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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 





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The World's Daily Newspapei 


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London, Tuesday, August 26, 1997 




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“Hep 5.60* 




Know: Where There 


Billions of Dollars Involved in Black Markets 


By Raymond Bonner 
and Christopher Drew 

W 7un C 'j 5fnTif 


NEW \ ORX— - The largest tobacco compa- 
nies are selling billions of dollars of cigarettes 
each year to traders and dealers who funnel 
them into black markets in many countries, say 
law enforcement officials and participants in 
the trade. 

In the last decade, the volume of cigarette 
smuggling around the world has nearly tripled, 
according to a leading tobacco research or- 
ganization. This reflects a general surge in 
cigarette sales abroad, especially for U.S. 


brands. And industry officials acknowledge that 
a sizable share — the researchers say one-fourth 
— of the cigarettes sold overseas pass through 
smuggling rings sei up to evade foreign taxes 
and sell major brands at a discount 
The companies say they do nothing to en- 
courage the smuggling and do noi condone it. 

But recent criminal investigations in several 
countries show that people in the tobacco in- 
dustry have played a significant role at times in 
stimulating and fueling it. 

In one case, two sales managers for Brown & 
Williamson Tobacco Corp. have pleaded guilty 
to aiding smugglers. But what law enforcement 
agents say is far more common is for the compa- 


nies to sell huge quantifies of top brands to 
traders and dealers who are little more than 
pipelines to the smugglers. 

For instance, newly available court docu- 
ments show that R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., die 
second -largest U.S. cigarette maker, sponsored 
trips to a posh Canadian fishing resort for 
several dealers who have since been charged 
with conspiring to smuggle cigarettes into 
Canada. On one fishing trip in 1995. a Reynolds 
salesman even joked with the dealers about the 
smuggling. 

Some of the dealers admi t that they pour huge 
volumes of cigarettes into the smuggling net- 
works. 

One of Europe's biggest cigarette traders, 
Michael Haenggi. said in an interview that he 


had been buying Winstons from Reynolds for 
15 years and had resold many of them to smug- 
glers in Spain. Mr. Haenggi said his three- 
person trading company in Switzerland had 
handled $100 million in sales last year. 

“Of course I know where the cigarettes are 
going.” he said. “But is that my problem?" 

Other inquiries show that two organized- 
crime groups in Italy take in $500 million a year 
by smuggling in Marlboros they buy from Swiss 
dealers selling products made by Philip Morris 
Cos., America's largest cigarette maker. 

Hong Kong prosecutors plan to place a 
former marketing manager for Britisb-Amer- 
ican Tobacco Corp., a subsidiary of BAT ln- 


See SMOKE, Page 6 


In Landmark Deal, 
Florida Settles Suit 


The state of Florida settled its lawsuit 
against U.S. tobacco companies on Mon- 
day for $1 1.3 billion, in what state officials 
said was a landmark deal that had extracted 
“the largest monetary concession the in- 
dustry has ever paid." Governor Lawton 
Chiles, who took pan in the closed-door 
talks with indushy lawyers, signed the 
agreement and called it a “victory of his- 
toric proportions.” Page 3. 


China Leads 


In Executions 


<:r -r,d Pr 


Amnesty International Cites 
Arbitrary 5 Standards of Justice 


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By Seth Faison 

New York Times Sen ice 








BEUING — In one case, a man in Sichuan Province was 
executed for stealing 14 cows. 

In another, two men were sentenced to death for the theft of 
a car they sold for $1,200. 

In a third, a man was put to death for repeatedly vandalizing 
strips of electric cable. The vandal, Chen Guangru, may have 
caused serious damage to public property, but his real mistake 
was getting caught during a nationwide anti-crime campaign 
last year that stressed severity and speedy punishment above 
alL 

Chinese authorities sentenced more than 6.100 people to 
death in 1996 and carried out atleast 4.367 executions, asserts 
Amnesty International, a human rights organ izatiou based in 
London, in a report to be released Tuesday. 

"Throughout the 1990s, more people have been executed 
or sentenced to death in China than in (he rest of the world put 
together,” the report said. 

A detailed chronicle of the way the death penalty is applied 
in China, the report describes how Chinese officials used a 
political-style campaign to get tough on criminals, ending up 
with a broad array of standards for execution. The report was 
based on public accounts made during the crackdown. 

A spokesman for the Justice Ministry in Beijing said that 
relevant officials were in a meeting all day and could not 
immediately comment. 

Officially, the anti-crime campaign was intended to send a 
message to outlaws that the authorities would not passively- 
tolerate the growing crime rate that seemed to be a result of the 
deep social change caused by economic growth in China. The 



See CHINA, Page 6 


BLOW TO THE OLYMPICS IDEAL — In another strike at Sweden’s hopes of hosting 
the 2004 Games, a blast Monday damaged a Gothenburg stadium entrance. Page 18. 


Governor Bush and Gore: In Spotlight and Shadows 

Familiar Name Gives Vice President Listens 


5 


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Republicans Hope 


By Richard L. Berke 

New York Times Service 




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‘ INDIANAPOLIS — The top billing 
and die most coveted speaking slot at a 
three-day Republican gathering here did 
not go to the speaker of the House or to 
a former vice president from this state or 
to the party’s vice presidential nominee 
last year. It did not even go to the movie 
actor turned senator who heads the com- 
mittee investigating campaign finance 
abuses. 

It went to Governor George Bush of 
Texas, who in his first term has burst 
into the political stratosphere as the hot- 
test figure among major players in Re- 
publican circles. 

Despite the most open field in years, 
many political professionals are declar- 
ing. embarrassingly early, that Mr. Bush 
is the Republican to beat for die pres- 
idential nomination in 2000. The buzz 
only intensified Saturday when Mr. 
Bush, despite his protestations that his 
only concern is his re-election next year, 
made a rare foray into national politics, 
coming to this meeting, which show- 
cased presidential hopefuls. 

Tantalizing his audience from the 
.start, Mr. Bush said: “I’d like to get 
something off my chest I know there’s 
all kinds of speculation, and all kinds of 
rumors, about future politics. The na- 
tional media — many of them are here 
today — are having a field day. won- 
dering out loud whether I’m going to 
follow in my father’s footsteps. 1 want to 
confront that matter head-on tonight I 
will not jump out of any airplanes.” The 
audience roared. 

It was probably Mr. Bush's best-re- 
ceived line of the evening. From there, 
be hurried through a stiffly delivered. 



To Silicon Valley Elite 


By Elizabeth Shogren 

Los Angeles Times Service 


Governor George Bush signing a program for Carolyn Shinkfe and her 
daughter, Caroline, of Dayton, Ohio, at a party gathering in Indianapolis. 


though serviceable, 25-minute speech 
about how his accomplishments luce 
an overhaul of the state education sys- 
tem, a welfare overhaul and tort reform 

could be a mode! for die nanon. 

One danger of the high expectations 
for Mr. Bush was demonstrated here 

Saturday. 


Republicans gave the Texan a re- 
spectful standing ovation, but later said 
they had been more impressed with the 
speech delivery of Dan Quayle, die 
former vice president; Steve Forbes, the 
multimillionaire publisher. Senator 


policy problems large and small. 
While its existence re 


: its existence remains something 
of a secret in official Washington, Gore 
Tech is rapidly becoming one of the roost 
influential brain trusts is town. 

In recent months, Gore Tech has 
weighed in on issues ranging from edu- 


See BUSH, Page 6 


See GORE, Page 6 


The Digital TV Duel Gets Sharper 

~ nnrl Anctnlii imnno nthpr rnuntries. mean evervborfv nutside t 






Newsstand Prices 


I 1.000 BD 

Cyptus„ ce i.oo 

Denmaik .....14.00 DKr 

Roland 12.00 FM 

Gfcraaar. £0.85 

Seat Britain...^ 0.90 

Egypt-. ££5.50 

Jwfan 1250 JD 

•taiya-JC SH 160 
Kuwait 700 Ffls 


Malta. — 55 c 

Nigeria ...125,00 Naira 

Oman -1.250 OR 

Qatar 10.00 OR 

Rep. Ireland. JR £ 1-00 
Saucfi Arabia -.10 SR 
S. Africa ....R12 + VAT 

UAE.— 10.00 0b 

U.S. Mi. (Eur.)...5120 
Zimbabwe. .... Zm.S30.00 


By Joel Brinkley 

New York Times Semce_ 


I 


1 




805025 


NEW YORK — A fierce competition 
hafbrotea out betwara lie Urnted 
Sates and Europe to provide the tech- 
nology for more than a dozen eoonmes 
Sun S-e preparing to begin the transition 

^TlreUtdted States and die European 
Unton have each devised then own 
technical standards for digital broad- 
S$t “they have differing stan- 

^fS'bS^'-dgov- 

eminent officials from both have bean 

Sbsssras s 


and Australia, among other countries, 
trying to sell their systems with demon- 
strations and sales pitches. 

This week, both groups are in Beijing, 
and the U.S. delegation is staging a 
high-definition television demonstra- 
tion at the Great Wall of China, hoping 
to impress the Chinese. The Europeans 
are showing their wares, too. 

So far, neither side has won a decisive 
advantage, in China or anyplace else. 
New Zealand seems ready to choose the 
European system, and South Korea ap- 
pears poised to choose that of the United 
Sates. 

Otherwise, said David McAvock, an 
executive involved in promoting 
Europe’s system, “everybody, and I 


mean everybody, outside the United 
Stales and Europe is still thinking about 


it.’ 


profii 

kevc 


At stake are both prestige and hu^e 


...its. A handful of companies 

:ey patents behind both systems — the 
United States' Grand Alliance system 
and Europe’s Digital Video Broadcast- 
ing system, known as DVB. 

And over time, manufacturers from 
both the United States and Europe hope 
to sell equipment worth uncounted 
billions of dollars to broadcasters and con- 
sumers around the world who will be 
installing digital broadcasting equipment, 
— * buying digital televisions for 


and 


See HDTV, Page 15 


Honecker’s Successor 


Jailed for Wall Killings 


Rrenz Draws a 6V2-Year Term; 

2 Other East (Germans Sentenced 


By Edmund L. Andrews 

No- York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — It does not show 
up on the roster of White House ad- 
visory panels and blue-ribbon commis- 
sions. It does not even have an official 
name, although those in the know have 
nicknamed it “Gore Tech.” 

Once a month. Vice President A1 
Gore meets privately with a select group 
of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, some- 
times on the high-tech executives’ home 
turf in Northern California, sometimes 
around a conference table at the White 
House. ■ 

“They’re like the kind of meetings 
I’m used to in the Valley,” said Kim 
Poiese, a Palo Alto software entrepre- 
neur who is a regular participant. 
“There’s no hierarchy and no protocol 
about who can speak when. That would 
get in tire way. 

Although the topics vary from month 
to month, the overarching agenda is the 
same: fathoming the implications of 
America’s “new economy” and de- 
vising practical solutions to public 


BERLIN — A German court sen- 
tenced the last hard-line Communist 
leader of the former East Germany to six 
and a half years in prison Monday on 
charges of being responsible for the 
fatal shooting of people trying to cross 
the Berlin Wall. 

The conviction of Egon Krenz, who 
ruled East Germany for a few weeks 
before the regime collapsed in December 
1 989, marked the last and most ambitious 
attempt to hold East Germany *s top polit- 
ical leaders responsible for the hundreds 
of people killed during the Cold War 
while trying to escape to the West. 

Besides Mr. Krenz, who was imme- 
diately taken into custody, the court also 
convicted two top members of the 
former Politburo and sentenced them to 
three years in prison. 

The decision Monday was the last of 
more than 50 trials against some 100 
soldiers, military officers and govern- 
ment officials who were charged in con- 
nection with shootings at the border. 

Of those, 55 people have been con- 
victed. Most of those received either 
short or suspended prison sentences. 

But this case was notably different, 
because prosecutors went after top 
political leaders who had no direct role 
in the shootings but who were in charge 
of government policy. 

Prosecutors and civil rights advocates 
argued that Mr. Krenz and his comrades 
had to face trial because the soldiers and 
military officers were ultimately just 
carrying out orders from the Politburo. 

But critics of the process, from both 
sides of the Berlin Wall, have angrily 
complained that the trial itself violated a 
renet of human rights: that people 
should not be punished for actions that 
were not illegal under laws in effect at 

rhar time. 

Many also argued that prosecutors 
tied Mr. Krenz and the other Politburo 
leaders to the shootings by extremely 
thin reeds. 

In recent polls, Germans have been 
divided almost equally between those 
who wanted tough punishments and 
those who believed the former officials 
were being unfairly prosecuted. East and 
West Germans were split evenly. 

Mr. Krenz, 60, remained defiant and 
pugnacious about his innocence 
throughout the trial, denouncing it as a 
sham and daring, the jndge to convict 
him. 

“I would be ashamed to be acquitted 
as long as the wrongful verdicts against 
border guards and my imprisoned 
friends are not reversed,” he said in his 
closing statement in the trial, one week 


ago. “My honor means so much to me 
that 1 would rather go to jail than to sell 
out on bended knee.” 

Mr. Krenz took over the reins of 
government from Erich Honecker, the 
autocratic leader who became severely 
ill in the last days before the fall of the 


See KRENZ, Page 7 


A Defection? 
North Korea’s 
Envoy in Cairo 
Can’t Be Found 


C-ympUJln (Xiz SxjTFnm Dufwln 

CAIRO — Egyptian authorities said 
Monday that they were searching for 
North Korea's ambassador to Egypt 
after reports that he had defected and 
was seeking asylum in a third country. 

The North Korean Embassy in Cairo 
denied that Ambassador Chang Sung 
Gil had defected, but gave conflicting 
accounts on his whereabouts. 

One official said Mr. Chang was in 
the embassy in Cairo. Another said he 
was in North Korea on persona] busi- 
ness. 

The amhassador, reported by South 
Korea to be seeking asylum in another 
country, has gone to the United States, 
the official Middle East News Agency 
reported Monday. 

If this is confirmed, Mr. Chang would 
be the first North Korean ambassador to 
defect to the West 

In 1991 and 1996, two mid-ranking 
diplomats in Congo and Zambia de- 
fected to Seoul separately. 

In Cairo. Assistant Foreign Minister 
Saeed Rag ah said Mr. Chang and his 
wife had been missing since they left 
home on Friday. 

“We searched hospitals and other 
places in case there was an accident and 
we made several investigations, which 
yielded nothing,” Mr. Ragab said. 

South Korean newspapers and tele- 
vision reported Monday that Mr. Chang. 
48. his wife, and their teenage children 
sought asylum in the U.S. Embassy in 
Cairo over the weekend. 

The embassy refused to comment, 
and South Korea's Foreign Ministry 


See KOREA, Page 7 


AGENDA 


Dow Coming Offers Breast Implant Settlement 


MIDLAND, Michigan (AP) — 
Dow Coming Corp. offered about 
$2.4 billion Monday to settle silicone 
breast implant claims, acknowledg- 
ing the devices can cause health com- 
plications but denying they cause dis- 


ease. 


The settlement, part of a plan to 
bring the company out of bankruptcy 
protection, would be offered to the 
estimated 200,000 women worldwide 
who say implants injured them or 
made them ill. The amount of the 
settlement could increase. 


The Dollar 


New York Monday 8 4 P.M. previous dose 


DM 


1.8193 


1.8189 


Pound 


1.6065 


1.6115 


Oxygen Problems 
For Mir Occupants 


Yen 


118.745 


118.345 


6.1289 


6.1285 



-2824 


7859.57 


7887.91 


S&P 500 


change 


Monday fir A P.M. previous dose 


-3.4 


820.15 


023.55 


CAPE CANAVERAL, Honda 
( AP) — The three men aboard the Mir 
space stationlost the use of both their 
primary and backup oxygen gener- 
ators on Monday, a potentially se- 
rious problem, NASA said. The men 
were trying to repair the system Mon- 
day before losing routine contact with 
Earth, but Mir has enough oxygen to 
last at least a couple of days. 


Books Page 10. PAGE TWO 

Crossword - Page 9. Montserrat, the Devastated Island 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19.. EUROPE Pago 5. 

A Primeval Forest's Uncertain Future 


The IHT on-line www.iht.com 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAX, AUGUST 26, 1997 

PAGE TWO 



Volcano Awoke in 1995/ More Than Hail of 1 2,000 Residents Flee 

Montserrat: An Island Sinking Under a Sea of Ash 


By Serge F. Kovaleski 

HjaMggftHi Post Service 

P LYMOUTH, Montserrat — Id Mont- 
serrat's battle between man and nature, 
nature — in die form of die Soofriere 
Hills volcano — is triumphing, threat- 
ening the viability of this onetime par adi se in the 
eastern Caribbean. 

Nearly two years of eruptions have ravaged 
large swaths of the island with fast-moving 
rivers of superheated gas, rocks, asb and 
boulders the size of boats, destroying hundreds 
of homes and burying villages. Plymouth, the 
capital of this British dependency, today is a 
rum. The country’s economy has been de- 
stroyed. as has the farming sector, just when this 
tiny island was becoming self-sufficient in pro- 
ducing many key crops. 

Since the volcano awoke in July 1995 after 
centuries of dormancy, more than half of Mont- 
serrat's 12,000 residents have fled to other 
Caribbean islands, Britain and the United States, 
while others have been placed in shelters, some 
of which are in deplorable condition. 

Two thousand people have abandoned die 
island in the last eight weeks alone following 
several devastating eruptions. One .of those, on 
July 25, claimed at least 19 lives — die volcano’s 
only victims — and forced the closing of Mont- 
serrat's airport. 

The British government has begun a voluntary 
evacuation program, ferrying residents by boat 
to Antigua, about 48 kilometers (30 miles) north- 
east of here. Officials said that as many as 600 
people had registered to be evacuated and re- 
ceive financial assistance for relocation, a pro- 
cess that will be carried out ova: the next few 
weeks with the support of the British Navy. 

Observers and government officials here ex- 
pressed concern about the growing flight from 
the island, saying that it does not bode well for 
the future of Montserrat, which needs between 
2.000 and 3,000 residents to function. 

Large numbers of businesses and banks have 
already been forced to close because of the 
dearth of customers. 

A T THE same time, most neighboring 
islands, wrestling with high unem- 
ployment and other problems of their 
own. have made it clear that while they 
are sympathetic toward the evacuees they do not 
want to take them in permanently. Many people 
on Montserrat, however, have relatives in Bri- 
tain. which has relaxed residency restrictions for 
the refugees. 

The volcano crisis has been accompanied by 
spasms of social unrest and political instability. 
Residents have staged sporadic demonstrations, 
complaining that their living conditions continue 
to worsen, that the British have not reacted 
swiftly enough in helping the island and that the 
Montserrat government has fallen short in se- 
curing more generous resettlement packages 
from London. 


■ ' .■ ''.v '<i 

• y. " ^ ^ 



In Plymouth* what used to be the capital's vibrant streets are vast stretches of 
ask piled nearly two meters high in some parts . Buildings and /tomes 
oe been reduced to burned-out shells, some crushed by immense boulders . 


“I feel like we are slowly being wiped off the 
face of the earth." said Jean Beckett, 39, who has 
been living in a government-operated shelter 
near Salem with her husband since their home 
was obliterated by lava a month ago. “I don't 
know how in God’s name we can rebuild from 
this. Our capital is gone, livelihoods are gone, no 
one seems to be doing much about it, and the 
only sounds you hear that mean anything are the 
rumblings of that horrible volcano." 

In {he meantime, scientists here said that the 
most likely scenario for Soufriere Hills is that its 
activity not only will continue at current levels 
but also may increase over the long run . belching 
greater amounts of the combination of super- 
heated gas. ash and nick. 

"There is consensus among all die senior 
scientists involved that this crisis has now 
entered a stage for which there is little precedent 
in other well-documented eruptions and that 
there is an urgent need to consider the future 
outlook and hazard implications in light of the 
escalating pattern of activity," the Montserrat 
Volcano Observatory said in a draft report pre- 
pared for the Montserrat government. 

“The prospect of larger explosive eruptions 
over the coming weeks and months is signif- 


icantly increased and the/areas with substantial 
populations in the center of the island are now at 
much higher risk than before," it concluded. 

Government officials said that an estimated 
two-thirds of the 1 0 1 -square- kilometer (39- 
square-mile) island, including Salem, the pro- 
visional capital, has been designated as an "un- 
safe zone" and that the safe portion of Mont- 
serrat, where governmental, commercial and 
personal activity is now centered, has been re- 
duced to about 33 square kilometers. 

Most of the devastation from Soufriere Hills 
has been concentrated in the southern and west- 
ern sections of the island and the encroaching 
threat of the volcano has forced an increasing 
number of people and institutions to flock to the 
north. 

At the evacuation center in Brades on Sat- 
urday, where refugees were being processed 
before they boarded a ferry to Antigua, Cynthia 
Peters expressed misgivings about leaving her 
husband and their evacuated home behind while 
she headed for London, but said that the havoc 
wreaked by the volcano had worn her out 

"I’m tired of running," she said. ‘Tra fed up 
with sleeping with friends or in a car. I was in 
Kinsale and had to run. Then I was in Salem and 


had to run again. I am just exhausted. So why not 

leave?" ... 

But her husband. William Peters. 60, who like 
some others has decided to weather the turmoil, 
offered a different perspective: "I am a re- 
sponsible citizen and I have interests here. I just 
can't pick up and go. 

“For one thing, I don’t think I can get a job 
anywhere else. I have to remain here and fight, 
fight the government and the volcano," said Mr. 
Peters, who owns a small baking business. 

To survey the hardest-hit parts of the island is 
to witness devastation of surreal proportions. In 
Plymouth, what used to be the capital’s vibrant 
streets today are vast stretches of gray ash piled 
nearly two meters (six feet) high in some parts. 
Buildings and homes have been reduced to 
burned-out shells, some crushed by immense 
boulders. A phone booth in the center of town lay 
buried in the ash almost to its top. The smell of 
intense heat and fire still wafts through the air, 
and the only sign of life during a recent visit there 
was a stray dog. 

The island's one hospital, recently construc- 
ted to replace the one leveled by a hurricane 
seven years ago, was destroyed; its staff now 
operates out of a school in a nearby town. The 
main seaport, in Plymouth, has been shut, but an 
emergency jetty has been built in little Bay in 
the north so that boats can rescue people in case 
of a full-scale evacuation. Elsewhere on the 
island, there are no hotels operating. 

About 1 ,100 people have been placed in shel- 
ters, some of them in buildings that are not 
completed and are in substandard condition. 
“They dumped us here like we are animals," 
said Dorothy Gordon, who is staying at a shelter 
at the Briggs Primary School with her 15-month- 
old baby and 12-year-old son. "The cooking 
areas are not complete, so people can't eat full 
meals, and neither are some of the bathrooms." 

T HE MONTSERRAT government 

spokesman, Herman Sargeanr, said that 
the British government plans to start 
building emergency housing in the north 
and that the Caribbean Community and Common 
Market intergovernmental organization had 
committed to constructing a village there for 
people displaced by the volcano crisis. Other 
infrastructure projects, however, have been 
frozen by the British for fear that a cataclysmic 
eruption could occur, Mr. Sargeant said. 

Recently, tensions have developed between 
the Montserrat government and the British over 
the amount of the resettlement packages being 
offered by London. 

Mr. Sargeant said that the assistance the island 
asked England to provide over an 18-month 
period included the equivalent of $14,800 to 
heads of households, 5 11,100 to spouses and 
S7.400 for children, pins airfare. For people 
moving to other Caribbean countries, however, 
the British are offering S3.840 for each adult and 
S960 for individuals under age 18 over six 
months, as well as airfare. 


At Least 4 Die£ 

As Bomb Blast 

- £. 

Hits Crowded : 

f 

Algiers Market 

Agence France-Presse 

ALGIERS — At least four people 
were killed and more than 60 wen? 
wounded when a bomb ripped through a 1 
crowded market in the El Biar district^ 
Algiers, sending hundreds of shopper? 
scrambling for safety, according to a* 
preliminary official toll. 

Three women and a 10-year-old bajp. | 
were confirmed dead. Most of the vie* 
tints were women and young girts, ac- ** i 
cording to initial reports. . * 

Security forces attributed fee attack 
to Islamic extremists. 

Hundreds of panicked shoppers and* 
merchants fled fee carnage into sur-' 
rou nding commercial streets, many run- 
ning to a nearby mosque, witnesses 
said - ' 

Security forces sealed off the area as. 
ambulances rushed in. f. 

The wounded were evacuated to sev- 
eral hospitals in Algiers. One, a young 
woman, died in the hospital. . 

The general panic caused by the blast 
led to hysterical scenes at one of fee 
hospitals to which the dead and 
wounded were brought as anxious rela- 
tives pressed for news of their loved 
ones. * 

The E3 Biar market was previously 
targeted in a car bomb attack on July 3€f y| 
that left three people dead, according to 
the authorities. Press reports said eight 
people feed in the attack. 

Responsibility for that attack wait 
claimed by the Armed Islamic Group, 
the Moroccan Medi-1 radio station re- 
ported. The group, a hard-line Islamip 
group that is waging war against the 
secular, military-backed government; 
warned then of other "spectacular ac- 
tions" in fee capital. 

There has been no sign of a letup in 
the indiscriminate killing of civilians 
despite the release from detention erf 
Abbasi Madam, leader of the banned 
Islamic Salvation Front. His release in 
July was seen as a conciliatory gesture 
by the Algerian authorities to Islamic 
militants. 

A 10-day surge of violence attributed 
to Islamic militants has killed over 160 
ci vilians , mostly in the center of fee 
country, according to unofficial tolls. 

On Monday, Algerian newspapers re; 
ported that suspected Islamic extremists 
massacred nine people and kidnappeij 
eight others in two suburbs southeast of 
Algiers. On Wednesday, tens of thou- 
sands of people took part in protests 
against terrorism across the country, 




6 More Climbers Die in Falls in Swiss Alps 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


UN Atrocity Investigators Wait in Congo 


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WASH?- 
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10 " 
victim- * - • ‘ 
Umifci 

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public 5-’ " 
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----- 


Reuters 

ZURICH — Six people died in the 
Swiss Alps over the weekend, including 
two Americans who plunged from the 
Matterhorn, raising the death toll since 
mid-July to at least 49, officials said 
Monday. 

A combination of snow, heat and 
thunderstorms this summer in fee Alps 
has made high-altitude climbing and 
hiking more dangerous. 

On Sunday, two American climbers 
fell about 50 meters (165 feet) to their 
deaths while ascending the Matterhorn 
above Zermatt A third member of fee 


party survived. The bodies of the two 
climbers, aged 39 and 4 1, were recovered 
Monday. The victims were not identified 
pending notification of their families. 

In other accidents, a 53-year-old Aus- 
trian fell to his death near the eastern 
Swiss resort of Arosa, and a hiker in fee 
Loetscbental valley in the western can- 
ton of Valais was found dead Sunday by 
a search crew. A 40-year-old climber 
from Geneva fell to his death Saturday in 
Valais, and fee body of a climber from 
fee Zurich area was recovered Saturday 
on Ringelspitz mountain in Grisons, the 
Swiss press agency SDA said. 


New Rules at Schiphol 

AMSTERDAM (AFX) — The Neth- 
erlands transport minister, Annemarie 
Jorritsma, will impose night flight re- 
strictions at Amsterdam's Schiphol Air- 
pent to reduce excessive noise pollution. 
Dutch newspapers reported 

As part of a package of measures 
announced by fee minister, noisy air- 
craft will not be allowed to take off or 
land at the airport between 1 1 P.M. and 
6 AM., while less noisy charter aircraft 
will be allowed to land but not to take 


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Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 



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Boston to Philadelphia Windy and cooler with 
could have a thunderstorm showers in London 
Wednesday or Thursday. Wednesday and Thursday, 
then sunny and pleasant then some sun and nice 
Friday Sumy, hor and dry Friday. Thunders lor/ns. 
horn the central and south- some wan heavy rains, vrtl 
ern Plains lo the South- rumble across France and 
wesL Nee m Chicago with Germany. Warsaw to St. 
sunshine, but gusty tfiun- Petersburg will be sunny 
derstorms will rumble and comfortably warm 
across the northern Plains Stormy n Ireland and Scot- 
land with soatang rang 


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Beijing and over most ol 
northern China Wednes- 
day into Friday Paniy to 
mostly sunny and steamy 
In Seoul with a thunder- 
storm posstrie each after- 
noon. Partly sunny, warm 
and humid in Tokyo with 
the chance lor showers 
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southeast China. 


Karachi 

K Lumpur 

K-Khaboti 

Maria 

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PtaAM 

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Seoul 

Stanghai 

Singapore 

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PAGE 3' 


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ucjtilil TBHU.SE. « EDNESBAV, SEPTEMBER U, W 


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INTERNATIONAL herald TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


$11.3 Billion Deal Settles 
Florida vs. Tobacco Suit 

Officials Hail Agreement as a Landmark 


political N 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 


9 


j-- WASHINGTON - The slate of Florida on 
Monday settled its lawsuit against U.S. to- 
bacco companies for $11.3 billion, in what 
state officials said was a landmark deal that 
had extracted “the largest monetary con- 
cession the industry has ever paid.'* 

Governor Lawton Chiles, who had inter- 
ceded in closed-door talks Sunday with to- 
ss industry lawyers, signed the agreement 
v Monday in a Tallahassee courtroom, calling it 
a ‘ ‘victory of historic proportions. 1 ’ L 
. With the proposal $368.5 billion national 
settlement between cigarette makers and 40 
states still awaiting approval in Congress, 
where its fate is less than certain, the Florida 
agreement takes on larger significance. 

It is the second settlement between a stare 
and the industry. Mississippi, a less populous 
state, settled its suit on July 3 for $3.6 billion. 
If the national settlement is ratified, it would 
supersede these agreements. 

Michael Moore, the Mississippi attorney 
general and a leader in the fight against to- 
bacco, said that the Florida settlement might 
be “the most important event yet in the 
tobacco war.” 

. Governor Chiles, speaking outside the 
courtroom in Tallahassee, said the agreement 
was of greatest importance to Florida's chil- 
dren. 4 ‘The victory is the straw that broke Joe 
Camel's back,” he added, referring to the 
advertising cartoon character that critics said 
was calculated to attract young smokers. 

In trading Monday, first indications were 
that cigarette stocks were holding their own. 

- By settling in Florida, tobacco companies 
ayoided a jury trial that might ultimately have 
cost them more. Circuit Court Judge Harold 
Cohen, who would have presided over the 
trial, approved the settlement Monday, call- 
ing it “an eminently reasonable solution. ” 


He said it showed that a national settlement 
wasboth possible and desirable. 

The $1 1 .3 billion will be paid out over 25 
years, with payments Totaling $1.2 billion 
coming in the first year. Part of the money is 
intended to compensate the state for the costs 
of treating patients with tobacco related ill- 
nesses. Part will be spent on health clinics and 
anti-smoking campaigns. 

In pretrial testimony last week, top ex- 
eauives of two of the largest cigarette makers, 
RIR Nabisco Holdings Co. and Philip Moms 
Cos. conceded that smoking is harmfiil and 
has a role in causing deadly diseases. Florida 
officials said Monday that those concessions 
were pan of their settlement. 

The tobacco industry has been in steady 
retreat for months as pressures have mounted 
from lawsuits by slates and individuals and a 
growing tangle of local and federal restric- 
tions on smoking. 

In Philadelphia, a federal district judge on 
Monday set Oct. 14 for a class-action suit, 
representing 10 million smokers, against the 
tobacco companies. The next suit filed by a 
state, Texas, is to come to trial in January. 

The White House supports the state set- 
tlements and is still reviewing details of the 
national agreement Barry Toiv, a spokesman 
with President Bill Clinton, vacationing at 
Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, said 'that 
Mr. Clinton would receive his advisers’ rec- 
ommendations no sooner than SepL 7. 

Mr. Moore, the Mississippi attorney gen- 
eral, said Sunday thar he expected a bill 
implementing the national settlement to be 
introduced in early September, with White 
House support 

But the administration is said to be con- 
cerned about language in the settlement that 
would limit the Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration's regulation of nicotine use. Repub- 
lican congressional leaders say they might not 
complete action on the legislation this year. 


New York Confronts Swiss 

City Takes a Tougher Line Than U.S. on Holocaust 




- - By David E. Sanger 

■ ? ‘ New York Tunes Service 

. \ 1 WASHINGTON — As it 

- • •--> 1 tries to persuade Switzerland 
:.-.e to pay greater restitution to 

victims of the Holocaust, the 
7 " United States has been en- 
••• 7 ... gaged in a delicate dance with 

the increasingly testy Swiss 
. public. But now New York 

City, taking a far more con- 

.. . approach with 

, . . Swiss. . companies, may be . 

t . „ v^n\inl.0B.®0 about to upset that effort. 

Ever since May, when the 
_ . United States issued a report 

criticizing how Swiss banks 
- aided the Nazis and impeded 

_ the efforts of Holocaust sur- 

“T 7 yivors to recover their family 

•; fortunes, the Clinton admin- 

istration has sought to calm 
the ensuing political storm. It 
has repeatedly praised the 

• "• Swiss for confronting the past 

- - . and steered clear of any hints 

jit might consider sanctions 
■f against the banks. 

’ Now New York’s comp- 
troller, Alan Hevesi, whose 
' f . family included Holocaust 

- victims, is starting to drop 

those hints. 

. . ' ' Last month Mr. Hevesi 

. .wrote to the chief executives 

of Swiss companies in which 
New York’s $70 billion pen- 
sion funds have been inves- 
ted, asking for details about 
how much the companies had 
contributed to a special fund 
set up to aid aging Holocaust 
survivors. So far a dozen 
companies have confirmed 
that they are making contri- 
butions to the fund, but only 
one has revealed how much. 

“As to your question with 
respect to die size of our con- 
ttibution,” wrote Fritz Ger- 
ber, the chairman and chief 
executive of Roche, one of 
Switzerland’s larger compa- 
nies, “I hope you can un- 
derstand that we have agreed 
not to disclose individual fig- 
ures in order to avoid internal 
discussions-” Another exec- 
utive wrote of “an agreement 
between the participating 



& 


companies not to publish the 
amount of the individual 
donations.” 

In Switzerland, some ex- 
ecutives and politicians have 
already said that they feel as if 
they are being shaken down 
for contributions. More than a 
few, including a former pres- 
ident of Switzerland, have 
said they suspect the United 
States is engaged in a con- 
spiracy to undercut Switzer- ■ 
land’s role as a world finan- 
cial center — and thus a 
competitor to New York. 

In an interview, Mr. Hevesi 
declared that he was “deeply 
disappointed” with the ac- 
tions of Switzerland’s largest 
private bank, the Union Bank 
of Switzerland, where Holo- 
caust-era documents were de- 
stroyed in January. 

Mr. Hevesi, who is running 
for re-election in November, 
said he had asked his staff to 
“begin an internal review of 
the city’s options” in dealing 
with Union Bank, which 
earned fees in excess of $1 .25 
million last year for a variety 
of banking services for the 
city. Through a New Yoik 
spokesman, the bank said Fri- 
day that it was "surprised by 
Hevesi’s comments” and that 
it had been “responsive to all 
his requests.” 

Mr. Hevesi stopped short 
of actually threatening to cut 
off business with the bank, 
and even if the city did that, 
the economic impact would 
be minimal- But Clinton ad- 
ministration officials say they 
are worried that his actions, 
along with a newsletter, 
“Swiss Monitor.” that Mr. 
Hevesi has begun circulating 
to financ ial officers of other 
states and cities, could 
hamper delicate, behind-the- 
scenes negotiations with the 
Swiss. 

S mar t F.i7j»nstat, the under- 
secretary of state for econom- 
ic affairs, said in an interview 
broadcast Friday on Swiss 
television that die adminis- 
tration “feels very strongly 


that any sanctions at any level 
— federal, state or local — 
are counterproductive.” 

The U.S. historical report 
issued in May concluded that 
Switzerland's banks tilted the 
country’s traditional neutral- 
ity toward Nazi Germany, 
hiding gold and other assets 
that the Nazis had looted from 
throughout Europe. It deter- 
mined that Swiss banks 
knowingly violated a 1946 
accord to. turn over half of. 
those assets to the Allies for 
the resettlement of refugees. 

It also concluded that the 
banks had systematically 
hampered efforts by Holo- 
caust survivors and their heirs 
to recover assets placed in 
Switzerland for safekeeping. 

Even before the report was 
published, three major Swiss 
banks said they would con- 
tribute to a Special Fund for 
Needy Victims of the Holo- 
caust, and other Swiss compa- 
nies have made donations. The 
Swiss central Bank also prom- 
ised a significant donation, but 

prova? has bwn^^^huntil 
at least the autumn. 

A mnch larger humanitari- 
an fund proposed by the 
Swiss government, not 
primarily intended for vic- 
tims of the Nazis, must be 
approved in a national ref- 
erendum that the government 
has yet to schedule. Polls 
show that it may be de- 
feated. 


Hispanics Turn the Tide 
Of Political Clout in D.C. 

WASHINGTON — At times lately, Hispanic 
legislators in Congress have felt like a ragtag 
group of volunteer firefighters confronting a 
scorched-earth campaign against immigrants. 

The early “brush fires,' ’ the ones that took aim 
at illegal immigrants, seemed predictable and not 
much of a threat. But when Republicans took 
control of Congress in 1994, the leadership set its 
sights on tax-paying legal immigrants. 

Almost daily, Hispanic Democrats and Re- 
publicans in the House of Representatives con- 
fronted new legislation — bills to ditch .bilingual 
education or to kick green-caid-faolding residents 
off welfare. 

That may be changing. While Hispanic law- 
makers and advocacy groups have suffered a 
string of policy defeats, namely on welfare and 


immigration, they are convinced that the wor- 
stflare-ups are behind them. One indication that 
attitudes might be shifting was a victory last 
month on the reinstatement of Supplemental Se- 
curity Income benefits for some elderly and dis- 
abled legal immigrants, after a bitter and pro- 
tracted battle that seemed lost early on. (NYT) 

6 Don’t Know' Is the Word 
About Clinton’s location 

EDGARTOWN, Massachusetts — With Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton largely cloistered during his 
vacation on Martha’s Vineyard, it has fallen to his 
deputy press secretary, Barry Toiv, to perform the 
dedicate balancing act of protecting the first fam- 
ily's privacy while keeping the American public 
informed (that is, tossing a few details to the four 
dozen or so reporters here). 

So far, he has more than risen to the first half of 


the challenge. Mr. Toiv has been gamely siving 
briefings that have become the dailv high 'point. 
One answer Monday — in which '8 of the 21 
words were “don’t know” — has already been 
hailed as aclassic. (The question was whether Mr. 
Clinton had started reading any of ihe books he 
brought to the island.) 

Mr. Toiv closed that briefing by noting, “I’ve 
been on vacation, so I know even less than usu- 
al.” (/V> T) 

Quote/ Unquote 

Dan Schneer, a former spokesman for Pete 
Wilson, the California governor, on Vice Pres- 
ident A1 Gore’s success in wooing Silicon Valley 
entrepreneurs to his political camp: “I can talk to 
CEOs about how they shouldn't support Clinton 
because he opposes capital gains tax cuts. But if 
they just had beer and pizza with A1 Gore the night 
before. I’m only going to get so far." (2-47*1 



!i/.- ''"V 


TdtuUiv EjrJcv/Tbc AwniMcd Pn» 


OUT OF STEAM — A barge holding up one end of the Belle of Louisiana steamboat after it inexplicably began to sink into die Ohio River 
near Louisville, Kentucky, where it has been docked since 1962. The 83-year-old Belle is known as the oldest Mississippi-style steamboat. 


Away From Politics 


• A steady rise in births and a continuing stream 
of immigrants will add nearly 1 8 million people to 
California's population by 2025, according to the 
latest projections by the U.S. Census Bureau. 
Demographers predict that the most populous 
U.S. state will continue to grow faster than any 
other, a trend that could affect everything from the 
water supply to the morning commute. (LAT) 

• For the first time in their 150-year history in 
the United-States, Asian Americans are forming a., 
national civil rights organization. The National 
Asian Pacific American Network Council is de- 


signed to provide the United States’ fastest-grow- 
ing ethnic group with political clout like that of 
the National Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People and the Anti-Defamation 
League. (LAT) 

• A sightseeing plane crashed a mile off the 
Maryland coast near Ocean City as beachgoers 
looked on. The three people aboard the plane were 
missing. The cause of the crash was not im- 
mediately known. Witnesses in the popular beach 
town claimed the plane was doing acrobatic ma- 
neuvers, the police said. (AP) 


• A man armed with a shotgun burst into an 
office inside the Guggenheim Museum in New 


York and stole $10,000, the police said. The 
museum had just closed, and the museum cafe's 
27-year-old manager was the only one inside the 
second-floor office. The Fifth Avenue museum's 
swirling architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright was 
the setting fora fictitious police chase in "Men in 
Black,” a hit summer film. (AP) 

• A 2-year-old boy died after following his 
mother back into a burning trailer home in Galena, 
Missouri, the authorities said. Jacomb High’s 
mother had safely removed him from the home 
before she returned to rescue her other two chil- 
dren. They managed to escape, through a bedroom 
window, but Jacomb. who had followed his moth- 
er back in, was engulfed by flames. (AP) 


Victims of Violence: 1.3 Million a Year and Soaring 


By George Lardner Jr. 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Emer- 
gency rooms at hospitals 
across the country are treating 
more titan 1.3 million people 
a year for injuries caused by 
violent attacks, an increase of 
250 percent over previous es- 
timates, according 10 the 
Justice Department 

Sixty percent of the victims 
were men and 40 percent 
were women, according to a 
1994 nationwide study of 
emergency room visits. 

More ihan 9 of every 10 — 
94 percent — were 'injured 
during an assault Almost half 
the injuries, where the place 
of attack was known, were 


sustained in the home, either 
the patient's or someone 
else’s. Two percent of the vic- 
tims were hurt during a rob- 
bery, and 5 percent were in- 
jured during a rape or sexual 
assault 

Women were more likely 
than men to have been injured 
by someone with whom they 
had an intimate relationship: 
a current or former spouse, 
boyfriend or girlfriend Men 
were more likely than women 
to be treated for injuries 
caused by nonrelatives: ac- 
quaintances or strangers. 

The findings were based on 
a firsl-of-its-kind survey of 
emergency room visits at 31 
hospitals that provide 24- 
hour service and have staffs 


trained to record the cause 
and circumstances of every 
injury, according to the Bu- 
reau of Justice Statistics. 

The study was undertaken 
to “augment available esti- 
mates of certain types of more 
serious violence, such as do- 
mestic violence and sexual 
assault, that have been shown 
to be difficult to measure,” 
the bureau said 

The survey said approxi- 
mately 243,000 people, or 17 
percent, were treated for in- 
juries inflicted by someone 
they knew intimately. 

4 “This was four times high- 
er than the estimares of the 
number of such crime victims 
treated in hospital emergency 
rooms as measured by the Na- 


tional Crime Victimization 
Survey, one of the nation’s 
principal sources of victim 
crime data,” the Justice De- 
partment said 

The report said the higher 
numbers were “not surpris- 
ing” because the survey fo- 
cused on non accidental injur- 
ies ‘ ‘regardless of whether the 
victim perceived the event to 
have been criminal in 
nature.” 

The annual crime victim 
survey shows lower numbers 
because it is based on inter- 
views with victims them- 
selves, who might not regard 
the attacks as criminal. 

“Many of the victims, in- 
cluding those of long-term 
abuse, are unable or unwill- 


Clinton Photos Used in Alleged Jewelry Scam 




Do YOU LIVE 

in Athens? 

For a hand-delivered subscription 
on the day of publication, 
call 00 33 1 4143 9361 


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THE wnRLITS DAILY NEWSPAPER 


By Don Van Natta Jr. 

New York Times Service 

MIAMI — Executives of a 
jewelry company arranged 
for a photo opportunity with 
President Bill Clinton at a 
fund-raiser here last fall, and 
then used the photographs to 
help win credibility and court 
vulnerable investors in whai 
the authorities say was a 
scheme that defrauded 15,000 
people of $38 million. 

Some investors lost their 
homes and life savings after 

buying necklace-making kits 

of ' beads and thread for as 
much as $3,000 a set A Miami 
circuit judge shut down the 
company, Unique Gems In- 
ternational Cojp., in March. 

The judge appointed a re- 


ceiver to investigate the com- 
pany's operations, which the 
authorities described as an il- 
legal Ponzi scheme with no 
sales, and to process thou- 
sands of investors’ claims for 
restitution. 

The receiver, Lewis Free- 
man, found that Unique Gems 
had used third parties to con- 
tribute $85,000 to the Demo- 
cratic National Committee to 
buy seats at the fund-raising 
dinner for about 30 of its ex- 
ecutives and its most product- 
ive necklace assemblers. Fed- 
eral law prohibits political 
donations from third parties. 

Mr. Freeman said the ex- 
ecutives bad tried to cash in on 
their brief brush with the pres- 
ident, tthom they met on Oct 
22, 1996, at the Biltmore Hotel 


in Coral Gables. After eight 
executives had their photo- 
graphs taken with Mr. Clinton, 
the year-old American corpo- 
ration showcased some of the 
images in glossy newsletters 
as a way to prove its legit- 
imacy to potential investors. 

The company suggested 
that the president had person- 
ally endorsed Unique Gems. 
“The company has been 
honored by President Clinton 
for its role in helping many 
people with real opportunities 
to earn a well above-average 
income.” read a caption ac- 
companied by a photograph 
of a smiling Mr. Clinton, in a 
flier used to recruit investors. 

Advocates of campaign-fi- 
nance reform say the episode 
is an example of how some 


contributors have exploited 
the Democrats* vetting pro- 
cess at fund-raisers. 

Four of the top executives 
of Unique Gems have left the 
United States and are now be- 
lieved to be living abroad, the 
authorities said. 

A spokesman for the 
Democratic National Com- 
mittee, which has no record of 
any political contributions 
from Unique Gems, said that 
the committee’s lawyers were 
working with Mr. Freeman to 
determine whether third 
parties had made contribu- 
tions on behalf of Unique 
Gems or its executives. 

Lawyers for the company 
denied that the business 
amounted to a Ponzi scheme; 
they said that its executives 


had made a series of poor 
business decisions in trying to 
properly market several hun- 
dred thousand assembled 
necklaces. 


ing, because of fear or em- 
barrassment, to report such 
abuse to authorities or to pro- 
grams that measure these vic- 
timizations,” the report ad- 
ded. 

In addition to the estimated 
1,335,900 victims of vio- 
lence, the study said, 81,700 
people turned up at the hos- 
pital with “injuries that had 
probably been — or were sus- 
pected of having been — sus- 
tained from acts of violence. ’ ’ 
The total of 1,417,600 rep- 
resented 3.6 percent of all in- 
jury-related emergency room 
visits in 1994. 

The study found that al- 
most half of the victims of 
violent injuries were under 
age 25. Blacks were dispro- 
portionately represented, ac- 
counting for 24 percent of 
those treated for such injuries 
while constituting 13 percent 
of the population. 

About three out of five in- 
juries were inflicted without 
the use of a weapon, most 
often the result of a punch or a 
kick. About 5 percent of the 
victims were treated for gun- 
shot wounds. 




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THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 





PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26,1997 



Artillery Duels Ease 
Along Kashmir Border 

Tensions Unlikely to Scuttle Peace Talks 


CanpMbfOvSatfPnmDiifiaBtka 

URI, India — Indian and Pakistani 
troops exchanged artillery fire along the 
Kashmir border for the fifth day in a row 
on Monday, but the fighting was dying 
down and. officials in New Delhi said 
the eruption was unlikely to affect peace 
talks. 

“The heavy artillery firing has sub- 
sided,” said Talmiz Ahmed, an Indian 
Foreign Office spokesman. 

The Indian Army said Pakistani 
troops suffered 60 to 70 casualties 
in the Uri sector in weekend cross- 
border firing along a military control 
line in disputed Kashmir. 

Pakistani officials denied the Indian 
assessment but gave no other details. 

“We reject the Indian report," a 
Pakistan Defense Ministry spokesman 
said. 

Troops fired mortar shells and -rock- 
ets at each other along die military line 
of control in Uri and Kapwara districts 
north of Srinagar, the summer capital of 
India's Jammu and Kashmir state. 

But the firing appeared less intense 


Manila to Punish 
Health Care Denial 

Agence France-Presse 

MANILA — President Fidel Ramos 
signed a bill into law on Monday to 
punish hospitals and clinics if (hey re- 
fuse treatment to patients in “emer- 
gency or serious cases" because they 
are unable to pay. 

Medical personnel will risk a jail term 
of more than two years if they break the 
law, which covers state and private hos- 
pitals as well as clinics. 

The law closes a loophole whereby 
administrators were penalized if they 
asked patients for deposits or advance 
payments. But they were not penalized 
if they refused to admit someone. 

“It’s not only the demand for a de- 
posit but also the refusal to admit that 
will be punishable," Health Secretary 
Carmencita Reodica stressed. 

Hospitals now will be allowed to 
refer a patient to another medical fa- 
cility only “if the hospital where the 
patient was brought does not have the 
capability or if there is consent from 
relatives," said the secretary of health, 
whose department will monitor com- 
pliance with the law. 

Hospitals could previously turn away 
poor people "by simply refusing ad- 
mission to patients who appeared to be 
more of a burden than a. contributor to 
their earnings," Mr. Ramos said. 

The loophole “often resulted in the 
loss of life and limb," especially among 
poor people. Mr. Ramos added. 


than daring the 48 hours ended Saturday 
when five people including three ci- 
vilians were killed on the Indian side of 
die Himalayan border and four died on 
die Pakistani side. 

India and Pakistan have fought two 
of three wars since independence in 
1947 over Kashmir. India controls 
two-thirds of Kashmir and Pakistan 
holds the rest. 

Senior diplomats from the two coun- 
tries are scheduled to meet in mid- 
September in New Delhi for a third 
round of peace talks that began in 
March. 

An Indian Defense Minisoy state- 
ment said the situation at the border was 
“under control" 

Officials in New Delhi sought to play 
down prospects that the clashes would 
affect peace talks. 

A senior Indian government official 
who did not wish to be identified said 
sporadic fighting traditionally breaks 
out in August in Kashmir. 

“We feel the aim is to push in mil- 
itants under cover of fire, also to de- 
moralize the population," he said. “I 
thinlr this particular episode ha it more or 
less died away." 

Lidia accuses Pakistan of aiming 
Muslim guerrillas waging a seven-year 
insurgency in Kashmir. Pakistan says it 
provides only moral and diplomatic 
support to die militants. 

The official said he did not think the 
f ightin g had anything to do with the 
peace talks, adding. “I don’t think it 
affects the talks one way or another." 

He said no dates had been set for die 
next round of talks, “but my impression 
is still mid-September." 

The Indian defense minister, Ma- 
lay am Singh Yadav, said in the northern 
city of Lucknow: 4 ‘We want peace, and 
there will never be any step from our 
side which can be construed as a breach 
of peace between .the two countries." 

He added. “We will give a befitting 
reply if our unity or integrity is 
threatened." 

At Uri. reporters saw two destroyed 
Pakistani bunkers. 

The Uri sector, nestled among pine 
forests and located on the old road 
between Srinagar and Muzaffarabad, 
capital of the pan of Kas hmir con- 
trolled by Pakistan, has been a major 
battlefield in all three wars between 
the neighbors. 

Earlier, India had said two soldiers 
and three civilians were killed by heavy 
Pakistani shelling in two sections of the 
region during the 48 hours that ended 
Saturday. 

Pakistan said four of its. civilians had 
died, but officials in Islamabad scoffed 
at statements by Indian defease offi- 
cials. who said about 50 Pakistanis had 
died. (Reuters. AP) 



UyUa? 


Cambodian Buddhist monks walking through a camp in Kap Chemg, 
Thailand, on Monday. About 20,000 Cambodians have fled to Thailand. 


Shelling Resumes 
In Cambodian Area 
Lost by Royalists 

Reuters 

CHON CHOM PASS, Thailand — 
Artillery and mortar fire resumed m 
intermittent bursts on the Cambodian 
border Monday, less than 12 hours after 
the last royalist stronghold fell to troops 
loyal to Second Prime Minister Hun 
Sen, witnesses said. 

The witnesses said they were sur- 
prised to hear bursts of artillery and 
mortar fire coining from toe direction of 
O'Smach. toe last base of troops loyal to 
Prince Norodom Ranariddh, because 
the royalists had said they were low on 

ainiTiitni fw yp 

Amid heavy rain, troops loyal to Mr. 
Hun Sen fired bade more than 20 ar- 
tillery and mortar rounds late Monday 
morning. Fighting has been taking place 
in various parts of Cambodia since Mr. 
Hun Sen ousted Prince Ranariddh as 
first prime minister after clashes July 5 
and 6 in Phnom Penh. 

Thai officials on toe border said Mr. 
Hun Sen’s troops had control of toe 
town, but were likely clearing mines left 
by the royalists and the Khmer Rouge 
guerrillas who fought beside them. 

Another bonder source said the roy- 
alist troops who left O’S mac h were hid- 
ing in toe jungle and were ready to enter 
refugee camps and join the Cambodian 
civilians who fled into Thailand last 
week co escape toe fighting. 


briefly 


Jiang Follower to Lead Beijing Party 


Cc*q*tat hr Oar SKffFrem Dapacba 

BEIJING — Jia Qinglin, who is may- 
or of Beijing and a prot£g6 of President 
Jiang Zemin’s, has been appointed 
Communist Party chief in toe capital, 
toe Xinhua press agency said on Mon- 
day. 

The party appointed Mr. Jia. 57, to 
replace Wei Hanging , 66, who is bead of 
toe party's watchdog disciplinary com- 
mission. 

Mr. Wei took over temporarily as 
party boss in Beijing in April 1995 
following the purge of Chen Xitong, 67. 
Observers had not previously viewed 
Mr. Wei as being part of Mr. Jiang’s 
inner circle. 

Mr. Jia is expected to be elected to the 
political paity*s Politburo at a congress 
m September, party sources said. 

“Jia Qinglin is Jiang Zemin’s man," 
one said. “Hang Zemin is now r unnin g 
Beijing." 

Mr. Jiang has been maneuvering to 
expand his influence in the run-up to toe 
party congress next month, and control 
over China’s capital had long eluded 
him. 

Mr. Jia was previously governor and 
party secretary of Fujian Province, 
which helped spearhead the reform 
policies launched by toe late patriarch 
Deng Xiaoping in the 1970s. 


The Chinese news agency did nor say 
who would succeed Mr. Jia as mayor, 
but some sources have said a dark horse 
candidate who had no ties to the dis- 
graced Mr. Chen was likely to get the 
job. 

As part of the reshuffle, one of Mr. 
Chen's closest aides, Vice Mayor 
Zhang Baifa, was expected to step 
down, the sources said. 

"Jiang Zemin has rooted out Chen 
Xitong’s influence in Beijing.’ ’ said one 
source, who asked not to be identified. 

Mr. Chen, who ruled Beijing for more 
than a decade as mayor and later held its 
top job of party boss, was forced to step 
down after an associate cam e under 
investigation for corruption and com- 
mitted suicide in April 1995. 

Mr. Chen, who has since disappeared 
from public view, was the most senior 
official to be caught in a corruption 
scandal since the Communists came to 
power in 1949. 

He was expected to be expelled from 
toe party at its congress next month, 
Chinese sources said. 

Unpublished party documents have 
said that Mr. Chen abused his office by 
amassing S24 million in unauthorized 
funds and lavished favors on friends, 
associates and a mistress. 

Corruption was virtually eliminated 


in the years after toe Communists rook 
over, but it has returned along with 
China’ s economic reforms in toe past 1 7 
years. 

Mr. Jiang has declared war on cor- 
ruption, portraying it as a virus that 
threatens toe party. Courts frequently 
impose the death penalty in major cor- 
ruption cases. (AFP, Reuters) 

■ Rioting Farmers Arrested 

Chinese police have arrested about 30 
people after angry farmers in southern 
Guangdong Province rioted amid fears 
the government was underpaying them 
for their grain, Reuters said Monday. 

Officials said the riot erupted last 
Friday when the farmers attacked local 
Communist Party officials and police, 
overturned and destroyed several police 
vehicles and rampaged through gov- 
ernment offices, a police official said 
from toe village of Beixiang. 

The authorities sent in several hun- 
dred paramilitary armed police to re- 
store order, and about 30 people had 
been arrested, toe official said. 

Unrest in China's rural and urban 
areas is rarely reported publicly, but 
diplomats and analysts say such inci- 
dents are on the rise as economic re- 
forms give rise to greater freedoms, 
higher unemployment and inflation. 


Personals 


HAY THE SACRED HEART at Jesus be 
adored. Raffled, loved and presented 
tuougtoui the world, now and forever. 
Sacred Heat of Jesus pay far is. Sari 
Jude, worker of miracles pray to us. 
Sami Jude, hefaet of the hopefess, pray 
far us. him. Say this payer nre tines 
a day. by the nrth day you prayer nfl 
be answred. I has never been bum 
la ted. PiUtttion muS be promised. 
A.V 


Announcements 


BARQEAS24 

AU 26 AQUT 1997 
Prtx Has TVA en devise tacale 
{traduction tbporUe suMtararde) 
RmjfeGB les harems arftrtais 

FRANCE [zone Q en FHI • TVA 
GO: 3.72 FOD*: £26 

SCS7- 5J0 SCSP: 5J8 

UK end - TVfl 175% {tout 8%| 

GO: 05580 FOD*: 05476 

ALLEMAGNE (zone I) DW1 - TVA >5% 
ZONE I - G : 

GO I.IQ 

ZONE 0 - 1 ; 

GO: 1.06 

ZDHEB-F: 

CO. 1,05 

Z0NEIV-F: 

SCSP: 1.45 

ZONE IV - E : 

GO. 1.06 


SCSP: 1.44 
SCSP: 1/45 

FOO. 0.70 


BELGIQUE enFBT- TVA 21% 

GO: 2231 FOO 1152 

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H0LLANDE (Z0te2) KLG/I - TVA 17.5% 
Oft 1544 FOO 0^16 

SCSI. 2JXB SCSP: 1549 

LUXEMBOURG en LUBI - TVA 15% 

GO 19.48 

ESPAGfC (zone A) en PTASMVA 16% 
GO nfigj 

SOT: 103.45 SCSP: 10759 
* Usage regfamene 


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Australia Offers - 
‘Peace Dividend’ - 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New 1 * 
Guinea — Australia offered * im 
million dollar "peace dividend”-; 
Monday to help end the nme-yea£ 
secessionist war on the island uf* 
Bougainville. . _ J 

After meeting with senior Papua*' 
New Guinea ministers, die Australi- 
an foreign minister, Alexander* 
Downer, said the five-year fund, the^ 
equivalent of $74.5 million, would-* 
be dedicated to reconstniction and'; 
rehabilitation projects on the island 

The funds are being allocated'* 
from the 240 million dollars in for-** a 
eign aid Australia provides annu- 1 W 
ally to Papua New Guinea- (Ar)-l 

Mrs . Marcos Calls 
Aquino a Dictator 

MANILA — In an unusually 5 
strong public attack, the former first 
lady, Imeida Marcos, lashed out 
Monday at Corazon Aquino, who\ 
replaced her husband as president, 
saying it was Mrs. Aquino who was I 
a dictator, not Ferdinand Marcos, a 

In a speech in Congress, Mra+JI 
Marcos accused Mrs. Aquino of a 
series of misdeeds and praised the 
late Mr. Marcos as a vigorous ad- 
vocate of democracy who was 
forced by eveots to proclaim mar- -I 
tial law. Mrs. Aquino urged Filipi- * A 
nos in a speech last week to oppose £ T 
a return of dictatorship. (AP) - 

Taipei to Control 
Building Heights 

TAIPEI — Building projects in '4 
mountainous areas will be re- : J 
viewed and restrictions stiffened* 1 } 
following the deaths of 28 people in * 
toe partial collapse of an apartment* 7 ' 
block during a typhoon, the gov- ^ 
eminent said Monday. £ 

Buildings will not be allowed to - 
exceed seven stories, and limits on 
development will be more strictly.*- 
enforced, it said. (APfy_ 


f 


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it 




Flash Floods Cut 
Thailand Traffic 

BANGKOK — Road and raiTjj 
traffic to southern Thailand remained* J 
cut Monday by flooding that faced.'! 
toe evacuation of about 50,000' ^ 
people and caused four deaths. 

■ Flash flooding tod by loyeuUaJP 
rains inundated thorisaikistiPtidltife^ 
over toe weekend in toepitmnccs of ' ;. 
Chbraption, toe haMhstiif,’ H 
with Trang, Surat Thani, Krabi, u - 
Yala, Pang Nga and Ranong. '' (AP) ^ 



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Taiwan Urges Better Ties With China 


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TAIPEI — Taiwan wants better re- 
lations with China but will not be rushed 
into it, its leaders said Monday at toe 
start of the governing Nationalist Party 
congress. 

They called for an end to years of 
hostility between the two foes and an 
exchange of visits by their leaders. They 
also vowed not to pursue independence. 

But while painting vistas of a new era 
of peace and friendship, they rebuffed 
Beijing’s insistence that Taiwan accept 
Chinese sovereignty and stop conduct- 
ing itself as a separate country. 

President Lee Teng-hui sought to al- 
lay China's suspicion he wants to de- 
clare Taiwan independent and separate 
from China But he rejected Beijing's 
offer of a Hong Kong-style solution 
whereby Taiwan would return to 
Chinese rule but keep its economic sys- 
tem and way of life. 

“We adamantly oppose China's he- 
gemony, and reject the ‘one country, 
two systems* formula,” he said. Taiwan 


will deal with China “with toe greatest 
patience.” he added. 

Beijing suspended talks between the 
two countries in 1995. 

China claims Taiwan is a renegade 
province and says Mr. Lee is secretly 
steering it toward independence. Last 
year, it conducted menacing missile tests 
that were interpreted as a threat to re- 
cover Taiwan by force if it declared 
independence. ^ 

The Nationalists fled to Taiwan in 
1949 after losing the mainland to Mao’s 
Communists. They say they want re- 
unification, but only after both sides 
recognize each other as equals. 

Vice President Lien Chan called for 
an end to hostility and an exchange of 
top-level visits. Taiwan “wishes to see 
the realization in Asia of an era in which 
Chinese do not fight Chinese, but in- 
stead Chinese help Chinese,” he told 
the congress. 

The annual gathering focuses this 
year on building support for Vincent 
Siew, toe prime minister-designate, and 


bolstering die party for a tough fight ih 
year-end local elections. m 

Mr. Lee, who has expelled his ops 
po neats from the party and brought al 
firmly under his control, is set to be rtf 
elected chairman Tuesday. Delegated 
will also elect members to toe central 
committee and the powerful central? 
standing committee, which Homin' 1 ^ 
topparty and government officials. 

The congress, the 15th in toe 102- 
year-old party's history, finds toe Nafl 
tionalists scrambling to shore up thdn 
once unshakable rule against challenges 
brought on by toe democratic reforms 
they themselves have brought about 

Now, 10 years since martial law wa? 
lifted, toe opposition Democratic PrtU 
gressive Party governs more than baff 
the populace at toe local level. Il £? 
expected to make even more gains in 
November elections. •; 

Many voters consider the National isf 
Party to be corrupt and too long M 
power. They also blame it for failing ttS 
stop a wave of violence. (AP. Reuters) 


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ufcu ills TRIM .Trtu * UDMftDAl, SEPTEMBER **?i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


* ♦■iii r,. viPfj 


* /J 




en<f 


Poland s Primeval Forest Is Intact, but Faces an Uncertain Future 


By Jane Perlez 

Afav Fort Tims Service 


Vr\ \l 


BIALOWIEZA, Poland — In one of 
tne paradoxes of nature, the last frag- 
^ nt , foe primeval forest that 
sketched from the Atlantic to the Urals 
nom the Mediteiranean to the northern 
seas, re main s intact here on the eastern 
ooraer of Poland, one of modern 
Europe s most polluted countries. 

Descendants of the bison tHar ap- 
peared in early man's cave paintings 
5ml roam through bogs and swamps 
Small, gray horses, a sedate subspecies 
of the wild horses of the steppe, still 
graze on native grasses. And in the early 
dflwn, thin shafts of light pierce the 
darkened world hidden beneath a tower- 
Ving canopy of oak, ash and elm trees. 


Once the playground of kings and 
oars, of German Nazis and Polish 
Communists. Bialowieza Forest sur- 
vived because the leaders preserved it 
tor their grand hunting parties. 

Today, though, a democratic Poland 
has begun to fear for the forest’s future 
— partly because the public has begun 
to enjoy it — and so there is a growing 
sentiment among conservationists that 
access needs to be more restricted if jt is 
to remain pristine. 

In the old days, paradoxically it was 
the very lust for the hunt on the part of 
aristocrats and tyrants that kept the 
forest pristine. 

King August of Poland and his 
friends killed 42 bison and 13 elk one 
afternoon in 1752 as his wife. Queen 
Maria Jozefa, seated in a specially erec- 


«rr 


1 7«‘n»i u bi 


'fffllw 


led grandstand — that's how they often 
hunted in those days — killed 20 bison 
released into an arena before her and 
read a French novel between rounds. 

When the czars annexed part of Po- 
land in 1795, they commandeered Bia- 
lowieza. For more than a century, they 
exploited it for wood, fur and s kins but 
never so much that their hunting pas- 
time would be ruined. Hermann Goer- 
ing took time out in World War H to 
hunt, and Nikita Khrusbcbev was en- 
tertained here by his Polish comrades. 

But now, even as hunting and com- 
mercial logging continue in some parts of 
the forest, Polish research scientists fear 
that the sport that once served to protect 
the last stand of Europe's original forest 
isjnore harmful than helpful. 

In the last five years, the researchers 


have tapped into the growing environ- 
mental movement in Poland, mobilized 
people to write more than 300,000 let- 
ters and campaigned to make the entire 
forest a national park. In a partial suc- 
cess last year, the area of the forest set 
aside as a national park was doubled. 

“Since 1994, less cutting of the trees 
is allowed, but there is still too much," 
said Maigoizata Buszko, 27, a zoologist 
who studies the wolf, “and there is less 
hunting than before, but there is still too 
much.” 

The long tradition of hunting in Po- 
land, and the money that the state earns 
-7 hunters from Germany pay $2,000 if 
they shoot a deer — are hard to over- 
come, she said. 

Bialowieza Forest covers 580 square 
miles (1,500 square kilometers) of land 


.-X IK 


Karadzic Bloc 
Cries Treason 
As Plavsic TV 
Goes on Air 


if M 


i?" Control 


/ ioodf (j! 


The Associated Press 

• , ! BANJA LUKA. Bosnia-Herzegovi- 

. _ . - ' ' “a — Outraged supporters of Radovan 

\ Q Karadzic, the farmer Bosnian Serb lead- 

1 “ ~ tar and alleged war criminal, accused the 
rival camp on Monday of committing 
treason by broadcasting television pro- 
grams critical of him 
• The start of broadcasting late Sunday 
marked the first time that people in the 
Bosnian Serb entity bom in 1995 of the 
Dayton peace agreement had their 
choice of domestic television fare. Until 
now, all broadcasting was controlled 
from Pale, the village southeast of Sa- 
rajevo that is Mr. Karadzic’s headquar- 
ters. 

“ft is obvious that this is all a treas- 
on.’ ' said tiie Bosnian Serb prime min- 
ister, GojkoKlickovic. 

! The anti-Karadzic broadcasts were 
organized by supporters of President 
Bujana Plavsic, the former Karadzic 
prot£g£ who now accuses him and his 
aides of starving Bosnian Serbs as they 
profit. 

r , . . v , ^ ; In another effort to increase her in- 

; f « <inij I rflft ;t ” flueuce, Mrs. Plavsic appointed a new 
■U \ police chief in Mikoojic Grad, a town 
about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of 
V Banja Luka. Hie appointee, Brane 
~ Pecanac, took over without incident 
; J Monday. 

> Television programming began after 
technicians at a transmitter 40 JkUome- ( 
toy japrthwestoftiie city the nec- ' 

essary arfjnsiment&; : Before that, all 
broadcasts went to Pale, which retrans- 
mitted them. 

! Hie new outlet has a range covering . 
the western part of the Bosnian Serb 
state and reaches into areas controlled 
by the Karadzic camp. 

It is likely to widen the split slowly 
dividing the Bosnian Serb territory into 
two entities. 

Sources at the pro-Plavsic television 
studios in BanjaLaka, the northwestern 
town serving as her stronghold, said that 
similar adjustments were planned for a 
transmitter on Mount Majevica, near 
Tuzla. That would extend their broad- 
cast range into Karadzic-controlled 
eastern Bosnia as far as Zvoraik, about 
50 kilometers northeast of Pale. 



_ Banka CuLmWRnda* 

Plavsic supporters hurling eggs during a demonstration against their political rivals in Banja Luka on Monday. 


in Poland and Belarus, with 40 percent 
in Poland. 

The land in Poland is divided into 
three degrees of protection: an area 
where hunting of deer and some other 
animals is allowed: a national park, es- 
tablished in 1921, where there is no 
hunting or felling of trees, and an inner 
sanctum, called the strict nature reserve, 
of 35 square miles. 

In the reserve, there are limits even on 
the number of visitors, and those who 
can get in must be accompanied by a 
park guide. The only vehicles allowed 
are bicycles and horse-drawn carts. 

The nature reserve in Poland is the 
purest form of the forest. Not even a 
chain saw is allowed to be used to clear 
logs and debris from fallen trees; hand- 
held axes are used instead. In this en- 
clave, no new trees have been planted by 
man. Ra th er, new trees have sprung up 
from seeds dispersed from the trees 
themselves. 

When a 5 00-y ear-old oak finally 
dropped of old age in 1975, its gnarled 
trunk crashed to the forest floor and still 
lies there, covered in fungi and ferns. 

The eastern edge of the reserve runs 
along the border with Belarus, which 
also maintains vast tracts of the forest as 
a national park. The border is shielded 
by an electrified fence, and the southern 
edge of the reserve is fenced to keep 
humans oul Tourists must enter 
through a narrow gate. 

The northern and western boundaries 
of the reserve are open to the national 
park area so animals — red deer, roe 
deer, moose, horses, boar, and bison — 
can wander in an area untainted by the 
intrusions of man. 

The conservation experts like Miss 
Buszko say it is essential to expand the 
protected areas because even in the 
strict nature reserve, the fauna and flora 
are not as extensive as they used to be. 

Bears were wiped out in the early part 
of the century and have not been re- 
introduced. By 1919, bison were extinct 
in the forest, too, killed by poachers and 



soldiers. With the help of specimens in 
zoos, bison were reintroduced after 
World War □. 

Slightly smaller than the American 
variety, these bison are the biggest an- 
imals in Europe, and the kings of the 
forest There are about 3,000 of this 
variety in the world, and about 300 of 
them are in Bialowieza. 

The number is kept steady, Ms. 
Buszko said, by annual culling of 20 to 
30 animals. Like lynx and wolves in the 
forest, the bison are protected. 

Bnt even though the bison are the 
kings, in the winter they are dependent on 
humans these days. Since they no longer 
have the freedom to migrate to warmer 
climates, six feeding stations — gabled 
wooden sheds filled with hay — have 
been established so the bison can survive 
the months when they are unable to find 
enough food through the ice cover. 


BRIEFLY 





Kith Chini 




. -~iT- 

' 

’■ & 

U Hard-Liners Are Criticized 

. • Mrs. Plavsic criticized Bosnian Serb 

• . - ~ (_■ hard-liners on Monday for, she said, 
meddling in army affairs and added that 
elections were the only way out of the 
current crisis, Reuters reported. 

“They are playing with fire by trying 
to convince the army to align itself/’ 
she said at a news conference. "This is 
the worst possible violation of the con- 
stitution. 

.. Mrs. Plavsic again said that the le- 
gislative elections she has called for 
October, but which hard-liners backing 
Mr. Karadzic are trying to thwart, were 


5 

t 

; - : :S5 

v:t 


■ "The people want to join Europe,” 
she said. f *Those blocking thatroad wiD 
^ become part of our past The elections 
^are really very important.” 

- she won harking from an influential 
defector as support for the Karadzic 
> party continued to crumble. 

Dragojub Mhjanic, deputy president 
of the Bosnian Serb republic, issued a 
statement saying that he now supported 

X Mrs. Plavsic. . . 

He said his “bitterness had 
“readied its ultimate limits.” 


Inquiry Assails Haughey 

DUBLIN — A government-ordered inves- 
tigation recommended Monday that former 
Prime Minister Charles Haughey be prose- 
cuted for initially denying that be was given 
13 million punts ($1.9 million) by a busi- 
nessman. 

Prime Minister Bertie Ahern said that it was 
“indefensible and disgraceful’* that Mr. 
Haughey had concealed gifts from the super- 
market baron, -Ben Donne, from 1987 to 1991. 

An inquiry into Mr. Dunne’s political con- 
tributions concluded that Mr. Haughey had 
lied when he repeatedly claimed not to have 
received donations from Mr. Dunne. (AP) 

Papon Wins Court Ruling 

PARIS — A French court Monday found a 
newspaper that had called Maurice Papon a 
“zealous servant of the Nazis” guilty of en- 
dangering the accused war criminal's pre- 
sumption of innocence. 

The court said the France Soir newspaper 
roust publish a statement by Mr. Papon, bat it 
did not award the former Vichy police official 
the 1 million francs ($165,000; in damages he 
had sought 

Mr. Papon goes on trial in Bordeaux on Oct 
6 for his role in the arrest and deportation 
during World War II of 1,690 Jews, most of 
whom perished in Nazi death camps. He has 
denied any wrongdoing, saying he was fol- 
lowing orders. (AP) 

Greenpeace Blocks Rig 

AMSTERDAM — Greenpeace activists 
continued a blockade off the northern Dutch 
coast Monday to keep a gas-drilling rig from 
reaching its drill site. 

The dispute pits 25- Greenpeace activists 
against Netherlands Oil Co. „ which planned to 
conduct test drills for gas in the Wadden Sea 
about 60 kilometers (40 miles) north of Am- 
sterdam. The drills were scheduled to start 
Sunday and last three months. 

Environmentalists have been battling for 
years to protect the area known for its rich 
diversity of rare plants and ani m al life. (AP) 

For the Record 

The Swedish government is considering 
an opposition demand to open an investigation- 
into reports in the newspaper Dagens Nybeter 
that as many as 60,000 people in Sweden were 
sterilized this century on the grounds of having 
“undesirable” racial characteristics. (AP) 






2,000 in Crimea 
Criticize NATO 




s'\.t The Associated Prta 

YEVPATORIYA, Ukraine 
.. — About 2,000 people in the 

. / t Crimean Peninsula gathered 
Monday to protest a NATO 
/ v‘ ” milita ry exercise that brought 
~ U.S. ships and forces to the 
^ area, which is populated 
mostly by ethnic Russians, 
and they denounced Ukraine's 
w anning ties with the North 
Adamic Treaty Organization. 
The crowd gathered at a 
. . monument to Soviet soldiers 
: who died freeing .Crimea 
- - v from Nazi occupiers daring 
V Wcrid War II, then marched 
A - ;. H) kilometers (6 miles) to the 
, beach resort of Yevpatoriya 
anri held a rally in the c enter. 
-The protesters, ranging 
. mfronv young Russian nation- 
. J? alias to World War II vet- 
. ; t ! - enmg, earned red Soviet flags 
and banners with anti-NATO 
and anti-American slogans. 






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rrssT: 


TOraWJjMPIgBjW 






-PACE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY AUGUST 26, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Some Like It Hot, but Many in Europe Welcome the End of August 


: >3U 


• By Craig R. Whitney 

g f. New York Times Service 

PARIS — In Norway, there were tropical 
\nights — more than a dozen when the tem- 
Qjperature never dipped below 20 degrees cen- 
n pgrade (68 Fahrenheit) this summer, for the Gist 
i,time since record-keeping began — and Norsk 
Iskrem had sold 20 million more ice cream cones 
..than usual by early August. 

4* In France, there were scorching days — 15 
.'■Consecutive days in August alone when the tem- 
jperature hit 30 degrees centigrade (86 F) or 
'higher, the longest heat wave in this century 
c according to die French Meteorological Ser- 
^vice. 

r \ And in central England the average temper- 
ature this month — close to 68 degrees Fahren- 
heit (20 centigrade) — was almost as high as in 
[ 1995, when temperatures in August set a record 
Ti^ere. 

^ But it has been an unpleasant heat, bringing with 
jjj temperature in versions and air pollution that was 
so severe in Paris last week that authorities cut 
fares on subways and buses in half — and that was 
when milli ons of Parisians had taken their cars out 
of town for their annual August vacations. 


Europeans have h ft d more than usual to com- 
plain. about with their weather this year, starting 
with a prolonged April drought and a late- spring 
cold snap that produced snow in the Loire Valley 
in early May. 

June was cold and wet in most places, and 
prolonged heavy rains in Central and Eastern 
Europe caused devastating floods in the Czech 
Republic. Poland, and Eastern Germany in July. 

August then turned so balmy in most parts of 
the Continent that penguins had to be smeared 
with suntan lotion at the Edinburgh Zoo, ac- 
cording to authorities there who said the heat had 
caused the birds to molt so heavily that they were 
in danger of sunburn. 

* 'We don't yet have enough information to say 
. whether die unusual weather has anything to do 
with global warming or the El Nino current in the 
Pacific,” said Alain Foidart, a weather forecaster 
in Toulouse. 

“There was a stagnant situation in July when a 
low pressure area kept sucking cold air from 
Russia down into Carnal Europe and producing 
rain there,” Mr. Foidart said, “and there's been 
another stagnant situation since the 6th and 7th of 
August, with high pressure over the Continent and 
low press ore off the French Atlantic coast bringing 


op warm and dry air from the Sahara Desert” 

Hie heat wave is now coming to an end, Mr. 
Foidart promised, with the arrival of the first of a 
series of Atlantic storms that will soon bring 
West European weather back to its usual pattern 
of cold, rainy spells offset by brief, sunny ones. 

“While the heat has been sustained, it hasn’t 
been exceptionally hot,’* he pointed out, with 
'temperatures this month coming nowhere near 
the record high temperature for France, 44 de- 
grees centigrade (1 12 Fahrenheit). 

But Paris, too, has had nights balmier than 
those in New York City this summer, with a 
record overnight low of 22 degrees (72 Fahren- 
heit) late last week — and hardly any home air- 
conditioners, perhaps because French windows, 
which are not raised and lowered but pulled open 
to the inside — are not air-conditioner friendly. 

Anecdotally, at least, the European climate 
does seem to be changing. On 20 farms in south- 
ern England, where there have been a series of 
unusual droughts over die past decade, which 
Included a couple of scorching 38-degree cen- 
tigrade (100 Fahrenheit) days in the s ummer of 
1990, sunflowers now grow where none used to 
survive the damp weather, and birds began build- 
ing nests two weeks earlier Than usual this year. 


“Mediterranean days and tropical nights 
aren’t what forged the British character,” a 
columnist for the London Evening Standard, 
Lesley Gamer, wrote last week. 

In Bordeaux, rhe Wine Trade Council said mai 
the grape harvest began last Monday, a month 
ea riift 1 * than usual and not much later than Aug. 
15, 1893, the earliest on record. 

The most serious side-effect of the beat wave 
in Paris and Strasbourg during the past week has 
the high air pollution, worse in Strasbourg, which 
lies in the Rhine Valley between the Black Forest 
and the Vosges Mountains, than in Paris, where 
the authorities relentlessly build underground 
municipal parking garages for automobiles and 
then endlessly debate what to do if cars create so 
much pollution that people can no laager 
breathe. 

Much hot air was devoted to this subject last 
Tuesday and Wednesday, when ozone levels 
reached 200 micrograms per cubic meter of air, 
enough to set off Alert Level 2. Alert Level 3 
would actually require the authorities to forbid 
some drivers from using their cars. 

Which ones would stay in their garages is 
something that French governments, no matter 
what their political persuasion, have never 


been able to bring themselves to decide... 

Partisans of using license plates to regulate 
traffic, with those ending in odd numbers allowed' 
to drive on one high-pollution day and even / 
numbers allowed to drive the next, did battle with 
advocates of stickeis that would stigmatize gas-, 
guzzling big polluters and bar them altogether^ 
the worst days, and signs went up urang mo- 
torists to stow down on the peripheral highway 

around the city. . . 

But nobody did, and a weekend breeze swept 
the worst of the ozone cloud, and all the palaver, 
away The high temperature in Paris on Monday . 
was 29 degrees centigrade (84 F), and the fore- 
cast is for cooler weather Tuesday. 

■ Paris’s Pollution Danger Recedes 

Parisians breathed a sigh of relief Monday as 
light winds put an end to a two-week spell of. 
high-ozone pollution due to car exhaust fumes 
and hot weather, Reuters reported 

The police said the French capital’s speed 
limits, which had been lowered by 20 kilometers 
per hour (12 miles per hour) 12 days ago to curb 
fumes, would return to normal Tuesday as the 
weather institute forecast rainstorms and lower 

temperatures. 


SMOKE: 

i Links to Smugglers 

Continued from Page 1 

.jlustries PLC and a British affili ate of 
r^rown & Williamson, on trial this year 
_ 'p n charges that be took more than $3 
million in bribes from dealers involved 
in smuggling cigarettes into fhina 

Spokesmen for the three cigarette 
companies said they did not knowingly 
sell to dealers who supply smugglers and 
refused to discuss any of the criminal 
cases. But they said that while a few 
salesmen might have been too aggres- 
sive, their executives had done nothing 
; .wrong and that the companies should not 
be held accountable for what happens 
,pnce they sell their products. 

Hie smuggling costs foreign govern- 
ments an estimated $16 billion a year in 
lost revenue. But more important, health 
►experts say it threatens to undermine 
.initiatives in many nations to discourage 
^smoking, particularly among teenagers. 

That is because yonng people tend to 
.smoke more when they can buy cig- 
arettes cheaply, and smuggled brands 
often sell for about a third less than ones 
,pn which taxes and customs duties have 
been paid. 

*. The sheer scope of die smuggling also 
.pould force changes in the $368.5 billion 
settlement being negotiated with the 
MS. tobacco industry’- The proposed 
.agreement says that before the govern- 
-ment could older the companies ro lower 
the nicotine in cigarettes, it would have 
ro guarantee that smugglers would not 
bring in more potent substitutes. But 
'given how easily smuggling can take 
place, President Bill - Clinton said last 
month that this provision was unreas- 
onable and should be changed. 

| The recent surge in black-market 
sales has many causes, from the re- 
laxation of customs inspections in 
Europe to the opening of vast new mar- 
kets in Russia and Eastern Europe, 
ir Market Tracking International Ltd., a 
^search firm in London that provides 
data to tobacco industry publications, 
estimates that 280 billion of the 1 trillion 
cigarettes exported each year by all pro- 
ducing nations pass through the hands of 
Smugglers, up from 100 billion in 
1989. 

: The rise in smuggling also has co- 
incided with a massive pash by U.S. 
companies to expand overseas, which 
they see as a way to offset a decline in 
Sales at home. American cigarettes are 
regarded as top qualiry and are seen as 
clue in many countries. 

\ But as popular as American and other 
Western brands are, the companies also 
rira into various sales barriers, including 


‘ • .C>> c ■ - 

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GOBlEj Silicon Valley's Elite Gives Advice 


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v- • . ; ■ ^ l 

•.*** - • < ' * 



Continued from Page 1 

cation policy to staffing at the Food and 
Drug Ad minis tration. 

Increasingly, White House officials 
all the way to President Bill Clinton are 
seeking its guidance — and responding 
to its advice. 




“We're so conceited that we think picture. 


dense and bright and you can. see it 
clearly,’ ’ he said in a recent interview. 

“The growth in ray underatanding of 
. the new economy is similar to that pro- 
cess. 

“At first it’s sketchy, and then there 
are more details filled in. After awhile, 
I’m better able to paint a bright and vivid 



what’s in the best interest of our industry 
is in the best interest of the whole coun- 
try,’' said Halsey Minor, the 32-year-old 
founder of t he fa st-growing technology 
company CNET and another Gore Tech 


“We feel in some ways like we’re 
reviving America,’’ said Steve Perlman, 


Clearly, both Mr. Gore and his Silicon 
Valley advisers foresee potential ben- 
efits from their alliance. 

For the vice president, die insight 
gleaned from thebrainstormiog sessions 
could help him outpace the competition 
in 2000. 

The Gore Tech participants, as rep- 


annthtw participant and inventor of resentatives of the fastest-growing sec- 
WiebTV. a device that enables people to tor of the U.S. economy , would be valu- 


AIonbloeM|»RBBrAHK 

Kenyan men fleeing the troubled Likoni neighborhood Monday on their way to the port city of Mombasa. 
Sporadic overnight attacks occurred in the area after firearms were stolen from a local police station. 

IMF Team Meets With Moi on Kenya Corruption 


Reuters 

NAIROBI — An International 
Monetary Fund team met Monday with 
President Daniel arap Moi to seek per- 
sonal assurances that he would stamp 
out official corruption inreturafora' 
steady flow of IMF cash. 

The meeting in the Indian Ocean 
port of Mombasa was the first since the 
Fund halted a $205 million loan pack- 
age July 31. citing governance issues 
and corruption. 

Government officials said the talks 
at die presidential residence in Mom- 
basa lasted about 45 minutes. They 
said discussions with key ministers 


“President Moi said that they held 
useful discussions with the IMF 


pre-election political unrest hit the 
economy hard, driving the Kenyan 


team," the Presidential Press Service shilling down by nearly 20 percent 


reported. “He expressed hope that fol- 
lowing the talks, a solution will be 
found regarding' the suspension' Of the 


against the dollar as foreign investors 
pulled out 

Businessmen said- they awaited pro- 


Enhanced Structural Adjustment Fa 1 ' gress pi thp.IMF. talks.. /•_ ; 


would precede another meeting with Micah Cheserem. 


cility to the country." 

The press service said the IMF del- 
egation was made up of Deputy Di- 
rector Goddal Gondwe and Resident 
Representative Reimer Carstens. 

Mr. Moi was flanked by Kenya’s 
leading economic reform figures: Fi- 
nance Minister Musalia Mudavadi and 
the Central Bank of Kenya governor. 


Mr. Moi on Wednesday. 


cause the savings from evading taxes can 
be so greaL 

Law enforcement officials say that the 
dealers usually provide such a distance 
between the companies and the smug- 
glers that it would be hard to consider 
charging the companies with doing any- 
thing illegal. 

Yet, even some dealers say that they 

and the companies sell the cig- 

are ties so indiscriminately that “ 
they both know certain sales are ‘Of 


The aid suspension, coinciding with 


“It’s easy to talk, it's not so easy to 
agree,” said Charles Gardner, resident 
representative of the Eastern Africa 
Association that groups mainly British 
companies. “We have not seen any 
sign of any action being taken on the 
issues raised by the IMF. I’m pes- 
simistic." 

Mr. Carstens said the talks with Mr. 
Moi were aimed at agreeing on a date 
when negotiations could begin. 


WebTV, a device that enables people to tor of the U.S. economy, would be vaiu- 
surf the Internet and send electronic mail able additions to his campaign support: 
with their television sets. t eam . . 

To some exten t t the hubris is un- For the entrepreneurs, the more the 
riftre tanrfable Durin g the last three years, government listens to them, the less 
the high-tech sector has contributed 27 likely they are to be surprised by le- 
percent of the growth in the U.S. gross gisiation that could cripple their compa- 
domestic product, according to a recent nies at home or dull their competitive 
analysis by Business Week magazine. edge abroad. 

Even the adminis tration’s political np- Mr. Gore says the group's problem; 
ponents acknowledge the significance of solving attitude is what keeps him con* 
the Washington-Silicon Valley alliance, ing back. i J 

“The White House and vice pres- “It’s much easier for me to articulate 
idem’s office have been absolutely mas- challenges to a group ready to hear 
terful in the way they’ve worked tins them," he said, 
community,” said Dan Schneer, a 
former press spokesman for Governor T>T TCTT, 

Pete Wilson of California. 

Although there have been only eight n tv* 9 ft 

Gore Tech meetings so far, the col- JTvGDlWHtCttFlS liODC 
laboration already has had a measurable • 

impact on public policy. Some ex- Continued from Page 1 

^amples: ; — \ . , • 

. > An adrainistration-enfo Fred .Thompson , .ofi Tennessee, ■, the 

to improve c ommuni cation between fonder actor;" and Alan KeyeS", ’& ‘radio 


nies at home or dull their competitive 
edge abroad. 

Mr. Gore says the group's problem;, 
solving attitude is what keeps him con* 
ing back. L y 

“It’s much easier for me to articulate, 
c hallenge s to a group ready to hear 
them," he said. 


school and home through an interactive 
computer network. 

• A White House-sanctioned effort to 
make it easier for parents to monitor 
their children’s Internet use. 

• An administration campaign to en- 
act legislation to prevent unnecessary 
delays in approval of new pharmaceut- 
icals. 


talk-show host. 

Still, many in the audience said that 
one off night for Mr. Bush did not detract 
from his overall appeal. 

“He needs to work on delivering that 
speech and exciting the Republican rank 
and file,” said Herbert Schumann Jn, a 
commissioner from Cook County, 
Illinois, who was a delegate here. “But 


Gore Tech consists of a core group of he has the right message.” 


One result is that Mr. Bianchi ended company's distribution system and 
up selling Philip Morris products to an jeopardized investments in overseas 
.-crime figure now on trial in factories. 


Italy, prosecutors there say. Mr. Bianchi 
himself is not a defendant, and be has 
denied that he did anything wrong. 

Andre Reiman, a senior vice pres- 
ident for a Philip Morris subsidiary in 
Europe, questioned whether the cora- 


15 or so regulars, although the roster 
varies somewhat from month to month. 
It includes the young, successful de- 
signers of new technologies that are rap- 
idly becoming household names in 


jiigh taxes, limits on imports and coun- headed for the black market. 


tries where cigarette distribution is cor- 
rupt. 

' The smugglers, though, have increas- 
ingly maneuvered around such limits. 

J To be sure, in cities from Naples to 
Bogota, the image of street peddlers 
hawking contraband cigarettes has been 
an enduring one. 

1 The manufacturers benefit in that they 
normally receive the same price for cig- 
arettes whether they end up in contra- 
band markets or not. And despite 
markups by dealers, smugglers and 
Salespeople, contraband cigarenes can 
Still he sold cheaply and profitably be- 


If the companies say they do C1 » i 
not, “it’s a fie," said Corrado nj- 0 
Bianchi, who said he had sold * 
Philip Morris cigarettes as a 
dealer in Switzerland before retiring two 
years ago. “Of course they know." 

Mr. Bianchi said he had sold large 
quantities of Philip Morris brands “to 
200 people maybe, and they come from 
all over, Dutch people, Germans, Span- 
ish, Greeks, Italians." But. he said, he 
never asked the buyers what they were 
going to do with the cigarettes. “In our 
work, you can't ask what they do with 
the cigarettes." 


‘Of course I know where the . 
cigarettes are going. But is that my 
problem?’ 


Adam Bryan-Brown, a spokesman for America: Netscape, Yahoo, WebTV. 
Reynolds's international tobacco sab- Java. 

sidlary in Geneva, said governments “Our goal was to wire up this com- 
were responsible. "The root causes of m unity with the White House," said the 
contraband are well known — the high White House technology adviser, Tim 
duties and taxes imposed on cigarettes." Newell. "We feel it’s been successful.” 
_____ he said The collaboration represents a striking 

“ But Per Brix Knudsen, the turnabout for the technology industry, 


dfrectorofan anti-fraud unit for which has long practiced a leave-us- 
the European Union, said: "It's al o a e-and-we'U- leave -you -alone strate- 
astomshmg that these big pro- gy in its dealings with government 


pany had sold cigarettes directly to Mr. 
Bianchi. "As far as we can determine, 
he has never been a customer," he 
said. 

"I am not going ro sit here and tell you 
there is not contraband in cigarettes," 
Mr. Reiman added. "It’s there. The 
causes are just a little more complicated 
than people believe.” 

Philip Morris executives in New 


York said smugglers competed with the operate. 


ducers are not more concerned 

that soch a large quantity of 

their product is arriving on the 
illegal market How is it that such a trade 
can take place?" 

Much of Europe's tobacco trade takes 
place in Switzerland, where the law ba- 
sically does not view selling cigarettes 
to people who smuggle them into an- 
other country as a crime. Investigators in 
the rest of Europe say that Swiss au- 
thorities — and tobacco companies 
themselves — are rarely willing to co- 


The group has informed Mr. Gore’s 
understanding of what kind of economy 
will work for America in the next cen- 
tury , a vision be espouses regularly in 
speeches across the country and is likely 
to incorporate into his presidential cam- 
paign for 2000, aides say. 

Explaining the impact the group has 
had on his thinking, Mr. Gore, a tech- 
nology buff, uses an Internet analogy. 

"Sometimes, when you're downioad- 


Three weeks ago, the NBC News pro- 
gram "Today" devoted 12 minutes and 
47 seconds to an interview that could 
have passed for a campaign advertise- 
ment. It even included an interview with 
former President George Bush, who 
gushed that if his son were elected pres- . 
ident, “it would be good for Amer- 
ica.” 

“It would be enormously satisfying 
for his parents." he added. “Enormous- - 
ly." 

Indeed, many Republicans hoe said 
they were favorably disposed toward 
Mr. Bush out of fondness far his parents. 
Besides the pedigree, Mr. Bush inherits 
quite a fund-raising Rolodex from his 

The very act of being elected governor 
of a major state left no doubt that the 
younger Mr. Bush would become a play- 
er in national politics. Another factor is 
that Mr. Bush, at age 51, is a" fresh face 
who is enormously popular with Texas 
voters. And he managed to press through 
an ambitious agenda that nas been ac- 
ceptable both to moderates and social 


IHEVA: Widespread Crackdown on Crime 


! Continued from Page 1 

n deriving impetus for the campaign 
ppeared to be to affirm the authority of 

F eijing at a time when it was openly 
□ored by local officials. 

Efforts to make the rule of law more 
just in China have been slowly gaining 
momentum, and earlier this year the 
national legislature passed new criminal 
jaws that legal experts praised for bring- 
ing more modem, professional standards 
Into China’s system of justice. 


ecuted on May 19, 1996. for a crime he 
was accused of committing on May 13. 
1996. 

“This translates as six days from al- 
leged crime to final execution of the 
sentence, including arrest, investigation, 
first trial, appeal, approval and review,** 
the report said. 

In many more cases, local officials 
exercised broad discretion in deciding 
what constitutes a capital case. 

A man named Lu Qigang was sen- 
tenced to death for sticking thorns and 
needles into the buttocks of female cyc- 
lists near the horticultural farm in 





into China’s system of justice. tenced to death for sticking thorns and 

J Yet last year’s campaign, called needles into the buttocks of female cyc- 
V Strike Hard,” demonstrated that there fists near the horticultural farm in 
Still remains some way to go before legal Beijing where he worked. An official 
cases and issues are fully decided by account of his trial alleged that Lu “ac~ 
judges instead of by politicians. ted indecently toward women in broad 


iges instead of by politicians. ted indecently toward women in broad 

By collecting and analyzing data on daylight" and that “it seriously harmed 
: executions carried out last year. Am- the peace and aroused the strong in- 
testy International's report was able to dignation of die masses.” 
demonstrate the way that local author- Although many women who have 


* * - % ■ 




P es sometimes arbitrarily punish of- been sexually harassed may feel Mr. Lu 
riders, violating the principle of equal- got what was coming. Amnesty Inter- 
ivy before the law that the cuirent national pointed out that the crime of 


aism," with which Mr. Lu was 
is an ill-defined term that is 


leadetship publicly endorses. “hooliganism," with which Mr. Lu was 

1 “Police, judicial organs, and local charged, is an ill-defined term that is 
leaders were under pressure to achieve open to wide interpretation by local ju- 
jjpeedy results,” the report said. “Eager dicial officials and that execution in this 


ing a picture, it will come up in sort of conservatives, whose blessing is crucial 
sketchy form, and it will add another in Republican primaries T 

layer and another layer, and then it gets “People say he’s a dam good gov- 
i ercior in an important state,” said Gov- 
ernor Terry Branstad of Iowa, the state 
that holds the first presidential caucuses. 
“He’s ruffled some feathers, but he’s 
accomplished some significant 
things. 

He has also had setbacks. Most no- 
tably, Mr. Bush's plan to give Texans $4 
billion in property tax cuts was scuttled 
by the state legislature earlier ibis year 
because members of his own party ob- 
jected to raising other taxes to offset the 
property tax relief. 

Even as his chief political adviser, 

Karl Rove, has been soun ding out the 
governor’s prospects, Mr. Bush has been 
subtle about his intentions. He was the 
only politician here who did not mingle 
with the crowd after his speech. He 'C- 
slipped out the back. ■ 

Karen Hughes, his press secretary, 
said that the governor was not aware 
when he accepted the invi tatio n tha t this 
event had been advertised as an early 
rattle call for would-be presidents and 
that he had come here because “he feels 
“ n ° b v li P. ation » Help the party raise 

i Moscow listening to the crew of 

ike part in a soacewalk ® J f* nalhon WiHcy, executive di- 



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sjpeedy results,” the report said. “Eager 
to prove their credentials, several 
provinces began their campaigns by 
retrying and sentencing to death offend- 
ers previously sentenced to fixed terms 
of imprisonment.” 

**, In one murder case, a man was ex- 


MIR EAVESDROPPERS — Officials at the Russian Mission Control in Moscow listening to the crew r % * 

the Mir space station Monday. Michael Foaie, the U.S. astronaut, will take part in a soacetalk But J r °^ nalhon ™ey, executive di- 

for Sept. 3, officials said. Mr. FoaJe and a Russian cosmonaut, Anatoli Solovyov, will make the SD&ofwaii! 55?' of the sta *? Re P u Wican party, said 

to inspect the Spektr module, which was punctured in a collision with an unmanned cargo eraftjlSn"^ ^ n d ^ er d ° n - Satl “day night had not 


rase could hardly be called appropriate. 
Chinese legal scholars alnrady have 


expected to take effect in October. 
Although the authorities often defen- 


recognized the limitations of this charge. ded their “Strike Hard” campaign as 


and hooliganism will be replaced by 
several more specifically defined of- 
fenses in revisions to the criminal law 


necessary to combat serious enme such 
as drug trafficking, most of those pun- 
ished with death in drug cases were 


couriers found guilty of simple posses- said diet she took the r r.^. c . for M 
topori cites the ctse of a young 

woman who earned a package on a train checker whf«n k 5 “ a llc ! cel 

from her honeymoon .nKurSning to to 


Mr. Bush and his advisers probably 
have good reason to be skittish about his 
ambitions beyond Austin. 

,„, As Ms- Hughes put it “He’s a guy 
who saw a very popular incumbent pres- 
IS 01 ^ one he knows very well — go 
™ 90 percent to 30 percent" in the 


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INTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUN E, TUESDAY, AUGU ST 26, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


PAGE 7 


' , :j> l 


Credo of Israeli Who Would Not Be a Jailer: Mass Arrests 6 Do Damagi 


ha/- 




HI Mi: 

; ‘im> Hope 


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By Joel Greenberg 

* New York Tunes Servic e 

c - Israel — Yuva! Lotem, 

a lieutenant m the Israeli Army reserve, 

- vmdly remembers the scene when he 

- JfP 0 . . t0 Megiddo jail: two young 
raiestmian prisoners taking out the 
garbage, ringed by military police of- 

. ucers and a platoon of reservists car- 
rying tear gas canisters, helmets and 

! clubs. 

' ‘When I saw that, I sensed how right 
J was when I refused to be a part of it/’ 
Lieutenant Lotem said of his refusal to 
serve at the military prison to protest the 
detention of Palestinians there without 
trial. “If they’ve done something wrong, 

. why aren’t they being tried?” 

Lieutenant Lotem, 40, a former para- 
trooper who helps direct films for a 
living, was jailed for 26 days in an army 

- stockade last month for resisting service 
at Megiddo. 


briefly 


Israel Says Jordan 
Agrees on Dam Site 

JERUSALEM — Jordan has 
agreed to build a dam with Israel on 
land claimed by Syria, Israel's wa- 
ter commissioner said in an inter- 
view published on Monday. 

Meir Ben-Meir told the Israeli 
newspaper Ha’aretz that the proj- 


While be was doing time, two suicide 
bombers struck in a Jerusalem market, 
killing 14 people and themselves. The 
Israel! authorities responded with a 
senes of punitive measures and a wave 
of arrests of suspected Palestinian mil- 
itants. 

At least 140 of them were jailed with- 
out tnal under what is known as ad- 
tremstrative detention, bringing the total 
of such detainees to about 380 accord- 
ing to official figures. 

They are held for periods of up to six 
months that can be extended. Many have 
been jailed for more than a year, and 
human rights lawyers say that more than 
50 have been held for two years or 
more. 

Israeli officials defend the detentions 
as imperative security measures taken to 
ward off serious threats. Suspects are 
jailed without charges because, the of- 
ficials contend, bringing them to trial 
would disclose vita] intelligence 


sources, and their reports would be in- 
admissible in court anyway under the 
standard rules of evidence. 

Against die background of the 
carnage in Jerusalem and the Israeli 
crackdown that followed. Lieutenant 
Lo tern’s act of resistance, a rare phe- 
nomenon in the Israeli Army, stood out 
in even sharper relief. The shock of the 
bombings has left relatively few Israelis 
concerned about possible government 
abuses in response to the violence. 

Lieutenant Lotem has refused reserve 
duty in the West Bank. Gaza Strip and 
Lebanon over the last 15 years on the 
ground that he will have nothing to do 
with a military occupation. Since com- 
pleting his regular army service, he has 
been called up for reserve duty several 
weeks a year like most Israeli men. To 
him, the recent arrests were futile. 

“It’s like cutting off the head of a 
monster that immediately sprouts 10 
more beads,” he said in an interview 


ect’s location was on the edge of 
what was A1 Hama enclave south- 
east of the Sea of Galilee before the 
. 1967 war. It was a demilitarized 

zone between Israel and Syria on the 
southernmost slopes of the Golan 
Heights. (Reuters) 

Burundi Quarrels 
‘ With Its Mediator 

ARUSHA. Tanzania — Growing 
tensions between Burundi and Tan- 
zania on Monday scuttled peace 
talks aimed at resolving die bloody 
three-year conflict in Burundi. 

Tanzania was supposed to me- 
. diate between Burundi’s Tutsi gov- 
ernment and Hutn rebels. Bat on 
Sunday, the Burundian foreign min- 
ister. Luc Rnkingama, repeated ac- 
cusations that Tanzania was har- 
boring Hutu rebels among the 
300,000 refugees camped in the 
western part of the country. He de- 
manded Tanzania disarm them be- 
fore talks could begin. (AP) 

; :i Cut^Accus<Rs;;U,^,X:, 

, Of Causing Plague 

GENEVA — Cuba formally ac- 
cused theUnited States on Monday 
of causing a crop-killing plague on 
the island in violation of the 138- 
nation biological weapons treaty. : 

The United States dismissed the 
allegations as baseless. 

Cuba’s appearance before a spe- 
cial session of the treaty nations 

* gave Havana an opportunity to ex- 
plain its allegations, initially made 
in a note to the United Nations Gen- 

* eral Assembly in April. 

Cuba maintains that a U.S. nar- 
cotics -eradication plane that flew 
across Cuba cm Ocl 21 spewed a 
dangerous biological agent known as 
thrips palmL The insect, which ; 
“strikes and severely damages prac- 
tically every crop," showed up in 
potato plantations about two months 
after the flyover, Cuba says. (AP) 



Sunday near the town of Kfar Shmaryahu. 
where he lives, north of Tel Aviv. 

‘ ‘Mass arrests may be effective in the 
short run, but in the long term they do 
damage, because people come out of jail 
more anti-Israeli and even more mil- 
itant’ * 

“I would go talk to the monster. In the 
end we’re going to talk to them as well, 
just like we’re shakin g Arafat’s hand," 
he added. “It’s only a question of how 
much more blood will be spilled before 
people understand that” 

Lieutenant Lotem. who completed his 
prison term at the end of July, received 
an unusual message of support from a 
Palestinian administrative detainee, 
Imad Sabi, who has been jailed for 20 
months without trial on suspicion of 
political activities in the militant Popular 
Front for the Liberation of Palestine. 

Mr. Sabi, 35, who directed a research 
center in the West Bank before his arrest, 
was scheduled to appear Tuesday before 


the Israeli Supreme Coart to argue his 
appeal for release so he can study 
abroad He wrote an open letter to Lieu- 
tenant Lotem after reading about his case 
in a newspaper. He asked the lieutenant 
wheiher he nad doubts about his actions, 
and why he chose to refuse when he 
could have easily gone along and served 
as a humane jailer. 

“Isn’t ‘state security’ important to 
you?" Mr. Sabi wrote. ‘ ‘And what if I’m 
a real terrorist?” 

The letter appeared on the Op-Ed Page 
of The New York Times on Aug. 19. 

Lieutenant Lotem said he had written 
back to Mr. Sabi, replying that in demo- 
cratic societies people are deemed in- 
nocent until proven guilty. 

In the interview, Lieutenant Lotem 
said: “In this case people are denied the 
basic right to defend themselves, and the 
principle of innocent until proven guilty 
is turned completely upside down. These 
are political prisoners held because of 


their opinions, not because of anything 
they’ve done. If they had done anything 
they would have been indicted.” 

As for Mr. Sabi’s query why he didn't 
go along and serve as a gentle jailer. 
Lieutenant Lotem said, “There is no 
enlightened occupation, and there's no 
good jailer when die prisoner is jailed 
without justification." 

He said that it was imperative to show 
Palestinians that there are other Israelis 
besides soldiers, security agents and mil- 
itant Jewish settlers they meet in the 
West Bank and Gaza Strip. 

“It’s important for Palestinians to 
know that there are people on the other 
side who care about mem, who wish them 
web, who believe that they deserve free- 
dom and want tohve with fcem in peace,” 
Lieutenant Lotem said. “They should 
know (hat not everything is black, and that 
there’s hope that the two peoples can live 
in peace one day. If they won’t think that 
there is such a chance, we’re all lost” 


Amir T ViUjB lwU M 

Palestinian children playing Monday on the ruins of one of two houses 
blown up by Israelis in the West Bank because they lacked permits. 

KOREA: Ambassador to Cairo Is Missing 


Continued from Page 1 

said it could not confirm that be was 
defecting. Norm Korean Embassy of- 
ficials in Cairo earlier denied that the 
ambassador had defected. 

They kicked and punched television 
journalists before barricading them- 
selves Inside the embassy and calling on 
the Egyptian police to disperse the re- 
porters. 

An embassy official who declined to 
be named said: “No, this is wrong news. 
The ambassador is in the embassy.” 

He declined to allow journalists to see 
Mr. Chang or speak with him. 

Mr. Chang was due to return home 
next month after a three-year assign- 
ment. 

North Korea analysts said Mr. 
Chang’s reported move, after the de- 
fection of top a Pyongyang ideologue, 
Hwang Jang Yop earlier this year, un- 
derscored crumbling controls in the Sta- 


linist country. 

Mr. Chang’s diplomat brother, Chang 
Seung Ho, based in Paris, has also left 
for a third country to seek asylum, ac- 
cording to officials in SeouL 

“Egypt is North Korea’s stronghold 
for its nonaligned diplomacy; Chang’s 
defection is a big blow to Pyongyang,” 
said Lee Ki Won, vice president of the 
private Institute of North Korea Studies 
in SeouL 

“But I think it would be rash to expect 
a domino of defections by diplomats.” 

South Korean news outlets said the 
ambassador’s son disappeared a year 
ago from Cairo after criticizing Pyong- 
yang's system. 

The Joong Ang Dbo newspaper said 
the son fled to Canada. 

Meanwhile, a North Korean soldier 
defected to South Korea across the west- 
ern sector of tee Demilitarized Zone that 
separates the Koreas, the South Koreans 
reported. (Reuters, AP) 


KRENZ: Ex-East German Leader Convicted in Wall Killings 


Continued from Page 1 

wall Prior to that time, however, he was 
the Politburo member responsible for 
security policy. 

But Mr. Krenz argued that East Ger- 
man border policies were dictated by the 
former Soviet Union. 

To that end, he reminded listeners that 
former President Ronald Reagan 
pleaded during a speech here in 1987 
that Russia tear down the Berlin Wall. 

“He did not cry, ‘Honecker or Krenz, 
tear down the wall!” said Mr. Krenz. 

In his ruling Monday, Judge Josef 
Hoch refused to accept that defense. The 
judge acknowledged that the old East 
German regime was beholden to the 
Soviet Union. f 

But, Be added, the German officials 
dependency on Soviet authority did not 
exclude them from responsibility for 
criminal activity. 

But the judge did offer a measure of 
leniency, fencin g Mr. Krenz to six 
years in prison rather than II as the 


prosecutors had requested. Indeed, Mr. 
Krenz’ s sentence was shorter than the 
one handed down to the former minister 
of defense, Heinz Kessler, who was sent 
to prison for more than seven years. 

One of the other two people convicted 
Monday was Guenter Shabowski, a top 
spokesman for the Poliburo who was 
also the person who almost inadvert- 
ently opened the Berlin Wall in 1989 
when he mistakenly said that border 
traffic would be opened up immedi- 

at TT,e statement went far beyond what 
the collapsing Politburo actually had in 
mind but prompted a spontaneous flood 
of people that East German authorities 
were never again, able m contain. 

Mr Shabowski, 68, distanced himself 

markedly from Mr. penz during the 
trial, arguing that he had no role what- 
soever in setting border pohcies and had 
not been one “who murdered from be- 
hind a desk.” . . 

But Mr. Shabowski was also far more 
contrite about the moral and political 


failings of the old system, and his own 
role in both. 

The third Politburo member con- 
victed Monday was Guenther Kleiber, 
65. Mr. Kleiber was responsible for East 
Germany’s disastrous economic policy 
when the wall came tumbling down, and 
was also the regime’s leading hard-line 
socialist ideologist. 

AH three Politburo officials have said 
they will appeal the decision to Ger- 
many’s constitutional court. If that fails, 
-as most experts predict, Mr. Krenz said 
last week Ire will appeal to the European 
Court for Homan Rights in Strasbourg, | 
France. 

■ Gorbachev Criticizes Conviction 

The former Soviet leader Mikhail 
Gorbachev on Monday criticized the de- 
cision to convict Mr. Krenz, Agence 
France-Presse reported from Berlin. 

“I believe there is no judicial or moral 
justification for the conviction of Krenz 
and his comrades,” Mr. Gorbachev told 
the RTL television station. 


Denying Shuffle Rumor, Kohl Rebukes Waigel 

,, ,- amejltarv elections, which position-dominated upper house of Par- 
c<mpi*dbyO*srfF*mD*p*** Mr Waigel has iiament last month. 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl ^“^L^would’be interested .Mr.Kohl believes an overhaul of Ger- 

issiX stinging rebuff to bis finance Mimstiy. . . ™ny> burdensome ami complexes* 


BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
issued a stinging rebuff to 

rmnister Monday for opening publK dis- 
cussion on a possible cabinet shuffle in 
his absence. 

. “This discussion has angered me 
mightily," Mr. Kohl told the mass-enr- 


imgaoxy, «u. j^juux . 

eolation Bild daily. “I have no intention 
of changing tiie government around- 
Stance Minister Theo Waigel tas 
publicly pushed for a shake-up m ml 
K ohl’s team in recent weeks, saying he 
is weary after eight “ “f 
popular job at fee center of debate over 
how to repair the weak economy. 

• While publicly stating that a shuffle 
could peric up the government s image 


Shuffles are but opposition leaders say the chancel- 

of government, wfr- ffice i or ’ S plan favors the well-off and would 

.wipe at aincsaste^®®^ ,h e budget deficit 

afla- a of £ls Set Mr. Waigel’s reported interest in be- 

Those who are una „ . . coming foreign minister, either m acab- 

should read the constimtio^ ^ ^ reshu ffl e OT ^ fte September 

Mr. Kohl sought de _ 1998 election, rankles the Free Detno- 

authority, telling Bild Ihe d oats, whose own Klaus Kinkel holds the 

bate “absolutely ^unnec^n^ job. Mr. Kohl said that if changes to his 

“highly damaging to ms ruling government were to be discussed, it 

alition. building must be within party ranks, and among 

“tFiffSEl get his am- Parliemeut grcup leader,, not r^ubhe. 
Since WIT. nast the on- 


Monitors Ask Restraint in Lebanon 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Trying to stop the 
violence in southern Lebanon from 
spreading, the five-nation group mon- 
itoring the conflict there has called on 
Israel and Lebanon to do everything pos- 
sible to halt attacks against civilians- 

The call for restraint was unusually 
direct, reflecting concern that violence 
could rise after a week of fierce fighting 
that saw pro-Israeli militiamen and Ira- 
nian-backed Shiite Muslim guerrillas 
launch artillery and rocket attacks 
ag 3 nn.gr civilians. 

Along with France, Syria and the 
United States, Israel and Lebanon are on 
the panel, and both apparently suc- 
ceeded in deflecting explicit criticism of 
their actions. The rules of the panel 
require that it operate by consensus, 
severely hindering its capacity to assess 
blame publicly. 

But after a heated four-day debate in 
the southern Lebanese town of Naqura, 
the group issued a statement during the 
weekend declaring it “incumbent” on 
both countries to prevent further attacks 
like those last week, when car bombings 
and shelling killed at least 10 civilians. 

Implicit criticism was directed at Leb- 
anon's reluctance to rein in the Iranian- 
supported Hezbollah and other Muslim 
militias and at Israel’s loose alliance 
with the Lebanese Christian militia that 
unleashed an artillery barrage last week 
that killed seven civilians in the pre- 
dominantly Muslim port city of Sidon. 

In the future, the report said, Lebanon 
and Israel must each “do its utmost” to 


prevent attacks against civilians. Leb- 
anese officials wanted to see Israel 
blamed explicitly for the attack on Sidon, 
which was carried out by the South Leb- 
anon Army, a militia supplied with arms 
by Israel that operates from the Maronite 
Christian enclave of Jezzin. 

Similarly. Israeli officials urged more 
direct criticism of Lebanon for allowing 
Hezbollah, or the Party of God, so free a 


hand after attacks that included a deadly 
car-bombing in Jezzin that provoked the 
artillery barrage and the launching of 
dozens of rockets into northern Israel in 
retaliation for the Sidon strike. 

The five-nation panel was set up last 
year to monitor adherence to agreements 
made in April 1996 in which all sides 
agreed to cease attacks aimed at ci- 
vilians. 


Japanese Leader Urges Israeli 
To Lift Closure on Pales tinians 


Agence France-Presse 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryu taro 
Hashimoto, in a meeting with the vis- 
iting Israeli leader, Benjamin Netan- 
yahu, called Monday for an end to the 
closure of Palestinian territories, im- 
posed by Israel after a major terrorist 
bombing four weeks ago, officials said. 

During the two hours of talks, Mr. 
Hashimoto made the point that the Pal- 
estinians would be able to take part 
calmly in die peace process once they 
had attained “economic self-reliance 
and stability,” die officials said. 

The Japanese leader urged Mr. Natan- 
yahu to lift the economic sanctions as 
soon as possible, saying they “invite 
antagonism against IsraeL” 

But the Japanese prime minister’s ap- 
peal was swiftly rebuffed by Mr. Net- 
anyahu, officials said. 

The Israeli leader was quoted as reply- 
ing that he wished to end the travel ban 


but that “we have no choice but keep it 
in force as long as terrorism exists.” ’ 

“Id this regard, we request Japan to 
cooperate with us,” be added. 

■ PLO Is Said to Bar Attacks 

A senior Palestinian official said 
Monday that the Palestine Liberation 
Organization had told militant groups 
they must suspend attacks on Israel. 

“We have asked the opposition 
groups to oppose peace deals only 
through democratic and peaceful means 
and not through military attacks,” an 
aide to Yasser Arafat, head of the Pal- 
estinian Authority, said after a unity 
meeting with Muslim militants in Ga- 
za. 

If attacks continue, the Palestinian 
Authority will crack down on those who 
txy to embarrass it by taking the law into 
their own hands, warned the aide, Tayeb 
Abdel Rahim. 


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PAGE 8 


Beratt> 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


fUBf JSHffi WITH THE NE* VUBK T1MRS AND ™* WASHINGTON KST 


No to Better Bombs 


The surest way to improve Amer- 
ica's nuclear security in the post-Gold 
War world is not by developing ever 
more effective unclear warheads. It is 
by pressing for deep cuts in Russia's 
poorly guarded nuclear arsenal and by 
haltin g the further spread of these 
weapons, especially to rogue states. Yet 
the Energy Department and America's 
miHaar weapons labs are now engaged 
in a nuclear-weapons upgrade program 
rhar will make both of these vita! arms 
control objectives harder to achieve. 

The problem comes from a misuse 
of the $4 billion-a-year stockpile stew- 
ardship program. President Bill Clin- 
ton approved the program to shore up 
Pen tag on and Energy Department sup- 
port for che nuclear test ban treaty he 
signed last year. 

The administration sold the program 
to the public as a way to guarantee the 
continued safety and reliability of 
America’s nuclear weapons stockpile 
through advanced computer simula- 
tions and other techniques, without the 
need for actual nuclear weapons tests. 
But its obvious appealto the military 
and weapons scientists is that it assures 
that the nuclear weapons labs will re- 
main open and their bomb designers 


So long as the stewardship program 
is confined to maintaining existing 
weapons, it does some good and little 
harm. But documents made public last 
week by the Natural Resources De- 
fense Council indicate that the Energy 
Department sees the program as a way 
to develop designs that add to the 


power and precision of existing 
weapons, or even to develop entirely 
new warheads. Mr- Clinton must re- 
direct the program back to its original, 
more modest goals. 

Using the stewardship program to 
upgrade weapons by computer sim- 
ulation would not violate the test ban 
treaty. The treaty simply bans all 
weapons tests involving nuclear chain- 
reaction explosions. Bui it would sig- 
nificantly reduce the chances of Rus- 
sia’s Parliament approving the major 
nuclear aims reduction treaty thai is 
now before it. That agreement, signed 
by Presidents Boris Yeltsin and 
George Bush in January 1993, would 
cut the number of permitted Russian 
warheads by half and completely elim- 
inate land-based multiple warhead 
missiles, the Cold War's most dan- 
gerous weapon. Russian nationalists 
can be counted on to resist any paring 
of Moscow’s nuclear arseaal if Wash- 
ington pushes ahead designing bigger 
and better bombs. 

The bomb-improvement program 
also reinforces the arguments made by 
countries, like India, which claim that 
nonnuclear nations should be obliged 
to restrain their ambitions only to the 
extent that the nuclear powers move to 
limit their own arsenals. 

Mr. Clinton must resist any impulse 
to please all sides in this argument, and 
come down firmly on the side of arms 
control agreements that America needs 
far more urgently than it needs im- 
proved nuclear bombs. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Unfree Hong Kong 


When China took control of Hong 
Kong from Britain on July 1 , new chief 
executive Tung Chee-hwa promised 
that the city-state would enjoy more 
democracy than ever. The election bill 
he has introduced to his Legislative 
Council puts the lie to that assurance. 

Under British rule, Hong Kong was 
never totally free. London appointed 
the governor and acceded late and re- 
luctantly to an elected council. But 
Chris Patten, Britain’s last Hong Kong 
governor, responded to pressure in re- 
cent years by greatly expanding elec- 
toral freedoms. If die coancil accepts 
Mr. Tung's recommendations, that 
process will be thrown into reverse. 

The new Beijing-installed adminis- 
tration proposes that only 20 of the 
council’s 60 members be popularly 
elected. Ten would be named by a 
Beijing-appointed electoral college. 
Another 30 would be picked by * ’func- 
tional constituencies, which Mr. Pat- 
ten had broadened to include 2.7 million 
voters — close to universal suffrage — 
but that now would shrink to 180.000 
corporate leaders and die like. 

And in case this elite rule were not 
enough to safeguard Beijing’s interests, 
even die system for electing the 20 
popular-vote seats would be changed, 
to limit the influence of the Democratic 
Party — Hong Kong’s top vote-getter 


under the previous, fairer system. 
Emily Lao, an elected legislator who 
lost her place when China disbanded 
the electee! council and named one in its 
stead, called the new system “fraud- 
ulent, undemocratic and bad.” 

A government official dismissed the 
democrats’ complaints as “petty- 
minded” and said the possibility of 
universal suffrage might be reviewed 
after the year 2007. Aside from the 
insult of a decade’s wait, though, who 
will do the reviewing? The legitimacy 
of that decision, and of every other 
piece of Hong Kong legislation, will he 
in question as long as the council itself 
is not democratically chosen. 

At Hong Kong’s transfer. Secretary 
of State Madeleine Albright and others 
said that the holding of free and fair 
elections would be a crucial test of Mr. 
Tung's — and China’s — intentions. 

If it is dear long before next May’s 
vote that the elections can be neither 
free nor fair, 'what will the Clinton 
administration say? The United States 
of course cannot tell Hong Kong or 
China what to do. But it can make 
clear, when Mr. Tung visits Wash- 
ington early next month and on every 
other conceivable occasion, that the 
West will not pretend that Hong Kong 
is a democracy if in fact it is not 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Gambling in Cyberspace 


Moving an old problem to a new 
setting can help clarify issues and 
sharpen debate. With any luck, the 
proposal by Senator Jon Kyi, Repub- 
lican of Arizona, to impose a federal 
ban on Internet gambling will do just 
that for issues raised by the explosive 
growth of legalized gambling that is 
not conducted in cyberspace. The bill, 
which will come before the Senate 
Judiciary Committee in September, 
seeks to extend bans on interstate 
gambling to block the use of the In- 
ternet for betting. 

On-line gambling, of course, wakes 
all the specters of addiction and cor- 
ruption mat lead people to oppose the 
enoy of gambling into their commu- 
nities. The ability to gamble in the 
privacy of one’s home at all hours of 
the day opens up previously unthink- 
able vistas for the squandering of 
money, while making it even more 
difficult than it is in other venues to 
regulate fly-by-night outfits. Most on- 
line gambling concerns so far require 
players to make a minimum deposit in 
an account opened for the purpose, and 
some players who thought they had 
“won” jackpots have reported con- 
siderable difficulty in getting paid. 

If gambling by Internet is allowed, 
communities will suffer significant 
loss of local autonomy. Unlike casinos 
or slot palaces, though, Internet 
gambling isn't likely to have much 


effect on the surrounding neighbor- 
hood. much as Internet-borne porno- 
graphy doesn’t create red-light dis- 
tricts. On-line gambling also sidesteps 
another big reason for opposing 
gambling: governments taking a hand 
in luring people into the games of 
chance — whether directly, via state 
lotteries that take money dispropor- 
tionately from the less wealthy, or in- 
directly, by agreeing to the blandish- 
ments of lobbyists who promise that 
the advent of gambling will bring quick 
money for everyone's favorite causes. 

Internet gambling, by contrast, might 
remain a private vice with no govern- 
ment money in it — if anything, it might 
suck money from the state-funded lot- 
teries. And that raises the question of 
how far Americans think government 
should go in regulating people’s con- 
duct in the privacy of their homes. 

On-line gambling is on the list of 
issues set to be examined by the pres- 
ident's commission on gambling. But 
that commission remains on a slow 
track, while the growth of the on-line 
gambling industry is. to say the least, 
brisk. An equally brisk debate on the 
Senate bill would be a good way to 
sort out what people .redly object to 
about gambling and what — short of 
a highly unlikely general prohibition 
— are the proper places to focus those 
objections. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


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0997. /inrmanoai/ Hrrafd Tribune. AH ngha rarrxtJ ISSN 02919052. 



TUESDAY, A UGUST 26, 1997 

EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Heading Toward Worker Backlash in America 

^ j ■ !h« hinh of 59 Deicent hit in 


E AST HAMPTON, New York — 
The just resolved United Parcel 
Service strike was a shot across the 
bow of the inflati on leas 1990s. Amer- 
ican workers are now beginning to 
challenge die very forces that have led 
to a spectacular resurgence in corporate 
profitability and competitiveness in 

the United States. 

They are saying “no” to years of 
corporate cost cutting that has been 
directed primarily at the labor force. 

The strike and the settlement, which 
was largely mi the union’s terms, ques- 
tion tire wisdom of a Fedoal Reserve 
that, by leaving monetary policy 
steady, seems content to ignore the 
danger of renewed inflation. And the 
settlement underscores the potential 
far a sharp decline in the ever frothy 
stock and bond markets. 

These concerns are certainly at odds 
with today’s conventional wisdom. 
Many believe that the American eco- 
nomy has entered a new era. 

According to this tale, the post-Cold 
War forces of globalization, deregu- 
lation and a technology-led Informa- 
tion Age have combined to produce a 
rare and powerful recovery, led by in- 
creased worker productivity. 

In such a scenario, wage increases 
are largely offset by increased worker 
productivity. As a result, costs are beld 
in check, inflation remains quiescent 
and corporate profit margins widen in- 
exorably. The finan cial markets enjoy 
the best of all worlds: low interest rates 
thatunderpina strong bond market, and 
healthy co r porate earnings that nourish 
an ever rising stock market 
The productivity-led recovery offers 
ample rewards for shareholders and 
•workers alike. Labor can reap higher 
wages as productivity increases, while 
investors can reap handsome returns. 

It is quite possible, however, that a 
very different scenario has been re- 
sponsible for die good news on in- 


By Stephen S. Roach 

flarinn and corporate profits in recent 
years. Call it a labor-crunch recovery 
— one that flourishes only because 
corporate America puts unrelenting 
pressure on its work force. 

That is a much tougher and more 
pessimistic vision of the U.S. economy 
in the 1990s. Pressured by intense glob- 
al competition and frustrated by efforts 
to boost productivity in information or 
service industries, businesses become 
fixated on slashing labor costs, which 
account for dose to 70 percent of all 
corporate expenses in America- 
Intimidated by die ultimate of 
job insecurity, labor initially complies 
with corporate America's demands. 

A labor-crunch recovery 
is a recipe for mounting 
tensions and a rout 
power struggle between 
capital and workers , 


Companies hire more temporary and 
part-time workers, and full-time work- 
ers are made to stretch their work 
schedules as never before. 

At the same time, employees begin 
to bear more of the cost of their ben- 
efits, including health insurance. And 
then there is me clincher: Wages, ad- 
justed for inflati on, are squeezed, lead- 
ing to a near stagnation that has per- 
sisted for more than two decades. 

Unlike the productivity-led recov- 
ery, the labor-crunch recovery is not 
sustainable. It is a recipe for mounting 
tensions, in which a raw power struggle 
occurs between capital and labor. In- 
vestors are initially rewarded beyond 


their wildest dreams, but those rewards 
could eventnally be wiped out by a 

worker backlash. 

Investors are quick to repudiate the 
case for worker backlash and defend 


the 


below the high of 59 percent hit i 
late 1980s. 

Which takes us back to the recently 
settled UPS strike. One strike hardly 
makes a trend, but there can be no 


the miracles of the productivity-led tg- mistaking the message ; from ■ 
covery. And why shouldn't they? The tion’s most significant work stoppage 
latter promises no end in sight to the since 1983. Today, with the 
glorious bufi markets of the 1990s. ployment rate at a 24-year low labor 
But there is one small problem with unions are emboldened 
this grand vision of the brave new world. And with corporate profitability at 

There is not a shred of credible evidence its highest in a generation, i^n^e- 
in the macro-economy that supports the ment has decided that n c^ affad to 

give workers a raise. For UPS, the cost 
of settlement Is hardly trivial. By some 
estimates, it will eventually cost as 
much as Si billion a year, and that 
comes right out of the company’s bot- 
tom line. - - 

In die end, that is what worker back- 
lash is aQ abouL It speaks of a labor 
force challenges the very notion of 
cost catting, which has been central to 
America’s economic recovery in the 
1990s. 

Whether future labor batdes are 
fought over wages, part-time work, 
mandatory overtime, temporary work- 
ers or pension and medical benefits, the 
message will be the same: Gone are the 
days of a docile American labor force 
that once acquiesced to slasb-and-bum 


notion of a meaningful improvement in 
America’ sproductivity . 

In Ae Commerce Department's just 
completed comprehensive revision of 
the national economic accounts, the 
poor productivity performance of the 
1990s was left essentially unaltered. It 
found that die United States experienced 

average annual gams of slightly less 

than 1 percent over the past six years, 
little different from the disappointing 
performance of die 1980s and less than 
half the gains of the 1950s and 1960s. 

It is at this point that productivity 
revivalists claim foul. They argue that 
the data must simply be wrong. Even 
Aian Greenspan, chairman of the Fed- 
eral Reserve, has embraced this point 
of view, and it seems to have had a 
major impact on the Fed's recent de- 
cisions to leave monetary policy un- 
changed. 

But (he weight of evidence is in- 
creasingly in favor of the labor-crunch 
scenario. And it is not just the official 
statistics on productivity that favor this 
argument. 

There has also been a dramatic re- 
alignment of die nation’s economic 
pie, with, a much larger slice going to 
capital and a smaller one going to labor. 
Corporate profits surged to 9.6 percent 
of gross domestic product in 1996, die 
highest share in 28 years, and labor 
compensation stood at 58 percent of 
gross domestic product in 1996, well 


corporate restructuring. 

The potential for worker backlash 
raises profound questions. Can higher 
inflation and thinner profit margins be 
for behind? Can die Federal Reserve 
afford to keep interest rates low? Will 
the financial markets continue to enjoy 
unbounded exuberance? 

As the pendulum of economic power 
begins to swing from capital back to 
labor, these are risks that we must now 
begin to confront 

The writer, chief economist and di- 
rector of global economics for Morgan 
Stanley Dean Witter, contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 



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The United States Can’t Afford to Keep Alienating Indonesia l 


W ASHINGTON — In- 
donesia’s recent decision 
to buy 12 Russian Sukhoi jet 
fighters and eight Mi- 17 mil- 
itary helicopters signals a major 
shift away from U.S. suppliers 
by Southeast Asia’s largest and 
most influential nation. 

This shift, reflecting growing 
Indonesian resentment at crit- 
icism in die U.S. Congress, 
threatens major damage to U.S. 
strategic interests in East Asia. 

In the late 1980s, the United 
States sold 28 F-16 fighter air- 
craft, manufactured by what is 
now Lockheed Martin Marietta, 
to Pakistan, which paid cash up 
front for the planes. But Pres- 
ident George Bush was preven- 
ted in 1990 from starting de- 
livery of the planes by the 
Pressler Amendment in the U.S. 
Senate, which blocked the sale 
on the grounds of Pakistan's 
possible development of a nu- 
clear weapons capability. 

Since that time the United 
States has held the planes and 
the money, and has added insult 
to injury by charging Pakistan 
an annual tee to maintain the F- 


By Edward Masters 


16s, which are sitting ou an air- 
field in Arizona. 

In the fall of 1995, the Clin- 
ton administration had the 
bright idea of selling the planes 
to third parties and passing the 
proceeds to Pakistan. President 
Bill Clinton asked Indonesia’s 
President Suharto if he was in- 
terested in adding to Indonesia's 
F-16 fleet, and eventual agree- 
ment was reached that Indone- 
sia would buy nine planes. 

“It seemed that everyone 
would come out a winner. 
Pakistan would get at least part 
of its money, Washington would 
get rid of the embarrassment of 
holding both the planes and the 
funds, and Indonesia would get 
a good airplane. But what 
seemed like a commonsense 
solution failed to take account of 
Congress, where immediate 
agitation began to prevent sale 
of the planes to Indonesia on 
human rights grounds. 

Faced with this opposition, 
the administration waffled, 
missing several target dates for 


submitting to Congress the re- 
quired notification of intent to 
export the planes. 

Congressional critics charged 
that Indonesia might use the 
planes against local dissidents. 
Others claimed that Indonesia 
was already squandering vast 
s ums on armaments. In actual 
fact, Indonesia has one of die 
world's lowest rates of per cap- 
ita expenditure on weapons. 

As gratuitous accusations 
mounted in Congress, Indonesia 
took the initiative. In a May 26 
letter reflecting more sorrow 
than anger, Mr. Suharto told Mr. 
Clinton that, in order to remove 
“a stumbling block” to “efforts 
to expand and enhance the re- 
lationship,” he was canceling 
the proposed purchase of F-16s. 

To further clear the decks, he 
terminated Indonesia’s partic- 
ipation in America’s Interna- 
tional Military Education and 
Training program, which was 
also under attack in Congress. 

I would venture to suggest 
that other former ambassadors 


This Year’s Prize Neanderthals 


B OSTON — Every year, 
I commemorate Aug. 26, 
the anniversary of the passage 
of women's suffrage in Amer- 
ica, by paying homage to my 
foremothers. I gather together 
a prestigious one-woman jury 
to dispense the Equal Riles 
Awards. This is a highly com- 
petitive set of honors awarded 
only to those who have done 
their best to do the very worst 
for women. 

This year the good news is 
dial scientists discovered that 
we are not direct genetic de- 
scendants of Neanderthals. 
The bad news is that so many 
Neanderthal act-alikes contin- 
ue to cavort in our midst But 
enough of this ranting. The 
envelopes please. 

First and foremost, our an- 
nual Battle of the Sexes Prize 
goes to the military itself. 
With so much friendly fins 
over sexual harassment, we 
had trouble picking one target 
even at the Aberdeen Proving 
Ground. So we hereby issue 
tattered ’60s T-shirts to the 
entire Pentagon: “Make Love 
Not War” — or at least learn 
the difference. 

As for peacetime conflicts, 
a Milwaukee jury of civilians 
wins this year's Double-Stan- 
dard Bearer Prize. These folks 
awarded Jeroki Mackenzie 
S26 million, after deciding 
that he was unjustly fired from 
Miller for repeating an off- 
color joke from “Seinfeld.” 
They made it official: A man 
falsely accused of harassment 
gets more than any woman 
actually harassed We send the 
jurors a George Costanza tape: 
“Yadda, yadda, yadda." 

While we are on the subject, 
our Blind Justice Award goes 
for the second time to Judge 
Thomas J. Bollinger of Mary- 
land. In 1993 he sympathized 
with a rapist This year he 
erased the criminal conviction 
of a wife-beater, saying the 
man was merely in “the 


By Ellen Goodman 


throes of domestic intranquil- 
lity.” Judge Bollinger has re- 
cused himself from further 
abuse cases, but we offer him 
a new bench. For retirement. 

We would also like to 
bench Wil Cordero. The Red 
Sox outfielder allegedly used 
his wife for batting practice. 
This entitles him to die very 
crowded bail of infame for 
Superstars in Sexism. 

But on to other playing 
fields. The prize for Cyber- 
misogyny (new technology, 
old ideology) goes to Marion 
Walton of Arkansas. He was 
so enraged after his wife 
stopped his cyberspace affair 
that he assaulted her. We offer 
Marion a new e-mail address: 
behindbars.edu. 

If this news makes you 
want to run away from it all, 
don’t do it in Reeboks. This 
misbegotten company wins 
our Fashion Ms-Statement 
Award for naming their new 
women’s running shoes “In- 
cubus.” It turns out that In- 
cubus is the name for an evil 
spirit that has sexual inter- 
course with women while they 
are sleeping. To Reebok we 
send condolences and a book 
of mythology. 

Speaking of myths, our an- 
nual Boys Will Be Boys Prize 
goes to those wonderful role 
models at Senate, die make rs 
of in-line skating gear. They 
put a slogan on their laundry 
tags that reads: “Destroy All 
Girls.” We ship them a full 
complement of snakes, snails, 
and puppy dog tails attached 
to pit bulls. 

As for the Domestic Back- 
lash Award, this elegant ar- 
chaic whip is usually given to 
a deserving man. Today ir 
goes to die two female authors 
of “The Rules,” that retro 
tract tm how to catch the man 
of your grandmother’s dreams 


by acting like your grand- 
mother. 

Is Linda Riss a Rules Girl? 
Let’s just say she is the winner 
of this year’s Stand by Your 
Man Prize. In 1959. Burton 
Pugach hired three thugs to 
blind her with lye. Fourteen 
years later when he got out of 
jail, she married him. This 
year she went to court to de- 
fend him against charges that 
he threatened his mistress. We 
would send her a doormat, but 
frankly that seems redundant 

The winner of our Knight in 
Shining Armor chalice is Marc 
Zigo, the married man who 
conned and brought down Air 
Force Pilot Kelly FI inn and 
then graciously said. “At no 
time was a gun to Lieutenant 
Flinn's bead.” We recom- 
mend a dishonorable dis- 
charge from female company. 

No ceremony would be 
complete without a Raging 
Hormonal Imbalance Prize. 
This one is being sent to the 
honchos at the Health Main- 
tenance Organization who 
dreamed up the cost-saving 
idea of “drive-thru mastec- 
tomies. ” We suggest drive -by 
customers. 

We were going to give the 
Dubious Equality Award to 
the female boxers joining Don 
King’s stable. But after care- 
ful consideration, we pick Ar- 
celi Keh. She won the right of 
60-something women to join 
60-something men in medi- 
care parenthood. We send her 
a biological clock. Broken. 

Finally the Ms-Adventures 
in Advertising Prize. What 
token of our esteem can wc 
offer those creative geniuses 
who gave us the pathbreaking 
image of Jenny McCarthy sit- 
ting on the toilet with undies 
around her ankles and Can- 
die’s on her feet? We are 
working on a needlepoint em- 
broidered with our heartfelt 
marketing advice: Flush it. 

The Button Globe 


to Indonesia would share my 
view that over die years this 
program has been successful 
and cost-effective. 

Cancellation of these two 
programs threatens 30 years of 
close security cooperation be- 
tween the world's third and 
fourth most populous nations. 
More important, it puts at risk 
several important U.S. strategic 
interests in the world's fastest 
growing economic region. 

China is already the dominant 
military force in Asia, and it is 
embarked on a major program 
of modernizing its forces. 
Richard Bernstein and Ross 
Munro in their book “The Com- 
ing Conflict with China” say 
China’s major goal is to “re- 
place the United States as the 
preeminent power in Asia.” 

Toward that end, Beijing 
seeks to reduce American in- 
fluence, among other means 
‘ ’by extending its power into the 
South China and East China 
Seas so that it controls the re- 
gions essentia] sea-lanes.” Chi- 
nese maps project China’s 
boundaries well into Southeast 
Asian waters and include islands 
claimed by five other states. 

Protecting the interests of 
America and its friends will re- 
quire at least two things — 
strengthening the U.S.-Japan- 
Korea fulcrum in Northeast 
Asia, and further building ties 
with the member states of the 
Association of South East Asian 
on China’s southern flank. 

Indonesia, which now con- 
trols many of the sea-lanes on 
which China has fixed its sights, 
has half the population and 
more than half the resources of 
ASEAN. It is by far the dom- 
inant influence in feat highly 
effective regional grouping. 

Jakarta also plays a key lead- 
ership role in the ASEAN Re- 
gional Forum, in which the nine 
ASEAN states are joined by the 
major Pacific powers to focus on 
security matters. It is perhaps not 
an accident that the next forum 
meeting this December will for 
the first time exclude die United 
States but include China. 

A second U.S. interest is also 
at stake. The decision by In- 
donesia to shift to Russia's Suk- 
hoi SU-30 jet fighter, a plane 


already purchased by India, and... 
the Mi 17-IV helicopter will be 
noted in other capitals. Other,? 
Asian nations, facing U.S crit- 
icism or under strong budgetary- 
pressures, are likely to follow *j 
Jakarta’s lead and take a hard 
look at Russia's bargain base-^ 
ment equipment J j 

Tbe quality may be inferior.,; 
to U.S. products, but there are,? 
no strings attached and no polit- 
ical embarrassments. n 

This would not only cost,- 
sales by U.S. firms but would /4 
complicate regional comple-g 
mentality in equipment and- 
overall security cooperation. . - 
The F-16s are probably a.i] 
dead issue. But Indonesia has 3 
not burned its bridges. The-; 
Suharto letter stresses the need,; 
for continued cooperation and /* 
further efforts to expand and en-. ( 
hance the bilateral relationship. ^ 
In 1965, Indonesia’s Presi- 
dent Sukarno told America to.;, 
"go to hell” with his aid. Pres-j 
ident Suharto has been much^ 
more polite, and the F-16s in- 3 
volve trade, not aid. But the// 
effect will be the same if Wash- 
ington fails to hear what its In-*- 
donesian friends are saying, -j 
Dialogue works with Indone-'b 
sia, including on issues of hu-^ 
man rights. I have seen this in .j 1 ■ 
my own extensive experience’^ 
with that country. Idle poseur-,;; 
ing and threats do noL , 

Indonesia has clearly left the 
door open. The question is r , 
whether Washington has the \ 
foresight to cool tire rhetoric and ,5 
work cooperatively on a bread - 
range of issues, including tau- ] 
man rights, for mutual benefit , L 
1 ■*» 

The writer, a former U.S. am- 
bassador to Indonesia who now 
heads the United States-ln- 
donesia Society, contributed 
this comment to the Intema-~ 
tional Herald Tribune. 




Letters intended for publi- 
cation should be addressed 
“ Letters to the Editor" and 
contain the writer's signature, 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be re- 
sponsible for the return of un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


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IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Uruguay Drama 

NEW YORK — During the na- 
tional fete at Montevideo, tbe 
capital of Uruguay, the Pres- 
ident of the Republic, Senor 
idiarre Bor da, was shot and 
killed by an assassin as he was 
leaving the church where he had 
been present at the celebration 
of a ‘ ‘Te Deum ’ ’ on occasion of 
the anniversary of Indepen- 
dence. Some unknown person 
used a pistol with fatal result. 


I 

agents who watched the “con- j 
vention” in the woods that plans 1 
were discussed for using the J 
coal and rail strikes for a general { 

uprising throughout the country 1 
and that methods for spreading J , i > 
Red propaganda in the Army ; 
and Navy were discussed. 1 

1947: Coup in Quito j 





QUITO, Ecuador — Dr. Velasco ■ 
Ibarra was misted in a bloodless ! 
“single-shot” revolution led by t 
inoo d j n. , Colonel Carlos Mancheno, who ! 

vfdZl Ued rropaganda assumed complete control of the • 
^ government in the name of the j 

country's aimed forces. An at- . 
tempt by Dr. Ibarra to remove J 
Colonel Mancheno as Defense i 
Minister apparently led to the j 
revolution, which caught most \ 
citizens by surorise. Dr. Ibarra j 
returned from Columbia, where 
he has been granted asylum, to 
Ecuador in 1944 to assume the ! 
rjaruirtw? ia iL - . j Presidency after the overthrow j 


NEW YORK — Following the 
arrest of seventeen radicals at 
their meeting in the- woods near 
Benton Harbor, Mich., Federal 
agents and State officials are 
searching for other leaders of 
the reds who made their escape 
then, including Rose Pastor 
Stokes, Boris Reinstein and 
Arnold Lokowsky, the latter 

two ’ * 

men 


4 





-a, MimuiTUlV 




PAGE 3 


im 


erk 


A State Law Makes Waves 
In Foreign Trade Policy 


INTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBU NE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 

" OPINION/LETTERS 


A New Cosmic Vision 


PAGE 9 


By Fred Hiatt 


» * - i fc i 


»U Indonesia 


AA7 ASHINGTON — Is the European 
. ; ▼▼.Union about to slap economic 

sanctions on the Commonwealth of 
■ ' :: Massachusetts? It may come to that in a 

- ‘ : :v C fl ““ helps explain the ambivalence 

./ ™ e Umted States about its place in a 

• r. ~ ; globalizing economy — an ambivalence 

• _■ ..';r that will come to the fore in Washington 

ne « moQ th, when President Bill Clinton 
j seeks expanded trade negotiating 

powers from Congress. 

’!;= This particular stoiy begins on the oth- 

/ ; CT side of this interconnected globe, in the 

beautiful but sad Asian land of Burma. 

pa The narco-Aug junta of military tallies 
V w ho misrule that natioa may qualify, 
against stiff competition, as the world's 
tnost odious regime. By the same tokeo, 

' die woman who should be Burma’s lead- 
er, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi — whose 
- . party won an election seven years ago but 

. never was permitted to take office and 
7 - i,; ' w ^° ^ under house arrest pretty 

. : much ever since — is unsurpassed in 

: - ■ : courage, dignity and determination. 

• J ‘ : - The contrast hasn’t gone unnoticed. A 

grassroots movement in Ae Umted 
' ~ : c States has persuaded a dozen cities, in- 
cluding San Francisco and New York. 
7;. and one state, Massachusetts, to adopt 
. -7. ... economic sanctions of Aeir own. 

_ . Modeled explicitly on laws designed 

-. to help Nelson Mandela and Ae Sou A 
African anti-apartheid movement, the 
' Massachusetts law bars any stale pro- 
curement from companies doing busi- 
Q ness A Burma. As in the SouA Africa 
7 . ' case, Ae law is having an effect; sup- 

• r ~ . ' porters claim that Apple Computer Inc., 

PepsiCo Inc., Eastman Kodak Co. and 
oAer major firms have pulled out of 

- •- • Burma raAer A an risk losses in Ae 

v" Umted States. 

But wait. While Massachusetts was 
debating Ae Burma bill, Ae United 
States in 1994 joined the World Trade 

Organization, a new Geneva-based body 

intended to promote fair, universal rules 
, of commerce. As part of Ae package. 

Congress signed on to an international 
J AltJlu code on government procurement. In so 
doing, Aey promised to award contracts 


based solely on merit, noton extraneous 
’ " ' _-- s - political or cultural factors. 

■ • Aha! said Ae European Union last 

- June (joined by Japan a month later): 
-r • Massachusetts's Burma law is in clear 
- violation. Following WTO procedure, 

, Ae Europeans requested “consulta- 
• . _■.• 7 Ji tions” and may now demand a three- 
• ■ — r- - judge panel to bear their case. If h wins, 
the WTO would demand a change in Ae 
'■ Massachusetts law or, as an alternative, 
— economic compensation. 

. .. Why would Ae Europeans hand 

. i' Burma’s Angs this kind of moral sup- 

■ l-.v port, especially when Ae European 
‘ . Parliament claims to back Burma’s 

rj. uaf’* demdfcrals? Many Europeans sore fed * 
-l-i-.rrwr.t and up^w i A what ftey see Arrferica’s 
■ : 7 <-i - job growing tabrtof seeimg' ; tb impose 
r-r.A h. its own foreign policy by punishing 
Europearrcotnpames that do business in 
Ti Iran, Libya, Cuba, Burma or elsewhere, 
'ti :-3. Because Aey couldn’t stop Congress 
fro® acting Ais way, Aey’re picking 
‘ . on Massachusetts, kicking Daw Aung 

■ ~ r ~ r San Suu Kyi along Ae way. 

’7 rs The U.S. administration says it will 
"" W:.:. defend Ae Massachusetts law. As he asks 

Congress for wider authority to shape 
.JT - j new trade agreements, Ae last thing Mr. 

r - Clinton wants is confirmation that Ae 
- v WTO impinges on local sovereignty. 

7 *“ ‘7:- But while they are defending Ae Mas- 

. __!? sachusetts law, administration officials 
"..7 • have not gone so far as to label it 
‘ ' defensible. In Ae long run, some will 

*L% admit privately, Aey don’t think it would 
be so bad if states and cities were nudged 


Ae sanctity of contract, Ae opportunity 
for anyone to compete based on 
hard work and quality, raiher than 
personal connection or corruption 
Trade talks Aese days focus less and less 
on tariffs and quotas and more on how 
societies organize themselves _ in 
environmental or copyright law, health 
and safety standards, local zoning and 
national cultural protection. 

WTO critics on both left and right see 
danger precisely in Aat drive toward 
uniformity. They don’t want to cede 
local control on such basic issues, es- 
pecially when Aey believe rhai Ae ben- 
efits flow mostly to large corporations. 

For Michael Shuman, a lawyer at Ae 
Institute for Policy Studies. Ae Mas- 
sachusetts law on Burma is a case in 
point. The 13. S. Constitution may assign 
foreign policy powers to Washington, 
but stares and local governments always 
have nibbled at the edges, he said. “A 
large number of voices on foreign policy 
helps democratize Ae process, ’ ’ he said, 
adding “creativity and diversity.” 

In truth, Ae WTO can’t force Mas- 
sachusetts to change its law, nor can it 
force Washington to make Massachu- 
setts back down, as a trade lawyer, Alan 
Wolff, pointed oul The WTO can only 
hold the United States to what it agreed 
to and extract a price if it falls short — 
exactly as Ae United States has de- 
manded of many oAer countries. 

But Ae U.S. trade representative, 
Charlene Barshefsky, trying to appease 
Ae Europeans, already has pressed other 
states not to follow Ae Massachusetts 
example. And some in Massachusetts 
are not pleased about the pressure. 

If Ae WTO had been around 10 years 
ago. argued a Burma activist. Simon 
Billenness, “Nelson Mandela might 
still be in jail today.” He said be ditto ’t 
think Ae Massachusetts legislature 
would back down. 

“Here in Boston,” Mr. Billenness 
said, “Aere’s a certain tradition of not 
letting European bureaucrats impinge 
on our decisions regarding taxes and 
spending.” 

The Washington Post. 


Is Opening Minds 

By Richard A. Shweder 


^ , TfE AMAXMG TKWG 
_ ABOUT ASA. THESE HUMAH 
SCIENCE FICTION MQVffi.5 IS 
THEY ACTUALLY B£f/EV£ WT 
HE UlMlJTfoTAKE OVER THOR 
-blamet. . 


C HTLMARK. Massachu- 
setts — Many Americans 
have apparently traded in Aeir 
old perceptions of Ae heavens 
for something new. 

Gone is the vision of Ae 
! starry sky as a canopy sep- 
arating us from paradise. Gone 

MEANWHILE 

is Ae counter- image of Ae aer- 
ial regions as a mindless matrix 
of dead elements, silent forces 
and imergalactic debris. 

According to a recent Harris 
poll, about 60 percent of 
Americans believe Aat there is 
some kind of sensible being 
out A ere in space, and Ae be- 
lief is more common among 
Ae more highly educated. 

The celestial bodies and 
spaces of our visible universe 
have always been a cosmic 
Rorschach test, inviting the 
human imagination to project 
meaning into outer space. 
And until recently, two master 
narratives have prevailed. 

One is the religious epic 
about sunlight as Ae shadow 
of God and starlight as Ae 
luminous power of heaven 
shining through holes in the 
firmament. The oAer is Ae 
equally momentous secular 
saga about space as an ocean of 
emptiness, an astrophysical 
and metaphysical void, offer- 
ing no hope of celestial gloiy. 

These days, many of us have 
lost confidence in — or have 
become bored wiA — both 
types of tales. 

Closer analysis suggests 
that educated opinion on Ae 
meaning of Ae blue yonder 
divides into three camps. 

There are Aose who hold 


Ae belief — perhaps fueled 
by episodes of “Star Trek" — 
that amidst all Aose "billions 
and billions of stars” is an 
extraterrestrial smarter than 
Einstein and more erudite 
than Aristotle. According to 
Ae Harris poll, Ais is a large 
and growing group. 

Then there are Aose who 
emphatically deny Ae exist- 
ence of extraterrestrials. As 
Aey see it, if you can’t find 
signs of intelligent life on 
earth, you’re not going to find 
Aera anywhere else. So they 
find it easy to dismiss Ae 
tales of Aose who claim to 
have been abducted by aliens, 
taken for a ride on an uniden- 
tified flying object and sent 
home with a videotape of elf- 
like creatures sipping tea by 
Ae control panel. 

Perhaps one reason people 
in this group are so skeptical 
is that when Aey were kids, 
"Invaders From Mars” and 
"War of Ae Worlds” gave 
them nightmares. They find 
comfort in the idea Aat there 
is no one out there beyond 
our cozy home planet 

Finally, there are those who 
believe Aat anything is 
possible, and so Aey are open 
to Ae idea of intelligent life 
in outer space. When the CIA 
recently disclosed that more 
Aan half of Ae alleged UFO 
sightings in the 1950s and 
1960s could be attributed 
to high-altitude spy planes, 
many people in this camp 
probably wondered whether 
a crafty UFO captain might 
have been shadowing Aose 
U-2s to avoid visual detection 
from Ae ground. 

The big question is why 



so many of America’s best 
and brightest have embraced 
Ae idea that intelligent extra- 
terrestrial life exists, or at 
least Aat it might. 

One explanation, favored 
by disenchanted political ana- 
lysts, is Aat Americans have 
become appropriately cynical, 
believing that if you can’t find 
signs of higher intelligence 
on earth, you might as well 
search somewhere else. 

A second explanation, 
favored by conservative critics 
of higher education, is Aat 
our venerable religious and 
scientific master narratives 
about Ae heavens have been 
deconstructed by skeptical 
and nihilistic champions of 
postmodernism. 

Many American college 


students do Aink Aat to be 
educated is to be open-minded, 
and Aat anything is possible. 
At least 60 percent of my most 
literate and sophisticated un- 
dergraduates believe Aat lev- 
itation cannot be ruled out. 

A few of Aem believe Aat 
magicians really do perform 
levitation and that Aey call it 
magic so as not to frighten Ae 
general population. So why not 
believe in extraterrestrials? 

A third explanation gives a 
more positive spin to Amer- 
icans’ open-mindedness about 
Ae heavens. According to this 
view, a long overdue spiritual 
revival is taking place to Ae 
United States in which Ae 
tired and tiresome opposition 
between faith and science is 
finally being laid to rest 


Those who see this as an 
uplifting development may 
also welcome Ae boom 
in books, movies and televi- 
sion shows Aat take us, as 
"Star Trek" would have it, 
"where no man has gone 
before” — beyond Ae legends 
of premodem Aeology and 
Ae disenchanting stories of 
modem science. 

At Ae moment all one can 
say wiA confidence is Aat in- 
terpretations of Ae cosmic ink 
blot are changing. And only 
God knows what it all means. 

The writer is a cultural an- 
thropologist and professor of 
human development at the 
University of Chicago. Re- 
contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


■V 2 

• 1 »■> - 


gain from an international code on pro- 
curement, suggesting that it is worth 
giving up something along Ae way. 

To the administration, in fact, and to 
defenders of Ae globalizing trade re- 
gime to general, Ae WTO not only can 
help U.S. multinationals sell more, but 
also can help spread Ae American way 
throughout the world: Ae rule of law. 


In Defense of Nigeria 

Regarding “Two-Faced Nigeria ” 
( Editorial . Aug. 7): 

It is interesting to read that General 
Sani Abac ha’s principled and faithful 
execution of the Political Transition 
Program is now being described as 
* ‘crushing democracy at home.” 

, .The ^ remains Aat General 

Abacha’s go verumeuthasbeen success- ■ 

tares and values and Jtas "begun the pro- 
cess of democratically electingNigena’s 
future leaders. This was demonstrated by 
Ae well organized municipal elections 
in March Aat were held throughout Ae 
36 states of die federation and in Ae 
capital, Abuja. On Oct. 1, 1998, Ae 
elected civ ilian president will be sworn 
in and the National Assembly wfll be 
inaugurated. General Abacha has not 
bean “manipulating electoral issues.” 

Moreover, Ae article's claim that 
Nigeria has political prisoners is base- 
less. The 20 Ogoni activists who are 
being held are implicated in the murder 
of four prominent Ogoni leaders and are 
currently awaiting trial. Due process 
of law was strictly followed in Ae 
Ogoni murder case, and Ae conviction 
and execution of Ken Saro-Wrwa and 
eight other activists was not “base- 
less.” A competent tribunal tried Aem 
and found Aem guilty of murder. 

Finally , Nigeria’s global and regional 
peacekeeping efforts are not a recent 
phenomenon. Since World War II, 
Nigerian troops have participated 
in United Nations missions in the 
Congo, Lebanon and former 
Yugoslavia. In western Africa, Nigeria 
is Aerefore continuing a policy of 

CROSSWORD 


making human and material sacrifices 
for global peace and security. 

E.F.I. ANIEGBUNA. 

Paris. 

The writer is attachi for information 
and culture at the Nigerian Embassy. 

Giving Wealth Undue Credit 

- .Regarding "Look, Wealth Is Bringing 
Liberty and- Equaling' {Opinion; Aug. 
2Tf by George F. Will* n *• 1 •--* • v 

It is amusing that Mr. Will credits 
wealA, all by itself, wiA increasing 
popular leisure in Ae United States. To 
reduce the working day was Ae demand 
of labor, not business. To guarantee old- 
age security was Ae achievement of Ae 
welfare state. It is always instructive 
to see rhapsodists of business wait 
decades to side wiA reforms that, at Ae 
time, Aeir beloved instiAtion opposed 
kicking and screaming. 

TODD GITLIN. 

Siena, Italy. 

The writer is a professor at New York 
University. 

Seeking Solutions for Africa 

Regarding “Africa: Can a Formula 
for Stability and Progress Be Found?" 
( Opinion . Aug. 23) by William Pfcff : 

Mr. Pfaffs quest for a “formula” 
assumes Aat there may be only one 
solution to Ae manifold problems of Ais 
heterogeneous and diversified continent 
Certainly time is not ripe foe a fed- 
eration. But what other options exist? 

Having worked for more Aan 30 years 
mostly for the development of Africa, I 


am dissatisfied wiA Ae lack of progress, 
especially in Ae light of the large pop- 
ulation growth. National governments, 
as well as foreign donors, have neglected 
Ae development of Ae rural areas, re- 
sulting in huge urban problems. 

The African people expect change, 
especially starting at Ae top. Why is Ae 
donor community not willing to insist 


on term limits for heads of state? How 
many African leaders have been ef- 
fective after eight or 10 years in office? 
But each country should decide for itself 
on the process of choosing anew leader 
and Aus entering Western-style demo- 
cracy. Development should follow. 

CHRISTIAN BONTE-FRIEDHE1M. 

The Hague. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer's sig- 
nature. name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are subject to 
editing. We cannot be responsible for 
the return of unsolicited manuscripts. 


Mondays 
Wed nesdays 
Fridays 
and Saturdays 


ACROSS 

^ 1 Dateless 
^ s Chitchat 
' •Chorusvoice 
i« Pasty 

is Prince Wi Siam's 

school 
is Cancel 


17 * me. 

aa Stop working 
*1 PuHacon 
22 Clear tables and 
such 

29 Where to nez is 
as Door opener 
27 Da fifm work 


PARIS PROMO 

Apartments to rent - 
Furnished or not 


Tet +33 (0)1 *5 63 25 60 
Fat: +33 (0}I 45 6 l JO 20 


JO PiBoW cover 
92 Coercion 
JS Bikini tops 
3a Provo neighbor 
49 Medicine for 
what aBs you 

at* mel* 

4« Lethargy 
45 Second of three 
virtues 

49 Where to see a 
hula 
47 Draw 
4 » Dick Francis 
book ‘Dead 
■ 

SI Make a mistake 
■2 Unopened 
94 Pom 
sa Nothing's 
attemuttve 
ae ■PhooeyP 
at Gets used (to) 

■s’ me?" 

ea Eskimo boat 
ee Christen 

70 Suffix with 

bfifidn 

M State* Pfcice 

72 Barks 

79 Pig food 


1 Practice w«h 
Rocky 

2 Saga 

3 Got down 

4 -Understand?" 
*TV 

mon8y^ser 

S Gobbled up 
7 Passing shots 
9 New York 
hoepswt 
•Disparage 
M Hard-working 
Insect 

11 Snooty one 


1 * 'Star Trek* 
character 

13 Au» maker 
Ransom E. 

it Very, in Valence 
it Currency, in 
Capetown 

as 'Planet of the 
Apes* planet 

as Range choice 
27 Gaping pit 
** Bo-peep's staff 
2 * Brownish gray 
ai French wine 

district 
33 Follow 

as Sound of the 
60*3 

35 Scrub 
37 Glaswegians, 

&g. 

as Is gloomy 
42 Former Austrian 
prince 

«3 Home 
wreckers 

« Affronted 
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product 

ssLiorrtOfored 

ssOompah 

instruments 
se Buzzing ' 

87 Champagne 
Tony erf go" 

aa “—Eyes 
(Eagles hit) 

80 Siamese, now 
■2 Stir up 

83 Prefix wtm 

Poto of trash 

84 Escalator part 



are 


INTERMARKET 


days. 


*7 Bit of electricity 


©New York Times/Ediled by Will Shorbt. 


Solution to Pnzde of Aug. 25 


□Hama anna aaaa 
□qsoe aaaa snjaa 
HaQEnmnatanaaaaa 
ESS SSHS SSESSS 

□aan asaa 
anasmasasss ana 
oasas saa astss 
asss sasaa aass 
ansa sas saass 
she anaasnaasas 

□qh □ QHaa 
osanaa □□□□ aaa 
ssanaaBQQnsaaaa 
sans ansn ansan 
hbbei aaaa saaaa 


Wherever you are in the world, there’s good business to be done at the IHT’s Intermarket 
Featuring two pages of classified advertising on each of the above days, the Intermarket 
is regularly visited by over half a million internationally minded people. Be there. 

A great deal happens at The Intermarket. 
Call +44 171 420 0348 


THE WORLD'S DAILY NF.WSPAPEH 







Small Rocks 
For Big Egos 

Classic Jeweler Creates 
‘Minimalist’ New Look 


By Diana Jean Schemo 

New York Times Service 


R IO DE JANEIRO — They may as well be in the attic, 
but here they axe relegated to the vaults downstairs, 
these jewels meant for pampered grandmotherly 
chests: chokers dripping with emeralds, diamonds 
cut like e xclamatio n marks around sapphires, rubies as big as 
badges set in gold pendants. 

At the world headquarters of H. Stem & Co., Roberto Stem, 
38. hopes his very different sense of style will rejuvenate the 
jewelry empire his father, Hans, started 52 years ago. Today, 
be says, customers want understatement, a subversive idea 
rumbling from the belly of plenty in the city of no shame. 

■ ‘We’re not trying to set trends,” he said. “We’re trying to 
. see them and follow them.” 

- in catering to a new generation’s fancies in mineral and 
metal, Stem, who took over as creative director in 1992, has 
called on experts from other fields for aesthetic direction. He 
has insisted on a new, minimalist creativity from his designers, 
who were accustomed to giving free ran to their visions 
.without worrying about materials or final price. 

“In the past, the daughters looked at the mothers to figure 
■out what they wanted to buy,” he said. “Now, mothers are 
.t aking their cues from their daughters.” 

Stem turned toward his 74-year-old father, the company 
president. “Do you agree with what I’m saying?” he asked 
.“Am 1 talking too much?” Hans Stem neither shook his head 
nor nodded. “You need to have your dreams,” he said. “The 
question is, do they sell?” 

While Stem pieces have traditionally derived their impact 
from die stones, especially Brazilian colored stones, the newer 
■ones aim to impress with their Brancusi-like sculptural forms. 

The Greta rings, for example, are matte gold bands with rope 
designs and a stone like a gametcH' tourmaline embedded in the 
center. The cut shows the secret charm of the semiprecious 
.stones, how they appear black or almost colorless at an angle 
and richly hued when viewed head on. In the simple, almost 
masculine Justine ring with a cabochon-cut amethyst, aqua- 
marine or topaz, a small diamond twinkles like a private star. 
“Fra- some people, jewelry is a matter of status or power," 



Mogul Art: Tribute in Textiles 


By Paula Deitz 



we’re seeing a lot of gold that’s matte finish, we’re seeing 
hidden diamonds. People want to have nice things, but they 
don’t want to be showy about iL” 

Many of the modem pieces cost from SI, 000 to $5,000, and 
with prices rivaling those of designer outfits, the company is 
hoping that women will come to see jewelry as an accessory 
that can be worn for several seasons. While the newer pieces 
are meant to be anti-elitist, in a sense they represent snob- 
bery 's more extreme form: the mark of a person so secure that 
she doesn’t need big rocks to show off. 


S 


ELLIN G this new philosophy is a delicate affair. 



: ideal-pitcft'to the Uninitiated: 
“You buy something that's more subtle, some people with 
taste will recognize it, and they will have a much better 
opinion of you. The ones who count will know. ’ ’ 

That is a hard message to get across in Brazil, a country 
known for style but not for understatement; witness Carnival 
and the scraps of string that pass for bathing suits. 

But Stem’s theory is that tastes, like everything else, are 
going global, and that what sells in Rome will sell at home. 

So far, gift-giving men have not caught on. Stern likes to tell 
the story about a man who came to the store with his wife. He 


lota Mater Jr. toTta New YwkTtaes 

Roberto and Hans Stern and their Stardust bracelet. 

would not buy the piece she loved, a modem choker with 
scratched gold disks, instead, he bought hex a diamond ring. 
“Later, she came back and bought the choker herself,” he 
said. '‘Both men and women are doing something emotional 
when they buy jewelry,” he added, “but men need to have a 
justification, to somehow make it into something rational” 

Simon Teakle, a senior vice president of Christie’s North 
America and head of its jewelry department in New York, says 
H. Stern has always been known for “very stylized jewelry” 
and “wonderful use of high-quality semiprecious stones.” 

“Have I seen them on the leading edge of design? Not 
really,” he said. "But with the name and the quality and 
marketing muscle with the stores they’ve got all around the 
world, they're well positioned to take advantage of any new 
design initiative.” 

Though H. Stern is a private company and precise sales 
figures are not available, Hans Stem admits that the last couple 
of years have been lean. 

He came to Rio in 1 939, his family among the last Jews able 
to flee Nazi Germany. As a young man, he worked as a typist 
in a gemstone company, gradually learning the business. 
When he struck out on his own, he said, he rode horseback into 
the state of Minas Gerais (which means General Mines), 
negotiating with the wildcat miners and gold panners called 
garimpeiros. He had $200 in his pocket. 

At the time. Stem suspected he could build an international 
market for jewelry featuring the stare's abundant aquamar- 
ines, amethysts, tourmalines, citrines and topaz. Brazilians 
would hardly touch them. ButH. Stem is now Brazil's largest 
jewelry company and has stores in 16 countries, including one 
on New York’s Fifth Avenue. 

“We’re not here to make art,” says Roberto Stem. “It has 
To go to market.” And piefces that don’t sell don’t stay. “It 
used to be, we’d make a mistake and find excuses to keep it 
sitting on the shelf for 50 years,” he said 

But how magnificent some of those mistakes were. A trip to 
the vault turned up an aquamarine choker with a 28-carat stone 
that was the blue of the Rio sky through sunglasses. The stone 
was about a half-inch { 1.25-centimeter) wide by almost an 
inch tall. Another choker, for $350,000, glittered with 21 
carats worth of emeralds and 65 carats worth of diamonds. 

Pieces like this still account for 90 percent of the inventory, 
and will continue to be produced. 


L ONDON — A brilliant coral- 
red campaign tent, pitched be- 
tween mws of cedars and 
against a mosaic of stone 
arches, fa as transformed the interior 
courtyard of the Victoria & Albert Mu- 
seum into a scene from a 16th-century 
Mogul miniature. 

If this view is startling under gray 
London skies, the 22 opulent tent panels 
inside create an even more luminous 
effect The embroidered designs, with 
hand-cut mirror-work set within ogee 
arches, are contemporary interpretations 
of historic tent hangings. These panels 
radiate with the efforts of more than 800 
women from nine countries, who tamed 
craft into art and rediscovered their cul- 
tural heritage. 

“Shamiana: The Mughal Tent,” an 
exhibition that runs through Sept 15, 
evolved from the ideas of Stur- 
een Akbar, who was the edu- 
cation officer for Sooth Asian 
arts at die museum until her 
death this spring. Akbar, who 
was bom in India and raised in 
what is now Bangladesh, was 
aware that immigrant women 
from conservative families of- 
ten live a sheltered existence. 

In 1991, she decided to invite 
South Asian women and girls 
Irving in London to visit the 
museum’s Nehru Gallery of 
Indian Art. She began by call- 
ing on neighborhood groups in 
East London and showing 
them^ slides of the Victoria & 

Albert collection. For many of 
tiie women, .the subsequent 
tour of the gallery — with talks 
in Bengali, Urdu, Hindi, Gu- 
jarati and Punjabi — was their 
first museum experience. 

Encouraged to sketch ob- 
jects in tiie collection, several 
of the women became inter- 
ested in the tent motifs de- 
picted in late 16th-century 
miniatures of the Mogul Em- 
peror Akbar and his court, as 
well as in the tent han gin gs 
from every period on display. 

Whether the emperor was 
hunting with cheetahs or be- 
sieging a fort, an Imperial red 
tent was always part of his 
encampment For the women, 
this image of nomadic life 
came to symbolize the tem- 
porary dwellings of refugee 
communities like their own. 

They were inspired to make 
tent panels that tell new, cul- 
turally diverse stories through " 
traditional needlework and 
innovative techniques. 

The surprise was that a 
project begun fra local wom- 
en spread by word of mouth to 
40 groups elsewhere in Bri- 
tain and in Bangladesh, 

Dubai, India. Ireland, Burma, 

Pakistan, South Africa and 
tiie United States. The result- 


ing 66 panels have been on view in 
rotation since late June. 

Regal reds dominate the panels, which 
are all mounted against a mottled indigo- 
blue fabric primed in gold. A double 
panel from a group of women in Somerset 
juxtaposes a typical scene from a Mogul 
miniature — a palace on a river with an 
elephant, trees and birds — with one 
showing an FngHsh manor house along a 
river. The tree of life at die center draws 
sustenance from both rivers. The caption 
for one panel stated: “As we grow 
stronger, die plants become more colorful 
and the blossoms show new life.” 

A panel from Surrey shows, however, 
that the women have not forsaken tra- 
ditional needlework stitches or themes. It 
depicts vignettes of village life in 
Bangladesh in yellow and green stitching 
against a vibrant zed background. From 


The panel from the Hopscotch Asian 
Women’s Center in Camden shows 
women in office jobs dressed in saris and 
in Western clothes, amid a peacock and a 
fine rendition of Big Ben. On another, 
entitled “Freedom of Life,” a woman 


of embroidery in typical abstract patterns, 
with an occasional horse or bird. 



plead for the right to choose a mate and 
the kind of maniage she wants. 

Hie sole panel from Long Island, no 
longer on display, was'a renckaing of 
Mogul architecture. Farzana Khan, -a - 
free-lance textile artist in Syos$et, New 
York, worked with four other -women at^ 
home to produce a panel showing 
stately entrance to a nobleman's house. It 
is based on a mini ature from the V&A. 

“We used several techniques- — in- - 
eluding appliqud, beads and mirrors — 
to make the fountains and gardens in (he 
background as gorgeous as they would 
have been in the Mogul period, ” she 
said. > 

A panel from Los Angeles, created by 
one woman working alone, 
depicts the Emperor Akbar in 
princely finery. Afrozaa 
Tamil, on art history graduate 
of Dhaka University, drew on ■ 
her talent as a copyist df 
Mogul miniatures and made 
the. portrait with cut-out and 
painted fabrics and glued on 
glass beads for jewels. 

All the scenes tend to relate 
to traditional themes and ar- m 
chitectural motifs, but the T 
• panels' underlying meanings 
surpassed Akbar’s expecta- 
tions. In the end, the project 
ided the cultural soil 
which true art springs. 3 


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KBAR did not live 
to -see the Mogul 
tent project in 
.place; she died of 
breast cancer in March at age 
52. Last summer she was 
made a member of the Order 
of the British Empire by 
Queen Elizabeth II at Buck- 
ingham Palace for her accom- 
plishments in the South Asian 
communities of London, i 

Deborah Swallow, the 
chief curator of the Indian and 
Southeast Asian collection at 
the Victoria & Albert, credits 
the program with c hang in g 
the lives of many women. . I- 
"We hear of women who 
have stepped out and gone 
into business and of young 
girls who grew up through tire 
project” she said. But sire 
noted with regret a few afihe 
girls have since been returned 
to ffieir rountnes'fdr ariangSl 
marriages. 

Nevertheless, in the< 
for oae panel, a woman' 
Gujarat India, wrote, “Todsfy 
the life of my family hangs by 
the thread I embroider.” . 


Japan 


Bar 




Tent panel from Madras with animals, abstract pattern. 


Making a Market for South African Crafts 


Paula Deitz. co-editor of 
the Hudson Review, wrote this 
for The New York Times, s 

■i 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


By Jura Koncius 

Washington Post Service 


’EW YORK — South Africa is showing its ' 


flag in new places. "South African must be 
>f tr 


N l_ 

the flavor of the mouth,” said a store buyer 
strolling beneath South African banners at 
the International Gift Fair here. 

He was right Nine manufacturers brought trunk 
loads of hand-beaded Zulu Christmas ornaments, in- 
tricately crafted wire art, recycled glassware and Nel- 
son Mandela coasters for the five-day twioe-yearly 
exposition. South Africa was the latest pavilion among 
□early 3,000 exhibitors, making its second appearance 
after a successful presence at the February snow. 

“When the new government came in in 1994, they 
wanted to re-approach the world market,” said Beth 
Phillips, a marketing consultant * ‘There has been a lot 
of surprise on the retailers' part They didn’t expect to 
find this many sophisticated products.” 

Sheila Shuman, owner of Furniture Out of Africa, a 


national chain of six stores, was one American retailer 
who placed an order. 

“There is a fascination here with Africa. The vari- 
ety is so diverse. People have been collecting West 
African art and sculpture for a long time. South Africa 
is now a new source of good things.” 

Sharman had stopped at the Utiungo booth, as had a 
buyer from New York's stylish emporium Henri 
BendeL They were attracted by the fine ceramics, 
delicate teacups and plates resembling flowers and 
vegetables, each hand-rolled and painted. Uthingo, 
which represents work by several contemporary ar- 
tisans, also showed candles decorated with hot-wax 
patterns, a craft practiced by several generations of 
women in the same South African family. 

“It’s nice to participate in the developing growth of 
these countries. For women to be able to use their 
handiwork is great,” Sharman said. 

Lynne Lange, a Sooth African who runs Uthingo, 
picked up some folk-art chickens created out of in- 
expensive colored plastic from a craftsman selling his 


wares by (he side of a road. “We’ve sold hundreds of 
them,” she said. 

Pieter Swart, marketing manager of Africa Trading, 
represents 800 artists. 95 percent of whom are women 
from rural areas. His line includes Zulu Fire Sauce, a 
hot condiment; tea tree oil soap; and flatware decorated 
with glass beads and animal print designs. “We try to 
keep some of the tradition, yet make products that are 
more contemporary and functional,” Swart said. 

Part of the purpose of die pavilion is to support rural 
development and small craft businesses, according to 
David Graham, an international trade and investment 
consultant who organized the effort. The pavilion is 
partially funded by the South African Department of 
Trade and Industry. 

“My view of Americans is that they like original 
and creative things and they are always looking for 
something new,” Graham said. “There is both an 
empathy and an interest in South Africa, but you still 
have to be original. The tilings are colorful, vibrant and 
dynamic. That’s wbai our country is. ” 


BOOKS 


FOOLS, MARTYRS- TRAITORS: 

The Story of Martyrdom in the Western World 

By Lacey Baldwin Smith. 429 pages. $30. Knopf. 
Reviewed by Theodore K. Rabb 

U NLESS we are their devoted followers, martyrs 
tend to make us uncomfortable. Are their sac- 
rifices worth the agonies they cause? Can we make 
sense of their indifference to suffering, both their own 
and that of their families? Should we admire their 
fierce resolve? Condemn their blinkered obstinacy? 
Treat them merely as fools or traitors? 

Even after 400 pages, Lacey Baldwin Smith is not 
sure. He makes it clear why he believes a broad and 
disparate range of those who died for their beliefs, 
from Socrates to Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, from the 
Maccabees to Dietrich Bonhoeffer, deserve to be seen 
as martyrs; but he also suggests that it is impossible to 
answer many of the troubling questions these difficult 
and determined people raise, both fra- their contem- 
poraries and for posterity. 

None of the many figures who populate his book 
wins Smith 's unquestioned admiration. He finds short- 
comings of character and achievement in all his sub- 
jects, starting with Socrates, whom he considers the 
inventor of the veiy concept of martyrdom, and ending 
with Kun Gerstein, the tortured model for the char- 
acter of the same name in Rolf Hochhuth’s “The 
Deputy." The reservations come easily with arrogant 
and destructive men like Thomas Becker and John 
Brown, but they also arise in the case of the saintly and 
gentle Thomas More, whose harshness toward others’ 
heresy and coldness at the last toward his own family 
Smith rightly emphasizes. That nearly all martyrs at 
some point questioned their own motives helps, of 
course, in establishing the ambiguity of their cause. 

Can one remove the taint of supreme egoism from 
the aura of selflessness the martyr seeks to project? It is 


a question that, in one form or another. Smith poses and 
leaves unanswered in every case. In some instances, 
such as the Maccabees or Jesus, the difficulties are 
compounded by fragmentary evidence; but even 
massive documentation — for example, on the Rosen- 
borgs — does not allow him to reach firm conclusions. 
The specific causes the martyrs advocate may vary 
widely. For Socrates, it was his own autonomy and 
concept of virtue; for Becket, the institution of the 
Church; for Charles I. the inviolability of monarchy; 
for Bonhoeffer, an ideal of both religious and national 
pride. But the underlying dilemma never changes. Is 
this self-promotion or is it suffering for truth? 

The problem is intensified by one particular factor 
that is essential to martyrdom: If martyrs are to serve 
their purposes, they require maximum publicity. With- 
out the attention he received, Gandhi would have 
fasted in vain. Without the high drama of the journey to 
Jerusalem, the public gauntlet thrown before authority 
and the climactic execution, the story of Jesus could 
not have been transformed into the story of Christ 
Letters, diaries and books have to cany the message — 
whether the biblical account for the Maccabees or 
Foxe’s "Book of Martyrs” for the victims of Bloody 
Mary's wrath, in the 20th century the media have 
.expanded: plays fra More and Gerstein, radio and 
newspapers for the Rosenbergs, and one might even 
add television for the followers of David Koresh. 

Whatever the mechanism, however, it has been 
crucial for the martyrs that their tales be told, and 
preferably oft told. For that reason, such qualities and 
skills as stoic self-discipline, a sense of timing, ef- 
fective image-making, and the ability to capture. and 
control center stage have been indispensable to the 
martyr. Public executions make their taskmuch easier 
— More's "I die the king’s good servant, but God's 
first” has resonated far more widely than the Dia- 
logue of Comfort that be wrote in the Tower. But even 
a death hidden from view, like Bonhoeffer’s, can 


inspire accounts, embellished by the words of the 
victim, that add tiie necessary final touch of idealism 
and virtue triumphing over cruelty and sin. To moke 
the case, however, is to glorify the central character, 
and thus the charge of ambition (or at least self- 
delusion) hovers above every one of the subjects of 
this book. 

There are a few judgments that fellow historians 
will challenge. While admitting that martyrs' deaths 
are usually not the reason their causes triumph. Smith 
makes an exception for Charles L whose admirable 
demeanor at his trial and scaffold, he believes, helped 
save England's monarchy. Given (be attempt to crown 
Cromwell, and, across the North Sea, the Dutch quest 
for a king even after a century of republican rule, it is 
hard to see any practical consequences of Charles's 
execution, except among romantic and diehard be- 
lievers in divine right. 

In addition. Henry VD1 is allowed more of a con- 
science than he probably had, and Smith's concen- 
tration on England from the Middle Ages to the 19th 
century keeps him from Continental martyrs who 
could have enriched his account: Jan Hus, Michael 
Servetus, W illiam the Silent, Giordano Bruno. 

S TILL, there are more than enough episodes, prob- 
ing analyses and insoluble perplexities in this book 
to raise the central issues that revolve around the fierce 
and awesome figure of the martyr. 

Anyone who would like to try to understand what 
justifies human beings in the possibly suicidal impulse 
that drives them to accept no compromise; to assert 
high moral principle in the face of accusations of 
idiocy, barbarism, ingratitude and mere treason; and 
finally to die for a cause; can begin at no better place 
than "Fools, Martyrs, Traitors.” 

Theodore K. Rabb, professor of history at Princeton 
University, wrote this for The Washington Post. 


T AL Shaked has won the 1 997 World 
Junior Championship. Moreover, 
he won the rank of grandmaster for his 
excellent performance. 

The 19- year-old sharpshooter of Tuc- 
son, Arizona, scored 914-3 in the title 
tournament for players under 20, held in 
Zagan, Poland, recently. That put him 
into a tie with Vigen Mintmian, an 
international master from Armenia, but 
Shaked earned the championship on 
tiebreak points. 

Shaked was typically impressive in 
his eighth-round defeat of the Hungari- 
an grandmaster Zoltan Gyimesi. Play- 
ing aggressively in the opening, am- 
bitiously in his exciting middle game 
attack and sharply in the ending, Shaked 
came through like a fully seasoned 
grandmaster. He will be formally ac- 
corded the title in September at the 
International Chess Federation Con- 
gress in Moldova. 

In the Rubinstein Variation of the 
Nimzo — Indian Defense, when Black 
retreats with 6...Ba5, in place of giving 
White the bishop pair with 6...Bc3 7 
Nc3. he is aiming for tricky complic- 
ations. 

He is ready for White to try to trap the 
bishop, after 7 Rbl. by 8 b4. And after 
7...Na6 9 Qa4 Bb7!, he defies White to 
thrust 10 b4?l, when 10...Bc6! 11 b5 
Be4 12 Rb2 cd 1 3 ed Nc7 gives Black 
the more efficient mobilization. 

Shaked ’s aggressive advance with 12 
d5!? could not be met by 12...ed because 
13 Nf5! leaves White facing simulta- 
neous threats such as 14 Ne7 and 14 
cd. 

After 14 Bd3, Gyimesi made a daring 
attempt to challenge the white center 
with I4...f5!?, but Shaked haughtily ig- 
nored the chance to win a pawn with 1 5 
ef and perhaps allow counterplay. In- 

OYINESU8LACK 


stead, he snatched the attack with 15 Oh 
Ol? f4 16 e5!?, the immediate point 
being that 16.. Jg? is crushed by 17 Bh7 
Kb8 28 fg. 

After 16...g6, Shaked broke up the 
enemy king’s cover with 17 Bg6! hg L8 

Qg6- 

He soon pressed the attack with 21 
Nce4l, threatening the conclusive 22 
Ng5. After 21...Qd$ 22 Qh6 Kg8 23 
Bf4, he already had three pawns’ com” 
pensation for his sacrificed bishop and 
nis attack included the threat of 24 
Bg5! 

Shaked's 26 Nef6 Nf6 27 Nf6 forced 
Gyimesi to give up a rook for a knight 
with 27...Rf6 28 ef, and to head for i 
losing endgame with 28...Qh7. 

Gyimesi chose defense by 29...ed 30 
bade 31 f7 Qf7 32 Be5 Qh7 33 Qh7 Kh7 
34 ab a5, so that he could put up a 
dynamic fight with his passed a, c and d 
pawns. 

But Shaked powerfully got a rook 
into action with 37 Rfel! Bc6 38 Re7; 
One point was to punish 38...Kg6 by 39 
Rd 1 a3 40 Rd6 Kf5 41 Rf6 Kg5 42 Rg7 
Kh5 43 g4 Kh4 44 Rh6 mate. The 
second point was that after 38...Kg8 39 
Rg7 Kfi? 40 Rh7, it would have been 
useless for Gyimesi to go into 40...Ra6 
41 b7J Bb7 42 Rd7 Bc6 43 Rc7 Ke8 44 
Rdl a3 45 Bb4! A 

Shaked single-minded! y went 
straight for the simplest victory with 47 
Ral! Nal 48 Bal, which established an 
unbreakable dark-square blockade of 
the black pawns. 

Meanwhile, the white pawns could 
stroll in to queen. 

i ^ e I-, 5 V?Jv lhere could have f o£ 

lowed 52... kh6 53 f5 Kh7 54 f6 Kg8 55 
g5 and Shaked would quickly make 4 
new queen. Gyimesi gave up. 


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N1MZO-IND1AN DEFENSE 



SHAKE QM/HITE 
Position after 46 . . . a 2 


WUte 

Black 

Shaked 

Gyimesi 

1 <H 

Nf6 

2 c4 

e6 

3 Nc3 

Bb4 

4 e3 

b« 

S N ge2 

c5 

6 a3 

BaS 

7 Rbl 

Na8 

8 Qa4 

Bb7 

9 Bd2 

Bcfl 

10 Qc2 

(H) 

41 Ng3 

42 US 

BW' 

43 e< 

Ne8 

14 Bd3 

£5 

15 0-0 

f4 

16 es 

gfl 

17 Bg6 

18 Qgfl 

19 Qh6 

kLb 

Kg8 

20 Qg6 

21 NCe4 

Kh8 

Qd8 

22 QM 

KgS 

23 BM 

24 b4 

ar 

75 Nh5 

Nc5 

2fi Neffi 

NW 


wane 

Shaked 

27 Ntt 

28 ef 

29 ab 

30 ba 

31 17 

32 Be5 

33 QH7 

34 ab 

35 Bd4 

36 Bc3 

37 Rfel 

38 Re7 

39 Rg7 

40 Rh7 

41 RhS 

42 RaS 

43 13 

44 Rel 

45 Kf2 
48 Ke3 

47 Rat 

48 Bal 

49 h4 

50 h5 

51 g4 

52 f4 


Black 
-Gyimesi ! 
RfG < 

Qh7 

ed - 

dc 

& ■; 

Kh7 

as 

Nb3 ' 

a4 ; 

Bcfi i 

Kg8 > 

K38 ; 

83 r 

KT7 j 

BaS 
Ke6 
KT7 

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Nal 

Ke6 4 

Bcfl 

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K«5 

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PAGES' 




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Vi 4:/ 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 


PAGE 11 


U.S. Drug-Services Giant Created 

Cardinal Health to Buy Bergen for $2.4 Billion in Stock Swap 


m i i 'a t > - - - i -4 -mm 


wHewwMv 



t. DUBLIN, Ohio — The health care- 
service provider Cardinal Health Inc. 
t ^Src-^ Monday to buy die medical sup- 
ply distributor Bergen Brunswig Crap. 
'" for $2.4 billion in stock in a deal that 
'• will create ope of the largest pharma- 

ri ■' ceu deal -services providers in the 
■r r United States. 

!• Robert Walter, Cardinal's ehairmap 
and chief executive, described the 
-companies as highly complementary, 
■saying each had a variety of operating 
: apd service strengths that would "con- 
r tribute to the combined entity." 

J The new company will be called Car- 
dinal Beraen Health Inc. and will be 
'-based in Dublin, Ohio. It was not im- 
■ mediately known whether any job 
losses would result from the acquisi- 
ftion. 

- "This merger will result in a com- 
~pany that is extremely well -positioned, 
iboth strategically and financially, to 
-meet the challenge of a rapidly changing 
Miealth-care environment,” said Donald 
• Roden, Bergen's president and chief 
executive officer. 

± - Under terms of the deal, which ha$ 


-fixed exchange ratio of 0.775 share of 
-Cardinal stock for each Bergen share 
-'they own, the companies said. 

■ Cardinal will issue about 40 million 
shares for the acquisition. Based on 
Friday’s closing price, they would be 


worth $2.4 billion. Cardinal will also 
assume about $386 million in long-term 
cfebL 

In March, Bergen Brunswig called 
on a planned $1.65 billion merger with 
the Miami-based Ivax Corp., a generic- 
drug maker. It never said why it backed 
out, though analysts had questioned the 
viability of the deal 

Bergen is a leading supplier of both 
pharmaceuticals and medical-surgical 
supplies. For the year ended June 30. 
Betgen reported sales of $1 1.3 billion 
and net income of $82.6 million, ex- 
cluding one-tune charges. 

Cardinal is one of the country's 
largest wholesalers of drugs, health and 
beauty products. It serves pharmacies, 
health-maintenance organizations "and 

S itals. It reported net profit of $22 1 
dd for the year ended June 30 on 
sales of $11 billion. 

Cardinal shares closed up $3.3 J 25 at 
$65,625 on Monday, while Bergen 
shares soared $12,125 to $42.0625. 

In the third year after the combin- 
ation, the companies predicted an an- 
nual pretax savings of about $100 mil- 
lion. 

Cardinal will take a one-time charge 
related to the acquisition in the quarter 
in which the deal closes, said Debra 
Hadley, a spokeswoman for Cardinal. 
She said it was too early to specify the 
amount. She said the companies had 
discussed the possibility of a transaction 
for several months. 


Robert Martini, Bergen's president, 
will be chairman of the new company, 
while Cardinal's chairman, Robert Wal- 
ter. will be chief executive. 

(AP. Reuters) 

■ Cambrex Buys BioWhittaker 

In other takeover news, the phar- 
maceuticals and chemicals maker. 
Cambrex Corp.. said Monday that it had 
agreed to buy BioWhittaker Inc. for 
$130.9 million, while Perk in-Elmer 
Corp. said it would buy PerSeptive 
Biosysiems Inc. for about $360 million 
in stock, news services reported. 

Cambrex’s cash tender offer for 
BioWhittaker valued the company at 
$ 1 1 .625 a share, a premium of $ 1 .3225 
over its Friday closing price. 

BioWhittaker, which supplies cell 
cultures and test equipment to biotech- 
nology and pharmaceutical companies, 
has been for sale since late May. 

Cambrex said it did not expect to 
make any changes in BioWhittaker’s 
work force or management. 

Nearly 20 percent of BioWhittaker is 
owned by the German dnigrnaker 
Boehringer Ingetheim GmbH, which 
agreed to the sale. 

Perkin-Elmer said it would buy Per- 
Septive Biosystems to expand its line of 
analytical instruments used to speed the 
development of new drugs. PerSeptive 
makes instrumentation systems for the 
purification and synthesis of bio- 
molecules. (AP. Bloomberg) 




mm?:; 



Tokyo Seeks 

a Talks Over 

U.S. Ruling 









Ain Young JwaVTbe AnocMal Pseu 

CALLS FOR SUPPORT — Workers marching Monday at a Seoul 
rally for the financial rescue or Kia Motors Corp. Meanwhile, the 
government unveiled an aid package for troubled banks. Page 15. 


r 

Japan Banks Luring Star Traders to Deal With ‘Big Bang 9 


v* Bridge News 

-- TOKYO — Japanese banks are using 
-high annual salaries to lure top-notch 
/traders and dealers, both Japanese and 
non-Japanese, to strengthen manage- 
ment before the major changes sera 
[arising from "Big Bang" financial de- 
regulation, market participants said. 

The deregulation will increase com- 
petition in financial markets and lower 
bank earnings, so the banks are making 
■efforts to strengtiien management in their 
dealing sections, they said. 

*. For example, according to these 
sources, a prominent foreign exchange 
dealer who was working for a European 
securities firm, has recently returned to 


the city bank be had been with. Some city 
banks are reviewing their salary systems 
because they have been unable to recruit 
specialists under present conditions. 

Additionally, another market partic- 
ipant said; "Paying higher annual sal- 
aries is partly aimed at preventing bank 
employees from quitting by giving them 
the impression banks might pay them 
higher salaries” in the future. 

According to another source, a major 
city bank is seeking people familiar with 
the securitization or bad loans and the 
creation of instruments known as asset- 
backed securities. 

Some batiks are also reviewing the 
state of their cross-shareholdings of 


stock, although they are currently unable 
to directly sell shares. 

"The Big Bang deregulations con- 
tinue to prompt Japanese banks to step 
up efforts to strengthen management,” 
said Tomomichi Tomiie, head of a new 
team at Anderson Consulting aimed at 
helping Japanese institutions deal with 
deregulation. "As for dealing and trad- 
ing businesses, the number of Japanese 
financial institutions that have been able 
to make money in overseas markets has 
been limited. Unless Japanese firms hire 
foreign dealers and traders who are fa- 
miliar with various financial products, 
they will find it difficult to make money 
through dealing.” 


The Anderson team will provide ad- 
vice to major financial institutions on 
how to keep up with the competition in 
the coming age of deregulation. The 
team is targeting major banks, securities 
and insurance firms. 

A senior official at a major city bank 
said: “Some banks have already in- 
troduced a U.S. -style, in dividual-per- 
formance- based annual salary system, 
but it remains quite questionable wheth- 
er the system will be adopted by most 
Japanese banks and whether the system 
wul contribute to preventing people 
from changing jobs. ' ’ 

Mr. Tomiie added: “Top Japanese 
banks are aiming at becoming universal 


banks, but Big Bang deregulations will 
not be a major concern for local 
banks.” 

A bill to amend foreign exchange and 
trade laws won parliamentary approval 
in mid-May, allowing individuals and 
companies other than banks to handle 
foreign currencies more freely. 

The measures, to take effect in April 
are intended to allow anyone to engage in 
the foreign exchange business and all but 
completely liberalizes foreign currency 
settlements in place of yen settlements. 

The new law will increase compe- 
tition in industry and lower Japanese 
banks' earnings through liberalization 
of commissions. 


Few Share Merrill Analyst’s Gloomy View on Technology Sector 


CempSfd by Oar Sictf From D is pacbn 

NEW YORK — The long-term out- 
‘iook for the semiconductor industry re- 
mains bullish, most analysts say, despite 
a Merrill Lynch & Co. forecast of a 
slowdown next year. 

" Mark Edelstone, a Morgan Stanley & 
Co. analyst, said Monday that he had 
placed outperform ratings on 10 semi- 
conductor companies, including Intel 
Carp., and remained bullish on the sec- 
- tor's growth prospects for the next sev- 
eral quarters, seeing a potential for ac- 
/j celeraled earnings. 

. • - •„ An S&P Equity Group analyst for the 
technology sector, Megan Grahffln- 
Hackett, said that, in general, nothing 


had changed in terms of industry fun- 
damentals for the fourth quarter or next 
year although there has been concern 
over the higher level of share prices. 

Recent profit-taking was “healthy,” 
she added. 

"I think most of the industry is seeing 
strong demand overall and while it has 
to be taken on a company-by-company 
basis, I think the trends remain positive, 
especially given a lot of new product 
due next year,” she said. 

Comments by Merrill Lynch’s 
Thomas Kurlak, in a research note made 
public last week, sparked sales in the 
technology "sector Friday, and dealers 
said that the sell-off was a key con- 


tributor to the slide in the Dow Jones 
industrial average that day. 

Intel fell Monday, but technology 
stocks were broadly higher. (Page 12) 

Investors are extremely sensitive to 
any pointers whether U.S. companies 
can sustain their earnings momentum, 
die analysts said. 

Mr. Kurlak downgraded his inter- 
mediate-term recommendation to neu- 
tral from accumulate for Intel and Texas 
Instruments Inc., cut earaings expec- 
tations on Intel and advised investors to 
take profits in the near term to get the 
advantage of current price levels, 
which, he said, had been buoyed by 
optimism for a strong fourth quarter. 


"Oar general strategy on semicon- 
ductor stocks has been to take a trading 
approach based on the cyclical nature of 


the industry and the waxing and waning 
of investor perceptions that the cycles 
generate,” he wrote. 

“Presently, the stocks are up sub- 
stantially, the recovery is in gear and 
perceptions are for more of the same in 
1998.” 

Referring to other analysts, though 
not by name, he continued: “We are less 
sanguine about 1998 and see the fourth 
quarter's seasonal strength as an op- 
portunity to reduce positions in inter- 
mediate-term accounts. 

"We believe that this recovery’s mo- 


mentum will stall” he concluded, “ag- 
gravated by chronic industry overs up- 
ply.” 

Mr. Kurlak also said that in the in- 
termediate term he saw vulnerability to 
the market's current earnings estimates 
and to the bullish "investor psychol- 
ogy” toward the group. 

Meanwhile, the disk drive market in 
Asia faces some uncertainty in the third 
quarter stemming from currency tur- 
moil in Asia, a senior executive at Seag- 
ate Technology Inc. said Monday. 

"It's slowed down some purchases,” 
because of the influence on purchasing 
power, said Joel Stead, a Seagate senior 
vice president. (AFX, Reuters) 


CbmpfMtr? Our Stiff From Oupurm 

TOKYO — Deputy Trade Minister 
Osamu Watanabe said Monday that 
Tokyo wanted io discuss with the U.S. 
government its ruling that Japanese 
companies had sold supercomputers at 
unfair prices in the United States. 

The Commerce Department said last 
week that after a year-long investiga- 
tion, it concluded that NEC Corp. and 
Fujitsu Ltd. had dumped supercom- 
puters on the U.S. market. NEC and 
Fujitsu were ordered ro pay tariffs of 
454 percent and 173 percent, respec- 
tively, as a result. 

Mr. Watanabe said that he hoped to 
hold talks * ‘as soon as possible' ’ but that 
there had been no response from Wash- 
ington. The Commerce Department on 
Thursday issued a final ruling in favor 
of Cray Research Inc.’s dumping 
charges against the 2 Japanese super- 
computer makers. 

NEC said in Tokyo that it intends to 
plans to appeal the ruling in U.S. 
courts. 

In May last year, NEC beat Cray, 
Fujitsu and other computer companies 
in bidding to provide supercomputers to 
the University Center for Atmospheric 
Research, an affiliate of the federally 
funded National Science Foundation. 
Cray complained that NEC had offered 
its supercomputers at below fair market 
value. 

Mr. Watanabe also said that some 
Japanese automakers had significantly 
reduced inventories. But most are mak- 
ing only slight efforts to cut inventories 
because they expect sales within Japp 
to improve soon, Mr. Watanabe said. 
New vehicle sales in Japan have fallen 
the past four straight months. 

Japan’s five biggest automakers said 
Monday that they had increased pro- 
duction in July despite the downturn in 
domestic sales in order to boost exports 
to North America and Europe. 

Separately, Toshiba Corp. has cut the 
forecast of its personal computers ship- 
ments from 4 million units to 3.7 million 
units in the year to March 1998 due to 
slower demand in the United States, a 
spokesman said Monday. 

“The downgrade is due to slowing 
growth of global PC demand,” he said, 
adding that sales in the United States in 
the year would be weaker than expec- 
ted. 

"PC sales in the United States in die 
year to March 1998 is expected ro be 
about 1.7 million units,” which is lower 
than its previous forecast of 2 million 
units, the spokesman said. 

NEC Corp., meanwhile, said it would 
increase production capacity of its note- 
book PCs to 1.8 million units a year 
from 1.2 milli on units. 

NEC said the upgrade was expected 
to be completed by the end of Septem- 
ber. 

“Actual output will be subject to 
market demand,” a company executive 
said. He declined to elaborate on capital 
spending needed for the planned up- 
grade. (Bridge News. Bloomberg. AFP ) 


Netscape Renews Its Assault on Home Market 


STOCKS 


* By Steve Lohr 

New York Times Service 

i NEW YORK — Remember the 
browser war? Well it’s back with a 
vengeance. And by officially reviving 
hostilities with Microsoft last week, 
Netscape Communications Cwp. has 
displayed a hard-won understanding of 
the principles of technology marketing 
in the Internet era. 

* Rule 1: Market share is a company s 
most valuable asset. 

•: Rule 2: You make money mostly 
from selling Internet products to compa- 
nies, bat yon make your name in the 

Consumer market. 

r Specifically, Netscape announced that 

it would return to its roots by once again 
marketing its Navigator browsing pro- 
gram as a stand-alone psoduci and begin a 


new assault on the home market 

The move is an abrupt change from 
last fall when Netscape executives de- 
clared the browser war with Microsoft a 
thing of the past The upstart company 
based in Mountain View, California, 
said it had matured. Instead, the com- 
pany explained it would focus on the 
lucrative corporate market and fold its 
browser into an industrial-strength 
product. Communicator, a bundle of e- 
mail and work-group software. 

At the time. Marc Andreessen, co- 
founder and senior vice president for 
technology at Netscape, said: “The big 
war in 1997 is going to be over group- 
ware and e-mail. We’re going to take 
those software markets and turn them 
upside down.” 

Yet, in the market for groupware — 
soft wa re that enables employees to work 


on documents together — Netscape is 
facing strong competition, led by the 
Lotus unit of IBM, and Microsoft 

And Netscape's decision last fall to 
bundle its browser into Communicator, 
which competes with the Lotus Notes 
offering, did not go down well with 
IBM, which made its point in late July 
by announcing that it would include 
Microsoft's Explorer browser with Lo- 
tus Notes. 

That was "a strategic move on Lo- 
tus’s part to put pressure on Netscape to 
unbundle Navigator,* * according to Clay 
Ryder, chief analyst of Zona Research. 

Netscape did precisely that last week, 
and friendly relations between IBM and 
. Netscape have been restored. Lotus 
Notes users will now be able to use the 
Navigator browser without Netscape's 
groupware baggage. 


BFs Grand Gesture Saves the Day 


By Mark Landler 

Ne w York Times Service 


N EW YORK — Sometimes 
the most tortuous negoti- 
ations can be teased along 
with a grand gesture by a 
single person. 

Sir lain Vallance, the chairman of 
British Telecommunications PLC, 
made such a gesture last week during a 
pivotal moment in the talks to salvage 
nis company’s takeover of MCI Com- 
munications Corp. 

MCI had agreed to accept a 22 per- 
cent reduction in the value of the deal. 
But the company's directors wanted a 
guarantee that the deal would finally 
close without any further snags, ac- 
cording to people with knowledge of 
the talks. 

Sir Iain’s bold stroke? If British 
Telecom’s shareholders did not ratify 
the $19 billion deal, he would resign, 
he vowed to MO directors in Wash- 
ington, speaking to them via a video 
hookup from London. 

People familiar with the meeting 
said his pledge gave MCI’s board the 
confidence to accept the revised deal. 
And it ended one of the more bizarre 
trans-Atlantic corporate dramas in re- 
cent history. 

"It was extremely difficult,” said 
Gerald Taylor, the chief executive of 
MO, referring to the three days of mara- 
thon talks tha t led to the new deal an- 
nounced Friday. "But when we looked 
at what MCI would be like by itself, it 
wasn’t as good as what we have now.” 

What MCI has now, though, is the 
subject of spirited debate among share- 
holders and analysts. Did the company 
preserve a powerful alliance that will 
set the agenda for the global com- 
munications industry of the future? Or 
did it simply patch up a relationship 
that is bound to slip back into chaos the 
next time MCI or British Telecom hits 
a rough spot? 

The contretemps between MCI and 


singiei 
Sir 1 
British 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


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British Telecom has deep implications 
for the rest of the telecommunications 
industry, which is rapidly consolid- 
ating into a handful of vast alliances. 

But even deals between next-door 
neighbors, like the recent combination 
of Bell Atlantic Corp. and Nynex 
Corp., are prone to internal strife and 
culture clashes. It was bad personal 
chemistry between top executives that 
helped derail tentative talks this sum- 
mer between AT&T Crap, and the Bell 
company, SBC Communications Inc. 

For British Telecom and MG, the 
pressure to smooth over their differ- 
ences is especially acute because the 
companies must still persuade their re- 
spective shareholders that the revised 
deal is wrath supporting. 

Investors for both companies ap- 
proved the original deal this year, al- 
though some MCI shareholders had 
filed suits, claiming the terms were 
insufficiently generous. 

MCI and British Telecom now both 
plan to resubmit the deal to shareholder 
votes by early December, with a goal of 
dosing the deal at the end of the year. 

Based on the value of the deal when 
it was announced last November, MCI 
shareholders will receive about $2.02 a 
share less for the company under the 
new terms. They will also be deprived 
of a one-time British Telecom dividend 
worth about $1.21 a share. Moreover, 
MCI shareholders will wind up with 
only 25 percent of the combined com- 
pany versus 34 percent under the old 
agreement 

The prolonged dispute over terras of 
the deal laid bare the stark differences 
between the two companies and two 
sets of shareholders. 

From British Telecom’s perspec- 
tive, the dispute was a cut-and-dned 
case of renegotiating an acquisition to 
account for the deterioration of MCl’s 
financial results. 

That deterioration had been made 
clear July 10, when MCI warned Wall 
Street that it was running up unex- 


pectedly large losses from its entry into 
the local telephone business. The com- 
pany said those losses could reach 
$800 million in 1997 alone. 

British Telecom responded by push- 
ing to reduce the price of die deal to 
mollify its institutional shareholders, 
who are used to the steady earnings of a 
regulated utility and who reacted to 
MCT’s alarming news with Jury. 

For its part, MCI could not under- 
stand what all the fuss was about. As 
(he nation's No. 2 player in the in- 
tensely competitive long-distance 
business, it was accustomed to making 
bold bets and weathering losses to 
break into new markets. 

And so, when Sir lain and other 
British Telecom executives investigat- 
ed MCl’s business and then demanded 
that the deal be revised, it plunged MCI 
into a searing internal debate, accord- 
ing to several executives with know- 
ledge of the company. After three de- 
cades of refusing to back down from 
monoliths like AT&T, some insiders 
resisted the idea of MCl’s capitulating 
to its monolithic partner. 

As for MCl’s actual business plan, 
several analysts said the company would 
have been severely handicapped by los- 
ing British Telecom's war chest just 
when it was mounting an assault on the 
local telephone monopoly in America. 

“This was a choice between eco- 
nomic reality and emotional indepen- 
dence," said Michael Price, a man- 
aging director at Lazard Freres & Co., 
who advised MCI on the original deal 
and its revision. 

After weighing these issues, MCI's 
chairman, Bert Roberts Jr., decided to 
make a deal with British Telecom. But 
in accepting a lower purchase price, he 
still had to persuade his colleagues and 
MCl’s directors, some of whom were 
fiercely opposed. 

The combined company, called Con- 
cert PLC, wQl have 43 million business 
and residential customers in 70 coun- 
tries producing revenue of $43 billion. 





PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 



Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


ksnernuioral Herald Trih 


Very briefly: 


• BankAmerica Corp. has received approval from the Na- 
tional Bank of Poland to establish a wholly owned sub- 
sidiary, Bank oF America (Polska) SA, in Warsaw, Poland. 
The subsidiary will be frilly licensed for foreign exchange 
activities. 

• Wausau Paper Mills Co. has signed a definitive agreement 
to acquire Mosinee Paper Corp. The combined companies 
will have more than $1 billion in annual sales. 

• Maytag Corp. said it was acquiring G.S. Blodgett Corp., a 
commercial cooking products manufacturer, for about $93.5 
million in cash. 

• Intel Corp. has launched its next-generation Pentium H 
chip set processor platform. 

• Argentina is resuming beef exports to the United States 
after nearly 70 years. The 700 pounds (315 kilograms) of 
tenderloins and striploins that arrive Tuesday will be used for 
promotional events at the Argentine Embassy; subsequent 
exports will be targeted at specialty US restaurants. 

Bridge News. AFX, Reuiens 


Weekend Box Office 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “GJL Jane” and “Money Talks” dom- 
inated the U.S. box office over the weekend, with a gross of 
S 1 1 . 1 million. Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on 
Friday's ticket sales and estimated sales fen- Saturday and 
Sunday. 


Mexico’s Gasoline Conundrum 

Pemex Stresses Production to Detriment of Refining 


Reuters 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico, one 
of the world's largest oil produ- 
cers, is oozing crude faster than it 
can sell it — leaving people here 
wondering why it needs to import 
growing amounts of gasoline. 

Imports of about 9 3,000 barrels 
a day of gasoline so for this year 
have cast a spotlight on the coun- 
try’s feeble refining capacity at a 
time when demand is reviving 
after years of economic crisis. 

While Mexico has historically 
imported gasoline, the latest levels 
are the highest in at least six years. 
Hie state oil and gas monopoly 
Pemex paid a $190 million import 
bill in the second quarto-, the com- 
pany's chief executive, Adrian La- 
jous, noted recently. 

And in car-mad Mexico, the 
ubiquitous green and white Pemex 
gas stations are by law the only 
place where Mexicans can fill their 

tanlrg 

So some Mexicans are puzzled 
why the oil giant — whose ex- 
propriation from foreign owners in 
1938 was one of the crowning mo- 
ments of Mexican nationalism — 


has free rein to shop abroad for 
what should be its most basic 
product. 

‘ ‘You would think that a big oil- 
producing company would be able 
to produce enough gasoline for its 
own needs,” said the Mexican 
newspaper columnist and oil spe- 
cialist David Shields. 

“It takes up a lot of dollar in- 
come that Mexico could be spend- 
ing on other things. 

The grumb ling among Mexic- 
ans draws attention to the sorry 
state of the country's six anti- 
quated, neglected refineries. 

Extensive improvements at the 
sites are needed to convert them to 
produce new formulas. Mexican- 
made gasolines, especially the 
soofl-to-be-outJawed formulas 
containing lead, are largely re- 
sponsible for the smog that hovers 
over Mexico's cities. 

Pemex ’s refining operations re- 


which creams off about 90 percent 
of Pemex ’s revenue in taxes for the 
national coffers. 

Conscious of the need to avoid 
letting the gasoline deficit soar, 
Pemex has undertaken projects to 
boost refining capacity. 

”A deficit of this size calls at- 
tention to the need to increase re- 
fining capacity, in particular, gas- 
oline production,” Mr. Lajous 
said recently. 

He said the pace of import 
growth would probably slow in the 
second half of the year to an av- 
erage 75,000 barrels a day. 

Oil analysts broadly support Pe- 
raex’s strategy, saying it is wiser to 
buy gasoline abroad now while 
building up production capacity. 

Pemex also clearly sees richer 
pickings in pumping crude than in 
producing more gasoline. 

“The ethos at Pemex is to find 
the most cost-efficient option,” 


fleet years of underinvestment as said George Grayson, professor at 


officials opted to sink money into 
more lucrative drilling projects. 

Money is often tight at the oil 
monopoly. Its budget is deter- 
mined by the federal government. 


the College of William and Mary 
in Williamsburg. Virginia. 

“Why spend massive money on 
re finin g when you can buy gas- 
oline from the U.S. coffers?" 


U.S. Stocks Tip Lower 
In Sumi Her Doldrums 


# 


Dollar Firms Despite Rate Fears 


CaaptM ty Our Pram Dapaxha 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against the Deutsche mark but lost 
some of its early gains in late trading 
Monday after a rise in prices in 
Germany fueled concern that the 
Bundesbank may raise lending rates 
to stave off inflation. 

The U.S. unit rose againsr the yen 
after low retail and supermarket 
sales in Japan showed consumer 
spending' was not picking up fast 
enough to warrant any increase soon 
in Japanese interest rates. 

“there's fear that inflation is 
kicking up in Germany,” said 
Thomas Lapins ki, chief currency 
trader at NfTB Bank. ‘'A lot of 
traders are a bit nervous (he Bundes- 
bank might raise rates.” 

At 4 P.M., the dollar was at 


1.8193 DM little changed from 
1.8189 DM on Friday. 

Earlier, it rose as high as 1.8265 
DM. 

The dollar was at 1 18.745 yen. up 
from 1 18.345. 

West German consumer prices 
rose 0.2 percent in the month ended 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

mid-August and 2 percent from a 
year earlier, more than expected by 
most analysts. The central bank 
could raise its securities repurchase 
rate, which it uses to determine oth- 
er interest rates. 

Bill Bertha, manager of foreign 
exchange at Mellon Bank in Pitts- 
burgh. said the dollar could decline 
as far as 1.78 DM by the end of the 


to 


week if the Bundesbank were 
tighten its rate policy. 

The mark was also supported by 
waning concern that Finance Min- 
ister Theo Waigel, a chief proponent 
of conservative fiscal policies, was 
on his way out of office. 

Mr. Waigel said last week that he 
might quit his post after elections in 
1988, but Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
helped allay such concern in a tele- 
vision interview in which he said 
“there will be no cabinet re- 
shuffle." 

The pound fell to $1.6065 from 
$1.6115. Against the French franc, 
the dollar inched up to 6. 1 295 francs 
from 6.1285. 

The dollar edged lower against 
the Swiss franc, to 1.4982 francs 
from 1.4985. (Bloomberg. AP) 


Compiled fn Our SvgF«*> Dapatthes 

NEW YORK — U.S. shares 
were slightly weaker Monday, but 
trading was light and, in contrast to 
recent sessions, without any clear 
direction. 

Philip Morris stood out as it pos- 
ted a gain after the U.S. tobacco 
industry settled a lawsuit with the 
state of Florida. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age fell 28.34 points to 7,859.57, 
while the technology-laden Nasdaq 
composite index finished 2.84 
points higher at 1,601.53. 

The markets have been partic- 
ularly volatile in the last few weeks 
amid concerns about weak corpo- 
rate profits and signs of inflationary 
pressure that may cause the Federal 
Reserve Board to raise interest rates 
in the autumn. 

After gaining more than 100 
points in each of the first three ses- 
sions last week, the Dow dropped 
127 points Thursday and plunged 
another 177 points Friday before 
surging back in the final minutes of 
trading, ending the day down just 6 
points. 

Traders noted that stocks con- 
tinued to benefit from some bar- 
gain-hunting after the market’s re- 
cent lows. 

“1 think the environment is still 
favorable,” said John Niedenber- 
ger, a money manager with Ad- 
vanced Investment Management in 
Pittsburgh. 

“Inflation is still low, and until 
that changes, even with these big 
swings, it's hard to see a major 
decline.” 

“Investors were impressed with 
the momentum on Friday,” said 
Peter DaPuzzo, president of Cantor, 
Fitzgerald & Co. 

Several companies agreed to be 
acquired at sizable premiums to 
their Friday closing prices. Bergen 
Brunswig jumped after Cardinal 
Health agreed to buy it and Mosinee 
Paper Corp. soared after Wausau 
Paper Mills Co. said it would ac- 
quire it 

SFX Broadcasting after Hicks, 
Muse. Tate & Furst agreed to buy 
the broadcaster. 

General Motors posted a strong 
gain after it was cited in published 
reports as one of the stock picks of 


Francis Cuizio, president of FXQ 
Investors Corp. 

Mr. Curzio was featured prom- 
inently as someone who predicted 
the 1987 collapse. . • 

Compaq Computer gained afte^ 
Toshiba said it expected to seU few- 
er computers in the year through 
March because of increasing com- 
petition in the U.S. market 
Woolworth was weaker after 
Bernard Sosnick, a retail analyst, 

U.S. STOCKS 

was quoted with a prediction that' 
the shares could fall sharply by 
end of the year. , ^ 

Volume was fairly light and, 
dealers noted that many investors; 
and traders were on vacation. “ 

“1 wouldn’t read too much into j 
the noise.” said Robot Fetch, a. 

Lord, Abbett & Co. money man-i 
ager. referring to recent volatility in’ 
the market. . / 

“There are not a lot of paracf 
ipants in the market. And with less _ 
liquidity — fewer buyers and* 
sellers — there’s often more voiat- j 
ility.” ■; 

Bonds fell for a fourth day as th£ 
Treasury prepared to sell $27 biJ- ri 
lion in debt and traders fretted that , 
reports this week on growth, con-^ 
s timer confidence and housing, 
would show the economy to be ro-j 
bust ^ - . . 

“The bond market is still GB f 
spooked by the fear of inflation/ - i 
said Alan Day, who helps manage,, 
funds at Stratevest Group. 

The benchmark 30-year Treas-. 
ury bond fell 8/32 to 96 7/3 2/ 
nudging the yield up to 6.67 percent r 
from 6.65 percent. " 

“If there's continued consumer 
demand and spending, it means the 
economy probably can’t slow by~ 
itself,” said Scott Graham, a trader 
at Prudential Securities, meaning? 
that this could prompt another rate£ 
rise by the Fed. 

"Short-term, I’m bearish oo» 
bonds,” he said. 

“We’ve got a debate going oh 
whether the economy is growing 
foster in the second half of the. 
year,” said Robert Alley, a func^ 
manager at AIM Advisors. n 
(Bloomberg. APT, 





rr. -v .. 


r-- • ; 


l.C.I.Jone 
1. Money Talks 

3. Air Force One 

4. Mimic 

5. Conspiracy Theory 

6. Cap Land 

7. Event Horizon 

B. Leave ttto Beaver 
9. George of ttre Jungle 
1 OJVienm Block 


(HoftHood Rowed 
(New Line Catena) 
(Colombia Floats) 
(Dimension FBms) 

( Warner BnaJ 
(Miramax) 
(Paramount) 
(Universal Pictures) 
(WON Disney) 
(Cahrmtao Pictures) 


SI 1.1 million 
SIM minon 
S&2mUSm 
S7JmSton 
S7JmiUJan 

57.1 million . 
S44miISan 
£L4 mutton 

53. 1 mflHon 
SSmflDon 


For investment information 

Read THE MONEY REPORT every Saturday in the IHT. 


•Sii 




UPS Presents Final Contract Offer to Pilots 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


Monday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The (op 300 most active shares, 
up to Hie dosing an Wal SfreeL 
The Associated Press 

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it 

ft 

















nt 




WkUAn 

WMET 

157 

IBS 

m 

17*. 

lift 

13ft 

tin 

-H 

WteenT 

W 

12 

lilt 

lire 



ilk 

lift 

lift 

i*. 



in 

lift* 

lire 



WEHJpe 

WBfeS 



nre 








xaua 

TSD 

Sft 

i* 

<* 



Indexes 
Dow Jones 

Oh* tok uv Ito CH 

InOUS 7BKL23 7944.17 783109 7859-57 -28J4 

Ten ISM-JO 3959.19 193030 TMDM UK 

UM 231.49 232. 70 730*9 231.79 +0.44 
Came 7440*5 2477.18 2448.18 345653 -141 

Standard & Poors 


Industrials 

Trnrtsp. 

U HRfles 
Finance 
SP 500 

spioq 


NYSE 

co*toouto 

meunrirt* 

Tnmsp. 

U«y 

Han 

Nasdaq 


insurance 

Finance 

Tramps 

AMEX 


T»*r 

lM One 44 a 

— 1006-94 108207 

— 667-21 67060 

— 198J2 

— 105.93 

— 92X54 

— B9&.91 


198.13 

10X44 

920.15 

892X3 


Most Actives 
NYSE 

Campon s 
PtilMort 
k nan 
Gen Decs 
Iomega 

GnMctr 
BeruBrs 

CaatHH t 
PetorCO 
FnrdM 
P"Wi 

Ceend 
MfcmT 
ATAT s 
IBM* 


nut 


vot 
118011 46* 
63412 *sn 
57923 I4»| 
43*6* 42V. 
42048 24ft. 
38511 46!) 
32424 43V, 
31444 44V. 
31441 374* 
29454 44U 
TTBxO 57V* 

27478 All* 
27024 471* 
24846 am 
24402 107 


+ ‘» 

->l 

*"» 

• IV* 


♦ire 

-ft 

•IV) 


-ire 


41144 


474-83 

683393 


47802 

60433 

442.15 

28547 

44ZJ9 


UH i&S 
!J32 BBS \%& 

2BH50 XXU7 2023.9* 
101340 100694 100941 


+I-W 


a* 

♦ 141 

♦gu 


Nasdaq 

irWs 

MCI 

Note* 

Cornier 

TefeCanA 

SMlMfes 

COcn 

MKROfl* 

DeOCtNS 

Centaur 

Oracle s 

3E? 

aSoSw 


VM. HUH 
163402 96V) 
ran sow 
•4*74 91* 
643S8 13* 
61071 IB* 
«!«! 57 
50931 78** 

sss '*? 

474*7 43 * 

46544 41V* 
4065 27* 
430M WV» 
42913 12* 
419*8 133* 


Low uki 
64>*. 47'* 

44 Vt 44* . 

14V* 14* 

6 * 64* 

23* 73*. 

44* 66'i 
40M» 42 *12V» 

41*4 65* *S*i 
34*. 3A*« 

42 4r. 44 V. 

55* 559ft 
59* • S9*‘ft 
45 4SU* 

39*v» 40* 

134* Wl 


93* 94V. 

JOV, 
** * 
17* 12** 
IT* 1 * 


84* MV, .1* 
aen ou ♦.* 
399* 39* -1<4 

2» 27* *10* 
52* D* A* 
17V. I7»* *11k 
99* 99* 


The Auticiaied Press 

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — Fresh 
from its settlement with the’ Teamsters, 
the United Parcel Service has offered 
hundreds of its union pilots a final con- 
tract offer, touting its pay raises and 
pension plan. 

The contract will be mailed to the 
pilots for a vote with the resnlts ex- 
pected in October. Bob Miller, president 
of the Independent Pilots' Association, 
offered no opinion on the proposaL 

The 2,000 pilots refused to cross picket 
lines during a nationwide 15-day Team- 
sters strike that ended last week against 
UPS, the nation's largest shipping com- 
pany. UPS presented die offer as contract 


talks with the pilots union resumed Sun- 
day after a ihree-momh JulL 
The contract would give . flight, cap-, 
tains a 32 percent pay raise during the 
next five years, from S 15 3. 000 a year to 
S202.000. Pay for co-pilots would rise 56 
rcenL from SS4,700 to $ 1 32,000. while 


an 


?> 

■A 

' 4 


. <2 

un-„ 


Si 


ight engineers would receive a 94 per- 
cent increase, from S48J92 to $94,000. 

The minimum peosion paid to pilots 
would be SI 00,000 per year after 25 
years of service. 

A LTS spokesman, Ken Shnpero. said. 
“While these figures seem huge to most 
working Americans, and far beyond the 
reach of 99 percent of us, it's the kind of 
compensation that is deserved by our 


pilots who've demonstrated 
matched proficiency and safely record. ^ 
.'.'Union pilots have flown under anqkr 
contract since December 1995. ' ^ 

If pilots vote against the new pros'- 
posal, contract discussions would begin" 
again. The pilots cannot legally strike 
unless the federal mediator. Maggie Jac- 
obsen, declared an impasse and a 30-day^ 
cooling-off period. 

Mr. Shapero praised Mr. Miller for" 
letting the pilots vote on the agreement 
without the IPA’s support. The Team- 
sters did not allow a similar move during 
its strike. The UPS chief executive, James 
Kelly, has acknowledged that the com- 
pany could not afford another strike. 


-r. ’ •* 

iSC'.’y - • 

e: A '- • • 

Lii:; • 

ctiv’i 

\3ix ::■■■■ 

M;i ■ 

lv ~ - 

ci !■"' •' ' "■ ' 

EKSfr. 

sell bs “ :* • 

•:•••• 

ikK“-:r.- 
bftVj ? 
Mis.". 

Mr 

5.AT-:. - ■ . 

r-\\: 

c;ftr 

l£- . 

-airr.cc. " • 


WORLD- Tu: r 

■ Monday, iuc Ci 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Amstsric- 

s-nir 

i£.- 


i— 


Aug. 25, 1997 

Hlyn Low- Lotpsl Oigc Op*t 


High Low LolKl Oige Optrrt 


Grains 


COCO* (MCSE] 


Food 


CORK (CSOTJ 


h*k law Umt C*. AMEX 


647*4 64M3 64685 433)2 


- Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bon* 
10 Public U1U 
10 Industrials 


1(086 
101 35 
106-46 


O* 

-QlOI 

-0.18 

40.15 


3PDR 

Hann 

j-tobra, 

IDA 

JTSConi 

»©■ 


V* Wit tarn laa» 
37129 rrw, 91?*b 92Tr 


ARC 

Te(nR 


19S35 7V» 
M1J 27* 
8348 7T. 

757B * 

5514 na 
54« 5) 

4814 33V. 

4495 6 I V» 
448) 33 


, 1 * 2 v« . 

37*i 27* 4*1 

7Vi 7*, - 

H *» 

21* 23* 4* 

» 5?. _ 

J 2 *i 32* « * 

6 * tV* **i 

30* 323'. tJ-V* 


-m» 

Sep 97 

271ft 

268ft 

271ft 

-ft 

36619 


Dee 97 

276ft 

Z72ft 

276ft 

-Ift 179.723 


Mores 

2B5ft 

281ft 

284ft 

-1ft 

-43.154 


May 98 

290 

286 

790 

•ft 

11,744 


luiea 

293 

288 ft 

292ft 

•ft 

1415* 

Q*- 

Sep •* 

275ft 

273 

273ft 

-ft 

1682 

Yd 

Dec 98 

271 

269ft 

270ft 

•Ift 

10344 


10 metric tons- s per Ion 




Sep 97 

7i« 

15*8 

1593 

*)l) 

7.105 

Dec 97 

1619 

1607 

1615 

♦ Id 

38.123 

Mores 

7648 

76T1 

7645 

*16 

26379 

May 98 

1668 

1651 

166S 

*17 

11371 

Jut 98 

1683 

1673 

1682 

*1* 

2,738 

Sop 98 

7701 

1688 

1701 

*18 

4JM6 


Trading Activity 

NYSE 

Arana 

Dnqtota 

V33SS 

jatas 1 


3 AMEX 

AOnmed 

DlCtH 

ssts? 


Nasdaq 


1407 

1235 

555 

3397 

121 

11 

,997 

low 

3277 

57 

77 

SSS5? 

VSM 

jtceH&a 
«i» Leers 


Non 

1947 

1407 

2043 

5197 

727 

Si 

Pm 

1«64 

2448 

161* 

5751 

70S 

*4 

OM# 

Pie*. 

Market Sales 




311 

252 

179 

--is 

11 

193 

3*6 

16S 

724 

-» 

9 

NYSE 

Ante* 

Nasdaq 

Tofoy 

4-dO 

39XU 

70.14 

S28J0 


stfna 
31 JS 
628.78 


EsL sales 57.000 ftrt Krtes 71660 
Flft Dpofi Ini 30083(1 up 7483 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT3 
100 Ions- dcUan pa ton 

Od 97 21500 211J0 714.40 4l.n0 lfc877 

Dec 97 204 30 201.00 203 80 4 1.60 43*450 

Jan 96 2WJW 19760 T99J0 tlJO 7^95 

Mar 98 195.00 J93 l00 1*470 4070 9J77 

May 98 19130 19100 193J0 40.30 4611 

Jul 98 1 9430 moo 194JD uncA. 1*84 

ESI. talas 22M0 Frts tales U.130 
Fricaponml 1.092128 up 902172 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

MV 000 8k- coils per lb 
Sep 97 2285 2267 2277 

00 97 n.00 2185 3293 

Dec 97 Z3J2 23.16 23.32 
Jon 99 2367 73J8 2362 

Mar 98 7380 23.60 2280 

May 98 23.95 21 75 2195 


T.70 

125 


►215 


1&100 

143)8 


■ 0.20 
■0 23 
•0.14 40025 
-0.14 8690 

■217 4169 

■0.10 2276 


6*1. tales I Fffs tales 9230 
Ftfs open W100.161 o« 879 

COFFEE C CNCSEJ 
37 J00 lbs.- cem per 8x 
Sep«7 17480 17165 1 73.03 
Dec 97 163.00 15860 1a0.70 
Mar 98 14860 14660 1ft*. 15 4)90 
May 98 14290 14)80 147.90 42W 
JM98 137.90 137 90 537.90 
Es>. sales N. A Frt s soles 0897 
F»ts apon Ini 17.705. oH 276 


SUCARWORU) 11 (NCSE) 

11 2800 n»s • cants par Bi 
Oct 97 1181 1162 1166 

Mar 98 120* 11.91 11.93 

May 98 17.02 11.90 11.91 

Jul9S ll»2 H.79 JI.79 

Es». toms NA Fte sales 10740 
Ffsopon ml 201.759. up 972 


1898 

9.934 

1970 

1894 

990 


■0.13 90413 
■007 68613 
8.09 UwOi 
-008 ia(7? 


Dividends 

Company Par And Roc Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Evergreen Am _ 83 8-22 8-26 


Compmiy 

Commodore SepTe 
Merrill Corp n # 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

- 25 9-15 9- JO 

87 9-30 10-15 


Evergreen Bal 
Ever g reen TsStmt 
Maso Offshore Tr 
Mesa Roy Tr 6156 


- ASS 8-22 8-26 

- .10 8-22 8-76 

_ 8080 B-29 >0-31 

8-39 10-3J 


REGULAR 


STOCK SPLIT 
ABance Beplnc 3 for 2 sptiL 
CHS Electronics 3 for 2 so Pt 
Fort Bend H kto 2 fart spOL 
Harris Corp 2(or I split 
Lennar Carp 1 sham of LNR Property Cp tor 
eoehshare nekL 
Merrill Carp 2 tar 1 spBt. 

PepsiCo Inc one share of Tricon GtobalRes- 
to Brunt Inc tor each share held. 

Robert Haff/nff 3 for 2 split 
Omrom Him Grp 3for 2 split. 


■* ThloliolCotp 


INCREASED 

o JO 8-29 
INITIAL 


ABance Bncpn 
Harris Corp n 


it 


9-15 

9-4 


9-12 


9-30 

9-12 


BancFirstOMo 
Cente Construct 
Chem First Inc 
Clnn Fncl 
DeltB NaturiGos 
Omoninc 
FaSwook NaBBIc 
Fanner Bros 
Florida Progress 
Grey Advertising 
inftnaie Brands 
Irrva core Corp 
KJefmrrt BenAw 
Lone Star Ind 
NatlGas«» 
Schott Hornet p 
Somerset Group 
Thomas Nelson 


M 

.05 

.10 

.41 

285 

.15 


.05 9-12 
6010-17 
625 9-5 


9-9 9-23 
TO -2 10 - 1 * 
9-8 9-23 
9-12 10-15 
9-2 9-15 
9-6 9-13 


EsJ soles 16,000 Fits sate 27.645 
Fits open bd 189.985. up 97880 

.SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

5.BW bu mMmum- cents pet bushel 
Sep 97 663* <65* 663* -I* 11946 

No* 97 470 613 619* -7 82878 

Jan 98 622 616* 621 -I* 17696 

Mar 98 630 634 -3* 7.255 

May »8 «3b 632 63SV -5* 5.871 

EsI. sales 35.0OQ Fffs ulos 76H10 
Frhs open W1I34 199. up US5 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

6000 bu minimum- cents per bushel 

Sep 97 3A8-S 361 MS V, -3* 14320 

Dec 97 382* 3751s 380u -3* 59.635 

Mar 98 »3 387* 392 -4V, 17.118 

May 98 395 390 395 -3 1091 

EsI. 18000 Fits sate 234113 

Frft apon IM 105,476. ad 365 


ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) 
ISAM lbs • ceres per lb. 

Sep 97 6840 67 JO 67 JO 

Nov 97 70.00 *9.15 69 70 

Jon 98 73 JW 7220 72.60 

Mar 98 75.90 75.10 7545 

EsI. soles N A Fits sate 8000 
F«-. open Ini I. oil 34.962 


-OJO 

*005 

-0.15 

0.30 


9,373 

11276 

9.368 

*04S 


140 

-1.70 


Metals 

COLO 1NCMX3 
100 irov or.- dollars per Iroy at 
Aug 97 325 00 324J0 324.60 
Sep 97 325 la 37350 32810 

Oct 97 32700 32830 32610 

Ore 97 32880 327.00 37800 
Feb 98 mOO 379 JO 3?9.70 
A0r98 331.90 

Jun98 33180 

AW)98 23400 

0-398 33830 

Esi. sales NA. Frfs sate 47^8* 
Fris open ml JD2,dS4 up A2I5 


148 

2 

164177 
1 70 11**32 
1 70 1A97I 


-1.70 

1.80 

1.80 


SJ93 

7A9J 

1121 

111 


O 2)125 
M MS 
Q SB 
O .06 

a jos 
s 
a 


10-1 
11-3 
9-20 
9-9 9-16 

9- 5 9.16 

10- 1 10-15 

9-3 ?} 5 
9-1 9-1S 

9-15 929 
9-5 9-23 
M 8-29 9-is 
JOt 11-3 11-17 


-030 48537 
42)5 21645 
,0.02 11.661 
4105 5J37 

-007 1701 

-0.07 567 


0-anaeali b-appromnole omaont per 
ilrartfADR; g^ayabto in Conafian funtt; 
m-maalhly; q-quarterty; s-seari-encutri 


Stock TaUes Explained 

Solos Ggwes me unoflldaL Yeaty Wghs om laws reflect Ihe previous 52 weeks plus Ihe cunert 
wedcbutikJBiektestlindtoBday.WheieBspBarslodnl h iitoiid om ounOngtoapenmloriuMe 

has beeitpoidflwyeoBhi^HcMrinnpeafxjffwdend ore shnrtifcttte new siodvs only. Kites 

otherte nrtal rales of UMcfends ore annual (SsOwwmenb based on Die totei tfeimtion. 

0 - SvWend also extra (s). b - annual rote at cGvWtsrt plus stack dividend, c - liquutaiing 
dhrfdend. cc - PE exceeds 99xld - called, d - new yearly tow. dd - loss in Ihe tasll 2 nwnths. 
e - divide nd deawed at paid to preceoinp 12 moult k. f - annual rate, increased on Iasi 
dedaiatloa 9 - dividend In Cano (Don funds, subject to 1 5% non-residence (at I - dividend 
doctore d after spot-up or stock dmdei*d.i- dividend pd to ttlis year, ornimsL deferred, or no 
action taken at latest cSvWend meeting, k - dividend declared Or pad this year, an 
accumulative Issue wflti dividends to arrears, m -antrum nOe, reduced on Srsl dectorafioa 
n - new issue in the post 52 weeks. The high-tow range begins with the start of trading, 
nd - next day deRvery. p- Initial dMdenl annual rate unknown. P/E - pnee-eamings rain. 
q>dQsad-endmutualfund.r.dividendaedaiedorpaldin preceding 12 man ms. plus stock 
dividend, s - stack split. Dividend begins wtfli dole of spot. sJs - soles, t - Svtdwd poid to 
stock in (meeting 12 months estimated cash value on e* -dividend or c*-tistri button aotc. 
u- new yearly Wqt1.11 - hating halted. *1 • in bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized 
underthe Bankruptcy Act, or seal rifles assumed by such aim pa trios, wd - when distributed, 
uri - when issued/ ww - with warrants, x - oc-dividend or w-Ugws. xtfcJ - pr^flsirtouiion. 
xw • wtttwut warrants, y- a-dhldend and soles in lulL yld - yield, i - sales in tuB. 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

40,000 lbs.- cents per 8>. 

OC197 6890 6855 6872 

D« 9 7 7060 70.15 7032 

Feb 98 7285 72J2 77J7 

Apr 98 7467 74^5 74.47 

Jtm98 71 JO 71-25 71 j? 

Aug 98 71 JO 7085 70J5 

EU sales 827? Frfs sate I torn 
Fte open Ini 916*4, up 996 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

50000 8rv- rents per lb. 

Aug 97 80.90 »J5 808? AO? IS4 
Vp 97 80.90 80 JO SO 45 *012 1730 

0097 8040 79 A5 90.17 *037 6.706 

No* 97 81^5 8090 BIO) ,037 4J22 

JB19B (1.90 glJS 81.70 , 0.45 2.215 

Mm 98 8160 S1.J0 B 1.-10 -0 35 1,177 

Eil odm 2J45 Fits solos 3.919 
Fri) open Ini 21.711 oft 138 

HOGS Leas (CMER) 
joooo lbs.- cents per to. 

Od 97 71 35 70.75 7092 -OI0 18262 

Dec 97 68 05 67 45 67 77 - 0 07 8518 

Fob 98 67 10 46J0 6690 -0.02 2.933 

Apr 98 bill 62J0 42.82 * 0.12 1^04 

Jun98 6745 47.25 67.57 *037 565 

EsI stoes 1800 Fits sales 4.979 
Fit s open Ini 31. 1 71 up 632 

FORK BEUIES (CMER) 

Aouo ms. -rents per lb 

Aun 97 8847 B6JQ 8882 *2.45 410 

Feb 98 77.35 71J» 71.05 -0-52 1670 

Mor« 72J0 71.10 71.10 4)35 335 

Es) ■atm 1,145 fits ante 1.354 
Fits open Ini 4464 vp 132 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 
24000 lbs - cents per 8> 

Aug 97 10040 99 JO 99 4S 
S«p 97 10060 9930 99efl 

OCI97 10060 99 70 99 70 

Nov 97 loom 09 10 v9 10 
Ore 97 100.40 98.70 9890 

Jbn98 *900 

1=«b98 9930 9840 9840 

Mor98 98.90 98 JH 9805 

Apr 98 988 0 9780 97 80 

EsI sntosNAFrtsmteii.nl 
Firs optn mi 46J76. up TVS 

SILVER (NCMX) 

MOO Iray a - cents per Ira, <u 

Aug 97 46(180 

Sop 9? 46700 459 JO 4ft| M 

£9197 46*90 

Dee97 47J00 46*J0 4«a 10 
Jem 98 J*9 to 

M»98 479.00 47490 474 90 
Mov*8 479.30 

Ju 9fl J83J0 

§sl snte HA. F« soles 48.127 
Fits open ml 88.714 up is 

PLATINUM (NMERt 
SO Iray UL. dolor, per Iruy o: 
Oct 97 dll . oo 405J0 408 10 
Jan 98 406.00 40100 402.10 

fur’s 401 00 39660 396 60 
JlJgB 392 60 

EsI sate N A Frl-.sote 1 Ml 
Frfs tnwn til 11707. oil U 


920 

14882 

2.132 

IJ18 


fl-SS 
0 JS 
-035 

- 0 »S 

-0 85 14325 
4IJS 743 
-0.85 696 

-0 85 1728 
-0 50 496 


4,90 34 

■IM iS, 770 
7.00 78 

■t ia 3i.au 

-M 0 20 

7 10 11.191 


7 10 

7)0 


1078 

2-126 


High LOW Lores) Otgo Oplnl 

SYR TREASURY (CBOT) 

S100000 ptln- p(S &64lh»0f 100 pet 

Sep 97 *06-50 106-38 106-39 - 06 184319 

Dec 97 106-28 106-19 106-20 - 07 36.374 

EsI. sate 51 XXIO Frfs srtas 57 J90 

Fits open tot 224691 off 0327 

10 YR TREASURY (CBOT) 

S100000 prln- pis 8. 32nd S H 100 pd 

Sep 97 109-00 )08-22 108-23 - 04 305,831 

Dec 97 109-18 >08-10 ICB-lt -05 *9.803 

Mar 98 108-04 107-31 107-31 -06 1.994 

EsI sales 64400 Frfs sales 104.942 

Frrs open tot 407,678. off <«78 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

(8 pa-ilOftOOO-pU A Ends o 1 100 pell 

Sep 97 11MS 112-11 112-14 -02 498.504 

Dec 97 112-13 111-30 1)2-02 - 02 OL226 

Mar98 111-26 111 23 111-73 - 07 31638 

Jun 98 111-10 -02 2588 

Est. sate 2404100 Frti sate 498.338 

Firs open mi 6I&MI. up ra 365 

10-YEAR FRENCH 60V. BONOS (MAT1F1 

FFSDaOOO-pbonOOprj 

Sep” IW-® U’- 31 179-46 *002 15^449 

Oec *7 945* «8J6 98 44 — 002 14J7B 

Mor98 97 88 97 88 9784-002 0 

ESI soles 28J17 

Opon ml.. 171327 up 6.103. 

UBOR I -MONTH (CMER) 

S3 mffBon- pfi of 100 pci. 

9435 uneh. 1&964 

Oct 97 9433 «4JI 94J2 441 7.974 

Nov *7 9437 *436 94.27 -OO: 7J77 

Est. sate l.l 1 1 Fits sales UI7 
Frfs open ml 39. 744 up 19 

EURODOLLARS ICMER) 

St mttorv-pH of u» peL 
Sep 97 9438 94.25 94 25 -0 07 479.904 

Dd97 9418 9414 94 17 -081 4688 

?.® C 2 JfJ“ 2J5 4 W- 07 J UI2 490.532 

Mar 98 0401 91 9e 93.97 -003 350653 

«“ n 2 S-5 4 S 35 -0.03 28Q.24S 

Sep 98 93 78 9174 93 75 4) 04 219.809 

Dec 98 9X67 9362 OlfJ 4704 188^06 

Mur 99 9X*4 93M 9367 474)3 738.112 

S’ 5 * 101866 

SepW «J5 9151 93 J2 4L03 84855 

Dec 99 9X47 93 43 9364 47IK1 74798 

Mar 00 0146 9343 9X43 -003 6S514 

EsI. safes 204836 Fits sate 487-430 
Fits apon miX79i6XL up 1&699 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

62JOO pounds. Spar pound 
SeP 91 16000 1.6008 16056-00028 

Dec * 7 76014 1.5960 7J99847.0028 
WOT98 1J932 4LO028 

EsI Wte XS9S Firs sales 12676 
Frts open fell 5057 i ofl 1.636 

CANADIAN DOLLAR fCMER) 

IDOJOO fcllwj, 5per Cdn dir 
Sep’! -7JJ4 7191 7196,0 0007 61611 

D“ 97 -72« .7226 .7233 *0.0002 S.771 

Mor98 nn 7265 7262*a00kJ2 720 

EM. sate 1968 Frt s sales 11287 
Fits open mi 69.369. on 1025 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

175000 marts. S per mar* 

S2?W sl« ISf -5500 0 0070 99.657 

OkW -5545 5525 5532 4)0020 

5563 4)0030 

|sl. sate 24700 Frts sate 6Uio 

Frts open Ini 106491, ah 5)9 


11 ? 


KW Law LolesJ CTiga Oplnfj 


CAC 49 (MAT1F7 
FFTOOpretodcnpalnl n.^1 

Aug 97 79370 28740 2*980—9.00 JIOSE* 
Sap97 29460 28835 29060 -BSD 25.0903 
Dec 97 296/.0 2967.0 29300 - 900 931.' 

Mar98 NT. N.T. 29550 —9.00 9^80*‘ 
Esl soles: 1&898. 

Open Int. 77070 up 2-254 


• &to' : 

iarv 


4)J9 

4147 

4143 

41.43 

4L1B 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 (MCTH) 

SUXU lbs.- rents per fh. 

Od 97 7365 72.90 73.10 

Dec 97 7170 712$ 7135 

Mar 98 74.90 7455 74*5 

M«f 98 75 J5 75-30 7142 

Jul98 76J0 76JQ 7605 

Est. sales NA Frts sales 400 
Fits open tol 1. off 79,939 


HEATIN6 OIL (NMER) 

42000 90k cenls per pal 
Sep 97 53-10 5105 5200 

Oct 97 5 440 52.70 52.93 

Hav97 5115 5X90 5198 

Dec 97 5630 5480 5498 

Jon 98 5170 5563 5563 

Feb 98 56 80 55.93 5193 

Mai 98 56 00 55.28 5528 *023 
Esl. sate NA. Fits sate 27603 
Fits Open Ini 152.371. off 1.121 


LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 
MXX) bbL- dollars perbu. 

Od 97 

Nov 97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Feb 98 
Mar 98 

EsL sales NA Fits sate 74798 

Fits open to) 397441 off & 1 08 


*i.’ 


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-149 

-1.19 

1.09 

-1.04 

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Jim 98 
Feb 98 
Mar 98 


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No* 97 
Dee 97 
Jon 98 
Feb 98 
Mar 98 
Apr 98 


NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

10000 mm bhi% Spcr mm Hu 
Od97 2-570 £450 2490 *0.015 S2J64 

3635 2^0 2623 *0013 18647 

H— Lns 173s *0 010 

2.753 2.725 2.745 +0 009 

1345 ■°- 005 
1370 2455 2J40 47.OQ5 

Esl. solas N A. Fils sate 59.771 
Fils open In) 224828 Up t.yjj 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

JM00 pM cenls par oaf 
Sep 97 67.60 6155 6450 

“2 »00 5940 
5740 5460 5* 70 
57.10 56.00 9ft 
56 60 55.93 55 92 
56 70 564 2 56 22 
5472 
5937 

Esl. sate N A. Fits sate 41607 

Fns open ini 1 1QJ2X Off 42 



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Mr. 

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Mar 98 


1 80 

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431 

2 


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Dec 97 9481 9479 9479 

Moi98 9473 9477 it n 
EM. -4Pcs 439 Firs sate w 
Frts open Enl 14381 all 10s 


-0 02 
-HO! 


7.081 

1269 

1.032 


YEN (CMER) 

I2J miMon ym. S pw )D0 wn 
SCO?/ 6503 8438 8440 4) 

8S51 8551 -0.0042 
86*6 4)0043 
Esl -ate 1X478 Frrs sdq 40789 
Fits open ln| 844 ) 76 . up 4 , | ij 

Es 

T° r ” 6876 4100W 

EM sales 94)e3 Fits sate 2*426 
Fits (toon mi Siam, off I.19S 

MEXICAN PESO ICMER) 
wr peso 

Stew - ,23w -S 

Sr [ *" ■ nw0 riuaJSS 

3alo« 11(7 Plt'j ulnr in 
Fns open ml 44 )69. up an ‘ 


.p rnM _ .Stock Indexes 

SP COMP INDEX (CMER) 

SM»(fHte* 

a,9 -°° 92)60 
2“ ” 929 JO 931.90 

Min 98 940 JU 940 JX) 940.00 

EsJ. sales NA Fits sate 82.142 
Ffts open Ini 200699. up 1.766 


8081 5 
2.714 
538 


51.420 

1620 

1.056 


7Z1SS 

14544 

5655 


CACAO (MATIF) 

FF200 per imte poini 

sSS K SH 22 “ -’■» awi 

2906.0 -JL50 2S0»I 

NteM ^ 71300 ~ *%.• 

MW’S N.T. N.T. 2955.0— 9JI0 

Esl. soles: 1&B98 

Open ML- 77j)7o up 2.356. 



til 


Moody's 
Reuters 
DJ- Futures 
CRB 


Commodity Indexes 

Ooh Prayhv^t 0. 




1471.70 
1.80560 
149.03 

237 J4 

Loaded 


1465 

l&SJO 

14873- 

23864, 

. i~t 






» » •urtmr a ** l«L 


PAGES 


• « 

Pr n ,p ^% 

^'Idrij. .Swiss Raid 
Offices of 
TV Mogul 

Kirch Investigated 

Over Tax Evasion 


UiT*-r In Pilots 


n c 
:-.‘.vra 

.rJir-iHif. 


Ompikd by Our S«$ From Dapattkc 

MU NICH — Leo Kirch, head of 
German media company Kirch 
Group, is being investigated on sus- 
picion he hid “billions” in profits 
from German tax authorities, Ger- 
man and Swiss prosecutors said 
i O Monday. 

; The Munich prosecutor’s office 
said it had asked Swiss prosecutors to 
help its 21 -month-old inquiry into 
whether the head of Germany’s 
second-biggest broadcasting com- 
ity avoided paying up to 400 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks ($219 5 million) 
in taxes, according to news reports. 
Swiss authorities said they searched 
‘‘about a dozen” homes and offices 
last week as part of the inquiry. 

The investigation is likely to re- 
new speculation about the state of 
Kirch Group's finances, which 
many media analysts say have been 
tender pressure because of problems 
with the company’s DF-1 digital TV 
venture. Still, they said, because the 
privately held company rarely pub- 
lishes financial information, it is dif- 
X ficult to assess the impact any pen- 
't aides could have on one of 
Germany’s do minan t television 
broadcasters. 

can’t help matters,” said 
Petra Heist of Bayerische Vereins- 
bank AG in Munich, “but given the 
lack of reliable information, it’s 
tough to draw conclusions.” 

Ihe Zurich district attorney, Di- 
eter Jann, said German officials 
were investigating whether Mr. 
Kirch had used MH Medien-Han- 
dels AG, a company owned by a 
business partner, Otto Beisheim, 
one of Switzerland’s richest men, to 
hide profits “in the billions” from 
German tax authorities. 

; According to Swiss news reports, 
Medien-Handels bought the rigbts 
tp 2,500 movies from Kirch Group 
in 1990 for 500 million DM. A few 
months later, the Swiss company 
,‘v sbld the rights to the Kirch-owned 
f broadcasters SAT-1 and Pro Sieben 
for 1.6 billion DM — even though, 
the reports said, the films had never 
left Mr. Kirch's storage houses near 
Munich. 

Mr. Kirch owns 43 percent of 
SAT-1, while his son Thomas Kirch 
owns 60 percent of the voting rights 
of Pro Sieben. '. 

■''Mr/ Jantt~ said - the raids;- were 
aimed at finding evidence connect- 
ing Mr. Kirch to Medien-Handels. 

■■ ~ ■ (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 2 6, 1997 

— EUROPE _ 


RAGE 13 


Russian Auto Industry Faces Long Haul 

Output and Registrations Rise , but Products Depend on Protectionism 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — Russia’s investment-parched 
auto industry, inching its way out of a deep rut 
of languishing production and burgeoning 
debt, has a way to go on the road to recovery. 


compared to others," said Patricia Isayeva, a 
United City Bank analyst. 

Production rose 5 percent in the first seven 
months of the year at one of Russia’s biggest 
automobile producers, Gorkovsky Avtomobilny 
Zavod, and both AvtoVAZ and KamAZ arc 
promising increased output this year. 

Time Armstrong, Eastern Europe analyst at 
DRl-McGraw-Hill, said registrations of new 
cars also rose 10 percent Iasi year. 

“We would expect that kind of growth to 
continue.” he said. “We have got to the point 
where acquisition of cars is becoming feas- 


continue." he said. “We have got to the point 
where acquisition of cars is becoming feas- 
ible.” 

But while pretax profit at Gorkovsky rose to 


555.49 billion rubles ($95.5 million) in the first 
half of the year from 324 billion rubles in the 
First half of 1996, financial results from other 
companies lag. 

AvtoVAZ posted a 1.1 trillion ruble loss for 
1996 despite increased output of its boxy, old- 
fashioned Ladas, and the tnickmaker KamAZ 
said it lost 1 .16 trillion rubles that year. 

As foreign carmakers including the likes of 
Mercedes Benz and BMW start arriving for this 
week’s annual Moscow car show, issues of 
competition both within and outside Russia are 
being thrown into uncomfortable relief. 

Production figures — although not so rosy at 
aJ] companies — mask the still poor quality of 
the vehicles and the continuing failure of some 
manufacturers to face up ro competition. 

“The Russian auto industry is actually 
favored by protectionist policy.” said Andrei 
Abramov of Rinaco-Plus, “and if that was not 
the case then we probably would not be able to 
speak about the performance we have now.” 


While stiff import duties mean even the 
shoddiest of Russian makes is s till competitive 
in price with otherwise superior foreign brands, 
the gap has begun to narrow with the sta- 
bilization of the economy this year. 

AvtoVAZ is Russia’s biggest corporate 
debtor with 2.85 trillion rubles owed to the 
government in tax arcears as of May I . For now 
it continues to limp along on sales of its 
cheapest — ■ and oldest — models. 

“vAZ dominates the marker — it produced 
681,000 units out of a total 870.00,” said Mr. 
Armstrong, adding that VAZ was also starting to 

put its house in order by restructuring its debt to 
tbe government But its high er.rangff 7 A(<!»c ran . 

not compete with similarly priced imports from 
South Korea’s Daewoo Motor Co. and Volks- 
wagen AG's Skoda »n», Ms. Isayeva s aid. 
Despite the success of GAZ's light Gazelle 
truck and KamAZ's Oka car, the analysts said, 
Russian carmakers will need to be nimble to 
stay abreast of a rapidly changing market. 


.OA£V. : ;S 

■ 4500 

■ 4200 

. 3900 

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1997 

Scenes 


London 

FT^-lIWiriCfex 
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1997 


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1997 


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Source: Telekurs 


922.19 . -91 R42 .+Q.41. 
2ASOM 2,367:34 -027 
. $071.79 4,086.01 -0.35 
637,13 . 530.44 +0.11 

3,428.37 3,441.48 ^0.38 
68a €80.37 -0J}3 

dosed . 4.901. W 


BBD.16- €80.37 -003 

dosed . 4.901.10 
585J&- ‘ -582.56 ' +0.53 
14282- 14198 +0-53 

2,89857 g-904-23 -0.19 
3,380.12 3,406.06 -0.76 
;1i329.83 1,330.0 2- -0X1 L 
3,531.36 3,535.06 -0.1 Q 

InhMTuuiuul HcriiJ Tnhunr 


Strike in Norway Threatens New Oil Production Very briefly: 


Bloomberg News 

OSLO — A Norwegian labor union, 
Oljearbeidemes Fellessanunenslutning, said 
Monday that 343 of its members on five North 
Sea oil rigs went on strike at midnight Sat- 
urday. 

The strike, which could affect four drilling 
rigs, may mean that start-up of production on two 
major fields will be delayed, according to Hans 
Aasmund FrisaJk, a spokesman of Statoil A/S. In 
addition, a prolonged strike may mean a delayed 


stan of produclion on the state-owned Nor- 
wegian oil company's Nome field, which was 
planned for the end of September. 

The workers rejected a wage agreement from 
the Norwegian Shipowners’ Association, which 
offered a 7.8 percent pay increase dating back to 
July 1. Memberships of two other unions ac- 
cepted the offer this year. 

■ Call for Huge Rise in Saudi Oil Sales 

Saudi Arabia should flood the world with oil 


to increase its market share and regain influence 
over prices, according to the son of the former 
Oil Minister Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Reuters re- 
ported from London. 

In a rare public call for sweeping economic 
change by a member of the business estab- 
lishment, Hani Ahmed Zaki Yamani, said the 
world's largest oil producer should increase out- 
put to 20 million barrels (2.7 million metric tons) 
a day from the current 8 million barrels a day 
over the next five years. 


2% Inflation Rate Rekindles Fears of German Rate Rise 


Bloomberg News 

WIESBADEN, Germany — 
Consumer prices in Western Ger- 
many rose 0.2 percent in the month 
to mid-August and were up 2.0 per- 
cent from a year earlier, the Federal 
Statistics Office said Monday in a 
preliminary report 

The inflation rate was higher than 
expected. Economists had widely 
expected prices to be unchanged in 
the month to mid-August and to 
advance 1.8 percent on the year. 

Price growth slowed from July, 
when prices rose at a monthly rate of 
0.4 percent But they accelerated on a 
year-on-year basis. In July, prices 
rose at an aanual rate of 1.7 percenL 
Analysts said demand in Ger- 
many was still too weak for compa- 
nies to pass on the higher cost of 
,-unported goods to their customers.- 
The higher-than-expected in- 
crease in August consumer prices, 
coupled with a surge in import price 


growth in July, has ignited concern 
that the Bundesbank may soon raise 
interest rates for the first tirne in five 
years to preempt increased inflation. 

The central bank will set its target 


money market rate, the securities 
repurchase rate, on Tuesday, when it 
calls for bids for Wednesday’s 
weekly repurchase auction. The 
bank has left the repurchase, or repo, 


France Sees Higher Growth 


Reuters 

PARIS — Finance Minister 
Dominique Strauss-Kahn of France 
warned Monday that a rise in U.S. or 
German interest rates would hurt 
economic growth at home but said 
he did not expect monetary policy to 
tighten anytime soon. 

His comments, three days before 
a meeting on Thursday between 
Prime Minister Lionel Jospin and 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl, high- 
lighted the potential for Franco-Ger- 
man tension if the Bundesbank 
raises rates. 

“If there were a turn of die screw 


from the American central hank or 
the Bundesbank, this would not be 
good for growth,’ * Mr. Strauss-Kahn 
told French RTL radio. “I think that 
every (Me will be reasonable and that 
as far as it is possible there will be no 
such turn of the screw.” 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn said that as 
long as the B nodes bank and the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board did not raise 
rates, France could expect relatively 
healthy growth of 2.9 to 3.0 percent, 
a slight increase from his own earli- 
er predictions. Late-last week Mr. 
Strauss-Kahn had predicted growth 
of 2.8 to 2.9 percent. 


rate at an all-time low of 3 percent 
for the past year. 

It was also announced Monday 
that German industrial output rose a 
revised 2.9 percent in June from 
May. up from die 1.4 percent rise 
originally reported, according to 
figures provided tty the Bundes- 
bank, Germany's central bank. 

■ IMF Outlook on Deficit 

The International Monetary Fund 
sees the German federal deficit at 
3.1 percent of gross domestic 
product in 1 997, down from an earli- 
er forecast of 3.3 percent, 
Bloomberg News reported, quoting 
a Finance Ministry report 

With a deficit of 3.1 percent. Ger- 
many would move closer to meeting 
one of the qualifying criteria for 
European, economic jandjzianeiant. 
union, though it would still be above 
the 3.0 limit, at least according to a 
strict interpretation of the criteria. 


• Deutsche Balm AG, the German railroad operator, said that 
rising passenger service revenue helped increase sales in (he first 
half by 2.1 percent to 14.9 billion Deutsche marks (SS.I8 
billion). Pretax profit rose 1 .6 percent, to 191 million DM. The 
company forecast 30.8 billion DM in revenue for the full year. 

• Socfete Bic said it had raised its bid for SfteafTer by S2 
million. Bic announced July 31 that it had agreed to buy 
Sheaffer, but it said Sheaffer breached this agreement Friday 
by signing an agreement under which Sheaffer management 
will buy the company. Sheaffer is controlled by the Lux- 
embourg investment bank Gefinor SA. 

• Industrial Reconstruction Organization, which was set 
up in 1982 to reconstruct and sell off ailing Greek businesses 
under stale receivership, said it expected to be abolished 
before 2000 because it is close to completing its task. 

• Groupe Air France said sales for July rose 9.7 percent over 
July 1996 as passenger revenue increased 9.2 percent and 
parcel freight grew 14.8 percent. From April to July, total 
revenue increased 7.6 percent, with passenger revenue rising 
6.7 percent. 

• Dubai imported a record 62.% metric tons of gold in July, 
cementing its role as the largest bullion redistribution center, 
die World Gold Council said. 

• Sweden's trade surplus fell 9.6 percent in July, (o 12.3 

billion kronor ($1 .54 billion). Reuien. AFX Bridge 


Daewoo to Invest in Algeria 

Agcnce Fronce-Presse 

ALGIERS — Daewoo Corp. plans to invest $2 billion 
in Algeria over the next five years, according to news 
reports Monday citing the Sourh Korean conglomerate's 
president, Kim Woo Choong. 

Half die amount will be invested very shortly, said the 
president, who is visiting Algeria with a delegation. 
.Daewoo .wants, to invest in iha electronics, mechanical, 
building material and telecommunications sectors, the 
reports said. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


; Monday, Aug- 25 

Prices In beat currencies. 
TeteXtirs 

J Htgu Low Oeee Pi**. 

Amsterdam ‘“5SK 


ABH~AM.RO 
m A 4 %on 
Afctfd 
AkzoNobd 
Boon Co. 

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Markets Closed 

- Markets in Bombay and 
London were closed Monday 
for a holiday. 


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11360 

11275 


1114 

1091 

1097 

1091 

OSreffl 

733 

AU 

TSi 

493 

Parental 

2650 

2630 

2645 

2645 

Ptreto 

*770 

*670 

*704 

4700 

RAS 

147® 

1*550 

146® 

146® 



21850 

21840 

217® 


12645 

124® 

12614 

125® 


107*5 

10490 

10665 

106® 

TtM 

5835 

5735 

5795 

5/*<> 


Kuala Lumpur 


IGenitf Me je&2 

PrwrtmSMlAa 

47 47 2D 4750 

223 22350 221 

48 48 47 

71 7120 71.® 

2250 2250 2270 
140 14110 
47 4750 4XA0 

139 19 

434 636 £8 

185 1X5 184 

94 94 95® 

132 in ia» 
78 79 7720 


AMMBHdcp 12.10 
Goang 1070 

MdBanktog^ 71A0 

Mr* In* Slip F 655 

PrtranwCfl* 9^ 

PrtfcBk X£ 

RffTDOQ 330 

World 755 
RoOroreisPM 26 

3saa*~. .is 

YTL 6J0 

Madrid 

Acerirw t«® 

jss 1 ^ ■ 

ST"" 32 


Hong Kong 


B50 X70 160 

£g IS 

S8 2S 

1455 1420 US 
1MJ0 VHSD 11050 
xas 9.10 9.05 

47 JO 7075 4fl 
1675 1x45 1625 
7flW 1X50 2X20 
17A5 1X45 17 JO 
4H3 4J2 X® 

20 iff Jg 

74 7625 7650 
2130 M 
2270 2 270 2255 
2045 2045 2045 

^ X77 z| 

JS ^ •§ 

740 745 770 

6J0 690 7 

6475 6525 6525 
2055 W4S 2MS 
1750 17.« 1740 


Bcb ^Sb' W»P 

SS& 

CEPSA 

Contimnto 

CcrpMttofre 

Endeso 

FECSA 

GosNfltWtt 

lbertreta 

Pnw 

Rrt«l „ 

SevfflemaEtec 

TaJuKilera 

Tetrfonicfl 

Union Fe»M 

WsncOBlMrt 


CmnpedNt; MX96 
PmtMR 98540 

1140 11.70 12 

1040 10.70 10.70 
21.10 21.10 2140 
590 590 445 

855 855 9.15 

8 110 770 

332 334 3A0 

170 330 376 

730 730 740 

15 75 75 M7S 
745 74S 775 

8S5 XS5 835 
9.1S 930 9JS 

1470 1470 1530 
645 630 670 


PrartouK 58X56 

26150 26800 26200 
178CT “WTO 1795 
£490 5550 5540 

7820 7890 7920 

4040 4100 4110 

1420 1455 1410 

7800 7830 7840 

58io a® a® 

34310 34790 3*280 
4290 4»0 «1S 

4600 *530 4630 
32H 3270 3270 

8340 8300 CTO 

3155 3190 3140 
1220 1235 1215 

4740 489 47® 
1735 1745 1 740 

78® 2865 2SS0 

6090 4118 6090 
1360 1375 1360 

80® 81® ?»0 
4015 4040 4025 
lias 12® T1» 
2759 27® 2760 


Montreal 

Bee Mob Com 
CrtoTIreA 
CdnUBA 
CT FWtSrt 
GazMrfro 
Ct-WesJ LHeco 
ImoKD 
IrwestoreGip 
LdMowCm 
N oll BK Canada 
Corp 
rwoFW 
QuebeaxB 
RogmCcramB 
Royal BkCdo 


AterA 

DennorekeBk 
Hkem . 
HoWundA 
KwarwAsq 

NreskeSkog 


Orta An A 
Petal GaaStc 
Sega Penm A 
SdAsted 
TBHg o ttanOW 
Storebrand An 


PmtoUV: 2597 J4 

SOU 50 M 5X10 
76 V. 2616 27 

3X15 3814 3830 

4X85 *385 4185 
1X05 1X10 1X05 
3385 3110 33 

3» 3914 3985 

35.10 3SVi 35JJ5 
2035 2055 2060 
1785 IB 1780 
3X35 33 Vl 3X65 

3719 3716 3680 

26.40 26.40 36V. 

9J4 9S0 970 

62 VI 6*15 6135 


OBX MW 61X16 
Piretoes: 68X37 


133 1® 

205 201 

2X40 2*60 
29 JO 29 

139 135 

45 45 

410 402 

403 397 

287 282 

154 133 

540 537 

*22 *19 

156 153J0 
12* 118 
652 645 

50 *9 


131 12X50 
202 SQ 
2*80 25 

29 JO .29 20 
136 136 

<5 46 

410 *06 

397 4® 

2B3 a* 
153 152 

538 540 

*22 422 

15SJ0 154 

122J0 121® 

652 639 

*9 JO 50 


Jakarta 


WOO 5725 5725 61® 

yiH 925 950 11® 

1025 ng 

SB50 B475 87® W® 
3425 31® $2S 

3g S8 s ms 

^ i I i 

3350 3150 37® ■*** 


Manila 

AytfoB 

SSBS. 

MeM 

Prfren 

PaBWX 

PhflLoroOg* 

SrtMlowHB 

SM Prime MOB 

Mexico 

Alto A 
BanaajB 

CeanCPO 

OfroC 

EmpModema 

G^Ftomw 

ffiSKS 

TdevsaCPO 

TeW«l- 


BcnCoriffl JtO 
Bca fiden renl 
SeodRoma 


p mmS 

is 17J0 173 
1*0 13» 136 J5 

X70 7^ 7J0 8^ 

79 77J0 79 JO 

*90 470 4» 490 

Sill 530 5® ^ 

198 If V97 
880 875 875 875 

5*50 55 5SJ0 

*90 7 7J0 

Baton todW«76JI 

Prevtow 502X41 
«« 6170 63.® 6X*0 

gS 21» 23J 24^ 
41.® 41-90 4LK 
iji* ujS 1*60 V*70 

S® 41® 5" 

5X411 5780 5780 5X40 

S ^ siS M 

WO 36.K VX 
13QJJ0 12X90 12910 12980 
30.10 2 X25 2035 

*" ST ¥SKiSSS 

>g 'S '& 'I 

S£ S ™ S 


Accor 

ABF 

ASJ-UAP 

Banaakf 

BIC 

BNP 

CanaiPtos 

Cmrefow 

Cartw 

CCF 

CeWwn _ 
Christloa Dior 
CLF-DeAi Fmn 
Qed lAgrietfc 
Danone 

Eridanta BS 


Eurntoma 

GhlE mb 

HaW* 

IflWW 

LV«H 

McMnB 

PBlOWA 

Pernod RJconl 

Peogwtdt 

Pireajft-Pnjd 

Pranwies 

Benaui 

Resort 

Rh-PoutencA 

SanoA 

Sdmddw 

SEB 

SGSThoresoo 
Sle Generate 
Sodexto 
St Goto* 

5uel (OeJ 

AjaLvanEaui 


BiwkuaPfU 

Brahma Pfti 

CemrtPtd 

CE»PM 

Copd 

ESatntofas 

naubmcaPU 

LlgiilSivIdw 


PeiratemPM 

PoidHaUn 

SldNodoncd 

SotBBClOT 

TeMvasPM 

Tetertg 

Tefal 

TefcapPId 

Unftaoca 

UtiminasPM 

CVRD PM 


Seoul 


Koreo El Pwr 
Korea ExdiBk 
LCSaretcon 
Pahang Iron Si 
Satwaog D4»tor 

aCJnnCD DOnK 

SKTcfecoan 


1090 10J0 
740® 725.10 
52-70 518* 
7589 7*48 
1590 1580 
*95.00 4BS80 
62980 62080 
47780 47580 
42880 41B80 
28880 28080 
19081 18989 
3780 35.10 
iaio io8o 
140.99 13X01 
16199 16149 
14220 14280 
33&® 32380 
3945 3880 

HAS 1140 

2*30 25J0 


1080 10J0 
73080 73081 
5280 51 JO 
7*70 7150 
1580 1680 
488. DO 4R580 
629.® 62SDO 
47780 47680 
42*01 41X00 
2X580 28*® 
19081 18X00 
3780 35.10 
10.10 9.90 

13980 137 JO 
161 JO 16380 
142.15 1*280 
33480 32250 
3945 3X90 
TL75 1140 
2680 2580 


Sao Paulo 


CAO40: 2*9X57 
Previous: 296*23 

151 968 954 

H6 219 221 

til 923 924 

« 790 79* 

W1 *W 406 
yn 7® 701 

172 483 48240 

JO 261 28346 
J12 1014 1M1 

05 3835 3363 

£51 288 231 iO 

JO 31190 315 

141 6ft 644 

05 MB 9 S 

551 SS3 Sit 
SO 1290 1266 

m ?p m 

577 704 707 

105 *10 *21 

145 X70 X70 

.90 1 685 

vn m m 

l30 37440 376 

531 338 *47 

J0 407 41X50 
KO 1083 1087 
132 2241 2227 

(JO 141* 1424 
550 353 355 

06 43740 437 JO 

294 297 294 

575 679 670 

532 27® 27X 

130 2154 2JS4 
ISO 166.50 163 

i50 165* 1717 
.10 345 247 JO 

37 604 60* 

U6 32X20 324 

fS6 9U 979 

578 * ® 

172 779 784 

181 2799 2302 

566 867 B67 

L 1 5 16.15 16J0 
562 666 664 

112 723 732 

JO 161 152JD 
596 605 609 

L10 110J0 11X96 
-J0 381 JO 320 


Web 1125X80 
NfHto 111 5780 


Singapore 

Asto Pec Brew M.T. 
CerehosPoc <56 

arrDmflj izjo 

Cade Carrtaw 1140 
Fanaft* 081 

[,,-Inn 
IUIMI 

DSSLgid 

HKLand’ — 

JardMatoesn* 7JO 
Jart Stn*^c* 3.94 
KewalA 

W.“ 

OSUntor 
PartawrHdgi 
Serahmiong — 
Sing Ait-torts* 1280 
Sing Land 7 40 

Sing Press F 2*® 
Ski greefttod 3M 
SiwTeteaeiffl 245 
TreUeBank 2J7 
UW Indusirtst 1.10 
UW«aa»F 1*10 
WlnflTaiHdiP 348 
-.hUS-Mlan. 


Stockholm 

AGAB 

ABBA 132 

AsstOanan 
Astra A 
Adas Copa A 

Au toft ■ VU 

BedretoiB 

EitasonB 

HenanB 

lTUXt*rtA 

iiwestorB 

MdOoB 

Northaftm 
PtamOJpiohn 271 
SanthftB 
Scmto B 

SCAB 

S^BadiaA 
SfcnufiaRn 
SkanstaiB 3X 

SKPB 

SpartmtanA 
sot A 131 

SvHmflcsA 
WraB 2U 


MAW Ban* 
Nat Mutual Hdg 
Neva Corp 
PacfiicDuntop 
Pioneer Ml 
PuhBioa 
Rio Unto _ 

SI George Bank 
WMC 


19-10 198! 

Z11 110 

584 581 

341 3L56 

<71 <55 

X10 XQS 
2055 20.43 
X3T XZ4 
732 7 JO 
BJD X03 
1133 11.16 
<14 <07 


19.10 19.12 
2.10 111 
582 581 

341 340 

<68 *55 

BIB B 
2050 2038 
X24 X27 
732 7.25 

XI2 X02 
1131 11.18 
<11 <13 


Cerepasito index: 74V76 
Pravtoes: 742J8 

92500 90200 92000 90500 
7950 77M 78® 77® 

219® 207® 207® 205® 
139® 129® 129® 129® 
252® 246® 250® 251® 
57® H90 56® 5290 

43500 47500 4U ® *80® 
620® 610® 613® 61200 
4B8® *75® *82® *80® 
735® 72000 728® 725® 
9500 92® M20 91® 

5200® 5000® 5170® 5200® 


Taipei 

Catbay Life Ins 
OnregHxa Bk 
QrtopTungBk 
□rina Dewtpmt 
OUna Steel 
FMBaik 
FamosaPtafic 
Hua Non Bk 
WtCnmra Bk 
Han Ya Plortcs 

fTSStf 

Ttrtuog 

Ukt Mire Elec 
Uld World Chin 

Tokyo 

Afeumoto 
Aj Nippon Air 


Star* Mreftt fafec 1801147 
Prwtoas: *9*542 

145 14080 142 143 

1K50 110 113 11180 

9280 06 9280 8*80 

138 133 136 133 

3080 30 3020 3X20 

11*50 11080 11280 11* 

IS 6280 5n a m 
123 11680 12080 120 

5580 54 5*50 £580 

79 75 77 JO 7SJ0 

99 93 96 99 

172 166 170 163 

*52C *3J0 *130 AS 
M2 138 138 137 

65 63 <3 63 


staOTtoKHns 

Pravton:l9e44 

N.T. N-T. 580 
*46 446 <5* 
1180 iijo run 
1090 11 11J0 

090 0.90 090 

17 JO 17 JO 17 JO 
<12 *20 <12 
X90 X90 9 JO 

116 124 124 

733 7JJ 745 
192 194 392 

£95 6 685 

382 152 152 

*42 *50 *80 

*16 *18 *20 
12.90 1110 1190 

XI 0 XI 5 X15 

6J0 630 *30 

6J5 685 6J0 

1230 1280 1230 
730 730 730 

2**0 2*70 2*50 
176 2JJ 10* 
239 244 242 

2JS 177 175 

136 138 1® 

1*10 1*20 14 

340 340 340 


SXlfUaeimn 

PmtorrcMMM 

10*50 114 107 

118 n9 12X50 
236 243 246 

12680 127 12985 

242 244 245 

302 30X50 3£ 

575 5® 539 

33980 34480 34150 
309 309 312 

716 717 734 

39580 *00 404 

260 273 

346 24980 248 

271 37980 277 

241 246 5* 

221 22180 223 

17680 18X50 183 

8251 O « 
314 321 320 

320 •me 325 
214 216 21880 

173 177 177 

130 13X50 13*50 
24 W » 
2® 210 21*58 


AsoMBpnk 

AsaNOvre 

AsMCtoi 

BkTokwMfto 

Bk Yokohama 

Bfidgestone 

Canon 

QwboBec 

SCRS 

DaMchl Kretg 
OntwaBank 
Dahre House 
DahreSec 
DO I 
Daiso 

E^_Jrex»lRy 

few . 

Fofl Bank 

FoO Photo 

Fujitsu 

HaStoniBk 

HQodil _ 

Honda Motor 

1BJ 

(HI 

Itochu 

tto-Yotado 

JAL „ 

JoprtTteOQCO 

■teas 

Sew! Elec 
Kao 

KtrensaMHry 

KcwflSteei 

cnWMppRy 

KktnBmrerr 

Kobe Steel 

Komatsu 

Kubota 

KjoCfiRI 

Marubeni 

Morel _ 

McBuCeem 

Mateo Elec tnd 

MabvBecWk 

MBsubbhl 

MbubeteO) 

MteobfeteS 

MttsobfeWEst 

MftsobishiHw 

MlbUwWWbS 

Mitsubishi Tr 

Mitsui 

MfcteFudosn 

MtoU Trust 

MundaMfe 

NEC 

NStoSec 

Msm 

Matanda 


NHHl 225: 1865X17 
PreuVMtE 1M5Q.T7 

II® II® 1170 
703 7® 

3250 3390 3*00 

899 910 

645 6*0 

9*1 9*1 

2230 2260 2230 

505 505 512 

2720 2720 2730 

3350 3360 3450 
2010 2030 2010 

19*0 1950 19*0 

2680 Z7® 2730 

Ml 850 6*1 

1*0 1*® 1440 

630 647 650 

1 *® 1*10 1 *® 
735 736 754 

7010O 701® 7000a 
2630 26*0 2720 

70a S200a 5210a 
3® 2380 2440 

4530 *570 *730 

1530 1550 IS® 

4580 4610 46® 

1S50 1560 1590 

ii 20 n*o mo 

1IB0 1100 12® 

3550 300 35« 

1690 1690 1690 

360 365 360 

506 511 506 

6850 69® 6890 

*65 *60 475 

9380a 9630a 9350a 
3t» JW 3M 
640 654 6*0 

22® 2220 2190 

1780 1810 1790 
*73 *73 *70 

298 298 300 

673 OS £00 
99S 10® 985 

169 170 17B 

MS 

*93 5M 490 
82® S3® 8570 

1950 1970 1950 
587 593 599 

431 447 430 

1920 1920 1960 

4360 4360 4460 

2220 2220 22® 
13® 1310 1310 

1220 12*0 1240 

299 300 305 

566 568 567 

16® 1660 16® 
804 BIB 80S 
706 Kg 709 

1680 1690 1690 

10® 1060 10® 
1410 14® 1420 
695 706 693 

5300 5310 5370 
1510 1520 1540 
21® 22® 2270 
581 585 6® 


Sydney 

Ameer 

A NZ Biting 

BHP 

DOfw 

Bnjfltofei tod. 
CBA 

CT Areas 
Cates Myer 
Cm*s 
CSft 

FeitatBrew 
GoatonFM 
ta Arstnda 
Lend Lease 
MJMHdgs 


X32 X28 

iai3 934 
17J0 1X97 
*03 3J6 
2X10 Z7J0 
1539 15J8 
15L2S 1X15 
X5* 6J6 

X99 649 

503 *88 

26* 259 

1 M 134 

13.14 13 

3045 29J3 
169 166 


law 9J2 

17J S 

2X20 2767 
1533 1539 
1520 1520 
669 646 

X93 664 

SiQ 492 
262 260 
196 195 

1514 13 

3X36 2997 
167 166 


SES^?“ 

813 

549 

784 

532 

BK 

549 

787 

531 

HtepenS ta) 

309 

302 

309 

311 

ffissm Motor 

766 

759 

759 

736 

HKK 

1® 

l® 

192 

191 

Nomura Sec 

1640 

16® 

1630 

16® 


NTT 

NTT Date 

Op Paper 

OaataiGai 

ffleoh 

Ratio 

SakumBk 

Sankyn 

Sanaa Bank 

SaawElac 

Secorn 

l&X. 

SektsutHoure 


1T3® 1110b 1I«* 1120t 
5280b 91flb 521® 526® 
610 605 <09 605 

276 271 274 271 

1720 1760 1770 
13430 13000- 130® 13600 
770 743 745 750 

39M 3850 38B0 39S0 
1540 15® 15® 15® 

*6* 456 457 454 

0490 8360 8400 0500 
53® 5270 S3® 5260 

10® 1040 1060 10® 

n® 1140 11» 1150 


J||q Trib Index Press as c<S 3O0 P M New Yor* :ma 

Jnn .1,1992=100. Level Change % change year to date 

% change 

World Index 172.98 + 1.00 + 0.58 + 15.98 

Regional Indexes 

Asafi*adfic 126.07 40.32 + 0-25 + 2.14 

Europe 182.17 - 0.37 - 0.20 + 13.01 

N. America 205.27 + 2.91 + 1.44 + 26.78 

S. America 163.29 + 3.10 +1 94 +42 70 

Industrial indexes 

Capital goods 223.96 + 0.76 + 0.34 + 31.03 ! 

Consumer goods 188.03 + 1.32 + 0.71 + 16.48 

Energy 197.43 + 2.98 + 1.53 + 15.65 

Finance 131.08 + 0.14 + 0.11 + 12.55 

Miscellaneous 183.33 - 1.17 - 0.63 +13 32 

Raw Materials 185.48 + 0.68 + 0.37 + 5.76 

Service 163.04 + 1.33 +0 82 + 18.73 

UlffiBS 161 .38 ■ + 1.35 + 0.84 + 12.48 

The International Herald Tribune World Stock Index © tracks ttv V S ctoBar vatves at 
280 intamaaanallv hwabli rocks from 25 eountras. For mom information, stow 
txxAdot >s sva&ibfe oy writing to TTrs Tub Inoaiciet Avenue Charles cfe GauPe. 

SESPT NauHy Ofltto . France. • Compiled by Btaomberg News 

High Low ansa Piw. High Low Close Prey. 


Seven-Elewr 8800 

Steep 13X 

SWtokuElPwf T95D 

SUrtzu 652 

Sto-etwOr 3100 

SWreWo 

StezuakoBk 

5omxrnk sno 

Sony ill® 

Sumitomo 995 

SuraBomo Bk 1870 

SumiChere 4® 

Sumhuno Elec 19® 

SumttMCU 285 

Surelt Truet 1190 

Tt4»te> Phorm 
Takeda Clt«n 
TDK 

TohokuHPwr 1940 

Total Balk 1040 

TaWoMrtne 1*20 

Tokyo El Prw 
Tokyo EJedrai 
Tokyo Gos ~ 

TokyvCorjL 633 

Tonen 1120 

TfwxmPrfrt 1840 

Toray Ind 820 

Toshiba 726 

Totfttn 26*0 

ToyaTnet 992 

Toyota Motor g SO 
Yaiaanaudii 2920 

tcxIOafcxlO 00 


87 W 8790 
1330 1 310 

1930 1910 

6® 626 
3000 3100 
20® 212D 

1210 12® 

56® 5680 

107® 110® 
987 983 

1850 1860 

477 477 

19® 19® 


3330 

9080 95® 

19® T920 

10*0 1020 
1350 1410 

22*0 2250 

6810 71® 

638 — 

1110 1110 
1840 1810 

809 a® 
721 715 

26® 1520 


Toronto 


Alan Mum 
Anderson Eqrf 
Bk Manfred 
Bk Nova Sadia 
BartckGaid 

BCE 
BC Telecomm 
Bjodiem PtkTBi 
BontecnflerB 
Corse® 

OBC 

CdnNattRd 
CdntatRa 
UnOcoOP# 
CdnPodBc 
Caninai 
Detesco 
Darnto 
Dondiue A 
DuPont Ccb A 
EdptfBrteKon 
EunNmMng 
FabfuFM 
Faksmbridge 
FfettH-awflA 
Franco New® 
Guff Cdo Res 
ImperMU 
Iks 
1PLE 


T5E tadudrUc <727^1 
Prevnev 67W-7B 


Loewen Group 
Maori) Bid 
MoaulnttA 
Mememea 
Moot 
Newbridge tfet 
NaamkiJnc 
NoncA Energy 

NIIki 

Nmn 
ODBC 
PotmnPfltkn 
Petra Cdo 
PlaoerDame 
PomPBBm 

Potash Scnk 
Ranatssance 
Rio AJgotn 


2*05 2*65 

31.10 30.60 

52.10 P 

1714 1714 

54*0 
bjjw 4185 
32J5 31® 
40 Wi 3930 
34U 31® 
38JD 37 
2X55 2X05 

so® m 

3m 36JB 
70 JO 6940 
37 3645 
3*10 354* 

42.15 41J0 

3X45 38 

29V4 29.10 
1170 11.55 
31® 3155 
22.90 311* 
MB w.w 
2195 3US 

3® *9 

27.10 2*60 

2160 234 

34 3316 
11.20 11.® 
77 7*10 
4040 3945 

50.15 SO 
SON 2030 

45 4*15 


17.95 

97® 

17H 

17® 

17 JO 

91 JS 

97U 

« 

17 10 

11.94 

17 

17 

28® 

27.® 

28 

» 


6SHt 6445 
2X40 28 

3514 3*85 
144 143 

11.90 11® 
32 3114 

rift 26 
2530 25 

2*35 2*10 

14 13*4 
104 10050 

15 35 
3170 



High 

LOW 

Close 

Prey. 

Rogers CanreJ B 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

27 v» 

Seagram Co 

51 * 

*9 45 

SI 1 * 

SO JO 

ISflCdDA 

Z2J0 

22JD 

22v. 

32.® 

Surtax 

46J0 

*5^t 

45.90 

■to JO 

TaOsmsmBv 

41® 

4*65 

4*15 

4*70 

Ted. B 

271* 

2*80 

26-ffi 

27 

Teleglobe 

*8% 

*7 JO 

J8 

47.85 

TeEi 

27.95 

27 JO 

27J5 

77 J5 

Thomson 

33J5 

32.70 

32JO 

33 

TorDomBonfc 

42JJ5 

*1J0 

41.95 

41.10 

Tranutfo 

17J5 

17J5 

1745 

1740 

TmmCdaPlpe 

26 J5 

2*20 

26W 

2*® 

Trimark Fell 

65W 

64 

6*® 

64 ft 

TrizecHahn 

31.90 

31 JS 

31M 

311* 

TVX Gold 

7J0 

7JS 

7J5 

7J5 

Wastoast Emr 

2691 

2*15 

26® 

24.15 

Weston 

941* 

93 

93 

941* 


Vienna A SJS“3SS-2 

Preriow: 133047 
Boehtor-Uddeh 991 JO 987.10 997 986.10 

OwfltomlPftl 60* S95 604 99*90 

EA-GmiboI 3050 2980 3010 29W 

EVN 1530.10 1501 1516 1506 

RurtotenWlMi 504 4®J0 *99 499 

OMV 172O.101696J0 1701 1692 

OestEleHrtz B63J0 857.25 85X10 857 JO 

VA State 565 S45J0 iff. ID 04 

VATedl 2365 232* 2340 23® 

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PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26. 1997 


PAGE IS 


N- 




T 


South Korea to Help 
Ailing Banks With 
Low-Interest Loans 


ASIA/PACIFIC 





<5 I* •• 

' '*• ..v« 




SEOUL — The government an- 
■ - nounced a rescue package for the 
: financial sector on Monday that 
- fwovides emergency funds to South 
••- Korean banks with substantial bad 
•.loans and guarantees for local and 
.-.foreign borrowings. 

The first beneficiary of the pack- 
age is Korea First Bank, which will 
. receive special loans from the Bank 
■- of Korea, the Finance and Economy 
V .Ministry said. 

The loans to Korea First will 
carry an annual interest rate of about 
■?« percent, lower than the current 
•■■market level of 11 percent to 12 
•'.percent. Finance Minister Kane Kv- 
_ ong Shik said. 

; “The exact amount of the loans 
has yet to be fixed,” Mr. Kang said. 
“The government and the central 
bank will review the self-rescue 
■package offered by Korea First 
/Bank last week and will try to im- 
--plement extension of the special 
■Joans at the earliest possible time.” 


Mr. Kang said the government 
also planned to allow Korea First to 
increase its capital through rights 
issues. 

The government will buy at least 
some of the new bank shares after 
raising funds through state bonds 
Mr. Kang said. 

The ministry also said that Korea 
Asset Management Corp. would 
buy an unspecified amount of bad 

loans from Korea First 

Mr. Kang said the central bank 
would extend financial support to 
investment banks as well. 

The ministry said the government 
was committed to guar an teeing re- 
payments of local banks' debt over- 
seas. 

The central bank and the state-run 
Korea Development Bank will ex- 
pand foreign currency-denominated 
loans to banks and nonbanks that 
have had difficulties tapping loans 
overseas because of lowered credit 
ratings. 







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The 1.9-kilometer bridge linking Singapore and Malaysia being topped off; it is to open Jan. 2. 


Bangkok 

Seoul 


-SET- -g ' 

.Owj^oe^Videx- 


■742.55'! 1 ™ 


New Links for Southeast Asia 

2 Major Bridges Expected to Increase Trade and Tourism 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 


Joans at the earliest possible rime.” As part of moves to attract more 

funds into the financial market, the 

Banks Said to Plan 

Dainong’s Demise p “ t 


ji ■; A&ence France-Preue 

'i SEOUL — Creditor banks of the 

j. . Dainong Group, which was put un- 
■ ’ - der bank protection in May, have 

' decided to dismantle the company 
/and save only its Midopa depart- 
71 "'ment store, the Yonhap press agency 

: - said. 

An official of the industrial group 
. said he had yet to receive official 
...word of the move and was not able 
/to immediately confirm the Yonhap 
"report. 

• ‘ - ' Dainong is the 34th-largest South 

[ 'j Korean industrial group, with in- 

v teres ts in textiles, department stores 
'.and newspapers. 


cent to attract foreign capital. 

But the foreign-ownership cap on 
such state-run companies as Korea 
Electric Power Corp. and Pohang 
Iron & Steel Co. will remain un- 
changed at 18 percent, a Finance 
Ministry official said. 

The ministry did not say when the 


foreign ownership cap would be in- 
creased, but the official said the 


creased, but the official said the 
move could bring in about 1.36 tril- 
lion won ($1.51 billion) in fresh 
foreign funds. 

The government said that it 
would also expand access to the 
bond market and generally accel- 
erate the liberalization of capital 
markets. 

Meanwhile, foreign exchange 


SINGAPORE — Two major new 
bridges — one nearly finished and 
the other in the planning stage — 
would streamline the flow of trans- 
port in Southeast Asia, increasing 
trade and tourism between Singa- 
pore, Malaysia and Indonesia. 

President Suharto of Indonesia re- 
cently approved the more ambitious 
of the two projects: a bridge linking 
the resource-rich Indonesian island 
of Sumatra and peninsular Malaysia 
across the Strait of Malacca. If com- 
pleted early next century as planned, 
the 95-kilometer (60-mile) bridge 
would be the longest in the world. 

It dwarfs the other project, a joint 
venture supervised by the govern- 
ments of Malaysia and Singapore 
to build a 1.9-kilometer bridge 
linking Tuas, part of the Jurong 
industrial hub on the western side 
of Singapore's main island, with 
the Malaysian stale of Jobor. 

Under construction for more 


alternative route between Malaysia 
and Singapore,” a Singapore official 
said, "and will also alleviate the 


Mrs. Siri said the bridge would 
probably open for traffic around 

200' 1 Kni ndrWt thsr mnerrtirrinn 


Manila 

Jakarta” ' 

WeHingtan. 

Bombay 

Source: Telekurs 


PS£-.. v ; -'. 

Composite index 

NZSB -40 ' 

Sensitive Index • ■ 


2,3S4-B3 2,428.73 


642*S 

2A88.lt 


2,497,77.. 4K3si 


LnicraaUinia] HcnldTribunc 


2002 bin added that construction VQI*y briefly I 


traffic congestion at die existing Jobor could start only alter the plan was 
causeway. This will boost tourism and approved by the International Mari- 


trade for the two countries.” 

The cost of the dual three-lane 
bridge, with associated expendit- 
ures, is expected to exceed $870 
million. 

The cost of the bridge over the 
Strait of Malacca has not been cal- 
culated. but engineers estimate it 
will run about S2J2 billion. That 
project, proposed by Prime Minister 
Mahathir bin Mohamad of Malaysia 
last October, will be undertaken by 
private companies led by Renong 
Bhd. of Malaysia and the Indonesian 
company PT Malindo Transmadu. 
which is controlled by Siti Hediati 
Prabowo, Mr. Suharto's daughter. 

The project’s developers have 
not disclosed the precise location 
of the bridge because, they say. 
such information could lead to 
speculative property purchases in 
the vicinity, pushing land acqui- 


Its financial problems arose from dealers in South Korea said Monday 


•'overexpansion. 

f :. Dainong Group suffered a 302 
“billion won ($336 million) loss last 
—year on sales of 1.38 trillion won, 
f. bringing its debt to 1 .84 trillion won 
: - a :< at the end of 1996. 

■ _ Its financial standing was further 
,.hurt by a hostile takeover attempt 


that the Bank of Korea had sold 
dollars at 904 won, but that the U.S. 
currency had continued to climb. 

The dollar closed at a record high 
of 904.60. up from 899.80 won on 
Friday, on strong demand and tight 


than two years, this bridge is due to sition costs higher and making the 
be opened to traffic Jan. 2, provid- venture less viable. 


supply, dealers said. 
‘‘There are a nui 


are a number of banks 


~by Shindongbang Co. for Midopa with long dollar positions,” said a 
- Co., which accounted for 60 percent dealer at a domestic bank. * ‘but they 


" of Dainong Group’s turnover. 

Dainong group borrowed 100 
•million won in January to thwart the 
’'bid, the first attempt at a hostile 
/takeover in South Korea.; The bid 

* -to- aeU^^^!^perceat -stake in 

"Midopa to Dainong. 

At the rime the bailout was ratified 
at a May 28 meeting of Dainong’s 23 


are hoarding their dollars and con- 
tinuing to secure the greenback on 
expectations of a further rise in the 
future.’* 

The central bank had sold dollars 
in'botb -the. spot; and forward mar- 
kets, dealers said. ; - 

Traders said typical Monday dol- 
lar demand, caused by the settle- 
ment of import bills that matured 


tug an alternative to the road and 
rail causeway between the north- 
ern rip of Singapore and Johor Ba- 
haiu, the main city in Johor. 

Built in the 1920s, the causeway 
handles about 43,000 vehicles a 
day and is notorious for traffic 
jams at peak rimes. The new bridge 
will be able to cany about 200,000 
vehicles a day. 

“The bridge will provide a fast 


But the most likely terminus 
points of the dual two-lane bridge 
are considered to be Melaka in 
Malaysia and Dumai on the central 
eastern coast of Sumatra. 

Mrs. Siti said the bridge would 
extend 42 kilometers across the 
Strait of Malacca. 47 kilometers 
across an island off of Sumatra and 
another 6 kilometers over water 
between the island and Sumatra. 


time Organization in London. A 
spokesman for the organization said 
die design of the bridge would have 
to be studied carefully to ensure that 
ii did not impede maritime traffic or 
affect navigational safety. 

The section of the bridge over the 
main shipping channels in the Strait 
of Malacca — by far the busiest 
maritime link between the Pacific 
and Indian oceans — will be as many 
as 90 meters (300 feet) above sea 
level to allow vessels to pass safely 
underneath, Mrs. Siri said. 

Initial estimates by the Indone- 
sian-Malaysian consortium pro- 
moting the project suggested that 
between 2.000 and 5.000 vehicles 
a day would use the toll bridge. 

Some economists question 
whether such a flow would justify 
rite cost of the bridge on strictly 
commercial grounds. 

Mrs. Siri acknowledged that the 
current instability of Indonesia's 
currency and stock market made 
now an unfavorable time to unveil 
the project because developers 
were not seeking government fi- 
nancing for the venture. 

“We will raise money from a 
variety of sources.” she said. 
“These include the stock market, 
long-term loans from foreign banks 
and by encouraging property de- 
velopment” near the bridge. 


• Honda Motor Co., doubled its exports in July to the United 
States, to 22,700 units, against July 1996, as domestic pro- 
duction increased 26.1 percent, to 119.713 vehicles. Nissan 
Motor Co.’s domestic production grew 3.4 percent, while 
production at Toyota Motor Co. rose 0.4 percent. 

• Yaoban Japan Corp. shares rose 19 percent, to 156 yen, 
after a company spokesman said that Chairman Kazuo Wada 
would borrow 20 bullion yen ($170.7 million) from friends in 
Hong Kong and that the money would be used to repay 
overdue bills for the financially troubled retailer. 

• Toshiba Corp. has cut the forecast of its personal computers 
shipments from 4 million units to 3.7 million units for the year 
through March due to slower demand in the United States. 

• Thailand's budget deficit for the 10 months through July 
was 31 billion baht ($943.7 million) or 3.3 percent of the 
budget for the year, the Finance Ministry reported. 

• Sausage Software Ltd. shares rose 30 percent, to close at 26 
Australian cents ( 19 U.S. cents), after the company said it had 
entered into a distribution accord with Netscape Commu- 
nications Corp. 

• Unocal Corp. announced it had set up a company, Unocal 
New Ventures, to pursue pipeline and power projects and 
explore oil and gas exploration and production ventures in 
Thailand. 


• Renong Bhd. of Malaysia has sent a 22-member delegation 
to Pakistan to explore investment opportunities, Pakistani 
officials said. The delegation, which wul stay until Saturday, 
will meet with the state-controlled Board of Investment, the 
Privatization Commission and the ministries of petroleum and 
natural resources, water and power and commerce. 

• Chinese authorities have shut down 42 illegal videodisk 
production lines in the southern province of Guangdong and 
seized 2.5 million pirated audio and video products, the 


official China Daily reported. Bridge News, Bloomberg, AP, AFP 


Loss in China and Taxes Reduce Foster’s Net 


-.creditor banks, the conglomerate over the weekend, was also respon- 

• u j; . ■ - c _n.i. e 4.„ 


-said it would dispose of six unprof- 
-• itable units this year, inclading Dain- 
! ong Petrochemicals and Midopa 


' Food System, and sell real estate in percent last year. 

- _ » - - - • 1_2 / A C V 


sible for die won's decline. 

The won has fallen about 7 per- 
cent so far this year, after falling 8 


? an effort to raise working capital. 


(AFX, Bridge News, Bloomberg) 


Campled by Ota SuffFram Dapadtes 

SYDNEY — Foster’s Brewing Group Ltd. 
blamed increased taxes and offshore losses as 
the Australian beer giant reported Monday that 
net profit fell 15 percent, to 250.5 million 
dollars ($186.7 million), in the year ended 
June. 

The company said pretax profit rose II 
percent, to 336.7 million dollars, from the 


coming a focused and leading international portfolio, which it valued at 320 million dol- 


beverage group. 

* ‘The platform we have established provides 
exciting opportunities for the future," be 
said. 

The stock market appeared to agree, as 
Foster’s finished up 2 cents in Sydney at 2.62 
dollars. 

Foster's also said that it planned to sell about 


lars. 

Group sales rose 10 


Singapore 
Eases Rules on 
Immigration 


Group sales rose 10 percent last year, to 2.8 
billion dollars. (AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


New Fears Hurt Stocks 
In Jakarta and Bangkok 


previous year, while sales grew 12 percent, to one-third of its U.S. and Australian property 
2.62 billion dollars. 


But the brewer’s tax burden surged to 70.9 //’J/nnp £ Ztyft 

million dollare from 21.1 million dollars in the ^OeUr U €?#!€? MJUJS 0.0 /U 

year ended June 30, 1996, as previously ac- flffZrvnt Contrni Tar irei 
cumulated tax losses bad been fully accounted UJ IrrCai Oem/TH lOTgei 

for. 


■ Food Retailer Sets Expansion 

Wool worths Led., Australia's largest food 
retailer, said Monday that it would rely on 
inner-city store expansion and a new gasoline 
venture for earnings growth over the next three 
years, Bloomberg News reported. 

The projection came as Woolworths reported 


an 1 1 percent rise in net profit, to 258 million 
dollars, for the year ended June 30. led by strong 
grocery sales. Revenue also rose 11 percent 
from the previous year to 15J57 billion dollars. 

* ‘Our agenda is to develop the metro concept 
in the inner cities and get the petrol canopies in 
the supermarket car parks,” Managing Di- 
rector Reg Clairs said. 

A rapid stare expansion would depend on 
the earnings performance from its one new 
store in Sydney. 

Mr. Clairs said Woolworths planned to open 
200 gasoline retail sites by 2000. To date, 
Woolworths has 17 stations and earnings have 
been satisfactory, he said. 

The retailer said its capital expenditure pro- 
gram over the next two years of 1.2 billion 
dollars meant the prospects of pursuing over- 
seas ventures were minimal. 

“It’s a little bit on the back-burner but we are 
still looking at it.” the chief financial officer, 
Geoff KJeemann, said of international expan - 


OntM by Our Sufi Fran 

JAKARTA — Indonesia’s 
benchmark stock index plunged 
5.5 percent Monday to a 49-week 
low as high interest rates and a 
weak rupiah raised concerns that 
corporate earnings will suffer. 

The Thai stock index also fell, 
with its benchmark index drop- 
ping neatly 5.4 percent 

“Hold on tight there’s a very 
rough ride coming,’ ’ said T. Stma 
GuhaRoy, who invests in Indone- 
sia for Koeneman Capital Man- 
agement (Singapore) Ltd. 

“It’s easy to find out how much 
foreign debt these companies 
have,” he added, '‘but irs dif- 
ficult to know how much is 
hedged, and at what price.” 

The Jakarta Stock Market 
Composite Index dropped 31.75 
points to close at 542.65. 

The combination of higher in- 
terest rates, foreign debt and de- 


all across the board. Until those 
downgrades are built into prices, 
we won’t see any rises.’’ 

There is also broader concern 
that slower earnings and higher 
interest rates will result in loan 
defaults, threatening the solvency 
of banks. Mr. Roy said he did not 
think die large, publicly traded 
banks were in such danger, though, 
he said, it was likely that sane of 
the country’s smaller banks could 
be squeezed out of business. 

The rise in interest rates has 
also made Indonesian fixed-in- 
come investments much more at- 
tractive to investors relative to 
stocks. 

Three-month deposits are 
yielding about 30 percent- The 
composite three-month interbank 
rate rose to 47.2 percent Monday, 
its highest level in at least four 


In addition, the hig h start-up costs of the 
recently established Foster’s China and a loss 
at its 40 percent-owned Molson Breweries in 
Canada cut into profit 
The company reported that it lost 19 million 


Reuters 

SYDNEY — Coeur d’Alene Mines Corp. of 
the United States said Monday that it had ac- 
quired a 5 J percent stake in Eagle Mining Corp. 
of Australia, which is the subject of a hostile 


dollars in C hina, IT .7 percent more than in the takeover bid by Great Central Mines Ltd. 


previous year, while an abnormal loss of 17.8 Coeur d’AJei 
milli on dollars was related mainly to Molson. million Eagle s 
President Ted Kunkel said the company still chases on the o] 
hoped to break even on its China operations by It noted that I 


Coeur d’AJenc said it had acquired the 4.2 
million Eagle shares since May through pur- 
chases on the open market. 

It noted that Eagle had rejected the offer of 3 
Australian dollars ($2.24) per share bid by 


* ‘Whether we do is actually irrelevant,' ’ he Great Central but refused further comment on 
said. “We are building in that part of the world Great Central’s bid or Coeur d'Alene's stance 


for future value over the longer term,” 
Foster’s said that most of its divisions were 


doing well in the first quarter. 


as a major shareholder. 

“Our decision in May to build a strategic 
investment in Eagle was based on the com- 


“Carlton& United Breweries has been per- pany’s low-cost production profile and ex- 
forming exceptionally well," Mr. Kunkel said, cellent potential for increases to the company’s 
“Miidara Biass had an excellent July, and reserves and resources,” the Coeur d’Alene 


Molson is tracking well.” 


Molson was moving toward a stable market er, said. 


president and chief executive, Dennis Wheel- 


share, he added, and was showing signs of 
improvement in its underlying profitability. 


Coeur owns 50 percent of the Western Aus- 
tralia-based gold miner Gasgoyne Gold Mines 


Mr. Kunkel said the results reflected con- NL. Eagle shares closed 12 cents higher Mon- 
tinued -progress in Foster’s strategy of be- day at 3.35 dollars. 


Mr. KJeemann said the retailer’s capital ex- 
penditure in 1998 would reach 700 million 
dollars this year, including 40 million to 50 
milli on dollars on gasoline retailing sites, 220 
million on two distribution centers and 180 
milli on on expansion of retail sites. 


Age nee Frunce-Presse 

SINGAPORE— In an 
effort to “produce for 
world markets” and be- 
come a “knowledge- 
based economy.” Singa- 
pore intends to ease im- 
migration rules and pro- 
vide inexpensive housing 
to attract foreign profes- 
sionals, Prime Minister 
Goh Chok Tong said, 
adding that the economy 
has a continuing need for 
“intellectual capital” 

Singapore must be- 
come a “cosmopolitan, 
global city, an open so- 
ciety where people from 
many lands can feel at 
home.” Mr. Goh told a 
National Day rally. 

Singapore’s popula- 
tion hit 3.6 million last 
year, including 560,000 
foreigners. The number 
of foreigners has been 
growing rapidly, with 
some 30,000 people set- 
tling here last year as per- 
manent residents. 

“We need to expand 
this inflow,” Mr. Gob 
said Sunday, appealing 
to Singaporeans to wel- 
come foreigners and nor 
treat them as competit- 
ors. 


years. 

This month. 


the benchmark 


ST^^darego- stockindexh^f^len^^ 
ineto knock corporate profits this cutting the market capital ^ion 
\/ff Bnu said, thoueh it is of the Jakarta exchange by 


HD TV: Stakes Are High in Fierce U.S. -Europe Trade Race 


Continued from Page 1 


worst untd they can quan^ *c ou tlool channels and interactive services- 

impact on companies bottom raieaB ® P°° P° suc h as Internet access — that dlg- 

Unes. • • D T^Rlr,otr,lr <5FT market in- ital television promises. 

“We’re now looking at a pen- Tte B^okSb i niara ^ ^ ^ United States, two compa- 

od of one, two, three months that dexWm98poiD , ^ h ^ ^ stand to earn the most from 

interest rales are going to be Jugh- raSed low, with licensing royalties: Dolby Ubora- 

er than previously thought, said ^ riSTMonday in tones, apnvatdy held San Franci«:o 

ThomasMeidinger, a salesman^ o^t i 33.50 on company that devised the Grand AJ- 

Nikko Securities, ‘‘and thais hers Bridge News) fiance’s audio system, and Zenith 

making for earnings downgrades Fnday. (Bloomberg, nag Electronics Corp., which created the 

j transmission system. Zenith, owned 

ASEAN Plans Stable-Currency Fund among the seven companies and in- 
stitutions that make up the Grand 

The Associated Pros Alliance; Dolby is not. 

irr t a r a t t nurpt tr — S outheast Asian nations will setup a spec*" ^ ^ other s id e of the Atlantic, 

KUALA LUMPUR . .. nf thrrr currencies, . ; mrw sftnnt for Enrrv 


We’re now looldcg * a peri- 


“We re now looking w a ^112908 noints to 529.61 . 

odofone, two, three moQths toat dex^ps^^ h ^ 

interest rales are going to be jugh- cunencv remained low, with 

er than previously thought,’ saui onday in 

TWffiMeidinger, a salesman^ 34taht &om33-50 on 


group. Two European companies — 
Thomson SA and Philips Electron- 
ics NV — are members of both. 

For a long time the United States 
held a clear marketing advantage; 
only the American system supported 
high-definition television. The Euro- 


system that used conventional analog 
transmission — a gravy train none of 
the companies wanted to jeopardize. 

In 1993 the Europeans acknowl- 
edged that their analog hish-defin- 


edged that their analog higb-defin- 
itioo television system was a dead 
letter. In the following years a small 


pean system offered only standard- group of broadcast engineers began 
definition digital broadcasts, and its work on their own digital system. 


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proponents disparaged the desire for The European wok was completed 
hign-definition TV, or HDTV. and marketing begun at about the 

But this spring, when Australian time that deployment of the Grand 
broadcasters, among others, made it Alliance system was stalled by 
clear they would not choose a sys- protests from the computer industry, 
tem that did not allow for high- Computer executives contended the 
definition broadcasts, the Euro- U.S. system was nor sufficiently 


1800I25W CHjbm 
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Q50IIM figqvir 800132501 itfn 08DWSW37 






Alliance; Dolby is not. 

On the other side of die Atlantic, 
,4 this is very important for Euro- 
pean-based manufacturers of trans- 
mitters and satellite-television 
equipment,” Mr. McAvock, an of- 
ficial in the DVB project office m 
Geneva, said. The office is not wtil- 


peans changed course and drafted 
standards showing that their system 
could do high-dennition television. 


compatible with computers. 
“We lost a whole yea 


“We lost a whole year,” said 
Robert Graves, who was an AT&T 


The Grand Alliance standard for executive then and a senior official 
digital television was developed in a of the Grand Alliance. 


Butbeweicomeomciuuuy™ , i7to say which among the more 

Indonesia. Malaysia, Thailand, Brunei, Singapore, ^ l0Q companies that are DVB 

.ASEAN groups Indon^^Wteteysjj stand to earn the mosL 


Burma, Vietnam, Laos and the cooperated during the 

Mr. Anwar said association conies, 

recent crisis of the currencies ofsev Philippine peso and the 

The Malaysian ringgit *t^nSi^^have^cia^ 
Indonesian rupiah are among regional cuiren 

recently. — 


There is some crossover Several 


American companies, including In- governments had been handing 
Qmflriooal Business Machines dreds of millions of dollars ov 

******** ... e . . n L V am A/vrmentPc /a 


government-sponsored race that las- 
ted almost 10 years. In 1990 a soon- 
to-be contestant in thar race. General 
Instrument Cop., developed the 
world's first digital television sys- 
tem. But for several years after that, 
European broadcasters showed no in- 
terest in digital television. European 
governments had been handing hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars over to 


fYjm and Hewlett-Packard Co. are companies to promote the develop- 
h^iant members of the DVB ment of a high-definition television 


With the market to itself, DVB 
won customers among numerous di- 
rect-broadcast satellite companies 
around the world, including the 
EchoStar system in the United 
States. But now the battle is joined. 
Far more than half of the world's 
television viewers gei their service 
from an antenna, not cable or satel- 
lite systems. And it is this “ter- 
restrial' ’ broadcasting that is the tar- 
get of marketers from both sides. 



DINING 


The World’s Top Tables 


Patricia Wells 
‘ Food Critic 


If you missed it in the IHT, look for it 
on our site on the World Wide Web: 


I 


i 





PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 


Monday’s 4 P.M. 

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997; 

-T ^r. 


World Roundup 


Court Jails 5 Fans 

soccer A Dutch court jailed 
five Ajax Amsterdam fans Monday 
for their part in a brawl that led to 
the death of a fellow supporter, 
court officials said. 

Judge Beyer-Lazonder sen- 
tenced the five to six months im- 
prisonment. with two months sus- 
pended, and barred them from 
attending matches for two years. 

They were the first guilty ver- 
dicts to be handed down in the trial 
of more than 40 Ajax and Fey- 
enoord Rotterdam supporters ac- 
cused of fighting a pitched battle in 
March on wasteland outside the 
capital in which an Ajax fan died. 

* ‘If you had not been there, there 
would have been no fight,'' the 
judge told the men, dismissing a 
defense argument that they were 
not directly involved in the killing . 

The prosecution has asked the 
court to jail a group of Feyenoord 
supporters, charged with taking 
pan in the fatal beating, for up to 
five years. {Reuters) 

Italian Player Dies 

BASKETBALL!. Da vide An~ 
cilotro. a 23 -year-old player in the 
Italian first division, died Sunday 
night after suffering a brain hem- 
orrhage a week ago, doctors said. 

Ancilotto, who played for Tele- 
market Roma and the national 
team, collapsed on the coun on 
Aug. 17 during a match against 
Nancy Basket Cougars of France in 
the Italian city of Gubbio. f AP) 

Popov Takes 4 Golds 

swimming Alexander Popov re- 
lumed to the pool and won four 
gold medals in the European Cham- 
pionships. which ended Sunday. A 
year after he was stabbed in Mos- 
cow. Popov set the fastest times in 
the world this year in the 50- and 
100-meters freestyle. He also won 
tw o relay golds. ( Reuters l 

Norman Wins by 3 

golf Greg Norman shot a 3- 
under-par 67 Sunday for a four- 
stroke victory over Phil Mickelson 
in the World Series of Golf in Ak- 
ron. Ohio. 

Norman’s final-round left him at 
7-under 273 for the tournament. 

Norman collected $396,000 and 
a 1 0-year PGA Tour exemption. 

Mickelson didn *t have a birdie in 
his round of 2-over 72, which gave 
him second place at 3-under 277. 

• Mark CaJcavecchia will be at 
the winnere-only World Series next 
year. His victory in the Greater 
Vancouver Open on Sunday will be 
his passport. Calcavecchia shot a 5- 
under par 66 in the Final round for a 
1 -stroke victory over Andrew 
Magee on Sunday. It was his first 
PGA Tour title since 1995. (AP) 



Greg Norman's 7-under 273 
took the World Series of Golf. 


Scoreboard 



Thanh) n.x/ijvivr Framc-PnrRC 


Chanda Rubin of the United States serving Monday to Tamarine Tanasugarn of Thailand in the opening match 
on the new Arthur Ashe stadium court. Tanasugarn won their First- round match at the U.S. Open, 6-4, 6-0. 


Thai Cuts the Ribbon With Upset 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — Chanda Rubin won 
the first point on the spanking new Ar- 
thur Ashe Stadium court ana the first 
game. She also was the first loser in the 
1997 U.S. Open. 

Rubin may have been selected to be 
first on the centerpiece court of the S254 
million National Tennis Center expan- 
sion because she is the highest-ranked 
African-American in tennis, it made no 
difference on Monday. 

Tamarine Tanasugarn of Thailand 
was the first winner In the new complex, 
6-4, 6-0. “1 feel very happy that 1 played 
in the stadium, to be the first — no, first 
two players in the stadium,” Tanas- 
ugara said. "It's my first time to play in 
a big stadium, center court.” 


Tanasugarn took advantage of 33 un- 
forced errors from Rubin. Tanasugarn, 
who was bom in Los Angeles and moved 


U.S. Open Tennis 


to Thailand at age 5, looked at ease on 
the court. 

"I played on Court 1 in Wimbledon 
two years ago in the junior final, but this 
is the biggest I ever played.” said the 
Thai, who reached the third round at 
both the Australian Open and Wimble- 
don this year. 

Venus Williams, who is being billed 
as the next black tennis star, also was 
given a chance to shine on the Stadium 
court. She succeeded, beating Larisa 
Neiland of Latvia, 5-7, 6-0, 6- 1 . 


The early matches produced a rapid 
upset as the women's 15th seed. Rux- 
andra Dragomir of Romania, Iosl to the 
.American Lisa Raymond, 6-2. 3-6, 6-3. 

The first seedeef player to gain a spot 
in the second round was No! 14 Mark 
Philippoussis. The big-serving Australi- 
an pounded out a 6-3. 6-4. 3-6, 6-4 
victory over Morocco's Karim Aland. 

The men's 12th seed. Felix Mantilla 
of Spain, beat Jason Stoltenberg of Aus- 
tralia. 7-6 (7-4l. 6-3. 6-2. 

Other first-round winners included 
France's Alexia Dechaume-Bailerei. 
who beat compatriot Anne-Gaelle 
Sidot, 6-3. 3-6, . 6-3, and Miriam 
Oremans of the Netherlands, who beat 
Elena Makarova of Russia, 3-6, 6-4, 6- 
4 .(AP. Reuters ) 


Maradona Goes the Distance and Scores 


Ccmptlnltn OurSuig Fnm Pufiuxln 

Diego Maradona played a full 90 
minutes and scored as Boca Juniors 
opened the Argentine League season 
with a 4-2 vicloiy over Argentines Ju- 
niors. 

Maradona, 36, playing the second 
competitive game of his latest 
comeback, scored Boca's final goal 
from a penalty against the club with 
which he began his career. 

Claudio Caniggia had a subdued de- 
but and looked disgruntled when he was 
substituted during the second half. 
Caniggia, a veteran of two World Cups, 
was playing his first game after a year's 
absence from professional soccer. 

Toward the end of the match, 
Maradona began arguing with the ref- 
eree and afterward was picked for an 
anti-doping control, a choice he saw as 
not entirely coincidental. "For a change 
they picked me," he said. "They were 
holding up the No. 10." 

brazil Five players were senr off, 
four of them in a tumultuous first half, as 
Internacional humiliated Gremio, 5-2, 


in a brutal derby in the Brazilian Cham- 
pionship. 

The match between the rtvo leading 
teams from the southern city of Porto 
Alegre is one of the toughest in Brazilian 


World Soccer 


soccer, with the rugged style tradition- 
ally favored by teams from southern 
Brazil adding spice to the local rivalry. 

Vicious challenges flew throughout 
Sunday's first half. Brawls flared twice, 
holding up play for a total of five 
minutes, and each ended with a player 
from each side being sent off. 

Internacional finished with eight men 
as it also had defender Regis dismissed in 
the second half for a nasty tackle. In- 
ternational increased its lead at the top of 
the table to six points over Portuguesa. 
Gremio, the reigning champion, is in the 
bottom half of the table. 

Only 16 of the 26 teams played during 
the weekend. The championship has been 
thrown into chaos as many teams have 
gone on lucrative excursions to Europe. 


world COP The Czech Republic’s 
chances of qualifying for the 199S 
World Cup ended when it lost, 2-J. to 
Slovakia on Sunday in Bratislava in the 
first meeting between the two teams 
since the nations split four years ago. 

NORTH AMERICA Cruz Azul of Mex- 
ico City fell two goals behind after 14 
minutes against the Los Angeles Galaxy 
but fought back to win the north and 
central American Champions Cup, 5-3. 
in Washington on Sunday. It was Cruz 
Azul's second consecutive victory in 
the competiuon and its fifth overall. 

After Eduardo Hurtado scored twice 
for the Galaxy in the opening 14 
minutes. Benjamin Galindo, Joahan 
Rodriguez and Hector Adomaitis struck 
in a five-minute span to give Los Ce- 
menteros (the Cement Makers) a 3-2 
halftime Lead. 

Carlos Hermosillo scored twice in the 
second half. Jorge Campos, the Galaxy’s 
Mexican goalkeeper-runted- forward 
who will play for Cruz Azul during Ma- 
jor League Soccer's off-season, struck 
with 12 minutes left. {AP. AFP, Reuters ) 


Gothenburg Stadium 
Damaged by a Bomb- 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM— A bomb exploded 
at a sports stadium early Monday in the 
western Swedish city of Gothenburg, 
where soccer matches are to be played if 
Sweden wins the right to hold the 2004 
Olympics. 

No one was injured. 

The blast at the Cfilevi stadium was 
the latest in a series of attacks against 
Swedish sports facilities, apparently 
aimed at scuttling Sweden’s pending 
Olympic bid. All previous attacks have 
taken place in Stockholm. 

“It was a bomb,” said a Gothenburg 
police officer, Elena Canefur. “We 
don’t know yet who did it” 

Stadium employees said a Stockholm 
daily newspaper received a telephone 
call shortly before the explosion, warn- 
ing that a bomb would detonate soon, 
although the caller gave no details. 

The explosion, described by police as 
powerful, hit the players' entrance to the 
sports arena. The roof of a tunnel used 
by players to run onto the field col- 
lapsed. 

The police sealed off the stadium. 

The 1995 world athletics champion- 
ships were held in the stadium, U.S. pop 


star Michael Jackson performed there'; 
last week and it regularly hosts top-level- 1 . .- * 
soccer events. .... .. • 

Following the blast, a Swedish radio’- • 
news program and two Gothenburg- 

newspapers’ received calls threatening ari , . 

bomb blast in a central Gothenburg^, 
shopping mall, the police said. j 

Earlier this month, a bomb wrecked'; 
the press section of Stockholm s _ ■ 
Olympic stadium but caused no injuries. - - 
The bomb followed a series of arson ■* 
attacks on Stockholm tennis and sports, 
arenas. 

Responsibility for those attacks was * 
claimed by a little-known group calling .. 
itself We Who Built Sweden. It has j 
called the Olympics a waste of money. " 

We Who Built Sweden published a.' 
series of threats last year against-; 
Gothenburg and Stockholm, at t acki ng - ■' • 
the government for failing to solve so- 
cial problems. 

The president of the Stockholm com- _ 
mi tree seeking the Olympics, Oiof Sten- •; 
hammar, said the attacks were against ; 
the entire Olympic movement ! 

* ‘Tfie Olympic movement must stand '•' & 
firmly against any person or group try- \ *j*F 
ing to use these methods,” he said. ; 


Terrorism in Sweden 
Clouds the Olympics 


By Annelie Barkelund 

Washington Post Service 

STOCKHOLM — If track stars such 
as Carl Lewis, Maurice Green, Wilson 
Kipkecer and Sergei Bubka bad their 
way, Stockholm would be the Inter- 
national Olympic Committee’s choice 
to hold the 20CW Olympic Games. 

While the group hoping to bring the 
Games back to Sweden has succeeded 
in gening the backing of more than 50 
elite athletes from around the world, it 
has received lukewarm encouragement 
from the Swedish people. 

There has been active hostility on the 
part of someone or some group, in- 
cluding bombs and arson. 

A recent survey showed that 28 per- 
cent of the Swedish people do not want 
the Games in Stockholm, and that ac- 
tually marks a shift of attitude in favor of 
the Olympics. 

A similar poll four months earlier 
showed 41 percent against bringing the 
event here. 

Far more worrisome than negative 
public opinion is the negative publicity 
generated by a series of arson attacks 
and bombings. 

An explosion Monday at a soccer 
stadium in Gothenburg may be con- 
nected to the bid. So, it seems, was a 
bomb at Stockholm's old Olympic Sta- 
dium on Aug. 8. No one was injured in 
either explosion. The Monday bomb 
was the ninth attack linked to the 
Olympic bid since May. 

More ominous still was a letter re- 
ceived last week by a news agency 
threatening violence that would "make 
the 1972 Olympic tragedy in Munich 
look like a kindergarten tiff.” 

The letter was signed VSBS — the 
initials of the group's name translate 
from Swedish as "We Who Built 
Sweden." 

"If Stockholm gets the 2004 
Olympics, we will do everything in our 
power to disrupt and destroy," the letter 
said. "The world must realize that we 
are committed to the cause." 

The group claimed it possessed an 
arsenal obtained from motorcycle gangs 
and former Soviet bloc nations and was 
able to make bombs. 

The Swedish police say they have not 
established a definite link between the 
letter and opposition to the Olympics. 




perspect 


pointing to racist language in the letter 
as evidence that the writer could be an • 
individual or group opposed to the-gov- : J 
emment or among influx of hundreds of { 
thousands of immigrants. 

Whether the bombings — and the J 
threat of more violence — will hinder or j 
help Stockholm’s bid is unclear. « 

"It certainly is a negative tiring ;’ 1 ’ 
said Janies L. Easton, an Internationa] 
Olympic Committee member from die 
United Stales. 

“You don't like to see it happen 
because you wonder how deep it runs in 
the community. But, if it doesn't really 
measure the pulse of the people, you 
have to ignore it" 

Dick Pound, an TOC official from 
Canada, believes the incident could ac- 
tually sway the sentiment of many of the 
111 voting IOC members toward 
awarding Stockholm the Gaines. 

"The biggest thing is to get it in 
live,” he said. 

ou don’t fall to your knees and 
give up everything just because some 
lunatic sets off a bomb. This ought to 
drive more people to support Stockholm 
to show these acts are not going to affect 
the Olympics.” 

Pan of many Swedes’ opposition to 
holding the Olympics stems from a re- 
cent economic downturn. 

The Swedish economy fell into re- 
cession during the early 1990s, with 
employment climbing to about 8 per- 
cent and the government implementing 
extensive cuts. 

Opponents fear that money that could 
be spent on health care and education \ 
will be shifted to cover costs for the 7 
Olympics, which are estimated at more _ 
than $ 1 .5 billion. 

They cite the example of the 1995 ; 
world track and field championships in ’ 
Gothenburg. 

Athletes praised the event for its or-, 
ganization and the enthusiastic response 
of spectators, but the championships 
lost $6 million, $3.25 million of which 
the city was forced to bear. 

"We are critical of the government's 
decision to guarantee any economic loss 
for the Games in 2004.” said Stefan 
Eslby. chairman of the Association 
Against Olympic Games in Stockholm. 

"And we believe that the economic- 
calculations that they have made are far 
too optimistic." 


BASEBALL 


Major League Stanmnbs 

AMWCAM LEAGUE 

EAOTHVSIOH 



W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Battlmore 

83 

44 

454 



New York 

77 

52 

J97 

7 

Boalcn 

45 

44 

.496 

TO 

Toronto 

63 

64 

48B 

21 

Detroit 

40 

49 

MS 

34 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



Cleveland 

67 

60 

-528 



Milwaukee 

44 

45 

494 

4 

Chicago . 

44 

<4 

492 

4ri 

Kansas City 

57 

75 

409 

is 

Minnesota 

52 

74 

404 

I5H 


WEST DIVISION 



Seattle 

73 

57 

JS63 



Anaheim 

71 

40 

.542 

2V1 

Texas 

62 

68 

477 

11 

Oakland 

52 

79 

397 

2lM 

NJmOHAL LEAOU8 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Atlanta 

80 

so 

415 



Florida 

75 

53 

584 

4 

Now York 

70 

59 

543 

th 

Montreal 

63 

65 

484 

16 

Phflodetahto 

45 

80 

-360 

32% 

CENTRAL OIVtSION 



Houston 

49 

61 

531 

— 

Pittsburgh 

44 

44 

508 

3 

St. Louis 

59 

70 

457 

9>A 

Cincinnati 

56 

71 

441 

ll'4 

Chicago 

53 

78 

400 

»7 


WEST PtVtSWN 



Los Angefcs 

72 

58 

554 

— 

San Francisco 

59 

.546 

1 

Co lorn do 

es 

48 

477 

10 

San Diego 

a 

48 

477 

10 


SUNDAY'S LMIMMU 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Minnesota 000 108 080-1 « e 

Baltimore HI 220 Ota-5 9 0 

Hawkins, Trombley (5). Guadodo {7% 
Agukera HD end D.MHec KDmianfecU Onus 
CHI. A. Benfez (SI and Webster. 
W — Kflrmeinerti. 9-5. L—H nurture. *4. Sv-A. 
Berm (91. HRs— BaBmore. ByAndenan (14). 
Betroa (23), R. Palmeiro 09). 

Detroit 000 no 000-0 4 I 

MUwnrttM Oil 111 19* — 4 9 0 

Stair. M. My era Ml. Brecon fSl and 
Casanova; JJflerwdes and Leva. W— J. 
Mercedes, 6-7. L -Blair, 13-d. HRs — MIL 
rnul.ee Bumffi 1241. Clrillo IB). Loretta (5). 


Taranto 111 004 100 000 3-11 21 0 
Kansas C. 000 330 002 000 0-8 IS 1 
(13 bn lags) 

Carpenter. QuantriTI (8), Escobar (9). 
Plesoc (11), Crabtree (12) and OBrien, B. 
Santiago (10); Banes, Olson (6), Carrasco (7), 
Whtaenanl C9I..J. Montgomery <101. Cos km 
(12) aid Macftvfane, MLSweeney (10). 
W — Crabtree. 3-3. L— Castors, 0-2. 
HRs— Toronto, Cruz Jr 2 (20), Sprague (13). 
Kansas City, CDows OS). Sutton (1). 

Boston 001 020 000-3 B 0 

AnatMta 011 000 000-2 4 1 

wakofiekL Gordon (9) and Hattebeig; 
KHiU DaJWay (7), James (71 and Turner. 
W— Wakefield, 914. L— K_ Hill fr-11. 
Sv— Gordon (2). HRs — Boston Jh-Valentin 
(IS). Anatwim, Hodins 113). 

Omfaid 000 001 000-1 S o 

Orfdaad 011 001 ldx-4 6 1 

Smiley, Plunk (4), Joanne (7), Shuey (8) 
and S. AJottoc Haynes, Groan (4). Taylor 
(A), MoMer (8), T. JJMfflttKWS IB) and 
Go. WU Boms, w — Haynes 2-3. L— SmBey 2-3. 
Sv— T. J .Mathews (1). HRs— Cleveland. Jus- 
tice (28). Oddand, Bellhom (4). Stairs (22). 
New York 000 020 100-3 4 1 

Seattle ooo 021 20» — 5 7 i 

D-Wnte and GtrordL' Claude. Ayala (7), 
Timlin (91 and Da.Wtbon. W— Ayala 9-4. 
L— D. Weds. 14-7. 5 v— Timlin (lOf. 

HR s New York. Curtis (12). Seattle, Buhner 
(31), Da-Wfeon (12). 

CNage 100 000 200-3 7 1 

Tens 001 000 000-1 4 1 

Bare, Faolke (7), Karchnar (9) and 
Pafcrepas. Helling. Bones (91 and I. Rod- 
riguez. W-Sere 24 L— Hetl ing, 1-1. Sv— 
Korchner (9). HR— Chicago, a Guillen (3). 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Gncmok 100 DO0 030 2—4 10 1 

Atlanta 100 001 020 0-4 7 3 

(Winnings) 

Morgan, Shaw (Q, Betndn HO) mid 
Toubensee, J. Oliver (81: Smoltz, Cottier (8). 
WoMen (9), C. For (10), Embree UO) and 
J.Lopez. W— Show, i-2. L-C Fw 0-1. 
Sv— BefiAdO (1). HRa— Cincinnati, 

RJhmders (16). Atlanta Lofton (5). 

Son Diego 038 000 000-3 9 0 

New York 000 000 200-2 5 1 

Pimlth. Tl.Worreil (71. Hoffman (9) andC 
Hernandez: Bohonox Udle (81 and Hundley. 
W-P. Small W. L— Bohonox 3-1 Sv— 
Hoffman (30). HR— New York, Huskey (14). 
Las Angeles 100 003 001-4 8 0 

Philadelphia 000 010 000-1 & 1 

I.Valdes. Radinsky (9) and Piazza Beech. 
B lazier (7). R. Harris (9) and Parent 
Lieberthal (9). W-l. VoWes. 9-10. L-Beech 


2-8. HRs— Los Angeles EcYaung (7). Zflile 
124). Phfiodelphia, Bairon (21 . 

Colorado 000 081 000-1 4 I 

Houston 102 000 00*— 3 4 0 

Jm.WrighL Leskanic (4), DeJcan (01 and 
Mamrarins Hampton and Ausmos. W — 
Hampton 11-8. L— Jm.Wright 6-10. HRs— 
Colorado, Bicheltet 191 .Houston. DeSell fill. 
San Franceses 000 111 111—4 12 1 

Pittsburgh 030 200 04*— 9 13 1 

Gardner, R. Rodriguez fS), R. Hernandez 
(4). D. Henry (81 Poole (B), Tovnrez (8) and 
B. Johnson; Lieber, Wallace (71. Sodawsky 

(8) , Chri s tiansen (8), Ruefaef (9), M. Wilkins 

(9) and OsBl W— Christiansen, 5-0. L— D. 
Henry- 4-5. Sv— M. Wilkins CO. HR-San 
Francisco, Vizcaino (4). 

Montreal 000 003 000-3 8 1 

Oncnga 20S 100 041-12 IS 0 

C Perez, Bonnolt I3L M. varies (61. KBne 
(8) and Hetchei; Je. Gonzalez, R. Tafts (81 
and Serais. W— JeGanzcdez. 104. L— C Pe- 
rez. 11-10. HRs— Montreal, R. White (20). 
Chicago, Sandberg 2 (10), Soso (291. 
Dunston (9). 

SI. LodlS 000 BOO 100-1 8 0 

Florida 400 001 »*— 7 9 1 

Stotfleroyre. Frasdatwe (4). Beltran (7). C. 
King 18} and Dlfeflce. Lomakin (41; Dicta, 
Rawed (7). Vocberj (91 and Zaon. W— Ojolo 
1-0. L— Stottfemyre 12-9. HRs-SI. Lout. 
Gaetti (14). Florida. Counsel! 0 ). 



World Series of Golf 


Final scores Sunday tram S2. 2 railBon 
NEC World Series of God hold al par-70. 
7,140-yard (L53S meters) Firestone Country 
Club in Akron, Ohio: 

GregNomwrvAustrnMn 

Phil Mkfcetson U.5. 


Fred FuntoUi. 

Tiger Woods. UJ. 
John Cook. US. 
VflovStogXFW 
Carlos Franca Para g. 
Tom Lehman, U J. 
Davis Love III, U.S. 
DawdOgrixUJ. 

Nick Price, Zimbabwe 


48-48-70-47—273 

67- 72-44-72-277 

70- 40.71 -68— 278 

47- 77-49-70-278 

68- 49-07- 74—278 

71 - 71 -71 -44—279 
75-47-48-70-280 
7J-A4-W-71— 280 

48- 71-70-72-281 
71-70-47-73—281 
68-7148-74-281 


Vancouver Open 


Firm! scores Sunday tram *15 nrilion 
Greater Vancouver Open, played on 8.783- 


yard (8206 meters), par-71 Northview Gall 
and Country Chib m Surrey, British 
Columbia: 

MoikColavecchta. ui 
Andrew Magee, U.S. 


Bab Esjcs, U.S. 

Russ Cochran. UjS 
P.H. Horgon HI. U.5. 
Mlchoel Chrislie. U.S. 
David Sutherland. U.S. 
Tim Herron, U.S. 
BIBGiassoa UA. 

John Adams. U5 
Payne Stewart U.S. 


6ft-Mr4S-tA— 2<S 

65- 71 454S— 244 

66- 47.69-45—767 
494844-44-749 
7143-72-64-270 
71474845—271 
66484849 — 271 
664947 49 — 27 1 
6748-6749—771 
66-6847-70—271 
414848-71— 271 


JOHNNIE WALKER RYDER CUP 

Leading European standing lor (he Ryder 
to be played Sept 26-78 at VMdcrania in 
Sola grander. Spain. Top 10 finishers quality 
lor 1 2man team. European captain Seve Ba- 
aeateras trill select Iasi two prayers after 
this week's final qualifying event the BMW 
International Open In Munich. 

1. Colin Montgomerie. Britain B 73,625 points 

2. Darren Darke. N. Ireland 59*813 

3. Bernhard Longer. Germany) 519.148 

4. Ian Woosnam. Wales 5 14.0S9 

5. Per-Ubik Johansson. Sweden 477,965 

6. Lee Westwood. England 468,1 S3 

7. Ignacio Garrida. Spain 371496 
& Castanttao Rocca. Italy 345.132 
9. Thomas B|am. Denmark 331.479 

I Q-MkjuH Angel Martin Spain 3244(H) 

II Mario OtezabaL S pair 31 i461 

12. Padralg Harrington, Ireland 293.517 

1 3. Paul Broadhurst E ngland 3n.707 
14 JoakJm Hacggnni Sweden 74844 O 
I S.Roger Chapman. England 242J72 

Note: Miguel Angel Martin of Spam is 
iniu red and will not be available (a play 



World Cup 


EUROPEAN ZONf 

GROUP sn 
Slovakia Z Czech Republic 1 
frwMBIBSi Spain 70 pants; Yugoslavia 
19; Slovakia 1 5; Czech Rep. 7; Faeroe Islands 
& Motto 0 

ASIA ZO Ml 

FIRST ROUND 

GROUP FIVE 
Uzbekistan 5. Yemen t 
standings: Uzbekistan 16 paints. Ye- 
men to Indonesia 7: Cambodia 1. 

Uzbekistan odvanced to second round. 


MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER 

Kansas City A San Jose 2, SO (2-11: 

STJUKHNOS: Eastern Confarenco: O.C. 
42 points; Tampa Boy 36. Columbus 29; New 
Enqland 2& NY-NJ 22. Western Corderenm: 
Kansas City 40. Colorado 35.- Dallas 30; Los 
Angelos 26. San Jose 24. 


TENNIS 


Andreo Glass, Germany, 1-a, 7-e (7-51, 6-2. 
Minam Oremans. Nelhertontis. del. Elena 
Makarova Russia 34. 6-4. 4-4. Sarah 
PllkowsW, France, del. Rene Simpson, Cana- 
da 6-1. 44. 74 (7-5). 

Venus Williams U.S, def. Larisa Ndland. 
Latvia 5-7. 6-0. 6-1. Henrielo Nogyova Slo- 
vakia def. Alelaandra Otsza Poland. 6-1 6- 
0. Anna Koumikova Russia def. Sabine Ap- 
petmans. Belgium. 6-2, 6-0. 


MW PRO (HMIHOHMK 

M B ROOK U HE- MASSACHUSETTS 

FINAL 

Sieng Schalken Netherlands dot. Marccio 
Ptos. 2. Chile 7-5. 6-1 

WTA RAMKINOS 

I. Martina Hingis, Switzerland. 4566 points; 
1 Monica Seles. U.S. 377ft 3. Jana Novotna 
Czech Republic. 3517 4. Ire Mqoft Croatia 
3305: 5. Amanda Coetet Sautti Alnca 2969; 
t- Lindsay Davenport U.S, 2831; 7. Steffi 
Graf. Germany. 2560; 8. Ai*c Huber. Ger- 
many. 2454 9. Can data Martinez. Spoke 2383; 
10 Mary Pierce. France. 7344; II. Arantxa 
Sanchez, Spain, 2117: 17. Irina Spirlea Ram. 
1878.-13.Mar> Joe Fernandez, US, 1797. 14. 
Brenda Schuftz -McCarthy, Netherlands. 106 I. 
15 Puvondra Dragamr, Romania 15%. 

ATP RAN KINGS 

I. Pete Sampras U.S, 549 1 points.- 2. Mlc- 
hoel Chang, U5, 1632. 3. Yevgeny kaftri- 
mkov; Russia 2693; 4. Goran Ivanisevic. 
Croatia. 2414 5- Thomas Muster. Austria. 
2.544 4. Cartas Moya Spain. Iaa 9. 7. Ala 
Carrel fa. Spain. 238 o. 8 Sergl Brvguem. 
Spain. 2.3*2; 9. Gustavo Kucrtea Brazil 
219a io Marccio RkaCMe. 11 17; li. Tho- 
mas Enqvist Sweden. 2.0JA: 12. RHb Man- 
tilla Spam, 1,94ft 1 3, Boris Becker, Germany, 
i.9tft 14. Patrick Rafter. Australia. LB9ft 15. 
Albert Casla Spain. 1,803 

U.S. Open 


MONDAY WUUin 
FIRST ROUND 
WOMEN SNOUf 

Tamanne Tomasuoom. Thai Iona del. 
Cnanda Rubin. U.S. 4-A 6-0. Fima PertcttL 
Italy, dot. Eh Coflem, Belgium, 6-3. o4 
r.lcike Batacf. Germany, def. Tatiana Panova 
Ri7sam.6-d.4-i. 

Lho Raymond IU. def. Rutandra 
Drag now M51. Romania. 6-2 34. 6-3. Gala 
Loon Garcia. Spain, del. Anne Miller. U.S, 4- 
4. s-2 63. Alem Dechaumo-Bollen?!. 
France, ruri. Anne-Goclle Sktot. Franco. o-X 
34.6-3. 

Mana Alejondm Venla Venezuela del. 


Maizio MorMli. Italy, def. Hendrik Dreefc- 
mort Germany, 6 - 1 , 74 (7-5), 6-3. 

Felb ManIDfa (12). Spahv def. Jason 
SMienocra Ausirafia 74 (7-4). &- 1 6-7. 

Mark PtiWppaussis 114), Australia del. 
Korim A la mi. Morocco. 6-1 4-4. 3-a 6-4. 

Johcm Von Hereto Belgium, def. Ffflp 
DewuH. Belgium. 64, 44, 74 (7-31. 74 (7-5). 

Greg RuwdsU Bnfata def. David 
Whealan. Uj. 6-2 6-3, 6-3. 

Sdmi Draper. Australia del Jon Michael 
GambllL Ui.fr4,6-174II3.nj. 

Jens Knippschlld Germany, del. Slava 
DosedeL Czech. 7-i 5-7. 6-4, 6-7 f5-7), 6 - 4 . 


FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUI 

ARI70HA- Waived DE Brent Bumsti 
Eric England FB Rod Brown. I.B Lwi 
bms, FS Kenny Harris. TE Janus Hai 
WR Mlchoel Watkins. 

a TL6NT»— waived DT Shannon Bn 
Anthony Phfflips. CB Lenny JIAcGill a 
Roell Presion 

BALTIMORE— Acguired T-G B 
Dofney tram Pittsburgh tor ihew io< 
round draft pick and G Ben Cuvi 
PMadefphia Engles tor ineir low ^ 
draft pick. Wcnrea OL Aks Bcmslu 
Randy Bicrman. OL Jerome Oantr 
Mike Flynn, OL Dcnnh WhttriMre. W| 
aid RJehard LB Bernard Russ. DL Dt 
Jeffries, DL Charles Kina and DL 
Moore. 

BUFFALO— Waived OL Gtoiw Pariu 
Jushn Amour. WR MllcheH Callow 
David Whip-, s Mali Stevens, DL 
Brawn and C BUy Conaty. 

Carolina— W aived LB Kevin (j 
Siqneri DL Ronaldo Turnbull. 

Chicago— Waived DT Marc Splndk 
Jack Joekson. WR PhlHjp rhw. f Mil 
taney. RB MJctlacI Hlchi TE Tie 


aNCiNKAT I- Waived LB Canute Curtis. PB 
Ty Daulhard WR Mike Jenkins. LB Tim Ter- 
ry. and S Lawrence Wnghl. Put OL Kevin 
Sargent on the physically unable to perform 
list. 

Dallas— W aived WR Oronde Gadsden, C- 
Tony Hutson. RB Jorvts Pony, and T Tj 
Washington. Reached an ln|uiy settlement 
with G Pal Kesl. 

DETROIT— Waived T Enc Beverly, QB Chris 
Dlttoe. DT Shone Dranetf. LB Rick Hamilton, 
RB Eric Lynch, WR Miles MocJk. and CB 
Ryan Stewart. 

OEM VE R— Waived OL Reggie McElroy, S 
Cory GilUard. CB Vance Joseph, S George 
CogtrtlL OL Chns Banks. LB Arnold Aic, WR 
Sir Mown Wilson. 

green BAY-Tradod WR.PR Qadry Ismail 
to Miami far conditional draft choice. Waived 
C Eugene Chung. S Brad Edwards. LS/TE 
Harper Le Bet LB Joe Cummings. RB Jerald 
Soweto D6 Randy Under and DB Joe 
Rowe. 

indianapous— W aived QB Kerwin BdL 
OL Ron Collins. WR Chris Doetlng. OL Stave 
Hardin. WR Note Jacquel. DB Richora 
Jana*. WR Kaipo McGuire. 

Jacksonville— W aived WR Curtis Marsh. 
OT Todd Forham. CB Robert Massey. FB 
Lrthal Maslon and OB Todd PnHcor. Trad- 
ed DE Paul Frase to Green Bay for their 19 ?g 

41h mund draft pick. Traded OT Jimmy Hem- 1 

dan toCIwago tortbeir 1W8 7th-round draft 
pick. 

Kansas cn-r— Traded WR Cruls Penn Io 
ChJcogo Bean tar 1998 5lh-raund draft pick. 
Warred DT Brentsun Buckner. OT Pete 
Swanson, and 5 Vann Washington. Put CB 
Tony Stargofl on injured nsofvc. 

Miami- Pelcned S Sean HIIL WR 
Lawioncu Dawsey. WR Scott MIHer. QB Da- 
mon Haro, DT Norman Hand. S Earl Little 
and LB Eddie Sutter. 

Minnesota— W aived QB Todd Boumaa 

WR Tarry Btana DE Mike Chalenskl, 0 
LaShun Daniels. LB Ben Hank*. P Todd Kur* 
and T Kenneth McDaniel. 

NEW ENGLAND— Waived DB Corwin 
Brawn. FB Knmrey Boreen TE John Burke. 
OL J.P. Conrad WR Tony Gaitor, CB Butler 
Bynofe and CB JM Talc. 

new Orleans— W aived DE Ronaldo Turn- 
bull RB Earnest Hunter, CB Donovan Greer. 
TE Rickey Brady, WR Matt Both. CB ink 
Aleago. Announced retirement ot LB Rlcvey 
Jackson. 

NSW YORK WANTS- Waived TE Brian Sax. 
ton, P Scott Plover, RB Robert Waft*f. G 




NEW YORK jets— W ahred T Reggie White. 
WR Ray Lucas, LB Tim ScJwrt C Potrtck 
Augota. CB Anthony Fogle, RB Robert 
Farmer', and WR Alonzo Johnson. * 

Oakland— Waived DE Aundray Bruce. DT 
Lrrfioi Gtorer. WR Ed Homey, TE Marcus 
Hinton CB Carl Kidd, LB Shay Molrbreok and 
C Danny Vida. 

prrrLAOELPHrA — Acquired G Sean Love 
from Hew York tor past comlderatiorB. 
Placed OB Koy Defmeron mfured reserve Itst. 
Waives G Horry Boatswain LB Sylvester '. 
WriflhL WR Russell Copeland, WR Note Sin- 
gleton LB DeShawn Fogle and CB Eric Sut- 
ton. 

prrrsau RDH-Wdived QB Jhn Miner. RB - 
Terry Richordsoa OL Mark Non and TE John 
Farquhar. Re- signed K Norm Johnson. Trad- 
ed OL Bernard Datney to Baltimore and DE 
Israel Raytoom to Carolina both tor undis- 
closed draft picks. 

p. Louis-worved lb Pens* GasWni DB 

Mike Scuitock. OL Trent PoOorrJ, OL Robert 
Couch, DT Ty Parten S Ron Carpenter, LB . 
Dwayne Sabb. 

san diego — P ut DT Reuben Davis on to- 
lured reserve and reached an in|ury settle- . 
mem with DT Don Soso. Wowed FB Robert 1 
Chancev, LB Al Smith. DTConnePSpoInCB.' 
Willie Clark, and S Gerame Williams. 

SAN fsanosco— S igned C Jesse Sapoto. 
Released DE Herman Smith. Waived DT 
Slew E Hitman, DT Albert Reese, DE Cartas 
Thornton WR Travis Hamah. G Rod MO- ' 
Stead, T MUcc Krtm and FB Steve Avery. 
Released TE Sean Manucf tram the cxempt- 
fefl squad RsL 

Seattle— W aived WR Ed (fie Gaines. TE 
Ronnie Williams, LB Glen Young, LB Eric 

Unverzagt. Q Andrew Greene. S En< Stokes • 

and DT Myron Etzy. Released S TJ. Cun- 
nlnghom from physleolly unable to perform 
list 

tampa BAY-Woived RB Reggie Brooks, G 
S«fi DlftmorvCB Al Harris, WR Brice Hunter 
WR Aflltuny Ladd, T Jeff Miller and FB 
Dwayne Mobley. 

TENNESSEE- Waived RB Spence George 

“^2 K ’i^f CUltoU,h - 5 Btome McElmur- 
ry.0L David Boftey. T Winston AWerion. WR 
Sheddrrt Wlisan and TE Jam^S 

MlUOI 









»« Ifcli 4 


■»n tf • R JttirttliaifB Si^ JMZ .... 


PAGES 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 


PAGE 19 


SPORTS 



.Panthers Sack Their Sack Leader 

They Mease Greene, a Holdout, as Teams Get to 53-Man Limit 


The Associated Press 

The Carolina Panthers finally gave up 
on trying to meet Kevin Greene’s con- 
tract demands, cutting the man who led 
the National Football League in sacks 
last year and replacing him with Ren- 
aido Turnbull, a one-time Pro Bowler. 

It was a bitter end to a bitter holdout 
and the highlight of cutdown day in the 
NFL as teams pared down to the 53-man 
roster limit. 

In other major moves, die Green Bay 
Packers shipped Qadiy Ismail, signed to 
replace Desmond Howard as a kick re- 


NFL Roundup 


turner, to Miami; Rickey Jackson abor- 
ted his comeback attempt with the 
Saints; and Steve Emtman’s injury- 
plagued career may have come to an end 
with his release by die 49ers. 

The biggest impact may have been 
Carolina’s farewell to Greene, whose 
1 4.5 sacks helped the Panthers reach the 
NFC championship game in their 
second season. In Turnbull, they ac- 
quired a similar-style player whose pro- 
duction had fallen with New Orleans 
and who was released last week. 

"In Renaldo, we have acquired a 
player who has prior experience in our 


defensive system and could have an 
immediate impact." said Dom Capers, 
the Carolina coach. Capers coached 
Turnbull as an assistant in New Or- 
leans. 

Greene, who turned 35 last month, 
stayed out of training camp io protest 
the Panthers' failure to rework the 
second season of his two-year contract. 
He was scheduled to make between $1 
million and $1.6 million from Carolina 
dais season, depending on how many 
incentive clauses he satisfied. 

Not all the teams' cuts are permanent 
Many teams readjust their rosters for the 
entire week leading up to the opener, 
and many of the players cut Sunday may 
be back where they started after waivers 
expire on Monday. 

There were few surprises. 

The 39-year-old Jackson walked into 
coach Mike Ditka's office and said he 
would retire. He returned to the team’s 
front office, where he worked last 
year. 

“He gave it a good go. but it's not the 
same defense,” said Ditka, who in his 
first season has retained only 28 of the 
53 Saints who went 3-13 last year. 
“That's the biggest thing, it’s not the 
same defense that features outside line- 
backers on the line, coming.” 


Washington released offensive line- 
man Andre Johnson, its first-round draft 
pick a year ago. 

Hie most active teams were some of 
the best. Pittsburgh re-signed kicker 
Norm Johnson after discovering that 
Chris Jacke, the ex-Packer, will be out 4 
to 6 weeks with a hip injury. 

Like Greene's, some cuts involved 
money. 

Pittsburgh, for example, released 
quarterback Jim Miller, the opening- 
day starter last year. He would have 
made nearly $1.9 million as a third- 
stringer behind Kordeh Stewart and 
Mike Tomczak. 

"It used to be the game was 80 per- 
cent football and 20 percent business, 
and now it seems like it’s 80 percent 
business and 20 percent football,” 
Miller said. "But that’s the way the 
game has gone. 1 won’t hold any 
grudges.” 

The trade of Ismail was about a dif- 
ferent sort of number — Green Bay’s 
glut of talented wide receivers. They 
include starters Robert Brooks and Ant- 
onio Freeman, plus Derrick Mayes, Don 
Beebe, Terry Mickens and Bill 
Schroeder, a star in the World League 
who had been impressive in exhibi- 
tions. 



kliHurj Lihn^iKi'lli'uln- 

The Dodgers* catcher. Mike Piazza, tagging the Phillies* Kevin Sefcik as he slid for third base in Philadelphia. 

Giants Fall From First in NL West 


it S 

Oh 


linden 

mpics 


rrcc 

.ViJ* 

: .’«j re 

't r 


-'lit 


Kickoff Classic a Heisman Preview 


New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — The 
race for the Heisman 
Trophy began in 
earnest at Giants Stadium in 
the Kickoff Classic. 
Donovan McNabb, the elu- 
sive, multitalented quarter- 
back. represented Syracuse. 
Ron Dayne, the bruising 
fullback, is Wisconsin's 
pride and joy. 

The players have history 
on their side. This game has 
a much better record of pro- 
ducing Heisman winners 
than it does of generating 
spine-tingling competition. 

Sunday’s 34-0 rout by 
Syracuse was the latest in a 
string that have become the 
Kickoff Classic’s signature. 
On the other hand, six Heis- 
man winners have played in 
this game in its first 1 4 years, 
so the Syracuse quarterback 
and the 262-pound (119 
kilogram) Wisconsin full- 
back — the hare and the 
tortoise — have a chance. 
.,.MqNabb,shpt out of the. , 
blocks. Sunday. The nimble , 
junior completed 11 of 14 
passes for 211 yards and a 
touchdown. He also ran five 
times for 27 yards and a 
touchdown. 

Dayne never got a chance 
to ramble. In fact, the af- 
ternoon was a sobering pre- 
view of what life behind a 
young offensive line will 
most likely be like this sea- 
son. 

As a freshman last year he 
gained 2,109 yards, scored 
21 touchdowns and aver- 
aged 162.2 yards a game. 
Dayne ran 13 times, gained 
46 yards and didn't score. 
He caught two passes for 24 


Vantage Point / William C. Rhoden 


yards. 

“He got the maximum of 
what was blocked,” said 
Barry Alvarez, the Wiscon- 
sin coach. 

In the short run. McNabb 
has die clearest path to the 
Heisman: He has a veteran 
offensive line, good receiv- 
ers and two years as a starter 
under his belt 

In the long run, Dayne, 
the tortoise in this race, may 
be the better pro. 

“McNabb is a super ath- 
lete and he has got a super 
arm," said Frank Gilliam, 
the director of player per- 
sonnel for the Minnesota 
Vikings. “You'd like to see 
him in a pro-style offense to 
see how he’d do.” 

It didn’t take much to see 
that Dayne has already got it 
There was that 10-yard run 


when he bowled over An- 
twaune Ponds, the Orange's 
highly regarded linebacker. 
There was another run when 
he eluded a tackier with nifty 
footwork you would not ex- 
pect from someone his size. 

“Oh. he’s a player," Gil- 
liam said. Indeed, Dayne is 
one of the nation's most at- 
tractive college backs; if he 
decides to leave Wisconsin 
at die end of his sophomore 
season, scouts have little 
doubt that he would make an 
impact on a National Foot- 
ball League field. 

It’s his impact off the field 
that they worry about If 
Dayne leaves school after 
only two seasons, scouts like 
Gilliam fear thai the already 
fragile relationship between 
NFL scouts and college 
coaches will shatter. 



Vi, 

far W SlfcSL 

Rty Soihbid>wc4<coUn 

Wisconsin’s quarterback Scott Kavanagh being 
caught for a loss by Syracuse end Jason Walters (90). 


Many coaches view 
scouts as predators who 
swoop down, pluck the best 
underclassmen and effec- 
tively wreck rebuilding pro- 
grams. min would be min- 
idynasties and jeopardize 
theirjobs. 

To combat the “predat- 
ors,’ ’ many coaches Have es- 
tablished an array of restric- 
tions on when scouts can 
come on campus to evaluate 
players. 

For a while the restric- 
tions eased, but now “it's 
becoming veiy restrictive 
again,” Gilliam said. 

“What the coaches don't 
realize is that we don’t want 
these kids to come out early, 
either,” he added. “We 
want them to stay, get the 
kind of teaching , coaching 
we can’t afford to give them. 
You don’t think the NFL 
cao’t live without Ron 
Dayne for two years?” 

The reality is that if 
Dayne decides to come out 
after two seasons, the NFL’s 
gentlemen's agreement will 
not be able to stop him. The 
minor league system that the 
NFL doesn’t have to pay for 
will be threatened. 

Dayne is not talking. 
However a family member 
said Dayne’s position is 
simple: If he has a repeat of 
last year, he’s out of Madis- 
on- 

Scouts who watched the 
tortoise struggle behind a 
young offensive line Sunday 
afternoon, who watched the 
hare run through Wiscon- 
sin’s Swiss cheese defense, 
can breathe a little easier. 

The great Dayne isn ’t go- 
ing anywhere. This year. 


The Asst-K-iaied Press 

San Francisco slipped out of first 
place in the National League West after 
it lost. 9-6, in Pittsburgh. The Giants, 
who have lost four of their last five 
games, had led or shared the division 
lead since May 10. 

“It doesn't matter until September,” 
Barry Bonds said. “You just try to stay 
close until then. September is where you 
make the difference.” 

Pittsburgh, which swept the series, is 
three games behind Houston in the NL 
Central. The Pirates have won six of 
their last seven games. 

"There's no pressure on us," said AI 
Martin of Pittsburgh, who hit a two- run 
single in the eighth^ “Remember, this is 
a team that was supposed to lose 100 
games.” 

Cubs 1 2 , Expos 3 In Chicago, Shawon 
Du ns ton, who had never started at any 
position but shortstop, tried a new po- 


sition for the Cubs. Dunston played left 
field where he caught five fly balls 
without a problem. 

Ryne Sandberg bit two home runs to 
help the rookie Jeremi Gonzalez gain 
his 10th victory. 

Marlins 7, Cardinals 1 In Miami, Craig 

Counsell hit his first home run in the 

NL Roundup 

majors, and it was a grand slam, as 
Florida’s Kirt Ojala (1-0) earned his 
first career victory. 

Counsell’s homer capped a six-run 
first inning. Ojala, making his second 
career start, allowed five hits and struck 
out eight before leaving after the first 
two batters reached base in the seventh. 

Padm a. Mots 2 In New York, Pete 
Smith, the San Diego pitcher, drove in 
three runs with his second career triple 
and shut down New York. 


With the bases loaded in the second. 
Smith sliced a drive down the right-field 
line, and Butch Huskey missed it with an 
awkward dive. The ball rolled into the 
right-field comer as the slow-footed 
Smith made it to third. 

Astros 3, Rockies 1 1n Houston, Mike 
Hampton pitched a four-hitter and 
Derek Bell homered for the Astros. 
Hampton won for die eighth time in nine 
decisions. Bell, 18-for-31 1.581) in his 
last seven games, also drove in a run 
with a bases- loaded walk. 

Dodgers 5, Phillies 1 In Philadelphia. 
Ismael Valdes pitched eight strong in- 
nings and drove in a run as Los Angeles 
took first place in the NL West. 

In a game reported in late editions 
Monday: 

Reds 6, Braves 4. In Atlanta, Eduardo 
Perez hit a two-out, two-run double in the 
10th for Cincinnati, which won despite 
17 strikeouts by five Atlanta pitchers. 


Kingdome Jinx Sticks to Yankees, 5-3 


The Associated Press 

Nothing brings out the best in the 
Seattle Mariners and their fans like a 
visit from the New York Yankees. 

Dan Wilson’s two-run homer in the 
seventh inning gave the Mariners a 5-3 
victory over the Yankees and a 2-1 edge 
in their weekend series. 

A club-record 169,024 watched 
Seattle improve its Kingdome record 
against New York to 17-4 since the 
1995 playoffs. 

“It felt like this game was so cru- 
cial,’ ’ said Ken Cloude, a rookie pitcher 
who combined with two relievers on a 
six-hitter. “It definitely had a different 
feeling out there.” 

Jay Buhner also homered for Seattle, 
which won Friday night, 9-5, before 
New York took a wild 10-8 decision in 
1 ] innings on Saturday night. 

Chad Curtis homered for the' Yan- 
kees, who dropped seven games behind 
first-place Baltimore in the American 
League East but still holds the AL wild 
card spot 

“We played well,” New York man- 
ager Joe Torre said. “We just didn’t hit 


much.” The Y ankees were 0-for-7 with 
runners in scoring position. 

With the score tied, 3-3, David Wells 
walked Andy Sheets to open the seventh 
and Mike Blowers sacrificed. Wilson 
then hit a 1-2 pitch over the wall in left 
for his 12th homer. 

Orfoios s. Twins 1 1n Baltimore. Scott 
Kamieniecki pitched seven strong in- 
nings as Baltimore completed a three- 

AL Roundup 

game sweep of Minnesota. Geronimo 
Berroa hit a two-run homer and Brady 
Anderson and Rafael Palmeiro hit solo 
homers off LaTroy Hawkins as the Ori- 
oles won their fifth straight and their 
22d of 28. 

Red Sox 3, Angels 2 In Anaheim. No- 
mar Garciapana tied a league rookie 
record by extending his hitting streak to 
26 games, and Tim Wakefield pitched 
into the ninth inning as the Boston Red 
Sox beat the Angels, 3-2, ending athree- 
game losing streak. 

Garciapana singled twice, tying the 
league mark set by Guy Curtright of the 


:agc 

is the longest by a Red Sox player since 
Wade Boggs hit in 28 straight in 1985. 

Wakefield allowed four hits, walked 
three and struck out four. 

Blue Jays 1 1 , Royals 8 Jose Cruz J r. hit 
a two-run homer in the 13th, his second 
of the game and 20th of the season, as 
Toronto won in Kansas City. 

Athlotics 4, Indians 1 Ln Oakland. 
Jimmy Haynes pitched five shutout in- 
nings and combined with four relievers 
on a five-hitter. Matt Stairs and Mark 
Bellhom homered for Oakland. 

Browers 6, Tigers O In Milwaukee. 
Jose Mercedes pitched a four-hitter for 
his first major league shutout. 

Jeromy Bumitz, Mark Loretta and 
Jeff Cirillo each hit solo homers as Phil 
Gamer became the winn ingest manager 
in Brewers history, with 423 victories, 
one more than Tom Trebelhorn (422- 
397,1986-1991). 

White Sox 3, Bangers 1 Ozzie Guillen 
hit a two-run homer in the seventh in- 
ning to help Chicago win in Texas and 
end a five-game losing streak against 
the Rangers. 



DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 



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PAGE 20 


ART BUCHWALD 


a 


M ARTHA’S VINE- 

YARD, Massachusetts 
— It goes without saying that 
everyone on Martha’s Vine- 
yard wants to see the pres- 
ident 

Nobody wanted to see him 
more than Luke Larson. 

Larson's neighbors back in 
Toledo knew t hat Luke was 
on the island, 9PIIIK1 
and if he didn’t 
see the presi 
dent at least 
once he would 
turn out to be 
one of To- 
ledo's stum 
blebums. 

The night Bucbwald 
Clinton arrived on the island 
Luke rushed out to the airport 
only to discover that he had 
missed him by 10 minutes. He 
watched tearfully as the pres- 
ident and his entourage dis- 
appeared down a dirt road 
His wife told him, “Why 
don't you go to the golf 
course tomorrow morning? 
He's sure to show up." 

Luke got up at 5 and went 
out to Farm Neck Golf 
Course. He set up his portable 
chair and started on his dough- 
nut and coffee. By 8 o'clock 
there were hundreds of people 
standing around, hoping to get 
a glimpse of the prez. 

In the distance Luke could 
see four figures surrounded 
by Secret Service men advan- 

Berlin Film Fest Date Set 

Agerce Frunce-Presse 

BERLIN — The 48th in- 
ternational Berlin film festi- 
val will be held from Feb. 1 1 
to 22, festival officials an- 
nounced Monday. Organizers 
said that the 12-day festival 
would henceforth open on a 
Wednesday and close on a 
Sunday, when its top prize, 
the Golden Bear, will be 
awarded. 


Feeling dejected, Luke 
went home and took a hot 
bath. 

The next day he heard that 
the president was going boar- 
ing. He went down to the dock 
of the Edgartown Yacht Club 
only to discover that the boat 
had been moved to the Vine- 
yard Haven Yacht Club. 

This made him sick. He 
walked home and said to his 
wife, “That does iL I’ll never 
give $100,000 to a Clinton 
campaign again." 



MMhdiHI/Rciilcn 

Sean Connery and his wife, Micheline, in Edinburgh. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 1997 


i 


For Just One Glimpse 


New Waves Portraits of the Artist, Warts and All 


rin g toward a fence. Just at 
that moment a man on a large 
motorized lawn mower yelled 
at the crowd, “Please move 
oat of die way — I have to cut 
the grass." 

Luke yelled “But the pres- 
ident is coming.’’ 

“That's why I have to mow 
the lawn now. He doesn’t 
want to lose his bad’' 

Everybody moved away 
from die fence, and no one 
caught so much .as a glimpse 
of Clinton. 


Luke was so discouraged 
that he went home for a bowl 
of clam chowder. 

His wife said “I hear that 
Ted Dan son and Mary Steen- 
burgen are giving a birthday 
□arty for the president’s 51st. 
Maybe you could see him 
from the road in C hilmar k.” 

Luke let out a triumphant 
yell, dashed out of the house 
and drove up South Road He 
parked his car, climbed onto 
the roof and tried to peek over 
a stone wall. Nothing. Then 
he heard sirens and ran to the 
side of the road. In front of the 
presidential vehicle was a TV 
truck with a cameraman on 
the roof. It completely ob- 
scured Luke's view. When he 
gor back to his car there was a 
parking ticket on the wind- 
shield The fine was $50. 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tima Service 

L ONDON — Reconstructed in a studio 
in London's East End. Soho’s Colony 
Room club looks seedily authentic. And 
as always, the champagne is flowing, the 
mood bohemian, the language florid. 

Then, in walks Francis Bacon, already in 
the mid-1960s hailed as Britain's greatest 
postwar painter. Or rather, in walks the 
Shakespearean actor Derek Jacobi look- 
ing sufficiently like Bacon to shock some 
extras who knew the artist. 

Bacon is a regular in the club that he 
nicknamed “a concentration of camp" 
and be is promptly welcomed by his drink- 
ing mates with a roar of jokes and gossip. 

Trailing him is a dark-haired young man. 

“This is George,” he says. “Introduce 
yourselves. George is a little shy.” 

As it happens, the newcomer, George 
Dyer, played here by Daniel Craig, would 
soon become a famil iar face at the Colony 
Room because over the next seven years 
he was Bacon's principal lover and most 
important model. And it is their stormy 
relationship that the British director and 
screenwriter John Maybury has chosen to 
focus on in “Love Is the Devil,” the first 
feature film about Bacon, whose paint- 
ings are distinguished by their anguished 
and tortured human forms. 

The movie, to be released early next 
year, ends with Dyer's suicide on the eve 
of Bacon's major retrospective at the 
Grand Palais in Paris in October 1971. 

Bacon himself lived another 21 years. 

“It’s as much the George Dyer story as 
it is the Francis Bacon story, although I 
see Bacon as the central character," May- 
bury, 39, said in an interview in Paris. Francis Bacon 
“Bacon is an incredibly fascinating char- 
acter, as a painter, as an English-Irishman and as a character 
in London.” 

The idea of turning the lives of great artists into movies 
has been an attractive one for a long time: in the 1930s, 
Charles Laughton played the title role in “Rembrandt": in 
the 1950s, Kirk Douglas was van Gogh in “Lust for Life"; 
in the 1960s, Charlton Heston took on Michelangelo — and 
the Sistine Chapel — in “The Agony and the Ecstasy.'* 
And the list goes on — movies good and bad, over the 
years, about Caravaggio, Modigliani, Camille Claudel. 
Munch, Toulouse-Lautrec and WarhoL, plus two more about 
van Gogh, one more about Rembrandt and many others. 

A good many of those movies were art-house films. The 
film about Bacon, however, seems to be pan of a new wave of 
film portraits of painters intended for larger audiences. Of 




Francis Bacon portrayed by Derek Jacobi in the film “Love Is the Devil.” 

nd as a character late, there have been Christopher Hampton's “Carrington.” wii 
about the English painter Leonora Caning ton's relationship run 


Rather, the artists are being portrayed a sj 
flawed human beings, people whose: 
emotional torments, personal tragedies 
assorted addictions or sexual unortho- 
doxies are as important as their art.. . 

True, without their art, their private - 
dramas and frequent forms of sdf-de- . 
struction might seem tawdry, even com- 
monplace. But it is evidently easier to 
understand their pain than it is to fathom, 
their genius. And it is often pain ~ or 
some form of inner turmoil — that drives ^ 
the creative process. 

“How often can you take shots of a 
painter painting?’’ Ivory asked during 
the making of “Surviving Picasso.” . 
“What's interesting is how their lives 
shaped their art, whal caused the art to be " . 
the kind of thing that it was. ” - ---r 

In “Love Is the Devil,” while the - 
director tries to balance life and art, the" 
screenplay shows Bacon more often ai- 
p]ay — drinking, gambling, cooking, - 
watching boxing, making love — than at 
the easel 

Through off-camera commentaries 
and excerpts from television interviews^ 
the director also gives Bacon the chance 
to explain his art and the carnal, mu- 
tilated human forms that he portrays. 

“Some seem to think my work is 
drawn from an expression of horror, 
which has never really concerned me,” 
Bacon says in a voice-over as he shows 
Dyer around the British Museum. 
“Pleasure is impossible to define, and 1 
feel horror occupies much the same ter- 
ritory.” On television, he explains: “Al- 
though my subjects are drawn from my 

friends, they are simply that Subjects. I 

wu-m feel no real emotional attachment once 
l.” • they are on canvas.'’ 

None of Bacon's paintings, however, 
will be seen in the movie. While nothing came of frequent 
rumors that the Bacon estate might seek an injunction to halt 




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about the English painter Leonora Carrington's relationship rumors that the Bacon estate might seek an injunct 
with the writer Lytton Strachey; Ismail Merchant and James shooting, it did refuse to cooperate with the film. 


Ivory's “Surviving Picasso," about Picasso’s 1 0-year liaison 
with Francoise Gilot, and “Basquiar,” the painter Julian 
Schnabel’s tribute to the young New York graffiti artist Jean - 
Michel BasquiaL who died of a drug overdose in 1988. 

In addition to “Love Is the Devil," movies are being 
prepared about the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. the Abstract 
Expressionist master Jackson Pollock and (again) Rem- 
brandt. There is also talk of movies about Georgia O'Keeffe 
(Michelle Pfeiffer is interested!. Diane Arbus, Robert Map- 
plethorpe and, again. Modigliani. 

What gives these films a new son of appeal is that, like 
many of today's biographies, they are not simply paeans. 


PEOPLE 


Still, with Jacobi, who most recently played Claudius in 
Kenneth Branagh’s “Hamlet," “Love Is the Devil” at least 
has a Bacon who looks the part (even though it was originally 
offered to Malcolm McDowell). And when the public has a 
strong visual image of some celebrity, this obviously helps. 

In other forthcoming movies on painters, the fast-rising 
Mexican actress Selma Hayek (“Desperado") will play the 
lead role in "Frida,” to be directed by Robert Sneider.,. ; . 

The new film about Rembrandt is a French production to 
be directed by Charles Matton, himself a painter and sculptor, 
with Klaus Maria Brandauer (“Mephisto” and "Out of 
Africa”) playing the Dutch master (speaking French). 


-..ii f 1 
J t i ' 


Missile’ 1 " *’■ ‘ 


T HE British actor Gary Oldman’s first 
venture into moviemaking — "Nil by 
Mouth,” a view of working-class alcoholism 
and domestic violence in south London — 
won the top award at the 5 1 st Edinburgh film 
festival. A close runner-up was a contro- 
versial film about a cystic fibrosis sufferer 
who blots outjiis agony through masochistic 
self-mutilation. The awards were presented 
by Sean Connery and Michael Caine. “Un- 
der the Skin,” a first feature by the British 
director Carine Adler about a young wom- 
en's response to her mother's death from 
cancer, won die award for best new British 
film over tough competition from 18 entries, 
including "Mrs. Brown," in which Judi 
Dench plays Queen Victoria, and "Wilde," 
in which Stephen Fry plays Oscar Wilde. 
The only foreign winner was "Wednesday 
19.7.1961," a documentary by Victor Kos- 
sakovsky about 50 boys and 5 1 girls bom in 
Leningrad on the same day as he was. 

□ 

Representative Joseph Kennedy 2d 
sprained his foot playing football wiih John 
Kennedy Jr., but a spokeswoman said the 
rough sport had nothing to do with family 


rivalry. “They were on the same team." said. 
“It was all in fun.” The Kennedy cousins rook 
the field together at the family compound in 
Hyannis Port. Massachusetts, despite the dis- 
pleasure of Joseph with John s decision to 
break with family tradition and openly discuss 
the Kennedvs' recent dirty linen: the con- 
troversy around Joseph Kennedy's decision to 
seek an annulment of his first "marriage, and 
Michael Kennedy's alleged affair with his 
family’s teenage baby sitter. John Kennedy 
Jr., who made the comments in the September 
issue of his magazine, George, called the 
brothers “poster boys for bad behavior." The 
congressman, the eldest son of the late Robert 
Kennedy, will be on crutches for the next 
couple of weeks. 


The latest album by the rock group Oasis. 
“Be Here Now.” has gone to No. 1 in album 
sales in Britain four days after its release, with 
nearly a million copies sold. The album, the 
group's third, received favorable reviews 
from critics, who predicted sales of more than 
3.5 million albums in Britain alone. With 
350.000 copies sold on the first day of its 
release, it equaled the first-week sales for 


Oasis’s previous album, “(What's the Story) 
Morning Glory?” — which has sold 35 mil- 
lion copies in Britain. 


President Vaclav Havel of the Czech Re- 
public has instructed his lawyers to seek 5 
million koruny (SI 47.000) in out-of-court 
damages from a shoe company that used his 
likeness in a poster campaign containing of- 
fensive language, the Prague newspaper Dnes 
said Monday. The posters depict a sculpted 
bust of Havel. 60. being licked by a dog — a 
terrier — alongside an offensive slogan writ- 
ten in English. The image of the terrier in- 
volves a play on words on the name of his 
wife. Dagmar Veskrnova. a former actress. 
The paper said that Havel did not object to this 
allusion to his private life. What shocked him 
was the inclusion of the vulgar expression. 
The president, who said he was taking legal 
action to demonstrate that “not everything is 
acceptable," threatened to sue if the matter 
was not resolved out of court. 


Britain's Charity Commission said Mon- 
day that it was looking into the local arm of 


Michael Jackson's Heal the World charity IL 
following a television report that the orga- 
nizalion had made no donations for three 
years. “Concerns have been raised with us 
and we are looking into the matter," a spokes- 
woman said. The pop superstar set up the . 
charity in 1992. proclaiming a goal of raising 
£60 million ($100 million) by the end of 1993 
to help children and the environment. 

° . 

The singer Lou Rawls lent his voice to a I 


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good cause, helping raise $100,000 for 
Alzheimer's research, cancer treatment and 
independent living for senior citizens at . a 
conceit in Billings, Montana. Helping older 
people is a special concern of Rawls, who was. 
raised in Chicago by his grandmother. His 90- 
minute conceit featured favorites like "You'll 
Never Find," “Since I Met You Baby" and 
"Tobacco Road." Rawls, who has raised 
millions of dollars for black colleges and 
needy children, said that spending a week in a 
coma after a car crash years ago had made him. 
a better person. "I saw many reasons to live,’' 
he said. "I realized J had an immature attitude 
about life and I began to learn acceptance; 
direction and understanding." 





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