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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

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INTERNATIONAL 





PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


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Paris, Wednesday, August 27, 1997 



r. No. 35,gl(£ S 


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Death Toll Soars in Algeria’s Endless Terror 


Comp^rd by Oar Staff Firm Dbpetcha 

BENI ALL Algeria — A total of 64 villagers were 
massacred in an early-morning attack Tuesday in the 
mountains here south of Algiers, raising to 181 the 
number of fatalities in a series of recent village 
massacres and a bomb attack in Algiers. 

Witnesses who escaped the latest slaughter said 

j k women . were among the victims in Beni Ali 
and that an additional four women were abducted by 
the assailants. One report said that the victims were 
beheaded and that their heads were put on their 
doorsteps. 

It said people from the town and nearby com- 
? iui ^i. es were abandoning their homes and heading 
tor Blida, a garrison town about 50 kilometers (30 


miles! south of Algiers, a region that is a stronghold 
of Muslim fundamentalists. Beni Ali is in the moun- 
tains nine kilometers to the south. 

The latest attack came a day after bomb blast in an 
Algiers market and only a few hours after the gov- 
ernment reaffirmed its determination to stamp out 
terrorism. 

The Chrea Mountain region where the latest attack 
took place, 60 kilometers south of Algiers, has been 
the scene of numerous previous massacres blamed on 
rsiamic extremists. 

Algeria has been gripped by a fundamentalist in- 
surgency since the military intervened in January 1 992 
to cancel the second round of elections that the Islamic 
Salvation Front was poised to win. Some 60,000 


people have died in the conflict in the last five years. 

On Tuesday, the government spokesman. Habib 
Chawki Hamraoui. was cited by the official APS 
press agency as saying the government, supported by 
popular will "and the mobilization of all patriots, 
reiterates its commitment to pursue the struggle 
against terrorism.” 

"Patriots" is the name given to government- 
backed vigilante groups that try to defend villages 
against attacks by armed Islamic gangs. 

Mr. Hamraoui called the recent massacres "in- 
human acts," adding they bad been carried out “to 
demoralize the population and damage the image of 
Algeria.” He appealed to Algerians to be more 
vigilant against terror. (AFP. Reuters) 


De Klerk StepfOff 
The Political Stage 

Ex-President's Exit May Signal 
Big Shake-Up in National Party 


By Suzanne Daley 

A’ph 1 Times Service 


U.S. Grants 
Asylum to 
North Korean 

Cairo Envoy Thought 
To Know Secrets on 
Missiles to Mideast 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 


WASHINGTON — The North 
Korean ambassador to Cairo, who is 
believed to have important information 
on his country’ s ballistic missile sales to 
Iran, Libya and Syria, has defected to 
the United States, and on Tuesday he 
was granted political asylum. 

James P. Rubin, the State Department 
spokesman, confirmed the defection of 
Chang Sung Gil and said that his broth- 
er, Chang Seung Ho, had defected from 
the diplomatic mission in Paris, where 
he was commercial representative. 

Ambassador Chang is the highest- 
ranking North Korean diplomat to de- 
fect to the United States, Mr. Rubin 
said. 

His defection was the most important 
from die North since Hwang Jang Yop, 
the country’s leading political philoso- 
pher. sought asylum at South Korea's 
Beijing mission in February. 

In Paris, a North Korean diplomat 
branded the defectors as "crinunala,” 
saying they were freeing an official in- 
vestigation cm suspicion of misuse of 
public funds. 

He said the Pyongyang government 
would demand their return. 

Mr. Rnbin said that the ambassador’s 
wife was also in the United States. But 
repeatedly citing die sensitivity of die 
case, he did not address reports that die 
ambassador had brought a child, and his 
brother’s two children. 

He would not say whether the de- 
fectors had earlier contacts with U.S. 
officials. 

Nor would he say how they had arrived 
in the country, or where they were. 

The confirmation of the defections 
came a day before U.S. and North 
Korean officials were to meet in New 
York for a third round of discussions on 
weapons proliferation, including North 
Korean missile sales to the Middle East, 
an area Mr. Chang reportedly knows in 
intimate detail. 

Referring to the ambassador, Mr. Ru- 
bin said, * 4 We have no reason to believe 
he has any direct connection to the on- 
going missile negotiations.” 

' He added that the lead U.S. negotiator 
at the talks, Robert Einhora,.a deputy 
assistant secretary of state, had received 
indications from North Korea that the 
talks would go ahead. 

On SepL 15, broader talks on al- 
leviating tensions on the Koiean Pen- 
insula — involving the two Koreas, the 
United States and China — were sched- 
uled, and Mr. Rubin said those dis- 
cussions were also expected to proceed. 
"We don't believe this will have any 

See DEFECTION, Page 10 



And AwadMgerex FrmccA’rcmc 

ISRAELI TEAR GAS OVERCOMES GIRLS — Palestinian schoolgirls covering their faces after Israeli 
soldiers accidentally fired tear gas Tuesday near their classrooms in Bethlehem. About 40 girls were treated 
for gas inhalation. Soldiers fired tear gas and rubber bullets to quell a riot by stone-throwing youths. 

m ‘ ' * 1 ” ■ ~ ^ - 

A Chilling Chapter in Sweden’s Past 

From 5 35 to ’76, Up to 60,000 People Considered ‘Inferior’ Were Sterilized 


The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — They were con- 
sidered to be "inferior,” flawed by bad 
eyesight, mental retardation or "un- 
desirable” racial characteristics. To 
prevent their genetic characteristics 
from being passed on, they were ster- 
ilized — sometimes involuntarily. 

Sweden had as many as 60,000 of its 
citizens sterilized from 1935 to 1976. 
Adults and children were singled out by 
doctors, school authorities or other of- 
ficials and were pressured to consent to 
theprocedure. 

The idea behind this sterilization pro- 
gram had chilling similarities to Nazi 


ideas of racial superiority — and media 
reports on it now are prompting a sober 
self-examination. . 

The program stemmed from the pur- 
suit of eugenics, a once-popular move- 
ment to improve humanity by con- 
trolling genetic factors in reproduction. 

Although Sweden’s sterilization pro- 
gram was a matter of record, it received 
little public attention and was ignored in 
most reference books. A recent series 
about the program in the respected 
newspaper Dagens Nyheter, however, 
has stirred national debate. 

Especially shocking to many Swedes 
is the fact that the Taw allowing the 


sterilizations wasn’t overturned until 
1976, three decades after the human- 
engineering policies of the Nazis col- 
lapsed in the rubble of the Third Reich. 

The sterilizations focused on a wide 
range of people, from those of mixed 
race to unmarried mothers with several 
children "Grounds for recommending 
sterilization: unmistakable Gypsy fea- 
tures, psychopathy, vagabond life,” 
reads one document cited by Dagens 
Nyheter. 

Maria Nordin, 72, told the newspaper 
that she had been sterilized in 1943 

See SWEDEN, Page 10 


JOHANNESBURG — Former Pres- 
ident F. W. de Klerk, who negotiated an 
end to apartheid but often seemed a 
lonely figure in recent years, trying 
without success to remake his Nation^ 
Party into a multiracial organization, 
announced Tuesday that he had had 
enough. 

Mr. de Klerk said he was resigning as 
the head of the National Party. South 
Africa's leading opposition party, and 
retiring from politics altogether. 

After quoting from a book by a 
former National Party leader. Dr. D. F. 
Mai an, about the difficulties of deter- 
mining when to leave public life. Mr. De 
Klerk said simply, "I know the time has 
come for me to go: I must now faithfully 
act accordingly.” 

Mr. de Klerk's departure is a major 
blow to the largely white-supported Na- 
tional Party and could well signal the 
be ginnin g of dramatic political realign- 
ments hoe. Surveys have consistently 
showed that Mr. de Klerk is more pop- 
ular than his ailing party. And without 
hzm, some political analysts say, many 
National Party voters will go elsewhere. 

South Africa's political landscape is 
particularly volatile at the moment 
President Nelson Mandela's African 
National Congress still dominates. But 
the opposition parties have been trying 
to reposition themselves for the 1999 
elections, flirting with a range of part- 
nerships and coalitions. 

In addition, several well-known 
politicians both black and white are 
trying to start up new parties which 
could get a huge boost from National 
Party defectors. 

Mr. de Klerk's resignation had been 
rumored for weeks. He is said to have 
become discouraged by the in-fighting 
over a vision for a new National Party 
and by the continual hammering he is 
taking from political opponents and the 
work of the country's Truth and Re- 
conciliation Commission, which is in- 
vestigating atrocities of the past. 

Some analysts said they believed that 
Mr. de Klerk, 61, wanted to leave the 
political stage with his place in history 
— as the man who freed Mr. Mandela 
from jail and successfully oversaw a 
peaceful transition to a n on-racial de- 
mocracy — untarnished. 

There was wide agreement, however, 
that the National Party, which instituted 
apartheid and ruled the South Africa 
with an iron fist for more than 40 years, 
would be hard hit by Mr. de Klerk's 
departure. The party has no-one else in 
its ranks who has anything resembling ' 
Mr. de Klerk's stature. 

"The National Party has been po- 
litically dead for some time,” said An- 
dre du Toit, a political analyst with Cape 
Town University. "But the corpse takes 
a long time to decompose. It would be 
very difficult to recover from this 



See DE KLERK, Page 10 


One Sign of Optimism in Moscow — A Baby Boo 


By Michael Specter 

New York Times Service 


MOSCOW — Five years ago. with the Russian 
economy in a deep depression and people overcome by 
fear and confusion, Lena Volkovskaya made a solemn 
vow to herself. 

"I promised I would never have children,” the 32- 
year-old lawyer recalled recently. "My friends were 
all the same way. There was no money here and no 
future here. It seemed very scary to me. We all decided 
that you would have to be crazy to bring a baby into 
this world.” 


Miss Volkovskaya laughed softly and glanced at her 
stomach. In about 10 hours she would give birth to her 
first child, a boy. And if she is crazy she is not alone, at 
least in Moscow. For the first time in a decade — a 
time when Russia plunged into (he most serious demo- 
graphic crisis in the modem history of industrialized 
nations — Moscow seems to be in the midst of a baby 
boom. 

The figures are preliminary, much of the evidence is 
anecdotal, and the emerging sense of optimism in 
Moscow may not translate to other parts of Russia. 
Still, taken with other small but clear economic in- 
dicators — a rise in the standard of living, more job 


opportunities, and an apparent end to the nation's 


apparent « 

disastrous industrial decline — even a small baby 
boom here would be a solid sign of optimism from 
women who have refused to give birth for years. 

"You hear it from so many of the women who come 
in here,” said Alla Kalugina, a gynecologist at the 
Center for Family Planning and Reproduction, a spot- 
less, modem hospital in the center of Moscow. 

Last year, the center averaged eight births every 24 
hours. So far this year the average has .risen to 20. 
“People are feeling better about their lives and 

See RUSSIA, Page 10 


Sm Knjvnie Awnual 

F. W. de Klerk announcing his de- 
cision to step down as party chief. 


Illegals Use 
Chunnel, and 
Loophole 9 to 
Slip Into U.K. 


By William D. Mental 

Los Angeles Times 

LONDON — Along with the tourists 
and traders speeding in air-conditioned 
comfort through the Channel Tunnel 
linking Britain and the rest of Europe, 
increasing numbers of undocumented 
immigrants are arriving in London seek- 
ing political asylum. 

The traffic is orchestrated, British of- 
ficials say, by legally savvy and tech- 
nologically sophisticated people movers 
— a tiny European version of the 
"coyotes” who work the Rio Grande. 

Alarmed at the growing traffic, Bri- 
tain and France began scrambling last 
week to stop the flow — mostly from 
developing nations — made possible by 
an embarrassing loophole in regulations 
governing rail travel through the 50- 
kilometer tunnel. 

Gare du Nord, the Paris terminus of the 
cross-channel Eurostar train, is the smug- 
glers’ dot, officials say. There, Africans, 
Asians and East Europeans — who typ- 
ically pay thousands of dollars to or- 
ganizers for illegal passage to Britain — 
board Eurostar trains bound for London. 

Until French police began random 
checks last week, there were no doc- 
ument controls at the Gare du Nord. It 
has been easy for illegal travelers to 
embark in Paris and "lose” their nonex- 
istent documents on the train. 

At Loudon's Waterloo Station, the 
travelers simply announce to British im- 
migration officers that they have no 
papers and are fleeing persecution in 
their homeland. The claims are often 
bogus, but under British law the more 
assertion of persecution guarantees a 
four-month stay and the prospect of at 
least a year more of subsidized living as 
legal appeals are pursued. 

"Every criminal gang in Europe 
knows that Eurostar is an open door to 
London.” said John Tincey, an immi- 

See ASYLUM, Page 10 


AGENDA 

Sard-Liners Strip Plav sic of Army Control 

PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AFP) paGETWO 
- The hard-line Bosnian Serb Par- Lone-Running Battle for Narita 

lament on Tuesday stripped Pres- - — 

lent Biljana Plavsic of exclusive au- Page II. 

rarity over the army. It also urged rrassword Page XL 

tat local elections scheduled for next Pages 8-9. 

aonth be delayed. Meanwhile, four Op ^ 20-21. 

f the army’s top eight generals Sports b 

hewed support for Mrs. Plawicm ThafntBnnarKet Pago 7. 

er attempt to wrest power from 
iadovao Karadzic. Page 6. 


The 1HT on-line wv.nv.iht.com 


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91302 



Beijing Falls to a Golden Horde 

Real Estate Developers Tearing Down Huge Central Sections 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Service 


Hiluy SatilBflV WadMfMi ftB 


A Beijing resident walking past demolished houses 
that are increasingly being replaced by office towers. 


BEUING — For centuries, the architecture of 
old Beijing has withstood rebels and invaders, 
warlords and imperialist powers. Communist cen- 
tral planners and Red Guards. 

But what those waves of people failed to destroy 
is now succumbing to a far more powerful force: 
real estate developers. 

Giant swaths of central Beijing — once lined 
with single-story courtyard houses, sloping tile 
roofs and narrow Janes of gray brick — are being 
demolished to make way for the kind of look-alike 
high-rise office towers, garish shopping arcades 
and hotels that have become common worldwide. 
For the most part, the new construction is hasty and 
poor in quality; the builders' favorite facing ma- 
terial resembles white bathroom tile, and windows 
are often tinted metallic blue. 

In the last two years, the destruction of old 
' Beijing has been picking up speed. 

For the Financial Street development near the 
Fotbidden City, more than 20,000 homes were 
razed. Along the Second Ring Road where the city 
walls once stood, whole blocks have been cleared 
to make way for commercial office buildings. 


stores and a new Foreign Ministry building. 

Plans already approved would wipe out 60 per- 
cent of the old structures in one of the city's 
northwestern sections. And a Hong Kong tycoon, 
U Kaishing, has had a hole the size of a baseball 
s tadium dug in the heart of the city, where he will 
erect a high-rise office and retail complex known 
as Oriental Plaza. 

"We’re just destroying the city,” said Lu Jun- 
hua, a professor of architecture at prestigious 
Qinghua University. "It’s not a war. It’s not a 
revolution. It's construction.” 

What is being lost is more than old bricks and 
mortar, it is the very character of old Beijing. In a 
vast and autocratic nation, Beijing’s architecture 

g ave its citizens homes, courtyards and streets on a 
uroan scale. 

"The city’s character before was horizontal," 
said Zhang Kaiji, former chief architect of the 
Beijing Institute of Architecture. "Now it's been 
ruined by high-rises. It's become a third-class 
Hong Kong." 

Beijing, with its 13 million residents, has long 
been a city of wails within walls. Within the Great 
Wall spanning the northern border were concentric 

See BEIJING, Page 10 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27. 199 1 


PAGE TWO 



Last of the Diehard Protesters / A 2d Runway by 


Narita Airport Nibbling Away at Farmers 


By Sheryl WuDunn 

fleer York Twin Sen ice 


N ARITA, Japan — Koji Kitahara is a 
slight, gray-haired man with a soft- 
spoken manner, but his 75 years have 
not siolen the sieeliness from his eyes 
or the fire from his lifetime battle: his dream ro 
tear down Narita airport, Japan's main link to the 
world. 

'*1 mean stopping the airplanes, tearing down 
the buildings and removing the runways,” Mr. 
Kitahara said. 

Hardly anyone supports his demands, and the 
government is not about to scrap an airport that 
moves 25 million passengers into and out of 
Japan each year. But as Mr. Kitahara sits among 
the piles of futons that he sells in a shop here, it 
becomes clear that he is the kind of man who can 
bring a government to its knees — and he and a 
handful of fanners have done just that. 

For 32 years, they have blocked the com- 
pletion of the airport by refusing to give up their 
land to -the government Most of the airport has 
been built around their small farming plots total- 
ing about II acres (4.5 hectares) — less than 1 
percent of the area planned for the airport But 
Narita, the largest air hub in Asia, is confined to 
a single runway because a few patches of onions, 
potatoes, and Japanese vegetables are growing 
smack in rhe middle of where planes on a second 
runway would take off. 

A few days ago, the airport moved one step 
closer to complerion as two families agreed to 
talk with the government about selling and rent- 
ing their land for use by the airport 


M R. KITAHARA is a member of one 
of four families that are holding out 
and he is probably the most stub- 
born. Over the years, the govern- 
ment has tried force, persuasion, temptation and 
harassment to get the land. 

The government has even put down strips of 
the second runway so that some day, when the 
remaining fields are available, the final pieces 
can be put in place quickly. 

Mr. Kitahara is nor the only one who dislikes 
Nariia airport. Many travelers would be ready to 
dismantle it, for it' is a sprawling and chaotic 
combination of terminals that are bursting at the 
seams. It is so distant that it takes many people 
mo hours ro get to Narita from their homes in 
Tokyo, and a taxi fare to the airport from Tokyo 
can run to S300. 

"I'm a research engineer, but I just spent an 
hour trying to find this line.” said Masaki Yano. 
as he stood in a line — just inside the main door 
— that would allow him and his baggage to 
proceed to the first ticket check-in counter and 
then through a process that would ultimately take 
him to Los Angeles for vacation. 

“The design is so bad." he said. "This space 
is used for people getting in line, at the same time 
it's the space for the corridor.” 




f Moi" \uhiilbr ■W tot TIw* 


Koji Kitahara* 75, is 
probably the most stubborn 
of the remaining farmers 
who have been blocking the 
completion of Narita airport 
for the last 32 years. 


hi it*’ \-jhLHi- V**» 


Kuniko Ogawa and her husband. Kuniaki* standing in their vegetable field 
which skirts Narita airport, have agreed to negotiate with the government. 


Still, one of the biggest problems is thar Nar- 
ita. the world’s sixth-largest airport in terms of 
passenger traffic, has just one runway. In a land 
famed for consensus and harmony, it seems odd 
at first that a handful of farming families would 
create so much inconvenience. 

But consensus in Japan does not fall from the 
skies. It is the product of hard work, like endless 
meetings at which nothing is decided or bleary 
drinking sessions after work when sensitive is- 
sues are never directly discussed. 

Many experts say the conflict with the fanners 
goes back to the beginning, when the govern- 
ment did not try to build consensus but simply 
announced in 1966 that it would build the airport 
on what was then farmland. 

The government had every legal right to ex- 
propriate the land, but it also assumed that farm- 
ers would be proud and patriotic enough to give 
up their land for the new airport. So it boldly 
unveiled the blueprint without consulting the 
360 farming families who owned the land. 

That turned out to be a big mistake. Japan was 
a political hotbed at the time, and radical pro- 
testers seized on the issue to mount a major 
attack against the conservative government. 


Fierce clashes occurred when the authorities 
tried to take over the land: gasoline bombs were 
hurled in the air, and several people on both sides 
were killed over the years. 

The government set up riot police checkpoints 
to track the comings and goings of the farming 
families, and this hardened their opposition even 
more. Political supporters moved onto the land, 
and thousands of sympathizers across the nation 
purchased tiny symbolic patches of the fields to 
make the land more unwieldy for the govern- 
ment to seize. 


t; 


I HE COSTS of those earlier battles af- 
fect travelers to Narita even now. When 
passengers arrive by train, bus or car. 
they are all checked for identification, 
and riot-equipped police officers are still sta- 
tioned at the airport to guard against protesters. 

The government has apologized to the fam- 
ilies and has officially given up the effort to 
forcibly take their land. Perhaps as a result, the 
anger and the opposition of the farmers seems to 
be abating. 

Kuniaki Ogawa. one of the two cousins who 
finally agreed this week to negotiate with the 



Mir Restores 




Then Solar 
Panels Balk 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — The crew members of - 
the ailing Russian space station Mi£ .;’ . 
have fixed their oxygen-generating sys T ;-j 

terns after a brief time without fresh air, 

but they hit a new snag Tuesday while ; 
trying to aim the solar panels they re- 4 , 
paired last week, officials said. •’ 

The U.5. space agency NASA said , - 
Monday that Mir 1 s two working oxygeq 
systems — its Elekrron generator and a.-* 
backup system of oxygen candles —■[. 
had bnefly failed, leaving the crew with 
just a few days’ supply of bottled oxy- , 


gen. 

Russian 


Mission Control 


officials. 



N3T 


government, hinted that his children did not 
w'ant to pick up the battle. 

"Rather than leave this to my children. I 
wanted to put an end to this problem and solve it 
within my generation.” said Mr. Ogawa, 56, a 
farmer whose sun- weathered skin and quiet de- 
meanor belie the anger that took 32 years to fade. 
"Finally. I feel relief." 

The New Tokyo International Airport Author- 
ity is mounting another effort to build a second 
runway by 2 (XXI and to coraplere the reaovation of 
pan of the airport a few years later. 

"I will persuade the three fanning families/ ’ 
said Sustimu Y amamoto, the official in charge of 
purchasing land for the airport authority. As for 
Mr. Kitahara, whose land the airport wants but 
says is not essential for completing the second 
runway, Mr. Yamamoto sighed and then 
shrugged. "His land is not on the runway.” he 
saiii "And anyway, by the time the runway 
opens. I w ill have persuaded him.” 


saying the 

American — bad solved it in an hour. 

"The situation is as follows — the , 
Elektron is working, the system which ^ 
uses candles is working, and one . 
Elektron which is in Kvant-2 is no.t 
working becanse there was no elec-' 
tricity there,” said the deputy flight . 
director, Viktor Blagov. 

The older backup Elektron-2 oxygen T 
system in the Kvant-2 module has been. ■ 
off since June 25 , when the Spektr mod-%, 
ule was punctured in a collision with 
supply ship, causing a power loss. 

The crew may be able to turn on thaj . 
system as a result of wiring repairs they j 
made aimed at restoring most of the , 
energy supply. "Yesterday, we turaea 
on Kvant-2.” Mr. Blagov said, "and 7“‘ 
now we will work on Elektron-2.” ^ • 
Another problem loomed, however/^ 
when NASA reported that the crew- 
members were unable ro point Spektr’s f 
solar panels toward the son. i : 

*■ ‘Commands sent to the «>lar arrays, 
to try to slew, or move them intoa better! . 
orientation to face the sun, _were not >- 
successful,” the officials said. \ 

A NASA physicist, Michael Foale/ . 
40. is on Mir with two Russians, Anatoli" r 
Solovyov, 49. the co mmander , and. a _ 
flight engineer, Pavel Vinogradov, 43. 

Four days ago, the crew reconnected! ' - 
cables inside Spektr, linking its solar. - 
panels with the mother ship. But if the 
solar panels do not face the sun, they 
generate less power than Mir needs. •' j 
Mir has run on 60 percent of its usual ; 
power since the collision. Officials say 
ifSpektr’s three working solar panels — 
a fourth was smashed in the collision 


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Basques Hope Sleek New Art Museum Will Change Their I 


By Anne Swardson 

iVashiHjtoii Post Sen i. « 


BILBAO. Spain — This city in the 
heart of Basque country , known around 
the world mostly for acts of terrorism by 
separatists, will take its place on the 
world stage in October for a nonviolent 
reason. 

It is then that an American-designed 
art museum of the highest architectural 
order will open its doors. Paid for en- 
tirely with local funds, the S100 million 
structure is a symbol of Basque regional 
power and independence that its spon- 
sors hope will attract visitors from all 
over. 

But it turns out that the museum and 
the terrorism are not unrelated. In a city 
that is home to half of Spain's Basques, 
the museum also is the cornerstone of a 
broad-based campaign against the vi- 
olence that has cost nearly 800 lives in 
30 years. 

It is a campaign focused nor on police 
and guns, but on culture and invest- 
ment. 

Bilbao and all of the Basque country 1 
are undergoing a Si -billion-plus re- 
development designed to undercut the 
separatists by allowing mainstream 
Basque nationalist pride to flourish in 
the sunlight. 

The intent of both Basque politicians 
and the government of Spain is clear, to 
use development and prosperity ro nour- 
ish nationalism in its most peaceful 
form and. in the process, to marginalize 
and weaken the violent separatist move- 
ment known bv its Basque initials. 
ETA. 

Independence from Spain will hold 
less allure, the theory' goes, if Basques 
govern their own fate — and hold their 
own purse strings. 

If the effort succeeds, it may offer 
lessons to other developed nations with 
angry ethnic minorities. If it fails, more 
people will die. 

"We think culture will help combat 
the violence." said the deputy mayor of 


Bilbao. Ibon Areso. “It’s not the only 
goal of the museum, but it’s important. 
More and more, the cultural and eco- 
nomic aspects are related. If we can 
raise the economic level, young people 
will be less attracted ro violence.” 

Last week was fiesta week in Bilbao, 
and signs of the redevelopment were 
everywhere. Revelers could take the 
new’ subway — modeled on Metro in 
Washington — to die bullfights, walk 
across gleaming new pedestrian bridges 
to the outdoor concerts, look down the 
Bilbao River from rhe fireworks and see 
the gleaming facades of the museum. 

An airport is under construction, and 
a neighboring high-tech business cor- 
ridor is attracting' foreign and Spanish 
companies. A convention center that 
will also house the local orchestra is 


rising from the shells of broken-down 
factories on the riverbanks and, farther 
along the river, a library and cultural 
center is being built 
The entire port of Bilbao, on which 
the economy was once based, is being 
moved downriver and offshore, at a cost 
of S258 million. 

The regional Parliament just ap- 


proved a sweeping plan for urban re- 
newal designed tc 


fto revitalize the decayed 
riverfront along its entire 16-kiloraeter 
(10-mile) length from Bilbao to the At- 
lantic, placing office, commercial and 
institutional space beside the river and 
even in it. 

High-speed rail connections to Mad- 
rid and Paris are planned, as is a clean- 
ing of the foul-smelling river. 

Such grand projects often founder on 


financing, and some of these may not 
come to pass. But the Basque country 
has both the political clout to get money 
from Madrid and the European Union in 
Brussels and the autonomy to raise its 
own revenue. 

"There is a collective desire to trans- 
form the city of Bilbao.” said Alfonso 
Vegara. director of the Madrid archi- 
tectural and planning firm that created 
the regional plan. 

The jewel of the project to transform 
the city is the museum. Designed by a 
California architect. Frank Gehry, its 
vaguely maritime, vaguely petaled 
shapes dominate the riverbank. 

hs gray titanium panels reflect the 
industrial history of the city. Its tower- 
ing glass panels are open to the river 
view and its rowers are made of local 


limestone. More than 90 percent of the 
work was done by Basque companies. 

Local and regional officials hope the 
museum will alter the image of this run- 
down industrial city and become a sym- 
bol of rebirth that" will attract tourists 
and businesses and spur growth. It was 
built in collaboration with the New 
York-based Guggenheim Foundation, 
which will manage the museum and 
display some of its vast collection of 
20th-century art there. It will also have a 
sizable component of Basque an. 

With much fiscal sacrifice, Basque 
regional governments are paying the 
entire price. The Spanish national gov- 
ernment is not involved. 

"They're reaching out with this 
building to the global society." Mr. 
Gehry said. 


increase this level to 90 percent 
"We can generate some power freon j 
the solar arrays even if they are not f 
pointed in the best possible direction,”- i 
said Sergei Pouzanov, a member of the j 
NASA team at Mission Control 
"At this point we cannot say that itii* 
not functional because it will be sorae-£ - 
time before they figure out what wa£.*. 
wrong with the solar array control sys+* 
tem." he said. “It may be the motor, iff 
may be the wrong commands to ttoe^f 


computer, it maybe a broken line. 


le Russian flight director, V lariirm ^j- 
Solovyov, said that Spektr’s solar paneltfjV 
were transmitting power but thar it would* 
lake several days before it was knows*; 
just how much energy Mir would gain.*!. 

In preparation, Mr. Vinogradov was£. 
mopping up moisture that formed iijf 
Kristall after it was switched off. 

President Boris Yeltsin said during iti, 
visit ro Saratov that the repairs hai*v 
■revived Mir. "There is nothing tragic!^ 
there.” he said. "In fact, the lads wortf-” 
really well, and the American special- 
ists agreed with us on that. They thought 
the station was finished. ’ ’ — 



The Hdii.. .. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Athens Cracks Down 
On Drunken Driving 


ATHENS — Seeking to halt an in- 
crease in alcohol-related road accidents, 
the authorities in Athens have begun a 
crackdown that includes stiff fines, jail 
sentences and car confiscations. 

The decision to impound vehicles 
was made by a court after a public 
outcry when two women were killed by 
a drunken driver Thursday as they 
crossed a street. 

Greece has one of rhe worst records 
of traffic accidents in Europe, with an 
average of six people killed each day. 
officials say. (API 


lion dinars (Sl.229 billion) in 1996. up 
6.8 percent from 1.323 billion dinars in 
1995, official statistics showed Tues- 
day. 

The number of tourists was 3.8S5 
million, down 5.7 percent from 4.120 
million the previous year, a Central 
Bank report said. f Reuters) 


A total of 393 people were killed on 
Spanish roads during the first three 
weeks of August, a 17.7 percent in- 
crease over the same period last year, 
the Department of Transport said Tues- 
day. Since Jan. 1, Spanish road ac- 
cidents have taken 2.617 Jives. (AFP) 


Tunisian Tourism Up 


TUNIS — Tunisia’s earnings from 
tourism, the country’s main source of 
hard currency, amounted to 1.413 bil- 


Tai wan’s privately run EVA Air- 
ways Corp. signed an agreement Tues- 
day with Continental Airlines that is 
aimed at jointly expanding air markets. 
EVA's If.S. routes will be connected 
with Continental's, starting early next 
year, subject to government approval. 
The carriers will also launch joint mar- 
keting campaigns. (AFP) 


TEG 


www.hotelgulde.com 

book directly - save money worldwide. 

THG - The Hotel Guide AG, Switzerland 
Fax: + 41 41 379 09 29 E-mail: thg@hoeeIguEda.ch 



Correction 


A caption on the Americas Page in 
Tuesday's editions misidentified a sink- 
ing Mississippi River steamboat. It was 
the Belle of Louisville. 


Europe 





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day Showers and thunder- Germany Thursday. Ihen over mosi ol northern 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, W EDNESDAY. AUG UST 27, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


RAGE 3 


T ,’^nl4 


Transport Workers Find U.S. a Drug Si eve 


POLITICAL NOTES 


By Mireya Navarro 

iVin- York Times Sen-ice 


II* MIAMI — The three wooden cargo 
craies dropped off by a courier at the 
international airport in San Juan, Puerto 
Rico, for a Delta Air Lines flight to New 
. __ York City looked harmless. 

■ ‘ l ^ e nervous behavior of the cour- 

-- ier raised suspicions. Law-enforcement 
I/ officials looked inside the crates and 

f ? uod LOOO pounds (about 450 kilo- 
i grams) of cocaine. 

The shipment was pan of an illicit 
7 - operation over three to four years in 
wyuch, federal officials said, thousands 
of pounds of Colombian cocaine were 
hidden in suitcases and cargo crates 
. a £°ard Delta flights from Puerto Rico 
aAd unloaded for nationwide U.S. dis- 

■ i tnburion. 

] What made the operation successful 
For so long, the government said, was 
that it was run with the help of Delta 
employees who used fake airline tags 
^ ^ bypassed check-in and security pro- 

cedures by hauling the illegal loads 
t ™ough the airport restaurant and bar. 

. This episode illustrates what federal 
law-enforcement officials said has be- 
come an alarming trend across the conn- 
'■ try: increasing involvement of airport 
and harbor workers in drug smuggling. 
a ' Jn the fiscal year staninglasi October, 

figures from the U.S. Customs Service 
■'r.c show thar 148 commercial cargo em- 
pfoyees at airports and seaports have 
;•* been arrested nationwide, accused of 
helping smuggle drugs in aircraft com- 
partments and ship cargo containers. 

"“'i . V .Although arrest figures for other 
s. \» years were not available for compar- 
ispn. officials said such statistics told 
only part of the story. Insiders are often 
-- : able to avoid arrest because they know 
when customs inspections of aircraft 
• i and containerized cargo will occur, and 
- . they can simply not pick up the drugs. 

- Although only small numbers of air- 
p6rt and harbor employees are involved 
m drug smuggling, their impact is great, 

- .• federal officials said, because the work- 
l f : ers had another insider's advantage — 

access to obscure hiding places in toi- 
■; lets, cockpits and passengeT cabins in 
aircraft and in cargo containers aboard 
:.j- . ships. 

l_; Officials said the employees come 
r. frpm virtually every segment of the 




.E.T. MIAIVf 


hiuill Hh* V«A Iim« 

Customs officers checking cartons aboard a truck leaving the port of Miami, a favorite route of drug runners. 


work force — baggage handlers, cater- 
ers, cleaners, ticket-counter agents, 
mechanics and flight crews at airports, 
and longshoremen, freight checkers, 
and ship crews at ports. 

Helping pass a few pounds of the 
contraband can earn a worker an ad- 
ditional S3 ,000 to S5.000. 

Felix Jimenez, the Drug Enforcement 
Administration's special agent in 
charge for the Caribbean in San Juan, 
sai± “A guy who's making $5 an hour 
suddenly is making $400,000 a year by 
doing this.’* 

“It attacks the integrity of the sys- 
tem,’ ' Raphael Lopez, the Customs Ser- 
vice special agent in charge in Miami, 
said of what law-enforcement officials 
call “internal conspiracies.” An em- 
ployee is “someone who is trusted, and 
that trust is violated.” 


The problem has been growing at 
major ports as aggressive law enforce- 
ment pushes traffickers to find ingeni- 
ous methods of concealment. Customs 
Service officials said. 

But, they added, it is particularly 
acute in San Juan and Miami, major 
gateways for illegal drugs because of 
their proximity’ to South America. Air- 
port and harbor workers are suspected in 
most cases in which drugs are seized at 
the Port of Miami and Miami Inter- 
national Airport, officials said. 

At the Port of Miami, where customs 
inspectors seize more drugs in cargo 
containers than at any other port in the 
country, customs officials say part of the 
problem is lax security and the lack of 
criminal background checks of employ- 
ees that are standard in some other ports 
around the country, such as die Port of 


New York-New Jersey. 

In a report prepared for congressional 
hearings last month on efforts to stop the 
flow of drugs into the United States, 
Representative John Mica, Republican 
from central Florida, called security at 
the port “weak, ineffective, and over- 
burdened.” 

Dock and warehouse workers have 
such free rein around the port, Mr. Mica 
and Customs Service inspectors said, 
that employees have been known to 
tamper with surveillance cameras, drive 
around to pick up drugs and leave. There 
are no checkpoints. 

But Arthur Coffey, president of the 
International Longshoremen's Associ- 
ation Local 1922 here, blamed “a short- 
age of manpower, budget cuts, and in- 
effective leadership” at the Customs 
Service. 


Christian Coalition 
Outlines Its Agenda 

Washington — when Repub- 

lican leaders return to Washington 
next week they wifi be greeted with a 
friendly but firm nudge from a con- 
stituency they cannot afford to avoid. 
The message is simple: Now that rhe 
budget is balanced, it's time to move 
on to moral issues. 

In his debut as president of the 
Christian Coalition. Don Hodel 
spelled out Tuesday a legislative 
agenda that revives some recent 
battles and takes up a new one. 
Highest on the list is legislation aimed 
at prohibiting religious persecution 
worldwide, a clear indication mat the 
coalition continues to look beyond its 
early mission of fighting abortion. 

Mr. Hodel's announcement is also 
intended to remind Washington that 
the Christian Coalition, with its 1.9 
million members, remains influential 
despite the impending departure of its 
director, Ralph Reed" 

“We are very clearly sending a 
signal,” Arne Owens, a spokesman, 
said. 

The priorities include pending le- 
gislation and general policy sugges- 
tions. such as reducing tax rates 
across the board and giving local of- 
ficials more control over education. 

Two of the Five items deal with 
religious freedom. The coalition will 
push for legislation that would im-. 
pose sanctions on foreign govern- 
ments thar do not permit free religious 
expression. A constitutional amend- 
ment being sponsored by Represen- 
tative Ernest Istook, Republican of 


Away From 
Politics 

• Most parents with children in 

public schools support using tax 
money to send srudents to private and 
parochial schools, according to a Gal- 
lup survey. (API 

• Investigators ordered more Boe- 
ing 747 fuel tank explosions as they 


Oklahoma, would permit school 
prayer and other religious expression 
on public property. ( WP j 

Summer Reading 

For a Beach Nap 

WASHINGTON — For the beach- 
goer who wants a different kind of 
book this month, why not sample the 
summer offerings of the Government 
Printing Office? Here’s an eclectic 
range of topics with catchy rides at 
affordable prices. The GPO listed "In- 
ternational Certificate of Vaccination, 
Nov. 1991." forSJ, its leading seller 
at the end of June. No. 2 was “Federal 
Benefits for Veterans and Dependents, 
1997.” at $5.50. 

The fourth best selling book was 
“The Blair House Report,” which 
“contains the instructions given by 
President Clinton and Vice President 
Gore to the new cabinet,” according 
to the catalogue blurb, and costs S3. 

The surprise at No. 9, “Questions 
and Answers About Electric Mag- 
netic Field Associated With the Use 
of Electric Power,” for S3, pushed 
“Code of Federal Regulations, Title 
1 0,” at $39. into 1 0th place. ( WP ) 

Quote / Unquote 

Newt Gingrich, the House speaker, 
avoiding a "straight answer to the 
question of what he was doing in New 
Hampshire, site of the first presiden- 
tial primary in 2000: * ‘There are a lot 
of good reasons to come to New 
Hampshire; a couple of years ago we 
came to look for moose." fNYTf 


tried to learn what downed TWA 
Flight 800 in 1996. (AP) 

• Regulators have begun a safety 

review of Union Pacific in the wake 
of three accidents thar killed seven 
people since June. (API 

• A firefighter who gave photo 

blueprints of an FBI complex to a 
militia leader in West Virginia has 
been convicted under a new federal 
anti-terrorism law. (AP) 




A Tarnished Gingrich Tours Nation to Revive His ‘Indiana Jones’ Image 



f 

, | • . 4 . 






Sari tVpOlK WwufJ ft**. 

The House speaker appears to be getting little benefit from budget accord. 


By John B. Yang 

Washington Past Sen-ice 

MANCHESTER. New Hampshire — As Newt 
Gingrich travels around the United States on his 10- 
state. 13-city "'redemption tour,” the Georgia Re- 
publican is often greeted with the theme from “Raid- 
ers of die Lost Ark," the movie about a daredevil 
archaeology professor who narrowly escapes disaster 
after disaster only to triumph in the last reel. 

It is an image that surely appeals to Mr. Gingrich, 
speaker of the House of Representatives and a former 
college instructor whose childhood dream was to 
become a paleontologist and who has dodged his fair 
share of runaway boulders of late. 

“It is true that my life on some days sometimes 
seems adventurous enough to be an Indiana Jones 
movie,” Mr. Gingrich said last week to Jay Leno on 
“The Tonight Show.” 

But if a goal of this posl-budgewleal trek from the 
beaches of California to the forests of New Hampshire 
to the Rocky Mountains is a rehabilitation of his 
tarnished image — perhaps in hopes of making a run 
for the presidency in 2000 — it is not going to be easy, 
as his poll numbers continue to indicate, at least not 
without some of Steven Spielberg's special effects. 

It will take a “long, long time' ' to repair his image, 
said John Pimey Jr., a Claremont McKenna College 


political scientist ‘ ’He ’s as unpopular as an American 
can get without being a puppy strangler.” 

And even among conservatives, he continues to 
have problems. 

Concord, where he met about two dozen teenage 
drug counselors and spoke at a fund-raising reception 
for rwo Republican representatives, is the midpoinr of 
a trip that was to have been part victory lap for the 
tanned, newly slimmed Mr. Gingrich after linking 
arms with President Bill Clinton on a deal intended to 
balance the budget and cut taxes. 

But Mr. Gingrich appears to be getting' little benefit 
from the budget accord, which advisers had hoped 
would replace the image of the speaker as the bel- 
ligerent who twice shut down the government in 1995 
with that of the leader who gets things done. 

While public approval of Congress and Mr. Clinton 
are at new heights, Mr. Gingrich’s numbers remain 
consistently low in a variety of polls. Just 30percent of 
those questioned by the Pew Center for the People and 
the Press this month said they had a favorable opinion 

Of him. 

"The public just doesn’t like him, so they're not 
going to give him credit whether or not he deserves it,* ’ 
said a political analyst, Scuarf Rotheoberg. 

On tour, the speaker finds himself defending the 
budget deal against conservative criticism that it gave 
too much new spending to Mr. Clinton while not doing 


enough to trim the size of die federal government. 

At a Republican conference in Indianapolis last 
week, former Vice President Dan Quayle followed 
Mr. Gingrich and got a big response when he heaped 
scorn on the budget package, declaring that "the 
taxpayer once again got the shaft." 

Mr. Gingrich, to burnish his image as a responsible 


Mr. Gingrich, to bnmish his image as a responsible 
leader, has stressed working with Mr. Clinton. 

While this shift reflects the fact that Mr. Gingrich's 
strongest support among House Republicans now 
comes from moderates, there are analysts who spec- 
ulate that it is also part of an effort to position himself 
for a possible presidential run, something the 54-year- 
old speaker has not ruled out 

They argue it would be a graceful way to extricate 
himsen from his troubles in the House. 

Further, House rules bar him from serving as speak- 
er beyond Jan. 3, 2003, and be has indicated he would 
not care to remain in the House as a rank-and-filer. 

And even if he did not win his party’s presidential 
nomination, he could command the loyalty of enough 
party activists to help determine who did. 

“What does he have to lose?” remarked Professor 
Pitney, die Claremont McKenna political scientist “A 
presidential race can’t hurt bis reputation, and it might 
help. He’d have to give up the speakership anyway. 
This way. he’d go out striving for something grand 
instead of skulking off to retired-pol limbo." 


Colombia President Defies Logic 

Country on Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, but Samper Endures 


By Diana Jean Scheino 

Afar York Times Sen-ice 

BOGOTA — The letters to the editor 

column in El Tiempo one recent day read 

: Alike the script for a movie that could be 
■bailed "Country on the Verge of a 
Nervous Breakdown.” 

The first note was from a woman to 
her husband who had been kidnapped 
months before, urging him not to lose 
hope. Another reader exploded over the 
• ■ ‘swindlers, juvenile delinquents, phony 
civil servants; peddlers selling umbrel- 
las, videos; books, dogs, taffy, knives, 
kites; predators, murderers just out or 
jail” who -besiege him the moment he 
leaves home each morning. 

A third recalled promises President 
Ernesto Samper made, that his last yen m 
office would be a “striptease,” unveiling 
great works. With interest rates on sav- 
ings accounts falling short of inflation, me 
pledge rang mie in a way, the reader said. 
“We’ve been completely fleeced. 

Three years into his four-year term* 
j^Ir. Samper has proved himself a more 


audacious politician than opponents in 
Washington or at home imagined. 

Mr. Samper won the battle over the 
drug corruption charges. Nobody expects 
him to leave office before his temi expires 
next August. Yet his victory is dubious. 

‘ • “He’s a political genius,” said Fran- 
cisco Mejia, an economic consultant 
who was one of those calling for Mr. 
Samper to step down. “But it doesn t 
matter. He doesn’t have credibility, 
nobody trusts him, and without that, you 
can’t really run a country." 

Pardoned by Congress on charges that 
drug dealers from Cali pumped $6 mil- 
lion into his election campaign, Mr. 
Samper has used control of jobs, pork- 
barrel projects and of the airwaves to 

ignore calls for his resignation. 

Er-nnnmic growth, which had been 
running above 5 percent a year before 
Mr. Samper took office, is down to an 
expected 1 .5 percent this year, while the 
. major international investment houses 
now advise their clients to invest else- 
where. The unemployment rate, once at 
6 percent, has more than doubled. 


With government soaking up domestic 
sources of finance, Colombian compa- 
nies have turned to foreign banks. During 
Mr. Samper’s term, foreign debt has 
soared to $32 billion from $17 billion. 
Government spending as a share of the 
gross domestic product has swollen to 33 
percent from 20 percent, Mr. Mejia said. 

In social and political terms, the situ- 
ation is hardly more optimistic. About 70 
percent of all kidnappings in the world 
occur in Colombia. More people died 
violent deaths in the first nine months of 
1996 than all last year in the United 
States with eight rimes the population. 

In order to prevail over enemies, Mr. 


Sultan Escapes Sex Charges 


Los Angeles Times 

LOS ANGELES — A federal judge 
has ruled that die Sultan of Brunei, one 
of the richest men in die world, cannot be 
sued for allegedly holding a former Miss 
U;s.A. as a sex slave on his island. 

U.S. District Judge Consuelo Mar- 
shall found that the sultan vras a foreign 

head of state and therefore wa^protectea 

by sovereign. immunity .fronjNawsuiis 

« [d£d in the united States. \ 

* ;The grant of immunity came at- the 


to proceed "would be incompatible 
with U.S. "foreign-policy interests.” 


Shannon Marketic. the 27-vear-old 
former Miss U.S. A, claimed in com- 
plaint that she and six other beamy 
queens were hired for modeling and 

against her will in a palace ’ 

(Eg which the scannly.elad nwdek 

were forced to attend panes wi*men 

wto tried to force them to performs 

“The sultan denied the allegations. 


odds. He has tried to satisfy the Rodrig- 
uez Orejuela brothers, the Cali traffick- 
ers who allegedly financed his election, 
as well as officials in Washington, who 
have castigated him for protecting the 
interests of the drug lords. 

A perfect example has been a bill to 
reinstate extradition, which the president 
launched as Washington prepared its 
annual report cad on Colombia's co- 
operation in fighting drug exports. 

The United States is eager to have an 
extradition treaty with Colombia. It 
would like to be able to try the Colom- 
bian drug lords in its own courts. Mr. 
Samper’s proposal has effectively 
muted Washington's criticism. But the 
law would not apply to drug dealers who 
turn themselves ltf, like the Rodriguez 
Orejuelas. And a twist in the bill an- 
nounced last week means that passage of 
a second law, under the next president’s 
administration, will be necessary. 

In the atmosphere of lawlessness be- 
yond any sense of proportion or shame, 
some crimes veer into th v surreal. Last 
week, a legislator reported that a 32- 
foot-wide metal bridge weighing 40 tons 
had disappeared from his district. Res- 
idents of San Agustin, in Neiva state, 
neither saw nor heard anything. 


Even in Space, 
One Can Now 
Vote on Earth 

New York Times Service 

HOUSTON — 
Among the ' electoral 
blocs a politician has ro 
worry about, voters stuck 
in outer space do not 
make for a veiy big con- 
stituency — not yet, any- 
way. ’But if and when 
they do, they will add 
vast new complexities to 
the concept or a ger-out- 
the-vote drive. 

Space travelers can 
now casr ballots in elec- 
tions back home, NASA 
and Texas election offi- 
cials announced Mon- 
day, as' they revealed 
their high-technology 
solution to what they 
called one of the more 
vexing legal and logis- 
tical challenges in the 
history of suffrage. 

The problem arose last 
fall when an American 
astronaut, John Biaha, a 
registered voter in the 
Houston area who was 
on a four-month mission 
aboard the Russian space 
station Mir, said he 
wanted to vote in the 
November elections. 
Texas officials said there 
was no legal way for him 
to do that. He had left 
Earth long before absent- 
ee ballots had even been 
drawn up. 

But on Monday, the 
secretary of state of 
Texas, Tony Gaiza, said 
a new computer program 
would allow astronauts to 
cast ballots by. sending 
them via e-mail to the 
National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration. 


Genetic Tie to Colon Cancer 

For Ashkenazi Jews, Risk Is Doubled, Report Finds 


By Rick Weiss 

Washington Post Semce 

WASHINGTON — Re- 
searchers have discovered a 
new kind of genetic defect 
that doubles a person's risk of 
colon cancer. The defect is 
present in one of every 17 
American Jews, making it the 
most common cancer-associ- 
ated mutation ever identified 
in any ethnic population. 

The mutation, apparently 
rare in non-Jews, appears to 
be responsible for about one 
in four cases of inherited 
colon cancer in Ashkenazi 
Jews — those of East Euro- 
pean ancesny, who constitute 
more than 95 percent of the 6 
million Jews in the United 
States. It can be detected with 


a newly available $200 blood 
test, which some geneticists 
predicted would quickly be- 
come one of the more com- 
monly used genetic tests. 

Doctors called the laresr 
discovery a major advance 
because a positive blood test 
can alert people to the need for 
regular colon examinations, 
called colonoscopies, which 
can detect colon cancer in its 
earliest stages. The disease is 
easily prevented or cured 
when growths in the colon are 
spotted early and removed. 

Diets high in fiber and low 
in fat lower a person's risk of 
getting colon cancer, which is 
the third most common type 
of cancer in the United States. 
Doctors recommend periodic 
colonoscopies starting at age 


Court Fines Mexican Publisher 


The Associated Press 

MEXICO CITY — A 
judge found a Mexican news- 
paper publisher guilty of tax 
evasion and fined him $3,150 
in a case that has fueled a 
nationwide controversy. 

Juan Ealy Ortiz, owner of 
the El Universal newspaper, 
which has been critical of the 
government, has insisted that 
he was being politically per- 
secuted- He repeated that ac- 
cusation Tuesday through his 
lawyers, who were quoted in 
a front-page story in El Uni- 
versal 

Judge Alberto Perez Dayan 
of the Fifth Penal Court Dis- 
trict in Mexico City on Mon- 
day set the minimum sen- 
tence for the charge against 


the newspaper of failing to 
pay its 1995 taxes. Mr, Ortiz 
has to pay the fine as pres- 
ident of the company. 

El Universal executives 
and columnists of many other 
newspapers criticized the 
fine, saying President Ernesto 
Zedillo’s administration was 
out to get the newspaper be- 
cause of its opposition to the 
government. 


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of Nature Genetics, was led by 
Ben Vogelsiein of Johns Hop- 
kins University in Baltimore. 
Researchers said it could help 
them find the underlying 
causes of other kinds of can- 
cers in different populations. 

The research involved ge- 
neric analyses of blood or tis- 
sue samples from about 1 .000 
Ashkenazi Jews. Most colon 
cancers are due to genetic 
changes acquired during a 
person's lifetime, but an es- 
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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERA LD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1997 

asia/pacifkT 


Religious Groups Press 
Seoul to Aid the North 


.... v *:"— ■&* . 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Times Service 

SEOUL — Putting shaip new pres- 
sure on the government over food aid to 
North Korea, South Korean religious 
organizations on Tuesday handed of- 
ficials a huge stack of petitions calling 
for increased aid to the North. 

The organizers said that the petitions 
contained 1.1 million signatures, a re- 
markable number in a nation of 45 mil- 
lion people. The success of the petition 
drive underscores the growing discom- 
fort in South Korea with the images 
filtering out of the North of emaciated 
children and an increasing sense that 
some aid is necessary to avert a cata- 
strophic famine in North Korea. 

South Korea has been deeply am- 
bivalent about assistance in the last few 
years. South Koreans feel a strong emo- 
tional tie with compatriots in the North, 
but they are also resentful of the North's 
failure to show gratitude for past aid and 
alarmed about die risk that the food will 
simply bolster the North Korean Army. 

The theme of the rally Tuesday by 
religious leaders, before they handed 
over the petitions to the Unification Min- 
istry, was that North Korea's politics may 
be repugnant but that the most important 
thing is that its people are starving. 

"North Koreans are our brothers and 
sisters," declared Cardinal Kim Sou 


Hwan, the Roman Catholic leader in 
South Korea. "Even now, countless 
numbers of North Koreans are starving, 
especially the children. ' ' 

The sense of crisis was underscored 
by a video, "How Many More Must 
Die?" shown at the rally. It presented 
images of excruciatingly thin children 
and of bodies washed ashore on the 
Chinese side of the river that marks 
China's border with North Korea. The 
narrator said that the bodies were of 
North Koreans who had tried to flee to 
China but had drowned because they 
were too weak to swim properly. 

The petition drive was strongly 
backed by Christian and Buddhist or- 
ganizations, which have been gathering 
contributions for private assistance as 
well as c alling on the government to do 
more. The aid groups also emphasized 
that Pyongyang, should allow more 
monitoring to ensure that the food is 
actually given to people who need it. 

Some visitors to parts of North Korea 
have seen few signs of hunger and have 
suggested that the talk of famine is 
exaggerated. Bur others have reported 
seeing corpses and have taken photos 
apparently showing children suffering 
from severe malnutrition. 

The most common view seems to be 
that hunger is widespread in North 
Korea. Moreover, crops this summer 
apparently have been mostly poor. 




RADIOACTIVE LEAK — A nuclear waste storage side at a re- 
processing plant in Tokaimura, northeast of Tokyo. An official said 
Tuesday that the site had been leaking low-level radiation for 30 years. 


After No Results, Japan 
Ends Fusion Research 


By Andrew Pollack 

Sew York Tunes Service 

TOKYO — The idea that cheap, 
bountiful energy can be produced by 
so-called cold fusion has suffered an- 
other blow as the government of Japan 
said it would terminate its research, 
which has failed to confirm that the 
phenomenon exists. 

Japan had pursued the quest for 
room-temperature nuclear fusion long 
after most governments and scientists 
in the United States and Europe had 
dismissed the concept of cold fusion as 
an illusion. Japan said Monday that it 
also was throwing in the towel. 

"We couldn't achieve what was 
first claimed in terms of cold fusion," 
said Hideo Ikegami, a retired professor 
at the National Institute for Fusion 
Science in Nagoya. "We can't find any 
reason to propose more money for the 
coming year or for the furure.” 

The Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry, which has spent 2.3 bil- 
lion yen (S19.5 million) on cold fusion 
over the last five years, will not provide 
any new financing in the next fiscal 
year, said Shin-ichiro Fukushfma, a 
director of the ministry's electric 
power technology department A cold- 
fusion Laboratory set up by the ministry 


in Sapporo is expected to be- shut, ; 
scientists said. 

In 1989, two scientists. Doctors B. 
Stanley Pons of the.University of Utah ; 
and Martin Fleischmann of Southarop- ; 
ton University in England, shocked the ». 
world by reporting that nuclear fiisiou,- 
the process that creates the heat of the 
sun and the explosion of a hydrogen" 
bomb, could be reproduced in a jar": 
using readily available materials. 

They said their simple apparatus 
offered the prospect of virtually an-.; 
limited, inexpensive energy. 

But other researchers could not re- j 
liably reproduce their results. The field ' 
had fallen into disfavor by 1 992, when 
Japan, hoping to take the lead in the 
technology and desperate to reduce its - 
nearly total dependence on imported . 
oil, decided to start its program. 

In addition to the government pro- 
gram, about 20 major Japanese compa- 
nies have been pooling money to 
provide SI million or more a year for 
university cold-fusion research. That 
f inan cing is also likely to end, re- . 
searchers said. 

Officials at the Ministry of Inter- 
national Trade and Industry say that 
the S20 million spent on rhe program 
was a pittance compared with what is , 
spent on other energy programs. 1 


India Rejects Media tion 
By the U.S. on Kashmir 

NEW DELHI — India on Tuesday rejected a 
U.S. offer of mediation to end Kashmir border 
clashes with Pakistan and said that differences 
with Islamabad should be resolved in bilateral 
talks. 

“We have seen press reports relating to a 
possible U.S. interest in mediation." a foreign 
ministry spokesman said, adding that there was 
"absolutely no question of mediation by third 
parties in India-Pakistan issues." 

A senior official at the U.S. State Department 
was quoted as saying on Monday that Washington 
would be willing to mediate to end Kashmir border 
clashes between India and Pakistan if invited by 
both nations. Indian and Pakistani troops traded 
fire across their Kashmir border for the sixth 
consecutive day Tuesday, but the exchanges were 
relatively light and there were no casualties, Indian 
officials said. 

India accuses Pakistan of arming Muslim guer- 


BRIEFLY 


illas in Kashmir. Pakistan says if provides only 
moral and diplomatic support. (Reuters) 

Nerve Gas Cult Is Reviving 

TOKYO — The Aum Supreme Truth dooms- 
day cult, responsible for deadly nerve gas attacks, 
is attracting back followers and setting up new 
branches, public security authorities said Tues- 
day. 

A total of 427 Aum followers were arrested 
after the 1 995 Sarin gas attack on Tokyo subways, 
but one in three, or 138 people, has returned to the 
cult after their release, news repons said, quoting 
a survey by the Public Security Investigation 
Agency! (AFP) 

Hun Sen Promises Order 

PHNOM PENH. Cambodia — Hun Sen, who 
wrested power in a coup that ignited a new civil 
war, promised Tuesday to restore securin' and 
stability to Cambodia or leave office if he fails. 


Speaking at a graduation ceremony for busi- 
ness students in Phnom Penh, Mr. Hun Sen de- 
clared that he would not seek office in a promised 
May 1998 election if his programs fall through. 
Mr. Hun Sen said that he had a long-term strategy 
to fight rampant crime — drug trafficking, armed 
robberies and Iddnappings. ■ 

"If I cannot succeed, it would be useless forme 
to remain in office for another term," Mr. Hun 
Sen said. (AP) 

A 2d Hong Kong Protest 

HONG KONG — A dozen pro-democracy 
campaigners marched to the office of Hong 
Kong's new' leader Tuesday to demand that China 
release a dissident who is reportedly ailing. 

The protest, the second since Hong Kong re- 
turned to Chinese sovereignty in July, came after 
reports that that the dissident, Wang Dan. was 
suffering from severe headaches and a stomach 
disorder. Mr. Wang. 27, a leader of the 1989 
Tiananmen Square democracy protests, is serving 
an 1 1-year sentence. 'API 


Lee Consolidates Power in Taiwan 

President Wins 3d Term as Chairman of Nationalist Party 

Reuters that Mr. Lee’s re-election as the Nationalist 

TAIPEI — - President Lee Teng-hui on Party chairman did not change Taiwan's 
Tuesday won a third term as Nationalist Party status as part of China. Leaders of the island 
chair man in an uncontested election that con- are only local officials, he said. , 

solidated his power base. Beijing also poured cold water on a peace 

Mr. Lee won more than 93 percent of the overture by Taiwan, saying that strained ties 
2.209 votes of partv delegates. Party officials could improve only if the island halted ac- 
had orig inall y set "the w inning target at 85 tivities to split the motherland, 
percent, higher rhnn the 82.5 percent Mr. Lee Taiwan news media said Nationalist of- 
won four years ago. ficials mobilized ail available resources to 

"I will continue to devote mvself to pro- ensure a landslide for Mr. Lee this year to : 
moling party reforms and upholding the con- signal unity within the party, whose image has- 
tinued development of the country ’s democ- been tarnished by a spate of violent crimes and - 
racy and constitutional politics," he said in an corruption. 

acceptance speech. “The high winning percentage demons 

Mr. Lee named Vice President Lien Chan strates the fiim uniiyof party members." Wu- 
as party deputy chairman. Poh-hsiung, the party secretary-general, said. 

Mr. " Lee. 74 and Taiwan-born, rose to Constitutional revisions in July allow Mr. 
power after he succeeded Chiang Ching-kuo Lee to dictate all major policies, inducting 
as president in 19S8. He was elected party foreign, defense and China affairs. They also 
chairman the same year. " reduce the power of the prime minister, turn- 

in Beijing. China's Foreign Ministry ing him essentially into a presidential chief of 
spokesman, Tang Guoqiang. said on Tuesday staff chosen by the president. 




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Child Abuse in Australia 

Much Pedophilia Left Unpunished, Report Says 


Aseiue Fruni e-Presse 

SYDNEY — Generations of children 
suffered enormous harm as police and 
local authorities turned a blind eye to 
sexual abuse by Australian clergymen, 
church officials and teachers, a" royal 
commission report said here Tuesday. 

The report, by James Wood, a Su- 
preme Court judge, criticized years of 
neglect and under-funding of child pro- 
tection services, and warned that as 
many as 10 percent of children in the 
general community could be victims of 
child abuse. 

Calling for a new approach to the care 
and protection of children. Justice Wood 
said that such numbers represented "a 
significant problem" since past expe- 
rience showed that any one offender was 
likely to come into contact with many 
children, and having abused once was 
likely " to reoffend with a degree of 
regularity." 

There was a deep-seated ignorance on 
the part of major churches and religious 
organizations, the report said, about the 
extent and significance of child sex 
abuse by their members. 

One admitted sex offender, a member 
of the Christian Brothers Catholic teach- 
ing order, told the commission that it 


was not until he was threatened with 
dismissal that he realized his actions 
were criminal. He said that the vow of 
chastity applied * 'primarily to hetero- 
sexual relationships." 

"The fact is that there has been a long, 
sad and extensive history of child sexual 
abuse by members of the clergy and by 
those associated with the churches, 
schools, homes and the like conducted 
by religious associations." the report 
said. 

Because of the impenetrability of 
these organizations and the failure of the 
police to effectively investigate, a "very 
considerable amount of criminal con- 
duct of the most serious kind has been 
left undetected and unpunished. 

"Enormous harm has been done to 
generations of children.” 

Franca Arena, a Labor member of 
Parliament, whose identification in Par- 
liament of a former Supreme Court 
judge as a pedophile led to his suicide in 
November, threatened to name more pe- 
dophiles. She said that she was "ap- 
palled" the commission had not inves- 
tigated certain people in "high places." 
and that she had copies of affidavits from 
child sex abuse victims accusing a judge 
and a politician of abuse. 


A Rabbit Virus 
Hits New Zealand 

The Associated Press 

WELLINGTON, New Zealand 
— A rabbit-killing virus has been 
illegally introduced in South Island 
farmlands infested with wild rab- 
bits, apparently by formers desper- 
ate to save their grazing lands. - 

The Ministry of Agriculture con- 
firmed on Tuesday the presence of 
rabbit calieivirus disease on at least 
four farms in Central Otago, as well 
as suspected outbreaks at" three oth- 
er South Island locations. 

"It appeals this disease has-been 
deliberately and illegally intro- 
duced,” said Barry' 0'Neil,"the min- 
istry's chief veterinary officer. 

Australia is suspired as die 
source of the infection. 

Tests on dead rabbits on Crom- 
well farms confirmed they had been 
lulled by calieivirus disease. Farm- 
ers threatened to release the virus 
last month after scientists with the 
Ministry of Agriculture rejected an 
application for the virus to be in- 
troduced legally into New Zeal- 
and. 

Properties were quarantined 
where rabbits killed by the virus 
were found. Stock movements from 
the area have been banned. 


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Snubbed, a Determined Romania Makes NATO Entry 6 Our Main Target’ 


By Edward Cody 

Foil >, i i. [ 

BUCHAREST — This is NATO 
country.- wiih a zeal the Marlboro Man 
can only envy. 

Lett oul of the Western alliance’ * first 
uave of expansion last month in Mad- 
rid. Romania is swallowing its disap- 
pointment and making an all-out effort 
— political, economic" and military — to 
guarantee it is on the. second list of 
expansion countries scheduled to be 
named in April 1999. 

“Being in NATO isourmain tarser.” 
said Colonel Mihail Ionescu, chief of 
the Defense Ministry’s Directorate for 
European and North Atlantic Integra- 
tion. “It was before Madrid, and it is 
even more so now.” 


The determination n> n>m the North 
Atlantic Treatx organization rises al- 
most to the level of national obsession, 
with 95 percent o! the papula t it m 
voicing approval despite the hiah price 
rag. More rhan a desire fur NATO's 
nuclear umbrella, officials here say. the 
eagerness reflects an ache to see Ro- 
mania anchored once n»«ie in the West 
after a generation of communism and 
the erratic dictatorship of Nicolae Ceau- 
sescu. 

Although opinion surveys show ihm 
enthusiasm is highest in Rumania. the 
campaign tor NATO membership here 
is parr of a widespread desire across 
Eastern Europe to join the w inning side 
of the ideological straggle that con- 
cluded at the beginning of ihe decade. 

Ln that light, membership in NATO is 


seen here as a path toward sharing in the 
free- market richer ol the evolving Euro- 
pean Union. 

"For us. it is an identity issue — 
being in the club.” said Sorin Ducnru. 
whu hejd> ihe Foreign Ministry's 

NATO department. 

The U.S. decision to limit the first cut 
of NATO expansion to Poland. Hun- 
gary and the Czech Republic, form- 
alized at the Madrid summit conference, 
has not generated the resentment pre- 
dicted b\ some last spring, when Pres- 
ident Emil Constantinescu \ govem- 
mem waged a quixotic campaign for 
admission wuh backing from France but 
litile chance of success. 

Instead. Romania is redoubling ef- 
forts ro cemenr close strategic ries'wiih 
the United States, recount zinin Wash- 


ington's key role in NATO as well as its 
interest in East European and Balkan 
stability. At the same rime, officials in 
Bucharest are following NATO inte- 
gration closely in Poland. Hungary and 
the Czech Republic, with an eye to 
imitating what works well there and 
avoiding what fails. 

“The idea is to have the same steps 
and approach to NATO :ls the three 
countries that are already integrating.” 
said Constantine Ionescu. the" Defense 
Ministry's secretary of state for defense 
policy and international relations. 

In some wavs. Romania failed to 
make the first cut at Madrid because it 
started from so far behind. Under Mr. 
Ceauseseu's suffocating hand, the 
country failed ro begin the transfor- 
mations alreadv under way hv the late 


100th Zionist Anniversary 

BASEL. Sw itzerland — .Around 1.700 delegates 
began gathering here Tuesday to mark the 100th 
anniversary of n historic meeting that launched the 
Zionists' modem drive to create a Jewish state. 

Hundreds of soldiers and policemen cordoned off 
the conference center to deter any terrorist violence 
or anti-Semitic demonstrations by right-wing rad- 
icals. Sharpshooters look up positions on roofs. 

Military patrol boats cruised the Rhine River near 
the Three Kings hotel, while the Swiss Air Force 
scanned the city's closed airspace. 

Despite the tight security, officials said they were 
hoping the congress would promote a fresh look at 
Swiss ties with Jews which have been strained by 
allegations that Swiss banks hoarded the wealth of 
Holocaust victims. t Reuters) 

Briton Charged in Murder 

BARROW-IN-FURNESS, England — The 
former husband of a British woman whose body was 
found in a lake 21 years after she disappeared has 
been charged in court with her murder. 

Gordon Park. 53, a retired school readier, was 
remanded in custody when he appeared before mag- 
istrates in Barrow -in-Fu mess in the northern Eng- 
land county of Cumbria. 

Mr. Park was charged Monday with the murder of 
his first wife. Carol Park, who was 30 when she 
vanished in July 1976. leaving behind three children. 
Her body was found 13 days ago. 


C .... • 

^ - 







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Pi'* J h ••• 


AHOY THERE — Cars fording floodwarers in Gan. southwest France, after a storm Tuesday. 


On Monday, a court here sentenced Mr. Krenz to 
six and n half years in prison. He w as immediately led 
away to jail because authorities feared he would flee, 
even though his sentence will not become legally 
binding until his appeal is heard. 

The court found Mr. Krenz guilty because he had 
shaped rhe shooi-to-ktll orders carried out by border 
guards. 

Mr. Krenz. who succeeded Erich Honecker as 
head of the now-defunct Communist state, has in- 
sisted that the government was only follow ing orders 
from Moscow' i Reuters) 


Krenz Appeals Conviction 

nr-T-fc ¥ 1 -vt i- rr r* v • * 


BERLIN — Egon Krenz. East Germany's last 
hard-line Communisr leader, lodged an appeal Tues- 
day against his manslaughter conviction for the 
deaths of people who were killed in the 1 980s while 
trying to flee over the Berlin Wall. 


ANKARA — Turkey is planning to transport 
drinking water from its southern shores to northern 
Cyprus' in order to offset water shortages in the 
breakaway Turkish Cypriot state, a government 


spokesman said Tuesday. 

The project would “cover the drinking water 
deficit of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus." 
the government spokesman, Sukru Sina Gurel. told 
reporters. 

Northern Cyprus has suffered droughts in the last 
few years. 

Speaking after a cabinet meeting, Mr. Gurel said 
the projectVould cover most of the enclave's water 
needs and would be put into practice by the end of the 
year. 

A balloon-type tanker, pulled by mgs. would be 
used to carry the warer across the Mediterranean Sea 
to storage tanks in the Turkish Cypriot state, which is 
recognized only by Ankara. 

Cyprus has been divided since 1974 when Turkey- 
invaded the northern third of the island in response ro 
a short-lived coup in Nicosia that was engineered by 
Greece, which was ruled at the time by a military 
junta. {Reuters ) 


1 9S0s in East European neighbors that 
were feeling the ripple from Mikhail 
Gorbachev's Soviet perestroika, or eco- 
nomic restructuring. 

The government that arose front Ro- 
mania 's 1989 revolution under Pres- 
ident Ion Iliescu swiftly began to reform 
the military and point toward NATO: It 
was the first to sign up for NATO's 
Partnership for Peace program in 1994. 
Bur it was slow to take difficult eco- 
nomic measures needed to undo the 
socialist economy. 

With Slovenia — the oiher candidate 
that was put un the waiting list at Madrid 
— Romania had the lowest percentage 
of production from the private sector 
among major NATO contenders when 
the picks were made. 

This was identified as the bis reason 


MI5 Surveillance 
On British Editor 
Tied to Libel Suit 

rhi t « u-1 ;jteJ h i y. 

LONDON — A journalist was placed 
under official surveillance when she al- 
lowed the former head of Ghana's se- 
curity service to use her bank account as 
a conduit to pay for a libel action, news- 
paper reports said Tuesday. 

Victoria Brittain, deputy foreign ed- 
itor of the liberal Guardian newspaper 
and a specialist on .Africa, is a long- 
standing friend of Kojo Tsikata. who is 
suing a rival London daily. The In- 
dependent. 

Some £250.000 i $402,000) was de- 
posited in Ms. Brittain’s account to pay 
for the suit over an article that said Mr. 
Tsikata had been named as a suspecr in 
the murder of three Ghanaian High 
Court judges. The Times reported. 

The MI5 British security service sus- 
pected that the funds were being 
laundered by Libya through Ms. Brit- 
tain's account, according to David 
Shayler. a former Sunday Times jour- 
nalist who retired five months ago from 
ML5. 

The Guardian said that MI5 tapped 
Ms. Brittain’s phone after her bank re- 
ported in 1993 that large sums of money 
had been deposited in her account. 
Agents followed her. monitored her 
meetings and planned to plant an elec- 
tronic listening device in her home, but 
gave up the plan, the newspaper said. 

The Guardian said Tuesday that Mr. 
Shayler later acknowledged that the 
transactions were -entirely innocent.” 
It said that neither Ms. Brittain nor The 
Guardian had played any part in the libel 
action against The Independent. 


for leaving Romania oul of the club. 

Mr. Iliescu. branded a neo-eommu- 
nist. lost elections last November to an 
opposition coalition headed by Mr. 
Constantinescu. It was the first time 
since before World War II that Romania 
transferred pow-er in unchallenged elec- 
tions. Mr. Constantinescu and his prime 
minister. Victor Ciorbea, pledged to 
dive head-first into a free- marker econ- 
omy. But by that time, the image of a 
Romania slow to change was set. and 
there was roo lirtle time To undo it before 
Madrid. 

This month. Mr. Ciorbea announced 
a list of 1 7 large, state-owned businesses 
that are being shut down, throwing 
30.000 Romanians out of work at the 
beginning of whoi he has promised will 
be" Polish-style economic shock ther- 
apy. 

Diplomats here caurioned that this is 
only the beginning. Although half of 
Romania’s overalf economic activity 
has moved to private hands and small 
shops buzz with shoppers along the 
busy avenues of Bucharest. SO percent 
of large-scale industrial production still 
comes from state-ow ned enterprises. 

But Mr. Ciorbea. although a former 
union activist, has made it clear he 
wants full-scale privatization despite 
ihe prospect of temporary social pain. 

In the meantime, the Defense Min- 
istry came home from Madrid, licked its 
wounds and started a military-wide as- 
sessment of what needs to be done by 
1999 to make sure Romania gains ad- 
mission to NATO. That review is due in 
aboui 10 days. 

Most necessary' steps — force re- 
duction. rank reorganization along 
NATO lines, modernizing equipment 
and procedures to make them NATO- 
compatible — have already begun. 

Mr. Ciorbea conducted tough nego- 
tiations Iasi week with Bel) Helicopter 
Textron for a $1 billion, 12-year pro- 
gram to produce in Romania 96 heli- 
copter gunships modeled after the U.S. 
military’s AH-1W Super Cobra. Inev- 
itably, the Romanian helicopter will be 
called the Dracula. 

France expressed disappointment 
that Romania was choosing Bell over a 
French offer, particularly given Ro- 
mania’s production of French helicopter 
models in the past and strong French 
support for Romania's NATO candi- 
dacy before the Madrid decision. But 
Romanian officials said the choice w>as 
part of what they describe as a strategic 
partnership with Washington. 

“We can say a lot of things about 
equality and so on. but we are convinced 
that the trans-Atlantic link is the most 
important thing for security in the 
area,” said Colonel Ionescu. "We are 
right next to Russia. Political orient- 
ation is a question of interests.” 


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^Thai 


PACE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD T RIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST27^1997 

INTERNATIONAL 




Bosnian Serb Generals Split in Power Struggle 


:.4 of Top 8 Commanders Attend Meeting With Mrs. Plavsic 


i* CiVfUfd Ia- Out Stiff from Daptot-hn 

r BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzego- 
.’vina — The struggle for power in the 
^Serbian part or Bosnia intensified 
‘fl uesday , with half the army 's top gen- 
erals showing their support for Pres- 
ident Biljana Plavsic in her attempt to 
C wrest power from Radovan Karadzic. 
!- Four of the Serbs' eight main army 
'"commanders met Mrs. Plavsic in her 
.stronghold of Banja Luka in north- 
-western Bosnia. 

1 Those who stayed away included 
!-the army chief of staff. General Pero 
"Colic, a deputy of his and the com- 
inlanders of the two army corps in the 
"eastern half of Bosnia. That section is 
'under the control of Mr. Karadzic, the 
'former president and an indicted war 
'criminal, and his allies in their strong- 
hold of Pale, just east of Sarajevo. 

' United Nations sources said that 
. General Colic had refused an offer of 
a helicopter to take him to Banja Luka 
rafter be talked in Sarajevo with the 
' U.S. commander of the NATO Sta- 
bilization Force in Bosnia. 

Among those attending the Plavsic 
'meeting were General Milan Torbica, 
the air force commander. General 
Momir Talic, who commands the 


First Corps, the Bosnian Serb Army's 
most powerful fighting unit, and Gen- 
eral Novica Simic, commander of the 
Third Corps. 

The boycott by four generals sug- 
gested that the army, like all other 
Bosnian Serb institutions, was split in 
die struggle between Mr. Karadzic 
and Mrs. Plavsic, a Serbian nation- 
alist and former Karadzic ally who 
now accuses him of getting rich while 
his people starve. 

Bosnian Serb Army sources said 
before the meeting that Mrs. Plavsic 
intended to name a replacement for 
General Colic. Her favorites were said 
to be General Talic or General Simic. 

The army is generally regarded as 
low in morale and poorly trained. At 
the beginning of the Plavsic-Karadzic 
conflict early this summer, it was 
thought to support the president, but it 
has since sometimes been critical of 
her. Mrs. Plavsic said Monday that 
she would see “whether the chief of 
staff and the corps commanders are 
people who know where the place of 
the army is.” 

Although she says Serbs should 
settle the power struggle by them- 
selves, the peace force and Interna- 


tional envoys have given her vital 
backing. Hundreds of British and 
Czech soldiers with the Stabilization 
Force intervened last week to foil an 
alleged attempt to oust her. 

On Tuesday, a force spokesman. 
Lieutenant Colonel Mike Wright, said 
that a peace force regiment had de- 
ployed near a transmitter on Mount 
kozara, where, he said, the force and 
other international organizations have 
equipment Pro-Karadzic police 
thwarted an attempt by pro-Plavsic 
forces to take over that transmitter 
Monday and use it for their new tele- 
vision station. Control of the trans- 
mitter would enable them to broad- 
cast deep into Karadzic territory. 

Banja Luka TV has broken with the 
Pale studio controlled by Mr. Karad- 
zic. Other media, the police and Par- 
liament also are now split between the 
rival camps. Media control is a major 
weapon in a rural land where television 
is the main source of news for many. 

International officials are furious 
with television controlled by Karad- 
zic supporters in Pale for comparing 
the peace force led by the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization to the Nazi 
occupiers in World War n. 


The peace force has the ability to 
limit or suspend Bosnian Serb tele- 
vision. International officials have 
promised action, but not yet an- 
nounced what they will do. 

In another development, the United 
States offered aid to Mrs. Plavsic, 
announcing loans of $1.1 million to 
Bosnian Serb companies. 

Pan of a package agreed to with 
Mrs. Plavsic on Aug. 7, the aid seems 
intended to underline that those who 
support the Dayton peace accord — as 
she says she does — will get funding 
denied to Mr. Karadzic, whose half of 
Bosnia is desperately poor. 

The international force, meanwhile, 
is hastily training hundreds of Serbian 
police officers in Banja Luka. 

A spokesman, Alun Roberts, said 
that funding for the rushed program 
was being considered “at a high level 
of the international community.' 1 

Police chiefs in three key towns — 
Banja Luka. Prijedor and Mrkonjic 
Grad — are loyal to Mrs. Plavsic, Mr. 
Roberts said. 

He said that the leaning of three 
other towns in western Bosnia was 
unclear and that two more still answer 
to Mr. Karadzic. The police in eastern 
Bosnia remain behind Mr. Karadzic, 
but Mr. Roberts insisted that the situ- 
ation there was fluid (AP. Reuters) 




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Bonn Seeks Contact With Iran 

BONN — Germany said Tuesday that it wanted to 
patch up its troubled relations with Iran, four months after 
a German court ruled that Tehran had ordered the murder 
of Iranian Kurdish dissidents in Berlin. 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel said in an interview 
with Neue Ruhr Zeitung that Germany wanted to * ‘slowly 
re-establish contacts with Iran.” TTve interview was to be , 
published by the newspaper Wednesday. A text was 
released by the Foreign Minisuy. . ' 1 

Mr. Kinkel welcomed remarks by the new Iranian 
foreign minister, Kamal Kharrazi, who has said he is. 
ready to meet with European Union ministers. He said 
Bonn would consider how to respond to Mr. Kharrazi. iii 
consultation with the Luxembourg EU presidency. 

“We will not ignore this wish after a long pause in 
contact," Mr. Kinkel said . ■ . - 

All EU countries except Greece withdrew their am- 
bassadors from Tehran after the ruling by a Berlin court that 
Iran's senior leaders had ordered the 1992 assassination of , 
four Kurds in a restaurant in Berlin. The European Union 
also suspended its policy of “critical dialogue” with 
Tehran. (Reuters) 

Army-Student Clash in Congo 

KINSHASA, Congo — Soldiers clashed with student 
demonstrators here Tuesday and there were unconfirmed 
reports that four students had been killed by gunfire, state 
radio reported. : 

“The studenrs were protesting against soldiers who 
had entered the campus," the radio said. “Shots were 
fired and there are reports of four students killed.' ' 

A Kinshasha police official. Rans Chalwe, said there . 
had been trouble on the campus of the National Institute . 
of Teacher Training. He said there had been injuries but 
no deaths. (Reuters) 

■ • ■ l 

Talks Start Without Burundi 

.ARUSHA. Tanzania — Peace talks on Burundi began 
Tuesday despite the refusal by one side — the Tutsi-led 
government — to participate. 

Former President Julius Nyerefe of Tanzania, the me- 
diator, went ahead Tuesday with the talks, dismissing as 
“stupid' ’ accusations that he was pro-Hutu and therefore 
unacceptable as a facilitator. Burundi has said that Tan- 
zania’s neutrality has been compromised because it har- 
bors Hutu rebels along its western border. 

“These accusations are not new,’’ Mr. Nyerere said, 
adding, ‘ ‘These are stupid reasons. ’ ’ 

He held talks with representatives of the main Hutu 
rebel organization, the National Council for the Defense 
of Democracy; the main Hutu political patty, Frodebu; 
the radical Tutsi party Parana, and two other political 
parties. Bur without the participation of the government, 
there is little possibility of headway in resolving the 
political crisis and its violent spillover. (AP) 

U.S. Lottery Offers 55,000 Fisas 

WASHINGTON — The United States will make avail- 
able 55,000 immigrant visas through a lottery this fall that 
will be open to applicants from all geographic regions. 

"Die annual lottery is aimed ar increasing the number of 
resident visas from areas that normally receive a dis- 
proportionately small number of such visas. 

The winners will be selected ar random following the 
Oct. -4 to Nov. 24 mail-in. In addition to being born in a 
qualifying country, applicants must have either a high 
school education or its equivalent, or within the past five 
years have worked two years in an occupation requiring ar 
least two years of training or experience. 

Entries must be typed or printed clearly in English and 
include the tuli name, date and place of birth for the 
■applicant and any accompanying spouse or minor child 
Applicants must also include their address and telephone 
number, if possible; their native country, and a recent 
photograph of the principal applicant. 

Applications for the lottery, using one of six postal 
addresses, should be sent to; 

DV-99 Program 

National Visa Center 
Portsmouth, N.H. 

U.S.A. 

Zip codes are: Asia, 00210; South America/Central 
Amenca/Canbbean, 00211; Europe, 00212; Africa 
00213; Oceania. 00214; North America. 00215. f.ipj 


Do you live in Austria, 
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Generals arriving Tuesday in Banja Luka for talks with the Bosnian Serb president. 


BRIEFLY 


GENERAL 











.. 


PAGES' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27. 1997 


PAGE 7 


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GENERAL 


Legal Notices 




hi the OrcuB Court of the lift Judi- 
cial Circuit In and far Dacia County, 
Florida, Gwaral Jurtaflction DMalon. 
Case No. 87-4977 CA. Office oftta Al- 
tornay GeneraL Department^ Legal 
Affaire, State of Ftartfa, PfaMIfr, 

WflQUE GEMS CORP, a Bprida 
corporadon. afUa UGL and ENRIQUE 
PtflELA, tndMdusfiy rod ta Presktert 
of UNIQUE GEMS INTL CORP, 
Dsfandante. 

Notice cl Bar Date, Las day fa *ng 
el proots oi dams and procsdin to 
daamine raid dfflms 

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on June 
S. 1937. tfe Court fisted an Onto 


.jJJ 


wtedi sri lorth if* Blowing procedure to 
deierntrne We vaW claims agwnsi 
Untque Gems Infl Corp. rUGD andfa 
ihe Receerersfap s assets, as totas 

1 The Notice snail be puMshed every 
day fa a period of fai (4) weeto . 

2 Al oriBWS ol UGl mat desire to 

preserve any claim against the ua es- 
tate are required to confarie a P™ ol 
Qom auached here® as ExrtM "A* and 
attach copKs cl al documfflts herthril 
falends ro rely uxxi to prove a calm 
sgamsi UGl and/or the Receivetships 
assets. Any creator who lab to Umriy 
lie and serve the Proof of Claim by ttte 
Bar Dale sftal be forever tared and 
pennenendy eraomed from assermg any 
crams floats! UGl. _ 

1 a you datn » be a vaito credto o< 
UGl. arel you wish to preserve your 
cfaim agaW the assets o UGl. you are 
required® to a Prool pi Ctemand d 
supporting (kxwnerts bmB rnffly* 
ffiw 31, 1997, (the *Bar DateT by 
ri^n the , 

A. Be the original Prod of Cten md 
copies of aD supporting documents 

Witte ■ „ 

Lews B. Freeman.- Recewer 

"“> Vui Sheet #103 
rail Gn 


3250 

Coorari 


Iruve, Ftorida 33133 


4 The fihg Ol a Prod of Ctaen sfal be 
; deemed codsed to juristoWn by m 

! 5. You are uged to fife a Fhocf ^ 

, fa the Rflcewrship case. II y 0U J^' 0 
i SeaPwHolcam.yoe'Miiwt»* ,e 
■ ® panUpate In the fistrSUion. 8 aiy, 
i hum the Receivership l» assets wxw- 
: ered t?i tie Receiver^ 

6 Riiher. you are adnsed ifiri ifie Re- 
carer s iJpmBng legal aM«or® 

( BHBitfag senriMs. You m wart .to 

1 contaci your own coinsel m hano tits 

ettm. You may also wanl to set * the 
advee ot tax consotef^OT^ouniOTS. 

7 To peteprie n a <*3^5“ 


, $ 
N " v f 

\ 

' I 


parties, you must property « ouMta 
fam anO submi t as intfcaisd narw m 
a famefar marwar- . . 

8 Any Prod ol Own not finely served 
wti he tisafthred and any doormens te- 
fed ipon by the cfanns* » apm te 
Pains stuch are not tr^Y ®ed »to 
saved ai accortarcB wto has note «# 
be nadnssUe at any evMwflar y tear - 
w cc trsi oonitated n tlw prerteana 
TnE DEADLINE TO HLE -.yQUR 

PROOF OF CLAIMS. FTOAY, * 
OCTOBER 31, 1997. 

DATED * 

KSHAiV, SLOTO, flRSNSEHC A 
HELUtGER, P-A. 

. Aitomeys fa Ihe Recewa 
2350 FW Unco Fhancial Ceria 

200 South Bacsyne Borieranl 

Mara. Fbrida 33131 
1305)379-1732 

By. Andrew B Heftger. ESO 
Fla Bat No 851553 






Personals 


MAY THE SACRED ffiART of Jesus be 
adored, glorified, loved end preserved 
. throughout the world, now aid forever 
Sacred Hean of Jbsus pray fa us. Saint 
Jude, wotter of miracles pray fa us. 
Saw Jute, najpw d Ihe hopeiera. pray 
fa i*. Amen Say this prayer nine tfaes 
a dey. by ihe rfah day you prayer wi 
be answered, ft fee never been town 
to fai- PuoUcanon msl be promised. 
AV. 


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Real Estate 
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Paris Area Furnished 





kteri axormodahon etudfa5 bedrooms 
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BERflJ CHAMPS ELYSSS 
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7th BAC, Sri* 4 to Jan 3 rooms, stray, 
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Paris Area Unfurnished 


NOTRE DAME, superb 5-room apart- 
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Auto Rentals 

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RUSSIAN BUSINESS Visas mewmg 
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PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PI Bi.tSHFD WITH THE NEW HIRK TLWK5 \ND Tiff. WVjHINCTOS POST 


tribune l t Looks Like the Bulls ’ Game Is Almost Over 





"'fir 


Stand Up to Hun Sen 


Less than two months have passed 
since Hun Sen’s coup d’&at in Cam- 
bodia, yet already that despot's one- 
time critics seem prepared to forgive 
and forget. The Japanese government. 
Cambodia's chief benefactor, has re- 
sumed giving aid, while acknowledg- 


ing that a previously proclaimed con- continuing — pattern of extrajudicial 
dition for doing so — the assurance of executions aimed at rooting out Ranat 


“fundamental human rights and polit- 
ical freedom” — has not been met. 
The United States has restarted only 
humanitarian aid. but U.S. diplomats 
were the first to meet with Hun Sen’s 
new puppet prime minister, and the 
U.S. Embassy has refused sanctuary 

to political refugees. 

Now. no doubt emboldened by this 
weak-kneed response, Hun Sen is de- 
manding that the United Nations re- 
place its human rights team in Cam- 
bodia. Here, at least, the international 
community should stand firm. 

The United States has more than a 
passing interest in this Southeast Asian 
nation. Since helping supervise UN- 
monitored elections in 1992. it and its 
allies have poured in billions of dollars. 
They pointed to Cambodia as a show- 
case of democracy-building and post- 
conflict reconstruction. 

As early as 1992. though, interna- 
tional weakness was undermining such 
hopes. The United Nations sent in 
20,000 troops but did nor dare disarm 
Hun Sen's private army nor that of his 
rival. Prince Ranariddh. When Hun 
Sen lost the election, he was none- 
theless permitted to muscle into gov- 
ernment; in an arrangement carrying 
the seeds of its own destruction, he 
became second prime minister while 
the prince served as first prime min- 
ister. During the past two years, as 
human rights abuses mounted and Hun 
Sen increased his intimidation of op- 
ponents. U.S. officials continued to 


to interfere with human rights groups. 
The UN center is in fact responsible for 


The UN center is in fact responsible For 
much of the progress that Cambodia 
had witnessed since 1992, including 
the flowering of local human rights 
groups and stirrings of an independent 
judiciary. Hun Sen — ironically, along 
with Prince Ranariddh — tried to shut 
the center down once before, in 1994, 
but international donors, including the 
United States and Japan, resisted. 

Japan, the United States and other 
donors still accounr for nearly rwo- 
thirds of Cambodia's governmental in- 
come. Tbeir failure to use this leverage 
more effectively has been scandalous. 
They should now defend the UN cen- 
ter's courageous staff, reprogram some 
aid money from Cambodia’s govern- 
ment to the center, and make clear that 
their forbearance has some limits. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Against Land Mines 


This month the Clinton administra- 
tion rightly though belatedly decided 
to join more than 100 other nations 
working to adopt a draft treaty banning 
anti-personnel land mines. Regret- 
tably. the administration still insists on 
pressing for two Pentagon-sponsored 
exceptions that are likely not only to 
delay this Canadian-led initiative bur. 
worse, to undermine the larger goal of 
drawing holdouts like Russia and 
China into a worldwide treaty'. 

Land mines were the leading cause 
of American military casualties in the 
Vietnam War. They also kill tens of 
thousands of civilians every year in 

g laces like Cambodia, Angola and 
osnia, and continue to kill and maim 
for years after the wars they were used 
in have ended. Simple to design and 
cheap to produce, they are poor coun- 


President Bill Clinton should reject 
both of these demands. 

Achieving an effective global mine 
treaty is a prime American interest 
Preventing needless military and ci- 
vilian casualties should take preced- 
ence over sparing the Pentagon the 
trouble of adjusting its contingency 
plans. These plans can be modified to 
conform to a land mine ban without 


compromising American security'. 
The case for a Korean exceptioi 


tries’ weapon of choice against so- 
phisticated military powers like the 


phisticated military powers like the 
United States. Veterans’ groups, hu- 
lan rights organizations and Vietnam 


man rights organizations and Vietnam 
veterans now serving in Congress 
helped persuade the administration to 
join the Canadian effort. 

Some important military powers, 
like Russia and China, are not taking 


pan in these draft treaty negotiations. 
For most of this year, these and other 


For most of this year, these and other 
holdouts have stymied a parallel at- 
tempt to negotiate a worldwide ban on 
land mines through the United Na- 
tions. The goal of the Canadian ini- 


tions. The goal of the Canadian ini- 
tiative is to create powerful moral pres- 
sure on these countries to drop their 
resistance. 

Washington’s negotiators are 
burdened by the Pentagon’s insistence 
on two exceptions that could sabotage 
efforts to negotiate a worldwide treaty. 
One would permit continued Amer- 
ican use of mines on the Korean Pen- 
insula. The other would create a loop- 
hole for anti-personnel mines sown in 
conjunction w r ith anti-tank mines. 


The case for a Korean exception is 
based on long-standing American plans 
to use land mines to slow a North 
Korean ground invasion of the South. 
Yet military analysis, including a former 
commander of U.S. troops in South 
Korea, General James Hollingsworth, 
now argue that such use would be "a 
game plan for disaster,’ * leading to un- 
necessary casualties among American 
troops and South Korean civilians. 

The other exception the Pentagon 
wants would expand a provision in the 
present draft treaty that allows the de- 
ployment of some anti-personnel 
mines, under carefully circumscribed 
provisions, to protect anti-tank mines 
against tampering. Washington wants 
this loophole expanded so that it can 
continue to use an existing weapons 
system that air-drops anti-tank and anti- 
personnel mines together. The better 
solution would be to design new com- 
bination mining systems that do not 
require renegotiating the draft treaty. 

If the United States persists in de- 
manding the two exceptions, other 
countries will have no trouble finding 
comparable loopholes of their own. 
The coalition of veterans, activists and 
legislators that helped bring the ad- 
ministration this far should sustain its 
efforts until Mr. Clinton stands up to 
the Pentagon’s needless demands. The 
chance to save so many lives should 
not be further delayed. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


The Hague Grows Teeth 


The war crimes tribunal in The Hag- 
ue has finally assumed the authority, 
and the power, to impose its will. By 
invoking a range of new and revised 
legal instruments and by winning the 
cooperation of international armed 
forces, it is beginning to show that it 
has teeth. The new vigor justifies hopes 
that the tribunal will outlive some of 
the Balkan regimes, and may yet even 
contribute to political change. 

The tribunal is now less dependent 
on the tried and tested but effectively 
nonexistent “goodwill” of the author- 


ities of the states whose responsibility 
for the war brought about the crimes in 
the first place. Had these governments 
displayed a minimal willingness to co- 
operate with one another and with the 
world, perhaps the tribunal would nev- 
er have been necessary. Yet authority 
has remained in the same hands in all 
the states under the tribunal’s remit 
Thus expectations that they would vol- 
untarily fulfill tbeir international legal 
obligations toward the tribunal have 
been utterly misplaced. 

— Mirko Klarin writing in War 
Report (London), bulletin of the 
Institute for War & Peace Reporting. 


Heralb^Sribune 


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W ASHINGTON — I watch from 
the areen of the third hole of 


insist that he was a man they could 
work with. Evea now they refuse to 
call his July 5 coup, in which Prince 
Ranariddh was deposed, a coup. - 
A new report from Human Rights 
Watch/Asia documents not only the 
coup but a post-coup “ruthless — and 


iddft loyalists and deterring criticism 
by the opposition press and local hu- 
man rights activists.” Dozens of Hun 
Sen’s political opponents have been 
murdered, and many more are missing. 
Others have been detained and tor- 
tured. Police visits, surveillance and 
phone cutoffs have effectively shut the 
opposition press. 

Much of this has been documented 
by (he UN Human Rights Center and 
by local Cambodian groups, now op- 
erating at grave risk, which the UN 
center has trained. Thar explains why 
Hun Sen is now targeting the UN team, 
despite his early post-coup promise not 


YV the green of the third hole of 
swanky, verdant Robert Trent Jones 
golf course. A helicopter is lifting off 
.from the clubhouse pad, leaning north 
and heading for Washington, 40 miles 
(65 kilometers) away. My partner, a 
smart guy who has been around, looks 
up from his putL 

‘ ‘There it is," he says/’ ‘Ihe official 
sign that the buD market is over.” 

Yes, bull markets — and, more im- 
portant, powerful economic recoveries 
— end in excess. 

■ When you see business execs heli- 
coptering to the golf course, waiters 
discussing the merits, of Intel versus 
Applied Materials, 22-year-olds in sus- 
penders smoking cigars and drinking 
martinis, and houses in the suburbs 
selling way over the asking price — then 
you know that the referee has brought 
the whistle to his Ups and is about to 
blow. The game is nearly over. 

The last American recession (de- 
fined as a decline in the economy’s 
output of goods and services) ended six 
years ago. It was mild and brief. When 
will the next one start, how deep will it 
be. how long will it last? 

No one knows. But it is reasonable to 
assume that Bill Clinton, like every 
president since Richard Nixon, will 
have a recession he can call his own. 
The business cycle has not been re- 
pealed — and as long as people think it 
has, it never will be. 

Harbingers may abound, but they 
don’t tell us why the recession will 
start Let’s look at the most likely sce- 
nario and its political consequences. 

The traditional recession ploi first 
has prices and wages rising, so the 


By James K. Glassman 


Federal Reserve raises interest rates to 
choke off inflation. Corporate borrow- 
ing costs increase and profits drop, 
consumers stop buying on credit, new 
investment screeches to a halt the 
stock market tanks. 

Bui anyone scanning the horizon for 
signs of inflation today is looking in the 
wrong direction. More likely, the next 
recession will start because of a glut, an 
oversupply. 

Businesses, in a frenzy to expand, 
will make poor use of capital, and we 


’There are too many 
hotels in Phoenix, arid 
there is too much 
manufacturing 
capacity in China . ’ 


will have too much stuff to go around. 
Prices will not rise, they will fall, and 
firms will go bankrupt In the cascade, 
unemployment will accelerate, and, de- 
spite low interest rates, economic 
growth will cease. 

In other words, what we have to fear 
is not inflation but deflation. 

If you want a preview, look at Japan, 
where, with long-term bonds paying 
just 2 percent interest the economy is 
finally lifting itself our of the muck 
after five years. 

Once they get started, deflations are 
hard to stop. Buyers always figure that 


prices will drop further as time goes on . 
so they keep putting off purchases. 

Do you still believe that the United 
States has entered a New Era, that 
broader world markets and techno- 
logical change have created a reces- 
sionless nirvana? 

You may be right, but, as an antidote, 
listen to James Grant, writing in 
Grant's Interest Rate Observer, his 
brilliant and expensive (although not 
infallibly perspicacious) newsletter 

“Prosperity is self-limiting. There 
can be no New Era because speculative 
markets won’t stand for it Booms, in 
fact create busts. 

“Incited by low interest rates, capi- 
talists will build something. Stimulated 
by ultra-low interest rates, by ultra- 
high equity valuations and by the sup- 
porting New Era theories, they will 
build some more. They will not stop 
building, in fact we have observed, 
until the money stops.” 

If Mr. Grant is right, then we should 
be seeing excess not simply among 
individual consumers — who are 
spending themselves into bankruptcy in 
record numbers — but also among 
corporations. In the first part of this 
decade these firms applied die tough 
lessons they had learned about over- 
expansion and reckless spending. But 
now. 75 months into the boom, have 
they gone haywire? 

Mr. Grant answers in the affirma- 
tive. He points to too many “semi- 
conductor fabs, aircraft facilities, retail 
stores, auto plants, computer assembly 
lines, steel mills, commercial banks 
and commodity-chemical manufac- 
turing facilities.” He adds: “There are 
too many hotels in Phoenix, and there is 


too much manufacturing capacity in, 
China.” In a glut like this, companies 
have no pricingpower. There are more 
things on the market than consumers 
and businesses want to buy. 

In fact producer prices have fallen 
for seven straight months, and 21 per- 
cent of America's largest companies, 
including Coca-Cola and Eastman 
Kodak, reported a decline in-re venues 
for the first quarter. 

“If this continues, writes Robert 
Kearns of David L. Babson & Co., the 
investment firm, "over the long run it 
is hardly a favorable trend for profits,, 
corporate well-being and the nation s 
workers.” 

In a world in which booms create 
busts, there is nor a great deal we can do 
to prevent the cycle. , ' 

Bnt politicians should pay close at- 
tention. According to my “Being 
There" theory, those in office get the 
credit — or die blame — for currem- 
ecoDomic conditions, whether they 
have anything to do with them or not 
Thus. Bill Clinton has reaped the har- 
vest of the fat years (which were ac- 
tually the legacy of Ronald Reagan). 

But what about the lean ones? Re- 
publicans, now rejoicing in the bipar- 
tisan budget deal, would be wise to put 
distance between themselves and 
Democrats. The way to win in 2000 is 
to pin the recession on the “failed 
policies” of Bill Clinton. 

Alas, that is a tough act for those who 
just joined happy hands with the pres- 
ident — and another compelling reasoD 
for them ro re mm to their roots as the 
party of smaller, less intrusive gov- - 
erament and much lower taxes. 

The Washington Post. 




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A NATO That Creeps Eastward Is Bad for Russian Democrats 


M OSCOW — The enlarge- 
ment of NATO, although 


IV Ament of NATO, although 
still in the initial stage, has 
already revived some tradition- 
al misunderstandings and cre- 
ated new misperceptions be- 
tween Russia and the West The 
fallout may be felt this autumn 
when Russia takes up the 
START-2 treaty and other mil- 
itary issues. 

There is a broad political con- 
sensus in Russia that the ex- 
pansion of NATO not only runs 
counter to Russian security in- 
terests but also violates some 
commonly accepted rules on 
which the* Cold war was ended. 

While Moscow was agreeing 
to the reunification of Germany 
and to having that country stay 
in NATO, to disbanding the 
Warsaw Pact and then the very 
Soviet Union, to deeper reduc- 
tions of nuclear and conven- 
tional forces than in the West, to 
the hasty withdrawal of half a 
million troops from comfort- 
able barracks in Central Europe 
to tent camps in Russian fields 
— while Moscow was agreeing 
to all of those things, nobody 


By Alexei Arbatov 


took the trouble to warn Rus- 
sians that NATO, the most 
powerful military alliance in the 
world, would start moving to- 
ward Russian borders. 

To the contrary, Moscow was 
being repeatedly told by the 
West that it would be accepted as 
an equal and genuine partner in 
global politics and that no major 
decision on international secu- 
rity would be made without it 

Well, the NATO summit 
meeting in Madrid in July made 
it apparent that snch one-sided 
decisions will be made and that 
Russia's opinion really matters 
only as long as it is in line with 
the Western position. 

It is not that Russians want to 
abolish NATO. They would 
prefer, however, that this great 
military alliance find other 
post-Cold War functions. 

The primary questions in the 
Russian mind remain unre- 
solved. If NATO expands as a 
military defensive alliance, 
what is the threat to the new 
members — Poland, Hungary 


and the Czech Republic — that 
would warrant such an expan- 
sion (apart from “historic 
grievances,” of which there is 
no shortage in Russia, too)? 

If, on the other hand. NATO 
expands in a new role — as the 
foundation of a European se- 
curity system for peacekeeping 
— why the hasre to expand? 
And why is Moscow's opinion 
dismissed? If there is a reason to 
hurry, why is Russia nor being 
seriously considered as a mem- 
ber of such a security system? 

Why. instead, is* it offered 
only the Partnership for Peace — 
the "junior NATO” for former 
Communist countries — and yet 
another consultative committee? 
And why are those considered 
insufficient for the new and as- 
piring members, while being 
good enough for Russia? 

At best NATO expansion to 
the east is seen in Russia as a 
mistaken policy, fraught with 
complications mid new contro- 
versies. At worst it is viewed as 
consummation of the “grand 


design” of encircling and isol- 
ating Russia, achieving an over- 


whelming strategic superiority 
over it and finally doing away 
with it as a European power 
once and for all. 

The fact that the reaction in 
Russia to the Madrid meeting 
was quite, muted should not bring 
complacency. Summer is a dead 
season for Moscow politics, a 
vacation time. No doubt the 
NATO issue will surface in Rus- 


sian politics with a triple force in 
the fell — on the issues of the 


And it should be recalled thaf , ‘- 
when President Boris Yehsin r “ 
agreed to that five years ago/ r 
when the meaty was negotiated, 
he could not imagine tfaat^ 
NATO would start moving to- 1 J 
ward Russian borders. ** 

It is surprising that even 00* *7 
some people in the West fail to?* 
recognize that Russia, like thef^ 
United States, is not a homb-^ 
gen ecus political player devis-- 1 ^ 
ing sophisticated bargaining” 2 


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What’s Changing in Hong Kong 


the rail — on the issues of the 
cuts in the defense budget pro- 
posed by the government rat- 
ification of aims control treaties 
such as START-2, and deep re- 
ductions in the size of the army. 

In all three cases, the concern 
raised by NATO expansion will 
be a major impediment to 
reaching the right decisions. 

One notion accepted in the 
United States is that the “man 
in the street” in Russia doesn’t 
care about NATO expansion. 
However, raise the subject with 
* 1 a man in the street who is at all 
interested in foreign affairs" 
and you will find deep concern. 
Such men and women number 
in the millions. 

They are pensioners who re- 
member the horrors of World 


strategies. Most -Russian polk- . 
ical actions are the result of' ■ 
tough domestic infighting, and 3 -' 
foreign and domestic events can 1 ^ 
shift internal balances and af- ' 1 
feet policy decisions. p 

Many of those who have?" 
been trying to persuade the 1 / 
United States not to expand" 4 
NATO are the people who have , 
staked their careers (and prob-^ 
ably more than that) on Russia's* 5 ’ 
close and fair cooperation with* 5 
the United States. ■ • - ' 

They will still advocate rat- 
ification of START-2, but"-? 
against the continuing clamor^; 
over NATO expansion their"? 4 
voices will hardly be heard. ,r 
I would never claim that Rus- 
sia has been without fault ur£ 
its relations with other nations- i 
and on domestic issues. I am 7 -! 


H ong kong — one 

could be lulled into be- 


By Philip Bowring 


lieving that there never was a 


change of sovereignty. After 
a deluge of news, comment 


a deluge of news, comment 
and invention around the time 
of the handover to China, the 
world's media understand- 
ably decided that they had had 
enough of Hong Kong. 

Meanwhile, Hongkong it- 
self has been too preoccupied 
with record rainfall and a 
roller-coaster stock market to 
think too much about where its 
new government is leading it 

Midsummer is always a 
damp and torpid time, and no 
one expects major develop- 
ments before October, when 
good weather should be on 
hand for Chief Executive 
Tung Chee-hwa’s first policy 
speech, which will roughly 
coincide with the Communist 
Party Congress in Beijing. 

The wary local greeting of 
the handover has been fol- 
lowed by a mild sense of relief 
that it all passed off quietly. 

Few expected trouble, or to 
see the handover followed by 
daily displays of the might of 
the People's Liberation Army. 
But the fact that the PLA has 
been confined to barracks has 
led many to forget that it is 
here at all. 

Beneath this quiet exterior, 
a lot has happened in the first 
two months of the Special Ad- 
ministrative Region that in- 
dicates the character of the 
new regime and of local re- 
sponses to it. 

The most appropriate phrase 
has been used by Mr. Tung 
himself: This is an executive- 
led government Where it is 
leading may not yet be clear, 
bur that it intends to proceed 
without much impediment 
from the legislature or the legal 
system is abundantly dear. 

As Margaret Ng, legal con- 
stituency representative in the 


visional Legislature is push- 
ing through with great haste 


disbanded legislature, put it: 
"It will not take long for the 


"It will not take long for the 
inhabitants of the new SAR to 
realize that their rights and 
freedoms will depend on ad- 
ministrative clemency and not 
theprotection of law.” 

Tne China-appointed Pro- 


ing through with great haste 
and minimal debate a signif- 
icant body of important le- 
gislation. This legislature is 
supposed to be only a stopgap 
body producing urgent legis- 
lation prior to elections next 
year. In practice, it is proving 
a quick-acting rubber stamp 
for everything the executive 
deems administratively or po- 
litically convenient 

Among other things, it uni- 
laterally modified tne Hong 
Kong residency rights, sup- 
posedly enshrined in China’s 
Basic Law . of children of Hong 
Kong Chinese residents. 

With no consultation and 
scant debate, it "froze” labor 
protection legislation passed 
by the previous legislature 
which did not suit the far cat 
groups who dominate the pro- 
visional legislature. 

It will soon pass legislation, 
arrived at after just seven days 
of public “consultation,” on 
the system for next year’s 
elections. This will drastically 
reduce the franchise, intro- 
duce a voting system specif- 
ically designed to limit the 
sears won by Hong Kong’s 
most popular party, and give 
even more influence to nar- 
rowly based business con- 
stituencies. To frustrate some 
leading pro-democracy vote 
winners, it has barred foreign 
passport holders from the di- 
rectly elected seats. 

Aside from the legislature, 
there is also already a sub- 
stantial list of executive de- 
cisions aimed at limiting legal 
challenges to administrative 
actions and increasing arbi- 
trary decision-making powers 
— for example, on use of a 
“national security ’ * pretext to 
outlaw public gatherings. 

More generally, some in 
the media see a marked de- 
cline in the openness of the 
bureaucracy as the legislature 
has been tamed and account- 
ability limited. 

All* this is not universally 
unpopular. Many thought the 


previous system too prone to 
argument and politicking. 
Some like being executively 
led even if they don’t always 
trust the leaders. 

There has also been a subtle 
but important shift in power 
realities shown by currency 
turmoil in Southeast Asia. 
Once, Hong Kong wanted to 
distance its financial system as 
far as possible from that of 
China. Financial indepen- 
dence was a cornerstone of 
“One country, two systems.” 
The recent crisis saw Hong 
Kong, and the markets, assume 
that China, which now has its 
own huge foreign exchange re- 
serves, was important in fright- 
ening off speculators and 
maintaining the Hong Kong 
dollar peg to the U.S. dollar. 

^ But it is also true that Hong 
Kong, with its strong streak of 
distrust of all authority, is not 
taking either executive-led 
government or appeals to pat- 
riotism lying down. 

Although there was an ev- 
ident increase in media self- 
censorship in the months lead- 
ing up to the handover, the 
situation has not become 
worse. Indeed, there are signs 
of grearer determination now 
to exercise old freedoms and 
test the new limits. Commen- 
tators may be wary of being 
too rude about leaders in 
Beijing, but they are familiar 
enough with many of Mr. 
Tung’s acolytes to feel free to 
display their views, and some- 
times their contempt. 

Attempts by those wishing 
to display their "patriotism” 
toward Beijing to drum up 
anti-foreign sentiment have 
fallen on deaf ears. Hong 
Kong has enough Canadian 
passport holders, and enough 
sense of its role in the world, 
not to fal I for that trick. 

So Hong Kong is already 
facing more rapid change than 
many had bargained for. But 
Cantonese irreverence, a tra- 
dition of bending without 
breaking, may yet triumph 
over patriarchal attitudes. 
"Chinese values” and exec- 
utive-led decision-making. 

International Herald Tribune 


War II. They are members of 
the military, defense workers, 
mass media professionals, gov- 
ernment workers and political 
elites. These groups have high 
turnout rates in elections — or 
they directly conduct election 
campaigns, influence public 
opinion or help shape policy 
decisions. 

As for START-2, which calls 
for a deep reduction in long- 
range nuclear weapons by Rus- 
sia and the United States, the 
agreement reached in Helsinki 
in March to extend the period 
for implementing the treaty by 
five years improved the pact’s 
chances of ratification by Rus- 
sia this falL So did the appoint- 
ment of a new minister of de- 
fense. Igor Sergeyev, an ad- 
vocate of the treaty. However, 
the political tensions over 
NATu enlargement may be 
used by opponents of the treaty 
in the Russian Parliament to 
block it once again. 

Personally. I am fully com- 
mitted to the ratification, but it 
is worthwhile to keep in mind 
that the treaty envisions much 
larger cuts — at much higher 
costs — in Russian forces than 
in American forces. 


sure that NATO expansion will'- 
not topple Russian democracy.^ 
But it will make the goals of 1 - 
Russian democrats much harder- . 
to achieve. 

The Madrid meeting is uni-_, . 
versally perceived in Russia (by \£ 
some with grief, by others with ™ 
malevolence) as a major defeat I 
of Moscow's policy of broad > 
partnership with the West ! 

It is considered a great set- « 
back for Russian democrats, f 
whose domestic political pos- i 
itions, commitments and re- J 
form plans are largely predic- j 
ated on such cooperation. J 


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The writer is deputy chair- 
man of the Defense Committee 
of the Russian Parliament and a 
member of the Yabloko bloc. He 
contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


Mo 


IK 


Letters intended for publi- 
cation should be addressed 
"Letters to the Editor” and 
contain the writer’s signature, 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We Cannot be re- 
sponsible for the return of' un- 
solicited manuscript s. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEAR S AGO 


1897: Faure’s Visit Sir George Sutton, chairman of 


LONDON — The Times, in a 
leader on the visit of President 
Faure 10 Russia, says: * ‘The sig- 
nificant and striking ceremo- 
nies of M. Faure’s visit to die 
Tsar have now come to an end, 
and the President of the French 
Republic is on his way home, 
laden with splendid memories 
and carrying to his country the 
assurance of a cordial alliance. 
At the farewell luncheon on 
board the Pothuau the Tsar and 
M. Faure. in almost identical 
words, referred to the two coun- 
tries as friendly and allied.” 


u Y eor g e Sunon, chairman of 
the Amalgamated Press (North- 
cliffe s oldest associate and 
friend), as trustee under the first 
will, has entered three caveats 
against probate of the later win 
on the ground that the testator 
was of unsound mind when it 
was made. 


1947: Pfeiffer Beaten 


1922: Times’ Future 


LONDON — a great legal 
battle will probably be waged 
^ future control of the 
*?f Ties and the entire North- 
cliffe interests. It now develops 
that Lord Northcliffe made two 
wills Lady Norrhcliffe is the 
chief beneficiary under both. 


BUDAPEST — A .severe beat- 
ing administered to the leading 
Hungarian opposition leader 
and several of his colleagues 
was assailed by a spokesman for 
the United States Legation as 
either “inability or unwilling- 
ness of the Hungarian govern- 
ment tu provide adequate guar- 
anties for freedom of speech or 
assembly. The spokesman said 
itat Uie assault against Zoltan 
Pfeiffer, former member of par- 
liament and leader of the Hun- 


;; ■ 


Fp> 


. — — Vi lilt iiun- 

ganan Independence party, was 
viewed with “serious concern” 
in view of the next elections. 


ii ! 




y hi* 








PACE 3 


*«nA a ■ 


HTt HiA. tvtlUi 


fixapcuuni ittlMOL 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27. 1997 


PAGE 9 


n °*t o. 


OPINION/LETTERS 


i'er 


The China Nightmare? 
Wake Up, America! 


■■Jl; 


4 


- I 


-A, 




uni Demociate 


' By Tom Plate 

; T OS ANGELES — If America 

j -1-^is 20“° 10 put the worst pos- 
, sible spin on China’s motives. at 
: every rum, then why not just 
saddle up for war righr now? 

When allegations surface that 
, China may have slipped a few mil- 
lion dollars into U.S. campaign 
coffers, some seem to assume that 
somehow this alleged act trans- 
formed the U.S. government into 
a Manchurian candidate puppet 
overnight, with Commies in 
Beijing yanking the strings. 

When U.S. authorities appre- 
hend one lone Chinese merchant 
ship carrying illegal guns that set 
sail from a nation of 1J1 billion 
people and many ports, why not 
assume that the operation origi- 
nated with President Jiang Zemin 
himself? China is nothing more 
than a totalitarian monolith, right? 

Hold it right there, urges Rand, 
the esteemed think tank in Santa 
Monica, California. In one of 
the most important reports it has 
ever issued, “Chinese Military 
Commerce and U.S. National 
Security," Rand’s Center for 
Asia-Pacific Policy takes the 
voodoo out of contemporary 
sinology and shows why the 
China of nightmares is far more 
frightening than the reality. 

Referring to the almost exclus- 
ively American fear that China's 
activities on both sides of the 
Pacific constitute serious threats 
to the United States, this timely 
work of analysis and fact collec- 
tion deflates a whole roster of 
overblown headline issues. 

It looks at the operations of 
Chinese businesses in America 
and finds them mainly nonthreat- 
ening. as they are mostly working 
independently, often competing 
fiercely against one another. 

It assesses the shipment of il- 
legal armaments by companies in 
China and agrees that this needs to 
be watched carefully. But the re- 
port adds this context: China is less 
an awesome military or security 
threat than a disorganized and de- 
centralized (if fast developing.) na- 
tion coping frantically with enor- 
mous domestic problems. 

By emphasizing the . largely 
fragmented and frequently non- 
cooperating structure of China’s 
military and civilian establish- 
ments, the report suggests that the 
picture of ail anti-American con- 
spiracy directed by an all-schem- 
ing Beijing master class is a fanci- 
ful hallucination indeed. 

Thereport warns against the ten- 
" r r\::^deacy lolumpthe many law-abif^ 

Chinese companies into the 
same category as those few that do 
. -7 i:*...- - ^0^ u.s. laws, as if all Chinese 
• V.: companies were guilty until 

proved innocent. This mistake, it 
says. ‘ ‘will only exacerbate die at- 
mosphere of paranoia and suspi- 
cion in the overall relationship.” 

As for the much vaunted privare- 
secior business operations of the 
People's Liberation Army, the re- 
port says most of them lose money, 
even though they are intended to 
supplement military wages in the 
face of past budget cuts, 


What about those suspicious 
Chinese arms exports to Third 
World countries? Again, the re- 


port counsels us not to assume chat 
Beijing has Strang central controls 


over all its arras exports. It there- 
fore approvingly singles out 
former Secretary of Slate Warren 
Christopher for handling the con- 
troversy over chemical weapons 
shipments to Iran by having U.$. 
sanctions slapped on ihe export- 
ing Chinese companies involved, 
not on the central government. 

Regarding dual-use technology 
sent to China — the sale of soft- 
ware or hardware that conceiv- 
ably could be used for warlike as 
well as peaceful purposes — this, 
the report agrees, must be 
watched like a hawk. 

But, again, hold your missile 
fire. America's bilateral strategic 
relationship with China, reminds 
the report, “is arguably the mosr' 
important in the post -Cold War 
world and should not be disrupted 
by what are ultimately second- 
order issues." 

Moreover. China is still so 
technologically underdeveloped 
that its ability to absorb and de- 


Culture Bank Turns Mali Village’s Art Into an Asset 


F OMBORJ. Mali — This vil- 
lage of a thousand souls is not 
easy to find. An unpaved road 
winds out of Douenoa. a market 
town 160 kilometers south of 
Timbuktu, to where Fombori 
nestles in the cliffs of Dogon 
country. 

Fombori ‘s farmland is poor. 
Desertification and drought are 
ever-present. Young people drift 
away to towns, and village elders 


By Perdita Huston 


MEANWHILE 


deplore the loss of Dogon tra- 
ditions. Yet from this inauspi- 
cious setting comes a unique an- 
swer to questions of poverty and 
pride, a story of democracy "at the 
service of cultural preservation. 

A few years ago. Aissata On- 
goiba. president of the Fombori 
village women's association, 
traveled into the Dogon hills to 
visit relatives. It was tourist sea- 
son and her relatives 1 village had 
organized a craft fair, hoping to 


sell to the visitors who come to 
hike the Dogon cliffs and observe 
Africans’ ability to survive in 

seemingly hopeless conditions. 

Carved statues and masks, 
beaded gourds, handwoven ma- 
terials were eagerly purchased by 
passing tourists. Aissata took the 
story of this phenomenon back to 
Fombori. She told the women's 
group of her discovery, of how 
visitors value Dogon crafts. 

But, she cautioned, visitors 
also wanted to buy traditional 
ceremonial objects that should 
stay in the village. Like her coun- 
try 's leaders, she worried that 
Mali’s national heritage was be- 
ing sold off as little more than 
souvenirs. 

Her dream was to create a mu- 
seum for ceremonial objects that 
would artract visitors to Fombori 
who might then want to purchase 
the women’s handicrafts. 

During the next two years, con- 


stant meetings among the local 
women's organization, the town 
council, a district cultural official 
and two Peace Corps volunteers 
resulted in a small grant from a 
donor agency and the construc- 
tion of a five-room mud and brick 
building. It was dubbed the 
Dogon Village Museum, and the 
townspeople elected a board of 
directors to oversee its operation. 

Alas, given its remote site 
Fombori 's museum failed to 
attract sufficient visitors to 
sustain itself. Also, villagers were 
reluctant to place family cere- 
monial an in the museum. What 
was needed was an incentive. 

In a village as poor as Fom- 
bori, the best incentive rumed 
out to be credit. Why not link 
villagers' need for small loans 
with the museum? The mu- 
seum's board hired a bank man- 
ager and placed him in charge of 
the initial loan capital of S391. 


• Villagers could quality’ for 
loans of from $5 to S40 when 
they put a family heirloom in the 
museum as collateral. The loan 
amount was determined on the 
basis of verifiable historical in- 
formation on the artifact. Loans 
to be repaid within four to six 
months at a modest interest rate 
were to finance the museum’s 
activities. Soon, objects never 


From one of the 
world's poorest 
nations has come a 
unique answer to 
cultural preservation. 


seen before began to emerge 
from Fombori 's modest homes 
for display in the museum. The 
Culture Bank was in business. 

Mali is one of die world's 
poorest nations. Yet from it has 


come a treasure of an idea: how to 
preserve cultural heritage by mak- 
ing it a living asset at the service 
of community development. 

Fombori ’s an is in a museum 
for its children to see. They 
warch with pride when visitors 
from afar come to marvel at their 
ancestors' art. Villagers do not 
sell their artifacts in time of need: 
they remain their property. 

The official inauguration of 
the Culture Bank consisted of 
much drumming and dancing, 
the consumption of five roasted 
goats and me display of villa- 
gers’ finest outfits. From four 
years of village debates and con- 
struction work, a new institution 
had emerged from the least likely 
of sites. Aissata now shares her 
vision with Fombori' s villagers, 
development workers and, at 
last, museum visitors like me. 


The writer, a journalist and 
author, is sewing as director of 
the U.S. Peace Corps in Mali. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


ploy sophisticated U.S. techno- 
logy ii 


Ban Land Mines 


Learning From India 




•ait 




ogy is extremely Limned. 

what this detailed report does 
not go into is the heretofore lim- 
ited focus and imagination of 
Chinese foreign policy. But in its 
most recent twists and turns. 
Beijing has offered less menace 
than opportunity. 

In volatile Korea, for instance, 
China has remained at worst neu- 
tral. Ground is being broken on a 
huge U.S. -brokered energy pro- 
ject in North Korea that could 
never have got to first base with- 
out Beijing being on the team. 

A former U.S. arms control 
official, Michael Nacht, noted in 
a recent speech at UCLA: “There 
appears to be a substantial tilt by 
Beijing toward South Korea. By 
contrast, China's relations with 
North Korea are more limited and 
strained than in the past.” 

Until recently, China loosened 
its purse strings for virtually no 
one in Asia. In a stunning move 
this month, it extended $1 billion 
in emergency credit to baht- 
bartered Thailand. 

We Americans must avoid de- 
mented demonizations of Beijing 
simply because it is still nom- 
inally Communist, just as we mosr 
also not fall prey to unblinking 
approval because all we can see 
over there are potential dollar 
signs. We need a foreign policy 
driven by relevant facts and in- 
telligent analysis, not by old 
myths and new hatreds. 

"Charles Wolf, dean of the Rand 
Graduate School, cautioned: ‘ ‘We 
will have trouble with China. 
They see the world differently 
from us." It’s a wise caveat to 
keep in mind. 

Even so, 1 also fancy the 
way Mr. Nacht responded to 
America’s let's-contain-China 
crowd. “Engagement," he said, 
“is containment.” 

The Los Angeles Times. 


Regarding “Sorry. Banning 
Land Mines Is Not a Good Idea " 
( Opinion . Aug. 22 1 by Frederick 
Bonnart: 

Mr. Bonn an used the same kind 
of arguments as the National Rifle 
Association supporters do to 
defend free access to guns: The 
destructive effect of the weapons 
just depends on who uses them 
and the bad guys can always 
obtain them even if they are il- 
legal. This is true, but the facr 
remains that a great deal of 
accidents occur because those 
weapons circulate too easily. 
The fewer land mines and hand- 
guns on the market, the less 
people will have access to them. 

- Mr. Bonnan's suggestion that 
nations keep a record of land mine 
positions is unrealistic. Would 
troops set up sign posts next 
to each mine to warn children 
who might be playing in the vi- 
cinity? The only way to reduce 
the number of innocent victims is 
to reduce the number of land 
mines in the fields. 

VINCENT SMITH. 

Courbevoie. France. 


Regarding "India: The Crit- 
icism Is Justified bur Overdone" 
f Opinion , Aug. IS) by AM. 
Rosenthal: 

Hats off to Mr. Rosenthal for 
gerting emotional about India, and 
for giving India a break. 

Maybe there is something 
endearing about the way that 
India, assuming all its diversity 
and burdens, has doggedly stuck 
with democracy and a certain 
system of values. Maybe there 
is something amiss about the 
West preaching democracy to 
Third World countries, yet being 
intolerant about its flip side. 

Progress in India is not nearly 
that of the Asian tigers, but at least 
it is mature and democratic. 

CHAND KAUL. 

ChSne-Bougeries. Switzerland. 


History shows that wars always 
nullify former situations. By 
the same logic, the Golan should 
remain IsraelL 

MICHEL B ROCHET AIN. 

Paris. ' 


Totalitarian Hi in a 


Hitler Was Given Power 


Regarding “Cologne Faces 
Realiry of Nazi Past " (Aug. 151: 

The article said that the election 
in March 1933 was “the last 
before Hitler took power." 
In fact. Hitler did nor “take 
power," but was appointed 
chancellor by President Paul 
von Hindenburg on Jan. 30, nearly 
two months earlier. 

EUGENE SELESKOVITCR 
Houilles. France. 


Regarding "A New Credo fora 
World (Mostly l at Peace: Make 
Money. Not War" (Aug. 25): 

I take exception to the state- 
ment that “no Stalin, no Hitler, no 
Mao visits the cruel whims and 
devices of totalitarianism on vast 
numbers” of people in the world. 

China is most definitely a 
totalitarian stare. It has visited 
unspeakable atrocities on the 
people of Tibet, and it continues 
to do so. Deforestation, torture 
and murder are commonplace. 
Tibetans, who as a result of a 
Chinese invasion are now a 
minority, are routinely forbidden 
to practice their religion. 

The genocide of the Tibetans 
and the destruction of their culture 


rival the honors of the Holocaust 
But this remains largely ignored, 
perhaps deliberately, by the type 
of money-loving people described 
in the article who are eager to do 
business with China. The lure of 
profit that China dangles in front 
of the world indeed masks a ' ‘new 
form of economic imperialism." 

NORMAN JACKSON. 

Paris. 


Letters intended for publication 
should ■ be addressed "Letters to 
the Editor" and contain the 
writer's signature . name and fill 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


Mr. Bonnart said land mines 
can be easily mapped and 
later removed, and that waiting 
parties could agree on post- 
conflict mine clearance. 

It would be nice if modem 
warfare and its aftermath were 
that simple and civilized. Today's 
conflicts are messy and shift back 
and forth over the same contested 
ground. Antipersonnel mines 
are usually laid in profusion under 
volatile conditions and are seldom 
accurately mapped; once laid they 
can be extraordinarily hard to 
detect. This is why so many 
people are still being maimed by 
mines on a daily basis. 

PHILIP C. WINSLOW. 

London. 


On the Golan Heights 

Regarding “Mideast: The Solu- 
tion Is Still 'Land for Peace " 
(Opinion. Aug. 18) by Stephen S. 
Rosenfeld: 

The phrase “land for peace" is 
a misnomer. 

Israel is obviously holding onto 
the Golan only for security rea- 
sons, as it is worth close to noth- 
ing. After the creation of the state 
of Israel, Syria used the Golan 
Heights to shell Israeli villages. 
When Syria anacked from the 
Golan Heights in 1967, Israel 
counterattacked and conquered 
the territory. 

Germany attacked Poland in 
1939 and Russia in 1941, but was 
later defeated. So now Breslau 
(Wroclaw 1 is Polish and Koenigs- 
berg (Kaliningrad) is Russian. 
Hundreds of other towns were 
taken back from the German ag- 
gressor by Russia and Poland, but 
is anyone demanding that Russia 
and Poland withdraw from Ka- 
linin grad or Wroclaw? 




Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 


and Saturdays are 


INTERMARKET 


days. 


The RTFs Intermarket regularly features two pages of classified advertising for the following categories: 


MONDAY 

™S° AY CSS Au»motive E«emtanent 

. Trov „i Residential Real Estate, Dining Out. 


SATURDAY 

TMlattnaatei J " 1 ' Vtrsl '° f '" 1 444 



THE WORLD’S DAIDf NEWSPAPER 


i 





PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


Cyberthieves Take America Online Subscribers for a Ride 


By Rajiv Chandrasekaran 

Washington Past Service 


tally the cost of such crimes, industry 
specialists estimate it is costing con- 
sumers millio ns of dollars a year. 

“This is a serious nroblem that’s 
growing exponentially,” said Richard 


messages included offers for free time 
on the service and a request to re-enter 
billing information to confirm a new 
payment plan, executives said. 

AOL is not alone. Such scams re- 


WASHINGTON — The electronic- 

mail message recently sent to America ^ „ . - „ , T , .. 

Online Inc. subscribers looked official Power, analyst at Computer Security In- cently have been tried on subscribers to 
enough. Titled “Important AOL in- stitute in San Francisco. “Criminals are other on-line services and on people 
formation'’ and bearing the signature of becoming ever more clever at maoip- 
the company's Member Services de- ulating people in the on-line world.’ 

Con artists have long used phones, the 


partment, the message provided an up- 
date of the on-line computer service s 
efforts to fix its busy-signal problem. 

At the end of the note, subscribers 
were asked to jump to a World Wide 
Web page — which featured a letter 
from AOL’s chairman, Steve Case — 
where they were asked to enter their 
natnp. and address as well as their home 
phone number and credit-card numbers 
to update AOL’s new computers- 

But what unsuspecting subscribers 
really were updating, officials say, were 
the fries of a cyberthief trying to commit 
credit-card fraud. 

Thai scam, perpetrated earlier this 
month, is the latest in a series of in- 
creasingly bold and sophisticated on- 
line ploys to wrest personal information 
from AOL subscribers and Internet 
users in general. Although law enforce- 
ment officials say they have no way to 


mail and face-to-face pitches to wheedle 
personal information out of 
people. Electronic mail, 
however, represents a new 
and potentially easier medium 
for committing such crimes, 
according to industry observ- 
ers and law-enforcement officials. 

“It’s relatively easy for fraud artists 
to look like legitimate companies,” 
said David Mediae, associate director 
for credit practices at the Federal Trade 
Commission, which investigates e-mail 
fraud. ’That’s one of the problems 
inherent in the technology.” 

With e-mail, Mr. Power said, “you 
don’t have to worry about masking your 
voice or putting on a disguise.” 

AOL subscribers have received sev- 
eral messages in recent months that aim 
to swipe their credit-card numbers. The 


who have direct connections to the In- 
ternet, industry analysts said. 

Yet AOL has been especially attract- 
ive to those seeking to commit fraud 


‘Criminals are becoming ever more 
clever al manip ul ating people on-line . 9 

because of its size — it has more than 8.5 
million subscribers — and because many 
of its customers are on-line neophytes. 

AOL officials say they investigate 
reports of credit-card fraud and report 
incidents to law-enforcement agencies. 

In the case of the most recent scam, the 
company said it was alerted to the mes- 
sage by subscribers and its own em- 
ployees tiie day the message was sent, 
and was able to have the Web site that 
was collecting subscribers’ information 
shut down that day. 

Tatiana Gau, AOL’s vice president 


of integrity assurance, said all the cred- 
it-card scams were under investigation 
by the company and law-enforcement 
authorities. “They ate all ongoing in- 
vestigations," she said. “TTaere has 
been no conclusion of the cases at this 
juncture.” 

But the company conceded it could 
do little to squelch the scams other than 
alerting subscribers not to part with 
personal financial information on-line. 

The come-ons, however, 
can be remarkably smooth. 
The message sent to AOL 
subscribes this month 
sounded much like AOL’s re- 
cent television spots and of- 
ficial correspondence with customers: 
‘ ‘As you know, the number rate priority 
for all of us at America Online continues 
to be meeting our obligation to provide 
you with the best possible service.” 

The note then asked the reader to 
click on a highlighted section of text. 
Clicking on the text sent users to a Web 
site outside the AOL service, where 
they were asked to type in their personal 
information. 

Ms. Gaa said it appeared the site was 
maintained by at least three computers 
across the United States, but she de- 


clined to release additional information 
pe n din g the company's investigation. 

In addition to the credit-card scams, 
many AOL users also have been sent e- 
rnail recently by con artists trying to get 
their system passwords. The messages 
offer such things as a free pornographic 
picture or a piece of software that will 
increase a computer's performance. To 
get the gift, the user must open a file that 
is attached to the message. When the 
file is opened, however, it starts a pro- 
gram that surreptitiously collects the 
subscriber's account name and pass- 
word — and sends it back to the hacker 
who sent the message. 

Such “Trojan Horse” programs also 
are frequently sent to Internet users and 
subscribers of other on-line services. 
Computer security experts warn users 
not to open attached files unless they 
know the person who sent the message. 

* ‘People need to be as skeptical in the 
on-line world as they are in the off-line 
world,” Mr. Mediae said. “Just be- 
cause it’s coming over a computer and 
it’s got a nice-looking electronic image, 
that doesn't mean it’s official.” 


Recent technology articles: 
wwwJht.com/IHT/TECH/ 


RUSSIA: Moscow Produces a Baby Boom 


Continued from Page 1 

about life in general,” Dr. Kalugina 
said. “At least in Moscow they feel that 
maybe things are going the right way. 
Wo are seeing women who have put 
these decisions off and now, facing them 
again, they have decided that maybe it’s 
worth taking the chance.” 

The increase in pregnancies began in 
the summer of 1996, immediately after 
President Boris Yeltsin defeated his 
C ommunis t challenger in a presidential 
election widely seen as a turning point 
for Russia. 

Because statistical reporting on births 


DE KLERK: 

Quits as Party Chief 

Continued from Page 1 

though.” Mr. de Klerk offered several 
reasons for his resignation, including the 
need to give the party a chance at being 
seen as a wholly new entity. 

“With my retirement I wish to open a 
door for the National Party to provide 
further proof of its dynamic break with 
the past, with a view to best enabling it to 
play its full role in the realignment pro- 
cess,” Mr. de Klerk said. 

He also said it was a recognized prin- 
ciple of good management that a man- 
ager could not be effective for much 
longer than eight years and “so too a 
party leader should not be at the helm for 
longer than this." 

He said that after his resignation be- 
comes effective on Sept. 9. he would 
devote his retirement to writing his 
memoirs, so that his version of South 
Africa's turbulent and racially divided 
past would be recorded. 

In the last 1 8 months, Mr. de Klerk has 
been crisscrossing the country trying to 
convince anyone who would listen that 
the National Party was ready to remake 
itself. But the reaction to his vision of a 
broad-based party championing family 
values has been tepid. 

At the same time, his efforts have 
thrown his own party into turmoil with 
older conservative leaders resisting 
changes. At one point, earlier this year, 
Mr. de Klerk apparently bowing to those 
hard-liners dismissed his heir apparent, 
Roelf Meyer, from a key position in the 
party. 

In response, Mr. Meyer quit the Na- 
tional Party to start his own, and dozens 
of National Party leaders have followed 
him out the door. 

In July, Mr. Meyer announced that he 
would merge his new party with the 
party of a popular black leader, Bantu 
Holomisa. 

Mr. Mandela said Tuesday that Mr. de 
Klerk deserved an honorable place in 
history. “I only hope South Africans will 
not forget the role de Klerk played in 
effecting a smooth transition from our 
painful past to the dispensation South 
Africa enjoys today,” Mr. Mandela said. 


SWEDEN: 

A Chilling Chapter 

Continued from Page 1 

because she was considered to be men- 
tally inferior. She said one day the 
school superintendent told ber to come 
to his room and sign some papers. “I 
understood what this was about,” she 
said, “so I ran into a toilet and sat there 
and cried for a long time for myself.” 

Sweden, with its long-standing pro- 
gressive stances on social issues, is not 
accustomed to being on the defensive on 
ethical issues. “This is a frightening 
picture that now is being shown to the 
Swedish people.” Alf Svens son, chair- 
man of the opposition Christian Demo- 
cratic Party, said in a letter to Prime 
Minister Goran Persson. 

■ Similar Program in Belgium 

The sterilization of mentally handi- 
capped people is still being practical in 
Belgium, but the procedure is only car- 
ried out with the patient’s permission. 
Agence France-Presse reported Tuesday 
from Brussels, quoting a Belgian Health 
Ministry spokesman. 

‘ ‘This procedure is only carried our on 
adults who are declared incapable by the 
law courts and whose intelligence quo- 
tient is very low,” the health ministry 
spokesman said. He underlined that the 
patient always has the final say. 


varies greatly in different regions of 
Russia, it will not be clear until next year 
whether the climb in Moscow’s birth 
rate is part of a national trend or whether 
— as is often the case — behavior in the 
capital has no clear relation to the rest of 
the country. 

But here, at least, die change is clear. 
In the first half of 1997, more than 
50,000 babies were bom in Moscow. 
Only 72,000 were bom during ail of 
1996, according to statistics from the 
city Health Department. While the birth 
rale remains low by any standard — 
New York City’s, for example, is more 
than twice as high — if the early figures 
hold, women in Moscow will have 35 
percent more babies this year than they 
did last year. It is the first such growth 
spurt in Russia since before the collapse 
of the Soviet Union in 1991. 

The change is palpable. Maternity 
wards at nearly every type of hospital are 
far busier than just a year ago, and preg- 
nant women — a true rarity in a country 
that competes with Italy and Spain for 
the lowest birth rate in the world — are 
visible on the streets again. There are 
several new baby stores in Moscow and 
a heavily advertised children's furniture 
store has just opened on Prospekt Mira, 
an expensive shopping street 

“All my friends are talking about this 
all of a sadden,” said Irina Anisova, 28. 
who is expecting her first child. “I don't 
really know why anybody would be 
afraid to do it” 

Not even the most optimistic analyst 
could interpret a surge in Moscow’s 
birth rate as a sign that Russia’s dev- 
astating demographic problems have 
come to an end. Life expectancy for 
men, 59, is lower than in any other 
developed country and the mortality rate 
of 15.1 deaths per 1,000 people puts 
Russia ahead of only Afghanistan and 
Cambodia among the countries of 
Europe and Asia. The death rate among 
working-age people in Russia today is 
higher than it was 100 years ago. New 
data show that annual alcohol consump- 
tion — now a world-high at 27 Joints 
per person — doubled between 1990 and 
1995. 

Furthermore, the remarkable drop in 
the fertility of Russian women — so 
often attributed to the uncertainty and 
economic strains of post-Communist re- 
forms — has been under way for de- 
cades. Although the decline in the birth 
rate in Russia, from 23.2 per 1 .000 pop- 
ulation in 1960 to 9.0 in 1995 seems 
dramatic, it really reflects changes that 
have transformed the developed world 
as women leave the farm, move to the 
city, and are presented with greater 
choices in how many children to have. 

Not since before World War D have 
Russians produced enough children to 
replace all the people who were dying. 
Until recently that was not considered so 
serious a problem; again, it is common in 
the West But the number of children 
bom in Russia between 1990 and 1995 
was 3.7 million fewer than the number 
bora between 1985 and 1990. At the ■ 
same time, the death rate accelerated. As 
a result, the population of Russia is 
shrinking rapidly and may continue to do 
so for years. 

“You can look at Moscow in the past 
two years and see that things are better 
and that families are more secure,” said 
Vladimir Borisov, a demographer who 
teaches in the sociology department of 
Moscow Pedagogical University. “So 
my guess is that some women, usually 
older and more prosperous women, are 
choosing to have children.” 

“But the long-term trend is down and 
it’s going to stay down,” he said. “This 
is something that has been happening in 
the entire world. Civilization does not 
need as many children as it did 100 years 
ago. I don’t think this is the beginning of 
a huge swing upward, but I also dunk 
people have stopped wondering if the 
high price of sausage means they can no 
longer have a family. 

The final birth rate figures for 1996, 
just made available, show that Moscow 
was one of only four regions — in a 
country with 89 — that showed a slight 
increase over 1995. The city's mayor, 
Yuri Luzhkov, has added to the incent- 
ives for childbirth. Beginning next 
month every woman who is pregnant 
will receive a free, hourlong video on 
how to feed and care for an infant. 

“It doesn't seem as horrifying to me 
as it did before," said Natasha Yalkin, 
28. a secretary at a private real estate 
company here. “I don’t know if it’s 
actually the political situation or the 
money or whaL But 1 feel the climate is 
better, the hospitals are better and maybe 
the country is getting better, too.” 



]»-■ Hifl/T!*- 'tn, fcrk Tm 


A maternity ward nurse caring for babies in Moscow, where births are running 35 percent higher titan last year. 

DEFECTION: North Korean With Missile Details Flies to U.S. 


Continued from Page 1 

effect on the missile talks, nor do we 
believe that this will have any effect on 
the four-party talks,” said Mr. Rubin. 
“Nor do we see this as connected to 
some collapsing of the leadership.” 

The defections were likely, nonethe- 
less, to be a major embarrassment in 
Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. 

Mr. Chang had been scheduled to 
return to North Korea next month at the 
end of a three-year assignment. 

He had been missing since Friday, 
when he failed to report for work in 
Cairo. 

Egyptian government sources there 
told The Associated Press that Mr. 
Chang was flown out of that capital on 
Monday, using a false name and Amer- 
ican travel documents. 

Cairo serves as North Korea's dip- 
lomatic headquarters in the Middle East, 
and U.S. officials will be keenly interested 
in debriefing Mr. Chang. Before being 
assigned to Cairo in 1994, he. was deputy 


foreign minister in charge of the region. 

U.S. administration officials at first 
declined to discuss the diplomatically 
sensitive defections. 

As to what information the ambas- 
sador might be able to provide, Mr. 
Rubin was circumspect, saying that such 
information was “of a character we 
don't normally discuss.” 

He would not say whether South 
Korean officials would be given access 
to the ambassador. 

In Seoul, analysts who follow North 
Korea told Reuters that Ambassador 
Chang could shed important light on its 
reported sales of missiles and other 
weapons technology to Syria, Iran and 
Libya. “Chang should have access to 
firsr-class information on missiles,” 
said Kim Koo Seup. the chief North 
Korea researcher at Seoul’s state-funded 
Korea Institute for Defense Analysis. 

Mr. Kim said that North Korea had 
exported the Scud-B missile, with a 
range of 300 kilometers (175 miles) and 
the Scnd-C. with a range of 500 to 600 


kilometers, ro Middle East nations. The 
Scnd-C is an upgraded version of the 
Soviet Scud-B. 

In a report to Congress issued last 
month, the CIA said that during the latter 
half of 1 996 North Korea and Russia had 
supplied Egypt with equipment to build 
medium-range Send ballistic missile. 

It also said that Syria was seeking 
equipment for missile production from 
North Korea and Iran. 

Iran, in turn, reportedly has upgraded 
a Scud missile, with North Korean help, 
to give it a range of up to 1.300 to 1,5 00 
kilometers. 

Some analysts worry that unless North 
Korea's transfers are restrained — pos- 
sibly as pan of the broader negotiations it 
has entered into with Washington, Seoul 
and Beijing — Pyongyang may begin 
selling longer-range missiles. 

Park Sung Hoon, senior North Korea 
analyst at the National Unification Min- 
istry, said that Mr. Chang’s defection 
would not have a major impact on the 
four-party peace talks. 


ASYLUM: 

Miens Use Loophole ; 

Continued from Page 1 

i- 

grarion inspector and spokesman for 
Britain’s immigration workers union.; 
“It is the only way to get into Britain j- 
without a document.” 

“This no longer is ordinary illegal;, 
immigration but a coordinated criminal ; 
assault on a wide-open breach in our; 
frontiers. It started with Somalis, spread j 
to Turks, and now criminals mother-) 
countries are joining in,” Mr. Tmcey; 

^From January to June. 404 Somalis ; 
without documents arrived in Britain, ;■ 
229 of them at Waterloo by train. In July ! 
alone, more than 400 other Somalis i 
without papers arrived at Waterloo, ac- ■ 
cording to a spokesman for the Home, 
Office, which is responsible for inter- i 
national security. . _ A 

Officials say Pans is the preferred 
jumping-off point for the people smug- 
glers because service from there is more- 
frequent than from Brussels, the othe r 
major continental terminus, and Pans 
offers a larger multiethnic community in 
whicb to operate. 

During one weekend this month, 118 
Somalis and 42 Turks walked off trains 
from France to request asylum. 

“We were near meltdown that day at 
Waterloo,” Mr. Tincey said. “The staff 
couldn’t cope. Lt takes around five hours 
for an immi gration officer to complete 
the initial interview with an asylum 
seeker.” 

In theory, there are no longer frontier 
controls in the 15 -nation European Un- 
ion, but Britain insists on tightly con- 
trolling its borders. There are special 
walk-through lanes for Europeans ar- 
riving in this country by air or ferry, but 
all others, including Americans, face 
potentially long fines and one-by-one 
e xamina tion by an immigration officer.' 

Airlines and ferries that bring on- 
documented passengers into Britain free 
fines of around $3,000 a person. 

When regulations for the Chunnel 
train were drawn up, however, frontier- 
free was the byword, and train operators 
were exempted from such liability. So 
Eurostar does not check documents 
either in Britain or at its terminals- in 
France and Belgium. 

As it competes with airlines in the. 
time-is-money world of international 
transportation. Euros tar prides itself oc - 
its short check-in times: as little as 10 
minutes before departure for first-class . 
passengers, 20 minutes for others. 
Travel time from central Paris to central 
London is three hours. - 

The Home Office said that when the 
number of asylum seekers began to 
swell. Immigration Minister Mike 
O’Brien demanded that Eurostar offi- 
cials “tackle without delay the problem 
of asylum seekers arriving without prop- 
er documents.” 

“We fully agree that there is a prob- 
lem, and we are working with our col- 
leagues in the French national railways 
to find a permanent solution,” Leslie 
Retail ack, a spokesman for Eurostar, 
said last week. 

Making Eurostar liable is being con- . 
sidered, Mr. O'Brien said The company 
could be required to establish expensive 
document checks and perhaps to in- ' 
crease check-in times. 

The new random document checks by 
French police at Gate du Nord are being 
applauded, but Mr. O’Brien described 
them as “a temporary solution.” 

According to Home Office figures, 
there are about 53,000 asylum cases 
awaiting final decision in Britain, the- 
second-largest number in Western 
Europe. Because of its borders with East 
European countries, Germany has about 
10 times as many. ^ 



BEIJING: Falls to the Golden Horde (of Developers) 


Continued from Page 1 

rings of walls: the city wall, the courtyard house 
walls, the walls of the Imperial Palace and, at die 
center, the deep red walls of the Forbidden City, 
home of the emperor. Although they were in- 
effective as military structures, the walls reflected 
China's tendency to look inward rather than out, 
resist foreign influence rather than welcome it. And 
at the core of the society lay the family unit. 

After the Communists seized power in 1949, the 
party chairman, Mao Zedong, leveled several 
neighborhoods to create the vast Tiananmen Square 
at the city center. Around it, he erected Soviet-style 
buildings such as the Great Hall of the People. 

The designs were examined at the highest levels 
of government; Mr. Zhang, who designed the His- 
tory Museum and Museum of the Revolution on 
Tiananmen Square, was pressed by Premier Zhou 
Enlai to make its columns more massive. 

Later, Mao ignored appeals from Liang Sicheng. 
a Chinese architect trained at the University of 
Pennsylvania who was charged with drawing up a 
city plan in the 1 950s. Mr. Liang had urged Mao to 
create a new city outside the city walls to absorb 
future growth, while maintaining the inner city as a 
living museum and residential area. The walls, he 
suggested, could be lined with plants and benches 
and turned into an elevated park. 

Instead, Mao ordered the destruction of the 
massive walls, first built by a Ming Dynasty emperor 
in the early 1400s, to make way for a ring road. 

"The city wall was like a frame to a painting,” 
Mr. Zhang said mournfully, “and the gray color of 
courtyard houses was like the background color.” 
Only one of the 13 gates in the city walls was 
preserved. Recently, a small section of die wall has 
been reconstructed. 


constructed for wealthy merchants and high-rank- 
ing officials, were built with strong roof beams, 
small gates, ornate door handles and carved 'Stones 
at the entryways. 

* ’The city of Beijing is like a magnified quad- 
rangle, symmetrically and neatly arranged and sur- 
rounded rectangularly by high walls,” wrote Xu 
Yong, a photographer who has documented the old 
city. “This lends magnificence to the city.” 

He wrote that in 1990, when hutong neigh- 
borhoods still occupied a third of Beijing and 
provided housing for half the population. Now 
these neighborhoods house barely one-tenth of the 
city’s population. . 

Beijing’s sense of neighborhood and community®., 
has been pulverized along with peoples' homes. 
Residents used to meet in courtyards, squat on front 
stoops, play checkers on sidew alks or pass the dark 
alley walls as they walked or biked home. 

Now most Fight their way home, dodging auto- 
mobiles along broad avenues illuminated by over- 
head lights. They arrive at nondescript high-rises 
that dwarf them and scurry up stairs or ride el- 
evators to their isolating compartments. Commu- 
nities have been atomized; the individual is alone 

To be sure old courtyards look more charming 
from the outside than inside. Homes meant for one 
wealthy family each have been jammed with more 
Oian a dozen families boused in ramshackle ad- 
ditions thai fill in much of the original courtyards 
Coal briquettes, bicycles, brooms and other house- 
hold items clutter passageways. 

The new apartment buildings have more space and 
0“* during the Cultural Revolution 
f n<aghbor *. could be tormentors or spies. 

Nonetheless, an opinion survey by Qinghua lini-d? 
vers, ^ researchers indicated that only 20 percent oF ’ 

ffpJKES .?.?!? ne L w hous i?S Project were 


A Beijing rodent sleeping on 


bearing the character that means 
houses are coming down for modern apartment blocks. 


narrow lanes, known as hutongs, that numbered in 
the thousands. The courtyard homes, originally 


Kurt Kranz, Painter and Bauhaus Adherent, Dies at 87 


Ajiencr France-Presse 

HAMBURG — Kurt Kranz, 87, 
the German painter who was one of 
the last representatives of the 
Bauhaus movement, died Friday. 

“Of the generation of Bauhaus dis- 
ciples, Kranz was among the most 
prominent,’ ’ said Wuif Herzogenraih, 
director of the Bremen Arts Hall. 

Kranz taught in Hamburg from 


1950 to 1975, as well as in the United 
States and Japan. At the Bauhaus in 
Dessau, he was a student of Paul 
Klee, Vasily Kandinsky and Josef 
Albers from 1930 to 1932. 

Edgar Shannon Jr., 79, Scholar 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Edgar 
Shannon Jr., 79. a former president 
of the University of Virginia who 


was outspoken against the Vietnam 
War. died Sunday gf cancer at his 
home in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Although Shannon served in ihe 
Navy in the Pacific Ocean, was over- 
seer of two U.S. miliiary academies 
and left hts stamp on ihe Central 
Intelligence Agency, he is best re- 
membered for his dramatic stance 
against the war. 


C °n d ’ ? erest Profaned othSoptions 0111 ^ ^ 

One Beijing worker said that his wife preferred 
their new apartment s more modem appliances and 
Ibat she does not nSTSS 
neighbors because she was not very sociable. But 

Sow h" aP 5 y , ^ biked 15 minutes 10 work; 
now he pedals hard to make the journey in 45 

m But eS ih7 If™!? 1 co ? m,nlc “» bear, cold or rain. 

But the relentless force of real estate devel- 
opment is difficult to resist. 

n . 1 ?? ub f; even t Wecan , come U P with a zoning 
®t fec I ! ,ve, y control developers” 
said Mr. Lu. the Qinghua architect who is hdpLsA 
draw up a new Beijing master plan. During the P iwo£ 
years ihe planning group has been working many 
preservation debates have been settled by bull* 
dozers and sledgehammers. * 




PAGE 3 


.an MUUCtlL* 


:kr<%KNVfc* weffT K Mtt CB «J«2. 


'■ international herald tribune 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1997 
_ RAGE II 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 








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Porgy and Bess’ in Austria: Far From Catfish Row 


By Craig R. Whitney 

’. Mw York Tmn 5rnf, v 

B REGENZ, Austria — “Porgy 
■and Bess " * is a parable of life in 
today’s black American 
ghetto, said one of Europe’s 
v . most celebrated opera directors, and he 
insisted on an unorthodox production 
mat made Catfish Row look like 
• ■ Los Angeles after a race riot. 

But the director. Goetz Friedrich, did 
hot reckon on a cast of black Americans 
“a a white American conductor, all of 
i 1 insisted “It ain’t necessarily so.” 
- : 1 The heavens opened on the vast Bre- 

S en z Festival open-air stage on Lake 
- Constance at the premiere in July, send- 
• * - mg the production temporarily into 
more traditional and intimate stage sur- 
! " f’ ou F <: ^ 1 SS inside. “We’ve got our opera 
back," the conductor. Andrew Litton, 
said then. 

- By that time Friedrich had stormed out 
of a meeting with the cast members, who 
"■ )^ ere upset by the living conditions thai 
festival organizers had provided for them 
r in a boarding school ana by the deafening 
explosions accompanying the opera's 


storm scene on the amazing outdoor set: 
an apocalyptic Los Angeles freeway ruin 
balanced precariously above the lake, 
mstwd of setting ai the edge of 
Charleston. South Carolina, that DuBose 
Heyward and Ira Gershwin envisioned in 
their libretto for the 1935 work. 

In die end, George Gershwin’s music 

j nc ** ne * s of the characterization 
in the drama came through, and 1 86,000 
people, mainly German speakers, wel- 
comed the production warmly. But it 
also laid bare a cultural gap about as 
wide as the Atlantic between Europeans 
and Americans. 

The idea was to show a social earth- 
quake, a place where communication 
has been broken," the director of the 
festival. Alfred Wopmann, told mem- 
bers of a visiting American orchestra, 
the Dallas Symphony, led by Litton, 
which closed this year's festival with a 
concert Thursday. 

“Because the stage is out in the lake, 
they always try to find a different 
slant.” Litton said. The musicians 
laughed when he added. “I think thev 
succeeded in ‘Porgy and Bess.’ ” 

Victor Pond, a member of the chorus 


who said he probably would not be back 
next year, described ihe experience as 
“two months of hell." 

“The organizers said they had never 
confronted anything like this before," 
he said. "We said. ’You've never dealt 
with .Americans before."’ he added, 
although he is originally from Panama. 

Pond said rhat the chorus and the 
dancers had complained to the man- 
agement after being rousted out of their 
hotels to make room for paying audi- 
ences. and housed in the Mehererau 
Gymnasium, a private boarding school 
where they found no private wash- 
rooms, no private toilets, no cleaning 
staff and no cooking utensils. 

W HEN they tried to express 
their concerns about safety 
to Friedrich, he was offen- 
ded “We were told that a 
cast never confronted a director in 
Europe.” Pond said. "We organized 
ourselves, got legal advice and in the 
end we won a settlement.” 

The settlement was $3,200 a person, 
in addition to the S4.200 each in the 
original contract for members of the 


chorus. The conductor won other, smal- 
ler disputes bur lost the overall battle. 

“I grew up with the view that this was 
an intimate piece," said Litton, “and it 
couldn’t be in this production.” 

“If we changed the key of the music, 
we’d be in trouble, but the staging seems 
to be able to do anything it wants," he 
said “There’s always been more of that 
in Europe than in the United States. 
They’ve always had so much monev 
here." 

The colossal staging alone cost S6.6 
million in a S21 million production, 
Wopmann said, 30 percent of it coming 
from state, local and city subsidies. 

Gordon Hawkins, in the role of Porgy 
in the last performance, wondered 
whether die staging distracted attention 
from the music at the very end of the 
opera, a poignant moment when Porgy 
sets off for New York to look for Bess. 

Most of the audience at that point is 
looking up at the top of the ruined 
highway, 50 feet ( 15 meters) above the 
lake, where daredevil stagehands are 
unfurling a banner that appears to show 
a black nst clutching a rainbow. 

"1 couldn't do anything about that," 


Litton said, but he did persuade 
Friedrich that the African drums that 
open the production — a touch some of 
the American cast also found objec- 
tionable — should be taken offstage 
after only a few minutes. And, he said, 
he perauaded the director to delay the 
arrival of a police boat, its siren scream- 
ing, until the mnsic is about to end at the 
close of the first scene. 

C RITICS observed that Litton 
had succeeded in getting the 
Vienna Symphony to swing 
authentically to the music. 
“The music is not always written the 
way it should be played,” he said. 
“Tliey had no trouble getting that right 
away, because the Vienna waltz is also 
not written the way it’s played.” 

Arthur Woodley, who sang Porgy 
here, said: “I'm more used to this opera 
being set in Charleston in the 1930s, and 
now it’s in the teeth of L. A., and you had 
to make adjustments. When Porgy ’s be- 
ing questioned by a policeman about the 
murder in the first act. his line is ‘I don’t 
know nuttin* ’bout it, boss.’ You can 
make that sound cowering or confron- 



tational, and I put an edge 
on it in this production." 

Wopmann conceded ihat the 
shortage of suitable hotel rooms had 
caused problems for the cast this year 
and said he hoped many would return 
when the production is done again next 
summer. 

Because of the bad weather at the 
premiere and a heavy rehearsal schedule 
in Berlin, where he is general manager 
of the Deutsche Oper, Friedrich never 
saw a performance of his production for 
the outdoor stage here. 

“I wanted a production that took ac- 
count of the fact that we are living in 
another era in 1997 and 1998 than the 
1930s,” he said. "I heard that there 
were people living under bridges and in 
tunnels in New York City ana thought 
that an urban setting like Los Angeles or 
the Bronx was as good a way of dram- 
atizing the lives of these people on the 
margins of socieiy today as the South 
was in the 1930s.” 

“ ‘Porgy and Bess’ is neither just a 
musical or just an opera," he observed 
“It’s all those things together, creating 
something new, a sui generis work.” 


LONDON THEATER 


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New ‘Seagull’ 
Is Minimalist 


By Sheridan Morley 

Iniemurioiml Herald Tribune 


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■ ONDON — More than one “Seagull” is flying 
1 around London this late summer. Like * ’King Lear’ ’ 
I .a year or three ago, it seems to have become suddenly 

hot, whether at the Old Vic in the enchanting Peter 
Hall/Felicity Kendal version, or now, at the Donmar Ware- 
. <■ house in a more radical if less ravishing staging by English 
. . Touring Theatre. 

r, This inevitably is a bare-bones production (in a new trans- 
lation by Stephen Mulrane) and has been on the road since 
'i. early May, but the Warehouse is perfectly suited to such 
i- minimalism, and the director Stephen Unwin has found all 
kinds of virtues in necessity. 

■' • 4 Like Coward’s “The Vortex," Chekhov’s classic is a 
“Hamlet’ ’ variant oddly unw illin g to acknowledge its source; 

- but until we understand that both these dramas of country 
house owners in decline (they were, after all, written less than 
30 years apart, at times of massive social and moral change in 
both Russia and Britain ) are essentially extensions of the 
Hamlet/Gertrude closet scene, we are never fully going to 
appreciate what is going on between mother and son, and 
although it has always been possible to find other things at 
stake in both scripts, the question of at least intellectual incest 
should never be this far from the surface. 

Here we get Cheryl Campbell as an unusually bitchy, 

- ; outlandish Arkadius, an actress forever about to send in the 
. clowns but whose career seems to have been little more 
; successful than thar of the dobmed Nina. Equally. Duncan 
* 1 ". Bell’s Trigorin is now a self-haling, defeated novelist instead 
. ' of the starry Moscow writer more usually discovered in the 
character. There is not a lot of difference between him and 
-» Arkadina on the one hand, and Konstantin and Nina on the 
■ . other; the older couple may have escaped die stifling boredom 
. ' and lethargy of her country estate, but the bright lights and the 
- ; big city have apparently brought them no greater satisfaction 
and only marginally better incomes. 

As a result, at least one of the central conflicts here — 
- , commercial success versus artistic failure — is denied us, and 
we are left with a group of depressives essentially trying to 
work out whether they would rather be depressed in the 
, country or the town. 

■> . Forced to play with the aid of a crutch, MarkBazeley makes 
... of Konstantin asuitably angry young man, perhaps rather too 
• . close to Jimmy Porter for period comfort, but one for whom it 
. • is impossible to feel much sorrow at the final suicide; the only 
real question here is why he didn’t do it sooner. 

> As for Nina, Joanna Roth comes up with a young drama 
g student whose career, again, seems to have fallen apart in 
m uch the way one might have predicted from her self- 
consciously terrible performance at the outset in Konstantin’s 
horrendous little verse drama. 

T HE id e a that some great talents have gone missing 
here is itself missing throughout, and I found myself 
more often than usually reminded of my two favonre 
critical responses to the play; a 1929 London crinc 
who wrote that Lenin was right to kill them alL ana a 
Broadway reviewer who felt, two decades later, that all 01 
l ‘ Konstantin’s problems could have been solved by an athletics 

scholarship to a decent university. . 

To the Theatre Royal Haymarfcet we welcome back yet 



TV Reaps a Harvard Harvest 


By James Stemgold 

Afnr York Times Sen-ice 


Cheryl Campbell and Mark Bazeley in 


SUfhen Vaughan 

‘The Seagull.” 


again Peter Hall’s revival of “An Ideal Husband," the 
production, now four years old, which has already triumphed 
all over the West End and on Broadway (soon also to open in 
Australia) but still manages to Tetain from the original cast 
Martin Shaw as an Oscar- looking Lord Goring and Michael 
Denison and Dulcie Gray as the cynical elders. 

We are now of course into Wilde times. With the centenary 
of his death only acouple of years away we have the imminent 
opening of the Stephen Fiy movie and a raft of new bi- 
ographies. 

All of these serve to highlight Hall's early realization that 
even by Oscar’s standards of creative egocenmciry tins was 
the most autobiographical of his plays, with sexual, social and 
political scandals crashing into each other as a very similar era 
of centennial angst overtook a weary London aching for 
change but oddly unable to find the energy with which to see 
it through. 

Some of the new casting is considerably less powerful than 
the originals, and it is clear that Hall himself has been too 
preoccupied with the survival of Ms troubled Old Vic com- 
pany to pull the newcomers into first-class form. 

All the same, thanks to the master class in octogenarian 
survival offered by the Deni sons (he was in the film of ‘ ‘The 
Importance' ' half a century ago and has lost none of his Wilde 
panache, while historians might like to consider the amazing 
truth that Oscar had been dead less than 15 years when they 
were bom), and Martin Shaw's increasingly charismatic chats 
to the audience while still in full character, this “ Husband’ ’ is 
still about as close to ideal as it gets. 

It might also be worth recalling at this stage that it originally 
emerged from neither of Britain's state-subsidized compa- 
nies, but from a commercial team working in the heart of the 
West End. 

If there were any more proof needed of the importance of 
keeping the Hall company alive, if not at the Vic then 
elsewhere, it is at the Haymarket. And maybe that is the theater 
they should now make their home? 


L OS ANGELES — Richard Ap- 
pel was a Harvard man for the 
1980s. He graduated with a de- 
gree in history and literature in 
1985, went directly to Harvard Law 
School, like many of his classmates, and 
later joined the U.S. attorney’s office in 
Manhattan, a conventional step in a 
high-flying career. 

And today? Appel is a Harvard man 
for the 1990s: he writes for "Die 
Simpsons.” 

Welcome to the other Hollywood. 
Without doubt, the movie industry con- 
tinues to be die most visible and glam- 
orous side of the entertainment field. 
But head over to the second most fash- 
ionable tables at the city’s must-see 
lunch spots, or peek inside some of the 
biggest houses in Los Angeles* toniest 
neighborhoods, and you will find the 
frequently better paid and at times better 
educated writers and producers of tele- 
vision shows. 

Prime-time television may be reviled 
in intellectual circles for hs supposedly 
lowbrow sensibilities, but many people 
in the medium regard this as a second 
golden era, both in terms of money and 
the quality of writing. Few things 
demonstrate the growing attractiveness 


of die field more than the presence of 
dozens of Harvard graduates (as well as 
many other Ivy Leaguers), particularly 
in comedy. Writing staffs of shows like 
“The Simpsons," “King of the Hill." 
“Sarurday Night Live" and “Late Show 
With David Lettexman" have come to 
look like Harvard alumni clubs. 

Many other shows, including “Party 
of Five," “Cracker," “News Radio,” 
"Third Rock From the Sun,” “Sein- 
feld," “Veronica’s Closet," “The 
Larry Sanders Show.” "Suddenly 
Susan,” “Murphy Brown” and “The 
Naked Truth," have or have had Har- 
vard writers and producers and even a 
few Harvard-educated actors. 

It is a career path that, as many of 
these people admitted, at one time 
seemed dfclassd by Harvard standards, 
but has gained considerable cachet with 
die soaring salaries and numbers of 
graduates heading out here. 

“It's like there’s a conveyor belt of 
people now coming out here,’ ’ said Ap- 
pel, who added that many, like himself, 
had worked at The Harvard Lampoon, 
long a launchingpad for television com- 
edy writers. ("Tne Lampoon has been 
the end of many a promising career in 
cancer research." said David Sacks, 
class of ’84 and a co-executive producer 
of “Third Rock From the Sun.”) 

These people are, of course, endowed 


with varying degrees of talent. Bui. more 
important, they tend to be exceptionally 
ambitious, and the world of television 
now has credibility as a place that bright 
young Ivy Leaguers can go to show off 
their skills. 

It is a business that pays huge sums 
even to very young people and is rising in 
prestige because of heavy media cov- 
erage. At a show like “The Simpsons," 
fairly typical for sitcoms, a story editor, 
who holds one of the most junior po- 
sitions, earns about $1 10,000 in a 22- 
episode year. The job of supervising pro- 
ducer. a mid-level writing position often 
reached after a few seasons, pays roughly 
$550,000 a year, and the top writing job, 
that of executive producer. $700,000 to 
as much as $3 million a year. 

B Y contrast, the top salary for a 
first-year associate at a major 
New York law firm is roughly 
$86,000 a year, a figure that 
rises to about $ 170.000 in foe fifth year, 
according to the National Association 
for Law Placement. 

“I think we’d all be doing this even if 
it paid $16,000 a year." said Bill 
Oakley, class of ’88 and a consulting 
producer of “The Simpsons." "But it 
does help that you can make as much 
after a few seasons as someone who’s 
been at a law firm for 40 years." 


BOOKS 


V 


CROSSWORD 


A ACROSS i| BHUard cushion 

1 Statesman tT t™”** 

I Euan “"9 

, ' 5 Pan of a wolf laOl ri lead -in 

/." pack W Excitement 

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29 Account of a trip 
conducted by 
Virgil 

x» Pretend 
at Sail spar 
9 i Abstract artist 

Milton 

32 Hindu goddess 

of fortune 
M Romantic 
exploit 
37 Repent 
sa Regatta blades 
41 Ingenue 

43 Cooper hero 

44 Show how 

43 Weatherman AI 
*r Cop's question 
to a speeder 
32 Leporine 
creatures 

93 Actress 

Dawn Chong 
s« Warriors’ org. 

57 Defenseman 
Bobby etaf. 

5 S "Get tost I" 

S 3 Sicilian Indian 

S 3 Verdi's' 

Chorus' 

34 LeshB Caron 
role 

S 3 Sprightly 

es 60 s catchword 
S7 Some are spft 

DOWN 

1 Soprano Gluck 
a ’Hop along 
Cassidy' actor 

3 Marriage 
prerequisite 

4 The whole 
shortin' match 

s IB-suited 
• Scarlett O'Hara 
and others 
7 - — e sempra 
((tail an motto) 
altaoes through 


• Mao or Lao 
foHower 

10 Fuming 

11 Western 

12 Hyperion, for 
one 

13 COi. Bowie s 
mission, with 
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(song of 191 3) 
22 P.M. times 
a* Trunk line 
as Large stain 

20 Country not In 
Pushdw's travel 
plans 

27 Advertiser with 
a swoosh 
2 * Tony 
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followers 

33 ft exists among 
thieves 

34 The Yukon's 
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33 -Dies ' 

37 Brews 

joSucJdfngspot 
40 Communist 
land, ones' 
Abbr. 

43 U.S 1 and 
others 

43 Companion of 
Gabriel 
4B Brave 
47 Victory shout 

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cfirpnider 

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30 Chang 0 - 85 " 
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31 Epigram maoc 

tale 

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33 how flawed 
g^ds are sold 

s* Disparity 
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PHOTOGRAPHIC 

MEMORIES 

By Jack Delano. 216 pages. 
$29.95. Smithsonian. 
Reviewed by 
David Nicholson 

A BOUT a quarter of foe 
way through this unas- 
suming autobiography. Jack 
Delano tells of photographing 
a Connecticut fanning couple 
for foe Farm Security Admin- 
istration in 1940. Though 
“with a bit of flattery ” he 
managed to persuade foe wife 
to pose just as she was (she’d 
wanted to change her dress), 
foe two refused to loosen up, 
“posing stiffly . . . scaring 
morosely at the camera, not at 
all like the jolly people they 
really were.” 

So Delano told the man his 
pants were falling down. The 
picture, reproduced in “Pho- 
tographic Memories,” shows 
foe results — Andrew Lyman 
stands bolding up his pants; 
his wife's head is tossed back 
as she laughs heartily. It was 
“just what I wanted,” 
Delano writes, “because that 
was what they were really 
like." 

You could say something 
s imilar about this book by foe 


multitalented Delano, a pho- 
tographer, cartoonist, design- 
er and composer who died re- 
cently in Puerto Rico, where 
he had lived for 50 years. 

Far too often, he gives us an 
unadorned recitation of foe 
events in his life, telling us 
what he did where and with 
whom. This has a certain 
documentary value, of course, 
but the best parts of foe book 
are foe unguarded moments 
when he quotes from letters or 
diaries, letting slip a compel- 
ling description or anecdore 
that gives us a glimpse of what 
die roan behind the camera is 
really like. 

In 1943, for example, trav- 
eling across foe country 
shooting photographs of foe 
railroad industry. Delano 
found himself one night mus- 
ing about all the “things I 
cannot photograph." What 
follows is a list with some of 
foe compression and beauty 
of poetry, reminiscent of the 
writing of Walt Whitman or 
Jack Kerouac: 

The warm darkness of the 
caboose 

The constant throbbing of 
the train 

Two men sitting in darkness 
of cupola looking our 
windows 


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New York Times 

TTns lisiis based on report* from mere 
than 2.000 bookstores throughout the 
United States. Weeks on list are not 
necessarily comecuivc. 

FICTION 

™i LatWato 

V** Wl «U 

1 UNNATURAL EXPO- 

SURE. bv Patricia 
Conwell... I 

2 COLD MOUNTAIN, by 
Charles Frazier.. 


2 THE PERFECT STORM, 
by Sebastian i 

3 INTO 


THIN 
Krakaner. 


Jon 


3 SPECIAL DELIVERY, 

by Danielle Steel 3 

4 PLUM ISLAND, by 

Nelson DcMiEe 4 

5 THE NOTEBOOK, by 

Nicholas Spirits .... 5 

6 IF THIS WORLD WERE 
MINE, by E. Lynn Haris 7 

7 THE PARTNER, by John 

Grisham 6 


4 

7 

7 

12 

44 

4 

24 


4 MIDNIGHT IN THE 

GARDEN OF GOOD 
AND EVIL by John 
Bc rerafc - — b 162 

5 THE BIBLE CODE, by 

Michael Drosnin 4 10 

6 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH GOD; Book 1. by 

Neale Donald Walxb 5 36 

7 THE MILLIONAIRE 

NEXT DOOR, bv Thomas 
J. Stanley aod William D. 

Danko 


8 BRAIN DROPPINGS, by 

George Cariin — S 

9 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH GOD; Book 2. by 
Neale Donald Walsch. — 11 


8 LONDON, by Edward 

Rutherford 11 12 

9 UP ISLAND, by Anne 

Rivers 9 II 

10 THE GOD OF SMALL 
THINGS, by Arundhali 

JJ FAT TUESDAY. by- 

Sandra Brown 8 9 

12 CHASING CEZANNE 

Peter Mayle 13 9 

13 POWER OF A WOMAN, 

by Barbara Taylor 
Bradford 14 6 

14 DECEPTION ON HIS 

MIND, by Elizabeth 
George 10 b 

15 FATAL TERRAIN, by 

Dale Brown IS 5 


10 THE GIFT OF FEAR, by 

Girin de Becker 9 8 

It MARTHA STEWART - 
JUST DESSERTS, by 
Jeny Oppenbeuner 10 6 

12 JUST aSIAM. by Billy 

Graham — 13 15 

13 BILLIONS AND BIL- 
LIONS. by Carf Sagan IS 4' 

14 UNDERBOSS, by Peter 

Maas 14 17 

Js THE MAN WHO 
LISTENS TO HORSES, 
by Many Robert... I 


NONFICTION 
I ANGELA’S ASHES, by 
Frank McGwrt,, 1 49 


ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 MIRACLES CURES, by 

Jean Carper I 

2 SIMPLE ABUNDANCE. 

• by Saab Ban Breatbnsci; 2 

3 MEN ARE FROM 
MARS. WOMEN ARE 
FROM VENUS, by John 

Grav 3 204 

4TH£ ZONE, ty Barry 
Sears with BUI Lawren 4 7 


4 

72 


The passing of signal lights 
Lon eh looking farmhouses 
Isolated interlocking lowers 
The crazy moon in the sky 
with one lone star above 
it. . . 

Bom in 1914 in Ukraine, 
Delano came to the United 
States with his parents when 
he was almost 9. He grew up 
in Philadelphia where, for a 
time; he thought of becoming 
a conceit violinist. After high 
school, he attended foe 
Pennsylvania Academy of foe 
Fine Arts, where, in 1935, he 
received a fellowship that al- 
lowed him to spend several 
months traveling throughout 
Europe. There he bought a 
camera to take "tourist pic- 
tures," but after looking at 
foe work of such painters as 
Goya, van . Gogh and 
Brueghel, Delano decided 
that his goal of becoming a 
magazine illustrator was 
"cheap and tawdry." He 
“began to think that perhaps 
in photographs I could show 
foe same concern and under- 
standing of ordinary people 
that I fonnd so compelling in 
foe work of foe artists I ad- 
mired so much." 

A year or two after gradu- 
ating from foe academy, 
Delano was hired by Roy 
Stryker, who directed foe his- 
torical section of foe Farm 
Security Administration, an 
agency created during the 
Roosevelt administration to 
help farmers beleaguered by 
foe Great Depression. 

Working for foe agency, he 
and his wife, Irene, whom be 
had met in art school, 
“traveled through all the 
states from Florida to Maine, 
photographing cotton plant- 
ations, tobacco forms, fruit 
orchards, agricultural fairs, 
the lives of farm families, 
sharecroppers, fishermen, 
migratory farm laborers, 
teachers, religious ceremo- 


nies, funerals, baptisms, 
every aspect of working 
people’s lives." 

In 1941 Stryker sent him to 
the Virgin Islands to shoot 
photographs for a report be- 
ing prepared for Congress, 
and suggested offhandedly 
ihat Delano “stop by for a 
few days in Puerto Rico, 
where we have an FSA pro- 
gram." Not knowing where 
foe island was. Delano had to 
look it up in an atlas. Little did 
he know bow significant foe 
island would be to his future. 

A FTER the war, Delano 
received a grant to make 
a book of photographs about 
Puerto Rico. He and Irene 
sublet their apartment in New 
York, thinking they would re- 
turn in a year. They never did 
Influenced by foe charismatic 
Luis Munoz Marin, foe 
Delanos became involved in 
the island's cultural and in- 
tellectual life, creating from 
scratch educational efforts 
like a graphics workshop and 
a documentary film depart- 
ment. 

What comes through most 
of all in “Photographic 
Memories" is Delano’s love 
and respect for people. The 
sections about the '40s have a 
palpable sense of inclusive- 
ness and belonging that 
seems impossible in our di- 
verse, fragmented culture. 

Still, foe truth is that, as a 
writer, Delano is a great pho- 
tographer. Go find "Puerto 
Rico Mio,” foe book that in- 
cludes a selection of the more 
than 2.000 photographs he 
took in the 1940s, together 
with his photographs from the 
1980s. It contains some of his 
work that is most likely to 
endure. 


Da\‘id Nicholson, a Wash- 
ington writer, wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 


Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

To subscribe, call 

1 - 800-882 2884 

■TfW fk LNTElCirflOMLM* * 4 

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WEDNESDAY AUGUST 27, 1997 


PAGE 13 , 




.I ^es produces x. ...most of which it exports 

Jh® 1 * 45 percent of the world's r with the largest demand comina - 
i- Solar P°wer equipment... £ from the Padfic RiS 9 ! • 

Demand iw sour byfegion ^ 

?. West Asia 


gggB Bundesbank Alert Hurts Dollar 

top solar power Firms : Signs of Inflation-Based Rate Increases Also Bite Into Stocks 


J Other 


Nora Figures are rounded. 


: ■ Africa/Mideast 12 % 

Latin America o«%r 


By shipments of solar power 
equipment, measured in mega- 
watts produced, 1996. 

Siemens Solar (U.S.) 1 8.0 

508BSstfijooSJW^<4o^;:.:::utfcsij::aEv«5«.Jvc;5Srfl'.w WU» '* 

Solarex {U.S.) 10.8 

wsw»»ww<.*i"vr."f rc»rr«s«ntf. 

Kyocera (Japan) 9.1 

British Petroleum 8.45 

Note: Equipment is measured 
by die amount of watts produced 
under standard test conditions; ' 
one megawatt equals a million watts. 


Thr WtLitunjiiin Pom 


Solar Energy’s Time to Shine? 

Worry on Global Warming Helps Fuel Sales and Investment 



By Martha M. Hamilton 

Washington Post Ser vice 

WASHINGTON — Could global 
wanning help solar energy find its 
place in the sun? 

Solar power, long regarded as not 
much more than a curiosity, is rapidly 
growing and attracting new invest- 
ment because of concerns that carbon 
dioxide and other “greenhouse” 
gases produced by burning fossil fuels 
may bring devastating changes in tem- 
perature and precipitation worldwide. 

* ‘We think solar is something which 
could be a valuable business for us,” 
said John Browne, group chief ex- 
ecutive of British Petroleum PLC. BP 
has recently invested $20 million in 
what it says will be one of the largest 
and most technologically advanced 
solar cell manufacturing plants in the 
world, to be situated in Fairfield. Cali- 
fornia. 

Solar power represents less than a 
tenth of a percent of the total market 
for energy. And even though industry 
officials expect it to expand by about 
30 percent this year worldwide, its 
worth will still be only a little more 
than $1 billion a year. The United 
States is the largest producer of solar 
equipment, bnt most of the sales are 
outside the country. 


Mr. Browne recently broke ranks 
with other oil and gas executives when 
he said in a speech at Stanford Uni- 
versity in May that BP believed the 
possibility of climate change could not 
be discounted and should be acted 
upon. Part of BP’s response, he said, 
was to develop alternative fuels. 

A privately held Washington com- 
pany, Sunlight Power International, 
has attracted investments from two 

Industry officials expect 
the market for solar 
power to expand by 
about 30 percent this 
year. 

European insurance companies that 
are concerned aboat the storms and 
rising oceans that might result from 
global warming. Swiss Reinsurance 
Co. has invested $2.75 milli on and 
GAIA Kapital, which is associated 
with Rolf Gerling of the German Ger- 
ling Insurance Group, invested $2 mil- 
lion in the U.S. company, which plans 
to supply and service solar power to 
communities in developing countries 
beyond the reach of the power grid. 


Bruno Leisch, head of Swiss Re's 
Investment Center Europe, said the 
company was attracted both by the 
economics and the environmental po- 
tential of the venture. 

Jeff Serfass, president of SunLigbt 
Power, said: 

”We are starting a business that 
focuses on providing electric service 
to rural regions of developing coun- 
tries where there is no electric service 
and where die expectation for gaining 
electric service is out so many years 
that we provide an option for people to 
get what we all consider one of the 
basic commodities in life.” 

The company, which is already op- 
erating with a partner in the Domin- 
ican Republic, goes into such an area 
and offers electricity for a fee, then 
installs, operates and maintains the 
equipment at a monthly rate. 

The traditional markets for solar 
power are in areas of the world that 
power lines do not reach, according to 
Harvey Forest, chairman of Solarex 
Corp. 

But he said there was a growing 
market for solar to supplement power 
in countries served by traditional elec- 
tric generating facilities, especially in 
Germany and Japan. 

See POWER, Page 18 




Body Shop Ads Accentuate the Ordinary 


By Stuart Elliott 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Can a plump plastic 
doll help change the way that fa shion , 
beauty and cosmetic marketers portray 
women in advertising? 

The Body Shop, me iconoclastic re- 
tailer that sells creams, soaps and other 
products primarily to women, hopes so. 
The chain, which has been suffering 
sales declines in the United States in me 
face of intensifying competition, is un- 
dertaking a rare campaign in the main- 
stream American media, which carries 
the theme “Love your body.” 

The campaign is emblematic of a 
hotly debated issue: the ability of ad- 
vertising to affect and influence be- 
havior. The print advertisements and 
posters focus on self-esteem and self- 
image and center on the doll, nicknamed 
Ruby. 

Ruby’s arrival in America comes 
after she appeared in ads in several of 
the 47 countries in which Body Shop 
International operates stores, including 
Australia, where newspapers mere 
coined her nickname, and Switzerland. 

The reason for that sobriquet is ob- 
vious afterseeingthe toy, which appears 
in an ad in die September issue of me 
magazine Self and on the posters due to 
go up in Body Shop stores for twoweeks 
beginning in mid-September. Though 
Ruby’s red hair, blue eyes and pert nose 
are zypicai of so-called fashion dolls, her 
body is definitely not 

the doll’s breasts, stomach and 
thighs are in a word, Rubenesqoe. 


She reclines on a green velvet sofa 
under this headline: ‘ ‘There are 3 billion 
women who don’t look like supermod- 
eis and only 8 who do.” 

“Most of the cosmetics industry 
bases its communications on stereotyp- 
ical notions of unattainable ideals,” 
said Marina Galanti, head of global 
communications at Body Shop Inter- 
national PLC in Littlehampton, Eng- 
land. “We’re asking for a reality 
check.” 

“The images in the barrage of ad- 
vertising around you have very little to 
do with people riding the bus with you. 
sitting in the office with you, having 
dinner withyou,” said Ms. Galanti, who 
oversees advertising and marketing. 
“It’s good to step back once in a while 
and say, ‘Hrnmrnra.’ ” 

The Body Shop campaign, created in- 
house, indicates a growing trend: sales 
pitches that mock or tweak conventional 
methods of peddling products, partic- 
ularly images perceived as persuading 
women to conform to certain ideals of 

appearance. . 

That trend has intensified in the 
1990s with the formation of such ac- 
tivist groups as Stop Anorexic Mar- 
keting, an organization founded by 
women in the Boston area, some of 
whom have suffered from earing dis- 
orders. _ . , 

For instance, ads for Dove beauty bar 
promote that Unilever product as “for 
the beauty that’s already there. Cam- 
paigns for Chic jeans from Henry f. 
Siegel Co. have earned such themes as 
“Look like yourself' and “It's what 


you feel that counts.” Print ads for me 
Freeman Cosmetic Coip. feature a 
woman, her back turned to the camera, 
asking, “How much do you need to see 
to know I’m beautiful?’ ’ 

An ad for Special K cereal, run in 
Canada by Kellogg Co., depicted an 
ultra thin model and carried die head- 
line, “If this is beauty, there’s 
something wrong with the eye of me 
beholder.” 

“It’s enlightened self-interest to 
identify yourself with women who will 
be drawn in by advertising that doesn't 
show an anorexic 15-year-old,” said 
Susan W K idman Schneider, editor in 
chief of Lilith, a quarterly women’s 
ma gazin e from Lili th Publications Inc. 
in New York that has ran articles on 
subjects like self-esteem and self-im- 
age. 

“Say what you will about the Body 
Shop trying to reclaim market share,” 
she added, referring to me chain’s loss 
of sales to rival retailers like Bath & 
Body Works, H20 Works and the Gap. 
“The campaign is teiribly clever.” 

Ms. Galanti said: “In terms of com- 
petition. it’s good to celebrate our points 
of difference. And Ruby does that. ” 

Most ads by Body Shop International 
have appeared in stores, devoted to 
cause-related marketing programs like 
voter registratioa. 

The company has advertised only 
sporadically in American media, 
primarily in small, so-called alternative 
publications like Lili th and Mother 

See RUBY, Page 18 


CURRENCY & I NTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


Aug. 26 


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AM. PM- c** 

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London 32540 325J0 +150 

Mow York 32840 32940 '140 

US. doflws per ounce, London otSdal 
fdOta; Zurich and Hew York mnhig 
end dosing prices New York Centex 
(DecJ 

Sowce: Reuters. 


Can/nJni bi Ow Staff FmuDis{vtr*^ 

FRANKFURT — The prospect of an 
increase in German interest rales sent 
the dollar tumbling below 1.80 
Deutsche marks on Tuesday as spec- 
ulation heightened that the Bundesbank 
would take action to curb inflation. 

The weakening dollar and the threat 
of higher interest rates in Europe’s 
largest economy sparked a decline in 
stocks and bonds across the Continent 

"Everybody was lulled in by a gen- 
eral perception that inflation is dead,” 
said Guenier Albrecht, chief economist 
at the German Chamber of Industry and 
Commerce. “Now the issue is on the 
agenda a gain. ” 

The fear persisted even though the 
German central bank left its key money 
market rate unchanged on Tuesday, set- 
ting a 14-day tender for securities re- 
purchase funds, or repos, at a fixed rate 
of 3.0 percent 

The repo rate has been held steady 
since August 1996, but the central bank 
has kept markets on edge in recent 
weeks with warnings that it may have to 
steer its monetary policy to contain any 
potential inflation threat. 


The dollar initially rose on the central 
bank’s inaction but was at 1 .7975 DM in 
4 P.M. trading in New York, down from 
1.8193 DM on Monday. 

Recent economic reports, mean- 
while, indicate that German inflation is 
running at a stronger-th an -expected 
clip. 

On Tuesday, the Bundesbank said 
that a surge in the inflation rale for 
Western Germany was caused by rising 
oil prices in July and August. 

The central bank said West German 
consumer prices rose at an annual rate of 
2.3 percent in the six months to mid- 
August. up from a rale of 1 .4 percent in 
July. 

The increase in the rate, which is 
adjusted for seasonal influences, helped 
feed concern that the central bank may 
soon raise interest rates to preempt fu- 
ture price pressures. 

A strong increase in oil prices played 
an important role in pushing the 
Bundesbank's annual consumer prices 
rate up. a central bank economist said. 

The Bundesbank's inflation figure, 
which is adjusted for seasonal factors, is 
based on preliminary unadjusted data 


reported Monday by the Federal Stat- 
istics Office in Wiesbaden. 

In that report, the statistical office 
said that consumer prices rose OJ per- 
cent in the month to mid-August and 
were up 2.0 percent from last year, a rate 
that was also higher than expected and 
that represented the fastest pace since 
April 1995. 

Horst Siebert, a member of Bonn's 
major economic advisory panel, said 
Tuesday that Germany’s inflation rate 
was on ' ‘an upward trend,” which could 
lead the Bundesbank to increase interest 
rates in the next six months. 

Mr. Siebert said the August annual 
rate was a “certain warning signal.” 

He also said it would become more 
difficult for the central bank to stick to a 
“strict policy of stability” once coun- 
tries are selected for participation in a 
European common currency early next 
year. The euro is due to be iaunched on 
Jan. 1. 1999. 

Germany's European partners want 
to prevent a rate increase by the Bundes- 
bank because that could hurt their cur- 

See INFLATION, Page 14 


France Pushes for a 35-Hour Week 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — The Socialist-led govern- 
ment of France is preparing legislation 
that would cut die workweek to 35 hours 
by the year 2000 and impose a special 
tax on overtime pay, a newspaper re- 
ported Tuesday. 

But the Socialists' talk of maintaining 
the same salary despite the shorter hours 
seems to have fallen by the wayside 
since the June election that brought 
them to power, Le Monde reported. 

The shorter workweek, down from 38 
or 39 hours in most sectors, is viewed as 
a solution to France’s record unem- 
ployment. currently 12.6 percent of the 
work force. 

The Labor Ministry plans to unveil 
the proposal during a meeting among 
representatives from unions, employers 
and government scheduled for late 
September and early October. 

Employment Minister Martine Au- 
bry will meet trade union and business 
leaders from next week before com- 


pleting proposals on moving to a 35- 
hour workweek, a ministry spokeswom- 
an said Tuesday. 

To induce companies to shift toward 
a shorter workweek, the government 
wants to cut corporate employee taxes 
for companies that reduce hours before 
July 1. 2000, Le Monde reported. 

In addition, overtime hours above the 
current regular limit could be slapped 
with a surtax as early as next year, 
further forcing companies to slice their 
hours and hire new workers. 

Prime Minister Lionel Jospin may 
face an uphill battle, with unions and 
employers raising objections. 

Louis Viannet. head of the pro-Com- 
mnnist General Labor Confederation, 
said Tuesday that the shorter workweek 
should take' effect “comprehensively, 
quickly” and without a reduction in 
salary. 

If employers stick to their opposition, 
he said, “there is going to be conflict.” 

Employers argued that a blanket 35- 


GloLal Private Banking 


hour week could hart business com- 
petitiveness, especially among the 
country’s smaller companies. 

■ Mini id Shifts Toward Internet 

Mr. Jospin has said that France Tele- 
com should promote a “gradual mi- 
gration' ' onto the Internet of the on-line 
services it provides on its Minitel fa- 
cility. AFX News reported. 

Speaking at a university near Bor- 
deaux, Mr. Jospin said a government 
plan, to be presented in detail in autumn, 
would aim at “bridging the French back- 
wardness in information technology.” 

Minitel is a text-only system that has 
had little success outside of France. 

The government will also promote 
improved access to government data via 
the Internet. Mr. Jospin said. 

He urged “all current media enter- 
prises to increase their activity on the 
Net,” adding that state subsidies might 
be made available to encourage news- 
papers to publish on the Internet. 


At REPUBLIC, MANAGING 
YOUR ASSETS IS A DIALOGUE, 


NOT A MONOLOGUE. 


1 of RapvU* 

National Hank of Note York 
(Sniaot) S.A. in Cvmm. 


740 740 

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In fact, we consider asset management 
a team effort, with you as the hey member of 
that team. Your particular financial needs, your ' 
objectives, help us determine the winning strategy. 
Our fundamental goal: to protect your capital 
as we safeguard its purchasing power, 
tjww It is a simple principle upon which we base 

. in Cvmn. . 

our brand of financial conservatism: private 
banking built upon rigor, discipline and prudence. Tbis 
sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, bas created 
a global private bank of exceptional stability, capable 
of weathering the roughest storms. 

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To our way of thinking, it is security as 
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And in the process, to provide a unique quality f u uf 

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service, understanding and discretion. \w >.*t in iVitf York. 


3.13 110 

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H Republic National Bank of New York” 

Strength. Security. Service. 


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* K.itiUk X.U.J tLiir.J V.. 1-4. lUO'i 





PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERA LD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1 997 

THE AMERICAS 


R 


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| Investor’s America J 

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Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


imwimi .«ul Kcrak] Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Court Rejects Encryption Ban Anew 

SAN FRANCISCO (NYT) — A U.S. District Court has 
again ruled that government attempts to restrict the export of 
data-scrambling software are an unconstitutional restriction 
on freedom of speech. 

The ruling, by Judge Marilyn Hall Patel, reaffirms a ruling 
she made last year that could under min e a. Clinton admin- 
istration plan to force U.S. companies to develop dataren- 
cryption systems that would permit government agencies to 
eavesdrop on data and voice communications. 

The new ruling comes in a suit filed by a University of 
Illinois at Chicago mathematician and the Electronic Freedom 
Foundation, a group promoting civil liberties. The suit con- 
tended that die government controls were unconstitutional 
Judge Patel’s original ruling applied to State Department 
regulations that classified cryptographic software as a 
weapon. But in December, the administration shifted control 
over data-scrambling software from the State Department to 
the Commerce Department. The new suit asked the court to 
rule on the constitutionality of new Commerce restrictions. 

• US Airways Group Inc. has asked die U.S. government for 
permission to fly two new daily round trips from Philadelphia 
to London’s Gatwick Airport as of spring. 

• American Stores Co-’s second-quarter net profit rose 8.2 
percent, to $90 million, as improving drugstore sales offset 
slight declines at its food stores. 

• Learning Co., a troubled software company, said it would 
retire $150 million in debt by issuing preferred stock to 
Thomas H. Lee Co-, Bain Capital Inc. and Centre Partners 
Management LLC. 

• Bombardier Inc. said Scandinavian Airlines System AS 
would buy 15 Dash 8-400 aircraft for 442 million Canadian 
dollars ($3 16.1 million), its largest order for die new 72-seat 

aircraft. Bloomberg 


Robust Data Give Markets Cause for Pause 


Carydtti typo- Stiff From Diipatcka 

NEW YORK — Blue-chip stocks 
struggled Tuesday as the latest in a 
flurry of robust economic readings 
aggravated some nagging inflation 
jitters. 

“Earnings are growing and cash 
is flowing into die market, but 
there's concern that the economy 
may be growing too strongly and 
that profit growth may slow,” said 
Joseph Stocke, senior investment 
manager at Meridian Investment 
Co. of Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. 

The Dow Joaes industrial average 
closed down 7735 points at 
7,782.22. The Standard & Poor’s 
500 Index dropped 7.14 to 913.02, 
and the Nasdaq composite index fell 
10.28 to 1,591.29. 

Small -company shares .were con- 
tinuing to attract some of the money 
from the blue-chip sector, giving the 
market a mixed tone. 

Stocks started the day mostly 
lower after interest rates rose to their 
highest level since early July in the 
bond market. But bond prices re- 


covered after the Treasury met ro- 
bust demand at its auction $15.5 
billion in 2-year notes, sending long- 
term borrowing costs back down, 
easing some pressure on stocks. 

The benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond rose 6/32 to 96 14/32, taking 
die yield down to 6.65 percent from 
6.67 percent. 

Earlier, bond prices had slipped 
after the in a senes of eco- 
nomic reports suggested an increase 
in economic activity that could ag- 
gravate inflationary pressures. 

Reports from two private re- 
search groups showed gains in retail 
shifts and consumer confidence. The 
government, meanwhile, reported 
that manufacturing activity contin- 
ued at a healthy pace, and a realty 
group reported that sales of existing 
homes rose-2.2 percent in July. 

The reports came as economists 
scoured new data for clues on 
whether the economy had been ac- 
celerating. 

After nudging a key interest rate 
higher in March to protect against 


inflation, the Federal Reserve Board 
has withstood the temptation to slow 
the economy further, easing worries 
about slower company profit growth. 
With the recent pickup in business 
activity, however, investors are fear- 
ful the central bank will intervene 
again in the coming months. 

Separately, the Commerce De- 
partment reported that orders for 

ILS. STOCKS 

big-ticket durable goods fell 0.6 per- 
cent in July, Bat excluding aircraft 
and defense purchases, which can 
skew monrb-to-month numbers, the 
figures showed the economy con- 
tinuing to expand. 

Novell, the most active issue on 
the New York Stock Exchange, rose 
1 to 10 on speculation that the maker 
of network software might be 
bought hy International Business 
Machines. 

Sybase also climbed I 11/16 to 
19 3/16 amid speculation that IBM 
might be interested in acquiring the 


database software company. 

Alcoa, a major aluminum pro- 
ducer, declined after it was down- 
graded to “outperform* fr° m 
“strong buy” by analyst R- Wayne 
Atwell at Morgan Stanley, Dean 
Witter, Discover & Co. 

Aames Financial a mortgage 
loan company, declined after report- 
ing unexpectedly weak fourth- 
quarter framings and warning ana- 
lysts that profit in coming quarters 
be hurt 


could 


3 nit as more consumers 


preray their mortgages. 

C-Cube Microsystems' stock 
rose after the maker of digital video 
compression technology presented a 
new line of video and graphic de- 
coding chips. 

Clear Channel Communications 
shares rose after the operator of ra- 
dio and television stations said it 
would not buy Paxson Communi- 
cations' two professional sports 
teams and would buy fewer bill- 
boards as part of its final purchase 
pact between the companies, valued 
at $600 million. (Bloomberg . AP) 


Carlyle to Buy United Defense for $850 Million 


CmrOid bj Otr Stiff Fnm Dispaches 

CAMP HILL. Pennsylvania — 
The Carlyle Group, a closely held 
Washington, D.C. partnership, has 
agreed to buy United Defense LP, 
the maker of the Bradley fighting 
vehicle, for $850 million from the 
co-owners, Harsco Corp. and FMC 
>., the companies said Tuesday. 
Inked Defense, which also makes 
other military vehicles and weapons 
for die U.S. Army and Navy, had 
been for sale for several months. 
FMC and Harsco rejected a higher 
bid by General Dynamics Corp. that 
faced antitrust opposition. 

Two weeks ago, people familiar 




with the negotiations said General 
Dynamics had offered $1 billion for 
United Defense, its only U.S. rival 
In the armored military vehicles 
business. News reports of the talks 
prompted two federal lawmakers to 
request an antitrust review before an 
agreement was even reached. 

Carlyle Group is a leading in- 
vestor in defense and aerospace 
businesses that controls more than 
$1.8 billion in equity capital. 

“If Carlyle is the buyer, the deal 
sails right through, ” said William 
Kovacic, an antitrust law professor 
at George Mason University. 

FMC, a producer of chemicals 


and machinery for industry, gov- 
ernment and agriculture based in 
Chicago, is managing partner and 60 
percent owner of United Defense. 

Harsco, a diversified industrial 
products and services company, 
held the remaining 40 percent 

United Defense, with 5,700 em- 
ployees, is the prime contractor and 
systems integrator for the Crusader, 
the Army’s $20 billion next-gen- 
eration artillery development sys- 
tem. It was formed in 1994 by com- 
bining FMC's Defense Systems 
Group with Harsco Carporation’s 
BMY Combat Systems Division. 

Other major programs include the 


Bradley family of fighting vehicles, 
Ml B readier, and Ml 13 armored 
personnel carriers. 

Carlyle typically invests in 
companies, holds them several years, 
then sells them. Man Holt, a Carlyle 
managing director, said he expected 
die company to take the same ap- 
proach with United Defense. 

General Dynamics’ retreat from 
bidding on United Defense su gg ests 
that it will be difficult for the com- 
pany to make acquisitions because it 
races only one competitor in many 
of its key businesses, winch could 
raise antitrust issues, analysts said. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


INFLATION: Prospects of a German Rate Increase Send the Dollar Tumbling 


Continued from Page 13 

rencies, Mr. Siebert said. But on 
Tuesday, the European stock mar- 
kets bore the brunt of possibly high- 
er interest rales. 

“There is anticipation that the 
Bundesbank will pull the trigger and 
that could be the start of monetary 
tightening around Europe,” said 
Francois Langlade- Demoyen, a 
European equity strategist at Credit 
Suisse First Boston in London. 

German shares were worst hit, 
dropping almost 3 percent on Tues- 
day, with the DAK index falling 


1 12.46 points to 3,959.33, pushing 
the index well below the key chart 
level of 4,000. 

London, which was closed Mon- 
day for a bank holiday, edged down 
03 percent, or 14.80 points, to close 
at 4.886.30. 

The French CAC-40 index de- 
clined 1 percent, or 29.31 points, to 
2,869.26. 

U.S. stocks also felL (Page 14) 

Also weighing on the dollar was a 
rise in Germany’s trade surplus, 
which hit an eight-year high as a 
weak mark propelled a boom in de- 
mand for German goods. 


The weak mar k also pushed up 
the price of imports, though, fueling 
concern German rates will rise. 

The dollar’s 15 percent rise 
against the mark helped Germany's 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

trade surplus widen to 13.4 billion 
DM ($7.37 billion) from 9.8 billion 
marks in May, the Federal Statistics 
Office said. Exports surged 23.3 
percent in June from a year ago. 

The surplus was the biggest since 
June 1989, before reunification. 

Analysts had expected a June sur- 


plus of 10 billion DM. Against other 
currencies, die dollar fell against the 
yen, dragged down by its weakness 
against the mark. The U.S. currency 
fell to 118350 yen from 118.745 
yen. 

It also fell to 1 .4850 Swiss francs 
from 1.4982 francs and to 6.0550 
French francs from 6.1299 francs. 

The pound edged up to $1.6125 
from S 1.6065. 

The Canadian dollar plummeted 
to a 17-month low against its U.S. 
counterpart as traders braced for this 
week's current-account report 

( Bloomberg . Renters. AP) 


Republic 
Ends One 
War Over 
Dealers 


By Robyn Meredith 

New fort Tones Semce 

NEW YORK — It is one 
down and one to go for H. 
Wayne Hnizenga’s Republic 
Industries Inc., the largest car 
dealership owner in the United 
States. 

Republic, which has been 
feuding in the courts with the 
U.S. arm of the Toyota Motor 
Co. and with American Honda 
Motor Co., reached a prelim- 
inary agreement late Monday 
with Toyota that would allow 
Republic to buy more Toyota 
dealerships and would end lit- 
igation between Che two sides. 
The deal with Toyota came 
after more than six hours of 
meetings in Dallas. 

Neither company would dis- 
close details of the framework 
agreement. 

“We’ve agreed to agree,” 
said Nancy Hubbell a Toyota 
spokeswoman. She added dial 
both sides had given in to the 
other’s demands. 

For the last nine months. Re- 
public has been snapping up car 
dealerships with the blessing of 
many automakers eager to thin 
the ranks of their dealers and 
modernize dealerships. Toyota 
and Honda, however, have re- 
sisted. Each adopted policies 
intended to slow sales to large 
dealer groups like Republic, 
and each sued Republic when it 
refused to stop making offers to; 
buy dealers. 

Republic countersued After 
watching its share price fall by . 
nearly half this year, Mr. Huiz- 
enga accused the Japanese 
automakers of trying to drive 
down the price of Republic 
stock by creating uncertainty,. 
Republic has often used its 
stock as currency for buying 
dealerships. 

The deal announced Monday 
was reached after tire stock 
market closed Shares of Re- 
public closed up $1.8125 at 
$25.25 on Tuesday on the New 
York Stock Exchange. In June, 
the stock hit a low of 
$203125. . . 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 



Indexes 
Dow Jones 


im iw a» 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


77994* 7860.71 777061 778122 


Turns 293*85 294088 290045 291100 -27JB 
UH 231 At 233-56 231.03 73X27 +058 

corap 244448 2457.22 2432X5 343088 -19.64 


Standard & Poors 

H I M Today 

M*b Low Om 4 PM. 
Industrials 1095J8 107948 106287 107X79 
Trcrep. 674.12 66&SI 670 AO 66 246 

Unities 19&Z2 19745 196.13 19&51 

Finance 10645 105-02 10544 10160 

sp 500 nosa 917.29 92aw 97102 

SP100 90646 889.54 892*3 88429 


V*L M* 
84382 67V, 

53304 ISVi 

50540 14ft 
50710 4534 
«C3 6S*. 
47VS5 4SV» 
47076 11* 
37739 SSft 

32083 60 

36607 36% 
30345 55ft 


Urn La* 

651. 4Sft 
24ft 2Sft 
14H 14*1 

41 44*66 

urou m» 

S3V» 52=111 
23V 23 
45V 45ft 
59 » 

i26v mu 

66 6WI i 


NYSE 

Ca npjaii 
\v£ 

Tn 


Nasdaq ^ 


*42.14 

2B578 

44390 


4744# 47536 -247 

jWjg 4£6 


Nasdaq 

Onpate 

Indian** 

Bott 

E 


■■■■i 127544 
170846 169161 14*940 
I1706A4 16*699 1706.96 
207733 7019-21 2019.21 
101041 100633 100632 


isr 

InW* 

StSs 

BE** 

Ora 

wgtd. 


IS 


Mcnaffs 

MMdOt 


86753 52V 
82511 39ft 
61616 19ft 
62350 lfift 
59996 SOI 

B 

412*8 mn 
40567 3»t 



54516 

51146 

47431 


AMEX 


L~ L*. AMEX ^ 

4700 AdA 71 4U710 4. ft Ad 


*47 SQ 646J3 647 39 +QA4 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
lOPubOcUlfl 

10 Industrials 


Today 

an* Nam 

10X86 10X78 

101.25 10137 

10646 10619 


JTSCorp 

SPDR 

Ollnd 


42861 « 
39784 17r% 

!£ib 

*141 37ft 


6217 


ft ft +ft 
VII* 919* -ft 
34ft 39ft +691. 
2V. 2V. 

» 

_ . 26ft. wu» -n 

3WW SW» 30ft -V» 
32 V» 3SVk +». 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 

AAancrt 
Detuned 
Unchanged 
TaU Issues 
NraHUB 
New LOWS 

AMEX 


Unchanged 
taM issues 


313 

251 

!3 

x 

II 


Nasdaq 

Advanced 

DadJnoa 

Uncharged 

jew 

New Lows 

Market Sales 


NYSE 
Arne* 
Nasdaq 
Inmffio ns. 


1654 236V 

1617 1K» 

2101 1652 

5373 5751 

114 1*7 

63 S3 


Triday Pm. 

440 ORB. 

45X50 485X0 

2745 2444 

58X60 567.74 


Dividends 

Corapaay Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Gold Fields SA LM b JO 9-5 10-8 

Stoat SPLIT 

1 share at investor 
J16 shares held, 
spa. 

INITIAL 

Dollar Gen n - .04 9-8 9-23 

INCREASED 

Albany Fnd Q .18 9-12 IO-1 

Aoerfona Bnep Q .16 9-12 10-3 

Mayflower Co-op Q .17 9-5 9-12 

Rawn Indus O .15 9-2S 10-15 

REGULAR 

AmerBusMessni Q J315 Ml 9-15 

AmerGvt Income M .03 9-4 9-24 

AmerGvt IncPtfl M .035 9-4 9-24 


Company 
AmerlnsdMtgSS 
AmerfnsdMtg 86 
Amer Irad Mtt^BS 


Per Ami Rec Pay 


Co Vest Bncshn 
Duff Phelps CreflOt 
Fsi CoramndCp 
Fd Midwest FnU 
Fori Dearborn Inca 
Mahaska Invest 
MnMSIreetBkGfp 
Mofflndawfl 
McRae Indus 
NaftCnffSyst 
NertnCenfriBcshra 
Pocahontas Fed 
Utd Ikunrinatteg 


.10 8-31 11-3 

■07 8-31 11-3 

.10 B-31 11-3 

-03 11-3 11-17 

.13 9-5 9-15 

-06 9-30 10-15 

.10 9-15 9-30 

.03 9-5 9-1 1 

2A 9-15 10-1 

J 39 9-15 10-1 

.27 9-5 9-19 

JO 9-8 9-15 

, .14 9-S 9-26 

0 .165 9-15 9-30 
Q JJ9 9-12 9-26 

Q .09 9-5 9-16 

Q .0625 9-15 10-6 

Q -223 9-15 10-3 
Q 73 9-11 1M 


MMNj&Wpntelt amount par 
vlMi WMHfc ypayMo la Capoten tunds; 
nmoaWnq-quarterfns-seml-Bnial 


” Slade Tables Explained 


itornme hm been ppM. Itje years high-tow range and dvidend are shown forthe n 
omeiwoe noted, rales at dividends ore annual disbursements based 
est daaaranon. 


stocks 
rhe latest 

a -fflvtdsnd also extra (s). 
b - annual iota of dMOend phis stack div- 
idend. 

C - Bquftfatfng dividend. 

cc-PEwcoedsW. 

dd- colled. 

d- new yearly law, 

dd - toss In Hie kst 12 months. 

o- dlvfdend declared or paid in preceding 12 

months. 

f • annual rate, increased an km deda- 
rattofL 


p-Mtid dhridend. annual rate unknown. 
P/E - price-earnings nnto. 
q - dased-end mutual fund 

s -Sock spin. Dividend begins with date of 
swn. 

as -sates. 

!" P f *«dlng 12 

BftssKar—* ~ 


9 - dividend in CanmSan funds, subtoct to tf-itewyearfyhigh. 

15% non- residence fax. v-traSng liallea 

i - dividend declared otter spm-up or stock " " “ “Wkniptcy or receivership or being 
dividend. reorganteed under Ihe Bankruptcy Aclw 

i-tfvjdendpoldl Ws yens retried defaied or “•‘•Ponfes. 

nooeflon taken at totesUvidend meetm. *“ ‘ when.distributed 


wi- when Issued/ 
srw-witti wartonls. 


noaeSon taken gt loteskfividcnd meettoo. 
k - cfiuidend dedored or paid this yeas an 

accumutafive issue wtoi cMdends in areas, t n ^ ' ■ , , 

n - annual rate, reduced on tat dectora- nvf*? 0l [. e> ' n 9hts. 

lion, - ac-agtmiution. 

n -new issue In the past 52 weeks. The high- . 

km range begins with the skirt at trading- vld 2j? B,Klon<,M,KB, ^ ,JIL 

nd - nest day delivery. rJSftf* 


era- 

-ift 

*v* 

•'S 

% 

Jft* 

♦Mi 

-lftl 


Aug. 26, 1997 

Vftgh Low Latest Chge OpM 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT1 

&000 Du mWmuiiv- eenfs per bmM 


269ft 263ft 263ft 
273ft 267ft 267ft 
282ft 27515 276 

287 280ft 281 

290 34 284ft 

272ft 266ft 366ft 
269ft 264 264ft 


27V* Jft 
77ft 77ft -ft, 
27ft 

134W134M, -(VW 
JIM, Jllh -*» 


Sep 97 
Dec 97 
Mar 98 
May 98 
Julfe 
Sep *8 
Dec 98 

Est. stoes 70000 Mom tales 58447 
Maws open M 30X411 OP 2483 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT1 
100 tans- (tobre por ton 

Sep 97 24640 241J0 24600 -0.90 

0 <397 21480 212-70 31480 -040 

Doc 97 20170 20280 28380 -080 

Jon9B 20080 19120 1*980 -050 

MW98 19480 19150 1*450 8J0 

Moy9B 19180 192-50 19X50 -080 

Est so fts 2 1 800 Mows rafts 19894 
Mtm open Int 109867, off 981055 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT1 


Tb 3150* 
-Sty 181141 
-8ft 46367 
8 11.941 
-8ft 1X293 
-6ft 1886 
-5ft 10468 


Mgh Lm> Latest Chge Oplnl 

GRANGE JUICE CNCT7C 
15800 Bis.- cents per to. 

Sep 97 67 J5 67 JO 67^0 -020 7,920 

Nov *7 69.90 6980 69 JS -025 11951 

Jon 98 7280 7280 72JD -020 X438 

Ms *8 75.90 7580 75 JS -030 *271 

Est sales ILA. Mem rales 1725 
Mom open kit 3*481 eff 475 


COLDMCMX) 


Metals 


laotroy m._. dollars ps bw 


21852 

17339 


0159 

■L622 

6655 


33680 32480 325JO 
Sep 97 32680 

Oct 97 32X70 32580 32780 

Dec 97 330J0 32730 32*80 
FWl 98 332.10 37970 33070 
Apr 98 33100 33260 33260 
Jim 98 33470 33380 33470 
Aug *8 336.90 

Oct 98 339 JO 

EsL sales NA. Mam scries 9.814 
Mars epwi Int 201 J32, off 1^22 

HI GRADE COPPER CNCilMO 
25800 tote- ants per to 


-1.10 K 
*0.90 2 

t<X90 16120 
4-180 111459 
-180 14922 
-180 5J93 

-0.90 78*3 

*0.90 1121 

-O.90 Jll 


6X000 bs- cents per lb 




Sap 97 

101 JO 

9940 

9980 

+0-20 

1*971 

Sap 97 

*2-76 

2240 

2245 

-X32 

1*225 

00 97 

10X70 

9980 

9«.90 

+X20 

1132 

Od 97 

2194 

2237 

2245 

-03B 

1*700 

Nov 97 

99.15 

99.15 

99.15 

*0.05 

1320 

Dae 97 

2X32 

2288 

22.91 

-041 

39.102 

Dec 97 

10X25 

9X70 

9885 

-085 

1*853 

Jan to 

2147 

2110 

2X10 

-0.42 

9,1 to 

Jan 98 



VX4J 

•0J5 

744 

Mar 98 

2X70 

2132 

2340 

-040 

*573 

Fab 98 

9X50 

9X45 

9845 

*085 

701 

May to 

2X80 

2149 

2X49 

-046 

2J75 

Mot to 

9X50 

97-75 

97 JS 

-030 

2.783 

Est sides 19800 Mam sate 1*229 


Apr 98 

9880 

9*9S 

9735 

-045 

502 


MOWS open tot 89,739. off 10X256 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

5800 bu ntobnum- certs per buchol 
Sep 97 its 657ft 662ft -ft 12812 

Nov *7 619 612ft 615ft -4ft 82866 

Jon 90 630ft 614ft 616ft -Oft 1X032 

Mar98 628 623 624ft -5ft 7875 

May 90 634 630 631ft -4 5928 

Est sales 31X000 Mom soles 2781 4 
Atom open Inf 13*959, off 1,240 

WHEAT K80T1 

5000 bu minlaium- amti par bvshef 


5ep97 

366ft 

363 

364 

-1ft 

16800 

Dec 97 

382 

378ft 

379 

-1ft 

6X374 

Mar 98 

393 

389 

390ft 

-Ift 

17,250 

Mayto 

394 

391 

392 

-3 

1209 


Est soles 1X000 Atom soles 1X000 
Mem open ttrt 1. ad 106475 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

40000 lbs.- cents pa to 
Oct 97 69.15 6840 68.97 *025 

Dec *7 70.40 7012 7047 +0.15 

Feb 90 7285 7140 7280 *022 

Apr 98 7*72 7*35 7*62 +015 

JWI9B 71 JO 71.10 71.40 *012 

Altg 98 71 JO 70.90 70.90 +085 

Est. pries 1 1.293 Mam ides 0169 
Mom <pen mi 916*7, up 23 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

50000 to*- cents per to 
Aug 97 81.10 E080 81.00 +017 

Sep 97 81 15 8035 80.92 +047 

Oct 97 8080 80 JM B0J5 +0.62 

No* 97 8170 80.95 81^0 +060 

Jaa*8 8235 1180 8227 *057 

A6ar*B 8200 8135 11.97 *057 

Est scries 3058 Mom sales 2895 
Mom open W 21 J41 off 1 76 

HOC&-LM* (CMER) 

40800 lbs.- cents pa lb. 

Od 97 7040 68.97 6935 -157 

Dec 97 6780 66.17 6660 -1.17 

Feb 98 6655 65J5 6572 1.17 

Are» «85 6200 6220 062 

Junto 67*5 67.00 67.12 045 

Ejrt sales 9,984 Mom ides 1550 
Mom open krt 313*8. up 2 1 6 

PORK BE LUES (CMER) 

RW00 tos.- conta per to. 

Aug*7 B9J0 8682 8582 -180 

FebW 7145 6885 6885 -100 

Mar to 71 as 68.10 68.10 -100 

&L ados 2208 Mam sates 1.007 
Mom open ini *251 o« 211 


48.125 

21536 

11.780 

S6A 

awe, 

691 


1777 

1759 

*246 

*147 

2263 

1,197 


■Alla 

6,746 

1058 

U12 


157 

1618 

311 


on COCOA (NCSE) 


Food 


Ions- Spar km 
1438 1575 

1411 

♦ 38 

UW2 

<655 

1596 

1453 

*» 

37.+90 

Irifll 

1630 

1680 

+35 

7*838 

1702 

1451 

1700 

♦35 

12.388 

1717 

1668 

1717 

+ 35 

2,532 

1736 

1685 

1736 

+35 

*175 


Sep *7 
Dec 97 
Mar 98 
May to 
tulto 
Sep 98 

Est. totes NA Mom sates *308 
Man open lid W861 Off 300 

COFFEE CDU3E) 

27300 lb*.- cents par lb. 
sap*7 178.75 17180 178.15 +115 

Dec W 16880 15900 16*40 +S73 

Mar to 15380 14880 15250 +A3S 

MfljW 14*75 14280 14675 +385 

Jrito 141 80 13X50 141 JO *160 

&sl. series NA Mam nries 1,836 
Mom open dill 780X up 1 03 

SVCARWORLD II (NC5E) 

V 12800 bs.- cants per to. 

0097 11 B0 11,63 11.79 *013 

213 n*3 12H *tt|g 

* 1287 11.90 1206 *015 

11.94 11.7* 11.94 *0.1 S 

EsL sa les NA Man sales 10877 
Mwrs open Im 702141, up 882 


1.000 
10 OK 
4041 
1,290 
1801 


9136? 

69355 

1*578 

iai63 


EsL sales N A. Atom sales 9499 
Man open bit 47871, up 59S 

SILVER (NCMX) 

1000 boy to.- cents per tray or. 

Aug 97 465 40 +*60 24 

Sep 97 46*50 46080 465.70 *4J0 3X122 

Od 97 46930 **40 78 

Dec*7 47X50 46580 47240 **30 32752 

An to 47*00 47200 47480 *430 20 

Mar 98 479 JO 47680 479.20 *4.30 11,226 

May 98 48*50 48350 48350 *430 2078 

Jul 98 48780 +430 2126 

Est. sdes NA Atom sales \?ASi 
Man open In* 8*83* off 1876 

PLATINUM CNMER) 

50 troy at- dotare per tray a* 

Od 97 41X00 «Q80 40460 -380 10307 

Jan *8 40280 39780 39X60 -250 2654 

Apr 98 40080 39X10 39210 -380 431 

Jut 98 38910 -380 2 

Erl. scries N A Mam sales 73S 
Mom open hit 1139* up 107 


Oos* 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
Denars per metric tan 
*' (HM Grade) 

178000 171580 
1659.00 166080 
(HM Grade 
221300 221680 
2IW80 219500 


tsu* 


Lsed 

Spot 


167180 167200 
I6269j 1677ft 


217280 217200 
216100 216280 


628ft 

63880 


629ft 

63980 


61380 

62480 


61480 

63580 


654500 655580 
664080 665080 


S £Ura 

Tin 

Spot 542080 543080 
rawN 546580 547080 
Ztec (Special Mgh Grade) 
Spol 168580 148X00 
Forward 148X00 149000 


655580 656500 
665200 665*00 


SU580 534580 
538580 539500 


166480 166880 
148400 148600 


Hig» Lira Otnc Oige OpM 

Rnancial 

U5T BILLS (CMER) 

SI mnan- ptr at TOO pet 
Sv*7 9*91 9489 94.90 uneh. 6976 

9480 9*79 94.79 unch. 2.2B7 

Mar to 9*71 9*71 94.70 4101 1838 

Erl. scries 904 Man sates *28 
Mom open Int 1O301. off Si 


SVR TREASURY (CBffn 
Sioaaio prin- ptr & 64VIS atioo pa 
Sop to 106*5 10628 10640 + ffl 175076 

Dec 97 10627 10611 10671 * 01 47J85 

Est scries 75000 Man* wries 50.994 
Matrs open tel 21a36l, off *33? 

’fYRTBEASUKYCCBOT) 

SlOOJDOpnn- pts A32ndso1 100 pd 

10 »-' 4 l»-2S *02 775832 

"2 IS"! 7 10M3 108-14 ♦ 03 11ZJS3 

Mar98 I084M I0B4D 10603 *04 *997 

Esl. sales 1 30.000 Mom sales 9*013 
Mom open int 3WX252, Oh 1 7.376 

bonds <cbot j 

4 of IW pen 

1 tJW 111-2* 115-19 *05 446,939 

11212 111.14 11241; -S 99^ 

^ 111-31 Ill-U 1.1-28 *Ss ££ 

111-15 *05 2588 

Em 5alg ^ ? tffil0 sates 271.914 
Mom open Irrt 58239* off 32 m/ 

LONG GILT (UFFE) 

00.000 pis i ^5 ot 108 pd 

r2« "‘*•15 114-01 1(4-14 *00*141948 

D-C97 11404 1,3-77 114414 -5To %'!£ 

Est. scries. 95470 Prev. sates ni -u i 
Prev. open art. iTX+os up 471^^* 

GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFFE) 

DM2SD800 - pis a( 100 pci 

Sep to 10220 10175 107.15 *0te5*ncin 

Dec97 10IJ0 100 90 101* *5i) ’lln? 
EsI Hrios. 191.384 ftev. sates 702900 
Ptr* open ml.. 7*1733 m | 6 1 


High Low Urieri Chge OpM 

10-YEA R FRENCH GOV. BONOS (MATIF) 

FFSOaOOO-ptsollOOpct 

Sep to 12X74 119J8 12958 +X12 15X021 

Dec 97 9X70 9X30 9X56 *0-17 15070 

Mar 98 9780 9780 9786 +0-12 . 0 

Est. sides: 109805. 

Open kit: 173891 off 236. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 

1TL 200 nUBan - pti <ri HD pd 
Sep 97 13599 13516 135*4 -0J5 92906 
Dec to 10X10 107.41 10784 -0J2 2289 
EsL sales: 52872 Pie*, ales: 52668 
Prev.apwiM.: 115444 off 2582 

LIBOR 1-MONTH (CMER) 

S3 mDBon- pis ailOO pa. 

Sep to 9*35 9*34 9435 unch. 15967 

Odto 9*32 WJ1 9*32 unch. 2043 

Nov to 94J7 9*26 9*27 WKh. 7J74 

EsL sales 1,925 Mam sates 927 
Atom open kit 39.1 62 up 1 7 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI mltion-pttallOOpcl 
Sep 97 94J7 94JS 9*25 uneh. 47X405 

Odto 9*17 9*16 9*17 uneh. *688 

Dec 97 9488 9*04 9*07 unch. 42608 

Mar 98 9198 9193 91to uneh. 35*244 

Junto 9187 9180 9185 unch. 279811 

Sap 98 9177 9170 9175 undl 21X676 

Doc 98 9X64 9159 9163 unch 1B9A32 ' 

Mar 99 9162 9157 9161 undt 13X512 

Jun 99 9157 93152 9156 uneh. 10219b 

Sep 99 9383 9149 9153 unch. 8*640 

Dec 99 9146 9141 9144 unch. 74192 

AtarOO 9145 9140 9344 *081 65265 

E*t softs 44*386 Atom rates 185943 
Mam open Ini 2791,4711 off 163 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

62500 pounds, S per pound 

Sep 97 1-6224 1-6036 18088+08032 47.557 

Dec 97 18118 1.6000 18000+0.0032 7,326 

Mar 98 1J964+08032 208 

EsI. sales &9M Atom sides *016 

Mom open kit 49,122 off 1801 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100000 dollars, S par Cdn «r 
Septo .7202 .7176 J179-08017 61121 

Decto .7236 -7717 .7216-08017 5811 

Mar to .7255 .7250 7245-08017 726 

Ed. sates 1656 Mam sales *993 
Atom open Krt m 1 21 up 754 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

125000 man* s per mart. 

-55® -S«k 5574+08074 P9JS9 

Decto 8619 5535 5606+0.0074 \c«n 

Morto -5642 55*0 5637+00074 1531 

EsL sates 3*126 Mam sates 20B88 
Mom open bu 10*60* up ns 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

115 raUanym. S per 100 yen 

Sep 97 -8525 .8443 8488*08048 82211 

Dec 97 8620 8560 8599+08048 2741 

Mar to 8715+0.0049 S7B 

EsL sates 1X235 Mom sates 21036 

Mom open mi 85539, up 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

1 25000 hones. S par Irene 
Sep to 6785 5648 8753*08064 51348 

Decto 5838 5760 5823+08065 1243 

Mar 98 5892+08066 1456 

Est. sates 16589 Mam sates 11.200 
Mom open ini 55757. up 551 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

SDQ400 peso* S purpose 

Sep 97 .17780 .12742 .12762 -.00071 21.929 

Decto .12280 12250 .12265 -.00065 1*702 

Mar 98 .11822 .11795 .11800-80142 5821 

Est. sate *4*2 Mom rates 1873 

Mam open M 4*36* up 95 


3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

£300800 phot 100 pd 
Sep to 92.71 9759 9270 Unch. 110462 

DecW *155 *251 9254 UiKh 1 27 JOS 

Mar to 9252 9758 9251 Undl. 10*298 

Junto 9255 9250 9253 Undl. 7M78 

Sep to *259 9155 9159 *081 55745 

D9C9B 9286 9252 9156 +082 49870 

92.66 9170 +081 39,981 

Junto 92.72 9259 9172 *OD1 32279 

£si. safes: 35801 Prev. sates: 76.787 
pre». open inr_ 55*712 up 11,784 

3-MONTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

DM1 nriNon - pis ot 100 pet 

srato 9664 96 eO 9652 +081 24X217 

3 d 07 S t H- 9tiS ' , ■ 0 ■ 0, ‘- ra 
NX N.T. 9*52 +aoi 150 

9636 9540 +0.01 292779 

!*-3 ’ 61B H3i +0.01 27X226 

JwW 96 08 9593 9501 —0.01 711750 

95 0 9579 —082 16*071 

Decto *5 to 9550 *SS5 —083 151531 

Mar99 95 42 95.33 9536 —083125280 
Ed. sales. 356.79? Prev. sides; 20X885 
Pm Open in).: liioJt .2 & I4 . IM 

J-MONTH PIBOR (MATIF) 

FF5 mil ion pit al 1® pd 

%S1 601984 

9631 *004 44999 
2* 2513 * 083 2950? 

9*« 95.98 96.04*081 2X773 
«94 9584 9588-082 29,225 
95*5 9158 - 087 27,197 
9535 9548 9551 —001 7* 7 1 13 

9519 95 19 9531 -002 *53? 


Dec 97 
Mar 98 
Junto 
Sep to 
Decto 
Ma> 99 
Junto 
Scpto 

EsI. sate: 6*682 
Open Ini 7eao»up249. 


High Law LaM Chge OpM 

1-MONTH EURO LIRA aiFFEL 
ITL1 mlBan-ptsoflMpd 
Sep 97 9X30 9122 9126 Unch. 9X474 

Dec 97 9X44. 9151 9157 -084 9X5T1 

Mar to 9X95 9X80 9X87 — (LOS. 53*508 

Junto 9*20 9487 9*13 —085 4*349 

Sep 98 9*34 9*20 9*21 -085 37,197 

Decto 9*39 9*26 94X3 —084 2X541 

Mar 99 9*32 9*20 9*25 -OOS 1&0B4 

EsL sates 61,197. Prev.ides 4*925 
Prev. open Mj 385870 19 1215 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 OlCTK 
syxn t».- ewits pw bl 
O d 97 7190 7285 7X27 -OB3 7.257 

Dec 97 7325 7240 7285 -0J0 41891 

Mix 98 7*50 7X95 7*12 -OJ3 12340 

Atoyto 7530 7*77 74.95 -0147 SHM 

JlriW 7*20 7540 7X60 -065 &U0 

EsL rate NJL Atom sates K498 
Mom open Int 8X12* up 531 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 

S 428M gat cente per 5^ 22J98 

W 5X45 5235 5285 -088 42J78 

MW97 5*45 5X70 5190 8.08 2X415 

• Dec97 5581 5*75 5*95 -083 20535 

Jan to 56J0 SSjSB 5585 +082' ttJM 

Febto 5635 5*00 5680 +087 8893 

Mix to 5680 5550 5X75 +047 7275 

EsL sdes N A AAam wrias 6X737 
Mam open Ire 151900, up 529 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) ■ 

1800 bbL- dQBan perbM. 

Od97 1942 19.16 19J0 +4)8210*440 

Nov 97 1984 1932 1941 +4UM 4S6S9 

1?*7 1945 1933 +884 48.171 

SJ2 I?- 47 19-50 19-59 +a(M 2&630 

19 jo 1942 1982 +4)84 1*117 
Mar 98 19JD 1982 1983 +004 9,967 

EsI. sales N A. Mam sates 11X8S3 
Mom open Int 397811, up X43 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

1O000 ram btu% s per nan btu 
SM97 2-560 2-405 2314*8825 2*571 

OdW 2350 2^60 230+08)3 5X205 

Nov 97 2480 2400 2440 +4L017 1*984 

Dec 97 2385 2.725 Z74S +0810 19339 

Jpnto 2-795 2-740 2345 +41802 19877 

Febto 2490 2340 2345 4)805 13437 

EsL serin N a. Mom solas 61319 
Mom open Oil 221 450 off S378 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

42.0to gob cents par ool 
Sap97 6*70 6110 6181 -060 2G931 

Oct 97 59,20 5X50 5X91 -0.29 3*75 5 

NOV 97 5*90 56.10 5640 -810 11046 

Dec 97 5*25 SS4S 56.10 +085 11420 

Jcm9B 5630 5530 56.05 +0.13 11309 

Febto 5640 *8.18 1442 

Mreto 5630 +0.18 *717 

Apr to 5945 +0-28 2438 

Esi solas NA. Moira sate* 4X927 
Atom open m 10*077, off 4446 

GASOIL OPE) 

U -S- arikm per metric Ian- lots ot 100 tons 
■jep97 14*50 162JO 16380 — 1J5 19331 
Dd 97 16630 16430 16535 —130 1&227 

JJw97 16X25 166.75 16735 —150 9801 

DacJJJ 170.25 16X50 16980 —330 l*to8 
to 171.75 17X25 17035 —335 9473 

to 171J5 17X75 17X50 —200 3394 
Mar to 17050 16930 16930 -250 

EsL sates: 2X200 . Prev. sates: 20475 
Piev. open «_■ B*678 up 1979 


Stock indexes 

SP COMP INDEX (CMER) 

SDOvlmtex 

Sep97 92*00 91280 91730 -585 181 
O'*” J3S80 92480 92*75 *30 1* 
War 98 94*50 94125 943J5 -XI 5 2. 
EsL sates N A. Mans sales 57875 
Mom open Im 20X54* off 13 

FT5E 100 (UFFE) 

£25 per Mex point 

4WM1 +7 -° 49r 
Doc 97 49918 4921.0 49708 +68 7J 
Mar98 n.t N.T 50150 *6.0 1, 
Est. sates: 941 X Prev. sate: 1X420 
Prev open Wj 78.23+ up a8 

CAC« (MATIF) 

FF200 per Iwtex point 

Awg97 29110 283*0 28618-278 33. 
Sap 97 2920.0 2847.0 2868.0 - 388 2* 
P* 97 29268 29003 28913 — 3X5 
Mar TO 29178 29158 29)88 — 378 9, 
EsL sale* 55 18* 

Open bit; 7X1 16 up 1,04* 


Commodity indexes 

Base Previous 
MoalYs 137180 1371.70 

Reulere NJL 189540 

DJ.Fuhires 149.16 

CSB 23749 23734 

Mafft Assaekileti Pmss. London ' 
inriFinonad Futons Exchange, Inn 
Petroleum Ercbo/ige. 


J, 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1997 


Stork’s Net 
Rises 62°/o 9 

Lifted by 
New Units 

Bloomberg News 

NAARDEN. Netherlands — 
Stork NV, a Dutch maker of 
industrial machinery, said 
Tuesday that first-half profit 
rose 62 percent, aided by the 
inclusion of its Fokker units, 
which were not part of the com- 
pany a year earlier. 

Net income rose to 65.4 miJ- 
Uon guilders (S3 1.9 million) in 
* 7 ? ended June 30, from 
40.4 million guilders in the half 
ended June 15, 1996. 

Operating profit rose 75 per- 
cent to 96 million guilders on 
sales of 2.08 billion guilders, up 
from 1.41 billion in the vear- 
earlier period. 

The company, which bought 
the aircraft services and tech- 
nology units of the bankrupt 
airplane maker Fokker NV in 
July 1996. said their addition 
lifted operating profir. 

Stork amended its accounting 
methods to report a 12-month 
period, rather than 13 four-week 
periods. This means the first 
half is now 26 weeks, not 24 
weeks as in last year's figures. 

“The extra two weeks made 
something of a difference." 
said Joost van Beek of Kempen 
& Co. “The Fokker thing is a 
one-off, and there will presum- 
ably be na impact of acqui- 
sitions for the first half of next 
year. The numbers are basically 
an overstatement of develop- 
ments on a full-year basis.** 

The company forecast a 
“strong- rise in full -year net 
and earnings per share, without 
being more specific. 

Stork’s shares finished up 
3. 10 guilders, at 85.7. 

Fokker Aviation helped lift 
the operating profit of the com- 
pany’s industrial-components 
unit, which rose to 25 million 
guilders from 9 million. 

Stork is reorganizing and di- 
vesting its foreign installation 
and assembly business, which it , 
said had posted a “consider- 
able” loss. 


EUROPE 

Hoechst Sheds Rugby Generic-Drug Unit 


C-ntiU t* On- Suri r,. ,i, [»w 

NEW YORK — Hoechst Marion 
Roussel said Tuesday that it would 
sell its Rugby Group generic-drug 
unit to Watson Pharmaceuticals Inc 
of the United States. 

The U.S. unit of Hoechsi AG 
which still owns three other makers 
of generic drugs Arthur H. Cox in 
Britain. Berk in Japan and Copley 
Pharmaceutical Inc. tn the United 
States — has decided to focus more 
narrowly on brand-name drugs, said 
Peter Ladell. chief operating officer. 

■"Die decision io divest Rugby is 
consistent with our company 's near- 
and long-term global strategy,'* he 
said. 

Generic drugs are drugs on which 
the patent has expired, which means 
the maker loses exclusive manu- 
facturing righis. Generic drags can 
then be produced by competing 
companies. 

Price erosion for generic drugs in 
the United Stales in the past two 


years, legal woes at CopJev and the 
desire to focus efforts on developing 
so-called blockbuster drugs have 
prompted Hoechst to step up its ef- 
forts to get out of generics, said Sven 
Borho of Mehta &. isaly. 

/‘Direct participation in the gen- 
eric-drug business is not pan of our 
core business strategy," Mr. Ladcli 
said, "which is to discover and de- 
velop novel, branded pharmaceut- 
ical therapies for important human 
illnesses and make them widely and 
rapidly available to patients.'* 

In Frankfurt, shares in Hoechst 
AG fell 4.75 percent, or 3.45 
Deutsche marks, to 69.15 DM 
i$37.89). 

Watson will pay 570 million ini- 
tially, with additional payments 
based on future operating results. 
Other terms were not disclosed. 

Besides acquiring Rugby, which 
is based in Georgia, Watson also is 
buying the company's applications 
for new generic drugs, which in- 


clude several licensed products. 

Rueby had 1996 sales to phar- 
macies of $307.4 million, down 
from $401.7 million in 1995, and 
would be ranked 38th among Amer- 
ican drugrnakers according to IMS 
America. Watson had 1996 sales of 
S 142.9 million, a 97 percent in- 
crease over 1995 sales. 

Hoechst is also expected to jettison 
its beleaguered Copley division. The 
company paid $55 a share, or S546 
million, for a majority stake in Co- 
pley and has watched the share price 
plunge to about $6.50 this week. 

In May. Copley pleaded guilty to 
federal criminal charges for falsi- 
fying drug reports to the Food and 
Drug Administration and agreed to 
pay a $10.7 million fine, the largest 
ever for a generic-drug company. 

"The Copley division will be 
sold." said Hem ant Shah, an in- 
dependent pharmaceutical industry’ 
analyst. "That's been a real disaster 
for Hoechst ’ ' 


The acquisition of Rugby will 
nearly double Watson's" generic 
product line and expand its new 
product list with six approved gen- 
eric drugs. 

(Reuters. AP, AFX. Bloomberg) 
■ Bertelsmann Sells Italy Unit 

Bertelsmann AG said Tuesday 
that it had agreed to sell Carriere 
Holding Industriale SpA, an Italian 
paper producer, to an investor group. 
Reuters reported from GuetersloL 
Germany. No price was disclosed. 

Bertelsmann said it was pulling 
out of the paper business to con- 
centrate on its core media activities. 

The group buying Caniere is led 
by the British investment firm CVC 
Capital Partners and includes the 
management of Carriere. 

Carriere employs 600 workers at 
a plant in Italy and distribution units 
in Germany. England and France. It 
has annual sales of about 400 mil- 
lion DM. 


UBS to Buy German Private Bank 


Biin>iiih t -ii News 

ZURICH — Union Bank of 
Switzerland said Tuesday that it was 
buying the German private bank 
Schroeder Muenchmever Hengst 
Co. for 350 million Deutsche marks 
($192.4 million) m a bid to increase 
its most profitable unit and expand 
in Germany. 

Switzerland’s biggest bank will 
buy a 90 percent stake in the Ham- 
burg-based money manager from 
Lloyds TSB Group PLC of Britain 
for about f 100 million (5160.7 mil- 
lion). and acquire the remainder 
from the German bank’s partners. 


The purchase comes as banks and 
insurers worldwide seek the steady 
earnings streams of money man- 
agement. The chief executive, 
Mathis Cabiallavetta. had said since 
assuming his post Iasi year ihat UBS 
would buy a money manager. 

UBS's private banking and asset 
management unit accounts for about 
half of the company’s total earnings, 
which rose 67 percent to 1 .86 billion 
francs ( $ 1 .24 billion ) in the first half 
and are expected to swell to a record 
3 billion francs for the full year. 

"It makes sense that they are do- 
ing something in rhis area.” said 


Lorenz Reinhard, a fund manager at 
Bank Julius Baer & Co. AG in 
Zurich. "We've waited a long time 
for this, and it’s the first step in the 
right direction." 

'Earlier this year. UBS was re- 
ported to be in talks to purchase 
Scudder, Stevens & Clark Inc., but 
the Chicago-based money manager 
was later snapped up by Zurich In- 
surance Co. for about $1.67 billion 
in cash and stock. 

UBS shares slipped 15 francs to 
1.485. in a failing market. Lloyds 
shares fell 6 pence to close at 719 
pence. 


ING Renews Pursuit of a US. Brokerage 


Gnft Ifdtn Our Sijff Ftm PnjvfcVj 

NEW YORK — Internationale Nederlanden Groep 
NV is considering buying an American brokerage firm 
and is in talks with several investment banks, including 
Furman Selz Inc., people close to the companies said 
Tuesday. 

ING, the biggest Dutch financial-services company, 
bought Barings PLC in 1995. But it was unable to buy an 
American securities firm despite talks with Montgomery 
Securities. Dillon, Read & Co. and Oppenheimer & Co. 

“ING simply wants to be here,” said Robert Tortor- 
iello, a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Stein & Hamilton, a 
New York law firm. “They have a securities subsidiary 
that isn’t that big a player." 


The price being discussed for Furman Selz is around 
$300 million, according to a media report that cited 
people fa miliar with the situation. 

ING in Amsterdam refused comment on the report. 
Executives at Furman Selz also refused to comment 

ING has said it wants to expand in the United States 
to get a piece of the Si 00 billion a year in revenue 
generated by the American securities industry. It lost 
out in May when Swiss Bank Corp. bought Dillon Read 
for $600 million. 

Furman Selz — a firm of about 700 employees that 
specializes in investment banking for health care, me- 
dia. and shipping companies — * ‘would fir rhe bill ” for 
ING. Mr. Tortoriello said. (Bloomberg. AFX) 


Improved Sales 
Lift Telia’ s Net 
In First Half 

Bloomberg News 

STOCKHOLM — Telia AB. 
the Swedish telecommunica- 
tions company, said Tuesday 
that net profit increased 1 2 per- 
cent in die first half as a rise in 
sales and lower financial losses 
outweighed lower margins. 

Profit rose to 1.00 billion 
kronor ($126.2 million) from 
895 million kronor in the first 
half of 1996. 

The state-owned company is 
considering a sale of shares to 
the public to prepare for the 
increased competition that will 
accompany full deregulation of 
the European Union's telecom- 
munications markets, sched- 
uled for next year. 

"Competition continues to 
pressure prices on telecom ser- 
vices." Chief Executive Lars 
Berg said. * ‘Profitability must 
endure yet more pressure in the 
short term because of restruc- 
turing.” 

Sales rose 10 percent to 
22.51 billion kronor. Gross 
margins fell to 26.2 percent 
from 28.3 percent in the year- 
earlier period. 


PAGE IS 



| 

Frankfurt 

. London 

■ Paris 


PAX 

. FTSE 100 Index \CAC 40.* 



I i?tt1 - 




*116 .. 



. 4200 

-jRf'5000 — - 

jlA 3,m 

JL 


? . 4800 

Kf 2950 

n \ 

3600- — ^ 

— m- —p 

fV--. 2800 n 

r 

: ^w-AM- 

— - m rJ- 

TTa «mVm 

2650iW/lf 

T7 A ZSOO'firSh vT 

j J A 

1937 

1997 

1997 

Exdrange - 

Index • 

•Tuesday Prev. 

% 


Oose • • Close Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX . 

903.44 922.19 * 

■ZOQ 

Brussels 

BEL-za... * 

2^341 JB2 2.36034 

*051 

Fiankfurt 

DAX .. '* 

3^59.33 4^71.79 

*2.76 

[ Copenhagen stock M&ket ■ .. 

627.31 631.13 

*0.63 

HetetnkT .'• 

h^Gensral , 

3^80.08 3.423.37 

-1.41 

Oslo ‘ 

cm ; * ' 

.676.® ; 680:16 . 

~03? 

London ’ 

r'FTSEW 

488&30 Am JO 


Madrid • 

Stock Extaiange 

580,14 585.84. 

'0.99 

Milan ' 

- MiBTEL. 

: ‘.14160 *14282; 

-0.65' 

Parle. - 

CACAO 

2^69.26 2,898^57 

-1.01 

Stockholm - 

SX 16 . 

3^52.15 3,380.12 

-0.83 

Vienna 

ATX 

1,33149 t ,329.89 

+0.11 

Zurich 

SPl 

3,467.70 3,531,35 

-1£Q 


Source: Talekurs InvrrnalK-nal Herald Titowu- 


Very briefly: 


• South Africa's economy expanded 2.5 percent on an an- 
nualized basis in the second quarter, compared with a 1 
percent contraction in the first quaner. But the government 
revised downward its growth forecast for 1997 to 2.2 percent 
from 2.9 percent. The economy grew 3.1 percent in 1996. 

• Asiana Air loc. of South Korea said it had concluded a final 
contract with Airbus Industrie for the purchase of six planes, 
the manufacturer said. The order is worth about 5700 million 
based on catalogue prices. Asiana until now has had a fleet 
totally made by Boeing Co. 

• Alusuisse-Lonza Holding AG said that first-half net profit 
rose by a lower-than -expected 7.7 percent, to 223 million 
Swiss francs (S 148.7 million) and that results had been 
restrained by its chemicals unit, where profit fell 19 percent. 

• Italy’s balance of payments showed a surplus of 12.13 
trillion lire ($6.82 billion) in July compared with a deficit of 
323 billion lire a year earlier. 

• Denmark unveiled its draft budget for 1998, showing a 
surplus in state accounts for the first time in a decade and 
predicting sound economic growth. 

• Jyske Bank A/S, Denmark's founh-largest bank, stud net 
income rose to 498 million kroner ($71.8 million) in the first 
half, up 35 percent from a year earlier, as gains on investments 
surged and losses on bad debt felL 

• British Telecommunications PLC said it would invest 
£9.1 million ($14.6 million) to build a telephone sales op- 
eration in southwest Belfast, creating 750 jobs. 

• European Group Newspapers bought the title and assets of 
the newspaper U.K. Sunday Business “for a nominal fee” and 
said it planned to launch a new title "in the near future.” 

• Reed Elsevier PLC declined to comment on reports that it 
was considering the sale of its consumer magazine operations. 
Analysis estimated they were worth £750 million to £800 

million. Retuers. Bloomberg. AFX. Bridge News 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Itaesday; Angr46^ — 

Prices in tocoi currencies. ' 

Telekurs 

High Low Close Prey. 


High- -Low - Oom Rm. . 


msterdam 


AEX Imtec 90144 
Piwrtoc 1:922.19 

N-AMH0 45 JO 41,10 4220 4380 

)0fl 160 15110 15180 19920 

3d 55® 5170 54 55® 

io Nobel 342 334 331*0 338 

in Co. 143 JO 133® i 34-70 14Z50 

S Wesson 39.30 37 JO 38.10 3180 

View 100 B 0 99 JO «9-50 100 

rtfsdtePW 108* I as 105.10 JOB 

PA 204.90 19450 195 JW 

evier 31JQ 3810 31.10 30.90 

flsAmer B5J0 MJO 83-10 B4S0 

rones *350 4130 6320 *80 

I roc rvn 99.90 57 JO 58 *0 

jenwytr IK® 100 101 JO 104 

reken 333-50 320 321 330 

vpwmscra 130J0 12430 12520 129 

Doud 


Deutsche Bonk 11020 10720 10880 112-35 

DeulTetotom 3925 37.55 3840 3870 

Dresdnet Bank 74.10 7110 7110 73*0 

Fresenhis 338 326 330 33S 

Fresen lus Med 13520 133 13320 137 

Fried Kimrp 3U 352 358 34120 

Gehe 10820 106-10 106*0 10820 

155 145 145 153 

97-31 9170 95 10020 

455 455 *55 450 


SA Breweries 
Somancw 
Sasoi - 
SB1C 
Tiger Oars 


Midribs Z ml 
Henkel pfd 
HEW 
HocMfef 
Hoechst 
Kmsfodt 
Lohmeyer 
Unde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 
Mramesmanfl 
MetoOgaicUsehafl 


fDoutfas 

Group 

A 

3 BT 
AcydGp 

riOO 
Grinten 
Ips Elec 
rarara 
dstodHdg 


I evo 

tainfr 


MS KIOTO 


9030 85 87 90 ® 

95 90.70 9190 9160 
7520 *9*0 71 74.80 

4620 44 45.10 45.80 

7820 7*50 .75 77.20 

6140 6190 63 65 

338 324.10 324.10 336 

25720 24270 24650 250 

151E0 146.90 1 48 JO 15120 

113.90 109 11160 113 

82*0 77.60 80 Bl-50 

195 19190 19320 196.40 
6320 6120 63*0 63*0 
197 19520 19550 19820 
117.20 11540 11540 117J0 

108.90 105 10520 10510 

446*0 43510 438*0 4*320 
10520 103 105 106 

46 43 44.10 4520 

258 246.10 25120 254*0 


Preussag 
RWE 
SAPpfd 

SGLQrtofi 

Siemens 
Sponger (Axel) 
Soedzucter 
Thgssen 

VEW 

Vtag 

VtfksMigen 


BCD 

B A0 

8* 

082 

421 

416 

417* 421J0 

100.10 

9630 

9fl.ro 

100.20 

572 

572 

STJ 

574 

795 

778 

7» 

BOO 

1317 

1297 

1305 

1317 


ng*ok 

MSp m IS m m 

gTTitri B* 24.75 2125 2425 23.75 

Up lor 334 316 314 

tonWllF 574 560 560 572 

Ssta 3825 3320 3320 37 

£S&f 4 '§ m lj 

tomm 108 99 100 109 


Helsinki 

ErtsoA 
Hutdamoki I 
Kem'tro 
Kesko 
Merita A 

Metro B 

Meftp-SerioB 
Neste 
Nokia A 
Onon-Yhtvmae 
Outokumpu A 
UPMKymmene 

Vo I met 


Hong Kong 


Asia 

Cnthay Pacific 
Clwmgtow 
CKlnfrastrod 


China Ltohl 

GHcPadft 


’o Our Readers _ 

Qoo Haw 8k 43.90 4220 42® 4460 

5ue to technical problems ****** Ajg 

the source, the Bombay Hongseogs*. i«® its to® ioa® 
:k prices were not avail- 


UeLjOfl 


BEL-20 todae 2341 2! 
Prevtoos: I360J4 

1670 1625 1625 1«0 

7470 73CC 7450 7520 

fflOO ftS50 B7D0 8660 

3QW §00 3020 31® 

mUO 17700 18100 18400 

1740 1725 1725 1760 

7390 7250 

3550 3475 

7230 6970 

3310 3265 

5670 5600 


ji In* 

Henderson Ld 
HK Chino Cos 
H< Electric' 
HK Tetocwnra 
HwewaBHrigs 
HSBCHdBS 
Hutchison Wh 
Hyson Dm 


Dev 

Oriental Pres* 
Peari Oriental 
SHKPrt 
Sfxin TO 


SlnolBndpk 

5 th Chino Post 
SwirePticA 
Wharf Hdgs 


Jakarta 


98 

4J0 

7J5 

705 

6620 


7250 7370 
3490 3510 
7060 71« 

3265 3320 

S JS «B 

{So 13900 14025 14200 

13750 13325 13450 13675 

4875 4830 4860 

10100 10450 10375 
1415 3330 3375 3380 
«S50 20400 20525 JM5) AflUJlnM 

14500 14650 144® BklnTMndon 

a"*" 1 ” .ISiSSSm 

tndoceiMDl 

•*w» - ■ indofoo 

PrtMBt: 631-13 imteji) zlzz z^. 

3R) 

705 


anhagen inootorf 


* 382.38 37H 

fgB 3M 352 

For 940 03&C 

t 381 371 

ifttteBk 703 6°0 


35£ 

940 

375 

695 


Johannesburg 

i w i 

AngtoAmlnd 
AVMlN 


I B 

ItttotoM 

rdh*B 

BerB 

fWkB 


245 

735 

701 

971 

382 

424 

435 


no 

695 

945 

376 

417 

415 


423 

431 


422 

<35 


BaikJK 
C& Smith 
DeBeen 


Wurt 

1*35 1625 19&* 1*25 
22826 224.10 22AJD {gW 

Hdg 409-50 , 3 , uj impend Hd9» 

a 4U0 46 4?!2\Jrtai«Ccal 

ga, 1 g| sj if issr^ 1 

W 8120 79 79 B220 

4BLSB 3020 3820 « 

1320 128120 1J81 20 1328 9425 n 

JZ Ag g fig « 


LtotrLKe 
LajUfeSturf 
MilHKO 
Nctnpak 
Nedcor 


20< 199 I992ti 20! 

lijB 11J0 11-30 11*0 
5S 5475 5525 S57S 
25 >420 25 25 

150 14820 14920 14875 
3A75 35 3485 

^35 3790 3720 3810 
1020 1820 10*0 10^ 

63 6J 
7A 2AM 
199 2-98 

63 6325 
^ 368 3*9 J5 

f?175 7*0.75 W120 

gi US 8| 

FJ m. $ 


*320 6225 
24JS 24 
3 298 

6320 6120 
3*920 368 


High 

LOW 

dose 

Pm. 


High 

LOW 

Close 

142® 14020 

141 

141 

Utd Ufl»M 

7J5 

495 

499 

3d 

3420 

34 

3420 

venpume Lx uts 

<86 

485 

485 

-« 75 

- 41 

41® 

•U5 

-Vodofane 

119 

3.10 

3.14 

214* 21420 21475 71620 

WtBlbreod 

8.18 

aje 

am 

74 

73 

73 

74 

WiSoms Hdgs 

32 i 

320 






Wobtoer 

£58 

<<2 





WPP Group 

- 283 

274 

2.79 


High Low Ow 


Paris 


8.13 

323 

428 


Kuala Lumpur 


86 B3 B3_50 86J0 

7130 69.10 69.15 7160 
655 447 653 652 

95 W 94 9* 

1230 1195 1212 1235 
3725 3630 3480 3450 
520 51170 51620 S25 

864 833 MOJO 877 

„ 40 39.10 39.10 40) 
Metro' 9120 9020 9120 9130 

Munch ffuee* R 54J20 527 532 SM 


520 485 512 S36 

81 77 79 81*5 

*12 402 40S20 41 CL 20 

186 179 180*0 189 

230 222 222 23220 

11190 110.10 112.95 117*0 

1620 1620 b20 1635 


AMMBHdgs 
Gertbig 
fJtol Banking 
VmI Inn snip F 
PetronasGos 
Proton 
Public Bk 

Penong 
Resorts Worid 
Rothman* PM 
SimeOmtiT 
TdetumMal 
Tenqgo 
Utdtnglneen 
YTL 


1120 

10.70 

21*0 

245 

134 

8 

26 

7.75 
820 
9*5 
1490 

6.75 


71*0 11*0 
10-50 1020 
20 20.10 
560 260 

B.95 9.10 

8JH 820 
108 112 
3-24 130 

7*5 7.15 

2525 25.75 

6.95 7 

820 835 

8.95 895 

1190 7190 
450 470 


1170 

1070 

Z1.1Q 

5.90 

895 

810 

3J4 

330 

720 

2515 

7*5 

855 

920 

1470 

620 


Madrid 


BotseMtXiSS0.il 
Pimm*: 58524 


Acatnca 

ACESA 

Agun Barceton 
Aroentoria 
BSv 
Banesto 
BanWntor 


SS « 

48*0 47 47 48 

72 70*0 7080 71-20 
22.70 2180 JIM 21»0 
162 156 157 161.10 

47 4520 46 4720 

140 137 J37 139 

436 423 429.10 434 

185 181 181 185 

94 89 89-50 94 

13* 13020 13170 133 

79J0 78 78 79 


London 

Abbey MoH 
Ailed Danwcq 
Anglian Water 
Aigos 

Asda Group 

Assoc Be Food 5 

BAA 

Ba rotors 

Bass 

BATInd 

Bank Scotland 

BhieOrde 

BOC Group 

Boots 

BPBInd 

MAausp 

Brtt Airways 

BG 

Brit Land 
Bril Pettra 


FT-SE 100:488428 
Previous: 4991.19 


"TSSSiSSS 


910 8*5 8*5 8.70 

30*0 30 30.10 30*3 

ms 1815 1330 1145 
9220 8975 9120 89.75 

2520 2i30 2530 25.75 

39 3850 38*0 38.80 
45*0 4430 44*0 45.10 


930 875 870 9.10 

72 70 7020 7035 

1*45 16.10 I6l25 16*5 
2860 THIS 2845 2850 
1850 1815 1820 1845 

5 433 485 472 

259 256 256 JH7 

7775 76 76.75 7825 

nrsunuBT 2430 2190 2190 M 

jShSonEIHdg 2230 21 JO 21J0 020 

toryProis 2020 20*5 20*0 20*5 


139 1*0 1*4 

95 9825 9620 

£67 4*0 4.70 

7i0 7.75 7*5 

6*0 7 690 

-~ 65 66-25 6S25 

30 29*5 2920 £*5 
18 17.W 17.80 17.95 


83S 
A70 
777 
6J0 
120 
5*8 
5*7 
14.12 
817 
543 
430 
4.19 
11.14 
804 
3*5 
14*7 
A 60 
2*7 
AQ2 
825 

- - w A41 

Brt Steel 1.78 

BrilTelecocn 4J0 

BTP. 231 

Burmafi Cestm 11*5 

Burton Gc 137 

GjbWWMets 5*6 

Codbujysctwr 885 

Carlton Ccrere 815 

CsnmdlMn 731 

Compass Gp 636 

awtadds 125 

Dbens 6*4 

EtedrocDBipoomto 470 
EMI Group 52a 

issas s 

Furn ColonW 1.73 

GeirfAcddenl 9.40 

OBC 1» 

GKN 11*5 

Glroa Webcome 1835 

Granada Gp 838 

Grand Mel 5-92 

GRE 177 

GrewcteGp 4.90 

Guinness 5.70 

6*5 
612 

Hid 01 20*5 

1816 

Imp! Tobacco 
Kingfisher 
LaaiHOfce 
UindSeC 
Law* 

UordsTSBGp 
LuajsVoilly 
Mats Spencer 
MEPC 


GU5 
HO« 
HSBC I 
ia 


MereuivAMel 
National r 


Coa^wsfletodtt 5M34 

Piwtoas; 542*5 

5600 5325 5400 5725 
TIM 825 1850 m 
1100 975 1050 1050 

9175 6400 9150 B700 

3500 OTO 3S5 3M0 

3700 332S 3£« 3800 

7000 6700 6900 ^0 


law 

No« Power 

NalWeS 

Ned 

Nurwcti Union 
Oromgfl 
P&0 
Peanon 
Pilkingtan 
PowerGeri 


3.95 

734 

2*8 

937 

2*7 

422 

732 

102 

882 

4.79 

1168 

173 

847 


7J» 
1*2 
109 

447 
729 
1^ 

730 

Premier Famel! 8K 
PniderdiOl 6J» 

RoUtraeJiGp 
Rank Group 
RKWtCoim 
Red lento 

Raedlito 

RMWaitaWal 
Beutm Hdgs 
Re**n 
RT7ro«l 
KMC Group 
ftdbRovra, 

RcwjI Bl> Sent 
Royal i ~ 
smwo! 


^ 9 &I K« 80 ® ^ 


7.77 
149 
9.73 
UK 
854 
119 
435 
198 
1O04 

10*5 

603 

ai&SuiAfl SA 

®9 

5alnsb«y 
Sanders 
ScotNeucrelte 

SStPoww 

sewnt». 

Severn rient 
SheflTionspR 
Siebe 

SnuttiN^Miew 
5mdti Wtae 
Smiths ftto 
SftemEtoc 
Staaecaacn 
Stand Oralef 
Tate & Lyle 
Tesco 

Tftames Mrfer 

31 Group 
Tl Group 
Tomkins 
Unilever 
Utd Assurow 
tWNews 


320 
4.45 
1840 
7 *2 
439 
18 2 
MS 

432 

ia« 

1.78 

NA 

S3S 

468 

7.05 

1815 

424 

421 

7.95 

487 

'S3 

707 


808 

428 

7*7 

62! 

130 
803 
527 
13.90 
810 
815 
A03 
433 

II 

7.95 
339 

1431 

H 9 

228 

888 

861 

430 

1.74 

405 

109 
10*5 
135 
144 

534 
505 

7.18 
621 
3-18 
622 
467 
5*5 
6.16 
6*3 

131 

9.18 
3.71 

11*8 
1113 
.810 
5*8 
170 
483 
5*5 
635- 
607 
2008 
935 
3*7 
733 
2*0 
9.15 
227 
445 
7JM 
197 
. 872 
470 
13*8 
2*6 

535 
737 
7*2 
334 
206 
6*0 
735 
1*3 
7*8 
5.10 
5.97 
7*6 
338 
9*0 
293 
5*0 

110 
621 
192 
9.93 
1025 
2*3 
538 
S26 
174 
4*0 

1020 

739 

423 

173 

8*7 

418 

1075 

1.76 

534 

oa 

459 

6.95 
MB 
417 
411 
7*3 
480 
SB 
112 

1785 

430 

698 


821 427 

463 461 

7J3 7*9 

423 635 

149 121 

5.06 5X0 

860 522 

1401 1409 
813 815 

531 5X>9 

410 416 

417 404 
7132 11*8 

7.98 7.93 

3*1 3*2 

1437 14*2 
6*5 654 

161 2*3 

691 £93 

867 878 

437 440 

136 135 

414 436 

111 115 

10.98 1889 

136 13* 

652 SM 
520 523 

£09 814 

735 735 

624 624 

331 333 

624 666 

4*7 4*8 

525 652 

619 621 

490 479 

132 1.73 

936 935 

374 333 

1133 11 JO 
1234 1129 

833 807 

£81 £29 

234 175 

489 485 

5*9 £75 
639 638 

612 609 

2136 3033 
KL09 10.10 
192 187 

733 730 

162 229 

930 937 

163 2*4 

451 4*9 

7.19 735 

1.98 1.98 

£76 £87 

476 474 

13*0 13*3 
171 2*5 

5*1 535 

7.90 7.94 

7.65 7*0 

337 135 

2.08 106 
644 6*7 
739 7 it 
1*6 1*5 

7*5 7*7 
5.10 £17 

6*4 603 

7.74 738 

3*6 3*6 
9*9 9*7 
194 im 

5*8 5*9 

115 116 

£27 £25 

198 197 

9.99 9.97 
1030 10*4 

2*9 143 

6 SB 
£29 5M 

338 136 

440 4*1 

1823 1838 
737 738 

435 428 

177 2*2 
853 8*8 
425 *32 

1081 1096 

137 1.76 

532 £37 

831 835 

462 4*3 

695 72)7 

9.94 1035 

418 425 

415 416 

7JB 7*7 
485 435 

114 115 

17.97 17J6 
433 430 

72)1 72)1 


1 Popular 
Bco Santander 
CEPSA 
Continent 
C ory Ma pfre 

PECSA 
Gas Natural 
Iberdrola 

ftycn 
Rep sd 

SevOanoEVc 
Tabocoteru 
Telefonica 
Union Fenosa 
VWenc Cement 


248® 

26010 

241® 

24*0 

IBIS 

17® 

IB® 

1H0 

55* 

5490 

55* 

5550 

78® 

7720 

7830 

7890 

<100 

402S 

<aso 

41® 

1470 

1430 

1450 

1455' 

7850 

7650 

7720 

7830 

5850 

5720 

5770 

5850 

34900 

34150 

242S0 

34790 

4305 

4230 

4275 

4290 

*35 

4590 

4430 

4430 

3400 

3220 

34® 

3270 

■370 

8210 

B370 

83® 

3195 

3105 

31 as 

3190 

1235 

1215 

1230 

1235 

6920 

6790 

68* 

6a® 

1765 

1720 

1735 

1745 

2685 

7835 

2850 

7665 

61® 

5990 

6000 

4110 

1380 

11® 

13* 

1375 

3170 

7970 

80® 

SI® 

4M0 

3945 

3995 

<0* 

1195 

11® 

1195 

12® 

27* 

2730 

2745 

27* 


Accor 

AGF 

Air Liquid* 
AteBta Ateth 
AW-UAP 
Banco ire 
BIC 
BNP 

Conoi Plus 
Caretour 
Casirw 
CCF 
CMeteni 
OirfihonDliir 
CLF-DeMa Fron 
OmBApricole 
Danone 
Bt-Aquttnme 
EridarfaBS 
E 


Manila 

Ayala B 
Arab Land 
Bk Philip 81 
CAP Homes 
MarattElecA 
Metro Bonk 

Perron 
PCIBcnk 
PM Long Off 
ScnMJguHB 
SM Prime Hdg 


1650 

1775 

137 

720 

7720 

477J0 

SJP 

198 

060 

55 

7.10 


P5E Index: 2380*2 
Previous: 2364M 

1520 16 1675 

1650 1675 1720 

129 131 136 

5*0 520 7*0 

75 77 JO 77 JO 

445 450 475 

£10 £10 5^40 

193 193 197 

8*1 £50 875 

54 54 55 

690 7 7 


Gen. Eoux 
Havns 
Inetol 
Lataipe 
Uanmd. 

LtJred 

LVMH 

MkhelnB 

PtrtxM A 

Pernod Rico rd 

Peogeol Cn 

FHnoufr-Prlm 

Promodes 

fenoutl 

ftaMt 

Rh-Pot/teocA 

Sonofl 

Schneider 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodertw 
StGohaln 
Suei(CiB) 

Suu Lyon Eaia 


2F 



962 

219 

942 

792 

406 

7D9 

48490 

1030 

3880 

291 

31330 

650 

955 

560 
1275 
930 
709 
824 
BJO 
7.10 
W 
379 
. 845 
4D3 
1113 
2362 
1419 
35720 
439*0 

299 

690 

2708 

2770 

16720 

1697 

246 

uu 

319.90 

967 

600 

787 

2825 

875 

1605 

674 

727 

162 

610 

11120 

382*0 


CAC-40s 2-936 
PllMUSI. 189127 

936 942 «8 

212 216 219 

919 941 923 

761 777 790 

39520 39620 4M 
686 71lt 700 
465 468 483 

77130 780 781 

1003 1011 1014 

3770 7782 3835 

28520 289 268 

30320 30891 31190 
627 634 648 

974 926 950 

544 556 553 

1275 1275 1290 

906 913 923 

690 700 704 

812 815 810 

860 860 870 

6*5 6.95 7 

481 695 694 

367.10 369.60 374*0 

822 845 838 

395 401 407 

1066 1104 1083 

21 S3 2236 2241 
1369 1380 1414 

345.10 353 353 

42820 437 437.60 

290 79420 297 

667 671 679 

2600 2652 2700 

209 1 2170 2154 
16QJ0 16620 16620 
1642 1651 1698 
234*0 23520 245 

584 590 604 

312 31420 32020 
941 951 960 

577 585 582 

764 777 779 

2765 2776 2799 
848 853 867 

15.75 1575 14.15 
646 6S2 *66 

797 712 723 

15510 15BJ0 161 

582 604 605 

no m jo 110*0 
365 372*0 381 JO 


Auto— 
EledrofrikB 
Ericsson B 
Heraid B 
tncenfryeA 
Investor B 
MnDoB 
Hartonkn 
Phann/Urtohn 
Sarah* B 
Scania B 
SCAB 

S-E BanfcwA 
Skendla Fan 
Stems ko B 
SKFB 

SranoankonA 

SjdjdA 

SvHandasA 

VohoB 



Low 

dose 

Prrar. 

304® 

' ' 298 302® 303® 

580 

560 

578 

580 

345 

332® 33820 344® 

30B 

296 

304 

309 

719 

714 

717 

7)7 

400® 

390 

396 

400 

265 259® 

2* 245® 

251 

245 

250 249® 

278 

271 

27 6 279® 

245 

2* 

241 

246 

221 

21420 

220 221® 

10! 

175® 

179® 

180® 

81® 

81 

83 

83 

324 311® 

319 

321 

321 

315® 

3)9 323® 

215 TO® 211® 

216 

176 

173 

175 

177 

131 

128 

129 130® 

243® 

236 

243 

242 

211 

204 

207 

210 


Sydney 

Amcor 

AMZBUng 

BHP 

Bond 

BrosiWesInd. 
CBA _ 

CC Arntrfi 
Coles Myer 
Coma ico 
CSR . 
Fosters Broiv 
Goodman FW 
1CI AusJroOo 
Lend Lease 
MIMHrias 
Nal AustBcmk 
Nat Mutual Hdfl 
News Cap 
Poctftc Dunlop 
Pioneer ton 
Pub Broadcast 
Rio TWO 
St George Bank 
WMC 

Westpoc BUng 

VrooSdePet 

IVootwarihs 


AMMHfK: 262620 
PietrlaM: 2637.10 


827 

10.12 

17J8 

4*2 

28J0 

1536 

15.18 

624 

7.12 

503 

2*5 

)J7 

1113 

3020 

1-71 

19.13 

2.11 

5*5 

1*2 

4*9 

813 

20*0 

825 

734 

8.24 

1120 

AI6 


818 

9.97 

17.11 


15.18 

1430 

635 

6.96 

4.95 
227 

1.96 
1195 
3035 

166 

189B 

210 


425 

110 

20J0 

8J0 

11.10 

A10 


831 830 

ID 10X7 
1773 1770 
4X0 4 

2815 2870 
1571 1533 
1420 1570 
635 6*9 
7JK £93 
4.99 503 

228 263 

1.9* 1.96 

1324 13.14 
X*0 X36 
1*7 1.67 

19.04 19.10 
211 2.10 
5*2 582 

3*1 
4*8 
506 
2020 
874 
7.32 
8)3 


1 The Trfb Index 

Puces as ot 3 GO PM. Mew York n me 

Jan. T. 1892= >00 

(Ml 

Change 

% change 

year to data 
% change 

World Index 

172.89 

-0.09 

-0.05 

+15 92 

Regional fndaxea 

AsiaTPsciHc 

126.98 

+0.91 

+0.72 

+2.88 

Europe 

179.81 

-2.36 

-1.30 

+ 11.54 

N. America 

203.39 

-1.88 

-0.92 

+25.62 

S. America 
industrial Indam 

166.34 

+3.05 

+1.67 

+45.36 

Capital goods 

221.69 ' 

-2.27 

-1.01 

+29.70 

Consumer goods 

188.19 

+0.16 

+0.09 

+16.58 

Energy 

195.87 

•1.56 

-0.79 

+14.74 

Finance 

131.19 

+0.11 

+0.08 

+12.65 

Miscellaneous 

183.24 

-0.09 

-0.05 

+13.26 

Raw Materials 

185.32 

-0.16 

-0.09 

+5.67 

Sendee 

163.27 

+0.23 

+0.14 

+18.90 

Utilities 

162.75 

+1.37 

+0.85 

+13.45 

The lnunna0onal Herald Tribune World Stoc* Index C tracks rhe U S dollar values erf 
280 ettemattonaBy mvestaUe stocks from 25 countries. For more m forma non, a free 
booklet la available by writing to The Ttto index. 181 Avenue Charles do Gentle. 

92521 NeuOy Codex, France Compded by Bloomberg News. 

High 

Law dose Prev. 


High Low 

Clew Prev. 


426 

875 

7.18 

805 


11.13 nil 

4.13 4.11 


Mexico 

Ada A 
Banned B 
Cemex CPO 
OfroC 

EmflModerno 

Gpo Carso A1 

GpaFBcomer 

Gpo Fin Inbuna 

KfibCtortMex 

TelevteoCPO 

TelMexL 


6370 
men 
4170 
14*4 
4275 
57 SO 
3*4 
34*0 

36*5 

129*0 

2070 


Baton todac 491787 
Previous: 4996-18 

6270 62*0 63.10 
22J0 2135 2320 
40*0 40*5 41.40 
14*3 14*2 1470 
4170 41.70 4270 
56J» 56*0 57.70 

320 123 3*4 

34*3 34*0 3470 
2SJ0 3580 3770 
12800 129 JO 131 JO 
2000 2815 2070 


BrodescoPtd 

Brahma Pfd 

CerolgPfd 

CESPPtd 

Copet 

EteTrotaBs 


Milan 

Aleanza Assic 
Bar Comm (tal 
Bca Fldeurom 
Bai (fl Roma 
Benetton 
Cred fto ftofc no 
Edison 
EHI 
F« 

General] Assk 

IMI 

INA 

mSotOKB 

Moated ten 

OfretU 

PomoKfi 

PYU1 

RAS 

Rota Banco 
S PtWa Tortio 
Tetocam ItaSa 
TIM 


MIBTetef«8fCKl41MJa 
PtlVtotls: I4Z82J0 

14500 14170 14260 14550 
<345 4225 <290 4310 

5945 5850 5940 5950 

1565 1522 1544 1554 

7*701 skmn 9.wn 26200 

3420 3545 3555 3630 

8200 8050 8150 8145 
10150 9910 10045 10095 
5635 5490 5515 5600 
37050 36100 34600 37000 
16290 15995 16135 16190 
M0 2560 2575 £85 

S37S 5240 S27S 53*5 
7625 7465 7620 7505 

1)430 11110 11430 11360 
1100 1085 1094 1097 

753 725 744 733 

7650 2610 2645 2645 
<740 4605 4605 ,4705 

14690 14570 14660 1*600 
22000 71550 21550 21850 
12700 12320 12*40 12615 
10655 10365 10400 10665 
5950 5725 5790 5795 


sso pauio •nsasiss Taipei 

11.10 1085 ilJO 10*0 
745.00 73DJ0 74QJ0 73800 
5490 5250 5430 5259 
7820 75.00 7820 74J0 
1£W 1529 15.90 1585 

51500 49400 51200 49729 

NOUbancaPft 645.00 S»J» 645X0 630JM 

UgWServtocB 47620 <6500 467 JO <7620 

LJghtpw 426J0 <2100 42490 42199 

PetrobrasPW 289.00 M3J0 2S7.00 2B500 

Puufeto Un 19500 190J0 19500 190 JO 

SWNadorad 3800 37 JO 3720 39J0 

Scum Cruz 10J9 10J0 1075 10JO 

TelehnuPM 14170 140 JO 14170 1*200 

Teferato 17100 16X00 169.00 HIM 

Telert 149J1 14100 149.00 14215 

TetespPfd 365.00 339.90 35500 337 JO 

Umbcnco 4! JO 39 JO 41 JO 39 JO 

Usiminas PM 1200 11 JO 1L93 11.95 

CVRD PM 27.10 26.11 27 JO 26.10 


Stock MartMrattex: 1011644 
PrariDHi 16011*7 


Cathay Ufe Ins 
Oiuno Bk 
CKanTunfl Bk 
Chtoa Devefrnrd 
Oi mo Steel 
PtnJ Bank 
Formosa Plastic 
Huo Nan Bk 
Infl Comm Bk 

HanYaPteta 
Shin Rang Life 
TaNw/rSemr 
Tatww 

Utd Men Elec 
Utd World Chin 


142 142 142 

113 113 113 

96 9850 9220 
. _ 137 138 136 

3170 3020 3020 3070 
11520 113 113 11220 

64 SO <1 sn 
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f&GOki 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 27, 199“ 


ASIA/R4CIFIC 


PAGE 17 


South Korean Won 
Hits New Low Amid 
Fears Over Bad Debt 


Cto^byOarStfFmnDbpacha 

SEOUL — The South Korean 
won tumbled to a record low Tues- 
day as mounting bad loans and tur- 
moil in Asian currency markets 
prompted banks and companies to 
buy dollars to ensure they can repay 
foreign debt 

The dollar climbed to a high of 
909.80 won before the central bank 
bought won to bolster the currency 
and the dollar eased to 904.55 won. 

The decline raises concern *h»r 
South Korea will follow such other 
Asian countries as Thailand In- 
donesia in allowing its currency to 
devalue because ora slowing econ- 
omy and a current-account deficit. 
Foreign banks have said they are 
reluctant to lend money to South 
Korean borrowers, especially hanks 
that have more bad loans than share- 
holder equity — making them tech- 
nically insolvent. 

“We cannot rule out the pos- 
sibility that the won has become a 
new victim,*’ said Takashi Isoai of 
Yamaichi Research Institute in 
Tokyo, citing South Korea’s per- 
sistent current-account deficit and 
weak economic fundamentals. 
“There is a possibility that spec- 
ulators are targeting the won amid 
the currency woes in Asia and con- 
tinuing financial crisis in South 
Korea.” 

Yukong Ltd., Korea’s biggest oil 
refinery, for example, must reckon 
with an additional 1 .2 billion won 
($13 million) in unrealized foreign- 
exchange losses each tune die dollar 
gains by 1 won, a company finance 
executive said. Yukong has $1.2 bil- 
lion in long-term foreign debt 

Korea First Bank, which has seen 
several of its biggest customers go 
bankrupt, has about 7.2 trillion won 
of bad loans on its books on which 
no interest has been paid for three 

months. 


The bank has 1 .5 trillion won in 
shareholder equity. 

Until the Korean economy is vi- 
brant enough to attract foreign cap- 
ital, the won is likely to weaken as 
investors and companies hedge their 
currency risk and shun won-denom- 
inated assets. 

“The main concern is the state of 
the economy.” said Stephen Taran, 
head of credit research at Lehman 
Brothers in Hong Kong. “If push 
came to shove, they’d see die cur- 
rency fell a little further.” 

The won’s fall came as banks and 
companies — which have more than 
$106 billion in outstanding overseas 
debt — scrambled to buy foreign 
currency to meet debt and trade pay- 
ments. 

“When die Bank of Korea did not 
intervene at 90S won, there was no 
stepping the greenback until the 
BOR started to dump dollars at 908 
won,” a dealer at a foreign bank 
said. 

Another dealer at a domestic hank- 
said, “The interventions took the 
market completely by surprise, and 
in feet, many dealers feel betrayed 
by the Bank of Korea since it did not 
give any indication of its policy di- 
rection.” 

Korean stocks also declined, with 
the composite index in Seoul falling 
7.73 points to 734.03, as the drop in 
the won inflated corporate borrow- 
ing costs. 

Despite the won’s plunge. South 
Korean dealers rulea out the pos- 
sibility of seeing an attack on die 
currency along the lines of feat on 
fee beleaguered Thai baht. 

“The won’s depreciation is not a 
recent phenomenon,” said Oh Suk 
Taeof Citibank in Seoul, adding feat 
speculative trading was limited be- 
cause of restrictions on foreigners 
seeking to buy the won. 

( Bloomberg . Bridge News. AFP ) 



.'h-ntc l43#nHr WM li-i 

Pavement dwellers in Bombuy: during the property boom, gangsters rousted denizens of the city. 

Bullets Over Bombay; Realty Bites 


The Assuror/ 1 ■ i Press 

BOMBAY — It is a rough-and-tumble game: 
Bodyguards on alert. Police escorts for some.'Guns 
kept at the ready. 

But one can never be too careful when it conies to 
fee Wild West world feat is fee real estate market of 
Bombay. 

“We’ve told our members: Keep guns ready. 
Before they shoot, you shoot,’ ' said Kumar Venkata 
Satyamurty, the leader of a property developers trade 
group. 

The bright lights of Bombay — its glamorous film 
industry, its booming economy — have been a mag- 
net for builders and for mobsters looking for a piece 
of fee profits. 

Since April, five builders have been shot dead in 
India’s financial capital. 

The police, pointing to gangsters, say that the 
bloodshed is the result of a developer-mob under- 
standing that has gone bad. 

In 1995, Bombay’s real estate market exploded 
because of free-market reforms introduced by the 
government 

The price of prime office space made this city the 
most expensive in fee world, a survey by Colliers 
International Property Consultants showed: That 
year, a square foot (0.3 of a square meter) sold for 
5970 — slightly more than fee rate in Tokyo and four 


times that of Manhattan. No corporate leader wanted 
to be without an office in upscale South Bombay. But 
properly v.as scarce. 

Owners and developers hoped to cash in on the 
boom by selling property or tearing buildings down to 
make way for gleaming office towers. Some of them, 
however, first had to get rid of unwanted tenants. 
They turned to mob thugs. 

But soon the market began to soften. At the start of 
1 997, a square fool of Bombay office space was going 
for S675. 

Today, a room with a view of fee Arabian Sea can 
be had for around S570 a square foot in one of the 
office towers feat house leading software, pharma- 
ceutical. engineering or manufacturing companies. 

Prices may have slid, but Indian mobsters stuck 
around. No longer needed to strong-arm unwanted 
tenants, they lurned to extortion — demanding pro- 
tection money. 

Those who fail to pay up receive threatening calls 
or are killed. 

Mr. Satyamurty. founder of fee 10,000-member 
Federation of Accommodation Industries of India, 
says that mobsters have become too expensive. 

“Even those builders who did pay the underworld 
cannot any more.” he said. 

“But the gangs don’t care if the industry is doing 
well or not.” 


Bears Maul a Malaysian Bank’s Initial Public Offering 


Bloomberg News 

KUALA LUMPUR — Malay- 
sia's second-largest merchant bank 
and best-known stock underwriter, 
RHB Sakura Merchant Bankers 
BbrL, could not have picked a worse 
time to crane to market 

The country's main stock market 
has . lost, more i faan^a _quarter_ of its _ 
value this year, failing Tuesday fo a 
31-month low. Meanwhile, higher 
interest rates are stalling this once 
turbocharged economy. 

While that makes it an inoppor- 


tune time for any company to sell 
stock to the public fra fee first time, 
it is particularly bad for a company 
that is in the business of helping 
other companies to do so. 

“Nobody's hot about banks; mer- 
chant banks are worse,” said Cher 
Hung Jin, a funds manager at Dai wa 
International Capital ' Management. . 

Not surprisingly, kHB Sakura 
shares fell below the price set for 
their trading debut and closed Tues- 
day at 3.62 ringgit ($1.30), 11.7 
percent lower than fee offering price 


of 4.10 ringgit. At one point they 
had fallen as low as 3.60 ringgit. 

The dismal showing by the com- 
pany, which is run by Abdul Rashid 
Hussain, a prominent businessman 
with influential contacts, reflects the 
country’s weakened underwriting 
and corporate-finance business. 

About 94 companies went public 
last year as fee market boomed. Re- 
cent offerings in fee year’s crop of 
59 initial public offerings have been 
more coolly received. 

RHB Sakura joins a growing list 


of Malaysian IPOs, especially big- 
ger-capitalized stocks, that in- 
vestors are spuming. By contrast. 
many offerings scored stupendous 
premiums last year. 

“I don't think they expected it to 
be so bad." said Angie Ang. an 
analyst at Caspian Research. “The 
offer price didn’t look excessive 
three to four months ago. Now it’s 
expensive." 

Utama Banking Bhd.. a banking 
group, and Padiberas Nasionai 
Bhd., fee manager of fee nation’s 


Maybank Proposes Bonus Share as Profit Rises 


Bloomberg News 
KUALA LUMPUR — 
Malayan Banking Bhd., 
Malaysia’s largest bank, said 
profit before a gain rose 23 
percent in the year ended June 
30, and it proposed a 1-for-l 
bonus share issue. 

The 23 percent rise “is 
slightly below my numbers,” 
said Angie Ang, analyst at 
Caspian Research (Malaysia) 
Sdn. But, he added, “the vari- 
ation is acceptable.” 


Maybank, as it is known, 
bad profit of 1 32 billion ring- 
git ($475.6 million), up from 
1.08 billion ringgit fee pre- 
vious year. 

The results exclude a one- 
time gain of 1.66 billion ring- 
git from the sale of May- 
bank’s 75 percent stake m 
Kwong Yflc Bank Bhd. to 
Rashi d Hussain Bhd. 

Net interest income, a ba- 
rometer of the health of the 
bank’s lending business, in- 


creased 20 percent, to 3.2 bil- 
lion ringgit Net income, 
which includes other income, 
such as fees and commis- 
sions, rose 16 percent, to 3.6 
billion ringgiL 

Maybank said it expected 
loan growth to slow to be- 
tween 15 percent and 18 per- 
cent this year, down from 
243 percent from fee year 
just ended. 

Mayhank’s stock has lost 24 
percent since July 1 amid con- 


cern feat the slowing economy 
will cool demand for loans, 

crimping profit growth. 

Maybank shies dropped 1 
rin gg it Tuesday, to 20.10. 
The re prat was released after 
the close of trading. 

Investors have pushed 
shares of Malaysian banks 
lower in recent days after 
Standard & Poor’s Corp. 
warned that the slump in fee 
value of feeringgir could nig- 
ger an increase in bad debts. 


mm 


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rice stockpile, are some of fee other 
recent IPOs feat have delivered 
weak premiums. Investors have par- 
ticularly been shying away from fi- 
nancial stocks. 

Miss Ang did not see IPOs for the 
large capitalized stocks garnering 
large premiums anytime soon. 

RHB Sakura was the adviser and 
main underwriter for a string of 
high-profile offerings, including 
Petronas Dagangan Bhd.. YTL 
Power International Bhd. and Pun- 
cak Niaga Holdings Bhd. 


Very briefly: 

• The Bank of Japan said fee recovery trend in personal 
spending did not seem to have been hindered by fee April 
increase in the consumption tax, which was offset by steady, 
although slow, improvements in labor conditions and income. 

• DDI Corp. and Nippon Idou Tsrnbin Corp. have formed a 
marketing and research alliance with Shinsegi Telecomm 
Inc., a South Korean cellular-phone operator, as fee Japanese 
companies seek a bigger share of Asia's swiftly expanding 
cellular-phone market. 

• China will not open its telecommunications sector to for- 
eigners in the near future, said Wu Fichuan, minister of posts 
and telecomm uni cations. 

• Sichuan Changhoog Electronics Group Corp., China's top 
television maker, said net profit rose 68 percent in fee first half, 
to 930.6 million yuan ($11 1.9 million), despite a price war. 

• China Tin Group Co., fee country’s second-largest tin 
producer, is hoping to increase production to 20,000 tons by 
2000 from 15,000 tons in 1997 after conducting an expansion 
project at its Lai bin smelter. 

• Asian Development Bank lending to China will frill to 
about $700 million this year from about $1 billion last year as 
a number of projects are still being prepared for approval. 

• Australian National Industries Ltd., a metals and en- 
gineering group, posted a profit of 14.43 million Australian 
dollars ($10.8 million) in fee second half, compared wife a 
loss of 218.4 million dollars in the year-earlier period, as 
earnings in most of its divisions increased. 

• Independent Newspapers Ltd. will pay 308.9 million New 

Zealand dollars ($199.7 million) to buy a 48 percent stake in 
Sky Network Television Ltd, fee nation's largest pay- 
television operator. Bridge News. AFX. Bloomberg 


FIDELITY WORLD FUND 

SociiBe d’lnvesrissement a Capita) Variable 
Kansallis House - Place de 1’Etoile 
B.P. 2174. L-1021 Luxembourg 
R.C. No B 9497 

NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY 
GENERAL MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary General Meeting 
of Shareholders of fidelity World Fund (the “Fund") will be 
held at the registered office of the Fund in Luxembourg on 
September 5, 1997 at 11.00 am. to consider the following 
agenda: 

1 . To hear the report of the liquidator. 

2. To appoint an auditor to the liquidation. 

If you are unable to attend the above Extraordinary General 
Meeting, you are urged to execute and return a proxy to the 
registered office of the Fund prior to fee date of the Meeting. 
Proxies can be obtained from the registered office of the Fund 


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* PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2 


27,1997 



I Li Peng Says 
j Asians Must 
| ‘Ward Off’ 
i Speculators 


Cumrttaltn Our SatfF romDurtorha 

SINGAPORE — China and its 
Southeast Asian neighbors need to 
strengthen coordination and coopera- 
tion to “ward off international financial 
speculation," Prime Minister Li Peng 
said Tuesday as he concluded a three- 
day visit here. 

The economic strength of China and 
members of the Association of Sooth 
East Asian Nations, Mr. Li told Singa- 
pore executives, is * ‘relatively weak, and 
the financial system not adequate. 

Mr. Li said the currency turbulence in 
the region had been caused by spec- 
ulators and too much money going into 
unproductive investments, such as 
property. "We should seriously draw 
lessons from previous financial crises in 
the world, keep a high vigilance, 
strengthen financial regulation, im- 
prove die financial system so as to fore- 
stall and reduce financial risks to the 
minimum and ensure a sound growth of 
the economy," he said. 

* ‘The cooperation between China and 
ASEAN nations should be oriented to- 
ward the 21st century." be said, noting 
extensive common interests between 
China and the region. 

In addition to existing ties in areas such 
as trade, science and technology, finance 
and information, China and ASEAN can 
cooperate in infrastructure, technological 
transfer, poverty alleviation and envi- 
ronmental protection . Mr. Li said. 

Total trade between China and 
ASEAN last year was $20.4 billion. 
ASEAN comprises Brunei, Burma, In- 
donesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, 
Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. 

Mr. Li attributed a drop in foreign 
investment in China this year in part to 
new import duties, but he said Beijing 
was using such measures to “guide" 
rather than “discourage" investors. 

Although investment fell by $23.5 
billion in the first half from the fust half 
of 1996, Mr. U said that the foreign 
capital that had come in went to more 
productive industries. 

“We still give exceptional waivers 
for high-tech projects, projects we need 
and projects that are globally compet- 
itive," Mr. Li said. 

He said that Beijing was focusing 
development and investment planning 
on the 120 large state- or collective- 
owned conglomerates that account for 
50 percent to 60 percent of oil business 
assets and 60 percent of revenue. China 
has 80,000 state- and collective-owned 
enterprises, he said. 

(AP, Bridge News) 



YtmSokBong/Ranen 

HIGH-FLYING CURRENCY — Workers tossing enlarged bills during a 
Seoul rally Tuesday to protest a court ruling limiting retirement benefits. 


Nomura Banks on Clout to Revive 

Clients Who Shunned It After Scandal Are Creeping Back 


Bloomberg, News 

TOKYO — Japanese companies 
are Ending Nomura Securities Co. 
hard to stay away from. 

Since March more than a dozen 
major companies — including Sony 
Corp. and Nippon Telephone & Tele- 
graph Corp., the world 's largest phone 
company — have proclaimed they 
would not do business with Japan's 
largest brokerage after it admitted that 
two executives had paid $3.1 million 
to a racketeer. 

Among the others were the utilities 
Kansai Electric Power Co. and Tokyo 
Electric Power Co., which said it was 
their responsibility as “public-in- 
terest" companies to bar Nomura 
from selling their new bond issues. 
Their announcements were a blow to 
Nomura's bottom line since utilities 
account for 40 percent of Japan's S230 
billion market for corporate bonds. 

But some of those companies are 
quietly returning. They are afraid they 
will have trouble selling their bonds 
without the brokerage, which boasts 
the longest customer list and largest 
sales force in the Japanese bond in- 
dustry. On Tuesday, Tokyo Electric, 
Japan's Largest issuer of bonds, used 
Nomura as part of a group of un- 
derwriters to sell 4 percent of $424 
million worth of bonds. 

“In the end they have no choice but 
to acknowledge the p lacing power of 
Nomura," said Hayato Karo, general 
manager of research at die Bond Un- 
derwriters Association. 

"Nomura has the best connections 
and the best sales power, and these are 


what companies need to find buyers 
for their bonds.” u 

Kansai Electric was the first to brea*. 
the boycott. The utility Japan’s second- 
largest barred Nomura from a $500 
millio n bond issue in April. In late June 
it invited Nomura back, asking it to help 
sell S250 million worth of bonds. 

While Nomura did not lead the 
group of 46 brokerage and banks un- 
derwriting the issue — that honor went 
to Yamaichi Securities Co. — Kansai 
Electric gave Nomura the fourth- 
Iargest portion of bonds to sell, S2S 
milli on worth. 

More utili ties say they will soon 
follow Kansai Electric’s lead. Kyushu 
Electric Power Co. and Chugpku Elec- 
tric Power Co. say they are consid- 
ering letting Nomura participate in 
their next bond issue. 

East Japan Railway Co., one of Ja- 
pan's largest railroads, and Ajinomoto 
Co., the world's largest maker of the 
food additive monosodium glutamate, 
have also said they will resume deal- 
ing with Nomura soon. 

It is important for Nomura to get 
back into the market soon because this 
year is likely to be the biggest ever for 
sales of new corporate bonds as 
companies rush to take advantage of 
record-low interest rates. 

The Kansai Electric bonds that 
Nomura sold, for instance, carried an 
annual interest rate of 1.75 percent 
over four years. 

The return of these customers 
should bring some respite to Nomura, 
whose sales have plummeted since 
customers started shunning it in 


March, when it admitted that it might 
have broken the law. 

But it will remain a difficult year. 
Underwriting of all bonds accounted 
for almost a fifth of the brokerage’s $39 
billion in sales last year. So sales are 
sure to slip this year, especially since 
Tokyo barred Nomura from selling new 
government bonds until the end of me 
year. That is an even bigger business for 
Nomura than corporate bonds. 

Nomura has been lead underwriter 
for just two corporate issues since the 
scandal broke in March — a mere 1 .4 
percent of all new issues, compared 
with its commanding lead of 20 per- 
cent before the scandal. 

■ NEC Links Up With Microsoft 

NEC Corp. and the U.S. software 
giant Microsoft Corp. said Tuesday 
that they had agreed to cooperate to 
develop computer network servers, 
the Associated Press reported. 

The agreement will ensure tighter 
integration of the Japanese computer 
maker’s leading mainframe and server 
technology with Microsoft's BackOf- 
fice family platform, the two compa- 
nies said. 

Under terms of the accord, Microsoft 
will support NEC’s development of a 
new product trailed Express Server for 
Enterprise, which will be based on the 
Microsoft Windows NT Server. 

The two said they would also col- 
laborate on developing hardware and 
software for a product called Express 
Network Server, which will enhance 
the use of the Internet and intranets for 
smaller businesses. 


Sony to Increase Video Game Output by a Third for Christmas 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Sony Corp. said Tuesday 
that it was increasing output of its pop- 
ular PlayStation to make sure there are 
plenty’ of the home video game systems 
in stores by Christmas. 

The company said it would raise 
monthly production of the game players 
by 33 percent to 2 million units between 
October and the end of the year. 

That could help PlayStation kick Nin- 
tendo from its long-held spot as the 
biggest player in the SIS billion global 
market for video games. Nintendo ex- 
pects to ship 12 million Nintendo64 
consoles in the year ending March 31, a 
third less than Sony. 

"We’re beyond the stratosphere and 
headed towards tite moon," said Rent- 
ier Dobbelmann, electronics industry 


analyst at SBC Warburg Japan Ltd. 

Mr. Dobbelmann projected that 14 
million PlayStation units would sell this 
year — better than Nintendo but still 
about 4 million below Sony's target 
Sony said Tuesday that it had shipped 
20 milli on units since it unveiled the 
PlayStation three years ago. Thai is far 
ahead of Nintendo's latest player, which 
debuted a year ago. 

“PlayStation is the undisputed leader 
in the next-generation console category 
and is widening its gap over the com- 
petition.” said Kaz Harai, chief op- 
erating officer of Sony Computer En- 
tertainment Inc.’s American unit. 

Kyoto-based Nintendo is going on 
the offensive. It plans to spend SI 00 
million on American ads this autumn for 
its game console software. It also has 


promotional tie-ins planned with Pep- 
siCo Inc.'s Taco Bell and Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer Inc.’s latest James Bond 
film. “Tomorrow Never Dies." 

Nintendo's 64-megabit software 
cartridges are packed with microchips 
designed to power die three-dimension- 
al, quick-response fighting and racing 
games favored by children. 

Sony, on the other hand, uses a disk 
format for 32-megabit PlayStation soft- 
ware. The disks store lots of informa- 
tion, providing rich detail and cinematic 
color, which works best in static role- 
playing games preferred by adults. 

Nintendo will likely win a larger 
share of die adult market, however, as 
programmers take advantage of the 
greater power and flexibility offered by 
its more powerful machine to create 


games geared toward older customers, 
said Hironobu Sawake, analyst atNikko 
Research Center. 

One reason for Sony's quick rise to a 
commanding lead over Nintendo is soft- 
ware. More than 900 titles can be bought 
for the PlayStation in Japan, more than 
10 times die number available for Nin- 
teudo64. 

Analysts warned that the PlayStation 
might already have reached its zenith as 
die popularity of Nintendo’s more 
powerful machine spreads. 

“The PlayStation’s growth rate is 
maturing even as shipments of the Nin- 
rendo64 have begun to accelerate,’ ’ said 
Mr. Sawake, who expects the tables will 
be turned by this time next year. 

As Nintendo and Sony slug it out, the 
big loser is Sega Enterprises Ltd. Once a 


formidable contender in the home video 
game market. Sega has suffered from 
sagging sales of its 16-bit game ma- 
chines. 

Nintendo shares were unchanged at 
10,600 yen ($89.64), Sega slipped 30 
yen to 3.490 and Sony rose 400 yen to 
11 , 100 . 

■ TDK’s Net Profit Rises 35% 

TDK Corp.. the world’s largest au- 
dio- and videotape maker, said Tuesday 
that first-quarter profit rose 35 percent 
from a year ago. and analysts predicted 
that the company would continue to do 
well. Bridge News reported from 
Tokyo. 

TDK posted group net profit of 13J29 
billion yen as group sales rose 9.2 per- 
cent . 


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POWER: Global-Warming Worry Fuels Growth of Solar Energy 


Continued from Page 13 

Solarex, based in Frederick. Mary- 
land, is a unit of Amoco/Enron Solar, a 
joint venture of the Amoco Corp. and 
Enron Corp., a natural gas and elec- 
tricity trading and marketing company. 

Recently, at a United Nations meet- 
ing focusing on climate change. Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton announced plans to 
place a million solar energy systems on 
roofs in the United States by 2010. 

“Generally speaking, I think the sol- 
ar industry has a very positive future.” 
said Energy Secretary Federico Penta, 
whose department is overseeing the ini- 
tiative. 

Solar power for the most part is more 
costly to produce than electric power 
from generating plants fired by oil, coal 
or natural gas. But in remote areas 
where the only other possible source of 
electricity is diesel-powered generators, 
solar is competitive, according to Mr. 
Forest of Solarex. 

Solarex is the No. 2 player in the 
worldwide market for solar power. 
Siemens Solar Industries is No. 1 . Kyo- 
cera Corp. of Japan is No. 3, followed by 
British Petroleum. 

Solar industry executives say they 
hope that, as the market for solar power 


grows, economies of scale and tech- 
nological innovation will drive prices 
down. 

“We are very small,'’ Mr. Forest 
said. “We’re also patient It takes a long 
time to develop an energy source. 
We've only been in business for 25 
years, although the technology has been 
around for longer than that. 

Scott Sklar, executive director of the 
Solar Energy Industries Association, 
said that the global movements toward 
democratization and privatization were 
driving the industry, as well as concerns 
about the environment 

As governments become democratic, 
“they want to serve the total popu- 
lation.” he said, and as utility compa- 
nies are privatized, they look for new 
ways to compete. 

“We've grown tenfold in 10 years," 
he said. “Last year. I cut ribbons at four 
new U.S. manufacturing plants. This 
year, it will be six to eight.” 

Mr. Skiar said there were parallels 
between the market for solar power and 
the market for cellular telephones, 
which use solar power to drive their 
networks in remote areas. In the 1970s, 
the big phone companies did not believe 
cellular telephones, which are more 
costly in the United Stares than the 


traditional wired phone, would find a 
niche. Cellular phone service is now 12 
percent of the market, Mr. Sklar noted. - 

■ Tberraalloy Rebuffed do Patent 

Aavid Thermal Technologies won a 
patent fight over technology used to 
keq) computer chips cool when a U.S. 
appeals court threw out a lawsuit filed 
by Bowthorpe PLC's Thermalloy Inc., 
Bloomberg News reported from Wash- 
ington. The U.S. Court of Appeals for 
the Federal Circuit upheld a lower-court 
ruling that last year declared a Thermal- 
loy patent invalid. Thermalloy had 
sought to halt sales of Aavid products 1 j 
that generated $13.7 million in sales last . " 
year, about 13 percent of Aavid 's total 
business. 

The dispute involves “heat sinks," 
used to conduct heat away from sensitive 
electronic components and dissipate it 
into the surrounding air. Thermalloy has 
a patent that covers a method of man- 
ufacturing heat sinks by gang sawing a 
set of grooves to form the pins of the 
device. A three-judge panel of the ap- 
peals court unanimously said the patent 
was invalid because Thermalloy im- 
properly tried to broaden the scope of the 
patent after it filed the lawsuit. 




RUMELI ^IMENTO 


FOR 100,000 MT PETROLEUM COKE 
AND 120,000 MT STEAM COAL 
OF OUR CEMENT FACTORIES 

TENDER OF COAL 

• 100,000 Metric Tonnes of Petroleum Cuke and 
1 20,000 Metric Tonnes of steam Coal shall be 
purchased to meet the needs of our factories. 

• The payments shall be performed in tlx- form of 
irrevocable, confirmed L/C c.stab!i>hed by 
European First Class Banks. 

• The text of the Contract shall be in Turkish and 
thar Turkish form shall he signed 

• The team for tendering expire, on September 5, 
1997 at 6:00 p.m. 

• For detailed information, please see TENDER 
SPECIFICATION. 


Specification is available at 
Import Department of Rumeli pimento A.S. 
Buyukdere Cad Rumeli Han No 40/7 
Mecidiyekoy ISTANBUL/TURKIYE 
Tel: 0 (212) 288 69 19/20 


RUBY: Body Shop Ads Use Doll 

Continued from Page 13 


Jones. 

"Our approach to adver- 
tising has been son of ex- 
perimental." Ms. Galami 
said. “This is a trial for taking 
alternative imagery into the 
mainstream media. There are 
a lot of interesting possibil- 
ities there, even for cornpa- 


wnpa 

jrthc 


tries oriented toward unortho- 
dox methods of 
communication." 


relevant to a seller of oint- 
ments, lotions and potions. 

"It’s not a question of what 
we 're trying to tell people, but 
of what we ’re nor trying ro tell 
people." Ms. Galanti said. 
“We’re saying our products 
will moisturize, cleanse and 
polish; they will nor perform 
miracles.” 

In Britain, Simon Green, 
creative partner at the BDDH 
agency in London, praised the 
campaign last month in a cri- 


ir . . r— D" •“*»» Uiviiui ill il Wl> 

If that evokes the strategy tique for the newspaper The 
pursued by Benetton Group Independent, as “incredibly 
SpA, the Italian apparel re- powerful" because "ir shows 
toiler notorious for cam- enormous empathy for worn- 
paigns that advocate stands en." 
on contentious social issues. In addition to the Rubv 

1 W*- Gataiu spent four print ad and posters, there will I 
and a half years overseeing ’ — * * — - ’ 

international communica- 
tions and media for Be- 


netton 

‘‘I don't have a problem 
with advertising as a tool for 
activism," 

she said. 

‘ The more interesting way 


be what Ms. Galanti called 
"Ruby approval stickers" in 
stores, which consumers cap 
affix "on images of men and 
women they agree with. ’ ’ ■ 
Ruby is an element of a 
three-pan campaign with 
self-esteem motifs from Body 
Shop International. After the 


““ “ ing iS ,0 ‘ mke foeus '« Sep,;Xr ™ toS; 

product.'’ 

Body Shop international 
initially thrived in America 
with proclamations by its 
founder, Anita Roddick, on 
such contentious issues as an- 
imal rights and ecology. The 


toberwiU be devoted to “self 1 
esteem and activism," in the 
form of a promotion to sell 
whistles that symbolize what 
a coming print ad calls “the 
urgent need to stop violence a 
against women." ; * 

In November. Ms. Galanti 


rowly focusedonra topic more kleT” ““ ^ ~~ wrin ; 









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OuetMfom supplied by fund groups 10 RHcwpdJ Pdf" (W: 33-1 40 28 09 09} Service Sp OftSOfBd by 

For Intormatiort on how to list your fund, fax Katy Houri at (33-1) 41 43 32 12 or E-mai! : funds0fht.com ■ur^IX’l Jl 

To receive free cfafly quotations for your funds by E-mail : suscfftie at e^und8@ffrtxom IMLJIxIA 


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Sports 


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Ashe Stadium Opens 
With Song and Upsets 

Ivanisevic and Courier Bow Out 



• 






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Rouen 

Boby Brno’s Kofomaznik, right 
ou tieaping Sctioettei of Rapid. 

Zurich Advances 

soccer Grasshoppers of Zurich, 
which played in the Champions 
League last season, only just qual- 
ified for the first round of the less 
prestigious UEFA Cup Tuesday 
after a 2-0 loss at Braun Bergen. 
Brann’s Stefan Paldan scored in the 
41st and the 44th minute. The Nor- 
wegians launched a string of attacks 
in the second Half but the Swiss, 
who had won the first match 3-0, 
clung on to win 3-2 on aggregate. 

An own goal gave Hapoel Petah 
Tikva of Israel a 1-0 aggregate vic- 
tory over Vejle of Denmark on 
Tuesday. In the 32d minute a shot 
rebounded off the crossbar, struck 
Kent Scholz, a Vejle defender and 
flew into the goal. 

Rapid Vienna lost. 2-0, in the 
Czech Republic to Boby Brno but 
advanced, 6-3, in aggregate. In the 
Ukraine. Par Zetterbetg and Enzo 
Scifo scored for Anderiecht of Bel- 
gium, which beat Poltava. 2-0 in the 
match and 4-0 overall. (Reuters) 

Gold for Frederick 

athletics Frankie Fredericks, 
the Namibian sprinter, made sure of 
his share of a jackpot worth more 
than $200,000 when he won the 
final 100-meier race of the Golden 
Four series in 9.99 seconds Tues- 
day in Berlin. 

Fredericks also won the 100 me- 
ters at the three other events in the 
series — in Oslo, Zurich and Brus- 
sels. His clean sweep gave him a 
share of the jackpot of 20 one kilo 
(2.2 pound) gold bars with Gabriela 
Szabo of Romania, winner of all four 
women's 5.000 meters races and 
Hicham Guenouj of Morocco who 
swept the four mile races. (Reuters) 

Hawerchuk Retires 

ice hockey Dale Hawerchuk. 
the veteran center who is I Oth all- 
time in points in the NHL, an- 
nounced bis retirement Monday be- 
cause of an arthritic left hip. Hawer- 
chuck, 34, played for the 
Philadelphia Flyers last season. 

• Neal Broten, a member of the 
gokl medal-winning 1980 U.S. 
Olympic team, retired from the 
NHL. He played 992 games for the 
Minnesota North Stars and Dallas 
Stars. (AP) 

Parish Quits at 43 

basketball Robert Parish. 43, 
a center who won three NBA cham- 
pionships with the Boston Celtics 
and one, this summer, with the 
Chicago Bulls, retired Monday. 
Parish played a record 1 .61 1 games 
over 21 seasons. (AP) 


Scoreboard 


By Robin Finn 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The weather cooper- 
ated, even if die mayor of New York 
didn't Right on schedule, and brimming 
with the ambition of becoming the most 
progressive and impressive of the tennis 
world's four Grand Slam events, the U.S. 
Open celebrated its first day with a com- 
bination of glitz and grit 

Whitney Houston, recruited for Mon- 
day night’s gala dedication ceremony of 
Arthur Ashe Stadium, the crown jewel 

U.S. Open Tznnis 

of this $254 million rehabilitation of the 
previously decrepit National Tennis 
Center, hit the high notes. 

Goran Ivanisevic and Jim Courier, 
both of them upset in the opening round 
on an otherwise balmy afternoon, were 
off key. 

Monica Seles, seeded second, started 
her quest for a third U.S. Open title in a 
hurry: she took just 60 minutes to dis- 
pose of Kristi Boogert, 6-1, 6-2, under 
the spotlights of Ashe Stadium. 

“It’s one of those nights you maybe 
have 10 moments like this in your tennis 
career,” Seles said of the opening of the 
new stadium. 

Pete Sampras, the defending cham- 
pion, was not thrilled to begin his cam- 
paign under the spotlights in a relatively 
strange stadium, but be made short work 
of Todd Larkham, an Australian qual- 
ifier, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3. 

John McEnroe, a four-time U.S. 
Open champion, provided the sour note 
atop this former landfill site by dis- 
paraging Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's re- 
fusal to give tiie evening's keynote ded- 
ication speech. According to McEnroe, 
who appeared at the dedication cer- 
emony with 38 other former champions, 
including Chris Evert, Ivan Lendl. Don 
Budge and Rod Laver, the mayor's ab- 
sence was a "lame” example of "pol- 
itics rearing its ugly head.” 

Lamer still was the performance 
turned in by Ivanisevic, the No. 4 seed, 
whose inability to translate his enormous 
talent into a title in a Grand Slam event 
continues to baffle him and to provide 
breakthroughs for otherwise underqual- 
ified opponents like Dinu Pescariu. 

“No way I can lose to him if 1 play 


mality in his game but were dwarfed by 
the 75 unforced errors that helped the 
somewhat stunned Pescariu carve out 
his 4-6, 7-5, 6-1, 7-6 (7-3) upset 

“It’s very frustrating when you lose 
first round,” said Ivanisevic, who also 
bottomed out early at the U.S. Open in 
1994 and 1995. “I lost first round at the 
French Open, second round at Wimble- 
don, first round here: it’s terrible. You 
know, 10 years on the tour, sometimes 
you lose the hungriness For the tenni s. 

Ivanisevic had tamed Pescariu in the 
opening round ai Wimbledon, but his 
powers of concentration went haywire 
shortly after he won the opening set 
Pescariu noticed that Ivanisevic had 
gone on vacation midway through the 
second set Monday in the shopworn 
1 finis Armstrong S tadium, now this fa- 
cility's second-string stage. 

“I just tried to keep the ball in play; he 
did the rest, and he was missing almost 
every ball.” said Pescariu. a Romanian 
ranked No. 91. ‘‘I don’t think he's in 
such good shape right now.” 

Todd Martin, another opening-day 
upset artist, had been away from the 
circuit for six months recuperating from 
elbow surgery, and had six consecutive 
losses in his previous six matches with 
Courier. But Martin made a triumphant 
return to competition in Ashe Stadium. 

After being overpowered by Courier 
in tiie first set, he applied steady pres- 
sure, in the form of a stiff serve- and- 
voliey assault, he vanquished Courier 3- 
6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. 

“1 played much better than I thought 
I would, considering tiie situation,” 
Martin said. *Tm not sure what my 
expectations were, but they were ex- 
ceeded.” 

Martin came into 1997 ranked 12th in 
the world but played just eight matches 
before having surgery for a bone spur in 
his elbow. He said he went into the 
match with Courier, who was unseeded 
here for the first time since 1989, merely 
hoping to avoid embarrassing himself. 

Instead, the 62d-ranked Martin 
rattled tiie 25th-ranked Courier with his 
consistency. And also with his joy at 
being back in the fray again after a six- 
month hiatus. 

“I think today I might have won the 
match on eagerness.” said Martin, who 
pounded 13 aces and broke Courier five 
times. ‘ * Jim really carried the play for a 



Carol Nnini / Ajm FinKrlVair 

Mary Pierce serving to Gigi Fernandez on Tuesday. Pierce won, 6-1, 6-2. 


made the most of it” 

Monday's defeat marked Courier’s 
third consecutive loss in the opening 
round of a Grand Slam event — his 
fourth-round finish at the Australian 
Open remains his sole Grand Slam high- 
light for 1 997 — and was an indication 
that his hardcourt title earlier this sum- 
mer in Los Angeles was a harbinger of 
nothing. 

Lilia Osterlob, who turned profes- 
sional this summer after capturing the 
National Collegiate Athletic Associ- 
ation title playing for Stanford Uni- 
versity, ignored her ranking of 240th 
and ambushed 55th -ranked Barbara 
Rittner, 6-3, 1-6. 6-3. 

• Steffi Graf, who participated in the 
parade of former champions on hand to 
dedicate the facility, vowed to return to 
tennis fit and healthy. “I’m gunning for 


Open. Graf said she would not even 
bother making a comeback if she did not 
think she could improve upon her 5-1 
record against the woman who usurped 
her at No. 1, 16-year-old Martina Hin- 
gis. 

• Chris Evert said she was puzzled 
why Jimmy Connors and Andre Agassi 
were absent at Monday night's cere- 
mony when others like Don Budge, who 
was in a wheelchair, and Boris Becker, 
who flew in from Germany, made the 
effort to attend. She confirmed that the 
unseeded Agassi apparently had his 
feelings hurt when his name was left off 
from the introductions at the Champions 
dinner on Sunday night: “There was a 
mistake made; he was not mentioned.” 

But Evert felt Agassi should have 
attended the ceremony anyway. As for 
Connors, who apparently had a schedul- 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1997 

Kafelnikov 

Justifies 

# 

His Open 
Seeding 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Yevgeni Kafelnikov [ 
started the 1997 U.S. Open in New York ■ 
on Tuesday, which made a change from 1 
12 months earlier. 

In 1996. he was ranked fourth in the 
world but the U.S. Open seeded him ! 
seventh, and he went home to Russia ■ 
rather than play. 

On Tuesday, he opened the second 
day of play at the new Arthur Ashe 1 
St a d i um with a display of all the talents 
that earned him the No. 3 computer’ 
ranking and seeding this year. 

Kafelnikov advanced to the second - 
round with a 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4) victory 
over Cristiano Caratti of Italy. 

Mary Pierce of France ripped past the 

American Gigi Fernandez, 6-1, 6-2. 

Pierce, seeded No. 9, took just 54 ■ 
minutes to beat the veteran doubles spe- 
cialist on the Stadium 2 court _ * 

Pierce pounded Fernandez, serving 
four aces, cracking 21 winners to seven 
for tire American and inducing 27 errors ' 
from her overmatched opponent 

Martina Hingis, the women’s top 
seed, dispatched Tami Jones, a pregnant 
American, 6-0, 6-1. ' 

Iva Majoli of Croatia, the French 
Open champion, also breezed into the *, 
second round with a 6-3 6-2 victory over ’ . 
Catalina Cristea of Romania. 

Jana Novotna, the third seed from the '■ 
Czech Republic, beat Virginia Ruano- : 
Pasciial of Spain, 6-0, 6-4. , 

In other women’s matches Tuesday; * 
Mary Joe Fernandez, an American. - 
seeded No. 12. beat Naoko Kijimuta, of ’ 
Japan, 6-2, 6-3 and Yayuk Basuki of- 
fndo nesig beat Noelie Van Lottum of 
France, 6-3 6-4. 

MeilenTu.the 1994 U.S. Open junior ‘ 
girls champion, beat fellow Californian ^ 
Jolene Watanabe, 6-3, 7-5. 

In the men’s singles, Richard^ 
Krajicek of the Netherlands beat Wayne ■ . 
Black of Zimbabwe, 6-4, 6-2, 6-2; Mag- \ 
nus Larsson of Sweden beat Jan ■ 
Siemerink of the Netherlands, 6-4, 6-2, ) 
6-3; and Jeff Tarango of the United ! • 
States beat David Prinosil of Germany, * 
6-4, 6-2, 7-5. I 

Alex Corretja, the No. 6 seed, sub- * 
dued Marc Rosset of Switzerland. 4-6, ! 
6-3. 6-2. 6-2. in their first-round match. - 






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24 a css provided the only trace of nor- waned, I took what came to me and underwent knee surgery after the French appointed” he was not in the lineup. seeds scheduled to play Tuesday. 



America’s Youth Learns to Love Russian Bomb 



New York Times Sen-ice 

NEW Y ORK — Match point is not cold yet. and 
the Clearasil junkies are scrambling forward in the 
stands, creating a mosh pit at courtside. They are a 
lunging, swarming mass of adolescent boyhood, 
each kid climbing over the other as if the last Sega 
on the shelf were at stake. This is better than that. 
This is the sun-kissed Anna Koumikova. 

“I scored.” said Mark Tarmeki. obviously age 
14, holding up Koumikova's autograph like a 
trophy. He had survived the postmateh melee fol- 
lowing Kournikova's 6-2, 6-0 victory over Sabine 
Appelmans, 6-2, 6-0. on Stadium Court Monday at 
the U.S. Open. Marie had lived only to be asked the 
most ridiculous of questions: What’s the big deal? 
"Are you kidding?” he said. “She's the bomb.” 

The bomb is blond, tan, with a heck of a back- 
hand, the toniest girl in Adidas stripes. The midriff 
queen of the court. 

“I think that tennis is a lady's sport, so we should 
look out there like ladies,” said Koumikova. whose 


Vantage Point / Selena Roberts 

as the pinups she graces, she tips a winner down the 
line. You may believe she is a marketing creation 
dreamed up to add sex appeal to the game, but she 
reached the Wimbledon semifinals this year. 

A year ago Koumikova was considered more 
fluff titan fury when she arrived in New York, but 
she beat Barbara Paulas on the Stadium Court as 
she reached the fourth round. 

‘ ‘That’s where I made my first, biggest match.’ ’ 
said Koumikova, who is Russian-born but distinctly 
American in style after spending much of her child- 
hood in Florida. “This year, I had already played on 
Center Court at Wimbledon, and so I'm used to that 
kind of big court I felt very comfortable.” 

The crazy attention that can be irritating. This is 
where her petulance shows. Any boy in the pack 
who thinks he has a chance at a prom date should 
know that the cool Koumikova — with Sergei 


I iWiim-l R 


Slam events this year. She wants the full-time • 
tennis life and cannot imagine living outside tiie ’ 
tour, saying she would “get bored” staying in one'.* 
city too long. Whatever normal teenage life she is. ’ 
missing out on, she does not consider herself a .* 
bum-out case in the making. v 

“I still think everyone is different," she said. 
“It doesn’t mean that what happened to some of ' 
the other girls is going to happen to me. Obviously, ! 
I’m still here. And I am sure I’m going to be here, ■ 
and nothing is going to happen to me. - ' 

* ‘They shouldn’t make those kinds of rules. I’ve • . 
been practicing my whole life to play. And I’m just \ ’. 
like, you know, just waiting right now. For what, I ■ 
don’t know.” 

Typical teen, she cannot wait to be treated like an ’ 
adult One day, she may be a serious rival for Martina 
Hingis. One day, her look will be less of an issue 
once she is recognized for bring something besides 
“the bomb." Not that she claims to notice- tiie 
special attention from the young guys who claw after 


years. “1 just try to look after myself and really play, been known to give groupies that far-chance look one young guy yelled out “I love you Anna. ” 
They wouldn't come here if I couldn’t play.” as she slips on by. “I think that happens to everybody,”’ Koumikova 

. Just when someone thinks about casting off the Koumikova is not a fan of the age rule that said, as if anyone believes that teenage boys would 

Koumikova tutting a forehand to Appelmans. 1 6-year-old Koumikova as a player as thin on talent restricts her to 1 3 tournaments plus the four Grand risk life, limb and their pride for any other player 






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Major League Standings 


EAST DIVISION 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Bafflmora 

83 

61 

ASA 

— 

NewYork 

77 

52 

497 

7 

Boston 

66 

66 

500 

19*6 

Taranto 

63 

66 

.488 

21 

Drtrafl 

61 

69 

jua 

23W 


CENTRAL HVMON 



Cteteortd 

67 

60 

Sto 

— 

Milwaukee 

65 

65 

■500 

3W 

Chicago 

64 

46 

492 

4’4 

Kansas Off 

52 

75 

409 

(5 

Minnesota 

52 

77 

403 

16 


WEST tkVtSIQN 



Seattle 

73 

58 

557 



Anaheim 

71 

60 

-M2 

2 

Tents 

a 

69 

473 

11 

Oakland 

52 

79 

J97 

21 

HJCnOMLUJUMI 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

PeL 

GB 

Atlanta 

80 

SO 

475 

— 

Ftartrfci 

IS 

S4 

sn 

415 

New York 

70 

60 

538 

10 

Montreal 

64 

65 

496 

15tt 

PhfladetaMa 

47 

80 

-365 

3 m 

CENTRAL OmSOM 



Houston 

69 

61 

-531 

— 

Pfltsburgh 

67 

66 

4(8 

3 

St Louis 

S9 

71 

454 

10 

Qndnnan 

58 

71 

450 

Wk 

Odcogo 

53 

78 

405 

10A 


WESTDtVBXM 



Las Angeles 

73 

59 

.553 

— 

San Francisco 72 

59 

550 

*1 

Colorado 

62 

70 

470 

11 

San Diego 

62 

70 

470 

11 


■OHO«rtUHSCMD 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

T BUB ra oil 000-3 S 1 

MBwoukw on 000 MX— 7 12 0 

TtCMs*. W. Hetwau (31 and L Rodrigues 
A daman. Fetters (7). Do. Jones [VI and 
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6. HRs— Texas. Ja Gonzalez OU. 
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DetreU a«i ooi oaa 001-7 it I 

Minnesota 010 201 200 000-4 12 0 

S.Saidefs. MkeS (4), M.MrCfS {71, BracaH 
(7). To Jones (101, Sager (111 and Wotbodu 
Radkft Swindell U). TiumUey 18). Guardado 
(1(0. Aguilera (1 U and Stefnbacfi. W-Sagcr 
3-4 L— Aguilera *1-4. HRs— Detroit Nieves 
(19). Walbeck (3). Minnesota. 8 rede (I). 
Boston 100 002 321-9 17 0 

Seattle 003 011 300-9 It I 

Support. Mahay (6), Brandenburg (4). B- 
Henry [7). Hudson (81. Gordon (9) and 


Hattebag; Wolcott Charlton (6), B. Welts f7>- 
SpoOaric (8), Stocumb (8) and Da.Wfcon. 
W— Hudson 3-0. L— Stoaimb' 0-8. 
Sv— Gordon (31. HRs — Basion, Hatteberg 

(8) . Seattle, Griffey Jr 2 (43), A. Rodriguez 
Oil. Sheeted). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Ctodnati 021 840 000-7 13 0 

Colorado HO 022 200-4 12 2 

Fe. Rodrigue?, Sullivan (51. PAJAortinez 
(7). BeHitda IS). Show <91 and J. Oliver 
F.CasHBa S. Reed (d), M. Munoz (7). Dfpoto 

(9) ond Je.Reed.W- PAJAartinezl-0.L— F. 

CasttHo 10-11. Sv— Show 06). 

HRs— Cincinnati. R. Sandere (17), B. Boone 
(6). Cotorada L. Wbfeer (37). Hetkm 13}. 

Second gone 

CbKfeMfi 210 002 010—4 17 1 

Colorado 01S 002 001—4 12 0 

G-Whtte. Graves (4). Remlmge (7), 
BeUndo (8). Shaw (0) and Fordyce: Hutton. 
Hobnes (6), Leskanic <81. OeJetn (?) end 
NVanwaring.W — G White 2- l.L— Hutton 3-2. 
Sv— Shaw (27). HRs — CnonnatL Nimnalty 
(5). Cotorada Bichette (20). Helton (4>. 

Las Angela 104 030 000-8 13 1 

PVMrergb 110 000 000-2 S 2 

RAAarflnez. Guthrie (4) and Piazza 
Schmidt Ruebel (5), Sodowstcy (8). 
OtrisSansen (9) and Kendall. W — R. 
Martinez, 7-3. L— Schmidt 8-7. Sv-Gathrie 
(1). HR— Los Angeles. Mondesi (26). 
Second game 

Las Angela IN 200 000-3 8 1 

Pittsburgh n» on 003—4 6 3 

Candteffl. Osuno (7). To.WoobB (9) and 
Prince Petes. M.WDUns (8) and Os IK 
W—M. WBtfns 8-3. L-fD.Warrefi 2-4. 
HRs— Pittsburgh- Rcndg (A), M. Smith (7). 
SaiDtego 0M 000 010-1 10 0 

Pbiadolphta ON 170 D2r— 10 13 0 

Cunnana D. Voms 15], Bniske IS). 
Bergman (7) and C Hernandez; M.Leiter 
and UotieritiaL W— m. Latte. 9-13. 
L— Cunune 6-3. HR — Philadelphia, 
Lieberthal (19). 

SeCorid game 

Sob Diego 010 003 000-4 5 2 

PfcBuMpNa 001 130 Ktx — 6 10 0 

Ashby. Bodrtter (7) and Flaherty; Keep. 
B lazier (4), Gomes (6). Spradlin (7). Battalia 
(9) and Parent W— Staler )■). L— Ashby 6- 
10. Sv— BottaHco 124). HRs— Son Diego. 
CamMJi (19). Philadelphia Brogna (16). 
Montlcal ON 010 010-2 6 0 

SL Loots ON ON 001—1 o 1 

PJMoritnez Uitiiaa <91 and Fletcher, 
Wtdger (9); Arbor. Fosses 19) and Lomptan. 
W— P. J Martinez 1S-6 L-Aybar 0-Z 
Su — Urbina (21). HR— MontreaL Fletcher 
(16). 

Florida 0U IN 000—1 8 0 

Chicago ON ON 30i—3 11 0 

A-Femondez. Alfonseca (81 and C. 


Johnson; Tapani, Piscfcdta (8). T Ado ms (9) 
and Servos. W— Tapani. 3-1 L— A. 
Fernandez, 16-9. Sv— T. Adams (13). 

Son Fitmasca 020 000 221—7 11 0 

NrvYort 0M Ml 000-1 6 1 

Estes. R. Hernandez (7). Beds 19) and a 
Johnson; BJ Jones. YPerez (7). Rojos (9) 
and Hundley. W— Estes. 17-4. L—BJ Jones. 
13-8. HRs— San Frandscn. G. Hill DO). B. 
Johnson (7) 

Japanese Leagues 


Montreal 

Hamilton 

Winnipeg 


0 12 227 259 
0 2 TOO 264 
0 2 1»6 291 


14 268 212 
12 271 240 
8 194 234 
8 253 226 



W 

L 

T 

Pci. 

GB 

Yakut! 

61 

43 

2 

.587 



Yokohama 

57 

44 



-564 

2.5 

Hiroshima 

54 

49 

_ 

-524 

65 

Hanshin 

47 

57 

1 

452 

14.0 

Chunicto 

48 

59 

1 

449 

144 

Yamlun 

45 

60 



429 

165 

ManciiAmii 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

Orix 

55 

41 

3 

.573 

— 

Selbu 

58 

44 

2 

Sifi 

— 

Nippon Ham 

51 

54 

T 

486 

8J 

Daiei 

SO 

55 



476 

9J 

Kintetsu 

48 

56 

2 

462 

11.0 

Lotte 

43 

55 

3 

.439 

120 


nisMT's nwtn 

CENTRAL LEAGUE 
YofalltA Yomftrri 3 
Yokohama 1, ChunicM 0 (10 innings! 
Hanshin 4, Htrashima3 

MOFKLEAOUe 
Kintetsu 4 Orix 3 (12 Innings) 

SeflxJ 7. Nippon Ham 2 (10 innings) 
Do toil. Lotto 0 


1. Tiger Woods. U.S, 1098 pobris overage; 
2. Greg Mormon, Austria) Ml Ernie Els. 
South Afrian lOJHt A NfcV Price. Zimbabwe) 
9 JBi S. Cofin Manftjmnerte Brtiakv 6. 
Tam Lehman. US. 865. 7. PM Mtteboa 
US. 033; 8. Mosashi Ozsfo. Japan) 7.93,- u. 
Davis Love III, U5. 7.59, 10. AAorKCMeora. 
Ui, 755,11. Justin LeonanL U.S. &BQ; 12. 
Fred Couples. Uj. 6 64 13. Steve ESungtev 
Australia) 461 14. Soft Hoch. U^. M9: 15. 
Nick Fatdo. Brdaai) 645. 


CFL Standings 

usim omnoN 

W L T PF PAPh. 

7 2 0 14 388 173 


Edmonton 7 2 0 

British Columbia <30 

Saskatchewan 4 5 0 

Calgary 4 5 0 

Weetand resorts 
Toronto 27, Saskatchewan 1 
Edmonton 28. Hamilton 24 
Montreal 26 Whmtpeg 21 
BritfcJi Catumblo 37. Calgary 23 


moum retmue uagui 

Blackburn 7. Sheffield Wednesday 2 
UEFA CUP 

SECOND OUAUFTMO POUND. RETURN LEG 
VWskto Padova Ukr. a Anderiecht Bet g. 2 
Anderiecht won 44) on aggregate. 
Dnlprapetnmk. Ukr. T VknWavkaz. Rvs. 4 
Vtodlkavkaz won 6-2 on aggregate. 

Bma, Czech P. Z Rapid Vienna Austria 0 
Vtenna wan 6-3 an aggregate. 

Liltestram, Nor, I, Dinamo Minsk. Belarus. 0 
LWeslrnm won 3-0 on aggregate. 

Odra WodzIsKnr, PoL 3. Vrigugrad, Rus. 4 
Volgograd won 6-3 on aggregate 
Orebra Sweden, a Jabhncc. Czech Rep. 0 
Orebra won an away god tni-l aggregate. 
Tmava Slovakia 0 PAOK Salonlca Or . ) 

PAOK won 6-3 on aggregate 
Hapoel Petah nkva Israel, I Vetie. Den. Q 
Hapoel won 1-0 an aggregate. 

Aarhus, Denmark, 3 Ulpest, Hungary, 2 
Aarhus wan 3-2 on aggregate. 


U.S. Open 

m NEW YORK, rt 1. 
MONDAY'S BOLTS 

RUST ROUND 
WOtMM'S SSOU 1 

Ngoko SawamoTnu, Japan, def. Erika do- 
Lcrta S3t Elam Wognec Germany. 

def. Katarina 5ftider*ova Sbnakia. 6-2. 6-3. 

Lilia Osfertoh. U5- def. Bgrbora Rittner, 
Germany. 6-1 1 -& 6-3; Elena Likhovtseva 
Russia drt. Petra Langrava Czech Republic, 
t-5, 6-t Tara Snyder. U.S. def. Qfc° Lugina 
U krone. 6-0. 7^ (7-S). 

Anbc Huber(8).GemiDnv. Gel. Gloria Pbzt- 
cWni Doty, 6-2 6-2 Magdalena Malceva 
Bulgaria del. PavSna Stojanova. Bulgaria b- 
Z 6-3. Rochet McQviHaa Australia de4. 
Cristina Tomms-Vaiera Spain z-6. 7-S. 6-4. 

Francesca Lirbioni Italy, OH. Fang LX Oil 


na 6-4 3-6. 6-2 Florenda La bat ArgenTma, 
def. AngeSco Gavalrioa Mexico. 6-2 6-1 . 

Mcgui Scma, Spain, del Magdalena Grey- 
bawska, Poland. 6-4 l-A 6-S Ludm«a 
Rjcritebva Czech RepubBc del. Jana Kan- 
dan', Germany. 6-1, 6- 1; Irina Spiriea (111. 
Romania dot. Amy Frazier, U^. 6-1, 6-1. 

Ai Suglyama Japan, dot. Arm Grossman. 
U-S. 6- r (5-7), 7-i 6-2 Joannette Kruger. 
South Ajrtea act. Bartrara Paulus (U), Aus- 
tria 6-2 6-7 (2-77, 6- 1; Rika Hlroki. Japan, def. 
Mariana DtazOTiva Aiyenttna 6-4, 4-a 6-2 
Monica Seles (21. U.S*def. Kristie Boogert 
NefheriomJsi 6-1. 6-2 Janet Lee, UX. def. 
Miho Sack). Japan. 6-2 6-7 (3-71. 6-1 
Poola Suarez, Argentina def. Sandra 
Doptex. Austria 6-2 3-4. 7-6 (7-4); JodOe 
Trail def. Adnana Gersl Czech Repub- 
lic 7-6 (7-4), 6-2 

mwinwiw 

Alex Rodulexu. Germany, del. Oleg Oga- 
mdov. Uibekratoa UM7-i (7 5), 6-1. 

Todd Marita UJ5. def. Jim Courier, U5.3- 
6 6-2 6-4 6-7. 

Jerome Gabnanl Franco, drri. Hicham 
Anut Manxra 6-4. 1-4. 7-6 (7-4), 66. 7-5. 

Jonas Bloriunaa Sweden def. Francteca 
Covet Spain 6-2 6-4 6-4 Michael ScA Ui. 
dot. Cecil Momflt, Ui. 6-13-6.6-4 7-5. 

Dtnu Pcsavtu. Ro manta, del Goran Ivani- 
sevic (4). CrooBa 4-6. 7-5, fc-T. 7-6 17*3). 

Brett Steven New Zealand, dc*. Juan Al 
bcrl Vfloca Spain 4^, 6-2 6-1. 6-2 
John van Lottum Nethertands. def. Richey 
Rcacberg. U S- 6-1. 6-4. 2-6. 6-4. 

Dante Voce*. Czech Republic del. Lau- 
rence Tieieman Italy. 4-6 6-4 1-661 6-2. 

Jlri Novak. Czech Republic def. Davtdo 
Sanguhwfll lldly. 5-7. 6-2 7-6 (1 l-9l, 6-2 
RicJrarri Framben. Australia def. Patrick 
McEnroe, U.S. 6-2 6-2, 6-7 (BID), 6-2 
Marcos OnOuska South Africa def. Fob- 
rice San to ra France, 5-7. 44. 4-6 6-2 6-3. 

Javier Sanchez, Spain del. Albert Portn 
Spam, 7-S, 6-2 7-S Petr Korda (15), Czech 
Republic, def. U5- 2-4 7-5. 7-6 (7.1), 64. 

Martin Damm Czech Popubllc dot. Tom- 
my Ha U 5- 6-1 6-4, 6-7 (5-7). 64. 

Patrick Baur. Gcnnanv- def. Jaknc Ok*t, 
Brazil 44 3-6. 64, 6-1 6-2 
Pete Sampras (lh U5, del. Todd 
LoWnm Auslnrto 6-16-1,6-3. 

raUMriKnum 

FIRST ROUND 
WOMXN’S KINO US 

PntrJdn Hy-Baulois. Canada art. Mart eta 
Kochfa Germany. 6-2 6-»r Brto Rippnor. US. 
def. Natalia Mcdwdcva U krone, 6-2 6-2 
Mary Plcice (9X France, del. Fernan- 
dez. U-S- 6-1, 6-2 Nolasho Zvereva Below* 
dot. Radka Znibakava Skrvokta. 6-), 7-5. 

IvaMakUi (4). Croatia del. Catalina Cristas, 
Romania. 62 62 Nana Mlyogl Japrm, del 
Ims Guirochatogul Arg. 6-2. 7-S. 


Sandrkie Testud. Franca del. Marla An- 
tonio Sanchez Lorenzo, Spain- 6-2 61 
Metien Tu, U JS. dot. Jolene Waranabe. 
U5- 62 7-S.- Karina Habsudom Slovakia 
det Nathofic Tauzkd, Franca 7-5, 7-6 (7-2). 

CorinaMarariu,Ul.de{. Annabel Eftwood. 
AustraSa 74 (7-3). 7-60-3); Sarto Farina, it. 
det. Undo Wild. Ul. 64, 67 (3-7), 64 
Jana Novotna (3), Czech Republic def. Vir- 
ginia Ruarro-Pascual Spain- 6-2 64 
Martino Hingis CO. Swltu det. Tami Jones. 
U-S- 62 6-1: Yuka Yoshida. Japan det. 
Kristina Brandi. US. 67 (7-9). 61. 64 
Mary Joe Fernandez (?2>. U-S. def. Naoko 
KIRmuta. Japan. 62 62* Samantha Smith, 
Brtlaia def . Ntcaie Pratt Australia 6-261. 

Vtmrfc Basuki Indonesia def. Noede von 
Lottum. Fr. 62 64 Alexandra Final Fr. 
def. EmmanuelkeGogliardL Switz. 61,61. 

Patty Sctinydcr, Swltz. det. DomMque van 
Roost Belg. 62 62 Olga Barabanschikova 
Belarus, def. Laura Gofona Italy, 62 62 
■UK'S SI NOUS 

Richard Krajicek. Nethertands. def. Wayne 
Black. Zimbabwe. 64 62 62 
Yevgeny Kafelnikov (3), Russia def. Cris- 
liano Caratti Italy, 6-2 64 7-6 (7-4). 

Mogmra Larsson Sweden, drt. Jan 
Siemerink, Nc morion*. 64 62 62 

Jeff Tara nga Manhattan Beach, Calif, drt. 
David PrtnosA Germany , 64 62 7-i 
Marceta FdippInL Uruguay, drt. Alex 
OBrien Amarttn U^. 62 64 64. 

Aka Corretja (6). Spam, def. More Rosset. 
Switzerland. 4-6 62 62 62 
■Ion Krastok, Slovakia drt. Alexandw 
Volkov. Russia 34 7-6 (74). 6a 61. 

Sorgts Sargskn Armenia drt. JuSan Alan- 
sa .Spain 24 046264. 64. 

Tammy Haas, Germany, drt. Oliver Gross, 
Cawro on 62 64. 2-a 64 LeotWer Poes, 
uwra. net. Cartas Costa Spotn 61. 7-S, 64 


■»«»rnn 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

C To "t«- and 
,^^ Co<J ^ ,r ^VarKmnreT.PCLPut 
LHP Mark Langston and OF Orlando 
Pa meiro on IS-day disabled Bst. Truled INF- 
OF Aaron Gulel to San Otago for c Angrto 
tlKDITOCUn, 

RHP rata 

RHP Jaime Smith 

CLFreUNB-Scnt rhp Batata Colon to 
5S2; ^ RMlkfd Avon tram 

Fra D nf T ^I" A S^ RHP Brta " 

Gtenn Drihmon to Toledo. ll_ Annognard OF 


Curbs Pride refused a minor league assign- 
ment and boar me a free agent. 

Kansas errr— RecaUed RHP Jim Pritsley 
from Omaha aa. Released RHP Mike 
Perez. 

Minnesota— A ctivated C Greg Myers from 
15-day dteobiod list. Optioned OF Tor* 
Hunterto New Britain EL 
OAKLANO-AOrtafed rhp Brad Rigby 
Irom 15-day dtsabted Hs». Designate] RHP 
John Johnstone tor assignment 
SEATTLE— Option ed RHP Feflpr Lira and 
INF Brent Gates to Tacoma PCL Activated 
OF Rob Ducey from IS-day disabled list. Pat 
OF Lee Tinsley on 15-day disabled bt. Re- 
caSed S5 Andy Sheets and RHP Bob Wolcott 
from Tacoma 

Texas — Put IB Will Ctartc and OF Warren 
Newson on 15 -day disabled fist and 2 & Marie 
McLemore who is relroocitve to August I 9 tti. 
Transferred RHP Xavier Hernandez from 16 
day dteabtad bst to MLday disabled Hst 
Bought contract of INF- of Alex Dkc tram 
Oktahoma City, AA. Recaned RHP Eric 
Moody and OF Mike Simms from Oktahoma 
City. Sent RHP Tanyon Sfuitze outright to 
Oktahoma City. C Frank dairies. OF Doug 
ONrtILandOF Brian Btatr oulright to Tutsa 
TL and INF Ryan GorecM oulright to Char- 
lotte. IL. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

cnK*ao-PvtRHP Kevin Foster on 15 -day 
disabled fct retroacitve ta Aug. 17. Readied 
RHP Dave Stevens tram Iowa AA. 

CINCM NAT »— Put LHP Kent Merckoron 16 
day rflsobled IhL Recalled RHP Danny 
Graves tram fndtanapalh. AA. 

FuwiOA— Bought contract of RHP Qonn 
PaB from Owrialte.IL Sent RHP IGrtOiota to 

Charlotte. 

ri^frtoiL-Put 3 B Scon Berry on 15 -day 
daabfcdfisi. 

mew voeic-Optloned LHP Joe Crawford to 
Nortek. IL Recafted INF Jason HonltketTwn 

Norfolk. 

OF Gregg Jefferies 
on 15-dgy dhobled fist, retroadtve to Aug. 12 

52 ?®°? 18 wt *° Robertson tram Seranlon- 
WBkcs-Borrc. IL 

ST. Lours— Agreed 10 terms with LHP Rich 
Antoeloci minor -league corTfroct. PW OF Hri- 
an Jordan on 15-doy disabled list. 
san BiEOo^Adrvatod RHP Jan Bniske 

samfuncisco— P eailied OF Marvin Be 

"Kr'‘ PCLiwto * aotj ”'"‘- 

BA5KITUU 

aMI^TBALL ASSOCIATION 
E F Oms Mins and G Tyus 

CHAftiOTTc-aigned C Hate Wabaume. 


oricAco— Announced the reflrejnenl of C 
Robert Parish. 

^ Denv er— Acquired F Eric Wfflams from 
Boston for 2 second-round draft choices. 
Detroit— 5 igned G-F Mask Sorty. 
phoenix— Signed F TomChamber% F CRf- 
ford RaMnsanond C WBDom Cunningham to 
l -year contracts. 

PoerLAND-SIgned F B rian Grant to 7-yeor 
Contract. Re-signed C Chris Dudley to 1-year 
contract. Renounced rights to F CWfont 
Robfraaa G Rumeai Robinson, G Mflchefl 
Buffer and G Marcus Brown. 

SEATTLE-SlgnedG-F David Wingate to 1- 
year cortrart. Re-signed G Eric Snow to j. 
rearaxrtnxJ. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

», N ^'^^ K .? ,ftKT5 - SisnM C Lance Scott 

SS.’SSSSSt"— 

tSFESSSSSZSt 

BrianHaraen aatoted FB JeratoSawefl oft 

PTodd Kwzoff waivers from Minnesota and 
g J ohn Buri y aft wavers from New Eng- 

T^. S rS!!?^ 5 on " hl B[ «m- Traded TE 
Dora » Green Bay far past carted- 
enntons. 

Hand off 

water* ttWvod or Rashod Swinger. Signed 
DT «fct»el MohrinZ c® 

WchadSwIftandS Gerame wmtams to proc- 

DE Jeff Posey. 
DE Cartas Tfemdcn DT Albert ReesaRB 
Rejmort Rutherfora WR Curtb ShNfer iS 
practice squaa 

TSKHEiSEE- signed RB Spencer Georae 
ow CB George MeCWlooah I to S 

CMiAlHMi FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

ef i^Annwrmra Jeff Giles accept^ the 
position of president. 

■OOBY 

NATIOIIAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
^Anaheim— S igned D Mb» Crawtey 3- 

Y^rarntrud. 

CAWLIWA-Tradcd C Amrinui ' 

Kidd' 900 ' F ■ 

arSfS^ AS-AnnOUn0<!d ren,em « # •» C Nad l 
New JERSEY— Acquired D VktetfmH ! 

SXSw? 1 1054 

h ” n amwT,Bn ^ LW Don ■ 

NEWyMKBAiGERs-Jlgreedtotenniwtff, ! 
F Johan Lmdbiom and D JoH Brawn. 


Ill 










io* \ J*j£ 


PAGES 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 27. 1997 


RAGE 21 


SPORTS 


' 'ij* 

Italians in Exile Show the Why 


l I , "<H0V 

I H is 0,1 




o 


Iniernaiiunul Heruld Triha w 

L ONDON — Great feats can hap- 
pen in precious little time- In just 
over nine seconds, Donavon 
Bailey. Carl Lews and Ato Boldon have 
run the 100 meters: and in just over nine 
seconds from, goal line, to goal line, 
three footballers carved out a goal for 
Chelsea on Sunday. 

Ed de Goey, the club's Dutch goal- 
keeper, caught the ball from a comer 
and threw it almost half the length of the 
field. 

Dan Pelrescu, a Romanian wingbaclc 
who usually patrols the right, ran to 
receive the bail wide on the left. With 
vision, with accuracy, with just enough 
weight, Petrescu used the outside of his 
foot to swerve the ball 35 yards (32 
meters') through the center of the field. 

The ball dropped for Gianluca Vialli. 
The brooding Italian, neglected on 
Chelsea's bench last season, had begun 
his run before Petrescu made the pass. 

Thus Vialli made up the mind of 
Petrescu, just as Petrescu had invited the 
throw from de Goey. 

Vialli kept his body between oppo- 
nent and ball. He allowed it one bounce, 
two . . . and as it rose a third time, struck 
ir venomously from 25 yards so that 
nobody would stop it. 

From goalkeeper ro goalscorer, from 
defense to attack, from three foreigners 
in harmony, the goal demonstrated how 
the ball travels fester than man. 

Vialli scored four goals during the 
match. Numerically. Marco Negn, an- 
other Italian, beat him, with five for 
Glasgow Rangers on Saturday. And 
Benito Carbone hit a brace of goals of 
scintillating sweetness for Sheffield 
Wednesday as it lost, 7-2. to Blackburn 
Rovers, the English Premier League 
leader, on Monday. 

So Italians in exile are becoming 
more than ice-cream salesmen in British 
eyes. They are pan of the changing 
culture exposing English and Scottish 
soccer ro 150 foreigners at a cost ap- 
proaching $300 million. 

While Brits discover the flavor of 
imports, they by no means invented the 
practice. Germany's Bundesliga has 148 
legionare from 38 countries: Spain and 
I tidy start their seasons next weekend, 
their teams crammed with foreigners. 

In Spain, the outnumbered domestic 
homhrcs talk of striking unless clubs put 


Vantage Point / Rob Hughes 




a block on some imports. The union 
cannot prevent free movement of West- 


ern Europeans, but wants controls on 
players from South America, eastern 
Europe and Africa. 


Allowing six non-European Union 
players per ream, claims the union, 
stifles Spanish youth. 

A generation ago, Italy stopped 
stranieri. Now it lets them 'in like oil 
gushing out of a burst pipe. 

Oil is the right analogy. A new figure 
at the president’s table, a petroleum 
billionaire, is pumping up into the latest 
inflation. 

Massimo Moratti. paymaster of ln- 
ternazionale, is attempting what his fa- 
ther, Angelo, did in the 1960s — mak- 
ing hrt er great by pouring money in 
from his oil refineries off Sardinia.’ 

The son acquired Milan’s blue and 
black dub two years ago when it was 
sinking like a stricken ship. It was out- 
paid and outplayed by A.C. Milan, the 
house of Silvio Berlusconi. 

With the Agnelli flagship. Juventus. 
now ahead ot them, both Milan giants are 
trying to buy back the power and glory. 

Inter, changing coaches and its squad 
wholesale, broke the world record fee for 
Ronaldo ( if he stays for nine years on his 
contract, it works out at SI 30 million). 

Ronaldo is one of seven summer pur- 
chases by Inter. Only one is Italian. The 
club has bought another Brazilian, a 
Unjguyan. a Frenchman, a Nigerian and 
an Argentine. They join to Youri Djork- 
aeff (France), Javier Zanetti (Argen- 
tina h Aron Winter (Holland). Nwank- 
woKanu (Nigerian) and Ivan Zamorano 
(Chile), most of whom arrived only last 
summer. 

They will be managed by Luigi Si- 
moni. 58. who has spent most of has life 
coaching at clubs where talent had to be 
sold to make ends meet. 

Simoni’s predecessor, the Englishman 
Roy Hodgson, wishes him well, but says: 
“The president thinks the way to hit the 
jackpot is not by coaching or working 
hard. He is of the opinion that we’ll give 
this lot of players a go. and if it doesn't 
work we'll bomb them out and get in a 
new lot for another £50 million ($80 
million). 

“You don’t need a soccer coach. You 


just need someone who feeds the mon- 
key.*' 

Do monkeys eat humble pie? Mor- 
atti "s neighbor and rival, the media mag- 
nate Berlusconi, has had to. Last year he 
allowed Fabio CapelJo. Milan’s ultra 
successful coach, to go to Real Mad- 
rid. 

The team's stars behaved like aban- 
doned orphans. Milan slumped to 11th 
in Serie A. Berlusconi lost a fortune 
hiring, firing, and compensating first 
Oscar Washington Tabarez. then Arrigo 
Sacchi. as coach. 

Capello is back, with a new purse and 
an old mandate. He has lo make Milan 
king of San Siro. he might restore Milan 
to European pre-eminence. 

Berlusconi has bankrolled the buying 
of 10 players — two of them Italians. 
There is new Dutch. Brazilian. Croat, 
German and Swedish blood io augment 
the "old” retainers Paolo Maldini. De- 
metrio Albenini and George Weah. 

With Franco Baresi, the emperor of 
Milan's defense retired, with Roberto 
Baggio gone for a snip to Bologna, the 
red half of Milan trusts Capello To blend 
a team that heats the hell out of Inter's 
reliance on Ronaldo-mania. 

The boy from Brazil's backstreets 
shared, wiih his fiancee Susana. a Milan 
hotel suite previously allocated to Prin- 
cess Diana. He shares the burden of 
making Inter great again. 

He happens to be black in a pan of 
Italy where racial intolerance has lately 
been manifest. If Nwankwo Kanu. the 
Nigerian recovered from heart surgery, 
makes the lineup. Inter's attack would 
hold a message against racism. 

At Milan. George Weah from Liberia 
might team up with Sweden's Andreas 
Andersson. or the troubled former Ajax 
youth Patrick Kluivert. Again color 
matters less than ability. 

And Italy’s champion, Juventus, re- 
casting for the third straight year, shows 
the same disrespect for racial barriers. 
Though selling as well as buying, Ju- 
ventus now favors Filippo Inzaghi 
(Italian!), and Daniel Fonseca t'Ur- 
uguyan) in attack. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 


Why Ryder Cup Hopes Hinge on Olazabal 


i o ml 


By Ian Thomsen 

Inierndiiomtl Herald Tribune 

A strange variation of the Ryder 
Cup will begin Thursday near Munich 
at the BMW International Open when 
the continent rallies around Jose Maria 
Olazabal. If Olazabal plays well this 
month in Germany, then the European 
team might be propelled to retain the 
Ryder Cup next month in Spain. 

If Olazabal fails this weekend, he 
might take the European team down 
with him. 

How could one player be so crucial 
among die 24 who will take part in 
golfs most dramatic team competi- 
tion? The young U.5. team, already 
chosen, is led by Tiger Woods, Justin 
Leonard and- Davis Love 3d, all win- 
ners of major championships this year. 
.The Americans will bring six major 
champions to Valderrama. all of them 
younger than 39. 

The Europeans appear to be on the 
other side of the curve. AmoHg their 
surviving core of Nick Faldo, 
Bernhard Langer and Ian Woosnam, 


Woosnam is the youngest at 39. More 
Americans have won major titles this 
season than the Europeans have pro- 
duced in the last four years — from 
Faldo and Olazabal at the 1996 and 
1994 Masters winners, respectively. 

Olazabal, 31, could give Europe the 
presence, the feeling of a younger team. 
For one thing be has fought hard to 
overcome the debilitating foot prob- 
lems that sidelined him for 18 months. 

He would give Europe a home- 
course advantage at Valderrama. No 
country outside of the U.S. or Britain 
has ever staged a Ryder Cup. but the 
Spanish galleries will understand 
whar’s at stake if they see Olazabal 
playing at his best. He learned how to 
fight from his former Ryder Cup part- 
ner Seve Ballesteros, now the Euro- 
pean nonplaying captain, and the pride 
expressed on his home soil might in- 
fect his elder champion teammates. 

Best of all, Olazabal ’s automatic 
qualification would allow Ballesteros 
to spend his two ‘ * wild card ” picks on 
Faldo and Jesper Parnevik. the U.S.- 
based Swede who finished second at 


die British Open. It says much about 
the depth of the European Tour that 
Ballesteros has so few choices. His 
.American rival. Tom Kite, had many 
options before rounding out his team 
with Lee Janzen and Fred Couples. 

"It s very close and I still nave to 
play well this week." said Olazabal. 
who hopes to maintain his currem 1 1th 
place in the RyderCup standings. (The 
Top 10 players earn automatic places, 
but No. 10 Miguel Angel Martin of 
Spain has suffered a hand injury and 
will not be available to play.) 

Olazabal could still be overtaken by 
No. 12 Padraig Harrington of Ireland, 
who is almost £22.000 behind him in 
the standings, or any of several other 
players. 

The Europeans will hope that 
Olazabal maintains his momentum 
from last weekend at the European 
Open in Dublin. After barely making 
the cut — one more shot and he was 
out — he closed with rounds of 67 and 
65, including an emotional punch- 
throwing birdie at the 1 8th to equal the 
low round of the week. 



Dj'iJ ZJ urt -ii.'Thc Av— o«cd Pirw 


Reggie Sanders of the Reds hitting a three-run homer in Coors Field. 

Two Homers in the Ninth 
Save Day for Pittsburgh 


The A«.- luu-J Press 

Two misplaced pitches by Todd Wor- 
rell took the Los Angeles Dodgers from 
a sweep lo a split. 

Worrell gave up home runs to Mark 
Smith and Joe Randa on consecutive 

NL Roundup 

pitches in the ninth inning as the Pitts- 
burgh Pirates stunned Los Angeles 4-3 
Monday night for a doubleheader split. 

"I'm sure this is going to linger," 
Worrell said. “You don’t forger about a 
bad performance in 15 minutes." 

The Dodgers won the first game 8-2, 
and a victory in the nightcap would have 
given the club a 1 'A-game lead over San 
Francisco in the NL West. Los Angeles 
took over the division lead for the first 
time since April 13 on Sunday. 

“Ii was another storybook finish in a 
storybook season." Randa said. "We 
were exhausted, down and dragging, 
ready to lose a doubleheader, and we 
wonthe game." 

The Pirates, picked to finish last in the 
National League Central, trail first- 
place Houston by three games. They are 
20 games ahead of their last-place pace 
of a year ago. 

In the first game. Ramon Martinez 
won his first official start in more than 
two months and the Dodgers roughed up 
Jason Schmidt for eight runs in 4'A 
innings. 

Gteits 7, Met* 1 Brian Johnson hit a 
two-run homer and Shawn Estes 1 17-4) 


improved to 9-0 following a San Fran- 
cisco loss as the Giants won in New 
York. Estes allowed one run and six hits 
in 6t6 innings as the Mets lost for the 
11th time inT6 games. 

cub* 3, Marlins i In Chicago, Doug 
Glanville broke a 1-1 tie in the seventh 
with a two-run. bases-loaded single as 
the Cubs beat Florida for the first time in 
eight games this season. 

Kevin Tapani allowed seven hits in 
seven innings, and Terry Adams got 
three outs for his 1 3th save. 

Expos 2 , Cardinals 1 At St. Louis. 
Pedro Martinez (15-6) took a two-hit 
shutout into the ninth and lowered his 
major league-leading earned run aver- 
age to 1 .6 1 . He set a career best for wins, 
allowing four hits and striking out 1 3 in 
$¥> innings. Ugueth Urbina got the last 
oui for his 2 1 st save. 

Phillies 1 0, Padres 1 ; Phillies 6, Padres 

4 In Philadelphia, Rico Brogna homered 
and drove in two runs in the second 
game. Midre Cummings went6-fbr-9 in 
the doubleheader, getting his first four- 
hir game In the opener and driving in 
two runs. 

Reds 7, Rockies 6; Reds 6, Rockies 4 

Chris Stynes had four hits and Jon Nun- 
nallv had three hi is as Cincinnati swept 
a doubleheader in Denver. 

In the opener. Reggie Sanders and Bret 
Boone hit two- run homers for the Reds. 

Colorado's Larry Walker went 5-for- 
9 in the doubleheader, raising his av- 
erage to .376, seven points behind the 
NL leader. Tony Gwynn. 


Home Runs 
By Mariners 
Cannot Save 
The Bullpen 

The Assi<MCiI Press 

The Mariners’ sluggers were again 
undone by their shaky' bullpen. 

Seattle hit four homers Monday, in- 
cluding Ken Griffey's major league-lead- 
ing 42d and 43d. But the bullpen failed to 
hold the lead and the Mariners lost. 9-S, to 
the Boston Red Sox in Seattle. 

Two Seattle relievers. Norm Charlton 
and Heathcliff Slocumb. blew saves in 
the seventh and eighth innings, giving 
the bullpen 20 lost saves this year. 

“You never want to see all those 
home runs go to waste," Slocumb said. 

Charlton blew his 30ih save oppor- 
tunity by allowing three runs with two 
walks and a hit batter in the seventh. 

Andy Sheets hit his first career home 
run and Alex Rodrisuez also homered 


AL Roundup 

for the Mariners, who increased their 
major league- leading total to 206. 

John Valentin drove in the go-ahead 
run for Boston wirft a ninth-inning 
single off Slocumb. 

The Mariners have lost nine games in 
which they led after seven innings. 

With the score tied. S-8. in the ninth. 
Jeff Frye drew a leadoff walk from 
Slocumb and Darren Bragg sacrificed. 
Nomar Garciaparra was "intentionally 
walked and Valentin, who went 4 for 6, 
singled in the go-ahead run. 

Slocumb. who arrived in a trade with 
Boston on July 3 1 . is 0-4 since joining 
the Mariners. 

After homers by Griffey and Rodrig- 
uez in the seventh put Seattle ahead. 8-6, 
the Red Sox tied it in the eighth when 
Valentin scored on Griffey’s throwing 
error and Troy O'Leary hit a run-scor- 
ing single off Slocumb. 

Bob Wolcon, called up from Triple- 
A Tacoma earlier in the day, started for 
Seattle and struck our eight in 53* in- 
nings. 

The right-hander, starting in place of 
the injured Randy Johnson, gave up 
three runs and 10 hits. 

Garciaparra set an American League 
rookie record by extending his hitting 
streak to 27 games. 

He led off die first with a single off 
Wolcon, breaking the rookie hitting 
streak record held by Guy Curtrighi. 
who had a 26-game streak for the Chica- 
go White Sox in 1943. 

Drawers 7, Rangers 2 In Milwaukee. 
Julio Franco homered as the Brewers 
won for the eighth time in 1 1 games and 
closed within 3!* games of Cleveland in 
the American League Central. 

Franco hit a two-run homer and went 
3 for 4 as Milwaukee reached .500 for 
the first time since Aug. 5. 

Juan Gonzalez hit his 31st homer for ■ 
Texas. 

Tigers 7, Twins 6 In Minneapolis, Bri- 
an Hunter's run-scoring single in the 
12th inning off Rick Aguilera sent the 
Twins to their fourth successive loss and 
14th in 15 games. 

Minnesota’s Paul Molitor, who went 
2 for 6. moved into 14th place on the 
career hits list with 3,144. 

Brad Radke of the Twins, attempting 
to become the second 1 8-game winner 
in the majors, did not get a decision for 
the first time in 23 starts since April 27. 
He allowed six runs and six hits in five- 
plus innings. 


......... DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 






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PAGE 22 


OBSERVER 

The Warring Party 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — When last 
sighted on the radar, Wil- 
liam Weld had sacrificed em- 
inence {'the governorship of 
Massachusetts) and headed 
for Washington to do baitle 
with Senator Jesse Helms, 
That was three or four 
weeks ago and the long si- 
lence that followed naturally 
raised fears that Helms might 
have trapped and eaten him. 
Humanitarians were relieved, 
therefore, by a short wire-ser- 
vice story in some papers. 

This said that Representa- 
tive Clay Shaw, a Florida Re- 
publican, had announced his 
support for giving Weld an 
ambassadorship. Since con- 
gressmen are assumed to 
know who is among the quick 
and who the dead, Shaw’s 
statement raises hopes that 
nothing terribly untoward has 
happened to Weld, but that he 
is merely languishing in 
chains in the Senate dungeon. 

Behind this bizarre story 
there are curiosities locked 
within curiosities. It is curi- 
ous thar President Bill Clin- 
ton should have proposed 
Weld, a Republican, to be am- 
bassador to Mexico. It is curi- 
ous that Senator Helms, also a 
Republican, should resist it. 

□ 

True, Helms, once a talk- 
radio host in North Carolina, is 
a Republican of the unrecon- 
structed mossback species, 
while Weld is a Republican of 
the uptown breed, reeking of 
Boston and outrageously 
moderate political ideas. 

Still, they are Republicans 
together, are they not? 

Of course not Together is 
not where Republicans live. 
Apartness is their natural hab- 
itat and, they rhink, their 
strength. They are nor a party. 
They are a church at war with 


itself. He who is false to the 
prevailing orthodoxy (radical 
conservatism, nowadays) 
must be stripped of his epaul- 
ets and sent forth in sackcloth 
and ashes for re-education in 
the purities of die dogma. 

And Weld is a . . . mod- 
erate! 

As chairman of the Foreign 
Relations Committee, Heims, 
claiming power to block any 
diplomatic nomination he 
chooses, swears that Weld 
shall not pass. He will not 
even grant Weld a committee 
bearing, presumably fearful 
Jesr some weak-willed fellow 
Republicans speak well of the 
moderate rascal, as Shaw has 
already done. 

□ 

The Washington media 
were shocked at Weld's gall 
in coming to Washington to 
campaign for his nomination. 
Many sensible media people 
and most of the airheads 
seemed appalled that a nom- 
inee — a mere nominee for a 
mere ambassadorship — 
should challenge power so 
august as Helms represented. 

For a fellow who was 
thought to have presidential 
dreams. Weld, it was said, 
had revealed a deplorable ig- 
norance of political reality. 

Bur suppose it was fatigue 
with Washington's dreary old 
political reality that sent 
Weld forth. That might not be 
a bad starring point for a polit- 
ical campaign. It is obvious 
that voters by the millions are 
also fatigued with what 
Washington calls political 
reality’. 

A government in which 
one cranky committee chair- 
man can hold the nation's for- 
eign policy hostage whenever 
it suits his whim is unlikely to 
leave anybody impressed' by 
Washington's idea of polit- 
ical reality. 

New Kwt Times Sen ice 



Venice Festival Won’t Shun the Hollywood Glitz 


By Roderick Conway Mom's 

Inie mationiil Herald Tribune 

V ENICE — The long- 
awaited and much-needed 
reform of the Venice Bi- 
ennale, which runs the 
fil m festival, remains stuck in that 
state of suspended animation that 
movie folk like to term “in de- 
velopment.' 1 Felice Laudadio — 
film critic and for nearly 20 years 
curator of film festivals in Italy and 
Latin America (and organizer since 
1991 of the Italian and European 
sections of the Palm Springs Film 
Festival.) — was appointed some- 
what late in the day as the new 
maestro charged with the task of 
orchestrating this year's event. 

The impression that Laudadio's 
principal agenda was to make the 
Venice film festival (Aug. 27 to 
Sept 6) once again a strictly art 
affair, hinted at by his own recent 
remarks that he would not be ar- 
ranging "a festival for photograph- 
ers," was vigorously disclaimed by 
Laudadio in an interview at the 
Palazzo del Cinema on the Lido. 

“It's true that I'm not interested 
in names for names' sake, but this 
does not mean a return to art cinema. 

As far as I'm concerned, there 
simply are good films, mediocre 
films and bad films. Moderately good films with stars in 
them usually stand a strong chance of gening into festivals. 
But what I've tried to do is to choose on the basis of quality 
alone, regardless of whether the directors or actors are well 
known," he said. 

“Also," he added, “all the films in competition are 
genuine world premieres, and in fact, with very few ex- 
ceptions. so are the ones in the other sections." 

American films are given less prominence than in the 
recent years of GiUo Pontecorvo’s stewardship, when 
Venice became a launching pad for their European dis- 
tribution. But Woody Allen’s out-of-competition “Decon- 
structing Harry" will open the festival, and there are two 
U.S. productions in competition: '‘One-Night Stand," dir- 
ected by the British-born Mike Figgis (whose previous 
movies include "The Browning Version" and "Leaving 
Las Vegas"), starring Wesley Snipes as Max. a settled, 
prosperous, happily married man, whose unexpected and 
fleeting fling with Karen (Nastassia Kinski) throws his life 
into turmoil: and Bob Gosse’s “Niagara, Niagara," the tale 
of two teenage misfits, Seth, a peny thief (Henry Thomas) 
and Mary (Robin Tunney), a frequently inebriated invalid, 
who set off to find a rare’doll in Toronto. 


A scene from “A Ciegas,” by the young Spanish director Daniel Calpasoro. 

Seven other U.S. films, including the already mega- 
eaming “Air Force One" * (which has yet to open in Europe), 
Paul Schrader's “Affliction," Guillermo Del Toro’s “Mim- 
ic' ’ and Joe Dante's "The Second Civil War,” are scheduled 
for mezzanone (midnight) and mezzogiomo (midday) slots, 
holding out the promise that, despite Venice’s change of 
direction, the likes of Harrison Ford, Nick Nolle, Mira 
Sorvino and James Cobum will take the trouble to appear in 
person. 

Gerard Depardieu and Alida Valli (veteran star of Carol 
Reed's “The Third Man” and Luchino Visconti’s 
“Senso”) will be coming to receive lifetime achievement 
Golden Lions, while the one for Stanley Kubrick, who is 
immersed in making “Eyes Wide Shut,*’’ will be collected 
by Nicole Kidman at a showing of “ A Clockw ork Orange. ‘ ’ 
which Warner is hoping to return to general release. 

The section reserved for Italian films, two of which are in 
competition, has been scrapped by Laudadio. who said: "If 
there bad been eight or 10 really good ones available, I would 
have retained it. But. while a' festival can be a great tram- 
poline to launch a film, to push a not particularly ac- 
complished one, even by a talented director, does nobody 
any favors.’* 


There is- however, a special Brit- 
ish Renaissance grouping, show, 
casing seven of the latest U-.K, of- 
ferings, among them Brian 
Gilbert's "Wilde" and Iain 
Softely’s "The Wings of a Dove." 
(-Alan Rickman's debut as a. di- 
rector, “The Winter Guest," with 
Emma Thompson and Pbyffida 
Law, will appear in competition.) 

Zhang Yimou's “Keep.Cooi;” 
described as "a humorous take qq 
changing relationships Beuy^- 
roday’s urban Chinese." 
was blocked by the Beijing 'au^ . 1 
thorities from showing at Cannes, 
will also (barring last-mirimt 
hitches) join the in-competition 
lineup, along with a joint Hong 
Kong-China production, set 
against the handover of the colony. 
“Chinese Box" directed by Wayne 
Wang (whose previous hits include 
“Dim Sum” and."Smoke"), star- 
ring Jeremy Irons as a terminally ill 
English journalist and Gong Li as 
* ‘a reformed hostess. ' ' Japan is rep- 
resented by Takeshi Kitano s 
“Hana-Bi," a story of two retired 
cops and their strangely arrived at 
embroilment with a gangster. 

Terrorism provides the theme for 
the Irish entry, "The Informant," 
directed by the New York-born Jim 
McBride (maker of "The Big 
Easy"), and for "ACiegas" (Blinded) by the young Spanish 
director Daniel Calpasoro. Films from Brazil, France, Po- 
land, Russia and the Belgian “Combat de Fauves,” with 
Richard Bohringer and Ute Lemper, are also in the running 
for prizes. 

Laudadio's attempts to set up a film market 4 la Cannes at 
Venice foundered this year through lack of time and op- 
position. from some in the Italian movie sales business. 

"Some of them have objected," he said, "to the festival • 
taking on this new role, saying Venice should remain "pure' 
and not soQ itself with commerce. And this is coming from 
the merchants. It’s astonishing!’ ’ 

“I’ve seen well over 300 films and had to chose 60 or so. 
But there were at least the. same number again that were 
perfectly suitable for showing at Venice, but m which 1 saw 
some kind of shortcoming — or was maybe just mistaken not 
to choose," said Laudadio. "These would certainly have 
been given a chance if I'd managed to organize the market 
Venice could do much more to help films of good quality/,' 
After all, films can sometimes be art, but they are also a 
commodity that has to be bought and sold. And if J’m 
reappointed to run the festival next year, I am absolutely 
determined to get the Venice market off the ground." 


international herald tribune, Wednesday; august 2 t, 1997 




FESTIVALS 


PEOPLE 


Marsalis Hits Town, and French Village Leaps in Stature 


By Mike Zwerin 

Inrerwunonj) HrruhJ Tribune 


M ARC1AC, France — The re- 
cognition factor of names 
dropped is a meaningful measure of 
the importance of occasions like 
these. Names at JIM (Jazz in Marciac) 
are gening increasingly august every 
year. 

The festival, which celebrated its 
20th birthday this year, has become a 
major event whose impact has more in 
common with, say, tae Sugar Bowl 
than with “Jazz on a Summer's 
Day." It’s about more than music 
now. The economic and social well- 
being of an entire region is at stake. 

The songwriter Carole King 
(••Tapestry/* " v * 


‘You've Got a s 


At the bandstand in 
the town square, 
the music is free. 


Friend”) was here to meet with Wyn- 
ton Marsalis, who has become Mar- 
ciac 's patron saint by now. King said 
they were discussing a musical col- 
laboration. 

Another King, B.B., was sitting in 
gridlock in his band bus, staring out 
the window. The famous blues man 
told the children asking for his auto- 
graph that he was "too tired" to sign 
their little pieces of paper. A French 
drummer asked whether that’s what is 
called an "attitude problem." 

Ray Charles, "The Genius of 
Soul.” hired an all-star combo he 
called the "Giants of Jazz” to play 
songs other chan those already as- 
sociated with him. The idea came 
from Jean-Louis Guiihaumon, direc- 
tor of the festival and mayor of 
Marciac (pop. 1,200). He has also 
been responsible for installing a full- 
time jazz program in the high school, 
of which he is the principal. (Marsalis 
teaches there every August.) More 
than any other single person, Guil- 
haumon is responsible for having 


made Marciac something 
mote than just another wide 
spot on a road. 

Although Charles's band 
— including Johnny Griffin, 
Phil Woods, David Newman. 
Roy Hargrove and Nicholas 
Payton — had rehearsed, their 
stage interpretation of The- 
lonious Monk’s “Straight No 
Chaser” was a sorry' one. 
Members of the audience, 
most of whom live within a 
radius of 250 kilometers, were 
not fooled. After 20 years, 
they've learned to hear die 
difference between a minor 
second and a clinker. 

Charles invited Marsalis on 
;e and he came out to jam 


with Hargrove and Payton. 

The three premier trumpet 
stars injected some conson- 
ance for a few choruses. 
Charles, who is known for be- 
ing rude to fellow musicians, 
promptly dismissed them. The 
backstage buzz was that he did 
not want his applause stolen. 

He called for pinch soloists. 

When musicians reach a 
certain level of fame, they 
seem to be driven to abuse 
their power. This does not appear to 
be true of Marsalis as yet, but, still 
For one thing, his ego is already being 
stroked quite enough thank you very 
much. For another, directing the Lin- 
coln Center Jazz Program in New 
York, he has been accused of agism 
and racism. It is said that when he cook 
over the program’s orchestra he 
kicked our older white guys. And in 
general at this point in his career, one 
runs the risk of appearing to suck up to 
the Establishment. 

He's still looking and sounding 
very good, and so a lot of the criticism 
might be just plain jealousy. And it is 
not the same Establishment on this 
side of the Atlantic. 

This year, Marsalis's statue was put 
up on the Place du Chevalier d’An- 
tras, next to a nice little museum 
called Les Territoires du Jazz. 



).F I -. 1 - viii. 

Marsalis (and statue) as Guiihaumon watches. 


Marsalis composed a "Marciac 
Suite," writing some of ir on (he 
airplane and rehearsing it in Marciac. 
The work has been described as a sort 
of Gascon tone poem. It is tuneful, 
unpretentious and fun. It represents 
local people and events with a great 
deal of humor and musicality. ft was 
interrupted by a thunderstorm at mid- 
night. The weather bureau warned the 
festival to evacuate the 5.000 listeners 
from the tent c*the largest circus tent 
in Europe.” says Guiihaumon ) where 
the concerts take place because big 
tents attract tightening. 

Marsalis’s band — Walter Blind- 
ing, Marcus Roberts. Rodney Whit- 
taker and Herlin Riley — finished it 
the following afternoon on the band- 
stand in the town square where the 
off-festival takes place. The music is 
free down there. 


The band sounded as happy 
as Charles had been sad. Mar- 
salis obviously wanted to 
please these people. For the 
most pan. they are clean-liv- 
ing country folk with their val- 
ues on straight. But it was very 
hot, and pleasing them would 
provide no major career boost 
for him. No matter how nice 
they are, the people in Marciac 
are not members of any cul- 
tural elite. They do not in- 
fluence world taste. You re- 
spect Marsalis for that 
This year, Marciac has been 
named a site majeur and gran- 
ted a 5 million franc 
(5830,000) subsidy by a com- 
bination of regional and na- 
tional levels of government to 
encourage a revival already 
begun by the American jazz 
music being performed and 
taught there. 

Infrastructure will be de- 
veloped. The Jake will be 
spruced up with little boats 
and cabins for hire. New busi- 
ness are moving into town — 
three furniture factories, a a 
auto-driving school, a com- 
puter consultant an industrial 
design firm. 

Guilhauraon's high school had 90 
students before JIM. Now there are 
160. thanks to the conservatory. 
Think about it. Teenagers in a public 
high school in la France profonde 
learn to play music — Mingus not 
Mozart — that originated with Af- 
rican Americans in New Orleans and 
developed in Chicago and New York. 
Is this a global village ot what? 

Some years ago. Guiihaumon says, 
he was "told by statisticians that our 
village would soon no longer be vi- 
able." 

"They said the school would have 
to close," he said. "These are sci- 
entists, remember, serious people. 
They told us, in fact, that we were 
condemned. But there was one ele- 
ment (hay did not take into account. 
The will of man." 


T HE oldest person in the world is 1 17 years 
old. has 500 descendants and lives in 
southern Vietnam, the daily Saigon Giai Phong 
claims. Le Thi Co was reportedly born in 1 880 
in a suburb of Saigon, now known as Ho Chi 
Minh City, and is still in good health, the paper 
said. The paper insisted she is now the world’s 
oldest living person. The official title has 
already been given by the Guinness Book of 
Records to a Canadian, Marie-Louise Mefl- 
leur, 116, following the death in August of 
Jeanne CaJment in France at the age of 122. 

□ 

The Belgian couturier Olivier Strelti is 
delighted that the rubber-lipped Rolling Stone 
Mick Jagger has picked ms designs for the 
group's latest "Bridges to Babylon" world 
Four. "Mick Jagger saw some of our designs in 
an American "magazine and asked to see 
diem.” Strelli said The 54-vear-old rocker’s 
fancy includes a figure-hugging red velvet coat 
and matching trousers, as well as a short velvet 
tiger-print coat in gold, brown and burgundy. 

a 

Steven Spielberg's dinosaurs have been 
outdone by a 14th century Japanese princess 
who fights ro save forests. The animated film 
"The Princess of Mononoke" has attracted 
7.7 million viewers in Japan so far and 
grossed 6.3 billion yen (about S54 million) 
since its Japanese debut in mid- July, an earn- 
ings record for a Japanese movie.* a spokes- 
man for Toho Co. said. Spielberg's "The Lost 
World: Jurassic Park" attracted 5 million 
people in Japan during that period. 

D 

No one can accuse Rosemary Clooney, 69, 
of marrying in haste. Clooney is a step closer 
to marrying a dance instructor she met on a 
movie set in the 1950s. Clooney and Dante Di 
Paolo, 72, are engaged and plan ro wed this 
fall. The two have lived together since 1973. It 
will be the second marriage for each. 



□ 

A federal appeals court upheld a $ 150,000 
jury award for actor Clint Eastwood in his 
lawsuit against the National Enquirer, a su- 
permarket tabloid. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court 
of Appeals ruled (he tabloid should have had 
doubts about the story written by a freelancer. 
Cameron Docherty. because the National 
Eoouirer had run a story a few weeks earlier 
that had contradicted Dochertv's article. In 
addition, the judges said the tabloid should 
nave been suspicious when the reporter told 


FAME’S PERKS — Liza Minnelli ar* « 
riving at Catania, Italy, where sbe^ilLT 
be a Judge at a Miss Italia contest 

the National Enquirer's editors his tape had 
been erased. Eastwood sued the tabloid after a 
Dec. 21. 1993. cover story that claimed to-be- 
an interview entitled "Dirty Harrv Lifts the 
Lid on His Private Life' ' was published. 

□ ; 

The actor Tom Selleck has no plans ro go 
into politics. The "Magnum, P.I." star rook, 
on columnist Maureen Dowd of The New- 
York Times. Dowd wrote last week that Re-! 
publicans were crying to recruit Selleck for the 
Senate. Selleck likened her column to a 
tabloid report full of “half-truths and fab- 
rications." In a letter to The Associated Press.; 
Selleck said. "I have never seriously con- aJL 
sidered running for elective office nor have T 
ever participated in meetings to that end. ” 

□ 

Mother Teresa turned 87 Tuesday to the 
cheers and applause of hundreds of school 
children and aid workers who gathered at the 
headquarters of the charity organization she 
founded in Calcutta's slums. 


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in the springtime. 


Even country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home or to other countries really easy. 
Just dial the AT&T .Access Number for the country you're 
calling from and you’ll get the clearest connections 
home. And be sure ro charge your calls on vour AT&T 
Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous phone 
charges on your hotel bill and save you beaucoup de francs 
tup to 60% ). Check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


7 nnwiUill' M $ li-an*.’ hi*-! .7 C- r - r*,; j - t ‘ 1 ' c.p-iMlif^n.un •• V‘ r 1 ■ j. 

Jr- fc>‘', /( hi4,v0.iR tffifltci‘wrs-;n«'a.Vrfi .un.eaiiux BnU-naQ r„. ir.-y. j , nr.(? f tap* iff*! 4if.ii ir'v f _• 1 jfer , j.j • *• • f , • «' • .v.ur- » ir. . 

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Steps to follow for easy 
calling worldwide; 

E.Jum dial die YTST.VXuSj Number 
for the country 'nu jn? cuiling from 

2 Dfol ihe phoritp number you’n: calling 
.% Dial Iht i.iHim; cnrj number listed 
Jlwe v.iuriMriie 


AT&T Access Numbers 


EUROPE 

Austria «o .. 

ozz-383-mi 

Belgium* . .. . 

3-800-1 M-tfl 

France ... 

■0- SOQ -99-0 011 

Germany 

..DWMflB 

Greece* 

-00-800-1311 

Irelanda. 

1-MO-5SD-000 

ftalg • . .. . 

172-1011 

Nettrarfaiufs* . 

0800-022-0111 

Russia *A(Mascowji 

.... 758-5042 

Spain. . 

900-33-00-11 

SwBdeo 

.023-735-811 

Switzerland* . . 

0880-89-0011 

United Kingdom a 

0500 -89-0011 


0800-89-0011 

ftriOOLEEAST 

Egypt*{Cplro]* . 

510-0208 

Israel . . .. 

177-100-2727 

Saadi Arabia <• 

1*800-10 

AFRICA 

Ghana 

0191 

South Africa 

0-800-99-0123 



lln,, lte ■ u,ce * '«*■ for «he coumrv wu rv am from? jta ask jnv operator f„ 
AT&T Dlrecr Service, or visit oar c4kr at tRljh/AvwwjaxomitraveJer 



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