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77?e season begins 
Sunday, 

Page 21. 



INTERNATIONAL 





PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 




Paris, Friday, August 29, 1997 





(£ No. 35,ttl£ 


* 


Swedes Look Hard 
Into Dark Backyard 

Sterilization Program Was ‘Barbaric, 9 
Health Minister Says to Shocked Nation 


By Dan Balz 

Washington Post Service 


STOCKHOLM — The victims 
were young and mostly female, 
judged to be rebellious or promis- 
cuous. of low intelligence or perhaps 
of mixed blood. One was a young 
woman whose priest believed she had 
not learned her confirmation lessons 
well enough, another couldn't read a 
blackboard because she did not have 
eyeglasses and was deemed to be re- 
tarded. 

In the eyes of Swedish authorities 
they were misfits in a forward-look- 
ing nation, and for that they paid a 
terrible price: sterilization at the 
hands of the state, often against their 
will Over four decades, 62.000 
Swedes were sterilized as part of a 
national program grounded in the sci- 
ence of racial biology and carried out 
by officials who believed they were 
helping to build a progressive, en- 
lightened welfare state. 

Now the collective history of the 
victims, brought lack into public view 


by a sharply written series of articles 
in the country's largest morning news- 
paper, has stirred the public con- 
sciousness of a country that has often 
ignored the darker corners of its past 

The newspaper series — and the 
international interest in the program 
— have prompted a painful re-ex- 
amination of Sweden's self-identity 
and forced the government to an- 
nounce its intention to create a high- 
level commission. The new commis- 
sion will be asked to explain why this 
happened and bow to compensate 
those whose lives were unalterably 
affected by it 

“These acts were barbaric,” said 
Margot Wailstrom, the minister of 
health and social affairs, who ad- 
dressed a press conference Thursday. 
"We should call things by iheir right 
name. Today of course we strongly 
condemn these acts, and they can 
never be defended.” She added that 
"no amount of compensation” can 
fully repay the victims. 

See SWEDEN, Page 6 


^ f-m - 7 

Bosnian Serbs Attack U.S. Troops 



A ILS. soldier in NATO's Bosnia force patting up barbed wire in Brcko on Thursday as Bosnian Serbs protest 



Asia Stocks Plummet Under Currency Pressures 








By Michael Richardson 

International Herali Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Waves of selling 
battered Southeast Asian currencies and 
stock markets Thursday following a 
controversial move by Malaysia to re- 
strict share-trading and signs elsewhere 
in the region of rising interest raies and 
flagging economic growth. 

Philippine shares were hit hardest, 
with the benchmark stock index plum- 
meting more than 9 percent to its largest 
one-day loss in 10 years. Panic selling 
set in amid fears of rising interest rates 
and slowing economic growth, traders 
said. 


Those factors have been punishing 
financial markets in the region since 
July 2, when Thailand severed the link 
between its baht and a basket of cur- 
rencies that reflected the U.S. dollar. 
With much of Southeast Asia's recent 

Emerging markets elsewhere still 
attract fund investors. Page 15. 

growth fostered by borrowing from 
abroad, the economies began to suffer 
when the dollar rose this year. Countries 
were forced to increase interest rates to 
defend their currencies, and that slowed 
economic growth and discouraged over- 


seas investors seeking double-digit 
stock-market returns. 

Thailand has turned to the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund for help and is 
reforming its economy under a program 
accepted by the lender. But other coun- 
tries are trying to work out the problems 
by themselves, with varying results. 

For example, stocks in Malaysia 
plunged 4.2 percent Thursday in one of 
the worst losses in the market’s history 
after new rules imposed late Wednesday 
to prevent short-selling and push prices 
higher backfired. (Page 4) 

Short-sellers borrow a stock and sell 

See MARKETS, Page 4 


| The Dollar 1 

New York 

Thursday <9 A P.M. 

previous dose 

DM 

1.7945 

1.806 

Pound 

1.6185 

1.6133 

Yen 

119.105 

118.6% 

FF 

6.039 

6.0775 

1 

The Dow 



Thursday dess 

ptmwus Oose 

-92.9 

7694.43 

7787.33 

S&P 500 9 

change 

Thursday 9 4PA1 

previous ease 

-10.03 

903.67 

313.70 


Albright to Visit Syria 
In Bid to Size Up Assad 


By Steven Erlanger 

Ate * 1 York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — Madeleine Al- 
bright, U.S. secretary of stale, plans to 
go to Syria for talks with President 
Hafez Assad during her first official trip 
to the Middle East next month, accord- 
ing ro senior U.S. officials. 

Mrs. Albright’s trip will also take her 
ro Israel. Egypt, and Jordan. Her 
primary goal is to get die Palestinians 
and Israelis talking seriously to each 
other again about peace based on co- 
operation to achieve security. 

Bur with Israeli encouragement, Mrs. 
Albright is also interested in taking the 
measure of Mr. Assad. She would also ny 
to restart suspended peace negotiations 
between Syria and Israel, the officials 
and Middle Eastern diplomats said. 

The current difficulties between Israel 
and the Pales tinians , and a new Amer- 
ican drive to press the two sides to focus 
on a final settlement rather than taking 
interim steps, persuaded her to go, of- 
ficials said. There is one proviso — the 
Palestinians must restore at least a lim- 
ited degree of security cooperation with 
the Israelis, according ro the officials. 

The trip is expected in the second 
week of September ; bnt one senior of- 
ficial stressed that final decisions had 
not been made. 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
of Israel has been eager to restart tails 
with the Syrians. Such a step could shift 
the emphasis from difficult relations 
with the Palestinians, and allow him to 
appear more like a peacemaker, the of- 
ficials and diplomats said. It could also 
remind Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian 
leader, dial he is not the only focus of 
Israeli negotiating efforts, they added. 
Sign of movement on the Syria-Israeu 
track are likely to increase pressure on 
Mr. Arafat to deal with the Israelis on 
final-status issues. ‘ ‘Assad is seen as me 
bad guy,” one diplomat said. So me 
Syrian track is convenient for Netan- 
yahu even if a deal seems very faraway. 


Newsstand Prices 



Andorra 10.00 FF Lebanon U-^.DQoj 

Ames 12.50 FF Morocco 

Cameroon ..1.600 CFA Qatar- 

Egypt ... ....££5.50 Reunion- 

France 10.00 FF 

Gabon 1 . 100 CFA Senegal .......l-IOOW, 

; Italy, 2.800 Lire Spam, 

bay Coast. 1.250 CFA Tiwsa -12501^ 

JMdan..- 1.250 JO UAE.— -«»»: 

Kuwait .700 Fite U.S. Ml (Eur.l-.^ljO. 


He’ll be perceived as a dealmaker and 
not just someone who fights with Arafat 
all the time.” 

A number of previous secretaries of 
state, including Mrs. Albright's prede- 
cessor, Warren Christopher, tried with- 
out success to draw Mr. Assad into 
productive negotiations with Israel. Mr. 
Christopher was widely criticized for 
spending too much time on die Middle 
East, and in particular, in Damascus, 
where he made more than 20 visits. But 
for most of his term, rhe Labor Parry was 
running Israel and a comprehensive 

See ALBRIGHT, Page 6 


Golan Pullout 
Considered in 
5 94 by Rabin 


By Douglas Jehl 

AVh - York Times Senice 

JERUSALEM — In secret talks in 
1994, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of 
Israel told the U.S. secretary of stale that 
he could consider a peace with Syria in 
which Israel would withdraw to a line 
that divided die two countries at the 
outset of the 1967 war, the notetaker in 
the meetings said Thursday. 

Mr. Rabin’s stated willingness to dis- 
cuss such a plan went well beyond what 
has widely been understood io be his 
negotiating position, said the notetaker, 
Itamar Rabinovich, who was then Is- 
rael’s ambassador to the United States 
and its chief negotiator with Syna. 

Even beyond a withdrawal 
Golan Heights to an international border, 
Mr. Rabin told Secretary of State Warren 
Christopher that he could accept Sj-na s 
insistence on a further Israeli pullback to 
the June 1967 lines if President Hafez 
Assad of Syria accepted stnet conditions 

set by Israel in other areas- 

Mr. Rabinovich described Mr. Ra- 
bin’s stance as "a hypothetical 5< *' 
nario,” but its disclosure along with 
information about a saiesofs^ret 
meetings between the late prime min- 
ister and the secretary of state in 1993 



Roberto PfcH/Tbc AmuKd ftew 


LIKE-MINDED ON THE EURO — Prime Minister Jospin of France 
and Chancellor Kohl of Germany meeting Thursday in Bonn, where 
the two agreed to adhere to the timetable for introducing a single 
European currency and on the need for the euro to be strong. Page 14. 

PAGE TWO ASlAJPACmC Page 4. 

The House That Software Built Japan Looks ,4new at Juvenile Justice 


AGENDA 

Joseph Kennedy 2d 
Out of the Running 

BOSTON (AP) — Representative 
Joseph P. Kennedy 2d announced 
Thursday that he would not be a can- 
didate for governor of Massachusetts 
because he feared the campaign would 
focus on scandals within his family. 

Mr. Kennedy. 44. was alluding to 
his brother’s alleged relationship with 
a teenage baby sitter. Entering the race 
in light of tiie scandals, he said, was not 
fair to his family. “It's not fair to the 
people of Massachusetts," he added, 
“and it’s not the right thing to do.” 

Mr. Kennedy, the eldest son of the 
late Robert F. Kennedy, had been 
viewed as the favorite in the race as 
recently as a year ago. But he has 
recently been bartered by negative 
publicity that has undercut his stand- 
ing in the polls. 


THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Martian Geology Baffles Scientists 


EUROPE Pages. 

London Decision Due on Sinn Fein 


Books — 

Page 9. 


Pages 8-9. 

Sports 


Tiie Intermarket 

Page 7. 

B The IHT on-line 

www.iht.com ■ 



Law Makes a Texas University Whiter 


By Sue Anne Pressley 

Washington Post Sen-ire 


AUSTIN. Texas — As classes began this week at the 
University of Texas, the flagship school in a highly diverse 
state has become distinctively whiter. 

Among the freshman class of 6400, there are only 150 
black students, half last year’s number. And the law school, 
for years one of the major U.S. educators of minority 
lawyers, is welcoming only 4 blacks and 26 Hispanics to its 
first-year class. 

University officials agree that the scarcity of both blacks 
and Hispanics is a direct result of new prohibitionson racial 


preferences that could affect the university's makeup — 
and its public image — for years to come. 

The experience of Texas is being watched closely around 
the country because its universities are the first under court 
order to dismantle affirmative action policies. That court 
ruling, the Hopwood case — named for the white student 
who brought a discrimination suit after he was denied 
admission to the university’s law school — says that race 
cannot be used as a factor in admissions. 

The Texas attorney general, Dan Morales, ruled that this 
basic ban on affirmative action also must include financial 

See CAMPUS, Page 6 


EinflVnffirui’f, 


Soldiers Fire 
Warnings as 
Mob Occupies 
Police Station 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Tunes Service 

BRCKO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
American troops had to use tear gas and 
fire warning shots to disperse groups of 
angry rock-throwing Serbs on Thursday 
while taking over this town's police sta- 
tion from supporters of Radovan Karad- 
zic, the Bosnian Serb leader indicted for 
war crimes. They later hastily evacuated 
40 United Nations police officers. 

The seizure of the police station was 
the latest salvo in the effort to chip away 
at Mr. Karadzic' s control of the Bosnian 
Serb enclave. It follows the seizure two 
weeks ago of police stations in the city 
of Banja Luka, as well as several smaller 
stations, like those in tiie town of 
Mrkonjic Grad. 

NATO officials said they expected 
the unrest here and in other Bosnian Serb 
towns to fade in the coming days. But 
they also said they had reports of some 
Seths carrying banned assault rifles. 

“NATO troops,” an official said, 
“are being especially vigilant." 

[After U.S. peacekeeping troops in the 
NATO force were attacked, the White 
House issued a warning, Reuters report- 
ed. “We' re continuing to work with both 
sides,” a White House spokesman, Joe 
Lockhart, told reporters on the island of 
Martha’s Vineyard, where President Bill 
Clinton is vacationing. He said the 
United States would not tolerate either 
side inciting violence against the Sta- 
bilization Force troops. 

[•‘It's important that all of the parties 
there understand that they should not 
challenge SFOR. and that we will hold 
the leadership responsible for keeping 
their people under control,” Mr. Lock- 
ban said. He declined io say what the 
United States might do if the leaders did 
not heed the warning.] 

The 35.000-member Stabilization 
Force is being used for the first time since 
being deployed 19 months ago to provide 
security for supporters of the Bosnian 
Serb president, Biljana Plavsic, who is 
locked in a bitter power struggle with the 
hard-line leadership in Pale and is mov- 
ing to seize police stations and media 
outlets. 

Beefed up SFOR contingents were 
deployed ahead of the trouble Thursday 
in Brcko, Bijeljina and Doboj to “deter 
the outbreak of violence,” NATO of- 
ficials said. These officials said they 
anticipated problems as police loyal to 
Mrs. Plavsic moved in w take over 
police stations and radio and television 
transmitters in the Serb-held areas of 
northern Bosnia. 

Mrs. Plavsic, who has criticized Mr. 
Karadzic and his followers for corrup- 
tion, has promised to abide by the 
Dayton agreement and cooperate with 
the international community. But her 
lack of authority has made it impossible, 
until now, for her to carry out any of 
these policies. 

The seizure of the Brcko police station 
took place early Thursday morning when 
U.S. troops in armored personnel carriers 
sealed off the building to permit police 
backing Mrs. Plavsic to take control. 

But supporters of Mr. Karadzic set off 
an air-raid siren, and hundreds of Serbs, 
many aimed with fire bombs, metal 
bars, chunks of wood and rocks, at- 
tacked the soldiers outside the building. 
At least one American soldier was 
slightly injured and troops had to fire 
tear gas grenades to break up the mob, 
according to NATO officials. Warning 
shots were also fired, they said. 

UN officials said 15 of their vehicles 
were destroyed and that three UN em- 
ployees were slightly injured. 

The U.S. soldiers withdrew from the 
police building, but NATO officials said 
the handover of the station to police 
loyal to Mrs. Plavsic was completed. 

During the melee, NATO helicopters 
dropped canisters of tear gas on a crowd 
attacking the UN police station where 
the 40 international police monitors 
were barricaded behind locked doors. 

Before being evacuated by U.S. 
troops, the UN police officials shredded 
records and erased sensitive computer 
files to prevent them from falling into 
the hands of Karadzic supporters, UN 
officials said. 

By late Thursday afternoon, the town 
See BOSNIA, Page 6 


In Japan, a Textbook Case of Truth and History 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

Imentaiiorui! Heruld Tribune 


TOKYO — For three decades, 
Saburo lenaga and Nobukatsu Fujioka 
have stood on opposite sides of the 
lsua ixnu u.v, , riMrlv barricades in a battle over now much 

and 1994 schoolchildren here should team .about 

than ever oefore Mr. . Kao ‘ lilical f v Japanese atrocities during World War 
ness to consider bold and - n including tiie slaughter of up to 

unpopular steps asapnee f pe 300,000 Chinese in the Rape of Nank- 




jis northern neighbor. . 

Details of the meeting rnJulj 1994 and 

See BORDER* Page 6 


ing. * 

Through the couns and the media, 
Mr. lenaga has fought with tenacity and 


7 * 


humor to stop the Education Ministry 
from dropping passages about atrocities 
from school history textbooks, includ- 
ing his own. For generations of Japanese 
who have known only affluence, Jap- 
anese atrocities represent a grim but 
necessary reminder of the horrors of 
war, Mr. lenaga says. 

For his pari, Mr. Fujioka has written a 
string of best-selling books playing 
down Japanese atrocities and cam- 
paigned tor tighter screening of school 
textbooks by the Education Ministry. 
Mr. Fujioka says that those now in use 


are too bleak and that they foster only 
tear and loathing of Japan among the 
nation's schoolchildren. 

More than a half-century after the end 
of World War II, Japan is still deeply 
divided over the war crimes its troops 
committed against Asian and Western 
soldiers and civilians. 

All the same, when Mr. lenaga bows 
out of the battle of the textbook with a 
final appearance at the Supreme Court 
on Friday, few of his intellectual op- 
ponents will be watching as carefully as 
Mr. Fujioka, 


* ‘Mr. lenaga has every right to ask the 
court to sit, but ro ask ihe government to 
go through the events of history one by 
one and give its approval is a mistake,*'* 
said Mr, Fujioka, 53, a professor of 
education at Tokyo University. "It's 
nonsense.” 

Mr. lenaga, 81, a prolific, award- 
winning historian who retired in 1986, 
shrugged off Mr. Fujioka’s objections 
as the “dynamics of history,” 

For Mr. lenaga, the battle against 

See HISTORY, Page 4 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST '29, 199T 


PAGE TWO 


$60 Million Dream on Lake Washington /The House That Software Built 


A Window Into Bill Gates’s Techno-Home 


By Elizabeth Corcoran 
and John Schwartz 

Wtnlnnf}iPn Post Sen ice 


W HAT seems to impress guests the most 
is the library — a suite of three rooms 
connected by arches, ihe center room 
crowned by a dome. Here, the richest 
man in America, whose fortune is wrung from the 
digital revolution, pays homage to that ancient 
database, the book. 

After seven years of construction, the house is 
finally ready for occupancy. In the library, carefully 
crafted shelves are loaded with rare editions. Op- 
ulent chairs — a bit more formal than the furniture 
elsewhere in the house — are tastefully arranged by 
a leading interior designer. 

A special nook has been constructed to display 
one of the owner's most prized possession, a sci- 
entific notebook kept by 
Leonardo da Vinci in the 
early 1500s. Da Vinci’s 
distinctive, mysterious, 
backward-running 
manuscript cost about 
S30.8 million. 

Huge windows look 
westward across a pictur- 
esque lake toward the 
Olympic Mountains. For 
Bill Gates, 41, chairman of 
Microsoft, a young man so 
rich he could have any 
house, any view, any- 
where in rhe world, this 
vista seems to say 
something profoundly 
personal. 

He has ordered a motto 
inscribed around the base 
of the library dome. It is a 
sentence from the final 
page of "The Great 
Garsby.” one of the bil- 
lionaire’s favorite novels 
f there are four rare copies 
on his library shelves!. 

The inscription: “He 
had come a long way to 
this blue lawn, and his 
dream must have seemed 

so close that he could 

hardly fail ro grasp it." 

What does Bill Gates dream of? For years, he has 
dreamed of this house — a S60 million. 20,000- 
square-foot < 1,800-squore-meten amalgamation of 
boyish exuberance and elegant taste, of futuristic 
technology and a passion for old books. As it has 
risen on the shores of Lake Washington near Seattle, 
this home has fascinated tourists, inconvenienced 
neighbors and frustrated Mr. Gates. In his book. 
"Tne Road Ahead.” Mr. Gates wrote that the house 
had “been under construction for what seems like 
most of my life.” 

Sometime in the next few weeks, Mr. Gates, his 
wife. Melinda French Gates, and their daughter. 
Jennifer, will move into their new home. For all of 
the interest in the place — Barbara Walters has 
pleaded for a televised tour — America's wealthiest 
daddy, mommy and toddler would prefer to move 
quietly. The details of the home are held as close as 
the features of the latest Microsoft product 
As with software, however, details do leak. 

In May. Mr. Gates invited a hundred corporate 
chiefs, along with government officials including 
Vice President A1 Gore, to a summit on technology 
at Microsoft, with dinner at his work-in-progress. 

The visitors arrived by boat crossing Lake 
Washington toward the low-slung, hill-bugging, 
lodge-like mansion and surrounding guest house, 
sports courts, gardens and garage. In all. the com- 
pound totals some 40,000 square feet spread over 5 


acres 12 hectares). The boat landed at a 100-foot 
(30-meter) dock that led to the main level — the 
level for entertaining — of the multilevel house. 

In the entry hall they found a long, airy stairway 
rising several floors. To their right was a huge room 
— big enough to seat 100 comfortably at round 
tables' for dinner — and on one wall of this room 
were 24 video screens, each with, a 40-inch (100- 
centimeter) picture tube. They can display 24 dif- 
ferent images or just one. On this night, they played 
a concert by the Vienna Philharmonic. 

On the opposite side of the foyer was the exercise, 
room and spa, in close proximity to the indoor 
swimming pool. It is no ordinary pool. Sixty feet 
long, with speakers built in to pips music under- 
water, there is an ancient fossil imprint of a palm 
frond the size of a sapling in a massive slab of cream- 
colored stone behind the diving board — which is 
made of gleaming wood, not ordinary fiberglass. 



What does the founder of Microsoft dream of? For years, he has dreamed of this 
house - a 20.000’ square- foot blend of boyish exuberance and high technology. 


The fossil motif is repeated on the floor. Sliding glass 
doors separate the pool area from the outdoors. 

Or guests could have moved from the foyer to Mr. 
Gates’s 20- seat private theater, with a large screen 
for showing high-definition television images. The 
theater chairs were plush and comfortable, each 
furnished with' a small table and lamp. 

Most striking, according to several of Mr. Gates's 
guests, was the “Northwest sensibility,” an overall 
style in keeping with the design traditions of the 
Pacific Northwest, thanks in no small part to Thierry 
Despont. a French architect and designer. With the 
architects James Cutler and Peter Bohlin, Mr. Des- 
pont greatly influenced the look of the house. 


M 


R. GATES may be brassy in business, 
fis 


but he is all polished wood and vaulted 
ceilings at home. Miles of fiber-optic 
.cable are strung inside the walls and 
crawl spaces. Video screens capable of displaying 
computer images, standard television or high-defin- 
ition TV are everywhere. But the technology is 
unobtrusive — even the electrical outlets and phone 
jacks are hidden away. 

What visitors recalled were the classic touches — 
like the towering old beams of Douglas fir salvaged 
from a lumber mill, then sanded and nibbed to a 
satiny finish and braced across the ceilings with iron 
bands. 


“I wanted craftsmanship but nothing ostenta- 
tious,” Mr- Gates wrote. “I wanted a bouse that 
would accommodate sophisticated, changing tech- 
nology but in an unobtrusive way that made it clear 
that technology was the servant not the master.” 

Guests said that it was a comfortable, rather than 
imposing, house. Of course, these were chief ex- 
ecutives of various companies, and they were perhaps 
more charmed than dazzled to find Dale Cmhuly. a 
renowned glass artist giving demonstrations of his 
craft on the deck overlooking' Lake Washington. 

Still, one guest confessed to knocking over a 
glass of wine by accident. He felt embarrassed, he 
said, but in the way you feel when you dump wine 
on your best friend’s carpet. It was not like spilling 
a drink in the Oval Office. 

Measuring about 384 feet from one end to the 
other, the Gates house is 10 times the size of the 
average new American home, but downright cozy 
compared with such be- 
hemoths as the Hears! 
castle at San Simeon, 
California, which boasts 
90.080 square feet of 
house on 2 / 0,000 acres of 
land 

Mr. Gates's house has 
about 20 rooms (not in- 
cluding bathrooms, hall- 
ways' and closets) and six 
bedrooms. The upper, 
more private level in- 
cludes a kitchen that 
many visitors found re- 
spectable. but bardly 
awe-inspiring. 

Like any house proj- 
ect, this one took longer 
and cost more than any- 
one anticipated. Original- 
ly, the price tag was es- 
timated at about SI 0 
million. 

Many aspects of the 
house's' design reflect the 
taste of the young bach- 
elor who started the proj- 
ect: There is a room with 
a built-in trampoline and 
20 -foot ceilings, and a 
game arcade. The dock is 
suitable for water skiing 
and the garage is built in- 


R/-n Unre-r ». .n\r Uni— 


to the hillside, almost like the Bar Cave. 

After the wedding, Mr. Gates’s wife took a hand 
in the plans. She redesigned the kitchen and added 
an office for herself. 

Outside designers persuaded Mr. Gates to add 
another feature for his daughter They caned a 
stream into the backyard to attract frogs, turtles and 
other creepy craw lies. Near the edge of the lake 
there will be a salmon hatchery. 

And then there are the gizmos. 

The principal purpose of the ubiquitous video 
screens, in the library, by the hot mb. embedded in 
the walls like so many pictures, is just that — to 
display artwork. A few years ago. Mr. Gates started 
a company called Corbis, which has steadily ac- 


quired the rights to 17 million pictures and images. 
From these. Mr. Gates can select a constantly chan- 


of a third- 


ging array of art Bored with a picture o 
century mosaic that shows Virgil writing the 


Aeneid? Tty Ansel Adams instead. 

Once the technology is debugged, the house can be 
programmed to please the Gates family and its vis- 
itors. Guests will provide information about their 
preferences in art and music. They will receive elec- 
tronic badges that relay that information to sensors as 
they move titrough the house. As if by magic, lights 
wifi brighten or dim. the temperature will be adiusied, 
the pictures displayed on the video screens will 
change and favorite' music will play on the stereo. 


At Least 8 Die in Blast 
Near an Algiers Market 



ir. *>i/r Su7 Fnm DafVi 

ALGIERS — A bomb concealed in a 
package exploded Thursday in the 
lower" Casbah neighborhood here, 
killing at least eight people and wound- 
ing 22. according to sources at the Mail- 
lor Hospital. 

The death toll was expected to rise, as 


several people had serious injuries, in- 
cluding a 12 -ve 


year-old girl whose legs 
were to be amputated, the sources said. 

There was no immediate claim of 
responsibility for the 10:30 A.M. attack 
in the busy neighborhood near a fruit 
and vegetable market. 

Most of the victims were reportedly 
shoppers and sidewalk hawkers on the 
street, which is usually packed with 
pedestrians at that hour. 

The death toll could have been much 
higher, according to the official APS 
press agency, which said the “terror- 
” apparently fearing a security check 


ISL 


at the" entrance to a nearby covered 
market, threw the deadly parcel under a 
car. where it blew up. 

On Monday at the same hour, an 
attack in another Algiers neighborhood 
left four people dead. 

There has been a resurgence of vi- 
olence in Algeria in recent weeks that 
has been blamed on Islamic extremists 
who are seeking to topple the country’s 


military-backed government. . -j. 

More than 1,000 people have beetT' 
reported killed since June, most of them -Li; 
in massacres in rural hamlets south of j.7 
Algiers. On Tuesday, 64 people were: i 
murdered in the mountain hamlet of^L 
Beni Ali, 60 kilometers (40 miles) south. 
of here. And on Wednesday, security^ 

■ forces seized about 40 bombs at a bomb. 
factory in the southwest subuifr of Eu- - j- 
calyptus. a government source said 1 
Thursday. The factory' reportedly be-* • 
longed to the Armed Islamic Group, the . 
most radical Islamic faction. 

The bomb Thursday was thought iff i 
be relatively small, but witnesses said it. r * 
had a devastating effect because the r 
street was narrow and crowded. The! g 
blast ripped through surrounding market \ 
stalls and shacks, spewing domes and— 
ocher merchandise into the street. “A 7 ; 
wild panic seized the crowd.’ ■ a witness. 1 ' _. 
said. “People were running in every 
direction, women were screaming.” ' • - 

The Casbah, an ancient walled neigh- 
borhood, is considered a stronghold of 
Muslim militants. 

On Wednesday, the opposition Front 
for Socialist Forces party called for a 
march on Sept. 11 to appeal to the - 
authorities to seek a consensus for peace ■ . 
and to urge aimed groups to lay down ; 
their weapons. (AP.AFP) - J - 


Lebanese Report 7 Dead 
In Israeli- Guerrilla Clash 





Debate 

florid'' 1 ]' 
On 




( i: 




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TRAVEL UPDATE 


Egypt to Relocate Oasis Temple 


Israel and Jordan to Share Airport 


JERUSALEM (Reuters) — Israel and Jordan have agreed 
on operating a joint Red Sea "peace aiiport” in Jordan's port 
of Aqaba to handle air traffic for the neighboring Israeli town 
of Eilat, the Israeli Transport Ministry said Thursday. 

Israel will divert flights from Eilat's congested aiiport to 
Aqaba ,jusr9 kilometers (6 miles) away. The airport will begin 
test flights carrying domestic Israeli traffic to Eilat via Aqaba 
next week. 


.Uvmi c Fijtia-Prew 

CAIRO — The Egyptian authorities 
have decided to move an ancient oasis 
temple in the western desert to a new 
location 600 meters away, to protect it 
against seeping underground water. 


The AsM'ijrevt Press 

SIDON, Lebanon — Three Israeli 
soldiers were burned to death and four 
guerrillas were killed in a battle Thurs- 
day. hours after Israeli planes blasted 
suspected Hezbollah bases in the moun- 
tains of southern Lebanon. Lebanese 
security officials said. 

The three soldiers were killed and 10 
were wounded when Israeli forces were 
trapped in a blazing forest in Wadi el 
Hoger. on the edge of the Israeli-oc- 
cupied buffer zone in southern Leb- 
anon. the officials said. 

Four guerrillas of the Lebanese Shiite 
movement Araal were killed and two 
wounded in the shoot-out. the officials 
added. 

In Jerusalem, the Israeli Army de- 
clined to comment on the reports, but 
Israeli television reported a heavy fire in 
the area of the fighting. 

Earlier. Lebanese security officials 
said that two Israeli jets had fired two 
air-to-surface missiles at suspected 
guerrilla hideouts in the highlands of 
Iqlim el Tuff ah. sending plumes of 
smoke billowing into the air. 

The Israeli Army confirmed the raid 
and said that the pilots reported accurate 
hits. 

There were no immediate reports of 
casualties in the raid, although Hezbol- 
lah claimed to have hit several Israelis. 

The targeted area of Ain Bouswar 
faces an Israeli-occupied swath of south 
Lebanon, which is under the control of 
some Ij 500 Israeli soldiers and the 
2,500 allied militiamen of the South 
Lebanon Army. 

A war of attrition to drive out these 
forces is led by Hezbollah, an Iranian- 
backed fundamentalist Shiite Muslim 
group that often launches attacks from 
.Ain Bouswar. 

Hezbollah said its fighters ambushed 
an Israeli patrol on the edge of the 
occupied zone, inflicting "several cas- 
ualties." 


Lebanese security officials, 
on condition of anonymity, 
the ambush but hot the numba'of cas- 
ualties. ': 

The air strike against- suspected 
Hezbollah positions was the second in* . 
less than a week. . ’ - ■ 

On Saturday, Israeli .planes ahd'aiv .; 
t tilery pounded suspected Hezbollalf 
hideouts near Shiite Muslim villages in* 
south Lebanon. No casualties were re- 
ported in those attacks. T : ": 

The hostilities marked an escalation 1 ... 
of violence that has killed 26 people thhu 
month in south Lebanon, the last active> i 
war front in the Arab-Israeli conflict ■ 
Israel occupied southern Lebanon- 
and in 1985 declared it a “security 
zone,” saying thaf it would act as a- , Sj 
buffer against cross-border incursions 1 ; 
by guerrillas into northern Israeli 
towns. 






Drop''' 


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TV - • 


Harder Line Urged 
For Sierra Leone 


L cri-s 
:hi r 


Reuters 

ABUJA, Nigeria — A tougher em-; 
bargo aimed at removing Sierra Leone's! 
military junta wall be proposed to the 
annual summit of West African leaders 
that opened in the Nigerian capital on* 
Thursday, conference sources said 

Foreign ministers from the 16-mem- 
ber Economic Community of West Af- 
rican States ended a marathon meeting 
that went through the night and decided . 
to recommend righrer sanctions against; 
the Freetown coup leader, Major- 
Johnny Paul Koromah. 

Diplomats said they also decided to 
recommend that the mandate of the re- 
gional military force that helped bring 
the seven-year civil war in Liberia to an 1 
end should be extended to include Sierra 
Leone. 


rc w 


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- r r 






llr- 


WEATHER 


JAL Targets Unruly Passengers 


TOKYO (Reuters) — Worried by rising violence on flights. 
Japan .Airlines has given attendants permission to tie up unruly 
passengers, a company spokesman said Thursday. 

Under new guidelines. JAL airport counter staff and the pilot 
of a plane can refuse to allow a drunken passenger to board a 
flight if they believe the passenger could turn violent. 

"Flight personnel can use restraining methods, including 
tying up an unruly passenger," the manual says. 


Sea at Thai Resort Turns Putrid 


BANGKOK (AP) — The sea at one of Thailand’s most 
popular resorts has turned green and foul-smelling, driving 
away tourists and killing fisk a newspaper reported Thursday. 
The Bangkok Post reported that nearly all the beaches at 
Pattaya, about 110 kilometers (70 miles) southeast of 
Bangkok, were affected over the past week. 

Officials were unable to identify the cause, suspecting 
either waste water being released from nearby factories or 

storms in the Gulf of Thailand 




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that turned 


The typhoon designated 
Amber bashed eastern and 
southern Taiwan on Thurs- 
day, bringing heavy rains and 
strong winds that set off land- 
slides. halted trains and shut 
down airports. No casualties 
were reported. t.AP i 


Europe 


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Forecast tor Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeather. 





Heavy 

Snow 


Asia 


North America Europe 

The Noriheas! and New Pauly sunny ana mce in Ali-Ji slamming southern 
England mill be warm with Wasiem Eurooe Saturday. Taiwan. Typhoon Amber 
■or* ol sun Saturday 10 but a storm bringing wind- will cause Hooding rain and 
Monday. But a storm «n:i driven rams to Ireland and htgh wtnds with coastal 
cause heavy rain across Scotland Sunday may flooding lor rhe coast ol 
Newtcundlana li will be cause some showers and China near Xiamen Friday, 
tot iron - , me southern and o thunderstorm m London Sunny and hoi in Beijing 
central Plains tnrojgh ihe ana Pans Monday Sunny Saturday, bui ihundsr- 
Midwesr. but clouds and ana warm tram Moscow to storms Sunday will be tol- 
siiowers will keep the Stockholm, bul Belgrad lowed by cooler weather. 
Northwest cooler and Ankara wll have soak- Warm and hunwj in Tokyo 

mg rams. ano Seoul 


Asia 


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Mtwn,*rsioms. r-ratn. sksnow AunHn. 
wcv. iv-weain?r an mop*, lorwaww and data proiHdad by Accu Weather, Inc.e 1997 


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PAGE 3' 


)ii4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 




1,1 B|; 


PAGE 3 




_ THE AMERICAS 

A Campus Mourns a Frat Death 

New Orleans College Struggles With Fatal Student Drinking tSS 

^Christopher Cooper at LSU. Uni- waitme cars. On the group’s return to 

— rod runs S'nhx tt *** npadiri « , “ r lhe ir fraternity house. 8 someone called 


.s^/fT «*»*'*«■ X 

4r' 


By Christopher Cooper 

•Vru lunt Timm Sen ice 

NEW ORLEANS — They came in 
swarms in their Jeep Wranglers and 
sports cars to the funeral home, so un- 
schooled in rhe conventions of death 
that many did nor know how to dress. 
Louisiana State University offers few 
occasions that require a navy suit 

Indeed, many in the crowd may never 
have been to a funeral home. Certainly, 
few bad ever buried a contemporary. 

It generally takes people years, to 
drink themselves into the grave but 
Benjamin Dayries Wynne. 20, to whom 
f the young people were paying their last 
respects and whose funeral was held 
here Wednesday, accomplished that in a 
single evening. He died Monday night 
after drinking enough to put him six 
times over Louisiana's legal limit for 
intoxication. 

Just before his death. Mr. Wynne had 
received a pledge pin from the Sigma 


Alpha Epsilon fraternity at LSU. Uni- 
yersiiy officials said it was traditional 
for fraternity members to eet a little 
drunk on pledge night. 

But Mr. Wynne and his fellow fra- 
ternity members got more than a JinJe 
drunk, officials said. 

They said that early on Monday even- 
ing the men from Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
were drinking heavily at an off-campus 
parry in Baton Rouge before heading to 
Murphy s Bar, where Jason Griffin, the 
fraternity president, has a banendin^ 
job. ° 

At the bar. the officials said, the 
group continued io drink heavily, or- 
dering pitcher after piicher of a 'high- 
powered concoction called Three Wise 
Men. made from eouaf mnc isi. 


men, raaae rrom equal 
proof rum. Crown Rov 
Jaeeenneister. a lioueur 


[ pans of 151- 
al whisky and 


Jaegermeister, a liqueur. 

Witnesses said many of the young 
men were so drunk by midnight that 
they could not walk. Some of them had 
to be shuttled by shopping cart into 


u '! mii "DeaJ > 


Debate on Cigarette Deal 

Florida’s Massive Settlement Raises Doubts 
On Merit of One-Time $368 Billion Proposal 


’U* 1 ! ni;;ii 


r f.illt' ( f. 

- - 'Til j.Pii" 


John M. Broder 

NV» Yi-rfr Times Servic e 

WASHINGTON — The abrupt 
SI 1.3 billion settlement of Florida's 
case against cigarette makers has stirred 
a sharp debate over whether to adopt the 
proposed nationwide tobacco accord or 
to continue the state-by-state lawsuits 
that have been humbling to the tobacco 
industry. 

President Bill Clinton and members 
of Congress are now debating the merits 
of the proposed $368.5 billion national 
tobacco agreement that would end most 
of the litigation against the industry in 
exchange for sweeping new cigarette 
regulations. 

Backers of the nationwide settlement 
proposal said the Florida deal proved 
rhe industry's willingness to compro- 
mise and paved the way for enactment 
of sw eeping public health advances. 

These advocates contended that the 
Florida case — which featured startling 
admissions by tobacco executives and 


short-circuit the legal process with a 
flawed nationwide compromise rushed 
through a Congress tainted by millions 
of dollars in tobacco contributions. 

If the national accord is adopted, law- 
suits pending in 37 stares and Puerto 
Rico will disappear and the states will 
share the 25-year. $368 .5 billion set- 
tlement fund. The national settlement 
would also supersede the agreements 
reached in Mississippi and Florida and 
in any subsequent states that agree to 
settle their suits against the industry. 

Ralph Nader, the consumer advocate 
who has long opposed making a deal 
with the industry, asserted drat the state 
attorneys general had been snookered 
by tobacco companies' pursuing a de- 
vious. and so far successful, long-term 
strategy to win release from their crush- 
ing legal liabilities. 

“The companies have been doing 
nothing but winning since the an- 
nouncement of the deal with die a t- 


rlorida case — which featured startling tomeys general and the plaintiffs’ law- 
admissions by tobacco executives and yers,” Mr. Nader said, referring to the 
new cigarette marketing restrictions — June 20 nationwide settlement proposal, 
had undermined the bargaining position “They've won an agreement for im- 
of the tobacco producers. • mumiy. for open season on foreign mar- 

They argue that the White House and kets, for deductibility of their payments. 
Congress should move quickly to seal for elimination of punitive damages and 
the broader deal with a weakened in- freedom from class actions/’ 
dusrry. Florida was just their fates: victory. 

But foes painted -the Florida settle^ Mr. Nader contended, a low-cost re- 
meni — and Mississippi’s earlier $33 prieve from further embarrassing dis- 
billion payoff — as merely tactical closures, a potentially ruinous jury ver- 
nioves by an industry seeking to escape diet and treble damages under the state’s 
the potentially crippling state lawsuits racketeering laws, 
by winning the broad immunity prom- “They got all their goals in the global 

ised by the proposed nationwide pack- settlement and now they are winning 
age. their subgoals by neutralizing one ai- 

~In the agreement announced Mon- torney general after another.” Mr. 
day, major cigarette companies prom- Nader said. “They are turning tigers 
ised to pay Florida $ 1 1 .3 billion to settle into papier-mSche pussycats.’ ’ 
a suit seeking recompense for Medicaid Grant Woods, anomey general of 

expenses for smoking illnesses. Arizona, said the Florida case proved 

The companies agreed to eliminate that the states* strategy has been ef- 
advertising billboards near schools, to Active in wresting concessions from the 
pay for anti-smoking campaigns, to re- industry. But he added that not all die 
move vending machines from places remaining cases were as strong as Flor- 
accessible to children and to stop ad- ida’s and that the national settlement 
verrising on transit vehicles. proposal contained provisions that 

Opponents of the larger nationwide could not 6e won or enforced at state 
accord said that the two states’ ser- level. 

dements demonstrated that major • ‘You could win all 40 of the lawsuits 

strides — and huge awards — could be and still not come close to achieving for 
achieved in state-by-stare litigation. public heal* what is achieved in the 
Now is not the time, they added, to settlement.'' he said. 


the campus police. When the authorities 
arrived shortly after midnight, they 
found nearly two dozen of the men 
passed out; four, including Mr. Wynne, 
were hospitalized. 

One of them. Donald Hunt, 21, re- 
mained in the hospital Wednesday. He 
was reported in stable condition. The 
other two were released. 

At the funeral borne, Mr. Wynne's 
parents stayed near his open coffin 
while more than 200 people paid their 
respects. 

Peggy Wilson, a family friend and 
New Orleans council woman, said of the 
parents, “They’rejust devastated.” She 
added; "You hear about something like 
this, and you think, how can children 
today be that stupid? But the truth is, 
they've always been stupid. They get 
together, and they egg each other bn. Ir 
could happen to any one of us.” 

Among the floral tribu tes was a lavish 
spray from the “Brothers of Sigma Al- 
pha Epsilon.” 

Mr. Wynne’s death comes at a time 
when the university has tightened its 
regulations on liquor. Alcohol is banned 
at most on-campus events and forbidden 
at fraternity socials. 

The dean of students at LSU, Thomas 
Risch. said he had searched the Sigma 
house just a few hours before the pledge 
party returned. 

“They were clean,” he said. **I’d 
like to tell you there's a way to prevent 
deaths like this. There isn’t” 

Mr. Risch continued: "The individu- 
als who want to drink heavily also tend 
to gravitate toward the fraternities. But 
I'd say the fraternity problem is a lot 
smaller than it used to be.” 

The fraternity has been shut tem- 
porarily by its national organization. 

Mr. Risch said it was a never-ending 
struggle to keep a campus of 28.000 
students swept clean of liquor in a state 
that is known for letting the good times 
roll. 

"People celebrate here,” he said. 

He also said the university was re- 
thinking its policy of banning alcohol at 
events on the campus, because, he said, 
"The thinking is. ‘Maybe we should try 
to control the circumstances under 
which this son of activity goes on/ ” 

He added. “We can't very well do 
that if all the drinking is being done off- 
campus.” 

Mr. Risch vigorously denied that 
LSU bred problem drinkers to a greater 
extent than any other large American 
university-. 

But he said that drinking, especially 
among young Southern men. might be 
etched into the regional ethos to some 
extent. "From my perspective.” be 
said, "our males do appear to grow up 

slowly." 




r 



ft**'.*. ■ *■ 







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The rover between the rock called “Wedge,” at left, and ‘“Flute Top,” right foreground, and “Flat Top.” 

Martian Geology Baffles Scientists 


By John Noble Wilford 

No i YvrL Tunes Srn xv 

NEW YORK — In the first major 
surprise of the mission, mineral studies 
by the little roving vehicle on Mars 
have revealed at least two distinct 
kinds of rocks on the planet, and 
neither type bears a clear resemblance 
to volcanic rocks on Earth or to me- 
teorites presumed to come from Mars, 
according to scientists. 

The findings have left planetary sci- 
entists confused, waiting for more data 
and looking for explanations of how 
the rocks were formed and what they 
imply about the planet's geologic his- 
tory .Project officials said that both the 
Mars Pathfinder spacecraft and its 
rover Sojourner appeared to be in good 
shape. 


Of the four rocks so far examined in 
detail at the landing site, two contain 
much higher amounts of the element 
silicon than are present in Martian me- 
teorites. and the other two have more 
sulfur than is found in terrestrial vol- 
canic rocks. Yet. all four rocks give the 
appearance of being volcanic. 


California, where foe mission is dir- 
ected. “There seem to be two distinct 
rock populations at the site, but we 
can't explain any of rile differences.” 

Other geologists suggested several 
possible "explanations. Perhaps the 
rover's spectrometer for determining 
surface chemistry was detecting only 


Thanasis Economou. a University of dust coating the rocks, not the rocks 
Chicago geochemist who is a member themselves. The dust, a mixture of ma- 


of the Pathfinder science team, also 
said there were puzzling differences in 
composition between the soil and rocks 
at the site. The soil contains chromium 
not present in the rocks, and much 
higher concentrations of sulfur and 
chlorine. But silicon and aluminum are 
more abundant in (he rocks. 

"So far. it's a problem.” Mr. Eco- 
nomou said at a news conference at the 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. 


terial from far and near, could yield 
puzzling chemical traces. Or the sulfur 
concentrations, geologists said, could 
be a sign of past water reactions. 

Another Chicago geologist, Robert 
Clayton, said: "I don’t know what it 
means. But if you take the analysis at 
face value, it means Mars geology is a 
lot more complicated than we previ- 
ously thought. It makes Mars an even 
more interesting planet.” 


Crew of Mir Steadily Extends Power Supply 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — The crew aboard the 
Russian space station Mir continued 
efforts Thursday to repower sections of 
the ship that have been off since a June 
collision, officials said. 

Mir lost 40 percent of its power after 
a June 25 collision with its cargo sup- 
ply ship, forcing the crew to shut down 
four scientific modules and severely 
limit their experiments since then. 

The crew of two Russians and one 
American have stayed mostly in the 


two oldest sections of the space station, 
the ship’s core and the uny Kvant-1 
module, which is less rhan slx meters 
long linked up to the core. 

But repairs last Friday have allowed 
them to harness some power from the 
solar panels in the Spektr module, 
which was punctured and is still sealed 
off from the rest of Mir. 

Since then, they have repowered the 
Kvant-2 module and started work on 
the Krista I! module, officials said. 

”ln Krisiaii. they will gradually turn 


on equipment/ ’ said a Mission Control 
spokeswoman. Rufina Amosova. 

‘ Other than the heater, ventilation and 
fan, nothing was on before today, but 
now they will turn on the scientific 
devices and test their reliability'.” 

The crew began dry ing and cleaning 
Kristall on Tuesday. "After they have 
reconnected Kristall, it only remains 
for them to reconnect Priroda for 
power to be restored io the whole of the 
space station.” another spokeswoman 
said. Priroda is a research module. 


Beeper- Snooper News Service Shut Down in N. Y. 


By Eleanor Randolph 

Luy Angeles rimes 

NEW YORK — In what is being labeled a wake-up 
call to anyone using a pager to send messages, federal 
authorities have charged that a news bulletin service 
serving New York news organizations was tapping 
into beeper transmissions by the police, emergency 
crews and even the mayor's office. 

“This case gives new meaning to the phrase T 
spy/ ” said the Manhattan federal attorney, Mary Jo 
White. 

Three people and the news service, called Breaking 
News Network of Fort Lee, New Jersey, were charged 
Wednesday with mail fraud, conspiracy and violating 
the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. 

Ms. White said the case was the first prosecution of 


interceptions of messages sent ro pagers. She said the 
arrests should alert people using paging systems that 
“your communications may not be secure.” 

"No governmental agency or business is immune 
from this illegal monitoring/’ she said. 

The police, accustomed to media and private cit- 
izens using scanners to monitor their radio trans- 
missions. in recent years have begun sending sensitive 
messages on so-called alphanumeric pagers, using a 
mix of letters, numbers and symbols. 

The New York police first learned that those mes- 
sages were being monitored when rhey received two 
anonymous letters last spring. The letters, quoted in 
part in the complaint, said a “computer wizard and 
hacker” had been “bragging” that he could intercept 
private pages sent to the city's top officials. 

A cwo-month investigation led to the arrests of the 


alleged hacker and two officials of Breaking News 
Netw ork, or BNN . The computer expert, Jeffrey Moss, 
25, surrendered to authorities in Florida. 

Steven Gessman. 37. an owner of BNN. and Vinnie 
Martin, 41 . BNN's manager, were released on $50,000 
bail each. 

Ms. White and other officials said that the news 
service was used by about 3,000 clients, including 
some of New York's top local radio and broadcast 
stations, which were believed to pay at least $80 a 
month. 

Ironically, clients of the service were notified of by 
beeper messages of the beeper-monitored news 
breaks. 

Police Commissioner Howard Safir said that as a 
result of the intercepts, the city has changed its com- 
munications system. 


POLITICAL 


Publisher Wins Tussle 
Over Whitewater Notes 

NEW YORK — Whitewater prosecutors 
have abruptly ended their effort to obtain 
from a publisher the notes and unfinished 
manuscript of a book by Webster Hubbell, 
the former associate attorney general and 
confidant of President Bill Clinton. 

After a day of heated discussions by 
telephone, a lawyer for William Morrow & 
Co. and prosecutors with the office of Ken- 
neth Starr, the Whitewater independent 
counsel, agreed that the New York pub- 
lishing house would not have to provide 
editorial material in connection with a broad 
subpoena issued on Aug- 8 by the office. 

But Mr. Morrow agreed to turn over 
financial documents, also sought by the 
subpoena, involving Mr. Hubbell s 
$400,000 contract to write “Friends m 
High Places.” fNYT} 

Ron Browns Son Pleads 
Guilty in Donation Case 

WASHINGTON — The son of the late 
Commerce Secretary Ron Brown agreed 

Away From Politics 

• Aviation authorities are investigating a 
fight between two air traffic controto a 
the control tower at New' Y ork s La Cinr 
Airport. The altercation apparently did not 
delav aircraft or cause safety problems ror 

travelers or others in the tower. (Reuters) 

• Timothy McVeigh, who w^sconrided 
and sentenced to death in the tMttahoraj 
City bombing, has gotten the change u* 
lawyers he requested, with Stephen Jones 
replaced as lead anomey by Robert Nigh 
Jr., another member of the defense ream, as 
Mr. McVeigh appeals his convicuon. Mri 


Thursday to plead guilty to an election-law 
violation stemming from donations he 
made during the 1994 campaign. 

Michael Brown will plead guilty to one 
count of making donations to Senator Ed- 
ward Kennedy's 1994 campaign that ex- 
ceeded the $2,000 legal limit for an in- 
dividual donor, the Justice Depanmem said, 

Mr. Brown. 32, actually donated $4,000 
beyond the limit to the campaign of the 
Massachusetts Democrat, the department 
said. Under the plea agreement, Mr. Brown 
w-ill plead guilty to a misdemeanor, and 
prosecutors will not seek a prison sentence. 

At the time. Mr. Brown was an officer of 
an Oklahoma natural gas company run by 
the Democratic fund-raisers Nora and Gene 
Lum, who earlier this year pled guilty to 
felony fund-raising violations. (AP ) 

Quote /Unquote 

J Phil Carlton, lawyer for Philip Morris, 
on foe advantages of a nationwide agree- 
ment on smoking: “You can t accomphsh 
the public heal* goals — and that includes 
foe commitment to reduce under-age 
smoking — on a staler-stale tests You 
could wind up with a patchworic quilt of 
different requirements that wouldn t make 
a lot of sense. ’ ’ ,Jsri > 

* Manv of the Union Pacific Railroad’s 
safety "problems have one smigecause. ib 
employees are exhausted, foe Federal Rail 
Administration chief says. Jolene Mobitos 

dimeter 

errors and missing freight information were 
the norm. 

- a c manv as 20,000 American troops 
ftnm rhe 1940s through foe mid-1960s and 

Department said. 


Thousands in Mexico Protest Slaying of 4 Doctors 


By Sam Dillon 

iVru 1 York Times Service 

CIUDAD JUAREZ. Mex- 
ico — Thousands of physi- 
cians and nurses staged a two- 
hour strike to protest foe slay- 
ings of four doctors whose 
bodies were dumped along a 
road hours after they were 
called to treat an injured man. 
apparently a drug trafficker. 

Wednesday’s walkout, en- 
dorsed by local business or- 


ganizations, which have 
called a strike of their own for 
Monday, underlined the 
growing anger here and else- 
where in Mexico over the 
government’ s failure to solve, 
or often even to investigate: 
proliferating criminal and 
drug violence. 

Colleagues described rhe 
four physicians, who were 
beaten and strangled after 
leaving hospitals to treat a 
man with a gunshot wound on 


Disney World Caution 

Encephalitis Alert Is dosing Pools Early 


The Associated Press 

ORLANDO, Florida — Walt Disney World is closing hotel 
swimming pools and water parks an hour before dusk each day 
because of an Orange County medical alert about mosquitoes 
tbai carry encephalitis. 

The company is also curtailing golf, fishing, hayride and 
campfire activities, and is advising guests to wear long- 
sleeved shim and pants after dark and use plenty of mosquito 
repellent to guard against foe potentially fatal viral infection. 

Disney's decision earlier this week followed foe medical 
alert about Sl Louis encephalitis, carried by foe Culex nigri- 
palpus mosquito, which feeds after sunset. 

“We’re particularly concerned about swimming pools be- 
cause people aren’t fully clothed and they can’t use mosquito 
repellent.” said a Disney spokeswoman, Diane Ledder. 

The three water parks and swimming pools at Disney’s 15 
resort hotels and villas began closing at 7 P.M. this week, 
about an hour earlier than usual. 

So for this time, no one in Florida has contracted foe virus. 
The 1990 encephalitis outbreak in Florida infected 230 people 
and caused 1 1 deaths. The elderly are most susceptible ro foe 
disease, which causes flulike symptoms that can lead to coma 
and death. 

Activities at Disney’s three theme parks — Magic King- 
dom. Epcot and Disney-MGM Studios — have not been 
affected by foe alert and" are being sprayed for mosquitoes. 


Friday, as innocent victims of 
the narcotics bloodshed that 
has previously claimed 
mainly traffickers. 

Earlier this month, two col- 
lege sweethearts were among 
six people shot and killed 
when gunmen lulled a lawyer 
who had represented drug 
traffickers, in the process rak- 
ing the popular Max-Fim res- 
taurant with automatic rifle 
fire. 

“Life seems ro be worth 
nothing here,” said Dr. Car- 
los Paredes Espinoza, pres- 
ident of the Juarez medical 
association, which organized 
Wednesday’s proresr. “And 
everyone is vulnerable, from 
the humblest worker to the 
most eminent professional." 

Other brazen drug violence 
has flared in Mexico City, 
Guadalajara and the border 
cities of Tijuana and 
Matamoros in foe weeks 
since July 4. On that day. a 
man foe government identi- 
fied as ~ Amado Carrillo 
Fuentes. leader of foe Juarez 
cane! who became Mexico’s 
top trafficker, died hours after 
plastic surgery. 

Journalists have counted at 
least 15 drug-related killings 
here since foe death of Mr. 
Carrillo, and 7 other men 
have disappeared since being 
kidnapped here last week. 


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As more innocent people 
have become victims of foe 
bloodshed, it has aroused 
widespread fury over the often 
sloppy law enforcement by foe 
Mexican police and prosecu- 
tors. many of whom ore be- 
lieved to work for traffickers. 

“None of foe authorities 
— city, state, or federal — 
seem wil 1 ing ro fight the crim- 
inals," said Nora Elena Yu, 
president of the Juarez Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

The latest violence began 
at 6 P.M. Friday when three 
men opened fire on a lawyer 
as he drove through crowded 
rush-hour streets. Returning 
the fire, the lawyer wounded 
one of his three assailants in 
foe shoulder. 

At about 7:30 P.M., two 
young men entered San Ra- 
fael Hospital and, finding that 
the only available physician 
was Dr. Tavare Flores Gonza- 
lez. a 36-year-old gynecolo- 
gist. persuaded him to accom- 
pany them by saying a 

S ant woman needed 
:al help, according to 


Dr. Paredes of foe Juarez 
medical association. 

About 9 P.M., two men, 
also in their 20s. entered 
Guemika Hospital, nexr door 
to San Rafael, and began 
walking the halls asking doc- 
tors to go to a house to treat a 
man with a shoulder injury, 
said Dr. Antonio Valdez Tor- 
rez, the hospital's director. 
The men refused to accept 
ambulance service, he said. 

Dr. Fredy Patemina Gran- 
der!. 40, a urologist, eventually 
agreed to go with foe men, and 
he in mm recruited Drs. Javier 
Quintero Heredia. 41. an or- 
thopedic surgeon, and Lamec 
Villalobos Cornejo, 40, an an- 
esthesiologist, to accompany 
him. Dr. Valdez said. 

The bodies of the four phy- 
sicians were discovered foe 
□exr day on a dirt road 10 
blocks from their hospitals. 
Dr. Flores had been beaten to 
death. The others had been 
strangled. The station wagon 
seized during foe attack on the 
lawyer foe previous evening 
was found nearby. 


This way to 



Don’t miss it. A lot happens there. 


7 



PAGfe 4 


asia/pacific 


Teen Killer Forces Japan to Rethink Lenient Juvenile Justice Classroom Battles 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Tones Service 

TOKYO — One of Japan’s most no- 
torious criminals is behind bars and his 
killing rampage is over. Bat the public 
honor is as strong as ever and is prompt- 
ing a broad debate about what to do with 
children like him whose behavior is not 
remotely as tender as their years. 

The boy has admitted to attacking five 
children killing two of them — one of 
whom, an 11 -year-old neighbor, was 
beheaded and his head left on a school 
gate. 

The killing, which was accompanied 
by challenges to die police and threats to 
continue the slayings, was one of the 


grisliest in recent memory in Japan. 

No official announcement about the 
■boy's fate has been made pending the 
results of a psychiatric evaluation, but 
newspapers here are speculating that he 
may be released from his detention cen- 
ter in just two or three years. 

The prospect that a confessed double- 
murderer — even one who was Wat the 
time of the crimes and has since only 
turned 15 — would be released in afew 
years has unnerved die public. 

It is too early to be sure, but the case 
may be remembered as a milestone in 
Japan, provoking a fundamental reorgan- 
ization of the juvenile justice system. 

While all countries tend to be more 
lenient on criminals when they are young- 


sters, Japan has been particularly sym- 
pathetic to child offenders. By law a 
person cannot lace criminal charges for 
offenses committed before the age of 16. 

“In the past, nobody had ever se- 
riously discussed penalties for 14- or 15- 
year-old children," said Mas ami Hori, 
the lawyer for two girls whom the boy 
has confessed to attacking. * ‘We were all 
stunned to find such a murder committed 
by a 14-year-old boy." 

‘ ‘The juvenile code just does not an- 
ticipate murders by kids 15 or younger, 
so I think revisions are now necessary," 
Mr. Hori added. 

Another lawyer who has specialized 
in criminal law and juvenile delin- 
quency, Jun Haseg awa, said the entire 


juvenile system must be overhauled be- 
cause it rests on an idealistic and mis- 
takenpremise. 

‘ ‘The legal system is based on the idea 
that if only the child's environment is 
improved, he will be O.K.," Mr. Hase- 
gawa said. “So die state takes the child 
away from inadequate parents and puts 
him into a reform school so that he will 
become rehabilitated 

“But the notion that juvenile crime is 
just the product of a bad environment is 
roo simple,” he said 

The sympathy shown to children con- 
trasts with die severity dealt to adult 
criminals in Japan, but now the patience 
for youthful offenders seems acutely 
strained One case that has been men- 


tioned several times is that of a 15-year- 
old boy who in 1964 broke into a house 
and stabbed a 23-year-old woman to 
death as she pleaded for her life. 

The boy was released after 17 months 
in reform school. In 1979. he killed four 
people in a bank robbery before being 
shot and killed by die police. 

Justice Minister Isao Matsu ura has 
said that perhaps there should be 
changes in juvenile proceedings, pos- 
sibly including applying the criminal 
law to children suspected of serious 
crimes. 

But. he told the Yomiuri Shimbun 
newspaper, “ir is important that we 
avoid making any hasty, impulsive de- 
cisions.” 


Malaysia Cool to Appeal 
By British Aide on Rights 


CtmptlrdbyOir Suff Fmm PupmcSa 

KUALA LUMPUR — Foreign Sec- 
retary Robin Cook of Britain on Thursday 
pressed Southeast Asian leaders to re- 
spect fundamental human rights, but 
Malaysia responded that each country had 
a unique domestic agenda and should be 
allowed to deal with its own problems. 

“Human rights are a fundamental of 
foreign policy,” Mr. Cook said in a 
speech at the start of a six-day visit to 
four countries in the region. “There is 
room for debate about the implemen- 
tation, but not about the principle. 

“Every country is a member of the 
intemadonal c ommuni ty and it is there- 
fore reasonable to require eveiy govern- 
ment to abide by the rules of membership. 
They are set out in the Universal Dec- 
laration of Human Rights,” Mr. Cook 
said, according to the text of a speech be 
made to members of the Institute for 
Diplomacy and Foreign Relations. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Moha- 
mad has reportedly suggested that the 
declaration, drawn np by the United Na- 
tions. should be changed because it is 
outdated and should say more about 


Racial Politics 
Is Repudiated 
By Australia 

Cvnpdni by Oar Stuff From Dapaxha 

CANBERRA — Australia on Thurs- 
day reaffirmed its nonracial approach to 
foreign and trade policies and said it had 
to be “realistic" about its ability to 
promote human rights in Asia and the 
Pacific. 

The repudiation of racial politics was 
an obvious slap at a member of Par- 
liament, Pauline Hanson, who has 
warned that Australia risks being 
“swamped” by Asians and has urged a 
freeze on Asian immigration. 

Foreign Minister Alexander Downer 
delivered the 92-page assessment of for- 
eign and trade policies for the next 15 
years to Parliament on Thursday. 

“Racial discrimination is not only 
morally repugnant, it repudiates Aus- 
tralia's best interests,” said the paper 
entitled “In the National Interest 

“The rejection of racial discrimina- 
tion is not only a moral issue, it is 
fundamental to our acceptance by, and 
engagement with, the region where our 
vital security and economic interests 
lie." the paper said. 

Australian business leaders and dip- 
lomats have said Ms. Hanson's com- 
ments have damaged Australia's repu- 
tation in the region and threaten trade. 

The paper sets out more “hard- 
headed ,r foreign and trade policies for 
Australia's conservative government, 
elected in March 1996, compared with 
its Labor predecessor, said officials. 

Foreign and trade policies for die next 
15 years would focus more on pragmatic 
benefits for Australia, such as jobs and 
trade. There would be more focus on 
bilateral lies, with the United States, 
Japan, China and Indonesia singled out, 
compared with Labor's emphasis on 
multilateral relations. 

On the issue of human rights, an area 
where Australia's conservative govern- 
ment has been criticized for being soft, 
the paper said Australia must be “real- 
istic" in what it can achieve. 

“Linking human rights to trade serves 
neither Australia's trade nor its human 
rights interests,” said the paper. "The 
objective of human rights policy should 
be to make a difference on human rights, 
not to posture. " f AP. Reuters) 


economic freedoms. The Malaysian for- 
eign minister, Abdullah Badawi said 
that while h uman rights were of great 
concern to Kuala Lumpur, each country 
had its own agenda. 

‘ ‘Other countries, too, have their own 
problems,” he said after meeting with 
Mr. Cook. “I think in human rights, it is 
very difficult to have one common yard- 
stick that is universally applicable.” 

Mr. Abdullah said the discussions had 
been “interesting” but stressed that 
Malaysia and other countries in the re- 
gion had to balance the need for human 
rights with the kind of political stability 
that would allow economic growth. 

“Without political stability nothing 
can be achieved,” he said. “If we're 
concerned about stability and we allow 
freedom without restraint by civil rights 
groups, that's the kind of freedom that 
can also upset a lot of things in a particular 
country and can cause instability. 

“I think with freedom there must also 
be responsibility and we have to be 
aware of that.” 

Mr. Cook, outlining the principles of 
Britain's relations with Southeast Asia, 
said the new Labour government's 
warmer relations with its European part- 
ners made it the obvious choice as a 
bridge between the two trading blocs. 

He said Britain wanted to make a 
significant contribution to the region's 
security but stressed that nations such as 
Malaysia could not hope to fulfill their 
huge economic potential withont re- 
specting basic freedoms. 

Mr. Cook also said Britain would 
boost its efforts in the fight against drug 
traffickers and called on Southeast Asia 
to help, especially in curbing the ac- 
tivities of Burma, whose military gov- 
ernment he said was openly conniving 
with drug barons. 

Mr. Cook flew later in the day to 
Indonesia, which is probably the most 
delicate stop of his six-day tour, with 
aims sales and human rights issues, in- 
cluding East Timor, high on his agenda. 

Sales of military hardware dominate 
Britain’s exports to Indonesia, totaling 
S700 million in 1996, or more than half 
the overall figure of S 1 .342 billion. 

Human rights groups said 16 British 
Aerospace ‘Hawk’ trainer aircraft 
ordered by Jakarta for some $260 mil- 
lion might be used against independence 
fighters in the former Portuguese colony 
of East Timor. (Reuters, AFP) 


Lawmakers Protest 
New Bid by Ramos 

Reiners 

MANILA — Philippine opposition 
lawmakers walked out of a stormy ses- 
sion of Congress on Thursday after 
members of President Fidel Ramos's 
governing coalition opened a debate on a 
move that would allow him to run for a 
second terra. 

About 40 opposition legislators in the 
lowo: house cried to block debates on a 
resolution seeking to amend the country’s 
constitution, but lawmakers supporting 
Mr. Ramos used their overwhelming 
numbers to overrule their objections. 

“The majority unshamedly used the 
tyranny of numbers,” said Edcel Lag- 
man, an opposition lawmaker. “What 
happened tonight is unparalleled in the 
history of parliamentarism.” 

Mr. Ramos's opponents and leaders 
of the country's Roman Catholic Church 
have warned that the Philippines could 
be headed for another dictatorship if the 
constitution is changed. 

The constitution limits a president to 
one term to prevent the rise of another 
authoritarian ruler like Ferdinand Mar- 
cos, who was ousted in 1986. 



Foreign Secretary Robin Cook, left, arriving in Jakarta on Thursday, with Ambassador Robin Christopher. 

Rules Change Aids Malaysian Plunge 

Foreign Investors Infuriated as Government Seeks to Limit Trading 


By Thomas Fuller 

Special to the Herald Tribune 


KUALA LUMPUR — An already- 
foundering Malaysian stock market 
plunged as much as 8 percent at one 
point on Thursday following hastily im- 
plemented trading restrictions that in- 
furiated foreign investors and had ana- 
lysts asking if the government knew of 
more impending bad news. 

It was one of i the biggest single drops 
in the history of the exchange, with the 
market's composite index closing down 
35.74 points — 4.22 percent — at 
812.18, its lowest level since August 
1993. The recovery from the low came 
in the last half hour of trading, but some 
analysts forecast further losses. 

“Volumes were thin, the support was 
not convincing,” said one foreign econ- 
omist who asked not to be identified. 
“As far as we can see, the rally was 
limited to index -linked stocks.” 

For several weeks, Malaysian officials 
have attempted to talk the stock marker 
and the ringgit higher without success. 
On Thursday, the Bemama news agency 
reported that Prime Minister Mahathir 
bin Mohamad had asked local state-run 
pension funds like the Employees 
Provident Fund and Permodolan Nas- 
ional Bhd. to buy stocks Friday. 

The prime minister repealed his al- 
legation that George Soros, the hedge- 
fund manager, was behind the market 
nirmoil. Mr. Mahathir said he had ev- 
idence that funds managed by Mr. Soros 
had been selling Malaysian shares. The 

g rime minister previously accused Mr. 
oros of speculating against the ringgit. 
Since July 1, the ringgit h 3 s lost 14 
percent of its value against the U.S. 
dollar. On Thursday, the dollar hit its 
highest level against ringgit since flot- 
ation in 1973. rising to 2,8920. 

The stock market's composite index 
has fallen 34 percent in ringgit terms and 
43 percent measured in dollars since the 
start of the year. 

The restrictions introduced Thursday, 
which were aimed at stemming short- 
selling, stunned traders and investors. 
The measures were announced dis- 
creetly late Wednesday and took effect 


at the start of trading Thursday, leaving 
market participants little time to prepare 
for the new rules. 

"The aim of this whole thing was to 
stop short-selling, but in doing so, it 
prevents genuine sellers from being able 
to operate.” said Koh Huai Soon, senior 
analyst at SocGen Crosby Research 
Malaysia Sdn. Bhd. in Kuala Lumpur. 
“It backfired," he said. 

Several analysts questioned die tim- 
ing of the move', pointing out that it came 
amid a delay in the release of July trade 
figures — data that are closely mon- 
itored in the market given Malaysia's 
swelling current account deficit. 

One "might well see a connection 
between the delay in the current-account 
figures and these measures designed to 
support the market." said Simon 


Woods, director of Caspian Securities 
Hong Kong Ltd. 

Three weeks ago, around the time 
June trade figures were to be announced, 
the government imposed restrictions on 
foreign currency trading, holding trans- 
actions to S2 million per customer. 

The new trading rules effectively ban 
the short-selling of any of the 100 stocks 
that make up the composite index by 
forcing sellers to have the shares in their 
accounts. Previously, they could settle 
an order five days after execution. 

The hasty implementation of the new 
rules meant traders who had been given 
' ‘sell ' * orders the previous day could not 
execute the sales Thursday. Foreign in- 
stitutions were hit hard by die restric- 
tions. analysts said, because their set- 
tlement funds came from overseas. 



Irjn. i- 


Malaysian trader setting rates Thursday for the plummeting ringgit. 


Continued from Page 1 _i 

government screening of school text- 
books started in the early 1960s, al- 
though the motivation for his epic fight; 
dates to the late 1930s. 

Then, he was a young history lecturer ; 
at a university in Tokyo. Like the 
books he studied as a child, those he used; 
to teach witii were written by govern^- 
mem officials. Their aim was to foster 7 
loyalty to and a willingness to die to r 
battle for Japan and the emperor. - 
In the 1930s and early 1940s, Mrv: 
lenaga was familiar only with props.*- \ 
ganda about Japan’s overseas military - 
adventures. He knew only of shining V 
Japanese victories and of tbs brutality of : 
enemy forces and local people, and 
no opposition to the war. - ’ ,9 

It was only after 1945 that uncensored 
news of Japanese atrocities on the main- 
land first reached Japan. Racked by guilt . 
over his lack of resistance to the war, Mr. 
lenaga started to campaign for the ab- 
olition of the system under which gov- 
ernment officials wrote school text-? 
books. But Mr. lenaga savored only a 
partial victory. 

U.S.' occupation officials, afraid of a 
resurgence in Japanese militarism, abol- 
ished the old system of government* 
written textbooks. But they replaced it 
with a screening system forcing authors 
to submit manuscripts to the Education 
Minis try for approval before 'publica- 
tion. The system was designed to weed 
out authors mailing for Japan to take up 
arms again. But as soon as U.S. forces 
withdrew from Japan, bureaucrats startf r 
ed to use the new system to blot out or & 
water down passages about Japanese 
war crimes, Mr. lenaga contends. ; 

“If you think about the atomic bomb 
attacks againstHirashima and Nagasaki,' 
Japan was a victim in the last war,” Mr 
lenaga said. “But Japan was also ad 
aggressor, and if we don’t come to terms 
with that, we can never hope to main* 
peace with the countries we invaded and 
with the people we subjugated.”.--. 

Under the new screening system, the 
Education Ministry ordered Mr. lenaga 
to delete or revise passages, about war -1 
time atrocities in a textbook he sub- 
mitted for approval in 1965. In response, 
he launched the first of three legal chal- 
lenges against the government, charging 
that the screening system violated aca- 
demic freedom and freedom of expres- 
sion enshrined in Japan’s new U.S.-dic- 
tated constitution. 

In one passage in his textbook Mr. 
lenaga wrote: “When the Japanese 
Army occupied Nanking, they murdered - 
large numbers of Chinese soldiers and 
civilians, and many of the Japanese of- 
ficers and soldiers violated Chinese 
women.” In a note, the Ministry of 
Education ordered Mr. lenaga to delete 
the phrase “violated women.” saying 
“the violation of women is something 
that has happened on every battlefield in 
every era of human history.” 

“This is not an issue that needs to be 
taken up with respect to the Japanese 
Army in particular,” it said. 

In another passage, Mr. lenaga wrote 
abonr tire “atrocious acts” of the no- 
torious Unit 731, which specialized in 
research into bacteriological warfare at a 
base near Harbin in northeast China. 

The Education Ministry ordered the 
deletion of the passage, saying that it 
was premature to mention Unit 731 in a 
school textbook because of a lack -of ' 
“credible scholarly research." The ac- 
tivities of the unit which included mur- 
dering several thousand Chinese and 
other prisoners of war in experiments, 
were already considered historical fact. 

Yet, in seven court rulings over three J 
decades, only one judge upheld Mr. len- \ 
aga's charge, in 1970, that screening 
textbooks violated the constitution. Two 
other judges found screening excessive 
or illegal. The rest rejected his lawsuits, 
which were funded by a 25,000-strong 
nationwide support group. Worse, his 
lawyers expected Mr. lenaga to lose his 
final appeal as well, although they were 
holding out for some vindication in toe 
wording of the judge’s ruling. 

Speaking by phone earlier this week 
as he rested at a mountain lodge before 
his last court appearance, Mr. lenaga 
said he had only one regret over his 30- 
year legal battle: He draws the ire of far- 
right thugs. Over the years, they have 
attacked his home, threatened his family 
and at times forced him to live under ■. 
police guard for dishonoring Japan and. ■ 
the emperor, as they see it s’ 

"Win or lose, it makes no differ- 
ence.” he said. “What’s important is to 
fight for the right to express our spirits,” 
he said, citing a poem he wrote after his 
biggest and only real victory, in 1970. 

He added, “Of course, it’s also im- 
portant to remember that the ruling class 
— the bureaucrats and elected politi- 
cians — aren’t there to tell us what to do; 
they’re there to be told what to do for 
us.” 


BRIEFLY 


A Lull in Cambodian Fighting 

PHNOM PENH — There was a lull Thursday in the 
fighting between the forces of the Cambodian strongman 
Hun Sen and royalist fighters oh the eve of King Norodom 
Sihanouk's return home. 

Thai military sources said the situation in the contested 
Cambodian border town of O’Smach was largely quiet 
Thursday, a day after Mr. Hun Sen’s forces unleashed a 
sustained attack on royalist positions around the town. 

King Sihanouk, who has been in Beijing for medical 
treatment since February, was due to return home Friday for 
the first time since his son. Prince Norodom Ranariddh was 
ousted as co-prime minister by his former coalition partner, 
Mr. Hun Sen. (Reuters) 

New Prime Minister in Taipei 

TAIPEI — Taiwan’s ruling Nationalist Party said Thurs- 
day it had approved a cabinet reshuffle, appointing the 
lawmaker Vincent Siew to lead what many analysts de- 
scribed as a "marker-friendly” team. 

Besides the appointment of Mr. Siew as prime minister. 


Foreign Minister John Chang was promoted to deputy 
prime minister, replacing Hsu Li-teh, who would become 
special adviser to the president, the Nationalist Party 
spokesman Tsai Bih-Hwang said at a news conference. 
Taipei's U.S. representative, Jason Hu, was appointed 
foreign minister, he said. (Reuters) 

Seoul Is Still Hopeful on Talks 

SEOUL — South Korea on Thursday shrugged off the 
decision by North Korea to cancel talks with "the United 
Stales on missile proliferation, saying It was a temporary 
setback. Officials said they were still preparing for four- 
nation peace talks designed to end a state of war on the 
Korean Peninsula and expected North Korea to attend those 
talks in New York in mid-September. (Reuters) 


For the Record 



MARKETS: Southeast Asia Stocks Crumble on Slowdown Fears 


Continued from Page 1 

it. hoping to repurchase it at a lower price 
before returning it to the lender. Wide- 
spread short sales can put pressure on 
stock prices, but the technique is useful 
in certain hedging strategies. 

At one point, the Malaysian market 
was down more than 8 percent to a Four- 
year low in reaction to the short-soilin' 3 
curbs, which some fund managers 
warned would deter investment there. 

The sharp fall in Philippine stocks 
came after the central bank raised re- 
serve requirements for banks Wednes- 
day. lifting the amount of cash they need 
on hand to 8 percent of assets from 3 
percent. 

Meanwhile, the government said 
growth through June slowed to 6 percent 
from 6.9 percent a year ago. 

Currencies in Southeast Asia also 
crumbled Thursday, led by the Malay- 
sian ringgit. It was pressured by con- 
cerns over Kuala Lumpur's ballooning 
trade deficit. The ringgit has lost 5 per- 


cent of its value against the U.S. dollar in 
the past week. It sagged nearly 2 percent 
Thursday, with the dollar rising to 2.892. 
before recovering slightly. 

The Thai baht, the Indonesian rupiah, 
the Philippine peso and even the usually 
sturdy Singapore dollar followed the 
ringgit's descent. 

Analysts said that the currency jolts 
unnerved regional stock markets. 

"Whai we have right now is a con- 
fidence crisis around ihe region.” said 
Patrick Tan, investment directorai Rorh- 
schild Asset Management (Singapore) 
Pte Ud. “Markets are fragile and sus- 
ceptible 10 the slighiesi shock.” 

In Indonesia, shares fell by more than 
L.Sperceni, in Singapore 3.6 percent and 
m Thailand just over 2 percent. 

The regional contagion also hit Hong 
Kong, where shares fell by 4.23 percent. 

Concerns about rising interest rates 
were a factor.” said Hugh Peyman. 
Asian strategist for Dresdner Kleinwort 
Bt-nson m Singapore. "But investors 
also seemed 10 be affected for the first 


time by fear that perceptions of H 
Kong will change because of what 
been happening in Southeast Asia,” 
Since Thailand and then toe Ph 
pines broke long-standing links berv 
their currencies and the dollar 
month, weakness in one Southeast A 
cu EF9 c y s piUed over into other 
This has undermined regional si 
markers, hitting especially hard 
many foreign investors whose refen 
currency is the dollar. 

For example, in dollar terms, 1 
stocks have fallen by more than 70 
cent so far this year, Malaysian stock 
a- percent, Philippine stocks by 30 ; 
cent, Singapore by 23 percent and 
donesta by 22 percent. 

"The peg to the dollar was the 1 
da mental thing that held South' 
Asian markets and economies tog 

u Mr f T n an wid - “to toe brave 1 
world of flexible exchange rates 
currency volatility, the rules h 
changed and investors are grapplin, 
value these markets,” 


1 





. . .MKiinmnimiuv W' 


n t'iuifiiiiiv firWJPMMD *4- 1447. 


PAGE 3 


!lKl "Hv. 

' •• ’ 1 * . 4 * 


INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, FRIDA1, AUGUST 29, 1991 

EUROPE 


RAGE 5 






Freed Russian Sex Slaves Don’t Draw Sympathy 

'A Normal Woman Would Have Died’ 


By Alessandro Stanley 

\l I* ' Hull S y , (If, 

VYATSKIYE POLYANY. Russia 
• — When the Soviet Union collapsed in 
1991. some of the luckier residents of 
this town got a chance to own their 
garages. Most used the metal shacks to 
store car parts, farm equipment and 
potatoes. Alexander Komin, 44, an elec- 

* trieian. used his to dig himself an un- 
derground colony for female slaves. 

, By his own admission. Mr. Komin 
-lured homeless women and kept them 
phained in a nine-square-meter bunker 
. buried 12 meters deep. H'e starved, beat 
! and had sex with his captives. By the 
time he was arrested on July 21, two 
men and two women had been 
inurdered. Two of the three women who 
survived had the word "slave" crudely 
"tattooed on their foreheads. 

Mr. Komin had a utilitarian streak: 
He installed three sewing machines and 
put his captives to work stitching un- 
derwear. flowered housecoats and oven 
mitts that he sold all over town. 

Everyone in Vyatskiye Polyany, an 
Industrial town of 40.000 people 1 ,000' 
kilometers east of Moscow, was hor- 
rified by the secret life of Mr. Komin. 
who was well liked. But few expressed 
piuch pity for his captives. 

'“A normal woman would never have 
survived such conditions," Nadezhda 
Kamskaya explained tartly. "A normal 

• a woman would either have died or killed 
jp the man." 

Almost all tlie victims had a trail of 
marriages and abandoned chil- 
dren , and one has a prison record. 


Mrs. Kamskaya's view is widely 
shared. Russia is a society untouched by 
contemporary notions of women's soli- 
darity and victims' rights. 

Like thousands of provincial towns in 
the former Soviet Union. Vyatskiye 
Polyany is a tight-knit community in 
surly decline. Half the workers at the 
local armaments factory have been laid 
off: the other half get their wages — S50 
a month — months late. Almost every- 
body in iown is struggling to stay even. 
There is little sympathy for the neigh- 
bors who slip through the cracks. 

When Tatyana Melnikova. 37. and 
Tatyana Kozikova. 38. first showed 
their tattooed faces on local television. 
. the municipal authorities opened bank 
accounts for them so viewers could 
donate the $400 it will cost to get the 
tattoos removed. So far, not a single 
ruble has been received. 

Both women, and the third survivor, 
Irina Ganushina, 23, have returned to a 
so-called normal life. Mrs. Ganushina, 
who was lured to Mr. Komin's garage 
on March 1. spent three months in the 
bunker until Mr. Komin decided to 
marry her. He brought her back up 
above ground, settled her in his apart- 
ment, and bought her a wedding dress. 
When she found a chance to get away 
from him, she went to the police. 

Mr. Komin sics in on iron cage in a 
cell in a police office, awaiting trial on 
murder and kidnapping charges. Russia 
has put a moratorium on the death pen- 
alty, so he faces 25 years to life in 
prison. 

Mr. Komin and his captives alike 
recount their stories without much emo- 


SM 



•1$ 



liltlplt 


Ml 

nmmm 

li mm* 




non. A small, wiry man with an en- 
gaging smile and bright blue eyes, Mr. 
Komin sat calmly in his cell wearing 
brown sneakers with the laces removed 
and expressed no remorse. 

"I am sorry that I didn't get a chance 
to marry Irina or finish my underground 
dream, ” he said — to expand his bunker 
by adding several more rooms and a real 
bathroom. 

He also said he fell he was doing his 
victims a favor. “These were unem- 
ployed, homeless women.” he said. “I 
gave them a place to live and a job'. ’’ 

Mr. Komin said he had felt weighed 
down by the responsibility of keeping 
his underground workshop going. 
“Every day," he said, “1 had to think 


U.S. Checkins With Moscow 
On l Seismic Event ’ in Arctic 

WASHINGTON — The United States said Thurs- 
day that il was asking Moscow aboui a "seismic 
event" Aug. 16 ar or near an Arctic nuclear test sire to 
help determine whether Russia breached a self-im- 
posed moratorium on nuclear tests blasts. 

Russia denied it had conducted a test. The 
Pentagon said the United .States was “aware that a 
seismic event with explosive characteristics occurred 
in the vicinity of the Russian nuclear test range at 
Novaya Zemlya.” (Reuters) 

Yeltsin Removes a Reformer 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin removed 
Yuri Baturin, a key force behind military reform. 


from his post as head of Russia’s policy-making 
Defense Council, the Kremlin said Thursday. 

A spokeswoman said First Deputy Defense Min- 
ister Andrei Kokoshin had been appointed to replace 
Mr. Baturin, who will remain a presidential aide. She 
would not say what had prompted the change and 
give other details. 

Mr. Baturin was appointed to secretary of the 
Defense Council when it was set up in July 1996 to 
coordinate long-delayed reforms of Russia's vasr and 
underfunded armed forces. < Reuters i 

Israeli Alleges Swiss Racism 

ZURICH — Israel’s ambassador to Switzerland, 
which has been embroiled in controversy over its 
handling of Holocaust-era assets, accused Swiss 
politicians of provoking a huge rise in anti-Semitism, 
according to an interview published Thursday. 

The envov. Gabriel Padon, whose rwo-year post- 


ing ends in September, urged the government to 
counter the trend. 

He also told the weekly Jewish paper Juedische 
Rundschau that he hoped the Jewish community 
would be more active in opposing racism. 

“In my opinion, anti-Semitism in this country has 
grown massively, especially in the past year.” Mr. 
Padon told the paper. (Reuters) 

Bonn Backs Land Mine Ban 

GENEVA — Germany, vowing to destroy all its 
anti-personnel land mines by the end of the year, said 
Thursday that it fully backed a global ban. 

Guenther Seibert, ambassador to the United Na- 
tions-sponsored' Conference c*n Disarmament, said 
Bonn was committed to Canada’s “Ottawa Pro- 
cess,” which is aimed at reaching a treaty in Decem- 
ber to ban the production, stockpiling, use of and 
trade in mines. ( Reuters i 



Jjniw IMJ ‘TV V .* Ji-ri fi*i* 


about them, think about feeding 
them.” 

He said the beatings and tattoos .were 
necessary: “When they tried to escape, 
they had to be punished. After that. 1 
guess they did fear me." 

Mr. Komin. who spent three years in 
jail for hooliganism in the early J 970s 
and learned the sewing trade in prison, 
does not think he is insane. ' ‘ Of course, 
such a crazy idea would nor come to a 
normal man," he said. "But still. I ihink 
I am normal/ ' 

His dream dwelling consisted of two 
tiny, cramped, damp and filthy rooms 
— three bunks in one, and a television 
set and three sewing machines in the 
other. When Komin arrived each mom- 


Jim,’. Hill, The V?. y..<; Time- 

.Alexander Komin. left, in his cage; 
Tatyana Melnikova, above, with 
“slave” tattooed faintly on her 
forehead, survived below ground 
for two years as a seamstress and 
sex slave with two other women. 

ing, a light woutd go on — a signal for 
his slaves to pur wires attached to the 
wall around their necks, lock them, and 
place the key where he could see it. 

Mostly, the decor suggests Komin's 
odd fantasies. Pornographic pinups ad- 
orn most walls, alongside hand-sewn 
crosses and icons. On the wail above the 
lowest bunk bed, die victims had pasted 
their own sources of inspiration: pic- 
tures of the Madonna and Child and 
photographs of Harrison Ford and Bony 
Manilow. 

The first victim was a neighbor. Vera 
Tolpayeva, who came to the bunker in 
the summer of 1995 after a drinking . 
bout with Mr. Komin. She helped him 
lure an acquaintance. Tatyana Mel- 
nikova, and her boyfriend. Nikolai 
Malykh, both experienced tailors, to the 
bunker. Mr. Malykh was poisoned, his 
body dumped in a nearby field. Later. 
Mrs’. Tolpayeva fell from favor and was 
forced ato choose either to drink anti- 
freeze or have it injected in her veins. 
She chose the former, and died. 

Tatyana Kozikova. a cook from Uly- 
anovsk, had served ]wo years in jail 
there, and in July 1995 eagerly accepted 
Mr. Komin's ofrer of a drink and a job. 
She survived. 

Yet another woman, Tatyana Nazi- 
mova. 28, was picked up in a railroad 
station in 19%. but she turned out to 
have leukemia and no work ethic. She, 
too, died of anti-freeze poisoning. 

Yevgeni Shishov, a former para- 
trooper whom Mr. Komin recruited to 
help him expand the bunker, was later 
electrocuted. 

Those bodies, like Mr. Malykh's, 
were dumped in fields. The police ini- 
tially assumed all the victims died of 
poisoning from moonshine vodka, a 
common cause of death. 


A British Nod 
To Sinn Fein 
Expected for 
Role in Talks 


Lcni/rt Jin I LV Suff Frvui Du/wrtrs 

BELFAST — Britain will decide Fri- 
day whether to admit Sinn Fein to 
Northern Ireland peace talks, officials 
here said Thursday. 

The move comes six weeks after Irish 
Republican Army guerrillas declared a 
cease-fire in their long struggle against 
rule from London. 

Officials would not indicate what the 
decision would be, but observers con- 
sidered a thumbs-up for Sinn Fein’s 
participation to be a formality. 

The British secretary for Northern 
Ireland, Maijorie {Mot Mowlam, will 
make an announcement at a Belfast 
news conference on Friday morning, 
according to aides. 

She had been expected to announce 
' Thursday that Britain believed that the 
IRA cease-fire was operating satisfac- 
torily and that Sinn Fein could enter the 
talks, due to start Sept. 15. 

Officials said the delay in the an- 
nouncement was caused by unspecified 
"logistical reasons." 

In a letter to Sinn Fein in June, Ms. 
Mowlam said the party could join talks 
within eight weeks of a renewed Irish 
Republican Army cease-fire. 

The IRA began the latest truce in its 
violent campaign against British rule on 
July 20, and since then no bombings or 
shootings have been attributed to the 
outlawed group. 

Protestant politicians who back Brit- 
ish rule but accuse London of pandering 
to Irish separatists said they were con- 
vinced that Sinn Fein would be brought 
to the conference table. 

Ian Paisley, head of the Democratic 
Unionist Party, who fears talks will 
weaken British rule, said it was a “fore- 
gone conclusion” London would give 
Sinn Fein a long-sought invitation. 

After the IRA announced a cease-fire 
Britain said it would wait six weeks to 
judge its validity. 

All Unionist patties are angry that 
Sinn Fein is apparently to be invited 
without the IRA's being required to 
hand over weapons. 

The Democratic Unionists and an- 
other small party, the United Kingdom 
Unionist Party, say they will not take 
pan in the talks. 

Britain and Ireland are adamant that 
anv change in sovereignty can come 
only through the ballot box. They want 
rheparties to agree to new island-wide 
trade and economic links to ease the 
decades of animosities. (Reuters, APi 




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PAGE 6 


international herald tribune, Friday, august 29 , 1991 


: 



INTERNATIONAL 



BOSNIA: 

U.S. Troops Attacked 

Continued from Page 1 






Without Acrimony,’ Paris Concedes U.S. Global Supremacy 


S0 


•- • 


of Bucko was shuttered and quiet. A 
Mercedes with German license plates 
sped through one of the main streets 
. carrying men who displayed a poster of 
; Mr. Karadzic and who shouted obscen- 
. iiies at a foreign visitor. 

Brcko is a vital choke point in the 
! Bosnian Serb enclave. It lies in a narrow 
corridor linking the eastern and western 

parts of Serb-held Bosnia. The fote of the 

- town was so sensitive it was left un- 
resolved at the Dayton peace conference 
and will be handed to the Serbs or the 
Muslims by an interna dona! arbitration 
committee. 

Brcko is in the part of Serb-held Bos- 
nia patrolled by American troops. 

Bnt Brcko was not the only scene of 
unrest Thursday. 

While police loyal to Mrs. Plavsic 
appear to be in control in Brcko, they 
have been unable to take over stations in 
Bijeljina and Doboj. 

In Bijeljina, Karadzic supporters 
blocked the town center to prevent 
SFOR troops from securing the police 
station. Sorbs in Doboj banged on 
NATO tanks with wooden clubs and 
gathered to prevent NATO troops from 
taking over the television transmitter, 
still in the hands of hard-liners. 

Meanwhile, Mrs. Plavsic took another 
step away from Mr. Karadzic, her former 
mentor, on Thursday, when she formed 
her own political party, the Serb Na- 
tional Association. 

■ Improving U.S. Coordination 

The Pentagon’s top general said 
Thursday that me United States needed to 
improve its coordination of military and 
civilian roles in future foreign interven- 
tions like Bosnia, Haiti and Somalia, 
Reuters reported from Washington. 

General John S halikashv ili, chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in re- 
sponse to questions that perhaps a single 
civilian or military coordinator should 
be appointed to ensure that each future 
U.S- operation, from military tasks to 
justice - and food distribution, runs 
smoothly, together and mi time. 


llfN 


Reuters Mr. Vedrine's remarks were a rare 

PARIS — The French foreign min- acknowledgement for Paris, which 
ister says Paris will accept U.S. global generally portrays itself as a rival to 
supremacy “without acrimony,” but Washington in world diplomacy, 
will say “no” to Washington when Because Washington “has no coun- 


matter of our view of international re- Washington i 

larions ’ • he said. troversies like Middle East peace talks^ . 

llfc Vedrine, named foreign minister NATO 




legitimate interests are at stake. 

France, “one of the seven or eight 
influential world powers,” must re- 


r d “without acrimony” to the fact 
the United States has become the 
sole superpower, Hubert Vedrine said . 
at an annual conference of French am- 
bassadors. Paris must maintain ‘‘a 
friendly, fr ank, genuine and direct dia- 
logue” with Washington, he said. 


E%1 Under UN administration 
I 1 Bosnian Serb repubtic 
^ Mustim-Croat federation 


when it's a matter of our legitimate President Bill Clinton claim a warm 


interests, or those of Europe, (xr if it’s a personal relationship. But Paris and 


ivu. rcuimc,iuuicu,iuiaKuuuuM™ — " — . . . - 1 - 

June when a leftist alliance of So- and - 

dists, Communists and Greens de- In JijremaiksJVfc 
ned the center-right in an early par- finned Ereoch suppjjt for a 
mentaiy election, has previously European Union and said European 
en critical of u!sNhegemroy” as econotmc and monetJ^mnon would 
s President Jacques Chirac, a con- bolster Europe s worl d role. ^ 
rvative. “The single currency will create.* 

But French- American diplomatic positive sho^ and wiD have ^ power 

fs are a common occurrence despite to federate Europe, he saM. Tne 
aerally dose ties. Mr. Chirac and euro’s airival wul have a k a “ nc *?§ 
esident Bill Clinton claim a warm effect in a world dominated by tne 
rsonai relationshfo. But Paris and dollar.” 


in June when a leftist alliance of So- 
cialists, Communists and Greens de- 
terweight. at least today, there is in- feaied the center-right in an early par- 
herent in its power the risk of liege- liamemary election, has previously 
mony and a temptation to act been critical of U.S. “hegemony,* as 
unilaterally, notably on the part of its has President Jacques Chirac, a con- 
legislative organs,” he said. servative. 

“So in some cases we will be a friend Bnt Freoch-American diplomatic 
or ally of the United States, while in tiffs are a common occurrence despite 
others we will have to tell them ‘no’ — generally close ties. Mr. Chirac and 






tiffs are a common occurrence despite to federate Europe, 

opnprnihf rlnw ti«c Mr fhirae and GUFO’s arrival Will , 





'J'rf 

~_Y.\ t*f: - * 





ALBRIGHT: 

Syria Visit Planned 


** vo* * emu***'' 


Continued from Page 1 




' \- ■ -‘Twrf- ■?&, : ■ 

** ' 


Ini v - * i 
* -* 
-•.y 


■tv- ■ 
*2-5 - 




Snljjc iWTV \noctwd Pm* 

A Bosnian Serb running alongside a NATO compound Thursday in Brcko, where Serbs harassed NATO troops. 


SWEDEN: Nation Examines Self-Image After Revelations of Sterilization Program 


Continued from Page 1 


The reality is that, for many years, 
these acts were routinely accepted in 
Sweden — and other Scandinavian 
countries — and often promoted by of- 
ficials who were otherwise seen as em- 
bodying progressive and humane values 
of statehood. 

As Miss Wallstrom stressed Thurs- 
day, there was nothing secret about the 


800; from the late 1940s into the 1950s, 
there were about 2,000 a year. 

At first, about 70 percent of those 
sterilized were women. Miss Runcis 
said, but in the 1950s and' 1960s, this 
grew to perhaps 90 percent. The pro- 
gram was abolished in 1974. 

Miss Runcis said she believed that 
while the idea behind the policy was 
about race, its implementation was 
based more on economics and social 


Itwascarriedontinthelightof behavior. Butas late as 1963, according 


blic debate at a time when Swedes to the newspaper series, a sterilization 


at the program believe that, at its peak, a 
sizable majority were forced. The vic- 
tims, many of” whom were in mental 
institutions — although by today’s stan- 
dards they would not be considered men- 
tally ill — or in reform schools, were told 
they had to sign a document authorizing 
the procedure if they wanted to get out. 

In some cases, conples judged to be 
inferior parents were sterilized, as were 
their children when they became teen- 
agers — all part of a theory that believed 


Middle East peace seemed in sight 
By contrast with the I.iknd Party in 
control, Mrs. Albright has deliberately 
refrained from visiting the Middle East 
until she felt a trip could make a dif- 
ference. Mr. Netanyahu is even more 
opposed than Prime Minister Shimon 
Peres had been to the retinn of the Golan 
Heights to Syria. The Syrians say that 
Israel promised during American-me- 
diated talks to hand over the entire Golan 
up to the borders thar existed before the 
1967 Middle East War, but the Israeli 
negotiators deny that any such agree- 
ment was reached. 

One of the chief Israeli negotiators, 
Itamar Rabinovich, a former ambassa- 
dor to the United States, said that a frill 
withdrawal from die Golan, seized by 
Israel in the 1967 war, was “in the realm 
of the possible," but only if Israeli con- 
ditions on security, water rights and nor- 
malization of relations were met, winch 
they were not. 

Mr. Netanyahu has said that he would 
not withdraw from the entire Golan no 

matter what the circumstances because 

s^joium»f XBocaxiiv* of security and water needs, 
phere Serbs harassed NATO troops. . But peace with Syria is key to a com- 
prehensive settlement in the Middle 
East, and Israeli officials concede that it 
I ■ .. could not happen without U.S. help and 

lization trogram mediation. Mrs. Albright also wants to 

° discuss the Syrian role in Lebanon and to 

and trauma kept them silent for most of press Mr. Assad to stop support for ter- 


Kabila Is Accused 
Of Hindering Probe 


Sk 


UNITED NATIONS, New York . 
— A team scat to investigate al- - 
legations that Hutu refugees from 
Rwanda were murdered in eastern 
Congo by troops loyal to Laurent 
Kabila has again been stymied by . 
Mr. Kabila’s government, an Amer- 
ican on the team said Thursday. 

Reed Brody, an American hu- 
man-rights expert and one of three 
investigators appointed earlier this 
nmnih by Secretary General Kofi 

Annan, said in a telephone interview 
from Kinshasa that the Democratic 
Repablic of Congo government had. . 
written to Mr. Annan raising new , 
conditions that ‘ ‘put obstacles i n toe 
way of the mission. ’ * (NYT) 




Flocks of Tourists 
Fill Bethlehem 


their lives. “They’ve internalized the 
establishment view of themselves as 
useless, as people who shouldn't have 
been bora, said Bosse Lindquist, who 
produced the radio documentary and 
wrote a book about toe issue in *1991. 
“They were ashamed. They put toe 
whole blame on themselves.” 

Maciej Zaremba, who wrote the 
newspaper series that touched off die 
uproar this week, believes there are a 


public debate at a time wnen aweaes 
believed they were creating a society 
that would be toe envy of toe world. 

Other nations, including the United 
States, have had their own dark chapters 
of sterilization and medical experiment- 
ation on toe poor, toe incarcerated or 
those in mental institutions. But what 
strikes home here is that Sweden was 
seen as a country with enlightened at- 
titudes toward toe weakest among toe 
population. 

“Everything was so good, so equal," 
said Maija Runcis, a doctoral candidate 
in history at Stockholm University 
whose research has helped expose toe 
full dimensions of toe sterilization pro- 
gram. “Nobody had seen toe back- 
yard.” 

There have been other reports of the 
sterilization program. Swedish Radio 
did a documentary six years ago, and toe 
producer also wrote a book based on 
interviews with many of toe victims. 
Last year, an academic study of toe 
sterilization policies of Sweden and oth- 
er Nordic countries was published in the 
United States. 

But these accounts were largely ig- 
nored or dismissed. Then last week, toe 
respected newspaper Dagens Nyheter 
published two lengthy articles describ- 
ing the history of toe program and ar- 
guing that toe Social Democrats, toe 
country’s governing party today and 
when the program was initiated, accep- 
ted toe policy as an essential part of their 
overall philosophy. The Sornl Demo- 
crats argued that Swedes bear a col- 
lective responsibility for the program. 

It wasn’t until this week mat national 
television did its first long story on the 
issue. But Swedish officials were bom- 
barded with questions from abroad, and 
it appears now that there will be no 
turning back from toe kind of inquiry 
that could fundamentally affect the way 
Swedes see themselves — and how toe 
rest of toe world sees Sweden. 

“From a democratic point of view, it 
is not acceptable to hide this black 
chapter of our Swedish history any- 


was earned out on someone deemed of that society would be improved if toe 
“mixed race." cycle were broken. 

Politicians defended toe program as a Miss Runcis found toe case of the 

way to hold down toe costs of toe en- young woman who had not mastered her 
larging welfare state. They argued that it confirmation studies well enough to sat- 
was important to limit toe size of fam- isfy her priest “I thought it was horrible, 
iiies, especially those with a history of terrible history," she said “I thought I 
anti-social behavior. Miss Runcis said had to write about this." 
toe Social Democrats “argued that it Dagens Nyheter published an account 
was necessary to sterilize people who of a 72-year-old woman who told of 
got a lot of benefits from toe welfare being forced to undergo sterilization 


social misbehavior was hereditary and series of reasons thar explain why toe 
that society would be improved if the government is acting now when it did 
cycle were broken. not in toe past 

Miss Runcis found the case of toe One is a growing body of evidence of 

young woman who had not mastered her toe true nature of toe program. Another 


rorism in toe region. Officials and dip- 
lomats believe Mr. Assad may be ready 
to resume talks with the Israelis and 
Americans because it restores him to a 
position of importance and because he is 
concerned about military cooperation 
between Israel and Turkey. The Turkish 
militar y allows toe Israeli Air Force to 
train in Turkey in exchange for Israeli 
help in repairing Turkish planes. 

■ Syria Warns Abusers 

Syria's tightly controlled media has 
begun to target corruption and misman- 
agement, a possible government warn- 
ing against abuse of power. The As- 


BETHLEHEM, West Bank — 
Hundreds of tourists poured into 
Bethlehem on Thursday, a day after 
Israel lifted a monthlong siege that 
battered the economy of toe West 
Bank town. 

But Palestinians said tire return of 
tourists to Bethlehem, toe tradition- 
al birthplace of Jesus, would barely. ’ 
ease the city a s economic difficulties., 
as long as Israel maintained a clo- 
sure ot the West Bank and Gaza. 

The town's 40,000 residents, tike 
Palestinians across toe West Bank 
and Gaza, are still suffering under 
the Jewish state’s blockade which 
keeps tens of thousands, of. Arabs, 
from jobs in Israel. (Reuters) 


Castro Is Not IU 1 


isfy her priest “I thought it was horrible. Swedes who do not see toe past the way 
terrible history," she said. “I thought I their parents do. 
had to write about this." Miss Wallstrom, who has been the 

Dagens Nyheter published an account government's chief spokeswoman on 
of a 72-year-old woman who told of toe issue, is pan of that generation. On 


is that there is a new generation of sociated Press reported from Damascus 
Swedes who do not see toe past toe way The government newspaper Tlshrin 

their parents do. called far a full investigation earlier tins 

Miss Wallstrom, who has been the week after reporting that a senior official 
government's chief spokeswoman on In toe Agriculture Ministry had forged 
toe issue, is pan of that generation. On his minister’s signature, granting a 


state because toe welfare state was only 
for people who behaved themselves." 
No one can document with certainly 


No one can document with certainty 
how many of these sterilizations were 
involuntary, but those who have looked 


after being judged mentally slow be- 
cause she could not read toe blackboard 
at school. “I am not ashamed. ' ’ she told 
toe newspaper. "Others should be.” 

For most victims, however, shame 


Thursday, under a barrage of questions 
about how toe Swedish government had 
allowed this program to continue for so 
long, she said: “It's impossible for me to 
say. I belong to another political gen- 
eration. I can hardly explain this." 


group of merchants permission to import 
livestock from Russia. Tlshrin said that 


toe official forged toe signature “for 
personal benefit* ’ but gave no details. 

“We should not keep silent about 
such acts," the newspaper said. 


MIAMI — The Cuban govern- 
ment says that Fidel Castro “ is in 
excellent health” despite & flurry of 
unsubstantiated reports that the 71- 
year-old dictator had died or was 
ailing. 

The rumors touched off much 
discussion Wednesday on Spanish- 
ianguage radio and television sta- 
tions as well as at streetside caf- 
eterias in Miami's Little Havana, 
where bumper stickers declaring 
“No Castro, no problem” are com- _ 
mon. (Reuters) 


GENERA. 


Fers:" s 





_ .-‘■x . ^ * .• 


IP® 5 ' 

<i?' # ^ °\i»’ iliiji 



; 'r . 

" t~'+- At r ;: j 



BORDER: Rabin Considered a Pullout 


Continued from Page 1 


other talks were first reported in Thursday 
editions of the Israeli newspaper 
Ha’aretz, which said it had obtained 
minutes taken during toe discussions. 

Mr. Rabinovich said he was troubled 


toe el-Hama enclave southeast of toe Sea 
of Galilee, that sea’s northeast shore and 
the east bank of toe Jordan River along a 
16-kilometer (10-mile) stretch just north 
of the Sea of Galilee. 

But Mr. Rabinovich confirmed that 
Mr. Rabin had told Mr. Christopher in 


• I tirraiit 


by the fact that secret information had Jerusalem on July 18, 1994 

hw*n Hicrlrvcpr? hiif mnfirmprl sfatavlc timnM J: • 



V“*V''~V.r 


__ Rpftyn Bcdc/Agera Fiau-Pmc 

CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION IN CHINA — A stretch limousine leaving Tiananmen Square in 
Beijing on Thursday after being ordered by the police to depart Some Chinese entrepreneurs can now 
afford such status symbols, and believe that their wealth entitles them to disobey traffic regulations. 


CAMPUS: Under New Race Law, University of Texas Is Whiter 


Continued from Page 1 


aid, recruiting and undergraduate pro- 


more," said Alf Svensson, the leader of grains. The result, many educators and 


the small Christian Democratic Party. 
Mr. Svensson, who along with a former 
prime minister. Carl Bildt, recently de- 
manded a formal investigation of the 
program, added: “To hide is to deny. 
Swedes ought to be ashamed." 

“It raises questions that are very dis- 
turbing to the Swedish peace of mind.” 
said Arne Ruth, toe editor in chief of 
Dagens Nyheter. ‘ ‘The fact that this has 
attracted international attention helps to 
explain why there is rising reaction in 
Sweden as well." 

The sterilization program had its roots 
in toe study of eugenics, whose advo- 
cates believed in the potential of human 
engineering to create a superior race, a 
pseudoscientific theory that helped 
bring about toe horrors of Nazi Ger- 
many. 

Sweden, toe first nation to establish an 
institute on racial biology in 1922, en- 
acted its first law authorizing steriliz- 
ation for toe mentally ill in 1934. By 
then, Germany, Denmark and Norway 
already had similar laws. 

The law in Sweden was broadened in 
1941 to include what was considered 
anti-social behavior, which dramatically 
increased toe number of sterilizations. In 
1935 there were 235; in 1941 , there were 


includes the 4 blacks and 26 Hispanics 
after the school received applications 
from 225 blacks, 306 Mexican- Amer- 
icans and 2,515 whites. All those totals 


students here believe, is that top-ranking are down from last year. 


minority students feel unwelcome at toe 
University of Texas, and are accepting 
better offers at out-of-slate schools, 
which still operate under affirmative ac- 
tion policies. 

“We are deeply concerned, " said Mi- 
chael S harlot, dean of the law school. 
“We’re a school that over toe past de- 
cades has produced more African- 
American and Hispanic lawyers than 
any other law school in the United 
States. We’ve played a major role in 
diversifying the legal profession. It’s 


California is toe only other state with 
an admissions policy that bans the use of 
race, with affirmative action banned in 
law schools this year and undergraduate 


After nearly a yearlong battle in toe 
courts, California can now begin en- 
forcing a controversial new law that 
eliminates race and sex as factors in a 
variety of state programs, from hiring to 
education and contracting. 

The measure makes California toe 
first state to abolish affirmative action 
programs, a move that has captured the 


been disclosed, but he confirmed details 
of the article in a telephone interview 
Thursday. 

“I believe Assad understands today 
that he could have made peace, not under 
toe full terms he would have wanted, but 
under reasonable, acceptable condi- 
tions," the forma- Israeli negotiator said 
Mr. Rabin made his commitments to 
Mr. Christopher under toe express un- 
derstanding that they not be presented ro 
Mr. Assad as Israel’s negotiating po- 
sition, the former negotiator said 
They were intended instead to allow 
Mr. Christopher, who was then shuttling 
between Israel and Syria, to present real 
ideas as hypothetical suggestions and 
then gauge the Syrian response. 

Only if it became clear that Syria 
would meet Mr. Rabin's conditions on 
matters including security, diplomatic 
relations and open borders would Israel 
have agreed to discuss withdrawal to the 
1 967 lines. That point was never 
reached, Mr. Rabinovich said. 
Nevertheless, the disclosure of Mr. 


school in 1998. At the University of interest of public officials nationwide 


Rabin’s use of toe gambit and the po- 
sition he had staked out by July 1 994 has 
further demonstrated toe stark differ- 
ences between his stance and that of 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, 
who has vowed never to return any part 
of the Golan, which was captured by 
Israel during the 1967 war. 

Israel and Syria have not held peace 
talks since before Mr. Netanyahu be- 
came prime minister in June 1996. 

Mr. Netanyahu has said he wants to 
see negotiations resumed “without 1 ore- 

" I I .* . 


California at Berkeley School of Law, 
only one black is entering toe first-year 
class, and university officials are equally 
dismayed over the lack of diversity. 

* ‘Certainly there is a very serious con- 
cern about the fact that we have only one 
African-American in toe current class," 
said toe University of California's 


tragic because we’re not going to be able spokesman, Jesus Mena. Last year, there 


to continue." 

This is the first academic year in 
which toe impact of the Hopwood case 


were 20 blacks in Berkeley’s first-year -- .«*uuaaons resumea wiuiour ore- ton r .. 

law class. Court of Appeals denied the groups' conditions " a ohrase he uses to maClr ■ then * was ke P l m Israel 

which toe impact of the Hopwood case In Texas, student leaders have been latest attempt 10 prevent toe law from clear that he will not be hounH^hThi J ™ Mr. Rabin was prime minister, Mr. 
has been felt clearly in Texas. Before toe vocal in their concern that administra- going into effect, clearing toe way for it predecessor’s commitments “ Rabm I 0VIch Mid- The ambassador, who 

, tore are simply accepting the situation, to trto effect TTtureday. Mr »■ notetakor in mostS™ 


since campaigns for similar bans are 
under way in several states. 

A coalition of civil rights groups 
fought the law in various federal courts, 
arguing that it abolished only programs 
that benefited women and minorities 
while keeping preferences for those who 
sought them on such grounds as age. 
disability or veteran status. 

But on Tuesday, the 9th U.S. Circuit 


would be willing to discuss a withdrawal 
to those lines. - 

Mr. Christopher traveled toe next day 
to Damascus, where he met with Mr. 
Assad. In briefing Mr. Rabinovich )atw 
about that meeting, a U.S. special envoy, 
Dennis Ross, is reported in Ha’aretz to 
have said, among other things: “At toe 
end of toe day, as part of the package in 
which toe Israeli demands will be real- 
bred, and when the United States un- 
derstands toe demands of Israel will be 
realized, the meaning of full withdrawal 
in such circumstances will be to the lines, 
of J line 4, 1967’ ' — before the war. „ 

Mr. Rabinovich said he believed toe- 
quotation to be accurate. 

The former negotiator said, however, 
that it would be wrong for Syria to say that 
Mr. Rabin had ever given explicit consent 
to so extensive an Israeli withdrawal. 

“A willingness to discuss does not 
mean acceptance,” he said, adding that 
Mr. Rabin would have insisted as his 
price that the Syrians meet his terms for 
m a intain i n g security in the Golan 
Heights and establishing a “true 
peace, including full diplomatic re- 
lations. 

The Ha’aretz report said that toe Is- 
raeli Ale on the meetings was code- 
named “Pocket," because Israel and toe 
United States had agreed that Mr. Ra- 
bin s assurances on territorial witbdraw- 
ai, including his readiness to negotiate 
over the 1967 lines, would remain in an 
American pocket" for safekeeping. 

The talks were so secret ihat no writ- 



CSC--; 


.# - 


ruling, toe umveraity. like others around rare are simpiy accepting ine situation, to take effect lliursday. Asked about the reoorL Mr ^ noiaai£e r m most of toe ses- 

toe country, could use race as one factor saying they are bound by a court order This means that in theory, at least, yahu said during a trip to South kS- JS?*’. safeguarded the documents him- 
m deciding which students to admit; that and there is little they can do. government agencies from the biggest “The hadn at * srae l s embassy in Wachinotrvn 


lh 


policy led to acceptance of minorities 
with slightly lower test scores than those 
of white students. 

And for decades, the first-year law 
school class would include about 40 
blacks and about 60 Hispanics, gradu- 
ating a total of 650 black lawyers and 
1 .300 Hispanic lawyers over the years. 
This semester, the first-year class of 488 


d there b hide they can do. government agencies trom the b.ggest “The basic question is not things d£ aiwu 1 m Washington. 

No one denies that the campus does not state offices in Sacramento down to the were discussed between differ^ ^ Rabin w as assassinated in 

reflect the state’s population; about a third smallest local water and sewer districts ficials in toewst bStSShS toS November 1995, Mr RabSch 
of the population is either Hispanic or immediately have io begin dismantling will be discussed.” hi ” gS that ^ 1cfed the new prime minister, Shimon 


black and half of its public school stu- 
dents are members of a racial minority. 

■ California Ban Is Affirmed 


affirmative action programs that conflict 
with the voter-approved ban. 


. In public, Mr. Rabin vigorously ob- S H lhe u taU “* tb en did the same 
jeeted to Mr. Assad’s demand that Israel oKc tanyahu a ^ er he took office in 


William Claihornc of The Washington 
Past reported from Los Angeles: 


•rations or other nongovernment to be ceded toSvria in such^ nldttl 0 7 He over the written record to 

oups, nor does ii apply to federal af- would include land that was wL"nh ISraeU S over nnte?Sriri1w6: 

firmahve action programs. Bniish-mandaied Palestine. inEng ^ nhe was replaced as ambassador,^ he 





. . MAM . 1w . wcr.ncniV. sC pTCunra ^i«7 


PAGE 3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 


PAGE 7 




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1.400 sq.m, garden, sate parking, boat 
moonng, near Wit, 15 oars Sitvhoi 

NLG 1.30 M0 E-mat saperrya Coves 

Tel. +312W212311 

Italy 

HOtfTEFURE. ASO VALLEY 

From oerror fox sate anc«nt mansron, 
ever C rooms. 4 salts, parity restored 
■ad hand pamtings and rfecorattons. 

4500 aq m garten and oraigerie. i hour 
south cl Ancona portairpen # miles 
from sea Please cored Mr Segaic 
Conaerae. SuiTtsta House. Si Ucra 
'Fac 441-81-833 85 24 

Tet +41-81482 11 32 

Beautiful qjaoKJS. matem eparmert b 
me hsn cf VENICE 8 senes b ;n ny 
heart cafi for (Has *33 41 526 - 0655 


mt 


ROME. MAGNIFICENT LUXURY VILLA. 
EwpeMer.1 central location tQOO sq m 
spaociis rooms san tJI bjh & jacuczc 
y/m separate maids quarters 2500 
sq.m landscaped garden swimming 
pool central au-coodninting, 4 -qj 
satage. secumy system US Si.5M 
Tet 272-315-6202 Fa*. Cr'-*i,'P790 


London 


LONDON TOWNHOUSE 

6 FLOORS 
South Aide; Street 

2 Lftmg rooms, 2 Master Bedroom suies 
i Ltorarv. 2 Lara? Be-iooms 
i Dww Room, t.feiy Batewns 
BEAUTffl.lL GARDEN 

US S3J MILLION 
FAX; 7^212)888-4829 USA 


H0UESEARCK LONDON Let us 
search for you We lina homes Hats 
to buy and m and provide corporate 
relocation services. For individuals 
and companies Tel' -4J i7i 83B 
1066 Fa- - 44 171 B3B 1077 
tttpihrrmiiQrneseandico uVhoni 


Monaco 


SUPERB APARTMENT, 240 SQJI. 
penthouse Dupiw. panwanc sea new 
and moirtans. large reception room. 

2 Kdrooms, 2 bathe, lame fuJty 
lined ktichen. pantrv, laundri- room, 
guest dressing room, large terrace and 
bqgas 140 sqm 2 cellars. 2 iprages 
INTERMEDIA 
TbI: +377 93 50 66 84 
Fax +377 93 SO 45 52 


Norway 


BERGEN-PARADE, ON WATERFRONT, 
nountam views 550 sam house, large 
boaflicuss about 2 acres incJoor port 
Ca SI mo Brtthur? appointment call 
♦47-45-B18E0, Fax -47-55-901319 or 
E-ne» hmeJfcve r?wiSw jt 


Switzerland 


□ 


LAKE GENEVA & ALPS 

Sate D taraqnss authorized 
speciality since 1975 


Annette prop?:-!! cvercSsg ;•&£ 
5 to 5 beewrs XTi £F: 21-w.CGl 

REVAC SJL 

52, Ltorrtbrfflanl CR-1211 GENEVA 2 
Tel 4122-734 IS « Fax 734 12 20 


V81ARSOUOH; terradiate sale. 2 br. 

2 satr. vicherere. ;v r; rear, sacar 
BW S£J«? r VSis STJ 357Ci23 


Paris and Suburbs 


PARIS ffiUtLiY s.'srrs 21? «- 
: v r3. ShrdT":-- -‘3 53- 
2 zv-.rs 

$■ T * — e* s? 


7th bellechasse. *i: -:t =*=;- 
tea err-r: '.:c3«-«. ar.i.s *&■ 


IE ST LOUS omer sflfcrtrt * sqm. 

50 sqm living, i bedroom, 4tl ftXtcHL 
sun Tel 33 (0)143266868 S 080310322 

PARS 16ft, Off OIA. 911 flow, smy 
ownasefc 150 sqm M. No iv 
temetSary, Tel. -33 lOli 45 01 64 44 

USA Residential 

HERMOSA BEACH, CAUFORNU 
Beauiitul 4600 sq fl home whh 

180 degree view ol Pacific Ocean & 
KBSfine 20-5 rrat to Beve rty HSs or 
dowreovm ins Angeles. Sun dote, fire- 
places. security system Waiting dstanca 
lb beacti. mtfjfe restauans. fflooplno, 
cinema, eic Sale pnee US 5784,000. 

Long term lease possible al 55000/mo. 

Contact George Tel: 310476-5619 

FSSC 310-376-7397 

40 MIN. FROM NYC, FfBnWIr Lakes. NJ 
Coumiy Club commumly Exceilert 
schools Cortemporary Tutor. One acre, 
seefoded on aide-sac Four bedrooms, 

2 tit teforuomt PrfsHte awfim 2 car 
garage it grout pool screened porch, 
central, an condition sprinklers securty 
system, art many extras S675XB0 US. 

Cafl Margaret 201-4930722 

NAPLES. FLORIDA • GOLF/GULF! 

Beach, tennis, yacht 3 bedroom. 3 bah. 
medtaten £ mornng rooms US S1.49U 

Terry Wanen iDtwrrw+ya Realty) Tel 

941-4 34- B049 Fax 941-434-7324 

SrtWrs webvne. 

MIAMI BEACH (BALHARBOURSurf- 
ste) Ocean) rom penffiousa. New 2 room 

2 M2 bath 180 sqm. Marble flow Gran- 
ge bar S385K Tel: 31M&0614. 

ROXBURY. CT Dream country retreat 
cofonal oca 1760 3 bedroom + guest 
house, pool, lentis. 23 acres, beautiful 
roflng Ids 5836K Tel 212-88MB1. 

Real Estate 
for Rent 


Italy 

ROME - CITY CENTER 

Nee equipped apartments. 

Hetoric retaoence at ot ifah cenL 
Partnytpnfen. 

From ftOOFF.-week al year long. 

2 id 6 patsons. housing only 

Tet Parte +33 (0)1 49 M 20 53 

London 

SPACIOUS studio. South Ksnamjon 
cerraHy tosm. Post to subnay. steps, 
fully fomtahed pm b» entrance, pare, 
separate bedroom area, fully equipped 
kitchen access to pmaie gaidens £200 
per v.-sek. Avaiabte n Novenfoa. Tel. 

-33 .Oil 43 23 15 96 

CAPITAL Apartments S tenses tor rent 
snititag Stav la see vm temngs.ca. 1 * 
pr tetertars ++44 17) 794 6702 

LOMBARDY PLACE BAYSWATER W2 

EsauA' S-Dc-Srpor: tewse. £830 per tn. 

Sa iz‘ sneii jrds:. security ones Tef 

C-ri 2 lr rm fjxOi*: 2:46 j39 


FRANCE 


A.B.V.L. 


Gerald Kreiner 

pilldJMMrtaHWMJJiH 


Will <1* • lilt' iv«=o;iit ll 1(11 Vi III 
& will • > >iim.n> a Hu* i<ii*|n‘i i\ 
Tcl.i XNftfl 33 20 4NI .10 
»'a\.: 3'.t(U) 1 11 2<> tIH (it) 

^ r.- if*-*- 

^ ju» ' jui- ' M 1 /. mu)». 


Holland 


TL Herenaiach 

1015 BH Amsteidam Tel +31 iD 6^2252 
Fee 6392262 E-nB*wDCfseh£01lpnf 


RENTHOUSE BUERNAT10NAL 
No i in HofeirJ 
lor (semO fumfched itouses/ffleos 
T A 31-206448751 Fax 31-20-6465909 
Woven 1821, 1063 Am Amsterdam 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


NOTRE DAME, superb 5 -room apai- 
men 125 sqm kbdem equpped kkh- 
en, 2 bedrooms, 2 Dabs qidn vwy sun- 
ny. optional parkirtg FF14.5M + 
effirgat T* +33 IW3 66 66 40 21 


Paris Area Furnished 


e$ c0 ^ 



ideal Bccotmuxlatm sufi>5 bedrooms 
QtaSy and saves assured 
READY TD MOVE M 
Tel -+33(0)1 43129600 Fax (0)143129806 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PANS 
Tel: *33 (0)1 OL30.05 


AT HOME IN PARS 

PARIS PROMO 

Apoimerts to rert hxrished or nol 
Sates 8 Property Uanagonent Services. 
25 AvHoche 75006 Paris FxOI -4561 1020 

Tel: +33 (0)1 45 63 25 60 


KOUFFETARD ■ Heart of Paris, marts! 
place, sunny, calm, fafft squpped, 2- 
roooi fiat, renovated FR.500 net + 2- 
rronth depose. Tet +33 (0)1 47C7 2795 
before tOanVater or leave message 


15th, near 7th. over gatden. i superb Sv- 
mc- 2 bedrooms. Brace. Frii.000 + 1 
bsfaj + 1 bedroom. FF7.53D. sun. qutt 
equipped, redone. Tel +32I0|G08615126 






^ +44171420 0348 




HOLIDAYS 


2 


HOTELS 


Hotel 

ATALA 

< .7 Kcnijis-lUysi 

* * + * 


-)8 refined rooms, fuSy equipped 
- Air conditioned - Direct 
Telephone - Satellite TV - 
Seminar mentis (lunch m<al- 
lablliiy) ■ Bar ■ Private garden - 
Gastronomictd restaurant. 

950 Jf to 1400 ff a day 

10, rue Chateaubriand 
75008 Paris 

I Tel: +33 {0)1 45 62 01 62 I 

I Fax: +33 (0)1 42 25 66 38 I 


Auberge la Cle des Champs 


**NN Logis de Fiance 
Tennis - Heated Swimming Pool 
Equestrian Center 
24550 VUlefranche-du Pertfiord 
Tel: +33 (0)5 53 29 95 94 
Fax +33 (0)5 53 28 42 96 


Bed A Breakfasts 


MANHATTAN LODGINGS, NYC, Short 
stay lutvy apartments, superior B & B 
regis fry. many location; 
Tel. 212-475-2090 Fax. 212-477-0420 
BiwriBihanaiWtpngs com 


Hotels 


PARIS 

LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE 




13, rue UAguesseau, 75008 Paris 
Just off the Faubourg Samt-Honore and The Elysee Falace 
A LUXURY APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE 


Very exclusive, located in one of the most prestigious neigh 
bouriioods: Faubouig Saint-Honore and Champs Elysees. 



feet 

lens. 


one or 


Thirteen 
completely 

living-dining _ 

two marble bathrooms and some with studies. 

Ideal for both family holidays and business trips, a perfect 
“pied-k-terre". 

All hotel services. Daily maid service. Air conditionning. 
Underground parking. Complete security. 

For more mfonnntion or reservations, please fax directly to: 
+33 (O) 1 42 66 35 70 or call +33 (Oil 44 51 16 35 


HOVEL LK£SI'l?EHfE Hlt\$J TJ ’ * * * 

Between the Seine and the Tanlheon in the heart ol The Latin quarter 
Charm me rooms and apartments ravins onto the square 
Paul-Lanfceun, equipped with kitchenette Hdeal for long stays.) 
• Ratc-i from AV FF fo J.2iK' FF rer day 

■MIRAGE DISCOUNTS FOR HER.ILD TRIBUTE READERS- 


Lr.vTrH c<f fr 

1 dav 
3 davs 
6 days 


RCv'U 
1. ..•■ 

700 FF 
l.SOOFF 
3,000 FF 


FiXv.i 

A'.i'l-i 

600 FF 
1,600 FF 
2,800 FF 


Af aRTMS’.T 
111-. 

900 FF 
.2,400 FF 
4,200 FF 


ArARTME'.T 
At OUST 
800 FF 
2.100 FF 
3,900 FF 
r>. r.rj.’ rjfiN 


For i'r o .Uni - :k lulu lire u Re-u.*!-;. fi . rr P ?or ! ! vr'* 

50, r. des Bemaidins, 75005 Paris ■ Tel: ++35HJI 1 41 41 51 sl-Fax: -5510) 1 4b 53 93 22 
M. RER Si Michel Notre Dames - Parking nearby. 


Holiday Rentals 


Caribbean 


Lebanon 

Switzerland 

ST. BARTHELEMY. F.W.L OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS - beach- 
front to hHtsBte Y.tth pools. Ora agents 
have inspected all villas personalty. For 
reservations on Si Barts. Si Mam An- 
otfla. Barbados Musnque. ita Virgin ta- 
Srv&.. Call WIMCO/ISIBAR7H ■ US. 

KOI 1649-BOltifax 847-6290. from 
FRANCE C-5 90 16 20 • ENGLAND 0 
-30M9-S31P 

HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East of Belnjl 

5 star defoxe. Exceptional foertm. secu- 
rity, comfort, fine cuisine, conventions, 
business services, saiellire TV. IB min 
transfer from airport free. UTELL Fax: 

(961) 4-972439 / (+33) {0)1-47200007 

SWISS CHALET, NkfuntGtanis, 70 km 

S. of Zurich Beautiful alpine scenery 

Ideal tot taking, biking, summing and 
afomnordc sluing. 3 bettooms. sl«is. 

7. Fax +41 55 640 79 03 

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE ImA 

PARIS STUDIO, 18 Bid Bouroaiciaia. 

28 sqm, modem kdchenerie. Rem 
FF4500fmortfi. Purchase also possftie. 

Tel & Fax ++41 62 849 13 15 

LE MARAIS center. beautif’J 6F sqm 
flat funistad nth bathroom big kndhen 

Free re*. Tel +33 lOn 42 77 5? 95 


Switzerland 

GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apan- 
mpTs From studes to 4 bedrooms Tef 
<1 21 735 622:. Fa> -Si 22 735 2S71 

14th, charnwq 2-bertotn tumened ftaL i 
firertace. dtenwashar. laundry, pnvaie 
yart. R50tt'ma Cal Arne 1-53820163 

PARS -Louvre cfarowg 2-bidrooro te 
uatm neOmaluOy equroped. F6X- (tie; 
m 7 nigtts Tel +33 .Oil -C ij « 

USA 

6th. ODEON. tegh dess studo m low 
house, charming, quiet, fuQy equipped. 
F5.500 net Tet +33 (Off 46 SS V 60 

Tin BAC, s?3 4 to Jan 3 r:ow S jr. 
vre-A calm. CNN al! smetiUM =?.:• 
Fr?ca: Oiener *33 T-’ -UTSS 

NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 

.-.++■> •' * -if Grea •.■,:awr.i 
F&Zr.zw 2«:-^9-5223 Far itj- 
iii-t£r. £-V 2 j arn«nr.«4arf:br 


GENERAL 


Persona/s 


MAY THE SACRED HEART or Jsius be 
aocred. glorrlied loved ano ptaserved 
ihroughout flu wjrtt non ano toreva 
Sacred Heart d Jesus pray tor us SaW 
Jude. wxXef ol miracles pray lor us, 
Sart Jude, tester of (he hopeless, pray 
for us. Amen Say tta prayer me tones 
a aay a- 1 ?» wren dav >mr pwr 
be answered 1 has neirer teen knwm 
to lari PuHnalion must be promised 
AV 


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FRANCE ( 20 « Ci en FFJ1 - TVA 20.F« 
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Call C22 346 K S =sot; AdfiKy 
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WCOLE VERY PRETTY AND SHAPELY 
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PflEUER ESCORTS 24 lire 
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97725020 

BEGUM & UJXEMBOUB& Bnsai 
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: ft CYPRUS Aim. 

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RMAMh ttttmli. 

Tel. 358 9 608826. 

Fac 358 9 646 508 
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W. @56315738. 

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Ttl 357-1-457-7293. 
For 351-1-457-7352 
SPAN Madrid. 

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Fw 4566074. 

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UMTHO STATES 

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Qfifc! 

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PAGE 8 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


PVPUSHU) WITH TH£ MW YORK TIMfN AND Tilt WO-HINfiTON FOST 


Honor the Facilitators 


Fonner President F. W. de Klerk's 
announced resignation from politics is 
drawing a fur share of shrugs and even 
criticism in his home country of South 
Africa. His departure from the scene 
comes too soon, it is said; his National 
Party will now go down the tubes. Or it 
comes too late; he would have been 
wiser to withdraw while his reputation 
was at its peak. In fact, fora transitional 
figure such as Mr. de Klerk, there 
never may be a perfect moment to step 
aside. But that takes nothing away 
from the remarkable contribution he 
made by rising, at one particular mo- 
ment in history, above his party, his 
position and himself. 

As so many nations have moved 
from authoritarianism toward freedom 
in recent years, much of the credit has 
gone — rightly — to the dissidents and 
democrats who suffered for their be- 
liefs. fought for change and, in coun- 
tries lucky enough to have such fig- 
ures, provided moral exemplars during 
the confusing years of change. Nelson 
Mandela in South Africa. Vaclav 
Havel in the Czech Republic, Lech 
Walesa in Poland — each might even- 
tually have succeeded, even without a 
de Klerk or a Mikhail Gorbachev 


loosening the strings of police-state 
1. Historical forces, c 


control. Historical forces, outside pres- 
sures and the resistance of countless 
unremembered heroes all play a role. 
Yet each struggle would have been 
longer and, most likely, bloodier with- 
out the contributions of those few rep- 
resentatives of old regimes who, im- 
probably, saw the wrongs in systems 
that had nurtured them. 

These transcendent figures have not 
fared well once histoiy has rushed past 
them. Often they find themselves 
pressed to answer for the sins of the 


systems they helped abolish (but also 
once helped run) while floundering to 
secure a place in the new order. Old 
friends consider them traitors, while 
the beneficiaries of the .change they 
helped initiate never fully trust them. 
Mr. Gorbachev is a lonely object of 
derision in Russia, attracting fewer 
than i percent of votes in a recent 
presidential election. Roh Tae Woo, a 
South Korean general who helped 
move his country from military dic- 
tatorship to democracy, faced old 
charges of army brutality and political 
corruption, and now sits in jail. 

Mr. de Klerk became president in 
1989, a product and by all indications a 
bulwark of South Africa's system of 
racial apartheid. Yet in 1990 be freed 
Mr. Mandela from prison after 27 years 
and legalized his African National 
Congress, setting in motion the re- 
forms that led to Mr. Mandela's elec- 
tion in 1994 — and Mr. de Klerk's 
demotion to deputy president. In 1993 
be shared with Mr. Mandela the Nobel 
Peace Prize. Since last year he has been 
in opposition, struggling to revive his 
party and fending off accusations that 
he knew of state-sanctioned murders 
during the apartheid era. 

Not that he should be immune from 
such inquiries. There is. of course, a 
poignancy in Mr. de Klerk's (as in Mr. 
Gorbachev's) inability to fully under- 
stand or succeed in new circumstances 
he helped create. But his nation's im- 
patience and ingratitude, its demands 
for accountability and justice and his- 
torical truth, its rude democratic clam- 
or — ah ibis is, in part, his legacy. It 
may not feel to him like much of a 
prize, but it is worth more in the end 
than the Nobel. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Post-Communist Excess 


"When Americans say something is 
histoiy, that means it's irrelevant." the 
Polish journalist Konstanty Gebert 
likes to say. "When we say it. it means 


just the opposite." The Communist 
till very mu 


past is still very much present in Po- 
land 


land and Germany, which have re- 
cently taken controversial measures to 
punish Communist officials and col- 
laborators. Germany's conviction of 
three East German leaders for shoot- 
ings at the Berlin Wall and Poland's 
new law to bar secret-police collab- 
orators from government jobs raise 
questions about both nations' commit- 
ment to the rule of law. 

This week a Berlin courr convicted 
three members of East Germany’s 
Politburo of responsibility for shooting 
deaths from 1984 to 1989. The former 
security chief, Egon Krenz, was sen- 
tenced to six and a half years. Two 
others are to serve three years. None 
had any role in writing the laws, but 
prosecutors argued that they had been 
rold of shootings and had praised bor- 
der guards who killed fleeing citizens. 
About 100 people have been tried for 
such shootings. Defense officials were 
convicted for writing the laws, and 
some border guards have received 
short or suspended sentences. 

Like many other trials of former 
East German officials, these have been 
legally questionable. Many politicians 
and legal scholars see them as ex post 
facto justice, punishing people for acts 
that were not criminal when commit- 
ted. German courts have ruled that the 
border policy was so unjust that an 
exception can be made. While inter- 
national law would make such an ex- 
ception for crimes like genocide, few 
scholars would say that border shoot- 
ings qualify. But if highly indoctrin- 
ated young border guards have been 
convicted, their leaders should be held 
responsible as well. 

Poland has just instituted a screen- 
ing law designed to keep people who 
collaborated with the Communist 
secret police out of government jobs. 
The law requires top government of- 


ficials and political candidates to de- 
clare whether they were informers. 
Later, a panel of judges will review the 
secret police files. Those who tied will 
be barred from office for 10 years. 

The law is somewhat better than the 
controversial screening law in the 
Czech Republic. The Polish law will 
allow judges to take into account 
whether people were forced to inform 
by threats to themselves or their fam- 
ilies. But it echoes many of the in- 
justices of the Czech version. The 
screening judges in Poland must be 
approved by the justice minister, 
which could* lead to a repeat of the 
jliticization that occurred in 1992. 


pouti 

That year, a right-wing government 
gave Parliament a list of 64 politicians 


supposedly named as informers in the 
files. A parliamentary investigation 
found that the list contained the names 
of many government opponents — in- 
cluding Lech Walesa — but in only 10 
of the 64 cases was there real evidence 
of collaboration. 

That episode also revealed that the 
files are full of holes. They contained 
signatures of supposed informants 
forged by secret police recruiters, who 
needed to meet a quota. Other people in 
the files who were pressured into col- 
laborating gave the secret police no 
harmful information. 

Before the screening courts start 
their work, the Polish government 
must devise mechanisms to deal with 
the ambiguities of collaboration and 
the flaws of the files. But it should also 
ask why it is still worrying about in- 
formers. Poland is right to continue to 
prosecute Communist-era criminals, 
such as those who shot protesters. But 
informing was not a crime, and bad 
behavior under communism is no 
longer any guide to whether a person is 
a market-oriented , democrat today. 
Poles who worry that informers are 
sabotaging their nation should con- 
template tiie spectacular progress that 
Poland has made toward political and 
economic health. 


— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Getting Tough in Bosnia 


While I’m not going into detail about 
what might or might not happen to 
Radovan Karadzic, what happened at 
Prijedor [in July] should be a warning ro 
everyone. There, the police chief, who 
was indicted as a war criminal, es- 
sentially committed suicide. He was 
surrounded by British troops and chose 
to shoot back. He could have sur- 
rendered and gone to The Hague for a 
free and fair trial. 


The world should understand that 
the NATO-SFOR command is going to 
be very vigorous from now on in im- 
plementing the Dayton agreement 
The British have a new government 
and a new. no-nonsense foreign sec- 
retary, Robin Cook. For the fust time 
in five years there is no daylight be- 
tween London and Washington on 
Bosnia. This is very important. 

— Richard Holbrooke, in an 
interview distributed by the Los 
Angeles Times Syndicate. 


HeralO^ribtmc 


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Here’s a Simple Way to Prevent Food Poisoning 

** - - - Some anti-nuclear and enviro riragit a l . 


M ADISON, Connecticut — It is a 
good rule of thumb that techno- 
logical solutions work better than in- 
creased regulation. Before 1920, thou- 
sands of babies died annually in New 
York and other large American cities 
from drinking contaminated milk. The 
solution was not more federal dairy 
inspectors or a merger of government 
agencies. It was pasteurization. 

The solution to the problem of food 
poisoning — whether the food in- 
volved is hamburger, strawberries, 
raspberries, cider or some other 
product susceptible to bacterial con- 
tamination — has been sitting on the 
shelf for most of 40 years while hun- 
dreds of thousands of Americans have 
been sickened and thousands have 
died. It is the equivalent of pasteur- 
ization, and its neglect is a disgrace. 

The technology is food irradiation. 
The U.S. Army pioneered its devel- 
opment beginning in 1943, and it has 
since passed into commercial appli- 
cation in some 40 countries, including 
limited use in the United States. 

Irradiation uses gamma rays from a 
solid radioactive source to disrupt the 
DNA of, and thus to kill, noxious bac- 
teria. parasites, mold and fungus in and 
on agricultural products. Gamma rays 
are si mitar to microwaves and X-rays. 

Irradiation does not make food ra- 
dioactive, nor does it noticeably change 
taste, texture or appearance. Depend- 


By Richard Rhodes 


ing on dose and on whether the food is 
packaged to prevent recontamination, 
irradiation can retard spoilage, kill 
germs or even completely preserve. 

The World Health Organization, the 
American Medical Association and the 
American Veterinary Medical Asso- 
ciation all endorse the process. 

The U.S. Food ana Drug Admin- 
istration has approved irradiation of 
pork, poultry, fruits, vegetables, spices 
and grains, although its use remains 
limited. Most imported spices are pre- 
served with irradiation. Tropical fruits 
like mango and papaya from Hawaii 
are treated to kill exotic pests. 

Irradiated chicken is served in hos- 
pitals in the Southeast. Astronauts 
aboard the space shuttle eat irradiated 
food, including steak. 

Food irradiation would have preven- 
ted the illnesses caused recently by 
con taminate d hamburger from Hudson 
Foods and the several deaths linked to 
Jack in the Box restaurants in the North- 
west in 1993. It could kill the sal- 
monella that infects much of the poultry 
and eggs sold in the United States; the 
deadly mutant E. coli strain 0157:H7, 
which the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention have characterized as a 
major emerging infectious disease; and 
such ugly stowaways as beef tape- 


worms, fish parasites and the nemat- 
odes that cause trichinosis in pork. 

The new meat inspection system now 
being phased in by the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture does not even mention, 
much less mandate, irradiation. 

Neither Agriculture Secretary Dan 
Glickman nor the Food and Dreg Ad- 
ministration invoked food irradiation as 
a solution to the Hudson Foods situation, 
preferring instead to press for destruc- 
tion of 25 million pounds (11.3 million 
kilograms) of meat that could have been 
made edible with the technique. 

Authorization to inadiate red meat 
has lang uish ed at the FDA since 1994. 
Several states have responded to pres- 
sure from citizen groups by either ban- 
ning or imposing a moratorium on the 
sale of irradiated food, without review- 
ing scientific evidence of the techno- 
logy’s safety and value. 

Why the gap between .promise and 
application? Because food irradiation 
— like cancer treatment, medical dia- 
gnostics, sterilization of medical dis- 
posables. aircraft maintenance and 
many other technologies — uses ra- 
dioactivity, which Americans have 
been taughr to fear. 

Commercial irradiators use metallic 
cesium- 137 or cobalt-60 as sources of 
radiation in heavily shielded processing 
plants. When the radioactive sources 
are not being used ro sanitize food, they 
are stored safely underground. 


lA/hiv auu > . - ; 

groups have campaigned against food 
irradiation, even imagining a conspiracy 
among the Food and Drug Adminfc-. 
iration, the World Health Organization 
and the nuclear power industry rouse fee ; 
process to dispose of nuclear waste. , 
Similarly fanatic resistance plagued 
the introduction of vaccination, water 
chlorination, pasteurization and fluor- l. 
idation — comparable technologies- 
that have reduced disease and saved , 
millions of lives. The unsupportetL- 
■fears of the Luddite opposition are 
making people suffer needlessly. 

Mr. Glickman has said that the Hud- 
son Foods case highlights the need to ■ 
better educate the public on how to 


prepare food properly, but we can’t all 
become sterility technicians 


at home. 

Thermometers won’t protect us from 
E. coli-con laminated alfalfa sprouts. 

Public health has been a primary 
responsibility of government for more 
rhan a century. Inspection and testing - 
alone, however responsibly applied, 
can never assure consumer safety where 
invisible pathogens are concerned 
Pasteurization saved the babies. Ir- 
radiation can sanitize our food 


The writer is author of “Deadly 
Feasts: Tracking the Secrets cf a Ter- 
rifying New Plague" and "The Making 
of the Atomic Bomb." He contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 




A : 


Link Japanese and Koreans in a Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone 1 






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T OKYO — A carefully de- 
signed Nuclear Weapon- 
Free Zone in Northeast Asia, 
covering Japan and the Korean 
Peninsula, would enhance the 
security of both. It would also 
help stabilize the nuclear status 
quo in- the region and encourage 
China and Russia to reduce their 
stockpiles of nuclear aims. 

For more than 30 years Japan 
has maintained its commitment 
not to possess, make or intro- 
duce nuclear weapons into its 
territory. In December 1991. 
South and North Korea issued a 
historic joint declaration for a 
nonnuclear Korean Peninsula. 

Seoul and Pyongyang de- 
clared that they would not pro- 
duce, test, receive, possess, 
store, deploy or use nuclear 
arms. The declaration has not 
been put into force, primarily 
because of widely held suspi- 
cions that while North Korea 
may have frozen a covert pro- 


By Shioichi Ogawa 


gram to develop nuclear wea- 
pons, it has not abandoned its 
ambitions entirely. 

But the basic conditions for a 
Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone 
covering Japan and the Korean 
Pe nins ula would be achieved 
once concerns surrounding that 
program are resolved and there 
is a reconciliation between 
South and North Korea, or the 
peninsula is reunified under the 
South's control; 

In such circumstances, the 
zone could be made compatible 
with the U.S. policy of extend- 
ing its deterrent nuclear shield 
to Japan and South Korea. The 
zone m which nuclear weapons 
would be banned would be lim- 
ited to the territorial spaces of 
Japan and the two Koreas. 

That would allow the United 
States to deploy nuclear-armed 
Tomahawk cruise missiles in 


the waters around Japan and 
Korea. The missiles are the only 
tactical nuclear weapons that 
Washington reserves the option 
to use in a regional crisis to 
deter an adversary’s first use of 
weapons of mass destruction. 

The zone would dissipate 
lingering suspicions in China 
and Russia that Japan and South 
Korea might go nuclear. Bei- 
jing and Moscow could then 
give legally binding assurances 
that they would not use, or 
threaten to use, nuclear wea- 
pons against either Japan or 
South Korea. 

Anti-Japanese sentiment re- 
mains strong among the Korean 
people and there might be an 
upsurge of Korean nationalism 
after reunification. If Japan sus- 
pected that Korea was acquiring 
nuclear weapons, or vice versa, 
each would come under strong 


pressure to do likewise. A mu- 
tually verifiable nonnuclear Ja- 
pan and Korea would ease the 
task of managing relations. 

A zone covering the Korean 
Peninsula would make it hard 
fora reunified Korea to abandon 
its security relationship with 
America and pursue a neutralist 
policy. A U.S. nuclear umbrella 
for a united Korea that banned 
the stationing of U.S. nuclear 
weapons on Korean soil would 
oblige it to maintain an adequate 
conventional military balance 
against neighboring powers. 

Given the size of the Chinese 
army, it would be impossible 
for Korea to maintain this bal- 
ance on its own. It would need 
some security arrangements 
with the United States, includ- 
ing the stationing of American 
troops in a reunified Korea. 

This is a crucial security in- 
terest for Japan. A neutral Ko- 
rea, without the presence of 


U.S. soldiers, could have .a _ 
knock-on effect in Japan, mak- - 
ing it harder to maintain U.S; 
forces there and undermining 
the effectiveness of the U;S.- 
Japan Mutual Security Treaty. . 

The Nuclear Weapon-Free -. 
Zone would also cover Japan's 
controversial plutonium recyc-. 
ling program, which Tokyo in-~ 
sists is intended to make, the 
country’ self-sufficient in feel 
for generating electricity and is 
not part of a secret option for 
developing nuclear weapons. 

Some East Asian countries 
remain suspicious. Tokyo's 
support for such a zone, andan 
associated verification regime, 
would help ease their concerns. ^ 


.Al 




nc." 

ih'. 


ii*- ■ 

■Ci 


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Kir- 

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The writer is a senior re 
searcher at the National Ihsti- : 
tute for Defense Studies in ' 
Tokyo. He contributed thb per- 1 
so rial comment to the Interna- - 
tionai Herald Tribune. 


What’s It Worth, All This Stubbornly Unmastered Nature? 


B altimore — whai is 

nature worth? I mean the 
whole blue-green ball of fer, 
fin, feathers — Amazons ro Ka- 
lahari. Everests to ocean muds, 
lions' roars and hurricanes to 
aspens rustling, and the shell- 
scrape of horseshoe crabs jost- 
ling for spawning room on a 
moonlit beach. 

Let’s stan with an easy pan 
of the calculation, one of the 
biggest, showiest, rarest birds, 
the whooping crane. 

In March. I observed the last 
wild whoopers on Earth, win- 
tering along the Texas gulf 
coast. There are only 159, 
spread out so you'll not see 
more than a few any day. Yet 
more than 100,000 people a 


Bv Tom Horton 


year each pay S28 to tour boat 
operators for 


a glimpse. 

Even if you don’t assign im- 
mense value just to knowing 
that such birds still ply their 
ancient, annual routes, you have 
to agree that whooping cranes 


are economically significant 

Ironically, months later, ir is 
the experience of a less spec- 
tacular bird from that trip, a 
dead duck, that seems most pro- 
found. It was a hen redhead, a 
species common on Ches- 
apeake Bay before pollution 
suffused the shallow-water 
grass habitats where it fed. The 
duck lay on a Golf of Mexico 
beach. By the marks in the sand, 
it had been felled by a falcon, 
which made a meal of its flesh. 

A white-tailed hawk was tear- 
ing at it when we arrived, until an 
even tougher customer, a cara- 
cara, planted its fearsome talons 
against the big hawk and bullied 
it off the redhead carcass. 

It looked as if the caracara 
would finish the job, but our boat 
drifting nearer made it nervous. 
It left the remains to a hovering 
gulL who ate wife relish. 

No one boards tour boats to 


see dead ducks. So how do we 
assign economic value to that 
sunbaked tatter of gristle and 
bone, which gathered in its flesh 
the energies of sun and water 
from grazing grassy shallows 
across half a ’continent, then 
winged south 1,000 miles to be- 
come a banquet for falcon, 
hawk, vulture and gull, and 
after sunset perhaps a morsel of 
dessert for a bobcat or fox? 

And bow do we set such val- 
ues against the values touted for 
more farms and more dredging, 
which both threaten to pollute 
sea grasses in Texas bays where 
some 80 percent of all remain- 
ing redheads winter? 

Sadly, current economics do 
a poor job of accounting for the 
“natural services" performed 
by dead ducks, even though 
these underwrite the rich com- 
munity of life that makes nature 
tourism the fastest growing pan 


Agog in a Crazy Neighborhood 


H ONG KONG — Ir is not 
right to be rude in public 
about one’s neighbors. And it 
is not correct for journalists to 
use fee media to talk up their 
own pecuniary interests. So 
what does a journalist do 
when news comes from his 
own doorstep? 

Fortunately it is not Di and 
Dodi, Bill and whoever. It is 
an inanimate object — a little 
plot of land whose boundary 
starts just across fee road, at 
most 40 meters from where 
this is being wrirten. 

In Thursday's papers my 
neighbor was news around the 
world. In the International 
Herald Tribune it made 30 
column inches, including a 
front page photo. This piece of 
land had just been sold at auc- 
tion by the Hong Kong gov- 
ernment for 5.55 billion Hong 
Kong dollars ($700 million). 

It thus set yet another Hong 
Kong and global record for 
accommodation value — land 
price relative to the size of the 
residential building to be 
raised thereon. 

Instead of 80 existing up- 
per-middle-income apart- 
ments until recently occupied 
by British military families, 
this 1 13,000-square-foot 
(10.000-square-meter) site 
will provide around 130 super 
luxury high-rise apartments. 

These will surely have plat- 
inum bath taps, odor-proof 


By Philip Bowring 


toilets and cunning statues 
above fee from door which at 
fee flick of a finger can be 
either Mao, Deng, Goidfinger 
or fee Goddess of Democracy. 
The apartments will probably 
even have parking space — 
for an additional 3 million 
Hong Kong dollars. 

The record-breaking loca- 
tion is, one must admit, agree- 
able. Repulse Bay, or Shallow 
Water Bay in Chinese, has 
beaches, sea views, greenery 
and proximity to fee heart of 
Hong Kong. It could be An- 
tibes transplanted to the Upper 
West Side in New York. 

Nonetheless, to break even 
at the land price, fee developer 
will have to sell these apart- 
ments at not less than 20,000 
Hong Kong dollars per square 
foot. That comes to a mere $5 
million for a modest 2.000- 
square-foot place — with toi- 
let. but minus parking space. 

The land's sale price was 
trumpeted around the world as 
evidence of confidence in 
post-handover Hong Kong, in 
the Hong Kong dollar, fee 
Hong Kcmg economy, Tung 
Chee-hwa. Jiang Zemin, etc. 
It may indeed be a reasonable 
price for fee combined wis- 
dom of Mao, Deng. Confucius 
& Co., plus a nice sea view. 
Who can tell? 


A jaundiced journalist like 
me would naturally wince at 
the idea of moving across the 
road to pay five times his an- 
nual income just to rent such a 
place — even one without the 
swank taps. Jealous! Anti- 
China! Don’t understand fee 
Asian miracle! Missed fee 
new paradigm of economics! 

Maybe. But I was lucky. 
I just happened to need a place 
to live in Hong Kong not so 
long after the last boom turned 
sour. Thank you. Citibank, 
for lending absurd amounts to 
a speculator who went bust, 
ana then for disposing of your 
security at a nre sale price. 
Just 12 years ago you sold for 
700 Hong Kong dollars a 
square foot! 

Now doubtless all fee banks 
which lost fortunes in Hong 
Kong in the mid- '80s are again 
falling over themselves to lend 
to the territory’s increasingly 
indebted developers. 

I should be rejoicing at the 
neighborhood news. Too bad 
Monte Carlo, Malibu, Minato-’ 
ku — sorry, you can’t keep up 
with us folks in Repulse Bav 

Actually, this is all a dis- 
turbing reflection of underly- 
ing financial instability. And a 
numbing commentary on the 
contribution of so-called con- 
servative bankers to booms 
and busts. But I forgot His- 
tory is bunk. 

hitenuuuwai Herald Tribune 


of the 523 billion tourist eco- 
nomy in Texas. 

Sacrificing grassy bays for 
cropland and barge channels 
will reflect only positively in 
current economic indexes that 
reflect die value of new crops, 
more fertilizer sales and extra 
tractors, but none of the natural 
trade-offs. 

This is more than an abstract 
exercise in bookkeeping, be- 
cause we protect only what we 
value. We may envision a day 
when equal weight goes to 
nature just for what is beautiful 
and spiritual; in fee meantime, 
we had bener work to give 
nature its dollars- and-ce ms due. 

That is the aim of a new book 
entitled “Nature’s Services; 
Societal Dependence on Nat- 
ural Ecosystems" (Island 
Press. Washington). Accessibly 
written for the lay reader, it fea- 
tures fee work of 13 scientists, 
including fee University of 
Maryland's Robert Costanza, 
who runs the Institute for Eco- 
logical Economics. 

Recognizing fee impossibil- 
ity of putting a true price on 
Earth (aesthetic and spiritual 
values are only touched upon), 
the authors nonetheless come 
up wife a range of $16 trillion ro 
$54 trillion a year as the value of 
services provided by natural 
systems. (The human economy 
is about SI 8 trillion, a year.) 

The n a rural services we hu- 
mans take for granted range 
from pollination of plants (hu- 
man beekeeping is only a tiny 
part) and pest control to fee 


regulation of climate and the 
support of global fisheries. 

“What would it cost if we 
had to replace such systems?" 
Answering that question is one 
way fee book tries to arrive at a 
value for nature. Even $54 tril- 
lion a year is probably conser- 
vative, the authors feel. 

There is so much we simply 
can't comprehend. A square 
meter of fertile soil, for ex- 
ample, contains literally mil- 
lions of insects, worms, fungi. 


notozoans and algae, and bil- 
ion, 1 


ions of bacteria. 

Most have never been stud- ; 
ied. Which ones, the book asks, 
and in what mix, would be es- 
sential to bring along if we were 
to try and re-create even fee. 
most basic conditions for life on 
a distant planet? 

A calculation fascinating to 
Chesapeake Bay dwellers is the 
hugely disproportionate value 
of fee planet's coastal regions. 
These include estuaries, sea 
grasses, coral reefs and conti- 
nental shelf fisheries. They cov- 
er only 6.3 percent of the 
world's surface, but are respon- 
sible for 43 percent of fee total 
value of natural services. 

Something like . half of 
Earth's population lives on 5 
percent of its surface, and much 
of that 5 percent is in the su- 
perproductive coastal regions. 

I think this book is the most 
important environmental pub- 
lication in years, a starting point 
for a desperately needed new 
view of Earth. 

The Baltimore Sun. 


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IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS A m 


1897: Uganda Revolt 


ZANZIBAR — A revolt broke 
out in fee Uganda Protectorate, 
but was successfully sup- 
pressed. On July 6 King 
Mwanga left .Uganda secretly to 
organize a rising in fee Buddu 
district against the Government. 
Mwanga 's forces were defeated 
by Major Teman. The King es- 
caped to German territory and 
surrendered himself to the Ger- 
mans. It is intended to proclaim 
the infant son of Mwanga as 
King, with a regency. 


effects — increase of savings, 
contented wives, and steadiness 
in employment — while the 
antis emphasised hypocrisy, 
contempt of law, and interfer- 
ence wife personal liberty. 


o.-.. 


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194/: Against Russia ■ . 


1922: Sweden 'Wet 5 


STOCKHOLM — Sweden is to 
be “wet." That U fee only rea- 
sonable conclusion to be drawn 
from the figures feus far received 
on the prohibition referendum. 
For months propagandists have 
been assaulting fee population 
with arguments for and against 
the measures. The prohibition 
aavocaies pointed to fee good 


— Pope Pius XII and 
President Truman have pledged 
one another mutual support in 
their struggle for peace and 
against the common unnamed 
foe which evidently is Com- 
munist Russia. Mr. Truman em- 
phasized the need for fee unity 

0f 7i h .? ™ oral forces of the 
world Pope Pius hinted in 
reply that there are some flaws 
[n the moral position of fee 
United Stares, but indicated feat 

P^cc efforts 
wlII find wholehearted co-op- 
eration from God’s Church” 
ihe mistreatment of Negroes 
2' s “fed by European Com- 
to . b f?nd America as a 
land of racial injustice. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 


PAGE 3' 


RAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


^ ^ A Need to Apply Soap 
To Republican Mouths 

By George F. Will 

.WASHINGTON ~ Ad- would use the military for po- 

confabulation^ it? 5S. iPSSS. “ C .» ible 

; last weekend. Jack Kemp said 
that someday we may be able 
10 Use .our computers ro make 

i » Jamestown, rwmus ior me Kepuuu- 

andhoThS’n burg J cans “ the ne3Ct presidential 

campaign should be good 
dS/wri^ h® *** '‘if we Only twice since FDR have 

uD^anri^hS raess 11 Democratic presidents won 

j), and that is why we are on popular-vote majorities ( Lyn- 


with its fundamental mission, 
which is war fighting, nor 
helping politicians provide a 
grateful nation with an alibi. 
Portents for the Republi- 


> ? 


-- i i 


t' [ ?> I. 


■ r, -i 


/ 'Sut iue 


■this earth.” You wondered 
why? Now you know. 

Mr. Kemp took to the po- 
| dium a written speech but 
- ; made a point of abandoning 
the text and improvising. The 

■ text deserved abandonment 

• It said “we must lead with a 

> vision of tomorrow’ * and “our 
‘ Republican Party stands at a 
, crossroad” and must "seize 
'tfj® moment” and move 
“boldly into a new century” 

■ because the nation is "at a 
I watershed moment," standing 
r "on the brink of a new century 
' and a new millennium.” 

■ Bur Mr. Kemp, who is 

■ genuinely generous in spirit, 

< is notably generous in esti- 
mating his ability to speak 

' extemporaneously. 

"Half of everybody who 
has ever been alive in the his- 
tory of the world is alive 
today," he told his audience. 
Actually, 5-3 percent, not 50 
"percent, is about right, accord- 
ing to Carl Haub, senior demo- 
grapher for the Population 
.Reference Bureau. 

- But even were Mr. Kemp *s 
number correct, it would be 
-about as illuminating as this 
from a Tom Stoppard play: 
“Clufton Bay Bridge is the 
fourth biggest single-span 
-double-track shore-to-shorc 
■railway bridge in the world 
-bar none.” 

Mr. Kemp was in a math- 
ematical mood in Indianapol- 
is, where his concluding 
words were. "Let’s make the 

• Republican Party the major- 
ity party of each and every 
.American.” 

Such stuff is, in a way. 
funny, but politics is a rhe- 
torical craft and there is noth- 

• ing funny about someone as- 
piring to national leadership 
using die language with lazy 
carelessness. Dfd Republi- 
cans learn anything from their 
experience with their last na- 
tional ticket) 

The Indianapolis gathering 
was a preview of some 
presidential hopefuls, among 
w hom Mr. Kemp is perhaps 
the most seasoned. Hopefuls 
;are legion because the 2000 
election will be just the fifth 
^ince 1928 with no incumbent 
president running. 

With the Dole-Kemp 
disaster still green in memory, 
it is not roo early for Repub- 
licans ro bristle with whole- 
some intolerance of rhetorical 
malpractice. Several ex- 
amples of that were in Mr. 
■Kemp’s prepared text, which 
Mr. Kemp admired enough to 
release to the press. 

■ In a paragraph dealing a 
glancing blow to the subject 
of welfare reform. Mr. Kemp 
said. "We have conclusively 
-proven over the past 30 years 
that rhe federal government 
simply can’t help people.” 

Really? Much has been 
learned about Washington's 
■limitations, but Mr. Kemp’s 
formulation validates Demo- 
-cratic caricatures of Repub- 
licans as extremist blather- 
skites whose credo is “Just 
say no to nuance.” 

"Similarly. Mr. Kemp’s 
■text, after saying ’’the drug 
epidemic in America should 
■have been put to rest years 
"ago,” added, “Let’s let the 


don Johnson, 61.1 percent; 
Jimmy Carter. 50.1 percent). 

Before 1992, Republicans 
had won seven of 10 and five 
of six presidential elections. 

Since 1945, only one sitting 
vice president who wanted his 
party’s nomination did not get 
it — Alben Barkley in 1952. 
So the Democrats’ nominee 
probably will be A1 Gore. He 
(like Mr. Kemp) campaigned 
poorly for his party’s nom- 
ination in 1988. and in J992 
(like Mr. Kemp in 19%) de- 
clined to seek the nomination. 

Thus it is by no means clear 
that Bill Clinton will join .An- 
drew Jackson and Ronald Re- 
agan as the third president 
since the founding era to have 
his vice president elected to 
succeed him. Unless, that is. 
Republicans tolerate the sort 
of slapdash rhetoric served up 
by their ticket in 1996 and 
dispensed in Indianapolis by 
half of that ticket. 

U’tif/iiHgfMt Pi.ji Writers Group 


Let’s Teach the Young to Exult 
In the Wonder of Science 


Are there basic life-forms on Mars? 


By Flora Lewie 


B 


INI CALAF, Menorca, Spain — Daniel, 
aged 7. was rather disappointed wiih the 
Mars landing. The precise success of ibe 
long voyage did not astound him, and all that 
Sojourner found, he said, was “rocks, like 
ours.’ - After all. his mother Michele said, 
man on the moon was old history for him. It 
happened before be was bom, so he con- 
sidered it more or less always possible. 

Michele remembered very well the ex- 
traordinary day of the moon landing. She 

MEANWHILE 

was working in the U.S. Peace Corps, in a 
remote Brazilian village without telephone, 
radio or television. Still, word had somehow 
trickled through to the villagers about 
the dramatic event, and on the appointed 
day they all gathered to have a good look 
when the moon rose. 

All they saw was the same old moon, not a 
single human being. ‘ ’Ha.” they s.aid to each 
other, "what did you expect? Just another 
American lie. as usual.” 

Jamie, aged 21, lives in New York near 
the Museum of Natural History. He has 
become fascinated with dinosaurs and he 
marveled at news of the recent finding of 
a number of dinosaur eggs in the American 
Northwest. He knew about the dominant 
theory thar ibe great beasts and many other 
forms of life were wiped our when an 
asteroid collided with Earth and obscured 
the sun long enough to destroy the food chain 
some 150 million years ago. 

But he had not thought about the 
implications for evolution. It evidently 


started all over again, and went ro current 
complexity. But it never repeated dinosaurs. 
Instead, it produced people. Why the 
difference? Just accident? 

The renewal could be seen as a version of 
the biblical flood and the ark, sign of a 
creator dissatisfied with results and deter- 
mined to launch a new tack. Did it happen 
more than once? Modern cosmology would 
suggest so, but it also suggests 3 pattern of 
repeated creation and destruction within the 
currently known laws of physics, with vast 
scope for accidental variations. 

This is an age of great wonder, sophis- 
ticated knowledge without precedent, and 
easy cynicism, which comes more readily 
from knowing too little than too much. 
The layman, which means practically every- 
body except advanced specialists in their 
particular fields, has to stretch hard to cope 
with the meanings of science. 

Children, who leant to use computers as 
easily as older generations learned to read 
and write, have to devise their own sense of 
what is awesome, and it is often different. 
They need to be taught what an achievement 
it is for science to have made so much 
learning accessible, and also what science 
cannot be expected to do. 

The physical and social sciences are 
based on two quite distinct approaches 
to reality-. They are so different that I am 
convinced it is misleading, a dangerous 
illusion, to speak of “social science.” It 
should be called social studies. 

Hard science is a precise definition of real- 
ity derived from rigorous rules of observation 
that permit assured prediction. Any exception 



Z CM 


~ Sillily 


Improbable 


requires an adjustment, or sometimes a com- 
plete overhaul of dominant theory. 

It enables us to send a little box. enclosed 
in a capsule atop a rocket, to an exactly 
predetermined spot on Mars where it 
will conduct exactly preplanned tests 
and transmit the results ro Barth. 

Social studies use a much more speculative 
concept of reality where perception is at least 
as important as what is perceived, often more 
so. They are the studies of ourselves and our 
societies from inside, not of the world out- 
side, and of how the tw o interact 
The separation is about method and 
the reliability of results. But of course man 
is rhe observer and the I earner. However 
insignificant his role, which asrronomy 
and cosmology have shown us. he is in 
that way rbe center of it all. 

Science does depend on the society- 
which produces it. and which provides the 
resources and respect that encourage it. 


Afore likely 

* 

L> I'firn II Ml|i in TT»*l i‘»-n -....In * . 

It depends on the intellectual and cultural 
climate of a time and place. 

Bur it also has its own dynamic, an 
independent existence that drives it in 
directions not always foreseen and 
provokes social and moral dilemmas that 
ir is nor equipped to address. Genetic 
engineering and some aspects of ecology, 
for example nuclear energy, are obvious 
current questions. 

To deal with this enduring quandary, 
which is magnified and not at all diminished 
by the tremendous expansion of scientific 
knowledge, it is important to retain the sense 
of awe. both at nature and at man’s capacity 
to deal with it and ro understand it. 

Exulting in wonder, especially at what 
has been accomplished in one's own 
lifetime, may be a privilege of the elderly. 
It is also a' promise for the young, and 
they need to be taught to enjoy ir. 

«> Fl Wo Lmit. 


Help the Young Black Men at the Bottom, and Trouble Won’t Work Its Way Up 


W ASHINGTON — Five 
years ago. about 42 per- 
cent of young black mea in 
the District of Columbia were 
in some sort of trouble with 
the law — locked up. on pa- 
role or probation, awaiting 
trial or being sought on an 
arrest warrant 
Today, it’s just a hair under 
50 percent. Don’t be surprised 
if ihe numbers (supplied by 
the National Center on Insti- 
tutions and Alternatives in 
Alexandria, Virginia) are still 
worse five years from now. 

Why shouldn’t they be 
worse? What is happening 
that would reverse that dismal 
trend? Where is the evidence 
that anyone is trying very 
hard to change it? 

Oh, we ’ll talk about it fora 
few days, just as we did five 
years go. Unfortunately, now. 
as then, even much of our talk 
is off-target. Give us a racial 
disparity that reflects negat- 
ively on black people, and our 
first talk will be of racism. 


By William Raspberry 


Young black men ( the sur- 
vey focus was on men aged 1 8 
to 35) are more likely than 
their white counterpart’s to be 
stopped by white or black po- 
lice officers, more likely to be 
arrested for similar offenses, 
more likely to be tried and. 

A conspiracy of 
circumstances 
impels black men 
into problems. 

upon conviction, more likely 
to do time. 

But little of this explains 
what is happening in Wash- 
ington and other U.S. cities. 

To start with, the 50 percent 
figure includes probationers 
— young men who. for rea- 
sons of parental influence or 
official leniency, manage to 
avoid formal punishment 


I am not so naive as ro 
suggest that race is a non- 
factor. I am saying something 
else: Any explanation that be- 
gins with the criminal justice 
system — police, courts and 
prisons — is likely to miss 
the heart of the matter. A vir- 
tual conspiracy of circum- 
stances impels young black 
men into trouble. 

It starts, of course, with 
poor black men. who, increas- 
ingly likely to grow up with- 
out effective fathers, may find 
ihemselves drifting ihrough 
school and through life, get- 
ting by on their wits and their 
wifiinsness to take dangerous 
chances. The schools that 
could be a haven from the 
pressures of big city life be- 
come just another pan of the 
problem, furnishing neither 
sanctuary nor much learning. 

Many survive these diffi- 
cult circumstances, of course. 
And a lot get skimmed off and 


saved along the way — the 
obviously bright, the out- 
standing athletes, the children 
of deeply religious households 
and (probably because they 
are beyond worrying about be- 
ing branded “different” and 
therefore free to follow their 
own dreams) the gay kids. 

Too many succumb, how- 
ever. and they wind up feed- 
ing statistics like those report- 
ed this week by the National 
Center — even while then- 
sisters may head off ro college 
or careers. 

But if it begins with poor 
black men. the problem has 
been climbing right up the 


socioeconomic ladder. Think 
sneakers — those multihued. 
assiduously marketed shoes 
with inflated heels, soles and 
prices — and ask yourself 
who decides which brand and 
what style will become this 
month’s must-have model. 
The styles in sneakers almost 
always percolare up from the 
trouble-prone rough kids to 
the increasingly better-off. 
And so do the styles of dress, 
speech — and behavior. 

Nor is ir as silly as ir may- 
sound. Especially at the 
younger end of the 18-to-35 
cohort, young black men may 
affect the styles and manners 


of the street roughs as a 
form of protective coloration. 
There are streets in some 
big cities where a blazer, 
nicely pressed trousers and 
a cheery "Hi. guys” could 
get you hurt. 

The strange thing is, we 
know that trouble starts at 
the bottom and works its way 
up. And still we keep trying 
ro start our solutions near the 
top. So much of what we do 
is done with the middle 
class in mind. 

The affirmative action 
programs so widely under 
attack may still be needed, 
but they don’t do much for 


the young men who have 
abandoned all faith in making 
it in (he straight world. 

We middle-class blacks 
might be compared to a spark- 
ling new roof on a house 
whose foundations are crum- 
bling and whose lower walls 
are under increasing stress. 
No amount of attention to the 
roof will keep the house from 
collapsing. 

It is past time to start de- 
voting serious attention, ef- 
fort and resources to those ai 
the bottom — if not for al- 
truistic reasons, then at least 
to save ourselves. 

Thi H PiKt 


BOOKS 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Globalization Ethics 

Regarding “Why Should a 
Society's Economic Burdens 
Be So Lopsided" ( Opinion . 
Aug. 21) by William Pfaff: 

Mr. Pfaff has accused The 
Economist of being irrespons- 
ible and callous, of caring 
nothing for social justice, and 
of failing to answer a question 
he posed in an article entitled 
"Why Should Workers Bear 
the Brum of Globalization 
Pain?” (Opinion. Jan. 13 1. In 
fact, he misrepresents The 
Economist’s view and quotes 
it inaccurately. 

The article in The Eco- 
nomist about which Mr. Pfaff 
complained did indeed an- 
swer his question. It pointed 
out that globalization and the 
creation of flexible labor mar- 
kets have on the whole en- 
riched workers every where. 

In South Korea, where 


die vast global changes under 
way would claim some vic- 
tims. notably unskilled work- 
ers in die rich world. On bal- 
ance. however, we believe 
thar the integration of the 
world economy is an engine 
for mutual enrichment. 

PETER DAVID. 

London. 

The writer is business af- 
fairs editor at The Economist. 

Mr. Pfaff replies: 

Mr. David merely says that 
The Economist believes in 
tbai received wisdom which 
holds that globalization will 
in the long run produce a ra- 
diant future for all. 

Presently, there is more 
evidence against die fulfill- 
ment of this proposition, 
during the lifetimes of either 
Mr. David or myself, than 
there is in support of it. My 


question, characterized by 
The Economist as “bleat- 
ing,” remains unanswered. 

I will restate it as follows: 
What is the ethical justific- 
ation for a management de- 
cision thai the sacrifices im- 
posed by globalization should 
be imposed exclusively upon 
today’s employees, while 
today’s investors and man- 
agers profit? 

~ Why this has happened is 
obvious. As Robert Ayres of 
Insead said (Letters, Aug. 28/. 
labor is immobile while cap- 
ital and technology are mo- 
bile. The distribution of 
power in the economy today 
makes pena2izing labor easy 
and penalizing investors dif- 
ficult or impossible. 

But the ethical question re- 
mains. It could, in the end. 
prove the most important 
question for politicians, and 
even for managers. 


drug problem like any other striking woricers prompted 
threat to national security. ” Mr. Pfaff s V*™*™** 

■ But is that problem — a to overseas markets had 
powerful domestic appetite raised wages by an average 
for drugs — like any national of 15 percent a >ear for lO 
security threat? Is it like the years. Not ^ much globaliz- 
sort of threats the military auonpain there, 
recruits and trains its person- The Economist also pom 

nel to meet? Mr. Kemp’s out that *e flrable U ■ S. labor 
implied analysis is a soothing martel had creared 8nU»n 

alibi for .Americans: Foreign- jobs smee 199L whdedv 

S: o c n ^.v" 

supplv side, with weaponry. Economist c are s very much 

His implied promise is that abcu ' J usnc ^ “Jf 1 . 
as commander in chief he conceded m our aracle that 


In this Saturday’s 

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A 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 

■ U utlook for 
the Majors. 

deliver)- in key cities. 


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1-800-882 28&* 


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L— 


DOUBLE FAULT 

By Lionel Sit river. 317 pages. $22.93. 
Doubleday. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

L IONEL SHRIVER has an interesting 
idea in this, her sixth novel: world- 
class tennis as metaphor for the tensions 
that can arise in two-job maniages when 
competition shoves love aside. 

Marriage often entails aD element of 
rivalry, especially when partners share 
intellectual or professional interests, but 
it has become a veiy real problem now 
that feminism and economic reality have 
combined to send so many women into 
the job market. The cliche is lawyer 
married to lawyer, but why not tennis 
player married to tennis player? 

There can't be much dispute, after all, 
that professional tennis demands whole- 
hearted commitment from those who play 
it or that it intensifies the ego and drive 
that drew them to it in the first place. Not 
merely that, but mixed doubles is a nov- 
elty in tennis. 

Singles is wftar really matters, and 
men and women who play singles often 
must go their separate ways. Tennis 
players who marry other tennis players 
— and, by the way. few of them do — 
therefore must contend with pressures 
thai ordinary spouses are spared: 
around-the-clock work obsession, in- 
flated self-regard and self-absorption, 
and frequent, prolonged separations. 

The tennis players whose .lives unfold 
in "Double Fault” are Willy (nee Wti- 
helmina) Novinsky and Eric Oberdorf. 
Both are in their twenties. She is petite, 
obsessive, haunted by parents whom she 
regards as hooked on failure, and hope- 
lessly in love with tennis: “I’m a tennis 
player.” she says. "I can’t envision being 


anything else and still being me. “ He by 
contrast is tall, rangy, loosey -goosey, 
good at just about everything — he 
“dearly excelled at whatever he put bis 
mind to” — yet more interested in mas- 
tering a skill than becoming a slave to it. 

They’re an unlikely pair, but then so are 
most people who end up marry ing each 
other “This Oberdorf was Germanic by 
nature and liked order. A Novinsky had a 
generic Eastern European predisposition 
ro chaos.” They meet at a court on Man- 
hattan's West Side, and quickly move in 
with each other. When Eric suddenly, 
unexpectedly proposes marriage, Willy 
accepts in a daze of delight. 

But the rings have scarcely slipped 
onto their fingers when the pattern of tneir 
lives begins to change, mien they met. 
Willy outranked Eric by several hundred 
places in die world computer lists, but 
after rising for a time, she begins to slip; 
then she injures her knee while playing a 
match, and is put on the sideline. 

Eric, meanwhile, finds his game fall- 
ing completely into place, almost be- 
yond his control; his ranking rises stead- 
ily — from 926 to 708. then all the way 
to 169, then into the near-ether at 75 and 
58 — and he becomes a player to be 
reckoned with, one good enough to fill a 
slot at the U.S. Open and ro beat higher- 
ranked players. 

Willy, convalescent and lonely, is 
furiously jealous. She desperately wants 
not to be. but however vigorously she 
fights herself, she loses. Eric tries to tell 
her that everything will be all right, but 
she disagrees: 

" "What’s happening to me?’ she 
sobbed- ‘I love you, so why can’t I act 
like ir? Why am 1 so mean to you? That 
you can’t even tell me when you win 
prizes? And I don’t blame you ! I want to 
be happy for you. but I can’t! You’re 


right. J just get mad. and it's horrible. I 
hate it. You come home and you ’ve won 
another big match and this anger rises 
instantaneously in my throat like heart- 
burn. And then l feel gross, gross to 
myself, bitter and ugly and twisted. How 
can you stand it?' ’’ 

Though Shriver might take issue w ith 
this judgment, the evidence she presents 
suggests that Willy treats Eric as she does 
because that’s the way she is: single- 
mindedJy driven, utterly self-absorbed, 
selfish in the extreme. In’ the last analysis 
she cares about no one except herself and 
is incapable of self-sacrifice in the in- 
terests of others. As a result the story of 
her marriage seems less a metaphor for 
comped tiveness than the tale of how one 
quite dislikable young woman engineers 
her ow n ruin, an end that few readers are 
likely to regret. 

M ATTERS are not helped by 
Shriver’ s method. She writes well, 
but she is insufficiently confident of her 
characters, her plot and her storytelling 
powers. Her narrative is littered with 
gratuitous analysis that merely serves to 
get in the story’s way. and toward the 
end she reaches the novelist’s avenue of 
Jasr reson: She brings a psychologist 
onto the scene, leaving it to him to tell 
Willy — and the reader — what is 
wrong. 

Some of his comments are quire sen- 
sible. but w'bar he says would have great- 
er effect if it emerged naturally from the 
unfolding of the story and the evolution 
of character. Add to that too many tennis 
balls bouncing back and forth across the 
net, and you end up with an interesting 
idea undone bv an artless novel. 


Jonathan Yardley is on the staff of The 
Washington Post. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

S OME 65 years ago. when 
the game was youn*. a 
woman named Dorothy Rice 
Sims made a serendipitous 
discovery at the bridge table. 
She bid something she did not 
have, perhaps accidentally, 
and prevented the opponents 
from reaching an easy game. 
She liked taking risks — she 
was one of the earliest women 
aviators — and repeated her 
effort frequently, with mixed 
results. 

She called such moves 
* ’psychological . ” but the 
hndge community, which 
jumped on this strange band- 
wagon, preferred "psychic" 
or “psyche” or even, deplor- 
ably, “psike," They were 
popular for a time, and there 
were even some systems that 
included well-defined psych- 
ic openings. But they are now 
out of favor in die tonmament 
world, for good reason. 


If they fait the opponents 
are happy. But if they suc- 
ceed, there will be raised eye- 
brows and the psycher may 
have to explain herself to a 
committee. The difficulty is 
that a regular partnership may 
have a built-in improper ad- 
vantage. A player may be 
aware thar his partnerhas pre- 
viously psyched in a partic- 
ular way, and be ready for it, 
while the opponents are in the 
dark. 

This does not apply, 
however, in social bridge 
games, played in (he home or 
in a club. These are usually 
referred to, loosely, as "rub- 
ber bridge," although the 
four-deal Chicago ®ame has 
generally displaced rubbers 
of indefinite length. If you 
keep changing partners, he or 
she will have no better chance 
than the opponents to under- 
stand the peculiarities of your 
bidding. 

The diagramed deal was 
played at die Town Club, 9 


East 86th Street in Manhattan, 
and the South cards were held 
by Davis Berah. When his 
partner opened one heart and 
his right-hand opponent 
passed, he realized that the 
opponents were likely to do 
very well in a spade contract. 
He therefore bid one spade, 
and his partner rebid one no- 
trump. Determined to main- 
tain his illusion, he now bid 
two spades. Rebidding a 
psychic is a very’ rare maneu- 
ver, but it worked just fine. 

The opponents led the dub 
ace. and ne was happy to fail 
by seven tricks for a penalty 
of 350 — ir could have been 
eight. If he had simply raised 
his partner’s heart suit the op- 
ponents would have bid 
spades ai least to same. Six 
spades is an excellent con- 
tract for Easi-West, because 
Nonh is virtually certain to 
have the diamond king as part 
of his opening bid. 

After ruefully congratulat- 
ing the crafty declarer, East- 


West indulged in a furious 
post-mortem without reach- 
ing any agreement. The the- 
oretical answer is thar West 
should have bid a natural two 
les on the first round. If 


le opponents have bid rwo 
suits there is no need for any 
cue-bid. 

NORTH id> 

♦ fi5 

7 A K 10 6 3 
KT 4 
*Q92 

WEST 

* A Q 10 8 4 3 

«7 

> Q J 9 3 
*AS 


EAST 
* K J 9 7 
:Q2 
v A 108 h 
+ K 10 <1 


SOUTH 

*2 

7 J9854 
* 52 

*87653 

East and West were vulnerable. 


The bidding 
North East 

South 

West 

1 7 Pass 

\ * 

Pass 

1 N.T. Pass 

2* 

Pass 

Pass Pass 



We$t led the dub act 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 



Better Than Disney: Carcassonne, the Fortress on a 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 


C arcassonne, France — in 

a country so rich in chateaus, 
palaces, cathedrals and monu- 
ments, it may be bordering on 
hyperbole to suggest that the fortified 
town of Carcassonne is the most breath- 
taking sight of alL Suffice it to say that, 
seen from afar, it offers the extraor- 
dinary spectacle of a medieval fortress 
that seems to have changed little over 
the centuries. Imposing, impregnable, 
with massive stone ramparts, towers 
and barbicans adding to its authority, the 
town dominates a large area from its 
hilltop. No wonder the Black Prince 
took one look and abandoned his plan to 
attack it 

Today Carcassonne can be entered 
peacefully, although the illusion of be- 
ing back in the Middle Ages quickly 
evaporates. La Cite, as the walled town 
is known here, is one of provincial 
France's most popular tourist spots, 
drawing more than 2 million visitors a 
year. Most spend only a few hours here, 
which explains why the main street into 
the town is lined with shops selling 
postcards, plastic medieval armor, ice 



Tut Eigclaod Ijt Tile Vud. Timn 

This wav to the Torture Museum. 


cream and sandwiches. Most also come 
in the steaming hot school vacation 
months of July and August. In May or 
September, without the heat or crowds. 
La Cite is a far gentler experience. 

The one image that does not change is 
that of the great fortress on the hill. And 
thar sight alone justifies any detour. 
Gustave Nadaud, a 19 th-century French 
songwriter, wrote, “You should not die 
without seeing Carcassonne,” and it 
was this panoramic view that he had in 
mind. Today we can add to that image 
the ramparts at night, bathed in light, 
floating magically on the horizon, beck- 
oning like a dream castle in a fairy tale. 
Visitors who watch the spectacular 
Bastille Day Fireworks display on July 
14 each year may even be forgiven for 
thinking of Disney. Bm La Cite was 
here first, by about 1,700 years. 

HOMANS, PRANKS AND V1SIOOTHS 

The first settlement on the hilltop in fact 
dates back to around the sixth century 
B.C., although it was not until much 
later that the Romans constructed de- 
fensive positions on the site, with the 
first circle of ramparts and barbicans 
built in the third century to deter the 
barbarians. By then. La City's location 
astride the broad valley- that leads to the 
Mediterranean between the Massif Cen- 
tral and the Pyrenees had given it im- 
mense strategic importance. In the fifth 
century, the fortress was captured by the 
Visigoths, who strengthened it further, 
holding it until it was overrun by the 
Franks in foe eighth century. For 400 
years, it came under the suzerainty of 
the counts of Toulouse, 60 miles (100 
kilometers) to the northwest. Then, once 
again, it changed hands and destiny. 

In foe 1 2th century, a dissident Chris- 
tian religious movement known to its 
enemies as die Caihar heresy became 
influential in the region. Its attacks on 
the Catholic establishment for corrup- 
tion and other forms of immorality en- 
raged the Vatican, which eventually 
ordered a punitive crusade. The pontiff. 
Pope Innocent IE, promised forgiveness 
of sins to all who joined the olTensive, 
while foe French king, Philippe n Au- 
guste, hinted that captured land would 
be distributed to the crusaders. On July 
22, 1209, the so-called Aibigensian 
Crusade sacked nearby Beziers, killing 
thousands of its inhabitants. One week 


later, it laid siege to Carcassonne until 
foe fortress’s leader, Viscount Ray- 
mond-Roger Tree cave 1; surrendered on 
Aug. 15, 1209, 

A monastic account written in 1218 
described what would prove to be a 
turning point in the history of La Cite: 
“The crusaders considered how best to 
take the town. If it were destroyed like 
Beziers, then all it contained would be 
lost So they decided to allow all the 
inhabitants to go free provided they left 
the town naked. Thus all their booty 
could be preserved for foe new viscount 
So it was done. All the inhabitants left 
foe town carryin g nothing but their sins. 
The Count of Montfort torn took over, 
to foe glory of God, foe honor of the 
Church and the ruin of the heresy.” 

In 1240, Trencavel's son tried to re- 
capture La Cite, but by then a second, 
outer circle of ramparts had been built 
and the inner wall had been raised. It 
proved invincible and the royal troops 
drove off foe attackers. Soon after, two 
villages diar had sprung up at foe foot of 
the ramparts were razed and their pop- 
ulation was housed in a new town a mue 
away on foe opposite bank of the river 
Aude. Known variously as Ville-Basse 
and Bastide-Saint-Louis, It too was for- 
tified, although it was often attacked and 
burned (by the English forces led by 
Edward, known as the Black Prince, 
among others). 

La Cite was never again conquered, 
its ruler safe inside his own castle, the 
Chateau Comtal, within the larger fort- 
ress. The town's military importance, 
however, gradually dwindled until, by 
the 19th century, its stones were being 
carried away to be used in other con- 
struction. 

A T this point. La Cite could easily 
have suffered the fate of scores 
of Cathar castles that stand in 
ruins on hilltops around this area of 
Languedoc -Roussillon. Fortunately, foe 
writer Prosper Merimee, who was 
serving at foe time as Inspector General 
of Historic Monuments, came to the 
rescue, proposing its restoration. In 
1844, foe influential French architect 
Eugene Viollet-le-Duc arrived here to 
oversee the town's restoration. He did a 
remarkable job, although he did stir a 
controversy by adding touches of his 
own, such as conical-shaped roofs to 



TorElgdaal (ufThe New YoA Ttao* 

The double walls and ramparts of the medieval fortress, bathed in light, offer an extraordinary spectacle . 


barbicans that were previously open to 
foe skies. 

I recount all this history because, 
almost like the levels of an archae- 
ological excavation, foe different 


roc example, different-sized stones re- 
cord work done on the ramparts in the 
third, 13th and 19th centuries. 

Guided tours of La Cite's towers and 
ramparts leave regularly from the gates 
of the Chateau Comtal, visiting areas 
not otherwise open to foe public and 
helping bring the history alive. A little 
“train'.' on rubber wheels and several 
horse-drawn carriages offer 20-minute 
visits of the moats and ramparts. 

The other monument not to be missed 
is the Church of Saint Nazaire. There 
was a church at the site as early as foe 
sixth century, although the earliest re- 
mains — a splendid Romanesque nave 
— date from foe 12th century. With 
Carcassonne brought under foe control 
of the French monarchy in the 13fo 
century, the church was largely rebuilt 
to conform to prevailing Gothic fash- 
ions. The graceful narrow columns 
around the apse and transept make the 
church seem even taller than it is, while 


its magnificent north 'and south rose 
windows, daring from foe 13th and 14th 
centuries respectively, cast beautiful 
light at dawn and sunset 

Beyond the Ramparts 

Wandering around foe narrow streets 
of the overbuilt town offers a few sur- 
prises. A new Greek-siyle amphitheater 
behind Saint Nazaire offers a Dusy pro- 
gram of classical and pop concerts in 
July each year, followed by a medieval 
show in August. Nearby, there is the 
Musee de i’Ecole, a delightful little mu- 
seum housed in an old primary school 
that shows how French classrooms 
looked 70 or 80 years ago, flip-up 
desktops and fountain pens included. 

Children, on the other hand, are more 
likely to be drawn to foe Cartoon Mu- 
seum, on the Rue du Grand Ptiits, which 
shows how cartoons are made. The pres- 
ence of familiar Disney characters 
seems doubly justified here; some say 
La Cit6 inspired the set of Walt Disney 's 
1959 movie “Sleeping Beauty.” Older 
children may prefer to cross foe street to 
see foe mimnm dedicated to the Cathar 
Castles and Instruments of Torture. It 


matters little that, except for the early, 
13tfa century, La Cite was untouched by" 
the Inquisition or torture. 

Outdoor cates and restaurants take- 
full advantage of the splendid setting, 
with the shaded Place Marcou a popular"! 
spot for a snack. There are also ample' 
opportunities to taste the cuisine of this l 
region, notably its famous cassoulet and [ 
foie gras. Serious gourmets should bead ! 
to La Barbacane, the restaurant at the * " 
Hotel de la Cite — foe best hotel within) 
the fortress, its gardens offering a good* 
view of the "Ville-Basse and beyond. \ 

Perhaps foe only reason to go to~the< 
Ville-Basse is to see foe market that fills j 
the Place Carnot on Tuesday, Thursday • 
and Saturday mornings. Fruits, yege-p 
tables, cheeses, meats and a richse-; 
lection of pates and tetrines save to ! 
r emind that the French continue to mas- ! 
ter the art de vrvre. ! 

Still, for me, foe best reason for leav- j 
ing La Cite is also the main reason for - 
approaching it — to peer once again in' 
amazement at its majestic profile, toi 
wonder what medieval peasants and,' 
warriors alike thought when they saw it-i 
— and to know that, generations hence, • 
it will still be there. 


vifr* "'/tv • 

calf” 

' ' 

<!* 

' To'- 




4** : .mCHINi 


Mysteries and Sea Monsters Make for a Perfect Month on Cape 


LUFTHANSA 


CONTINE * 7 * 1 

airlines 


I SINGAPORE 
i AIRLINES 


VIETNAM 
1 airlines 

, MAJESTIC 
• HOTELS 



By Marilyn Stasio 

New York Tunes Service 


C APE COD, Massachusetts — When my 
nephew graduated from college. I gave 
him what foe beach bums in my Mas- 
sachusetts family would consider a ticket 
to heaven; a month on Ope Cod and a beach bag 
stuffed with books. I covered the essentials: maps; 
birding manual; some bike-and-hike guides from 
Down East Books; “Moby Dick”; Eugene 
O'Neill's sea plays; “Shipwrecks of Cape Cod and 
the Islands”; “The Sinking of the Andrea Doria”; 
David Cordingly's “Under the Black Flag" (the 
best of the pirate books); ‘ ‘The Outermost House,' ’ 
Henry Beston’s memoir of his “Year of Life on foe 
Great Beach of CapeCod" in 1928; two collections 
of ghost stories set on Nantucket and Martha's 
Vineyard, and my very own copy of “Jaws." 

I think be dipped into the ghost stories, and 1 know 
for a fact he read “Jaws.” The beach bag is back 
with me now, filling up fast wifo more sea sagas and 
ghost stories and regional mysteries for the next visit 
to Cape Cod or the islands — maybe mine. 

A New England ghost tale does the trick when 
you are 8 years old and sleeping away from home 
for the first time. Daring a blissful week spent wifo 
my best friend, Connie, at her family 's beach house 
in Provincetown, I remember being called in from 
clamming in the bay because a summer storm was 
blowing up. We went to bed covered with 
“measles” — those round, brown shell mem- 
branes that we collected from periwinkles and 
plastered on our faces with spit — and looked out at 
the storm from the window by our bed. 

A Taste for Melodrama 

In the eerie silences between thunderclaps and 
lightning flashes, we told scary stories about foe 
poor little pirate girl who was eaten by a shark, and 
tbe sea monster that swallowed foe Woods Hole 
ferry, and the ghosts of the drowned sailors who 
were walking up the beach . . . right . . . now! 

I trust this explains my melodramatic taste in 
beach books and why it asserts itself so em- 
phatically on foe Cape. For all foe natural glory of 
foe beaches and foe contrived jollity of local com- 
mercial attractions, this old resort area takes its true 
character from a history as grand and grave as foe 
sea that shaped it On foe Outer Cape, much of that 


history is buried under Atlantic waters; a Chatham 
historian calculates that as many as 2,000 ship- 
wrecks lie on the ocean floor between Eastham and 
Monomoy Island. 

Despite foe menacing presence of those majestic 
cliffs on Gay Head, foe Vineyard always strikes me 
as a much sunnier place than the Gray Lady, as foe 
seamen call thar windswept and fog-bound island of 
Nantucket Its history is embedded in its cobblestone 
streets, stately brick mansions and splendid harbor, 
relics of the island's preeminence in the 18th-cen- 
tury as foe whaling capital of foe world. Even today, 
despite 300 motonzed craft in the town boat basin, 
you can stand at the end of Old South Wharf in foe 
foggy hour before dawn and glimpse the phantom 
masts of squat whalers and graceful shipping 
schooners swaying in and out of foe mists of time. 

A rainy afternoon There is no better place to 
spend a rainy day on Nantucket than in the mari- 
time library of foe Whaling Museum on Broad 
Street, poring over foe spidery writing in foe cap- 
tains' logs of those long-ago voyages. Homer 
Kelly, foe scholarly sleuth in Jane Langton's en- 
chanting New England mysteries, agrees: "After a 
couple of hours in the company of these seamen 's 
logs foe floor of foe library begins to feel like a 
quarterdeck,” he says in “Dark Nantucket Moon" 
(Penguin). “It tips beneath ray feet. 

“The winds of foe Horn whistle around my 
chair. I can hear foe creaking of the masts, ana 
there's old Daggoo in the mainmast-head, crying. 
‘There! there again! there she breaches! right 
ahead! The White Whale, foe White Whale!’ ” 

If the past holds mystery and romance, foe 
present holds real and constant danger for seashore 
communities like foe ones on Cape Cod and the 
islands — which is why foey make great settings 
for mystery stories. It’s a lot more fun to read about 
hurricanes, electrical storms and those ferocious 
nor’easters like the one that ripped through 
Monomoy Island and tore up foe Chatham coastline 
in 1991 than it is to live through these monsters. 

In Francine Mathews's “Death in Rough Wa- 
ter” (Morrow) a commercial fishing boat is trawl- 
ing for codfish off foe Georges Bank when one of 
these gales blows up, churning the ocean into a 
frothing mass of 20-foot (6-raeter) waves and 
washing the captain out to sea. “When a man was 
lost at sea, fear cut deep in the hearts of his 
confederates,” observes a mourner at the Por- 


tuguese church service for foe drowned seaman. 
“No one who fished for a living wanted to die for 
it” I happened to be in Provincetown one summer 
when such a storm hit, knocking out the electrical 
power up and down foe Cape and forcing tbe 
cancellation of the Blessing of foe Fleet for tbe First 
time in 41 years. 

Wanting to say a prayer for the fishermen any- 
way, I went to a candlelight ceremony at a Por- 
tuguese church much like the one in Mathews's 
story, where I saw the sober faces of people who 
knew what it was to weather a storm. 

Another elemental force — a fire fierce enough 
to destroy a whole town — poses foe danger in 
“Nantucket Revenge” (Lyford Books. Presidio 
Press). The pyromaniac in Larry Maness’s thriller 
is caught before he can blow up the waterfront and 
incinerate the town. The islanders weren’t so lucky 
in 1846, when a blaze that started in a millinery 
shop swept through town, burning down every 
structure that wasn’t made of brick. 

On occasion, foe sun does shine in the books I 
take on a Cape holiday. 

Among other authors, Philip A. Craig on 
Martha's Vineyard, Virginia Rich on Nantucket, 
and Rick Boyer, Margot Arnold and Phoebe At- 
wood Taylor on the Cape write the kind of regional 
mysteries that you can toss in the bag and take to 
the beach without turning blue skies gray. 

Taylor’s droll period whodunits are a special 
treat, thanks to foe Codfish Sherlock, Asey Mayo, 
a salty Cape codger who entertains summer visitors 
by solving picturesque crimes. Craig's retired de- 
tective ana Boyer’s amateur sleuth both own beach 
houses wifo spectacular ocean views and both of 
them manage to get in a lot of fishing and sailing. 

W HEN foey are not being killed off in 
colorful ways, foe characters in these 
regional mysteries lead idyllic lives. 
You will understand, though, why my own mind 
keeps stepping back to that Provincetown cottage 
where OTteill himself might have looked out to 
sea, dreaming of “the beauty of the far off and 
unknown" that lies just “beyond foe horizon” — 
and where you can still see pirate ships and sea 
monsters and the ghosts of drowned sailors walk- 
ing up foe beach . . . right . . . now! 

Marilyn Stasio writes the Crime column for The 
New York Times Book Review. 



MOVIE GUIDE 


Mira Sorvino in Guillermo Del Toro’s “Mimic. 1 


Kerr) Hqn 


Mimic 

Directed by Guillermo Del Toro. 
US. 

Guillermo Del Toro's ominous 
“Mimic,” which is both larger and 
more limited than his elegantly hor- 
rific "Cronos,” narrows its appeal 
to a very specific audience. “Look! 
The organs are perfectly formed!*’ 
— viewers who fail to find that a 
piquant observation may remain im- 
mune to (he film's elaborate sewer 
setting or its other creepy-crawly 
charms. Indebted to “Alien” and to 
tbe sophisticated nightmares of 
David Cronenberg, “Mimic” ima- 
gines a vengeful insect world be- 
neath the streets of New York. This 
setting has a shadowy intricacy, bnt 
it also has excrement on its walls. 
Ghoulish interest is a prerequisite 
for watching Mira Sorvino (as a bold 
and athletic entomologist) act 
against performers who have mand- 
ibles, or for appreciating foe care 
wifo which nymph, juvenile aod 
adult insect villains have been de- 
vised. Similarly, foe film’s sound 


track is complex and nuanced, even 
if many of its aural sensations sug- 
gest itchy-scritchy cockroaches skit- 
tering across foe floor. Directing in 
unrelievedly sinister style, though 
his film might have benefited from 
more tonal variety, Del Toro suc- 
ceeds best in early sequences not yet 
overwhelmed by slime and goo. 
These are foe scenes that introduce 
hard-working Susan, who has a 
poster of a dung beetle on her lab- 
oratory wall, and her nice-guy hus- 
band and colleague (Jeremy 
Northam). The critters and foe sound 
effects of “Mimic” are, by some 
lights, its main attraction. The bugs 
move wifo scary agility, and foe 
sounds are evocative, even if his- 
trionic music too often suggests that 
foe Phantom of the Opera may be in 
foe wings. ( Janet Maslin, NYTi 

In the Company of Men 

Directed by Neil LaBute. US. 

"In the Company of Men” may not 
subject you to actual bloodshed, but 
it doesn’t have to. Set in the de- 


humanized world of corporate 
America, Neil LaBute's movie rev- 
els in figurative violence — foe emo- 
tional damage that can be wreaked 
on lovers, for one, and foe back- 
stabbing in foe office when every- 
one's vying for promotion, for an- 
other. This independent, low-budget 
movie (it cost a mere $25,000) 
shreds its characters’ souls, tears into 
foe female sex, and leaves you feel- 
ing more cut up about humanity than 
you did before foe movie. Is there a 
reason to see such a feel-bad movie? 
Not for many people. Yet, there's 
something about “In the Company 
of Men* ’ that pulls you in deeper and 
deeper. And your repulsion for foe 
lead performer — played with un- 
nerving presence by Aaron Eckhan 
— becomes a disconcerting fascin- 
ation. As the appropriately named 
Chad Piereewell, he*s foe movie's 
most malignant presence and its top 
draw. When the movie starts, Chad 
and his supenrisor-firieni Howard 
(Matt Malloy), are lamenting foe 
way they’ve been treated by women. 



Chad complains that his wife walked 
out on him. Howard is recovering 
from a physical attack from the wife 
he 's divorcing. As they prepare to fly 
to a branch office, Chad hits on an 
idea. Why not take out their frus- 
trations on an innocent, defenseless 
woman who isn't getting much ro- 
mantic attention in her life? First, 
they'll feign romantic interest in her 
and, as soon as her ego swells from 
the attention of two men. foey ’U drop 
her like a stone. In the first week at 
the branch office, Chad selects foe 
prey. Her name is Christine (Stacy 
Edwards). She’s sweet, misting and 
happens to be deaf. Perfect victim 
material. This movie might shock 
you; it ought to. It might make your 
blood boil. It might even tickle you 
(if so, please seek help). But it won't 
[cave you without a strong opinion 
For foe recoreL it’s exceedingly well 
made. Eckhart is in chilling com- 
mand as a sort of satanic prince in 
shirtsleeves, while Malloy and Ed- 
wards imbue their roles with edev 
sensitivity. (Desson Howe.WP) 


Cop Land . j 

Directed by James Mangold. U.S. T 
"Cop Land” was supposed to do° 
for Sylvester Stallone what “Pulp" 
Fiction' ' did for John Travolta. But^ 
this sluggish exploration of police } 

(inmintinn In/,1., /I T- 





VJ 




V-' : 


_ . ™ mujuugu 

Stallone is credible as a weak, con-p 
small-time sheriff, this sub-:l 
urban “Serpico” is a noble, pas-: 
sioniess charade. The drama is*> 
dense but misses foe moral com-, 
plexities and grit of its urban pre-^ 
decessors. It takes a more ardent* 
director to bring genuine outrage tew 
fo is increasingly familiar plot line.-- 
btallone transforms himself into'* 
[he slumped and groggy Freddy^ 
netiin. He not only packed on 40 F 
pounds — a la co-star Robert De* 
Niro in “Raging Ball” — but he** 
obviously hasn’t lifted so much as*> 
eyebrow for many moons, and' 

his cknnUani i- I ■ - , .. 




to 






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ENTERINATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 


PAGE 11 


(ill 


Getting to Know Glasgow, the ‘Dear Green Place 

— ...... . ■ n a afaaiud «n HitaalpiaMakiao ahanMwr ai 




By Sarah Lyall 

. New York Times Service 

G LASGOW — If Edinburgh is 
Scotland's stately dowager, then 
Glasgow, just 40 miles (.65 ki- 
lometers’) to the west, is its feisty 
teenage! Friendlier and a bit wilder than 
Edinburgh, Glasgow is still working to ex- 
tricate itself from its old image as a has-been, 
postindustrial city of closed uctories and no t- 
so-exciting culture. But even though most 
visitors are likely to think of Edinburgh first 
when they think of Scotland, they will find 
vigor and indeed loveliness in Glasgow, 
whose name means roughly “dear green 
place” in Celtic. 

‘ Glasgow rose to prominence in the early 
1 8th century, when trade with the American 
colonies — Scottish manufactured goods and 
clothes went out, and tobacco, rum and cotton 
came in — brought prosperity to the city and 
created a class of very wealthy tobacco bar- 
ons, some of whose huge houses can still be 
Seen. 

< Tobacco money also built Glasgow ‘s Vic- 
torian center, set around George Square and 
flowing eastward into the Merchant City dis- 
trict With the opulent City Chambers, built in 
1 S 88 , as its centerpiece. George Square forms 
the heart of the city’s pedestrian-friendly 
downtown. 

* About 10 minutes from George Square by 
taxi is Glasgow University, founded in 1451 
and set on 63 acres of park land. Known for its 
work in the sciences and its formidable old 


buildings, the university is also home to a 
number of galleries and museums which, like 
most in Glasgow, are free. Near the university 
is the West End, a center of bustling neigh- 
borhoods. parks and some of the citv's best 
restaurants. 

This Sunday, Glasgow will close a number 
of streets and devote itself to Pure Glasgow, a 
daylong celebration of the 100 th anniversary 
of the Scottish Trade Unions Congress. En- 
tertainment includes jazz, rock and classical 
music, street theater, fashion shows and ac- 
tivities for children. A parade with giant 
puppet sculptures will begin at 2 P.M. in 
George Square; at 1 1 P.M.. there will be a 
flamboyant finale and fireworks. Except for a 
few indoor events, everything is free. 

Come to the Ceilidh ~ ~~ 

With a resurgence of interest in Scottish 
culture, more and more ceilidhs — traditional 
evenings of participatory Scottish music, 
singing and dancing — can be found. The 
Piping Center, a hotel at 30-34 McPhater 
Street, plans ceilidhs on Sept. 25 and Ocl 23. 
Admission is about S14, and snacks and 
drinks will be sold. 

Even more boisterous ceilidhs are held on 
Fridays from 9 P.M. to 2 AM. on the Renfrew 
Ferry, moored at Clyde Place on the River 
Clyde; admission is S9. 

For a breathtaking day trip, visit Stirling 
Castle, a 40-minute train ride northeast of 
Glasgow and a key setting in the Scottish 
Wars of Independence. This year is the 700th 


anniversary of the Battle of Stirling Brjdgeji 
seminal moment in the history of 
Wallace, who was portrayed by Mel Gibson 
in "Bravehean.” The calendar of evwits in- 
cludes museum exhibits, music, walks, 
rnres on Wallace-related topics and a re- 
enactment of the battle. . 

Glasgow is foil of the work of the architect 
Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the pioneer otan 
innovative style that still astonishes. A gooo 
place to stan is the House for an ArtLov^r, 
which was built in Bellahouston Park in 
southwest Glasgow last year from the plans 

Mackintosh submitted to a competition in 

1901. Several spectacular rooms are open, 
and the architect’s original drawings are on 

dlS ft y Humerian An Gallery, on the Glasgow 
University campus, also has a fine Mack- 
intosh section, including a reconstruction or 
his house in Glasgow, in his singular Art 
Nouveau style, with most of its original fur- 
nishings. The bedroom and sitting room are 
remarkable for their spare, cool beauty. A 
gallery with other Mackintosh works, in- 
cluding drawings and architectural plans, is 
on the top floor. _ 

Along with rooms devoted to Old Masters 
and to modem British art, the Hunterian also 
houses an impressive collection of works by 
the American James McNeill Whistler, who 
loved Glasgow. The gallery is located at 82 
Hillhead Street. 

The Willow Tea Rooms, at 21/ 
Saucbiehall Street, one of several pedestrian- 
only thoroughfares in the city center, is 


steeped in Mackintoshian character and is a 
g^eat place for a break from shopping or 
sightseeing. One of several tearooms de- 
signed as temperance-driven alternatives to 
the city's gin houses, the Willow was opened 
in 1903. closed in 1926 and restored in 1980. 
It features Mackintosh’s signature high- 
backed chairs, murals and stylish light fix- 
tures. Tea and snacks are sold. 


bacco lords, the Gallery of Modem 
An. on Queen Street, is divided into four 
sections, corresponding to the elements: The 
Air Gallery is at the top and die Earth Gallery 
on the ground floor. A covered rooftop cafe 
serves light lunches and snacks. Admission is 
free. 

The Glasgow Cathedral, a brisk walk up 
the hill from the city center, is a splendidly 
somber Gothic building dating from the 12th 
century. Deceased Glaswegian dignitaries 
are chock-a-block in the walls and floors, and 
Sl Kentigem (more popularly known as Sl 
M ungo), Glasgow’s patron saint, is in the 
basement Guided tours are available. 

Pollok Country Park, three miles from 
Glasgow’s center, is a calm, green oasis and 
the home of the spectacular Burrell an col- 
lection. Amassed by Sir William Burrell, a 
shipowner who died in 1958, it has 8,000 
items, from reconstructed medieval castle 
rooms and Chinese jade and porcelain to 
Rodin sculptures and Impressionist paint- 
ings. Admission is free. 



Crn Palcmm fm The Ne» YmVTime 

Puppet Theatre Restaurant in Glasgow’s West End. 


GOOD TRAVEL DEALS 


THE FREQUENT TRAVELER 


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j Taipei 

4 

t Worldwide 

1 

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£ Madeira 


Round-trip from Heathrow to Mefboume/Sydnay via Beijing for £899 
(SI ,125), or £349 one-way. Optional stopovers in China. Fortravel between 
Nov. 1 and March 31. Round-trip fares to Beijing from £340 and Shanghai 
from £399 fortravel between Sept 15 and Oct. 31 . Tickets must be bought 
before Sept 5. 

AirPoInts and Miles and More members can now earn and redeem miles on 
both carriers. For example, an Air Points member making a round-tnp 
economy flight with Lufthansa between Hong Kong and Frankfurt earns 
3,646 points. . 

Buv a full-fare round-trip business-class ticket from London, Manchester or 
Birmingham to New York, Newark or onward destinations in the United 
States and claim a round-trip companion ticket for £99 (SI 60). Travel must 
be completed by Sept 10. 

Round-trip to Singapore. Penang or Kuala Lumpur for £385 (5620): round- 
trip to Jakarta. Cebu or Lombok for £435. Stopover in Singapore allowed on 
onward flights. Some restrictions apply. You must book by Sept. 30 tor 
departure before N ov. 27. Trailfinders (44-171) 938-3939- 

Three-niqht “Discover Da Nang" package for 4,780 Hong Kong dollars 
C5615) perperson includes roimd-tripffigWsfrom Hong Kong to Da Nang via 
Ho Chi MinhCrty. one-night at Hotel Equator!^ in Ho Chi MinhCrt^andWO 
nights at the new Furama Resort China Beach. Da Nang. American 
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Nov. 30. 


Why Getting 


By Roger Collis 

International Herald Tribune __ 

B USINESS travelers rate 
“punctuality” along with 
“convenient schedule” and 
“reputation for safety” as the 
three most important factors in choosing 
an airline, according to most surveys. 
The Association of European Airlines, 

on* Tflnnrfc flint ATllv 


^.£r : EV T » - .B.T.A ▼ . ,r : • y " • ; 

I “Superior" singles and “deluxe” singles for 3.400 and 3,700 Taiwan dollars 
I (5118 and S128). Unffl Sept 10. 

! -summer Interludes" cSesdsocurtsof 25 to 30 percent breaWa^. 

\ plus perks such as airport transfers and museum visrtsai 19 properties. Until 

j Sept 7. . 

i Two-night “Body and Sold Retreat" package for 12.900 Hong 
/«?iRR51for a double “deluxe" room indudes limo transfers, breakfast one 
iSTt-ni bam, body sCTub and massage, fecal, 
gymnasium workout and swimming. Until Sept 30- 

' ms issues 

transfers to and from Funchal Airport and two evening meals. Until OcL 31. 




ARTS GUIDE 




As the summer unfolds. 

' ^ museums worldwide present 

■ / - a wide range of exhibitions. 

■^Uj-TRAL.R ~ 

Sydney , . 

Powerhouse Museum. teJ. (2) 
_ 217-0111, open dafly. To May 

■ - 1998: “Evolution and Revolution. 

* / Chinese Dress, 1700s to Now. 

' ■ AUSTRIA H 


t— 




"V* ■'/ 

V- 


Vienna 

Kunsthistorisches Museum, teh 

(11 525-24-403, dosed Mondays. 
To Oct 19: “Gold und Silber aus 
Mexico." Pre-Columbian gold and 
U silver artifacts. 

* J ■ELOl liW ~ 

IStefctaVlHe, tel: (2) 279-8438, 
dosed Mondays. ToNov. 12: M- 
ons Mucha: L’Esprrt de l ^Nou- 
veau" More than 140 works by 
Mucha (1860-1 944). 

J BRITAIN II 

Edwbwoh 

Royal Scottish Academy. td. 
f (31) 5564921. open daily. To oct 
5: “Raeburn." Portraitsby the 
Scottish painter (1756-1 BZ3)- 

TateGdlery, tel: (171) 887^000. 
open daily. To Nov. 30: *» nd J* n i ; 
Nature to Abstraction." 

60 worics by the Duttf P loneer 01 

» abstract art (1872-1 944)- 

ft The National Galjew teUi7i» 

4 747-2865. open daily. To Sept Z8. 

“Seurat and me Bathers. Cen^rs 

orSr^BS Seurat’s "Bathers at 

Ro^Sattemy ofArte.teM 1 
439-7438, open dariy.To Sept26- 
"Hiroshige: Images of Ra,n< 
Moon arid Snow." 

■ « AN A 


Montreal . Ari4L 
Montreal Museum of tf n» Jg* 
tel: (514) 265-2000, dosed Mpn 
days. To Nov. 2: “Henn Carter- 
Bresson: Pen. Brush and Camer 
as." 

■ P I H M A * 

Copenhagen 

hem Hammershoi.” p ®"JS s 09 

*6 Danish artst (1B64-191 6). 


■ 

Muses dee Beaux- Arts, tel: 03- 
80-74-53-59. dosed Tuesdays. To 
Set 13: “1900-1938: Prague. 
Capital Secrete des Avant- 
Gardes." Prague's contribution to 
Avant-Garde movements, from Art 
Nouveau to Surrealism. 

Musee d’Art Modems at d'Art 
Contamporain, tel: 

62. dosed Tuesdays. To OCt . 20. 
"Des Modem es aux Avant- 
Gardes." Documents the Dada. 
Ruxus and the New Realism 
movements. 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 

0 i -44-78-1 2-33, closed Tuesdays. 

To SepL 20: "Made in France: 
1947-1997." Artistic, creation in 4 
France over the last 50 y 60 ^- 
Also, .to SepL 29: “Fernand 

Forcdafion Cato Pj lJJ 
Contemporem, tel: 01-42-18-58- 
50, dosed Mondays. To Nov. z- 
“Amours" The expression of love 
In all forms of art 
Jeu de Paume, tel: 01-47^3-12 
50 dosed Mondays. To oci. i»- 
“Cesar: Retrospective." An over- 
view of the French sculptor's 

work. __ 

| felRM ANT 1 

j K^urfonim, Ttergarteni (3g 
1 266-2190. dosed Mondays. 1° 
OA. 31: The Franks: Precursors 
! of Europe." 

1 KunSmuseum, tel: ^ 8 LlIr 6 f- 
60 dosed Mondays. To^Sept 7. 

) -Multiple Identity: Amer^sdje 

: Wjnst 1975-1995 aus Dem Whit 

< ney Museum of American Art. 

^n^-Bichartz-Museum, t^- 

ToSeot 1 4: “L'Art Gourmand. Stfr 

l Sffu Z 

r- ®°“f"?5 tj |] jibs !or connoisseurs 

16 th century. 



A portrait by Raeburn on 
show in Edinburgh. 

J GREECE 

Thessaloniki 

The Museum of Byzantine cul- 
ture. tel: (31) 86-85-70, open dally. 
To D*. 31 : “Treasures ol Mount 
Athos." Paintings, icons, 
manuscripts and consecrated ves- 
sels from the monasteries. 

J ISRA EL JZ 

tel: (2) S7DB- 
™ open daily. To Sept. 6: ‘The 

tooenious Machine ol Nature: Four 

SISuries of Art and Anatomy." 


Traces tiie efforts of artists from 
the end of the 15th century. 

■ ITALY , 

Museo Civico, tel: (49) 875-1105, 
dosed Mondays. To Sept. 30: Da 
Padovanlno a Ttepolo." Paintings 
of the 17th and 18th centuries, 

■ — 

Tokyo 

Bridgestone Museum, tBi: (3) 35- 
63-0241, closed Mondays^ To 
Sept. 28: “Georges Rouault. 

m NETHERLANP* 

Amsterdam 
R ijksmuseum, tel: (2°) 
open daily. To Nov. 9: “Whistler en 
Holland." Etchings and watercol- 
ors by the American painter. 

B UNITED STATES 

Philadelphia ... 

Philadelphia Museum of Art, tel. 
(215)'684-7860, dosed Mondays. 
To Auc. 31 : "India: A Celebration of 
Independence, 1947-1997.” More 
than 250 photographs. 

International Art 

Kassel, Germany 

Documents X To SepL 28. 

Lyon, France 
4e Biennale. To SepL 24. 

! M2“«,na te .T0N0,.9. 


ill AAUWjrv f — 

by more than 15 minutes — - a marginal 
deterioration over 1995. Sixty-six per- 
cent of die delays were due to airport or 
air traffic congestion, or to planes miss- 
ing their departure or landing slots. 

But on-time performance is only pan 
of the picture. You may applaud the 
captain as a hero when he announces, 
“Despite our late departure, ladies and 
gentlemen, we’ve been able to make up 
some time and should be arriving 10 
minutes ahead of schedule.” But be 
aware that airlines are padding their 
timetables to disguise routine delays. 

Many flights, especially on short- 
haul routes within Europe — say be- 
tween London and Paris, Geneva and 
Frankfurt — often take longer today 
than they did 30 or 40 years ago, despite 

the advent of modem jets. 

* ‘There is a trend toward longer flight 
times,” says Goran Stael von Holstein, 
general manager for research and in- 
formation at the Association of Euro- 
pean Airlines in Brussels. “Most air- 
lines count from blocks off to blocks on 
— in other words, from gate to gate. 
Some may count the time from closing 
the doors, but that’s marginaL We' track 
the average 'block-hour’ speed every 
year” — the speed per hour from the 
time the blocks are taken off the plane’s 
wheels at the gate to the time they are put 
back on at the other end. 

SLOWER FLIGHTS in EUROPE The as- 
sociation’s statistics show that the av- 
erage block-hour speed for short-haul 
services within Europe has decreased 
from a peak of 538 kilometers per hour 
(335 miles per hour.) in 1983 to 518 
kilometers per hour in 1996. 

Michael Donne, an aviation specialist 
in London, said: “Flying from London 
i to Vienna with Austrian Airways, I was 
staggered to read in the in-flight bro- 
chure that the journey time of 2 hours -O 
■ minutes allowed for something like 40 
minutes' ground taxiing time. 

; crossword"" 


Modem jets flying from London to 
Paris, the busiest route in Europe, take 
just about as long today as Lufthansa’s 
legendary Junkers JU-52 trimotor did in 
1939. It now takes 60 to 80 minutes, 
according to the OAG flight guide for 
July 1997, compared to 75 to 80 minutes 
shown in the Lufthansa timetable for 
July 1939. The same applies to othCT 
short trips: Brussels to Frankfurt took 70 
to 75 mmutes in 1939. while it takes 60 
minutes today. 

There was far less traffic, of course, m 
those days, and the older planes hedge- 
hopped while modem jets take time to 
climb to cruising altitude. But still: The 
JU-52 cruised at 106miles per hour (170 
kilometers per hour) with a top speed of 
just 155 miles per hour, compared to 
more than 500 miles per hour for a 
Boeing 737. 

Back in May 1960, according to the 

AUkr timaMhU Pririch Airwavs' 


ABC flight timetable, British Airways 
Vickersviscount turboprops made the 
215-mile journey from London to Paris 
in 65 minutes. In 1970, Caravelles and 
Tridents, early jets operated by Air 
France and British Airways, were ex- 
pected to make it in 55 minutes. 

There is similar slippage on trans- 
Atlantic flights. The advent of the Boe- 
ing 747 in December 1970 cut the 13- 
hour flight from London to Los Angeles 
to 10 hours 30 minutes. Timetables now 
allow for 11 hours, while the slower 
twin-engined Boeing 767 adds another 
50 minutes to the trip. 

V IRGIN Atlantic has raised the 
stakes in die business-class wars 
with plans to introduce private 
cabins with double beds and showers, 
exercise areas, a pub/lounge and per- 
haps even a restaurant on its ulnalong- 
haul flights from Britain to the U.S. 
West Coast and the Far East 

Virgin’s Upper Class (business) 
already offers sleeper seats, an upstairs 
lounge and in-flight massage. 

The idea of converting pan or the 
cargo hold into sleeping compartments 
for premium passengers was first put 
forward when Airbus launched its four- 
engined Airbus A3 40-300 and -400 
series 10 years ago. Airlines like Virgin 
and Lufthansa already provide rest areas 
for crew in the hold of the aircraft. 

But it is the advent of the new Airbus 
A340-600 — a stretched version of the 
A340 now flying — that makes the idea 
commercially feasible. Seating up to 


11 UW ujfjuk “ — 7 

commercially feasible. Seating up to 
375 passengers and with a range 01 


7,300 nautical miles (13,500 kilorne-. 
ters), this aircraft is capable of flying ■ 
nonstop from Europe to Australia, in- 
volving flights of more than 16 hours. 
Virgin will be the launch customer with 
an order for 16 of the new aircraft part 
of a£1.6 billion (S2.56 billion) deal wrth 
Airbus, for delivery in 2002. 

Steve Ridgway, director of customer 
services at Virgin Atlantic in London,; 
said: “Airbus has agreed to lower the 
floor level of the cargo hold by 9 to 10 
inches [22 to 25 centimeters] to achieve 
a meaningful headroom of about 6 feet 5 
inches, which gives us the opportunity 
for the first time of using some of this 
space for passengers. There’ll be a 
double staircase at the front and a sec- 
ondary one ax the back. ’ * 

Restaurants in the Air 

“The challenge,” he said, “is to im- 
prove the overall ambiance by not hav- 
ing the cabin divided up by galleys, 
lavatories and wardrobes, but move 
them downstairs. Whv have all these 
people queuing in the aisles? We 11 also 
have separate lavatories for men and 
women. Our research shows that men 
take much less time than women, so u e 
could skew the ratio — eight female to 

five male — saving space. „ 

* ‘The idea is ro keep people mobile, 
Ridgway added. “We*re looking at 
things like an exercise area with a high 
humidity 'saturation zone’ and between 
8 and 16 private cabins which would 
convert from a daytime lounge to a ted 
— maybe a cross between a bed and a 
couchette — plus low-volume showers, 
like the ones they have on yachts, which 
don’t use vast amounts of water and soil 
give you a good shower. 

"The shared facilities would be pan 
of the Upper Class product. For sleeping 
cabins, we're talking about a premium 
; of 40 to 50 percent, still comfortably 
below normal first-class fares. The ul- 
umate thing might be instead of having 
; your Upper Class seat with all that per- 
; sonal space, you’d have a simple econ- 
omy-type seat for take-off and landing; 

I a restaurant where you could book a 
1 table for lunch or dinner with some- 
s body; and then have your cabin as a 
lounge/bedroom. It’s all a space-cost 
s equation really. I’d say it's a far mcer 
i proposition than being stuck in a nrst- 

x class seat for ail that time.” . 

) About the only thing missing in this 
f scenario is an outside jogging irack. 


ACROSS 

1 pursuing 

« Part ola 


14 Truman 

biographar 

Miller 

is Atomic bits 


21 £goiste's 
concern 
tut Event where 
one stands lor a 


■5SS5 name 

1 * Blackmore 


e Bibliophile's 

suffix 


heroine 

» Sticking spot? 


PARIS PROMO 

Apartments to cent - 

Furnished or not- 


ISrJsSS 

Ge^narl artlS^bDn 1 1^41, • 


Do you live in Austria, 
Belgium, Luxembourg 
or Sweden ? 

For ^formation about subscribing call: 

Austria 01 891 363 830 
Belgium 0800 17538 (toll-free) 
Luxembourg 08002703 (toll-free) 

Sweden 020 797039 (toll-free). 


^’annurs PUP- SCTSftPga 


TcL- +33 C0)1 45 63 25 60 
Fax: +33(0)1 45 6l 10 20 


24 Actress 
Dickinson 
■a Suffix with scan 
27 Quip, part 2 

31 MASH 
procedure 

aa Lend (pay 

attention) 

33 Liza's mentor, 
to Liza 

24 Telecommuni- 
cations letters 
»Obte-wlnning 
dramatist David 
3S 1 982 Michenar 
epks 

40 Out of focus 

41 Quip, part 3 
4S Gives the 

heave-ho 

47 Quilt stuffing 

48 "Helpl" 

4S They make 
contact in 
'Contact' 
ao Professional 
runner? 

ai Foreign heads 
of state 

M End of the quip 
SB Latin extension 
■o Belittle 
Bt Brood 

B2 London- to- 
Usbon dir. 

•3 Kind of star 

. DOWN 

1 Grp. with a 
caducous 

2 Eliot Ness, e.g. 

3 Swaps to a car 
lot 

4 One who's 
tickled 


s Start again from 
scratch 

« Move over a M 

f Big 

a Fuel tor the 
body 

a Desert mount 

10 Veterans Day 
mo. 

11 Tiredness 
14 Cop 

is Bird decoy 
17 Without 
substance 
is It comes from a 
pen 

22 Deli order 
is Where hurling 
originated 
28 Like Mitch 
Miller, e.g. 

28 Horror novelist 
Peter 

28 St. Paul's 
birthplace 

at Memphis 
setting 

N British peers 
34 Not so 
well-heeled 


AIR NUN 

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38 Pentagon big 

37 Cubist Rubik 

38 Patronized an 
mn 

40PartotW.W. IPs 
Pacific theater 

4i Broncos run for 
them: Abbr. 
42Super*duper 
«3 Clean up 
44 Initiations 
4a Bray 

aa “Palmer of the 
soul*: D'lsraeli 
aa NobaHst Pavlov 
83 Singer McEntire 
as Third-century 
data 


PUBkbyUMDWO 

© IVeie York Tunes/Edited by IHli Short*. 


aa i-Down 
members 

57 rule 

aa State on the Ati. 


Solution to Puzzle of Aug. 28 


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1 



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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 


PAGE 13 


CLT-Ufa 

And Kirch 
Revive Pact 

In Digital TV 

Ca*f*d6y OurSitfFnm Ofcp*** 

BERLIN — Kirch Group and CLT- 
® television joint venture of Ber- 
JJdsmann AG and Audiofina’sCLT, said 
Thmsday that they planned to merge 
their digital television operations. 

s digital television service, 
DF-1, will be merged with the Premiere 




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Some Investors Saw 
Asian Woes Coming 

Many Funds Fled to Other Markets 


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and Kirch now have an equal stake. 
As e ariy as Jan. 1, 1998, programs will 
be offered to customers under the 
Premiere name. 

^ Schmidt-Holtz, chief executive 
of CLT-Ufa, said the commercial sports 
channel DSF also would supply pro- 
grams for digital sports output on 
Premiere. 

Current subscribers will be able to 
acc ess both DF-1 and Premiere pro- 
gramming using a single digital de- 
coder, based on the “d-box” technol- 
ogy developed by Kirch’s DF-1. 

The plan is still subject to the ap- 
proval of the authorities. 

Kirch and CLT-Ufa agreed in June to 
end a long-running dispute and form a 
pay-television joint venture. They also 
agreed to use a single decoder for trans- 
mission. They called the move an- 
nounced Thursday a continuation of that 
agreement 

But analysts doubted then that the 
deal would go through since man y me- 
dia alliances in Europe have been 
scrapped. 

Kirch’s DF-1 has been struggling, 
signing up only a fraction of the sub- 
scribers it had hoped to attract- An al- 
liance with Rupert Murdoch’s British 
Sky Broadcasting PLC fell through in 
May. But Kirch brings a huge library of 
programming to the venture, including 
the German-language rights to popular 
American series like “Baywaich” and 
“Star Trek.” 

The Luxembourg-based CLT-Ufa is 
jointly owned by Germany’s Bertels- 
mann and Audiofina’s Compagnie Lux- 
embourgoise de Telediffusion S A. 

Separately, Premiere said Thursday 
its sales rose 3 1 .5 percent in 1 996, to 579 
million Deutsche marks ($321 million). 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 



By Glenn Collins 

New York Times Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — Burger King is un- 
leashing a Big Mac attack of its own. 

The company trumpeted Thursday 
its introduction of a version of the sig- 
nature Big Mac burger of McDonald ’s 
Coip. Called the Big King, it will be 
available Monday at ail 7,277 Burger 
King restaurants in the United States. 

As might be expected, the Big King 
has two all-beef patties, special sauce, 
lettuce, cheese, pickles and onions on a 
sesame-seed bun — the same as the 
Big Mac. 

Faced with this challenge, McDon- 
ald’s is not about to be dethroned with- 
out a fight. Ii has laid the groundwork 
to strike back at Burger King by test- 
marketing its own version of Burger 
King’s flagship Whopper. Called the 
Big and Thsty, it has yet to make its 
debut across die United States. 

The hamburger wars are intensifying 
as grow* has slowed and impulse 
diners’ restaurant options have expan- 
ded beyond fast food to lower-priced 
casual-dining rhaing and prepared 
meals from supermarkets and delicates- 
sens. To grow, burger chains must gain 
sales at each other’s expense. 

By offering more variety on its 
menu board. Burger King has been 
gaining market share, in part by poach- 
ing customers from McDonald’s, 
whose own market share has been de- 


clining as its new product introduc- 
tions flagged. A recent promotion by 
McDonald’s, in which it cut prices on 
some sandwiches to 55 cents, was 
dropped after it failed to generate big 
increases in business. 

It is too early to tell whether the 
aggressive Big King advertising cam- 
paign — planned weeks ago — will 
erase the recent adverse publicity when 
Burger King and other companies re- 
called potentially tainted beef from a 
plant in Nebraska. 

As for the new Big King, its patties 
are flame-broiled and each weighs 2.8 
ounces (80 grams), instead of the 
grilled 1.6-ounce patties in the Big 
Mac, which was introduced in 1968. 

And what of Burger King’s special 
sauce? It is King Sauce, of course, 
presumably mixed from different in- 
gredients than McDonald’s secret, pro- 
prietary Big Mac sauce. 

The Big King shows that “bigger 
burgers are back,” said Ron Paul, pres- 
ident of Technomic Inc., a restaurant 
consulting company in Chicago. “Cal- 
ories and juiciness are in.” 

In an introductory promotion, the Big 
King will cost 99 cents until Sept. 14; 
the Big Mac costs an average of $1.98 
nationally. Presumably, it will be priced 
competitively after the introduction. 

A $20 million national television 
and print advertising campaign for the 
Big King will begin Sunday, the day 
before the sandwich will become avail- 


able. Television advertisements fea- 
ture the theme “Get Your Burger’s 
War*” and *ey assault *c Big Mac 
wi* such tag lines as “Get ready for a 
new taste that beats the Big Mac.” 

Some of the campaign’s prim ads 
boast of *e Big King *at “it’s Like a 
Big Mac, only it has more beef than 
bread.” Other ads assert *at *e Big 
King is “just like a Big Mac. except 
it’s got 75 percent more beef. And it’s 
flame-broiled.” 

“There is only one Big Mac.” said 
Charles Ebeling, a McDonald's 
spokesman, “and nobody else can sell 
one, which is more than the sum of its 
parts: It’s a brand that is *e gold 
standard of hamburgers.” 

McDonald’s has been testing its Big 
and Tasty, a quarter-pound hamburger 
wi* lettuce, tomatoes and mayon- 
naise, in California. 

‘T wouldn't call that a Whopper,” 
Mr. Ebeling said. He also said that the 
company had no imm ediate plans to 
discontinue another quarter-pound 
burger, *e Arch Deluxe, which has 
failed to meet sales expectations since 
its introduction in May 1996. 

McDonald’s had a 41.9 percent 
share of *e $36 billion fast-food bur- 
ger market last year, a decline of 4 
percentage points from the previous 
year, according to Technomic. 


to Technomic. 


Burger King’s share rose 1 point, to 
19.2 percent, last year, and Wendy’s 
increased 3 points, to 1 1 percent 


By Erik Ipsen 

Imcnuuumol Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Some Western fund 
managers contemplating the carnage in 
Asian equity markets Thursday had rea- 
son for relief. Many had begun switch- 
ing out of what they saw as overheating 
markets in the region 18 months ago, 
analysts said Thursday. 

“Many foreign funds have been 
switching into Latin America and Rus- 
sia for over a year and it has proven a 
very profitable strategy,” said Richard 
Gray, an eme rging markets analyst at 
the Bank of America in London. While 
Asian markets have skidded, some 
shedding nearly 10 percent of *eir 
value Thursday alone, and many down 
by more than a third in the last two 
months, Latin America’s markets have 
gathered steam. 

Although many Latin American mar- 
kets also suffered Thursday, caught in 
the downdraft from weaknesses in U.S. 
trading, *e losses were a fraction of 
those logged in Asia. In fact, Thursday’s 
performance barely dented the claims of 
Mexico and Brazil to rank among some 
of *e biggest gainers on the globe this 
year, wi* rises in their stock indexes of 
roughly 45 percent and 65 percent, re- 
spectively. 

Meanwhile, stock prices in the far 
smaller markets of Hungary and Russia 
have not only shrugged off the problems 
of Asia but have outperformed even *e 
best of the Latin Americans. On the 
Budapest stock exchange prices stand 
80 percent above year-aid levels, small 
change compared wi* Russia's 181 
percent ascent in just under eight 
months. 

For managers of emerging-market 
funds, the spo dines s of the performance 
of markets around the world represents 
salvation. Unlike the Mexican peso 
crisis of 1994, which quickly under- 
mined confidence in all emerging mar- 
kets, Asia’s troubles still look like they 
can remain isolated. 

“The primary reason for optimism is 
that many of *e other emerging markets 
have done quite well and will likely 
continue to do well,” said Brian Gendr- 
eau, emerging-markets analyst at Smith 
Barney in New York, which has been 


overweight in Latin America and un- 
derweight in Asia all year. 

Perhaps the best sign of *e endur- 
ance of investor interest in emerging 
markets generally is the question that 
Mr. Gendreau says has topped his most- 
frequently- asked list for two weeks run- 
ning. “Investors keep asking me if this 
is the right time to get back into Asian 
markets,” he said. 

His answer and the answer of most 
other Western analysts and fund man- 
agers remains "no.” But there are 
clearly plenty of investors our there pre- 
pared to read into the sinking markets of 
Southeast Asia nothing more than a 

See STOCKS, Page 14 

U.S. Growth 
Revised Higher 

CanpBedtyOurSuffFivmDdparka 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. econ- 
omy grew at a faster pace in the second 
quarter than previously estimated, while 
inflation remained near lows set in *e 
1960s, *e government reported Thurs- 
day. Jobs also remained plentiful. 

Gross domestic product, the total out- 
put of goods and services, rose at a 
revised 3.6 percent annual rate in the 
second quarter, the Commerce Depart- 
ment said. That figure was up from the 
government's previous estimate of a 2.2 
percent gain in the quarter. The revision, 
the largest in three and a half years, 
nearly wipes out what economists had 
viewed as a respite from the 4.9 percent 
grow* rate in the first quarter. 

The Labor Department also reported 
that first-time claims for state unem- 
ployment benefits fell a larger-than-ex- 
pected 16,000 last week to a seasonally 
adjusted 323,000 — a sign that the econ- 
omy continues to generate new jobs. 

The U.S. investment boom “has ex- 
panded capacity, setting the stage for 
continued non inflationary grow*,” 
said Jeffrey Frankel, a member of Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton’s Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisers.. (AP, Bloomberg) 



Insurers Push Suers From Cashing In 


By Reed Abelson 

New fort Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A funny thing is 
ha p pening on *e way to *e American 
courthouse, as class-action lawyers and 
the insurance industry mop up some of 
the worst sales abuses heaped upon con- 
sumers in recent years. 

While lawyers are walking away wi* 
upward of $150 million in hard cash for 
representing customers who said they 
had been doped into buying unnecessary 
or overrated policies, millions of poli- 
cyholders are being offered far less. 

They can either take their chances of 
getting cash through arbitration or they 
can take a package of low-interest loans 
and discounts on a handful of insurance, 
ann uity and mutual-fund products. In 
short, they would be putting up more 
cash to buy new products from the same 
institutions that let them down. 

This is only *e latest variety of a 
series of settlements criticized for hand- 
ing consumers scrip in lieu of cash. 

People who *ought that *ey had 
overpaid for airline tickets because of 
price-fixing wound up wi* a small dis- 
count off the price of another mp. Own- 
ers of leaky Mustang convertibles got a 
$400 coupon toward the purchase of a 
new Ford. Contact-lens wearers who 
said they had been overcharged by 
Bausch & Lomb were given a little cash 
and certificates for more products. 

Now the coupon craze is being em- 
braced by life insurance companies, in- 
cluding New York Life Insurance Co., 


Prudential Insurance Co. of America, 
Transamerica Occidental Life Insur- 
ance Co. and John Hancock Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. 

While the details of each settlement 
differ, the deals usually consist of a low- 
interest loan to cover *e premiums on 
an existing policy and a discount on the 
purchase of a new product (In some 
cases, policyholders might qualify for a 
small enhancement of the cash value of 
an existing life insurance policy, with- 
out putting additional money down.) 

But in most cases, insurers have con- 
fined the price breaks to a narrow uni- 
verse of so-so products while insisting 
on the broadest posable release from 
liability far past and future claims. 

“Ithink it’s a brilliant concept,’ ’ said 
Melvyn Weiss, a class-action lawyer in 
New York whose firm, Milberg Weiss 
Bershad Hynes &Lerach, served as lead 
counsel in many of the cases that have 
resulted in noncash settlements. “It's a 
great solution to policyholders; it’s a 
great solution to *e company.” 

But consumer advocates, state reg- 
ulators, academics and even some 
plaintiffs’ lawyers, are not so sure. 

The settlements are “being copied 
because plaintiffs’ lawyers want fees, 
and the defendant knows it’s a won- 
derful way to buy peace, " said Michael 
Malakoff, a Pittsburgh lawyer who is 
seeking a reversal of the Prudential set- 
tlement reached last September. 

A lot of the problem lies in the sheer 
bread* of the settlements. They include 
anyone who bought a life insurance 


policy when the deceptive sales tech- 
niques were being employed, some- 
times for more than 15 years. 

As a result, the critics say, the people 
who were actually deceived could end 
up wi* much less than if they were the 
sole beneficiaries of the settlement, and 
people who do not yet know they were 
harmed may also come up short. 

The very fact that the insurers are 
willing to be so expansive and include 
all potential claimants, critics argue, is a 
sign that these enhancements do not 
“cost” the companies much at alL 

“It’s a marketing tool for die de- 
fendants and a cheap way to buy our of 
liability,” said Susan Koniak, a visiting 
law professoral Cornell University. 

The liability that so concerns the in- 
dustry giants arises from three types of 
unsavory sales practices rimed at gen- 
erating commissions that have become 
tiie focus of scandals and class-action 
lawsuits in recent years. 

Some cases involve “churning” — 
pressuring customers to use the cash 
value of their old policies to buy new 
ones no better than the previous ones. 

Other cases accuse agents of over- 
stating bow much policies would earn in 
the late 1980s when interest rates were 
in the double digits, even offering “ van- 
ishing premium” policies. When in- 
terest rates fell, policyholders were hit 
wi* bills they had never expected. 

The third category of complaints in- 
volves policies that were inappropri- 
ately billed as investment ex retirement 
vehicles. 


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PAGE 14 


Investor’s America 




The Dow 


9009 - 



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: 6.40 



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Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 

tmcrruiKirul Herald Tribune 

Very briefly! 


Manufacturing Squeeze at Boeing 

SEATTLE ( AP) — Boeing Co., falling behind on orders for 
747 jumbo jets, is shifting about 200 employees from its 767 
to its 747 production line, and may hire an additional 200 
workers to catch up. 

Bob Dryden, executive vice president of airplane pro- 
duction for Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, said 
Wednesday the manufacturing squeeze was the result of 
increased production, a parts shortage and the need to train 
hundreds of new workers. 

Bell Atlantic Reaches 2d Accord 

New York (Bloomberg) — Bell Atlantic said it reached an 
agreement with Sprint Corp. to connect the two phone compa- 
nies' local networks in New York, bringing Bell Atlantic one 
step closer to being able to offer long-distance in the state. 

The agreement is Bell Atlantic’s second accord in New York 
with one of the three largest U.S. long-distance carriers. 

It signed an agreement with No. I AT&T Corp. in May and 
expects to reach an agreement with No. 2 MCI Commu- 
nications Corp. within a week, said Bob Varettoni, a Bell 
Atlantic spokesman. 

• Soros Fund Management LLC. an investment adviser con- 
trolled by the billionaire investor George Soros, and affiliates 
raised their joint stake in DBT Online Inc. to 6.56 percent from 
S.51 percent of the company's outstanding stock. 

• Citibank has acquired the Mexican Banco Confia, a fi- 
nancial institution embroiled in scandal after the disappearance 
of its president and SI 75 million, officials said Wednesday. 

• Equity Residential Properties Trust said it agreed to buy 

Evans Withycombe Residential Inc. for SI. 06 billion in 
securities and assumed debt. Bloambertt. afp 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 



Jospin and Kohl Commit Themselves to ‘Stable Euro 


By John Schmid 


Intenujihinul Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of Germany and 
Prime Minister Lionel Jospin of 
France moved to bury their ideo- 
logical disputes over Europe on 
Thursday by jointly committing 
themselves to a "stable” future 
single currency and reaffirming the 
euro's hotly debated 1999 starting 
date. 

The leaders used the occasion of 
Mr. Jospin’s first visit to Bonn as 
prime minister ro revive confidence 
in the euro and repair the strains in 
the French-German alliance that 
have complicated relations since 
Mr. Jospin swept to power in May 
elections. 

The two leaders agreed to work 
"shoulder to shoulder to advance 
the European unification process,” 
according to a statement from a 
German government spokesman. 
Peter Hausmann. Feuding over the 
single currency, over french de- 
mands for make-work spending and 
distinctly cool personal relations 
had clouded this summer's two pre- 
vious meetings between Mr. Jospin 
and Mr. Kohi. 

Addressing one of the points of 
friction in die alliance, the two lead- 
ers agreed to "strict” adherence to 
the euro's deficit benchmarks. 


Germany and France are strug- 
gling to cut their budget deficits to 3 
percent of gross domestic product 
this year to fulfill the requirements 
for joining the single currency as set 
out in the Maastricht treaty. 

Mr. Jospin, a Socialist, initially 
exhibited ambivalence toward the 
criteria after he woo the election 
with anti-austerity, job-creation 
pledges. At the same rime, Mr. 
Kohl’s government has come under 
heavy pressure at home to ensure 
that Germany and other qualifying 
nations stick firmly to the project’s 
rigid budget discipline. 

Pledging efforts for a "stable” 
euro, Mr. Jospin helped buttress 
Mr. Kohl's promises to the skep- 
tical German public that the new 
currency will be a suitable substi- 
tute for the Deutsche mark. And 
with assurances of the January 1999 
starting date, Mr. Jospin helped 
muffle the critics in Germany who 
want to postpone or abandon the 
project 

The latest French budget propos- 
als for next year, now taking shape, 
should further mend ties across the 
Rhine, analysts said. 

“Three percent is the center- 
piece.” said Christopher Potts, an 
economist in Paris at Cheuvreux de 
Virieu investment advisers, refer- 
ring to the Maastricht criteria. 

“The symbols in the budget will 


be for monetary union.” he said, 
"this from people who three 
months ago refused such efforts." 

Even before Mr. Jospin's elec- 
tion, Ger mans feared what they saw 
as efforts by the French to dilute the 
independence of the proposed 
European central bank. After die 
French elections, the tenor of re- 
lationships worsened when the new 
French government rejected "Ger- 
man coalitions” for the euro, in the 
words of Interior Minister Jean- 
Pierre Chevcncment 

That mood has evidently 
changed. The daily Die Welt said 
Thursday that Germany should for- 
get its earlier fears that Ranee was 
more interested in creating a polit- 
ical counterweight to the European 
central bank than ensuring the sta- 
bility of the single currency. 

The newspaper commented that 
the French finance minister, Domi- 
nique Strauss -Kahn, had made clear 
that Paris was committed to cutting 
its budget deficit to meet the 
Maastricht criteria. On Wednesday, 
Mr. Kohl and President Jacques 
Chirac insisted separately that the 
single currency would start on 
schedule and in accordance with the 
Maastricht criteria. 

France also appears ready to take 
other concrete steps toward better- 
ing its relationship with Germany. 
According to the French newspaper 


Le Monde, the government is pre- 
pared to drop its objections to a 
reorganization of the four-nation 
Airbus Industrie aircraft consorti- 
um. 

That would represent a major 
concession to German-led efforts to 
create an agile European company 
that can compete with Boeing Co* of 
the United States, which earlier this 
month bought McDonnell Douglas 
Corp. to form the world’s biggest 
aerospace oompany. 

Gennany's Airbus partner, 
Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG, lent 
credence Thursday to French "sig- 
nals" that Paris will drop its ob- 
jections to the restrocturing. 

"DASA welcomes the signals 
from France, which point to an ac- 
celeration in the restructuring of the 
European aerospace industry,” said 
a Daimler spokesman, Theodor 
Benien. "This is exactly in the in- 
terest of DASA.” 

■ Dollar Falls Against Mark 

The dollar fell against the mark, 
dragged down by weakness in the 
U.S. stock market and by concern 
dial die Bundesbank might try to 
defend the marie, Bloomberg News 
reported from New York. 

The dollar’s decline against die 
mark began in European trading on 
suggestions from a German official 
that the central bank would sell dol- 


lars or raise interest rates to 
strengthen the mark, down 14 per- 
cent since the year began. 

Bob Savage, chief currency 
trader at Lehman Brothers, said, 
“There's a worry in the market dial 
the Bundesbank will raise rates, that 
it's a question of when and not if.” 

The dollar was at 1 .7945 DM In 4 
PJVL trading, down from 1 .806 DM 
on Wednesday. 

But it strengthened to 119.105 
yen from 118.895 yen in the pre- 
vious session. 

The dollar fell against die Swiss 
franc, to 1:4845 francs from 1*4937, 
and the French franc, to 6.0390 
francs from 6.0775. _ _ 

' The pound was at $1.6185, up 
from $1.6133. ‘ 

Concern about a Bundesbank 
move gathered strength after coun- 
cil member Helmut Hesse had said 
die bank would act if the dollar 
climbed to 1 .90 DM or more. 

Mr. Hesse said the central bank 
might sell dollars or raise interest 
rales if the dollar rises too for too 
fast Later comments by some of his 
colleagues suggesting German rates 
aren't headed higher failed to offset 
the impact of Mr. Hesse’s rem a rk . 

"The marker’s giving a little bit 
more credence to what Hesse said,* ’ 
said Junes Culnane, a currency 
trader at Norddeutsche Landes- 

h ank. 


STOCKS: Some Fund Managers Saw Woes of Asian Markets 18 Months Before 


Continued from Page 13 

potential starting gun for a major 
bargain-basement shopping spree. 

What worries some observers is 
that what ails Southeast Asia is by 
no means unique to the region. The 
yawning current-account deficits, 
for instance, which helped to spark 
the June currency crisis in Thailand 
that subsequently spread throughout 
the region is a problem shared by 
Brazil, Poland and several other 
emerging-market nations. 

For those who point to Brazil's 
immense $53 billion hard-currency 
horde and conclude that it h as more 
than enough ammunition to with- 
stand an attack on its currency, there 
may be a rude surprise. James 
Lister-Cheese, senior analyst with 
Independent Strategy in London 
said that two months ago Thailand's 
central bank boasted of reserves of 
nearly S40 billion, reserves which a 
long and losing defense of the baht, 
be said, depleted ro as little as S4 
billion. 

Curiously, if it is safety that West- 
ern investors should suddenly crave, 
many analysts insist that it will be 


hard to find in any market — in- 
cluding those of the leading indus- 
trialized nations. 

“Can anyone really look at the 
Dow at 8.000 and say that there is 
less risk there than there is in many 
emerging markets?” asked Mr. 
Gray of Bank of America. 

Having already witnessed the 
flight from Asian equities to those of 
Latin America and Eastern Europe, 
some observers wonder if the next 
shift might not be out of equities 
altogether. "We are seeing more 
money flow into cash,” said Mat- 
thew Merritt, emerging market 
strategist at ING Barings in London. 
Once the present state of volatility 
passes over the markets, Mr. Merritt 
predicts that the place to invest will 
be Eastern Europe. It could be a long 
waif, however. 

■ Wall Street Slumps 

Stocks fell Thursday, led by com- 
puter-related shares, on speculation 
that inflationary pressures may not 
have eased as much as thought in 
recent months, news agencies re- 
ported. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 


fell 92.90 points to close at 
7,694.43, after partially recovering 
from a 128-point drop. The Standard 
& Poor’s 500 Index fell 10.04 
points, to 903.66. 

Bond prices, which had gained 
more than a point after a report dial 
the U.S. economy continued to grow 
with little inflation, also retreated. 

The benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond price rose 30/32 to 97 12/32. 
taking the yield down to 6-58 per- 
cent from 6.65 percent 

General Electric rose, leading 
stocks that gained. 

J. Thomas Madden, chief invest- 
ment officer at Federated Investors, 
said: “People still want to own the 
household names — large-cap US. 
stocks. Nothing has happened to 
shake broad investor confidence.” 

Not all investors shared Mr. Mad- 
den's confidence about big stocks. 
Earlier, investors sold shares of 
large companies such as Exxon and 
Coca-Cola that led the market high- 
er during the past three years. 

Caterpillar and International 
Business Machines also fell. 

The technology-heax-y Nasdaq 
composite index fell 14.23 points to 


158131, dragged down by com- 
puter-networking and chip stocks. 
Altera, which makes programmable 
logic device chips used in network- 
ing equipment, warned drat 
quarterly sales will slow because of 
waning demand in North America. 
Altera, the most active U.S. issue, 
slid. 

Other computer-related shares 
also declined, including Xilinx and 
Ascend Communications. 

Evans Withycombe Residential 
climbed after Equity Residential 
Properties Trust agreed ro acquire 
die rival apartment company in a 
deal valued at $1 billion, equity Res- 
idential. a Chicago-based firm ran by 
Sam Zell, a financier, will pay $625 
milli on in securities and assume 
S432 million in debt from Evans. 

Caldor rose after a judge granted 
the depaitmeni-stare c hain another 
extension for Chapter 1 1 bankruptcy 
protection. Caldor, based in Norwalk. 
Connecticut, filed for bankruptcy 
protection in September 1995. 

LSI Logic fell after SoundView 
Financial downgraded its short-term 
rating to “hold” from "buy.” 

[Bloomberg. AP) 


ING Buying 
Furman Selz 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The Dutch 
investment company Interna- 
tionale Nederlanden GroepNV 
said Thursday it would buy-the : 
securities concern Furman Selz 
Co. for $600 million in cash ina - 
drive to expand its involvement - - 
in the U.S. financial industry. - 
The deal is the latest in a 
flurry of acquisitions of U.S. 
investment banks this year after 
easing of regulatory barriers.- • 
£NG said it was impressed 
with Furman’s consistent 
growth and profitability. Fur- 
man Selz said the deal would 
enable it to offer access to new 
products and markets. 

Furman Selz, an employee- 
owned firm founded in 1973 
emphasizing equity research, 
has more than 3,000 corporate 
clients, generated more than 
$400 million in revenue last 
year and manages more than 
$10 billion in assets. 





WORLD v - 1 - - '* 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday’s 4 P.M. Close 

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V, 

146* 

1W 

■v* 

Enti 

365 

14': 

lift 

14k 


Eowfl 

«9 

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•k 



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OD 

IP. 

lift 

is” 

-ft 

Fssn 

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U6 

700 

3ft 

If*' 

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15 

ift 

■' * 

Most 

<60 

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8>i 

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FAuiPl 

I960 

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102 

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FnfHeR 

591 

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Gceari 

247 

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34 k 

■ft 

CtoVFd 

1308 

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1476 

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PiaAnCfl 

PmanC 

PtgOd 

pH5e„ 

PissfeTd 

PhU 

PMK 


Srtots 

fetes* 

Miri 

jmdr 

5MdPta 

SbeffCn 

Shaft* 

MBraM 

SaM 

SpoWT ii 

SPDR 


as? 

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TMOk 

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TlWBfflM 

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M V. 
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7ft 2ft 
W Ilk 
12ft 12ft 

15ft 1*5 

1» 2ft 
3*5 14ft 
iov. r, 
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*i* mm 
72 * 71 + 

*» Sft 

lift 1M 
«ft ft 


a®* 79 V, 

nth u 

«>• I It 


IH Ift 
15?* 13‘, 
lift im 
Hr. if, 
3 ft 


l'k 


Dow Jones 

apn High Lot Lou CM. 

Incus 774X78 711119 763.19 ItfiKO -OT.ftl 

Tram 2W6J7 2901. U 3871.85 287*81 -3D.M 

KOI ZEL48 233.96 230JI 751*6 -1JO 

Cano 2427.19 34*0.17 J403/I 2411.91 -24*2 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


Standard & Poors 


liKtvstitab 

Transp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

SP 500 

SP100 


HI* LOT aow 

1078.10106131 1075^9 
663.13 652.78 6SSA7 
199.31 19754 19836 
105.07 104.00 10437 
916.23 903.83 913.70 
888-41 87442 88533 


ra*r 

4PJ8. 

1062-67 

64935 

197.99 

103.77 

90347 

87440 


JZ NYSE 

•j Congas*: 
-ft indurtlob 
- Transit. 

*2 a* 1 * 

-ft Finance 

■>1 

+j Nasdaq 

**£ Camposte 
r* iiwvsmats 
;£* Bante 
*7? Insurance 
• > Finance 
^ Tra,w 
ft AMEX 


Hid lot »-M- ora. 

47455 469.77 47554 -047 

604IM 59467 40145 -034 

*3458 43011 43X83 -105 

785.18 281.42 78X83 135 

44039 AJ415 43946 017 


High LOT FJ» 

1590.90 157158 15*45? 
12CL71 T272JM 128JJS 
171156 170046 171134 
172057 170943 1719JD 
202653 201757 702444 
101058 100535 101064 


-642 
■034 
♦ 1155 
♦ 443 
-143 
*052 


45130 64831 65141 

Dow Jones Bond 


X Bonds 
10 Unities 
10 Industrials 


am* a*. 

100.77 *0 04 

10153 * 033 

105.92 -0.14 


Caracas 

lomeae 

PMMors 

LSI Lag 

C-cnE.tccs 

CkoCT 

Hoirama 

McDfUOs 

Shewn* 

Eneas 

JomJn 

Magn*3 

Emu 

NomsBks 

PflZWJ 


Nasdaq 

Altera 
Ascena 
inld k 
3Com 

MCI 

Cisco 

TekCwA 

Grades 

WA Moll 

Min* 

DelCQIS 

Nave* 

JEMS, 

SuiWci 


AMEX 

SPDR 

And raj 
H«JTT 

viocB 
JT5 Cora 

sns- 

T«fiR 

Unlob 



VOL HIM 

183028 S3 
17*403 419, 
145534 94ft 
143573 41ft 
134111 28ft 
120487 14ft 
101751 18 
79464 38ft 
6*754 60ft 
61891 Oft 
60140 830. 
57974 9ft, 
5W 70 99ft 
55646 »«r. 
SS»1 49*,* 


SI 53*9 
40*4 41 ft 
sr» 92ft 
45ft <7 l » 
21ft 28*. 
73 7S 
I TV; l/V, 
3Pt Wi 
S*ft 60»k 
46ft 48V. 
80ft »lft 
9 9ft 
94ft 

30ft 30». 

47*t aft 


Vni Htw LOT LOT 
41191 914ft 90 9m* 

11848 35ft 34V. 35*i 


7628 33*1. 
4057 :*•• 

5807 31 

5771 ft 
5570 4>. 

50*1 5ft. 
4254 31 

4152 I'M* 


32ft 34 
2 2 ft* 
304. 30ft 
4ft 4. 
44ft 4*i 

5ft 5ft » 
34ft JS'9 
I*. I '* ft 


.ft 

A 

£ 

% 

-£• 


♦ 4-, 
5 

-•I. 


Aug. 28, 1997 

H&i Low Lain! Cbge Op ml 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT3 

5000 bo minimum- certs pw bushel 
Sep 97 768 - 264' j 26T- -2 -. 28175 

Dec 97 272'rj 269 2«9*- -2-^ 187372 

Ate 98 280*, 276*6 T7T . 2-. *6.254 

Alov 98 7857. 781 -a 2*T* -2V 1ZS9S 

M 98 2B8ft 2844ft 7854* -ji. 19.079 

Sop 98 273 270 270. -ft U37 

Est Ml te NJ4. Wests suite 55405 
Waft open int 305974. up 1079 

SOYBEAN MEALICSOT) 

1 00 Ians- doOm per tan 

Sep 97 74SJQ 24630 248J0 *1 60 19-447 

0a 97 219330 71580 217.00 -1.10 life* 

D*«97 20830 20360 70430 -190 44408 

Jon 98 20380 19980 700.70 3_30 9J05 

Mar 9* 199.00 19570 19570 -110 10.066 

Mar 98 197 90 19450 19460 -340 5*53 

Eftl. srtes N A Waft sales 21454 
Weds open Ini 1 1284«. up 2.716 

SOYBEAN OIL (CSOT1 
*04)00 lbs- amis per k> 

Sep 97 21*7 22.45 22.67 *010 9.182 

Od97 27.91 22AS 27.91 *ai* 17.IS2 

Dec 97 7115 22.97 TAOS *ai2 3A667 

Jon 98 2147 7119 2142 *0.11 11009 

Mar 08 2130 2143 2365 *005 6434 

A*ay98 2302 23.42 2342 *0.17 1695 

EsI. sales NA Weds solas 71121 
Wests opan Ini 85235. off 977 


High Law urtal Chse Opml 

ORANGE JUICE [NCTin 
15000 Its.- arts per a 

Sep 97 69 JO a7-5C *095 6.178 

Nor 97 7235 6940 TQ70 .080 15J75 

Jen 98 7575 72.79 7*75 -C.93 <468 

MOT 98 77.75 7590 76AJ -040 4 

EsL sales NA V.edi sefes 64*6 
■Wws open bit 34525 

Metals 

GOUKNCMX) 

TOO tray ce. - on tors, per bur cc 
5*P 97 32410 -1.70 46 

Oct 97 32830 32490 32510 -1J0 156H 

Dec 97 37200 32570 327.10 -1.70 109.322 
Feb 98 33200 32880 32840 -130 14803 
Apr 98 33190 33070 33070 -1.70 5380 
Am 98 334 JO 13280 17240 -1.70 8433 
Aug 98 33500 -170 1151 

Od98 33730 -1.70 111 

Dec 98 34140 33960 339^0 -170 6.120 

Esi solas N A -Vests safes 18462 
Wests open bit 197,19a up 320 

HI GRADE COPPER CNCMXJ 
25400 lbs.- cents per b 

Sot 97 9980 9*50 9655 -235 11410 

Od 97 99.60 9700 97-55 -ZAO 2.056 

NSW 97 97 -*5 9775 97.45 -100 I4QS 

Dec 97 9940 96J0 97.15 -240 19455 

Jan 98 9870 9740 9745 -1.80 748 

Feb 98 9840 9*75 9675 -1-80 704 

War 98 9800 9670 96*5 -140 2425 

Apr 98 9740 96J5 9655 -1.40 526 

Way 98 9*75 9*40 9610 -ITS 1454 

EsT srtesNAWetfs sales 14,311 


Trading Activity 

NYSE 

Advanced 
Decimal 
Uncnanged 
Toni ones 
NewHign, 

New LOTI 

AMEX 

Advanced 
Decined 
Unchcngea 
rate Issues 
Not Hems 
Nen lots 


1614 
1 193 
517 
3384 


324 

no 

179 

742 

J9 


Nasdaq 

Advanced 

DecSnea 

Unchanged 


Market Sates 


NYSE 

Amex 

Nasdaq 

InmMons. 


ird 2256 

l»78 1800 

2077 1693 

5370 5747 

94 730 

SS 37 


MO COTS. 

38779 591.98 

21 98 34 48 

675.73 *35-43 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

&00Q hu minimum- cents per bushel 
Sep 97 670 657 661 A -81* 10433 

Not 97 677 *17 *19 -7ft 8*922 

Jan 98 670ft 610 672ft -6ft 19.73S 

War 98 636 *7817 *29ft -7 A060 

Wav 99 AAJ 635V: 637ft 4ft 6245 

Est soles NA Wests safes 36473 
Wests open ini 138455, up 1.778 

WHEAT <C80T} ’ 

5.000 bu mWsnum- amis per bushes 

Sep 97 378 368** J76 *4ft 10461 

Dec 97 39s 385ft 393 + 5 65^70 

Mar 98 406 396ft 404ft ♦5’v 19501 

Way 9a 437 397ft 405ft +*ft 2442 

Esl safes NA Wests safes 35*878 

Wetfs open ml 107.1981 up 1793 


Livestock 
CATTLE fCMERJ 
40400 tos. • aents par t> 

0d97 6740 67.12 *7.22 -0^0 

Dec 97 69-15 *8*5 6842 -0-47 

Feb 98 7245 7147 71.82 -072 

Apr 98 7AOJ 7080 73.92 4J.10 

Jim *8 7070 7042 7057 -017 

EaL softs 1 1790 Wests safes 20.20S 
Weds open tall 95.9*6. up 1.656 


Dividends 

Company 


Per Amt Rec Pay Company 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


STOCK SPUT 
KhnbaHnB B 2 for isplit. 

RehabCare Grp 3 far 2 spa 

STOCK 

FstFnd BcsOH .. 109b 9-5 10-1 

INCREASED 

AeantCommun 0 .17 9-23 10-10 

RkMoodHIdgs O .04 MS 930 


Merrrncc Imlui 


Autticntic RbfeSS 
Berkshire Gas 
CiUcsnp odjpf 2 
Cihcorp adlpf 3 
Cornerstone Rlty 
Elmira Svgs Bh 
ElrtW Electron 


0 4175 9-3 10-8 
a JBS 9-30 10-1S 
Q 150 11-14 11-30 
O 1.7511-14 11-30 
0 25 9-22 10-20 

Q -16 9-12 9-26 

Q M 9-t «(S 


Ena to Homes 
FNB Corn PA 
FsJ FndBcp OH. 
Fst Keystone FsJ 
Fst Liberty Fnd 
G&KSvcs 
Groy Camm 
Great Lakes Chem 
Hancock PalGIDrV 
MettfanJ SvgsBk 
Merrimoc Indus 
Nrttim StnfasPwr 
OHSLFnd 
Peeples Bonk MC 
PukKId Funutun? 
Pulaski SvasBk 
Valey Naflincp 
Wamaca Grp A 
Whitney Hlog 


D 0175 
Q .02 
Q .16 
M .0875 
Q .18 
0 .10 
0 .705 
Q 22 
O .12 
2 17 

a 475 

Q J75 
Q 48 
O .28 


9-8 9-29 
9-1 9-15 
9-5 ID-1 
9-12 10-1 
9-15 10-1 

9- 18 10-2 
9-9 9-23 

10- 1 11-4 

9-5 9-30 

9- 15 10-15 
9 5 9-1 0 

10 - 1 10-20 
9-30 10-15 

95 9-79 
9-2 9*15 

9-15 930 

9-5 10- ! 
9-3 10-8 
9-15 10-1 


•045 

-035 


a-aronrat- b-approxJawle aamml per 
shsms/ADR; 9-payaMc in Canmfiaa funds: 
m-aNflWy: a-evorferfy, s-semr-anrivai 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales figures ore unoffidaL Yccrty highs and tows reflect fhe previous 52 weeks plus the 
current weak, but nol Ihe ialesl trading day. Where a split or slock dividend a mourning to 25 
percent or more has been pa to fhe years Big* -to» range ono dividend ore shown tor die new 
stacks only. Unless otherwise noftd, rales of dividends are annual (Sstawscmcnls based an 
ThelaWdecfttmiofl. 

a • dividend ntso extra (si. b - annual rate of dividend plus stock dividend, e - liquidating 
dividend, a - PE exceeds 99. dd . called, d - new yeoriy low. dd - toss in the Iasi 1 2 months. 
• - dividend dedered Or paid m preceding 12 months, f - annual rate, increased on last 
decJaraiKm. g - dividend in Canadian funds, subject to UTS- non residence fax. i - dividend 
declared after split -up or slock dividend, j - dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or no 
action taken oi lofesl dividend meeting, k - dividend declared or paid this year, an 
accumulative issue with dividends m arrears, m- annual rate, reduced on Inst dcdaralkm. 
n - new issue in me past S3 weeks. The high -tow range begins wilh rhe start of Trading, 
nd - next day dcEvenr. p - inriiaJ dividend annual rale unknown. P/E - price- earnings ratio. 
r ■ dosed -end mutual fend r - dividend declared or para in preceding 12 months plus dock 
dividend s - sloe* spiff. Dividend begins with safe of spBf. sis - sales, t - dividend paid in 
slock in prece&ng 12 months, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or cx-dtstrttwtjon date, 
u - new yeorfy high, v-lradmg helled n - in bankruptcy or receivership orbeing reorganised 
underihe Bankruptcy Ad; orsenrrihesassumedby such companies, wd - when dtelribuTed. 
wf - when issued/ ww - with warrants, i - ^ dividend or ex righls. xdh - a-dfsTribtlfran. 
tm ■ wilhout wurranfs. y- ci-dnidcnd and sales in fell. yM - yield z - sales m hiH. 


FEEDE R CATTLE (CMER) 

50400 tot. • cents p«r lb 
Aug 97 8040 8035 80-T7 

Sep97 79 70 7840 7915 

OC197 7945 7862 79.07 <U7 

NOT 97 8045 79.90 8tt07 -0.12 

Jon OT 8140 8090 81.07 *807 

Mar98 81.25 80 70 80.90 *007 

EJ safes 4575 wotfs safes 5-472 
Weds open ini 22.069. up 667 

H0C5-LBS6 ICMERJ 
40400 lbs.- cents per to 
Od 97 70.75 69.90 70 JO *1.17 

Dec 97 tJJV 66 85 67.45 *107 

Ffb 98 66-52 65-55 66J7 *1.00 

SprtS 6300 6210 6 2 75 * 0.77 
Jun 98 67 JO 66 70 6745 *065 
Est. srtes B.715 Weds safes 6492 
Weds cram M 31 J02. up 9! 

PORK BELUES (CMER) 

40400 tos • osnls per lb. 

F*b 98 6845 *7 as 68.27 *7.20 

Mar 98 *8 « 6? 05 68.25 022 

Esl. safes 2092 Weds safes 2492 
Weds open M 4B01, up 517 


*401 

24560 

13002 

M37 


2900 

3.75B 

6J6* 

4330 

2-443 

14*0 


I7J38 

6.945 

1191 

1^40 

942 


4260 

323 


Weds open M 46.231. oH 711 

SILVER (NCMX1 

AOOO (roy at- cwrls per Iror ar. 

Sot 97 479.00 46240 44390 4)10 144S6 

Od 97 46450 *0J0 78 

Dee 97 48640 467 JO 471.00 *OJO 44937 

JOT 98 47260 *OJO a 

Mar 98 49240 47600 477.90 *440 11^31 

Way 98 49400 48220 48220 *040 X083 

JlH9B ffli-50 *0.40 2126 

S«p 98 490.90 *040 994 

Esf safes NA WerTs safes 27.140 
Weds open M 815*7, oHI.781 

PLATINUM (NMER) 

SO tray at- (tolars per trey cb 

00 97 40940 40410 407.70 * 450 9451 

JOT 98 40450 40250 40270 *550 2687 

Apr 98 398 00 397 JO 397.20 *5.50 <35 

Jui9« 39320 *550 2 

Esl. sides N A Weds safes 1,747 
Weds open bit 12975, off 507 

Close Previous 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

Dollars per meWc ton 


High Lon Latest Oige OpW 

10-YEA R FRENCH 60V. BONDS fMATIF) 
FFSXLQQQ • nts of 100 od 
Sot 77 129.76 129-52 129-62 *0.12 I5WI22 
Dec 97 9850 9854 9346 UndL 14069 
Mar 98 9840 9000 9746 OndL 0 
Est. safes: 106,167. 

Open ird: 171091 oft 2212. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 
m. 209 mflfan - pts of 100 pd 
Sep 97 13546 135.11 13563 *034 8S3S1 
Dee 97 10745 107J0 10741 +4L30 24674 

EsL sales: 64712 Prev. safes $2561 
Pre*. open InL. 112425 off 1417 

LIBOR 1-MONTH (CMER) 
SSidltoa-pIsaflOOpd. 

Sep 9? 90) 9435 9436 unch. 1S799 

Od 97 9434 9432 9433 *a01 7,923 

Not 97 9429 9426 94 29 *042 8478 

Esl. sales NA WerTs sales 2679 
Werfs open M 40570. up 1.183 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI driBon-ph <rf 100 pet 
Sep 97 9457 9425 9457 *041 474903 

Od97 9420 9417 9419 *042 5475 

Dec 97 9412 9405 9411 *045 503567 

Mar 98 9444 9346 9443 *047 354364 

Jun 98 9193 9344 93.92 *048 277,424 

5ep«S 9343 93.73 9342 *0.07 218467 

Dec 98 9J.71 9161 9350 *008187471 

Mar 99 9368 9261 92b7 *047 131665 

Jvm 99 9362 9X56 9342 *447 104343 

Sep <9 93J9 9153 9158 +007 8*476 

Doc 99 9341 9144 9151 *0.08 7173B 

War 00 9351 pus 9151 +ojjg MW8 

Es). safes Na Weds safes 271282 


Alai 

Fanlard 

Ssr 

ForftarO 

Lead 

SL, 

Nfehel 

Tin 

Spol 

Farsianl 


(High Grade) 

I 673ft 767a ft 

1637 00 1637ft 

tHtofeOfrt 

217100 217400 
216100 216200 


632ft 

64140 


633ft 

64200 


649000 650040 
658540 459000 


534540 537040 
541040 541540 
DiK aped* Hfeb Grade) 
Spol 1*6400 16*940 
FonrOTl 15D2.00 1503.00 


168040 
1457 00 


219440 

?»78ft 


637ft 

44300 


449500 

4)9040 


539500 

544040 


149200 

1508 00 


1685 00 
1658.00 


219840 

2179ft 


633ft 

64*00 


650500 

697540 


540040 

544540 


169540 

1)09.00 


COCOA (NC5E1 


Food 


lOnwtoc fans- 5 par ten 
Sup«7 1689 1630 

1687 

+51 

1.024 

Ore *7 

1734 

1647 

I7» 

+64 

39-MI 

Mai 08 

1750 

167S 

1749 

+64 

2*867 

Moy 98 

1768 

169) 

1768 

+64 

11351 


Ell. vOn NA Weds solos 4280 
Weds, open M 101,465 up 313 

COFFEE C (NCSEJ 
VS 00 lbs.- cenft per b 
Sop 97 18740 few 18685 *JJS 

Dec 97 176 00 16950 175.25 *300 

Mai 98 160 00 155 00 159 85 *2JS 

May 98 ISJ.7S 15240 15*75 *27) 

Jul 98 1)040 14940 14975 *225 

Esl safes NA Wetfs **6 L783 
Weds open ml 18.767, Up 594 

5UGARW0RLO II OIC5E) 

II 200a an -cents per lb. 

0097 1124 1142 1168 ■001 

War 93 12.08 H-98 1204 402 

May 98 124} 11.9) 11.99 442 

Esl. safes NA Wmft safes 7*776 
Weds open bit ros.«2 up 1.558 


TSt 

10.781 

*007 

1.479 

1,280 


92340 

72642 

17.418 


Hfati Lot Ooso Oige Opkil 


Financial 

US T BILLS (CMER) 

SI matare at at fCOpet 

I 4 -’ 4 ‘*-' n *°® 4-753 

Oc<97 9441 94.79 94 «3 -045 2450 

98 94.78 *407 1,188 

^sotes N A Weds sales 295 
weds open inf 11491. up m 

^Treasury icboti 

5108400 Mi- pis 6 64ths at 100 Dd 

Sep 97 KM-59 106-38 106-58 * 21 IS* 209 

Dec 97 106-39 106-16 106-39 * 20 66,001 

SS’t 4 Sale * w- 252 

nws open bit 220.2ia bff 2 710 

^"TREASURY (CBOT) 

Ii?® 0 ■ 1 S , ‘A 321UIS ollOO pd 

SS - ?? * 16 234151 

»■- n 108-JI 108-1 s 108-30 . lt> 164.738 

esIwimN A ft«te solos 1 7a 789 
weds open in 406. 110. up g.34) 

“ 2«E«URY BONDS (CBOT) 

O M 5100400-pfs 8 32ttds of IN act) 

^s?7 ni’io !!e » ,IJ ' 21 ^ 3S7 - W 

Ntew } 7 1? ”«• * 31 2 «'-S*4 

™98 IIJ.JI 11241 I17.30 .3| 

Ertsofte HA. Wcrfs safe- 467.5CO 
Weds open M «1 1415 up 9^ *84 


»07 IO2447 
046 95979 


LONG GILT (UFFE) 
t»«W • ph 5 32nasof loo pd 
Scp« 114-18 11*41 |7*.T6 
D«97 11*47 llj-27 ||4_os 
Esl. sales. 1596) Pin sales- 115175 
Prev open mi. 190*76 up )7.%a 

GERMAN GOV BUND CUFFE1 
DM2saow ahal loOprj 
5ep97 102 JO 10200 I0P 28 ,0 33 7-iTau 

D«97 10,* , D11 ) 

Esl «r, I6r.09i Pre*.^. 1,7.000 

Ptr* up-n Ini 466426 up jjj j 


Klfetfs open tot 2800415. on 404 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

62500 pounds, * per pound 

SOT 97 14190 1.6042 1 6)60*40032 47.182 

Dec «7 1*130 I.604D !40M*aO0» TJ7I 

Mar 98 1-5080 1 3900 14032*00030 217 

EsJ. sates NA W8ds srtas 10051 

Wads open W 4&972 offl 7 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

IttbOOO deflais, S parCdn. tttr 

Sep 97 .7218 .7204 .7209 undi. 57445 

Dec 97 .TT39 7244 .7746 uneft. G374 

Mar9B .7275 undi. 728 

Ey. sales NA Werf-s safes 2*754 

Weds open W 6*721 oil ieSO 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

125400 marks. S per mar) 

-S" -US -5S7 4 *040)8 97^90 

Dec 5 -5637 5538 5606*0 00)8 *337 

Mar 98 .5627 5*77 4637*040)8 1J34 

Esl. sates N A Weds sates 3*6)9 
weds open W (05.531 ofl 1*31 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

12-5 rmteon yen s per 100 yen 

Sep 97 4478 4410 44)4-414021 82613 

Oee97 4582 8522 4524A.0022 1100 

Mar 98 8650 .8639 4639 4.0OT 579 

Esf. sales NA Weds safes 18474 

Wads open Im 8*301. up 1370 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

12*000 fitness per tranc 

Sep 97 4790 4664 4748*04033 50018 

Doc 97 .6860 4772 4819*0 0034 16M 

M0T9B 4889*44035 1456 

EsL sates NA. Weds sales 12025 

Weds open Int 5*809, off 1.219 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

500400 pesos, s per peso 

Sep97 .12820 .12765 .12797 Undi 21475 

Dec 97 .13310 .12272 .12305 undv linf 

War 98 JIBS? .11830 .11852*40085 M70 

EsL sates NA Weds safes 1907 

Weds open W 4*9)1 off 173 

5- MO NTH STERLING (UFFE) 

E500000- pfeof loopa 
Sep 97 9270 9247 9270 1 after, 

£2 £2 VPl 888 

92.48 92*3 9247 UndL 107-427 

2-51 niS 9230 UndL 76464 

JZ39 9254 9257 UndL 55442 

W n ojS J9 - 7n 

* i73 r004 *1,144 

9277 o??l S’? 6 vWW ^70 

92.77 9J.71 917 6 ,0.04 73.347 

E< safes 68470. Prev. safes: 4*973 
Prev. open Wj ***435 ^ 

nifPiSte 1 “ 5 *SSK (UFFE) 

DM1 mteOn pis at >00 pel 

SSw “L0SOM47 

9*37 o * tq ! t47 HU» 290520 

LOT 9615 *048 27i»i 

S” 9549 95m «« «S 

9sS 25 W +0.10 1*7,943 

B S if S3 3SBS 

icKISt 1 P,BOH IMAT1F) 
fFSrnlUan - Dhaf 100 pd 

SOT 97 96. jj 9*5; 9*54 

96 32 96J6 

9671 

’AW 9646 9609 

«« **- 9Q 95,3 
9S7J 95 70 9573 

95 « 9553 954S 
9S.W 95 36 95-39 
Esl. sales- 49470. 
ftonn M ■ 761672 eft 1,154 


Low Latest Qige OpW 


3-MONTH EUROURA (UFFE) 

ITL 1 mBiaa - pts af 100 pd 
Sep 97 9125 9131 9122 *tt01 95466 

Dec 97 9153 93-49 9152 *030 9RM0 

Mar 98 9114 9180 9181 *042 5*776 

Jun 98 9*10 **47 9448 -MUD 47-575 

Sep 98 9*2* 9422 9*25 +0.04 37,445 

Dec 98 9425 9429 9425 +107 38*44 

Mar 99 9427 9*23 9*27 +0.06 1*542 

Jim 99 9*15 9*08 9*15 +048 9|471 

Est sales. 54575. Prev. sales; 36-341 
Prav. open tali 391259 up 1.107 


industrials 
cotton 2 otenn 
Siooo tos.- cents per lb. 

Od97 7*00 7110 7123 +023 7471 

Dec97 7*10 7130 7X49 *0.16 47,196 

Mar 98 75L20 74<0 7*80 +0.JJ 11342 

May99 75.90 75*5 7520 +0.11 4789 

JW98 7640 76.10 76.19 +4L18 4556 

Esl. sales NA Weds sates 29,260 
WfedtapOT bit 87,134 up 890 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 

41000 gal certs per M 
* ~ 5130 5230 5221 -0.75 1*200 

5*10 5125 5158 -020 44468 

55.10 5*40 5443 -4L45 21282 

56.15 55*0 5528 -0*0 22226 

5645 5410 5628 -040 T&770 

5745 5455 5468 -0*0 10759 

5470 5U3 5413 -030 &105 

EsL sides NA Weds sales 3&II5 
Weds open ini 15*977, ofl 1*15 


fa 

Sep 97 

0S97 

Nov 97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Feb 98 
Ate- 98 


U«JT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 
1,000 Obi- doflars per bbf, 

2^.97, J995 19*5 1928 -015 

Jte»97 19 88 19-57 1947 -016 

12? ,9?3 ’9,76 -016 

T 2-2S ,9M >9-*9 -016 
'940 -017 

Mar 98 19.99 1940 1940 -016 

Est. sales N A Wed's sales 110878 
Weds open tot 404 77* up 0303 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

JSJ 2 S mn, **»* S per mm btu 

WOT £675 0470 2456 +0.17-1 
JtevOT 1780 1625 2.765 *0.140 
Dec 97 2480 1735 2460+0128 

Jan 98 1880 1750 2460 +0120 

Esl sales NA Weds sedes 84550 
W»ds open bit 209.251 off 10123 

« m H a 3 edsasoune (mmeid 

4*000 grt. cants per oai 
“ 68*0 6400 


104646 


50782 

29238 

1*937 

9,954 


5*626 

20070 

20538 

19488 


5ep97 
Ofl 97 
Now 97 
Dec 97 
Jon 98 
Fen 98 


Dec 07 
Mar 98 
Jun 98 
Sep 98 
Dk« 
Mar 99 
Jun 99 
Sep 99 


672T +1.11 11933 

6145 4020 61.18 +052 0*53 

SL50 5740 5743 +003 1*592 

57 60 5470 57.14 -0.06 11904 

£7-50 5470 5499 -O01 ll*«3 

57*5 5749 5749 -0 06 1537 

Ed. safes N A Weds ■Mine 5*948 
Weds open Ini 109,570 up 1,247 

GASOIL (IPE) 

U .4 iMlars per mefrtc fen - tots of 100 tors 

Sep97 16*75 14L2S 16*00 *020 14643 

00 97 16740 16520 16620 +0-75 )7*«h 

No* 97 1*875 16720 16820 +020 10313 

iSJt l*-f? lnJ0 1*810 

!3S ™S ,71Ji ‘°- 75 '0338 

Feb 99 172-50 17120 17100 +0 7S ZSo 

Mar98 17120 17040 17UX) *0.75 UK 

1 WW ■ Pro*- sates : 20602 
rTv* Open fen.: 86282 up 441 

BRENT OIL (IPE) 

U 4 . oallais par bcarel - lois of 1*00 banrts 

OdOT 18.61 1838 1B*0 —0.14 7<aM 

1840 I8 60 18*5 — 017 lOjun 

1845 18.67 isio ZgjB t sSa 
1840 1840 18*7 lo In 4*55 

187* ,8 76 ,Ci 
Esl sales: 72.000 Prey, sates 37,928 
Prw. open M.: l6l.34?aHM9l' 


N0*97 
Ifcc97 
JaaOT 
Feb98 
War 98 


Mor9a 935.00 wig .are 

5a>« 7X610 

™«is open ini 20X821. up 1277 

FfSE 100 (LIFFE) 
p3perunfe»pdrt 

8™ ffl S » ^ “i 
BttSSfWWi*- 

CAC40UHATIF) 

FP200 per Index paini 

Open ml 7*318 o«X255. 


Dec 97 
Mar 98 
Jun 98 
Sep 98 
Dec 98 

Mar 99 
Jun 99 


+ 003 57*47 
+ 004 <1.793 
‘0.05 30607 
f 005 2*972 
*004 28.8*4 

* 005 27.566 
‘004 2*107 

* om 9.IJ7 


Commodity Indexes 


Previous 

1.572.30 Ifrua 
'•JJS-fS 1.908J0 

•fiBsssussa 


Moody's 
Reulas 
Dj. Futures 
CRB 


Thur*,da> LI 


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PAGE 3 


wxibiWL' (cnvuceniV fiffPTCimPB 91. 1447 


EUROPE 


Renault 
Sells Last 
Of Stake 
In Volvo 

OxxtMbyOwSk^Fwm DapAKha 

PARIS — Renault SA said 
Thursday that it had sold its 
remaining stake in the Swedish 
car company Volvo AB for at 
least 2.5 billion kronor ($318 
million), closing the last 
chapter of a failed mercer 
plan. & 

The sale of its remaining 3 
percent stake will result in a 
one-time gain for Europe's 
fourth-largest car manufacturer 
of a little more than 1 billion 
French francs ($164 million). 

Renault said it received a 
little over 200 kronor for each 
Volvo A share, which closed 
unchanged in Stockholm on 
Thursday at 3955 kronor. 

Renault shares closed down 
6 francs at 159. 

The transaction followed 
Volvo’s sale July 3 1 of an 1 1 .3 
percent stake in Renault and 
marked the conclusion of a re- 
lationship between the two car- 
makers that failed to result in a 
merger in 1994 because of op- 
position from Volvo sharehold- 
ers. 

“It was a symbol of our 
links,'* said Mats Edenborg, a 
spokesman for Volvo. “Both 
companies decided to sell their 
stakes because there was a good 
sale opportunity. ’ ’ 

Shares in both Renault and 
Volvo have outperformed their 
respective French and Swedish 
benchmark stock indexes since 
the beginning of the year. 
Volvo shares were up Thuisday 
by 32 percent since Jan. 1; 
Renault shares were up by 51 
percent. 

Renault initially bought a 
stake of 25 percent in Volvo’s 
car bosiness on Jan. 18, 1991, 
and Volvo took a 20 percent 
stake in Renault, the rest of 
which was held by the Bench 
government 

The cross-ownership aimed 
to pave die way for afull -blown 
merger a few years down die 
linel (Bloomberg. Reuters ) 


A First-Half Boon For 2 German Giants 


Telekom Plans to Raise Dividend 

Cimmkd hr Our SuffFim toyackn 


BERLIN — Deutsche Telekom 
AG on Thursday reported Thursday 
that operating profit rose 39 percent 
increase as revenue grew in the first 
half, led by sales of phone service to 
private customers. 

It said it expected to pay a higher 
dividend for ail of 1997. 

Operating profit at the parent 
company rose to 3.2 billion Deutsche 
marks ($1.78 billion) between Janu- 
ary and July, compared with 2.3 bil- 
lion DM for the year-earlier period, 
the company said. The figure does 
not include subsidiaries, such as 
Telekom’s mobile-phone business, 
or its stake in Matav Rl, Hungary’s 
national phone company. 

Sales rose 5 percent to 29.4 bil- 
lion DM. 

Telekom said it expected its re- 
sults to get a seasonal lift in the 
second half. 

“We expect the usual seasonal 
improvement in earnings in the 
second half of the year,” Chairman 
Ron Sommer said. 

. “Or this basis, we expect to pro- 
pose to our shareholders’ meeting to 
raise the dividend to 1.20 marks.” 
The company paid a dividend of 60 
pfennig last year. 


Mr. Sommer announced that 
Telekom would take a 21 percent 
stake in VocalTec, an Israeli com- 
pany that makes software for phone 
calls over the Internet. 

In addition, Mr. Sommer said that 
at the end of August Telekom’s on- 
line service would begin offering 
television reports and music on de- 
mand in a bid to raise on-line shop- 
ping. 

“This partnership gives us the 
possibility to develop a high-value 
product portfolio for Internet-based 
telephone services that we want to 
market globally,” he said. 

Telekom said sales to private cus- 
tomers were higher, without giving 
an exact figure. Analysts said that 
was a positive signal ahead of full 
deregulation Jan. I, when Telekom 
faces such competitors as O.tel.o, a 
joint venture between R WE AG and 
VEBA AG, and Mannesmann Ar- 
cor. 

“It’s good to see some growth” 
in private customers business, said 
James Downie, analyst at ABN 
Amro Hoare Govett in London. 
“Some market share erosion is in- 
evitable when competition comes.” 

Telekom shares fell 90 pfennig, to 
37.10 DM. (AP. Reuters ) 


Lufthansa Profits From Weaker Mark 


Ca^dhOtrSBfFremDapuHin 

FRANKFURT — Lufthansa AG 
said Thursday that its pretax profit 
more than tripled in the first six 
months of 1997 and that it expected 
profit and sales to continue growing 
in the second half of the year. 

The company reported record 
earnings for the first half, with 
pretax profit surging to 397 million 
Deutsche marks ($220.2 million) 
from 1 19 million DM. 

Profit was helped by a weaker 
mark, an increase in long-haul 
traffic and cost-cutting measures. 

Operating profit was up 206 per- 
cent, to 327 million DM, compared 
with 107 million DM in the year- 
earlier period. 

The company said all pretax 
profit was derived from ordinary 
business activities. The gains in the 
first six months of this year will also 
have an impact on the dividend for 
1997 earnings, Lufthansa said, with- 
out giving details. 

Sales rose 9.1 percent, to 10.7 
billion DM, Lufthansa said. 

Chief Executive Juergen Weber 
said the sinking mark, which has 
fallen 15 percent against the dollar 
this year, was a decisive factor in the 
sales increase. 


“For over 20 years we had only 
headwinds from the currency and 
now it is the other way around, ” Mr. 
Weber said, adding that the currency 
“tailwind” added about 120 million 
DM to earnings. 

The German government still 
owns a 35.7 percent stake in the 
company, but plans to release in- 
formation regarding full privatiza- 
tion next week. Mr. Weber said he 
expected the government shares to 
be placed on the market in October. 

The earnings lifted Lufthansa's 
shares by 5 pfennig, to 36.95 DM. 

“It was a very positive surprise." 
said Martin Stuemer of PEH Wer- 
tpapier AG. 

Lufthansa is among the big in- 
ternational carriers that have adap- 
ted to deregulation and sharper in- 
ternational competition by cutting 
costs and forming alliances with 
other airlines to fill more seats. 

The airline said first-half traffic 
sales, which includes passengers 
and freight and accounts for more 
than 90 percent of sales, rose 9.6 
percent, to 9.6 billion DM, led by 
gains in its trans-Atlantic routes. 
The number of passengers increased 
5.7 percent to 20.8 million. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Novartis Merger Leads to Higher Net 


Ctmv&aibr C*r Stuff From Ois/u arte* 

BASEL, Switzerland — Novartis 
AG, the world's largest dnigmaker, 
said Thursday that 1997 first-half 
net profit rose 27 percent on in- 
creased sales as well as savings from 
the $36 billion stock swap that 
formed the company last Decem- 
ber. 

Raymund Breu. chief financial 
officer, predicted that growth in full- 
year net profit would “exceed” the 
first-half increase. 

Reporting first-half profit for the 
first time since the merger of Sandoz 
AG and Gba-Geigy AG, Novartis 
said it earned 3.12 billion Swiss 
francs f $2.08 billion) in the half, op 
from 2.45 billion francs a year earli- 
er. 

The year-earlier figures were 
based on sales by the two compa- 
nies. 

Ail three of its divisions, health 
care, agribusiness and nutrition, 
contributed to the growth in sales. 


operating and net income, the com- 
pany said. 

U.S. sales make up 46 percent of 
Novartis’s bosiness, , while Europe 
represents 39 percent of its market. 
Asia, Africa and Australia total 15 
percent of sales, the company said. 

Sales last month rose 19.2 percent 
to 16.56 billion francs, it said. 

Ope ra ring margins improved to 
24.2 percent, from 23 percent in the 
first half of last year. In die health- 
care division, which make s up about 
60 percent of sales, operating margin 
rose to 26.9 percent from 25.6 per- 
cenL In the agribusiness division, it 
fell to 28.9 percent from 305 percent, 
and in the nutrition unit, it slipped to 
9 percent from 10.4 percent. 

Novartis said it had reduced its 
work force by 5,100 employees, 
leaving it with 89,000 worldwide. 

Expenses from corporate over- 
head were cut by 1 28 million francs 
because of the merger. 

( Bloomberg , AFP. Reuters) 


■ Roche Delays Obesity Drug 

Rocbe Holding AG said Thurs- 
day that it had withdrawn its ap- 
plication for U.S. approval of its 
obesity drug, saying it needed time 
to prove to the Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration that Xenical can not be 
linked to cancer. Bloomberg News 
reported from Basel. 

In May, an administration advis- 
ory committee unanim ously recom- 
mended approval of Xenical. 

Roche said it would take “a few 
months ’ ’ before it would reapply for 
U.S. registration of the potential 
blockbuster in the world’s biggest 
drug market 

The news sent shares in Switzer- 
land’s second-biggest drugmaker 
down 745 francs, to close at 12,600. 
It came a day after the U.S. reg- 
ulatory agency said American 
Home Products Corp.’s diet treat- 
ments had been linked to more than 
80 cases of heart disease. 


Rolls-Royce 
Posts a Profit 

LVofrin/ by Our SkffFnn Oapakrkn 

LONDON — Rolls-Royce 
PLC announced a profitable 
first half Thursday, boosted by 
increased demand for its air- 
craft engines. 

Rolls-Royce said it earned 
pretax profit of £116 million 
($185 million) in the six months 
ended June 30, in contrast to a 
loss of £169 million a year 
earlier. The company took a 
charge of £263 million in the 
year-earlier period to cover 
withdrawal from its steam 
power-generation businesses. 

Sales rose 23 percent to 
£2.335 billion from £1.9 bil- 
lion. 

But Rolls-Royce shares 
closed at 235.5 pence, down 19, 
after the company warned that 
its costs had risen in expanding 
jet engine sales for passenger 
planes. (Reuters. AFX) 


PAGE 15- 


Investor’s Europe 


Frar^frut 

j; "/ ; London 


dax ■ 

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Source: Tetekurs 


liucfiuuiuDil Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• General Utilities PLC, a unit of Compagnie Generate des 
Eaux SA, will offer 175 pence per share for Leigh Interests 
PLC, a British waste-management company, valuing the 
company at £1 16 million ($186.9 million). 

• Fort is NV, a Belgian-Dutch financial-services company, 
said first-half net profit rose 28 percent, to 466 million 
European currency units ($508.4 million), as the acquisition 
of MeesPierson NV lifted earnings. 

• Metro AG, Europe's largest retailer, said first-half op- 
erating profit rose a less-than-expected 37 percent, to 94.8 
million Deutsche marks ($52.6 million), as sales outside of 
Germany grew, particularly ar its new operations in Poland, 
China and Romania. 


• Lad broke Group PLC’s first-half net profit rose 45 per- 
cent, to £76.8 million, thanks to a rebound at its betting shops 
and European Hilton International hotels. On the strength of 
those earnings, analysts raised their full-year profit forecasts 
by £5 million to £12 million to an average of £220 million. 

• The Paris Appeals Court on Monday will hear a case filed 
by a Eurotunnel SA shareholders’ group, which disputes a 
ruling by the French financial markets council that Euro- 
tunnel’s creditor banks bad not acted in concert in the financial 
restructuring of the company. If the group wins the case, the 
banks could be forced to make a bid for die outstanding shares 
in Eurotunnel. 


• Skanska AB, the largest construction company in Sweden, 
said first-half profit almost tripled, to 7.476 billion kronor 
($950.3 million), because of a one-time gain from the sale of 
shares in the maker of industrial tools Sandvik AB. 

• Swiss Bank Corp. has been fined £480,000 and ordered to 

pay costs of £176.095 by Britain's Securities and Futures 
Authority, following two disciplinary cases against the 
bank. AFX. BluvmbetR. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


HJgft Low Oom Pm*. 


High Low Qose Pm*. 


Hlfta Low Clau 


High Low Cte* 


Thursday, Aug. 28 

Prim In local amende*. 
TMrirure 

High Low des* Piw. 

Amsterdam 


High Low 

Deutsche Book 11030 iota® 
Deu! Telekom 3005 3065 
DrcsdnerBmk 74.10 7150 
FmentaM 325 315 

FreseriusMed 13X80 127 

Fried. Kiupp 374 372 


Geh* 


ABN- AMRO 
Aogon 
Ahold 
AkaNobd 
Boor Co. 

Bob Wesson 
CSMcw 
DnrfBsdie Pot 
DSM 
Etsoifcr 
Rods Ante* 
Getranlcs 
G -Braccw 

HeSeten* 

HoMmaucM 

Hntbottgka 

ING Group 

Klm 

WtPBT 

KPN , 

mnnua 

OceGrintai 

PhSpsBec 



4340 

w 

36*0 

97.30 

10? 

194 

3220 


SB 

wmo 

334 
12440 
BS. SO 
9520 

71.10 

46.10 
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64.10 
324 
154 

151 JO 
112 
8*80 
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19450 
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43480 

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3M0 
150.70 
50JQ 
322 
121.10 
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96 
103-50 
186 
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5430 
107-50 
31450 
115 
84 
89 
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7320 
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311 
24350 

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11450 

102.90 

40470 

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241 


4020 4240 
151.10 15440 
SUO 5470 
325 337 70 
12170 13040 
3570 3420 
96 9480 
104 10540 
18750 19270 
3070 31.90 

80- 50 8450 
6350 64.41 
5740 5740 

10450 105 

319 330 

11550 12340 
8*10 8480 
9050 9350 
6550 7090 

wi n 4540 

7370 7110 
62 6350 
315 322 

24490 250 

14470 15070 
108 111.60 

81- 50 83 

192 1« 
6270 6270 

193 19*50 

11450 117 

10350 10540 

415 43*40 
100 10140 
43 4440 
2050 25070 


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Lohaeyer 

Unde 

Lufltwnso 

MAN 

Mwmesmajn 


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US 137 
N • 93 
455 450 

06 0570 
73.10 7150 
653 642 

94 91.50 
1255 1205 
3750 36.10 
512 510 

075 853 

MaWgMefisdnft 39.90 3970 
90 8450 

Munch Rued; R 575 559 

Pmcsag _5 g 506 

RW= 8*30 8250 

SAP pH 402S0 40050 

Slum* 71470 112 ® 
SptingtfCAiaO 1680 1600 
Siwbudcer 850 W1 

ir ■* s 

Vfag 769 761 

Vofawagen 1328 1306 


OOM PIWUL 

10070 109-35 

37.10 a 
7250 7130 

315 315 

130 13270 
37270 36430 
10750 107 

137 146 

9350 9470 
455 455 

8550 86 

7150 7150 
642 648 

9150 92 

1205 1220 

3655 36.90 
51130 512 

053 86550 
3940 3940 
M5D 9170 

560 as 

515 520 

83 SI 

40170 399-® 
18075 181® 
224® 22440 
HISS 111 
1600 1600 
850 841 

421® <27 

97.10 98 

572 -578 

762 772 

1307 1315 


SA Breweries 
Scmancw 


SBiC 

Tiger Ocis 


141® 1*0® 

141 

141® 

. UMlKStfes 

7 m 

687 

6.97 

37® 

36® 

36® 

37 

Venrione La uts 

*75 

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4*4 

64 

£2® 

6375 

62® 

Vodofane 

321 

389 

1W 

21* 

211 

213 

213 

Whil&road 

8 

7.90 

7® 

7250 

7L75 

71.75 

73 

Wauomi Hdos 

3*2 

368 

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Wttretey 

4® 

*45 

*48 





WPP Group 

278 

271 

175 





Zewco 

19® 

19® 

19® 


PirriooK 8*772 


AMMBHdgs 
Ga*tg 
Md Bartons 
Mol Wl Ship F 
Retraces Gas 
Pratan 
PabficBk 
Eenong 
Resorts Worid 

RaOunonsPM 

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040 

118 

232 

775 

2150 

7.05 

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870 

13® 

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9® 10® 
970 9® 

17® 20.10 
5.10 S10 
7® 755 

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3 3 

276 3 

560 560 

23 2*90 
6 60S 

8 8.90 

7® 870 

11 12® 
488 5 


11 

1070 

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595 

090 

IX 

3-1B 

376 

775 

2575 

7 

845 

870 

1250 

675 


Bangkok 


SET Wes 51176 

Pmtanu 52374 



176 1® 1® 
190 175 1M 


175 

190 


C/W Comm 


21 2125 23® 24 

320 312 312 322 

550 550 550 566 

87® 83 BS® 87® 

in * 1 !8 


Helsinki 

EnsoA 
Huhtanwfcll 
Kembo 
Kota 
MerBo A 
MrrtnB _ 
Mrtso-SertoB 
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Nokia A 

Orion- YMymne 
OuMunuA 
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HEX ConewItodBB 3391® 


PravhBs: 303.11 

49 

4770 

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218 

216 

218 

217 

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77 

70 

7050 

7080 

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12 

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160 

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Md$u 


67 

6250 

65 

62® 


NDteei 225:1845145 


Pnvteas: 1944)74 

1140 

1IN 

11® 

11® 

709 

703 

707 

70? 

3730 

3040 

3040 

3150 

899 

864 

874 

BM7 

645 

679 

643 

634 

935 

929 

929 

930 

72® 




511 


■f ; 7B 


27® 

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3300 

y, j 

Wy''l 

«» 1 

xno 

2010 


»10 

19® 

1950 

19® 

19® 

MX) 

7600 

7610 

MW 

830 

815 

974 

979 

14® 

14® 

1440 

UM 

641 

620 

638 

621 

1410 

1380 

1410 

1380 

770 

741 

7® 

7® 

6530a 

6410B 

6410a 

6670a 

7670 

26® 

7650 

7600 

54700 

53800 

4400o 

52700 

7390 

7350 

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2390 

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1540 

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1510 

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11® 

11® 

11® 

1170 

11® 

11® 

11® 

3670 

3610 

3640 

3590 

■1690 

1A® 

16® 

16/0 

374 

370 

373 

372 

519 

511 

511 

517 

6610 

6490 

6500 

6/20 

495 

475 

490 

V! 

ion 

9840a 

9900a 

9800a 

3190 

3100 

3140 

3180 

647 

615 

635 

631 

77® 

2200 

2220 

22 10 

1800 

17® 

1/70 

1780 

479 

47? 

477 

475 

794 

790 

793 

797 

686 

<79 

686 

679 

994 

9® 

984 

971 

• 171 

167 

1® 

169 

830 

fltt 

S3 

m 

480 

475 

479 

47K 


7820 

7900 

woo 

1970 

1950 

TWO 

79® 

60S 

sn 

604 

588 

449 

441 

441 

646 

1930 

1890 

18® 

1990 

4190 

3980 

4030 

4750 

27® 

7?» 

77® 

72® 

1370 

1300 

1300 

1300 

1730 

1710 

12® 

1770 

31? 

307 

311 

308 

563 

545 

5® 

567 

1700 

16® 

1670 

1700 

917 

801 

90S 

807 

703 

696 

699 

694 

!/« 

1680 

1690 

1690 

1020 

997 

997 

1010 


|The Trib Index 

Prices as cf3 OO PM New York wne 1 

Jan ». J932 - IOC 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
% change 
♦14.28 

World Index 

170.43 

-1 37 

-0.80 

Region M Indom 

Asiz'Pudfic 

122.81 

-1.79 

-1.44 

-050 

Europe 

179.88 

-2.07 

-1.14 

+11.59 

N. America 

201.90 

+0.53 

+0.26 

+24.70 

S. America 
Industrial Indexes 

165.11 

-3.34 

-1.98 

+44.29 

Capital goods 

218.25 

-0.13 

-0.06 

+27.69 

Consumer goods 

185.45 

-1.13 

-0.61 

+14.88 

Energy 

196.47 

-1.33 

-0.67 

+15.09 

Finance 

12B.52 

-7.48 

-1.14 

+10.38 

Miscellaneous 

178.71 

-4.44 

-2.42 

+10.48 

Flaw Materials 

184.14 

-0.72 

-0.39 

+4.99 ■ 

Service 

160.88 

-2.02 

-1,24 

+17.16 

Utilities 

162.38 

-1.97 

-1.20 

+13.19 

The intemationelH&aXt Tribune World Stock Index O trucks Vie U.S.OoBar values of 
3B0 imemericriBiy invostablo stocks Iromas countries. For mom ntomailon, a tree 
booklet is awteUe by wntino to Vie TritlndexW Avenue Charieorte Ooulle. 

32521 NeuOy Cedes. France. 


Compiled by BtoambarpNem. | 


Mitsui Fudosn 
iVWari Trust 


Store Market todee 9927® 
P l ftaB S. 100SU7 

1® 141 142 144® 

11650 112 112*0 115 

104 98 98 105 

134 1 29 1 29® 134 

30M 29® 29.90 3020 
117 112 112 1U® 

64 62® 62® 64 

127® 120 121 12S® 

61 57® 57® 60 

77® 75 75 77® 

97 93 93® 96® 

1® 155 156 161 

47 *S® *160 44.70 
139® 131 131 139 





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TohokuElPwr 
ToialBartk 
Tok» Marine 
Tokyo EiPwr 
Tokyo Etecfron 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Core- 
Taaen 

Tappan Print 

Tcraylnd 

Toshiba 

Tostom 

Toyo Trust 

Toyota Motor 

Yunonwdii 

a:4lMb:*lJm 


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770 

270 

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2580 

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Toronto 

AfaHUCnu. 
Alberto Energy 
Atari Alum 

Anderson Erel 

Bk Montreal 
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BC Telecomm 
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37.10 

36.85 

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PAGE 3' 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 


PAGE 17 




Li Ka-Shing’s Empire Prospers 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


C&npM by Osr SaffFma Dspanha 

Hutchinson 
r ^ rted Thursday that 
lX t “*9^ net P™ 101 was virtually un- 

S E Km fr °T, the ^ hilf of 1996, at 

TM billion Hong Kong dollars ($1.01 

dou “2i eVe “ operating profit 

■ Sal ?-«» e . to 20.82 billion dollars 
from 18.01 billion dollars, while op- 
profit increased to 5.08 billion 
dollars from 2.53 billion. 

A decline in exceptional gains sharply 
leduced net profit, which ma^ased hv 
0.12 percent * 

Exceptional gains totaled 1 .92 billion 
dollars, representing the sales of 
Hutchison s stake in Hongkong Eleciric 
Holdings Ltd. and part of its stake in 
Asia Satellite Communications Ltd 

But gains in the first half of last year 
totaled 4.10 billion dollars following the 
spin-off of the British cellular phone 
company Orange FLC. 

Tbe company, which is controlled by 
Li Ka-shing, announced an interim div- 
idend of 48 cents compared with 42 
cents in 1996. 

“The interim results have been 
achieved in an increasingly competitive 
environment in each of the group's core 
businesses,” Mr. Li said. 

Competition was particularly keen in 


the telecommunications market, he said, 
wj* new licenses being granted and 
operators aggressively competing for 
new snbscnbers. h 

But rental income was steady, led by 
investment properties of more than 10 
rn^on square feet (900,000 square me- 
ters), Hutchinson said, while the com- 
pany continued to accrue new land. 

Hutchison executives said that the 
company, which has interests in prop- 
erty, energy, telecommunications, con- 
tainer terminal operations and retailing 
did not plan any spin-offs. 

There had been speculation that 
Hutchison might float its Husky Oil Ltd. 

Separately, one of Hong Kong’s 
largest property developers, Cheung 
Kong Holdings Ltd. reported a 69 per- 
cem increase in first-half net profit, to 
1 5. / S billion dollars, over the like period 
last year. 

Mr. Li, who is also Cheung Kong’s 
chairman, said he was “reasonably pos- 
itive ' about the future of the Hong Kong 
property market Profit in the second 
half would rise significantly, he said, 
following completion of a number of 
development projects sold in the first 
half. 

Cheung Kong will “further 
strengthen its policy of expanding sig- 


nificantly its quality portfolio of rental 
property” in coming years, he said, 

Mr. Li refused to comment on reports 
that the company may increase its stake 
in Jardine Matneson Holdings Ltd or 
Hongkong Land Holdings Ltd,, saying 
only, "To increase the number of the 
shares if the price is right is very pos- 
sible." 

(AFP, Reuters) 
* CTnC Pacific’s Net Grows 23% 

CITIC Pacific Ltd., viewed as main- 
land China’s investment bridgehead in 
Hong Kong, said Thursday that first-half 
net profit rose 23 percent, to 6.14 billion 
dollars, Ageace France-Presse report- 
ed. 

Sales were 8.52 billion dollars, com- 
pared with 6.1 billion dollars in the first 
half of last year, and exceptional g a i ns 
rose slightly, i o 3.23 billion dollar from 
3. 30 bil lion dollars. 

CrnC Pacific said it would increase 
its interim dividend to 20 cents a share 
from 16.5 cents, in addition to main- 
taining the special dividend of 30 cents 
per share it offered last year. 

CITIC Pacific is the publicly traded 
Hong Kong unit of China's biggest in- 
vestment vehicle, China Internatio nal 
Trust & Investment Corp. (Holdings); it 
was launched in 1990. 


% 



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International £4 



Singapore Units Unified 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Singapore Technologies Pte. said Thurs- 
day that it would combine four of its publicly listed sub- 
sidiaries into one company with a market capitalization of 
about 2 billion Singapore dollars ($1.34 billion). 

The government-owned company said the consolidation of 
ST Aerospace, ST Shipbuilding & Engineering, ST Electronic 
& Engineering and ST Automotive would result in a world-class 
engineering operation able to compete globally with the likes of 
British Aerospace PLC and General Electric Co. The company 
will be called Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd. 

"The rationale is to integrate the capabilities of die four 
companies.” the bead of ST Aerospace, Boon Swan Foo, said. 
“Being larger in terms of market capitalization, we will be 
able to target acquisitions, buy in new technologies, develop 
new capabilities and achieve higher critical mass.” 



Seoul Warns Kia Group Over Rescue Plan 


Reuters 

SEOUL — The Ministry of Finance 
and Economy signaled Thursday that it 
was considering abolishing a four- 
month-old program thar has kept three 
major conglomerates afloat. 

Analysts said the announcement was 
a warning to the troubled Kia Group, tbe 
country's eighth-Iargest conglomerate, 
or chaebol , which has not met creditors' 
demands regarding labor and manage- 
ment after being por under ibe program’s 
protection in July. 


“Problems regarding the anti-bank- 
ruptcy agreement and a plan to abolish 
the pact will be reviewed,'* said Yoon 
Jeung Hyun, deputy minister for finan- 
cial policy. 

Mr. Yoon criticized Kia for refusing 
to meet creditors* demands even though 
it has benefited from the bailout. 

Banks said this month that they would 
grant 183.1 billion won ($203.3 million) 
in emergency loans to Kia only after the 
group's top executives tendered resig- 
nation letters and its labor union agreed 


in writing to a wage freeze and a work 
force reduction. 

But Chairman Kim Sun Hong and the 
company's union have said they will 
never agree. 

“Bankers became extremely frus- 
trated because there wasn't any level of 
influence they could exert over Kia’s 
management, * ’ said Henry Moms, man- 
aging director at Coryo Securities. * ‘The 
government sat on the sidelines for a 
while but ultimately decided it had to 
support the bankers’ position.” 


Investor’s Asia 



. . . . y fr V»j i M t .i fo > ' ■ i k W i ufti i. 


MtUMn/Rcwm 

Striking bank employees in New Delhi on Thursday 
protesting plans to allow expansion of private banks. 

Bank Employees Start 
2-Day Strike in India 

Reuters 

BOMBAY — Nearly 1 .5 million Indian bank workers went 
on strike Thursday, crippling banking operations nation- 
wide. 

The workers started the two-day strike to register a host of 
grievances, largely involving the growth of private banks. 

In Bombay, the country’s commercial capital, only a few 
private and foreign banks were open for business. 

‘ ‘The strike is total in Calcutta, Bombay, Delhi, Madras and 
Shillong as per tbe information received from these places,” 
said Tarakeswar Chakra borty , a spokesman for a group of nine 
bank onions. 

Union leaders and government officials met earlier in the 
week to try to avert the strike at the state-run banks, which 
account for around 80 percent of loans and deposits in India. 

Union demands include a reversal of a government decision 
to allow private banks to set up in rural areas, and the 
implementation of a pension plan in private banks. 

The unions also want a revision of wages for employees in 
rural banks. But the demands do not include changes in wage 
levels for the average bank employee. 

A clerk in a public-sector bank starts on a monthly salary of 
less than 5,000 rupees ($137.25). 

Banks will reopen for a half day on Saturday as usual, when 
money market activity will resume. 








Source: Tie/ekurs 


-•'.ifn r * fh 


IiMMimioul Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


■ Japan's 22 government ministries and agencies made 
budget requests totaling 80.55 trillion yen ($679.75 billion) 
for the year ending March 1 999, up 4 percent from the current 
budget, according to an estimate by the Ministry of Finance. 

• Vietnam's Ministry of Planning and Investment has com- 
pleted a plan aimed at attracting $43 billion in new foreign 
direct investment by 2000, the Saigon Times reported. 

• Optus Communications Pty., Australia's No. 2 phone 
company, posted a loss of 41 1 million dollars ($308 million) 
due to costs at its new pay-TV unit, Optus Vision, over which 
Optus took 100 percent control in March. 

• Australia's current account deficit narrowed 47 percent, to a 
seasonally adjusted 2.45 billion dollars, in the second quarter. 

■ Tbe Philippine economy grew 6 percent in the second 
quarter, down from 7.69 percent a year earlier. 

• South Korea's finance minister, Kang Kyong Sbik, said he 

would review by the end of September a pact among banks 
aimed at preventing corporate failures, saying that many 
financial institutions viewed the April accord as counter- 
productive. Bloomberg. AFP. AP. AFX 


Telkom Net Rises, but Slock Falls 

Bloomberg News 

JAKARTA — PT Telkom, Indonesia’s domestic 
phone monopoly and largest publicly traded company, 
said Thursday that first-half net profit rose 17 percent, to 
821 billion rupiah ($296.4 million), over the first half of 
last year as phone-line installations and use grew. 

But the earnings were below expectations and came 
against the backdrop of the regional currency crisis and 
fears that economic growth would slow. Telkom shares 
fell to their lowest point in more than a year, falling 225 
rupiah, car 6.9 percent, to 3.025. 

“This number was awful," said David O'Neil, head of 
research at Lippo Securities in Jakarta. 


Sales rose 21 percent to 2.874 trillion rupiah, as total 
lines in service rose 22 percent, to 4,51 million lines. 


t 

K 


$ 




SOUTH AFRICAN RESERVE BANK 

A year of economic consolidation 

Extracts from address by Dr C. L. Stals, Governor of the 
South African Reserve Bank, at the seventy-seventh 
Ordinary General Meeting of shareholders of the Bank on 

26 August 1997 


e turbulences in the South African market for foreign 
ihanee from February 199ft, and the suhwouMit . 
stabilisation of the balance of payments, contributed 
a weakening of overall economic growth and to an 
turn in inflation. The major task for monetary policv 
f r the past year has accordingly been to restore both 
ernal equilibrium and domestic financial stability 
rich are imporUni preconditions lor sustained 
■estor confidence and economic growth. 

The process of restoring external economic 
uilibrium had to begin at home. Many adverse 
tors converged to contribute to the sudden e» change 
e shock of Februarv 19%. Some were of a non. 
inomic nature white others were rooted in 
icroeconomic developments over the preceding two 
ire. The problems caused by non-econonwc factors 
mnished as concern about the finalisation i nf the 
restitution of the Republic of South .Africa, the delay 
local authorin' elections in certain provinces, and the 
Utical composition of the Government of 
.tv, were fortunately allayed during the £*ir« of the 
it'vear. Equally important has been th* fact that the 
SrSr newlv appointed in April 19% has Stood the Wrt uf the 
Acts with acclaim and soon established himself a> an effective kadi r 
the ctninlrv's overall financial policy . 

The monetary policy approach adopted by the Reserve Bankur.cJ.-r 

IH.-Y market interest rates HVteguuJiJ in 
ruption later tin. 

■ear of economic consolidation 

: i— * - 

issr-Ktra , *, -m-w -,***■£ 

ti lK equal t» an annualised rate •*» - K “ . , irU 

Co- d-mesrir j;tu.!:P!d“;he tint 

~ k»«- r' - «*«** 

ing the vvculd qu,irti.t ul i • ,.vi>-ndilure expariikx. 

•vert m demand when b«t.tl finiss d* , H . r tV m w fhe 

in hv 2 per <vn». alter having ikxfinvd 



Better equilibrium in the balance of payments 
The salutary effects on the balance of payments of 
slower growth in total domestic expenditure are clearly 
reflected in the rapid decline in the deficit of the 
current account. On a seasonally adjusted and 
annualised hosts, ihis deficit declined irom K) 3 billion 
in the second quarter of 19% to only R35 billion in the 
second quarter of 1997. 

The improvement in the current account was 
supported b> - a larger net inflow ot funds reflected in 
the capital account of the balance re payments. The 
pressure on the exchange rate of the rand which 
continued from February to Ortdhr 19%, subsided 
again after October, almost as suddenly as it had 
appeared. During die first three quarters id 19%. the 
net capital inflow amounted to only RHB million, but 
this was followed by a net inflow iVl R3.1 bilfkm in the 
fourth quartet; and bv w less fhan Rltv7 billion in the 
firsl half of 1997. 

After the rand hod depreciated by .vs much as 
235 per cent in nominal terms between I4Fcbrujry 19%,md the end ot 
October 19% ft appreciated by Ifl per cent over the next five monlfo. 
From the end nt March In the end of July 1997, however, the rand 
depreciated again b}' 3.6 per cent to give a net increase re«MJ percent in 
the external value ot the currency from November in% to the end re 
lulv 1997. It should be noted, however, that the average lex-el of the 
exchancL' rate the rand over the first seven numths ul 1^7, compared 
with its average value over the same period in 199ft. shwb’cxi a 
depivcultan in nominal terms of 8,4 per cent. 

The aiuntn-'s gruns foreign reserves held by the consolidated 
Kmfong sector Indeed increased In- R175 billion tr.er ihepajt three 
ouhwr tu reach a fowl of R31,1 billion at the i>nd ot June 1‘W. This wax 
sufficient to cover about •*'/ weeks of imports of gimd- and ■services. 

Monetary aggregates slow to respond 

CH-er the past twvi years* the Reserve Dank has nn various iHXasums 
advanced reasons whv chanpa in the AU mtnwy supply may nave lusi 
sunk 1 1» its usefulness as a reliable anchor lor monetary policy. At this 
juncture, the Bank regards changes in Kit only .is .« 
f/nportanl financial indicator*. More- recently. Uw Bank has become 
more wwvvrned about the excessive increase in dumextu hank ovdil 
l v tension, not «»lv because of its influence on the money supply, but 
SU^Sher retire. There hax ».ir evampfo, been growing anxtehr 
about the ot er-n tension of the private wclor x indcbtedne» relative lo 
dixposjble income, and the increasing vulnerabililv of the hanking 
adverse developments in a po*ubly less favourable future 
macroeconomic environment 

The relationship between the nronev supplv and nominal 
iiAhiui-iUm. or the velocity of rireubtien id I Aik may he changing, but 
L-n. n-I.H ion-hips are being exfaWhhed m the pnirtw- of 
I"" , formation i>vi.T the longer term, it remains Bin? that mlbhor 
iSy iintv. i. i. nriM l-v 

e»cr-Mve money creatiim. 

nmriiehou! 19%, the annual rale ol increase in the M l money 
lluctu.ited within <» "arrow range- of between 13.6 and Ihl pi-r 

W i. rwiW , .St ;*1M r« «"'■ «< 

.whaevt araduaHy to P‘ ,, ‘ vnI >n l aw m7 ' 


The increase in AO has runv consistently exceeded the rate of 
growth in the nominal value ot gross domestic product for more than 
tnrw txars. with the result that the ratio of the total amount of money 
in circulation to gross domestic product has risen to 58 per amt. which 
is the highest level since 1980. A lack of availability of money can 
therefore hardly be advanced as a reason for the slowdown in real 
emanomir activity over the past eighteen months. 

Total bank credit mended to the private sector likewise continued 
to increase at a high rate throughout !*»%, and fluctuated between a 
peak of 16,9 per cent in July and a kiw of 16.1 per cent in December. 
During the fust si* months of 1997, it peaked at 17,4 per tent in April 
and then declined only marginally lo lte3 per cent over the twelve 
monfhs up lo June. 

In the present situation, the Reserve Bank feels that a cautious 
monetary policy stance remains justified. This has been the approach 
throughout the "past year and undoubtedly has had a major influence on 
dwefnpmcnts in the money market. The shortage of funds in thte 
market, as reflected by the amount of accirnimodaHon required by 
banking institutions from the Reserve Bank first increased from a daily 
average of R4,9 billion in January 199ft in RlO^j billion in March 199/, 
betrmf if declined to R7J billion in My IW. 

The Reserve Bank raised its lending rale lo banking institutions, the 
Bank rale, from 15 jvr cent at the end of 199p ro 1ft jvt cent in April 
199ft, and then to 17 per cent in November 1 9%. 

The sharply inwrted shape of the yield curve in South Africa 
make* the comp,irison ot the level ot focal interest rates with the 
international market-- more difficult At the long **nd ot the spectrum, 
the vield on king-term Government bonds in South Africa seems to be 
on the low side in real terms. Short-term interest rates, and partkulartv 
bank lending rates at the other end of fhe yield curve, seem to K- high 
in South Afnca. reflecting negative expectations on inflation, high risks 
involved in more short-term lending to an already m-erN'rrowed 
community, and a relatively high demand lor funds. 

The coreervative monetary policy measures applied by the Reserve 
Bank over the past eighteen months haw paid off by containing the 
increase in inflation ro below 10 per cent, despite the pressures arising 
from the depn'dation o» the rand last year. Measured over a period nt 
twelve month-, the raw of im rea-e m the overall production price index 
ro-e from 5A per cent in April 19% to 9,b per cent in Mareh 1997. but 
then declined to 73 percent in Jiuw 1997. 

Movements in the amsumer price index followed a -imilar path 
and the imreasr in consumer prices, measured over Iwi'lvv numths. 
rose from 5.5 pv cent in April 199ft u- 9,9 per cent in April 1997, before 
declining to BA fx*r cent in June 1997. 

At this stage, the international market imperative requires ot South 
Africa to bring its rate of infl ation gradually in lint- with IK- rest ol tK- 
wirid. Alternatively, the country'< drive towards greater p,irtidpjlkm 
as an important bintiwmif fund. 1 * in IK* world financial markets will 
he constrained. 

Financial market reforms pay dividends 

TK 1 major reforms in South Attica's financial markets over Hie pasl tew 
years paid pud dividend- in tK- form of substantial increases in the 
volume of businms done through tKse various markets. Structural 
impnnvmenLs inUvductd by the JoKinnesburg Stock Exchange, the 
Bond Exchange of South Africa, and tK* South African Futures 
Exchange tSAFEXl were also boosted b>- tK- further a-Livation ot 
exchange cnntnils. 

TK- importantv of the fomwl capital nwrU+s for the evnnonite 
dm-iupnwnl i>f South Africa can bv cleartv illustrated by two Kisic 
statistics. Finite, over the eifihUvn montJis from fin- Kgiittling t»f J99f» 
up to foe middle of 1 997. foe amount ot new capital raised through 
issues on the Sl«k Exchange and mi L-sin* ol fixed infoirsl-hftiring 
securities in the primarv bond nurket amounted lo approximately 
RSI billion, Secondfo, over tK* xifiK- period, net purchases fn« twri- 
resi dents of South African sccunthw listed on the exchanges amounted 
to about R34 biflinn. 

Supportive fiscal policies 

The Minister ill Finance applied turtfn-r dtsoplines in his Budge! 
pniptisati h*r IW/W with a commit mcnl u< reduce both gireemment 
dwsiving and foe deficit beftsv bornnving during the current fecjl 
war In lire preceding \var net Ji«aving bj- gmemment w,w equal in 
Xl per cent, and the "budget delicit equal to 5A per rent ot gross 
domedic product TK- deficit tor the current fiscal year is expivUd to be 
reduced fo 4^1 per amt of gnvw domestic pnxtucl. 

The .Government afo» uiihU- an impxirtani eiinfribufiiwi tu the 
ntficial fureign reserves of tK- country b\' way of two Kind issues in 
international cipif.il markets during June 1W. TK- total proceeds from 
tlicx- two luaih amounted to KXH billion. 

Hie K-tter harmunwation of mnnetan' and tiscal policies over the 
past year made a major contribution to the success achlevid with flu,- 
objective of restoring overall financial stability after the foreign 
exchange market disruption «*f Ft'hniiirv kid war. 


http;/ / \\ w w.reshankxv-ra 


Financial co-operation in Soothem Africa 

The Committee ol Governors of the Central Banks of the twelve 
members ot the Southern African Development Community (SADC) 
met twice during the past tweh-e months lo discuss matters of 
financial cn-openibon. The Secretariat of foe Committee within foe 
Reserve Bank has made good progress in foe compilation of a 
computerised data base of financial statistics of the region and 
information on foe functions and responsibilities of the twelve 
participating central banks. 

Officials from all the central banks participated in a number of 
courses presented by thu Reserve Bank’s Training Institute, and a course 
was again presented for bank regulators and supervisors in the East and 
Southern Africa Banking Supervisor, Group (ESAFk A special study is 
being undertaken with the support ol the World Bank on the 
development of national payment and clearing systems with a view to 
the eventual establishment "of a cross-border payment and settlement 
system lor alt SADC countries. 

" Over the next year, the fti-ordination of financial co-operation m 
the region will K’ extended also In indude foe activities ot commercial 
(private) banks and slock exchanges. 

A need for more flexible monetary policy operations 
Developments over foe past year revealed a need for greater flexibilitv 
in the market for short-term hinds. The bansformahon in lK> South 
A trie, in financial markets since ]9iJ4. and in p.irticular tK- further 
integration into the gfnhat financial system, will in future require more 
pnmipt action and decisive direction for movements in tin,mcial asset 
prices, interest rates and exchange rates. 

In March 199fi. the Reserve B.uik will start introducing a new- 
upgraded dectnmically driven National Payment System In provide for 
a daily automated settlement ot outstanding interbank positions. TK- 
sx-stem is planned to K- extended by September |9Ug ui effect intraday 
acttlemenLs im a gross basis inr large trartsachvms. The iiiinxiuctinh 
of the new xvrsatile payment and settlement system will also provide a 
gor'd opportunity For tK- Reserve Bank lo reconsider the 
existing aevummndation arrangements Ktwven the Bank and pnvate 
banking institutions. 

At this stage, foe Bank would like to give runiev ul foe pniposed 
intniduction ol a new. more flexible aixommudalion facility, to Fx- 
created in foe lorm of regular repurchase transactions between foe 
Reserve Bank and iLs banking sector clients. TK> pric jte banks will be 
ottered the on^xirtunity to tender cm a regular basis tor central bank 
hinds through foe repurchase facilire. ,md accordingly be given more 
scope to manage lK-ir own liquidity px*silions tx-ttir. 

FurtK-rmiw. foe purpes*- ot ihe miniinum cash rvsem* accounts 
that bjnks must maintain with foe Reserve Bank will be intended to 
serve also as operational .recounts lor foe regular self lement ot clearing 
account balances. An a veraging primipie will be introduced in uims ot 
which each iunk will have to on sure that tK- average* dailv bal-utcc in iN 
.iccuunl ctver a munfolv fx.-ri«xJ will comply with foe prescribed 
minimum crash reserve rc'quiremonLs. 

TK< present discount window lacilite will still be rc-tanuxi lo 
provide banks with a furtK-r source of funds tor the management 
of Hwir iicfuidity posit ions. Il Is envisaged. Kiwex’er, that tire Bank rate 
fur such loans will tx> ji a suhstanti.il pn-miiuri lo the fluctuatinu 
eltective interest rate as established tn tK* rc-gular n-purvhastf 
(ransacttiiib- 

Concluding remarks 

Looking hack, the p.id year was particularly ch.il leiiging lor 
macroeconomic management TK* Resene Bank can tv salistk'd 
that il . has hum relatively <ucti-ssiul in making Us specialised 
cunirihuticm to the* altainment ot tK' Gcuvninienl’s overall economic 
ohjcvlires .is set mil in tK- MarnyiV/tom blwli-gy for Cmn'lh 
Employ infill iiihi Rnliflribiilii'ii (GEAR). Alter major dKturiunces 
in fK* market fur foreign exchange early in I "Mr t. sfahi/itv h.t.- 
Kvn restored- TK* rate of Infiatinn, whidi accelerated in nearly 
10 per coni by Apnl 1*^7. is now atxiting. To achieve iKtv results 
required -a ciin-islenl restrictive monctarv policy tvilli reialiteh 
high inton-sl rates. As the monetary poficy objcftiVis arc- King 
consolid.ilixi and otK-r programmes ol GEAR, for example lo 
inncow total saving in the ecimomy, are King implemented trilh 
greater effect IK- wav will K* paved tier lower inlerc-.! rates on a more 
durable basts. 

TK- pniic'y of peisisting tvilh «M.ii(iai monetary dtsciplnk-s in 
fiouth Airicra at this difficult stage of general transinrntahini is 
unciersiandohiy being nppi*cd in some circles due hi adjustment 
fatigue .md Inislrated expectations, il is imperalixx*. Kmexi-r, for tK' 
sake of attaining higher economic grcnvth of a nimv ciurable nature, to 
ensure cwefall financial stability that will alw* make acce« to tin- wurfci 
financial markets easier lor South African lx 'movers This task 
demands tlte cimiinuous implemenlation c4 monelary policies that w ill 
create a financial environment uitH low- inlkiticvu a sound banking 
system, and well-lunilioning fin.incial 'markets. 


Adcov 6 tw«u 3 S» 






PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 199 s 


Thursday’s 4 P.M. 

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PAGES 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1991 


Advertisement INTERNATIONAL FUNDS August 28, 1997 ■ 

available on Internet: htip;//w ww.iht. com/I HT/FUN/funds.html 1 


PAGE 19 


SMif-TriR ECU 


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lose Maria Otazabai of Spain 
teeing off in the BMW Inter- 
national Open in Munich. 

Tarnud Grabs Lead 

golf Frenchman Fabrice Tar- 
nud on Thursday upstaged a bevy 
of players chasing Ryder Cup 
places by shooting a 9- under-par 63 
for the first-round lead in the BMW 
international Open in Munich. 

Instead of the Ryder Cup, Tamud 
has the more modest goal He is 
129th in the European rankings and 
in danger of losing his toar card. 

Tamud was a stroke ahead of five 
players: Englishmen Peter Baker 
and Carl Watts, Swedes Peter Hed- 
blom and Patrik Sjoland and Wayne 
Westner of South Africa. Colin 
Montgomerie, is in a seven-man 
group a further stroke back on 65. 

The event is the last one at which 
European golfers can win Ryder 
Cup points. Baker, 20th in the 
standings, needs to win to reach the 
to earn a place on the team. Padraig 
Harrington, an Irishman who is 
12th on the Cup table, pitched in for 
an eagle on the last for a 66. He is 
one stroke ahead of Jose Maria 
Olazabai of Spain who is 1 1th. and 
with Miguel Martin injured, holds 
the last automatic place. (Reuters) 

Wife Says Bowe Hit Her 

boxing Riddick Bowe, the 
former heavyweight champion, has 
been accused by his wife, Judy, of 
beating her and has been 
summoned to appear at a hearing 
Ocl6. 

Judy Bowe reported the alleged 
assault to the police Tuesday. After 
finding no evidence of physical in- 
jury, they refen-ed her to a court 
commissioner in Prince George’s 
County, Maryland, who issued a 
criminal summons charging Bowe 
with second-degree assault, ac- 
cording to court records. f AP) 

Cooper Is Most Valuable 

basketball Cynthia Cooper, 
who led the Houston Comets to the 
best regular-season record in the 
WNBA's first season, was chosen 
the league's MVP Wednesday, and 
her coach. Van Chancellor, was se- 
lected coach of the year. 

The WNBA postseason began 
Thursday with two one-game semi- 
finals: Charlotte at Houston and 
New York at Phoenix. The winners 
meet in the championship game on 
Saturday. (AP) 

Denilson Is Most Costly 

soccer Denilson, a Brazilian in- 
ternational, confirmed Thursday 
that he would sign for Real Beds of 
Spain. The midfielder also said re- 
ports that his transfer fee from Sao 
Paolo was $34.6 million, a world 
reconi were correct. (Reuters) 

No Bull From Ditka 

Mike Ditka, coach of the New 
Orleans Saints of the National 
Football League, is not impressed 
with Michael Jordan and the Chica- 
go Bulls. 

“I don't care if they win nine 
NBA titles,” Ditka said. 'The '86 
Super Bowl was the greatest thing 
to happen to Chicago sports.” 

In 1986, the Chicago Bears beat 
New England. 46-10. Ditka was the 
Bears coach. (LAT) 


By Robin Finn 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — The metropolitan 
hard courts can be harsh on clay-court 
champions. 

Iva Majoli of Croatia, the 1997 
French Open champion, and Thomas 
Muster of Austria, who ruled the roostar 
Roland Garros in 1995, were drummed 
out of the U.S. Open in back-to-back 
upsets Wednesday in the wind-blown 
Arthur Ashe Stadium. 

Muster, the No. 5 seed, failed to in- 
timidate Great Britain's great hope, Tim 


U.S. Open Tennis 


H enman, with his heavy artillery and 
took on a hangdog look as he found his 
own composure under fire and lost 6-3, 
7-6 (7-3), 4-6, 6-4, in the first round. 

“It's disappointing, but it's no shame 
to lose to someone like Tim Henman.” 
said Muster, who had not played him 
before. “He has a very stylish game, he 
has great potential he’s a good spirit 
and he’s good for the game. He felt he 
could come in and put me under pres- 
sure, and that’s what he did” 

The fourth-seeded Majoli who has 
not played like a champion since her 
surprising victory over Martina Hingis in 
the French Open final in June, was elim- 
inated in the second round by Sandrine 
Testud of Fiance, 6-4, 2-6, 6-1. 

Majoli said she has allowed her title 
to become something of an albatross. 

“I just have to get used to and deal with 
the pressure that comes with winning a 
Grand Slam,” said Majoli 20, who also 
lost to Testud last week in Atlanta. ”1 
have to go out there and not care about 
any thing except my tennis and just play, 
be aggressive, go for the shots and then 
lose — not play like nothing and lose.” 

Nobody would ever accuse Muster, 
who had bulldozed a path to three pre- 
vious U.S. Open quarterfinals, of back- 
ing down from a challenge. Bullying is 
his business, and there be was Wednes- 
day, down by two sets to none but 
pretending to be undaunted by it 
Six games into the third set, tricked 
and tripped up by another fluttering 
volley from Henman, Muster decided to 
stop chasing the ball and tamed his 
attention to the source of the shots that 
were stymieing him. 

Brandishing his racket, be ran past the 
net and into Henman's territory and ac- 
tually chased the Englishman off the 



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Thomas Muster missed a shot, then ran past the net and chased his opponent, Tim Henman, off the court. 


court and into a comer passageway. Hen- 
man cowered there until he was sure 
Muster had returned to his own domain. 

Though Muster's game didn't scare 
Henman, who possesses the physical 
menace of a gazelle, the sight of the 
fittest, meanest competitor on the circuit 
headed straight at him did inspire Hen- 
man to take flight, and Henman ac- 
knowledged as much to Master later. 

“I said in the locker room I wasn't 
scared to a dmi t that I was frightened, so 
I thought the best thing to do was keep 
running,” said the 22-year-old Hen- 
man, a 1996 and 1997 quarterfmalist on 
his home turf at Wimbledon. 

Muster, meanwhile, responded an- 
grily to a report in an Italian newspaper 
that he had railed a drug test this summer 
in Cincinnati “I’m very surprised I 
tested positive since they haven't even 
unsealed the doping test yet,” he said. 

Mark Miles, the ATPs chief exec- 
utive officer, issued a release Wednes- 
daybacking Muster's denials and stating 
that foreign news accounts alleging that 
Muster had tested positive were “un- 
informed and irresponsible.” 

Venus Williams, who is 6-foot 2- 


Punished Batumi Fails 
Where Paris Succeeds 


The Associated Press 

Dynamo Batumi failed Thursday in 
its attempt to emulate Paris Saint-Ger- 
main on Thursday by overturning a 
UEFA-imposed 3-0 deficit in their 
European Cup Winneis Cup second leg 
against Ararat Yerevan in Yerevan. 

Dynamo lost the first leg, 4-2, in Ba- 
tumi but had the score changed to 3-0 


after the governing body of European 
soccer ruled that the Georgian team had 
fielded a suspended player, David So- 
logashvill Though R os tom Torgashvili 
scored in jost the second minute and 
Vano Makharadze got a second after 38 
minutes, Ararat held on to win, 3-2, on 
aggregate. 

Champion* Cup On Wednesday, Paris 
Saint-Germain wiped out its UEFA 
punishment in spectacular style with a 
5-0 crushing of Steaua Bucharest in the 


Champions Cup qualifying round. 

PSG fielded a suspended player in the 
first leg in Bucharest, which it lost 3-2, 


and UEFA changed the result to a 3-0 
victory for Steaua. 

PSG canceled out the deficit within 
32 minutes at the Parc des Princes with 
two goals from Ral a Brazilian and one 
by Marco Simone an Italian. Florian 
Maurice gave PSG a winning 4-0 lead 
before halftime at the end of a move 
begun a few seconds earlier by the PSG 
corner flag. Raj completed his hat-trick 
in the second half. 

Another Brazilian, Sonny Anderson, 
scored Barcelona's winner in a 1-0 vic- 
tory at Skonto Riga as the Spanish giant 
made it to the Champions League, 4-2 


inches (1 .8 meters) tall met an opponent 
nearly a foot shorter, and Williams 
played a round of spin ball sending 
shoes toward Gala Leon Garcia of Spain 
that practically bounced over hex head. 
The result was a head-spinning 6-0. 6-1 
victory that took just 35 minutes. 

Monica Seles, seeded second, needed 
64 minutes to reach the third round, but 
she got there with a 6-2, 6-3 dismissal of 
15 9th -ranked Tara Snyder, and ninth- 
seeded Mary Pierce advanced with a 6- 
2, 3-0 victory over Silvia Farina, who 
retired with an ankle injury. 

Selena Roberts of The New York 
Times reported: 

Anna Koumikova, 16, met her 
curfew Wednesday night at Arthur Ashe 
Stadium. And Irina Spirlea, the No. 1 1 
seed, seemed pleased to have sent 
Koumikova home-early with a 6-1, 3-6. 
6-3 victory over the Russian. 

“It is frustrating when you see all the 
attention given to two or three players,” 
Spirlea said. “Sometimes it makes you 
angry. I just want to shut up the mouths 
of everybody because they just think so 
much about her.” 

Spirlea, a Ro manian, added: “I am 


on aggregate. 

Temuri Ketsbaia, a Georgian inter- 
national, scored in the final minute of 
extra time to give Newcastle a 2-2 draw 
at Croatia Zagreb and a 4-3 aggregate 
victory. Faustino As prill a had scored for 
Newcastle from the penalty spot in the 
44th minnte. 

Goran June of Zagreb was sent off for 
giving away the penalty with a foul on 
Jon DahITamasson, Newcastle's Danish 
striker, and toe home team had to play the 
remainder of toe match with 10 men. 
Yet, Dario Siraic leveled and then Igor 
Cvitanovic scored a 90th minute goal to 
make it 2-1 and force extra time. The 
match was headed for a penalty shoot- 
out when substitute Ketsbaia scored. 

Roberto Sens ini, an Argentine mid- 
fielder, headed two goals as AC Parma 
bear Widzew Lodz, 4-0, to advance 7-1 
overall 

South America The bitter rivalry be- 
tween Chile’s Colo Colo and the South 
American champions. Cruzeiro, boiled 
over again Wednesday when their Su- 
percup match was delayed by seven 
minutes of protesting and arguing. 

The first-round Group 1 game in San- 
tiago turned sour when Luis Inarra, a 
Cruzeiro official, was sent off in toe 
second half and walked slowly across the 
pitch toward the tunnel in what appeared 
to be delaying tactics. Angry Colo Colo 
officials started to argue with toe referee. 
Fans jeered and threw objects onto die 
pitch, hitting a Colo Colo reserve. 

Colo Colo, which had trailed, 2-0. 
after 20 minutes, went on to win, 4-2. 

Earlier this month. Cruzeiro bear Colo 
Colo on penalties in a Libertadores Cup 
semifinal that finished with a brawl. 



Newcastle’s two goal scorers, Kets- 
baia, left, and AspriUa celebrating. 

■ Wright in Hot Water 

Ian Wright, toe Arsenal and England 
striker, could face a long ban. The Eng- 
lish Football Association charged him 
Thursday with misconduct after a con- 
frontation at Wednesday’s Premier 
League game at Leicester City. 

In July, the FA gave Wright a “final 
warning” over his behavior. 

Patrick Vieira of Arsenal Steve Walsh 
of Leicester and Pat Rice. Arsenal's as- 
sistant manager, were also charged for an 
angry exchange with Graham Barber, the 
referee, after the 3-3 draw. 

Wright ran off the bench at toe end of 
a match, which ended with three goals in 
the time Barber added on for injuries and 
delays. 

Walsh had scored Leicester's second 
equalizer in the 96th minute. Barber said 
he assumed that Wright and the Arsenal 
players were angry over the amount of 
stoppage rime played. 


not saying she is not good, but it is 
frustrating because sometimes you are 
seeded and you are not playing on the 
stadium court or sniff like that And she 
is unseeded and she gets everything, but 
we can live with this.” 

Koumikova said: “It is not my fault 
that people write about me. I don’t want 
the others to drink that I am doing it on 
purpose or something like that I am just 
try ing to play twinis and play for the 
fans.” 

■ IIS. Player Collapses on Co art 

Lilia Osterioh of the United States got 
a pass into toe third round of her first 
professional tournament Wednesday 
when her opponent and compatriol 
Corina Moranu, collapsed during and 
had to be removed from the court on a 
stretcher. The Washington Post reprat- 
ed. 

Morariu had taken Osterioh to a third 
set even wito a nagging kidney infection 
that, despite treatment, gave her more 
and more difficulty throughout toe 
match. She defaulted after the third 
game of the third set, wito Osterioh 
leading, 3-0. 


Bulls Sign 
Jordan to 
Contract for 
One Season 


Michael Jordan broke another 
barrier when he signed with the 
Chicago Bulls for at least one more 
season for what may be the richest 
annual salary in professional sports 
history.- 

The National Basketball Asso- 
ciation club announced Wednesday 
that its star guard had agreed to a 
one-year deal which is believed to 
be worth slightly more than $30 
million. Anything more than toe 
$30. 14 million that Jordan received 
last season would make the contract 
toe largest ever for a single sea- 
son. . 

An all-day negotiating session 
among Jordan, ms agent, David 
Falk, and the Bulls chairman, Jerry 
Reinsdorf, in Las Vegas appeared 
to seal toe deal 

Falk, declining to disclose finan- 
cial terms, did say that toe new 
numbers are “a sufficient amount 
so that Michael based upon the 
year he bad J felt comfortable 7—- or 
he wouldn't have agreed.” 

Jordan, 34, led toe Bulls to their 
fifth championship in seven" sea- 
sons in Jane. 

He also got Reinsdorf to agree 
not to trade his good friend, Scottie. 
Pippen, sources said. 

Jordan was said to be looking for 
between $36 million and $40 mil- 
lion — and many media’ reports 
have characterized the deal as dose 
to those figures. A league official 
said Jordan had signed for very close 
to what his annual salary was a year 
ago. A source close to the Bulls said 
the contract was for $33 million. > 

The Bulls can now concentrate 
on several other free agents, in- 
cluding Dennis Ro dman. -The 
ream's general manager. Jetty 
Krause, plans to meet wito Rod- 
man’s lawyer, Dwight Manley, 
when Krause returns from vacation 
next week. (WP, NYT, AP) 


■ i 

Hon ier- Happy Mariners 
May Find Denver Heaven 


The Associated Press 

Edgar Martinez, Alex Rodriguez and 
Paul Sorrento all homered for Seattle as it 
lost. 9-5, to Boston. The Mariners have 
hit more homers than any other team, and 
on Thursday they start an interleague 
series in Denver wito toe Rockies. It will 
be their first game at Coras Field, hone 
of the home run. 

The third and final period of imer- 
league play begins Thursday with four 

Baseball Roundup 

games. By Friday, all 28 teams will be 
involved in interleague action, wito toe 
final such matchups of the regular sea- 
son scheduled for Wednesday night 

The American League holds a 66-64 
edge after games in June and July. At- 
tendance averaged 34,083 for toe first 
1 30 interleague games, about 2 1 percent 
above the overall season average. 

On Wednesday in Seattle, Nomar 
Garciaparra singled on toe first pitch, 
extending his hitting streak to 29 games. 
He later hit his 25to home run. 

Athletics 8, Yankees 7 Jason McDon- 
ald hit a single that skipped past Paul 
O’Neill, the New York nght fielder, for 
a three-base error, giving toe A's the 
winning run wito one out in the ninth in 
Oakland. Matt Stairs, Ernie Young and 
Magadan all homered off Hideki Irabu. 

Indians 10, Angels 4 Matt Williams hit 
a three-run homer and a three-run double 
during a 10-run fourth inning, leading 
Cleveland to victory at Anaheim. 

Orioles 7, Royals 3 Rafael Palmeiro hit 
a solo home run in the fifth inning, then 
hit a tiebreaking grand slam in the eighth 
as Baltimore beat visiting Kansas City. 


Blue Jays 13, white sox 2 Joe Carter, 
tied George Bell’s team record with 202- 
home runs as Toronto beat visiting 
Chicago. 1 

twins 2, floors o Bob Tewksbury 
earned his 100th career victory, pitching 
a five-hitter for Minnesota against vis- ' 
iting Detroit. ' 

Hangars 7, Brewers 1 Rusty Greer hit a 
solo homer and Tom Goodwin had atwo-. - 
run double as Texas won on toe road; . 

In the National League: 

Astros 6, Braves 4 Jeff Bagwell con- 
nected for a two-run shot in the 13th, tfr 
give Houston a victory in Atlanta. - 
The Astros also scored twice in the 
ninth off Mark Wohlers, who blew what 
would have been Greg Maddux's’ 
league-leading 18 to victory. 

Dodgers 9, Pirates S Mike Piazza 

homered twice and drove in six runs as 
visiting Los Angeles won fra toe 1 1 to 
time in 15 games. 

•lets is, (Bants e In New York, Jason 
Isringhausen made his first start since 
Sept. 17 and woo, despite allowing five- 
tuns, 1 1 hits and six walks. 

Marlins 4, Cubs 3 Darren Daulton hit a 
two-out, two-run single in toe ninth to 
give Florida victory in Chicago. 

Phillies 7, padres s Philadelphia 
wasted a 6-3 lead in toe ninth, but won at 
home on Kevin Stocker's 12th-inning 
single. . i 

Rockies 7, Reds 5 Vinny Castilla hit ' 
his third home run in two g ames, and 
Ellis Burks and Andres Galarraga also 
homered for toe Rockies in Denver. 

C ar di n als 4, Expos 3 David Bell tied 
the game wito a seventh-inning homer, 
then hit a go-ahead single in toe eighth 
as Sl Louis rallied from a 3-0 deficit. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 

AMMWCAM UMMW 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet- 

GB 

BaHiman 

84 

45 

Air 

— 

New York 

78 

S3 

-595 

7 

Boston 

67 

67 

.HO 

1*6 

Toronto 

64 

67 

489 

21 

Detroit 

«1 

71 

Mi 

24W 


CENTRAL OMBON 



Cleveland 

68 

61 

527 



Mlwairtroa 

66 

66 

-500 

3% 

Chicago 

65 

67 

jtn 

4Vr 

Minnesota 

54 

77 

412 

15 

Kansas! City 

53 

76 

All 

15 


WECTOfVISKM 



Seattle 

74 

» 

J56 

— 

Anaheim 

72 

61 

-Ml 

2 

Team 

63 

70 

474 

11 

Oakland 

53 

80 

J90 

21 

MjmONAI IlMW 



EAST DIVISION 




w 

L 

Pcf. 

G6 

Atlanta 

81 

51 

614 



Florida 

77 

54 

SSB 


New York 

71 

61 

sse 

ID 

Montreal 

65 

66 

jCM, 

15V, 

Phdadelphia 

49 

80 

JSO 

30ft 


CENTRAL BM9HON 



Houston 

70 

62 

J30 

— 

PHtsbuigh 

67 

67 

J00 

4 

SI. Louis 

60 

72 

.455 

10 

Cincinnati 

58 

73 

.443 

lift 

Chicogo 

S3 

80 

.398 

17ft 


WESTDIVB10N 



Las Angeles 

75 

50 

J60 

— 

Son Francisco 73 

60 

J49 

Ift 

Colo rode 

64 

70 

.478 

11 

San Diego 

62 

72 

M3 

13 


WVDKUDJnr'SUOKORB 

AMERICAN LEAQUE 

Tuns OS 000 100-7 14 1 

MRwoukM 100 000 000-1 7 1 

D.Ot»er, Patterson (8) end L ryitfa. 
Woodard Wane (4), Davis TO, A. Reyes (0) 
and Mammy- W-D. Oliver, 11-10. 
L — Woodard 3-3. HRs— Trans, Greer 03). 
Milwaukee, VWgt C7>. 

Boston 100 041 IM— 0 14 1 

Seattle 002 til 000-5 '7 2 

Snbwtwgen, Wosrfln (5). Woto rtteM (7), 
Gorton (8) aid Hcsetman; Fassera, B. Wete 
{6}, Spokntc 16), Aynta (7). Sloaimb (9) and 
DaWKsoa. W— Wmdln 4-5. L— Fassero 13- 
8. Sv— Gordon Cfl. HRs— Boston. Gor- 
dapono OS). OLeorr (13). Seattle, E. Mar* 
Wire* (23). AJtodrtgiroz 02}. Sorrento (251. 
adage 000 000 020-2 « 3 

Toronto 402 300 31*— 73 14 • 

Drabri, N. Cruz (5) and FabregrBi 
Hentgen and A Santiago. W— Hoatgen 1 4-& 
L — Drabak 10-9. 

Detroit 000 000 Mft-4 5 2 

Minnesota 010 010 00*— 2 j 0 

Madder, Broad U) and Wtfbcck; 
Tartabary and Sletnboch. W— ' Tewksbury 5- 
10. L— MoeMer B-KL 

K Dittos aty 000 000 300-3 6 0 

Bertfanore BOO 012 04*— 7 7 1 

Appier. Canasca (8), J. Waiter (8> and 
MacfarksK, Erickson Rhodes (8) and 
Webster. w-Rhodes 0-3. u-Carascn 1-3. 
HRs— Karens City. C. Davis (27). Baltimore, 
R. Palmeiro 2 (311. 

Orntand 000 10M 900-10 IS 1 
Anaheim 120 000 010-4 s 2 

Jr.WrigM, Juden (B), Mesa (9) and 5. 
Alomar, Borders (7); Watson, Hasegawa (4). 
Cotta ret (7), P. Harris (8). DaJWay (9). 
Peretval (9) and Kreutet Ene omoc i on (0). 
W— Jr.WrigM 5-2. L-Wfltson n-fl. 
HRs — Cleveland. Ma.WDHama (28). Grissom 
(9). Anaheim, Hawed (10) 


NOW York 010 222 000-7 14 2 

Ocftftmd 310 200 011—0 15 0 

Irabu, KnJtagas (4), Stanton (A), Nelson 
(8) and Gironft Lamrine. Mahler (5). A. 
5m oB (5). Taylor (7), TJJMaffrews (9J and 
MayndGa-WNams (7). W— ' TJ-Mothews. 4- 
1. L— Neteon. 3-4. HRs— Oakland. Magadan 
(4). Stairs cm EiLYotmg (5). 

NATtOHAL LEAGUE 

Las Ang l es 330 000 102—9 18 1 

nttsMHEb on ooo 101-5 10 2 

DJteycv Had (7), To-WwreU (9) and 
Piazza; Cooke, Johnson CO, Christensen (3), 
M. WTDOna (51, Wallace (71, Ruebel (8) end 
KendoL W — D. Reyes. 2-2. L-Coake. 9-11 
HRs— Las Angeles. Piazza 2 (31). 
Pittsburgh, Wart 01. 

Son Francisco 013 101 00B— « 14 0 

lire York 002 0M 80s— is T? • 

Ruetec Tavares (5), R. Rodrigue (5], p. 
Hsny (7]» Poole [7), Muthodand (7) and B. 
Johnson, MirobeUi (01; Isringhavseat Y. 
Perez (6). LJdte (a). McftUchad (81. 
JiLFranca <9J and Piatt. W— tataghausca 1- 
0. L—T owner, 5-4. 

Florida 000 100 003-4 6 0 

Chicago 002 MO 100-3 9 2 

Saunders. Rowel (7], VOtbeig (8), Nen (B) 
aid C Johnson. Zaun (9); TrachseL 
Patterson (7). Ptsetatta (B). T. Adams Wand 
M -Hub bard. Sends (9). W— Nen, 9-2. L— T. 
Adams, 1-& HRS— Florida, Conrite (13J. 
OuasgaOrio (8), 

SanKega ON 201 003 000-6 14 0 

PbRmMpMa 004 000 020 001-7 14 2 

12 barings 

J .Hamilton. Huffman (8), Broshe (17} card 
Flaherty, C Hernandez (93; SdiSng, Karp 
(71, BaftaNco (8). SprodEn (9], Blazler (11), 
Comes (111 end Lieberthal. W -Comes. 3-1. 
L— Brinks, 3-1. HR— San Diego. CamWti 
£30 J. 

CtaebmO 000 010 310—5 6 3 

Colorado OU 421 00*— 7 tl 0 


RemBnget. Burba (51. Graves (7) and J. 
CHreer: Thomson. Leskanic IS). M. Munoz 
(n, Dipato (9) and Manwaring. 
W— Thomson. ML L— Rem Linger. 6-6. 
Sir— Olpata (11). HRs— OncinnalL R. 
Sanders (19). Colorado, Burks (25). 
Gatanngo (341. Castilla (361. 

Monbwd 001 002 008-3 10 0 

St. Loots 000 002 11s— 4 7 1 

Henrmn&an. BuOnger (61, Telford (71 and 
Fletchen Morris, Fiusariorc (7>, Beltran 191 
and LampMth DifeOce (7). W— Fnnariore 5- 
Z L— Tetfant 3-4. S*— BeBran (I). HR— SI. 
Louis, Da Bel (1). 

Houston OH 100 002 010 2-6 13 3 
Atlanta 000 010 020 010 0-4 9 1 
Idianings 

Halt T. Marlin (8), R. Springer 1 
Mognante HI), Hudok (13), Lima (131 and 
Ausmin. Eusebio (l2UGJIAaddux, Wohters 
(9), Cottier PI. E mhrw (l 0), Uglenberg noi. 
Ctofltz (11). Byrd (121 and EddPetcz, J. 
Lopez <100- W— . Hudefc I-Z L — Bvrt 3-3. 
5» — Luna (2). HRs — Houston, Bagwell (35). 
Can (4). Atlanta Grotto rano (51. 

Japanese Leagues 
imubAVinsuin 

CENTRAL LEAQUE 
Yokult 12, Yomturi 5 
Yobohamo & Chanlchl 5 

PACIFIC LEAGUE 
Seibu A Nippon Ham I 
Kintetsu), OrtrQ 
DaieU. Lotte 2 


TENNIS 


U.S. Open 

wkmoshat's urein 

WOMEN'S SI HOL1S 

SECOND ROUND 

Ante Huber <81, Germany, dcf. Janet Ur, 


ua. M, 4-1. UDn usterioh, U.S. det Conna 
Morariu. 6-7 (5-7), o-t, 3m. retired. 

Murrico Seles ®, US. def. Tara Snyder, 
Ua. 6-1 6-3. 

Sandrine Tested. France, del. Iva Maioii 
W), Croatia. 64, 2-6. 6-1. 

Venus WB&arres U.S. def. Gala Leon Gar- 
da Spain. 6-4 6-1. Karina Habsusaua Slo- 
vakia def. AI Sugfama Japan. 5-7, 6-3. 7-5. 

Mary Pierce m, Fionas def Slfvta Farina 
Italy, 6-1 3-4 retired 

Amanda Coctrer (5). South Africa def. 
Alado Dechaume-Banerei France, 6-1, 6-1 . 

Irina Spirlea (II), Romania dot. Ama 
Kouirritova. Russia, 6-1, 34,6-3. 

Miriam Oiemnna Notheriands, del. Mefke 
Babel Germany, 7-^ 6-1. 

. Elena Wagner. Germany, def. Patricia Hy- 
Boulafc. Canada 63.06, 7-6 (8-6). 

MIN'S SINGLES 
FIRST ROUND 

Patrick Rafter (13). Australia deL Andrei 
Medvcdnu, Ukraine, 63. 64 7-5. Paul 
Hoarhu* Ndhcitands. def. Goto Bianca 
Spain, 7-6 (66), 64 67 (671, 67 (3-7), 63. 

Marecta Rip? no), Chile* def. Luke Smflti 
a uit tafia 6-1. 6-1. 6-4 Uand Rous Fr„ dcf. 
Gflbor Schallar, Austria 4-a o-a 6-3, 61 6-1. 

Christian Ruud, Norway, dcf. Maic-Kevln 
Goeflncr. Getmarty, 64. 46. 1 6. 64, 63. Hcr- 
nan Gamy, Aigantma def. Daminik Hrbaty, 
Slovakia 67 (67), 61 67 (9-11), 61 61 

Tim Henman. Brit def. Thomas Muster (5), 
Austria 6-1 76 (7-3), 4-6. 6-4 Cedric PMina 
Fr. def. Peter Wessafc. Nottt. 64, 61 62. 

Fernando MeUgcni Brazil def. Jony Sty- 
manskt Venezuela 61 61 6 1 . 

SECOND ROUND 

Mark PhOippoossfS (14), Australia dcf. 
Jerome Gofenard. Franca 76 (7-51. 6-1 1-0. 
retired 


SOCCER 


Champions Cup 

SECOffl) QUAUFYMG ROUND, RETURN LEG 
Croatia Zagreb Cra.1 Newcastle, Eng* 2 
Nuwcostte United won 4-3 on aggregate. 
Ulna mo Kim, Ukraine, a Brandby, Deo, 1 
□kuuno Kiev won 4-3 on aggregate. 
Dinamo TMsi Geor.l. B .Leverkusen, Ger, 0 
Bayor Leverkusen won 62 on aggregate. 
Gaiattoary, Turkey, 4 Sion. Switzerland t 
Gakrtasaray won 8-2 on aggregate. 
Gkngnw Rnngon Scot. I, Gatebarg- Swa, 1 
IFK Gatehorg mnd-i on aggregate. 

Jan Pori. Finland 1, F eyenoor d Neth, 2 
Foyenoordwon 8-3 on aggregate. 

K- Ljerse SK, Beta, 3. A^Famagastd Cyp. 0 
Uerse SK won 3-2 on aggregate. 

Mszyr, Beta rut 1 Otymplakos, Greece. 2 
Otympiafias wan 7-2 on aggregate. 
Marihor, Slovenia I, BesIHax. Turkey. 3 
Bnlktas advanced 3-1 an aggregate. 
P-SC- Fr, S, Steaua Budtare&L Romania 0 
Pans SL Germain won 7-3 an aggregate. 
Foma Itoiy. 4 WWww Lodi Poirot 0 
Parma won 7-1 an aggregate. 

Posonhoig. Mar, 3. MTK. Budapest Hun- 1 
Posen bom BK won 4-1 on aggregate. 
Skonto. Latvia a Barcekma Spain. I 
Barcetona won 4-2 on aggregate. 

Spartak Moscow, Rus-0. Kosice. Slovakia 2 
Kaske wan 2-1 an aggregate. 

Soana Prague, Czech R. X Salzburg, Aus-Q 
Spado Prague won 3-0 on aggregate 
Sporting Lisbon. Port, i Heifer, Israel 0 
S prating Lisbon wan 341 on aggregate. 

Cup Winners' C up 

PRELNUUflV ROUND. RETURN L£Q 
B. Babrank. Bel, 4, Talllnna Sadaiti £st - 1 
Behbyna Bobruisk wan S-2 an aggregate. 
VWlmannocylar, Ice- 1 Hibernians. Malta 0 


Vestmumueyiar won 4-0 on aggregate. 
Kynpaz Ganja, Arer- a Dinabarg, Latvia I 
D (noburg won 2-0 on aggregate. 

Zagreb. Croatia 1 Sloga (FYR Macedonia) 0 
Zagreb win 4-1 on aggregate. 

S. Donetsk. Ukr. 1 Zlmbro CWsmro, Mold. 0 
Shakhtor Donetsk won 61 on aggregate. 
Ararat Yerevan. Arm- a D. Batumi, Georg- 2 
Ararat Yerevan won 3-2 an aggregate. 
Sloven, Slovakia 1 Lovskl Bulgaria I 
Siovnn won 3-2 on aggregate. 

Apod , CypnnA Havnar BoHMoei Fame I. 0 
Apoet Nicosia wan 7-1 an aggregate 

EMHISH PMUIfn UA4P8 

Barnsley 2, Bolton 1 
Coventry 1. West Ham 1 
Everton a Manchester United 2 
Leicester 1 Arsenal 3 
Suuttkunptun l. Crystal Pataca 0 ■ 
Tottenham 1 Aston Villa 2 
Wlmbtedon a diebea 2 
CTAfWtDias: Blackburn 1 0 points; Manch- 
ester United (ft Arsenal B; I nfcwyter ft West 
Ha m7;Che hog ft Crystal Palace 6: Newcastle 
ft Tottenham ft Barnsley ft Liverpool & 
Coventry & Bolton 4' Leeds 4; Everton s 
Southampton 1 Wimbledon 1 Sheffield 
Wednesday I, Derby 1 Aston VDo 0. 


TRANSITIONS 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

. OF Dnrron Lewis to l_w 

Angeles lor player io be named. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

NEW YO U*— Agreed to terms with Bobby 

yatentere, manager, ana 3-yearconhod. Ac- 

rSS" lMln 9 hou « , n fromftHtay 
INF JOSon Horttkc to 
Binghamton. EC Transferred PHP Armando 


Reynosa hom 16 to 60-day disabled Dst. ■ 

BUKinUUl 

NATIOriAL BASKETBALL ASSOCUIlOn 
TLAKT *~ Agmw *° •wrtw wffli Lenny 
wwens, coach, on 4-year contract esden- 
skms. . . 

Chicago— A greed la terms with Michael 
Jordan on I -year contract 

LAKERS-Signecl G Jan Barry. 
ouando— A greed to terms with G Nick 
Anderson on 6year contract. 

Portland— S igned G John Cratty. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL POOH) ALL LEAOUE 1 

Sta " D ""“. 

cHicAco-signed TE Tremayne Alien and' 

K#nvJcn,UBS <» ndw R Smith to 
pradkB squad 

NEHEE— Agreed fe terms with SS Blaine. 
Bstiop on ftyuaramhocl. 

■MCUT 

National hockey leaoue 

M 15E5r e<, --^«c 

^new yobk Rangers— S igned F Pierre Se- 
Tear rarriST^ 

c Dok»HowetS^ A,mOU,U * d rnuwn «iri of 

W, ' t ' RW Tie 















urmiTcnAV 1497 


PAGE 3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1997 


PAGE 21 


SPORTS 







I s - 

“* \-a< 


"On 


... *— • ■ 


i. * >" 




Super Bowl Champion? It’s Green Bay (or Perhaps Denver) 


\huinen 
hut Heavei 


Lus Aj/geles Times Service 

■ From worst to first, how the 30 Na- 
tional Football League teams stack up: 

No. 30. Atlanta: The Falcons have not 
only the worst starting quarterback in- the 
league in Chris Chandler, but the worst 
backup in Billy Joe Tolliver. Had they 
not cutTommy Maddox, they also would 
have the worst No. 3 quarterback. 

Top newcomer: Tennessee quarter- 
back Peyton Manning — next year. 

Drawback: The 53-man roster. 

. 29. Baltimore: Quarterback Vinnv 
Testaverde had a dream season and nev- 
er looked so good and the Ravens won 
four games. What happens when he 
returns to his true form? 
r 4 _ Top newcomer Defensive tackle 
;»Tony Siragusa, and that ought to sell a 
Jot of season tickets. 

; Drawback: Bam Morris’s suspension 
for substance abuse. 

28. Chicago: The Bears dealt a No. 1 
pick to Seattle for quarterback Rick 
Mirer and then he couldn’t learn the 
offense. 

■ Top newcomer Chris Penn, a wide 
receiver obtained in a trade with Kansas 
City, although the Chiefs probably 
would have cut Penn anyway. 

, Drawback: Wide receiver Curtis 
Conway will be out six to eight weeks 
with a collarbone injury. 

■ 27, New Orleans: The Saints wiU run 
the ball, keep the game within reach in 
the fourth quarter and then Coach Mike 
Ditka will yell “Boo” to startle the 
opposition and steal a victory. 

' Top newcomer: Troy Davis, a run- 
ning back so small no one can see him , 
which makes it tough to tackle him. 

Drawback: Ditka is back, but Buddy 
Ryan, his assistant in Chicago, isn’t. 

26. Arizona: The Cardinals haven't 
been to the playoffs in a nonstrike year 
since 1975. Good news — the NFL’s 
collective bargaining agreement is near- 
ing expiration, and there’s always the 
possibility of a strike. 

Top newcomer: The Cardinals took 
local hero Jake Plummer, who fired up 
fans but received two years' probation 
when accused of groping four women in 
a local bar. 

Drawback: Loss of offensive coordin- 
ator Jim Fassel to the Giants, leaving 
quarterback Kent Graham to flounder. 

25. San Diego: The Chargers have a 
new offensive philosophy lacking only 
tbeplayers ir requires to carry it out. 

Top newcomer Running back/wide 
receiver Eric Metcalf looks like the 
Chargers’ only threat beyond wide re- 
ceiver Tony Martin. 

Drawback: A stadium that must be 
sold oaf or the taxpayers of San Diego 
start coughing up more money. 

24. New York Giants: There are all 
kinds of great reports flying around Fas- 
sel and the team s upgrade in personnel. 
Hello. Dave Brown is still the quar- 
terback. ‘ 

Top newcomer Christian Peter, who 
is coming off alcohol problems and a 
penchant for beating up people. 
Drawback; Fassel s faith m Brown. 
23. Tennessee: The Oilers were in a 
position to waltz into theplayoffs last 
year, then they collapsed. They wore out 
their welcome in Houston, and now 
appear to be unwanted in Memphis 
while officials dig a hole for a new 
stadium in Nashville. 

Top newcomer The re-signing of left 
tackle Brad Hopkins. 

Drawback: The inexperience of quar- 
terback Steve McNair. 

22. Tampa Bay: Some people are 
picking the Buccaneers to be one of the 
most improved teams in the league. 
Some people are just plain crazy. 

Top newcomer New uniforms, rid- 
ding die world of that ugly orange. 


NFL Preview / Articles by T. J . Simeks 


Drawback: Quarterback Trent 
Dilfer’s insistence on throwing the ball 
to the other team. 

21. Buffalo: The Bills are going from 
die no-huddle to an attack chat will 
require No Doz to watch. New offensive 
assistant Dan Henning will use two tight 
ends to run the ball and keep it awav 
from quarterback Todd Collins. 

Top newcomer: Rookie running back 
Antowain Smith. 

Drawback: The Bills will have a solid 
defense, but sooner or later Collins will 
be out there. 

20. New York Jets: How much dif- 
ference will Bill Parcells make 
overnight to a team that has lost 28 of its 
last 32 games? 

Top newcomer: Parcells. 

Drawback: Parcells. How many 
people remember that his Patriots were 
5-1 1 two years ago? 

19. Minnesota; Where have you 
heard this one before — if running back 
Robert Smith can stay healthy. He 
can't. 

Top newcomer Randall Cunning- 
ham has come out of retirement. 

Drawback: The Vikings can beat the 
Packers in Minnesota ffive consecutive 
years), but no one else. 

18. Miami: A year from now Jimmy 
Johnson makes his move. This year, 
however, be continues to change di- 
apers with 17 draft picks from the last 
two years- gaining experience. 

Top newcomer: Pass rusher Jason 
Taylor. 

Drawback: A crumbling offensive line 
will nor allow Johnson to run the balL 

17. St Louis: The Rams have the 
best young talent in the league, and it's 
all riding on the development of quar- 
terback Tony Banks, who has been a 
chronic fumbler. 

Top newcomer: Coach Dick Vermeil 
says he won’t work as hard as he did in 
Philadelphia. So why hire him? He got 
the Eagles to the Super Bowl- 

Drawback: Running back Lawrence 
Phillips wiU play on a swollen knee. 

16. Indianapolis: No team stands out 
in the AFC Easi. and the Colts appear 
feisty and competitive. But they still 
have an offensive line hellbent on get- 
ting quarterback Jim Harbaugh buried. 

Top newcomer Tackle Tank Glenn. 

Drawback: The Colts will contend 
with rumors throughout the season that 
they are headed for Cleveland. 

15. Philadelphia: Coach Ray 
Rhodes has told everyone the best quar- 
terback on his roster is Bobby Hoy mg, 
so he’s starting Ty Detmer? 

Top newcomer Center Steve Everitt. 



ux) CjnronHr.w 

Steve Young. San Francisco 49ers' 
quarterback, fending off a tackier. 


Drawback: The Eagles have a history 
of wasting first-round draft picks — 
defensive end Jon Harris continues the 
tradition. 

14. Washington: The Redskins 
pulled away with a 7-1 record last year, 
then took a look in the minor and real- 
ized they were frauds. 

Top newcomer. Defensive coordin- 
ator Mike Nolan was hired from the 
Giants to bolster the league’s No. 28 
defense. How good were the Giants? 

Drawback: The best offensive 
weapon the Redskins have is wide re- 
ceiver Michael Wesrbrook, and they 
want him to undergo counseling. 

13. Kansas City": They had many off- 
season meetings, did a lot of soul search- 
ing and then announced they will try to 
score some points this year.’ 

Top newcomer: A passing game, 
which will feature wide receivers Andre 
Risen and Brett Peniman, tight ends 
Ted Popson and Tony Gonzalez and 
quarterback Elvis Grbac. 

Drawback. Loss of defensive end 
Neil Smith. 

12. Oakland: If Jeff George got all 
ticked off at June Jones, his coach in 
Atlanta, how will he react to the sniping 
of A1 Davis, the Oakland owner? 

Top newcomer Defensive lineman 
Darrell Russell gives the Raiders one of 
the best lines in the league. 

Drawback: The Raiders intend to use 
little Napoleon Kaufman as their 16- 
game battering ram. 

11. Pittsburgh: The Steeiers looked 
so impressive in the preseason, but those 
games don’t count. 

Top newcomer Greg Lloyd, who sat 
ODt last season because of a knee injury. 

Drawback: Running back Jerome 
Bettis, who runs best when motivated, 
has been given a four-year contract. 

10. Detroit: If the Lions could be in 
the playoff hunt with Wayne Fontes in 
control, imagine what they can do with a 
real coach calling the shots. 

Top newcomer: Bobby Ross, the new 
coach. 

Drawback: The Lions will try to play 
this season without any defense. 

9. Cincinnati: If Ki-Jana Carter, the 
running back, finally lives up to ex- 
pectations. the Bengals can make the 
AFC Central one of the league’s better 
division races. Cincinnati went 7-2 un- 
der Coach Bruce Coslet last year. 

Top newcomer: Dick LeBeau, former 
Steeler defensive coordinator, who will 
employ the zone blitzes that have sep- 
arated Pittsburgh and Carolina from the 
pack. 

Drawback: Because of the compe- 
tition in the AFC Central, which will 
hurt a team's overall record, the winner 
of the division probably will have to 
play on the road m the playoffs. 

'8. Carolina: An injury to quarter-' 
back Kerry Collins and the loss of line- 
backer Kevin Greene give the Panthers 
their first severe case of adversity. Like 
San Francisco. Carolina will feast on the 
Saints, Falcons and Rams, but this is a 
playoff team thai ranked No. 23 on 
offense a year ago. 

Top newcomer The signing of Ren- 
aldo Turnbull gives the Panthers a 
Greene-like replacement 

Drawback: No one will take the Pan- 
thers lightly any more. 

7. Jacksonville: The Jaguars looked 
like the team to beat in the AFC until 
Mark Brunell suffered a knee injury. He 
says he will be bark in no time and his 
backup, Rob Johnson, has looked great 
in the preseason. But what if Brunell 
doesn’t come right back? 

Top newcomer: Offensive coordin- 



Unr H^HlMUtniTu 

Brett Favre, the Green Bay Packers' quarterback, is most definitely No. 1. 


ator Chris Palmer replaces Kevin Gil- 
bride. 

Drawback: Johnson comes into the 
season with seven pass attempts in his 
NFL career. 

6. Seattle: It's not that the Seahawks 
are so good , but what a wonderful sched- 
ule to fatten their record. They play five 
doormats from a year ago in the Jets, 
Saints, Ravens. Falcons and Rams, and 
get two games against the Chargers. 

Top newcomer. Paul Allen, the new 
owner, brings an open checkbook, plans 
for a new stadium and a threat to Coach 
Dennis Erickson to win or start typing 
that resume. 

Drawback: How Jong will John 
Friesz last at starting quarterback before 
Warren Moon gets the call? 

5. New England: The Patriots won't 
have the edge they had under Parcells, but 
Pete CarroU still' has Drew Bledsoe and 
Curtis Martin, and how much can a guy- 
screw up a Super Bowl team in one 
year? 

Top newcomer Carroll. Some teams 
that interviewed him for their head 
coaching position walked away unim- 
pressed, labeling Carroll immature. 

Drawback: Carroll is no ParceUs. 

4. Dallas: The Cowboys have so many 
question marks. Is running back Errunitt 
Smith a step slower? Is wide receiver 
Michael Irvin trouble-free? 

Top newcomer. Wide receiver An- 
thony Miller provides home-run threat, 
if he can play on a sore knee. 

Drawback: Dallas will have no pass 
rush. 

3. San Francisco: This is just like one 
of those Disney movies where they let a 


kid out of the stands manage a baseball 
team, only this is a football stoiy with 
Steve Mariucci living out a dream. The 
49ers have so many good players it 
really doesn't matter who is in control. . 

Top newcomer Kevin Gogan. Quar- 
terback Steve Young is perhaps a con- 
cussion away from ending his career, and 
Gogan brings a tough-guy attitude to the 
offensive line that might save Young. 

Drawback: The 49ers can't beat Car- 
olina. 

2. Green Bay: The Packers could 
have the NFC Central wrapped up by 
the end of November. The Packers are 
clearly the best team in the NFL, and 
when they lose the Super Bowl it will go 
down as one of the great upsets. 

Top newcomer Kicker Brett Con- 
way. The Packers didn’t want to pay 
Chris Jacke big bucks — now let’s see if 
it comes back to haunt them. 

Drawback: At some point your neigh- 
bor is going to walk out of his house 
wearing a big hunk of cheese on his 
head. 

1. Denver: This is all about redemp- 
tion, giving John Elway a chance to 
return lo San Diego in January and bury 
a nightmarish Super Bowl loss to Wash- 
ington a decade ago and establish him- 
self as one of the game's great quar- 
terbacks. 

And who wants to make a no-brainer 
pick like Green Bay? 

Top newcomer. Wide receiver Rod 
Smith steps in as Denver’s only deep 
ihreat. 

Drawbadc Elway will try to play 16 
games with a tom biceps muscle in his 
throwing aim. 


Liv A ngeles Times Sen hr 

GREEN BAY, Wisconsin — There 
are new uniforms in Tampa and new' 
duds in Denver. 

There are 1 1 teams siamng fresh at; 
the (op. some new coaches, such as Dick 
Vermeil, old enough to consider Social 
Security, and others, such as Steve' 
Mariucci, young enough to require a- 
learaer’s permit. 

Elvis Grbac, Brad Johnson and Heath- 
Shuler are starting quarterbacks: War- 
ren Moon, Boomer Esiason and Jim 
Everett are noL 

Bill ParceUs is back in New York, but 
with the Jets. Mike Ditka will be back in 
Chicago as the Saints' coach. Houston 
has moved to Nashville but will play in 
Memphis. 

So many changes in the NFL in 1997, 
and yet when it's all over Jan. 25 in San 
Diego at Super Bowl XXXII, it prob- 
ably wUl be the Cheeseheads — as the 
Packers and their fans are known — 
hoisting the victory suds once again. 

Sure" the Green Bay Packers, like 
every other team, have a new look after 
the losses of Desmond Howard, Keith 
Jackson. Sean Jones, Chris Jacke and 
Andre Rison. But on closer inspection 
they have lost only one starter (Jones), 
and they are talking with good reason 
about becoming the first ream since 
Miami in 1972 to go undefeated. 

“Most definitely, that’s the talk 
around here,” safety LeRoy Butler said. 
“It’s a realistic goal — we’re pretty 
damn good.’’ 

How good are they? They will open 
the regular season 14-point favorites to 
defeat the Chicago Bears. 

“O.K., we won the Super Bowl,” 
Butler said. “Now our aexr goal is to 
make history: Win the Super Bowl 
again and so undefeated if we can.” 

Some Cheesehead has already looked 
this up: In the last 50 years, only 13 
teams have lost just one game. 

“I’ve been looking for weaknesses,” 
Butler said, “but I can’l find any." 

Look again. The Packers play the 
Cowboys this season, and the Packers 
have lost eight in a row to the Cowboys, 
making it more likely that they will 
become the first team since the 1985 
Bears to lose only one game all sea- 
son. 

“Green Bay is dearly the team to 
beat,” said Troy Aikman, the Dallas 
quarterback. "But I still like our 
chances and I still like San Fran- 
cisco’s.” 

The Cowboys lack the wallop they 
have had on defense in previous years, 
while the 49ers have been struggling to 
find the right group of bodyguards to 
keep Steve Young standing. Carolina 
and Jacksonville start without their reg- 
ular quarterbacks, and Denver always 
chokes. 

The Packers, meanwhile, have been 
fine-tuning. The hoopla, however, that 
comes with winning a Super Bow l usu- 
ally sabotages efforts to repeat, and this 
season eight Packers will have their ow n 
television shows. 

“It used to be tough for any football 
player to set a television show.” Steve 
Belkin, president of Sports Media Man- 
agement, a company that produces 
sports programming, said in a published 
report. 

‘ ‘Now, it seems like you can get one 
if you’re the Packers' water boy.” 

Reggie White, the star defensive end, 
who will talk religion on the air. will 
also have his face plastered on 50 mil- 
lion soup cans. 

The soup company will donate 
50,000 cans to food banks for every 
White sack. 

After the Packers play the Bears, no 
one will go hungry. 



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of publication in Oslo 
and Bergen, 
call 00 33 1 4143 9361 






PAGE 23 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 29. 1997 


POSTCARD 


Not Your Usual Deli 


By Daniel Williams 

Wig brngtun Post Struct 

M OSCOW — A half kilo 
of cottage cheese, 
please, some kielbasa, a loaf 
of rye and a carton of milk. No 
NATO expansion today, 
thank you, but the unsliced 
Soviet Union looks good. 
And how's the chopped Boris 
Yeltsin? 

It’s one-stop shopping for 
food and politics at Zhirin- 
ovsky's Grocery Store, the 
latest innovation in the career 

of Vla dimir Zhiri novsky. 
Russia’s mosr flamboyant 
and unpredictable politician. 

Zhirinovsky butsr onro 
Russia's political stage six 
years ago by appealing to its 
citizens' sense of frustration 
over the hard times that ac- 
companied the shift from 
communism to capitalism. 
His ultranationalist, incendi- 
ary statements won him at- 
tention and votes, to the hor- 
ror of the Yeltsin government 
and Washington alike. 

Despite repeated electoral 
setbacks, he has main rained 
his influence along another 
track — through party orga- 
nization. Along with the 
Communists, his Liberal 
Democratic Party is the only 
opposition force that can field 
candidates nationwide. 

□ 

Now he is trying to alrer his 
image a biL The grocery store 
shows a kinder, gentler 
Zhirinovsky, aides say. 

“We are showing chat our 
leader cares about what the 
people care about," said 
Mikhail Bashaglov, a mem- 
ber of parliament from 
Zhirinovsky's party and man- 
ager of the shop. “Most 
people care nothing about 
politics, but they're very in- 
terested in finding sour cream 
at a good price. 

The srore opened a month 


ago in a quiet neighborhood 
near Moscow State Uni- 
versity. It is a clean, well- 
lighted place, and it regularly 
sells some products at dis- 
counted prices. 

A color portrait ■ of 
Zhirinovsky is the shop’s 
only decoration. If business 
goes well, Zhirinovsky plans 
to create a chain. “Maybe 
some caf£s, too,’’ Bashaglov 
said. 

□ 

Customers ■ interviewed 
there recently said they came 
for the bargains, not the pol- 
itics. Nevertheless, several 
edirions of Zhirinovsky’s 
party newspaper were 
stacked on a table, free for the 
taking. One featured the 
headline “Patriotism Is an 
Effective Way of Uniting the 
People and State." On the 
back page was an article 
about demonstrations against 
NATO expansion. 

Despite Zhirinovsky's fre- 
quent anti-Western outbursts, 
die store sells numerous for- 
eign products, including yo- 
gurt and cognac. The vodka, 
however, is Russian, and his 
personal brand, Zhirinovsky 
Vodka, takes up most of the 
space on the vodka shelf. His 
portrait adorns the label. 

Zhirinovsky's Grocery 
Store is run by a business arm 
of the party, Bashaglov said. 

(Meanwhile, the bad boy of 
Russian politics was more 
than a bit piqued when the 
bouncers at Chuck Norris's 
“Beverly Hills Casino." a 
swish new nightclub in cen- 
tral Moscow, kept him away 
from a private party and 
beauty contest. AFP reported. 
“He’s my guest," the em- 
barrassed Hollywood star ex- 
plained. putting his arm round 
Zhirinovsky and ushering 
him inside, in a clip shown on 
Russian NTV television 
Thursday.; 


Call It ‘Weirdstock’: Nevada Desert Event Is Hot 


By Michael Colton 

Washington Past Service 

H UALAPAI PLAY A Nevada 
— Near the tower made of 
animal bones, several half-naked 
women, known as the Space Cow- 
girls. ride by with goofy, mis- 
shapen. multicolor bikes borrowed 
from Pedal Camp, a sort of bicycle 
graveyard where gear-head Frank- 
ensteins build makeshift vehicles 
from scavenged and donated pans. 

Behind Pedal Camp, the Man 
stands tall. Forty feet tall. Soon he 
will bum. For this is Burning Man, 
and dial's what we’re here for. 

Burning Man is an arts festival in 
the Nevada desen, but that's like 
calling World War Q a skirmish. 
For this week, the Hualapai Playa 
near the Black Rock Desert a vast, 
eerie landscape, has officially be- 
come an alternate universe. Around 
15,000 people are expected in this 
instant city in the middle of 
nowhere; they come to do things 
they can’t do anywhere else. 

They — no, we — will crash-test 
TVs and dance and drum all night. 
We will lick cherry syrup from a 
huge ice sundial that holds frozen 
clocks and watches within. We will 
impersonate sperm and fertilize a 
giant egg. We will cover ourselves 
in mudat the nearby hot springs. 
We will often be naked if we are not 
sipping martinis in formal wear. 
And on Sunday night we will in- 
cinerate the effigy that gives the 
festival its name. 

The central tenet of Burning 
Man is “no spectating." Its cre- 
ator, Larry Harvey, a former San 
Francisco landscaper, has called 
the festival “Disneyland in re- 
verse,” pointing out that here the 
visitors themselves are the attrac- 
tion. Journalists are treated no dif- 
ferently from anyone else; my 
“press pass” says simply, “This 
pass entitles you to nothing in par- 
ticular. Have a beautiful experience 
of your own." 

In addition to participation, the 
other pillars of the Burning Man 
experience are radical self-expres- 
sion and a shared struggle to sur- 


vive. The former is easy to see out 
here on the playa, where spraced-up 
* ‘art cars,* 1 covered in microchips or 
shaped to look like various animals, 
sit idle while their owners craft cos- 
tumes for their own bodies. 

As for survival — well, no one 
gets off easy here in heat that can 
reach 1 10 degrees Fahrenheit (43 
Centigrade), where dust devils whip 
over you and clog every orifice with 
playa din. Everyone is responsible 
for his or her own shelter, food and, 
most crucially , water. (Also aJco- 
hoL tobacco, firearms, etc.) 

Burning Man. which runs 
through Monday, is a festival with 
no m eanin g and every meaning. 

Bur ning Man is an 
arts festival with no 
meaning, a ‘hippie 
neo-pagan freakfesL’ 

and any attempt to label it will 
inevitably fail. There are political 
and philosophical conclusions to 
be drawn from it, perfect for an 
undergraduate sociology thesis, 
but they're ignored by those ex- 
periencing the immediate, visceral 
thrill of the event 
Though intensely creative, many 
of die people here spend all day in 
front of a glowing screen. Burning 
Man is their chance to let loose. 
Many participants meet over the 
Internet finding carpools and camp 
mates. Some have theorized that 
Burning Man is itself a physical 
manifestation of the Internet, 
where anything can, and does, hap- 
pen. Fittingly, Wired magazine has 
latched on to Burning Man, c allin g 
it the “new American holiday." 

In Harvey's phrase, Burning 
Man is a “new populist social 
movement" that has been pigeon- 
holed as a “proto-apocalyptic, hip- 
pie neo-pagan freakfesr. ‘ ’ 

Much of the creative energy 
goes into theme camps, which are 
tiie main structures here. They are 
themselves living an. individual 
enclaves open to all who stop by for 


a cocktail, a chat or perhaps a 
spanking. Anyone who thinks of a 
theme-camp idea can create one. 

Among this year's offerings: the 
Aliceum, featuring flaming cro- 
quet and Mad Hatter tea parties: 
Alien Abduction Camp: Camp 
Sunscreen (volunteer masseuses 
welcome); the Sticky Fingers Shop 
for shoplifting; Sketch City, with 
more than 100 Etch-A-Sketches; 
and Womb With a View, a 74-foor 
(23-raeter) model of a pregnant fe- 
male body. 

One camp. Frequency Publics, 
an interactive spoken-word radio 
station, is one of several pirate ra- 
dio stations that have sprung up in 
Burning Man. There is also a news- 
paper, the Black Rock Gazette, 
whose editor. Rusty Blazenhoff. 
brings firearms to die festival and 
was responsible for last year's 
Toaster Kill, in which three dozen 
toasters were mercilessly de- 
stroyed. “We’re nuts about guns, 
but we’re not gun nuts," he says. 

The production that Burning 
Man has become — this year’s 
event will cost nearly S 1 million — 
had modest beginnings. On the 
summer solstice in June 1986, Har- 
vey, recovering from a failed love 
affair, builr an eight-foot wooden 
man with his friends, which they 
burned on a San Francisco beach. 
(Naturally, an event like this has 
California origins.) Perhaps it was 
a catharsis, or an act of revenge, or 
a symbol of his own mortality'. Har- 
vey refuses to label it. 

“The Man never represented 
anything,” says Harvey,- 49. who’s 
never seen without his Stetson. “It 
was a spontaneous, impulsive act 
like so many things at Burning Man. 
Representing nothing, the Man be- 
comes tabula rasa: .Any meaning 
may be projected onto him-’’ 

Buoyed by the response of the 
handful that gathered- Harvey built 
and burned a Man the next summer. 
And the next And the nexL The 
Man grew, and so did the crowd. In 
1990, with about 800 people on the 
beach, the police stepped in to pro- 
hibit Harvey from setting the Alan 
aflame, citing potential fire haz- 


rsrr.v ife.ys" 





• v/ ■ w ■ ^ * <i. 

f *: 

s?.; * : ?• - n? ‘ 


The Man waiting to be burned in Nevada's Black Rock Desert. 


ards. Harvey agreed but the crowd 
rioted — attacking Harvey and try- 
ing to light the Man themselves. 

. The burning had become too 
easy, and its onlookers too de- 
manding. If this event was to sur- 
vive, it had to become an Event. 

Later that summer — on Labor 
Day — Harvey and 100 compadres 
and tiie Man struck out for the 
Black Rock Desert in Nevada, the 
largest flat expanse in North Amer- 
ica? "It was uke walking out onto 
the frozen ocean," he says. 

“The move to the desert saved 
Burning Man from becoming a 
roadside attraction, and a mere 
thrill to be consumed passively. It 
now required active effort to reach 
the site. People struggled together, 
forming a community, and it turned 
everyone who came into a par- 
ticipant" Burning Man has be- 
come cosmopolitan — there are 
participants from Turkey, England, 


& 


Ireland, Iceland, Australia. Japan.4& 
and Denmark — but about half die** 
attendees are Bay Area resident^' 

Theprimitive survivalist aspects 
of the festival may-seem to contrast 
with the digital world of its in- 
habitants. but Burning Man has be- 
come a pastiche of various parts of 
our culture and history. Tt nas the 
spontaneous-gathering feel ‘ of 
Woodstock, the spirituality - anti 
temporary community of the Rain- 
bow’ Gathering, the campiness, out- -j 
rageousness and identity-transfor- 
mation of tiie drag-queen scene, tire 
edginess and danger of a Harley- 
Davidson convention and the bum-, 
ing and worship of, well, die an- 
cient Druids. 

Every time you ask what Burn- 
ing Man means, you get a different 
answer. For Harvey, it's the way 
the community “spontaneously 
generates culture" — instead of 
simply consuming it. 


AN APPRECIATION 


PEOPLE 


American TV Bids Farewell to a Great Showman 


By Bill Carter 

New York Times Sen ice 


N EW YORK — It was 
perhaps the ultimate 
tribute. A colleague at the 
top of the entertainment 
business had just learned of 
the death of his longtime 
friend, Brandon Taitikoff. 

“In an industry that is 
often very cynical and un- 
forgiving, Brandon didn’t 
have a cynical bone in his 
body," said Jeff Sagansky, 
co-president of entertain- 
ment for Sony Pictures. 

' ‘He believed in everything 
be was doing, and more 
than that he believed in the 
medium and the people 
who watched it" 

Tartikoff, 48, one of the 
most successful showmen 
in the history of network 
television, who brought to 
NBC such hit series as “Hill Street 
Blues," "The Cosby Show," 
"Miami Vice" and “Cheers," died 
Wednesday at UCLA Medical Center 
in Los Angeles of complications from 
treatment for Hodgkin's disease. 

In recent years the head of his own 
entertainment production company, 
Tartikoff had been an executive with 
NBC, Paramount Pictures and New 
World Entertainment. 

But it was as president of NBC 
Entertainment, a job he took in 1980 
and held for more than a decade, that 
he made his mark on the television 
industry and the viewing public. 

NBC, which had been widely re- 
garded as the laughing stock of the 
television industry when Tartikoff 
began, ended the decade with the 
longest laugh in network history: It 
finished first in the Nielsen ratings 68 
weeks in a row. 

At NBC. where he had not worked 
since 199 1 , the legacy of his programs 
remains at the core of the network's 
success. For example, it was Taitikoff 
who. looking for a possible successor 
to Johnny Carson at the "Tonight” 



TH4; W*Abuiji/R*utrr» 

Brandon Tartikoff, 48, who “smiled at life.” 


show, signed a deal with a then-little- 
known comedian named Jerry Sein- 
feld that led to the most successful 
show on NBC in the last half decade. 

Tartikoff was known for taking a 
highly personal approach to program- 
ming, often offering producers his 
own ideas for shows that later turned 
into hits. Among the most memorable 
was a meeting with a young producer 
when Tartikoff scribbled the phrase 
“MTV cops” on a napkin. The pro- 
ducer, Anthony Yerkovich, turned 
that notion into "Miami Vice." one 
of NBC’s powerhouse programs of 
the '80s. 

Tartikoff seemed destined to pro- 
gram a network from a young age. At 
10 he began telling his parents that he 
thought the lead actor in his favorite 
show. “Dennis the Menace” was 
miscast. Later, at Yale, in a writing 
seminar given by the author Robert 
Penn Warren, lie suggested that a 
D.H. Lawrence story needed a better 
plot. Warren told him, “You should 
probably think of a career in tele- 
vision." 

He followed the advice, joining 


WLS-TV, an ABC-owned 
station in Chicago. There he 
made a name for himself for 
his creative promotions of 
the station's trove of dusty 
old movies, at one point call- 
ing a batch of ape movies 
“Gorilla My Dreams 
Week." The movies scored 
huge ratings. 

That brought him to the 
attention of the network. He 
worked a year at ABC before 
joining NBC in 1977. At the 
time, the network was in the 
midst of a total collapse. 

Fred Silverman, the net- 
work's president and a le- 
gendary programmer himself, 
installed Taitikoff. then 31. as 
head of entertainment in 1980. 
He was the youngest person 
ever chosen to be the head 
programmer of a network. 

When Grant Tinker, the 
highly regarded head of the 
MTM production company, arrived at 
NBC a year later, charged with re- 
surrecting its fortunes, he decided that 
Tartikoff was one of its key assets. 
“In the midst of all NBC’s flounder- 
ing. Brandon looked like an island of 
sanity," Tinker said. 

Taitikoff had enormous personal 
hurdles to overcome throughout his 
career. As Don Ohlmyer, president of 
NBC's West Coast division, put it. 
“Life didn’t always smile on him. yet 
Brandon always smiled at life." 

While he was in Chicago, at age 25, 
Tartikoff was first diagnosed with 
Hodgkin's disease. He underwent ra- 
diology treatment and never missed a 
day of work. He was declared cured. 
Less than a decade later, shortly after 
he took over as president of NBC 
Entertainment, the disease returned. 

It came at time when his early ef- 
forts to return around NBC’s pro- 
gramming fortunes were faltering. 
One lineup of eight new series he put 
on the schedule failed en masse. 

In 1982, at a meeting of NBC af- 
filiates, Tartikoff appeared to discuss 
NBC’s programs. He had been un- 


dergoing chemotherapy. Only the 
highest NBC executives’ knew be was 
wearing a wig and had false eyebrows 
taped to his face. The NBC affiliate 
managers asked him to leave the 
room. He sat sick and chilled, in a 
hotel lobby, as the managers insisted 
to Tinker that Tartikoff be fired. 

Tinker refused, and the network 
began to rum around soon after, as 
Tartikoff added first “Cheers," then 
"The Cosby Show," to NBC’s 
lineup. Later years featured other 
classic shows ’ like “L.A. Law," 
“Family Ties," “Golden Girls" and 
“St. Elsewhere." 

The cancer again went into remis- 
sion. Tartikoff attacked life with the 
same unrelenting vigor he brought to 
his work. He and his wife. Lilly, were 
one of the most active and attractive 
couples in Hollywood. 

Tartikoff s family life received an- 
other blow in 1991 when he and his 
daughter Calla, then 8, were seriously 
injured in a car accident He quickly 
recovered. His daughter, however, 
went through a long process of treat- 
ment The family moved to New Or- 
leans to facilitate her treatment and 
had only recently moved back full 
time to Los Angeles. 

After the accident Tartikoff joined 
Paramount Pictures as chairman, 
where he supervised such hit movies 
as “Wayne’s World” and “Clear and 
Present Danger." But he left Para- 
mount in 1992 to devote more time to 
his family in New Orleans. 

Though he developed shows for 
New World Entertainment, he was 
mostly involved in independent pro- 
duction since then, through a com- 
pany he had named H. Beale, after 
Howard Beale, the dazed anchorman 
character in the movie "Network." 

Sagansky of Sony Pictures said he 
had been shocked at the news of 
Tartikoff's death because he had so 
recently spoken with him and found 
him as full of life as ever. 

"He had just been through treat- 
ment and his voice was barely a whis- 
per," Sagansky said, “but he wanted 
to tell me his latest ideas." 


T HE latest film by Woody 
Allen, “Deconstructing 
Harry," opened the Venice 
Rim Festival, but the director 
wasn't there. “My heart is in 
Venice but everything else is 
in Manhattan," said Allen, 
whose film was shown out- 
side competition. As the fes- 
tival got under way, the 
American director Stanley 
Kubrick, the Italian director 
Michelangelo Antonioni, 
the French actor Gerard De- 
pardieu and the Italian act- 
ress Alfda Valli were hon- 
ored for lifetime achieve- 
ment. The actual competition 
for the top prize began Thurs- 
day with a showing of the 
French movie “Le Septieme 
Ciel" (“Seventh Heaven") 
by Benoit JacquoL 

□ 

The newspaper Le Monde 
on Thursday backed a jour- 
nalist whose interview with Princess Diana 
sparked British accusations that the princess 
was meddling in politics and prompted a 
denial from Diana. '‘We stand by our story 
and we deny the denials." the influential 
French daily said. The princess had denied 
telling Le Monde’s Annick Cojean that the 



NIHi-+- '•p-.'‘lir' R--i.it- 

Depardieu in Venice. 


“But we have only been, 
really together for a year."; , 
Was she happy about beings ' 
teen mother? Apparently? 
“The good thing about hav- 
ing young parents," said 
Peggy, “is that they under- ? 
stand their children better.” 

□ ’ 

The actress Robin Givens 
is married again, and this time 
the groom has a passion/ 
gentler than boxing. Givens 
married a tennis teacher from v 
the former Yugoslavia. ' 
Svetozar Mari nko vie. in a l 
beachside ceremony in San 
Diego. Givens, who co-stao 
in the television sitcom 
“Sparks." married Mike 
Tyson in 1988. but divorced - 
him about a year larer and. 
went public with tales of beat- 
ings by the boxer. 

□ ••• 


Housing and Urban Development Secre- 
tary Andrew Cuomo and his wife, Kerry 
Kennedy Cuomo, have a new daughter. Mrs: 
Cuomo, the daughter of Ethel and the laie 
Robert Kennedy, gave birth Tuesday to a ’ 
girl. Michaela Andrea, in Washington. They' 
also have 2-year-old twin girls. The newesr 


previous Conservative government’s policy addition is the eighth grandchild for the 
on land mines was “hopeless." But Le former New York governor Mario Cuomo 

and bis wife, Matilda. All are girls. 


Monde wrote that Diana “indeed pronounced 
this sentence: 'The former one was so hope- 
less,’ " referring to the predecessor of the 
current Labour government. . . Elizabeth 
Emanuel, who designed Diana’s wedding 
gown, said Thursday that she had been in- 
undated with offers to help save her fashion 
company from financial collapse. The de- 
signer had said her business was in “a very 
critical position" because of the collapse of 
her major backer. “We have had an un- 
believable response." said Emanuel, who is 
talking to several potential backers. 

□ 

Franck Petitdemange has become 
France’s youngest grandfather at the age of 32 
and 4 months, according to the Guinness 
Book of Records. His daughter Peggy, a 16- 
year-old high school student, gave birth to a 
girl in the eastern French town of Toul. The 
father, Kevin, is also 16. “We have known 
each other since we were 9," said Peggy. 


□ 

Yakov Ravin was walking in a Los 
Angeles park with bis grandson last month 
when he saw a face that looked familiar. Sure 
enough, it was former President Ronald 
Reagan. “I wanted to take his picture im- 
mediately." Ravin, who lives in Sylvania,- 
Ohio, told the Toledo newspaper The Blade.. 

He approached Reagan and asked for per- 
mission to take a photo. “Go ahead," Reagan 
said, smiling. Ravin looked over to the Secret 
Service agents he saw with Reagan and they 
gave the go-ahead. So 12-year-old Rost!k*~ 
Denenburg, who moved to Ohio five years 
ago from Ukraine, joined Reagan on a bench 
in Armand Hammer Park while his grand- 
father snapped away. Reagan. 86, has largely 
withdrawn from public life since being dia- 
gnosed with Alzheimer's disease. But Ravin 
said the former president "looked good' 
enough" during their brief meeting. 



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