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Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL: 




rUmnc! 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspapei 


R 


Paris, Wednesday-Thursday, December 24-25, 1997 



No, 35,712 



- ■‘V ' . ■ . 




Hong Kong 
Bans Fowl 
From China 

Fourth Avian Flu Death 
Cited in Chicken Curb 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Past Service 

HONG KONG — Rattled by a mys- 
terious avian virus that has killed four 
people and hospitalized eight, Hong 
Kong health authorities on Tuesday sus- 
pended all imports of chicken from 
mainland China, by far die largest sup- 
plier of poultry to the territory. 

The halt to imports came as the “bird 
flu” on Tuesday claimed its fourth sus- 
pected victim, a 60-year-old woman 
who died in a local hospital. The gov- 
ernment said that she died of pneu- 
monia, but could not confirm yet that 
she had the avian virus. 

So far, the virus has affected children 
as young as 2, a teenager who died and 
adults of various ages. One victim a lcr> 
in critical condition is a Filipino do- 
mestic worker who is believed to have 
been handling a chicken in preparation 
for a family meal. Only 2 of the .12 
people to contract the disease have been 
successfully treated and released from 


1*1 HIM i 



is a new illness, a new virus,” 
said Paul Saw, the deputy health di- 
rector, at a news conference Tuesday. 
“There is still very little we know about 
the virus," 

The import suspension was described 
as a temporary measure to give officials 
here time to set up a stria system of 
controls for monitoring Chinese-origin 
poultry. The controls will include a new 
rapid blood test for imported birds and a 
five-day holding period before the 
chickens can be sold at local markets. 

China supplies Hong Kong about 
75,000 chickens each day, or about 70 
percent of local consumption. 

Hong Kong officials said the sus- 
pension of Chinese chicken imports had 
been agreed to by authorities across the 
border. Leslie Sims, the senior veter- 
inary officer with die agriculture and 
fisheries department, said the move was 
intended to “restore confidence to die 
local market and to insure that only 
wwfcded lards can be imported to 
HeugKong.^- - 

Cana is widely suspected to be die 
source of -the mysterious influenza 
known as H5N1, but commonly called 
‘Trird flu*?' because it was originally 

See FLU, Page 7 


OiM.-. i ' 


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AGENDA 

Russians Will Free 
U.S. Man Held as Spy 

WASHINGTON (Renters) — 
An American telecommunications 
engineer arrested and charged with 
espionage in Russia will be allowed 
toieave under an agreement with the 
R ussia n security service, the U.S. 
Stale Department said Tuesday. 

Richard Bliss, on employee of 
Qualcomm Ccwp., based in San 
Diego, was arrested in the Russian 
city of Rostov-on-Don on Nov. 25. 
Mr. Bliss, his company and U.S. 
'Officials deny that he was spying. 

To Our Readers 
Because of die Christmas hol- 
iday, this is a double issue of the 
IHt, The papa will not be pub- 
lished on Tnursday. Publication re- 
sumes with Friday’s issue. 

Books Page 10. 

Crossword.*-. - ..... Page 10. 

Opinion - Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19. 

. flhafttfwm a ritet Pages 4,5. 


fto IHT on-line wwv;. iht.com 


The Cotlar 


Mw I Vwfc Tuaaday 0 4 PM. pwtatw dpM 


DM 


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1.7815 


Pound 


1.687 


1.6635 


Yon 


12925 


130.125 





•127.54 


7601.77 


S&P 500 


7819.31 


TuwdayQ^PM. pmwamdpM 
-14^8 839/12 " 953.70 




Newsstand Price* 

■ Anttona. ..10.00 FF Lebanon U.a0QC| 

12.50 FF Morocco 16 Dh 

Cam *oon...i.600Cfi l \ Qatar ,_10.00 QR 

. Egypt „£E5,5Q Reunion liSOFF 

France 10.00 FF Saudi Aral».'-....10 SR 

Gabon. t.tOOCFA Senega! — 1.100 CFA 

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•wy Coast. 1250 CW Tunisia— 1250 Din 

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Kwaa ,..700 Pfe U.S. MU. (Sir.) ....SI 20 




Seoul Fights Debt Crunch 

Stocks and Won Fall as Foreign Bankers Set Terms 


' ■- • • 




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A courtroom sketch portrays ‘Carlos 7 listening to testimony in Paris. 

‘Carlos’ Tells Paris Jury: 
‘There Is No Law for Me’ 

Terrorist Makes Final Plea in Murder Trial 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — Making his final plea for 
acquittal, the terrorist- known as 
“Carlos the Jackal” attacked the pro- 
ceedings Tuesday as a political snow 
trial to punish him for his “love of 
revolution.” 

“There is no law for me,” said 
Carlos, who was bom in Venezuela 
and whose name isHich Ramirez Sanc- 
hez. He is on trial for the 1975 murders 
of two French investigators and a fel- 
low pro-Palestinian rnilrrwnr Lebanese 
whom he said had betrayed him. 

But before Judge Yves Comeloup 
halted his monologue and sent the 
jury to deliberate on the trial’s sev- 
enth day, Carlos said he was unafraid 
of spending the rest of his days behind 
bars. “They want to sentence me to 
lifeinprison/'hesaid. “I’m 48 years 
old, so it could be another 40 of 50 
years. That doesn’t horrify me.” 


Carlos took the stand and spoke for 
more than two hours before the court 
recessed briefly. With the right to 
continue speaking as long as he wants. 
Carlos planned to continue long after 
the break, but Judge Comeloup halted 
him after another hour. 

In a rambling speech of heavily 
Spanish-accented French, Carlos 
Stuck tD the them**- he has mainffttTK»ri 
throughout the trial: his “love of rev- 
olution and love of justice” — 
something he said he could not get 
from the French judicial system. “I 
am a political prisoner, ’ ’ he said, read- 
ing from a red notebook. 

He spoke at length about the Pal- 
estinian cause, for which he fought 
over many years, calling it “a world- 
wide war and a war the world will 
win,” and condemned Israel as a 

See CARLOS, Page 7 


By Don Kirk 

Special to die Herald Tribune 


SEOUL — South Korea’s stock mar- 
ket and currency dropped again to re- 
cord lows Tuesday as the government 
fought to quell fears thar it would have 
to declare a debt moratorium. 

The rapid decline in the value of the 
currency, the won, reflected the des- 
peration of a financial community 
searching for foreign currency to pay off 
debts due this week and next 

“All bets are off, the bottom’s fallen 
out,” said Richard SamueJson, branch 
manager of SBC Warburg, watching the 
dollar rise to 1,962 won as banks closed 
Tuesday. The currency almost reached 
the 2,000 mark during the day, hitting an 
all-time high of 1 ,995 won before easing 
slightly. 

The thirst for dollars had the same 
impact on the stock market where share 
prices slipped 7.5 percent, their worst 
day ever, amid growing fears that more 
companies would go bankrupt without 
the credit or investment needed to pro- 
duce, export and stay afloat 

Government officials met with foreign 
bankers to appeal for a rollover of $20 
billion in loans falling due by the nnirMV. 
of next month as a way to avoid going 
into default A Finance Ministry spokes- 
man estimated that South Korean in- 
stitutions would be able to pay off $ 10 
billion in debts if foreign banks “agree to 
roll over half of their Korean loans.” 

Foreign bankers, however, were said 
to be divided in their response. 

“We can work it out if everyone 
remains cool,” Guillanme Lejoindre. 
chairman of the Foreign Bankers As- 
sociation, told Bloomberg News, re- 
porting 1 ‘smiles on the foreign bankers' 
faces by the end of the meeting. ' * 

But on die basis of word from bankers 
at the meeting, a securities analyst said 
some of them “want to restructure and 
refinance, and some do not.'’ In any 
case, he added, “We hear they’re 
rolling over for only a month” instead 
of three to six months, the norm. 


Japanese and American hanks were 
said to be leaning toward extending 
loans. “They have huge interests here,” 
the analyst said “It’s in their interest to 
avoid a debt moratorium." In addition, 
major foreign banks, including Citibank 
and Chase Manhattan, may form a con- 
sortium to drum up $10 biluon in credit, a 
Finance Ministry spokesman said. 

A sign of deepening distrust in the 

• Indonesian foreign debt may be as 
much as $200 billion. Page 11. 

■ South Korea's conglomerates 
won’t be easy to fix. Page 15. 

South Korean economy was that not a 
single foreigner invested in govern- 
ment-backed bonds of three years or less 
on Tuesday — the first day foreigners 
had ever had access to that market. “It 
was as if you gave a party and none of 
the guests showed up,” an analyst said. 

The yield on three-year corporate 
bonds set a record Tuesday. The interest 
rate soared to a high of 31.45 percent 
before closing ai 31.11 percent — an- 
other reflection of distrust in the vi- 

See KOREA, Page 15 



Tbc Aamixeil Prc" 

A Korean Exchange Bank employ- 
ee updating a display of the won- 
dollar conversion rate on Tuesday. 







Makers of Luxury Goods 
Sour on Asia’s New Poor 


By Jennifer Steinhauer 

New Yorfc Times Service 

NEW YORK — The visual rhet- 
oric of fashion has always had only a 
tenuous relationship with its actual 
business plan. 

A few of those house-defining 
gowns depicted so lavishly in 
magazine advertisements do sell/ but 
most fashion profits are raked in at the 
perfume and accessories counter. 
And while there certainly are affluent 
American customers for designer 
goods, roughly half of the .world's 
full-priced luxury purchases are made 
by Asians, either in their own coun- 
tries or while traveling. 

Many fashion companies, therefore, 
have pegged their growth in recent 
years to the Pacific, largely through 
sales of handbags, perfumes and other 
goods that will fit into the overhead 
compartments on an airplane. 

This is the business reality that is 
being severely tested these days as 
Asia suffers an economic upheaval that 
has seriously injured the luxury retail 
business in Hong Kong, South Korea 
and elsewhere and caused many lux- 
ury-goods companies to rein in their 
growth plans, at least far now. 

“The wealthy Asian consumer just 
went over the cliff and will probably 
stay quite depressed over 1998,” said 
Edward Yardeni, chief economist at 
Deutsche Morgan Grenfell in New 
York. “Most of these higb-end re- 


tailers that had been counting on 
Asian yuppies for their growth over 
the next 10 years are stuck with 
American yuppies for now.” 

Economic weaknesses throughout 
Asia have caused currencies and 
stock prices to plunge: Hong Kong, 
tbe hot spot of luxury-goods sales, has 
taken a beating since October, and the 
Japanese economy has been in a 
traded slump, with recent bank 
ures underscoring the seriousness. 

At the same time, the cuirencies of 
several Southeast Asian countries — 
spots that fashion has eyed for years 
— have weakened sharply in tbe past 
several months. In South Korea, 
where the International Monetary 
Fund was recently forced to come up 
with a $60 billion financial bailout, 
there was already something of a 
backlash against foreign luxury 
goods. If that mood continues, there 
could be long-term trouble ahead. 

AH these problems have meant one 
simple thing: There are far fewer 
people willing or able to shell out for 
leather handbags and spike-heeled 
shoes these days, let alone for the 
matched designer outfits the Asian 
customer favors. 

Luxury sales in Tokyo have re- 
mained mostly steady, but foreign 
travel is down for the Japanese. 
People are no longer flocking in such 
huge numbers to Hong Kong, where 

See LUXURY, Page 15 


Scigri GttVTte Amniatd Proi 

BELARUSSIAN SANTA CLAUS — Andrei Sukach, 5, and his mother, Irina, 26, unpacking Christmas gifts 
Tuesday that were distributed to patients at a hospital in Minsk by the Belarussian Children's Fund. 


Somali Quest for Peace: 
A Shaky Accord at Best 

Bitter Rivalries Threaten Hard-Fought Deal 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Service 


U.S. Lifts the Lid on Old Nuclear Toys 


By Walter Pmcus 

Washington Pest Service 


WASHINGTON — More than 30 years ago, the United 
States developed a lightweight nuclear device and then “ex- 
tensively practiced” delivering it to an enemy harbor using a 
navy or Marine parachutist, according to materials made 
public by the Defense and Energy departments. 

Formerly classified film showing a parachutist with a so- 
called Spatial Atomic Demolition Munition was among 
formerly classified material concerning atomic weapons, 
including hundreds of thousands of pages of documents; 
made public Monday by Energy Secretary Federico Pena as 
part a Clinton administration program announced four 
years ago to introduce greater openness on atomic matters. 


Although the smalt nuclear device was never used, its yield 
of less than a kdoton — or 1,000 tons of TNT — could have 
caused enormous damage and, if detonated in a harbor, would 
have left a wide area of radioactive wreckage and con- 
taminated water. 

Roger Heusser of the Energy Department’s Office of 
Declassification acknowledged that the 60-pound (27-kilo- 
gram) weapon, part of the U.S. arsenal from 1963 through 
1989, could be seen as a precedent for a possible present-day 
terrorist nuclear weapon. 

Another nuclear weapon capable of being fired by a single 
soldier, the so-called Davy Crockett, was also shown for tbe first 
time being tested in a simulated battle at the Nevada Test Site. 

See WEAPON, Page 7 


CAIRO — The leaders of rival 
Somali factions have agreed to try to 
restore national government for tbe first 
time since civil war engulfed tbe coun- 
try six years ago, but tensions among the 
clans make it all but certain that fresh 
differences and rivalries will emerge. 

The accord, the product of more than 
a month of negotiations, aims to end the 
conflict and anarchy that have prevailed 
in Somalia since the toppling of the 
dictator. Mohammed Siad Barre, in 
1991. 

It would establish an interim gov- 
ernment in which power 'would be 
shared among the factions that have 
divided the country into aimed camps. 

That government and its leaders will 
not be chosen until hundreds of del- 


Fired for Pregnancy, Actress Is Awarded $5 Million 

ultimately unsuccessfully — claiming 
she was demoted because of her looks, 


By Lloyd Grove 
and Davia Von Drehle 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — An actress hired 
to play a slender temptress on tele- 
vision's “Melrose Place” — but fired 
after she became pregnant — has won a 
judgment of nearly $5 million from a 

^SumerTylo^.nudn- 
tained in her lawsuit against Spelling 
Entertainment Group and Spelling 
Television Inc. that clever camera 
angles, advanced technology, body 
doubles and ber own fit figure could 
have allowed her to continue in the cast 
of the bed-hopping evening melodrama. 


Instead, she charged, one of the pro- 
ducers of the show had said: “Why 
doesn’t she just go out and get an abor- 
tion? Then she can work.” 

Spelling officials, who denied that 
the abortion remark was made, 
countered that a visibly pregnant wom- 
an would not be credible as a “vixen, 
seductress, adulteress” and therefore 
could not be part of “Melrose Place." 

The jury award — $4 million for 
emotional distress and $894,601 for 
economic loss — is the latest blow in a 
long-running war over the rules that will 
govern a television universe obsessed 
with appearances. Since the early 
1980s, when a repeater in Kansas City, 
Christine Craft, sued Metromedia — 


women have argued that the industry’s 
standards are not only skin-deep but 
illegally discriminatory. 

Tbe verdict came at considerable per- 
sonal cost, Miss Tylo said. 

“We’ve won a victory after a little 
over a year and half of nothing but 
attacks on my family, my personal life, 
my sex life, my birth control methods, 
problems with my marriage,” she said 
A jubilant Nathan Goldberg- Miss 
Tylo’s attorney and lead litigator, said 
die case had set a precedent for tele- 
vision. “This is the first case in the annals 

See ACTRESS, Page 7 



... 




__ Kfnl I’fTHi-.-r^Kriilrr. 

Hunter Tylo after the verdict. 


egates representing Somalia’s various 
clans gather to review the plan next 
month in the Somali city of Baidoa. 

But at a signing ceremony Monday 
night at the Egyptian Foreign Ministry, 
faction leaders and others who took part 
in the talks described the accord as a 
major step and perhaps a watershed in 
the quest to end the conflict. 

“This means everything for 
Somalia,” said Hussein Mohammed 
Aidid, who succeeded his late father. 
Mohammed Farah Aidid as leader of 
one of the country’s most powerful fac- 
tions. The younger Aidid described the 
accord as “the culmination of years of 
negotiations apd agreements.” 

Mohammed Shaaban, an Egyptian 
assistant foreign minister, said of the 
Somali faction leaders, “They are now 
halfway toward ending their war.” 

In addition to Mr. Aidid, Monday 
night's ceremony was attended by most 
of Somalia's most important faction 
leaders, including All Mahdi Mo- 
hammed,' a fierce rival for control of 
Mogadishu, the country's long-divided 
capital. . 

While the ceremony underscored a 
broad base of support for the accord 
among Somali faction leaders, there re- 
main sane forces in Somalia who have 
expressed opposition to the unification 
plan. 

These include Mohammed Ibrahim 
Egal, president of breakaway Soma- 
liland in the northwest of the country, 
who has said he will not allow the region 
to be reintegrated in any unified Somali 
government 

They also include two faction lead- 
ers, Colonel Abdallah Youssef and 
General Aden Abdallah Niir, who had 
beat aligned with Mr. Ati Mahdi but 
abandoned the negotiations in Cairo last 

See SOMALIS, Page 7 










PAGE TWO 


Conjoined Twins / Separate? A Definite 'No' 


Two Special Sisters , Living One for the Other 


By Natalie Angier 

New York Times Service 


R EADING, Pennsylvania — Like many 
twins descended from a single egg 
whom the world has deemed “identi- 
cal,'' Lori and Reba Schappell prefer to 
emphasize their differences over their simil- 
arities. 

Lori is warm and boisterous and maternal. She 
wants to get married and have babies, she says, 
and at the age of 36, she wants to do it soon. Reba 
is quiet and self-contained, and she squirms 
whenever her sister hugs her in public or tells her 
that she loves her. Reba is focused on her fledgling 
career as a country singer. Earlier this month, she 
flew to California to accept an L-A. Music Award 
for best new country artist of the year. 

Lori keeps her brown hair short, speaks with the 
broad-voweled accent of the Reading area, where 
the sisters have always lived, and loves strawbeny 
daiquiris. Reba colors her wavy hair copper, has 
adopted a Nashville twang and is a teetotaler. 

But there are certain things the sisters un- 
deniably share. They are, literally, of one flesh. 
They are conjoined at the head, portions of their 
skull, scalp and blood vessels fused at the side in 
a mirror-image configuration, so that they face 
in opposire directions. 

And though they have two distinct brains, 
they are of one mind in their opinion about 
whether they would ever consider undertaking 
the risks of surgical separation. 

“Our point of view is no, straight-out no," 
said Reba. for the moment not the “quiet" one. 
“Why would you want to do that? For all the “ 
money in China, why? You'd be r uining two 
lives in the process." 

"And we'd miss the other one horribly if she 
were to die," Lori added. 

Reba and Lori live a life that no singleton can 
imagine, and one that looks unbearably difficult. 
Where one goes, so must the other. 

Reba is snort and cannot walk for herself, and 
so her sister wheels her around on a bar stooL They _ 
venture out in the world fearlessly; and die world 

it of them. But as they see 
cult than all lives. 




Man; Kan/Thr 'In M Time 


Lori holding a mirror so she can watch 
television with Reba. According to a new 
analysis, the assumption that life as a 
conjoined twin is not worth living, and that 
separation should be tried in nearly every 
case, is one in need of some serious scrutiny. 


it, their lives are no more 

‘ ‘There are good days and bad days — so what?" 
says Reba. “This is what we know. We don't bate iL 
We live it every day. I don't sit around questioning 
it, or asking myself what I could do differently if 1 
were separated.” 

Nor does Lori appreciate being held up as an 
exemplar of fortitude. "‘People come up to me and 
say, ‘You 're such an inspiration. Now I realize how 
minor my own problems are compared to yours.' 
But they have no idea what problems I have or don't 
have, or what my life is like." 

T HE ATTITUDES of the Schappell sisters are 
strongly felt, but not unique. As Alice 
Dreger, a historian of anatomy at Michigan 
State University in East Loosing, argues in a 
new analysis of the medical treatment of conjoined 
twins, the assumption among surgeons, the public and 
most parents, that life as a conjoined twin is not worth t- 
living, and that separation should be tried in nearly 
every case, whatever the risks, is an outsider's 
premise, and one in need of some serious scrutiny. 

Writing in the current issue of Studies in History 
and Philosophy of Science, Ms. Dreger reviews 
cases in which surgeons have sought to separate 
conjoined twins even when the distribution of 
shared organs resulted in the extreme disability or 
death of one. She points out that throughout history, 
conjoined twins who reached adulthood have ex- 
pressed satisfaction with their linked lives. 

Consider the case of Mary and Eliza Chulhurst, 
one of the first documented examples of conjoined 
twins. Bom fused at the lower back and buttocks in 
the year 1 100, the Chulhurst sisters — also known 
as the Biddenden Maids — lived for 34 years in 


Kent, England. After the death of one sister, doctors 
urged the survivor to allow them to attempt surgical 
separation to save her. She refused, declaring, “As 
we came together, we will go together." She died 
several hours later. 

Yet despite the testimony of twins themselves. 
Ms. Dreger argues, doctors persist in regarding 
conjoined twins — also known by the now-dis- 
favored term, Siamese twins — as monstrously 
abnormal beings who must be individuated sur- 
gically, even if such standard mores of medicine as 
“first do no harm" are set aside to do so. 

She explores at length the ethics that surrounded 
the case of Angela and Amy Lakeberg, bom in 
1993. The girls were attached breast to belly, shar- 
ing a liver and a single, six-chambered heart, rather 
than two four-chambered ones. Because the infants 
had no chance of survival in their conjoined state, 
the parents opted for a-long-shot effort to save one of 
die twins at die expense of the other. 

In an extraordinary operation, a team of surgeons 
at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia cur off cir-- 
culation to Amy, deliberately “sacrificing” her to 
salvage did heart for Angela. Hie effort ultimately 
failed, and Angela died 10 months later, but the 
doctors involved, as well as many others, have 
maintained that it was better to try to rescue one twin 
rather than allow both to die. 

Yet, as Ms. Dreger argues in her new report, if the 
twins had been bom separate, and the health of both 
were failing, nobody would have proposed that one 
sickly twin should be killed and her organs bar- 
vestal for the sake of the other's survival. 

“That we would go so far as. to intentionally 
asphyxiate a conscious head, and kill one of the 
twins in order to make a singleton out of them just 
astonished me," Ms. Dreger said. "There was 


much ethical discussion at the time about the 
cost of the operation, but very little about wheth- 
er or not this was morally right.” 

Ms. Dreger and others who share her views 
see parallels between medical attitudes toward 
conjoined twins, and toward those children bom 
with other anomalies, including ambiguous 
genitals, dwarfism, congenital deafness. Such 
conditions have invited aggressive attempts at 
fixing, often through a long series of operations, 
medications and rehabilitations; and most have 
required that the therapies be performed on 
children too young to have a say in whether they 
want to be treated or not. 

“There’s an allurement called the treatment 
train,” said David Thomasma, director of the 
medical humanities program at Loyola Uni- 
versity Chicago Medical Center. * ‘You hop on, 
but it’s very hard to get off. The power of die 
medical model today to shape our decisions is 
enormous.” 

T THE SAME time, surgeons say that 
their techniques are better than ever, 
and that thev can correct many physical 
defects early. In addition, the number 
of children bom with disabilities is declining as 
the resolution of prenatal ultrasound and other 
fetal diagnostic procedures improves, allowing 
parents to abort abnormal fetuses. 

In sum, die dominant culture appears to be 
moving in two contradictory directions: more 
accommodating of disabilities in adults, but less 
tolerant of imperfections in children. 

“I'm concerned that as more abnormal chil- 
— dren are prevented through abortion and testing, 
we'll be less tolerant of abnormality, 1 1 said Alan 
Fleischman, a bioethicist and senior vice pres- 
ident of the New York Academy of Medicine in 
Manhattan. We'll blame families if they knew 
there would be an abnormal child but chose not 
to abort." 

What people find difficult to imagine about 
conjoined twins is how they negotiate such 
_ ordinary needs of the body as sex and excretion, 
and how they can stand doing everything to- 
gether. Reba Schappell capitulated to Lori for a few 
years while Lori attended college and then worked 
in a hospital. Now Lori says it is Reba’s him to 
dominate, and she accompanies her sister to re- 
cording sessions and performances, at which she 
practices a kind of Zen detachment. 

“I'm just there, I'm not doing anything," said 
Lori. “I say hi to people, but then I let Reba get 
down to business.” 

Yet the sisters also engage in a constant and 
ips largely subconscious dance of intimacy: 
a sister's stray lock of hair, or picking a bit of - 
lint off the other’s shirt When they move through a 
shopping mall they look like young girls, best 
friends, heads bowed together, murmuring to each 
other, swept up in a realm of their own. 

Doctors who have performed separation sur- 
geries say that the apparent contentment of the 
Schappell sisters is just as well, for in their case 
separation is probably impossible, and would lead 
to mutual death by hemorrhaging. 

For parents, the desire to give their children as 
normal a life as possible is so profound that it can 
override any fears they have about the dangers of 
separation surgay. Michelle Roderick said that after 
she gave birth in May 1996 to Shawna and Jane lie, 
attached at the abdomen, she and her-husband never 
considered keeping the girls conjoined. 

“We felt that since the chances were so good that 
they’d comp out of it as healthy individuals, we 
didn’t think it would be fair not to try," she said. 

The surgery took more than seven hours, and at 
one point Shawna went into cardiac arrest and 
almost died, Ms. Roderick said. But today, the girls 
ran around and talk a mad streak like any other 
toddlers, displaying their pencil-thin scars to all 
who care to see them. 


Denise Levertov, 74, Dies; 
Was Poet and an Activist 

Co-Founder of Protest Group on Fretnam War 

NEW YORK (NYD - Denise St" 974 Stow* far 

urday of complications from lymphoma ministration. 

in Seattle, where she lived- David N. Schramm, 

As a poet and political activist, Ms. . tboi Jj tv on Big Bang Theory 

Levertov was “a touchstone, a main- 1 . vnoic iNYTt David N 

miner for our generation,” .he poet ^WTORk^Vn 
Robert Creeley. one of her first pub- Sciuanun.5_._anMopnys.e_ 

Ushers in the United Stares, sard Mon- *4 bo^? 

‘‘She was a constantly defining pres- died Friday 
ence in the world we shared, a remark- h f™ i ?, p iSSS£d at a Denver airport. ■ 
aW * p0et ^MrSchrumm was ftying iromQdca- 

US 'ThepoW Kelme^hROTOlh once wrote Z Asp£ Ccd»dasaid >£gs 

' that MsTLevertov was most subtly nan for J5J5KS2 1574 tmdwas 
skillful poet of ber generation, the most where he ta^ht M 

— — 1116 — 

r<h g e tradition established hy WU- hr his jdn.-dM a ^control tower and 



Mr. Schramm had been a Louis Block 
Distinguished Service Professor in the 
physical sciences at the university since 
1 982, and the vice president for research 
since 1995. ' 

Owen Barfield, 99, Writer ; 
And Last Oxford Inkling ; 
LONDON (NYT) — Owen Barfield^ 


spoke directly through her poetry 
voting commonplace objects and im- 
ages over large philosophical concepts. 

The author of more than 30 books of 
poetry, essays and translations, she 
wrote with great particularity and sen- 
sitivity about aspects of love. She was, 
as in die title of herfirst book of essays, 

“The Poet in the World." 

A defining moment of her life was the - * * * - - : 

Vietnam War. She helpedfound a group 99. a writer and philosopher oflanguag? 
called the Writers’ and Artists’ Protest and the last surviving ^member ot the 
Against the War in Vietnam, was ac- Inklings, a g-oup of Oxford mu. [lec reals 
lively involved in the anti-nuclear who held passionate discussions ahpul 
movement and, in 1967, edited a volume Christianity and mythology at 
of poetry for the War Resisters League. Lewis's house between the two world 

During World War n, she worked as a wars, died Sunday m East Sussex. Eng* 

nurse in London and also began pub- land. * 

fishing her poetry. Her first volume of Mr. Barfield, whose work was greatly 
verse, “The Double Image,” was pub- admired by T.S. Eliot and J.R.R. Tolku 
fished in 1946. ea, among others, was credited with 

helping Lewis make his celebrated tranj 
sition from atheism to Christianity ana 


Admiral David L. McDonald, 91, 
Chief of Operations in Vietnam 
WASHINGTON (NYT) — Admiral 
David Lamar McDonald, 91, who com- 
manded American naval forces as the 
U.S. involvement in Vietnam rose and 
crested, died Dec. 16 in Jacksonville 
Beach, Florida. 

As chief of naval operations from 
1963 to 1967, Admiral McDonald was 
the navy's senior officer, commanding 
670,000 officers and enlisted personnel, 
870 ships and 7,200 aircraft. 

He defended the importance of Amer- 
ican sea power, and he argued that naval 
bombing offensives in North Vietnam 
saved American lives in South Vietnam. 
He was awarded a Gold Star, in lieu of a 
second Distinguished Service Medal, 
for his service as chief of naval op- 
erations. 

Richard Clark McCurdy^88, _ 
Shell Co. Executive and Sailor • 
NEW YORK (NYT) — Richard 
Clark McCurdy, 88,. a former president 
of Shell Oil Co. and an avid sailor who 
helped develop ways to handicap yacht 
racing and make it safer, died Dec. 4 at 
his home in Darien, Connecticut 
Mr. McCurdy, who was president of 
Shell from 1965 to 1974, had a large 
impact on die company by expanding it 
ana investing heavily to upgrade its re- 
fineries. 

An engineer by training, he empha- 
sized using science and research to find 
oil and natural gas. In 1947 he went to 
Venezuela to run the Shell group’s ex- 


was known for his wide-ranging works 
on lan gu age. He wrote most of his booki 
after retirement and spent a great deal of 
time in the United States, where 
taught graduate courses at various uni- 
versities. ; 

Peng Meng-chl, 89, a former senior 
general who bloodily suppressed a 
Taiwanese uprising' 50 years ago. died 
Friday -in Taipei after a long bout with 
cancer and heart disease. After Mao’s 
Communists swept the Nationalists out 
of mainland China in 1949, Mr. Peng 
rose through the ranks of their Taiwan- 
based government to serve as chief of 
the general staff and later as ambassador 
to Thailand and Japan. 

Sally Marr, 91, a comedian and tal- 
ent agent and mother of the comedian 
Lenny Bruce, died Sunday in Los 
Angeles. Ms. Marr worked as a waitress 
and maid and later became a stand-up 
comedian. Her son started his career by 
imitating his mother’s act. 

Sey Chassler, 78, who expanded the 
purview of women’s magazines beyond 
printing recipes to promoting equal 
rights as the editor in chief of Red book, 
died of complications from colon cancer 
and a stroke on Dec. 1 1 in New York. (4, 
During Mr. Chassler’s 16-year tenure. * 
Redbook became one of the United 
States' largest-circulation women's 
m aga zin e — rising from 2 million to 
nearly 5 million. 


* 



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Take the Metro and Phone Home 

PARIS (Reuters) — Travelers on the Paris Metro will 
increasingly be able to use their mobile phones in the un- 
derground train network, the RATP urban transport authority 
said Tuesday. 

Only three Metro stations allow for service now, but the 
authority said the main stations in the Metro and the RER 
suburban rail network should be covered by the end of next 
year, although total coverage would take a few more years. 

On Autobahn, 12 Havens for Prayer 

BONN (Reuters) — Transport Minister Matthias Wiss- 
mann urged his country's motorists on the road this Christmas 
to stop for spiritual refreshment as well as gasoline. 

“During the stressful and hectic Christmas holiday 
season, the autobahn churches are an ideal place to relax 
and reflect,” Mr. Wissmann said. There are 12 such 
churches. 

Kenya will lose at least $280 million in tourist earnings 
from mid- 1997 to mid- 1998 because of violence that hit the 
coastal region in August and fears of trouble preceding general 
.elections on Monday, industry sources said. (Reuters) 

Hundreds of truck- drivers slowed traffic on highways 
throughout Italy for several hours Tuesday in a protest 
against government plans to increase their pension con- 
tributions. (Reuters) 

Zimbabwe air traffic controllers were on strike for the 
third day Tuesday over pay and working conditions. The 
authorities insisted that the action had not disrupted any 
scheduled flights. (AFP) 


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day. but « win be dry and 
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Very cold Siberian air w« 
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4 


^erce Struggle on Indian Ret 



PAGE 3 


MERICAS 


tions: Teaching Sobriety 


political 


it ! 


fit 


"in I, 


By Dirk Johnson 

New York Times Sen-fa 


li... 


^Jl|- 


PORCUPINE, South Dakota — Cold winds as 
jagged as broken- glass wail across banen fields 
pnd bumpy roads here in deepest South Dakota, an 
echo of the pain in the wretched and unforgiving 
land where Britton Kills Right, as a boy of 12 had 
burned two tattoos into his arms: “More Beer" 
and a sketch of the Grim Reaper. 

"I wanted to drink," said Mr. Kills Right, now 
22. ' and I wanted to die." 

■ But he has found reason to live. Sober now for 
; : nearly a year. Mr. Kills Right is pan of a fast- 

• growing sobriety movement among American In- 

that uses healing programs, including sweat 
^lodges, that are steeped in ancient ways. Tribal 
officials, meanwhile, have been aggressively pro- 
-moting teachings. that remind American Indians 
. that alcohol, absent from native life for centuries, 
was introduced during European hegemony. 

.. Tribal leaders say that the view of alcohol has 
•••■• changed starkly among die 26,000 residents of the 
\ American Indian Reservation at Pine Ridge and on 

• other reservations, especially among the young, 
!witb chapters of Students Against Drunk Driving 

' growing rapidly. Here in Shannon County, politi- 
cians for tribal offices often post signs with the 
pronouncement: “A Sober Candidate." 


But it is a fierce struggle. American Indian chil- 
dren lesam early that life is bitter, and brief, on the 
Pine Ridge reservation, one of the poorest places in 
America, where men die at an average age of 56 .5, 
younger than anywhere else in the Unit3 States. 

Burdened by poverty and suffering, their sal- 
vation from misery often comes in a bottle, ul- 
timately a cruel hoax, as staggering rates of al- 
coholism contribute mightily to the early deaths. 

Mr. Kills Right, who began drinking at age 6, 
watched his 28-year-old mother die after being 
poshed through a window in a drunken brawL He 
watched his grandmother drink herself into ob- 
livion. A friend had a car accident while drunk, a 
wreck that left him brain dead, and another friend 
with a drinking problem committed suicide. He saw 
his father drink himself into a rage nightly, always 
looking for a fight, sometimes bearing Britton. 

“I drank beer, vodka, whisky, anything 1 could 
get, and when I didn't have any alcohol, I used 
mouthwash and cough syrup to get me drunk "Mr. 
Kills Right -said. “And every day, I prayed for 
death." 

He h ad b een sitting in a jail cell, locked up for 
public drunkenness, when a man and a woman 
arrived and asked him if be wanted to go with them, 
take a warm shower, eat a sandwich and drink a can 
of soda pop. 

They were workers from Ampetu Luta Otipi, a 


■ whose name means living in a red 

jny with all things. There, Mr. 

■ through a purification ceremony in 
[made of willow branches, prayed to 
jditated and learned that great be- 
, Horse had railed against drinking 
i’s poison and warned it would lead to 

..vo Dogs, the medicine man at the 
Iter, said that young American India n s 
Id that drinking and despair had always 
[culture. He said that many young men 
ight to see intoxication as a rite of 
it took a real man to be a drinker. 

Jt a young man, ‘What is Lakota?' " 
bgs said. “And he will reply, ‘Lakota is 
Lakota is to be alcoholic." " * 

I medicine man will retort: "Lakota is a 
kota is proud! " 

tribal lands, treatment programs have 
shing. sometimes run on a shoestring 
volunteers, and sometimes financed 
lie from casino gambling . The Oneida 
isconsia, among others, used the casino 
build an alcoholism treatment center. 
Dakota, civic leaders say that people 
L w drunkenness as an inevitable feature 
[the reservation have become more out- 
>ut the scourge. 


.ft. 


’ M ii- 


; il*It 




-\-r 


.... 


i. -1 Swfi; , ' .7 

; j \ \ u if -it 


Away From. 

Politics 

•.The Food and Drug Administra- 
tion has approved the fust inhaled an- 
tibiotic, a medicine to help cystic 
fibrosis patients fight off deadly lung 
infections. PathoGenesis Corp.’s Tobi, 
or tobramycin, for inhalation, appears 
to increase the lung function orcystic 
fibrosis patients up to 12 percent during 
six months of treatment. (AP) 

• A spectator who was injured in 
New York when a giant balloon at the 
Macy "s Thanksgivi ng Day Parade went 
out of control has emerged from a 
coma, her lawyer said. Kathleen Car- 
onna^ 34, now listed in serious but 
stable condition, was injured Nov. 27 
when unusually strong wind caused the 
balloon to strike a lamppost, r ainin g 
debris on spectators. (AP) 




“When you go to powwows or other public 
events," said Tim Giago. publisher of Indian 
Country Today, a Rapid City newspaper, “you just 
don’t see open drunkenness like you once tad. Our 
people are becoming more aware of our traditional 
ways and culture. And thery're realizing that drunk- 
enness was not pan of it" 

The success of such programs has yet to be 
^measured A recent Harvard University epidemi- 
ological study of life expectancy was based on 

1990 figures. , _. 

The study found that American Indian men in 

South Dakota die 15 years earlier than other men in 

the United States, who live to an average age of 
7 1 .66. Indian women here live an average of 66.07 
years, or nearly 14 years fewer than the national 

average. , . 

Diabetes is common on the reservation, anu 
some people live almost an hour's drive from me 
nearest hospital. It seems that a huge majority 

smoke cigarettes. ,, 

Fires loll the occupants of ramshackle homes 
with dangerous space heaters. People freeze to 
death alone in the darkness in winter. . 

Residents of Pine Ridge are more than four 
times more likely than people in the rest of the 
United States to die in car accidents; a small 
minority use seat belts and alcohol plays a part in 
‘ most fatal traffic accidents. 


Gunmen Kill 
42 in Attack 
On Town in 
South Mexico 


Vi 






ray* 


r# 


X,. 


X 


• The Philadelphia Inquirer an- 
nounced that Robert Rosenthal, an 18- 
vear veteran at the newspaper and now 
its executive editor, will become ’ 
editor, the top job, on Jan 1. 


*♦ - 


The MaflbMUn Mcrony/Tbr HmnaMMrt Piw« 

Kansas, after a Coors 


oe the ONE FOR THE ROAD — Cases of beer litteriJighway in Manhattan, Kansas, after a looks 
(NYT) delivery truck went out of control on an icy Interstajd crashed. The driver was not seriously injured. 


Mexico’s Attorney (General TriMo Fix the System 


it} . . 

V.- 


L. 

* • •* • * 
liMfr — r- - 


• .*!•' - V i v ■ 


By Sam Dillon 

Nr*' Tori • Times Service 


t K 


- MEXICOCITY — Jorge Maxirazo Cuellar spent his" 
first weeks as Mexico's attorney general investigating 
his predecessor’s involvement in a scheme to rig a 
murder trial by faking the discovery of a skeleton. 
Later, he had to put Mexico’s drug czar on trial on 
charges of collaborating wkh traffickers. 

Then several police and array officers were arrested 
in connection with the theft of a haif-toaof cocaine from 
an evidence room at a local branch of his own agency. 

• Suspecting more corruption. Mr. Madrazo dismissed 
all 2300 of the country's narcotics officers and pros-- 
ecutors, requiring them to take polygraph tests before 
they could be rehired. Three out of four of them failed. 

Much of Mr. Madrazo’s first year in office has been 
a grueling ordeal, with searing new scandals unfolding 
within his agency week after week. And even as he has 
sought to reform Mexico’s criminal justice system, his 
-efforts have been repeatedly interrupted try the de- 
mands of doing battle with the drug traffickers and 
other bands of violent criminals, he said. 

' ’This islike trying to fix a car that’s going 1 20 miles 
an hour," Mr. Madrazo said in a recent interview. 

As the seventh attorney general in seven years, Mr. 
Madrazo holds the most important job in Mexico’s 
_ struggfe against narcotics corruption and violent 
• crime, which have come to dominate not only relations 
with the United Slates, but also politics and business 
throughout much of the country. 


At first he seemed an unlikely man for t ^ 
former professor, he acknowledges that he it 
stunned when President Emesio Zedillo -ad 
: him in December 1996. 

“I want to tell you that I never imagined l ig 
attorney general," be said. “That was just n in 
the aspirations of a professor .of constitution ’ 

At the time, Mr. Madrazo was preside! ie 
National Human Rights Commission, inveig 
abuses by the army ana police. Now, Mr. Mad in 
charge of a 17. 000-member agency that inci ie 
federal police and thousands of federal prosec i is 
a sprawling and discredited ‘ — 

cracy, and Mr. Madrazo has 
A recent scandal came 
local police officers, apparently in the pay of its 
traffickers, were accused of involvement, in s- 
appearance of 90 people along the border ’ ie 
United States. Instead of issuing a knee-jerk c >f 
police involvement, Mr. Madrazo 's reaction w r- 
acteristic. “Our police are not impermeable r- 
ruption, and I don’t have anything to fear in p g 
this,” he said in the interview. “So, we’re goii o 
a serious investigation." 

Mr. Madrazo has appointed a special inve jr 
who is gathering evidence, but so far no police < -s 
have bom arrested. 

Jose Miguel Vivanco, director of the Wash t- 
based Human Rights Watch/Americas, said r. 
Madrazo, * ‘Every time we meet, he describes hi is 
for making his agency a professional organizati it 


can enforce the law without committing abuses. 

“He has a good diagnosis of the problems, and he 
knows the challenge is enormous. I’m not sure he s 
enjoying himself, perhaps he feels isolated. But he 
understands die importance of the role he s playing m 

^Tben, Mr. Vivanco added, “Many times I’ve seen 
him to be frustrated by the obstacles. ' 

One recent frustration came when Mr. Madrazo s 
nrosecutors accused a millionaire banker in Monterrey 
SithSrauding investors of 

the banker under house arrest. A judge ruled that the 
m uou* - ----- in court to answer 

arrest. 

publicly, saying, 
‘Thelegal system is working mainly for those who 
have the most money ” 



The Associated Press 
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CAS- 
AS, Mexico — Gunmen attacked a 
small, rebel-controlled town in southern 
Mexico, killing at least 42 people, peas- 
ant activists said Tuesday. 

If confirmed, ii would be the worst 
attack in Chiapas state since 135 people 
died in the Zapatista uprising in January 
1994. 

Members of the peasant group Las 
Abejas said 42 people were killed and 
six were miss ing after the massacre 
Monday, according to Manuel Gomez 
Perez, an official of the rebels' auton- 
omous government in Polho. 

Witnesses reported hearing gunshots 
for four hours in the town of Acteal. Mr. 
Gomez Perez said. 

Las Abejas sympathizes with the 
rebel Zapatista National Liberation 
Army, which set up a breakaway county 
government in the area in 1995. 

Clashes between supporters of the lo- 
cal government and the officially rec- 
ognized government — affiliated with 
Mexico’s ruling Institutional ^Revolu- 
tionary Party — have raged for seven 
months, killing 30 Tzoizij Indian peas- 
ants and leaving nearly 7,000 homeless. 

“It’s an incomprehensible situation 
in which we have not been able to stop 
the violence," Samuel Ruiz, San Cris- 
tobal de las Casas’ Roman Catholic 
bishop, told XEWM radio. 

Few details were known about the 
attack because of the inaccessibility of 
the area. 

“Many died, but we don t know tor 
sure how many are dead and how many 
are injured," Mr. Gomez Perez said. 
Gonzalo Ituarte, a spokesman for the 


Clinton Team Drafts 
Urban Schools Plan 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton 
administration is drafting plans to 
expand its education agenda next 
year with initiatives that focus on 
the problems in urban public 
schools, many of which are over- 
whelmed with academic failure and 
are physically falling apart. 

Final details of the plan have not 
been resolved, but a variety' of ideas 
are emerging: from reviving an ini- 
tiative to repair thousands of crum- 
bling schools to creating a program 
that would reward urban districts 
that enact tougher academic stan- 
dards and let parents choose 
whatever public school they want 
for their children. 

The White House and the Edu- 
cation Department have been work- 
ing all month on the proposals, 
which they expect President BiU 
Clinton to unveil in January and 
which could ignite another round or 
political battles with Republican 
leaders in Congress over a subject 
that he has vowed to make the de- 
fining priority of his second term. 

Mr. Clinton has a lengthy list of 
education initiatives making then 
way, with mixed results, through 
Congress. But some school leaders 
and lawmakers have criticized him 
for not putting more emphasis on 
urban public education. During 
budget negotiations with Republican 
congressional leaders earlier this year, 

the president shelved the proposal that 

urban educators wanted most: $5 bil- 
lion to fix dilapidated schools. 

“Urban education has not been a 
very visible part of the administra- 
tion's agenda so far.” said Michael 
Casseriy. director of the Council of 
Great City Schools. (WrP) 


,vc uic uiu9i wvuwj . • _r 

Mr. Madrazo listed some San Cristobal de las Casas, 

his tenure. His bi&- rcported43 dead -eight ft. Ml and 






At Last, a Pill to Cure Baldnei 


conviction * g Ml 

decessOTS. he said. Seizures of cocaine, manju J children were hospitalized in 

San Cristobal with gunshot wounds, the 
radio station .reported. Survivors said 
women and children were shot at pomt- 

large? wtdehsoggests ioU.S. officials totbg-pre^ blank rsoge,The *adon said R«1 Cross 

ably continue to buy protection from 

Perhaps Mr. Madrazo ’s biggest success has been to 
convince skeptics, among them many Amen can ann- 
dnig officiaSfthat he is serious about criminal justice 

reform. 


dec ess ora, he said. - , 

opium base during 1997 showed some uacnasa. and 
his anti-drug agents succeeded in detaining a handful 
of important traffickers. ■ 

Butthe leaders of Mexico sjpp ^cartels 


Diaiifc- lougc- , 

workers had been unable to enter the 

area because it was too dangerous. 

At least 300 people have died in sim- 
ilar clashes in Chiapas state since the 
1994 uprising. 


(but Read Fine Print) 


By Sheryl Gay Siolberg 

New York Times Service 




- j* 


-• » 




W AS KINGTON — For as long as there 
■ws been" baldness, it seems, there have been 
/fforts to cure it: oils and creams, toupee? and 
ransplanis; not to mention what hair stylists 
jingedy term “the combo ver.” 

But as much as some men may have 
Afcnted one, there has never been a baldness 
sill ■i-i until now. 

The. Food and Drug Administration an- 
nounced Monday that it had given Merck & 
the maker of crucial treatments for bean 
“sease, osteoporosis and AIDS, permission 
0 sell a tiny tan octagonal tablet that, ex- 
periments show, cither promoted the growth 
>f hair or at least stopped hair loss in S3 
wrcent of men who took it 
. There arc, however, some drawbacks: The 
ill. which will be marketed as a prescription 
nedicine under the brand name Pro pec ia, can 
ause birth defects and so is not approved for 
vpmen. It is useful only for the genetic con- 
ation known as male pattern baldness. It 
nust be taken once a day, every day, for the 
cst of a bald man’s life. And it curries a slight 
15k of impotence, lasting only as long as the 
wj t i* taken. 

. “This is not a panacea," said Dr. William 
, 'rank, a dermatologist at Beth Israel Dea- 
oness Medical Center in Boston who has 
«en following the progress of the drug dur- 
n £ testing. “It's not going to grow hair on the 
xiie of way man who takes it. Bui the 
hnical studies which have been done so far 
re promising." 

Critics, however, say the idea of a pre- 
v » cription drug for baldness is frivolous, and 
omplain that no long-term studies have been 
nnducied on the drug. 

"It is a cosmetic issue," said Dr. Sidney 
Volfe, director of Public "Citizen’s Health 
tesearch Group, an advocacy organization in 
^•‘Vashington. “What, is the risk that 0X16 
radiug off for a cosmetic benefit?" 








And John Capps 3d , founder of Bald- 
Headed Men of America, a support group for 
bald men, said no right-thinking bald man 
would even consider a pill. 

“We believe that sku is in," he said. 

Officials at the Food and Drug Admin- 
istration, however, said they had become 
convinced that for some men, hair loss is 
nothing to laugh about. 

It is estimated that 33 million American 
men have male pattern boldness, character- 
ized by a receding hairline and hair loss at the 
vertex, or crown, of the scalp. 

One survey, published four years ago in a 
dermatology journal, found that more than 90 
percent of men who were growing bald wor- 
ried about the future of their hair. 

"One man’s frivolity," said Dr. Michael 
Weintraub, the director of the Food and Drug 
Administration office that evaluated Prope- 
cia, “is another man’s serious problem," 

Merck conducted three clinical trials of 
Propecia. involving 1,879 men, 1,215 of 
whom were followed for as long as two years. 
Although Merck scientists studied men who 
had a wide range of hair loss, the experiments 
enrolled only men from the age of 18 to 41. 
Thus there are no data on how Propecia works 
in older men. 

None of the men in the studies grew back a 
frill head of hair. But when scientists counted 
the number of hairs in a one-inch-diameter 
circle on the scalps of the subjects, they found 
that 83 percent of the men had kept their hair 
or grown more. 

And before-and-after photographs, which 
Merck submitted to dermatologists for eval- 
uation, showed visible improvements in two- 
thirds of the men taking the pill, as against 7 
percent of men taking a placebo. 

Among all the subjects, 30 percent were 
rated as slightly improved, 3 1 percent were 
rated moderaidy improved, and 5 percent 
received a greatly improved rating. 

The men began seeing results about three 
months after first taking the drug, said Dr. 


•A 


Venl Prictdennaiologist at the University 
of CaiifoTat San Francisco who partic- 
ipated ini Merck srudies. “This is real 
- ' [ Ce said. “This is not peach 


hair," 
fozz.” 

But in 

must com 
their lives 

The o 
function, 
the men 
creased til 
achieving 
ported a 


*r to sustain the effects, men 
oking the drug for the rest of 


effects related to sexual 
raing to Merck, 1-8 percent of 
1 £ Propecia expenene^ de- 
,-M . 3 '.percent had difficulty 

iere^ion. and 1.2 

puneu a oe astjn Iheir semen level. The 

problems w« avdy.'however, when the men 

discontinuet se. ^ - 

The activ incedieni in Propecia is one 
milligram < foasteride. which Merck 
already sells i aive-milligram dose as Pro- 
scar, a treazrr it ^enlarged prostate glands. 
Finasteride v ritby inhibiting production of 
dihydroiesto erne, or DHT. a potent form 
of the male ofione testosterone that con- 
tributes tom leanem baldness. 

Finasterid a'-o' causes an abnormality in 
male fetuse a condition known as hypo- 


spadias, in which the opening of the perns is 
on its underside rather than on the op. Be- 
cause the drug can be absorbed through the 
skin, Merck encases its tablets in a coating, 
and warns that women should not touen me 

actual powder. . . , . 

The company has said there is no risk to the 
female partners of men who use Propecia. But 
Dr. Carlos Puig, president of the Han- Loss 
Council, a trade group whose membership 
includes doctors, said more research was 
needed because most of the safety data on 
finasteride came from studies of Proscar, 
which is typically given to older men 

Merck officials said they expected that 
Propecia, which is to be available in phar- 
macies next month, would cost $45 to $49 a 

mt There is only one other medicine for bald- 
ness approved by the Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration: minoxidil, an ointment sold 
over the counter as Rogaine by Pharmacia & 

^ P iisecause there have been been no studi« 
testing Rogaine against Propecia, there is no 
accurate way to compare the two. 


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An Immunity Drive 

WASHINGTON — Faced with a 
swelling number of uncooperative 
witnesses. House Republicans will 
push for immunity from prosecution 
that would compel testimony on 
campaign fund-raising abuse, a 
committee chairman says. 

“We're going to make a big din 
before it’s over," Representative 
Dan Burton, Republican of Indiana, 
said after making public a new count 
of recalcitrant individuals. 

The House Government Reform 
and Oversight Committee, headed 
by Mr. Burton, said 46 potential 
witnesses had asserted their Fifth 
Amendment rights against self-in- 
crimination, 12 had fled the country 
and a dozen others were foreigners 
who refused to be interviewed. 

Mr. Burton said congressional 
investigators would go to Califor- 
nia and abroad next month in search 

of evidence showing how illegal 
foreign money influenced U.S. 
political campaigns. ' 

“We will push for immunity for 
those who we think can help move 
us up the food chain,” he said. If 
we can get immunity for some 
people, we can trace sources to 
some of the foreign areas." (AP) 

Quote /Unquote 

Bill Carrick, a veteran Democrat- 
ic consultant, on the Jan. 13 special 
election in the diverse 22d Con- 
gressional District in California: “In 
one congressional district, you have 
so many of the different Californios 
right there, the old West ranching 
community versus the new West 
software entrepreneurs and the 
people around the universities. It is 
very complicated politically-’?WlTJ 


PAGES 




PAGE 4 


JWTERNATKMVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEhURSDAY, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 


Asian Group 
Sets Plan to 
Fight Smog 


ASIA/J C 




p*. \ . . . 


9 Nations WiU Upgrade 
Iheir Anti-Fire Measures 


Tuesdav to agree on new food aid to 

Taiwan to EndTies 

With South Africa " 

TAIPEI - Taiwan said Tuesday JXMS? 

ihaiiiu^idraddiptoc relations M»SVa South Korean 




that it would end diplomatic relations Korean 

with South Africa on Dec- 3 1 , one day a secaad 

before Pretoria plans to forge ties with ^ 

China. . r .I n **int*fo inward tniaratt- 


I Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Southeast Asian en- 
vitroomeM ministers unveiled a regional 
action plan on Tuesday to Qy to prevent 
3 a recurrence of the smog generated by 
Indonesian forest fires that smothered 
““Sjof me region earlier this year. 

' . ’*™ is veiy specific with a specific 

tune frame of what we want to achieve 
and when to achieve it." Environment 
Minister Yeo Cheow Tong of Singapore 

Mr. Yeo said participants agreed dur- 
mg a two-day meeting ro upgrade fire- 
fighting capabilities, prevention and re- 
gional monitoring. 

He said the nine members of the As- 
sociation of South East Asian Nations 
would develop national plans that should 

include laws against fires in the open and 

strategy to deal with fires and smog. 

’ Malaysia, Mr. Yeo said, would take 
• the lead m drawing up preventive mea- 
sures, Singapore would initiate regional 

• monitoring mechanisms while Indone- 
' biLities. U d fOCUS 00 fire-fi S htill g capa- 

"With the regional action plan in 
• place, ASEAN will be in a better do- 
si non in the event of a recurrence of 
smoke haze in the future." he said. 

y 16 smog spread over Singapore and 
Malaysia and even reached parts of the 1 
Philippines, reducing visibility to arm’s \ 
length in some places, causing wide- c 
spread health problems, hurting busi- r 
nesses and the region’s tourist industry • a 
it lasted from August to October. 

ine smog was euphemistically L 
known as haze in the region. It was (1 
caused largely by brush and forest fires n 
m Indonesia amid a drought linked to El a. 
Nino, the weather phenomenon. 

Environment Minister Sarwono 
Kusumaatmadja of Indonesia said he — 
would propose a moratorium on new 
investments in the palm oil industry to *■ 
cuuJown on the neal to set fires to clear I 

, Th er c was this stress on quantity 
that drove the investors to clear land out 
ot proportion to what we really 

k® sa * d at a new s conference im 
J*®* s tbe one that triggered the ere 
h^e problem. The drive was really not do: 
needed. If we concentrate on quality 
then the whole problem will be more <m< 
manageable." 

Indonesia is the world’s largest pro- Ch 
ducer of crude palm oil after neigh- 1 

^imgMakysia. Both are members of in< 

ASEAN along with Brunei, Burma, to f 

taS‘£Sy£3 £ m ' S,a8ap0re ' Tha " sh ° 








before Pretoria plans to rorge aes wim Beijing. "If *cy 

South Africa said Monday that its <JTdeEvS>^w 

««*£?**“ w 

Taiwan said it would set up a li- 

aison office in South Africa on Jan. I f%2 n /i f n EnlGT&'€ 
to maintain “mutually beneficial and haUla IV g 

substantial relations” with Pretoria, D amp-fits Network 
one of only 30 nations that recognize BenOJ * !CWV 

sss 

Timothy Yang, chief of Taiwan’s for- dreds more cities ana uounuou 

sb 4 *—-** sShSSs&T 

_ _ — a • ■ comes as unemployment nationwide 

I. _ 7* c _ i n Pft*: 


_ j • | comes as unemployment nationwide 

Cambodia Attacks soars from a ^*™SSS rBd 

ctt 1 _ F 19 Dl^ a « structunngof stare nunrt in snullCT 


, , ,, „ structuring of state enterprises. 

‘Unbalanced’ Press 

PHNOM PENH — The Cambod- of Civil Affeire’s 
1 sovernment threatened legal ac- the ministry chief. Doji Coring. , w 


An airliner lying in a field after a crash landing near a Bangladesh airpoit. AH 89 is ^dcravsui^ivedr 


Bangladesh Plane Accident Ires 55 

. . 


Reuters 

DHAKA, Bangladesh — About 55 
people were injured as a Bangladeshi 
airliner on a domestic flight made a 
crash landing near an airport in the 
northeastern town of Sylhet, officials 
and witnesses said Tuesday. 

The aircraft, carrying 89 people, 
landed in a paddy field three kilometers 
(two miles) from the runway Monday 
night in thick fog. The cause of the 
accident was not immediately clear 

Witnesses said about 55 people,' in- 


cludmg the pilot, were injured. The Bi- 
man Bangladesh Airlines Fokker28 was 
c^rying 85 passengers and four crew on 
a flight from Dhaka, the capital. 

An official at Sylhet airport said the 
plane had made several unsuccessful 
attempts, to land on the runway. He said 
it broke into pieces when it landed but 
tna not burst into flames. 

Mohiuddin Khan Alamgir, the min- 
ister for civil aviation and tourism, said: 

The plane has been badly damaged. 
It s a miracle that the passengers and 


craw svspite crash-landing." 

He s v isitin g the crash site 
and sqj hospitals that the in- 
w in serious condition." 
Mr. I the Fokker 28, which 
theairiujd jo 1981, bad been in 
Pppcfmdition.’’ He said the 
airhne’sfokker 28 had been 
ground e< of the investigation 
intothe ch e accident. 

inis, h said, left the airline 
wrth only^iced turboprop plane 
to operattestic routes. 


rJrilNUM ttUNtl — ine wmoou- wi r rw >-rino was 

ian government threatened legal ac- the rr^trychjef.I^jjCCTing. 
tion Tuesday against local and in- quoted as telling heads ot civil aflrnra 
temational new7^mzations whose bureaus attending ai nation^ Icorifer- 
coverage of fighting between rival ence. China has a social security sys 
forShconsidS unbalanced. tem in 40 percent of its cities. (AP) 

Khieu Kanharith, secretary of state 

in the Information Ministry, said some n L /; m|J * First 

news organizations were relying too tiepllOllCanS I WM 
heavfly or solely on resistance leaders r 

as sources, resulting in one-sided cov- lTl Australia VOie 

tsasssssr— «ms» -jess 


troops and resistance forces. CANBERRA - 

The government was .especially strongly outpolled monarchists m ana- 
critical of the Voice of America. Vi- tional vote to deer delegates to a con- 
olators can face fines and pris- ference to consider whether Australia 
on. (AP) — 


Talks by Koreans 
On Food Aid Stall 


BEIJING — North and South nuzaw 
Korean Red Cross delegations failed places. 


reiGDGC LU bUHAIUbi wiwuiw 

should become a republic and sever its 
remaining legal ties to Britain. 

Republicans won 45 of the 76 seats 
for the constitutional convention,, to 
be held in February, the Australian 
Electoral Commission said Tuesday. 
Candidates who want to retain Queen 
Elizabeth n as head of state won 27 
places. (Ratters) 


: L_ 

Beijing, Outraged, Rejects Juts’ Call for Referendum on Tibet 

Our Suff From Dbpadia 4< . 

. BEOING — China rejected a call Tuesdav hv n „ J .** ncc car *y 1996 as China violated human riahts in Tibet.” Mr. Tang nonviolent campaign for Tibetan autonomy. 


C^^MbyOiirSKffFmDopadKt 

. BEDING— ' China rejected a call Tuesdav bv an 
mtananonal group of jurists for a Tibetan ?ef- 
mde Pf Ddence znd dismissed allega- 
“ ■ 7vbet - “ siand ^ 


1996 * China violated human rights in Tibet." Mr. Tang nonviolent campaign for Tibetan autonomy 
. charged. Beijing says it has spent millions of dollars 

imMnt^^\™^“ thoi ? ofthere P a In a 365-page report, the jurists group said that raising Tibetan living standards and restoring 


tionsof human-rights abuses in Tibet as slander S., 1 "? international laws. 1 anintenrive poUticalre-educalioa drive was under Buddhist monasteries, Tibetan activists say that 

The so-called self-determination is out of the eanizSnn 1™? S - ^. teri ^ aI _ a ? airs - and 1 way in monasteries. It also said that Buddhist nuns other important sites have been destroyed and that 

quesdon, said Tang Guoqiang, a spokesman for § ThTchinS,. ^ airfother women had been raped with cattle prods economic benefits go mostly to ethnic Chinese 

fThi^ 1 ^ 1686 ^ 0r ? 1 S n Miniitry. “Tibet is a part of ante ^ Ion * denit *nd that prisoners had died Tnrecent years from settlers. 

Q ^ T * . P Tibet and ^ P ersecu ^ torture or negligence. The jurists group said a Tibetan referendum 

The International Commission of Jurists, based reiecmr^n^tH^Si^ aflempts to invest ft caUed for a special UN human-rights in- could result in independence, self-rule as part of 

m Geneva, caUai Monday for the United Nations as J Sbvl^P human nghts “ vestigator for Tibet. China, a continuation of the current situation or any 

!? ?5 asor a referendum in Tibet on whether it “This: n-tvJf* J , , Chinese Communist troops arrived in Tibet in other status chosen by Tibetan voters, 

should remain under Chinese control soven-iotrS^f JS- 10 ™ dlsre 8 ard tort 1950 to assert Beijing’s claim to die texritory. Its The authors of the report visited the Dalai Lama 

lfae group said that repression in Tibet had J ?. > m ? a » openly propagandize ruler, the Dalai Lama, fled to India in 1959 and in India, but said they had not been allowed to 

-determination and slanderously received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 for his travel to Tibet (AP, Reuters) 


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PAGE 6 


EUROPE 


A Big String Added to NATO Growth 


Senator Says U.S. Military Spending in Europe Must Not Rise 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 


possibly with added conditions affecting 
the American role in the alliance and 


PARIS — A leading congressional 
critic of NATO expansion conceded 
Tuesday that the plan would be ratified 
this spring by the U.S. Senate — but 


Europe. 

The key conditions, said Senator Ted 
Stevens, Republican of Alaska, center 
on the U.S. share of costs incurred by the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization as 


the price of integrating the Czech- Re- 
public, -Hungary and Poland into the 
alliance. - 

As chairman of the Appropriations 
Committee, Mr. Stevens said dial he 
wanted the Senate to stipulate that U.S. 


military spending in Europe would not 
rise as a result of enlargement 


Despite Havel, It’s Check , 
If Not Yet Mate, on NATO 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Tunes Service 


PRAGUE — Fewer than half the 
Czechs support NATO membership 
for their country, even though Pres- 
ident Vaclav Havel has often spoken 
about the importance of the Western 
alliance, according to a survey. 

The survey suggests that Czechs are 
more concerned with their economic 
well-being, which they feel is 
threatened by current domestic polit- 
ical upheavals, than with any external 
threat that the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization is intended to thwart. 

TTiis was the third of four surveys 
this year by the Factum polling com- 
pany that showed less than SO percent 
support for membership in the alli- 
ance; results Monday showed 42.8 
percent. 

The results, which a Clinton ad- 
ministration official described as “not 
helpful." came two months after 
Washington blunrJy told the Czech 
government that it was dissatisfied 
with its preparations for NATO. 

Enthusiasm for NATO membership 
has been muted in the Czech Republic 
all along, and lagged behind that in the 
two other central European countries, 
Poland and Hungary, that have been 
invited to join. 

The Clinton administration con- 
siders the embrace of the three post- 
Communist countries by NATO as the 
centerpiece of its European policy but 
has been nervous about the lethargic 
attitude in the Czech Ministry of De- 
fense. This has been particularly dif- 
ficult for the administration to deal 
with because Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright, who was bom in 
Czechoslovakia, has made no secret of 
her aspirations for the Czech Repub- 
lic. 


During several visits by high-level 
Pentagon officials in October,- the 
government was told to sharpen its 
preparation for membership. 

Debate on the expansion of NATO 
began in the U.S. Senate in the fall and 
die issue is expected to be voted on 
next spring. A two-thirds majority is 
necessary for passage in the Senate, 
and approval by the parliaments of the 
15 other NATO members is also 
needed before enlargement can move 
ahead. 

Administration officials warned the 
Czechs that tepid public opinion and 
an ill-prepared military would not 
help their cause in the Senate. 

To please the administration, the 
government of Vaclav Klaus, who 
was forced to resign as prime minister 
last month, increased military spend- 
ing this fall. The Defense Ministry 
also made some personnel changes. 

Bat Mr. Klaus and his other min- 
isters rarely discussed the importance 
of NATO with the public. 

The results of the survey Monday 
showed that Mr. Havel, virtually the 
only passionate proponent of NATO 
membership among Czech officials, 
has had little impact on public opin- 
ion. 

Jan Herzmann, the manag ing di- 
rector of Factum, said in an interview 
Monday that the results reflected 
“lack of discussion of NATO.” 

Those who remain undecided are 
still a substantial group — 30.5 per- 
cent — and 26.7 percent said they 
were opposed to the expansion, Mr. 
Herzmann said. 

A survey conducted in the spring 
showed peak support of 50.1 percent, 
he continued. A survey in April 
showed 39.9 percent support and in 
June support dipped to a low of 37.4 
percent 


rise as a result of enlargement 

With total U.S. military costs on Euro- 
pean operations running around $10 bil- 
lion a year, he said during a visit to Paris, 
if the Clinton administration can “do it 
within that $10 billion, then they can 
have enlargement, too." 

The ceiling is essential, he said to 
protea the Defense Department's 
budgets for military readiness and for 
new weapons, especially those designed 
to destroy missiles fired at the United 
States or at U.S. forces deployed in the 
Gulf or the Pacific. 

A logical way to find funds for en- 
largement, Mr. Stevens suggested, 
would be to cut the strength of U.S. 
forces in Europe, currently numbering 
about 1 15,000. 

Although Mr. Stevens said that the 
Senate would vote for ratification rather 
than disavow a presidential commitment 
to foreign governments, his stand over 
costs seemed bound to aggravate the 
trans- Atlantic row over how to share the 
financial burdens of enlargement along- 
side a continuing peacekeeping oper- 
ation in Bosnia. 

NATO governments have steadily re- 
duced their estimates of the price — and 
presumably the pace — of enlargement. 
In its most recent figure, NATO 


headquarters put the cost at $2 billion, 
down from S30 billion, itself down from 


down from $30 billion, itself down from 
an estimate of more than $100 billion 
last year. 

A specialized U.S. publication. De- 
fense News, said earlier this month that 
classified military reports at NATO 
showed that Washington and other cap- 
itals had been “low-balling” the pro- 
jected costs to deceive public opinion 
about the price. 


Hanukkah Candle at Vatican 


The Associated Press 

VATICAN CITY — A Hanukkah 
candle was lighted Tuesday at the Vat- 
ican for the first time in history, next to 
an olive tree commemorating diplomatic 
ties between Israel and the Holy See. 

The event marked die launch of IsraeT s 
50th anniversary celebrations. Although 
it mirrored ceremonies in more than 30 
countries, the Israeli ambassador to the 
Holy See said this one was "unique.' ’ 


German Real Estate Magnate Sentenced to Prison Term for Fraud 


CwfOntln Our SuffFizwPbfUKhts 


• FRANKFURT — A court here sen- 
tenced Juergen Schneider to six years 
and nine months in prison on Tuesday 
for masterminding the fraud behind the 
biggest postwar property collapse in 
Germany, but the court also criticized 
banks for being foolish. 

Mr. Schneider, who fled to the United 
States and left 2,000 creditors holding 
debts of more than 6 billion Deutsche 
marks (S3.37 billion), was Found guilty 
of obtaining loans by fraud. The banks 
were admonished for having been neg- 
ligent in providing them. 


The sentence, which is to begin after’ 
Christmas, amounted to about half of the 
maximum possible sentence. 

Mr. Schneider’s former partner, Kari- 
Heinrich Kuepferie, an architect, was giv- 
en a nine-months’ suspended sentence. 

Judge Heinrich Gehrke criticized the 
banks that had supported Mr. Schneider 
for "having shown unbelievable care- 
lessness in opening the door to this so- 
called big investor.” 

The court found Mr. Schneider guilty 
of four cases of aggravated fraud and of 
fraudulently obtaining loans amounting 
to 165 million DM. 


Mr. Schneider’s empire-comprised 
shopping centers and hotel and office 
projects in East and West Germany. It 
fell apart when an economic and con- 
struction boom engendered by unifica- 
tion came to an end. 

Mr. Schneider fled Germany in April 
1994, and after spending a year on the 


run trying to escape from justice au- 
thorities, he was arrested in Miami. He 


thorities, he was arrested in Miami. He 
was extradited to Germany in February 
1996 and the trial began on June 30. 

He was long one of the most glam- 
orous and respected real estate magnates 
in Germany. (AFP. Reuters) 


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International 
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ads work 


The Associated Press 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany 
and his defense minister, Volker Ruehe, 
met Tuesday with German troops from 
the international peacekeeping force in 
Bosnia. 

Mr. Kohl's visit, his first visit to the 
war-ravaged Bosnian capital, came just 
a day after a visit here by President Bill 
Clinton and his family. Overnight, the 
U.S. flags on the city's light poles were 


past the planned withdrawal deadl in e of 
June 1998, a move likely to prompt 
America's allies here to foUow suiL • 

Upon his arrival, Mr. Kohl went' to the' 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization base 
that serves as the Bosnian headquarters 
of the German-French brigade in 
Rajlovac, a Sarajevo suburb, for a pre- 
Christmas visit with the troops. .- # 

Mr. Kohl said afterward that the main 
purpose of his trip had been to thank the 
soldiers for their contribution to im- 
plementing the Dayton peace accords. 
He said the images of Sarajevo he had 
seen reminded him of Germany just after 
World War H. 

Mr. Kohl said his message to Bosnian 
leaders was dint “it makes no sense to 
challenge the international community 


replaced by German flags. 

Mr. Ruehe has been a regular visitor 
to Sarajevo ever since Germany de- 
ployed its troops this year as part of the 
international peace force. 

On Monday, Mr. Clinton announced 
that U.S. troops would stay in Bosnia 


and to believe that one can. have a future 
conducting a policy that has barbarian 
consequences." 

He added, “It is clear now that the 
international community is becoming 
more decisive aod more energetic" and 
that “the war criminals must go before 
the tribunal" in The Hague. 

■He said that during lunch with the 
soldiers, he asked them whether they 


would take pail in this mission again if 
they were asked and that they all had said 
yes. He said the soldiers told him they 
could see they were helping people. 

Mr. Kohl was due to meet Bosnian 
leaders in Sarajevo later. It was not clear 
whether Momcilo Krajisnik, the Bos- 
nian Serb representative on the joint 
presidency, would attend. 


RDEFELY 


Ulster Gives Holiday 
To Scores of Inmates 


BELFAST — More than 160 pris- 
oners from the Irish Republican Army 
and Protestant loyalist paramilitary 
groups were being released for Christ- 
mas leave Tuesday from jails in North- 
ern Ireland. 

They were granted 10 days’ parole 
to spend time with their families, in a 
move that outraged many here. 

Among those being released from 
Belfast's top security Maze prison was 
' Patrick Magee, convicted of planting the 
IRA bomb that was directed at Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher in 1984 in 
Brighton, England, killing five people. 

Meanwhile, 10 inmates jailed for 
IRA crimes were being released on 
Christmas parole from jails in the Irish 
Republic, including Thomas McMa- 
hon, who was given a life sentence in 
1979 for the murder of Lord Mount- 
batten. (AFP) 


Italian Parliament 
Approves ’98 Budget 


ROME — Italy’s upper house of 
Parliament voted into law Tuesday the 
center-left government’s 1998 budget, 
which includes measures aimed at 
trimming 25 trillion lire off next year's 
deficit. 

The Senate approved the budget by 
159 votes to 48, with no abstentions. 
The lower house of Parliament, the 
Chamber of Deputies, passed the 
budget last week. The budget now goes 
into effect on Jan. i. 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi and 
Treasury Minister Carlo Azeglio 
Ciampi had stated that the deficit-cut- 
ting measures in the 1998 budget must 
be passed in order for Italy to join the 
initial phase of European economic 
and monetary union in January 1999. 

The measures include plans to cut 
•4.5 trill ion lire ( $2.6 million) in welfare 
spending in 1998. Savings of some 4.1 
trillion tire are projected from tight- 
ening the pension system. (Reuters) 



ir 


-*** m 




rm • . _ ' Brin UiL'.TIk A«<%iflinl Pir« 

The convicted IRA bomber Patrick Magee, who has served 11 rears ofa 
35-year sentence, leaving Maze prison near Belfast for 10 days Tuesday. 


heard reports from Romanian intel- 
ligence services on Mr. Severin's al- 

j' i 


legations, published in a newspaper 
interview three months ago. 


Foreign Minister 
Quits in Romania 


interview three months ago. 

Mr. Severin said .then that he had 
evidence that two or threeparty leaders 
and another two or three prominent 
newspaper editors were working for 
foreign intelligence services. He did 
□bt 'name the individuals or the foreign 
agencies. (Reuters) 


1994 had worsened, 

A military tribunal sentenced Mr. 
Priebke, 84, to five years in prison last 
summer for the 1944 massacre of 335 
people in Nazi-occupied Rome, but it 
gave lum credit for time spent under 


- •* < Bto 

AM 
> unfit 

•• 




pretrial arrest since his extradition 
from Argentina in 1 994. 

. Mr. Priebke ’s attorneys have lone 
contended, that his psychological con- 
.diuon was too “fragile" for the mil- 
itary hospital. (A p) 


BUCHAREST — Romania's for- 
eign minister. Adrian Severin, an- 
nounced his resignation Tuesday after 
an -investigation failed to substantiate 
his allegations that local politicians and 
journalists had worked as spies for 
foreign governments. 

- Mr. Severin said at a hews con- 
ference that his resignation was “the 
sole solution" but added dial he stood 
by his accusations. 

Mr. Severin’s announcement fol- 
lows a meeting Monday of-.the Su- 
preme Defense Council, led by Pres- 
ident Emil Coastantinescu, which 


Ex-Nasi Is Released 
From Rome Hospital 


i'*’ 

41rr^ 

.-*** 


For the Record 




ROME — r The former SS captain 
Erich Priebke, convicted for-his role in 
a World Warii massacre of civilians in 
Italy, was released from a Rome mil- 
itary-hospital Tuesday and moved to 
his. lawyer’s home to- serve _the final 
three months . of his' sentence undeir 
house arrest. .■■■■' 

■- His attorneys asked :fdr Mr. Prieb-. 
ke’s release, after doctors said the ef- 
fects of a minor stroke he suffered in 


The war crimes trial of Maurice 
Papon was suspended Tuesday bv a 

CT? “I^ d f aux 10 S* ve toe former 
•Vichy official nearly two weeks to 
recover from a bronchial infection. 

nJf t tT, n £°™s Castagncde. who 
noted that Mr. Papon, 87. appeared 
wary m recent days, cited aWm 

doctor saying 
toff-toe defendant needed “strict med- 
ical surveillance.” Judge Ca^timhcdc 
suspended the trial untif Jam5 



■ l .s 


Convalescing Yeltsin Visits His Office Briefly 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin 
paid a three-hour visit' to his Kremlin 
office Tuesday, but then returned to a 
sanatorium where he has been convales- 
cing for two weeks with what is reported 
to ne a bad cold. 

"Coming back to work is the best 
medicine ror die president,” said Mr. 
Yeltsin’s spokesman, Sergei 
Yastrzhembsky. 

' Doctors had recommended that Mr, 
Yeltsin stay in the government rest home 
until the end of this week, but the restless 


president said Monday that he was fully 
recovered and would be back at work 
Tuesday.' 

In a compromise worked out with the 
doctors,, die president, spent just three 
hours in his Kremlin office Tuesday 
before he headed back to the sanatorium 
on the western outskirts of Moscow, Mr. 
Yasnzhembsky said 

While at the Kremlin, Mr. Yeltsin met 
with his chief of staff and several other 
members of his inner circle —the first of 
a series of meetings planned for the rest 
of the week, die spokesman said. . 


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>ees U.S. ‘Blackmail 9 Behind Security Council Demand 


BAGHDAD — Deputy Prime Min- 
ister Tarifl Aziz on Tuesday condemned 
a United nations Security Council state- 
ment demanding that Baghdad allow full 
access to UN weapons inspectors, say- 
ing it was die result of U.S. blackmail. 

‘The statement issued yesterday by 
the Security Council mirrors once again 
the blackmail practices by America on 
the council/’ Mr. Aziz said in a state- 
ment carried by the official Iraqi news 

agency, INA. 

“Aziz 'has called on the council to 
pursue an objective and balanced way 
and work for lifting the embargo im- 
mediately/’ INA said, referring to UN 


sanctions imposed on Iraq after it in- news conference Tuesday. His con> 
vaded Kuwait in August 1990. meats highlighted the rift between the 

Americans are dominating the United Stales and Russia over how to 
Special Commission: and they use it to deal with Iraq. (Reuters, AP) 

fulfill their purposes, and we have called . IT v w t Dl _ , 


for a balanced structure/’ Mr. Aziz 
said. 

In Moscow, meanwhile, Russia's for- 
eign minister again called on the United 
Nations to speed up its inspections of 
Iraq’s military arsenals so that sanctions 
could be lifted as soon as possible. 

'‘The UN Special Commission must 


■ UN Measure Ig Bhmted * 

Barbara Crossette of The New York 
Tunes reported earlier from New York: 

The Security Council said Monday 


But die council, blocked by Russia from the statement, said afterward that 
with at least the tacit support of several he thought it important that the measure 
other members, stopped short of con- included an acknowledgment that ef- 
demning Iraq- forts are being made to find a way for 

The statement issued Monday, which Iraq to meet all its obligations. Other 
followed inconclusive meetings in diplomats said this appeared to be a nod 
Baghdad last week between the Iraqis to R ussian diplomacy, 
and the chief arms inspector, contained Responding to calls from Russia, 
no specific threats. France, China and Egypt that Iraq should 

It was nonetheless welcomed by Bill see some furore hope orhaving sanctions 
Richardson, the U.S. representative, eased if it is to be expected to cooperate 
who called the statement ‘‘another fully, Mr. Richardson said earlier Mon- 
Strong signal” that Iraq “must comply day that it was Baghdad's refusal to 
with all Security Council resolutions.” accommodate requests by Richard But- 
Sergei Lavrov, the Russian represen- ier, the chief inspector, for access to 
tative, who was largely responsible for “sensitive” sites that ’ was keeping the 
removing the condemnatory language sanctions in place. 


work to ensure the earliest lifting of the President Saddam Hussein allow the in- 
sanctions, and not mm it into some kind specters to see “any and all” buildings. 


that Iraq’s failure to open disputed sites Richardson, the U.S. representative, 
to weapons inspectors was “onaccept- who called the statement ‘‘another 
able” and demanded once again that strong signal” that Iraq “must comply 


; the embargo im- of an amorphous, distant goal, ’’Foreign 
d, referring to UN Minister Yevgeni Primakov said at a 


equipment, documents and vehicles tijey 
want 


Medical Team Dispatched 
As Ebola-Like Virus Hits 
Flooded Region of Kenya 


Bv James CL MeKin W Jr chiefs with radio transmitters thatat least 

New York Times Service* ' 143 people have died from an unknown 

— — — — — disease this month in flooded villages 

NAIROBI — r The World Health Or- , throughout the area, which lies on the 
g a n iz at ion and local medical officials border with Somalia, 
are sending a team of doctors to north- But. health officials in Nairobi said 
eastern Kenya on Wednesday to inves- that tbe majority of those deaths had not 
ligate an outbreak of a mysterious dis- been confirmed and that no doctor had 
ease with symptoms similar to those of examined the bodies or tested the blood 


the deadly Ebola virus. of the vici 

Government officials in. the Garissa The go 
region, which has been hit hard by flood- had confi 
ing in recent weeks, say they have re- disease, al 
ceived unconfirmed reports from local to reach a 


of the victims. 

The government doctor in the 
had co nfirm ed only three cases 


FLU: 

Hong Kong Ban 

Continued from Page 1 


to reach a hospital in the town of Garissa 
last week, officials said. Those three vic- 
tims died after suffering far several days 
from high .fever, v omiting, diarrh ea and 
hemo rrhaging from the mouth and other 
orifices, health officials said. 

Tbe symptoms are close to those 
caused by the Ebola and Marburg vir- 
uses, the deadly fevers that have broken 
out periodically in central Africa and 



oul pmoaicauy in central rnnea ana . ka Motanroimir Aimuei p™ 

found only in birds and poultry. Butin its northern Kenya since the mid-1980s. Members of the UN inspection team in Iraq on Tuesday trying to fit a file cabinet into a UN vehicle heading to the 
first known comment on this growing doctors said. Baghdad airport. Tbe United Nations says Iraq’s refusal to open certain sites to inspection is “unacceptable.” 

public health crisis, a report Tuesday on ButDr. PeterTukei, chief virolotost at 

the state-run China Central Television the Kenya Medical Research Institute, ' 1 . 


said that border inspectors in Shenzhen, said that while doctors had not ruled out %W/r/ A A • r •/*, ,1 r • i c mr i m 

just across the border from Hong Kong, the Ebola virus, the outbreak was more W aV/VX vJJ. 1 • ASTUBTlCa JblttS ttlB Liu On SOflie UlcL liUClOCir lOVS 
had found no traces of the virus in any likely to be connected to contaminated . J J 


birds bound for Hong Kong. 


likely to be connected to contaminated 
flood waters or perhaps some mosquito- 


Offidals of Hong Kong’s health and home Illness, 
agriculture departments said that the dis- He said the Ebola strain, which is teans- 


Continued from Page 1 weapons information as '‘bom classi- 
fied.” Instead, he announced, “we will 
Launched from a shoulder-fired recoilless oaly classify where there is a compelling 


ease .was most likely contracted from mitted by contact with an infected per- rifle, tbe Davy Crockett was main tamed in national security interest” As an ex- 


direct exposure to infected chicken or son’s blood, generally breaks ant in one 
chicken races. location and fans out from there, as people 

Mr. Sims said the virus had been who have care 
found m two swabs of chicken dnwpings cany the disea 
collected fromtwomarket stalls 10 days This illness 
ago and froma dead bird at a wholesale popping- up 

Tbe offirials said they still lleTlood 

determhMsdwhcaher humans can pass on store likely to 
the diseaj&Jp each other. But jittery the victims ate 
Hong Kj^|lpis are taking few chances; a “From all d 
young-W^pn office worker said that I very much do 
shenoW.cmpriy held her breath wfaenev- think one can 
ershe toafa someone coughing cm the unlikely to be 
btwadfllbSfshe was searching stores for Whatevexit 
a smpealTttiaSk to wear. appears to hav 

Chickea Ss a popular part of Hong has caused cc* 

Ktmg meals; particularly m this season ital, where nr 
of foe winter solstice when poultry be- vinrial health 
comes a part of the traditional Chinese Hassan Abdi, 
celebration; at are used as offerings to peared to be to 
the gods. Mott chickens are brought in the anopheles 
live froin China, bought live and tied in a evidence to 
band$b7ahd then taken bock to apart- however, heal! 
meats, where they arckilkd and plucked 


each other. But jittery the victims ate or drank, 
are taking few chances; a “From all tbe descriptions I’ve beard. 


son’s blood, generally breaks out in one the army from 1961 to 1972. ample, be said Energy Department nu- 

location and fans out from there, as people With a range from just over 1 mile to 6 clear facilities would no longer he per- 

who have cared for "tbe sick unwittingly miles (2 kilometers to 10 kilometers), it mitted to classify information “solely 
cany tiie disease!© other places. was among the first atomic battlefield related to public and worker health and 

This illness, however, appears to be weapons given to lower-echelon troops, safety or environmental qualify.” 
popping- up in scattered villages some of whom were stationed in Europe The department also made public 
tinoug^ut mo r^ion. Since all tbe vii- and the Far East. The Davy Crocketts 270,000 pages of materials related to its 


us illness, however, appears to he 
ling- up iu scattered villages 
tghout me region. Since all the vif- 


said.'fae disease is woe withdrawn from units in part be- 


safety or environmental qualify.” 

The department also made public 
270,000 pages of materials related to its 
giant facility at Hanford, Washington, 


more likely to be caused by something cause soldiers could not keep toe devices which for almost 50 years operated nu- 


as secure as regulations required. 

Among the more spectacular films 
made public was the 1962 test entitled 


upgraded from confidential and secret 
levels to top-secret classification would 
include documents on bow to use or 
control nuclear weapons. Another cat- 
egory set for higher classification in- 
cludes drawings that show how weapons 
are designed and built, some of which 
have up to now been held at lower than 
top-secret levels. 

Fart of the problem. Mr. Heosser said, 
was that in the past the Energy and 
Defense departments set different se- 
curity standards for the same classific- 


From all tbe descriptions Ive beard. Among the more spectacuJ 
Iverymuchdoubtit,”pr. Tukeisaid. “I made public was the 1962 test 

think one can lay aside his . fears. It is Operation Sedan, which saw a 1 

unlikely to be Ebola or Martnug.” ton device exploded to see whether aiom- 

Whatever it is, the mysterious disease ic detonations could be used for peaceful 
appears to have a high mortality rate. It proposes, such as moving earth to dig 
bias caused considerable fear in the cap- canals or create harbors. One > 


dear reactors to produce plutonium for ation levels; these will now be brought 
U.S- nuclear weajjon^Tbe papers detail together in one system. 


made public was the 1962 test entitled how the city of 7,750 people was de- In addition. 
Operation Sedan, which saw a 104-kflo- . signed, and for the first time disclose pored new ru 
ton device exploded to see whether atom- analysis of higher than anticipated ra- protect Enerj 
ic detonations could be used for peacefhl dioactive contamination at the site. blowers “whe 
proposes, such as moving earth to dig Mr. Pena also announced measures to duct about an' 
canals or create harbors. One of many increase security for the secrets that re- tivities,” sud 


canals or create harbors. One of many increase security for the secrets that re- 
“Fiowshaxe” experiments, Sedan left a main. As he pul it: “Our new way of 


Hassan Abdi, as saying the illness ap- 
peared to be hemorrhagic fever born by 


quoted the pro- “Plowshare” experiments. Sedan left a 
in Garissa, Dr. crater 320 feet deep and 1,280 feet in 
* the illness ap- diameter (200 meters by 400 meters), 
ic fever born by Along with the first release of once- 


doing business will reduce the amount of 
information that will be kept classified, 
while increasing the protections for 


In addition, Mr. Pena said two pro- 
posed new rules would be offered to 
protect Energy Department whistle- 
blowers “who report potential miscon- 
duct about any of the department’s ac- 
tivities” such as health violations or 
allegations of fraud. 

He announced that the department 
would no longer automatically reim- 
burse contractors found liable in 


anopheles mosquito. There is no classified atomic test footage, Mr. Pena smaller amounts of critical information whistle-blower cases. “In the future,” 


evidence to bade that assertion up, 
however, health officials said. 


announced that the government was end- 
ing a practice tfnT considered all atomic 


about our nuclear activities.” 

Mr. Heusser said information to be 


Mr. Pena said, “as a general rule if a 
contractor loses a case, they will pay.” 


BRIEFLY 


Netanyahu Surveys 
West Bank From Air 

ALFEI MEN ASHE, West Bank 
— Prime Minister Benjamin Net- 
anyahu and his cabinet minis ters 
flew over the West Bank by heli- 
copter Tuesday before announcing 
a decision on how much land to give 
the Palestinians in an upcoming 
I troop pullback. 

Mr. Netanyahu said the tour 
served as a reminder that Israel must 
retain parts of the West Bank it cap- 
tured in the 1967 Middle East War. 

“We have flown east looking 
over the Jordan Valley, realizing the 
importance of having that buffer 
against a threat from the east,” Mr. 
Netanyahu said, after three heli- 
copters carrying the group landed in 
the Jewish settlement of Alfei 
Menashe. (AP) 

Algeria Shepherds 
Killed by Attackers 

ALGIERS — Ten Algerian ci- 
vilians were slaughtered by armed 
groups of suspected Islamic extrem- 
ists in a suburb of Algiers and in a 
hamlet near the western city of 
Tlemcen, local newspapers report- 
ed Tuesday. 

A gang swooped on a farm in 
Cheraga, on the southwestern out- 
skirts of the capital, overnight Sun- 


the property and an elderly woman 
who had tried to raise the alarm. 

Six shepherds were killed Sun- 
day in the hamlet of Sidi-Senoussi, 
near Tlemcen, by attackers who slit 
the throats of 500 livestock before 
fleeing, the papers reported. (AFP) 

7 Military Men Die 
In Colombia Crash 

BOGOTA — Seven military of- 
ficials, including two senior of- 
ficers, were killed when their U.S.- 
built UH-1H helicopter crashed in a 
jungle-covered area of northwest 
Colombia, military spokesmen 
said. 

Victims of the crash, which oc- 
curred Monday shortly after the air- 
craft took off from the Pacific port 
of Bahia Solano in Ghoco Province, 
included Rear Admiral Jose Au- 
guste Malallana, commander of the 
Pacific Naval Force, and Brigadier 
General Luis Gutierrez Calderon, 
head of the Marine Corps’ 2d In- 
fantry Brigade. 

The air force commander. Gen- 
eral Fabio Zapata, said the cause of 
the crash was not immediately 
known. Bat be said an attack by 
leftist rebels had been virtually 
ruled out ( Reuters ) 

For the Record 

Nicaragua’s Sandinista news- 
paper, Barricada, will continue 
publishing despite a financial crisis, 
it says. The paper, which had been 
scheduled to publish its final edition 
on Monday, said in an article that it 
would sell its headquarters and use 
the proceeds to pay back wages to 
its 250 employees. (Reuters) \ 


(Reuters) 


- Siiik^ foe outbreak of “bird flu” and 
foe first reports tracing foe disease to 
infected chicken, chicken sales here 
have plummeted, down as much as 70 
percent T>y some estimates, and some 
restaurants have taken to assuring their 
rastofeta fast their chicken comes from 
Australia or foe United States. 

Heaafr officials repeated their assur- 
ance Tuesday that the virus could not be 


SOMALIS: A Bold Blueprint for Peace. 


Continued from Page 1 

week in opposition to tbe accord. 

The agreement leaves much to be 


to rebuild confidence shattered by years 
of bloodshed. 

Among those that are to take effect 
immediately, they said, are the suspen- 


DJIBOUT1- 


•Adcfi* Ababa 


SOMAUIANd 
^(disputed) / 


contracted by eating cooked birds, but tions. Mr. Ali Mahdi and Mr. Aidid 

, . . ,7 . u 1. II lud). lilr.Tn In Annmcw fnr 


determined, including the question of sion of mihtaiy operations around the 
whq will be president during a three-year country and foe reopening of 
transition period before national elec- Mogadishu’s airport and seaport 

.■ . _ — A V- Hr Ai«Ui4 ft r irn—ntlni nr fnirrimirr Tnn nliflllt 


CARLOS: There Is No Law For Me’ 

Continued from Page 1 Earlier, Francois Honnorat, another 

defease attorney, said that the prose- 
“ terrorist nation.” During foe trial be cution had based its case on evidence 
has often referred to his arrest and im- fabricated by intelligence agents work- 


ETHIOPIA 


cautioned that poultry should be well- would both appear likely to compete for of Somalia trod 
cooked People m contact with chickens the post _ foe worid, with 

have been ad vised to wash their band*; But as participants in foe ta lks ao- sion working to 
thoroughly scribed it, foe agreement among r' 

The vims scare given another don leaders is notable for the 
blow to Hong Kong’s tourism industry, which it seeks to balance power 
already reeling from a dramatic down- foe country's rival centers, 
turn caused by high prices, a regional The right to dispatch the 465 a 

economic collapse ana foe earlier prol> who are to attend the meeting mB 
lem of a debilitating smog covering to be apportioned by tribal baser 
much of Southeast Asia that caused forma la that was debated for week 


Mogadishu’s airport and seaport. 

As recently as four years ago, foe plight 
of Somalia had caponed the attention of 
the world with a UN peap&sepmg mis- 
sion working to protect shipoKnts of food 


prisonment as a “Zionist plot.” 

Earlier Tuesday, his defense Lawyers 


ing for the French government. 

Carlos listened quietly, dressed in the 


asked foe judge and jury to acquit him of same blue blazer and multicolored ascot 


scribed it, foe agre ement among foe fac- and other goods to teas of thousands of 
tion leaders is notable for foe way in civilians made desperate by a combin- 


which it seeks to balance power among 
foe coantry’s rival centers. 

The right to dispatch the 465 delegates 
who are to attend the meeting in Baidoa is 


ation of drought ana civil war. 

U.S. troops who waded ashore in 
December 1992 were among the first to 
take up their places in that 21 -country 


touch 11 of sSfotSsTAJa^'foat^caused fenrotiaSaTwas debated for weeks by the struggle for control with foe elder Aidid, foe elder Aidid, a coalition erf clan-based 

many EnroDeans to defer visits to -this faction leaders and that is intended to whose forces killed more than ^ two dozen forces pmed in templing Mr Snd Barre m 
MuwjjtwB n ^ — • a Man* Ammiran cnIHim m httttlM: T 001 hnr that alliance onicktv fractured. 


to be apportion® 
formula that was 


tribal basis under a mission. But their focus soon became a 


riiat Somalia might ever again 


murder charges, saying that foe evidence 
was manipulated and calling foe trial 
“Stalinist” In an often-impassioned plea 
fra- foe man once considered foe world’s 
most wanted terrorist the defense lawyer, 
Olivier Maudret also assured the jury 
that Carlos would not go free if acquitted 
Since be is also under investigation in 
France for four terrorist attacks, he would 
not be released from prison even if he was 


as a state. Under the leadership of acquitted by foe jury, which comprises 

■ Aidid, a coalition of clan-based nine civilians and three judges. 

ined in toppling Mr. SiadBanein “What I propose is acquittal,” Mr. 


he has worn since foe proceedings 
began. He faces life in prison if con- 
victed 

Mr. Honnorat accused French author- 
ities of manipulating witnesses and falsi- 
fying fingerprint evidence. 

Prosecutors’ physical and circum- 
stantial evidence has included finger- 
prints on a whisky bottle and glasses at' 
the Left Bank apartment where the 
Id Uings occurred; more fingerprints on a 
postcard addressed to a Venezuelan 


Venezuelan 


iend and compromising accounts of 


The tourism association has issued a . 
“bini flu fact sheet” for arriving vis- 

.1 .« tr - rv 


—fleer the size and strength of the clans. American soldiers in battles that reached 1991, but that alliance quickly fractured Maudret said ‘ ‘The solution to acquit conversations from former friends and 

— mm rn - * A * - — V- * - A<^jkL<bi 1 AftO jkai^l ' I'Wm lCfldCrS vndmi otviAiVf* ir/ut* f Wfjll «%Af 1 nnftrr 


The leaders of many among should not shock you: Carlos will not lovers. 

Somalia’s armed political factions have leave jaiL ” Carlos was captured in Khartoum, Su- 

met periodically m recent years to try “I don’t ask it for Carlos," he said, dan, on Aug. 14, 1994, and brought to 
fold put together a transitional govern- “but for us, for our country, what itdoes Paris by French agents, 
meat But foe accord signed Monday best, in foe name of law and truth.” He was convicted in absentia for the 
night represents foe first time that a Tlx: lead defense attorney, Isabelle killings in 1992, bur once be was cap- 
broad base of rival groups has been able Coutant-Peyre, called foe proceedings lured, French law required that he be 
to agree on a plan fra: doing so. “apolitical process” and “Stalinist.” given a retrial 


will include 
minister, eil 


residential council whose 
reflect a broad spectrum. 


The last UN troops left Mogadishu in fold put together a transitional govem- 
1995, and most Somalis have continued to meat. But the accord signed Monday 


bore, and warnings have been posted 
torperts in France and Taiwan. 


move swiftly to carryout steps intended 


Eve in despair, reliant on faction and clan 
leaders for security and basic services. 
Some analysts have despaired of the 


night represents foe first time that a 
broad base of rival groups has been able 
to agree on a plan fra doing so. 


He was convicted in absentia for foe 
killings in 1992, bur once be was cap- 
tilled, French law required that he be 
given a retriaL 


In Europe, Good-Bye to Ben & Jerry’s ? 
Eli May Ban U.S. Dairy Products Jan. 1 


U.S. to Let Firms ACTRESS: Jury Awards Hunter Tylo $5 Million for Being Fired 


Bid for Turkish Sale Continued from Page 1 


Bhamberx News 

BRUSSELS — U.S- dairy exports to 
the European Union worth 530 million a 
year could be barred starting Jan. 1 after 
foe European Union failed to approve a 
list of U.S, dairy plants that Washington 
says meet foe EU*s hygiene standards, 
American officials in Brussels said. 

- The officials said foe decision could 
prevent exports to the European Union 

trf well-known ice cream brands like Ben 

& Jerry's, manufactured by Ben & 
Jerry’s Homemade Inc., and Grand Met- 
ropolitan PLC’s Haagen-Dazs, as well 
as other yogurt, cheese and milk 
products. 

The problem resulted from the failure 
of foe two sides to adopts food trade pa« 
before tbe end of foe year that would 
recognize each other’s hygiene stan- 
dards and supersede individual agree- 
ments between the United States and foe 
15 EU member states. 

Either the European Union must, vote 


to accept a list of approved dairy fac- 
tories proposed by foe United States, or 
■ EU inspectors must inspect about 200 
U.S. plants, American diplomats said. 

The problem is part of a long list of 
trans-Atlantic agricultural trade- dis- 
putes, which were heightened last week 
by foe EU’s threat to ban all U.S. meat 
exports and the U4>. ban on all EU lamb 
and beef tbe week before that. 

Washington had expected foe Euro- 
pean Union to approve an 1 1-page list of 
milk processing factories at a meetmgof 
its veterinary committee on Dec. 16/but 
foe list was not put forward for a vote, 
American officials said. 

The United States is hoping that EU 


Union Vs veterinary committee Jan. 7. 

In the meantime,, it has appealed to the 
customs authorities of the EU member 
states to take a flexible approach regard- 
ing products already in transit on Jan. 1. 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The State 
Depaitzxtent authorized U.S. 
companies Tuesday to compete for 
a contract to supply attack heli- 
copters to Turkey, a spokesman 
said. 

A department spokesman, 
James Foley, said that after a joint 
State Department and Pentagon 
review of requests by American 
companies. Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright “today de- 
cided to allow U.S. participation 
in this competition.” 

“Her decision is fully consistent 
with our policy concerning arms 
transfers to Turkey,” Mr. Foley 
said. “We seek to support tins im- 
portant NATO ally's efforts to meet 
its legitimate self-defense require- 
ments, and to fulfill its NATO com- 
mftxnenis.” 


of the law to deal with foe issue of preg- 
nancy discrimination as it impacts act- 
resses,” be said after the judgment was 
rendered in Los Angeles Superior Court. 

In a statement after the decision. Sally 
SnchiL general counsel for Spelling En- 
tertainment Group, vowed to pursue foe 
case further. 

“We completely disagree with foe 
jury’s verdict, which we believe is in- 
consistent with both foe law and the 
evidence in this case," she said. “The 
award is not based on foe evidence 
presented and is even more than the 
plaintiff asked. We will appeal the ver- 
dict and are confident that we will be 
vindicated at foe appellate court level.” 

Miss Tylo had asked for $2.5 mil- 
lion. , 

She was playing the psychiatrist 
Taylor Forrester on a daytime soap opera, 
‘'the Bold and foe Beautiful,” when, in 
late 1995, she joiiied the “Melrose 
Place” cast in the role of Taylor McBride. 


The popular evening soap, on foe Fox 
network, tracks the intricately interwoven 
lives of tbe uniformly sexy inhabitants of 
an apartment building in Southern Cali- 
fornia. A melange of skin, deceit and 
improbabilities, the program is the 
brainchild of Aaron Spelling, a producer 
legendary for his frothy, racy touch. 

According to Mr." Goldberg. Miss 
Tylo told foe “Melrose Place” produ- 
cers that she was pregnant in March 
1 996, when she was only a month along. 
It was her third child; the baby, Isabella, 
was born in November 1996. 

The producers decided to fire her 
“within 5 or 1 0 minutes,” Mr. Goldberg 
said, and informed her by letter on April 
10, 1 996. She never made an appearance 
on foe show. 

Since Miss Tylo filed suit, tbe “Mel- 
rose Place” star Heather Locklear has 
become pregnant, and foe show con- 
tinued with her in foe leading role. Lira 
Rinna, who replaced Miss Tylo in foe 
role of McBride, recently announced her 
own pregnancy. The show's producers 


have indicated that they will write the 
baby into foe script 

Spelling Entertainment Group said 
there was no parallel between Miss 
Locklear’s pregnancy and Miss Tylo's. 
Miss Locklear is foe star, it said, while 
Miss Tylo’s- character was still on the 
drawing board when she was fired. 

‘ ‘Equating the creative importance of 
a pivotal established character with a 
not-yet- introduced character is absurd,’ ' 
foe statement said. The company also 
said it had offered Miss Tylo a role in foe 
series after she gave birth. 

Nothing in the law requires a com- 
pany to cast a visibly pregnant actress in 
the role of a hard-bodied seductress, the 
company insisted In a deposition read 
during the trial, the executive producer, 
Frank South, said it was “not dramat- 
ically sensible” to have a woman who is 
five months pregnant “rolling around in 
bed with our stars.” 

Miss Tylo, meanwhile, has returned 
to “The Bold and the Beautiful” and is 
again pregnant. 


r -' ■ 
Ka? 






PACES 


WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(Sribuite 


Pl'BUSHKD »mi THE NKW YORK TIMES AMD THE WASH PIG TOM Km 


Support for Inspection 


Much has been made of ihe fact that 
Russia. France and China apparently 
stand ready to veto any American bid 
for United Nations approval of force in 
Iraq. A veto by one or more of the 
permanent members of the Security 
Council would leave President Bill 
Clinton in a tight spot To ignore the 
veto would do heavy political damage, 
setting a precedent damag ing to the 
basic integrity of the council. But to 
respect the veto could enable Saddam 
Hussein to keep and further develop 
terrible and, in his hands, menacing 
weapons of mass destruction. 

The Clinton administration's public 
statements indicate that the president is 
prepared to act alone or in small com- 
pany to suppress such a threat, but his 
woid is not everywhere received as 
credible. 

Left somewhat obscured in the tu- 
mult is the other veto option relevant to 
Saddam Hussein's defiance. The 
United States pledges to veto any eas- 
ing of economic sanctions until Iraq is 
in full compliance with Security Coun- 
cil resolutions aimed at discovering 
and dismantling its special weapons. 

The administration does not enjoy 
full international support for military 
action , but it does for arms inspections. 
On Monday the council reaffirmed the 
mandate of the inspectors to go any- 
where in Iraq to root out suspected 
weapons, equipment, records and the 
rest. The mandate covers Iraq's so- 
called presidential sites, some or which 
are large, sprawling places having 
nothing'to do with the president's quar- 


ters or offices and everything to do 
with Saddam Hussein’s anthrax prep- 
arations. Plainly, that is why he has 
unilaterally declared these sites off 
bounds to the inspectorate. 

Saddam Hussein has made a tragic 
exploitation of his suffering popula- 
tion by refusing to use the diplomatic 
means available for its relief. Up to this 
point, however, the Russians, French 
and others taking a softer line have not 
said that sanctions should be lifted, 
despite the Iraqi leader's refusal to 
permit full-access inspections. On the 
contrary, they demand that he permit 
such inspections. That leaves Iraq un- 
der tremendous pressure not simply 
from Americans, but from Russians 
whom he seeks to cultivate. It leaves 
Washington now saying to Moscow 
that it is Russia's responsibility to de- 
liver Saddam Hussein to the UN res- 
olutions on inspections. And so it is. 

The Russians, pursuing their own 
foreign policy agenda, may claim that 
they are keeping American bombs and 
missiles from being fired at Iraq. But 
they are also now counseling the Iraqis 
to let the inspectors do their job. 

Iraq condemns the chief UN arms 
inspector as a “liar" for asserting that 
Saddam Hussein is hiding evidence of 
prohibited weapons at the presidential 
sites. But a far better method than pub- 
lic debate is available to measure the 
truth of the inspectorate's charges and 
the regime’s denials. It is, of course, the - 
inspections. Even the Russians — even 
the French — seem to agree. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Against Global Warming 


The global warming accord was 
barely signed in Kyoto this month 
when critics pronounced its chances of 
ratification by the U.S. Senate to be niL 
If that is true, the Senate has clearly 
misread the American public, which in 
every survey has expressed an appetite 
for decisive action. The Senate's at- 
titude defines what could be President 
Bill Clinton's biggest challenge in the 
new year — leading the Senate where 
the public wants it to go. 

Few scientists doubt that the warm- 
ing of the earth’s atmosphere, caused 
by carbon dioxide and other green- 
house gas emissions, poses a gigantic 
threat. But even before Kyoto, the Sen- 
ate had voted, 95-0, to reject any treaty 
that damaged the American economy 
or did not require developing countries 
to have their own energy conservation 
programs. The Kyoto agreement 
seems not to have satisfied many sen- 
ators on either count. 

Mr. Clinton must therefore spend 
the next year enlisting the participation 
of developing countries and persuad- 
ing Congress that the market incent- 
ives, tax credits and other strategies he 
has in mind will dramatically improve 
energy efficiency nationwide and al- 
low America to meet its emissions tar- 
gets without throttling the economy. 

Getting the developing countries to 
sign up will not by itself cany the day 
in the Senate. At least 20 senators are 
unlikely to vote for the treaty in any 
circumstances, viewing the science as 
dubious or any kind of environmental 
regulation as offensive. t The key to 
ratification will be the stance of such 
pro-environmental Republicans as 
John Chafee of Rhode Island, James 
Jeffords of Vermont and Olympia 
Snowe of Maine. In addition, John 
McCain of Arizona and Richard Lugar 
of Indiana, both conservatives, have a 
record of sensitivity to American in- 


ternational obligations and down the 
road may well be persuaded to support 
the treaty, and bring others along. 

American attitudes toward .energy 
have changed since the 1970s, when 
gasoline lines and high prices gave sac- 
rifice a bad name. Americans have also 
coalesced politically around supporting 
the environment. Senate and House Re- 
publican leaders learned that lesson 
painfully in 1995 when they tried and 
failed in their assaults on the Clean Air 
and Clean Water Acts. In addition, as 
Mr. Clinton pointed out, every major 
environmental advance of recent years 
has been described as a potential eco- 
nomic disaster, only to prove more 
doable than previously thought. 

A two-thirds vote in the Senate is 
required for approvaL Millions of dol- 
lars will be spent by energy companies, 
agribusiness and labor unions to portray 
the administration as bent on destroying 
the economy. Some Republicans ate 
hoping to demonize the global wanning 
treaty as they demonized Mr. Clinton's 
health care proposals in 1994. But it is 
also interesting that some Republicans 
have begun saying that they do not want 
to help Vice President A1 Gore ride the 
environmental issue to die White 
House in 2000. That means they might 
be willing to support a treaty and share 
in the credit. 

Any serious American effort to re- 
duce greenhouse gases will require 
sacrifice. Even economists sympath- 
etic to the environment warn against 
voluntarily bringing a repeat of the 
1970s oil shock. The environmental 
movement would be making a mistake 
to belittle the anxiety Americans feel 
about such warnings. But critics of the 
treaty will make an even greater mis- 
take if they underestimate the public's 
anxieties about global warming — and 
their resolve to address it 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Take a Fresh Look at Cuba 

The time comes when broken re- 
lations between neighboring countries 
demand a hard look and consideration 
of change. That time is now for the 
United States and Cuba, 

Thirty-nine years ago when Fidel 
Castro brought Soviet-style commun- 
ism to the Western Hemisphere, Wash- 
ington's hard trade embargo made 
some sense politically. Not now. Now 
Mr. Castro and Cuba stand in the in- 
ternational shadows. The Cuban people 
deserve a break. Lifting the embargo 
enough to allow U.S. companies to sell 
them food, medicines and medical 
equipment could bring them relief. 

The people have suffered under an 
obsolete economic and political system 
that has deprived them of the most ele- 
mentary freedoms. Their plight has been 
exacerbated by the embargo, which 


made life more painful while failing to 
rewrite political realities. Suddenly, a 
handful of forces are coming together 
that could create historic-change. 

A new generation of Cuban- Amer- 
icans, people who played no role in the 
1958 revolution or the fumbled at- 
tempts at counterrevolution, are re- 
placing the hard-line exiles who have 
shaped U.S. policy toward Cuba. 

Congress should pay close attention 
to what Pope John Paul II has been able 
to achieve even before his planned visit 
to Cuba in January. Hundreds of West- 
ern journalists will be roaming the 
country before, during and after the 
papal visit. Cuban- Americans will be 
permitted entry to visit their relatives. 
Christinas will be celebrated as an of- 
ficial holiday. This may be a changing 
Cuba, and Washington would do well 
to look for positive opportunities. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


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A Palestinian State in Israel’s Security Equation 


N EW YORK — Benjamin Netan- 
yahu and his cabinet are under 
pressure from the United States to pro- 
duce a plan for further Israeli redeploy- 
ment in the West Bank. So far they 
have failed to come up with a plan, 
The cabinet is riven by ideological, 
political and personal differences. 
Some members oppose return of any 
land to the Palestinians. Infrastructure 
Minister Ariel Sharon proposes Pal- 
estinian Bantu s tans limi ted to about 35 
percent of the West Bank. Defense 
Minister Yitzhak Mordechai’s "secu- 
rity” map calls for retention by Israel 
of 55 percenL 

In the end, there will be a Palestinian 
state in the West Bank and Gaza. 

There will be provision for demil- 
itarization of the new stale and for ar- 
. rangeraems that will assuage to a certain 
extent Israel’s security concerns, includ- 
ing minor territorial adjustments. The 
maps now being argued about could not 
be more irrelevant — except for the fact 
that even the most parsimonious pro- 
posals mark a historic turning point 
They come to terms with the par- 
tition of Israel and accept the principle 
of returning territory to the Palestin- 
ians, a principle that was always re- 
jected by LflouL Indeed, it was Likud’s 


By Henry Siegman 


insistence on retention of the entire 
land of Israel that essentially defined 
the party and justified its existence. 
The various maps have confirmed the 


. _ . _ thinffs it has weakened 

cause ai the end of the 20th centur/Uis forces within Israel and 


in theAmericon Jewish community . 

A peace agreement will become pus- 
dhlJwhen Israel's leaders finally ac- 


: their importance, not in tbe borders 
they advocate. Tbe principle will in- 
exorably lead to a Palestinian state in 
most of the West Bank and in Gaza. 

Palestinian reluctance to dismantle 
terrorist operations, however political- 
ly destructive and morally reprehens- 
ible, will delay the outcome but in the 
ebd will not prevent it 
The reason for this inevitability is 
not the effectiveness of the peace pro- 
cess or the genius of tbe Oslo accords. 
The Oslo agreement is deeply flawed, 
although it was the most that could be 
achieved at the time. Tbe peace process 
that it triggered has not been so cleverly 
contrived as to make it irreversible. 

Rather, it is the relentless logic of 
history that will yield a Palestinian 
stare. The question is not whether it will 
happen but when, and at what further 
cost in human suffering. 

The state will emerge not as a reward 
for Palestinian good behavior but be- 


inconccivabie that a people with os 
own culture, faith and political identity 
itftrt remain under permanent occupa- 
tion by apoyrer utterly foreign to it-The 

days when dreams 
foreign rule could 

as to fail to underttand that resistance to 

■■ tc e.'i«n nk Li uru* 


this historic process, even if motivated 
by merely tactical considerations, cre- 
ates resentment and bitterness that un- 
dermine die very security in whose 
name their policies are defended. 

The talk about “reciprocity” from 
the Palestinians is a smokescreen, for 
the list of Israeli violations of the Oslo 
accords is as long as the list of Pal- 
estinian violations. 

S imilar ly, the ineptitude of Pales- 
tinian leadership — its reluctance to 
take on the terrorist infrastructure in 
territories under its control and its fail- 
ure to build a democratic political cul- 
ture transparent institutions (de- 
spite demands from the Palestinian 
population for accountable political 
leadership) — has done immeasurable 
damage to the Palestinian cause. 


smallest compromise is seen as a gra- 
tuitous gift to an undeserving ad- 
versary. That is an attitude that will not 
prevent the emergence of a Palestinian 
Sate bur will further damage Israel s 
security interests. These interests eon 
be served effectively only in a context 
of negotiations that accept the legit-, 
imacy of both sides’ basic aspirations. 

President Bill Clinton and Secretary 
of State Madeleine Albright are to be 
commended for having set that context 
as die goal of their initiative to revive 
the Middle East peace process. 

The writer, ’ a senior fellow at the 
Council onTorvign Relations, loidrib* 
uted this personal comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


Post- Suharto Indonesia Will Need a Reformed System 


JAKARTA 


President 

Suharto is again visible, hav- 
ing apparently recovered from 
tiredness, but his political 
health has never been weaker. 

He is not threatened by any- 
one in particular. Authority re- 
mains in his hands. But personal 
power no longer translates into 
decisive government. There is a 
vacuum, as lack of implemen- 
tation of the IMF support pack- 
age vividly demonstrates. 

Age and his biggest mistake 
— outrageous commercial fa- 
vors forms family — are catch- 
ing up with Mr. Suharto just 
when leadership and good ex- 
ample are most needed to face 
economic crisis. With the El 
Nino drought adding to the na- 
tion’s woes, luck, too, seems to 
have run ouL 

What the Chinese call the 
“mandate of heaven” is slip- 
ping, as at high and low levels 
of society the opinion spreads 
that he is now more a liability 
than an asset. He will ignore 
overt calls 'for his departure 
from known critics. What mat- 
ters is whether he listens to 
those who are the cogs, big and 
small, in his system. 

None will say it to his face, 
but they say it to each other — 
publicly damn him with faint 
praise,* or politely defer en- 
dorsement of his re-election in 
March. Officials contradict 
each other, and even the first 
family shows signs of rivalry. 

It may just be wishful drink- 
ing, but even many close to the 
center now believe there is a 50- 
50 possibility that he will not 
start another term. 

Mr. Suharto's reappearance 
last week comforted fee public 
in the short term. People fear his 
sudden departure. But they re- 
cognize the need for painful re- 
forms if tbe currency is to sta- 
bilize and die government is to 
provide leadership through 
what is likely to be at least two 
years of hardship. 

The reform needed to bring 
back foreign capital and reas- 


By Philip Bowring 


sure local depositors is not jost a 
question of reorganizing and re- 
capitalizing the banks, difficult 
though that is. It means taking 
an ax to monopolies such as in 
food and forestry, which have 
been a source of cash lubric- 
ating the political structure, and 
to the privileges of the pres- 
ident’s children. 

The offspring have not only 
achieved e x traordinary wealth* 
(and debts) bur have distorted 
policies toward key industries 
such as power 'and cars. Is Mr. 
Suharto strong enough to over- 
ride his family instincts? 

The urban elite had 
grudgingly tolerated such abus- 
es. and its own lack of political 
participation, so long as they 
'were prospering. Now they link 
the sudden change in their for- 
tunes to the family as well as to 
political stasis and die uncer- 
tainty over succession. 

Who will be president and 
vice president in March? That 
will be a start, but not the end of 
uncertainty. Mr. Suharto may 
be just fit enough to remain 
president for now. But for an- 
other five years? 

If he stays, he is almost cer- 
■ tain to be persuaded to have a 
military vice president At least 
five names are among the pos- 
sibles, headed tty the incumbent 
Try Sutrisno. 

Were Mr. Suharto to step 
down, the permutations are 
endless. One is that Mr. Try 
would succeed. He has few en- 
emies in the military or else- 
where, and no damaging busi- 
ness connections. Critics say he 
is neither bright nor dynamic. 

Some surmise that Mr. 
Suharto might more willingly 
step aside if his elder daughter 
Tutut became vice-president, 
providing some protection for 
hims elf and his family from the 
fate that befell the Chun Doo 
Hwan and Marcos clans. But for 
many, Tutut would represeat 
“family business as usual” 


Simply changing a few 
names at the top is not enough to 
deal with the underlying causes 
of economic crisis or to meet 
new political aspirations. 

Hie next president will start 
with goodwill but only a frac- 
tion of Mr. Suharto’s personal 
authority.. He will have to .build 
a coalition of interests to sup- 
port a common goaL 

The military is the nation's 
strongest institution, and its im- 
portance has been emphasized 
by outbreaks of disorder in the 
past 18 months. Further trou- 
bles are likely as the economic 
fallout from the currency col- 
lapse gathers momentum. 

Urban workers are being laid 
off. and prices are rising be- 
cause of devaluation and 
drought. Next month is not only 
the New Year but also Rap 
madan, when workers normally 
get a bonus. If companies can- 
not pay, expect trouble. 


The military is ready and 
willing to take a tough stance 
toward isolated disturbances. 
But it would be another matter 
altogether if the Jakarta lower 
middle class took to the streets. 
The military is thinly spread 
and knows it 

Well before the economic 
crisis, religious and ethnic ten- 
sions were on tbe rise as groups 
maneuvered for position in 
preparation for political 
change. Genuinely radicalism, 
whether on the left or among 
Muslims, is still at die fringe. 
There is no huge ideological 
divide, as between Communists 
and Islam, or Cold War ingredi- 
ents as in the 1960s. 

The economic crisis will 
pass, and the family can be put 
m its place without turning so- 
ciety upside down. But there is 
as yet no alliance of the center, 
as between the military, busi- 
ness, church and civilian groups 
which ousted Ferdinand Marcos 
and thwarted the Communists. 


There are many personal as 
well as group rivalries. So long 
as the army holds together, these 
should be contained within the 
existing socioeconomic struc- 
ture. For now, moderates front 
assorted camps will compro- 
mise with eacn other to protccr 
national unity and the gains of 
30 years. There is a constitution, 
however imperfect, to follow, ' 
But the longer a change of 
leadership and bounce leaning 
are put off, the sliaiper the in- 
ternal tensions and the greater 
the dangers of splits in the mil- 
itary, street-level discontent 
and economic nationalism, 
aimed at ethnic Chinese as well 
as at foreign capital. , 

Indonesia has competent 
technocrats,- believes in mod- 
ernization. is instinctively tol- 
erant and has excellent longer- 
term economic prospects. But it 
needs a new president and a 
broader political base to handle 
today’s stresses. 

International Herald Tribune 


Caught Trying to Gag a Dissident 


H ONG KONG— The White 
House recently tried to pre- 
vent the Voice of America from 
broadcasting an interview with 
the Chinese dissident Wei Jing- 
sheng because It would offend 
Beijing. The move backfired on 
U.S. and Chinese authorities. 

The White House had made a 
deal with Beijing. In exchange 
for releasing Mr. Wei from pris- 
on and letting him fly to Amer- 
ica, President Jiang Zemin 
would receive the fullest honors 
and dignities in Washington. 
Mr. Wei would not be released 
until after Mr. Jiang’s October 
visit, so that China’s act would 
not look too much like bending 
the knee to foreigners. And 
there was apparently an implicit 
deal, under which Washington 
agreed that Mr. Wei would not 
be used “politically.” 


By Jonathan Mirsky 


Toward the New NATO Concept 


B russels— O n Dec. 16 , 

the foreign ministers of the 
16 NATO countries solemnly 
signed the protocol of accession 
for the Czech Republic, Hun- 
gary and Poland. This is the 
penultimate step in the enlarge- 
ment process and is historic 
partly because that meeting of 
the NATO Council was the last 
at 16. The three acceding coun- 
tries will now participate (albeit 
without a vote until ratification) 
in all the alliance bodies. 

But the main historic import 
is the effect on the nature of tbe 
alliance. This change, and oth- 
ers that have taken place, will 
have to be reflected in its stra- 
tegic concept 

Work on die new concept is 
under way. Last July, NATO’s 
leaders directed the organiza- 
tion to update the 1991 concept, 
and on Dec. 16 the ministers 
approved terms of reference. It 
is due to be presented at a Wash- 
ington summit in April 1999, 
the 50th anniversary of the al- 
liance. By then, parliamentary 
ratification for me three new 
members should be complete. 

Strategic concepts were 
simple when a direct threat was 
measurable in army divisions, 
air squadrons, ships* missiles 
and nuclear warheads, all of 
them in known geographic lo- 
cations. But what is the force 
posture, command organization 
and political backup required to 
counter a Saddam Hussein, who 
may have a biological warfare 
arsenal, and would any reaction 
to him be an automatic NATO 
responsibility? 

NATO Iras intervened in 
Bosnia at the request of the UN 
Security Council. Will it do so 


By Frederick. Bonnart 


to counter a gruesome situation 
in which streams of refugees 
head for Europe? How likely are 
such challenges, and how ready 
are NATO nations to make the 
required effort and sacrifices to 
mai n tain military forces at 
levels to deal with them? 

Thai is the sort of questions 
that would have to be resolved 
before the formulation of a clear 
strategic concept from which 
organization and method of op- 
eration would automatically de- 
volve. But such questions can- 
not be answered simply. Use- 
fully clear, on the contrary, are 
the events that are already shap- 
ing force requirements, and the 
willingness and ability of mem- 
ber nations to contribute. 

Tbe experience of Bosnia is 
my w part of modem training and 
exercises, both at national and 
at alliance levels, including that 
with members of the Partner- 
ship for Peace program. This 
came out clearly at the recent 
first exercise of .a combined 
joint task force headquarters, 
the new NATO element 
destined to take on the com- 
mand of any detached opera- 
tion, including peacekeeping. 

By applying the Bosnia ex- 
ample, this headquarters was 
able rapidly to deploy a com- 
mand chain to control the re- 
quired mix of aliied forces and 
project them to cope with the 
situation. NATO’s military 
structures will be organized to 
cope with similar emergencies, 
and this will be reflected in the 
strategic concept 
It is vain to expect that, be- 


Europe, the Europeans will re- 
lieve the United States of a large 
part of its present share of re- 
source expenditure. European 
defense budgets will remain 
level or wul decline, even 
though w ithin them moderniz- 
ation is taking place. Although 
this means a lesser capability in 
the immediate present, in due 
course the result will be more 
modem forces, more capable of 
forward projection. 

It is not burden-sharing that is 
of primary importance. What 
really matters is the understand- 
ing that an encroachment on any 
member is an encroachment on 
alL Maintaining the freedom 
and security of member nations 
must remain the core task of the 
alliance, however remote any 
present threat 

The need and ability of mem- 
bers to pool their national 
armed forces in a common mil- 
itary organization is an evident 
consequence. Practice over 
many years is breeding new 
military forces able not only to 
operate together but to think in 
alliance terms. This applies to 
any operation, be it new peace- 
keeping action or the common 
defense commitment. 

This spirit engenders the soli- 
darity, inside Europe and across 
the Atlantic, that is the real basis 
of the alliance. It provides mil- 
itary strength and moral jus- 
tification. It is NATO's most 
important asset, and this should 
come across clearly from, the 
strategic concept. 


China’s Foreign Ministry 
spokesman. Tang Guoqiang. 
said: “We are against any coun- 
try using Wei Jingsheng againsl 
the Chinese government." . 

Human Rights Watch/Asia 
rook the opposite side. Said its* 
Washington director, Mike 
Jendrzejczyk: “We can only as- 
sume from this that not offend- . 
ing Beijing is more important to 
the administration than exerting 
pressure on China to release 
more dissidents and improve its 
human rights record." 

A Washington official ex- 
plained: “The VO A broadcast 
went ahead, right? But we could 
say to Beijing, 'Look we poin- 
ted out to VOA that this could 
cause trouble. But VOA is not 
just a tool of the government’ 
That way we show we trietLiid 
they get a civics lesson.” 

. A spokesman for Mr. Berger 
insisted that he had never asked 
the VOA to canceL That is 

— — — J . ™r*- ™ -««■—» — disingenuous. What Mr. Berger, , 
the editorial independence of wanted was a cancellation, and'l 
VOA.” But it was * 'perfectly good for VOA Director Evelyn 1 
appropriate for VOA to under-- Lieberman for telling him to' 


James Sasser, the U.S. am- 
bassador to China, learning of 
the coming VOA interview 
with Mr. Wei, called the Na- 
tional Security Council to say 
that such a broadcast could im- 
peril the release of other dis- 
sidents and violated an under- 
standing that Washington 
would not exploit Mr. Wei. 

There were to be two broad- 
casts, one by the Voice of 
America and the other on 
WoridneL The Voice is funded 
by tiie U.S. government but, 
like the .BBC, is largely inde- 
pendent Worldnct is essen- 
tially a propaganda station. 

Sandy Berger, the national 
security adviser, called top of- 
ficials at both stations, white 
House spokesman Mike Mc- 
Curry said after the row became 
public that “we would not 
make any effort to violate 


stand what the consequences of 
some of its broadcasts might be 
from our perspective. ” 

VOA went ahead. Woridnet 
canceled. 

David Burke, chairman of 
the independent Int ernational 
Broadcasting Board, which 
keeps an eye on U.S. broad- 
casting, said it was “disgrace- 
ful that anyone in government 
would circumvent the VOA 
■Board of Governors, which was 
designed to be a fire wall 
against that kind of pressure.” 

Jest after the VOA broadcast. 


jump in the lake. 

There is a lesson here for 
Beijing. Even one of Bill Clin- 
ton's most senior aides could 
not snuff out freedom of speech ■ 
in a broadcasting station funded 
by the U.S. government 

Diat is the liberty that 
Chin ese Communist leaders 
will never understand, and that 
Mr. Wei symbolizes. 


The writer. East Asia editor 
°f die Times of London, con* 
tnbuted this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 5(1 YEARS AGO 
1897: Opening China 

NEW YORK — The World 
says: “The partition of China 
undoubtedly means a great im - 


funher afield, say, somewhere ' cause Bosnia-type crises are 
in the Near East or North Africa, more likely to arise in or near 


The writer is editorial direc- 
tor of NATO's Sixteen Nations, 
an independent military jour- 
nal. He contributed tfib com- 
ment to the International Her- 
ald Tribune. 


movement in the material wel- 
fare of the Chinese. Nothing 
European rule could inflict 
upon them could approach the 
grinding cruelty of their Tartar 
rulers. But until the civilized 
world shall readjust itself to the 
changed * conditions resulting 
from the opening up of the 
Chinese Empire, there will be 
mighty and painful disturbances 
among the civilized peoples of 
Europe and America/’ 

1922: French Jobs 

PARIS — France has virtually 
no unemployment and faces a 
great lack of farm workers. 
Latest statistics show an impres- 
sive net decrease of population. 
The idea seems to be gaining 
that France, which never has 
encouraged immigration, might 


wisely do so under unprecedent- 
ed economic conditions. France 
^ derive much profit from 
care ™Hy selected immigration. 

1947: Great Soakers 

LXJNDON — George Bernard 
obaw believes some of the 
Sreatest creative geniuses could 
not have done without liquor. - 
“‘ejrade paper “Irish Listening 
world asked him whether he 
■ nought writers would attain 
gr?!? creative thought if they 
would abstain from alcoholic 
simulants. Mr. Shaw replied: 

borne of them would be unable 
to (to without them. Ibsen was a 
soaxer. Beethoven was a- soaker. 

ceruiinly nor a TT 
(teetotaler). Nor was Moore. On 
“to other hand, some great, 
poets and saints have\, 
““abstainers. I mvself am a 
vegetarian and a TT.'But I caa- 
Jftet I should not do 

M& onbm,dylil “ 


i 






mix 


' INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY-THURSDAT, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PACE 9 




How the West Sped Asia 
On Its Road to Ruin 


By A-M. Rosenthal 


Worn led 




ft# (><iu a Distiil 


IvT E W YORK — Maybe ii is the 
JLN arrogance that comes from 

E wer, maybe some other intel- 
tual disease, but governments, 
liticians and particularly capi- 
talists of the West are not getting 
[he real messages that come from 
the collapse of Asian economies, 
j The lessons are that they them- 
selves, these .Westerners of eco- 
. homic and political might, helped 
kpeed Asia to its disasters — and 
that unless that truth is accepted. 
Slaves of collapse will come 
Y Crashing again and again. 

! All over the West, government 
bureaucrats, politicians and jour- 
nalists are telling us. with almost 
unbearable smugness, that Asians 
Finally are understanding that de- 
mocracy, openness in business 
dealings and nonfavoritist rule of 
jaw are all essential to the practice 
of capitalism. But don't worry, 
jhey say, the computerized global 
economy will make sure 

feverything turns out jim-dandy, 
i A few things are wrong with 
those sermons. First, capitalism 
has shown itself flexible enough 
to have worked for the security of 
rulers, and the profit of investors, 
under governments based on fas- 
ti cism, religious fundamental- 
ism, slavery, internal terrorism, 
apartheid absolute monarchy, 
militarism — the whole nasty 
pnenu of nondemocratic regimes. 
Now, backed by Western billions, 
it helps maintain a Communist 
government in China. 

[ The real lesson is that openness 
and freedom are essential not to 
' capitalism in ail its incarnations 
but to a specific form of capi- 
talism. That is, democratic capi- 
talism — the combination of a 
free political society and an open 
Economic system, without control 
by government-business conspir- 
acy or partnership. 

, Democratic capitalism is what 
Westerners want for themselves 
put did not think was important for 
if Asians. They invested hundreds of 
^ billions in forms of capitalism that 
destroyed democratic capitalism. 

As Kim Dae Jung, South 
Korea's president-elect, has said, 
“Asian values" never precluded 
democracy. He said that long ago, 
when he was under house arrest 
by South Korean dictators and ig- 
nored by Westerners doing busi- 
ness with his captors. 

Take a quick look around 
American capitalists race Euro- 


pean capitalists to sink money into 
China's economy, knowing a 
great chunk goes to the Chinese 
aimed forces. French, Russian 
and German investors tine up in 
Iraq for contracts with Saddam 
Hussein — effective only if sanc- 
tions are lifted. So, at the United 
Nations, that becomes the goal of 
the investors’ nations. 

In parts of the Middle East, 
Western investment goes almost 
entirely into despotisms that have 
no intention of permitting political, 
religions or business freedom. Rus- 
sia, supposed to be a developing 
capitalist partner, helps Iran build 
missiles. For the story in detail, 
read the special report by Kenneth 
Timmerman, an American expen 
on Iran and weapons proliferation, 
in the January Reader's Digest. 

Now back to Asian countries 
floored by their own systems of 
capitalism: capitalism based on 
cronyism, familism and corrup- 
tion^ and ruled by economic com- 
bines. Their members are gov- 
ernment, bank and business 
cliques that get together to decide 
who gets contracts and how they 
are split Also: who gets loans, at 
what rate and with what collateral, 
excuse the thought For what they 
do every day. in America they 
would all be in jaiL 

Foreign investors knew what 
they did. They knew they were not 
investing in democratic capital- 
ism but in secretly run systems 
that perverted the techniques of 
capitalist marketplaces until they 
destroyed them. 

But Western businessmen and 
governments did not think it 
mattered, bottom line. When they 
found outthat they were oh so very 
wrong, they and the Asian gov- 
ernments peering into the chasm of 
default got the International Mon- 
etary Fund to poll them back. 

Even political democracy is no 
guarantee of creating democratic 
capitalism if its leadership is frag- 
mented and foolish enough — see 
India. Cosmetic changes in places 
like Indonesia or Malaysia will 
not do it either. 

Western investors and govern- 
ments themselves cannot guaran- 
tee Asia what it needs — capi- 
talism prospering in and for 
democracy. But they can help — 
by not giving the fruits of demo- 
cratic capitalism to governments 
that destroy the tree. 

The Nn- York Tima. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


American Culture 

Regarding “Cintma Virile in 
Europe: Rejecting US. Culture" 
(Opinion, Dec. 16) bv Richard 
Pells: 

Rejecting U.S. culture is not 
about rejecting the values of the 
free market and entrepreneur- 
ship, as Mr. Pells suggests. It is 
about rejecting a culture that 
has produced the phenomenon 
he epitomizes: Americans’ belief 
in the superiority of their values 
and an evangelical zeal in pros- 
elytizing. 

It is this unquestioning accep- 
tance: of the superiority of all 
things American that Europeans 
refuse to swallow. 

The more Americans tout the 
superiority of their values, the 
more they testify to the failure of 
American culture. 

TOMILA LANKINA. 

Oxford. England. 

Mr. Pells’ s article underlines 
the narrow-minded way in which 
Americans view Europeans and 
the inflated view they have of 
themselves as deliverers of 
“culture." The suggestion dial 
European youths hostile to Amer- 
ican movies are influenced by 
Marxism is absurd. 


As an educated European and 
as a strong supporter of capital- 
ism, I don't reject American 
movies for being commercial. I 
reject them for being shallow, 
predictable and, more often 
than not, downright bad. I will 
take an intellectually stimulat- 
ing English, French or Italian 
movie anytime. 

There are, of course, b rillian t 
American movies, but they are 
few and far between. 

. European youths' rejection of 
U.S. culture does not mean they 
reject the free market or are 
“skeptical about the benefits of 
privatization." It is rather a 
sign of intellectual maturity, 
something that is missing in die 
United States. 

MICHAEL BJORK. 

Hong Kong. 

Khatami’s Importance 

Regarding “Iran ’s Real Hope Is 
Its People" (Opinion, Dec. 22) by 
Azar Nafisi: 

Ms. Nafisi fails to recognize 
the importance of Mohammed 
Khatami’s election as president 

Because he represents the 
people, he is daring to bring about, 
slowly, many liberating changes. 
Against all odds, he has proposed 


The Sinking of the Titanic: 
A Romantic Ideal Lost 


By Richard Cohen 


a dialogue with the “Great 
Satan," the United States. 

Perhaps Mr. Khatami , given 
enough time and encouragement, 
will be the one to democratize 
Iran. 

VICTOR N. OSCODAR. 

Angiet. France. 

Tall Tales 

Regarding “ Trail of Lies Leads 
to an Emptv Grave at Arlington" 
(Dec. 13 ): ' 

As a veteran of the U.S. Army, 
I was appalled to read about die 
lies and deceptions spun by M. 
Larry Lawrence. 

It is difficult to believe that he 
could have fabricated such tall 
tales without anyone’s detecting 
them earlier. 

.The senators of both parties 
who in 1993 questioned Mr. 
Lawrence's qualifications for the 
post of ambassador were more 
than justified in their doubts. 

Having been a resident of 
Switzerland for more than 
25 years, I have seen a succession 
of good to excellent U.S. am- 
bassadors to this country. Sadly, 
Mr. Lawrence fit neither 
category. ' 

PETER P. MORF. 

Bern. 


W ASHINGTON — "Titan- 
ic" is number one at the box 
office and that is as it should be. 

This is a terrific film — and at 
over three hours, a long one. too 
— marred by a kitschy plot and 
some awful dialogue. 

Bn; the hours whiz by and the 
emotions rise and fall tike the sea 
itself. In a way, it is wrong to say 

MEANWHILE 

the Titanic s ank. As a tale, as a 
lesson for us all, it steams on to 
an unreachable horizon. 

I am something of a Titanic 
junkie. I have read the requisite 
books beginning with Walter 
Lord’s “A Night to Remember" 
and seen all the films by now. I 
have also seen die current Broad- 
way musical, a stunning theatrical 
event, and of course I have watched 
the TV shows. 

The story of the Titanic endures, 
although few cross the oceans in 
ships anymore and almost no one 
goes down in them. The prime 
reason, of course, is that the story 
is not only about them — the pas- 
sengers — but about us as well. 

Both the Broadway play and 
die movie emphasize the role of 
luck, dumb luck, in who lived and 
who died. In the play, a man ar- 
rives at the dock too late and rues 
his rotten fuck. He has missed 
the Titanic. 

In the movie.'our hero, played by 
Leonardo DiCaprio. wins his ticket 
in a poker game — and he is off on 
a return voyage to America. His 
luck runs our when the ship sinks. 

Luck has many names — fate is 
one — and anyone sentient must 
be in awe of iL For unaccountable 
reasons, some people get on a 
doomed airplane and others do 
not It is the sort of happenstance 
to give one the shivers, if you 
think about it — which is why 
most of us prefer not to. 

Then, too, the Titanic story is 
about tiie limitations of techno- 
logy. of science. This was die un- 
stable ship, a modem marvel and 
yet it. tike TWA Flight 800, simply 
vanished. A hole in the ocean, a 
bole in tiie sky — it is the same. 

People who managed to control 
almost all aspects of their lives 
— the wealthy and the power- 
ful above all — died because for 
a short while they put their faith 
in technology, and they were 
betrayed. 


But the Titanic’s sinking was 
an old-fashioned disaster. The 
ship did not evaporate in the blink 
of an eye — a midair explosion, a 
plummeting into the sea or. as in 
Indonesia recently, into a marsh 
— but went down slowly, over the 
course of more than two hours. 

Time provided the opportunity 
for both heroism and cowardice, 
for nobility and cravenness, and 
this interlude between the lime 
when the ship scraped the iceberg 
and when it went down allows 
us to ask the most titanic of all 
questions: How would we have 
behaved? 

The current film pulls no 
punches: Some of us behaved very 
badly. The front page of The New 
York Times on April lb. 1912, 
said “Rule of Sea Followed.” but 
that was not always the cose. 
Women and children did not al- 
ways go first nor. after the ship 
went down, did the survivors in 
lifeboats try to save their fellow 
passengers thrashing around in the 
bitterly cold water. All but a hand- 
ful of those in the ocean died. 

For some, the Titanic is a tale of 
hubris, of thinking that techno- 
logy could master nature. For oth- 
ers, it represented the end of the 
class system. All of those people 
in steerage were too poor to afford 
a stateroom and, because of that, 
too poor to live. They died be- 
cause they had a touching faith 
in the ship's builders, the owners 
— in an elite that failed them 
utterly, if only by not providing 
enough lifeboats. 

World War I, a bit more than 
two years later, offered only fur- 
ther proof that Europe's ruling 
class was composed, mainly, of 
imbeciles. It went over the top, 
leading a generation to slaughter. 

But the greater lesson reached 
past that war to the nexL In World 
War n. in the Holocaust and as- 
sociated horrors, much of Europe 
was in a lifeboat — and did noth- 
ing to save those who were not. 

The sinking of the Titanic thus 
sank the romantic ideal of who we 
are and how we will behave when 
threatened. Whether on the ocean 
or on land, most chose not to hear 
the screams of the doomed. 

This is the greatest luck of all: 
the luck of selfishness. It is one, as 
the Titanic tragedy showed early 
in our century, that most of us 
have in abundance. 

The Washington Post. 


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-THURSDAX, DECEMBER ^4-^5, 1997 STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


As Film Costs Rise, Hollywood Bets It All on Openings 


N EW YORK — “Titanic,” 
“Tomorrow Never Dies,” 
“Scream 2,” “Anastasia,” 
“Rubber” or “Amistad.” If 
you haven't been drawn to the block- 
busters released in the United States 
since Thanksgiving, wait a day or two. 
Something new will come along: “As 
Good as It Gets,” “The Postman,” 

■ * “Kun dun/’ For even as the cost of mak- 
ing and marketing the typical big-budget 
film approaches $70 million, the window 
of opportunity for finding an audience is 
shrinking. “It's as if Procter and Gamble 
had to launch a new toothpaste every 
other week,” proposed Frank Rose, au- 
thor of “Hie Agency.” a history of the 
William Moms talent agency. 

Many people in the business are in- 
clined to write off this make-it-or- 
break-it focus on the first weekend’s 


By Peter Passel] 

New York Times Serfice 


box office gross as a self-destructive 
impulse from an industry notorious for 
chasing the ffavor-of-foe-moafo- But a 
closer look suggests that method links 
beneath die seeming madness. 

The economics of marketing now 
powerfully favors nationwide openings 
in thousands of theaters over die “plat- 
forming approach,” in which a movie 
opens in a few cities and builds. “Dis- 
tributors are effectively forced to spend 
everything up front," said Howard llcht- 
man. executive vice president for mar- 
keting for the Cipcplex Odeon chain. 

The revenues from domestic theat- 
rical release are a shrinking share of tile 
total income from the typical film aimed 
at a mass audience. The opening has 
thus become the fulcrum for selling 
everything from videos to foreign dis- 
tribution to toys and popcorn. As an 
indirect result, shelf life on the big 
screen is shrinJting. 

To be sure, there are no absolutes in 


film marketing. Many movies, in par- 
ticular foreign films and modest inde- 
pendent productions, still open in a 
handful of theaters and still rely on 
media reviews and word-of-mouth to 
create an audience large enough to jus- 
tify die move to the multiplexes. 

By tiie same token. $30 million-plus 
productions are occasionally shown in 
New York or Los Angeles, in time to 
qualify for Academy Award nomina- 
tions, then open nationally months later. 
“Sneak previews” are dill sometimes 
used to create a buzz weeks before the 
publicity avalanche. But with big-budget 
movies, the trend toward betting it all on 


screens, has become normal. _ movie exhibition. Between 1980 and nn t.fhod-cnivilig consumers at the 

Television has played akey role. While 1996, the number of auditoriums - J ^ s j onstan d. 
distributors have used local television creased by 69 percent while movre at- The exhibitors’ emphasis on the rapid 
spots for decades to supplement print tendance rose just 31 percent, creaimg a first-run films is comple- 

..... T,, - I J n tUTnovu u* 


distributors have used local television creased by 69 percent while movre at- The exhibitors’ emphasis on the rapid 
spots for decades to supplement print tendance rose just 31 percent, creating a mmovCf 0 f first-run films is ctwple- 
adveitising, Warner Brothers pioneered perceived glut in theater capacity. bv changes in the market for the 

the useof oetwoik television as its prin- It’s not dear whether ‘glut is the „ ^ product. Two decades ago 

cipal advertising medium in the early right word since, with higher nacet no* y revenue from most movies 
1980s, and others soon foDowed Despite prices, the total domestic box office ^ domestic theatrical re- 

tire cost, one studio executive said, na- gross rose 1 15 percent in the same pen- r.- „ theatrical revenues 


1980s, and others soon followed Despite 
the cost, one studio executive said, na- 
tional television delivers frequent movie- 
goers at the lowest price per person. 


gross rose 1 15 percent m the same pen- "T" thcn dieairical 

od. But there’s little doubt that theaters JS^f'rurone. Latin America and Asia 
often strain to fill auditoriums at $6 to $8 from increasingly important, 

a ticket and pat a premium on booking have ^ 0 ficc. 

Si- >>“;«■ 


Y the same token, it is widely 
accepted that an advertising 
blitz is more cost-effective 


B Y the same t< 
accepted tha 
blitz is ma 
than the same 
over a longer period. 


4 ) 

* Bui*" 

. I <i 


special effects that draw audiences. ^ num ber of households with 

% average movie from the seven million in 


blitz is more cost-effective ine average movie nwui «« r— -- {rom 1S muiion in 

■than the same number of spots major studios cost $39 milhon to m^te . 78 million toda\ Pay-cable 

onger period. “There are too last year, up from $9 million in 1980. 1980 to » ” ■ - aam (eti of 


t? V humabr* 

: *v* : *** ...... 


opening weekend seems inexorable. over a longer penoo. "mere are roo uu* year, up uoui ^ "JiT M, a nnels consume vast numbers oi 

In the early 1970s a typical movie with many mice running around the. field And while eveiy deal between distno- , 55 million sub- 

broad appeal might open in 300 to 400 where the elephants are dancing,” con- utorc and exhibitors is negotiated, the • . „j enl y Q f cash to bid 

theaters. Today the seven major smdios eluded Peter Giaves^president for rqar- split in box office revenues, typically sot -value p av _ Der .view movies on 
are releasing record numbers of films, ketiiig at Polygram Films. - 70-30 in the first few weeks of a run, P . . . ' ‘ growing urea. 

216 in 1996 compared with 134 in 1980. While dependence on television heavily favors the distributors. « rimmed ■)« million households 

Yet the 2,000- to 3,000-screen opening, drives the saturation opening, so too As aresult, theaters are lucky to cover with esnm^ them, 

in an industry with a total of 29,0001x1. does the contemporary economics of their costs on box office revenues, with paying SbU.i muiron in 


*4*j 

v-.tf ** 

. i M | *»• 


The Many Sopranos of ‘Traviata ? 




bv r 


By David Stevens 

Inicnuitiunal Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — The Paris 
Opera’s new produc- 
tion of “LaTraviata” 
has its musical 
■ strengths in the right places, 
with Angela Gheorghiu equal 
. to most of Verdi’s wide-rang- 
ing vocal demands in the title 
role and finally moving as the 
tragic heroine, and with 
Janies Coition and the orches- 
tra delivering a finely tuned 
account of this popular 
score. 

It is sometimes said that 
Verdi wrote each scene for a 
different soprano, from col- 
oratura to dramatic, so no 
single performer can hope to 
encompass them all But Ghe- »wu»k. 

orghiu, who is convincingly Angela Gheorghiu and Ramon Vargas in “ Traviata ." 


V *>;•' >•* 


s 




m’| 


< * > 

*«-■ tmmeitli iui 


the main problem was that it 
never went away. 

In die setting of Violetta’s 
convincingly ugly country 
house, which filled half the 
stage in its suburban entirety, 
the ramp was barely kept out 
of sight by a bucolic back- 
drop curtain. But it re- 
appeared in die scene of the 
party at Flora Bervoix’s, 
mating it look as if Violetta 
and her friend share the same 
digs, and it was still there 
in the final act, where .the 
(fying Violetta normally oc- 
cupies her own unfurnished 
premises. 



^ * ,4 
1: 


B UT Violetta’s home 
appears to have 
been converted into 
a ftill-scale hospital 
viata" ward, complete with patients 
in other beds and a vacant bed 
from which a corpse has been thought- 


lovely as the seductive court- 
esan, negotiates the frenetic coloratura 
demands of the first act well enough, 
then moves from strength to lyric 
strength, ending with a death scene that 
was touching in spite of an eccentric 
scenic setting. 

Her principal partners were Ramon 
Vargas, who displayed one of foe most 
attractive lyric tenors currently avail- 
able, along with a stiff stage comport- 
ment that did not make for a conv in- 


filling foe big stage frame at foe Bastille 


••a* 



. . . 

' '• viw mm 

, ; -v **** 

• •«*** sir 

— .i -it 




with an essentially intimate work has not fully removed. Only the lighting helped 


found particularly convincing solutions, concentrate attention on the heroine's Alun Armstrong in “The Front Page'' at the Donmar Warehouse. 


ft M> 
"!-• . - 
.-■W HfW 


It looked a bit as if Jonathan Miller and death bed. 


his colleagues used up most of their 
budget in foe first two scenes, then made 
the best of it for foe remainder. 


The veteran Carlos Feller gave foe 
role of Doctor Grenvil more’ than cus- 
tomary substance, and Katarina Karoeus 


The most prominent element in Ian as Flora, Soria Coliban as the arrogant 


MacNeil’s set for foe opening party Baron DouphoL, Vladimir Grishko as 


‘Peter Pan’: Love and Crocodiles 


.. V .'V }'*£* 1 4 


media MAJKKItg 


■a 


scene, which is supposed to take place at Gastone and Isabelle Cals foe Annin a 


ment that did not make for a conv in- Violetta’s home, was an elevated, stage- made solid contributions. Clare 
cingly passionate Alfredo, while filling curved ramp down which foe Mitchell’s vast array of costumes ef- 
Alexandru Agache, a solid baritone, was guests have presumably descended and fectively evoked 19th-century Paris and 
foe little more than conventional as the on which a couple of them occasionally the choreography of Francoise Gres 
elder GermonL wander and gaze down on foe scene. It made foe most of foe hispanic enter- 

Once again, however, the problem of was quite effective in that context; but tainments at Flora’s party. 


guests have presumably descended and fectively evoked 19th-century Paris and 
on which a couple of them occasionally the choreography of Francoise Gres 
wander and gaze down on foe scene. It made foe most of foe hispanic enter- 


tainments at Flora’s party. 


L ONDON — - 1 have never met 
another theatergoer above foe 
age of 10 who agrees with me 
that J.M. Barrie’s “Peter 
Pan’ ’ is the greatest British play of the 
century: Avast, poetic, sprawling, dark 
masterpiece about life and death and 
love ami loss and crocodiles and fairies 
who will die unless children applaud 
them. 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


BOOKS 


DEGAS 

IN NEW ORLEANS 


By Christopher Benfey. 294 
pages. S27.50. Knopf. 
Reviewed by 
Grace Lichtenstein 


W HAT a pleasure it is to 
explore a New Orleans 


▼ V explore a New Orleans 
not splattered with the Gothic 
literary blood of Anne Rice! 
Yes. "Degas in New Or- 
leans” involves a haunted 
house, ghosts and titillating 
couplings, but all elements 
are solidly anchored in his- 
torical events and retold by 
Christopher Benfey in a deft 
synthesis of an criticism and 
historical speculation. 

Benfey, a professor of lit- 
erature at Mount Holyoke 
College, is a frequent con- 
tributor to magazines such as 
The New Republic and Slate. 
He uses foe 1872 visit of the 
Impressionist Edgar Degas as 


his departure point for a 
learned look both at Degas’s 


learned look both at Degas’s 
work and ai the Crescent City 
at a turning point in its fas- 
cinating history. 

Few Impressionist schol- 
ars. according to Benfey, have 
paid attention to the fact that 
Degas's mother was a New 


Orleans- bom Creole. He adds 
that none, until now, realized 
that Degas’s family included 
a quadroon, Norbert Rillieux, 
his mother’s first cousin. Ril- 
lieux was foe inventor of a 
sugar-refining process that 
the author says was compa- 
rable in its impact on foe sugar 
industry to foe cotton gin's 
effect on foe industrial rev- 
olution in America. 

Using this knowledge, Ben- 
fey theorizes that foe family’s 
nuxed-race heritage was one 
reason that Degas could not 
paint “black faces in New Or- 
leans as mere local scenery.” 
He examines the painter’s ren- 
derings of a black nurse in 
New Orleans and of a blade 
circus performer as “emblem- 
atic of Degas’s hesitation 
about the depiction of race.” 

Furthermore, two of De- 
gas’s brothers were living in 
that city when foe 38-year-old 
painter arrived for a five- 
month sojourn that included 
much time at the offices of his 
uncle, Michel Musson, a cot- 
ton broker. Benfey believes 
that the painter — whose visit 
spanned New Orleans’s two 
most important holidays. All 
Saints Day and Mardi Gras — 
arrived “distracted and 


stalled in his profession,' ’ but 
returned to France “with a 
new sense of direction and 
resolve” in his work. As it 
had with so many others. New 
Orleans cast a stimulating 
spell over his creative output 
It also happened to be a 
time of political and cnltural 
upheaval in foe city. Recon- 
struction had brought 
“American” carpetbaggers 
to police this most sophisti- 
cate! of Southern ports. Ar- 
istocratic Creole families, in-, 
eluding Musson’s, were in the 
forefront of a revolt against 
foe “foreign” occupation. 
Their opposition included 
battles with federal officials 
and foe- formation of a no- 
torious White League. Degas 
might even have witnessed 
one skirmish, the “Battle of 
the Cabildo.” in Jackson 
Square in 1873. 


"fc MEANWHILE, as Ben- 
IVXfey notes, American 


BEST SELLERS 


Thr New York Times 
Tlus tw ii ba«d on reports from more 
than 2,000 bookstores throughout the 
UnUffd States. Weeks on list are not 
necessarily consecutive. 


2 ANGELA'S ASHES, by 

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8 COMANCHE MOON, by • 

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by Brany Gsfcr 

11 CONVOCATIONS 

WITH GOD: Book 1. by 
Neale Donald Walsdl 10 

12 TUESDAYS WITH 


writers such as Kate Chopin 
and George -Washington 
Cable were beginning to min e 
die rich lode within the city’s 
“hybrid character” — a city 
with its own unique bonds be- 
tween blacks and whites, 
France and America, art and 
commerce. Some may 
quibble with Benfey’s inclu- 
sion of Cable's and Chopin’s 
stories among the city's most 
“distinctive creations.” on a 
par with the jazz of Jelly Roll 
Morton and Louis Armstrong, 
and foe “complex rituals” of 
Mardi Gras. But it would be 
hard to dispute Benfey’s ad- 
dition of Degas’s “The Song 
Rehearsal” and “The Cotton 
Market” to the list 

Indeed, he titles his chapter 
on how Degas came to paint 
merchant scenes “The Cotton 
Ballet.” He links “The Cot- 
ton Market, New Orleans.” 


and “Cotton Merchants in 
New Orleans” to Degas’s 
work before and after his New 
Orleans visit: “He has ap- 
plied foe techniques of paint- - 
ing ballet rehearsal — foe 
wide, steeply sloping floor on 
which to deploy his ‘crablike’ 
figures; foe varied arms and 
leg positions of foe dancers; 
the order amid apparent chaos 
— to this new scene. And 
what he learned in painting 
foe ‘Cotton Office,’ he ap- 
plied in tun to his later ballet 
pictures, lucrative as bales of 
cotton, that he worked cm im- 
mediately after his return.” 

Benfey makes another ima- 
ginative leap in his discussion 
of foe “haunted house” on 
Royal Street, connecting it to 
foe tumultuous Reconstruc- 
tion era in foe city, to the 
unique standing of Creoles of 
color, ' to the practice of. 
placage — the arrangement by 
which well-to-do white men 
kept second families bam of 
their long-term relationships 
with octoroon mistresses, 
whom they met at social balls 
designed toward that end — 
and to the background behind 
George Washington Cable’s 
story about foe house. 

“Degas in New Orleans” 
is framed by chapters detail- 
ing Benfey’s musings while 
strolling along Esplanade, the 
street that ■ separates foe 
French Quarter from the Fau- 
bourg Marigny. Take the 
stroll with him, and you will 
find it an elegant and unortho- 
dox introduction to a city that 
remains a secretive, seductive 
metropolis. 


even so we now get moments of un- staging ever of Stephen Sondheim's 
forgivable parody and jokiness. “Saturday Night,” foe first musical 

True, this “Pan” does restore to us for which he ever wrote words and 
the almost unknown last act. in which music, back in 1952 when he was just 2 1 
years after the children have flown and still five years away from "West 
home to their Darling household Peter Side Story. ' ’ The production had a trou- 
rerums. only to find that Wendy has bled history, not least because foe pro- 
done the unforgivable' and got herself ~ducer died during foe auditions, and 
married; stilL there is always her daugh- although in the intervening 45 years 


Sefuf 




Happily we now have the boy who 
ould not grow up on the main Olivier 


would not grow up on the main Olivier 
stage of the National; this version is not 

entirely new, having first been 

devised and staged by Trevor EEE 
Nunn and his “Les Miserables” 
partner, John Caird. for the Bar- HP 1 
bican back in 1982. Nunn has DC 
dropped out as co-director, to be 
replaced by Fiona Laird, but in 
essence many of their original 
intentions remain intact Peter is again 
played by a boy (an innovation they 
introduced) and we have now Alec Mc- 
Cowen in superb form as foe crusty 
Barrie himself to lead us through foe 


THE AT E R 


married; still, there is always her daugh- 
ter to be kidnapped and flown to Never- 
Never Land. 

As the pirate chief (and also of course 
foe children’s father, Mr. Darling, a 
double that has been traditional since 
foe play was first staged), Ian McKellen 
seems oddly subdued, able neither to 
feel nor inspire foe terror that 
sfekd lies behind the book hand; but 
T E R . the rest of the casting works well 
^7^ enough, with Daniel Evans as a 
J\_ J charismatic Peter and Claudie 
Blakeley as an unusually tough, 
feminist Wendy. 

Again some very weird liber- 
ties have been taken with foe text, 
Hook's great speech from the pirate ship 
appears to have been cut heavily, and 
“Oh dark and sinister man” was never 
intended as foe cue for some cheap mal- 


s till labyrinthine plot as narrator, ob- ‘ apropisms. Equally shameful is the mo- 


server and ultimate moralist. 

The set this time is foe most lavish 
ever seen at the National, even though 
John Napier’s designs have gone so far 
over the top that his Mermaid Lagoon 
resembles nothing so closely as foe 
backdrop for an Esther Williams pool 
movie of the early 1950s. 

“Peter Pan” was undoubtedly Bar- 
rie's lifelong obsession, and Caird and 
Nunn have* tried to wrap up most if not 
all of its many versions into foi6 one 
foree-hour extravaganza; not just foe 
1928 play but the 191 1 novel, foe New 
York version of 1950 and foe screenplay 
Barrie wrote for an unproduced Charlie 
Chaplin silent of 1920. Mercifully, they 
have given foe Walt Disney and Steven 
Spielberg travesties a wide berth, but 


ment when McKellen, having just re- 
verted from Hook to Darling, allows an 
echo of Hook to invade his nursery per- 
formance in foe doghouse. These and 
many more are seif-referential gags 
which chip away at the original, while the 
late Stephen Oliver’s score still hovers 
uneasily between background music and 
full-blown operetta. Given foe deviser- 
directors’ expertise with “Les Miser- 
ables.” it would surely have marip. more 
sense to allow this production to become 
foe musical it so aches to be by simply 


although in the intervening 45 years 
there have been various attempts to get 
it back on its dancing feet, Sondheim 
has always been highly and rightly re- 
luctant to go back to an essentially col- 
legiate romp. 

Indeed, “Saturday Nighi” would, 
even with Sondheim's later elevation 
to musical sainthood, have a tough 
time surviving in the West End or on 
Broadway. The book by the Epstein 
brothers, who went on to “Casa- 
blanca;" is incredibly fragile, in- 
volving as it does a group of apartment 
sharers in 1928 Brooklyn trying to sort 
out their lives in the nick of time for the 
Wall Street crash. 

But to anyone with even a faint in- 
terest in what Sondheim later did to 
change foe entire shape of the American 
musical, the clues are all here: songs that 
go through foe show but with different 
meanings depending on which character 
is singing them, lyrics that come un- 
obtrusively out of dialogue instead of 
foe usual pause while foe band strikes 
up, and a cynical, waspish, bitchy hymn 
to Brooklyn that foreshadows “ Officer i 


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borrowing the Jule Styne/Maiy Martin 
Broadway score, which remains one of 
the best I have ever beard and vastly 
more loyal to foe original Barrie plan 
At the minuscule Bridewell just off 
Fleet Street, an amazing scoop: the first 


l unlike many of foe other songs here) in 
Sondheim anthologies. 

At his Donmar Warehouse (now 
threatened with grant withdrawal), Sam 
Mendes has a fast and furious revival of 
“The Front Page” in which the only 
real problem is foe ineffable English- 
ness of Griff Rhys-Jones as Hildy John- 
son. What starts as a wonderful parody 
of Chicago newsmen in the ’30s ends up 
as a Ben Travers farce about inept Eng- 
lishmen abroad. 


... 


CROSSWORD 


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Grace Lichtenstein , a New 
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BUSINESS/FINANCE 

WEDNESDAY-THUR^DAY, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 



:2i<yDCERa 


CONTWnSI 




PAGE 11 


•.i 


Indonesia’s 
$200 Billion 
Debt Burden 

( Bank Says Repayments 
May Be Double Level 
. Of Jakarta Estimates 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Indonesia’s total 
foreign debt may amount to $200 bil- 
- lion, nearly double the level recorded by 
I the government in Jakarta, according to 
t- an estimate made public Tuesday anrirf 
| rising doubts about East Asia's capacity 
r to repay loans. 

{ The estimate, by die Indosuez bank 
: group, takes into account $83 billion in 
; undeclared offshore borrowing by In- 
donesian companies. 


in 

re- 


t Even based on die official figure of 
: Indonesian corporate debt — $65biIIion 
1 — Indonesian companies wfll have to 
| repay $50 billion in 1998 unless foreign 
c banks agree to roll over or reschedule 
: the loans, bankers said Tuesday, 
j Excessive short-term borrowing in 
| dollars by Indonesian companies, in- 
t eluding many of the largest, before die 
t Indonesian rupiah started to plunge i 
( value has created this looming debt re 
e payment crunch. 

'■ The scale of the interest and principal 
t repayment bill, which amounts to more 
; than double the level of Indonesia's for- 
< eign exchange reserves, is undermining 
| confidence in the country’s currency, 
j stock markets and economic future. 

Smite analysts are now drawing a par- 
aliel between Indonesia and South Korea, 

1 where the debt crisis stems from foreign 
; creditors’ reluctance to roll over an es- 
► timated $100 billion in short-term debt, 

[ much of it held by the private sector. 

■ On Tuesday, South Korea gave for- 
eign bankers a full account of die coun- 
try’s overseas debt crisis for the first 

See INDONESIA, Page 15 



Thai B ank Shake-Up: 
Foreigners at the Gate 


Tly ^wnriBiithiM 


BRIGHT LIGHTS, DIM OUTLOOK — Thousands of white bulbs illuminating the plaza in front of Seoul's 
dty hall, although the region’s continuing economic crisis is putting a damper on the year-end holiday season 


By Thomas Crampton 

International Herald Tribune 

■ BANGKOK — A major Thai bank 
being considered for purchase by the 
American giant Citibank fired its pres- 
ident and chairman Tuesday in a man- 
agement shake-up that analysts said 
would be played out across Asia’s 
crisis-hit banking systems as foreigners 
move in. 

“First Bangkok City Bank was con- 
sidered to be a more family-run bank,” 
Tanya Sirivedhin, assistant governor of 
die Bank of Thailand, said. “Credit 
procedures at some family-run banks 
are not as professionally run as would be 
desired.” About 40 percent of First 
Bangkok's stores are controlled by 
Thailand's so-called whiskey kin g , 
Charoen Siriwatranpakrii. who holds 
most of the country’s licenses to pro- 
duce and distribute liquor. He took con- 
trol of the bank about a decade ago. 

Owned by families or influenced by 


Asia’s Troubles Cast Shadow on U.S. Profit Forecasts 


By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — Every earnings sear 
son can bold nasty surprises for in- 
vestors. But with the stock market 
swooning lately over reports of finan- 
cial turmoil in Asia and every lowering 
of profit expectations by a major Amer- 
ican corporation, some analysts are 
worrying that -the shocks in early 1998 
will be particularly unpleasant 

In any case, as they scour Asia for 
signs of where its economies — and 
their demand for American goods and 
services — are going, analysts and U.S. 
corporate executives are warning of the 
difficulty of predicting the effects of the 
spreading crisis there. 

“It’s a very complicated issue,” said 


Thomas Doerflinger, a strategist at 
PaineWebber. “Costs are being changed 
by shifts in currencies and demand flows 
in each country. It’s tricky.” 

Many strategists are warning that the 
bad news from Asia will show up more 
sharply in reports for the first quarter, 
which will not come out until die spring, 
than in those that will be issued in 
January and February. 

“What is coming up will give us some 
clues but not the final story,” said Eric 
Miller , chief investment officer at Don- 
aldson, Lnflrin & Jenrette in San Fran- 
cisco. The shutting of factories, the im- 
pact of tighter credit and the mass layoffs 
will not be fully reflected in the fourth 
quarter, he said. “The real pain is still 
ahead. ’ ’ With American high-technology 
stocks showing greater volatility lately 


Refocusing Ads for Aging Boomers 


By Stuart Elliott 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — Efforts to in- 
terest advertisers, agencies 
and the media in older con- 
sumers are being redefined 
to make the older audience, well, 
younger. For almost two decades, there 
have been initiatives aimed at burn- 
ishing the image of consumers in their 
60s and 70s to counter perceptions of 
them as tradition-bound tightwads. 

Those attempts have made some 
headway — giving high-fiber cereals 
and decaffeinated beverages more 
prominence, for example but not 
enough to offset the longtime obses- 
sion on Madison Avenue with youth 
who are believed to spend more freely 
and have more malleable brand pref- 
erences and buying habits. 

Now, those trying to bolster appeals 
to the so-called mature market are in- 
creasingly portraying that demograph- 
ic segment as beginning with people in 
their 50s. 

That reinterpretation seeks to re- 
vitalize the market by including the 
baby-boom generation, the 76 million 
Americans bora from 1946 through 
1964 who are turning 50 at a rare of one 
every seven to eight seconds. 

However, seeking to expand the ma- 
ture market by counting die 10,000 or 
more boomers who currently celebrate 
50th birthdays every day in America 
runs a risk: The boomers are notoriously 
Peter Pan-like in refusing to grow old. 

“The focus has been on the younger 
audience because that’s where the fun 
seems to be,' ’ said Louis Van Leeuwen, 
managing partner of Fifty Something 
Marketing, in Riverside, Connecticut, 
which is being started up by several 
advertising and agency executives. 

“But by 2000,” he said, “Amer- 
icans 55 and older will have twice die 


discretionary income of those who are 
18 to 34.” 

One advertiser presenting a vision of 
younger older people is VF Corp., in a 
campaign for Vanity Fair lingerie re- 
cently introduced by the Martin 
Agency in Richmond, Virginia, part of 
Interpublic Group of Cos. 

One print ad begins: “How could 
you know, when you were 20 and 
impossibly sexy and unable to imagine 
yourself otherwise, that time would 
teach you something. That age is not a 
loss but an exchange: of wisdom for 
youth, grace for foolishness, love for 
lust” 

Leda Sanford, vice president and 
senior editorial director of the targeted- 
marketing division at Age Wave Com- 
munications Corp. in Emeryville, Cali- 
fornia, which concentrates on older 
demographic groups, said: ‘ ‘Important 
companies are beginning to accept that 
there is an aging America and they will 
start to lose share of market if they do 
not adjust their advertising messages. 
The force of the boomer wave is what 
will change what America feels about 
aging-” 

The contrast between die younger old 
and the older old will be even more 
pronounced among women, Ms. San- 
ford said, because “when a 40-year-old 
woman aims 55 now, she will have for 
the most part worked. She will be pro- 
ficient Nobody will push her around.” 

To reflect that. Age Wave has in- 
troduced a younger version of Always 
on die Go!, a magazine aimed at wom- 
en in their 50s that is published for the 
Buick division of General Motors 
Corp. The new magazine. Get Up and 
Go!, is directed at working women 
aged 40 to 50. 

The CBS television network has 
been working hard to persuade Madis- 
on Avenue to rethink demographic 
definitions to consider baby-boom age 


groups, from 35 to 54, as well as 
younger age groups, from 18 to 34. 

One reason is the median age of CBS' 
viewers: 52.4 years, the oldest of any of 
the six broadcast networks, according 
to a study released last week by 
BJK&E Media, a unit of Bozell, Jac- 
obs, Kenyon & Eckhardt 

“Hie baby boomers have estab- 
lished the cultural and social agenda of 
this country since they were in school.” 
said David Poltrack, executive vice 
president for planning and research at 
CBS Television in New Ycuk. 
“They're not going to concede that 
leadership position as they break 50.” 

Besides, Mr. Poltrack said, age 
ought not to be considered an “ab- 
solute determinant of whether 
someone is in the market for a product 
or not” Income, education and family 
size, he said, are more important. 

Those involved in boosting boomers 
into the ranks of the mature market are 
aware of the pitfalls. 

“The boomer is not going gently 
into that good night and will continue 
to gravitate to youthful images," Ms. 
Sanford said. 

At the same time, she said, “Some 
of the best ad agencies in the world are 
afraid of ’contaminating’ the younger 
part of the market: If they do things 
right for die older market and die 
younger people see it, they worry 
younger people will be turned off.” 

That is important because the 
boomers’ children are becoming an 
important market for products such as 
cosmetics, movies and snack foods. 

But while “the concept is gaining 
momentum,” Mr. Van Leeuwen said, 
so far only a small fraction of mar- 
keters are “beginning to see the light” 
about the mature market. 

“You can’t sell everything to every- 
body.” he said. “I can’t sell you a car if 
you’re not in the market for it.” 


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Dec. 23 


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7ft 

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Sources: Routes, Btoomboru, MerrtH 
LrorU, Bank_of7akro-MIhubiSl>i, 

Comma*, crem Lyceaab. 


finU 

AM. 

PM. 

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Zorich 29115 

29105 

+220 

Lrarton 29270 

29250 

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+250 


US. nation per ounce. London official 
(bangs ZutidO and New York opening 
and closing prices; New Yat* Come* 
(Feej 

Sawee Rtetsrs. 


than those in many other industries, the 
efforts of two closely watched companies 
to assess the impact of Asia’s economic 
woes on their earnings prospects show 
the uncertainty that investors face. 

Intel Corp., die world's top maker of 
integrated circuits, says the impact has 
been negligible — so far, that is, and as 
best as it can make out Some of the 
worst-hit countries, such as Indonesia, 
are not major markets for its products, 
the company says, and Japan, which has 
been limping along economically for 
years, had not been expected to generate 
significant new orders anyway. 

As a result, a spokesman said, Intel is 
keeping a close eye on China and India, 
trying to gauge whether their economies 
— and their demand for Intel’s chips — 
will slow because of the fallout from the 
rest of Asia next year. But, he said, it is 
too early to tell whether there has been 
any significant change in the company’s 
prospects in those two countries. 

This means that Intel's fourth-quarter 
earnings report, due in the second week 
of January, may not tell the full story. 

The same uncertainty applies for in- 
vestors in Applied Materials Inc., the 


world’s largest manufacturer of com- 
puter-chipmaking equipment 

Although the company surprised Wall 
Street with better-than-expected earnings 
for its fourth quarter dial ended in Oc- 
tober, investors have since pushed its 
stock price down 42 percent because the 
company gets more than half of its sale s 
from Asia. 

“The bottom line is that we don’t 
know yet” a company spokesman said. 

“Right now with what is going on in 
South Korea, our customezs are trying to 
figure out in which direction they want to 
move. And we have to wait until those 
decisions are made.” For example. 
South Korean chipmakers may find it 
difficult to buy the next generation of 
chipmaking machiner y right now. But 
many analysts say they will have to do so, 
whatever the cost, to stay competitive. 

The turmoil in Asia, combined with 
signs that the American economy may be 
peaking after years of strong growth, has 
divided analysts about the earnings pros- 
pects for American industry -as a whole. 

Abby Joseph Cohen, co-chairman of 

See FORECAST, Page 15 


national industrial policies, banks 
across Asia ignored international 
lending practices and spent years 
building up portfolios of risky debt. 
Although eager for capital from out- 
side investors, the region's banks 
have been reluctant to give control to 
foreigners. 

“These perverse lending practices 
combined with lax regulation and pro- 
tectionist policies for local banks cre- 
ated the powerful concoction that led to 
today's economic crisis,” a senior for- 
eign banker in Thailand said. “Every 
bank in this country needs more pro- 
fessional management” 

The last six months of economic 
crisis have revealed the level of risky 
loans and prompted Moody’s Investors 
Service Inc. on Monday to lower the 
national credit ratings of Thailand, In- 
donesia and South Korea to “junk” 
status, a rating normally assigned to 
risky corporate ventures. 

Although Thailand is desperate for 
billions of dollars to meet tough new 
standards imposed as part of the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund’s bailout a 
line of credit to replenish depleted gov- 
ernment reserves, Thai batiks and au- 
thorities have resisted allowing foreign 
partners to take control. 

“This reluctance to give away con- 
trol is ultimately going to work against 
them,” Sriyan Pietersz, a strategist at 
SocGen Crosby Securities, said. 
“Changes in the boardroom are a step to 
facilitating a takeover or merger that 
would in the end- bring an infusion of 
new capital.” 

Miss Tanya said the central bank, 
which holds a 15 percent stake in First 
Bangkok City Bank, approved of the 
commercial bank's move and hoped the 
installation of a more professional man- 
agement team would raise confidence 
and stop a recent flood of withdrawals 
from the bank. 

Citibank’s country manager. Henry 
Ho, said he had had no role in the 
changes and only heard about them after 
the official announcement. 

“We are in the midst of conducting 
due diligence, with 30 people reviewing 
all components of the bank,” Mr. Ho 
said. “We will decide the value of the 
bank when we have finished due di- 
ligence by the end of February.” 

See THAILAND, Page 15 


Global Private Banking 


Wealth 


THAT TOOK A LIFETIME 


TO BUILD SHOULD BE TREATED 


WITH THE PROPER RESPECT. 



UtoJuvartan of RepulUt 
Nmtlomol B-Jk of Norn Vori 
(Stomal S.A. m (mmm. 


At Republic National Bank we Wieve that 
hard-earned wealth deserves to he nurtured and 
preserved. And so we run our hank according 
to one fundamental principle: to protect 
our clients' capital as we safeguard its purchasing 
power. 

It is a simple principle upon which we hase 
our brand of financial conservatism: private 
h anking built upon rigoi> discipline and prudence. 

This sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, 
has created a global private hank of exceptional stability, 
capable of weathering the roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republic's capitalization ratio, 
on a risk adjusted basis, is two times 
as great as that required by the world's 
international hanking regulators. 

To our way of thinking, it is security 
as well as return that we must ensure each 
day. And. in the process, to provide 
a unique quality of service, understanding 
and discretion. 



VorU of 

RtpuUk Notional Hank of 
■Vw Vor4 m Nine 1'iiri, 


Republic National Bank of New York" 

Strength. Security. Service. 

A iJrr H. J> ■ ^ tab ' l«««* ’ Li'iiAw ■ ■ Rriiut ■ KmvJy JliPf ■ 1 km Aim ■ Cjmhui Limb • ■ C.WjIl* ■ Iwn,. 

IIib^ ■ Manila ' Hnv-LH, ■ Miami ■ Milan ■ Mvnt* Carl* ■ ■ M.— I»,J * IL... ■ 

' P" 1 * 1 ' |lm1 * W tak ■ Rv Jr Imaiiti ■ &uitUa> - Ai«apun- - S*lnar ■ Tli|M ■ T.<L» ■ Tiw.nl., Zamb 

“ CrpJt Ntfa-nJ Hub .1 Nr- VA I W 


- r-T. 



; PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY- THURSDAY DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 




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•Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 

IwcncukHnl Hcmtd Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Playtex Products Inc. agreed to buy Personal Care Group 
Inc. from J. W. Childs Equity Partner LP, for $182 milli on 
in cash and stock, to add Wet Ones towelettes and Mr. Bubbles 
to its line of infant-care products. 

• Innkeepers US A Trust said it would buy six Residence Inn 
by Marriott hotels in Seattle and Portland, Oregon, for $93.8 
million in cash, in its first foray into a lucrative regional hotel 
market. 

■ Republic Industries Inc is in talks to acquire First Team 
Automotive Corp., which owns 10 new-car dealerships in 
Florida, the Orlando Sentinel reported. 

• BellSouth Corp. has created separate units to oversee its 
telephone and wireless communications operations to sharpen 
its focus on each part of the business. 

• Chile’s economy expanded at a higher-than-expected 7.9 
percent in October from October 1996 as electricity pro- 
duction and imports surged. • 

• AT&T Corp. signed a definitive agreement to sell its- 
AT&T Solutions Customers Care unit to Matrixx Marketing 
Inc., a unit of Cincinnati Bell Inc., for about $625 million in 

Cash! Bloomberg 


Oil and Gas Explorers Plan Merger 

Bloomberg News 

HOUSTON — Ocean Energy Inc. and United Meridian 
Corp. agreed to merge Tuesday, creating the ninth-largest 
U.S. company devoted exclusively to oil and gas exploration 
and giving them the resources to pursue deep-water projects in 
the Gulf of Mexico and off the coast of West Africa. 

The agreement, structured as a- merger of equals, would 
result in a company with a stock market value of about $23 
billion and annual revenue of $560 milli on. 

The two companies are joining to cut costs and make it 
easier to borrow money to exploit their deep-water sites, 
analysts said. 


Dollar Slips 
On Talk of 
Japan Sales 

Bloomberg NeWt 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell • 
against foe yen Tuesday after some 
traders speculated that the Bank of 
Japan might sell the U.S. currency to 
support foe yen. The dollar also eased 
against most European currencies. 

Some traders, however, said they 
expected the dollar to rebound next 
week amid an increase in Japanese 
corporate bankruptcies and a cash 
crunch in South Korea. 

“The bankruptcy news is bad for 
the yen, not to mention that Korea 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

collapsed,’ ’ said Richard Koss, mar- 
ket strategist at MFR Inc. 

• Some traders downplayed the de- 
clines because Japanese markets 
were closed for a holiday, and many 
traders worldwide are already on 
vacation for the year-end holidays. 

The dollar fell to 129.250 yea in 
late trading in New York from 
130.125 yen the day before and to 
1 .7740 Deutsche matWfrom 1.78 15 
DM It also fell to 1.4345 Swiss 
francs from 1.4390 francs and to 
5.9335 French francs from 5.9590 
francs. The pound rose to $1.6670 
from $1.6635. 

Concern over more bankruptcies 
was triggered by Maruso Securities 
Co., a medium-sized Japanese 
brokerage that filed for bankruptcy. 
Meanwhile, in South Korea, foe won 
tumbled to a record Low and stocks 
fell sharply. Some traders said the 
threar of dollar-selling by foe B ank 
of Japan had lifted the yen against 
the dollar. Analysts estimate that foe 
central bank spent as much as $8 , 
billion last week defending its cur- 
rency, which has fallen 12 percent 
against the dollar this year. 

“There is speculation of BOJ in- 
tervention ova the next two to three 
days,’ ’ said Richard Gffljooly afPari- 
bas Capital Markets. “Theycanpash 
foe market any way they want in dim 
trading. So for people holding dollars 
over foe holiday, there's a risk.” 

While most markets around the 
world will close Thursday for 
Christmas, Japan will remain open. 

The U.S. dollar rose to a 12-year 
high against foe Canadian dollar 
amid speculation that Canada would 
not raise interest rates soon. 
“Canada has limite d scope to raise 
rates" because the central bank does 
not want to choke economic growth, 
said Marc Chandler, a strategist at 
Deutsche Morgan Grenfell. The 
U.S. dollar rose to 1.4375 Canadian 
dollars from 1 .4346 dollars. 


Thrift - Case Judge Denounces U.S. Defense 


By Jerry Knight ■ 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — A federal judge has 
thrown out virtually all foe defenses foe gov- 
ernment has raised against a series of lawsuits 
that could force foe government to pay billions 
of dollars in damages to foe owners of failed 
savings and loans. 

Judge Loren Smith, chief judge of foe U.S. 
Court of Claims, chastised Justice Department 
lawyers for stalling foe lawsuits. He said he was 
prepared to rule that the government most pay 
damages to foe owners of about 120 sayings 
associations that sued the government because 
they were hurt financially when Congress 
tightened thrift regulations in 1989. 

The Supreme Court ruled last year that foe 
government broke contracts with S&L own- 
ers when Congress rewrote thrift accounting 
rules in 1989. The new rules put hundreds of 


S&Ls out of business and forced others w 
invest billions of dollars to comply with 
than. 

The Court of Claims is in the midst of a 
long trial to determine how. much the gov- 
ernment owes foe S&L owners, several of 
which are seeking damages of more than $1 
billion each. Government attorneys have said 
foe total potential cost to foe taxpayers is 
“tens of billions,” and private estimates go 
much higher. 

“I don’t think anyone knows how much it 
is,'” said Jecry Barron, chairman of Landmark 
National Coip., an offspring of one of foe 
companies involved in foe Court of Claims case 
Monday. but *Td say it’s between $50 billion 
and $100 billion.” Mr. Barton’s company con- 
tends it lost $1.8 billion when the government 
shut foe S&L it owned. Oak Tree Federal in 
New Orleans. 

Landmar k is one of more than 100 S&Ls that 


have filed lawsuits. ">ntetK«ng «**£*£ 

SKiSKfSKS.-- 

foe thrift crises, government Hnlam 

“off billions of dollars in losses, and 
mJ ^°Jusrice Department, which defern&ita 

^Rulingin favor of Landmark and i three other 
S&L owners. Judge Smith said 
partment attorneys have used lc S a J* I £T?! S 
that “range from the rejected to the implaus- 
ible.” 


Aftershock of Korean Drop Shakes Blue-Chips 


CampBal by Oar SafFrom Disporeka 

NEW YORK — The aftershock of 
a sharp drop in South Korean stocks 
drove the U.S. market lower Tues- 
day, with blue-chips falling sharply 
in foe final hour of trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
closed down 12734 points at 
7,691.77 and foe Standard & Poor’s 
500 index fell 1438, to 939. 12. De- 
clining issues outnumbered advan- 
cing ones by a 6-to-5 ratio on foe 
New York Stock Exchange. 

Large banks that do business 
overseas declined foe most Ji\ 
Morgan, which led foe Dow’s de- 
cline, fell 3 % to 112. Citicoip fell 4 
3/16 to 123 *6. 

, “Money managers are confused, 
so there’s no consistent buying or 
selling,” said Robert S treed, a 
money manager ax Northern Trust 
Co. in Chicago. “No one knows 
where the world is going.” 

In foe technology sector. Remedy 
plunged 11% to 21% on concern that 
its earnings will be hurt by IBM’s 
acquisition of Software Artistry, a 
Remedy rival. Shares of Remedy, 
which makes, help-desk software, 
more than tripled last year. IBM fell 3 
3/16 to 99%. 

Lattice Semiconductor fell 8% to 
45% after PaineWebber down- 
graded the chipmaker’s shares to 
“neutral” from “buy.” 

Applied Materials fall 1% to 28% 
on lingering worries about the Asian 
market turmoil on the semiconduct- 
or-equipment makers’ prospects. 
Intel was foe most actively traded 
U3. stock, falling IVt to 70 3/16, 
also hurt by Asian concerns. 


The technology-heavy Nasdaq 
composite index closed down 22.15 
points at 1,509.91. 

The late drop in stocks sent some 
investors to foe safety of foe Trea- 

US. STOCKS " 

snry bond market, helping prices 
reverse an earlier slide. The price of 
foe ben chmark 30-year issue fin- 
ished up 5/32 point at 103 17/32, 
leaving the yield, steady from Mon- 
day at 5.88 percent 
Bond prices were lower earlier as 


traders struggled to find buyers be- 
fore foe Chris tmas break for the $1 1 
hin i nn of new five-year securities 
that the Treasury sold Tuesday. 

. Among other active stocks, Fried- 
man, Billings, Ramsey Group 
closed up % at 20V4 in first-day trad- 
ing. The investment hank, formed in 
1989 to manage stock sales in high- 
growth areas such as technology and 
financial services, is regarded as a 
possible takeover target. 

Apple South fall 3 3/16 to 13 7/16. 
The restaurant company said it 
planned to sell 61 company-owned 


lebee's Neighborhood Bar & 
[ restaurants and 264 other fran- 
chised restaurants, leaving that seg- 
ment of the business. The company 
also warned that its fourth-quarter 
earnings have been hurt by rising 
labor costs ami expenses asso ciated 
with starting a new menu and open- 
ing new restaurants. 

Kofax Image Products fell 2 to 
5Vfi after foe maker of imaging soft- 
ware and scanner enhancement 
products warned it would post dis- 
appointing results - for its second 
quarter. (Bloomberg* AP ) 


U.S. Growth Slows on Weaker Spending 


OmpBtdbrOnrSngFnmDOpiocha 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
economy grew slightly less vigor- 
ously in foe thir d quarter than was 
previously thought, the Commerce 
Department said Tuesday, as con- 
sumers spent less and businesses pat 
less into inventories. 

But as growth ratcheted down, 
corporate profits accelerated and the 
inflation rate was flat, with prices 
rising at the slowest rate in three 
decades. 

Gross domestic product, the 
broadest measure of economic ac- 
tivity, grew at a 3.1 percent annual 
rate in the Jnly-September period, 
compared with a previously estimat- 
ed 33 percent, foe department said in 
its second and final estimate of 
quarterly economic activity. That 


followed a sizzling 4S percent an- 
nual expansion iq foe first quarter 
and a growth rate of 33 percent in foe 
second quarter. 

Bat many analysts say a further 
slowdown is in store as foe Asian 
financial crisis curbs U.S. sales 
overseas. Some are forecasting a 
growth rate of between 2 percent 
and 23 percent for 1998. 

The Asian turmoil had little effect 
on orders to U.S. factories for dur- 
able goods in November. They re- 
bounded 4.8 percent, foe steepest 
rise since a 73 percent surge in 
December 1992, erasing a 0-1 per- 
cent drop in October. 

The Commerce Department said 
orders for such goods, which are 
items expected to lastmorefoan force 
years, totaled a record $195 billion. 


up from $186. 1 billion in October. 

The GDP report’s component 
that measures inflation showed a 1.4 
percent annual rate, foe slowest rise 
in prices since a 0.9 percent advance 
in foe second quarter of 1964. 

The report also showed corporate 
profits were significantly stronger 
in the third quarter than was pre- 
viously thought, rising at a rate of 
42 percent, or $19.9 billion a year 

— more than double foe second 
quazter's$8.1 billion pace of growth 

— in s tea d of the 1.7 percent annual 
rare estimated a month ago. 

Consumer spending increased at 
a 5.6percent annual rate, rather than 
foe 53 percent earlier estimate. It 
had slipped to a 0.9 percent gain in 
' juarter after i\u 


foe second 
percent in 


first 


tier jumping 53 

(Reuters, AP) 


AMEX 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The 300 most traded stocks of Hie day, 
up to the dosing on Wd Street 
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-ft 

£0 

Sft 

» 

» 

-n 

410 

7 ft 

7 

7 

j* 

va 

22 *k 

21 1 * 

JU 

>ih 

ts* 

4 

JH 

JH 

-* 

2 » 

ft 

te 

M 

-H 

121 

ii 

H 

M 


BN 

ift 

V» 

IH 

■«. 

411 

4 *k 

4 ft 

4 ft 

ft 

ID 

lift 

14 ft 

IS* 

•te 


sm hw> um um aw 


SH 


<ni 

117 

14» 

uu 
&* 
i m 
4477 
M 
MS 
571 
139 
171 
177 
131 
119 
M 
13U 


J8 


su 


n 


M M 
ISM I Mi 
MW Ml 
1* IM 
17* 17V. 

2M EM 
9 ft »ft 
UM Oft 
m BM 
wi m 
KW» 11% 


Mk 

tn 

4ft 

+k 

xt 

m 

1W 

-n 

DR 

M 

20H 

4k 

4h 

* 

4H 

-U 

ih 

m 

IH 

-ft 

ift 

<A 

IH 


7ft 

7H 

7M 

_ 

1? 

1ft 

1ft 

•H 

9H 

Ift 

9ft 

♦ H 

la 

ft 

ft 


ft 

37ft 

37H 

mu 

U 

Jt 

-k 

ft 

* 

ft 

♦ft 

ft 

to 

ft 

-ft 

Mft 

15ft 

14ft 

•ft 

Uft 

lift 

.IM 

•H 

12W 

4ft 

\ 

1ft 

-a 

W 

m 

9H 

+s 

17ft 

17k, 

17ft 


m 

in 

Wh 


w 

lh 

9k 

.ft 

40 

4k 

4ft 

•ft 

7 

4k 

4M 

•n 

20ft 

m 

Sb 

•ft 

4H 

n 

M 

-ft 

TN 

w 

n 

■h 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


lav Lot «. 

in 2w 

as sE 4 

cm sm -7f» 
25*5 25%k 4b 
CM aft 
71 Vk 71H 
309k Nh 
10514 105M 
UH UVl 

mm m. 

^35 


Indexes ■ 

Most Actives 

Dow Jones 

am to Uv IN a» 

Indus 781684 78X111$ 748UI 748L77 -127J4 
Tram TIS2S9 315679 3133.10 3U4J4 -75JB 
IIN 247J8 649X0 344J8 248X3 +OJ2 

Cato 2657.14 2550-12 299.16 252950 -3726 

NYSE 

FrifriBRn 

VM. 

63155 

54049 

52539 

44195 

Ci 

Standard & Poors 


3$0& 

Pnrtees Iter 

up ire am 4PJ6. 
Industrials 1105X51093X3110^31 1084X9 
Trnnsp. 675.4E 6?1L32 673.06 664.97 

UtQWas 230-94 227 JM 230X6 23123 

Finance 117X5 116JJ2 116J6 115JM 

SP 500 95473 94X25 95370 939.12 

ndwr 

2^5* 

Teams 

mwvi 

Moram 

{bS? 

MOT 

TfrW 

3® 

5912 

mi* 

2UB2 

18204 

22939 


2» 

32 

73V. 

22W 

109 

3: 


♦vS SP100 456X4 44941 45X80 445-25 


NYSE 

SSSffi 

asp 

Finance 


Nasdaq 


88? 28 p jigv 

m p Wk 

484X3 481J4 4813 443 


£ Nasdaq 

MV lav Lmt 


Composite 

+k Mvsrttt 


n nance 
Trarap. 

AMEX 


llteaS 1171X5 ... 

3085? 202074 20457 -575 

I7644S 1JSLH 1759.00 -042 

243U7 2«Ot 2 <2642 -10JK 

102408 101136 10203 -U3 


MW lav lav CM. AMEX 



M11S 45932 0603 -2-52 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 10494 

ID unites 102-54 

10 Industrials 10737 



« at ■« 

13 *k ft. M -Mi 

JH 45* -ft 


11020 7W TV*. 7J> -Vk 

W Sk £ $ .§£ 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Nasdaq 


4k TounsuB 
*« 

3 AMEX 



- W* 


BSCS?. 

Market Sales 


NYSE 
Amex 
Nasdaq 
In muttons. 



t M ar 

440 

51702 
30.19 3451 

55298 027.10 


637.23 

491 


Dividends 

Company 


Par Amt Rec Pay Company 


IRREGULAR 

ACM Gv Sear JB 12-30 1-16 

ACM GvSccor .045 1-16 

Argentina Fund - 95 12-31 M3 

Biol Essex . 92 12-10 12-00 

Korea EtecPwr b .1512-30 — 


Pohong Iron SH 


b .1444 12-31 — 


INCREASED 

Gommunffy Fed Q 98 1-2 1-16 

FstUidtedCpMa O .15 1-20 2-1 

Oaren Asset Q J9 12-31 1-19 

Washington Fedl - M 1-7 1-22 

INITIAL 

Cedar Fab- LP n - 9212-31 2-13 
Legacy HoMsg - AB 12-30 12-31 


Inca CtopFd 2D00 
LaBn Am Dfaawr 
MassMuKplm 
MassMutlPlMr 
Pakistan In* 
ScuddrNwAsta 
ScuddrNw Europe 
Scoddr Spain 
Spain Fund 
TfeoJFwnd 
WMwdDfrvest 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

n 

\M 


YEAR END 


ACMMngdDttr 
ACM Mind 1n» 
AflkmcBARMkt 
AlflanoeWUDb-ll 
Autlsta Fond 
BrazaFund 
OownteGtaQtw 
Foreign CoJEirE 
IncoOpp Fd 1999 


.1X21512-30 

. .rm 12-30 
_ 2J1 12-31. 
.144541240 
- .74312-31 
.2771201 

. 98412-31 
_ 197 12-31 
_ jOSIS 13-31 


1-16 

1-16 

1-9 

1-16 

1-9 

1-12 

1-14 

1-15 

1-9 


. 4733 12-31 

- 445 12-31 

- 1-70 12-31 
_ 9912-31 
.4112 12-31 
. X4 12-31 

2.19512-31 
-24751221 
-2371 12-31 

- 4499 12-31 
. 249 12-31 

REGULAR 

AmafstPrepFd 2 M.10601241 

AmahrMtg 
CenlTiri Hudson 
CeamiMoino 

GBC Bancorp 
Mean Royalty Tr 
NoleoCtes 
Pulaski Bk 
StJghnKnis 
United Mob Home 
VjtoyneSvgsBn 
Zb»» Bancorp 


O 9212-31 
Q S 3 S 1-9 
Q 925 1-9 

Q 4212-31 
Q .1012-31 
O .12 1230 

M 4346 12-31 
Q 25 2-20 
Q 275 1-6 

O -825 1-14 

§ - ,7S W7 


.155 

.12 


ntegpay Ba UbiC—Milbnds 

M-mncflUy; thouarteily; s^s mteau ioey. 


US. Stock Tables Explained 

Safes figures are urxjIBdd. Ysort/ lk5*H <»n1 Iwe reflodttie previous 52 weeks plus the aurrert 
woiot»dnoWwMesHn8fliig^Wliereo5|a»5toc(lridgidiiniQurilteg1o25peicgdorma!e 
has betn paid and Jridand are Sh aw far tw now OotteonbiUiiIeM 

attieradm noted R5BtfdMdendsa»aminIdmiraemenN based an 4ieUestdedaaSM 
o -dividend also extra (sL h - anmnd rate of dividend phi* stock dMdend. e - BquMatbig ‘ 
dMdend.ee- PE aooeeds99j3d-ooledd‘De«fyemlylow.dd-hxHlnB» 108112 monthfc 
*- fivfdwd dmatma or pad In pnswfijW 13 norths, f - annual rata, Increased on tat 
dedareSoikg- dMdend taUmt(Bdnfan<Ite>ub|etf1o | ntnaa-naidenoe fox- i'lMdend 
dedorod oflMpflhipwstodc dMdend [ -dMdend paid Ihb year, ocnilled deferred or no 
odton taken at Iota* cflvMend ntatfnp. k - dMdend declared or paid this year, an 
aaMnuiaiiwtaiM wBhdfvktands monears-oi -annual rote, reduced an tastdectaratai. 
n- new Issue In the pat SR mire. The high-tow range begins wtthtae start of trading, 
ita- next day dtihnry>P-hiBMjMd«dBrewditdeiinluKARLPra-pric»«anilnnsRilla. 
q- closed-end imduolhnH lr-igiijdenddedare d or piAHnprecedbigl 2 month& phis aodi 

dMdend. i - stack ipflt. OMdend begins wtth date of spUL as - sales, t - dMdend paid ai 
stock In preceding 1 2 maim* estimated auli value on ex-dMdend drex-<S5tribulion dote. 

0- new y«rty(rigtLV-tnnSng ha Ifedvl- in bankruptcy or receJvwsh ip or being reoraaRbEd 

undarthe Baidruptcy Act vnannKOSsumed by such companies, wd- when dbdbflwted 
wi - when bsoedf ww - w«i wnmrets. s - eruMdend or en-rigMs. Mb - reMUstribuflan. 

jmr-widKWtwarranis.r-eR'dMdendandsiitasinfuJLild-ylefcLi-saleslnftilL 


ESTEEtNATIONAi'FUTURES 


-9ft* 

■» 

•I 

-ft 


w 

Sep 98 
UK 98 
M99 
Dec 99 




Dec. 23, 1997 

Hgh Um Latest dig* Opiat 

Grains 

CORNCCMm 

&000 tw mtatanare cents per tmM 
Mar 78 348 262 247 +3W 173.109 

274W 2691* 274ft +3 4938 

28014 275ft 229ft +3H 59J88 

278ft 275ft 278ft +Zft 6427- 

282ft 278ft 282ft +2ft 3X534 

295 291ft 294ft +2W 337 

276 +3 673 

- EsL Idas 40000 Mam nie« 44408 
Mom Open W 324438. off UN7 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT1 
100 teas- doBon per ton 
Jm 98 207-00 20540 20640 +020 2X999 
Mre98 20440 202X0 20430 +040 35582 
May 98 20340 20140 20340 +050 2X238 
JUIM 205L30 203X0 20540 +040 14081 
Aug 98 20540 20430 205X0 +040 4963 
Sep 98 20530 20400 20520 +020 3416 

EsL sales 1&000 Moors sates 17447 . 

Mom open kd 110450 afl 87 

soybean oil aaon 

60000 Rn- ends pflf lb 

Jan 98 2476 2442 2444 -OU 21408 

Mar 98 25.16 2490 25-01 4X19 44954 

M»9S 25X5. 25.16 2523 4X16 1X578 

-M 98 25X2 2S2S 25uffi 4X10 12408 

Aug 98 2SX0 2520 2125 4X12 1523 

Sep 90 2525 25.11 25.11 4X14 1252 

EsL ska 1 94»0 Mm sates 14599 
Mam open M 101471 00 1031 

SOYBEANS fCBOTl 

SOOO faa mWnwm- certs per buriwi 

Jan 98 080 075ft 079ft 46 37X51 

Mar 98 082 077ft 081ft -ft *4X72 

Mor98 687 683ft 686 -1 21776 

■MW 690 087ft 609ft -ft 25416 

Aug 98 609 600 087ft -1M 4138 

EsL «AM 37X00 Mam Mtes Z&750 

Mom open M148XOX ad 1X75 

WHEAT rcuan 

5.000 bu ikfnfnwm- cads pw bnsM 
Ma-98 316ft 332ft 335ft" +2ft 56,106 

morn 344 340U 343ft +2ft 11363 

J»I9S 349ft 340 349ft +2U 19X75 

Sep 98 355 3S3 355 +-I 725 

EsL solas 9400 Mom solas 11597 
Mam open int 9X708. oft 530 


Livestock 


H«b taw Latest Cbge OpM 
ORANCEJDICEOKTH) 

ISflJO QjAr f Wltf DvBl 

Jan 98 85.15 8410 8440 41X0 9233 

Mar 98 89JH 07X0 88.10 4X55 2X649 

MayW 9100 91.10 9125 41X5 5X89 

Jul 98 95X0 9450 9455 4X75 3287 

EsL sates NA. Mam sales 6295 
Mom open bit 46254 00 595 


CATTLE (OMER) 
xamo tea.- canto pw b. 




Dec 97 

64.92 6575 

6SJ5 

-uo 

1J43 

FtoTO 

44-35 65X3 

4575 

X.17 

4a«05 

AprW 

arm t&so 

68.40 

-0 07 

2X534 

Jan 98 

48J0 67.95 

MOT 

+0-15 

\£M 6 

Aeg9S 

OdW 

49X0 48.90 

49X2 

+au 

4X39 

7190 7170 

71.70 

-002 

1X0B 

EiL nte ISOM Mam totes 1 QUi 1 


MamapanM lOUtll. «H 30 



FEEDEf 

CATTLE (CMER) 



svno ibft^ outfs pw Rl 
J an 96 7dS7 7&1S 

76X2 

-0X2 

7X41 

Mw-98 

77 JS 76X5 




n 

77X2 77X5 

77X5 

4LI5 


78X0 7870 

78X0 

■0.17 

um 

AugW 

8042 8005 

BUD 

0X5 

919 

Sep 98 

80X5 saoa 

80.07 

■QW 

199 

EsL sates 

lxiB Atom sates 2.175 


Atom open fad 1&709, up 78 




59X5 sew 5895 4X10 2A624 

Aprsn 57X5 5055 57.15 +O-02 8204 

■(■Pi? 41,5 6535 +a05 5M0 

JlHW 64X0 6417 6425 +0JB L541 

Aug 98. 61 XS 6120 6127 +0L0S 272 

EsL sates 4>0C Mom sates 4306 
Momapea 10137411, up 31 


BELLIES (CMERJ 
tefc- rente par Bl 


FefcM 5525 5480 5490 4X55 5.991 

55 V 5423 5435 -.25 1314 

Muyve SS2D SUM 5S35 4X40 MB 

&l sales iXlOMent Ufa U1B 
Mom open WM6Z a#fl24 


Food 

cocoa wesa 

JOmaMchns-Sparten 

Mre«8 1654 1616 1650 +30 4X152 

Mj»« 1685 1651 1684 +X 20681 

1710 109 1710 *29 5X58 

Sep’S 1736 17W 1736 +28 43 22 

Dec 98 1764 170 17(4 +28 WB6 

Mar99 1788 1770 1700 +36 8X79 

EsL sates &160 Mam talas 1M09 

Mans open bit 95X6Xaa 1,146 

COFFEE CWCSH 
37X00 OkV cents par B>. 

Mo-98 16300 15800 162X0 +525 142V 
Moyffl J SAW 15400 13725 +450 5672 

Jul 90 15230 14830 15220 +&00 B793 
Sep 98 146.00 14225 14400 +4JB L342 
Dec» 14X00 141X00 ICL00 +475 1200’ 

EsL trees 4522 Morn SOlH 402 
Mom open Ire Z7258 00631 


5UCARW08LD 11 0KSEJ 

11200 Bwr cents per lb. 

Mar 98 1228 1220 1221 4X03 94553 

May 98 12X33 11.99 1200 4X03 ' 31890 

Jol9S 1U3 11X1 11X1 4MK 20026 

Od98 1134 11JB 11-53 inch. 344M 

Ed. ireai 7JU3 Mum cdtee 4728 
Mom GS» lid 194738UP 74 


Metals 

COLDOKMX) 

100 bwazr doom pv fray m 
Dec 97 29430 29250 29430 +130 

Jon 98 294X0 +3.00 

FttW 29420 29270 29530 +280 

Apr 98 moo 29270 297 JO +270 

Jun98 30000 297 JO 299 JO +270 

Aug 98 30130 299 JO 301 JO +2J0 

0098 30120 +270 

Dec 98 305X0 303X0 30*30 +230 

Feb 99 307X0 30700 307X0 +270 

EsL Sates 3X000 Mom Wteil 4955 
Mom open tot 184048 off 612 

HI SHADE COPPER CNCMUO 
24000 Bee- cents per Rx. 

Dec 97 79X0 TO30 7840 -1X0 

Jan 98 7925 7860 78X5 -UJ5 

Feb 98 7930 7920 2925 -1.05 

Mar 90 81 JO 79 JO 79J5 -1.10 

Aar 98 9030 8025 8035 -1JB 

fSorW 8215 8070 8070 -135 

Jim 98 8230 8130 8130 -135 

Jul 98 8220 81 JO 81 JO -135 

Aag9B- 8270 8130 8130 -135 

EsL sates 7.»0 Mom write 4837 
Mars opwi Ini 7O204PP 1383 

SILVER CNCMTO 


127 

97215 

12X67 

12314 

4467 

2X29 

14500 

2929 


Dec 97 62030 60030 6(9 JO +2220 
Jan 98 63030 60330 63080 +2050 
Feb 98 62230 +2050 

Mar 98 62530 601 JO 62430 +21-80 

Mo*98 62150 602-00 62430 +2130 

JUI9B 62630 60330 62430 +7130 

Sep 98 62430 60230 62430+2130 

Dae 98 62230 <1030 62280 +2130 

Ed. sales 14000 Monk sOes 4603 
Mom open U 94944 00 9 

PLATINUM (NMER) 

50 tray si- dates par trey ac. 

Jot 9a 35600 35000 355,00 +130 

Apr 90 35X80 35000 351.70 +1X0 

Jld98 35530 39120 350J0 +1X0 

Od 98 35020 +1X0 

EsL sides NA. Mom sates 2670 
Mom open fad 14314 off 130 


LONDON METALS tLMEl 

DaHaisperiMMeten 

AtewtemOOgbcraW 

Sped 1499-00 1500.00 150630 

tawanl 152730 152830 153400 


Sort 


— IWthGnM 

1732ft 1733ft 175200 

176030 176330 178130 


53430 

53930 


53530 53030 
52930 


3* I . 587030 588030 590530 591530 
Fknranl 596030 597030 600030 601030 

Ua 

Spat 520030 529000 533400 534430 

Forward 529030 529400 5320.00 532400 

UKCSpoeMMakGreM 

Spa ^ 1090ft 1091ft 1087ft 1089ft 

Forward 1111ft 1112W 111X00 111400 

MBh Law Owe CDge OpM 


Financial 

US T BILLS ICMER) 

£1 mWon-pteaflOOpcL 

Mnr98 9493 9487 9491 tttdL 7,935 

Jan 98 9498 9488 948S -OJM 1J22 

Sep 98 9485 4135 23 

EsL solas 1.756 Mam sates 2751 

Mem apan bn 2184 ail 356 

ii yb Treasury (cboti 
nnooo prtoi pte «, 32nds aMU pd 
MAfW 11M? 112-08 11M2 -01 26X963 

JIM» 112-14 112-11 UM1 >01 2391 

S«I»9B 112-11 -01 90 

EiL saks 45300 Mom trees 27, 115 
Mam trees M 3A&39& op L184 

US TREASURY BONDS tCWm 
£prex1lftO«H* i4 Snda of 100 pcO 

1»22 120-28 -01 699318 
AM9B 1214)1 120-13 120-18 -01 31X31 

Sop98 13040 -01 4146 

D0C98 12042 11M0 1204)2 -01 4758 

Ere. srees 175300 Mon trees 145387 
Monte open M 764394 00 248 

UIIIS GILT (UFFQ • 

• P*» 1 JSnds of 100 pd 

£5S Sjg ,Z1 ' U +0-J4 4235 
MM* 12149 -+0-13 181.197 
JWI9B N.Y. N.T. 10647 +0-13 1398 
Ere-WMs: Ms. Prev, great; 34342 
Prev. open kiL: 1905)0 up 1,239 

CERMAN 60V. BUND (UfW) 
DM2ayw.pteof taopd 

hSS ffr . L^ 89 IS®* * ft15 3®“° 

JM98 N.T. NT. 104X6 +4.15 1,144 
EsLarees: 35448. Pnn.sOec. SUM 
Prev. opontaL: 240177 vp 4357 


Mgb Lav LOksI Chge Qpfap 

18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAm 
FF50Q300 - pts oUOO pcJ 

Morn ioi ji ioi jo 101 jo + ojo yum * 
Jen 90 101.CC 10UU 101.16 +UD 125 
EsL sales: 31912. 

Open Irrfj 136J99 off 2J47. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND OJFFE) 
rn.200ad0an- pts of 100 pd 
Mar 98 116X5 11634 11657 +0X4 11X7® 
Jon 98 11630 11600 11597 +0J4 73 

Ere. sates: 165® Prev. sates: M398 
Prev. open Hj 118342 up U3J 

UBOR 1-MONTH ICMER) 

S3 mBon- pts re 100 pa 
Jam 98 9430 9428 9429 inch. 20639 

Feb 98 9429 9428 9428 unch. 1X750 

Mar 98 9423 one*. 3399 

Eat. erees 4937 Mare sates 4*97 
Mam open btf 38389,00 Z70 

EURODOLLARS ICMER) 

H raBftHhptsof lOO pd 
Feb 98 9421 9420 9420 anch. 6558 

Mar 98 9421 9418 9419 unch. 48&119 

Junes 9421 9417 9418 noth. 396.777 

1310 Sep 98 9417 9413 9414 -031 299946 

3X67 Dec 98 9409 9405 9406 -031 222X17 

X243 Mar 99 9410 9405 9436 4X01 16X758 

3X522 Jun99 9406 9402 9403 4L01 137.138 

1X47 Sap 99 9433 9X99 9400 4X0T 102JB4 

5.127 Dec 99 9198 9X93 9X95 4X01 104247 

UU Mar 00 9400 9X96 9357 4131 74338 

3-732 Jim 00 9X90 9194 9195 4X01 6X567 

1,246 Sep 00 9356 9192 9X94 unch. 53X08 

Est. ides 284986 Mem sates 2KX2D9 
Mom apwi M 2J0MJ77, up 6X08 

BRITISH POUND ICMER) 

623U paunebk S pw paimd 
Mar 98 1X660 1X520 1X612+03052 32J08 
Jan 98 1X546+03056 U15 

Sap 98 1X480+03060 4 

EM. sates 4085 Mam sreea 4564 
Mam open » 3X527. o0 659 

CANADIAN DOLLAR CCMER) 
10Q300do8are.SparCdn. dr 
Morse X992 X973 X9784L0009 565U 

Jun98 X995 X98S X9094UIOO9 1592 

5ep9B -7002 X996 X9974X0009 733 

Est. mas 4678 Mom sates 6241 
Mom open W 60666 00158 

GERMAN MARK ICMER) 

12S300 ants. C per me* 

Mar 78 J667 3636 3659+03016 6X599 

Jim 98 3690 J681 J687+03014 4405 

Sep 98 3712+03016 140 

6sl rates 93U Mom sales 7375 
Mom open bn 76147. op 57 

JAPANESE YEN fCMERI 
123 mOBen jen 5 pw 100 yen 
Mar 98 J833 7751 J825+03045 07,119 

JWI98 J940 -7892 3933+03045 1X64 

Sep 98 3040+03045 TJ72 

Ere sates M30 Mom solas 1 1,188 
Atom open H 96166 00 L280 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

125300 fames, s pw fame 
Mar 98 .7054 -7010 JO4Z+O3016 36737 

Jon 98 Jii2+a«nd ix4i 

Sep 98 .7181+00016 110 

Ere sales 6391 Mom sates 4A9 
AAorn apm Ini 3&29X 00638 

A&EWCAN PESO ICMER) 

506000 ptoos+S per peso 
Mar 98 .11757 .11840 .11840-30688 16405 
Jun 98 .1 1560 .11445 .11445-30745 1265 

Sep 98 .11140 .11100 .11100 tQ074S 4807 
Erf. Mta W19 Mom sales 1196 
Monte open fan 34.998. o0 70 

2-MONTH STERUNG (LIFPEJ 
ESDOOM-phreiMpd 
Mar9S 92X8 92X3 92X7 +034 141378 

Jon 98 9259 9254 7258 +OQ5 10&73 

Sqi9B 92.73 92X8 9272 +034 81050 

DeCtB 7232 9237 92J3J +034 71340 

Mar 99 Till 7337 7111 +CJU ft ew 

Am97 9131 9X26 9131 +004 61079 

Sep 99 93X4 9138 9143 +004 

|re sales 21226 PRisatn: 4X143 - 
Pie*, apwi inL: 691.15* op 3388 


455 

28 

66763 

7,142 

7,344 

1+512 

7373 


6584 

7300 

300 

4 


Previous 


158730 

153530 


175330 

178230 


53230 

54130 


Jan 98 
Fib 98 
Mar 98 
Jan 98 
Sep 98 
□K9B 
Mar 99 
Jun 99 


MMNTH EUfUMARK CUFFS 
DM1 mOton - pis of 100 pa 

96ffl NX 9633 Unch. 17306 
H.Y. N.T. 9621 , +031 TSO 
9625 9623 9624 +601376723 
9614 9611 9613 +002 mta 
9634 9600 9602 +034 241571 
9XB4 KJ9 9X83 +034 mW 
4035SaiO9 
95X7 9SX3 93x7 +03411X422 
Est m Has 86)96 Prm sales: 171376 
Prev. open InU 1.794434 off 7373 

XMONTH P1BOR CMATIP) 

' FF5 mBtan - pteaflM pd 
Jon 98 9635 9634 9634 +031 1x26 

Mar 98 9637 9624 9626 + 031 8IK7 

Jun 98 9616 9613 9613 + 031 s rnS 

KE.5 S^ 04 Mi+in-SS 

Dec 98 9687 9534 9536 + 003 2X718 

Ere srere: 27470 
Opto Mr 2641 89 00 227. 

3-MONTH EUROLIRA (UFFQ 

m. 1 reBto -pis ollOD pd 

Maris 9431 9473 9477 +034 152307 

JmM 95X4 95X0 7543 +03s'mli 

Sep 98 95X0 95X3 95X7 +036 9L9m 

Dec9B 95X8 95X3 95X7 +039 453W 


Wgb Law Latest Oga Optat 

Mar 99 9557 95X8 95-56 +0.09 8R225 

Est Idas: 36686 Piev. sates: 49X77 
Prev. open lot: 5574D3 up 4009 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

50300 lbs.- cuds pwm 
MorW 6834 67.12 67X1 -0.45 42350 

May 98 69X0 68X1 68X9 41X6 16044 

Jul 98 7070 6935 7030 -0.30 14786 

Od» 7X12 71 JS 71.75 4X35 U&3 

Dec 98 7X95 72X0 72X9 4X17 11211 . 

Est sates NA Mom sates 6354 
Mam open M 87302. 00 1.119 

HEATING OIL GNMER) 

42300 gdl cents pw gal 
Jan 98 5135 50 xo 5070 4X45 30375 

Feb W 51 JO 51.10 51.15 4L36 46190 

Mar 98 5130 5135 51X5 -026 19X34 

Apr 98 51 JO 51.15 5135 -021 11,196 

May 98 51X0 5135 51.15 +009 8399 

Jan 98 51 JO 5075 5130 +029 11303 

Jd 98 5175 51X0 51 JO +034 4659 

EsL wdes HA Atom sales 77399 
Mam open biM47X73. up 201 

UGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1300 Ml- dates per ML 
Feb 98 18X5 1020 1833 +001 123325 

Mar 98 18X1 10X0 10X8 4L01 44111 

* 1876 18X0 18X2 4US 24829 

1004 1873 1076 4UB 21X77 

1098 1835 1835 4134 32X54 

1934 1834 1090 4X04 17,976 

Ere totes N A Mom sales 40223 
Mom open bit 404446 a0 26268 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

IO000 mm bars, s per am Mu 
JanVB 13» 1190 2316 4X151 32.770 

Ft* 98 2-300 2.170 2708 4)394 37X65 

Mur 98 2350 6140 6176 4X077 24X63 

AprW 6180 1000 6120 4X067 16033 

May 96 6170 2390 6115 4)350 8.754 

" 2.165 6100 6120 4L020 4948 

NA Mam sales 47.702 


Apr 91 
Mayl 


98 
.'98 
Jan 98 
Jaf98 


r98 
— y98 
Jim 98 
Est. 


Atom apan fait 21 1209. all 4106 
UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 


19X70 

31.178 

16341 

16682 

moo 

8371 

6.759 

3354 


JmiW 55X5 54% 5572 4X41 

M»W 5635 55X5 5572 -032 

Mar 90 56X5 55.70 56.17 4L27 

flC* 5^5 axo 58X2 -0.03 

58.15 58X7 3.07 

Jwi« 58.10 5753 5752 -0.aa 

JI49B 57J3 -082 

Aug 98 5635 5632 4JJ3J 

Est. sates NA Mam sales I9J03 
Mom cwh Int 104186 afl 1300 

GASOIL OPE) 

- ** °> too tans 

islsi 157JS 15875 Unckaao 

IS* 1S8JS 151 ’- 75 +0JS U3 

Mar98 140-50 159.25 1407s Unch. 11X 

A«90 lfflxo 14030 14075 +075 43 

Wj 14075 1413# +050 XA 

JunW 161.00 140J» 14130 -650 1?2 

Jul98 16175 16175 16275 +075 X3 

Bd.'xdWFO^IOO. Prev. setos : 14539 

Prev. epen Inu OU42 up 60t 

BRENT OTLIIPE) 

W. b0,w ■ lota an.000 bonus 
*J->8 1773 +035 7B.S 

/Has J!— ]7 " 34 17X3 +0.05 3971 

JP®* lj-57 17x5 17 JO +034 1 7_T 

fljwj jj-64 17J2 17J6 +0.0 ys a, 

■ftlj J7X9 17J5 17X3 -tin 1 8.7; 

3890 1775 17X4 17X0 +a04 5l| 

Est. sates: 20000 . Prev. tales: 10851 
Pwv. open WL 188734 off 553 


vv-uSsaysgr" 

250xlndK 

KSSSSSSS ts 

S" WWl 

Ett rales HA Mom soles 70599 
Monte apm ini 466744 off 7.796 

PTSE 100 (UFFEJ 

sstaffiMB,. 

sssarafrm- 

CAC4B (MATIF) 

FRM per index point 

SI -5 7*590 2863.0 —1 23 
««0J -123 

"•90 2899J 28833 28853 -1J3 

gO-satet 26641. 

Open InL: 87, 100 up lu. 


Commodity indexes 


sss? 

C«B FUh "= 


Qw 
1X50 JO 
1.76450 
142J7 
231.95 




Previous 
1X5870 
1,74970 
14133 
23177 
.London 
i Ml 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 


RAGE 13 


EUROPE 


London Cheers as Bonuses Arrive Under the City Tree 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — The City of London’s most 
valuable workers will take home about £1 
billion ($1.7 millioa) in bonuses this year — 
a third more than last year — even after a 
wave of mergers and turmoil in Asia shook 
world financial markets. 

“Optimism is high,” said Simon Gee, 
manager of City operations for Robert Half 
International, an executive search firm. “It’s a 
very good time to be in the City right now.” 

Gains from stocks, bonds and currencies, 
together with a shortage of qualified people 
and the rise to prominence of specialist ac- 
tivities like emerging markets means that 
City bonuses and base salaries are rising. If 
markets continue climbing, compensation 
should also keep rising, executive recruiters 
said. 

At the same time, half a dozen recent in- 
dustry mergers mean thousands of City em- 
ployees face finding a pink slip, not a bonus 
check, in die office mail The merger between 
Swiss Bank Corp. and Union Bank of Switzer- 
land, for instance, will result in the elimination 
of 3,000 London jobs, and (he sales of the 
investment banking units of National West- 
minster Bank PLC and Barclays PLC are 
expected to add a few hundred more. 


Still, while jobs will be lost and expenses 
curtailed, the net result of the wave of in- 
dustry transactions has been to increase year- 
end payouts by generating fee income for 
advisers— well in excess of last year’s record 
$1.3 billion according to Philip Healey, Ed- 
itor at Acquisitions Monthly magazine — and 
guaranteed bonuses for many newly trans- 
ferred employees. 

“The reality is that good people always 
cost, 1 * said Robert FI ohr, managing partner at 
Kom/Feny International Hie difference this 
year, he said, is that die spread between the 
‘‘really big earners” and the “pretty big 
earners” is wider than before, with the big 
money increasingly concentrated in the hands 
of a few. 

“Bonuses will be greatly awarding the 
people who are leading and building busi- 
nesses,” Mr. FlohrsaidL “They’ve got to pay 
off guarantees and make die best people 
happy.” 

That includes those who work in emerging 
markets and who racked up big losses after 
Asian stock markets, led by a 54.76 percent 
decline in the Thai stock exchange, tumbled 
in the second half of die year. 

In fact, people working in emerging mar- 
kets are likely to deposit the fattest checks, 


several headhunters said. “A smart insti- 
tution is not going to underpay its emerging 
markets people,”- said Mr. Flohr. “If they 
don't compensate the people taking the risk 
— who have had a good year overall — who 
are they going to get to sit on their Asia desk 
again? If you're committed to the business, 
you’ve got to pay through good times and 
bad.” 

Still, the tendency to pay large lump sums 
is one regulators would prefer to see 
changed. 

“The concern is noi whether bonuses are 
big or small, bat whether the way you re- 
munerate people leads to corruption of in- 
ternal controls,” said Peter Parker, spokes- 
man for the newly formed City regulator, the 
Financial Services Authority. 

The Bank of England has questioned 
whether the promise of stratospheric one- 
time payouts encourages traders to take risks 
they otherwise wouldn't. And in a set of draft 
industry guidelines published in July, the 
Securities and Futures Authority, whose 
functions along with other regulators are be- 
ing taken over by the Financial Services 
Authority, said regulated firms should 
“design, build, and use operating arrange- 
ments with a view to ensuring that they can 


not corrupt the integrity of the firm, or any of 
its systems and controls.” 

That does not mean people are going to 
stop making lots of money, and most of iz in 
one big check, headhunters said. 

Other than those in emerging markets, 
people likely to receive seven-figure checks 
this year are mergers advisers, having done a 
record number of transactions tins year; those 
working on new issues in hot industries like 
telecommunications; experienced senior ana- 
lysts for growing industries, whose numbers 
are in short supply; people working in eso- 
teric areas like emerging market high-yield 
debt and credit derivatives, and asset man- 
agers, headhunters said. 

Another factor driving City bonuses ever- 
higher is the growing equilibrium between 
pay scales as London bankers catch up with 
their counterparts in New York, where sal- 
aries and bonuses traditionally have been 
higher, headhunters said. London has 
emerged as the financial capital of a uniting 
Europe, at the same time that U.S. firms are 
bolstering their staff here and moving more of 
their people to London. 

“All of these Americans come over here, 
and they don’t do it just to sightsee,” Mr. 
Flohrsaid. 


Investor’s Europe 



'J A S O 
1997 


%Ts'ond' 


Czechs 9 Christmas Carp 


By Peter S. Green 

Intenuiiiviiil Herald Tribune 

PRAGUE — It’s Christmas in 
Prague and for a week before the 
traditional Christinas Eve feast, the 
Czech capital takes on the air of a 
Chinese market, as live carp are 
weighed and sold, and often scaled, 
guaed and filleted at street-comer 
fish stands. 

Huge plastic mbs the size of wad- 
ing pools are filled with the 70- 
ceobmeter-long (27-inch) gasping 
and flopping fish. 

“In four days, I sell as many carp 
as I do the whole rest of the year,” 
said Milan Drazdak, director of Ry- 
barstvi Praha A.S. 

Most Czechs have their fish killed 
and cleaned at the stand. But others, 
like Miroslava Pokorua, take their 
carp home alive and let it swim in 
the family bathtub until it is time to 
start cooking. 

“I want my daughter to see it in 
the bathtub,” said Mrs. Pokoma as 
her 7-year-old daughter, Tereza, 
shrank back while her father stuffed 
a slithering 2.5 kilogram <514 
pound) carp into a plastic shopping 
bag. 

Most of the year, the Czech carp 
business is slow and steady, with 
much of the fresh fish sold abroad. 
But come Christmas, Mr. Drazdak 
works around the dock, running a 
network of four dozen fish stands on 
Prague street comers, resupplying 
them twice daily. His company, 
which had a monopoly on carp sales 


during communism, now supplies 
about one-third of the 325,000 fish 
Prague residents are expected to eat 
on Wednesday night. 

Some 250 other street vendors 
buy their fish from Mr. Drazdak or 
straight from fish farms in southern 
Bohemia. 

About 30 million koruny 
($882,000) of Rybaratvi Praha’s an- 
nual turnover comes from selling 
fanned fish, a fourth of the com- 
pany’s revenue, Mr. Drazdak said. 

The rest comes from wholesaling 
more lucrative sea fish, a big hit 
among the nouveau riche of post- 
Cornmunist Prague. 

Czechs have bear fanning earn for 
more than 600 years, ever since local 
nobles began to drain the marshy 
land around Treboo. in southern Bo- 
hemia, and today a vast network of 
canals links about 270 carp ponds. 

Bred in laboratories and then in- 
troduced into ponds where they are 
fed for three years on a mixture of 
com. fish meal and vitamins — 
“everything a carp needs to be 
strong and healthy,” Mr. Drazdak 
said — Che earn are harvested by 
draining the shallow ponds and then 
left for three months in tanks of 
clean water to remove the taste of 
mud from their flesh. 

Czech carp, Mr. Drazdak said, 
fetch premium prices abroad, and 
now he and a group of investors are 
hopring l o. increase^ the ir year-round 
profits and rebuild the Communist- 
era conglomerate of fish ponds, 
maintenance and sales that once 



CARPE DIEM — A street vendor in Prague handling a carp 
Tuesday. Czechs traditionally serve the fish on Christmas Eve. 


provided 13,000 tons of carp an- 
nually 

That makes good business sense 
to Martin Nejedly, a stock analyst at 
the brokers Wood & Co. in Prague. 


“The best would be to merge as 
many thing as possible and cut un- 
necessary administrative costs,” 
Mr. Nejedly said. “You’d get econ- 
omies of stale.” 


Italy Lowers Rates 
As Deficit- Cutting 
Budget Is Cleared 

. Bloomberg News 

ROME — The Bank of Italy cut 
interest rates by 75 basis points 
Tuesday after the Senate approved 
the 1908 budget and its package of 
25 trillion lire ($14.3 billion) in def- 
icit cots. 

The Bank of Italy brought the 
discount rate down to 5.50 percent 
from 6.25 percent and cut its fixed- 
term advances rate to 7 percent from 
7.75 percent The discount rate is the 
lowest rate at which commercial 
banks can borrow money from the 
central bank. 

The governor of the central bank, 
Antonio Fazio, suggested in a 
speech Oct. 31 that he would not cut 
rates until the 1998 budget bill was 
approved by Parliament. The lower 
house gave its approval for the fiscal 
package Friday, and the Senate 
cleared it Tuesday. 

The most recent Italian inflation 
data, p reliminar y estimates for this 
month, showed consumer prices un- 
changed from November and 1.5 
percent higher than a year ago, in 
line with government targets. 

Italy’s interest rates, however, are 
still among the highest in the Euro- 
pean Union and are close to a full 
percentage point higher than die 
benchmark German rate. If Italy is 
to participate in European monetary 
union at its planned outset in Janu- 
ary 1999, its rates must drop to 
levels approaching Germany ’s. 


'j&dhengfry-- 

ArosteRjam : 

AEX . » "• ; 

•Tuesday 
• . Oosa 

= Print. ... 
Gk/so : 
87949 

% 

Zhsngs 

+aei 

I'flnUtett'-' 

BEL-2Q - • C. 

■ -.Z&M 

2,454.34 

-256 

RauHtat / 

.DfiX. 

4,043,02 

4/384. 7S 

-f.02 

Coper^tagen Stock Market . 

writ 

648.81 

-0^1 

HetaJnki - 

HEX General 

. 3^10J97 

3.156.57 

+1.72 

Osfo . ■ ■ 

OBX ■; 

WS30 

658.21 ; 

-1^2 

London • 

FTSE100- 

.. s^iaao 

5,02020 


Madrid- 

Stodc6o*arige 

61156 

614.34 

■KJ.10 

mm 

MtBTEL 

16168 

15931 

+1.49 

•Parte • .. 

GAC40 ■ 

2£6&73 

2.852^0 

+1.66 

StocStoeton : 

• SX 16 

3^94.86 

3,080.06 

+0.46 

Vienna 

ATX . 

1^4736 

1,249.97 

-0.16 

Zurich • 

spf 

. 3,770.40 

3,738^4 

+0.86 

Source: TeJekurs 


linunamul HctjW Tnhuoe 

Very briefly: 


• Lloyds TSB Group PLC agreed to sell its International 
Factors unit, which offers collection and invoice discounting 
services to small and medium-sized companies, to Bank of New 
York Corp. It did not disclose the price but said it would have 
a pretax profit on the sale of £160 million ($266 million). 

• The European Commission cleared the proposed takeover 
of Mercury Asset Management Group PLC, a British fund 
manager, by Merrill Lynch & Co. of the United States. 

• Reckitt & Colman PLC will buy four U.S. household- 
products brands, including Spray *n’ Wash and Glass Plus, 
from S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. for S 160 million to try to bolster 
its position in the market for fabric and glass cleaners. 

• Zurich Insurance Co: and BAT Industries PLC agreed on 
final terms for the Swiss insurer's purchase of the British 
company's financial-services units for about $18.7 billion in 
stock, securities and assumed debt. 

• Volkswagen AG denied a published report that there had 
been delays in the production of new Beetle and Golf models. 
The German carmaker said production of the Beetle began last 
week in Mexico. 

• Remy Cointreau, a French drinks company, declined to 
comment on speculation that it could be a takeover target for 
Pernod Ricard SA. But it said any takeover offer would have to 
he friendly and win the approval of die Heriaid-Dubreuil family, 
which controls 62 percent of Remy Cointreau. 

•Amalgamated Beverage Industries Ltd., South Africa’s 
biggest Coca-Cola bottler, agreed to boy the business of 
S uncrush Ltd., a smaller bottler, for 1.89 billion rand <$389 
million). 

• Sears PLC sold its Shoe City chain to Brantano NV, a 
Belgian footwear retailer, as part of the British retailer's 
reorganization plan. Sears will sell 44 stores to Brantano and 
close 39 shops, at a total cost of £27 million ($44.9 million). 

• British manufacturers’ investment fell 4.4 percent in the 
third quarter from the previous quarter but was up 20 percent 
from a year earlier. 

• Telecom Italia SpA plans to charge customers using its new 

Digital European Cordless Telephone service a fee of 170 lire 
( 1 0 cents) pins value-added tax per minnte. The service, which 
gives cordless phones citywide range, is to be launched in 28 
Italian cities Jan. 1 . Bloomberg, Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Lm Oos* Pra*. 


1 


4 



Tuesday, Dec. 23 

Price* in locol currencies. 
TeMurs 

Ugh Lew dew Pm* 
Amsterdam uxum mx 

WWWiKR 


¥ 


ABM -AMRO 
Aegon 

aSm 

AtoNcbri 

towaon 

CSMcm 

OoflfcdwPrt 

SL 

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HDOOOMSSCM 
Hum Donate 

W* 

UNPBT 

ST 



S3? 

VNU 

WDBnKICM 


39.30 
177 JO 
0*0 

22XTO 

6SJ0 

31.30 
07.90 
1WJ0 
101 JO 
3140 

87 

65 

5070 

84 

OOJ» 

83 

7180 

sun 

75 

4570 

■W0 

wn 

60JK 

225 

1214 

W-50 

. » 
18MQ 
57 
173 
121 
108 
120.10 
108 
SSJO 
257 JO 


3740 

174 

51 JO 
323 
6380 
3070 
87 JO 
KB 
17X50 
32 
8530 

44.10 
49 

82.10 
X&30 
8740 
7150 
81 JO 
7X70 
4420 
7X30 
4340 
59 JO 
21140 
11520 

95 

7450 

183 

5X80 

17220 

170.70 
10420 

118.70 
10140 

54 

75320 


3740 3820 
17420 175.90 

51.90 52 
334J5D W w 

4470 64J0 
3070 3120 
8820 84.90 

105.10 WSJ0 

17820 179 

33 32.50 
8130 8520 
(430 4480 
4920 5030 
8220 _ S3 
33820 34QJ0 
83 B2J0 
72 72 

81.90 8220 

7450 74 

45 JO 4320 
7820 8020 
*120 44 

6020 4020 

220 22240 

114.10 11920 

95 97 

75 » 

183 183 

S 7 57 

17220 172 

120-70 171 

10720 10720 
118.70 11920 
107 10420 
Sd-B0 £440 
25320 237 JD 


Bangkok 

Mr Mo fee 
Bangkok Bi,F 

BS& 

Steal Cow BAP 
TeteanaUa 

JSSBr F 


HUh 

Atona 11820 

AraCrirata 17120 
BJiBeSn ,4D 

BASF _ 4125 

Beyw Hypo 8k 8925 
BarAmrabank 11920 
Bayer 4325 

Bdmda rf 75 

Bewog 5X30 

BMW 1742 

Commerzbank 7520 
Daimler BflfiZ 12X95 
Degussa 87J0 

Deutvte Bank 1*4 
DedTetetaw 32 

RSa"* =83 

FcesoHusMed 11920 

MS - "ft 

HEW 442 

HodiHef 74 

Heeds! 5920 

tostodf JU 
U*wyer 7X50 
LJnSe 1075 

LufthansoR 3X10 
MAN 503 

BW — ■ _ 194 
Metofloeaftetaff 33 
Metro 45 

MundlRueCkR 655 

ST* 9X80 

SAP 531 

SGLcSjon 23020 
ISSlAwi) 1W 

Suedzuetaf B§5 

JEET ™ 

VEW 590 

S3U« "W 


Law dose Pm. 


Ili65 1T7 
149 171 

3920 3920 
4070 41.10 
88 I8J0 
11820 11820 
4225 5X2fl 
73 7S 
51 JO 5220 
1234 1239 
7110 7390 
imo 12020 

8420 8420 
12X70 12 195 
31J0 3120 
8120 83 

300 30450 
119 119 

31420 31620 
93 9320 
126.10 12410 
109 JO 111 

442 442 

6420 74 

59 AS 59 JO 
409 409 

7220 73 

1057 1058 

32J0 32J0 
495 502.70 
8BS2D 889 
3120 3X25 
ass 63JS 
648 655 

510 528 

91 92 

514 OB 
17X90 173.90 
226 230 

101 JO 102.15 
1260 1260 
870 882 

378 37950 
119.35 11995 
990 590 

982 987 

957 949 


11725 
147 
40.15 
59J0 
8*20 
11720 
60 
7280 
5X20 
1212 
7220 
11130 
B5 
12410 
31 JS 
81.10 
303 
11820 
316J0 
9470 
12520 
108 
462 
7020 
5BJ0 
610 
72 
1050 
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493 
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31 
4175 
652 
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91 JO 
508L20 
17X80 
228 
10025 
1290 
877 
37520 
11510 
570 
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230 230 230 

117 119 125 

9.70 9 JO 1075 

394 402 394 

358 372 W8 

48 4875 5220 

920 ABC 9 JO 9 JO 

49J5 47.7S 48.75 <820 

95 89 90 95 

1920 Tt 1920 1920 


7M 

123 

1050 

402 

380 

5020 


Bombay 


ferem 30 Mo; 3641,11 
Preteas: 341434 


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92 88.75 8975 8473 |7/yin 

42158 617 62® dio nong lujng 

27325 M3 24720 240 

IS 14320 144 143 

04.25 232 23430 23075 

W 9.75 975 975 

787 78)25 2*3 284 


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CuOwy Podflc 540 


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1870 1790 1800 1850 

4690 6500 4550 4440 

9770 9S80 9440 9570 

34» 3325 MAS MO 
18200 I29B0 IMS 17*» 
IBIS 1780 1W UK 
8500 &160 8478 8420 

zoo 330 £5 

7630 7SW 7CT TflO 

1700 1670 1670 12W 

5420 5320 5360 5400 

16175 15975 15975 16025 
15725 15400 154» 15M0 
Ur» 1373® 73*® 7£» 

5330 5350 5380 5M 

10300 9940 10050 10W 
BBC 3340 3300 3355 

729S HIS 2» ^0 
3J2S 3300 3205 3205 

174000 HMtf IMS WSW 


21 X 

4X40 

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905 87X42 9® 

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40.70 42-30 

29.» 3040 
18JD 19.10 
3JB 160 
1035 1035 
70S 7X25 
570 6X6 

JAM 3530 
14 1X45 
28.15 28,70 
U4S 15.15 
173 IS 
IBS 186 
4570 47.10 
1485 15 

2130 21S 
12S 12-95 
2490 7415 
173 123 

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430 433 

5.10 535 
3970 4040 
16JD5 17J5 
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42 41S 42 41S 

210 206 210 an 

S3 SOS 53 5070 
84 8X30 84 83S 

29 28.10 JBBO XJ 
12490 121 12470 12120 

4LB0 40 4QS 3980 
132S 129 I32S 1*3.10 

377 364 370 376 

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19J5 2030 
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3X05 3105 
4150 4175 
720 7JS 
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1.99 138 

10J0 10.10 
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9.05 490 

U4 370 
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3175 2950 
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BAA 493 

Bontors ■ 1415 


BATInd 
BonkScoriand 
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BPB tad 
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BrtUteM 

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972 

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576 

338 

935 

873 

138 

1497 

541 

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493 

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BrH Steel IS 

Bril Telecom 479 
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BwrahCUloi IDS 
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CoNtWStess ■ 533 
CadtanSCw 420 
CBrikmCoron 454 
Corsmii Unton 8S 

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GKN 12-65 

GtaB«Mknw 1490 
GmudaGp 925 
G RE 

GrewofcCp 
GUS 
Han 

HSBCHUp 
K3 

tenplTaioaa 


542 

114 


825 

135 


435 
BJ3 823 


2J1 2J1 

524 Ml 


Jakarta 


Arfmma 

Bk InHInOon 

fikNcgots 

CutongCRn 

IlHtoenwnt 

mfcfaod 

Mdagal 

SaropowaHM 
Semen G«s*. 
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1500 1459 1450 1475 

JK 350 425 375 

603 500 575 S9 

8100 3059 *350 8075 

1850 1750 1800 1475 

1950 1W0 1«0 1»0 

97S0 9475 9475 9400 
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326 

435 

727 

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273 

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AMBB 197 195. HI 1« l*g 

AfBd» 23070 230 W 2»® 

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582 

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Pn»Jenl«l 

Raj8roekGp 

Rank Croup 

Reckflt Cota 

R*facd 

Reerilnl 

ROTteUtaCar 

RmsenHdgi 


Kuala Lumpur 


JJP 7.92 

1020 10.50 

920 9 JO 
5J0 

9 825 

X72 190 

123 1J9 

Stop. Susp. 
450 645 

3120 3X50 
146 344 

IX® 1120 
4S5 490 


Kir ms 
RMCGroop 
Rofa Royce 
toy* 8* Scot 
RrrraifcSaiAl 
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Sofcsbory 
Sdraders 
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SaJPiwer 
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SnBti Nephew 

SmBhKlne 

SfflStesM 

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Stand Charter 

TateXLUe 

Tesco 

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Toraktas 

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Ukl Assurance 

UHKeea 

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Vendorae Lxirts 


WWbread 
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WPP Gawp 
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418 

407 

417 

407 

729 

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252 

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429 

432 

424 

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133 

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129 

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427 

423 

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424 

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128 

129 

620 

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4.19 

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455 

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494 

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171 

897 

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480 

428 

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2.90 

2.96 

492 

484 

418 

488 

522 

520 

520 

524 

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7X15 

780 

741 

744 

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480 

475 

475 

470 

453 

429 

449 

438 

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138 

124 

130 

140 

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115X30 

11450 

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25050 

24450 

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ACESA 

Agoas Braxton 


1411 

927 


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BcoPoputor 
Bco Santander 
CEPSA 
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524 527 525 


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940 9J4 945 


845 

135 


1442 1472 1485 
5J7 5L59 457 

174 277 275 

62B 478 444 

750 7.96 758 
437 443 

128 129 

448 470 

1J7 1J0 _ 

9.97 1022 10L10 
121 122 124 

528 521 520 

402 414 420 

453 


FSCSA 
GasNaturd 
IBertroto 

KmrtOl 

SwfcnflSOT 
Tobgctera 
TMtraten 
Unroii Fenou 
VOteDcCeawta 


22400 21990 
1975 1925 
4380 6700 
9310 9150 
467S 4S7S 
1495 1470 

8400 J17D 
3470 3405 
7OT60 J0110 
4620 4SS0 
4700 4660 

2795 2745 

3920 3840 

2B20 2760 
UX 1730 
7810 7700 
1990 1955 

2215 2170 

4440 6360 
1415 1390 
1J100 11820 
4475 4420 

14* 1420 
5930 2BSS 


41451 
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22160 71970 
1945 1955 
626 0 6270 

9210 9150 

4635 4625 

8320 8300 

3425 3445 
70750 7D1.H 
4610 4560 
4660 4660 

2745 2710 

3890 3835 

2775 Z795 

1235 1M 
7770 7700 
1980 1945 
1190 2145 

6380 6420 

1395 1395 
11890 11950 
4435 oas 

1430 1435 
2930 2915 


X44 

1X1 

W 

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XS9 
725 724 


2.93 

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440 424 420 

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184 3J9 184 

12 12J3 1134 
14.12 1423 14.17 
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475 633 475 

7.15 721 722 

7 JO 7.98 746 
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920 920 921 

3J6 192 X94 

825 && ass 
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82 84 

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50.10 49.10 49.90 5000 
2240 2220 2270 23 JO 
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1748 17.«6 1722 1740 
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5240 5040 5220 5120 
104 2.99 103 2.99 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 3100 

3630 3X70 3470 3U0 
15000 14820 14820 15150 
2120 2X90 21.15 2170 



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172 

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861 

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410 

395 

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308 306.20 

315 


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324 327.70 323-50 

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848 

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550 

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12300 11 BOO 11800 12*00 
5710 5710 5710 6200 

15300 14600 14600 15600 
3800 3640 3640 3950 

18100 15600 15600 16900 
31600 43300 43300 47000 
32000 28600 28600 31000 
41400 381 DO 38100 41400 
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tataOOO 386500 3845N 420000 


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539 

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27930 

273 

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3J0 

X70 

180 

369 

30X11 


29 JO 

29.19 

1749 

1729- 

1749 

1727 

1130 

11.12 

1147 

11 

745 

724 

740 

VJO 

649 

us 

6-36 

420 

XU 

492 

5X0 

5.08 

230 

£86 

190 

2J6 

241 

£32 

2J2 

£33 

1025 

KL0 

1050 

1049 

2930 

»Jl 

29.13 

tan 

an 

0.95 

OSS 

aw 

7069 

3040 

2064 

2022 

225 

235 

224 

£40 

UO 

£03 

829 

7.94 

3.13 

3XU 

3.12 

3X0 

413 

196 

408 

3.95 

669 

462 

649 

457 

1729 

1650 

1727 

1X80 

B72 

835 

B69 

838 

5J08 

5 

5JD8 

492 

964 

945 

943 

9-a 

1030 

1037 

1040 

l£fl 

497 

481 

495 

480 


The Trfb Index 


Pncos as of 3.00 PM. New York time. 

year to date 
% changs 

+ 13.11 


-24.70 
+ 17.46 
+ 31.90 
+ 24.98 

+ 18.89 
+ 2723 
+ 12.32 
+ 350 
— 10.45 
-7.61 
+ 24.33 
+ 14.81 

The International Herald Tribune World Stock Max C tracks tfw U S. teftir value 
Of 280 ksemabonaPy mvestable stocks Imm 3S countries. For more information, 
a tme booklet is avaiaoia by rutting to The Trto tn&x. 1B1 Avenue Cfwitas de 
GauBe, 92521 NeuiBy CaOex. France. Corapjtad by Bloomberg Mows. 


Jan. 1. 1992= too 

Level 

Chang* 

%change 

World Index 

168.70 

+ 0.49 

+ 029 

Rogfonal Indaxus 

Asia/Pacific 

92.94 

+ 0.95 

+ 1.03 

Europe 

18955 

. +0.47 

+ 025 

A I. America 

21354 

+ 0.19 

+ 059 

S. America 

143.01 

+ 0.11 

+ 0.08 

InduairW Indwros 

Capital goods 

20320 

- 1.10 

-054 

Consumer goods 

20528 

+ 052 

+ 0.40 

Energy 

191.74 

+ 154 

+ 0.65 

Finance 

12054 

+ 028 

+ 023 

Msoettaneoie 

14455 

+ 151 

+ 0.91 

Row Materials 

162.04 

+ 254 

+ 1.78 

Service 

170.73 

+ 053 

+ 0.37 

UtUMea 

164.71 

+ 051 

+ 0.49 


Taipei 


Camay Lte ins 
OwngHiMa Bfc 
CMaoiTung BJt 
Chtno Devela mt 
Ctdra Steel 
Fieri Brak 
FomosaPmSte 
HootenBk 
IrSIComm Bk 
Non Yd Plastics 
SMn Kang Life 
Taiwan Semi 
Tatung 

LfW Were Elec 
Wi Worid CWn 


Hlgb 

Low 

Oose 

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Stock MroWItaeKi 803X31 
PrateaKBlMJn 

14740 

U4 

144 

146 

IDO 

95 

95 

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a 

68 

68 

69 

91 JO 

90 

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9050 

2450 

24 

24 

7479 

97 

94 

9430 

9550 

4230 

to 

61 

a 

9930 

96 

9X50 

98 

61 

SB 

5830 

60 

57 

55 


56 

106 

111? 

102 

105 

112 

109 

109 

1DP 

34 

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35.10 

35JU 

6430 

63 

43 

43 

6230 

6130 

62 

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. iCdaA . 
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TaHsrooii Eny 
TeckB 
TtegJobf 
Trios 
Thaman 
TorOomBank 
Trafttatea 
TransCda Pipe 
TriankHri 
Triaec Harin 
TVXGoto 
WoriasaJ Eny 
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1 

44.15 

4335 

44 

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2570 

2570 

2190 

1 

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64.15 

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425 

417 

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120 

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Market Closed 

The Tokyo stock market 
esday forahol- 


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was closed Tuc 
iday. 


Toronto 


TSE Intoriftuts: 4S76J8 
PtMDOS; 6584J8 


Vienna 


ATX todet 126220 

r' 


PreteOS; 124736 

Bonk Austria 

434 

630 

634 

631 

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Boelrier-Uadeh 

720 

710 

716 

710 

CiHSlnrnJPW 

686 

480 

487 

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3290 

3215 

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1570 

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DMV 

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176950 

499 50150 
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1705 

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1240 

1137 

1240 

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465 

457 

461 

453 


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2469 

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AndaoraEite 14.10 
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Bk Nora Sate &5h 
BarickGoW 2620 
BCE 48 

BCTeteconun 4120 
Sbcftem Pfiamt 3190 
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45.10 
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31 W 
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3720 
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EuraNnMng 19J0 
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320 

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2-55 

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371 

332 

335 

170 

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621 

5.95 

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5.98 

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179 

138 

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Retch Oi Paper 

2.13 

2XQ 

113 

JXW 

Ura Hatton 

191 

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390 

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830 

7 M 

730 

830 

Wlson Horton 

1020 

1020 

1020 

1020 


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SPIIrolBe 3749X79 
PnNtaK: 377X48 


325 

1X10 

19 




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24.90 

6480 

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Laewen Group 319$ 

Moon! Bid) 15.10 

Mam mi A 90 w 

I1J5 
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Maya M l 
Wnhcmex 

Moore 

NsoMdnNel 51 U 
totwJdlnc 2480 


Horan Energy 
NthMiTdecon 
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On 

PoncdnPeftn 
Pete Cda 
Racer Doree 
PooaPeta 
Potash Saik 


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125 
1145 
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261 
17 JO 
1230 
11920 


Renataance 3M 

Rio Atgasi 341* 

Rogers Contel 8 1345 



CT 

















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 


PAGE 15 



ASIA/PACIFIC 


Chaebol Reform: Like Redoing the Whole Economy 


Investor’s Asia 


By Steven Mufson 

Wuihmgton Post Service 




hn t5 


SEOUL — Among the 300 VEP 
guests flown in from around the 
world to celebrate the opening of 
Halla Group's state-of-the-art 
shipyard in February 1996, there 
was no premonition that within 20 
months, the giant South Korean con- 
glomerate would run aground. 

Instead, the event seemed the cap- 
stone of a classic South Korean rqgs- 
lo- riches tale for Chung In Y ung, the 
partly paralyzed chairman who ran 
away from his poor countryside 
home as a teenager in the 1930s, 
lived through two warn, made- his 
fortune and overcame a stroke in 
1989 that left him in a wheelchair. 

Owning a shipyard was one of Mr. 
Chung's long-cherished dreams, 
and its opening also seemed a tribute 
to the might of the South Korean 
conglomerates known as chaebol. 

Twenty months later, capsized by 
debts totaling 30 times Its equity, 
Halla Group, South Korea’s 12th- 


|\ Halla Group, South Korea s 12th- 

noils m l^osnia 

shrovard. Mr. Ch one’s storv is still a 


Dec. 6 and is trying to. sell the 
shipyard. Mr. Chung’s story is still a 
classic South Korean tale, but one 
rewritten for a new, troubled era: a 


tale of blind ambition, the unbridled 
power of corporate chairmen and the 
unchecked, debt-driven spending 
habits of these conglomerates. 

For 40 years, chaebol such as 
Halla have been the engines of Soath 
Korea’s economic miracle and cozy 
partners with the government, which 
protected their home markets, lim- 
ited competition and doled out gov- 
ernment contracts. In the early 1990s. 
the combined revenue of the top 10 
chaebol equaled three-quarters of the 
country’s gross national product. 

But these economic engines have 
seized up. Eight of South Korea's 
top 30 chaebol have declared bank- 
ruptcy in the past year. Suddenly itis 
dear that the huge conglomerates 
had run amok, relentlessly seeking 
bigger market shares and borrowing 
money without regard to profits, 
cash flow or potential failure. 

' ‘We believed that the big compa- 
nies would never go bankrupt,” said 
S.Y. Yoon, executive director of 
Ssangyong Engineering Co., a unit of 
the country’s sixth -big ge st chaebol. 

No longer. After years of delay, 
the country finally must overhaul the 
chaebol. The International Monetary 
Fund, as a condition for its S57 bil- 
lion assistance package to South 


- Korea, insists that the country .re- 
vamp the lending guidelines and cor- 
porate-governance laws that allowed 
these conglomerates to be run as 
their founders' personal fiefdoms. 

The team advising President- 
elect Kim Dae Jung says it is ready. 
A longtime dissident and opposition 
member, Mr: Kim has few ties to the 
conglomerate chieftains. 

“The chaebol operated behind 
closed doors, they had the govern- 
ment’s power, and they could 1 do 
whatever they wanted with the fi- 
nancial system,' ' said Kim Won Gil, 
an economic adviser to the pres- 
ident-elect. When it comes to their 
survival now, Mr. Kim said, “we. 
will leave it to the markeL” 

But with corporate empires at 
stake, Kun Geun Tae, a national as- 
semblyman and ally of the president- 
elect, predicted, “The resistance of 
the chaebol will be fierce. ” 

Reforming the deeply entrenched 
chaebol means reforming the entire 
economy. After the Korean War, the 
government picked businesses to 
help mobilize the devastated econ- 
omy, The model was Japan’s keiretsu 
system of corporate alliances. The 
Seoul government awarded protected 
franchises and allocated cheap crediL 


In return, the chaebol built new in- 
dustries. Per-capita income climbed 
from $60 a year at the end of the war 
in 1953 to $10,000 last year. 

“ft went like gangbusters,’’ said 
Robert Felton, a director of McKin- 
sey Inc., an international marketing 
consulting firm, in Seoul. “I'm an 
admirer of The chaebol as a devel- 
opmental model, when you're flat 
on your back.” 

But by the late 1980s, the system 
was not working. Years of cheap 
loans meant that companies di.d not 
Use money wisely. . Productivity 
lagged. Unions began to demand, 
and get, bigger pay increases. Cor- 
rupt relations with the government 
produced wasteful projects and huge 
political slush funds. Bonks, heavily 
influenced by the government, were 
little more than cash boxes. 

Later,' chaebol were allowed to 
open their own banks,' which they 
called “cash windows.”. ■ 

When Halla went bankrupt, it had 
a debt-to-equity ratio of more than 
3,000 percent, about 30 to 60 times 
what would be considered an ex- 
cessive level in the United States. 
Ever since his stroke in 1989, Mr. 
Chung had been in a hurry to make 
his company as big as possible to 


Tokyo Brokerage Fails as Lending Tightens 



CMBpOtdtvOurSuffFma Dapatchrs 

TOKYO — Maruso Securities Co., a medium-sized 
Japanese brokerage, filed for voluntary bankruptcy 
Tuesday after it was unable to obtain new loans amid a 
worsening credit crunch. 


The privately held brokerage has 44.5 billion yen 
343.6 million) in debt, the company said. It was the 


($343.6 million) in debt, the company said. It was the 
fifth Japanese brokerage to collapse this year, after 
Ogawa Securities Co., Echigo Securities Co., Sanyo 
Securities Co. and Yamaichi Securities Co. 

The company west bankrupt because of “losses in 
derivatives trading, including Latin American bonds,” 
Chairman Masahisa Hayashi said. 

Maruso, capitalized at 1.36 billion yen. could not 


raise funds because Japan's banks were dbliugout fewer 
loans in order to meet capital requirements. The banks. 


Apn-r Fnncr-Pime 

Mr. Hayashi announcing 
Jf j the bankruptcy Tuesday. 


loans in order to meet capital requirements. The banks, 
many of which bad their credit ratings lowered, are also 
paying more to borrow money at home and overseas and 
passing those costs on to their clients. 

The credit crunch threatens to choke the economy and 
cut into profits by forcing companies to slash spending. 

On Monday, the Japanese government temporarily 
shelved plans to impose even stricter lending and capita] 
requirements on financial institutions. Finance Minister 
Hiroshi Mitsuzuka said the government woald abandon 


.for now its proposal for a tighter bank-supervision 
system that it had planned to adopt in April. 

Finance Ministry officials are now urging banks to 
continue supporting businesses even though they may not 
meet the requirements of the tougher credit standards. 

The proposed guidelines had called for harsh pun- 
ishments, including business suspensions or even clo- 
sures for banks whose lending practices woe judged to 
be too lax. 

But under pressure from Prime Minister Ryu taro 
Hashimoto, finance officials met Monday to devise more 
flexible lending guidelines. Mr. Mitsuzuka is expected to 
announce die softened guidelines Wednesday. 

Ministry officials said their retreat from the initial 
proposal was only temporary and that they would tight- 
en lending standards again once Japan’s economy re- 
gained its strength. 

Maruso 's problems stemmed not from loans to Jap- 
anese companies but from the 1995 Mexican currency 
crisis. The brokerage had sold financial instruments 
based on Mexican government bonds with repurchase 
agreements, the financial daily Nihon Keizai said. 

After the instruments developed latent losses, the 
company was forced to buy them back under those 
repurchase agreements. (Bloomberg, Reuters. WP) 


rival Hyundai Group, which was 
headed by his brother. For several 
years. Halla’s revenue grew at 40 
percent annually. 

“We didn’t do planning," a 
former executive said. “We carried 
out his ideas.” In addition to the 
shipyard and a profitable auto-parts 
business, Halla expanded into re- 
sorts, paper mills and other man- 
ufacturing. 

Mr. Chung was not unique. Al- 
most every chaebol chairman had 
his own pet project or passion. 

Ssangyong Group's chairman, 
M.P. Kim, is a “car maniac,' ’ say 
people who know him. He once 
owned 20 cars, including a Jaguar. 
BMW, Mercedes, Lotus and Lam- 
borghini- So he jumped into the 
crowded South Korean car market, 
which already had three giant play- 
era — Hyundai. Daewoo Group and 
Kia Group — and two smaller ones. 
Ssangyong owned a small maker of 
fibre engines and dump trucks, but it 
had neither car designs nor a sales 
network. The company invested $4 
billion to design two passenger 
models — a four-wheel-drive jeep 
and a car called the Chairman. 

The business lost money. This 
month, Ssangyong sold its plant to 
Daewoo, which plans to cut costs by 
using its own distribution network. 
Daewoo did not pay Ssangyong a 
penny. It took over about 60percent 
of the plant’s staggering debt, which 
still left Ssangyong with debts of 
$850 million. 

It was typical of a chaebol that 
costly investments might have little 
to do with its core businesses. Sam- 
sung Group, despite fierce compe- 
tition in its core business of making 
dynamic random-access memory 


Hong. Kong 
Hang Seng 
16500 rtf 
15000V 

13500 » \ 

12000 
10500 

9000 . . B „ 


Singapore 

Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 


J A S O N 0 
1997 


J A S O N D 
1997 


'j A SON 
1997 


Exchange Index ' 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 
Singapore .Straits Tiroes 
Sydney ' . ABOnSnaries 
Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 


Bangkok 

Seoul 


Tuesday Prev. ' % 
Close Close -Change 
10,368.10 '10,172.47 +198 
1,53631 1,541.65 -035 

2£5&90 2,503.40 +?-22 
dosed 14.799.40 - 

556 ^5 569.83 *2-37 

3S&87 376.95 -2.67 

3653 6 396.06 >7.5 0 

8,03831 8.104.03 -0.81 


Closed 

556JS 

'miff 


569.83 

376.95 


Manna 

Jakarta 

Wellington 

Bombay 

Source; Teiekurs 


SET 366,87 376.95 -2-67 

Composite Index 366.36 396.06 -7-50 

Stock Market Index S.dsLil 8.104.03 -0.81 
PSE 1^55.66 1,887.18 -1.67 

Composite index 397.03 385.85 +2.90 

MZSE-40 -2)227.20 2.300-62 -3.19 

Sensitive Index 3,641.11 3,616.34 +0.68 


3,616.34 +0.68} 

InL-rruUnnal HcfakJTnhunr 


Very briefly: 


chips for personal computers, is 
sinking billions of dollars into the 


sinking billions of dollars into the 
auto business. 

"These corporations were locked 
into competition for larger market 
share,” said Park Yung Chill of the 
Korea Institute of Finance. “If one 
entered the steel industry, all the oth- 
ers would uy to do the same thing." 

Chaebol projects also often were 
linked with politics. President Kim 
Young Sam approved Samsung Elec- 
tronics' entry into the automobile 
business on condition that it put its 
plant in Pusan, Mr. Kim’s home base. 
When the plant opens. South Korea’s 
passenger-car production capacity 
will exceed its domestic demand by 
more than a million cars a year. 


• China's automobile sales stalled in November, showing a 
rise of only 0.5 percent from a year earlier, to 129,000 units. 
Production was up 6.2 percent, to 135,600 units, leading to a 
16 percent increase in unsold vehicles. 

• Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. plans to combine its two 
classes of stock and make a bonus issue of one new share for 
every 10 shares held. It will also award holders of its foreign 
stock, which trades at a premium to its local shares, an ad- 
ditional 1 .6 shares for every 10 shares held. 

• IBM Japan Ltd-, a unit of International Business Machines 
Corp„ will operate Daiwa Bank Ltd.’s computer systems, 
making Daiwa die first major Japanese banking concern to hire 
another company to handle information technology. . 

• Bankers Trust New York Corp. advised Delifrance Asia 
Ltd-’s minority shareholders to accept an offer by Sembawang 
Corp. to buy 5 1 percent of the French bakery chain, saying the 
company’s share price could drop after the "offer expired. 

• China will begin scrapping bank lending quotas next year as 
part of a financial reform spurred by the Asian currency crisis, 
the People's Daily newspaper reported. 


• Hong Kong’s consumer-price inflation rate fell to 5.1 
percent in November from 5.5 percent in October. The corn- 


percent in November from 5.5 percent in October. The com- 
posite price index showed a year-on-year increase of 5.4 
percent last month, down from 5.7 percent in October. 

• United Microelectronics Corp., the second-largest chip 
foundry in the world, expects its net profit to rise 6.6 percent 
next year, to 10.02 billion Taiwan dollars ($307.4 million). 


• ICI Australia Ltd. will buy Imperial Chemical Industries 
PLC’s explosives businesses in the United States and Europe 
fOT $370 million. Bloomberg. Reuters 


^Bad Crop Forces Indonesia to Import Rice 


* The Associated Press 

JAKARTA — Indonesia ordered 
100,000 tons of imported rice this year 
because of a shortage in domestic pro- 
duction caused by drought and harvest 
r failure, the government said Tuesday. . 

~ w About 50,000 tons of rice have ar- 
7^’ -Thrived from Thailand and Vietnam, and 
I t/P' "**' J "' another 50,000 tons are expected by the 

W lend of this month, said Beddu Aiming, 

fhead of the national logistics agency, 
‘jBulog. 

^r* ‘ “ We will have to import several hun- 

r ired thousands tons of husked rice next 

/ear to prevent a price increase,” the 
rfficial Antara news agency quoted him 
* is having said Monday. 

f. The government said shipments 

| ^^^vouid be ordered next year from 

ItTT- j* ^B’aki.stan, China and India. 


Mr. Amang said the country’s rice 
stock currently stood at 1 .6 million tons, 
down from 2.2 million tons last month. 

President Suharto has ordered the 
agency to try to curb further increases in 
the price of rice, which rose 75 percent 
in November. 

This month. Food Minister Ibrahim 
Hasan said the government had alloc- 
ated nearly I trillion rupiahs ($1% mil- 
lion) to finance rice and sugar imports 
ahead of expected shortages in Feb- 
ruary. 

The weather phenomenon El Nino 
has been called a major cause of an 
extended dry season in Indonesia this 
year. The Agriculture Ministry said at 
least 450,000 hectares (1.1 million 


I 



LUXURY: Design ers Seek Other Markets 


Continued from Page I 


two-thirds of the economy has tradi- 
tionally been based on consumer spend- 
ing. Sales in luxury stores throughout 
the rest of Asia have been spotty to 
downright miserable over the past few 
months, and the carnage is visible. 

Shares of Gucci Group NV, which 
were trading at $39.1875 on the New 
York Stock Exchange late Tuesday, 
down 68.75 cents, are nowhere near 
their high of $73 reached in June. 

The picture is similar fra- LVMH 
Moet Hennessy-Louis Vuitton SA, the 


largest luxury-products company in the 
world, as it is for Dickson Concepts, a 


acres) of paddy fields were damaged by 
drought from July to November. 


Km Ik Hwin/Apncc Francc-Pressc 

Seoul residents lining up at the Foreign Exchange Bank of Korea on 
Tuesday to sell U.S. dollars as the won reached another historic low. 


FORECAST: 

Profits in Question 

Continued from Page 11 


KOREA: Seoul Fights a Big Debt Crunch 


Continued from Page 1 




tk investment policy committee at 
loIdinaQ Sachs & Co., remains upbeat. 
Ws. Cohen said that the fourth quarter 
[is the most difficult to parse for ona- 
vsts" because the write-offs companies 
ike at the' end of the year are usually 
tuch larger than in any other quarter. 

But, she said, “I think the whole 






raner is going to be pretty good," 
Iding that signs from some of the banks 
id financial companies that will lead off 
* reporting season were positive, 
ompanies are saying that the Asia factor 
will not be a big dad,” she said. 

But Mr. Doerflinger of Paine W ebber, 
t contrast, said many earnings es ti- 
tles for American industry as a whole 
f 1998 were still too high. 

No matter how the final earnings re- 
nts cotneouL, the worry about Asia and 
e expectation of slower growth in the 
nited States next year have led analysts 
scale back their earnings projections 
r the last three months of this year. 
According to Fust Call, a Boston- 
sed concern that tracks earnings es- 
tates by analysis around the country, 
recasts for companies in the Standard 
Poor’s 500-stock index have been 
dsed downward over the past five 
*ks and now call for an average profit 
Tease of S3 percent from a year earii- 
compared with a mid-November av- 
of 11.2 percent 


ability of South Korean business. 

Officials sought more help in a series 
of meetings wife David Lipton, under- 
secretary of the U.S. Treaty and a key 
figure behind the $60 billion bailout 
package put Together by the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund. 

Mr. Upton, however, countered with 
four demands, Korean media reported 
Tuesday. First, he was said to have called 
for deregulation of the foreign-exchange 
market, rightly controlled by the gov- 
ernment even though the won was 
floated last week. Second, he reportedly 
asked the government to authorize South 
Korean companies to lay off imneeded 
workers as soon as possible rather than 
delaying the process under pressure 
from unions and labor laws. 


promised a “total struggle” to oppose 
any job losses. 

South Korean officials, however, are 
more fearful of a debt moratorium, 
which they say would be a political and 


THAILAND: 

Shake-Up at Bank 


Continued from Page 11 


economic disgrace of far greaterpro- 
portions than having to ask the IMF for 


Thiid, Mr. Lipton asked the govern- 
ment to protect the interests of minority 
shareholders, who have no power to ex- 
press their views within Korean compa- 
nies. And fourth, be requested compli- 
ance with the terms of membership in the 
Organization of Economic Cooperation 
and Development when it came to trans- 
parency and opening of markets. 

Indicative of the struggle that Seoul 
faces, however, the Korean Confeder- 
ation of Trade Unions, representing 
600,000 workers in major industries, at- 
tacked President-elect Kim Dae Jung for 
saying Monday that he would support 
layoffs if necessary. The union accused 
him of bowing to U.S. pressure and 


portions than having to ask the IMF for 
a bailout. Under a moratorium. Korean 
companies, which rely on imports of 
raw materials, would have to pay cash 
on delivery for everything. 

Finance Minister Lim Chang Yuel, 
fighting to counter the mood of per- 
vasive pessimism, assured Mr. Kim that 
the country would not default and would 
“lift legal restrictions” on the foreign- 
exchange market, according to a 
spokesman for Mr. Kim. 

The downgrading of South Korea's 
credit by both Moody’s Investors Ser- 
vice Inc. on Monday and Standard & 
Poor’s Coro, on Tuesday was partly re- 
sponsible fra- Tuesday’s precipitous de- 
cline. The move precludes many foreign 
investors, such as managers of pension 
funds, from putting dollars into Korea. 

Another factor was a report spread by 


aides of Mr. Kim that the government’s 
total foreign debt was $300 billion. The 


total foreign debt was $300 billion. The 
deputy finance minister. Kang Man 
Soo, (his week estimated foreign debt at 
more than $200 billion. 

S&P added fuel to the fire by es- 
timating South Korea’s foreign -ex- 
change reserves at only $4.7 billion — 5 ■ 
percent of the country’s short-term for- 
eign debt — and South Korean banks' 
debts abroad at twice their assets. 


“Thai officials are desperate to make 
the Citibank deal happen,’' said Masat- 
sugu Nagato. general manager of the 
Industrial Bank of Japan. “There have 
been many rumors about foreign 
takeovers, but not many have taken 
place. Now the authorities have shown 
they are willing to take action to make 
changes happen." 

Thailand recently relaxed ownership 
rules that had limited foreigners to a 25 
percent stake in the country’s financial 
institutions. Now, with prior approval, 
foreigners may own 100 percent of Thai 
banks and .finance companies. 

Changes may be taking place at the 
official level, but the lead editorial of The 
Nation newspaper Tuesday suggested 
popular sentiment remained unchanged. 
The newspaper accused foreign banks of 
acting with “undue self-interest” in a 
time of economic upheaval. 

“The Foreign Bankers Association is 
creating grudges among Thai corporate 
borrowers, bankers and policy makers,' ’ 
the newspaper’s editorial said. “It 
would be tetter for members of the 
Foreign Bankers Association to keep 
their mouths shut and not use this fragile 
opportunity to bargain in public." 

But the symbolic importance of the 
Citibank deal has been raised by recent 
failed attempts to bring in foreign in- 
vestors. 


world, as it is for Dickson Concepts, a 
luxury-goods producer and retailer 
based in Hong Kong. 

Elsewhere, Joyce Boutiques Holdings, 
which operates high- fashion stores in 
Hong Kong, said it had a loss of 27.9 
million Hong Kong dollars ($3.6 million) 
in the half-year that ended Sept. 30; 
business partners in Taiwan are taking 
longer to pay the French shoemaker 
Robert Geigerie; Calvin Klein has put its 
South Korean and Hong Kong expansion 
plans on hold, and Donna Karan In- 
ternational is eager to sell its Japanese 
affiliate, company executives say. 

In an example of how the growth 
equation has shifted, DFS Group Ltd., a 


duty-free-store empire that has been on 
the leading edge of Asian expansion, is 


the leading edge of Asian expansion, is 
now angling to buy Barney's Inc., a 
bankrupt New York high-end retailer. 
Luxury-goods merchants everywhere 
are also pinning hopes on Europe, until 
now regarded as anemic. 

“In Europe, there are still a lot of 
markets for us," said Ippolito Etro, 
chief financial officer at the Italian fash- 
ion house Etro. “And I see a lot of 
companies pushing toward the States, 
the only market which is still big and 
where you can still increase.” 

Asia accounted for 38 percent of the 
Italian company's growth last year, for 
1997, it will be just 3 1 percent. The Asian 
economic crisis “has kind of stopped our 
growth there," Mr. Etro said. 

Domenico De Sole, chief executive 
of Gucci, said all luxury companies 
would have to focus on other markets in 
the short term. 

“It is pretty clear people have to 
change the focus of their business and 
gain strength in United States and 
Europe,” said Mr. De Sole, whose com- 
pany makes 10 percent of its sales in 
Asia and another large chunk in Hawaii, 
a prime Asian tourist destination. 


The Asian shopper is not only in the 
majority in many stores from Milan to 
New York to Hong Kong, but also more 
geared to baying entire outfits than, say, 
her American counterpart, who might 
pair a Prada skirt with a Hanes T-shirr; so 
losing an Asian shopper is more serious. 

* ‘What is striking when you see con- 
sumers in Asia is their whole head-to- 
toe concept,” said Faye Landes, a retail 
analyst at Smith Barney in New York. 
“Diey take a different view of the 
product, which is that they want it all." 

For a large publicly traded company 
such as Gucci, the storm may be 
weathered by trying to focus on sales in 
other regions. But small companies with 
large Asian exposures may find them- 
selves in a typhoon. 

Even at a company such as Anna Sui. 
however, where executives say thar at 
least 40 percent of the business comes 
from Asian clients, optimism has not 
gone out of style. 

The company recently established a 
partnership with lseian Co. of Japan to 
license and distribute its goods exclus- 
ively in Japan and some orher Asian 
countries; it also has a relationship with 
Joyce in Hong Kong.. 

“Over the last year, the plan we de- 
veloped was to take a strong but meas- 
ured approach to Asia.” said Rod 
Kosann, the company's president. 
“From 1997 to 1998, we are looking for 
our business to grow 20 percent there. 
We look at what is going on and are 
concerned about iL but we think it is 
going to be a great market.” 

More than a dozen fashion executives 
interviewed last week said they were 
hopeful about Asia in the long term. 
Some others seemed to think thar the 
problems were those of their licensed 
partners rather than strictly their own 
concerns. But even if licensees or reuil 
partners absorb the initial hit, those part- 
ners will be buying less merchandise or 
forcing vendors to mark it down. 

Still, for companies with a cash cush- 
ion to carry them Through or that have 
strong sales elsewhere in the world, it 
makes no sense to leave Asia now. 

“Producers have a longer time ho- 
rizon when they think about production 
and market share,” said Stew Radelet. 
an economist at the Institute for In- 
ternational Development at Harvard 
University. “And for people interested 
in the long term. Asia is where the action 
is. With 60 percent of world's pop- 
ulation growing at 7 percent a year, you 
have to be there." 


•i'C is*-. 


INDONESIA: Country’s Total Foreign Debt Burden May Be $200 Billion, New Estimate Suggests 


Continued from Page 11 


t» ill* 1 >11 


It * 


V---: 


• .lie, hoping to prevent them from 
11 ' sgering a default. 

• In both countries — despite 
Hibtllion-dollarstaodby loons ar- 
ged by the International Mon- 
ty Fund — recent rapid falls in 
value of ttieir currencies against 
dollar have made it much more 
•ensive for companies to repay, 
jyen service, their loans, 
ihe rupiah has plummeted more 
u 50 percent against (he dollar 
~c the middle of the year. 

’This meltdown in its currency 
Id lead to a wave of corporate 
kruptcies, and this could be very 


destabilizing," said David Hale, 
Chicago-based global economist for 
the Zurich Kemper group. “Half of 


Indonesia’s major corporations are 
technically bankrupt if we don tget 
the npiah back to.3,000 or 4,000“ 

to the dollar, he said. 

The dol lar rose Tuesday to 5,245 
rupiah from 5.100 rupiah Monday. 

Indonesia is the world Is fourth 
most populous nation and its fourth- 
laraest debtor. Official figures put 
Indonesia’s combined government 
and private debt at $1 17 billion , of 
which $65 billion is private. 

Bonkers and economists have little 
doubt about the government’s ca- 
pacity to repay its foreign debt, much 


of which carries concessional interest 
rates and long repayment terms. 

But C.J. de Koning. Indonesia 
country manager for ABN-AMRO 
Bank of Holland, said that the av- 
erage maturity of the Indonesian 
corporate debt was only 18 
months. 

“Which means that the private 
sector repayment obligations are 
$3.6 billion per month and $43 bil- 
lion in rbe coming year,” he said. 
“Add to this the interest to be paid 
of nearly.$6 billion per year, ana one 
can easily understand that a $49 
billion payment obligation creates 
an immense hurtle." 

Pablo Zuanic, head of research in 


the Jakarta office of Indosuez W.I. 
Carr securities, said that economists 
in the French financial services 
grouphad estimated that at least $44 
billion in offshore bond borrowings 
by Indonesian companies were not 
included in die official private" sec- 
tor debt figure; nor were short-term 
offshore borrowings. 

“In total, it. would not be far- 
. fetched to assume that the total In- 
donesian foreign debt amounts to 
$200 billion,” he said. "With three 
quarters of this debt being private, 
arid at least a third maturing over the 
next 12 months, it is not hart to see 
where the pressure on the rupiah is 
coming from.” 


In a meeting Monday with rep- 
resentatives of major Indonesian 
companies. President Suharto said 
that the private sector must work 
closely with the government to 
overcome the country’s troubles. 


Worldwide MVGAS 
“MMM - 96” 


“The problem is companies are 
ing shon-term loans for lone-term 


using shon-term loans for long-term 
projeers.'' he said. 

Mr. Suharto, who recently re- 
turned to work from a 10-day rest 
period ordered by his doctors that 
farther unnerved the markets — said 
he had appointed Radius Prawiro, a 
former coordinating minister for the 
economy, to head a task force to 
help firms renegotiate foreign loans 
10 gain more time for repayment. 


for those who can count 
their money! 


The Project “Campaigner ' 

Our WWW-address in the Internet: 


http:/ / 195.5.141.10 or 
http: / / www.volna.ru 










PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 




■ wm 


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PAGE 18 


T* I'fTRMUiaeilLM * i 

licralo^^^fcnbunc 

Sports 


W^NESDAy-imffiSDAS; DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 




Rcnttn 

Ryutaro Hashlmoto, the Jap- 
anese prime minister, holding 
the Olympic flame on Tuesday. 

Flame Flies to Japan 

Olympics The Olympic flame 
' arrived in Japan on Tuesday on a 
chartered flight from Greece. A 
. torch relay will take the flame 
through every prefecture in Japan 
on its way to Nagano for the start of 
the Olympics on Feb. 7. ( Reuters ) 

lid a Wins a World Title 

boxing Japan's Satoshi lida 
knocked down Thailand's Yokthai 
Sith Oar in the first round Tuesday 
and went on to take the World Box- 
ing Association junior bantam- 
weight title with a controversial 
unanimous decision. 

lida floored Yokthai with a left 
late in the first round. Yokthai 
began his comeback in the fourth 
round, but referee Enzo Montero 
penalized Yokthai in the sixth, and 
ninth rounds for low blows. (AP) 

Golfer Can Use a Cart 

golf Casey Martin, the disabled 
golfer suing the U.S. PGA Tour for 
the right to use a riding cart, will be 
allowed to ride at the first two events 
next month in the 1998 Nike Tour, a 
level below the main PGA Tour. 

Martin, 25, has KHppel-Trenau- 
nay-Weber syndrome, a circulatory 
disorder in his right leg. He is suing 
the tour under the Americans with 
Disabilities Act. The case is due to 
go to trail Feb. 2 in Oregon. (AP) 


For Some, the Greatest Gift Is Simply Ploying Soccer Again 


International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — - If Charles Dickens were writing 
"A Christmas Carol” today, Tiny Tim would 
be given new limbs so Oat be might enjoy the 
simple pleasure of die simplest game. 

Implausible? By no means. The dream of soccer 
crosses so many boundaries, and medical science is 
now so capable, that the handicapped can share the 
experience. All it requires is goodwill over more 
than the Christmas period. 

Happily, die miracle is happening in Georgia and 
in Angola- In 1 998, it will start to happen in Uganda. 
There, some of the thousands of victims of man’s 
inhumanity to man — in the form of the land mine 
— are reintroduced to the movement of soccer 
through the care of the Red Cross and the generosity 
of UEFA, the governing body of European soccer. 

“Soccer is about mobile people/' said Lennart 
Johansson, the UEFA president Johansson said 
this in a clinic in Tbilisi where young men, some 
limbless, some with one leg blown off, were being 
made mobile through artificial limbs. 

Johansson's face hid neither pity nor pride. 
"This,” he said, "is only the beginning. What 
we see here is encouraging, but we intend making 
a real contribution to helping these people re- 
discover the joy of playing. Football can only 
maintain its leading role if our world wide move- 
ment re tains its spirit of solidarity.” 

This column and officialdom are not the most 
reliable of supports for one another. But this is 


Vantage Point / By Ror Hughes 


Christmas, and there are a million and one reasons 
to respect UEFA's initiative. 

The million is the initial donation, in Swiss 
francs ($720,000), which UEFA has committed 
from its funds to the International Committee of 
the Red Cross campaign providing surgery, ar- 
tificial limbs and rehab ilitatioa in 71 countries. 

And the one? That Is UEFA's commitment to 
Africa. Geographically, 'it lies beyond UEFA 
bounds, but Johansson has an accord with Issa 
Hayatou, the president of the African soccer con- 
federation, which recognizes that, while Europe 
enjoys the riches of soccer's popularity, Africa is 
often the supplier of human resources. 

Anti-personnel mines, alas, cross those bound- 
aries, too. I recall a friend's going' into Vietnam 
shortly after soccer began to make inroads into 
postwar inertia. "The will of the Vietnamese to 
play this game is beyoud belief!" he reported. 
"They are clearing wasteland of bloody mines to 
lay out their pitches. ’ * 

In Vietnam, and in Angola. The Red Cross uses 
a promotional photograph that is indelible to the 
memory. In a jungle 1 clearing near Luanda, six 
individuals are playing with a soccer ball The 
player who has just kicked it has one sound leg, his 
other leg is artificial. At least one other amputee is 


' turning to face the baJL One player stands out. He is : 
white, he has only die disability of being retired 
from full-time sport. He was Affiled to be wrong- 
footed during an impromptu match -in Huamfco 
where die Red Cross has a base.. 

"The sight of 22 players, all with artificial 
limbs, was unreal,'' said Cbristophe Bonvin, 
formerly aSwiss international player. "But when I. 
joined in, one of them even managed to sidestep, 
me, leaving me on the floor.” 

Bolivia's laughter echoes the feelings he shared 
with amputees who play at Huambo twice a week. 

. "Soccer has always represented a link between 
races," said Bonvin. "And clearly the handi- 
capped can join in." 

Similarly, Johansson watched in Tbilisi as a 1 
player, who had been good enough in Ms youth to 
be apprenticed to the Dynamo Tbilisi club, but 
whose legs were both blown away by a legacy of 
the separatist rebellion in Georgian in (he early 
1990s. demonstrated the first, determined efforts to 
'regain his mastery of the soccer ball. 

That young man, seeking to recapture self- 
expression which once came naturally to him, was 
joined last year by 348 Georgians who -fell victim 
to mines laid beneath their feet. When you watch 
soccer in the most mobile, most highly charged. 


- and most profitable club competition in soccer 
the UEFA Champions League — you are likely to. 
be reminded of the appalling legacy of more than 
2,000 people maime d or killed every month by 
land mines around the world. 


F ORNOT only is UEFA’s million a three year 
gift to the Red Cross, it is backed, hi many 
countries, by free television air time during 
Champions League broadcasts which the Red 
Cross can use to publicize its appeal. Soccer, the 
global game, can afford global generosity. The 
Champions League - is a gold machine that brings 
UEFA and the clubs millions each season. 

FIFA, the world soccer governing body, which 
organizes soccer wherever there is light and space 
to.play, has just projected its income from TV and 
" marketing over me eight year period to 2006. The 
figu re is in the region of three billion Swiss francs. 
FIFA also gives. Its S.O.S worldwide soccer fund 
to provided * ‘villages” and sbelter to orphans. 

Nevertheless, the cause of land-mine victims is 
particularly appropriate to soccer. The amputees 
need the balance soccer teaches. Think what a 
forces soccer, if truly unified, could make to mo- 
bilizing the l^dicapped. This is one area where all 
of soccer could hold hands and provide countless 
more legs. 

Rob Hughes is oh the staff of The Times of 
London . 


; -arc* 

> ft* 


32 Become Free Agents 
After Baseball Deadline 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Tony Phillips, Ge- 
ronimo Berroa and Bob Haraelin were 
among 32 players who became free 
agents when their teams failed to offer 
them 1998 contracts before the Dec. 20 
deadline. 

Phillips, 38, pleaded guilty to mis- 
demeanor cocaine possession last 
month and was ordered into a drug 
program that could clear his record. The 
police said Phillips was hying to buy 
$30 worth of cocaine when he was ar- 
rested at an Anaheim motel on Aog. 
10 . 

Anaheim tried to get rid of him 
then, but the union filed a grievance 
and the team was stopped. Traded to 
the Angels by the Chicago White Sox 
on May 1 8, Phillips hit .275 with eight 
homers, batted in 57 runs and scored 
96. 

Berroa hit .283 with 26 homers and 
90 runs batted in for Baltimore. 


Hamelin, the 1994 American League 
Rookie of die Year, was released by 
Kansas City during spring training and 
signed withDetroit, hitting .270 with 18 
homers and 52 RBIs. 

As teams rushed to sign players be- 
fore the end-of-year break, the New 
York Yankees and reliever Darren 
Holmes agreed Monday to a $6.4 mil- 
lion, three-year contract Oakland 
agreed to deals with a pair of free agents, 
a $450,000, one-year contract with out- 


a $450,000, one-year contract with out- 
fielder Shane Mack and a minor-league 
.deal with catcher Damon Berry hill that 
would pay him $350,000 if he makes the 
team. 

Another fre e-agent catcher, Joe Oliv- 
er, agreed to a minor league contract 
. with the Detroit Tigers. And first base- 
man Hal Morris agreed to a one-year 
contract with the Royals. 

In a trade, the New York Mets sent 
outfielder Carl Everett to Houston for 
reliever John Hudek. 




New England's Jimmy Hitchcock, right, breaking up a pass to the Dolphins’ Brett Perrfman. 


Haw Drrjk/Thr tartar,! tW 


DO YOU LIVE IN Patriots mi, but Miami Gets 2d Chance 


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The Associated Press 

MIAMI — The Patriots beat the Dol- . 
p hins in Miami in the final game of the 
regular season to earn the right to meet 
them in New England next week in the 
first round of the playoffs. 

The Patriots' 14-12 victory on Mon- 
day night broke a tie with Miami in the 
standings, giving New England the 
'championship in the American Football 
Conference East and home-field advan- 
tage for the first round in the playoffs. 

Miami also lost its regular season 
game on Nov. 24 in New England, 27- 
24. Next Sunday, it will try to break a 
seven-game losing streak in postseason 
road games since winning the Super 
Bowl m January 1974. 

"Fortunately we get another shot," 
said Jimmy Johnson, the Miami coach. 

Johnson was bitter about the offi- 
ciating Monday. A holding penalty neg- 
ated a 2-point conversion that would 
have tied the score, and a fumble return 
for a touchdown was waved off when the 
officials said the play was blown dead. 

"I wouldn't like it at all if it was over. 
But it’s not over," Johnson said. 

But the site for the rematch favors - 


New England. ‘^Hopefully, it will be 20 
below," said Ty Law. a Patriots corner-, 
back, referring to the weather. 

Drew Bledsoe, the Patriots quarter- 
back who is crying to shake a reputation 
for poor play in big games, threw for 
only 173 yards Monday. But he rallied 
New England from a 6-0 halftime def- 
icit with touchdown drives of 70 aud 55 
yards. 

New England’s defense forced (he 
Dolphins into repeated negative-yardage 
plays with frequent blitring. A harried 
Dan Marino completed 28 of 44 passes 
for 278 yards but was sacked four' 
times. 

"They blitzed us and blitzed us, and 
half the time we didn't make the ad- 
justments," Marino said. 

Marino's 8-yard touchdown pass to 
Lamar Thomas made the score -14-12 
with 3:46 left. But Karim Abdul- Jab- 
bar’s 2-point conversion run was neg- 
ated by a bolding penalty on tackle 
Richmond Webb, and on the second 
conversion attempt, Marino's pass fell 
incomplete. 

The Patriots missed a chance to run 
out the clock when they decided to 


throw on third-and-1, and Bledsoe's 
pass fell incomplete. 

Tom Tupa then shanked a punt 18 
yards, and Miami started at the New 
England 47 with 1:58 left But Lawyer 
MUloy intercepted Marino's despera- 
tion pass on fourth-and-15 at the Miami 
48. 

Manio Grier scored the first Patriots 
points with a 2-yard touchdown run, his 
first of the season. ' 

■ Indianapolis Fires Coach 

The Indianapolis Colts' owner, Jim 
Irsay, reacted to the team’s' league- 
worst '3-13 record ty firing Lindy In- 
fante as coach and Bill Tobin as vice 
president and director of football op- 
erations, The Washington Post report- 
ed. 

Irsay hired Bill Polian, who had been 
the Carolina Panthers’ general manager, 
as team president and gave him a six- 
year contract 

Elsewhere, the Buffalo Bills' coach 
Marv Levy, 72, refused to say whether 
he would return next season.- leaving 
open the possibility that his 12-year 
tenure with, the team could be over. 


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THE WOHUTS DAILY NEWSPAPER 







U* IjSfe 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 


RAGE 19 


U i f - . . 


SPORTS 




s Kings Beat the Hawks, 1-0 

JS (j|| Goalie Storr 9 Up From Minors , Shines With 32 Saves 


The Asss visaed Press 

Los Angeles goalie Jamie 
Storr made hts First National 
Hockey League appearance of 
ihe season a memorable one. 

Storr was recalled last 
week from Long Beach of the 
International Hockey League. 
On Monday, he made 

NHL Roundup 

32 saves for his first career 
shutout as the Kings beat the 
Blackhawks 1-0 in Chicago 
to extend their winning streak 
to three games. 

“It was a lot of fan out 
there." said Storr, who was 
selected seventh overall in the 
1994 draft but stuck in the 
minor leagues this season 
after injuring a groin muscle 
in an exhibition game. “This 
is the way I’d like to start 
every season. When I came 


up. I just wanted to show I 
could contribute some way.” 

The 2 1 -year-old goalie is 
7-5-2 in parts of four NHL 
seasons. 

“Their goaltender was out- 
standing, and that was the sto- 
ry of the game," Chicago 
coach Craig Hartsburg saicL 

EUims 2 , Lightning 2 Dino 
Ciccarelli scored his second 
goal of the game with 37.7 
seconds left in regulation 
time to give Tampa Bay a tie 
with St. Louis. 

The right wing redirected 
Roman Hamriik’s drive past 
goalie Grant Fuhr, helping 
Tampa Bay tie a franchise re- 
cord with an eight- gam e 
home unbeaten streak. 

Brett Hull gave the Blues a 
2-1 lead in die second period. 

Red Whigs 4, Brum 2 In 

Boston. Chris Osgood marte 
33 saves and Anders Eriksson 



had a goal and an assist as Efiv JBsRBigp; I 
Detroit beat the Bruins for the • 1 

ninth straight time. ' • ^ 1 

leftin regulation as Edmonton . 

earn a tie in Montreal ■ I 

ThibaolL 38 * ^ ocelyn 

dreas Dackell had a goal and 

tend its unbeaten streak at the , 

New York Islanders' Nassau 
Coliseum to five games. - ' 

Mighty DueJcs 5, Flam** 1 In 
Anaheim. Teemu Selanne 

scored twice to reach the 30- . 

goal mark for the fourth time s*m Mm^^a/Reae^ 

in his career as Anaheim beat The Flames’ Michael Nylander staying on his 


Calgary. 


feet while dueling with, the Ducks’ Paul Kariya. 


Even Without Ewing, Knicks Top Mavericks 


The Associated Press 

The New York Knicks won eas- 
ily in their first game since Patrick 
Ewing’s season-ending wrist in- 
jury. But their opponents were the 
Dallas Mavericks. 

The Knicks handed the Mav- 
ericks their ninth straight loss. 79- 
67, Monday night. 

“We’re going to have trouble 
with teams with big centers,” said 
Dave Checketts, Madison Square 
Garden’s president, at halftime. 
“Fortunately, we’re playing a team 
tonight that doesn’t have one.” 

Wizards 110, Milwaukee 79 In 

Milwaukee, Juwan • Howard 
scored 25 points and Chris 


Webber added 23 as Washington 
extended its season-high winning 
streak to five games. 

Rod Strickland added 19 points 
and 10 assists for Washington, 

which turned . 23 Milwaukee 
turnovers into 30 points. 

Hornets 81 , Raptors 79 In Char- 
lotte, Glen Rice made up for a 
subpar performance with me win- 
ning tip-in at the buzzer, capping a 
Hornets comeback from a 1 2-point 
deficit with nine minutes left 
Nets 99, Magic 88 Sam Cassell 
had 28 points, six assists and five 


steals to lead New Jersey to vic- 
tory in Orlando. 

Pistons 96, 76 ms 92 Grant Hill 
had 22 points, 10 rebounds, 8 as- 
sists and 3 blocks, and Detroit 
overcame a 21-point second-half 
deficit 

Jerry Stackhouse scored 17 
points and made a key block against 
Tim Thomas with 6.4 seconds left 

Job 101, Hawks 99 In Atlanta. 
Karl Malone scored 27 points, in- 
cluding a clinching jumper with 32 
seconds remaining, as Utah 
handed the Hawks their third 
straight loss. 

Lakers 94, Rockets 83 In Hous- 
ton. Kobe Bryant scored 19 points. 


and Eddie Jones had 9 of his 17 
points in an early thud-quarter 
charge that helped Los Angeles 
beat the Rockets. 

Sims 91 , Warriors 76 In Phoenix, 
Cedric Ceballos scored 1 1 of his 
17 points in die fourth quarter as 
the Suns beat Golden State. Ant- 
onio McDyess also scored 17 
points for the Suns. 

Kings 89, Timberwohres 79 

Mitch Richmond scored 27 points 
as Sacramento rallied in the 
second half to beat Minnesota. Mi- 
chael Stewart, a rookie, scored 13 
points, grabbed 13 rebounds and 
blocked four shots for Sacra- 
mento. 


A New Bicycle for Christmas 

Frenchman Hopes a Santa Claus Brings Sponsorship, 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tr ibune 

P ARIS — Any day now, 
they agree, it has to happen, 
is bound to happen, will 
happen — today, tomorrow, no 
larer in any case than Thursday. 

Christmas is on their minds, of 
course. The man with the check 
for 3 million-plus francs 
($500,000) will be their Santa 
Claus. 

“Pere Noel, you can call 
him,” said Louis Mattei. who has 
swept away all uncertainty — in 
his own thoughts, anyway — that 
be can form a new, low-budget 
professional bicycle team for uie 
season that starts in February. 
Tlie French Cycling Federation 
said last week that he cannot, that 
he has nor guaranteed sufficient 
funds to pay the riders and that 
therefore the federation cannot 
approve his application for the 
eighth French team. 

Mattei is undaunted. “They 
say it’s finished," he said. “For 
roe, it’s not finished. I filed my 
papers in time. I have 61 riders 
who have asked me for work, I 
have a letter of accord with sec- 
ondary sponsors. All I need now 
is one or two more days. 

“This will be my Christmas 
present, when the principal spon- 
sor declares himself and gives us 
die money. It will happen.’’ 

Mattei would be nibbing his 
hands together if he were not 
using them to speak on the phone 
and turn pages in his notebook. 
“We see a budget of 8. 9. 10 
million francs. Already we have 
more than 5 million. We have 
deposited with the French fed- 
eration 3 million francs, mostly 
from the municipality' of Sl 
D enis, to cover 10 riders. When 
the principal sponsor steps for- 
ward. we will have the rest: a 


clear road ahead.” Although he 
will not hint who the sponsor 
may be, he insists he has one. 

One of his direaeurs sporrifs, 
Laurent Joly, was no less exuber- 
ant “I’m confident" he said in 
another phone call. “Nice timing, 
no? A Christmas present for all of 
us. It’s bound to happen." 

The federation's rejection? 
“People say no when they can 
mean to say yes. Another day or 
two, they will say yes." 

A rider for the proposed team, 
Denis Lepra ux, nas no doubts 
either. “No problem, they tell 
me." Le prolix, the best French 
amateur tnis year, is 33 years old. 
A decade ago, he turned pro- 
fessional for two years, left no 
mark and returned to the amateur 
wars. 

“1 think I’ve missed 
something,” he said. “I had 15 or 
20 victories this year and now I’ve 
got this desire to see what kind of 
professional I can be. When I 
retire, I don't want any regrets. 

“So it’s now or never.” he 
decided. “It has to happen. Just 
in time for Christmas, too." 

Only Gerard Rue. the second 
directeur sponif. was restrained, 
but Rue, who has just retired after 
an honorable 1 1-year career as a 
professional racer, is the only one 
on the team who has solid ex- 
perience beyond the amateur 
level. He knows that things go 
wrong: Ask him about the French 
championship in 1992 when he 
had die race won until a teammate 
led die charge that caught him 
and left him in seventh place. 

“We’ll see.” is as far as Rue 
will commit himself. “I’d like to 
be hopeful but all 1 am now is 
disappointed. It’s easy to say it 
has to happen, but so far it hasn’t. 
Let’s wait and see.” 

The proposed team's organ- 
izer. is willing to wair. just an- 


other day or two. Mattei, w'bo is 
in the construction business, has 
been manager of another small 
team, BigMat Auber 93, but has 
fallen out with its ways. 

"Everything was too vague 
there,” he said vaguely. What he 
meant was that, Leproux aside, he 
wants to hire young amateur 
riders and form them, as Au- 
bervilliers did when it started in 
1994. Last year, with a budget 
that doubled to 14 million francs, 
the team enlisted veterans and lost 
its purpose, as Mattei sees it. 

“So many young riders avail- 
able.” he said, "so many riders 
who would be on welfare, no 
jobs at all, if it weren’t for us.”. 
When he announced his plans for 
the team, he said, Belgians, Itali- 
ans and even Russians called 
him. looking for work. 

“But I toTd them no,” he con- 
tinued. “There are too many 
young French riders out of work. 
Wepiantohave 14. 15. 16riders, 
mostly young, all French. 

* 'You’d think the French Cyc- 
ling Federation would appreci- 
ate that.” 

The federation, however, has 
been stung by this argument be- 
fore. In its unfavorable decision, 
it noted that Mattei had not di- 
vulged the name of his principal 
sponsor and could not guarantee 
that his riders would be paid. 

“The major concern of the 
federation,” it said, “is to pro- 
tect the riders and to avoid re- 
peating the cases of Force Sud, 
Agrigel-La Creuse and Eura- 
lel.” All three were underfunded 
and left their riders unpaid. 

“Not us.” Mattei insisted. 
“When the sponsor makes him- 
self known, you will see that we 
have the budget. One day. two 
days at most. Certainly by Christ- 
mas. What a Christmas present 
that will be for all of us.” 


Scoreboard 



iii 


>2 


;v 


4 1’U* 


»w>ju s)l 


NBA Standings 


Atlantic division 


I- 

. W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

r Miami 


8 

280 

— 

New York 

16 

11 

293 

2 

< Ortondo 

16 

11 

293 

2 

; New'Jeaey 

14 

11 

260 

3 

J WteltaHton 

14 

14 

200 

4Y_ 

I Bariaa 

12 

12 

200 

4Vi 

} Phttartotphta 

6 

19 

240 

It 

CENTRAL DMBOM 



Atanto 

19 

8 

204 

— . 

: Mdiia 

17 

8 

280 

1 

^ OdtfBlte 

16 

9 

240 

3 

i aScago 

16 

9 

240 

7 

L Oeretond ... 

. 16 


-64ft. 

.2.. , 

DriTOH 

13 

15 

.464 

6h 

MRwaukee ” 

12 

U 

262 

6*Y 

Toronto 

J 

24 

.111 

16 


NUlVEfVr DM3KM 


Utah 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Minnesota 

W 

16 

14 

15 

11 

L 

10 

9 

10 
14 

Vancouver 

10 

17 

DaSos 

5 

71 

Denver 

2 n 

mcvKormoN 

Seattle 

21 

5 

LA.Lahen 

21 

6 

Phoenix 

16 

B 

Portland 

14 

10 

Sacramento 

10 

17 

Golden State 

5 

19 

LAdppen 

5 

23 


MONDAY'S Hmn 
Doha 12 13 22 20- 47 

New York IV IS 25 20— 79 

DiScofl tr-12 5 51& Flricv5-21 3-3 13f H.Y^ 
Houston MO 2-2 19. Johnson 8-IS 1-2 18. 
Rrtoomfc-Dcotos 41 (Green 9), New York 
Sl (MBs 101. Assists— Dodos 13 (Pack 5). 
New York W [Word SI. 


Detroit 21 11 24 40- 90 

PbBodetpHo 27 19 2S 21— 92 

D:HHI5-11 11-1422. B.WHlknns7.133-3 17. 
Stockhouse 3-10 10-11 17; P: Cotamin 6-14 
10-12 231 Jockson 8-13 33 20. RrtMndte 
— Detroit 52 (HU 10), PteMelpNa 48 
(Coleman 8). Assists— Detroit 16 (HIU S). 
Ptrflodetphla 21 (Iverson 9). 

NewJorenf 32 23 21 23— 99 

Orliuto 29 2S 20 14-88 

NJ j Cosed 12-1 74428, GW 7-13*4 lft O: 
Price 8-15 33 21 Grant 7-14 44 11 
Rebounds— New Jersey 53 (Kittles II), 
Crtantb 42 (Grant 11). Assists— New Jersey 
18 (Corn! 6), Ortondo 23 (Grant Price 7). 
Toronto 17 24 18 28- 79 

amtelte 15 14 21 29— 81 

T: StoBdamta 8-18 44 21. Canty4-1T 35 
11 WaBoce 44 34 11 C- Mason M2 34 17. 
Rice 7-16 1-7 16. Kebwnds— Toronto 40 
.(CtatottcyStoudamlre 7h Clrariatto 58 (Mason . 
II). Assist*— Toronto la CCMstfe 6). 
Choriotto 24 (Wester 11). 

Utah 24 25 26 26-101 

Attain 23 24 23 29- 99 

U: Malone 10-15 7-11 27, Horoocek W4-7 
IS; A: Loettnw5-14 10-11 2 A SmMi 310 7-8 
11 Rebounds — Utah 56 (Keefe 101, Atlanta 
43 (Laettrier ICO- Asabte— Utah 21 (Stockton 
8), Attanta 15 (Smith 4). 

WnsMnjTm 32 27 27 24—110 

MRwaubM 19 18 21 21—79 

W: Howard 315 9-12 25. Webber 313 7-9 
2$ M: Robinson 9-23 2-2 22, Johnson 5-8 0-0 
la Smith 4-n 2-2 la Reboomis— Was- 
hington 49 (Howard 10),MnwBUtae42 (HfB 
1 1). Assists— Washington 26 (Strickland ID). 
MBwaukec 14 (AMefl 4). 

LA. Lakers 14 26 30 24— 94 

Houston 20 29 17 17-83 

LA- BTyont6-135-6 19. Campbell 5-11 8-11 
lfcH: DrexJer4-148-817.Baridey 5-134-4 14. 
Rebounds— Lakers 45 (Compbef 14), 
Houston S3 (Borktey 21). Assists— Lakers 19 
(Von Exd 10), Houston 18 <Drexler6). 
OoMen State 19 16 22 19-7* 

Phoenix 20 24 22 25-91 

V: Deft 312 2-2 IS, Smith 311 1-1 1* P: 
McDyess 7-14 38 17. Cabo Ikw 39 44 17. 
Rebounds— Golden State 4S (Dnmpter 133, 
Phoenix 52 (Kidd 9). Assists-Gotoen Stole 


24 (Darapfer, Coles 6), Phoenk 27 (Kidd 10). 
Minnesota 22 10 19 IS— 79 

Sacrmoaio 19 16 26 28— 89 

M: Gog Holla 322 7-9 19L MatoOfy 4-175-6 
15; S: Richmond 315 13-1627,WiBomsen 3 
13 34 U Stewart 310 34 13. Robwnds- 
— Minnesota 61 (GugGatta 17). Sa cram ento 
52 (Stewart 13). Assists— Minnesota 15 
(Mdrbury 6), Sacramento 22 (Johnson 6 ). 

Major College Scores 

Ptndue 1 1& Florida A&M 67 
Stanford 9&UC Santa Barton 62 
UCLA 81, Boise State 75 
Iowa 82, Southern Mississippi 58 
Mississippi 74. Lauisvnen 
Montand lia North CooOno-AcSevflte 52 
Denson 65, Charleston Southern 42 
Rhode Island 87. Ohio University 72 
Was! Vfegjnio 55, Virginia Tech 52 

The AP Top 2S 

Tap 25 toemo in Aoio clo tad Press’ men’s 
bavtabsfl pea, rridi tost-plBoe vow* In 
pmnthesee. records through Dec. 21. end 
total points. 

Record PH Pw 
1. North CBroflna (70) 12-0 1,750 1 


24. Temple 33 132 16 

25. Tatas Christian 9-1 126 24 

Others receiving votes Michigan 1 14, Saint 

Louis 110, Georgia Tech 94. Maiqurite 89. 
Tennessee as. Georgia SOI Miami 8ft Hawaii 
75, Oklahoma SL 57. G. Washington 42. Ifr 
noH 35. BaO St 25, Milfllltppl St 21. Woke 
Forest 11 'Massachusetts 11 Colorado St. 1 ft 
Kansas St 9, Washington ft N. Iowa 5, Arizona 
SL 3. Murray SL 3. Gonzngo 2. UL-Chicogo 1, 
Miami Oita t, Rutgers 1. Vanderbilt 1. 


NHL Standings 

ufnucoMnuNa 

ATLANTIC DIVBKIN 

W L T PH GF GA 
rsey 23 10 I 47 106 67 
I pitta X 9 7 47 101 78 


Men Jersey 
Philadelphia 
Washington 
N.Y. Islanders 
N.Y. Rangers 
Florida 
Tampa Bay 


23 10 I 47 106 67 

20 9 7 47 101 78 

16 13 7 39 103 98 

15 16 5 35 98 96 

10 16 12 32 96 105 

12 19 5 29 88 1 08 

7 21 7 21 64 107 


2. Kansas 

3. Duke 

4. Kentucky 

5. Ariamo 
3 Utah 

7. Purdue 

8 . Stanford 

9. UCLA 

10. South Carolina 

11. Coraredtcut 

12. Arkansas 

13. Xavier 

14. New Mexico 

15. Iowa 

16. Mississippi 

17. Florida St 

18. Princeton 

19. Syracuse 

20 . Montand 

21. Clemon 

22. Rhode bland 

23. West Virginia 


131 1435 

131 1410 

31 1436 

7-2 1464 

130 1425 

32 1471 


Pittsburgh 

Montreal 

Boston 

Ottawa 

Caipfino 

Buffalo 


NORTHEAST DIVISION 
i 18 11 8 44 100 88 

19 14 5 43 110 93 

16 15 6 38 93 96 

16 17 4 36 92 87 

13 18 5 31 92 100 

12 16 6 30 83 93 


CENTRAL DWtalON 


6-1 

1,127 

11 


W 

L 

T 

Pis 

GF 

GA 

6-1 

14384 

6 

Dallas 

24 

9 

4 

52 

118 

77 

9-1 

14717 

12 

Detro* 

21 

9 

7 

49 

122 

93 

84) 

997 

13 

StLoois 

21 

12 

5 

47 

111 

SB 

6-2 

843 

10 

Phoenix 

14 

16 

6 

34 

97 

102 

7-1 

838 

14 

Toronto 

12 

17 

5 

29 

78 

93 

8-1 

756 

15 

Chicago 

11 

18 

7 

29 

77 

87 

7-1 

665 

18 


PACIRC DtVIHON 



8-2 

617 

17 

Cotorado 

18 

8 11 

47 

110 

93 

8-1 

588 

19 

Los Angeles 

15 

14 

6 

36 

102 

97 

9-0 

453 

25 

San Jose 

14 

18 

4 

32 

91 

100 

5-3 

227 

22 

Anaheim 

13 

18 

6 

32 

87 

112 


Edmonton 

Vancouver 

Calgary 


11 17 9 31 
11 20 5 27 

10 21 7 27 


lAomunrs results 

Detroit 1 2 1-4 

Boston 8 1 1—2 

1 st Perte3 D-Kocur4 (Eriksson) 2d Period: 
D -McCarty 9 (Larionov, Lidsbom) (ppl.l B- 
Khrisfleti 13 (EMI AMron) (pp). 4. D- 
Eitason 3 (Murphy, Ytormon) 3d Period: B- 
Alllson 1 1 CVm I mpe, Khrtstldil 6, D-Udstram 
14 (en). Shots on goto: D- 7-1*4-25. 3 7-13 
IS — 35. GoaOes: D-Qsgood. 3 Dafoe. 
Edmonton I 1 1 0-3 

Montreal 2 1 0 0-41 

1st Period: M-Savage 9 (RsaM Kohnt)2, 
M-Domphoosse 10 (Mansorv Corson) X E- 
Wetgto 10 (Mironov. Smyth) (pp). 2d Period: 
E- Weight 11. 5. M-. Thornton 2 (Brtsebols. 
Bure) 3d Period: E-Smyth 12 (Antatl 
Weight) Overtime: Nona. Skate oe goat: E- 
1314-12-2-38. M- 12-331— 26. GoaMs: E- 
Essensa M-TWboult. 

Ottawa 2 I 1-4 

N.Y. (slanders 0 1 O—l 

1st Period: O-Dockell 5 (McEoriiem) (sh). 
Z O-Zhottak 4 (Daigle. Kravchuk) (pp). 2d 
Period 0-PttSck2 (Lambert Bonk) 4. N.Y.- 
PoWy 18 (McCabe. BeriuzzO 3d Period: O- 
Ya&hin 14 (Dackell AAcEochern] Struts on 
goat 0-14-1 38—32. N.Y. 37-5-15. GeaBeS: 
O- Tug mitt. New York, Sato. 

SLLoato 110 6—2 

Tampa Bay 0 1 1 8—2 

1st Pnrioct S J--Turgeon 5 (Cnartoal Yoke) 
2d Perlort T-Gcaaeffl 6 (Langkow Wtoroer). 
ft 5i_-HoM7 (Turgeorv Chase) 3d PvrioitT- 
OaBretf 7 (Norton, HomrtaOOT: None. Shrti 
en gold: SJ_- 7-332-22. T- 133144-32. 
Cnttoii SJ_-Fuhr. T-SdiwoA Puppa 
Los Asgries b 1 0-1 

Ctacnga 0 0 0-8 

1st Period: None. 3d P eriod : LA.-Murroy 
10 (Perreault. Zmotek) 3d Period: None. 
Shots oa pent LA- 6-12-3-21. C- 313 
10-32. Goattos: 1_A.-Starr. C-Hackett. 
Calgary 0 1 3-1 

Anaheim 1 3 1—5 

1st Period: A-Setanne 29 (Rucchki) 2d 
Pariota C-SflBmnn 13 (Morris, AlboBn). ft A- 
Todd 4 (Young. Daigneairtt) (pp). 4. A> 
SskumeSO (Ruatrin, Mironov) 5, A-Nieteen2 
(RycttaO 3d Parted: A-Mirantw 5 (Kortyn) 
Shots on gout: C- 13313-34 A- 313 
10—24 Goades: C-Tabaroocl A-Stitoienkov. 


NFL Standings 


s-New England 
y-Mlaml 
N.Y. Jete 
BufUo 
IndkmapoBs 

x-Pdtsbuigti 
y-JacksomSIe 
Tennessee 
Ondmitl 
Bald more 


x-KosoE CBy 
y -Denver 
Seattle 
Oakland 
San Diego 


AMERICAN COM FEKXIICS 

EAST 

W L T Pet. PF PA 
England 10 6 0 .625 3o9 289 

I 9 7 0 463 339 327 

fe 9 7 0 J63 348 287 

610 0 J75 255 367 
pofls 3 13 0 .188 313 401 
CENTRAL 

urgh 11 5 0 388 372 307 

otniflle 11 5 0 488 394 318 

see 8 8 0 500 333 310 

alt 7 9 0 .438 355 405 

re 6 9 1 .406 326 345 

WWT 

rsCBy 13 3 0 A13 375 232 

rr 12 4 0 .750 472 287 

8 8 0 500 365 362 
J 4 12 0 550 324 419 

go 4 12 0 250 266 425 


x- N.Y. Giants 
Washington 

PhSadctoMo 

Dallas 

Arizona 

x-GreenBoy 
y-Tnmpo Bay 
y-Oetn>ft 
y-Mlnnesata 
ClticDgo 


EAST 

W LT Pci 
ID 5 1 AM 

8 7 1 531 
6 9 1 406 
610 0 275 
4 12 0 250 

CENTRAL 
13 3 0 213 
10 6 0 .625 

9 7 0 263 
9 7 0 263 
4 12 0 250 


NFL Playoffs 


SATURDAY. DEC. 27 
Minnesota at N.Y. Grants. 1 230 pjn. 
Jacksonville at Denver, 4 p.m. 
SUNDAY, DEC. 2B 

Miami at New England 1 £30 pro. 
Detroit at Tampa Bay. 4 pro. 

divisional punrosre 

SATURDAY. JAN. 3 

Denver. Jacksonville, or New England a) 
Pittsburgh, i£30 pro. 

Detroit Minnesota or Tampa Bay at San 
Frandsca 4 pro. 

SUNDAY. JAN. 4 

Detroit N-Y-GiontsorTampa Bay at Green 
Bay. 1230 pro. 

Denver. Jacksonville, or Miami at Kansas 
City, 4 pro. 

COM FEU MCE CMAMPIOIUHPE 

SUNDAY. JAN. 11 
Divisional playoff winners 
SUPR BOWL 
SUNDAY. JAN. 35 AT SAN DCGO 
AFC champion n. NFC champion 6 pro. 
PRO BOWL 

SUNDAY, FEB. 1 AT HONOLULU 
AFC ». NFC 
-All time* EST. 


WEST 

x-San Frandsco 13 3 0 213 
Caratnc 7 9 0 >08 

Attanta 7 9 0 XSS 

NewOriems 610 0 275 

SL Louis 5 11 0 213 

wrofl division trite 
y-d Inched ptoyof! berrtt 

MOKBAY*S RESULT 
New Eng tad 14 Miami 12 
End Regular Season 


Mallorca 1, Satomanca 0 

ARGENTINA CHAMPIONSHIP 
FINAL STANDmaS: Rivet 45s Boar 44- 
Rosario Central 3 Sr San Lorenra Vela, Ghn- 
nasia La Plata 32; Indepemfiente 3ft Argerrit- 
nos Jrs 29s Ptatense 2& Lanus !& Ferro 24- 
Estudkvites 2ft- Racing 21; Gtmnosia Jujiry, 
Union 2ft Colon 19: EspamH 1 7s Neweits 14 
Humean, Glmnasioy Tiro 12. 

emu oiampionsmp 

final xTuffiMCSc Cato Cola 35; CotolF 
ca 3ft Audax 29: U. de Chile 2& Cohreioo 2* 
Puerto Montt 24 OsomoSl; CoquimtM 2ft La 
Serena Ifc Palestlno 1 7; Huochipaw, Antofa- 
gasta 14 Temuca Uirion E spa no la 1& Wan- 
derers Concepcion 7 1. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

OAKLAND— Agreed to terms with INF Kurt 
Abbott C Damon BerrytuH RHP Buddy 
Groom and OF Shane Mack on one-yegr con- 
tracts. Declined to offer 1998 contracts to SS 
TTlson Brito and C lay Molina. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Arizona— N amed Dwayne Murphy first 
base and outfield coach. 

Cincinnati— S igned RHP David Weathers 
and LHP Steve Cooke to 1-year contnicte. 
DecBned to offer 199B contra ds to LHP Joey 
Etechen and OF Stew Gtbralfer. 

BASKETBALL 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

boston— A ctivated G Dee Brawn and F 
Ray Rogers Jr. from injured TbL Put C Perris 
Ellison and F Dontae Jones an Injured list. 

new york- Activated F Ronnie Grandlson 
from ln|ured fel. 

PORTLAND— Put F Jermaine CTNeol on Ire 
lured fist Activated C Alton Lister hum hi- 
lured DsL 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
INDIANA POLS— Fired Lhtdy Infante, toads 
and Bill Tobin, d rector of football operations, 
N.YJHANTS— signed TE Alfred Pupunu. . 

HOCKEY 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
NHL— Suspended Boston Bruins F Ted Da- 
nolo far three games wffhoirt pay, and fined 
him S 1,000 far receMng match penalty for 
MgtFSticking In Dec. 20 game. 

phdendc— P ut D Sean Gagnon and LW 
Jim McKenzie on Inlured CsL 
calcary— R ecalled LW Todd Hlushho 
from Saint John. AHL 
tampa— R ecoiled G Derek Wikhison horn 
Cleveland. IHL. 

COLLEGE 

AMERICAN SOUTHWEST CONFER- 
E Her —Announced East Term Baptist (Jni. 
versify will join conference. 

st. JOSEPHS— Announced G Arthur Doris 
has been declared ocadendcaBy ineHgibto tor 
resr ot season. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 




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page 20 



1 


OBSERVER 

Home for the Holidays 


By Russell Baker 



ffy went to die cemetery 
we other day to put oui Christ- 
mas wreaths for our kin. They 
were inexpensive wreaths, 
we decided that paying more 
man $10 per tombstone 
would be gross vulgarity. 

Money had almost always 
been in tight supply with the 
persons ' being honored. In 
their time they would have 
laughed themselves hoarse at 
news that some fool bad 
squandered $10 worth of 
pmey twigs on a burial plot. 

For my mother. $10 was 
almost a week's salar y at one 
time, but nowadays it does 
not fetch you anything very 
gaudy, and the model we 
wired to her headstone was 
appropriately modest. 

□ 

Even now 1 am uncertain 
about the point of the exer- 
cise. Maybe it has to do with 
my mother's profoundly sen- 
timental response to this high 
holiday combining crass mer- 
cantilism with mystic tales of 
Middle Eastern kings and an 
overcrowded inn. Having her 
family in her house at Christ- 
mas was absolutely essential 
to her happiness. 

Well, a boy sprouts 
whiskers, leaves the old 
neighborhood, marries, be- 
comes a parent and — let the 
cruel truth be uttered — one 
day discovers that going home 
lo mother's for Christmas is 
more than his spirit can bear. 

There is that dreary trip in 
dark December afternoons, 
along dangerously crowded 
roads or through miserable 
airports. There are small chil- 
dren to be transported. 

Soon the children are gi- 
gantic. They love Grand- 
mother. Oh yes, no doubt of 
that But then they begin 


showing unmistakable signs 
of thinking, “Much as I love 
Grandmother, I don't want to 
go to Grandmother's bouse 
for Christmas." 

Neither does Dad. Neither 
does Mom. Dad and Mora 
have their own place now. 
They want to have Christmas 
in that place. Having Christ- 
mas there is one of the things 
that makes it a “home." 

My mother had to be con- 
fronted with the brutal fact 
No, we were not coming for 
Christmas that year, or any 
other year thereafter. We 
were going to have Christmas 
“in our own home.” 

□ 

She was begged to come 
join us and sometimes did, 
but a lot of the joy had drained 
out of the season. 

Time passed. Our children 
left the neighborhood, mar- 
ried. became parents. They 
came back for Christmas, of 
course, though it meant long 
hours of driving, sometimes 
in terrible weather. 

To bring the story to its 
obvious end, we told them to 
cut it out and stay in their own 
places at Christinas, and they 
do, more or less. We com- 
monly stay Christmas Eve 
with a son who lives nearby, 
rise next morning to watch 
children destroy the wrapping 
paper before breakfast, then 
clear out happily. 

□ 

The truth of it. though, is 
that lately, a melancholy onset 
of bad conscience sends me 
toward the graveyard bearing 
$10 Christmas wreaths. 

Some senseless apology, I 
think, is being offered here. 
Everybody must grow up, 
make his own life and grow 
old. It is pointless to apologize 
for what is inevitable. Still, we 
went with the $10 wreaths. 

New York Tunes Service 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY -THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24-25, 1997 


The Holocaust as a Second Generation Presence 


By Dinitia Smith 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — In 1990, Deb Filler, a 
Toronto-based stand-up comedian, 
went to Europe for what she called “a whirl- 
wind tour of Eastern European death camps" 
with her father, Saul, who had been a pris- 
oner at Auschwitz. When she returned home, 
she wrote a comic monologue about growing 
up as the child of a Holocaust survivor and 
her father's experiences in the- camps. The 
piece, “Punch Me in the Stomach," was 
performed at the New York Theatre Work- 
shop in 1992 and later made into a docu- 
mentary film. 

Jokes about Auschwitz? "I thought the 
□umber on his arm was his phone number," 

Filler says in her monologue. When her 
father was crammed into a single bunk with 
eight other prisoners, “someone would yell, 

‘■nun!' "she recalls his telling her. “ ‘Weall 
had to turn at the same time, and we laughed 
What else could you do? We laughed the 
whole first night at Auschwitz.' ” 

Filler is one of a group of children of 
Holocaust survivors who have turned to 
theater, to writing; to art, in an effort to sort 
through the experience of growing up in 
families with memories too terrible to speak 
of. This fall there were two new books, 

“Where She Came From: A Daughter's 
Search for Her Mother's History,” by Helen 
Epstein, and “Shtetl: The Life and Death of a Small Town 
ami the World of Polish Jews,” by Eva Hoffman, each of 
them a re-creation of prewar shtetl life. 

Before them came the work of the cartoonist Art Spiegel- 
man, author of “Maus”; the fiction writers Carl Friedman in 
the Netherlands and Nava Serael in Israel, and the writers 
Lev Raphael, Thane Rosenbaum and Melvin Bukiet in the 
United States. Then there are filmmakers, Chantal Akerman 
and Aviva Kempner, and the artist Christian Boltanski, with 
his altarlike installations on memory. In the 1980s, the Israeli 
rock stars Shlomo Aria, Yehuda Polliker and Yackov Gil ad, 
all children of survivors, incorporated the Holocaust into 
their music. 

There has been a stream of memoirs by the second 
generation, among them Julie Salamon’s * ‘Net of Dreams." 
In 1996, Daniel Goldhagen’s “Hitler's Willing Execu- 
tioners” was, in effect, an examination of the anti-Semitic 
culture that brought about the destruction of the extended 
family of his father, Erich, in Romania. 

There is an estimated total of 250,000 children of Holocaust 
survivors in the United Stales. “We call ourselves the 2 G’s," 
said Epstein, referring to the second generation. “The one 
common element is enormous physical and psychic dis- 
ruption in our family history because of great catastrophe.” 
In “Children of Job," perhaps the first comprehensive 



• • Above all, Epstein learned that her mother 
had once been a normal, pretty, laughing young 
woman, “My mother was a party ghrL” she saw. 


Brian RiSr'Sn*- fail. Tub™ 

Deb Filler, who made comedy of growing upas a child of a Holocaust survivor. 

study of second- generation writing, published this year, Alan 
Berger, a professor of Holocaust and Judaic studies at Florida 
Atlantic University, calls the writing of survivors' children an 
attempt to cope with “the presence of absence.” 

“we children feel we have no voice,” Filler, the comedi- 
an, said in an interview. 4 ‘Because what we have experienced 
is in no way as significant as what our parents did. How do 
you beat Auschwitz? How do you beat that story?” 

Helen Epstein, 50, grew up in the Czech fimigfe com- 
munity of Manhattan. In her first book, “Children of the 
Holocaust,” she describes her mother, Franci, as superbly 
competent, a dressmaker to wealthy women: But she 


the tanga Thar was a revelation- My nwtfter was 

a bimbo. That was liberaring." 

But her mother’s youth ended, with the 
Nazi - occupation* Epstein's, grandparents 
were murdered in. a trench, near Riga- Even- 
tually. dose' to death from typhus, Epstein s 
mother was freed from Bergen-Beken. In 
1 946, she married Kurt Epstein, aiso a camp 
survivor. They moved to the United States in 
1948, just before the Communist takeover. 

. . “For me, writing the book was creating a 
reality,” Epstein said at her home in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, where she lives with 
her husband, Patrick Mehr. whose parents, 
Romanian Jews, were hidden during the war. 
“I was creating for myself a great-grandma 
and a grandma, and the mother I would have 
had without the Holocaust. It was the most 
wonderful writing experience I ever had. 

“Shtetl,” Evaitomnan’s account of the life 
of Jews in prewar Poland, is more ambivalent. 
In an earlier book, “Lost in Translation.’ 
Hoffman, 50, wrote about moving to 'Canada 
-in 1959 when her parents, fled Polish anti- 
Semitism. “Shied'* (Houghton Mifflin i k 
about Bransk, in eastern Poland, a village that 
was once 50 percent Jewish, in the region of 
her parents’ home before the war. They were 
among the few survivors of their families. 
“As I grew up, my mother talked about it, and my father 
didn't” Hoffman said. “They bad a willingness to live, to 
throw themselves into life, to be happy. There was a sense 
that death was the ground from which everything sprang. 
Poland figured in toe Jewish postwar imagination as the 
inferno. But from my father and mother’shistory. I knew this 
was a great oversimplification.” 


iympi 

sudden rages when his children didn’t eat their dinner. 

hi doing research for “Where She Came From,' ’(Little, 
Brown), Epstein traveled to Czech cities and villages in 
search of anyone who might have known her family. 

The Jews, she says, were caught in the complex web of 
relations between local Czechs and ethnic Germans; they 
were despised but necessary, with their business skills, to toe 
landed gentry. Many Jews had become secularized. 




Hoffman, 50, lives in London. In writing about Bransk. 
she was guided by a local man who was researching the 
vanished Jews of toe town. Hoffman explores Jewish- 
Christian history in Poland. 

The Polish sited, she argues, was less anti-Semitic during 
suffered from sudden episodes of depression, when she the Middle Ages and Renaissance than other parts of Europe, 
locked herself in toe bathroom for hours at a time. and Jews were often allies of the Poles against invaders. But 

“She would often say that she had lost her laugh in toe from toe Cossack rampages in toe 17to century and various 
war,'* Epstein said in an interview. Her father, Kurt, who had partitionings of Poland, groups clung to their identities in 
been on toe Czech Olympic water polo team, flew into an ethos of separateness,” she says. “Jews played an 

inordinately important role in the peasants' mythological 
universe,” Hoftman writes. 

At the heart of Hoffman's quest was a need to explore why 
some Poles participated in toe slaughter of Jews and why 
others helped them at great risk. She came up with no 
answers, sne writes, only an ambiguous picture. In the end. 
she said about toe Poles who helped save Jews, “that needs 
to.be acknowledged, and it needs to be honored" 


f!- 


I if' 


ON THE ROAD 


PEOPLE 


Jan Morris: An Author Reconciling the Opposites 


By Sarah Boxer 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Jan Morris was sensibly 
dressed for the evening: a cream-colored 
shirt, buttoned up high; a string of big white beads, 
and a red jacket. She offered her hand in a soft 
partial handshake. Her cheeks were rosy, her hair 
fluffy white, and her smile poised for a big open- , 
mouthed laugh. 

She was exhausted after a three-city book tour 
and toe endless taxi line earlier that day at 
Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan, but was none- 
theless optimistic about the evening. She pre- 
dicted that a dry martini would revive her. Then 
she added, with a combination of British hauteur 
and Welsh mischief, “I’ll bet you have never had 
a dry martini.” 

Before anyone could open toe doors of toe 
Mayflower Hotel, Morris, the author of about 30 
books, including two memoirs, a novel and works 
' on toe British Empire, Venice. Oxford, Hong Kong, 
Wales and Manhattan, pushed her way through 
those doors into toe unseasonably warm night air of 
Central Park West. The pace was brisk for a 71- 
year-old woman. The Cafe des Artistes was in 
sight, and she knew the way. 

Seated under a plain charcoal portrait of Howard 
Chandler Christy, the man who painted toe res- 
taurant's lavish nude murals, she asked for a dry 
martini on toe rocks with a twist, but then, after her 
American dinner companion ordered a dry martini 
straight up with an olive, she did toe same. Soon she 
; began to revive. 

She started talking about her travel strategies. If 
it is a strange city, sne takes a tour bus, she said, to 
“knock off the things you must see.” Then she 
wanders aimlessly about “with all antennae out." 
Three stops are essential: a food market: some kind 
of religious service at a mosque,' a church or a 
synagogue, and a court of taw — not the high 
criminal courts, but the small ones, “the guy up for 
a traffic offense.” She added, “I’m always on toe 
criminal's side.” 

The important thing, she said, is “you've got to 
be alone." even if people want you to have 
company. 

One of her happiest moments, she recalled, was 
on toe Isle of Man. “I was in a pub in Peel, enjoying 
a pint of Guinness. A woman approached me and 
gave me a leaflet. ‘This is to reassure you that God 
is with the lonely^' I drank another Guinness.” 

Morris carries her own creature comforts. If she 
has a car. she takes a teakettle and a hot water 



ED-wonti I. UnWHir Cjafanploa IVm 

Morris's new book is “50 Years of Europe.” 


bottle. If not, she takes only toe bare essentials: 
some tea and a decent marmalade, Oxford vin- 
tage. 

“The worst of American civilization, the worst 
thing, worse than toe electric chair,” she said, “is 
grape jelly.” The waiter arrives just as she is about 
to address toe subject of peanut butler. 

She ordered a plain 12-ounce steak with little 
boiled potatoes and a green salad, no garlic on 
anything. “I hate garlic,” she said. 

With the ordering out of the way, she was on to 
the next bit of Americana: Abraham Lincoln. Two 
days earlier, she had clinched a deal with Random 
House to-write a book on Lincoln. Why Lincoln? 
She digressed. She said toe book of hers that she 
liked best was “Fisher’s Face," which she called 
“a capricious evocation of a man." The man was 
Jacky Fisher, or Admiral Lord Fisher of Kil- 
verstone, Britain's first sea lord, who died six 
years before Morris was bom and with whom she ' 
plans to have an affair after she dies. She fell in 


love “with his face and his profession," she said, 
and yet she still has doubts about his character. “I 
don't know how faithful he was to his wife,' ' she 
said. “He was a conceited and arrogant fellow.” 
Which; by the way, she admires. “Arrogance 
seduces me.” 

What does this have to do with Lincoln? “Ab- 
raham Lincoln represents the United States, and I 
have equivocal feelings about him,” she said. “I 
resist toe log-cabin-to- White-House syndrome, but 
I love Lincoln in so many ways. He was kind to 
children and to toot awful wife of his. And I love toe 
Gettysburg Address.” 

Then there is Lincoln's face. "It looks mean 
sometimes,” she said. “But it was tempered by the 
war. It is a wonderful face.” 

Her book on Lincoln, she said, will be a for- 
eigner's response to an American idea. “The 
American view." she said, “lacks irony.” “You.” 
she said, meaning Americans, “are more like the 
French than toe British.” When it cranes to me- 
morials, “you are more uninhibited." 

Moms seemed just as sensitive to the national 
characteristics of mustards. When the waiter 
brought her her steak, she asked for British mus- 
tard, disdaining not only the American brands but 
also toe French. 

When she received toe desired mustard, she 
turned to toe theme of the evening: “the recon- 
ciliation between opposites.” Her new book, “50 
Years of Europe: An Album" (Villard), was writ- 
ten in brief dispatches from all over Europe to show 
how “toe boundaries and frontiers are fading 
away." Morris, who is half English and half Welsh, 
considers herself “areconciliation between' Wales 
and England." 

“I love bridges, and 1 like to feel that I am one," 
she said. The bridge, her favorite metaphor, led, 
appropriately, to toe other great reconciliation of 
opposites in Jan Morris’ life: male and female. 
Twenty-five years ago. Jan Morris was a man, 
James Morris, who served in the British Army, 
married and raised four children. In 1972, he had 
a sex-change operation. Morris is still with toe 
same woman sne married when she was a man. 
although they are divorced and call themselves 
sisters-in-law. 

“My passions are the same," she said. But her 
role is different. 

‘ ‘I play an allegorical part. ’ ' she said, asking, “Is 
this arrogant?" before going on. “It's a curious 
situation I occupy in life. Because of this, both men 
and women feel at home with me. I belong to both 
groups.” 



M ORE Camelot artifacts 
are going on the block. 

Flash n, toe 22-foot-long ra- 
cing sloop owned by John F. 

Kennedy from age 17 to 25 is 
one of them. The antique writ- 
ing desk dial he used to sign 
documents in the Oval Office, 
is another, as is toe black Per- 
sian -Tamh pillbox hat that 
Jacqueline Kennedy wore to 
the baptism of her son. These 
are some of the 600 items of 
Kennedy-era and Kennedy- 
family memorabilia to be auc- 
tioned off at the Park Avenue 
Armory on March 18 and 19, 
by Guernsey’s, the small auc- 
tion house that is billing the 
sale as second only to coat of 
the Jacqueline Kennedy 
Onassis estate sale at Sothe- 
by’s in April 1996, when frenzied bidding for 
IJ200 lots fetched. an unexpected $34.4 mil- 
lion. The president of Guernsey’s, Arlan Et- 
tinger, said the sloop, the desk and the hat 
were toe real thing, and that more than half toe 
lots were amassed by Kennedy’s longtime 
personal secretary, Evelyn Lincoln, who died 
in 1995 at age 83. 

. □ 

The rumors have been around for months, 
now it has been confirmed by a spokeswoman 
for toe Spice Girls that Posh Spice, aka 
Victoria Adams, and David Beckham, the 
Manchester United midfielder, are planning 
to marry when their extremely busy lives 
permit it Adams, 23, and the four other Spice 
Girls are starting a global tour early next year, 
and Beckham, 22, is expected to be on the 
England team for the World Cup matches in 
France next summer. “As soon as Gucci 
makes clothes for expectant mums, I would 
even consider a pregnancy,” Adams was 
quoted as adding. 

□ 

The new movie “Titanic' r gets one red face 
for historical inaccuracy. In toe film, the actor 
Leonardo DiCaprio plays a budding artist 
from Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, who ' 
pity describes ice fishing back home on 
Wissota. The. snag is: Lake Wissota wasn't 
created until five years after toe passenger 
liner sank in April 1912. “It couldn't have 
happened because toe lake wasn't filled until 
1917," said Dolores Beaudette, the Chip- 
pewa Falls historian. The Lake Wissota hy- 


TUNING UP — Conductor Keith Lockhart, checks 
on Yasufairo Fujrta, who won his wish on a Japanese 
TV contest — to play trumpet with the Boston Pops. 

droelectric project was started in 1915 and 
finished in 1917, when the area was flooded to 
create the lake. 


□ 

Sweden's Queen Silvia, who turned 54 on 
Tuesday, was hailed by toe Swedish press as a 
heroine after she resuscitated a member of toe 
Swedish Academy who collapsed at a gala 
■ dinner. The evening paper Aftonbladei said 
the queen was standing next to 79-year-old 
Step Rudholm on Saturday when he sud- 
denly fell unconscious. The queen and the 
author and academy member Per Waestberg 
helped to lay Rudholm, a former marshal of 
the realm, on the floor. “The queen said she 
had taken a course in card io-pulmonary re- 
suscitation and took care of Rudholm while I 
looked for someone to call an ambulance," e 
Waestberg said. Rudholm regained con- • 
sciousness after 10 minutes and did nor need 
to go to hospital, Aftonbladet said. - 

□ 

Three screenwriters have sued the makers 
of the new James Bond film “Tomorrow 
Never Dies,” claiming toe idea .for the film 
was lifted from a script they wrote. The 
writers. Jeffrey Howard, Chris Beutler and 


from Chippewa Falls, 'Wisconsin, who him- Jay Schlossberg-Cohen submitted the script 

Lake tilled * ‘Currency of Fear' ’ to several people in 
the movie indusby. According to the suit filed 
in federal court in Los Angeles, one person 
who asked for a copy of the script in February 
1996 was Madeline Warren, wife of Bruce 
Feirstein, who is credited with writing • ‘To- 
morrow Never Dies.” 








all the tea in 10811. 


Every country has Its own AT&T Access Number 
which makes calling home or to other countries 
really easy. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for 
the country you're calling from and you'll get the 
dearest connections home. Now you can charge 
■your calls on any' of rile . credit cards shown, as 
well as on your AT&T Calling Card. And when you 
use AT&T, you can avoid outrageous phone charges 
on your hotel bill and save up to 60%.* Check the 
list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


py * e f rten . P 1 . alt . w ten* on an«»n«r prdqatma testing. ■Compared to certain houl otophone Oarga baaed on cafe to tha US to November 1 9W. Actual utfm n» ba 

^ ^ ’ “"A? daT ** ‘V ***** *■ wuwr «hdi you arc ottne. Credit cant oft* uifcct to Mibb#!?. Payment arms subset m your crate card agroarrarc. BofcMaeed countn*t MTrnKcoumrr- 

ID tt> ! CoumiTMtMoumij ram comm aFtfviEn*ofa<aawttwU5.tAiS*i uditiond ctarja bawd on aumy p>u ar«cE*.Ybu an a! the US. from afl CDtiwta Uaai sbo»«. 

mpn Focal cotn p»mmt tfunne die call - Csiiaij nibble to dedgnawo countries ody. *Lmh«l mUattlKy ■Payplwie deposit »Dia]~0T Brit, ousi* Caw. •Additional charge. app* orate nUse UK. number in N. Ireland. 


phones 
©1997 AT&T 





Steps to follow for easy 
calling worldwide: 


1. Juk «flaJ the ATST Access Number 
fof the Country jrou are raffing from. 

2. Dal die phone number you're caSng, 

3. CM your card number. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


EUROPE 

Austria eu 

022-903-01 1 




Greece* 

00-800-1311 

Ireland U 

Italy* 

.1-800-550-000 
172-1 on 

Motherlands* 

Russia • A(Moscow) » 

0800-022-9111 
755-5042 




Switzerland* 

United Kingdom & .. 

.0800-89-0011 

.050049-0011 

0000-09-0011 

MIODIE EAST 





Saudi Arabia & 

■ i-aoo-to 

AFRICA 


South Africa. 

■0-800-99-0123 


Can't find the Access Number far che cotmiry jouV-a caJfing frtxrV Jusr uk any operator 
tor AT&T Direct* Service, or <risn our Web Wk ac htqx//www^n.eom/trav e ie r