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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


** 


Paris, Wednesday, February 5, 1997 



No. 35.437 



Albright Family Tragedy : Deaths by the Nazis 


By Michael Dobbs 
WashuigUm Past Service 


. . . , . W.MettamccJRmcr. 

Madeleine Albright didn't know 3 
grandparents were Nazi victims. 


WASHINGTON — Madeleine Korbel Albright 
was almost 2 years old when her parents whisked her 
out of Czechoslovakia in March 1939, less than two 
weeks after the Nazi occupation, giving up tbeir life 
as a prominent diplomatic famil y and saying good- 
bye to many relatives. 

Eventually, she and her parents came to America, 
where Madeleine followed in her father's footsteps 
into a diplomatic career that culminated two weeks 
ago when President Bill Clinton her the fust 
woman to be secretary of state. 

Mrs. Albright has spoken movingly of her past awf 
of the importance that her family’s experience with 
Nazis and later Communists has had cm her political 
views. 

But she says she was never aware of what 
happened to family members who stayed behind in 


Czechoslovakia: Research by The Washington Post 
shows that more than a dozen relatives, including 
three grandparents, were killed in the Holocaust. 

In an interview last week, Mrs. Albright, 59, who 
was raised a Roman Catholic and is now an Epis- 
copalian, said her father and mother never talked to 
her or her two siblings about the relatives’ fate or their 
Jewish background. 

She said she found the new information “fairly 
compelling “ but wanted to conduct her own research 
into her family and its fate. “Obviously it is a very 
personal matter for my family and brother and sister 
and my children," she said. 

“The only thing I have to go by is what my mother 
and father told me, how 2 was brought up," Mrs. 
Albright said. 

She said her parents said of her relatives only that 
they died “during the course of the war." 

Mrs. Albright defended the choices her parents 
made and said she could not question their mo- 


tivation. “I believe that my parents did wonderful 
' k: — for us.’ ' she said. 


new information was uncovered during re- 
search for an article for The Washington Post 
Magazine, scheduled for publication Sunday, about 
Mrs. Albright’s family's experiences in Czechoslov- 
akia in the late 1930s and 1940s. The information is 
based on documents in German, Czech and Jewish 
archives, Auschwitz transportation lists and inter- 
views with friends and family members in Europe. 

Captured Nazi documents now in the possession of 
Holocaust researchers show that close relatives of 
Mrs. Albright’s who remained behind in Czechoslov- 
akia during World War Q — including the grand- 
parents, her uncle and aunt and a first cousin — died 
m Nazi concentration camps. 

Mrs. Albright, who was bora in Prague in 1937. 
spent the war years in London, returning with her 

See ALBRIGHT, Page 3 


Stroke Puts Pamela Harriman in Coma 


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Ambassador to Paris 
Suffers Hemorrhage 

By Roger Cohen 

New York Tones Service 

PARIS — Pamela Harriman, the U.S. 
ambassador to France, was unconscious 
and in critical condition here Tuesday 
after suffering a brain hemorrhage on 
Monday, officials said. 

Mrs. Harriman, 76, did not recover 
consciousness after fainting at the Ritz 
hotel, where she had been swimming. 
One official said: “She is profoundly 
unconscious. It really does not look 
good at all." 

A statement from die U.S. Embassy 
said that Mrs. Harriman. who was 
rushed to the American Hospital of Par- 
is in the western suburb of Neuilly, was 
in “serious condition.” 

Her son. Winston Spencer Churchill, 
a British member of Parliament and 
grandson of the wartime British prime 
minister, was at her bedside. 

Of late. Mrs. Har riman, who was 
national co-chairman of die 1992 Oin- 
ton-Gore presidential campaign, had 
been talking with enthusiasm of return- 
ing to the United States this summer. 

Mrs. Haniman, who was named am- 
bassador to loanee in March 1993, had 



Vbeot Am/vy/Affnoc fta a-Bug 

Pamela Harriman, who remained 
in serious condition Tuesday night 

no previous history of medical problems 
and was in England last weekend on a 
family visit The poise, die ready smile, 
the bright-eyed gaze and artfully ca~ 
deuced voice that proved so winning 
throughout her life, not Least during the 


Possible Successors 

Speculation about a possible 
successor to Ambassador Pamela 
Harriman was focusing on Frank 
Wisuer, now the U.S. ambassador 
to India. Another person widely 
cited for the Paris embassy was 
Felix Rohatyn, the New York in- 
vestment banker. Page 7. 


last four years in France, were entirely 
intact 

In recent months, Mrs. Harriman had 
been through perhaps die testiest period 
of French-American relations since her 
arrival. She had taken to alluding, with a 
grimace, to that “awful phrase, Af- 
south" — a reference to the Naples- 
based Allied Forces Southern Europe 
command coveted by Jacques Chirac, 
the French president 

The command oversees the U.S. 6th 
Fleet, die largest naval armada in the 
world, and the United States has no 
intention of giving it up to a Frenchman. 
The issue, still unresolved, has been 
little short of poisonous. 

In general, however, Mrs. Harriman 
has been a successful ambassador, com- 
bining a mystique and class attractive to 

See HARRIMAN, Page 7 


South Korea’s Economic Malaise 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Timet Service 


SEOUL — During the dirt-poor years 
following the Korean War, South 
Koreans were exhorted, to extend the 
lives of pencils by attaching sticks to 
stubs that had become too short to grip. 

Roar decades later, the Seoul Edu- 
cation Office is reviving the slogan. 
“It’s time to grasp the used-up pencils 
again," it said in a recen t newspaper 
advertisement that called on students 
and tbeir parents to “take the lead in 
saving our economy." 

Such DOTny-pmching might seem out 
of place in a nation of 45 million people 
that is now the llth largest economy in 
the world, with a per-capita output that 
has quadrupled in the past decade, to 
more than 510,000. 

Though it has performed an economic 
miracle. South Korea is now gripped by a 
deep unease about its future. Economic 
growth is slowing, the stock market is 
near a four-year low, the Korean won has 


‘Sandwiched 9 Between 
Two Levels of Growth 

sunk to its lowest level against the dollar 
in a decade, and the trade deficit has more 
than doubled in the last year. Banks are 
hobbled by bad debt, business strangled in 
red tape, and wages are soaring, weak- 
ening competitiveness. 

Suddenly, it seems to Koreans, the era 
of. fast growth is coming to an end. 


make the leap from industrialization to a 
_ economy on par with 
the United States and Japan. The sense of 
crisis has been punctuated by two events 
in the last month — the nationwide strike 
in reaction to a new labor law that 
threatens job security, and the stunning 
collapse of Hanbo Steel, flagship of the 
Datum’s 14th largest conglomerate, un- 
der nearly $6 billion in debt and a cloud 
of ccaruption. (Page 15) - 

* ‘Most people don't think it’s a cycle 


but that structurally something is 
wrong," said Kim Pyung Koo. a pro- 
fessor of economics at So gang Uni- 
versity in Seoul “South Korea is being 
sandwiched between fully industrial- 
ized economies and less developed, 
low-cost economies like China.’’ 

Some of foe gloom is u n warranted. 
Yes, the pace of growth has faltered from 
9 percent two years ago to an expected 6 
percent this year, bet that is sill twice as 
fast as expected growth in the United 
States. While a recent newspaper ed- 
itorial was headlined “Soaring Unem- 
ployment," foe jobless rate it lamented 
was 2.4 percent, a figure that most other 
countries can wily dream about 
Moreover, some of foe problems are 
cyclical. One reason for the surging 
trade deficit, for instance, is that prices 
of computer memory chips, which ac- 
count for 16 percent of South Korea’s 
exports, have collapsed because of a 
glut, not because Smith Korean compa- 

See KOREA, Page 7 


Landslide for Muslim League 







Thv.lmnAvrtVrrm 

Mian Nawaz Sharif proclaiming his victory in the Pakistani election. 

Bhutto Party Is Routed 

Pakistani Opposition Easily Wins Election 


By John F. Bums 

New York Times Service 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — 
Pakistan’s general election turned in- 
to a rout Tuesday as nearly complete 
returns showed foe Pakistan Muslim 
League returning from three years in 
opposition to score one of foe most 
lopsided election victories in foe 
country’s history over foe Pakistan 
People’s Party led by the dismissed 
prime minister, Benazir Bhutto. 

Hu landslide triumph gave Mian 


Nawaz Sharif, foe Muslim League 
leader who will take over as prime 
minister later in foe week, close to a 
two-thirds majority in the National 
Assembly. That will be the largest 
margin any elected government in 
Pakistan has had in decades. 

Results showed that Mr. Sharifs 
party would end up with about 740 
seats in the 2 17-seat Parliament, com- 
with only 25 or so for the 
s’s Party of Miss Bhutto. Her 

See PAKISTAN, Page 7 


Neighbors’ Support for Rebels Reshapes Sudan War 


SAUDI 

ARABIA 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Post Service 


WADI MAHDL Sudan — In the re- 
mote grass-hut villages along Sudan s 
harder with Ethiopia, foe air swirls with 
rumors about foe heavily amwdmoops 
who have rolled up big gains during 2A 
weeks of fighting against Sudanese gov- 
ernment forces. 

Some say the invaders wear short 
2 pants. Some say that their- skin ha? 4 

p reddish tint and that they speak a foreign 

tongue. Many believe, or say *ey do, 
that foe fighters are Ethiopian soUbere 
operating with support from Israel and 

fterUnited States. . - 

But few dispute the effectiveness •« 
tite enemy forces or that so far the 
government has done precious little to 

^Istwfoem with my own eyes,” said 


Badawi Ali, who walked here with his 
two wives and 16 children after enemy 
troops last week overran his border vil- 
lage 65 kilometers (40 miles) to the east 
“I won’t return. I’m scared. There's a 
lot of Ethiopians there." 

At first glance, the fighting in eastern 
Sudan seems yet another dreary chapter 
in Africa's “forgotten war." a 40-year 
conflict that since resumption in 1983 
after an 11 -year hiatus has killed an 
estimated 1 million people and driven 2 
million others from their homes. The 
conflict is usually described in terms of 
ethnic and religious rivalry between 
northern Sudan, which is predominantly 


Arab and Islamic, and southern Sudan, 
where Christianity and African tribal 
religions prevaiL 

But the Sudanese civil war has taken 
a new turn. With the active support of 
. and Eritrea, both of which are 
to receive militaiy aid from the 
United States, southern rebels have 
opened a new front in eastern Sudan in 
alliance with traditional Sudanese op- 
position parties from the north. That has 
alarmed Sudan’s Islamic fundamental- 
ist leaders, who have called for holy war 
against foe attackers and sought to rally 
: from other Islamic countries. 

: escalating tension between Sudan 


and its neighbors has raised fears in the 
region of a wider conflict that could 
destabilize the Horn of Africa and phmge 
foe continent’s largest country into 
Somati -style anarchy. In Washington, foe 
states surrounding Sudan are viewed as a 
new “front line’’ in foe cold war between 
the West and its allies and radical Islamic 
governments in Khartoum and Tehran. 

The United States accuses Sudan of 
supporting Islamic extremists, includ- 
ing those behind the attempted assas- 
sination of President Hosni Mubarak of 
Egypt in Ethiopia in June 1995. Sudan 

See SUDAN, Page 7 



SYT 


Looted Gold 
Might Go to 
Holocaust 
Reparations 

U.S., France and U.K. 
Freeze $68 Million 
From Wartime Fund 


By David E. Sanger 

Sen York Times Sen ice 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States. Britain and France have agreed 
to freeze the distribution of $68 million 
in gold bars that were looted by the 
Nazis from European central banks, and 
Clinton administration officials say the 
gold could form the core of a fund to 
compensate Holocaust victims. 

The gold bars have been stored in the 
vaults of the Federal Reserve Bank in 
New York and at the Bank of England 
since Switzerland. Sweden and other 
nations turned them over to Allied 
powers at the end of World War II. 

Most of the estimated 337 metric tons 
of gold collected from those secret ac- 
counts. worth nearly $4 billion at cur- 
rent gold prices, was long ago returned 
to central banks across Europe after they 
had been systematically looted by Ger- 
man troops as they moved across 
Europe. But the group administering the 
disbursement of the gold, the Tripartite 
Commission, still has $6S million that 
was supposed to be distributed to the 
central banks early this year. The com- 
mission was then scheduled to go out of 
existence. 

Jewish groups led by the World Jew- 
ish Congress intervened, however, 
claiming that some pan of the gold came 
from private citizens in Europe, espe- 
cially Jews whose assets had been 
seized as they were sent to death 
camps. 

The president of foe World Jewish 
Congress, Edgar Bronfman, asked that 

See GOLD, Page 6 


Moscow Faces 
Host of Offers 
In NATO Talks 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Convinced that broad in- 
ducements will be needed to win Rus- 
sia's assent to NATO enlargement, the 
United States and its allies are pursuing 
a web of diplomatic initiatives that 
could give Moscow favorable treatment 
in areas ranging from air traffic control 
to weapons treaties and a direct voice in 
big-power policy-making. 

An alliance official, describing the 
scope of the U.S.-led dialogue, said Tues- 
day that NATO's planned eastward ex- 
pansion had become “more challenging, 
more ambitious and potentially more his- 
toric than German reunification.' ’ 

In 1990, five-nation talks ended the 
Cold War division of Germany. If suc- 
cessful, foe current diplomatic offensive 
aimed at foe heart of foe former Soviet 
empire, involving a dozen countries di- 
rectly and a score more indirectly, 
would lay a basis for long-term stability 
throughout the Continent. European ana 
American analysts say. 

The key to a breakthrough, Strobe 
Talbon, the U.S. deputy secretary of 
state, said, is to “really show the Rus- 
sians that this is nor a NATO trick, a grab 
for a few countries, but really a sincere 
effort to secure political stability and 
promote prosperity in Europe for a long 
time." while most attention has focused 
on direct U.S. talks with Moscow, Mr. 
Talbott and European policymakers in- 
terviewed this week emphasized the ira- 
of other negotiating tracks, 
include: 

• NATO's bid for a special relation- 
ship with Moscow, which could include a 
Russian role in planning for peacekeep- 

See NATO, Page 7 


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Israeli Army Copters Collide; 70 Die 


More than 70 Israeli soldiers were 
killed Tuesday night when two military 
helico pters on foe way to Lebanon col- 
lided above a kibbutz in northern Israel. 
It was the worst militaiy air disaster in 
the nation’s history. 

Shift on Hong Kong 

Britain announced Tuesday that it 
would grant fell citizenship, to $,000 
Hong Kong residents from ethnic 
minorities who were likely to be left 
Stateless when foe colony reverts to 
China in July- ~ 


The army said that foe two heli- 
copters were loaded with explosives, 
and that each was taking 37 soldiers to 
the Israefi occupation zone in southern 
Lebanon, it was still searching for sur- 
vivors. Page 7. 

PAGE TWO 


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INTERNATIONAL HFBAT.D TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 5. 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Lab Animals / Unemployed Apes 

A Surplus of Chimps Spurs 
Dispute Over Their Future 


By David Beireby 

Nn- York Tunes Service 

H olloman air force base. 

New Mexico — Hands and feet gently 
slapping concrete, Chandra and Shasta 
come loping down their sunny outdoor 
run at the complex operated by the Collision 
Foundation here. The little apes do not look up 
when the black triangle of a Stealth fighter knifes 
across the sky above them and banks for a 
landing at a nearby runway. 

Born on this base, where the air force used 
chimpanzees four decades ago to establish that 
human beings could go into space, they are used 
to jets. But these toddling one-year-olds will 
probably live until the middle of the next cen- 
tury. and what their futures will be like — where 
they will live, who will care for them, and what 
experiments, if any, will be performed on their 
bodies — are questions at the center of a mount- 
ingpolitical and ethical dispute. 

They are among the newest members of a 
captive population of about 1,800 chimpanzees 
in Amen can biomedical research, each of which 
costs roughly $15 a day to maintain. Many of 
these chimps, including most of the 150 to 200 
that have been infected with HTV, the virus that 
causes AIDS, are essentially unemployed — no 
longer used in experiments. 

When they are not caged alone temporarily for 
an experimental protocol, most of the chim- 
panzees pass their time in small groups housed in 
cell-like cages at a handful of sites around the 
country. Many play with toys and devices de- 
signed, as required by federal law. to make their 
lives more interesting. Some watch television. 

“They like programs about chimps, like Na- 
tional Geographic specials," said Kate Baker, 
enrichment coordinator at Yerkes Regional Prim- 
ate Center, a federally financed center in Atlanta 
that holds about 200 of the apes. “They like 
shows on how to use tools. And they like to see 
people arguing, so Oprah is a show they like." 

The perception or a surplus has helped re- 
searchers like Bill Hopkins, who has many chimps 
available for his study at Yerkes of such traits as 
handedness and the ability to recognize faces. 

It has also encouraged speculation about odd- 
sounding projects that might not be considered if 
biomedical chimps were regarded as scarce — a 
proposal, for example, to use female chimps as 
surrogate mothers ror bonobos, a closely related 
and much rarer species of ape, or a suggestion 
that chimps be fed meat tainted with “mad cow" 
disease to see if they can become infected. 

The debate over the “chimp surplus" extends 
from the National Institutes of Health — whose 
director. Dr. Harold Varmus. appointed a com- 
mittee last year to issue recommendations on the 


handling of the research chimp population — to 
Congress, which is being lobbied with at least 
two proposals for legislation. 

The surplus is partly a result of a surprisingly 
successful drive begun in 1986 by the health 


successful drive begun in 1986 by the health 
institutes to breed chimps for AIDS research 
(wild chimps have not been imported for research 
since 1975). The chimp baby boom exploded just 
as researchers were deciding that infected chimps 
did not come down with AIDS and hence could 
not be used as animal models for the disease. 
(Now, it seems chimps can contract AIDS.) 

Most chimps in biomedical centers are now on 
some form of birth control, though the breeding 
program has not been completely stopped. The 
health institutes, for example, have renewed a 
grant for breeding at the Coulston Foundation. 

The surplus also derives, though, from a cul- 
tural change. The very similarity to humans 
(genetically, they are more than 98 percent 
identical) that makes chimpanzees attractive 
subjects for research on HIV, hepatitis, malaria, 
respiratory diseases, Lyme disease and parasites 
has also made their use troubling to more and 
morepeople, including some scientists. 

“There is a generational change in research- 
ers," said Frans de Waal, an ethologist who 
studies social behavior in two bands of chimps 
that live in large, toy-filled enclosures at Yerkes. 
“The younger generation doesn't feel the same 
right to do whatever they please." 

Chimpanzees also have powerful allies in an- 
imal rights groups, so using them invites es- 
pecially intense scrutiny, which can add to cost 

"My concern is that a lot of people have been 
put off from studying chimpanzees in particular 
because they feel it’s too expensive and they'd 
get beheaded." said Joe Erwin, a specialist in 
captive chimps who has run sites for both zoos 
and biomedical centers. “Ending all research is 
just terribly threatening to the animals. What we 
really need is to find more support'* 

Demand for chimpanzees in research has been 
cyclic in the past, said Dr. Thomas Wolfle. 
director of the Institute for Laboratory Animal 
Resources at the National Research Council and 
study director for the health institutes' com- 
mittee. There was talk of a chimpanzee surplus in 
die early 1980s, after hepatitis research had 
slowed, for example. 

Part of the committee’s mission. Dr. Wolfle 
said, is to determine how many chimpanzees 
need to be held “in reserve" for the next in- 
fectious agent that comes along. 

“We do all have this feeling that there will be 
another two or three infectious agents coming 
down the pike," said Dr. Patricia Fultz, a mi- 
crobiologist and a committee member. “So we're 
going to need chimpanzees in the future." 

But the surplus debate has attracted groups 








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that sense a chance to remove large numbers of 
chimps from biomedical research for good. Pro- 
posed legislation in Congress, for example, 
would create a system of ‘ ‘ sanctuaries" to which 
research chimpanzees could be “retired." 


A cross the philosophical spectrum is the 
Coulston Foundation, which is lob- 
bying for a bill that would direct mil- 
lions of federal dollars for research on 
aging in chimpanzees. “We don't have enough 
chimps for what we want to do," said the pres- 
ident of the foundation. Dr. Frederick Collision. 

The foundation, spun off in 1993 from Dr. 
Coulston’s private manufacturing company. 
Cool st on International, will soon control the 
largest captive colony in the world. Besides its 
400 chimps, about 100 are being added from a 
research lab owned by New York University 
Medical School. Collision also has a contract to 
care for the air force's 150 chimpanzees. 

Dr. Coulston has long worked with the mil- 
itary, dating back to his work on malaria during 
World War H, and he was in charge of the air 
force’s chimpanzee colony from 1970 to 1980. 

In May 1995, a clause in a military appro- 
priation bill that would have given him ownership 
of the air force chimpanzees was killed after Dr. 
Jane Goodall, the researcher and advocate for 
chimpanzees, objected. The bill passed instead 
with a provision requiring the air force to solicit 
bids for a contract to care for the apes. In Defense 


The largest captive colony of 
chimpanzees will soon be run by 
Dr. Frederick Coulston’s 
foundation. But animal rights 
groups consider him a 
throwback to days of cruel and 
indifferent treatment of apes, 
and one plans to compete with 
him for the care of 150 chimps . 


of Animals is among those that will compete with 
Dr. Coulston for the contract, said Eric Kleinian, 
the animal rights group’s research director. 

Dr. Coulston has long been reviled by animal 
rights groups as a throwback to days of cruel and 
indifferent treatment of apes. "His record of 
animal care is extremely troubling," said Su- 
zanne Roy, president of In Defense of Animals. 

Three chimpanzees in a building run by Dr. 
Coulston died in 1993 after being left overnight 
with a space healer dial malfunctioned, raising 
the temperature in their holding area to more than 
140 degrees Fahrenheit (60 centigrade). The 
Department of Agriculture charged the found- 
ation in die incident, and Coulston paid a $40,000 
fine last year to settle that and other charges. 

On Jan. 21 a chimp named Jello, recently 
arrived from the NYU laboratory, died after being 
sedated for transfer from one cage to another. 

In Defense of Animals filed a complaint with 
Agriculture charging that a necropsy had re- 
vealed that the ape had food in its trachea. 
“Everybody knows before you tranquilize an 
animal you fast him," Mr. Kidman said. He said 
the group's account was based on reports from 
three sources within Coulston. 

The foundation denied that Jello had been fed. 

Many researchers back the foundation. "Coul- 
ston is an approved facility for primates," Dr. 
Fultz said, adding “The facilities for the chimps 
that I have seen there are just as good as else- 
where. I don’t think there’s a big difference.’' 


Britain Relents ? 

On Citizenship 
For Minorities 
In Hong Kong 

_ GunfaMArOr S*SfFr>M Oufkbfoi 

- LONDON — In a change of heart, 

Britain announced Tuesday that it 
would grant full citizenship to 8,000 
Hong Kong residents from ethnic 
minorities who were likely to be left 
stateless when the colony reverts to 
China. 

The decision gives beneficiaries — • 
ethnic Indians, Pakistanis. Sri Lankans. 

Malaysians. Portuguese and Singapor- 
eans, all of whom faced statelessness — 
the right to live in Britain. 

The announcement by Home Sec- 
retary Michael Howard was a victory 
for Hong Kong's governor, Chris Pat- 
ten, who had pressed the issue with 
fellow Conservatives in Prime Minister tfjn 

John Major’s government- nmm 

About 8,000 people in Hong Kong — igMl 

roughly half of them of Indian and ffinB 
Pakistani descent — are classed as eth- jjggjga 
nic minorities. Being non -Chinese, they ■Em 

do not qualify for the Hong Kong cit- H 
izenship that takes effect when China HSnp 

gains sovereignty July I, although they n 
retain the right to live in Hong Kong. WW 

The travel documents Britain gives 5 > ‘ 
most Hong Kong residents do not give 
them the right to live in Britain. 

In a statement late Tuesday in Hong . 

Kong, Governor Patten applauded the t 

move as “an excellent Chinese New I 

Year present to Hong Kong. ’ ’ 1 

“3l has been widely acknowledged in & 

Hong Kong that the group in question 
represents a very special case." he said. 

"Without tins pledge, their status ^HL 
after 30th June 1997 would have been IK 
uncertain — entitled to right of abode in Hftgle 

Hong Kong without Chinese nationality §§8li 
and to British nationality without die |||||| 
right of abode in Britain. The decision 
today ends this uncertainty." 

London had earlier promised to guar- 
antee asylum for ethnic minority res- . - 

idents if China made it impossible for , 
them to remain in Hong Kong. But Mr. ) j" . 
Major's government refused to gram 
them citizenship, saying this would set a ’1 
precedent for other former colonies. I \ 

Mr. Patten had argued that failure to 1 ‘ V V 

do justice to Hong Kong’s ethnic minor- 
ities “would be an exceptionally un- 
fortunate way for Britain to bring the F.T 1 .. 

curtain down in this last of its great [all 1 ! 

colonial dependencies." 

Mr. Howard said he expected most if . ’ ] 

ethnic minority residents In Hong Kong I ijjv [7 “ ] j 

to continue living die re. (AP. AFP) 


i in** 1 







Helms Makes ‘Hostage’ 
Of Chemical Arms Pact 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

ll’giWngitwi Post Senice 

WASHINGTON — Senator Jesse 
Helms, chairman of the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee, has served notice 
that he will hold an international treaty 
banning chemical weapons hostage to 
his own foreign policy agenda, includ- 
ing reorganization of the State Depart- 
ment and reform of the United Nations. 

Mr. Helms's staff released a Jan. 29 
letter from him to the Senate majority 
leader, Trent Lott, saying that "top Re- 
publican priorities" such as “legisla- 
tion that ensures comprehensive reform 
of the United Nations" should come 
before consideration of ratifying the 
Chemical Weapons Convention. 

Senate Republican aides said that Mr. 
Lon, a Mississippi Republican whose 
support for the chemical treaty is luke- 
warm at best, is inclined to let Mr. 
Helms, a North Carolina Republican, 
have his way rather than try to cir- 
cumvent him and force an early rat- 
ification vote. 

The treaty, one of the most ambitious 
global arms control agreements of re- 
cent years, was negotiated during a Re- 
publican administration and has been 
endorsed by many prominent current 
and former officials of both parties. 

Aides to Mr. Helms portray his po- 
sition as a test of the Clinton admin- 
istration's professed commitment to bi- 
partisanship in foreign policy, saying 
that Mr. Helms is prepared to negotiate. 

Supporters of the treaty say that Mr. 
Helms has created the first big test of 
Mr. Lott's leadership, arguing that the 
majority leader should use his clout to 
win ratification of the agreement rather 
than let Mr. Helms and his conservative 
allies control the agenda. 

Signed by 161 countries and ratified 
by 68 — three more than necessary for it 
to go into effect on April 29 — the treaty 
bans the use, possession and manufac- 
ture of nerve gas weapons. If the Senate 
has not ratified it by then, the United 
Stales will be excluded from participat- 
ing in the enforcement system, including 
international challenge inspections. 

Major U.S. chemical manufacturers 
have supported ratification because they 
will eventually be barred from some 
export markets if the United States does 
not participate. 


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Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright went to Capitol Hill last week to 
lobby for ratification. 

And a National Security Council 
spokesman, David Johnson, said 
Monday that the administration inten- 
ded “to work with the Senate on a 
bipartisan basis" on the chemical 
weapons accord and sought to achieve 
results “at the earliest possible time." 

But the administration faces two high 
hurdles in efforts to get the treaty rat- 
ified. One is that Mr. Helms, Senator 
Jon Kyi, Republican of Arizona, and 
other Senate conservatives have serious 
reservations about it. They say it cannot 
be adequately verified, would not be 
enforceable against outlaw, nonsignat- 
ory nations like Libya and gives in- 
adequate guarantees of Russian com- 
pliance. 

The other problem is that Mr. Helms, 
under Senate rules, is in a position to 
force the administration to negotiate be- 
cause he can hold up treaties, ambas- 
sadorial nominations and confirmation 
of senior State Department officials. He 
did that in the last Congress in an un- 
successful effort to force the admin- 
istration to accept his pet project, ab- 
olition of three foreign policy agencies 
and merger of some functions into a 
reorganized State Department 

In his "Dear Trent” letter, Mr. 
Helms said that he wanted to “focus on 


28 Guerrillas 
Die in Algeria 

Reuters 

PARIS — Security forces and 
pro- government militiamen have 
killed 28 Muslim rebels, including 
a suspected bomber who was shot 
along with two other guerrillas in 
Algiers, an Algerian newspaper re- 
ported Tuesday. 

The security forces said they 
killed die three guerrillas in die 
capital on Monday as they were 
preparing to cany out assassina- 
tions, die newspaper Liberte said. 

It said one of the three was iden- 
tified as Redouane Mouhamer, who 
was being sought by the authorities 
for his alleged role in a car bombing 
in the capital on Jan. 21 that killed 
at least six people and wounded 
more than 40 others. 

The paper also reported dial se- 
curity forces killed 17 guerrillas in 
an operation last week, and that 
eight more were killed in a gun 
battle with a pro-government, anti- 
Islamist militia south of the cap- 
ital. 


top Republican priorities first’ ’ — “en- 
actment of legislation fundamentally re- 
structuring the antiquated foreign 
policy agencies of the U.S." and pas- 
sage of legislation “that ensures com- 
prehensive reform of the United Na- 
tions." 


Sanford Meisner, Acting Teacher, Dies 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Sanford Meisner, 
9 1 , one of the most influential American 
acting teachers of this century and for 
decades the director of the celebrated 
Neighborhood Playhouse School of the 
Theater in New York City, died Sunday 
in Sherman Oaks, California. 

Mr. Meisner, an unassuming bur cha- 
rismatic man who began his career as an 
actor and occasionally undertook di- 
recting. was one of a handful of master 
drama instructors. He exhorted several 
generations of students to be truthful, 
spontaneous and emotionally credible 
and to act with other actors, not against 
them. 

His students included Gregory Peck, 
Joanne Woodward, Diane Keaton, 
Robert Duvall and Grace Kelly. He also 
taught such directors as Sidney Lumet, 
Sydney Pollack and Vivian Matalon, 
plus the playwright David Mamet. 

A 1985 documentary film about Mr. 
Meisner’s shaping of actors was aptly 
titled “The Theater's Best-Kept 
Secret" because people outside the 
Neighborhood Playhouse School were 
unlikely to know the name of the pub- 
licity-shy instructor, despite tbe ferae of 
his proteges. 

The Neighborhood Playhouse is still 
in operation, along with the Meisner/ 
Carvilie School of Acting (James 
Carville was the co-founder) and the 
Sanford Meisner Center for the Arts, 
both in Hollywood. 

Sharing a stage convincingly with 
other actors, he stressed, is just as im- 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Japan Is Asked to Add 
3d Airport for Tokyo 

TOKYO (AFP) — The head of the 
International Air Transport Association 
urged Japan on Tuesday to build a third 
airport for Tokyo. 

Japan has a “substantial capacity 
problem" with its airports, said the as- 
sociation’s director-general, Pierre 
JeannioL 

“ Narita needs urgently a second run- 
way, and Tokyo must decide very soon 
•on a third airport, free of curfew, so it 
will probably have to be in Tokyo Bay,’’ 
Mr. Jeanniot said. Narita serves inter- 
national flights, while Haenda Airport is 
for domestic travel. 

Washington Wants 
Ticket Tax Reinstated 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Clin- 
ton a dm i nis tration urged Congress on 
Tuesday to reinstate an expired airline 
ticket tax and said delay could shut 
down important improvement projects 
at U.S. airports. 

Donald Lubick, acting assistant 
Treasury secretary for tax policy, asked 
the Senate Finance Committee to im- 


mediately reinstate tbe taxes, which ex- 
pired Dec. 31, and to give the Treasury 
the authority to transfer money it has 
collected into the Airport and Airway 
Trust Fund that finances airport mod- 
ernization. 

Tourism Is Up 12%, 
Czech Republic Says 

PRAGUE (Reuters) — The Czech 
Republic continued to attract tourists in 
record numbers in 1996, but they stayed 
for shorter periods of time, many of 
them at top class hotels, the Statistical 
Bureau said Tuesday, 

The number of foreign visits, meas- 
ured by die border police, rose by nearly 
12 percent from 2995, to 109.4 million, 
tbe agency said. 

An Incb or snow (two and a half 
centimeters) covered the capital. Nico- 
sia, and other lowland areas of Cyprus 
on Tuesday after the first snowfall in 
eight years. (AP) 

Tbe Chinese aviation authorities 
have slashed air fares for foreigners 
traveling in China to try to increase 
tourism, the China Daily newspaper re- 
ported Tuesday. (Reuters) 


Europe 


portam as creating a character. “It's a 
very bitterpill for the actor to swallow,” 
he mice said, to be told that another actor 
“is more important than you are, but 
you have to believe this. It must become 
your religion." 

In 1933, he became disillusioned 
with Method acting, and wrote: “Actors 
are not guinea pigs to be manipulated, 
dissected, let alone in a purely negative 
way. Our approach was not organic, that 
is to say, not healthy." 

He decided that American actors 
needed “an American approach.” He 
began teaching at the Neighborhood 
Playhouse in 1935, and the next year 
took over as head of the institution. 

His classroom, in the brownstone feat 
bouses the playhouse's school on 54th 
Street off First Avenue, was peppered 
with signs advising students to “Act 
Before You Think,’ r ‘ ‘Be Specific, ’’ and 
remember that “An Ounce of Behavior 
Is Worth a Pound of Words.” He con- 
tinued to teach spiritedly into his 80s. 

BohumH Hrabal, 82, Author 
Of ‘Closely Watched Trains’ 

PRAGUE (AP) — Bohumil Hrabal, 
82, whose novel of romance under Nazi 
occupation inspired the Oscar-winning 
film “Closely Watched Trains." ac- 
cidentally fell from a fifth-floor window 
and died Monday. 

Mr. Hrabal, a lawyer, turned to writ- 
ing in the early 1960s. He wrote nearly 
50 books, many of which could not be 
officially published in Communist 
Czechoslovakia. 


WEATHER 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 


His 1965 story “Closely Watched 
Trains" was turned into a film by Jiri 
Menzel and won an Oscar for best for- 
eign film in 1967. 

Theodoros S tamos, 74, Painter 
And Rothko Trial Figure 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Theodoros 
Siam os. 74, a precocious member of 
Abstract Expressionism's first gener- 
ation and a prominent figure in a trial 
feat rocked the art world in the 1970s, 
died Sunday of a lung ailment in Yi- 
annina, Greece. He lived in New York, 
where he was born, and on the island of 
Leflcada, Greece. 

Mr. S tamos was never considered an 
Abstract Expressionist of the first rank 
and was nearly a generation younger than 
its chief innovators. But he was among 
fee style's earlier adherents and a close 
friend to many Abstract Expressionist 
artists, most famously Mark Rothko. 

When Mr. Rothko committed suicide 
in 1970, Mr. S tamos was named one of 
fee three executors of his estate, along 
wife Bernard Reis, an accountant, and 
Morton Levine, a professor of anthro- 
pology'. In 1971, guardians acting for 
Mr. Rothko’s children filed a petition 
against tbe executors, charging that they 
had sold a large group of paintings to fee 
Marlborough Gallery at an unusually 
high discount that was detrimental to his 
reputation, and feat they were wasting 
the assets of the estate. 

Mr. S tamos and fee other executors 
were found guilty of negligence and 
conflict of interest. 


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North America 

MM air wflt oow the Gnat 
Lakes, mid- Atlantic and 
Southeast Into tha week- 
end. Much ol the rest of 
the U.S. and southern 
Canada wO average near 
nonroL The West wtU be 
quite stormy through Saturn 
day wtti localy heavy rain 
possible over California 
and the Northwest 


North America 


Europe 

Near- to abova-norntal 
temperatures win prevail 
across much of Europe, 
except In the southeast, 
where cold air wflf dm In. 
Showers could dampen the 
British Was and northwest- 
ern Europe Friday. Stormy 
across northern Scandi- 
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ern Media nronaun Into die 


Northe as t China and both 
Koreas, Including Bering 
and Seoul, will be mainly 
dry with near- to above- 
normal temperatures. 
Tokyo and much of Japan 
will also average near to 
Just above normal with 
unsettled weather Thu re- 
day and Saturday. Hong 
Kong will be damp and 
rather coot. 


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Imprint* par Offprint, 73 rue de T Evanglte. TSOIS Paris. 







PAGE 3 



^1:1 UWT;.. 



- - — • -L*.% ■ 


crammoNAL herald tribune, Wednesday February 5, 1997 


WE AMERICAS 



ily Joins Dying Ray in Push for a Trial 


POLITICAL 


By Rick Bragg 

New York Tones Serv*-* 


aad r days later, recanted hiS con- 
fession. 


Ray. will be granted a new trial in a 
killing that occurred in 1968 -are 

ATLANTA In the name of truth and justice, extremely slim, ft is -even uncertain 

— ^ — . wenty-mne our family iscalling for a trial, a trial whether Mr. Ray; who is once again 

” t but failing a bole. 

could survive tong 

■ Dexter King said enough to see a trial through. ■■ 
mat he and others in the f amily have But his approaching (kadi- has 

no way of knowing whether a trial lent a sense of urgency to an un- 





toy stretches into forever 
James Eari Ray, the man who 
we ?l!° PP 800 / 01 ’ fee assassination 


a rwmam S tns father's death, but they 


sur- 


ma&on i 

“I don’t think his trial — if he is 
granted a trial — will necessarily 
give us the unequivocal proof,” Mr. 


expected coalition of Mr. King’s 
family, Mr. Ray’s younger brother 
arid several old civil rights advo- 
cates to reopen the case. 


ber, faebas been in critical condition. 

Each tune he rallied. 

. has §f. vc w uw unequivocal proor, - Mr. seme me many conspiracy theories 

4} and Mr Rav’sn^nT^ ass ^?f* 3 ,? n King said, “but at least in regards to — some involving the FBI and other 

* 

pamfiiL 

Now, the family wants Mr. Ray to 

have the trial he has sought for aj- 


hi 

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most three decades, since he con- 
fessed to the killing, pleaded guilty 


than we do now.” 

There is also the simple fact that it 
is the humane thing to do, Mir. King 
said. “Especially in ti gh t of the feet 
be is oz> Ms deathbed.*’ 

The chances that the 68-year-old 


They hope a new trial will resolve 
whether Mr. Ray was the killer, and 
settle the many conspiracy theories 

agents of the U.S. gov ernment 
that have swirled around the as- 
sassination for three decades. 
Several of Me. King’s oldest 


posited Mr.Ray's crusade for a trial, 
never believing that he acted alone. 


Mr, Ray was a small-time escapee 
from a Missouri prison who had 
banded some of his petty crimes. 

“Even if Ray pulled the 
he was the mol of ocher peo 
said the Reverend Joseph Loweiy, 
idem of the Southern Christian 
Conference and an old 
associate of Mr. King. - 
“He never demonstrated that he 
had die intelligence or the resources 
to plot and carry it out He was a 
tool, a patsy, as much a victim of the 
violence and hatred as Dr. King.' * 
Mr. Ray has talked to reporters 
off and on for decades ana even 
played himself in a mock trial on 
television. But he has never 
answered the specific questions 
about his involvement to the sat- 
isfaction of anyone. Old friends of 
Mr. King and family members hope 
it would be different in a trial. 

He has offered conflicting and 


inconsistent stories over the years as 
to where he was on the late af- 
ternoon of April 4, 1968, when Mr. 
King was killed in Memphis. But he 
has long insisted that he was used by 
others. 

Lawyers for Mr. Ray. in a hearing 
set for Feb. 20, plan to ask for a 
ballistics test ou the rifle that is 
believed Id be the murder weapon, 
hoping - that contention will be 
proved wrong. It is one more step — 
and a crucial one, considering Mr. 
Ray’s failing health — in “the ul- 
timate goal to get a trial,” said Wil- 
liam Pepper, a lawyer from London 
who represents Mr. Ray. 

His lawyer says a trial would 
show that Mr. Ray was the unwitting 
accomplice he claimed to be. “He 
doesn't have a great deal to con- 
tribute to the truth of the assas- 
sination of Martin King.” Mr. Pep- 
per said. 



Army’s Top Enlisted Man 
Accused of Sexual Assault 

Ex-Sergeant Also Says an Officer Tried to Bury Incident 


By Eric Schmitt 

New York Tones Service 


Kn> HakmyThe New MTw 

Brenda Hoster says her superiors at the Pentagon suppressed her complaint 


Simpson 
Loses New 
Ridfor 
A Mistrial 


Los Angela Times 
SANTA MONICA, CaK- 
fomia.-rr O.J. Simpson’s 
lawyers nave lost their faiest 
bid to scuttle his civil tiiaL as 
the judge rejected their air 
gument that a juror ■ he re- 
moved from "die panel last 
week could have turned the 
panel against Mr. Simpson. 

Shouting at Judge Hiroshi 
Fujisaki across the Superior 
Court courtroom, his face red 
with anger, the lead defease 

S . Robert Baker, re- 
• demanded a mistrial . 

He argued that . Mr. 
Simpson was entitled to a 
fresh start because the former 
juror, . Rosemary Caraway, 
who was dismissed for failing 
to disclose that her daughter 
works for county prosecutors, 
could have poisoned her fal- 
low jurors* attitudes toward 
the case. 

Mrs. Caraway was bumped 
from the panel last Friday, 
after taking part in 14 hours of 
deliberations. An alternate 
juror took her place. 

Judge Fujisaki brusquely 
turned Mr. Baker down, but 
said he could ask the jurors 
about Mrs. Caraway after the 
verdict 

The judge has dismissed at 
least a half-dozen defense re- 
quests fora mistrial since jury 
selection began in Septem- 
ber. 


Away From Politics 

• The California Court of Appeals has thrown out a 
$1.2 milli on judgment against ABC News won by Mark 
Sanders, a man whose telephone psychic work had been 
secretly videotaped and. broadcast on “Prime Time 
live.” ABC cited the. ruling as a vindication of its 

' undercover reporting, which nas led to six judgments 
against fee networic in toe past five years. (AP) 

•A felon suspected of engineering a series of bomb- 
nogs at a Northern California courthouse and bank in 
order to derail a drug trial tint could imprison him for life 
surrendered an Tuesday. Kevin Lee Robinson, 29, al- 
legedly hired several men to carry out the bombings so be 
COTj ^d ^sacppt his a^ajpt^ trial at the Solaao County : ^| 

• Certain -hair dyes contain so much lead that bath- 
rooms, hair dryers, hands and tinted hair can be coo- 
taminated, says a study published Tuesday in the Journal 
of fee American Pharmaceutical Association. . (AP) 


WASHINGTON — A 22-year veteran of 
the U.S. Army has accused her former boss, 
die army’s top-ranking enlisted man and a 
member of the commission charged with re- 
viewing die army's sexual harassment 
policies, of sexually assaulting her in her hotel 
room during a business trip to Hawaii last 
April. She says at least one senior army officer 
then tried to cover up fee incident. 

As a result of the allegations, made formally 
in a complaint mailed to the army on Friday. 
Gene McKinney, the sergeant major of the 
army, asked to be excused from his duties on 
the panel until die matter is resolved. 

In a statement Monday night. Sergeant 
McKinney denied that he had ever engaged in 
any form pf sexual misconduct. 

Army officials said Monday feat they had 
granted the request and would investigate fee 
charges when fee formal complaint arrived. 

The woman. Sergeant Major Brenda 
Hoster, said that after she had overcome her 
initial fears about reporting die incident and 
had told her superiors at the Pentagon about it 
seven weeks later, they had taken no action 
and had suppressed her complaint. 

They also ignored ber pleas for a job trans- 
fer and left her wife no other choice, but to 
retire early, she said. 

That could have ended fee matter. Sergeant 
Hoster, an army journalist and public affairs 
.specialist, said she had reluctantly agreed to 
leave quietly in August, partly “for me good 
of the army” and partly because she feared, 
she said, that no one would believe her if she 
pressed her case. 

But when Array Secretary Togo West Jr. 
appointed Sergeant McKinney in November to 


fee panel to examine sexual harassment. Ser- 
geant Hoster said, she could not stay silen t Not 
when the man she says kissed her, grabbed her 
and asked her for sex was to help set the army's 
future policies against sexual misconduct 
“It wasn’t right.” she raid in an emotional 
three-hour interview ax her lawyer's office in 
Denver last Friday. “He doesn’t have any 
business being cm that paneL' ’ 

Sergeant Hosier’s complaint detailed in 
the interview and in a 13-page sworn state- 
ment that was sent Friday by certified mail, 
will probably widen an army inquiry into 
sexual misconduct that has focused until now 
mainly on reports of army drill sergeants 
raping their teenage female trainees. 

The most serious incident in the complaint 
Sergeant Hoster said, happened last April, on 
a business trip to Hawaii. She said Sergeant 
McKinney came to her hotel room and made 
several sexual overtures, she said. 

The complaint also suggests that at least 
one high-ranking army public-affairs officer 
covered up Sergeant Hosier’s allegations and 
hid the dama g ing information from fee 
army’s senior leaders. 

to a response Monday to questions from a 
reporter, the army said that Sergeant McKin- 
ney and Colonel Robert Gaylord, the deputy 
chief of army public affairs who heard Ser- 
geant Hoster ’s complaint in June, would have 
no comment, pending an investigation. 

Sergeant Hoster, who now earns $10 an 
hour as an office manager for a dentist, said 
she fait betrayed by an army she had trusted. 

“Here is this army feat I served in for 20 
damned years with a system of leadership I 
believed in,” she said. “Here’s a bunch of 
people I would have stood in any foxhole 
with, and defended their lives with mine. They 
sold me out” 


Loti Begs to Differ on Medicaid 

WASHINGTON — Even while pledging to work wife 
President Bill Clinton in a bipartisan spirit Senator Trent 
Loa of Mississippi, fee Republican leader, says he is 
opposed Mr. Clinton’s proposal to set firm limits on 
federal Medicaid spending. He also says there is little 
money available to fix the new welfare law in ways 
sought by the president 

Mr. Lon told the National Governors’ Association on 
Monday that he agreed with its position on Medicaid, 
adamantly opposing a limit on federal spending in fee 
program. Governors fear that such limits would shift costs 
to the states, which already pay 42 percent of Medicaid 
costs nationwide. 

“1 never have liked fee idea of a per-capita cap.” Mr. 
Lott said. “Your policy statement is right on target. I 
personally share your concerns.” 

To be sure. Mr. Lott said, “we’re going to have to find 
some ways to control fee increasing cost of this program,” 
which finances health care for 37 million law- income 
people. But neither he nor the governors specified how 
that should be done, except to say that state officials should 
be given more control over design of fee program. 

Since its creation in 1 965, Medicaid has been an open- 
ended program, providing health insurance to people who 
meet eligibility criteria set t>y federal and state laws. 
While preserving the entitlement, Mr. Clinton would, for 
the first time, impose a firm limit on federal Medicaid 
spending to guarantee that per-capita Medicaid costs rise 
no faster than the nation’s per-capita economic output. 

In the budget he announces this week, Mr. Clinton will 
also ask Congress to restore food stamps and disability 
benefits for some legal immigrants who lose such as- 
sistance under the new welfare law, which he signed on 
Aug. 22. But Mr. Lott said that “it would be very hard for 
us to come back and open up” the welfare law. “If you 
open fear bam door, a lot of horses will run out,” he said, 
alluding to the desire of Democrats to change other parts 
of fee law. (NYT) 

Clinton Is Still Riding High 

NEW YORK — President Bill Clinton had broad 
support as he prepared for his State of the Union address 
Tuesday night, yet a majority of Americans think Con- 
gress should investigate his campaign fund-raising, polls 
found. 

Mr. Clinton has maintained a high job-approval rating 
since fee election, 63 percent in a CBS News Poll and 60 
percent in a CNN-USA Today-Gallup Poll. By com- 
parison, Congress got only 36 percent job approval in 
both polls. 

CBS found that Americans think the Republicans in 
Congress will have more influence than Mr. Clinton over 
the next two years, by 5S percent to 34 percent. But they 1 
say Mr. Clinton should have more influence, by 51 
percent to 36 percent. 

Only 46 percent think Mr. Clinton is serious about 
campaign finance reform, CBS said, but even more doubt , 
fee Republicans’ intentions. 

Sixty-two percent think Congress should hold hearings ' 
about White House meetings wife Clinton campaign . 
contributors. (AP) ■ 


Quote/Unquote 


Bob Dole, fee former Senate majority leader and 
Republican presidential candidate, on the need of fee 
House speaker. Newt Gingrich, to restore his image after 
being reprimanded for ethics violations: "I think Newt’s 
going to have some rehab. He’s going to have to work at 
jLjge’s going to have to demonstrate to the American 
jteoplfrthat we can all talk back and forth, but fee bottom 
line is they want to trust their leaders. They want some- 
body they can believe in, somebody they can trust. And I 
think Newt’s going to work very hard at regaining that 
trust He needs to, for himself, for the House, for fee party 
and for fee country. " (NYT) 


ALBRIGHT: Secretary Didn’t Know That 3 Grandparents Were Jewish Victims of the Holocaust 


Continued from Page 1 

family to Czechoslovakia in 
1945 after its liberation from 
fee Germans. Her parents 
were granted political asylum 
fa fee United States to 1948 
after . a C ommuni st coup in 
Czechoslovakia. 

Mrs. Albright cranes from 
a family of Czech Jews who 
owned a braiding materials 
business before World War 
II, according to interviews in 
the family’s home village. 
Mrs. Albright's father prob- 
ably embraced Roman Cath- 
olicism around fee time of fee 
war, according to Josef 
Maxck, who worked closely 
wife Mrs. Albright’s fafeer 
imm ediately after fee war. 

Like many other assimil- 
ated Grech Jews, Mrs. Al- 
bright’s father, Josef Korbel, 
considered himself a 
Czechoslovak patriot first 
and rarely referred to his re- 
ligious background. Under 
fee racial tows introduced by 
fee Nazis after the takeover of 
Czechoslovakia, however, a 
family like fee Krabeis would 
have been considered 100 
percent Jewisb- 

“I have aiway stboaghl of 
myself as a Czechoslovak 
Catholic,” Mrs. Albright said 
in fee faterview. * ‘My parents 
were, of fee generation who 
were fee chB- 

Czecboslov- 

alria, the only democracy in 
Central Europe: This was 


Mayor Foresees 
‘Blood in Streets’ 

Of Washington 

- - - Washington Post Service 

streets” as people suffer from drea of a. nee 
severely reduced servi^im- 

proves his plan to save about grewup witn. 

$50 .million next year by 
lengthening the time fee city 
takes to repay its debt. 

: Responding 

his$33biniOT spading 

posal for 1998, Mr. Barry 
called his debt restructuring 
plan “a valid K>°I” thai en- 
-jfefed him to balance fee 
budget responsibly- He also 
SOL .pr^ 
provided an «the daim that she wasbam 

w - 

from public sehoolsand pro ^ had also received “fee 
grams serving fee jwor- , 0( ^onaltetMrwfc<to would 

’The ^mefamg about fee fact 

. take -feat. . Mr. Banys® 1 my family was of Jewish 

^Th^tomct's chief r rz= 

.. dal officer, Ant^y 

said that the -mayor s 


Mrs 

received several letters wife, 
information about her family 
background since fee .1989 
collapse of :commuDism to 
Chechoslovakia and particu- 
larly since 1993, when ber 
name began ajneuta; : in fee 
papers as the chief U.S. del- 
egate to fee United Nations. 
Some of fee letters contained 
erroneous urformafion. such 


Origin,” she said. “Ibis ob- 
viously has become more in- 
tense fee more my name has 
been in the paper and to con- 
nection wife, my current job 
as secretaiy of state.” 

The question of Mrs. Al- 
bright's religious background 
was mired in December by 
Arab newspapers, which 
' dted unsourceff reports of bra 
Jewish origins as & basis for 
attacking her nomination as 
secretaiy of state. Questioned 
about these reports. State De- 
partment officials said fee 
had been raised a Roman 
Catholic and had converted to 
Episcopaiianism after her 
marriage in 1959 to Joseph 
MediU Patterson Albright, 
scion of a wealthy newspaper 
family. 

Spine Albright relatives 
and family friends in what is 
now the Czech Republic said 
they bad long known of her 
relatives’ fate. 

“My children know very 
well about every derail,” said 
Dagmar Simova, Mrs. Al- 
bright’s "first .cousin, who 
stayed behind in Chechoslov- 
akia /after the 1948 coup and 
has had only sporadic contact 
since then with the American 
branch of fee family. 

When Miss Simova 
learned .in the summer of 
1945 that he* parens and sis- 
ter. — Mis. Albright’s aunt, 
uncle and cousin — had died 
to the Holocaust, Mrs. Al- 
bright was only 8 years old 
and was cousidowt too 
young to be * told. Miss 
Simova said. 

Famfly members who died 
during the Holocaust tor 
eluded Mrs. Albright’s two 
paternal grandparents, Amost 
and Olga Korbel, according 
to documents made available 
by a Holocaust research cen- 
ter supported by the Prague 
Jewish community. The doc- 
uments and a family friend 
suggest feat Mis. Albright's 
.maternal grandmother, Anna 
Spieglova, was killed by die 
Nazis as well 

The records, which are 
based on transportation lists 
captured from the Nazisat fee 
end of World War .H, stow 


that some of Mrs. Albright’s 
relatives were killed in the gas 
chambers at Auschwitz. Oth- 
ers died of typhoid and mal- 
nutrition at a holding camp at 
Terezin, where Czech Jews 
were kept before being sem to 
Auschwitz. 

to an unpu blished, unfin- 
ished 11-page family narrat- 
ive made available by Mrs. 
Albright, her mother made no 
reference to relatives who 
died in the Holocaust In fee 
memoir, written after Josef 
Korbel’s death, in 1977, 
Mandula Korbel tried to de- 
scribe his “turbulent life.” 
The memoir ends abruptly in 
1945, just before the Korbel 
family returned to Prague 
from London. 

The manuscript describes 
in detail how Mrs. Albright’s 
parents succeeded in leaving 
Czechoslovakia to March 
1939 with their nearly 2-year- 
old daughter, 10 days after fee 


Nazi invasion. Mandula Kor- 
bel recalled that her husband 
returned to Prague from Eng- 
land just two days before the 
invasion. 

“Wife fee help of some 
good friends and lots of Jude 
and a little bribery, we tnan- 
aged-to get the necessary 
Gestapo permission to leave 
the countty,” wrote Mandula 
Korbel, who died in 1989. 

Mrs. Albright’s chances of 
surviving fee Holocaust had 
she and her parents stayed in 
Czechoslovak would have 
been very slim. The German 
authorities insisted that regis- 
trars provide detailed records 
of everyone of Jewish des- 
cent. 

Josef Karbel’s file at the 
Foreign Ministry contains a 
birth certificate issued in 
March 1941, describing him 
as “Jewish.” 

Of the 80,000 Czech Jews 
who were rounded up and 


sent to Terezin to 1941 and 
1942, the survival rate was 
approximately 10 percent. 
Most of the survivors were 
young men and women who 
were “selected” to perform 
various menial tasks at Aus- 
chwitz rather than being sent 
directly to foe gas chambers. 

While the subject of fee 
Holocaust was evidently too 
painful for the Korbels to dis- 
cuss with their children, they 
apparently did discuss the 
matter with friends in 
Yugoslavia, where Josef Kor- 
beJ served as a diplomat both 
before and after World War 
IL Brief references to the 
tragedy have appeared in the 
Yugoslav press, based on the 
reminiscences of a now-de- 
ceased Yugoslav journalist, 
PavJe Jankovic, who was very 
close to the Korbel family. 

■ ‘A Fascinating Story* 

The White House said 


Tuesday feat President Bill 
Clinton was briefed on the 
discovery that Mrs. Al- 
bright’s ancestry and said this 
to no way complicated ber 
ability to encourage peace in 
fee Middle East, Reuters re- 
ported from Washington. 

The White House spokes- 
man, Mike McCrary, said 
Mrs. Albright herself briefed 
fee president and Vice Pres- 
ident A1 Gore on fee matter on 
Monday. 

“The president said it was 
a fascinating stoty and en- 
couraged Madeleine to find 
our more, to look into her 
family history,” Mr. Mc- 
Crary said. 

“He thought it was fascin- 
ating.” 

Asked on Tuesday if fee 
discovery might to any way 
complicate Mrs. Albright's 
efforts to encourage the 
Middle East 
McCuny replied; “No.’ 


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PAGE 2 




ASIA/ PACIFIC 


Are 100,000 Troops in Asia Too Many? Pentagon Takes a Look 


By Paui Richter 

Los Angeles Times 


WASHINGTON — In a disclosure 
that could raise concern among Amer- 
ica’s Pacific allies, a top Department of 
Defense official has said that the 
Pentagon is considering scaling back 
the 100,000-troop deployment in Asia 
that has been a symbol of American 
commitment to the region. 

Admiral Joseph Prueher, commander 
of U.S. forces in the Pacific, said De- 
fense Secretary William Cohen had 
made it clear that the size of the de- 
ployment was “on the table” in the 
wide review of American military 
forces that is under way. 


The admiral said Mr. Cohen made his 
views known in a meeting with 
Pentagon officials last week. 

American allies in the region have 
watched with concern in recent years as 
U.S. forces have retrenched around the 
world while Chinese assertiveness and 
military strength have grown. 

To calm allies in nations such as 
Japan, South Korea, Australia and 
Taiwan, U.S. officials have cited die 
continued troop strength as a proof of 

American commitment. 

In December, President Bill Clinton 
mentioned it in a speech to the Australian 
Parliament in Canberra, declaring, “We 
will maintain about 100,000 troops 
across the Pacific, just as we maintain 


about 100,000 troops in Europe.” 

“We share the view of almost every 
nation in Asia that a strong American 
security presence is a bedrock for re- 
gional stability.” Mr. Clinton added. 

In addition, in a trip to Japan that 
same month, Mr. Cohen’s predecessor. 
Wiliam Perry, said the Asian force con- 
tingent was “not even on the table,” 
Admiral Prueher said. 

While some sources have speculated 
that die navy could lose 20.000 po- 
sitions when the review is completed in 
the spring, the Pentagon's consideration 
of the troop strength does not neces- 
sarily mean the military will end up 
trimming the Asian deployment. 

In congressional testimony and other 


E 


iblic comments recently. Mr. Cohen 
as stressed his view that American 
strategic and economic interests are 
growing rapidly in Asia. While he has 
talked of the need to review troop 
strength, he also has talked of the need 
to maintain large contingents overseas 
to prepare for war. 


Kenneth Bacon, the chief Pentagon 
spokesman, said his guess was that Mr. 
Cohen would not end up trimming the 


forces in the Pacific. “But I don’t think 
be has been willing to fence anything off 
at this stage,” Mr. Bacon said. “It's just 
that he went in with an open mind.” 
Andrew Krepinevich, executive di- 
rector of the Center for Strategic and 
Budgetary Assessments, a Washington 


research organization, said the 100,000 
troop number has “gained a level of 
political significance,*' adding that 
“people in places like Japan ana Aus- 
tralia believe that while the U-S. mil- 
itary has drawn down, the drawn-down 
ends at 100,000 troops. 

If troops are withdrawn, Mr. Kre- 
pinevich said. Asians “could conclude 
that America is retreating into its old 
isolationism.” 

In fact, the figure may no longer make 
the most sense for the United States, 
given improvements in military tech- 
nology and changes in strategic needs, 
he said. “But since there's a political 
significance to it, you’ve got to be care- 
ful about how you transition away.” 


Filipino Bishop Is Slain 
In Mainly Muslim Area 


CivyUnl Our Ssjff From Dvpcacha 

MANILA — Attackers opened fire 
Tuesday on a Roman Catholic bishop 
walking outside his cathedral, killing 
him and a bystander and wounding five 
others, the police said. 

Bishop Benjamin de Jesus, 56. was 
shot six times in the head and body by 
two attackers — one of them a boy 
between the ages of 10 and 15. said 
Monsignor Pedro Quitorio, spokesman 
for the Catholic Bishops' Conference of 
the Philippines. 

The bishop was the most senior 
church official to be slain in the Phil- 
ippines in recent history, a church 
spokesman said. Local officials said they 



The AnpQttcd Plan 


Bishop Benjamin de Jesus, who 
was shot to death Tuesday in Jolo. 


feared the attack would aggravate ten- 
sions between Christians and Muslims. 

The bishop was slain in Jolo, a 
Muslim-dominated town in Sulu 
Province about 580 miles (1,000 ki- 
lometers) south of Manila. The area is 
considered a “no-man’ s-land” where 
Muslim rebels control large areas. 

Authorities said that a security guard 
at Mount Carmel Cathedral had re- 
turned fire but that the attackers fled in a 
van driven by a third person. Their 
identities and motive were unknown. 

The provincial police director. Char- 
lemagne Alejandrino, said that the ped- 
estrian killed was a woman, and that one 
of the five injured by stray bullets was a 
9-month-old infant 

In Manila, President Rdel Ramos 
condemned the bishop's killing and 
ordered Defense Secretary Renato de 
Villa to form a panel to investigate. 

Pope John Paul D condemned the slay- 
ing as “a deplorable act of violence.” 
The killing took place amid increas- 
ing tensions in the area, where a Muslim 
guerrilla group. Abu Sayyaf. has con- 
tinued to fight even though the main 
rebel group, the Mono National Lib- 
eration Front, signed a peace accord 
with the government in September. 

Abu Sayyaf has carried out numerous 
attacks against Christians, including the 
1994 kidnapping in Jolo of the Rev- 
erend Clarence Bertelsraan, an Amer- 
ican priest. He was freed. 

Bishop de Jesus had warned at that 
time that the kidnapping was an attempt 
by Islamic extremists to drive Christian 
clerics from Muslim areas of this pre- 
dominately Roman Catholic country. 

(AP, Reuters) 


BRIEFLY 


Chinese Officials to Visit Taipei 

TAIPEI — A group of senior Chinese officials will visit 
Taiwan this month despite a 19-month-old freeze in un- 
official relations between Taipei and the Communist main- 
land, the Taiwan hosts said Tuesday. 

According to the sponsors, Chinese Youth International, 
the delegation arriving Feb. 20 will include Wang Xiaomin. 
daughter-in-law of one of China's most influential elders. 
Wan Li, a former Parliament chief and member of the 
Communist Party's ruling Politburo. 

Miss Wang is a key member of Beijing's apparatus for 
dealings with Taiwan as deputy director of the exchange 
bureau of the Communist cabinet's Taiwan Affairs Office. 

She will visit privately but is expected to meet informally 
with officials of Taiwan's exiled Republic of China gov- 
ernment as well as the Straits Exchange Foundation, a state- 
funded body formed for such contacts. (Reuters I 

Cult Member Jailed for Gassing 



EXILES — Luo Yi, 23, left, a Chinese dissident, 
announcing in Tokyo that he was giving up his fight 
to stay in Japan and wifi go to Denmark. His older 
brother. He Wei Hui, a resident of Japan, looked on. 


soldiers were manning roadblocks on major routes. (AFP) 


TOKYO — A follower of the religious cult accused of 
the Tokyo subway gassing received a 17-year prison term 
Tuesday for killin g a businessman with VX nerve gas. 

AJdra Yamagata, 31. admitted the killing and said the , n „ n , rrr 

victim had been targeted for execution by the cult as a spy. Afghan KsfUgeeS Die Of llUIlgBT 
He was found guilty of murder in the VX gas incident and JO J O 

of the attempted murder of two other people between 
December 1994 and January 1995. 

The sentence is the longest so far handed down to scores 
of followers of die Aum Shinrikyo sect facing trial for 
crimes that came to light after the March 1995 sann gassing 
on the Tokyo subway, which killed 12 people. {Reuters) 


Jakarta Troops Sent to Hot Spot 

JAKARTA — Troops have been flown to Indonesia's FOT the RBCOrd 
West Kalimantan Province after ethnic rioting forced the 
closure of the border with Malaysia, reports said Tuesday. 

News of the deployment came as security personnel in 
the area arrested 1 1 people in connection with tile unrest, 
the newspaper Media Indonesia said, quoting Major Gen- 
eral Namun Anum. the military commander For the area. 

Two infantry companies were flown to the provincial 
capital Ponrianak on Saturday and Monday, the newspaper 
said. Residents confirmed die arrival of troops ana said 


KABUL — Ten Afghan refugees die every day in camps 
in the western Afghan province of Herat, die United 
Nations said in a report released here Tuesday. 

The report, which called for urgent food assistance, said 
intensified fighting between supporters of the Taleban 
militia and partisans of a local warlord had brought new 
waves of refugees, who were succumbing to severe cold, 
hunger and related diseases at a rate of 10 a day. (AFP) 


Despite the lure of a sizable reward, no one inlhdiabas 
come forward with information about four Western tourists ' 
taken hostage in Kashmir in 1995. authorities and dip- 
lomats said Tuesday. (Reuters) 

Indian government troops fighting rebels in Kashmir 
began a weeklong cease-fire Tuesday to allow the Muslim 
majority to observe the end of Ramadan in peace. (AP) 


Korean Talks * 
Put on Hold 
As the North 
Seeks Grain 


Agmcr Fnmce-Prrsse 

WASHINGTON — American offi- 
cials say that North Korea's decision not 
to take part in a key briefing this week 
has derailed die process leading toward 
peace talks. 

For the second time in two weeks, 
North Korea has put the briefing with 
American and South Korean officials on 
the bade burner as it seeks to procure 
grain for the Communist country 
stricken by severe flooding and struc- 
tural economic problems. 

The State Department spokesman, 
Nicholas Bums, said Monday that the 
North Koreans, in suspending the brief- 
ing scheduled Wednesday in New York, 
had re parted their need to focus on grain 
negotiations with Cargill Inc., a U.S. 
commodities trading concern, and other 
companies. 

"we do not expect that the North and 
South and the United States will be 
meeting in New York this coming Wed- 
nesday, as we had proposed and as we 
had set.” he said. 

With grain negotiations taking pri- 
ority. he said, ”it is uncertain when this 
joint briefing will be rescheduled.” 

North Korea appealed to the inter- 
national community earlier Monday for 
additional emergency food aid. The of- 
ficial Korean Central News Agency said 
die grain shortfall from last year's harvest 
totaled 53 million ton s — almost double 
international aid agency estimates. 

One of the companies in negotiations 
with Pyongyang is Cargill, which re- 
ceived a Clinton administration waiver 
in December to sell up to 500,000 metric 
tons of grain. 

The United States has a trade em- 
bargo a gainst North Korea; exceptions 
are made for humanitarian reasons. 

A Cargill spokesman. Lori Johnson, 
confirmed that negotiations were con- 
tinuing. “We’re sail working with the 
North Koreans toward what we hope 
will be a deal,” she said. 

The briefing is aimed at presenting a 
U.S.-South Korean proposal presented 
last April for four-way talks aimed at a 
peace settlement for die divided Korean 
Peninsula. The United States and China 
would serve as intermediaries. 

Asked whether Pyongyang was seek- 
ing some form of U.S. government fi- 
nancial “underwriting” of the Cargill 
deal before it would proceed with the 
briefing, Mr. Bums stressed that Wash- 
ington “believes that these are private 
grain discusssions.” 


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talHereU 




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I COMMERCIAL 
1 & INVESTMENT 

I PROPERTIES 

- 

Sates 

FRENCH COMPANY OFFERS 

IN MOSCOW 

KW RENT: 

2.000 sqjn. offices - 2,700 saia 
mrehouse wfih 500 sqjn. offices 
FOR SALE 

5riUy BUHJmG 3,000 sqm. ■ 

5 stops to GontHcial career 
+ 1200 sqm warehouse. 

Write HT Bca 22. F-S2X1 tteufiy Cdx 

SMALL CHARMING HOTEL. 2i sute 
rooms in Gemano near Rome - wife 
part - convention lacflitiee - large 
rariaaart - panoramic faca&xi In Raman 
» - ideal tar meetings to relaxed ekno- 
mhara. Contact owner to negotiate sale 
Exceiert price. Please fax 10 Kaly ■ 
+3SW364Z77. 1 

UNIQUE WPORTUWTY. INVEST IN 1 
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1-516-829-5973 LSA. 


HIAIfl BEACH 2 PROPERTIES 135 
unfc * ratal Great oppoftiny. 

Cafes toe Reetas 
WH -954-731-6000, EH 338. 







V 

j:„. ■ 




.. v ... 


** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1997 


PAGES 


’ r '"« L 

//.z 

1 */*#- V 

Min 

W, v { . 

'•fa, 


INTERNATIONAL 


briefly 


>* 


4 UN Workers Killed in Rwanda 

RW ^ nd l^L Four United Nations employees 
’ a 1 5 a ®bodten and two Rwandans 

^K3S£? m MUthwKKra « Tuesday, 

•“*"£ of 

»25^£ , *A mdan minister and chairman of th& 

Anpy. Alexis Kanyarengwe, said Monday that 
211(3 was feared in the coon- 

SihSS ^ 011 of a Canadian Roman 

uimouc pnest by an unidentified gunman in_i»onh- 
western Rwanda. Waters) 

Mercenaries Leave Sierra Leone 

e Sierra Leone — Executive Outcomes, a 

South African .mercenary group, has left Sierra Leone after 
neiprng tnm the tide in its civil war by HftHrmg the army 
against rebels. & 3 

‘Executive Outcomes has officially left Sierra Leone,’ ’ 
die group s commander. Brigadier Burt Sachse, saidToes- 
most employees left Monday and that only a 
hspdnil of people were staying behind to finish acco unts. 
The group has been in Sierra Leone since May 1995. The 
military government had turned to the mercenaries after 
rebels overran bauxite and diam ond minin g centers and 
staged attacks near the capital, Freetown. 

fr'ssndoot Ahmad Tejan Kabbah, who Was elected in 
March 1 996 after four years of arm y rule , a pe a ce 

accord with the rebels in December. ( Reuters ) 

Colombia Deploys Troops 

BOGOTA — The Colombian Army said Tuesday that 
it was pouring hundreds of reinforcements i nto a moun- 
tainous area near the capital where at least 19 soldiers and 
1 0 leftist guerrillas have been killed in heavy fighting. 

Army sources in Vtilavicencio, capital of Meta 
Province, said that up to 1,000 troops would be sent into 
the combat zone, about 50 kilometers (30 miles) east of 
Bogota. They would reinforce about 400 already in place 
near die small town of San Juanito, where soldiers, 
backed by helicopter gunships and air farce bombers, 
have been battling hundreds of Revolutionary Aimed 
Forces of Colombia rebels since Friday. - (Reuters) 

Brazil to Disarm Landowners 

BRASILIA '—Running out of patience with a wave of 
violence that has swept the countryside, die Brazilian 
government announced Tuesday that it would disarm 
battling landowners and militant squatters. 

President Fernando Henrique Cardoso said it was time 
those who broke the law were punished and violent clashes 
between estate owners and the dispossessed came to an end. 
“People and known groups have gone beyond die norms of 
behavior that must be respected, lolling aid causing trouble 
in several parts of Brazil," Mr. Cardoso said. 

So far this year, at least five people have died in 
fighting between peasants and farmhands. (Reuter) 


Israel to Sell Plots 
For Settlers’ Homes 


The Associated Pros 

JERUSALEM— In a move that could threaten the Middle 
East peace process, die Israeli HcnismgMinisny said Tuesday 
thatitplanned to all plots offend in 1997 for5,000 new homes 
in Jewish settlements in the West Bank and Gaza. Strip. 

The plan, if approved by the defense- minister, could bring 
20.000 more Israelis to die disputed lands where the Pal- 
estinians hope to set up an .independent state. About 145,000 
. Jewish settlers live rathe' West Bank and Gaza, amid 2 million 
Palestinians. 

Ignoring Palestinian, protests. Pride Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu has said he is detennined to expand Jewish set- 
tlements and would never agree to full Palestinian statehood. 

Under die Housing Ministry plan, plots of land would be 
sold in dr near several settlements, including the West Bank's 
Emanuel, Efrat, Ariel and Alfei Menasbe. 

lit the area targeted for construction outside Efrat, Jewish 
settlers and Palestinian villagers have clashed over land 
repeatedly in recent years. Resraents of the Palestinian village 
of El Khader have said that die land earmarked for con- 
struction of settlement homes belongs to them. 

A spokesman for the HousmgMhustiy said that in the 1 997 
land sales plan, “we are offering plots for a total of ap- 
proximately 5,000 homes” in the West Bank and Gaza. 

Saeb Erekat, the chief Palestinian negotiator in peace talks 
with Israel, said die Housing Ministry decision would en- 


thmJcthe current positions of the Israeli government axe 
very worrisome and very dangerous to die peace process,” 
Mr. Erekat said. “They must make die choice between 
settlements and peace. They cannot have both.’ ’ 

■ In addition to die homes planned forthe West Bank and 
Gaza, about 2364 houses are to be built in 1997 atHarHoma, 
a new Jewish neighborhood planned in East Jerusalem, die 
ministry said. 

The neighborhood is to be built on 460 acres of land 
expropriated four years ago — . two-thirds from Jewish 
landowners and one-third from Palestinians — after die 
Supreme Court in October- lifted a restraining order that had 
blocked construction. 

The Palestinians want to set up a future capital in East 
Jerusalem, and are fiercely opposed to Jewish housing pro- 
jects there. 


Swiss Investigating Scientology 
And Impact on Internal Security 

Ream 

BERN — The Swiss government lias a group of experts 
looking into the activities of the Church erf Scientology, a 
spokesman for the Justice Ministry said Tuesday. 

The investigation into the group, which is based in the 
United States and has branches in many countries, is being 
conducted by a subcommittee of the ministry’s consultative 
commission fix* state security. 

“The task of this subcommittee is to investigate whether 
Scientology has any impact on die internal security of Switzer- 
land,” said Viktor Schlumpf, a Justice Department spokes- 
man. It is uncertain whether there will be a report published 
after the subcommittee finishes its work, he said. 

- The organization had abcut 5,000 members in Switzerland- 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 






SOVEREIGN (FOREX) LTD 

SWISS BROKERHOUSE 
118, Rue du Rhone 
1204 Geneve 

24 HOURS FOREX DESK 

Concept for 100% market security 
against losses. Interbanking conditions. 
No commission. Managing Accounts. 

Phone: ++41 1214 63 22 /Fax ++41 41 728 08 09 


INVITATION TO BID 


For tfie purdwe of inspection service company based in Maraofco, 
Venezuela. Thriving company servicing the oi! ft manufacturing 
Industries nationwide, Is for ole by owners. Esnbfehed ll yearsago.it 
Is now the largest NDT company *1 the courary with a cooaptece raw 
of NDT equipment, jnduding over 30 sets of gamma ratfiography 
equipment anaafl anrifenr tains. Wholy-owned base office ft yard are 
included in the safe -with 94! stpruof consmicdonankxs toai^ower 
22. hectares. Odier services performed indude Casing Tubing ft DriH 
Ffee Inspection. Cathode Protection InstaBadoa Chemical Cleaning. 
Mechanical cleaning by hydrojec (for heat exchangers, etc.). Brandt 
offices exist in the eastern region of the country where major 
investments byht’l o9 companies are schetWed to occur due id the 
recent Implementation of laws allowing private investment in the oil 
sector. The company is a registered service provider to PDVSA, the 
Stats Oil Company. Company to be sold by sealed Wd process. 
Scheduled public opening of bia is Feb. 27, 1997 in Miami. R. Parties 
I nt eres te d In partidparing in the bidding process can obtain the formal 
tad package fcy renikrin g a US $1,000 fiEng fee. Cbreacr Qtafcy Systems 
Associates, CA by fax at 58 (country code) 81 8! 1678 for further 
Instructions. Reference Wd#9701-CWin your correspondence- 


BUSINESS APARTMENTS 



business IN 

BRUSSELS* 

For a week, a month 
or longer, 

business apartments 
. with every facility. 

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U.S. Rejects Report 
Of Plan to Hit Iraq 

Renters 

WASHINGTON — The United Stales said Tuesday that 
there was no reason for heightened concern about possible 
military action against Iraq after a German newspaper re- 
ported that Washington might launch a cruise missile strike. 

“The United States always reserves the right to use its 
military force to defend its nnnnnai interest anywhere in the 
world,'* said the State Department spokesman, Nicholas 
Bums, ‘’but I see no reason to heighten your concern in any 
way pertaining to the situation in the Middle East." 

The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeirung said United Nations 
inspectors had found that Iraq continued to develop missiles in 
violation of UN resolutions. It added that the Uni 


was studying a 
A Defense 


nited States 
ible missile strike against Iraq. 

it spokesman. Kenneth Bacon, also 


Era Rappaport, sales manager for bousing at Shilo, a 
West Bank settlement, passing new homes for sale. 

Quake Kills at Least 11 in Iran 

Agenct Prance-Presse 

TEHRAN — At least 1 1 people were killed and dozens 
injured in two earthquakes that flattened villages in moun- 
tainous northeast Iran on Tuesday, die Interior Ministry said. 


responding to the report, said that Washington supported an 
analysis by the chief UN inspector, Rolf Eke us, that Iraq was 
hiding an operational Scud missile force of 18 to 25 missiles. 

“This is against the sanctions" brought against Iraq after 
the 1991 Gulf War, Mr. Bacon said. “Obviously I can't 
describe what our future actions would be. but we have shown 
time and time again that we are prepared to protect U.S. forces. 
We are prepared to protect our interests in the Gulf." 

Mr. Bacon declined to say whether Iraq might be trying to 
rebuild its missile forces. But another defense official said 
Washington believed that Iraq was hiding previously built 
weapons rather than “building new inventory." 

The German article, being published Wednesday, said that 
the United States could make a decision this week on whether 
to launch a Tomahawk missile strike at Iraq. It gave as the 
basis for its report “American security sources." 

The Uniced States has launched three Tomahawk strikes 
against Iraq since the war ended. 

The newspaper said that UN inspectors who were in Iraq 
from Jan. 5 to Jan. 23 found evidence, according to American 
sources, that Iraq was continuing to develop missiles with a 
range of around 1 ,000 miles ( 1 ,600 kilometers). 

It said that the inspectors had been “massively obstructed" 
and dot Mr. Ekeus had written to Prime Minister Tariq Aziz of 
Iraq on Jan. 13 telling him that Baghdad was contravening UN 
resolutions and that its move would have consequences. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAT, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1W 


PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1997 


EUROPE 


Milosevic Looks Ready 
To Concede Defeats 


Whry Opponents Vow to Keep Protesting 


By Jonathan Randal 

Washington Post Service 


BELGRADE — The Serbian pres- 
ident, Slobodan Milosevic, appeared 
willing Tuesday to reinstate opposition 
victories in Belgrade and 13 other cities 
in the Nov. 17 municipal elections. 

But the leaders of the opposition co- 
alition. wary of the president's record of 
manipulation, delaying tactics and de- 
viousness. reacted skeptically, as did 
tens of thousands of Belgrade Uni- 
versity students and other demonstrat- 
ors who had gathered to hear the op- 
position leaders in Republic Square on 
the 77th consecutive day of peaceful 
street protests here. 

Mr. Milosevic "finally accepted 
what he should have two months ago," 
said the Democratic Party leader, Zoran 
Djindjic. while adding that die demon- 
strations would nonetheless continue. 

“This is just a first step, but it is not 
enough." he said, repeating the coali- 
tion's rails for the state to relinquish its 
virtual monopoly on radio and television 
and punish those responsible for beating 


Bulgarian Parties 
Reach Deal on 
Early Elections 


(.'orbital M Our SutfFnm OapOKha 


SOFIA — The governing Socialists 
agreed Tuesday to hold early elections 


in April, heading off a tense showdown 
with opposition parties after 30 days of 
mass anti-government protests, a joint 
statement said. 

A statement issued by the Socialists 
and opposition parties said they had 
agreed that President Petar Stoyanov 
"should set early general elections in 
the second 10 days of April/’ 

The Socialist ftuty agreed to the elec- 
tions just hours before its seven-day 
mandate to form a new cabinet expired. 
The Socialists and two small allied 
parties hold a total of 124 of the 240 
seats in Parliament, which was elected 
in December 1994 to a four-year term. 

The Socialists, the former Commu- 
nists. have been held up to widespread 
criticism over the shattered economy. 

The agreement was reached at a 
meeting of the National Security Coun- 
cil called by Mr. Stoyanov as the coun- 
try faced another day of paralysis from 
strikes and opposition protests. Hie 
council is made up of leaders of all 
political parties as well as the prime 
minister and Parliament speaker. 

Earlier, the Socialist Party named a 
new cabinet at a separate meeting with 
Mr. Stoyanov. The party acted on its 
own after the opposition rejected ap- 
peals that it join in an interim coali- 
tion. 

A single-party government is not what 
Bulgaria needs right now. said Nikolai 
Dobrev. who was designated prime min- 
ister. But he added. “It is better than 
having no government at all.” 

The previous prime minister, Zhan 
Videnov, also a Socialist, resigned in 
December under fierce criticism for 
Bulgaria's economic plight. 

Wages remain low. and prices rose by 
more than 150 percent in the first nine 
months of lasl year. (Reuters. AFP) 


and jailing demonstrators. Mr. Milo- 
sevic’s about-face was contained in a 
letter instructing Prime Minister Mirko 
Maijanovtc to prepare a "special law” 
for parliamentary consideration to restore 
the opposition victories in keeping with 
the Dec. 27 findings of the Organization 
for Cooperation and Security in Europe. 

Significantly. Mr. Milosevic men- 
tioned no deadline for voting into law 
such extraordinary legislation "respect- 
ing the legal order of our country." a 
formulation designed to lend the aura of 
formal legality to the frequent twists and 
turns he has used rather than reinstate the 
opposition victories. But he did suggest 
his proposal would resolve die crisis “in 
a pragmatic way." 

Hours later. Mr. Marjanovic clarified 
tile timing, stating on state television that 
his government would present a draft 
bill to Parliament, "most probably” 
Wednesday. Yugoslavia’s president. 
Zoran Lilic, was quoted on television as 
saying that Mr. Milosevic's proposal 
was "the only way to solve the crisis.” 

Mr. Milosevic's letter did not spe- 
cifically mention any of the disputed 
municipal election contests other than 
Belgrade itself, but he was believed to 
have attached real importance only to 
denying the capital to die opposition. 

His letter accepted no personal re- 
sponsibility for the dispute. Mr. Mi- 
losevic simply said it was * ‘high time to 
end" a crisis that trad "considerably 
hurt our country” at home and abroad. 

Mr. Milosevic cast his decision in 
terms of preserving Serbia's relations 
with the international community rather 
than of knuckling under to the oppo- 
sition’s daily street demonstrations in 
Belgrade and dozens of other cities. 

"I would like to stress that the state's 
interest in promoting relations between 
our country and die OSCE and the in- 
ternational community as a whole,” his 
letter said, “by far surpasses the im- 
portance of any number of council seats 
in several towns.' ’ 

But if so, diplomats, opposition politi- 
cians and ordinary Serbs were left to 
wonder why Mr. Milosevic had stub- 
bornly sought to deny the opposition 
control of municipal governments so be- 
set with debts and without meaningful tax 
revenues or executive powers that at face 
value they constituted a poisoned gift. 

In the process, be has suffered his 
most humiliating domestic political set- 
back in a decade of power marked by 
economic and financial ruin and the col- 
lapse of his Greater Serbia dream, which 
ended in defeat in the wars in Croatia and 
Bosnia that he helped encourage. 

Some diplomats and political analysts 
say they are convinced that Mr. Mi- 
losevic. who only three months ago 
seemed invincible, may now be a spent 
force incapable of winning parliamentary 
elections scheduled before the end of the 
year or of maneuvering the federal con- 
stitution to keep himself in power as 
president of Yugoslavia after his term as 
Serbia’s president expires this spring. 

The opposition, a bickering, ineffect- 
ive coalition before the crisis, is now in a 
strong position to drive home its demands 
in eventual discussions with the gov- 
ernment. What lay behind Mr. Milo- 
sevic 's timing remained murky even for a 
leader accustomed to keeping his options 
open to die last Only Sunday night, 
hundreds of armed riot policemen backed 
by water cannons injured more than 100 
demonstrators in the most serious vi- 
olence of the crisis. 



Spain Rejects 
Call for Talks 
With Basques 


> .il.- H 


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fUpb krri^iUiifn 

A worker examining a train carrying spent nuclear fuel that derailed near a French border town. 


Train With Nuclear Cargo Derails 


CcrpJni by Ota- Surf Front DisptBcfta 


PARIS — A train carrying spent 
nuclear fuel derailed in eastern France 
close to the border with Germany and 
Luxembourg on Tuesday, but there 
was no radiation leak, French and Ger- 
man officials said. 

No injuries were reported, and of- 
ficials said the cause of the derailment 
near the French v illag e of Apach was 
under investigation. 

The three first cars each carried 60 
tons of nuclear waste in 90-ton re- 
inforced containers, the French nation- 
al railroad SNCF said. The fourth car 


was an empty auto earner. 

The locomotive and first three cars 
of the train derailed but remained up- 
right, SNCF said. 

Special cranes were being used to 
put the engine and cars back on the 
track. In the meantime, rail traffic was 


shut down, the railroad said. The waste 
was picked up Monday at a nuclear 
power plant near the northern German 
city of Lingen and was headed for 
reprocessing at the Sellafield facility in 
Britain, via the French port of Dun- 
querque. 

Emergency teams at the site meas- 
ured no unusual radiation and observed 
no leaks around the cars, the Lower 
Saxony Environment Ministry said. 

Officials said two of the three cars 
would be put back on the rails, while 
the cargo on the third would be shifted 
to a new wagon. They said this would 
take about 24 hours. 

No signs of sabotage were imme- 
diately found, authorities said. 

An official in the Apach city hall 
said the accident had occurred just 
outside the border village of 800 
people, on a rail line running alongside 


the Moselle River. Officials said they 
decided against evacuating residents as 
there was no danger. 

But emergency workers sealed off 
the immediate area as a routine pre- 
cautionary measure. 

German officials said 60 to 80 nu- 
clear convoys a year travel through 
Germany each year. 

Germany’s opposition Green Party 
said die accident was one of a series of 
recent nuclear mishaps, including an 
incident at die Sellafield plant on 
Sunday in which six workers were 
contaminated by radioactive dusL 
“These incidents are the logical 
consequence of a policy which con- 
sistently ignores the incalculable risks 
of atomic energy to both people and the 
environment, and focuses on economic 
interests.” the party said. 

(Reuters, AP) 


Reuters 

MADRID — The Spanish govern- 
ment rejected Tuesday an initiative by 
its moderate Basque allies to open a 
dialogue with the Basque separatist 
group ETA amid escalating tensions, 
saying that talks would only fuel vi- 
olence. 

The Basque National Party, a na- 
tionalist but nonviolent party that sup. 
pons the governing Popular Party m 
Parliament, asked the government 
Monday to negotiate an end to die vi,’ 
olence in the northern Basque region. 

The Basque National Party unveiled 
its proposal the morning after a power- 
ful car bomb blew up in the Basque city 
of San Sebastian and days after a bicycle 
merchant was shot and killed in the 
same city. 

The government blamed ETA. whose 
initials stand for Basque Homeland and 
Liberty, for both attacks. 

“There are no short cuts in the war 
against terrorism.” Interior Minister 
Jaime Mayor Oreja said in a radio in- 
terview Tuesday. "A hasty dialogue 
would only provide an oxygen balloon 
for the terrorists." 

The Basque National Party, which 
holds 5 of the 350 seats in Parliament, 
has traditionally advocated negotiations 
with ETA. 

Its support in Parliament is not es- 
sential to the Popular Party's majority, 
but it does bolster the government in key 
votes. 

The conservative government 
headed by Prime Minister Jose Maria 
Aznar. has repeatedly rejected overtures 
for talks with ETA until it renounces 
violence and lays down its arms — two 
proposals unacceptable to ETA. 

Other major political parties also re- 
jected the initiative, saying that it was 


poorly timed, unclear and would only 
ran violence. 


fen violence. 

“This mindset is very dangerous be- 
cause it demonstrates that violence pays 
off.” said the Basque Socialist leader. 
Ramon JaureguL 


Chernomyrdin 
Shoots Bears in 


‘Imperial Hunt’ 


Turkish Army Shows Its Clout New Duties for Russian Minister 


A %ence Francc-Presse 

MOSCOW — Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin of Russia was criticized 
by the local press Tuesday for having 
taken part last month in a bear hunt that 
harked back to the Czarisl era. 

The costly preparations for the Jan. 12 
event in the northwest region of Yaroslav 
included the building of a two-kilometer 
( 1 -2-mile) stretch of road, the setting up 
of a special communications network by 
army experts and the distribution of new 
uniforms to forest rangers. 

The prime minister, who flew to the 
hunt by helicopter, killed the first bear 
— a year-old cub — with a bullet to the 
neck. He and the regional governor then 
killed another cub and its mother. 

The daily Communist-leaning news- 
paper Sovetskaya Rossiya said in an 
article tilled "Imperial Hunt” that the 
cost of the expedition, which was not 
revealed, could have been used to ‘ ‘pay 
thousands of retirees” or to finance one 
of ‘ ‘the battles in Chechnya. ” 

Mr. Chernomyrdin has reacted by say- 
ing that bear hunting in Russia was legal 
and that he had a license. 


ANKARA — Tanks paraded Tuesday through an Is- 
lamist-controlled Ankara district that carried out an anti- 
Israel protest last week, in an apparent show of strength by 
the staunchly secularist army. 

Hours later, the Ankara state security court ordered the 
detention of Mayor Bekir Yildiz, an Islamist, over the 
protest in his district, Sincan, the state-run Anatolian News 
Agency reported. Bui the police said that Mr. Yildiz had not 
been seen since late Monday. 

The news agency reported that 20 tanks and 15 armored 
personnel carriers were taking part in training in the district 
Military officials denied that the activity was in response to 
the anti-Israeli rally Friday. 

“This is training that we do all the time, an official said. 
"This is the normal route of the tanks.” ( Reuters ) 


MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin made Russia ’s top 
law enforcement officer a deputy prime minister Tuesday, 
giving him additional powers to fight tax evasion and other 
economic crimes. 

Interior Minister Anatoli Kulikov will retain his current 
duties and also be in charge of the tax police, the customs 
service and economic security, said the president's press 
secretary, Sergei Yastxzhembsky. 

Mr. Kulikov's promotion steins from a need for better 
coordination between law enforcement agencies in the fight 
against organized crime, the spokesman said. (AP) 


Albania Starts to Aid Investors 


New Charge in Reporter’s Death 


DUBLIN — A Dublin man was charged T uesday with the 
murder of an investigative reporter, Veronica Guerin. 

The suspect, Paul Ward, 32, was arrested on Oct 18 and 
charged with conspiracy and accessory to murder. Those 
charges were dropped Tuesday in favor of die more serious 
charge. 

Ms. Guerin, 36, a reporter for the Sunday Independent 
newspaper, was shot and killed on June 26, 1996, while her 
car was stopped at a traffic light. She had previously been 
shot in the leg and beaten in retaliation for her efforts to 
expose figures in Dublin’s criminal underworld. (AP) 


TIRANA, Albania — President Sali Berisha led talks on 
easing the effects of the collapse of pyramid investment 
schemes Tuesday, but the main opposition group, the 
Forum for Democracy, boycotted the meeting. 

In the streets of Tirana later in the day, some people who 
had put their life savings into the schemes gathered around 
newspapers, reading instructions on how to recover a 
portion of their investments. 

"I have seven children," said Sako Sinani, a man in his 
40s. ‘ ’I sold my apartment to put money into the schemes, 
and now they are offering 60 percent back. This is robbery. 
This is a government of thieves.” 

Five investment schemes have collapsed, but partial 
compensation has been announced for only two, whose 
assets were frozen in state banks. ( Reuters ) 


CURRENCY 


CAPITAL MARKET SERVTCES 


GOLD. $68 Million Could Form Core of Holocaust Victims Fund 


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Finding the right investment 
adviser takes time. 

It’s never too late to talk 
to a Swiss banker. 


the money be placed in a resti- 
tution fund for Holocaust vic- 
tims, and die organization 
began legal action in Britain 
late last year to stop the last 
disbursement. The action has 
since been suspended- 
Now the Clinton adminis- 
tration. citing newly found 
evidence to support those 
claims, says it has persuaded 
Britain and France to hold on 
to the remaining gold until the 
three countries — and Euro- 
pean nations that were the in- 
tended recipients of the $68 
million — can weigh the new 
evidence. If they determine 
that much of the gold stolen 
from the central banks was 
intermingled with privately 
owned assets, they would 


face the immensely compli- 
cated logistical and political 
problem of deciding who 
should receive the gold. 

"We’ve taken the first 
step, freezing die money in 
place,” said Stuart Eizenstat, 
foe undersecretary of com- 
merce and the administra- 
tion’s lead official in sorting 
out the diplomatic problems 
that have mushroomed 
around the question of 
Switzerland’s stewardship of 
Nazi gold. "But we don’t 
have any agreement yet on 
whar to do nexL” 

France, which would have 
received up to a third of the 
$68 million, was reluctant to 
agree to foe freezing of the 
fUnds, American and British 
officials said in recent weeks. 
But it has since agreed. 


On Monday, foe World 
Jewish Congress said it had 
been told by France’s foreign 
minister, Herve de Charette, 
that it would soon receive "a 
sympathetic response” to 
Mb'. Bro nfman ’s appeals. 

The decision to freeze the 
$68 million came as Switzer- 
land and its banks agreed, in 


principle, to set up another 
nurd to benefit Holocaust sur- 


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fund to benefit Holocaust sur- 
vivors, who maintain that 
Swiss banks have refused to 
turn overfunds from accounts 
that Jews established in 
Switzerland to keep their as- 
sets from falling into Nazi 
hands. Those funds are sep- 
arate from the gold looted 
from Europe's central banks, 
and many of the records that 
would make it possible to 
track that money disappeared 
long ago. 

A separate commission, 
beaded by Paul Volcker, a 
former chairman of foe Fed- 
eral Reserve Board, is now 
conducting an audit of long- 
dormant accounts in Swiss 
banks. 

But in foe end, officials 
say, any compensation to 
Holocaust victims and their 
heirs will require a series of 
political decisioos. 

Some funds will un- 
doubtedly come from Mr. 
Volcker's audit, and some 
may come from the Swiss 
government, which has been 
under pressure to return to 
Jewish organizations foe 
money that Switzerland de- 
manded in the 1940s in ex- 
change for harboring Jewish 
refugees. The $68 million 
may form another pot of 
money that could be contrib- 
uted to a fond. 

“Whatever we do will be 
symbolic, because it is im- 
possible to put together a pre- 
cise accounting.” a senior 
Amen can official said lost 
week. “The question is 



whether other countries, and 
Switzerland, will see the need J 
to act quickly while some of 
foe Holocaust survivors are 
still alive.” 

Until the recent eruption of 
questions about the Swiss 
banks’ interactions with Nazi 
Germany, almost no one had 
heard of foe Tripartite Com- 
mission, a bureaucratic relic 
from foe aftermath of World 
WarIL 

Throughout the life of the 
commission, it has operated 
under the assumption that all 
the gold in its bands was so- 
called monetary gold that had 
come from the national re- 
serves of central banks. Bur 
foe exact origins of the bars 
were impossible to deter- 
mine. Most of foe gold had 
been melted down and re- 
formed at least once to hide its 
identity, and there is testi- 
mony from former Nazi of- 
ficials to suggest that some of } 
it was melted down several 
times. 

Often. Switzerland ap- 
peared to turn a blind eye to 
the origins of the gold. 

Over the weekend. Senator 
Alfonse D’Araato, the New 
York Republican who took 
up foe Nazi gold issue and has 
turned it into both an inter- 
national controversy and a 
theme for his re-election cam- 
paign. released a State De- 
partment memorandum of 
April 17, 1946, alleging that 
100 tons of Belgian gold in 
Switzerland had been depos- 
ited by the Nazis. Switzerland 
denied knowing the origins of 
that gold in 1946, and in re- 
cent days the Swiss National 
Bank has repeated foal deni- 
al. 

"These are the same re- ^ 
sponses the Swiss tried to * 
give foe Allies 50 years ago. ' * 

Mr. D’Amato said. "They 
were rejected then, and they 
should be rejected now." 


' • \; ; 












U ~~~ — ■ ^ 

h> « * 70 Israeli Soldiers Killed 

1 H:ts % 2 Helicopters Collide 
On the Way to Lebanon 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


CVwprfctf by (ha- Staff From rb *] t .u f i trT 

. SHAAR YESHUV. Israel — Two 
• lsraeh military transport helicopters cn 
' - rt !S t ^ banon collided in heavy fog 

northern Israel on Tu^da? 

^5!' more ^ 70 soldiers. 7 
uie crash was the worst military air 
disaster in the nation's history. The 
" • .. W0TSt previous accident was a 1977 heli- 

. ■ “PJf 1 ; crash Urn* killed 54 people. 

& _ ■“ 1 5 il ei ^? e “’s the worst 

tragedy the air force has known in its 50- 
*- : year history." ’ said President Ezer Weiz- 

■ aDd a fonncr d£ f miy 

PriDK Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 

■ m a statement: “This is a grave 
disaster , and a heavy heart goes out to the 

. families of the victims. The entire nation 
L to day for the loss of our young 
fighters." J * 

: SUDAN: ~ 

" Civil Whr Takes Turn 

Continued from Page 1 

denies any involvement in terorism. 

The rebels’ latest offensive appears to 
, have caught Khartoum unprepared. A 

representative for the Sudan People’s 
Liberation Army, the main southern 
. „ rebel group, said in Asmara, the Eritrean 

” capital, that the rebels had advanced to 

within 30 kilometers oftheRoseixes dam 
at Damazin, 320 kilometer southeast of 
Khartoum, which supplies the ra prfai 
with 70 percent of its electricity. 

While that claim could not be con- 
firmed independently, journalists who 
' . have visited the area report large numbers 
of refugees, many riding ancient trucks 

even live animals. Defensive prepar at ions 
along the rutted dirt trade from Damazin 
were virtually nonexistent, and local mil- 


“ — ~ PHW MW MA* SWUAIRU V Wmj 

were loaded with explosives, andthat 
each was taking 37 soldiers to the Israeli 
occupation zone in southern Lebanon. 

Mr. Netanyahu's spokesman, David 
Bar-Dan, said it was doubtful tint any of 
the soldiers on beard had survived. 

The prime minister canceled a trip to 


and Israel Radio said be would put off a 
meeting Thursday with Yasser Arafat, 
president 0 f foe Palestinian Authority. 
King Hussein of Jordan and Mr. Arafat 
conveyed condolences. 

A night wlnie explosion lit the night 
sky as the helicopters — UJS.-made 
Sikorsky CH -53 transporters-— collided 

and crashed to the ground at a kibbutz in 
the- eastern Galilee, eight kilometers 
(five . miles) south of the border with 
Lebanon. 

The army commander for the region. 
Major General Amiram Levine, con- 
firmed thar the helicopters were carrying 
soldiers to Lebanon as part of a troop 
rotation. 

“There wasa huge explosion, “said a 
resident of foe settlement, Rachel Fro- 
movitz. “They crashed right above us 
and the helicopters came down in a fiery 



Envoy to India 
Seen as in Line 
To Take Over 
For Harriman 


By Joseph Fitchett 

Inwnarionn! Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Speculation about a suc- 
cessor to Ambassador Pamela Hamm an 
has focused on Frank Wisner. a career 
diplomat who is ambassador to India. 

Mr. Wisner, 58. has not been offi- 
cially nominated by the White House, 
but State Department sources said Tues- 
day that he had appeared set for die job 
for several weeks, with a tentative ar- 
rival dale in Paris next June, the date 
when Mrs. Ham man had planned to 
leave the post. 

Another name widely cited for the 
Paris embassy has been Felix Roharyn, 
the New York investment banker and 


uy cuuiuiaoQcr ror me icpou, m ituvAinn Fian-Rcw 

moral Amiram Levine, con- BUDDING BRUCE LEES - — Clergy members from the Peterborough diocese in Britain sharpening their self- 
x the helicopters were carrying d e f e n se sfcflb Tuesday during a half-day course at the headquarters of the Northampton police department. 

> Lebanon as part of a troop ~ 

was* huge explosion,” saida - 

High Court Rejects French Tycoon’s Appeal 


longtime Democrat 
Mr. Wisner appea 


Another resident, Yoav Frenkel, said 
on Israeli Radio: “We saw a helicopter 
in the air with smoke coming out from it, 
and then it crashed into the settle- 
ment’’ 

General Levine said the army was 
working to identify the dead as quickly 
as possible. “The most important thing 
right now is foe search for survivors and 
identification of foe dead," be said 
No residents of tire kibbutz were bint, 
but there was extensive damage 
throughout tire settlement .from the ex- 
plosion. (AP, Reuters) 


CamfSalbfOmrSKfFranDupa John 

PARIS — Ranee's highest court on 
Tuesday upheld an eight-month jail term 
against the bankrupt tycoon Bernard 
Tapie for rigging a soccer match and 
ordered him to remain behind bars for 
eight months. 

One of Mr. Tapie’s lawyers, Jean- 
Yves Lienard, said that his client would 
resign his sear in the European Par- 
liament, his last political job. Mr. Tapie, 
54, has already been stripped of his seat 
in the French National Assembly. 

The Com* de Cassation rejected Mr. 


Tapie’s appeal of (he sentence, which 
was handed down by a lower court in 
November 1995 ova- a 1993 match- 
fixing scandal. 

The flamboyant former boss of the 
Olympique Marseille soccer team has 
never been jailed despite several con- 
victions for fraud, corruption, tax eva- 
sion and fmanriai mismanagement 

Mr. Tapie had spent his first night 
behind bars Monday after turning him- 
self in at the grim La Same prison in 
Paris. On Tuesday, the prosecutor asked 
the court to reject Mr. Tapie’s appeal. 


Mr. Tapie said shortly before the de- 
cision was handed down that he did not 
know how he would cope with prison. 

“To have lost my freedom is very 
hard for roe and for those who love me.” 
he told the newspaper Le Figaro in an 
interview from prison to be published 
Wednesday. “But as ii is the first time, I 
cannot say how I will react.” 

Mr. Tapie could be allowed to serve 
his term at an open prison, spending the 
nights in a cell and being allowed out in 
foe daytime to work in his new calling as 
a movie actor. (AFP, Reuters} 


Mr. Wisner appears to hold the edge. 
State Department officials said, because 
his extensive political experience could 
help him ease U.S.-French relations 
after they wen? marred recently by fric- 
tion over issues in Europe, the Middle 
East and Africa. 

While not characterized as a diplo- 
matic troubleshooter, Mr. Wisner has 
held top-level positions in the State De- 
partment and the Defense Department in 
the Clinton administration. After be- 
coming ambassador to Zambia, he was 
subsequently ambassador in Egypt for 
five years in the 1980s, in the Philippines 
during the closure of U.S. bases there. 

Mrs. Harriman, esteemed by French 
officials for getting Washington to focus 
more attention on Ranee, had told foe 
Clinton administration thai Mr. Rohatyn 
and Mr. Wisner. who has a French wife, 
were both old friends of hers, but that 
Mr. Wisner was her personal choice as 
her successor, sources said. 


NATO: Allies Pursue Host of Diplomatic Initiatives to Win Moscow Over on Enlargement 


■if HI 


,V?fi f' is 


- iscd counteroffensive had yet to begin. 

* Tensions were high during a visit last 
week to this village of 5,000, on the 
eastern bank of the Blue Nile 370 ki- 
lometers southeast of Khartoum sad 15 

■ kilometers from the nearest rebel-held 
, (own. Refugees filled foe scrubby wood- 
lands nearby, cooking meals chi open 

' fires or stretching out in the shade on 
etude cots of wood and twine. On foe 
other side of town, a company of gov- 

- eminent soldiers was getting ready for a 

* fight, digging trenches and stacking 
' cranes of ammunition. 

Despite their gains of recent weeks, 
rebel leaders acknowledge they have little 
chance of toppling foe government by, 
force. They say their strategy is to exert 
. erougfr military pressure on it to spark an 
amty coup, a poptiar uprising or bofo . 

“The idea is foat this helps to prove to 

- the regime that oppression will be met 
with armed resistance and it will not 
pay.'* Sadek Mahdi, a former prime 
minister and head of foe opposition 
Umraa Party, said in Cairo last month. 
“The best that can be done is to check 
the military hegemony of the regime.” 

Mr. Mahdi, a legendary figure in Su- 
danese politics whose grandfather de- 
feated the British at Khartoum in 1885, 
was deposed in the 1989 coup that in- 
stalled die current leadership of Lieu- 
tenant General Omar Hassan Ahmad 
Bashir and Hassan Turabi, the speaker of 
the National Assembly, leader of the 
National Islamic Front and by all ac- 

* counts the real power. 

Mr. Mahdi fled the capital in Decem- 
ber. AGs departure came on top of the June 
1995 decision of foe mam northern op- 
, position parties and southern rebels l ed by 
i Colonel John Garang to form a military 
; alliance. That alliance was welcomed by 
Ethiopia and Eritrea, which accuse Khar- 
' loam of supporting Islamic rebels trying 

- to overthrow their governments. 

Ethiopia and Eritrea maintain warm 
relations with Washington, which de- 
cided last vear to provide them and 
' ' Uganda with $20 mill ion in surplus mfl- 
itary aid- Uganda also backs the Su- 
‘ rebels. U.S. officials have denied 

that the aid — such nonlethal supplies as 
.. tents and radios— is intended to help foe 

- rebels, and they say there is no e videnc e 
; Etimmia and Eritrea have been directly 

involved in the latest fighting. 

But there is little question that foe 
'' rebels operate with backing : from both 

■ -countries, which have allowed item to set 
7 up bases and have given logistic assist- 
ance. according to diplomats in foe «- 

i, giotL Although Etinopia denr« rtrsm- 
volved in the fighting. Sudanese officials 
and some witnesses assert that its soi- 
" diets, backed by tanks awiheavyaroJJery. 
helped sei/e toy row** aoa S^J? da 

before turning ihem over to fie rebek^ 

Rebel forces opc^g^ra Entt^, 
meanwhile, have skmnrshed with gov- 
ernment troops to 

threat to the main road ta&ms Khartoum 
with Port Sudan on the Red Sea. 


Continued from Page 1 

ing and some other operations. 

•Thirty-nation talks aimed at redu- 
cing nonnuclear arsenals under the aus- 
pices of dm Organization for Security 
and Cooperation in Europe. 

•Political initiatives by the European 
Union. - 

• Overtures from the Group of Seven, 
the club of leading industrialized coun- 
tries that Russia has sought to join. 

. President Boris Yeltsin of Russia has 
insisted on bilateral consultations with 
key European countries, including Ger- 
many, France, Britain and the Neth- 
erlands, which holds .foe-rotating pres- 
idency of the EU in the months leading 
up to the North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization summit conference in July at 
which NATO wants to announce new 
members m Central Europe, 

Another hurdle involves meeting die 
needs of countries that will not be in the 
first wave of NATO enlargement, not- 
ably Ukraine and foe Baltic states. 


Knotty issues most be ironed out for 
any accord. For example, Russia wants to 
be included in a new air traffic control 
system — which plays a role in air de- 
fense — that NATO plans for new mem- 
ber states. Extending it to Russia would 
be logical, Moscow says, if NATO really 
intends for its forces to participate in 
future peacekeeping operations. 

Moscow has demanded a treaty with 
NATO that guarantees a Russian voice 
in alliance affairs ahead of enlargement 
and rules out any arms buildup m new 
member states. But NATO governments 
want tins special relationship to be a 
political agreement that clearly excludes 
any veto powers for Moscow. 

Western hopes for assuaging Russia's 
military concerns are pinned on the 30- 
nation anns-control talks that opened last 
week in Vienna as a follow-on to the 1 990 
treaty on conventional forces in Europe. 
By setting lower ceilings on the number 
erf tanks, artillery and other offensive 
weapons in each country, an agreement 
would reassure Russia that it faces no 


military threat on its western flank. 

“If we can get credible progress 
there,” a German ambassador said, “it 
should make the Russians less worried 
that they need a treaty with NATO and 
take a lot of the pressure out of the 
political negotiations.'’ 

The idea, aDntch diplomat said, is to 
“frontload” the Vienna talks for an early 
diplomatic payoff by laying out a plan for 
most countries to have smaller arsenals 
while leaving room for Russia to move 
farces to cope with crises on its borders. 

But new alliance members will need 
latitude for allied troops to maneuver on 
their soil so that “there is no second- 
class NATO,” a U.S. diplomat said. 

Low ceilings would offer economic 
benefits for prospective member states. 

“Most of them are still in foe process 
of throwing stuff away” from their 
Warsaw Pact arsenals, one official said, 
pointing out that die new democracies 
race major development challenges and 
need to minimize military spending. 

But Russia would lose a key source of 


PAKISTAN: Voters Rout Bhutto Party and Restore Opposition 


Continued from Page 1 

party will have about a third of the seats 
it held in the previous Pariiament- 

Seats won by several smaller parties 
allied to the Muslim League will push its 
seat total to 165 or more. Imran Kahn, 
the fanner cricket star who was crying to 
break into politics, failed to win any of 
the seven seats he contested. 

Miss Bhutto, looking puffy-faced and 
exhausted as the humiliating scale of the 
defeat became clear, immediately chal- 
lenged the result, saying it bad been 
rigged by the addition of hundreds of 
thousands of phantom votes. 

But she said she would not lead mass 
protests, a common tactic of Pakistan 
opposition parties, because she believed 
the country needed political stability if 
pariiamentaxy democracy, suppressed 
for long periods by military rulers, was 
to survive. 

“I do not accept the results,” Miss 
Bhutto said at a news conference in 
I slamabad, where she arrived earlier in 
the day from the Bhutto family’s an- 
cestral home in Larkana in southern 

Pakistan. She wem re-election to her own 

assembly seat even as many key min- 
isters in her former g o vernment were 
defeated. 

For Miss Bbutto, a two-time prime 
minister who was dismissed on both 
occasions for alleged corruption and 
misrule, the root was the worst election 
rebuff in the~30 years that the Bhutto 
family has dominated Pakistani poli- 
tics. 

“The results were engineered," she 
said, “Votes were added, foe whole 
thing was a fraud for foe people of 
Pakistan. But the country needs stability 


for the economic progress of the people. 
If we don't have stability, who mil suf- 
fer? The people of Pakistan will suffer 
and suffer aim suffer. Engineered elec- 
tions, governments that are dismissed, 
agitations, what’s foe point?” 

Mr. Sharif, a 47-y ear-old industrialist 
who will be having his second turn as 
prime minister after heading a govern- 
ment between 1990 and 1993, rejected 
the charges of banm-stnflSng arid ap- 
pealed to Miss Bhutto, his rival in four 
elections in the last eight years, to accept 
defeat 

“The international observers were 
here, they certified, they stud very cat- 
egorically, that foe elections were free and 
fur, and I think every Pakistani believes 
that,” he said. “And I think the Pakistan 
People’s Party of Benazir Bhutto must 
1mm to accept defeat gracefully.'’ 

Despite his large majority, Mr. Sharif 
may have to tread carefully if his gov- 
ernment is to complete its five-year par- 
liamentary term, something no civilian 
government in Pakistan has done since 
the country was founded in 1947. 

For one thing, the Muslim League, a 
party founded by Mr. Sharif in the 1980s 
and distinct from the Muslim League that 
led Pakistan ai independence, has been a 
fractions alliance- that has had little co- 
herence on policy issues. Founded by 
politicians Hke Mr. Sharif who were re- 
cruited into politics under the military 
dictatorship of General Sanl-Haq.it has 
suffered several schisms as a result of 
rivalries and regional differences. 

In power again, the league’s biggest 
challenge may be managing relations 
with two competing power centers — 
President Farooq Leghari, whose dis- 
missal of Miss Bhutto’s government in 


November has made him, in a sense, the 
godfather of the new government, and 
the armed forces chiefs who were re- 
cently appointed by Mr. Leghari to a 
shadowy body, the Council for Defense 
and National Security. The council, 
which will have two equal blocs com- 
posed of government ministers and an 
appointed group consisting of the pres- 
ident and foe military chiefs, will form- 
alize the powerful behmd-tte-scenes 
role the military has played since the 


death in 1988 of General 23a opened the 
way for a mum io elected govern- 
ments. 

Homing in on foe most sensitive issue 
confronting Mr. Sharif, Miss Bhutto 
challenged him Tuesday to use his two- 
thirds parliamentary majority to abolish 
the ZLa-era power that has been used by 
presidents four times in the last decade to 
rii-cmisfi civilian governments. 

But Mr. Sharif, aware that any early 
challenge to Mr. Leghari and the mil- 
itary chiefs conld be fatal to his ad- 
ministration, was quick to say that be 
had other priorities. 

Mr. Sharif said his priorities would be 
economic progress, an improvement in 
law and order and an end to endemic 
corruption — issues that pre-election 
polls showed to be paramount among the 
56 million eligible voters in Monday's 
balloting. 

Another major priority that Mr. Sharif 
outlined during the campaign was an 
effort to improve relations with India, 
which have been mired in polemics for 
years. 

His failure to mention this in his re- 
marks Tuesday may have reflected a 
realization that this, too, could be po- 
litically hazardous. 


hard currency as new NATO members 
stopped buying spare parts for their So- 
viet-built warplanes and tanks. 

This economic aspect of enlargement 
will ultimately have to be met with aid, 
allied officials said, and a German poli- 
cymaker said his government had told 
Moscow that bilateral accords, including 
economic ones, would be possible if 
enlargement went smoothly. 

Another incentive put forward by Par- 
is and Bonn is a permanent G-7 seal for 
Moscow. Since Russia is not ready to 
participate in economic deliberations, 
the group could be split into an economic 
committee and a political committee, 
with Russia as a member of the latter. 

But German officials said Russia 
seemed more focused on trade-offs 
within Europe and perhaps from the 
EU. 

While the EU agenda is officially 
filled with internal reforms, several of- 
ficials said their governments were 
quietly weighing a plan for accelerating 
the entry of the Baltic states to bolster 
their security after they get left out of the 
initial wave of NATO expansion. 

Ukraine is a trickier problem, but after 
bilateral contacts with U.S., French and 
German leaders. President Leonid 
Kuchma has agreed to settle for closer 
coordination with NATO — a formula 
diplomats call “an enhanced relation- 
ship” to show that it ranks below Rus- 
sia’s “special" relationship. 

Western strategy in selling enlarge- 
ment involves persuading Moscow of foe 
advantages to be gained from accepting a 
deal that, ultimately, it cannot block. 

“It’s not exactly saying that "no is not 
an option,’ but it does come down to the 
idea that there is a window of opportunity 
here,” an American policymaker said. 
Washington and Bonn adopted a similar 
strategy on German reunification. 

But this time the challenge of getting 
Russian leaders to concentrate on closure 
is more complicated. Western officials 
say, because of the need to make progress 
simultaneously in so many negotiating 
tracks involving so many capitals. 

Even the core process involves two 
overlapping sets of talks: the political 
dialogue between NATO and Russia 
about future cooperation and the mil- 
itary track involving conventional arma- 
ments in Central Europe. 

Public attention has focused largely 
on the NATO-Russia debate, which cen- 
ters on foe terms of a new partnership 
with Russia — for example, in planning 
and even decision-making about some 
aspects of peacekeeping and other al- 
liance operations — without giving 
Moscow a veto. 

To emphasize allied unity about Ibis 
offer, the talks are being conducted not by 
U.S. emissaries bait by NATO's secre- 
tary-general, Javier Solana Madariaga. 

“The idea is to move away from an 
era when Washington spoke for NATO 
and Moscow for the Warsaw Pact,” a 
U.S. official said. 


HARRIMAN: 

Brain Hemorrhage 

Continued from Page 1 

foe French with a cool sense of when and 
bow to delegate authority. At once the 
French-speaking daughter of an English 
baron and a woman with the ear of 
President Bill Clinton, Mrs. Harriman 
has known how to play on foe snobbery 
and pragmatism of her French inter- 
locutors. 

Mr. Chirac gave instructions Tuesday 
that the “best specialists” be placed at 
her disposal, and the foreign minister, 
Herve de Charette, expressed Ms sym- 
pathy and best wishes for a quick re- 
covery. 

Mr. de Charette also spoke of his 
‘ ‘excellent personal relations” with Mrs. 
Harriman — a slightly disingenuous de- 
scription of a relationship that was sorely 
tried in recent months by a series of 
minor tantrums involving Warren Chris- 
topher, the former secretary of state. Mrs. 
Harriman — amused, but not entirely — 
took to commenting on the “really ter- 
rible chemistry" between the two men. 

Mrs. Harriman, the daughter of the 
11th Baron Digby, was 19 when she 
married Randolph Churchill, foe son of 
Winston Churchill, the British prime 
minister during World War 11 . Tfie mar- 
riage ended in divorce after foe war, and 
it was then that Mrs. Harriman first 
sojourned in France, where she had af- 
fairs with, among others, Gianni Agnelli 
and Baron Elie de Rothschild. 

Her second marriage, in 1960, was to 
Ley land Hayward, the cinema magnate. 
She became a naturalized American cit- 
izen after wedding her third husband, foe 
wealthy diplomat Averell Harriman, in 
1971. 

It was in the 1980s that Mrs. Harriman 
first became deeply involved in resus- 
citating and raising funds for the Demo- 
cratic Party, a process that culminated 
with her centra! role in foe first Clinton- 
Gore campaign. The subsequent nom- 
ination as ambassador to France reflec- 
ted her contribution to President Clin- 
ton’s election. 

After Mr. Clinton was re-elected, 
there were widespread rumors that she 
would leave Paris at foe beginning of this 
year. But the president told ter that be 
was not ready to name a successor, and 
she agreed to stay on until this summer. 

She had been engaged in recent weeks 
in a concerted diplomatic effort to 
smooth over -the fissures in relations 
between France and America. Her own 
view was that if France insisted on being 
an equal partner, and felt ruffled when 
treated merely as an important partner, 
America should spend more time trying 
to make France appear equal. 

■ Clintons ‘Very Concerned 5 

President Clinton and his wife, HDlary, 
are “very concerned” about Mis. Har- 
riman, Agence France -Presse reported 

Tuesday, quoting White House officials. 


As After the Economic Miracle 9 Slowing Growth, Rising Wages and Structural Problems Have Many Wondering f ‘What Next?' 


Continued from Page 1 ^^Scte^^soStore^Mn gradual and 

. ^rwnneritiveness Also, foe fell of stmtetiMhaff-tearteA 
meaarelOfangcompjOTwn^ Some enhes s^ foat the government of 

ancae products more compen * than taking bold measures, it is offering half- 

Korean exports. cmith Korea's econ- measures or symbolic gestures. 

. -.Whatiste PP c ^*^ c «^r^cl Seoul The isstwsar foe heart of Sonfo Korca’seco- 

nmv i* mftiunnx- * ^ nmnir Tnalnise are snoos (mes: 


rues are losing ^ has made Jap- Japan. Some colics- say mat foe government of •The chaebol s near-monopoly of credit has 

the Japanese yen m inetaMyrai . 5^1 President Kjm Young Sam seems adrift Rather allowed them to expand so fastthal industry is 

ancae products more compcn c, 6 1 j wn taking bold measures, it is offering half- swimmmgmcwer-c^acity. it has also frozen out 


tries run by chaebol Bribery of government Park Ungsuh. president of the Samsung £co- makes it easier for companies to lay off workers 
nffirials and bankers by businessmen wanting nomic Research Institute. Companies typically and tame growth in wages, led to labor strife, 
loans is common. take six months to pay bills, meaning that smaller though many economists think ft was necessity. 

• The chaebol’s near-monopoly of credit has firms live from band to mouth. For all South Korea’s travails, other countries 

“ * Ttegovemmrathas lifted some restrictions on in Asia, where export growth and economic 


mcwer-c^jacity. It has also frozen out bank leodi 
small, entrepreneurial companies that ownership 


and raised the ceiling on foreign 
a South Korean corporation’s stock 


omy is maturing. . of bus- nomic malaise are serious ones: 

. tasured-h ^^™^^SSgrow* .Wages tevequadnipkd^ce 1^7, 

ness, tightly closed_rom^55^,. c|T o^ lhe rise than in ofocr Asian “Tiros’ such as 


intheUnitfid States have often been the pioneers to 20 percent from 15 percent. The president has 


in new technologies. 


promised further sweeping reform of the bloated 


faster .The cnrrent-accoimt deficit, foe broadest financial sector, but since that would lead to 


growth have slowed in the last year, have found 
themselves in the same boat. And for South 
Korea, at least, the boat isn’t about to capsize. 

In most industries that are now at foe core of 
the Korean economy — steel, shipbuilding, cars 


nwx, ngnuy ^ industry at the 


rise than in other Asian ‘ ‘Tigers” such as Taiwan measure of trade, more than doubled in 19%, to mergers and layoffs, most analysts do not expect and electronics '—the major competitor is Japan, 
and Singapore. That has forced a mass exodns of about S23 billion, in part because South Korea’s drastic action in a presidential election year. where wages are much higher. South Korea can 


jttKtsitisinJap 8 ” 

The government i 

.. rcfbrms — - deregu 


.. reforms — ‘^SmyatthepoWof 


in embark on economic lowernwge countries in Aria. Such a nfigrandn 
- foe financial system, is now-rtarting for teavfer mdustnM as welL 
LTumv St foe oowerof .Banks are weighed down by bad debts and a 


such as shoe manufacturing, to dearth of small companies and its technological 
otries in Aria. Such a migration laggazrisess force ir to import Japanese com- 
be heavier industries as weB, portents and production machines, 
taghed down by bad debts and a At present, foe Deed far reform seems most 


fcric of business acumen that stems from their urgent With the financial system nearly closed to many people say are already too powerful, 
kawfiroe role as little more than agents erf foe fonrien capital, and interest raies that exceed 12 The one decisive move Seoul has tak 


longtime. role as litriemore foanagems erf the foreign! 
government, founding loans to favored Indus- percent. 


e economy is starved for cash; said 


drastic action in a presidential election year, where wages are much higher. South Korea can 

One potential sticking point is that if bonks are still sell products that are less expensive, if lower 
to be strengthened, it might be necessary to end in quality, than the Japanese, 
the ban on chaebol ownership of them. That “Korea is mid-priced, mid-tech capital and 
would only strengthen these conglomerates that intermediate goods,” said Mr. Marvin ofSsangy- 
many people say are already too powerful. ong Securities. “Mid-priced mid-tech goods are 
The one decisive move Seoul has taken to exactly what China needs, it's what Eastern 
increase competitiveness, a new labor law that Europe needs and Latin America needs.” 




-ipj- !V i "• 








INTERNATIONAL 


mat at n TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 




PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1997 

EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Tteralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



published with the vijik times and the htakhinctcm post 


Truth in South Africa 


Auschwitz’s Ghosts Come to Call on Switzerland * ^ 


When South Africa's Truth and Re- 
conciliation Commission began work 
last April, the wife of Steve Biko 
feared it could grant amnesty to the 
people who murdered her husband in 
1977. Last week, five policemen said 
they had killed Mr. Biko, and they will 
likely get amnesty in return. 

But Mrs. Biko got something she had 
long been denied — the truth. For de- 
cades. the apartheid government in- 
sisted that her husband had committed 
suicide or died accidentally in a struggle 
with police. His killers will now confess 
to this and several other notorious 
murders on national television. 

Mrs. Biko has not said whether she 
now feels this is an acceptable com- 
promise. It is for South Africa, the only 
country that has ever tried this kind of 
approach to dealing with crimes from 
its pasL To further reconciliation, the 
Truth Commission was established 
with the power to grant amnesty not in 
blanket form, but only to those who 
confess to political crimes. 

Without the lure of amnesty, it is 
likely that no one who knew of Mr. 
Biko's murder would have talked, 
making convictions impossible. The 
new South African government has 
attempted few prosecutions. The most 
prominent defendant, former Defense 
Minister Magnus Mai an, was acquitted 
of involvement in a massacre. Less 
prominent victims have little chance of 
interesting the state in prosecution. 

Ideally. South Africa's courts will 
someday be efficient and fair enough 
to deliver widespread justice. Mean- 
while. the Truth Commission trades 
the impossible for the possible, namely 
information that is indispensable for 
healing after apartheid. 

Its investigations have implicated 
the highest officials and revealed how 
apartheid worked. 

The Biko revelations are especially 
welcome because so far only a few 


prominent apartheid officials have ap- 
plied for amnesty. But more applica- 
tions are coming, including those of a 
former minister of law and order and SO 
high-level policemen. In addition, the 
African National Congress has turned 
in more than 100 applications from 
members covering crimes they corn- 
mined fighting apartheid, and more are 
on the way. There will likely be a rush 
of applications right before the dead- 
line, which was extended till May. 

The amnesty applications are only 
one side of the Truth Commission. 

Since last April, die commissioners, 
led by Archbishop Emeritus Desmond 
Tutu, have held public, televised bear- 
ings around the country in which vic- 
tims speak of their suffering. The sto- 
ries of ordinary people — typical is the 
seamstress whose son was arrested and 
never seen again — continue to make 
news every day. A weekly television 
program on the commission continues 
to draw a wide audience. 

The hearings are therapeutic not 
only for the victims. The televised 
statements of victims and criminals 
can open the eyes of whites who ig- 
nored or justified apartheid's crimes, a 
crucial ingredient of reconciliation and 
for creating a democratic culture. 

Many whites, perhaps most, still 
seem determined to ignore the Truth 
Commission. But if these confessions 
cannot convince them apartheid was 
wrong, probably nothing will. 

At bottom, the controversy over the 
Truth Commission is a debate over 
what new democracies must do to 
overcome the legacy of dictatorship. 
Such governments should have two 
goals, to heal the victims and ensure 
that dictatorship never returns. The 
Truth Commission alone cannot meet 
those aims, but it remains one of the 
best attempts any nation has yet 
made. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Peru’s Strategy 


The basic rule in hostage negotiations 
is to keep lines open to the hostage 
takers and to make their best option lode 
to be a safe and minimally compensated 
release of their innocent captives. 

Peru's president. Alberto Fujimori, 
is following this strategy to free the 72 
hostages (down from 500) seized in 
Japan's Lima embassy by left-wing 
MRTA terrorists on Dec. 17. At any 
moment things could go horribly 
wrong, and if that happens the re- 
sponsibility will rest first on the ter- 
rorists who initiated the confrontation. 
But for the moment, Mr. Fujimori is 
giving the right strategy a fair test. 

Over the weekend he firmed up his 
sagging position with Japan — a cru- 
cial consideration given Japan's major 
policy investment in Peru and given 
too that it is Japan's premises and 
diplomats that remain captive. The 
Japanese had been visibly concerned 
lest Peru provoke a premature show- 
down. For a Peruvian pledge to hold 
off using force while the hostages re- 
main safe and then to consult Tokyo. 
Japan endorsed Mr. Fujimori's refusal 
to free convicted terrorists. Bill Clin- 
ton added his approval Monday. 

In Washington. President Fujimori 
reported on his “conversation" and 
“dialogue" — he does not acknow- 


ledge * ‘negotiations' ' with terrorists — 
with the MRTA- He said the group had 
“implicitly" backed off its earlier de- 
mand for release (' ‘liberation”) of im- 
prisoned companions. Mr. Fujimori 
also indicated some capacity for give in 
a particular area die group has spot- 
lighted: improving die cruel conditions 
— themselves the official response to 
terrorists' past abuse of less coercive 
prisons — of the government’s current 
MRTA prisoners. Yet one more pos- 
sible area of maneuver is asylum for the 
terrorists; it seems blocked at the mo- 
ment for lack of a ready asylum giver. 

In the batde for international opinion 
that becomes a part of almost every 
hostage situation, Mr. Fujimori has 
been struggling hard. Though demo- 
cratic in form, his rule is undeniably 
authoritarian in some of its substance. 
But when he ran for re-election, Per- 
uvian voters enthusiastically approved 
his hard line, accepting his claim that 
terrorists forced him into it and that his 
frce-maiket program to tackle Pern's 
miserable poverty offered hope. Rom 
Lima, The Post’s Gabriel Escobar re- 
ports that the rebels are few and split 
and “despised by most Peruvians and 
particularly by the poor." The Robin 
Hood model has no resonance in Peru. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Programs That Work 


In the familiar and frazzling con- 
gressional argument over U.S. foreign 
aid for family planning, the side whose 
explicit purpose is to oppose abortion 
has been marking up notable gains, in 
the past two years, these funds have 
been cut by a full third, kept from being 
spent until nine months of the fiscal 
year have passed and then allowed to be 
spent only in small monthly sums. Now 
an important vote is coming up that the 
family planning side hopes will halt 
and reverse this legislative harassment 
of a valuable program. The vote is not 
about funding abortions — something 
prohibited by law and policy anyway. It 
will simply determine whether funds 
already appropriated for family plan- 
ning in fiscal 1 997 will be held up until 
July or released in March. 

Not a great issue, it could be said: a 
battle over crumbs in Congress. But it is 
a great issue if you believe U.S. vol- 
untary' family planning programs have 
made u central. 30-year contribution to 
reducing poverty arid enhancing human 
dignity around the world. They work. It 
is demonstrable that when programs and 
funds are reduced — by cuts, delays 
and policy encumbrances — uninten- 


ded pregnancies and abortions follow. 

We now come to the large and con- 
tinuing mystery of these programs. A 
strange belief that abortions can be 
made to end if family planning is re- 
stricted is what apparently has led anti- 
abortion advocates to work for the 
denial and diminution of family plan- 
ning services. “Chris,” former Sen- 
ator Mark Hatfield wrote not long ago 
to one of those advocates. Represen- 
tative Chris Smith, Republican of New 
Jersey, “you are contributing to an 
increase of abortions worldwide be- 
cause of the funding restrictions on 
which you insisted in last year's fund- 
ing bill. U is a proven fact that when 
contraceptive services are not avail- 
able to women throughout the world, 
abortion rates increase. ... This is un- 
acceptable to me as someone who is 
strongly opposed to abortion." 

The global generation now coming 
of childbearing age is the largest single 
generation ever to reach reproductive 
maturity, the Rockefeller Foundation 
reports. This is a sobering reminder of 
the need for the United States to resume 
its leadership in an important field. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


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D AVOS, Switzerland — At the 
World Economic Forum here, that 
storied annual meeting of what The 
Economist magazine calls "the people 
who run the world." the focus has been 
unrelentingly on the future. Yet almost 
rudely, the past will not release its grip. 

This is the country, after alL about 
which the world now has a stark ques- 
tion: As 6 million died in the Holocaust, 
did Switzerland cry all the way to 
the bank? 

It seems it did. The country was a vast 
teller window, takin g the deposits of 
Jews on the tun, Nazis hiding their plun- 
der and maybe, some suspect, what is 
nicely called nonmonetary gold as well 
— not the bullion found in bank vaults, 
but the gold taken from the jewelry and 
teeth of those killed. Of the deposits left 
behind by doomed Jews, maybe 532 
million remain in dormant accounts. 

Whatever the figure, Swiss banks 
have been painfully reluctant to ac- 
knowledge they were holding money 
that should go to others. 

Fussy and officious to the point 
of caricature, it's as if the bankers 
here were waiting for the ghosts of 
Auschwitz to show up with their 
passbooks. Only recently have the 
Swiss come around and. in a gesture 
long delayed, agreed to set up a com- 


By Richard Cohen 

pensation fund for Holocaust victims. 

For the younger generation of Swiss, 
coming to terms with their country’s 
history has been painful — and things 
may yet get worse. 

Switzerland, after all, was not the 
passive neutral it has portrayed itself, 
but a willing business partner of Nazi 
Germany and, initially at least, a coun- 
try whose establishment was largely 
pro-fasdsL It was the Swiss who in- 
sisted that a “J“ be stamped into five 
passports of fleeing Jews — so they 
could be spotted at the border ana 
barred from entering their country. 

Nevertheless, Switzerland is hardly 
a unique case. The Holocaust was an 
enormous crime and what we are learn- 
ing is that the list of unindicted co- 
conspirators is great. Little by little 
France has been turning over the rock 
on its collaborationist past — die role of 
the French police, for instance, in the 
roundup of Jews and their shipment to 
Auschwitz and death. About 75.000 
Jews made the journey: a mere 2,500 
returned. France disgraced itself. 

Sweden, too, has begun to look into 
the true nature of its neutrality and so. 
for that matter, has Portugal — a dic- 


tatorship at the time. Even the United 
States is combing its archives to deter- 
mine what it knew about the movement 
of moneys during World War II and 
whether it chose silence over protest. 
The report is due next month and its 
findings may surprise — possibly 
shame — many Ame ricans . 

Undersecretary of State Stuart 
Eizenstar, the U.S. coordinator for the 
various efforts to determine what 
happened to the Holocaust funds, has 
been meeting here with Swiss gov- 
ernment and banking officials. Prime 
Minis ter Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel 
has also met here on the same subject 
and so. for that matter, have some other 
U.S. officials. AU in all, a conference 
dedicated to tilings digital, virtual and 
cyber finds itself dealing some of the 
time with the events of 50 years ago. 

Why? Mr. Eizenstal probably has the 
best answer the end or the Cold War. 
For 50 years, the West was preoccupied 
with the Co mmunis t threat — and one 
member of the alliance was reluctant to 
ask another member of the alliance whflL 
precisely, it did during World War 1L 

Now, though, those questions are 
being asked and they are being promp- 
ted in some cases by the declassifi- 
cation of once-secret documents. 

Ultimately, the questions raised by 


die Swiss Holocaust funds — the 
dormant accounts, the business rela- 
tionships — are not about money, but 
about morality. We all know it is wrong 
to kill people on account of their eth- 
nicity, religion or political persuasion. 
We all know it is wrong to remain silent 
while a crime is being committed. But 
how wrong is it to do business at a 
distance with the bad guys? 

This is not some dusty moral question 
from the newsreel era. but one as con- 
temporary as the computerized message 
network at this conference. It informs the 
debate over U.S. policy toward China — 
constructive engagement, as it is called 
— and our contrary policy toward Cuba. 
In one case, we do business, in the other 
we don't. For die Cubans we mount a 
moral high horse: for the Chinese we 
dismount Even the Swiss are entitled to 
laugh at our moral muddle. 

In this quaint alpine ski village, 
chock full for the moment with tycoons 
and politicians, the future is already 
upon us. The talk is digital, virtually 
virtual and always about the inevitable 
millennium. We are heading, with all 
our digital toys, into another century. It 
will be a brave new world for sure — 
but we. 1 fear, will remain the same 
old moral cowards. 

The Washington Post 


Western Economic Nostrums Are Not What Japan Needs 


T OKYO — Japan’s current 
economic slump has some 
important lessons for the rest of 
the world. 

Most have blamed the slump 
on the problems of overregu- 
lation and ingrained waste and 
corruption in the political-bu- 
reaucratic system. Failure to 
carry out reform promises is a 
major cause of the current pes- 
simism. Bui die same problems 
existed back in the days when 
Japan was prospering. Die cause 
of Japan's current economic 
malaise lies elsewhere, in the 
massive but largely overlooked 
harm caused by rapid currency 
appreciation up to 1995. 

In little more than a decade 
after the failure of Reaganite 
strong-dollar policies in the 
early 1980s. the yen appreci- 
ated from 240 to the dollar 
down to less than 80. In theory, 
and very much in practice, too. 
almost all Japanese companies 
exporting to dollar markets or 
competing with foreign goods 
and services from those markets 
had to cut costs and prices by 
more than half to remain in 
business. No economy, even 
one as strong and competitive 
as Japan’s was. can handle a 
deflationary shock of this size. 

Western free-markeL lais- 
sez-faire economics sees cur- 


By Gregory Clark 


rency shifts benignly, as the nat- 
ural result of markets acting 
freely. If anything, appreciation 
is seen as good and stimulatory 
because it cheapens imports and 
forces producers to work 
harder. Depreciation is seen as 
protectionist and harmful. 

In fact, it can easily be the 
exact reverse. Appreciation can 
be highly destimulatoiy. The 
protection offered by depred- 
ation can be highly beneficial. 

True. Japan's economy is 
also dogged by corruption and 
waste, not to mention the col- 
lapse of its late-’80s land and 
share boom “bubble" econo- 
my. But most waste and cor- 
ruption simply results in the 
transfer of funds from the hon- 
est to the dishonest. The re- 
sources do not disappear. 

During the 1960s and '70s, 
Taiwan and South Korea were 
spending close to 20 percent of 
their gross national product on 
defense. Yet they still managed 
to grow, splendidly. Economies 
can tolerate a high level of re- 
source misallocation. provided 
they are basically competitive. 
The U.S. savings and loan scan- 
dals of the late '80s were on a 
par with the financial scandals 
we now see in Japan, and 


today's U.S. economy seems 
healthy enough. 

In Japan, the waste and cor- 
ruption needed to sustain die 
ugly political, bureaucratic and 
gangster empires are scandalous. 
But they make up far less than 20 
percent of GNP. Japan still has to 
do something about the collapse 
of land and share prices. But its 
basic problem today is the loss of 
competitiveness caused by past 
yen appreciation. 

Currently, Japan wants to 
think otherwise. On the advice 
of our Western economic ration- 
alists, it looks at the U.S., British 
and New Zealand economies, 
which all threw themselves open 
to privatization, deregulation, 
enterprise restructuring and 
ftee-market reforms in the ’80s 
and are now regaining compet- 
itiveness. Japan should do the 
same, the advice goes. 

Everyone seems to forget that 
all three economies first passed 
through heavy recession, unem- 
ployment and trade deficits, 
largely as a result of those re- 
forms. They also had to suffer 
the burden of high interest rates 
imposed by monetarist purists, 
which kept their currencies 
overvalued and worsened the 
trade deficits and recessions. 


Fortunately, the economic 
collapse reached a point where 
currencies had to collapse. The 
United States led die way. Then 
the British pound went from 250 
yen down to 140 in the space of 
just three years. The New Zea- 
land dollar went from over 200 
yen down to less than 60. It was 
the highly protectionist and 
stimulatory effects of this cur- 
rency collapse that kick-started 
the recoveries we see today. 

The economic rationalists 
who like to claim the recoveries 
in the three economies as the 
result of their policies are like 
doe alcoholic who recovers after 
a long spell of detoxification 
and then claims that alcohol is 
the key to good health. They are 
right in a sense, but not a very 
good sense. 

Deregulatory and restructur- 
ing reforms are obviously good 
dungs. But most also have 
strongly deflationary effects. 
Their gains emerge only when 
the economy gets moving again, 
and usually that requires action 
the rationalists often oppose — 
Keynesian deficit spending, low 
interest rates or the protection- 
ism of currency depreciation. 
Japan also now has a good 
chance of recovery, what with 
the yen having depreciated to 
120 to the U.S. dollar and 


interest rates at historic lows. 

Sadly. Japanese planners 
have once again let themselves 
be led astray by our Western 
rationalists. They fret over whut 
they see as excessive yen de- 
preciation and the mild rise in 
import prices. Some even argue 
against the low interest policies. 
The <me stimulatory move they 
consider, mainly at U.S. urging, 
is a cut in tax rates. 

But in Japan, unlike the 
United States, tax cuts go 
largely to increase the already 
high level of savings and reduce 
needed demand. Instead, Japan „ 
should be expanding govern- V 
ment spending, and solving the 
budget deficit problems later 
when its economy starts mov- 
ing again, as we see in the 
United Stares today. 

But once again, Tokyo's 
planners have succumbed to 
Western advice and want to 
start cutting deficits now, at the 
height of Japan's troubles. They 
want to increase the threat of a 
deflationary spiral just when the 
cheaper yen promises to pull the 
economy our of its tailspin. 

Western rationalist econom- 
ics has a lot to answer for. 

The writer, a former Australi- 
an diplomat, comribiued this 
comment to the Herald Tribune. 


The China Obsession: Separate Reality From Exaggeration 


D AVOS, Switzerland — At 
this touchstone of Western 
concerns, the annual meeting of 
the World Economic Forum, an 
unhealthy obsession with China 
is abroad. The view of China is 
distorting perceptions about the 
rest of Asia and, paradoxically, 
is also likely to harm relations 
with China itself. It is inciting 
those eager to confront the 
Chinese “threat" and will lead 
to disappointment for those 
placing bets on China’s global 
role. Avidity for participation 
in China and rear of the 
consequences are feeding this 
obsession. 

The counterpoint is the al- 
leged eclipse of Japan, despite 
its continuing dominance of 
Asian commerce, its pivotal 


By Philip Bowring 


role in financial markets and the 
huge implications of its current 
reform program. 

The China litany goes 
something like this: Relations 
with China are the most impor- 
tant issue for the United Stares 
and are key to global progress; 
China will inevitably become the 
dominant power in a growing 
Asia and thus will become a 
global superpower; China’s 
economy will be the biggest in 
the world by 2000-somedting; 
ethnic Chinese capital is the driv- 
ing fcarce in world commerce; 
reunification with Taiwan and 
Hong Kong will spur China to 
further advances; no interna- 
tional company can afford 


not to be in China, and so on. 

The reality of China is: 

• Its post-Mao reforms have 
been very successful, but they 
are still recent and exist in a 
potentially volatile political en- 
vironment. Domestic concerns 
will remain paramount. 

• Large enterprises remain 
state-controlled and are mostly 
inefficient Manufactured ex- 
ports come mostly from enter- 
prises with foreign investment 
Taiwan and Korea have a clutch 
of globally operating and 
leading-edge companies; China 
has none. 

• Size and strength are not 
the same thing, as a large, 
middle-income country luce 


Take a Fresh Look at Foreign Aid 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachu- 
setts — Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright and the Re- 
publican leadership in Congress 
have expressed nope for re- 
newed bipartisanship in foreign 
policy. One place to start is for- 
eign aid, which has been much 
maligned and misunderstood. 

Republicans have made 
stinging attacks on foreign aid 
in recent years, many on target. 
Their critique — that countries 
escape poverty not through 
handouts but through long-term 
economic growth — is suppor- 
ted by experience and research. 

For developing countries to 
achieve rapid growth in today's 
global economy, they must em- 
brace pri vate, rather than state, 
ownership of business. They 
must be receptive to foreign 
trade, technology, ideas and in- 
vestment. and they must have 
governments that accept die rule 
of law and curb corruption. 

Open-ended foreign aid pro- 
grams can frustrate long-term 
growth if they allow nations to 
avoid tough political decisions, 
such as ending corruption and 
special privileges for elites. 

But a carefully designed pro- 
gram can make all the differ- 
ence for reform-minded gov- 
ernments that are unstable and 
financially strapped. 

Of course, there will be times 
when, for strategic or human- 
itarian reasons, we will choose 
to send aid to countries that are 
not adopting market reforms. 


By Jeffrey D. Sachs 


History shows that assistance 
given on a temporary basis and 
for a specific purpose can do 
exactly what die Republican 
leadership has in mind: spread 
democratic capitalism, espe- 
cially in countries emerging 
from communism, war or for- 
eign domination. 

This after all was the goal of 
the greatest foreign aid success 
of all time, the post-World War 
H Marshall Plan for Western 
Europe. The Marshall Plan had 
two key features: It was con- 
ditional on policy changes in 
the countries that received as- 
sistance. and it was temporary 
— just four years. 

Other highly successful 
American aid programs, such as 
those in Smith Korea and 
Taiwan at the end of the 1950s, 
took a similar approach. And 
Poland was able to shift quickly 
to a market-based currency and 
free trade starting in 1990 be- 
cause of $200 million from the 

United States and $800 million 
from Europe and Japan, assis- 
tance given specifically for that 
purpose. The result? Poland has 
had the fastest-growing econ- 


omy in Europe since 1993. 

Virtually, every economi- 
cally successful country has 
benefited from at least a short 
period of foreign aid in its cru- 
cial years of reform. 

The point is not to deliver 


enough money to overcome 
poverty but to give countries 
breathing space so that they can 
help themselves. 

A better focused foreign aid 
program need not cost more than 
we Americans are spending 
now, though greater success 

for morespending. The keyisto 
direct the aid to countries that are 
eager to reform their economies 
along free-marbet lines. Some 
governments now receiving fi- 
nancial aid from us would not 
pass that test. 

Aid to particular countries 
should be limited in duration; 
from the beginning, there 
should be a plan to phase it out 
And in the case of impoverished 
countries bankrupted by foreign 
debt, we should reduce their 
debt burden so that those will- 
ing to reform their economies 
can have a fresh start. 

Dozens of countries, many of 
them still making the transition 
from communism, are strug- 
gling to carry out democratic 
market reforms. The United 
States should take the oppor- 
tunity to help shape the world in 
the direction of rising prosper- 
ity and democracy. 

The writer, director of die 
Harvard Institute for Interna- 
tional Development, has advised 
Russia, Poland. Ukraine and 
other countries on economic 
policy. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Tunes. 


Brazil demonstrates. Techno- 
logical leadership is the key to 
global power. China shows few 
signs of spawning innovation 
on a scale to make it a leader. 

The reality elsewhere in Asia 
is that: 

• Japan is and will remain by 
far the leading power (not in- 
cluding the United States) for 
die foreseeable future, through 
its naval strength as well as 
its technological and economic 
might Its military potential will 
remain under wraps so long as 
the U.S. presence remains. But 
Japan needs global commerce; 
China does not 

• China’s nuclear capability 
has limited use. Given the im- 
portance of technology, a united 
Korea is as likely as China 
eventually to succeed Japan as 
the leading regional power. 

• Russia's present confusion 
will not last forever. Russia re- 
mains an important factor in the 
northeast Asian power balance 
and will be able to influence 
events in southeast Asia as well. 
Russia’s fear of Chinese 
designs on its Far East re- 
sources is more important than 
the two nations’ current in- 
terests in cooperation ami arms 
sales. 

• Japan, Korea and the West 


have far more commercial in- 
terests in southeast Asia than in 
China. That will remain the 
case because, historically, these 
countries are open to commerce 
and need foreign friends. South- 
east Asian economic success 
over the last 30 years owes noth- 
ing to China. 

• Die Malay world. 300 
million strong, has advanced 
faster than China since 1950 
and is not about to acquiesce to 
China. Indonesia, because of 
geography, will never lack for 
potential non-Chinese allies. 

• The notion that the Chinese 
diaspora will provide the brains 
and capital for China’s global 
expansion is a myth that flirts 
with racism. 

None of this denies the im- 
portance of China’s growth. It is 
possible that, like the Soviet 
Union in its heyday, China will 
perceive foreign threats and 
divert its energies from im- 
proving living standards to ac- 
quiring the skills and indus- 
tries to make it a global power. 
Nor is it impossible that in 50 
years China will be the equal 
of Japan. 

But the reality for now and 
the foreseeable future is 
something else ag ain. 

International Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1897: Cuban Assembly local boxer, at a theatre here, he 


MADRID — The Queen Regent 
to-day [Feb. 4] signed the decree 
for the execution of Cuban re- 
forms. The principal feature is 
the creation of a Cuban As- 
sembly under filename of Coun- 
cil of Administration. This As- 
sembly will be composed of 35 
members and will have the right 
to frame a budget, to examine 
the qualifications of officials and 
to draw op customs tariffs with a 
proviso that Spanish products 
shall always be accorded certain 
advantages over five general tar- 
iff. The Governor-General will 
be the representative of the 
Spanish Government, with the 
power to appoint high officials. 

1922: Wearing a Smile 

PEORIA, Illinois — When 
Jimmy Kelly, Chicago bantam, 
threw off his bathrobe and 
stepped into the ring to shake 
hands with Stanley Everett, a 


local boxer, at a theatre here, he- 
discovered he was wearing 
nothing but a smile. His seconds 
hurriedly flung an overcoat 
about him and rushed him to a 
dressing-room. He returned in 
an appropriate ring costume 
and won a draw in ten rounds.- 

1947: British Coal Crisis 

LONDON — Great Britain's 
industrial output began to sag 
alarmingly today [Feb. 4] for 
lack of coal, and as a result an 
estimated 50.000 persons are 
out of work and up to 30,000 
have been placed on part time. 
Thousands of other workers 
face unemployment in a matter 
of days unless the coal crisis 
eases. Principal shutdowns 
have occurred in the automobile 
and textile industries. For the 
second consecutive day. the' 
Cabinet discussed the growing 
industrial stoppage throughout 
the nation and a new plan of fuel 
allocation is being drawn up. 






I 




INTERISEATIONAX HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1997 


PAGE 9 


:r‘r/ 




OPINION/LETTERS 


i*«*ration 


What. Labour Promises 
On Europe and Jobs 


By Anthony Lewis 


"1 Needs 


T — to toe run-up to 

A~#thc British election, now 
likely to take place in May it 
seems increasingly difficult to tail 
toe two major parties apart. Two 
. weeks ago Labour's shadow 
chancellor of the exchequer, Gor- 
don Brown, went so far as to 
promise lhai Labour would not 
raise income tax rates for five 
years if it won, nor increase public 
spending for two years. 

The political logic of the move 
jHf plain. Labour is generally 
thought to have lost m 1992 be- 
mu** 5 h planned to raise taxes. 
Like Bill Clinton last year, party 
leaders want to neutralize attacks 
from the other side. 

Are there still real differences 
in whai a Labour government 
would do? I put the question to 
Mr. Brown, and got a passio nate 
answer. 

He began with Britain’s rela- 
tionship to the European Union. 
Under pressure from Conserva- 
tive anti-Europeans, Prime Min- 
ister John Major has sounded in- 
creasingly negative about the EU, 
distancing himself in particular 
from its project to create a single 
European currency. 

Mr. Brown reiterated Labour’s 
position that it will decide about 
J oi ning the sin gle-currency plan in 
terms of the national interest But 
he saw the increasingly xeno- 
phobic tone of Conservative op- 
position as the signal of a move 
toward leaving the EU altogether 
— which would be disastrous for 
Britain. 

“Right-wing Tories are trying 
to recreate a past that cannot be,” 
he said, “in a world of free trade. 
They talk of sovereignty as if 
NATO didn't exist. They talk of 
Britain's role in the world as 
centered on the special relation- 
ship with America, but with the 
end of die Cold War that is not the 
) only means by which we can play 
apart.” 

There has always been an in- 
sular element in British thinking, 
reflected in the famous newspaper 
headline “Fog in Channel, Con- 
tinent Cut Off." Could a Labour 
government persuade the public 
that Britain's interests are whole- 
heartedly in Europe? 

“I think people see the Con- 
servatives on die sidelines of 
Europe,” Mr. Brown replied, 
“carping, half in and half out, 
always wanting to blame Europe 




for everything dial goes wrong. 

“We can lead in Europe, and 
express our national identity bet- 
ter that way. Z think people want to 
see the British spirit ana character 
in the Community: openness, tol- 
erance, a strong sense of fair play, 
inventiveness. 

‘"The British genius ties in 
qualities that are wider than self- 
interest. That is why it is not anti- 
British to be internationalist. It is 
why we can express our sense of 
being British by being in 
Europe.” 

Mr. Brown tied those views to 
domestic policy, too. He said he 
had pledged not to increase public 
spending or income taxes because 
a modem left-of-center party 
could not be a tax-and-spend 
party. But it still could have a 
principled program, be . said, to 
undertake government initiatives 
for community purposes. 

More education and training 
are Britain’s great needs, he said 
— to equip people for more so- 
phisticated work. As it is, the 
country has a high level of long- 
term unemployment despite being 
in a rosy economic period. 

Altogether, he said, 19 percent 
of British families now have no 
one bringing in wages — com- 
pared with 11 percent in the 
United States. 

“You can't continue support- 
ing a fifth of the population.” he 
said, with unemployment and oth- 
er benefit payments. To make 
work more attractive than wel- 
fare, he would like when he canto 
cut the starting income-tax rate in 
half, from 20 percent to 10 per- 
cent. “You need to equip people 
for work, and you need reform of 
taxation and benefits to make the 
work ethic more important.” be 
said. 

“We can't be reduced to the 
notion that self-interested indi- 
vidualism is all Britain is about A 
country also needs to have a sense 
of community, of trust” 

Those themes may show up in 
tire campaign when Mr. Major 
finally calls the election. Right 
now Labour has to beware of 
overoptimism. The latest poll 
gives it a25 point lead — a figure 
that may reflect not so much ap- 
proval of reformed Labour 
policies as a widespread public 
feeling that the Tories are ex- 
hausted after 18 years in power. 

TheNewYbrkTmes. ' 



Giving for the Joy of It: 
An Anonymous Incentive 

By Jane Stanton Hitchcock 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


I’m deeply upset by the cov- 
erage of the Swiss bank accounts 
during World WarIL The articles 
take the side of the Jewish groups 
while giving the Swiss banks’ po- 
sition short shrift. 

In the article “Swiss Accused 
on Anti-Semitism” (Jan. 14), the 
definition of anti-Semitism is 
much too broad. I’ve seen many of 
the “anti-Jewish” letters men- 
tioned in the article; the writers are 
addressing the specific point of tire 
matter — namely, that it is black- 
mail to tell Swiss banks to either 
establish a compensation fund be- 
fore (he committee investigating 
these claims has presented its find- 
ings, or face a boycott. It makes no 
difference that these threats come 
from Jewish groups. 

Please don’t be manipulated by 
Senator Alfcmse D’Amato and 
others who make eye-catching ac- 
cusations with no hard evidence. 
It’s so easy to portray the secretive 
Swiss banks as the villains and the 
account holders as the victims of 
greedy banking practices. It's also 
a sign of sloppy journalism. 

ROBERT CARLSSON. 

Geneva. 

It is undoubtedly deplorable 
that Switzerland, Sweden and oth- 


er countries did questionable busi- 
ness with Hitler’s Germany. But 
Americans and others have to un- 
derstand that neutral countries had 
no choice, as Hitler was danger- 
ous and very near our frontiers. 
Switzerland, encircled by Nazi 
forces and their allies, had to make 
certain concessions. And, unbe- 
lievable as this may seem. Hitler 
was the democratically elected 
bead of Germany. 

PETER WORMSER. 

Zurich. 

Regarding “New Yorkers Warn 
the Swiss" (Jan. 30): 

It should be dear to everyone 
that Switzerland is not being 
blackmailed by the Jewish com- 
munity, which has a legitimate 
right to full disdosure of what 
happened in our country during 
the war. 

But what about the “warnings” 
sent by New York city and state to 
Switzerland that they would make 
it difficult for Swiss banks to do 
business in New York unless the 
Swiss created a fimd to compensate 
Holocaust victims? That warning 
sounds remarkably similar to the 
dictionary's definition of black- 
mail as “coercion or extortion.” 

I have always admired New 
York City for its cosmopolitan 
atmosphere, but I fail to under- 


stand the present attitude of the 
government there. 

HANS ULRICH FISCHER. 

Riehen, Switzerland. - 

Cut-Rate Carriers 

The article “Cut-Rate Carriers: 
Puritan Chic” (Jan. 17) barely 
touched on one of the most com- 
pelling reasons business people 
stick with the major airlines: geo- 
graphical convenience. Many of 
the British carriers mentioned fly 
exclusively from airports such as 
Stansted and Luton mat are fairly 
inaccessible to Londoners, unless 
we make a time-consuming de- 
tour that adds costly hours to jour- 
ney times. In order to keep landing 
fees and fuel costs down, some of 
those carriers fly into equally re- 
mote airfields at the other end, 
too. 

Heathrow and, to a lesser ex- 
tent, Garvvick may be congested 
and irritatingly labyrinthine but at 
least they're easy to reach. Non- 
etheless, I abhor being forced to 
pay through the nose for the con- 
venience and flight choice and 
hope, perhaps vainly, that in time 
the majorairiines wUl be forced to 
lower their ticket prices to more 
realistic levels. 

MARK WILLIAMS. 

London. 


W ASHINGTON — Charles 
Feeney has restored the 
good name of Anonymous. 

Mr. Feeney is the man who 
donated more than $600 million to 
charily without insisting that a 
wing, a chair or a flower be named 
after him. Just the opposite, in 
fact He dispensed his enormous 
wealth in silence and secrecy (un- 
til business and legal develop- 
ments threatened to remove that 
secrecy), thus giving up such 

MEANWHILE 

perks as instant social status, galas 
in his honor and preferred treat- 
ment in hard-to-book restaurants 
— all for the undiluted joy of 
giving for giving’s sake. A real 
humanitarian. A good guy. A 
shoo-in for “Ripley's Believe It 
or Not” 

Such unheralded munificence 
is certainly not unknown in Amer- 
ican life, though on this scale, in 
this day and age, it seems like 
science fiction. 

In olden days, like, say, the 
Middle Ages, it was not rare for 
men and women to offer up their 
talents and their purses anonym- 
ously for the greater glory of God 
and their fellow man, rather than 
for self-aggrandizement. 

Throughout history, countless 
good deeds and generous acts 
have gone unrecorded, probably 
because, until relatively recently, 
there were no such things as tele- 
vision talk shows, call-in radio, 
and People magazine. 

But let's face it, these are dif- 
ferent times. The meek have not 
inherited the earth, as promised. 
Virtue is not its own or anyone 
else’s reward. Beauty is as beauty 
photographs. And the truth may or 
may not set you free, depending on 
whose version you believe. No 
doubt about it, these are tough 
times — times that demand cour- 
age and, above alL incentives. 

How, 1 asked myself recently, 
can we, as a society, honor Charles 
Feeney and people like him with- 
out invading their privacy, while 
encouraging others to follow in 
their invisible footsteps? 

Here is a possible answer. Use a 
fraction of me money set aside for 
campaign financing and- set up 
what shall be now and forever 
known as The Room of the Un- 
known Donor. 

As I envision it. The Room of 


the Unknown Donor is located in 
an unpretentious structure of 
modest proportions. like, say, a 
log cabin. Easy to maintain, it is 
situated in a pristine place sur- 
rounded by beautiful spacious 
skies, amber waves of grain, 
purple mountain majesties, and 
fruited plains. A view, in other 
words, unsullied by buildings 
with the names of individuals 
carved in stone on the facades. 
Outside, on the front lawn hois- 
ted atop a wooden flagpole, an 
eternal blank check waves bravely 
in the breeze. Over the entrance is 
a painted crest depicting a camel 
sailing comfortably through the 
eye of a needle, under which is 
inscribed, in Latin: Donate Ta- 
citurn. (Roughly translated, that 
means, “Give as Much as You 
Can but Shut Up About Zc.”) 

It is a room where people can sit 
for a while and contemplate the 

Throughout history, 
countless good 
deeds have gone 
unrecorded. But 
these are different 
times . 


personal consequences of doing 
something both satisfying and le- 
gal that nobody will find out 
about. A room where kind hearts 
are more than coronets, and little 
acts of unremembered kindness 
hold sway. What goes on spir- 
itually in this room is strictly be- 
tween you, your God, and the In- 
ternal Revenue Service. And by 
tire way, admission is free, but if 
you want to make a donation for 
the upkeep of the place, you can. 
No one will know. 


The writer, a playwright and 
novelist, contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post. 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed " Letters 
to the Editor " and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


BOOKS 


EVIL SISTERS: 

The Threat of Female 
Sexuality and The Cult 
of Manhood 

By Brum Dijkstra. 477 pages. 
$30. Knopf. 

Reviewed by 
Elizabeth Fox-Genovese 

F eminism has schooled 

us to recognize the myriad 
ways in which men prey upon 
women, whom they routinely 
victimize through violence, 
ahu.se. rape, incest and even 
murder. 

In “Evil Sisters,” Beam 
Dijkstra invites us into an 
imaginative world in which 
women victimize men, suck- 
ing their vital fluids and en- 
ergy; depleting their man- 
hood, and toppling then- 
economic accomplishments. 

The book opens with a lur- 
id account of Theda Bara’s 
hypnotic portrayal of the 
Vampire in the film rendition 
of Porter Emerson Browne’s 
play and novel “A Fool There 
Was.” 

Dijkstra lingeringly de- 
scribes the Vampire’s mer- 
ciless and inexorable con- 
quest of the once prosperous 
and happily mamed John 


Schuyler, who impotently 
succumbs, his masculinity 
oozing from his pores. 

The Vampire's triumph 
blazes in what Dijkstra calls 
“one of the most graphically 
sexual kisses ever recorded 
on screen^ ’ and be insists that 
“there continues to bea direct 
connection between the lurid, 
bestial intensity of that single 
kiss and our own lingering 
suspicions about the function 
of human sexuality in a civ- 
ilized environment.” For that 
kiss evoked “sexual inter- 
course as the deadly attack of 
a cannibalistic usurper” and 
vividly demonstrated “that to 
get involved with a sexual 
woman was equivalent to 
death itself.” 

“A Fool There Was” casts 
along shadow over * ‘Evil Sis- 
ters,” which explores the late 
19th- and early 20th-century 
fascination with foe threat of a 
predatory female sexuality 
that lays waste men's vital 
physical, psychological and 
material resources. 

Dijkstra trapes this obses- 
sion through literature, theat- 
er, film and art as well as 
through numerous medical, 
psychological, social and cul- 
tural theories, suggesting that 
the fantasy of unbridled fe- 


BESTSELLERS 


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male sexuality formed the 
woof of an encompassing cul- 
tural fabric whose threads in- 
cluded a no less obsessive 
preoccupation with the threat 
of undesirables of lower 
classes and other races. 

Dijkstra, who has estab- 
lished himself as an accom- 
plished scholar in the cultural 
and intellectual history of the 
period, ranges widely and au- 
thoritatively through the vast 
literature that wrestles with 
foe nature of modernity and 
its implications for sexual re- 
lations, social cohesion and 
civilization itself. Above alL 
however, he focuses on the 
role of art, especially meta- 
phor, in implanting danger- 
ous notions within the cul- 
tural psyche of Europeans! 
and Americans. 

Dijkstra does not intend 
“Evil Sisters” as a mere 
scholarly exercise but as a 
cautionary tale for our times. 
Thus, be criticizes the easy 
modernist assumption that art 
never causes social behavior, 
asking if anyone actually be- 
lieves “that the ‘virtual real- 
ity’ of foe movies and tele- 
vision. with its relentless 
glorification of the masterful 
ejaculations of the man who 
rales with his gun, has no 
influence on foe mortality 
rate of inner-city youths.” 

More dramatically, he an- 
nounces Chat “metaphors are 
foe gateway to genocide,” 
and “an image can kfli.” For 
an image “can eat into reality 
. and force our world to take cm 
foe shapes and colors of our 
fears”; and metaphor, “by 
establishing a bridge between 
image and act, encourages us 
to bypass common sense and 
reasonable doubt.” 

In “Evil Sisters,” Dijkstra 
seeks to demonstrate that the 
fin de siicle theories of sexual 
difference fed the fantasies of 
a female sexual aggression 


which fed fantasies of the 
emasculation of elite men 
which fed fantasies of the ra- 
cial peril and class peril. And 
so on. To cut to the chase, this 
metaphoric morass ended in 
Hitler, anti-Semitism, and the 
Holocaust 

The moral is not hard to 
draw, but Dijkstra leaves 
nothing to chance. In dwell- 
ing upon purportedly natural 
differences between the 
sexes, he asserts, “Writers 
such as Fitzgerald. Heming- 
way, and Faulkner and innu- 
merable other intellectuals 
and politicians in Western 
Europe and the United States 
thus helped prepare the world 
for the realpolitik of geno- 
cide,” for “their metaphoric 
excursions into foe battle of 
the sexes were rapidly being 
translated into the language 
of global war.” 

Above alL, Dijkstra insists 
upon the deadly con- 
sequences of foe moderns’ 
proclivity to ground meta- 
phors of difference in science 
or, as he would have it, 
pseudoscience. 

Unfortunately, in his 
eagerness to hold modem the- 
ories and images of sexual 
difference uniquely responsi- 
ble for pernicious notions of 
sexual dualism and racial dif- 
ference, be tends to slight ev- 
idence that these ideas have 
flourished throughout human 
history. Indeed, they have 
been so ubiquitous as to make 
one wonder whether they do 
not constitute a fundamental 
feature of the human condi- 
tion. 


Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, 
whose most recent book is 
“Feminism Is Not the Story of 
My Life: How Today's Fem- 
inist Elite Has Lost Touch 
With the Real Concents of 
Women," wrote this for The 
Washington Post. 


Living in the U.S.? 

. Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

To subscribe, call 
1-800-8822884 
(in New Yoric, call 212-752-3890) 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATPRDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-3, 1W7 



international herald tribune, 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1997 
PAGE 10 


STA.GE/ENTER TAJNMENT 



> 

Shootout at ‘Swan Lake’: Bolshoi Staging Causes a Flap 


By Daniel Williams 

Washington Post Service 


M OSCOW — This is defin- 
itely the Bolshoi Theater, so 
unmistakably grand with its 
gilt boxes and constellation 
of chandeliers. And die playbill says 
that on stage is “Swan Lake,'’ possibly 
the world's best known and most be- 
loved ballet 

So. Where's the Evil Genius, one of 
the ballet's signature characters? What 
are those children doing running around 
the stage? Isn't the music being played a 
tad . . . fast? 

Rarely have so many radical changes 
been made to Tchaikovsky's master- 
work as in the version that just com- 
pleted a two-month run here. Rarely, 
too, has a production of “Swan Lake” 
met with so many negative and down- 
right nasty reviews. It was as if ‘ ‘Amer- 
ica the Beautiful" had flopped at Bill 
Clinton’s inauguration. 

Lots of elements contributed to the 
unusual hubbub, which for a time com- 
peted with the daily drumbeat of con- 
tradictory reports over the health of 
Russia’s president, Boris Yeltsin. The 
ballet was the first major adventure by 
Vladimir Vasiliev, a handsome, flam- 
boyant former Bolshoi dancer who has 
been the theater’s artistic director for 
almost two years. He took over from his 
longtime teacher and rival, Yuri Grig- 


orovich, after a power struggle that 
would have been worthy of Kremlin 
politics. Such a history alone would 
have made the production noteworthy. 

But there is more to the passions 
aroused than the fate of a new ballet 
czar. “Swan Lake" “is the symbol of 
ballet itself," remarked Yaroslav Se- 
dov, a critic with Itogi magazine. “Rus- 
sians know all the main episodes by 
heart.” 

“Swan Lake" touches a deep recess 
in the Russian mind. Swans appear fre- 
quently in old Russian folk myths, so for 
all the ballet's universal appeal — and 
its Germanic setting — Russians regard 
the work as springing from their fertile 
Slavic soul. 

Tchaikovsky's score is hugely famil- 
iar to Russians — if for no other reason 
than that during Soviet times it became 
an anthem for major — and usually 
somber — national events. In the 1980s, 
it was played so often to mark the suc- 
cessive deaths of Leonid Brezhnev, 
Yuri Andropov and Konstantin 
Chernenko that the repeated broadcasts 
became a grim joke. “I still get nervous 
when 1 hear the music,” a Moscow 
journalist said. “I think someone im- 
portant has fallen over.” 

The dual burden of the ballet's 
prestige and familiarity makes it risky 
for anyone to revamp the work, and 
Vasiliev marie some big changes. First 
and foremost, he discarded the rather 


^ 


* - .w • t. 

.. V- 

• : ,v\*4 

•••• 



mythical plot line. In the old version, a 
prince chooses between two swan-wo- 
men, one representing good and one 
evil. In Vasuiev’s version, the prince 
competes with his father for the hand of 
one swan-girl. The roles of Evil Genius 
and the bad swan, Odile, are folded into 
the role of the father. All this severely 
upset the critics. “What remains is a 
banal family drama packed in swan’s 
feathers," wrote Tatiana Kuznetsova, a 
critic with the newspaper Vek. 


Other innovations raised eyebrows 
— energetic and insistent dancing by 
secondary characters and the corps de 
ballet, which in the eyes of some ob- 
servers detracted from the main dan- 
cers; the showy use of children ca- 
vorting on stage during a picnic scene; 
the deletion of some well-known num- 
bers; and the use of Tchaikovsky’s 
original tempo, which over the years 
had been slowed to accommodate per- 
formers. Most critics contended that 


the current troupe was not up to the 
pace. 

Lev Gu shkm. the editor of Ogonyok 
magazine, tartly judged that the show 
was “of normal European standards, 
altho u g h . . . from this theater we have 
the right to expect something greater.” 

Audiences seemed not to have 
minded; the Bolshoi was packed d uring 
the ballet’s Deamiber-Januaiy run, with 
$16 tickets earning scalpers up to $200. 


Vladimir Vasiliev, the artistic director of the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow. 


mance, spectators could be beard prais- 
ing the rest pace and lead performers. 
Some critics explain the popularity by 
panning the audience as well as foe 
ballet. “Many of the new breed of cap- 
italist Russians who are able to afford foe 
Bolshoi are people who would not know 
a swan from a chicken, " said Vadim 
Gayevsky, a critic and professor. 

in any event, all toes are pointing at 
Vasiliev and he is stoically standing by 
his concept of "Swan Lake. ” For many 
years, he regarded parts of the libretto as 
obscure, and some of the scenes as bear- 
ing. “Anyway, wiry must we be satisfied 
with only one version of ‘Swan Lake’?” 


he asked in a recent interview. 

At 55, the bold eyes and almost Day- 
Glo blond hair that made the dancer 
Vasiliev a Hurling of the public are still 
attractive attributes. His legendary re- 
belliousness is also in evidence, a trait 
that led him to criticize productions 
forced cm the Bolshoi by imperious So- 


viet culture ministers — even 
as he danced in them. “Itnay 
be forgiven for making changes in ^ 
a classical ballet, for being different. 

But so what?" he said. I have been 
doing this all my life- 1 never fit in.” 

As to restoring Tchaikovsky's faster 
pace, Vasiliev recalled telling his dan- 

cere: “Dears, if an orchestra member felt 

that the tempo of someone's music was 
too fast for him to play, he would just be 
seat away to take more lessons." 

He was sitting in the third-floor office 
above Door 16 of the Bolshoi, which 
was occupied by his predecessor, Yuri 
Grigorovich, for more than 30 years. 
Throughout their careers together, the . 
two men were frequently at odds. Va- 0 ; 
siliev appears to believe that the rivalry 
is somehow behind foe bad press for his 
“Swan Lake." 

“Intrigues," he said without elab- 
oration. 

G rigorovich now lives in 
St. Petersburg and could not 
be reached for comment. In a 
curious twist, his version of 
“Swan Late’’ will be performed this 
month at the Bolshoi. No one can re- 
member rival productions of the same 
ballet being staged at the Bolshoi in one 
season. 

“This is my answer to people who 
say I am unwilling to recognize the 
works of rivals,” Vasiliev said. 


I elm":- 

*«'■ 




.ul- 


The One 
And Only 
‘Henry IV’ 

Trouping Isn’t 
What It Was 


By Sheridan Moriey 

Inlemaaanal Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — First off, a tripartite 
declaration: I believe the 
“Hairy IV” plays (newly ar- 
rived at the Old Vic) to be 
Shakespeare’s greatest, and therefore ar- 


in this country should not become, as it 
virtually already has, a Royal Shake- 
speare Company monopoly, and I am 
well aware that the collapse of Prospect, 
Actors’ Touring Company and countless 
other classical troupes on the road has 
deeply weakened British theater. 

All the more reason tiien to bid a warm 
welcome to English Touring Theatre, 
which brings this new Stephen Unwin 
staging to the Old Vic; it is only then that 
the critical problems start to arise. 

In a company of 20, many of than 
doubling and trebling minor roles, it is 
really only the top five — Timothy West 
as Falstaff, his son Sam as Hal, Gary 
Waldhom as Henry IV, Joseph O'Con- 
nor as a vintage Northumberland and 
Shallow, and Paul Imbusch as Blunt and 
York — who seem to have any real idea 
or memory of how these amazing plays 
should be done. 

For they are in every sense — re- 
ligious, political, familial and even geo- 
graphical — the very spine of England 
herself, a great cavalcade of people and 
politics from the heights of the Court to 
the wilds of Gloucestershire and the 
depths of Eastcheap. But an essentially 
scratch road company can only just be- 
gin to do them justice. 

Such are the perils of small casts and 
the impossibly high cost of touring; a 
much worse problem is that the otherwise 
agile director has not entirely worked out 
whether he wants these plays to be re- 
ligious, monarchical or revolutionary. 
They have of course to be all three as well 
as warlike, nostalgic and epic, which is 
hard to do on this Jdnd of a budget 

Everything improves drastically to- 
ward the end of Part n, even the cos- 
tumes. but there is a sense here of a cut- 
price collection of highlights from the 
plays rather than the vast intricate 
tapestry of them. But let us not be un- 







Lucy Briers and Paterson Joseph in " Henry IV, Part F at the Old Vic. 


grateful, this is the best (if also the only) 
r ‘ Henry IV’’ that most British cities ate 
going to get in 1997 and possibly 1998. 
Those of us with great and long memor- 
ies of the way things used to be on the 
classical touring circuit had better just 
get used to the fact that die Bard is no 
longer big business on the road, and 
usually too expensive for those few sur- 
viving tour companies even to contem- 
plate. Let us, like Timothy West's near- 
definitive Falstaff, just learn to adapt to 
changing times. 

At Hampstead, the Arab writer 
Hanan Al-Shaykh, who escaped Beirut 

LONDON THEATER 

in the worst of the bombing to settle in 
Britain, has a curious first full-length 
play entitled “Paper Husband." Its 
subject is essentially the British attitude 
to immigrants, especially from the Af- 
rican mainland, but both writer and di- 
rector (Gemma Bodinetz) seem fatally 
undecided as to whether they want a 
drama about the incomprehensibility and 
frequently savage unfairness of Britain’s 
ever-shifting immigration policies, or a 
sitcom about jokey foreigners doing then- 
best to take on Anglo-Saxon attitudes. 

A somewhat unwieldy plotline fo- 
cuses on Amina (a wonderfully sexy 
and starry performance here from Sasha 
Behar who has only very recently come 
up through the ranks of the RSQ, a 
Moroccan hotel maid working in the 
West End and desperate to get herself a 
husband for visa purposes. 

Predictably, she falls in love with cue 
of her marital targets, a languid Eng- 
lishman who seems to have drifted in 
from Merchant-Ivory (Rupert Penry- 


Jones). Confusions backstage and on 
stage then multiply: a marriage broker, 
(the splendid Veronica Clifford) who 
seems to have erupted in from the Mo- 
roccan tour of "fiddler on foe Roof,” 
sets Amina up with a number of un- 
suitable spouses, and by foe end of foe 
' evening we have long since ceased to 
care about foe bitter reality of those 
faroed^to s^d loi^lmms ^ueuixig in an 

Croydon for permits of entry that may 
well be denied in the end. I can’t help 

here"asa novelist rather fora a dramatist) 
had not drifted off into quite so many 
byways of racial, religious, national and 

Sexual mim mrigr s tandmg. 

On the Cotiesloe stage of foe Na- 
tional, Mark Wing-Da vey has a revival 
of Caryl Churchill’s "1976 Light Shin- 
ing in Buckinghamshire to which 
neither foe passing of 20 years nor the 
present staging has been especially kind. 
This was the play that effectively made 
her name, and it was written around the 
anarchic groups that briefly flourished 
around the English countryside between 
tiie Civil War and the Restoration. 

1 can see the wisdom of reviving it 
now, as again we approach a millennium 
in a spirit of random social change; the 
crossover points are remarkable across 
three centuries, from our treatment of 
vagrants and squatters to foe belief in a 
Second Coming. But part of the original 
triumph was Max Stafford-Qark’s won- 
derfully flexible and seemingly im- 
promptu staging. This time around it is 
all a great deal more heavy-handed, and 
some of the cast members seem only 
very vaguely in control of the play or 
their multiple performances. 


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Pairing Two Musical Giants 


By David Stevens 

Intcnuaional Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — The idea of serving 
Schoenberg's “Piexrot Lun- 
aire" and Stravinsky's “The 
Nightingale" on die same op- 
eratic bill of fare does not sound like an 
impresario’s brainstorm. More likely h 
has to do with Pierre Boulez, a cham- 
pion of die composers and conductor 
of thi s double bill at the ChateleL 
Yet despite the aesthetic gap, there is 
ample justification for bracketing them 
on a single progr am , if only to pair two 
musical giams of this century. They are 
also coni emp o rai y: In the four-year 
gap between writing the fiist act and the 
rest of 1 The Nightingale,” Stravinsky 
heard, and was mightily impressed, by 
one of the first performances, in 1912, 
of “Pierrot” in Berlin. 

In one of his conversation books 
with Robert Craft, Stravinsky aligns the 
contrasts and parallels between hunself 

* ‘more mteresSg.” Maurice lSvSjn 
a 19I4artide after die Farispremiere of 
“Le Rossignol,” relates Stravinsky’s 
"new conception” to Schoenberg’s 


most recent manner , although the latter 
is “harsher, more austere, Ik’s say foe 
word: more cerebral.” 

Albextine Zehme, who commis- 
sioned “PierrotLunaire 1 ’ for herself to 
perform, was an actress who special- 
ized in melodrama, spoken recitation 
against a miisirai background. The 
composer chose 21 of Albert Giraud’s 
"Pierrot” poems (in Otto Erich Har- 
tleben’s free translations), which he set 
in Sprechstimme, spoken voice with 
pitch indications, and a chamb er en- 
semble of eight instruments played by 
five musicians, foe combination of in- 
struments varying with each poem. 

Stravinsky wrote foe first act of his 
Andersen fairy-tale opera in 1908-09, 
and the second and dunlin 1913-14. hi 
between, of course, came the giant leap 
forward of "Firebird,” "Petrushka” 
and "Rite of Spring.!’ Much has been 
made of a stylistic grain the two parts of 
the opera. But heard now, the essential 
unity of foe delicate and refined writing 
for a large orchestra prevails. 

The young stage director Stanislas 
Nordey, malting his debut in music 
theater, and his set designer,. Em- 
manuel dolus, used the same baisic set 


but treated it entirely differently by 
costume (Raoul Fernandez) and fight- 
ing (Philippe Berthome), accept per- 
haps for foe trenchcoats worn by Pier- 
rot and the Nightingale. 

For “Pierrot,’ ' the singer (Christine 
Schaefer, excellent and very much a 
soprano-reciter) occupied foe front of 
the stage, while in the upstage gloom 
ghostly faces appeared, one per poem, 
grouped according to the composer's 
tinee-times-seven format. The musi- 
cians, visible at foe edge of the stage, 
were part of die visual show. 

For “The Nightingale," it was all 
bright primary colors to create the 
'faiiy-tale atmosphere. Natalie Dessay 
was brilhant in foe coloratura tide role 
of the real bird vfoo stows up her 
mechanical substitute and restores die 
emperor (Jean-Luc Chaignaud) to life. 

- It would be hard to imamne^ a better 
musical realization than Boulez pro- 
duced, joined in the Schoenberg by five 
soloists of the Ensemble Contempo- 
rain, and in the Stravinsky by the Or- 
chestra tteParismgood form. The Paris 
performances will run through Sunday, 
and the productions will be taken this 
spring to foe Berlin Festtage. 


‘Palestrina’: Musician’s Musician 


By Henry Pleasants 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — The Royal Opaa 
has chosen as the principal new 
offering of its 50th anniversary 
season Hans Pfitzner’s 
“Palestrina,” premiered in Munich in 
1917 and here given its first professional 
production in Britain — 80 years on. 

An odd choice, but, in die event, an 
admirable accomplishment. Nicholas 
LehnhofPs staging is faithfully tradi- 
tional, as are settings and costumes. A 
stellar (and numerous) cast is splendidly 
supported try the Royal Opera Orchestra 
under the direction of Christian Thiele- 
mann. 

In German-speaking central Europe, 
“Palestrina" has retained a respected 
place on foe fringe of the standard rep- 
erto ire ever since being hailed, after that 
Munich premiere under foe direction of 


Bruno Walter, as a masterpiece by, 
among others, Thomas Mann. 

A masterpiece it isn’t It is too long 
and too prolix, and the score pales in 
comparison with wbat Richard Strauss, 
Pfitzner’s conte m p o rary, had done and 
was still doing at the same time. But, as 
a reactionary view of foe state of clas- 
sical (European) music, just after foe 
turn of the century it is a fascinating and 
deeply felt document. 

Pfitzner (1869-1949) was a com- 
poser bom a generation too late. His 
musical world was foal of Wagner, 
Bruckner and Mahler. He loathed what 
he heard and foresaw in the music and 
the theories of Arnold Schoenberg. In 
“Palestrina’’ he identifies himself with . 
foe composer (1525-1594), defending 
himself and his polyphonic Masses 
against foe plains ong reactionaries at 
the Council of Trent rad the monodists 
of the Florentine Camerata. The auto- 


CROSSWORD 


biographical flavor is heightened by 
foe fact that Pfitzner supplied his own 
excessively wordy libretto. 

In central Europe “Palestrina” has 
always attracted leading singers to its 
leading role. The title role, especially, 
has proved a grateful vehicle for, among 
others, Karl Erb, its creator, Julius 
Patzak; Max Lorenz, and Nicolai Gedda 
(who recorded it and who appears here, 
at 71, in a cameo role). 

The London cast, beaded by the 
American Thomas Moser, veteran of 
the German opera stage, in the title role, 
is strong, with many famili ar names 
attached to secondary roles in the tu- 
multuous bickerings of clerical dig- 
nitaries at the Council of Trent (Act 
D). 

The production moves next summer 
to New York and next season to Rome 
and Dusseldorf/Diiisburg. Further per- 
formances here Feb. 10, 15 rad 19. 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 5, 1997 


PACE ll 1 


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AS 


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A Changed Time Inc . 
Is on a Profitable Roll 

Publishing Is Time Warner’s Bright Side 


By Robin Pogrebin 

New York Times Serviro 


N! 


EW YORK — There is no 
other way to put it: Time Inc. 
is on a roll. Three of its pub- 
lications — People Sports 
Illustrated and Time — led in advert- 
lsm S pages published by consumer 
magazines for 1996 , accenting to the 
Publishers Information Bureau, while 
™ee other Time Inc. publications — 
Money, Martha Stewart Living qnri 

Entertainment Weekly — tookfte top 

three spots in the recent yearly cir- 
cmanon rankings, the first single-pub- 
hsher sweep in 14 years, according to 
the Media Industry Newsletter. 

After posting flat or declining earn- 
ings from 1989 to 1991, Tune Inc. has 
accomplished consistent double- digit 
growth the last five years and expects 

tn tv.pt mnv .1 PenA Ml* - ■ 


Where there were just 12 magazines 
a decade ago, for example. Time 2ha 
now has 28. Though Tune remains the 
flagship magazine, it was long ago 
passed in profitability by People and 
Sports Illustrated. 

Once a place where divisions be- 
tween church and state — shorthand for 
the editorial and business departments 
-7' woe considered sacred and rela- 
tionships between editors and publish- 
ers tended to be mo rally, suspicious, 
Time Inc. is becoming a place where 
everyone keeps an eye on profit 

To foster a sense of e n trroreneur- 
sMp among publishers and editors, op- 
erations have become less centralized. 


MEDIA MARKETS 


to post more than $530 miHinn in op- 

than$4 


crating profit for 1996 on more 
billion ra revenue. 

Thus, even though Time Inc.'s par- 
ent, Time Warner Inc., has been strug- 
gling under a cloud of debt, causing 
concern among stockholders, the pub- 
lishing unit is thriving. 

‘ ‘The return an capital is higher than 
any other business we have in Time 
Warner," said Gerald Levin, Time 
Warner’s chief executive. "The per- 
formance of the magazines has never 
been better fhmnciafiy in terms of ad- 
vertising and calculation and editor- 


ially in terms of quality." 
strong, but TimeTnc. has been de- 


fat only is its 


up and titles 


velopmg into a very different company 
from what it long had been. 


with responsibility over 
and circulation given to 
magazines and a marked reduction in 
meetings and layers of bureaucracy. 

Whereas executives used to be pro- 
moted for mysterious reasons ofpedigFee 
and personal connections as well as skill, 
now, insiders say, perform a nce is more 
likely to be a key to promotion. 

In describing this transformation, 
people inside and outside Time Inc. say 
all roads lead to the seemingly com- 
bustible, but surprisingly compatible 
combination of a bearish mathem- 
atician from Alabama and-a 
intellectual from near 
adelphia: Dan Logan, the president 
and chief executive, and Norman 
Pearistine, the editor in chief. 

Outwardly, the two men seem like 



y&jK 



Doo Logan, left, and NornMPearistfaie:uiM»nv€SitionaIbirtsiiccessfuL 


Major Fires New Salvo at EU and Labour 


Youssef M Ibrahim 

fit h- Km* Tima Service 


t 



LONDON — In an new assault on the 
European Union, Prime Minister John 
Major said Tuesday that European em- 
ployment policies were too generous to 
workers and stifling to business, and he 
pledged that his Conservative Pmy 
would keep Britain out of the so-called 
EU social chapter, which concerns the 
protection and welfare of workers. 

Calling the social chapter ‘‘a Trojan 
horse loading on Britain all the prob- 
lems that brought us to our knees in the 
*70fc," Mr. Major vowed, again, to keep 
Britain from adopting it 

His comments at a gathering of about 
200 business leadens in Brussels marieed 
a further distancing of Britain from 
Europe — a process that has taken toe 

dm of a campaign issue over the past 
few weeks as wamings about domi- 
nance of British policies from the con- 
tinent have become a rallying cry for 

°gg?^tion Laborn Party has as- 
serted thallbc Tory leaders are exag- 
getating the differences between the 


two patties, oa Europe in an attempt to 
recapture lost political ground. 

A few weeks ago, Mr. Major attacked 
an EU decision to limit the woxk week to 
48 hours as a health and safety measure, 
asserting that it was an example of Brus- 
sels imposing bureaucratic rules that are 
a hindrance to business. 

Since then, several GooservativePupr 
figures have contended that Britain's 
moves in the 1970s and 1980s to lib- 
eralize rules of hiring and firing set it 
mxart from the Continent, which remains, 
they said, crippled with government wd- 
fare constraints that restrict investment 
and increase unemployment. 

At the moment, Britain is exempt 
from the social chapter, but Labour lead- 
ers have said they would immediately 
jom it if the party won the elections that 
must be hela by May. - 

Labour’s view is that Britain’s wel- 
fare lies wi th a Europe moving increas- 
’ / toward streamlined economic and 
,_ical union. 

“Crudely," Mr. Major said, “foe 
choice is between two dramatically dif- 
ferent economic philosophies: Toe en- 

-- — m nwvMiaK awl tKo eiv^inl ** 


The apposition contends that it is foe 
Conservative Party that is deeply (fivided 
over die course to fbDcrw toward 


Europe. 

“No 


.to amount of lies about Labour 
would disguise the Tories’ divisions," 
said John Prescott, the dqpoty leader of 
the Labour Party. 

The liberal Democrats, Britain’s third 
party, asserted that the government’s 

jt; -c 


was foe real threat to economic 
“The prime minister is scare-mon- 
gcring, using foe social chapter as noth- 
ing mere than a decoy to draw attention 
away from the government’s civil war 
over Europe,” the liberal Democrat 
spokesman, Charles Kennedy, said. 

Philip David, an American invest- 
ment banker in London, said: “Beyond 
the campaign rtietoric, the real battle is 
for Britain’s role within the European 
Union. One of tile tilings Major is saying 
is that labour is trying to use Brussels to 
bring about the social Chapter in order to 
destroy the tilings Maggie Thatcher in- 
troduced: weaker unions, downsizing 
social programs, diminished compen- 
sation and business liabilities.” 


CURRENCY 9k INTEREST RATES 



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SmueB e ms . 


WMX Girds for a Housecleaning 

Wa ste-Management Firm to Shed 3,000 Employees 


CfnvtitdbyOirSafiFrcmDIifxwrkn 

CHICAGO — WMX Technologies 

Inc., bowing to shareholder pressure for 
tqp-to-bottom changes, said Tuesday it 
would slash 3,000 jobs over the next three 
years, divest itself of about SI .5 trillion of 
noncore businesses and reUan to its roots 
in the business of hauling trash. 

The waste-management services 
f, based in the Chicago suburb 
Brook, Illinois, said it took a 
$680 million charge in the fourth 
quarter to begin tire restructuring, which 
includes eliminating 1,200 jobs tins 
year through layoffs and attrition. 

WMX plans to also buy back as much 
as SI billion of its stock with a tender 
offer in the second quarto- and to ask 
shareholders to rename fire company 
Waste Management Ihc^ the name under 
which it operated from 1971 to 1993. The 
proposal will be submitted to sharehold- 
ers at its annual meeting May 9. 

WMX is responding to pressim* from 
shareholders including the investor 
George Soros, who want the company to 
focus on collecting trash and hazardous 
waste in North America. WMX said the 
moves were designed to leave it in mar- 
kets where it could be the largest or 
second-largest company. 


The changes also illustrate fire power 
that major shareholders can have on a 
company’s decision-making, analysts 
said. WMX*s stock soared Iasi week to a 
52-week high cm expectations fire com- 
pany would announce that it was ac- 
celerating its restructuring. 

The stock fell Tuesday, however, clos- 
ing at $33,125 in New York Stock Ex- 
change trading, down $3. 

"The management changes are to 
pacify shar eholders who’ve been 
grumbling, ” said Michael Hoffman, an 
analyst at Credit Suisse First Boston. 
"Psychologically, it’s a good move." 

One of the more significant changes 
the company announced was the reas- 
signment of James Koenig, the chief fi- 
nancial officer. 

Major institutional shareholders had 
wanted him removed because of the 
company’s stagnant performance, Mr. 
Koenig was nmoed president of Waste 
Management Shared Service, a post giv- 
ing him responsibility for administrative 
support. John Sanford, vice president and 
chief financial officer of foe company’s 
Wheelabrator Technologies subsidiary, 
was named to succeed Mr. Koenig. 

WMX also named Joseph Holsten as 
chief operating officer. He had been 


chief executive of its international sub- 
sidiary. 


Stanley Druckenmiller, managing di- 
tor of 


rector of Soros Fund 
called in December for Mr. Koenig's 
ouster. The Soros Fund holds a 4.6 per- 
cent stake in WMX and has been im- - 
happy with the company’s languishing 
stock price, as has Lens Inc., which has ■ 
a $17 million stake in foe company. 

Mr. Druckenmiller also had joined 
others in calling for foe resignation of' 
the company's chief executive, Phillip 
Rooney, and Dean Bumrock, its chair- 
man and founder. 

WMX said it intended to generate 
increasing amounts of free cash, partly 
by controlling costs and carefully al- 
locating capital. Its aim is for $3 billion 
in free cash after dividends over foe next 
24 months. 

The company said it would sell, 
among other assets, the remaining wa- 
ter-services division of Wheelabrator to 
U.S. Filter Carp, for about $77 millio n. 

For the three months ended Dec. 31, 
foe company reported a net loss of 
$4613 million, reversing a profit of 
$49.7 million, or 1 0 cents a share, a year 
earlier. Revenue rose to $234 billion 
from $2.25 billion. ( Bloomberg , AP) 


Japan Agrees to Cut Liquor Duties 


Bloomberg Newt 

BRUSSELS — The European Com- 
mission said Tuesday that Japan would 
cut levies on liquor imports and raise 
taxes on some cranestic products in two 
phases, one beginning Oct. 1 and foe 
other a year later. 

In response to a ruling made in 
November by fire World Trade Orga- 
nization. tire c ommis sion said, Japan 
will tax imported clear liquors such as 
vodka and gin at the same rate as foeir 
domestic equivalents and natrow tire tax 
difference cm imports of such “brown” 
liquors as whiskey and brandy to 3 per- 
cent from 600 percent, compared with 
domestic brands. 

But foe increase in tax on one type of 
tire Japanese liquor shochu will not be 
fully implemented until 2001, the ex- 
ecutive body of the European Union 
added. To compensate for tire delayed 
increase in tax on this "shochu B,” fire 


commission said, Tokyo agreed to ac- 
celerate foe reduction of tar^ on Euro- 
pean whiskey and brandy, saving the 
whiskey industry about $110 nmlion 
and brandy maters about 549 million 
from 1998 to 2002. 

"Adoption of new liquor tax legis- 
lation by foe Japanese cabinet is ex- 
cellent news," said the British trade 
secretary, Ian Lang, adding that foe 
Scotch whisky industry had estimated 
the new laws would save it £75 million 


($121.5 million) a year. 

But the United States remained un- 


Hugh M orison, director general of 
the Scotch Whisky Association, said in 
December that foe industry wanted an 
end to such tax discrimination in 1997. 

If the World TYade Organization 
agrees that changes should be made 
more quickly, the commission said, 
European distillers would expect "to 
receive comparable treatment in terms 
of any trade concessions." 

Japan is fire second-largest market for 
Scorch whisky outside tire European 
Union, with sales in 1995 of £1193 


satisfied, the commission said. Wash- 
ington and other trading partners, it said, 
"are continuing to press for a shorter 
period of implementation of the new tax 
regime in Japan." 

Makers of Scotch whisky, such as 
Guinness PLC, Grand Metropolitan 
PLC and Allied Domecq FLC, also had 
sought faster action- 


million. Japan's liquor market is valued 
at an estimated $253 bi 


)3 billion, according 
to the market-research concern Eur- 
omonitor. But imports account for only 
about 8 percent of its sales, compared 
with 35 percent in the United States and - 
30 percent in Germany. 

The WTO ruling in November came 
in response to a complaint filed by the 
Union, foe United States and Canada. 


Global Private Banking 


Security is the main reason 


WHY SO MANY CLIENTS BANK 


WITH US. AND STAY WITH US. 



Many private banking clients split tbeir 
assets three ways. They keep a part for special 
opportunities. Another part for longer-term 
growth- And, very importantly, a part they 
know is absolutely secure. 

At Republic we axe well equipped to 
provide our clients with all three options. But 
what the hank is best known f or, world-wide, 
is its outstanding security. 

We assure security by maintaining some of 
the strongest capital ratios in the hanking indus- 
try, a high degree of operating efficiency and a 
relatively small loan portfolio. Our credit ratings 
are AA. 

Clients sense this security in the quality of 
our service: personalized, responsive, hut meticu- 
lously discreet Which is why they hank with us, 
and stay with us. Security and service, after all, 
are the heart and soul of Republic. 



VorlJ HaoJqaartart a f 
Rapuilie Hationtl Bank of 
AW York m AW lari. 



Republic National Bank of New York’ 

Strength. Security. Service. 


A Safrm Bank - Nm Y«k ■ Gffim . London ■ Bagntf * Bcirat • BmsrJy Hill* ■ BaotuM Aim* • Caynum IiLmds ■ CopcmWm - G&nlfatr 
Gucin—y ■ HcrnjKong • Jakarta • Loa AngtJm ■ Lnjjfjmo • Luxembourg • Manila • Mexico City • Miami ■ Milan * Mont. Carlo • Montevideo 
Montreal - Moacov • Nuu ■ Plena - Pwtk * Pent. JJ Eat. ■ Rio <1* Janeiro • Santiago ■ Singapore . Sydney ■ Taipei • Tokyo • Toronto - Znnck 


• ErpAk NaKoml ftmfc JJW 1996 









PACE 2 


1 


I ii' 





PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERAI.P TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 5, 1997 



THE AMERICAS 






I 


I 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 



5500 620 






The Dow 


■Ptw. ■ 
Ctoss ‘ i 
6806/16 


+0.40 


NYSE 


7B9L26 .•786.73 .. 44X32 

N*SE=" 

s&p too 

7fS^A ■ *d37- 

NYSE 

Composite- 

4ji34f • -41248' . f0.21 


Nasdaq CoB^ioslte 

.im28- .13752.1 -0J21 

' • “ 

MaiitetVaiije ' 

689.25 589.71- 

Toronto 

TBE Index 

614&41. . 614a93 ^G.G7 

sfc'Saito7 

Bovespa - 

mSSUXJBQ 80959.40 -0.06 

Mexico City 

Balsa 

385259 ■ '36S&50- -fO.45 

■ Buenos Aires Merval 

70731 706.19 r»0.19 

Santiago . 


5228.73 " 5260^4 4Lfib. 

-Caracas . 

Capft^ General ■ 

6374.02 S403JJ0 ■ -045 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

Iiuenunpiu! Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Local Services Lift Sprint’s Profit 


PepsiCo ’s Earnings Plummet 


Ca^^bjOmrSklfFnmOhptmita 

NEW YORK — PepsiCo Inc. said Tuesday its 
earnings skidded an unexpectedly steep 85 percent in 
the fourth quarter because of losses in its international 
beverage business and slumping sales at the Pizza 
Hut and Taco Bell chains. 

PepsiCo earned S2S million in the three months 
ended Dec. 28, compared with SlSl million a year 
earlier. Revenue rose 4 percent, to $9.53 billion from 
$9.21 billion in the 1995 quarter. 

The overall results were lower than Wall Street bad 
expected, and PepsiCo shares fell $1.25, or 3.6 per- 
cent, to $32,875 on the New York Stock Exchange. 

Pepsi’s international beverage unit posted a loss of 
$404 million- The surprisingly poor results showed 
that Pepsi probably would need to spend more time 
and money than it had anticipated to compete with 
Coca-Cola Co. around the world, analysts said. 

"They've got such a significant hole to climb out 
of that it's going to take them years," said Martin 
Romm, an analyst at Credit Suisse First Boston. 

The Joss in the international beverages operation 
was compounded by troubles at PepsiCo ’ s restaurants, 
which include KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut. The unit 
had an operating loss of $144 million, reversing a 
profit of $261 million a year earlier. 

The company said last month it would spin off the 
restaurants to better focus on areas such as overseas 
drinks and its Frito-Lay snacks business. 

Pepsi said Tuesday it also had decided to sell some 
of its smaller restaurant businesses, including the 
Chevy's, California Pizza Kitchen and East Side 


Mario's chains. No buyers have yet been found. 
Those businesses are separate from the fast-food 
restaurant operations. 

For the quarter, PepsiCo had an operating loss of 
$69 million on beverages including the $404 million 
loss on international operations, which lost only S3 


million in the like quarter a year earlier. The North 


American beverage business had a $335 million op- 
erating profit, up from $289 milli on a year earlier. 

PepsiCo also had an operating loss in restaurants of 
$99 million because of a SI44 million loss in its U.S. 
restaurant business. Sales were off 4 percent in its 
UJS. restaurant business for the quarter. 


Operating profit in the snack-foods operation rose 


16 percent, to $525 million. (AP. Bloomberg] 

■ Colgate's 4th-Quarter Profit Jumps 48% 

Colgate-Palmolive Co. said its earnings climbed 
48 percent in the fourth quarter as sales grew 7 
percent, led by its Latin American division. The 
Associated Press repotted. 

The consumer-products company earned $181.7 
million in the final three months of 1996, compared 
with $122.5 million a year earlier. Revenue rose to 
$2.30 billion from $2.15 billion. 

The results exceeded Wall Street's expectations, 
and Colgate shares rose $2.50. or 2.7 percent, to 
$98.75 on the New York Stock Exchange. 

Reuben Mark, chairman and chief executive, said 
volume growth rose in each of the operating divisions 
around toe world, led by an 11 percent rise in Latin 
America, where the Mexican market is recovering. 


Financial Sector Lifts 
Stocks From Tech Slide 




n- 


I? 




n 


KANSAS CITY, Missouri (AP) — Sprint Corp. reported 
fourth -quarter net income of $245.3 million Tuesday, re- 
versing a loss a year earlier caused by a charge for an 
accounting change, as stronger profit from local telephone 
operations offset a 2 percent drop in long-distance profit. 

Sales rose 8 percent, to $3.62 billion. Profit on local phone 
operations rose 60 percent, led by strong demand for tele- 
phone lines. A $60 million charge related to a lawsuit canceled 
out a 12 percent increase in long-distance revenue. 

The company predicted lower profit this year, mostly because 
of investments in digital wireless communications services. 

• Ford Motor Co.’s automobile sales rose 2.6 percent in 
January, to 280.282 vehicles, with a 14 percent increase in 
truck purchases outweighing an 8 percent drop in car sales. 

• Dow Corning Corp.’s fourth-quarter profit rose 55 percent, 
to $61 .4 million, bolstered by the sale of a unit and lower interest 
expense as it operated under bankruptcy-law protection. 


Apple Will Pair Its Co-Founders 


Bloomberg News 

CUPERTINO, California — 
Apple Computer Inc. said Tuesday 
it was restructuring for the second 
time in less than a year, consol- 
idating several units into broad 
sales, marketing and research and 
development operations. 

The struggling computer maker 
also said its co-founder, Steve 
Wozniak, would join another co- 


founder, Steven Jobs, in advising 
the company. The company also 
said it would fire more workers and 
would disclose a final number of job 
cuts by tbe end of die month. 

The new teams will focus on cus- 
tomer in the business, education, 
publishing and consumer areas, the 
company said. The restructuring is tbe 
seccnd by the company's chairman, 
Gilbert Amelio. But analysts said 


Apple’s prospects were dimmer now 
than when Mr. Amelio joined the 
company a year ago. 

The restructuring was announced 
after the stock market closed. Apple 
shares dosed 93.75 cents lower at 
$15375 in New York. In the past year, 
Apple has reported $892 million in 
losses, seen its stock slide 43 percent 
and slipped to No. 4 among PC 
makers worldwide from No. 3. 


CjofJWM Oht SMf Fian 

NEW YORK — Blue-chip stocks 
were higher Tuesday as a laie-day 
rally in bank shares overcame a slide 
in computer-related issues. 

But trading was cautious as Fed- 
eral Reserve Board policy-makers 
met to determine whether inflation 
can stay tame without an increase ui 
interest rates. 

"The overall picture is still one 
of rising prices, with good earnings 
and stable rates. ' ’ said Richard Pell, 
chief investment officer at Bank 
Julius Baer." Investors are always 
looking for something to worry 
about and we are seeing some of 
that now after January’s run-up." 

The Dow Jones Industrial Av- 
erage closed up 2732 points at 
6,833.48, reversing a decline for 
most of the day. 

But declining issues outpaced 
advancers by a 12-to-l 1 ratio on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

Treasury bonds were little 
changed as investors bet that Federal 
Reserve Board policymakers, who 
are meeting Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, will leave interest rates flat 

The benchmark 30-year Treas- 
ury bond rose 15/32 to 97 12/32, 
pushing the yield down to 6.70 per- 
cent from 6.73 percent. 

Evidence of tame inflation came 
in two reports released Tuesday. 

Tbe Conference Board said the 
index of future economic activity 
advanced 0.1 percent in December, 
providing further evidence of modest 
growth. The slight increase follows a 
revised 03 percent increase in 
November and no change in Oc- 
tober. Meanwhile, a government re- 
port showing a 1 percent decline in 
new home sales in December also 
provided evidence that the economy 
is growing with little inflation. 
"We’re seeing moderating 


growth and minimal inflation. Thai 
has granted the Fed a respite here.* ‘ 
said Robert Smith of Smith Af- 
filiated Capital Corp. 

Shares of banks and other finan- 
cial companies gained amid optim- 
ism the central bank will refrain 
from raising interest rates. Chase 
Manhattan rose 2V5 to 96'4. Citicorp 
gained 1 to 1195*. and Bank Amer- 
ica rose l'/fc to 1 14%. 

Bellwether technology shares 
were pulling back after several days 
of strength. 

Networking concerns were being 
bartered in Nasdaq trading amid 4 
growing earnings jitters. 3Com. 




1 ! * 


>!t 


US. STOCKS 


which last week warned of weak 
business in late December, slumped 
314 to 58% after two investment 
firms lowered their profit estimates. 

After the market dosed. Cisco 
Systems announced second-quarter 
net income of S33S.5 million, or 49 
cents a share, after a charge of $43.2 
million to write off in-process re- 
search and development, and a gain 
of $473 million from the sale of 
stock in another company. 

Revenue for the quarter ended 
Jan. 25 increased 73 percent to 
$139 billion. 

Market jitters about Cisco's 
earnings had hurt stocks across the 
computer networking equipment 
sector. 3Com fell 3!4 to 5S%. and 
Cascade Communications was 
down 1 at 37%. 

Xylan fell 6 1 /; to 22 after re- 
porting fourth' -quarter earnings that 
matched analysts' estimates. 

Circuit City Stores — CarMax, 
the most active NYSE issue, was 
unchanged at 21 W after an initial 
public offering at $20. 

f Bloomberg. AP) 


9 


i i 


• Chevron Corp. plans to eliminate at least 600 of tbe 1 ,600 
i Informatk 


jobs at Chevron Informational Technology Co- the unit that 
handles the company's network-computing services. 

• NextWave Telecom Inc. said that MCI Telecommuni- 
cations Corp. held the equivalent of a 12 percent stake in the 
wireless-communications company, and it revised terms of its 
initial public offering, granting buyers both a Series B common 
share and a security that could entitle the holder to more stock. 

• Trans World Airlines Inc.'s largest stockholder, the In- 
ternational Association of Machinists, warned of a possible 
shareholder lawsuit if the airiine moves toward downsizing. 

• Miller Industries Inc. is buying 30 towing companies as the 
Atlanta-based tow-equipment maker seeks to make its Road 
One unit the largest U.S. towing service. 

• AT&T Corp.’s chief financial officer. Richard Miller, 

resigned, in the second departure of a top-level executive since 
John Walter took over as president and chairman-designate of 
the company last year. Bloomberg, ap. wp 


Dollar Moves Higher After Rubin Helps Ease Fears on G-7 






Cmpled by Ow Staff Fnm Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — The dollar over- 
came the uncertainties surroundin 
this weekend’s planned Group o: 
Seven summit meeting to end 
mostly higher Tuesday, helped by 
remarks from U.S. Treasury Sec- 
retary Robert Rubin. 

Mr. Rubin’s remarks seemed to 
ease concerns that G-7 officials 
would try to counter die dollar’s 
strength when they met in Beilin on 
Saturday. He said that U.S. industry 
was well positioned internationally 


and that the currency should not be 
used to bolster U.S. exports. 

“America industry, much to their 
credit, is competitive in the global 
economy," Mr. Rubin said. “I think 
the key to competitiveness is effi- 
ciency, and I do not believe that we 
can use our dollar just for trade 
policy." U.S. manufacturers have ar- 
gued that die strong dollar is hurting 
their exports by helping companies 
abroad sell goods more cheaply to 
U3. consumers. Last week, the 
American Automobile Manufactur- 


ers Association, which represents 
General Motors Corp_ Ford Motor 
Co. and Chrysler Corp.. said that a 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


weak yen hurt U.S. automakers. 

The comments "took away any 
belief traders might have had that G-7 
leaders are going to rash” to weaken 
the dollar, said Richard Vullo. man- 
ager of currency sales at Bayerische 
Hypotheken & Wechsel Bank. 

The dollar closed at 1 22.465 yen. 


up from 121.725 yen at the close 
Monday, and at 1.6476 Deutsche 
marks, compared with 1.6405 DM. 
It also ended at 1 .4290 Swiss francs, 
up from 1.4187 francs, and 53660 
French francs, up from 53490 
francs. The pound closed at 
$1.6205. up from $1.6200. 

The dollar also got a boost after 
the Bank of Japan’s governor, Yas- 
uo Matsushita, suggested the U.S. 
currency's recent strength against 
the yen did not pose a risk of in- 
flation for Japan. 


In addition. Japan’s finance min- 
ister, Hiroshi Mitsuzuko, said G-7 
officials would not devote discus- 
sions "only to currencies or Japan 's 
stock slump" at their meeting. The 
G-7 countries are the United States. 
Japan, Germany. Britain, France. 
Italy and Canada. 

The U.S. currency also was pushed 
higher by a report in a German news- 
paper that the CIA had discovered 
Said missile sites in Iraq and that the 
U3. military may attack them. 

(Bridge News. AP. Bloomberg) 


Jli!- 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 P.M. Close 

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Indexes 
Dow Jones 

OMD 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


Feb. 4, 1997 


High Low owe digs Oplof 


Low Lott On. 


Indus MfflJI 6833.48 BOM 6833*8 -Z7J7 
Trims 2340.14 2347.07 2334J7 ZBUB — SJB 
Utfl 232.11 732-37 73] JO mu 
comp 211456 211772 3107.87 211772 +131 


5 Standard & Poors 


hh 

UH 

IT** 

Sft 

lft 

7ft 


IT’-: 

14ft 

IB 

5hft 

2ft 

7ft 


♦ft 
♦ ft 
tlft 


17ft 

13ft 

9ft 

ft 

5ft 

2ft 

lift 


4ft 


13 

lift 

3ft 

w» 

17ft 

17ft 


ft 

5ft 

TV. 

17ft 

nft 

Uft 

up 


-ft 

■v. 


I Oft 
12ft 
17ft 
2ft 
17W 


12ft 

18ft 

2ft 

04 

71V 


left 

4ft 

12ft 

18ft 

7ft 


7ft. 



High 

Law 

Close 

CAB- 

Indurarfab 

92*97 917.96 

92*97 

+ 2J9 

Transp. 

562*3 558J59 560^44 

+036 

monies 

199.16 

19BJ6 

199.16 

+006 

Finance 

B9J0 

38.73 

89.58 

+066 

SP500 

709 JB 7B360 7B9J6 

+ 253 

SP100 

775JJ6 

76870 

775M 

+ 282 

NYSE 

won 

LOW 

Uld 

CUB. 

OmpoUte 

41134 

*11 AS 

41334 

♦ 084 

Industrials 

51*^0 

314*7 

379*8 

♦ 336 

Transp. 

367 JE 

36113 

38411 

— 365 

LIBCty 

269.2/ 

287.10 

269 J/ 

♦ 1*7 

Finance 

VIM 

37117 

377*8 

+ 1*4 

Nasdaq 

M0& 

Law 

Last 

are. 

Coreposfro 

137101 

1364J9 U72J8 

—377 

industrials 

115*73 1ULSI 1I47J5 

—451 

Baiks 

13S3A2 134733 1352.42 

♦UI 

Inurace 

M45JD 1451.0* 1*8173 

♦ 1321 

Feiance 

1484.95 168161 

148*95 

+ 480 

Transp. 

88170 

876^3 

arere 

—3*4 

AMEX 

Hah 

LOW 

LOW 

aw 


lift 

4ft 

2ft 

47ft 

«ft 

lift 

4ft 

ZM 

lift 

17W 

I* 


I7*i 

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25ft 

4ft 

24ft 

4ft 

7ft 

Wft 

4W. 

24ft 

in 

17ft 

IM 


59076 ran 56775 -046 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
10 Ultimo 

10 Industrials 


10X52 

100.45 

106.59 


a* 

+0.16 

+0.12 

+020 



VaL HWi 

Lew 

Loaf 

are 

OrCCcrn 

133328 22 

30ft 

71ft 


MercFh 

120457 TA 

lft 

2ft 

♦ ft 

PepsiCo S 

HH028 33ft 

32ft 

J2ft 

-ift 

WMXTc 

9*430 35 

37V* 

33 

-3% 

FsOrtas 

7*356 36 

34ft 

34ft 

♦ ft 

VaSRsrtn 

65708 MU 

27ft 

22ft 


USAHteB 

83746 36ft 

35ft 

3611, 

♦ lft 

GnMrtr 

32852 S 

16ft 

Vft 

-ft 

A7XT i 

*1*91 39ft 

39 

3*ta 

-ft 

CocaO s 

39971 S9ft 

Uft 

ifft 

—ft 

ChaseM 

37077 9*44 

93ft 

96ft 

♦ lft 

OtymRi 

38972 13ft 

1 IV, 

raft 

— 2ft 


38676 88ft 

B3h 

04ft 

-lft 

RJHptC 

38863 6ft 

6ft 

6ft 

♦ U, 

IBM 

33787 154ft 

UOft 

ISM 

-lft 

Nasdaq 


VOL Hah 

Low 

Lost 

are 

3Com 

7*7478 40ft 

53ft 

Sift 

-3ft 

Chen s 

172X16 47ft 

64"/i4 

67ft 

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CAIWne 

172027 * 

& 

2ft 

-ft. 

Met 

11121? 164ft 

164ft 

♦ ft 

xvVnCnn 

71478 22ft 

20ft 

22 

— «ft 

Microsfls 

70144 UBft 

IOOM 

103ft 

♦ ft 

ApptoC 

83484 16ft 

Uft 

15ft 

—■ft. 

Onxtes 

56572 «% 

39ft 

39ft 

♦ ft 

Ascmd 

5*787 88ft 

64ft 


-aft. 

USRobf s 

53300 65ft 

62ft 


-1 

TrtoCOmA 

3092 13ft 

12ft 

Uft 

+ft 


48146 21ft 

20ft 

a m 

—ft 

SunMIcs 

44311 32ft 

32 

32V. 

—ft 

DeOCrts 

40908 68ft 

42ft 

64ft 

—ih 

PrwnRsn 

39288 23ft 

20ft 

23 

- 

AMEX 


VaL Kelt 

LOW 

Law 

Ore 

Hmtro 

8906 41ft 

40ft 



VlocB 

7888 33ft 

3Zft 



USBkods 

63*7 16ft 




Anwax 

oia a*. 

7ft 

8ft* 



5632 79 ft. 

rvu 




5158 6ft 





4893 8ft 

6ft 




’ 4801 ft 




wr-nme* 

45*4 38ft 

37ft 



Harken 

4115 3 Th 

Sft 

3ft, 

-ft. 


too* Low Close Chge Optat 


Grains 


CORN (CBOT) 

M00 bu mWmum- onK Mr bush* 

Ha V 289ft W 267 Vi -ft 117.855 

MOV 97 248 % 2 46 267ft — 1V> 70345 

JUI77 24 Aft 244ft 244 -ft 67.343 

S8P97 263 240ft 241ft -lft 7,535 

77 263ft 242 253ft -I 44/01 

Est sites MA. Men's, ate 44711 
Mon'S ewer W 310285 up 300 


ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) 

ISJKOCa.- onto Herb. 

MorTT B7JS 85H0 88*0 -085 10077 

May 97 90. W 8880 89*0 — U» 7JB4 

JUI77 9140 7125 7170 -090 2 4533 

SeP 97 9658 7550 9570 —045 2.118 

Est. sates NA Man's, site 3*077 
Man's anenint 2141 S alt 505 


High Uw daw Chge Optra 
10-YEA R FRENCH 60V. BONDS 1MAT1F1 


H=5oaooo -ptsoriob pd 

Altar 07 130.94 13080 131 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 lorn- oolite per lai 
Mar 77 23L30 23350 236J0 -070 35725 

May 77 23070 22750 23050 -1.00 21414 

Jul77 22070 22680 22840 —LIB 19804 

Ami 77 22580 22480 72670 -180 3828 

Sep 97 221 J)0 220.00 27180 -150 2720 

0097 21250 21150 21250 + 250 1 864 

Estates NA Man's, sates H43B 
Man's open M 88504 up 132 


SOYBEAN OL (CBOT) 
40866 6m- cants parte 


Metals 

OOLO (NCMX) 

TOO boy at- ctoOcr* par Hoy etc. 

RS>97 34780 

Mir 77 34770 

Apr 77 3080 3040 3080 +080 

Jut 77 3S0JS 

AOB77 35110 

OCf 77 35550 

Dec 97 35080 

Feb98 360.91 

Est soles HA. Aten's, site 2MU3 

Mart's ocen int 171872 off 3772 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCAAX) 


780 

48 

77845 

23815 

UM 

3578 

11331 

2.907 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

5800 bu nMiwn- cents per bushel 
Mcr 97 737 728 734ft —lft 

MOV 97 737 TB 734ft -3 

JUI77 735ft 72Bft 733 -3ft 

Aug 97 730 725 730 —lft 

50P 77 700ft 470 700 -1 

Estate HA. Man's. sales SLOT 
Aten's open int 171.348 up 273 


23*0 

+0*4 

40JB7 

25*00 to*.- cenre per to. 
Feb 97 

HUB 

2*89 

24.18 

♦am 

19774 

Mar 97 

102*5 

71,920 

24 a 


14.920 

Apr 97 

10I.1S 

1JB9 

2472 

—tun 

lie 

May 97 

99 JO 

6.921 

24*0 

— OiOS 

ZSM 

Jun 97 

*9 J5 

700 

rang 

+0*5 

059 

JU97 

90*0 

4J7B 

sate 

11743 


Aug 97 

97*0 

611 

up sn 


Sep 97 

97 JO 

2J99 




OU97 

96J5 

SO 


Mar 97 7483 
AW 77 94J9 
Junf7 9452 
Sep 97 94.19 
Dec 97 9481 
Mcr 78 9191 
JWlTO 9381 
Sep9B 9173 
Dec 90 7141 


17543 

•3896 

4.903 

3935® 

294504 

712793 

175870 

134882 

1(0857 

81.171 


34542 

2825 

1849 


73837 

36,127 

34879 

5,155 

1833 


Mon's open W SUM up 1067 


»in 


♦H 


I* 


15ft 

79* 

It* -ft 
7ft -7, 
4h -ft 
,V« 


Trading Activity 

NYSE 


Nasdaq 


3M 


15H 

5ft 

IV, 


Total I 
WwWl 
Nm Lows 


1395 

1342 

7*1 


Admeed 


Undxroed 

TOMinms 
New Hons 
New Lows- 


1613 1965 

2147 zora 
1464 1720 

5734 5735 

174 204 

64 40 


WHEAT (awn 

5800 DumHmun- arts per buetwl 
Mcr 97 343 357 341ft +lft 

Altov 77 352 345ft 350ft +Tft 

JU97 340 335 338ft +ft 

Sep 77 342ft 338ft 341 +ft 

Eat. ate HA AAon's.Ste 16845 
Mon's open W 64814 up 1328 


24876 

10935 

24835 

1883 


AMEX 


Market Sales 


IH 

5H 

II 


l»ft 

27ft 

IH 

2 *. 

Tift 


Advanced 
OscJbied 
UnchanoM 
Total issues 
Newrtofts 

NcwUnn 


249 

JSJ 


Today 


■ NYSE 
•Amex 
pi Nasdaq 
tnmMms. 


491.85 56478 

1787 21.96 

547.95 53754 


left 

» 

iw 

M 

HM 

7ft 

» 

Uft 

ZPVtt 


I6H 

10H »H 

i we -v* 

3 -ft 

l(M -ft 

2ft 


Dividends 

CMBpany 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
IRREGULAR 

Madeca ADR b 8945 2-14 2-2S 

SunEniqy Partner _ .15 2-17 3-10 


Campmiy 


AMBHnd 
BSB Bancorp 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Sparta Surgical 1 tar 5revane spW. 


DukeRHy lnv 

Foiaitarai 


Cp Am 


14 

17. 

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4H 

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Uft 

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W» 

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I7H 


IM 

Ifft 

lift 

24ft 


■lft 


l*ft 

an 
17ft 
24ft .ft 
Hft 

Xh -ft 
12ft 


BanhAraerCorp 
Bloch Hlb 
CoBancotp Inc 
OPLinc 

Inter-Reglanal Fn 
Niwaan AZPrem 
NuvCA IWun Value 
Nw CT Premium 
Nuv FL Inv Qual 
HuvGAPram 
Nuv AAA Prem 
SMRestettr 
Sun Banco 
v A Beach I 


81 2-20 
JH 2-14 
.17 2-14 
>34 2-14 
.16 3-3 
-069 2-15 
-048 2-15 
865 2-15 
882 2-15 
865 2-15 
87 2-15 
JO 2-21 
-26 2-21 
85 2-14 


3-12 

3-1 

3-3 

3-1 

3-17 

3-3 

3-3 

3-3 

3-3 

3-3 

3-3 

3-7 

3-7 

2-26 


tadepamW Bkstir 
Imquatse Bnes 
Kemper Slraflnca 
Liberty Corp 
NJ Resources 

NatnsGvfnco 2003 
NatnsGv Inca 2004 
Nttnast IN Bncp 

“siSm 

Cate 


n 

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JSVi 

2ft. 

IM 


rv» 


lift 

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TM 


REDUCED 

KenwerMuHJMJcr AA 8725 2-14 

Nuvwi Ml Pram M 867 2-15 


2-26 

3-3 


PkxmnrCdfi 
Scturttz^ava 
Se an Roebuck 
Stwrgard Stumge 
Sown Ota Inc 
United Cos Fh) 
WAAXTech 
Warren Bncp 


Per Ant Rec Pay 
REGULAR 

_ 86 2-14 2-28 

G JS 2-24 3-10 

0 .11 3-10 3-31 

_ .19 2-14 2-28 

O 81 2-14 2-2B 

Q J7 2-17 3-17 

Q JO 1-24 3-14 

O 85 2-14 2-28 

O 88 2-10 2-28 

AA .147 2-14 2-2S 

Q .IBS 3-15 4 - 2 

Q AD 3-14 4-1 

M 8514 2-14 2-27 
M 8538 2-14 2-27 
a JJB 2-10 2-24 

Q .15 2-18 2-28 

Q JDS 2-2S 3-17 

Q .12 3-7 4-1 

Q .10 2-14 2-2B 

O J3 2-28 4-1 

Q 87 2-10 2-20 

Q .925 2-21 3-15 

Q JOB 3-14 4-1 

Q .16 3-19 4-3 

0 .11 2-4 2-19 


Livestock 

CATTLE fCMER) 
doxoa Bib- carts per lb. 

M97 UJS 63.72 SUB -092 

Apr 97 6780 4577 6590 -0.92 

An 77 4587 6430 4152 -045 

Aus97 6490 44.10 6432 -037 

OC997 66.10 4730 67.45 -032 

Dec 97 7035 <980 «J7 -032 

Ed.Jte NA. Man's. ides 36344 
Mm's open W I.U4864 up 1H10CS 

rrmm cattle (cmbu 
sgjioa •■«.- cents par ft. 

Mir 97 71145 4175 48.97 -087 

Apr 97 7085 49J5 »J7 -0J5 

May 97 71 JO 7045 7095 

Alia 97 7542 74.1B 7*60 -0.12 

Sep 97 7525 74J0 7380 —027 

Od97 76J0 7540 7SJ0 -OJ5 

Est.ste NA Atan's.ste 5419 
Mm's open M 2X227 off 45 


1*277 

41877 

14836 

17,140 

9812 


SILVER (NOW 

MOO (ray at- onus par troy n. 

Fab 97 46840 14 

Mar 97 49030 49030 49050 + 030 54834 

Apr 97 49Z3J 

May 97 49*80 12834 

M9I 49930 *896 

Sep 97 9090 2.977 

Dec 97 SfiJO 4873 

Am 96 51140 6 

Est sates NA Mar's, ate 12842 
Mon's Open inf 90J42 UO 310 

PLATMUM 0NMER1 
SO My oz.- doflors per Irw ox. 

Apr 97 35480 3S&00 3S6JOO +080 20833 

JWJ7 35780 3811 

Oct 97 359.90 2J74 

JOI96 34238 1281 

EsL sates NA Man's. 1255 
Mon's open Int 27274 up 7S 

dose Previous 

LONDON METALS CLME) 

Donors pec metri c te w 


ISLm 


159816 1599% 161020 161120 
162320 162*80 163420 163620 


236580 "oSLoa 238280 renwi 
219920 220020 219020 219220 


7258 

2886 

*3X> 

42«5 

1285 

1895 


Spat _ 666% 

Forward 67720 

Hhte 


6£Fn 

67820 


66*00 

67520 


66520 

67620 


SpoT 759020 760020 761520 
Forward 


762020 

769080 770020 771020 772020 


IStL»i1 *1 020 580520 


H0G54JM (OABt) 

Ain ft,.- cams par ft. 
rtb VT 7SJ2 7520 7521 +0te 

Art 97 7540 7*50 7531 +057 

Jun97 8087 B0JS 8037 +OB 

Jut 97 7880 7130 78JB +0« 

Aug 97 7540 74» +l» 

Od 97 6830 47J0 6842 +OB 

Ed.ste NA Man's. sb4m 9879 
Mon's ooenirt 31771 off 8» 

PORK BELLIES (CMBO 

4M00 tefc- c urs pa r ft. 

Feb 97 7980 7745 7*30 +M 

Mar 97 7780 7481 25 

MOV 77 7880 7735 7832 +122 

JUI97 77 JO 7*85 77-5 + S5 

Alta 77 7580 743S 7*Q +047 

Est sates NA Mnn-^Kite 1298 
Mon's open irt 8800 afl 64 


7325 

0672 

7879 

1854 
1818 

1855 


I 586020 567020 596520 
zmc (special HU Grade! 

Spat 115114 115014 115T4 
Forward 117120 117220 117320 

High Low CJase Chge 


581520 

597020 


115414 

117420 


Oplnf- 


Rnandal 


2821 

1161 

2843 

425 


:£ Kysor Intfustl 


rmnasub ln wUm otc oraount prt 
sbore7ADRjg-payaHe h Canateim fandsr 
ns+aoadMy; g 4|uiiHe »tr ; 5-s te -mmwl 


UST.BELS (CMBU 
(1 refloat- rtioMOOpd 
Mar 97 9*97 9*9S 9*94 +081 *714 

Mar 77 9*97 9*95 MM +081 *714 

Mar 97 9*97 9*95 9*96 +081 4JI4 

Mcr 97 9497 9*95 9*96 +021 *714 

Eta. sates NA Mori's, sales 638 
Man's open Int 8873 up 50 

XYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

SlCKUHOrtln- pts* Mtn ollOO pd 
Mur 97 106-46 10*173 

Mcr 97 104-44 18*173 

Ma-97 104-44 18*173 

EsL sates NA Aten^Lite 50,917 
Man's open W 19*679 up 1471 


Food 


18 YR TREASURY (CBOT) 


uu 

ia 


pi 




HH 

fta 

»u 

lft 

aft 

Bft 


15ft 


IH 


lft 

13ft 

18ft 

3ft 

11 


IH 

Urt 

lift 


-ft 


lira 

isra 

IN 


nut 

IN 

n*» -ra 

15>. ,ra 

iara <h 
lira ra 
tsra ,i« 

12V. Jf, 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales BguHae unafBOaL Ytey Nte md tom nflad the previous 52 weeta plus the eunatf 
week butnorthelntesttTBtanH day. Whema spfflorriocti dNMend amaunllri tf h > 2Spacm itsa m e re 
has been pate, the years Ngh-hm lanpe ate dvtitend me Shaun lor me new Rods only. Unless 
oftawfae noted rotes of dhilitewfa me annurfiftbiirwriBrds famed on Bie MestrtaJraten. 
a - dhridand also adia (s). b - anrexd mte of divrdend phr* stock dividend, c - Bqutdatlng 
divKtend, a: - PE exceeds 99jdd- coded, d- new yearly low. dd-lou In the last 12 months, 
e - dhiwend declared or paid In precedkiB 12 months, f • annual rate, increased on last 
a«toTOtkin,g-dMdend In Canadian funds j ubject tol5%norMe3ldence tax. I -dWderid 
dadaivd otter spHF+ip ar stock dhrfdemL J - Addend paid thb yem amflled, deferred, or no 
adton taken at latest Aridend meeting, k - (Bvfdend dedaied or paid thb year, an 
ooamiulaitwB issue wftti cflvWends te o nears, m - arand nde. reduced on last dedaranon. 
n- new Issue In itie past 52 weeks. The Ngtv-lmr range begins wtm me dart of tmtBng. 
nd - nan day deawery. p -Inlltal dNMend, annual rate unknown. P/E - prtcetetdnas nflaL 
q-rtssed -end mutual fund, r-tflvldenddeckjred or paid In preceding! 2 momti* pi us stom 
dMdena s - stock apUL OMdend begins wfffi date of spat, ds • sales, t < diuMend paU In 
stock In preceding 12 monttn. esdmaTed cash mteean ndMdand ar ex-dbMnfflon dole, 
e- nawyearty high. *- trading halted. * 1 . m banknrateYOrteoefvenMparbeina raorganbietf 
unaerttK Bankruptcy Act, arsecurttles assumed by such companies, wf-wbendfslrtbufed. 

issuc & mw - with warrants, x - ex-dMdend dt Eac-riofrts. mRs - BMflstiflJution. 
»■- without warrants, y- ex-dMdend and sales bi futt. vM • yield, z - sales In ful 


COCOA CNCS8) 

10 marie lom- * oar loft 

Mar 97 13Z4 

MOV 97 1254 
July? on 
Sep 97 1404 

Dec 97 1431 

Est. softs NA Aten's, teles 2.914 
MotSomiM 8*943 off 810 


1313 

U23 

+S 

1342 

1352 

+ 11 

1370 

080 

+11 

1399 

1406 

+13 

1422 

1431 

+ 12 


2*445 

13881 

9258 

*141 


Mar 971 09-09 10S-31 109-07 ■ 

Jun97 108-21 108-13 IE-71 i 

Sap 97 108-04 107-70 108-04 

EsL sates 4*433 Man'S, seties 4 

Mon'S venire 344807 up 277 


21813 

1373 


COFFEECfNCSE) 

S7J»ftfc-aert*parb. 

Mar 97 14698 WJS 14S8S *U5 
MOV 97 148.90 T35J5 14L40 +*« 
Jut 97 13788 13225 137JS +595 
SOP 97 13488 18988 13321 +«» 
Esf. sties NA Mart, sates BU47 
MorrtaoaiM 4*434 UP 1153 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 WCSE) 
tlMCOft*.-eonl*P<irfc. 
mrV 1087 MJS 1042 -MS 
May 97 1083 1634 HUB -823 

Jul97 1034 1639 1031 . _ 

Od 77 1037 1033 1033 —4103 

Estates NA Marrt.sates KUEll 
Alton's Open ter 155201 Off 295 


rua\ 

HL2S0 

*833 

3204 


U5 TREASURY BONOS (CBCm 
(8 pra-noaaoo+ft* s. xtnatet too — 

Mar 97112-09 111-25 112-07 +04 40810 

Jun97 111-35 111-10 111-23 +04 34248 

Sap 77 11W» 111-03 1)149 +04 7225 

Dec 97 110-29 11MB 110-28 +04 1962 

Estates 325200 Mart. sate 30277 
Men*sepenim otjh off ear 


— . ~ 13086 +022132,763 

Jun 97 12986 12934 12926 +024 14807 
Sep 97 12772 12772 12788 +024 776 

Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 96.96 +022 0 

Est. volume: 13X907 . Open bit: 14*246 up 
*960. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BONO CLIFFE) 

UL 200 ratal • pll dflOO Kt 
M*77 12970 129.10 12972 + 088 109847 

Jun97 129 JO 129JS 129.10 +084 9.961 

SepV7 • N.T. N.T. 129 J2 + 083 400 

EsLSrtCS; 84823. Picv.sates: 19899 
Pm-OOenlOL; 12*100 up U20 
EURODOLLARS (CAABR) 

Si mnon-aisef too pa. 

Feb 97 MAS 9484 9*44 

9*0 9*0 

9*0 9130 

9*29 9*31 

9*15 9*18 
9196 9*00 

9364 9350 
9377 9180 
9389 9373 

913 9341 

Est. sates 292867 Mandates <30838 
Man's open hit 2710850 Off 2570 

BRfTW POUND (CMBO 
0800 pounds. S per pauna 
Mra-97 18Z6 18144 18206 

Jun 97 18200 18130 18105 

Sap 97 18144 

Dec 97 18100 I 

EsL solas 7274 Mon's, stew 6,902 
Mon'S open Inf 39.924 up 42 
CA N ADIAN DOLLAR (CMBD 
IMUM drthaa, s par Cdn. dir 
Mcr 97 J48T 7457 7443 42749 

Jun97 JSO J5M 7507 8804 

Sep 97 7540 7546 7544 3825 

Dec 97 7600 ^B4 7583 VS 

W Mai's, stew *563 
Mon'S open ait HJ11 up 511 
GBIMAN84ARK (CMER) 

UMBO Himtc a. saw mark 

Mar 97 8112 80» JOU 81858 

Jun 97 8147 8124 8130 5.179 

5CP 97 8149 2.173 

D«C97 8209 IB 

EsL sate 12806 Eton's, stees 19800 

Man's apmH B8821 up 1995 

JAPANESE YOU (OWSR) 

lumnsnwra leer in van 

Ma-97 8237 8211 8214 75808 

Am 97 834i 8ne .m 1 3002 

50P97 8484 8478 8431 646 

EsL soles 12.213 Man's, sate 12862 

Mon's open taJ 79871 off 341 

SWISS FRANC (CMBU 

US800 hones, s per te rn 

Mcr 97 TIBS 7033 7041 47782 

ten 97 7119 7103 7107 2880 

ta97 72IS 7155 7174 1,919 

at-ydas NA Mon's, sites 1*243 

Mon's open Ira 152803 up 108402 

MgP jjffl E URPWUUMC tUFFE) 

DMImtai-nofioopct 

F«M7 9687 9687 9686 —081 3867 

® gs sss aszsi^ss 

DeOT 9*65 9*57 9688 — 0J» lSs® 

tag 9688 9638 9641 — 6iB 12*633 

J UlffB 94J7 9617 9620 — 0JJ5 99L646 

SapSH 96JO 95J3 SS -0.C6 7X733 

2SS ajg 

Maw 9BAB 9340 9142 — OM A246 

M8K M,,aa 

Pm.apentaL; 1.178826 up 4 
WAO^STEJ^HOCUinTn 

ssnuxn-pteofiooad 

Mart? 9167 *85 

J(«97 tot s 9342 

a® 2 % 82 

g 

ass 

Mot99 9168 9164 

Am99 9Ztl 92J7 

Sg» 9284 9251 

DeCP9 9281 9248 

Est stew; 3*714. PlWV, galas 5149 
Prev. open InL: 474872 up *144 
MAMITO PfBOR CMATIPJ 
FFS mOBan - pta of 100 pet 
Mar 97 9689 9682 9684 +O00 71899 
Jun 97 9671 9683 9685 +535 49813 
Sep 97 9689 9682 9684-OfflS^ 
Dec 97 9662 9653 9656 —0.01 27857 
Mar 98 9683 9*45 9*46-002 17750 
Jun 98 9684 9*29 9*30 — 08) 16871 

Sep « 9*15 9*09 9*11 JSStt 10819 

Dec 90 9*91 9585 9587 +am 10021 

Mar 99 9584 9580 9581 +081 11433 

Jun 99 9SJ8 9S27 9SJ7 *083 5,757 

Sep 99 95.13 95.11 9*11 +SS 3838 

Dec 99 9*90 9*8S 9*85 +082 L361 

^ "terne: 12284* Open Wj 263290 off 

3-MtHfinH EUkOURA OJFFE) 


High Low Close Chge OpM 

OOV7 77 JO 77.IS 7750 +085 1.483 

Doc 97 77.45 77 JO 7785 +0.W 12,48# 

Mar 98 7&20 7&00 7870 -005 775 

Est. sates NA Man's, odes 6885 
MaYsaecnM 43,939 up 314 
HEATMOOL (NMBU 
42800 Dot cam pgr art 


Sep 97 
0(397 


H « 

64.18 

-1.10 

3**57 

8) .« 

81.91 

-0*7 

14.71/ 

5970 

59.98 

-0*7 

6*00 


58*1 

—017 

7.130 

50.10 

5871 

-0.17 

3.788 

58*8 

58.48 

-017 

3.135 


5871 

-0.17 

3,196 


5V J6 

-017 

1*23 

59*1 

59*1 

-417 

1*92 

8025 

8031 

-OI7 

4J9S 


Estates 44824 AtanVstees 24J15 
Men s ocen int 87.937 up 7056 
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NME8) 

1 800 but- drttars per bbl. 

Mar 97 2*43 2382 2*02 -0.13 75888 

APT 97 23.94 2143 2361 -6.13 <B,MS 

May 97 2144 22.95 23.14 -689 25.979 

Jun 97 2100 22J0 2275 -6.06 32J99 

tel 97 2262 22J2 2279 -608 16,110 

Aug97 2275 21.96 22JM -684 13.973 

Sep 97 2178 21.65 2171 -685 14424 

ptfW 549 2141 2149 —683 10805 

NOU97 2170 2170 2170 -SUQ 78® 

Dec 97 21.M MB 20.93 -003 24,717 

ten 98 20.72 2068 1089 -08] 12847 

Poll 90 2060 20JD 20JD -003 7890 

Mgr9B J0JJ -083 2751 

gdjrtas 74819 Mandates 42.750 
MarrtopenH 35*990 up 1314 
NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

IM00 mm Mu’s, s par mm Mr 
Mcr 97 2500 2JM 2897 

Apr 97 2J7D Zln 2249 

May 97 2155 2841 1141 

An 97 2.13D 2840 2125 

84 97 1130 2070 2125 

AW 97 2130 2060 2124 

Sen 97 2.135 2090 201 

Od 97 2141 2090 1141 

NOW 97 279 23 2744 

Dec 97 2370 2330 2341 

JOT« 2410 2370 2394 

BLsates 30854 Mar’s. sate 21319 
Mon's open irt 155825 up 1654 
UM-EADB) GASOLB4E (NMER) 
fUOOaoL CM per art 
MO-97 68.90 47.50 48J1 — *04 30831 

flg r ” «■» »J3 —0-16 13855 

MOTJP 7080 4885 4943 -8.14 9.220 

ten 97 4865 6770 Mill —689 *667 

■M97 4480 4*10 4*45 —0.04 X8ffl 

AW 97 4*55 6*40 64J5 —084 Tin 

Est sales 1883a Man's, sc^s 21 224 
Man's open taf 61541 Span ™ 

CASOfLOPEJ 

^ dolta per oietrfc km - lots of 100 tans 

Fe<s97 MftK 202.00 20X00 — 1.00 2Q.1S) 

"ffff 1WJ» ,91 “ ™ —225 1*9W 

Ap(97 193JX) 189J0 19025 — 1J0 0425 

WW 18*00 18*75 Unch. 17M 

J . u . n ” >8^50 18*50 16125 UncfL 7,715 

JulW 18*25 16575 185 JS +0JS £482 


30,774 

18859 

1*351 

9852 

8852 

7880 


8494 

*770 

7859 

4800 


AUQ97 18*25 165.75 185J5 +0J5 LOT 
Sept w 16*00 ias.ea ]r££ ZJs 


DO 97 18575 ii*25 iES VH 

NO* 97 10*75 18580 18SJS +075 57T 

D0C97 1BSJ5 18*75 lsS +OJO 1277 


! 71 !*' 7,500 ‘ Open Int: 67819 up 


«46 + am 104739 
9143 -am 107824 
W2Z +081 71,918 
rate +MJ 51,903 
92» -MB 39JS9 
raw +ara 3*110 
9276 +083 21,791 
9270 + *03 1*347 

-aw m 

raj; +aos 

9253 +085 
9149 +084 


BRENT OIL OPE) 

U8. doaars pa- band - kds af 1800 barrels 

Mar 97 22.77 ra in 2£43 — 0.11 47J1S 

*X97 22J9 2187 SSt-OM 39845 

Mayra 2185 2148 21 J5 -0.10 17890 

J ™ra 2144 21.13 21.17 -all 16,979 

IVijS? 211? 2083-0.11 11170 

&SS ^ 3084-0-11 1116 

Sgpra N.T. N.T. 2OJ0— 0.10 5409 

0097 20 J0 2030 2005—000 17?J 

JKS ,S-J- N.T. 1983 -Ote zSJ 

Dec97 1986 1970 1982 - 004 1352 

^Est sales: 31800 Open Intj 151323 up 


£3 

3400 


1772 

IJ19 


AI51 

J7859 

27.923 

18464 


GERMAN GOVERN MENT BUND (LlfTB 

DM2S3600-DlSOfllX)nCt 

MniP7 102M 101J2 10179 —00523*767 

JIM97 101.12 10088 100.91 —084 9748 

estten.' noBzr. Prat softs: i24j» 

Prev-apmirt; 240515 up 134 


Slf^^aPta. + 084 9*4* 

3 S g as ;ss n 

ten* 9*88 9192 9482 +*S jjoffi 


Stock Indexes 

Mf COMP. MDEX (CMBU 
SOOxInen 

VS EH5 mM "l" + 1*S 179804 
JW9J S0L40 79400 801.18 +480 9J41 

Swra 80+ J0 MTU 888.95 + 4.05 
Oec97 BI*9S *cio 

gajofts NA Man's, sales 
Mart open W 1 off 194234 
FTSE1W OJFFE) 

£25 per Met paint 

Mnrt7 428ft0 42498 42558 - *0 59473 
ten97 42W8 42S58 42758 —18 4.999 

8ep97 43008 43068 43018 —48 1.44t 

gLirtes: 8400. Prev. sites: 8837 
Prev. open hit: 64873 Off S« 

CAC40 (MATIF1 

25098 - 780 2*487 
Mar 97 25358 25108 25158 — 780 10 . mn 

^ H 253615 2517 -® - 7 -oo IM 

Jun 97 24078 247X8 24818 -680 1855 
Sep ra 24968 34878 24928-6JO *836 
Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 25128 — A 80 o 
Mar ra N.T. N.T. 25308 — 780 7829 
Sep 98 N.T. NX 2505J0-7JM 710 

EsLeokime 12892. Open M.-61.I67 up 


590. 


9 


LOHGGlLnUm} 

€50000 -pts&32Ddstfieo per 
Mart? 112-14 11145 1 12-18 +0-1917*274 
Jun97 111-26 111-15 11146 +0-19 
Esl sales: 11*339. ftp*. «tex 7*248 
Prev, open Int; 17*099 up *837 


InduaHafa 

COTTON JOICTN) 

508W tosvaanhi dot to. 

Mrs 97 7 * 37 7*45 7580 +OIK pbh 

MW97 R60 «S 700 

Jul97 7780 7*92 7775 +0,52 a^ 


Commodity indexes 


as* 

DJ. Futures 
CRB 


deu 

144380 

1,94380 

1ST 83 
33986 


Prettows 

1*4418 

1.94240 

15187 

23889 






JJVFEBW^TIO^ALSEEiALO TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 , 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


Rome Sees 
Asset Sales 

Bringing In 

$18.5 Billion 

Gmrt Inlfy 

■ Treasury will take 

in 30tplhon h re (SJ8.5 billion) this 
year from selUna stakes in compa- 
mes it owns Treasury Minister 
Carlo Azeglio Ciampi said Tuesday 
in a speech to a group of parlia- 
mentaiy committees. 

§ , Tbe first of three sales to m fre 

tins year will ^ ^ pubu^ 

EAT SpA, and that sale will take 
place m the spring, he said. 

Mr. Ciampi also said die Treasury 
wwJdseU its 87 percent stake in 
Aurostrade SpA, the company that 
owns JUKI operates Italy’s highway 
networfc, by the beginning of sum- 
mer. He said the sale would take 
place on schedule because there was 
no need for Parliament to set up a 
new regulatory body first 
. TOe sale of Italy’s telecommu- 
nications company, STET, or So- 
cieta Finanziari a Telefonica, will be 
held in the autumn, Mr. Ciampi said, 

orlrlrnn 'P . _ . a _ « 


to spin off any of STET’s subsi- 
diaries before the sale. Investors had 
speculated that the Treasury would 
* spin off such subsidiaries as Telecom 
Italia Mobile SpA and Sirti SpA to 
raise extra revenue. 

STET’s management is still look- 
ing for international alliances to 
help it compete in deregulated mar- 
kets, he said. 

“We intend to create a hard core 
of mostly Italian shareholders 
up of important players without in- 
terest in the sector," be said. 

He did not give a date for the sale 
of the electrical utility Enel SpA. 

( Bloomberg , Reuters ) 

■ Machinists Sign Contract 

Employers and Italy's three ma- 
jor unions accepted and signed a 
new contract for machinists, ending 
seven months of acrimonious talks 
and bringing pay increases for 1.8 
million workers in some of Italy’s 
key export industries, Bloomberg 
News reported from Milan. 

The contract for workers in all 
industries that use metal machines, 
inducting car and appliance makers, 
calls for pay increases of 200j0001ire 
a month and one-time payments of 
512,000 tire for each worker. The 
contract expires Dec. 31, 1998. 


Rewiring Europe for Telecommunications 

BT and VIAG Get License Loose Links at Vebacom 


BONN —VIAG AG and British 
Telecommunications PLC were 
awarded Germany's fourth mobile- 
telephone license Tuesday, a central 
pan of the two companies' strategy 
for winning a piece of die country’s 
telecommunications market. 

The venture, E2 Mobil funk 
GmbH, is owned 62,5 percent by 
VIAG and 37.5 percent by BT. 

Alfred Mockett, managing di- 
rector of BT’s global-communica- 
tions division, railed the award a 
landmark for die companies' part- 
nership. 

“This means that we will hold 
licenses for infrastructure, fixed 
and mobile communications, and 
we will be well placed to challenge 
Deutsche Telekom in the German 
marieeV’hesaid. 

The decision by the post and 
Teleco mmunicatio n^ Ministry was 
not much of a surprise, as VIAG 
and BT were the only known ap- 
plicants. 

The venture will face three com- 
petitors already operating digital 
mobile phone services in Germany. 
One license is owned by Deutsche 


Telekom AG, the state telecom- 
munications giant that sold a 
minority stake to the public in 
November. 

Other licenses are held by Man- 
nesznann AG and the joint venture 
known as E-Plus MobUfunk 
GmbH, which is owned by Thyasen 
AG, VEBA AG, BellSouth Coip. 
and Vodafone Group PLC. 

VIAG andBThave said they will 
invest 6 WEoo Deutsche marks 
($3.65 billion) in the system. Ana- 
lysis question the strategy, saying 
Germany’s mobile-telephone mar- 
ket is already overaowded. VIAG 
andBT say they expect mobile tech- 
nology to increasingly dominate the 
telecommunications market. ■ 

There are currently more than 5 
million mobile-phone customers in 
Germany, die ministry said. The 
biggest network, the D2 network 
operated by a subsidiary of Man- 
nesmann and the U.S. company 
AizTouch Communications, has 
23 million customers. 

VIAG shares rose 18.50 DM to 
close at 70230 in Frankfort, and 
BTrose 6 pence (9.6 cents) to 431 
in London. (Bloomberg, AP, AFP) 


Cut^Hed 5? Okt Staff From D iq xM lizs 

LONDON — Cable & Wireless 
PLC said Tuesday that talks were 
under way with its partner VEBA 
AG about the future of Vebacom, 
their teteconraumicatioas joint 
venture, amid significant differ- 
ences over how io compete in the 
German and European markets. 

-Cable. & Wireless said it had 
disagreed with VEBA, which 
wanted to invest heavily in build- 
ing network infrastructure in Ger- 
many. If also does not want to lose 
management control of the venture 
to RWE AG, aGennan utility com- 
pany that is negotiating to join the 
venture. - - 

VERA owns 55 percent of 
Vebacom, and the dispute craters 
on proposals for Cable & Wireless 
to give half of its 45 percent stake 
to RWE. 

Cable & Wireless sec up the ven- 
ture with VEBA to compete in both 
the German and the pan-European 
telecommunications markets. The 
British company said VEBA 
wanted to invest less in a pan- 
venture. 

ale & Wireless has struggled 


with divisions both in its own ranks 
and with external partners over the 
past few years. 

Its former chairman and chief 
executive quit after a boardroom 
struggle in 1995. Richard Brown, 
chairman of the company since Ju- 
ly 1 996, won shareholder approval 
last year when Vebacom lured 
RWE away from rivals British 
Telecommunications PLC and 
VIAG AG in Germany. 

But VEBA plans to weak with 
RWE with or without Cable & 
Wireless. Marie -Lxrise Wolff, a 
spokeswoman for VEBA, said 
Monday. If Cable & Wireless pulls 
out, a 225 percent stake will be 
available for anew partner, she said. 
VEBA said Tuesday rt was talking 
to several potential buyers of a stake 
in its tebgnr ffm nit rati ons venture, 
but it refused to name them. 

On Monday, VEBA said that 
Cable & Wireless “could" leave 
their joint venture in Germany, 
shuffling the corporate lineup yet 
again, less titan a year before the 
country's telecommunications 
market is to open folly to com- 
petition. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


Investor’s Europe 




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Source: Tetakurs 


tnvenuUMnl Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


EU Aims to Ensure TV Sports Coverage for All 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The European Commission 
will propose on Wednesday changing EU law to 
ensure that every one can see live television cov- 
erage of major sporting events like tire soccer 
World Cup and the Olympic Games. 

lire proposal, in tire form of an amendment to 
the Elf's television without frontiers law. was 
drawn op by Culture Commissioner Marcelino 
Oreja. 

Under the plan, ray television channels such as 
BSkyB and Canal Plus would still be able to buy 
exclusive rights to sporting events. But the law 


would specify how they use them. “By keeping 
restrictive measures to the minimum that is ab- 
solutely necessary, it would avoid putting Euro- 
pean companies at a competitive disadvantage in 
the global rights market,” the draft proposal 


Television companies would have to respect 
national laws setting out events that must be 
broadcast for free, either uncoded or on a non- 
subscription channel. Three EU countries — 
Britain, France and Belgium — have such lists, 
but as a result of tire EU move other countries 
could draw them up, EU officials said. 


In Britain, soccer events like the FA Cup Final, 
the Scottish FA Cup Final and tire World Cup 
Final are on the list along with tire Derby and 
Grand National horse races, the Olympic Games, 
the Wimbledon Tennis Championships and 
home cricket test matches involving England. 

On France’s list are the Summer and Winter 
Olympics, the Tour de France bicycle race, Euro- 
pean Cup football matches. Five Nations rugby 
union matches in which the French national team 
takes part, and tire French football cop final. 

In Belgium's Flemish region, a new list is 
drawn up every year. 


• Germany's industrial output rose a surprisingly strong 1.4 
percent in December from November and 3.3 percent from a 
year earlier; many analysts said the data made it unlikely that the 
Bundesbank would reduce rates soon. 

• Degussa AG, a German chemicals and metals maker, said 
its first-quarter pretax profit rose 20 percent, to 1 15 million 
DM ($69.9 million), on strong sales abroad; revenue rose 16 
percent, to 3.46 billion DM. 

• Union Bank of Switzerland said it and Morgan Stanley & 
Co. were selling as many as 3.54 million common shares of 
the German software company SAP AG in a private place- 
ment. The 5.7 percent voting stake belongs to the Eugenia 
Trust, a vehicle established by SAP’s co-founder, Hans- 
Wemer Hector, but now controlled by UBS. Mr. Hector 
resigned from SAP's supervisory board in December. 

• Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. raised its hostile bid far 
Clyde Petroleum PLC, a British oil explorer, by about 14 

to £494.6 million ($797.2 million). Clyde rejected the 
which Gulf Canada said was its final offer. 

• AJmazy Rossii -Sakha, Russia’s monopoly diamond pro- 

ducer, said tire Industry Ministry was developing proposals for 
export quotas cm rough diamonds. Bloomberg. Reuters 


Poland’s ‘High -Growth’ Finance Minister Steps Down 


Bloomberg News 

WARSAW — Grzegorz Ko- 
lodko, tire man' who mapped out 
Poland’s high-growth strategy after 
tire collapse of communism, 
resigned as finance minister Tues- 
day after months of speculation that 


his frequent feuds with tire central 
bank and other government leaders 
would cost him his job. . 

Resident Aleksander Kwas- 
niewski named Ids economic ad- 
viser, Marek Belka, to succeed Mr. 
Kolodko, an appointment welcomed 


by investors who hope tire new min- 
ister will keep tire economy on track 
by continuing to place limits on gov- 
ernment spending. Polish stock and 
bond prices were little changed in 
response to the news. 

The lack of reaction reaffirmed 


that “politics isn’t the top issue in 
the market," said Dieter Benesch, 
an investment adviser for Julius 
Baer’s Central Europe Stock Fund. 
“It shows that people look mote at 
the fundamentals, and they don't 
expect any big changes." 


KLM Reports a Loss 

The Associated Press 

AMSTERDAM — KLM Royal Dutch Airlines NV on 
Tuesday blamed higher fuel costs for a third-quarter net 
loss of 7 million guilders ($3.8 million). 

KLM said it spent 83 milli on guilders more on fuel in 
tire third quarter than in the same period a year ago, when 
it recorded a net profit of 102 million guilders. 


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439 

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614 

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109 

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116 

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7.95 

606 

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244 

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90 

944 

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134 

131 

134 

133 


The Trib Index 


CtosBippridoSi 


Jan. 1 . 1932 - 100 . 

Level 

Change 

% change 

ywr to date 
% change 
+ 1^16 

World Index 

151 .B 6 

+ 0.16 

+ 0-11 

Region*! Indexes 

Asia/Paafic 

11046 

+ 0.08 

+ 0.07 

- 17.43 

Europe 

161.94 

-053 

- 0.20 

+1635 

N. America 

176.68 

+ 0.87 

+ 0.49 

+S 7.73 

S. America 

131.63 

+ 0-21 

+ 0.16 

+ 48.06 

MustrWtndaxeo 
Capital goods 

179.99 

■ 0.94 

- 0.52 

+ 35.45 

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168.49 

■ 0.15 

- 0.09 

+ 22.03 

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179.45 

+ 0-68 

+ 0 J 8 

+ 32^2 

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110-89 

+ 0.43 

+ 0-39 

- 1 Z 84 

MmceBanaous 

164.61 

+ 0.03 

+ 0.02 

+ 21.21 

Raw Materials 

177.97 

+ 1.47 

+063 

+ 25.51 

Service 

13861 

+ 0.42 

+OJ 0 

+ 15.68 

UtHNes 

142^1 

- 0.37 

- 0^6 

+ 12-32 


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** • 













































































... 


INTERNMTO?tAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 5, 1997 


Pohang Agrees to Run Hanbo 

Bankers Are Questioned as Bribery Allegations Widen 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


CwpiW hr Ow 

SEOUL Pohang Iron a Steel 
£5. one of South *£ 

profitable companies, took tempor- 

Ptifcmg, the world's second- 
targest steelmaker after Nippon 
Seed Corp., agreed to a government 
request to manage the bankruot 
Hanto Steel & General Constru^ 
tion Cq., whose collapse last month 
was South Korea’s biggest business 
failure tn a decade. 

Separately, the heads of two com- 

4 mercial banks and a fonner gov- 
ernment bank chief were summoned 
for questioning amid allegations of 
bribery. 

Shin Kwang Shik of Korea Fust 
Bank and Woo Chan Mok of Cho- 
hung Bank were questioned by pros- 
ecutors seeking to determine wheth- 
er they had taken bribes for making 
Joans to the bankrupt company. 


Also questioned in connection 
with what critics say is the largest 
wibes-for-loans scandal in South 
Korean history was Lee Hyung Koo, 
former chief of the state-run Korea 
Development Bank. Lee Cbul So o, 
fonner head of Korea First Bank, 
was arrested last week on charges of 
taking bribes from Hanbo. 

While a spokesman for Pahang, 
which is state-controlled, said the 
company would manage Hanbo rm ^r 
it was sold, the government may have ' 
a difficult time finding a buyer. Hanbo 
has close to $6 billion in debt, and it 
will need to spend an estimated $2 
billion to finish bctiJdmg a plant 

TomakeHahbo attractive to buyers, 
the government would have to lean on. 
creditor hanks to write off its bad debts, 
and that might spark voter resentment 
in a presidential ejection year. 

President Kim Young Sam would 
be “reluctant to be seen as wiping 
die slate clean for one of the big 


boys,” such as the Hyundai group of 
companies, said Hank Morris,, re- 
search director at Coryo Securities. 

Creditor banks and the govern- 
ment asked Pohang’s chairman, 
Kim Mahn Je, to overace Hanbo, 
which employs 22,000 people and 
has more than 600 suborn tractors. 

“For Hanbo, tins is as good it can 
get with no immediate candidate to 
buy it.” said Kim Kj Hwan of Dac- 
hau Investment Trust “Pohang is 
die only company qualified and ex- 
perienced enough to look after the 
bankrupt steel company.” 

It is an unlikely buyer, though, 
because foe two companies make 
their products in different ways, re- 
quiring different types of facilities. 
Pohang uses blast furnaces, and 
Hanbo uses electric furnaces. 
“Hanbo's facilities are useless for 
Pohang,’ ’ said Kim Kyung Hood of 
Daeyu Securities Co. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


Shanghai Financier 
Gets 17 Years in Jail 


By Seth Faison 

New font Times Service 

SHANGHAI — After two yeare 
of silence, Chinese authorities an- 
nounced that die chainnan of what 
was -once one of Shanghai’s lead- 
ing securities firms has been sen- 
tenced to 17 years in prison. 

Guan Jmsheng, the chainnan of 
Shang hai Inftyriatinnal Securi ties , 
is Warned for losing* more ihan$120 
million on paper in the overheated 
bond-fnmres market in one day of 
chaotic trading in February 1995. 
The firm then tried to manipulate 
die market by orchestrating a macs 
of sell orders at several firms. 

On Monday, the authorities an- 
nounced that Mr. Guan, once a 
pillar of Shanghai’s young secu- 
rities market, bad been found 
guilty of accepting of accepting 


$35,000 in bribes and misappro- 
priating $300,000 in public funds 
from 1992 to 1994. 

Remarkably, an official ac- 
count of court proceedings failed 
to even mention the bond scandal, 
though there is little doubt that 
Mr. Guan’s role in it was the prin- 
cipal reason be was apprehended 
and held for two years. 

Itis possible that because China 
still lacks a securities law, foe au- 
thorities did not have legal means 
to prosecute him for what they 
later called a blatant manipulation 
of the market But the mystery that 
remains around Mr. Guan — why 
it took two years to resolve his 
case, or where he has been held— - 
suggests that financial crimes in 
China will still be handled by stan- 
dard C omm unist Party methods 
that allow little transparency. 


TIME: Its Publications Are the Debt-Laden Company’s Bright Side Very briefly: 


Continued from Page 11 

oil and water. Mr. Logan, 52, the math- 
ematician, has an easygoing manner that 
u belies what by all accounts is a shrewd 
,T business sense. 

Mr. Pearlstine, 54, has earned a repu- 
tation as a New York mover and shaker, 
an expert editor and a savvy veteran of 
corporate intrigue. 

Mr. Logan came to Time Inc. as pres- 
ident and chief operating officer in 1992 
from Southern Progress, a successful 
publishing company in Birmingham, 
Alabama, that Time Inc. bought in 1 985. 
He was appointed chief executive in 
1994. Mr. Pearl stine joined Tune in 1995, 
after 23 years at The Wall Street Journal, 
including eight years as managing editor 
and one year as executive editor. 

With the magazine industry having 
become increasingly competitive and 
focused on profits, even Time Inc.’s 
rivals concede that the company's tac- 
^ ties are paying off. 

“Time me. is hot,” said Steven Florio, 
president and chief executive of Conde 
Nast Publications. “They’re laimrhing 
new magazines, and their mature titles 
have had an interesting step up over the 
past couple of years drat Don and Nor- 
man have been there.” 

People at Time Inc. in large part at- 
tribute the company’s newly straight- 
forward approach to Mr. Logan’s per- 
sonality. They describe him as a no- 
nonsense chief with an analytical mind. 

“There’s a calculus to publishing,’ ’ 
said Landon Jones Jr., the managing 
editor of People, who has spent 26 of the 
past 31 years at Time Inc., “and he 


understands that calculus very well” 

The emphasis on performance, in- 
siders say, is reinforced by Mr. Peari- 
stine, who is described as foe first editor 
in chief at Time Inc. to take an active 
interest in the financial as well as the 
editorial side of magazines. 

A1 though Mr.Hearistine’s primary re- 
sponsibility is editorial, Mr. Logan has 
also given him control over Time luc.’s 
international magazine operations as well ’ 
as foe new-media department — foe first 
time a Time Lac. editor in chief has had 
formal business duties. 

Some question this move as a dan- 
gerous blurring of the line between 
church and state. “Wiry are they turning 
over this business responsibility to 
him?” Mr. Florio of Coode Nast asked. 
“I dunk, if you’re an editorial voice, you 
should remain an editorial voice.” 

But many others at Time Inc. say Mr. 
Pearistine’s and Mr. Logan’s common 
interest in financial details has gone a 
long way toward alleviating me his- 
torically distant, often adversarial re- 
lationship between editors and publish- 
ers throughout the company. 

“1 think what a lot of people in this 
building now understand is that editors 
who communicate with their publishing 
counterparts here are in feet in a stronger 
position to influence outcomes than Ki- 
lters who wall themselves in,” said 
Hemy Muller, the editorial director of 
Time Inc. “The church that talks to foe 
state and works with the state is a 
stronger church.” 

Tune Inc. has pot increasing emphasis 
on trying to build on its principal brand 
names: developing products that in 


many cases have nothing to do with 
magazines is as effort to constantly ex- 
pand on the company’s core franchise 
without abandoning it 

people magazine recently made a deal 
to work on stories with foe network 
television show “Dateline NBC” and 
has spun off new titles such as In Style 
ftnH a Spamsb-language edition malted 
People en EspanoL 

Time started a popular youth-oriented 
version. Time for Kids, and last month 
joined with Time Warner’s CNN unit to 
produce a new weekly TV news show. Id 
D ecember, CNN and Sports Illustrated 
started a 24-hour sports news network. 

It is practically impossible to make a 
direct Irak between the recent success of 
Time Inc.’s titles and the company’s 
earnings. But many attribute Time Inc.’s 
five years of 13 percent compound an- 
nual growth to Mr. Logan’s strategy of 
extending the brand and solidifying the 
base — as well as his effort to raise cover 
prices, all of which has taken some of the 
unpredictability out of what is typically 
viewed as a cyclical business. 

If there is any universal frustration 
within Time Inc., it is that foe company's 
growth has not made any impact mi the 
overall health of Tune Warner. 

Tom Wolzien, a media analyst at San- 
ford C. Bernstein & Co- said foe success 
of Mr. Logan and Mr. Pearlstine was 
simply not enough to counter the legacy 
of debt from the original merger of Time 
Inc. and Warner Communications. 

“It almost doesn’t matter how well 
these guys are doing in their individual 
operations,” he said. “It’s really too 
bad.” 


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;■ Tokyo;:- 


• Tokyo property prices, which have been falling for more 
than five years, got a lift from an auction of a parcel of land in 
die center of the city. Four local companies and one Singa- 
pore-based concern bid 372.3 billion yen ($3.1 bffiion) for 53 
hectares (13 acres) in a former railway yard near foe Ginza 
shopping district 

• Premier (Ml of Britain abandoned its drilling sites off the 
coast of Cambodia, citing discouraging test results. En- 
terprise Oil capped its wells in the same, area in December. 

• Australian retail spending fell 1 percent in December, to 
10.13 billion dollars ($7.86 billion), compared with forecasts 
of an increase of about 0.3 percent. The decline raised the 
possibility of a negative growth rate for the final quarter of 
1996, which would be the first contraction in the country's 
economy since the second quarter of 1991. 

• Taiwan sold about 203 million shares, or a 2.8 percent stake, 
in China Steel Corp. to international investors for $186 
milli on as part of a plan to reduce its ownership of the island’s 
biggest steelmaker. 

• Japan’s personal -computer market will probably grow by 
less than one-third in the year ending March 31 , analysts said, 
after expanding by 70 percent last year. 


^ 687 . 28 .27 

We^gtbO : . i.377.94 --1.60 

Source: Tefekurs LUcmanonnl HeraM Tnhuoe 


• Goodman Fielder Ltd., foe largest publicly traded food 
producer in Australia, will merge five units of its poultty 
division, Steggles, into one operation in Sydney, resulting in 
some job losses in its administrative operations. 

• Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. asked for an 
increase in local phone rates of at least 31 percent, which 
would be its first increase in 13 years, to try to offset cuts in 
international rates proposed by U.S. regulators. 

• Technology Resources Industries Bhd., a Malaysian tele- 
communications concern, hopes to capture between 10 per- 
cent and 20 percent of the country's fixed-line subscriber base 
after 1999. 

• Petroliam Nasiona! Bbd.’s purchase this week of a stake in 
foe Dai Hung oil field in Vietnam from Broken HID Pty . gave 
it majority control of the field, raising the Malaysian com- 
pany’s ownership to 63.75 percent from 20 percenL 

• Japan's Finance Ministry vetoed a plan to bail out credit unions 
in Osaka. The government says no more public money will be 
used to deal with bad loans held by financial institutions 

• Hitachi Ltd, Mitsubishi Electric Corp. and Texas In- 

struments Inc. plan to develop a one-gigabit dynamic ran- 
dom-access memory microchip. AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg 


Fire Shuts Down Toyota Operations 




Gafde/ bj Ow Staff From Dapwda 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor Corp. said Tues- 
day it would keep all but one of its 18 Japanese 
plants closed Wednesday but hoped to return 
to normal production after foe weekend. 

A fire Saturday at Awn SeBri Co., a parts 
maker, forced Japan’s biggest automaker and 
its affiliates to stop production of vehicles at 
all but one plant Tuesday. Almost all its cars 
use brakes and clutches produced by Aisin. 

Without parts coming in as scheduled, 
Toyota’s “just in time” production system. 


designed to minimize inventory to maximize 
efficiency, could be crippled. Mie Aoyama, a 
spokeswoman for Toyota, said the company 
had no plans to revise that system but said it 
would study how to avoid concentrating its 
parts production. Work is to resume Wed- 
nesday on lines that make parts for overseas 
production and after-sales service. One line at 
the plant in Tahara is to reopen Thursday. 

An analyst said Toyota's earnings would be 
little affected if the company resumed pro- 
duction by next Wednesday. {Bloomberg, AP) 


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Sports 


PAGE 18 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 


5.mA 


World Roundup 


Jets Hire Belichick 


FOOTBALL The New York Jets 
said Tuesday that they would hire 
Bill Belichick as head coach for 
next season with Super Bowl coach 
Bill Parcel Is waiting in the wings to 
take over for the 1998 season. 

The Jets said Parcells. who is pro- 
hibited from coaching in the NFL 
next season unless the New England 
Patriots give their permission, had 
been hired as a consultant 

Belichick, a former head coach 
of the Cleveland Brawns, served as 
assistant head coach to Parcells last 
season with the Patriots, 3S-21 
losers to the Green Bay Packers in 
the Super Bowl. (AP) 

• Mike White, fired as coach of 
the Oakland Raiders, joined the St. 
Louis Rams as assistant head coach 
and tight ends coach. [AP) 


NFL Eyes L. A Super Bowl 


San Diego could lose the 1998 
Super Bowl, Paul Tagliabue, the 
NFL commissioner, said on a visit to 
San Diego. 

San Diego City Council has ap- 
proved a $78 -million expansion plan 
at Jack Murphy Stadium, but op- 
ponents have fried a lawsuit to stop 
construction until the public votes on 
the project in a May referendum. 

Tagliabue said Monday dial the 
NFL could move the game to Los 
Angeles. He said the NFL could 
sign contingency agreement by the 
end of the week with officials of the 
Rose Bowl in Pasadena. (LAT) 

• If work goes ahead at Jack 
Murphy Stadium, it would reduce 
the capacity to 40,000 dining the 
baseball season. The San Diego 
Padres said they would send a del- 
egation to Honolulu this week to 
check the logistics for moving a teg- 
ular-season series to 50,000-seat 
Aloha Stadium. Talks are centering 
cm moving a three-game series 
against the St. Louis Cardinals to 
Honolulu in ApriL (AP) 


Raptors Starting Stadium 


basketball The Toronto Rap- 
tors said they would start building an 
arena on Wednesday even though 
they had not been able to persuade 
the Maple Leafs hockey team to join 
them. 

The NBA team, which plays in 
the Sky Dome, had been wooing the 
NHL Maple Leafs as partner since 
November. The 20,000 seat arena 
will be called the Air Canada Centre 
and is expected to be completed by 
February 1999. AP, Bloomberg) 


Seven Enter Hail of Fame 


basketball Scoring ace Alex 
English was among seven people 
elected to the Basketball Hall of 
Fame. 

The others were Peter Carril, the 
former Princeton coach, and Don 
Haskins, the Texas-El Paso coach, 
power forward Bailey Howell, wo- 
men’s stars Denise Cunv and Joan 
Crawford, and Spanish coach Ant- 
onio Diaz-Miguel. 

In 1966. Haskins' five black 
starters beat Adolph Rupp's all- 
white Kentucky team to win the 
NCAA title. 

English scored 19.682 points in a 
15-year professional career, mostly 
with the Denver Nuggets, 

Diaz-Miguel. who coached 
Spain for 27 years, led his team to a 
silver medal at the 1984 Los 
Angeles Olympics. (AP) 


Baiui Escapes Trial 


skating A Connecticut judge 
Tuesday permitted Oksana Baiui, 
the Olympic skating champion, to 
enroll in an alcohol education pro- 
gram. effectively granting her re- 
quest to avoid prosecution on drunk 
driving charges. 

Baiui. 19. was also fined the 
maximum $90 plus costs on a sep- 
arate charge of driving too fast for 
conditions. The Ukrainian athlete 
pleaded no contest to the second 
charge and did not enter a plea on 
the first charge. 

Baiui, who lives in Simsbury. 
Connecticut. was originally 

charged with driving while intox- 
icated and reckless driving after she 
ran her Mercedes off a road and 
crashed on Jan. 12. (AP) 



English Play Politics 
With the World Cup : 


-it’K 1 ■ 




By Rob Hughes 

/nwMhnuf Herald Tnbune 


L ONDON — Not for the first time, 
the English are complaining that 
the Germans have laid out their 
rowels and taken the whole beach. 

Last summer, Germany eliminated 
England on penalties — again — at the 
European Championships. Even so. 
England staged an enthusiastic, safe and 
reportedly hugely profitable games, and 
so decided to bid for World Cup 2006. 

A general election looms, and there is 
scarcely a British politician who dares 
alienare tbe goodwill aroused by the 


teemen do. struck a deal: England for 
*96, Germany for 2006. and in between 
France for flic World Cup in 1998. * 

In January last year. FIFA president 
Joao Havelange “offered” 2006 to 
President Nelson Mandela and South' 


Africa. Braun flew to Johannesburg amL 
if FIFA desired a historic®- 




Ei* M a tt ag Agaa Fnax-FloK 

STEEP CHALLENGE — Fritz Strobl of Austria taking his first tr aining run on the World Championship 
downhill course at Sestriere, Italy. Strobl docked tbe fastest practice time. Luc Alphand of France was second. 


Austria to New Zealand, by Slalom 


By Christopher Clarey 

International Herald Tribune 


SESTRIERE, Italy — She has been 
an Austrian in New Zealand and a New 
Zealander in Austria. She has been pan: 
of a large, well-funded junior program 
and she has been on her own. carefully 
counting her schillings and blessings. 

But what Claudia Riegler has always 
been since she first strapped on boots in 
the mountains above Salzburg is a gifted 
slalom skier. 

On Wednesday night, when she 
weaves her way down the floodlit 
Kandahar course at the World Alpine 
Championships, she and Sweden’s con- 
siderably more experienced Pemilla 
Wiberg will be the two favorites. 

Wiberg, the compact blond with two 
Olympic gold medals in her Monte Carlo 
trophy case, is the definition of versatile 
and appears well on her way to winning 
her first overall World Cup title. Riegler, 
winner of three of the seven World Cup 
slalom races this season, is the specialist, 
which helps explain why a 20-year-old 
who grew up in the heart of Austrian ski 
country is representing New Zealand. 

She made her dec ision in the spring of 
1993 when the Austrian national 
coaches decided they were not ready to 
include her in their senior team because 
she was succeeding only in slalom. 

“We discussed her case for a long 
time at that meeting,’ ’ said Herwig Dem- 
schar, the U.S. women's coach, who was 
at die time head of the Austrian team. 

“But we had a system in Austria, 
which remains the same, and it is that we 
only look at athletes with at least two 
events. We want them educated in the 


right way. That was not the case with her, 
so we told her to wait another year." 
Riegler was not prepared to wait 
“I had nobody to support me in that 
meeting,’' she said. “I hadn't gone to 
ski school like so many of die other 
Austrian girls. I had gone to normal 
school because I wanted to have a more 
balanced life, and there was no one who 
was pushing for me even though I was 
the best for my age in slalom.’ 

A gifted hurdler, she debated quitting 
skiing and focusing on track. 

Ultimately, she chose to take advan- 
tage of her dual citizenship: her father, 
Erich, is Austrian; her mother, Alice, is a 
New Zealander. 

Riegler had made the long trip to 
Christchurch several times as a child. 


Money wasn't the only problem. In 
her first season competing for New Zea- 
land in 1993-94. she had no full-time 
coach and had to organize her own 
training and travel. But there was some 
support in tbe form of Annelise Cober- 
ger. New Zealand's first and only skiing 
star until Riegler came along. The 
granddaughter of German immigrants, 
Coberger became the first skier from the 
southern hemisphere to win an Olympic 


medal by taking silver in the slalom in 
1992 in Albertville, finance. 


She spoke English with only the slight- 
est of Germanic accents. The problem 


was that the New Zealand ski federation 
had no money to support her. 

Initially, it would be up to her parents 
to pay the bills for her travel and train- 
ing: bills that would amount to approx- 
imately $50,000 annually. 

“They weren’t so happy when I came 
up with the idea; they thought it was 
pretty dumb actually, but I convinced 
them and promised I would finish 
school,” Riegler said Tuesday, as she 
gazed up at the Italian Alps from the 
deck of her hotel in Sestriere. 

* ‘I always felt guilty or something if I 
traveled a long way just for one race and 
crashed because I thought, ‘Wow, this 
costs so much money.’ 

“But my parents always told me not 
to worry because if they couldn't afford 
it, they wouldn't do it. Not that they're 
millionaires or anything.” 


When the 16-year-old Riegler flew to 
New Zealand to train in July 1993. 
Coberger trained with her and continued 
to do so until she retired in 1995. 

Riegler did have one more oppor- 
tunity to become an Austrian skier. Dur- 
ing the 1994-95 season, her first com- 
plete season on the World Cup, die 
Austrian coaches approached her after 
she had finished in the top 15 three 


times. But by then she had a coach, Sepp 
Weissenbach er. who had first worked 


with her at age 8, and a newly acquired 
taste for independence. 

“I knew from my friends on the Aus- 
trian team that you always have to do 
what you're told and that a lot of times 
you can’t say what you want otherwise 
you get in trouble,” she said. “It was 
tempting in a way after that first year 
because I didn’t get any funding from 
New Zealand, and it might have been 
easier. 

“But then I thought, Nah, I don't 
want it easy because it's boring." 

Now she has an excellent chance of 
doing something that has been accom- 
plished by plenty of Austrians but never 
by a New Zealander win a world title. 


jingoism of Euro 96. Even though can- 
. dictates for the 2006 World Cup need not 
declare themselves for another couple 
of years. FIFA committee men were 
invited to dine at No. 10 Downing Street 
next Wednesday with defending Prime 
Minister John Major. 

This triggered a response from 
UEFA, the European soccer federation, 
which has members on the invited list 
but had no prior notification of Eng- 
land's bid Gerhard Aigner, UEFA's 
general secretary, faxed England's 
Football Association pointing out that 
UEFA had agreed to support only one 
candidate for 2006, and was committed 
to Germany which began canvassing 
almost four years ago. 

Outrage. England would not be 
passed over for Germany. The rhetoric 
of its soccer administration, claiming 
that UEFA and Germany had done the 
deal behind closed doors and were 
blaggards of the worst kind transmitted 
itself to Parliament. 

Tony Blair, the Labour leader, de- 
nounced this “cozy stitch up.” Jack 
Cunningham, Labour’s shadow National 
Heritage Secretary, said England 
wouldn ’t stand for this attempt “to hijack 
European support for Germany.'* 

John Minor said England, and Eng- 
land alone, had the combination of her- 
itage, modem stadiums and organiza- 
tion to stage this World Cup. 

Amid the deafening din of Parlia- 
mentary umbrage erne voice needed 
coaxing into the public arena. Not until 
Monday did Sir Bert Millichip, the 
former head of England's FA. say he 
Anew that UEFA had been committed to 
the German 2006 bid. 

Sir Bert, who retired as FA chairman at 
82 last summer, was at UEFA meetings 
where the German bond was forged. He 
had blessed the decision on at least three 
occasions. He had his reasons. 

Millichip wanted, as a swan song, to 
bring soccer home to England, to restore 
international faith in the game's mother 
country alter the deadly hooligan years. 
He achieved this in collaboration with 
Lennart Johansson, his Swedish friend 


agreed that il 
World Cup in Africa. Germany would 
hold back until 20 10. 

Some of us reported these machin- 
ations. FIFA committeemen from all 
continents ruminated on them over 
cocktaiLs. This was not cheating. In the 
way the world works, pledges and puct^ 
and friendships were being worked 
Once Millichip retired. England had 
nobody on the influential committees of 
FIFA and UEFA — committees often 
carrying the same members. Germans 
are everywhere, giving time, input and 
ideas, contributing to the world game' 
From Beni Vogts, the national coach, 
on the technical committee to Horst 
Schmidt, an expert in stadium assess- 
ment, Germany talks and listens. ‘ 
Since Sir Stanley Rous was ousted aif • 
FIFA president. England has had. apart 
from Millichip. a mute and remote voice. 

It has not yet dawned that, just as Sir 
Stanley was nicely placed to assist Eng-' 
land as the 1966 World Cup host, so the 
Germans are where it counts as the cen- 
tury ends. 


R 


W HEN UEFA's 49 member 
countries decided unanimous^ 
ly last year that only one na- 
tion pier continent should be put forward 
as World Cup host, the German bro-' 
chure was already on the table. It was 
public knowledge, except, apparently, 
to the FA. 

Millichip endorsed, or at least did no{ 
oppose, this. It was the policy formu- 


lated by Johansson to avoid a repeat of# 

if 


who is UEFA president, who persuaded 
rs that Euno 96 had a safe an 


others that Euro 96 had a safe and re- 
warding place in England's cities. 

Their ally, the head of the 1996 Or- 
ganizing Committee, was Egidius 
Braun, a German who, as all commit- 


the ruinous contest between Japan and J 
South Korea. 

UEFA admits that it was remiss in not 
putting down in writing the consensus 
accepted some time ago that Germany 
would be its 2006 candidate. Johansson, 
an appeaser rather than a confronta- 
tionaiist. has offered to send two emis- 
saries — Norway’s Per Ravn Omdal and 
Turkey's Senes Erzik. to London this 
Friday to attempt to soothe the FA. 

The English, who have received polit- 
ical support from FIFA, are marching on. 
Given the power struggle between FIFA 
and UEFA, the German-English rivalry 
could continue until 1998. ; 

That Is when UEFA’s idea of one 
nominee from each one continent will be 
put to a FIFA congress. It is when Jo- 
hansson ’s own bid to replace Havelange 
as FIFA president will be won or lost. 

With an ounce of luck or common 
sense, politicians will then take a back k 
seat, aiul this spat between old sporting ™ 
rivals can be laid in cold storage until 
votes are invited for real in 2000? 

Then, tbe 2006 World Cup will go to 
Europe. Latin America or Africa after alt 
Unless we have broken it up with bick- 
ering and short-term political games. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London 


aim' Da v iur.li* 




‘»i 1 1 . . • . . 


Lucrative Rematch for Tyson and Holyfield 


By Richard Sandorair 

Nr*' ftmt Times Service 


NEW YORK — The van- 
quished champion vowed a knock- 
out. The new champion vowed to 
perform better. And the promoter 
was on a hyperbole high, citing 
Shakespeare. Faulkner. Eins tein, 
the Kennedys, Snoop Doggy Dogg 
and God in meandering soliloquies 
designed to push the Mike Tyson- 
Evander Holyfield rematch on 
May 3 in Las Vegas as the greatest 
athletic endeavor since, presum- 
ably, the first velociraptor races. 

Holyfield stunned boxing Nov. 9 
by stopping Tyson to capture the 
World Boxing Association heavy- 
weight title. Holyfield dominated 
Tyson for most of the fight, band- 
ing him his second defeat of his 
career. 

Not a word of strategy spilled 
from Tyson's lips at a Manhattan 
news conference Monday, not a hint 
of .how Richie Giachetti, his new 
trainer, will ready him. He focused 
on a terse message: I did badly last 


time; I will win this time. 

What did he plan differently? 
“I’ll knock the man out,” be said. 

Then: “You’ll watch me. I’m 
sure you’ll be interested in the out- 
come. No. I can’t give you any 
insight.” 

And: “I believe I’ll do very 
well." 

Asked whether bis reputation 
depends on winning the rematch, 
he said: “You tell me. I'm going to 
make $100 million or $160 million 
this year. You tell me.” 

Tyson became emotional when 
discussing the apparent contradic- 
tion between his Muslim faith and 
the sponsorship of die fight by St. 
Ides, a malt liquor brewer. 

“I don’t drink liquor, and I don’t 
sponsor liquor,” be said. “I don’t 
go on radio stations rapping about 
it. I don't believe in it” 

Holyfield revealed just as little 
of his plans. He described his love 
of boxing, how he has respected 
Tyson since they were amateurs in 
the early 1980s and often circled 
back to his faith in God. 


“X don’t look for the same Mike 
Tyson, and he shouldn't look for 
the same Evander Holyfield of 
Nov. 9,” he said. “I know I have to 
be better." 

“Thepoint is I know what I’m 
doing. That’s the reason I'm good 
at it I’m always in shape. I love 
boxing. I love the technique.” 


The fighters’ camp displayed 
cor that preceded 


none of the rancor 
their first bout, especially the bile 
directed at Holyfield by Tyson's 
handlers. Except for Tyson, every- 
one smiled at least once as King, in 
the full flower of his ebullience, 
orchestrated a boxing love-in, with 
amorous paeans to money. And 
what money: a reported $35 mil- 
lion to Holyfield, and $20 mfllioo 
to Tyson. 

"This is the type of atmosphere 
a Tyson-Holyfield fight is sup- 
posed to bring!” King said. 

King rambled about ‘ ‘Macbeth” 
and William Faulkner to describe 
the genesis of “The Sound and the 
Fury,” his title for the rematch. 

The mighty sound of Holyfield's 


upset, he said, “was reverberating 
— it was the sound that shocked the 
world — from that sound created 
an intensity, an ambition that is all 
too powerful, and you can feel the 
power of the fury that will happen 
on May 3.” 

Now, he said, “We will ask, is it 
a fluke or double jeopardy?” 

And: * ‘We’re going to make this 
‘Macbeth' in addition to!” In ad- 
dition to what, be did not say. 

King, the mastermind behind 
Tyson’s post-incarceration for- 
tune, took mock offense at the no- 
tion that Holyfield, or anyone for 
that matter, should retire because 
he or she had made more money 
than can be spent. 

No one asked the Kennedys to 

S uit making money, he said. 

preading the word of God may be 
Holyfield’s motivation to continue 
boxing, but money is King’s reason 
for promoting. 

“Don’t ask me why I should quit 
because I have plenty of money,” 
he said “Ask me how I can get 
more money with less effort” 



Adjm NuHTIv VMa-iu.-d IVi-*- 

A guarded Mike Tyson pondering Holyfield rematch. 


Scoreboard 


v. 

\ 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standi nos 


ATLANTIC HVniQN 



w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Miami 

34 

12 

.739 



New Vart 

32 

14 

A96 

2 

Orlando 

22 

20 

-534 

10 

WosMngton 

22 

24 

A78 

12 

New Jersey 

12 

32 

-273 

21 

Boston 

IT 

33 

-250 

22 

PhOoddpNa 

11 

34 

.244 

22Vi 


CSNTRAL DmOON 



Chicago 

41 

5 

A91 

— 

Detroit 

33 

12 

-733 

77i 

Atlanta 

30 

14 

.682 

10 

Choriotte 

27 

19 

-587 

14 

Cleveland 

34 

21 

533 

16W 

Indiana 

23 

22 

500 

IB 

Milwaukee 

31 

34 

jsa 

19*4 

Toronto 16 

29 

556 

id 

24Vt 

maWESTDMSKM 




W 

L 

Pet 

SB 

Houston 

31 

\4 

,696 

— 

Utah 

32 

14 

jm 

— 

Minnesota 

22 

24 

JIB 

10 

Dallas 

IS 

28 

549 

15V> 

Denver 

15 

32 

J19 

17* 

San Antonio 

11 

32 

556 

19'A 

Vancouver 

9 

40 

.184 

24'A 


ananciHvnHSN 



LA La bets 

34 

12 

.719 

— 

seoflte 

32 

14 

596 

2 


portend 25 22 JS33 9M 

Saonimrito 21 36 M7 13 'a 

LA. Clippers is 35 .419 u , n 

GaMan Stole 17 28 .378 !£», 

noedbi 16 31 .340 1814 

MOHMTIIUHTI 
Boston 32 21 33 28 — 114 

nmnlO 26 28 27 21—162 

B: E-WHUoro 1 1-1 7 S-9 27, Day 6-16 10-11 
3& T: Staudamlre 9-20 5-6 26. Janes B-lo 2-2 
18. Rebounds— Boston 51 (Walker 13), 
Toronto 43 (Jones 11). Asststfr-Baston 24 
(Wesley 11), Toronto 25 (Slowkimlre 101. 

SuCMOllHIlQ 34 IS 26 IB— BS 

Son Antonia 22 27 11 19— 79 

& Richmond 7-199-926. Grayer 6-9 1-1 16; 
SJL: Maxwell 5-14 4-4 1& WlidilS 5-143-4 13. 
Rebo i de S acramento S3 (Potynlce 17). 
Smt Antonio 47 (Anderson 7). 
***»*— Sacramento 22 (smith, Edney. 
Richmond 41. Sm Antonia 24 (Johnson toi. 
WasMagm* 14 n 26 si— » 

Utah 32 30 30 19—m 

W: M meson 7-10 4-7 ia Strickland 5-121- 
2 1 1, Murray 4-9 2-2 1 1,- U; Malone 7-1 0 1 0- 14 
IK 5. Howard 7-10 2-4 1&, 

Weshkigton 44 IMureson 9), 
UWi 52 IMakne 10). AssUh-Washtoaton 
22 (SMdtkutd 7Ji Utah 38 (EUey 9). 


Place *aie Om*toh am paint far • 2SA- 
ploca vote. mid teat wank** ronUng: 


HOCKEY 


1. Kamos C7DJ 

2. Wake Forest (1) 

3. Kentucky 

4. Minnesota 

5. unh 

6. torn Si. 

7. Maryland 
A Duke 

9. New Mexico 

10. demon 

11. Louisville 

12. Ondrmotl 
IX Michigan 

14. Arizona 

1 5. Colorado 
ILVBonova 
17. Xavier, ONo 
IB. Stanford 

19. South CareB na 
2(L North Carolina 
21.Tukme 
27. Tuba 

23. Texas Tech 

24. India no 
25-tovw 


The AP Top 25 


Racard 

Pts 

PlV 

22-0 

1,774 

1 

18-1 

1,697 

2 

20-3 

1534 

3 

IP-2 

1565 

6 

15-3 

1512 

4 

15-3 

1565 

11 

17-4 

1536 

5 

17-5 

1,102 

12 

16-3 

1,1 BO 

13 

17-4 

1.151 

7 

18-3 

1,142 

9 

15-4 

1.136 

B 

15-5 

914 

16 

13-5 

827 

ID 

16-4 

73S 

IB 

155 

6B5 

14 

155 

620 

20 

13-4 

556 

15 

15-5 

448 

25 

135 

323 

19 

16-5 

317 

— 

17-5 

306 

31 

135 

211 

22 

17-6 

132 

17 

15-5 

130 

— 

voles: Marquette 

89, 

dance 71 

HBnois 

69, 


NHL Standings 


ATLANTIC DMSKW 


Anahatoi 

20 25 

6 

46 

Calgary 

19 27 

6 

44 

Lbs Angela 

19 28 

A 

44 

San Jose 

19 27 

5 

43 

MCOTBJtVS MSBU* 

Vanoamr 



1 

Ottawa 



3 


46 146 155 
44 131 154 
44 144 1B3 


PNtodeipNa 
Florida 
N.Y. Rangers 
New Jersey 
Washington 
Tartpo Bay 
M.Y. Bandore 


W L T 

29 15 7 
26 15 11 
26 21 7 
24 17 B 
21 25 6 
IB 25 6 
16 26 9 


PIS CP 


CA 
65 151 125 
63 149 120 
59 1B4 150 
56 129 123 
48 136 141 
42 137 156 
41 137 149 


north bast anmoN 

W L T Pis CF CA 


TlMiep2St— g InHia A e a o d nmi Piw 


in pi 


rds through Fob. 


2. total point* breed an 2S points tar ■ (bra*. 


Temple 2X Boston College 21, New (Meats 
ULFKrttn St. K l*neis St. 12, Virginia 11. 
™*Crtqn9, E. Mjehigai 7. HawaS 6, Georgia 
L Wjorie Wand 5. Miami 4. Teres 4. 

3- Colorodo st i, 

Ond Roberts 1. 


Pittsburgh 

2B IB 

5 

63 

IBS 

155 

Buffalo 

27 19 

6 

60 

149 

135 

Montreal 

19 25 10 

48 

16B 

189 

Hartford 

20 23 

7 

47 

146 

143 

Boston 

20 25 

6 

46 

147 

175 

Ottawa 

17 23 10 

44 

138 

A 

148 

m 

eomtALDNIEKM 




W L 

T 

Pts 

CF 

GA 

Dallas 

29 19 

4 

63 

157 

127 

Detroit 

24 17 

9 

SI 

1S2 

115 

5L Louis 

25 24 

4 

54 

160 

155 

Phoenix 

22 25 

4 

40 

140 

161 

Odaigo 

20 25 

8 

48 

137 

143 

Toronto 

19 33 

1 

» 

1S3 

185 


PACtnc cbvwoh 




W L 

T 

Pis 

OF 

CA 

Cotoroda 

32 13 

B 

72 

182 

124 

Edmonton 

25 22 

5 

55 

144 

151 

Vancouver 

24 25 

2 

50 

141 

170 


1 2—4 
3 2 1-6 
Rrsf Period: V-Bw* 22 (Joseph) 2,0-, Von 
Allen 5 (Cunneywortto X O-Ytattn 24 
(Lmikkanen, Duchesne) *. O-VW Allen 6 
(OmtieyiMrih ZhohoJO Second Periods O- 
Duchesne a (Vpshln) 6, O-. Dockefl 8 
(Yashin. LatHdunen) (pp). 7, V-HetSoon 2 
(RWtey, Mogflny) (pp). TIUrfl Period: V- 
Roberts B CRkSay) 9, V-RUey 15 (Mogany. 
Roberts) 1 (VO- Daigle 21 (Lambed) Shots IS 
gooL- V- 7-7-7—21. O- 17-NW— 36. GaaBes: 
V-Hirech, McLean. O- Rhodes. 

Florida 1 • 1 B-2 

Montreal 2 1 O »-2 

First Period: M-Rudnsky 16 (ReodN. 
Datnpnausae) (pp)- a F-MoBonby 21 
(Nkdetmayeb Gustabsan) fipp). Second 
Period: M-Malakhov 4 (Rudnsfcy, 

Damphousse} (mil- Period: F- 

Gaipentov B (Gustafsson. Ntodamayeri 
Ov erfl ow - Hand. Shots in gm± F- 10-11-17- 
3— fl. M-9-7-7-1^ — M.C«*0E F-HfcpaWcfc. 
M- Theodore. 

I m Annum 0 3 0-3 

Cdgary 0 1 i-a 

Past Period: None. Sectad Period! LA- 
PerreaoOll, Wtf.X LiO Angeles, OR*!* 15 
(Smyth, Boodter) [ppLX L-A.-.Nun ntnen 13 
(Nereham OkzyW tppL < COft ^m X 
Third Period: C-Ffeury 22 (SBBnmGatneri 
Shots aa goal: LA- 7-W-l* C- 12-10- 


19— a. Goalies: UL-Fteet. C-KHd. 

CMoago 2 T 1— 4 

San Joso 1 1 S — 2 

First Period: SJ.-Granoto 15 (Kazkiv, 

N (chaos) (pp). 2, C-EL5utter3 (Carney) X C- 
Oatden 11 (Amante WMnrich) Second 

Period: C-P robot 6 (WBtnridv Sykom) 5, 
SJ^Wood l.Ttort Period: C-Daze 10 (Miner. 
Wetnricft) Sbebt oagecfc C-U-1S-9— 3B.SJ.- 
18-10-12— «L G oodes: C-Tenefl. SJ.- 
Hrudey. 


Xla .Hoping, China daf , Dmitry Tomashevtav 
Uzbekistan, 6-1 7-5 (7-3) 6-1 
Oleg OgaredM. Uzbeussan emt Pan Bing, 
CMM64647-5. 


TRANSITIONS 


SHU M umsTonwieH 

Extremadura 4 Hercules 0 
wndne.1 1-Reaf Madrid 52. 
2Aaree!ona 47, IRed Betts 42, LReal 5a- 
dedod 4a 5AaporHw Coruna 39, 6ABeflca 
Madrid 36, T-lAdadalld 31 BAINeflc Bilbao 
32, 9Jtadng Santander 31, 1 a Tenerife aa 
ll.VUmda 29, 12J>rMo 27, 13J potting Gl- 
|aa 2i i4Xetta Vigo 2S> iSCompostefo 24, 
i6Jtayo voflecano 21 l7£sponyel 23. 
1Blflgianes21,19Jleicules19.2ILSav0lal& 
21 Zaragoza 1L22J=xtiem«fcjnJl6. 


MAJOR LEAOUE BASKS AU. 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Boston— R eleased 2B Roberto Mejia. 
NATIONAL league 

Atlanta— A greed to terms wtftiRHPMB* 
n ie le d d on 1 -rear contract. 

■ HOUSTON- Ay— d r> 


Mm LHP MPa 


TENNIS 


Davis Cup 


MUfOeEANUSOKE, GROUP 1 
CHMA m IOBRXSTMI 
TUESDAY, HBE1JMG 
CMm 1, Uzbekistan 1 


"EW YOBK-Agroed to terms vrilh LHP 

James Baron and OF Jay 
Payton an 1-year contracts. 

MOirntEAL— Agreed to terms with OF Hen- 
ry Rocfetguex m 1 -War contract 
5T. Louis— Invited P Braden Looser, P 
to* AnxtXJ, p Mott Morris. P Tom McGrow. 
M= Stew senaone, 1 From News. OF Mlcsh 

MWiuu 

HAllOllAL BA9KSTBAU. ABSOC1ATMN 
^^iw-SlOnee C Brett Srebo torremrtn- 

J^^FR^ SlatBr(or||> . 
^WMWjlgnid^F Stephen Howard fcr re. 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
cmaNNAn -Named Mark Duffrw 

Hnebockersceach and signed Nm to hvo-yeor 

contract. 

Dallas— F kad Mike WWdk arena* and 
cofttffllortfng coacti. 

■iiY. giants— N amed Rod Ootutumrcr qgar- 
terbocks coach, MW Jackson wide receivers 
coach and Dk* Rehbetn tights, ends coach. 

Miami— T erminated the contracts ot DB 
J-8. Brown ond LB Chris Singleton 
NEW ENOU HO— Named PctoCairoll coach 
and signed him to 5-year contract. 

OAKLAND —Named Joe Bugei coach. 

SAN P nan asco— Waived RB Derter Conor, 
SDedrlck Dodge and RB Derek LovMe. 


r 


V 


V V 


\ •• 


NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
nhl— S uspended Dallas F Todd Harvey 
and Washington F Potof Bondra. effective 
Sunday pencflng a hearing, Harvey (ora fla- 
grant elbow against Matthew Bamofly of 
Buffalo In Fridays game ond Bondra tor a 
kneeing inddent against Ray Sheppard of 
Pwlda in Saturdays game. 


USTA— Announced MollVal Washington 
wtn rapnee Andre Agassi on Davis Cup team 
tot Ws weekends flea-round match a! 
Brazil. 

COIUM 

Cohtal— N oraed Jan Collins taetban 
ooocn, 

MtCNiMN-Suspended G Brandun Hugh- 
ns !TOm Saturdays gtahe far brooking un- 
spectfled team rate. 







r 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 5, 1997 


" 'i-i 


sr oim 




■ fi - L, 


Explaining Rodman: 
Black P sychic Pain 




( , New York Times Service 

? REEN BAY won the 
I f Super Bowl because a 
VJ naturally endowed 
black runner made the dif- 
ference in a baule of brain- 
power between two brilliant 
white-coaches and their de- 
termined white quarterbacks. 

; Whether or not you buy 




Vantage Point / Robert Lipsytk 




graphy of the Bell Curvere 
who subscribe to the 19th 
century “Law of Compensa- 
tion which postulates an in- 
verse relationship between 
mind and muscle.” 

The athletically superior 


use of the discredited theories 
of skin, skull, tendon and 
glandular differences. 

African-Americans diem- 
selves have been accomplices 
in senti mental i?ing black ' 




letes: How Sport has Dam- 
aged Black America and Pre- 
served the Myth of Rac*” 
(Houghton Mifflin). It's pro- 
vocative, disturbing and rel- 
evant after a month that fea- 
tured Desmond Howard, Oj. 
Simpson, Dennis Rodman 
and Oksana Baiul. 

“White spectators might 
see Dennis Rodman as the 
latest black clown act,” 
Hoberman writes. “But how 
many African -Americans 

look past his antics and find 
themselves engaged In the 
spectacle of his loneliness 
and psychic pain?” 

Ai Actually, there are black 
'critics who see Rodman in the 
tradition of the class cut-up 
and those who see him as an 
example of creative resis- 
tance to white oppression. 
Hoberman says Rodman’s 
decorated body markets 
“black self-hatred.” 

Hoberman *s central thesis. 


Hoberman disposes of the 
“why” of Mack pre-emin- 
ence early in the book. “Die 
sports fixation is a direct re- 
sult of the exclusion of blacks 
from every cognitive elite of 
the past century and the re- 
sulting starvation for ‘race 
heroes.’ ” 


through slavery and discrim- 
ination. 

Hoberman is a professor of 
Germanic languages at the 
University of Texas at Austin 
and brings a fascinating in- 
ternational view. 


Jjam 

ft- 1 






si ve promotion of black sports 
heroes has been at the expense 


questions that “Darwin’s Ath- 
letes’ 'poses are those thatcon- 
cero the rote of a black in- 
telfigemaa that tends to 




water*** 


mb* ft 


of real black heroes — he cites romanticize black af friptog 
the Tuskegee Negro Air Hoberman cites Spike Lee’s 
Corps and the pilots and as- “exhzbitionistic fandom," 
tronauts who followed. which he has nadaved fain bie 


R ACIAL issues are rout- 
inely dodged in sports, 
unless a non threaten- 
ing, highly commercial super- 
star emerges: Michael Jordan, 
Tiger Woods. In two months, 
we will endure the re-beati- 
fication of Jackie Robinson. 

As Hoberman points out. 
Robinson is a true American 
hero, one of the few in sports, 
but his breaking the major 


“exhzbitionistic fandom,” 
which he has pariayed into big 
advertising bucks. 

He quotes Professor Mi- 
chael Enc Dyson on Jordan — 
“die supreme symbol of black 
creativity” — as an example 
of the dangerous implication 
that the body, not the mind, is 
the center of black culture. 

Of course, none of this 
would matter if all black ath- 
letes were like Giant Hill, that 
product of an athletic Huxiable 
family — which may only 


S3 


vr *** ; : - 


Vw i,r 






Sgl g DOCKS- Shaun Bcsl/Rruim 

quotes Professor Mi- Tire Panthers’ goalie, John V an biesbro uck, leaping over a sliding Martin Rucinsky of the Canadiens in Montreal, 
arc Dyson on Jordan — 
iprerne symbol of black 

SSSS5 In Canada 9 It 9 s No Holiday on Ice 

iter of black culture. ^ 


By Howard Schneider 

Wasfungion Post Service 

SUDBURY, Ontario — At 17. Dave 


that the black domination of league color barrier 50 years prove that these are problems MacDonald turned down hockey scbol- 


mainstream U.S. sports is both 
a product of racism and a 
subtle support system for con- 
tinuing inequality, is not new. 

But Hoberman may be the 
first to expose the turgid his- 
tory, both in America and 
Europe, of the “tabloid sci- 
•j tnce” of racial biology as it 
Supplies to athletics. While be 
is not without his grace notes 


ago has become an unjusti- 
fied feel-good story, espe- 
cially without any real ana- 


of class as much as race. 

After all, how many white 
coaches, the brilliant kind 


arship offers from a handful of American 
colleges and moved hundreds of miles 


Hockey Association, the umbrella group 
for hockey in Canada. But the drive to 
make it to the most competitive level is so 
strong that the association and its af- 
filiated leagues are forever embroiled in 
disputes over who can play where, and 
for what teams, and in efforts to keep 


(“every night is amateur plexity of attitudes, black and 
night at the Evolutionary white, toward racial biology. 


lysis of its cost to black who keep all that natur al 
institutions. Why weren’t black power in line, will ex- 
black coaches, owners and plain that when athletes go 
accountants brought up to the wrong it is usually because Canadian boys everywhere, 
majors with him? theirpoor, dysfunctional faxn- ” ~ " 

The book's heaviest going ilies did not prepare them for 
is also the most rewarding, as sudden wealth and fame. 

Hoberman explores the com- Which brings us to Baiul, 


coaches, the brilliant kind from home to board with strangers. He players as close to their local rinks as 
who keep all that natural did it to play goalie for the Sudbury possible. Some parents rent apartments 
black power in line, will ex- Wolves arid take a shot at reaching the or use addresses in other towns or regions 
plain that when athletes go National Hockey League — the dream of to allow their child to play on a favored 


Cafe”), this is serious read- 
ing. It’s also a valuable de- 
fense against the porao- 


from the integrationists’ fear 
of where scientific investiga- 
tions might lead to the racist 


theirpoor, dysfunctional fam- 
ilies did not prepare them for 
sudden wealth and fame. 

Which brings us to Baiul. 
the week’s quintessential 
ghetto athlete: bad attitude, 
out of control, a drunken 
driver who only happens to be 
a short white girl. 


ream, Costello said, or even allow friends 


Now, at 20, MacDonald finds himself or relatives partial custody, 
in this frigid northern Ontario town, pa- ‘ ‘The dream of being an NHL player is 

ring in front of a goal at the hockey rmk probably the dominant dream of every 
for the rival Guelph Storm. In his last male in Canada." Costello said. “It cre- 
year of eligibility for Canadian junior atesalcrtofambitiontodo well.Therecan 
hockey, the Ontario native knows he be sane rough and bad experiences.” 


A Career Day for Jazz Reserve 


The Associated Pms The Jazz outscored the Bullets 10-0 in the 

Stephen Howard, a reserve forward, started last 3:28 of the opening quarter. Midway 
the last day of his second 1 0-day contract with through the second quarter, the Jazz led by 28, 
Utah by signing for the rest of the season arid and Washington did not threaten thereafter, 
then scored a career-high 16 points to help the kma»aa,*iw« T9 Another player on a 10- 


H g s * Utah by signing for the rest of the season 2 
*1' i IH 1 * then scored a career-high 16 prints to help i 
5 • I II- jazz bury the Washington Bullets 111-89, 


probably won’t make the pros and is 
stumped about what to do next 
Canada considers hockey its game, 
and a highly regimented system that 
winnows the best players from the 
rabble, beginning before puberty, has 
grown over the years to keep it that way. 
With increasing frequency, however, 
questions are being raised about whether 
that system has changed hockey from a 
healthy national pastime into an op- 
pressive, and perhaps counterproduct- 
ive. adolescent career choice. Largely 
divorced from neighborhood ca- 


Kennedy ’s case was certainly the ex- 
treme. Shortly after his coach, Graham 


Questions are being raised 
about whether Canada’s 
tough system has made 
hockey an oppressive 
adolescent career choice. 


day contract, Jeff Grayer, scried 6 of his 16 maraderie or high school spirit, it is an 


. "I think. I bring somethmg positi ve to this prints in a 20-0 run that saw Sacramento erase 
team, and it just shows that it has been ap- an 11-point deficit en route to an 85-79 victory 
predated by the front office as well as the over San Antonio. 

— The Kings’ Mitch Richmond scored 26 

t. NBA Rouhdbp . points, and Tyus Edney sealed the win in San 


divorced from neighborhood ca- James, was sentenced to prison onsexu- 
maraderie or high school spirit, it is an al assault charges involving Kennedy 
intense world of competitive tryouts, and another young player, Kennedy 


ambitious parents and 16-year-olds with 
professional agents. 

The revelation by NHL player Shel- 
don Kennedy that he had suffered re- 


made public five story of how he had 


aged 1 6 to 20 at the top, a step away from 
the professional draft. Beneath is a pro- 
fusion of clubs and leagues that begins to 
gather the best players by age 1 0 onto the 
most competiti ve squads. 

By 12, the elbows start to fly. At 14, 
the checking becomes aggressive, and 
waiver rules can bind players to par- 
ticular teams. By 16, die fighting has 
become tactical: The major junior teams 
routinely will carry a tough guy ready to 
brawl on the team’s behalf. 

Only die most promising make it that 
far, and those who do, like MacDonald, 
recognize that they are no longer playing 
a game but choosing a vocation. It is a 
calling that requires them to leave home 
in the middle of high school, usually at 
16or 17. live with “billet” families paid 
by the team to house and feed them, and 
devote their time to hockey. In the 
Ontario league, they get $40 per week 
spending money. 

Since 1969, the top junior league 
teams have produced 54 percent of the 
players drafted by the NHL. That allure 
is strong enough to entice Canadian 
youths to trade neighborhood friend- 
ships and the routines of high school life 
for endless hours of practice and bus 
rides across the Canadian landscape. 

* ‘Nobody tells you about the highway 
to the top of the hockey plateau that is 
littered with young people whose careers 
have been bashed,” said John Gardner, 


been sexually assaulted hundreds of president of the Metro Toronto Hockey 


Antonio with two free throws with 24 seconds pealed sex abuse in his teens at the hands 


players.” said Howard, who had been cut twice left. The Spurs closed to 71-66 in the fourth 
by the Jazz in the last four years. ‘ ‘Tonight, we period before Grayer hit a 3-poiruer and Ed- 
were fortunate that we caught a team co a long ney added two free throws. 

a -» u«« U iA.n nuwt d 


of his coach focused attention on one 


times, beginning at age 14. 

Since then, reports surfaced that the 
former head of the Western Hockey 
League — one of the other top teenage 


road trip that was kind of tired.” Vernon Maxwell paced the: 

Karl Malone played only 27 minutes bur led their fourth straight, with 15 p 
the Jazz on Monday with 24 points and 10 catties 114, Raptors 102 & 
rebounds. Bryon Russell added 15 points as Williams scored 27 points a 
Utah handed die Bullets their second heavy loss Boston starters had at least 20 as the Celtics 
in two days and sixth straight road defeat. woo on the road for only the second time this 
“All I know it that we stunk it up — season. Todd Day added 26 points, David 
period,” said the Bullets* guard Rod Stack- Wesley had 25 and Antoine Wt 

■ 1 » 1 1 m • - J *■ - * - -* TViwiAn Ctrkiv/fnrTMra lo/? tliA C 


Vernon Maxwell paced the Spurs, who lost and policies are being developed to ad- 
their fourth straight, with 15 points. dress it. But those involved with the 

Catties 114 , Raptors 102 In Toronto, Eric sport say the issues run much deeper 
Williams scored 27 points and three other under a system in which (heams of pro- 


problem — the immense power of leagues — also had abused players. An- 
coaches over the lives of their charges — other top teenage league in Quebec has 


fessional stardom and a fat NHL con- 


had to deal with several sexual assault 
cases in recent years, as well as in- 
vestigations into sexually suggestive 
team initiation rites. 

Most serious Canadian players have 


land, who played 31 minutes despite a sprained 
ankle. “Defensively, we were terrible. ’ 


Damon Stoudamire led the Raptors with 26 
points and 10 assists. 


tract overpower the simpler values of no connection with a high school or 
keen competition and fun. college team-. Instead , there is a pyramid 

“We are not in the business of pro- of teams that players must climb, with 
during career players,” said Murray Sudbury and Guelph and the 47 other 


League. “We have got to wake up." 

On a bitter cold night in Sudbury, 
MacDonald waltzed baric and forth dur- 
ing breaks in the game. 

He was on his mark, all flailing legs 
and arms as he worked to help his new 
team beat the one that kicked him loose 
before the season. 

“I’m just going to take it day by day,” 
MacDonald said as be began to face the 
facts of a life after hockey: the dimin- 
ishing likelihood of a pro tryout, the 


college team; Instead, there is a pyramid probable necessity of going to college 
of teams Lhai players must climb, with even after turning down scholarships, the 
Sudbury and Guelph and the 47 other alternative of playing in a semipro league 


Ex-Sharks 


Costello, president of the Canarian "major junior” franchises for players for a few hundred dollars a week. 


The Associated Press 

Ulf Dahlen, Michal Sykora 
and Chris Terreri didn't have 
to wait long for a chance to 
play their former team. 

Traded by the Shades to the 
Blackhawks about a week ago, 
the rinse returned to San Jose 
on Monday night and helped 
Chicago to a 4-2 victory. 

Dahlen snapped a first- 
period tie with a goal, Sykora 
assisted on another and Ter- 
reri made 38 saves as Chicago 
registered its third straight 
victory and first in three tnes 
against the Sharks this sea- 
son. 

“Our team was struggling 
and we needed some fresh 
blood, some new enthusiasm, 
and the three of them have 
brought that, ’ " said the Chica- 
go coach, Craig Hamburg. 

Sykora said, “I'm with a 
different team, so I can't care 
if the Sharks win or lose.” 

“We’re a tired hockey 
team,” said the San Jose 
coach. Al Sims. 

San Jose outshot the Black- 
hawks 18-1 1 in the first peri- 
od, bur were frustrated by the 
goaltending of Terreri, start- 
ing in place of regular goalie 
Jeff Hackett. 

Bob Probert extended the 
Blackhawks’ lead to 3-1 with 
a tap in at 4:52 of the second. 

San Jose closed within a 
goal 116 minutes later on 
Dody Woods's unassisted 
score. But the Blackhawks 
came back to score again with 
2:36 left when Eric Daze fin- 
ished a break with his 10th 
goal of the season. 

Kings 3, Flames 2 Theoren 
Fleury’s 300th career goal 
wasn't enough for the Flames 
as Los Angeles won at Cal- 
gary behind Stephane Fi set’s 
39 saves. 

Fleury got his first goal in a 
month, and his 22d of the 
season, midway through the 
third period after a goalmouth 
scramble in front of FiseL 

Yanic Perreault scored a 
short-handed goal at 5:27 of 
the second, and Ed Oiczyk and 
Kai Nurminen added power- 
play goals for the Kings. 

Senators 6, Canucks 4 

Alexei Yashin continued his 
superb play with a goal and 
two assists to help Ottawa 
reach 10 home victories for 
the first time In its five years 
in the league. 

The Senators have lost just 
two of their last 10 games to 
climb within four points of a 
playoff berth in the East. 
Yashin has five goals and two 
assists in Ottawa’s last six 
games. 

Panthers 2, Canadians 2 Jo- 
han Garpeniov scored with a 
deflected shot with 3:30 left 
in the third period to give 
Florida a tie in Montreal. 

Scott Mellanby scored his 
200th point as a Panther with 
a goal on a power play in the 
first period. Martin Rucinsky 
an d Vla dimir Malakhov 
scored power-play goals for 
host Montreal, the team *s first 
in seven games. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


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"Oh, yeah? And you don’t stink ! 
You never did, and you never will!" 







INTEBNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAX FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 



L-m 


PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Napoleon the Adman 


Pat Boone Sheds Mr. Nice Guy for Heavy Metal 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — You may 
have seen the TV com- 


jLN have seen the TV com- 
mercial in which John Wayne 
finds his misplaced beer in an 
Army barracks. Unless 
you're one of the 17 Amer- 
icans who did not watch the 
Super Bowl, you surely saw 
the commercial in which Fred 
Astaire danced up and down 
the walls wielding some son 
of vacuum cleaner. 

Were you amazed that 
these two dead movie stars 
could perform in brand new 
commercials despite being in 
a post-life condition? If so, sit 
back and hold on to your 
socks because, if 1 may vary 
the immonal words of AJ 
Jolson. you ain't seen nothin* 
yet. 

Id fact you will soon see the 
late A1 Jolson himself looking 
just as immortal as his im- 
mortal words. AJ is starring in 
a new 30-second commercial 
for a corporation that sells 
eyeglasses. 


The eyeglasses people had 
to pay big money to outbid the 
hearing-aid industry for 
Jolson. In the hearing-aid 
commercial he would have 
said, “You ain’t heard noth- 
in’ yet.” 

One of the exciting pro- 
jects is a commercial for a 
household smoke-alarm de- 
vice starring Napoleon Bona- 
parte. It opens with a spec- 
tacular wide shot of Moscow 
burning. Then we see Napo- 
leon face to face with the czar. 
Napoleon says. "If you’d 


By Richard Harrington 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — Pat 

Boone's parents are not 


VY Boone's parents are not 
crazy about the new musical di- 
rection their 62-year-old son is tak- 
ing with "Pat Boone in a Metal 
Mood: No More Mr. Nice Guy.” 
"Noooo! When I played them the 


rough mixes at home — and it had to 
be loud — Daddy and Mama were 


bought a smoke alarm, this 
wouldn't have happened.” 


Theplot goes tike this: Wo- 
man wearing specs comes in- 
to the sponsor’s store. Says, 
"Can’t see a thing with these 
glasses.” “No wonder.” 
says salesman, played by A1 
Jolson. “Lenses are coated 
with greasy fingerprints, solid 
auto-exhaust emissions and 
dandruff. Let me wash them 
for you.” 

Putting on freshly cleaned 
specs, woman cries. "I can 
see! I can see!" Salesman 
Jolson, slipping set of spon- 
sor's eyeglasses over her 
nose, says, “You ain’t seen 
nothin' yet!” She reads bot- 
tom line of eye chart flaw- 
lessly and tells Jolson. “1 
could kiss you if you weren’t 
married to Greta Garbo — or 
one of those old-time movie 
stars, y'know. whoever.” 


This project is still not in 
production. Two problems: 

First, die Russian gangsters 
who own Moscow want more 
money than the smoke-alarm 
industry can afford without 
asking Napoleon to work 
free. They’d have to persuade 
him it would be worth a for- 
tune in the long run to get 
name recognition in Amer- 
ica. 

Second, Napoleon refuses 
to speak his line in English. 
Industry rumors have it that 
the late General de Gaulle 
turned down the commercial 


be loud — Daddy and Mama were 
sitting there shaking their heads 
with glum looks because this is not 
tibe way they envision me singing or 
recording." Boone said recently 
from his home in Los Angeles. 
"Daddy wears a hearing aid in both 
ears, and at first he turned them 
down. Then he took diem out.” 
Daddy Boone is 90, Mama Boone 
86. and one suspects their eyes must 


have popped during the recent 
American Music Awards when Pat 


rather than say it in English. 
And that Napoleon, Being 


twice as great as de Gaulle, 
must also refuse to use the 
tongue of the Anglo-Saxons. 

That's one story. Another is 
that Napoleon tried to learn the 
line in English, but gave it up 
in despair, telling the ad 
agency he was too dead to get 
his tongue around English 
vowels. 

The biggest advertising 
story of the spring, however, 
will be about the carving- 
knife industry si gnin g Julius 
Caesar, Brutus and Cassius 
for a 30-second production 
introducing its new state-of- 
the-art ham slicer. 


American Music Awards when Pat 
— good old milk-drinking, clean- 
living, straight-arrow Pat, grand- 
father of 15 — came out to present 
the hard rock/heavy metal award 
with Alice Cooper and out-Aliced 
the shock-rock veteran. Shirtless, 
decked out in leather pants and vest, 
sporting a choker, studded bracelet 
and dangling dragon earring — and 
tattoos — this person did not look 
remotely like Pat Boone. 

And the white bucks? Those can 
be spotted on the back cover of “No 
More Mr. Nice Guy” (an Alice 
Cooper anthem), as a shades -sport- 
ing Boone sits astride Big Bertha, a 
classic Hariey-Davidson motor- 
cycle. 

What the heck is going on? 

Even Pat Boone wonders. It’s a 
“bizarre thing that I've done.” 

The just-released album boasts 
Boone's big-band versions of a 
dozen hard-rock and heavy-metal 
tracks. These are songs made pop- 
ular by Metallica (“Enter Sand- 
man"), AC/DC (“It’s a Long Way 
to the Top”), Ozzy Osbourne 
(“Cra^y Train”), Led Zeppelin 
(“Stairway to Heaven”), Guns 
N’Roses (“Paradise City”), Judas 
Priest (“You’ve Got Another 
Thing Coinin' ’*) and Deep Purple 
(“Smoke on the Water"). 


Until a few years ago. Boooe, a 
former teen idol who has a weekly 
gospel show on the Christian Broad- 
casting Network, was denouncing 
heavy metal as satanic. In a 1991 
interview in the record collectors’ 
magazine Goldmine, he singled out 
Judas Priest. AC/DC and Guns 
N’Roses for having gone "beyond 
degradation and depravity to inhu- 
manity.” 

"This is true,” Boone concedes. 
"I was very disparaging of even the 
terra ‘heavy metal' because it 
wasn’t even human, so how could 
you convey human emotion?” 

“No More Mr. Nice Guy ’’ had its 
genesis five years ago when Boone 
was on a concert tour. In a late-night 
bull session with his band, he got 
around to the idea of doing some- 
tiling different, something he 'd nev- 
er done before. Well, he’d never 
done heavy metaL 

And heavy metal had never been 
done big-band style. "Trombones, 
trumpets and saxes are metal, after 
all, and pretty heavy metal in the 
right hands." Boone points out 
helpfully. "The idea was to take 
good metal songs in a direction no 
one's ever heard." 

And that's when Pat Boone, 
whose chart-toppers have included 
"April Love’ ’ and ‘ ‘Love Letters in 
the Sand,” found hims elf listening 
to what he once condemned as 
satanic verses. “I didn't really 
know the songs or groups,” Boone 
says. “All I'd done was put them 
down because of the impressions I 
had of the way they looked and the 
excesses that seemed to go along 
with the lifestyle, the distortion and 
anger in the music when Td hear it 
going across the radio diaL It sound- 
ed so jarring, so unnerving, I just 
went right on to something else." 

Incongruously, Pat Boone did 
most of his heavy-metal research 
while starring in ‘ ‘The Will Rogers 
Follies" at the Will Rogers Theatre 
in the country music mecca of 
Branson, Missouri. Trapped doing 
12 shows a week for nine months. 
Boone spent much of his free time 
in his dressing room, seriously 
listening to heavy-metal albums 


eoe 


















ftoum; Krutoi* 

The new Boone has embraced those “satanic” verses. 


New York Times Service 


and cranking up his boombox. (“I 
now know that to appreciate this 
music, it’s got to be loud. It’s not 
background music.”) He even 
went to concerts by Ozzy Osbourne 
and Alice Cooper, but hid the metal 
CDs from his wife, Shirley. It was 
as much because of the covers as 
the contents, he says. 

"I don’t believe a whit in as- 
trology, but you can sure make a 
case for me being the Gemini clas- 
sic split personality,” Boone says. 

Once die songs were chosen, 
they were cut with a 19-piece band 


that included jazz musicians Tom 
Scott and Chuck Findley, with 
guest spots from Richie Black- 
more, Ronnie James Dio. Dweezil 
Zappa and Sheila E. 

Married, with four kids and ab- 
sent even the whiff of scandal. 
Boone is the first to admit die pro- 
ject started as a joke, “and that’s 
what makes this so dangerous, pre- 
carious. I see die humor in it, of 
course, and I’ve been playing an 
die humor in it and yet expecting 
that when the record comes out. 
people will see I'm very serious 


about the music. We were respect- 
ful, tried to keep all identifying 
trademarks, and a lot of people 
h3ve told me that for the first time 
they can understand die words. . 

According to Boone, there's 
already enough material for a sc- 
quel, "Songs I love by Dokken, 
Aerosmith. Poison, Scorpions. 
Megadeth. I fed like 1 stumbled 
into King Solomon's mine.” 

Boone's old fans might suggest 
he's stumbled into a location of 
much greater depth, though he is 
quick to point out that he doesn’t _■ 
endorse "the extracurricular ex- 
cesses that have characterized the ' 
metal lifestyle.” 

. In fact, he went over all the lyrics . 
with a fine-toothed comb. Most 
were O.KL One small exception:.. 
Van Helen’s "Panama.” 

“It’s a great song about either a 
car or a girl.” Boone explains, 
pointing to such lyrics os *Tm go- 
ing to get her at die turn/ And take ! 
her home with me.” “That was fine 
because I told myself I was singing 
about a car. WelL there's one line 
— 'hit the on-ramp/ Straight info : 
my bedroom' — so I changed it to 
'hit the on-ramp/ Nothing that she 
can’t do.' Ana that parses and 
sounds the same. Nobody but Van. 
Helen would probably know I'd 
changed anything, but for me it 
keeps it kind of clean,” he says. 

Between 1955 and 1961, Boone, 
made the singles chan 60 times. 
Copping it six times. "I always ; 
thought it was going to fizzle out : 
and it was just God's way of helping 
me work my way through college." 
Boone says. Yet in the '50s, only ; 
Elvis Presley was more popular, ; 
and Boone had more records on die 
chans than Little Richard. Chuck. 
Berry and Buddy Holly combined ' 

His grandkids love his new al- 
bum, he says. “They, too, thought 
it was crazy and undoable but when 
they heard the 'Enter Sandman’ 
demo, they were really gung-ho 
and now they’re stoked by my be- 
ing on the big rock stations and on 
television and in the papers. All 
their friends are saying. ‘This is 
your grandfather?’ ” 


•V 




CAPITALIST MUSCLE 


PEOPLE 


Mrs . Lenin’s Palace Survives to Help Fittest 


T HE writer Iris Murdoch is suf- 
fering from Alzheime r’s disease. 


By Michael Specter 

New York Tunes Service 


M OSCOW — The Palace 
of Young Pioneers was 


lYAof Young Pioneers was 
one of those ideas that could 
have been bom only, in the 
brain of a Bolshevik. Con- 
ceived by Lenin's wife as the 
world's biggest recreational 
complex, the building had 
open exercise space for 5.000 
robust young Communists, a 
lecture hall with 1.000 seats, 
dozens of rooms for meetings 
and clubs, a movie theater, a 
concert stage, and a pool. 

It took the party's youth 
group 3 million hours of col- 
lective labor to build the 
palace, and nearly every great 
hero of the Soviet Union ap- 
peared there at one time or 
another. Shapio 

Rudolph Nureyev danced 
in the palace; it was there that Garry 
Kasparov emerged as the strongest chess 
player in die world. And in 199 1 , while 
casting his vote at the palace for the 
dissolution of the Soviet Union. Boris 
Yeltsin issued one of his fiercest attacks 
on the party he had deserted. 

* 'This place is just so full of history.” 
Valentina Malnova, 25, said as she 
straddled a machine called a Sit Master, 
which uses electronic measurements 
and a series of timers to help people in 
search of an ideal abdomen perform the 
perfect situp. 

Still a monument to die notion of fit- 
ness on the grandest possible scale, the 
45, 000-square -foot (4. 1 80-square-meter) 
palace is under radically new manage- 
ment. After months of negotiation, hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars' worth of 
reconstruction, and the installation of 
what its owners swear are more tread- 
mills and stair-climbing machines than 
existed in the entire Soviet Union, die 
place has been transformed into Russia's 
newest, biggest, and trendiest health club. 
Gold's Gym. 

In a city where marketing experts 
long ago learned that the best way to 
attract the right shoppers is to charge 




JSP 




Shaping up at Moscow’s trendiest health dub. 


high prices, and where the new rich buy 
more Mercedes sedans and $100,000 


more Mercedes sedans and $100,000 
stereo sets than in any other place on 
Earth, it was only a matter of time before 
the fitness craze — if that is a proper 
way to describe an elite club with 500 
members and a snack area that offers 
espresso and latte made from beans 
flown in each week from Seattle — took 
hold of the imagination. 

“It was just a gaping need in the 
community." said James Weinstock, a 
recent graduate of the University of 
Pennsylvania who is one of die club’s 
three main partners. “We are not pre- 
tending this place is for the average 
Russian. Obviously, it isn’t.” 

For those who can come up with the 
$2,000 annual membership fees, there are 
two indoor tennis courts, a Nike Sport 
Court for basketball and volleyball, and 
scores of Cybex weight machines. Also 
included are personal trainers, a play- 
room for toddlers, nannies (to look after 
children whose parents are busy with the 
personal trainers), aerobic classes taught 


by graduates of Moscow’s elite institute 
of Physical Culture, tannine booths. 


' Physical Culture, tanning booths, 
uash courts, and a store that sells 
15 Gold's Gym T-shirts and $210 


I Nike Gore-Tex athletic shoes. 
Then there is the latte. “It's 
not from Starbucks, believe it 
or not,” said Paul Kuebler, 
one of the other partners. 
‘ ‘It’s from a small roaster that 
I have always loved.” 
Kuebler. 31. Weinstock, 25, 
and a Russian partner, Vladi- 
mir Grunlik, 31, have a 25- 
year lease on the premises. 
Both of the Americans had 
been in Moscow for some time 
before deciding to open the 
club; they raised the money 
mostly in the United States, 
although the majority of those 
seeking to join so far are Rus- 
sian. 

The partners have paid 
Gold’s, which has hundreds 

of gyms around the world, a 

j*jn« Hui/Thc Nrv wi Tta.« licensing fee for use of die 
rith dub. name. Itmay be aclub famous 

for introducing the world to 
rich buy Arnold Schwarzenegger's finely tooled 
100.000 and incredibly huge chest (in the film 
ilace on “Pumping Iron”), and it is still revered 
e before in California as the temple of body- 
i proper building (where else could you see 
rith 500 Keanu Reaves, Mickey Rourke, and 
it offers Wilt Chamberlain work out?), but 
n beans Gold's is hardly a brand name in Mos- 
— took cow. “I had never heard of it," said 
Angela Kushinikova, 23, an aerobics 
1 in the instructor. 1 ‘People are here because it is 
stock, a a wonderful place to work out. It's a 
rsity of pleasant break from a stressful life, 
e club’s Nobody is going to pay that kind of 
not pre- money for the name alone." 
average Weinstock is an animated and ex- 
citable young man. On a tour of the 
with the seemingly endless complex, he is eager 
here are to point out every sophisticated piece of 
•£ Sport equipment in the place. He clams up 
rail, and only when asked about die mob. Mafia 
es. Also members are famous for hanging out at 
a play- Moscow’s sporting clubs. “We never 
ok after say we don’t want you.” Weinstock said 
with the with a tight smile. ‘ ‘We tell them we are 
s taught full up, or we are not taking members for 
Institute a while. We have it worked out. So far, it 
booths, hasn’t been a problem.” That may be 
at sells because the club has very conspicuous 
d $210 and very large guards of its own. 


her husband said Tuesday. The public 
announcement through a Daily Tele- 
graph interview followed months of ru- 
mors about 77-year-old Murdoch’s ap- 
parent writers' block. “Iris has 
Alzheimer’s. There is no doubt about 
it,” her husband, John Bayley, told the 
Daily Telegraph. Six months ago. Mur- 
doch. the author of 26 novels and one of 
Britain’s most intellectually' brilliant 
writers, had described her so-called 
writing block as being in a “hard dark 
place" from which she was trying to get 
oul Murdoch, whose most recent novel 
‘ ‘Jackson’s Dilemma' ’ was published in 
1995, is one of only two writers to have 
won both of Britain’s major literary 
awards, the Booker Prize and the Whit- 
bread Prize. Bayley, who is caring for 
his wife at their home in the university 
city of Oxford, says Murdoch does not 
seem depressed. “She usually appears 
mildly amused,” he said. He said he had 
decided to go public to highlight a con- 
dition that few people discuss. “I think 
we must be open about it” 


opened on Nov. 17, 1994, has paid back 
75 percent of its costs, and another pay- 
ment to investors is expected shortly, the 
show’s spokesman. Adrian Bryan- 
Brown, said. “It’s not a total wipeout ” 


Ralph Lauren was named menswear 


designer of die year by the Council of 
Fashion Designers of America, and 


but which said he owed it $4.9 million. 
Shakur, who was gunned down by an 
unknown assailant in Las Vegas while 
in the car of Death Row reconds’ chief, 
Marion (Suge) Knight, had plans to 
finance a youth center and was setting 
up a special phone number where chil- 
dren in trouble could call him. the 
magazine said. 


Donna Karan received the women's 
wear prize at the group’s' annual awards 
dinner in New York. Arnold Scaasi 
received a lifetime achievement award. 


The rapper Tupac Shakur was trying 
to break with drugs and violence and 
settle down to a new life with his fi- 
ancee, Kidada Jones, before his murder 
five months ago. Vanity Fair reports. 
The magazine said Shakur “was ex- 
hausted playing the gangster role’ ’ and 
also wanted to break with his record 
company. Death Row, for whom he had 
sold more than $60 million in records 


So you want to be in show business? 
Think twice. Jay Lena put tourists to 
the rest as he opened a five-night stint in 
Las Vegas by getting them to audition us 
showgirls. He began “The Tonight 
Show With Jay Leno” with taped seg- 
ments of visits he paid to hotel rooms of 
MGM Grand guests, asking them if they 
wanted to be Vegas showgirls. Accom- 
panied by the dancer-choreographer 
Debbie Alien and four showgirls, Leno 
ad-libbed about die talents of the un- 
suspecting guests as they donned glitzy 
costumes and were led through dance 
routines and high kicks. 


Bank 


When Mia Farrow’s memoirs go on 
sale Wednesday, what revelations can 
readers expect? Is there anything new to 
be learned about her relationship with 


Woody Allen, which ended so bitterly, 
about her marriages to Frank Sinatra 


about her marriages to Frank Sinatra 
and Andre Previn, about her rise to 
stardom or her 14 children? No one 
connected with the book, “What Fails 
Away,” is saying, and die publisher. 
Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, was not re- 
leasing any early copies. But as for 
Farrow’s liaison with Alien, Nan 
TaJese, the editor, said, “She describes 


the courtship so well dial you under- 
stand why she fell in love with him.” 


The Broadway and London produc- 
tions of “Sunset Boulevard” have come 
to the end of die road. The Andrew 
Lloyd Webber musical will close in 
New York on March 22 without re- 


couping fa $10 miltion production costs, 
while the London edition will shutdown 


while the London edition will shut down 
April 5. No financial figures were avail- 
able an the English production, which 
will have had a ran of almost four years. 
The - Broadway production, which 





U rf i. 


, _ _ _ » , — Mikf 

The designer Ralph Lauren and his wife, Ricky, at the awards dinner. 



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