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Mm. 




INTERNATIONAL 



The World s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

** London, Thursday, February 6, 1997 


No. 35.438 


Envoy Who Dazzled 
Dies in France at 76 

Party- Giver , Later a Party-Builder, 
Hamman Cultivated the Powerful 



By Marilyn Berger 

Neu- York Times Service 

Pamela Digby Churchill Hamman, 
I 76. the United States ambassador to 
France whose life and loves placed 
her front and center on the world stage 
for much of the 20th century, died 
Wednesday. 

The ambassador had been in in- 
tensive care at the American Hospital 
outside Paris since suffering a cerebral 
hemorrhage after exercising on 
Monday night. Embassy officials said 
no further medical details would be 
revealed out of respect for the family. 

A service in Pans was planned be- 
fore a funeral in Washington, an em- 
bassy source said, speaking on con- 
dition of anonymity. The ambassador 
was to be buried at the Hamman 
family plot in Hamman, New York, 
about 45 miles (70 kilometers) north 
of New York City, the source said. 
Dates were to be determined later. 

Bom in England in 1920 into an old 
aristocracy that no longer counted for 
much. Mrs. Hamman made her way 
into the new aristocracy of the 
wealthy and powerful that counted a 
great deal. In the course of her jour- 
ney. she captivated some of the 
world's richest and most attractive 
men and left her pathway littered with 
trngry women who yapped at her heels 
and dined out on tales of her es- 
capades. 

Although she devoted her later 
years to rebuilding the Democratic 
Parry in the 1980s and to a well- 
regarded term as U.S. ambassador to 
France in the 1990s. none of her ac- 
complishments put to rest the legend 
that enveloped her, the legend that she 
was die last of the great courtesans, 
the most talked about playgirl of the 
Western world who basked in the 
reflected glory of the powerful men in . 
her life. She married three of them. 


The fust was Randolph Churchill, 
the son ofWinston Churchill. She was 
1 9 years old and in Iter post-debutaote 
year when they married. 

Within months, Randolph wenloff 
to war and she found herself at the 
center of wartime London as a con- " 
fidante and hostess for the prime min- 
ister, whom she called “papa.” He 
reveled in her company. 

Through Winston Churchill, she 
met Max Beaverhrook, the press bar- 
on, who became her mentor; Harry 
Hopkins, Franklin D. Roosevelt's en- 
voy, who became her friend; and 
Averell Haniman, the lend-lease ad- 
ministrator, who became her lover, 
and. 30 years later, her husband. 

If World War II was the finest hour 
for Britons, h was surely the best of 
times for Pamela Digby Churchill. 
With expenses underwritten by Mr. 
Haniman, she took up residence in 
Grosvenor Square, a small pared of 
London that became so filled with 
Americans that she remembered it as 
Eisenhowerplatz. 

There, she cultivated a salon where 
she brought prominent Americans 
and Englishmen together for small 
dinners and raised eyebrows as she 
fell into a number of liaisons, often 
with married men. The most prom- 
inent among diem were her London 
neighbor, John Hay (Jock) Whitney, 
who later became the U.S. ambas- 
sador to the Court of Sl James's, and 
Edward R. Murrow. the CBS broad- 
caster and wartime voice of London 1 
in the United States. I 

After the war, by then the mother of 1 
a son. Winston Spencer Churchill, 
and divorced from Randolph, she re- 
located to Paris, where, armed with 
the cachet of the Churchill name and 
her own energy and resourcefulness, 
she established herself in the inter- 

See HARRIMAN, Page 2 


Swiss Banks’ $71 Million 
' Forms Holocaust Fund 


By Alan Cowell 

\< n )'nrJL Times SrraVr 

BONN — Switzerland's three largest 
banks announced Wednesday the form- 
ation of what was allied a '‘human- 
itarian-fluid for the victims of the Holo- 
caust” with an initial value of $71 
million. 

The banks said they had placed 100 
^ million Swiss francs in an escrow ac- 
count with the Swiss National Bank and 
-Vinvited other panics, particularly die 
: Swiss government and the Swiss Na- 
tional Bank, to contribute. Officials said 
-J Ae three hanks had comribuied roughly 

third each. 

. ;i' Switzerland's secretive commercial 
-~taijks have been facing mounting ac- 
, cosmkms. which they deny .that they are 
aoarding untold wealth in unclaimed 
deposits by Holocaust victims who 
' Opened Swiss bank accounts in the 
"5930s and then were killed in German 
tioBtentration camps. 

A statement by dw three banks — - 
• OwSt Suisse. Swiss Bank Corp. and 


Union Bank of Switzerland — said they 
“trust that this initiative will dear the 
way for the Swiss government, Switzer- 
land's business and financial community, 
ami Jewish organizations to work to- 
gether toward folding a just and equitable 
solution to die issues involved.” 

The gesture followed threats by Jew- 
ish groups and by New York stare and 
city institutions to impose sanctions 
against Swiss banks. 

“We are breaking with the past,” 
Michael Willi, a spokesman for die 
Swiss Bank Corp. in Basel said Wed- 
nesday. 

“We are not saying we are guilty," 
he continued. “We are not saying we 
collaborated. We are saying that, in the 
past, we acted in such a legalistic way, 
and we want to break with dial past. 
Now we want to make a humanitarian 
gesture.” 

Banking officials said it represented 
the first time that Swiss commercial 
banks bad offered their own money in 

See SWISS, Page 5 


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President Bill Clinton speaking in the House as he declared that the 
state of the onion was good and outlined his program to make it better. 

A Confident Clinton 
Skirts Thorniest Themes 

State of the Union Speech Lacks Bold Message 


By DanBaiz 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — In his State of 
the Union Address a year ago. President 
Bill Clinton had one overriding objec- 
tive: to salvage his presidency and win 
re-election. This year, be faced a dif- 
ferent kind of challenge: to recast the 
political sloganeering of that campaign 
into a compelling and concrete agenda 
to move die country forward. 

hi his speech last year. Mr. Clinton 
declared that the era of big gowmment 
was over, an acknowledgment of the 
political winds that bad buffeted his 
presidency. On Tuesday night, he made 
clear that the era of smaller government 
need not be the era of inaction or in- 
difference. “We must be the shapers of 
events, not observers,” be said. 

His rhetoric was often loftier and 
more eloquent than his inaugural ad- 
dress of two weeks ago. which sought to 
stamp foe 21st century in his image. And 
his emphasis on educational excellence 
and racial reconciliation struck: themes 
of enormous significance to the future 
of the country. 

But faced with die choice of con- 
tinuing to offer an agenda of small, if 
politically popular, gestures or present- 
ing. the country with something big and 
bold, Mr. Clinton chose the safer, smal- 
ler approach. He talked little about the 
hard choices required to balance the 
budget, other than the areas •where he 
wants to spend more money. He said 
nothing of the potential effects on his 
own and other generations of trying to 
restructure Medicare and Social Secu- 
rity to assure their long-term solvency. 

Nor did the president offer much of 
an olive branch to the Republican ma- 
jority in Congress. Despite much talk of 
bipartisanship and cooperation these 
past few months. Mr. Clinton's speech 
did as much to signal his differences 
with Republicans on the budget as it did 
to reassure them that he is ready to 
compromise significantly. That posture 


Woman's Ordeal in Court Roils Mexico 


I . £ By Julia Preston 

• •' - ,y~u- 1;»< times SrivuV 

TEXCOCO, Mexico — The hush of 
the deserted train station in the hazy 
dawn was broken by ihe argument be- 
tween two women and a man coming 
% from a night of drink and dancing. 

1: . Witnesses testified later that the three 

were on a pedestrian overpass heading 
into fee station when the man, vwbiy 
inebriated, grabbed one of the women. 
\ tore her clothing, and tried to sexually 

ftcpjjolj issr. ,, 

./ * ‘No female ever got away from me, 

s* he was heard to shout. _ 

Alter several minutes of struggling, 
Claudia Rodriguez F^andoayomg 
" wife and mother of five cMdrerntfad 
something unusual far a 
and something that has made her a 

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lying point far Mexican feminists. She 
pulled a .22-caliberpisroI from her jacket, 

waving ft to tty to force the man beck. 

But he came at her again, Mrs. 
Rodriguez told police. She fired one 
shot, mortally wounding the man, Juan 
Manuel Cabrera Antunez. 27. 

Mrs. Rodriguez, 30, denied bail by 

the courts, is completing a year in jail as 
ter trial on homicide charges proceeds. 
If convicted, she faces at feast 10 years 
in prison. Her lawyers contend that her 
one gunshot, in an elevated. train station 


on the outskirts of Mexico City, was a 
clear case of self-defense. They have 
tried, in vain, to persuade prosecutors to 
dismiss the charges. 

The case aroused an outcry from 
Mexican women across a wide spec- 
trum, especially those in the capital city. 
They feel especially vulnerable because 
of the virtual breakdown of the police 
system at a time when the worst re- 
cession in 70 years has contributed to a 

See RAPE, Page 6 


Fergie Makes It Big in America 

Former ‘Duchess of Pork 9 Becomes Weight Watchers’ Icon 


$ 


D 2 9 4 8050 £ 9* 


By Claudia H. Deutsch 

Nnv yart Tlntrs Service 

NEW YORK — To Howard Rnbea- 
siein, it was a no-brainer. His long-time 
client Weight Watchers International 
Inc. needed anew spokeswoman; a new 
client, Sarah Ferguson, the duchess of 
York, believed in healthy eating, needed 
lYKmey repay off debts and, perhaps most 
important, was a publicity machine. 

“She just has to smile, and the cam- 
eras go off," he said. 

Mr. Rubenstein, a New York public- 
relations man, invited the duchess and 
Albert Uppert, Weight Watchers' 
founder, io admnerpaity.The bund dale 


took, and last month the sHrmned-down 
duchess — marc than 50 pounds lighter 
titan the2Q3 pounds that once earned her 
the stinging “Duchess of Pork" label 
from the British press — signed a one- 
year contract with executives of Heinz, 
Weight Watchers’ owner. 

Now, for 1 a reported 51 million, the 
duchess will travel the United Stares on 
Weight Watchers’ behalf. 

That comract — along with smaller 
ones to appear in commercials for 
Ocean Spray’s cranberry cocktails and 
to endorse Olympus cameras — has 
raised hackles aH over Britain. - 

See DUCHESS, Page 6 


not only demonstrated the president's 
restored sense of self-confidence but 
assures hard bargaining in the months 
ahead. 

Mr. Clinton went to the House cham- 
ber Tuesday night more free to define 
himself and his full agenda than at any 
time in his presidency- Four years ago, 
he was encumbered by the need to con- 
centrate his energies on a weak econ- 
omy. and already bad ceded some of his 
power to the congressional Democrats 
who controlled Congress. Two years 
ago. he arrived battened, beaten and 
fighting for survival in the face of Re- 
publican victories in 1994. 

See CLINTON, Page 6 



■*W: r 



Representative J.C. Watts of Ok- 
lahoma, before giving the Republi- 
can response to Mr. Clinton's speech. 


Unanimous Jury 
Finds Simpson 
Liable for Murders 


By Stephanie Simon 

Los Angeles Tunes 

SANTA MONICA, California — 
Sixteen months after a criminal-court 
jury acquitted O. J. Simpson of the 
murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and 
Ronald Goldman, a civil jury has unan- 
imously found him responsible for their 
deaths and ordered him to pay £8.5 
million in compensatory damages. 

The mostly white jury deliberated for 
three days before returning its verdicts 
Tuesday night. The jurors’ decision 

Mr. Simpson's public resurrection 
appears impossible. Page 3. 

came as a moral victory for the victims' 
families, who had repeatedly charged 
that the mostly black criminal jury had 
allowed a black celebrity to get away 
with murder. 

Mr. Simpson stared straight ahead, 
betraying no emotion, as the verdict was 
read aloud, one week after the case went 
to the jury. The murder victims' re- 
latives, wearing buttons emblazoned 
with pictures of their slain loved ones, 
sobbed with relief and clenched each 
others' hands. 

Then Kim Goldman's voice shot 
across the courtroom. Through her 
tears, she shouted atthe man she blames 
for IdUbg her brother: “Ob my God, 
you're a murderer!" 

Mr. Simpson did not move. 

The victims' families claimed the 
verdict as a moral victory. 

“We finally have justice for Ron and 
Nicole," Fred Goldman, Ronald’s fath- 
er, said in a brief, tearful news con- 
ference. He added: “Our family is 
grateful for a verdict of responsibility. 
That’s all we wanted. Now we have it. 
thank God." 

Mr. Simpson slipped quickly out of 
court — where scores of spectators had 
gathered waving signs, chanting and 
pressing tip against police Condons to 
snap pictures of fellow demonstrators. 
Many shouted "Killer! Killer! Killer!" 
as Mr. Simpson drove off. 

The jury verdict brings some closure 
to the impassioned drama that began 
when the crumpled bodies of Nicole 
Simpson and Ronald Goldman were 
discovered just before midnight June 
12, 1994. 

But the legal case is not over yet. 

The verdict included an order for Mr. 
Simpson to pay £8.5 million to com- 
pensate Ronald Goldman’s parents, 
Fred Goldman and Sharon Rufo, for the 
loss of their sot’s love, companionship 
and moral support. 

The Brown family did not file a claim 
for compensation and thus did not re- 
ceive any financial award in the first 
round of jury deliberations. 

The trial now moves on to a punitive- 
damages phase in which jurors must de- 
cide bow much Mr. Simpson should pay 
both victims' families as punishment for 
what they found to be his wrongdoing. 

In that phase, expected to start 
Thursday and last just a few days, the 
jurors will hear testimony about Mr. 
Simpson's financial assets to help them 
set an appropriate damage award. 

Mr. Simpson will not be able to dis- 
charge his financial obligations to the 
victims’ families by claiming bank- 
ruptcy. The Goldman and Brown fam- 
ilies can garnish 25 percent of his salary 

See VERDICT, Page 6 



Htcux Mau/Apwc Praue-Piouc 


Mr. Simpson leaving the court- 
house in Santa Monica, California. 


Wall Street 
Marriage for 
Dean Witter 

Bride: Morgan Stanley 
The Price: $10 Billion 


By Mitcbett Martin 

iniemavtmal Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — The name Morgan 
Stanley, Dean Witter, Discover & Co. 
hardly rolls off the tongue, but the com- 
bination announced Wednesday of one 
of the top global underwriters with one 
of the biggest American brokerage 
bouses in a 510 billion takeover bad 
Wail Street talking about a wave of 
consolidation in the securities industry. 

The deal, structured as a stock-swap 
takeover of Morgan Stanley Group Inc. 
by Dean Witter, Discover & Co., comes 
less than a month after Salomon Brothers 
Inc. said it would form an alliance wife 
Fidelity Investments as a way of provid- 
ing a retail outlet for the s locks and bonds 
it brings to market around the world. 

Although fee deal on Wednesday was 
structured as a takeover of Morgan 
Stanley, if was really a way for that firm 
to gain access to Dean Winer’s links to 
individual investors via its brokerage 
operations and its credit cards. “It puts 
additional pressure on institutional 
firms that are without that capability,” 
said Joan Solotar, an analyst at Don- 
aldson, Lufirin & Jenrette Inc. She said 
underwriters “could feel pressure to 
link up wife retail firms," although such 
alliances could be along the lines of the 
Salomon-Fidelity arrangement instead 
of through takeovers. 

See DEAL, Page 12 




• •. i' ,• 


LMRU keboen/Tbr AaoM Presi 


FRENCH CONNECTION — Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft Corp., 
talking with reporters after meeting Wednesday with President Jacques 
Chirac in Paris, where Mr. Gates was attending a computer trade show. 


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THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Resolution of Another Murder? 

ASIJUPACtFIC Page. 

JVtwu, the Real Test for Pakistan 

EUROPE Pages. 

Ambition and Weakness in Serbia 

Books Page 10. 

Crossword. Page 10. 

Opinion Pages 8-‘ ■ 

Sports ... - Pages 18-19. 

loteuadonaf Gtastthd Page* 


AGENDA 

Italy Rebuffs 
Bonn on Euro 

The political jockeying over Euro- 
pean monetary union intensified 
sharply on Wednesday as Prime Min- 
ister Romano Prodi of Italy rejected 
German suggestions that his country 
should be excluded from the launching 
of the single currency. 

The issue came to a boil ahead of a 
meeting between Mr. Prodi and Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl in Bonn on Fri- 
day. 

In a statement issued by his office in 
Rome, the prime minister said he was 
* ‘solemnly committed' ’ to meeting fee 
criteria for adopting fee euro in 1999." 
Page 11. 

Compagnoni Takes 
World Slalom Title 

Deborah Compagnoni of Italy won 
the women's slalom Wednesday night 
at the World Championships under 
floodlights in fee Italian ski resort of 
Sesttiere. The silver medal went to her 
compatriot Lara Magoni and the 
bronze to Karin Roten of Switzerland. 
The reigning champion, Pemilla 
Wiberg of Sweden, missed a gate and 
failed to finish. She was one of 4 of the 
top 1 S racers who did not complete the 
second run. Page 18. 





** . 


PAGE 2 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 

PAGE TWO 


Pamela Harriman, America’s Woman at Center Stage in Paris, Dies at 76 





Continued from Page 1 

national set and had a succession of love 
affairs with, among others. Gianni Ag- 
nelli, heir to the Italian Rat fortune; 
Baron Elie de Rothschild of the French 
banking family, and Prince Aly Khan. 
' the playboy son of the Aga Khan. 

When none of those affairs culmin- 
ated in marriage, she moved on to Amer- 
ica where she captivated, and married, 
Leland Hayward, the Broadway produ- 
cer. After Mr. Hayward's death. AvereLi 
Harriman once again appeared on her 
radar screen. After a brief courtship, they 
were married. 

As a young girl she was peaches-and- 
cream pretty, but no great beauty, and in 
her teens, decidedly pudgy. Taught, as 
were all bat the most exceptional well- 
born girls of her time, that the goal in life 
was to marry well, she developed an 
uncanny ability to attract and beguile 
men. 

She enveloped them in her attention, 
anticipated their every need, and locked 
on them with adoring eyes that sug- 
gested genuine interest in their every 
word. Wren it was suggested to one man 
of her acquaintance that she didn't have 
much of a sense of humor, he shrugged 
and replied, "Maybe, but she makes you 
feel you have the best sense of humor in 
the world." 

She was resilient, and she aged well. 
One of her biographers. Christopher Og- 
den, was beguiled himself when he de- 
scribed how she looked on the night in 
November 1992 when she welcomed the 
new president. Bill Clinton, to a dinner 
reception at her Georgetown house.- 
"She looked fabulous, almost breath- 
taking,’* he wrote in his book. "Life of 
the Party." "She was seventy-two but 
looked in her mid-fifties and had the 
energy of a forty-year-old. Her posture 
was regal. Her rich, now-blond hair had 
not a strand out of place." 

And, he went on. "Her complexion 
was ivory with just a him of blush, so 
impeccable that her very light makeup 
looked natural. Her smile can appear too 
practiced, but tonight it was wonderfully 
wide and guileless. Her voice is ero- 
genous and can skip across the scales of 
an aural keyboard. Tonight, her voice 
was low. with a sexy, croaky catch that 
had guests leaning close to digest every 
practiced syllable. The eyes shone with 
twinkles. She was absolutely vibrant." 

Not everyone saw her that way. Wo- 
men on two continents saw her as a 
scheming hussy who set her sights on 
snaring a millionaire. Sally Bedell 
Smith, the author of another biography 
of Pamela Harriman. entitled "Reflec- 
ted Glory, ' ' told an audience at The New 
York Public Library in 1996: "She 
wanted great wealth and power. These 
were big ambitions for a person with 
little to say and no wit but she had 
unflagging determination and ruthless- 
ness.’ ’ 

• Mrs. Harriman was quick to deny that 


she'd ever had a hidden agenda, or, for 
that matter, any agenda. In 1996. in a 
conversation in" which she was encour- 
aged to reminisce about her life, she said, 
* ‘My life, for me, has been free flowing. 
1 mean, it happened. I never thought. 
•Now I'm here. I want to go there or do 
that.' It never occurred to me. I mean, 
I've taken life as it has presented itself to 
me." She bristled at the way she was 
characterized in the press and lamented, 
"Few people have as many miscon- 
ceived notions [about them] of what they 
are and why they are." 

She said she should not be faulted for 
the fact that the succession of men in her 


‘My life, for me, has been 
free flowing. I mean, it 
happened. I never 
thought, ‘Now Pm here, I 
want to go there or do 
that.’ It never occurred to 
me. I’ve taken life as it 
has presented itself . . . 
Everything in life, I 
believe, is luck and 


life happened to be rich. "Those were 
the people I met." Then she said, 
"Everything in life. I believe, is luck and 
timing." 

Pamela Harriman remembered World 
War n as the most exciting lime of her 
life. During bombing raids she shared 
the shelter under 1 0 Downing Street with 
the prime minister and his wife. Clem- 
entine. Above ground, there were din- 
ners and weekends with world leaders at 
Chequers or at Lord Beaverbrook's, tea 
dances at Ciaridges and the Dorchester, 
officers to entertain at the Churchill 
Club. President Roosevelt's envoy, 
Hany Hopkins to look after. And there 
were Mr. Harriman. Mr. Whitney, Mr. 
Murrow and one or two others. 

After the war she put in a brief stint as 
a reporter for Beaverbrook’s Daily Ex- 
press and Evening Standard, contrib- 
uting news about politics, literature, the 
arts, the theater and the social scene in 
London, New York. Palm Beach, Mon- 
tego Bay, Paris and the south of France. 
When she traveled, young Winston, her 
son, was left in the care of a nanny or a 
friend or sent off to study at boarding 
school. 

Although she had had quite a number 
of adventures during the war. she looked 
back at those postwar years as a time to 
“catch up on all the things that 1 might 
have done if I hadn’t had those six years 
of war." she said. "I wanted to discover 
a let of things that I had not done at the 
age of 19.*’ 


Her catching up included that fling 
with AJy Khan, the breakup of her mar- 
riage to Randolph, and a new life In 
Paris. There she met Gianni Agnelli, fell 
in love, and converted to Catholicism in 
what the gossips said was an effort to be 
a more acceptable bride to the Rat heir. 
During their five-year affair, she 
provided him with connections in Eng- 
land and America; he provided her with 
an apartment on the Seine, couture 
dresses, vacations in the south of France, 
yachting trips, but not a wedding ring. 

Then there were five years as mistress 
to Baron Elie de Rothschild. Because he 
was married to one of the most well- 
liked women in Paris society. Pamela 
became the target of more than the usual 
slings and arrows. There were other 
friends, too, not the least of whom was 
Stavros Niarchos, the Greek shipping 
tycoon 

“I'm censored for having had 
friends," Mrs. Harriman lamented in 
that conversation at the embassy res- 
idence in Paris, referring to the books 
and articles written about her, “and of 
course, more friends than I've ever 
really had, men friends. The amount of 
people that I read about that I've slept 
with that I've never slept with." She 
added, “I mean it’s extraordinary .’’ 

She insisted that she wasn't looking 
for a rich husband or any kind of hus- 
band. "The one thing that they've aJI 
missed is the fact that having once been 
married I said to myself ‘I don 't have to 
get married again.' ’* She said, “I was 
bruised. I would have loved my first 
marriage to have worked. When it 
didn 't, then I didn ’i want — what annoys 
me, especially in this world where wo- 
men are equal with men. why do they all 
take the same tack, that people didn't 
many me. Nobody’s ever thought that I 
didn't want to marry." 

But then she did marry. During a visit 
to New York she was introduced to 
Leland Hayward, a legend himself as the 
Broadway producer of such hits as 
"South Pacific" and "The Sound of 
Music." A friend asked Pamela to go to 
the theater with Mr. Hayward, whose 
wife. Slim, was traveling in Europe. It 
wasn't long before Mr. Hayward pro- 
posed and Pamela accepted. 

Five months after Mr. Hayward’s 
death in 197 1 . there was a serendipitous 
meeting with Averell Harriman. who 
had been widowed the year before. Their 
reunion took place in August 1971 at a 
dinner party given by Katharine Gra- 
ham, publisher of The Washington Posl 
A mouth later. Pamela Digby Churchill 
Hayward added the name Harriman. He 
was 79. She was 51 

Although Governor Harriman was the 
heir to the Union Pacific Railroad for- 
tune, he was famously parsimonious. 
With Pamela, however, he was gen- 
erous, and for the first time in his life 
began to live up to his means. She fixed 
up his houses. She catered to his every 
need, and he to hers. She became an 



Pamela Harriman, then Pamela Digby Churchill, leaving St. John's Church in London on Oct. 4, 1939, after 
marrying Randolph Churchill, son of Sir Winston Churchill, Britain's prime minister during World War IL- s 


American citizen and adopted his in- 
terests in the Soviet Union and, more 
exuberantly, in the Democratic Party. 

As Mrs. Averell Harriman, she gave 
fund-raising dinners for Democratic 
candidates during the 1970s. But it was 
the election of Ronald Reagan and the 
Republican sweep in the 19S0 election 
that galvanized both Harrimans to ac- 
tion. To resuscitate the Democratic Party 
they agreed to form their own political 
action~committee, which quickly be- 
came known as PamPAC. Mrs. Har- 
riman surrounded herself with advisers 
and learned quickly. She built up her 
political curriculum vitae, giving 
speeches and, with the help of friends, 
writing op-ed pieces for Hie New York 
Times. 

Presided over by the newly energized 
Pamela, the Harriman house in George- 
town, with its fine collection of Im- 
pressionist paintings, became a 
headquarters of sorts for the part)’ in 
exile. Contributors paid thousands of 
dollars to be invited to her impeccably 
arranged receptions and dinners where 
they were given briefings and allowed to 
rub shoulders with the likes of a Clark 
Clifford or a Robert Strauss and any 
number of presidential candidates ana 
senators, both current and past 

As Governor Harriman 's health de- 
teriorated. his wife worked assiduously 
to keep him occupied, making sure he 
had visitors to keep him company when 


she was away. By now Mrs. Harriman 
had her own airplane so she was able to 
return to him in the evenings. He died on 
July 26. 19S6, at the age of 94. 

Governor Harriman left Pamela most 
of his fortune, more than $100 million, 
and designated her as an executor and 
trustee of his estate and their charitable 
trusts. He made a number of the usual 
charitable bequests and bequests for his 
grandchildren. His daughters and their 
children were to share in the remains of a 
marital trust after Pamela's death. 
Again, Pamela was embroiled in a fam- 
ily feud, this one far worse than the 
Hayward battles. 

At about the time of his marriage to 
Pamela, Governor Harriman put his in- 
vestments in tite hands of William Rich, 
a man he believed to be a careful and 
conservative investor, and be engaged 
his old friend Clark Clifford, and his 
partner Paul Wamke, as his lawyers. He 
told Pamela to follow their advice. 

Mr. Clifford soon became preoccu- 
pied with the BCCI scandal and had little 
time for anything else. Mr. Wamke 
moved to another law firm, and Mr. Rich 
proceeded to make highly speculative 
investments, some based on loan guar- 
antees signed by Mrs. Harriman. that 
resulted in huge losses. 

The Harriman heirs turned to Pamela 
to make good on those losses, but her 
own fortune had dwindled along with 
theirs. In 1994, they sued her in Man- 


hattan Federal Court. 

While maneuvering dragged on to 
settle the suit out of court. Mrs. Hot-. 
riroan prepared to make at least some 
payment to the family and to its char- 
itable trusts by cutting back expenses 
and selling some property as well as 
three paintings, a Picasso, a Matisse and 
a Renoir. A settlement, reportedly in the 
millions of dollars, was reached at the 
end of 1995. The two sides agreed not to. 
divulge the terms. • ; 

In 1988, Mrs. Harriman ’s choice for- 
president was AJ Gore, not MichaeL 
Dukakis. Between the Democratic 
feat in 1988 and the 1992 election, she 
flirted with a number of candidates be-, 
fore settling on Bill Clinton. Then she* 
committed herself wholeheartedly tp: $ 
raise money for his campaign. He- ' 
showed his gratitude, first, by choosing: 
her house for that first triumphal victory, 
dinner in Washington after his election 
and. second, by choosing her as his* 
ambassador to France. 

That was how Mrs. Harriman came to* 
preside over the palatial mansion that 
serves as the residence of American am-, 
bassadors on the Rue du Faubourg St.-* 
Honore. not very far on a Paris street, 
map but a world away from the Avenue: 
de New York and the apartment shy- 
occupied in the 1950s as Pamela Digby 
Churchill. That she was a woman with ar 

P ast enhanced her standing with the" 
tench. 



| M 1 1 1 1 * 

WL 

<>i iiw 





Clinton Hails Mrs. Harriman as ‘Extraordinary’ Ambassador 


Cony, W bv Oar Suff From Dupmrta 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton 
mourned the death Wednesday of Pamela Har- 
riman. U.S. ambassador to France and Demo- 
cratic Party patroness, calling her “one of the 
most unusual and gifted people I ever met." 

"She was an extraordinary United States am- 
bassador. representing our country as well as our 
government to the people of France," he said, 
“and earning the trust of the leaders and the 
admiration of people." 


Mrs. Harriman, the fund-raising doyenne of the 
Democratic Party, was a supporter of Mr. Clin- 
ton's when he was still in Arkansas and a small- 
state governor with an uncertain future. 

"She was a source of judgment and inspiration 
to me. a source of constant good humor and charm 
and real friendship," Mr. Clinton said. "We will 
miss her very, very much." 

In Paris. President Jacques Chirac praised Mrs. 
Harriman. “The president had a great appre- 
ciation of Pamela Harriman, who was a great U.S. 


ambassador and a great lady," said Mr. Chirac's 
spokeswoman, Catherine Colonna. 

Mr. Chirac telephoned his condolences to Win- 
ston Churchill, Mrs. Harriman’ s son by her first 
husband. Randolph Churchill, and a member of 
Parliament, who was among relatives close by 
when she died, the spokeswoman added. 

She added that the Elysee Palace was in contact 
with tite U.S. Embassy and with Mrs. Haniman’s 
family members about arrangements for a formal 
tribute. (AP, AFP ) 


Israel Mourns 73 Soldiers Killed in Crash 

Reuters 

SHAAR YISHUV, Israel. — Israel 


Germans and Dutch 
Improve Police Links 

The Associated Press 

NOORDWUK. Netherlands — A 
German-Dutch police pact was inaug- 
urated Wednesday in an effort to com- 
bat cross-border crime and forge closer 
cooperation between law enforcement 
authorities. 

The agreement will allow the police 
to pool their resources in criminal in- 
vestigations and prosecutions, accord- 
ing to the Dutch Justice Ministry. 

The accord also provides for better 
methods to share police intelligence. 

The agreement was signed in April 
1996. but was officially put into effect 
by Dutch and German justice repre- 
sentatives who met Wednesday to ar- 
range the final details of the pacL 


mourned Wednesday for 73 soldiers 
killed when their two helicopters 
crashed in the worst air disaster in the 
country's military history. 

The cabinet and Parliament ob- 
served a minute of silence at morning 
meetings, hours after the two U.S.- 
made Sikorsky CH-53 transporters 
collided and crashed Tuesday in Is- 
rael near the Lebanese border. 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netan- 
yahu, on a visit Wednesday to the 
crash site, said the victims were killed 
on a mission to protect their country. 

"The people here know better 
than any how these soldiers and 
heroic commanders take risks to 


protect the residents of the north," 
he said at the’ village of Shaar 
Yishuv, where one of the helicopters 
fell onto a house. Nobody on the 
ground was hurt. 

"Our quest for peace involves 
constant sacrifices, constant risks," a 
grim-looking Mr. Netanyahu said as 
Ik observed rescue workers search- 
ing in the debris. The helicopters had 
been en route to the 15-talometer- 
wide (nine -mile -wide) occupation 
zone in southern Lebanon that Israel 
carved out in 1985 to protea against 
guerrilla attacks. 

The army said that 13 officers 
were among those killed. The Israeli 
defense minister appointed a com- 
mission to investigate. 


“There were no survivors." said 
the army chief. Lieutenant General 
Amnon Shahak. 

The cause of the collision was not 
clear, said the air force chief. Major 
General Eitan Ben-Eliahu. 

"We know of no malfunction be- 
fore the incident," he said. 

Israeli television and radio broad- 
casts repeatedly carried the names of 
the dead and funeral times. Flags were 
lowered to half-staff and shops were 
closed. Mr. Netanyahu canceled 
meetings with King Hussein of 
Jordan on Wednesday and with the 
president of the Palestinian Authority, 
Yasser Arafat, on Thursday. The 
king, Mr. Arafat and President Hosnj 
Mubarak of Egypt sent condolences. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


French Transport Strike Planned 

PARIS (AFP) — Urban bus, streetcar and subway networks 
in the French provinces are expected to be disrupted Thursday 
in a new strike by transportation workers over demands for 
early retirement, officials said Wednesday. 

The strike action is planned to last 24 hours, but could be 
extended. Cities likely to be hit include Toulouse, Marseille, 
Clermont-Ferrand, Nice, Strasbourg, Lyon, Bordeaux. Lille, 
Montpellier, Reims and Tours, union sources said. 

The new action comes after a strike by French railroad 
workers Wednesday that disrupted train services across most 
of the country. 

Czech railroad workers voted Wednesday to extend a 
national strike for another 24 hours after the government 
supported a tough stance reward the strikers. (Reuters) 

American Airlines said it would immediately suspend all 
operations if its pilots' unions decide to strike Feb. 15, an 
action that could leave thousands of passengers stranded in the 
middle of the Presidents' Day holiday weekend. (WP) 

More than 3,000 tractors on Wednesday clogged a major 
provincial highway linking southern Greece with a number of 
central cities as farmers protested, seeking higher subsidies, 
cheaper fuel and debt relief. (AP ) 

Delta Air Lines said it would halt its regular passenger 
flights servicing Moscow and Sl Petersburg from Frankfurt 
starting next month. < Reuters) 

A UJS. Senate committee has approved a bill to reinstate a 
package of taxes including a 10 percent tax on commercial 
airline tickets and a $6-per-ticket tax on international de- 
partures. (AP) 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


WEATHER 


Park Lawns 
Liberated ; 
In Paris 

Reuters 

PARIS — In a policy re-i 
versal. Paris plans to' let; 
people walk on the grass. . • 
City Hall said on Wednes- 
day it would take down ‘ * Keep 
off the grass” signs in the cap- 
ital's413 public parks and gar*., 
dens to give Parisians an un-* 
precedented chance to walk,* 
play or loll on the lawns. • , 

"The capital is not a mu j 
seum and we want to give the 
public back the lawns in Par-, 
is," a city official said. 

Parisians will be allowed! 
access to part of the grass ii£ 
each park, while another sec- 
tion will be roped off to let the - ; 
grass recover. 

Paris also plans to sei up- 
additional chairs and benches! 
in its parks, which cover 3.000; 
hectares (7,410 acres), andl 
provide special provisions fw‘ 
the handicapped. 

Under current laws, any-! 
one venturing onto the grass! 
is ordered off. and some of- 
fenders are fined. 



Depth 

Mtn. 

Res. 

Snow 

Last 


Resort 

L 

U 

Pbtel 

Pistes 

State 

Snow Comments 

Andorra 

Pasde la Casa 

150 

200 

Good 

Hard 

VfJt 

30 

td 29 MS cpsn some great sftaig 

SokJeu 

40 

180 

Good 

Hart 

Pekd 

29(1 

at 21 SB opart at but brad good 

Austria 

Ischgl 

X 

110 

Far 


Pdd 

21/1 

aff 4 1 Ob qpai. good at auw 

Kitzbutiel 

10 

45 

Herd 

•ram 

ihr 

20/1 

Staing /Meaning nKtrWmi (jrnta 'ey 

Lech 

60 

150 

For 


Pekd 

21/1 

at 34 opan. cowr a* good 

Moyrtioton 

20 

40 

Had 

Owed 

Var 

21/1 

01128 We opm a Faaognncok 

Obergurgl 

30 

140 

Goo d 

Had 

PCM 

21/1 

sM 22 ktit open, o d/ranpnpb 

Saatbadi 

20 

30 

Hens 

An 

Var 

Zl/I 

a* Ms upon. ammachneB 

Sl Anton 

45 

170 

For 

*y 

V* 

20/1 

at 32 Ms open, nrarwswiflMq 

Canada 

Lake Louise 

125 

165 

Good 

Opan 

Var 

3G 

a* l?Ms dpan. ratgmmaa p&gs 

Whistler 

70 

240 

Good 

Hart 

Var 

31/1 

at 26 Ms open, great at abtuOe 

Franco 
Alps (THuaz 

BO 

MS 

Fat 

Open 

Vm 

20/1 

74/83 Ms opon, sw* ftaAGood 

Las Arcs 

65 

175 

Good 

Hart 

Var 

30/1 

7G77Mscpan. mtstf gooti dong 

Amnaz 

140 

1B0 

Good 

Open 

Vm 

2 i n 

at Us Open, good tftaugh some lea 

ChamoMi 

10 

216 

Good 

An 

Vet 

5/1 

47MS aferepat, doina tras/i enow 

Courchevel 

95 

125 

Good 

Had 

Petal 

20/1 

at 68 arm opai ptaaa ncUag: up 

Las Deux Alpes 

EO 

275 

Good 

Hard 

Var 

22(1 

5U63 Bb (Wrt r>cc tfmgh wn/y 

Megeve 

25 

140 

Fa* 

ran 

Pctd 

m 

39/4/ Sits opart reafisn®s tdgh up 

Mfidbel 

50 

125 

Far 

Hard 

var 

201 

(tiffy apen. otouIbHaslek 

La Plagne 

100 

180 

Far 

Hard 

Petal 

21/1 

lOS’in fills Open. £ rutr Hairing 

Sens ChevaBer 

BO 

300 

Good 

Hart 

Va 

22 n 

67/73 Me opan. aB but fcmoa pood 

Tlgnaa 

95 

IE0 

Gdod 


Vta 

21/1 

great aOote 2500m. fufe/nor down 

Vttd-Mre 

80 

220 

Good 


Vic 

21/1 

80100 WS qpw. nns pear 

ValThorens 

100 

300 

Good 

Had 

var 

2i n 

a* 25 Mi opart pasm lamui Good 


nuimity 

Berchtesgadan id so 
O barstdoH 15 BO 


far Oread Md 21/1 1531 M* oper^ good 3t sttfucf* 
Far Haul Petal 30/12 bI 26 E#s open, somowftal cKhon 


Rauf 


Deplk 
L U 


Min. Res. Snow Last 
Pistes Pistes Stole Same 


Haty 

Bomrio 

Cervna 

Cortina 

Courmayeur 

Uwtgna 

Matiertma 

Selva 


30 195 
100 410 
X 110 
*5 190 
65 ISO 
«6 » 
25 X 


Far 

Good 

Good 

Good 

Goad 

Goad 

Good 


M Var 201 M//6 Ms o, mmsmg helm 2D0C 

Opm Petal IB/1 afJSMscpari gmtsting 
«T PcM 26/1 at SI tfts open, oda mam path 
nfa Var 2tn 21& Sts open, good Ugh up 
Opan Pcka 2fifl 3001 Us open, greet at leraK 
Hart Petal 20/1 ISfl/Bte epmv pt»e6 moa» get 


OX 


Aspen 

150 

165 

Good 

Open 

Vta 

3 ft 

hjfyc pen. 

Brbckenrfdge 

155 

200 

Good 

Open 

•rated 

3/3 

1? Us and 122 nib open 

Crested Butte 

155 

200 

Good 

Open 

Var 

28/1 

al 13 oner «tog 

Mammoth 

330 

450 

Good 

Opan 

tear 

26/1 

1300 tas opan. amaatattioa 

Park C«y 

190 

2BQ 

Good 

Open 

Vta 

3Q 

at 14 Ms and 88 tab open 

Vail 

1B5 

210 

Good 

Open 

Pekd 

28/1 

20 SB end 4644 acraa qpen 

Winter Paik 

160 

190 

Good 

Open 

Vu 

3/2 

17/30 end flTTttf tab open 


Europe 


Norway 

Geila 

45 

50 

Far 

Hart 

PcM 

18/1 

atlBUBOpen. 120km of amatay 

Switzerland 

Crans Montana 

40 

290 

Good 

ran 

Var 

nn 

4041 Stsa opart peal ar aCKuda 

Davos 

45 

145 

Good 

Hart 

Vta 

21/1 

of 9 M9 (pea m^pDBnMd 

Wasters 

20 

145 

Good 


Vta 

21/1 

af 9 Ms a, patair baton 2DOOm 

Murren 

50 

120 

Fa* 

ley 

Vta 

20/1 

jl f? Mb qpert nee ebon fBOGit 

Saas Fee 

55 

230 

Good 

*9 

Vta 

2771 

2S06 Ms open, g/EfiMerv 

SL Moritz 

4Q 

180 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

2U1 

al lb open, good cowr Mnu£nui 

Xfertuer 

50 

180 

Good 

worn 

var 

21/1 

72/74 Mb cpm. runs arpjaAfe 

Wengen 

10 

90 

Fair 

*9 

Pt*d 

20/1 

»S 20 fits qeen poor jfcpii 

Zermatt 

40 

an 

Hart 

Art 

Vta 

20 /I 

B973 flfcs wearing dorm 



Today 

Tomorrow 


High 

LowW 

H«1 

LowW 


OF 

OF 

OF 

OF 

Akjawe 

18/64 

9/4fi i 

14/57 

W4Bf 


7/44 

205*1 

1060 

409 ah 

Ankara 

0/32 

■an Be 

2/35 

-4/25 e 

AUMns 

lfiffil 

7M4 a 

13/65 

409 eh 

BnnMfcna 

12/53 

3/37 a 

1363 

4(38 a 

Brforafc. 

3/37 

■6422 an 

SOS 

-2/29 pc 

Bertn 

USB 

■e/29po 

a/48 

3*37 c 

Bruaaato 

fi/43 

■was c 

BMfi 

1/34 ah 

ft.Hnpa.at 

-1/31 

-730 pc 

002 

-4/25 pc 

Copanhaoan 

4/39 

307 pc 

7/44 

■2/2 B Gh 

Costa Dei Sol 

IB/84 

8/46 s 

16/81 

e/46 c 

DuMn 

13(55 

7144 tt 

BMfi 

205 DC 

FAfftnph 

11/52 

7744 tal 

7/44 

-1/31 e 

Florence 

W4fi 

-209 pe 

6146 

205 a 

Frnnfcfun 

3/37 

-mi c 

4/38 

1/34 c 

Geneva 

4 ex 

-1/31 pc 

6/46 

104 pc 

1 Marta 

■1/31 

-8/22 c 

307 

-2(28 an 

baartxri 

7/44 

6/41 PC 

7/44 

307 aft 

Los Palmas 

asm 

19*6 PC 

24/75 

18*1 pe 

Dabon 

18/59 

BMQ a 

12/53 

BMfi aft 

lonHon 

9MB 

8/43 c 

BMfi 

1134 e 

Hamm 

iaei 

4091 

12/53 

2/36 pc 

MnOcrra 

11/52 

Ml g 

11/52 

6/43 a 

Intel 

6M0 

-2129 i 

9MB 

1/34 a 

Moscow 

-a/27 

10/15 ta 

-4/25 

■4/25 PC 

Munich 

002 

-408 pc 

7/44 

-lOI DC 

Nee 

13/55 

307 a 

12(53 

7/44 1 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWealher. 



Key-UU: Depth In cm on kwer end upper stapes. Win. Plata* Mounranarfe pMee. Bee. Pistes Hun 
tatting n rason triage. Ait. Andes! sam 

Reports jtffrinri by me Sh Out) et Great Brian 


Ortr 2/35 -2/29 e «*39 

Petal a MS 307 pd 7/44 

Proem 2/35 -2/29 pc 400 

O a.lqmfc -U 2 S -d/ie-MI - 6/22 

Rome 1«/57 3/37 pc 12/53 

SI Puantnng -307 -OMBpc 1/34 
ShcUmM 2Kb -4/29 e fi/43 

Sratfaowg 307 104 c 8/46 

Tatarm -209 -M2 C 205 

Venice S/43 -405 ■ 7U4 

Viara -1131 -405 pc 6*43 

Waraow -1/31 -504 pc *OB 

Zuneh 104 1/31 (HO 


MS pc 

104 c 

-101 e 
■002 c 

3074 
-405 in 

205 an 
3/37 s 
-700 m 
205 po 
205 c 
104 c 
1/34 pc 


Jewreem 

North America Europe 
Near- to above-normal Near- lo above-normel 
tempera! urea will prevail temperatures will prevail 
from the Great Lakes lo across much of Europe. A 
Northeast MDd across die cold shot will move out ol 
Southeast with showers southeast Europe into 
possUe Into Saturday. The Turkey by the weekend. 
Plains Will be tranquil. Stormy weather wW contav- 
wtilta ihe West is stormy ue over Scandinavia into 
Friday and Saturday. The northweet Russia with wet 
unsettled weather will weather from southern Italy 
reach Ihe FtoeMea Sunday, to Greece Friday and Sat- 
urday. 


Asia 

Bailing wiH be mainly dry 
with near- to above-normal 
wmpenMuies through Sat- 
urday. betora turning cold- 
ar Sunday. Both K areas 
and southern Japan wfll be 
mikh Japan wfll be unset- 
tled tfwa weekend. Season- 
able and damp In Hong 
Kong with occasronal 
Showers. 


Asia 



Tomorrow 


High 

LowW 

High 

LowW 


CF 

CF 

CF 

CF 

Ban 

32*9 

2-1/75 1 

32/88 24,75 1 

Bontfc* 



»V86 23/73 c 

&84419 

409 


b/4J 

-K31 s . 

Hcmoav 



30*fi 

17*21 

Cata.lt! 

28/79 


29/79 

12*3 a ‘ 

Chong Mel 

31/88 


30/66 21.70 c . 

Cctomoo 

3080 

31/70 re 

2SW 

21/70 » 


21.70 

17 . 62 r 

22/71 

lfi/81 Hi 

HoCtr Ifliw 

K/33 


33*1 

25.77 pc 

tong Kong 

10(64 

1 CIG 1 r 

20*« 

18/El 611 

tetamaftan 



20/40 


Joknrtu 

31138 

25,77 1 

30.86 

24 7SI ' 

Hand. 

26/79 

13/55 i 

ae/H ? 


4. U*npu 

33/91 

231 73 e 

J2*q 

2173 1 

It Ktantafc: 

329a 


31*8 

24-75 pc 


31.38 

21/70 pc 

3096 


NnwDoW 

24/75 

5,41 s 

2673 

8MB 6 

PnremPenh 

32*9 

23/73 pc 

3289 


Phukca 

31(89 

24.751 

30*6 2073 c 

Hongnon 

31*8 

24.75 1 

31*8 

23,73 e 

Srai 

7/44 

-307 i 

74J 


Shanghai 

9M0 

2/35 pr 

;.J4 

541 r. 

S/ngaooia 

32*9 

24(79 pc 

32,6t. 

2V7T pc 

Ttap« 

I7/B2 

17/62 f 

J2>71 

20*8 r 

Tokyo 

9/48 


1050 


Woneane 

■9*6 

16*1 r 

21/7(1 

1762 ah’ 


North America 



4US1P 


find information on over 100 of the world’s leading aid resorts online 

Planning your ski trip? 


Internet - h{tp //skiin.com Minitet 3G1 


Middle East 


Abu Dhobi 
Baku 
cwn 
□amaacui 


nyttlh 


2Sr77 13/S pc 

a/48 nasn 

1253 2/35 pc 

e/43 4&I 

5/41 MSI 

iaes data 
22m sues 


34/73 13 /sspe 
12/M S/41 B- 
14/57 307 a 
8/48 <OS « 

a/48 -307* 

am 2/35 ■ 
21/70 m*pe 


Today 

Mflh UwV Mgh LowW 

CF CF OF or 

104 MM an 205 -2/29 an 

1407 307 PE 13/55 3/37 c 

7/44 -»7a 3/37 -662 PC 

335 -405 * 1/34 -8/10 oc 

W48 3/37 r BM6 2/35 xh 

Denver -367 -9/IB c 1/34 -862 qc 

Dean* 205 -4/2Sa 305 -760 pc 

Htratti 26/79 20(68 pc S7W 1 CUES pc 

Houston 1305 *48 pc 14/57 8/48 c 

LesAngpM 1S/S6 4/38 a 1956 fi/43 Mr 

UHR1 27/W Ifl/Bfipc 27/60 21/70 oc 


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BtaBau 26(78 IB/84 pc 26/79 KWH DC 

N»a Yorii 7i44 0/38 B 6/43 -269 pc 
24/75 14/57 pc 24/75 14/57 pc 
18/64 fi/43 * 1Q/54 «48 a 

M/57 7«4 pc 13/55 5/41 r 
10(30 3/37 a 10/60 4/39 e 
■161 -11/13 pc -2/£9-r2nic 
10S0 307 pc IQ /50 3/37 0 ; 
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Orlando 


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Toronto 

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fMmw. w-WMtftor AM map*. Jofivam and data proi d wl by AccuWHnf ha, kic C 1507 


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Capo Town 

36/79 




CreaMoncB 

2271 

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19(16 



29/84 

7*4 4 

3I'« 



31*8 

2373 s 

36,90 

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12(53 • 

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Ti»e 

14*7 

M7pe 

11*92 

4/39 pa. 

Latin America 


- 

Buem/ins 

24/75 

18*4 B 

28*2 


Coreoa 

B*4 

2271 pc 

29.84 


LKna 

27/90 




MeacoOty 

2170 

B/4JPC 

21-73 


HUMJanotre 32*9 

2S77 pc 

32W 

22.71 pc. 


29*4 

Il'Wi 

30*6 


Oceania 

Auckland 

21/70 

15/69 pc 

21/70 


Sydney 

26,79 

iaw be 

27*0 20*6 c • 








PAGE 3 




— .. 


,N at: 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, J“>97 

THE AMERICAS " " 



*S&4 .w, f 


* 




/ ':/ 7 ; / :. 
/.j.W*;’ 

/ /w;- 


Clinton’s Dead Heat With the O.J. [erdict: TV’s Finest Minute 


By Tom Shales 

w ^lun/tt(m Pag Service 

^ ledia melldowtt l Input 

• 2S££L^ traffic sddlock! And all in one 
nignt of maximum-strength mega-TV. 

to be a live telecast of Pres- 
Clinton s Stale of the Union Address 
; S^vS*? W m the O. J. Simpson dvfl trial 
m^hfomia announced that Fhad reached a 

; ri™^.33S!,i!f- Worfcs flew * rushe d some- 
. fews stumbled into action. 

verdia were announced while Mr 
Clinton was spe alfin g? 

Network news executives had to weigh the 
.options of cutting away from the speech or 
breaking in with the voice of an anchor or using 
a vifleo-oaly crawl an die screen. The suspense 
was maddemng as the president continued. 

And continued and continued, as be loves to 
•do. 

Then, just as he was reaching his dramatic 
; conclusion, CBS flashed it on the screen: “BuZ- 
. ledm 0.3. Simpson Liable for Ran Goldman 
-P^uh- fr was the first of several verdicts, and 
^■CBS was first to telecast it among the major 
-.networks, followed by ABC, NBC and CNN. 


“I’m afraid it’s going to be; a very long 
evening.’* Senator John McCain. Republican of 
Arizona, said era CNN’s “Crossfire*' more than 
m hoar before the speech started. He was re- 
ferring to Mr. Clin ton's infemous verbosity, but 
the evening was made longer by the vigil that 
television kept outside the Santa Monica 
courtroom, a nod siege" made up of tracks and 
cameras and satellite dishes and hordes of re- 
porters and onlookers. 

Just before the speech, a CBS correspondent, 

COMMENTARY 

Bob Schieffer, cold die anchor. Dan-Rarher, that 
all of Washington was talking about the coming 
verdict, not the coming address. “So far, it has 
completely overshadowed all the talk and all die 
speculation about what tire president might 
say," Mr. Schieffer said. 

- Mr. Rather promised viewers that die speech 
would be followed by a 11 ‘quickie poll’ ’ of a focus 
group reacting to what the president said. But 
only a few mmutes later, with the suspense and 
momentum budding about the Simpson verdicts, 
Mr, Rather said the poll was being abandoegd. 
“In a-word, we’ve canned that.” he said. 


In fee hour before the speech, there was no 
news to report from Santa Monica other than 
feat the verdicts had been reached and would be 
announced that night. 

But fee networks were duly-bound to stay on 
the air since they could not predict exactly when 
that announcement would come. At 8:26 PM., 
an ABC reporter, Cynthia McFadden. said that 
fee verdicts could be made public ‘ ‘within mo- 
ments,** but it was nearly two hours later that 
they finally woe. 

ABC was concentrating so much on the ver- 
dicts that the State of fee Union Address was 
almost forgotten. Its anchor, Peter Jennings, 
promised up-to-the-minute verdict coverage, 
then added almost parenthetically, “And of 
course, the president speaks to fee nation. That is 
coming on as welL” This was about 30 minutes 
before fee scheduled start of fee speech, though 
the actual start was 15 minutes late. 

■ It seemed highly unlikely that the verdicts 
would be announced before Mr. Clinton began 
speaking. Hie question was at what point in his 
address they would come. He was almost done 
speaking when the news came out. so those in 
the House chamber did not bear it until after fee 
American people fed. 


Ironically, fee huge viewer interest in the 
Simpson verdicts probably will turn out to be a 
ratings bonanza for Mr. Clinton. What could you 
do but station yourself in front of the television 
screen and not move? Mr. Clinton’s could turn 
out to be the most-watched State of the Union 
Address in television history. 

In the hour before the speech, NBC, ABC and 
CNN all bad video from the scene in Santa 
Monica: the courthouse mostly, and also shots 
from Mr. Simpson’s home in Brentwood. But 
CBS curiously stuck wife talking beads and 
showed almost no pictures from the West Coast. 
What CBS did was put on a very good radio 
show. Unfortunately, this was supposed to be 
television. 

Mr. Rather, of course, was never sluggish and 
stayed on the air continuously with only a half- 
hour break between fee “Evening News” and fee 
start of prime-rime coverage. He did get a little 
rattled on occasion, twice referring to the coming 
speech as Mr. Clinton’s “inaugural address” 
then quickly co rre c tin g himself and saying, 
“Live television goes feat way sometimes.” 

As for tte speech itself, it almost seemed like an 
afterthought wife the Simpson mania. But it was 
crisply delivered, often forceful and emphatic. 


As predicted, Mr. Clinton spent more time on 
education (about 15 minutes of die hour-long 
speech) than on any other subject The speech 
was not brilliantly written, as Clinton speeches 
never seem to be, but as a presentation under 
rather remarkable conditions — with everyone 
watching and yei distracted — it has to be rated 
as at least very good. 

Mr. Clinton looked bright-eyed and bushy- 
haired. Things went well for him in fee chamber 
and on the tube. Let's face it; fee man has got 
television licked. It wasn't an easy victory, as it 
was for Ronald Reagan, but he brought it off just 
the same. 

“What a day and what an evening this is 
turning out to be,’ ' Mr. Rather said early in the 
night. This was true. About half an hour later, 
Mr. Clinton was one minute into his speech 
when he declared, ‘ ‘My fellow Americans: The 
state of our union is strong. ’ ’ 

Wouldn’t it have been funny if he’d then said, 
“Thank you and good night”? Or if he’d ar- 
ranged to have the O. J. verdicts given to him so 
he could read them at the end of the speech? 

Well, maybe not funny, no. But it would have 
been fee only thing that could have made this 
media- mad night any media-madder. 


DNA Gives Shelter 
To 6 The Fugitive’ 

Tests Bade Doctor in 1954 Killing 


By Peter Finn 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — An 
enduring mystery in the his- 
tory of U.S. crime — fee 1954 
Sam Sheppard murder case 
that inspired the television 
series “The Fugitive’’ — 
may have been resolved. 

New DNA testing of 42- 
year-old evidence from the 
Ohio slaying suggests that Dr. 
\ Sheppard was telling the tnife 
when he said feat an intruder, 
and not he, bludgeoned his 
pregnant wife to death. 

■The intruder became the 
mythical “one-armed man” 
on television, the movies and 
in the popular imagination. 

' The DNA test results, 
presented to the Cuyahoga 
County prosecutor’s office m 
Cleveland on Tuesday, found 
the blood and semen of a thud 
person on crime scene items. 

- The findings supported the 
physician's much-scorned 
story that a shadowy, 
“bushy-haired” ' figure at- 
tacked his wife. Marilyn, in 
her bed as Dr. Sheppard slept 
nearby on a couch m the early 
morning of July 4, 1954. 
Largely because of circum- 
t stantiaJ evidence, and be- 
cause no credible evidence of 
an intruder ever surfaced. Dr. 
Sheppard, then 30. was found 
guilty of the murder. The con- 
viction was overturned 10 
years later in a key U.S. Su- 
preme Court ruling that pre- 
judicial publicity had nude 
the trial a “carnival.” 

At a second trial in 1966, in 
which Tie was defended by F. 
Lee Bailey, Dr. Sheppard was 
acquitted. But doubts about 
his innocence persisted. He 
died an alcoholic in 1970. 
guilty of murder in the eyes of 
many. 

"I feel Dad is definitely 
exonerated,” said Sam Reese 


- : •'U - ■ * 


Sheppard, the Sheppards’ 
only son, in a phone interview 
from San Francisco. ‘The 
truth has finally prevailed 
Since I heard the results I’ve 
bounced back and forth be- 
tween. anger and relief. At 
least, now Mom and Dad can 
be remembered as fee people 
they truly were.” . . 

Exactly who fee killer was, 
however, DNA, the molecular 
basis of heredity, cannot say 
— at least wife any certainty. 

Earlier this year, an Ohio 
judge, hearing a civil case in 
. which Dr. Sheppard's son is 
seeking a declaration of in- 
nocence for his father, 
ordered that a blood sample 
be drawn from Richard Eber- 
ling, who had washed fee 
windows in the Sheppards’ 
suburban Cleveland home 
around the time of the 
murder. Mr. Eberling, 67, is 
serving a life sen fence in Ohio 
for murder in another case. 

Mr. Eberling, who denies 
having lolled Marilyn Shep- 
pard. was identified as a sus- 
pect through a ; six-year 
private investigation of the 
murder by lawyers and m- 
vestigatoxa working wife Sam 
Reese Sheppard. 

The allegation was con- 
tained in a 1995 bode, 
“Mockery of Justice: The 
True Story of the Sheppard 
Murder Case” by Sam Reese 
Sheppard ' and Cynthia 
Cooper. 

The DNA tests found that 
Mr. Eberling could not be 
ruled out as the source of 
blood from the crime scene 
because he shared a key ge- 
netic marker wife Mood and 
semen taken from it But the 
analysis falls short of declar- 
ing a match between Mr. 
Eberling’ s DNA and feat ex- 
tracted from evidence. 

The testing was conducted 
by Mohammad Tahir, DNA 


ii ” ‘If- • : 

I;,-. .• .* •£•/- . 




r 


technical manager at the In- 
dianapolis- Marion • County 
Forensic Services Agency. 

Mr. Tahir extracted DNA 
from a bloodstain an Mr. 
Sheppard’s pants, from a 
blood drop on a wood chip 
token from fee basement stairs 
in fee Sheppard home and 
from vaginal swabs taken from 
Mrs. Sheppard. 

Testing of the swabs indi- 
cated the presence of semen. 

DNA analysis shows that 
the blood and fee semen come 
from the same person, Mr. 
Tahir mid. And those 
samples, in turn, are consist- 
ent with a key DNA marker in 
Mr. Eberiing's blood, Mr. 
Tahir said. 

But there are also unac- 
counted-for markers in the 
crime-scene samples, which 
makes it impossible to tie 
them directly to Mr. Eberling, 
Mr. Tahir added. 

The test results conclude 
that fee blood from the wood 


chip and the pants are incon- 
sistent wife Mis. Sheppard's. 

This is significant because 
they could not have been Mr. 
Sheppard’s blood, either. Ac- 
cording to all reports, includ- 
ing physical examinations on 
the morning of the murder by 
doctora hostile to his position, 
Mr. Sheppard had no cuts or 
wounds on his body feat 
could have bled 

And if the blood was not 
his, the semen could not have 
been his, either. 

Dr. Sheppard’s story, never 
wavering but not very con- 
vincing, was that he awoke 
during fee early hours of July 4 
to the sound of his wile’s 
screams. He said feat he was 
sleeping on a daybed in die 
couple’s lakcfronr home in the 
Cleveland suburb of Bay Vil- 
lage and that he rushed upstairs 
and was knocked unconscious 
by a blow to the head. 

After checking for his 
wife's pulse and finding 


Simpson’s Hopes Dashed 
For a Social Resurrection 




t*'. 

«<*<,... . I 


IV AaaonaNd Pren 

Dr. Sam Sheppard being returned to his Cleveland cell in 1954 after his conviction. 


none. Dr. Sheppard said he 
heard a noise downstairs and 
chased a man out of the house 
and down to the beach, where 
the two wrestled before Dr. 
Sheppard was overpowered 
and knocked out again. He 
described the assailant as a 
tall man wife a big head and 
bushy hair. 

The police never believed 
Dr. Sheppard. A man of ar- 
rogance, he was an immediate 
suspect. 

Those in Cleveland who 
have long been convinced of 
Dr. Sheppard’s guilt said they 
were unswayed by the new 
findings. . 

* ‘The basic problem here is 
that they do not have Sam 
Sheppard’s DNA.” said Mi- 
chael Corrigan, a common 
pleas court judge in Cleve- 
land whose father prosecuted 
Dr. Sheppard. “And the 
DNA results they do have 
seem inconclusive because of 
that.” 


By James Rainey 

Lot Angdes Tima 

LOS ANGELES — In the end, O.J. 
Simpson, was resigned to it Not just to fee 
vert&ct, but to the loss of stature, of con- 
siderable wealth and, certainly, of public ad- 
ulation. 

A civil jury’s finding that Mr. Simpson was 
responsible for fee death of his former wife 
and her friend could only reinforce the former 
football idol’s feeling that his hopes of a 
public resurrection had vanished, a close con- 
fidante said. 

“He can’t win as far as be is concerned,” 
said the associate, who had spoken to Mr. 
Simpson in fee days preceding fee verdict 
Tuesday. “He knows be is ruined by ail of 
this. Now he is just going to go on in the best 
way that he can.” 

In the ranks of Mr. Simpson's boosters, the 
jury’s decision heaps injustice on a man 
wrongly accused. For his attackers, $8-5 mil- 
lion is a pittance; only life in prison would 
have been fair punishment. 

But for Mr. Simpson himself, fee court's 
judgment comes as just another reversal in a 
life already constrained in almost every sense, 
even without fee presence of prison bars. 

He is likely to lose most of what remains of 
his fortune. The considerable resources he will 
maintain will constantly be within striking 
distance of the court's judgment He will find it 
difficult, if not impossible, to work, or trade on 
his orice golden persona. He has been rejected 
by many of the country club friends and golf 
buddies who once embraced him. Even in fee 
black community, generally a bastion of sup- 
port, Mr. Simpson’s attempts to fashion a new 
life are likely to be haunted by the killings. 

What Mr. Simpson will tty to fall back on, 
according to friends, is a rekindled family life, 
an undying obsession with golf and the sup- 
port of a few allies, like his lifelong friend A1 
Cowlings. 

Lathe “suicide” note he left before leading 
police on the now-infamous chase around 
Southern California, Mr. Simpson himself 
predicted, “No matter what tire outcome, 
people will look and point.” 

As Mari Womack, a UCLA cultural an- 
thropologist, said after Mr. Simpson was ac- 
quitted in the slaying of Nicole Brown 
Simpson and Ronald Goldman, “When the 
paragon falls, he falls wife a heavy crash.” 

It is a measure of fete considerable stigma 
surrounding Mr. Simpson that almost every- 
one interviewed for this story, including lus 
backers, insisted on remaining anonymous. 


Now, an expected appeal of the jury verdict 
could drag on for months. Soon, sources said, 
he is likely to file a malpractice suit against his 
onetime friend and erstwhile defense team 
member. Robert KardasMan. for Mr. Kar- 
dashian’s alleged breech of legal ethics in 
assisting in a book that detailed many of the 
Mir. Simpson defense team’s tactics. 

Mr. Simpson can expect his former in-laws 
to renew fear challenge of his custody of his 
children. He potentially could be forced to 
return to court for years as the Brown and 
Goldman families attempt to collect the judg- 
ment. 

Mr. Simpson could very well lose his 
Brentwood estate and his Bentley automobile. 
A San Francisco condominium where his 
mother lives also could be seized. 

Still. Mr. Simpson will be left with sub- 
stantial assets— -principally pension accounts 
that total about $2 .5 million. 

There has been some speculation that Mr. 
Simpson might give up his longtime base on 
fee west side of Los Angeles and relocate to 
Florida, where the law would make his prin- 
cipal home not subject to court seizure. 

Mr. Simpson has said little, however, about 
hisplans. 

The one theme that he has repeated is that, 
at 50. be intends to devote much of fee rest of 
his life to rearing 1 1-year-old Sydney and 8- 
y ear-old Justin, the children he had wife. 
Nicole. 

“I think he will spend more time with his 
kids than he ever has,” said one associate, 
who speaks to Mr. Simpson regularly. “He 
loves them and wants them. I just know feat is 
where his heart is cm this.” 

But his former in-laws, Louis and Juditba 
Brown, who raised the children during die 
protracted criminal trial, have said they would 
press their efforts to get die children back. 

Several legal experts predicted Tuesday, 
however, that even fee finding that Mr. 
Simpson was liable for the killing of two 
people might not reverse fee decision by an 
Orange County judge in December to give 
him custody of Ms children. 

Mr. Simpson is said to worry that his efforts 
to build a relationship with the children will 
never be freed from fee intense public scrutiny 
that follows him. 

They have made a few forays into the 
Brentwood community. But most people, in a 
community that is studiously disinterested in 
celebrity, simply ignore Mr. Simpson. 

That experience might be welcomed by 
some, friends said, but is painful to a man who 
once reveled in his fame. 


Plea for Qiernical Weapons Pact 

WASHINGTON — The acting chief of the CIA said 
Wednesday that fee United States needed the Chemical 
Weapons Convention to help determine whether hostile 
nations were developing chemical or bidwcal arsenals. 

George Tenet, acting director of central intelligence, told 
the Senate Intelligence Committee that the treaty, awaiting 
Senate ratification, contains valuable tools that will help 

* 

said “Buithere are tools in this treaty such as date ^changes 
and on-site inspections which will help us verify. 

The likelihood of discovering and stopping covert pro- 
duction of chemical weapons is at the heart offeedetete m 
Congress over ratification of fee convention, whnfewaUd 
ouSwTdevclopraent. production *md “JV 
weapons. Opponents contend tt is flawed by inadequate 
verification provisions. * ' 

$21 Billion for Welfare ‘Flaws’ 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Cintron's new budget 


AMERICAN 

~TOPICS 

Architecture Students live Close to Nature 

60 odd shelters, ^ someti^ live for 

Norman, started wife 
' ** StaSsu^oalmnnsLO^rai 

walls, a Mlarbartetyairf even 
experience hasprovitolM 


POLITICAL 


will call for spending more than S21 billion to ease the 
impact of die new welfare law on poor families and im- 
migrants who have not become citizens, according to budget 
documents circulated throughout the administration. 

The figure is about one-third higher than earlier estimates 
of how much Mr. Clinton would spend 'to fix what be 
characterized as “serious flaws” in fee welfare measure 
passed only five months ago. 

The welrare law cuts off disability and food stamp benefits 
to most legal immigrants who are Dot citizens. In the 
documents, Mr. Clin ton proposed restoring benefits to about 
250,000 noncitizens who became disabled after they entered 
the country. He also imposes increasing funds to create job 
opportunities for welfare and food stamp recipients who will 
be required to work under the new law. 

The welfare bill, passed by Congress last summer and 
signed by fete president in August, would save $54 billion 
over five years. If enacted, Mr. Clinton’s new budget pro- 
posal would reduce those savings substantially. (WP) 

Vote on Term-Limit Amendment 

WASHINGTON — The House Judiciary Coraraitiee has 
voted to send a constitutional amendment feat would limit 


may choose to live in conventional dormitories, those who 
pick fee shelters find it a powerful experience. No electricity 
is permitted, and students have u> trek through rocky terrain to 
reach communal bath facilities. But as Ms. Norman said, “ft’s 
probably the most beautiful thing about being here.” 

Mr. Wright arrived in the area in 1937 to build Taliesin 
West, his winter home, studio and architecture school He 
died in 1959. Today, students spend half fee year at Taliesin 
West and the other half at Taliesin, Mr. Wright’s former 
summer home and studio in Spring Green, Wisconsin. 

Short Takes 

' The well-heeled New Yorker prep ari ng for a ski vacation 
no longer has to worry about altitude sickness. An upscale 
health club in Manhattan, Crunch Fitness, has installed what 
it calls a hypoxic workout room, which simulates die air at 
.9,000 feet (2.700 meters) by lowering the amount of oxygen 
from fee normal 21 percent, at sea level to the 35 percent 
typical, say, of Aspen, Colorado. Wcdring ont in the room for 
three weeks before a mountain vacation, a Crunch spokesman 
says, makes fee body better at processing oxygen and helps 
fee . vacationer avoid die headaches, dizziness and nausea 
often associated wife trips to high altitudes. - 


lawmakers' service to 12 years in each chamber of Congress 
to the full House for a vote, though even supporters said its 
chances for passage were uncertain. 

Reflecting the deep divisions the term-limit issue has 
generated in Congress, the panel voted, 19 to 12, on Tuesday 
to seed the amendment to the House for a vote, likely next 
week, without a recommendation feat it pass. House com- 
mittees usually endorse the legislation they produce. 

Representative Bill McCollum, Republican of Florida, a 
proponent of term limits, acknowledged feat getting fee 290 
House votes required to approve a constitutional amendment 
may be “a little beyond the grasp of this Congress.” (WP) 


Quote /Unquote 


Chuck Hagel. Republican of Nebraska, a congressional 
freshman who staged the Republicans’ biggest Senate upset 
of the 1996 season when be beat Governor Ben Nelson, 
reacting to President Bill Clinton’s State of fee Union 
address: “The speech was really mush. The most pressing 
issue we have to deal wife in trns country is Medicare and 
what did he give it — five lines? Thai’s not leadership. He 
put all the fun things up front — and they look like they’re 
going to cost a lot. ” [WP) 


The Miss America contest this year faces a serious risk of 
having no Miss Vermont. Last year, only 10 young women 
competed. This year, unless someone is found to direct fee 
contest, it might not happen at all. Evidently, Vermonters, 
who are known as thrifty, conservative-minded individu- 
alists, figure they have better things to do. The state contest 
director stepped down last month to care for a rick relative. 

There are bad job interviews — the interviewer falls 
asleep, you spill catsup on your white shirt during lunch — 
and then there are really bad job interviews. Usa Cunningham 
of Grand Ridge, Illinois, was being interviewed for a job at a 
local power plant when the man interviewing her pulled a gun 
from Ms desk drawer, asked her if she liked guns, and began 
waving fee weapon around. Finally, as he reached to return 
the gun to fee drawer, it went off, and the bullet struck him in 
the knee. In die chaos that followed, police arrived, informed 1 
her of her right to remain silent, and told her she was being 
considered a suspect She went home and heard nothing more 
from fee police. 4 ‘I can only assume that once my interviewer 
regained consciousness,” she told The SL Petersburg Times 
of Florida, “he confirmed my story.” Incredibly, fee com- ] 
pany contacted her with a job offer. She turned it down. ! 
huernaaonal Herald Tribune 


Away From Politics 

• The army should re-examine whether the benefits of joint 

military training for men and women outweigh the drawbacks, 
the army’s chief of staff. General Dennis Reimer, said in a 
Senate Armed Services Committee bearing called to address 
fee military’s response to recent allegations of widespread 
sexual misconduct by military trainers. Several senators sug- 
gested that mixed-sex training contributed to the problem, but 
General Reimer said he believed the quality of die army had 
improved because of the integration of women. (WP) 

• Properties offered by the state of California as part of a 

$380 million swap to protect an ancient redwood forest are 
unacceptable to amber company officials, who want cash 
instead. Bat Pacific Lumber Co. of Scotia and its corporate 
parent, Texas-based Maxxam Corp., stopped short of saying 
feat the tentative agreement was dead. State and federal 
officials will meet with Maxxam representatives Monday in 
Washington to discuss fee status of fee swap. (AP) 

• The aviation safety commission headed by Vice President 

A! Gore is nearing completion of a set of recommendations 
ranging from air traffic control upgrades to development of 
passenger profiles to spot possible terrorists. An early set of 
draft recommendations contain few surprises, other than a call 
for an interagency task force to study possible missile defense 
systems for airliners. The recommendations are scheduled to 
be aired in a public hearing next week. (WP ) 

• A DNA profile, taken from blood found at a 1992 crime 
scene, has led to the arrest of a man wanted in the stabbing 
deaths of five women. Danny Keith Hooks, 38, was arrested in 
San Jose. California, after an FBI taskforce began a search for 
him in fee San Francisco area. The victims were found May 
1 6, 1992, in a house in Oklahoma City. All had been stabbed 
repeatedly, and four had been sexually assaulted. (AP) 


"The Discount Street for Arts de la Table in Paris'" 



0 


Ofv ALL LEADING- 
BRANDS: 

CHINA CRYSTAL 
SILVERWARE 
& GIRTS 

SALES IN 
FEBRUARY 


Rue de Par.idii - Paris X' - Metro Poissonniere/Gaie de l'Est 




-wv? ■ --- e- 








PAGE 2 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAT, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1W7_ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Pakistan to Test Fragile Democracy 

The Problem Is Not Elections but the Periods Between Them 




By Kenneth J. Cooper 

Washington Post Service 

ISLAMABAD. Pakistan — It took 
■ more than two decades for Pakistan to 
hold its first free election and almost 
two more for national votes to become 
the standard way to transfer political 
power. Other habits of democracy, 
however, have yet to take hold. 

“The problem is not elections,” said 
Peter Manikas, a senior consultant to the 
National Democratic Institute, which 
has monitored several Pakistani elec- 
tions. “The problem is what happens 
between elections.” 

Four national votes in the last eight 
years, pining two competitive political 
parties against each other, have not in- 
creased government accountability — 
and actually may have increased cor- 
ruption. The country's courts, which are 
only partly independent of political in- 
fluence, have not been trusted to probe 
official wrongdoing evenhandedly, 
leaving corruption investigations to 
temporary, ineffective tribunals. 

Opposition parties in Parliament 
have been single-mindedly devoted to 
ousting the government of the day, 
which they have succeeded in doing 
four times since 1988 through similar 
dismissal orders issued by indirectly 
elected presidents. 

Behind it all looms the military, 
which has ruled Pakistan for half its 50- 


year history and remains a stabilizing 
but secretive power. Public memory of 
martial law, which ended a decade ago, 
continues to stifle free expression. 

The problems of Pakistan’s demo- 
cracy are so manifold that a Council on 
Foreign Relations panel recently 
warned that the developing nation of 

130 milli on “may turn into a failed 
state” if its political leaders do not 
change course. 

The leader with the greatest oppor- 
tunity to solidify Pakistan's democracy 
is the presumptive prime minister, Mian 
Nawaz Sharif. 47. whose Pakistan 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Muslim League won an unprecedented 
two-thirds majority in parliamentary 
elections Monday. Mr. Sharif, who also 
was prime minis ter from 1990 to 1993, 
will face a small, disjointed opposition 
possibly led by the Pakistan People's 
Party of tbe ousted prime mini ster. 
Benazir Bhuttor which captured about 
20 seats. 

’‘Benazir Bhutto has totally des- 
troyed our economy, so we'll have to 
bring in very bold reforms,” Mr. Sharif 
said Wednesday. “Since we have an 
overwhelming majority, we are prepar- 
ing a fresh agenda.' ' 

Mr. Sharifalso has promised to break 
a pattern in which Pakistani leaders 
have been accused of using courts and 


investigative agencies to exact revenge 
on political opponents. He seemingly 
did it to Miss Bhutto's family alter she 
was dismissed from office and he suc- 
ceeded bcr in 1990; she did it to Mr. 
Sharif’s family after his resignation 


brought her back to power in 1993. 

“We are not going to indulge in any 
politics of revenge, Mr. Sharif said in 
Lahore, his home town and the capital of 
Punjab province. * ‘It will be clean , good 
politics, and we'll try to seek her co- 
operation to take the country for- 
ward.”- 

Miss Bhutto, despite charging that 
the election was rigged, congratulated 
Mr. Sharif on Wednesday and said she 
would not try to destabilize the new 
government. Her party would not have 
the strength to undermine Mr. Sharif in 
Parliament anyway, and her popularity 
has fallen so far that she would have 
difficulty organizing street protests of 
any size. 

“The country needs political stabil- 
ity,” Miss Bhutto 'said. "Our people 
need economic relief. The two go hand 
in hand.” 

International election observers have 
not supported Miss Bhutto's charges of 
election rigging. Observers from both 
the European Union and Common- 
wealth nations pronounced the voting to 
have been generally fair and free. 

The apparent cease-fire between the 
two longtime rivals could undergo an 


• . *Y- ^ 

. . ... Jl 








Dylan MutraetfRcw ca 

Qazi Hussain Ahmad, a fundamentalist leader in Pakistan, gesturing as 
he spoke Wednesday at a rally for Kashmir’s independence from India. 


immediate test. Ethics legislation bar- 
ring winning candidates from taking 
their seats tf they have defaulted on 
loans from government-owned banks or 
have violated campaign spending limits 
has been used in the past to pursue 
political vengeance, and several can- 
didates are known to be in default. 

In her post-election news conference. 
Miss Bhutto indicated that she would try 
to achieve while out of power what 
critics have said she could not do in 


office — secure a strong democracy in 
Pakistan. She led a crusade for demo- 
cracy dial resulted in the restoration of 
free elections in 1988, but both gov- 
ernments she has led since then have 
been dismissed an presidential orders. 

“We’ve had four national assemblies 
sacked,” she said. “We’ve had politi- 
cians defamed. Enough is enough. I 
think we should give this country a 
breathing chance for parliamentary 
democracy to work.” 


India’s Leader * 
Is Open to Talks 
With Pakistan 


Agenrr f-rancc-Preue / 

NEW DELHI Prime Minister 
H.D. Deve Gowda said Wednesday that 
the country was ready for talks with 
Pakistan after general elections them, 
the Press Trust of India reported. - 
Mr. Deve Gowda, in Port Louis in 
Mauritius on a two-day visit, also hinted 
that he might be ready to meet tire jjricnfe 
minister-designate. Mian Nawaz Sharif, 
if tal k s at the ministerial level went 
well. 

He said India would “fully cooperate 
with Islamabad" but would wail for 
Pakistani prime minister-designate do 
make the first move. 

“Let him first assume office and ex- 
tend an official invitation to us for 
talks,” Mr. Deve Gowda said, adding: 
“India is keen to have mutual dialogue 
and discussions with Pakistan to son out 
our pending problems. “ 

Mr. ShanFs Pakistan Muslim League 
nounced the Pakistan People’s Party qf 
Benaztr Bhutto in federal and provincial 
elections Monday. - 

There has been no official dialogue 
between India and Pakistan since Janu- 
ary 1994, when the foreign ministers of 
the two countries met in Is lama bad, tfie 
session ending in acrimony. * 

India's relationship with Pakistan has 
been uneasy since the two countries; - ' 
went their separate ways after winning r 
independence from Britain in 1947. 


4 - Way Korean Talks Get 
Support of Pyongyang 

TOKYO — North Korea would “pos- 
itively” consider joining proposed four-na- 
tion talks aimed at a permanent peace on tbe 
Korean Peninsula, a senior Pyongyang of- 
ficial was quoted as saying Wednesday. 

“We would positively consider four-way 
talks if they were to work in favor of peace and 
the reunification of the peninsula." Hwang 
Jang Yop, secretary of the ruling Workers 
Party, told Japan's Kyodo press agency. 

North Korea had agreed to attend a prep- 
aratory joint briefing by U.S. and South 
Korean officials bn the four-nation peace 
talks, which would also include China, but 
Pyongyang has put off attending the briefing 
this months. (Reuters) 

China’s ‘Disgrace’ to End 

BEIJING — The disgrace and humiliation 
that China suffered for more than 150 years 
will disppear with the re nun of British-held 
Hong Kong to Chinese rule this year, the 
deputy prime minister of China, Qian Qichen, 


said Wednesday. “Hong Kong will return to 
the embrace of the motherland,” the Xinh ua 
press agency quoted him as saying in a mes- 
sage to the people of Hong Kong to mark the 
last Chinese Lunar New Yea under British 
rule. 

“Asa result, the disgrace and humiliation 
China has suffered from for more than 150 
years will disappear,” Mr. Qian said, re- 
ferring to the unequal treaties China signed 
after its defeat by Britain in the mid- 19th 
century and under which Hong Kong was 
handed over to Britain. (Reuters) 

Offensive in Sri Lanka 

COLOMBO — Sri Lanka's army has 
launched its biggest offensive this year 
against rebel-held territory in tbe north and so 
far has met no resistance, military officials 
and news reports said Wednesday. 

Tamil separatists abandoned two camps 
before tbe major offensive, a Defense Min- 
istry spokesman said. (Reuters) 

Jakarta Curbs Politics 

JAKARTA — The Indonesian govern- 
ment has further tightened its grip on political 



STARTING YOUNG — 
South Korean children 
aboard a boat off the west 
coast of Korea wearing 
the national flag and 
headbands with slogans 
protesting Taiwan’s plan 
to ship nuclear waste to 
North Korea for disposal. 


Yw Jai Hjflungtfbe Aoraucd he* 


activity before the May 29 general elections, 
saying officials will review speeches before 
they are broadcast during the campaign. 

"A team that includes officials from the 
Home Affairs and Info rmati on ministries will 
screen the speeches before they are broad- 
cast,” an official of the committee overseeing 
the elections said Wednesday. 

Political broadcasts are made over state 
television and radio and relayed on private 
networks. 

Tbe official said speeches from the three 
parties legally permitted to contest the na- 
tional and local elections should not attack the 
government and should stick to the programs 


of the respective political groups. (Reuters) 

VOICES From Asia 

Yoshinobu Shimamura, public relations 
chief in Japan's governing Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party, on women who served as wartime 
prostitutes for Japanese soldiers: “Koreans 
and Chinese were recruiting women, with 
local pimps playing the role in most cases. 
Some women chose themselves to follow such 
a path. Which was better, being a poverty- 
stricken daughter or being able to say ‘hello’ 
fashionably? They were quite proud. ” (AFP). 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 

EUROPE 


llp^H "f? 

«ii» Albright’s Discovery Is a Familiar Story to Thousands 


By Gustav Niebuhr 

New York Tunes Service 


“It is c hillin gly similar to my own 
story,’ ’ said Kati Marton, an author and 
journalist who ranigr^d as a child frcm 


NEW YORK p o jum uanst wno emigrated as a cmia Horn 

Madeleine Albrinht'sdSS^ ^ ** un £ ar y w *tb her parents in the 1950s. 

wa? Reared ** a Roman Catholic, she dis- 
ELwa covered at 29that her parrats were bom 


olic, she was of Jewish background and 
■ -had lost relatives in the Holocaust, 
opens a window onto one of the mare 

poignant legacies of the Nad era. • 

wSfw^n 50 , 5 ' 62 ” after the end of 
•World War n. thousands of adults in 
-Eun^pe. the United States and Russia 
continue to discover that their origins 
-are not what they had been told. 

Many are stunned at the revelation of 
, 'personal histones that were suppressed 
« .by parents who believed that the survival 
of their families lay in burying the past 

“In Poland, every single day, Jews 
surface who thought they were Cath- 
olics all their life," said Abraham Fox- 
man, national director of the Anti-De- 
iamation League of B’nai B’rith. 

: Mrs. Albright’s history came to light 
in an unusual way, through inquiries by 
a Washington Post reporter preparine a 
.profile of her. 

But in it, others felt the shock of 
recognition. 


Jews and that her maternal grandparents 
died at Auschwitz. ■ 

“I just felt I wasn’t who I thought J 
was,** said Ms. Marten, who is host of 
“America and the World,’* a National 
Public Radio program sponsored by the- 
Council on Foreign Relations. “It was 
just an unsettling reeling.’* 

Clinical psychologists who work 
with Holocaust survivors and thcjr chil- 
dren say that those who decided to cloak 
their pasts in silence saw their decisions 
as basic to survival, perhaps more out of 
instinct than reason. 

“There are so marry reactions people 
bad to having lived through that per- 
secution,” said Dr. Joseph GcHebter, a 
cGnical psycihologist ra Brooklyn, New 
York, who has led discussion groups for 
Holocaust survivors and their children. 
“One of the reactions people had,** be 
added, “was to .avoid their Jewish- 
ness.” — 

The Washington Post, quoting Naaa- 


era documents as well as some of Mrs. 
Albright’s European relatives; reported 
that more than a dozen members of her 
family, including three grandparents, 
. were slain as Jews daring the Holocaust 
Mbs. Albright said her parents never told 
hex of this. 

That they did not may seem odd 
today, in an era when there is an Amer- 
ican Holocaust Memorial Museum on 
the Washington Mall, but that reflects 
how modi certain cultural values have 
changed. 

‘ ‘The atmosphere after World War II 
was not necessarily what it is today, 
with anti-Semitism,'* Dr. Geljebter 
said. Referring to an infamous pogrom 
in Kielce, Poland, he added: “I mean, 
people were killed in 1946.” 

Dr. Yael Danieli, a New York clinical 
psychologist who is co-founder and di- 
rector of the Group Project for Holo- 
caust Survivors and their Children, said 
a decision by parents to hide their Jew- 
ish identities “could be conscious or 
unconscious,” but often stemmedfrom 
the belief that it was in their children’s 
interests. 

It is a matter of protecting the child. 
Dr. Danieli said. “You’re talking about a 


very complex psychological reaction.” 
From her experiences dealing with 
survivors, she recalled encountering a 
woman whose parents converted to 
Catholicism immediately after the war 
pd raised their daughter Catholic “to 
insure that if die Holocaust ever 
happened again, she would be safe.” 
She also spoke of meeting a man 
whose parents had not Juki him circum- 
cised, so that he would not be targeted 
should another persecution occur. 

Mrs. Albright was bom in Prague in 
1937, the daughter of Josef Korbel, a 
Czech diplomat The family left 
Czechoslovakia just before the Nazis 
invaded in 1939 and spent the war years 
in London. 


in 1945, but were granted political 
asylum in America after a Communist 
coup in Czechoslovakia in 1948. 

Dr. Danieli suggested another reason 
that some Holocaust survivors would 
not discuss their past. 

“The survivors were focused on 
building a new life in anew country with 
all the difficulties that come with that, 
where you don’t have the language and 
the customs,” she said. That process, 


she added, is “future-oriented,” unlike 
mourning. 

Still, the price of keeping such secrets 
can be tension between parents and chil- 
dren, when the laner discover the 
truth. 

Such was the case with Ms. Marion. 
“It’s still a tender topic,” she saidL “but 
I think we've found our way back to 
each other, as loving people do." 

Mr. Foxman, who was bom in Poland 
in 1940, tells a somewhat different sto- 
ry. 

When his parents fled the Nazis, they 
entrusted him to a Catholic nanny, who 
had him baptized. Although they re- 
turned after the war and took him back, 
after a legal battle with tbe nanny, he 
said his parents could never explain 
their original decision. 

“People did all kinds of things to 
protect their children, to protect them- 
selves, to protect their samty,” be said. 
Referring to Mrs. Albright’s discovery, 
he said: “What I find so distressing and 


perplexing is bow long the tentacles of 
the Holocaust are.” 

“I think the haunting thing,” he ad- 
ded, “is it’s still out there, it still impacts 
us." 


in the IHI 

•d Section, 

[igress 
r Mess 
hkfurt 


In Badly Weakened Serbia, 
Where Blame Is for Others, 
Worst May Be Yet to Come 



3; By Chris Hedges 

_j,» New York Tunes Service 

BELGRADE — Tbe apparent de- 
jfflsion by President Slobodan Milosevic 
$if Serbia to reinstate opposition victories 
jn 14 cities, including the capital, does 
3pbt mean that the crisis here is over. In 

S there are many signs, despite the 
aphalism of the opposition coalition, 
the real crisis has hardly begun. 

The country of ID million enthu&i- 
~ jtetically backed Mr. Milosevic’s (hive 
•sSx years ago to make the Serbs the 
^pasters of the former Yugoslavia. That 
jSmbition fueled a iVar that shattered the 
3$ountry, accelerated die steep economic 
Recline begun by the old Communist 
«t£ctatorship, created more than 2 mil- 
lion refugees, destroyed Bosnia-Herze- 
govina and left 200,000 dead. 

And, even with opposition leaders 
ensconced in the city hall in Belgrade, or 
contesting Mr. Milosevic in presidential 
elections this fall, tbe industrial sector 

~ NEWS ANALYSIS ‘ — 

"Will remain "obsolete and dysfunctional, 
4be currency hostage to mounting in* 
■Ration and the responsibility for the war 
ignored or dismissed with tired nation* 
-tflist cticbfe and self-pity. 

This refusal by the Serbian govern- 
l ment and political opposition to come to 
terms with its role in the war makes it 
-impossible to communicate, indeed to 
. even speak a common language, with 
not only the Muslims and Croats, bat 
with many in the outside world. And the 
gross failure to honestly confront the 
past has left many Serbs adrift, unable to 
understand what went wrong or where 


they would like to go. 

The bleak, polluted cities and towns in 
Serbia stand as testaments of Communist 
mismanagement and post -Communist 
corruption. Trains, which rarely break 65 
kilometers an hour (40 miles an hour) on 
old tracks, can no longer effectively 
transport goods. Factories, saddled with 
obsolete technology from two decades 
ago, limp along at 10 or 20 percent 
capacity. Roads are filled with yawning 
potholes and the currency is barreling 
daily toward hyperinflation. Foreign in- 
vestment is nearly nonexistent, and 
wages have dropped to under $200 a 
month from about $800 a month. 

The crisis, and more importandy the 
respo nsib ility of the Serbs for their own. 
predicament, is always fobbed oft with 
tbe country’s woes now jpmned on Mr. 
Milosevic s corrupt regime, the sanc- 
tions imposed during the war and outside 
-hostility to the Serbian nation. Serbs are 
plagued by a dangerous myopia and 
deep-rooted nationalism teat could, as 

the situation here deteriorates, see the nse 

of new demagogues and violence, bom 
inzemaUy a/id in the kind of adventurism 
due led to war six years ago. 

“The war was finally stopped by 
fbrees outside the society, said 
Latinka Ferovic. who was purged trom 
her post in 1971 as head of the Com- 
munist Parrv in Yugoslavia when she 
began to push for liberal reforms, twi 
the social pathology that triggered the 


show little remorse for die atrocities 
carried out against the Muslims and use 
terms to describe the two rival ethnic 
groups in the former Yugoslavia that 
can only be considered racist 

“The crowds in thestneet look and 
sound pro-American,’ ’ said Bogdan De- 
nitch, die director of The Institute for 
Transition to Democracy, “but if to- 
morrow Washington begms to pot pres- 
sure on Milosevic to respect tbe rights of 
the Albanian majority in Kosovo the 
crowds will swiftly rum anti-American. 

“The opposition does not see its role 
as one of educating tire crowd to the 
reality around us. I am worried that, with 
Milosevic weak and on his way out, he 
will be replaced by an even weaker 
opposition that will have to play to die 
sentiments of the crowd, to all these 
nationalist pressures from below.” 

There are moments, even during me 
daily demonstrations, when such sen- 
timents bubble to the surface. University 
students, who have occupied many uni- 
versity b uilding s and c any out parallel 
protests with the Zajedno coalition, stood’ 
recently on die edge of die pedestrian 
mall in the center of Belgrade facing 
Hues of riot police in gray flak jackets. 

“Go to Kosovo! Go to Kosovo! Go to 
Kosovq P’ they chanted at die police- 
men. Kosovo, with an oppressed Al- 
banian majority, is ruled by the Serbs. 
And Mr. Milosevic in his rise to power a 
decade ago accused ihe Albanians, along 
with Muslims, Groats and tine West, of 
seeking to destroy the Serbian people. 

Stare propaganda is maeasmgty do- 
voted to me plight of Ihe Serbian minority 
in Kosova ft is a transparent tactic, but it 
puts the opposition,' winch backs *e Bos- 
nian Seito leadership and was critical of 
the Dayton peace a g ree m ent, in the po- 
sition of having to outdo the president as 
the defenders of the Serbs. 

“The brutal nationalism we had dur- 
ing the war, that was personified by 
these paramilitary leadens like Aikan. 
has been replaced,” said Obrad Savic, 
editor in chief of a magazine published 
by dissidents from the Belgrade Circle. 

“Now we have a more sophisticated 
form of Seth nationalism, where we mix 
tiie language of nationalism with the 
rhetoric used in a civil society. It is 
absurd to speak about Serb ascendancy 
in a nation where one third of the people 
are non-Seibs and then call ourselves 
democrats, but it is synqptoraatic of the 
hollowness of oar political debate.” 




■ * c ^ V. • *•. >- •** 



JMBfDdiwflbt te ad llud Vw 

Demonstrators celebrating in Sofia after it was announced that Bulgaria would hold new elections in AprIL 

IMF Aid to Bulgaria Awaits Elections 


Raaerr 

SOFIA — The International Mon- 
eteiy Fund will resume talks on crucial 
aid to pull Bulgaria back from tbe brink 
of debt default as soon as an interim 
government is in place, an IMF official 
said Wednesday. 

Hie IMF welcomed Bulgaria’s de- 
rision to hold early national elections by 
April 20 as me former Communist rul- 
ing party bowed to opposition pressure 
on Tuesday. 

With its economy sliding into chaos, 
the country has been paralyzed by wide- 
spread strikes and 30 days of mass 
demonstraticHis to force ejections two 
years early. 

Tbe IMF, which has delayed vital 
funding, and the European Union have 


said no help would be forthcoming until 
the political crisis was sorted out. 

President Fetar Stoyanov must ap- 
point an interim cabinet by Ffeb. 20 


SWISS: 3 Banks Start a Holocaust Fund 


Continued from Page 1 

the long-running effort by Jewish or- 
ganizations to seek c om pensation re- 
lated to Switzerland’s close financial 
relationship with Nazi Germany. 

The. announcement came two days 
after the United States, Britain and 
France agreed to freeze the distribution 
of $68 minion in gold bare looted, by 
Germany from European central banks 
and said it could be used to form the core 
of a Holocaust compensation fund. 

In New York, tbe world Jewish Con- 
gress said through a spokesman. Elan 


1 ^fw^itical opposition, as has In New York, tbe World Jewish Con- 

* “SsSSsaTK sttsszteafcss 

' our SSS public, ment as“a positive raona^calb 

: *E5S3s!s!S sksssssssk 

; gagaggqgg 

> ment. injects ^ much lower than a figure m 

=■!= 

SSaUand ^ Worid Jewish 

: . The Un \^^^^ritioncSition night and stressed^ figure of 100 

; mffioo Swiss francs- was an, initial 

; forjtetero Serbs infusion” that could lead to former 

. for betraying the conmTrctionsfrom other parties.” 

, remam appalimg ign^t oi . Werner Abegg, a spokesman for the 

; ay’s tide war, iiKlwmsj -Jg Swiss Narionafriank in Zurich, said 

* of Sarajevo that ^^’Pf^Sde that, while it bad publicly expressed 

’ kilted and nufl« , gJjS I ? Serblead- readiness to contribute an .unspecified 
; earned out by the Bosnian to a “fund or fouadamsn,” tt 

would act in concert wim the Swiss 


* ership in their n ^ ie ‘ . jh _ ooposiiion would act in concert with, file Swiss 
r While many, w brth toe ^p^"' rovesatneof. 

1 andthegoveflW*n| L , #S^23£55 ^fSS^theSwiiBgovexnmenthas 
1 of denKrcraey ore- arid it would consider a contribution 

■ often do not And. while 1 once the function and aims of the pro- 

posrf Jbnd lave been woAcd out in 


detail and once a government-appointed 
commission of historians issues a pre- 
liminary report on war time Swiss fi- 
nancial activities. Tire government says 
Ae report should be ready before the 
summer. 

The issues of wartime Swiss gold 
dealings with Germany and the postwar 
reluctance of Swiss banks to identify 
quickly dormant accounts belonging to 
Holocaust victims are being investigat- 
ed in Switzerland as separate issues. 

Apart from the historians’ commis- 
sion looking into a wide range of deal- 
ings^ with the Nazis, including tbe trade 
in looted grid and Switze r land's treat- 
ment of Jewish refugees, a separate pan- 
el headed by . Paul Volcker, a farmer 
chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, is 
inquiring into the whereabouts of 
acCOOHES. 

Swiss banks say they have found 
about $29 million in dormant accounts 
but argue that only a small proportion of 
this can be traced to Holocaust victims. 
Many claimants seeking access to 
dormant accounts say Swiss bank of- 
ficials treated them in an unsympathetic 
and legalistic way, demanding, for ex- 
ample, that death certificates be pro- 
duced for people whose deaths in con- 
centration camps had gone unrecorded. 
.. The statement Wednesday by tbe 
three banks said they “stressed that 
investigative efforts to identify un- 
claimed assets belonging to victims of 
the Nazi regime are separate from and 
unaffected by this initiative.” .. 

-Until last month, tbe Swiss govesn- 
mem resdsted tiie idea of a compensation 
fund, arguing that it constituted an ad- 
mission of £nilt in the fade of what 
officials depicted as a conspiracy by the 


whose main role will be to organize the 
elections. This cabinet could also pre- 
pare, jointly with the IMF, measures for 
implementation of a strict monetary 
mechanism. 

The IMF proposed the implemen- 
tation of a currency board last year to 
halt the free fall of the national currency, 
the lev, and to restore confidence in 
ailing local banks. The system requires 
levs in circulation to be matched by 
central bank reserves, severely curbing 
financial powers of the government and 
tiie central bank. 

“Bulgaria’s economy has become a 
moving target now and stricter mea- 
sures will be needed to contain the 
crisis. The currency board alone will not 
be enough,” said an IMF official. Tbe 
currency board system must be accom- 
panied by radical structural reform, in- 
cluding closing loss-making enterprises 
and banks, he said. 


Flu-Stricken Pope 
Cancels Audience 


The Associated Press 

VATICAN CITY — The flu 
forced Pope John Paul H to cancel 
his general audience Wednesday 
and cut back on his activities over 
the next few days. 

The pontiff made the announce- 
ment himself from his window 
overlooking Sl Peter’s Square. 

“Influenza has also entered the 
Pope’s house,’ ’ he said, appearing 
in good spirits. “And it has also 
' reached me.” He said doctors had 
told him to stay inside. 

“1 have to, therefore, be limited 
to saying hello to you from the 
window of my office,” he told 
thousands of p3grims standing un- 
der the rain. 

Meetings set for later tins week 
with Prime Minister Jose Maria 
Aznar of Spain and Foreign Min- 
ister Alexander Downer of Aus- 
tralia were canceled. 


United States, Jewish organizations and 
the media. 

■ Dutch Seeking Gold 

Tbe Dutch Finance Ministry said 
Wednesday that it had appointed a com- 
mission to track down Dutch gold 
looted by the Nazis and believed to be 
kept in Swiss banks. The Associated 
Press reported from The Hague. 

A total of 145 tons of gold was taken 
from the Dutch Central Bank, and 70 
tons were returned after the war.The 
missing grid Is estimated to be worth 
1.5 biluon guilders ($815 million). 


Bulgaria’s shattered economy went in- 
to a nosedive during tbe last month while 
politicians squabbled oq how to resolve 
tbe deadlock. With January inflation ex- 
pected at more than 50 percent, hyper- 
inflation has become a factor for the first 
time. Long lines of customers have 
formed outside bread shops to stockpile 
before prices go up the next day. 

The lev collapsed to 3,000 to the 
dollar on Wednesday from 600 at the 
beginning of tbe year and the central 
bank has exhausted its arsenal of mon- 
etary instruments to support tbe lev. 

Foreign exchange reserves fell $415 
million in January and there is a short- 
age of cash for vital imports such as fuel 
and grain. 

A temporary freeze of personal sav- 
ings is another measure being con- 
sidered, the official said. It would in- 
clude replacing personal deposits with 
government securities. 


BRIEFLY 


5-Power Summit 
On NATO Suggested 

PARIS — President Jacques 
Chirac of France, encouraged by 
talks with the Russian president, 
Boris Yeltsin, has floated the idea 
Of a five-power summit meeting in 
Paris to discuss Europe's future se- 
curity system, diplomats said Wed- 
nesday. 

Under the German-backed pro- 
posal, tbe leaders of the United 
Stales, Russia, France, Germany and 
Britain would meet in April to es- 
tablish the broad lines of a deal that 
could enable Moscow to accept the 
enlargement of NATO, they said. 

Russia would be offered security 
guarantees, arms control conces- 
sions and an enhanced overall re- 
lationship with tbe West. 

The talks would prepare the 
ground for a summit meeting of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
in Madrid in July, where the al- 
liance is due to name the first former 
Communist countries of Central 
Europe to be admitted. Moscow re- 
mains opposed to the move. 

Diplomats also said a Paris sum- 
mit meeting could provide a forum 
for talks between Mr. Yeltsin and 
President Bill Clinton. 

A White House spokesman, 
David Johnson, said, however, that 
talk of a special meeting in Europe 
witb a Yeltsin-Dinion meeting was 
“highly speculative." He said the 
venue for the bilateral summit talks 
would be discussed when the Rus- 
sian prime minister, Viktor 
Chernomyrdin, visits Washington 
later this week. (Reuters} 

Solemn Says Turkey 
JfbritMtfo Expansion 

BUDAPEST — The NATO sec- 
retary-general, Javier Solana 
Madanaga. said Wednesday he did 
not expect Turkey to block the al- 
liance's expansion into Eastern 
Europe as a way to gain closer links 
with the European Union. 

“The two decisions are inde- 
pendent,” he said, adding that he 
did not think a Turkish veto was 
“going to take place.” 

Mr. Solana was on his way to 
Turkey for a two-day official visit 
in a new attempt to reduce tensions 
with Greece. NATO officials fear 
that the continuing crisis in rela- 
tions between the two members of 
the alliance could spill over into 
plans to reform the organization. 

Foreign Minister Tansu Ciller of 
Turkey has warned that Ankara 
could veto NATO’s expansion plans 
if its aspirations for closer ties witb 
(be EU remain frustrated. ( Reuters ) 

EXJ Faces Censure 
In ‘Mad Cow 5 Crisis 

BRUSSELS — A European Par- 
liament committee met Wednesday 
to consider a threat to censure the 
European Commission for mis- 
handling the “mad cow" crisis. 

If the committee agrees to it. the 
possibility of censure action will be 
put to a vote Feb. 1 9. The proposal 
for a censure motion gives the com- 
mission until December to apply 
corrective measures that include a 
reorganization of EU veterinary 
services and a shake-up of scientific 
advisory committees. 

A censure motion would force 
the commission president, Jacques 
San ter, and his 19 colleagues to 
resign. (Reuters) 

For the Record 

The Turkish Parliament de- 
cided, 269 to 259. Wednesday 
against an inquiry into Foreign 
Minister Tansu Ciller that could 
have sent her to court on corruption 
charges. (Reuters) 


Police Fail to Quell Protest 
By Thousands of Albanians 

Some Officers Join Crowd After Clash in South 

Our From Dopatom in Vlore's main square, some shouting, 

VLORE, Albania — Riot police gave “Down with Berisha.' ' 
up attempts to disperse a large demon- Many Albanians blame the president, 
stratioD in this southern city Wednesday Sali Berisha, for the collapse of the 
and let protesters continue their march funds. 


against the collapse of get-rich-quick 
pyramid savings funds. 

Some of tbe police appeared to join 
tbe demonstrators, taking off their hel- 
mets and handing out cigarettes. 

“Peace, peace, tbe police are with 
us,” some in the crowd chanted. 

Earlier, the police and protesters 
hurled stones ai each other after the 
security forces sought to break up a 
crowd of about 7,000 that had gathered 


to demand full refunds following die of the area. 


In one clash before the police backed 
down Wednesday, masked special force 
officers beat a demonstrator and then 
kicked him as he lay unconscious and 
bleeding on the ground. A local police 
officer sought to revive the protester 
with heart massage, but appeared to have 
failed. The demonstrator was taken 
away in a police van. 

The police also fired rubber bullets 
toward journalists and ordered them out 


cave-in of a pyramid investment fund 
that had been popular in the area. 


The Interior Ministry issued a state- 
ment denying that anyone bad been killed 


Tbe police also fired shots into the air in Vlore. A ministry spokesman, Ndrek 
and used dogs and water camion to move Gjini, said that three people had been 
the crowd, but many demonstrators lightly injured when the police dispersed 


fought back and eventually broke a po- 
lice cordon of about 300 officers. An 
earlier attempt to break up tbe demon- 
stration also railed. 

Thousands more people joined the 
crowd during the afternoon, including 
children and people on crutches. The 
demonstration was the first large-scale 
protest in Albania in more than a week, 
widespread rioting swept the Balkan 
country last month following the col- 
lapse of a number of pyramid investment 
funds. 

Soldiers guarded government build- 
ings Wednesday as the crowd gathered 


a crowd of 200 people. (Reuters, AP) 


Protecting Amsterdam 

The Associated Press 

AMSTERDAM — City officials on 
Wednesday approved a proposal to pro- 
tect the picturesque scenery of Am- 
sterdam's historic city center. 

The move City Hall means more 
stipulations will be introduced to reg- 
ulate housing zones and building per- 
mits in order to keep the old-world 
character of the cityscape intact. 





. . r 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAT, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 


PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


President Adds a Global Gloss to His Domestic Assessment 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton's State of the Union Address 
was as much an address on the state of 
America's global role. 

A farsighted America, he said, will 
lead the world “to a better place.’’ 
Shortsighted, and its words will fall on 
deaf ears abroad. 

“To prepare America for the 21st 
century, we must master the forces of 
change in the world and keep American 
leadership strong and sure for an un- 
charted time." Mr. Clinton said in his 
address Tuesday night to Congress. 

In a speech that covered more foreign 
policy ground than any of his previous 


annual messages, Mr. Clinton called for 
"action to keep the world's strongest 
force for peace and freedom and 
prosperity" and said that international 
leadership required unity. 

The president cast his challenge for 
improving U.S. education in global 
terms, saying that American classrooms 
should become “the envy of the 
world." 

“In the end. more than anything else, 
our world leadership grows out of the 
power of our example here at home, out 
of our ability to remain strong as one 
America," be said. 

Mr. Clinton restated a six-point- for- 
eign affairs agenda: 


• To help build an “undivided demo- 
cratic Europe," including an expanded 
NATO by 1999. "A Europe in which all 
democracies define their future not in 
terms of what they can do to each other, 
but in terms of what they can do together 
for the good of all — that kind of Europe 
is good for America." 

• To look to the East no less than the 
West. “Our security demands it. Our 
prosperity requires it: more than 2 mil- 
lion American jobs depend upon trade 
with Asia.'’ He said he would go to 
China and noted that he had invited 
China’s president to the United States. 
He also called for funding an agreement 
with North Korea to dismantle its nu- 


clear weapons program in exchange for 
peacetime nuclear energy advances. 

• To expand American exports, es- 
pecially to Asia and Latin America. ‘ ‘ By 
expanding trade, we can advance the 
cause of freedom and democracy around 
the world." 

• To continue “an unrelenting force 
for peace, from the Middle East to Haiti, 
from Northern Ireland to Africa. Taking 
responsible risks for peace keeps us from 
being drawn into far more costly con- 
flicts later.” 

• To move strongly against threats of 
terrorism, specifically by ratifying the 
Chemical Weapons Convention, already 
approved by 68 countries. 


• To maintain “a strong and ready 
military.” 

Mr. Clinton called on Congress to 
approve payment of debts to the World 
Bank, die United Nations and other in- 
ternational bodies. 

“If America is to continue to lead the 
world, we here who lead America 
simply must find the will to pay our 
way," he said. 

“A farsighted America moved the 
world to a better place over these last 50 
years." he added. “And it can do so for 
another 50 years. 

“But a shortsighted America will 
soon find its words falling on deaf ears 
all around the world.' 1 


Rebels in Zaire 
Report Advances 


GOMA, Zaire — The Zairian 
rebel chief. Laurent Desire Kabila, 
said Wednesday in the eastern rebel 
stronghold of Goniu that his forces 
were advancing on all fronts in their 
campaign to topple the govern- 
ment. 

He said his troops were continu- 


ing their advance in the rich mining 
province of Shabu in the south 
where they captured the strategic 
Lake Tanganyika port of Kalemie 
on Monday. 

The rebels arc closing in on the 
town of Moba. also cm Lake Tan- 


Polished Republican Voice 


Black Lawmaker Skillfully Replies to Clinton, 


But Is Upstaged by Own Remarks on Race 


By Katharine Seelye 

New York Tunes Service 


WASHINGTON — Republicans 
took no chances this year with their 
response to President Bill Clinton's 
State of the Union Message. 

Last year, the response delivered by 
Senator Bob Dole, then his party's front- 
runner for the Republican presidential 
nomination, was widely panned as a 
political disaster. The lighting was bad. 
He spoke from his empty office, with no 
audience to enliven the presentation. 
And the speech's highly partisan thrust, 
in sharp contrast to Mr. Clinton's con- 
ciliatory tone, sent a negative image 
across the country. 

On Tuesday night. Representative 
J.C. Watts of Oklahoma, a 39-year-old 
black Baptist minister who exercises his 
oratorical powers regularly from the pul- 
pit, sought to offer the nation a more 
positive vision of the Republican Party. 

Mr. Watts gave a polished perfor- 
mance, much rehearsed and profession- 
ally lighted before a live audience in the 
stalely Library of Congress. But for all 
his skills and the Republican Party's 
careful calculations, Mr. Watts still found 
himself somewhat upstaged, not only by 
the media glare from the Simpson verdict 
across the country, but by some of the 
fallout from his own gaffe in a Wash- 
ington Post interview Tuesday morning. 

In his remarks, die father of five chil- 
dren spoke of an agenda based less on 
policy than on inner personal strength. 

“Government cant ease all pain,* * he 
said, referring to racial problems in 
America. “In fact, government some- 
times rubs die wound raw and makes the 
healing harder. The Republicans know 
that we must, individually, all of us, 
accept our share of responsibility." 

Mr. Watts’s notion that government 
cannot solve racial problems created 
havoc Tuesday when The Post quoted 
him in a manner suggesting that he was 
calling the Reverend Jesse Jackson and 
Mayor Marion Barry Jr. of Washington 
“race-hustling poverty pimps" because 
their careers depended on keeping black 
people dependent on government. 

Mr. Watts said in a statement Tuesday 
night that Mr. Jackson’s and Mr. Barry's 
names were, correctly, not included in 
quotation marks because he made the 
comments in reference to “some of the 


The letter Opened by crediting Mr. 
Gingrich's selection of Mr. Watts as the 
party's official spokesman “to the 
strong support all the fine people in the 
4th District have given me." 

It closed with an appeal for money. 
“Please listen to me next Tuesday and 
let me know your reaction to what I have 
to say," the letter said. “Your feedback 
will mean a lot So will your most gen- 
erous contribution to my campaign." 

Ellen Miller, an advocate of over- 
hauling campaign finance laws, said: 
“There's something particularly ironic 
about Watts soliciting money based on 
his participation in this event It reflects 
that many members of Congress just 
don’t get it” 

Mr. Watts brushed aside questions 
about the letter with a swipe at Mr. Clin- 
ton: “We’ve got Bill Clinton prostituting 
the White House to raise money and you 
guys are asking me about a fund-raising 
letter I sent to my constituents?" 

Jody Thomas. Mr. Watts's campaign- 
finance director, acknowledged she was 
using the Watts speech as an opportunity 
to try to raise money. 



ganyika, about 160 kilometers (100 
miles) south of Kulcmie, the. rebel 
leader said. . . (AFP] 


Iran Quakes Kill 58 I 


TEHRAN — Two earthquakes 
killed 58 people and leveled at least 
14 villages in northeastern Iran,- 
where rescue teams are searching 
for survivors in the rubble, state 
media said Wednesday. 

The official news agency, IRNA, 
reported that 45 villages had been 
badly damaged in the quakes, one of 
which registered 5.6 on the Richter 
scale and the other 6.1. (Reuters) 


23 


Peru Seeks Talks 


Ja A' ’ 


rrv- 


FEATHERED FRIENDS — Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany attempting to make his way around 
the carnival queen's peacock headpiece at a Mardi Gras reception held in Bonn on Wednesday. 


CLINTON: Speech Focuses on Small and Safe Themes Rather Than Big and Bold Ones 


LIMA — Peru's government 
sought Wednesday to restart stalled 
talks with Marxist rebels who have 
held hosrages inside the Japanese 
ambassador's residence in Lima for 
50 days. 

The police were checking secu- 
rity around a house near the res- 
idence that has been selected for a 
possible meeting between a gov- 
ernment ■negotiator. Domingo 
Palermo, and the rebel leader, 
Nestor Cerpa Canolini. 

But there was no evidence of 
movement on the main obstacle to 
such a meeting — the government's 
refusal to consider the Tupac Am- 
aru Revolutionary Movement's de- 
mand to release some 400 jailed 
comrades. (Reuters) 


Continued from Page 1 


But after his November victory, he 
stood Tuesday night as the dominant 
politician in the capital, with approval 
ratings at the peak of his presidency. 

“More than any other State of the 
Union, the president approached this one 
on his own terms,” said Geoff Garin, a 
Democratic pollster. 

Mr. Clinton showed again how much 


he has been shaped by five terms as 
governor of Arkansas. His domestic pri- 


orities — by far the lengthiest portion of 
his speech — echo what many of the 
nation’s governors have been advoc- 
ating the past month in their own state of 
the state addresses, from education stan- 
dards to charter schools to slow ex- 
pansions of health care coverage to com- 
bating juvenile crime. 

Mr. Clinton showed that in an era of 
scarce federal resources, his appetite for 
action far exceeds his bankroll. “It’s an 
indication of what politics is likely to be 


like in the era of balanced budgets. 
There's no room for big, bold initiat- 
ives," said Vin Weber, a former Re- 
publican House member from Min- 
nesota. 

The president said he wanted to play 
both teacher and preacher in his second 
term. Racial reconciliation and educa- 
tional excellence have been his passions 
since he first took the governor’s office 
in Little Rock in 1979. and he gave them 
special prominence in his remarks to the 
joint session of Congress. 

He promised to make education his 
top priority over the next four years and 
called for "a national crusade" to raise 
standards and prepare schoolchildren for 
competition in the 21st century. "Edu- 
cation is one of the critical national se- 
curity issues for our future," Mr. Clinton 
said in asking for a “nonpartisan com- 
mitment” to excellence, adding, “Pol- 
itics must stop at the classroom door." 

But his elevation of education to the 
center of his second -term agenda un- 


derscored not only his personal passions 
but the political high ground he enjoys 
on that issue — and it represented a clear 
challenge to the Republicans. 

Where Republicans once called for 
abolishing the Department of Education, 
they now find themselves on die de- 
fensive on the issue, thanks to the sup- 
port Mr. Clinton won last November 
from suburban voters and middle-class 


women. 

On the issue of race. Mr. Clinton 
reiterated the themes of his inaugural 
address, calling diversity one of the 
greatest strengths of the country if every- 
one is given the opportunity to achieve 
that greatness. 

But he said, ‘ ’We are not there yet. We 
still see evidence of abiding bigotry and 
intolerance, in ugly words and awful 
violence, in burned churches and 
bombed buildings." 

But on this issue. Mr. Clinton proved 
again he prefers reconciliation to con- 
troversy — failing even to allude to the 


debate over affirmative action that con- 
tinues to divide the country. 

What was most striking about the 
speech was how tittle time Mr. Clinton 
devoted to two contentious issues that 
will tie up the White House and Con- 
gress this year. 

The fust is balancing the budget. In a 
few quick paragraphs, he disposed of the 
issue that divided Washington the past 
two years. “Let this Congress be the 
Congress that finally balances the 
budget" he- said to applause. 

But he made clear he would oppose 
Republican efforts topassa.cQmtituti.oaal 
amendment to balance the budget. “We 
don’t need a constitutional amendment 
we need action." he said. So much for 
starting the debate on conciliatory terms. 

On campaign finance reform he called 
for enactment of bipartisan legislation 
by July 4. But he offered no mea culpa to 
the American people for the violations 
his own party committed during the last 
campaign. 


Ecuador Plea Made 


WASHINGTON — Fearing that 
a general strike in Ecuador could get 
out of hand, the United States urged 
people there Wednesday to refrain 
from violence and called for a 
“broad national dialogue" of the 
country's political leaders. 

The United States “views with 
concern the events taking place in 
Ecuador and calls for calm and na- 
tional reflection. We hope Ecuador- 
ans will refrain from violence," the 
State Department spokesman, 
Nicholas Burns, said in a state- 
ment 

The Organization of American 
States' secretary-general. Cesar 
Gaviria, left Wednesday on an 
emergency trip to Ecuador ar the 
request of President Abdala Bu- 
caram. 

The general strike was called the 
largest in recent years. (Reuters} 


leadership in the black community but "O A 'D’17. q f | 

not in reference to Reverend Jackson or ijGlt m UGJ6Ti 

Mayor Barry.” " J 

Mr. Jackson, who had been invited to Continued from Page 1 

sit Tuesday night in Speaker Newt Gin- 
grich 's box in the House chamber to hear substantia] increase in violent crime. 


RAPE: Self-Defense Case Roils Mexico 


VERDICT: Jury Finds Simpson Liable 


the president's speech, told the speaker 
earlier Tuesday that he would fed un- 
comfortable sitting there after Mr. 
Watts's remarks. Mr. Gingrich even- 
tually smoothed the matter over, and Mr. 
Jackson agreed to join Mr. Gingrich on 
Tuesday night. 

In his speech, the second-term con- 
gressman offered a personal sermon that 
examined the matter of race from his 
singular perspective as the only black Re- 
publican in die House, and focused, above 
all. on character and faith-based values. 

“Our first priority is to bring values 
back and give them pride of place in our 
moral and economic renewal." he said. 

While he generally praised Mr. Clin- 
ton. he was sharply critical of what he 
described as Mr. Clinton's reliance on 
government in solving racial problems. 

“I am afraid that when the admin- 
istration and others talk about race." Mr. 
Wans said, "it sounds to me like the 
same old. same old — a bunch of ser- 
mons and sloganizing that defends the 
old assumption that government can 
heal the racial divide." 


Mis. Rodriguez’s treatment by the legal 
system has cast light on the web of biases 
surrounding the issue of rape in Mexico. In 


been a victim of discrimination. 

The chief of security for a major tele- 
vision network killed a robber who tried 
to steal his watch at gunpoint while his 
car was stopped at a red light on a 
Mexico City street. Juan Francisco 


Continued from Page 1 


a country where feminists have labored for Gortares Martinez, a former army cap- 
decades to reduce violence against women tain, was freed with no charges within 48 


but have achieved only limited results, the hours on the grounds of self-defense, 
case has given new energy and publicity to “That made a click in the minds of 
the feminist movement. many women," said Marta Lamas, a 

Ar first, Mrs. Rodriguez languished in leading feminist who helped organize 
anonymity in a tawdry state prison in the the campaign for Mrs. Rodriguez's re- 
town of Texcoco, not far from the site of lease. “We can’t have a situation where 
the kilting. a woman's physical integrity is worth 

But the way a district appeals judge less than a wristwaich.” 
responded last July to her lawyers ’ request The case was turned into a national 

to dismiss the case offended many wo- cause with a fierce declaration from 
men. Judge Gustavo Aquiles Gasca ruled Maria Felix, a veteran queen of the 
that Mr. Cabrera was not responsible for cinema. In December, the movie star, 
his attack on Mrs. Rodriguez. Forensic never known for feminist militancy, said 




and seize his borne, cars and other assets, 
including perhaps his football trophies 
and golf clubs. If their attorneys are 
aggressive, they can follow Mr. 
Simpson until he pays the full amount 
due, even if it takes decades. 

“This jury is very, very, very mad,” 


said, including allowing testimony from. - 
a hot-line counselor who said a woman 
she believed to be Nicole Simpson called 
a battered women's shelter in fright five 
days before the murders. 

Before turning to an appeals court, 
however, Mr. Simpson has 120 days to 
ask Judge Fujisaki to overturn the jury 
verdict or reduce the damage award. The 


said David Wood, a Los Angeles civil judge has complete discretion to slash 




; * 

F f ?■> , 


tests confirmed that his blood was sat- she wanted to “summon the pop til a- 


urated with alcohol while here was not. 
“He could not react to his own ac- 


tion" to support Mrs. Rodriguez. 

“I would have grabbed a pistol, too. 


tions, while she could have avoided and blown him away," she said. 


■ Appeal for Funds Draws Flak 

Mr. Watts on Tuesday also found 
himself defending a two-page solicit- 
ation letter sent on his behalf to about 
6.000 of his supporters, John Yang of 
The Washington Post repotted from 
Washington. 


hers," Judge Gasca wrote, ordering the 
case to go forward. He concluded that 
Mrs. Rodriguez had purposely brought 
the assault on hereelf. 

“Instead of avoiding the sexual at- 
tack, by her attitude in remaining in the 
company of her aggressor despite his 
propositions to her, she provoked him to 
attack her so she could snoot him in some 
vital part of his body,” the judge wrote. 

Another shooting a few weeks later 
compounded the impression among 
many women that Mrs. Rodriguez had 


More than 500 women, including fed- 
eral legislators, novelists, and soap op- 
era stars, signed a petition printed in 
national newspapers calling for Mrs. 
Rodriguez's release 
But this fanfare has done little to help 
her in court. So far, judges and prosecutors 
have regarded her story with suspicion 
based, they have said, on the fact that she 


HaBppe Lh«Iendh/lV iWWtThy 

Mrs. Rodriguez claims self-defense. 


paign to make sure Mrs. Rodriguez is 


attorney who bandies many wrongful- 
death cases. “Lord help Mr. Simpson 
when they get the opportunity to award 
punitive damages. " 

The verdict sparked strong emotions. 

“White America, shame on you!” a 
black customer at a south-central Los 
Angeles beauty shop shouted as the ver- 
dicts were announced on TV. 

Meanwhile, at the Riviera. Country 
Club in the Pacific Palisades where Mr. 
Simpson was once a member, a handful 
of patrons clinked glasses and gave 
thumbs-up signs as they watched the 
verdict at the bar. The bartender said the 
club was glad the ordeal was over. “1 
think 90 percent thought he was guilty in 
the first place," he said. 

Mr. Simpson can, and most likely 
will, appeal the verdict against him. 


the compensatory damage award of $8.5 - . 
million and can reduce whatever pu- 
nitive damages are awarded as well. 

Buteven during appeals. Mr. Simpson ; 
cannot easily postpone payment to the 
victims’ relatives. The Goldman and 
Brown families can start seizing his h ank 
accounts and auctioning off his property' 
even during the appeals process, unless::', 
Mr. Simpson posts a bond equal to 150 !T 
percent of the verdict award. 

The jury that held Mr. Simpson liable-:, 
consisted of six men and six women; :? 
ranging in age from mid-20s to mid-70s. i 
But the characteristic that most analysis - 
remarked on from the start was that most- ; 
of the panelists were white. '.J 

The jury that acquitted Mr. Simpson;: 
in the downtown Los Angeles criminal*-!; 
courthouse was mostly black; in their 


five children who makes her living 


was out in the street at dawn without her cleaning houses. “She was a woman 


husband and armed with a gun. 

And Mr. Cabrera's mother, Onelia 


with an infant at home, but she was out in 
the street all night stirring up trouble. Is 


strong grounds for asking a higher court 
to overturn the verdict. 

Superior Court Judge Hiroshi Fujisaki 


one Jamaican immigrant who described 
himself as half-black and half-Asian. - 
To reach a verdict, only nine of the 12 ." Tj 


Amunez, 58, has mounted her own cam- that a real mother?" 


made some questionable evidentiary rul- jurors had to agree. But when polled in 


tngs favoring the plaintiffs, analysts 


DUCHESS: U.S . Firms Hope Consumers Will See a Rebel They Can Love in a Slimmed-Down Sarah Ferguson 


Continued from Page 1 


"What I think about this last of the duchess’s 
actions is probably unprintable,' ’ Hugh Trevor-Rop- 
er. the noted historian, asserted in the conservative 


Daily Telegraph. ‘ 'Only somebody this vulgar could 
take the British royalty into this kind of situation." 


executive of Blackman & Raber, an advertising 
consulting firm. 

She could, of course, fall flat her endorsements 
perceived as just more gold-digging, but the betting is 
that she will not The duchess's outn£ wardrobe, 
weight problems, marital infidelity and flagrant 
spending — and her willingness to show public 


for which the duchess is reportedly getting $500,000 
— will do little to win over the British press. In a 30- 
second spot for LightStyle, Ocean Spray's reduced- 
calorie drink, she dumps a bucket of ice on some 
paparazzi clamoring outside her window — pre- 
sumably the same ones who immortalized her bare- 


b she reafly one in the United States? More eluded rome startling new evidence.^ 
specifically, is the endorsement of a controversial Most important of all was Mr - 
duchess who has been a yo-yo dieter for years Simpson's testimony, parts of which the^ 
relevant to diet programs and beverages? jurors asked to hear again on their last,> 

?°“ bts V H , e / ^ of deliberations T^sday. 

struggle with her weight and her lack of self- The Dlaintiffs’ ■itfnmni flnnial . 


open court, all 12 jurors said they sup-** 
ported eveiy part of the verdict. 

The wrongful death case brought by- ‘ 
the victims' families was an abbreviated'*,; 
version of the criminal trial — 41 days of'*' 
testimony rather than 133 — but it in-*: 
eluded some startling new evidence. T.' 1 
Most important of" all was Mr.;* 
Simpson's testimony, parts of which the-.* 


Indeed, in England, where the press has never let contrition for all of it — have already made her a 

i on iti.' cnii'iAd fhp Hiir i fiaee*c * 'imlfwn-1 AftrlinA iL> T ) I o»_. i ■ 


breasted sunbathing in front of her children and her esteem, her using food for emotional reasons, all of 


up on its savage attacks, the duchess's "vulgarity" 
has made her a pariah whose endorsement would 
make people cringe, not buy. 

But in the United Stales, infamy — if that is what 


darling in the United States, where it has never seemed 


inconsistent to admire both royally and rebels. sue says sne is so uiuracuoonai as to serve i*»avia murpny, ucean spray s maneeting ■ 

“Americans line up other book signings in CranApple instead of tea, and that she understands president, says consumers say that cranberry be 


ex-beau John Bryan's attention to her feel. 

In another, briefer spot for CranApple cocktail. 


she says she is so "untraditional" as to serve 


this will resonate with our members." said linHg 
Webb Carilli, a Weight Watchers spokeswoman. 
David Murphy, Ocean Spray's marketing vice 


The plaintiffs’ lead attorney, Daniel-. 
PetroceUi, argued that Mr. Simpson lied> 
about every important fact in the case.’, 
during his four days on the witness stand,- T * 


record-breaking numbers." Nancy Josephson, the 


she represents — sells. Celebrity “bad. boys,” in a duchess's American agent, said. "They tell her, 
line that stretches from the current basketball star * We can relate to you; you've had a tough time, but 
Dennis Rodman back at least to Jimmy Connors, a you’ve overcome obstacles.' " 


why Americans dumped all that tea in the harbor. 

“In America, rebellion against the royal family 
and convention is admired, but here she us disliked 


one-time bad boy of professional tennis, have par- 
laved naughtiness into endorsement contracts. 

Advertising experts say die time is right for a “bad 
girl" to join these ranks — and one with the tabloid 
appeal of fallen royalty is a prime candidate. 

“This may be a real breakthrough for the ad- 
vertising business," said Martin Blackman, chief 


for exactly the same reasons.' ' said Harold Brooks- 


Not surprisingly, the duchess is not fond of Baker, publisher of Burke's Peerage, a well-known 
sorters and refused to be interviewed for this royal-family watcher and commentator. 


reporters and refused to be interviewed for this 
article. Even Ms. Josephson was loath to discuss 
any other assignments the duchess may be ex- 
ploring, lest the British tabloids pick up her com- 
ments and twist them. 


The commercials for Ocean Spray Cranberries — asset in Britain. 


royal-family watcher and commentator. 

The Minor, a British tabloid, said the ads would 
not be shown in England “because her royal in- 
laws would choke on it." But the more practical 
reason is simply that Fergie is not a commercial 


ages are zingy, so “we wanted a well-known 
person with zing who looks like she’d have a good 
time at a cocktail party." Besides, Mr. Murphy 
insists, the duchess is “a loyal consumer of Ocean 
Spray juice.” 

But some marketing experts warn that her well- 
publicized money problems may destroy her cred- 
ibility. People can believe that Michael Jordan 
wears Nikes or that Bill Cosby loves Jello, they say, 
because both men are perceived as too rich to have 
to tout products they do not like. 


pointing out that Mr. Simpson’s testi-^ 
mony contradicted dozens of witnesses. ■ 
To combat the evidence against Mr.!: 
Simpson, the defense relied on the;* 
themes that worked so well in the crim— ? 
inal trial. It argued that physical ev-'S- 
idence could not be trusted, and said the”: 
police framed Mr. Simpson. But the", 
plaintiffs countered those arguments:* 
with expert witnesses who implored jur-% 
ors to trust the blood evidence as utterly- ^ 
reliable — and. Mr. PetroceUi argued."- 
utterly incriminating. “ 








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WTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATURDAY-SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 




PAGES 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 



PL'BU&HED WITH THE NEW YORK 


AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Clinton’s Long List 


After a lifetime of running for office. 
President Bill Clinton is now said to be 
' running for a place in history. On Tues- 
■ day night, he may have set some kind of 

• laundry-list record for Stale of the Uni- 
on messages by unveiling dozens of 

• proposals to improve education, expand 
' health care, fight crime, employ people 

on welfare, explore outer space, clean 
up riven and cany out other projects- It 
was a far cry from his declaration last 
year that the era of big government was 
over, except for one fact He pledged to 
do it all in a world of diminished re- 
sources resulting from his pledge to 
balance the budget in five years. Miss- 
ing from the address was a clear outline 
of how be intends to pay for iL 

It was good at least to see President 
Clinton seizing the initiative again. 

He challenged Congress to pass the 
campaign-finance reform initiatives put 
forward by Senators John McCain of 
Arizona and Russell Feingold of Wis- 
consin by July 4. The president was 
right to admit that “debsy will mean 
death,' ' a truism illustrated when he put 
off reform four years ago at the request 
of the Congress’s leading Democrats. It 
remains to be seen now whether he and 
his administration will match his words 
with vigorous action on this one issue 
that can do more than any other to 
restore Americans’ faith in politics. 

By making education a high priority 
and calling for a nonpartisan approach, 
Mr. Clinton was reaching back rhet- 
‘ orically not so much to the Great So- 
ciety as to the Sputnik era, when edu- 
cation was a matter of national security. 
The proposal to leverage federal 
money for a major school construction 
program was a welcome initiative for 
New York City and other overcrowded 
areas. Increasing tuition grants for poor 
families will also help those most in 


need. We have argued that his tuition 
tax credits would help coo many who 
da not need it. but a revived debate 
about improving education standards 
will be most beneficial. 

Another sure sign that Mr. Clinton 
had his eye on history lay in his em- 
phasis oo international issues. His ap- 
peal for rapid Senate approval of the 
Chemical weapons Convention and 
for payment of debts and dues to the 
World Bank and the United Nations 
reflected an overdue recognition that 
these issues will not be acted on unless 
he throws his prestige behind them. We 
continue to have qualms about the ad- 
ministration's plans to expand NATO 
over Russian objections and widen re- 
lations with a China unrepentant about 
human rights violations, bur the speech 
signals that Mr. Clinton is prepared to 
educate Americans about his thinking. 

Although the speech was as ped- 
estrian in its own way as his second 
inaugural address, the president was at 
his best, as he always is, in appealing 
for a sense of community and cooper- 
ation. The swirl of events around his 
speech emphasized both the oppor- 
tunities and the difficulties still in- 
herent in race relations in America. 
Television broadcasters were clearly 
torn between their civic duty to follow 
events in Washington and the con- 
tinually dismal allure of the latest O. J. 
Simpson verdict A healthier symbol 
lay in the Republicans' choice of J. C. 
Wans, the black congressman and 
former football hero from Oklahoma, 
to give the opposition response. Mr. 
Wans and the president both sketched 
visions of a Washington leadership 
toying with a new bipartisan ideal. 
That would, of course, be a state of the 
union worth pursuing. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Job in Pakistan 


: The voters of Pakistan were under- 
standably sullen about their election 
this week. Forced to choose between 
two former prime ministers — Benazir 
’Bhutto, ousted last November on cor- 
ruption charges, and Mian Nawaz 
Sharif, removed on the same grounds 
* in 1993 — they have given Mr. Sharif 
another chance to govern. The lack of 
1 enthusiasm was reflected in a dismal 
turnout of about 30 percent Clearly 
Mr. Sharif's first task is to clean up the 
' bribery and influence-peddling that 
have nearly destroyed the political in- 
stitutions of a country ruled by the 
military for half its histoiy. 

Miss Bhutto’s defeat came after 
voters grew increasingly disappointed 
over her government’s performance. 
Educated at Harvard and Oxford and 
highly articulate and impassioned in 
her advocacy of democratic values and 
the needs of the poor, she came to be 
seen as a chaotic manager, reliant on a 
coterie of sycophants and tolerant of 
corruption in her entourage and family. 
Among those accused of looting the 
public treasury was her husband, Asif 
Ali Zardari, who remained in jail 
throughout the election campaign. 
Miss Bhutto has recovered from defeat 
before and no doubt is already plotting 
a third return to power. The Bhutto 
name could once again rally peasants 
and poor people in the slums of Kara- 
chi and otiier big cities. 

Pakistan has had difficulty estab- 
lishing civilian institutions because of 
the tremendous power wielded by the 
army and intelligence services, the 
clergy and the wealthy feudal landlord 
families, of which the Bhuttos were 
one of the most powerful. Since die 
economy has been liberalized in the 
last decade, powerful business interests 
have also found bribeiy a convenient 
way to influence the government 


Billions flowing through Pakistan to 
aid the anti-Soviet rebellion in Af- 
ghanistan in the 1980s left a legacy of 
trade in guns, drugs and terrorism. 

Miss Bhutto’s efforts to combat cor- 
ruption were weak, but Mr. Sharif 
would be mistaken to wage a vendetta 
against her. Hie investigation and pos- 
sible prosecution of corruption cases 
should be earned out by civilian in- 
stitutions, possibly overseen by the 
“accountability commission'' created 
under the interim government that has 
ruled the country since November. 
New ordinances requiring disclosure 
of the personal assets of officials and 
granting greater independence to the 
Bank of Pakistan should be preserved 
and expanded. 

The new government needs to assure 
Pakistanis and the country’s friends, 
including the United States, that the 
military does not have undue influence 
in running Pakistan. Mr. Sharif should 
abolish a newly created advisory coun- 
cil, dominated by the military, that was 
set up after Miss Bhutto’s government 
was dismissed. Pakistani military and 
intelligence officials have harmed the 
country by building up its nuclear 
weapons program and aiding die re- 
actionary Islamic forces that last year 
seized control of the government in 
neighboring Afghanistan. 

Pakistan faces great problems of 
poverty, illiteracy, crime and tensions 
with its neighbor, especially India. 
The United States should do what it can 
to help Pakistan establish honest and 
independent civilian institutions. But if 
Pakistan is to serve as a force for sta- 
bility in South Asia, long its ambition 
and that of Washington, the country’s 
political leaders must eliminate the 
corruption that has so badly under- 
mined public support for democracy. 

— THE NEV, YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


America Is No Model 

Zero tolerance, workfare, negative 
campaigning by political parties — is it 
just an accident that these recent 
themes in British political debate are 
all imports from the United States 7 Or 
do they signal a deepening Ameri- 
canization of British politics and cul- 
ture? Seventy years ago. Paul Valery 
wrote that Europe aspired to be ruled 
by an American commission. Not 
knowing how to rid itself of its history, 
it sought to be relieved of it by being 
ruled by a country that had none. 

Valery's observation is strikingly 
untrue of Europe today. There is a 
growing perception thar the social and 
economic model on which postwar 


European prosperity was founded is 
not working. Yet no European thinks 
of copying American policies. A so- 
ciety in winch widening economic and 
racial inequalities have become hope- 
lessly intertwined is not a model that 
any of the states of continental Europe 
is inclined to emulate. 

The Brazilian fried America thar 
free -market policies has created, in 
which people are not so much divided 
by race as segregated racially by class, 
is neither admired nor envied in 
Europe. It is feared. America today is 
not a source of inspiration for Euro- 
peans. It is a warning to be heeded. 
Except, of course, in Britain. 

— John Cray, commenting in 
The Guardian (London). 


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NATO Expansion Would Be a Fateful Blunder 

* . • n. -- t- -* .. nn/1 rKftie MAiinf 1 


P RINCETON. New Jersey — In 
late 1996. the impression was al- 
lowed. or caused, to become prevalent 
that it had been somehow and some- 
where decided to expand NATO up 
to Russia's borders. 

This despite the fact that no formal 
decision can be made before the al- 
liance's next summit meeting, in July. 
The timing of this revelation — co- 
inciding with the presidential election 
and the pursuant changes in responsible 
personalities in Washington — did not 
make it easy for the outsider to know 
how or where to insert a modest word 
of comment 

Nor -did the assurance given to the 
public that the decision, however pre- 
liminary, was irrevocable encourage 
outside opinion. 

But something of the highest Im- 
portance is at stake here. And perhaps it 
is not too late to advance a view that, I 
believe, is not only mine alone but is 
shared by a number of others with 
extensive and in most instances more 
recent experience in Russian matters. 


By George FI Kerman 


The view, bluntly stated, is that ex- 
panding the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization would be the most fateful 
error of American policy in the entire 
post-Cold War era. 

Such a decision may be expected to 
inflame the nationalistic, anti-Western 
and militaristic tendencies in Russian 
opinion; to have an adverse effect on 
the development of Russian demo- 
cracy; to restore the atmosphere of the 
Cold War to East- West relations, and to 
impel Russian foreign policy in di- 
rections decidedly not to our liking. 

And, last but not least, it might make 
it much more difficult, if not im- 
possible. to secure the Russian Duma’s 
ratification, of the START-2 agreement 
and to achieve further reductions of 
nuclear weaponry. 

It is, of course, unfortunate that Rus- 
sia should be confronted with such a 
challenge at a time when its executive 
power is in a state of high uncertainty 


and near -paralysis. And it is doubly 
unfortunate considering the total lack 
of any necessity for this move. 

Why, with all the hopeful possi- 
bilities engendered by the end of die 
Cold War, should East- West relations 
become centered on the question of 
who would be allied with whom and. by 
implication, against whom in some 
fanciful, totally unforeseeable and most 

imorobable future military conflict? «. ~y — , — ■> ~ 

fam aware, of course, that NATO is change a decision already nwde or ca- 
talks with the Russian au- citly accepted by the alliance s 16 

member countries. But there are a few 
intervening months before the decision 
is to be made final. 


Russian mind — and their security in- 
terests as adversely affected. They 
would, of course, have no choice but 
to accept expansion as a military fait 
accompli. 

But they would continue to regard it 
as a rebuff by the West and would 
likely look elsewhere for guarantees 
of a secure and hopeful future for 
themselves. 

It will obviously not be easy to 


conducting talks with the Russ i a n 
rhorities in hopes of making the idea of 
expansion tolerable and palatable to ■ 
Russia. One can, in the existing cir- 
cumstances, only wish these efforts 
success. But anyone who gives serious 
attention to the Russian press cannot 
fail to note that neither the public nor 
the government is waiting for the pro- 
posed expansion to occur before re- 
acting to it 

Russians are little impressed with 
American assurances that it reflects no 
hostile intentions. They would see their 
prestige — always uppermost in the 


Perhaps this period can be used to 
alter the proposed expansion in ways 
that would mitigate the unhappy ef- 
fects it is already having on Russian 
opinion and policy. 

The writer, a former ambassador to 
the Soviet Union, is professor emeritus 
of historical studies at the institute for 
Advanced Study, fie contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 





* 


The Good News Is Russia Isn’t Paralyzed by the Bad News 


M OSCOW — Russia runs 
on assumptions and 
thrives on paradox in this gray 
winter of Boris Yeltsin's 
gravest illness. 

Many in the overlapping in- 
ner circles of Russian political 
and economic power now as- 
sume that Mr. Yeltsin will never 
return as an active presides L 
The effects of major heart sur- 
gery, pneumonia and other sus- 
pected but unspecified health 
problems have confined him to 
a sickbed for much of the past 
six months. He is strong enough 
to make ceremonial appear- 
ances — as he did Sunday in 
welcoming President Jacques 
Chirac of France — but is be- 
lieved to be too weak to rule. 

Moscow is gripped by an air 
of political intrigue and open 
jockeying for power among Mr. 
Yeltsin’s aides and his rivals. In 
secret, new alliances are being 
discussed, and perhaps struck, 
between potential successors 
and the rich economic interest 
groups that Russia’s robber bar- 
on capitalism has spawned. 

But die texture of daily life in 
the Russian capital suggests a 
different assumption holds sway 
for the population at large. 
There is no visible sense of 


By Jim Hoagland 


alarm that the outcomes of Mr. 
Yeltsin’s struggle to live or of 
the palace plots to succeed him 
will significantly affect Rus- 
sia’s stumbling economy, its 
deconstructing government or 

The people’s 
sangfroid is an 
accomplishment of 
the revolution that 
Mr. Yeltsin began. 

its chaotic search for a new 
place in the world. 

Seen as public fatigue or cyn- 
icism by some and passivity by 
others, this sangfroid is in fact 
one of the great accomplish- 
ments of the revolution that Mr. 
Yeltsin began by leaping aboard 
a Soviet tank five and a half 
years ago. It is a sign that in 
many ways the revolution has 
run its course. A more conven- 
tional political process of mud- 
dling through has taken hold. 

Crowds have not taken to the 
streets or tanks rolled into Red 
Square in reaction to the power 


vacuum and bitter infighting 
evident since Mr. Yeltsin was 
re-elected last July. The re- 
sponse has been discussion in 
Parliament about constitutional 
changes on succession, re- 
newed capital flight, the 
hedging of investments by the 
robber barons and a cascade of 
nasty, competing leaks to the 
newspapers from the rival polit- 
ical camps. In short, inside-the- 
Bc I way ski stuff. 

The man who would succeed 
Mr. Yeltsin temporarily if he 
were to die (and whom official 
Washington would like to see 
win his own full term) is Prime 
Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin. 
He had to take time this week 
from preparing for discussions 
with President Bill Clinton and 
Vice President A1 Gore in 
Washington to explain to the 
Russian press why he had shot 
a mother bear ana a cub on a 
recent hunting trip. 

The vacuum (and such un- 
welcome attention) has forced 
Mr. Chernomyrdin, the former 
head of the Soviet Union’s gas 
industry, to behave in a more 
focused, take-charge fashion 
than is bis custom. In tiie course 


of a long conversation at the 
Russian White House on 
Monday, Mr. Chernomyrdin 
loyally disputed the assumption 
that the Yeltsin era is over. But 
sharp words for his political 
rivals seemed shaped by the 
assumption he denied 

“It was a serious illness,’’ he 
acknowledged after asserting 
that Mr. Yeltsin would soon be 
back at work and would attend a 
scheduled March summit meet- 
ing with Mr. Clinton. Mr. 
Yeltsin contracted pneumonia 
by hurrying back to work too 
soon after his Nov. 5 quintuple 
bypass surgery despite Mr. 
Chernomyrdin's pleas to him 
“to take more time,” the prime 
minister said 

Asked about public declara- 
tions by former General Alex- 
ander Lebed that Mr. Yeltsin is 
in fact too ill to govern, and 
other anticipatory moves by 
would-be successors, Mr. 
Chernomyrdin advised them 
“not to make a fuss.” 

“Tills is all in vain,’’ he said 
“They are leaping before they 
look. This does not help me in 
my work and all the problems 
we face today.” 

He offered me little help in 
deciphering signs of serious 


rivalry within the Yeltsin team 
itself. Some insiders say that 
Yeltsin chief of staff Anatoli * 
Chubais is jockeying to sideline 3 
Mr. Chernomyrdin and consol- 
idate a regentlike position in 
the Kremlin. 

But the prime minister dis- 
played no emotion as he dis- 
tinguished his role as the head of 
the cabinet and Mr. Chubais's 
position as “head of the admin- 
istration of the president,” lack- 
ing the power to sign documents 
or issue instructions on his own. 

In contrast, Mr. Chernomyrdin 
noted that he had been working 
as a boss since he was 30: “I've 
always been in charge. I’m not 
afraid to make decisions.” 

Mr. Chernomyrdin’s de- 
cision to combat in this inter- 
view a widespread image of ,1 
being stolid and indecisive * 
seemed to me to be another in- 
dication of the volatility of 
power in the Kremlin today. 

Tales of invisible intrigue in 
that precinct are familiar. What 
is new, and hugely welcome, is 
the ability of the Russian public 
to take those tales in stride, 
while focusing on the larger 
forces reshaping society for 
better or for worse. 

The Washington Post. 


What Switzerland Most Needs to Open Are Its Moral Accounts 


D AVOS, Switzerland — In 
virtually every article 
about the dispute between 
Swiss bankers and Jewish 
groups over the bank accounts 
of Holocaust victims, there is a 
historical reference that is 
blandly repeated over and over 
“Switzerland was neutral dur- 
ing World War IL" Every time 
I read that reference I can't help 
thinking: What does it mean to 
be neutral between the perpe- 
trators of the worst crimes 
against humanity in modem 
history and their victims? What 
does it mean to say that the same 
rules should apply to the money 
of both? What does it mean to 
put yourself outside history? 

The reason this Nazi banking 
issue continues to fester is be- 
cause too many Swiss still insist 
on being morally neutral, on try- 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


ing to live off the international 
system without being fully part 
of it. As a senior Swiss official 
remarked to me: “The Swiss 
people are shocked by this bank- 
ing affair, because they are not 
used to seeing themselves on 
CNN." In their view, they are 
the victims of a plot to take their 
quiet little country away, to drag 
them back into history. 

Thank goodness there is a 
growing minority here that 
feels Switzerland should apo- 
logize and do justice to the 
Holocaust victims. 

But the majority still fell into 
two camps: The doves say let’s 
just pay the Jews something and 
get them off our backs, and the 
hawks say they shouldn’t be 
paid a dune unless they can 


show up with the passbooks of 
theix dead relatives. 

“You can’t really blame the 
people,” the Swiss official said 
to me. “No one has ever told 
them what our real role was in 
World War IL” That role in- 
cluded storing Nazi gold, which 
was then used to buy war ma- 
terials; warehousing property 
looted by the Nazis from other 
countries; barring Jewish ref- 
ugees from entering Switzer- 
land and then charging the Swiss 
Jewish community a tax for 
every single Jew allowed in, and 
being less than cooperative in 
helping Holocaust survivors 
track family assets or Nazi look 

No, the issue here is not 
“blackmail.” It’s bankruptcy 
— moral bankruptcy. I wish the 


A Case for Investment in Burma 


R ANGOON — The parti- 
cipation of Unocal Corp. of 
the United States in a $1.2 bil- 
lion project to develop a world- 
class natural gas field in the 
Andaman Sea off Burma and 
pipe the gas to neighboring 
Thailand for power generation 
has plunged the company into 
controversy. At its center is the 
question of whether engage- 
ment with Burma is preferable 
to isolation in bringing about 
positive change and improving 
living conditions and h uman 
rights. 

This is a legitimate debate 
and Unocal respects the views 
of those who disagree that in- 
creased business improves hu- 
man conditions. But many 
thoughtful observers, as well as 
the members of ASEAN, the 
Association of South East 
Asian Nations, are committed 
to economic and diplomatic en- 
gagement with Burma. 

We in the United States are 
coo often under intense fire 
from politicians and human 
rights activists who promote 
isolationism. They want the 
U.S. government to implement 
sanctions, banning future in- 
vestment in Burma. If they have 
their way, Unocal and other 
American companies will be 
forced to pull out. 

Advocates of sanctions be- 
lieve this would bring about a 
change of government in Ran- 
goon. But the history of sanc- 
tions against other countries 
clearly suggests that the critics 
of U.S. investment in Burma 
are wrong. 

Sanctions are counterpro- 
ductive. They hurt people, not 
regimes. Consider nearly four 


By John Imle 


decades of failed U.S. sanctions 
against Cuba. Sanctions have 
damaged the economies of 
Cuba and other countries, and 
hurt ordinary people, but their 
leaders remain entrenched. 

History also shows that real, 
long-term political change must 
come from within. Economic 
reforms almost always precede 
political reforms. Economic 
progress, fueled by foreign in- 
vestment, provides the foun- 
dation for more democratic and 
open societies. This has been 
Unocal's experience over 30 
years as an investor in large 
energy projects in Indonesia, 
Thailand and the Philippines. 

Unocal's Burma project is 
basically a 30-year gas supply 
agreement between the Bur- 
mese and Thai governments — 
the first such cross-border com- 
mercial energy agreement be- 
tween them. It is a contract (hat 
will contribute to long-term re- 
gional cooperation between two 
nations that have not always 
been on the best of terms, 

The first gas is scheduled to 
be piped to Thailand in mid- 
1998. Currently, ali the project 
partners are providing capital. 
The earliest financial break- 
even point would be 2001 , more 
likely 2002 or later. Early pro- 
ceeds to Burma from sale or the 
gas to Thailand are already be- 
ing earmarked for other energy 
projects that would provide an 
even broader underpinning for 
manufacturing and agriculture. 

The construction of the on- 
shore section of tire pipeline in 
Burma is creating jobs, small 


industries and new opportuni- 
ties far the 35,000 people who 
live in the area — a very poor 
region. Unocal and its partners 
are providing unproved med- 
ical care, better schools, and 
sustainable livestock and agri- 
cultural development 

Unlike many of our critics, I 
have been to Burma and ex- 
perienced firsthand the grati- 
tude of the villagers for our 
presence. These people — 
Mon. Burmese and Karen — 
are also stakeholders in the 
project, a feet that should not 
be forgotten in this internation- 
al debate. 

There is also a wider issue at 
stake for foreign investors and 
exporters. The growing trend 
toward using the business com- 
munity as an instrument of for- 
eign policy must be halted. 

Economic isolation ofBunna 
will not work. Three decades of 
self-imposed isolation have 
made me country one of the 
poorest in the world. To reim- 
pose isolation would be a cruel 
trick on the 50 million people of 
Burma, many of whom are just 
beginning to benefit from eco- 
nomic opportunity and broader 
international contacts. 

The U.S, government should 
keep die door open to Burma, 
using its diplomatic skills and 
taking advantage of the Amer- 
ican Embassy in Rangoon. Dip- 
lomacy and business should 
play complementary roles in 
building economies and open- 
ing societies. 


Swiss would keep some of their 
money, instead of paying it all 
back to the descendants of 
Holocaust victims. They need 
to use that money to build a 
Holocaust memorial in Switzer- 
land that would teach the Swiss 
about their own unspeakable. 

What does it mean 
to be neutral about 
the Nazis? 


and unspoken, chapter of his- 
tory. The accounts we need 
opened are not just the Swiss 
bank accounts, but the Swiss 
moral accounts and their his- 
torical archives. Fortunately, at 
feast some Swiss recognize that 
Lili Nabholz just led an effort in 
the Swiss Parliament to estab- 
lish a historical commission that 
will examine the entire Swiss 
govemment-Nazi relationship. 

It’s a good thing, because in 
mid-March an exhaustive 
American study of that relation- 
ship, coordinated by Undersec- 
retary of Commerce Stuart 
Eizenstat (expected to move 
soon to the State Department), 
will be released. This study is 
based on data collected during 
and immediately after World 
War U, when U.S. secret agents 
penetrated the Swiss banking 
system to track Nazi assets 
flowing in and out of Swiss 
banks. The study should 
demonstrate the depth of Swiss 
rith Nazi assets 


before, during and after the wgr 
and the obstacles the Swiss 
have put up against Jews arid 
others who trial to locate anti 
recover stolen property. 

“It would be unfair to judge 
today's generation of Swiss by 
what their ancestors did 50 
years ago,” said Mr. EizenstaL 
who met here this week with 
Swiss officials and bankers. 
“But they will be judged by 
how they respond to the rev- 
elations of what their ancestors 
did and whether they draw the 
appropriate lessons." 

It is interesting to watch this 
affair unfold from the perspec- 
tive of the Davos World Eco- 
nomic Forum, which brings to- 
gether corporate titans and 
politicians to discuss the impact 
of globalization on the world. 
Klaus Schwab and Claude 
Sraadja, the intellectual archi- 
tects of Davos, have been 
among the first to warn about 
the populist backlash against 
globalization from those who 
feel left out, left behind or 
trampled by the inexorable 
spread of free trade and laissez- 


involvement with 


faire capitalism. 

But the Swiss bank affair re- 
minds us of the potential moral 
backlash against globalization 
— the backlash against those 
who would like to construct the 
world on a one-dimensional 
basis, where commerce is 
everything, where only finan- 
cial accounting matters and 
where moral accounting never 
comes into play. 

The New York Times. 



IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 'V 

1897: Cuban Opposition 


i-.- 


NEW YORK — Leading Cu- 
bans confirm that the Queen Re- 
gent’s plan of Cuban reform is 
utterly inadequate and unsatis- 
factory. The Cuban leaders say: 
“There are 35 members of the 
Administrative Council ... 21 
posts are to be held by the people 

and the remainder appointed 
by the Crown. How many of the 
21 elective members do you 
suppose the Cubans will be able 
to choose? Not half a dozen. The 
Spaniards would have a large 
majority of the council. If the 
council had great powers or little 
powers would be no matter, 
“e effect would be the same. 
The Spaniards would continue 
to rule the island absolutely.” 


address to the American Society I 
of Civil Engineers. Mr. Elliott 
estimates that in 50 years the US. 
population will be 250 million. At 
that time the average transpor- 
tation mileage would mean the 
movement of 750 billion freight 
ton miles a year, plus added pas- 
senger travel. To provide for this, 
according to Mr. Elliott, will re- 
quire an additional railroad in- 
vestment of $25 billion. America 
still has before it die needs of a 
pew counfry, whose immensity is 
indicated in Mr. Elliott’s figures. 


v. 


The writer, president of Un- 
ocal Corp. of the United Slates, 
contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


1947: Nut Farming 

LONDON — The Labor gov- 
ernment announced today [Feb. 
6] its projected extension of 
socialism to die British colon- 
1099. * vi ies - A vasI system of mech- 

-KRiIwayns Future anized ground-nut ferns, thou- 

sands of square miles in area, is 

to be established in the African 
colonies of Kenya, Tanganyika 
and Northern Rhodesia under 
full government ownership. 


77 fP 16 HeraJd ^ in an 

Hduoiral:] Howard Elliott, chair- 
man oftoe Northern Pacific Rail- 
way company, recently made an 




^htthi r ~~ — — 

fy* Not-So-Modest Proposal 
For a Plutonium Prison 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


rAb& > 



By Jessica Mathews 


YU ASHINGTON — Three 
T V years ago. the U.S. National 
Academy of Sciences reported its 
unsettling answer to the question 
of what should be done with the 
tons of plutonium coining out of 
tens of thousands of nuclear 
weapons that would be retired as 
the Cold War ended. 

%% The surplus material, it said. 


heads are dismantled, twit with . fly. 
fuel cores still intact and in-coun- 
tiy die possibility remains of. a. 
relatively quick reversal. 

Analysts at the Rand Coip.. 
have proposed a notion that could 
deal with all of these concerns. 
They suggest SMART — Stra- 
tegic Material Accelerated Re- 
moval Talks. The idea is 10 move 


r?G& 


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BWNCHJWOl 
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JlanGrcenspart- 

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'Vnniit nupc „ ,.i _ j > — iui<iumib w uiuig 

T "? -1*®“°* . excess plutonium and highly «h- 
tiMBl ^ ricbed uranium out of both cotm- 

c?? Worse, u could tries to a third country (tbev sue- 




Bad Ni 


'y find no Options to remove the 
Uireat, only to reduce it. Worse 
still, the measures it did come up 
with would be achingly slow. 
Coping with plutonium was going 
to be a lasting security hangover 
of the Cold War. 

Developments since then have 
underlined the academy's mes- 
sage, particularly the dismal se- 
curity conditions at Russian nu- 
clear sites. 

And other problems are worth 
i noting. On the strategic front, the 
treaty from the Strategic Arms, 
Reduction Talks, START-2, is in 
deep trouble. Russia shows no in- 
nterest in ratifying it, partly be- 
2 _cau.se of unhappiness over NATO 
i i expansion but also for the un- 
^ ^assailable reason that in order to 
-[maintain equivalence with the 
it United States, Moscow would 
have to spend billions it doesn't 
-rhave to build new intercontinental 
-^ballistic missiles to make up for 
liweapons that START-2 would 
/ban. 

-r The answer is a formula that 
✓would fudge START-2 and go 
/•directly to a START-3 agreement 
.{allowing about 2,000. instead of 
n3,500, weapons on each side. But 
a that, of course, would greatly in- 
C crease the amount of plutonium to 
jrbe dealt with. 

It has also become clear that the 
.two sides differ profoundly on 
--•what to do with separated plutoni- 
. hum. Russia sees the stuff as pre- 
■ i cions reactor fuel. The United 
-i States sees it as an enormous pro- 
h 1 iteration risk diat would be better 
treated as waste and buried, 
n. finally, as the number of op- 


iral Accost 


uerarional warheads - has 
/iplurameted. focus has inevitably 
■j i shifted to the failure of the treaties 
.%to deliver the aims control they 
i-seem to promise. The amount of 
-uweapons fuel in either councry 
does not actually- change a lot 
Weapons above negotiated limits 
are stored as reserves. Some war- 


•? ; 


ricbed uranium out of both coun- 
tries to a third country (they sug- 
gest Greenland), where it would 
be protected by a joint force and 
by engineered features that would 
make it easy to move material in. 
quickly but hand to take it out 
(collapsing tunnels, tiismanrifri 
railroad tracks, etc.). 

While it would take years to do 
all this, the authors estimate that at 
the end of a decade, 90 percent 
fewer potential nuclear waibeads 
would be in both countries ih«n in 
the case of either or both disposal 
options. That’s a big enough dif- 
ference to command alien non. 

The SMART site would be a 
prison from which material could 
-be removed but only at agreed 
Tates and for agreed purposes, pre- 
sumably. civilian use. Thus it 
would take a giant step toward 
irreversibility, yet without having 
to confront the hnge difference of 
view in Washington and Moscow . 
over plutonium’s final fare. 

Would Russia ever agree? That 
probably depends on what finan- 
cial incentives the United States 
might provide. Should the United 
States pay? Yes. if it would oth- 
erwise cost more to boy less se- 
curity. If START-2 is not ratified, 
fox example, the Pentagon estim- 
ates, it will have to spend an ad- 
ditional SS billion. SMART might 
be linked to a START-3 agree- 
ment. 

Any new idea as difficult as this 
one would be to negotiate is easy 
to dismiss. To take just one ex- 
ample. no country might want to 
house the site, even for the income 
and as a major service to world 
peace. However, SMART'S po- 
tential benefits for both aims con- 
trol and the vexing problem of 
plutonium management are great 
enough to warrant a close, hard 
look. 

The writer, a senior fellow at 
the Council on Foreign Relations, 
contributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Global Farces 

Regarding "If Globalizing 
Means Westernizing, Then It 
Means Trouble" (Opinion, Jan. 2) 
by William Pfaff: 

. : It's a puzzle to turn freon the 
excellent series of factual and nn- 
aaced reports on globalization 
(Dec. 30-Jan . 3) to Mr. PfafTs 
shrill and ill-informed opinion 
piece. 

Mr. PfafTs premise illustrates 
the very “historical parochial- 
ism" he criticizes. The era when 
only the West had capitalism, and 
foistedi ton the rest of the world as 
imperialism, is old history. 
Today, globalizing as often as not 
means “Eastemizmg." The mul- 
tinationals spearheading; the new 
globalization are as likely to be 
Japanese, Korean. Taiwanese or 
Malaysian as American or British 
{"The New British Empire Is 
South Korea's ," Dec. 31). The 
West versus the rest is yesterday’s 
battle even if a few mconigibles 
are still fighting It. 

Just as problematic is Mr. 
PfafTs contention that globaliz- 
ation drives down wages. Again, 
his wild generalizations (not a 
number in sight) neither refine nor 
even engage with the carefully 
weighed and argued view that 
“Free Trade Helps lift World 
Poor” (Dec. 30). 

It's early yet, but so far the 
balance of evidence is that in 
the long run globalization pro- 


duces many more winners than 
losers. 

AID AN FOSTER-CARTER. 

Leeds, England 

Regarding “ Globalisation : 
Fine for Some and Bad for Many" 
(Opinion, Jan. 24) by John 
Cavanagh: 

Mr. Cavanagh is mistaken in all 
Ins arguments against free trade. 

Rise in inequality: If it were 
true that increased trade led to 
growing poverty, we would have 
all been dead long ago. It is 
enough to compare living stan- 
dards in open economies to those 
of dictatorships or heavily reg- 
ulated countries. 

Jobs and wages: Comparing 
Hong Kong with say, Albania, 
shows the fallacy that globaliz- 
ation means fewer jobs and lower 
wages. 

Environmental plunder Envi- 
ronmental damage is by far more 
serious in socialist economics 
than in the capitalist world 

Community collapse: In devel- 
oping countries today, capitalism 
often means a welcome oppor- 
tunity to earn one's living rather 
than being tied to traditional com- 
munities. And. hey, if these com- 
munities are so great, nobody is 
forced to leave. 

Democracy in danger Global- 
ization breaks up old, corrupt 
power systems by offering a 
wide ranges of possibilities to 
people who were once prevented 


, _ i JF .* . 

1 -. ^ . >• .j! 1 


A Cancer Patient’s Case 
For Medical Marijuana 

By Richard Brookhiser 

W ASHINGTON — Doctors to whom we are trying to teach the 
never say that anyone is evils of drugs. What sort of signs! 


from choosing their own way of 
life. 

JACOB ARFWEDSON. 

Paris. 

I am distressed that Mr. 
Cavanagh 's Institute for Policy 
Studies was labeled a “leftist think 
tank.'* Is this phrase meant to con- 
tribute to or detract from the read- 
er's assessment of Mr. Cavanagh’s 
views? If yon are going to begin to 
label contributors, may 1 suggest 
you label all of them, be they con- 
servative, right-wing, liberal, fem- 
inist, humorist, etc. 

J.S. PARSONS. 

Pretoria. 

Tibet's Monasteries 

Regarding "Giving Up on 
Tibet" (Editorial, Jan. 3): 

This editorial states that the 
Chinese “destroyed virtually all 
Tibet’s monasteries.” In work for 
the China Exploration and Re- 
search Society, 1 have visited 
dozens of monasteries across the 
Tibetan plateau, and am directing a 
project to restore two of them. It 
would be much more accurate to 
say that virtually all monasteries 
suffered some damage. Tibetans 
have been hard at work rebuilding, 
and although they have not (yet) 
replaced all the lost structures, their 
work is evidence of the durability 
of Buddhism on the high plateau. 

PAMELA LOGAN. 

Altadena, California. 


vv never say that anyone is 
cured of cancer, but in a few. 
months 1 may well win the next- 
best accolade: I will be five years 
away from a case of metastasized 
testicular cancer that has not re- 
curred. 

Though I did not particularly 
enjoy ray treatment,- it was better 

MEANWHILE 

than the alternative. One aspect of 
the experience, however, was 
needless and unnecessary: in or- 
der to deal with the nausea of 
chemotherapy. 1 smoked mari- 
juana, and that, under federal law 
(reaffirmed in the wake of Cali- 
fornia's Proposition 21 5 in 
November legalizing the medical 
use of marijuana in that state), 
made me a criminal. 

None of my doctors or nurses 
discouraged me from trying pot, 
because they all had experience 
with cancer patients who bad used 
it to good enect The same chem- 
ical property that makes stoned 
college students clean out a re- 
frigerator helps a nausea- wracked 
invalid keep food down. 

Marijuana has helped AIDS pa- 
tients with the wasting syndrome 
recover their appetite, and it 
seems to be useful in treating oth- 
er ailments as well. Yet the law 
makes it a drug illegal under all 
circumstances, along with 

heroin. 

Supporters of the ban dismiss 
the evidence of marijuana's med- 
ical efficacy as anecdotal. This is 
not entirely true — a study com- 
missioned by the Los Angeles Po- 
lice Department in 1970 to see 
whether the reefer-maddened had 
dilated pupils found instead that 
marijuana lowers the pressure on 
the eyeball, which is why the drug 
arrests the progress of glaucoma. 
But it is true that studies are scant, 
largely because the government 
makes them impossible. Dr. Don- 
ald Abrams, an AIDS researcher 
at San Francisco General Hos- 
pital, has tried for years to get 
marijuana from the federal gov- 
ernment to study its effects on the 
wasting syndrome — to no avail. 
The Clinton administration's drug 
czar. General Barry McCaffrey, 
dismisses pot’s medical claims.- 

The enemies of medical 
marijuana also say that using it 
sends the wrong signal to children 
•••ayi " r ■ j ‘ lu 

.... . - f . i... 


to whom we are trying to teach the 
evils of drugs. What sort of signal 
— that you, too, can be as cool as 
a cancer patient? When I was 
lounging around my hospital ward 
with a roomful of bald people, 1 
didn’t think 1 was making a life- 
style statement. Medicine is not 
recreation. If the uses of morphine 
were discovered now, would we 
keep it out of the phannacopoeia 
for fear of sending the wrong sig- 
nal about opium? 

The final charge of the generals 
who want to cany the drug war all 
the way to the sickbeds is that 
many of the supporters of medical 
marijuana, such as the billionaire 
financier George Soros and Na- 
tional Review, also suppon 
sweeping changes in all the drug 
laws. That is true. But the two 
positions are not necessarily 
linked. If you oppose the drug 
war, then the ban on medical 
marijuana is indeed one symptom 
among many of its excesses. But if 
you support the war, the ban is an 
irrelevancy, like fighting the Hun 
in World War I by changing the 
name of sauerkraut to “liberty 
cabbage.” 

Z made many of these points in 
testimony before the crime sub- 
committee of the House Judiciary 
Committee last spring. The chair- 
man, Bill McCollum, was attent- 
ive and serious. He knows the is- 
sue because he supported a 
medical marijuana bill in the early 
] 980s. So, for that matter, did Rep- 
resentative Newt Gingrich. Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton has backed no 
legislation, though he performed 
private tests in his college days. 

If these men, or any Washing- 
ton lawmakers, found themselves 
or their families in a position 
where they needed some joints to 
keep from vomiting, they could 
easily find them. People in the 
Midwest, or people alarmed by 
continuing anti-pot rhetoric, 
would find it more, difficult. This 
is the great evil of current laws — 
the iniquities they impose on the 
average and the law-abiding, as 
opposed to the hip or the- power- 
ful. The voters of California saw 
things clearly when they backed 
Proposition 215. Washington 
should follow their lead. 

The writer, senior contributing 
editor at National Review, con- 
tributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


The Most Up-to-Date Reference 
for American Business Terms 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY 


-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 



PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 199* 

HEALTH/ SCIENCE 


The Sequence of Life: Thinking Small About Genetics 


By Nicholas Wade 

New York Times Service 

ILTON HEAD, South Car- 
olina — Working in the 
shadow of the vast project to 
decode human genes, bio- 
logists are rapidly deciphering the ge- 
netic makeup of much smaller organ- 
isms, including microbes that cause 
disease. The result, these scientists say, 
is that the frill DNA, or genomes, of 
many pathogens is likely to be decoded 
in the next several years, offering new 
drug and vaccine strategies. 

They say their field will have an 
impact far sooner than will the better 
known $3 billion project to decipher the 


human genome, which began in the late 
1980s and is not expected to be com- 
pleted before 2000. 

“It is absolutely clear that die avail- 
ability of whole genomes has changed 
the way we are doing science," said Dr. 
E. Richard Moxon, an infectious disease 
specialist at Oxford University. 

Aside from their medical importance, 
the small genomes are also of interest in 
two other arenas. Biologists hope that 
by comparing diverse genomes, they 
wall be able to trace the tree of evolution 
back to the origin of life, or at least to its 
earliest branches. And industrial chem- 
ists are screening genomes from the 
poles to the deep sea in search of en- 
zymes with special properties. 


Sequencing a genome means deter- 
mining the nature and order of all the 
chemical building blocks, each repres- 
ented by a letter, of an organism 's DNA. 
The smallest known bacterial genomes 
contain as few as 500,000 letters in their 
genetic instruction set. That is just a few 
pages, compared with die 3 -billion- letter 
tome of human DNA, but it is still daunt- 
ing enough that the Erst bacterial genome 
was sequen c ed only two years ago. 

Sequencing a small genome costs Si 
million to $15 million, depending on the 
length of the organism's DNA. Despite 
the costs, which are enormous by the 
usual standard of biological research, 
plans are now under way for sequencing 
the organisms that cause diseases tike 


malaria, syphilis. Lyme disease, typhus, 
gastric ulcers and gonorrhea. 

The agencies financing the work are so 
eager to stake out claims that the National 
Institutes of Health and Wellcome Trust 
of London each formed plans to se- 
quence the tuberculosis bacterium before 
deciding to join forces instead. 

To the human eye, the printed result 
of a computer- generated genome se- 
quence is a meaningless string of A's, 
G’s. T’s and C's, representing the four 
chemical components of the genetic 
code. But computers can annotate the 
text of a genome, marking where its 
genes probably start, flagging die on and 
off gene switches that are found in DNA 
regions between the genes and marking 


the hidden viruses that have slipped 
their DNA into their host's genome. 
Most Important, computer programs 
can identify the likely role of many 
genes by comparing their DNA se- 
quence with the thousands of genes of 
known function whose sequences have 
now been deposited in data banks. 

Genomes annotated in this way are 
transformed from gibberish to draft 
blueprints of a living organism. For 
scientists, the annotated genomes of 
pathogenic bacteria are like a decrypted 
top-security message about the enemy's 
strategy and tactics. They lay bare every 
inherited weapon and defense, even 
though much is not yet understood. 

The era of small-genome sequencing 


began in 1995 when Haemo- W? 

philus influenzae, a bacterium S. 
that causes ear and throat infections 
{no relation of the flu virus), was 
sequenced by a team led by Dr. J. Craig 
Venter of the Institute for Genomic Re- 
search and Dr. Hamilton Smith, of 
Johns Hopkins University School of 
Medicine. 

The availability of the Haemophilus 
genome offered several deep insights 
into the microbe’s game plan, including 
the crucial mechanism by which it keeps 
shifting the composition of its coat to 
evade its host's immune system. News 
of the sequence had particular impact 
because few had believed a bacterium 
could be sequenced so easily. “ 


.util ’""' 1 


Facts About Cats, 
iDogs and Allergies 


mu 


By Denise Grady 

1 New Yuri Times Service 

EW YORK — Their sons, 8 
and 10 years old. were beg- 
ging for a dog, but Laurie 
and Lou Gallo had always 
thought it out of the question because of 
•Gallo's allergy to cats and dogs. 

Children are persistent, though, and 
iMr. and Mrs. Gallo like dogs themselves. 
• And they kept hearing that people with 
■allergies could tolerate certain breeds of 
dog, particularly poodles, Airedale ter- 
mers. Portuguese water dogs and terriers, 
-which supposedly do not shed. 

( The Gallos knew that allergies were 
-caused by dog dander, or flakes of skin, 
;and not hair. But. the theory went, 
dander tended to stick to hair, and with 
■less hair being shed, there would be less 
,dander in the air. 

The idea made sense, sort of, and they 
decided to test it by borrowing a re- 
lative's miniature poodle. Peaches stayed 
•with them in their home for a week and 
-even slept in the couple's bedroom. Mr. 
Gallo did not sneeze once. 

■ Encouraged but still cautious. Mrs. 
Gallo consulted breeders, visited pet 
shops and borrowed library books about 
•specific breeds. All promoted poodles 
and certain other dogs as allergy-safe. 
The family became enchanted with a 
jype of tov spaniel called the bichon 
irise, which, they agreed, looked like a 
•poodle, only cuter. Mrs. Gallo was de- 
lighted by a book that declared, 
.“Bichons do not shed dander, making 
■them more compatible to the family 


that has a member who is allergic.'’ 

On a Wednesday in December, they 
brought home a bichon puppy, freshly 
shampooed and brushed by the breeder. 
They named him Clouseau, and by bed- 
time, the boys had fallen in love with him. 
By Saturday morning, Gallo was miser- 
able: ids eyes itched, and beared, bis nose 
had clogged shut, and be could not stop 
sneezing. 

The puppy would have to go, Mrs. 
Gallo decided. The boys were heart- 
broken, and one demanded that bis fath- 
er move out instead of the dog. 

“I was the villain." Mr. Gallo said 

‘‘I was consumed by guilt," Mrs. 
Gallo said 

Nonetheless. Clouseau went back to 
the breeder, who insisted that she had 
never encountered anyone allergic to a 
bichon before. 

The Gallos have given up the idea of 
a dog. But they still wonder why 
Peaches seemed to work out and 
Clouseau did not 

Their story does not surprise allergists. 
“I encounter the poodle theory all the 
time," said Dr. William J. Davis, a pro- 
fessor of clinical pediatrics and director 
of allergy and immunology at Columbia 
Presbyterian Medical Center in Man- 
hattan. "There’s veay little truth to iL” 

A week, the period the Gallos spent 
with Peaches, is probably not a long 
enough test period Dr- Davis said In 
sensitive people, altagies can develop at 
any time, even after a long exposure to an 
animal. 

Safe-pet stories abound anyway. 
“The chihuahua theory is very preval- 











BOOKS 


PERSONAL HISTORY promoting herself and putting her chil- 

By Katlmnrie Graham. Illustrated. 642 The second major event of Graham’s 
pages. 5-9.95. Alfred A. Knopf. story is her marriage to the dazzling 

Reviewed by Philip Graham, who clerked for two 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt Supreme Court justices then, after 

, .. serving in the Army Alt Forces during 

■kl EAR the end of her extraordinary World War H, took over as publisher of 
mm autobiography. “Personal History.” ^ Post ^ made both it and himself 
Katharine Graham, the former publisher major players on the Washington scene 


ent," said Dr. Harold Nelson, an allergist 
and senior staff physician at the National 
Jewish Medical arid Research Center in 
Denver. “The classic folklore tale is that 
chihuahuas actually cure asthma." 

They do not, arid Dr. Nelson said he 
did not know how the idea had got start- 
ed “I can think of only one possible 
explanation,’’ he said"They'te sort of 
dreadful tittle dogs. They wheeze when 
they breathe, and I always had this feeling 
that maybe people thought the dogs were 
drawing the evil spirits out of the asthma 
patient and taking it into themselves." 

Allergists say all the safe-breed the- 
ories are just wishful thinking . When 
people are allergic to cats or dogs. Dr. 
Davis said the allergens that make them 
sick are the proteins in the animals' skin 
secretions and saliva. “All dogs and all 
cats have saliva and skin," he said “So 
theoretically, there is no such thing as a 
nonailergenic cat or dog." 


Combined with what she describes as 
her compulsion to please people, this 


As for the idea that dander and saliva 
stick to hair and that non-shedding dogs 
are therefore nonailergenic, forget it. 
said Peyton Eggleston, an allergist and 
professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins 
University in Baltimore. Particles of the 
offending proteins become airborne, 
just waiting to be inhaled 

But if there are no allergy-safe dogs or 
cats, where did the poodle theory come 
from? “The stories appear silly but can 
have reasons,'* said Dr. Thomas A. 
Platts -Mills, head of the Asthma and 
Allergic Disease Center at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia in Charlottesville. 
Allergists know cases in which an al- 
lergic person seems able to tolerate an 
individual dog. No one can explain those 
cases, except to speculate that such 
people may not be highly allergic in the 
first place, that one dog may secrete less 
protein than another or that a particular 
dog may secrete a type of protein that is 
less irritating to someone. 

“We think there really are differ- 
ences in protein production between 
dogs that may help one patient and not 
another," Dr. Platts-Mills said “and 
make for a lot of confusion." 


of The Washington Post justly praises the during Eisenhower and Kennedy ad- 
memoir of her former managing editor ministrations. 


Ben Bradlee {"A Good Life"), calling it 
“ a book in which we hear his true voice — 
the besr kind of book." 

The same can be said of hers. Al- 
though you can't know for certain that 
it's her own voice you’re hearing, it 
certainly rings true: It is frank, self- 
critical. modest when necessary, proud 


The second major event of Graham's battering left her ill equipped to take 
story is her marriage to the dazzling charge of a news empire. In her account 
Philip Graham, who clerked for two the resulting insecurity makes her situ- 
Supreme Court justices, then, after atioQ seem all the more perilous when 
serving in the Army Air Forces during the Post gets so far out on a limb during 
World War n, took over as publisher of the early stages of the Watergate in- 
the Post and made both it and himself vestigation.or when so many people are 
major players on the Washington scene advising her to give in to the demands of 
during the Eisenhower and Kennedy ad- the pressmen's union. You chew your 
ministrations. nails down to the nub for ber. 

"Phil was the fizz in our lives," Gra- In short, this is a public life recounted 
ham writes. But later she has to add, personally. 

"Looking back, I see that he was like a Characteristic is her story of taking 
rocket fizzling out — still giving off used-car ads by telephone during a 


A llergists agree that the 

luck of the few with their pets 
cannot be stretched to fit all 
allergic people and entire 
breeds of dogs. The safest advice for 
families with someone allergic to an- 
imals, they say, is not to get a warm- 
blooded pet in the first place. And if 
there is an animal in the house already 
and the person is suffering from allergy 
symptoms, the best solution is to get rid 
of the pet 

Dr. Davis also acknowledged that 
sometimes, for an elderly person or a 
retarded child, for instance, the com- 
panionship of a pet was so important 
that it was worth trying to find a way to 
live with it If the animal is causing 
asthma, though, the risk of serious ill- 
ness is thought to outweigh any benefits 
the pet might provide. 

In the meantime. Dr. Davis said, 
veterinarians have discovered that dogs 
also suffer from allergies, and they have 

But he said he had not yet hearefof any 
pets becoming allergic to their owners. 


sparks and even occasional bursts of Newspaper Guild strike in 1974. ‘'You 


flame, but steadily burning down." A 
manic-depressive without know Lag it. he 
broke down and ended up shooting him- 


when justified and, above all, one that to death on Aug. 3, 1963. 


can tell a good story, whether detailing 
an embarrassing anecdote (from which 
its owner was far from immune) or out- 
lining contemporary American history 
(to which she was a frequent eyewit- 
ness). In her acknowledgments. Graham 
says that she wrote this book herself, 
with the help of her researcher. Evelyn 


In the climactic third act of her drama, 
she takes command of the Post herself 
and, despite self-doubt, steers it through 
its exposure of the Watergate scandal, 
which ended Richard Nixon's presiden- 
cy, and its bitter confrontations with its 
labor unions that, she argues, enabled the 
paper to modernize itself. In the end. 


Small, who * ‘ took the words I wrote and both she and her company emerge trans- 
shaped them.*’ , formed and commanding. 

That the voice is so true comes as a bit 


of a surprise, considering tbe length it 
goes on. To glimpse the book's large 


UCH of this is familiar, even the 
harrowing story of her husband’s 


number of pages is to anticipate one of breakdown. What is fresh and powerful 


those public memoirs that inch forward 
by the day and hour without personal 
revelation. 


sound overqualified," one dealer said 
when she read back what he had dictated 
to her. “You could be anyone. You 
could be Katharine Graham." She was 
startled for a second before she replied, 
“As a matter of fact, I am." Later they 
met in person and had a laugh over the 
exchange. She even admits to being hurt 
that the considerable role she played in 
Watergate was left out of the movie “All 
tbe President’s Men.” 

But the importance of ‘ ‘Personal His- 
tory" is that it tells the story of a pioneer. 
When Graham took over the Post in 
1963, the women’s movement had not 
yet begun to gather steam, and both 
boardrooms and newsrooms were still 
deeply male dominated. So she bad not 


CROSSWORD 


Personality Quirks , 
Or ‘Shadow ? H Iness ? 


By Jane E. Brody 

New York Tones Sen'ice 

EW YORK — They may 
sound like nothing more 
than personality quirks — a 
working mother who is com- 
petent and controlled at ber job but 
explodes at home when small things go 
wrong or a computer programmer who 
is the ultimate loner, sitting hunched 
over his terminal night and day. 

One wo man could never see long 
projects through to their end. Instead of 
setting reasonable goals and meeting 
them, she would jump into a project 
with both feet only to find her initial 
energy and enthusiasm fading before 
she completed it when a new project 
captured her attention. 

One man was obsessively concerned 
about his body, always scanning it for 
signs of trouble. When something does 
happen, he cannot stop thinking about 
what it may mean. As a child, he was 
obsessive about sports activities: “I 
wouldn’t just pitch one hour a day: I 
would stand in front of a wall and make 
5.000 pitches, from 11 A-M. to 4 PJVL” 

But. in fact, each of thesepeople was 
eventually found to be suffering from 
what Dr. John J. Ratey, a psychiatrist, 
has named ‘ ‘shadow syndrome," a mild 
form of a well-recognized neuropsy- 
chiatric disorder like depression, atten- 
tion-deficit disorder, obsessive-com- 
pulsive disorder, mania or autism. 

Dr. Raiey, who is executive director of 
research at Medfield State Hospital in 
Massachusetts and is affiliated with Har- 
vard Medical School, said a person with 
shadow syndrome might have three or 
four symptoms of a recognized disorder 
that was usually defined by 10 or so 
symptoms. That person tnay have serious 
difficulties meeting life’s challenges but 
never know why. More often than not, 
his clinical experience has shown, such 
people Name themselves for their social, 
academic and professional failures. 

Millions of these people are "falling 
between the cracks/' said Dr. Michael 
Liebowitz, a psychiatrist at the New 


But he added that even if the symp- 
toms of a person's condition did not 
exactly fit established diagnostic cri- 
teria. “it can be classified as a mental 
disorder if it is associated with clinically 
significant distress or dysfunction." . 

And even problems that do not seem 
severe can have serious consequences. 
Dr. Frederick Goodwin, former director 
of the National Institute of Mental 
Health and now a professor of psy- 
chiatry at George Washington Uni- 
versity School of Medicine, said, 
* ‘Many of these milder states are chron- 
ic and can be even more disruptive of a 
person's life and ability to function than 
a well-defined clinical syndrome that 
comes and goes, say. every three to six 
months and lasts two weeks." 

Subthreshold syndromes can, for ex- 
ample, result in poor school performance, 
an inability to hold jobs, difficulty mak- 
ing and sustaining friendships, marital 
discord, inappropriate behavior as a par- 
ent and a general failure to fit into society. 
Yet, all such syndromes respond well tp 
treatment. Dr. Ratey’ maintains in a new- 
book, "Shadow Syndromes," written 
with Dr. Catherine Johnson, published 
this month by Pantheon. In fact, he add, 
“for most people with shadow syn- 
dromes, jusi understanding the origins of 
the behavior is the biggest help." 

Most surprising, perhaps, are the 
people who turn out to have a sub- 
clinical form of autism, a neurological 
condition usually present at or shortly 
after birth in which individuals are 
drawn into their own world and fail to 
make contact or communicate with oth- 
ers. Dr. Edward Ritvo, a professor emer- 
itus of psychiatry at UCLA, and his cq- 
workers uncovered fascinating cases of 
mild autism among die parents of all 380 
autistic children identified in Utah. 


never know why. More often than not, LTHOUGH they had married 

his clinical experience has shown, such Mm and had children and were 
people Name themselves for their social, generally of normal or abov&- 

academic and professional failures. average intelligence and of- 

Millions of these people are * ‘falling ten very successful, these parents were 
between the cracks, said Dr. Michael always deemed to be “weird," "odd 
Liebowitz, a psychiatrist at the New ducks" or “nerdy." Unlike true autistic 
York State Psychiatric Institute at the - people, they had no language problems* 


Columbia College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. “Yet their symptoms warrant 
fixing. They can be very distressing, 
even disabling." 

Dr. Robert Spitzer, chief of biometric 
research at the institute, said: “Mental 
disorders exist cm a continuum, like 
blood pressure and cholesterol levels. It is 
somewhat arbitrary as to where we make 
a cutoff between health and disease." 

But Dr. Harold Alan Pincus, director 
of research for the American Psychiatric 
Association, said he was concerned 
about “the rush to get out brand names" 
for so-called subthreshold disorders be- 
fore they have been systematically eval- 
uated. "We must first study tbe natural 
history of the conditions, then study 
treatments to see if they will alter that 
history," he said. 


but they had difficulty “grasping the 
subtleties of interpersonal relationships 
and didn't understand the social inap- 
propriateness of their behaviors," Dr. 
Ritvo said. 

Dr. Ratey said children with mild 
autism were often too uncoordinated to 
do sports and too poor at grasping social 
cues to have friends. 

“These people suffer from a con*- 
genital lack of grace, they don't know 
now to do the interpersonal dance,” 
Dr. Ratey remarked. "Their intentions 
are good, but people think they are 
awful, arrogant, self-important be- 
cause they come across so boldly when 
they do say something and because 
they tend to say things that are com- 
pletely inappropriate, that rend the 
seemiiness of Life." 


here is her point of view and singular only to transform herself but the cultures 


perspective. She writes of her parents 
objectively but lets you know between 


But Graham’s story more than jus- the lines how much her mother's com- 
tifies its length. As she shapes the drama petitiveness suffocated her and how 
of her life, it comprises three major much her father’s unexpressed love 


episodes. The first is her experience 
growing up as the daughter of two dif- 
ficult parents. Her brilliant but remote 
father. Eugene Meyer, capped his suc- 
cessful career as a financier and public 
servant by buying the struggling Wash- 
ington Post in 1933 and nursing it to 
health until it finally broke even a decade 
Jaier. Her overbearing, self-absorbed 
niother. Agnes, spent much of her life 


drew her to the newspaper business. so openly is winning. ‘ 

What is new about her account of her deeply into her faults ai 
husband’s illness is bow much he den- in desperation makes y 
igrared her. especially when he was That she expresses such love and grat- 
drinking, and how little she was aware of itude for those who helped her is touch- 
ber transformation into a “doormat ing. That she grew and finally succeeded 
wife.” (She blames his illness for his is inspiring. 

treatment of her, but to judge from her 

account, complex cultural crosscurrents Christopher Lehmaru 
beat at the two of them as well.) siaffofThe New York Tt 


in which she found herself as well. 4SticKir> 
(When male leaders dismissed subor- * Ethane 
di nates, they were commanding: when dmeth 
she did so, she was flighty.) 14 Longer 

That she failed and railed and admits it Frazier 

so openly is winning. That she sees so 1flRunk y 
deeply into ber faults and turns to others 1 
in desperation makes you cheer for her. 


ACROSS 

1 Weebft 
4 Sticking point 
■ Ethanol, to 
cSmethyl ether 
14 Longtime 
Frazier foe 


M Actor Wffiam of 
“Knots 
Landing” 

17 Sunday reading 
leVYHdemess 
home 

SB Explosives and 
such 




Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on the 
siaffofThe New York Tunes. 


BRIDGE 

; By Alan Truscon " ISSSEfEttSSSi 
. a natural course. North's final 

I T is 7 1 years since Harold bid was precipitate; an explor- 
Sterling Vanderbilt intro- atory move searching for the 
tiuced “contract bridge" to diamond queen would have 


three friends on a cruise 
through the Panama CanaL 
Since that time, many clubs 
have been named for him, one 
of them in Lake Sucess. Long 


been appro p riate. 


not rely on establishing 
dummy's fifth spade to score 
the 13th trick. 

He began by leading to the 
club ace and ruffing a club 
with the diamond nine. West’s 
play of the ten and queen of 


NORTH (D) 
* AKQ75 

9A92 
0 A KS2 

S3 


Island. Another is in Nashville, doubleton queen of diamonds 
where die name is perhaps due in a defender's hand was his 
more to Vanderbilt Uni- main chance, and that would 


When die heart queen was clubs su gg ested shortage in 
led, Pennington inspected the that suit, and he became con- 
dummy and realized that he fident — almost confident 
would need some luck. A enough to claim the grand 
doubleton queen of diamonds slam. West was now marked 
in a defender's hand was his with length in the major suits 


*106432 

9QJ1093 

OQ 

AQlfl 


EAST 
* J8 
987 
0 10 6 5 4 
* J7B52 


yersity's being there than to bring him close to 13 tricks, 
the origins of the game. He began by winning wit 

On the diagramed deal, re- the heart king and leading 


main chance, and that would and was headed for trouble, 
bring him close to 13 tricks. The diamond king was 


ported by Kathie Wei -Sender diamond to the ace. Tbe ap- 


He began by winning with cashed, and the diamond 
the heart king and leading a eight finessed. The diamond 


SOUTH 

*9 

VK84 
0 J873 
AAK984 

Both sides were vulnerable. Tbe bkl- 



from a game at the Nashville 
Vanderbilt. Lee Pennington 
landed os South in an optim- 
istic seven-diamond contract. 
The opening one-club bid was 


ice of the queen on His 
an obvious singleton. 


jack removed East’s last 
trump, and the club king ad- 
ministered the coup de gr&ce: 


made him think again. Now he West could not protect both 
would need to draw four spades and hearts and the 
rounds of trumps, and could grand slam was made. 


North 

East 

South 

Vest 

1* 

Pna 

2* 

Pass 

24 

Pass 

30 

Pass 

4 N.T. 

Pass 

5 0 

Pass 

70 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

West led the heart queen. 



HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE 

A PRIVILEGED PLACE! 

HquaGtafrdGuBon 1211 Geneva 


318 32 00 
318 33 00 


' Sf “The Raggedy 
Man* poet 
n Frostiness 
M Latitude 

n Varda 

National Park 

SB “Bird on “ 

(Gibson film) 

ft Together, 
musically 

SB Upbeat, in music 
si The yoke's on 
them 

aa Patrick Ewing, 
for one 

34 Queehua, e.g. 

3B Musical that 
premiered 
3/29/51 
3* The Faerie 
Queens' 
character 
40 Thatched 
■a AL player 
44 Smack 
«aCoty of France 
4B Places tor hats? 
si Fraternity letters 
SB Lot 

■3 Kind of card 
S4 Golden Horde 
member 

seMfnt 

07 Beer, 
sometimes 
se Pacific divider 
mt Popular 
Herehsybar 
ea Repute 
83 B. AO. stop 
••Furtive 
•9 TV Guide span 
■s Guitarist 
Nugent 


i Southeast 
Florida city 
x Pie preference 


3 Gymnast's 
finale 

4 Airport queue 
b Bravo, e.g. 

B Any one of the 


t S ong from 
36-Acrosa 

s Nothing doing? 

• “Byel" 

is FertiHzstton shea 
11 60 I a-70'sTV 
sleuth 

is Uncut 

13 End a shutdown 
18 With 27 -Down, 
song from 
36-Across 
xx Psychiatrist/ 
author R. O. 

28 Sell 

27 See IB-Down 
30 States of alarm 
33 Suffix with 
slogan 

3SActre8sSue 
Langdon 

37 Not suitable 

38 VISTA worker, 
pemaps 

41 Understanding 
43 Pool area 

43 Footprints - 

44 

reason 
48 Con 

47 pep talk, 
sometimes 
so Chateaubriand 
8# Pretentious 

s« Weigh tutting 
maneuver 



id Pert of Italy 


Pun*al«d«U.I.Mn ■ ■ 

® New York TimesJ Edited by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of Feb. 5 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 


PAGE 11 


Liquidation 
jOf Foncier 
Voted Down 

\* 

But Some Still Predict 
* Paris Firm Will Close 

Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Shareholders of Credit 
Foncier de France S A, a state-controlled 
mortgage lender, voted Wednesday not 
to dissolve the bank. 

The vote does not affect the gov- 
ernment's talks with employees who are 
pr«estmg a slate plan to dismantle Cred- 
it Fancier, and some analysts predicted 
the lender would be still be liquidated. 

A total of 98.62 percent of the votes 
were cast against a dissolution. The 
•government indirectly holds a majority 
of the company's shares 


• the shareholders meeting came on the 
'20th day of an employee sit-in protesting 
the government’s plan. Union officials 

* r $aid the sit-in would continue at least 
until Thursday morning. 

“Dissolving Credit Foncier is out of 
f the question," the company's chief ex- 
ecutive, Jerome Meyssonnier, told a 

■ rowdy assembly of small investors, most 
bf them employees, ahead of the vote. 

■ Under die company's statutes , share- - 
^holders had to meet once Foncier’s cap- 
ital fell below zero to determine whether 
■to dissolve the company. 

In April 1996, the mortgage lender 
posted a loss of 10.8 billion French 
francs ($1.95 billion) for 199S that 
wiped out its capital. 

- The loss drove the government to put 
-Credit Foncier up for sale. When no 
buyer emerged, die government an- 
nounced in July that it would dismantle 

v The company, transferjxirt of its staff and 

* loans to a rival. Credit Immobilier de 
France, and selling the rest eventually. 

■' At Wednesday's meeting, the board, 
chaired by Mr. Meyssonnier, recom- 
mended that die company’s statutes be 
■changed to give shareholders until the 
end of 1998 to rule on a dissolution or 
continuation of the company. Hie rec- 
ommendation won a majority of votes. 

’■ Mr. Meyssonnier would not comment 
bn the currenr talks between employee 


■by the g overnment to break the stalemate. 
He said Credit Foncier needed capital, a 
financially sound partner and a “pro- 
found restructuring.” 

• r Before the vote, bond analysts said 
they expected the government- to go 
through with its liquidation plan. 

“At die end of die day, I drink tins 
whole thing is going to ret wound up,” 
said Paul vanner of Paribas Capital 
Markets in London. 

Credit Foncier employees have oc- 
cupied the company’s headquarters since 
Jan. 17. Convinced that the company is 
viable, they hope to win a postponement 
of die government plan ana hold out for a 
buyer to come forward. Unions say Cred- 
it Rwcier’s 1995 loss was deliberately 
overstated by its state-^ipointed man- 
agers to pave the way for its liquidation. 
The unions say Foncier’s own manage- 
ment has said the company will post a 
profit of l billion francs for 1996 and an 
equivalent amount for this year. The 
company had a profit of 402 million 
francs in the first half of 1 996. 







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Donna Miller Damon, left, and Edmund and Julie Doughty helped get Crown Pilot crackers back on shelves. 

A Small Island Helps Sway Nabisco 


By Julie Flaherty 

New York Tones Service 

BOSTON — Hardly anyone com- 
plained when Brown Edge Wafers or 
the kind of Chips Ahoy cookies that 
came coated with tiny multicolored 
sprinkles disappeared from U.S. gro- 
cery stores last year. In fact, except in 
the case of (me rather bland brand, 
there was no consumer outezy over the 
300 or so other products that RJR 
Nabisco Inc. discontinued in 1996. 

But the Crown Pilot cracker has its 
Ians; and because of them, rite trig, 
hearty cracker, a staple on New Eng- 
land tables since the late 18th century, 
has a second lease on life. 

Donna Miller Damon, who lives on 
Chebeague Island, a tiny fishing com- 
-immity in Casco Bay off Maine’s 
southwest coast* became- alarmed last 
June after a dropping trip in Portland. 
‘’Could you find any Crown Pilots?” 
she recalled asking another shopper on 
the feny home. 

The neighbor said no. No one else 
could find any Crown Pilots, either. 

Nabisco bad dropped them from its 
product line iuMay because they were 
not making money. It had been selling 
about 241 JOOO pounds of Crown Pilots 
a year, said Ann Smith, a company 
spokeswoman By comparison, she 
mid, Rite crackers, another Nabisco 
brand, sells more than 150 million 
pounds a year. 

That didn’t stop loyalists. The 
cracker crusade, a textbook example 
of Down East determination, was un- 
der way. In an op-ed piece in the 
August 19 96 issue of Inter-Island 


News, a newsletter servicing 14 Maine 
islands, Mrs. Damon asked readers to 
call Nabisco to object. 

“If a corporate executive can deter- 
mine what we have fox supper on 
Sunday night in Maine, it can happen 
anywhere,” she wrote. “Will collard 
greens and grits be next?” 

On Tuesday, 3,500 irate calls, let- 
ters and e-mail messages later, 
Nabisco, based in Parsippany, New 
Jersey, announced that the crackers 
had gone bade into production and 
would reappear in stores starting next 
week. 

“We thought we were discontinu- 
ing a cracker,’’ Mark Hosbein, the 
business director of Nabisco’s Savory 
Snacks division, said at a shipboard 
news conference in Boston Harbor. 
“It is apparent we were interrupting 
histoiy for many people.” 

Chebeague Island (population 325) 
cheered, with typical Down East un- 




derstatement. “It's been a great edu- 
cation for .my children to see that big 
companies can be responsive,” said 
Mrs. Damon, who attended the news 
conference. 

Last week, Mrs. Damon, 46, a his- 
torian, substitute teacher and lifelong 
resident of the island, said the crackers 
may mean more to her parents than to 
her. “They are in their 80s, and they 
were still having them two to three 
nights a week for supper,” she said. 

“They were crushed when they 
heard they stopped making them.” 

For many New Englanders, the 
Crown Pilot cracker is not just a food 
bar a heritage. It was created in 1792 
by John Pearson, a baker in New- 
btuyport, Massachusetts, whose busi- 
ness joined with other bakeriesa cen- 
tury later to form National Biscuit Co., 
now known as Nabisco. 

Sailors loved the crackers because 
they kept well on voyages, earmng the 
name “hardtack” or “ship’s biscuit” 
Landlocked cooks crumbled them in 
soups and stews and used them in place 
of milk or cream to thicken chowders. 

If it is 10 degrees below zero, who 
wards to venture out for groceries? 
“When the bread’s all gone, you can 
take out one of these Pilot crackers,” 
said Beverly Johnson, 48, a plumber 
on the island. 

“I remember my father in Mas- 
sachusetts pouring molasses an 
them.” 

When Nabisco discontinued the 
crackers, which sell for $2.89 for a box 
of 24. it told disgruntled customers to 

See CRACKER, Page 15 


Nippon Credit Denies It Is Close to Bankruptcy 


TOKYO — Nippon Credit Bank Ltd. 
dismissed rumors that it was going 
bankrupt as “groundless" Wednesday 

and said it had the support of the Finance 

Ministry and the Bank of Japan. 
“Although we cannot disclose de- 


selling property assets, reducing staff 
and closing branches. But the market 
remained skeptical, and shares in Nip- 
pon Credit dropped 35 yen (29 cents), or 
1 6 percent, to 1 8 1 yen. The stock started 
the year at 305 yen. 

“Nippon Credit Bank is in a very 


lailsofyear-to-March earnings at -severe smumon, and it w^lMy re- 
wetent, cartings are in line with onr quire some degreeof govemiraauas- 
^SoreSsL^the bank said. "Thera ^stance or support to remain solvent, 
?^^^veT^opUtions.” said W^ter Ahtetr, semor analyst at 
• said it had reported its Jardine Fleming Securities Uri. 

foeFirana Min- Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsuzuka 
bank and expected said the government was not wor- 
isuy andthe “J™ J™. jjr ned,” but he added that “the support 

o« of the top 20 system has already been set up ” 
.Nippon CPeOiti -smallest offoree Shoji Nishflcawa. a senior executive at 

is finances, were 
including healthy- “We are generating a sizable 


profit in bond-market trading.” Mr. 
Nishikawa said, g that die bank 
expected to post a profit for die year 
ending in March. He said Nippon Credit 

debt in the year, having written* off 90 
triQian yen m the firs half of that financial 
year. He also said there was no possibility 
“at all” of a merger with Industrial Bank 
of Japan Ltd. 

Nippon Credit’s latest ordeal began 
Wednesday morning when traders 
began to sell its shares on vague talk that 
the bank would hold an emergency 
news conference. There was also a ru- 
mor about a possible merger. 

Tbe dumping of the bank's shares 
ignited renewed selling throughout the 
banking sector. Tbe shsup fell in bank- 


ing shares has been largely to blame for 
foe tumble in foe Tokyo stock market 
since mid-December. The Nikkei 225- 
stock average ended 127.36 points 
lower at 18,186.97. 

Mr. Nishikawa said foe sell-off had 
been influenced by exaggerated media 
reports of concern over the health of 
Japan's financial system. 

He also said the bank would be able to 
post a profit for foe current year even 
after disposing of problem loans as it 
bad planned — but only if Tokyo stock 
prices remained at their cunem levels. 

like other banks, Nippon Credit re- 
lies on its own shareholdings to help 
provide cash, so as the stock market 
tumbles, its situation worsens. 

(AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


Prodi Rebuffs Bonn 
On Monetary Union 

Rome Is ‘ Committed 9 to the Euro 


By Tom Bueride 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The political jockey- 
ing over Europe's planned single cur- 
rency intensified sharply Wednesday as 
Prime Minister Romano Prodi of Italy 
rejected Germany’s suggestion that Italy 
should be excluded from tbe launching of 
the euro in 1999. 

The development underscored the 
potential that tensions over monetary 
union could split European Union gov- 
ernments before early 1998, when the 
bloc's leaders are to select the initial 
group of countries that will adopt the 
single currency. 

The tensions are particularly high be- 
tween Italy and Germany, and the issue 
came to a boil ahead of a meeting in 
Bonn on Friday between Mr. Prodi and 
Chancellor Helmut KohL 

Mr. Prodi has staked his political ca- 
reer On bringing Italy into monetary uni- 
on at tbe outset, considering it not only a 
matter of national pride but also nec- 
essary to sustain domestic support for the 
budget cuts his government is pursuing to 
qualify for the euro. 

In a statement issued by his office in 
Rome, Mr. Prodi said he was 4 ‘solemnly 
committed” to meeting foe criteria for 
joining tbe currency in 1999 and de- 
plored “the constant repetition of false 
stories and unjustified statements, in- 
cluding from authoritative media, which 
have no foundation whatsoever.” 

He was referring to a report in foe 
Financial Times that EU officials were 
working toward an agreement that 
would bar Italy and other southern 
European countries from monetary uni- 
on in 1999 to assuage German fears 
about foe stability of foe euro but would 
guarantee their entry in 2000 or 2001, 
provided they got their economies and 
government finances into acceptable 
shape by then. 

“I absolutely exclude that there is a 
plan that aims to put Italy and other 
Mediterranean countries on foe side- 
lines,” Foreign Minister Lamberto Dini 
of Italy said. 

For Mr. Kohl, however, the long- 
standing German aversion to marrying 
tbe weak lira to the euro has been com- 
pounded by his government’s recent eco- 
nomic and political woes. Unemploy- 
ment in Germany is 103 percent, and 
figures due to be released Thursday are 
expected to show an increase in the rate. 
Meanwhile, a debate over (be timing and 
scope of tax reductions has split the gov- 
erning coalition and generated unpre- 


cedented grumbling about Mr. Kohl's 
economic stewardship. 

In this climate, some analysts say, 
any hint of a broad-based monetary uni- 
on could make it impossible for Mr. 
Kohl to sell the project to foe German 
people, a majority of .whom already 
oppose the euro^-- ^ " 

“The more we approach economic 
and monetary union, tbe more people 
are nervous,” said Werner Becker, a 
senior economist at Deutsche Bank AG 
in Frankfurt, “and that has to be taken 
into account by the German chancellor, 
who wants to be re-elected.” 

The idea of a delayed Italian entry to 
monetary union is not a new one. Gerrit 
Zalm, the Dutch finance minister, told 
southern European countries last month 
they should take advantage of the lengthy 
transition and aim for entry between 2000 
and 2002, rather than going on a deficit- 
cutting crash course in time for 1999. 

Italy's budget deficit was 7.4 percent 
of its gross domestic product in 1996, 
and most private forecasts say the gov- 
ernment will be hard-pressed to achieve 
4 percent this year, Jet alone the 3 percent 
limit for joining the single currency. 

Officials in the German government 
and at foe Bundesbank in Frankfurt have 
stepped up their calls in recent days for a 
small group of countries to launch the 
euro. In particular, they have expressed 
concern about the exuberance of finan- 
cial markets, which has driven Italian 
interest rates down sharply in recent 
months in anticipation or Italy's early 
entry into monetary union. 

The fear in Germany, officials and 
analysts say, is that the government 
could face pressure to admit Italy to the 
euro club m 1999 or risk die financial 
turmoil of a new run on the lira by 
keeping Rome out. “The markets have 
overdone expectations that a large num- 
ber of countries can qualify” for foe euro 
at foe outset, Jueigen Stark, the deputy 
finance minister, warned last week. 

Mr. Stark did not find comfort in Wed- 
nesday's market reaction. After a brief 
spate of selling, Italian assets rallied 
strongly, with the Deutsche mark ending 
at 985 lira, off from 987 lira Tuesday, 
while yields on 1 0-year Italian bonds fell 
to 732 percent from 7.46 percent. 

' Government officials in Bonn and Par- 
is and foe EU Commission in Brussels, 
which is managing die transition to foe 
euro, denied any deal was in the works to 
guarantee entry in 2000 or 2001 for Italy, 
Spain or other countries. SuTfoey said — 
several mechanisms existed to guide late- 
comers into monetary union. 


As Fear of G-7 Abates, 
Dollar Sends Yen Down 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Speculation that foe 
Group of Seven industrialized nations 
would use their meeting in Berlin this 
weekend to rein in the dollar receded 
Wednesday, helping lift the dollar to an 
almost four-year high against the yen. 

Traders said that with little sign that 
government officials were eager to cap 
foe dollar's ascent, and more than a few 
signs that a further appreciation would 
be welcomed, there was little to tether 
the currency in place. 

The dollar climbed to 123395 yen 
Wednesday m New York from 122.465 
yen Tuesday. 

Far from complaining about the 
strength of the American currency, foe 
managing director of the International 
Monetary Fund called the dollar’s per- 
formance a “remarkable success’ 'for tbe 
Group of Seven — the United States, 
Japan, Germany, France, Britain, Italy 
and Panada. 

fo testimony before a committee of the 
French Senate in Paris, Michel Cam- 
dessus lauded tbe realignment of cur- 
rencies that has seen the dollar soar by 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Bankers Held in Hanbo Case 


Cross Rates 


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SEOUL — The chief executives of 
two major South Korean banks were 
arrested Wednesday on charges of tak- 
ing bribes in return far extending pref- 
erential loans to foe debt-stricken 
Hanbo Group, prosecutors said. 

Prosecutors alleged that Shin Kwang 
Sfadk of Korea RrstBank and Woo Chan 
Mok of Chohung Bank each took a 400 


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million won ($461,000) commission in 
exchange for lending to foe failed 
Hanbo Steel & General Construction 


Korea First Bank is foe biggest cred- 
itor to Hanbo Steel, foe country's 
second-largest steelmaker and foe flag- 
ship of Hanbo Group, which has out- 
s tanding loans of 1 .08 trillion won. Cbo- ■ 
hung Bank had lent it 494 billion won. 

Hanbo borrowed about 5 trillion won 
in loans from 61 banks and financial 
institutions before it was declared in- 
solvent last- month. The company had 
borrowed the money, with collateral 
that now appears insufficient, to build a 
$7 billion Steel mill in foe western town 
ofTangjin. 

Potaang Iron & Steel Co„ the world’s 


second-largest steelmaker after Nippon 
Steel Coxp. of Japan, agreed to a gov- 
ernment request to help manage Hanbo 
temporarily. 

The arrest of foe two bankers marked 
foe latest in a string of loan scandals 
plaguing foe South Korean banking in- 
dustry and underscored the need for 
financial restructuring, analysts said. 

The latest arrests brought to IS foe 
number of chief executives of local 
banks who have been jailed or forced to 
resign since President Kim Young Sam 
took office in 1993 on an anti-corrup- 
tion platform, the analysts said. Most of 
die bankers were found to have received 
bribes from borrowers. 

Prosecutors also said foe former head 
of Korea Development Bank, Lee Hyung 
Koo, had been sou home after 26 hours of 
interrogation over allegations thai be had 
given preferential loons to Hanbo under 
pressure from politicians and government 
officials. * ‘We have failed to find wrong- 
doing by Lee in connection with Hanbo,” 
said the senior prosecutor, Choi Byung 
Kuk. Mr. Lee was fired as labor minister 
in 1995 amid corruption charges. 

(AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


nearly 15 percent against the yen and 
nearly 1 1 percent against tbe Deutsche 
mark over the past 12 months as creating 
the most favorable climate for economic 
growth foe world had seen in 15 years. 

He said foe dollar’s rise was “a nat- 
ural confirmation by markets of foe U.S. 
economic good health and of its strin- 
gent macroeconomic policy."- 
His sentiments were echoed by Pres- 
ident Jacques Chirac of France, who 
said France was “benefiting" from the 
rise in the dollar. He also signaled an 
eagerness to see foe dollar rise further 
still, saying it was merely “progress- 
ively reaching its normal level.” 

The comments put the French pres- 
ident at odds with a stance taken by 
German officials. Finance Minister 
Theo Waigel of Germany said he was 
satisfied 1 with tbe dollar’s current level: 
“A year ago, everybody wanted a 
stronger dollar; now we’ve got it,” Mr. 
Waigel told Bridge News. 

Just last week, Hans Tietmeyer. the 
president of foe Bundesbank, loudly hint- 
ed that the time had come for the dollar to 
level out, stressing that its period of 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 


OECD Opens 
Way to Russia 


Washington Post Service 
PARIS — The Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment, a group of foe world’s 
richest industrial countries, is ex- 
pected Thursday to invite Russia to 
begin membership talks, officials 
said Wednesday. 

Russia’s economy is far more 
backward than that of even the 
poorest OECD member, but West- 
ern powers, particularly foe United 
States, see foe promise of accession 
to the OECD as a tool to further 
economic reforms in Russia. 

“It is a vote of confidence in 
them, even though they have a long 
way to go” said David Aaron, U.S. 
envoy to the OECD. “It’s in part 
makmg dear we warn Russia as part 
of the Euro-Atlantic community.” 
Russia formally applied fen; 
membership in May, whoa Prime 
Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin first 
proposed it. - 






PAGE 2 



** 


— mm + in TRIBUNE. B ATUBDAY-SUNPAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 





PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAX FEBRUARY 6, 1997 



THE AMERICAS 


;! - .I" 1 ’ 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30- Year T-Bond Yield 


6700 

6100 


7.00 W 

6 60 W" 

A- 

5500 

6.20 - - - • • - 




1.65 ■ 

'*■ s 0 

3936 

Exchange 

NYSE 

N' D J F 
1997 

index 
The Dow 

122 -- 

106 6 ‘ N ' D ‘ 

1996 

WacteesdayPrev. 
Close Close : 

67^8 J90 G8EBA8. 

/ 

J “F ' 

1997 

_ % 
Change 

-1.27 

NYSE 

S&P500 

77K2S 78&2B 

•-i.se 

NYSE 

SAP 100 

76i37 775.06 . 

-1.34 

NYSE 

Composite 

408-74 - 41&34 

-1.11 

U.S. 

Nasdaq Composite 134&44 1372^3 

.-1.74 

AMEX 

Market Value 

585.41 58355 ■ 

•QJBS 

Toronto 

TSE Index- 

6112>t, 6*45.41 

4jS4- 

Sao Paulo 

Bovespa 

8171U90 60907.90 

..+0.99 

Mexico City 

Botea 

Closed - 366259 

- 

[ Buenos Afros Men/al 

6S924 7QZ.51 

-1.17 

Santiago 

IPSA General 

5224.18 5228.73 

-0.09 

Caracas 

Capital General 

64Z7-SJ . 6374.02 

*0.-64 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

Internal hxihI Hcrakl Tnhuite 

Very briefly: 


Conoco to Buy TransTex Assets 

HOUSTON (Bloomberg) — DuPont Co.’s Conoco Inc. 
. unit confirmed Wednesday it had agreed to buy natural-gas 
.properties in Texas fromTransTexas Gas Corp. 

TransTexas said it was negotiating to sell the gas properties 
and a pipeline in southern Texas for Sl.l billion. Conoco, the 
Houston -based energy division of DuPont, would not confirm 
that figure. Trans Am eric an Refining Corp., a sister company 
of TransTexas. said TransTexas would recapitalize after the 
sale of the properties. 


• Mattel Inc. said its fourth-quarter earnings before charges 
rose 22 percent from a year earlier, to $ 1 36.6 million, paced by 
strong sales of Barbie dolls and accessories. 

• The New York Times Co.’s fourth -quarter profit from 


Family Drama at Dow Jones 

Dissident Member Com plains of Management 


By Mark Landler 

New York Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — The drama involving the family 
that controls Dow Jones & Co. has grown more 
byzantine, as one of the family's younger dissidents 
sharply criticized other family members for misrep- 
resenting her views about company management 
Elisabeth Goth, 33, a member of the Bancroft family 
that controls 70 percent of the shareholder votes at 
Dow Jones, said in a letter to other family members that 
she was “growing more concerned by the day about 
the governance and direction of the company.” 

In the letter, a copy of which was obtained Tuesday 
by The New York Times, Ms. Goth complained that 
the family “did not accurately or completely rep- 
resent’ ' her views in a letter sent to Fortune magazine 
by the four Bancroft family members who sit on the 
board of Dow Jones. 

The Bancrofts were responding to an article in 
Fortune two weeks ago that said Ms. Goth was 
unhappy with the management of Dow Jones and had 
hired lawyers and investment bankers for advice on 
how to raise the company’s lagging stock price. The 
report unleashed speculation about Dow Jones, 
which publishes The Wall Street Journal, and sent its 
share price into daily gyrations. Dow Jones shares 
rose SO cents Wednesday to close at $39 .375. 

In their letter to Fortune, however, the four Ban- 
crofts said the family had “unanimously reaffirmed 
their commitment to Dow Jones remaining an in- 


what the company is doing.” Dow Jones released the 
text of the letter on its news service and made it 
available to other news organizations. Roger May. a 
spokesman for the company, noted in the Journal 
article that all four family members who had signed 
the letter to Fortune also voted in favor of the costly 
rescue plan for Telerate. 


It was the company's portrayal of the Bancroft 
family letter, rather than the lansu 


dependent public company" at a meeting over the 
weekend in New York. The statement did not ex- 


plicitly endorse the management of Dow Jones, 
which has come under criticism on Wall Street for its 
decision to plow $650 million into the company's 
troubled Telerate unit. But in an interview published 
Tuesday in The Wall Street Journal, Jane MacElree, 
one of the family members who had signed the letter, 
seemed to put a stamp of approval on the company's 
Telerate strategy as well when she said, ' ‘We support 


language of the state- 
ment itself, that seemed to offend Ms. Goth. In her 
letter dated Tuesday, she said, “The accompanying 
comments to The Wall Street Journal force me to 
clarify my position both for Fortune and The Wall 
Street Journal.'' Ms. Goth could not be reached for 
comment. Her advisers, Ira Millsiein of the law firm 
of Weil, Gotschal & Manges and Nancy Peretsman, 
an investment banker at Allen & Co., did not return 
telephone calls. Mr. May declined to comment on 
Ms. Goth's remarks except to say, “The company is 
pleased that Ms. Goth confirms her support for the 
continued independence of Dow Jones .’ 1 

Mr. May said it was appropriate for Dow Jones to 

E ublish the full text of the original Bancroft family 
stter because the four family members who had 
signed it were also board members. In addition to Ms. 
MacElree, they are Christopher Bancroft. Martha S. 
Robes and William C. Cox Jr. 

Dow Jones announced last month that it would 
invest S650 million in Telerate, its financial data 
service, which has been losing market share to com- 
petitors such as Reuters and Bloomberg. 

Ms. Goth said in her letter that her complaints were 
shared by her cousin, W illiam C. Cox 3d, and another 
family member who has expressed unhappiness with 
the direction of the company. Mr. Cox could not be 
reached for comment 

Dow Jones has been buffeted by rumors on Wall 
Street in the days since the unhappiness of Ms. Goth 
and Mr. Cox became public. Business Week reported 
in its current issue that Reuters Holdings had ap- 
proached Dow Jones about a possible meiger. 


DEAL: A Match Made on Wall Street 


Continued from Page 1 


DOLLAR: G -7 Meeting Is Unlikely to Impede Its Rise 


operations surpassed expectations, climbing 80 percent to 


Continued from Page II 


.1 million, on strong advertising revenue from its news- 
’ paper and broadcast units. 

• Rubbermaid Inc. reported a 2! percent drop in fourth- 
quarter profit to SI 9.9 million, below expectations, as it 
struggled with higher raw-material costs. 

. • A federal judge in Columbus. Ohio barred Cyber Pro- 
motions Inc. from sending unsolicited electronic- mail ad- 
vertisements, known among computer buffs as “spamming,” 
to CompuServe Inc/s 5 million subscribers. 


• Ben & jerry’s Homemade Inc. abandoned its seven-year- 
old Russian joint venture, giving its 70 percent stake in 
Iceverks to the city of Petrozavodsk. Iceverks has been 
'Unprofitable and is currently under criminal investigation 
stemming from a U.S. businessman's complaint that its man- 
ager had defrauded him in a coffee joint venture. 


• Apple Computer Inc’s chairman and chief executive 
officer. Gilbert Amelio. told the company’s annual meeting 
that he was suspending Apple's executive bonus plan until the 
company returned to profitability. 


Bloomberg, Reuters 


“normalization” was nearly over. 

The comments underline a his- 
toric difference in attitudes concern- 
ing currency values that has divided 
France and Germany. 

Currency traders, meanwhile, are 
betting that the American currency 
is unlikely to stop where policy- 
makers want it to — even if they 
could ever agree where that might 
be. “There is an international per- 
ception that the dollar will go higher 
until Europe and Japan show more 
lasting signs of an economic re- 
covery,” said Chris Turner, director 
of foreign exchange strategy at 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd. 

Among other things, that recov- 
ery would naturally lift European 
and Japanese interest rates from 


their present low levels and thus 
make it more attractive for investors 
to hold assets priced in those cur- 
rencies. With the United States pay- 
ing its lenders rates in the bond 
markets well above those offered in 
Japan and Europe, and with the mar- 
kets betting that those rates will go 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


higher still in the next three months, 
there is every incentive to hold on to 
dollars. 

“It is not just a case of dollar 
strength," said Jeremy Stretch, cur- 
rency strategist at NatWest Markets. 
“On the other side of the coin you 
have got die traditional hard cur- 
rencies of the yen, the Deutsche 
mark and the Swiss franc that are all 
weak and likely to get weaker." 


Far from protesting the U.S. cur- 
rency's rise or complaining about 
the dollar pricing American export- 
ers out of major international mar- 
kets, Treasury Secretary Robert Ru- 
bin this week reiterated that 
American industry remained suffi- 
ciently competitive. 

Analysis speculate that Mr. Ru- 
bin wants to use a weak dollar to 
help nurture a recovery in Europe 
and Japan, where the American sec- 
retary hopes U.S. exports will reap a 
bumper harvest for years ro come. 

Against other currencies Wed- 
nesday, the dollar was at 1.6445 
Deutsche marks, down from 1.6476 
DM. It was also at 5.5515 French 
francs, down from 5.5660 francs, 
and at 1.4240 Swiss francs, down 
from 1.4290 francs. The pound was 
at $1.6440. up from SI .6205. 


"The benefit is more for Morgan 
Stanley." said Caroline Smith, a 
fixed-income analyst at ABN- 
AMRO Chicago Corp. She said un- 
derwriters had to find ways to place 
their securities with retail investors. 

The stock market seemed to like 
the offer, bidding up prices of both 
companies* shares. Dean Witter 
closed up $2. at $40,625. valuing its 
offer at $67.03 a share. Morgan's 
shares jumped $7,875. to $65.25. 

Morgan Stanley said it was the 
world's third-biggest underwriter 
of common stocks last year, with 
$44 billion of shares placed in deals 
in which it was a manager. The firm 
also is a big asset manager, but it has 
only a small presence in the retail 
market that serves small investors. 

Dean Witter, by contrast, is a 
email underwriter, but it is the third- 
biggest UR. securities retailer, 
ranked by numbers of brokers. It also 
has four credit-card operations, the 
most important of which is the Dis- 
cover Card, issued to 39 million 
Americans. That makes it die largest 
issuer of credit cards in the United 
Stales. 

Although Dean Witter is largely 
an American company, it has global 
expansion plans. Philip Purcell, who 
is chairman of Dean witter and will 
hold that position at the merged com- 
pany, said, "We are the leading cred- 
it-card company domestically; some 
day it will be the leading global." 

He said the company, which was 
spun off from Sears, Roebuck & 
Co. in 1993, changed its strategy 
last year. "We decided we must be 
global, and we must be dominant 
globally.” be said. 

He refused, however, to say 
when the company would begin 
marketing credit cards outside the 
United States. "Give us a little 
time, and we’ll be there,” he said. 

Richard Fisher, chairman of Mor- 
gan Stanley, said, "We have be- 
lieved for some time that there will 
be consolidation and convergence in 
many industries around the world, 
buz especially in finance.” 

The executives said they had 
been discussing an alliance for three 
years. 

On the New^ York Stock Ex- 
change, shares in retail brokerage 
houses advanced after the deal was 
announced. A.G. Edwards Inc. was 
up $1,875, at $36,375, and Quick & 
Reilly Group Inc. rose $1.75. to 
$38,875. but Charles Schwab Corp. 
was unchanged at $37. 


The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed S6.58 points lower at 
6,746.90. Declining issues Were 
nearly even with advancers on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

Bond prices slipped on concern 
that the government’s report on 
January employment due Friday 
may suggest the economy is grow- 
ing quickly enough to accelerate 
inflation. This overshadowed the. 
factory orders report, which showed 
orders to U.S. factories tell a biggec- 
th an -expected 1.3 percent in 
December. The benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond fell 20/32 to 
96 24/32, pushing the yield up to 
6.75 percent from 6.70 percent. 

Intel dropped 716. to 15714 after 
two analysts cut their investment 
opinions on the computer-chip 0 
maker, citing concern that Intel wi j| 
not have software for its new Pen- 
tium MMX multimedia chip ready 
until the end of the year. 

Intel weighed on other techno- 
logy issues. The technology-laden 
Nasdaq composite index closed 
down 25.31 points at 1.348.44. 

Cisco fell 4 l A (o 63 after it reported 
slowing revenue growth. Apple 
Computer edged 'A lower to IS 1 ?* 
after the company announced Iaifc 
Tuesday that it would implement a 
second "restructuring program. 1 

International Business Machine^ 
fell 4%. to 14854 and Compaq 
dropped 4 to 80%. 

(Bloomberg. AP. Re uter^l 




iifi 1 -' 


■ Technology Sector Slumps 

Stocks tumbled, news agencies 
reported, led by the technology sec- 
tor as investors reassessed prospects 
for sales growth at Intel and other 
computer-industry bellwethers. 


Fed Leaves 
U.S. Rates 
Unchanged 


C.impiltJliyOarSutttnm tJapukltn 

WASHINGTON — Federal 
Reserve Board policymakers 
left interest rates unchanged 
Wednesday, apparently decid- 
ing that economic growth was 
moderating enough to prevent 
inflation from igniting. 

The widely anticipated de- 
cision means most borrowing 
costs for consumers and busi- 
nesses will hold steady as well. 
The federal funds rate remains 
at 5.25 percent and the discount 
rate at 5 percent. 

Data show that inflation re- 
mains under control despite 
strong U.S. economic growth. 

The Federal Open Market 
Committee last changed rates 
Jan. 31. 1996, when it cut the 
federal funds target rate and 
discount rate by 25 basis points 
each. (AP, Bridge News) ■ 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Wednesday’s 4 PJfl. Close 

The tap 300 most odfte shores, 
up to Hie dosing on Wall Street. 

77w Associated Press. 


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industrials 
Transp. 
Utmttes 
Finance 
SP 500 
SP 100 

92*97 917.94 92*97 
S6Q-43 55*89 560-44 
199.16 190Z6 199.16 
8980 88J3 8980 
7B9J2B 78X68 7B9J6 
775JJ6 768J0 77586 

910.15 

55*26 

19780 

BtLTS 

778.10 

76280 

NYSE 

Higti 

Lew Lad 

CM. 

COmpnrie 
Irakistriats 
Iranep. 
UtiBy 
' Finance 

4)50 

S2ua 

587.07 

27197 

380.10 

45684 400.75 
51081 51117 
361J1 303.10 
26*94 26*18 
373.92 375.18 

— *34 
— *01 
— 3J79 
-28) 

Nasdaq 

Mflb 

Lew Lap 

am 

Composite 

InkKtrtob 

Barts 

Insurance 

Ftateice 

TYarop. 

137282 134131 134121 -0*54 
1149.77 113293 II32J3- 1416 
13S5S9 1349 JO 1349J9 -107 
146*60 145*23 1454J3 — *47 
169X50 1403JB 168X50 — Z47 
87788 87X49 87X55 — *50 

AMEX 





MercFn 

Pa»Cai 

DWDisci 

uma 

CflTBWI 

MIcmT 

IBM 

AkToucti 

RCtatai 

BayNtwfc 

WoiMen 

GnMotr 

WMXTc 

ATS.7% 

FORM 


VOL Mod 

187711 TAB 

11701D m 

(8418 41 Vb 
78793 4514 
40704 «4fa 
57213 33ft 
55082 153H 
S2493 28 Mi 
51777 35H 
50507 7W4 
50130 2*'* 
48525 58’* 
47696 OH 
44488 371* 
41450 331* 


LOW 

21 * 
311* 
3JH 
43’* 
78 V* 

31 fa 
145V, 
26U 
35 
19fa 
23 
5414 

32 
3B’A 
32V. 


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40V. *2%. 

6SW ,7*1, 

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37fa —SI* 
14H4 —41* 
271* 

35/. *1* 

1»t* — 1* 

2314 — ’A 

57 —4k 

321* —1* 

38>i —fa 
32'* -1* 


High Law Oose Chqf OpbiT 


Grains 


CORN (CBOT) 

5-000 bu mriwfxim- arts wr bushel 
Mar 77 277 270 27241 +21* 118312 

Mar 97 271 260 /r 27U4 +2'.i 72.770 

JUV7 nVh 247V* 2701* +24* 48/21 

see 97 2461* 244 2444* 

Dec 97 240 245** 2474* 

Est. sates ha. Tub's, stria 50331 
Tue'sapenW 32L294 up HOT 



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ORANGE AJKE INCTN> 



15JN0 as.- carts per to. 




Mar 97 

87 JO 

8*30 

8*55 

+240 

15,117 

May 97 

90*5 

K7J0 

8985 

+225 

7.47B 

JU97 

9380 

9050 

9385 

+255 

2856 

Sen 97 

9*10 

9X60 

9550 

♦285 

2217 


mo" Low Oose Cltge apim 


High Law Claae dine Optat 


EURODOLLARS (CMER1 
Slrmragn-etsotlOOpct. 

Feb 87 W46 9** #445 




EsLsiries HA. Tub's, sales 3407 
Tue'sownim 283X1 off 112 


+1 10,191 

*21* 45071 


Metals 


Nasdaq 


MiarodTi 

3Com 

SunMict 

AaMMar 

Oracle s 

MO 

annum 
DrilCMs 
Irriafm 
YurieS vsn 


Ascend 


VU. HM 
297178 451* 
713003 143 
141153 71*w 

174474 train 

12071 59 V, 
95117 33T* 
043 44 VI 
77002 40V, 
72171 J7V, 
56978 41V, 
5S3OT 441* 
54137 1231* 
52550 141* 
44052 52 
45337 471* 


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19’* 

191* 

9*H 

S3* 

311* 

« 1 * 

371* 

J8V* 

591* 

115 

141* 

431* 

42H 


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411* — 5M. 

1541* -71* 
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541* -4 

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451* — 4V* 
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SOYBEAN MEAL (CBCJT) 

100 tom- doom par Inn 
Mar 97 mOO 234JM 23580 +020 34J62 

Mar 97 231-00 779 JO HI JO +OJO 23426 

JulW 22980 228.10 228 JO +0.90 19J49 

Aug 97 22780 22000 22480 +080 1720 

SCO 97 222.00 221 JO 221 JO 2,939 

00 87 21500 21100 7I4J0 +1.40 1AH5 

Esi. sales HA Tue’s. sales 15234 
Tub's apenM 84259 off 247 


SOYBEAN 08. (C80T) 


ISOLD (NCMXJ 

10a irav at- Hollars per rrov ac. 

Fflb 97 3(580 KUO 3MJB —140 

7*T«7 34570 

APT 97 34470 34430 341S8 -120 

Jun 97 34980 344.90 34520 -080 

AUB97 35020 34880 35020 -080 

Od 97 35100 3S2AB 352.40 -1.10 

Dec 87 355.90 35420 35530 -ABO 

Feb 98 357 AD 35780 35740 -L10 

ES. sates NA. Tub's, sues 32MT2 
Tub's open irtf 19U47 off 5Z5 


4284 

48 

94J09 

23,179 

5752 

3243 

10J24 

3208 


19.737 

Mar 97 94.43 9440 9443 +101 403^37 

AM-97 9439 9435 9438 5247 

Jun 97 8432 942B 8430 -001 385007 

Sea 87 9431 9415 M.17 -OS1 289238 

Dec 97 9403 919* 9190 -002 28^432 

Mm98 9322 9087 9389 -O01 174277 

Am 98 9383 93.77 9329 — 0L01 135549 

5ep98 9375 9320 9321 -002103844 

Dec 88 8383 9158 83^9 — 0J0Z 81.424 

Est.sdK NA Tub's, sales 302290 
Tue sapenmt 2207JB2 alt 3418 
BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

4UDQ paunas. 1 per pound 
(War 97 18420 18Z74 18174 

Jun 87 18370 18250 18330 

50>87 18141 

Dec 87 18101 

ESI. stes na Tin's, ides 4932 
Tub’s open bit 40292 up 440 


Mar« run 

&. sales HA Tue'5 sales 4211 
Tub's open int 43.924 ofl 31 
HEATING OH. (NMERJ 
44000 aaL cart* pnr pal 
Mar 97 4485 4380 4195 -023 38.944 

Apr 97 47.40 41.40 41.95 

May 87 4045 5980 4010 

Jun 97 58.15 5880 58.90 

Jill 97 5025 SL30 S8J0 

Aug 87 5880 5880 5820 

Sep 97 5980 59.00 5980 -088 3.19 

Od97 5845 985 985 rD88 1.BT7 

NW 87 980 9.90 9.90 +0« 1.517 

4031 


+0.04 15252 
+ 0.14 5858 

+ 0.09 7883 

+ 009 3834 

+ 021 3.105 


37807 

2227 

1850 


Dec 97 

est sales NA Tun's, sales 44.716 
Tun's open w 91.546 uo 3409 
UGHT SWEET C31UOE (NMERJ 
1 800 Wiv - aonara nor DH. 


4.744 


AMEX 


Mar 97 23.99 
May 87 24J8 
Jill 97 2426 

Aug 97 M2S 
Sep 97 24.95 
0097 2580 
Est.sda na TUB'S. tOtes 7829 
rue's open W 84825 OR 242 


W GRADE COPPQ? (NCMX) 


CANADIAN DOUAR (CMER) 
100800 aollars. I par can. dir 
Mar97 2449 2054 2448 


42870 


2X61 


+0.15 


Z&aaa In - oenrs aer b. 




Jim 97 J513 

7498 

7502 

0822 

2*00 

2*40 

+Q.16 


Feb 97 110.10 

10580 

11080 

+480 

2821 

SCP 97 7549 

7548 

7549 

1530 

3*43 

2*77 

+213 

15+430 

Her 97 1 0080 

1KL90 

10275 

+*7J 

22822 

Dee 97 


7583 

475 

2*60 

2484 

+085 

2108 

ADT97 10780 

10141 

10*75 

+*oo 

1,277 

EsL series NA 

Tub's, sates 2972 


3*75 

25.00 

♦MO 

2515 

Moy»7 105.10 

10185 

105.85 

+U5 

7895 

Tub's open rt 

52453 

up 142 


2*95 

2*95 

-0.12 

843 

Jun 97 10*20 

10180 

10*10 

+15U 

792 






Mgt I8W LOU On. 
59029 58484 585A1 — U4 


Daw Jones Bond 


20 Bants 
loumnu 
10 Industrials 


Close dig. 

10324 +082 

10036 — 089 

10073 +014 


5PDR 

Harken 

Hasbra 

RavaWg 

XO-Ud 

V«xfl 

NT Times 

HovnEn 

ylarwQir 

EchoBay 


VeL HM 
11890 7rVn 
10421 VVh 
8512 41** 
4203 2«*» 
4027 V* 
5905 33H 
5410 39 
5207 

4SI& U#i» 
4515 Mu 


Low 

771* 

31* 


41 


W. 

32 

38V* 

414 


List 

77tJ*. 

3*u 

411* 

2 h 


V* 


6 Wu 


371* 

39 

61* 

1 

Hu 


—Wu 

-Vn 
+ U 14 


*I’A 
—V* 
-Vx» 
+ «*. 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

S000 bu mlnlfiwn. cems mr buriM 
Mar 97 73814 7311* 739 +2 

May 97 737 731 738 +3 

J097 737V, 731V, 7381* +3’4 

Aug 97 734 729 7351* +3 1 * 

5«P 97 TOT m 708 + 214 

6si. sates NA Toe's, sales 42244 
Tim's own M 172.166 UR B20 


73479 

30480 

35878 

5446 

1872 


JUI97 10320 10009 10385 + 345 

Aug 97 9980 9940 102JD +385 

sen 97 Hxua 9880 10145 +285 

0097 9050 98J0 10080 +225 

soles NA Tue*s. xries 0753 
Tile's open irt 51,134 Oft 17B 


4404 

611 

2495 

583 


Uu 

14V 

I7 1 . 

Wi 


1 ?n 

R’l 

Wi 


i:-, 

:jv 

1 :*. 

ISW 


1*7 

IU0 

XM5 

W 

319 

219 

IS 


!+• 

J+. 

7+1 


IN 


ClOH 
CKV 
f50«-L 
(Kangi 
0 > IU 
foul 

Oaowj 
paw nr 

M.V11 

OrMitu 

Suit 

SlosBei 

ZanHc 

DiyCa 

DnUUu 

cm a 

EuB 

ECSc+i 

Eoirfoi 


111 *++ 


116 

III" 

209 


m 

6 »i 

1*23 

STS 

142 

571 

580 


ITO 


iw* 

7M 

II 

IH» 

3 

m. 

1711 


At 

71, 

T* 

1 

W, 

IP* 

IV, 

l“r* 

n*» 

wv 

rov 


a 

271, 

IV* 


21 , 


7V 


I0H 

lift 

71; 

ft 

34 


22 ft 

IP, 

lift 

3 

10ft 

12 


Traifing Activity 






NYSE 



Nasdaq 




HOCril 

PlWt. 


Oose 

pro*. 



1171 

Advanced 

1693 

1803 




Declined 



UncttanaM 

916 

BS7 

UnctKnoed 
Tofri issues 

5740 

5734 


119 

147 

New+fajhs 



New Lows 

12 

24 

Now Lows 



AMEX 



Market Sales 




Ctat 

Prev. 


Tottery 

Prey. 

Aowmced 

22S 

260 


dose 



326 

2S3 

NYSE 

577.7V 


UncM>«u 

106 

190 




TririBwes 
New trig ns 
New Lows 

21 

7 

16 

4 

Masduq 
fti mfflSfcvn* 

64787 

60*16 

Dividends 

Company 

Per Am! 

Rec Pay 

I 

i 

Per Amt 

Rec Pajr 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

5800 bu mWrmni- cents per busnd 
Mar 97 341 356 362 +4Vft 

May 97 351 'A 347 3521* +3 

JUI97 340 336 342 + 276 

Sea 97 3421* 339 3441* +21* 

EsI sales NA Tue’s. soles 14,730 
Tup's open Inf 40803 up IIS? 


27470 

11804 

24734 

1441 


SL.VBMNCMX) 

5800 bay at. aerits per Irav ab 
Wb77 «480 14 

Mor97 4OTJ0 48180 4Bt5D +080 55.957 

Aar 97 48880 

May 97 494J0 488J0 SUM +170 11043 

lH 77 49880 49380 47780 +120 «.«* 

S6P 97 SHL00 49SJ0 50280 +280 3880 

Dec 97 50780 504 JO SD4J0 +040 4.929 

Jim 90 309.10 9 

E3. sales NA Tub's, sotas 9487 
Tub's open ir4 90890 ofl 144 


125800 marks. I per mark 
Mar 77 8103 8094 

Jun 97 8138 ,4105 A'.-JS 

Soon 8173 8144 8173 

Dec 97 8194 8194 8194 

Stf.sMes NA Tue's. sales 15815 
Tie's open W 89445 up 017 


Mar 97 

2*23 

2380 

2*04 

+0.02 

7*291 

Aar 97 

2380 

2141 

2366 

+ 005 

4*192 

May 97 

2X32 

ZUM 

2X11 

-005 

27806 

Jun 97 

22.92 

2282 

2271 

-am 

XL2B 

Jul 97 


2289 

2241 

+002 

1*150 

Aug 97 

2280 

2282 

2210 

-002 

0645 

S6P97 

2177 

2177 

2177 

— aoi 

1A42T 

Od 97 

2180 

2144 

2180 

+ 089 

10,959 

Nov 97 

21.15 

21.15 

21.15 

-005 

X61'J 

Dec 97 

21.10 

2082 

2188 

+ 0.13 

23 JW 

jpn9B 

20*6 

2086 

2046 

-0JH 

HIM 

Feb 98 



2050 


7880 

MOT 90 



2032 


2,273 


02810 

5.173 

2.234 

II 


JAPANESE YEN (CMER] 

I U ml Ban vwv s per 100 ven 
MB' 97 8170 £120 8141 

Jun 97 £245 8225 8245 

Sep 97 8375 8375 8375 

Est sales NA Tbs's, sales 15839 
T lie's oren W 77874 up 498 


74894 

3815 

454 


7ft 


1145 

13 

143 

me 


Sift 

lift 

in 


50+e 

17ft 

l«k 

lft 


ft 

M 

TTOV 

58ft: 

1714 

IV, 


IRREGULAR 


lft 


EDsworth Convert 

_ .11 

2-10 

2-24 

Erickson LM 

■OS82 

2-10 

2-25 

AniDepOb 
Ito Yakado Co Ltd 

b 8832 

3-27 


Souttim Peru Copp 

_ 30 

2-14 

34 


Fed< 


nuts 

pltalCp 


Freeport McMo 
CHM Rnrs 


1 : 


in 


jsi^ 

J»T 

uoo 

IW 1 


Eiwxr 

EIC3B. 

EOOSk-T" 

Eavviu 

EtuBc 

rons+t+l 

EanTMB 

Pb+ta 

SLl+ffl 

FlAirJ 

raw 

Ponu 

90KPM 


nn tr*. ip. 


lift lift 
IMj 15ft 
w, 3m 
4ft 4ft 
V. ft 
15ft Uft 
30ft lift 
26ft Xft 
14ft 


15ft 

lift 

fcft 


STOCK SPLIT 

Crawford & Ca A&£ 3 tar 2 spot 
Nall Medfcol Fd 2 tar 1 spHL 


it. 


31, n v. 


lift 

JJft 

1 M 


lft 


ISft 

19* 

36ft 

Uft 


INITIAL 

Primes Teats Inc _ .15 2-20 

Provident Bncp n _ .14 2-10 


3-20 

2-21 


n 


7ft 


1*1 

31ft 

I] 


Uft 

n, 

lift 


i«n lit, 
28ft 28 
1 *. Iftft 
7ft 3ft 
Ml* IB 


INCREASED 

Crawford & Co A O .145 2-14 

Crawford & Ca BL a .145 2-10 

Lrwmj Ptart Q .13 2-21 

LAKDln Elect O .15 3-31 

Peooies Eneray Q 8 Ml 

llnlMnlnc o 80 2-1 B 


2-25 

2- 25 

3- 14 

4- 15 
4-14 

3-4 


» 


314 


REGULAR 

AMU Residential Q 83 2-14 
Ahmansan HF, 


Ambassador Apart 
ilgw 


CSTTf 

Can> 


Tf* 


lit 17»> 12’, IT: 


a* 


6 ft 


IT 


Church & Dw 
Ccmlnq Inc 
CuflenFrasl Bkrs 


Ml, 

oww 

OonW 

gup 

&•»*». 

Cavern 


lift 
13 m 
loft l«ft 
31ft 28ft 

4*1. 4ft 


1 M, 

17ft 

lift 

36ft 

41* 


Q 82 2-11 

a M 2-10 

a .11 2-n 

O .19 3-3 

Q 81 2-28 


2-25 

3-3 

2- 17 
2-28 

3- 31 
3-14 


linco 
Hatteras Inca Secs 
Heritage Bncp 
HWnwods Props 
HSbRopaJ Ham 
Home naps NY, 
lES Indus 
insieef Indus 
l/vine AptaitComm 
Kansas OTyP&U 
Keystone Inti 
Mattel Inc 
NUICOrp 
Mo Amer mug Co 
Besour Amer Inc 
Rockwell tall 
By toil -Saxton 
Salomon Bros HI 
Salomon Bros 
SonocaPdds 
SummB BkCpGA, 
SynaiayCojp 
VtinKam AC Adv 
Yonkers Fnd 


M .1325 

2-19 

2-28 

a 

.16 

2-2J 

3-13 

a 

09 

2-14 

3-1 

M.11075 

2-19 

2-28 

M 

OW 

2-14 

2-M 

Q 

M 

3-14 

331 

Q 

40 

2-14 

2-21 

Q 

.155 

3-17 

Ml 

Q 

43 

2-14 

2-25 

Q 

825 

3-14 

4-1 

O 

06 

3-14 

4-1 

O 

865 

2-14 

2-28 

O 

405 

2-27 

3-30 

Q 

.185 

5-7 

5-21 

O 

06 

3-14 

4-3 

a 

835 

2-14 

3-15 

O 

06 

2-1 B 

3-4 

Q 

.10 

2-14 

2-28 

Q 

89 

2-10 

3-ia 

s 

03 

2-14 

3-3 

M 

.125 

2-19 

2-28 

M.11075 

2-19 

2-28 

O 

.165 

2-21 

3-10 

Q 

O0 

2-15 

2-25 

O 

09 

2-14 

3-3 

M 

OB 

2-14 

2-28 

- 

05 

2-18 

3-7 



Livestock 



CATTLE (CMER) 




«04»a fak- am per to. 




Feb 97 6*25 

63JD 

6X73 

HUB 

1X266 

Apr 97 65.90 

6X40 

6X50 

+085 

43321 

Jun 97 6*57 

6*10 

6*17 

—025 

15#269 

Aug 97 6*42 

6*07 

6 *H 

— 0.12 

17,109 

Od 97 6782 

6730 

am 

—002 

10384 

Dec 97 6977 

6942 

69 J0 

—030 

4e2£A 

Est wries NA 

Tub's, sates 

20409 


Tub's open W 

104859 

ofl 1001525 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 



50-M0 fas.- cents dw to. 




Mar 97 6675 

6X05 

6040 

-087 

7831 

AO-97 69 JO 

6082 

6085 

—050 

3826 

May 97 2070 

6! JO 

70.10 

-045 

*770 

Aug 97 7*10 

7330 

7345 

—052 

*257 

Sep 97 7*30 

7375 

7380 

-455 

1496 

0097 7507 

7*37 

7*42 

—06/ 

1859 


Tile's sates 

5812 


Tue’s open W 

238B3 

up 356 


HOGS-Leae (CMB0 








Feb 97 7570 

7530 

7540 

— OLD? 

5367 

Apr 97 7X15 

7*35 

7*77 


1*596 

Jun 77 0080 

793) 

79J9 

—fUU 

8.148 

Jul 97 7800 

7745 

77 JD 

+015 

1.700 

Aug 97 7*90 

7*32 

7*00 

+0.17 

1,783 

0097 6080 

6785 

67-90 


1404 

EsLanto NA 

tub's antes 

'357 


Tub's ooenlrri 

3*314 

up 543 



PORK BBJJES (CMBt) 



riOPOO tbs. -cert 

we. 




Rh97 7880 

7XSS 

7732 

-047 

2.161 

MO- 97 77.60 

7*10 

7*45 

-080 

2403 

MOV97 7045 

7780 

7780 

-060 

7811 

Jill 97 7775 

7675 

7780 

—035 

600 

APB 97 7*30 

7480 

7*00 

-Oli 

456 


PLATMUM (NMB() 
so troy w.- dobart oar bay m. 

Apr 97 35&80 35480 254J0 0423 

Jul 97 35780 35680 35780 +0.40 X427 

Od 97 35980 mm 35980 -880 2877 

Jan 9a 34180 36130 3S1J0 —050 1882 

EM. scries NA Toe's stiles >831 
Tub's ooen irtf 77304 oft 70 . 


SWISS RANG (CMER} 

1 25800 foro. s per banc 
Mar 97 JD54 JU1 JD44 

Jun 97 J110 .7065 Jill 
56097 J176 

Esl.sdes NA Tue's. sales 
Tue'sopenira 


II. 
\AM* 
9.1* 
8.99? 
7859 
L5D 
W 6 T 

ura* 

7X» 
481 V 


47,172 

2885 

1.9W 




r net imSaMe (or me Is 


Mart? 

iss? 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (CMBt) 

SI nrikn- Ms Ol 100 per. 

Mar 97 94.97 94JM 94.95 -081 4804 

Jun 97 9484 

S6P 97 9472 9472 9172 

EsLurias NA Tue’s.sales 621 
TUB^nwlM 0,998 UP 12S 


3384 

808 


5 YR. TREASURY (£8073 

S100800 prtn- Pis 8. 4«ns at 100 pa 

Attr97 106-55 SCS-3B 104-44 —83 181433 

Jun97 M6-37 106-25 104-30 -02 10883 

Sea 97 104-16 

Esc. sales NA Tub's, sries 33.121 

Tue’s open M 195.116 elf 1543 


9489 9687 9688 +OJQ20&S22 

'MS 9688 HJS + D.tG 

♦ am 1713M 

— p-.,_ 9d79 96.76 96*77 t on? jum 

Oec97 9di2 96J9 Wl60 + up? I6L9S3 

MflfM 9W5 9Mi 9L43 *■ Hfll 171.130 

iSSi SS-K ^ + (LQ2 76704 

«« *55 + om 67,113 

W099 9J47 9&44 KA5 + DJJ3 4X517 

joiff SSJI 95.17 95,19 4 Qjd 4 75-inn 

5S62 K-!S W} Si* ISS mm 

21^2 J484 9480 iSSi 

¥39? MAS 9487 + atw Lrao 

JunOO 9427 9424 9486 +003 «g 

SOPM 5417 WJ, 44S m 

DetflO 9387 9386 9380 + 0.11 m 

Est sales: 12400. Pie*, sofas: 21*161 
Pie*. openinU 1,174597 ofl *229 


Est. scries na Toe's, sales 76812 
Toe’s open Int 358,513 up 3523 
NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

10800 mm Hu's, l per mm Mu 
Mar 97 2.520 zm 2860 
Apr 97 2280 2200 2250 

MOV97 ilffl 2110 2 MO 

Jun 97 2125 2100 2125 

Jill 97 2125 2 K)0 2125 

Aug 97 2138 2100 2125 

Sea 97 2)35 21)0 2130 

Oct 97 2135 2125 2135 

KOY 97 23Hi 223S 12SS 
Dec 97 2J4S 2345 2340 

Jan »8 2400 1380 2390 

Est. sales NA Tile's, soles 30831 
Tub’s open Int 159,125 uc 4100 T 

UW^ADED GASOLINE (NMER) T 

42000 oof, owns par aai I 

Mar 97 68J0 0.25 4220 —0.11 3CU34I 

Apr 97 flJJO 6985 . 4980 -083 U89L 
May 97 6980 6885 «J0 +007 1082V 

■Sfm 55^2 OM ♦0.10 4.70 

i* 9 * 4^5 64.10 6680 -CLQS 19S3 

AupW 6*70 6*25 6*75 + 0.20 242 1 

EM. sales NA Tua's. sates 18801 -i 
Tub's ooen ir« 70.580 up 2019 j 

GASOIL (I PE) 

Oaflars oer metric tan -tots 0(100 tors ■ 
JW-sg i98j» 201 jjo —100 10,757 
Mot 7 J ,,7S 19100 — I4JS7 
£f' 9 Zy j 90 ^ JffJS 18980 -1J25 2777 
May 97 18780 1B&25 184.25 — 050 2748 

■J“ d99 JB5J0 18*50 18580 —0.25 7839 

JlH 97 18580 18*75 185.00 — 05L5 2352 

tJJSl « }S5^S IS 45 ? 1 55-00 —0-25 1,37V 
•W-? Z84.75 185.00 - 0:75 983 

Oc« 97 N.T. N.T. 18580 — Q 75 189R 

NPU97 N.T. N.T. 1BS80 =4225 413 


wo E*l. sales: 17858. Open intj 42573 1 


H YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

■S1OU00 rtta- Pis & 3Mb of 100 pcs 
Mar 97 109-14 109-02 109-07 323802 

Jun 97 UB-Z7 108-14 108-3) —01 21849 

$8*97 10B-OT U73 

EM. scries NA Tub's, scries 52432 
rue's open W 344.741 up Z37 


Sep97 


Est. sates HA Tup's, soles 1806 
Tub's ooen tot 8819 up 19 


USTKEASURY BONDS (CBOT) 
ie pcs-siaeAOO-wb* Xtoas aeiao pcii 
Mar 97 112-19 111-31 112-OS —02 479,739 

Jpn 97 112-03 111-16 111-23 38JQ2 

Sen 97 111-20 111-02 111-15 +-06 7.564 

Dec 97 110-28 1964 

ESt Sates NA Tue^sefas 259A21 
TUB'sepenirt S29J59 Off 2365 


^“•iptSTERlJlIG ttJFFE) 

£500800 -pt Of 100 pc! 

” as & S&zaglK 

is Is B =S* ™ 

92.iTf 9274 9274 •*- O ff) 31.7M 

92.74 9289 9269 -So) 1*915 

9288 9L66 92 M . 081 m 

VZU 9260 9260 +0J» XOT 

na UndL ins 

9252 42*9 9249 Uncn, 1964 

Est sales: 67,459. Pray, sales: 4Q_»* 

Piw. open mu 47*128 ofl 244 

E? 5 ‘.S* 5 ** 100 P° 

9^8 ^ 


Mor99 

Jun?? 




BRENT OIL OPE) 
Ui daBare per batrd ■ 
Mar 97 2263 22J4 

Apr 97 22.15 2188 

May 97 21.71 21.40 
June 97 2185 21.13 
July 97 2180 2083 

‘ 20.78 2057 

N.T. N.T. 
2080 2080 
N.T. N.T. 
19-80 19.63 
EsI. sales: 31800. 
1.157 


Aug 97 
5ep97 
Od 97 
Nov 97 
Dec 97 


Ms of 1800 barrels 

2247 +084 4*395' 

2159 +M1 40629- 
SIM - 0.11 18804/ 
2188 —089 16,907' 
20J75 -888 12232 
2tL48 — 200 21 IP 

2053 —085 way 
2080 — 0-05 2710- 

19.78 -085 288** 

1957 -085 2497- 

Open Ini- 1521 66 otC 


p4nwirtb-« w eb eba ei«oiaeginper 
sAanVADR; g-payutrie la Canocdoa ftnutsi 
■Mnenflrii: q-qaarlertv; s^sentMunuel 


Food 


n. 


OamBrt 

Gcr+Ocnt 

Gmtadl 


14ft 


lft 1+. 


41ft o, J, 


to 10 ", »■» H» 


1JH 

e 


lft. 


"S 

sis 


1M 15ft 
27ft 2M, 
»« n 

Uft s 

n*, 32 
!*■ 
»« 
lift 


21 * 


listen 

Hsun 

HnriUr 


UWI 

&51: 

151’ 

JJB 


I ft. 


+M1C4 

rismevin 

•ttorvm 

HOBPHI 

HawEn 

rcuCas 

torffb 

npCrng 

nnsHY 


W 

5»l 


6 fft 

lift 

Uft 

31 


lift 

n 

iM, 


41ft 

3ft 

7ft 

1 /ft 

Uft 

lft 

16ft 


HI 18ft raft 18ft 


9 


lit* 

lift 


15ft 

10ft 

»ft 

DU 


it 

10 ft 

S’* 


Uft 
lift 
Wk 

IS 14*> 
Wk Uft 

ifi: 


ns .... 

yv» »ft 
13** lift 
.ft ftl 
lft lit 


17ft 

17ft 

IS 

W, 

IS** 

lift 

lift 

Ik* 

IJ*ft 


Ilk 


Stock Tables Explained 

Scries flgum are unoffidoL Yeraty Ngta and laws rafled Itie previous 52 weeks plus the current 
weft burnarttekriestiKxingdoy.Wtereaspfa or stock tlMdend amounting to 25 percent armoie 
IMS been paid, ttrtitoaahlgMawirtiyeiiitadhklend am shwm ferine new docks orty. Unless 
OflienMse noted rales of dividends ore annual dbbunemerrti based an the kriest dedpraUan. 
a-(S*ldend aba extra (sl.b- annual rate ol dividend phis stock dMdencLc- liquidating 
dividend, ee ■ PE exceeds 99.dd -called, d - new yearly law. rid - lass In the tost 12 months. 
* - dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 mimths. f - annual rate, increased on test 
dedandlorL g - dMdetid In Co nadkm funds, subject to 15% non-residence tax. I - dividend 
dwared after spUt-up or stock dftWend. | + dfvMend paid this year, omitted, deform or no 
dcmn Wen at latest dividend meeting, k - dividend doctored or paid mis year, an 
oocu mutative Issue wflti dhrtdertds In arrears, ra -annual rote, reduced an last deda rattan. 
0 - new tesue in me past 52 weeks. The hlgh-kw range begins with the start of trading. 
Bd p- Wtfa! dbridend. artnuol role unknown. P/E • Dtice-eamitw rolto. 

Q -<msed-end mutual fund, r- dMdend declared orpald in preceding 1 2 manth& plus stock 
dtoMe nd. t - stock split. DWdend begins with dote of spflLsb- sides. t+dMdendpafal in 
Stock M preceding 12 months, estimated cash value on eK-dMdend or ac-dbtrlbiiftan date 

e-i^yeortyhigli.y-tiadlnghallieiLiil-hi bankruptcy or recelvflrshlp or be in g tearytridrad 
underme unkniptey Aid. nrsecu rifles assumed by such campanles. wd -wtwn dfantbutao. 
wi - when K sue^Z ww - wttti wononls. » .ex-dWdend or ex-rights. XtBs-eic-riistrlbutioa 
*■ - wnnout wammts. y- ex-dhridend and sales In FuN. *ld* yield, z- sates In tolL 


COCOA (NC5E) 




ie morrte ronm- s ear ton 



Mflr 97 1293 

1260 

1277 

—22 

18444 

May 97 1323 

1302 

1306 

— J8 

25842 

Jut 97 1350 

mi 

>334 

-a 

1*182 

Sep 97 1379 

1360 

1362 

—17 

9896 

Dec 97 1403 

1308 

1386 

-14 

4347 

Esi.siries NA 

TWiBfn 

13334 


tub's ven ,Tii 

89,211 

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mr«7 14SJ30 

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139 JO 

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13680 

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13X00 

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1117 

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1*578 


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5UGAR-WORLO It (NCSE] 



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1050 

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1152 

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1034 

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97803 

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1033 

1IU0 

+086 

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2868 


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Mcrn tffiui 101.92 mu + (l 3& 23a902 

JU097 101^2 101 36 10L27 + 036 11.121 

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Piyv. open fat: 382823 op 1408 


LONCOtLT OJIYS 

£50000 - pis & 33nds M inpa 
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JteW7 111-96 111-17 111-18-080 9)9 

Est sales: 96950. Prev. safes: 13*970 
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Stock Indexes 

S4P COMP. INDEX fCMER) I 

$",.7 2£” 7MJ0 +040 177.894“ 

Jun97 80340 797.10 80240 -I JO 949ff- 

|£E£ 608.H 

Dec 97 *1*95 

EM.Bries NA Tub’s, sales 508m 
Tub's open int 191. Mo ofl JIZ7 


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MOT 97 131^ 13074 13180 +084137,182 
Jun 97 129J8 12984 129J4 +QJ8 1*457 
Sep 97 12780 127J8 12888 +CL40 776 

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ES. volume: m770. Open W415M1 Sup 
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Sep TO N.T. N.T. 25414 +3640 T|5 
Est. wlum«!6J43. Open Inf.- fiUfcl up 

BW, a 


Moody's 
Reuters 
OJ. Futures 
CRB 


Commodity Indexes * 

Oose PrmtoaS 
1+45780 
1.94840 
15189 
23941 


15183 

33884 





■]J* * { * '* i\ M i * , 1 i 1* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6 ? 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


Lufthansa’s Jobs Plan 
Would Eliminate 10 % 
Of Its Core Managers 


* Otr SAtfTnw Dufucrta 

, FRANKFURT — Lufthansa AG 
•ignored a growing threat of strikes 
amom its wo* force of more dun 
•pU.UUU oy announcing a restructur- 
ing plan Wednesday that would cut 
at least 1 0 percent of its core man- 
agement and administration staff. 

Tne airline also said it would give 
managers of its passenger business, 
-the company’s biggest moneyma ke r, 
‘more independence to by to increase 
the airline's flexibility and compet- 
itiveness before fiuil deregulation of 
the European airline market. 

‘‘In liberalized markets, only those 
competitors with die lowest costs can 
take die strategic options needed to 
secure their existence,” Juergen 
Weber, the airline’s Chairman, said. 
Lufthansa said the new measures 


ment and adminutraiive jobs in its 
core scheduled- flights business. 



wui* 


Plans Firm 
For Satellite, 
BSkyB Says 




Reuters 

LONDON — The British 
/-television operator British 
Sky Broadcasting PLC said 
Wednesday it was pressing 
ahead with plans to Launch a 
200-channel digital satellite ser- 
vice in Britain this year. 

BSkyB said it would proceed 
with its satellite plans despite 
its new digital terrestrial tele- 
vision alliance with Carlton 
Communications PLC and 
Granada Group. 

BSkyB, in which Rupert 
Murdoch's News Corp. is die 
leading shareholder, also said 
pretax profit rose 26 percent in 
the last six months of 1996, to 
£133.7 million ($216.4- mil- 
lion). Sales rose to £585.6 mil- 
lion from £464 million. 

The company posted record 
subscriber growth of 434,000 
in the last three months of last 
year, giving it a total of 6 mil- 
lion customers in Britain and 
Ireland. Shares in the company 
rose 19 pence, to 610. 


which all European Union carriers 
are to be allowed to freely transport 
passengers within any domestic 
market in the 15-nation region. 

The news came as the DAG trade 
union, currently conducting a poll 
on possible industrial action m. a 
lengthy pay dispute, said it was in- 
creasingly confident of securing die 
necessary 70 percent agreement 
among its members for all-out 
strikes to go ahead. 

Union officials said the move, 
which comes only days after Mr. 
Weber promised in a letter to em- 
ployees th£t the company’s atm was 
to create more jobs in Germany, 
would be seen as a- “declaration of 
war" by many employees. 

But Lufthansa’s shares soared 5.6 
percent, or 1.23 Deutsche marks (75 
cents), to dose at 2338 DM after the 
announcement as investors wel- 
comed the airline's efforts to focus 
on activities that accounted for 
about 70 percent of its sales of 19 
billion DM in 1995. 

“The restructuring at Lufthansa 
should help the company be more 
successful financially," said Frank 
Gaensch, a fund manager with Com- 
merzbank Asset Management. 

The move is the latest in a three- 
year reorganization effort aimed at 
streamlining Lufthansa's operations 
and catting costs before deregulation. 
The airline expects cost-cutting mea- 
sures to save it 1 Union DM by 2000. 
Lufthansa already has made its two 
other mam businesses — freight 
transport and charter flights — sep- 
arate units . (Reuters, Bloomberg) 

■ Airbus Sees Jumbo Partners 

Airbus Industrie said the Italian 
manufacturer Alenia SpA and Saab 
AB of Sweden were interested in 
investing in its $8 billion project to 
build a 555-seat superjumbo, Re- 
uters reported from Pans. 

The European aircraft consortium 
said Alenia, a unit of Italy’s state- 
owned defense company Finmec- 
canica SpA, coukl take as much as a 
10 percent stake in its A3XX su- 
perjumbo jetliner project and that 
Saab could take a 5 percent stake. 


EU Ends ‘Time-Out’ on Cuba 

Brittan Raises Stakes by Seeking Ruling on U.S. Law 


By PaulBIustein 

Washington Post Service 


The European Union has asked for an international 
trade panel to be appointed to rule on its complaint 
drat a U.S. Jaw tightening an embargo on Cuba 
violates global trade agreements. 

In so doing, the Union has locked itself into a legal 
showdown with the United States over the so-called 
Helms-Burton Act, raising fears among trade spe- 
cialists of a confrontation that conld undermine die 
.recendyfonned World Trade Organization. 

The EU move, by starting the clock ticking toward 
a mandatory ruling by die world trade body, rep- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


resents a significant raising of the stakes in the fight 
between Washington and Europe over how to deal 
with Cuba. Many trade specialists fear that if tbe case 
proceeds, the United States will be forced to reject the 
trade body's claim of jurisdiction over the issue on 
grounds that America’s national security is involved, 
damaging the ability of the fledgling organization to 
decide trade disputes among nations. 

“It’s vexy dangerous," said Jeffrey Schott, an 
economist at the Institute for International Econom- 
ics. “This is a lose-lose situation.” 

The EU decision to press its case reflects the 
international anger over die U3. law, which was 
approved by Congress in March 1996. It sets penalties 
for certain noo-U-S. companies doing business in 
Cuba, something that many European raid other gov- 
ernments view as an illegal attempt to impose U.S. 
policy beyond the country's borders. 

Although die European Union lodged a complaint 
againsttbelaw with the Wmld Trade Organization in 


October, many U.S. officials and trade 


said theybelieved the move was largely symbolic and 
that the EU would allow the case tolan] 
limbo because of the risks it owl 
Geneva- based organization. 

But Sir Lets Brittan, die EU trade commissioner 
who has been a particularly vocal critic of the Helms- 
B niton law, this week shrugged off any misgivings 
among some European officials and said he would not 
back off from the case unless Washington made 
, concessions. 

According to EU diplomats. Sir Leon formally 
asked the WTO’s director-general, Renato Ruggiero, 
to appoint three judges to arbitrate the matter, which 
means the panel will be required to issue a decision 
■within six to nine months. 

“Before now, we’ve been in sort of legal timeout 
mode, and tbe case could have stayed there for years, 
but this means an end to the time-out,” said a U.S. 
official, who added thar he was “astonished "that the 
EU seemed to believe it could benefit from moving 
die matter forward. 

According to Mr. Schott, the EU is almost certain to 
lose die case because Washington can assert that its 
law was based on national-security considerations, a 
virtually foolproof defense under international trade 
law. But by pressing its case, the EU “will raise the 
question anew in tbe American public debate of 
whether other countries can use the WTO to rein in 
U.S. sovereignty,” Mr. Schott said. 

Hugo Paemen, the HU’S ambassador to the United 
States, hinted that the 15-nation European Union may 
be using the case to prod Washington toward a com- 
promise on its Cubapolicy when he said one of the 
ideas behind the WTO procedure was dial “it en- 
courages the parties to crane to an agreement before the 
work of the panel is finished.” 


Roche to Buy U.S. Flavorings Fir 


CampOeibfOmSieffFnm Dtifsachn 

BASEL, Switzerland — Roche 
Holding AG said Wednesday that it 
would pay Hercules Inc. and 
Mallinckrodt Group Inc. about $1 
billion for Tastemaker, a U.S. fla- 
vors company, a move that would 
make the Swiss dnigmaker the 
world's top fragrances and flavors 
company. 

Tbe transaction, exact terms of 
which were not disclosed, would 
give Roche about 16 percent of the 
world market in raw materials for 
fragrances and in food flavorings. 
“This acquisition will be an excel- 
lent strategic fit and will ideally com- 
plement tbe activities of Givandan- 
Roure, Roche’s fragrances and fla- 
vors division,” Roche said. With the 


deal die Swiss company would 
move past a New York-based rival. 
International Flavors & Fragrances 
Inc., which has about 15 percent of 
the market, analysts said. 

Roche’s purchase comes at a time 
of consolidation in the pharmaceut- 
ical industry and follows speculation 
thai the Swiss company might sell its 
own flavors unit, which accounts for 
less than 10 percent of its sales. 

For Hercules, based in Wilming- 
ton, Delaware, and Mallinckrodt, 
based in Sl Louis, Missouri, — each 
of which owns 50 percent of Taste- 
maker — the sell-off leaves room to 
focus on health care and specialty 
chemicals. 

Some analysts said the deal was 
not in Roche’s best interests. Fla- 


Investor’s Europe 


OAXr'pcT'*- ./ ; 

. 3250 — — 4500 ; 2500 

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■ 2930 jj- 4i 4180 -f- i 2280 

' 2770 --%/*■- m 

; 2610 3860 — -- — 



T'cTl'T ti J F' 
1996 1997 


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1096 1996 1997 

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2,75003 2,742. 78 +0^B 


Source: Tetekurs 


bucnuiiaivd Herald Tribtw 


Very briefly: 


vors and fragrances “is a low-mar- 
gin business, and I would rather 
have seen Roche get out of it,” said 
Genghis Lloyd-Hanis, an analyst at 
Credit Suisse in London. 

Roche shares fell 155 Swiss 
francs ($108) to 12,130, reflecting 
investors’ disappointment that the 
company was buying a business, not 
selling one, traders said. A disposal 
would have added to Roche’s $10 
billion cash reserve and heightened 
recent speculation that the company 
was planning a major acquisition — 
talk that has helped its shares rise by 
15 percent since mid-January. 

Hercules shares were unchanged 
at $46375 in New York trading, 
while Mallinckrodt fell 873 cents to 
$39,625. (AFX, Bloomberg) 


• Fried. Krupp AG Hoescb-Krupp’s steelmaking unit, 
Krupp Hoesch Stahl AG, said its supervisory board had 
approved plans to cut around 2,200 jobs and invest 660 million 
DM ($402 million) over the next two years to modernize its 
blast furnaces. 

• Aero International (Regional), which contains the regional- 
aircraft activities of Aerospatiale, Alenia and British Aerospace 
PLC, said orders fen to 59 planes in 1996 from 1 1 1 in 1995. 

• Sydkraft AB could ask for more than 20 billion Swedish 
kronor ($2.7 billion) in compensation from the state for 
closing its two nuclear reactors as part of a plan 10 phase out 
nuclear power. 

• Deutsche Telekom AG and Netscape Communications 
Corp. expanded their software agreement to include software and 
services for corporate computer networks. 

• Marieberg AB, Sweden’s largest newspaper publishing 
group, was ordered by authorities to sell part 01 its empire if it 
wanted to retain its stake in TV4, a private television group. 

• Germany and the Russian Federation signed an agreement 
calling for the repayment of 25 billion DM of Russian debt 
over the next two decades. 

• Germany’s building industry was ordered 10 honor wage 
contracts designed to bring wages in Eastern Germany up to 
West German levels. 

• Opraf, Britain’s railroad regulator, awarded the North West 
Regional Railways passenger-rail franchise to Great West- 
ern Holdings Ltd., a consortium made up of Great Western 
Trains, FirstBus PLC and 31 Group. 

• Russia’s consumer prices rose 23 percent in January from 
the previous month, after a 1.4 percent rise in December. 

• Gucci Group NV acquired a majority stake in Gucci 
Venezia Sri, which owns flve franchised outlets in northern 
Italy. The company also said it had opened two stores in 

t~*hina_ Bloomberg. AFX. AFP. Reuters. Bridge News 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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3325 

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19730 

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B33 815 815 825 

262 252 280 25250 

995 sa 5f0 " S90 
T7U 1*620 16620 167.10 
<79 JO 470-1 0 476J0 46950 
79 7620 7M0 7720 

39*80 37820 39250 379 


MovneNldda 
Mitt Hite 

HM AuS Bar* 

NatMotnoJ Hdg 
News Carp 
NarowndrMin 
Marti Utf 
PndBc Duntop 
Pioneer Inti 
Pub Broodcoa 
OantasAtorem 
Sonte 


Markets Gosed Pau, ° 


Bren ipu tedrec 81711 21 
PretoeoEl 


agssf 

PtBnfine 

nmrita 

gass 


^ ’IS ^ 
££ i2£ iSS iSS 

MO 3C5 XM) 

SS 3 S3 

^ ^ H 

ss w g m 

SS 3 M 0 

§08 W5 ^ 

s ,1 

t*niA 11*50 1 W5D 11 W0 

S 1 X 0 113 N 11300 

! i ’» 1 ’i 

SS ^ 3S S 


.* , 


Start MdesSKJP 

293 394 X6 

392 3*5 g! 

m 085 #7# 

X6 M7 W 

SSI 588 5M 

S* 880 |g 

374 371 

334 375 

347 » » 

g. ^ 

ST liTM 


Copenhagen 

nm » 

eu f 

o*n g? 

DMOamBX Sal 

BBT #B S 

«N 

» 

»“*•» s 

tA » 

Frankfurt 



sa? 

GreotB»B<e. 

Guonodonstov 

GwocoGroap 

Mono Lung Dev 

HsSsenoBk 

Hwtoweoobw 

HendettenUi 

Hwmn 

HKCnmaOc* 
HR Bed* 
HKStreagHM 
HKTetocoaw 

HwreeflHdip 

55KS hn 

HewWe rtdPey 

OtetelPTM 

PerelOrtenM 

enn 

SlnoLafldCa 

StoCteiaPntt 

STgrV 

TVBreodcosto 

WlnfMte 

wneetodi 

Jakarta 

ii?i 

B* WTfadon 

GodoBflSMIB 

lreto«i*rt 

Wtetote 

SowpoemoHM 

SeweftGi^t 

TteeteHW**™ 1 


6290 6135 
1(55 1775 

1575 1575 
11150 l»g 
3500 3425 
5325 5250 
*775 65SS 
14450 1 3750 

4200 UB5 


OK «7S 
1600 1775 
1600 1575 

msa ig» 

5300 a* 
*625 6600 

7400 nx 

4150 4125 


Johannesburg yggSB 

an* 

t*3S 140^ 

OtteWSfi 26 SM ^2 Sa 

WJS?" 1 W T8» IMS 



Oinre Wte a eim 
SremtoGp 
Grand Md 
GRE 

GreeneltoGp 


umsec 

Lneree 

Legal Gent Sfp 
UWteTSSGp 
UnMrty 

sssasf 

McuPopw 


PUtotem 

PowreGre 

RafllreckPP 

RBDkGm 

RtUWOW 

RedOBd 

need UK 

RaataitBfPHaf. 

BeowsHcte 

torenm 

ftMCGrooo 

Bft. 

Ks 

s%wy 
stete 
Sdrextoa 
SootMewCasM 
ScelPteH . 
SKOriMT . 
Severn Trent 
SUrfTranspR 
SUM 

5rem Nephew 

SrtthKbto 

SnSMM 


191 195 

1653 1004 


Stock markets in Taiwan 
and Mexico were closed 
Wednesday for a holiday. 

Milan 


Ba Caere IM 
Ben Hdeucnu 
BcadiRtoa 


BadesaPfd 

BrertnaPId 

cerefa pm 
SPP fd 


PM 

UeWSerrfdas 


id?SreiM 


HAS 

RttoBnm 

SPaotoTatas 

SM 

TstoamJMa 

TIM 


Montreal 

Be* Mofc Com 

OdhTkeA 

CdnWIA ■ 

CTFWitee 

GBAMre 

GMMUkn 

NMUConoda 


QateearB 

BmaarenB 

SSmS 


MIBTHfotlnr 1263660 


Pmtes 1341160 

12S35 

12370 


12355 

3500 

300 

35/0 

3355 

4630 

4415 

<500 

46« 

13X 

1303 

1324 

1387 

»JSO 

20900 

27350 

21100 

2430 

TBS 

2405 

3345 

MOJO 

mo 

10050 

100 50 

VMS 

mo 

9225 

8930 

5458 

5330 

5450 

4350 

33050 

32650 

32H5U 

32*00 

19900 

15510 

15895 


2255 

6900 

XU 

6755 

2240 

4825 


7380 

7260 

7300 

735D 

11400 

11000 

II35U 

10930 

1335 

1301 

131/ 

1310 

9675 

3625 

2640 

2665 

3640 

2540 

3635 

3590 

16100 

15620 

16090 

14600 

17900 

17/tU 


l/US 

1T7W 

11400 

11750 

12360 

1 CM 

79Z. 

SOTO 

no o 

4710 

4530 

4710 

4 530 

4795 

4650 

4770 

4720 


iPfd 
TetobrasPfd 
Tetonig 

TekJpPM 
UetoBKn 
CVRD PM 


829 852 

70050 670J0 
44*0 44.10 
5829 JiOO 
15.10 1420 
rv. m i« M 
51100 49BJJ0 
37350 3494)1 
33006 mji 
20856 20540 
9X40 9X40 
IS&Stt 14000 
16000 14600 
2*200 25000 
35-41 3450 

2729 2540 


: 81 82240 
839 840 

69506 66900 
4426 44.10 
5800 53J0 
1501 1425 
it? ne jtx ih 
57000 «KO0 
37000 35350 
33000 32601 
20800 20700 
9170 92J0 
74650 15100 
75700 15200 
25400 24950 
35410 3500 
2529 2600 


WMC „ 

nuoaswo rtn 

Vtodwartos 


0 

766 

758 

754 

8J0 

111 

116 

110 

1/28 

1765 

1720 

17-0 

363 

XU 

147 

33* 

23.10 

77M 

a 

2267 

1X12 

I2J3 

mi 

1250 

1250 

1250 

1265 

1265 

568 

439 

465 

459 

651 

665 

651 

668 

1X45 

1665 

1864 

1838 

4A5 

436 

465 

43* 

265 

259 

262 

260 

244 

23V 

262 

239 

135 

1 » 

33S 

128 

159 

156 

158 

156 

1255 

1233 

1255 

1139 

256 

251 

257 

192 

2320 

22JD 

2171 

225* 

765 

766 

04 

766 

162 

12* 

132 

127 

1585 

1420 

1526 

15.70 

126 

124 

125 

123 

6J0 

626 

666 

624 

164 

161 

161 

167 

190 

190 

198 

193 

114 

368 

114 

100 

328 

320 

325 

169 

650 

623 

660 

623 

JJO 

238 

239 

239 

Ate 

42V 

A84 

431 

4J0 

430 

428 

432 

854 

860 

692 

826 

M0 

7.94 

6W. 

755 

249 

266 

14H 

145 

7.53 

IM 

/64 

739 

965 

VJf) 

965 

950 

134 

1 39 

133 

134 


[ The Trib Index 



Closing prices. 

Jan. J. 1992 - 100. 

Level 

Chong* 

% change 

year to dale 
% change 
+14.94 

World Index 

151.57 

-0.29 

- -0.19 

Region*! tncteoM 

Asia/Padfic 

109.18 

-1.68 

—1.52 

-18.68 

Europe 

164.51 

+2.57 

+1-59 

+1&20 

N. America 

173.83 

-2.85 

—1.61 

+35J>1 

S. America 

Industrial tadexaa 

132.04 

+4121 

+0.16 

+48^9 

Capital goods 

177.42 

-2.57 

-1.43 

+33^2 

Consumer goods 

167.73 

-0.78 

-0.45 

+21.48 

Energy 

181.42 

+1.97 

+1.10 

+33.77 

Fmanoe 

110.47 

-0.42 

-0.38 

-13.17 

Mtscetianoous 

166.12 

+051 

+0.31 

+21.58 

Raw Materials 

179.00 

+1.03 

+0.58 

+2R23 

Service 

139.11 

+0.30 

+022 

+1582 

utmes 

143JJB 

+0-57 

+0.40 

+12.77 

too MumatbnulHBmk/Tiauno WoM Stock Max C tracks t/m US. datarvutomot 
290 trUBmatloraBy OjvsstBOte etoda trom 25 countries. For mm MornmUon, a free 
booUoi is awSabls by mNng to 7baTnbMox.1Bl Avenue Charles do GauSe. 

92X1 NeuHy Cede*. France. CompBod by Bkxnbstg Atoms. 


Afr 


Seoul 


Oaeaai 


KtaMatore 
ttoreoHPwr 
tenreaEreABk 
Keren Mob TU 
LGSemkw 
Pebeng Inn St 


698*0 

Pn W eir . *1525 

174098 713800114000117000 
5200 5040 5070 5000 

76300 15800 1*300 16300 
26S00 27900 2*100 SI 00 
7330 *800 TWO 4370 

£86000 550000 580000 577000 
21000 19300 19900 20600 
4*600 42700 42200 44100 
54060 5140 57760 52400 
11100 10900 11060 10900 


Tokyo 

ABnonato 
AlWmon / 
AuaSanS 
ArertOiere 
A*a*&lws 
BkTolcreMReo 
ekYokohrenb 
Bddgemne 
Canon 
ChdboElec 

D^-lddKang 

Da tare Bank 

DatooHooee 

DatwoSec 

DOI 

Demo 

EasJJopcnJJy 

Brel 
Faouc 
“ IBank 
i Photo 


4BW me. 1818657 
PreWeereinux 


rinl>tadee 2 f 6 Uo 

PicrienB2NU2 


Singapore 

Asia Poe Brew 
CtrctetPoe 
CBy Doits 
CjdeConW* 
DdryFwnW' 


SfctelTteesrZItSJJ 

: 21 9X22 



NycrewdA 
Otto Are A 
PdfcoGaoSrc 
SagaPtrenA 


12950 

145 

2379 


124 


OBX iDdeC S7923 
PreWe0E5B2.il 

its in in 

144. 144 145 

2338 3140 2X30 
24 2750 2750 
9550 96 98 

4950 4959 50 

306 306 306 

mm 37150 37UD 
19250 193 19750 

19850 11050 11150 
SM 515 515 

276 280 X0 

13050 IZISO 124 


OSIMtaSkF 
PcBtaeayHdgs 
SaBbawoag 
Stag Air tomgn 

5ingUBd _ 
Sing FW« F 
Slog Tech bid 
SfegTWKomn 
Stitts Stoan 

Tat Lee Bote 
UtOtedusMel 
UUDSMBkF 
VWngTWHdg# 
“tolAl Abend 


765 

765 

755 

755 

1060 

TOAD 

1030 

1030 

14 

1X70 

1190 

1430 

15 

1420 

15 

1420 

OJO 

QJB 

ate 

029 

7950 

7850 

79 

I960 

520 

S55 

540 

520 

655 

559 

650 

650 

1330 

13 

1110 

1110 

IM 

253 

tsn 

255 

630 

445 

*65 

AID 

140 

138 

140 

360 

11.10 

1050 

1050 

11.10 

AI2 

.Ate 

AH 

A10 

1850 

1110 

18J0 

1860 

1150 

11 

1JJ0 

11J0 

525 

565 

525 

520 

750 

755 

750 

755 

1X40 

13J0 

13J0 

1350 

865 

835 

835 

165 

2750 

2760 

27J0 

28 

184 

320 

350 

174 

132 

338 

130 

132 

Ate 

Ate 

Ate 

Ate 

366 

364 

146 

366 

121 

1.19 

120 

UD 

1620 

ISM 

16.10 

1620 

450 

466 

450 

450 


HochneriBk 

HflKW 

Honda Motor 

1BJ 

ttodw 

fto-Vtotoda 

JAL 

JopaiTobaam 

Jusco 

Kojina 

XflssaJScc 

KBWUK*SH»f 

KswaStoil 

rareoNippRir 

WftiBrewwy 

Kobe Steel 

Konetsa 

KubBb 


1090 1040 

7*0 742 

845 010 

£35 625 

1100 1070 

1670 1790 

670 645 

2150 2090 
2580 2540 
2210 2180 
2190 2130 

1946 1900 

1330 1260 

514 490 

1410 1360 

933 900 

73801 7130a 
24*0 2350 

5880b 49300 
2320 2390 

3S40 3440 

1330 ISO 
3720 3570 

1220 7190 

1060 1 030 

1100 . 7070 
3210 SIX 
1530 1460 

573 541 

£343 £730 
524 506 

79200 7880a 
3340 3250 
767 740 

2250 HU 


462 

295 

728 


12X 

457 

281 

7M 


Stockholm “JJSESH 

AGAB 10750 U6 107 10658 

ABBA 9J9 913 916 915 

Ateowwn 181*0 in.50 1&9 18150 

AshaA 3*450 341J0 343 341 


LtCB 

MONbBlI 

Mvai 

Mate EMC Jnd 

MoteEtacWk 

JWtautdsH 

MttsubtteCh 

WtebteHB 

MUtUbtaMEci 

MBSObfcWHw 

MbabtaMMei 

AUwbtaMTr 

mm 

MnsuTRidare 
Mitsui Trtrsl 
ttaretattfo 
NEC 
Ukan 
KSOsSee 
WotUKte 


1050 1020 
213 267 

844 B09 

571 561 

7190 7100 
2170 2100 
451 415 

486 475 

1880 1610 
1040 1810 

1010 991 

1140 1100 
343 336 

686 673 

1380 1230 


855 

905 


835 

895 


1260 118) 
905 883 

1180 10M 
765 734 

3900 3880 
MOO 1380 
16X 1570 
745 720 

8000 7900 

729 no 


... i Steel 
Wooen Motor 
NKK _ 
MaatareSec 
MTT 

NTT Data 


559 

295 

743 

245 


531 

291 

731 

236 


1579 1549 

non BSBOa 

3240b 3160b 


1050 1090 

756 763 

874 843 

*2B 635 

1100 1000 
1820 18*0 
670 669 

2130 2120 

2570 2550 

2170 2220 

2130 2170 

1930 1930 

1270 1320 

497 519 

1390 W10 

911 938 

7220a 7320a 
2390 3470 

4930a 5Q7DO 
2290 2330 

3500 3560 

1260 1330 

3690 3700 

1300 1190 

1640 1060 

1080 1090 

3130 3210 

1490 1550 

59 562 

£170 5340 
517 524 

7860a 7850a 
3»0 3350 

753 769 

2220 2250 

1240 1280 

460 466 

s s 

1040 10*0 

210 Z13 

822 851 

sa sa 

7150 7M0 
2100 2180 
420 460 

477 475 

1650 1690 

1820 IMS 
10 M 1030 
1130 113 
337 340 

677 686 

1260 1270 
MS 845 
TO 913 
1210 1250 

905 908 

1130 1160 
740 7*3 

3900 3780 
1380 1390 
1610 16X 
722 749 

7980 8020 
729 726 

SS 55 5 

293 293 

735 740 

238 245 

1560 1580 

B650O 8770a 
3190b 3250b 


0?l .. 

Osaka Gas 
RJcob 
Raton 
Salcma Bk 
Sanfcyo 
SanwaBank 
Sanyo Elec 
5ecom 
Se&aRwy 
MW House 
Seven Oven 

Shorn 

SSStuHPwr 

SWn-eisuQi 

ShtookoB* 

Scfftamic 

Son y 

StreiitofTO 

5«tnliomoBk 

SuodfOwn 

SuadtoaieBec 

SumHMefe) 

Suadl Tract 

TUteoPtnnn 

TokedoOcre 

TDK 

Tohotai El Put 
T otal Ban* 
TaMo Marine 
Totaio El Pwr 
Tokyo EJeOron 
Tokyo Gal 
TgkjuCwp. 
Tenon 

Toppan Print 
T unwind 


Tanwlnd 

Tasia 


Taya TraS 
Toyota Motor 
Ymnanoucw 

tnxlvakxJMO 


High 

LOW 

dose 

*52 

63* 

*40 

314 

300 

302 

1340 

1310 

1340 

7920 

7770 

7920 

723 

682 

60* 

3240 

3190 

3240 

13*0 

1310 

1330 

507 

491 

499 

*520 

*400 

*420 

4300 

41*0 

4250 

1110 

1090 

1100 

*900 

*830 

*070 

1630 

15/0 

1590 

2770 

2080 

2110 

2230 

2200 

2230 

1070 

1020 

1040 

10100 

9750 

99* 

8220 

8120 

gyn 

940 

92* 

940 

1330 

1270 

1290 

642 

415 

432 

1*5) 

1630 

1640 

272 

264 

270 

*5 

896 

910 

2770 

2700 

2730 

2400 

2360 


76S0 

7580 

7620 

2080 

2030 

2030 

956 

914 

940 

l«o 

tore 

7080 

2350 

2300 

2300 

4070 

3990 

4030 

305 

297 

300 

568 

546 

557 

1250 

1200 

1250 

1430 

1360 

1380 

694 

6/6 

687 

705 

692 

*90 

2910 

7880 

2890 

812 

787 

784 

3080 

2050 

3070 

2280 

2250 

2280 


Prre 


High 

LOW 

Close 

Pita. 

*41 


<2 

6155 

61A5 

611* 

313 

TaBwwmElw 

4720 

451* 

4&ft 

4720 

1350 

TeckB 

30ft 

29-85 

30.15 

3065 

mo 

Tetoglobe 

39 JO 

39 

39 

390. 

m 

Tetas 

20 

19JS 

19.90 

1925 

3190 

Thomson 

28M 

2/65 

2135 

2814 

13*0 


39.10 

37-90 

3130 

a&js 

505 


1*60 

1*20 

1140 

1625 

*600 

TinnsCda Pfea 

2£M 

24tf 

2520 

24.90 

4300 

Trtmart RnJ 

4560 

4520 

45*0 

45 

1090 

TitncHahn 

3110 

31V 

32 

3155 

6940 

TVXGold 

1040 

10ft 

1160 

1055 

1*311 

Westerns! Ear 

241* 

2416 

74ft 

2420 

2110 

2210 

1060 

Wteuon 

7*14 

7514 

7* 

7614 


9850 

0130 

940 

1340 

446 

1650 

273 

9S1 

2790 

2390 

7640 

2100 

955 

1080 

2370 

4130 

303 

22 

1250 

1430 

699 

704 

2920 

BI2 

30® 

2260 


Vienna 

BBAG 

BoeMOMMteh 
Brou-Un Gores 
OedBanstPW 
EA-Generol 
EVN 

Ftoglteen Wtan 

Moyr-Melnhor 

OMV 

omEtokM 

Rntiei+leni 

VAStotri 

VATMl 

Wtenerberg Beni 

Woriora 


BOO 

819 

666 

419 

3450 

1741 

551.45 

57450 

13® 

851 

402 

426 

1024 

2089 

1455 


ATX tadere 1187 Jl 
PrevtooKlllOJO 

787.10 787.10 790.05 

814 81820 814 

64* 666 659 

404.90 41350 4100 
3400 3420 3400 

172* 1740 1740 

54120 548 543 

571 573 57120 

13181322201329 JO 
845 050 845 

386.10 396 386.15 

421 425.90 419.70 
1790 1817 1785 

2071 2089 2095 

1431 1450 1430 


Toronto 

Abttd Price 
Alberti energy 
Alcan Aim 
AnderaiExpi 
Bk Montreal 
UNovaScaHa 
BarickGoU 
BCE 

SCTetoann 
Btacbem Phans 
BombafllerB 
BnseanA 
Bre-x Mi nerals 

Como 

CISC 

UDNanRte 

CtelteitK 

CttOoddPei 

CdaPuctac 

Corotoai 

Dotoscs 

Dantor 

DenohueA 

DiiPortCdoA 

Edper Group 

EoraNeeMng 

FtetaRnl 

Fakanbridoe 

FWOwOteA 

Franco Hwodo 

GuKCdaRes 

Imperial 08 

Inco 

IPL Enemy 
UaUMB 
Laewen Gn»p 
JMtanBifiU 
Magna M A 

W W W 


TSEtadastMs 611241 
Pra*toos:6l4SAl 


Newbridge Net 
NaireKio me 
Hycen Energy 
Nttnm Telecom 
Kara 
Onex 

Panerin PeOai 

PMraCdo 

PtacerDwrto 

PocoPeHm 

PsnteSak 

Rendssana 

RtoAtem 

RageBCaiWB 

SeepmrcCo 

StteCdaA 

Stone CenBGld 


M-tt 

32*5 

47.15 
1820 

49.15 
51 

3*30 

7tH* 

30 

80 

25* 

3SW 

22.10 

5A30 

*325 

5U0 

37 

2SW 

3625 

37J0 

2A6S 

124B 

26.15 
3» 

21 M 
3655 
298 
»J0 
2120 
sn 

1055 

.« 

46.10 

OJO 

1750 

4750 

in* 

73 Hr 
1250 
2620 
4615 
32 JO 
331* 
10650 
1150 
24 

SO to 
21 JO 
2BJ05 
1450 
11065 
46 
3240 

27.45 
SM 

5450 

21.45 


2210 
32J0 
46 
1720 
4750 
4920 
3546 
«9to 
2920 
80 
2105 
30V* 
2150 
5B * 

49 HC 

52.10 

35to 

24M 

3550 

3755 

26 

11.90 
25 

32V 
21to 
36 Vi 
296 
2» 
2155 
SB* 
late 
6440 
xcnc 
4Mt 
17ft 
47 JO 
1740 
7245 
1270 
2750 
U2P 

31.90 
33 

97ft 
12.70 
23 
58 
21 
27 JO 
1460 
104 

45.10 
3150 

2716 

5U0 

cere 

21ft 


2220 2216 
3240 32ft 
4*45 4755 
17to 1830 
4755 4655 
SI 50 
3555 36.10 
69ft 70ft 
2950 » JO 
00 7M 
25.40 2520 
3055 3070 
7150 7140 
5320 5430 
6340 6220 

32.10 5X55 

3620 3716 

2495 25.15 

26 3*35 
37.70 37.90 
26ft 24 

12 12 

2*85 2*05 
32* 3245 
21* 2140 
36ft 3645 
297 296 

2950 3040 
2165 2116 
59 5KSS 
1050 1050 
64* 64*0 
45ft 4545 

41.10 4020 

1760 1765 
47-40 4750 
1760 1720 
7320 73* 

1240 1240 

28.10 28.15 
4460 46.10 

32.10 3220 
33 33ft 

9760 9945 
1245 1245 
2155 23* 

SO 58ft 

21.10 21 JO 
2745 27JS 
1465 1450 

105 109ft 
45ft 46 
3140 3240 
2725 27 JO 
5X« 53.15 
54.90 55.10 
2140 21ft 


Wellington 

AH NZeaidB 
Briefly brvt 
Carter Holt art 
RrtdiOi Bids 
HeiehChEny 
FWehatRml 
ReKtiOi Paper 
Urn Neman 
Telecom HZ 
tMfattiHcrion 


181 

360 

360 

180 

123 

121 

123 

123 

329 

325 

125 

128 

457 

465 

450 

455 

A14 

A10 

A13 

4.14 

119 

115 

116 

119 

262 

221 

260 

in 

3.70 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 


PAGE 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


<Can America Online Sett in Cyber- Savvy Japan? 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Washington Post Service 


TOKYO In Japan, gangsters, 
sumo wrestlers and sushi coofa 
have setup their own Internet home 
pages. Farmers are even monitoring 
nee crops wnh the help of dieted 
. cameras and the Net. 

in short, Japanese are galloping 
on-line by the millions. Now, Amer- 
ica Online Inc., the company th?t 
more than any other created the on- 
line craze in the United Stares, has 
amved here to push hard for a piece 
of the action. 

Flying technicians across the Pa- 
cific, America Online is rushing to 
up s Japanese- language service 
that it hopes will begin sometime 
thisspnng. The big question: Will 
its brand name, a powerful draw in 
the United States, count for anything 
in a country that has managed so 
well without AOL as it moves to- 
ward cyber development? 

To launch its effort, AOL dis- 
patched John Barber to Tokyo six 
months ago. 


Breaking into many other mar- 
kets would be a lot easier. But AOL 
has to be in Japan, Mr. Barber said. 

About 45 percent of the personal 
computers in Asia are in Japan, he 
said, so “not coming to Japan was 

never an option.’* 

When he arrived, Mr. Barber, 49 
and a veteran in the on-line industry, 
hadno staff and spoke little Japanese. 

He also was new to AOL, having had 

teamed the business while naming 
General E le c tric Co.'s ul timatel y un- 
successful Genie on-line service. 

But he had AOL's technology, 
plus its marketing expertise, lively, 
screen graphics and content that sells 
— at least to American audiences. 

His mission was to figure out 
whether AOL’s service was 
something that would take Japan by 
storm as it was, like McDonald's 
Corp.’s hamburgers and files, or 
more like ao oversized American car 
that would have to be considerably 
altered to fit in. The decision: Go for 
basically the same service, but in 
Japanese afid with some cultural ad- 
justments — a greater emphasis cm 


golf than cm football, for instance. 

Japanese people, Mr. Barber said, 
are ideal on-line denizens — in- 
quisitive, educated and with a strong 
sense of community and interest in 
trying new things. • 

AOL hopes to benefit from strong 
backing from Japanese companies. It 
has two key allies: Mitsui & Co., one 
of Japan's largest trading companies, 
which owns 40 percent of AOL- 
Japan, and Nihoa Keizai Shim bun 
Inc., Japan’s leading business daily, 
which o\yns 10 percent. The two 
partners put up about $60 million for 
the new venture. AOL. which owns 
50 percent of the Japanese service, 
did not put op any cash. 

In die United States, AOL has had 
some problems recently. Most fam- 
ously, it has bad to oner credits or 
refunds to customers who could not 
log on to its overloaded system. But 
that has not generated much publicity 
here, and Me. Barber said be did not 
expect the incident to hurt die com- 
pany much here. In Japan, AOL is 
entering a market that already is 
growing rapidly, rather than having 


to be the engme that gets it going. 

Computer sales in Japan surged 
33 percent to 7.6 million units last 
year, according to Dataquest Inc. In 
the 12 months ended in June 1996, 
on-line users jumped by 2 million, to 
5.7 million, according to the New 
Media Development Association, an 
association of Japanese companies. 

The big problem for Mr. Barber is 
convincing Japan that there is a role 
for AOL m a country that is rapidly 
creating its own version of cyber- 
space. Already, Fujitsu Ltd.’s Nifty- 
Serve, an affiliate of LLS.-based 
CompuServe Inc., and NEC Corp.’s 
Biglobe have 1 m il lion subscribers, 
and 19 services have more than 
10,000 subscribers each. 

Another question is whether con- 
sumer want a commercial on-line ser- 
vice such as AOL, with its own fancy 
graphics and technology, or would 
rather go with a pure Internet-access 
service. Improved software has made 
the Internet a much friendlier place, so 
die ease of nse and other band-holding 
that the commercial services give are 
becoming less important 


“1 think it will be difficult for 
AOL to lure customers away from 
Internet providers,” said Kenji Ok- 
uda, 34, who is starting his own 
software company. “AOL is famous 
in the US., but I wonder why they are 
coming here now,” when the In- 
ternet has already taken off, he said. 

Much is riding on AOL-Japan’s 
pricing policy, details of which are 
still being worked out, according to 
Mr. Barber. 

Much of its content, which wall 
deal with news, sports, restaurants, 
travel, games and entertainment, 
still is being developed. As AOL- 
Japan struggled to sort through these 
problems, the launch da te was 
pushed from late 1996 to sometime 
this spring. 

The problems have been largely 
technical, some not encountered by 
AOL when it launched its European 
service a year ago. For instance. 
Japanese characters are larger than 
letters in the Roman alphabet and 
require software changes. Many 
Japanese modems also require dif- 
ferent software than U.S. modems. 


Investor's Asia 


tfoagKpeg- 
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; 15000 — 

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TOKYO — Sony Carp, said Wed- 
nesday its profit doubled from a year 
earlier in the quarter that ended in Decem- 
ber, mostly because of gains in overseas 
sales and a strengthening dollar. 

Sales were strong in many product 
lines, with the bi gg est gains coining 
from PlayStation consoles and cellular 
phones. Sony said. It said it had sold 
fewer Walkmans and more of its newer 
MiniDisc players, highlighting die shift 
from analog to digital technology. 

“There was the benefit of the weaker 
yen, but that wasn’t all,” said Sumio 
Sano. managing director of Sony Corp. 
“The results were very good.” 

% The company said net income rose to 
’ 75.33 billion yen ($613-5 million) from 
37.14 billion yen as sales rose to 1.67 
trillion yen from 1.35 trillion. 

Operating profit rose 40 percent, to 
164.49 billion yen. 

Soay’s shares closed at 8,220 yen, up 
90. Tire earnings announcement came 
after trading closed on the Tokyo Stock 
Exchange, but analysis said the results 
should lift the stock Thursday. 

“The trading statement was terrific,” 
an analyst said. “The market had been 


looking to upgrade earnings forecasts, bet 
this has taken a few people by surprise.” 

The strengthening dollar contributed 
1 10 billion yen to the sales figure and 40 
billion yen to operating profit, the com- 
pany said. The dollar was about 10 per- 
cent higher against the yen than in the 
like quarter of the previous year. 

Sony also raised its forecast for net 
profit for the year ending in March by 26 
percent, to 132 billion yen, saying there 
was little chance it would lose the ben- 
efit of the strong dollar before then. Sony 
is so confident the dollar will remain 
strong againstthe yen. in fact, that tire 
c o mpany has not yet hedged against a 
possible decline in the U.S. currency 
after that time either. 

“There's no reason to believe tire yen 
will rise beyond the current level for 
some time, so we foresee no reason to 
hedge,” Mr. Sano said. 

Sales m Sony’s “other products'’ di- 
vision rose the most, jumping 37 percent 
from last year. Die division includes the 
hot-selling PlayStation video-game 
player. Consumers have snapped up 
more than J 1 million of the machines 
worldwide in about two years. 

Sony Computer Entertainment in- 


cite quarter, to 1.291 trillion yen from 
1.047 


CRACKER: New England Fans of ‘Hardtack’ Sicay Nabisco 


Continued from Page 11 


try the company’s squarish Uneeda Bis- 
cuits. “They said. ‘No: it’s not tire 
same.’ *’ Ms. Smith recalled. 

* Not that the islanders are closed- 
y minded. They sampled many substi- 
tutes, sent to islanders from sympathetic 
snackers around tire world. One woman 
in Alaska mailed eightpounds of Sailor 
Boy PHor Bread. A group in Hawaii sent 
a local version. 

But most of the alternatives lacked 
the one ingredient — malted barley — 
that seems to give the Crown Pilot its 
special flavor. 

Actually, “bland” is tire first word 
many aficionados use to describe tire 
taste. 

Both Mrs. Damon and Nabisco are 


surprised that the cracker, sold only in 
New England, has fans across the coun- 
try. One call to Mrs. Damon came from 
a man in Alexandria, Vir ginia , whose 
family had emigrated from Trinidad in 
1919. He had never been to New Eng- 
land but was devastated by tire dis- 
continuation of the cracker. 

“In Afro-American Caribbean cul- 
ture they use a hardtack biscuit, ami tire 
closest tiling they had here was tire 
Crown Riot,” Mrs. Damon said. 

At the Island Market on Cbebeague 
Island, cracker tales are tire hot topic of 


ly se 

box on my grandfather’s table,” said 
Cathy MacNeOL, 38, who makes cram, 
clam and fish chowders at tire market “I 


remember sitting on his lap as a c hild . 
His mug and his cracker would be right 


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a „«= f-vprv Wednesday. To advertise contact Fred Ronan 

Appears every we 4i ^ ^ ^ j pax; + 33 1 4J 4S 93 70 

or your nearest IHT office or representative. 


TOggasaffligSgB 


Sony Says Profit Doubled in Quarter 

* Gains in Overseas Sales and Stronger Dollar Are Credited 


creased production of PlayStation con- 
soles to 1 milli on a month starting in 
November from about 650.0GO a month 
in the summer. 

Sony’s revenue from its entertainment 
business posted strong advances despite 
poor box-office showings by several 
movies, including “TheMfrrorHas Two 
Faces” and “Get on tire Bus.” 

Revenue from its Pictures Group, 
which includes the Columbia and 
TriStar studios, rose 36 percent in the 
quarter, to 124 billion yen from 91 bil- 
lion yea a year earlier. Sony said sales 
figures were lifted by tbe movie “Jerry 
Maguire” as well as by strong video 
sales for “Matilda” and “JumanjL” 

Sales in Sony’s bread-and-butter 
electronics business rose 23 percent in 


trillion yen. 

Sales at its music divirion rase 16 
it, to 185 billion yen from 160 
ton yen. 

But there were some disappointments 
for Sony as well, as sales of compact 
disk/read-only memory drives for com- 
puters, semiconductors and optical pick- 
ups declined from a year earlier. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


Australia Tycoon 
Gets Jail Term 


CamfOtdbj Our Stag Fran dapa ichn 

PERTH, Australia — Tbe fallen tycoon and former 
yachtsman Alan Bond received a four-year jail sentence 
Wednesday for perpetrating tbe biggest corporate frand in 
Australian history. 

Mr. Bond pleaded guilty to having cheated Bell Re- 
sources out of 12. billion Australian dollars ($925 mil- 
lion). Tbe sentence will begin when. Mr. Bond finishes a 
three-year sentence that was imposed in August after be 


was found guilty of defrauding one of Australia’s biggest 
lajnt 


companies, Bond Corp. Holdings, over transactions in- 
volving the Bench impressionist painting “La Prom- 
enade” by Edouard Manet 

In tire second fraud case, Mr. Bond pleaded guilty in 
December to having acted dishonestly as a company 
director. He used funds from Bell Resources to prop up 
Bond Corp. and his family company. Dallhold Invest- 
ments, after Bond Corp. took control of Bell Resources in 
August 1988. Michael Murray, tbe slate Supreme Court 
justice who sentenced him. said some funds were later 
recovered but that the loss to Bell Resources was es- 
timated at hundreds of millions of dollars. 

In return for tire guilty plea, prosecutors dropped five 
more charges related to the Bell Resources fraud and their 
appeal against tbe leniency of the “La Promenade” sen- 
tence. Mr. Bond, 58, is expected to serve about 16 months 
of the four-year sentence and to be released around the end 
of 1998. He was one of Australia’s richest men until his 
financial, brewing and real -estate empire collapsed under a 
huge debt load in tbe late 1980s. (AP, AFX) 


Hong Kong 

■ HdagSeng;-; 

.13^6330 . 13,548:4^ : 4©J53] 

Singapore 

Stoats ^ Times 

2,195.78 

2,19222 

+&1S 

Sydney ■■ 

iWOttirtsdas' 

2^35.80 

2,409,10 

+1.11 

Tokyo 1 

■ma&22k ■■ 

1S,mS7. 18,314.33 -0.70] 

'Koaia Uitapur Compos&e. • 

1,241.95 

1,235.36 

+063 

. Bangkok " 

S5T.. 

7*W». . 

765.42 

-2.72 

Seoul. 

• Composite Jndex 

598.60 ' 

895.96 

4038 

Taipei-. . ■; 

Stock Market index closed 

7,34088- 

- 


PS<= . 

3,39504-- 

3,398.89 

-0.08 

■Jakarta 

Comporitetoddx 

S8&86 

680.33 

+0.96 

Woffington 

N2SE-4Q . 

2^3036 

2.339.94 

-0.41 

Bombay." 

Sensitive Index. 

3*354,72 

3,377.63 

-0.68. 

Source; Tefefcurs 


lucmjiwnal Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• The European Commission voted to assess provisional 


anti-dumping duties of 392 percent on most handbags im- 
ported from China; the six-month measu 


measure must be approved 
by the Council of Ministers if it is to be extended. 

• Formosa Plastics Corp„ Taiwan's biggest conglomerate, 
said group pretax profit dropped 19 percent in 1996, to 283 
billion Taiwan dollars ($1.03 billion), amid lower prices for 
petrochemical products and higher costs for raw materials. 
Revenue rose 3 percent, ro 302.8 billion dollars. 

• Coles Myer Ltd., Australia 's biggest retailer, said sales rose 
5 percent, to 9.9 billion Australian dollars ($736 billion), in the 
six mouths ended Jan. 26. arelatively rare positive note from an 
industry that has been hit by a slump in consumer spending. 

• Intel Corp. plans a $600 million expansion project to 
increase output and broaden the product range at its factories 
in the Philippines. Tbe project will double Intel 's labor force 
in the country to 3.000 over the next three years. 

• President Fidel Ramos said the Philippine government 
would contest a Supreme Court decision that voided the sale of 


the five-star Manila Hotel to the Malaysian conglomerate 


Renong Bhd. The court ruled that the state-ownednotel was 
part of tiie national patrimony and should be sold to tbe losing 
bidder, Manila Prince Hotel Corp., a Philippine company. 
■ Fort Bonifacio Development Corp. said it would return 
28.4 billion Philippine pesos ($2. OS billion) to shareholders, 
including the government, over the next few months alter it 


completed a land sale. The transaction will help the gov- 
a budget surplus this year, as Manila owns 45 


eminent ^ 

percent of the company. 

• Toyota Motor Corp. said its Japanese plants should be back 
to nearly full production this weekend after a fire at its main 


brake-parts supplier. Aisin Seiki Co. Analysts estimated the 


fire had cost Toyota 20 billion yen ($164.3 million). Sep- 
arately. Japan rejected a U.S. request for deregulation of its 
brake-parts market AFP. AFX. AP. Bloomberg. Reuters 


beside him. A Wheat Thin wouldn’t be 
quite light in a chowder.” 

After tire news conference, Nabisco 
held a chowder lunch in Boston and 
similar events later in Gloucester, Mas- 
sachusetts, and Portland, giving away 
150 cases of crackers to people who had 
complained. The company also donated 
$3,000 to three New England historical 
societies. 

For the first time, tire crackers will be 
for sale outside New England, by the 
case only (12 boxes), by calling (800) 
NABISCO. They will be baked m Phil- 
adelphia, as they had been — same 
recipe, same brick-red box. Only their 
uses will change. 

“My daughter tikes them with brie 
and jelly,” Mrs. Damon said, “heated 
in tire microwave.” 


Goodyear and Sumitomo Sign Tire Deal 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Goodyear Tire & Rubber 
Co. has formed an alliance with Japan’s 
third-largest tiremaker, Sumitomo Rub- 
ber Industries Ltd., the companies said 
Wednesday. 

Goodyear, the top tiremaker in North 
America, will make Sumitomo Rubber 
tires at its factories in the United States, 
and Sumitomo will make tires for Good- 
year in Japan, a spokesman fra Sum- 
itomo Rubber said. * 

The spokesman said the plan would 
allow the two companies to make tires in 
the markets where they are selling them. 
Production quantities have not been de- 
cided yet. he said. 

Goodyear has less than a 1 percent 


share of Japan's tire market, according to 
Tire Shinpo, an industry newspaper. 
Sumitomo Rubber, which owns the 
Dunlop brand and says it is tbe fifth- 
largest tiremaker in the world, says its 
U.S. market share is in tire single digits. 

The alliance will not affect any of 
Goodyear or Sumitomo's operations in 
Europe, a spokesman fra a Sumitomo 
unit m Britain said. 

While the agreement is not “that big 
in itself." the Japanese stock market 
“might be impressed by a company like 
Sumitomo tying up with a well-known 
brand like Goodyear,” Joel Scbeiman, 
an analyst at ING Barings Securities 
(Japan) Ltd., said. 

itomo Rubber has trailed Bridge- 


stone Corp. in building its business in- 
ternationally, Mr. Scheiman said. Bridge- 
stone holds about half of the Japanese ore 
market, according to Toyo Keizai Incu a 
provider of financial information. 

Goodyear has sales offices in most 
Asian countries and makes tires in China, 
Taiwan. Thailand, Indonesia and Malay- 
sia, said Yoshi Shibusawa, marketing 
manager al Goodyear Japan Ltd. 

Separately, Goodyear posted a loss of 
$4082 million for tire fourth quarter, 
reveiring a profit of $146.4 million ayear 
earlier. Without an exceptional charge of 
$572 2 million to write down tire value of 
its oil pipeline and restructure some in- 
ternational operations, it would have had 
profit of $164 million. 


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World Roundup 


Bullets Fire Coach 

BASKETBALL Jim Lynam was 
fired as coach of ihe Washington 
Bullets on Wednesday following 
two blowout losses on its rood trip. 
Wes LJnseld, the general manager, 
said assistant coach Bob Staak 
would take over for the game 
against the Nuggets on Wednesday 
night in Denver. The Bullets had 
been expected to compete for the 
Atlantic Division title this year but 
have gone 22-24. They lost by 30 
points to the Los Angeles Lakers on 
Sunday and by 22 points to Utah on 
Monday. (AP) 

Tiger Feels the Heat 

golf Tiger Woods withdrew 
after 13 holes of the pre-tournament 
Pro-Am at the Asian Honda Classic 
in Bangkok on Wednesday, worn 
down by the heat, lack of sleep and 
food poisoning. Woods began his 
round at 1 1 A-M.. but the 33 degrees 
centigrade heat proved too much. 
He withdrew four hours later. 

Woods had arrived in his moth- 
er's homeland 12 hours earlier after 
a 20-hour flight from the Califor- 
nia, where he finished joint second 
at Pebble Beach on Sunday. 

Woods is expected to play 
Thursday in the first ftund of the 
tournament. He has reportedly re- 
ceived a $500,000 appearance fee 
for the event, which has a first-place 
check of $80,000. (AP. Reuters) 



Tiger Woods preparing for his 
abbreviated round in Bangkok. 

Dons Re-Sign Mitchell 

football The Detroit Lions re- 
signed quarterback Scott Mitchell 
to a deal reportedly worth $22 mil- 
lion over four years, including an 
$8 million signing bonus. {AP) 

NBA Champions for Paris 

basketball The McDonald's 
Championships, a six-team tourna- 
ment featuring this season's NBA 
champion, will be played in Paris 
from Oct. 16 to 18. the league and 
FIBA. the international basketball 
association, said Wednesday. 

The NBA winner will join the 
French champion, the top two 
teams in the EuroLeague. the South 
American champion and another 
team to be determined. (AP) 

Mesa Faces Rape Trial 

ba s eball Jose Mesa, a Clev- 
eland relief pitcher, will go on trial 
March 31 on charges that include 
rape, two days before the club opens 
the season at Oakland. 

Mesa is charged with rape, as- 
sault and other counts related to a 
complaint by two women he met at 
a nightclub Dec. 22. If convicted, 
he faces three to 10 years in prison 
on the rape charge and rwo to eight 
years on an assault charge. 

He set a record by converting 46 
of 48 save chances in 1995. (.AP) 


An Audacious Move 
By an Awful Team 


V. ' - 

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Karin Roten clearing a gate Wednesday In the first run of the World Championships slalom. She finished third. 

Compagnoni Wins World Slalom 


By Christopher Clarey 

Special to ike Herald Tribune 

SESTRIERE, Italy — While one 
Italian woman was covering her eyes 
with both gloves and leaping up and 
down in disbelief under the floodlights, 
another Italian woman prepared to rise 
to the occasion once again. 

Lara Magoni, the ecstatic Italian in 
the finish area, was perfectly content 
with any medal, but Deborah Com- 
pagnoni has made a habit of finishing 
first when it counts the most. And it had 
seldom mattered more to her than on 
Wednesday night with the World 
Championships in her own country for 
the first and probably only lime in her 
injury- and medal-riddled career. 

She had finished second in the open- 
ing run of the women’s slalom. And 
now, after four of her challengers — 
including Pemilia Wiberg of Sweden 
and Claudia Riegler of New Zealand — 
had missed gales and failed to Finish 
their second runs, Compagnoni leaped 
out of the start 

She, too, flirted with disaster near the 
top of the course, nearly missing a gate, 
but after that, she was as smooth a biend 
of power and finesse as capuccino is of 


coffee and cream. When she reached the 
bottom, she led Magoni by a whopping 
1.27 seconds with an aggregate time of 
one minute. 43.88 seconds. 

All that stood between Compagnoni 
and another major title to go with her two 
Olympic golds and one world cham- 
pionship gold was Karin Roten. the 21- 
year-old first-run leader from Switzer- 
land. Roten, a talented junior skier, has 
sometimes been called "the next Vreni" 
in her small, ski-mad nation. 

But Vreni Schneider at her best never 
failed to finish four consecutive slalom 
races as Roten did coming into the 
world championships. Roten would fin- 
ish this one. but she skied as if all too 
aware of the slakes. 

Compagnoni's line had been direct, 
reminiscent of her more flamboyant Itali- 
an contemporary Alberto Tomba. Ro- 
len’s line was less certain and when her 
time of 1:45.48 flashed on the score- 
board. she was third behind the Italians, 
which meant that the several thousand 
fans watching the first women's night 
race in World Championship history 
were suddenly making a lot of noise. 

“It feels great to win here in Italy.” 
Compagnoni said. “And it’s great to do 
well as a team because we are more than 


Big Clubs Fall in English Cup 


CongaMfo OurSufFnm Papak*n 

LONDON — For the first time in 22 
years, the FA Cup final at Wembley in 
May will not include one of English 
soccer's Big Five. 

Manchester United, the cup holder, 
and Arsenal, a six-time winner, were 

Soccer Roundup 

both knocked out Tuesday to complete 
the wipeout of top clubs. 

The other three members of the mod- 
em elite — Liverpool, Tottenham and 
Everton — were eliminated earlier, as 
was Newcastle United. 

The last time an FA Cup final did not 
include one of the five was in 1975, 
when West Ham beat Fulham 2-0. 

Since 1975, Manchester United has 
appeared in nine Cup finals, Liverpool 
in six. Everton in five and Arsenal and 
Tottenham in four each. In that period. 


United won the cup six times, Liverpool 
and Tottenham three times each, and 
Arsenal and Everton twice each. 

The streak ended when Wimbledon 
toppled Manchester United 1 -0. and Ar- 
senal lost 1 -0 at home to Leeds. 

Wimbledon's Marcus Gayle scored on 
a header in the 64th minute. United goal- 
keeper Peter Schmeichel, venturing up- 
field in the final minute, put the ball in the 
net with a spectacular overhead flick, a 
play ruled offside. The last time United 
failed to reach the FA Cup final was in 
1993. It won the league that year. 

Spain Atletico Madrid, the Spanish 
Cup holder, sealed a quarterfinal place 
in the Spanish Cup after scoring three 
times in the opening 20 minutes of its 
fourth round, second leg at Compostela. 
Atletico won 3-2, to add to a 2-0 victory 
in the first leg. with goals from Juan 
Lopez, Kiko Narvaez and Leonardo 
Biagini. (AP. Reuters) 



REAL-TIME INFORMATION FROM 
THE PARIS STOCK EXCHANGE. 

People make decisions every day. They need the most reliable 
source of information available. 

In France, they read Les Echos, France's leading newspaper. 

Les Echos is now accessible vio the net, offering preferential 
access to the Paris Stock Exchange. 

http:Awww.lesechos.com 



teammates, we are friends." 

She and Magoni often have been part- 
ners in pain, as well. Both have had to 
overcome major injuries, but Com- 
pagnoni ’s medical report is arguably the 
lengthiest on the World Cup circuit. She 
has had at least two operations on both 
knees and suffered from peritonitis and 
kidney infections. At the 1 992 Olympics 
in Albertville, she won gold in the Super 
G only to wreck her left knee in her next 
Olympic race, the giant slalom. 

But she bounced back to win that 
event at the 1 994 Olympics and then won 
it again at last year's world champi- 
onships in Sierra Nevada, where she. 
Tomba and the speed skier Isolde Kost- 
ner led Italy to its best finish ever at a 
world championship. Until this year, 
Compagnoni had never won a race in 
Italy, but she has now taken care of that 
unfinished business. And she could well 
win the giam slalom in Italy on Sunday. 

Magoni, a slalom specialist who had 
never finished in the top three in a World 
Cup race until this January, lives in the 
same village, Selvino. as Paoletta Mag- 
oni. who became the first Italian women 
to win Olympic gold medal in alpine 
skiing by winning the slalom in 1984. 
But though many automatically assume 
thai Lara is Paoletta’s younger sister, 
they are not related. 

Plenty of Lara's relations were on 
hand Wednesday night, however, in- 
cluding her mother, "who led a dele- 
gation 130-strong from her home in the 
province of Bergamo. 


Scoreboard 


By George Vecsey 

Ne w York Time* Service 

HEMPSTEAD, New York — The 
New York Jets had better hope their 
contract lawyers are superior to their 
guards and their tackles. This reeling 
franchise took an audacious step Tuesday 
in trying to hire Bill Parcells as a "con- 
sultant" without ever getting the ap- 
proval of the National Football League. 

This is a league that does not like 350- 
pound brutes walking around with their 
shirts out. Imagine what league officials 
might think about a football team hiring 
a man that is contractually barred from 
coaching next season. 

The league put out a terse statement 
that said the Jets "were neither denied 
nor given permission to make a con- 
sulting agreement with Parcells for 
1997.” Not exactly a ringing endorse- 
ment of the move by the Jets' owner, 
Leon Hess, and the team's president. 
Steve Gutman. 

"If asked to review die agreement 
between the Jets and Parcells as it may 
affect die Patriots’ contract rights for 
1997. the commissioner would review 
the matter, including holding a hearing 
if necessary.” the league said. 

With this two-paragraph missive, the 
NFL was virtually grading the Patriots' 
owner. Robert Kraft, into requesting 
just such a hearing. 

Up to now, Kraft has been merely 
holding out for the Jets' top draft choice 
in compensation for Parcel Is. Or maybe. 
Kraft mused, he would take Keyshawn 
Johnson off the Jets' hands. The Jets 
might have squawked that Kraft was 
"tampering,” but that would have been 
a massive exercise in chutzpah, given 
their own machinations. 

On Tuesday the Jets installed Bill 
Belichick. a good football man. as head 
coach for one year at most. After that. 
Belichick would revert to being a trus- 
ted assistant to Parcells. with whom he 
goes back 17 years. The issue here is not 
Belichick's loyalty or honesty bur rather 
the appearance of a deal that pays Par- 
cells to "consult” the Jets. 

Parcells would have an office at the 
Jets' bunker, would be present at games. 


would be privy ro personnel decisions, 
but would not attend practices or be on 
the sideline for games. 

Asked whether he had cleared this, 
little matter with the league. Gurman 
was downright stuffy. Football ques-. 
tions only, he said. Let him try that with 
a flotilla of league lawyers and Kraft 
lawyers who just might be asking ques- 
tions about this bizarre arrangement. .: 

Why would Kraft now stop and wish 
Bill Parcells good luek in his new and 
fascinating career? By nature. Bill Par- 
cells is not a consultant. A consultant- 
makes a report and closes the attache - 
case and goes home and lets somebody, 
else make the decisions. Consultants do 
not have responsibility. Parcells has 
walked out on teams because he could 
not get enough power. 

Bv nature. Bill Parcells is a football 
coach. He makes game plans, and he. 
expects them to be carried out. He walks 
up to very large men in locker rooms and- - 
he says in a very loud voice. "Better not . 
do that again!” 

If Leon Hess and Steve Gutman think, 
they can hide and restrain the natural 
inclinations of Bill Parcells, good luck 
to them. 

This arrangement puts a lot of people;, 
on the spot, starting with Belichick. who 
sounded sincere Tuesday in saying that 
he was with the Jets for the long run. that 
coaching is a group operation and that 
he had no ego problem in reverting to. 
being Parcells* assistant. 

Belichick was a head coach in Clev,. 
eland before that historic franchise was 
moved to Baltimore. He can handle 
himself. But the Jets' stratagem forces 
die new head coach to play down hi.s~ 
relationship with Parcells. Even if Par- 
cells is cleared by the league as a “con-_~ 
sultant," Belichick cannot readily 
identify Parcells as the source of an idea.'- 
a play or a personnel decision. 

Tlie first player to be cut or traded ' 
from the Jets just might say to the news 
media or to his next team that Parcells is 
running the whole show, even if it is 
patently untrue. 

The Jets have gone from a 1 - 1 5 record 
last season to a strange new game plan. 
Do you suppose they used a consultant?; 


Football Giants’ Star of ’30s Dies 


By Bill Brink 

New York Times Senice 

NEW YORK — Ed Danowski, 85, 
who led the New York Giants to two 
National Football League titles in 1934 
and 1938, died Saturday in East 
Patchogue, New York, from complic- 
ations of Alzheimer’s disease. 

In the single-wring formation popular 
in the J930s, the halfback was the 
primary passer. Danowski. the half- 
back, led the Giants in passing from 
1 935 through 1 939 and led the league in 
that category in 1935 and 1938. 

In his first professional season he 
helped the Giants win the 1934 league 
championship in the "Sneakers Game” 
that still endures as one of the most 
famous Giants games. 


The game against the Chicago Bears 
was played Dec. 9. 1934, on a frozen 
field at the Polo Grounds in upper Man-/ 
hattan. 

Trailing by 10-3 at halftime and un- . 
able to get good traction with their 
cleats, the Giants sent an equipmeni- 
man to Manhattan College to get some 
sneakers. Many of the Giam players 
changed into them, and they rallied to 
beat the Bears, 30-13. with Danowski 
running for one touchdown and throw- 
ing for another in the second half. 

Danowski starred at Fordham Uni- 
versity from 1930 to 1934. 

After his Giants career, he joined the. 
navy, then returned to Fordham to serve 
as head football coach from 1946 to 
1954, when the university dropped foot- 
ball. 


j BASKETBALL 1 

uttiHreimiD 

ATLANTIC DTVrSJON 

ia 



W 

L 

Pd 

GB 

Miami 

34 

12 

J39 



New York 

33 

14 

.702 

IVi 

Ortondo 

23 

20 

535 

9*5 

Washington 

22 

24 

.478 

12 

New Jersey 

13 

32 

589 

20W 

Boston 

11 

33 

550 

22 

Ph9adelphra 

n 

34 

544 

22tt 


CENTRAL DIVISKM 



Chicago 

42 

5 

594 

— 

Detroll 

33 

12 

733 

8 

Atlanta 

31 

14 

589 

10 

Charlotte 

28 

19 

596 

14 

Ctevekmd 

2S 

21 

543 

16V. 

Indiana 

22 

23 

-489 

19 

Milwaukee 

21 

25 

.657 

205 

Toronto 16 

29 

556 

25 

IBDWEST DIVtSION 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Utah 

32 

14 

596 



Houston 

32 

IS 

581 

•A 

Minnesota 

22 

2S 

-466 

»0» 

Dal las 

16 

28 

564 

15 

Denver 

15 

32 

519 

irA 

San Antonio 

11 

32 

5S6 

19'A 

Vancouver 

9 

41 

.180 

25 


PACT PIC DIVISION 



LA. Lakera 

34 

13 

723 

— 

Seattle 

32 

H 

596 

l'A 

Portland 

25 

23 

521 

9'A 

Sacramento 

21 

27 

538 

13'6 

L-A.CBppers 

19 

25 

532 

13V, 

Golden 5 lute 

17 

29 

-37D 

1616 

Phoenix 

la 

31 

540 

IB 


SeScofy B-10 6-9 22. Grant M2 2-3 IB. 
Rebormds— Indiana 49 (AJJovtt 13). Orlando 
49 (Se&afy II). Assists— intern 24 {Best 7), 
SS Oriando 29 (Homo w a y 91. 

Minnesota 26 15 34 26—101 

“ CMplk 23 36 29 27—115 

__ „ M:G*»9nolta 11-22 13-1435. Gomeft 6-183- 

Pd GB 3 TSCCuiTy] 1-16 4-4 30, Rice 9-20 44 24. 

— Mason 10-21 4-6 24. Rebounds— Mlnnescto 
■2“ J-7 42 (Garrett 10), Charlotte 47 (Mason IS). 

Assists— Minnesota 23 (Porter lOI.OwrWta 
I* 32 (Dtvoc IQ. 

Howtos 27 22 16 30-95 

“ HewYorB 25 21 25 28—99 

.244 zz x, HrOoJvston 10-176-626, EBe 7-11 S-5 22; 

N.Yj Houston 9-16 8-8 2 & Oakley 8-14 08 
~ 16-Rebooods — Houston 45 (W1HIS 14], New 

* York 45 (Ooktey 10). AssMs-Houston 24 
■*2 2“ (E*e 7), New York 22 (Johnson 6). 

f™ Jf, OevcteU 17 24 24 14—79 

In NUhntota* 17 12 29 26-78 

iS O Brandon 10-21 3-4 2% WB 5-86-11 16M: 

■JC 2 Perry 6-12 85 16. Anon 3-10 7-8 

■f* 25 iSJteboands— Oevekmd 47 (HO 101. 

a Mtwavfcee 39 (Br&Er 9). Assists— Oeve&md 

18 (Sura 5). Milwaukee 10 (Robinson 4). 

™ S ccnm e rO O 22 25 23 26— 96 

— Dallas 33 24 23 24—104 

, ■* 5; Ric hm ond 7-14 14-14 31. Abdut-ftouf 6- 

1844 18; D: Cassell 7-734 20, McOoud4-12 
It,, 3-4 1 7. Rebounds— Soqnnnerrto 39 (Polyirioe 
■""I 8J, Dcte s 46 (McCloud 9). 

" I:* Assists— Socmmento 19 (Richmond 51 

• l0U 25 Dallas 22 (Cassell 6). 

^ adage 25 21 14 28- 88 

•S 7, **■»»■* 30 19 IS 20-84 

l" C: Jordan 15-305-5 36. Plffpen 7-16 5-1 121; 
“*• P: Rider 6-15 5-7 19, Trent 8-11 2-4 la 

2i? Anderson 4-18 7-10 18. Rebomds-Chkogo 
■f” 45 <*PP=n «• PdrthBd 56 (Dudley 15). 

■Sr Assists— Chfoogo 18 (Kukoc Si. Portland 13 

f 40 18 (Anderson 4). 

„ - * „ ULLokers 28 IS 28 15-86 

“ “ 5 « LA. cupper* 21 29 32 26-168 

24 36 LA. LAKERS: Canpbel 8-14 4-4 2a Vbn 


» G-S- Sprewefl 8-18 3-4 2a J -Smith 7-150- 
0 1 4. Retooands— Atlanta 52 (Loettner B), 
Golden State 47 (Sprewe* 10). 
Assists— Atlanta 25 (Btaytoek 6). Golden 
State 27 (Spread! 8). 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standings 


ahjwtc omsuN 


V: Peeler 13-28 8-8 4a Abdur-RaWm 9-17 E*e)6-177-B2ftLA.CUPPERS:RoBerslO- 

6-724; NJjWtBes 10-209-1232,011 7-2010- 16 AS 24,VaughMft-ll 2-2 22, Sea* 7-144-4 


12 25. Rehoands— VDncouser 50 (Abdur- 


Lakon 42 (Knight), Los 


RaMm 11), Now Jersey 70 (Bradfey 161. Angeles 59 (Rogers 14). AX4isK— LA 


Assists— Vancouver 27 (Anthony 10), Near Lottos 15 ( 
Jersey 22 (Reeves Q. Angeles 21 (I 

IntfloM 28 21 19 19- 87 Attaota 

Olios do 26 29 29 27—111 Getdeo State 

LMHter6-l7 4-»ia,A_Da»fs7-UM14.-0: A:S5mltti' 


Lateen 15 (CampteG Von Exel 4), Las 
Angelas 21 (Rogers. Outlaw 6). 

Attaota 30 26 22 29—107 

Getdeo Stale 26 13 22 30— 85 

A: LSmUh 14-20 5636, Laettner 10-17 3-3 



w 

L 

T 

Pts 

81 

•a 

GA 

PhBadeiphia 

29 

15 

8 

66 

162 

127 

rwnaa 

26 

15 11 

63 

149 

120 

N.Y. Rangers 

26 

21 

7 

59 

184 

150 

New Jersey 

24 

17 

a 

56 

129 

123 

Washington 

21 

25 

6 

48 

136 

14) 

Tampa Bay 

19 

25 

6 

44 

139 

156 

N.Y. Mandere 

17 

26 

9 

43 

141 

152 

NOrmcAST DWtSWN 




W 

L 

T 

PTS 

GF 

GA 

Pittsburgh 

29 

18 

5 

63 

194 

159 

Buffalo 

27 

19 

7 

61 

151 

136 

Morrtreol 

19 

25 10 

48 

168 

189 

Hartford 

20 

23 

7 

47 

146 

163 

Boston 

20 

26 

6 

46 

150 

179 

Ottawa 

18 

23 

10 

46 

142 

151 

WUVUN6 

iownima 


CBVTRAL DMSreN 




W 

L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Dates 

29 

19 

4 

62 

157 

127 

Detrod 

24 

17 10 

58 

153 

116 

SL Louis 

25 

24 

5 

55 

151 

166 

Phoenix 

72 

26 

4 

48 

140 

163 

CMcogo 

20 

26 

8 

48 

137 

143 

Toronto 

19 

33 

1 

39 

150 

188 

PAcmc revtsiON 




W 

L 

T 

Pis 

GF 

GA 

Coloredo 

32 

13 

8 

72 

182 

124 

Edmonton 

25 

22 

5 

55 

164 

151 

Vancouver 

24 

26 

2 

50 

165 

176 

Anaheim 

20 

26 

6 

46 

149 

159 

Crdgary 

19 

27 

6 

44 

131 

154 

Los Angeles 

19 

28 

6 

44 

144 

183 

San joss 

19 

27 

5 

43 

134 

142 

nUMPSIUIITI 



Olfuwu 




1 

2 ' 

1—4 


Buffalo 0 1 0 0—1 

Ptrflodelptdo 0 0 1 0—1 

First P e r io d . None. Second Period: B- 
A udette 16 (Zhttitt. SmeMM (pp). ThMI 
Period: P-Otto 9 (Podefn, Petit) Overtone: 
None. Shots on gaol: B- 85-8-3—23. P-4-18. 
8-1— 29. Gaafles: B-Hasek. P-Snow. 

SL Louis 0 8 1 6— T 

Detroit 1 « o 0— I 

Ftost Period: D-Udsmm 9 (Yiermaru 
Lapointe) (pp). second Period: None. Third 
Period: S.L-Campben 16. Owrllne: None. 
Starts on goat: S.L- 4-10-11-2-27. D- 12-6-7- 
1 —26. Goalies: ILL-Fuhr. D- Vernon. 

Tampa Bay 2 0 0—2 

Phoenix o o o— 0 

First Period: T-Grnlton 18 (Zamuneri 
Yseboert). Z T-WiemerS (Ysetawt Grattan) 
Second Period: None. Third Period: None. 
Stmts an goat: T- 6-4-9—19. Phoenix 9-7- 
5-21. Geafies: T-To&arocd Phoetri^ 
KhabttHiBn. 


CRICKET 


INDIA TOOK 

TRuurouuur semES 
SOUTH AFRICA VS. INDIA 
TUESDAY, n EAST LOKOOH. SOUTH AFRICA 
India: 232-5 Innings closed ~ 

South Africa: 236-4 In 49 2 oven 
Saulh Africa wan by six irickets. 



* |f|!li('ll\ • 
iliiiii I) i 


} • JL 


I V 

■4 ^*-1 


Living in the U.S.? 

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for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

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llcralo^^^enbun c 

THE TOKLirS PXliy NEWSBLPEB 


bosm 1 1 

rh st Period: B-Bourque 11 (Oates) (pp). 2. 
O-Zhotfok 7 (Dotpte Qnmeyw ort h) (pp). 
Second Period: B-Oonoto 18 (Richter, 
Bourque) < O-Charske 6 (ZhaMk) 5 O- 
Ommlce 7 (Redden. York) (pp). Third Period: 
B-Dcnata 19 (Rtaaer, Harkins) (pp). 7. O- 
Dockeil 9 (Yashin. McEadrem) (pp). Shots 
an goat O- 6-19-12—37. B- 9-6-7—22. 
G o eic s: O-Tugwtt. B-Tollns. 

voKaner 2 I j 4 

PStthBS* 2 2 2—6 

FUH Period: P-Bames 13 (Nedved. 
Kasparattta) (pp) 2. V-Lumme 6 (Mogflny, 
nottorts) 3. P-Odedxic 6 ( Barnes) a. v- 
SllBnger 15 (Courtnall) Second Parted: P- 
Jagr43(W0oUey}6, P-AAuUen 3 (Kasparaitlx 
Barms) 7. V-, Roberts 9 (Ridley. Babydi) 
TMrd Period: V-simngar 16 (Lumme. 
Unden) Oh). 9, P-Frands 20 (Jagr, woaBey) 
la P-l«i!0iix37 (Fftmds. Jogri (on). Shot* 

an gorrt: V- 13-8-9—30. P- 10-9-8-27. 
Gnadns: V-McLean. P-LoSme. 

AttahtaO 1 1 1 2 

H.Y. Isfa mten . , j , 

• Hr»t Period; A-Morstwfl 1 gomphe, 
toRngortner) Sncnnd Parted: A-Kortyq 23 
««crt 3, New York. Andersson 6 
Ootfwnoe) (ppl. 4. New Vort. Potffy 31 
(Barent s mofttth fl Ttarn Period: New York. 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 








Chi' Pusi Un/The A..'«cutaJ Ku 


SPORTS 


Limping Lakers Fall to Clippers 


Cc^MhyChrS^Fnwmrk^arfirj 

The Los Angeles Lakers played the 
Loj Angeles Clippers without Sftaquilfe 
0 Neal and Byron Scon, who were side- 
lined with knee injuries, and looked woe- 
fully inadequate, 

Die Clippers handed the Lakere their 
• first loss in seven games, 108-86, Tues- 

NBA Roundup 


day night before a sellout crowd at the 
Pond of Anaheim. 

‘ ‘I have no excuses.’ ’ said the Lakers* 
“ { coach, Del Harris. * ‘They outplayed us 

j it’s that simple." 

ti ^ The Clippers made 12 consecutive 
' Ashots in the third quarter and handed the 

Lakere their second-woret defeat of the 

season. Playing their second game of die 

season without O’Neal, the Lakere were 
defenseless in the middle, as the Clippers 

omscored them, 54-40. in the paint. 

The Clippers also kept the Lakere’ 
guard Eddie Jones in check, Jones missed 
9 of 10 shots and scored five points in 29 
wr- minutes as the Lakere shot 35 percent, 
: 3p*£ their second-lowest field-goal percentage 

k. of the season. 

£ ; The Clippers' forward Rodney Ro- 

, gers had 24 points, a season-high 14 

‘ rebounds and six assists. 

i ‘ Bull* 08, Ttafl Blazara 84 Michael 
Jordan outscored Portland, 22-20, in the 

a 

shed 

_ of the 

Bulls' points in the final quarter and 
assisted on one of the other two baskets. 
His two free throws put Chicago ahead 
for good, 84-82, with 53 seconds re- 
maining, and he made two more from 
the line with 5.8 seconds left to clinch 
the victory. 

■ Horna ta its, Tnbeiwolves loi Dell 
Curry and Anthony Mason helped Char- 
lotte overcome a rare off night by Glen 
Rice. Curry scored 30 points and Mason 
had 24 points and IS rebounds as the 
Hornets won for the 10th time in 13 
games. Rice, who averaged 32.6 points 
in his previous 1 8 games, was held to 24 


Rodman Reinstated by NBA 


By Mark Asher 

Washington Pan Service 


Dennis Rodman, the suspended 
Chicago Bulls forward, has been re- 
instated by the National Basketball 
Association and will return for the 
team's first game after this weekend’s 
ell-star break. Tuesday against the 
Charlotte Hornets, the league com- 
missi oner, David Stem, announced. 

Stem warned Rodman last Friday 

in New York that any s imilar ipniHpnr 
could end his NBA career, according 
to Rodman’s agent and the executive 
director of the players union, who 
attended the meeting. 

Rodman was suspended a minim- 
um of 1 1 games far kicking a coun- 
side television cameraman in a game 
at Minnesota on Jan. IS, costing him 
more than Sl million and a reported 


$200,000 in an out-of-court settle- 
ment with the cameraman, Eugene 
Amos of Minneapolis. 

Rodman’s annual salary is $9 mil- 
lion. He announced Tuesday night 
that he would donate his salary for his 
first 11 games back after his sus- 
pension — about $845,000 — to char- 
ity. 

“It’s a first," said Rodman’s 
agent. Dwight Manley. “Whereas 
sports is so wrapped up in money aD 
the time, he wants to make a statement 
that Dennis Rodman plays from his 
heart and not from his wallet, and he’s 
out there with one intention, and 
mat’s to win.” 

lit addition to the suspension. Stem 
ordered Rodman to undergo counsel- 
ing and fined him $25,000, the max- 
imum allowed under die league’s labor 
agreement with the players union. 


on 9 -of -20 shooting. Tom Gugliotta led 
Minnesota with 35 points. 

ifagkr i i 1 , tews 8T In Orlando. Rony 
Seikaly scored 22 points, and the Magic 
shut down Reggie MiBer in the last three 
quarters. Miller led Indiana with 18 
points, but missed 1 1 of 17 shots and only 
scored seven after a productive opening 
quarter. 

Whrt»iil,GriTrtini los Kerry Kittles, a 
rookie, had a career-high 32 points as 
New Jersey defeated visiting Vancouver 
despite a 40-point effort by me Grizzlies’ 
Anthony Peeler. Kendall Gill added 25 
points, and Shawn Bradley had 16 points 
and a season-high 16 rebounds for the 
Nets, who learned before the game that 
their rebounding ace, Jayson Williams, 
will require thumb surgery that will side- 
line him for at least two months. 

Kiridn 99b Rockets 96 Allan Houston 
scored 17 of his 28 points in the fourth 
quarter, as New Yorknanded the Rockets 


their fifth straight loss. Houston’s 
Charles Barkley and New York's Patrick 
Ewing didn’t play because of injuries. 

Mowrtrlri 104, King* 96 In Dallas. 
Sam Cassell was 7-far-7 from the field 
and scored 20 points for the Mavericks. 
George McCloud, filling in for riling 
Jamal Mashbum, added 17 points ana 
nine rebounds for Dallas. 

Cawalterm 76b Buck* 78 Terrell 

Brandon scored 23 points, including an 
18-footer with three seconds left that 
lifted Cleveland over the Bucks in Mil- 
waukee. Elliot Peny missed two free 
throws with .18 seconds left and the 
Bucks clinging to a 78-77 lead. 

Hawks 107, Warrior* 85 Steve Smith 
scored 36 points, and Christian Laetmer 
had 23, as visiting Atlanta hanrinri 
Golden State its fourth consecutive 
blowout loss in San Jose. Mookie Blay- 
lock scored 19 points for the Hawks, 
who have won 15 of 18. (LAT, AP) 


The Clippers’ Darrick Martin, right, making a move on the Lakers* 
Nick Van Exel during a game in Anaheim won by the Clippers, 108-86. 


PAGE 19 


Baseball Calls 
For Peace Pact 
With Umpires 


By Murray Chass 

New York Times Service 

PALM BEACH, Florida — In a six- 
hour meeting that was attended by more 
lawyers than umpires or players, people 
on all sides of the incendiary issue of on- 
field relations between players and um- 
pires and off-field actions by the league 
presidents pledged to woik toward a 
more harmonious relationship. 

The group of 27 people who met 
Tuesday derided to form a smaller 
group of about eight, who would try to 
solve the problems that nearly resulted 
in an umpires’ boycott of last year's 
postseason games. 

Perhaps the most telling sign that the 
matters are being approached seriously 
is that the usually verbose Richie Phil- 
lips. the umpires' lawyer, had little to 
say afterward. Phillips joined Bud Selig. 
the acting commissioner, in a no-ques- 
tions news conference , and left the room 
after Selig read a brief statement. 

The reality remained that the umpires 
and the players will probably be work- 
ing. on at leasi some critical issues, at 
cross purposes. 

For example, following the Roberto 
Alomar spitting incident last Septem- 
ber. which triggered this meeting, the 
umpires want the league presidents to 
abolish the routine stay of player sus- 
pensions pending appeal. The' players 
would oppose such a change. 

Brian McRae of the Chicago Cubs, 
who joined David Cone of the Yankees 
as the only active players at the meeting, 
put the issue in perspective from the 
players' standpoint. 

"They may work out a way to speed 
up the process, but you can't take a 
person’s rights away," he said. "You 
can’t be convicted of something without 
having that appeal. That is set up to 
protect guys’ rights." 


Lemieux Gets 600th Goal 
To Join 6 of NHL’s Elite 


The Associated Press 

• Mario Lemieux became only die sev- 
enth player in the National Hockey 
League to score 600 goals when be 
capped a Pittsburgh Penguins’ victory 
over the Vancouver Canucks. 6-4. 

. “It’s nice to see No. 66 get No. 600,” 
the Penguins* coach, Eddie Johnston, 
said after the game Tuesday night 
“Tha’s terrific." 

Lemieux joined Wayne Gretzky, 
Gordie Howe. Marcel Dionne, Phil Es- 
posito. Mike Gartner and Bobby Hull as 

NHL Roundup 


S' 


■ i it i uift j 

. j I the only players in NHL history with 
if f'ftlttl F 600 goals. Lemieux, who has 859 as- 
sists, also joined Gretzky, Howe, Di- 
■f } , ’ onne and Esposito as the only players 

f » i : (•' with 600 goals and 800 assists. 

Lemieux scored his historic goal into 
an empty net in the final minute. 
Lemieux accomplished the fear in his 
719th game — only one more than it 
took Gretzky to do it. 

• The fans at the Pittsburgh Civic Cen- 
ter chanted “Mar-i-o. Mar-i-o. Mar-i- 
o,” gave him a standing ovation and 
showered him with hats. 

’ “It was great. That’s why 1 wanted to 


tile fans.” Lemieux sric 

Joe Mullen also moved closer to a 
scoring milestone with his 498th career 
goal as Pittsburgh improved to 17-5-"3 at 
home. Mullen needs two more to be- 
come the first U.S.-bom player to score 
500 goals. 

Mike Sillinger scored twice for the 
Canucks. 

Mm* 1, R*d Wings 1 Meanwhile, 
Scotty Bowman, Detroit’s coach, is still 
waiting to reach his 1,000th victory. 
Bowman remained at 999 regular-sea- 
son victories after the Red Wings tied 
St. Louis in Detroit. Jim Campbell, a Sl 
L ouus rookie, scored at S:1S of the third 
period to deny Bowman the victory. No 
coach m NHL history has recorded 
1,000 victories, 

Ryan, 1, Sabm 1 In Philadelphia, 
Jod Otto scored with 1:55 remaining to 
give the Flyers a tie with Buffalo. Don- 
ald Audette scored the Sabres’ only goal 
during a second-period power play. 
Garth Snow stopped 22 shots, including 
Bob Boughner’s breakaway effort with 
5:53 remaining. 

senator* 4, Brain* 3 Andreas Dackell 
scored Ottawa’s third power-play goal, 
breaking a tie with 6:44 left, as the 



Hall of Farriers 1966 Victory Lingers 


By Ira Berkow 

h/ex’ York Times Service 


SncGM/toln 

Mario Lenrieux's milestone goal 
helped Pittsburgh to a 6-4 victory. 

Senators extended their unbeaten road 
streak to four games. 

latmndar* 4, Ifigfaty Ducks 3 Derek 

Armstrong’s goal with 6:48 left gave 
New York a victory over visiting Ana- 
heim. The Islanders also got goals from 
Niki as Andersson, Zigmund Palffy and 
Derek King as they wot their third 
straight at home. 

lightning 2 , Coyote* o Chris Grattan 
scared 17 seconds into the game, and 
Tampa Bay snapped a three-game los- 
ing streak on the road. 


N EW YORK — He remembers 
coaches from some other col- 
leges in 1966 asking him, "Don't 
you have a quota at your school?" 

“No,” said Don Haskins, the bas- 
ketball coach at what was then called 
Texas Western, in El Paso. “No one I 
work for has ever mentioned it.” 

The question arose from some op- 
ponents because, while numerous 
schools might start one, two and even 
three black players, no one on the 
highest levels was regularly starting 
five. Except Haskins, the broad, beefy 
coach who, now gray-haired, is still 
known as the Bear. 

”1 was a young guy then — 35 years 
old — and I guess I really didn't give 
much thought to it,” he said Tuesday at a 
news conference in New York for him 
and the six other new electees to the 
Basketball Hall of Fame. 

'‘And 1 didn’t give a lot of thought to 
it before we played Kentucky for the 
national championship, either. I Just 
thought about beating them. I dfdn't 
really know until after the ^a me and I 
got bushels full of hate mail how im- 
portant that game was.” 

And that game 31 years ago on the 
University of Maryland campus became 
a landmark event for basketball in the 


United Stales and, many believe, for so- 
cial change. 

Texas Western, with five black starters 
and its first and only two substitutes in the 
game also being black, played the all- 
white Kentucky basketball team, which 
was coached by the legendary Adolph 
Rupp, who had never had a black player 
on his team. It was the last time dial an 
all-white school played for the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association basket- 
ball championship. 

Favored Kentucky took an early lead, 
but Texas Western’s 5-foot-9-inch 
(1.78-meter) guard, Bobby Joe Hill, 
stole the ball on two successive plays 
and scored lay-ups, and Kentucky never 
again led in the game, losing. 72-65. 

“Coach Rupp was cool to me after 
the game,” Haskins remembered. Rupp 
did not come into the Miners' locker 
room to congratulate the team. 

Haskins recalled how disparaging 
people were about those players, many 
recruited from the inner cities of Chica- 
go, Detroit and New York. 

“Well, 10 of the 12 players on the 
team got their degrees , ' ’ he said. “ And 
every one of the players have made 
successes of tbeir lives. ’ ’ 

He said that one of the terrible letters 
he received was from a professor at the 
University of Alabama. 

“He said his school would never let 
anything like all those — ‘n’ word — 


play there,” Haskins said. “But three or 
four years later, I remember playing 
Alabama in a tournament and 1 counted 
10 of its 12 players being black.” 

Barriers had begun to break down, 
and more and more blacks were allowed 
to play for big-time basketball universit- 
ies. A few years after the Texas Western 
game. Rupp, too, recruited his first 
black player. 

Eventually, blacks became head 
coaches at some of those schools, in- 
cluding Nolan Richardson, who played 
for Haskins and coached his own NCAA 
championship team. Arkansas, in 1994. 

One of those who sent a letter of 
recommendation for Haskins's election 
to the HalJ of Fame was Pat Riley, the 
Miami Heai's coach, who starred for 
that 1966 Kentucky ream. 

Though Haskins had triple-bypass 
heart surgery last year, be has returned 
to coaching, at age 65, his 36th year at 
what is now known as the University of 
Texas at El Paso. And while he has a 
victory record of 687-322 in Division I 
and has been to the NCAA tournament 
24 times, he will always be remembered 
for that historic 1966 title team. 

“He opened doors that may not have 
opened had he not stepped in and done 
wbat he did. "Richardson said “He had 
guts." 

’ ’All I did was play my best people,” 
Haskins said. “It was that simple." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATURDAY-SUNPAlf, TEBRHAKO-2, !997 





PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL WEftAT.n TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


White House Anon 


W ASHINGTON — It 
isn't too early for the 
book publishers to arrive in 
Washington and start signing 
contracts with people they 
think are going to screw up in 
the next four years. Mellow 
Books sent down their pres- 
ident. Mike Gluckman, 
known as “The 
Vacuum Clean- 
er of Capitol 
Dirt.” He told 
me he was 



Buchwald 


nervous m case 
every worth- 
while scoundrel 
had already 

been optioned. 

“In the first 
few weeks?" I gasped. 

Gluckman said, “There's 
tremendous demand for tell- 
all books, and if we don't sign 
agreements with loyal admin- 
istration people early in the 
game they'll wind up sleep- 
ing with the enemy.*’ 


the White House who would 
be willing to spill the beans on 
the president?" 

"I haven't found anybody 
in the same class as Dick Mor- 
ris. But I have just signed a 
contract with one staffer who's 
recording everything Hillary 
says under her hair dryer.” 
“Thar’s good stuff." I told 
him. 

“It better be — it cost me $3 
million in an advance. Some 
political turncoats sound good 
at first, but when it comes to 
gelling it on paper they can 
barely read or write.” 

“That must be disappoint- 
ing.” 


□ 


□ 

“Speaking of 


sleeping 
with the enemy, have you 
talked to many people inside 


Ronnie Scott's Death 


Blamed on Drugs 

Reuters 


LONDON — Ronnie 
Scott, the saxophonist whose 
London club became a mecca 
for jazz musicians, died of a 
drug overdose, a British cor- 
oner ruled Wednesday. 

Scott was found dead at his 
London home on Dec. 23, at 
age 69. Coroner Paul Knap- 
man recorded a verdict of 
misadventure, saying “an in- 
cautious overdose of barbit- 
urates" had led to Scott's 
death. The drugs that led to 
Scott’s death were prescribed 
by his dentist who was con- 
ducting extensive treatment 
.on the musician. 


"It doesn't bother me that 
much as long as they come up 
with fresh material. We have 
nothing against a good adul- 
tery story providing the con- 
senting parties have seniority. 
We’re looking for writers 
who can lead us directly to the 
big donors who gave illegally 
to both political groups. 

"The important thing to re- 
member about book publish- 
ing is that the American reader 
would rather know what hap- 
pens on the second floor of the 
White House than what de- 
cisions are made in the Oval 
Office. I have one political ad- 
visor who’s been going for 
long drives with a Clinton de- 
fense attorney. I don’t know if 
we can fill an entire book 
based on her story but it might 
sell if the press start asking, 
'How much did Clinton know 
and when did he know it?* " 

“Who will write die 
book?” 

“We’re holding negoti- 
ations with 'Anonymous' who 
joined the White House team 
on condition he would also get 
a book deal. Our prediction is 
that it could be a best-seller 
compared to ‘The Collected 
Lectures of Newt Gin- 
grich.”’ 


After the Fall, Marisa Tomei Is on the Rebound 


By Margy Rochlin 

New York Times Service 


'ViVvnfS* i. 


L OS ANGELES — Marisa Tomei keeps 
her Oscar on the dressing table in the 
bathroom of her New York City apartment, 
right next to the Vavoom hair gel and v anil la 
body raisL "It was a peak moment in my life, 
definitely. ” says the 32-year-old actress. 

She can remember every detail about the 
evening in 1993 when she was named best 
supporting actress for her performance in 
“My Cousin Vrnny.” On her way to the 
stage, she, in gauzy black-and-white Chanel, 
stumbled briefly but didn’t fall. 

Later, she hugged and air-kissed her way 
through a blur of exclusive parties. The night 
ended perfectly, at 4 AM., in die apartment 
of two old friends who hadn't been able to 
make it to the ceremony. There, Tomei was 
shown a kind of reverse perspective of her 
triumphant moment: "They videotaped 
themselves watching TV so I could see their 
reaction," she says. “Isn’t that cool?” 

But the celebration didn’t last long for this 
daughter of Brooklyn who had risen from 
nowhere to win the prize. First came die jibes 


of people who thought she was a lightweight; 
“My Cousin Vinny.’’ after ail, was a near- 


slapstick, if charming, comedy in which she 


played Joe Pesd’s scrappy girlfriend. 

t fou 


Then, over the next four years, came a 
series of movies in which she did little to 
prove her detractors wrong. Not only were 
the films indifferently received; they were 
also box-office disappointments. Her fast 
plummet after such a quick rise was widely 
noted. 

Even a bulletin board on America Online 
on which Tomei is discussed has the title — 
and this is from her fans — “So, has it been 
all downhill since ‘My Cousin Vinny’ for 
this young starlet?" 

The answer, it turns out, is easy: No. In a 
classic example of how mercurial Holly- 
wood can give as easily as it takes away, 
Tomei is on the rebound. 

In the last couple of months. Miramax 
Films has been placing ads in industry trade 
papers urging academy members to consider 
her for another nomination for best supporting 
actress, for her performance as the whisky- 
tippling, expletive-spewing single mother m 
Nick Cassavetes's “Unhook the Stars.” 
(Oscar nominations will be announced on 
Feb. 1 1.) And just two weeks ago. she and 
Gena Rowlands, who stars in “Unhook the 
Stars.” were both nominated by the Screen 



as Sylvester Stallone’s temperamental 
daughter in the ill-fated comedy “Oscar” 
and as Nicolas Cage's footsie of themoraenr 
in the straight-to- video "Zandalce." 

She ended upplayingrPesci *s soul mate iu 
"My Cousin Vinny** because, as the story 
s, Pesci saw her audition tape and liked 


Sun Oeenoad FarTbr New York Tima. 


After winning an Oscar in 1993, Marisa Tomei had a string of disappointments. 


ir style. 

In the midst of all this, Tomei helped found 
Naked Angels, a New York theater troupe 
that helped keep her grounded during those 
heady days when her agents began securing 
her spacious trailers and star billing. 

One evening, after the curtain fell, Tomei 
and company trooped over to a nearby res- . 
taurant with a Movieline magazine writer m 
tow. The resulting profile — which ran in 
1994 and became a popular item on studio 
faxes — depicted her as blunt-talking, con- 
sumed with the power of her early recog- 
nition and unreasonably demanding when it 
came to movie cast and crew. 

“Just humiliating.** winces Tomei, who 
says she neverread me piece but guessed that 
her friends did when they began looking at 
her with “pity in their ttyes.” 

Truth or fiction, the piece was timed to the 
release of her first top-balled role, in Norman 
Jewison’s “Only You." In it. she plays a 
teacher who jets off for Italy in search of 
romance. “I’m so bad in that." she says. 
That stinging self-review was seconded by 
critics. 

By choice or because of dwindling in- 


Actors Guild in its third annual awards. (It is 
considered an honor to be nominated because 
the vote is by the actors’ peers.) 

All this comes after Tomei made a stra- 
tegic retreat, concentrating on stage work in 
small plays in New York that critics loved her 
in and that hardly anyone saw. In the last year 
she made a “slam dunk” in “Demonology.” 
was “dazzling” in Clifford Odets’s “Rocket 
to the Moon" and, according to Vincent 
Can by in The New York Times, a “big, 
riveting presence" in “Dark Rapture.” 

Tomei has a certain notoriety in Hol- 
lywood, the kind that begins with free-float- 
ing talk of her arguing with directors and dial 
takes root as stories of hubris-filled conduct 
and general lack of esprit decorps. “I always 
feel tike I have to defend myself,” says 
Tomei, who insists she is a team player. 
“But I’m not sure why." 

Even her memorable dark-horse victory at 
the 1993 Oscars put her on the defensive. 
The quality of Tomei's performance in “My 


Cousin Vinny” became almost a side issue; 
what seemed to draw notice was that this 
arriviste beat out four grande dames: 
Vanessa Redgrave, Joan Plowright, Judy 
Davis and Miranda Richardson. 

Many theories about this sprouted, the 
most prevalent being that berstarched-collar 
competitors somehow canceled one another 
out, leaving the unknown candidate to steal 
the award. 

In 1994, a more fanciful hypothesis began 
to circulate: Jack Palance, the actor who 
presented Tomei with her statuette, had blur- 
ted out the wrong name. “That hurt my 
feelings," admits Tomei, who says the ru- 
mor made her feel as if Hollywood’s wel- 
come mat had been pulled from under her. 

Tomei's career took flight after a brief 
stint on the soap opera “As the World 
Tunis.” Appearances on the television 
series “A Different World” were followed 
by a clutch of television movies. In 1991, she 
snagged two roles in films with big stars — 


dustry heat, she regrouped, returning to the 
ubsidiary 


stage and taking subsidiary roles in pictures 
like * ‘The Paper." Ron Howard’s film about 
a tabloid She made one more stab at carrying 
a movie, as a Cuban prostitute in * ‘The Perez 
Family " To play the part she went on a 
pizza-and-wine diet that packed on 20 
pounds, which the director. Mira Nair. had 
asked her to gain. Although pundits roundly 
dismissed the movie. Tomei was praised Tor 
her heroic attempts to pull off hokey lines 
tike: “I am like Cuba. Used by many. 
Conquered by no one." 

This spring, Tomei will have two and a 
half films opening — “Sarajevo," starring 
Woody Harrelson, and “Brother's Kiss." 
She also has a two-line cameo in the tele- 
vision star David Schwimmer’s directorial 
debut, "Dogwater.” 

“Strike that last one from the record," 
asks Tomei, who admits that she only said 
yes as a favor to Harvey and Bob Weinstein 
of Miramax. “That does not exist as far as 
I'm concerned." 


POPULAR OPINION 


PEOPLE 


From Pudding to Tea, Zagat Tackles London 


By Frank J. Prial 

New York Tunes Service 


who in 1996 ate out 3.2 times a week, which 


L ONDON — Very early on pleasant mornings in the spring 
of 19%. a solitary jogger bounced along the neatly ordered, 
almost empty streets of the charming Chelsea section of Lon- 
don, pausing only long enough to stuff fliers in mailboxes. 

TTie young runner — trotter might be a better description — 
was Sholto Douglas-Home, a scion of one of England’s better- 
known families, a marketing executive 
and, at that time, the very new editor of 
London's newest restaurant guide, the Za- 
gat Survey. 

After starting 40 guides in the United 
States and Canada, Tim and Nina Zagat, 
the New York lawyers whose fust survey 
appeared in 1979, decided to cross the 
Atlantic. Imitators were copying their 
style, and it was time, they said, to take on 
London. And in 1998. it will be time to 
take on Paris, in an English-language 
guide, said a Zagat spokesman. Alan Ripp. 

Long-range plans call for surveys of vari- 
ous cities in Asia, he added. 

The Zagats’ first step in London was to 
take in Douglas-Home, 34. whom they 
had met a year earlier through friends. A 
marketing specialist with British Tele- 
com, where he still works, be had written 
restaurant reviews for the last decade for 
small publications here. 

More impressive still was his family 
tree. His great-uncle Lord Home was 
prime minister, and his father. Robin 
Douglas-Home, was a musician and nov- 
elist. His mother, Sandra Paul, once a 
popular London model, is married to the current home sec- 
retary, Michael Howard. A granduncle, William Douglas- 
Home, was the author of more than 40 plays. 

As Zagat devotees in the United States are aware, the 
survey depends on reader opinion to form its ratings. But since 
the guide was nonexistent in London, Sholto Douglas-Home 
had to do some scrambling. 

And running. 

“I couldn't give them copies of the guide," he said at lunch 
at one of his favorites, Le Caprice, "but I could and did try to 
give copies of our rating form to as many people as I could 
manage." After his morning jog in Chelsea, where he lives, he 
went off to work with his pockets stuffed with questionnaires, 
which he again began to distribute. 

Completed questionnaires began to trickle in. Eventually, he 
had ratings of 891 restaurants supplied by 1.700 diners, a 
number considered good by the Za g ats for a first-rime book. 
(The 1997 New York City guide received responses from 
18.006 people covering 1,820 restaurants.) The diners con- 



stituted a group 

means 775 meals a day, or 282,000 “dining experiences." 

"Some people who responded were Americans familiar with 
the Zagat books in the States." Douglas-Home said. “Many 
were Londoners who had encountered the surveys in American 
cities and were excited about bringing the concept hoe." 

The questionnaires were sent to the Zagat offices in New 
York, where a computer tabulated fie ratings. Then 
everything was sent back to Douglas-Home. “I was ap- 
palled,’’ he said. “It was like getting 
two encyclopedias in the maiL I began 
reading, reading and reading. It was 
more work than I’d ever dreamed of.” 
He spent most of June, July and Au- 
gust working his way through the re- 
sponses. “ThCT there was the problem of 
coordinating with the Zagals.There is a 
very definite house style to the Zagat 
Surveys, and the problem was to observe 
that style but not lose the English touch. 
The idea was to keep as much of the local 
flavor as possible without making the 
book incomprehensible to readers in 
New York. We had quite a few go- 
arounds, I must say.” 

The format is the same as in the 
American guides. Food, decor and ser- 
vice are rated on a scale of 0 to 30; a cost 
column reflects the price of a dinner, 
including one drink and tip. There is a 


commentary summarizing surveyors 
,, plus excerpts of the liveliest 


Jmultun Plmr/The INm HarkTmr* 

Douglas-Home edited the guide. 


opinions 

reactions. There are lists of the best 
places to bring children, the best wine 
lists and, special for the London guide, a 
list of “pudding specialists” and an- 
other for the best teas. 

The Zagats got an unexpected windfall in November, when 
the first survey appeared in London. Andrew Lloyd Webber 
lauded the guide in his weekly food and wine column for the 
The Daily Telegraph. “If their first guide to London is 
anything to go by, he wrote, "they will repeat their giant- 
killing performance in the U.SA and obliterate the need for 
any other guide, especially if they take on the rest of Britain, 
which one presumes they intend to do.” 

The Zagat Survey, Sir Andrew wrote, reminded him “of a 
good Sancerre — dry with a hint of fruit and easy to 
.understand.” 

According to the 1997 London Zagat Survey, the readers’ 
top five restaurants for food, service and ambiance are Ivy, 
Aubergine, Bi bend urn. La Tante Claire and Le Caprice. 

The top five for food alone are La Tante Claire, Aubergine. 
Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons, Waterside Inn and Capital Le 
Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons and Waterside Iim are country 
places, outside the city. 


T HE newest offering from 
Norman Mailer is a 225- 
page novel in the first person 
about Jesus Christ. The nov- 
el, called “The Gospel Ac- 
cording to the Son,” is to be 
published in May. The news 
began to spread after readers 
of Random House's spring 
catalogue were surprised to 
find a blank space on page 34 
under a photograph of the au- 
thor. The accompanying pro- 
motional copy said, “As we 
go to press. Norman Mailer 
has just given us a short novel 
that is certain to be one of the 
most extraordinary and excit- 
ing books of his exceptional 
career.” Random House con- 
finned that the novel is about 
Jesus and that the blank space 
in the catalogue bad been put 
there at Mailer’s request. The 
New York Times reported. 

Mailer refused to discuss die 
book other than to say in a 
statement issued through 
Random House: “My intent 
is to be neither pious nor satir- 
ical; it is instead to make com- 
prehensible for myself what 
Fulton Oursler once called 
‘The Greatest Story Ever Told.’ I'm 
going to say no more, because the 
book's publication is still three months 
away and I don't wish to arouse interest 
that cannot be satisfied at this point." 
The Last time Mailer took on a large, 
mythic subject for a novel, in 1983 in 
“Ancient Evenings,” it was met with 
derision from many critics. “Ancient 
Evenings,” written in the voices of 
Egyptians from the time of the 
pharaohs, is replete with unusual sexual 
practices that Mailer ascribed to them. 
Mailer's new novel is said to be a con- 
flation of the Gospels of Matthew. 
Mark, Luke and John. It is written in a 
somewhat Elizabethan style, with faint 
echoes of the King James translation of 
the Bible, as opposed to reflecting the 
Aramaic that Jesus spoke. 

□ 

Elizabeth Taylor delayed surgery to 
remove a benign brain tumor so she can 
attend a gala to celebrate her 65th birth- 
day and raise money to fight AIDS. 



a bag of cashews and a 
of Stephen King's bobi 


‘Thinner.” 


□ 


Jacqaa Mlncti/Reuen 

PYRAMID SCHEME — A Chinese acrobat troupe 
performing at the Monte Carlo circus festival, where 
it received the top prize;, the Golden Clown award. 


Surgeons plan to remove the tumor on 
Feb. 17. The Feb. 16 benefit, “Happy 
Birthday, Elizabeth — A Celebration 
of Life” will support the Elizabeth 
Taylor AIDS Foundation, which dis- 
tributes money for research and treat- 
ment Her birthday is actually Feb. 27. 


Michael Jackson made a quick trip 
to Rome to answer allegations of pla- 
riarism. The popular Italian singer A1 


f iansm. lhe popular Italian singer A1 
ano has accused Jackson of plagi- 
arizing his 1987 song “I Cigni di Bal- 


aka” (The Swans of Balaka). He says 
the song showed up on Jackson’s 1991 
“Dangerous” album as “Will You Be 
There?” Jackson testified in the pre- 
trial hearing that he had never met Bano 
and had never heard of the song until 
the suit was filed. 


□ 


□ 


Lily Tomlin is bringing back the 
precocious 6-year-old Edith Ann char- 
acter from the “Laugh In” TV series to 
raise money for a day-care center. ‘ ‘ Act- 


A man who left champagne, a stuffed 
monkey and other gifts for Jamie Lee 
Curtis has gotten the attention of the 


ors hang on that ability to play." she 
said. “I love to pretend to be Edith Ann 


and say all the things she can say." The 
Saturday night concert will benefit the 
Shady Lane School in Pittsburgh. 



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police instead. The police are 
looking forthe man, who was 
seen lurking around Screen 
Gems Studios in North Car- 
olina, where Curtis is film- 
ing. He was caught inside the 
gates last week and was 
asked to leave, then returned 
two days later, asked whether 
Curtis was there and left his 
gifts. Among the other gifts: 



President Carlos Saul Me- 
nem of Argentina says he has 
seen a segment of fie movie 
“Evita” and thought it was 


good even though “it missed 


point and does not reflect 
reality.” Menem said he had 
seen a 15-minute segment of 
the Alan Parker movie, 
based on Andrew Lloyd 
Webber's musical on the life 
of Eva Peron. “1 think it is a 
good movie," the president 
said, “but I’m not m agree- 
ment with all of its content.” 
Almost 45 years after her 
death of cancer at the age at 
33, Peron is seen by many in Argentina 
as a champion of social justice. 

□ 

Vito Farinola has graduated from J 
high school. And Vic Damone couldn’t 
be prouder. “I finally got my diploma.” 
Damone — who changed his name 
when he started his singing career — 
said at graduation ceremonies for La- 
fayette High School in Brooklyn. “Now 
I can go to college." He should have; 
graduated in 1947 but dropped out to' 
support his family when his father was 
injured. 


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