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.The World’s Dally Newspaper 




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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
R London, Tuesday, February 11, 1997 


No. 35.442 


Down the Ages, a Look at Aging 

Decades-Long Study Refutes Many Stereotypes 


By Susan Levine 

Washington Post Service 

BALTIMORE — Every two years 
without fail. Bill and Ann Gladmon 
drive to Baltimore and check iwti> 
' Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Cen- 
ter. For three days, they are pinched 
ana prodded, weighed and scanned, 
interrogated about bow they think and 
feel, and forced to run until they're 
breathless. 

After decades of visits, they no 
- longer bother to count the tests. But the 
doctors do, and what they have learned 
from the Gladmon s and more than 
2,400 other volunteers of all ages may 
be inspiring news for the elderly and 
elderly-to-be. 

The process of aging, they say, is 
not a disease. 

Known as the Baltimore Longjt- 
■ udinal Study of Aging, the $6-miUian- 


Rebuilding 
A Shattered 
Legal System 
tin Cambodia 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Junes Service 

TA KHMAU, Cambodia — When he 
was a police officer here in Kandai 
Province, criminal investigations were 
straightforward. "We beat, the sus- 
pects," Quk Vandath said, 

"If we wanted to get water from that 
glass over there." he added by way of 
illustration, pointing to a nearby table, 
"we beat it until it gave us water." 

Without equipment, without training, 
without an education in legal proce- 

the first point of contact Etaj^itrdtive 
judicial process — from arrests to trials 
to prisons —that has operated for years 
with few rules or resources. 

Like so much in this broken and 
fc struggling country, the justice system is 
* only beguming to recover from the mass 
killings of lawyers, doctors, teachers, 
monks and other educated people and 
the destruction of government institu- 
tions, including the conns, carried out 
by the radical Communist Khmer 
Rouge from 1975 to J979- 

-The lawyers were among at least hun- 
dreds of thousands and possibly as 
many as 2 million people who died 
during the Khmer Rouge years. When 
the United Nations helped to set up a 


a-year project is die longest-running 
inquiry of its lrind in the United States 
and tme of the most comprehensive in 
the world. 

From the start, it took a unique tack. 
Rather than examine morbidity and 
disease, it would follow healthy, ac- 
tive people and .oy to define "normal 
aging." \ 

Repeatedly, the results have con- 
tradicted stereotypes about the elderly 
arid shown that aging need not be a 
lose-lose proposition- Among the 
landmark findings: 

• Personality does not change with 
age but instead remains remarkably 
stable through the years: According to 
research published over the last 15 
years, seniors who are depressed or 
cranky or disengaged usually were 
much the same as young adults. James 
Fozard, director of the study, said, "If 
you warn to know what you’re going to 


be like in retirement, know yourself 
now." 

• Numerous mental capacities show 
similar constancy. As early as tire 
1960s, the scientists concluded that 
vocabulary continues to grow mod- 
estly in later life and that problem- 
solving and reasoning skills are re- 
tained. Memory might decline and the 
brain- needs more time to make and 
execute decisions, but Paul Costa Jr., a 
psychologist, stressed that those 
changes do not mean an older person is 
impaired. "The brain has so much 
reserve capacity," be said. 

• A healthy bean just keeps ticking. 
Or as Jerome Fleg, a cardiologist, put 
it. "You won't die of your aging 
heart." Tests since the late 1970s 
helped prove that cardiac structure arid 
function do not deteriorate over time 

See AGING, Page 10 





Nonr Saroetm, 19, in a Cambodian prison for selling a girl into 
prwtiturton, is due to be released, officiate said, because of her beauty. 


democratic government here in 1993, 
ftere were only about five lawyers left 
in tins country of 7 million people. 

With the help of several international 
organizations, Cambodia is now begin- 
ning to develop a small corps of lawyers 
andjudges, to Ham its police officers in 
proper procedures ana to revive the 
rudiments of a working legal system. 

"They had to start a legal system 
literally from scratch," said Francis 
James, an American lamer who helped 


beating, no more cigarette bums, no 
more hitting with a rifle butt. You could 
dear out the prisons today if you re- 


For Many, Europe Starts at Lampedusa 

* Illegal Migrants Find Italian Island a User-Friendly Place to Land 


. . By Celestine BoWen 

• New York Times Service 

LAMPEDUSA, Italy — In recent 
years, this lonely patch of Italy, a 
windswept island that lies closer to 
Africa than to Europe, has seen thou- 
sands of illegal immigrants arrive on its 
shores. , . 

Wet and bedraggled, they arnve from 
Tunisia by the boatfofr'-ofllj'tp be 
.greeted by the Italian authoritiffi^ond 
■ sent on their way — not home, pu*vtp 
government processing centers in Si- 
cily. There they are housed, fed add 
;pmvided with an expulsion order that 


gives them 15 days to leave the country 
— which most do, heading farther north 
in Europe. 

Offering the easy prospect of secur- 
ing what amounts to a 15-day visa to 
remain in Italy, Lampedusa has become 
a natural stepping stone for North Af- 
ricans seeking jobs and a better life in 
the European Union, where borders are 
becoming a thing of the past. 

“In 1992, when the illegal immi- 
gration phenomenon began, they pre- 
ferred to go directly to Sicily, where 
they could hide in the countryside,” 
said Captain Salvatore Orami, who 
heads the Italian Coast Guard here. 


High Court 
Judge Slain 
In Madrid 

Government Blames 
Basque Separatists 

MADRID — Two armed attackers 
shot and killed a Spanish Supreme 
Court judge outside his home in central 
Madrid on Monday, the police said. 

The judge. Rafeel Martinez Em- 
perador, was shot in the head and died 
on the way to the hospital. 

The government blamed the Basque 
separatist group ETA, saying that 9- 
millimefer shell casings found at the 
scene, alo ne w ith other evidence, were 
typical of ETA’s weaponry and tactics. 



The attack came just hours after a car 
bomb exploded in the southern city of 
Granada, killing one man and wounding 
seven. The government also blamed that 
attack on ETA. 

The assassination of Mr. Martinez 
came as the Supreme Court was con- 
fronting ETA’s political wing, the Herd 
Batasuna coalition. The high court had 
summoned 25 members of Heni Bata- 
suna’s executive board for questioning on 
the coalition’s use of an ETA videotape 

It was not inm^^^dear whether 
Mr. Martinez's slaying was linked to 
that confrontation. Officials said the 
judge belonged to a different branch of 
the high court than the one that had 
summoned the Hem Batasuna leaders. 

Mr. Martinez was shot outside his 
apartment in an upscale neighborhood 
of Madrid, one block from Retiro Park. 
The assailants fled, leaving the 


Judge Rafael Martinez Emperador 
of the Spanish Snpreme Court. 

wounded judge on the sidewalk. An 
ambulance arrived within minutes. 

Mr. Martinez was declared dead on 
arrival at a hospital a few blocks away. 
The police closed off streets for two 
blocks around the shooting site, fearing 
a car bomb. 

Last week, five Herri Batasuna board 
members were arrested after they ig- 
nored Supreme Court summonses. More 
members of the coalition were expected 
to be arrested over the coming week. 

On Monday, the body of one Heni 
Batasuna board member was found 
hours before he was due to appear be- 
fore the court. Eugenio Aranburo, 41, 
was found hanged in a bouse in the 
Basque town of Mallabia, an apparent 
suicide, a spokeswoman for Hem Bata- 
suna said. (Reuters, AP) 


Mh Mytatfnr New YHkTtaa 


Saddam’s Clan Is Reeling 
From Blows and Threats 

Signs of Disruption Grow After Attack on Son 


viewed the cases on the basis of pro- 
cedural error. 

"When I came here in 1994, the 
courthouses were in rains,” he sard, 
adding: "In the prisons there were 
people who had been completely for- 
gotten. Nobody knew why they were 
there or whether they had already com- 
pleted their sentences." 

A year ago, Mr. Ouk Vandaib, who 
bad become increasingly uneasy about 
the beatings by his fellow officers, 
began a new career as one of a small 
corps of barefoot public defenders 
working in the innovative Kandai Pro- 

See JUSTICE, Page 10 


"When they realized that they didn't 
need to hide because they had a 15-day 
pass, then they started coming here, 
because the dossing is shorter and 
safer." 

The surge in boar traffic — typically 
wooden Tunisian trawlers packed with 
30 or 40 people — peaked here last fail 
when 1319 immigrants were intercep- 
ted in October ana escorted to die ferry 
that makes the daily eight-hour trip to 
Sicily. Once, when the seas were too 
rough, a charter flight was arranged to 
cany the immigrants to Sicily. 

See ITALY, Page 10 


By Barton Gellman 

KwUngton Post Service 

AMMAN, Jordan — Udai Hussein, 
32, the eldest son and heir-apparent of 
President Saddam Hussein of Iraq, 
wheeled his expensive car into Bagh- 
dad's plush Mansour district shortly 
after sundown two months ago. pulling 
up a few hundred yards from Iraqi in- 
telligence he a d qua r ters. 

He knew die neighborhood intim- 
ately. Mansour’s shopping boulevards 
were regular backdrops to the brutal, 
hard-drinking nightlife that left reports 
of rapes and shootings in his wake. This 
night, Dec. 12, there was a difference: 
The blood to be shed would be Udai's. 

Two gunmen in jogging suits and 
helmets, somehow pinpointing Udai's 
whereabouts at a vulnerable moment, 
appeared beside his car. According to 
Iraqi opposition figures here, claiming 
eyewitness information, one poured 
automatic rifle fire through Udai 's open 
car window at point-blank range while 
the other shot into the air to keep ped- 
estrians at bay. 

Repercussions from the attack, which 
left Udai gravely wounded, have 
brought spasms of vengeance and be- 
trayal into Mr. Saddam’s innermost 
family and raised new questions about 
his grip on power. Because the gunmen 
tracked down their target despite a web 
of secrecy, false convoys and body 
doubles, the assassination attempt 
raised the specter of an inside job. And 
because the gunmen have yet to be 
found, the organizers of the attack re- 
main a potential threat to the regime. 

Mr. Saddam's wife, Sajida Talfah. is 
under house arrest, along with daugh- 
ters Raghad and Rana, according to 


Iraqi, American and other Western 
sources. Udai, whose condition was of- 
ficially described as "not a matter of 
concern," is now reported to be partly 
paralyzed by spinal injuries, at risk of 
losing a leg to gangrene and suffering 
from major wounds to the stomach ana 
bladder. 

Perhaps most threatening of all. die 
identities of Udai's would-be assassins 
have not come to tight despite a purge 
involving hundreds of executions and 
thousands of arrests, according to 
sources privy to Jordanian government 
intelligence data. Having deprived Mr. 
Saddam of his No. 2 and shattered the 
myth of invincibility that helped keep 
both of them alive, die assailants have 
melted away. 

The fall of Mr. Saddam has been 
predicted many times since the 1990-91 
Gulf War, but his regime has proven 
difficult to assess, and it is clearly more 
resilient than its enemies had supposed 
Nevertheless, there is little doubt that 
his clan-centered government, which 
bestowed power on, and removed It 
from, his sons, half-brothers and cous- 
ins over the years, has absorbed un- 
precedented blows of late. 

Less than a year ago, Mr. Saddam had 
his two sons-in-law killed. Hussein 
Kamel Hassan Majeed and Saddam 
Kamel Hassan Majeed bad defected 
from top security posts and then re- 
turned from Jordanian exile cm promises 
of forgiveness. His wife, Sajida, whom 
Jordanian witnesses said delivered her 
husband's personal guarantee to her 
daughters and their husbands, turned 
bitterly against Mr. Saddam when he 
had die men lolled anyway. 

See IRAQ, Page 10 


Rioting Hits 
West China 
As Muslims 
Battle Police 

10 Deaths Reported ; 
Security Forces Quell 
1,000 Separatists 

By Steven Mufson 

Washuppm Post Service 

BELTING — Riots broke out in a 
western Chinese town as about 1,000 
Muslim separatists battled the police, 
destroyed shops and burned cars, ac- 
cording to reports Monday by Western 
news agencies and a Hong Kong news- 

^More than 10 persons were killed, 
more than 100 injured and as many as 
500 arrested before security forces 
quelled the unrest Wednesday and 
Thursday in the town of Ytning, about 
50 kilometers (30 miles) from the bor- 
der of the former Soviet republic of 
Kazakstan, the reports said. The bodies 
of many -victims of the disturbances 
were burned, reports said. 

The unrest was the latest in a series of 
incidents in the far western province of 
Xinjiang, a vast but sparsely populated 
territory in China where tensions have 
often flared between Han Chinese and 
the mostly Muslim ethnic Uighurs, who 
had their own Republic of East Turkest- 
an from 1944 to 1949. 

In recent months, there have been 
bombings by Muslim separatists and 
several assassinations of pro-Beijing re- 
ligious figures and government offi- 
cials. Access to the region is restricted 
and journalists who have traveled there 
have been closely monitored. 

Covering a sixth of China, Xinjiang 
Has a population of 16.6 million, of 
whom 38 percent are ethnic Han 
Chinese, accenting to Chinese figures. 

Despite the region’s sparse popula- 
tion, Beijing governments have long 
viewed the nominally autonomous 
Xinjiang region as being important to the 
security of China’s western frontier and 
as an integral part of China. In addition, 
foreign oil companies have been ex- 
ploring major deposits of oil and natural 
gas in a desert area in the territory. 

According to an account by Reuters, 
the latest unrest erupted after a Chinese 
policeman tried to arrest a Uighur crim- 
inal suspect. 

Quoting a local source, Reuters said 
that the suspect and his family resisted 
arrest. The scene attracted neighbors and 
onlookers and the crowd swelled to more 
than 1 ,000 and turned into rioting. 

Later, demonstrators marched on a 
government building and demanded an 
end to Han Chinese rale, a Xinjiang 
government official told Reuters. 

Reports quoted local people as saying 
that a policeman had been stabbed to 
death and that hundreds of paramilitary 
police bad been called in to restore 
order. 


KAZAKSTAN 


UZBEKISTAN 

/kytksyzstan , 


> v r_v i PM*.-' 

TzL J t china'--'.' ' 


INDIA 


Swedes End Silence on Nazis 

A Not-So-Glorious Story of Doing Business With Hitler 


-By Fred Barbasb 

STOCKHOLM — On the overall 
■moral balance sheet of the Uojocaust. 
Sweden and the name of one S 1 *? 

. indu st ria list families, Wallenberg, are 
revered. 

While others stood by as Jewsvrere 
slaughtered. Sweden took steps to m- 
chethen^ deploying 
tite diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, whose 

- ■ 
Bahren ..^. 1.000 Dfri - 

— “ OT 




heroism in occupied Hungary saved 
thousands of Jewish lives. 

Fifty years of scholarship have re- 
inforced that proud, part of Sweden's 
stray as a neutral nation during World 
War EL But it is only part of the story. 

The other part is that Sweden, and the 
vast Wallenberg financial empire, made 
money and acquired looted gold 1 from 
doing business with the Nazis. While 
this is an oldstory of Sweden’s wartime 
past, compared to the prettier chapters rt 
has been ignored, a story of questions 
rarely asked, answers rarely furnished. 

Half a century later, the silence is 

coming to an end. ... , 

With information from newly 
plumbed archives casting light on the 
throughout Europe.new^ciKations 
are being made agairat Swrfoa s war- 
time government and the Wallenbergs 

no t Raoul, who remains untainted, 

bat particularly his uncles Jacob and 
Marcus, who ran the family enterprises. 
From -some of the news media here, 
from, the Jewish community and from 
others, pressure is growing for an ac- 
counting. 

-See SWEDES, Page 10 



AGENDA 


24 More Reported Slain in Algeria 






* V\ 


smUgalyaa/neAaocu^dPtcu 

ALBANIAN VIOLENCE — An anti-government demonstrator club- 
bing a policeman Monday during dashes in the southern Albanian port 
at Vtore. Thousands were protesting a failed investment fluid. Page 5. 


Papa 5. 


PAGE TWO EUROPE Paga5. 

The -Queen Bee of Belgrade Aoc Doubt* in France 

THE AMERICAS Pag* 3. INTERNATIONAL Paga7. 

AChange af Story on Whitewater Celestial Private Eyes for Hire 


Ax the end of Algeria’s most violent 
holy month of Ramadan since a 
Muslim insurgency began five years 
agp, armed groups killed 24 people, 
sources told Agence France-Presse on 
Monday. 

In the most brutal attack, attackers 

Statements by G-7 
Drive Dollar Lower 

The dollar lost ground against vir- 
tually all other major currencies 
Monday as markets took account of 
weekend statements from officials of 
tile Group of Seven leading industrial 
nations suggesting that its two-year 
rally had gone for enough. 

The currency markets “'have reacted 
in an appropriate way," the Bundes- 
bank’s president; Hans Tietroeyer. said 
as the dollar fell against the Deutsche 
mark and the yen. 

Few analysts, however, seem to ex- 

tcHast long. Sonic called the dollar’s 
weakness only a pause, not a reversal of 
its recent advances. Page 1 9. 


disguised as policemen in the south 
Algiers suburb of Eucalyptus were re- 
ported Friday to have slit the throats of 
14 civilians from three families. 

Another group killed a couple and 
their six-month-old child, the sources 
reported- Page 6. 


mm&m 



M The Dollar ■ 

NnrVoik 

DM 

Monday 04 P.M. 
1.6554 

previous dose 
1.6615 

Pound 

1.8408 

1.633S 

Yon 

FF 

122.775 

5.591 

123.25 

SL596 

1 TF-JF- The Dow 


Monday doM 

previous dose 

-51.29 

690654 

6657.83 

H S&P 500 ■ 

change 

Monday O 4 P.M. 
7JM..QP 

previous doss 

7R9.5R 


Books 


Page 9. 

...._. Page 11. 



.... Pages 8-9. 

Sports ....... 


Pages 26-27. 

MsrmtbnarCRtMMM 

PttgaA. 

. 








INTERNATIONA! HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY LL, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Above All , Personal Advice / Her Highness or His? 


Kleo Patra, the Queen Bee of Belgrade TV 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Tima Service 

B ELGRADE — Kleo Parra, the 
B alkan Prophet, addressed by fol- 
lowers as her highness, her ex- 
cellency, her holiness, swept into 
the television studio wearing a fake leo- 
pard-skin cape, tossed it aside and called on 
a makeup artist to begin work as he sar in a 
self-styled throne. 

War and political upheaval are nothing 
new to the Balkans and neither are flam- 
boyant fortune-tellers. 

‘They are all over the country,” said 
Snezana Stojflovic, a lawyer. “And the 
worse the situation gets, the more we have. 
The papers are filled with ads for these 
fortune-tellers.' 1 am amazed at how many 
people, even those who are educated, go to 
them.” 

Kleo Parra, a 36-year-old transvestite 
who says that in a previous life be was the 
ancient Egyptian queen, is Serbia's pre- 
eminent soothsayer. His clients pay $80, 
the equivalent of a month’s salary, for a 
session and they include Mirjana 
Markovic, the wife of President Slobodan 
Milosevic. 

Bearing long flowing red locks and 
wearing diaphanous outfits, he is a regular 
on the celebrity soda! circuit And the 
Balkan Prophet, despite being well over 
200 pounds (90 kilograms), does a brisk 
business selling (Set teas, something called 
Kleo tablets, which be says make users 
more vital, beauty creams and books on 
astrology. 

Kleo Patra, who often talks about him- 
self in the third person and litters his speech 
with ripe street slang, has a weekly half- 
hour television program on Sundays called 
“Meet Your Destiny.” It is broadcast on 
foe Pink entertainment network, which is 
operated by the government. 

For personal problems, he dispenses ad- 
vice that would make most Western ther- 
apists wince. He also makes political pre- 
dictions and is a firm supporter of Mr. 
Milosevic, calling him “a man sent to the 
Serf* by God.” 


,.; ( . 7 r^wsv^ .v -r. 








the front of the line.” To those who are 
struggling to live with unemployment, who 
lost family members in the Balkan war or 
who have become refugees, Kleo Patra 
usually offers a brighter future. 

In two letters read on a recent program, 
women who lost their homes in the war 
spoke of suicide, in both cases Kleo Patra 
told them it would be a huge mistake be- 
cause “your future is happy and success- 
ful.” 

“I see that all foe Serbs who were driven 
out of Croatia and Bosnia and lost their 
homes in the war will get them back, or at 
least get money back,” he said. “Anyway, 
I read somewhere that this is international 
law.” 

But while describing himself as a “cos- 
mopolitan humanitarian,” the fortune-tell- 
er acknowledged that he did not take kindly 
to criticism. 

Angered by a recent report in the local 
press that accused him of being a sham, he 
said he was arranging "to beat that so- 
called reporter like a caL” 

When asked if a lawsuit might not be 
-more a p pro pri ate he slammed his huge, 
beefy palm on the desk top. 

“In this country the only law is the iron 
bar,” he said. 

He abruptly switched to his trademark 
soft television voice. 

“Kleo Patra carries a Colt automatic 
pistol,’ ’ he said delicately. “It was given to 
her by a minister in the government.” 


Envoy to Taiwan^ 
Faces New Query 

Clinton Appointee Is Accused. 
Of Using Post To Pursue Deals 


A S HE spoke the phone rang and a 
distraught husband, a regular cli- 
ent, came on the line. Kleo Patra 
switched on the speaker phone. 
The man was calling from the Bosnian 
Serb city of Banja Luka, and wanted to talk 
about his mistress. 

Kleo Patra has warned that she is out to 
get his money. 

“I want to sleep with her,” foe caller 
said, " ‘even if it means I will die as soon as 
I am finished.” 

“Well,” said the Balkan Prophet, “this 
is about sex.” 

“No,” said the man. 

“Yes, Kleo Patra,” the wife said, 
grabbing the phone. “He won’t tell you. 
But thaTs what he wants.” 

Sometimes to keep the program moving 
along foe Balkan Prophet will ask himself 
questions — and answer them. 

“Kleo Patra,” he said in a stem voice, 
“how is it that people pay you so much 
money , that you have a villa in foe best part 
of town, that you vacation in Miami and 
drive a Mercedes, while most people in 
Serbia can barely find enough money to 
eat?” 

“Thank you for your question,’ ’ be said, 
switching again into his soft, high-pitched 

beiicte wubb. 


Prapn Ku^mbk/Tbe Nrw Yuri Tins 


H E WARNS viewers that “Serbs 
are a doomed people destined to 
slaughter th emse lves in cata- 
strophic wars in the next cen- 
tury,” but he had more reassuring words 
for a foreign visitor. 

“Don’t worry about America,” he said. 
“In your country I just see lots of 
floods.” 

Kleo Patra — the name is on his passport 
— has little time for the demonstrators who 
have filled the streets of Belgrade. The 
fortune-teller said he worried that many of 
the protesters had become mixed up with 

“black magic.” 

People turn to him primarily for personal . 


Kleo Patra, who says that in a previous life he was die 
Egyptian queen, is Serbia’s pre-eminent soothsayer. 


advice. In a large stack of letters were 
several from women pursuing much 
younger men. including one who had a 
crush on the high-school classmate of her 
son. 

Other letters talked of marriages that had 
gone sour. 

“I tell couples who have trouble that 
they each have to go out and find new 
sexual partners," he said. “Usually one of 
-them loves-tho idea and the other has to be 
persuaded. But, as 1 always say an my.. 


show, if you love someone you have to be 
able to give them up for others to love. For 
Kleo Patra, physical betrayal does not ex- 
ist” 

His celebrity status, be said, had led 
some clients to pursue him. 

“One boy thought I was the Virgin 
Mary,” he said, lowering his head as if 
embarrassed and putting his hand to his 
cheek. “Imagine. I just got up and locked 
-foe door and tdht hint heTtrafd acfme any- 
time for free. He could always go right to 


By Sara Fritz 
and Peter Y. Hong 

Los Angeles 7Sn« 

TAIPEI — A UJS. govern- 
ment investigation of a former 
American envoy to Taiwan, 
which began with charges that 
he had improperly solicited 
foreign contributions to Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton’s re-elec- 
tion campaign, has expanded 
to new allegations that he 
used his diplomatic position 
for private business pursuits, 
according to U.S. officials. 

The envoy, James Wood, a 
former Washington lobbyist, 
urged several leading Taiwan 
businessmen to dump one 
company that was handling 
their interests in the United 
States and to consider hiring 
another headed by one of his 
friends, according to two 
Taiwan men familiar with the 
conversations. 

And two Taiwan arms 
dealers reportedly said Mr. 
Wood offered, to broker a 
private sale of weapons, ac- 
cording to a Taiwan editor 
who testified about foe matter 
in a pending lawsuit 

U.S. officials said FBI in- 
vestigators were looking into 
those charges, which came 
after a string of allegations 
that Mr. Wood assertively 
sought camp ai g n contribu- 
tions by arguing, according to 
sources in Taiwan, that they 
owed the president money in 
return for his defense of their 
security interests. An inquiry 
by the State Department in- 
spector-general’s office has 
been subsumed by the FBI 
investigation. 

After U.S. Navy aircraft 
earners were sent to the 
Taiwan Strait lastyear to pro- 
tect the island during Chinese 
missile tests, Mr. Wood told a 
number of people, including 
Parris Chang, a leader of 
Taiwan’s main opposition 
party, the Democratic Pro- 
gressive Party, that die action 
cost foe United States “a lot 
of money" and urged his 
. Taiwan contacts to jfiB^ Jway . 
•to “reciprocate,” according 


to Mr. Chang. Mr. Wood‘s 
post was managing director ‘ 
of the American Institute ip 
Taiwan for two years until hig 
resignation Jan. 17. Tin 
quasi-public institute serves 
as the lf.S. government’s dip: 
lomatic re p rese n tative to tac* 
island nation in lieu of an env- 
bassy. 

The fund-raising allega- 
tions against Mr. Wood axil 
part of a wider Justice De- 
partment inquiry info the s<h 
lici ration of illegal Asiatf 
donations by a one-time 
Democratic Party fund- 
raiser, John Huang, and othef 
supporters of Mr. Clinton. 
Foreigners who are not legal 
permanent residents of the 
United States ore barred by 
law from contributing money 
to U.S. elections. 

Other allegations under in- 
vestigation by the FBI, ac- 
cording to sources close to the * 
probe, involve statutes that bar “ 
U.S. officials from using their 
positions for private gain. 

The Wood controversy is 
particularly troublesome fra 
the White House because, un- 
like the case with other asfi 
pects of foe fund-raising 
scandal, responsibility canrfot 
be directed m part at party of 
campaign functionaries. 

Mr. Wood, an Arkansan, 
has been a close friend of Mr, 
Clinton since foe 1960s arict 
was the president’s hand- 
picked emissary to Taiwan! 
His problems follow those 
several other friends of Mrt 
Clinton who received prom- 
inent government appoinW g 
ments, and came in a volatile ™ 
region in which foe United 
States has sensitive national 
security interests. r 

Mr. Wood, who lives in fob 
Washington area, did not re-. 
spand to calls seeking com- 
ment on the allegations. In an 
interview with Newsweek 
magazine in October, he denied 
pressuring businessmen for 
donations. But when asked if 
he ever told any to get in touch 
with Mr. Huang to make polit- 
ical contributions, he replied/ 
“Iran could have happened’"^ 


travel update Rebel Advances Bring War in Zaire to Turning Point 


Lobbyists Ask for EU Speed Limits 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Mandatory speed limits on all 
major European roads and random breath tests to detea 
drivers who have drunk too much alcohol should be among 
measures used to cut 20,000 from the European Union’s 
annual road death tolL 

The call for a package of safety initiatives came Monday 
from the European Transport Safety Council as it launched a 
campaign to get EU governments to commit themselves to 
cutting annual road deaths from the current 45,000 to 25,000 
people by 2005. 

More than half those killed recently have been car users, 
while those on two-wheeled motor vehicles and pedestrians 
each accounted for about 15 percent of deaths. 

French Transport Strike: No Letup 

TOULOUSE, France (AP) — Commuters in several French 
provincial cities Monday faced a fifth day of reduced transport 
Monday, as strikers refused to give up demands for earlier 
retirement and a shorter work week. 

Bus drivers in this southern French city said they would stay 
off foe job after an all-night bargaining session broke down 
over their demands for retirement at 55 and a 35-hour work 
week. In recent days, foe strike has shut down or severely 
reduced service in more than a dozen cities. 

Ukraine Trims Airport Capacity 

KIEV (Reuters) — The Ukrainian government has ordered 
a cut in the number of airports serving international routes 
because it cannot afford to pay customs and passport control 
officers, a government spokesman said Monday. 

Sources said seven airports will have their rights to serve 
international flights removed, down from a current total of 16. 

American Airlines and its pilots’ union, seeking to head 
off a strike, began holding federally mediated talks over their 
contract dispute. (AP) 


By Stephen Buckley 

Washington Post Service 

GOMA, Zaire — Zairian 
rebel fences have captured or 
are threatening several key cit- 
ies and towns in eastern Zaire 
in what may be a decisive him 
in their guerrilla war against 
President Mobutu Sese Seiko's 
government in Kinshasa. 

The rebels' moves toward 
Kisangani, Zaire's fourth 
largest city , and their taking of 
Kalemie, in the strategic 
province of Shaba; have 
alarmed the government, 
which announced a counter- 
offensive three weeks ago but 
has little to show for it. The 


rebel advances came in foe 
fourth month of a conflict that 
many fear could explode into a 
regional war or lead to further 
dissolution of this troubled na- 
tion, the second largest in sub- 
Saharan Africa. 

The insurgent force, which 
started its campaign in late 
October, says it controls a 
stretch of territory at least 960 
kilometers (600 miles) long 
along Zaire's eastern border 
with Uganda, Rwanda and 
Burundi. Although govern- 
ment officials have publicly 
disputed rebel claims in re- 
cent days, playing down or 
denying reports of rebel ad- 
vances in eastern Zaire, 


A Control Tower Error 
Blamed for Lagos Crash 


On March 23, the International Herald Tribune 
trill publish a Special Report on: 

The Telecommunications 
Industry 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

• The underwired Eastern Europe market. 

• Fierce competition in Asia among US 
carriers ana local carriers. 

• The rise of mobile telecommunications. 

• A look at the giant German telecom market. 

■ Latin America and Africa - the battle over 

potentially lucrative markets. 


Agence France-Presse 

LAGOS — The Nigerian 
air disaster in November 
that claimed the lives of 142 
people was caused by an 
error at the Lagos airport 
control tower, diplomatic 
sources said Monday. 

The sources arid local 
media reported that an of- 
ficial inquiry into the crash 
had discovered that the pilot 
of the fated plane was 
forced to change course 
suddenly to avoid another 
aircraft that was taking off 
using the same flight path. 

As he did so, he lost con- 
trol of foe Boeing 727, 
which crashed into a 
swampy lagoon Nov. 7 as it 


was coming in to land. 
Neither the aircraft nor any 
of the 8 crew members and 
134 passengers have been 
recovered. 

No official confirmation 
has been given of fofe -ver- 
sion of events. At fo&ettl of 
January, the Nigerian avi- 
ation authorities said they 
would shortly be able to 
shed some light on the 
cause of the disaster. 

According to the repents 
Monday, Flight 086, a do- 
mestic flight operated by 
Aviation Development 
Co., had been cleared to 
land at Lagos while another 
Boeing 727 was taking off 
using the same flight path. 


privately government faces 
“are very worried,” said one 
diplomat in the region. 

“They are describing the 
situation as very grave, ad- 
ded the diplomat, who spoke 
on condition of anonymity. 

Zaire began its counterof- 
fensive, with help from sev- 
eral hundred mercenaries, 
after the rebel face, known as 
the Alliance of Democratic 
Forces for the Liberation of 
the Cargo (Zaire), swept 
through several towns and 
cities in eastern Zaire in eight 
weeks. The rebel troops, be- 
lieved to number several 
thousand, shut several camps 
of Rwandan refugees be- 
tween late October and mid- 
November, sending at least 
600,000 scrambling home. 

The rebels, whose leader 
says his goal is to overthrow 
Marshal Mobutu, called for 
negotiations, but the govern- 
ment rejected the overtures. 
Instead, jtjbe army, has tried to 
retake lost 'territory and has 
largely failed. 

Government troops, who 
make the equivalent of 50 
cents a month, frequently flee 


as rebels approach, as was 
apparently the case twice this 
week when the rebels took the 
towns of Shabunda and 
Kalemie. Shabunda is about 
175 kilometers west of Lake 
Kivu; Kalemie is on Lake 
Tanganyika, to the south. 

“You can’t really call this 
a war,” foe diplomat said, “A 
war is when two sides are 
engaging each other. Right 
now, the government soldiers 
simply are not fighting.” 

If that continues, foe gov- 
ernment’s worries about the 
immin ent fell of Kisangani 
and the province of Shaba 
may be well-founded. 

Kisangani, in north-central 
Zaire, is the base of the coun- 
teroffensive. It has one of the 
few airports in eastern Zaire 
and sits along the strategic- 
ally important Zaire River. 

Diplomats and aid workers 
say they believe that the rebels 
may take Kisangani within 
days. Indeed, rebel move- 
ments p ro mp t ed international 
relief workers to evacuate the 
city Friday because of fears of 
impending violence. 

But at least as important is 


the mineral-rich province of 
Shaba, home to the rebel lead- 
er, Lament Kabila. Shaba, in 
southeastern Zaire, became a 
semi autonomous region after 
two rebellions dining foe 
1970s. 

Diplomats say that govern- 
ment officials have expressed 
concern that the rebels will 
overtake Lubumbashi, 
Shaba’s major city, after cap- 
turing Kalemie. If the rebels 
take Lubumbashi, they will 
control about one-third of 
Zaire. The fall of Lubumbashi 
would be the rogime’s “worst 
nightmare,” a political ana- 
lyst said. 

The rebels’ apparent suc- 
cesses are said to nave promp- 
ted the government to call 
upon African nations to help 
out by sending troops. Dip- 
lomats say the regime has 
sought help from Egypt Togo 
and Morocco. 

Egypt and Togo have 
denied that Zaire made such a 
request. Marshal Mobutu, who 
returned to Zaire on Friday 
after medical tests in France, 
stopped in Morocco before 
co ming bone but denies that 


he asked for troops. Morocco, 
sent soldiers to help put dowii; 
the Shaba rebellions. 

Meanwhile, the conflict’ 
has hurt aid workers’ efforts' 
to help 200,000 to 300,000 
Rwandan refugees remaining.' 
in eastern Zaire. Relief agen- 
cies reported last week that 
tens of thousands of refugee^ 
scattered from their camps as 
rebel troops approached. ^ 

■ Strike in Kinshasa 

A strike call by the oppcH 
sition closed much of Zaire’s!; 
capital Monday, with the cen- 
tral bank open but many* 
shops, businesses and gov- 
ernment offices closed. Res" 
ters reported from Kinshasa./ 

The main opposition party-, 
foe Sacred Union of the Rad- 
ical Opposition, led by Wit’ 
Malumba Etiemte' 

Tshisekedi, called the protest' 
to demand the removal of 
Prime Minister Leon Kongo 1 
wa Dondo. " 

The opposition attacked Mrr 
Kengo’s conduct of tire war in" 
the east and accused him of 
stalling promised elections a£a 
way of hanging on to power.-’ : 


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PAGE 3 







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INTERNATIONAL HERALD T1UBUNE, TGESDAX, FEBRUARY U, 1997 


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THE AMERICAS 


x 'Clinton's Whitewater Partner Changes Story 


POLITICAL NOTES 


y 


A 


/ 


By James Risen 

La* Angeles Times 


, WASHINGTON — In an attempt to 
avoid prison. President Bill Clinton's 
former Whitewater business partner has 
changed his story and told prosecutors 
• mat Mr. Clinton attended a 1986 meet- 
ing in which an illegal loan was dis- 
cussed, according to The New Yorker 
magazine. 

toW magazine 
to* 5®. had :o,d Whitewater prosecutors 
Mr. Clinton was present ax the meeting 
id which an illegal loan of $300,000 to 
Ntr. McDougal’s wife was discussed 
with .David Hale, a businessman who 
3 specialized >n brokering loans involving 
the Small Business Administration. 

In the past, Mr. McDougal has re- 
peatedly denied that 'Mr. Clinton at- 
tended any such meeting. Mr. Hale has 
testified that Mr. Clinton pressured him 
to make the loan during the race ring and 
warned him not to speak about it 

.’ In videotaped testimony last year in the 
fraud and conspiracy trial of Mr. Mc- 
Dougal and his former wife, Susan, Mr. 
Clinton denied that he was at the meeting 
with Mr. Hale and also denied that he 


ever sought to pressure Mr. Hale into 
making die loan. Mr. McDougal testified 
ar the same trial that the meeting with Mr. 
Clinton and Mr. Hale never took place. 

A White House spokesman said 
Sunday that neither the White House 
nor Mr. Clinton's attorneys would have 
any further comment 

Mr. Hale's allegation that Mr. Clin- 
ton pressured him to make the loan has 
long been one of the most explosive 
charges in the entire Whitewater affair. 
The office of Kenneth Starr, the White- 
water independent counsel, has never 
been able to take the allegation vety far 
because Mr. Clinton ana the McDou- 
gals have denied it for years. 

But the McDougals were convicted in 
the trial last year, and Mr. McDougal is 
now Dying to cut a deal with the White- 
water prosecutors to avoid prison in 
exchange for his testimony against die 

president. 

In the New Yorker article, Mr. Mc- 
Dougal said he failed five lie-detector 
tests, administered privately before Ins 
Whitewater conviction. During those 
tests, he dosed Mr. Ointoin knew about 
the loan and said Mr. Clinton never met 
Mr. McDougal and Mr. Hale to discuss it 


Me McDcragal has tuiried over the results 
of those tie-detector tests to Mr: Starr. 

“I flunked every time,” Mr.. Mc- 
Dougal told die magazine. ‘‘I was trying 
to get by dte test. I round they're bard to 
get around.” 

Mrs. McDougal, who is now in jail 
for her refusal to answer questions be- 
fore the Whitewater grand jury in Little 
Rode, Arkansas, told the magazine that 
her former husband was “wildly ex- 
cited'' about giving the lie-detector test 
results to the independent counsel. 

She also said Mr. McDougal tried to 
convince her ro testify against Mr. Clin- 
ton. But she still says that she does not 
know of any illegal activity by either 
Mr. Clinton or his wife, Hillary Rodham 
Clinton. 

In a jailhouse interview, Mrs. Mc- 
Dougal told The New Yorker that she 
mistrusted the independent counsel. Sbie 
said she felt like a pawn in a politically 
motivated crusade to get the Clintons. 

Her former husband, she said, nearly 
persuaded her to talk, before her sen- 
tencing hearing last summer following 
. her conviction. But she changed her 
min d following a conference call daring 
which Ray Jabn, a member of Mr. 


Starr’s staff, mentioned the mandate to 
investigate the Clintons. 

2h the New Yorker article, Mr. Mc- 
Dougal suggested that his former wife 
might have had another reason not to 
testify against Mr. Clinton. The two, he 
alleged, had had an affair. 

Mr. McDougal said that in 1982. he 
called his home to see if his wife had 
arrived safely from atrip to Europe, and 
found himself listening to a phone con- 
versation already in progress between 
his wife and Mr. Clinton. 

“They were intimate,” Mr. McDou- 
gal told the magazine. “There was no 
doubt in my mind.” 

Mr. McDougal also said be later 
asked her if she was having an affair 
with Mr. Clinton, and she acknow- 
ledged that she was. 

In the same article, Mrs. McDougal 
denied the charge. “I'm a small-town 
giri, a Southern Baptist,” she said. “I 
wouldn't do it. ” 

She said instead that her husband had 
wanted her to have an affair with Mr. 
Ointon. 

Mrs. McDougal was found guilty of 
fraud and sentenced to two years in jail, 
a verdict she is appealing. 


What Price Defiance? Gingrich Foe Now an Outcast 


By Melinda Henneberger 

A/w York Times Service 

. t WASHINGTON — In the congres- 
sional dining room, where backslapping 
arid bean soup are always on the menu. 
Representative Susan Molinari walked 
past her colleague and fellow New York 
Republican, Representative Michael 
Forbes, without a word or a look. 

"It’s very high school,” Mr. Forbes 
said as he returned to his table one day 
last week. 

: Eyer since Mr. Forbes flouted the Re- 
publican leadership by becoming die first 
in his party to announce that he would not 
vpfe for Newt Gingrich for House speaker, 
he has felt like the class outcast 


“The prom king and queen don't 
want to be seen tallting to me.” be said 
earlier that day, referring to Ms. Mo- 
linari and her husband. Representative 
Bill Rixon, also a New York Repub- 
lican. * ‘Every time they see me they give 
me one of these,” he said, and demon- 
strated die technique of moving from 
one side of a narrow Capitol hallway to 
the other while taking great interest in 
the ceiling. O ther s have shunned him, 
too, he says, “mostly leadership and 
wannabe leadership types.” 

No serious retribution has been re- 
ported among any of tire five Repub- 
licans who voted against Mr. Gingrich, 
as Mr. Forbes did. or the five who voted 
“present” rather than vote for the 


: in- 
accurate information to a House ethics 
committee investigating his use of tax- 
exempt funds for political activities. 

Most of those involved have declined 
to speak about any repercussions, and 
modi of the unpleasantness that Mb'. 


Forbes describes falls into foe category 
of petty humiliations, like leaving the 
chairs on either side of him empty in a 
packed Republican Party meeting. But 
for a politician — p erhaps the ul timate 
social animal — the withholding of those 
ritual arm grabs and two-handed shakes 
is in itself a form of punishment. 

Mr. Forbes was once a wildly en- 
thusiastic supporter of Mr. Gingrich. In 
an interview just after being elected to 


Sobriety Tests Crash School Dances 


By Tim Golden 

• _ AW’ Ynri Times Sen-ice 

.PIEDMONT. California 
— With his girlfriend on his 
apn and a tuxedo borrowed 
from his father on his back, 
Adam Taylor, 1 8, paused just 
inside, the door of .the Fied- 
nioki High School Winter 
Formal dance to appraise the 
goings on. Something periled 
his mouth into a crooked, sub- 
versive smile. 


m> long!” he said, setting off 
towanJa crowd of his friends. 

Waiting directly in Mr. 
Taylor’s path, however, was 
his old history teacher, Mr. 
Garvin, And waiting in Mr. 
Garvin's hands was a small, 
battery-powered breathalyzer. 
.-Mr. Taylor looked suspi- 
cipusly at die device. Mr. 
Garvin looked suspiciously at 
Mr. Taylor. On the teacher’s 
instructions, the senior at- 
tached a disposable mouth- 
piece to -the device, took a 
deep breath and blew. 

Fun is mu what it used to be 
at Piedmont High, a medium- 
sized public school that sits in 
the affluent hills above Oak- 
land and on the frontier of an 
ever-more -aggressive move- 
ment in American schools to 
stop foe. use of alcohol and 
thugs by teenagers. 

'Spurred in pan by a ruling 
of the U.S. Supreme Court in 
1995 foal expanded the au- 
thority of school administrat- 
ors to search students, edu- 
cators say, at feast several 
hundred schools around foe 
country have added tests for 
alcohol to the metal detectors 
and drug-testing that are 
already familiar in some U.5. 
schools* 

Ax Piedmont, no student 
may otter a school dance, 

prom, or graduation-night 
party anymore without first 
submitting to a low-tech ver- 
sion of the sobriety tests given 
by highway patrol officers. At 
scores of other schools m 
California, teachers and ad- 
ministrators arc using similar 
devices to check students 
who appear intoxicated on 
campus, at football games or 
at after-school events. 

In Arlington. Texas, school 

officials voted unajurmnisly 
on Thursday to cheek aU tagh 
school students for alcohol as 
they enter foeir ye***™ 
proms, For 

companies, anguished v*oe 
principals have become a 
promising new mntkeL 
- Several recent court de- 
ciaorts notwithstanding, ciyu 
libertarians say «e 
imbed by the trend. 

“The idea of zero tolerance 

has gotten a lot of ■£» 
down here, bui we don tthm k 
that what they’re doingi^c° ri ' 
siitutional,” Carrie Spenmg. 
regional director of dwNorth 
Texas office or the Amexmon 
Civil Liberties Un"**' **“ °* 
Arlington's policy. 

the mean botaebold m«^ 

SEKSESM 



ADdnySfad ? nnScNewWA'n>M 

Lauren Toker, 17, and Joseph Petta, 16, had to submit to a pre-dance breath test 


teacher, Daniel Garvin, put it, 
and probably a disproportion- 
ate number of civil libertarians. 
Evan so, aduh opposition to the 
policy has all but disappeared. 

“It was very controversial 
the first time around because 
it did seem like an intrusion,” 
said Patricia Allen, whose 
daughter, Whitney, is asenior 
at the school. “But I don’t 
think the kids think it's that 
hi" a deal anymore.” 

The students articulate 
their positions differently. 

“A lot of students think, 
‘Breathalyzers — that’s re- 
tarded,' ” said Liz Adams, 
16. “Less people go, and it’s 
less wild on the dance floor. 


in the foil of 1995. 

According to a survey of 
students Iasi spring, 45 percent 
opposed breath tests, 27 per- 
cent did not like them but were 
willing to tolerate them, and 
13 percent endorsed their use. 
Another 13 percent had no 
opinion or did not respond. 

“A lotmore kids will turn to 
drugs,” said Kristi Shave, 18, 
ajfbrmer supporter of the boy- 
cott who noted that the alco- 
hol-detection equipment 
would not detea drag use. 
“We’re teenagers. We don’t 
feel comfortable without being 
kind of, you know, tanked.” 
A feW years ago, teachers at 
Piedmont High say they 


But 1 don’t really mind it — began to sense a cloud gafo- 
we just leave early. ” eringovertwad. 1 ‘We watched 

Students said a considerable the character of our dances 
. »■. .! j — ; — - " said (lie 


number of juniors and seniors 
had boycotted foe dances since 
breath -testing was introduced 


change, , . 

Pam Bradford “You found 
beer cans on kids. You found 



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lads in the bathrooms, and 
they couldn't function. It just 
became very stxessfuL” _ 

At the end of a sometimes 
tumultuous meeting in Octo- 
ber 1995, members of foe 
school’s Parents’ Club en- 
dorsed foe breathalyzer idea. 


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Coogress two years ago, Mr. Forbes 
regularly invoked foe speaker and called 
him a hero, a visionary and a mentor. 

Then, six weeks ago, Mr. Forbes 
stunned colleagues with foe announce- 
ment that he could not in good con- 
science continue to support the speaker, 
who he said had betrayed their common 
conservative cause and lost credibility 
and effectiveness. 

Since then, Mb'. Forbes has been the 
focus of an rnrense attention that is new 
for him, and that be scans to find a little 
uncomfortable — but at foe same time 
not altogether unenjoyable. Being at odds 
with his party in such a dramatic way is 
new. too, and that holds no allure. 

It is unlikely that Mr. Fotbes’s de- 
fection will cost him support in New 
York's First Congressional District, the 
moderate, swing district on Long Island, 
where Mr. Gingrich is a hugely un- 
popular figure. 

And Representative Peter King, a fel- 
low Long Island Republican, said that 
ultimately neither foe local nor foe na- 
tional party could afford to indulge any 
revenge fantasies against Mr. Forbes. 

‘If I were Mike, 1 would be looking 
over my shoulder a little bit,” Mr. King 
said, “but that’s foe type of tiling you 
can do when you have a lot of money 
and a big majority. They'll be scram- 
bling just to keep the majority.” . 


A Ritual Gnashing of Biomedical Teeth 

■WASHINGTON — There were no reports of medical researchers drinking 
champagne from beakers after Health and Human Services Secretary Donna 
Sbalala presented her department's $375.8 billion budget last week. Even so. 
1998 promises to be reasonably fruitful for those w Diking in the biomedical 
sciences. 

That promise comes not from President Bill Clinton's budget figures, but 
from an awareness that biomedical research enjoys enormous support in foe 
Senate and the House, and that Mr. Clinton can moderate his requests in this 
area, knowing Congress will pump up foe figures in the horse-trading to 
come. 

The script, of course, called for scientists and their supporters to grumble 
appropriately. Calculations by National Institutes of Health economists predict 
that the cost of scientific research will increase 3 percent during 1 997 (about 
OJ percent faster than the predicted rise in the consumer price index ), which 
makes the National Institutes of Health's proposed increase of 2.6 percent for 
fiscal 1998 a net decline in buying power. 

Senator Connie Mack, Republican of Florida, who last month introduced a 
resolution calling for a doubling of the N1H budget to $25.5 billion over foe 
next five years, called the agency’s proposed increase “paltry” and “ab- 
solutely unacceptable.” 

But when the wailing and gnashing of teeth subsided, several veterans of the 
government research enterprise conceded that the life-sciences budget could 
have been a whole lot worse, given the competition from other programs and 
foe enormous pressures on the president to balance the budget And. they 
believe, money is on foe way. 

‘ ‘The biomedical research community is looking at the president' s budget as 
something they hope and perhaps expect will be expanded on,” said loim 
of American Societies for Experimental Biology in 


Suttie of foe Federation 
Bethesda, Maryland. 


fW 'PI 


Gun Lobby Leader Survives Internal Shot 

WASHINGTON — Wayne LaPierre Jr., the National Rifle Association's 
executive vice president, has survived an internal assault on his leadership of 
one of Washington’s most powerful lobbies — at least for the time being. 

After two days of healed and often personal debate, the group’s board 
Sunday blocked proposed changes to the organization's bylaws that would 
have weakened Mr. LaPierre’s authority and increased the power of the board. 
One of foe changes would have reduced the number of votes needed to remove 
an officer, such as Mr. LaPierre, from three-fourths to a simple majority of the 
76-member board. 

The perceived efforts to oust Mr. LaPierre stemmed in part from the 
concerns of his critics that the gun lobby had been running multimillion-dollar 
deficits, that membership was sliding and that foe group was steadily losing 
influence and stature. (WP) 


Quote /Unquote: 


Representative Michael Forbes, Republican of New York, who voted 
against Newt Gingrich to be speaker of the House and is being ostracized by 
many of his colleagues: “I'm not above playing hardball with them. Bottom 
line, we've got some close votes coming up ana they need my vote.” f NYT) 


Away From 
Politics 

• Hospitals in New York have begun 

open mandatory testing of all new- 
borns for HIV, the virus that causes 
AIDS, in (he first such program in the 
United States. (AP) 

• California has reached a tentative 
$89 million deal to buy, restore and 
preserve the Bolsa Ghica wetlands. 


home to rare bird species, after more 
than 20 years of wrangling. (AP) 

• A gas pipeline explosion near 

Kalama, Washington, has revealed no 
evidence of sabotage, according to 
investigators. ~ (AP) 

• The VS. Army wants to buy 

331,000 acres (132.000 hectares) of 
public land in the Mojave Desert in 
California, a proposal that has 
angered some environmentalists and 
desert users. (AP) 



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Simply match die location of the following golf courses to the 
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1. Royal Fan Ling Golf Club 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, FEBRUARY 1-2 , WZ 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1997 


ASM/PACIFIC 


In Hong Kong, Uncertain Exile for Chinese Dissidents 


n y Keith Rich burg 

Washinglpn Post Service 

HONG KONG — One fled China 
in secret to avoid jail and seek 
refuge overseas. Another finds him- 
self here by accident after a trip that 
' was supposed to take him back to 
China. A third says he'll stay and 
wait for China to come to him. 

• The three men are among an es- 
timated 100 dissidents from China 
who now live in uncertain exile in 
Hong Kong. Some asked for polit- 
ical asylum and are awaiting pas- 
sage to friendly third countries. Oth- 
ers are stranded after crossing the 
border clandestinely and being 
picked up by local authorities. 

The majority were involved in the 
1989 democracy demonstrations at 
Beijing's Tiananmen Square and in 
other Chinese cities — most after 
serving time in prison and continu- 
ing their democracy activities once 
released. Some fled to Hong Kong 
after Chinese government crack- 
downs on dissent 

While their circumstances vary, 
these exiles share one thing: They 


are believed to be in danger of arrest 
and imprisonment if they stay be- 
yond midnight on June 30. when 
Hong Kong's British rulers retreat 
and this prosperous colony and fi- 
nancial center of 6.3 million people 
is handed back to China and its 
Communist leaders. 

About 60 of the Chinese exiles do 
□ot want to leave — they have mar- 
ried, taken jobs and generally kept a 
low profile. The rest are looking to 
get out, and fast. 

“It's very dangerous," said 
Hugh Yu, 30, one of the former 
democracy advocates. "We have no 
passports, no documents at all. 
We’re just here under the Hong 
Kong government's protection. But 
after the changeover, we'll all be- 
come illegal. They could send us 
back to China or put us in jail." 

Han Dongfang, the most prom- 
inent of the mainland exiles here, 
has been encouraging the other dis- 
sidents to leave, even though be 
himself plans to stay and face jail. 
Mr. Han spent 22 months behind 
bars before being released to un- 
dergo medical treatment in the 


United States. When he tried to re- 
turn home to continue his union 
organizing. Chinese police carried 
him to the border and dumped him in 
Hong Kong. A week later, China 
declared his passport invalid. ‘ ’They 
kicked me out illegally," be said. 

With little fanfare. Western coun- 
tries appear to be moving to help 

‘We’D all become 
illegal. They could 
send ns back to China 
or put us in jail.’ 

some of the dissidents leave. Of the 
roughly 1 00 here, about 40 are wait- 
ing to be resettled in third countries, 
including the United States. People 
close to the matter said lasL week 
that before China takes control, all 
of those who want to leave will be 
given third-country refuge, with 
about a dozen going to Britain, a few 
to the United States and the rest 
scattered, mostly in Europe. 

Efforts to spirit Chinese dissi- 


dents through Hong Kong to the 
West began in earnest after the 
June 4, 1989. massacre of Tianan- 
men Square demonstrators. A 
clandestine network called Opera- 
tion Yellowbird, using local 
democracy advocates, businessmen 
and even organized crime syndic- 
ates. brought out hundreds 
of demonstrators. Many of them 
ended up in the United States. 

For some dissidents, though, the 
anxiety is in the waiting, with fewer 
than five months before Hong Kong 
becomes a part of China. Sane of 
those who want to leave have no Idea 
when they can go or what country 
will accept them. 

"This waiting period is too long." 
said Li. a 3 1 -year-old student activist 
who was last interviewed by a West- 
ern consulate four months ago and 
has not heard whether he has been 
accepted as a political refugee. 

Mr. Li. who asked to be identified 
only by his surname, had fallen un- 
der suspicion in China of being in- 
volved in student-organizing activ- 
ities being conducted by the 
prominent dissident Wang Dan. A 


student-union leader during the 
1989 protests, Mr. Li had already 
served one-and-a-half years in pris- 
on for “counterrevolutionary pro- 
paganda and incitement." 

He escaped from China in May 
1995, traveling for two weeks, 
“step-by-step," as he recalls it. and 
being pursued by Chinese security 
forces at every turn. When he does 
leave Hong Kong, Mr. Li hopes to 
continue his democracy campaign- 
ing from abroad. 

Mr. Yu also knows something 
about the inside of a Chinese prison: 
as a 1 989 student activist in southern 
China, he spent one-and-a-half 
years in jail, but was never tried. 

Mr. Yu went into business in 
China after his release. Using an 
assumed name, he sneaked into 
Hong Kong for reasons he asked not 
to be disclosed. He says he always 
intended to return to China, but one 
day before he was to go home, he 
was arrested by Hong Kong police, 
who routinely patrol the streets 
looking for illegal immigrants from 
the mainland. He now calls himself 
an accidental exile. 


Bullet Mistake 
By U.S. Disclosed 

Uranium Used Near Okinawa 


TOKYO — The United States has apologized for 
mistakenly firing 1 .520 bullets containing depleted urani- 
um during a military exercise on a southern Japanese 
island near Okinawa in late 1995 and early 1 996, the U.S. 
military in Japan said Monday. 

“The U.S. government has told the government of 
Japan that it regrets these incidents and the late no- 
tification," said a U.S. military statement 

The Pentagon notified Tokyo about the incident only in 
mid-January; a Pentagon spokesman said that because the 
incident posed no threat to health, the United States was 
not required to tell tile Japanese about it The military said 
that the bullets, supposed to be used only for exercises in 
the United States, had been '‘incorrectly catalogued." 

The ammunition was not to be used on Okinawa under 
a U.S.-Japanese agreement. 

Japan, in its own statement, while accepting the apo- 
logy, said it regretted that the United States waited a year 
to advise Tokyo. 

“We find the incident, as well as the fact that it took the 
U.S. this long to report the case, extremely regrettable." 
Deputy Foreign Minister Sadayuki Hayashi said at a news 
conference. 

Hie incident comes as Tokyo is in the midst of a dispute 
with Okinawa landlords who want to stop leasing their 
land to U.S. military bases. Forced leases for privately 
owned land in Okinawa expire on May 14. 

Mr. Hayashi apologized for Tokyo’s own delay in 
notifying Okinawa about the incident, saying that the 
United States had found the bullets to be safe and that 
Tokyo wanted to collect more information before making 
the incident public. 

The disclosure comes after Washington and Tokyo 
agreed in December to negotiate a plan to exchange 
information quickly on accidents involving U.S. military 
forces here. 

A U.S. team had assessed the environmental and health 
impact of the accidental use of the radioactive bullets and 
found there were no health or environmental risks. 

The depleted uranium helps the bullets pierce armor 
such as on tanks. Each of the 25mm projectiles contained 
5.2 ounces {147 grams) of depleted uranium, a heavy 
metal with about the same toxicity as lead. 

A U.S. contractor recovered 1 92 of the bullets during a 
March 1996 cleanup, and Japan will conduct its own 
research to determine the incident's impact on the en- 
vironment and whether there was a need for further clean- 
up efforts, Mr. Hayashi said. 

The level of radioactivity measured on the island of 
Tori Shima, an isolated gunnery range 90 kilometers (55 
miles) from Okinawa, was reported to be 10 times less 
than the level under which the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission would require a cleanup plan. 






. f teS 



Polling officers in the Indian state of Punjab counting votes. A Sikh-Hf ndu alliance won a landslide victory. 

Alliance Victory Lifts Hopes in Punjab 


Hong Kong Assures Filipinos 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong *s future chief executive. 
Tung Chee-hwa. on Monday promised to look after the 
welfare of the territory's 140.000 Filipinos, mostly do- 
mestic helpers, after the handover on July I. 

Jose de Venecia, speaker of the Philippine House of 
Representatives, who met with Mr. Tung here Monday, 
told reporters that the chief executive-designate gave him 
“the assurances to look after the welfare" of the Filipi- 
nos, who are the largest foreign community in Hong 
Kong. . 

Mr. de Venecia said the “very constructive meeting 
should boost the confidence of Filipino workers in Hong 
Kong. 

“We have received assurance from Mr. Tuna that the 
140,000 Filipino workers in Hong Kong will be taken 
care of after the handover." Mr. de Venecia said in a 
statement after the meeting. (AFP 1 

Summonses in Korea Steel Case 

SEOUL — South Korean prosecutors summoned three 
politicians, including a close associate of President Kim 
Young Sam. for questioning on Monday over huge loans 
to the failed Hanbo Steel Co., a prosecution official 
said. 

Prosecutors said they wanted to determine if any 
politicians had pressured bankers into extending loans to 
Hanbo Steel. 

Choi Byung Koog, a senior prosecutor, told reporters 
that Hong In Gil.a lawmaker of the ruling New Korea Party 
and a senior official at the presidential Blue House until last 
year, was quizzed on whether he had received kickbacks 
from Hanbo. Also summoned by prosecutors were Kwon 
Roh Kap, a top aide to the opposition leader Kim Dm Jung, 
and Chung Jae Chull from the ruling party. (Reuters) 

Burma Guerrillas Vow Attacks 


The Associated Press 

CHANDIGARH, India — An alli- 
ance between a Sikh religious party and' 
Hindu nationalists won a landslide vic- 
tory in the state of Punjab, raising hopes 
for a lasting peace in an Indian region 
traumatized by a decade-long insur- 
gency. 

The Shir omani Akaii Dal and the 
Hindu Bharatiya Janata Party won 93 
seats in the 1 17-member state assembly 
while the incumbent Congress (I) Party 
won only 14. 

A small party of Sikhs who still sup- 
port the struggle for an independent 
homeland for the religious minority 
failed to win a single seat. 

The alliance between moderate Sikhs 
and the Hindu party could erase the 


mistrust between the two communities 
created during the Sikh rebellion, which 
has left nearly 20.000 people dead and 
the state's economy shaitered. 

Prakash Singh Badal a rich landlord and head 
of die Shiromani Akah Dal, a party that once 
sympathized with sepamisB, is seen as likely to be 
Punjab's chief minister, a post he has held twice. 

It was a "verdict against the corrupt 
misrule of the Congress," Mr. Badal 
said. 

With Punjab gone, the Congress Party 
that once controlled most north Indian 
states and the federal government now 
controls only one tiny state in the re- 
gion. 

As elsewhere, the party in Punjab, 
once credited for crushing the insur- 
gency and bringing peace, is in disarray. 


accused of incompetence and corrup- 
tion. 

“The Akalis were well prepared and 
organized well in advance for the polls, " 
said Rajinder Kumari B hartal, the out- 
going Congress Party chief minister. 

More than 65 percent of the state's 15 
million voters turned out Friday for the 
balloting, nearly three times the figure 
registered when Punjab went to vote in 
1992, the first after the insurgency was 
suppressed. 

The Shiromani Akaii Dal had boy- 
cotted that election in response to a call 
by Sikh separatist groups, but much of 
the separatists' influence seems to have 
been eroded and the issue of a separate 
Sikh state is no longer on India's polit- 
ical agenda. 


YE KYAW, Burma — The pro-Rangoon Democratic 
Karen Buddhist Army guerrilla group vowed on Monday 
to keep attacking ethnic Karen refugees sheltered in 
camps along the Burma-Thai border. 

“We wilicontinue to attack them until they all return to 
Burma,' ' Captain Htu War. the group's commander, told 
reporters at his jungle camp on the Burmese side of the 
Moei River, which marks the border with Thailand. 

(Reuters) 

Pyongyang Denies Kidnapping 

TOKYO — North Korea on Monday denied media 
reports that its agents abducted a Japanese schoolgirl 20 
years ago, and accused the Japanese press and South 
Korea of fabricating rumors. 

“As the entire world is aware, we are a nation un- 
related" to acts that “infringe upon human rights such as 
abduction and terrorism," Radio Pyongyang said in a 
broadcast monitored by Tokyo-based Radiopress news 
service. (Reuters) 


Kim Consolidates Power 
By Promoting Generals 


TOKYO — Kim Jong D, 
the North Korean leader, has 
promoted a group of relat- 
ively young army officers as 
he apparently moves to con- 
solidate his power base. 

The official Korean Cen- 
tral News Agency said thai he 
issued an order Sunday to pro- 
mote four colonel generals — 
Kim Kyok Sik, Ju Sang Song, 
Kim Song Gyu and Pak Jae 
Gyong — to full generals. 

General Pak is among an 
elite group of younger of- 
ficers, most of them sons of 
North Korea’s founders, who 
have been speedily promoted 
through the hierarchy, re- 
portedly on the recommenda- 
tion of Mr. Kim. He has often 
accompanied Mr. Kim during 
visits to military units. 

Analysts said that Mr. Kim 
has gradually replaced top 
old-guard generals with his 
confidants. South Korea's 


government-run monitoring 
agency, Naewoe Press, de- 
scribed all four generals as 
Kim loyalists. 

It was the first top-levef 
military change since the 
death of a former defense 
minister, O Jin U, prompted a 
reshuffle of marshals and 
deputy marshals in 1995. 

The latest change followed 
the death of General Thae Py- 
ong Rol, a member of the cen- 
tral committee, who died last 
week. 

“Kim Jong II is expected to 
step up the promotion of his 
associates and loyalists in the 
military until he fully takes 
over the mantle of his father" 
a Naewoe analyst said. 

Mr. Kim has failed to take 
over formally the key posts of 
party general-secretary and 
state president held by his fa- 
ther, Kim II Sung, but experts 
believe he is firmly in charge; 

(AFP. Reuters ) 


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jnVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY FEBRUARY IJL, 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGE 5 


% 






1 



'New Victory 

Of Far Right 

Stirs Doubts 
In France 


By Barry James 

; fniemarional Hera/d Tribune 

; PARIS — A decisive victory for the 
^-immigrant National Front left 
rpsnai mainstream parties wondering 
a Monday whether the voter swing t<£ 
ward the extreme right is limited to 
France s south or whether it will spread 
across the country in general elections 
next year. 

. In the first tune it has won by an 
outright majority, the National Front 
captured 52.48 percent of the vote in 
municipal elections Sunday at Vitrolies 
which has a population of 39,000. It is 
an outer suburb of Marseille, where 
rightist parties have long exploited re- 
sentment over high immigration. 

. Three persons were wounded and 
seven arrested in violence surrounding 
the election. Riot police clashed with 
demonstrators in several incidents in 
areas mostly inhabited by immigrants. 

• _ The front also controls the southern 
cities of Toulon, France's Mediter- 
r ranean naval base; Marignane, next to 
Marseille; and Orange. 

; Jean-Marie Le Pen, who heads the 
National Front, said the Vitrolies vic- 
tory proved that his party was on the 
way to becoming first in France. 

; But many politicians from the main- 
stream parties said the National Front's 
success resulted from a mix of causes 
particular to the south. The party’s 
pledge to oust 3 million immigrants and 
to reserve jobs, housing and welfare 
benefits for French citizens struck a 
chord, analysts said, among a popu- 
lation resentful about high unemploy- 
ment. rising crime and corruption. 

■ The area also has a high number of 
former French residents of North 
Africa, who identify with the front's 
openly anti-immigrant positions, 
i ! The result “must be kept in pro- 
portion,” said the labor and social af- 
fairs minister, Jacques Barret. “We are 
looking at a very particular situation 
where the National Front has exploited a 
difficult situation.” 

Another reason for the front’s victory 
was the unpopularity of the departing 
Socialist mayor. Jean-Jacques Anglade, 
who emerged second m the first round " 
of voting a week previously. Mr. 
Anglade and his administration have 
been accused of corruption and of mis- 
management of the town’s bleak, high- 
rise pyblic, housing. . . 

. Those probhms meant Mr. Anglade 
did not prevail even though the main 
parties, inclodtngtoe oemjr-rigfrt groups, 
threw their support behind fim feri at- '.* 
tempt to defend “republican values.” 

. TTte new mayor of Vitrolies is Cath- 
erine Megret, wife of the National 
Front’s second-ranking official. Bruno 
Megret, who was declared ineligible to 
run because he spent more than the law 
allows in a previous campaign. 

Although she is inexperienced and 
made no secret that she was standing in 
For her husband, the 37-year old Mrs. 
Megret drove up the party's share of die 
vote by attacking corruption at city hall 
and promising a clean administration. 

Political analysts describe Mr. Megret 
as the main representative of the party's 
technocratic and modernizing faction, 
which is seeking to woo a disaffected 
working class away from the left. 

; The newspaper Le Monde said cen- 
ter-right politicians like Prime Minister 
Alain Juppe hud to conclude that the 
National Front is as much their foe as the 
Socialist Party is. 

At the same rime, the paper said, uie 
Socialists had neglected their formerly 
tight network of associations in work- 
ing-class districts, opening the way for 

the front. „ . 

Zt sees its domination of the southern 
towns as a springboard for increasing 
power in the rest of the country. Na- 
tionwide, the party has the support of an 
estimated 15 percent of the electorate, 
but many analysts predict this could rise 
if employment remains at or rises above 
its present level of 12.7 percent. 





- H_ ftahaMAgeace Rura-Pmo 

FACING CHARGES — Elfriede Blauensteiner, 66, confronting the news media with a crucifix in hand 
' Monday in Krems, Austria, where she went on trial on charges in the death of her 77-yesur-old companion. A 
suspect in the deaths of several elderly men, she has been dubbed the '‘Black Widow” by the local press. 

Yeltsin’s Ex-Bodyguard to Sit in Duma 

Election of Shadowy Former KGB Officer Unnerves Liberal Russians 


By David Hoffman 

Wadiingron Post Service 

MOSCOW — Alexander Korzhakov, 
the former bodyguard who was feared as 
head of President Boris Yeltsin's security 
service until he was fired last June, won a 
seat in the lower house of the Russian 
Parliament oo Monday. 

Although he will be just one of 450 
members of the State Duma, Mr. 
Korzhakov's election was no small mat- 
ter for the liberal Russian political elite, 
which reacted with dread ro news of his 
victory. 

Mr. Korzhakov, 46, a former senior 
officer of the KGB. had served as Mr. 
Yeltsin's bodyguard, confidant and ad- 
viser for 1 1 years. He was not only chief 
of a large security apparatus that had 
paramilitary powers and lucrative 
sources of money but also controlled 
access to his boss and had been known 
to intervene on policy matters. He also 
was part of a group that had urged Mr. 
Yeltsin to launch Moscow’s disastrous 
war in Chechnya. 

. Duringtoe presidential campaign last 
year, Mr. Korzhakov was quoted as 
saying publicly that he wanted to call off 
the elections. 

"'Ht Ms long been at odds with Rus- 
sia's liberal democrats, including 
Anaioli. Chubais. Mr. Yeltsin’s chief of 
staff, who played the lead role in getting 
Mr. Korzhakov kicked out June 20. 

Mr. Korzhakov has hinted darkly that 
he has compromising material concern- 
ing on many of those in power — - pre- 
sumably material he gathered as chief of 
the presidential security service. So far, 
he has not revealed the material. 

But as a member of Parliament, he 
will have immunity from prosecution. 


Under the Russian Constitution, he can- 
not be detained arrested or searched 
while a Duma deputy unless he is caught 
while committing a crime. 

Mr. Korzhakov's foes immediately 
expressed fears that he would launch 
new attacks on them. He often battled 
with the commercial -television channel 
NTV, which broadcast .reports at the 
outset of die war in Chechnya that in- 
furiated die Kremlin. 

In a commentary Sunday night, as 
votes were being counted the influ- 
ential NTV. anchor Yevgeni Kiselyov 

Mr. Korzhakov has 
hinted darkly that he has 
compromising materials 
on many men in power. 

lamented that “the compromising ma- 
terials with which he has so far only 
threatened everybody” would “prob- 
ably start to be published” 

“Let those who are awaiting these 
revelations be afraid” Mr. Korzhakov 
told NTV on Monday. ‘ 

Asked by Interfax whether he 
-planned to reveal tte material, he 
replied “Many should fear this.” 

Mr, Korzhakov won election over 10 
other candidates, with a p prox im ately 26 
percent of the vote in Tula, a city south 
of Moscow, filling a vacancy left by 
Alexander Lebed, who became head erf 
Mr. Yeltsin’s Security Council until he, 
too, was fired in October. 

The Tula campaign was a bizarre, 
festive and contused one, in which 
voters were plied with free vodka, tea 
and chocolate. Mr. Lebed was popular 


in the. region, where he had once com- 
manded an airborne division, and he 
endorsed Mr. Korzhakov last auiumn, 
although he later derided him as * ‘just a 
bodyguard.” 

Mr. Korzhakov, an elusive figure, has 
made it clear that be would be no friend 
of the current regime. During the cam- 
paign, be said, he discovered from talk- 
ing to voters that “the current lead- 
ership is inept.” 

“To put it crudely," he said, “it is 
state impotence.” 

■ Yeltsin Fires State TV Chief 

Just one year after giving him one of 
the country's most powerful media jobs, 
Mr. Yeltsin fired Russia’s embattled 
state television chief, replacing him 
frith his deputy. The Associated Press 
reported from Moscow. 

Eduard Sagalayev came under attack 
last week from several t op officials of 
the network, known as RTR. They is- 
sued an open letter accusing him of 
using network funds "for his own gain” 
and running the company according to 
“dictatorship and arbitrary rule.”. 

In a television interview Monday 
night, Mr. Sagalayev denied those 
charges, blaming unidentified “en- 
emies” for using the letter-writers 
against him. 

Mr. Sagalayev said he had asked Mr. 
Yeltsin on Monday to relieve him of his 
duties to preserve morale at the net- 
work. 

Mr. Yeltsin named the television 
commentator Nikolai Svanidze to re- 
place Mr. Sagalayev. Mr. Svanidze 
hosts the weekly newsmagazine show 
“Zerkalo” and has been the network's 
deputy chairman since 1996. 


Muslim-Groat Clash Leaves One Dead 


Agence France- Prrsse 

MOSTAR. Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
One person was killed and about 20 
were wounded Monday as Croats and 
Muslims clashed in the divided town of 
Mostar, UN and military officials said. 

Spanish NATO troops moved into the 
city in aimored. vehicles and separated 
battling crowds after Croats opened fire 
on Muslims visiting a cemetery. 

UN officials said that a crowd of 
about 100 angry Croats, some of them 
armed, had massed outside the 
headquarters of the local representative 
of the international force. Sir Martin 
Garrod. 

Meanwhile, a similar number of 


Muslims gathered on the Carinski 
bridge, across toe Neretva River from 
the Croats. 

Three teams of Spanish troops, each 
consisting of six armored vehicles and 
30 soldiers, were deployed on toe bridge 
to keep the two crowds apart. 

A UN spokesman, Alexander Ivanko, 
said the Croats had opened fire on the 
Muslims visiting a cemetery in western 
Mostar, which is held by toe Croats. 

The mufti of Mostar, Sead Smajkic, 
who led the visit to the graves, said, 
‘ ‘Our intention was to go peacefully and 
pray in a dignified manner.” 

UN workers m Mostar said the fight- 
ing broke out after the Muslims con- 


fronted a Croatian crowd holding a car- 
nival at which they intended to burn an 
effigy of Bosnia's Muslim president, 
Alija Izetbegovic. 

Tensions between the rival ethnic 
groups have remained high despite a 
nominal Muslim -Croatian political al- 
liance. 

Aid workers say the city is tense after 
15 explosions, many from hand-held 
rockets, in toe center in toe last week. 

NATO troops have stepped up 
patrols. 

Mostar was toe scene of fierce fight- 
ing in toe Bosnian war when Croatian 
forces tried, without success, to drive 
toe Muslims out 


Albanian Protesters Strip 
Police and Burn Uniforms 


The Associated Press 

VLQRE, Albania — Angry crowds 
threw stones and attacked riot police in 
this southern port Monday, beating 
some policemen and then burning their 
uniforms, guns and equipment in a pub- 
lic bonfire. One man was killed and 
about 50 injured, state television re- 
ported. 

The police responded by firing in the 
air. Some stood on the roofs of buildings 
and threw stones down on the crowd, 
but they appeared unable to quell the 
second consecutive day of violent un- 
rest over the failure of high-risk in- 
vestment schemes. 

Vlore, 95 kilometers (60 miles) south 
of Tirana, has been toe flashpoint for 
rioting that began when toe investment 
funds, in which hundreds of thousands 
of Albanians put their life savings, 
began to collapse. Protests, some ac- 
companied by sporadic violence, began 
in mid-January and have occurred in a 
half-dozen Albanian cities. 

The protests have taken on an anti- 
government focus because many people 
believe that President Sati Berisha’s 
Democratic Party either benefited from 
the schemes or should have acted sooner 
to control them. 

Mr. Berisha was meeting in Tirana, 
the capital. Monday with members of 
Parliament. 

A government statement accused 
leftists of organizing the violence. The 
statement, carried by the state news 
agency ATA, added that law enforce- 
ment officials “are fully determined 
and ready to respond to terrorist acts.” 

State TV said a man had been killed, 
though it did not say how he died or 
whether he was a policeman or a 
demonstrator. 

About 50 people, including police- 
men, were hospitalized in Vlore. ac- 


cording to the television report. On 
Sunday, at least 22 people were injured 
in clashes between toe police and ri- 
oters. 

Up to 7,000 people attacked about 
100 riot police Monday morning, trap- 
ping 20 of them who had fled into a ' 
building. 

The crowd pursued them, beat them, 
stripped off their uniforms and seized 
guns, helmets and shields. The police- . 
men then were let go, and the uniforms ' 
and equipment were burned in the cen- ' 
ter of town. 

Then toe crowd surged toward a po- ’ 
lice station, throwing stones and flam- 
ing sticks wrapped in rags. 

A helicopter landed on the roof of the 
police station and evacuated three po- 
licemen. Witnesses said their faces were ■ 
bloodied. 

On Sunday, uniformed men beat op- 
position leaders who have criticized the 
government’s handling of the invest- - 
mem schemes and threatened others in a : 
caf£ frequented by politicians and jour- * 
nalists. 

Neriian Ceka, head of the opposition 1 
Democratic Alliance party, was struck , 
several times with a truncheon. i 

The Interior Ministry blamed toe at- ! 
tack on “drunken people” and said the j 
police were investigating. 2 

Hundreds of thousands of Albania's ) 
3.2 million people, for decades ihe| 
poorest in Europe, invested their life • 
savings or money they earned working { 
abroad in the funds, which toe gov-> 
emment outlawed as pyramid! 
schemes. | 

The funds offered extremely high in-} 
terest rates, with the first investors paid I 
from the deposits of laier investors.} 
They eventually failed when no newt 
investors were brought in. and later in-j 
vestors lost their money. 1 


BRIEFLY 


Military Court Gets 
Priebke’s Retrial . 

ROME — The highest court in 
Italy decided Monday that a military 
court should hear the war crimes re- 
trial of a former SS captain, Erich 
Priebke, a court official said. 

The court had to rule on which 
branch was competent to hear the 
case, after military and civilian ju- 
dicial authorities both concluded they 
did not have jurisdiction. 

Mr. Priebke, $4, is tied to the mas- 
sacre of 335 men and boys in 1 944. 

At his first trial, a military court in 
August found Mr. Priebke guilty but ! 
freed him, citing an expired statute of 
limitations. The ruling caused an upt 
roar, and the verdict was quashed on 
appeal in October. ( Reuters ) 

Neo-Nazi Editor 
Convicted in Berlin 

BERLIN — The young editor of a 
neo-Nazi newspaper was convicted 
Monday of disseminating unconsti- 
tutional propaganda and incitement to 
racial hatred. He was sentenced toone 
year in prison. 

The presiding judge, Hans-Juergen 
Bruening, called the 25-year-old de- 
fendant, Hans-Christian Wendt, a 
“spiritual arsonist” and “a con man 
blinded by ideology.” 

Mr. Wendt, a leading member of an 
extreme rightist group, The Nation- 
als, edited the Berlin-Brandenburger 
Zeitung, a neo-Nazi newspaper. The 
court also found he participated in the 
dissemination of neo-Nazi pamph- 
lets. (AP) 

30,000 Dutch Pigs 
To Be Slaughtered 

AMSTERDAM — The Nether- 
lands will begin toe slaughter of 
30,000 pigs Monday in a bid to contain 
a swine fever outbreak that has spread 
to 1 1 farms in the south of the country 
in a week, the Farm Ministry said. 


“The pigs will be killed at a lo- 
cation at the center of the outbreak.” a 
spokeswoman said. Swine fever is 
highly contagious but is not harmful 
to humans. (Reuters) 

Moldova Holds Talks 
With NATO Leader 

KISHINEV, Moldova — The 
NATO secretary-general. Javier So- 
laria Madariaga, discussed the alli- 
ance’s planned expansion with Mol- 
dovan leaders Monday. 

Moldova — a former Soviet re- 
public of 43 million people — is not 
seeking membership. in theJ^ortH.At- 
lantic Treaty Organization, but has 
.said it is eager to serve as an in- 
termedihry between the ^Western al- 
liance and Russia, which opposes its 
enlargement 

“We are facing important decisions 
to be taken in toe security on Europe in 
1997,” Mr. Solana said upon his ar- 
rival for a one-day visit “and I would 
like to exchange views with the au- 
thorities of your country.” (AP) 

3 Go to Mir Station 
In Russian Rocket 

KALININGRAD, Russia — A 
Russian rocket carrying a German 
and two Russian astronauts to toe Mir 
space station lifted off successfully 
Monday. 

It took off from the Baikonur cos- 
modrome in Kazakstan. A burst of 
applause broke out ar toe control cen- 
ter in Kaliningrad when, nine minutes 
after liftoff, the third stage of toe 
rocket detached as planned, sending 
the capsule on its route to Mir. 

A German physicist, Reinhold 
Ewald, accompanied by Vassili 
Tsiblyev and Alexander Lazutkin of 
Russia, is scheduled to spend three 
weeks on Mir. 

Mr. Ewald, 40. will undergo a , 
series of experiments, many of them 
on the effects of space travel on hu- i 
man health, in preparation for longer 
space journeys in the future. (AFP) I 


Tf* : - 









BALLY 

SWITZERLAND 


SINCE 1851 







** • 


PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAy SUNPAX FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 



PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY II, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


24 Slayings 
Mark Finish 
Of Ramadan 
In Algeria 

/'/<«■ A «. i, uti-J 

ALGIERS — Armed groups killed 
24 people at the end of Algeria's most 
violent holy month of Ramadan since a 
Muslim insurgency began five years 
ago. sources said Monday. 

In the most brutal attack, attackers 
disguised as policemen in the south Al- 
giers suburb of Eucalyptus on Friday slit 
The throats of 14 civilians from three 
families, said people who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity. 

Another group killed a couple and 
their six-month-old child in Beau Frais- 
ier. a neighborhood in the hills of Al- 
giers these people said. 

Mohammed Madani. a 52-year-old 
former soccer star, was shot aiid killed 
as he left a mosque in Vieux Kouba. a 
south Algiers suburb, after Friday pray- 
ers. his family said. 

Outside tlie capital, attackers slashed 
or hacked to death six civilians in Draa 
Senane. near Medea. 100 kilometers (60 
miles* south of the capital, the sources 
said. Some of the victims were be- 
headed. 

A wave of massacres and car bomb- 
ings killed 550 people and wounded 700 
during Ramadan. Cemetery keepers 
have been busy, trying to keep up with 
burying the dead. 

“We're overwhelmed, the graves we 
dig every day aren't enough." said a 
gravedigger in Ai Alia cemetery on the 
eastern edge of the capital. 

More than 60.000 people have been 
killed by Muslim militants and Algerian 
security forces since the insurgency 
began. 

The Muslim uprising started when 
the government canceled parliamentary 
elections in January 1992 that the Is- 
lamic Salvation Front was expected to 
win. The militants seek to establish a 
state based on Islamic law. 

Madagascar Cyclone Toll Is 53 

t.iv/;.Y From e -Prase 

ANTANANARIVO. Madagascar — 
At least 53 people were killed and more 
than 500.000 made homeless by a trop- 
ical cyclone that struck southern 
Madgascar two weeks ago. according to 
the latest official toll, which was issued 
Monday. 

The figure is provisional as two dis- 
tricts are still cut off. 



■ L - 



■Tofin Hrrm«i‘ - (Tinn-Plf"- 

Rosalia Arteaga sitting at ber desk in the presidential palace in Quito, after her appointment as head of a caretaker government. 

Interim Leader Hints at Holding Power in Quito 




isa 


K'MW -KuvC 




Ojudia Ltiiit/Keulcii 

The ousted Ecuadoran president, Abdala Bucaram. 


Reuters 

QUITO. Ecuador — The new interim 
president, Rosalia Arteaga, raised 
doubts Monday about a military- backed 
deal to hand over power to the head of 
Congress as early as Tuesday. 

On Sunday. Miss Arteaga was ap- 
pointed head of a caretaker government 
as part of an agreement between law- 
makers and the armed forces to end the 
crisis that erupted Thursday when Pres- 
ident Abdala Bucaram was ousted by 
Congress on grounds of alleged mental 
incompetence. 

Congressional sources said the deal 
was based on the understanding that 
Miss Arteaga would step down within a 
few days, once legislation was approved 
allowing the congressional leader. Fa- 
bian Alarcon, to be appointed interim 
head of state. 

Mr. Alarcon, who would retain Miss 
Arteaga as vice president, would serve 
until August 1998, when new elections 
would be held. 

But Miss Arteaga, a 40-year-old law- 
yer and former education minister, 
raised doubts about the “transition 
deal 1 ' in a news conference at the pres- 
idential palace Sunday. She said Mr. 
Alarcon would be unable to assume the 
presidency until constitutional reforms 
were approved allowing Congress to ap- 
point a president 


Such reforms require the approval of 
more than two-thirds of the 82-member 
Congress, and Mr. Alarcon, the only 
likcl> candidate, could have a difficult 
time mustering the necessary votes. 

Mr. Alarcon was initially voted in as 
president by Congress on Thursday, 
after two days of demonstrations protest- 
ing Mr. Bucaram ’s austerity plan had 
paralyzed the country. But legal ques- 
tions arose over the ability of legislators 
to unilaterally select a replacement pres- 
ident. 

Mr. Bucaram gave up his fight for the 
presidency Sunday after the military 
withdrew its support 
The accord that paved the way for Mr. 
Alarcon to succeed Miss Arteaga spe- 
cifies that he could be appointed by a 
simple majority. But Miss Arteaga said 
the deal was legally flawed. 

“Under the current constitution. Con- 
gress does not have the capacity to des- 
ignate a president." she said, adding that 
it needed to “enact the pertinent reforms 
in order to proceed.*' 

She said she intended to remain in 
office "as long as necessary to restore 
democratic order.” 

Mr. Alarcon said Miss Arteaga, who 
spoke about the direction economic and 
social policy would take under her gov- 
ernment. appeared to be suffering from 
delusions of grandeur. 


BRIEFLY 


Pope Hopes to Visit Holy Land 

JERUSALEM — Pope John Paul il wishes to visit the 
Holy Land within the next three years, a Vatican envoy 
to Id" Israel’s chief rabbi Monday. 

“He expressed a great wish io come, and especially, if 
possible, before the war 2000." Cardinal Edward Cas- 
sidy told the rabhi. Israel Meir Lau. Cardinal Cassidy said 
the visit would not take place this year. 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel invited 
the pope to visit when the two leaders met at the Vatican 
last Monday. Israel and the Holy See established dip- 
lomatic relations in December 1 993. Mr. L-au noted that he 
had also extended an invitation to the pope on bchal I ot the 
foreign minister at the time. Shimon Peres, in 1993. 

Cardinal Cassidy, who heads the Pontifical Commission 
for Religious Relations with the Jewish people, suggested 
that the pope's visit might depend cm progress in the Arab- 
Lsraeli peace process. "It is something very high on ln> 
pro cram as far as desires are concerned, but actually it 
depends a little bit on how the situation develops." he 
said.” MP) 

Voters Registering in Nigeria 

LAGOS — Nigerians began registering Monday for 
elections, pun of the military government's program to 
transfer to civilian rule. 

Nigeria's electoral commission said it expected to 
register about 50 million voters, in a population of about 
100 million, w ithin the next 10 days. 

At St. Peter's registration center on Ajele street in central 
Lagos, more than" 150 people had registered within two 
hours of the opening. “I'm registering because I want to 
make sure there is a change of government next year.’ ' said 
Ade Eniola. a young man wailing in line at the center. 

Nigeria's last attempt at democracy ended in chaos 
when the previous military ruler annulled j presidential 
vote in 1993. General Sani Abacha, who seized power in 
the aftermath of the annulment, has promised to handover 
power to an elected president next year, but his critics say 
the transition program is a ruse to perpetuate his own 
rule. t Renters l 

Palestinian Women to Be Freed 

JERUSALEM — Israel's Supreme Court cleared the 
way Monday for the release of 23 Palestinian women held 
prisoner, throwing out an appeal by families of Israeli 
terror victims. 

The women, w hose release was promised in the interim 
Israel-Palesline agreement signed by the previous Israeli 
government, were expected to be freed Tuesday. Yasser 
Arafat, the Palestinian leader, planned to greet them in the 
West Bank town of Ramullah following their release from 
the Tel Mond prison in central Israel. 

Separately, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of 
Israel held a cubiner session to discuss plans for further 
Israeli troop withdrawals from rural areas of the West 
Bank. 

Under the accords, the first of three such handovers to 
Mr. Arafat's government is supposed to take place by 
March 7. The extent of the withdrawals, which has not 
been specified, threatens to become the next major stum- 
bling block in the peace process. 

David Bar-1 lan. Mr. Netanyahu's top aide, said no 
decision had been made on the scope of the withdraw als. 
Defense Minister Yitzhak Mordechai stressed at the 
cabinet meeting that Israel alone was responsible for 
determining the size of the withdraw als. i AT l 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1997 


PACE 7 


INTERNATIONAL 


} Celestial Private Eyes for Hire 

Cover the Hot Tub: Somebody May Soon Be Watching 


By William J. Broad 

Wen 1 York Times Sr rvur 

NEW YORK — ■ Conuner- 
■ ciai spy satellites are about to 
lei anyone with a credit card 
peer down from the heavens 
into the compounds of dic- 
tators or the backyards of 
neighbors with high fences. 

The first satellite is sched- 
uled to fly into orbit in April 
or May, another in December 
and perhaps a dozen in all 
'£ during the next decade. 

The launchings will end a 
monopoly that advanced na- 
tions held for nearly four de- 
cades on orbital espionage. 

Rivaling military spy craft 
in the sharpness of their pho- 
tos, die new U.S.-made satel- 
lites are designed to see objects 
on the ground as small as a 
yard or so in diameter — cars 
and hot tubs, for example. 

While the new craft pose 
knotty security and privacy 
questions, their builders tend 
to play down such issues and 
instead pledge to aid carto- 
graphy, law enforcement, oil 
exploration, disaster relief 
ana urban planning, among 
•'other things. 

“The possibilities are end- 
less,” says a brochure from 
Earthwatch Inc. of Long- 
mont, Colorado, which is first 
in line to send up the new 
satellites. “Vacationers will 
plan exotic sailing cruises 
along foreign coasts. Small 
retail businesses will have a 
better understanding of 
demographics.” 

Images are expected to cost 
as little as a few hundred dol- 
lars each, depending on 
whether an order can be filled 
from archives or requires a 
satellite to turn a camera on a 
new part of the Earth. 

The Clinton administration 
approved this commercial use 
of spy technology in 1994 to 
help aerospace companies fa- 
cing post -Co Id War contrac- 
tions and to challenge foreign 
ri vais in the emerging industry 
of civilian surveillance from 
space. Today, much of the 
.American activity involves 


gear and contractors fear once 
were, or still are, part of the 

scrawling government com- 
plex for espionage, as well as 
■ former federal officials. 

While federal and private 
specialists have quietly dis- 
cussed fee shift for years, the 

actual debut of a fleet of com- 
mercial spy satellites is ex- 
pected to prompt wide debate 
over the new industry’s 
promise and peril for nations 
and individuals. 

“The biggest market for 


cormaissance capabilities like 
those of the United States,” 
said John JPike, head of space 
policy at the Federation of 
American Scientists, a private 
group in Washington- “Bui 
it’s good because it’s going to 
significantly improve the 
ability of citizens to monitor 
governments.” • 

To date, the Commerce 
Department, which coordin- 
ates control of the private 
work, has issued licenses Co 
nine U.S. companies, some 


selling phot 
lotion of five 


While the new craft pose knotty security 
and privacy questions, their builders tend 
to play down such issues and instead 
pledge to aid cartography, law 
enforcement, oil exploration, disaster 
relief and urban planning, among other 
things. Foreign governments that cannot 
afford spy satellites are expected to be 
big customers. 


this information is going to be 
foreign governments that 
can’t afford their own recon- 
naissance systems,” said Al- 
bert Wheel on, a former of- 
ficial with the Central 
Intelligence Agency who 
helped shape fee nation’s 
early spy-satellite program. 

“The issue is going to beat 
up the first time we get a real 
crunch between two friends, 
tike Pakistan and India,” he 
added. “Right now, we have 
an incomplete policy. I don’t 
think the government Thought 
through fee issues thoroughly 
enough.” 

Analysts say the implica- 
tions of the shift will probably 
take decades to sort out po- 
litically, militarily and perhaps 
legally, in court cases in- 
volving possible invasions of 
privacy. Over all. they add, the 
subject is exceedingly com- 
plex and ill suited to blanket 
condemnation or praise. 

“It's bad because it’s go- 
ing to give countries like 
Libya and North Korea re- 


wife foreign partners, for 1 1 
different classes of satellites, 
which have a range of recon- 
naissance powers. 

The total number of spy- 
class satellites feat will reach 
orbit is hard to predict, but 
specialists say at least a half- 
dozen are likely to debut in 
fee next two or three years. 

Makers of die satellites say 
fee market for space photos 
might eventually reach bil- 
lions of dollars annually. 

The visual power of spy 
craft is usually expressed as 
the length, in meters, of the 
— * feature that analysts 
can see when photo pro- 
cessing is pushed to the limit. 

In the mid-1980s, the 
French government moved to 
the edge of fee espionage 
realm wife its civilian Spot 
satellites, which had a reso- 
lution of 10 meters (33 feet), 
and could aid urban planning 
and fee reconnaissance of 
large miHtaiy targets, such as 
warships. 

In 1987, Moscow began 


Dorothy Fosdick, 83, Adviser 
On U.S. Foreign Policy, Dies 


By Robert McG. Thomas Jr, 

Nr*? Yort Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Dor- 
othy Fosdick, 83. the foreign 
policy expert who helped 
fashion fee United Nations, 
the Marshall Plan and NATO 
in the 1940s. advised Adlai 
Stevenson in fee 1952 pres- 
idential campaign and then 
spent nearly three decades as 
Senator Henry Jackson's 
chief Cold War strategist, 
died last Wednesday at a hos- 
pital in Washington. 

Her sister. Elinor Downs, 
said fee cause of death was 
cardiac arrest. 

From the early months of 
World War II. when fee 
United Stares began planning 
for fee postwar world, until 
President Ronald Reagan 
opened the final phase of the 
struggle against fee Soviet 
Union wife his “evil empire” 
speech in 1983. Ms. Fosdick 
was in the thick of national 
foreign-policy planning and 
debate. 

Along fee way, she con- 
sistently took such a hard line 
against fee Soviet Union and 
was such a passionate and ar- 
ticulate advocate of military 
might that her colleagues 
sometimes had to remind 
themselves that she was. in 
fact, the daughter of the Rev- 


erend Harry Emerson Fos- 
dick, fee famous pacifist pas- 
tor of Riverside Church, the 
Rockefeller-backed bastion 
of New York liberalism. 

After obtaining a doctorate 
in public law from Columbia 
University. Ms. Fosdick 
taught sociology and political 
theory. 

Her academic career came 
to an end early in 1942, when 
she was recruited by fee State 
Department's opaquely 
named Division of Special 
Research and was assigned to 
begin planning for a postwar 
international organization. 

Over fee next few ' 
she helped shape die 
barton Oaks and San Fran- 
cisco conferences, which laid 
the groundwork for the 
United Nations. 

Her contributions were so 
impressive feat in 1948 at the 
age of 34, she became the 
only woman on fee State De- 
partment's newly formed 
Policy Planning Staff, a high- 
level, in-house think tank of 
nine strategic planners whose 
work tinder George Kennan 
and later Paul Nine helped 
shape the Truman Doctrine, 
fee Marshall Plan and fee 
North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization. 

During the 1952 presiden- 
tial campaign, Ms. Fosdick 


became so enamored wife the 
Democratic nominee, Adlai 
Stevenson, that she became 
his chief foreign policy ad- 
viser and had a romantic fling 
wife him. 

In 1954, after a period as a 
freelance writer, Ms. Fosdick, 
whose books included “What 
is liberty?” and “Common 
Sense and World Affairs,” 
became chief foreign policy 
adviser to Senator Jackson, 
fee Washington State Demo- 
crat known for his expertise in 
military affairs. 

In time, Ms. Fosdick: was 
eclipsed on fee public stage by 
some of her admiring young 
prot£g6s, among them 
Richard Perie, who became an 
assistant secretary of defense, 
and Elliott Abrams, who be- 
came an assistant secretary of 
state. 

Donald MacDonald, 88, 
US. Rear Admiral 

Rear Admiral Donald John 
MacDonald, 88, who com- 
manded a destroyer in some 
of fee heaviest sea battles of 
World WarTI. died on Jan. 17 
at his home in Washington. 

In 1940, he became exec- 
utive officer on the new des- 
troyer O’Bannon and then her 
commander in combat in the 
Solomon Islands in fee Pa- 
cific. 


Bulgaria Clears Way for Early Vote 


Agcncr Froncr-Prrsst 

)HA — The opposition 
lar Union on Monday 
ne fee third party to turn 
j an invitation to form a 
Brian government, pav- 

he way for elections in 
I and ending a month of 
rtainty and protests. _ 
tder the constitution, 
deni Peuir Stoyanov had 
sk three parliamentary 
pings in descending or- 
rf size to form a gov- 
ern to replace fee one led 
e former prime minister, 
i Videnov, who stepped 
i m December with fee 
umy in disarray. 

>w that fee Popular um- 
; coalition of fee Demo- 
: Pony and fee Agrarian 
n. has declined Mr- 
anov’s invitation to fo rm 
remittent, he is free *° 
int a caretaker SP*®"*’ 
and call early elections. 
- Stqyanov . who backs 
- • jtion. had firat to 


form a new government. Un- 
der intense pressure from fee 
opposition, fee Socialists de- 
clined fee offer last Tuesday. 

On Friday, Parliament's 
second largest grouping, fee 
Union of Democratic Forces, 
followed suit. 

The Popular Union, fee 
Union of Democratic Forces 


and the Movement for Rights 
and Freedom have staged a 
month of demonstrations and 
Strikes to press for el e ctions far 
before fee Socialists’ mandate 
expired at fee end of 1 998. 

Press repons said Mayor 
Stefan Sonyansky of Sofia 
could become fee interim 
prime minister. 



grouping, to 


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jtos with a reso- 
: five meters. The im- 
agery, from spy operations, 
was limited geographically 
and badly out of date. But it 
prompted fears in Washing- 
ton of foreign rivals. 

In 1992, the Russians 
raised fee ante by beginning 
to sell old imagery wife a res- 
olution of two meters — good 
enough to see planes, tanks 
and troop movements. 

The Bosh administration 
responded by easing Amer- 
ican regulatory barriers. In 
early 1993, it granted a li- 
cense for a commercial craft 
wife three-meter resolution. 

The Clinton administra- 
tion's 1994 decision was the 
most dramatic stop, giving the 
go-ahead for craft with a res- 
olution of slightly less than one 
meter. 

Today, the rules let U.S. 
companies photograph any- 
thing from space and sell fee 
fresh imagery on the open 
market But the government 
retains the right to switch off 
feeir cameras in time of war or 
international tensions, a plan 
known as shutter control. 

Uae federal government 
also has the right to screen 
and limit the American 
companies* foreign custom- 
ers. Nations likely to be 
denied access to fee imagery 
include Iraq. Libya, Cuba and 
North Korea. But some spe- 
cialists say front companies 
will probably evade export 
prohibitions, as they have re- 
peatedly done for atomic, 
chemical, biological and mis- 
sile technologies. 



Nidx-rii. llnk'IU 


ROSE MONDAY IN COLOGNE — An effigy of Chancellor Helmut Kohl bearing a cost-cutting package. 

Britain Could Be Barred From EU Border Vote 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Britain and Ireland 
could be left out of the decision-making 
process in a future border-free European 
Union, while non-EU members could be 
allowed an active role, the Dutch EU 
presidency suggested Monday. 

Under a proposal submitted to EU 
treaty negotiators, officials from Norway 
and Iceland would be allowed to vote on 
matters concerning the border-free 


Schengen area, while representatives 
fr o m London and Dublin would noL 
‘ ‘These countries are Schengen mem- 
bers,” a Dutch diplomat said, referring 
to Norway and Iceland, two non-EU 
countries. “It would be difficult to ima- 
gine fear Schengen members could not 
sit in on decision-making procedures.” 
At issue is the future of the 1985 Schen- 
gen Agreement, a pact between mostly 
EU countries, which abolishes border 


controls and increases cooperation on po- 
lice matters. Many EU member stales 
want the agreement to be extended to the 
Union when a new treaty is drawn up. 
possibly this summer. Not all EU coun- 
tries have signed up for Schengen, while 
some non-EU members have joined. 

Britain says it will not lift its border 
controls. Ireland, which has an open 
border wife Britain, cannot join Schen- 
gen without London. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 19*1 


L -..-lirl 1 ' 'V'i'rir 



PAGE 8 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1997 

EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Merallk 


INTERNATIONAL 



m RUSHED WITH THE NEW TURK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Feed North Korea 


Germany’s Problems Should Trouble Us, Too 




According to all available indica- 
tions, famine is stalking North Korea. 
• For political reasons, the United States 
thus far is reluctant to feed the hungry. 
It should put those politics aside and 
offer help. 

North Korea is undoubtedly the 
world’s least deserving country. Its 
paranoid and tyrannical rulers keep its 
23 million inhabitants inside a virtual 
prison, and within that isolated Sta- 
linist nation an untold number are 
locked up in a real gulag. 

The government routinely threatens 
South Korea and its allies, the United 
Stales and Japan, in the vilest terms, 
and it has sponsored bloody terrorism. 
Last September, when a North Korean 
spy submarine ran aground off the 
coast of South Korea, commandos 
spilled into the woods. Now the North 
has angered the South by agreeing, in 
its desperation for cash, to accept nu- 
clear waste from Taiwan. 

Mean whi le, old accusations have re- 
appeared of North Korean agents kid- 
napping Japanese girls — allegedly to 
provide models of Japanese behavior 
for North Korean spies-in-training. 

With such a record, it would seem 
obvious that the United States should 
offer no help. In this case, though, the 
obvious answer is not the right one. 

The downfall of the North Korean 
regime is fervently to be wished for. 
but using famine to bring that about is 
more than risky. Famines breed chaos, 
not democracy. The current regime 
could be replaced, difficult as it 


is to imagine, by something worse. 

North Korea's million-man army 
could launch a suicide attack. A hungry 
population could press against the 
South Korean border. 

Even setting those dangers aside, 
humanitarian motives should prevail. 
U.S. policy has long held that starving 
children should be Ted, no matter how 
evil their rulers. U.S. grain went to 
Ethiopia when its regime was un- 
swervingly anti- American (and in the 
process won the respect of many ci- 
vilians who knew what was going on 
and today remember U.S. help). The 
United States helped feed Iraqis, Su- 
danese, Angolans. 

Why is it not upholding this hu- 
manitarian tradition now? Mostly be- 
cause South Korea objects to providing 
food aid. Last fall South Korean of- 
ficials said they would be flexible if 
only the North apologized for the sub- 
marine intrusion. 

Improbably and thanks to US, di- 
plomacy. the North apologized — and 
now the South remains reluctant, in- 
sisting that North Korea engage in 
face-to-face diplomacy. This is a 
worthy goal, but it should have nothing 
to do with the famine. 

In fact, the United States should set 
only one condition for providing food 
— that North Korea allow sufficient 
UN monitors into the country to ensure 
that the food ends up where it should. 

All other issues should be negotiated 
separately. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Don’t Humor Helms 


Trent Lott and his fellow Repub- 
licans may feel a need to humor Jesse 
Helms in his erratic management of the 
Senate Foreign Relations Committee, 
but they only embarrass themselves 
and the Senate by letting Mr. Helms 
hijack a treaty that would ban chemical 
weapons. Mr. Helms plans to set aside 
consideration of the treaty until he can 
force the Stale Department and the 
United Nations to reorganize them- 
selves. That could take years. 

The Chemical Weapons Convention 
bans the production, stockpiling and 
use of chemical weapons and restricts 
international trade of otherwise inno- 
cent chemicals that can be used as 
weapon ingredients. 

It was negotiated by the Republican 
administrations of Ronald Reagan and 
George Bush and signed while Mr. 
Bush was still in office. Endorsed by 
68 nations, it goes into effect this April 
whether or not the United States has 
ratified it. 

If Washington misses that April 
deadline, Americans will be legally 
excluded from the new international 
inspection and monitoring bodies the 
convention establishes, and U.S. 
chemical companies will face punitive 
restrictions treaty negotiators meant to 
be applied to rogue states like Libya, 
Iraq and North Korea. 

Ratification of the convention is 
strongly supported by the Clinton 
administration, America's military 
leadership, the chemical industry, 
most Democrats and many Repub- 
licans. Last year, it was endorsed by 
a bipartisan 13-to-5 majority in the 
Foreign Relations Committee that 
included Republicans Richard Lugar, 
Fred Thompson, Craig Thomas and 
Olympia Snowe. It is also strongly 
supported by such leading Republi- 
can authorities on military issues as 
Senator John McCain and William 


Cohen, the new secretary of defense. 

At present, international law only 
proliibtts countries from being the 
first to use chemical weapons in com- 
bat By extending that ban to pro- 
duction, storage and use, as well as 
monitoring trade in potential weapons 
ingredients, the new convention will 
reduce the risk that American troops or 
civilians will be subjected to chemical 
attack by future enemies or terrorist 
groups. 

Even without the treaty, the United 
States is committed to destroying most 
of its own chemical weapons stocks. 
With it, it will be easier to get other 
countries to eliminate their supplies 
as well. 

That includes a Russian nerve gas 
program Mr. Helms has called atten- 
tion to in recent days. 

Treaty opponents also complain that 
the new inspection system may not be 
able to detect small quantities of pro- 
hibited chemicals. But the Pentagon is 
confident that no militarily significant 
quantities could slip through the 
inspection net. 

The convention looked headed for 
passage last September until the pres- 
idential candidate Bob Dole endorsed a 
pair of amendments that would have 
effectively blocked ratification. That 
swung enough Republican votes to im- 
peril the necessary two-thirds' major- 
ity, leading the Clinton administration 
to withdraw the convention tempor- 
arily from Senate consideration. 

No cme expects Mr. Helms and his 
fellow Republicans to follow the Clin- 
ton administration’s policy recommen- 
dations slavishly, but there is a dif- 
ference between reasonable debate and 
blind obstruction. On a matter of such 
clear importance and bipartisan agree- 
ment, the Senate should not allow itself 
to be manipulated by Mr. Helms. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Brazil’s President 

President Fernando Henrique Car- 
doso’s ambitious reform program for 
Brazil is already bearing spectacular 
fruit, pounding down inflation and lift- 
ing trade barriers just two years into his 
five-year presidential term. But five 
years is just not enough to turn the great 
but limping ship that is Brazil. Which 
is why. if all goes well, the lower house 
of Brazil’s legislature will approve a 
bill that could clear die way for a 
constitutional amendment ro allow 
him to seek re-election. The president 
is currently limited to one term. 

President Cardoso passed his first and 
toughest hurdle when the lower house 
voted in favor of the measure two weeks 
ago. A second lower-house vote must 
now be taken, followed by two votes in 
the upper house. If the legislature says 
yes to the proposed amendment all four 
times, voters will make the final de- 
cision in October 1998. 


When Mr. Cardoso began his pro- 
gram as finance minister in 1994, in- 
flation was running at 5,000 percent 
annually. Today, the rate hovers 
around 10 percent, the lowest level 
since the 1950s. His initiatives toward 
free trade are also making progress. 
But he needs more time to undo the 
barriers built by decades of isolation 
andprorecrionist legislation. 

The president's bid for re-election has 
raised a few eyebrows among those who 
fear it may trigger a re-election fever 
among national leaders across the hemi- 
sphere. Has democracy truly taken root 
in the hemisphere, they wonder. Are 
government institutions strong enough 
to withstand a strengthened executive 
power? These are valid questions. 
However, they don't apply in the case of 
Brazil. There the separation of powers 
and the equilibrium of forces are evi- 
dent Brazilian voters should be able to 
return a successful president to office. 

— Los Angeles Tunes. 


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B ERLIN — Strolling down 
Friedrichstrasse, just a few blocks 
east of what had been the wall, you 
would imagine that an economic mir- 
acle is happening all over again in 
Germany. 

Arising from the drabness that was 
the hallmark of the old Stalinist regime 
is a consumer utopia. For block after 
block, every designer label you’ve ever 
heard of competes for the brightest and 
most stylish store fronL Donna Karan, 
one sign informs us, is coming soon. 

Money is pouring in hone from 
private developers ana from the federal 
government, which is preparing to 
move the capital from Bonn to Berlin. 
The skyline is a thicket of cranes, the 
eastern landscape pockmarked by con- 
struction sites and teeming with earth- 
movers. 

The mere attempt to integrate the 
broken and decrepit economy of the 
East into the West German economy is 
a heroic acL But bold as the project is. 
its costs are high and Germany is in a 
serious funk. Last week it was reported 
that January’s unemployment rate had 
reached 12-2 percent, the highest re- 
corded since the 1930s. fri Berlin itself, 
unemployment went over 15 percent. 

To measure bow worried the polit- 
ical class is about this, you only have to 
notice how often the word “Weimar” 


By E. J. Dionne Jr. 

is now mentioned in the public debate. 
The Weimar Republic tried to implant 
democracy in Germany after World 
War I. It came crashing down in a 
catastrophe of inflation and unemploy- 
ment and Hitler took power. 

The Weimar analogy is strained. Ger- 
many is now a very rich country. It has 
kept inflation in check. And democracy 
is deeply implanted, all the more so by 
the struggle in the East to secure it- In 
the sea of bright lights and fancy labels 
of Friedrichstrasse, there is a slightly 
run-down but welcoming building that 
made the rest of the street passible. The 
“House of Democracy.” as it’s known, 
is where democratic dissidents from the 
old regime plotted and hoped. 

But you can have fewer problems 
than Weimar and still have problems. 
Werner Kolhoff was the spokesman for 
the mayor of Wesi Berlin when the wall 
came down and is now the city editor of 
the daily Berliner Zeitung. He worries 
about an interlocking series of resent- 
ments that economic stagnation is pro- 
ducing; of West against East and East 
against West; of Germans against for- 
eign workers; of the young against the 
system. 

“This new statistic is a shock for die 


country.” said Mr. Kolhoff, who hopes the old Communist regime) and an im- 
the new unemployment numbers will patience with politics in general- 
shake what he sees as a stagnant polit- Peter Glotz, a former Social Demo- 

leal system averse to the word cratic leader who is now the rector of a 
“change.” new university in eastern Germany. r 

A deep caution does characterize speaks of the alienation or young people 
German politicians. The Christian from both of the big political parties. .. 
Democrats of Chancellor Helmut Kohl “Those who are good, young and' 
fust won election after World War II left joined Amnesty International and u 
under Konrad Adenauer’s slogan “No Greenpeace.” he said. * 'Those who are . 
Experiments.” Mr. Kohl’s Christian good, young and right go work for. 
Democrats traditionally characterized BMW.” They forget party politics^ 
themselves as "Safe. Social and Free,” altogether. <■ 

meaning that they would take few risks The hard part is that Germun poiiti-„ 
and preserve Germany’s large welfare ■ dans have a reason for being cautious. ; 


state, its market economy and its demo- 
cratic institutions. 

But the existence of that welfare state 
and a powerful union movement makes 
the main opposition party, the Social 
Democrats, conservative in its own 
way. A party of the democratic left that 
enjoyed its heyday in the 1960s and 
'70s, the Social Democrats have 
achieved so many of their goals that 
they may have more reason to fear 
change than the Christian Democrats. 
Among their achievements: job secu- 
rity, high pay, extensive unemployment 
benefits and universal health coverage. 

Voter frustration with the caution of 
both parties has created strong support 
for third parties (including a big protest 
vote in Berlin for the successor party of 


Their system of mixing social benefits! 
and free markets has worked. It im-., 
planted democracy, created a high de- ' A 
gree of social justice and. until recently,., “ 
led to a thriving market economy. - 

Mr. Kolhoff notes that many Ger- ’ 
mans who want change would also!, 
protect the pans of the system that,! 
have protected them. 

There is no doubt that a rigid system,! 
created by a self-satisfied political class ; 
needs changing. The welfare state , 
needs reforming. But the German “so-.! 
trial market economy,” as it was 
dubbed, is a remarkable achievement of f 
postwar democracy. The trouble it's in.! 
depresses Germany, but it should worry 
the rest of us, too. 1 

Washington Post Writers Gmup. ~ 


While Americans Fret, Foreigners Applaud U.S. Success 


W ASHINGTON — Any- 
one who regularly en- 
counters foreigners here or 
abroad comes to know that, 
once you put aside the squeak of 
the day, they often appear to 
possess a higher regard for the 
United States than many Amer- 
icans do. We get caught up in 
sweaty partisan debate about 
particulars, and tend to discount 
our own high-flying rhetoric. 
They see our larger capacities, 
and compare our, to them, suc- 
cessful strivings with their un- 
requited ones. 

Take the president's State of 
the Union address last week. The 
programmatic core of it, his edu- 
cation program, was met with 
telling volleys from sundry 


By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


Washington ramparts and im- 
mediately submitted to the polit- 
ical wars. On past form. 


however, you can expect many 
Europeans to take tins program 
more positively — as further ev- 


idence of American seriousness 
in gearing up for a global econ- 
omy in the postindustxial age. 
Education as economic ladder 
and social solvent is something 
that Europe 's students of rigidity 
can understand. 

The special scandal of the 
European political economy is 
the unemployment rate — twice 
the American figure, stubbornly 
resistant to constraint and es- 
pecially deadly to fee young. 
Europeans are aware to the 
point of shame that year after 
year their societies are consign- 
ing large numbers of their 
young to the dole — a generous 
dole by American standards, but 
a life without dignifying work. 

Meanwhile, many Europeans 
stand amazed at die U.S. per- 
formance in creating jobs — at a 
rate of 2 million-plus a year — 
wife good growth and low in- 


flation thrown in. This record 
strikes Europeans as an un- 
maichable triumph of social 
policy as well 3S economic man- 
agement Yes, there are good 
jobs and not-so-good jobs, 
homeless people, guns, drugs, an 
underclass, but fee provision of 
work for young people coming 
of working age marks payment 
on a prime generational due. 

Here we come to the nub of it. 
The Europeans invented the so- 
cial contract embedded in the 
modem welfare state, and now 
they can neither afford it nor 
adequately alter its terms. We 
Americans lash ourselves for 
falling into the same bind, but 
from the trans- Atlantic perspec- 
tive our efforts to break out look 
far bolder and more effective 
than Europe's own. 

President BUI Clinton boas- 
ted in fee State of the Union dial 


wife four years of growth in his 
first term, “we” won back the 
basic strength of the American 
economy. You do not have to 
give him all the credit in order to 
grant that on the post -Cold War 
political measure on which 
these things are now judged, the 
American economic perfor- 
mance establishes American 
global leadership just as surely 
as fee American military per- 
formance did in the Gulf War. 

Remember “anti-American- 
ism”? It is hard to recall a time 
when the run of politically 
minded Europeans that on 
American journalist meets here 
was more openly admiring and 
respectful of America. 

Ending a six-year Washington 
posting recently, the Financial 
Times columnist Michael 
Prowse delivered a paean to fee 
American historical achieve- 
ment in defeating Nazi Ger- 
many, containing communism. 


aiding Western Europe and the 
developing countries and ensur- 
ing “the survival of a broacuy 
free-market global system dic- 
ing decades when nearly all of 
Europe's intellectuals woe bit- 
terly opposed to the veiy concept 
of laissez-faire." 

The greatness of the United 
States, he concluded, lies in its 
commitment to individual free- 
dom: “Nothing else accounts 
for its extraordinary dynamisqi, 
for its breathtaking innovation 
in every field from science atjd 
culture to business and sport.” 

Not feat America has de- * ; 
livered to all its citizens the fiijl 
promise of a free society. There 
can be no excuse for slacking 
off. But it is rewarding if rupt 
also helpful to see ourselves as 
— by my impression — maqy 
others see us. especially now 
feat we are being seen in a fa- 
vorable light , t 

The Washington Post. 


Balanced Budget Bamboozlement: Clinton Postpones the Pain 


W ASHINGTON — The 
Clinton . “balanced” 
budget pretense is now plain to 
see: Delay two-thirds of any 
spending slowdown until after 
leaving office. When fee time to 
cut comes, he'll be gone. 

Do you suppose candidate AI 
Gore, scrambling leftward for 
fee Democratic nomination in 
2000, will then subscribe to pro- 
posals loaded on fee back end 
for reducing the rate of spend- 
ing made by President Bill Clin- 
ton in 1997? Or that a President 
Gore would cut environmental 
spending in half, as Mr. Clin- 
ton’s budget now proposes? 

Hold not fee breath. We 
should ask the VP if he will cany 


By William Safire 


out promises made in today’s 
Clinton budget by the man who 
won’t be there. He can oily re- 
spond wife a mouthful of mush. 

The rhetoric of “balance” 
being perpetrated by Mr. Clin- 
ton is a fraud. He orates about 
making “fee tough choices,” 
but — wife the exception of the 
gutsy way he double-crossed 
gullible veterans — he shoves 
the hard part beyond his pres- 
idency. Tough choices get post- 
poned until tomorrow. 

If this budget is any guide, Mr. 
Gore will kick fee can on to fee 
day after tomorrow. This year, 
be had one big opportunity to sop 


up red ink — by getting Mr. 
Clinton to put the valuable 
broadcast spectrum up for public 
auction, as FCC Chairman Reed 
Hundt, a Gore ally, privately 
urged. 

But Mr. Gore was not about 
to deny the media lobby its cor- 
porate welfare; instead, he is- 
sued one forlorn bleat about 
broadcasting in the public in- 
terest, as his cover for fee 
missed opportunity to bring fee 
Treasury tens of billions for the 
public's airwaves. 

The second fraud in the Clin- 
ton “someday balance” is the 
pretense of tax cuts. Almost 


First the Commies , Now Clean Air 


N EW YORK — Here we 
go again. 

Hoping to prevent 40.000 
premature deaths per year 
while easing the health prob- 
lems of children wife asthma 
and other respiratory ill- 
nesses, the Clinton adminis- 
tration is proposing tough new 
anti-pollution standards that 
would lower the current levels 
of smog and soot in fee air. 

Industrial leaders do oot 
think this is a good idea. They 
have already launched a multi- 
million-doUar assault on fee 
new proposals, complaining 
they will cost too much money, 
will slow down the economy, 
will raise fee price of consumer 
goods, will force people to car- 
pool and — perhaps most 
ominously — will threaten the 
weekend barbecue. 

If this were a sporting event, 
I might ask for whom you 
were rooting — the kids with 
asthma who have a tough time 
breathing whenever there's a 
bad air day or the powerful 
representatives of the oil in- 
dustry. fee mining industry, 
fee Association of Intemation- 
. al Automobile Manufacturers, 
the American Bus Associ- 
ation, the Chemical Manufac- 
turers Association, etc. 

The problem* wife the in- 
dustry groups is that they lack 
credibility. 

They always claim that tak- 
ing steps to improve air quality 
will lead to economic catas- 
trophe. U.S. News & World 
Report, in January 1976, noted 
feat E. B. Speer, chaiiman of 
the board of U-S. Steel, had 
declared that “fee lifeblood of 
America's economic strength’ ’ 
was being undermined by fee 
Clean Air Act of 1970. 

Mr. Speer wanted the law 


By Bob Herbert 

weakened. Luckily, a more 
sensible approach prevailed. 
In 1977 fee law was expanded 
and strengthened. 

An article last month in fee 
National Journal had an item 
that showed just bow wrong 
industry can be. The article 
pointed out that during fee 
1990 Clean Air Act debates, 
“electric utility industry offi- 
cials asserted that curbing sul- 
fur dioxide emissions would 
cost $10,000 per ton. Today 
reductions are being made for 
as little as $100 per ton.” 

The new standards pro- 
posed by fee Environmental 
Protection Agency would 
Iowa: fee permissible levels of 
ground-level ozone (com- 
monly known as smog) and the 
airborne microscopic particles 
feat typically result from the 
burning of coal, gasoline, oil 
and diesel fueL These particles 
are technically known as par- 
ticulate matter and are com- 
monly referred to as sool 

A series of well-docu- 
mented scientific and medical 
studies have linlmri ozone and 
particulate matter to decreases 
in lung function and other 
forms of respiratory distress in 
children and adults, to in- 
creases in emergency-room 
visits and hospital admissions 
and to increases in mortality. 

According to fee American 
Lung Association, children 
playing outdoors in ozone 
levels 33 percent below the 
current standard have experi- 
enced as much as a 20 percent 
loss of lung function. The prob- 
lem is worsened by fee fact feat 
ozone levels tend to be highest 
on warm, sunny days — when 


kids are most likely to be play- 
ing outside. 

Mortality studies, accord- 
ing to the association, have 
shown that “the average life 
span shortening resulting from 
exposure to particulates is on 
fee order of two yeans.” That 
implies, association officials 
said, “feat many individuals 
in fee population have lives 
shortened by many years.” 

Big business contends that 
it would cost too much to do 
much about these problems. 
Overall air quality is improv- 
ing, so why bother to do more? 
If fee kids are gagging, if fee 
old folks are wheezing and 
gasping for breath, if some of 
our lives are somewhat 
shortened — well, that’s the 


every dollar of “cuts” — as in 
his plan to subsidize years of 
college to remedy fee failure of 
union-stultified lower schools 
— is offset by proposed tax in- 
creases elsewhere, or by his ex- 
tensions of taxes due to expire. 
His expected tax revenues pre- 
sume that fee business cycle has 
been repealed. 

And bow is the Republican 
Congress responding to these 
pie-in-the-sky promises of 
budget balance in fee next mil- 
lennium? By perpetrating a 
fraud of its own — slyly pre- 
tending to take the Clinton pro- 
posal seriously. 

This is what's on fee ele- 
phant’s memory: Last year, 
wife Gingrich talk of willingly 
taking a “train wreck” of gov- 
ernment shutdown to achieve 
an end to decades of deficits, fee 
poll -driven Mr. Clinton sav- 
aged the deficit hawks by heap- 
ing compassion on dependent 
old folks and single women. 

That’s- why we hear no more 
brave Republican talk of the 
president's budget being “dead 
on arrival.” Instead. Trent 
Lott’s strategy is to welcome the 
Clinton fake-balance as a basis 
for compromise and then nibble 
it to death. Balance, like God or 
fee Devil, will be in fee details. 

Maybe it’s politically astute 
to counter a phony budget-bal- 
ancing act wife a phony wel- 
come. But by fighting pretense 
wife pretense — by letting the 
president bamboozle the public 
mto believing we are already on 
the road to ending deficits — 
the Republicans undercut both 
current budget balancing and 


fee realism needed for a bal- 
anced budget amendment - 

Most Democrats don't waju 
that amendment because ‘it 
would make permanent today* s 
taxpayer tough-mindedness. 
They’ll try to generate fears *f»t 
such discipline will cause a de- 
pression and sink Social Secu- 
rity, but their best argument -is 
based on logic: Why amend die 
constitution when a balanced 
budget is just around fee 
comer? !; 

The truth is that it is nOL 
Recent declines in ' the deficit 
are a result of booming times, 
not normal times. Splitting fee 
difference between Mr. Clin- 
ton's budget and timid Repub- 
lican counterproposals won't 
stop fee red ink. 

u we are to reduce fee de- 
bilitating dependence on gov- 
ernment, we must let workers 
and investors keep more of their 
earnings and savings. And if we , 
are to reduce government bor- 
rowing, we must curtail enti- 
tlement spending now. starting 
this year in the real America, 
not wait until “out years” in 
Never-Neverland. 

Says Mr. Clinton: Not !to 
worry, balance is on the way, 
delay fee spending curbs ai ?d 
trust my successor. 

The Republican response 
should be: Stop fooling fee 
people wife promises of “put 
years.” Our children will be 
forced to pay interest tomorrow 
on the debt we choose to run up 
today. It's up to us, now, to tin 
fee crashing burden of debt from 
our next generation. 

The New York Times. 


The Environmental Protec- 
tion Agency, in its cost-ben- 
efit analysis of fee proposed 
regulations, estimated the 
costs at $8 5 billion and the 
benefits, including saved lives 
and reduced medical ex- 
penses, at $120 billion. 

But industry strategists are 
focused on other matters. A 
radio spot that was prepared to 
run in Chicago but was even- 
tually pulled said that barbecue 
grills and even lawn mowers 
might be banned by the new 
regulations. A voice in the ad 
expressed fear feat we Amer- 
icans might be forced “to 
change fee way we live." 

You might have thought that 
some thins equivalent to fee 
Communist threat had arrived, 
and that fee evils associated 
wife clean air must be resisted 
at any and all costs. Except that 
we’ve heard this hysteria be- 
fore. The proponents of bad air 
need a new approach. 

The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Republican Rx 

ALBANY, New York — The 
Republican majority in fee State 
Legislature, which began busi- 
ness with a c o m pr ehensive pro- 
gramme for the reform of 
everything and was to take a 
short cut to fee millennium, now 
finds its resolution sicklied o'er 
with the pale case of apprehen- 
sion lest the party has, in the 
Western phrase, “bitten off more 
than a chew. ’ 1 Senator Platt, who 

went South to enjoy die fruits 
of victory, has been sum- 
moned to avert further calamity. 

1922: Indian Massacre 

ALLAHABAD, India — Graphic 
details of fee massacre of 22 
Indian police last week by 
Gandhi volunteers at Chaun 
Chaura. in the Gorakpur district 
are published today [Feb. 8] in 
the Pioneer. About 3000 vol- 
unteers formed into a proces- 
sion and, headed by 4 or 5 men 


in homespun clothes carrying m 
Swaraj (Home Rule) flags, 
marched to a police station. 
After setting fire to the station 
and driving the police out of $>e 
building, the mob killed them 
in the most brutal fashion. K. 

1947: Peace Treaties 

PARIS — Peace treaties between 
the Allied nations and Italy, Ro- 
mania, Bulgaria, Hungary and 
Finland were signed in Paris yes- 
terday [Feb. 10] in fee Galerie de 
la Paix of the French Foreign 
Ministry. The signing was done 
amid an atmosphere of high pro- 
tocol but under strong protest 
from all the former satellite Axis I 

countries except Finland. Not 
permitted to make verbal pro- ! 
tests during the ceremony as fee 
result of a Big Four decision last 
week, fee representatives of j 
fee defeated nations took excep- 
bon to fee treaties by means 
of diplomatic notes which they 
filed through proper channels. 







Mini and maxi from the 1970s, Victorian madras-check dress and lattice dress by Vionnet from the 1930s. 


c By Suzy Menkes 

ji l me m otion al Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — One hand holds a hai 
box; the other is tucked into a fur 
muff. You can almost hear the dp- 
tap of dainty feet and the swish of 
the bustled velvet skirt. The parade of be- 
hatted. Belle Epoque. doll-size figurines 
isone of the rare moments when fashion 
springs to life in France's new Musee de 
la;Mode (Fashion Museum). 

‘ It also vibrates from the video screens 
inside the display cases: here a vivid 
glimpse of modem street style in all its 
rtjadcap diversity; there a milliner in the 
deprived war years making frivolous 
Parisian confections out of wood shav- 
ifigs, or a tangoing couple expressing the 
ertergy of 1920s fashion. 

' “It is difficult to catch a fleeting mo- 
ment when fashion is so ephemeral — so 
I want to make people think for them- 
selves and to see the exhibition as a work 
irf progress,” says Lydia Kamiisis, the 
museum’s curator. 

‘ The objects on display in the 1,500- 
s#iare-meter (16,000-square-fbot) per- 
manent exhibition space will change 
every six months — to rotate the 16.000 
aiphive costumes and 35.000 accessories 
and to encourage die puhlic to make 
regular visits. 

.! The museum — which has been beset 
by political power straggles — finally 
opened. last month with a society gala. 
The dinner was presided over by France's 
culture minister, Philippe Douste-Blazy, 
arid Helene David-Weifl, president of the 
central union of decorative arts, who says 
that the museum will confirm Paris as 
“the capital of creation, ideas, savoir- 
feire and refinement.” 

‘The three-floor museum, which in- 
cludes a documentation and study center 
dnd state-of-the-art technology, is now 
housed in the Rohan wing of the Louvre, 
with its entrance up a noble stairway 
from the Musee des Arts Decoratifs. 

Yet the initial impression of this fash- 
ion museum is disappointment. Is it die 
battleship-gray walls designed to give a 
neutral background? Or the show’s 
theme of “body geometry.” which 
seems too arcane to tell the exhilarating 


tale of 20th-century fashion and the so- 
ciological changes it reflects? 

A silhouette frieze showing fashion’s 
changing shapes from crinolines through 
bustles to miniskirts makes a striking 
visual introduction. But the story then 
unfolds backward — starting with an 
indeterminate long dress and a cyber- 
space suit to represent the 1990s and then 
back, by decade and century, to the days 
when a woman was symbolically caged 
in a paniuered slrirt or crinoline. 

The story of this century is the eman- 
cipation of body and spirit, and Kamitsis 
picks on pants for women as the key. 

"They were die motor for a new type 
of society," she says. “Since the in- 
troduction of pants, there has been noth- 
ing so radical." 

Yet you will search in vain for the 
symbolic Yves Saint Laurent pantsuit 
that expressed woman striding into a 
man’s world. Although the sexual re- 
volution is represented by a mini skirt 
and bodysuit by Andre Courreges- 

You don’t have to take a fe minis t point 
of view to stage a modem museum show. 
But each piece should at least capture the 
essence of its time: the droopy, flower- 
children anarchy of the hippie era. or the 
power suit and baroque flamboyance of 
the 1980s. Instead, everything seems a- 
typical: a jangling, dangling jeweled 
bodice from die futuristic Pierre Cardura 
blade pantsuit from colorful Lacroix, and 
nothing significant from Saint Laurent 

Only as fashion rolls backward does it 
make sense, with an excellent selection 
of slender. light 1930s dresses showing 
the roots of fashion modernism, and a 
display of the art and craftsmanship of 
Madeleine Vionnet, who donated 150 
dresses in 1952. 

And there lies the problem. If you are 
obliged to rely on gifts, with acquisitions 
on a restricted budget, how to create a 
truly representative collection? 

“I tell all my friends — lam always 
asking people to donate," says David- 
Weill, who says that gifts have included 
important period costumes from fam- 
ilies cleaning out their chateau attics. 

The upstairs galleries tell a lucid story: 
the decorative dandified vests of the 
18th-century beau; wispy neoclassical 


dresses; bombastic Victorian gowns, and 
a dramatic crinoline by Charles Frederick 
Worth that Kamitsis describes as “em- 
blematic of his work and his spirit" 
These outfits are presented in a context 
with a backdrop of alpine scenery for 
plaid walking dresses and a salon minor 
for the Worth dress. That staging seems 
inconsistent with the earlier displays and 
dated compared to, say, die video pro- 
jection of rococo curlicues. 

What could be done to make the part 
of the show that is in current memory 
seem more effective? Couture houses 
make donations and loans to museums 
worldwide. Marika Genly, archivist at 
Chanel, says that she has access to 3,000 
outfits and that during a 10-year stint at 
Dior, she acquired more than 400 outfits 
at auction. 

Speaking for Saint Laurent Domi- 
nique Deroche said the house gives to 
museums and lends from its 40.000 
archive outfits. They were used as the 
basis of the show held at the former 
Musee de la Mode in 1986 and for the 
seminal 1983 YSL exhibition at New 
York's Metropolitan Museum in the Di- 
ana V reeland years. 




Muer ilc b Mods IcnonUncst, Rare VJbrfOTA fpwypirn] 

Crinoline cages; Courreges minis; Ines de la Fressange with Jean Paul Gaultier; Kamitsis with Douste-Blazy. 


CROSSWORD 


A H VreelandJ The style guru, a 
former editor of Vogue, casts a 
long shadow over fashion ex- 
hibitions. for she set a standard 
of theater and drama and anticipated the 
popularization of museum culture. She 
also, by giving Saint Laurent the first 
museum show of a living designer, 
raised the aspirations of fellow coutur- 
iers, who now often stage self-curated 
(and self-vaunting) shows. 

Since fashion exhibitions have be- 
come crowd pullers and pleasers, it is 
hard lor museums to keep up custodial 
standards while competing in the en- 
tertainment business. 

The Musee de la Mode has noble 
aims, but it will be judged as much by the 
traffic in visitors as by its critical ac- 
claim. Today’s museum public is fa- 
miliar with multimedia ana virtual real- 
ity — and it is savvy about fashion. That 
suggests an exhibition that is as lively as 
fashion television and as entertaining as 
a visit to Nike Town. 


ACROSS 

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cars, for short 

s Foundation 

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lOJumpaithelce 
Capades 
17 British heavy 
metal group 
it Canned meet 
brand 
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ti Printings 


S3 Support for 
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1950 


1960 


1970 


1980 


Silhouettes infashionfrom i/ie Dior New Look., through the hippie caftan, to the 1980s power suit. 

The ‘Baby’ of Museum Collections 




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- J 

)» uaerraAand Hrraid Tribune 

P y^jUS — The two museums with 

renowned fashion and textile 
archives are the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum’s Costume Institute in New 

York and London’s V^na & Albeit Mu- 
iJnw do they respond 10 the challenge 


H L^teSS*n‘ r ' ewUok * ho *- 


The V&A will open “The Cutting 
Edge," an exhibition of 50 years of British 
design in March. According to the curator 
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policy has included getting examples of 
John Galliano's work from the outset and 
asking designers for donations. But even if 
fashion is “a baby in the history of mu- 
seum collections,” Meades insists that the 
same principles are applied in assessing 
any objecL 

She is also aware of the problems posed 
by designers staging flamboyant shows. 

“They have a pristine quality and that 
makes our task that much more difficult," 
says Mendes. “Fashion is the most bio- 
degradable of the decorative arts — it has 
been loved, been worn, been creased. We 
have to make it appealing.” 

Suzy Menkes 


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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY; FEBRUARY 11, 1997 





























































































































International Herald Tribune 



A Special Report 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1997 
PAGE 13 


International Education 


A Quiet Crisis 
For Germany 

Officials Fear Universities 
Are Losing World Prestige 


H EIDELBERG — Encrusted on a hillside be- 
tween the Neckar River and a Rhineland castle, 
this small university town is a jewel among the 
country's seats of learning. The steep streets 
seem to hold faint echoes of -student princes carousing; 
wooded paths evoke long walks pondering the teaching 
that made Germany a cultural power. In the tea shop, 
crowded with hikers on a Sunday, the walls ore covered 
with black-paper silhouettes and photographs of students 
with dueling scars in the Prussian tradition. 

For generations, a foreign elite has been drawn to post- 
graduate, studies in Germany, once a world leader in 
prfiilosophy and the sciences. This academic tradition, par- 
ticularly engineering and other science-based fields, sur- 
vived Nazi rule, and even after World War ILGennan post- 
graduate degrees were prized professional credentials that 
often offered the keys to success abroad. In Scandinavia, 
most doctors trained in the German medical tradition until 
English gradually took over in the postwar decades. 

International prestige and foreign students are still 
strong at the University of Heidelberg, perhaps partly 
because the town has helped preserve a local personality 
even as enrollment has grown to 30,000 — a medium- 
sized student body for Germany. Most German uni- 
versities have not fared so well as Germany's image as an 
intellectual leader has declined, officials and educators 
say. 

Especially at big universities in major cities, the spe- 
cialists say, enrollments have mushroomed facilities are 
overcrowded, teaching has become more impersonal and 
the foreign contingent has dwindled to insignificance in 
the overall mis. The same problems exist at universities in 
the new lander, aggravated by die provincialism inherited 
from decades of Communist control. 

“It is a quiet crisis for us." a German diplomat said 
explaining that the foreigners used to be a vital com- 
ponent in university communities, making these insti- 
tutions more cosmopolitan in outlook and helping keep at 
bay any risk of insular attitudes. 

Currently, the average foreign contingent of 4 percent 
in German higher education is “not satisfactory for a 
country which seeks to be internationally oriented and 
"wants to invest in the younger generations of partner 
countries," according to Barbara Ischinger, executive 
director of the German Fulbright Commission. 

A recent Foreign Ministry report warned bluntly that 
Germany is losing the benefits of having an influential 
body of foreign alumni who traditionally have been good- 

Continued on Page 14 


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Jury Is Still Out on Role 
Of the New Technology 


v%*ti 


Vice President Al Gore and President Bill Clinton watch computer-conferencing at a school in San Francisco. 

The Anatomy of Medical Ignorance 


Rv fVnro R Hoc p^ges on pancreatic cancer and a philosophy professor, reconstructive surgery, and liliSh woa uxc iiuuiiuic&fiiigc ui a icpuu iv me uimcu nauuua 

nyueorge Kiage without ever telling the stu- Ann Kerwin, who helped de- the late Dr. Lewis Thomas, Educational, Scientific and Cultural Org anisati on last year by 

— .... J — i i- la _ j -C _ _ j u x# ■ t i i_j v r rw_t .l 


By Barry James 


P ARIS — Can a machine take the place of a caring 
teacher? The question is of practical as well as of 
philosophical and ethical importance as information 
technology theoretically makes it possible for people 
. to leam anything, anytime, anywhere. 

In most countries, however, schools are places of civic 
formation as well as learning- And teachers, who typically 
account for 90 percent or more of education budgets, are often 
among those most strongly opposed, to a hasty introduction of 
new technology. 

The use of the technology therefore may remain limited in 
primary and secondary education, although it does hold great 
promise in leaching children with special needs or those who. 
for one reason or another, are homebound. 

The World Bank, a principal funding agency of education 
projects in the developing world, argues that technologies 
such as television, computers and radio can at best only 
complement teachers. 

But information technology seems likely to play an in- 
creasingly important role in higher and continuing education. 
One of the principal tasks of lower-level schools in the future 
may be to teach children how to develop their ability to go on 
learning throughout their lives. 

This was the main message of a report to toe United Nations 


T 


dent that we just don't know velop the 
> _ .UCSON, Arizona — very much about iL synonym, 

I At first Dr. Marlys “We would be better off compassed 

I Witte, a surgery pro- giving the students ignorance, well. 

-M- lessor at the Uni- There should be four or five Now the 
vereity of Arizona, found that pages left blank to be filled in ical Associ 


velop the course, sought a 
synonym, but no word en- 
compassed their goal so 


even her own colleagues re- by future doctors, or even by 
sisted the proposed new students in their research.” 
course. Scientists admit that their 

Grant applications were re- life is an exploration of ig- 
tumed with shock. Dr. Witte norance, said Dr. Witte. Her 
wanted to teach "Introduc- exploration of the subject 
tion to Medical and Other Jg- began in 1984. 
norance" — now proudly re- Responding to one of Dr. 


Now the American Med- 
ical Association assists with 
funding, and Dr. Wine has 
brought in medical experts 


dean of Yale and New York an international committee headed by Jacques Delors, the 
University schools of medi- former president of the European Commission. It said that the 
cine and the intellectual in- complexity and rapidity of technological change make 
spiration behind Dr. Witte's lifelong education an imperative for the future, 
class. “In a complex world of constant change, where knowledge 

Student research and spin- becomes obsolete every few yeans, education can no longer be 
off seminars sponsored by Dr. something that one acquires during youth to serve for an entire 
Witte around the world have lifetime,' ’ according to two experts, William E. Halal and Jay 


ferred to by former students 
as "Ignorance 101." 

To Dr. Witte and her sto- 


Scientists admit that their from around the world to lec- presented many unanswered Liebowitz, writing m a report for the World Future Society, 
life is an exploration of ig- tore on the unknowns of their questions. For example: “Rather, education must focus on the ability to continue 

norance, said Dr. Witte. Her discipline. • Was syphilis behind lea rning throughout life. Fortunately,, the information tech- 

exploration of the subject While on campus, they Mona Lisa's smile? nology revolution is creating a new form of interactive edu- 

began in 1984. proudly wear the title of Dis- • Is the push for mammo- cation that should blossom into a lifelong learning system that 

Responding to one of Dr. tinguisbed Ignoramii, “with graphy backed by solid ev~ allows almost anyone to leam almost anything from anywhere 
Witte’s early grant requests, a all rights pertaining idence? at any time.” 


foundation director said that thereto." 


discipline. 

While on campus, they 
proudly wear the title of Dis- 
tinguished Ignoramii, “with 
all rights pertaining 


he would resign before his 


dents, however, ignorance is organization funded ignor- 
□ot bliss. She wants medical ance. Dr. Witte was asked if 
students to understand that she would change die title, 
what is unknown about dis- She refused. She said that she 
eases and their cure far ex- 
ceeds what is known. 

"As teachers we often give 

information that is mi sin- 

formation," she explained. 

"Textbooks spend eight to 10 


The list includes Dr. Ter- 
ence J. Ryan of Oxford Uni- 


Continued cm Page 15 


Continued on Page 15 


ance. Dr. Witte was asked if versity, a leading dennatolo- j 
she would change the title, gist; Dr. Leo. Clodius, of! 
She refused- She said that she Zurich, known in plastic and i 


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PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1L 1997 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION I A SPECIAL REPORT 


Is U.S. Less Hospitable? Boom in Foreign Students Seems to Be Over 


By Edward B. Fiske 


W ASHINGTON — For more 
than four decades. Amer- 
ican colleges and universit- 
ies have had a seemingly 
irresistible appeal to students from other 
countries, and the education of foreign 
students in the United States has been a 
growth industry. 

71k number of international students 
studying in UJ5. institutions of higher 
education soared from 34,232 in the 
19S4-55 academic year to a record 
453,787 in 1995-96, according to the 
Institute of International Education. 
Trade experts cite higher education as a 
major export industry that contributes S7 
billion a year to the American gross 
domestic product. 

The dramatic growth of the post- Worid 
War years, however, now appears to be 
coming to an end. The latest figures show 
that last year's increase in foreign student 
enrollment was a mere 03 percent, the 
smallest growth rate in a quarter century. 


“The numbers are quite worrying,” said 
Richard M. Krasno, the president of the 
institute, which hades the trends under a 
grant from the U.S. Information Agency. 
*‘lf you believe, as I do, that foreign 
students coming to the United States is m 
our national interest, then we have every 
reason to be concerned." 

Analysts attribute the leveling off of 
foreign student enrollment to a variety of 
factors, including growing competition 
from Australia and other industrialized 
countries, the founding of indigenous 
universities in developing countries and 
a growing sense dial the climate for 
foreign students in the United States is 
becoming less hospitable. 

The hospitality problem is expected to 
be exacerbated later this year with the 
implementation of immigration legis- 
lation recently enacted by Congress that 
will increase surveillance of nonimmig- 
rant students and scholars. It will also 
require institutions to pay a fee of up to 
$100 per person to finance the new 
tracking procedures. 

"There seems to be an increasing 


atmosphere of intolerance in this coun- 
try,'* said Naomi Collins, executive di- 
rector of NAFSA: Association of In- 
ternational Educators. “Congress has 
focused on foreign students as if they 
were all potential terrorists.'’ 

Past growth in the number of foreign 
students is generally attributed not only 
to the prestige of American colleges and 
universities but to the size, diversity and 
flexibility of higher education in the 
United States. English was also valued 
as a language, as was knowledge of 
American culture and business prac- 
tices. 

According to the United Nations Edu- 
cational, Scientific and Cultural Orga- 
nization. the United Stases attracts about 
32 percent of the 13 millio n students 
who study outside their homeland, down 
from 40 percent in die early 1980s. 

“While the numbers are not yet de- 
creasing, our market share is going 
down.” said Mr. Krasno. “If we were a 
corporation looking at this kind of trend, 
we would be concerned." 

The institute’s latest annual statistical 


report. “Open Doors, 1995-96." notes 
that the majority of foreign students in 
the United States are Asian. Japan leads 
the list with 45,276 students, followed 
by China. South Korea, Taiwan and In- 
dia. The repent also noted that 84,400 
American students were studying in oth- 
er countries, a growth of 1 1 percent over 
the previous year. 

American colleges and universities 
welcome foreign students fora variety of 
reasons, including their impact on do- 
mestic students. 

“We want our students to have con- 
tact with the world," said Jerry Wilcox, 
dkector of the International Students 
and Scholars Office at Cornell Uni- 
versity, which has 2,609 foreign stu- 
dents this year. “That's why we put $1 
million of our own money into need- 
based scholarships for foreign under- 
graduates alone.' 

The economic value of foreign stu- 
dents has by no means gone unnoticed. 
Most foreign students pay their own 
way, and the Institute of International 
Education estimates that foreign stu- 


dents put out $3 billion a year for tuition 
and fees, another $4 tuition fortravel and 
living expenses, and that they create 
100,000 American jobs. 

The U.S. Department of Commerce 
lists the higher education industry as the 
fifth largest exporter of services in the 
country. Several factors have ted to the 
declining growth of foreign students, 
starting with the growing availability of 
universities in other countries. 

“It’s getting more difficult to re- 
cruit," said John Klockemager, vice 
presidem of Buena Vista College in 
Storm Lake. Iowa. “When we first went 
to Taiwan in 1986, die country could 
only educate 20 percent of its students. 
They have now built enough capacity to 
handle 45 percent." 

Many academics are quick to add that 
competition from indigenous institu- 
tions is a healthy development. “One of 
our purposes in training foreign students 
has been to build up universities back 
home," said Catheryn Cotton, who 
works with foreign students at Duke 
University in North Carolina. 


Competition is also coming from oth- 
er industrialized countries .that sec high- 
er education a* a thriving industry. Uni- 
versities in Japan and Britain have 
become aggressive recruiters, and Aus- 
tralia has made the building up of its 
foreign student population a major ob- 
jective of its trade policy. . 

Australian embassies market the na- 
tion's higher education system, and uni- 
versities have begun delivering services 
through paimer^ips wah lorai. instil 
rations throughout Asia iffld the Pacific. 
A recent official report projected a five? 
fold increase in the numfer of foreign 
students in Australian universities over 
the next 15 yeare- 

By contrast. U.S. information offices 
have been closed in many countries, and 
college officials wonder why American 
policy toward foreign students appears 
to be shaped more by the Immigration 
and Naturalization 5cn. ice.ihan by the 
Department of Commerce. 

EDWARD B. FISKE is a farmer edu- 
cation editor of The New York Times. 


(German Universities Fear a Loss of Prestige 


Continued from Page 13 

will ambassadors and sales- 
men for German exports. In- 
stead, the nation's universit- 
ies are no longer attracting a 
promising cross- section of 
potential foreign leaders fora 
formative period of studies in 
Germany, the report said. 

It noted that of the 125.000 
foreign students in Germany 
in 1992, one-fifth came from 


two countries — Iran and 
Turkey. The only Western 
country significantly repre- 
sented was France, with few- 
er than 5.000 students. 

“Germany has become a 
weak competitor, especially 
in Asia," the report said, ex- 
plaining that the United 
States and Australia succeed 
much better in attracting for- 
eigners because both coun- 
tries actively market their 
higher education facilities. 


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While German students must 
work out their own arrange- 
ments, U3. universities treat 
potential students like cus- 
tomers . offering them con- 
venient one-stop applications 
for degree courses and finan- 
cial aid, the report said. 

Calling for radical innova- 
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abroad rarely consider Ger- 
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college and even graduate 
students face a language bar- 
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contrast to a willingness in the 
United Stales or France to see 
some courses taught in for- 
eign languages. 

If “there seems to be an 
unwelcoming atmosphere for 
foreigners, ’ 1 the report said, it 
is partly because the German 
system is no longer in step 
with changes in higher edu- 
cation elsewhere. For ex- 
ample, the lack of short, spe- 
cialized courses at German 
universities may stem from 
misguided conservative 
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undermine academic rigor 
and thoroughness. In any 
case, the report said, foreign 
students are often unprepared 
for whai they find because 
they have not received good 
counseling of the sort dis- 
pensed by American and Brit- 
ish institutions. 

The decline in Germany’s 
popularity as a place to study 
is liable to accelerate, the re- 
port warned, if there is a 


students to publicize 
country and advertise the 
value of its academic degrees 
as qualifications that are a 
match — often more than a 
match — for BAs earned in 
U.S. universities. 

Of course, not everyone in 
German education has been 
waiting for this alarm bell to 
change things. Already, the 
Ful bright Commission 's Mrs. 
Ischinger says that “all in all, 
I am quite optimistic that Ger- 
man universities will increas- 
ingly offer 'international cur- 
ricula 1 and one- or two-year 
master's programs and thus 
continue to attract foreign 
students.” 

* Heidelberg University, tak- 
ing a leaf from the compet- 
itive techniques of privately 
funded U.S. institutions, has 
started to ask its foreign 
alumni for help in creating 



tetehanAnr 

The University of Heidelberg is asking foreign alumni for help in recruitment. 


recruitment networks abroad 
— an innovative step in Ger- 
many where universities are 
financed by the state and tra- 
ditionally have never felt the 
need to promote themselves. 

More broadly, Mrs. Is- 
chinger, who is familiar with 
campus conditions as a pro- 
fessor at Cologne University, 
insists that the problems of 
foreign students are shared by 


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many university-level Ger- 
mans in a system that has ex- 
ploded in a generation: from 
fewer than 460,000 students 
in West Germany in 1962, 
total enrollment is approach- 
ing nearly two million today 
in unified Germany. 

Many of the changes 
needed to attract foreign stu- 
dents, such as a wider selec- 
tion of courses, better student 
orientation and career coun- 
seling, are needed just as 
much by German students, 
she said, noting tfaai universit- 
ies have grown in size but not 
in flexibility and that, as a 
result, students often lose 
their bearings. 

Although Germany's Ful- 
bright program is the world's 
largest with an annual budget 
of 15 million Deutsche marks 
($9 million) from the German 
and U3. governments, it is in 
no position to change the sys- 
tem by itself. But it does try to 
sponsor foreign students and 
teachers to broaden the ties of 
German academe to the wider 
community. 

Funding more than 700 
grants a year equally split be- 
tween Americans and Ger- 
mans, the program strives not 
only to subsidize good schol- 
arship but also to set an in- 



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ship. Mark Walter, a graduate 
fellow last - year from the 
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his weeks at Daimler-Benz 
were “more valuable than 
any trip to the library I’ve 
ever made.'' 

The challenge of shaking 
up the intellectual environ-; 
ment is especially acute in the 
new lander, where several 
hundred jFulbright-fimded 
UJS. teaching assistants havfr 
been helping meet the over- 
whelming demand for Eng- 
lish-language teaching in a 
system where until recently, 
the first foreign language was 
Russian. The commission ha» 
also funded U.S. scholars ire 
architecture, law and business 
at Leipsig and Dresden and 
the smaller universities to 
help them make the transiti on- 
to international practices. 

“We find that loads of 
good U.S. academics are very 
excited at the prospect of liv- 
ing some of the pioneer days; 
on this new frontier," Mrs. 4 
Ischinger said, a phrase than 
sounded like a new breeze 
stirring in German academiaT 

JOSEPH FITCHUT is on 
the staff of the International 
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PAGE IS 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION / A SPECIAL REPORT 


J.S. Campuses, a Rush to Click On to Computerized Learning 


* 

■SDOtt 

behiu 

No, 

ies life, 
cators s 
new pha- 
education 
less than 
process” 


ph Rosenbioom 

i 

IN — Since the start of 
Identic year, professors 
Business School 
tve had their own 
rberspace for com- 
dents outside class. 
_ as mundane as as- 
or as exotic as poll all 
t night to customize a 
ext day, professors can 
iputers. There they have 
Tiooi’s own sparkling 
— a confidential, in- 
Ithe Worid Wide Web. 
part of an ambitious 
ini Clark has imple- 
roming bead of the 
)ber 1995. Mr. Clark 
J $11 million to ratchet 
investment in compu- 
technology. 
hat you don't do it well 
enough, and you get left 
lark explained, 
colleges and iwiveisit- 
! are joining what edu- 
tish into an expensive, 
■computer age m higher 
lany the aim is nothing 
oicturing the learning 
am., hereby “revolutioniz- 


ing” higher edncation, according to 
Carol Twigg, vice president of Educom, 
a nonprofit group that advises universit- 
ies on technology matters. 

A 1996 survey of 403 colleges and 
universities by the Washington-based 
American Council on Education found 
that many bad reached a “takeoff 
point” in exploiting computers for 
classroom learning, said Fiain« El- 
Khawas, a professor at the University of 
California at Los Angeles and the sur- 
vey director. Four-fifths of the insti- 
tutions reported spending more money 
on computer technology last year than 
the year before. 

As administrators rewire their cam- 
puses with high-speed cable to handle 
elaborate computer traffic and upgrade 
both computerized hardware and soft- 
ware, they are assessing the gains. 
“More effective, faster, more accurate 
learning” is how Ms. El-Khawas 
summed up the results so far. 

But some educators question whether 
computer-based learning methods rep- 
resent much of a leap forward for higher 
education at all 

“It takes a lot of resources to do this 
stuff, in capital expenditures and staff- 
ing,” said Gerard McCartney, chief in- 
formation officer at the Wharton School 
of the University of Pennsylvania and 
an authority on educational technology. 


“It's not clear that you wouldn't get the 
same results in spending it in more 
conventional ways — fairing more 
teachers and having a lower student- 
teacher ratio, for example.” 

Not so, said Mr. Clark, at least not as 
far as the Harvard Business School is 
concerned. He said that the business 
school ought to be a living model of the 
kind of technologically advanced work- 
ing world in which many of the school 's. 
students must operate as managers 
when they leave Harvard. 

“We wanted the nature of the school 
itself to be part of tile educational ex- 
perience,” lie said. 

And Mr. Clark portrayed tire com- 
puterized learning tools that the school 
is developing as an essential comple- 
ment to its case-study method. 

For a course in organizational 
strategy, for instance, a video clip is 
integrated into a computerized, inter- 
active exercise. The case concerns the 
Thermo Electron Carp., a Massachu- 
setts high-tech finn. The students' as- 
signment: analyze whether Thermo 
Electron is wisely hoarding more than 
$1 billion in cash reserves. 

When a student clicks on the video, 
the gray-haired image of the Thermo 
Electron chairman, George Hai- 
sopoulos. appears. He recounts: “In the 
past what we’ve had even a small 


amount of cash, some of our board 
members said, ‘What do we need all that 
cash for?’ ” He and his brother, John, 
continue in that vein for 29 seconds. 

With such computerized enhance- 
ments. Mr. Clark said, the “material is 
richer, and you can take things deeper 
and hook the student into the real world 
in a way that you couldn't do before." 

A NOTHER university that has 
plunged into computerized 
learning Is Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute of Troy. New 
York, which is best known for science 
and engineering. It has adopted the 
“studio” model — a studio in RPI- 
speak being a room that typically con- 
tains 25 computers equipped with in- 
teractive CD-ROM technology. 

The studios are supplanting cav- 
ernous balls where one KF1 professor 
used to lecture to 500 or more students. 
Now students in virtually alt introduct- 
ory math and physics learn by the studio 
method. 

It allows them to work in small teams 
and say. to simulate on a video screen 
an experiment with a ball thrown off a 
building as it follows an arc of gravity. 
During a studio class, an instructor is on 
call to help, if necessary. 

So popular is the method dial RPI is 
gradually extending it to subjects ran- 


ging from English literature to anthro- 
pology. said Brad Lister, a biology pro- 
lessor and director of the university's 
Center for Innovation in Undergraduate 
Education. “The major point,’ r he said 
“is students axe really hands-on. They 
are taking charge of their own learn- 
ing." 

Students are also using computers to 
learn through stMxiUed distance learn- 
ing. An early pioneer of distance learn- 
ing is the University of Phoenix, an 
Arizona-based behemoth with 32,000 
adult students who mostly work by day 
and attend classes at night on three 
dozen campuses in 1 1 states and Puerto 
Rico. In 1989, when the university 
began offering courses online, they at- 
tracted 12 students. 

Now the online enrollment in sub- 
jects such as business and technology 
management is 2,200, including about 
50 from foreign countries, and growing 
rapidly, said Terri Hedegaaid the uni- 
versity's vice president for online ser- 
vices. Students connect computers into 
the Internet by modem, and they obtain 
course assignments and contribute to 
class discussion on a web site. 

“We've been able to prove that the 
students are learning by their test 
scores,” Ms. Hedegaard said. 

Starting this fall, a new undertaking 
by the governors of 13 Western stales. 


aptly called the Western Governors 
University, will offer students an online 
catalogue of distance learning courses 
available at universities in 13 Western 
states. 

Meantime, the 940mem bent of Wake 
Forest University's Class of 2000 will 
be ctidting away at their IBM ThinkPad 
365XD laptop computers. The uni- 
versity in Winston-Salem, North Car- 
olina, prides itself on its strong liberal 
arts curriculum and its basketball 
team. 

But in September it attained a new 
point of pride. It presented a “free” 
laptop to each incoming freshman 
(while raising tuition by $3,000) as part 
of its plan to accentuate computer tech- 
nology. 

Mr. McCartney, the University of 
Pennsylvania expert on educational 
technology, said that he views the Wake 
Forest experiment skeptically. Compu- 
terized learning methods work better 
than traditional ones, he said, only in the 
teaching of “quantitative” subjects like 
mathematics or business finance. 

And what about providing a free 
laptop to every freshman? “Bui, like, so 
what?” he said. “That's the question 
you've got to answer.” 

JOSEPH ROSENBIOOM is a reporter 
for PBS's "Frontlines” series. 


A Dol e of 
Ignor 1 mce 
Is Hel Ithy 


Continued fo 1 Pa S e 13 


osclerotic 
it vessel 


testhesia 

uses ic- 
es? 

vi dence 
s," Dr. 
3 made 
know- 
are so 
estions. 
ant and 
-.ysiciao 
inswers 


■ • Why do of 
plaques devch 
branches? i 
■. How dd 
work? / 

• Why anty 
jectedasfore 

“AIDS istj a 
of medical 'oni 
Witte said. ‘ o 
so much pities 
ledge, and >ture 
many unansvnta! 

Even the mcuaU 

knowledgeab 
cannot feel tin wit 
on AIDS." ly f 

Dr. Witte In all too 
wM of what ias «aks. A 
distinguished uirjalist in 
lymphology, recalled 
treating a teener in St. 
Louis in 1968 wi a baffling 
illness. Tissue stiies much 
later confirmed tk it was one 
of the earliest cas of AIDS, 
and, as Dr. Wittouts it, the 
“attic" of her bnj still feels 
that the lymph*: system 
might hold the keto the dis- 
ease. 

Students in heglass must 
first classify thei ignorance 
on a medical topi and then 
write a term papefetting out 
everything unknovi about it. 
They keep an ignotgee log in 



their research. They must list 
their favorite failure. 

They see patients with 
baffling problems and devel- 
op questions about the bio- 
logical, clinical and ethical 
implications of what they’ve 
seen. ■ 

“It’s a seductive way to get 
people to understand the lim- 
its of knowledge,” said Dr. 
Witte. “We focus an recog- 
nition of ignorance. There are 
times to leave your brain open 
to new knowledge.” She said 
that the recognition of ignor- 
ance would eliminate the po- 
tential for fraud in science and 
research. 

Students receive the trap- 
pings of their ignorance: 
sheets of parchment-colored 
paper announcing that the 
above-named has received a 


doctorate in medical ignor- 
ance. They wear their ques- 
tion-maik icons as a badge of 
distinction. 

One of Dr. Witte’s former 
students who now teaches an- 
esthesiology said the program 
made medical school '‘more 
than an intellectual death 
march” of facts and tests. 

Dr. Witte’s husband. Dr. 
Charles L. Witte, a surgeon, 
tells her classes that surgery 
with its emphasis on excision 
is the ultimate in medical ig- 
norance — tacit acknowledg- 
ment that a malfunctioning 
part of the body cannot be 


fixed otherwise. He sees the 
medical progress of the past 
half-century as enlightened 
ignorance and skilled inquiry 
rather than the triumph of 
knowledge. 

The course's roots can be 
traced to a plea by the edu- 
cator Dr. Thomas in 1983 for 
courses in medical school to 
produce "students driven by 
curiosity; delighted and sur- 
prised to learn that science is 
an endless frontier." 


GEORGE RIDGE is a lawyer 
and journalist based in Tuc- 
son. 


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Continued from Page 13 

Mr. Halal is a professor of manage- 
ment and Mr. Liebowitz a professor of 
information systems at George Wash- 
ington University in Washington, which 
is developing compressed video devices 
to enable two-way television signals to 
be transmitted anywhere in the worid by 
telephone lines. 

Distance learning has moved faraway 
from the traditional correspondence 
course, aimed at the individual student 
working alone. The global reach of the 
Internet makes it possible to unite geo- 
graphically scattered students in a virtual 
classroom. Methods such as multimedia, 
video-conferencing and the Internet will 
increasingly allow students benh to pro- 
ceed at their own pace, and to interact 
with one another and their teachers. 

Even without taking tile technology to 
its limits, the idea of education as a 
lifelong process is catching on 
throughout the industrialized world. 
Already, working adults who pursue 
their studies part-time make up roughly 
half of students taking college courses in 
tiie United Stales. 

However, there is debate in scholarly 
circles about bow far the new technology 


should be used for teaching academic 
subjects in which personal contacts be- 
tween teadier and student are still vital. 
Britain's Open University, for example, 
a world leader in distance education, has 
embraced information technology cau- 
tiously, believing it to be no substitute 
for books and the exchange of ideas at 
live tutorials and summer schools. 

But the Open University is also mov- 
ing with the tide. It has set up a “know- 
ledge media institute” to explore ways 
of adopting information technology. 
Some teachers are concerned about this 
trend, arguing that the heavy investment 
that students are expected to make in 
computer and communications equip- 
ment contradicts the concept of 
“Open.” Cost, of course, is an impor- 
tant factor in many developing coun- 
tries, where few people have computers 
or even phones. Rather than uniting the 
world, the new technologies could lead 
to societies of information haves and 
have-nots. 

The Internet originally came into be- 
ing to allow universities to exchange 
information, and academics have been 
among the most enthusiastic proponents 
of the new technology. Although some 
educators fear the technologies will ad- 
versely affect the universities’ role as 


“communities” of learning, others say 
information technology can give stu- 
dents more direct contact with their tu- 
tors than in crowded amphitheaters. 

“Anyone who has participated in 
computer-conferencing or other inter- 
active media knows that the intensity of 
relationships can be astounding,” say 
Mr. Halal and Mr. Liebowitz. 

Multimedia education methods are 
not confined to schools. Dozens of 
companies, including Hewlett-Packard, 
Apple and Xerox, have turned to them as 
a cheaper and more flexible method of 
enabling employees to improve their 
skills using their borne PCs. 

This concept goes hand in hand with 
the development of networked global or- 
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The jury is still out between those who 
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substitute for the bard slog of reading 
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argue that it will achieve new and per- 
haps different levels of understanding. 
Bat it seems inevitable that computers 
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die way we go to school and college by 
the end of the century. 

BARRY JAMES is on the stttff of the 
International Herald Tribune. 


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PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY’ 11, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION /A SPECIAL REPORT 


Thai School: A Family Affair 


By Eric Melzer 


B angkok — as 

urban growth 
chisels away at the 
traditional Thai 
family, one school is calling 
' students, along with their par- 
ents and grandparents, to die 
lulls. 

The Tridhos Three Gener- 
ation School, situated near the 
northern city of Chiang Mai, 
intends to use family life os 
part of its curriculum when it 
opens in May. 

“It’s not easy for parents to 
make a big move and to give 
up their work.” said Tim El- 
lis, executive director, of the 
schooL * ‘But there’s so much 
frustration with the madness 
of Bangkok that people are re- 
examining what their values 
are and where they want to 
live and how they want to be 
involved in family.” 

The project is the 
brainchild of M.L. Tridhosy- 
uth Devakui, a Thai architect, 
whose projects include anoth- 
er alternative living facility 
called “Smart Living," 
which offers upscale apart- 
ments in Bangkok's business 
district to residents seeking to 
avoid commuting through the 
city's congested traffic. 

f .lift* the apartments, the 
Tridhos school comes with a 
hefty price tag. 

Bart Duykers, the school’s 
deputy director, said, “The 
parents pay a deposit of three 
million baht [$115,000] and 
can get dial back after a min- 
imum of five years if they 
decide to give up their mem- 
bership in the school." 

The fee entitles parents and 
grandparents to a two-bed- 
room apartment on campus 
during the student’s enroll- 
ment 

The cost of tuition and 
boarding is extra and works 


out to about $18,000, about 
seven times more than Thai- 
land’s per-capita income. 
Tridhos aims to be “a Thai 
school for future Thai lead- 
ers.” 

The tearhinp staff is 
largely Thai ana classes will 
follow a traditional Thai cur- 
riculum. Some Western in- 
structors are involved, includ- 
ing a group of fanner Peace 
Corps volunteers. An empha- 
sis on English Is intended to 
make students comfortable in 
both languages, according to 
school officials. 

‘‘It’s the way we teach, not 
the content that separates 
us,” Mr. Ellis said. 

Dr. Chanthrapanya 

Panompom. professor of edu- 
cation administration at Chi- 
ang Mai University, who 


‘There’s so much 
frustration with 
the madness of 
Bangkok that 
people are re- 
examining ivhat 
their values are . ? 


chose the Tridhos school for 
his son, said, “I believe in 
what they offer to my son in 
terms of international stan- 
dards and at the same rime we 
are trying to maintain our 
Thai culture, maybe you can 
call it Thai heritage. Many 
parents like to send their chil- 
dren abroad, bur in a sense 
they are losing Thai culture. I 
want my son to be Thai not a 
Westerner.” 

Dr. Panompom who lives 
in Chiang Mai plans to move 
onto the Tridhos campus with 


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his family. The school com- 
bines outdoor and indoor 
activities. The indoor ones in- 
clude classrooms equipped 
with hookups for students’ 
notebook computers — each 
student will be provided with 
one — as well as access to the 
Internet. Outdoor instruction 
will include environmental 
studies, organic fanning and 
community service within the 
village. 

With the school located ina 
lush river valley 20 kilome- 
ters (12 miles) outside of Chi- 
ang Mai, it will be consid- 
erably easier to accommodate 
outdoor activities than at 
private schools in Bangkok. 

School officials admit that 
separating the parents of stu- 
dents from their jobs in 
Bangkok may be impossible. 
Some parents will only be 
able to visit, with grandpar- 
ents or other relatives staying 
full time. Others can live in 
the village and commute to 
Bangkok during the week. 
Chiang Mai is an hour’s flight 
from Bangkok. 

School officials hope that 
once the school is in session 
the advantages of the family 
lifestyle will encourage fam- 
ilies to spend an increasing 
amount of time in the village 
until they finally choose to 
live there year-round. 

Twenty families have so 
far agreed to move into the 
school village. Fifty students 
are enrolled, though the 
school expects to fill the 300 
slots available for its May 
opening. 

Officials hope that 750 
families, or a total of 2,500 to 
3,000 people, will be living 
on campus over the next three 
years. 

To encourage enrollment 
during the school's first year, 
200 students will be allowed 
to apply for admission with- 
out family membership, thus 
avoiding the $1 15,000 depos- 
it 

Capital for the construction 
of the school came from Mr. 
Tridhosyuth’s architectural 
company and two Thai banks. 
The project is also backed by 
the That royal family. 



Venice International University, on the Island of San Servolo. hopes to bring together American and European styles of hig, 


education. 


In Venice , a New Twist on International Sti udy 


By Roderick 
Conway Morris 


ERIC MELZER is a writer 
and photographer based in 
Bangkok. 


V ENICE — Occupy- 
ing a tranquil, veid- 
ant island in the la- 
goon. with some 
fine Renaissance monument- 
al buildings and extensive 
gardens, only a few minutes’ 
boat ride from Piazza San 
Marco, Venice International 
University, which will be in- 
augurated in September, has a 
campus that would be die 
envy of almost any institu- 
tion. It could also prove an 
innovative model in interna- 
tional higher education. 

The Island of San Servolo 
was a Benedictine monastery 
in die early 9th century and 
has been continuously inhab- 
ited ever since. From the 18th 
century until the late 1970s, it 
was a mental asylum before 
being designated by the Itali- 
an government as a place of 


exceptional historical and ar- 
chitectural interest, ami state 
funds were made available for 
the island's preservation and 
restoration. 

Various projects were, 
meanwhile, put forward for 
San Servolo's subsequent 
use, the w innin g proposal be- 
ing from Venice International 
University, or VIU, a con- 
sortium of universities con- 
sisting of Venice’s Ca’ Fo- 
scari University, the separate 
University Institute of Archi- 
tecture of Venice, Duke Uni- 
versity, Durham, North Car- 
olina, the Ludwig 
Ma ximilians Universitaet, 
Munich, and the Universitat 
Autonoma de Barcelona. The 
group has been granted a re- 
newable. 30-year, free-of- 
charge lease of the island. 

The European Center for 
Training Craftsmen in Con- 
servation of tiie Architectural 
Heritage, which has been on 
the island for some time, will 


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‘‘We are hoping to institute 
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education abroad,” said Gi- 
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tian-born, a former professor 
of economics at Ca’ Foscari 
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professor of economic history 
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still involved in getting the 
project off the ground. 

‘‘At present, it’s possible 
under several schemes, like 
the Erasmus one in Europe, 
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foreign university. The other 
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American universities, in- 
volves the creation of then- 
own small institution abroad, 
a kind of enclave, where stu- 
dents and their teachers can 
be sent for a period to do 
courses. What we want to do 
at VIU is to overcome the 
shortcomings of both sys- 
tems.” 

The educators want to 
make San Servolo a place 
where students and teachers 
from the various member uni- 
versities can spend a semester 
— there will be two three- 
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be able to take courses taught 
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ticipating universities. 

The aim is to create a truly 
mternarional academic envir- 
onment, Mr. Toniolo said. All 
teaching will be in English, 
the university's official 1 
guage. 


Ian- 


H 


lesof 


E added that one of 
the principal chal- 
lenges is to bring 
together different 
dgner education sat- 

iy- 

‘ ‘The typical American un- 
dergraduate takes a major, a 
minor and does several other, 
perhaps cultural, courses,” 
Mr. Toniolo noted. ‘This is 
not the case with continental 
European universities, where 
students take much more spe- 
cialized, professionally ori- 
entated first degrees. But we 
believe that for American stu- 
dents to get a taste of the 
European system, and vice 
versa, should be a genuinely 
enriching experience.” 

Undergraduate • subjects 
that will be taught in the first 
semester this foil will include 
environmental sciences, law 
and economics, art history 
and linguistics. The cost of 
board and lodging on the is- 
land. in individual rooms with 
their own bathrooms, will be 
about $700 a montfa. 

At the same time, the uni- 
versity will also start a gradu- 
ate program, to wbicb all the 
participating universities will 
contribute teaching. Initially, 
two masters degrees will be 
offered, one in economics and 


finance, 
VTU’s Intei 
for Civil Sc 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1997 

PAGE 17 



INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION / A SPECIAL REPORT 




In Czech Republic, Church Schools Resuiface After 40 Years 


By Peter S. Green 


^Sister Mitiu»ela instructing a pupil. 


P RAGUE — In the shadow of the 
Vorsilsky Klasrer, Prague's 
17th-century convent of the Ur- 
suline sisters. Sister Michaela is 
reaching her fifth graders modem Czech 
history. 

. Across the Vltava River at a small 
kindergarten in sight of Prague Castle. 
Andrea Emyeiova is teaching Hebrew 
songs to a room full of kindergarteners. 

After four decades and more of of- 
ficial atheism in Eastern Europe, pa- 
rochial education is makin g a comeback, 
as parents and educators search for ways 
to rebuild countries damaged not only 
physically, bat spiritually, by Commu- 
nist rule. 

"We try to teach the children to de- 
velop a Christian spirit,” says Sister 
Michaela. 

She is doing that with the mixed bless- 
ing of the Czech Republic's Ministry of 
Education, Youth surd Sports. Hynek 


Kratky, the ministry’s director of 
primary and secondary, schools, agrees 
ihai parochial schools are reviving an 
important tradition in a nation that is still 
searching for moral renewal. 

But Mr. Kratsky fears they take too 
much money away from other children 
in a pitifully small education budget 
The Czech government spends some 
20,000 to 30,000 Koruny ($740 to 
$1,1 1 1) per student annually, and it must 
pay private- and church-nm schools 
most of that sum for students they edu- 
cate. 

Religious education is growing 
quickly in Central Europe, although it 
still accounts for rally a tiny fraction of 
students. In the Czech Republic, there 
are now 10305 students in 89 church- 
run schools, out of 22. milli on students. 

With teachers at state schools on _ 
dal strike over their low wages, that kii 
of money irks Mr. Kratky. 

"Private- and church-run schools 
have a right to subsidies from the gov- 
ernment, but they have total freedom to 


charge tuition and the government has 
no ability to control the quality of fee 
educational process,” he says. 

“If you want to say that church 
schools offer an education that is not 
available elsewhere, 1 say that is not so. 
The autonomy of public schools is so 
large that they cover most of the special 
needs of parents.” Mr. Kratky added 

But Jana Novakova, the soft-spoken 
principal at Vorsilska, disagrees. The 
state rally covers teachers' salaries and 
some books, she says. The church sup- 
plied the building and the Ursuline 
Foundation, set up to help the school, 
pays for computers, lab supplies and 
other essential extras. 

And while her school may be run by 
the church, Mrs. Novakova is proud to 
point out that it hardly fits the stereotype 
of habit- wearing disciplinarians rapping 
the knuckles of their primly dressed 
charges. Sister Michaela is the only nun 
teaching an academic class, and, apart 
from a morning prayer, the students have 
only an hour a week of religious lessons. 


Mrs. Novakova says she has little 
trouble finding teachers for the school, 
many of them stressed and tired from 
teaching in the public schools. 

In Prague, with a Jewish community 
of little more than 1 ,000 people, the first 
Jewish school is expected to open this 
fall. So far only nine prospective first 
graders have registered, but Rabbi Mor- 
dechai Deshe says be hopes the school 
will start with as many as 20 students. 

Czech Jews were traditionally among 
Europe's most acculturated, and very- 
few are observant, so Rabbi Deshe hopes 
to attract students by offering more than 
just a Jewish education. "We know it is a 
problem for parents to send their children 
to schools that are not in their neigh- 
borhood. so that is why we will have not 
just a Jewish education, but computers 
and very good teachers," he says. 

StiU, here too. the emphasis will be on 
a general education in a Jewish envir- 
onment, rather than a strictly religious 
education. Rabbi Deshe says. “The 
teachers won’t tell the children they 


can't eat pork, or it’s bad to drive on the 
Sabbath, because the children are not 
Orthodox, and we cannot make a school 
for people who do not exist. We want to 
teach the children about their traditions 
and history, and to fee! Jewish." 

Tomas Kraus, the director of the Fed- 
eration of Czech Jewish Communities, 
sends his 5-year-old daughter Noemi to 
Ms. Emyeiova's kindergarten class. 
Thai class is taught by Jewish teachers, 
but it is one of eight classes in an oth- 
erwise ordinary state-run kindergarten. 

Mr. Kraus says. “What we wanted to 
establish here is what existed before the 
war. when the community functions not 
only as a synagogue, but as a cultural and 
social establishment. It's important for 
the parents that their children have a circle 
to which they belong. And the children 
know this is something their parents and 
grandparents were a part of." 

PETER S. CREES covers Central 
Europe for the International Herald 
Tribune . 


Insights Into Why U.S. Students Lag Behind in Global Academic ‘Horse Race 9 


By Edward B. Fiske 

W ASHINGTON 
American 
Mudeots have 
rarely fared well 
in international comparative 
studies of educational 
.achievement, and a body of 
common wiMjam ha« de- 
veloped ro explain why. 

, Students in Japan and other 
countries, it i* cff id j have a 
longer school \ear. American 
students watch ioo much tele- 
vision. American teachers do 
not assign enough homework. 

Virtually alfof these pop- 
ular explanations have now 
been discredited by a massive 
new comparative study of 
educational achievement in 
.41 countries. It showed that 
American students log just as 
much time studying mathem- 
atics and science in their 
classrooms, but the nature of 
the instruction they receive 
differs greatly from that of 
other countries. 

"Our problem is not 
merely the amount of time 
U.S. students or teachers 
spend on mathematics and 
science but what they do with 
.the time they have." com- 
mented Richard Riley, the 
U.S. secretary of education. 

The new study is the Third 
International Mathematics 


and Science Study (TIMSS), 
which was released late last 
year by the International As- 
sociation for the Evaluation 
of Educational Achievement. 

TIMSS is the most com- 
prehensive and most rigorous 
educational study ever under- 
taken. Researchers collected 
data on the mmtiemaiirs and 
science knowledge of half a 
million students. They also 
looked at curricula, textbooks 
and teaching methods in each 
country is order to look for a 
correlation between the way 
countries organize instruction 
and how much students learn. 

As with previous interna- 
tional comparative studies, 
initial interest focused on the 
academic "horse race." The 
study found that eighth grade 
students in the United Stales 
perform at a level that is 
slightly below average in 
mathematics and slightly 
above average in science. The 
countries whose students out- 
performed U.S. students in 
both subjects were Singapore, 
Korea, Japan, the Czech Re- 
public and Hungary. 

TIMSS also reported that 
only five percent of U.S. 
eighth graders would qualify 
for inclusion among the 
world’s top 10 percent in 
mathematics, whereas 45 per- 
cent of Singapore's students 
would foil into this category. 


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In science, however, 13 per- 
cent of Americans would qual- 
ify for inclusion in the top 10. 

Since its release, the report 
has emerged as what Gordon 
M. Am bach, executive direc- 
tor of the Council of Chief 
State School Officers, termed 
a "wake-up call” for school, 
improvement. "American 
students are holding their 
own with the G-7 countries, 
but die rest of the world is 
pulling out ahead. We're not 
keeping up with the countries 
that are going to be our major 
competitors m the future." 

Business groups concerned 
about die quality of the future 
workforce have also seized 
upon the TIMSS findings as a 
lever to promote school re- 
form. "The study provides 
ample evidence that our cur- 
ricula and expectations for 
our young people are not de- 
manding enough," said Nor- 
man R. Augustine, vice chair- 
man and CEO of Lockheed 
Martin Corporation and 
chairman of the Education 
Task Force of The Business 
Roundtable, a corporate 
group. 

Two days after his recent 


inauguration. President Bill 
Clinton traveled to Glen- 
brook North High School out- 
side n»i«ign to highlight the 
importance of making Amer- 
ican education competitive 
with that of other countries. 

The president chose Glen- 
brook because it is participat- 
ing m a project called “First in 
the World” in which students 
from 20 school districts took 
tiie TIMSS test to see how they 
measured up to wcrid-cLass 
academic staodards. 

In his State of the Union 
address last Tuesday, Mr. 
Clinton referred to his visit 
and reported that “those stu- 
dents in Illinois tied for first in 
the world in science, and 
came In second in math." He 
listed the raising of academic 
standards as the first item on 
the 10-point, $51 -billion pro- 
gram that he unveiled in his 
speech as a way to improve 
U.S. education. 

In interviews, educational 
and other leaders suggested 
that the long-run value of the 
TIMSS study for school re- 
formers lies not in the “horse 
race" but in the fact that it is 
the first such report to provide 


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insights into why students in 
other countries outperform 
U.S. students. 

The study produced data 
showing mat despite the 
longer Japanese school year 
U.S. students actually spend 
more time in science and 
math classes than Japanese 
and German students. 

S TUDENTS in Ger- 
many and Japan 
watch just as much 
television as U.S. stu- 
dents, and U.S. teachers as- 
sign more homework and 
spend more class time dis- 
cussing it than teachers in Ja- 
pan and Germany. 

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terials and teaching methods 
showed that American teach- 
ers routinely stress breadth 
rather than depth. ‘ ‘We found 
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quently,*’ said James Stigler, 
professor of psychology at 
the University of California at 
Los Angeles who coordinated 
tiie videotaping of math 


classes in Germany, Japan 
and the United States. 

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American counterparts. 

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dent achievement, and these 
high expectations are rein- 
forced by parents and the 
community. "We expea less 
from our children and , to our 
dismay, they meet out expec- 
tations ,” said Mr. Riley. 

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whereas American teachers 
often have more academic 
credentials, teachers in the 
high-performing countries 
are better prepared in pedago- 
gical skills and spend more 
time working with colleagues 
and honing their lessons. 

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PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION /A SPECIAL REPORT 


How to Get Into the Act 

When Clowning Around Is Taken Seriously 


By Brad Spurgeon 

P ARIS — When the 
nine teenagers of the 
Shenyang troupe took 
nuns doing back-flips 
five meters above the ground 
from one vertical pole to an- 
other last month at a festival 
in the Cirque d’Hiver, they 
were demonstrating more 
than just a circus act. 

They were showing the 
fruits of nearly a decade of 
their educational careers. But 
if China has die oldest tra- 
dition of circus schools — 
schools existed there thou- 
sands of years ago — it is no 
longer alone in using a highly 
structured educational system 
to train circus artists. 

In the last half century, cir- 
cus schools have spread 
throughout the world, and the 
World Circus Festival of the 
Future is the place where the 
performers come to display 
their skills. 

“The Moscow circus 
school," said Dominique 
Mauclair, one of the organ- 
izers of the 20-year-old fest- 
ival, “was the first modem 
school. The Soviets were cut 
off from the rest of the world, 
so they started the school to 
get acts for their circuses." 

It began 70 years ago and 
became the model for almost 
all circus schools in Soviet- 
bloc countries. 

Not until the mid-1970s 
did circus schools bloom in 


the West- France was among 
the first, and today counts 
more than 100 official 
schools. 

“We noticed in the late 
'70s," said Mr. Mauclair, 
“that talented students were 
graduating from these 
schools, but they were not 
getting work. Circus produ- 
cers just weren’t interested." 

So he and his wife, Isa- 
belle. created the festival in 
1977. It immediately became 
an international success. 

The Shenyang troupe, 
which won a gold medal this 
year, is representative of acts 
produced by Chinese schools: 
highly disciplined and tech- 
nically impeccable. 

“Children start circus 
school in China at age 8," 
said Pu Tong, the official 
from the Chinese Ministry of 
Culture who selected the 
troupe for the festival. ‘ ‘They 
have parallel studies covering 
traditional subjects — art, 
language, mathematics, mu- 
sic, geography — and the cir- 
cus arts. After they finish, 
they immediately start work- 
ing in a circus." 

In contrast, the other gold 
medal winners this year rep- 
resented a country with prac- 
tically no circus tradition. 
Mark andBenji are graduates 
of the private Brussels Circus 
School. Their comic juggling 
act turns the traditional dis- 
cipline upside down, as when 
they juggle one club between 
them while mimir.lrrng the 



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movements of juggling six. 

“What was good about the 
Brussels school," said Mark 
Deboux, 23, “was that unlike 
many schools where they pro- 
duce people who are tna- 
chine-like technical wonders, 
ours helped us open our 
minds to see things differ- 
ently. It helped spawn our 
creativity." 

‘ "The course lasted only two 
years," Mr. Dehoux added, 
* ‘It isn’t really enough time to 
create an act. So we’ve been 
working on that for three years 
since leaving the school." , 

Mr. Mauclair says their 
learning experience is not 
unique. “It was in the early 
1970s,” he said, “that the 
Russians noticed that circus 
school is where yon learn die 
basic skills, but it isn't the 
place to create an act That’s 
when the studio phenomenon 
came into being." 

Specialist studios were cre- 
ated in Russia and elsewhere 
to create acts. The Canadian 
studio of Andre Simard, “Les 
gens d’R,” in Montreal, for 
example, creates trapeze acts. 

Caroline Blanc-Brude. 24. 
a French trapeze artist who 
studied under Mr. Simard. 
said schools really teach three 
basic disciplines — acting, 
dance and flexibility — in ad- 
dition to skills like juggling, 
acrobatics and unicycling. 
Like many students, she 
picked her school according 
to her chosen discipline. 

“I wanted to do trapeze," 
she said, “and I wanted to 
work under the best trapeze 
teacher in the world." 

She sought out Mr. Simard, 
a 1972 Olympics gymnastics 
champion, at the National 
Circus School in Montreal. 
The school, founded in 1981, 



offers a four-year course and 
a college diploma. 

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die more popular acts at the 
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Tmmig rr aTitft a Strain on Schools 


By Jenny Meili Lan 

H ong kong — 

Two years ago, 15- 
year-old Lam 
Oicong Hung im- 
migrated to Hong Kong frpm 
Kwongling, a small town in 
the southern Chinese 
- province of Guangdong. 
Upon arrival, he immediately 
began applying to schools. 

“1 received over 20 rejec- 
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on hold, Lam Cheong Hung 
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school. “My dream has come 
true," he said. 

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CRACs (children recently ar- 
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parents. Many are refused 
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Cantonese. 

In the last school year, 
more than 9,000 mainland 
children arrived to enter 
Hong Kong schools, and this 


though soflietyei we en- 
counter (hfficuhutoes which 
rake time," saat Ms. Wong.* 
“It is usually m because the* 
school won't wait them, but 
because sofne' bBients are 
rather choosy ad they don't 
like the sebooh. ftat our of— 
fleers recommtoxL” 

Mainland children. 1 ■ 

however, compiain that some ■ 
“recommended’’ schools are - 
located more &aa an hour's 1 ' 
commute from their homes, 
or require them to downgrade" 
their class level, sometimes-; 
by as much as. four years. 1 
Seventeen-year-old Yu 
Kin Cho, a new immigrant, 1 ’ 
for instance, was admitted to : 
a school on the condition that 
he join a class of 14-year- 1 
olds. “Everyoae is much' 
shorter than me. It’s embar-' 
rassing and unfair, bat 1 had- 
no choice," he said. 

One reason 'mainland chil— ■ 
dren are forced into lower 
grades is became many didn't, 
start school in China until age‘ ; 
eight or nine, while Hong' 
Kong children Typically enter- 
school at age five or younger. - 
Mr. Ho, however, noted’ 
that some schools downgrade 
students to discourage therrf' 
from joining. r. 

Once admitted, immigrant- 
students frequBdly confront", 
language barriers. In most. 
Hong Kong schools, classes 


RnmMnflkAamelta 

‘Little Cats” a Russian group, performing at Paris's recent World Circus Festival. 


year about 20,000 more are are taught in Cantonese and. 
expected. Moreover, more to a lesser extent, in English!* 


dplines. “Sports have 
brought a lot to tne techniques 
of the circus. Sports are rec- 
ognized in university cur- 
riculums. So the teaching of 
biomechanics, psychology, 
coaching, the whole sports 
system is really very well or- 
ganized." 

Melding disparate discip- 
lines is another role of the 
circus artist's education. Ox- 
ana Tarasyuk, 25, a Uk rainian 
clown, attended the Kiev Cir- 
cus School before going to 
drama school in Moscow. 

“I think it's more inter- 
esting," she said, “to see a 
clown who can act a role than 
one who only knows how to 
do a few tricks. 

BRAD SPURGEON is on the 
staff oft he International Her- 
ald Tribune. 


than 50,000 mainland young- 
sters bora to Hong Kong fa- 
thers have the right of abode 
in the territory after the han- 
dover to Chinese sovereignty 
in July. 

Accommodating such 
huge numbers poses a major 
challenge to the Hong Kong 
gover nment, which is already 
struggling to crowbar the cur- 
rent influx into the territory's 
education system. 

“Many schools discrimin- 
ate against new immigrants 
because they are afraid of 
having to lower their stan- 
dards and of damaging their 
school’s good reputation. 
Plus, they don't want to put in 
the effort to help these chil- 
dren catch up," said Ho Hei 
Wah, director of the Society 
for Community Organiza- 
tion, a Hong Kong group that 
helps Chinese immigrants. 

Schools known for having 
high teaching standards are 
generally the most reluctant 
to accept mainland children. 
Typically, it is only the 
schools with lower standards 
or the technical and vocation- 
al institutions that welcome 
them. 

Sze Lai Shan, community 
organizer of the Society for 
Community Organization, 
said that rather than leave ad- 


Many mainland youngsters 
arrive in Hong Kong knowing 
little English. 


A! 


ND with the excep- 
tion of those froirf : 
the , neiehboring* 
. province of Guang- 1 
dong. ^ many arc not very fa- 
miliar with Cantonese either:* 
“Often they cannot under- 
stand half of what the teachef- 
is saying. The whole thing is*- 
ridiculous,” said Law Chi- 
Kwong, a legislator. «- 

In order to keep pace, many* 
immigrant children attend, 
after-school tutorials and re*, 
medial language classes: ' 

Last year, the government 
provided abort 52 2 million- 
to various nongovernmental 
organizations that offer ad: 
justmem courses for main- 
land children. There are ba- 
sically two iypes of 
p rogr am s: an induction class 
that covers die logistics of 
daily city life and an English- 
language course. X 

Both are fee and last aboof 
60 hours. Ms. Wong of the 
Education Department said, 
“Students learn the survival 
skills they'll heed upon ar- 
riving — local currency," 
traffic rules, transportation:’ 
what comnnnily facilities are 
near their homes, and die ba- 


missions to die discretion of sics of Engfish." 


school principals, the Educa- 
tion Department should es- 
tablish a standardized test to 
gauge the academic level of 
immigrant children and then 
assign them school places ac- 
cordingly. In addition, a cer- 
tain number of places should 
be reserved for mainland stu- 
dents in every school. 

Wong Yuk-ha, the Educa- 
tion Department’s senior edu- 
cation officer, said such pro- 
posals are under 
consideration. In the mean- 
time, the department has set 
up a Central Placement Unit 
to help new immigrant chil- 
dren mid school places within 
21 days. More often than not, 
however, most children aid 
up waiting far longer. 

“We try to get them ad- 
mitted as soon as possible. 


“ EDUCATIONAL "= 
COUNSELING 

US. BOARDING SCHOOLS 
& COLLEGES 

Jean P. Hague, M A 
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But critics contend the* 
courses are too brief to make sr 
rignfficart difference. r 
“The government isn’t <k>: 
ins enough," said Mr. Ho*.' 
“It’s ridicidous to think that a 
child can -adapt to the local, 
environment and leam Eng- 
lish after undergoing two 
crash courses.” 

He noted that there is no-' 
quality control of the course? 
and said the government: 
should set up a system of 
quality assessment, in addP 
non to allocating more foods 
to improve the courses. -- 
At the same time, he crit-’ 
icized the government for 
shifting the burden of coping" 
with the immigrant influx td- 
NGOs. 

“In the next two years, 1 
there will be more than* 
70,000 new immigrant chil- 
dren in Hong Kong," saitf 
Mr. Ho. “If they cannot havtf 
a good education, then w£ 
will be wasting a lot of po- 4 

tential and manpowe r." 

JENNIHEOJ LAUis a jour? 
nalist based in Hong Kong. '■ 



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See Page 3 


‘R 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY U, 1997 


PACE 19 


Swiss Jobless Rate Tops America’s 

Record Figure of 5. 7% Reflects a Long Slump 


C.m<riMh r OurS t 4r/r nm , 

BERN — Switzerland’s unemploy- 
ment rate rose to a record 5.7 percent in 
January from 5..-* percent in December 

the government announced Monday as 

more companies cur staff in the coizn- 

^odd Warli. no_growth si “* 

Switzerland's jobless rate now sur- 
passes that of the United States ap- 
parently for the first time in histoiy.ln 
America, where unemployment was 5.4 
percent in January, companies are hir- 
ujg P^ple after cutting jobs in the 
1980s; Swiss companies are only now 
cutting back to try to become more 
competitive. Economists said the rise in 
die jobless rate would prompt the Swiss 
National Bank to continue its generous 
monetary policy, but few expected it to 
cut the discount rate, already at a his- 
toric low of 1.0 percent 
• The Swiss economy is expected to 
grow as little as 0.5 percent this year after 
having barely grown since 1990. The 
^economy has stalled as consumer spend- 
ing shrinks amid rising unemployment 
and failing real wages. Export growth has 
been sluggish. 

“Today’s figures just confirm that 
there 's no end to the recession in sight for 
now," said Daniel Knit an economist at 
Union Bank of Switzerland. “If we get a 
recovery sometime later this year, it will 


h ave to c ome from export growth." The 
Department for Industry, Commerce and 
Employment said 205,501 people were 
registered as unemployed at tbc end of 
January, surpassing the record of 
192.171 reached in December. 

The number of people in paid em- 
ployment fell by 247,500 between 1991 
and 1995, and the number of jobs is 
expected to fall further as job cuts by 
international companies filter through. 
Economists at the Federal Institute of 
Technology expect the jobless rate to 
rise to 6. /percent next year. 

Novartis AC, the drug maker formed 
by the merger of Ciba-Geigy AG and 
Sandoz AG, is eliminating 3,000 jobs at 
home. Switzerland's biggest banks are 
cutting 6,000 jobs. 

Faced with high costs and a rigid labor 
market at home, Swiss companies are 
expanding abroad. In the past decade, 
they have created new jobs elsewhere at 
an annual rate of 5.7 percent, according 
to Swiss National Bank figures. 

Joblessness, virtually unknown for 
30 years, is also climbing because a 
growing number of -email Swiss compa- 
nies are going out of business as demand 
at home shrinks. Alois Bischofberger, 
chief economist at Credit Suisse, said 
last week that he expected at least 1,000 
construction companies to fail this year 
as capital investment keeps declining. 


Last year, 4,156 Swiss companies 
went out of business, 8.8 percent more 
than a year earlier. That translates to 
about 1 1 fail ares a day in an economy 
that has been a model of stability ana 
steady growth for decades. 

The jobless figures followed a slew of 
data — including the index of leading . 
economic indicators for December — 
that last week suggested the economy 
would remain in a recession in the 
months ahead, economists said. 

Economists, including those at the 
Swiss central bank, pin their hopes fora 
recovery on the weakening Swiss franc, 
which has lost 6 percent against the 
dollar this year after a 1 6 percent decline 
last year. Export growth was the engine 
behind average annual growth of 2JS 
percent between 1983 and 1989. 

“The figures clearly show that (he 
structural changes in the Swiss econ- 
omy are accelerating,'' said Daniel 
HeftL, a spokesman for the Swiss Em- 
ployers’ Federation, the umbrella or- 
ganization of Swiss companies. “We 
are in a recession, but once the recovery 
is under way, we'll create new jobs. " 

The January jobless figure was at the 
upper end of market estimates. Econ- 
omists polled by MMS International 
were expecting an increase to 5.6 per- 
cent, but Merrill Lynch & Co. forecast 
5.7 percent (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


Telecom Negotiators Race the Clock 


BUhimbr^g News 

LONDON — Senior trade negoti- 
ators and company executives from 
more titan 60 countries gathered in 
^ Geneva on Monday in an 1 Ith-hour 
• attempt to forge a global agreement (jo 
open up telecommunications markets. 

The World Trade Organization wants 
an agreement by Saturday, the deadline 
set after talks collapsed last April when 
U.S. companies argued for unproved 
access to Asian markets, particularly for 
satellite and mobile communications. 

; Hopes for on accord were raised 
Monday by three new offers presented by 
Malaysia. Ghana and Grenada. Five other 
countries have agreed to submit revised 
offers this week. The European Union 
also agreed to put forward a new offer. 

While the jockeying for position con- 
tinues, the possibility of an agreement 


looks “a lot better than it did last 
April," said Neil McMillan, chairman 
of the WTO's telecommunications 
committee. 

“It doesn't mean it can't all go 
wrong,” he said, “but the group has 
manage d to solve a lot of problems that 
faced us in April, and the quality of 
offers has improved." 

But at least three key stumbling 
blocks to an accord remain: 

• Canada is refusing to allow foreign 
ownership of its telecommunications 
companies ro exceed 46 percent 

• U.S. companies are demanding that 
government treaty-based satellite orga- 
nizations such as Intelsat and Inmarsat, 
which control access to most satellite 
capacity worldwide, should be excluded 
from any WTO agreement 

• French negotiators want an agree- 


ment to require a certain proportion of 
local content in the information trans- 
mitted over phone networks. Similar 
rules apply to French television. 

Also casting a shadow over tiie talks is 
a proposal by the U.S. Federal Com- 
munications Commission to reduce fees 
that telephone companies outside foe 
United Stales charge for connecting in- 
ternational calls. 

The commission said (he plan was 
separate from the WTO talks, but ana- 
lysts said it went to the heart of any 
eventual accord. Many developing 
countries derive a lot of foreign cur- 
rency from payments they get on tele- 
communications traffic. 

If the talks fail, Mr. McMillan said, there 
is little willingness to extend them, because 
a new round of talks covering a broader set 
of services is scheduled for 2000. 



Saodn Sucavan/Thr Wnhragioa 

Jun-lchi Okawara, left, and Hideo Sawada fly into a national debate. 

A New Airline for Japan 

Shymark Sets Sights on No-Frills Market 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Washington Post Service 

TOKYO — One Japanese company 
has flown straight into the maelstrom 
of a national debate over how to say 
good-bye to market protections, price 
stability and other core features of a 
system that made Japan an economic 

titan. 

With the country’s postwar eco- 
nomic boom stalled by five years of 
recession and stagnation, Skymark 
Airlines has already become one of 
the most visible signs of the country's 
resolve to deregulate its famously 
regulated economy and stimulate 
growth in companies and jobs. 

For now, the company is just five 
people in a Tokyo office. But Sky- 
mark Airlines, which could be Ja-‘ 
pan's newest airline in 40 years, has 
already engendered widespread press 
coverage as well as investment from 
such establishment companies as 


Nomura Securities Co. Many people 
here say the deal is done and predict 
that Skymark will get off the ground. 

For the airline to succeed, Japan's 
bureaucrats must relinquish power 
that for decades has let them ma- 
nipulate entire industries. 

So far they seem willing to do that 
with Skymark. 

One of the entrepreneurs behind the 
airline. Jun-lchi Okawara, said the 
head of the Transportation Ministry's 
aviation bureau had said to him, “I am 
pro-deregulation, so go for it." 

On Friday, an advisory committee 
to foe Transportation Ministry recom- 
mended that new airline slots be set 
aside for newcomers and that they be 
given considerable flexibility in de- 
ciding where to fly. 

To date, foe three established air- 
lines have remained quieL But there 
still is plenty of fighting ahead for Mr. 

See FLY, Page 23 


Statements 
By G-7 Push 
Dollar Down 

But Analysts Wonder 
If Decline Is Durable 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The dollar lost ground 
against virtually all other major cur- 
rencies Monday as markets took ac- 
count of weekend statements from of- 
ficials of the Group of Seven leading 
industrial nations suggesting that its 
two-year rally had gone for enough. 

The currency markets "have reacted 
in an appropriate way,” the Bundes- 
bank’s president. Hans Tiermeyer. said 
as the dollar fell against the Deutsche 
mark and the yen. 

Few analysts, however, seem to ex- 
pect a softening-doll ar trend to go far or 
to last long. Keith Edmunds, chief for- 
eign-exchange analyst for IBJ Interna- 
tional, called foe dollar's weakness in the 
day's trading only a pause, not a reversal 
of its bounce back from its postwar lows 
of nearly two years ago against both the 
German and Japanese currencies. 

Rhetoric alone, even from the G-7, is 
unlikely to tarnish the dollar's pros- 
pects. Instead, analysts say, economic 
data to be released in the next few weeks 
will continue to draw a stark contrast 
between the robust health of the Amer- 
ican economy and weak performances 
in Japan and Europe. In coming weeks, 
they say, those fundamentals will make 
the dollar what it has so often been of 
late — a good bet to rise further still. 

What tiie world's leading central 
bankers would be prepared to do if the 
dollar soared beyond levels they have 
now defined as sensible remains to be 
seen. “It is clear that they do not desire 
a stronger dollar, but it is not at ail clear 
what they intend to do about it," said 
Avinash Persaud, currency strategist for 
J.P. Morgan. 

Even within the G-7 there seems to be 
little agreement on whether and when the 
central banks should wade into currency 
markets, selling huge amounts of dollars 
in the hope of pushing down foe cur- 
rency’s value. By virtually all accounts, 
the most avid advocates of intervention 

See DOLLAR, Page 20 


Thinking Aheq 

r* • / / 


d /Commentary 


Can China See Why Hong Kong Works? 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


Kong’s flourishing brand of capitalism 


W ASHINGTON — A strik- 
ing feature of the Cold War 
was that the West always 
understood the East better 
than the East understood the West If 
you had sent a group of Americans to a 
desert Island and told them to sec up a 
Communist society, they would have 
found the task relatively easy. 

, A group of Russians, asked to establish 
a free -market democracy, would not have 
known where to start. Indeed, you could 
;raue that mast Russians still don't. 

That mismatch in understanding be- 
. tween the two systems underlies one of 
'(he big worries in the West as Hong 
Kong heads toward reabsotption into 
China on July 1: Will Beijing inad- 
vertently kill the goose that lays foe 
golden egg by snuffing out Hong 
Kong's political and economic 
freedoms? . 

. China’s leaders almost certainly do 
not want to see Hong Kong go down foe 
drain. Although they may well prefer 
Shanghai to emerge as China's main 
financial center, they would like to ben- 
efit from Hong Kong's financial and 
entrepreneurial skills — and they hope 
to show Taiwan that it is possible to 
rejoin the motherland and remain pros- 
perous and happy. ... 

The concern is that foe Beijing au- 
thorities may fail to understand the sen- 
sitive and complex mechanisms - in- 
cluding the free flow of information and 
tiie rule of law — on which Hong 


__ the words of one leading Hong 
Kong politician with good contacts in 
Beijing, the question is not whether foe 
Chinese leaders understand capitalism 
— they don’t — it is whether they un- 
derstand that they don't understand it 
One U.S. official who has frequent 
contacts with die Beijing authorities 
says he is constantly amazed by how 

Some experts say Hong 
Kong will evolve into a 
mix of East and West — 
a blend of Chinese 
Confncian values and 
Jeffersonian democracy. 

much more they think they know about 
capitalism than they really do. 

So who is going to set them straight? 
The obvious answer is Hong Kong it- 
self. That at least was the message 
brought to Washington last week by 
political and business leaders associated 
with the Better Hong Kong Foundation, 
an influential pro-China group that is 
close to the leadership in Beijing. 

Instead of seeing Hong Kong as an 
outpost of freedom and civil liberties 
about to be overwhelmed by a repress- 
ive China, members of this group be- 
lieve Hong Kong will act as a “beacon 
of the free-maiket system” that will 


draw China farther down the road to 
capitalism and democracy. 

They are convinced thru Beijing will 
let Hong Kong run its own affairs with- 
out too much interference. Ultimately, 
they say, HongKong will evolve into a 
unique mix of East and West — a blend 
of Chinese Confucian values and Jef- 
fersonian democracy. 

Not everyone in Hong Kong would 
find that reassuring. Last week’s vis- 
itors to Washington pointedly declined 
to enter foe debate over whether small 
amounts of repression would be all right 
after China took over. 

On one side of that debate are Hong 
Kong politicians who argue that even 
foe slightest infringement of civil liber- 
ties would start undermining not only 
basic human rights but worldwide busi- 
ness confidence in Hong Kong as well. 

On the other are many in the business 
community who say that a moderate 
clampdown on free expression — the 
banning of some demonstrations and 
some press censorship, for instance — 
would not stop business as usual. Any 
interference with the judicial system 
and tiie rule of law, according to this 
view, would be much more dangerous. 

The Better Haig Kong Foundation’s 
members may not be entirely objective. 
Their main mission is to reassure the 
world about the Chinese takeover. But 
foeir theme — that Hong Kong’s pos- 
itive effect oi China will outweigh any 
negative Chinese impact on Hong Kong 
— is seductive. In that, at least, most 
Westerners should be able to hope foal 
they are right- 


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PAGE 2 



INTERNATIONA! HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 




PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY II, 1997 


R 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor's America 


The Dow 


30- Year t -Bond Yield 





: j»was %iiS= 


OvS. 






Toronto * :j: TSE.->«l8jfi 


4 * s -*r 







Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


Herald Tribune 1 


Very briefly: 


• Westinghouse Electric Corp„ the owner of the CBS tele- 
vision network, is acquiring two country-music cable chan- 
nels from Gaylord Entertainment Co. for $1.55 billion in 
stock. Westinghouse is continuing its expansion into cable TV 
with The Nashville Network and Country Music Television. 

•Vencor Inc, an operator of nursing homes, has agreed to 
acquire TheraTx Inc, which provides health-care companies 
with integrated information systems, for $1 7.10 a share, or about 
$354 million. 

• Plasma & Materials Technologies Inc, a producer of 
semiconductor-malting equipment, says it has developed a 
way to apply insulation material between the millions of tiny 
wires that connect a chip's transistors, reducing interference 
between the thousands of transistors on a chip. 

• WavePhore Inc. has introduced a service that broadcasts 

data to home personal computers via television signals, al- 
lowing users to bypass bottlenecks in the Internet. Microsoft 
Corp., Intel Corp. and Compaq Computer Corp. are de- 
veloping ways to support the integration of computer and TV 
technologies. AP. Bloomberg 


$1 Million Prize: It’s a Kick 

Sports Ad Campaigns Enter the Playing Field 


By Thomas Heath 

Washin gton Past Service 


WASHINGTON — When a 26-year-old invest- 
ment banker from New York City named Lance 
Alstodt kicked a 35-yard Geld goal and won $1 
million at the Pro Bowl football game in Honolulu 
recently, he set off a roar throughout Aloha Stadium 
and was instantly swarmed by a jubilant throng of 
players from the National Football League. 

m the ensuing days, people talked more about the 
man who had made the $1 million kick than the 
football game itself. The phenomenon also launched 
the (tick's sponsor, Hershey's Chocolate USA, on a 
public-relations streak. . 

After the kick on Feb. 2, Mr. Alstodt, an amateur 
who had been selected to try the 35-yard kick as part 
of the football game's entertainment packa g e, ap- 
peared on the “Today Show,” “Late Show With 
David Letterman’ ’ and an MSNBC news program as 
well as in countless newspapers and innumerable 
radio stations around the country. 

The Hershey $1 million Pro Bowl Kick has been 


replayed on hundreds of newscasts. Last weekend, 
Mr. Alstodt presented the Hershey jersey he wore for 
his kick to New York's All Star Cafe, where it hangs 
alongside jerseys worn by Joe Montana, the former 
San Francisco 49ers quarterback, and Mark Messier, 
the New York Rangers star. 

Marketing experts estimate that Hershey would 
have had to spend tens of millions of dollars to get the 
positive publicity that it received from one football 
flying through the uprights. The company's spon- 
sorship cost only a fraction of that amount 
“It’s all about feel-good and spin," said Seth 
Madins, a senior vice president at ProServ Inc., which 
served as Hershey's consultant 
Such contests — having amateurs try half-court 
shots, 1 0-foot putts or pitching a strike at professional 
sports events — are booming these days as sports 
teams and leagues try to And new ways to make 
money and their sponsors try to reap a bigger bang 
from their advertising buck. Instead of relying only 
on stadium billboards and commercials, consumer 
companies from Coca-Cola Co. to Nokia Corp. have 


discovered these contests, using everyday as a 
way to get noticed. But until Mr. Alstodt took' the 
Geld, these contests had been met with relatively tittle 
public-relations success. 

Hershey may have changed all that by finding a 
different way to run its contest. 

Big contest sponsors such as Gillette Corp. are 
implementing a playoff system similar to the one that 
Hershey used ro select its contestant, which increased 
the likelihood of getting a winner — and foe publicity 
bonanza that comes with it. 

Sports contests did not become a big business until 
April 14, 1 993, when the Chicago Bulls plucked a fan 
named Don Calhoun from his seat, gave him a 
basketball and watched as he sank a three -quart ers- 
coun shot to win a SI million contest sponsored 
jointly by the Bulls, Lettuce Kmeitain You Enter- 
prises and Coca-Cola. 

“Up until then, nobody thought people could make 
these shots,” said Adam Walker, an account manager 
for SCA, which handles contests for about half of the 
NBA’s teams. 

The contests can be structured in many ways, but 
mostly they are pan of an overall marketing plan 
between a sponsor and a team or a league. 

Once the company has a sponsorship, it most often 
turns to insurers such as SCA to assume foe risk. 
Instead of writing a $1 million check to Mr. Alstodt, 
Hershey bought a $100,000 insurance premium. The 
insurer then pays out the award in annual increments 
over 20 to 30 years. Consolation prizes such as the 
$10,000 Hershey would have had to pay Mr. Alstodt if 
he bad failed are picked up by the sponsoring com- 
pany. 

The price of the insurance premium depends on 
several factors, including the difficulty of foe fear, 
how foe contestant is selected and how much prep- 
aration he or she is given. 

On Saturday night, Tim Valente, 49, attempted a 
three-point shot — the American Express Million 
Dollar Shot — during NBA All-Star weekend in 
Cleveland. The shot failed for Mr. Valente, who did 
end up with a $10,000 consolation prize. But for 
American Express, it was a five-minute commercial 
watched by 5 million potential consumers. 


Technology Warning 
Drags Down Stocks 


Gwpflerfiy Or SuffFra* 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
Monday as Intel, Cisco Systems and 
other computer-relared shares 
tumbled after a warning from the 
networking company 3Com of dis- 
appointing revenue and earnings. 

“Fear is mounting that some of 
these companies won't be able to 
keep up with 1996 growth rates, 
said Richard Jandrain, director of 
equities at Banc One Investment 
Advisors. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
closed 49.26 points lower at 
6,806.54. Declining issues outpaced 
advancers by a 13-10 ratio on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The benchmark 30-year Treasury 
band was down 1/32 at 97 12/32. 
leaving foe yield flat at 6.70 percent. 

Some investors were concerned 
that foreign buyers might shy away 
from the $39.75 billion of new Treas- 
ury debt on sale this week after foe 
Group of Seven industrial nations, at 
a weekend meeting, suggested the 
dollar's rally had gone far enough. 

Foreign investors’ appetite for 
U.S. securities, including stocks, 
may be curbed, analysts said. 

“The dollar issue doesn't help." 
said Anthony Conroy, director of 
equity trading at BT Global asset 
Management, a unit of Bankers 
Trust New York Corp. 

The Standard & Poor's 500-stock 
index fell 4.11 to 785.45. The Nas- 
daq composite index slid 2232 to 
133539, dragged lower by 3Com 
and Cisco. 

3Gom’s shares plunged 13V6 to 
37% after the company warned that 
it expected third-quarter revenue 
and earnings to be below analysts' 
expectations. Its drop came five 
trading days after analysts warned 


that Intel would have a tough time 
duplicating its 1996 growth rate;- 
prompting a 6.7 percent drop in the 
chrpmaker’s shares. 

Cisco Systems, which leads foe 
market for computer networking ( 
equipment, accounting for 80 pcnxnt. 
of aline tworfc routers, fell 43b 10 08 
and Intel fell 4% to 151 hi. 

Westinghouse, one of the 30 Dow ■ 
industrial stocks, fell % to 1 7 Vfc after 
foe company said it would buy^ 

U.S. STOCKS , 

Gay lord Entertainment for $1.55'* 
billion in stock. Gaylord Entertain- ^ 
ment fell 3 to 22Vfc. 

Sears, another member of foe 
Dow, rose to 53 after Merrill 
Lynch said any weakness in the. 
stock should be considered a buying* 
opportunity, citing strength in foe.- 
retailer’s profit margins. , 

The gains in Sears helped limit 
declines elsewhere. 

Telecommunications shares ad- 1 
vanccd as computer-technology in- 
vestors looked fora less risky place to' 
invest. MCI Communications rose 5/ 1 
16 to 36 1 1/16. Sprint climbed % to 
43. and SBC Communications' 
gained I-i'a to 55 W. 

But Mr. Jandrain said computer-- 
related shares probably would have! . 
the highest growth rate of any in-' “ 
dustry on wail Street in 1997.1 
“These companies are still the per- 1 
formers,” he said. [ 

Philip Moms, down 54 at 
led tobacco companies lower after a) 
federal judge said the first phase of| 
new cigarette regulations proposed; 
by U.S. authorities would not bej 
blocked before they took effect.' 
UST and RJR Nabisco Holdings! 
also Fell. (Bloomberg. AP. Reuters# 



ip,-' l ' 

M I- 


DOLLAR: Statements From G- 7 Drive U.S. Currency Lower, but How Long Will They Keep It Down? j 


Weekend Box Office 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — "Star Wars" dominated foe U.S. box 
office over foe weekend, with a gross of $22.7 million. Fol- 
lowing are foe Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday's ticket 
• sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


1. Slur Wore 

amauurftd 

S22.7mflHon 

Z DonfTS Peak 

(Universal) 

318-6 mUfian 

1 The Beautician and the Beast 

(Pommaunf) 

U mllDon 

4. Jerry Maguire 

( Tri-SW 

SMmHon 

5. Scream 

(Dimension FBms) 

S34mMon 

6.Evtlo 

(Hadywood Pictures) 

S3 mUUm 

7. Mena 

(Tauritttarm) 

S2^mMan 

&.TIM Encash Potlent 

(Miramax) 

SZZrnflHan 

9. Beverly Hite Nlnfo 

(Tri-Star) 

SUmlHIon 

10. hi Love and War 

(New Line Cinema) 

$1.9mflflan 


Continued from Page 19 

are Japanese investors, against whose 
currency foe dollar has risen more 
than 50 percent since April 1995 and 
whose fragile financial system can ill 
afford the additional trauma of a 
breakdown in confidence in the yen. 

On Monday. Japan’s finance 
minister, Hiroshi Mitsuzuka, not 
only hailed die G-7 statement as a 
“great step” but also made' clear 
there could be a next step as well. 

He pledged that foe group would 
take action if the dollar resumed its 
rise against the yen. It was a pledge 
that no other G-7 minister chose to 
echo, however. 


Even less likely is the idea that 
governments of weak-currency 
countries would alter their econom- 
ic policies to make their currencies 
more attractive to investors. That 
would require Germany, France and 
Japan to support their currencies by 
raising interest rates while Wash- 
ington did its bit by cutting Amer- 
ican rates. 

Unless and until the G-7 proves 
willing to do that, Paul Lambert of 
UBS said, “they cannot draw any 
lines in foe sand.” 

Instead, he said, the governments 
are now merely trying to moderate 
the dollar's ascent. 

On Monday, most analysts in- 


sisted that they saw little cause to 
lower their forecasts for the dollar. 
Many still insisted that levels of 1 .70 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

DM and 130 yen could be reached in 
the next three months. 

By that time, however, many 
forecasters say, the economic tide 
might begin to turn in favor of 
Europe and Japan and against foe 
United States. An increase in eco- 
nomic activity in Japan and Europe 
in the second half of the year, co- 
inciding with a cooling of foe Amer- 
ican economy, should drive foe dol- 
lar lower, they say. 


If those recoveries fail to ma- 
terialize, all bets against the dollar 
could be off, and central bankers 
could be even more powerless than 
they are today to stop its rise. 

The dollar closed at 122.775 yen, 
down from 123.250 yen Friday, and 
1.6554 DM, down from 1.6615 
DM. 

The dollar was also at 1.4260' 
Swiss francs, down from 1.4305 
francs, and 53910 French francs, 
down from 5.5960 francs. 

The pound was at $1.6408, up 
from $1.6335. 

“They did not say they wanted a 
weaker dollar,” and the G-7 parties 
expressed “no intention of interven- 


ing,” Andrew Busch, a trader at thej 
Bank of Montreal in Chicago, toldi 
Market News Service. j ^ 

“That's why the dollar did whatitj * 
did,” namely.’ dip and then recover, 
partly, he said. J 

David O'Neill, a trader at Fujij 
Bank in London, told The Asso-j 
ciated Press, “Were the dollar to* 
come off a few more big figures, thej 
uptrend should still be intact” \ 

The U.S. economy makes the doP 
lar more attractive than currencies] 
from other rich nations, he said.* 
“Why should people be confident toj 
buy marks, yen or Swiss francs, 
when you look at their economies?"; 
he asked. • 


U 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 




Monday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 mast adfwe shares 
up to the dosing on Won Street 
The Associated Press. 



Indexes 
Dow Jones 

Open 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


HM Low ZKtan CRo. 


Indus 685000 arts B 007.70 Ol&M — 3644 

723"* 

a® CTJJ6 73002 mo -~vn 
Camp 211841 2125-H 210SJ7 219938) —11.17 

Standard & Poors 

Pmlgus Today | 

High In On 4sM 

Industrials 93300 909.99 923.10 91434 

Transp. 540*1 552J9 557.09 552J9 

Unites 198J9 196-03 197.7B 197.55 

Finance 9102 89.32 90-93 90.90 

SP500 7B9J2 778.19 789.56 784.99 

5P 100 77291 760.71 77201 764.90 

NYSE 


MercFri 

Camooa 

IBM 

BavNtwfc 
Hewff* j 
AT&T a 
OwsEngs 
PwdCos 

Entmv 

wouMarf 

Oil Brn s 

GnMafr 

WtfnB 

Orvslrs 

FamiMm 

Nasdaq 


VaL Hah 
sum j* 

34491 BZfc 
34919 14Gft 
34BU5 1914 
32728 S2Vi 
30934 391% 
30296 22* 
28871 3244 
27390 27 
244D7 349, 
24351 30ft 
25417 54ft 
2*376 17ft 
>4194 3*9, 
32833 41 


Low 3PM 
2 2ft 
78ft 789: 
143 143ft 

18ft 18ft 
42ft 49ft 
38ft 39 
19 V, m* 
32ft 32 W 
26ft 26ft 
24W 24ft 
28 28ft 
54ft 54ft 
17ft 17ft 
33ft 33ft 
40ft 40ft 


a*. 

»ft 

-4ft 

-5ft 

-ft 

-2 

-ft 

-3ft 

-ft 

♦ ft 

♦ ft 
-3ft 

—ft 

—ft 

—ft 

♦ ft 


Tram 
UK By 


Nasdaq 


415-51 41232 
671.24 51606 
364.19 359.54 
30.90 268.14 
380* 382.10 


415-84 -496 
51631 -221 
359.71 -145 
2023 *1J5 
38305 *0JJ 


30om 

Ctteos 

Wei 


VoL HM Law 3PM ClKL 


Commote 

Industrials 


134834 133723 
114199 1125.14 
136724 134678 
146294 145795 
170125 10325 
867.09 859.63 


□3722 — 20.19 
1125.14 —1573 
1367.12 * 19* 
1*4128 -164 
170125 -9J5 
85923 —280 


SUnMics 

USRoUt 

DeBCWs 

AnUMaf 

Orades 

TheroTx 

WtaridQni 

Repinas 

Gascons 

MWwl 


VOL Mob 
317009 4814 
26037 62ft 
124631 158ft 
68065 Hlft 
64444 44ft 
61442 34ft 
53233 67ft 
47916 66 
44777 499, 
43495 40ft 
42306 16ft 
41666 25ft 
41299 36ft 
38080 36ft 
33230 119ft 


Lew 

37 

58 

19ft 

97ft 

61 

33ft 

(xm 

62ft 

47 

39ft 

12Wu 

244ft, 

33ft 

34ft 

Hlft 


1PM Oft. 
38ft —13ft 
58ft -4ft 
1519ft -4ft 
98ft —2ft 
47ft -5ft 
34 

61ft -6ft 
639, -2ft 
47ft -1ft 
40 

16ft ♦ Jft 
24ft —ft 
34 -21ft, 

34ft -lift. 
lUft -3ft 


AMEX 

Hka 

Lorn 

»1l« 

cam. 

AMEX 

VOL 

Woh 

Low 

Lost 

CfaB. 


588.99 

50460 

58743 

♦an . 


19964 #Vu 

4»u 

4ft, 

-ft. 


Priorii 


9ft 

8ft 

Vft 


Haw Jones Bond 




SR3R 

RovatOo 

14833 79u tj, 
1MU 3Vu 

7B*7u 

2ft 

TO. 

3ft. 

rft. 






lunyfeK 

8993 

16"4i 

IB4 

14ft 







V«3C0 

7771 

34ft 

33ft 

34'* 

+ 1 

20 Burnt* 


10345 


-048 

idwflx 

770 

13 

12ft 

12ft 


io mimes 


10026 


+042 






♦ ft 

10 Industrials 


106-44 


— 0118 

FAusPr 

SKI 

Wft. 

8**u 


—ft 

Trading Activity 










NYSE 





Nasdaq 









Noon 

Prov. 




Noon i 

Pmr. 

' MWTOd 
Decfined 

unctxmooa 
Total issues 
NmWs 
New Laws 



into 
11 is 
923 
3T7S 
121 
16 

160 

944 

776 

330 

1M 

37 

Advonoea 
Dodmod 
Unchomed 
Tract issues 
New HOIK 
New Lows 



ten 

[02 

2227 

5739 

IK 

39 

2166 

1803 

1718 

5737 

163 

0 

AMEX 





Market Sales 








Prev. 




T «J 






341 

272 





Pw. 

Oidbnd 

Unchcmaea 

Taidbsm 



226 

116 

633 

Ml 

202 

715 

NYSE 

Airen 

Nasdaq 



465.15 

2143 

574.78 


641-56: 

32.17 

644-31 

New Lows 



4 

4 

Inm/Mom. 







Feb. 10, 1997 

High Low Oase Chge Opto 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT) 

sooo bu minimum- cants pw biahel 
fetar97 273ft 770ft Z»ft -1’A I1U» 

May 97 271ft 269ft 271 -I ft BOSH 

■M 97 269ft 267ft 269ft -1 73.112 

Sep 77 26514 265 265ft -ft 10J24 

Dec 77 267ft 264ft 267ft 45J>1 

Est.sates NA. Frf*s.sfcs 40411 
WsapenW 321729 off 137 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 tans- daDmsiir Ion 

Mor 77 23600 Z34J0 Z36J0 »1J0 32.545 

May 97 231.60 229 JO 23U0 ♦1.20 21931 

Jul97 22900 228JM 229Z0 ♦MO 20451 

Alin to 227 BQ 22080 32700 + 100 2002 

5eoto 22193 221.50 222 M +1.00 2044 

Oct 97 71100 21150 21 150 «10O 1.079 

Est-saes na Fri's. sates 1ZJW 
Fit's open bit 87.090 up 165 

SOYBEAN OR- (awn 
nundilB-ixriiperta 

Mv97 2399 23.75 23J7 -006 37.677 

Mav97 24,29 36.M MJ7 -003 2ZJ14 

JU177 2448 24-51 3144 -004 15.887 

Aug 97 2172 2470 2U0 -013 1223 

Sep 97 2495 2485 2481 -OI2 2J90 

OOV7 25JJ3 25.00 25JH —009 847 

Est. sates OLA. Frfs. sates 0247 
FWaopaito 87436 Up 156 

SOYBEAH5 (CBOT) 

SABO Bu minimum- aril per DuMI 

_ .. - J7J99 

39,998 
35J05 
Ul 

1342 


26MS 

T2-731 

26311 

2,144 


Hign uw Oase Chge opto 


Ugh Low Ouse Chge Oplnt 


ORANGE JUtCE (NCTNI 10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIF) 

T 5JJO0Q&- cert* per Bj. FFSOOLOOO - pis ot 100 ptf 

BE S2 'sjm mot wiaiio iji.ii 131^1 +&ibui777 

VZtF BE “23 Jun VL 131,2 uaw *0.18 \*sn 

MW BJD M -U 0 1119 Sep 97 128J8 12028 12a4a +0.16 876, 

5eo97 9200 9080 90« -U5 2J82 Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 97J6 *018 0> 

Esf.stfes NA RTS. safes & 000 
RYsooenW I off 29246 


Est volume: 59,966 . Open bit: 157 JSOup 
4. 76 8 


Metals 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFEl 
ITL 200 nBtan - prs otlflO pet 
Mv97 131A0 13IJQ 13 TjOH —022 100322 

Jwm 131.04 130JO 13058 - 021 11720 

Sep97 N.T. N.T. 13056 -024 600 


GOLD (NCMX) 

„ EMSQlei 40234. Piev.ialeK 45510 
F*97 34180 3*2-30 343JOO -030 <U77 Prev. men M: 1204*3 UB 2^15 

Mar 77 34X40 65 EURODOLLARS ICMER1 

Apr 77 345.10 34X40 34130 -070 99J76 „ mKan^al IMoct. 


FehTO 356JS1 X157 

E fl.KM* ILA. Fri's. scries 408S9 
FrTs open M IK427 up 430 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMXI 

lUNhL.cMiHre. 

Feb 77 10900 W7JD 10850 -030 2419 

Mar 77 10750 106.15 107.15 24498 

Apr 97 10800 10450 10500 
MOV 97 VBM 10X30 VOX +015 7.709 

Jun 97 10X30 +OT5 154 

JU97 101.80 101 DO W1J0 +0JBS 4683 

Aug 97 10070 +0J0 612 

Sen 97 9950 9950 9950 +015 2521 

00 97 99-05 5B4 

EAKWS N-A. Frfs. fries 11446 
FrFsapenH SX8S6 up SM 


F0> 97 

9149 

9448 

940 

♦102 

21JM9 

MV 97 

9M7 

9445 

9447 

+0JR 399463 

AW 97 

900 

9441 

9442 

♦101 

6,717 

Junto 

9434 

9434 

9435 


3BL501 

Sep 97 

9423 

9421 

9422 


291.576 

Doc 97 

9405 

9402 

9404 


2D434I 

fetor 98 

9195 

9192 

9193 

-0.01 180,911 

Jun 98 

AM 

*U? 

RUM 


I4W5J 

S«P 98 

9174 

9174 

9176 


101976 

Doc 98 

9165 

9161 

9164 

-tun 

81.705 

Mar 99 

9162 

9161 

91fi 


04998 

Jim 99 

9156 

9154 

9156 


44253 


High Uw OaM Chge Opto 

Dec 9/ 77.45 7650 7680 -031 I2JS 

Mqr90 7825 rtJS 77JS -031 7H 

Est. wfts NA. Fri'v sates 8200 
Fri's open to 1 off SDS1 
HCATWaOM. (NMBU 

42400 pal. ranis per eat 

Mar 97 4M0 5955 6070 +017 303P 

Apr 97 59 JO 5750 5070 -037 I9J64 

May 97 50M 5650 5755 -037 l» 

Jun 97 57.10 5600 S6J0 -027 4.966 

Jut 97 5665 5860 5550 -047 426; 

AuG 97 5690 5610 5435 -032 XOi 

Sep 97 5750 5670 5670 -047 IIP. 

0097 5775 57.15 5745 -052 l.W, 

Now 97 58-25 57 JO 57.95 -022 1.H2, 

Dec 97 980 5808 5046 -032 4,W, 

Eft. totes MJL FrTs. sates 38625 
Fffsmnbtf 98211 UP 100 -• 

UGHT SWEET CRUDE (HMER) * 

IriMD BUL- donors per UbL 


I * i • \ 




1 


Mar 97 7 40ft 

73«ft 

739ft 

flft 

May to 737ft 

733ft 

738ft 

+ lft 

Junto 739ft 

734ft 

739 

+2ft 

Auflto 736 

732 

736 

♦2 

S*p 97 711ft 

709 

711ft 

+4 

Est.stees NA. Fri's. sates 41176 

FrTs open ini 

168,731 

ait 706 


WHEAT {CBOT] 



SJOOBumfertniRHn- CWi parbuSta 

fenvto 340ft 

32 

30 

—4 

May 97 354 

30 

350 

—1ft 

i' ll to 342 

339 

339ft 

+ ft 

Sep97 345 

342 

343ft 

+7ft 


Dividends 


Per Amt Ree Par Company 


GranCarelnc 2-10 2-10 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 

□ryran Carp 1 lor 3re«Re spat. 

b «1 far Amors* spffl. 


♦ft 

Qnn Find 

Q 

xn 

3-14 

4-15 



O 

AO 

5-16 

US 

-w 

Mercury Gen 

Q 

.29 

3-17 

3-31 



INITIAL 




Halffnx Carp n 

- 

.0406 

2-21 

3-10 

-ft 


REGULAR 




ASA Ltd 

Q 

JO 

2-21 

2-28 

-ft 

Rnctrvi A/nyOlri Q 

.125 

3-21 

4-78 


Bush Indus 

O 

.035 

Ml 

2-25 


ChamedCnip 

Q 

.52 

2-21 

3-ID 


Co-Steel Inc g 

a 

.10 

Ml 

3-14 


Dana Corp 

a 

.25 

2-28 

3-14 


Decuiulu, Ind 

a 

07 

3-3 

3-14 


EVERENCap 

0 

-09 

3-4 

3-IB 


Fair Isaac 

Q 

_Q2 

2-20 

34 

-ft 

Goran Inc 

O 

OO 

2-18 

7-25 


Gen Bkvfing 
Hawrty Fun 
Haverty Finn A. 
IRT Property 
Independ Squmu 
Kautman Brood 
MemarincoFd 
Metctmdsbp 
Midcoast Energy 
NN Ban RoBer 

i Barilngm 
i MferemJ 
Pf Income Fd 
PflncoMngmnt 
Pf IncoOppart 
PrlmeSource 
Seffjpnmi Offy 
Seagram Se< 
Sttiwsf Socur 
Std Motor 

line 


PttMon Brink Grp 
Ptttston BartbiHi 


Per Anri Rec 

Pay 

0 

.11 

2-24 

3-24 

0 

JW 

2-17 

2-27 

Q 

MS 

2-17 

2-27 

a 

025 

2-20 

3-1 

fell 

.115 

2-20 

2-2B 

Q 

JI75 

M3 

2-27 

M 

-07 

2-18 

2-28 

Q 

05 

2-14 

3-3 

a 

.006 

2-21 

3-3 

Q 

m 

2-24 

3-10 

a 

07 

2-18 

3-3 

a 

025 

2-18 

3-3 

0 

06 

2-18 

3-3 

0 

,1625 

2-18 

3-3 

M 

087 

2-21 

2-28 

M 

087 

2-21 

2-28 

M 

073 

2-21 

2-28 

M 

045 

2-14 

3-3 

M 3)782 

M9 

2-26 

M 

07 

2-19 

2-26 

O 

05 

3-14 

4-1 

O 

08 

M4 

3-3 

0 

.10 

2-10 

3-4 

to iiubuqI 

Ipor 


te Conmfirai tundsi 


Est sales NJL. Fri’s. stria 14866 
Fri's open to 9.134 up B7S 


Livaslock 

CATTLE 1OAS0 

46800 On.- earn pern. 

Aor97 6845 4805 4827 -035 

Jun 97 43.53 4140 4142 -035 

Aug 97 6162 S3J7 6132 -027 

Od97 6682 6652 6657 -025 

Dec 97 6805 68J2 6852 -027 

Fe098 080 0A5 082 -007 

Esl.sdes NA. Fri's.stdes 10302 
Fri’s open to 108975 up 733 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMBR) 
sunei-aMMrh 
Mar 97 4800 47 JO 67J5 -067 

Apr 97 4825 6&00 6880 -072 

May 97 49.90 «JM 69.05 —012 

Aug 97 7190 7140 7141 -037 

Sep 97 7125 7175 7175 -OSS 

Qd 97 73.9G 7X® 7X40 -050 

Est. sales NA Fri's. safes X4B2 
Fri's open to 28505 off 130 

H0684ean {CMBU 
4(Um Rk,- oontupv lx 
Apr 97 7892 7815 73J) -075 

Jun 97 79 JO 7820 7842 — 1JB 

JU97 77.25 7 1* 765B —1-DO 

Aug 97 7405 7820 7865 -070 

Od 97 67 JO 6640 am -027 

Dec *7 0835 64.90 654)5 —080 

Est.sates NA Fri's. safes 7J75 
Fri's Open irt 3X603 off 175 

POflK BELLIES ICMBU 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sides figures ara uitoRdcOYkaityntoB end kMBrefied me pmtousSZ Meeks plus meewrerd 
MedK.bulnotltwlatest1»Biflnadoy.VWiereoapgtfestodi d M k te«i« liJiiu unliiBto2SperoBntoriiiore 
hmbepn pokL the yeoa Idgh-loM range <md0ridpral ore shoMiiftrtie raw Hods orty. Unless 
toioraiise noted toes otdMdendsaeMmuoldls I iuis e nMids hosed on me Meat dedondfan. 
a - dMdend also extra GO. fa - annual rate of dividend plus stock dividend, c - liquidating 
dMdend. ce - P E exceeds 99-dri - catted, d - new yearly low. dd - loss I n ffie last 1 2 monttis. 
e - dMdend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, f- annual redd Increased an last 
dedaratlarL g - dft Idend In Canadian fundi subject to 15% non- residence tax. I - dMdend 
declared offer spIN-up or stock dMdend. l-dlvfdend pa Id IHs yean am Med deferred or no 
action futen at latest dMdend meeting, k - dMdend dedared or paid this year, an 
accumolaitve Issue wn dMdsnds In arrears, a -annual rate, reduced an last decMraBan. 
a • new Issue in the past 52 weeks. The Mph-km range begins wnti the start at trading. 
Bd -next day deanery- p-tnPtni dMdend annual rate unknown. P/E- pri c e ea rn ings ratio, 
q- dosed-end mutual fund r- dMdend declared or paid In preceding 12 month* plus stock 
dMdend. s- stock split. Dividend begins wBh date olspflt. sis -sales, t- dividend paid In 
stadt In preenflng 12 monttid estimated ash value an cx-dMdend or en-dtshlfauikm date- 
u - new yeorty high, v- trading batted, vi -in bankniptey or reoBhUHShfeor faeftig reorgemtad 
underiha Bankruptcy Act, orsecoritles assumed by such companies, we- when dteWbuted. 
wl - when issued/ ee - wtth warrants, k - w-dMdend or av-rights. ndls - es-tBstitouBon. 
xw - without warrants, y- ax-OMdend and sales in fulL yM - yield. *- sales fa, fu IL 


4450 

14992 

17^00 

14935 

4391 

11® 


7jen 

x«J 

4993 

4079 

1.485 

1452 


7511 

1576 

2,125 

U68 

7m 


Feb 77 77-35 76X0 7415 —1,47 l^M 

Mar 97 7690 75. ID 75J0 —1.95 149 

May 97 7735 78*5 7615 — 1A0 3J07 

Jill 97 7650 7830 7620 -895 655 

AU097 74.40 7X27 7127 -075 471 

Esl sales NA Frfs. sates 2223 
Fri's open felt 8*56 off 91 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE] 

10 metric ions- saer ion 
” 276 1260 

310 1291 

237 ira 
368 1352 

388 1384 

. na Fri’s. sales 11237 
Fri's open to 90 JS 2 UP 473 

COPFBE C (NCSE) 

V J00 few.- am oer to. 

Mar 97 10J5 149-50 15865 +7 JO 28027 

MOV 97 13850 14800 15445 +845 185M 

JUV7 1020 14UB M9_» *7 JB SMS 

Sep 97 US40 VPJS MM +325 8421 

Est. sales NA Fri's. Kries 14288 
Frt'sapwito 48470 off 1061 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE) 

112200 tax- cents ob 1 m. 

Mar 77 1858 100 1851 — 003 54595 

Mav97 1051 100 1853 -803 37 jn 

Jul97 I860 1836 TOJB -803 2720B 

0097 1839 1835 1836 -804 J9J78 

&J. safes na Firs, sates nan 
FrTs open to 14809 off rjTfl 


SAVER (NCMX] 

8000 Mr a**- osnts per nav at 
Feb 97 49210 I 

Mor97 0720 49850 49558 *1J0 56,145 

Apr 77 49520 49520 0520 — 120 3 

Mar 97 50150 49550 50820 +120 14262 

Ail 77 50800 50120 9M20 +070 9264 

S*P97 5050 50650 5051 +120 3216 

Dec 97 51720 51220 51520 +810 5.156 

Jon 98 51720 9 

Est.sdes NA Frf8 sates 25,974 
Frfs open fed 72259 up 339 

FLATBJUM CNMBRJ 
5D tray da- dollars per MW OB. 

AprV7 36440 35520 35920 +190 20225 

Jul 97 36120 358J0 36120 +110 3231 

0097 36420 36020 36420 +4.1B 2265 

JO* 98 36220 36220 36220 -020 1.111 

EsLsdes NA Fri's. sates 2.983 
Ws open felt Z7232 up 131 
n o i o 

LONDON METALS CLMEJ 
DaBan par metric tan 
Atsretaam Ottab Grade) 

Spat 15Xfi0 155420 1587ft 1588ft 
F&nwrt 158720 158820 141720 141820 


EN.sdes NA Frfs. totes <12.125 
Fri's open fed 2214260 up 19156 
BRTT13H POUND (CMBU 
4U00 pounds, S par pound 
Na 97 1-4390 1.4297 15374 
Jun 97 15340 15270 15340 
Sep 97 1-4338 

Dec 97 I53D3 

Est sates NA Fri^saks 11.978 
RftOMlW 38071 Off 100724 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBU 
rauoa dBBara, 1 per can. dfe 
Mar 97 7420 7399 J401 

Jim 97 7462 7442 7446 

Sep 97 7585 7490 7490 

D«C 97 7543 7530 7530 

Est. sates NA Frfs.sates 8825 
Frits apento 55204 up 265 
GERMAN A4ARK (CMER) 

1 ZS200 merkx, S per mote 
Mar 97 5064 5040 -6047 

Jun 97 5102 5076 5085 

Sep 97 5132 5125 4125 

DEC 97 5151 

EsL sates NA Fri's. sates 57266 
Ws aoen inf *4281 up 6058 
JAPANESE Y« (CMBU 
1 15 mBnon yen. s pa* 100 yen 

Mor*7 2210 2175 2183 

PftotOto Jun 97 2312 2283 2296 

Ss>97 2389 

Est sales ha Rfs. sides 4X488 
Fri's open Kit 69504 up 4025 

SWBS H2ANC (CMBU 


34477 

S,TW 

1260 


Mar 97 2255 2145 

Apr 97 2273 21-45 

May 97 21.92 71 J8 

Jim 97 2153 2127 

Jul 97 21 JB 2898 

Aug 97 71.12 2044 

Sep 97 20.97 2050 

Od 97 2047 20J7 

NW97 2052 2825 

Dec 97 7052 2000 

Jan 78 2800 2DJ0 
Feb 98 1955 1870 

Mar 91 19.90 19J9 

Estsates NA Frf's.SOtes Ml 599 
FrficpmiH 37X750 up 2445 
NATURAL GAS (NMER1 
10400 mm Wu's. t pot mm ant 


2L96 -827 69.163" 
2173 —814 55527." 

2150 —830 32569 * 

21J5 —828 3LHS' 
2897 -832 I4JW’ 
2085 —0-22 15300* 
2030 -815 167*6' 
»39 -025 IMS i 

2022 -818 8M7. 
20.14 -812 ZUM> 

2000 -810 1179*. 
19.90 -OilO 739'. 
1952 -00 2JVS, 



MB' 97 

1260 

1150 

IMS 

W 


Aor 97 

2.150 

1890 

1095 

19.719. 


May to 

2JM0 

1050 


MAS*. 


Junto 

2075 

1045 

2045 

tsa 

42.461 

Jul 97 

LOffl 

2045 

1045 

9054 

Augto 

ZJJ7U 

1050 

1050 

W>. 


Sep 97 

ueo 

2070 

2070 

L5».. 


Od 97 

2.100 

1070 

2078 

8059 


Nov to 

1210 

1170 

1170 

47W- 


Decto 

2321 

22*0 

1280 

7370 y 


Jan 98 

LOW 

1325 

2325 

1594- 


Est.sdes NJ 

Fn"s sates 34,195 


86083 

M67 

2011 

Fri's anal Irt 

159,535 

OH 385 

l 

UNLEADED GASOUNE (NMER) 

i 

0JM BaL aents per aal 


30091- 

fetor 97 

5X45 

61.40 

6120 -OI6 


Apr to 

6X65 

6100 

6150 —4(8 

IMO: 


n „ „ — — laoo 2d7n-oo iosjb 

2229 J0 223800 225100 2255.00 


649 JO 65000 67000 47150 
65000 66000 07900 60100 


Nickel 

Spaf 770000 7710 JO 777X00 77B5J0 
FuihuhJ '* 


Morw J055 J023 J035 

Jun 97 J120 -7092 JIM 

58 P 97 Jin J177 J177 

a.sofea NA FriX sates 33J74 
Fri’s open felt 5UMB up 7514 
MMMTHEUROMAKKI 


85536 

3 J 79 

661 


04M 

2,732 

1.920 


71a 


779000 780000 787DHO 700000 


Spat 582000 5B3000 5835X0 584X00 
Forward 589000 5?00X» 590000 591000 
Opc (Spedai Htafa Grade} 

Spa 1156ft 1158ft 1170ft 1171ft 
Forward 117000 117000 1189ft 119000 


Mam 

Ap*7 

Jun97 

SSBE 

Dec97 


3415 

■47 


1276 

1260 

1267 

-2 

11257 

1310 

1291 

1303 

♦ 2 

29076 

1ST 

ira 

1335 

+6 

11290 

1368 

I3B 

UM 

♦ 3 

90*8 

1388 

1384 

1384 

+2 

5.1(7 


Financial 
UST.BLLSKMBU 

*1 nUMon* ptsaMOOPCt. 

MOT 97 95JB 9497 9*38 

Jun 97 9450 M» M0 

Sep 97 9445 

Bd. sales NA FrTx sates 
Frfs acen to 

SYR. TREASURY KBCm 

1100400 prfe>- m% & 640a oMW pa 
MCF 97 106-62 106-51 196-0 +01 184417 

Jim 97 106-44 106-39 106-44 +01 12463 

S0P97 106-28 ♦ 01 

EsLstoa 32480 FrTs. sales 64,992 
FfTsoponirt 196J80 aft 49 
It YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 
nauno ertn- m a baomoom 

Mra 97 109-29 109-10 109-17 +01 JT3JS2 

Jun 97 109-01 108-25 10B-30 +81 34420 

Sap 97 1QB-U (08-11 108- 13 1. 

Dec 97 18MB 

Est.sates 65 OB FrPs.sdoa 160J07 
FrTs open M 349.990 up 1946 
US TREASURY BONOS (0471) 
n mmiodjioo-ms a aanoxor mo pen 
Mor 97112-21 112-03 112-15 
Jun 97 112-05 111-25 112-00 
Sep 97 111-22 111-15 111-18 
Dec 97 11T-06 111-05 111-05 
MarfO 1U-27 

Jun 98 1»-17 

Sep 98 110-00 

Dec 98 110-00 

Mar 99 109-24 

EsLsdes 273400 nm sales 57X448 
Fri's open to 5KJ6S im 21130 


Mam 

Mam 

Sam 

Dee97 

Mar98 

Jean 

5ep98 

Dectt 

Mato 


MMJHTH EUROMARK PJFFO 
DMinBan-DHaflODpct 
FeP97 9 tS 9648 9648 Undi 120 

9649 9640 9649 UndL 206X9 

NX N.T. 9649 UnOl 1529 

9642 9640 9642 ♦ 041 148666 

9646 9643 9646 ♦ 001 163469 

960 964S 960 + 802 16322 

96J9 962S 9629 ♦ 8K litw 

SSI SS 1 

Junto 9531 9547 9531 * fiS 

SW99 9545 9S42 960S ,On 

Onto 94J9 9677 9440 *(#03 I&272 

gLsteM; 40.116 Pta.sal»rii7JM 
Pmr. open let.- 1.178L741 off I,ib 
3-MOMTH STERLING (L1FFH) 

CnUOO - pb at lOOpcJ 

93J3 tiff tin — on? 10X476 

9135 9X27 9X28 —804 74.7X1 

M.19 W.1I 9X13 -Ora 

93£7 nap 9X02 —803 33353 

N9J tttl 92.95 — 802 35495 

JJS3 SS 549 -am 21437 

to-M nsa 9244 —802 18X4 

9243 92J7 9240 — 8B2 8AM 

. 92J8 92.71 92.74 -U 

%&%£%£ »t=H & 

^MOfTTHPIBOS (MATIFJ 

F2"ato-^s«N100pct 

to JfS 96.70 96J1 +OJXJ *7409 
Jun to 96^ 96J3 96J5 +041 SaSS 

a ^ E * t,¥ ° i um«r2iff77. Open W J 56^959011 


18 


S ^ 

s ^ gs » =&s isgg 

uSS 10246 ♦ 0.13 239457 p*i^225i W?WrL7S'- 


Junto 10142 10143 jOMB +ai2~iX3U 
&i«DWK 92435. Pwy. safes 1 
Ptm. open tel: 2SU7D qt 
LONG GH.T (UFFEI - 

cRuno-ga £aua 0100 pa 

Mm97 113-15 112-28 112-29 -O-I0 
Junto 112-30 113-13 112-14—049 
Ete-sOes 54438. Prae-ndes 10434 

Pres. «pre tel- 1W4M v 600 


Jun 97 6445 6110 6175 -MS 74*s 

Jul 97 6120 6140 <250 — aio 4SU_ 

Aug 97 61X 6040 6840 _tL£S 4JM 

Esl sates NA Fri's, SateG 35.441 
Fri'sooanto 79J34 UP 5776 
GASOIL OPE} 

U4. donors per metric tan ■ tats oflOO laas 

Fed 97 19050 18635 188 25 -2J» 1UUS 
Mar 97 18440 17BJB 18125 —*.00 18J91 
AJJJ to 18140 178J5 17B45 — 4J5 8407 
May 97 18000 17575 17640 —US Jl». 
Junto 17940 176JI0 17640 — 5.09 G»' 
Jut 97 179.25 17600 176J5 —4-75 2403 
Aug to N.T. NT. 177^5 — *45 1^04 
Seplto 17940 17740 177.75 -4-25 1422. 
Od 97 17940 17740 177.75 —425 l.Jfi, 
NOV 97 17940 179.00 17840 —US 
Dec 97 18140 1 7840 17840 —ITS 3480 
Est. sales: 241 TO . Open fctU 66454 up 
2.276 • 

BRENT OIL n PE) 

U4.daBan per barrel- loti all JKWWrels . 

21483 2045 21.13 +0.18 affiB' 

AtX'to 2M3 20.18 2076 +012 SWW' 

MBT 97 2040 19.90 2039 +003 Ifc-W}' 

JtnseW 2023 19.70 2010 Unch. lTJW- 

July to 19.95 1945 1947 +0.01 12^2T 

Aug to 19J5 19.74 1940 —005 3,703’ 

5epto N.T. N.T. 1948 +043 5489’ 

0097 19^0 1940 19.32 +044 1779 • 

N°vto N.T. NT. 19,17 *005 2^4" 

Decto 19.16 1947 1943 +006 -U50* 

JMr. sates: 54454. Open Mj 1574*9 off’ 

4t31 . 

Stock Indexes 
SAP COMP. INDEX (OMER) 

SMxmdex 

Mur to 79695 790.10 791JB -335 1»*». 
Jun 97 80420 79140 799 JB — 2J0 10.n3. 
Sep to 81020 808.20 SOU -LIS I4W. 
Decto 81740 1481 

go sates NA Frfs. sates 82431 
Fri's open mr ivuoa up mi 
FTSE ISO fUFPBl 

43074 +84 S84M 

^ :ss ffi.. 

|g:.toteju 4.IB8, Prev.seles: !U» 

Prev. open fell: 64012 up 168 
CACMIMATIF1 

»^MK4 2§924 26034 +240 264g 

Jun to gwS S34 M7S.0 tSffi Mg- 

Sep to 25960 2S940 2587.0 +2.00 Mg. 
gfee 97 NT. NT. 26064 *240 7039 
Mur SB NT. N.T. 26214 +240 710 
» N.T. NT. 25984 +8« •>' 

Esl wdunM: 9.755. Open biU 6M19 UP - 


: '»»f i; 


is. 


industrials 


,J 


1 — 


OBTT0N J tNCTNJ 
NONBi.ansiwh 




v-or 

few to 7500 
May 97 7600 

-Uto 7700 
Oct 97 77 JO 

7505 
7601 
77 JS 

7401 
7155 
7601 
77 JS 

-M3 

—053 

-044 

+OIS 

19.975 

19064 

4856 

IJ78 

fetoady^ 
Reuters 
DJ. Futures 
CRB 


Ctaie 


IWWte- 

1^48440 1^7840 

1,957.10 

IS- 74 

23746 33i75 




'"ih„ 

"k/ 



EYTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1997 


PAGE 21 


EUROPE 


^British Tobacco CEO 
To Consider Settlement 

For Liability Oaims 


Bkxinbrrc News 

LONPON-Thc chief executive 
of BAT Industries PLC, Martin 
Broughton, has said the cigarette 
maker would consider settling dam- 
age claims brought by victims of 
smoking-related illnesses if doing 
so would end the growth of legal 
claims against the industry, 

“Clearly there would have to be 
some kind of payment to somebody’ ’ 
^ if the industry can secure a settle- 
■ ment, Mr. Broughton said in a BBC 
interview over the weekend. 

' They want a big payoff, and we 
want a peaceful life. 

The statement was Mr. 
Broughton’s strongest yet about the 
possibility of a settlement, a course 
that many analysts have said could 
help end the uncertainty hovering 
over the tobacco industry. Mr. 
Broughton said three months ago 
thar a government-endorsed settle- 
ment of U.S. liability claims would 
be a “common sense” approach. 

Shares of BAT, the maker of Kooi 
and Lucky Strike cigarettes, closed 


Si 


Norddeutsche 
Pursues Alliance 
With Berlin Bank 

Bloomberg News 

HANNOVER, Germany — 
Norddeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale’s chief executive. 
Manfred Bod in, said Monday 
the bank was still pursuing an 
alliance with Bankgesellschaft 
Berlin AG that could include 
exchanging stakes. 

“We expect the association 
that began in 1992 and 1993 to 
continue with greater intensity 
this year." Mr. Bodin said. '‘It 
will take at least six months to 
determine where areas of pos- 
sible synergy lie.” 

Warning that talks were at an 
early stage, he said his bank 
would be interested in exchan- 
ging stakes with the Bankgeseil- 
schaft holding company. 

The holding company was 
created by the 1994 merger of 
three state-owned bonks in Ber- 
lin. A full merger would create 
Germany's third-largest bank 
in terms of total assets, after 
Deutsche Bank AG and 
Dresdner Bank AG. 


at 5 1 8 pence ($8.41 ). np 8. The stock 

fell as low as 4 1 1 pence after a jury 
in Florida in August ordered its U.S. 
tobacco unit to pay $750,000 to a 
former smoker who bad contracted 
cancer. 

U was only the second time that 
the industry, which has $50 billion 
in annual sales in die United States 
alone, had lost a liability claim. The 
other time, the verdict was over- 
turned on appeal. The Florida award 
raised fears that juries considering 
about 300 other U.S. claims died in 
die past two years would also turn 
against the industry. 

But Nyren Scott-Maiden, an ana- 
lyst with Barclays de Zoete Wedd in 
London, said he was skeptical that 
such a settlement could be arranged. 
“You have to satisfy so many dif- 
ferent interest groups: the p laintiffs, 
the plaintiffs’ lawyers, the industry 
smd Congress as well,’’ he said “I 
suspect they’re still quite far apart,” 

Still, he said, a settlement would 
be “a desirable outcome” for share- 
holders in tobacco companies. 

Mr. Broughton is not the first 
tobacco executive to raise the pos- 
sibility of a settlement. Steven Gold- 
stone, chief executive of RJR 
Nabisco Holdings Coip-, which 
makes Winston and Camel cigar- 
ettes, said in March 1996 that the 
industry would consider a settle- 
ment if the terms were right. 

Mr. Goldstooe said the industry 
would consider paying for costs as- 
sociated with smoking, including 
charges such as state Medicare bills, 
in exchange for U.S. government 
immunity from liability claims re- 
lated to smoking. 

Mr. Broughton said in late Oc- 
tober, after BAT reported record 
pretax profit of £2.04 billion for the 
first nine months of 1996, that be 
doubted an agreement could be 
reached because it would not be in 
the interests of plaintiffs or their 
lawyers. 

Mr. Scott-Maiden said investors 
were so concerned about the pos- 
sibility of big losses in U.S. liability 
cases that they had discounted the 
profit made by Brown & Williamson 
Tobacco Coip.. the U.S. cigarette 
unit of London-based BAT. 

“At the current share price. 
Brown & Williamson, which makes 
a billion dollars a year, is put in at a 
negative valuation,” Mr. Scott- 
Maiden said. “A settlement may 
take away some of the profits, but it 
would at least allow you to value the 
rest of the company.” 


On-Line Shakeout for France? 

Executive Says Connections Will Equal Survival 


Reuters 

CANNES — : The French on-line business is 
headed for a year of ruthless concentration, and only 
a few big players with links to telecommunications 
companies will survive, die managing director of the 
multimedia-publishing company Hacbette Hlipacchi 
Grolier said Monday. 

The executive. Herve Diene, also said it would be 
at least 2005 before publishers coaid make solid 
profits on the Internet. 

“The market is currently fragmented between five 
or six access providers with some 20,000 subscribers 
each.” Mr. Digne said. “Because there is a price war 
in die sector, these activities on their own are not very 
profitable." 

Among French Internet-access providers, Wanadoo 
has a link with Ranee Telecom, as does Microsoft 
Corp.’s MSN, while Generate des Eaux SA’s Cegetel 
unit {dans to become an Internet-access provider. 
EasyNet, another Reach Internet-service provider, 
has link* to British Telecommunications PLC. but 
others such as America Online Inc.. Infante. Calvacom 
and Club Internet do not have such connections. 

“If the market continues to grow as slowly as it is 
now, not all of them can survive,” and some will 
have to restructure. Mr. Digne said. 

Club Internet is a privileged partner of Hacbette 
Filipacchi Grolier, as both are parr of Lagardeie 
Gnxipe. 

Hacbette Filipacchi has published a series of corn- 


disks with read-only memory, the multimedia 
disks known as CD-ROMs, and manages eight 
sites on the World Wide Web that relate to the main 
magazine titles of the group, which include EUe and 
Pans Match. Mr. Digne said thru die eight- sites man- 
aged by Hachetie Filipacchi Grolier attracted 1J2 mil- 
lion visits a month ana that the company was charging 
advertisers 250 francs ($4450) far each 1,000 visits. 

Mr. Digne said there were between 5.000 and 7.000 
Web sites in France. Although the number is almost 
sure to rise, he said, he thought there would be only a 
limited number of sites thar would be visited fre- 
quently. He said be refused to be carried away by 
forecasts of spectacular growth in die Internet that 
would make advertising a big source of revenue. 

“I don’t think that any company will be able to 
make a real return on investment until the year 
2005,” he said. “In the meantime, editors like us will 
have to try to limit the losses and get to know the new 
techniques to adapt to the new market” 

Regarding the CD-ROM market, Mr. Digne said 
there were signs that many multimedia computers 
had been sold for Christinas and that CD-ROM sales 
could rise. But he said 1500 new titles had been 
launched in the European market last year and that 
many publishers were still waiting to reach the break- 
even point on their titles. 

“If a CD-ROM title would sell 10,000 copies it’s a 
best -seDer,” be said. “Tbe break-even lies often around 
6,000 copies, and many titles are far from that” 


Heavy Traffic Gives a Lift to BA 


Carfdlei by Ow Staff Ditfxttrha 

LONDON — British Airways 
PLC celebrated 10 years in the 
private sector a day early Monday 
wife an announcement of record 
pretax profit for its third quarter, 
marred only by asharp rise in jet-fuel 
prices, which hit operating profit. 

Hie airline said higher passenger 
and cargo traffic helped raise pretax 
profit for the three months that ended 
Dec. 31 by 8.7 percent, to £113 mil- 
lion ($184.6 million), on a 6.3 per- 
cent rise in sales, to £2.02 billion. 

Pretax earnings for the nine 
through December also set a record, 
at £58 3 million, compared with 
£534 milli on a year earlier. 

But ojperating profit slipped to 
£131 million from £152 million be- 
cause of a 34 percent rise in fee 
quarterly fuel bill, to £222 million. 
The airline said operating profit 
would have risen 23 percent without 
the increase in fuel costs, which are 
coming down again. 

BA’s shares rose 10 pence to 
close at 597 after the results, which 
came in above the typical market 
forecast of around £100 million in 
pretax profit in the third quarter. 

“It’s a very, very good perfor- 


mance and clearly shows feat Brit- 
ish Airways remains fee industry’s 
leader in cost management.” said 
Chris Avery, an airline analyst wife 
Paribas Capital Markets. 

BA plans a progress report on its 
campaign to find £1 billion of an- 
nual cost savings when it reports 
full-year results in May, its chief 
executive. Robert Ayling, said. 

BA’s chairman. Sir Colin Mar- 
shall, said fee cost-cutting program 
was on track, and he said he ex- 
pected the growth and record profits 
seen in the airline industry in 1996 to 
continue in 1997. 

BA’s cost-cutting plan aims to 
trim 5,000 jobs in Britain within 
three years. Since fee plan was im- 
plemented in September, fee airline 
has announced various moves to sell 
or reorganize parts of fee business 
such as ground services and cargo 
handling. Mr. Ayling said it was too 
early to calculate the resulting sav- 
ings. But he said much still had to be 
done if the airline was to remain 
competitive. 

BA’s scheduled passenger traffic 
in the third quarter was up 9.1 per- 
cent. and its load factor, or propor- 
tion of seats filled wife paying pas- 


Investor’s Europe 



'S O N' D J F 
1996 1997 


Sxdiange 

index 

Monday 
■ Close 

Prev. 

Close 

% 

Change 

Amstenton 

AEX 

695JM. 

694.25 

+0.11 

Bmssefg 

SQL-20 

2,088.53 

2.O60.50 

+0.39 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3,184^6 

3.138.01 

+4.48 

Copenhagen 

StocK Market .. 

. 530 J29 . 

528.72 

+0.30 

Hafisbtid 

HEX General 

2,821.91 

2,806.08 

+056 

Osio 

OBX 

581.99 

584-22 

-0.38 

London 

FTSE100 

' 4^07.70 

4,30730 

Unch. 

Madrid 

Stock Exdxange 

475.55 

475.41 

+0.03 

mm 

WBlfeL 

12,680.00 

12.799.00 -0-93 ) 

parts 

CAC40 

2,585 J7 

2.597.52 

-0.08 

Stockholm 

SX16 

2,783.99 

2,751.00 

+1.56 

Vtenra 

ATX 

1^01.96 

1,196.96 

+0.42 

Zurich 

SPJ 

Z7SaJ3 

2.783.25 

+0.46 

Source: Telekurs 


Imenulunul HcrjU Tnhunc 

Very briefly: 


sengers. rose to a record 7 1 .2 percent 
from 70.7 percent a year earlier. 

Fuel prices caused a 0 J percent 
rise in unit costs, which otherwise 
would have fallen 3 percent, the 
airline said. 

Sir Colin did not comment on 
BA’s proposed alliance wife Amer- 
ican Airlines except to say that BA 
would also concentrate this year on 
completing regulatory clearance of 
that alliance and launching its re- 
sulting “enhanced services” across 
tbe North Atlantic. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg I 

■ Lufthansa Looks to Britain 

British Midland PLC and 
Lufthansa AG said they were ne- 
gotiating to set up a strategic al- 
liance, Bloomberg News reported 
from Frankfurt. They declined to 
give details. 

In May. Lufthansa's chief finan- 
cial officer. Klaus Schlede, was 
quoted as saying the airline “could 
not exclude the possibility” of buy- 
ing a stake in British Midland. 
Lufthansa subsequently said Mr. 
Schtede’s remarks had been misin- 
terpreted and that such a purchase 
was “not on the agenda right now.” 


• Tesco PLC, Britain’s largest supermarket chain, will open 
some stores for 24 hours a day in Mareh, becoming fee first 
supermarket operator to test demand for all-night shopping 
outside fee Christmas period. 

• Usinor Sacilor SA is considering forming a "strategic 
alliance" wife a Spanish steelmaker. Corp. Siderurgica 
Integral. 

• Kvaerner ASA, a Norwegian shipbuilding, construction 
and engineering company, has closed its ship repair yard in 
Gibraltar after talks with employees collapsed. 

• Britain’s raw materials prices fell a gmater-rhan-expecred 
0.5 percent in January, as fee strong pound drove down prices 
of crude oil, metals and chemicals. 

• 6,417 customers switched from British Gas PLC to new 
suppliers during the first day of domestic deregulation of the 
British gas market in two test markets in fee west of England, 
said TransCo, the company’s pipeline division. 

• South Africa’s gold output plunged to a 40-year low of 
522.38 metric tons in 1996, from 494.62 tons in 1995. but 
production should stabilize at around 500 metric tons a year in 
fee future, the Chamber of Mines said. 

• Romania’s central bank will allow fee discount rate, now 
at an annual 90 percent, to float in alignment with the one- 
week rate on auctioned refinancing credits. 

• The European Commission cleared fee takeover by Swiss 
Reinsurance Co. of Unione Italians de Riassicurazione 
SpA, an Italian reinsurance company. 

• Avis Europe PLC. a privately held car rental company, will 
float shares on fee London Stock Exchange in to raise £250 
million ($405.9 million) to repurchase 'General Motors 
Corp.’s 14.2 percent stake in the company. 

• Queens Moat Houses PLC, a British hotel company, sold 
25 hotels to a group of managers backed by Hambro Euro- 
pean Ventures Ltd. for £9 1.5 million. 

• Germany's cartel office has blocked Herlitz AG's takeover 

of Landre GmbH, a stationery maker, because it would give 
fee paper products company control of 50 percent of fee 
market. Bloomberg. AFX. AP. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Monday, Fab. 10 

Prices m local currencies. 
Tetefcws 

tU«» low Close Pie*. 


Amsterdam 


ABN-AMRO 

AtaU 
Nub MM 
Banco. 

Bob Wen no 
UMcvo 
DormxhePW 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Potto Aokv 
G etrarics 
G- Brecon 

I Inham—oif 

Mefinfcm 
Hoogoven cn 
Hind Douglas 
INC Gawp 
KUfl 
KNP BI 
KPN 

NMOoydGp 

Numcla 

OceGtMen 

PWfcsElK 

Ron^tadHdB 
} Robeco 
' ttodamcn 
RUnco 

Ropri Dutch 
UfliWffCW 

vmdnins 

VNU 

WWereWcw 


127 JO 
11&40 
117 
283-30 

07.70 
35JO 

108.10 

35120 

179.30 

78.90 
70X0 
S5X0 

to 

ISO 

320-50 

75-30 

131-40 

7140 

56.10 

39-40 

87.70 

55.90 
27BJO 
240x0 

7*90 
80.40 
136 
1S6 
5850 
HI 
108J0 
332-30 
315 
8*50 
37 JO 
226.70 


13480 
11680 
11130 
775 
8*30 
MJ0 
106.70 
349-50 
174 
70.60 
69 JO 
5480 
59J0 

148 40 
315 
7*50 
12850 
70.40 
U30 
38.80 
67 
55 
77550 
73*50 
7*30 
7860 
134 
15SJ0 
57.70 
16080 
10650 
329 
310 
8350 
36J0 
274 


176-50 12130 
17680 117.10 
116.70 11580 
20250 776.10 
8630 8550 
3*70 MJ0 
10740 1 06 B0 
351 JO 35280 
17170 17*20 
2880 3850 
69 JO 6950 
5670 56® 
5950 6020 
14850 14950 
375-20 370 

75-30 7*90 
12950 12820 

71.10 7080 
5*60 5*80 

39 39 JO 
67 67JQ 

55.10 5550 

J76J0 279 

239.10 23*80 

7*70 7*B0 
79.60 80 

13550 13350 
15550 155.10 
SB5Q 57.40 
16080 160-90 
108J0 10840 
330-70 33160 
313.40 310JO 
864) 8280 
3670 3750 
22*80 27480 


toga Lew 

AMBB 990 985 

Adidas 153 in 

ABtorHUg 3175 3145 

AIM 1333 1326 

BkSeriln 3170 3165 

BASF 020 6180 

Kauri *■£ %% 

BMW 10% 1078 

CtaWteahank 43J5 4285 
Debater Benz 12180 12890 
Degusso 711 104 

Drutsuw B«Ul 85.18 0*40 
DeutTeMMI 3170 3240 
OnadnerBreik 5X40 53J0 
Fresentas 319 314 

FresMusMed 1*540 145 

RteiLKrapg 26*50 . 263 
Get* 109J0 10750 

HetdeftnjZnd l«-» 138 

JEST ff 

Medtti 7*20 7250 

Knrsoot ,523 

Unde 1115 1090 

UfWteM 2*35 2*17 
MAN **9 *39 

Mnaysn ww. „_694 681 

MeWgMtfccfcrft3XflO £30 
Metre US 13330 

MundlRtKCfcR 3825 3800 

SST" t,* tTS 

i£SU 

serecS ,£■£ 

Tftrww 327.® 323 

Venn 9230 9213 

VEW 499 498 

Vktg 716 709 

”3 801 79150 


990 975 

153 14829 
3174 3274 
1329 1320 
3365 3340 
623* 60.90 
SUC 5X65 
6X15 41 JO 
6630 6540 
9158 9180 
10941 B735D 
4130 41.95 
12180 12020 
704 6S8 

85.15 KL45 
3X70 3X50 
5X35 5X60 
316 31950 
14SJ0 14580 
2UJQ 261 
10850 107.70 
14050 139 


CG. SmBh 

De Beers 

Oriefarteln 

Far teas Bk 

Gencor 

GFSA 

bar 

LkwtyHdss 
Liberty LHe 
Minorca 
Njotjjo* 


RnotHwtf Gp 


RHSlPWtaw# 
SA Breweries 


Sai* 

SBtC 
Tiger Oate 


Hi* 

Lore 

close 

Pro*. 

S3 

51 JS 

51 JS 

SI 

M 

2SJ0 

25-50 

25J5 

1*8 

145 147 JO 

14X50 

4X25 

42J0 

4X50 

4? 

38.10 

27 JD 

27 JD 

27 

19JO 

19 

19-25 

19 

117 

11*50 115-50 

113 

307 

3JD 

165 

3J8 

345 

345 

345 

340 

131.75 

13025 130JO 

130 

107 

105 

107 

1M-5D 

2025 

19 JO 

2Q.10 

19 JO 

81 

79 JO 

80 

BC 

49 JO 

4X40 

*8J0 

a 

63 

61 

61 JO 

6) 

6*75 

63 

6X25 

64 

13X50 

129 13X50 

12X25 

S2J0 

5X58 

52.50 

5X50 

52J0 

51.75 

52 

51 JS 

191 JS 

189J5 191-25 

190 

7X50 

72 

72 

71J5 



Hlqti 1 

Law 

Ctose 

Pre». 

T! Group 

5X2 

£35 

5X1 

537 • 

Toraklns 

293 

2SS 

190 

188 

UnSerer 

I1W 

1167 

1390 

UJ4 

UM Assurance 

SJ3 

5.15 

5.19 

5J0 

Uta Mews 

673 

667 

670 

67* , 

UMUtOftB 

694 

670 

686 

693 

VeratoreeUnts 

504 

*98 

*99 

5 1 

Vtatatone 

297 

187 

287 

189 1 

WUBtaead 

789 

735 

7J9 

785 . 

WBamsHdgs 

337 

333 

334 

333 

Wrisetey 

*73 

*74 

*74 

*77 1 

WPP Group 

248 

2X3 

2X8 

2X5 ! 

Zeneca 

17J2 

17X5 

17 JO 

17X6 , 


High Law daie Prev. 


4130 138 14050 U? I nn J nn 

8840 87 8840 8*40 1-00000 


7080 68.90 
7*15 71-65 
525 51 850 
1115 1005 

1*20 2375 
444 *37 

M 674 
3140 3335 
13*20 115,20 
3815 3820 

41850 408 

7195 7055 
25380 25050 
14120 1*2 

8782 8580 
32750 318 

92J0 9170 
499 500 

715 497 JO 
798 779 


Abbey 1 
AlfcdC 


Bangkok 

ArtolrtoSw 

BoagfccfcBkF 

kraoeTholBk 

PTTE«Jdoi 

SteCanmtF 

Store Com U lF 

THteomada 

Tim Always 

Thai Farm BkF 

irtdCoren 


SETMBC737J3 


Helsinki 



228 

230 

238 

Ciritori 

289 
29 JO 


214 

71.4 

216 


224 


44 

4175 

45 


57 JO 


318 



kola 

73.20 


712 

m 

75? 


1620 


ISO 

156 



282 


42 J5 

4X58 


Me&frSeriuB 

3670 


3650 

3650 


Neste 

135 


i.n 

127 


NOkki A 

325 

160 

152 

156 


Orien-vniynae 

173 

78 


Markets Closed 

Stock markets in Bombay, 
Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur. 
Singapore and Taiwan were 
closed Monday for a holi- 
day. 


SOTM lltSUf 

UPMKymmene 

Vobnet 


Hong Kong 


1025 

3*60 


cotrwPDdfle 12.15 


CMrSisfS 


Brussels 

AiewnC 

Barca tad 

BBC 

Bttawfl 

CM 

CW 

Cane 

CKteiu 

Cohort 

CVOcteeUort 

EbCtaeet 

EtoebeSw 

tats AG 

GMoaf 

WB 

GSL 

GcnBdnu* 

KratMtanV 


£mren 
{write Beige 
SrcGenBdg 

wwr 

TncteM 

UCB 

UtoMMfflteW 


12600 

6890 

7250 

19609 

3350 

2260 

125* 

nr 

15250 

1985 

SOU 

3255 

5930 

aw 

1590 

4590 

12*50 

11500 

11900 

48*5 

78« 

7775 

73950 

14850 

95000 

2558 


BEL £Uto«:2**8J9 

’!& ’US ’SS 

n£ 7200 ,7190 
19J5Q 1W00 IJOW 
3305 3MS 3335 
7236 72*0 2230 

12*6 i:n i 2 « 

115 Iff Ro 
14050 15250 1*350 
19*5 1?75 

8000 «20 «« 
3230 3258 
5830 5880 S790 

Tcwi 16M 
1575 1S90 1585 

kbi *6*6 *523 

IIS ii 

77® WO 

14750 1*825 1*08 
9*300 
3525 


CMmUBM , 3^5 

CMoeOsmUi ,*» 
China Re* Em 1675 
O* Estate* 


otp yi"!- 

CosOotadflc 

DoomnaBk 

First Poaflc 

Great Eat* 


9J0 

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1X95 

3380 


*860 

7710 

3690 


1482* 


Copenhagen 

BGfanh 297 

QahbereB _ M 
codwtas «]■£ 

Dante 36&» 

□as Dante Bfc 569 
OSSwmftiflB 26SJ0Q 
OS >9130 lttl85 
FUWB 

KflOLuflhaMC 6® 
HWHarthAB 68X50 

SSISS. Jl 


Frankfurt 


Unck MB 53029 
rrwtoefc 52X72 

S S4 

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26*000 2**00 26900 

679 6«2 


•45 

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GuflBBteota 

HonQ^|«* 

USSSSj* ^ 

Headsman Ld jX75 
HKRinn 
HX China Gas 
HK Electric _ , l5 

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ttSB 


3680 

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872 870 ~- 

K6 366 371JS 

S w a 

349 35 2 *55 

tiAXs 3180* 


'Natl 

f Domed 

Anglian Water 
Argos 

Atoto Group 

Assoc Br Foods 

BAA 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT tad 

BankSaetond 

BtoeQrds 

BOC Greog 

Boots 

BPBM 

BiKAeiOSp 

Brff Atnreys 

fell Gas 

Brit Land 

BritPetta 


HEXG enBU a e— ffilJi 

Prevtoassao&M 

280 285 280 

39 JO 39 JO 39 JO 
Z20 224 219.90 

S630 5680 5670 
68 71 JO 6650 
17 JO 7 7 JO 17.40 
280 282 2B5 

36 3650 36 

129 131 128 

378 33*50 32X20 

i7ua in in 

77 JO 77 JO 77.90 
43 4X50 42-50 4X70 
430 *25 436 430 

97 JO 95J0 97 JO 9650 
B9J0 8&5Q 89J0 88 


, gWW 
Pre ri te r . 13668JB 

re te.79 i« 

3* 3*10 3*40 
11-95 1105 12 

7*2S 7*25 76 

2X50 2X65 2X75 
3650 3670 J65B 
*QS *10 *13 

1635 16*5 1660 
£*s L50 ate 

39 JO 39 JO 39-50 
9.15 9 JO 9J0 

38J0 39.10 38J0 
1685 1090 1DJ7D 
» 3X10 3X70 
7BS 7X 7.10 
4*60 45 4*40 

1570 1570 15.9S 
73J5 93JS 93JS 
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71 JO 72 7150 
71-75 1X45 71 JO 
1*55 1*60 1*» 
27 JO 27 JO 27-90 
1*15 1A2S 1*25 
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188-50 199 JO JM 

5X25 58J5 59J5 

SB 28 2 120 

3X40 2 i*o nm 

20.16 2OJ0 19.90 
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49 JO 50 5 425 
2X70 2X95 22JQ 

in us w 

SM & 560 

27 JO 27 JO 27JO 
U 11 11.15 
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HO WS 5JJ 

MB 1JS 

625 6X 4JS 
70 71 JO 

7U5 2W5 
33JBQ 34 3*50 
a 35J0 3590 
Zl^) 27 JO 21J0 


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BTS 

BonnabCasM 

Burton Gp 

CabtotW etm 

CadfawySchw 

OnrtonCemn 

CaareiUntoa 

Compass Gp 

Cowtauids 

Dim 

EtedracanpOui 

EMI Group 

EnserertoeOI 

F«n estate 

GeriAoddert 

GEC 

GKN 

Genre Wdkoree 
Granada Gp 
Grand MM 
GK _ 
GnswtesGp 
Gctmwts 
GUS 
Henson 

re&hugs 

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Impl Tobacco 
Witartrier 

Lnobroke 

Land Sec 
Lasmo 

Legal GaiGre 
UotdsTSBGp 
LocaiVortJv 
Marta Spencer 
ME PC 

M ei c ur y Assta 
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PSO 

Pearson 

PttdMton 

P6WCTGW 

PremtarFartred 

Pnideuial 

RaBmekPP 

Rank Group 

Recur cun 

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Rentals Intel 

Reuters Hdgs 

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Johannesburg 

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Sm&iMeplw 

SeiRMOne 

SreOhstnd 

StemEkc 

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Stand amr 

TataALik 

Tesco 

TBems Wrier 
B Group 



FT-SE 188:438760 


Prestos: 428768 

7J6 

7JI 

7J9 

762 

*11 

*11 

*17 

618 

633 

627 

638 

628 

657 

6X5 

65S 

6X8 

1.16 

1.14 

US 

1.12 

*82 

*79 

*81 

*75 

535 

SJ6 

127 

SJC 

1188 

11X3 

11J8 

11X3 

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634 

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3J6 

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9X4 

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9.40 

936 

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680 

693 

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£46 

1263 

1230 

1236 

1147 

604 

2J1 

564 

116 


537 

£44 

530 

524 

5J4 

569 

733 

671 

7 JO 

738 

655 

637 

644 

654 

1X2 

1X0 

1X0 

1*0 

4X2 

*35 

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234 

23D 

2-50 

232 

IQ-50 

1031 

10X2 

1061 

1X9 

1X7 

1X9 

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*76 

*82 

*73 

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*75 

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5X0 

148 

5X7 

7 JO 

734 

7X7 

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7.10 

697 

745 

698 

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363 

165 

366 

5.14 

*94 

494 

538 

B 437 

4X8 

430 

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1135 

10.95 

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1133 

671 

6X3 

675 

671 

136 

1J4 

135 

1-55 

BJ7 

8X5 

861 

837 

392 

185 

369 

185 

985 

9X3 

943 

9.97 

10.12 

969 

1612 

967 

9.15 

863 

863 

9.14 

*52 

4X3 

4X4 

*47 

238 

292 

£96 

263 

533 

5X8 

151 

534 

*39 

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4J0 

*33 

636 

625 

633 

636 

067 

0X7 

047 

089 

536 

533 

535 

£53 

T5J0 

1106 

15X0 

1531 

7X2 

730 

7J8 

741 

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686 

6X3 

6X8 

661 

234 

138 

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767 

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438 

367 

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547 

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266 

1.94 

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243 

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*88 

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4X2 

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13X0 

1341 

13X0 

268 

204 

205 

245 

523 

107 

509 

£70 

8X5 

8.15 

8J1 

ELIS 

580 

169 

5X9 

5J5 

213 

2JJ7 

£18 

245 

4X5 

654 

641 

652 

735 

735 

734 

73S 

1X4 

1 JS 

1X2 

1X0 

660 

6X5 

649 

6X4 

SH 

5X3 

153 

£54 

562 

5X7 

542 

5X9 

363 

3J7 

191 

3J0 

*21 

406 

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7.12 

745 

748 

7.18 

127 

330 

337 

334 

1IU8 

1QJ2 

10J7 

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*77 

*71 

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6X7 

633 

6X4 

654 

334 

118 

£18 

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9XS 

935 

9J6 

9X5 

2X3 

£38 

2X1 

2X2 

6.15 

597 

MS 

591 

921 

948 

9.14 

931 

564 

*49 

541 

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167 

336 

£57 

166 

125 

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£33 

1748 

1730 

17 J0 

1693 

678 

673 

624 

4 XT 

175 

3J6 

172 

£68 

2 

266 

3 

3 

7 JO 

7.17 

7J9 

7.18 

1A73 

1059 

10X6 

10X9 

1IUB 

948 

9.93 

1009 

161 

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140 

140 

665 

8X7 

8J1 

BX9 

7J5 

7X0 

7X8 

7J2 

8J6 

7.70 

7J8 

7JS 

7X5 

7J0 

731 

7J8 

839 

£13 

ft.16 

847 

*43 

*35 

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437 

3X9 

3X2 

3X2 

£47 

. 6BB 

680 

641 

677 

548 

S33 

5JB 

532 


Madrid 


Baba tee* 47535 


Prerionk: 473X1 


1B7« 

18300 

18580 

18200 

AffiSA 

1785 

1/55 

1765 

17/S 

Agues Bo rceton 

5890 

5810 

5838 

5770 

AmtOorio 

BBV 

5940 

86® 

6180 

BOO 

5W0 

84» 

5960 

8500 


1130 

1115 

1115 

1125 


19990 

19800 

19B® 

19950 


3820 

3790 

3300 

3830 


N.T. 

JiT 

Ml. 

2730 


25570 

25000 

25150 

25100 


9020 

8920 

9000 

B920 

CEPSA 

4498 

4325 

4485 

4400 


2525 

74/D 

2M5 

3470 


8200 

9540 

8120 

9420 

8120 

9510 

8120 

9440 

FECSA 

1290 

12/0 

1280 

1270 


339CO 

33320 

33420 

33540 

IbenMo 

1645 

1600 

1630 

1605 


2515 

2S6S 

2595 

2500 



5650 

5641 

5/5U 

SevtBcnoEtec 

7380 

1355 

1360 

13/D 


6870 

4HW 

6820 

6870 

Tefetooks 

3410 

33/0 

3380 

3395 


1180 

1165 

1175 

11/0 

MriencCemetd 

1495 

1490 

1495 

1490 

Manila 


PSE bdee: 3386X2 


Prerioas: 338144 

AttokiB 
Ante Land 
BkPWBpW 

30 

3230 


30 

B 

0JO 
31 JO 

182 


183 

10 

CAP Homes 

1*50 

14 

1*75 

Mania Elec A 

132 

10 

10 

130 


730 

770 

730 

720 


1135 

HUS 

11 

11 

PClBenk 

35230 

350 35230 3S2J0 

PhSLaagDfat 

1580 

1555 

1580 

1560 

Son Mlgud B 

104 

101 

102 

103 

SM Prime Hdg 

ijn 

UO 

UO 

7X0 

Mexico 


Be to 

todac: 

1646X4 


Prevtos; 365*34 

Alfa A 

<140 

41 JO 

4140 

41 JO 


1742 

1668 

1740 

16X8 

CenwCPO 

29 J0 

0.0 

79-35 

0JO 

CXmC 

1064 

10X4 

1090 

1064 

Efflp Moderao 

4*45 

<440 

4*00 

44X5 


47X5 

46X0 

4680 

47X5 

GjwFtobtamsa 

040 

2/ JO 

27-50 

2/80 

16530 16*80 165.10 

165X0 

TetevteoCPO 

104X0 

103X0 10340 11030 

TeiAteL 

1*50 

1*40 

1*50 

1*58 

Milan 

MtSTetemaSCB; 12480X0 


Piwtes; 1279948 

AStonniABic 

12945 

12730 

12750 

12925 


3800 

3630 

3770 

3650 


4620 

4525 

45/5 

4550 

BduaRcn 

1445 

1381 

U31 

1365 

Sertta 

21250 

20600 

20600 

2I3U0 

CmaoHo&ao 

2515 

2430 

2510 

24« 

Edtoo 

10300 

9950 

KC0Q 

10120 

a 

TOO 

9079 

9070 

92/5 

S80 

MOO 

5370 

5370 

General Asst 

34100 

33450 

33600 

34200 

Ml 

16415 

16300 

16330 

16505 

IMA 

2360 

2260 

2315 

2315 

teSaar 

6830 

7730 

6695 

7*50 

6/00 

7595 

6845 

7650 

Medtotteca 

11975 

HUM 

11900 

1010 


1310 

1394 

1307 

1305 

PtMuaiid 

7735 

2688 

li/10 

2735 

P«[ 

3675 

3610 

3660 

3645 

RAS 

16720 

16510 

14520 

16670 

RotoBoitai 

18000 

1/RSO 

17975 

17900 


11850 

11665 

11/35 

11995 


8125 

4685 

7958 

4W5 

8105 

8045 

4710 

TIM 

<880 

4755 

48» 


Montreal 

See Mob (ton 

CdnTbtA 

CrtaUtaA 

crmsrc 

CccMete 

OMMLte 

bn arco 

buoUunGfB 

Not! BkCcooda 
Power Cere 
Power tad 
Ctebeew-B 
Rogers Com 8 
RoyriBkCda 


l re tas h i nto te O w c 2*5*13 
Prevtoec; 296*74 


*160 42.10 
2215 2110 
3214 321* 

32 32 

1616 MJ0 
22 21 JO 
3791 361b 

2B 27 JO 
1695 

15to U95 
291* 2570 
26U 25* 

2X60 2£*9 
X28 9 

5320 52to 


<2.10 <270 
22.15 2X15 
2M 32V> 
32 31* 

1635 76» 

21 J5 2114 
37435 3616 

27 JO 2B 

1495 7670 
1SJ0 IS 

29 2a 80 
2610 25* 

3SM 2125 
9 9 

5320 fiu 


Oslo 


OBX Mae 581-99 


Prevtos: 58*22 


180 

10 10 JO 

10JO 

BetgesenDyA 

CMsdantoBk 

146J0 

143-50 143J0 

146 

2170 

23X0 

23X0 

•ajti 

DennankeBk 

2740 

24X0 

2/ JO 

7330 

E*em 

98 

96 

96 

V7J0 

HaStundA 

SO 

47 

a 

49 


325 

325 33350 

328 

Norsk Hydro 

373 

370-50 372J0 371 JO 

201 

700 

200 

203 

NycxnedA 

no 

107 JO 

T07J0 

108 

OrktaAsoA 

507-50 

503 

503 5DLS0 

PetaoGeoSvc 

272 

26/ 

267 

70 

SogaPeiimA 

Sdrisled 

120 

136 

11/ 

132 

11/ 

132 

>19 

137 

TraasocEonOrt 

375 

368 

3 n 

375 

Storebrand Asa 

38.90 

38J0 

3890 

38X0 

Paris 


CAC-40E 2S95l 37 
PWVteWE2597J2 


742 

725 

730 

733 

AGF 

182X0 

1/8. Ml 

180 181 JO 

AirUquUe 

AkBWAWh 

932 

583 

911 

555 

925 

576 

926 

559 

A»*JAP 

381 JB 370-30 378.70 37330 


698 

685 

69* 

6ltS 

BIC 

910 

090 

908 

892 

BNP 

22680 

Kl 

22550 

225 


1185 

110 

1182 

110 


3399 

3345 

3360 

33/2 

Casino 

248-90 

24610 

2*7 

246X0 

CCF 

275 257 JO 

2/5 

256X0 

CeMem 

694 

686 

6191 

68V 


910 

avi 

901 

907 

CLF-Oerta Fr» 

53Z 


575 

533 

Credit Agrieote 

1261 

1261 

1261 

1295 


8*4 

832 

834 

842 

Etf-Apcriatae 

576 

552 

554 

582 

ErtdartoBS 

■96 

860 

886 

865 


7X5 

125 

/J5 

7X0 


793 

70 

780 

7/S 


<0X0 

432 ACM *** ** 

Inetaf 

836 

873 

880 

870 


3»J0 

363 

363 

360 

Legrand 

Lt&ri 

963 

2000 

949 

1966 

9S3 

1966 

957 

1999 


1*49 

1417 

1425 

1439 


58* 

i/0 

5 n 

5// 

MktKhnB 

3SBJC 

342X0 

354 342X0 

PaibasA 

405 

39650 

401 

395-50 


31*70 

310 

310 3T£W 

Peugeorat 

641 

619 

625 

624 

PtaouB-Prirt 

2515 

7355 

7445 

2368 


1643 

1570 

16Z7 

1562 


130 

127 JO 

l» 

12930 

Rexel 

1740 

1695 

1/40 

1705 

RWootencA 

185J0 

181X0 

186 

182X0 


1530 

1530 

1530 

1530 

Scnofi 

604 

586 

589 

5BV 


295 

288.10 288.10 

293 

5EB 

1112 

1101 

1101 

1120 


4081 

400 4Q5J8 

405 

Ste Generate 

673 

6*4 

662 

646 

Sodeabo 

274? 

2680 

7706 

7/a 


838 

mzsM 

833 

835 


283 

B'il 

272 

280 

MWdt 

5.3 SBS SB7 
172 16750 167.90 

m 

Tatri B 

488 471 JO 

473 

so 

Usinor 

0JO 

7RJ0 

0J5 

0JO 

VPto 

393 

389 

391 

394X0 

Seoul 

OiiMrilr were- 

70939 


Preriocs; 700J2 


116500 114000 115006 115500 


5190 

5070 

5100 

5120 

Kid Motors 

15900 

15600 

15900 

15100 


28200 

Z7E00 

■as m 

28100 


7300 

040 

040 

050 

urea Mob Tel 

555000 542800 550000 555000 


20200 

19600 

19900 

19700 


43600 

42800 

*2900 

*3500 


53900 

52000 

S3900 

52300 

5WnnooBar4 

11100 

10780 

10800 

10900 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AssTOomon 

ASHoA 

ABosCopraA 

AdtaBv 

EttMnB 

Ericsson B 

LlMaM P 

nemo o 

bKantota* 

tavestorB 

MODoB 

Norttaanken 

PtwmOWrim 

SanartkB 

Scania B 

SCAB 

S-£ BanUnA 
5kareflaPen 
Stonrita 3 
SKFB 

SpabankenA 
5«dsbYW*ekA 
Store A 
Sv Handles A 
VriwB 


n 

5X1 6 Moc 303X9 


PieriMB 2751X0 

106JD 

HUSO 

10650 

105 

Ml 

927 

935 

915 

18150 

1B1 

101 

1BSJ0 

3Z 

347 

355 

3a 

10 

175 

176 

1 7550 

332 

328 33050 

328 

■ISO 

448 441 JO 

44050 

2S 

246 

252 

244 

1090 

1063 

1073 

1073 

533 

358 

3? 

533 

345 

531 

341 

230 

21X50 

214 

219 

236 

221 JO 

225 

225 

27X9 

26050 27059 

272J0 

197 

191 

195 

190 

195 JO 

1*050 

IS 

189.50 

155 

153-50 

IS 

15*50 

68 

67 

67 JO 

67X0 

20*50 

203 

205 

20*50 

313 

310 

317 

30850 

IS 

182 

182 

182 

ns 

114 11*50 

11*50 

189 JO 

IS 

IS 

18850 

91 

9550 

9550 

97 

IS 

187 

IS 

18650 

IK 

IS 

18250 

10 



High 

Low 

Clese 

Pre*. 

Sydney 


AXOnflearfcs JS46X0 
Previous; 2*4670 

Ameer 

UO 

£15 

815 

817 

ANZBWjis 

£16 

8.12 

815 

810 

BHP 

1750 

17X0 

17X0 

I/J3 

Bortjl 

£46 

3X4 

£44 

3X5 

Brumbies tad. 

73 

2195 

22.99 

22.90 

CBA 

13J6 

13J4 

1158 

IJX6 

CCAmatf 

1335 

1122 

110 

1129 

Cotes Myer 

£10 

£06 

£08 

£05 

Comoieo 

6X1 

670 

6X1 

6XU 

CRA 

19 

>8X0 

1894 

1858 

CSR 

4X6 

*44 

4X6 

*44 

Fosters Brew 

2X7 

154 

£54 

2X5 

Gen Prop Trad 

2X6 

2X4 

2X4 

2X5 

GIO Aurtrtflo 

£49 

£41 

£44 

147 

Goodman Fid 

158 

1-55 

1J6 

1X6 

HJAustrmta 

12X2 

1180 

12X1 

12X0 

Total FoWw 

£02 

£96 

3 

£96 

Lend Lease 

24 

23.70 

2172 

23X0 

Marne Nicklss 
MIM Hdgs 
NalAusfilonk 

7XS 

7.77 

7.72 

7X5 

1X2 

1J5 

1 37 

IXI 

15X6 

15-78 

t£7B 

l£/5 

Hal Motud HOg 

133 

1 30 

IX* 

1X7 

News Carp 

6X1 

632 

67S 

6Jt 

ttorrnorxiy Min 

1X3 

1X1 

1X2 

1X9 

NoritiLM 

*07 

*06 

*11 

*04 

Podflc Dunlop 

£17 

3X8 

X09 

£11 

Ptaneerlatl 

179 

175 

339 

3/7 


6X1 

675 

635 

6X0 

Orertos Airways 

132 

239 

2J1 

239 

Sartos 

4X5 

*30 

431 

4JO 


4X3 

*33 

*34 

*42 

WerJfiaeis 

9X0 

9J0 

9X0 

9J0 

WMC 

8X4 

7XJ 

7X5 

8 

WestOeU Trust 

2X6 

2X4 

2X5 

2X4 

WeSoaeBtang 

7-58 

753 

757 

7X9 

WoodsidePet 

9X9 

9J8 

9X0 

9X5 

Waohrerths 

3J8 

135 

138 

335 


The Trib Index 


Pices *s of 3.-00 PM New York time. 


Tokyo 

ABmnalo 

AINtapanAlr 

AsoN&aj* 

AsoftlChem 

AsriNGfcss 

Bk Tokyo Mtau 

Elk Yokohama 

Bridgestone 

Conan 

QuibuEtac 

CJujgoku Etoc 

Da/NtePiftif 

Dri*(MKong 

DahraBreik 

Daiwa House 

DatooSec 

DOI 

Denso 

EasUapwiRy 

Eisal 

Fanuc 

FuPBa» 

I Photo 


IBM 225:18181.17 
Pl*ri00fil7B67A4 


Hoch^urt Bk 

Hitachi 

Honda Motor 

f&f 

liodai 

l»-Yofcfldo 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

Jusco 

Kj#mu 

AonsdEteC 

Kao 

KMCsaMHvy 
Kawa Steel 
KlnU NIppRy 
JOrin Brewery 
Koto Steel 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Kyushu Dec 
LTCB 
Mcrubert 
Mari 

MatouEtocInd 

MriuEieeWk 

MteiUsN 

MRSUhfclUai 

IWUitabhlEI 

MHsublsnl Eri 

MRSUtaridHty 

MKubtaMMa 

MJtsuUsWTr 

Mitsui 

MBsritadasn 
Mean Trust 
MuraOMfo 
NEC 
N6on 
NMoSec 
Nintendo 
Ntap Express 
KteenOfl 
Nippon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

NmureSec 

NTT 

NTT Data 

tSPitaer 

Osaka Ge> 

Ricoh 

Rohm 

Satan Bk 

Sonkyo 

Sanaa Bonk 

SaiyoDec 

Socatn 

Seibultaiy 

Sridsta House 

Savcn-Ektcn 


1050 

1020 

1030 

1020 

765 

751 

764 

156 

B17 

mi 

61/ 

811 

KLJ 

626 

6® 

626 

1050 

1030 

1050 

10® 

1840 

1790 

IKK) 

1790 

620 

613 

618 

620 

3130 

2080 

2130 

2100 

2610 

2560 

2570 

2570 

2050 

3020 

20® 

2030 

20® 

2010 

2020 

2U30 

1990 

I960 

1990 

I960 

1270 

12® 

1760 

12® 

503 

494 

495 

496 

1420 

1370 

1410 

I3M 

«7! 

891 

891 

892 

7210n 

040a 

060 a 

0200 

3460 

7430 

7*60 

2420 

4990a 

4930a 

4970a 

50®a 

2250 

2310 

nso 

2310 

3600 

3460 

3570 

3470 

1240 

1200 

1230 

1310 

3760 

300 

37® 

3690 

1210 

IIS 

ISO 

1190 

10® 

1020 

10® 

1020 

1090 

1070 

1090 

1000 

3380 

3300 


32® 

1430 

J 390 

1430 

ICO 

STB 

562 

565 

565 

5550 

53V0 

5490 

5360 

506 

501 

506 

.903 

8100 a 

KWto 

80/0a 

motto 

3450 

3770 

3420 

3260 

762 

725 

741 

7® 

2150 

7100 

21® 

2110 

1300 

1260 

1290 

1260 


475 

487 

472 

299 

290 

m 

03 

758 

08 

722 

09 

1060 

law 

1050 

ID» 

205 

201 

203 

20* 


835 

845 

827 

557 

U6 

£53 

541 

0® 

6990 

7000 

7130 


1970 

20® 

2020 

01 

30 

385 

391 

4B4 

474 

481 

40 

1680 

1600 

16® 

1630 

IBS 

1850 

I860 

1850 

1020 

996 

1020 

998 

1130 

1100 

1120 

1100 

339 

332 

335 

344 

680 

6/5 

6/9 

681 

1290 

1230 

1270 

1260 

856 

B45 

856 

B47 

696 

889 

892 

896 

1230 

lire 

1230 

IIS 

91/ 

903 

910 

905 

1160 

mo 

1160 

1170 

07 

705 

709 

m 

407D 

3970 

4060 

3950 

1390 

13/0 

1390 

I . wo 

1590 

1540 

1570 

1550 

673 

656 

665 

674 

7960 

060 

7860 

050 

726 

00 

720 

04 

533 

520 

\70 

519 

290 

285 

2S8 

7W 

765 

742 

m 

/42 

731 

733 

736 

7V 

1540 

1510 

15® 

1 WO 

85000 

raao 

M50a 

5450a 

3738 

3190b 

.17X0 

3250b 

657 

636 

657 

638 

310 

795 

303 

79? 

1390 

1370 

1380 

1370 

8230 

BOBO 

3230 


67B 

658 

6/U 

663 

3540 

3420 

35® 

.WO 

1310 

1270 

1290 

12S 

497 

48U 

*n 

481 

6400 

6330 

6390 

6.160 

4400 

4260 

sva 

4330 

1090 

1060 

1090 

1090 

7000 

60® 

70S 

70S 


Jen. 1. 1992* 100. 

Level 

Change 

■ta change 

year to date - 
% change 

World Index 
Regional Maes 

152.70 

+0.40 

+0-26 

+15.80 

Asla/Pacthc 

109.68 

+1.10 

+1.01 

-18.31 

Europe 

165.43 

+0.81 

+0.49 

+18.86 

N. America 

175.40 

-0.71 

-0.40 

+36.73 

S. America 

Industrial Indexes 

134.57 

+0.02 

+0.01 

+51.13 

Capital goods 

778.55 

-0.58 

-0.32 

+34.37 . 

Consumer goods 

170.63 

+0.82 

+0.48 

+23.58 

Energy 

178.53 

-1.15 

-0.64 

+31.64 

Finance 

111.05 

+0.87 

+0.79 

-12.72 

Miscellaneous 

162.39 

-1.28 

-078 

+19.57 

Raw Materials 

181.48 

-0.37 

-020 

+27.98 

Service 

140.46 

+0.83 

+0.59 

+17.05 

times 

145-89 

+1.08 

+0.75 

+14.75 


The International Horaid Tribune Wortd Stock lodes O tracks the U.S. dodar values ct ' 
&0 ntematronaBy investable stccks from 25 courmos. For mere information. 3 tree 
booklet is avaBeUe by wrung to The Trto Indax.lBl Avenue Charles de GeuOe. 

92527 Notify Cedes. France. CompSed by Bloomberg News. 


Sharp 

Shikoku BPwr 
ShTwrttu Ch 
Shizuoka Bk 
Soflbonk 
Sony 

Sumttomo 
5uraflomoBk 
SumltChem 
Sumitomo Elec 
SumnMriri 
SuniR Trust 
Talsbo Pliarm 
Takedo Chen 
TDK 

TohotaJ EIPwr 
Total Bonk 
Tokio Marine 
Tokyo El Parr 
Tokyo Elecfran 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Corp. 
Tooen 

Top pan Prim 

Tornlnd 

T osrifiw 

Toetem 

ToyoTnirt 

Toyoto Motor 

Vammnuau 

KsUXkbrstMOO 


Hte 

Low 

dose 

Prev. 

1570 

15® 

1570 

1580 

2020 

1990 

2020 

2020 

2260 

22M 

2260 

2230 

1050 

1020 

1030 

1010 

loaoo 

10300 

10600 

10300 

8560 

8*50 

8550 

8460 

908 

697 

904 

915 

12® 

1220 

1260 

12® 

453 

428 

449 

433 

1660 

1640 

1660 

1650 

20 

26* 

270 

262 

927 

907 

923 

911 

2820 

2720 

2820 

2720 

2490 

24® 

2*80 

2410 

7890 

7790 

78S 

7820 

20» 

3000 

2030 

1990 

910 

896 

900 

900 

11S 

lore 

lore 

1060 

2340 

2220 

2230 

200 

41® 

4030 

4110 

4070 

302 

293 

302 

302 

555 

541 

549 

543 

1230 

1190 

1220 

1190 

1390 

13(0 

1380 

1370 

69B 

675 

694 

674 

01 

698 

703 

707 

0® 

2900 

7940 

2920 

761 

750 

7M 

757 

3250 

3170 

3250 

3160 

Z300 

2290 

2230 

2230 


Hte Lw Close Pt*v. 


Toronto 

Abdtil Price 
Alberto Energy 
Akril Aluffl 
Anderson Expi 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nora Sana 
Bam Gold 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 
Blochen Plreriii 
Bombardier B 
BresamA 
Bre-r Minerals 
CamecB 
OBC 

CfinNOIRril 
can Nat Res 
CdnOcddPat 
CdnPodfiC 
Cominco 
Dofasco 
Domtar 
Donohue A 

DirPatdCdaA 

EdperGraita 

EuruNevMng 

FoHbFM 

Fatcon bridge 

FteftherCMA 

Franco Nmaaa 

GuHCdORes 

impertalOl 

Inca 

1PL Energy 

LaWlowB 

Lorwen Group 

MaardIBldl 

Magna inn A 

Mfi&nnei 

Moore 

Newbridge Net 
Homndome 
Norcen Energy 
Nihare Teiecom 
Now 
One* 

PancdnPenm 
Perm Car 
Placer Dome 
Poco Perim 
Potash Sask 
^enatosaace 
WaAigore 
Rogers Cornel B 

lass? 

StamConsdd 


Suncor 
Tarismrm Eny 

TeckB 
Teiegiobe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TorOom Bonk 

Tiansriio 

TransCdaPipe 

Trimoric Finl 

TitrecHohn 

TVXGold 

wesmastEny 

Weston 


<0X0 

**65 

31 

38M 

2030 

28N 

39.10 

1640 

2Sto 

45*. 

3X20 

1065 

2*60 

75J5 


59^0 

42to 

3065 

38to 

19J45 

2005 

3880 

1630 

^10 

44 

3X95 

10.35 

2*45 

74k. 


59^0 S9 ui 

4X85 4*40 
30-65 30«i 

38J0 3815 

20-20 W 

28.10 28W 

39.10 38 IV 

16J5 16-35 

25.15 25JO 

44 *5* 

33 13 

10*5 10J5 
2416 2*1* 

75 7665 


TSE Industrials: 4D74J5 
PrwnorBS 6101 J4 


7335 

22.15 

22.15 

22.10 

79.95 

29V. 

2*4 

29.90 

<7 55 

4/4 

47X0 

4 /xe 

17.20 

1610 

1630 

17.10 

49.10 

484 

48X5 

48X0 

51X5 

50X0 

51X5 

5890 

35.90 

35JS 

3£i5 

35X0 

69X5 

6V.15 

694 

69 J5 

SOW 

30.15 

304 

WW 

74V» 

7416 

744 

74V, 

26.15 

25,80 

9CAQ 

2£95 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY II, 1997 


PAGE 23 


TECHNOLOGY 



•Line Newspapers , but Only One Charges for Everything 


by Iver Peterson 

V| 11 *"■'* li»- ' Y.vwi,- 


NFtt YORK — Prom the moment 
uui newspapers moved onto the In- 
tone!. Mime media futurists have been 
pTVilicling that Americans will some 
!*?> ,h ‘ Mr ^S‘y Papers the way John 

l.i chink reads i he W.,J] Street Journal- 
lie {Hunts his Web browser at 
nup./Avsj.eom. scans the articles he is 
interested in. dnw nloadxa few to be read 
or printed later and logs off. 

: "In about 20 minutes or less. I’m 
flinched with what 1 need/' said Mr 
I rehmfc. an assistant professor of busi- 
ness and economics at Marian College 
- t p Indianapolis. "FronUy. 1 don’t need 
ttp-e pafKt version hanging around-— too 
Tiunv other paper things to read.” 

, although about 700 newspapers 
i.ow have sites un the World Wide Web 
only The Wall Street Journal, which is 
published by Dv>w Jones & Co., has so far 
managed to close the circle by charging 
for subscriptions for access to any part of 
its on-line daily. 

This distinction was underscored by a 
recent decision by Slate. Microsoft 
Corp. s on-line magazine, to abandon 
its plans to charge an admission price. 
Sluie learned vvhai other on-line pub- 
lications had assumed: Most people ex- 
po cl the Internet to be free. 

Many on-line publications require 
visitors to register for access, or they 
charge for premium services such as 


searches of their archives. The Web site 
of the San Jose Mercury News, owned 
by Knight-Ridder Inc., provides free 
admission to some features but charges 
for access to archive searches and daily 
news reports beyond a brief summary. 
The New York Times charges about 
2,000 overseas businesses $35 a month 
for access to its Web site, although the 
site is free to registered readers in North 
America. 

But only The Wall Street Journal 
Interactive Edition charges for all ac- 
cess. Mr. Trebnik and other subscribers 
say The Journal's specialized business 
coverage makes the on-line version 
worth the price. 

"A year ago. everybody thought no 
one would be able to charge for content 
and tfaar there would be a huge backlash 
from the Web community because every- 
thing is supposed to be free.*’ said 
Thomas Baker, business director of the 
paper’s interactive edition. "Sure, we 
lost a lot of readers, but we kept a lot 
too.” 

The Journal's breakthrough bas not 
answered all the questions surrounding 
on-line journalism. For one thing, 
nearly 90 percent of the interactive edi- 
tion’s readership had vanished by the 
time the last free trial subscriptions ex- 
pired at the end of the year. For another, 
the edition's subscribers gave anecdotal 
support to a deep worry of newspaper 
publishers: that on-line services, free or 
not. will cannibalize their profitable 


newspaper sales when readers such as 
Mr. Trebnik decide that they do not need 
"the paper version. ” 

Meanwhile, on-line advertisers, who 
pay to have links to their Web sites 
embedded in on-Jine journals, are still 
trying to decide whether reaching a re- 
latively small number of paying sub- 
scribers is as good as reaching 10 times 
as many freeloaders. 


The Journal's program is too new to 
answer perhaps the crucial question: 
whether subscribers will be loyal enough 
to resubscribe year after year. 

Martin Nisenholtz, president of The 
New York Times Electronic Media Co., 
said that on-line publishers were watch- 
ing the progress of The Journal's in- 
teractive edition for clues to a still- 
emerging Internet news business. Al- 
though The Tunes’ Web site — 
wwwj 13 rtimes.com — may before long 
begin offering fee-based archival 
searches and other premium services, 
he said, few on-line publishers, includ- 
ing The New York Tunes, are willing to 
accept the decline in readership that 
comes with subscription charges. 

“We are perfectly willing to start 


charging,” Mr. Nisenholtz said, “once 
we see an acceptably large and loyal 
audience emerging.” 

Mr, Baker said he was not dismayed 
by die plunge in readership that followed 
the imposition this year of a $49 annual 
subscription fee — $29 to current Wall 
Street Journal subscribers. The inter- 
active edition had 653,000 registered 
users before the fees were imposed, he 


said, an unknown number of whom also 
were subscribing to the newspaper: now 
there are 70,000. 

Mr. Baker said the number of sub- 
scribers would rise as Internet users 
began to accept the idea of paying for 
on-line services. “People will realize 
that if you want something interesting 
and deep, you are going to have to pay 
for it.” he said. 

Mr. Baker declined to discuss the 
interactive division's Finances beyond 
conceding that the edition had not begun 
to pay for itself. Bill Bass, an electronic- 
media consultant with Forrester Re- 
search Inc. of Cambridge. Massachu- 
setts, said most sites covered about 
30 percent of their costs from advert- 
ising, a figure that he estimated held true 


for The Journal's interactive edition. 

“Severny thousand is a pretty respect- 
able start,' ' Mr. Bass said. * ‘I would think 
that puts them right in the middle of 
where they expected to be. but they’re 
still not going to be making any 
money-" 

What subscribers to The Journal’s 
interactive edition get is access to major 
news and feature articles of the daily 
newspaper plus frequent news updates 
from Dow Jones News Service and The 
Associated Press. 

Mr. Baker said he was confident The 
Journal's Web site was not cutting into 
newspaper sales. He said the interactive 
edition’s readers were younger and less 
likely to be readers of the print version. 
Fewer than 40 percent of on-line sub- 
scribers have prim subscriptions, he said. 

In a sample of eight subscribers in- 
terviewed, only one. a woman in central 
Texas, said she would continue to buy 
both the print and interactive edition. 

Another one. Chance Harris of Aus- 
tin. Texas, said he might renew his print 
subscription once it expired, but six. 
including Mr. Trebnik, said they had 
stopped buying the printed Journal once 
the on-line version became available. 

“The 'Marketplace' section is the 
most important part of the paper to me,” 
one subscriber said, “and I can get that on 
line and not have to throw away big 
chunks of the paper that I never read.” 

Advertisers in the interactive edition 
pay a few cents each rime a page with 


one of their ads, which are linked to their 
own Web sites, is called up. Some are 
not concerned about losing the exposure 
that a free on-line publication offers. 

“We thought the demographies of 
The WaJJ Street Journal would be 
tight,” said Cyndy Ainsworth, market- 
ing director for Virtual Vineyards, un 
on-line food and wine retailer. “Be- 
cause we paid by the impression, it did 
not really matter to us if they charged 
their readers. In fact, we thought it 
might even be good." 

Virtual Vineyards paid The Journal 4 
cents for each “impression.” with a 
guaranteed 50,000 impressions before 
the charge locked in — a hurdle the 
interactive edition easily cleared. Ms. 
Ainsworth said. But the company 
dropped its account after the program 
failed to produce enough ’ "click - 
throughs" to Virtual Vineyard's own 
W’eh site, let alone hard sales, in (he 
future, she said, her company would try 
to negotiate ad rates based oh sales or ;Ii 
least on click-throughs. 

Advertisers mainly interested in at- 
tracting Wall Street Journal readers 10 
their own advertiser-supported Web 
sites said they were happy with the 
interactive edition, however. 

“We think it makes them a better, 
more select audience because they are 
paying to gel the service.” Miid Laura 
Henry of Lucent Technologies, which 
produces a free mapping service on the 
Web called Maps on Uv 


When The Wall Street Journal began paid subscriptions 
for its interactive edition, the Internet co mmuni ty, used 
to free information, began waiting for a backlash. 


Sr 


For Net Venture, 
TV Is Not a Model 


By Sieve Lohr 

1' Vt'M ]iii. fmrvi .s'rrrii i' 

NEW YORK — The on- 
line industry scents to be mov- 
ing toward a future that looks 
I Ac the pa. 4 : television. 

• Suddenly, companies are 
scrambling to embrace the 

. television business model. 
VUmcric;: Online Inc. execu- 
tives constantly compare 
their big on-line service to 
Cable telex is ion. 

The ir.iiustr\ is excited by 
>on willing known as push 
technology, which delivers 
customized data from the In- 
.’ernet directly to personal 
computet s. because it 
“broadcasts" information, 
presumably giving advert- 
isers a television- style cap- 
ti\ c audience, and the offer- 
ings of on-line services are 
lube led “channels." 

Hut Mining Co., a >t:ut-up 
concern based in New York/ 
opened Monday with a dif- 
ferent model. The new Inter- 
net media business is seeking 
i.» } ci run as many as 4.000 
, producers on the World Wide 
i Web. each operating a spe- 
* ci.: I -interest site on the com 
pain 's service. 

• Mining Co. has signed up 
foil site leaders w ith special- 
ties ranging from profession- 
al basketball to the soap opera 
“D;i\ s of Our Lives. 

By April, w hen promotions 
tn consumers \\ ill begin. Min- 
ing Co. plans to have 500 sites 
available. 

. Industry analysts who have 
S’ei; Mining Co.’s prototype 
ser. ice describe it as a hybrid 
that melds features of ;ui In- 
ternet search engine such as 
Yah* * 11 ! with ilioa.* of an on- 
line service *uch as America 
Online Inc. 

ii nmder. 5cou Kumit. 
formerly an executive at MCI 
Ti'Iecnniniunicatums Corp. 
and tTodigy Ins’., said the ser- 


vice sought to guide growing 
crowds of Internet wowsers 
painlessly to the wealth of spe- 
cial-interest information on the 
Web. 

With hs plan for thousands 
of offerings, he said. Mining 
Co. is a departure from the 
television-inspired business 
models of other on-line 
companies. 

“The on-line services like 
America Online and Microsoft 
Network are pursuing the 
cable-TV model, moving to- 
ward 20 or 30 big featured 
channels.” Mr. Kumit said. 
“We don’t think that's what 
the Net is about. It’s far more 
diverse/’ • . 

Mining Co.’s network, 
which is free to consumers, 
has a home page — 
wwwaniningco.com — from 
which users can tap into sub- 
ject sites. It hopes to make 
money from advertising: 13 
advertisers have signed up. 
Mr. Kumit says, including In- 
ternational Business Ma- 
chines Corp., AT&T Corp.. 
RJR Nabisco Inc. and Dur- 
acell International Inc. 

Mr. Kumit describes Min- 
ing Co.’s business plan as a 
“low-cost, shared-nsk mod- 
el.” The company provides 
its producers with technology 
and administrative support. It 
also sells the advertising. 

The site leaders, called 
“ guides,” have had their own 
Web sites before. They re- 
ceive a three-week training 
course from Mining Co. and 
will be paid a minimum of 
$250 a month. Beyond that, 
40 percent of Mining Co/s 
advertising revenue will be 
distributed to the guides. 

The guides are intended to 
be part-time workers. 
“We've set this up so a guide 
can work from a laptop in the 
kitchen," Mr. Kumit said, 
* 'and it’s for people who want 
to keep thet’r day jobs. ’’ 


FLY: A New Japanese Airline 


Continued from Page 19 

Okawara and hi* partner. 
HiJco Saw adn. two friends 
whose anti -establishment spir- 
it ha> lone hound them 10- 
gelhci . 

Hit: executives plan a 110- 
friils. commuter-type service, 
modeled alter Southwest Air- 
Jhks* t ’u. in the 1 .billed Slates. 
Izruehng businevs travelers 
■*’ hi: are tire’ll of high prices. 
They hope initially to link the 
oumtry \ ro o main population 
C 3 MC] s. Toky o :uid Osaka, in u 
scniLV .similar to the Wash- 
ton -New York shuttles. 

* According to imports here. 
Sky niai k plan-* to set prices at 
about one-third to one -half 
the current r.ue, but Mr. 
Okawara said 1* was too early 
to discuss pikes. He still is 
working out cost details 
whether to lease or own air- 
planes and how many em- 
plcnecs lo hire. 

- Japan's domestic air- travel 
nwJtcf is worth about S 1 2 bil- 
lion .1 sear. Right now, that 
market is the private lurl of 
iapat: Airlines Co.. All Ntp- 
s»n Airways Co. and Japan 
"Yir 5 ysj« ni Co. 

Years of |« election, nutty 
analysis say. has made the 
three l.st and overstaffed, Un 
foreign uluses, where they 
faav t'o up against w orki-yla-ss 
v'mpeh’.ors.' they often fuller. 
. A newcomer slut could make 
■ vtein -.weal a h:i in their home 
crake: might make them 
more competitive abroad. 

Mr Ok.mant ami Mr. 


Sawada met six years ago and 
discovered that they shared the 
same fantasy — to create that 
newcomer. At that time. Mr. 
Okawara said, the possibility 
was near zero. “We just calked 
about it as a dream,” he said. 

Sometimes timing is 
everything, and Skyro ark’s 
timing appears to be golden. 

By many analysts' ac- 
counts, the three established 
airlines helped set die stage for 
the newcomer's entry last 
winter by their response to a 
Transportation Ministry effort 
to promote such competition 
by partly deregulating fares. 
The three reacted in the tra- 
ditional fashion of oligopol- 
istic businesses: Given free- 
dom. they generally raised 
rates. 

Japanese corporate and ex- 
ecutive associations com- 
plained that competition was 
supposed to lower prices. 
That noise was unusual — in 
the past, companies here hes- 
itated to criticize the pricing 
arrangements of other Japa- 
nese mdustries. 

The established airlines 
now say they an? focusing on 
beating newcomers with 
prices and services by setting 
up subsidiaries focusing on 
Ideal routes- That is what the 
ministry wants to see. Some 
observers speculate that the 
airlines, which have had labor 
troubles, might welcome the 
new company because it 
would let them point to price 
competition as they bargain 
with their employees. 


1 

a 

g 


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PACE 2 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, IW7 




PAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 11, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Japan Surplus Hits 6-Year Low 

But Trend, Linked to High Oil Prices , May Be Ending 


C.wrrtiJ Our S^q> Cum Dispute ha 

TOKYO — The current-account 
surplus narrow ed 31 percent in 1996 
to its lowest level in six years, dragged 
down by higher crude-oil prices, the 
' Finance Ministry said Monday. 

The ministry' said the surplus, 
which measures flows of goods and 
services as well as of investment 
income and other monetary trans- 
fers. shrank ro 7. IS trillion yen 
(S58.26 billion) in 1996 from 10.39 
trillion yen in 1993. 

The services deficit widened 26 
percent from the previous year to 
6.78 trillion yen. the largest deficit 
since 1985. 

The merchandise trade surplus for 
all of 1 996 was down 26 percent from 
the previous year, to 9. 1 1 trillion yen. 
For December alone, it shrank 20 
percent, to 1 .05 trillion yen. 

Imports grew 25 percent, to 34.46 
trillion yenT while exports grew a far 
slower S.2 percent, to 43.57 trillion 
yen. In December alone, the current- 
account surplus narrowed 23 per- 
cent from a year earlier, to 820.7 
billion yen. 

“Both the cunem-account fig- 
ures for December and for 1996 
have declined, and that trend should 
continue for some time.” a Finance 
Ministry official said. 


The surplus in Japan ’s current ac- 
count has been falling steadily for 
three years, as the strength of the 
Japanese currency in the early to 
mid-1990s made imports more af- 
fordable in Japan. 

But a major decline in the yen’s 
value against the dollar over the past 
year and a half — which makes 
imports more expensive in Japan — 
is leading economists to conclude 
that future declines in the trade bal- 
ance may not be nearly as sharp. 

* ‘The decline in the yen has a very 
direct effect on prices, since Japan 
imports so many materials,” espe- 
cially those priced in dollars, said 
Koji Shimamoto. an economist at 
the Industrial Bank of Japan. 

A weaker yen helped carmakers 
raise exports II percent in 1996. 
Many companies complemented 
their overseas production with ex- 
ports to meet rising demand in the 
United States and Europe, analysts 
said. Exports of office machinery 
rose 10.4 percent for the year. 

Imports of crude oU rose 29.2 
percent in value terms, inflated by 
oil prices, which rose 13.1 percent 
during the year, the ministry said. 

* ‘The surplus is still cm a declining 
trend, but it may start rising again 
from around the middle of the year.” 


said Tomoko Fujii, an economist at 
Salomon Brothers Asia Ltd. The 
data seemed to have no immediate 
impact on the currency markets, 
which were more concerned about 
the effects of the Group of Seven 
meeting over the weekend. 

The United Stales indicated during 
the meeting that it was concerned 
about possible growth in Japan's 
trade surplus, which has been a 
source of friction between the two 
countries. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsu- 
zuka said Monday that Japan had told 
the U.S. Treasury secretary, Robert 
Rubin, that its current-account sur- 
plus was still on a declining trend. 

‘ 'I told him dial I did not think the 
current-account balance was 
worsening, as is viewed in the United 
States.” Mr. Mitsuzuka said. 

But Shunsuke Moran i. an econ- 
omist at Sphynx Investment Re- 
search, said the weakness in the yen 
against the dollar last year raised the 
value of imports despite a drop in 
volume. 

He said customs-cleared trade 
data for December, released at the 
end of January, showed that imports 
were up 1 3.4 percent in value terms 
but fell 2.6 percent in volume. 

( Bloomberg. AFP. AP) 


Woodside to Develop 
Timor Sea Oil Fields 



Cmjilni Ik On* ShSf Ditpa 

CANBERRA — Woodside 
Petroleum Ltd. received govern- 
ment permission Monday for it 
and its partners to move ahead 
with a ] .08 billion Australian dol- 
lar ($822.1 million) oil develop- 
ment in the Timor Sea. 

The company will build what it 
says will be the world's biggest 
offshore production site above the 
Laminaria and Corallina oil 
fields, with anticipated daily pro- 
duction of 170,0(X) barrels of oil. 

Warwick Parer, Australia's re- 
sources and energy minister, said 
the fields would be developed by 
Woodside. which owns 50 per- 
cent of the project, together with 
Broken Hill Pty. and Shell Aus- 
tralia Ltd., which each own 25 
percent. A spokesman for Wood- 
side said directors of Woodside 
and its partners were expected to 
approve details of the financing 
by mid- April. 

The two fields, which have re- 
serves of between 130 million and 
250 million barrels of oil. are ex- 
pected to begin production in 1999. 
The fields are in Australian waters 


about 550 kilometers (330 miles) 
west-northwest of Darwin and 160 
kilometeni south of the island of 
Timor. 

Laminaria is the first develop- 
ment in that pan of the Timor Sea 
and could become a key to the 
development of other discoveries 
in the area. 

“Compared with most other 
provinces around the world, Aus- 
tralia is grossly unexplored with 
regard to oil. and this son of thing 
will give a great impetus to that 
exploration.” Mr. Parer said. 

Natural gas produced at the site 
will be reinjected into the ground, 
Mr. Parer said, adding that Wood- 
side still had to submit an en- 
vironmental-management plan to 
the government of the Northern 
Territory. The fields, though of 
significant size, are smaller than in 
the country’s other offshore oil 
area in the Bass Strait between 
Victoria state and Tasmania. 

Mr. Parer said the fields would 
substantially increase Australia's 
self-sufficiency in oil from its cur- 
rent 75 percent. 

(Bloomberg, AFP ) 



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Source: Telekurs 


Inicrr.-iin'iu: lieu'- lirfwv 

Very briefly: 


• Korea First Bank, Cho Hung Bank. SeoulBank and Korea 

Exchange Bank postponed their annual shareholder meeting* 
until next month while the country’s top banking watchdog 
concluded an investigation into their involvement in the fi- 
nancial scandal surrounding Hanbo Group. __ 

• HSBC Holdings PLC formed an alliance with Wachovia 
Corp. to market corporate financial services globally. 

• Foster’s Brewing Group Ltd. said net profit rose 2 percent 
in the second half of 1996. to 169 million Australian dollars 
($128.9 million); sales gained 14 percent, to 1.37 billion 
dollars. The company expects earnings before interest and lax 
to increase for the full year. 

• Vietnam's finance minister, Nguyen Sinh Hung, said the 
country’s 9 percent annual economic growth rate may he in 
jeopardy without an influx of capital from home and abroad. 
Mr. Hung said Vietnam would have to spend as much as $45 
billion by 2000 to maintain the current growth rate. 

■ Mitsubishi Corp. is discussing several high-profile in- 
vestments in India; the company is in talks with the Tata 
group of companies and RPG Telecom Lid. about a S2 billion 
venture to provide basic telephone services. 

■GE Capital Corp.. the financial-services subsidiary of 
General Electric Co. of the United States, plans to bid 54:3- 
million Australian dollars for Loscam Ltd., a supplier of- 
[lets to the transportation industry that is controlled b\ 
,ctfic Dunlop Ltd. AF /*. W. Bloomberg. Retain 


Ilk Telecom Chief 
Gets Wake-Up Call 

Critics Cite ‘Antagonism’ in China 


Bloomberg News 

HONG KONG — The day 
Linus Cheung took over 
Hong Kong Telecommunica- 
tions Ltd., the company's 
stock price jumped 5 percent 
on the hope that he would 
strike deals with China. 

That was three years ago. 
These days, the only time 
Telecom gains that much is 
when investors speculate that 
China will buy more of the 
British-controlled telephone 
company — and bring in new 
managers. 

Mr. Cheung, 49. is under 
siege. Instead of securing the 
future of Hong Kong's largest 
telephone company, he is 
struggling to convince in- 
vestors that he can lead the 
unit of London-based Cable 
& Wireless PLC after Hong 
Kong reverts to Chinese con- 
trol in July. So far, Telecom's 
first Chinese chief executive 
has not opened many doors in 
China. 

“There's considerable an- 
tagonism toward Hong Kong 
Telecom in Beijing.” said 
Daniel Widdicombe, a tele- 
communications analyst at 
Bear. Steams & Co. 

Telecom needs an engine, 
not just a driver, analysts say. 
Without new markets, and es- 
pecially China, rising com- 
petition will eat into Tele- 
com’s profit. 

[Hong Kong Telecommu- 
nications said Monday it 
would launch its interactive 
television services in October 
and expected to invest about 2 
billion Hong Kong dollars 
($258 million) in the project in 
the next two years. Reuters 
reported. 

[The company already has 
invested 400 million dollars in 
developing the services, said 
William Lo, managing direc- 
tor at Hongkong Telecom IMS 
Ltd., the company's interact- 
ive multimedia services unit.} 
Mr. Cheung and his man- 
agers in effect were put on 
notice Friday, when C&W s 
new chairman. Richard 
Brown, pulled out of a ven- 
ture with VEBA. AG of Ger- 
many to sharpen C&W's fo- 
cus. C&W now looks certain 


to sell part or all of its 59 
percent stake in Telecom, * a 
move that analysts said might 
bring new managers with beu 
ter links with Beijing. 

’’There’s already been a , 
shakeup in C&W. and thar 
could conceivably extend to * 
Hong Kong Telecom.” David 
Gibtons. an analyst m 
HSBC James Capel Ltd., said. 
Less than five months before 
China takes over Hong Kong 
from Britain, Telecom is t&e 
colony’s only utility without a 
major Chinese shareholder. - 
That lack of state backing 
is becoming crucial. Tele- 
com. which lost its monopoly 
on fixed-line services 18 
months ago. needs regulator* 
to help it deal with new com- 
petition. It also needs new 
markets such as China's to 
offset any losses of business 
in Hong Kong. ^ 

All of that has not been Ica^ 
on investors. Since Mr. Chjr- 
-ung took the helm. Telecom 
stock has lost a sixth of us 
value, even as the benchmark, 
index gained a fifth. Orf 
Monday, the company's 
shares rose 10 cents to close at 
13.75 dollars. The trouble, in- 
vestors say. is that Mr. Cheung 
did only half the job they had 
hoped for He cut costs but 
failed to find new businesses 
while Telecom lost a sixth of 
its market share in Hong Koag 
in the past 18 months. 

“People expected too 
much at the beginning, that &e 
would bring in business with 
China." said Ambrose Chang 
at Dai wa International Capital 
Management Ltd. “Thar's 
not an easy job. especially 
with the political factors." ‘ 
China is not Mr. Cheung's 
only problem. Telecom lost 
bids for mobile- phone license^ 
in Hong Kong. Taiwan ana - 
Indonesia, apparently by bid- 
ding too cautiously. That 
leaves the company with just 
one major overseas license. in 
Singapore. C&W. meanwhile, 
has expanded in Asia — and it 
opened an office in Beijing, 
raising speculation that Tele- 
com’s parent had already de- 
cided to work around Mr. Che- 
ung when it came to China. .' 



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NASDAQ 


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EA.GE2 



TumrttBTATTflWAI. HRBALP TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAX FEBRUARY 1 - 8 , 19 W 




r > 


tNTEHNATWm 


PAGE 26 


Sports 


World Roundup 


Girardelli Retires 


skung Marc Girardelli, the 
Austrian who skied for Luxem- 
bourg, said Monday be was retiring 
because of bad knees. 

Girardelli won 13 Olympic and 
World Championship medals — 
the most by a male skier. He also 
won 46 World Cup races and was 
World Cup champion five times. 

Girardelli, 33, said he damaged 
an already fragile left knee in a 
World Cup race in December at Vai 
d’Isere, France. He raced a few 
days lateral Gardena, Italy, but bad 
a poor finish and decided to see 
debtors. 

“After talking with three top 
specialists, I was advised to leave 
the sport. They said there was a risk 
I'd walk on crutches for the rest of 
my life if I continued,'* be said. 

Girardelli has had a dozen knee 
operations in his career. 

Girardelli won his first World 
Cup race in 1983 and won World 
Cup races in all five Alpine dis- 
ciplines. (AP) 


England Wins Test 


cricket Darren Gough, apace 
bowler, took four New Zealand 
wickets in quick succession as Eng- 
land bowled the home team cut for 
191 shortly after lunch on the final 
day of the second test in Wellington 
to win by an innings and 68 r uns. 

Gough bowled Kiwi captain Lee 
Germon, had Blair Pocock bril- 
liantly caught by Nick Knight for 
64 and then rapidly removed Nath- 
an Astle and Simon Doull to finish 
with four wickets for 52 runs and 
match figures of nine for 92. 

Andy Caddick, a New Zealand- 
bom fast paceman. removed die last 
two batsmen, Geoff Allott and Chris 
Cairns. (Reuters) 


O’Meara Victorious Again 



Lcaoy Ign&j/ AP 

Mark O’Meara hitting an Iron 
on the 14th hole at the Buick. 


golf Mark O'Meara closed with 
a three-under par 33 on the back 
nine of the South Course at Torrey 
Pines on Sunday to hold off Craig 
StadJer and win the Buick Invi- 
tational, his second straight victory. 
O’Meara, who won the AT&T 
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am the 
week before, broke out of a tie with 
Stadler by making a 15-foot birdie 
putt at the 17th hole. (Reuters) 


Bickerstaff Moves to D.C. 


basketball Bemie Bickerstaff 
resigned Monday as the Denver 
Nuggets* general manager to be- 
come head coach of the Washington 
Bullets. Bickerstaff. who turns 53 on 
Tuesday, was on the sideline with 
head coach Dick Motta when the 
Bullets won the 1978 NBA 
title. (AP) 


Absent-Minded Contender Aims Higher 


By Ira Berkow 

New York Times Service 


C hicago— it was n o’clock in 
the morning — the appointed 
time he was to arrive at a gym and 
begin a light workoot — then 10 after 1 1 
and 11:30, and still there was no An- 
drew Golota. 

Go lota, a 28-year-old who had been 
ranked among the top five heavy- 
weights in the world until losing con- 
secutive bouts by disqualification for 
bitting iRiddick Bowe below the belt, 
was scheduled to be at the Windy City 
boxing gym on the southwest side of 
Chicago, a neat but traditionally in- 
elegant second-floor gym, which bad 
once been a warehouse. 

Golota has just returned to training 
for a May 3 bout with Jesse Ferguson. 

Golota was late. At 11:45, a call was 
made to the north side home where he 
lives with his wile and their 5-year-old 
daughter. His wife, Mariola, answered. 

“Oh, Andrew left some time ago,” 
she said. “He knows he’s supposed to be 
there. He ’ll be there. Bnt things happen to 
Andrew. He was late to our wedding. 
Both of them. Can you believe it, our own 
weddings? The first one was in Poland, at 
the Palace of Marriages, and be decided 
he wanted the pictures taken before, and 
not after, the avil ceremony. 

“Then we had a church wedding in 
Chicago, but he bad forgotten to confess 
his sins. So first he went into the church to 
see the priest and stayed there a long time. 
My God, what could be have been 
teffing? Finally Andrew comes out, and 
we got married." 

That was six years ago, and Golota, 
who at that time moved to Chicago, 
where Mariola lived, still seems to be 
ca aching up. 

"Andrew can be a terrific fighter, 
maybe a champion one day soon.’’ said 
George Simms, aBritish trainer, who was 

iatthe 



“It’s easy to hit above the belt on the punching bag,* 


TatU Rarhuaa/Thr Nr* Yui Tudm 

said Andrew Golota, who was disqualified twice last year. 


gym. “He hits hard and can take a punch, 
too. But in tire ring, he has to keep his lid 
on. He just can’t be going off his trolley, 
as he did in the two Bowe fights.” 

Then in walked a large man in a brown 
leather jacket and blue jeans. He had 
short brown hair and sharp but not un- 
appealing features, stood about 6 feet 4 
inches and weighed about 240 pounds. 

“I supposed to be here at 11 
o'clock,' ’ Golota said. 

Except now it was 1 1:58. 

“But still 1 1,” Golota said. 

On the walls of the gym were yel- 
lowing fight posters, some publicizing 
cards with Golota, die earliest ones with 


the Polish spelling of his first name, 
Andrzej, and sites like an outdoor arena 
in JoUet, Illinois, billed as “Rumble by 
Starlight” 

He was fighting for $50 a round, a long 
way from the $2 million he earned in die 
second Bowe fight which is still far from 
the $35 million Evander Holyfield will 
get for his second Mike Tyson heavy- 
weight tide fight on May 3. 

Golota’s fists thumped against the big 
black punching bag. Patches of sweat 
blossomed on his pink shirt as be hit 
above an imaginary waist. 

“It is easy to hit above the belt of the 
punching bag,” Golota said. “It’s not 
going anywhere. But in the first fight, I 
Hit him below the belt four times. The 
second fight. I did it only two times. I 
make progress.” 

Golota was 28-0 with 25 knockouts 
before die disqualification losses to 
Bowe. beach of those fights Golota was 
beating the former world heavyweight 
champion handily, when he unleashed 
blows that sent Bowe writhing to the 


canvas, ending the first fight in the sixth 
round, and the second in the ninth. 

“In the first fight, I hit Bowe low on 
purpose the first tare,” Golota said. “He 


hit me in back and I feel so much in kidney. 

'too. So 


I decide, you got to feel sranedang, too. 
you don’t do anymore.” 

Bnt to lose two fights in a row by 
identical disqualifications is strange. 
“What could you do?” Golota said. 
“Sometimes you don’ttirink.” 

His manager, Lou Duva, hollered be- 
tween rounds in the second fight for him 
to keep his punches up. 

“He was yelling too much,” Golota 
said. “There was so much noise. I could 
hardly hear him.” 

He recalled: “The fight was a war. 1 
was angry, I was tired. I don’t know. I no 
can let it happen again.” 

Golota dreams of the ch a mpionship 
belt “I just want it for a short tune,” he 
said. “I don’t need it forever.” 

He is a hero in Poland. He won a 
bronze medal in the 1988 Olympics, but 
he was a fugitive there until recently 


[sentence and a 
$7,000 fine on charges of assault and 
robbery, after a man had apparently be- 
gun a fight with Golota in a bar. 

Golota said he left the man with only 
a shiner, his underwear and one shoe, 
dumping the rest of the man's wardrobe 
that night into a trash can. 

“I was drunk that night,” Golota had 
said. “I -not do anything like that if 
straight. I be careful of my drinking 
from now on.” 

“We met when I made a visit to 
Poland,” said Mariola, a law student “I 
found Andrew to be very intelligent 
vary gentle, even. We had a whirlwind 
romance. 

“I remember one bitterly cold night 
when we were coming out of a nightclub 
in Warsaw and there was an old grandma 
sitting on the curb selling roses. Aritoew 
felt bad for her and he bought all the 
roses she had for me. We had so many 
roses we couldn’t carry them all. So he 
stuffed them in his jacket I had tears in 
my eyes. My Prince Charming." 


Toshack Quits as Coach of La Coruna 


Reuters 

John Toshack quit as coach of La 
Coruna while the reign of another Brit- 
ish coach, Bobby Robson, took a turn for 
the worse as Barcelona lost a local derby 
and slipped even further behind Real 
Madrid, the Spanish league leaders. 

Barcelona bad a player sent and con- 
ceded two penalties as it lost to neighbor 
EspanyoL Florin Raducioiu converted 
both penalties to give the smaller of 
Barcelona's two clubs a 2-0 victory. 

Luis Figo was sent off in the first half 
after receiving two yellow cards. The first 
was for complaining about die first pen- 
alty, given for handball against Fernando 
Couto. The second penalty came early in 
the second half after Laurent Bumc 
brought down Jonh Lardin. 

Toshack resigned late Sunday after a 
2-2 tie in a Galician derby with Celta 
Vigo. Augusto Lenoiro, the Deportivo 
president, said Toshack had offered his 
reagnatkjQ last week. 

Toshack will be replaced cm a tem- 
porary basis by second team coach Jose 
Manuel Corral. But Dteportivo is likely 
to sign former Valencia coach Luis Ar- 
agones for next season. 

brazil Palmeiras, the defending Sao 
Paulo champions opened the new sea- 
son with a 1-1 tie against promoted Sao 
Jose and blamed the referee, who was 


both female and foreign. Canadian So- 
nia Denoncourt disallowed a goal and 
sent off Cafu, a Palraeiras defender. 

“I can't see any reason to chose a 
woman for the opening match of the 
championship,” said Sebastiao Lapola. 
a Palmeiras director. 

But Denoocourt, 32, was praised by 
Sao Jose president Lindonice de Brito 


— the only female president of a club in 
the Sao Paulo championship. 

“Her presence was very important 
Here in Sao Jose, women have over- 
come prejudice,” she said. 

The Sao Paulo federation began using 
foreign referees for important matches 
last year to end accusations — usually 
made by the losing side — that local 
referees were subject to influences and 
pressure behind the scenes. 

The federation said opening day was 
& success. The average attendance was 
12,047 and the games featuring leading 
clubs Palmeiras, Corinthians and Santos 
were sold out even though they were 
played over Brazil's carnival weekend, 
tone 


The federation continued^ wife its time- 
out experiment The coach of (me side 
has the right to call a two-minute break in 
the 30th minute of the first half and his 
rival the same right in the second half. 

• FIFA, soccer’s world governing 
body, is considering two changes to die 
laws for goalkeepers. It wants to limit 
the time goalkeepers have to get the ball 
back into play but make it legal for them 
to move on the line before a penalty. 

■ MiDwall Makes Cuts 


MillwalL a London club in 1 
second division, sacked Jimmy NichoU, 
its manager, and Graham Hortop, its 
chief executive, Monday and transfer- 
listed 12 players in a£lJ) milli on ($2.4 
million) cost-cutting exercise. 

It asked all remaining staff and play- 
ers to take a 10 percent cut in wages. 

Mil) wall was relegated from the first 
division last season. It has debts of about 
£10 million. Trading in its shares was 
suspended last month and the dnb was 
handed over to administrators who made 
toe cuts Monday. (Reuters) 



■ NaamoffcBtoi 

Bobby Robson, coach of Bar- 
celona, watching bis team lose, 2-0. 


* 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY U, 1997 


Hasek Helps 
Sabres Past 
The Senators 


The Associated Press ' 

The Buffalo Sabres took an early \ 
lead against the Ottawa Senators * 
and, once again, goa bender ‘‘I 
Dominik Hasek protected it. * 


r .J to ” 1 

|[f^ 1 {ft t> lira* 


We know what kind of goal-' ‘ 
Nolan. * 


tender we have.” said Ted 
the Sabres coach, after Sunday's 2-„ 
I victory- "He's in. the zone right ’ 
now. He hasn't been just good. ! 
He's been great.” 

The Sabres took a 2-0 lead and.; 
Hasek mad 32 saves as the Sabres ~ 


NHL Rovnbup 


extended their unbeaten streak to 4 ‘ 
seven and took first place in the 
jvIHL's Northeast Division. ; 

Jason Da we scored 1 :34 into the" 
game and Derek Plante scored the '1 
eventual game-winner 37 seconds ~ 
into the second period for toe ; 
Sabres. 

Hasek lost the shutout with 6:57. 
remaining when Sergei Zhaltok;* 
scored off a rebound with the Sen- V 
mors on the power play. a 

“He was the difference,”^ Ot-. 4 
tawa coach Jacques Martin said of ; 
Hasek. “We created a lot of’ 
chances and had a strong game. He ' 
just made some big saves.” 

Panthers 4, Rangws 3 Rob Nie- j 

dermayer and Scott McUanhy 


scored power-play goals as Florida ■ 
beat visiting New York. E 


w* 


* 


£■ .■ 

r ' 


K 




r. 


5 - 

It- - 


The victory put Florida, which is " 
second in the Atlantic division, four 
points ahead of the third-place j 
Rangers and one point behind first- T 
place Philadelphia. 

Martin Straka and Jody Hull also 
scored for Florida. Vladimir 
Vorobiev. Sergei Nemchinov and.S 
Adam Graves scored for the: 
Rangers. 


“I *m disappointed,” said Wayne 
Gretzky of die Rangers, who hadan^l 


assist but went goal-less in his ea- . j 
reer-high I7to straight game. 

stw-a 2 , Kings i In Dallas, Neal 
Broten's goal with 43.1 seconds 
left in overtime lifted the Stars over ' 
Los Angeles. 

Kevin Stevens tied the game 1-1 
for Los Angeles- early in the third 
period before Broten, the Stars’ all- 
time leading scorer, banked the re- 
bound of Derian Hatcher’s shot offTf 
goaltender Stephane Fiset and into* 
die net for his third goal of the; 
season. 

Pat Verbeek scored the Stars’ -j 
first goal in the first period on Dal- T 
las’s first shot. Andy Moog posted 
his 348th career victory, toe most 
among active goaltenders. 

Flame* 6, Nighty Ducks 1 In Cal- 
gary, Dave Gagner scored two 
goals and added an assist as toe 
Flames won back-to-back games 
for the first time in a month. 

Gagner’s first goal of toe night, ; 
his I6to of toe season, gaveCalgary. 
a 3-0 lead 6:03 into the second 
period. Gagner set up Jonas Ho- H 
glund later in the period and scored - 
his second goal of toe game mid- . 
way through the third period on a -J, 
two- man power play. 

“We’re playing a little more ag- 
gressive as a team right now.” Gag- 
ner said. “Everybody’s moving up " 
in the play and the pace of our game . 
has quickened over toe past couple. - 
weeks.” ‘ 

Oiler* 4, Capital* 1 1n Edmonton, 
Ryan Smyth and Jason Aroott 


scored power-play goals and Bob ' 
30 saves as the Oilers 


Essensa made 
defeated the Capitals. 


ir 

is 1 -- 



SlORtBOABD 


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lovations included fine sand- 
wiches for fans who bought tickets in 
advance, live music before games and 
cheerleaders. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1997 


PAGE 27 


SPORTS 


Eastern All Stars 
Rebound to Win 

V 

Rice Takes MVP Award 

* By Mike Wise " 


, A'rw York limes Scnice 

: CLEVELAND — His 
motto is. “When in doubt, 
shoot. Andif you're off, shoot 
again." So Glen Rice shot 
And shoL And shot And 
when the third quarter was 
fomplete, the world of hoist- 
and-hope basketball had a 
bold new champion. 

■ With a shooting stroke as 
smooth as his clean-shaven 
head. Rice fired the Eastern 
Conference to a 132-120 vic- 
tory over the Western Con- 
ference on Sunday in the 47th 
annual All-Star Game at 
Gund Arena. 

! Before 20,562 who came to 
pay homage not only to 
Sunday's superstars but also 
to the legends of the league’s 
last live decades, the Char- 
lotte Hornets 1 shooting guard 
took over the game with an 
uncanny display of marics- 
fttanship in the third quarter, 
r- He scored an All-Star 
Game record of 20 points in 
the period, breaking Hal 
Greer’s record of 19 points set 
in 1968. He also broke Wilt 
Chamberlain's mark for 
points in a half (24), estab- 
lished in 1962. 

' Rice finished with 26 
points and edged out Michael 
Jordan, who registered the 
first triple-double in All-Star 
competition, for the most 
valuable player award. 

; Jordan finished with 14 
points, II rebounds and II 
assists, and his pivotal play in 
the second quarter helped the 
East rebound from a 23-point 

«l 

SCOREBOJ 




NUn 

FC 

FT 

Itch 

APFWs 

Malone 

30 

26 

0-0 

14 

0 0 4 

Kemp 

T9 

67 

1-2 

14 

1 1 10 

Okriuwon 

20 

56 

1-2 

63 

1 1 11 

Payton 

28 

7-15 

2-2 

0-1 10 2 17 

Stockton 

20 

5* 

04 

04 

5 2 12 

Richmond 

22 

3-7 

0-0 

1/3 

4 1 9 

Sprewefl 

2S 

7-12 

68 

1/3 

1 2 19 

GugBatta 

19 

3-7 

54 

16 

3 3 9 

Garnalt 

18 

1-7 

64 

16 

1 2 6 

Janes 

t7 

34 

67 

1-7 

1 I 10 

Setuempr 

20 

56 

61 

)4 

2 311 

CsMng 

12 

16 

04 

0-2 

0 1 2 



CAST 




Mta 

PC 

FT 

Rob 

APFPts 

Plppen 

25 

4-9 

06 

0-3 

2 0 8 

Hit 

22 

4-7 

34 

2/3 

2 2 11 

Mutombo 

15 

1-5 

1-2 

26 

0 0 3 

Jordon 

26 

514 

67 

61T IT 4 14 

Aj-tordotray24 

7-10 

2-2 

67 

3 2 19 

Baker 

24 

612 

34 

7-12 

1 2 19 

Brandon 

17 

611 

06 

16 

8 2 10 

Webber 

14 

1-4 

06 

14 

3 3 2 

T.itardowoyl4 

610 

04 

0-3 

2 1 10 

Mu 

2S 1624 

2-2 

1-1 

1 226 

Dumare 

10 

1-4 

04 

61 

1 0 3 

LoeHner 

24 

55 

?-) 

6)] 

2 4 7 


Wot MSS 33 — US 

East 21 34 43 36-132 

3-Poiitf goals— West mi, (Rfctanood 3^, 
StocMoo 2-Z Kemp 14. SpreweO 1-3, Sctwe- 
Ripf 1-1 Payton 1-S» GogBelM P-1, Janes D- 
1); East 12-29. (Rice 4-7. AJ-tedaway 3-5, 
Brandon 2-4 T-HartomoyS-A Dunces 1-4 
Mppen 0-3). Fouled out— N ock. Rebounds 
—Wert S3 (Garnett 9), East 74 (Baker M3. 
Assists— Wert 29 (Payton 10), East 36 Ciar- 
don m. TMrttoata-WBtf Ift Eras 22. 


deficit. Yet many of Rice’s 
long-distance shots — he was 
10-of-24 from the field, 4-of- 
7 from the 3-point line and 
scored all his points in 25 
minutes — were pivotal. 

“He came in and told me, 
'Keep stroking,' ” Rice said 
of Jordan's advice. “He said, 
‘I'm going to get you the ball. 
All the guys are going to be 
looking for you.' ” 

They found him. He shot 
Making his first four shots of 
the second half, be hit 8-of-l 1 
shots in the quarter and four 



Rot, kmKi/R*ulr» 


John Stockton of the Western All Stars squad, right, trying to steal the ball from Glen Rice of the Eastern team. 


of five of his 3-pointers. His 
streak Sunday mirrored his 
last month: Rice has scored 
30 or more points in 12 of the 
last 20 games and in three of 
those games he has broken the 
40-point barrier. 

“Sometimes you see the 
basketball going in before 
you release it, you feel 
everything you throw up is 
going in,” Rice said. “And 
it's one of die greatest feel- 
ings you can imagine. I love 
to shoot,” 

Others guys who had big 
games: Anfemee Hardaway 
and Vin Baker (19 points 
each); Terrell Brandon scored 
10 in front of his hometown 


fans, and Latreli SpreweU led 
the West with 19, including 
two surreal dunks on the 
break. One, over Scotrie Pip- 
pen, jolted the arena from a 
slumber. 

Jordan led the East on a 27- 
5 tear the last 5:43 of the 
second quarter. During a scin- 
tillating 1 -minute, 13-second 
stretch, be scored seven 
points. 

All of Rice's accurate 
bombs m the third quarter and 
Jordan's deeds in die second 
quarter served as a backdrop 
to a 30-minute halftime cel- 
ebration Sunday featuring a 
collection of the greatest 
players ever assembled on the 


same floor. The scoreboard 
continually played black-and- 
white television clips as 47 of 
those voted the top 50 players 
in NBA history took the floor 
at halftime amid much ado. 

Halftimes in the NBA often 
border on corny and tedious. 
But Sunday night’s was 
□either. The players filed onto 
the court, single file, wearing 
leather jackets bearing the 
team name they wanted to be 
associated with. (Charles 
Barkley picked the 76ers). 

There were some protrud- 
ing stomachs and receding 
hairlines. Yet all were treated 
as if they were members of 
some backwoods Ohio prep 


football team that had just 
captured the state title. 

Sweat glistening from his 
bald pace. Jordan was the first 
to rise on the makeshift plat- 
forms. By the time Bill Rus- 
sell's name was announced, 
the building was filled with 
fireworks and balloons and 
noise. 

Rice is clearly not in their 
class yet But he is on his way. 
After the game, he was asked 
whether he felt like the best 
player in the world. “By the 
look of this trophy.” Rice 
said, cuddling the All-Star 
award. “I'd have to say I'm 
the best player in the 
world.” 


Iowa State Can’t 
Contain Kansas 


The Associated Press 
Top-ranked Kansas re- 
bounded from its first loss of 
the season to beat No. 9 Iowa 
State. 69-62. 

The Cyclones led at half 
time but the No. 1 Jayhawks 
stepped up their defense. 
Iowa State shot only 29 per- 


Collioe Basketball 


cent in the second half and 
made just one field goal over 
the first eight minutes of the 
second half. 

Raef LaFrentz scored 21 
points for Kansas (23-1, 9-1 
Big 12), which had lost in 
double overtime to Missouri 
on Tuesday. The Jayhawks 
withstood Dedric Wil- 
loughby’s career-high 36 
points for Iowa State ( 16-4. 7- 
3), which had won five 
straight. 

“Our defensive philo- 
sophy is that one man can't 
beat you,” Kansas point 
guard Jacques Vaughn said. 
“He almost did.” 

Willoughby set a school re- 
cord with nine 3-pointers, and 
be finished 1 1- for- 19 from 
the field while the rest of his 
teammates were 9-for-33. 

Vaughn scored 18 points 
for Kansas, while Paul Pierce 
had 17 points and 10 re- 
bounds. 

No. 2 Wak» Forest 73, Mis- 
aowi 66 Tim Duncan had 1 8 
points and 20 rebounds as the 
visiting Demon Deacons (19- 
2) rebounded from their loss 
to Duke and kept the Tigers 
(12-11) from beating the two 
top-ranked teams in consec- 
utive games. Wake Forest 
started the second half with a 
20-2 run, but Missouri stayed 
within striking distance by 


making a school-record 15 3- 
poimers, seven by Jason 
Sutherland, who finished 
with 23 points. 

No. 4 Kentucky 93, No. 18 
Vinanova 96 Ron Mercer had 
23 points and 11 rebounds, 
and Kentucky (22-3) shot 55 
percent from the field, includ- 
ing 8-of-l 9 from 3-point 
range. The Wildcats also fin- 
ished with a 42-17 rebound 
advantage and forced 24 
turnovers, including 11 by 
point guard Alvin Williams. 
Chuck Komegay scored 12 
points for Villanova (17-6). 

No. 11 Arizona 81, No. 23 

itibmo 62 Miles Simon, who 
was sidelined by academic 
problems for the first 11 
games of the season, had ca- 
reer highs of 30 points and 10 
assists for the Wildcats (15- 
5). Lawrence Nelson led the 
Green Wave (16-7) wizb 15 
points in the game played in 
Phoenix. 

if om p hi a 79, No. 17 Lou to. 

vilie 59 Cedric Henderson 
scored 27 points, and the Tigers 
(12-11. 6-3 Conference USA) 
started the game with a 16-0 
run as the visitors missed their 
first 10 shots from the field. 
DeJuan Wheat scored 22 points 
for the Cardinals (18-5, 5-3), 
who also had five turnovers in 
the opening six and a half 
minutes of toe game. 

No. 25 IIUnoiK 66, Iowa SI 
Kiwane Garris scored 15 of 
his 21 points on 3-pointers 
and had lOassistsforthelllini 
(17-6, 7-4 Big Ten), who 
opened the second half with a 
17-6 run to extend their lead 
to 50-30. Guy Rucker scored 
16 points for the visiting 
Hawkeyes (16-6. 7-3), who 
shot 33 percent and dropped 
out of the Top 25. 


BASKETBALL 


•Top 25 Colleoe Result* 

. Ho* Ho top as loam In Hu Aeocdmad 
M cotage p ofl Arad taac 

grata 

, 1. Know m-u tort 10 Missouri 96-94. 
2DT; beat No. 6 lorn Side 6942. z Wafts 
fwert 09-2J fast to Mo. 8 Oufte 756* Mai 
Mtaouri 73-65. Z Kaotecky QH) lost to No. 
19 Sooth Caratao 84-79, OT; beat Western 
faotea 82-55; beet No. i6VHanow 93-56.4. 
Hieaettta Q8-2) boat Pam Stale 85-70. 5. 
Ptte (17-9 beat Brigham Young 85-49; beat 
Cobaate Stole 87-67. . • • > 

■ 6. Iowa Stole (!«-*» beat Baytar61-5Ztort 
9 No. 1 Kansas 69-6Z 7. Me nton* QM 
teat North CoraHno Stale 6655; tortto No. W 
Orman 8068. 8. Date n«l teat No. 2 
Bate Forest 7W* boor North CoroDna Stale 
88-51.*. New Meeke 08-4) beat Brigham 
Voting 74-3Z teat Southern Methodist 75-72 
teUoTposOwtsttei 90-59. tZOo iei en (19- 
« beet Weston Kentucky 695* beat No. 7 
.Marytood 00-68. 

‘ • II. I BMtwWs (1*4) tatto Sobri Lnott 64- 
62; last to Memphis 79-59. IZ Ctodeacril (17- 
« tea No. 2T Totem 6frK- te* Maiqaatto 
11-70. U Mkbtgw (174) lest to Msconrin 
58-51 beat Pw» Stole 81-64. V4. Artrew ns- 
9 beat Arizona Slate 17-71; teat No. 21 To- 
Jpne 41-62. 15. Crtornta (17-5) losf to Ne- 
braska 77-6K boat Tesns AIM 77-64. 

' 14. V8ftnam 07-6) beat West VtrgWa Bi- 
te Iasi to Me. 3 Kentucky 93-56. 17. Xarier. 
due a*4) teat Lb sate tt-67; tori to St 
Joseph's 79-65. It. Stated (1M) lad to 
Southern Cal Ml- tost to UCLA 87-68. 19. 
teribCantee (17-0 beat No. 3 Kentucky 84- 

79, OT.'beatHarida 76-68. 2B. North Ca t el ta 
(154) boot Florida State 90-62; boat Vfagtnla 
81-57, 

21. Tutew n*4) tostto NO. 12 andnndf 
6S44; lost to NO. 14 Artsma 81-6Z 2Z Tten 
07-0 lost to trice 75-58. 23. Tents Ttcb (14- 


6) lost to Tens 83-67; beat Nebraska 87-74. 
24. ladtasa (18-7) tort to Na 25 ten 75-67; 
teat Ohto State W-76. 25. tan 06-0 beat 
Na. 24 Indkina 75-67; lost to Uftnofe 6651. 

The AP Top 25 


Diesop»taa» In' Tte A e eu el— it Pra se * 
cotege taatattte pod. wttt flrsHMeae 
vatu In perenthaeae, record* Onaugh Feb. 
A to(rt potato teeed an 26 pataa tore (M- 
ptace koSb through gat point lor a 23th- 
plnce wen. and l as t anl rt reafttogc 

Record Pts Pee 


1. Kansas (87) 

251 

1.770 

I 

ZWtake Forest 

19-2 

1,669 

2 

IJUbmesoto U) 

20-2 

1621 

4 

4. Kentucky 

253. 

1*598 

3 

5. Utah 

17-3 

1*438 

S 

6 Duke - 

19-5 

1*387 

8 

7.aamson . 

194 

1A23 

10 

ZOndnaatr, 

174 

UH 

12 

9. lawaSL 

164 

1.168 

6 

10. Maryland 

186 

1*127 

7 

11. Arizona 

156 

U»6 

14 

1Z South Comoro 

176 

946 

19 

11 New Mexico 

1B4 

901 

/ 

14. Michigan 

176 

791 

13 

15. Colorado 

176 

730 

IS 

15 North CamUro 

156 

723 

20 

17. LOUKWIfe 

186 

606 

11 

18. VBanova 

174 

454 

16 

19.XovfCGOtik) 

164 

37S 

17 

20. liter* 

174 

300 

— 

21. Texas Ted) 

166 

246 

23 

2ZStaflted 

134 

171 

18 

2ZTutate 

167 

153 

21 

24. UCLA 

757 

144 

— 

25.CoU.af Charteston 

21-2 

Ml 

— 


Others ttceMng votes Tltea 129, SL 
Josephs ICQ, towa 8Z Tens 7?,Cn«omta 75, 
Georgto 75 Provtamoe 68. Southern Cal 59. 
Pacfflc 55. uxSona 51. Boston Cgtege 42. 
Morttuatte 21. New Orleans 21. HawaB 20, 
Manila. Temple t& Princeton >d ResaoSn 
7, Wrote SL 7. Missouri 5. V&gtata & Wert 
VbgMa S, N. Ariamo 4, N.C CterioltoA E. 


MlcNgon Z Mfasfcslppl 1 Oregon * Oral 
Robertsl. 


HOCKEY 


NHL Stand imos 


unaH 


ATLANTIC DMSKM 

W L T Pts GF GA 


PhSodetphta 

30 16 

8 

68 

173 

136 

Ftefda 

27 15 13 

67 

156 

136 

N.Y. Ranges 

28 22 

7 

63 

197 

158 

New Jersey 

26 17 

9 

61 

139 

128 

Washington 

2! 27 

6 

48 

139 

150 

Tampa Bay 

19 27 

6 

44 

140 

163 

N.Y. Wanders 

17 28 

9 

43 

144 

161 

' NORTHEAST OfftSiOM 

' “ 

. --- 


W L 

T 

PIS 

CF 

GA 

Buffalo 

29 19 

8 

66 

157 

139 

PbBbuiVi 

30 19 

5 

65 

205 

168 

Moahata 

20 27 W 

SO 

179 

206 

Hartted 

21 2S 

7 

49 

155 

174 

Barton 

20 27 

7 

47 156 

187 

Ottawa 

IB 24 11 

47 

146 

156 

wumKcownsm 


CMTRAL tOVtSON 




W L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Dates 

32 20 

4 

68 

172 

138 

DalraO 

2S IB 10 

60 

163 

128 

SL Louis 

26 24 

6 

58 

170 

173 

Pteentx 

23 27 

4 

50 

147 

170 

Qrtcogo 

21 27 

8 

SO 

143 

148 

Toronto 

21 33 

1 

43 

158 

192 

MCK DIVISION 




« L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Colorado 

32 14 

8 

72 

184 

128 

Edmonton 

27 23 

S 

59 

174 

156 

Vancouver 

25 27 

2 

52 

174 

184 

• Anaheim 

21 SB 

6 

48 

154 

170 

Colony 

21 28 

6 

48 

144 

162 

Son Jose 

20 27 

6 

46 

140 

167 

Las Angelas 

19 30 

6 

44 

147 

188 

itnoeAT-e— S4HIB 



Ottawa 



6 

t 0 

1 

BuBrte 



1 

1 

8-2 


FM Period: B-Dawe 15 (ZWtnBO Second 
Paled; B-Plonta 23 (Bamatoy, Grasekj. 
Third Period: O-Zhoft* 8 (Yoi*. 

Cumeyworiti) (pp). Stats ea goat: O- 159- 
9—33. B- 8-8-4— 2D. Goodes: O-Rhndes. B- 
Hasek. 

N.V. Rangers 1 1 1-3 

Florida 2 1 0-4 

First Period: F-Medermayer 8 fSvehta. 
Cto pc dw) (pjO. Z New York. Ite ro M e v S 
(Gretzky- RoMaBe) (PP7. Z F-MeBanbr 22 
Oriedermoyer. Garpentov) Cpp).4 F-StrakoS 
(Webs. Gurtafseon) Second Period: F-flu8 7 
(Morphy) L New York, Nentdiinw 6 (Flotey. 
Driver) TbW Period: New Vbrft. Graves 20 
(Karpovt5ev4>ontlstnxn] Shots on goal: New 
YOU 11-9-12— 3Z F- 9-9-11-29. Cottew 
New York, Richter. F-Vontaesbrouck. 

Les Angeles 8 8 10-1 

Dates 10 0 1-2 

Fhst Period: D-vertiete 15 (Bitten, SUoi) 
Second Period: None. TbW Period: LA.- 
Stevens 12 (Qkzyk, Naabm) Overtte r a 
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PAGE 2 


totitotmathwaT- HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, februaryl 


-2,1997 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11 7 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Switch to Real News 


Between Chaos and a Promise: U2’s New Sound 


W ASHINGTON — We 
had our annual State of 
the Union clambake at Stan 
Bromley's house the other 
night. We meet every year to 
relish the president’s address 
to the nation and enjoy watch- 
ing the members of Congress 
give him a 
well-deserved 
standing ova- 
tion. 

But some- 
thing happened 
this time that 
none of us had 
counted on. 

son jioy wks Buchwilld 
delivering its verdict just as 
the president was describing 
his Crusade for Education. 

We assumed that' all the 
networks would immediately 
interrupt their coverage of the 
president's speech to inform 
us if O J. was going on wel- 
fare. To our amazement they 
continued showing Clinton 
declaring, ‘ ‘The enemy of our 
time is inaction." 


Marge Y anker said, "What 
kind of country do we live in 
where they withhold an O J. 
Simpson verdict just so the 
president of die United States 
can tell us what his plans are 
for North Korea?" 

Abe Bonowitz added, 
"When the president heard 
that the veraict had been 
handed down he should have 
said, '1 interrupt my speech 
for this very important news 
bulletin.' *' 

Ruth Rosengarden said 
quietly. "Perhaps nobody 
told him.” 

Lenora Williams Overmy- 
er told her, "Hiey had to tell 
him. He's the commander in 
chief of all the armed 
forces.** 

Rise Bimbaum said, "The 
whole country has been wait- 
ing for this verdict for 


months. Politically it was a 
big mistake to keep news like 
that from the American 
people and use up precious air 
time to discuss pollution in 
the Florida Everglades. The 
O J. Simpson trials are part of 
our national heritage." 

Abe sounded disgusted. 
"The president didn't even 
mention the unemployment 
problems in the U.S." 


Amie Spalding said, 
“What unemployment prob- 
lems?” 

Abe replied, "All those 

0 J. expert lawyers are out of 
work now that title trial is over. 

1 read somewhere drat 45,000 
legal commentators on Ger- 
aldo Rivera, Larry King and 
‘Nightline’ have been pink- 
slipped and are presently on 
the street.” 

Our host, Stan, joined in, 
"J think if the president 
wanted to get our attention be 
could have denied any con- 
nection between his admin- 
istration and the party donors 
who bad coffee at the White 
House in their Bruno Magli 
shoes.'’ 

Marge was becoming ex- 
asperated. "Isn't there 
something in the Constitution 
that says you have to report 
the result of a jury trial before 
a State of the Union 
speech?" 

Lenora said, “If there isn't, 
there should be." 


The TV screen still showed 
the president talking. 

"Maybe they're announ- 
cing the verdict on the Disney 
Channel," Rise suggested. 

Bromley hit the clicker, 
and the Disney Channel came 
up. A voiceover announced, 
"We interrupt this program 
concerning the president’s 
address to bring you a special 
song from Snow White.’’ 


By Jon Pareles 

New York Tunes Service 

D UBLIN — It was crunch time 
for U2. The Irish band's next 
single had to be finished within 
three days, and the deadline for die , 
complete album, which had not yet 
been entitled "Bop,” was less than 
a month away. 

U2, with its producers and en- 
gineers, was recording and mixing 
in two studios simultaneously. 
Workdays stretched to 14 and 16 
hours. But even at that stage, 
everything was subject to change 
— including, as it turned out. me 
deadline. 

"We have trouble finishing 
tilings," said the Edge, U2’s gui- 
tarist. The album, originally due 
last September as a pre-Gmstmas 
release, was finished in iaie 
December, with all-night recording 
sessions up to the last minute. It is 
to be released March 4. 

During the nine months it took to 
make "Pop,” U2 invited a few 
journalists in to watch the band 
record. This observer joined the 
group just as it was finishing the 
single, which was released last 
week. It was a rare chance for an 
outsider to see a process that usu- 
ally takes place in private. 

For a band like U2. making an 
album is essentially a slow-morion 
improvisation in which ideas are 
seized and refined while the tapes 
roll. What state was the album in? 
"Chaos," said Bono, U2*s lead 
singer. "Promise,” said the Edge. 

U2 was intent on renewing itself, 
determined to sound like neither its 
1980s incarnation — as the most 
achingly sincere, and sometimes 
self-important, band of the decade 
— or the raucous, buzz-aod-crunch 
rock band that has survived the short 
attention spans of the early 1990s. 

Like RiLM. in the United States, 
U2 has been able to maintain the 
respect of alternative rockers while 
reaching a broader audience; unlike 
R-EJV1_ whose latest album was a 
commercial disappointment, U2 
will wholeheartedly promote 

“Pop” with a world tour that begins 



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■ ■ 








From left, Adam Clayton, Bono, Larry Mullen and the Edge during a recording session in Dublin for "Pop,” U2*s new album. 


in the spring. U2's label. Island, and 
much of the recording business hope 
that U2 is one group from the 1980s 
that can still sell like supe r sta rs . 

U2 made "Boy,” its 1980 debut 
album, when its four members, 
friends from high school, were still 
teenagers. The combination of the 
Edge& echoing guitar, Bono's im- 
passioned voice and the martial 
rhythms of Adam Clayton on bass 
and Larry Mullen on drums was an 
arena-size peak as instantly recog- 
nizable as the sound of The Who. 
The music evoked idealism with the 
resonance of a cathedral while car- 
rying lyrics about adolescent tur- 
moil and mystical Christianity. U2 
made honesty sound like a holy 
quest, and milli ons of listeners re- 
sponded, hearing their own yearn- 
ings in choruses like "I still haven't 
found what I’m looking for." 

The band’s old approach con- 
tinues to reverberate in best- 
selling bands like Live. But in 
1988, U2 reached a dead end with 
"Rattle and Hum.” As it strained 
to create the sound of integrity, it 
ended up with awkward emula- 


tions of American blues and souL 
So, a decade into its career, U2 
transformed itself for its 1991 al- 
bum, “Acfatung Baby.” It ex- 
changed transparency for distor- 
tion and earnestness for a nervy 
ambiguity. "We were absolutely 
adamant that we didn’t want to 
sound like U2," the Edge said. 
“We’re so much better if we don’t 
know what we ’redoing, because if 
it’s too easy, then that's what it 
sounds like — too easy." 

For its Zoo TV world tour in 
1992, U2 filled stadiums as it per- 
formed amid a barrage of television 
imagery, mocking and savoring 
both the global marketplace and 
U2’s own celebrity. “Zooropa,” 
released in 1993, certified that U2 
wasn't looking back. 

"We’re probably the only Euro- 
pean band of our generation still 
releasing relevant records and still 
playing in large spaces,” said Adam 
Clayton, U2’s bass player. "We've 
grown up along with a section of our 
audience. But we’ve always been 
relevant to a younger audience, and 
we enjoy that position too much to 


give it up unwittingly. I drink that in 
rock ’n’ roll, for a credible artist, the 
age limit may be about 35. But if 
you stay honest, you can push the 
age restriction a bit” Clayton and 
Bono are 36; the Edge and Mullen 
are 35. 

.“Rock V roll is obsessed with 
juv enilia, " said Bono. "But the 
sense of threat that rock ’n* roll has 
is actually not about boys. There's 
nothing scary about a man trying to 
be a boy. Men arc scarier than 


Before starting "Pop,” U2 took 
a year off, then made ‘ ‘Passengers: 
Original Soundtracks 1,” which 
was billed as a collaboration by 
Brian Eno and the four band mem- 
bers. It’s an album of songs for real 
and imaginar y films, full of eerie 
textures and juxtapositions. 

By the time U2 started working 
on "Pop,” the band's ninth full- 
length album, its numbers had 
grown fascinated by current dance 
music. To make "Pop,” U2 chose 
two producers. Flood, a soft-spoken 
En glishman , worked on "Zooropa” 
and has also produced albums for 


Depeche Mode and Smashing 
P um pkins. Howie B., a disk jockey 
and remixer with his ownindepend- 
ent label. Pussyfoot, is fluent in sub- : 
genres from acid jazz to trip-hop to 
techno to dium-and-bass to lounge. : 

Potentially, Flood could shape 
the monumental tones and dynamics 
of arena rock; Howie. B. could ma- 
nipulate off-the-wall samples and, 
sustain the abstract rhythms. Like 
David Bowie, whose new album, 
“Ea rthlin g.” embraces the chatter- 
ing electronic rhythms of drum-and- 
bass dance music, U2 hears its fix-, 
turn in up-to-date grooves. But it 
doesn’t intend to abandon melody. 

“Musicians, painters, whatever, 
they have no choice but to describe 
where they live,” said Bono. 
“Sometimes it may seem hard to 
keep your ear on the street because 
there's a lot of stuff you don't want 
to pick up. But as Bob Dylan said, 
‘He not busy being bom is busy 
(tying,* ami I think the dealh starts 
in your record collection. I like to 
feel alive. I think I'm awake, and 
this is die noise that keeps me 
awake.” 


EAST VERSUS WEST 


PEOPLE 


Hollywood Actors Flock Back to Broadway 


By Brace Weber 

IVw York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Anton Chekhov's 
“The Three Sisters” is a kind of 
New York perennial, popping up reg- 
ularly in limited runs, but rarely is it 
given a Tony-eligible staging, die kind 
of full-scale, conventionally interpreted 
treatment meant to withstand the scru- 
tiny of Broadway audiences and critics. 

Thai is the first thing to note about the 
Roundabout Theatre Company produc- 
tion that opens at the Criterion Center on 
Thursday. But even more remarkable is 
its cast, a glamorous ensemble of per- 
formers — including Amy Irving as 
Olga, Jeanne Tripplehom as Masha and 
Lili Taylor as Inna. Indeed, die pro- 
duction is perhaps the clearest signal yet 
of a mounting trend: the return, in ap- 
preciable numbers, of screen actors to 
the New York stage. For years. New 
York theater producers have lamented 
the loss of talented actors to film and 
television in Los Angeles. 

It was where the action, the notoriety, 
the money were: Have you seen Lily 
Tomlin. Swoosic Kurtz, Joan Allen, Jason 
Alexander. Adam Atkin, Scott Baku! a, 
Annette Bening or Kevin Spacey, all 
Tony nominees in the late 1980s and early 
’90s, on a New York stage recently? 

But now. just us Chekhov's troubled 
sisters yearn from a distance for the 
Moscow that once sustained them, so too 
do many actors, it appears, for New 
York. Arid no! just the megastars like A1 
Pacino, who swoop in to great fanfare, 
do (heir thing and disappear. Or the 
coterie of well-known Broadway per- 
formers who supplement their liveli- 
hoods in film and television, people like 
Philip Bosco, Bernadette Peters, Nathan 
Lane, Frank Lange I la. Be be Neuwirth. 
Janies Naughton and Tony Roberts. 

Rather, there is a whole new group of 
younger actors — among them Kevin 
Bacon, Kyra Sedgwick. Sarah Jessica 
Parker. Matthew’ Broderick, Anthony 
LaPagUa and Marisa Tomei, in addition to 
much of the cast of "Three Sisters” — 
who are renewing the primacy of New 
York theater in the performers' firma- 



Hn Knhncb/Tbc New YvkTia 


Amy Irving, Jeanne Tripplehorn and Lili Taylor in "The Three Sisters.’ 


"There’s a buzz,” said Alan Eisen- 
berg, executive director of Actors 
Equity, the actors' union. “I’m defin- 
itely hearing it from the membership. 
There’s renewed interest in Broadway, 
and in playing in New York, which is not 
just Broadway." It's a difficult trend to 
document, though a list of crossover 
actors compiled by the union. "Famous 
Performers on Broadway. 1994-1997,” 
runs to six single-spaced pages. "The 
ball is bouncing up," Eisenberg said, 
“and hasn’t yet reached its apogee.” 

David Marshall Grant, who portrays 
Kuiygin, the dullard married to Masha in 
“Three Sisters." said, "There’s just a 
tremendous number of people living in 
actor cyberspace right now. that nonex- 
istent, airplane -shaped place between 
LA. and New York." 

Grant has played dozens of character 
roles in films and on television, but is 
nonetheless best known for his stage 
work, particularly for his role as Roy 
Cohn’s reluctant prot£g£ in "Angels in 
America." for which he received a Tony 
nomination. 


Why this is happening is also a matter 
of conjecture. Grant said that the ease of 
air travel — "basically going from New 
York to LA. is dinner and a movie” — 
has had an impact A number of per- 
formers said in interviews that a per- 
ceived revival of New York itself, com- 
bined with a perceived decline of Los 
Angeles, is a factor. 

Others cited the upsurge in film and 
television production in New York, the 
bull market on Wall Street, which has 
stimulated investment in theater pro- 
ductions, and the rise of independent 
filmmaking in general. 

Among Hollywood actors, “there’s 
always been an interest." said Michael 
David of Dodger Productions, which 
produced "TheKing and L” starring the 
film actor Lou Diamond Phillips, and 
"Once Upon a Mattress" with Parker, 
both now on Broadway. The problem, 
David said, is that the long-term career 
cost of acting on stage had become un- 
tenable. 1 ‘not just in terms of the money 
you don't make." but in tbe necessary 
time commitment. 


W ILL they, won't they? The Oasis 
star Liam Gallagher and actress 
Patsy Kensit called off their wedding 
on Monday because of “obsessive and 
intrusive" media attention. Oasis’s re- 
cord company reported. Creation Re- 
cords said dozens of reporters who be- 
sieged the couple’s home and potential 
wedding venues had “removed any dig- 
nity from what was to be a private and 
special occasion.” The announcement 
was at once a cancellation of the wed- 
ding, and its fust official announcement 
after a storm of press minors since last 
week. Early on Monday morning, 
Gallagher shouted to reporters camped 
on tbe couple's London doorstep, "I’m 
not getting married today. I’m in 
bed.' 


The best-selling author John Grish- 
am thinks he’s suffering from overex- 
posure — at least on movie screens. 
Grisham sold movie rights to his first 
seven legal thrillers, but plans to wait for 
some time before letting Hollywood get 
his eighth book, “Tbe Partner.” due out 
late this month. “When people start 
telling you Tm not going to bity tbe 
bode. I’m going to the movie,’ it’s time to 
quit It’s time for a break, ’’Grisham said. 
Among tbe Grisham books turned into 
movies are “The Firm,” “Tbe Pelican 
Brief’ and “The Client.” 


The French director Patrice Leconte 
picked up two Cesar awards for his 
satirical take on the court of Louis XVL, 
4 ‘Ridicule." Tbe movie was named best 
film and Leconte shared the best di- 
rector award with Bertrand Tavernier, 
who won for ‘ ‘Capitaine Conan." Phil- 
ippe Torre ton was named best actor for 
"Capitaine Conan' ’ and Fanny Ardant 
best actress for “Pedale Douce.” The 
best foreign film award went to “Break- 
ing the Waves,” directed by Lars von 
Trier (Denmark). 


Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark 
has taken to dying his hair blond when 
he goes out dancing so as not to be 
recognized, the tabloid magazine Billed 
Bladet reported Monday. The 28-year- 
old son of Queen Margrethe and 
Prince Henrik was almost unrecog- 


nizable when be recently partied at the 
Le Kitch discotheque in Copenhagen. 
He was with his new girlfriend, the 
Danish rock singer Maria MontelL 


The daughter of the wireless pioneer 
Gugjiebno Marconi opposes the dis- 
persal of hundreds of historic telegrams 
belonging to the firm her father founded 
when they come up for auction in ApriL 
Tbe messages front the heyday of the 
wireless telegraph, including the distress 
signal from the Titanic, will be sold at 
Christie's in London. In a letter to The 
Times, Princess Elettra Marconi- 
GiovaneUi said the archives of the Brit- 
ish electronics groups GEC -Marconi 
should stay intact W in Britain, at any 
{nice. 


The singer-actress Whitney Hous- 
ton won three NAACP Image Awards: 
best motion picture actress for her work 
in “The Preacher’s Wife,” best gospel 
artist and best sound-track album. Den- 
zel Washington was named best actor 


for “Courage Under Fire.” The win- 
ners in 35 categories were chosen by a 
committee of industry professionals and 
national leaders of the National As- 
sociation for the Advancement of 
Colored People. ■ ' : ' . 


The celebrated Swedish film director 
Ingmar Bergman has attacked Swe- 
den's recent film record. In a rare tele- 
vised interview, Bergman, 78, said drat 
with few exceptions today’s batch of 
young Swedish directors “know their 
craft and are very accomplished but they 
do not touch on anything of note.” But 
Bagman singled out two directors for 
praise: Jan Troefl, whom he referred to, ^ 
as a "leading light,” and Richard > 
Hobart for his film, “Glaedjekaellan” 
(Source of Joy). . 


Prince Charles has agreed to the 
establishment of a fellowship in his 
name for the study of the Islamic world, 
tbe Oxford Center for Islamic Studies 
announced. 



Trw» Hoirii/Tbe Anodttnl fto» 

I Jam GaDagber and Patsy Kensit: On the lookout for peace and privacy. 








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So please check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


I love 0-800-99-0011 


in the springtime. 


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$eps to follow vhes calling 
ifl te rwfi oMgyfrwoTOcas 

I.jus dial tic AT&T Access Number 
far tbe Camay you are calling &wn 
1 Dial the phone number you 're calling. 

£ Dial the calling card number listed 
above your name. 


United KtagdoiiiA.-. 0808494811 

Mime east 

3niu*(Cairo)T 510-0200 

mel 177-18B-Z727 

Saudi Arabia o 1-808-18 

~ AFRICA 

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