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ATIONAL 



tribune 


The World’s Dally Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Wednesday, February 12, 1997 



No. 35,443 


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A Somber France, 
Racked by Doubt 

Under Pressure to Modernize, 
Nation Clings to the Old Ways 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Times Service 


PARIS — When Bernard Liautaud 
started Business Objects, a software 
company, he applied a simple formula 
that he naively thought might stir the 
imagination and shake the torpor of 
his country: dump French habus and 
do things the California way. 

The results were spectacular. 
Founded in Paris in 1990 with $1 
million of venture capital, the com- 
pany was worth close to $1 billion by 
early last year. 

_ From the French business commu- 
nity came a collective gasp. 

Such rapid growth in a co untr y 
where fortunes tend to build over gen- 
erations was extremely unusual. In- 
tent oa understanding the upstart who 
had so quickly created 600 jobs and 
such wraith. President Jacques Chir- 
ac invited Mr. Liautaud to the Elysee 
Palace. 

The 34-year-old m ultfmininn»m »*g 
pitch last July to the president was, he 
said, simple: a summary of die Silicon 
Valley mantra he learned while a 
graduate student at Stanford University 
and applied at his company. Boost a 
shareholding culture. Think global. 
Think marketing. Lower taxes. 

The president listened. But no 
changes to France’s heavily regulated 
economy followed. And when Busi- 
ness Objects's shares fell recently be- 
cause of delays in a new software 
program, there were some smug “I 
told you sos” from the establishment. 

Where other countries have em- 
braced the global entrepreneurship 
that drives Business Objects, France 
tends to see its economy and very 
identity threatened by innovation — a 
mood that provides perfect feeding 
ground Tor peddlers of xenophobia 
like the National front party. 

France today is racked by doubt 


itrospectii 

ive sense mat not only jobs — 
power, wealth, ideas and rfarinnal 
identity itself — are migrating, per- 
manently and at disarming speed, to 
leave a .vapid grandeur on mebanksof 
die Seine. Rapid technological inno- 
vation, radical strategic shifts, the In- 
ternet and die global market have 
contributed to an optimistic mood in 
the United States, as measured by 
opinion polls, the ever-rising stock 
market and an increase in jobs. But 
these same forces have cast an omin- 
ous cloud here. 

The old cultural antagonism be- 
tween France and America, rooted in 
the feet that both countries aspire to 
represent some universal model, has 
been brought to a new level by the 
American victory that a market- and 
Internet-driven revolution are seen to 


are now regular snipes at 
America's “velvet hegemony.’’ 
Profiting from this somber mood, the 
racist, extreme-right National Front 
of Jean-Marie Le Pen has won several 
victories in municipal elections, in- 
cluding in the southern town of Vit- 
roDes on Sunday, ft has gained sup- 
port precisely by attacking 
globalization — portrayed as dm 

d ftath of national culture — and the 

high unemployment, which it con- 
tends stems from ontrauuneled mar- 
ket forces and immigration. 

With left and right, socialism and 
conservatism increasingly indistin- 
guishable, the Front has claimed suc- 
cessfully that it is die only group wife 
a distinct message. 

“If we want to send the Arabs and 
Africans and Asians back to where 
they came from, it is not because we 
hare them, his because they pollute our 
national identity and take our jobs,'* 

See FRANCE, Page 2 


2 Top Seoul Aides Arrested in Scandal 



AgaxxFmct-Prtac 

Chung Jae Oral* left, a ruling party official, being driven to jail Tuesday after his arrest on charges of 
taking kickbacks in the Hanbo loan case. Another senior official, Hong In Kll, was also arrested. Page 4. 


Rewriting the History of the Americas 

Archaeological Find in Chile Indicates Asian Migration Began Far Earlier 


By Curt Suplee 

Washington Poa Service 


WASHINGTON — The Americas 
were inhabited by human beings at least 
as eariy as 12 JOO years ago — far 
earlier and a half a world farther south 
than previously believed — a team of 
archaeologists has announced. 

Artifacts unearthed at a site near 
Monte Verde, Chile, the nine-member 
group determined, predate by at least 
1 30 ft years the evidence of human hab- 
itation from Govis, New Mexico, that is 
conventionally accepted as the oldest 
known in the Western Hemisphere. 

More portentous, however, is the fact 
that the discovery is in South America, 
thousands of miles from fee Govis site. 
That suggests the first Asian immigrants 
arrived by a different path from fee one 
traditionally assumed — across what is 


now the Bering Strait — or got there 
much earlier than the current scientific 
consensus allows, or both. 

Indeed, fee Monte Verde dig also has 
revealed preliminary evidence feat Homo 
sapiens may have been in residence there 
as long as 33,000 years ago. 

“It totally changes bow we think of 
the prehisuay of America, *’ said a mem- 
ber of the Monte Verde team, Dennis 
Stanford of the Smithsonian Institution. 
‘ ‘Our models clearly are not right,*' and 
fee new results “open up a whole new 
time period for people to investigate.’* 

Since 1977, researchers headed by 
Tom Dill ebay of fee University of Ken- 
tucky have been excavating the riverbed 
site about 500 miles (800 kilometers) 
south of Santiago. They discovered 
remnants of dwellings wife wooden 
frames and animal-hide roofs, tools 
made of stick and bone, a piece of what 


is apparently mastodon meat, more than 
700 stone tools and a child’s footprint. 

When (feting of fee excavation (using 
an accurate method that de pends on the 
rate at which radioactive forms of carbon 
decay) indicated an age in excess of 
12.000 years, many scientists expressed 
grave doubt. So in January, a consortium 
of sponsors — including fee National 
Geographic Society and fee Museum of 
Natural History in Dallas — sent fee nine- 
member ream to investigate. 

Among them were several skeptics, 
including Dena Dincauze of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts and C. Vance 
Haynes Jr. of the University of Arizona. 
After 10 days, fee group unanimously 
endorsed the Monte Verde find. 

The Govis record has stood since the 
late 1 930s, though numerous contenders 

See MIGRATE, Page 6 


East Germany’s Youth Ponder the Past 


* 





By William Drozdiak 

• HfaftfnRfwi Post Service 

BERLIN — They are known as the 
“children of two societies.** 

As youngsters growing up in a Sta- 
linist state, (hey were nurtured on a diet 
of stem discipline, mind-numbing pro- 
paganda and cold Marxist logic. But 
over the past seven yeans, they have 
readied maturity in an atmosphere of 
freedom and challenges to authority that 
once seemed unimaginable. 

For young people in Eastern Ger- 
many, rational unity has meant fi 
their divided upbringings. Values . 
dogma drummed into (heir heads since 
binh have been exposed as frauds. The 
cozy intimacy they once felr in a tightly 
regimented society has been rcplacedby 
. a bewildering cacophony of voices and 
V choices feat now permeate their lives. 

- As 80 million Germans struggle to 


Children of 2 Societies 
Face Trauma of Unity 

find a common purpose after stitching 
their country bade together, they are 
looking increasingly to the “bridge gen- 
eration 1 ’ fix* signs of whether their 
country will ever vanquish fee profound 
alienation between populations in its 
East and its West 

For a group of 37-year-old students 
attending Herder High School along 
Paul Junius Street in a drab suburb of 
what was Communist East Berlin, the 
transforming experience of German 
unification remains a complicated pro- 
cess that they are still dying to sort 
out 

The simple truths according to Marx 
and are now crowded by doubts. 
At times, fee burden of change for the 


bridge generation seems overwhelm- 
ing- 

“In the old days, everything was de- 
cided for us,” an East German student, 
Alexander Tressel. said “It was easy 
because we did not have to choose. Now 
we find we have to make decisions on 
our own; and freedom of opinion brings 
a lot more responsibility.' 

But after experiencing shock at first, 
many students now say they relish fee 
metamorphosis. 

“Today, we are encouraged to dis- 
agree wife our teacher, but before, we 
were never allowed to show any 
doubt,” Robert Tietze, another student, 
said “It was a hard process to get rid of 
fee scissors we kept in our beads. You 
learned to censor yourself even as a 
young child But we all now feel a lot 
better about our lives.” 

See GERMANS, Page 6 



PM Laograck/Ifce Wntenpoi Poa 

Denise Grzeskoviak, a high school student, talking about changes in the 
teaching of history in the former East Germany since reunification. 


ian Scandal: Sex , 
Drugs and Heavy Metal 



By Douglas Jehl 

Ne*- York Tunes Sentce 


CAIRO — The official accusations 
have shocked Egypt’s conservative so- 
ciety, with tales of clandestine parties in 
which young people took drugs, en- 
gaged in group sex and then unearthed 
copses from Cairo cemeteries. 

The Egyptian press has been even 
more lurid, saying that the young fans of 
heavy-metal music were performing 
Satanic rituals, even urinating on the 
1 % Koran and fee Bible and slaughtering 
* cats, rats and other small animals to 
drink their blood 

Dozens of suspects have been ar*. 
rested by Egypt's powerful state se- 
curity police, and there have been, re- 
ports that some may soon be charged 
, under a statute that prohibits “contempt 

of heavenly religions." 

**The fust thing they waited to know 
was whether l was chasing cats and 


Ne wsstand Pric es 


Andorra 10.00 FP Lebanon 

AntfflM 12-50 FF Morocco 

Caw -1.600 CFA Qatar 

I Egypt £E 5.50 Reunion &SQ 

I SSr 1 10.00 FF Saudf 

Gabon 1100 CFA 


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5# 


fd 



drinking their blood,” said a 21-year- 
old woman whose dark makeup and 
clothiiig are fee uniform of a youthful 
rebellion, in Egypt feat is now under 
counterattack by die government. 

The young woman, fee lead singer in 
an Egyptian rock band, said chat police 
in commando uniforms who burst into 
her bedroom at 3 AJYL on Jan. 22 had 

beliefs and that she had answered^“by 
quoting the Koran. 

She and others who have since been 
released but still insisted on anonymity 
suggested feat fee accusations against 
them and others were fee products of 
no thin g more than popular imagination 
and official spite. 

The arrests were the first official 
c rackd own on rock music in Egypt, 
where fee main official preoccupation 
in recent years has been the activities of 
Islamic militants, not what fee gov- 

. eminent calls a secular extreme. 

And because most of the suspects 
come from well-to-do families, fee raw 
vigil outside a Cairo prosecutor’s office 
where they have been interrogated rep- 
resents a jarring contrast from the usual 
crowd: women dressed from head to toe 
in black as they wait for husbands and 
sons accused of links to the religious 

■ militants. , . 

Of fee more than 80 young rock fans 
who were anested last month, some 20 
remain behind bars. And after weeks in 
which rumors of wild conduct by the 
young and rich leaped into fee popular 
press, the official crackdown has been 
widely applauded by Egyptians who m 
taxis- .and. coffee shops now refer dis-; 

See EGYPT, Page 6 


| The Dollar 1 

Nsw York 

Tuesday C A PM 

pnadous ctow 

DM 

1.8784 

1.6554 

Pound 

1.6372 

1.6408 

Yen 

123.425 

122.775 

FF 

5.661 

5591 

| . The Dow | 

t J 

. Tuesday eta) 

prwtouadosa 

+51.57 

6658.11 

6806.54 

\ S&P 500 1 

charts 

Tlmday O 4 P.tt 

previous doss 

+4.11 

789.54 

785.43 


AGENDA 


THE AMERICAS P»fla3. 

ykrdict in Racially Charged Case 

EUROPE Piga 5. 

Secret files and Spain’s ‘Dirty Jfer* 


Serb Opposition Gains Are Upheld 

meat annulment. After the Socialists 
voided November’s opposition victor- 
ies, fee opposition began three months 
of huge street protests. 

Earlier article. Page 5 


Serbia’s democratic opposition 
gained its first major triumph over 
President Slobodan Milosevic on 
Tuesday as Parliament reinstated its 
victories in local elections. 

The Parliament, where Mr. Milo- 
sevic's Socialists and their allies hold 
a majority, voted 128 to 2 to pass a 
special bill overturning the govem- 


Books.M. — 

Crossword 

Opinion — 

Sports — 


.....Page 9. 

Page 10. 

Pages 8-9. 

... Pages 18-19. 


b it mna t tow l Class « sd 


no. 


Epic Oscar Nominees 

The wartime epic “The English Pa- 
tient” led in fee race for the Oscars on 
Tuesday with 12 nominations. Other 
leading contenders were “Fargo" and 
“Shine." while Madonna’s prediction 
of a best actress nomination for 
“Evita” failed to materialize. Page 10. 


Two Schools on Wall Street’s Direction 

Where ‘Neio Era’’ Analysts See Rational Level, Traditionalists See Danger 


By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

New York Tales Service 

NEW YORK — As tiie Dow Jones 
industrial average Bins with the stun- 
ning level of 7,000, several leading ana- 
lysts on Wall Street are counseling that 
the old rules no looger apply when 
judging whether tiie snick market lias 
soared beyond reason. 

'These market watchers, whom some 
call the “New Era” group, predict a 
new period for stocks that is defined by 
low inflation and fee public's keen at- 
traction to stock mutual funds. When the 
old standbys for valuing stocks are ad- 
justed fix- these factors, they assert, 
stock prices look either perfectly rea- 
sonable or, at worst, modestly high- 

But in bokfly rejecting old-style ana- 


lysis of stock maricet physics, the New Era 
group is meeting resistance from a group 
of traditionalists, many of whom draw on 
the sobering experiences of past down- 
turns. With an eye on measures used for 
decades, they fear that investors are being 
encouraged to pay grossly excessive 
prices for stocks and wul suffer terribly if 
— when, they declare — the market cakes 
a severe tumble. 

The old school, embarrassed at having 
missed out on the riches of fee bull 
market, finds strength in a long history of 
market binges and the hangovers that 
followed. The traditionalists are now tak- 
ing comfort from the Federal Reserve. 

According to minutes released last 
week, fee Fed's policy-making com- 
mittee observed at its last meeting of 
1996 that fee market's rally had been 


‘ ‘extraordinary and bad brought market 
valuations to fairly high levels relative 
to earnings and dividends. ' * 

Despite fee divisions between ana- 
lysts of the old school and the new one. 
there is broad agreement that investors 
should temper their enthusiasm for the 
market. Wife major stock indexes hav- 
ing risen so impressively, thqy say. in- 
vestors clearly face greater risks. 

In some ways, the disagreement over 
how to view fee current stock market is 
defined by generations and experience 
as much as methods of analysis. Byron 
Wien, a 63-year-old traditionalist who 
is United States investment strategist at 
Morgan Stanley & Co., recalled an en- 
counter after a presentation in Decern - 

See SHARES, Page 6 


Long Delay 
Over NATO 
Is Opposed 
By Albright 

She Mam of Tension 9 
In Europe if Expansion 
Of Alliance Is Stalled 

Cait9*e<!hjOtrS>&FnmDUpiadiH 

WASHINGTON — Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright said Tuesday 
a long delay in expanding NATO would 
create a “permanent source of tension 
and insecurity in the heart of Europe,” 
but she warned against a “Jowest-com- 
mon-denominator NATO” that would 
include all European countries buz im- 
pose obligations on none. 

“That would devalue and degrade 
NATO," fee testified before the House 
of Representatives' International Rela- 
tions Committee. 

The enlargement of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization will be a 
dominant theme of Mrs. Albright’s trip 
to Europe starting this weekend. 

At a summit meeting in Madrid in 
July, NATO is expected to invite new 
members to join by 1999. The likely 
candidates are Poland, Hungary and fee 
Czech Republic. 

“The process of enlargement has 
already encouraged the settlement of 
disputes between Hungary and Ro- 
mania. Germany and fee Czech Re- 
public, and Poland and Ukraine.” Mrs. 
Albright said. 

In fee future, she said, an expanded 
NATO could increase U.S. confidence 
that there would be no more conflicts 
like the Bosnia war of recent years and 
that democratic evolution in post-Com- 
munist Europe would endure. 

But Mrs. Albright said there was little 
the United States could do to end Rus- 
sian opposition to an enlarged alliance. 

“We must address Russia' s legitimate 
concerns,” she said, “but it is not in our 
interest to delay or derail a process that is 
helping to build a reunited Europe.” 

She noted that NATO bad proposed a 
formal charter with Russia to permit 
joint cooperation, consultation and 
training in response to crises. 

“We have made steady progress to- 
ward this goal,” Mrs. Albright said, 
“which will be a major subject of my 
discussions in Europe.” 

The secretary of state appeared to re- 
ject a suggestion by Representative Chris 
Smith, Republican of New Jersey, feat 
President Bill Clinton condition a visit to 
China on Beijing's willingness to release 
prominent political prisoners. 

Mis. Albright said fee United Stales 
should not limit its ability to pursue its 
national interests concerning China by 
speaking out only on one subject. Mr. 
Clinton and President Jiang Zemin of 
China have agreed to exchange pres- 
idential visits in fee next two years. 

Mjs. Albright also warned against fur- 
ther cuts in fee U.S, foreign affairs 
budget. “Diplomatic readiness is not a 
luxury; it is an imperative,” she said. 
“We cannot have world-class diplomacy 
on fee cheap.” The secretary also spoke 
out vigorously for paying the more than 
$1 billion U.S. debt to fee United Na- 
tions. (AP, Reuters) 


July’s Jferdict 
On Simpson: 
$25 Million 


By Stephanie Simon 

Los Angeles Tunes 

SANTA MONICA, California — In 
an emphatic verdict aimed at punishing 
him for decades to come, a jury has 
ordered O. J. Simpson to pay $25 mil- 
lion in punitive damages to tire relatives 
of his former wife, Nicole Brown 
Simpson, and her friend Ronald Gold- 
man. 

* * We came to fee conclusion that Mr. 
Simpson should not profit from these 
murders," said a juror, Stephen Strati. 

Mr. Simpson did not attend court to 
hear fee verdicts, though his sister and 
brother-in-law sat in front-row seats as 
the judgment was read. The same jury 
found Mr. Simpson liable for the slay- 
ings last Tuesday. 

“The man who killed my son and 
Nicole was held responsible by a court 
of law," said Fred Goldman, father of 
Ronald Goldman. “That's all that mat- 
ters.” 

[Mr. Simpson said Tuesday feat his 
case was far from over, but would not 
say much about it because “I don’t want 
to join in this circus atmosphere." 

[In a telephone interview with The 
Associated Press from his home, he 
declined to comment on any of fee legal 
issues or his personal situation. “It 
would be premature for me to say any- 
thing now,” he said. ' ‘Obviously, I have 
feelings. But this is far from over. 1 have 
no comment about anything." 

[But he added: “Definitely in the 

See SIMPSON, Page 6 





PAGE 2 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SAJUBPAy-SUNPAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY^ FEBRUARY 12, 1997 

PAGE TWO 



France Struggles With Crisis of Cultural and Political Identity 


Continued from Page 1 


said Bruno Megret, deputy leader of the party 
and husband of the new mayor of Vitro lies. 
"When we have power, we will organize their 
return. We will stop renewing their residence 
cards, and we will force companies to pay a tax 
on foreign workers that will eventually lead to 
the foreigners losing their positions." 

Such statements have a widening impact 
More than a third of French people now say 
they sympathize with at leak some of the 
National Front's ideas. Even a large city like 
Toulon has been won. The party's effective- 
ness appears to reflea the simmering frus- 
tration of a country that has lost its way. 

As Pierre Bimbaum, a political scientist put it. 
"Our problem is that we have not found the way 
to modernize while preserving our imagined 
community." In other words, how do you leap 
into the age of the Internet and remain French? 

France is still rich and it enjoys a clout 
beyond its wealth. Its nuclear bomb, its per- 
manent sear at the United Nations Security 
Council, its central place in European security, 
its hold on the world's imagination through its 
wines, perfumes and cheeses, and its uni- 
versal ist pretensions themselves — all carry 
weight. 

The country has many excellent companies; 
the Bourse rose 27 percent last year. As its 
leaders never die of repeating in these dark 
days, France is the world's fourth-biggest in- 
dustrial power. 

But France has a stagnant economy — 
growth was barely 1 percent over the past year. 
Its unemployment rate has swelled to 12.7 
percent of the population, more than double the 
rate in the United States. 

The corrosive anxiety pervading France is 
captured by a line from Rimbaud — "nos 
horreurs economiques" or “our economic 
horrors" — that is now widely used. The 
horror is not merely economic. Rather, the 
phrase captures the extraordinary collective 
angst of a people seemingly convinced that, as 
the philosopher Alain Finkielkraut said, 
"There is a crisis of the modem world." 

That crisis, as lived in France, is about 
cultural and political identity. Market reform, 
the global panacea, tends to leave the French 
cold. A hankering for grandeur — some re- 
conciliation of poetry and politics — remains. 

In the gathering debate between advocates 
of the un trammeled global market and those 
who argue that it accentuates social injustice, 
France tends to identify with die critics of 
globalization. Indeed, it increasingly seems to 
equate its welfare state with its very identity. 

The obsession with identity is particularly 
strong because France is on die veige of two 
historical steps that critics equate with an aban- 
donment of sovereignty. It is scheduled to 
adopt the European currency by 1999, thus 
yielding control over much economic policy; 
and it has indicated that it will return to the 
integrated military command structure of 
NATO, thus abandoning the most potent sym- 
bol of the Gaullist "non” to Washington. 

Both moves, however, appear vulnerable to 
the present mood. 

"The French are confronted by a lot of 
changes.' ' said a senior adviser to Prime Min- 
ister Alain Juppe. "Are they prepared to accept 
them all? France disappearing into the euro, 
disappearing into NATO, at die same time as 
we demand more mobility, harder work and 
sacrifice? An upheaval cannot be ruled out" 

France does not look prerevolutionary. The 
country's manicured capital, impeccable 
roads, high-speed trains, glorious food, se- 
ductive scents and deep-rooted savoir-vivre 
provide a compelling image of wealth and 
tradition. But just as the golden statuary on the 
bridges of Paris distracts the eye from the 
homeless sleeping beneath the arches, so the 







JafioCbwain&cNolSvfcTfwa- 

Lawrence Bricogne, like a million other French people, collects about $400 a month from a government unemployment program. 


moving beauty of France tends to mask what 
amounts to a kernel of despair. 

In Pantin, a few kilometers outside the gates 
of Paris, there is a housing development called 
Les Cortillieres, most of whose 5,000 inhab- 
itants aze immigrants from Algeria, Morocco 
and West Africa. Into such p lares are emptied 
the human flotsam who cannot afford life in the 
showpiece capital. 

Almost 40 percent of the population is un- 
iloyed. Graffiti hurl insults at Mr. Juppe 
police force. Life begins in die af- 
ternoon because, for marry young people, there 
is no reason to rise early. Drug dealers hang 
around in doorways. At the Jean-Jaures Lycde, 
repeated scrubbing has not quite effaced calls 
to join the ranks of militant Islamic groups that 
have carried out recent bomb attacks in Paris. 

“Some of these kids have never seen the 
Eiffel Tower." said Boris Seguin. a teacher at 
the school. "They live on the margins of the 
city and the margins of society. If the French 
republican model stood for one thing, it was 
integration through education. So you see here 
how the model is threatened.” 

The spread of alienated suburbs matters 
particularly to the French because the revolu- 
tion and the republic — and their universal 
resonance — were about the equal rights of 
citizens. 

That system appears to be cracking. The 
children of these suburbs are angry. In the 
Tours suburb of La Rabaierie on Oct 23, 1996, 
a 22-year-old Frenchman of Algerian descent, 
Mohamed Boucetta, was found m a coma with 
a bulletin his head. That led to a series of events 
that illustrated France's current malaise. 

Rage among Mr. Boucetta's North African 
friends that no assailant was arrested exploded 


into rioting; the rioting was then apparently 
" r. Le Pen’s 


compounded when agents from Mr. 

National Front sought to exploit the situation 
to gain votes. 

After the first night, tracts distributed by the 
Front began to appear. Some, emblazoned with 
the party's torch symbol, attributed the van- 
dalism to the "immigration policies" of gov- 


ernments of the left and now of the right 
To (me of Mr. Boucetta’s friends, Youssef 


Sana, who is 27 and the son of Algerian 
immigrants, there is no doubt that his friend 
was a victim of racist violence: “We are at war 
here in the suburbs. And we, the children of 
Algerians, are already losers. It's apartheid; we 
don’t even figure in the system." 

He added, “If Mohamed were a while French 
boy. the case would have been solved long 
ago." More than three months later, the police 
say the Boucetta case remains a mystery. 

Michel Mesmin, a local municipal official, 
said, "The only thing that is really dear from 
all this is we are an increasingly uneasy so- 
ciety, haunted by specters." 

That unease appears to be linked partly to 
the rigidity of a highly centralized system. 
France’s superb technocrats, who plamrci and 
managed the country's remarkable reconstruc- 
tion after World War 1 1, appear overtaken by 
the global economy, ill-adapted by their formal 
training to its challenges. Its labor unions, 
parading the rags of an exhausted socialist 
dream, often seem equally fossilized. 

Its political class is widely seen as a group of 
cloned eggheads — Mr. Chir ac, Mr. Juppe and 
toe foreign minister, Herve de Charette, all 
went to toe same elite school — out of touch 
with a population that consistently gives the 
president and prime minis ter approval ratings 
m the 25-CO-30 percent range. 

At die same time, because socialism was 
long toe source of idealism in France — the 
sustenance of Left Bank intellectuals and a 
strong labor movement — and that idealism 
was simply exhausted by the 14-year rule of 
Francois Mitterrand that ended in 1995, toe 
country has found itself suddenly bereft of any 
meaningful ideological debate. 

A slogan of Mr. Mitterrand’s second seven- 
year term was "Ni-NE* — neither nation- 
alization nor privatization. It translated into 
internal paralysis. It appears that it may now 
take the left several years to fashion a new 
message for the electorate. 

France suffers in tins void. " We have no 
more clear political markers," said Christiane 
Laporte, a headmistress. “We feel lost." 

This sense of loss is evident in France's 
reluctance to adopt the new. It is a society 


where fewer than 15 percent of homes have 
personal computers and fewer than 1 percent 
are connected to the Internet, figures wdl 
below not only toe United States but also 
Fiance's European neighbors. 

Opening toe new national library in Decem- 
ber, Mr. Chirac discovered the computer 
"mouse" for the first time and gazed at it in 
wonder. He has spoken dismissively of the 
Internet as "an Anglo-Saxon network,'’ al- 
though he did meet with Bill Gates, the Mi- 
crosoft titan, this month. 

It is not surprising, then, that Mr. L i autaud 


and Business Objects are scarcely national 
celebrities, in tiie mode of a Mr. Gates. Outside 
business circles, or the world of computer 
nerds, few people have heard of them. 

At toe other end of the spectrum from Mr. 
Liautaud stands Lawrence Bricogne. At age 
30, he is four years younger than the en- 
trepreneur. he has a qualification in computer 
sciences from a technical school but has not 
worked far almost a decade. 

He has a small Paris apartment bought for 
him by his mother, a piano, a television, a 
personal computer and an answering machine. 
He recently sold his car. Every month, like 
about 1 millio n other French people, he col- 
lects what is known as the RMI — toe acronym 
for the “minimum revenue for insertion." It 
amounts to about $400; it is what the French 
state reserves for those not receiving any other 
unemployment benefits. 

■ “The RMI allows mo not to work,’- Mr. 
Bricogne said. "It’s bizarre, it’s probably un- - 
healthy. Without it, I would have taken a job 
some time ago — night watchman, or a kitchen 
job in a restaurant Something menial. ’ ’ 

Mr. Chirac has tried to lay out a French 
"alternative” in which the energy of Mr. li- 
autaud and the solidarity that protects Mr. 
Bricogne are somehow married. Official calls 
for a more entrepreneurial spirit and stream- 
lined state have been spiced with criticism of 
Anglo-Saxon "flexibility" in the workplace — 
deemed "anti-social.” But tins hodgepodge has 
fallen far short of the galvanizing message, that 
toe French habitually await from their leader in 
this, toe most monarchical of republics. 


It has left toe country hunting toward union 
with Europe while its overarching welfare 
systems and cash-hemorrhaging state c©mpa- 
hi™. Air France or the bank Credit Ly- 


mes like Air France or toe bamc urcau i.y- 
npnak make the competitive demands of 
Europe and its German-dictated budget dis- 
cipline hard to meet , 

Since succeeding Mr. Mitterrand m mw- 
1995, Mr. Chirac has tried to battle the Na- 
tional Front by embarking on long-delayed 
reforms — of the army, toe j ustice system, 
social security, pensions, state companies — 
that are designed to give the ooonay mo- 
mentum and adjust it to the realities of this fin- 
de- miUennium. • . 

On a trip to Tokyo in December, Mr. Chirac 
t his time hustling to sell everything from 
ch apples to Airbus planes. For the man 
who personifies "Ur gloire de la Francs," it 
was a considerable step. 

Times change. The numbers in France are' 
not good; and capital and jobs, in the glob al 
village, are not much interested in a "certain 
idea of France." 

France cannot afford its welfare stale but is 

create jobs even as toe Unitet/states — for all 
its “downsizing” — has created more than 10 
million since 1993. But it is loath to ease the 
health and social security contributions that 
main- hiring prohibitively expensive. 


The minimum monthly wage here is about 
5,000 francs, or $900, but after mandatory 


contributions for pensions, health coverage 
and unemployment benefits have been paid by 


iloyers arid employees, it amounts to about 
" francs, or $1,465. Si 


So, 36 percent of the 

wage cost comes from social payments, com- 
pared with about 10 percent in America. 

French and international companies, many 
of which can now shift jobs to Portugal or 
Indonesia, are reluctant to hire, particularly as 
firing anyone is, in the words of one economist, 
"long, tedious and expensive." 

The ari thme tic of France’s unrivaled social 
security net is also bleak. Already facing an- 
nual deficits of about $10 billion, toe social 
security budget will face enormous pressure as 
the number of pensioners increases from 12 
million to 173 milli on over the next two 
decad e s , while toe active population scarcely 
grows, according to official forecasts. 

. Yet labor unions are demanding toe re- 
tirement age be dropped to 55 from 60, in line 
witoasettlementreached last year with striking 
truck drivers. They have also mounted a bitter 
attack on proposals to introduce American- 
style private pension funds, saying they win 
lead to a system "of every man for himself." 

France stands at a crossroads. Mr. Chirac 
has recentiy argued forcibly for the euro as the 
only way for Europe to "fight effectively 
against American hegemony." And he has 
pressed — unsuccessfully — for French com- 
mand of NATO’s Mediterranean flank as a 
symbol of European emancipation from Amer- 
ican military tutelage. 

Full NATO integration or toe preservation 
of a uniquely French membership? Real mar- 
ket reform — privatization, private pension 
funds, a shareholding culture — or preser- 
•vation of toe centralized, state-heavy French 
welfare model? America as firm friend or 
threatening purveyor of an undifferentiated 
global culture? A European currency and a real 
commitment to build a federal United States of 
Europe or toe temptations of the National 
Front's nationalism? 

Hesitating before these choices, France 


r e want to be an alternative, to show that 
if nobody resists America any more, at least we 
will,'* said die sociologist Jean BaudriUard. 
"The problem is that because we are not sure 
which model to embody, we tend to offer 
simply inertia." 


Ruth Brinkmann, Actress, Dies at 62 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


New York Times Service 

Ruth Brinkmann, 62. an 
actress and director who was 
a founder of the English 
Theater in Vienna, died there 
of ovarian cancer Jan. 1 8. 

Ms. Brinkmann was bom 
in Berlin. Her family moved 
to toe United Suites when she 
was 3 years old. She even- 
tually attended toe Yale 
Drama School and performed 
at toe Cleveland Playhouse 
and the Williamstown Theat- 
er in Massachusetts before 
moving lo Vienna, where she 


appeared in an English-Lan- 
guage performance of Jerome 
Kilty’s “Dear Liar” in 1963. 

Shortly thereafter, she and 
her husband, Franz Schaf- 
ronek, a director and dram- 
aturge, founded the English 
Theater in a small space in the 
Archduke Karl Palace. 

In 1974 they were able to 
renovate a real 250-seat theat- 
er and to begin producing 
plays year-round. The English 
Theater staged works by Noel 
Coward, Simon Gray, Neil Si- 
mon and Tennessee Williams, 


whose "Red Devil Battery 
Sign" received its premiere 
there. William Saroyan ded- 
icated his last play, “Tales of 
toe Vienna Streets," to the 
theater, where one of his earli- 
er works, "Play Things," had 
its premiere. 

Jean Hewitt, 71, Writer 
On Food for The Times 
NEW YORK (NYT) — 
Jean Hewitt, 71, a former 
food writer and home econ- 
omist for The New York 
Tunes and an early advocate 


of natural foods, died of pneu- 
monia Sunday in toe Bon 
Secours-Venice Hospital in 
Venice, Florida. 

Mrs. Hewitt planned The 
Times's test kitchen and was 
in charge of it from its open- 
ing in 1969. 

She also wrote a number of 
New York Times Cook Books, 
including "Main Dish," 
•‘Heritage" and “Weekend.” 
She was a charter member of 
Les Dames d’Escoffier and a 
lifetime fellow of the Culinary 
Institute of America. 


American Airlines Talks Continue 


WASHINGTON (AP) — American Airlines and its pilots 
resumed talks Tuesday with the helpof federal mediators in an 
effort to avoid a strike that could remove one-fifth of U.S. air- 
travel capacity this weekend. 

They face a deadline of midnight Friday to resolve toe 
dispute, which threatens toe travel plans of toe 200,000 people a 
day who travel on toe nation’s largest domestic airline. 

Pilots have vowed to strike if no agreement is reached by toe 
end of toe federally mandated cooling-off period. The airline 
says it will close if there is a strike. 


French Transport Strike’s 6th Day 

France (AP) — T 


Sabena Forges Deal With Virgin 


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London’s Adored Red Bus 
Is Rescued by Green Fuel 


BRUSSELS (AP) — Sabena will extend its cooperation 
with Virgin Express to include joint flights from Brussels to 
Barcelona, the Belgian airline said Tuesday. 

The two companies will begin the combined flights Friday 
using Virgin aircraft. The partnership allows Sabena to divert 


WEATHER 


Agence Fraucc-Prcsse 

LONDON — The open- 
platformed Routemaster. 
London's favorite red bus, 
has been rescued from extinc- 
tion. 

An announcement last year 
that toe gas-guzzling, ex- 
haust-belching double-deck- 
ers, most over 30 years old, 
were being phased out for en- 
vironmental reasons pro- 


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voked public protest. London 
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if their private operators 
agreed to the use of more 
costly ultra-low-sulfur fuels 
and more efficient catalytic 
converters. 

Keith Weightman, market- 
ing manager of Cowie 
Leaside, the privatized com- 
pany that operates more than 
100 Routemastexs, said Lon- 

prov^46Routemasters fora 
major central London route 
that carries 11 million pas- 
a year. 

ipanies have been buy- 
ing old Routeznastexs to use as 
‘ mal gimmicks. Mc- 
s has hosted ham- 
burger parties in a Route- 
master in Ontario, while 
Pepsi -Cola uses one to dis- 
pense drinks in IstanbuL 


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planes to other routes used mainly by business travelers, while 
giving Sabena a section of each Virgin Express flight to fid 


CLERMONT-FERRAND, 
workers in a dozen French i 
subway service for a sixth day Tuesday in their campaign for 
earlier retirement and a shorter work week. 

Only 14 of 154 bases here were on the roads for an estimated 
50,000 commuters. In recent days, toe strike has stopped or 
severely reduced service in more than a dozen cities. 


People smoking or playing loud music on public buses and 
jeeps in Manila will be subject to arrest, toe authorities said 
Tuesday. (AP) 


The South African airline Interair win begin a weekly 
service between Johannesburg sod Dona] a, Cameroon, on 
Feb. 23, company officials said Tuesday. (AFP) 


North America 
Tin Great Lakes into the 
E«at wfll avanege neer to a 


bit above normal through 
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oould affect these areas 


Satwday. Tha daep South- 
Mat and Florida will bo 
mad. Dry and warm in the 
Waal wtth drier and rrdder 
weather pushing into the 
Roehktt 


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M3d weather mV continue 
to piewafl across southern 
Europe into the weekend, 
while elsewhere near- to 
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atures ora the rule. The 
rosin atom track wffl ahS 
southward Info northwest- 
ern and central Europe. A 
series ef storm «M aflect 
those bths through Sstw- 

oay. 


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including Selling. wUl stay 
mainly dry and mile 
through Friday, then turn 
colder Saturday. Both 
Koreas and bo u them 
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dry lor the most part. 
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Manchuria will be oold, 
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THE AMERICAS 


Lobbying Heats Up on Contraception Vote 


POLITICALS OTES 


By Katharine Q. Seelye 

. forf Times Service 

. WASHINGTON — With the House 
lacing rhe first abortion-related vote of 
rhe new Congress on Thursday, both 
sides in the debate over money for fam- 
ily planning organizations around die 
. world are seeking to put human faces on 
their intense lobbying campaigns. 

; Those who say the United States is 
guilty of “contraceptive imperialism** 

. Monday produced people from Kenya, 
-Mexico and the Philippines who said 
programs backed by the United States 
.were oversupplying poor countries with 
contraceptives while basic health and 
i ^hygiene needs went unmet. 

' ; . The critics also said that in their ‘ ‘ra- 
.cist zeal to control the populations in 
■ developing countries, American- 
; backed doctors were inserting intramer- 
■ine devices in women against their 
;will. 

, In turn, . Planned Parenthood 
; sponsored a visit by two Russian pe- 
.aiatncians to brief Congress on what 
•they called the benefits of the family 
; planning efforts that the United States 
•had paid for. The doctors said abortions 
;in Russia had fallen to 2.7 million in 
. 1995 from 4.4 million in 1989. 


*e pediatricians added, because 
of the dire state of the Russian economy, 
the number of abortions will rise and 
women’s reproductive health will be 
seriously threatened if Congress does 
not; -"** - - 



ning argue that i 

do with abortion — U.S. law prohibits 
the use of family p lanning aid for that — 
the vote Thursday is shapin g up as a 
classic confrontation between support- 
ers of abortion ri ghts and abortion 
foes. 

At stake is an a ppro p r i ation of $123 
million in a 51 .63 trillion budget for aid 
for family planning progr am s in more 
than 100 nations this year. 

Interest groups have been lobbying 
members at home and generating tens of 
thousands of pieces of mail and tele- 
phone calls, mostly aimed at 50 mem- 
bers who are viewed as possible swing 
votes. 

Senator Patrick Leahy, the Vermont 
Democrat who supports the spending, 
said, “Buckets ofcash are being poured 
into a campaign to distort this vote and 
to whip people into a frenzy about it/' 

The vote is on two measures. An 
administration - backed resolution 

would have the Agency far Interna- 


tional Development advance the date to 
release the money from July, when It 
would amount to $92 million, to March, 
when it would be $215 million. 

The second measure, offered by Rep- 
resentative Christopher Smith. Repuo- 
' lican of New Jersey, would provide 
$385 million for family planning, on the 
condition that no money would go to 
any organization that performs abor- 
tions, even if the organization uses 
private money for that. 

■ Doubts on Amendment’s Fate 

David E. Rosenbaum of The New 
York Times reported: 

Afraid that they do not have the votes 
for approval. House Republican leaders 
have decided to postpone at least until 
next month further action on a con- 
stitutional amendment to require a bal- 
anced federal bud&et 

The decision Monday was the latest 
indication that adoption of the proposed 
amendment is in serious doubt. It would 
require approval by two-thirds of those 
voting in the House and Senate and then 
ratification by throe-fourths of the state 
legislatures. 

The House Judiciary Committee, 
which was scheduled to vote on the 
measure Tuesday, announced Monday 


2 Are Convicted 
In Murder of Jew 

•Racial Case Inflamed N.Y. 


\ By Blaine Harden 

, Washingron Post Service 

! NEW YORK — In a ra- 
| dally charged murder case 
r that has stirred passions in 
| New York for more than five 
I years, a jury in Brooklyn has 
; convicted two black men of 
violating the civil rights of a 
* > Hasidic Jew who was stabbed 

• to death during race riots in 

• 1991 in the Crown Heights 
[ section of the city. 

I Lemrick Nelson Jr., 21. 

1 was tried for murder and ac- 
‘ quitted by a mostly black jury 
« in 1992,' a verdict that out- 
; raged the local Jewish com- 
. m unity. New York politicians 
| subsequently brought pres- 

• sure on Attorney General 
\ Janet Reno to launch an in- 
. v estimation, and Mr. Nelson 

• was indicted two years later 
; on federal charges of violat- 

• ing die civil rights of the vic- 
| tim, Yankel Rosenbaum, by 

• stabbing him because he was 
; a “Jewish person.’ ‘ 

. The jury that convicted Mr. 

■ Nelson tiiis week as well as 
Charles Price, 43. who had 
been charged with inciting a 

! blackraobto**getjcw5,”had 

■ a substantially different racial 
; makeup than the one in the 

state murder trial. The jury, 
which deliberated for 20 
. hours over four days, was 

■ made up of two Jews, three 
.other whites, three blacks and 
four Hispanics. 

• The trial, while criminal in 
nature, carried echoes of the 
CU. Simpson civil case that 
has just ended, in that it was a 
second court test for a black 
defendant originally acquitted 
of murder. It is unusual for 
federal authorities to use civU- 

, rights statutes in such a case, 
t although the tactic was suc- 
1 cessfully employed to try 
'while police officers in the 
Rodney Kmg beating case in 
_ Los Angeles!" 

When the verdict was an- 

■ nounced Monday. Mr. Nel- 
son dropped his head to a 
courtroom table and sobbed 
‘He was 16 when the Crown 
Heights riots erupted and now 
faces six to 20 years in prison 
under federal sentencing 

' guidelines. Mr. Nelson, 
whose bail was revoked after 
the verdict, has been arrested 
..several times since his 
murder acquittal and has 
pleaded guilty to slashing an- 
. other youth with a razor. 

The victim's brother, Nor- 
man. a lawyer who came from 
! Australia for the trial and who 
had campaigned for years m 
New York and Washington to 


get the case reopened, said 
after the verdict that die 
justice system “can work.” 

As in die Simpson case, 
Mr. Nelson’s Lawyers argued 
in both trials that their client 
had been framed by police 
who had planted evidence. 

As part of that strategy last 
week, Mr. Nelson paced 
around in a federal courtroom 
wearing the government’s 
prime piece of evidence: baggy 
jeans stained with Mr. Rosen- 
baum’s Wood. The defense 
contended that the pants were 
evidence made up by the police 
and could not have belonged to 
die defendant because they did 
not fiL As Mr. Nelson paraded 
in front of the jury, the pants 
fell to his knees. 

This “does not fit, must 
acquit” defense, which Mr. 
Simpson’s lawyers used ef- 
fectively with a pair of bloody 
gloves in his murder triaL was'" 
ridiculed by a prosecutor. 

“like it’s a big surprise 
dial teenagers in Brooklyn in 
die 1990s would walk around 
with big baggy pants,” said 
Alan Vmegrad, calling it a 
ploy copied “from that trial 
on the West Coast," meaning 
die Simpson trial in Los 
Angeles. Mr. Price, who was 
videotaped in 1991 as he en- 
couraged a crowd to take ven- 
geance on Jews, showed no 
reaction to die verdict Be- 
cause he has a long record of 
pleading guilty to crimes such 
as larceny and drug posses- 
sion, prosecutors say be faces 
15 years to life in prison. 

Norman Rosenbaum as well 
as many Jewish leaders in 
Crown Heights had com- 
plained that the justice system 
was not aggressively investi- 
gating the case for rear of of- 
fending blacks. 

The rioting began in 
Crown Heights in August 
1991 after a black boy, Gavin 
Cato, 7, was run over and 
killed by an out-of-control car 
in the motorcade of a Jewish 
religious leader. 

There are about 180,000 
blacks in Crown Heights, 
along with about 20,000 
members of the ultra-Ortho- 
dox Luhavitcher sect 

The failure of New York 
police to quell the riot led to a 
scathing state report that foul- 
led then-Mayor David 
Dinkins and contributed to 
his election defeat in 1993. 

The driver of the car dial 
ran a red light and killed die 
boy, Yosef Lifsh, was never 
prosecuted — a fact that 
many Crown Heights blacks 
have called a gross injustice. 




DEATH NOTICE 


CARVELY, Andrew, 

tin Fcbnurv -t in Vupnia l,SA * &om a lrart 3tKK * 

^uro Fjjvpt, November r>0. 1932. he was educated at 
Cairo. and Washington University, St Urns. USA. 
t Victoria College, and staff wnter, 

of Sene 1958 and 

In US Entiw»y. libya. 

it iVTW Publications Research Associates, a group of 

«■ ,lw wd IcctunsTSfetaS 

mg work, tnuninj, prog Middle East and North 

of the histon Mam's modem political 

H^l SSS by bB family and many 

auk ihrotigfKiur the worid. _ 

1 St *52 22186. 

louds Hill 540439-2455. 

2T 4 i ^SSSsSSb ^ Clouds MIL 
mces mov be sent to Care* ^ w ^ 

of flow-era. c ‘™.^ u, J^ K 5^9thW> NW, Suite T-100, 
‘mtectirm Association. mw* ^ 

wi DC 2ffiKT. 


Away From Politics 

• The space shuttle Discovery blasted off on a 10-day 
mission to modernize the powerful Hubble Space Tele- 

. some. The seven astronauts will replace two instruments 
built with 1970s technology and install modem parts in 
others that will allow scientists to peer even farther into 
time and space. They plan to install a new imaging 
spectrogra p h and a new near-infrared camera. (AP) 

• The New York State Board of Regents has ousted all 

18 trustees of Long Island’s Adelphi University after 
contending that they failed to prevent the president, Peter 
Diamandopoulos, from pursuing policies harmful to the 
school and instead rewarded him with salary and benefits 
exceeding $800,000. ( WP ) 

• Georgia’s state flag was removed from New York 

state's Capitol in Albany after some lawmakers com- 
plained that the Corrfederatc symbol emblazoned mi it 
was offensive. Governor George Pataki said the flag 
contained a “symbol of hatred” for all Americans, and 
the chairman of the state's Black and Puerto Rican 
Legislative Caucus climbed a ladder in the Hall of Flags 
to take it down. (AP) 

• Eight students at Frostburg State University in Mary- 
land were charged with manslaughter for the alcohol 

ming death of a freshman who got drunk at a 
ity party. The freshman, John Sic Stinner, 20, 
consumed at least six beers and 12 shots of vodka in two 
hours at the off-campus Kappa Beta Zeta party. (AP) 


that the meeting had been canceled Sam 
Stratman, the committee's spokesman, 
said tile leaders wanted to wait until the 
Senate voted, hoping that approval there 
would give the measure momentum in 
the House. 

But approval in the Senate is by no 
means a certainty. Debate began on the 
Senate floor last week, but no vote is 
scheduled Senate leaders from both 
parties agree that the outcome there 
hinges on the votes of four freshman 
Democrats who have not announced 
their positions. 

The proposed amendment would re- 
quire that the federal budget be balanced 
by 2002 or two years after ratification 
Ity the stares, whichever came later. The 
requirement could be overridden only 
by three-fifths majorities in the House 
and Senate. 

An almost identical measure was ap- 
proved in the House in 1995 by a vote of 
300 to 132, 12 votes more than the two- 
thirds needed. But the amendment was 
rejected by one vote in the Senate. 

Almost all Republicans in Congress 
support the amendment, and most 
Democrats oppose it President Bill 
Clinton is strenuously opposed The 
proposed amendment has been a central 
part of Republican doctrine for years. 


Top U.S. Soldier 
Is Suspended 
In Assault Case 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Under growing 
pressure from Congress, the U.S. Army 
has suspended its highest-ranking en- 
listed soldier while he is being inves- 
tigated over accusations of sexual as- 
sault and harassment 

The action Monday against the sol- 
dier, Gene McKinney, tbesergeani major 
of the army, came as army officials said 
they had received at least one new com- 
plaint that he had sexually harassed a 
woman. Some officials, speaking on con- 
dition of anonymity, said there woe two 
new complaints. 

“There are other allegations.” said 
one senior army official. 

Mr. McKinney stepped down last 
week from a senior army panel review- 
ing the army’s policies against sexual 
harassment. He did so after a retired 
sergeant major said he had asked her for 
sex, grabbed her and kissed her in a 
hotel room during a business trip. 


ArmedForces ToeaNewLine 

Latin American Generals, for Most Part, Stay Within Law 


By Diana Jean Schemo 

New York Times Service 


QUITO, Ecuador — When Rosalia Arteaga 
addressed Ecuadorans for the first time as their 
interim president, her backdrop was a sea of stars 
and bars, representing the country 's most powerful 
admirals ana generals lined up behind her. 

While the generals did not actually chose among 
the three claimants to the president's office, they 
operated behind the scenes to broker a solution that 
ushered an eccentric populist out of office, gave the 
vice president her constitutional due and set the 
stage for new elections next year. The outcome 
quelled angry street protests and stayed within the 
boundaries of the law. 

The Ecuadoran military is regarded as among 
the least iron-fisted in Latin America. But the role 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


it played this week reflected the way the militaries 
of the continent now wield their power. 

They still exert a political influence that demo- 
cracies in North America or Europe would find 
unnerving. But the current military profile in much 
of Latin America is far more subtle than it was in the 
days of strongmen in uniform and hit squads, and 
the military is preoccupied with assuring its own 
political and economic survival as an institution. 

“ The generals realize that military institutions do 
better under democracy,” a diplomat here said. 
“They don’t have to tackle the hardest questions.” 
Nobody claims Latin American militaries have 
became branch offices of Amnesty International. 
In Colombia, Peru, Brazil and elsewhere, armies 
have been accused of brutal behavior against those 
who challenge the established order. 

But in a series of hemispheric meetings, the 


armed forces have also pledged to protect demo- 
cracy and constitutions, and for the most part seem 
to be following their word. 

In Colombia, the military has resisted pressure 
from business leaders and other sectors for a coup 
to remove President Ernesto Samper, whose al- 
leged acceptance of $6 million from drug dealers 
has made him the bane of Washington. 

Nor was the message lost on the military in April, 
when a Paraguayan general. Lino Cesar Oviedo, 
tried to seize power from President Juan Carlos 
Wasmosy. Neighboring countries were swift to 
signal their rejection, scuttling his power play. 

“There's been an effective consensus built that 
constitutional rule is the way of the future in South 
America,” said Bill Spencer of the Washington 
Office on Latin America. 

In Ecuador, Colombia and Chile, the military also 
has vast economic holdings, which a share of the 
country's oil profits, hotels, airlines and factories. 

In Chile, the military plays a central role in 
opening the south to economic development, noted 
Frederick Nunn, a professor of history ar Portland 
State University. “They see themselves as a last 
bastion of national values in an age of international 
everything,” Mr. Nunn said. 

The military now is often as providing the frame- 
work for democracy to function, and stepping in 
like a stem parent when the political high jinks 
threaten to get out of hand. Often, it is the institution 
that has most penetrated the countryside, reaching 
remote areas. 

When General Paco Moncayo, chairman of 
Ecuador's joint chiefs of staff, mediated the pres- 
idential transition here, be said be saw the military as 
largely assuring order and security while the Na- 
tional Congress worked to fill in the “legal va- 
cuums” of a poorly written constitution that con- 
tained no clear rules for presidential succession. 



kuh Han/Tbc Auoculnl l*cu 

PROTEST — Jesse Jackson being arrested at a construction site in 
Chicago, where he was protesting a white-owned firm’s decision to end 
a contract with a black trucking company. He spent the night in jail. 

urged Maryland and other states to 
embrace as-yet-undeveioped national 
standards in reading and math. And. 
mocking those who attacked previous 
welfare laws, Mr. Ginton warned the 
legislators to gird for the impact of 
changes in the system. 

“This welfare reform bill had this 
ringing declaration: Everybody who 
can work, everybody who's able to 
work, has to take responsibility for 
their own lives.” said Mr. Clinton, 
who signed the bill into law. 

“No more permanent dependency. 
Full of moral precepts. Well, the mor- 
ality shoe is now on the other foot." 
He added, “The challenge is 


Democrat to Retire 

WASHINGTON — Representa- 
tive Lee Hamilton, Democrat of In- 
diana, a 1 7-term lawmaker who is one 
of his party's leading voices on for- 
eign policy, will not seek re-election 
in 1998. 

“I am deeply grateful to the people 
of southern Indiana for placing their 
trust in me for these many years, and I 
hope they feel that I have served them 
well.” Mr. Hamilton. 65. said 
Monday in a statement. 

The retirement, the first of the 
105th Congress, presents an oppor- 
tunity for Republicans. Mr. 
Hamilton's district tends to be cul- 
turally conservative, with more in 
common politically with the South 
than with the Midwest 

Analysts predict that many veteran 
Democrats could decide to retire as 
trends point to a continued Repub- 
lican majority through at least 2000. 
As part of his effort to win a House 
majority in 1998, the House minority 
leader, Richard Gephardt, Democrat 
of Missouri, asked Democrats to let 
him know by tiiis summer whether 
they plan to retire so the party can 
recruit candidates and they can begin 
raising funds. 

A cerebral lawmaker with a folksy 
manner, Mr. Hamilton has made bis 
mark on foreign policy. In the 1980s, 
he led opposition to American aid to 
the anti-communist contra guerrillas 
in Nicaragua and was House chair- 
man of the special panel that inves- 
tigated the Reagan athninistration’s 
support of the contras. 

In 1991, he strongly opposed giving 
President George Bush authority to 
wage war in the Gulf. As chairman of 
the House Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee in 1993 and 1994, Mr. Hamilton 
championed President Bill Clinton's 
decisions to send U.S. troops to Bosnia 
and Somalia but was less enthusiastic 
about intervention in Haiti. (WP) 

Clinton Acts Locally 

ANNAPOLIS. Maryland — 
Cleariy comfortable in his own tribe. 
President Bill Ginton has begun 
politicking among the politicians, 
starting his itinerant national cam- 
paign to create education standards 
and to soften changes in the welfare 
system by addressing a special ses- 
sion of the Maryland Legislature. 

In the first of what aides say may be 
many such exhortations of state le- 
gislators, Mr. Clinton on Monday 


primarily on you and the employer 
community, which is the way you said 
you wanted it.” (NYT) 

Bipartisan Unity? 

WASHINGTON — Meeting at the 
Capitol in a show of bipartisan unity. 
President Bill Clinton and congres- 
sional leaders agreed Tuesday to try 
balancing the budget and to tackle 
other issues on which they share com- 
mon ground. 

Besides an attempt at compromise 
on balancing the budget by 2002, 
lawmakers said the two sides would 
focus on improving education, mov- 
ing welfare recipients to jobs, cutting 
taxes, cracking down on juvenile 
crime and dealing with the District of 
Columbia's wide-ranging problems. 
Bipartisan working groups would be 
formed to seek solutions. 

The two sides promised a product- 
ive year. 

“I think everybody involved felt 
that it was an excellent start and an 
excellent meeting,” Vice President 
A1 Gore said. 

The Senate majority leader, Trent 
Lott, Republican of Mississippi, said. 
"The atmosphere was the best I’ve 
seen in some time." 

Mr. Gore said the two sides wanted 
to avoid “the kind of tension that 
would slow down progress in the 
areas where we know we can even- 
tually find agreement." (AP) 

Quote I Unquote 

President Bill Clinton on the O J. 
Simpson verdict: “In terms of the 
jury verdict, thai's the system we have 
in America. It's over as far as I'm 
concerned. We need to get on to other 
things. But we always need to be 
working on how to bridge these di- 
vides between us.” (AP) 


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PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAX, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 




ASIA/PACIFIC 


2 Top Seoul Aides Held in Loan Case 


Reuters 

SEOUL — Prosecutors on Tuesday 
arrested a close associate of President 
Kim Young Sam and a top governing 
party official over a loan scandal sur- 
rounding die failed Hanbo Steel & Gen- 
eral Construction Co. 

Hong In Kii. a senior official at the 
presidential Blue House before he was 
elected to Parliament last year, and 
Chung Jae Chul, the highest-ranking 
New Korea Party official after Mr. Kim 
and the party chairman, were arrested. 

A prosecution official said they were 
charged with taking kickbacks from the 
founder of Hanbo Group, Chung Tae 
Soo. 

They are the first politicians to be 
arrested in the loan scandal, which has 
shocked South Korea and put die heat 
on Mr. Kim in a presidential election 
year. 

The Hanbo tycoon has already been 
arrested on charges of fraud and. other 
violations in connection with five tril- 
lion won ($5.8 billion) in loans the 
steelmaker piled up before it was de- 
clared insolvent Jan. 23. 

Two bankers have also been arrested 
on bribery charges. 

The prosecution official said Mr. 


Hong was accused of taking 800 million 
won on four occasions last year from 
Chung Tae Soo, who asked him to per- 
suade banks to provide loans to Hanbo 
SteeL 

Chung Jae Chul, the lawmaker, was 
accused of accepting 100 million won 
from the Hanbo founder, who asked him 
to pressure bankers into offering loans, 
the official said. 

He was also accused of passing on 
100 million won to an opposition mem- 
ber of Parliament, Kwon Roh Kap, from 
the tycoon, who tried to silence criticism 
over the huge loans that exceeded the 
value of their collateral. 

President Kim, who last month 
ordered an inquiry into the loans, has 
called the scandal a typical example of 
corruption. 

Prosecutors also questioned die Hanbo 
founder’s driver Tuesday on suspicions 
he carried apple crates sniffed with cash 
to bankers and politicians, said the senior 
prosecutor. Choi Byung Koog. 


‘The driver is a very important por- 
tion,* Mr. Choi 


son in our investigation,' 
said. 

Mr. Hong, the aide to Mr. Kim, denied 
taking money from Hanbo before he was 
summoned by prosecutors Monday. 


Mr. Kwon said he had nothing to do 
with Hanbo loans. But he has said he 
took 150 million to 160 million won 
from Hanbo, partly to finance an elec- 
tion campaign. 

The other lawmaker, Mr. Chung, has 
not commented publicly. 

Prosecutors have also summoned Mr. 
Kwon, a top aide to Kim Dae Jung, who 
beads the main opposition National 
Congress for New Politics. 

But National Congress and a smaller 
opposition group, foe United liberal 
Democratic Party, urged him Tuesday 
not to report to the prosecution office. 

“The prosecutors are trying to im- 
plicate the opposition to whitewash the 
nature of the Hanbo incident while try- 
ing to cover up real power behind foe 
scene,” said Yun Ho Jung, a spokesman 
for National Congress. 

Mr. Kwon, who earlier said be would 
report to prosecutors Tuesday, said he 
would now wait until they served him an 
official summons. Earlier, Mr. Kwon 
had been summoned by telephone. 

The two opposition parties have al- 
leged that government favoritism al- 
lowed Hanbo to expand its steelmaking 
flagship company and acquire or set up 
18 firms in the past three years. 



Celebrating the Chinese spring festival, paraders in imperial garb march in Beijing in hopes of a good harvest 


BRIEFLY 


Sri Lanka Legislator Is Killed South Korean Novelist Jailed 


COLOMBO — Gunmen shot and killed a governing 
party legislator and wounded another in southern Sri Lanka 
on Tuesday in foe first incident of violence during an 
election campaign, police officials said 
The legislator, Nalanda Ellawala, 29. of foe People's 
Alliance, died after being shot three times in the chest, foe 
officials said. Another People's Alliance lawmaker, Dilan 
Perera. was wounded in the attack. 

The attackers opened fire on Mr. Ellawala and Mr. Perera 
in Kuruwita. a town in the southern Ratnapura district 
where they had gone to file nominations for others in next 
month's local government elections. (AP) 


SEOUL — A Seoul court sentenced a South Korean 
novelist to three and a half years in jail Tuesday for illegally 
visiting North Korea and revealing state secrets. . 

A court official said the novelist Kim Yong, known as 
his pen name Kim Hah-ki, was found guilty of “revealing 
national secrets during questioning by North Korean au- 
thorities after illegally entering North Korea.** 

No details were given of what secrets Mr. Kim passed on 
to the North. The novelist who was held in North Korea for 
two weeks for a border violation, was arrested on his return 
home in August on charges of visiting the North without 
seeking approval from Seoul. , ( Reuters ) 


A Return to ' 50s for Vietnam? For the Record 


HANOI — Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet considered a 
leading proponent of economic reforms, called Tuesday for 
a revival of 1 950s-style labor policies involving millions of 
people in huge construction projects. 

Mr. Kiet 74, said in an interview with foe official 
Vietnam News Agency that mass mobilization of the 
country’s work force was needed to modernize Vietnam's 
crumbling national infrastructure. 

The agency said Mr. Kiet recalled precedents for the 
policy, including foe involvement of millions of people in 
such projects as the building in the 1950s of an irrigation 
system near Hanoi and the Ho Chi Minh Trail. ( Reuters ) 


Support for Prime Minister Ryutaro Hasbimoto of 
Japan has plunged in foe last two months, with voters 
critical of wasteful state spending and pessimistic about 
government reform promises. The Tokyo daily Asabi Shim- 
bun said the approval rating for Mr. Hasbimoto had fallen to 
42 percent from 55 percent in December. ( Reuters ) 


The United Nations High Commissioner for Human 
Rights, Jose Ayala Lasso, has accepted a government 
invitation to visit China. No date has been set for the trip, 
whose object would be to continue the “constructive 
dialogue” with Beijing on human rights. (Reuters) 


West China’s ‘Never-Ending’ Conflict 


j^ian 

IlO 

J iirll- f lift ‘ 





Agence France-Fresse 

BELTING — For most of China’s 
Muslim population, brotherhood with 
neighboring Central Asian nations far 
outweighs loyally to the Chinese empire 
that has controlled them — with varying 
success — for two millennia, according 
to experts on the region. 

Whatever it does, Beijing appears un- 
able to extinguish pro-mdependence sen- 
timents that spark into violence in a 
sporadic, bid increasingly common, pat- 
tern. 

‘ The battle in Xinjiang is never-end- 
ing,” said a Western diplomat with 10 
years’ expertise on China and its re- 
lations with its Islamic neighbors in 
Central Asia. 

“Beijing will never give units stra- 
tegic link to Central Asia and Pakistan, 
but certain elements of the ethnic 
Uighur population will attack their 
Chinese rulers whenever they have a 
chance,” he added. 

Last week's rioting in the western 
Chinese border town of Yinmg, near 
Kazakstan, was the most violent re- 
ported outburst since Communist China 
regained control of t he region following 
chaos during its civil war against foe 
Nationalists in foe 1940s. 


With reports of up to 40 dead in 
Yinin g, Chines e troops moved swiftly 
to seal off the town, closing roads and 
foe airport, imposing a curfew and 
rounding up 1,000 Muslims in buses 
commandeered from the local transport 
company. 

An exile Uighur group in Kazakstan 
put the toll as high as 80, but foat'report 
and many others from the region are 
impossible to verify. 

Fears of further violence must rest 
heavy on Chinese officials. 

They have already launched a year- 
long crackdown on foe separatists, who 
hark back to foe early 1940s when a 
Muslim of Kazak origin established the . 
short-lived indepeademrepablicofEast 
Turkestan in Xinjiang. 

Tlie leader. Osman, was executed in 
1951 and Beijing started to move large 
numbers of ethnic Qrineae into foe re- 


and its neighbors. According to exiled 
separatists in Kazakstan — which is 
only 50 kilometers (30 miles) from foe 
troubled town of Yining— some 57,000 


suspected pro-independence support- 
lme academics and clerics. 


era, including 
were arrested by Chinese authorities last 
year. 

Die exiles also say that Muslim ter- 
rorists lave stepped up their activities in 
the region. 

They killed 450 Chinese soldiers and 
militiamen in a series of attacksin the 
regional capital, Urumqi, in April and 20 
inore soldiers in street battles in the towns 
of Karamay and Turfen, foe exiles also 


gm- ■ 

Xinjiang — which translates as new 
frontier — now has a 37 percent ethnic 
Chinese population. 

The crackdown coincides with afresh 
resurgence of separatist sentiment 
across Xinjiang, brought about by the 
1991 collapse of tire Soviet Union and 
foe newfound freedom of Kazakstan 


addition, foe cemxists bombed 

militar y vehicles in Urumqi in Febru-. 
ary, set off 47 explosions on Xinjiang’s' ( * 
railway network since July and stole " 
important copies of the Koran from die 
Xinjiang Islamic Studies. Center, the 
exiles say. 

China has retaliated by sending emis- 
saries to all of the nei ghborin g Central 
Asian states — Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan 
and Kazakstan — and extracteaprom- 
ises from their governments that they 
will not support any separatist move- 
ments in Xinjiang. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY L2, 1997 


* W: 


EUROPE 


f K 



Secret Files Could Open New Chapter in Spain’s ‘Dirty War’ Saga 


By Craig R. Whitney 

__ iVf w York Times Service 

BILBAO. Spain — The Spanish Su- 
preme Court in Madrid is scheduled to 
examine on Wednesday a dossier of 18 
secret Spanish military intelligence re- 
ports that have been subpoenaed by 
prosecutors. 7 

They are investigating whether the 
deaths of 27 suspected Basque militants 
at the hands of the Anti-Terrorist Lib- 
eration Groups between 1983 and 1987 
were actually part of a secret paranul- 
naiy operation conceived ana carried 
out by the Spanish government itself, 
possibly with the knowledge of Felipe 
i Gonzalez, who was prime minister at 
' i the time. 

The investigators asked the Supreme 
Court to force the government to de- 
classity the original papers from De- 
fense Ministry files so that they can use 
them as evidence to try the officials they 


have charged, and it is this question that 
the court agreed to rule on after it views 
them Wednesday. 

Mr. Gonzalez, a Socialist, has re- 
peatedly denied all involvement. 

But the cloud over him contributed to 
his narrow election defear last year by 
Jose Maria Aznar, a conservative, who 
became prime minister. 

Last November, the Supreme Court 
declared Mr. Gonzalez immune from 
prosecution on the basis of the evidence 
that was available then. 

But the issue of what is generally 
called the ‘ ‘dirty war’ ’ goes far beyond 
personalities. 

Acknowledging the misdeeds of a 
young democracy that was still trying to 
shake the legacy of nearly 40 years of 
fascist dictatorship when it apparently 
decided to use police terrorism to fight 
Basque terrorism in die early 1980s, in 
the view of the Spa nish jou rnalists and 
others who have been leading the cam- 


paign to expose them, is vitally im- 
portant to strengthening the foundations 
of that democracy today. 

Mr. Aznar’ s conservatives, once in 
office, followed Mr. Gonzalez's de- 
cision to keep under wraps the military 
intelligence reports that the Supreme 
Court will examine, but if the court 
orders them declassified, prosecutors 
could reopen the issue of Mr. Gonza- 
lez's possible involvement. 

Sixteen former police officers and 
government officials, including a former 
Interior Minister who was close - to Mr. 
Gonzalez, have been charged so far. 

Purported copies of the defense pa- 
pers were published in December by 
two rival newspapers, the pro-Govem- 
ment El Mundo and the Socialist-lean- 
ing El Pais, and Defense Minister 
Eduardo Serra blurted out then that they 
appeared to be identical to die ones the 
prosecutors were asking for. 

El Pais published all of the copies at 


once, although it did not know for sure 
that they were genuine, its editors said, 
to keep its rival from publishing one of 
them at a time for weeks as a sort of 
water torture against Mr. Gonzalez and 
the Socialist opposition. 

If the texts are genuine, the Spanish 
state appears to be deeply implicated in 
more than a score of other killings of 
members of the Basque separatist group 
ETA. The group has killed more than 
760 people since 1968 and battled both 
dictatorship and democracy in its 
struggle for independence for the 2.5 
million Basques in northern Spain. Its 
initials stand for Basque Homeland and 
Liberty in the Basque language. 

In 1983 alone, terrorists killed about 
1 00 people in Spain. The Spanish police 
knew that scores of reiTorists had 
slipped across the border, where the 
French authorities generally regarded 
them as refugees and took no "action 
against them. 


In reaction, the Spanish police and 
security authorities apparently decided 
to fight fire with fire, with the French 
police sometimes looking die other 
way. 

The Anri-Tem>risi Liberation 
Groups, called GAL after the initials in 
Spanish, often used incompetent French 
gangsters to do the dirty work. They 
held a French furniture dealer. Segundo 
Marey, for 10 days thinking he was 
somebody else, and killed seven other 
people by mistake who had nothing at 
all to do with Basque terrorism. 

Two lower-ranking national police of- 
ficers who were sentenced in 1901 to 1 08 
years each in prison for their involvement 
in a botched kidnapping operation carried 
out by the Anti-Terrorist Liberation 
Groups have implicated senior govern- 
ment officials, including Jose Barri- 
onuevo, a close associated Mr. Gonza- 
lez who served as interior minister, and 
Rafael Vera, a former government 


Albanian Leaders Seek 
Emergency Measures 

Violence Flares Anew After 3 Die in Protests 


Agence Francv-Presse 

VLORE. Alb ania — The Albanian 
government asked the country's Par- 
liament on T uesday to impose a state of 
emergency in this Adriatic port, where 
ftrrious protesters rampaged, bunting 
buildings and attacking the police. 

“The situation in Vlore is extraor- 
dinary — it calls for extraordinary mea- 
sures." Prime Minister Alexander 
Me ski said on national radio. He said 
lhat the country's “constitutional or- 
der" had to be protected. 

Violence flared anew Tuesday as 
thousands of people attended the funeral 
uf a man killed Monday in the worst 
unrest to affect Albania in the recent 
wave of protests sparked by die collapse 
< . of get-quick-rich investment schemes. 

' ■ Early Tuesday, an angry mob of 
about 1 00 set fire to the local headquar- 
ters of the ruling Democratic Party as 
mourners gathered for die funeral. 

Flames leapt from the party's build- 
ings in a wottong-class district of Vlore. 
where riots in the last two days have left 
three people dead and more than 150 
wounded. 

Some 30.000 people, shouting anti- 
government slogans, accompanied the 
man's open coffin to the cemetery. 

* ‘The government is directly co blame 
for your despair." Kurd Kola, a former 


political prisoner and member of a right- 
ist opposition party, told mourners at tbe 
cemetery where the dead protester. Ar- 
thur Rustemi, was boned. 

Protesters said that Mr. Rustemi. 30, 
was shot by police during the clashes 
Monday, but the Interior Ministry said 
he was hit by a stray bullet fired by 
protesters. 

After the funeral the crowd beaded 
slowly back to central Vlore, where few 
police officers were in evidence. Al- 
banian Army units seen in recent days 
on heights around die southern port 
town were also absent 

Demonstrations have shaken Albania 
following tbe collapse of the high-risk 
investment schemes, in which hundreds 
of thousands of Albanians had put their 
life savings. 

Many accuse the government of col- 
lusion with those who ran the fraudulent 
funds, or of failing to take timely action 
to control the schemes. 

The government rejects these accu- 
sations and has in turn accused the op- 
position of opportunistically fanning 
unrest 

The opposition Socialist Party, a re- 
vamped group of former Communists 
who ruled this impoverished country for 
almost 50 years, has called for early 
elections. 



W&SyWsW $ Jf, 1 









.2 ? 


Arwaoin HJaro^ Vy-'i"' FraoorlVMe 

Albanians shouting anti-government slogans in Vlore on Tuesday during the funeral of a protester shot Monday. 


secretary of state for security affairs. 

Other "dirty war" cases brought by 
prosecutors involve allegations of mis- 
use of millions of dollars in secret gov- 
ernment funds allegedly used to pay 
mercenaries, bribe French police, or buy 
silence from witnesses, and charges that 
an indicted banker. Mario Conde. 
bought the secret defense papers from 
Colonel Juan Alberto Perote. who had 
allegedly obtained them illegally before 
his dismissal, and that Mr. Conde then 
leaked them to El Mundo. 

The story is a tangled one with plenty 
of subplots. Mr. Conde, who has been 
charged with fraud in connection with 
the $4 billion failure of the Banesto 
bank that he headed until 1 993. is said to 
have originally had the idea of threat- 
ening to keep' the secret papers unless 
prosecutors (hopped the fraud charges. 

But all the threads of the story so far 
seem to break off well before they reach 
the former prime minister's level. 

Band Conductor 
Shot to Death at 
Basque Carnival 

The .Associated Press 

MADRID — As funerals were licld 
Tuesday for a Supreme Court judge and 
another victim of terrorism, a gunman 
killed a businessman — the third attack 
blamed on die Basque separatist group 
ETA this week. 

A gunman dressed in black shot Fran- 
cisco Arratribel in the face as Mr. Ar- 
ra tribe I conducted a band during car- 
nival celebrations in the Basque town of 
Tolosa. an Interior Ministry spokesman 
said. The gunman, who was reported to 
be wearing a mask of some son. fled on 
foot 

Interior Minister Jaime Mayor Oreja 
attributed the latest, attack to the group 
ETA, which has been fighting for in- 
dependence for northern Spain's 
Basque region since 1968. 

Speaking to reporters at the funeral of 
Rafael Martinez Emperador. the Su- 
preme Court justice who was shot dead 
Monday, Mr. Mayor said: “We will not 
be coerced by terrorists. ETA will not 
have its way.” 

A former interior minister, Juan Al- 
berto Belloch. said: “With this attack, it 
looks like ETA is opening up all its 
channels for killing. It chose this moment 
so as to intimidate the government." 

In the southern city of Granada, five 
minutes of silence were held in memory 
of an air force barber. Domingo Pueme. 
who was killed in a car-bomb blast on 
Monday. The car bomb was believed 
planted by ETA. 


Election Changes in Serbia Are Delayed 


Reuters 

BELGRADE — Serbian uitranation- 
alistA- delayed Parliament's vote Tues- 
day on reinstating opposition victories 
in local elections while students began a 
new round of pro-democracy street 
protests. 

Reporters outside Parliament were 
able to watch closed-circuit television 
showing 147 parliamentarians gather in 
the 250-scat assembly. It quickly be- 
came apparent that the Serbian Radical 
Party, an ultranaiionalist group with 35 
parliamentarians, was holding up the 
legislation. 

“Absolutely there was an obstruction 
of Parliament by the Radical Party," 
said the federal trade minister. Djordje 
Siradovic. “1 don't understand what 
they are really after." 

The Radicals have submitted draft 


amendments challenging the bill to rec- 
ognize tbe opposition's gains in the 
elections, saying that as it stands it al- 
lows the international community to use 
Parliament to legalize decrees imposed 
from above. 

President Slobodan Milosevic’s So- 
cialists annulled opposition victories 
last November in 14 towns and cities, 
including Belgrade, on the ground of 
irregularities. 

That action prompted three months of 
huge protests and attracted an inter- 
national outcry. 

A week ago Mr. Milosevic an- 
nounced that he was asking Parliament 
to approve a bill recognizing the op- 
position's gains. 

The three-party opposition Zajedno 
coalition saw Mr. Milosevic’s introduc- 
tion of a special law as a triumph for the 


BRIEFLY 


protesters in Belgrade and other cities. 
But, suspecting subterfuge on the part of 
the Socialists, opposition politicians 
said they planned to keep up the pres- 
sure by continuing the rallies. 

The opposition coalition has said it 
fears that even when the special bill is 
passed by Parliament, Mr. Milosevic 
will remove the already limited powers 
of local councils with legislation strip- 
ping them of their sources of revenue. 

In Washington, Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright issued a personal 
appeal to Mr, Milosevic, urging him to 
ensure that the disputed election results 
were reinstated and to open a dialogue 
with his opponents. 

Her comments were pan in a letter 
delivered to Mr. Milosevic on Sat- j 
urday. i 


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in Two Airline Tickets... ' : 




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Italy Magistrates Jffcre Spied On 

POME Hundreds of left-leaning magistrates, in- 

cluding a current speaker of Parliament, were spied on by 
Italy's secret services for much of the Cold War. news- 
papers reported Tuesday. . . 

Investigators said Monday they had opened an inquiry 
after filets detailing the activities of 323 leftist mapstrates 
were discovered in an Interior Ministry office last Oc- 

*°*“This is a verv worrisome episode which at least shows 
how far we have progressed since then. Justice Minister 
Giovanni Maria Flick was quoted as saying in Tunn s La 

Lra kepi from the early 1960s until 1980 *e 
new««ipew said, adding that dossiers on the speaker of the 
low erh wise of Parliament and former magistrate. Luciano 
Viotonte. and on a top -graft magistrate. Gerardo 

that? 1 would have been ^ 

D'Ambrwio was quoted as telling La Repubbltca. 

Mr D'-Nmbrosio was part of the elite pool of Milan 

nitrates 

Italy's political old guard in the early 1990s. (Reuters) 

Yeltsins Recoveiy b Called Slow 

MOSCOW - 

sl owl v trom pneumonia an ■ j Tuesday 

VK.rzhCT.bsky aid 31 gj Kiutaif Spitting better linfc 
He added: activity, which is shown 

by little, mdudiftg in ^ a ^ intense work 

ssrrsSwS® 

wwfa alia hi< ^ S several 

heart bypass surgery *n No receni weeks. but spends most 
brief vims to rhe Kremlin in re^t wee ^ euJers) 

of his time at his country residence. 

French Protest Vote for Far Right 

VITROl-LES. France ; — 

chanting 'Ubcrts.Equ^iiyv French town to 

in Tuesday at the city hall ot mis so 


protest the election of a new extreme-right mayor. The 
police in Vitro lies were on alert after the election Sunday of 
Catherine M egret of the National From, which sparked 
violence Monday night 

The National Front, often accused of racism and anti- 
Semitism, blames North African immigrants for the record 
postwar unemployment in France. 

A group of about 30 young men set fire to cars and broke 
tbe windows of a primary school near the city center 
Monday evening in anger over the election, the police said. 
Most of tbe group were of North African descent 

The police stepped up citywide patrols throughout the 
sight and arrested 18 young men who were found ro be 
carrying knives. The police said six of those arrested were 
released Tuesday. (AP) 

Greece Bolsters Border Security 

ATHENS — Fearing a mass influx of destitute Al- 
banians and other immigrants, Greece has begun a large- 
scale effort to use the military and the police to plug the 
country’s porous northern frontiers. 

Greek media reported Tuesday that the security curtain 
could stretch tbe entire 1 ,200-kilometer (720-mile) length 
of the border from Turkey to Albania. 

George FUorendis, a senior Public Order Ministry of- 
ficial, declined to give details, but noted that the military, 
coast guard and the police were involved is the operation. 

‘‘Albania's collapsed pyramid schemes and continuing 
unrest may lead Albanians to bail out of their country and 
into Greece,’ ’ said Mr. Florendis. “We are concerned about 
this development and have to prevent it ’* (API 

EU Bans German Pig Exports 

BRUSSELS — The European Commission approved a 
ban Tuesday on theexport of pigs from six German states to 
counter an outbreak of swine fever. 

The ban took effect immediately to prohibit for at least 60 
days the export of live pigs from Mecklenburg-Western 
Pomerania, Lower Saxony, North Rhine-Westphalia. Bav- 
aria, Bremen and two districts of Brandenburg. 

The export ban may be lifted after 60 days, if no new 
outbreaks of die disease occur, officials said. 

On Wednesday, the executive body of the European 
Union will consider action to curb an outbreak of swine 
fever in the Netherlands. 

Swine fever is a highly contagious, usually fatal disease 
affecting pigs. (AP) 


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PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL 


HERA1D TRIBUNE, SATUBDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 




PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


BRIEFLY 


Algerians Discuss Coming Vote 


not all 31 women had been on the list approved by the 
government. The court was to meet later to hear the petition, 
a spokesman said. The half-dozen prisoners in question 
would not be released until the court Ailed, be added. (AP) 


PARIS — President Liamine Zeroual of Algeria met 10 
political party leaders Tuesday to discuss preparations for 

parliamentary elections, but the main secular opposition j i . my j r?, .i /* n 
group stayed away, saying that Algeria needs peace first. LOlOfflOlfl trOTKeTS utTlKC JOT iflY 
Officials and party members said by telephone from 

- j ■ _ .L I 1 1 I Lj I 


Algiers dial topics on the agenda included independent 
supervision of the elections, which are planned for the first 
half of this year, and the worsening security situation. 

More than 60.000 people have died since Muslim guer- 
rillas started attacks in 1 992 after elections in which Islamic 
Salvation Front was leading were canceled. During the recent 
holy month of Ramadan, die guerrillas stepped up attacks. 

The main opposition party, the Front for Socialist Forces, 
said that Mr. Zeroual 's meeting aimed only "to endorse 
decisions already taken by the authorities." and declined to 
attend. The Front has urged the authorities since 1 992 to open 
negotiations with the main opposition parties, including the 
outlawed Islamic Salvation Front ( Reuters ) 

Israel Frees 8 Palestinian Women 

TEL MOND. Israel — Israel on Tuesday began releasing 
31 Palestinian women held prisoner, keeping a pledge made 
in peace talks with the Palestinians. 

Eight women had been freed by 7 P.M.. Israel Radio said. 
Their release came after more than a year of delays and 
wrangling that embittered Palestinians who see Israel's read- 
iness to free prisoners as a test of the peace. 

A day after the Supreme Court threw out a petition by a 
group representing families of Israeli tenor victims, the 
group filed a new petition Tuesday afternoon, claiming that 


BOGOTA — Colombian public sector workers began a 
nationwide strike Tuesday, disrupting air traffic, transpor- 
tation. telecommunications and other services. 

About 800,000 workers were expected to join the action, 
union leaders said The strikers are seeking a 213 percent 
wage hike. The government, struggling to cui its deficit, has 
vowed to hold them to a weighted 13.5 percent increase. 

The government warned that leftist guerrilla groups were 
planning attacks to coincide with the strike. But apart from 
the predawn torching of a bus outside the central city of 
Ibague. there were no reports of violence. (Reuters) 

Cuba Replaces Culture Minister 

MEXICO CITY — Cuba’s veteran culture minister, Ar- 
mando Hart, a comrade-in-arms of President Fidel Castro, 
has been replaced, Cuban state news media said Tuesday. 

Mr. Hart’s successor is Abel Prieto, leader of the state- 
sponsored Union of Writers and Artists. Both men have 
argued for some freedom of expression, but within the limits 
of support for Cuba’s Communist system. 

Mr. Hart, 67, had been culture minister since 1976, and 
before that was education minis ter. He had joined Mr. 
Castro's July 26 Movement in 1955, only two years after the 
future Cuban leader led a failed raid on the military's 
Moncada Barracks in Santiago, Cuba. (AP) 



BEDOUINS EVICTED — Israeli police dragging a Palestinian from a Bedouin encampment Tuesday to 
make room for the expansion of a Jewish settlement in the West Bank. Two Palestinians were injured. 


3 


SHARES: ‘New Era ’ Optimists and Traditionalist Skeptics Square Off on Will Street Serbs in Croatian Enclave 


Continued from Page 1 

her when he predicted that 1997 would 
be the worst year for investors since 
1 990. when the Dow fell 4 percent. Mr. 
Wien expects the Dow to fall about 
1 .000 points this year. 

"1 am going to tell you what your 
problem is," a woman m the audience 
told Mr. Wien, who has worked more 
than three decades as an investment 
strategist. "The problem with you is that 
you went through 1973 and 1974 and 
those scars are still healing.'* The Dow 
dropped 45 percent in those two years. 

Mr. Wien makes no apologies for his 
attention to history, and in it he finds 
support for his methods. In 1987, he 
noted, many analysts argued that liquid- 
ity was changing its dynamics. But his 
valuation measures signaled that the 
market was significantly overvalued. 
The Dow Jones industrial average later 
took a breathtaking, one-day dive of 508 
points, or 22.6 percent. 

New Era analysts argue that measures 


that worked well in the past must be 
updated now that the investment climate 
has changed. 

Among that group is Abby Joseph 
Cohen, co-chairwoman of the invest- 
ment policy committee at Goldman 
Sachs & Co., who has become a major 
voice of bullishness on Wall Street in the 
last several years. 

“I have been a New Era person since 
1991," she says, explaining that 
changes in the behavior of the baby 
boom generation were a catalyst for her 
fresh market perspective. 

"It was easy for me to see that many 
of the people in this age group were 
beginning to increase their investment 
levels," she said. 

While Ms. Cohen forecasts that the 
Dow will hit 7,050 this year, she warns 
that stocks are fairly valued and that the 
market could stay roughly where it is 
until die earnings outlook is clearer later 
this year. 

Another New Era devotee, Richard 
Bernstein of Merrill Lynch & Co., notes 


that the market has soared 68 percent in 
the past two years even though con- 
ventional measures of fair value have 
been flashing warning signals far some 
time. “If everybody knows well that the 
maricet is overvalued and it is not going 
down, then — and these are dangerous 
words — something may be different," 
said Mr. Bernstein, 38, who is Merrill’s 
director of quantitative research. 

The issue of whether stocks have 
reached unsustainable heights has be- 
come more pressing as investors appear 
to be holding firm in their belief that 
stocks will continue lurching upward, 
brief dips and pauses. 


is that argues that the stock market is 
significantly overvalued, said the mar- 
ket ultimately would conform to the 
discipline of traditional measures. “The 
question is when," be said. 

When assessing the overall market, 
analysts frequently look at the price- to- 
eamings ratio of a particular index, 
which is determined by dividing the 
level of the index by the earnings per 
share of the companies that mak e up the 
index. According to the Standard & 
Poor's research firm, the average annual 
price-to-eamings ratio since 1 926 for its 
widely recognized index of 500 stocks is 
14.4. Its low was 6.64 in 1948, and its 
high was 26.1 in 1991. Based on nearly 


Raise Storm Warnings 


with only 

A poll of l,014 mutnal fund investors 
taken at the end of last year by Louis complete earnings reports, the figure for 
Harris and Associates found that 86 per- 1996 is 18.9. 
cent thought that the annual returns from But there are wide variations in how 
die stock market in the next 10 years will the ratio can be calculated — whether. 


be 14 percent or better, at least equal to 
those during the last decade. 

Andrew Engel, senior research ana- 
lyst at Leutbold Group, a research and 
money management firm in Mmneapol- 


for example, to use reported earnings or 
operating earnings adjusted for unusual 
corporate write-offs. Some show the 
market wildly overvalued, but others 
show it is only marginally so. 


MIGRATE: Find Shakes Up Archaeology 


Continued from Page 1 

for evidence of earlier human habitation 
have arisen. Until now, none had proved 
convincing to a majority of scientists. 

A major advantage of the Monte Verde 
site. Mr. Dillehay said, was that shortly 
after habitation the area was covered with 
a peat bog, ensuring preservation of a 
wide variety of evidence. Alex Barker, 
chief curator of the Dallas museum, said, 
"There are stakes that are still lashed in 
place with string that is knotted." 

At a minimum, the new find will 
oblige scholars to reconsider the stan- 
dard explanation of what Mr. Dillehay 
called “the first chapter of human his- 
tory in the Americas." 

The accepted theory is that restless 
prehistoric peoples from northeastern 
Asia managed to migrate into Alaska 
when global cooling trapped ocean wa- 
ter in glaciers, thus lowering the sea level 
and ex posing enough of the Bering Strait 
sea floor to provide a land bridge. This 
hypothesis also requires that there have 
been an ice-free corridor — formed be- 
tween two retreating ice masses — that 
would have allowed the first New World 
humans to survive a trek southward 
through the Yukon. Both essential con- 
ditions for this climatic "window” ex- 
isted about 14.000 to 12.000 years ago. 

So when scientists first dated the C?lo- 
vi> artifacts t typically stone "points” 
used to kill mammoths or other animals) 
to about 11.200 years ago. the chro- 
nology seemed ideal. Presumably, the 
fiiM settlers crossed the land bridge on 
schedule and their descendants then 


took about a thousand years to get as far 
south as New Mexico. 

The new findings make this notion far 
less tenable. If the Monte Verde site is 
12,500 years old, then the ancestors of 
those Chilean settlers somehow man- 
aged to travel some 10,000 miles from 
the Bering Strait to southern South 
America in only a few hundred years. 

In short, said Mr. Stanford of the 
Smithsonian, "they either had to go like 
hell to get to South America, or they 
simply came in earlier." 

Climate data and other evidence show 
that the next earlier window of migrat- 
ory opportunity existed about 22,000 
years ago. 

Alternatively, many experts speculate, 
the early Asian immigrants may not have 
traveled by land at all. Instead, they may 
have gone by boat, bugging the shoreline 
all the way from Alaska to Chile. But the 
real date of the fust arrival of Homo 
sapiens in the Americas may be far earlier 
than any consensus theory now permits. 

The Monte Verde team has found a 
second deeper layer of putative human 
artifacts that can be reliably dated at 
33.000 years old The evidence so far is 
tentative, though Mr. Stanford said that 
"most of the nine-member team, 
thought it looked pretty good." 

Mr. Dillehay 's group is continuing its 
excavation. Meanwhile, the Monte Verde 
results will likely revive flagging interest 
in many other putative pre-Clovis sites, 
including the Meadowcroft Rocksheiter 
in Pennsylvania, which has yielded stone 
tools and basketry that are estimated to be 
more than 19.000 years old. 



By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washington Post Service 

VUKOVAR, Croatia — The final 
countdown for the last sizable outpost 
held by Serbian nationalists in Croatia 
has begun against a background of Bal- 
kan storm warnings: protest demonstra- 
tions, blown-up railroad tracks, attacks 
on government offices and radical rhet- 
oric. 

The endgame is being played out over 
an area known as Eastern Slavonia. It is 
prewar Yugoslavia's richest region, a 
1.600-square-mile (4,100-square-kilo- 
meter) tract facing Serbia across the 
Danube and containing Croatia's best 
farm land biggest oil fields and a heavy 
dose of political symbolism. 

The region’s Serbian minority joined 
with ethnic Serbs in other Croatian bor- 
der areas to declare independence from 
the government in Zagreb in the spring 
of 1991 and fought a six-month war with 
backing from Belgrade to establish con- 
trol of these territories — nearly a third 
of prewar Croatia. 

After four years of an uneasy cease- 
fire with United Nations troops 
patrolling die Serbian-held areas, Croa- 
tia’s army, in two swift offensives in 
May and August 1995, took back all but 
. Eastern Slavonia. There, Zagreb and lo- 
cal Serbs, under U.S. and other Western 


pressure, agreed to the area's peaceful 
reintegration into Croatia on a schedule 
of gradual steps ending July 15. 

So with 5,000 heavily armed UN 
troops due to pull out by then, when 
Croatia reasserts total sovereignty, the 
more than 130,000 Serbs now living in 
the region are being called on to accept 
Croatian rule. 

President Ffanjo Tudjman has guar- 
anteed that their rights will be respec- 
ted. 

But these guarantees have met with 
widespread skepticism among the 
Serbs, raising fears that many will leave 1 
in one of the population shins that have 
become a h allm ark of the recent 
Yugoslav wars. 

In the first five days of February 
alone, 152 families left — nearly 10 
times the weekly average since June. 

Eastern Slavonia's problems pit the 
Serbs’ fears and lack of experience in 
give-and-take diplomacy against what 
the Serbs charge is lack of good-faith 
preparations by the local Croatian ad- 
ministration, according to observers. 

■ 3 Shot Dead in Region 

Three persons were shot and killed, 
apparently in a robbery, in the town of 
Beli Manastir in Eastern Slavonia, the 
United Nations said Tuesday, according 
to Agence France-Presse. 


SIMPSON: Jury’s Verdict Is $25 Million 


TbcNc* Vo* Time. 


Continued from Page 1 

future, I'll have something to say."] 

The jury ordered Mr. Simpson to “ 
$12.5 million to his two young chili 
by Nicole Simpson, who were recently 
returned to his custody. Ronald Gold- 
man’s divorced parents are to split an- 
other $12.5 million punitive damage 
award. 

In addition, jurors last week awarded 
Ronald Goldman’s parents $8-5 million 
in damages to compensate them for the 
loss of their son. 

The total damages of $33 J million 
represent a daunting sum even for Mr. 
Simpson, who in “glory days” as a 
football commentator, actor and pitch- 
man never earned more than $2 J5 mil- 
lion a year, according to bis business 
attorney. The defense said he was broke 
even before the first judgment came 
down last week. 

Mr. Strati, who served as foreman 
during the punitive phase, said the panel 
calculated the punitive award based on 
an expert's testimony that Mr. Simpson 


EGYPT: Sex ; Drugs and Heavy Metal 


GERMANS: East German Youths Cope With Divided Upbringing 


Continued from Page I 

paragingly to the "deviant youths." 

Bui ihe crackdown has been criticized 
by some intellectuals and human-rights 
advocates as reflecting an unfortunate 
Egyptian predisposition to use security 
forces io address social problems. 

Like most things Western, heavy- 
meial music came late to Cairo and it 
enjoys only u limited following. But 
over the last year its screeching guitars 
and often violent lyrics had emerged, for 
some, as a vehicle for the kind of un- 
restrained expression on which Islamic 
culture frowns heavily. 

Those who have attended them say 
recent heavv-metal gatherings have at 
the least been notable for (he consump- 
tion of alcohol and for public displays of 
affection, both generally taboo. 

In mimicry of Western bands and 
their followers, some fans have also 
gone so far as to adorn their clothing 
with symbols meant to have Satanic 
significance. 

Whether what occurred beyond the 
public gaze went further to include the 
kind of blood-and-sex rituals that the 
popular Egyptian magazine Rosa al 
Yousef has described may never be 
known. But the reports that began late 
last year sel off such an outcry that 
Interior Minister Hasson Alfi. architect 
of Egypt's six-year crackdown on Is- 
lamic militants, .swiftly pledged in ref- 
erence to the heavy-meml fans "to 
identify these groups and uproot them 
all," 

Among those who complained mast 
loudly about the reported evil deeds was 


the grand mufti of Egypt Nasr Farid 
Wassail. w r ho as the highest authority in 
Sunni Islam wields considerable power 
even in what remains a secular state. The 
mufti has portrayed the offenders as 
apostates before God. 

The "contempt of heavenly reli- 
gions" statute under which the author- 
ities say that those arrested may be 
charged was incorporated into Egyptian 
law to try to limit sectarian strife be- 
tween Muslims and the country's Coptic 
Christian minority, legal experts say. 

The law. which carries a maximum 
sentence of five years in prison, was 
invoked in the early 1980s as the 
grounds for the arrest of militant Muslim 
preachers who preached against Copts. 

Among the offenses punishable under 
the statute are the unearthing of corpses, 
the desecration of holy books and the 
ridiculing of religious rituals or figures, 
including the Christian, Islamic and 
Jewish prophets. In practice, the legal 
experts say. the law has been more often 
waved as a club than welded as a legal 
weapon, and some think that the au- 
thorities’ main purpose now is to deliver 
a powerful scare. 

Among youthful sectors of Egyptian 
society most tempted by the extremes of 
Western tastes, the episode already ap- 
pears to have prompted some behavior 
modification. 

"Almost everyone I know has cut his 
hair short" to avoid being mistaken for a 
heavy-metal fan. said Akram Mustafa, a 
student at the American University in 
Cairo. "And girls won't wear their black 
lipstick or even their black leather jack- 
ets." 


Continued from Page 1 

They are discovering a whole new set 
of historical truths. In the 10th grade, all 
German students receive intensive in- 
struction in the ill-fated Weimar Re- 
public and the rise of Nazism. While 
Germany's 16 federal states exercise 
independent authority over the cur- 
riculum, they are required by law to 
provide a full accounting of the Nazi era 
and the Holocaust. 


Bruges Forgives 
Top Bird-Feeder 

Agence France-Presse 

BRUGES, Belgium — City of- 
ficials decided not to press charges 
Tuesday against Prime Minister Jean- 
Luc Dehaene forgiving bread to spar- 
rows in violation of local laws. 

Mr. Dehaene was recently 
filmed by a Belgian television crew 
feeding a few birds in this city near 
the North Sea, which is also his 
birthplace. 

One member of the council, from 
the Flemish Liberal Party, imme- 
diately demanded that the full 
weight of die law be brought to bear 
on die prime minister. 

But the city decided not to push 
the case, arguing that Mr. Dehaene 
was probably not aware of the or- 
dinance against feeding the birds, 
which only took effect Dec. 17. 


For East Germans, the new version of 
20th-century history represents a jarring 
break with their previous studies. They 
are discovering for the first time that 
Jews, not Communists, were the prin- 
cipal victims at the Buchenwald con- 
centration camp, which they used to visit 
on field trips as Young Pioneers in the 
Communist days. 

“Hisfoiy was always shaped by the 
triumph of communism," recalled 
Heinrich Bortfeldt, a history professor 
who has taught in both political systems. 
"Everything was dictated by Moscow, 
and that meant only the Leninist view- 
point The kids heard about Nazis only in 
the context of die worst excesses of 
imperialism and capitalism." 

Now, for the first time, German stu- 
dents in both the East and the West are 
reading from the same script — printed 
in the West They are taught that die 
Nazis rose to power in the wake of 
economic collapse and the humiliation 
of losing World War 1; they learn about 
Adolf Hitler's race laws and the gen- 
ocide of 6 million Jews; and East Ger- 
mans discover that the Federal Republic 
of Germany was not the war-mongering 
successor to the Nazi regime thai they 
had heard it was. 

“in those days, we were forced to 
believe everything we were told; you 
could never express any doubts," Arvid 
Krueger said. “It was real indoctrin- 
ation. It created a lot of anger and sus- 
picion in us when we learned that history 
was really something different: Our par- 
ents seem astonished that we tend to 
question authority. But it’s only normal, 
because we resent the lies we heard 


about the 

Travel has already broadened their 
education and countered stereotypes 
that were pounded into them during 
early years ax Communist schools. Mr. 
Tressel, who studied last year in Min- 
nesota, now realizes the United States no 
longer represents "the last and most 
decadent stage of capitalism," as he was 
taught in grade school. 

‘ ‘I now see how facts were arrayed in 
such a way to_ present a false picture of 
American society,*’ he said. “We were 
always told about drugs, crime and ra- 
cism. Sure, these problems exist, but I 
learned during my year of study there 
that they are not the whole American 
story. Capitalism was supposed to be 
awful, but now I think I 
a stockbroker." 

Nonetheless, a sense of bitterness 
about the imposition of a Western ma- 
terialistic culture lingers among many 
East Germans, including teenagers. 
Those who have not made the adjust- 
ment and dropped out of school have 
become only more alienated from a uni- 
fied German society. A majority of cases 
involving skinhead violence and xeno- 
phobia, such as arson attempts on res- 
idences of Third World asylum seekers, 
have been 


!d like being 


could earn about $25 million over the 
rest of his life by trading in on bis no- 
toriety with bode deals, movie contracts, 
speaking tours and memorabilia sales. 

The huge judgments left: no doubt that 
most jurors were outraged at the slay- 
ings — and determined to hold Mr. 
Simpson responsible despite his forceful 
testimony proclaiming tus innocence. 

“He was ahero to us, and he betra; 
us all," said another juror, Orville Bi- 
gelow, 30, a flight attendant for South- 
west Airlines. “He's a charming man,' a 
nice man, but charming men kill." 

While the jury was unanim ous last 
week in finding Mr. Simpson respon- 
sible for the slayings, they could not 
reach consensus in five hours of de- a, 
liberations about punitive damages. One * 
juror voted against punitive damages 
altogether. Another dissented from the 
final figure, holding out for a lower 
award because she did not think Mr. 
Simpson could earn enough money to 
pay the entire $25 million. 

The verdicts are not the last word in 
the Simpson saga. Nonetheless, 
Monday’s verdicts against Mr. Simpson 
rang with a sense of finality. 

In interviews Monday, several jurors 
talked of reviewing all the evidaice 
piece by piece, knowing they would 
have to justify their decision to the na- 
tional media. They weighed die de- 
fense's conspiracy claims carefully, 
they said — and rejected them resound- 
ingly. 

"There’s just no way anyone could 
have planted all tha t evidence,'* Mr. 
Bigelow said. 

Mr. Simpson's contradictory state- 
ments, p ainstakingl y Laid out by the 
plaintiffs’ team, appeared to have sealed 
the verdicts against him. _ 

The jurors who participated in a news * 
conference after the verdict voiced 
doubts about his testimony: How be 
could remember every detail of his alibi, 
but not how he cut his left hand the night 
of the murders? How he could deny ever 
hitting Nicole, when they could see her 
battered face in photos? How he could 
insist he never, ever wore Bruno Magli 
shoes even when confronted with 31 
photos of him in the exact model that 
tracked bloody prints at the crime 
scene? 

"Finding O. J. Simpson liable of the 
murders and finding that he acted with 
oppression and malice was one of the 
easiest decisions I 


have ever had to 
make," a woman juror said. 

. , To prevail, the plaintiffs had to prove 

by dlsafrected case by showing it was probable 
youtta from Eastern Germany- that Mr. Simpson killed his fotmer wife 

Before, we used to calk about books and Mr. Goldman on June 12, 1994. But 


and theater, but now the only subjects 
anybody cares about are jobs and 
money," Mr. Krueger said. “There's a 

lot more death and crime than we used to 

experience. I have the impression that an 
entire country has lost the ability to 
laugh and enjoy themselves." 


some jurors said they far exceeded that 
standard, even satisfying die criminal 
trial burden of proof beyond a reason- 
able doubt. 

"It’s 100 percent for me," another 
woman juror said. "I really believe Mr. 
Simpson is guilty." 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1997 


PAGE 7 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


*hh! P„ 


Free Ads for Politicians? 
Stay Tuned to This Plan 


By David S. Broder 


X\l ASHINGTON — When 

T V you re trying to figure out 
one of those interlocking wooden 
puzzles, sometimes it helps to 
tvro it upside down. That is what 
happened to me one rooming re- 
cently when I had breakfast with 
cfj " unt ^» ^ chairman of the 
Federal Communications Com- 
mission. 

The topic was campaign fi- 
nance legislation — or so I 
thought. But when I remarked 
that the history of campaign fi- 
nance laws and regulations was 
fraught with unintended con- 
sequences, Mr. Hundt immedi- 
ately corrected me. 

"We’re not talking about cam- 
paign finance legislation,” he 
said. ” We’ re talking about giv ing 
candidates and voters more ac- 
cess - and these measures have al- 
most always succeeded. The Vot- 
ing Rights Act has been a success. 
7]^ provisions that allowed pres- 
idential debates have worked.” 

Mr. Himdt’s point was this: 
For decades, the campaign fi- 
nance debate has focused on die 
source and volume of funds — 
the supply side of the problem. 
Government has attempted to 
regulate who could give , the size 
of their contributions and, to the 
extent the courts allowed, the 
amount candidates could spend. 

Mr. Hundt suggested that we 
turn the problem around by asking 
where the money goes and wheth- 
er that cost can be reduced, that is, 
examine the demand side of the 
equation. The answer is obvious. 


Most of the money goes into buy- 
ing television advertising. Cam- 
paigns are expensive because 
television costs so much. 

In 1996, Mr. Hundt encour- 
aged the foundation-financed 
campaign of a former Washing- 
ton Post reporter, Paul Taylor, to 
persuade television and cable op- 
erators to make small blocks of 
free time available to the pres- 
idential candidates. Mr. Taylor 
had some success, but he never 
got the broadcasters to agree cm a 
single time when all viewers 
would find the candidates talking 
directly co them. 

Now Mr. Hundt is promoting 
a radical expansion of Mr. 
Taylor's proposal. He thinks 
broadcasters should be required 
to donate almost $2 billion worth 
of commercial time to a "polit- 
ical time batik'' that would be 
available free to candidates for 
federal and state office. 

That sounds like a huge bur- 
den to impose, but Mr. Hundt 
pointed out that die estimated 
$1.8 billion of paid political ads 
in the 1995-96 election cycle was 
only 2JS percent of the television 
ad revenue in that period. 

He also noted that, under a law 
passed last year, the government is 
about to haul broadcasters a gift 
of incalculable value in the form 
of a new spectrum of digital TV 
channels that can be used for 


movie theater-ejuamy programs or 
for a wide variety of otter high- 
fidelity communications. 

Last week Mr. Hundt's long- 





time friend Vice President A1 
Gore made that point a r rp»hT of 
administration policy — without 
endorsing Mr. Hundt's proposal. 

‘ ‘Digital technology, ’ * Mr. 
Gore said, "will greatly enhance 
the opportunities available to 
broadcasters to utilize multiple 
channels. The public interest ob- 
ligations should be commensur- 
ate with these opportunities.” 

Mr. Hundt has found one ally 
high up in the broadcasting in- 
dustry. Barry DiHer, who has been 
a key player for years and now 
heads his own company that con- 
trols a number of TV stations and 
the Home Shopping Network, 
proposed at an industry conven- 
tion in New Orleans last month 
that in return for the gift of die 
new digital TV spectrum, broad- 
casters "take sole responsibility 


for the cost of airing all political 
advertising messages for all gov- 
ernment candidates” and "use 
this lever as the impetus to abolish 
all forms of the current system of 
political contributions.” 

Mb. Diller conceded that his 
proposal would cost the industry 
more than $1 billion in lost rev- 
enue in the peak year of each 
election cycle. But he added. "It 
would also radically change the 
nature of our rotten political fund- 
raising system.” 

Advocates of same campaign 
finance bills are considering a 
way to incorporate the “free tune 
bank" into tbeir proposals. Mr. 
Taylor will hold a conference 
on the subject in Washington 
next month. But he and Mr. 
Hundt both concede this is not 
a panacea. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Two Nations 

Regarding “A Peace Con- 
sensus" (Editorial, Jan. 30): 

The editorial omits a minor 
point: On die altar of peace be- 
tween Israelis, any chance of 
peace between Israelis and Pal- 
estinians has been sacrificed. The 
Beilin-Eitan paper {drafted by le- 
gislators led by Yossi Beilin of 
Labor and Michal Eitan of Likud] 
is the very opposite of the Oslo 
agreement, which implied that a 
Palestinian state would come into 
being in order (o bring about a 


historic reconciliation between 
tbe two peoples. 

The document is a blueprint for 
the annexation by Israel of great 
pans of the remaining Palestinian 
territories, while turning the rest 
into a Palestinian Bantuland, con- 
sisting of an archipelago of en- 
claves cut off from each other by 
Jewish settlements and the "by- 
pass roads” connecting them 
with Israel. For these settlements 
practically all die Palestinian 
land reserves and immense quan- 
tities of Palestinian water have 
been expropriated. Their contin- 


ued existence, as well as the 
clause that practically allows the 
Israeli Army to operate freely in- 
side tbe territory of tbe Palestinian 
“entity,” mate a mockery of 
any pretense of Palestinian 
statehood. 

Let's get back to essentials. Two 
nations five in this country. The 
only solution is their coexistence 
in two national states — Israel and 
Palestine — with open borders and 
a common capital in Jerusalem. 
Everything else is nonsense. 

UR1AVNERY. 

Tel Aviv. 


Important policy and admin- 
istrative issues would remain: 
Could independent groups buy 
tune for “education" or “inde- 
pendent expenditure” cam- 
paigns? Who would diwy up tbe 
time bank among the thousands 
of Democratic and Republican 
candidates in each election? If 
the national parties controlled the 
time, how would dissident or 
maverick Democrats and Repub- 
licans fare? And how would 
min or parties be protected in the 
allocation of time? 

These are all important ques- 
tions. But this proposal offers a 
way to reduce the costs of cam- 
paigns drastically by eliminating 
or greatly slashing the expense of 
television advertising. It deserves 
to be part of the coming debate. 

The Washington Post. 


Confidence-Building 

Jim Hoagland (“What to Do as 
India and Pakistan Co Nuclear ” 
(Opinion. Jan. 16) is correct that 
"putting Washington in tbe 
middle and opening the gates of 
arms supplies to both sides can 
only make things worse/’ The 
only solution lies is agreement by 
India and Pakistan to resolve all 
disputes by peaceful negotiations. 
The first step in confidence-build- 
ing is for each of them to declare 
"no first nuclear strike” against 
the other. This should be followed 


The Heartrending Debris 
Of Corporate Cruelty 


By Wendy Reid Crisp 


P ORTLAND, Oregon — It was 
a dull day at the post office: a 


by broader negotiations on a nu- 
clear-free region in South Asia. 

NARENDRA SINGH. 

Wageningen. Netherlands. 

Sneaker Theory 

Among tbe odd theories for all 
the pairs of sneakers slung over 
U.S. telephone lines (American 
Topics. Feb. 3) there was no men- 
tion of one T ve heard: They’re me- 
morials to youths who were shot 
Sadly, I find that more believable. 

JIM SCIUTTO. 

Hong Kong. 


supermarket flier with specials on 
red snapper, the water bill, a letter 
inviting me to a wellness seminar 

— and a "check” for $5 milli on. 

I passed on the snapper, paid 

the bill, considered die seminar. 
The "check" I tore up angrily. 

When my aunt died four years 
ago at 92. my task as her executor 
and heir included sorting through 

MEANWHILE 

her things, dispensing treasures 
to the family and photographs to 
the local museum she helped 
establish. 

There was one surprise. She 
had been a victim of direct-mar- 
keting companies that offer the 
prospect of cash sweepstakes 
winnings. 

We had seen, but chose to ig- 
nore, some signs of this affliction. 
Though she bad excellent taste, 
she had begun giving as presents 
"diamond" necklaces, plastic 
binoculars, ceramic figurines and 
cheap telephones. 

But until I discovered boxes 
and drawers of junk, we hadn't 
realized the extent of her hopes. 

"No purchase necessary to 
win” is the law; the implication, 
however, is that entries returned 
with orders for, say. $5.79 candy 
dishes will put the contestant on 
the fast track to big money. 

As the editor of a tiny weekly 
newspaper, my aunt had never 
earned more than $10,000 a year, 
and she had an 80-acre ranch to 
maintain. 

Tbe promise of financial se- 
curity in old age, which she never 
believed she had reached, was ap- 
parently enough to get her to sub- 
scribe to more than 60 magazines 

— Esquire, Young Miss and 
Country Music, among other odd 
choices. 

For months after her death, her 
mail brought daily notices that she 
was a finalist in some contest, that 
cash was guaranteed if she only 
returned the winning number. 
There were official -looking let- 
ters from "treasury depart- 
ments.” lawyers and investment 
advisers. There were “checks” 
for $5 million. 

Several years ago, when 1 was 
editor of Savvy (“The Magazine 
for Executive Women”), the pub- 
lisher decided to boost circulation 


by direct-mail marketing to 
people who had a history of re- 
sponding to sweepstakes offer- 
ings. Tbe mailings emphasized 
tbe contest rather than the 


Some responses we received 
were written in arthritic Palmer 
penmanship. We read confused 
letters from old men in Arizona 
and young mothers in Appalachia, 
who like my aunt had indiscrim- 
inately subscribed to win the 
contest 

Most of them said something 
like, “I don’t know why I’m read- 
ing this magazine.” 1 was em- 
barrassed. 

Now, I’m angry. My aunt was a 
businesswoman. But seven of the 
last eight checks she wrote were 
for trinkets bought with the ap- 
parent expectation of moving her 

Boxes of junk from, 
the sweepstakes 
come-ons revealed 
the extent of my 
aunt’s hopes . 

name into a “grand prize" cat- 
egory. If she was seduced and 
financially drained by these 
come-ons, then so are millions of 
other people. 

Many of them live alone. Many 
are old and have small, fixed in- 
comes. All dream of financial in- 
dependence, of not being a burden 
to their families, of leaving 
something of value to the people 
they love. 

I know sweepstakes are legal, 
but they are cruel. Surely, some- 
where between capitalism and 
censorship there is room for a 
corporate conscience. 

The writer, national director of 
the National Association for Fe- 
male Executives, contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed “Letters 
to the Editor" and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


BOOKS 


THE CREATION OF 
DR. B 

j A Biography of 
Bruno Bettelheim 

By Richard Poliak. 478 pages. 
328. Simon & Schuster. 

Reviewed by 
Claire Douglas 

R ichard pollaks 

first encounter with 
Bruno Bettelheim took place 
in 1969. when they talked 
about Poliak's brother — • a 
former patient of Bettelheim 
who had died accidentally 
while playing in a hayloft with 
Poliak 2 1 years before. At the 
time of the interview. Bettel- 
heim was 63 and an inter- 
nationally renowned authority 
on autism, on the upbringing 
and treatment of children, on 
the analysis of fairy tales, on 
Jews and the Holocaust, and 
on the behavior of people in 
concentration camps (he had 
been in both Dachau and 
Buchcnwald). 

He was a multitalented and 
prolific popularizer of psy- 
choanalysis known for his 
best-selling books and his au- 
thoritative command of his 
subject. In his writing, Bettri- 
lieini had the rare ability to 
clarify and vivify theory 


through poignant case histor- 
ies and his accessibly gemut- 
Hch prose. 

Poliak, who was 35 at the 
time of tiie meeting, simply 
wanted to know what had 
been wrong with his brother. 
Instead of discussing the mat- 
ter as he had hoped. Bettel- 
heim blasted Poliak’s mother, 
brother and whole family. 
The eruption puzzled Poliak, 
as (fid Bettelheim ’s fabrica- 
tion of fact and the scene's 
shocking incongruity with his 
public persona and tire com- 
forting tone of his bodes. 

Largely a sequel to this in- 
terview, "The Creation of Dr. 
B” is a monument to scru- 
pulous investigative report- 
ing. Poliak makes good use of 
his skills as a former editor 
and writer for tbe Nation to 
marshal and organize a mass 
of material that sometimes 
looms like a threatening ava- 
lanche of facts and opinions. 
The book is prodigiously well 
researched, built on copious 
use of archival material as 
well as more than 200 inter- 
views with relatives, col- 
leagues, former patients and 
students. It is to Poliak’s credit 
that the reader usually escapes 
entombment in all the detail. 

He painstakingly amasses 
proofs to buttress all his as- 


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THE ZD- 


senions about Bettelheim 's 
life, and includes large slabs of 
informed and scholarly rebut- 
tal of Bettelheim’ s most cher- 
ished findings. Though not a 
particularly graceful writer, 
Poliak lightens his text with 
telling phrases; he quotes de- 
scriptions of Bettelheim as 
“the Don Rickies of psycho- 
analysis," "an authoritarian 
personality bearing an anti-au- 
thoritarian message," "a flor- 
id invention of himself,” a 
man who employed a "Nazi- 
Socratic method” of supervi- 
sion and teaching, whose 
classes became "a bit like 
Dungeons and Dragons.” Pol- 
iak adds his own somewhat 
less agile put-down by calling 
Bettelheim psychology’s 
"loudest advocate for tbe 
Mom-as-villain diagnosis.'* 

Part of bo* tbe blessing 
and the curse of "Tbe Cre- 
ation of Dr. B” lies in Poliak’s 
passion to prove continually to 
die reader that what he saw 
and heard the day of his initial 
interview with Bettelheim 
was real He catalogues the 
minute specifics of exactly 
where and how Bettelheim 
had lied before or altered his 
credentials to fit the vagaries 
of his moods and needs, or 
plagiarized, or took credit for 
otters' work, or lacked sci- 
entific objectivity and skill. 
Most painful to read, 
however, are the parallels be- 
tween the way Bettelheim 
talked ofPbllak’s dead brother 
and Poliak’s example after ex- 
ample of the way Bettelheim 
misdiagnosed, mistreated, 
harassed or abused children 
and his presumed inferiors. 

Valuable though these dis- 
closures may be — and Poliak 
discover im po r t an t new al- 
legations such as Bettelheim’s 
sexual abuse of teenage girls 
in his care — the book often 
reads mare like an indictment 
than a biography. PoQak’s 


heavy hand at times begins to 
take on the thudding reson- 
ance of his subject’s, and we 
are left with Bettelheini found 
guilty on all counts. This may, 
indeed, be the purpose for 
writing the book, for by mak- 
ing Bettelheim so clearly at 
fault, Poliak can exorcise his 
own guilt at his brother’s 
death and, well avenged, fi- 
nally lay him to rest. 

Poliak does grant Bettel- 
heim his charisma and talent, 
his teaching and fund-raising 
dolls, his indefatigable capa- 
city for work as well as his 
often sympathetic treatment of 
his charges. But Poliak's main 1 
line of defense of his subject is 
unconvincing at best. It rests I 
on Bettelheim 's own retro- 
spective explanation far his 
acti ons — that he was mo- 
tivated by the pessimistic 
thinkers he studied in his 
youth, whose "as if” philo- 
sophy condoned die creation 
of a Active life in order to bring 
some coherence and meaning 
into an essentially meaning- 
lessness existence. “As if" 
becomes the leitmotif of the 
book but remains too abstract 
an explanation for the beha- 
vior of an exceedingly com- 
plex man, elucidating neither 
his genius nor his pathology. 

Nina Sutton’s recent bio- 
graphy, “Bettelheim: A Life 
and Legacy,” covers most of 
tte same ground as ‘ The Cre- 
ation of Dr. B” but provides 
die reader with a more psy- 
chologically perceptive ana- 
lysis of Bettelheim b behavior 
and a clearer picture of him as 
a man of his time. The legal- 
minded reader will enjoy Pol- 
iak’s building his case against 
Bettelheini and seeing the pop- 
ular idol topple. 

Claire Douglas, a Jungian 
analyst and clinical psycho- 
logist, wrote this for The Wash- 
ington Post. 


4 SaMSntt CURE, 
bv Jam Ttewtanlac. 
Breads Addnfy andBmy 
Fox — — — — 


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PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL TfEttAm TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 12, 1997 
PACE 10 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 



In Munich, ‘ Julius Caesar’ Meets Tyrannosaurus Rex 


By Roderick Conway Morris 

Imernultonal Herald Tribune 


M UNICH — A life-sked di- 
nosaur, a severed head in a 
plastic shopping bag, killer 
sharks and a rocket that 
blasts off in Act 2 and plummets to Eanh 
in Act 3 are just some of the features that 
characterize Richard Jones's produc- 
tion of “Giulio Cesare in Egitto*' (“Ju- 
lius C-aesar in Egypt") at the Bavarian 
Slate Opera, where it was rapturously 
received by a packed house. 

“Giulio Cesare' ’ was one of the first 
of Handel's long-negiected operas to be 
revived — at the Gottingen Festival in 
the 1920s — and it has since been the 
most frequently staged of the com- 
poser’s 39 Trahan operas. The work's 
appeal rests on its ravishing and con- 


stantly inventive music, and the story of 
Julius Caesar's conquest of Egypt and 
his love affair with Cleopatra (who later 
followed him to Rome and bore him a 
son). The plot is relatively easy to fol- 
low for an audience that does not un- 
derstand Italian. 

The “language problem” — espe- 
cially given the firm apposition of Peter 
Jonas, the Munich Opera's administrat- 
ive and artistic director, to sum ties and 

the theater's commitment (amply re- 
warded by its box-office returns) to try 
to attract the widest possible audience 
— goes some way toward explaining 
the burlesque aspects of Jones's inter- 
pretation. 

The main protagonists of “Giulio 
Cesare' ’ constantly address and refer to 
the stars (“le steile”), fate and destiny 
so Jones, and the set designer, Nigel 


Lowery, provide an overarching night 
sky. the Milky Way spotted with ce- 
lestial bodies the size of soccer balls. 
Two moon-like planets, zed and white, 
suspended in this heavenly vault, sym- 
bolize the work's two grand themes: 
Love (Venus) and War (Mars). The 
giant Tyrannosaurus Rex that towers 
over the stage when die curtain comes 
up is something of a riddle, until die 
cretaceous colossus topples over, pres- 
aging the fail Of Cleopatra's cruel tyr- 
ant-king brother Tolomeo (Ptolemy), 
who has inadvisedly sent noble-hearted, 
magnanimous Caesar the bead of his 
erstwhile enemy Pompey in that plastic 
bag. And when Cleopatra bewitches 
Caesar, the love-struck Roman is en- 
ticed into the jaws of an outsize Venus 
Flytrap, which snaps shut, literally 
swallowing him up. 


While purists might regard such gags 
as provocative and irreverent, no such 
prejudice exists among new Handel en- 
thusiasts, to judge by audience reac- 
tions. And Handel operas were, after all, 
supposed to divert, even amaze, oth- 
erwise they could hardly have dom- 
inated the commercial London stage for 
three decades in the 18th century when 
they were first written, 

F OR a long time after the re- 
discovery of these operas, they 
were mercilessly abridged. The 
trims for this production, 
however, in keeping with the current 
search for authenticity, are discreet and 
intelligently and the show goes 
on for nearly four hours. 

Playing with their usual profession- 
alism. fee Munich Opera orchestra, vig- 


orously conducted by Ivor Bolton, 
achieves a creditable impres sion o f 
baroque sound. However, the stopped 
horns, to take but one example, simply 
cannot match the “natural," unstopped 
instruments for which Handel wrote his 
marvelous anbpbonal final fanfare. Giv- 
en the respect shown here for the integrity 

of the music, it is a. pity that period 
fnsftrimgnts are not being played. 

Ann Murray, in camouflage kilt, ma- 
roon jacket wife epaulets, and bald head, 

portrays fee eponymous hero (as she did 

in last year's equally modernistic “Xer-- 
xes,” directed by Martin Duncan, which 
will also figure in this year's Munich 
Opera Festival in July), providing once 
again the indefatigable engine feat 
drives the whole production Along. Mur- 
ray's energy seems as limitless as her 
ability to handle wife panache any phys- 


ical challenge a director IWgig 
throws ai her — managing here NB jj 
to project her voice crisply and ^ 
aufebly even singing face down after ^ 
she has dragged herself out of those 
shark-infested waters onto the beach. 

Pamela Coburn conveys fee neces- 
sary blend of strength and vulnerability 
in her convincing Cleopatra (one of 
Handel’s most powerful realizations of 
character- in-music) , and an excellent 
Kathleen Kuhlmann brings dignity and 
pathos to Cornelia, Pompey's widow, 
fee most challenging major role to 
carry off in the entire opera, and worts 
well wife an engaging and accom- 
plished Trudeliese Schmidt, as her son 
Sesto. 

There will be festival performances 
of “Giulio Cesare" on July 13 and 26, 
and of ‘ ‘Xerxes” on July 23. 


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The Gifts From Shostakovich 


Ralph Fiennes and Kristin Scott Thomas in “ The English Patient !' which picked up 12 nominations. 

‘English Patient’: 12 Oscar Bids 


By Lynn Elber 

The Associated Press 


B everly hills. 
California — The 
sweeping wartime 
epic “The English 
Patient" led wife 12 
Academy Award nomina- 
tions on Tuesday as Oscar 
voters recognized independ- 
ent films but not one partic- 
ular material girl. 

Madonna failed to receive 
a best actress bid for her star 
turn as Argentina's contro- 
versial Fust lady in fee mu- 
sical “Evita." The Film based 


on fee stage play also failed to 
gamer a best picture nod. 

Independents triumphed 
over major studio releases. 
Led by “The English Pa- 
tient," they claimed four of 
the Five best picture nods and 
many other top nominations. 

Best picture contenders 
also Included “Fargo," 
“Secrets & Lies," “Shine" 
and Tri-Star’s * ‘Jerry 
Maguire," fee only picture in 
feat category coming from a 
major studio. 

“Fargo' ’ and * ‘Shine’ ’ had 
seven nominations apiece, 
while “Jerry Maguire” and 



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“Secrets & Lies” each got 
five. 

Best actor nominees in- 
cluded Ralph Fiennes for 
“The English Patient," Tom 
Cruise for “Jerry Maguire," 
Woody Haralson for “The 
People vs. Lany Flynt," 
Geoffrey Rush for “Shine" 
and Billy Bob Thornton for 
"Sling Blade." 

His performance as a re- 
tarded man wife a violent past 
was a breakthrough for fee 
relatively obscure Thornton, 
who also received a screen- 
play nomination as fee writer 
of “Sling Blade" and was the 
film's director as well. He 
was a regular on the CBS 
situation comedy “Hearts 
Afire.” 

Top actress contenders 
were Kristin Scott Thomas 
for “The English Patient.” 
Brenda Blefeyn for “Secrets 
& Lies,” Diane Keaton for 
“Marvin's Room,” Frances 
McDonnand for “Fargo" 
and Emily Watson for 
“Breaking the Waves." 

Also favored but missing 
from the actress nominees 
was Debbie Reynolds for her 
role in “Mother.” 


T HE awards will be 
given out March 24. 
Billy Crystal will be 
host. 

The controversial film 
“The People vs. Larry 
Flynt,” about fee life of the 
Hustler sex magazine pub- 
lisher. didn't receive a best 
picture nod, but saw its di- 
rector Milos Forman nomin- 
ated as well as its star. 


Forman competes with An- 
thony Min|heUa for “The 
English Patient’’ Joel Coen 
for “Fargo,” Mike Leigh far 
“Secrets & Lies" and Scott 
Hides for “Shine." 

Supporting actor con- 
tenders were Cuba Gooding Jr. 
for “Jeny Maguire,” Willuni 
H. Macy for “Fargo " Annin 
Muelier-Stahl for “Shine," 
Edward Norton for “Primal 
Fear" and James Woods for 
“Ghosts of Mississippi." 

In fee supporting actress 
category were Lauren Bacall 
for “The Mirror Has Two 
Faces.” Joan Allen for “The 
Crucible." Juliette Binoche 
for “The English Patient" 
Barbara Hershey for “The 
Portrait of a Lady' ’ and Mari- 
anne Jean-Baptiste for 
“Secrets & Lies.” 

Also forgotten by fee 
academy was Courtney Love, 
the rock singer and sometime 
actress who played Flynt's 
outrageous wife in “The 
People vs. Larry Flynt.” 

Foreign language film 
nominees were “A Chef in 
Love,” from the former So- 
viet Union republic of Geor- 
gia; “Kolya.’ fee Czech Re- 
public; “The Other Side of 
Sunday,” Norway; “Prison- 
er of fee Mountains,” Russia; 
and “Ridicule,” France. 

In addition to best picture, 
director and three acting 
nominations. “The English 
Patient” also got nomina- 
tions for adapted screenplay, 
original dramatic score, cine- 
matography, art direction, 
costume design, film editing 
and sound. 


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By George W. Loomis 

S T. PETERSBURG — Mstislav 
Rostropovich is the dedicatee of 
Shostakovich’s two cello con- 
certos and readily acknow- 

Yefshostakovich made him a gilltfeat 
went overlooked until recently: A plan 
for a festival of the composer’s music. 
With feat plan as the foundation, 
Rostropovich assembled a 12-concert 
Shostakovich celebration, which runs 
through Feb. 22. 

The plan was apparently sketched out 
in the early 1960s, sometime after Shos- 
takovich and Rostropovich collaborated 
on performances at fee Edinburgh Fest- 
ival But it satin Rostropovich's personal 
files until he came across it a couple of 
years ago. The idea of realizing the com- 
poser’s intentions, Rostropovich has 
said, took on a “mystical significance" 
for him, and he came to feel a special duty 
to do so in the city where Shostakovich 
was bom and lived for much of his life. 

The impressive list of participants 
Rostropovich has brought together sug- 
gests that others fob a similar inspiration; 
conductor Yuri Temiikanov, violinists 
Gidon Kroner and Victor Tretyakov, 
cellist Alexander Knyazev, pianist Ignat 
Solzhenitzyn, mezzo soprano Olga 
Borodina, and fee Taney ev and Borodin 
quartets, among others. And the orches- 
tral works of fee composer are in fee 
secure hands of the St Petersburg Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; fee festival em- 
braces eight of fee 15 symphonies. 

Much has been made of fee “public” 


and “private” sides of Stostakovich’s 
music, but fee festival shows Shos- 
takovich in a comparatively optimistic 
mood, in part because of fee aeddem of 
timin g. The late works, haunted by 
thoughts of death, were not yet written 
when fee plan was conceived. 

Apart from this, fee choice of works 
suggests that Shostakovich may have 
wanted fee festival to have at least a 
modicum of conviviality, though it is 
just as likely tbai be remained concerned 
about what the Soviet authorities would 
accept. On fee bonds, for instance, is 
not fee highly personal Fourth Sym- 
phony, withheld until 1 961, but thee ver- 
popular Fifth, which helped rehabilitate 
the composer after Stalin’s devastating 
attack in 1936. And of fee two wartime 
symphonies, fee Eighth, a grim reflec- 
tion on war, which lost favor after an- 
other round of attacks in 1948, deferred 
to the vociferously patriotic Seventh. 

At fee opening concert last month, 
Temiikanov led a bracing performance 
of the Seventh, with all requisite military 
spit-and-polish, but it was especially 
moving to witness Rostropovich as so- 
loist in tte First Cello Concern, which he 
played at its premiere here, in fee com- 
poser's presence, nearly 40 years ago. 

After fee opening, the baton passed to 
Rostropovich. His reading of the first 
Symphony, the work feat established 
the 20-year-old composer’s internation- 
al reputation, showed it to be a work of 
considerable depth as well as sure 
design. The Tenth Symphony was an- 
other high point among fee early con- 
certs, a brilliantly constructed, intensely 
absorbing work. 


And one gained renewed respect for 
the craftsmanship of Shostakovich’s 
essays in concerto form, especially 
when treated to the kind of luminous 
account Kremer gave of the Second 
Violin Concerto. Among the chamber 
works, fee irresistible E-minor Piano 
Trio worked its magic through An im- 
passioned reading, with Rostropovich 
again on cello. 

Vocal music plays a secondary role, 
buz Shostakovich envisioned a place for 
Rostropovich's wife Galina Vish- 
nevskaya in the festival She graced the 
audience, but fee music designated for 
her, including fee urbane cycle “Satires” 
and Shostakovich’s orchestration of 
Mussorgsky’s “Songs and Dances of 
Death,” are now assigned to others. 


T HE St. Petersburg audience 
may have more Shostakovich 
blood running through its veins 
than do most others, but it has a 
tiling or two to learn about him too. Only 
last year, for instance, did it hear die 
original version of the opera “Lady 
Macbeth of Mtsensk” after years of 
suppression. The current opportunity is 
not being missed. Even at a top price of 
100,000 rubles (about $18) — an un- 
heard of amount here — tickets are hard 
to come by. 

Rostropovich, who turns 70 this year, 
sees himself occupied wife ever more 
Shostakovich in die years ahead. Prep- . 
arations for festivals along similar lines 
are under way for England and Japan. 


Petersburg Tunes. 


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A Spare ‘Pelleas, 5 Stylized as Noh 


I'ltf-'--.. 
1 ilSTT" 


By David Stevens 

international Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Debussy’s “Pelleas et 
Melisande,” which is both a 
cornerstone of fee French rep- 
ertory and an operatic one-of-a- 
kind, is bads at the Palais Gamier in an 
ultra-stylized production by Robert 
Wilson and a rich musical realization 
under James Cool on. 

Wilson’s staging is as highly form- 
alized as a Noh play. The movements of 
fee singers are choreographed rather 
than literal representations of what the 
libretto says, and sense of place is left 
mostly to fee viewer's imagination and 
knowledge of fee story. 

Wilson's decor is spare and geomet- 
ric and a flat backdrop is used as a screen 
on which varied colors and cloudlike 
shapes are projected. Frida Panneggia- 
ni’s costumes are like uniforms i — a 
white suit for Pelleas. a black one for 
Golaud, while Melisande is outfitted 
like fee hostess at a cocktail party and 


little Yniold is dressed as if he were a 
16th-century child prince. 

The characters never touch each other. 
Not in the tower scene, where Pelleas and 
Melisande communicate firms opposite 
sides of the stage and he does not come 
anywhere near her long hair, let alone get 
tangled up in it Not even when the 
enraged Golaud seizes Melisande by the 
hair and throws her around (according to 
the libretto) — here, Golaud’s cruelty is 
limited to his words, which have a visibly 
torturing effect on his young wife. 

With such stylized movement, the 
text becomes doubly important, and be- 
cause fee text says things mostly by 
suggestion and leaving things unsaid, 
the music also gains in importance, for 
Debussy begins where Maurice 
Maeterlinck’s words leave off. 

So much the better, then, that Coni on 
has his fine orchestra speak out in foil 
voice, realizing fee richness of tonal 
color that Debussy put into fee score. 

He also has the singers to match this 
forthright approach. Suzanne Memzer is 


CROSSWORD 


vocally a more than normally substantial 
Melisande. and Jose Van Dam is a pillar j 
of strength as Golaud, all fee more men- 
acing in his tortured jealousy because it 
is concentrated in his voice rather than 
given physical outlet. Russell Braun’s 
clear, almost tenon sh baritone was well 
employed in Pelleas 's music. Victor von 
Halem was a sonorous Arkel, Felicity 
Palmer the solid Genevieve and Gaele 
Le Roi a pert Yniold. 

There are six more performances 
through March 2 at the Palais Gamier, 
and fee Salzburg Festival, which is a co- 
producer, presents it in its 1997 pro- 
gram. 

Perhaps it is a coincidence, but almost 
simultaneous with this production of De- 
bussy's only completed opera, there are 
productions in Paris theaters of two plays 
by Maeterlinck, whose work is all but 
unknown now, although he was cefe- f 
brated in his day. “Pelleas et Melisande" 
is at fee Arbenee, and “La Mott de 
Tintagfles” is at the Theatre Gerard- 
Philipe in Saint-Denis. 


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praawwfiAL 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


E 7 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1997 


PAGE 11 


EMU Worry 
Gives Dollar 
Added Lift 

German Economy 
Overshadows G-7 

ConeMiyOm-SnfFmmDkpmJm, 

■ YORK ■ — The dollar resumed 

us climb against most other major cur- 
rmoes Tuesday, rising strongly againsr 
Ocittsche marie, amid growing con- 
«m about Germany’s economic troubles 
days after major industrial nations 
indicated the U.S. currency had risen far 
enough. 

Meanwhile. U.S. Treasury Secretary 
Robert Rubin told the House of Rep- 
resentatives’ Ways and Means Cozn- 
mittee that the dollar had corrected itself 
against other currencies and that its 
move had helped U.S. prosperity. He 
sard the strong dollar had brought low 
inflation and low interest rates to the 
United States. 

Although he said the U.S. currency 
was “now back in a normal Tanga,** his 
comments seemed to have little impact 
as traders focused on die marie. 

Traders sold marks after die BBC 
reported dial Germany’s budget deficit 
this year would be too large to the 

criteria for a single European currency. 

“People were piling out of die 
Deutsche mark, looking far any excuse 
to buy dollars,” said Mike Ca s ey , a 
manager for Federated Investors. 

‘New 


“News reports have got people think- 
ing about how weak die German econ- 
omy is.” 

The dollar rose to 1.6756 Deutsche 
marks from 1.6554 DM in late trading 

It was also quoted at 123.050 yea, up 
from 122.775 yen. 

The U.S. currency also gained to 
1 .4355 Swiss francs from 1 .4260 francs 
and to 5.6530 Bench francs from 
5.5910 francs. 

The pound was at $1.6365, down 
from $1.6408. 

The pound soared against the mark as 
investors sought a haven from Ger- 
many's economic troubles and the tur- 
moil surrounding monetary union. Bri- 
tain has not decided yet whether to join 
the single currency. 

The BBC report said the German 
budget deficit would reach 3.5 percent 
of gross domestic product this year, 
exceeding the 3 percent cap required for 
members of European monetary union. 

But the German Finance Ministry 
dismissed the report and repeated its 1 
latest estimate that the deficit would 
total 2.9 percent of economic output this 
year. Concern that Germany’s deficit 
will bulge grew after the government 
said last week that joblessness rose to its 
highest level since 1933 in January, 
le dollar’s strong rise against the 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 



iwm aub^whw NwMTei 

The staff: Michael Berman, left, Elizabeth Mifehefl, Matt Berman, John Kennedy Jr, Elmore Carmody-Gtbboos. 

George Searches for a Little Respect 


By Robin Pogrebin 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — John F. Kennedy Jr. has heard it all by 
now. 

He has heard the skeptics question - _ 

time and again whether he is just using MEDIA MARKETS 

his political magazine, George, as a 

springboard forms own political career. 


He is aware that people in the media industry mutter to 
themselves disparagingly, “Who's reading George?” 

And yes, the naysaying rankles. 

But while George may so far have failed to gain en- 
thusiastic accolades in elite publishing and political circles, 
- the magazine announced this month 

that it had reached a circulation of 
400,000 in just a year and a half. 


He has heard pundits pooh-pooh Ms publication — 
which combines occasionally weighty cover lines like 
“The End of Social Security * with cover images like the 
supexmodel Claudia Schiffer in nothing but a red, white and 
bhteClinton-Gare banner — as just so modi celebrity fluff. 


George is now the largest political magazine in the 
country. 

So Mr. Kennedy has been forced to come to terms with 
the prospect that winning readers and winning respect may 

See GEORGE, Page 13 


Productivity Gains 
Ease Inflation Fears 

U.S. Labor Costs Stay in Control 


Ce np d rdbyOwSaffFnm O i | urt a 

WASHINGTON — The productivity 
of U.S. workers rose a larger-than-ex- 
pected 2J2 percent in the fourth quarter 
— the biggest gain in three years — as 
labor costs were contained, government 
figures showed Tuesday. 

Productivity, a key measurement of 
how quickly living standards can rise, 
rose 0.8 percent for all of 1996, more 
than doubling its 03 percent gam of 
1995. It was toe best showing since pro- 
ductivity shot up 33 percent m 1992 in a 
recovery from the recession of 1990-91. 

But in a figure likely to calm fears of 
a rise in inflation, the government said 
unit labor costs — which take into ac- 
count both hourly wages and productiv- 
ity — rose at only a 1.4 percent annual 
rate in die fourth quarter, down from a 
33 percent rate in the previous quarter. 
For the year, unit labor costs rose 2.9 
percent, the same as in 1995. 

For businesses and workers, pro- 
ductivity gains are crucial to increases 
in profits and living standards. For the 
Federal Reserve Board, an improve- 
ment in productivity can signal a lack of 
inflationary pressures — which mems 
there is no need to raise interest rates. 

“La bey costs are still well con- 
tained,” said Robert Dederick, an eco- 
nomic consultant at Northern Trust Co. 
in Chicago. The Fed “can remain on 
hold” cm interest rates, he said. 

The U.S. unemployment rate, at 5.4 
percent in January, is near a seven-year 
low. But some economists say the rea- 


son a relatively tight labor market has 
not produced wage inflation is lhai glob- 
al competition and the memory of large 

layoffs a few years ago have made work- 
ers more concerned about job security 
and less likely to demand large raises. 

Although productivity in 1996 was the 
best in four years, it did not match that of 
the 1950s and 1960s, when productivity 
often rose more than 2 percent a year. 
Since the early 1970s. productivity gains 
have been averaging about 1 percent. 

Economists say the lag in productivity 
gains compared with the early postwar 
years is at the root of many problems in 
the U.S. economy, from worker inse- 
curity to slow growth in average incomes. 
Stifl. analysts said the 1996 figure was not 
bad, considering that the current eco- 
nomic expansion is six years old. Late in 
an economic cycle, with businesses using 
much of their operating capacity, pro- 
ductivity gains can be hand to crane by. 

“Basically the long-term trend in 
productivity is estimated at about 1 per- 
cent a year,” said Carl Palash, an econ- 
omist with MCM MoneyWarch Inc., a 
New York-based consulting firm. 
* 'Typically, productivity is below trend 
when you reach high levels of util- 
ization, so the fact that it’s staying close 
to trend is a very good development.” 
Separately, the weekly Bank of 
Tokyo-Mitsubishi/Schroder Wertheim 
on U.S. retail sales showed that 
i rose 0.9 percent last week from the 
jvious week, led by Wal-Mart Stores 
c. (AP. Bloomberg) 


SI 15% Rise in Profit and a Plan to Sell Units Lift Unilever’s Shares 


CfcqOrf by Or nm Dapm*a 

LONDON — Unilever Group report- 
ed a 15 percent rise in annual profit 
Tuesday aid pit its specialty-chemicals 
units up for sale, a move that is expected 
to raise as much as £5 billion ($83 
billion). 

The Anglo-Dutch consumer-products 
company saidpretax profit rose to £2.66 
billion last year on a 6 percent rise in 
revenue, to £3352 billion. 

The company, which also reports its 
earnings in guilders, saidprofit rose to 
4.12 billion guilders ($231 billion) 
from 3.73 bilKon guilders in 1995. Sales 
were 37 .8 trillion guilders, up from 79.7 
billion guilders. 

Unilever shares surged on the results, 
which were better than analysts had 
forecast, and on the planned sale. 

In London, Unilever rose 62 pence to 
1,472. In Amsterdam, the shares closed 
at 33130 guilders, up 17.90. 

Unilever’s chairman, Niall FitzGer- 


ald, said die sale of the specialty-chem- 
icals businesses would enable the com- 
pany to concentrate on achieving 
growth in its consumer-goods opera- 
tions, particularly in developing and 
emerging marke rs. 

Analysts said die sale, which could 
put Unilever in position far a major 
acauisition in its main food, detergents 
ana personal products businesses, was 
well timed. 

Mr. FitzGerald said, meanwhile, that 
the overall economic shuaticn in 1997, 
as in 1996, was likely to be generally 
favorable for die company, but he said 
he saw little reason to believe that con- 
ditions in Europe, particularly in France 
and Germany, would improve. 

“The figures were excellent,” Peter 
de Bie, a stock trader in Amsterdam, said. 
“It looks like their fourth quarter was a 
lot better than analysts were expecting, 
and their prospects remain good too.” ' 

The company also said it planned to 


Sell its four internati o nal chemical;; units 
to expand its consumer-products busi- 
ness, which i nclu de* brands such as 
Dove soap and Breyers ice cream. 

The units, which account for about 9 
percent of Unilever’s total sales, are 
National Starch & Chemical Co. in the 
United States, Quest International and 
Unichema International NV in the Neth- 
erlands and Crosfield PLC in Britain. 

“These are extremely large and im- 
portant parts of oar businesses,” Mr. 


FitzGerald said. * 'But for some time we 
have been reviewing whether they 
should be a continuing part of the port- 
folio — not because they are poorly 
performing themselves; they are excel- 
lent performers — bat whether we can 
give them the concentration and the 
focus that they require.” 

He did not say how much the busi- 
nesses, which have 15,800 employees in 
more than 35 countries, might Ming. 
Analysts estimate they could fetch £45 


billion to £5 trillion. In the short tenn, Mr. 
FitzGerald said, their sale would wipe 
out the company’s net borrowings of 
£1.7 billion. The proceeds would also be 
used for acquisitions in growth areas, he 
said, such as Asia and the Pacific or 
South America and in categories such as 
detergents, tea. ice cream, personal-care 
products and fragrances. 

“In China I would like to have a 
business 10 times the size.” be said. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg, AFX ) 


New at Reader’s Digest: Ads on Back 


By Stuart Elliott 

New York Times Service 


languages, have featured artwork, usu- 


Reader’s Digest, for the first rime 
ince it began accepting advertising 42 
ears ago, is selling space on its back 
over. 

If the estimated 50 million readers of 
le American edition of die magazine 
lip over any of the 15 million copies of 
ie February issue, they will see an 
dvertisement, in the form of a per- 
orated gatefold flap, by Leo Burneti 
'o. in Chicago for a longtime client, 
[all mark Cards Inc. 

On one side of the advertisement is a 
itch for Hallmark cards, part of a year- 
>ng series known appropriately enough 
s the back-cover campaign. The other 
ide bears a reminder to watch the 
Hallmark Hall of Fame” show. 

When Reader's Digest executives de- 
ided in 1955 to accept advertising. 33 
ears afteriLs first issue, they prohibited 
citing space on the back cover, which at 
ther publications is a highly prized — 
□d expensive — advertising position. 
1 place of ads, the back covers of the 
Hgest, a monthly with 48 editions in 19 


That policy was emblematic of Me 
strict rules under which die magazine 
has sold advertising. Other strictures 
prohibit ads for cigarettes or alcoholic 
beverages. 

The new back-cover policy : — which 
still carries certain restrictions — is 
mere than another effort to bolster ad 
sales. The shift is indicative of efforts by 
Digest managers to update their sales 
strategies and shake off an image as a 
fusty, musty marketer. 

That is becoming increasingly im- 
portant as the magazine’s parent. Read- 
er’s Digest Association, strives to im- 
prove its financial performance after 
posting disappointing results in oper- 
ations such as books and music. 

“The magazine does need to 
evolve,” said Gregory Coleman, pub- 
lisher of die American edition of die 
Digest and vice president and general 
manager for U.S. magazines at the Di- 
gest Association in New York. 

Too many media, Mr. Coleman said, 
have adopted changes that can blur die 


line between editorial content and ad- 
vertising, and tins “creates reader con- 
fusion.” 

The Digest must be “heavily reader- 
driven,” he said, in part because cir- 
culation brings in 65 percent of its total 
revenue, a high rate compared with oth- 
er magazines. 

Hallmark and Burnett will bay the 
Digest’s back cover “at least once 
more, and maybe twice more, this 
year,” said Brad Moore, Hallmark’s 
vice president for advertising. 

Mr. Coleman estimated the cost of a 
back-cover ad at $350,000 to $500,000, 
compared with $192,000 for a one-time 
four-color ad inside the magazine. 

The Digest is exploring back-cover 
ads in its international editions, Mr. 
Coleman said, as well as back covers 
featuring perhaps a photograph 
sponsored by a film company, or a paint- 
ing with a corporate logotype below il 

Other policy changes may be con- 
sidered, too, he said, perhaps even ac- 
cepting liquor ads. 

Some policies, though, will not 
change, Mr. Coleman said — such as 
the ban on tobacco ads. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Feb. ii Ubtd-Ubor Rates 


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HaaJtqaariere uf Republic 
National Bank of Notr York 
(Sintsvi S. .1 . h Genera. 


Republic clients are uncommonly per- 
ceptive people. They know we offer all the 
services of a modem, growth-oriented hank. 
Yet ask arty of them to describe Republic in 
one word - and that word is invariably: Safe. 

The main reason is that we have built 
Republic's global operations with client secu- 
rity uppermost. It's why we maintain one of 
the strongest capital ratios in the hanking 



DELY RECOGNIZED AS ONE 


OF THE WORLD’S SAFEST BANKS. 


industry, a high degree of operating efficiency and 
a relatively small loan portfolio. Our credit 
ratings are AA. 

Republic is now one of America’s 25 largest 
hanks and the Number One foreign-own ed hank 
in Switzerland, ranked hv assets. Putting safety 
first evidently makes a great deal of sense to a 
great many people. 



VtnrIJ llcajyuarler* of 
Rcppili.' X.fliiimi/ Rank of 
Sear York in aVcir York. 



Republic National Bank of New York’ 

Strength. Security. Service. 


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PAGE 2 



INTERNATIONAL HERAUO. TKIBIJNE, SATURDAY-! 



Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 


The Rich-Poor Gap in the U.S. Seems to Stabilize 


6800 

/W . &95 


^ £65 


6J5 



By Robert D. Hershey Jr. 

JVnr York Times Service 


Doliar in Deutsche narks H Dollar in Yen 


1.67 


1.57 


1.47 



S O N D J F 
1996 1997 


Exchange Index 



WASHINGTON —A new White 
House report contends that the gap 
between rich and poor m America 
appears to have stopped widening 
and may have reversal. 

“In die last few years some signs 


have begun to emerge that inequal- 
1 perhaps 


NYSE 


The Dow 


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NYSE 

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s&p^oo. . . 


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Compose 

414 40&. 

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528095 / ^316^3, ^ 4i&r' 

Caracas 

Capifal General 

NA. s ' 

Source; Bloomberg. Reuters 

hHemiioinl Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


ity may be stabilizing and 
even declining slightly.” President 
Bill Clinton's Council of Economic 
Advisers said Monday in an annual 
report on the state of the economy. 

While other reports in the last 
year, from the Census Bureau and 


from the University of Michigan, 
have shown a widening disparity 
between rich and poor Americans, 
die council found that the poorest 20 
percent of U.S. households had the 
biggest income gains of any of the 
five 20-percentile groups. 

* The increase; averaging nearly 35 
percent a year, was more than twice 
the gain of the top earning group. 
The council is a three-member panel 
headed by Joseph Sti glitz, who start- 
ed his new job as chief economist of 
the World Bank on Tuesday. 

Still, the council cautioned that the 
latest figures might prove to be only a 
pause rather than the start of a trend. 


“It is- too soon to tell whether a 
break in the long-term trend toward 
greater income inequality has oc- 
curred,” the report says. 

The council offered little by way 
of explanation for the latest figures 
other than to imply a shift in one or 
more of the reasons often cited fora 
widening of the disparity in wealth: 
more immigrants and women in the 
labor force, technological develop- 
ments favoring drilled workers, the 
expansion of international trade and 
the ‘‘winner-take- all” phenomenon 
in which top people are paid far 
more than those with only slightly 
less ability. 


But the report did say that the 
narrowing was sharper than would 
have been expected from a rising 
tide of business expansion that 
simply tiffed all the boats. 

• Social Security is the government 
program that probably contributes 
most to reducing inequality, the pan- 
el said, with other important factors 
being the earned income tax credit 
and the minimum "wage. The credit 
was made more generous in .1990 
and 1993, and.tbe minimum wage 
was raised in 1990 and 1996- 
In die report’s chapter on the 
labor market, the council disputed 
the contention of some analysts 


who, it said, believed that a basic 
change in the nature of the job mar- 
ket had occurred, with growth con- 
centrated in low-paying jobs, wages 
Failing, layoffs rising ana prospects 
of long-term employment fading. 

41 ‘These claims arc exaggerated. * V 
the council said, “histhejobsinthe 
middle, the ones offering wages 
close to the median, that have be- 
come somewhat scarcer. Layoffs, 
meanwhile, are not rising: The rate 
of job loss has actually declined 
somewhat, although it does appear 
that certain categories of workers 
previously less affected by job loss 
are now more at risk.” 




rY; 


Blue Chips Rebound as Bargain-Hunters Enter Market 


Time Warner’s Profit Rises 79% 


NEW YORK (AP) — Time Warner Inc. reported a 79 
percent rise in fourth-quarter profit Tuesday, citing strong 
performances by its magazines, cable operations and Home 
Box Office premium cable channel. 

The media and entertainment company's earnings rose to 


Bloomberg Newt 

NEW YORK — Blue-chip stocks rose 
Tuesday, rebounding from a sell-off on 
Monday, as a round of profit-taking drew 
bargain-hunters into the market 

But the technology sector was still de- 
pressed as the semiconductor maker Intel lost 
an early advance, taking the wind out of a rally 
in computer shares. 

“Today is another display of resilience by 
the market, as the common wisdom seems to be 
to buy on any setback,” said Michael Metz, 
chief investment strategist at Oppenheimer. 

The Dow Jones industrial average closed 
51.37 points higher at 6,858.11. Advancing 
issues slightly outnumbered losers. 


The Standard & Poor's 500-stock index 
rose 4.11 to 789.54. The Nasdaq composite 
index slumped 3.99 points to 1,331.35. Mi- 
crosoft, Ascend and Oracle led the slide. 

Intel and Microsoft fell after both compa- 
nies’ treasurers failed to convince investors 


US. STOCKS 


attending a Goldman Sadis symposium that 
prospects for future growth were good enough 
to warrant bidding up the prices. 

Two shares that were battered early in the 
week; the networkers 3Com and Cisco Sys- 
tems, rebounded slightly. 

A sell-off in computer shares began last 


week when analysts warned that Intel, an 
industry bellwether, may not duplicate its 
1996 growth rate. 

Concern that interest rates may rise also 
weighed on the market. 

Investors are looking to a government sale 
of $39.5 billion of new debt mat started Tues- 
day for clues to the strength of demand for 
U.S. assets. 

“Stock investors want to see how much of 
an impact the debt sale will have,” said Peter 
DaPuzzo, president of Cantor Fitzgerald. 

The yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was 
unchanged at 6.70 percent after a Labor De- 


in the fourth quarter. The price of the bond was 
quoted with a gain of 1/32, at 97 1 1/32. . . 

America Online weakened afterit reached a 
final settlement with 44 states to offer refunds 
to users of its on-line service who had had 
difficulty logging on. 

Norfolk Southern fell after the rail operator 
stated a proxy fight to gain control of Con- 
rail’s board and force it to consider Norfolk 
Southern’s takeover bid. 

Unilever's American depositary receipts 
rose. The company said fourth-quarter net 


profit rose 67 percent, helped by a change in 
' r methods, and said it would sell 


ity increased a larger-than-expected 2 2 percent 


accounting 

specialty-chemicals units representing 9 per- 
cent of its sales. (Bloomberg,. Reusers, AP ) 


■ f'- 








p'" 



Sltt ^ DOLLAR: Concern on EMU Sends Currency Still Higher 


“In October, we closed the merger between Tune Warner 
and Turner Broadcasting System; Time Warner is now stra- 
tegically complete.” Gerald Levin, the company's chairman 
and chief executive, said. 

For the fell year, however. Tune Warner reported a net loss 
ofS191 million, co mp ared with a loss of $166 million in 1995. 
Revenue rose to $10.06 billion from $8.07 billion. 


Continued from Page 11 


• Deere & Co.'s profit for its first quarter rose 6.3 percent, to 
SI 76.7 million, on strong sales of agricultural equipment both 
inside and outside the United States. 


• Westinghouse Electric Corp. said a charge reflecting die cost 
of cutting 1,100 jobs at its industrial businesses before they are 
spun off this year into a separate company resulted in a fourth- 
quarter loss of $34 million, compared with a loss of $7 milli on in 
the fourth quarter of 1995. 

• VF Corp„ the maker of Lee and Wrangler jeans, plans a 
major restructuring that will require as many as 3,000 layoffs 
over the next four years, according to a newspaper report 

• HRO & Co. will acquire Amisys Managed Care Systems 
Inc. for about $182.7 million, in stock to help its business of 
computer-systems sales to the health-care industry. 

Johnson & Johnson said it would buy Innotecb Inc„ which 


manufactures equipment used to make eyeglass lenses, for 
S13.75 a share, or $123.8 million. 


• Compaq Computer Corp. will set up a customer-care 
center in Dublin. Ireland, a move it said would create 550 jobs 
within three years. * AP. Bloomberg 


mark was also linked to a report 
citing unidentified German officials 
as saying they would welcome more 
s trength in the U-S. currency and 
would prefer to see it around 1 .70 to 
1.75 DM. 

The market thinks there “is more 
than a kernel of truth” in the report, 
according to Marc Chandler, an ana- 
lyst at Deutsche Morgan Grenfell. 
The Germans are more likely to let 
the dollar go higher than the Jap- 
anese, Mr. Chandler said. 

Dealers cited a comment made 
recently by a Bundesbank council 
member that a dollar rate of 1.80 DM 
would not be welcomed. 

Many market participants have 
interpreted the repeat to mean feat 
dollar gains up to 1 .80 DM would be 
acceptable. 

Earlier, the dollar briefly slipped 
below its highs, a move that was 
attributed to some apprehension 
over potential central bank inter- 
vention and profit-taking. 


“Tie Group of Seven hasn’t had 
any lasting impact,” said Tony Nor- 
field, currency economist at ABN- 
AMRO Bank in Loudon. 

Traders decided that central 
h anks probably would not intervene 
at this time to put the brakes on the 
dollar, Mr. Nomeld said. 

Many traders contend that eco- 
s, rather than the 


nomic 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


G-7 leaders, will be paramount in 
driving exchange rates. 

That means a higher dollar, they 
said, because U.S. economic growth 
is stronger than Germany or Japan 's, 
and interest rates are higher in 
America, luring money to invest- 
ments in the currency. 

“The difficulty for the G-7 is feat 
interest-rate differentials still favor 
the- dollar.” said Robert Hormats, 
vice chairman of Goldman Sachs 
International. 

Dealers said the market would 
continue to test Group of Seven of- 


ficials until they saw a policy ad- 
justment or central bank interven- 
tion. 

“Unless they start raising rates or 
doing something drastic tike that, 
there will be no change in fee trend” 
of a strengthening dollar, said Juer- 
gen Jjonker, a broker at Hollenkamp 
& Van DerFoel in Rotterdam. 

“When you look at where the 
growth is in fee world today,” 
former U.S. Treasury Secretary 
James Baker said in a television 
interview. “I can't blame people for 
buying dollars.” 

In Europe, the mark also 
weakened, as traders expressed fear 
that Germany might not meet the 
deficit criterion for taking part in 
economic and monetary union . 

Li addition to fee fact that a large 
budget gap would deter global in- 
vestors from putting their money in 
Germany, “fee thinking is that it 
will be a more watered-down euro,” 
said Chris Iggo, currency strategist 
at Barclays B ank, 

(AFX, Bloomberg . Bridge News) 


Apple Plans Big Charge 
For Acquisition of Next 


By John Markoff 

- New York Times Service 


CUPERTINO, California — 
Apple Computer Inc. plans to take a 
huge charge against earnings this 
quarter to reflect fee cost of ac- 
quiring Next Software Inc., and its 
executive in charge of courting out- 
side software allies wffl leave fee 
company after a year in fee job. 

Apple said it would take a $322 
million write-off far acquiring 
Next, which it agreed to -buy in- 
December in an effort to ovate 
new software technology- for 
Apple's aging Macintosh com- 
puter line. The company also said 
it would pay about $30 million 
more for Next than the $400 mil- 
lion previously estimated. 


The resulting loss, which Apple 
i wilf be 


did not estimate but which 1 


absorbed in fee current quarter, 
may mean that the company will 
not return to profitability m its 
current financial year, which ends 
in October. 

.Just last week, at the annual 
shareholders meeting, the chair- 
man, Gilbert Ametio, had indi- 
cated that Apple might become 
profitable by its fourth quarter. 

Analysts said Apple was trying 
to swallow most of the costs of 
acquiring Next in a single gulp, in 
hopes or pitting the worst at its 
financial problems behind ft. 

Apple also announced Monday 
fee resignation of Heidi Roizen, 
38, a Silicon Valley entrepreneur 
who had joined Apple last Feb- 
ruary as part of an effort to court 
the crucial community- of third- 
party software developers to write 
programs for fee Macintosh. 


liters Shares . 
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U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


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92X03 

91X38 

917JM 

92276 

Tramp. 

559-00 

55172 55235 

553.95 

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131X34 1337 32 I339A1 

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tedusrus 

1141 to 112658 113431 

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W62J4 145775 145X66 

+XB2 

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178138 119235 11D8LB2 

+9J02 

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589.73 

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35577 19V 

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3*083 38V 

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23571 22 

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23518 3ZV 

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Lew 

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3Com 

362670 SPt 

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Oral 

338715 62V 

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156677 ISM 

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02535 101ft 

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66977 25V 

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<3125 67V 

60 

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DeUCMs 

57432 66 

62ft 

63V 

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ApUMar 

5*337 49ft 

46ft 

46ft 

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52943 *M. 

39V 

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49551 36K 

toft 

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69*2 42V 

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High Law Cine Chge OpW 


Grains 


com fawn 

Uao bu mMrnum- cads oar OuM 
NaV 272V 271 VWi +ft 187,886 

MarVl 271* 270 271 14 

-M97 270 268ft 2WV 

Sep 77 266*6 265V. 766% 

Dec 77 268 % 266% 268 
B*. sales NA Man's, sties 34J29 
Man’s open W 324. KU up 374 


+ % Kim 
+» 7IUC 
+1 10,554 

+% 40253 


ORANGE JUKE 0KTN3 

IMOOJbn-msparft. __ 

Mar 77 VIM 7MD 7tto -075 1*560 

Mav77 llfl 81.20 BITS -075 8.158 

JUt 77 B7JD 8550 860 -MS 1411 

Sep 97 90.W 87.10 8740 -030 £283 

EH sales HA. Man's, s ots 5JI51 
Man's open W 35J29 off 1770 


High Law dose Chge Optitf 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATOT 
FFSKuno-ptooMooper 
Mur 9713130 131.16 131X6 +018141,777 
Jun 97 130.12 129.92 130.16 +0.18 14L577 
Sep 97 12828 128 -2fl 12X48 +0.16 876 

Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 97.76 +018 0 

Est volume: 57.966 . Open Pit: 157,250 up 
<268. 


High Law daw Chge Qpw 


Industrials. 


Metals 


SOYBEAN MEAL (OBOY) 

1 DO few*- doOora perron 

Mar 97 2050 2MJ® 2010 +540 31,198 

May 77 23L50 2300 Z3L20 +4J0 7X864 

JM97 23450 22? JO 2308 +440 20465 

Aug 97 2050 227 JO 2300 +470 3536 

Se>97 22750 22250 22750 +450 1916 

0377 21850 21550 21850 +330 1490 

Estsulo* HA. Man’s. sain 10JB1 
Man's Upon mr 87404 off *6 


GOLD (NCM30 
TOOLnwi _ 

Fed 97 34150 
Mar 77 
Apr 77 3«1* 
Jun 77 3*580 
Aug 77 34640 
Od 77 34950 
Due 77 351 JO 
FehTO 35400 
Estates HA. 
Alton's Open tof 


340.10 341 JO — TJO 
34L30 — 1J0 
MOJO 341 JO -1.29 
3CU0 3*400 -130 
3*550 346 M -138 
31730 34850 — JAJ 
35050 35L2D — 150 
791 «a —150 

Man's, sites 14680 
T9LTS3 ad 1674 


1481 

65 

NL798 

21404 

9565 

3500 

1B583 

1159 


soybean oil lawn 

dCLOOOtn- aerify per* ■> 

Mar 97 21M 2X77 23J3 +856 37572 

May 97 2129 205 2127 +0JM 22530 

JUI97 2US 2452 2454 +052 14.121 

AuHto 2400 3458 2477 +052 3323 

Sep 97 2493 2435 2490 + 054 2513 

Oct 97 210S 2550 2555 +054 853 

EsI. sales HA. Mai's, sales 8551 
Man's open W 80588 up 2S 


SOYBEANS (C80D 
AoooVimMnwnK cents urbuM 
Mar 97 751 731 749V +9V 

May 77 749V 737 748ft +10 

JM97 7 4 730 7« +9 

Aug 77 743 734V 743 +7 

Sep 97 714 711 715V +4V 

ESL sales NA. MaYL Sites 27509 
Man’s apiniid UBJ72 UP 41 


66308 

4057* 

31738 

16® 

155* 


M GRADE COPPBt (NCMX) 

2S5M Ims- cards par h. 

F<4>97 18850 HAJD 10730 -130 1579 

MCT97 10750 WSJW HJ6JJ0 -1.13 2437B 

Apr 97 10*50 W2J1 10350 -130 15» 

May 97 WX50 10130 10Z30 — 1.10 7585 

Jun 97 10250 10150 10150 -050 861 

MfT Ml JO MOJO 10050 — 1JB 4671 

AUO 97 79J0 —150 615 

Sep 97 7950 98J0 78J0 -450 25W 

OtJ97 78J5 -USB Si* 

Estates HA Mon’s. sites 4288 
Mon's open ht 5X576 off 281 


+851 2X351 
+051 4B330 
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+051 378576 
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-051 139565 
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Nwn 

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25.9* 

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17 

25 


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Mor97 363 351 362 +TO 

Mav97 34095 3S095 358V. +8 

JW97 345 339 SUV +5U 

Sep 97 39 3*3 3*Sft +5>A 

Est sales HA Mon's, sates 14777 
Man's open M 70,125 w 791 


2X674 

13584 

26.172 

2,152 


SH.VERQ4CMX} 
UOIraraL.enliMrm'K 
Fub97 4823D -1230 I 

Ata-77 49658 48050 48351 —1220 55559 

Apr 97 486.18 —1220 2 

May 97 50050 4KU0 4BO® —1228 14*57 

JUI97 50*58 4M50 493JB -122B »,18* 

Sep 77 50850 497 JO *97 JD -1230 352* 

Dec 77 71400 50440 50450 -1240 X174 

Jan 78 58730 -1150 9 

Esf.scdes HA Man's, soles 9,714 

Man's men M 92515 off 4* 


3X444 

2333 

159 

8 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMSU 

4iuM®L-osnu pares. „ 

Acr 97 65J7 *555 6155 +037 

Jun 97 63.97 6355 Q65 *9J3 

Aug 97 6177 414) 6142 +0.10 

0097 6656 4635 6657 + 0J0 

Dec 97 4650 6860 6855 +0.12 

Pom 70.» 6930 Tan +o.n 
Est sites HA Mofi. sales 20557 
NaftWWH HUH off- 2193 


PLATHUM OMMHR) 

40 hw 0b- Mas per toor to. 

Apr 97 36030 3SM0 35830 -4L70 2X346 
Jill 97 36050 3SM0 3te50 -0J0 1335 
0077 363JD 361 JO 362.70 -820 2073 
Jan 78 36520 -020 L110 

Est sdes ha Man^. solas 1*53 
Man's open in 27,164 up 131 


4X145 

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115*6 

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Dtvktends 

Company Per Amt Roc 

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AOtancc Cap Mng - J9 2-25 


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Cdn Hon Roflway . 33 3-7 

Imperial ChemHrf b 589? 3-7 


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a .10 2-21 3-6 

M JJS4 2-30 2-27 
Q 30 4-14 5-15 
Q JB9 2-26 3-12 
Q 585 3-10 3-31 
M .1386 2-20 2-28 
M .114 2-20 3-28 
O .0*5 3-3 3-24 

Q .11 2-12 2-26 
Q .10 2-27 3-13 
Q JOS 3-4 4-1 

0 JH 2-21 3-3 

Q .IS 4-1 4-29 
Q 36 3-25 4-11 
Q 35 2-21 3-14 
Q 53 2-21 2-7B 

Q JOS 2-21 2-23 

<5 5625 Ml 4-15 
Q 56 3-7 4-7 

Q .13 2-24 3-10 
M J1 3-2S 3-27 
Q . .175 2-25 3-14 
O .15 2-20 3-3 

Q J55 2-28 3-14 
Q 54 MB 3-3 
5 55 4-2 4-23 

M .1293 2-20 2-28 


PBBOER CATTLE (CME0 

291901) lbs. -cents par «>. 

Mir 97 67.95 4735 6757 +03 

Apr 97 <147 68.10 6835 +035 

May 97 »M 4930 BjO +0Xt 

Aug 97 73JH 7X0 7230 +0J7 

Sep 97 73JS0 7235 7332 +037 

Od97 7435 7130 3331 +M2 

Est SONS HA Man's, sites 4198 
Man's opanH 22J35 off fin 


Oaae 

LONDON METALS OJ6E) 

paBarapermelricta^ 

6 1536V 1SS50 155600 

I TS59.W 156050 1507JM 158850 

ggr Q SgS t ®S» J K7 241250 
nnnte 222050 222250 222950 223050 




6367 

3391 

4367 

4W5 

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Spar 639V, 640V 64950 69850 

F&waaJ 64950 65000 65950 66000 


NkteJ 


Spar 770050 771050 770050 7710.00 

Srwanl 779050 780050. 779050 780050 


Tie 


Spat 563050 5B405Q X20JX 583050 
Fbfwanl 


HOOS-Uan (CMER) 

ISS^TMS^TLoT Tig +OK 

Jun 97 78.H 705S MS0 +M 

WW Tt'JM 76.13 7677 1027 

Ana 97 7180 7122 7170 +055 

0077 57.10 4657 ST.®] -052 

Dec 97 65.15 6420 44.9S -I.N 

Est si tes NA Man's, sides 7356 
Man’s Open 9Y 3*301 ap 1198 

PORKBBJJBICNm 

«MHalH.-ClnHP*rKL. - 

Fell 97 7450 «J2 2X22 

Mu 97 7590 ' 

MOV97 7630 
JM97 76.15 

Aug 97 7170 


590550 591050 589050 590050 

P Grate) 

1155% 1156% 1158% 
Formnd 117550 117650 117650 117850 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (LI FFE} 

ITL200 rtta -ph of loo pd 

Ma97 UU0 13070 13082 —026 10S500 

JW»7 13070 13020 13Q32 —02* H5« 

Sep97 H.T. N.T. 13030 -024 <00 

Est sites: hums. Piw.HteE 4U4i 

Pm*, open NO: 119382 off 960 

EURODOLLARS (CMEtf) 

Si mnan-PMaflHpor. 

Feb 97 909 9439 9*50 

Mar 97 949 9M6 9437 

Ate 97 M33 M.42 9433 

Jun 97 94J7 904 9*36 

Sep 97 9423 9431 9431 

Dec 97 *405 WB 9494 
Mar 98 9355 7193 93.93 

Junto 9335 9131 YLB3 
Sep 98 9X77 9173 93J5 

D0C 98 9335 9332 9344 

Mar 99 9U3 9160 9161 

Jin 99 93J 9354 9155 

SIP 99 9152 9339 9349 

Dec 9* 91*0 9330 9330 

Ed. sites HA Moors, sdes 
Man's open Int 231X202 ofi 4158 
BRmSH POUND (CMER) 

48JH pounds. S per pound 
Mir 77 13440 13350 13352 
Jim 97. 13420 13116 13326 
■ 5*0 *7 13346 

Dec 97 1-6310 

Ed. sates HA Man's, sites L673 
Man's open int 38347 off 12M 
CAMADUUl'DOLLAR (CMER) 

NMVtem. tperCM.dk 1 
Mte 97 7405 7388 7400 

Junto 7M8 7423 .7*44 

SUP 77 7*4 7480 7480 

Docto 7518 7510 7518 

Estates NA Man's. sales 8,114 
Men's open Ini SMS off 1139 
COWAN MARK (CMBO 
man marks, l per martc 
Mar 77 3013 SMO 3979 
Junto 3049 3000 3015 

Sep 97 3083 MU 3075 

Decto 3147 

Ectsdes NA Maft. sites 4X744 
Man's upon bd 96356 up 2475 
JAPANESE YEN ICMBU 
IIS melon yen. s per loo m 
Mar 97 3200 3151 3164 - 

Junto 3300 JOS 3245 
Srato 3404 

EM. safes NA Man's, sates 3UM 
Moo's (men ini t5jn off 4131 
5WB5 FRANC (CMBQ 
KUHliuu. Spur lane 
Mteto 7015 3M5 3989 

Junto 7100 7108 70S) 

9»to Tin 

Estsates HA Men's. sates 19382 
Man's open M 50.901 off 3167 
MMirTHEO M3MARK OJFFB 

Brsrar«.-n UH 

w %.s:. %£ ^ + «« s « 

Junto 9632 9639 

Sain 96M 9632 

DK97 9470 9*37 

fttefa 9634 9630 


41(293 


X575 

495 


89 504 
1612 

UN 

28 


COTTON 2 (HCTW 
AMMO to*- epnte per h. 

Mar 97 7430 7330 7135 -831 

May 97 7535 7105 7137 -039 

■MW 76JH 76J0 76JS -0J2 
OU97 7635 7630 7639 -035 

Dec 97 7635 7630 7635 -035 

Mar» 7775 7735 ■ 7735 -037 

EsL sates HA MaYs-nfes 12392 
Mbit's oran inf 6X342 aR 804 
HEATMG OL (W4Bt) 

42300 ooL cents per ate 
Mar 97 6235 61.10 48.10 +034 

Apr 97 6010 5)30 5938 -008 

Mavto 5835 - 5735 58.10 -013 
Junto 5735 5(70 5735 -018 
JU 97 57 JK 563S 5630 -028 

Aug 97 5735 56JB 57.10 +QJH 
Sin *7 S3 5 57.10 5735 -013 

00 97 5BJ9 5775 SUB -038 
Howto 5830 5BLZ5 58J8 -038 
Decto 5835 5873 5835' -0.13 
ES- safes HA Mart-Ktes 46385 
Mon's opunud 98757 VO 539 
LIGHT nwr CRUDE (NMBO 
13H ML- Mara per ML 
Mar 97 2232 22T5 2238 +032 

Aprto 2230 2230 22J8 +030 
Mavto 2110 075 2136 -002 
JuoW 2130 2150 IU7 —Oils. 

>HW 2155 2127 2130 -039 

Aim 97 21.10 2130 21 JO —017 

SOP 97 21.15 2035 3)30 -015 

0(397 200 200 200 -015 
Mar 98 2010 2839 2QJB -0.10 

EsLhtes NA Man’s, rates 137322 
Man's onen W 37533* op 2084 
NATURAL GAS 04MB0 

10300 mm HiTs, S per mmbtu 
Morto 2330 1140 1220 
Ate 97 2.1(0 2390 2140 

Mavto 21® 2345 1100 

Junto 2380 230 2375 

■MW 2380 2M1 2JJ75 

AUB97 2385 20*5 2MB 

S«P 97 23B 2355 2085 
EsL Sates NA Mot's, rates 30.773 
Man'svnini 10311 up 276 
U9UAOB) GASOLINE 08MER) 


1778! 

21387 

9379 

1361 

ii^m 

763 


Cldi'C’-* - 
jKdu: 
ky T'*"— - 
itoil " !■*“ 
1c? f**’- _ ■ 
lx <1 " 

W &.r.:. ■ 

t'-- ■ 
cosb- 
feu*: . 
teib-iL'.-*.- 

tir.f rr.o.-. . 

fasr.-r.' .. .. 


* mm 


36328 

1930 

8364 

7.163 

5301 

3387 

xm 

1.98* 

1364 

4,944 


62305 
»3H 
3 *3» 
21915 
1X905 
1X840 
1*383 
10,907 
Z3U 


31316 

207S7 

14J85 

9313 

9.133 

730 

6322 


81365 

3319 

Ml 


Mar” 6(0 6X15 6*30 +077 030 

AW» 6X20 4X40 66.15 +039 2X®I 

Morto 66.03 033 6535 +0J4 1X374 

Junto 6530 4435 6430 +039 7,945 

3817 6150. 6110 -6X20 —831 4 JOS 

Aug 97 6130 6175 61J0 +037 430 

Eri-aUg HA Man's, sate* 37302 
Man's epnlnl 81311 up MB 


GASOIL OPE) 

U3. dallais per ineMc ten -lots Ml 00 lane 


feb 97 1943019135 
Mor97 18475 18235 


X9M 

1,9a 


JgWy 1^30 1793S 


. 17935 17730 

Junto I793S I7V35 
J «to 17930 17935 
Aw W 179JS 17930 
SepT 97 18030 17930 
Est satee 17300. 

VIM 


19230— 1130 1X072 
18275—1400 17391 
18030-1175 X 6 » 
17830 —875 4086 
17835 — 7 JO B325 
17835-675 2,971 
17930 -630 1301 
17930 -630 1353 

Open tat: 64301 off 



k M \!IK 5 I 


's' 


.§* '5 - ■. ■ 

» fW' 

W 49 7* ; . 


1X624 

8356 

t« 

11*5 

m 


High Low Ooee Chge OpW SepW 


Rnanctel 


+837 

7490 7X75 +055 

7570 7410 -035 

7538 7575 -035 

7182 7332 -025 

EsLsates HA MixYxsales X370 
Moo's apai ini M39 aR 217 


1+402 

23*7 

12*1 

447 


UST.BOXSKMBO 
SI intelnx pH of UO pcl 
M orto *4.99 *4.98 9438 4997 

Junto 9<J0 940 9489 3J3B 

sip 97 »os an 

Decto. . 9M8 -037 VI 

Estsotes NA Mon's.sites 8U 
Man's open w 9714 ap to 


Ote» Si 1.S8 

3 SS S5 

S«g9 9M9 9X09 

DlCto 9484 9482 

Est Titer 11077*. Pre». 


Prw-OPWW- I.171356 off 43ffi 

HspirTN sranjiw urns 


94-90 +031 2L529 

9690 + 031 170637 
9434 + 032 141359 
9439 t 833 161199 
96S +034118325 
9633 +UMW35S 

94.10 + 0 ® 77 - , *o 

+03S 66516 
«6B +0JM 46849 
9U4 + 084 7X339 
S07 + 034 20461 
9484 + 034 17331 
4X5« 


BR ENT OIL (IPE) 

U A rinten* per hansel ■ 
Morto 2138 2135 
Apr 97 2096 2063 

Moyto 30-59 2032 
■J«™to 2029 2009 
Mr9? 19.93 1937 
1978 1935 
1931 1931 
1937 WJ 6 
1930 1935 


Alig W 
Sep to 
Odto 
Nov 97 


late 0 1300 borate 
21.14 —133 29336 
2075 —134 54582 
2043 — 101 21.99C 
2014 —094 10825 
1930 — OBS 12322 
19.31 -037 X7D2 
1934 -069 5+489 

1939 -061 1754 

1936 —052 2384 



^ t •• 

■ $ i i- : :••• “ 

iv .1 ■■ • 


oanooo - pm or loopg^ 


1J8 EsL«**3Sito2. Open W.'l5046e Off 


u w e lt B n ee ra Se un u eiO M Bt per 
MnteflUHbt-pDntek ta Caanlra hmtte 
0HBB0MtoW8l8ltB l Mil IMWIH 


I YR. TREASURY (OOT> 
nowwo prte- BH* SPtete HD pa 
MB' 97106-63 106-55 104-30 -82 18X170 

Into 106-44 1 84-41 T0M3 -01 1X870 

Sep to 106-27 —DT 

Estates TLA. Man's. soles 193*9 
Man's oaenW 11X00 up IUI 


Food 


sacs. 


Stock TaUes Explained 

Sates Bgwes or wdiftdaL veaty nighs and tom icoract tee previous 52 weels phis the ament 

wwa. biffneritielg>esniaJlng<lny.v>hgggsp>orslocfci8ridendinrHuna0to25peiLBdi» mog 

has been paid ■» yeas NghJoiv range cm3 Mtend ae shown tor tna new sttdcsoaly. Uitera 
oBieiwfra noted rales0(Mknil5iBeamuar(8siwneineals barad an le latest dedarattn. 
a- dividend alsoeara W.h-anmial rateal dMdendirii»slo(*i»ridend.«*fiQuklaflng 
diviaend. ee-PE 8 «e«lsWj*d-eBBed.d-nBw yeailylow.dd-lass In ttw ta*12 months. 
• - dtehtend dedared or pMd in preceding 12 norths, f ■ annua! rate, Increased on lost 

doetaraflon. g - dMdend In Canadian funds, suhfeato 15% nonrasidaactfax. I *dMdend 
Metered nffer spM-upteslodtdMdariOl-iMdend paid diteyeac.onilHed,defannt.ornn 
oaten token at latest dividend meedng. t - aMdend dedared or paid Itds ma n 
ocrumotetNe taue wtti dMdends in omeis. ■- ■ anmial rofe reduced on kst dedaranon. 
n - new isnie In ft* pat 52 weeks. ThoMghkM rouge begins with the start of liadina. 
nd-nete day deUvery.p-iriiMl dividend onojoliote unknown. PTE- pridMOtni 119 s Rdla 
4 -dosed fend mnteal fund -dividend dedandar paid In pneudng 13 morths. ptesstoc* 
dviden d. s - siadc MM. Dividend boginx wRh dot* 0 spBL tis - sates- 1 - dMdend paM in 
«w» In pnwflng 12 MOfflht wdmoted oash vatoe an ex-dMdend or n-dteMraltea date, 
e -new yearly high v- trading halted, vi-lniiankniplcy or Kctevonhip or betogteoiganlJgd 

under ttwBon*roplcyAiCto r» c ari lte s ass um ed by such BNBpedeLwil- when iflshBiflted 

■4 * when issued/ «ew - wWi wwrorti. > - ex-dvidend or eiMiglite. »8S ■ ewflthSwOOri. 
me - wtttwul warraids. y- «-«vfctend and saiex in hi*. yM - yield 2 - sales in fuB. 


COCOA (NC3E] 

WnMMKM- Seer ten 
Morto 1345 
(tavto rnt 

Jun m 

Sen to 09 
Docto 1375 
Estsotes 7,547 Man's. totes' X630 
Man's wen id 0343 ate BB9 


13*7 

1361 

—33 

11J65 

nil 

1283 

-71 

2X783 

13U 

1712 

-23 

1X4/5 

W7 

1ST 

—23 

* toff 

1367 

1367 

-17 

&88t 


II YR. TREASURY (CUT) 
neojM Prtn- pis & 3Ms er irapa 
MW 97 109-21 109-14 W9-16 —01 311331 

Junto 109-02 108.34 108>» -« 35JB2 

SsptoUB-lS IQB-Q KB-D - ITT? 
Estsotes NA Men^soiia 473S 
MwiM 34830 off ‘ 190 


*6007 9172 

Junto 9149 9X44 

S*p97 9280 9X25 

Dec97 9115 91D9 

Marts 9106 9239 

junto . 92.98 9292 

Sepn 9253 9287 

P«to 9288 9182 

Mart? 9183 92JB 

JoCto 9178 9172 

Sglto «J2 9146 

Decto 9288 9282 

Estates 61725. Pm.i 

Prev-upeow.- *89332 


MIOWTH PI0OR (MATIR 


9X71 . 101 1010*5 
IteCB. 114394 
038 IMi 7X407 
2-14 +101 SL7V5 
R84 + 032 3X107 
«» + 102 3M33 

VM +032 21193 
920 * DJD 18399 
E5 + OJn 8332 

|3;as ssi? 

9288 + 105 4487 
Ms: 0355 
up 4947 


Stock Index** 

SAP OOMP. INDEX (CMOU 
W»h4n 

Moto 7910 78190 7900 17X524 

3097 79930 79030 79750 +150 1X984 

toff 80735 80100 8QUD +150 1316 

D«97 non -135 ' “ 

**“>*M* «■»! 
MaiTsopirW 191910 up 


IJM 




a0FFSC(MC» 

J'jcoK-amnrD. 

Mar 97 16630 1030 M155 *4M I73S1 
*6ay97 15935 15X80 157J5 >110 UJ45 
JU97 lw* I5DJD0 HUB *155 5374 
Sento 15830 14600 t4Uff lUO 3345 
EsI. sales 14050 Morfs.8dM H0I 
Moh'soMHW- 444B9 00-1*31 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBOY] 
tioo-ueojxB-cn&shiaiortaaDcn 
Mar 97117-21 10-12 117-15 47X40 

Junto H24I6 ■111-SI Hl-31 -01 4030 

srato 111-20 nun itui? — ai hum 

Draw . m-te —m Xmi 

Est sales NA •lea's, sale* 16X561 
NurSweaM 52X992 off 4573 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE) 

mjam. m per n_ . . ■ , , 

Mar 97 HU5 ■ U47 1033 >0.12 0371 

May 97 1U0 10 *8 HU8 >0.15 3MM 

JUI97 1037 1835 Wffl *8.13 to.W 

OQ97 1030 1033 NW9 >0.13 19352 

EO, sates 1X914 Men's.*** 14322 
66an'sapenM 10389 eB M 


GERMAN HVBWMENT DUNO tUFFS 

DM250300 -ate of 1 00 pet 

Mam IBIS B2J5 nan +02533X081 

Men ivui into 10202 +«< um 
EsteateE ISWHL PMsdec 18X386 
Pm. raealnL: 24204 Off X166 


g 9675 loS? »Jo 6 

j*p 97 9433 9631 9473 +0jn 36376 

S5S SS E 
S8M8fi83&$3 
SS g ^ H SiS 

JWI W 9Sw4a 9535 95A7 +njn m 

ua* + ® JD ~ Lrn 

0,6 99 9 4.96 96.96 9698 +QJM IJ 44 

^EstwAnne: 2X877. Openlnt; 26X959 oft 


Jtse lee cliffcj 

43013 




UHKfOUT 0L1TFE) 

S3? 

Junto 111-24 112-24 112-27 + D-U 6064 
Est sake SB3B6 Pawsdest 5K8M - 
Pin. open ktr 20X070 ep>12H • 


J-MOjnTIEOIRXJAA tUFTE) 1155.' 

fftiMon-pteaiMSfl rp 

SS &3S -a® 9X642 


Wjp (MATIR 

26010 +230 26323 

^ 2 Wlfl 259U 2575J) +100 1063 

^ 2 2587-8 +XM 6389 

RK 97 N.T. H.T. 260X5 +230 7J29 
H.T. N.T. 26234) +230 no 


jg£i 5« nS Sto -o£ 

S ^ S5 S ”=2S 

*■" 9JM Sul HU -Sal 


9X642 

76551 

4S323 

UM4 

1X517 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's 


QJ. 

CRB 


CtaM Picvtan 

M«30 1,48640 

1,95730 
.13X03 13274 

23738 2»Jfl 







INTERNATIONAL HERALDTRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 12, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


s to Market Success 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — Four years ago, 
Brian Souter and his sister. Ami 
Gfoag, decided that there had to be 
more to life than running a big Brit- 
ish bus company — so they took 

SvefSBSSSBtt 

their father a severance check from 
his job as a bus conductor and 
plowed the proceeds into a wave of 
acquisitions. 

Stagecoach Holdings 
PLCsnll ranks among Britain’s top 
bus operators, but now it is much 
more, too. In terms of sales, at £405 
trillion in the six months ended in 
***?**. operating profit, which 
reached £42 million, its old core 
business stands in the shadow of its 
vast new rail operations, and it now 
looks to the Continent for most of its 


With more than a quaner of those 
tow still in the hands of Mr. Souter, 
43, and his sister, who is manag in g 
d gg c tor » prosperity has come to die 
ramUy- Mrs. Gloag, for instance, 
now holds the keys to one of Scot- 
land's laigest castles as well as the 
position of second-richest w oman in 
Britain, behind Queen Elizabeth IL 
Stagecoach’s chair man did not 
get to the top by quietly following in 
others’ footsteps. Mr. Sourer prefers 
windbreakers to suit coats and 
sneakers to win grips, and be prac- 
tices a brand of bare-knuckled com- 
petition aggressive enough to have 
earned him more than a score of 
investigations by authorities into al- 
leged anti-competitive behavior. At 
times the hyperacquisrrive — and 
debt-prone — Mr. Souter almost 
seems to court controversy. 
According to Tim Khiczkowski, 


furore growth. 

r Stagecoach, based in Penh, 


For 


an analyst with the brokerage con- 
cern Granville Davies, reaction 


—a MAE A C lUi* 

Scotland, and for its founders, the 
shift in direction has paid off. From 
£i 34 million at the time of its stock- 
market flotation in foe spiring of 
1993, Stagecoach’s market valu- 
ation has grown to £1.8 billion. 


among investors has amounted to a 
reluctant embrace. 

“They don’t love the man,” be 
said. ’’They don’t love the busi- 
nesses he is in. But they love the 
company’s performance.” 

Mr. Souter made his first fortune 


former 

nationalized bus industry at bargain 
prices when few others were in- 
terested and transforming die bus 
business. He made his second by 
repeating foe process with parts of 
the did British Rail system. He 
hopes to make his next by repeating 
the process on the Continent 

In 1995 Stagecoach became the 
first group to seize the opportunity 
presented by the privatization of 
British Rail, buying the first and 
largest passenger-train franchise to 
be sold off. South West Trains. Last 
year ir added to dot with foe £475 
million acquisition of Porterbrook, 
foe first of three big train-leasing 
companies sold by the government 

list year. Stagecoach made its 
most important international acqui- 
sition to date, buying Swebus, the 
bus-company arm of foe Swedish 
state railway, for 1.2 billion kronor 
($164 million). Mr. Souter calls ft 
“foe most important deal of the year 
in tenns of oar company’s long- 
range development” and promises 
more. 

In a way, Mr. Scuta- now is a 
victim ofbis own success. His British 
bus lines outside London, for in- 


stance, have profit margins of 28 
percent, nearly four times their mar- 
gins before Stagecoach acquired 
ton and for above the national av- 
erage. Unfortunately, by demonstrat- 
ing foal long-shunned bus and rail 
compa n ies -can become major 
nxmey-spiimers, Mr. Souter has suc- 
ceeded m driving up prices in foe 
entire raD and bus industry in Britain, 
forcing him to set off for new mar- 
kets. 

Overseas, Mr. Souter hopes to 
find the two conditions that have 
made Ins fortune: companies that 
can be quickly turned around with 
better management, bener schedul- 
ing and more capital investment; 
and places where, as in Britain in the 
old days, bidders are scarce and gov- 
ernments can be counted onto prime 
foe privatization pump by making 
prices stunningly attractive. 

In the British domestic market in 
the past year, Mr. Soutet said. Stage- 
coach won none of the 20 rail fran- 
chises that followed South West 
Trains to the auction block. The 
reason, he said: his unwillingness to 
overpay. . 

Overseas, be said, he believes 
pressure is mounting for privatiza- 


tion of bus and rail systems. Several 
years ago. Stagecoach bought a 
privatized bus operator in Hew Zea- 
land. It also owns bus companies in 
Kenya and Malawi that were pur- 
chased in 19% for £1.1 million and 


posted operating profits last year of 
£4.5 million. 


It is in Europe, though, that many 
analysts expect to see Stagecoach 
concentrate its firepower. 

’’Sweden was the first country in 
Europe other than Britain to bite foe 
bullet and privatize, but it will not be 
the last,” Richard Hannah, an ana- 
lyst with UBS, said. 

When other countries follow suit, 
Mr. Souter hopes to have learned 
enough about the more regulated 
Continental bus market from his 
Swebus experience to bid for and to 
run what the other governments 
have for sale. 

Still, the push into less familiar 
terrain comes at a precarious juncture 
for Stagecoach. With debts equal to 
562 percent of its assets, and with its 
share price having risen nearly seven 
times in less than three years on the 
expectation of continued giddy 
growth in profit, some analysts say 
Mr. Souter has no room for error. 


nvestor's Europe 


'DAX/rV-'- 


’ r '*' 

- 2700 — 



i.y ABC-:. 








»... t... a *. 

/jfctgSfltr 

,tfop«fo«8®o stock >;■ 

" , ’ n -pAs> 

Helsinki ■ 


■ ¥>jss 

Oslo ■> ■ 


.i SttXI-: 5B1J89> -o.st 

ysufaffi •*: 


‘ -oioa’ 

•Mac WST. 


47$ JS5*:\ -0.40 

man v-. , 



Parte •- 





-o.i2 

-vianite * * 

ATX- ?• :i- -i 

1 ^: 96 ' '"^vT 

4S^*‘ V - 



Source: T&ekurs 


bNcrnWoM) HeraldThtmta 

Very briefly: 


<»H<! IV, 


owe 


Reuters Shares Slide 
On Profit Outlook 


Complied by Our Stiff Fran Dapasrhtt 

LONDON — Reuters Hold- 
ings PLC shares fell Tuesday as 
concerns about future earnings 
growth at the world’s largest pro- 
vider of financial information out- 
weighed a 17 percent increase in 
annual profit. 

The international news and in- 
formation group reported a pretax 
profir of £701 million ($1.15 bil- 
lion), up from £599 million a year 
ago. Sales rose 8 percent, to £2.91 
' billion, and the company paid a 
Vi full-year dividend of 1 1 .75 pence, 
' compared with 9.80 pence. 

Reuters stock tumbled 19 
pence, to 625. 

Reuters warned that changes in 
its price structure would make it 
difficult to improve the under- 
lying revenue growth rate 
achieved in 1996. 

"Foreign exchange is a prob- 
lem,” said Peter Job, foe com- 
pany’s chief executive. “If the 
pound continues very strong, it 
does reduce our rate of growth 
considerably.” 

John Clarke, an analyst at 
Daiwa Institute of Research, said, 

‘ ‘People have been worried about 
the growth prospects for Reuters 
for some time, including the im- 
pact of sterling.” 


Analysts said investors were 
also concerned that Reuters’ earn- 
ings growth would be hit by lower 
revenues from its foreign-ex- 
change dealing systems, in- 
creased costs associated with its 
Reuters 3000 product, and the 
failure of its Globex system to 
capture a large share of U.S. fu- 
tures and'options trading. 

Reuters said Globex. an auto- 
mated order-matching system 
built with foe Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange and the MATIF future* 
exchange in France, was not 
likely to continue beyond 1998 
because foe original partners had 
developed their own systems. 

The market was also disappoint- 
ed byfoe absence of further news 
from Reuters on returning value to 
shareholders, dealers said. Reuters 
deferred a plan to return £613 mil- 
lion in cash to shareholders after 
foe British government introduced 
measures to cut tax benefits linked 
to share buy-backs and some spe- 
cial di videadplans. The company 
said it was still considering how to 
return cash to shareholders. 

Mir. Job said the company re- 
mained focused on returning sur- 
plus cash to shareholders, and did 
not want to be pressed into ac- 
quisitions. (AFX, Bloomberg ) 


Cap Gemini’s Profit Soared in 1996 


PARIS — Cap Gemini SA, 
Europe’s biggest computer-services 
company, J *" •****'■ 


said Tuesday its 1996 


uesday its 

earnings more than quadrupled, re- 
jwfo in nera 


new busi- 


fleeting strong groi 
ness and lower interest 

Net profit rose to 280 nriUion 
French francs ($50 million) last year 
from 52 million francs in 1995, as 
revenue rose 31 percent, to 14.8 
billion francs. 

Cap Gemini said it generated more 
than 1 billion francs in new contracts 
last year. It forecast a 21.6 percent 


increase in sales this year, to 18 bil- 
lion francs, as ft benefits from buying 
Groupe Bossard, a French consulting 
company, and from increased co- 
operation between its computer-ser- 
vices and consulting activities. 

The company also said it planned 
to increase its presence in the U.S. 
and Southeast Asian markets by ex- 
panding its own businesses. 

“We’re not reaching for our 
checkbook to go on an acquisition 
hinge,” said Geoff Unwin, the chief 
operating officer. Last year, the com- 
pany opened an office in Singapore. 


“Cap Gemini has everything it 
takes to become one of the top lead- 
ers in this industry,” Nicolas de 
Smet, an analyst at HSBC James 
Capel, said. 

Shares of Cap Gemini rose 14.20 
francs to 310, their highest level in 
nearly five years. 

“The preliminary results demon- 
strate that the dramatic turnaround 
in the group’s financial situation 
continues,” Pierre Hessler, chief 
executive of Cap Gemini’s consult- 
ing unit, Gemini Consulting, said. . 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 


• Ericsson AJB’s fourth-quarter pretax profit jumped 39 
percent, to 246 million Swedish kronor ($333 million), 
surpassing most expectations, amid growing demand for 
mobile telephones and their networks. 

• General Electric Corp.’s aircraft-engines unit will not 
build the engines for Airbus Industrie’s planned stretched 
versions of its A340 plane. Airbus said. 


British Petroleum PLC said fourth-quarter profit rose 
27 percent, to £689 million ($1.13 billii 


ion), as an im- 
proved refining business and foe highest oil prices since 
the Gulf War helped offset weaker results in chemicals. 

• The United States hahed imports of Dutch pork 
products after an outbreak of swine fever in the Neth- 
erlands, the Dutch Agriculture Ministry said. 

• Sobering AG’s 1996 profit rose 46 percent, to 362 
million Deutsche marks ($220 million), according to 
provisional data, on strong sales at foreign subsidiaries. 
•Alenia SpA of Italy is expected to receive a stake in 
Airbus Industrie in exchange for assets. 

Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP. AFX. Bridge News 


GEORGE: Despite Its Popularity, Respect Eludes Political Magazine of John Kennedy Jr. 


Continued from Page 11 


ultimately prove incompatible 
goals for a mass market political 
magazine. “No one would be 
happier than me to have folks of 
all ilks Say good things about foe 
magazine.” said Mr. Kennedy, in 
shirt-sleeves and suspenders at a 
recent interview in his 4 1 si-floor 
office on Broadway. “Bat I 
would rather .have a magazine 
that really broke new ground — 
that interested a different audi- 
ence -of people in politics — than 
gain acceptance within the Belt- 
way.” 

Indeed, that was George’s 
original mandate as defined by 
Mr. Kennedy, foe magazine’s ed- 


itor in chief who, together with 
Michael B erman, the magazine’s 
president, owns half of Charge in 
a company called Random Ven- 
tures. Hachette Hlipaccbi 
Magazines, a unit of Lagardere 
Group of Prance, owns foe other 
half. 

lx was over dinner shortly after 
President Bill Clinton’s first in- 
auguration that Mr. Kennedy, 36, 
and Mr. Berman, 39, came up 
with the idea for “a consumer- 
oriented magazine about politics 
for a broad general audience that 
would he commercially viable,” 
Mr. Kennedy said. 

And by that measure, as well as 
those of the magazine industry, 
George is on its way to success. 


The ma 


zine’s current rate base 
— that is, paid cir- 
fvertisers 


of 400,i 

culation guaranteed to 
— exceeds its initial projections 
of 250,000 and puts the magazine 
well ahead of established political 
publications like The New Re- 
public (circulation 101, (X)0) and 
National Review (196,000). 

David Pecker. Hachette’s pres- 
ident and chief executive, said 
that while be had planned to in- 
vest $20 million to $25 million in 
George over the magazine’s first 
five years and to achieve prof- 
itability by year five, he now pre- 
dicted turning profitable by year 
four, if not before. * ‘I think we hit 
a chord here — we hit a niche in 
the market where there was a 


void.” Mr. Pecker said. “We're 
extremely satisfied with where 
foe magazine is today.” 

And while advertisers' initial 
love affair with the magazine was 
expected to cool — the first two 
issues, which were sold as a pack- 
age deal, each carried a hefty 175 
pages of ads; they now average 75 
— media buyers say they remain 
enthusiastic about the magazine, 
particularly because it is reaching 
a young, affluent, educated audi- 
ence. 

“It’s hard not to be impressed 
with a magazine that has reached 
400,000 circulation in such a 
short period of time,” said Gene 
DeWitt, president of DeWitt Me- 
dia, a media services agency. 


“The magazine has pretty strong 
legs. I mink it’s going to be 
around.” 

In bottom-line terms, then, Mr. 
Kennedy and his colleagues at 
George could be satisfied. But a 
magazine thrives on more than 
advertiser dollars; it needs buzz 
and wants respect. And, so far, 
Georee lacks for both. 

“They don’t have the quality of 
writing that a general interest 
magazine has and they don’t have 
the sharp point of view that a polit- 
ical journal has,” said Dee Dee 
Myere, who served as Mr. Clin- 
ton’s press secretary and is now 
Vanity Fair’s political editor. “So 
foal contributes to the perception 
isit?’“ 


here of, ‘Well what i 


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Sembcwafij 
Sing Mrfoteign 


SfeigUnd 

StogPimF 

StagTeditnd 


iSfearo 
1W Lee Bonk 
UtdtntkaMal 
UWOSanBkF 
WlngTal Hdp» 
tatUldoSats. 


BJO 

8 

BL2S 

azo 

mx 

10.10 

10.10 

10J0 

1440 

1*20 

1440 

14 

1520 

15 

15 

1S2D 

m 

078 

OJf. 

an 

19J0 

1920 

1930 

1920 

5J0 

520 

£80 

£75 

7 

675 

675 

7.10 

1140 

ino 

13.10 

13.10 

3 

2J4 

239 

£96 

630 

610 

£15 

630 

£44 

140 

£44 

£44 

11-X 

1030 

1890 

11.10 

*30 

£14 

4.74 

*12 

1830 

18.10 

1840 

18.10 

11J0 

1120 

llJO 

UJ0 

6 

£85 

535 

£75 

8J5 

7.X 

8 

7JS 

1160 

1140 

USD 

1150 

L45 

840 

840 

145 

2830 

28.10 

28.10 

28 

£86 

3J0 

180 

120 

£36 

3J0 

£32 

132 

456 

430 

*92 

*M 

332 

£44 

£50 

346 

132 

1.19 

120 

1.19 

1640 

1610 

1640 

1620 

452 

448 

448 

450 


i The Trib Index 

Prim* 

me et&OO P.U. Now York time 

Jrtn. 1, 7992 c; 100. 

Law) 

Chong* 

16 change 

year to data 

World Index 

151.18 

-1.52 

-1.00 

+14.64 

Bugtonal butaXM 





As&PetxGc 

109.11 

-0.57 

-052 

-18.73 

Europe 

1S2J7 

-ao6 

-1.85 

+16.66 

AL America 

174.54 

■O.B8 

-0.48 

+36.06 

S. America 

135.00 

+0.43 

+032 

+51.62 

InOuBtrtri tndaxa* 





Capital goods 

178.43 

-Z.12 

- 1.19 

+32.77 

Consumer goods 

170.01 

-0.62 

-0.38 

+23.13 

Energy 

176.55 

-1.98 ' 

-1.11 

+30.1 8 

Finance 

110.27 

-0.78 

-aro 

-13.33 

Miscellaneous 

151.79 

-O.BO 

-037 

+19.13 

Raw Materials 

180.96 

-052 

-0.29 

+27.82 

Service 

139.74 

-0.72 

-051 

+16.45 

Utmas 

132.92 

-12^7 

— S.99 

+4.55 

The International Herat! TrSmneWoitt Stock tnd&r& tracks rh* US. doSarmbaeol 

2BOtntarnatk)naSyirtnst3bleaockshtmZ5couritrlos.FornHmirtonnMen,Bfrm 

booklet Is awtabta by mrrina to 77w Trib MncIBI Avenue Charles do Gm*B, 

| 82521 NeuBy Cedes, France. 


Compted by Bloomberg No* kb. j 

High Ur 

Owe Pnv. 


Hi* Uw 

dose Pnv. 


Santos 474 488 474 471 

SouJhcOfp 43* 429 4M 434 

Wesfarmers 970 960 985 960 

WMC 786 779 785 785 

WestfeUThttf 267 265 Z66 265 

763 784 763 787 

• per 967 985 960 960 

3J7 133 134 138 


Taipei 


Sleek Martel lades: 74! 447 
Piorieos 734648 


Stockholm 


SXUlHtae 27906) 
P i cs bus 279 £ 99 


Coltioymelqs 
OtangHwaBk 
OaoaTungBk 
China Devekwrt 
China Stad 
Pint Bar* 
Fannosa Ptoailc 
Hub Nan bk 
I tfflCDmnBk 
Nan Ya Ptaslla 
Shin Kang Oie 
Tehran Semi 


AGAB 

ABBA 


AstraA 

AfknCoacoA 
AUttAr 
aectiehaB 
Ericsson B 
HamosB 
IneenMA 
UnestorB 
MdOoB 


531 

34X50 

211 


Paris 


CAG4* 29289 
PierieeK 299X37 


PtoMUjriottn 

SrotaittB 


283 286 286 

£46 £49 £51 

4J9 436 430 

423 423 433 

M7 288 089 


Manila 


P5EMk3S£70 


PitataBKXWJD 

AqntaB 

31 

30 

X 

30 

AmtaLdBd 

32JO 

183 

33 

181 

32 

183 

32 

182 

■OP Hons 

M 

18 

1330 

14 

MarfrtSKA 

179 

126 

129 

MevnBa* 

725 

/15 

729 

no 

Prina 

11J5 

7075 

n 

11 

pcmm 

36X58 35X50 

360 3S2JQ 

PMLs^MS 

USD 

1575 

1580 

15*0 

SMft&frlwg 

in 

7 JO 

101 

730 

101 

738 

10 

740 


£9 £63 £55 

1476 


1476 1482 T£60 
- 7 J7 766 7J8 
4flS 408 4JB9 
663- 669 668 

2J0 2J4 ZJ0 


Mexico 


375431 

30933 


AM) A 


3t IS *■ 


B 

XPO 


4448 035 4415 4235 
17JQ 1786 1778 1788 


TM STB 3188 2980 


£53 

402 412 403 

488-482 499 
186 U6 2 
489 493 492 


-_jC _ IIS 1096 1138 1086 
Grapltedm 4U0 4130 4L5D 4400 
GpoQBoAl 0.10 4£50 47.18 4780 
SnPkilDbmsB 2860 2400 360 2400 
UrobCbrKUex 1(860 W£7D MUO 16570 
TeMDCPQ W£20 lBUe IfiSJS 1D470 
TriMocL 1586 KM 1SJU 1476 



106 106 10450 

9X 935 935 

1BQJ0 1B550 181 

354 357-50 355 

17450 17450 176 

326 326 3X50 

443 453 44150 

24450 24B 253 

Mfl 1M7 1073 

’ S3! 533 

344 345 

216 214 

220 22X50 2X5 

267J5Q 268 27050 

' " 197 MS 

190 185 

ISA 15$ 
68 67 JO 
206 205 

312 

„ 182 
114 1)430 
189 1B9J0 189 

55-50 97 9530 

18788 188 188 

181 -50 IBB 18250 


UWWfcroBec 

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180 

171 

84 

9550 

25JB 

179 

71 

14550 

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65J0 

116 

545Q 

5350 

4050 

71 


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168 168 

82 83J0 
93 94 SO 

2530 25J0 
17* 177 

70 7050 
143 14X50 

83 B3 
6450 6450 

112 773 

5750 58 

5250 5X50 
39.90 40 

70 70 


778 

1*8 

82 

9250 

2550 

176 

7050 

143 

83 

6450 

11458 

5750 

5250 

3960 

70 


smacdoA 

Slone Co Mold 

Sunoar _ 

TaBwwnEny 

Te t*B 

Tefagtabe 

Trim 

Thoman 

TorOarn B anh 

Tramotti 

TransCdoPtpe 

TrtnwtFW 

TiteHohn 

TVXGold 

WestcoariEnr 


5 M 
20-65 
6055 
4445 
30H 
3940 
2060 
28-10 


m 

25.15 

4460 

33J0 

1060 

Z4U 

75 


56 
2055 
SB* 
43 30 
30V) 
38.90 
2040 
2750 
3930 
1667 
2495 
4X80 
3X05 
1005 
2420 
7416 


56-10 5616 

2055 20*5 
59 5955 
4415 4330 
30*5 30U 

39V* 38*0 
2055 sax 
27.95 28-05 
39*5 39 JS 
I64S 1645 
25 25.15 
44)6 4350 
3120 3105 
10.15 1065 
24« 241* 

7«VI 74 


Vienna 


ATX Mac 120023 
PlHlOOS 1201J6 


Toronto 


'nEMMMK (111.05 
PimB»6081J7 


19450 

189 

154 

050 

204 


30 S M 

181 JO 185 


114 


ABOrdMettZ4V>18 


Prortm: 244*40 

8J4 

£12 

a» 

£15 

£25 

£11 

£22 

£15 

1745 

1748 

1755 

1740 

345 

344 

£46 

344 

23 

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S 

2259 

1359 

1340 

1341 

1158 

1331 

IMS 

13L37 

1359 

£06 

£04 

£07 

ioe 

6SS 

670 

iX 

£81 

19 

1£S5 

1850 

1£W 

448 

*44 

448 

446 

X© 

234 

259 

254 

247 

245 

247 

244 

342 

£39 

£40 

£44 

156 

154 

15$ 

156 

1X69 

1X62 

1255 

1251 

3J02 

X99 

354 

3 

2SJ0 

23J0 

250 

3X77 

7JJ 

754 

746 

7.72 

1J6 

U6 

£76 

15J8 

1£75 

1174 

1556 

154 

151 

154 

154 

£74 

£65 

667 

£75 

147 

152 

147 

142 

*20 

*11 

*17 

*11 

£11 

108 

£10 

109 

£83 

179 

£83 

£79 

675 

X38 

670 

XX 

6J4 

258 

% 



BBAG 

BoefafcrtMdoit 
Bioo-UnGoese 
OecBtanri Pfd 
EA-Gawn# 

evn 

HiwwfcnWIen 

MnfrAte fa hof 

OMV 

OeUEIetartz 
Rodex-Hero 
VA Stahl 
V A Tech 
WlenertWB Bou 


783 78005 782 787 JO 

807 JO 802 805 801 

673 6*2 673 (7190 

417 401 JO 41630 40560 
34X 3390 3405 S3S0 

1732171 6J0 1720 17X 

559 554 559 558 

619 5S5 48X50 599 

1389 1377 137930 138330 
874 *62-70 871 869 

400 390 391 401 

439-50 06 OS 435-90 

1827 1800-1 01 80630 1820 
2153 2110 2110 2145 

1450 1440 1449 1447 


Wellington rese ll wec aiaao 

PlWUUBZlttfli 



351 

3J9 

350 

£79 

1J2 

1J1 

1J2 

1J1 

356 

354 

354 

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437 

4J2 

45$ 

440 

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452 

4 M 

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2.14 

109 

im 

US 

178 

178 

27B 

181 

3J0 

£60 

340 

373 

£97 

£90 

£94 

698 

11 JO 

1X30 

115 

11-30 


Zurich 


SPItafcK2)0Uk 
PrTrtatt 2794.13 


A&BB 
Adecco B 
AfaHlseR 
AfOs^eronoB 
AMR 

BoUnNdsR 

BK Vision 

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1812 

1828 

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04 

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432 

470 

1208 

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1X1 

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15*0 

865 

■B 

1535 

865 

1540 

BSD 

zm 

2865 

3930 

39M 

806 

199 

806 

800 

MG 

646 

663 

£57 

160 

148 

14X50 

149.50 


638 

5400 

539 

ma 

539 

500 

4700 

*SM 

4640 

4650 

1079 

1063 

1073 

1080 

1585 

1574 

IMH 

1577 


1710 

1/4? 

1707 

1544 

744 

I5D1 

736 

1520 

TC 

1775 

1962 

IMS 

I960 

12440 

12750 

ITI?\ 

174W 

27750 

713 

27S 

776 W 

»5 

WO 

3320 

SM 


no 

m 

963 

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as 

946 

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m 

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1243 

956 

1463 

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m 

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419 

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415 






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if 

to 

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ales 


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tion 

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to a 
racy 
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s the 


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lore 
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are 


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e to 

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nese 
with 
di- 
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il. il 


15. 

ner- 

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the 


d 


total 

12.5 

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ode. 

A’all 

-her. 

col- 


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nea- 
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it is 
late 


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as 
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the 

3s.” 

ma- 

ton- 


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and 

less. 

dea 

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than 


PAGE 14 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

N a tionwide prices not reflecting late trades efaafflere. 

The Associated Pj&s. 


um Ldm cm* 


as \si ks., 

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ASIA/PACIFIC 



.... '»<ca; 


nils?; 


Thai Firms Face a Gash Crunch 

Bad Loans, a Weak Baht and Slumping Stocks Are to Blame 


BANGKOK — Saddled with a 
stockpile of nonperforming debts from 
a stagnant property sector, Thailand’s 
financial institutions are likely to be hit 
by serious cash-flow problems this 
year, industry sources say 

Nonperforming debts in the prop- 
erty sector had a serious impact on the 
Thai economy after finance companies 
?s£. a clobbering in the middle of 
! 996, and analysts warn that this year 
may be even worse. 

“Many finance and securities 
companies will not set a profit target 
this year because they are only con- 
centrating on how to- maintain the sur- 
vival of their companies and reduce 
bad debts,’ ’ Saxavut Busayarat, exec- 
utive vice president of Thai Summit 
Finance & Securities, said. 

Recent worries about bad loans in 
the property sector were highlighted 
last week, when Somprasong Land 
PLC said Wednesday it had defaulted 
on $3.1 million in interest due on a 
Euro convertible bond issue. 

The benchmark Stock Exchange of 
Thailand index closed 3.24 points 
lower Tuesday, at 733.99, its lowest 
level in more than a year. 

“The Somprasong default is expec- 
ted to increase worries over loan-port- 
folio quality among local commercial 
banks and finance companies,” Som- 
chai Wongrasmee, an analyst with 
Ekachart Finance & Securities, said. 

Finance companies and banks with 
large exposure to die property sector 
may have problems “if their customers 
panic and start withdrawing money 
from deposit accounts," be said, adding 
that customers were already worried that 
banks and finance companies could be 
dragged down with their property debt- 
ors. Liquidity in Thailand^ banking 
sector has tightened, and analysts said it 
was unlikely that interest rates would 
come down soon. 


Meanwhile, the LLS. dollar is rising 
against the baht, and rumors of an 
impending devaluation of the Thai cur- 
rency are maiqng financial institu tions 
even more reluctant to lend money. 

The resulting cash-flow shortage is 
starting to affect local financial in- 

Central Batik Trims 
’97 Growth Forecast 

Bloomberg News 

BANGKOK — The central bank cut 
its 1997 growth. forecast for the nation 
Tuesday, saying the Thai economy 
would grow at about its slowest pace in 
a decade. 

Remgchai Marakanond, the Bank of 
Thailand’s governor, said government 
spending cuts announced Tuesday had 
prompted the bank to lower its growth 
forecast to 6.8 percent from 7.1 per- 
cent The economy grew at its slowest 
pace in a decade last year, at an es- 
timated 6.7 percent, and analysts say 
the figure is likely to be lower after data 
are revised. The government said it 
would cut spending 6 percent this year, 
to 925 billion baht ($35.6 billion), and 
it ordered state-owned companies to 
cut spending by 44 billion bant 


growth, the central bank chief said, 
they also will help narrow the current- 
account deficit by curbing imports. 

The country's deficit, which mea- 
sures the net flow of international trade, 
servioes and some funds, will be equal to 
7.4 percent of its gross domestic product 
this year, he said. 

Thailand also said it may sell 100- 
year bonds to demonstrate its financial 
stability. It would become the fourth 
Asian issuer to capitalize oo a global 
tread toward so-called century bands. 


stitutions,- analysts said. Many such 
companies have taken the unpreced- 
ented step of offering incentives to 
employees in all branches — including 
researchers and analysts — to do their 
part by bringing in more deposits from 
clients. 

“My company has been trying to 
encourage stadBf working in nanfutandal 
departments to bring in more deposits 
from clients since last year," Ariyawich 
Ek-r dampun, a senior vice president of 
ITT Finance & Securities, said. 

He said ITFpIaiined to increase client 
deposits as a way of raising liquidity, 
obtaining more revenue from finance 
businesses instead of relying mi die 
securities business, which has been hit 
by the slump on the stock exchange. 

Meanwhile, the property market has 
been suffering from oversupply and 
high interest rates, causing serious 
cash-flow problems for devel opers. 

Mr. Ariyawich said ITF’s deposit 
campaign would solve its liquidity 
problems, adding that it was preferable 
to such measures as layoffs or branch 
dosings. 

Butcashshortagescouldcausemany 
companies to. collapse in the coming 
year, he said, adding that the only re- 
course for failing companies would be 
to borrow at high interest rates from 
finance companies or banks. 

Mr. Saravut of Thai Summit Finance 
said the cash-flow shortage caused by 
high interest rates would be compoun- 
ded by the inability of many companies 
to get loam from overseas lending in- 
stitutions, which have shown a lack of 
confidence in Thai companies. 

He said many finan ce companies' 
cash-flow problems wotzld not be 
solved until the government imple- 
mented measures to bolster the econ- 
omy . and got positive results from 
them, something be said might not 
occur until the end of the year. 

(Reuters, APR) 


Paribas Purchase 
Marks France’s 
Advance in Asia 






Bangkok Airport Expansion Gets Funds 


CiyiM frt Opt ShtffFmHDtYWJm 

BANGKOK — The cabinet alloc- 
ated 12 billion baht ($462 million) 
Tuesday for an expansion of 
Bangkok's only international airport 
and postponed by seven years the com- 
pletion of a second airport. 

Don Muang International Airport, 
which now handles more titan 25 mil- 
lion passengers a year, will be expan- 
ded to handle as many as 45 million 
annually by 2007. 


The second airport was scheduled to 
be finished by 2000 ax' a cost of 96 
billion baht The transport and com- 
munications minister, Suwat Liptap- 
allop, said the seven-year delay in the 
timetable would allow time for a re- 
vision of its design and a thorough 
review of construction costs. 

Cost-antingstopsaretoixxduderene- 
gotiating an 11.7 bfition-baht landfill 
contract signed in December with Itali- 
an-Thai Development PLC. Tbe second 


airport, at Nong Ngu Hao on the south- 
eastern edge of Bangkok, has been in the 
development stage since the 1960s. The 
project, often mired in controversy, be- 
came an issue again recently when 
Prime Minister Chaovalit Yongchaiyut 
said he wanted to move the airport 
closer to tile country’s industrial heart- 
landLGitics said the prime minister was 
needlessly delaying a vital project and 
undermining the confidence of foreign 
investors. (Bloomberg, AFP, Ar) 


.. . Vfr 


Agence France-Prase 

HONG KONG — A move 
by Banque Paribas SA to buy 
Asia Equity Holding Ltd. is the 
latest sign of the growing pres- 
ence of French tanks in Asian 
brokerage operations at this 
period of increasing compe- 
tition in the region’s markets. 

The bank subsidiary of 
Compagnie Fmanciere de 
Paribas announced last week 
that it had reached an agree- 
meot in principle with thcThai 
brokerage concern Securities 
One Inc. to buy 70 percent of 
Asia Equity. 

Asia Equity is based in 
Hong Kong and operates in the 
maip Southeast Asian mar- 
kets. The deal follows the pur- 
chase of Crosby Securities 
Ltd, also based in Hong Kong, 
by Societe Generate SA in Au- 
gust 1996, the acquisition by 
Banque Nationale de Paris SA 
of Prime East Capital Group in 
Singapore at the begimring of 
February and the reorganiz- 
ation of WX Carr Inc., the 
Asian brokerage unit of 
Banque Indosuez S A, after the 
bank was taken under the wing 
of Credit Agricole S A. 

‘There has been a very sig- 
nificant upgrade in the 
French-owned equity busi- 
ness in Asia," said John Mul- 
cahy, WJL Carr's managing 
director in Hong Kong. 

The fifth major French 
player is Credit Lyonnais Se- 
curities Aria, one of the jew- 
els of heavily indebted Credit 
Lyonnais SA. 

The move by Paribas — an 
aggressive merchant bank, 
particularly in bond issues, 
that bad shown little interest 
so far in the distribution ride 
of die business — particularly 
illustrates the evolution of 
brokerage concerns is the 
area of transferable securities 
in Asia, a banking official 
who asked to remain an- 
onymous said. 

“If you are an investment 
bank without distribution, 
you have one arm tied behind 
your back,” he said. 

Over the past 10 years, large 
Asian concerns have de- 
veloped more sophisticated 
methods of financing — from 


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shares and debentures to con- 
vertible bonds and derivative 
securities. 

Banks that can not provide 
these services are pushed to- 
ward riskier “seamd-tier" 
clients, a French banker said. 

Working methods have 
also changed in brokerages as 
the commercial environment 
has shifted. 

“This is a very competitive 
environment; die era of high 
margins is coming to an 
end," Mr. Mulca&y said. 
Fund managers, who provide 
most of the brokerage busi- 
ness, demand a higher quality 
of research as well as reduced 
margins 

The answer to this profit 
squeeze is ‘ ‘full integration of 
the equity business, the whole 
range of activities that will 
make the best use of the costs 
basis,’’ Mr. Mulcahy said 

Brokerages must win the 
backing of the investment 
banks and in the case of “ all- 
embracing" European banks, 
turn the portfolio of commer- 
cial-banking clients to their 
advantage, be said 

Asia’s economic boom in- 
dicates that the cake will not 
stop growing, he said, but 
firms will have to fight for 
their slices of it. 

The french banker added 
that in this competitive atmo- 
sphere, Wall Street's giant 
frnns are far ahead 

Their profitability in a 
large domestic market “en- 
ables them to invest here 
some enormous suns, taking 
some considerable risks,' ’ the 
banker said 


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V. \ : ~m9T ^ 73733 ; • : -0 M 


r: ;- oj87 

lotovaimal Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 

• Giordano International Ltd., the clothing company foun- 
ded by Jimmy Lai, declined to comment as its shares rose 12 
percent, to 5.00 Hong Kong dollars (64.5 U.S. cents) amid 
speculation that it would make a breakthrough in its expansion 
in China. “There has been no progress that we have to report 
to the public," the corporate secretary, Alice Yip, said 

• Carter Holt Harvey Ltd- a New Zealand forestry company, 
said its third-quarter net profit fell 42 percent, to 53 million 
New Zealand dollars ($36 3 million) amid declining prices and 
a disappointing contribution from its Chilean operations. Sales 
in the quarter were unchanged at 3 11 million dollars. 

• Samsung Aerospace Industries Ltd. is negotiating with 
the European aircraft consortium Aero International (Re- 
gional) on possible joint development of passenger jets. 

• Philippine Airlines Inc. expects a net loss of about 2 billion 
pesos (375.9 million) for die year ending March 31. Share- 
holders, meanwhile, approved issuing shares to double the 
airline’s capital to 20 billion pesos. 

• The Philippine Supreme Court rejected a suit seeking to 
suspend die government's plan to deregulate the oil industry. 

AFX. AP. Bloomberg 


sea HOLDINGS (LUXEMBOURG) SA 

in liquidation 
2 route de Treves 
Airport Center/ Senningerberg 
Luxembourg 

By Judgement dated 31 January 1997, the Luxembourg 
Disbict Court sitting in commercial matters, appointed 
Mattre Marc KLEYR. attorn ey-ar-l aw, Luxembourg, 
liquidator of BCCI Holdings (LUXEMBOURG) SA, successor 
to Mr. Georges RAVARANL 

The Liquidator 
Marc KLEYR 



Degussa on Plastics Recycling 


Back to back lights. 
And back again. 


Extremely rigid yet easi- and their suppliers. Degalan 
ly mouldable, shock-resistant sets new standards in trans- 
yer incredibly flexible, light- lucence and brilliance. And it 
weight yer remarkably strong. is virtually 100 % recyclable. 

The manifold qualities of For instance, back lights 

plastics make them in many made from Degalan can be 
fields of modern research and reconverted into the original 
technology an essential ele- material — granules — with 
ment of innovative solutions. practically no loss in com- 
Wlth Degalan, Degussa pound purity or volume, 
has made a special high-grade And chat is how back 

synthetic material available lights can get back to being 
to automobile manufacturers back lights. And back again. 


They just keep coming back 
in different shapes and sizes. 

For Degussa, it all began 
with gold and silver. Today, 
we shine in many more fields. 


sOLur/o 

Q ° Degussa 




























































































































































































































««**«*«* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD 


TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAXi rimRUARYI-2, 1997 




PAGE 18 


^ BcraU»SSrtbun C 

Sports 


WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 12, 


World Roundup 


TV Worry for Italy 

soccer The Italian government 
intervened Tuesday to try to ensure 
that the entire country could see 
Wednesday's crucial World Cup 
qualifier between England and Italy 
live on television Grom Wembley. 

Private broadcaster TeleMonte- 
Carlo had won the rights to show 
the game, but its signal covers only 
80 percent of the country. 

Deputy Prime Minister Walter 
Veltroni had talks with the com- 
pany's owner Vittorio Cecchi Gori 
and the chairman of state broad- 
caster RAI, Enzo Siciliano to 
“verify the possibility of showing 
the England-Italy soccer match 
through -our Italy," the government 
said. 

Cecchi Gori also owns the radio 
rights to die game and has sold them 
on to private stations. It will be the 
first tune that RAI radio has not 
carried live coverage of an Italy 
game. (Reuters) 

Chang Breezes Through 

tennis Two-rime champion Mi- 
chael Cbang and fourth seed Todd 
Martin gained convincing straight 
sets victories in the first round of 
the $303,000 Sybase Open tour- 
nament in San Jose, California. 
Chang, who won in 1988 and 1992, 
overwhelmed qualifier Mas his ka 
Washington, the younger brother of 
2996 Wimbledon finalist MaliVai 
Washington. 6-2, 6-0. (Reuters) 

Bowe Reaches Root Camp 

boxing Riddick Bowe, the 
former world heavyweight cham- 
pion. stepped off a plane and into 
the ranks of the United States Mar- 
ines. The 29-year-old Bowe and 21 
other new recruits, most of them in 
their teens, were met Monday by 
three Marine instructors at the 
Charleston airport prior to a bus trip 
to the notorious Parris Island Mar- 
ine Corps training center. (AP) 

$15 Million for Vaughn 

» Outfielder Greg 
Vaughn agreed to a three-year, $15 
million contract with die San Diego 
Padres, avoiding arbitration. 
Vaughn, who was traded from Mil- 
waukee last summer, will make $4 
million in 1997, $5.25 million in 
1998 and S5.75 million in 1999, 
with $850,000 deferred without in- 
terest He hit .280 with 31 homers 
in 375 at-bats for Milwaukee, and 
.206 with 10 homers in 141 at-bats 
for San Diego. 

• Andy Van Slyke, who retired 
after the 1995 season due to back 
problems, is making a comeback 
with the St Louis Cardinals as a 
backup third baseman. Van Slyke, 
36, won five Gold Gloves as a cen- 
ter fielder, but started his career at 
third base with Sl Louis in 1984. 

• The New York Mets agreed to 

a minor-league contract with 
Howard Johnson. Johnson, 36, j 
played for rite Mets in the 1986 I 
world Series. He spent 1996 as a I 
coach with Butte of the Pioneer 
Rookie League, an affiliate of the 
Tampa Bay Devils. | 

Lavra Made Permanent 

basketball The interim 
UCLA basketball coach, Steve 
Lavin. was promoted to permanent 
head coach Tuesday and will re- 
ceive a four-year contract. 

Lavin, 32. was an assistant for 
five seasons before being appoin- 
ted interim coach when Jim Harrick 
was fired Nov. 6 . 

The Bruins (13-7) are tied with 
Southern California for first place 
in the Pacific- 10 Conference with 
an 8-3 record. (AP) 


A Young Star Keeps Italy Smiling 

Kostner Wins Super G and Likes Chances in Doumhill 


By Christopher Clarey 

International Herald Tritxaur 


SESTRIERE, Italy — The brief en- 
counter took place fast Tuesday. Axle 
SkaardaL die Norwegian, had just de- 


fended his world title in the men s Super 
G. Isolde Kostner, the Italian who was 
preparing to defend here, walked up and 
congratulated him. 

“Now, it’s 17 to you," Skaardal 
said. 

One week later, Kostner duplicated 
the Norwegian's feat, and like Skaardal, 
she won her gold medal on Tuesday by 
finding speed on the bottom section of 
the Kandahar Banchetta course. 

Kostner started eighth, and after com- 
pleting approximately three -fourths of 
the course, die trailed the leader, Katja 
Seizinger of Germany, by a significant 
margin: four tenths of a second. But then 
cam e the two big turns heading into the 
final jump. Kostner roared through 
them, and even though she was hardly 
the portrait of stability in the air — 
jumping remains her weakness — she 
already had earned back enough rime to 
take the gold from Seizinger by a very 
insig nificant margin: eight one-hun- 
dredths of a second. 

Seizinger 's German teammate. Hilde 
Gerg, won the bronze. 

"Two turns, that’s all it took," said 
Piennario Calcamuggi, a former Italian 


head coach. "She bad so much power 
coming out of them. It has been that way 
since she was a teenager." 

With her round cheeks and close- 
cropped hair, the 21-year-old Kostner 
could still be mistaken for a secondary- 

school student. In only her fourth season 

on the World Cup circuit, she now has 
won two World Championships and two 
Olympic medals: bronzes in die Super G 
ana downhill in 1994. 

She has also established herself, like 
her compatriots Deborah Compagnoni 
and Alberto Tomba, as a skier who 
thrives under pressure. 

“You have to have a little luck to win 
by eight-hundredths of a second,'* 
Kostner said 

The I talians ' success hone in front of 
their exacting, emotional fans is no co- 
incidence. At last year's World Cham- 
pionships in Sierra Nevada, Spain, they 
won four gold medals. This year, with 
Compagnoni’s sweep of the slalom and 
giant slalom, they have already won 
three events. Tomba will compete this 
week in the men's technical events, and 
Kostner will be one of the favorites 
again in Saturday’s women's downhill. 

“I think I can double like Deborah," 
Kostner said “The last few races I've 
had good results, and I'm in good phys- 
ical condition. I like the downhill course 
here." 

Kostner’ s first good result came on a 


Italy Pines for Past Glories, 
England Seeks the Future 


By Rob Hughes 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — There is an empty 
chair at the long table at the Milan 
restaurant L'Assassino. Cesare 
Maldini regrets he cannot take lunch 
today; he is abroad on a mission. 

The regular diners, who include many 
former soccer players, will raise a glass 
anyway, to MaldinTs recent 65th birth- 
day. They will also toast the mission, for 
Maldini is the new trainer to the Azzuni, 
Italy's national soccer team, which plays 


England on Wednesday at Wembley Sta- 
dium. 

It is a World Cup qualifying match 
critical to Maldini’s task of proving that 
old values, like old wines and indeed 
aging diners, gain from maturity. Italy 
was at odds with the modem schemes 
that Arrigo Sacchi tried to impose on its 
finest soccer sons, so when he quit as 
national coach, Maldini was told to re- 
store die methods that had brought Italy 
three World Cups. 

Wembley is the crunch game in Euro- 
pean qualifying Group Two. Only the 
top team in the group is certain to reach 
next year’s finals in France. It is as 
unthinkable for Italy to miss a World 
Cup in its centenary soccer year as it 
would be for England to fail its second 
qualifying test in succession. 

Fear wul lay a hand on the match — 
the fear of defeat The play wfll be cagey 
and likely to be garnished with, at best, a 
trickle rather than a torrent of goals. 
Cesare Maldini was in his day a safety- 
first defensive libero and would revel in 
a 0-0 finish at Wembley. 

This, like most things Italian, will be 
a family affair. Cesare Maldini picks the 
side. Paolo Maldini captains it 

You can forget nepotism. It is true that 
Italians have a saying. “ 'figlio tT arte,” 
bred for the job, and that Paolo is the 
fifth son of Cesare. It is also true that die 
son is a better player, a more eye-catch- 
ing athlete, than ever his father was. 

Papa Maldini could lock up the de- 
fense in Italy's classic cautious caten- 
accio style. Paolo can do that too. but it 


would be a waste to tie him to central 
defensive negative duties when be is 
incomparable among world players as a 
counterattacking left bade 

That is where the son has shone in 
most of his 74 games for Italy and where 
at 28 he has won every club honor in 
Europe with AC Milan. It so happens 
that Paolo can stoop to fairly cynical 
“none shall pass" Italian antics when 
the mood strikes or when, as this season, 
his form falls below expectations. 

Thirty-four years ago, the elder 
Maldini played at Wembley in an im- 
portant match. He lifted the European 
Champions' Cup as captain of Milan 
after the match, in which Ms team beat 
Benfica of Lisbon. 

The Maldinis are opposed by Gleam 
Hoddle, once a creative midfield player, 
now England's coach. 

On Tuesday, Hoddle announced that 
die player who now fills that role, Paul 
Gascoigne, was fit to play even though 
be is hobbled by an injured ankle and 
has not trained for two weeks. Who do 
the English think they are kidding? 

Part of the art of modem coaching is 
to conceal the team lineup, to try to 
outfox die opponent. Hoddle and 
Maldini are both at it both sending red 
herrings via journalistic messengers. 

The sting, the surprise nobody has 
talked about on England’s training field, 
would be to play Matthew le Tissier, an 
artist of languid skills, instead of the 
fading Gascoigne. 

As the teams rest in luxury hotels by 
the Thames, they might muse on die 
ticket prices for Wednesday’s game. 

The fans are being asked to pay three 
times for the wivilege of sitting in tbe rain 
this night. No, not tbe Mack-market 
ripoff, although apparently ljOOO tickets 
have found then way into scalpers’ 
hands. 

This is the English Football Asso- 
ciation’s scheme to entice “loyalty" by 
making customers buy three tickets at 
once: for the Italy game, for England vs. 
Georgia in April mid England vs. Mol- 
dova in September. Tbe price? Up to 
$300 a head. 

The passion play of Wednesday is the 
FA's leverage 

“England will always try to break 


very bad day foe siding in late January 
1994. when she won the Garmisch- 
Panenkirchen downhill in which the 
Austrian skier Uhike Maier died Her 
viettny was widely viewed as afluke: die 
result of a change in weather conditions 
that made the course faster for the lower- 
ranked skiers. Kostner quickly dispelled 
such ideas by finishing third in the next 
downhill, and then became a star with her 
medals in the LiUehammer Olympics. 

She is not die first star athlete in her 
family. Her father, Ulrich, played ice 
hockey in Italy's first division, and her 
brothers Fabian and Moritz are now 
doing the same. Isolde would have 
chosen ice hockey, too, but there was no 
women’steam in her hometown of Oiti- 
sei In the South Tyrol. 

“She lets hear skis ran as well as any- 
body on earth," said Calcamuggi. the 
former coach. ‘ ‘She generates speed that 
others simply cannot generate.’ 

Seizinger, the world's best speed ski- 
er throughout the 1990s, might have 
held off Kostner on Tuesday if not for a 
rough turn near the bottom. 

Kostner met the first target of one 
young fan who wrote to her recently. 

“She wrote me that I would win here, 
win next year in Nagano and then win 
the overall World Cup title in 1999.” 
Kostner said. “I wrote her back that it 
was a good plan, but it might be easier to 


write about than 


Cesare Maldini, coach for Italy, 
making a call from the team bus. 

through a brick wall," says Gianfranco 
Zola, the diminutive Italian forward who 
will definitely play for Chelsea in the 
English Premier League. “We Italians 
try to find a way around it." 

He alludes to the clash of styles that 
has long characterized England-Italy 
soccer matches. 

It is a difference embedded in culture 
and custom. 

“There has always been this differ- 
ence in mentality between us,” said An- 
gelo Perazzi, Italy’s goalkeeper of the 
moment “I was not surprised tire other 
day when Roy Hodgson called Italian 
players cheats because of diving in the . 
penalty area.” Hodgson is an English- 
man coaching Intemazianale of Milan. 

English soccer players, he imagines, 
would never do such a thing, would 
never dodge the spirit of play enshrined 
by rules their countrymen wrote. 

The truth, as Wednesday may show, 
is that the differences are disappearing, 
Hoddle, like Terry Venables before him, 
is on a mission to “Europeanize" the 
English, to adopt the formation of three 
defenders, five midfielders and two at- 
tackers that most thinking nations now 
apply with variations. This is the form- 
ation Maldini is taking Italy back to. 

Hoddle is trying, doubtless in his 
dreams as much as his conscious mo- 
ments, to trip up Italy at its own game. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 




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Japanese Linebacker 
Hop es to Make a Hit 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

The 23 -year-old Japanese line- 
backer was trying to explain how he 
had become a professional American 
football player. There have been only 
a few like him in recent decades. In 
die 1960s, some European soccer 
players were grafted onto National 
Football League teams as kickers, and 
in their little way they revolutionized 
thesport 

Masafumi Kawaguchi wonders 
what his role will be. He has never 
' played an official football game 
against American players before. At 5 
feet 10 indies and 208 pounds, be 
concedes that be will be one of the 
smallest, slowest performers when he 
joins more than 100 other players at a 
training camp for the Weald League 
of American Football next month in 
Atlanta. 

Kawaguchi and three other Jap- 
anese players were chosen at a World 
League tryout in Japan last month. 
They have been guaranteed jobs for 
this season largely because the World 
League would like to expand its tele- 
vision coverage into Japan. 

His unlikely football career began 
at 17, when be moved alone from 

school in IsanQemenle, California^ 
which was famous as Richard Nix- 
on's retirement home. Kawaguchi 
had always wanted to live in America. 
One of the first things he did was to tty 
out for the San Clemente High School 
football team. 

It was not a promising start He 
never played. 

“I had a chance in the preseason 
and in the practice games/’ he said. 
“I think I was doing good, bm I was 
wondering why the coach was not 
using me." 

After the football seasoiv.it was 
discovered that the coach had mis- 
takenly believed that Kawaguchi was. 
an exchange student and therefore not 
eligible to play. The entire season . 
went by with Kawaguchi waiting pa- 
tiently on the sideline, declining to 


ask the coach if there was a prob- 
lem. 

“No, I never asked,” Kawaguchi 
said from Hawaii, where be arid Ms " 
three countrymen are training in an- 
ticipation of die World League camp. 

- “I decided to achieve my goal and let 
my actuals speak for me. A lot of guys 
just talk too much; it’s fee same aO over 
the world - 1 find feat the really tough 
guys usually don't speak out kwd 
about what they have been doing.” 

. .. Kawaguchi indicated, however, 
that he is trying to adjust his pef- . 
sonality to fit in wife the Americans. 
When asked whether he had played 
well after he returned to Japan, he 
said, “I think I did.'* Such words 
must have sounded outrageous to 
him, because he added, “Normally 
Japanese won’t say such tilings about 
themselves." 

When he returned to Japan from his 
year in San Clemente, he had gained 
20 pounds of muscle from weight- 
lifting. He enrolled at a university in 
Kyoto and played American-style 
football for four years there. The last 
two years, he has been a kind of 
graduate-assistant coach of fee team, j 
overseeing the defensive ends. 

The World League will begin its 
fifth season this spring wife dubs in 
six European cities. Each club will 
employ seven European players. Ex- 
tra space has been created in fee 
league for Kawaguchi and his three 
countrymen. The league is hoping 
that they will emerge as credible play- 
ers and therefore help the game to 
grow in Japan. 

For Kawaguchi ‘s part he is hoping 
for nothing more than the chance to 
prove himself, to show by his actions 
that he plays bigger than be appears 
and faster than Ms recorded time in - 
the 40-yard dash. 1 

He doesn’t know whether he will 
be an outside linebacker or a safety. 

All he knows is that he will be playing 
in the Netherlands for the Amsterdam 
Admirals. 

At the end of the interview, he had 
a question about Ms new team. 

He asked, “What is Admiral?" 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1997 


PAGE 19 


SPORTS 


%h Blood Test on McCall 
Finds Him Drug-Free 

Psychiatrist Says it Whs Breakdown 


By Steve Springer 

Los Angeles Tima 


What really caused Oliver McCall to 
lose not only a World Boxing Council 
heavyweight title fight Friday night but 
also, seemingly, his mind? 

Why did he refuse to fight, refuse to 
defend himself, refuse to even walk 
pck to his comer between rounds? 
Why did he break down in tears and 
stroll around the ring jas if his opponent, 
Lennox Lewis, weren’t even there? 

It wasn't drugs. That much was de- 
termined by a blood test administered 
immediately after the fight, under the 
rules of the Nevada State Athletic Com- 
mission, that showed he was drug-fire. It 
was the second time in less than a week 
that he had passed a drug test. McCall, 
who has admitted to a drug problem, also 
was rested Feb. 4, the day after he strived 
in Las Vegas for the fight. 

Leonora Petty, a psychiatrist who ex- 
amined McCall on Saturday morning 
and who had not seen the fight, said; “I 
think his mental state is just fine. I spoke 
with him. He gave me answers, and I 
hade an assessment." 

’ r But that was not the opinion of Marc 
Shatz, who has been a clinical psychi- 
atrist in Beverly Hills, California for 
more than two decades and specializes in 
treating athletes and entertainers. Shatz 
did not examine McCall, but he was 
ringside at the fight 

"It was not drug-related at all,’ ’ Shatz 
said of McCall’s action. The boxer, he 
said, had a nervous breakdown. 

"The mind fragments, falls to 
pieces," he said. “It often can be drug- 
induced, but it doesn't have to be. In 
today's drug world, we always point 
first to drugs as the cause. It could be 
stress, anxiety or many other causes. It 
was an emotional breakdown. I ob- 
served all the symptoms first-hand He 
walked around the ring. He ignored his 
turner. His eyes had a glazed look, as if 
he were in a disassociarive state, as if he 
were not there at all, detached AH that 
indicates a breakdown. This was 
someone clearly in mental trouble. 

“People have breakdowns all over 
the country every day. What made this 
so unusual was that it happened in front 


of 5,000 people and on national tele- 
vision." 

How did Shatz reconcile his views 
with those of Petty, who examined Mc- 
Call? *‘I totally disagree with her," be 
said “I'm sure when he talked the next 
day, be sounded normal. A man can 
sometimes get a bit rational. Sometimes 
one can go m and out of psychotic states 
of mind. One can create a false self that 
can fool even the professionals. 

“He requires more extensive exam- 
ination. If Ireny bad seen his behavior that 
night, she would have understood Every- 
one there that night saw him go nuts." 

Shatz said he became concerned as 
soon as McCall entered the ring. 

Entering the Las Vegas Hilton ball- 
room, where the fight was to be held, 
McCall broke from his handlers, raced 
down the aisle and aggressively plunged 
through the ropes. 

"He bounced into die ring hyper and 
became manic once in the nog,” Shatz 
said "He may have had a mini-break- 
down right there. 

“In the first round it looked like he 
got his mind back, then it started to 
disintegrate. At first, 1 thought he was 
out on his feet. By the end, he was oat of 
his mind" 

McCall fought normally for the first 
two rounds, although Lewis, whom Mc- 
Call knocked out nearly two and a half 
years ago, had die edge. 

In die third round, though, his erratic 
behavior took over. At the 55-second 
mark of the fifth round, referee MQls 
Lane, who had twice warned McCall 
about his behavior, stopped the fight and 
declared Lewis the winner. 

McCall, whose $3.1 million purse has 
been held tip by the state commission, 
faces a hearing in March. At that point, 
the commission will determine the fate . 
of the purse and could fine or suspend 
McCall, who said Saturday he would 
like to resume training in two weeks and 
get another fight soon thereafter. 

"With his denial in the press con- 
ference, it could be difficult for this man 
to get the help he needs," Shatz said. 
"He needs a long-term treatment pro- 
gram. He can train if it's therapeutic for 
him, but he shouldn't make an appli- 
cation to fight for at least a year.*' 


Washington Starts Off Strongly 
But Falls Foul of Deep Bearcats 


The Associated Press 

SEATTLE — The No. 8 Cincinnati 
Bearcats looked distracted Monday 
night in the first half of an 82-69 
victory over Washington. 

But after committing 15 turnovers 

in the opening 20 minutes, they made 
only one in the second half. 

“That first half was crazy/’ said 
Danny Fortson. who had 22 noil 
and 11 rebounds as Cincinnati 
won its fourth straight 

The Huskies (13-7), who haven't 
been to the NCAA Tournament sinoe 
1986, stayed in contention until the 


final three and a half minutes, when 
the Bearcats outscored them 14-7. 

Fortson had 14pomts in the second 
half, and 3-point specialist Darnell 
Burton added 19 points, including 
four 3-pointers in the second half of 
die game, the only one on Monday 
involving a Top 25 team. 

Slender Mark Sanford, who led 
Washington with 18 points, spent part 
of the night wrestling inside with 
Fortson. “That was a lot of fun," 
Sanford said. “1 would love to play 
those guys again." 

The Huskies were hurt when their 
two 7-footers, Todd MacCulloch and 
Patrick Femeriing. fouled ont with 
6:12 and 5:50 to go. 



ahum Bm/Hraum 

The San Jose Sharks* goalkeeper, Kelly Hrudey, blocking a shot by Valeri Bure of the Montreal Canadiens. 

Roenick Helps Coyotes Beat the Blues 


The Associated Press 

Jeremy Roenick is still trying to fig- 
ure out what to expect from his Phoenix 
Coyotes teammates. 

"I’ve been on the biggest roller- 
coaster ride known to man this year," 
Roenick said after his goal and assist 
helped the Coyotes beat the Sl Louis 
Blues 4-2 Monday night at Kiel Center. 

Roenick was traded to Phoenix before 
the season, after a contract dispute with 
the Chicago Blackhawks. He has scored 
only 16 goals, far below his usual pro- 
duction. Four times in his career, Roeo- 
ick has scored more than 40 goals. 

Roenick said his latest frustration was 
the Coyotes' 5-4 loss in overtime Sat- 
urday night to the Dallas Stars, a game 
in which Phoenix blew a 4-0 lead in the 
third period. 


"We came back and put that game 
behind us. Maybe that will mean 
something as the season goes along," 
Roenick said. 

Keith Tkachuk scored 33 seconds in- 

NHl Roundup 

to the game for Phoenix, and Roenick 
made it 2-0 at the 2:33 mark. 

Blues coach Joel Quenneville said his 
team never recovered from that bad 
stmt. 

"It looked like for the first five 
minutes we weren’t ready to play.” 
Quenneville said. "It was 2-0 before we 
even knew we were in a hockey game. 
After that we played well, but that’s an 
awful big hole to climb out of." 

The Coyotes stopped the line of Brett 


Hull. Pierre Turgeon and Geoff Court- 
nail. which had scored 36 goals in the 
last 22 games. 

The loss was Sl Louis's fourth in its 
last six games at home and dropped the 
Blues to 1 1-15-4. 

CmaiSana 4, shatka 2 Jose Theodore, 
the rookie goalie, made a season-high 47 
saves, and Vincent Daraphousse reached 
the 800-point mark with a goal and two 
assists, as Montreal won at home. 

Damphousse scored his 2 1 st goal on a 
power play at 6:15 of the first period, his 
first goal in 10 games going back to Jan. 
22. He got his 800th career point with an 
assist on Vladimir Malakhov's goal at 
18:1 1 of the first period. 

Martin Rucinsky and Turner Steven- 
son also scored for the Canadiens. who 
are 6-0 in Montreal against San Jose. 


No Place Like Home? Not in the NHL 


By Helene Elliott 

Los Angeles Tones 


Another of the National Hockey 
League’s traditions has become a victim 
of "progress.” 

Certain trams used -to be unbeatable 
at home, gaming advantages from their 
rink and their tens. The Bruins stocked 
up on grinders who thrived on the short 
Boston Garden surface. The Black- 
hawks ruled Chicago Stadium, where 
visitors were intimidated by roaring 
crowds, the compressed neutral zone 
and the wonderful old organ. The 
Montreal Canadiens, who lost a total of 
14 home games while winning four con- 
secutive Stanley Cups from 1976 
through 1979. had the Forum ghosts to 
inspire them. 

No more. 

The Blackhawks, who moved into the 
United Center two years ago, are 8-16-3 
at home and headed for their first losing 
home record since 1957-58. 

The Bruins, who haven’t had a sub- 
.500 home record since 1966-67, are 10- 
16-6 at the FleetCenter. 

The Canadiens, who moved into the 


cavernous Molson Centre nearly a year 
ago, are 13-12-4 at home. Their home 
record hasn’t been under .500 since 
1939-40 and has (tipped to .500 only 
twice since then. 

The Sl Louis Blues are 8-4-2 under 
new coach Joel Quenneville but only 2- 
3 at home with him in charge. The 
Phoenix Coyotes, who were 22-16-3 at 
home last season as die Winnipeg Jets, 
are 1 1-144 at America West Arena. 

An obvious common thread is the 
bland, coolrie-cmter sameness of many 
new arenas, which puts teams on equal 
footing. A speedy team isn’t hampered 
in Boston or Chicago, where the ice is 
regulation size. Home teams have no 
edge knowing how pucks carom off the 
glass because many arenas use the same 
type of seamless glass. 

Coinciding with the opening of so 
many arenas the last few years, the 
winning percentage of home teams has 
fallen from .583 in 1994-95 to 361 last 
season and to -533 this season, through 
Sunday. That’s the lowest percentage 
since die major expansion of 1967. 

Fans are also less of a factor. Al- 
though the new buildings are bigger. 


many seats are more distant from die 
ice, taking fans out of the game. Tickets 
are also more expensive and beyond the 
budget of many individuals. That leads 
to more corporate seat holders, whose 
devotion is usually less fanatic. 

A star Phoenix Coyote forward, 
Jeremy Roenick, is puzzled by his 
team's home woes. 

"We're too lackadaisical- We’re too 
uncomfortable in our own building,' ’ he 
said. “We’ll go into Detroit and dom- 
inate and come back and Jose to a team 
we shouldn’t lose to. We feel we have to 
put on a show." 

That’s because marketing officials 
have decided that ticket prices are so 
high, fans won’t feel they got their 
money’s worth unless they’re entertained 
with loud music, inane trivia contests and 
flying mascots. Games aren't games, 
they’re circuses. No wonder players feel 
as edgy as tightrope walkers. 

To most fans, a competitive team is 
entertainment enough. Cut die 
sideshows and let teams focus on play- 
ing hockey. The result might be a re- 
vival of the old mystique of invincibility 
at home. 


NFL Jets Yield 
4 Draft Picks 
To Get Parcells 


By Gerald Bskenazi 

Ne w York Tones Service 

NEW YORK — Paul Tagliabue, the 
National Football League commission- 
er. has brokered a deal that freed Bill 
Parcells from die final year of his con- 
tract with the New England Patriots and 
allowed him to sign on immediately as 
bead coach of the New York Jets. 

Tagliabue managed to break through 
the intransigence of both the Jets' own- 
er. Leon Hess, and the Patriots’ owner, 
Robert Kraft, who were battling over 
Parcells like two knights over a prin- 
cess. 

In exchange for releasing Parcells 
from his contract, the Patriots will re- 
ceive a total of four Jet draft choices, 
though not the first pick overall in this 
year's draft, which the Jets own by 
virtue of their having been the NFL’s 
worst team last season. The Patriots — 
who made it to the Super Bowl cham- 
pionship game last month, where they 
lost to Green Bay — had said they 
would insist on getting that first pick in 
return for any deal over Parcells. 

Instead, New England will receive 
the Jets’ third- and fourth-round picks 
this year, their second-round pick next 
year and their first- round pick in 1999. 

Tagliabue held a hearing Monday, 
ostensibly to determine whether a con- 
sultant's job was really what the Jets had 
in mind when they signed Parcells but 
were precluded by his old contract from 
naming him head coach right away. But 
he also tried to get the sides to make the 
deal, and he succeeded after almost five 
hours of negotiations. 

“I said to Bob Kraft,” the commis- 
sioner said. " ‘Look, you’ve just come 
from a Super Bowl. Your quarterback 
and your running back are coming back 
from the Pro Bowl. Don’t you want 
them to start getting ready for next sea- 
son without these distractions?' " 

Tagliabue said he then told Hess, who 
is also chairman of Amerada Hess Corp., 
" ’You want Bill Parcells. Where would 
you rather have him this year? In Jupiter 
Beach, Florida, or coaching your 
team?’ ” 

Still, the sides could not agree. But 
after they agreed to accept binding ar- 
bitration, in 20 minutes Tagliabue 
presented a plan that he said he had 
worked on all weekend and that they 
accepted. 

Tagliabue said he bad explained to 
Kraft that eventually he would lose his 
stars through free agency or they would 
price themselves off the team because of 
the league’s limits on a team's overall 
payroll, known as the salary cap. 

“I showed Bob that while he was in a 
very strong position now, be would start 
having cap problems,” Tagliabue said. 
"Veteran players want to be paid. And 
as a Super Bowl team, be didn’t need so 
much money going to one player in the 
first round." He meant that tire No. I 
pick in the draft would cost Kraft that 
much more money and possibly create 
salary-cap problems. 

Moreover, although tire Jets gave up 
their 1999 first-round pick in the deal, by 
then they might be a better team, and thus 
would tie muting their choice later in the 
round, than they are now. For now, on the 
other hand, even their third and fourth 
choices are useful, because they will get 
to make their choices at the beginning of 
each round in this year's draft. 

The deal also calls for the Jets to make 
a $300,000 donation to Kraft’s char- 
itable foundation. 


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PAGE 2 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, 




PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Secret of Success 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — The life 
story of Pamela Harri- 
man, who died in Pans last 
week, reads like one of those 
bad novels in which women 
with gumption to spare come 
frcrm nowhere and make the 
world their private property. 
As fiction it is old and tired, 
but when a real woman really 
pulls it off it is quite won- 
derful. probably because the 
real world's deck is so heavily 
stacked against real women. 

Mrs. Harriman really 
pulled it off. and not just in 
spades, but also in clubs, 
hearts and diamonds. 

Ambassador to France was 
the last item on her rdsumd. 
Her final deed was a swim in 
the pool at the Ritz on the 
Place Vendome. Of course, 
she would never have made it 
to that most elegant of all am- 
bassadorships by taking her 
daily exercise at the YWCA. 


□ 


Ambition driven by grit, 
gall and sexual guile are still 
widely considered unseemly 
in a woman. In those bad but 
best-selling novels about 
such women they are usually 
portrayed as unprincipled 
hussies, to use the polite old- 
fashioned word. 

By contrast, men pro- 
pelling themselves upward in 
the same manner are usually 
treated as admirably ruthless 
and cunning go-getters. 

A summary of the ambas- 
sador's biography suggests 
that she never met anybody 
who wasn't famous. She mar- 
ried three of diem and bedded 
several of the others. 

The husbands were Ran- 
dolph Churchill, son of Win- 
ston: Leland Hayward, 

Broadway agent-producer of 
the postwar era. and Averell 
Harriman, multimillionaire. 


adviser to presidents, ambas- 
sador to the Soviet Union, 
governor of New York, etc. 

The bed dees included John 
Hay Whitney, Edward R. 
Morrow. Prince Aly Khan, 
Gianni Agnelli ana Baron 
Elie de Rothschild. Lot of 
money there. 

What was the secret of 
Mrs. Harriman 's success? 
One may have been that she 
never married unwisely. The 
Churchills were — well, the 
Churchills. Leland Hayward 
was well heeled. AvereU Har- 
riman was more so. He had 
long had a reputation for be- 
ing “tighter than a P ullman 

window” until Pamela 
loosened him so thoroughly 
that be started contributing to 
Democratic campaigners. 

After his death, the widow 
Harriman became a major 
contributor and fund-raiser for 
Democraticpoliticiafls, partic- 
ularly Bill Ginton. 

Ulus came the choicest of 
all ambassadorships — for 
those who can afford to foot 
the bills of Paris living. 

How explain her extraor- 
dinary success in an era when 
men ruled the world? Obvi- 
ously there was some quality 
in her that gave her i mmens e 
power to charm a certain kind 
of man. The kind who didn't 
bother to read the news be- 
cause he made it. 

“What annoys me, espe- 
cially," she once said, “es- 
pecially in this world where 
women are equal with men, 
why do they ail take the same 
tack, that people didn't many 
me? Nobody s ever thought 
that I didn't want to marry.” 

But of course women were 
not “equal with men” in her 
world. A man taking many 
lovers without clerical bless- 
ing was to be admired as a 
prince of love. For the woman 
who did, praise was — still is 


scarce. 


New York Times Service 


Gender Gap at Movies: Women in the Front Row 


By Bernard Weinranb 

New York Times Service 


L OS ANGELES — After years of making 
action and adventure films for boys of au 
ages, studio executives are concluding that a 
new audience has emerged that is dunging 
all the rules. 

Women. 

“Women are now driving the market- 
place." said Mark Gill, president of mar- 
keting at Miramax. “You ignore this audi- 
ence at your own peril. ” 

William Mechanic, chairman of Fox 

FilrrvH F.n nw tainmftnt, said that ill an : 

to attract more women to the theaters, 
stars are now playing significant, if not dom- 
inant, roles m that studio’s coining big- 
budget actitm films. Among them are* peed 
2: Cruise Control,'’ with Sandra Bollock 
(and Jason Panic) saving hundreds of pas- 
sengers on a Caribbean cruise ship threatened 
try terrorists, and “Alien Resurrection,” star- 
ling Sigourney Weaver and Winona Ryder, 
the fourth entry in the “Alien” series. 

“The aim is to do action films that are 
more woraen-friencDy, that is, having strong 
women in top roles and taking outa lot of the 
violence, ’ ' Mechanic said “Women are not 
only driving the box office but also video- 
cassette rentals and sales and TV watching. 



ZidrftiMlilial/IWLwt 


Among films a im ed at women: “Michael,” with John Travolta as a hell-bent angel. 


Not respecting their taste level is silly.” 
While won 


women have always been impor- 
tant at the box office, studio executives, most 
of them male, took notice in the last few 
months when women more or less decided 
which movies succeeded or failed 

“The First Wives Qub,” the comedy about 
three women wreaking revenge on husbands 
who have left them for younger women, was 
the first and most obvious one. It has grossed 
$105 million. But women have been central to 
the success of several disparate films. 

These include “Jeny Maguire," with 
Tom Cruise as a sports agent fit was mar- 
keted by Tri-Star as a love story, with the 
sports angle muted); “Michael,” in which 
John Travolta plays an angel who likes wo- 
men; “Evita," “The English Patient" and 
“Mother," the Albert Brooks comedy star- 
ring Brooks and Debbie Reynolds. 

“Scream,” the Wes Craven horror com- 
edy, can also dank women for the unex- 
pected size of its success. With an over- 
whelmingly female audience, the modestly 
budgeted movie has taken in nearly $75 
million. 1 ‘It’s actually a driller, not a horror 
movie,” said Gill. 


It was also women who determined a 
different fate for several movies aimed di- 
rectly at them. By largely ignoring “The 
Evening Star,” a sequel to ‘ ‘Terms of En- 
dearment”; “One Hue Day.” a comedy 
about single parents with Michelle Pfeiffer 
and George Clooney, and “The Preacher’s 
Wife,' ’ a Coble with Denzel Washington and 
Whitney Houston — movies that arrived for 
the Christmas holidays with high expec- 
tations — women turned them into major 
disappointments for their studios. 

Ana movie executives said a major reason 
for the commercial failure of “The People 
vs. Lany Flynt,' ’ which received some of the 
best reviews of de year, is that women are 
not going. The movie has been criticized by 
feminis ts like Gloria Steinem as glorifying a 
man whose magazines degrade women. 
While die film has played well in New York. 
Los Angeles and other big cities, it has 
collapsed elsewhere. So far it has grossed 
almost $19 milli on. 

“Wo man over 25 are very discriminating, 
very review-sensitive and the toughest to get 
into de theaters, in contrast to young men,” 
said Sherry Lansing, chairwoman of de the 
Paramount Motion Picture Group. “But when 


do come to the theaters, there's a huge 


Aithoi _ 
seemed to 


the 


last few months have 
cthe strength of women at 


the box office, some top executives saythe 
it for 


trend has been evident for several years. The 
Motion Picture Association of America, the 
studio's lobbying arm, said its most recent 
survey showed that the frequency of wo- 
men's going to movies had grown somewhat 
from 1993 to 1995. 


teenage boys tend to make 'the - decisions 
about what films to see — and girls follow 
along — just the opposite is true wid those in 
the 30-W-50 category. “If a guy, for ex- ■ 
ample, wants to see 'Showgirls'' and de . 
woman' doesn't want to. he will, see 
something that she wants to see,” Zaskin 
said. “They come to a mutual decision.” 
Moreover, she said, the studio has found 
that men tend to go alone to the movies far 
more than women, who often go with an- 
other woman or in a group. 

A woman’s film can no longer be cat- ■ 
egorized simply as a comedy or a romance, 
said Ziskm and others. “A Tom Hanks movie 

is a woman's film; so is a Tom Cruise or a 
Harrison Ford movie. ‘The Fugitive' was a big 
woman’s movie. So was ‘No Way Out.' Wo- 

men tend to like character-driven movies with 

strong narrative lines. Movies with’tex do 
appeal to women. Look .at ‘Fatal Adrac-i 
non.' " ■ -"-fi 

The surge of movies intended to lure female 
audiences is a result, in part, of the growing 
number of female studio executives with the 
power to give the green light to a movie. " ‘You 
don’t say you have to target womeswbut the 
reatity is, who’s making the choices and de- 
cisions?” said Stacey Snider, coresident for 
production at Universal Pictures. 

Ziskm put it more bluntly: * 'We’ve been a 
testosterone-driven business for along time, 
Now Fm looking more at an esirbgesHiriveii 
business.” 

In traditional Hollywood fashion, the suc- 
cess of “The First Wives Club” has, for the 
moment, begotten offspring. Bette Midler, 
one of that film's stars, is now in a iromedy, 
“That Old Feeling,” about a divorced 
couple who start an affair at their daughter’s | 


y 






(VI#"' ' . 

%**«•*» 




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Oil!' 1 


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And while precise figures on attendance 
ft few months are not 


man 


by women in the last 
available, studio executives say that exit 
polls at movie houses, .telephone surveys and 
what Gill termed overwhelming anecdotal 
evidence from theater owners leaves no 
doubt about the recent impact of women. 
Laura Ziskm, producer of “Pretty Wo- 
und “No Way Out,” who is now 
of Fox 2000, a division of 20th 
_ Fox that was set up to reach female 
audiences, said that what had especially sur- 
prised her was the influence many women can 
exert with their husbands or boyfriends in 
C-h oosm g fihms 

Tliakin said that the studio’s marketing and 
research executives had found that while 


y l ‘"nKBreakBrs 1 ,, 
stars Ahjelica Huston aini Drew Barrymore as 
a mother-daughter team of con artists. It is 
quite likely mat “The Breakers” would not 
have seen the light of day without " The First 
Wives Qub,” a number of executives said. 

“ ‘first Wives Club 7 convinced us that 


there’s a big audience out there for this kind 
ofpsetuze," said John Davis, producer of 
“The Breakers.” 


Laurence Mark, a producer of “Jeny 
jviaguire,’ * and of a coming comedy, ‘ ‘Ramy 
and MGchelle’s High School Reunion,” with 
Lisa Kudrow and Mira Sorvino, said: “When 
women show up for a movie, they’ve now 
proven they can show up in droves and bring 
their dates in tow. Whai could be better?” 


,9 


2 am Ihir: 


FRESCOES SAVED 


PEOPLE 


A Touch of Byzantium Comes to Houston 


By Paul Goldberger 

New Yttrk Times Service 


H ouston— F ew pieces 

of important spiritual ar- 
chitecture are made in these 
times. Fewer still come into 
being as a result of drama and 
intrigue worthy of a detective 
story. 

But the Byzantine Fresco 
Chapel, which opened on Sat- 
urday on a quiet residential 
street here, ranks as one of the 
most ambitious small reli- 
gious buildings of recent 
years. And it came to be be- 
cause of some stolen art, a 
philanthropist's determina- 
tion to discover its origins, 
and her luck at being able to 
rescue and restore it before 
the thieves' agents could sell 
it off piecemeal. 

The art is a set of 13th- 
century Byzantine frescoes 
that were originally in the 
dome and the apse of a small 
church at Lysi, on the island of 
Cyprus. In June 1983. they 
were offered to the Menu 
Foundation, the Houston mu- 
seum created by collector and 
patron Dominique de Menil. The museum 
was told that the frescoes, which had 
already been cut into 38 pieces, hod been 
discovered under rubble by a contractor 
building a seaside resort in Turkey. 

At that time, the frescoes, which de- 
pict the heavens with Jesus at the center 
surrounded by a dozen angels in a circle, 
as well as the Virgin Mary and St John 
the Baptist, were m a dork, dank apart- 
ment in Munich, and the sellers would 
say little more than that they had been 
discovered by accident. 

Menil representatives were suspicious 
and began trying to discover the works’ 
true origins. Three countries claimed 
them, but only Cyprus could cite a church 
where they fitted perfectly, and from 
which they obviously had been stolen. 
De Menil — awed, she said, by the 
frescoes' beauty — decided to buy them, 
in effect ransoming them, and ’to un- 



related structures she had 
built in the Montrose neigh- 
borhood of Houston, begin- 
ning with the Rothko Chapel 
in 1970, designed around a 
series of murals by Mark 
Rothko, and including the 
Menil Foundation museum in 
1987 and the Cy Twombly 
Gallery in 1995, both de- 
signed by Renzo Piano. 

After flirting with a plan 
that would have been largely a 
re-creation of the original 
Cypriot chapel at Lysi, De 
Menil turned in 1991 to her 
son, Francois, a New York 
architect. “Francois saved me 
from Disneyland,” she said. 

Francois de Menil had nev- 
er designed a free-standing 
building. But he understood 
his meter's desire for a build- 
ing that would powerfully ex- 
press a religious sensibility 
and house the frescoes in an 
environment resembling their 


original one, while following 
lition of 


K Carter Ssritfa far The New lorii TTbm 

Francois de Menil in the Houston chapel be designed. 


derwrite their restoration, which required 
a total outlay of more than 51 million. 
She turned over ownership of the fres- 


coes to the Church of Cyprus, part of the 
lurch. But! 


the Foundation's tradition 
conmusaoning works of con- 
temporary architecture. 

His building, winch cost 
more than $3 million, raised 
from several private donors who joined 
with the Foundation, is an elegant com- 
bination of concrete, steel and glass, sur- 


I S IT curtains for “Whistle Down the 
Wind," the .Andrew Lloyd Webber 
musical that was to have opened on 
Broadway in June? The Really Useful 
Company, Lloyd Webber’s production 
arm, said that the show, already post- 
poned from April to June, will not arrive 
on Broadway in 1997. A new opening 
date in New York was not announced 
“No one is talking," said a spokesman 
for the musical, but he said the cast had 
been released from their contracts and 
die sets most likely would be stored. The 
show, which closed Sunday in Wash- 
ington after a nine-week tryout run, was 
to have opened June 15 at Broadway's 
Martin Beck Theatre, where the mar- 
quee already was in place. The theater 
now is looking for a new tenant 
“Whistle Down the Wind,” based on a 
1961 British film, was directed by Har- 
old Prince, one of Broadway's most 
succMsftd directors of musicals. “I be- 
lieve, possibly because it was originally 
conceived for the cinema, ‘Whistle’ has 
not found its stage voice yet,” Lloyd 
Webber said in a statement “I agree 
with those who feel that it needs time for 
its creative team to stand back from it It 
is far, far too good a musical to open on 
Broadway until it's truly ready.” Its 
demise comes a week after Really Use- 
ful disclosed the double closings of 
Lloyd Webber’s “Sunset Boulevard” 
which will end March 22 in New York 
and April 5 in London. 



Ukrainian n . 
Serbs, Hutu 


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ChataFlaibd/ltaM* 

Khaled, at the French music awards ceremony; he won the best song prize. 


.□ 


Greek Orthodox Church-But she did not 
offer to return them physically to 
Cyprus. With the area of Lysi under 
Turkish control, she said, they would be 
belter protected in the United States. She 
eventually persuaded the Church of 
Cyprus to agree. 

She was equally determined that the 
frescoes not be presented as pure art, but 
be given a religious setting similar to the 
one for which they had been created “A 
sacred object is deprived of its function if 
it is seen only as lines and color," she said 
at her home here. “You amputate 
something important if you do char." 

De Menil decided to commission a 
chapel that would be the next, and per- 
haps Final, chapter in the series of art- 


rounded by a low stone wan. Like the 
Menil 


other de Maul buildings, it is modest in 
scale, aspiring to intensity of feeling 
rather than dazzle of spectacle. 

The chapel is a building that owes a 
considerable debt to Loms Kahn and 
Tadao Ando, surely the architects who 
have cone the closest in recent times to 
achieving profoundly spiritual architec- 
ture with the rough materials of concrete, 
stone and steel. Francois de Menil ’s 
chapel is not quite in their league; it is 
mote theatrical in its interior man any- 
thing either oftbem would have faiilt, and 
in other ways it has some of the hesitation 
characteristic of any architect at this 
stage in Ms career. But it unquestionably 
deserves a spot on die list just below these 
masters’ work. 


Charles Aznavour won the award for 
best male vocalist at France's Victoires 
de la Musique awards. In an evening 
dominated by veteran singers, Barbara 
took best female singer of the year and 


took best remale singer of me year and 
album of the year went to Eddy Mitchell 
for “Mr. Eddy.” “I hate competition. 


the Golden Rams. “Hamsun,” 
by Jan TroeU, won the award 
for best film and best screenplay, its 
veteran star Max von Sydow was named 
best actor and Denmark’s Ghita Noerby 
best actress. Each member of the cast 
speaks his or her own language in the 
joint Danish-N orwegian-S weoish pro- 
duction recounting the life of Hamsun 
(1859-1952), whose last years were 
soured by his support for Nazism. 


ly. ” ”1 date competition. 
That's for the young,” said Aznavour, 
72. But younger artists were also 
honored. The pop singer Khaled won 
the award for best song for “Aicha,” a 
mix of Algerian rai music with a Euro- 
dance beat, composed by Jean-Jacques 
Goldman. Les Innocents received the 
award for best group. 


Moreau” each had the dubious dfc-; 
tinction of having six nominations in 
the 17th annual Golden Rasbexry award 
for the worst in movies. The Golden 
Ras berry prizes will be announce 
March 23, theday before the Oscars arc' 
handed oul “Striptease” is up for Ras- 
berries for worst movie, actress (Demi 
Moore), screen couple (Moore and 
Burt Reynolds, who was also named, 
for worst supporting actor), director and- 
screenplay. 


A combined Scandinavian effort 
about tiie tormented life of the Nor- 
wegian Nobel literature laureate Knut 
Hamsun won the main Swedish cinema 


Two Michelin stars were shining on the 
Loixion restaurant Aubergine on Tuesday 
as the French company issued its 1997 
Red Guide to Britain and Ireland. Au- 
bergine previously bad one star. Four 
other establishments retained their three- 
star ratings: the Waterside Inn in Bray-on- 
Thaxnes, and Chez Nice, The Restaurant 
Marco Pierre White and La Tame Claire, 
all in London. 


□ 


□ 


‘Striptease” and "The Island of Dr. 


A judge in Los Angeles has sen- 
tenced Heidi Fleiss to 18 months in- 
prison and a $500 fine for attempted 
pandering, culminating the saga of the 
"Hollywood Madam." Fleiss, cur- 
rently serving a 37-month federal term 
for income tax evasion and money laun- 
dering, was silent as the state prison 
sentence was imposed. Under a pies, 
bargain, she will serve her state time 
concurrently with her federal prison- 
sentence ana avoid state prison. 



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