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ributie 


The World's Daily Newspapei 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

A : Tendon, TboRday, February 13, 1997 



E7 


No. 35,444 


Germany Probes Depths 
Of Anti-Foreigner Passion 

New Confessions Reveal Plot in ’92 Arson 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 


f 


DOLGENBRODT, Goiniany 

When fire engulfed a inaort complex 
^ four years ago that had been des- 
igoaied as housing for Third World 
^lum-seekers, many people 
it was another case of xenophobic 
haired perpetrated skinheads or 
ri^-mng radicals. 

^fiule deploring diis and other acts 
committed during a spate of violence 
gainst foreigners in 1992 and 1993, 
German commentators minimized the 
unpaa by saying that the crimes had 
be» earned out by fiin^ eleme nts of 
society. As if to underscore the point, a 
young neo-Nazi named Silvio Jack- 
Qwsk i was arrested and chai^^ widi 
setting the fire here in EfolgenbrodL 
But Mr. Jackowsld's eventual con- 
fession, after years of legal maneuvers, 
has unmasked a wider cMtsjniacy of si- 
lence that has shocked the country, 
prompting ftesh examination of die dqjd) 
of anti-foreigner sentiment in Germany. 

■ Within the past week, several prom- 
inent citizens of this lakeside viU^ 
abont 50 kilometers south 
have stepped forward to aHmir hav ing 
provided '‘financial and logisticid sup- 
port" to Mr. Jackowski and a skinhead 
acconqilioe. The villagers paid the ar- 
sonists $7300 and suited tiiem vkdth 
bottles filled with heating oil and gas- 
oline to set the resort abl^. 


In addition, prosecutors are looking 
into whether a Elolin real-estate agency 
that wanted to pincbase the resort com- 
plex and convert it into a idmb- 
ilitation clinic — before hs plans were 
overruled by a fiiandeDlxtis grate de- 
risioD to establish the ftxeignezs* res- 
idence — may have supported the anon 
atiadt. 

The case has provided a ghilKng ns- 
minder that otiierwise respectable 
toi^iers who uiplauded the bvnnzng of 
imnugram residences in such towns as 
Hoyersweida, Moelln and Solingen 
dmmg die wave of firebmntn^ may 
not be an isolated minority. 

Rather than £hame, the villagers of 
Dolgenhrodt have expressed anger and 
disiray over state diraorities who, as 
they tlescribe it. made a stupid, dedrioo 
to place fordeaers in mdr midst, 
thereto compel&g them to take drastic 
measures to protect their community 
from an invasion of Hiird World 
refugees. 

‘ ‘Look, we are a small village of 300 
inhabitants dial lives off tourists visiting 
our lake," said Dolgenbiodt's m^or, 
Karl Pfanoenschwazz, during -an inter- 
view at his vOia — vAkh once was the 
weekend retreat of the interior minister 
of East Germany. “How are we sup- 


pose 

find 


sed to react ^riien the state tells us to 
id room for 86 Gypsies 
“We were all frigntene 


Beijing Arrests Muslim Rioters 





Yusupbek Miikfalisi, an exiled leader of the Ulgbiir ethnic gronp in 
China, saying in Kazakstan that the Chinese had executed 30 
activists. Chim arrested an Ui^ur it said led separatist riots. Page 4. 


Top North Korean 
Defects to South 

Adviser to Communist Leader 
Walks Into Embassy in Beijing 


By Kevin Sullivan 
and Steven Mufson 

fHuAifUion Post Service 


or Africans? 
ened. Wehadoo 


See GERMANS, Page 6 


i 


•> 

• ' , • i'.s.-- 

Tv k- 


I 

■■■■ 




Zaire’s Whr: 
Ukrainians, 
Serbs, Hutu, 
Even Zairians 


By Ifoward W. french , 

Mine Bw* ThnrfSen&r 

WSANGANI, Zaire Every morn- 
ing. from an airport at the edge of this 
crumbling city, Yugoslav jets with 
Dtoainian pilote talte off widi a scream, 
headed east toward a huge, shifting war 
zone, bombing anything diat moves in 
the foi^ below. 

On the ground at the mrpon. Serbian 
t rem ers wth tattoos and ^ved heads 
drill members of an ^te Zairian unit, 
showing them how to break down and 
' elm & new mounted machine guns 
fliiid dibulder-fired rockets that Seibia 
. has sqriied to Zaire in defiance of an 
.hoeniaDOiul arms embargo. 

Rebels ^ipporied by neighborii^ 
Rwanda and Uganda have declared tins 
city, Zaire's third-largesi, their next 
strategic target. 

- In an effort to Munt die rebel advance, 
govenunem forces with little app^te 
ror batde have dismibuted assault rifles 
and BHinar .charges by the planeful to 
Hutu refrii^M from neighboring 
Rwanda. 

Smne 'die Hutu are nulitia mem- 
bers who Organized mass killtng of 
membm of dieir home country’s Tiitsi 
miiMff ity in 1994 , while others are 
fbimer members of die Rwandan Amy, 
was defeated by the Tutsi-led 
forces now in power in Rwanda. 

7^ Rwancibi Huiu and a few hun- 
dred mercenaries recruited in haste fiom 

a han^id of Enropean and African 
countries form die bukbone of the gov- 
ernment fighting foice in what by any 
Sand^ has to be one of Africa’s least 
conventional wars. 

Zaire’s own soldiers, after blazing a 
trail of looting, rape and dead! from the 
Rwan^ border zone, which they fled 
in November when the rebellion against 
President Mobutu Sese Sdro bem le- 
maiQ - t«^i^y and virtually us«^ m 
• combat mid arc mostly left to guard this 



Olina Considers Easing 
Trade Laws to Join WTO 


By David E. Sanger 

Nete York Tunes Serrice 


NVT 


workers to c^tured rebels, say Tbtsi — 
the predominant ethnic group among 
die itbeAs — bai« been hunting down 
young Hutu men as the rebels have 
advanced across the country. 

The mtnesses said rebels swept into 
the small town of Shabunda the other 
day, endtcled as many of the 40,000 or 

See ZAIRE, Page 6 


WASHINGTON — China has 
quietly told LT.S. ofScials it is willing to 
abandon major trade barriers, includmg 
srxne laws protecting its state-run and 
military-run industiies frt>m forei^ 
competition, in retuni ft»' membership 
in ^ Worid Trade Orgamzatimi, ac- 
cording to some of the officials. 

The offer, conveyed to a U.S. ne- 
gotiaring team over the past two weeks 
and reputed to Euixq)^ and 
officii^, nuiiks the fi^ tintefoiu China 
has discussed eliminating ^lecific laws 
diat have kmg been the subject of com- 
plaims foim^ inves&xs. 

These include a requirenieat that the 
investors export the great majority of 
the go^ th^modnee, rules that have 
contributed to China’s lishig trade sur- 
plus wifo die United States. 

But Chinese have yet to indicate • 
any wifiingness to tackle the most po- 
litically ei^osive proUem in openmg 
China^s maikec ending die big sul^ 
ridies Beijing gives state-run ind^tries, 
which empl^ a agnificmit pextioo of 


the count's woikers. Officials on sev- 
eral continents say the offers have so far 
been conveyed only in conversatiems 
between Cl^se a^ American offi- 
cials, and they remain skeptical of 
Beij^’s willingness to follow dirough 
on me changes they have discussed. 

U.S. Commerce Secretary William 
Daley, meeting with reporters Wednes- 
day, termed the proposals “extremely 
encouraging’' but said U.S. negotiators 
would wait to see die details of the 
Chinese offer in a written prcposaltobe 
preaented 'wfaen negotiators met next 
month in Geneva. 

“There always has been a dysfunc- 
tion between what they say aim what 
diey put in writing,” Charlene Bandief- 
sky, die U.S. trade representative-des- 
ignate. said Tuttday, “and for WTO 
accession, what they put in writing is 
what counts.” 

Nonetheless. Ms. Barshefsl^ said, 
“Obviously China’s ihetiiric lias im- 
provedsLgnificandy. and its willingness 
to begin to discuss issues of impixtance 
increased.” Others in nesiitoit Bill 

See WTO, Page? 


TOKYO — The Stalinist regime of 
North Korea suffered the highest-level 
defection in its history Wednesday 
when its top theoretician, a close adviser 
to the leader Kim Jong II. sought asylum 
at the South Korean Embassy in 
Beijing. 

Hwang Jang Y^, key architect of 
North Korea’s ^^ng philosophy of 
juche, or self-reliance, dieted on his 
way home from a two- week tour 
through Japan during which he gave 
:bes and interviews promoting 
Korean ideology. The author of 
many basic texts in North Korea, the 72- 
year-old Mr. Hwang is also married to a 
niece of the late lesder Kim fi Sung. 

“I’m astonish^; it’s like Marx de- 
fecting from the former Soviet Union,” 
said Hajime Iziuni, a lea^g North 
Korean sp^ialist from the University of 
Shizuoka in Japan. 

“It’s like Thomas Jefferson defected 
from America.” said a foreign diplomat 
in Beijing. 

North Korean government spokes- 
men at first reacted with denial, then 
charged that Mr. Hwang had been kid- 
napi^ A South Korean ^bassy 
spokesman said Mr. Hwang walked into 
the embassy just after 10 AM. witii one 
of his aides. 

Mr. Hwang remained ensconced at 
one of South Korea's Beijing embassy 
buildings, surrounded by Chinese se- 
curity police and at die center of sen- 
sitive diplcxnatic negotiations regarding 
his passage to Seoul 

M. Hwang’s defection is seen as 
further evidence of instability in North 
Korea, which is suffering from food 
shortages that some intemational relief 
agencies say threaten the country with 
famine this summer. Red Cross officials 
in Beijing said Pyongyang slashed grain 
consumption allowances four weeks 


ago by more than half, to 100 grams (4 
ounces) a day from 250 grams a day. 
“It's too nauch to die from and too little 
to live off,” said one official. Ware- 
house stockpiles are expected to be de- 
pleted by July. 

With reports of hunger increasing, 
defections have been on the ri.se among 
soldiers, officials and average citizens. 

But there has never been a defection 
by the likes of Mr. Hwang, a former 

A loan scandal is rattling the South 
Korean cabinet. Page 4. 

president of Kim II Sung University 
who is one of only 1 1 members on the 
powerful Secretariat of the Workers' 
Party of Korea. Three times he has been 
elected chairman of the Supreme 
People's Assembly. He has bren a 

See KOREAN, P^e 7 



Aipnii’ leaner- tVMh- 

Hwang Jang Yop of North Korea. 


Ifs Annual Bonus Time 
For Wall Streefs Winners 

Six Figures of Fun for ‘Masters of Universe’ 


By Trip Gabriel 

New York Tmes Service 


U.S. Superstores Adapt to Chinese Ways 


By Keith B. Richbuig 

SHENZHEN, Q*»ia — It’s^ a 
Monday afternoon, just a few shopping 
days befmie last week's advent of die 
Year of die Ox, and the aisles of the 
Wal-Mait “soperceater” be packed 
witii bargain hunters pushing caits 
loaded hi^ with food, Idtcfaen appli- 
ances and clothing. 

could be tiie pie-faolid^ 
piqg rush at any Wal-Mart store any- 
where in Middle America. Bat the cus- 
tomers here are newly prosperous 
Chinese from one of the country’s 
wealthiest southern cities. Alongside 
the American fare — the Campbell’s 


soup, Boun^ ptqter towels and Gillette 
shaving cream — diere are delicacies 
with i&t^tly Chinese characteristics. 

Down oue ai^ are the ladcs dried 

various watennelon seeds. One 

shelf is stacked lugh widi sc^bean milk, 
wnrl anflUhftT eam«>g mulfode brands of 
congee, a popular sotdbeni Chinese 
birakfast dish There are /lom yue peanuts, 
stacite and sladts of instant noodles, and 
packets of pieseived bamboo rixxxs. 

Megastores such as this one are op- 
erating in several Chinese cities as 
Amei^'s retail giants discover the 
worid's largest potential marke t — or 2 
billion aimpits waiting for someone to 
seU them deodorant, as the title of a 


recent book sums up the business rush. 

“It bog gl es the mind to tiiink if 
everybody wi^ed their hair eveiy day, 
how mu^ shampoo ymi wmiJd sell,^' 
said Joe Hatfield, chief operating officer 
of Wal-Mart Stores Inc. 

Over the years, quite a few foreigji 
companies have entoed China with sim- 
flar stars m their eyes, and tb^ are D(H 
always they find. Do- 

ing busing here carries serious risk: 
from officials who feel free to change the 
niies of c omm erce ovenught, to shop- 
pers whose pref erences don’t always 
meet American expectations — not to 
mentiem potmtial political instability. 

See STORES. Page 7 


NEW YORK — There they are 
a gain: the brash yom^ men witii 
slicked-back hair, prowling among the 
exotic sports cars in Steven Kessler's 
East 3^ Street showroom. finger 
the butteiy leather seats of an S84,900 
1 993 Ferrari Mondial, or dicker over the 
$179,000 price of a 1994 Lamborghini 
Diablo. 

From late December tiirougb March, 
Wall Street's bonus-paying season, 
when executives receive as much as five 
or six times their base pay in one lump 
sum, Kessler says he makes 80 
percent of his sales to stock and bond 
traders with money burning a hole in 
theirpockets. 

“Iney are young, aggreuive people 
who are able 10 jn^e decisions ^on- 
taneously,” Mr. Kessler said. “They 
come to see what’s in inventory, and 
when they receive their bonus checks — 
binro.” 

Unlike most businesses. Wall Street 


rewards its workers strictly according to 
the previous year's results, and 1996 
was spectacular. 

The securi^ industry's 150,000 
workers in New York City are expected 
to pull down bonuses of more than $8.1 
billion, 30 percent more than the pre- 
vious high of $6.2 billion in 199S, ac- 
cording to the New York state comp- 
troller, H. Carl McCall. (That works out 
to an average of $54,000 a peismi, with 
bonuses ranging from S1(J million or 
more for the bluest winners to a few 
thousand for iheiowliest clerks.) 

^though Wall Street employs only 
about S percent of the city's private 
work force, the bi| year-end paychecks 
have a disproportionate effect on the 
local and regional economy, buoying 
everything apartment prices to 
windfall tax revenues that can be 
sprinkled like stardust by Ci^ Hall in an 
election year. 

Big bonuses also have an effect on the 
culniral climate of the city. In stores and 

See BONUS, Page 7 


‘ ..P'* 


u; - 




« 4 


Kisangani has been sack^ 
by unpaid' army tnxns twice olrea^ in 
this the population is wary. Giy- 

ra tins mistrust, lew soldieis dare cir- 
culate in town alone, despite the as^t 
rifl^ ti*^ wear slung over tiieir 
shoulders. 

“You've got a bit of everything 
here,” said one imeairional aid wwker 
wUh lone eiqKrience in Zaire. 
wto have participated in geo oqde , 
S^bs who are most iHobaWy jaw enm- 
' Inals anri , on the other side, TuisKwy" 

trolled forces thm are nying w peril off 

genocide of their own.*’ 

Oedible witnesses, ftoin enuren 


Giscard on the Euro: 
Include Italy and Spain 


By Alan Friedman 

Intemationa/Iier^d Triune 




m waat anctPtteaa 


Bahrain IXJOOOn 

I'Cvteus C.C1.00 Nlgefia...i2^^ 

iomittrtc ...14.00 OKr. Oman — 1£S0» 
J=WBnd-...f2.00FAI. 

Otartw....,....! 1X85 

firaakBrilrin...£0.90 Sauci Arabia .10.00 R 

Egypt. £E550 S. Alirfea -R12 + VAT 

Joidan..M.~i«OJD UAE.. — ip-PO?!!! 

Ksnya. fC SK 160 U& ML (Eur) 

Ku»rait...,...-.eooFfc ZWH4rae.._ZimS30XO 

a.7. 



PARIS — FcMiner President Valeiy 
Giscard d'Estaing’s call for a 'Tower 
level” for the franc against the dollar 
Ivoke a taboo here last autumn ^ 
preceded a 10 percent i^preciation of 
the U.S. currency. , 

la an interview Wednesday, he broke 
new ASam. suggesting that it 

nii^t be possible for Europe leaders 
next spring to giant “conditional a^ 

ceptance” to Itafy adSpaln so that they . 

could join the first wave of nations 
launching Europe’s single ciniency m 
1999 

“It is iiqxxtant that Italy and 
Spain be members of the fiist wave of 
countries tile aao," be said, 

“because thrir paxtidpation will give a 
mily European flavar' If we ate jurt re- 
stricted » those countries centeredaiound 

the it win sirqily look Ukeanen- 
lagemem of tite Deutsche maik zone and 
not a ssiuixiriy Euippean endeavor.* 

'WiSeemphasizmg that “namrally- 
Italy and Spam can only be admitted if 
they meet die criteria omtained in the 
Maastricht treaty,” henonethdess pro- 
posed tiiat Eur^iean leaders who will 


meet in early 1998 conld agree on “a 
rolutioD*' to pave the way for tiiese 
swtiiem European countries to join tiie 

first wave. 

That solution, be explained, could 
involve agreeing next spring to a plan 
for Italy and Spain to jena the single 

currency launch even if tb^ fail to meet 
the 1997 target, but as soon as they meet 
the criteria, whether that is in January 
1999 or a oot^ 1^. 

In a wide-ranging interview hfr. Gis- 
card d'Estaing titese other 

points: 

• He disclosed that he had notifted 
President Jacques Chirac before bis call 
last Novemba to the firanc to depre- 
ciate agaii^ tile ^llar. 

•He said tha at a time hi^ un- 
en^oymeot and fiscal ausui^ there 
was a lack of politiesti leactohip across 
the European Union '*witii tiie notaUe 
idoo of Helmut Kohl ” 
called for “a mon active mon- 
etary policy” in France d»t was not 
■atod to cot shon-ienn imerest rates 
down to German levels to help ^nir 
growth. 

Cmnnienting mi the dMirabf&Qr of 
Sm GISCARD, Page 7 


exeepQi 

•OB 


AGENDA 


EU Gets Stay in Dispute Over U.S. Sanctions Laws 


The European Union on Wednes- 
day requested a one-week delay in the 
creation of a World Tirade Organi- 
zation panel that would rule on the 
lera^ of U.S. trade sanctions. 

T^ move raised hopes that the EU 
could readi an agreement with Wash- 

New Record in the Mile 

GHENT. Belgium (AFP) — Hich- 
am El Gueirouj of Morocco set a new 
world rec^ Wednesday when he ran 
tiie indoor mile in 3 minutes and 48.45 
seconds. The previous record of 
3:49.78 was set by Ireland’s Eamonn 
Ciogfrlan in 1983. 


inffoa over the sanctions, which 
Emope sees as a tiireat to its com- 
mernal interests. The dispute centers 
on two U.S. trade laws. Tbe Helms- 
Burton Act allows the United States to 
punish foreign cmnpaues that use ex- 
{xt^xiated properties in Cuba, while the 

mGETWO 

Missu^ ^irii in Bisoner Release 


BUSINESS/nNANCE 

KohPs Appeal on IRiges 


Paueii. 


1 The Dollar 1 

NeoiYOik 

Wadnaadaye^P-M- 

prevtoiaciMe 

DM 

1.667 

1.6784 

Pound 

1.6305 

1.6372 

Yen 

124.275 

123.425 

FF 

5.6B9 

5.681 


waoneadayPosB 

pmhxadcBF 

-Fi03.se 

6961.63 

6858.11 

1 S&P500 


WMiMttv*4P-n. 

pnwiBia etoee 

+13-23 

602.77 

789.54 


D'Aznaio Act enables Wa^ungton to 
withhold financing from foreign firms 
that do business with Iran or Libya. 

Senior U.S. officials welcomed the 
move by the Union, which will 
provide time for high-level negoti- 
ations. Page 12. 

Books Page 10. 

Crosstrord Page 18. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19. 

fcitWiMUai M l C tosaW w i PngnS. 



Vbdmr M«hailii/AEe«x nMKe.Pieiw 

INAUGURATED — ^ President '• -lan Maskhadov of Chechnya, left, 
and l^esident Vakha Ar.sanov at prayer during tbeir inau- 
guration Wednesday, as Alexander Lebed, rl^ht, looked on. Page 5. 


I 


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H 


PAGE TWO 


After 16 Months / Linked to 'Mutual Trust' 




Israel Frees Arab Women, 


But the Spirit Is Missing 


R 


By Barton Gellman 

Wtskmguii Past Strviee 


AMALLAH, Israeli-Occupied West 
Bank — Hadi Ghussein, a huslQ' 4 - 
y^-old boy, plotted recently to raring 
his Aunt Mae from Israel's Tel Mond 


^^his Aunt Mae from Israel's Tel Mond 
prison. He hatched the plan, his mother said, the 
first time he saw his aunt behind bars serving a 
99-year sentence for stabbing an Israeli Jew to 
death. 

“He asked me why she won’t come home 
widi us, and I said the Jews wcm’t let her out,” 
recounted Mayesoun Gbussein, 29, die pris- 
oner's older sister. 

"He said. ‘I will free her,’ and 1 said, ‘You 
can't, they will kill you.’ And he said, ‘No, I will 
go there with my bicycle and put her on the back 
and if they try to st(^ me I will shoot them with 
this gun.’ ” 

Hadi’s mother told that story with smiling 
pride as they waited together all day ontdoors 
Tuesday, the boy’s black plastic pistol lucked in 
his waistband, for Mae Ghussein’s promised 
release from her Israeli cell. It was one among 
many signs that a negotiated ainnes^ for female 
"security pris(»iers*' had not brou^t the spirit 


of fellowsl^ to which it a^iired. 

By night^ Mae Ghussein had yet to a]^)^, 
her fate tangled once again in a legal-political 


knoL But around midmeht, Israeli authorities 
announced that she and most of her fellow 


announced that she and most of her fellow 
female prisons had finally been fre^ 

Israel promised more thra 16 months ^o to 
lelttse the women, by now numbering 31, im- 
mediately. It was supped to be a ‘ ‘ct^drace- 
building measure," m the wads of the Pal- 
estinian-Israeli peace agreement, to * 'establish a 
solid base of mutual trust and g^ faith’’ with 
the Palestinian public and its self-tule auiha- 
ity. 

Prime hfinister Benjamin Netanyahu reaf- 
firmed that coixunitment in another agreement 
last month, and his government scheduled the 
release to coincide widi the thiee-day Muslim 
feast of Eid al Fur now under way. But a series of 
bureaucratic and legal delays, along with si- 
multaneous moves to seize additional Umd on the 
West Bank, transformed the event into one more 
mutually infririuing spaL 


The Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, who 
flew to Ramallah to celelnate the release and 
decla^ it '*a great contributioa to the pane 
process," stormed out of the Govemate Build- 
ing Tue^y evening when another last-minute 
Israeli Supreme Court chaUenge — this one, like 
the ones before iL from the Victims of Axab 
Terror lobby in Israel — brought fresh delays. 

"liiey are saying words and they ate playing 
games on the ground,’ * Ahmed Koiei, speaker of 
the Palestinian legislature and former chief ne- 
gotiator with IsrraL said in an interview here. 

It may have been too ambitious, in any case, to 
look for Israeli-Palestinian reconciliation on the 
subject of prisooets. Few subjects, if any, divide 
the two sioM more fundamentally in outlook. 

feie srinians of every political hue r^ard the 
prisoners as patriots jtdlM for hoiorable acts of 
resistance against Israeli conquest. Imprison- 
ment has touched neatly ev^ family, with 
Israel's government estimating dial 120,000 Pal- 
estinians — from a total popitiation of 2 million 
— spent time in Israeli cells during die 1987-93 
int^ada, the iqirising against occuration. Hie 
arrests arose from accusatiais of omnses tan- 
ging from murder to flying a fktg. 

Even suKKxters of the evolving peace accords 
said, as Zameh Hassao Abdallah, the mother of 
a prisoner, put it, diat '*if U wasn't for the 
inrifitfia, Israel would never have come to us for 
peace." 

Not even the most dovish Israelis. contrast, 

are p rep ar ed to accept drive-by shooting of 
civilian cars or icnifings in die bau as legitimate 
acts of war. 

And diou^ only a few hundred of the roii^y 
3,000 current Palestinian prisoners — includii^ 
five of the 31 women — were implicated in 
serious violence, Israeli commentators tend to 
call all of them "terrorists." 



Kbo* LwaaMgane 


A freed ^iles^man woman flashing a Vsign on arriving in RamaUahf but 
Israeli del<^ and Palestiman celebrations left an air of hostility. 


T he very idea of a party, which Mr. 

Arafat planned in Ramallah for Tues- 
day, ofifeixled most Israelis* sensibil- 
ity. 

"1 siqipoted the release widi very (UfBcult 
feeling, because they don’t deserve to be te- 
leasetC but I supported it in order to open a new 
page" in relations between Paiestinians and 
Jews, said Amnon Rubenstein, an Israeli mem- 


ber of Fariiament fimn the leftist Metetz Party. 

"The new page must be clean, not filled widi 
celebrations and parties for teirorists who 
murdered Jews, ’’ he added. 

In the Jewish settlement of Beit EU on the edge 
of Ramallah, protesting residents unveUed a 
garden Tuesday named for Zvi Klein, who died 
m 1991 in a lolling his family blames on one of 
the women released tooighL 

The woman, Abir Wahaidi. was not in fact 
charged with the murder, but she admitted head- 
ing die armed cell whose members were be- 
lieved by Israeli Jews to have shot Mr. Klein to 
death. 

"When we see how his memory is being 
defiled, dien we must do something to honor his 
memory," said Moshe Ayal, 39, who heads Beit 
El’s religious seoiinaiy. "The garden will sym- 
bolize growth, blossoming, flowering — all that 


was cut down by his murderer." 

Further draining die day of its joy was aforoed 
eviction of R^lmrins ^m an area marked for 


enxinsicHi of the Jewish setdement of Maale 
Artutnim outside JerusaloD, and a vitdent clash 
between Israeli troops .and hundreds of Pal- 
estinians trying to block the opening of a new 
Jewish quarry near' die West Bank city of 
Tulkarm. 

After hours of bureaucratic delays that 
seemed mtended te pievem prim&riine trievised 
scenes of the prisoners depmtiiig in triumph, die 
first of the womra were loaded into vans at 
dusk. 

But die last-minote l^al challenge forced die 


prison service to recall some of the raiscmers, 
and nearly all die rest said diey woum not go 


home without dieir comrades. All but one had 
finally left by midnigJiL 


Spanish Truckers Block Roads 


MADRID (AP) — Roads throughout Spain were blocked 
Wednesday a^ gasoline and fresh food wens in short supply 
in some re^ons as a trackers’ strike intensified. 

Triickers have blocked main roads in nonhera and western 
Spain demanding fuel subsidies, die recognition of illnesses 
ti^ to die profession, and the lowering of the Tetirement age to 
60 from 65. Some roads at the frendi and Portuguese borders 
were also blocked by the truckers. 


By Roger Cohen 

New Km4: Thus Servke 


Qfiers in American Airline Dispute 


PRAGUE In the cemetery of 
the small Bohemian town of Letoh- 
rad, which was hone to Madeleine 
Albright’s forebears, diete is a 
simple maible sl^ tucked away in 
a comer where the snow is un- 
trodden. Dated 1930. it roads 
simply: "1914-1918: We gave our 


WASHINGTON (AP) — American Airiloes and its pilot 
union have exchanged new contract proposals as talks con- 
tinue in hopes of averting a weekend strilte at the largest U.S. 
domestic airline. 

Airline officials and the Allied Riots Association offered 
letters outlining their new stances late Tuesday after a day that 
was charaaerized hs "frustrating" by the union. Ihe pilots' 
strike is to begin at midnight Friday if a deal is not reachol. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


French Transport Strike in 7th Day 


PARIS (Reuters) — Strikes public trans{Mrt workers 
demanding shorter working hours and eaiiy retirement dis- 
rupted services Wednesday in many French provincial cities 
for the seventh consecutive day. 

The protests halted or disrupted bus, tram or subway service 
in Marseille, Lille. Nice, Toulon, Caimes, Sete, Le Mans and 
se\'crai other cities. In Toulouse, where the strike began three 
weeks ago. and in Marseille, transport authorities hired private 
buses to replace services affected by strikers. 


Italy Rail Union Walkout Averted 


ROME lAFPl — Train unions have called off a 24-hCHir 
nationwide strike planned for Sunday after agreeing witii the 
government overnight on the reorganization of ItSy's state 
railroad, union leatters said Wedne^y. 

Only one union, a train drivers’ group, stayed out of the 
agreement and said it would clarify its position later. 


Up to 1,000 visftors were turned away from the Acropolis 
in .Athens on Wednesday as striking guards protesting plans to 
cut their salary bonuses kept the site from opening. (AP) 


Five counties in Inner Mongolia have been opened to 
foreigners, bringing the total number of Chinese counties open 
to overseas visitors to 1 .288, the official Xinhua press agency 
reported Wednesday. (AP) 


lives. You give love to your home- 
land." 

The theme of one generation’s 
sacrifice for the next has been a 
constant one in this waning cen- 
tury, not least in tiie bloodstained 
center of Eun^. 

Josef KorbeL Mrs. Albright’s fri- 
tfaer, took the exhortation to heart, 
loving and serving die Czechoslov- 
ak state bom out of World War L 

He later described the state as 
rising "phoenix-like from the 
aste of the Austro-Hungarian em- 
pire," ridi in its "heritage of free- 
dom." An assimilated Jew, he 
seems to have seen in Chechoslov- 
akia’s democratic gadiering of di- 
verse ethnic and religious groups 
— Czechs, Germans, Slovaks, 
Ruthenians, Magyars Jews — 
a moving symbol of the progress 
and emancipation his own mer- 
chant family had enjoyed. 

Then, within a decade of each 
other, the twin totalitarian forces of 
this century — Naa fascism and 
Soviet communism — engulfed 
Czechoslovakia. The former anni- 
hilated his Jewish family, the latter 
the interwar state he loved. 

Mr. KorbeL having fled to 
America in 1948, chose to recall 
for his daughter Madeleine, and to 
write about, "the total pei^y of 


tile communist mind." What 
Nazism did to the Jewish Koibels 
was suppressed. 

Id hu book, '‘The Communist 
Subversion of Czechoslovakia 
(1938-1948)"»dedicated "to tbe 
Memory of my Parents’’ — Mr. 
Korbel repeat^y assails '^^'the 
long night of ccumnunist to^t- 
arianism." He also deplores the 
Germanizatioa of Cze^ culture 
and the pillaging of the economy 
under Naa occupation. 

But he does not mentiou the fate 
of the more than 100,000 Jews in 
Us homelaDd, most of whan, like 
his mother and father, were l^ed 
by the Nazis during the period 


Czechoslovakia’s communist au- 
dioiities distorted its history . A me- 
morial recalled tiie suffering of 
Czech resistance figbtm, partic- 
ularly communists, imprisoned 
there, but it scarcely mentioned the 
Jews. 

Lists of Jewish deportees were 
kept secret The histoiy of Terezin, 
as tiie place where Czechoslov- 
akia’s Jewish community was an- 
nihilated, was subordinated to the 
dictates of "anti-imperialism" and 
"anti-Zaonism.'-' 

Today, a rooiumeiitai cross 
towering over a field of graves — 
dwarfing a Star of David — sug- 
gests a certain ambiguity. But 


The theme of one generation's sacriHce for the 
next has been a constant one in this centnr); 


covered by tiie w<^ 

Tliis, it seems, is a selective kind 
of histoy , one d»t left his daughter 
unaware of die fate of her gra^- 
parents. 

But the extent to which such 
generational links were severed or 
distorted in this centuiy by waves 
of violence and ideological warfare 
is becoming gradually clearer. 

The Cold War was also a war on 
history, oi both sides of the divide. 
Somewhere in diis stn^le. 
Albright’s past was buried. 

So, too. was the history of Nazi 
gold and plundered paintings in 
Ffonch museums. 

One example is Terezin, known 
in German as Theresien^dt, the 
small fortress town 50 miles (80 
kUometeFs) north of Prague wbm 
Mrs. Albright's grandparents were 
persecuted as Jews arid where her 
grandfather, Amost Korbel, died. 

For decades after ^ war. 


mudi has now been clarified. In 
1995 a list was published of die 
more than 70J0O0 Jews who per- 
ished in Terezin, or after dqior- 
tation from the town. 

llie names of Mis. Albright's 
paternal grandparents — Araost 
and Olga Korbel — are in the 
1,559-p^e list Of the 999 Jews 
who arrived in Terezin. with them 
on July 30, 1942, only 66 survived 
tiie war. Amost KotmI perished in 
Terezia: several of Mrs. Albright’s 
relatives died at Auschwitz. 

In the Czech Republic, which 
separated from Slovakia in 1993, 
tiie repeated oppression of this cen- 
tury 1^ bred a deep understanding 
of the forces tiiat lead to personm 
decisions Uke that of Josef and 
Mandula Korbel to convert their 
family to Catholicism and hide 
their Jewish descenL 


The converrioi took place in 
1939 in London, when t^deleine 


in the quest for survivaL she re- 
mained a secular Czedi. But unlike 
Mrs. Alhri^t, she knew the family 
history and passed it on to 
children. 

She said: "My parents, my 
grandpazeots, Madelone’s family 
— they all belonged to me in some 
way. My heart grew bigger for all 
of thern- It is thiK, I thintc, that 

should be passed down the g^- 
etations — not die Jewish feeling 
necessarily, but die remembrance 
of die dei^ I never for a moment 
suspected that she did not know." 

Now, by a strange twist of fate, 
Mrs. Albright appears likely to 
have the task of steering die C&ech 
Republic into NATO, foe Western 
alliance bora out of foe ba^e 
flgaingt Nazism to fight foe batde 

a g^nsa cnmmiifiism- 

Of sui^ union >m.fo Western na- 
tions her father dreamed. 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


WEATHER 


For Profiles 


the Associated Press - . ' 

WASHINGTON — Despite co^ 


plaints from civil Ubertarians,~a Whitt 
House commission is lecommendifte 
t^ automated passenger profiles $ 
used to help would-be terrorists pD 

rfwnmmtq fl} airHnftr s. 

The idea was. ambog S3 measurfo 
offered to President Bill Cliotai & 
Wednesday by the Whice'House' Com- 
mission on Aviatioi Safety and Sectt- 
xi^.Many of tiie propost^ are airea^ 
bemg implemented by aidines and vt 


TRAVEL UPDATE The Tortuous Choices of Albright’s Family 


Albright was 2, her cousin Dagmar 
Sima saM. Mrs. Sima lived wifo tiie 
Korbel family in London during 
tius war. 

Shortly after foe war. when Mr. 
Korbel was the Czedioslovak am- 
bassador in Josef Marek 

attended the baptism in foe em- 
ba^ of Mrs. Albright’s younger 
brofoer, Jan. Mr. Maidk, who was 
chosen as godfadier to Jan, had 
long known tiie Korbel family as 
Jews before the war. 

"But 1 found notiung strange in 
foe ceremony," he said. "Aft^aU, 
they were completely assimilated 
Czechs. Madeleine’s mother told 
me to be Jenrish was always to risk 
persecutioi.'' 

Even Dagmar Sima said the 
death of her|MueDts at tbe hands of 
the Nazis "did not make me feel 
Jewi^’* 

Also reared in an assimilated 


the modernization of air^traffic con- 
trol systems shoild be qied iip, the dr^ 
repoit says, with tiie goal of conpl^j^ 
it by 2C05. The rracM'also c^ for 
reducing ^ raze of airplane aoddents 
by "a frictor of five" in foe next 10 yon 
t^o^ a major upgrade of Federal AvC- 
ation Arfaniniaratifwi safety and secuti^ 
measures. - " 

Corcimissioiiers said Inducing tbe ac^ 
cident rate was crucial. Vlfiifle noting 
that risk of d^g in a plane crash re- 
mains low, a pFOjectioz oy Boeing Co. 
recently show^ that unl^ (he ^bal 
accident rate was reduced, an aminlir 
would cra^ sane^Miae around ^ 
worid nearly ev^wedc by 2015/ 

The conmission, Jed by Vice Res- 
ident Al Gore, was appoinied by bfr. 
Clinton after TWA FU^ 800 crafo^ 
off Long Island in July, kOling all 23D 
pe<^le aboard. lavestigatots have nijt 
yet determined what caused tbe Paift- 
bound Boeing 747 to ei^lode shortly 
after takeoff. 

Mr . Gore stud Wedziesday at the coqi- 
mission’s final meeting that tiie Na- 
ticxial Aeronautics and Sp^ Admm- 
istration would change its aviation- 
progtams to focus on safe^ l e search .. 

NASA will devote S500 million over 
the next five years to this effot, be 
said. 

The commissiai ui;^ that cost ntt 
be the only bau^ for deoding wbetha ft) 
put new rafeiy rules into effect Soni^ 
times asafiety rule should go ahead evn 
when die benefits cannot be easily 
measured, the conmissiaiers said 
Automated fffofiles, bomb^sniffi^ 
dogs and better training of security of- 
ficers were among the commissions 
recommendatioas. Tbe rqmrt said prd 
filing would be easy to ctory out, 'ds 
"passengers could be separated inm a 
very large majority who present littie dr 
no risk, and a small minoiiiy who 
adfitional attention.'*’' '' "''f'. 

Commissioners noted, for example 
that because Customs officials use auf^ 
mated proffiuig, "many legitimate trav- 
elers never see a Ciunoms agent any- 
more — and drug busts ate way up.’!^ 
But the prop<^ drew a chorus of 
objections. In a letter to Mr. Gore, h 
coalition of 17 groti^. inciudiag tip 
American Qvil Uberties Union aiM the 
American-Arab And-Discrimmati<4i 
Comiruttee, the panel to drop 
automated pronii^ altogether. > 

They said proffling would lead p 
discriminadoD against certain sets of 
traveleis, mainly foose of hfiddle Easi- 
emoriglD. It also creates an opportuni^ 
for fod^ officials to warehouse ia- 
focmation that, if proved wrong, would 
. be difficult ^ an innocent person tt 
erase, they said. • 

"The risks to privacy are enot- 
roous,’’ foe coition wrote. "This pr^ 
pi^ is a quick fix that won't fix ai^- 
thing." . ; 

‘The commission sought to allay ihote 
concerns, incorporating into tbe rep(^ 
IHOvisions that passenger profiles tie 
random and not unduly basra on race, . 
ethnidty or gender. 

Automated profiling involves usii^ ' 
computeis to, among other fomgg, scan 
the travel history and posri^ Griming 
pasts of passeog^ to identify poteotid 
terrorists. 

An official close to the oomnussiqa 
said it would do all it could to eostire tfatf 
profiling did not in^ge on d'vil ri^t^ 
saying aviation officials were not in- 
terested in creating "some huge data- 
base of suspect characters that is k^ 
for yean and years and then can taave^ 
life of its owil" 


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Europe 


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10 a Far wm ve las SWitecpmewabmlsan LMgno 

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S 45 Fv OoHd taavy SC Selva 

3D 140 Good Opw Rekd I2C iS^miiniai iSimiHidiaiiai „ — 

S 30 Fak M Pdka 129 ifflffnrpmi. ririiy fOTtimi Nofwaqr 


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s in Good ler haanr asn 

X IX Good IM lar se 

X IK Good Opel PM 59 

X ax Good IM Prild se 

X X Copd icy wa 21/1 




Forecast for BUiy ttnough Sunday, as provided by AccUWeoiher. 


X IK Good aaii hNvy 12B if33Miwi 


1M PM 02 eiMi 


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WhoUer td 2K Good Hed Vkr 1U2 oIXUsc 


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Davos 

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45 tx Good Kart 
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A atevm wM Mm a vMy 
mix of pmdpMsnon to the 
mXAllanlfc and N orth iaa t 


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CoM air drepping smith- 
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ntday, tel owad by a cMy 
shot owar lha waakeno. 


shot owar lha waakend. 
Unaeasenably cMp in the 
Oiaai Lakes and northern 
funs we furrias poaaUa 
IMsweakand.liadlnRart- 
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will be poiaM lo enter 
narthaaatarn Europe, 
indurtng Warsaw, late in 
lha w aai tend. Cooler and 
damp weather will affeei 
Italy and seuthaaatem 
Euifoe through the week- 
end. A mrtor atomi could 
oftoet thoBrlSah Islas by 

the and of ttia waskand. 


Asie 

A wortc GoU hont v6f 
through nerthaaslorn 
China Friday, then the 
Koreas Saturday. This 
front will knock tampera- 
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thosa areas on Saturday 
and Sunday rwpaeHvaly. 
Much of Ja^ wS etqi^ 
enee a modaratbig trend 
with olormy we all i a i pv«r 

thewBahand. 


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4. 





Clinton and Republicans 
Find Conunon Ground 

^ut Campaign Finance Is Left Off Table 


INTERNATIONAL HE3UJLD TRIBUNE, THURSDAi; FEBRUARY 


R4GE3 


THEAMERICAS 


y 


By Peter Baker and Eric Pianin 

H'aitetgBit ft)W Swvfcg 

. WASHINGTON — PresidcDt Bill 
.Clinton aod congresdona] l^dets iiave 
•tdcen their first steps toward translating 
.iMpartisan words into dee^ by 
Ip coDcenlrate on five top-priority ini- 



% 4igeiida was campaign fiia^j^ona. 

.Ni In a rare collaboration between a 
.(Veddent and Itpvmakers of different 
.mrties, the two sides Tuesday to 

^xas on issues where both beUeve con- 
sensus is withiD reach. Apart from tax 
educadon plans, those were: aid for 
jtBC _ District of Columbia, Juvenile 
jpstice measures and business incent- 
to put welfare recipwnts to wodc. 

‘ ‘The whole system is kind of toiduig 
4pward movement instead of paralysis 
.again, and d^'s a good thing forAmer- 
tpft,* * Mr. Clinton said before leaviim foe 
White House to meet with ccmgreK^ial 
.feaders at the Capitol. “And Tm going 
do what I can to keep it gmng.*^ 

But jost as dgnificant as foe areas of 
rammonaUty were the issues left off foe 
A ;L^le, most notably legislatioa intended 
.to stem the enormous flow of speoal- 
.uuerestjnoney into the electoral process. 
Tust last week, Mr. Clinton chulenged 
.pongress to pass such a plan by July 4. 

, For all foe goodwill generated dining 
private talks, a measure of how hard 
jit will be to agree on substance came 
ilpter in foe afternoon when Treasury 
.Secretary Robert Rubin and House Re- 


publicans clashed mi the pre»dcat*s 
balanced-budget {dan. 

Stfil. foe session betwe en Mr. Qinton 
tind ccmgresrional leadtts lepresented 
something of a m jptffnne in foeir re- 
lationship. Ax 'the invitaiioD law- 
makers, Mr. Qinton tiavd^ the lesjgtb 
of Pen^lvama Avenue to me^ them 
on their home turf, an iminmfll act for a 
president, and one intended to symbolize 
a new era of constmctive engagemenL 

The House weaker. Newt Gmgiich. 
Republican of Georgia, described the 
meeting as v^, very positive;" while 
the Sen^ majority leader, Trent Lotu 
Republican of Massachusetts, called die 
atnoo^ere "the best f^ve seen in smiie 
time.** Mr. Clinton was "delighted with 
file tone, "the White House spokesman, 
hGcbael McCuny, said. 

hi contrast with th(^ largely n^ative 
assessment of hfr. Qintoa’s budgdplan 
last week, Republican leaders on lues- 
day said th^ were prepared to use the 
presideot'sproposalas foe starting point 
ibr negotiating a loug-term agreement 
to eliminate foe deficit 2002, instead 

of writing their own plan from scratch. 
The leadm said tiiey would tty to wrap 
up a deal by A{nil IS. 

Woiidng gztxtps will be foimed in 
each of foe five areas to thrash out 
differences, and Mr. Clinton will assign 
a top offi^l to oversee negotiations for 
riift admintstrafirtn 

During Tuesday's meeting, accord- 
ing to partidpants, Mr. Qinton pot edu- 
cation and welfare on the table, while 
Mr. Gingrich brought up the Dizbdet of 
Columbia, and hfr. Lott added juvenile 



POLITIC AL/j 


Via MeN«Mc/Rnir«n 

Lott; rigli^ and Newt Gingrich talking np their bipartisan approach. 


crime. Because both sides have emn- 
peting tut overlapping tax-cutting 
plans, there was general agreement to 
add Aat issue as weU. 

The minority leader, Thomas 

rw*,*t*, TVwwrrat nf .Smnh nMVnm ^ wg 

rtixiffed in his atteoapt to add bdahfa 
insurance for poor cltildren to die agenda, 
and ofoer issues including nuclear waste, 
rhprmnA weSpOOS and the Supecfood 

but left o^^lisL 

White House officials said Mr. Qm- 


ton, while mentioning campaign fi- 
nance, dul not push to have it included 
because both parties are so demly di- 
vided on foe topic foat their leaders 
would be usable to lake a united po- 
sition. 

"Th^ would be the last {tiace you‘d 
want to go to get anything done," one 
aide to Cl&on said. 

Instead, the White House said it 
would attempt to pressure Congress to 
act mi campugn finance playing iq) 
public sentiment about the issue. 


Clinton Embraces a Soul Mate: TV Preacher 


By Peter Baker 

Wtakijigtat Pan Service 


tV «■ WASHINGTON — One is a Soufo- 
r Bapti^ from Arkansas who was 
,'^ucaied in Roman CatiK^ schools 
,jand ofien worships at his wife's Metit- 
odist church. 

Ihe other is a television evangelist 
_^\vho preaches about the {Xnm of setf- 
lesteem and "posribility thinking" to 
^inilltons of riewers each wedc fnm the 
.pulpit in his all-glass cafoedral in Soufo- 
,em C^ifomia. 

An unlikely pairing at first glance, 
.'perhaps, bmfteademBill Clinton seems 
.lo have found some^i^ of a smritual 
foul mate in foe Reverend . Jbobnt 
5chuUcr, host of "The Hour oTPower,'* 
piK of foe most w^hed fod .inftieitfial 
r^gjouaprogranismlufo^.... 

was Mr. Sdiullec as the WUte 


House foe weekend before the inau- 
guration, suggesting Scripture to mask 
the of the preridem*s seomd 

tenn. There was hfr. Schuller ag^ last 
week, sicting next to ffiUary Rodham 
Clinton in & House gallery during die 
State foe UmoD Addtess as foe pres- 
ident singled 1^ put for recognition. 

And &re was Mr. Schuller on the 
telepbooB with a White House speech- 
writer. offering thoughts for Mr. Clin- 
ton's caofesston-style talk a few days 
larer at a fxayer breakfast in vriiich ^ 
piesidect oomplaioed about foe mean- 
spiiitediiess tiik infiises Washington. 

As Mr. Qinton opens foe next st^ 
of his presidency, preaefaiDg recondli- 
tdiooTiw pasting himself .aa a unifying 
force in a divisive world, be bas tauned 
to many quarters for counsel. 

Bfofitobeenl^. Scfoul^ 
provided foe tntdk^ inspiration -^ his 


favorite verse (Isaiah S8:12, "Thou 
shall be ^ed. The repairer of the 
breach") has become almost an anthem 
for Mr. Clinton. 

"He thought he grabbed the Bible 
verse, but 1 think foe BiUe verse 
gralfoed him." Mr. Schuller said from 
his office in Garden Grove, California 
l^tnn his Crystal Catiiedral. sheatbed 
in more than 10.(XX} panes of glass, Mr. 
Schuller runs aoc of the nation's oldest 
televirion mizustries, a cxiagre^adon of 
^ Reformed Church in Amenca 
Now in hs 27fo season, his broadcast 
helps bring in more than $S0 million a 
year and reaches an estimated 20 mil- 
lion followers in 184 countries with his 
message of "positive tbeolo^." 
Among his "power quotes" is "God 
plus me equals a majority." * 

"He is an example of . an evangelical 
who puts a strai^t etnpharis on self- 


esteem and feeling good about one- 
self," said Ron Sider, a professor at 
Eastern Baptist Theologjcal Seminary. 
"R*s not dear that foe full Itistoric 
Cltristian affimtadon of sin is as clear in 
his preaching as it might be." 

Mr. Schuller is not as poUtically ori- 
ented as such evangelists as Pat 
Robertson or Jerry Falwell. 

Tbe minister finds no irony in grow- 
ing close to a president whose own sins, 
real or alleged, have been so thoroughly 
for foe world to examine. 

"There are real character accusations 
against hint," ]i^. Schuller said, "but 
you can't pass judgment until they're 
proved. As a p^or. my job is to help 
arid to heal foe hurting person, if 
you disagree with him.. 

*Tma Otristian and Jesus didn’t toy. 
"I love you, if/ Jesus s{)edali^ in 
loving sinners." 








AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Good Buddy: CB Radios 
Enjoy a Roadm^ Reaoaissance 

A ^oeration after citizens-band radios 
bad of {leople, especially truckers 

and oiher drivers, chattering over the air- 
waves in colorful ,^igon ("I tried to wam 
lum about that Smokey, but be had peanut 
bufler in his ears"), a revival is under 
way. 

More Americans are finding foat the CB 
. is a alternative to cellular phones. 

CB saiesase up by 70 percent in some areas, 
andOeneial Motors Corp. now offers foem 
as an optical in its new cars. 

Latin immigrants now use adapted ^Bs 
to cril relatives in Meiuco, Central America 

and Cobiu TCp^ foe Mercury News of San 

Jose, C^iforoia. 

A CB and antenna can cost less man 
$100, and there are no air-time charges oe 
moodtly service fees. A baric CB's range is 
only 5 miles (8 kilometere). but transnus- 
sioos can span tbe continent if a radio has 
"sideband" capacity, which adds 80 extra 
Wgher-powered channels, or if an amplifi® 
(whidi is ille^) is used. 

Some people bom after the C B cr^ 
, began a generation ago — sales exceeded 
1 1 million a year at foe fad's mid-70s apex 

have fotmd the radios to be a low-tech 

answer to the Internet, offering 39 channels 
of "chat rooms" where pec^, co^ 

verse uring names like "Califbniia Mama 

and "Mr. Big." , 

After falling below 1 inillioo m sales a 
w in the early 1990s. sales of CBs m on 
• foeir way back to 2 million a year, tndutfiy 
repre s entatives say. 


ShortTahes 

Environinentalirts and desert lovers 
say foey are aogiy over an anny {Boposal to 
buy 331,000 acres (132^400 hectares) of 
public-access land to foe Mojave Desert as 
a ate for extenave. war games. Most of tbe 
land, ooifoeast of Barscow, California, is 
r fi ana ged by foe Bureau of Land Man- 
a^nenL ff foe White House concurs and 
Ccnqpess ^^qnoves tiie $40 imllioo acqui- 
sition, it wo^ be foe largest purchase of 
CaMtmiia desert land in SO yeara. 

A blind Cinettmati man got more foan a 
brricen tulbooe when he was struck last 
■Bioztth by a {tickup trade while crossiQg a 
road: He was ticketed fbr^ywalldng. 

The accident h ap pened Jan. 22 as Jeff 
Riedlander, 62, was waDdng to work and 
aiqsaiently reered out of a crosswalk. The 
driver of the truck was not charged. Mr. 
Ftiefoander said he was going to pay tbe fine 
\wiriT leazning foat Ohio law gives foe right- 
of-way to blind people canying wUte canes. 
He now awaits a court hearing. "His jay- 
walk^ caused foe aeddent," saidapoliOB 
csqitaiii, Robert Biddle. ‘ 'Yes. you have the 
right-of-way ufoen you have a cane, but you 
must be lawfully die crosswalk." 

If you’re drawn to Anitfica's qnirlder 
side, c*»naripiF visifoig foeae museums: die 
American Bmeral Service Museum, in Hou- 
ston, which indudes the video "Ihe Histray 

Bmbaln^" and a never-used casket fo 
three; the Museum of Bad An. in Dedham, 
Massaafouseds ("No velvet Elvises, " says a 
spokesman, "only printings and scriptures 
done with soious iDtie% with some levd of 
until som^ung went horribly 
wrong"); the Trash Museum in Lyndhurst, 
New Jei^, where you can walk dirougfa a 
tunnel bu^ of guha^ and the Nk Museum 
in Old Lyme, Qinnectictit. vfoich features a 
lO-f^-^ (3 meter) nutcracker. Admis- 
sion diere is $3. Plus a nuL 

tntemadoiial Herald THbane. . 


Senate Unit Drags Heels on Lake Hearings 

WASHINGTON — Detennined to delay or derail Anthony Lake's con- 
finnation as director of the CLA, foe chaiman of the Senate intelligence 
committee has once agsin postooned public hearings on the nomination. 

Seiiator Richard Shelby. Republican of Alabama, said a lot of "unaaswered, 
perplexing questions*' ab^ Mr. Lake's conduct as Prerident Bill Ginton's 
^t-term national security adviser forced him to put off foe twice-postponed 
hearings until March 1 1 . 

A vote on Mr. Lake's confiimazioQ. which committee members and foeir 
staffs said would probably have passed nanowly if it were held soon, now is 
unlikely for at least five weeks. The committee's deputy chairman. Senator 
Bob Kerrey, a Nelxuska Democrat, said Tuesday foat the postponement "risks 
turning a porition that is extremely important to the nation's safety into a 
political football." 

Justice Depanment investigations excluded last week addressed some of 
the questions Mr. Shelby citeiC but foe answers clearly did not satisfy him. The 
Justice DepsTtment found that Mr. Lake had not lira to Congress about the 
adnunistration’s tacit approval of Iran's arms shipments to Bosnia's Muslims. 

Shelby, who has come close to accusing Mr. Lake of being untruthful, 
would not accept the finding. 

The Justice IJepartment also said Mr. Lake should pay $5.000 to settle a civil 
case brought bectmse he had failed to sell energy stoclts foat created potential 
conflicts of interest wjfo his powers as national securiQ' adviser. But foe report 
on that case, Mr. Shelby stud, "raises as many questions as it puiported to 
answer, and was not as satisfactory as 1 had ho^." (NYT) 

Qinton Fund-Raising Aide Unrepentant 

WASHINGTON — Alternately defiant and contrite. President Clinton's 
senior ride for his 1 996 re-election campaign has taken responsibil jfy for some 
fund-rrising missteps but insisted that he broke no laws and that Clinton's 

counship of Democratic donors was no different from foe practices of his 
predecessors. 

Harold Ickes, the former White House deputy chief of staff, acknowledged 
Tuesday that he should not have sought to steer mone than $1 million in 
donations from aTexas business leader to foe Democratic National Committee 
and otiier groups in the cIosii\g days of foe campaign. 

But he said his actions, which are under investigation, were not illegal 
because he did not solicit the money — which he was prohibited from doing as 
a federal employee. He said he had erred in using a government fax machine 
and telephone to contact an intermediary about the donation. 

Mr. Ickes defended the party's overall fund-raising record compared with 
what be described as pervasive abuses when he first got involved in politics. 

"The system is a lot cleaner and a lot less subject to abuse than it was 20 
years ago," Mr. Ickes said. "So. I make no apologies for either the amounts of 
money we raised or basically the way we raised it." (LAT) 


Quote/Unquote 


Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, urging Congress to support a 
measure tb^ would speed the release of mcmey ^family-planning programs 
overseas: ‘ 'I think the issue here. sir. is that we desperately need the money in 
order to try to get women out of foe terrible poverty that has existed." (NYTi 


Away From 
Politics 

• Fred Gridman offered to give up 

all claims to O. J. Simpron's money [f 
he will sign a confession about foe 
murd^ of his former wife and Mr. 
Goldman son. (AF) 

9 David Dinidiis. tiie former Oemo- 
ciatic mayor of New York City, said 
be would not challenge Mayor 
Rudolph Giuliani in the November 
el^on. "I'm not running, b^t I'm 
not hiding," he said. ' (AFT 

• The Cittders interim prerident. 
R. Clifton Poole, said he expected 


some male cadets at the South Car- 
olina military college to face criminal 
charts in the alleged hazing and har- 
assment of two female cadets. (AP) 

• Lawyers began planning appeals 

for the two black men who were con- 
victed in the killing of a Hasidic Jew 
during racial violence in Brooklyit in 
J99I. They will argue that 
both men on trial together hs 
each man's case. (/*/YT} 

• The entire staff of the only shelter 

for battered women run by New York 
City was replaced, after investigators 
, found foat workers there had sex with' 
4be women, used drugs on foe job and 
allowed abusive husbands and boy- 
friends into foe shelter. (A/7T) 


On President’s ‘To Do’ List, New Ambassadors 


Some of the most prom- 
ioeot aod sensitive ainbatoad- 
mial posts — including Mos- 
cow, Tri^o and Seoul — are 
among fopitxaatic varancies 
Presittent BUI Clinuxi must 
fiU now foat his foreign policy 
team is largely in pls^ 

Ihomas roley, former 
speaker of foe House of Rep- 
resentritves, is likely to be 
appointed as ambastodtx to 
Japan, tbe Sankei Shimbun 
i^poit^ Wednesday. Mr. Fo- 
1^, 67, wUl be ^ipoizued in a 
few weeks, tbe aewspaper 
said, quoting congressional 
officials. 

Mr. Foley was also ap- 
proached to be envoy to Lon- 
don but decided to succeed 
Writer Mondale in foe Tokyo 
post after conridering his 
^rife's (qnnion and lakzM into 
account foe better rea&ice 
in Triqro, tiK officials said. 

Tbe femur speaker was 
once involved in trade nego- 
tiations wifo Japan, par&u- 
lariy in the agncnlnire and 
airaaft sectors. After Ituing 
Ins House sear in 1994, he has 
bera weridng at a law office 
in Wariiington state. 

One of the trickiest post- 
il^ is Moscow, where tiu 
government has been semi- 
peralyzed by foe extended Ul- 


oesses of President Boris 
Yeltsin and relations are 
tested by a host of jupblenis, 
including Russian objecticxis 
to NATO expansion. 

Thomas I^kering quit as 
ambassador to Moscow last 
November. It is unclear who 
replace him. Among the 
leading candidates is Jatues 
CoUlns, a former No. 2 at the 
Moscow embassy and now an 
ambassador at large in charge 
of' the State Departmem's 
pograms riding foe former 
stales of foe Sovw Union. 

Among other major am- 
bassador^ posts e^qiected to 
be filled this yean 

• Germany: Vacant since 
last summer, the post could 
go to John Kornbhjro.acareer 
diplomat and the State De- 
partment's point man on Bos- 
nia-Herzegovina. 

• Britain: William Crowe 
Jr., retired chairman of the 
Joint Quefs of Staff, is ex- 
pected to leave London this 
year. A possible replacement 
is Swanee Hunt, foe ambas- 
sador to Austria, who was a 
major donor to Mr. Clinton’s 
19^ campaign. 

• South Korea: James 

Laney has rerigned. He 
earned hi^ marks for helping 
manage a complicated rela- 
tioaship witii Seoul while 


keeping an eye on tbe un- 
ixedic&le North. Jrim 
NegrppoDie. a fonzier ambas- 
sadwto foe Philippines and to 
Mexico, is said to want foe 
Seoul riot, but no clear fa- 
vorite has emerged. 

The death last week of 
Pamela Hairiman. foe ambas- 
sador to Ranee, added Paris 
to tbe list of vacant posts. 
Mrs. Harriraan bad made it 
known that she intended to 
leave by summer, so there 
already has been some jock- 
eying to replace her. 


Most often mentioned for 
tbe Paris post is Frank Wis- 
oer, a career foreign service 
officer who now is envoy to 
India. Another possibility is 
Felix Robatyn. a Wall Street 
investment banker and a 
prominent Democratic Party 
fund-raiser. 

Last week the Senate con- 
firmed Genla Hawkins 
Hobnes as ambassador to Aus- 
tralia, makmg ber the first ca- 
reer foreign servicewoman to 
head a major embassy. 

On Thursday the Senate 


Foreign Relations Conunittee 
is to hold a confirmation hear- 
ing on Mr. Qinton *s choice of 
Pete Peterson, a former con- 
gressman from FImida and 
Vietnam prisoner of war. to 
be tbe first U.5. ambassador 
to Vietnam since foe Com- 
munist nation was unified in 
1975. 

Representative Bill Rich- 
ardson was unanimously con- 
firmed by foe Senate on Tues- 
day to be ambassador to the 
United Nations. (AP. AFP] 


N.Y. Subway 
Goes Polite? 

WasWagiOB f OT* SfTW« 

NEW YORK — Can ^ 
.briwvior of New Ywkers be 
^'-Riodified so tint they ore con- 
siderate to each ofo^ 

: Ih an attem(ri to stop some 
•New Yorkers from push^ 
^ shoving long eocKigh 
.jrfoeis to ^ off trains on foe 
-buriesi uS, subway Ime.^ 
-jraosU Authority has oumi- 
tyiri‘‘ipiaifoimcoirinc^ fo 
•qrange vests. .It has also as- 

^signed a sweet-voiced woman 
^or the public-address wstem 

to instnxi outgtMog riocts to 
. out of orange bo^ T 

,< primwi in front of each train 

" door unti) the iocomnig 
comnniters have deared out. 


In this Friday’s 



The Car Column 



Mercedes SLK 



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THE WORLDS DAHY NEWSPAPER 


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\ 


INTEBNATIONAL WKBAl.D TRIBIJPJE, SATUBDAy-SCIND^ FEBRUARy 1-2, 1997 






PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL TTRBAT.n TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13^ 1997 


ASWPACmC 


China Seizes Alleged Leader of Riots 


CattpdtdtfOmStfFnmOup^d^ 

BEIJING — Police have oirested a 
member of the Ui^ur edinic minority 
on charges he led a riot last week in dK 
mainly Muslim northwestern region of 
S^jiang dial left at least 10 pec^le dead 
• and !44 injured, local officials said 
Wednesday. 

TIk two days of “beatin|, smashing 
and looting'" in Yining, a city near the 
Chinese border with Kazakstan, were 
pl anned and inspired by "a sroalJ num- 
ber of enemy elements,' ' accordng to a 
Xinj iang government spokesman, liu 
Yishmg. 

The authorities issued emergency no- 
tices calling on local officials to 
separatism in the region and warning of 
severe punishments for rioters. 

Government units were ordered to 
form vigilante squads to guard against 
possible attacks by separatists in Yin- 
log, officials said. 

“We are resolved to deal a blow to 
the hondhil of ethnic separatist ele- 
ments," said Zha^ Youlian, deputy 
director of the foreign affairs office for 
the Yili Kazakh Autonomous Prefec- 


ture, which administers Yining. 

Most of those who were beaten were 
Han Chinese, Mr. Uu said Han make up 
the vast majority of China's total pop- 
ulation, but re pre se nt only 3S percent of 
die potation in JGnjiang, where the 
majority are Lfighurs and other Muslim, 
edinic Turkic groups. 

The police arrested Abudu Heilili, 29, 
and were interrogating him, a local 
Communist Party official said Mr. Hei- 
lili underwent “ideological educadmi," 

the official said after being labeled tb& 
ringleader of another, less violent anti- 
Chinese demonstration in Yining in Au- 
gust 1995. 

The official account did not fully 
correspond with earlier ones from local 
police and pro-independence exile 
groups. One of those groups claimed 
that more than 300 people died 

Tlie government confirmed that pro- 
testers had been arrested but would not 
say how many. One Yining police of- 
ficer said the ix>lice fired warning shots 
to disperse me crowd and arrested as 
many as 500 pe^ie. 

But some residents said Wednesday 


that Communist officials bad already 
tried and mghurs in the re- 

gion, foDowing the anest'of mote than 
1,000 peq)le during and aAer the 
clashes S and 6. 

‘“nie trials be^ on the sixtit,” said 
(»e Yining resident, who is not Han 
Oiinese, “and six ringleaders were ex- 
ecuted the same day. 

Vusttpbek Mumisi, leader of the 
United Mvoludonary National Frmt in 
Almaty, the c^tal of Kazakstan, said 
Tuesday that ^ Uighor activists had 
been executed on Fe& 7. 

But a local police adrainistrator, Ma 
Shiqiang, conzirmed the riots Tuesday, 
accusing an illegal Islamic sect of in- 
citing the violence. 

A spokesman for the re^on's Com- 
munist Party (xmmiittee, who gave only 
his sumazne, Zang, said about 100 
Uigbur youtte started the rioting by 
matching outside Chinese-owned 
shops, shouting pro-independ^ice slc^ 
gans and praise for Allah. The crowd 
grew to wOt, be said, and some pro- 
testers burned cars and threw rocks and 
sticks. (Reuters, AP, AFP) 


Loan Scandal Rattles Seoul Cabinet 



. ix*. 




Af!fnce France-Presse 

SEOUL — Prime Minister Lee Soo 
Sung hinted that the whole South 
Korean cabinet could resign as Home 
Minisier Khn Woo Suk stef^ied down 
We^sday after being summoned as a 
t in the widening Hanbo scand^. 


Korea's former ambass^r to Beijing, 
Hwang Byung Tae of the governing 
New Korea Pai^, were to be questioned 
"as suspects" in the scandal, which has 
engulfed officials close to President 
IGm Young SaiiL 

The fla^up companies of tiie Hanbo 
group. South Korea’s 14th-lar«est con- 
glomerate, were declared baobupn on 
Jan. 23 with debts of nearly S6 billion. 

Senior Prosecutor Choi Byung Kook 
hinted that both Mr. Kim a^ Mr. 
Hwang were headed for arrest in the 
scandal, which has focused on hi^- 


level political pressure on bankers to 
extend big loans to Hanbo without coi- 
l^ral. 

“In connection with die preferential 
loans to Hanbo, Hwang and Kim will be 
summoned as suspects," Mr. Qioi said. 

Mr. Lee expr^sed remorse over the 


an ofter to “take lesponsibiliiy," sug- 
gesting that a mass resignaticMi by the 
cabinet was possible, the Yonhap News 


Agency said. 

Tonih^ quoted Mr. Lee as saying 
government officials "must always be 
responsible to the people and that their 
administrative and ethical tesponsilril- 
ities are no less important than legal 
responsibili^." 

But those remarks did not mean he 
would step down, his spokesman said 
Wednesday. 

“Lee oftered to take responsibility 


for the current situation,' ' a senior mde 
said, “but he did not say he will 
resign." 

Mr. Hwang, die former ambassador, 
now beads tbe National Assembly’s in- 
fluential finance and economic commit- 
tee. He and die borne minister, Mr. Kim, 




Tbe home minister is su^iected of 
accepting bribes from the head of 
Hanbo, Qumg Tae Soo, whoi Mr. Kim 
was ccmstruOTon minister in 1994. 

Prosectdors on Tuesday had arrested 
two senior aides who are members of 
Mr. Kim’s inner circle on charges of 
taking Ixibes for helping provide loans 
to the failed banking groim. 

They were the mat politicians to be 
arrested in the stormy Hanbo scandal, 
which has already left the group’s 
founder and two major bank brads be- 
hind bars pending tr^. 


■ ■ ■ ' leiiai Om 

IN THE SWIM — President Fidel Ramos of tbe Philippines, left fbr^iround, taking a dip with cabinet^ 
members on Wednesday. He invited jonmalists to poolside to disprove rumors that be hadsufifered a stroke. . 


\ V 


1 Two Issues Block 

EU-ASEAJVFbet 










Demoaacy advocates carrying banners urgii^ ASEAN not to offer 
membership to Burma demmistrating in Ban^tok on Wednesday. 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — IvCoves to demea 
ties between Eiunope and Southeast Asia 
stalled Wednraday over Burma and East 
UmcHr, delegates said, as officials from 
(be European Union and the Association 
of South East Asian Nations could aot 
agree on wording for a final declaration 
that indirectly deals with tbe two issues. 

Tbe biggest tc^c of debate on Wed- ^ 
nesday was Burma, which has been 
promi^ ASEAN membership along 
whb Laos and C^bodia. Tbe human 
rights group Amnesty Inteniational said 
Wednraday that political repression and 
rights violations in Burma last year 
rracbed tbrir faigbest levels since the 
suppression of a popular upising at the 
end of the ISffiOs. 

Officials ssud the fight between Por- 
tugal and Indonesia over East Timor 
vras another major stumbling block. 


Tokyo Aide Critical in BuUet Use 

TOKYO — The U.S. mOitaiy’s inadvotent firing of 
uranium-tipped bullets near Ok^wa could cause “fis- 
sures" in. relations widi Japan, tiie chief government 
spokesman. Seiroku Kajiyama. said Wetfairada^. 

Mr. Kajiyam also berated the Foreign Minisoy for not 
swiftly notifying Okinawan autiiorities about die mishap, 
addhig that be ^mpatiiized with Okinawan anger at what be 
said was the laie^ in a series of mistuqis and misdeeds by 
U.S. forces stationed there. 

The FcMcign Minisuy was informed by U.S. authorities 
of the firii^ of tbe 1,520 bullets on JaiL 15, but did ncA 
iiifOTm Okrnawan authorities until Monday. (Reuters) 

Sri Lanka Nominations Rejected 

COLOMBO — Sri Lanka’s ruling par^ suffer^ a 
serious blow vriien die nmninatimi papers of its candidates 
for electicms to die ^ital’s mumc^ council wm re- 
jected Wednesday, offuaals said. 

The papers from the governing People’s Affiance were 
not in order because they had mcluded two rawiriidfltes 
below the votiiig age of 18 to contest seats in Sri Jaye- 
wardenepura-Kotte. officials srid. 

Officii said lists of the opposition had also been 
rejected in at least one urban council in die central province 
biiti no finther were {mivided. Elections are due in 
March for 238 locri government bodies. '(AFP). 

Narging Victim Testifies in Tokyo 

TOKYO — A Chinese woman who says she was raped, 
stabbed and left for dead during the J^ianese Army’s 1937 ' 
Rape of NanJking (Nanjing) wept as she told a Tol^o court 
Wdlclnraday of her ord^ and aemanded compensation. " 

• IJm Xhiying, 79. is ooe of 10 survwors of tbe inassacres in 
Nanjing vdio are demanding 100 miffionyeneadi ($813,000) 
in conqiensation frcan tbe Japanese govemmenL Nanjing was 
sacked 1:^ Japanese troops, vdio executed 300,000 pe^le 
within a few months b^een late 1937 and early. 1938, 
aocxndmg to CMiese acarants. (Reuters) 

Hong Koi^ Importance Stressed 

LONDON — Fmeign Secietaiy Malcolm Rifldnd, be- 
ginning a weeklong trip to Southeast A^ said Wednesday 
that Hong Koig would remain “of vital imp ort an ce" to 


Biitam after tbe tenitoiy’s is transfened to the Chmese. 

ffi a s p c edi in Sing^xire, tiie text of which wra released ^ 
in Lood^ Mr. Riflmid isa^ “At the midni^ stioke on-** 
June 30, Bzitain’s relationship with Hong Kong wiU^ 
change. But it will not end. ' 

“Our de^ commitment to Hong Kong will reoiain,*’ he 
- added, “as a matter of poUtical and moral obligation to 
Hong Kong people, m the .3 milLion who still hold Biiti^ 
passports." ' (Reuters) 

Burniese Groups Mark HoUday 

RANGOON — Buima's military lulers and the op- j 
position led by Daw Aiing San Suu Kyi held separatt events •- 
Wednesdr^ to mark tiie 50tii anniversary of Union Day, ^ 
signaling that political divisions scffi ran deep in the mui- 
tietbnic nation. 

The National League for Democracy called for tripartite 
talks between dm nffii^ State Law arid Order Restmation 
Council, various ethnic groiqis and {ffo-democracy forces to 
build national reconciliation. 

Prime Minister Genmal.Than Shwe, in an ^ipareat’' 
reference to the democratic -.c^ipcisition and its western 
s up porter s , urged ethnic groups to rise up and crush ele- 
ments oat to disturb Bucma's progress. (Reuters}' 

FortheRecord 

A total of 5,150 Comnivnist rebels have been granted 
amnesty by tiie Philippi^ government over the last three 
years, said Alfredo Tadiar, diairman of tbe National Am-' 
nesty ConnnissioQ. - (AFP). 

• — President Soharto, at a canenMHiy marking Indone- 
sia’s press day, warned the news media Wednesday not 
to imhate foreign press '''values" in covering evrats in 
Indonesia. .(Reuters) 

A Japane^ court sentenced Hiroyuki Okada, 33, a 
former Aura Shinrik^ cult member, to Jour years in jail 
Wednesday for anempring to mass produce deadly sarin 
nerve gasand concealing guns.. (AFP) 

The use of young women as compensation payments 
by tribes in Papua New Guinea is iU^al and must be 
abandemed, a national comt judge has nil^ Judge Salamo 
Injia said the practira was “unlawftil, unconstitutional and 
renmgnaiitmtiie'piind.pLesofhuinaruiy.’' (Reuters) 



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Chechen President Takes Oath 
Vowing to Push for Freedom 


Reuiers 

GROZNY, Russia 

Checbaya’s first post-war 
president. Aslan Maddiadov, 
took ofiBce Weibesday 
pledging to realize the dream 
of todependence for which 
his ancestors and contempor- 
mes fought Russia. 

• Mr. Maskha^, a fonner 
Soviet artilteiy colonel who 
led separatist rebds against 
Russian troops sent to crush 
them in December 1994. also 
promised to strengthen 

and fight a crime wave in die 
shattered region. 

• **Now it’s the duty'of each 
^ every (me of us to realize 
the expectations of our an- 
cestors. our heroes fallen in 

holy war. of the right to 
live fi^y and iad^rend- 
endy," he said to rebels and 
Russian representatives in the 
facial. 

*For hundreds of years our 
nation was not allowed h> live 
freely, to be master of its 
country." he said. ^'Killed 
when they wanted to kin, 
burned when they felt Uke h, 
labeled 'bandits* when thgy 
felt Uke it, deported when 
diey fdt like it.” 


Behind Mr. Maskhadov od 
die stgtt of the asemUy ball 
stood leaders of the rebel , 
force that l mmitiflteddp*» R^ 
siu military iu fighting Aat 
lolled tens of tboasaoids of 
pec^le and left mai^ more, 
homeless. 

Alexander Lebed, former 
security adviser to Pre^deat 
Boris reltsin of Ru^ia, satin 
&e audience with Ivan Ryb^ 
kin, now die secretary of the 
Russian Securipr 

Mr. Lebed Sagned a peace 
deal widi Mr. Maskhat^ in 
Augi^ agreeing to withdraw 
Russian troops. The 
Cbecbens. conquered by 
czarist fences more than a 
ceimsy ago and seat eo masse 
to intemal exile in Cenhal 
Asia by Stalin dnrmg Worid 
War U, now se^ indepen- 
dence. 

But Moscow, fearxDg s^ 
aratism elseudim on its vast 
territories, insists diat die re- 
gjoD is a part of the Russian 
Fede ra ri on and will not dis- 
ease sovereignty for five 
years. Fordgn goventmeots, 
unvrining to aaga the Kr^- 
lin, W(xdd also balk at dip- 
lomadc recognidott. 


.Secuiity was extrem^ 
tight at the ceremCRty, witii 
hundreds of anned men pack- 
ing the hall and others 
crowded on the street outr 
side. 

‘*ln the name of the proph- 
et bom in Mecca I swear to be 
an' faoziest servant'of the' 
pet^le and a slave of Allah.” 
Mb'. Maskbadbv said ini Us 
oath of office, adding. “Com- 
lades-in-anns I thank you for 
your goodness.** 

Wben be bad finiriied a 
deafening roar broke out as 
hundreds of men fired ibmr 
Ealaidinikov rifles into die 
air, filling the air mdi the . 
smell of gunpowder. 

Me. Nuslmadov promised 
to. bong the myri^ of aiined 
groiqrs in the legioa into Kne 
and to protect Cbe^nya's 
Russmn ptmulation. 

”Rist OT all it*s necessary 
to streogibe& the Muslim re- 
ligion, to free the natioo from 
dm violence and mockery of 
crimmU etements.'* he 
"To tfaatl will direct all my 
efforts. A state cannot con- 
sider itsdf free whose cit- 
izens are in constant fear of 
their lives.** 



Belgrade Opposition Whry | 

Election Victories Now Law, but Rallies Continue 


Swiss Goyermnent Opts 
To Set Up Fund for Jews 


TENSE MOSTAR — AFreodisoldlm'witliliieNATO 
fwoe searching a resident of die Bosnian city ajfter more 
Mosliins were evicted fhnn tbe Croatian-held side. 


BRIEFLY 


Cmftt dbfOwSKfFrcaDi niiaLkj 

BELGRADE — A law xeinstatmg election 
victories by tbe pi^sition that P^dmit 
Slobodan I^osevic of Sertria had annulled 
formally cook effect Wednesday with its pub- 
lication in the official govemroem gazette. 

The law was approvro Tuesday in a spedal 
session of Parliament that was bctycotted by 
most cq>positi(» parties. 

But tile opposition parties remain waty 
because the law reinstates their victcuies in 
municipal elections Nov. 17 on tbe basis of 
provisional results compiled by lo^ election 
conunissioos. 

The <^}p05ition. fearing fiaud because 
these commissions are usually cmitroUed by 
the governing Socialist Party, wanted the law 
to i^ect results from taw voting data col- 
lected at polling stations. 

This way. tbe cq^rositioo parties say, they 
will not be Seated out of any extra seats diey 
might have coming once th^ laloe power. 

The parties also say that 12 weeks of pix^ 
democracy street lalues will continue until 
die opposition has actually taken power in 14 
cities, including Belgraite, and in 8 
naghbcuhood assemblies of the capital. 

1 ^ administrative reasons tiiis could take 
tip to two weeks. 

The passa^ of the law, at Mr. Milosevic's 
behest, was welcomed with caution Britain 
and Germany, which said they wraiJd care- 
fiilty watch bow it was carri^ out. 

But rid^ the wave of pqpular discontent 
and skeptit^ of Mr. Milosevic's goodwill, 
opposition leaders are now facing a choice of 


whether to call off the street protests and take 
their battle into institutions. 

The neo-communist Yugoslav United Left 
Party, a hard-line paimer in tbe governing 
coalition, warned against moves to topple tbe 
government by the street protests. 

The West has cautioned Mr. Milosevic 
against using force against the peacefel 
demonstrators and urg^ him to open dia- 
logue with his rivals, notably on the issues of 
access to the news media. 

In return, leaders of the opposition co- 
alition are r^rorted to have prxxxiiWd the West 
feat feey would cease testing Mr. Milosevic's 
patience on the streets once their victories 
were reinstated. 

The West has reimned severe sanctiems 
against Belgrade, barring access to desper- 
ately needed foreign capital until it improves 
its human-rights record and shows genuine 
commitment to democracy. 

Starved for cash, wife wages and pensions 
naming late in an election year, Mr. Mi- 
losevic has repeatedly promis^ reforms. But 
few among the opposition believe these re- 
forms will occur. 

In line wife Mr. Milosevic's promise of 
quick reforms, the Serbian Parliament ap- 
proved a new cabinet Tuesday, but opposition 
leaders dismissed fee reshuffie as cosmetic. 

Among the changes was fee appointment 
of Milan Beko to head a new mini^ that will 
begin the fnivatization of the huge, finan- 
ci^y ailing state sector of the economy. 

(AFP. Reuters} 


Tht Assodattd Press 

BERN — Tbe Swiss gov- 
ernment Wednesday Ibn^y 
agreed to set up a special fund 
to compensate victims of fee 
HolocausL 

However, it held back from 
committing itself to any gov- 
ernment contribution to fee 
fund. 

decision follows an 
anoouDoement by Switzer- 
land *s three biggest banks last 
week to contribute 100 mil- 
Uou Swiss francs ($71 mil-' 
Jion> to such a fiffid. 

Foreign Minister Flavio 
Cotti said at a press confer- 
ence that tbe federal conneU: 
had resolved finally to set up 
and manage a humaoitarian 
fund that would include the 
banks' ctMitributioQ and be 
(^)en to furfeer payments 


from other part^ 

Hrst, be said, fete frmd 
' would be established and ne- 
gexiations carried out wife in- 
feistry and Jewish orgaiuza- 
tions to dedde ibe exact 
purpose and lecipiefits of the 
money. 

The second step would be 
to set im a fouoiaation feat 
cmild indude donatioais from 
tile government and the Swiss 
Natick Bank. Any govern- 
ment contribution, Mr. Cotti 
stressed, would dqiei^ on 
prdiriiinaiy findings of mves^ 
dgations into Swiss banks’ 
wartime dealings, expected 
tfris s iimmeT - 

It was most likely tiiat the 
fend MKiuld be used to support 
humani tarian projects to aid 
destitute Holocaust survivors 
sad their offspring, he said. 


Bulgaria Sets Date for Elections 

SOFIA — President Petar Stoyanov swore in tbe mayor 
of Bulnaia's capital as the cat^ker prime minister on 
Wednesday, and set new elections foe ApsQ 19. 

Tbe ^jpointment of a new government brou^t an end to 
two years of rule by die Socialists, fee former Communists, 
that pim«d an ecoDomic disaster for Bulgaria. 

Stefan Sofiyansld, a pt^iular 4S-year-old economist, has 
binlt a solid reputation for governing Sofia deqnte Bul- 
garia’s ecooranic troubles. His interim gov^nment must 
help build a foundation for Bulgaria to e^ byperinflatitxi 
and a sharp drt^m living staiKterds. (AP) 

Kremlin Attacks NATO Chief 

MOSCOW — The Kremlin condemned Wednesday a 
tour of fonner Soviet rquUics by fee NATO secreta^- 
gfflieral, Jkrier Srfana Madariaga, accusing him of pursuing 
a hidden agenda to undermine Moscow’s iofluence. 

A Kremlin ^kesaum, Sergei Yastrzhembsky, told In- 
lexfax news agency, "The West in general and die NATO 
leadessfa^ in particular opposes any sort of integration of 
Che newly ind^ndenc gtate-nqxfelics of the former Soviet 
Union — eqi^tially vfeen tbe impulse comes from Mos- 
cow." Mr. Solatia arrived Wednesday in Annesiia, fol- 


lowing visits to Moldova and Geor^a. He was to end his 
tour in Azerbaijan. (AFP) 

Kohl Says He^s in Good Health 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl on Wednesday dis- 
missed suggestions that he was in poor health and that this 
mi^t have influenced his decision to wmt before deciding 
wh^er to run in ihe 1998 general election. 

Mr. KohL 66 , told the newsp^ier Bild, "Thankfully, I am 
in very good h^th.'' The news weekly Der Spiegel said 
that 1^. Kohl had undergone treatment for a prostate 
condition four times in the last seven years. Mr. said 

he Imd not undergone surgery since bis prostate operation in 
1989. '"Since tbm I have been going to regular check-ups 
with very satisfactory results.” (Reuters) 

Yeltsin Needs 15 Days to Recoup 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin is still ' "somewhat 
weak "after his bout of pneutnoiiia and be needs at least 10 
or IS more days to recover, Itar-Tass news agency quoted a 
heart surgeon, Renat Akchmin, as saying. 

Mr. Akchurin, who carried out a midtiple bypass 
eration on Mr. Yeltsin in November, said the pneumonia 
posed no risk for Mr. Yeltsin’s heart (Reuters) 



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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY FEBRUARY 13, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


Crash Revives Debate on Lebanon 

Ismetis in Dispute on UnUateral JUthdrawal From Buffer Zone 


By Serge Schmemann 

A^h’ York Tbnes Stniee 

JERUSALEM — The disastrous col- 
lision last week of two Israeli heli- 
cqxers fenyiog soldiers to southern 
Lebanon has revived a shan and some- 
times Intter d^)^ over whether Israel 
should unilaterally withdraw from hs 
self-proclaimed bulTer zone there. 

Cutting across party and ideological 
lines, the debate has dominated tele- 
vision talk shows, newspaper editorials 
and parliamentaiy sessions. 

Advocates of withdrawal argue that 
the buffer zone, set up in 1985, is no 
longer needed, since odier ways are now 
avoibble to block in^tracois and since 
the HatoUaii guerrillas based in Leb- 
anon can, and tuve, fired rockets across 
tbe zone. They say Israel's presence 
gives Syria a pretext for maintaining 
pressure on Isr^l by backing tbe gner- 
rillas. 

Those who favor keqnng the zone 
argue that wiAdrawing within a com- 
prehensive agreement widi Syria and 
Lebanon would only bring H^boiiah 


and hostile Islamic militias right up to 
the Israeli border. 

Curious new alliances have taken 
sha^ — the U.S. ambassador, Martin 
has agreed with Prime hfizuster 
Benjamin Netanyahu that a unilaietal 
pullback is unwise, while former in- 
telli^nce chiefs ha^ joii^ with West 
Bank setders and lerast politicians in 
aiguiiig that it is the best tfaiiis to do. 

The conservative Jenisafem Post 
gave the notion of withdrawal a cautious 
nod. The liberal Ha’aretz came out 
against it. aldiough one of its colum- 
nists, Yoel Marcus, {woclaimed Leb- 
anon m be '^Israel’s little ^^etnam*’ and 
said dut the buffer zone bad turned into 
a Irankensteio's monster, **devouiing 
its inventors.” 

Tho^ last week's disa^, whidi 
killed soldias. was evidoidy an ac- 
ddent, the viedms joined about 400 odier 
soldiera who have been killed as a direct 
or indUsect result of mamtaining the 14- 
kiloinetBr-wide (uneHmile-wide) zone. 

De^ite dre fiiror of the debate arid the 
mounting toU, tbe notion of a with- 
drawal does not seem to have much 


U.S. Admiral Accuses Iran 
Of Helping Iraq Smuggle Oil 


Tht Astocimed Press 

MANAMA, Bahrain — Skirtixig 
Iran’s Gulf coast, tankers are smutting 
tens of thousands of tans of fuel oil out 
of Ir^ in violation of United Nations 
sanctions, a U.S. admiral has charged. 

Tbe embargo breakers and their Ira- 
nian protectors have had two confron- 
tations widi the U.S. Navy in the last two 
weeks, Ik said. In one unpublicized 
inddent, an unidentified tugboat 
rammed a U.S. frigate. 

”Our indications are that this is a 
radier sophi^cated effort, centrally 
controlled widitn Iran,” Vice Admiral 
Thomas Fargo, commander of the U.5. 
5ih Fleet, said Tuesday at his headquar- 
ters in BahrtirL 

The ”Iran connection” alleged by 
the admiral is one visible sign of co- 
operation between the two former en- 
emies in tiyitm to foil American 
to enforce UN trade sanctions on Iraq. 

The main motive is money. 

Iraq, desptrate to circumvent the em- 
bargo, will sell tbe oil cheap, and a 
2.000-ton (980-idlogram) shipment of 
oil can net $150,000. Adid^ Fargo 
estimated. 


Crews of intercqited vessels tell in- 
vestigators that Iranian authorities are 
taking a cut of the profits. 

”A protectioa fw is paid to die Ira- 
nians ^ gnarsmtees tfa^ safe pass^ 
through territorial waters," the admiral 
diaiged. 

He said diat an franian Revolutionary 
Guard maritime station at the moolh erf 
Ae Shatt-al-Arab waterway that sep- 
artdes Iran and Iraq appeared to be ^ 
* ‘gatekeqier' * for the illicit shipments. 

On Wednesday, however, the Na- 
tional Iranian Oil Company denied 
it was helpmg Iraq smug gle oU, Iran 
News reported. 

The state-owned company said Iran 
had not provided Ira^ mm any fadUty to 
smuggle oil in violanon of sanctions, the 
English-language newqtaper report^ 

“Iran has never igawed the UN em- 
bargo on Iraq in Aepast nor will k do so 
in the futur^” it said. 

Even busines sated in a country allied 
wiA tlte United SiatesproSt from die oil 
smuggling. Admiral I^irgo chaiged. He 
said diat some smuggled diesel oil even- 
tually is unloaded in the United Arab 
Emirates. 


HfrraASSribnm 


popnlar suppttt so far. In a poll pub- 
lished Thesd^ in Ae dmly Ma'ariv, 79 
perooit of those question said diey 
opposed a unOaieral witbdrawaL 
One factor may be the popular per- 
ception rhar “unilatetal*' mi*an« uncon- 
ditional, even thou^ advocates of a 
withdraws^ intist tint any puUback be 
accompanied by arrangements on tbe 
securi^ of oorAem Israel. 

While last week's disaster was the 
catalyst, the growing sense that a peace 
agre^eot Syiu is not likely soon 
has ^vea Ae debtue impetus. Under the 
former Labor govesnimaiu a settiei^^ 
in southern Lebanon was usually 
viewed as an integral part of a deal with 
Syria, which then seemed widiin reach. 

Reviving negotiations wiA Syria is 
expected to be at the top of Ae agenda 
Aijs week in Washingeen as Mr. Net- 
anyahu boldis talks wiA Preadent Bill 
Qiahm and Secretary of State 
Mfeddeitie AlbrighL 
Mr. Netanyahu visited Israeli posi- 
tions in oorthem Israel ca Tuesday and 
said, “It is imp osgihie to advance peace 
between Israel and Syria if an indirect 
war agmnst lacad is being waged here." 
Shortly after the visit, laaeli warplanes 
launched a series of attacks de^ m Le- 
banese terrhonr, Amr first major sortie 
outside the bu^ zone smee 1^ AnriL 
Some Israelis believe that die U.S. 
resistance to a unilateral withdrawal is 
based on the fear tiiat such a move would 
set bade the search for a comprdtensive 
peace wiA Syria and Leban<^ 

But the premier advocate of wiA- 
drawal, Yossi Beilin, a minister in the 
previous govenunent, dismissed Ais as 
a “crazy argumenL” 

“It’s lilte agreeing to be a victim of 
Syria, a hostage of Syria, for as long as it 
doesn't want to make peace wiA us,” he 
said. Mr. Bolin has often served as the 
point man for new ideas on ways to 
teach peace, and it was a meeting 
C4gani^ wiA members of Ae oppo- 
sition and other officials on soum^ 
Lebanon that spurred the debate. 

A unilateral witiidawal has also 
drawn strong support from Interior Min- 
ister Avigdor Kualani, a member of the 
Third Way movement, which supports 
peace vriA the Palestinians but o^ses 
withdrawal frtxn the Golan Heists. 

Mr. Beilin's meeting was held Sat- 
urday ni^t. And thou^ it was meant to 
be private, and had b^ scheduled in 
advance, the notion of discussing apuU- 
back so soon after so great a fasten' 
drew considerable fire. 

But, Mr. Beilin said: “Those who ate 
against a withdrawal believe any timing 
is wrong. We can't run away frtnn 1 l 
T his is our reality.” 


THElTORtiysDiUnrWEWgBtPEB 

If yon would like to receive farther information on Ae advertisers who appeared in our 
fa teni a t i ona lEdiic a tionSiper^ Revolt 
onFebmaxy 11, 1997, please conqilete this coi^n& send it to: 

The International Herald Tribune g/oCbbbierdisect 

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TAKING STOCK — Prime hUtusterBayaiiira Netanyahu mcainiiiii%aoM-16 rifle as he mtflsradl sdAers 
on tbe border with Lebanon. He said peace with Syria was impossible until it reins in Hezbollah guerriDas. . 


U.S. Whms Russians on Arming Iran 


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By Robin Wright 

losAMgeies Times 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration has issued a diploma 
waznidg to Moscow about Russian as- 
sistance to Iran'smissile program — aid 
that potentially could thieateD U.S. 
troops in San£ ^abia, several Gulf 
allies and laraeL senior administration 
officials say. 

IntelligeDoe reports indicate diat Rus- 
sia rece^y transfezred to Iran tech- 
nology on tbe Rnssim SS^ nusrile, 
which has a range almost three times 
greater than any missile now in Iraii's 
arsenal. 

Tbe warning was issued during talks 
last week between Vice lYesident A1 
Gore and Priitte Minister Viktor 
Chemomyidin. 


Ihe traztefer basically involves de- 
tailed insnuctions on hew to construct 
the weapon's delivery system, U.S. 
soQices said. Hsraeli offirals s^ the 
transfer also included some parts for an 
SS4 missOe. 

Tbe SS-4, with a lan^ of 2,000 ki- 
lometers (1250 trules), carries a stan- 
dard warhead that is eqwvalent to 1,5 
tons of TNT. The Soviet Union, 
however, once loaded the missile until a 
1-megaton nuclear, warhead. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin denied that Mos- 
cow had authorized transfer of tbe giant 
missile, administration officials said. 

Administration officials are specu- 
lating ab^ nbeiber the tecfa^logy 
couldhave been transferred to Iran firann 
casb-stnqjped former Soviet weapons 
producers or complexes. 

“Ihiw it hq^ened is still a gray 


GERMANS: A Conspiracy of Silence 


Continued from Page 1 

idea what kind of p(^le would be com- 
ing here. It was terribly unwise to think 
feigners could live here. We have no 
5upennaik<% no jobs for them to do. 

“But I would calUt a fear of crime 
; latiKT than of foreignera. If yon wanted 
to-hring some Bosnimi women andchil- 
• dzea h^ that wouI4 But not a 

■ buiKb of -Gypries or Africans .who 
would* do ribttog but steal and cause 
trouble.” 

Thomas Oste, the owner of a flower 
shop who lives next to the tuios of the 
resorL has admitted making several large 
cash p^yntents to Mr. Jacki^sld to cany 
om tite arson and to buy his silence. 

Ffe told police be awd not bear die 
thought ofUv^ next to tire asylntn- 
seek^ and said he had fouikd a lot of 
sympathy for his feelii^ in the village. 
He said several of tusmeiids bad been 
happy to help him gather die explosive 
materials and find people — hfr. Jack- 
owsld and a glrinhftaH friend named 
Renato — to set fire to tiie lesotL 

But a number of other quesdrais 
could steer the case in more contro- 
versial directions, police and prosecu- 
tes acksowled^ mvestigatois say it is 
unclear where me florist got die to 
make tbe payoffs. Th^ note also tii^ a 
dq»uty to tbra-Mayor Ute Preissler has 
ben accused of assembling die gasoline 
bombs used in tbe attack. 

According to court records, Mr. Pre- 
issler strongly siqipcsted a proposal 
made 1^ a Bolin real-estate executive, 


Lothar Poetsrii]^ as a means erf block- 
ing tbe alien uffiux. Mr. Poetedbke 
offered to .jny $6(X),000 for die resort 
complex with the idea of buOdiog a 
medical rebabilitatioB clinic duu Mr. 
Iteissler believed would greatly bolster 
the village’s fortunes. 

When a local poition drive favoring 
the pri^x>sal faded and Brndenburg 
state autoorities refused to resciod tbeir 
decirion to establish the asylum- 
seekers’ residence, Mr. PFejsslo gn»v 
agitated, court records show. Accerd^ 
to court testimemy by hfr. Poetschlre's 
secretaiy, Mr.i Preissler phoned the real- 
estate agency a day before tbe arson 
attack aod demanded urgent action. 

“Those foreignars must not be al- 
lowed to crane; we have to do vriiatever 
is necessary to st^ diem,” the mayor 
was quoted as saymg. 

la an interview, Brandenburg’s 
dqjuty proseci^, Eugen Lazres said 
tfa» “for the time being, we have no . 
concrete evidence” that Preissleror 

die zeal-estate broker paitic^ted in die 
conspiracy, to.commit arsraL Rot he said 
die investigation would scrutituze “all 
diose people vdio may have possessed a 
motive” to see the immigrant re si dmoe 
itestn^ed. 

Aftra die arson, Brandenburg state 
audiraities relocated die asylum- 
seekers iriio had been due to come to- 
DoigenbrodL 

The Dolgecbrodt saga Uhistrates the 
persistent ride diar fear of fbreigDerS; In 
a Europe where upemploymeat is hi£^ 
and rismg, will spin out (rf controL 


ar^” a senior administration soureie 
said. “One possibility is chat it wffi 
beyraid the control of govanmeoL” ■ 
A Muldle East source 
Russian govenunent may ttot 
such an export but diey ckm’t do eniougK 
to stop iL” He added, “They ace cut 
monhoring uiiat is leaving couqg 

Ban’s acquisition of tbe SS-4 is bein^ 
interp r aed as a new indication ihs^ 
TehzCT is actively seeking a nuclear 
ciqnbility, according to a&mistrattoni 
sources asidiegte^csq)*^ . 1 

“A missile of that 'sitt and accuracy 
couU only be letiial or used effectit^ 
with a nuclear weapon or a bidogw 
wetqxm of near nuclear lediality,” said 
Anthony Cradesman, co-diiector of th< 
Middle East raogtam at die Center for 
Strategic and mtematioitf^ Studied . ’ 

AlgmanArmy 
Said to Attack 
BdidsmCt^^ 

The Asspcutted Pros 
AUjIERS — Security forces 
fired faand-hdd rodc^^ ao apart- 
ment building in central Algiers on 
Wednesday, killmg ar five 
people, witnesses - - - - 

TIk govemfflent, which has 
wa^ed a five-jrear campaign 
agamst Islamic militants, wouldnot 
immediately confirm the attadc. 

One witness, udio spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity, said soldiers 
suzTOunded the bitilding at mid- 
nighc Tuesday and exchanged gun- 
fire with unidentifiedpeopte inside 
for about hours before calling 

on the inbautants to evacuate. 

Minutes later, they an^ 

apartment on the sixtii floor of the ) 
to'lding with several hand-held ' 
rodeets. It was not clear who the 
soltfiers wrae firing on, but more 
diao 60,000 people mve been killed , 
in attacks by Muslim mili^ tie and 
in actions 1^ Algerian serairity'.' 
forces since the izisingedcy beg^ 
During the Muslim holy month 
of Rarnadao, wfaidi ended 1ast;,| 
wedeend, a wave of massacres and ' 
car bombings attributed to the mil- .. 

I items IdDedmoze than 300 people 
I and wounded hundreds more. 


2aAJKEzA J^rby Serbs, Ukrrdmans, Hutu tmd Even Zairians 

Continued from l^ge 1 Ufelong rebd from faraway croita], Kinshasa, insists that more griiiL ”There is 


so Rwandan refugees as they 
could, separated out the 
3 romig Hutu men and ma- 
chine-gunned an unknown 
mrmbCT. The others were 
simply allowed tom. 

S^or army ofnceis gave 
sepaseie accounts <rf tiae 
I “oraifessioa” of a capeuzed 
' rebd senrind whom they 
identified as Manfaieu Bar 
fenga. Tb^ said he told ibem 
two ^ys ago that he had been 
paid $450 to gather infbana- 
tion on the movements of 
Hutu refugees tiuougk east- 
centralZane. 

There are as many as 
300,000 Rwandans stranded 
in Zaite. Most are ordinary 
men. women and children, 
but it is widely believed that 
there are also thousands of 
former Hutu milzdazDeD and 
soldiers. Many of- these 
people already risk death' 
from starvatirai, ddiydration 
and disease, but for tiieir pur- 
suers, that is not ««wgh 

“The god ^tiie Rwandan 
govenunent, and the xeason 
they have supported this re- 
bellion, is that they are d&’ 
tenuined to exterminate die 
Hutu filters for feartiiat one 
day tb^ will come back for 
revenge,” said a Iratgtime 
European resident who once 


Lifelong rebel from faraway 
Shaba Province, has assuned 
leaderriop and sucoessflilW . 
eniuKiea the fruce to inclutte 
other tzaditional enenues of 
Marsh^ Mobutu, Zaire’s 
ItmgtUiie dictator. 

a (he insurreettaa, vdiidi 
has made hmnessive gams in 
recent d^s, has become a bid 
for outrigfit power by 
Kabila, it also remains a con- 
tinuatirai of Rwanda's civil 
war in a new dieater. 

And for toe embaOled 
Zairian government, led for 
31 ytm by Marshal Mobutu, 
who is rir^taoeoi^y fitt- 
ing advanced cancer, this war 
is most (rf an a desperate 
struggle to hmg on to power. 

At the airport hw — 
where the grim Serbian train- 
ers were swearing [Hofrisely 

thmagh their attempts tn fram 

Zahian cranmandos, vtoo of- 
ten have no clue how to use 
the new weapons — an <rf- 
ficermade DO attraiqrf to nuD- 
imize the army’s problems. 

“The enemy is hitting us 
in so many pteces ti^n is 
vray diffi(^ for me to say 
whm the front is,” sf^ 
Ueutenant Cd^l Nufota 
Kasrama, who traced a ^der 
web ofrebel movements with 
his fingex <m a map. “The. 
entire east (rf the countiy is 
aflected, and th^ seem to be 


croita], Kinshasa, insists that 
Mr. lUbila’s r^ls have 
been heavily assisted by the 
azmies of Rwanda, Uganda 
and, to a lesser extent. Bn- 
rundi.-fr! recent days, Wash- 
ington has . officially come 
around to this view, publfely 
warning those countries to 
Stop (tetabUizingZaire. 

Wlule some Zaizian of- 
ficers spoke wifii detramina- 
tion ab(W eventually wimuzig 
a war tiiat di^ kn^ they 
were losing, otiiers, vtoo in- 
sisted on anonymity, were fer 


moregr^ “There is a graqp 
cranpCd^ between thri 
people in most <rf these are^ 
and the xriiels,” srid one 
nior officer, who shrugged ^ 
he spoke of tiie long odds <i|^ 
his cause. 

“We don’t get aiiy int^ 
ligence from them, aoid maiqt 
of them are hunf^ who havq 
no problem jMCkmg 
weaprais against us. 

“After what (he govern^ 
mem and tbe army have done 
to tiie people in this country^ 
who can blame them?” 


foujght as a mereratety here able to push utoerever tiiey 
apdmaimamscranactstntbe ' wain to. wW I (zn tell you is 


warzooe. tiiat there is no way that an 

The rebellion began witha African rebellum couTd 
^toup of Tutsi who have achieve aQoftiiist^ itself.” 
lived in Zaire fra- centuries. Colonel Kasonga. like tte 
Since tiien, Laurent KaMla, a political antiuxities in ^ 


13-2^ 


Crimes Tribimal 
On Rwanda Assailed 


UNITED NATIONS — Two years after its cremioa, 
the Ruranda war crimes tribunal suifera mis- . 
m a nag ement, unqualified stsfi and from New ; 

Yoric headquarters, according to a new UN inves- r 
tigatioD. 

The r^iort. released Wednesday, sets out in j, 
financial abuses and mismanagement in the admin- ■* 

..istrative apparatus as well as apparent legal chaos in the ; 
prosecutor’s office set up to investi^te the 1994 ra- ^ 
ocide in Rwanda. .-i 

Some of tbe complaints emerged several months ago, 

and both Kofi Annan, the UN secxetaiy-geoe^ and his 

piedeoessor, Boutros Boutros Ghaii, have niaH«» per-> 
socnel dianges. But the report called for furtber “sub- ^ 
Stantiai’' change 

The tiibuial, in Arusha. Tanzania, has indicted 21 ‘T 
people. The first trial is under y/zy against Jean-Paul 
Akayesu, 43, the former mayor of Rwanda’s Taba . 
commune, charged with indting the public to slaughter - 
and orderin g Idllmg^ * 






INTERNATIONAJL IFfEBAT.!) TRIBUNE, TETURSDAX, FEBRUARY 13, 1997 


RAGE 7 


INTERNATIONAL 


Ecuador Congress Bars Acting President and Elects Alarcon 


BRIEFLY 


By EHaaa Jean Scheme 

Wnw Hanfe Tana Sen^g 


_ QUITO. Ecuador — The National 
Con^ has elected an mtenm pres- 
ident of the n^on for the second dme in 
a — this time after some con- 
nwneuvering mtended to 
ke» him in the job 

resigned after being barred 
congressicmal vote. 

• elected Fabian Alarcon by 

to 2 in what aj^ieaied to be 
the product of ovcit political deal-mak- 


'inessise, unlike 
the session Thursday, when legislators 
declared the dected jveddent, Abdala 
Bucaram. ^'tnoBdiUy inco m petent.** 
Hnndreds of tiiousiuids of people 
throughout the country had been dam- 
oring for his temovd, and the National 
Congress voted to replace' him witii Mr. 
Aiarcmi. 

Tlie- neats dt^, Ecuador biie^ bad 
three people clainupg tiie preddenQr: 
Mr. Alarcon, Mr. Biicaram, who 
baizicaded tdnwftif in the presktential 
palace, and his vice presid^t, Ms. 
Aneaga. Ba me miUim arrang^ fa 
Mr. Bucaram to step asid^ Mr. Alarcon 


to return to his congressional positioa 
Aneaga to take ova as intohn 
presid^ while Congress drafted rules 

wsuccessioa 

Mr. Bucaiam beaded Thesday to 
PanaoM, bis refuge for seveial years in 
tile 1930s afEa he was charged with 
comiptioa when be was m ayor of Guav - 

Mrs. Arteaga, who bad come to ad- 
disss CoDgiess before it voted to replace 
her, ft^md the door shA to her as the first 
bars ^ the national mthem were beiog 


played. 

‘%aei 


»is no democratic i^jise,** she 
said, and reamed to tire presidential 


palace where she resigned and relumed 
to the poshioQ of vice proident 
Noting that when other presidents 
were killed, their vice piesidents took 
over as a matter of course, she blamed 
political “machismo** foe ha and 
condemned what she called the *‘polit- 
kal bazaar’ ' (rf ^tism and ambhi^ in 

Congress. 

She threatened co publish a book le- 
veaHog the offers and Areats she said 
she bad received in the last few days, and 

called for a nationwide vote to elect a 
DewprestdeoL 

In a countiy where politica] ambitions 
wear ooly the flimaest of digg iri'c^ ^ 


members of Congress said tii^ were 
lookinB forward to new ajqx>intmems 
and public works projects in their dis- 
tricts under an Alarcon administration. 

While Congress lotdc no immediaie 
action to amend the constitution, the res-, 
olution voting Mr. Alarcon badt into the 
priKidency required ameadments to 1 ^- 
alize his appoiimnent within 95 days. 

Because a twcHhirds majority is 
needed 10 amend die ctmstinitioo, and 57 
of the 82 members of the Narinnai Con- 
gress voted ibr the resolution to install 
Mr. Alarcon, by implicatioo. tbe legis- 
lators made the election coostitutiona], 
officials said. 



On Form of Future Talks 


By Calvin Sims 
Nev Ymi Tmes Strict 


- 7 - The Peruvian govemmenr 
Md Mamst guerrillas have begun me- 
umisaiy riegotiations to end Sie 55-d^ 
b<»tage siege a tire Japanese ambas- 
sador's residence here. 

The govemmeot’s negotiator, Do- 
mingo Thermo, and the deputy chief of 
the Tupac Amaru reb^, RoUy Rojas, 
agreed Ttiesday on the st m e tu re of fti-. 
ture talks and said tii^ would continue 
at a date to be schedii^. 

. Tb^ met fa fear hours in a bmise 
opposite the residence where the guer- 
rillas are holding 72 hostages- The rebels 
virere then escort bade to the lesideDce. 

Later, the Canadian ambas^dOT to 
Peru, Anthony Vrnoent, read a brief 
statement £rt»n the two sides. “To^ 


U.S, to Allow 
CNN in Cuba 


The Asioeuted frets 

WASHINGTON —Tbe Ctinton 
admioisonation will allow CNN to 
open a bureau in Cuba and lA nine 
other news organizations fellow 
suit if Havana approves, an ad- 
ministratioin ofiScaal said Wednes- 
day. 

The official said U.S. penmssion 
far tbe bureaus will be extended to: 
CNN, Tbe Assodated Press, ABC, 
CBS, UnivisioD, The Miami Her- 
ald, Dow Jones News Services, 
Cuba Info, the Chicago Tribune 
and fee Sun-Seminel of Fort Laud- 
erdale, Florida. 

Tbe decisicn is part of an efTovt 
by officials in Washington to spur 
dmocratic reforms in Cuba by 
opening tbe flow of mfomution 
between Havana and the United 
States. 

It is also a bredc in decades of 
long-ttanding U.S. poli^ to isolate 
Rdel C^o’s Coonmmist leipxne. 

A Fcareign Ministry offic^ in 
Havana sdd CNN was tbe only 
U.S. news organization anfeoized 
sofarbyCubL 


we b^n the ndinuoaiy eooversa- 
titms.** it sad. have approved the 

procedure to follow future conversa- 
tions and we have agreo) to continue 
talks at a dace to be eAablisbed,*’ 

- [No date was announced Wednesday, 
Agence Rraoce-Press rqiAted fem 
Luna, as heavily armed police ofScers 
mxintam^ 8 oordo! aiound die res- 
idoice and bosts^es were seen cleaning 
a tesrace in shorts and T-shirts. 

[Japan welcomed the talks, Remers 
reported from Tokyo. A Fbrdgn Min- 
ts^ spokesman said the government 
hoped *^e talks wiD pave the way for 
the Stan of full negotiations so that the 
incident can be solved peacefiiUy, and 
the hostages fieed eariy.^'J 

Preside Alberto I^pmori, wbo was 
attefl<fing an ecaoomte deveiopmeot con- 
fe t enoe m London, said just before the 
talks that be was bcfidful feey would pave 
dte way fer a peaodfel Old to the boscage 
crisis. ' ‘Now feat tiiese CAiveisadoDs are 
begfening, I would say that feere are 
elements tiiat give os a certain optim- 
isnt** 

Ritf*hftp rfBgid#ffittn 5 i win » in aH hi<ehaw i. 

line position ifaA tbe govermaeta would 
not meA derhands by the guerrillas fer 
Peru to free their iomristmed emrrades. 

Government officials said feat the pre- 
Ufflinaiy talks were intended to set an 

g y n d ” a rinwWiMf; frir rigftntriv g 

godations, whidi may be conducted with 
Nestor Capa Caitol^ die tOkI leader. 

The two maja issues on fee agenda A 
Tuesday's tall^ die officials said, were 
die possible release of jailed gueniUas, 
who are part of the Cubao-inspaed 



Anti-Mine Meeting 

VIENNA — Experts from more 
than 1 00 countries gathered in Vi- 
enna c«i Wednesday for talks on 
outlawing anii-peraonncl mines, 
decile hostility ftom major mine 
producers to a total ban on the 
deadly de\'ires. 

The three-day conference re- 
ceived a late boost as delegAions 
from India, ^dustan and the /^b 
League arrived after the clo,ted< 
door talks had opened, according to 
Thomas H^noezi of Austria, the 
chairman of the conference. (AFPi 

Stakes on Rushdie 

TEHRAN — An Iranian reli- 
gious foundation on Wednesday 
raised its reward for the death of 
Salman Rushdie, the British author, 
but Presideni Hashemt RAsunjani 
quickly distanced his government 
from the move. 

The Khordad-15 charity foun- 
dation saidit was raising the bounty 
for anyone who would kilt Mr. 
Rushdie by $500,000 to a total of 
$2.5 million. (AFPi 

Focus on Basques 

MADRID — The Spanish Su- 
preme Court set to work Wednes- 
day to examine secret files pur- 
porting to prove (hat the former 
Socialist government set up deafe 
squads to wage a “dirty* war" 
against Basque separatists. 

The court's 33 judges ac study- 
ing the spy documents under high 
security to see if they might be used 
as evidence in court. iRctnvrs) 

For the Record 

A Mexican judge freed Claudia 
Rodriguez, who was accused of 
fatally shooting a man who tried to 
rape her. in a case that spurred an 
outcry on women’s rights. lAPt 


Cb 4 d riMii IVtwr 

Fabian Alarcoii, canter, waring to sopporters, with Franco Romero» head of the Ecuadoran Coogress, on his left 

WTO: China Ponders Easily Some of Its Trade Restrictions to Join Global Organization 


where die hostage-takers mijdit take 
a^lum after freemg thdr hostages. 

The tidks lock {dace under he^* se- 
curiQr, wife hundreds of polioemen 
aimed wife Mitcrniatir: weqxxis sur- 
itnodu^ fee lesideiioe. 

The Red Cross, which has assumed 
respposftnlity for the security of fee 
Qtl^ erected a huge Red Orc^ fla^ A 
die Imuse where negotiatkxis are bemg 
held ^ installed a metal detector at fee 
eaoraiice. 

The comijussioa of guaianKx^ wiu^ 
took, put in T\iesday's talks, mcluded 
Micbd Mifutig of die Red Ooss; Am- 
bassadorA^nceoC Ja^'s ambassador to 
Modco, Tenisuke Tarada; and Bishop 
Juan Litis CSpriuiL 


Continued from Pi^ 1 

CKotoo’S arimmi4aiT >ri ^ gay 
they believe thA China — in 
part to engage the United States 
on a subject other than human 

rights smA arms ga V-g may 

have decided to put entry into 
fee dub of trading nations A tbe 
top of its agenda. 

The Unii^ States can effec- 
tively block the eotiy of any 
country into fee trade orgam- 

rarinn by ar giring that jtS plans 

for open do noC meet 

tile gnyiqs’s lequiremenis. 

“They didn’t tiiink we were 
serious about it last year be- 
cause of tiie election,” a Ctin- 
too ad nnn js tra tiop i^tial 
said. 

*T titink fe^ now believe 
feA we win not stand in tbe wt^ 
of tiieir entry to tiie WTO oa 
pohtical gtoonds if their offer is 
sufficient'* Many intiieadmiii- 
isoation hope a deal to open 


China's economy will be the 
centerpiece of Mr. Clmton's 
first tnp to China, which is to 
take pl^ late this year or early 
in 1998. 

Ba these are many obstacles 
ahead, officials say. 

They say China's leadership 
^rpears deeply divided on 
wbetfaei joining tbe World 
Trade Or^nizatioo, which 
China hA seeking to do for 
some years now. is worth the 
high price. 

Some of its leaders, they say. 
fear thA any deal that weakens 
China’s already uncompoitive 
stAe-run industries could result 
in wide^sead unea^loymeot 
political instabiliiy. 

Meanwhile, tbe United 
St 8 ^ Japan and fee Eun^iean 
Umcn tbemaelves arc doing a 
delicate pirouette around the 
cutes of entry, eadi worried Aa 
tiie otiier could gain some kuid 
of political advantage in dealing 


wife tbe world's biggest emerg- 
ing market 

Accordhig to negotiators, 
here is whA Chinese officials 
said they would agree to do dur- 
ing a recent round of talks in- 
tended A a pr^ew for more 
formal negotiations starting in 
Geneva on March 4: 

a They would eliminate, over 
time, the requirement feA for^ 
sign companies building fac- 
tories in China export die vast 
majority of their outpuL 
Cempanies such as Pwitpftbe 
Loom Inc., the U.S. underwear 
maker, are required to export 70 
percent or more of tiieir out|^ 
electronics companies are often 
paired to export even more. It 
is imcleA bow quickly Quoa 
would phase oat such reipire- 
meots or whether individDal 
ooDtiacfs wife companies might 
still require such exports. 

• would pb^ out rules 

requiring foreign compames to 


bring large amounts of foreign 
currency into China and keep it 
there, requiring them to “bal- 
ance” titeir foreign unde 
meaning to export mote goods 
than fe^ impoA — and requir- 
ing hi^ levels of “local con- 
tent” tn goods made in China. 

a They would scrap laws feA 
bar many foreign comp^es 
from freely trading in China. 
Pot example, American food 
producer such as Cai^ Inc. 
are required to buy their wheat 
tiuough China’s state-run trad- 
ing agencies. lAfaer than im- 
porting it direcUy. 

hi each of these areas, tbe 
scope of fee concessions China 
is offering cannot be measured 
until it bas filed its propo^ 
warding of an “accession 
agreement” in Geneva. 

ThA process is expected to 
begin next month, ai^ it will 
toi^ off a worldwide nego- 
tiation <me in which Europe, 


Japan and the United State.s 
have differing agendas. 

China has noT yet submitted 
data to the trade organization 
feA would quantify its subsi- 
dies to stAe-run industries. 

One complexity* in this ne- 
gotiation is that American of- 
ficials and their allies are un- 
certain how much power the 
chief negotiAor — Wu Yi. 
China’s trade minister — ac- 
lually holds. 

She has managed to pi^h 
through smaller agreements, in- 
cluding one 1 Ai year thA led to a 
continuing crackdown on piracy 
of foreign-produoed sofmare. 
music and videos. But accession 
to fee World Trade Organization 
is a fv higher and more po- 
litically sensitive undertaking. 

“The myste^.” one Amer- 
ican officiA said, ‘‘is, at what 
point does tbe top politic A lead- 
eiship get involv^ to make the 
hard d^Aons?” 


GISCARD: Include Italy and Spain in Launch of Euro, He Urges STORES: U.S. Megaretailers Tailor Outlets to Chinese Tastes 


Continued from Page 1 

ding ItAy and Spain among die first 
; of nations to bunch the euro. Mr. 
m) d’Estaing stressed thA “fee 
^ofMaastiidttisverycteAiDsay- 
uu countries have to meet the taiga 
e January 1999.” 

I added: “It U only for practicA 
nes thA we have to decide in the 
g of 1998 on whqjoins, and tiiA is 
tiff to creAe a l&TOpean centrA 
ofltime. 

Ik diffic Aty will be those counties 
n 1997 will not meet the criteria, but 
feviously will mea (hem by Jami- 
999 . The trend will have to be very 
, and the numbers sol^ to A feA 
we mav have a solution.” 

: thA there could be a 

snon among govenunent ciriefe in 
iring of 295$ “about fee trend, and 
a (tecision in prindide could be 

t could be a conditionA accept- 
'* he ad de d, “whh tiie impleiiien- 
I delayed until they mett 
and tfiat could be January 1999, or 
- months later.” _ , 

•. Gisc^ d’Esiaing. ^ 

id a series of conversations he sam 
A had with Mr. Chirac before to 
last November for a new panty 
wn the franc and tbe dolter. 


”I AXilte wife Mr, Chiiac laA summer 
several times Axvut this issue, and be 
said I WA right about tire idea of a 
strcAger AoUar, but he feought it would 
be very fefficult to manage. He tboaght 
there were insurawumable tfestacles.l» 
thoo^ die arguiuents advAioed by our 
monetAyautiiotitieshere — namely tiiA 
we had DO room to act by ourselves iu the 
fiAd ^ interest rates or AcdiAtge rates 
— were impQsable to oveicome.” 

Mr. Giscard d’Escamg said he had 
written “feree long tetters” toMr. Qnr- 
ac rai tbe suliyect “He knew in advance 
tiiA 1 would make my comments abom 
the ftanc laA November in tiie magaaane 
L’Eiqiress. I mfonued him of tiie sub- 
stance of fee statement I would make last 
November. I fedn’t submit my statemoit 
for his apjxovaL but I acted on my own 
behalf and I tried to avoid Aiy coi- 
tradictions with Firencb policy.'” 

Mr. Cbirac’s spcHteswotaan, Cather- 
ine Ctelouna. sAd the presideiit “was 
informed this summer by Mr. Giscard 
d'Estamg about his thiifeng on mou- 
etaiy questions. Naturally, Mr. Giscard 
d'Estamg is soldy reqxmsible for bis 
prwosals.” 

The doUar-franc level, which on 
Wednesday stood A 5j6S fomes to tire 
dblter, was now “appropriate,” said Mr. 
Gisc^ d'Estaing.. “we are in a good 
targA zone. The exchange rate is very 


impoi *t aa c, and it was emder ffstimafFri by 
tiie French auflmrities. Last Novenfeer, 
whenl spAce crf'tiie exOiAige rate, all tiie 
establiAuneat was me. Now tiie 
Grom of Seven says tiie same thing 1 
said. 

When ariced to say if tbere was suf- 
fiedent pAhicA leactershm in Western 
Europe A pres e n t, Mr. Giscard d*&- 
lanigfedDOthesUAie. “Cleariyao, wife 
tbe DOtaUe exception of HAmm Kcfel, 
who bas a defiiute viacm of tite fixture of 
Eorepe.” 

He said tiiA today's Exnopean polit- 
icA leaders “are Ahbesang ti» prob- 
lems as tiiey oome.” 

“They acc all embanted,” he sAd, 
“and tiie public per c ei ves this. The last 
great c ooce ptuA period in Europe was 
tiie 1970s, and it was tiie period of 
European unity. Since thee there has 
been stagnatim. Since tiiea leaders have 
not been able to propose a new vt- 
Aoo.” 

Commenting on French mooeraiy 
policy, he said. “We need good Itoico- 
Gennan cooidiiiatioa in monaary 
to tiiA d^ not mean we need 
ideoticA polkjes. 

“Tliere is so reason for French in- 
terest rates A present to be higb^ than 
German rates. I think Bench interest 
rates can and should be reduced to tiie 
same range.” 


CoQtinDed fkom FBge I 

Stin, as a nnddte class wife lag buying 
po^^eraeraa,mai^foietoretAleraaie 
opting to take tbe ri^ W^Mait opene d 
its first “superstore” in Qima last August 
in Sbenriiea, one of (he coui^’s most 
pioqierous “qieciA economic zones.” 
across the bocte fiom Hong Kong. On 
to outskto of to is aootber &st in 

Chrna, WA-Mait*s conqiaiuoD store 
Sam’s. It offers shoppera even more of tbe 
American “warehouse store” feel. 

Qima is also home to Vanguard, 
Pricesmart and other lag retailos. But as 
to megastores msfa for a share of tbe 
QriTUftMft market, they are learning thA 
wfaA wraks on h^in Stiea U.S.A. 
doesn’t alw^ translaie here 

At Being’s Pricesmait store, for ex- 
ample, to company designed two huge 
loaoiog docks ibA could accommod^ 
full-sized trucks, in aotidpation of tbe 
big deliveries ixeded to keep shelves 
Slocked But toy found feA many of 
tiieir Chinese dismbntocs were for smA- 


ler in scale, arriving wife goods in car 
trunks, on three-wheel pedicabs or 
strapped to to backs of bicycles. A 
smAterdock had to be added for bikes. 

“It’s amaang whA you can put OQ one 
of those feree-Mieel^ bicycles.” sAd 
Brian M^ers. madreting duector at 
PiKxstaan. 

Correctly interpienng Chinese cus- 
toms also provides a fonnidabte cshal- 
leoge to to Western retaUers. WA-Mart 
once made to mistake of redei^ large 
quantities of paper towels and dimosaUe 
diapers. “^Most per^ here diduT know 
whA a paper towel is.” sAd Mr. Hatfield. 
As for the diapeis. be said. “Jr’s a voy 
expensive luxi^ when you stcqi and think 
about iL” 

Guard deodorant and riiavii\g 
products dem’t sell because they are 
priced A four times WhA they woAd cost 
in the Umted States. But electrcHiics — 
mcluding televisions and stereos — 
turned into a big business. Auto pans 
don'tmake It. to rice cookers and Amer- 
ican cosmetics are in high demand. 


The megastores bad to take into ac- 
count the limited stetr^e in the tiny 

trartments common even in tbe more 
iwuent Oiinese cities. That means huge 
American-sized packages and cases are 
out: smaller, compact sizes are in. 

Transpmt is Aso a problem for many 
Chinese, who often walk or bicycle to 
fee store — which limits what they can 
carry home. But in Beijing, Mr. Meters 
of Fricesmart sAd, “If fee price is nght. 
they'll find a place to store it. and they’ll 
find a car to gA it there.” 

Perhaps the suange.st thing for these 
executives was learning to cope u-ith 
China's rapidly changing bui>ine.s.s cli- 
mate, where personA connections matter 
more than business plans, and where 
rules are often a matter of interpretation. 

“If you come in with a huitl sell, it 
doesn't matter how good your logic is.” 
sAd Roy Rawers. Pricesman's mer- 
chandising director. “It doesn't matter 
whA the law says. What matters is whA 
the guy behind the desk imerpreui the 
law to say." 


BONUS: For Wall Street’s High Flyers, It’s Time to Buy ( and Buy) 


KOREAN: North’s Top Theoretician Seeks Asylwn m South 


Continued from Page 1 

Iff of the party’s cenirA committee, 
tddfeinion of one of North 

- cabA offere a «« 0 PP«^*y y 

[ Ktoan and U.S. inteUigro pf- 
i to learn about fee ^ situatioa 
• tbe seated Aid isote*« 3 .®toy» 

, some believe U J 

tiAly dSsasirous collapse. ApA a 

of underiings wto control one oi. 

Jhcar for the firat Mr. 

. who said be bad |*yS^** 
discussions wife Mr, Hwang 
any visits to Nmth 

iWa. ifia cotortiy to wm 
f to tbe outride worW ana 
low flats open i*® doors. 


rhinfl was expected to act as an in- 
tennediary between tiie isolAed North 
and other countries. R remains unclear 
hto tills inddent will afiea'diose talks. 

'Mary observers, paitzculariy in Sooth 
Kocea,fearifaA tbe severe food totages 
in Noth Korea have caused widespread 
jpgiah3ity in Tfoffe Korea Aid fiamuied 
XCrm Tmg Ii*s cofltrA over hawkirii mil- 
itary leattera Some military planners and 
diploniAS' say- tiuy: foar titA North 
Korea’sincrearingdesptotioo overfood 
coudd lead it to some iast-ditdi militAy 
invasiott or strfte A Soitih Korea. 

Seto leroonto CERXtiously to Mr. 
HwAig’s defection, taking carenot to 



would vradc -wife Qiinese of- 
ficials to move Mr:- Hw^ to SeouL 
There was' little (men ^oatiiig among 
govenment officiAS as foreiga, de- 
fease, umficatioD and aatitmA seemify 
miniriers held an emeigAicy meeting to 
discuss-how to haodte an issue thA has 


sux^ mfisiated Nordi Korea. 

“*0^ is big, big tasws here,” sAd a 
senior goverameat cfficiaL “He's to 
most uBpoitaat tfaeoreticten of jocto, 
wfaidt is to foQudstioa of to wltote 
country. Ths lave enonnoos, tie- 
meodons lapact oa to Noife Korean 
if they fizid out be bas defocted.” 

^oife KoreaiB to t^bfound^ by 
-the defoction, they would be justified: 

Mr. Hwang's resume as a North Kraean 
ideologue hu been impeccable until 
DOW. “He’s a communist to tbe back- 
bone,” the South Kraean official 
. Mr. Hvrai^ a thin, silver-hairod man 
wife passes, was the keynote speaker A 
aTeeeption a a Tokro hotel test week 
marititig Kim Jong ll*s SSth birthday, 

wtiidiisFeb.i 6 .HedetiveRdhis^peech 

standiiig..be^ Imge portraits ta Mr. dering $1 
Kim arid 11 Smig. when be finished, whbKetel 

he raised ina glass and led tite crowded 
balhDom m'a toart to to two leaders. 

MrJ Hwang left hte vdfo. two sons and 
two daughlere behind in ^oDgyang. 

Steve Mv^on reported^mBeyui^. 


Continued from Page 1 

restaurants there are nuiner- 
ous signs of a return to luxe. 
New York magazine recently 
published a boying guide to 
cQStooi goods, which in- 
cluded “b^c” dress shirts 
for $190 and shoes made 
from hand-carved lasts of Ca- 
nadian m^te for $1330. 

There is much discussioa 
on Wall Street of how to 
nrosperi^ of tbe late 1990s 
dif^ that of fee often 
vuli^ '80s. toera of “greed 
is good,' ' when many tbwgbt 
the party would test forever. 
Now many Wall Streeters say 
they are spending bonuses 
less flamboyantly, investing 
for fee long term intoknow- 
l^ge thA whA goes up also 
comes down. 

BA in bonos season, when 
2S-year-old Masters of the 
Universe roam the city, or- 

$12 martfm'g made 

with Kerel One vodka a to 
Four Seasons Hotel bar and 
$!^ tasting dinnera a Nobu 
in TriBeCa, self-restraint can 
be bard to find. 

Dai Rubin, who bad 


parked his , Aetna NSX-T 
sports car outride Steven 
Kessler Motor Cars tecendy, 
entered tbe showroom of 
bri^ red Fenaris and sleek 
Lotuses witii his fiancee and 
said. “We’re hxrfdng for 
something more fim.” 

hfr. Rubin drepped out of 
Princeton in 19^ to found 
J^biu Investors Group, a 
private company ibA had a 
banner year, be sAd. thanks in 
part to betting on to Internet 
“I trade big positions in small 
companies and terrorize fee 

chair man/* be said With as- 

surance. Besid» shopping 
for a new car, be bad just 
bou^t a ski house A Suatton 
Mountain, Vermont. 

Many on Wall Street, of 
course, are not making ex- 
travagant sums. 

Only about 1 ,500 in the top 
tier of traders, anAysts ana 
investment bankers take 
home more than $1 oiiliion in 
total pay, accorfeng to com- 
pensation experts. 

At to top, the nearly 200 
panners of Goldman, Sachs 
& Co. made $4 million to $8 
million apiece, according to 


people A tbe firm, although 
rouCT of it is reinvested in the 
firm until they leave. Alan 
Greenberg, chairman of Bear 
Steams & Co., which had a 
record year for profit, made 
$18.8 million in 19S^ ac- 
cording to the comply. 

The bonus system is deeply 
ingrained on WAl Screet 

‘ 'In a five-minute meeting, 
they give you a piece of paper 
wife a number on it.” ex- 
plained an anAyst a a major 
investment bank, who spoke 
on conditite] tiiA neither be 
nor his firm to identified. 
“It’s awesome. In some cases 
it's five, rix or seven times 
your salary, your whole year 
ID one payment Since many 
petite on Wall Street derive 
psycMc pleasure chiefly from 
their earnings, it’s a lot more 
significant than, say. a 
schoolteacher finding out she 
got a 3.5 percent raise. It is the 
scone.” 

Most investment banks 
promote a culture of e x treme 
discretion, playing down any 
flashy displays of wealth 
Even in a Champagne-pop- 
ping ycA like fee most recent 


one, vriien Wall Street *s total 
pi^ts were u record $12.5 
billion, bonuses are discussed 
only tersely, in a kind of code. 

you happy?” one WAI 
Streeter will say to another. 
“Yes, I'm happy.” fee col- 
league will reply. 

Many WAI Streeters de- 
clined to speak publicly about 
bonuses. In part that is a mea- 
sure of the industry's tradi- 
tiooaJ conservatism. Bui it i.s 
also a reaction to the lute 
1980s, when Wall Street was 
scorched by recession, as 
well as by public opinion, 
which tagged its players os 
money-hungty Gekkos after 
the character popularized by 
Michael Douglas in the 
movie “WAl Street.” 

“You still don't have the 
ugly behavior of the ’80s,** 
sAd an equity trader A a ma- 
jor house who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity. 

“People tove all been 
sobered by the layoffs and 
entrenchment in the business. 
Everybody knows we made a 
lot of money, but it's ‘When 
is it going to end?' rather than 
‘11118 could go on forever.’ ” 



.GE8 


EDnVRIALS/OPINION 


A Bad Idea for Russia 


The Presentable Face of France ’s Extreme Right 


President Boris Yeltsin’s prolonged 
illness is sparking talk of constitutionaJ 
' change in Moscow. The scheme is to 
avoid an election in the event of his 
death, allowing those now in or near 
power to retain their comfortable po- 
sitions. Some Americans are enamored 
of this proposal as a way to promote 
continuity. In fact, tbou^, it's a bad 
idea that would undermine democracy 
and, very likely, stability as well. 

Mr. Yeltsin has effectively been un- 
able to begin the second term that he 
won by election seven months ago. 
Mean disease, then major cardiac sur- 
gery and now what is being described 
as pneumonia have kept him from 
wo^. Although Kremlin officials say 
Mr. Yeltsin will be able to meet Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton at a late-March sum- 
mit meeting in Helsinki, the Russian 
leader is not governing in any mean- 
ingful sense. His spokesman Tuesday 
acknowledged that “the rehabilitation 
goes rather slowly" and cautioned that 
"we should not expect a speedy re- 
turn to the Kremlin.” Meanwhile, the 
coun^' drifts. 

ThL< debiiitatirtg absence has raised 
first, the question of when and how a 
leader should be declared inc^ci- 
taied. The Russian Constitution 
provides no precise answer. Some 
Russian parliamentarians have tried to 
initiaie a process that would throw Mr. 
Yeltsin out of office as unfit, but the 
majority is wisely not ready for such a 
step. Ttw president was elected in a fair 
and free election, and he may yet re- 
cover to serve out the remainder of his 
four-year term. 

If he does not — if he should die in 
office — Russia’s constitution calls for 


the fHime mlnlstef to serve as acting 
president for not more than tiiree 
mondis and to call new elections. Here 
is where Moscow’s mandarins start to 
get sweaty palms. Polls show the front- 
ninner in an electicm would be retired 
general Alexander Lebed, whom those 
now in power portray as a dangerous 
would-be dictator. Rather dian & him 
take power, they argue, the consti- 
tution should be amended to allow 
Prime Minister Viktor ChenKxnyidin 
to serve out Mr. Yeltsin's leim. 

We share many of the qualms about 
Mr. Leb^ his recent refitting as an 
incorruptible reformer who can rescue 
Russia from its miseries is unpersua- 
sive on many grounds. But those 
qualms certainly do not outweigh ob- 
jMtions to sh^-circuiting Russia’s 
young democracy. For one th^. it’s 
not clear that the likely alternatives are 
so far superior. Mr. Gbemomyrdin 
has not proven particularly adept, 
and Mayor Yuri Luzhkov of Moscow 
is more bombastic in bis nationalism 
than Mr. L^bed. More to Ae point, 
many of those who fear Mr. Lebed 
enjoy privileged and comqx access to 
Russia's riches, access that Mr. Lebed 
mi^t cut off. 

If Russians want to switch back to a 
vice-presidential system, the change 
should take place in tbe next teem, and 
not be deigned to save particular 
people’s jote or thwart particular am- 
bitions. Even Russians who l^itim- 
ately fear Lebed can’t justify des- 
troying Russian democracy in order to 
save iL U.S. officials and bushiessmen 
should refirain from encouraging such 
adevelopmem. 

— 7W£ WASHINGTON POST. 


Spooky Prospect 


President Bill Clinton's economic 
report, issued this week, contains a 
good description of the problems diat 
the budget issued last week fails to 
resolve. Chapter 3 is called “Econom- 
ic Challenges of an Aging Popula- 
tion. ' ’ llw stexy is familiar, m about 10 


years, the first of the baby boomers will 
begin to retire. "Without changes in 
policy, the costs of government pro- 


gr^s that provide the elderly widi 
retirement income and insure their 
health and nursing home care’’ — So- 
cial Securi^, Medicare and Medicaid 
— "will rise rapidly.’’ At the same 
time, revenues to pay those costs “are 
likely to be pinched somewhat, be- 
cause the number of people working — 
and paying taxes — will be growing 
more slowly.” 

~ By the year 2050. the costs of just 
these programs are expected to more 
than double, from the current 9 percent 
of gross domestic product to about 19 
percent “By contrast,” the report 
notes, “federal revenues have histor- 
ically been around 1 8 percent of GDP. 
Hence, absent any changes, expen- 
ditures on Social Security. Medicare 
and Medicaid could consume ail gov- 
ernment revenues by 2050 and exceed 
them thereafter.” 

Ii'sa spooky prospect, and the report 
goe.s on to warn against delay in ad- 
dressing it The Itmger you wait, it 
says, tlu: more interim debt you build 
up and the greater the ultimate interest 
cost you have to pay. In addition, any 
reform "adequate to the problem will 
need to he phased in gradually, to allow 
citizens time to adjust their persoruil 
financing plans accoidingly.” We'd 
add a third consequence: ’The longer 
you pul off cutting the cost of these 
mainly midd1c-cla.ss programs while 
trying at the some time to balance the 
budget, the mure disproportionate the 
pres.sure you put on other programs and 
puns of the population. We think par- 
ticularly of the program.s for the poor. 


Yet the budget, for the most part, 
does put off such action. Hie people 
who wrote tbe economic report were 
hardly unaware of thaL 

Hii^ ask in effect that the president 
be cut some slack because tfa^ things 
have to be done in sta^. Tbe gov- 
ernment was tunning an insuppmt^le 
deficit u hen he came to office; he cut it 
substantially with tiie bu^et he 
pushed throu^ Congress in his first 
year. ‘ ‘The next task is to coi^ete the 
work of (near-term) deficit reduc- 
tion,” as the president's new budget 
proposes. Tbed will be time ■— and 
time enough, the report suggests — to 
"make the hard decisions within a 
bipartisan proc^ and witii full awate- 
ness of the difficult trade-offs tiiey 
imply.” 

We think the president's backing off; 
they say he’s not. We’ll see. In the 
meantime, as the rqxut observes, 
‘ ’many of the key elements of any solu- 
tion are already known.” It mentions a 
number tlum though mostly in-non- 
committal terms and votii the sort of 
care you mi^t eiqiect firom such a 
report to point out their likely advose as 
well as advanta^us cmisequenoes — 
those “difficult trade-of&.” 

One interestiiig notion is that future 
Medicaid costs might be reduced by 
somehow requiring or inducing more 
people to buy iM^-term care insurance. 
You could require such insurance or 
^ve people greater inducements to buy 
It. through tte tax code, for exa^e, or 
by saying that a person vriio ended up 
having to turn to Medicaid but had some 
insurance could keep more of his assets 
than a person who had none. Tbe i»es- 
ident has meanwhile proposed a kind of 
floating cap on future Medicaid spend- 
ing. The trick would be to keep a cap 
ii^ cutting health care for the poo'. A 
device to shift some of tbe cost of long- 
term care to the private insurance sys- 
tem might help achieve th^ 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Israel in Lebanon 

l>rjcl continues to pay a heavy price 
for its inililory presence in the 440- 
.square-niile "security zone" it main- 
liiins in southern Le^on. In the last 
three years nearly 70 Israeli soldiers 
have been killed there in a shadowy 
war u'ith Hezbollah, the Iranian-sup- 
ported Party of God. This toll more 
than doubled last week when two Is- 
raeli helicopters collided over northern 
Israel, killing 73 soldiers bound for 
southern Lebanon, The troops were 
being moved In* air precisely to 
avoid Hezbollah's roadside bombing 
am bashes. 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netan- 
yahu. leading the national mourning 


for the victims, vowed that Israel's 
policy in Lebanon would not change. 
In fact, most Israelis seem eager for a 
change that would end Israel’s mini- 
occupation, if effective security ar- 
rangements can be made. Thai con- 
dition remains the key obstacle. 

Few Israelis are rrady to $u{^rt a 
unilateral withdrawal south Leb- 
anon, fearing th^ doing so would only 
invite increased cross-border attaclu 
on Israeli civilians. But at a minimum, 
last week’s tur disaster ought to prompt 
a comprehensive poli^ reappraisal, 
including an examination of alterna- 
tives. Hezbollah is conducting a war of 
attrition agai^t Israel, and it's one 
Israel can't win. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


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P ARIS — Hie extreme right in 
France demonstrated a sizahte gam 
in stren^ last weekend, bat alw a 
change in character, and tbe Imter is 
much more interesting tiian tte fonner. 

Hie National Front wtm a cl^-cut 
victory (52A peixsat of the vote) In the 
runoff of a municipal electicMi in Vit- 
ToUes, a soulless “new town” of 
39,(XX) near Marseille. VitroUes’ now 
is die fourtii town hall held by the 
National From, which has found its 
strongest supp^ in southern I^eoch 
towns and cities where immigrants are 
uumetous and unemploymeni is hi^ 
Nationwide, suppm for the National 
Frmt is around 15 perc e nt, but in the 
1995 presidential election the party 
won nearly a third of the woridng-^ass 
vote and a quarter of die unemployed 
vote. This populist appeal was con- 
firmed by die VitroUes result 
Hie pai^ demands preference far 
French nationals over unmigrants in 
jobs, bousing and social services and 
would review aU naturalizations of im- 
migrants since 1974 (which, if attempt- 
ed would probably be thrown out 
the courts). However, the racist mo- 
tivatimi fm supporting tbe National 
Eront is undouoredly less importam 
than socioeconomic anxiety. 

Tbe successftil National Front can- 
didate was Catherine Megret, wife of 
the second-ranldng leader of the Na- 
tional Front, Bruno Megret, himself 
barred from running for mayor because 
he had in aprevious electoral race spent 
more thui aUowed by law. 

Hie ousted mayor, a Socialist was 


BjWmBrnVTaS 


already accused of misznanagem^ 
and scandal, and appeals by die main- 
stream parties for a "Ri^i^Ucan” al- 
liance of government pakte with die 
Socialists uainst die National Rront 
proved ineffectual. Mr. Megret says 
he will be his wffe's “cotmseior” 
in r unning VitroUes. 

Mayorsd^ elections are of peculiar 
inqiortance in where nearly 

every politician seeks a political base as 
mayor of some town, an office that be 
can combine with membersfaip in die 
Natioi^ Assembly at some odwr post 
of national significance. Tbe present 
prime minister, Alan Jiqipe. is also 
mayor of Bordeaux. France's jxesi- 
dent Jacques Chirac, was mayor of 
Paris until his presidential electiai. 

With four town halls now in their 
hands, including die naval port of 
Toulon, the National Front no Icmger is 
dismissed as a phenomenon mi the 
political maigin. Yet it remains fim- 
damentally a protest party, with an 
electorate in pmt poshed from the 
fading Communist Party. 

Tbe discontented vote has in recent 
years moved rightward, made up 
largely of woridng people who believe 
they are left out of me prosperity of the 
lar^ society, yet have its social pre^ 
lems dump(^ on them and are dis- 
dained by nance's elites. 

An American earity recognizes in 
Jean-Marie Le Pe^ die National Front 
leader, a French counte^iart to tbe ra- 


cist-populist American demagogues of 
a not-so-distaitt past,, such as Eugene- 
(CX* Gene) Talmadge of Geor^ 
Theodore Bilbo of Mississippi and 
George Wallace of Alabama. 

Brano M^ret is another matter. Ifo 
has no real American countoparL He is 
an man with elitist and ra- 

raalLy ^utiusionaty views. He is a 
graduate of one of die most le^iect^ 
mgfimtin na of higher education in 

France, die Ecole Polytechniqiie, and 
(fid postgraduate wmk at the Univeraity 
of (^difotma at Berkeley. 

He subcabmet posts in Trendi- 
governments duriira the 1970s- and be- 
came a member(tf& central emnmittee 

the neo-Gaollist Party, die RPR. He 
later ktined die Naticmal Aont, vdtere he 
is apn regarded with seme su^pidon 
because of this orthodox back^ouiuL 
But he has marte hintarif a leading can- 
did^ to succeed Mr. Le Pen, who is 
nearly TO, as iusad of the pf^. 

His intellectual connections are ac- 
tually with two ri^tist groiTO crea t ed 
in die late 1960s and e^y 1970s, die 
Club de i’Horloge (die “clodt club” 
— named for the room with a clock in 
udtidi its mendiers first mm) and die 
Group for European Civilizmon Re- 
search and Stiufies (its Rench acronym 
is GRECE, iWich for Greece). 

Both are part of a jdiefioineiKai 
known at the mie as die Nouvelle Dnnte 
(or “New Ri^it,” whidi some Amer- 
ican neocraservatives for a time mis- 
took as aUies). The Club de I’Hoiloge is 
an fnfiumiriai ffoop of intellectiials, aca- 
demics, officials and busiiiessaieni(ie(>- 


logically located somevritere between 
d^ i f s'p fi r r a hle nationalist,^ anti-coDec- 
tivist and fr ec - e nterwise ri^ and the 
radicalism of GREC& 

GRECE is neepogan, hqs^ to 
Christianity and Judaism as reli^poos of 
“weakness” and “submissioiL” ad- 
miring of the all^edly Aiyan forebeais 
ofwairiorEurope,anxioustoseeEnn>- 
pem power TBstot^ and convinced diat 
a culturally debased and democraticaDy 
com^ United States dueatens Euro- 
pean civilization (as diey conceive it). 

Fascism is a slippeiy tarm, and a^, 
plied in the past to die National Boot it 
has been triorepoleirucri than ptfiitieaJly 
precise. But Mr. Megret’s mteUectual 
antecedents are truly diose from wtiicji 
in the 1 9^ and 19^ Fascism earner 
remaking populist movements b(m of 
post-world war diaos and nesentment 
and economic crisis. 

Mr. Megret’s practical ami^ioa ism 
do with the National F ront vdiat the 
Italian fflanfianco Fini has already ac- 
comifiished widi foe neo-Fascist Natkai- 
al AUianoe: to turn a disrqxitti^ pany 
of the extreme rigfit info an nufispens- 
able ally of the mainsneam ri^tt. . . .. 

1^. now is a major figure in 
Italian politics, bfr. Megret wants to 
beewne tbe same in France. To do so he 
has to transfonn tbe disgrunded votera 
of tbe National Root into an ideo- 
logical movement. 

is DOC as sinqite as he, or others, 
may now diink — but it is not 
impossible. 

International HeraUTribiau. 

9 Los Angela Tima Syndicate. 


Italian Vices Turn to Virtues in the Brave New Interknit World! 


R ome — H iere is a concern 
that as globalization knits 


By Thomas L- Friedman 


countries anifmaikete togjtther it 
will flatten cultural differences, 
as we’re all forced to drink 
Coke, eat Big Macs and com- 
pute on Windows 95. In some 
ways, this is hai^mung. But in 
odier ways a country's disdna 
political and ecCTiom i c cnhuie 
actually becomes more inipor- 
tant in this taave new worid. 

For one diing, as globaliza- 
tion shrinks goveenments and 
lowers natimial boundaries, 
cultures and societies now in- 
teract much more directly. And 
as globalization gives everyone 
access to tbe same infmmation, 
resources, technology and mar- 
kets, a society’s pucticular abil- 
ity to put these pieces toj^dier 
tn die fastest and most inno- 
vative manner increasingly sq>- 
arates winners from losers in 
die global economy; 

Consider Italy. Italy, in some 
ways, is die . ultimate post- 
industrial society: It has no 
govemmentl 


Well, just Idddmg, but foe 
fact is diat smne of ^y's vices 
during tbe Cold War — its weak 
govemmeDts, its^idemicoftax 
evasion, the pendant of Italians 
to woik around the state rather 
than through it — have become 
in this era of globali- 
zation, when, as di^ say, h’s no 
longer the big who eat tte small, 
ixit the fast who eat tbe slow. 

Italy today is nothing if not 
fast. In fact, the fastest-growing 
and single richest region in 
Europe today is northeastern 
Italy (the disfficts of Lombardy 
andT Veneto). Hiete, thousands 
of small and medium-size Itali- 
an entrepreneurs, who are used 
to cqier^ing without state help 
and often <^’t pay taxes, have 
created a beehive of trading 
companies and small mamdac- 
tuimg c^>eratioiisiharha:re b^‘ 
come hugely successful from 
Slovenia to Singapeae. 

“Italy is not a conqmter udfo 
a central bnun,” Pir^ Min- 


ister Romano Prodi explained 
tome.‘Ttisliltedielhteiiiet — 
everyone gives his cemtribu- 
tion. If you give some basic 
rules and infrastructure for 
system, its petfonnance will be 
unbelievable. 

“You have 6.000 Italian en- 
trepreneurs in Romania today. 
You wouldn’t know die name 
of a single one of their compa- 
nies, but diey are all over and 
very active.” 

Spedaliting in eveiydiing 
firan eyeglass frames to high 
fashioiL, these small fralian en- 
trepreneurs have quM^y made 
Italy the fiftb-laigest in<histrial 
power in the world Because 
these I talian conqiaiiies are 
small and fUadlde, foity can om- 
ven their industries from pasta 
to shoes veiy quickly, accord- 
' ing to market demands, flays a 
U!S. official in Rome: “You 
come toaFrenchinatt and say, *1 
would like some purple chei^. ’ 
He teU y(3u. ‘Cheese is nev- 


er purple.’ You come to a Ger- 
man and ask for purple cheese, 
he will tell you, ‘Pu^le chef^ 
is not in die ca^ogue, sorry.' 
You come to an Itaban and ask 
for purple cheese and he will 
ask you: ‘What shade of purple 
would you like? Magenta?’ 
Hiis ecoiKHmc culture, 
vdneh cennbines a flair for teefo' 
nological and design inoova- 
titm, a disdain for govemii^t, 
a trading network linlcftd with a 


dividualism and entrepreneur- 
ship is hardly unique to north- 
eni Italy. 

You see similar h(M z(»es in 
Hong Kong, Taiwan, Sing^iore 
and regions of Qiina (plus the 
overseas Qnitese), Isc^ ^lus 
the overseas Jews) and paits of 
India (plus the overseas Indi- 
ans), as well as Korea, Brazil, 
Argentina and Chile, to name 
iKii aiew: — 

So win these hot zemes rule 
die worid? Not ycL -Nortbein 
Baty may look bctyond Ital^ ftxr 
its matioks. but it's still part of 


Italy. And the Italian state, nd 
matter how weak, was a 
Moated Western European wdn 
fare state, which now has enor4 
mous deto that someone has td 
pay off. So it still matters. «here 
you live, and 9riiat your national 
economy is dtxng. Nortbeninaly 
can go a ieng way, but unless the 

ftaliflw ram iim 

prove its roads and telecomw 
nications and spur xeseaidi and 
devekqxn^ the norfo will ne^ 
er adii^ its full potentiaL ^ 
So culture matters a lot in tins 
new w(»1d, but so still do states,* 
and the trick is getting the ri|jl^ 
balanOB. Fte instance, Germanir 
is too much Alan Greenspan 
and not enough Benetton. Italj( 
is too much Benetton and n^ 
enou^ Greenspan. Ranee is 
not enough of eifoex. As Luccitj 
Caracciolo. editor of die It^an 
foreign poli(ty journal Lime^! 
remarked to me, “If we had 
German infrastructure and Itali- 
an flexibility,- we would be tt, 
superpower.^’ ' 

TheNewYorhlTmes. 


The Problem of Little Cyprus Looms Large on the World Stage! # 


P aris — Cyprus has be- 
come a UN metaphor for a 
conflict that no one can resolve, 
that drags on forever, but that 
isn’t too troublesome and can 
be more or less ignored. It's the 
epitome of expensive “peace- 
keeping” that never becomes 
“peac^naking.” 

But tune is running ouL Sev- 
eral impending intematicuial 
deadlines could iianslaie into 
great local trouble if the Cyprus 
deadlock is allowed to block 
diplomatic plans. Besides, die 
Greek . Cypriot government 
seems to have deci£d that faxi- 
voldng trouble is the only way 
to attract attention and fb^ the 
international community to act 
President Glavkos IGerides. 
who attended the Worid Eco- 
nomic Forum in Davos last 
week, denies that he (udered 70 
Russian ground-to-air missiles 
to exercise “leverage.” He 


By Flora Lewis 


needs them for defense, be said, 
pointing to a June 1993 UN re- 
port tb^ Turkey has 30,000 
troops stationed on die island 
plus 4,500 Turi^ CypricA sol- 
diers; that it has preposidoned 
large quantities of military 
equipment feu further reinforoe- 
menL and diat its warplanes 
have been overflying at will 
with no reaction frem foe United 
Nations or tbe British, who own 
two large rir bases diere. 

But be also notes that the mis- 
siles aren't to be delivered for 18 
months, foot they cost $225 rtrfl- 
lioQ which be can ill afford and 
that foe order can be canceled if 
a settlement is arrmeed. 

Since 1974, wbe^irrkey in- 
vaded after a Greek-sp(uuxned 
coup intended to unite Cyprus 
with Greece, the island has 
hermetically partitione(L There 


was virtually complete ethnic 
cleansing on both sides of the 
line, and a heavetdy place 
settled down in hellish com- 
munal hatred. The Turks, 19 
percent of die population, con- 
trol a third of the teiritOTy. A UN 
force, now down to 1,100 frran 
a of 2,500, patrols die di- 
viding line that runs through die 
mid(Se of the capital, Nicosia, 
but ugly inddents still occur. 

When Britain granted inde- 
pendence under tbe accords of 
1960, Greece and Turkey were 
also named guarantor powers of 
Cypriot umty and indqien- 
dence. As a result, their own 
guaiiels have reinforced tbe 
Qpriot impasse. Many times 
a diplomatic breakforough 
looked possible, but each time 
domestic politics in Athens or 
Ankara dashed the bepe. 


Republican Misogyny on Display 


N ew YORK — In foe 
months since American 
women deserted the Republi- 
can Party at die polls. Repub- 
lican leaders have disni&ed 
the gender as merely a mat- 
ter of pick^mg, not substance. 
RepuMcans tailed ”u> com- 
municate efieedvely to wo- 
men” was die depaitiiig party 
chairman Haley Barbour’s ra- 
tionale for the debacle. 

But two weeks ago Selwa 
Roosevelt, the Rea^in admin- 
istration’s chief of protocoL 
spoke for many of diose ali- 
enated women when she 
wrote an open letter in Hie 
Washington Post telling Mr. 
Barbour, “You still don’t get 
iL” Noting that she was not a 
liberal or “mudi of a fem- 
inist.” Ms. Roosevelt said she 
would nonetheless abandon 
her party as long as it toadied 
to a far right pufoing “certain 
extremist ideas.” 

She mi^t as wdi have 
saved her breath. In a con- 
gressional vote expected this 
week, the Republicans are 
again poised to dmonstrate 
just bow raudi diey’re still in 
hock to the extreiiust rd^ 
Ms. Roosevelt decries. 

The vote is on whaz should 
have been a routine measure 


By Frank Rich 

to release foreign aid frmds for 
international ramily p lanning 
foat were already appropriated 
by die last Congress. But the 
l^^blicans’ religious ri^t 
auxiliary is trying to denul die 
measure by purpeating diat 
it’s a “pro-life” litmus tesL 
To vote for family planning, 
says an ad signed by the Chris- 
tian Coalition, is to end(xse 
“foe CUntem administratioa’s 
overseas abortiem crusade.” 

The truth, of course, is the 
teverse. Eveiy study shows' 
that a rise in me avaSability of 
coDiFac^iticxi leads to adecline 
in tdioitioas, wbedier in indus- 
trialized nati(»s or foe devel- 
oi»iig worlcL If tbe goal of foe 
Republicans is really to elim- 
inam aboitions. it should be 
leadirig, not (mposing. efforts 
to futmer funuy-plapning ser- 
vices and sex education. 

But foe Republican Con- 
gress is bell-b^ on destroy- 
ing farxifly planning, at home 
and abroad; U.S. suf^it for 
inteznadonal family planning 
dro^i^ ^ percent between 
fiscal year 1995 and 1996, ac- 
cording to a new r^xm by the 
Rockereller Foundation. 


It isn’t hard to see why Re- 
mibfican women like ^wa 
Roosevelt are rqqialled Ity 
their party’s drift at die top. 
It’s one thuig for the Rejub- 
Ucans to be officially opposed 
to abortion, as many Amei^ 
icans are, but it’s quite anodier 
vfoen the party says that its 
^position to aboriioa justi- 
fi^ 0 |^)osition to abortum- 
prevention measures like fam- 
ily planning and sex efoica- 
doiL Not only is drat pomtion 
inconsistent, but its very hy- 
pcciisy reveals ^ true jai- 
oiity of its adherents. 

That priority is not to pro- 
tect “the unlxm” or discour- 
age promiscuity but to keep 
women fitxn exfenxsoig aoa.- 
trol over dieir own lives and 
bodies, even if that ftiaany an 
increase in abortions and oi- 
dangeiing their own health. 

Irs ham to um^jne a more 
hlanmt or fundamental oppev 
sitioD to the very notion of 
female emp owe r aient If die 
gemto-gs^traumadzed Re- 
publican Party can slicl^ 
repac k a g e this misogynist 
^enda so that it can be sold to 
moderate Americari women, 
cwsets and bustles may be in 
line for a comebaefo, too. 

TheNewYbrklima. 


A compromise diat might 
have been achieved Icxally was 
repeatedly blocked firom out- 
side. Now the danger is that the 
trouble will be inteniationalized 
much further. The &ropean 
UmoD has prennised to start ne- 
gotiatioos for the admission of 
Cyivus wid^ six moii^ of 
ending its current conference (XI 
internal refomi, due at the end 
of June but likely to be delay^ 
a few numtfas. 

Turkish Cypriots — who 
have fXDclaiined their own re- 
public in tbe nordi, recognized 
only by Hirfcey — say Hzikey 
must be admitted at tbe same 
time, which sinqily isn't going 
to hiqipea. Greece would veto. 

Giem also foreateos to veto 
the admission of Fa«gtem Euro- 
pean countties to NATO if 
Cyprus doesn’t get into the EU, 
aw Tuik^, a member of NATO, 
but not of the EU. threatens die 
same if Cyprus does iiL 

That's only tbe beghming of 
a diain of problems diat have 
nodiing to do with Cyprus, but 
that get IinJred to the conflict 
Tuik^ no longer has die same 
strm^c inmortance that it had 
during foe Oild War, and Mr. 
Klerid^ wants the United 
States to pressure Turkey to 
wifodraw hs troops and back a 
Cypriot ccxnprcxruse. But other 


highly sensitive issues are in-| 
voiv^ including Turkey’s rolei 
in oi^MS^ Ir^. its Central; 
Asian aspiratiixrs and concerns; 
about the rise of fundamen- 
talism in its politics. ) 

What foe Cypriot govern-; 
ment now seeks is a new,' 
stronger force to replace tbej 
UN, preferably a NATO foro& 
undex American c<xnmand,i 
which would oversee gradual 
Turkish withdrawal 
Britain asked Resident John; 
F. Kennedy to send tnx^ in thi^ 
eariy 1960s, and that activis&i 
internationalist Washington 
sard flatly no. In its cunentl 
mood, die United States iso% 
likely to react m(xe favorably. ! 

Cyprus isn’t really a relxgioDS[ 
disi^. Tbe Ordiodox ethniCj 
Gr^ks and Muslim ethniej 
Turks got al(Xig well enough; 
historically because of commoni 
opposition to CaihoUc invaders! 
an^ after Worid War Q, to the' 
British. Now they lad: a com-! 
mon enemy and camiot agree| 
between foemselves wcfoouti 
outside fmesrore. . I 

It is essential to relocalize the; 
c(xiflicL F(x it to be ai 

serious mtilriwatittnftl focce 
needed. And as there is DO virtuei 
m waituie for tbmgs to get worse,! 
NATO mould prqiare to act. 

9Flen£mi»s 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO i 

1897: TII« narrow strip of seas fixxn CubaJ 


PARIS — fThe Herald nys in 
an Eefitozial:] The evil now 
Herimnring is evidently 

not alone the microbe of 
diolen. and small pox: it lies as 
moch in die dreaoEiiI physiolo- 
gical wretchedness in which the 
Hmdu population lives. Poverty 
is die most redoubtable agent for 
foe extensioa of foe^ epidem- 
ics. In Older to combat and root 
foem out, a blow must be di- 
rected ^rinst the microbes and 

the bad soil in which they 

nmnsirata en aanlu Tn a/M:,:...— 


narrow strip of seas fixxn Cuba^ 
A large number of Cbinese, Ger-[ 
mans, Spaniards, Austrians^ 
Italians, and Polish and Russian 
Jews are paying from $100 to, 
$5(X) each to be landed from die 
West Indies <» the Ftorida cossl' 
This srmig giin g ts known as 
“dummy runniiig,” to distin-- 
guish it from another profitaUe 
source of West Indian smuggling 
(sdled “rum running.” 

1947: Palestine Dispute 

LONDON— Foreign Secrettuy 



became efiGsedve. Hus industry 
has been reqxinsibJe fin- the 
smuggfing into die U.S. of foou- 
sands of immigrants across the 


un.*. tIR /UiUA IttUUUUHHISiy 

s^ diey would like Bzh^ to 
wididraw from Palestine alto^ 
gather and let foem handle ther 
situation their own way. 




... .-5 








JNTEBNAllONAL HEELUiDTR^ THUKSDA]^ FEBRILURY 13, 1997 




OPINION/LETTERS 


Federal College Aid? 
Pass an Exam First 

By Robert J. Sanmefeon 


W-ASHINGTON —The fed- 
TT eral goyemment oould im- 
prove educahoQ in an ingranf 
almost no ad^tibna] cost It 
•oidy reqiure students wandns 
fed^mllegeaid — aizeady^ 
btil^ in loans and grants an- 
nuaUy — to pass a test showing 
ihM they are ready for coUege. 

Even a modestly rigorous ex- 
M would cause students to work 
Jwrto. Those who passed would 
oe better prepared. Those who 
didn t would receive a clear mes- 

s^e: Students must earn college 
aid through achieveroexu. It is 
not an emhletnenL 
I have made fliis proposal be- 
fore and know diat its dances of 

being ndten seriously are low. 1 
repeat it to underiine the super- 
fici^ty of President Bill Co- 
lon’s "crusade” to elevate edu^ 
catioQ. His plan is classic 
CUnton: It is full of g^ffrows 
goals (evety student sbendd read 
at age 8, two years of coUege 
should be as common as hi gh 
school); the details axe cemfusing 
(there ate partial subsidies for 
school cmsauciioa and vague 
"standards'* for public schools), 
and many proposals, if' enacted, 
wouid worsen what Mr. Clinton 
L promises to improve. 

] Let’s be clear. Public schools 
1^ are mainly a local tyatf gf. 
fair. Fede^ aid has never ex- 
ceededlOpercentoftotalmend- 
ing and, at $18 fnlUon in is 

recently about 7 peicenL 
Clinton’s plan would mostly add 
buieaucra^. And it's unclear 
how the "standards" suggested 


for leadmg and math in the fboiib 
and ^^ith grades would im- 
prove schools, b«»us6 low test 
SCOTes would cany.' no penalQr. ^ 
- Where the fodctalgoventssent 
matters is in higher educatioo. 
About half of full-time college 
students get federal aid.. Most of 
tbe new money in'Mr. Clinton's 

C l (two-thirds of-ihe $70 inl- 
co^ between 19^ and 
2002) would raise sub^edes, m 
the form of new tax Ixeaks or 
lam PeB grants. 

The aim is mostly politicaL B 
is to. relieve the anxieties of 
middle-class finniiiftK that they . 
can’t afford ooUe^Mr. CUnton- 



^ Ik 


added education required a 
bi^-tedi economy. 

Not so. If the tax tweaks pass, 
tbe benefits will be fleeting be- 
cause — in the main — 
win oSiset them by raiang tu- 
ition. Even the Americaa Cono- 
cQ cm Education, the trade group 
for colleges, lends credence to 
that "CoUege prices have cmi- 
tinued to rise because tbe maiket 
has been able to bear the in- 
creases,' ’ it says in an analysis of 
foitions. "Most insdtndons have 
been able to raise tuitions and 
still have foil dassnxmis." 

iTtxn 1980 to 199S, the con- 
sumer price index rose 8S per- 
oenL In the same period, tuintms 
for public coUegM rose 218 p^ 
cent at two-year schools and 254 
pexoeot at foupyear collies. At 
private colleges, the increases- 
were 192 pexcent for two-year 


sdiools and 238. pereeot for 
four-year schools. 

Meanwhile, the p ro p ft ti oo of 
lu^ school graduates going to 
coQege rose mom 50 percent in 
1980 to ^penient in 1995.0ver 
tile same period, the amount of 
animal federal aid, adjusted for 
inflation. Increased from $25 Ul- 
lion to $37 biliimi. 

Many coUege students now 
are ill^i^xued and leave. In 
1995, 29 pocent of fiesfamen 
took aiem^al course. Only 37 
percent of new students at two- 
year colleges have a degree five 
years later. At four-year col- 
1^^, that's 54 percent 

The latest evidence that col- 
lege gradnatM aren't in short 
sqpply comes in a book, "Teach- 
ing the New Basic Skills" 
Frank Levy of tbe Massachusetts 
Instimte of Teclmcdogy and 


Richard Momane of Harvard. It 
is true, the two economists write, 
tiiat tile wages of coUege gradu- 
ates rose relative to those of high 
school graduates in the 198te. 
Superficially, this suggests a 
scardiiy of '^riih college- 

levri skills. The reason this is not 
true, tiiey argue, is that some 
coUege graduates are hired for 
jobs reqidrixig rally nindt-grade 
mafo and lea&ig skills. 

"D(wg math at a ninth -grade 
level means tbe ability to ma- 
nipulate fractions and ^Wiitwat^ 
and to inteepret line gr^ihs and 
bar gn^bs,^’ they wnte. But 
conqteiues no longer trust a hi^ 
school diploma to signify this 
level of sinll because "many re- 
cent high school graduates don’t 
have it.’’ 

Inanewsurve 
students 


survey of high school 
by tile rablic Agenda 


Fouodrttion, cwo-thiids say they 
could work harder and would do 
better. "You can just glide 
tiiTou^" one said. "Ihey prac- 
tically hand you a diploma." A 
test — embodying what we 
ought to expect from a high 
school graduate — would check 
this complacency. It wouldn’t 
toudi the best students or the 
worsL It wouldn't directly affect 
elementaiy schools. But it would 
motivate most high school stu- 
dents who aspire to college. 

Mr. Clinton is all for standards, 
and be criticizes "social promo- 
tion" in public schools. But be 
declines to inmose an effective 
standard or end social promotion 
at the one place — the door to 
coUege — where he might Stu- 
dents will intuitively grasp tbe 
hypocrisy. Will anyone else? 

WuUfytiOA Post Wiiers CnN9>. 


Diversity as a Sales Pitch: 
How Do You Say ‘Crass’? 


By RekhaBasu 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Boland’s Progress 

^ Resan/mg *Po/amTs High- 
Gnowtft Finance Minister Steps 
Doivn” (BusinesslFinance, Feb. 
5): 

The lack of native maricet 
reaction to my resignation as first 
^epuiy priine rninisier and finance 
minister sh^d be seen as a sign 
pf tbe good shape of the PoU^ 
Monoffly. I decided Do quit my 
political posts not becmise of 
"frequent feuds with the centra] 
Donk and other leaders" — they 


will argue witii each minister of 
finance who win follow my path 
of tou^ structural and stabiliza- 
tion polities — but due to the foa 
tiuit my misn on had been siic- 
cessfolly completed. 

1 do sfipreciate tiiat you refer to 
xne as a "mi^giowdi finance iniii- 
ister," because GDP indeed ex- 
panded in 1 994-96 by more than 20 
percent and craionues to increase 
this year by another 6 percent or so. 
71^ is based upon strong exprat 
and investment growtii, wmich 
soared during fois period by mote 


titan 38 perceoL Smultaneously, it 
was po^ble to reduce inflation by 
^pennfs between December 1993 
and 1996 and to decrease anem- 
plojment by 3 J praots. 

Poland is meeting two fiscal 
Maastricht criteria, keetnng the 
defirit last year at 2.4 percent of 
GDP and btin^g tiie ratio of pub- 
lic debt down fr^ 86 percent ci 
GDP in 1993 to below 50 percent 
in 1997. Poland’s membeiriup in 
the Orgaitization for Ecom^c 
Cooperatkai and Development is 
anotiter factor cradributing to fur- 


ther liberalization and integration 
of our economy. 

GRZEGORZ KOLOOKO. 

Kelsinid. 

Russian Sensitivities 

Alexander Lebed has desciibed 
NATO's expanrirai jdans as "ca- 
pricious trimni^italisin." The al- 
liance’s plan certainly looks pro- 
vocative. We sb^d tiot fofget 
that trouble forRussia canae out of 
Enrtqie on four separate occasions 
betwWn 1812 and 1941. Nor 


should we fraget tiiat Russia was 
Britain's only ally for six crucial 
mootiis b 1^1, when the fare of 
the vdiole world seemed to hang b 
the balance. In the battle for 
Bjtd^ we all owed, and still owe, 
so much to so many m Rusria. 

We need to be more sensitive to 
Rusria's sensitivities, and to de- 
vise a security scheme that will 
put Russians’ worries to rest 
Early rall«, as France has sug- 
gest^ se^ enunentiy sensible. 

DAVID MORRELL. 

London. 


D ES MOINES. Iowa — A wo- 
man named Geeta called 
me tbe other day. Sbe asked for 
me by name, which she pro- 
nounced flawlessly. 

Naturally, I assumed sbe was 
tbe friend of a friend, reachmg out 
through the vast Indian ^peline 
— maybe even a newcomer to 

MEANWHILE 

town in need of a connection from 
back home. 

But Geeta was not any of the 
above. Sbe was a sales represen- 
tative from a major teleiAone 
company. 

“Aap Hindi bol tehe?" ("Do 
you speak Hindi?’’) she asked, 
after idendfymg herself. 

This company has not had any 
luck winning my business to date. 
It has sent me cb^ after check — 
$50, $100 or more — to switch 
long-^iance companies. 

It has had various people call 
with various hard-to-refrite sales 
tebes. Though I’ve been polite, 
've remamed (for reasons 1 won't 
bore you with) loyal to another 
long-distance carrier. 

But my resoluteness has appar- 
ently not sunk in witii this com- 
pany. Some alert sale^rson 
evidently recognized my name as 
an Indian one, and decided an b- 
diaij-to-bdian pitch was b order. 

1 do, b fact, qreak Hindi, 
though imperfectly. I love break- 
ing bto it with friends. A common 
language has a unique way of fur- 
thering a bond of btimacy. 

But frankly, 1 was not mter- 
ested b helping this company fa- 
cilitate yet another sales ploy, 
havii^ explained to them count- 
less times before tiiat I didn't want 
to make the change. 

So 1 greeted tiie question about 
as warmly as 1 would any demand 
for information about my lifestyle 
and speniting habits by an btrus- 
ive telemarketing rniresentative. 

"You don't speak English?" I 
responded, ever so patiently. 

As someone who advocates 
makmg woikplaces more multi- 
cultural and hospitable to (tiverse 
work forces, you mi^t have 
thou^t I'd be erabraemg this kbd 
of as the next stqp in di- 
versity. But it just makes me 
laugh. 

As America grows more mul- 
ticultural. the one thing tiiat stays 
the same is the bottom line: cap- 


italism. Eveiytiiing, even an ac- 
cent Of a name, becomes a soles 
tool. 

This isn't the first time I've 
been the object of an ethnically 
ta^eted sales pitch. Back b New 
York skate 1 was pursued by at 
least one Indian insurance seUm; 

He would leave mess^es on 
my machine like, "Hi Rekba, 
Sanjay," followed by the name of 
sninsurance company. "Just call- 
ing to cheek in,"^he would say. 

At first the familiar tone of 
voice puzzled me, since I didn’t 
think 1 knew any Saiday. 

Of course, he wasn’t the only 
bsurance-company representa- 
tive usmg die personal approach. 

Alter my son was bom and the 
birth announcement ran in the pa- 
per, I learned the extent to wbch 
some agents will go to drum up 
busbess, I was suddenly getting 
congratulatory cards and colls 
from just about every agent b 
town. 

It's not odd for members of any 
commuxuQr to try to funnel busi- 
ness to one anodier. Indians b 
America patronize Indian real es- 
tate agents, travel agents, nannies 
and seamstresses, for example. 

But most people know that 
this telephone company is a giant 
corpoianon, and the mere sound 
of an Indian sales rep isn’t going 
to bspire great feeungs of na- 
tionalism. 

I do appreciate tite compaDy’s 
hiring Indians and members of 
other mmority groups. 

And it’s not that it isn’t fun to 
hear an Indian accent. 1 just would 
have liked it better if it had been 
a coincidence. 

What's more, this company has 
no way of knowbg how many 
generations away customers with 
ethnic-sounding names might be 
from their ancestral homeland, or 
if they even identify as members 
of an ethnic ^up. 

Anyway, it wasn't the last time 
we heard from Geeta. 

She called agab the following 
week and got my husband. But by 
last week it was an Anglo-sound- 
bg salesperson callbg. 

If only I could figure out whai 
language it would take to make 
them afi understand "no." 


The writer is a columnistforthe 
Des Moines Register. This com- 
ment was distributed by New York 
Times Special Features. 






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^ feb 24, 25, 26, 1997 Paris, France 

eco 1997 

Gco-logiques strategies * 


-4- 4- f ~r T' i" 

An international conference on strategic tools, plans and 

thinking about environment as a component of 
competitiveness, for industry and govemmenL 

Simultaneous translation — French, En^ish & Japanese 

day 1 Policy In the Making 

Main fiippi French Mine Minteter-Open/Uff 

Viishffiinii Isu}i Chairman, Nissan Motor Company^ Chairman, Environment & Safety Committee, 
Keidanren, Tokyo : Xe/danren’s voluntary action to cope with reihiction of -waste 
antfeOa -on approach try Japanese inriastry 

David Vice-President. The Dow Chemical Company; Co'ChaIr, PresMant Clinton's 

Commission on Sustmnable Development : Fco-Efftcleney- A CompeUthre edge 
In the ehemkal Industry? 

Mfkell PozMvanov Mayor of Mariupol. Member of the Ukrainian Parliament with Olivier Bomsel, 

CERNA, Eoole des Mines, Paris : ¥/hyls a morket-dr/ven economyiVedyto better 
manage the environment In former Soviet Block Countries? 

Philip nWiittT Director of Planning, EnvinMiment and External Afbirs, Former European 
Coordinator, Shell International and Chief Executive, Shell Nigeria : 

Responding to society's changing expectations.* Lessons (earned from Brent Spar 
and risewhere. 

Bill Long Director of Environment, OECD : Overview oftools and strategies for 
envlnmenlai management 

Rrancfc ROoed President of Danone, France : Industrial and environmenta/ aneems while 
baUdbtg a global company: 

8afo ribadr dt the Paris MdM de Vnia at the lovftotfee ^ Che dty 0/ Parle 

day 2 Programs-Case Studies 

with ; Brad iUlenby (USA). Roth Frommer (EU* DGX 0 > 

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JUIan Kupds ffanad^, Corinne Lepage (Aanc^ s' 

Katsuo Send OaparO, TBpfer (Gennany) and others 

day 3 Cutting-Edge Techniques 

For more details and registration information, contact : 

Association for Colioquia on the Environment, Periny Allen and ChristopheBonazzI, 
73 avenue Paul Doutaer 75016 Parts, France. 

T:33 (0)145038284 F:33 (0)14503 8280 
E-mail : ace9ecop7.org Web site : www.eco97-org 

Honorary Chairman, Brice Lalonde with the ofRcIal patronage of 
The Rench Ministry of the Environment and 
1 QKD (Otganfe e tion far Ecotromic Co-operation and Pevetopmeni) 


Ademe 







PAGE 2 


I 


PAGE 10 



INTEBNATI01SM>HEKAL^ S ATOBDtf-SUWDAi; FEBRUARY 1^3, »97 


IpmEaONAlIONALHERAU^ TRIBim, THTTBSnAY^ frrhttahv t.h 1997 


HEALTH/SCIENCE 


Finding Causes of Impotence 


By Robert W. Stock 

NewYmUltmeiSavite 



EW YORK — My oew 
doctor (old me he was send- 
ing over a que^oinaiie 
fore my appointmenL The 
. first page turned out to be a snap; 
marital status, ttoe of bath, education. 

The next few jages were socnedung 
else a g?«n? Dtnmg sexual activity are 
you preoccui»ed a^ut getting and 
maintaining an erecdon? How ofteo do 
you have sexual intercourse or attenipt 
to have sexual intercourse? 

Seeing those questions there in blade 
and white gave me pause: What had I 
let myself m for? 

I had called the doctor because I 
hoped he could help me with a case of 
creeping impotence. I had my doubts, 
but 1 was determined to stop the creep, 
and chat was how I ended up on the 
doorstep of Dr. E Douglas Wnitdiead. 
a Manhattan urologist. He has no lack 
of potential patients. Some 30 million 
American men suffer Ciom partial or 
chronic erectile dysfunction, as the 
doctors call it, and the majoriQr are 
older than 65. 

But only 10pereeatofiiiqx)tentinea 
seek medical bl^ Many assume noih- 
ing can or should be done; older meo 
om accrat inqxxeoce as an inevitable 
part of agnig, uliidi it is not, and 

in the old'u^^^efiiL and uuntfuraL 

My generation — Pm 67 — was 
raised to believe that die perfonnance 
aspect of sex defined our manhood. 
FaUure wovdd be entshing, untfamkable. 
We were also told that M percent of 
iirqxitence was psydnlogic^ Tod^, 
the experts say that the vast majexity of 
irnpotaice m rnen of ar^ ^ is oigaiiic 
in nature — a proUem with blood ves- 
sels or the nervous system. ' 


In men over 6 S physical causes are 
the chwf cu^nit 90 poceot of tiie tunc. 
And once the partiailar physical {Hob- 
lem is detemuned, there are efiective 
treatments available — from vacuum 
punm devices to self-administered 
medications. Several more treatments, 
mr.hvBng plls to be taken shortly be- 
fege sex, are on the way. The pills, 
which are still e xp e rim e n tal, are lUtely 
to diange the wfole treatment of im- 
potence. 

Impotence has a host of possible 
causes, including high blood {nessure, 

<fiabetes and prostate cancer, and many 
of the medications used to treat them. 

Dr. Whitehead started me off with a 
[Aysical exam and blood tests, vtiiich 
eventually showed that my testosterone 
levels were oormaL No inicfa for me. 

Next came a test called the RigiscaiL 
For tiuee nights in a tow, 1 went to bed 
wearing a heavy, batteiy-4adea mon- 
itoring device straroed to my left leg. 
Two wires emerged from die monitor, . 
ea>ch endi^ in a loop. 1 attached die 
lo^ to my penis, one at the base, the 
other at die ^ and then I tried to sk^. 
Men of all ^es have etectioos during 
the rapid-eye-movement stages of sleep. 
If mine were measured at (he normal 
frequency, duration and rigidity, it 
w^d mean my main ptoUem was not 
oigamc but psjvhalogi^ — something 
io wy beau was ovaoidmg my bo^'s 
nom^ sexual reactions. 

A few days later in bis office. Dr. 
Whitehead (felivered the veztiicL “I’m 
afraid you had only infrequent erec- 
tions, and diey were pomy main- 
tained,*' he said. 

Then the nerves in my penis were 
tested and pEDDOunced ncroiaL 

The next test called for the penite 
mj^on of a drug called aiprakadil, 
which is supposed to stimulate an ereo- 

firtn Then a iwrhn i fiim an ulca- 


sound machme to check the State of die 
aiterial blood flow in my penis. The 
rqpoct: “A ootain degcee of hapair- 
menL” 

Difficulty with penile blood flow is 
the moA eommou cause of i mpo t ence. 
Dr. Whitehead said. Then, with jdateic 
models and fall-color (Swings, he 
proceeded to eaqplaio my options. 

Last November a pank of the Amer- 
ican Urological Assodation listed five 
potential tfaerapiea. The three it leoom- 
mended — and which Dr. Whitdiead 
suggested I conrider — areailcovaed 
by ^fedicare and medical insarecs. 

One approved treatment is a vacuum 
device feat consists of a plastic ^- 
inder tiiat lodes like a test tube wife a 
pm^ The patient places tiie 

cylinder over his penis and pumps fee 
air out, drawing blood into die penu 
and creating an erection. An elastic 
band is then placed around the base of 

the to mainfain fee eieCtiOlL 


S URGICAL implants are an- 
other option. The thiid ap- 
proved trealmeot is & 
penile iojectimi called 
Cavenect, which was used as pert of 
my test The self-injected 

alprostadil relaxes the smooth nmsclea 
in fee penis and expands fee arteries to 
improve blood flow. 

1 considered fee advantages and dis- 
advantages of each treatmeaL The sur- 
gical inqdants require no rigtnarole — 
no i^tmpmg or injecting. But 
are invasive and subject to mechamcal 
faSnre (feough it is rare). And surg^ 
was more than I was ready to &nk 
atvMrf The vacuum ptmp la rifnpl^ to 
use and noumvasive, but it is cum- 
beraome. 

I finally chose the CaveijecL There 
are needlea, of course, bat tb^ are short 
fiH nryj virtually 


Prostate Study Lacks Volunteers 


By Gina Kolata 

tfeifYort limes Service 



EW YORE — fr is OIK of 
tite most inqmtant medical 
probloms rating mec over 
55: vhat is die best way to 
treat early prostate cancer, the seexmd 
leafeng cause of cancer d^h in men? 

ShcNiId it be treated a^iessively, 
with a dierapy lite rafecal surgery, 
which can leave men inqiotent arid 
incontinent? Or riiould it be al^ 
and monitaied to be sure its growfe 
does not suddenly accelerate? 

But scientists who are tt^ng to get a 
definitive aaswa* to diis question are 
findipg that it is excrndatiiigly difSculL 
A clmical trial, in vhkh men wife pro- 
state cancer would be randomly as- 
signed to surgery or to carefhl mon- 
horing, was b^jra duee yer^ ^ ^ 
Depamneat of Veterans Affidrs m col- 
laboration wife dK Natioiutl Cancel hi- 
stitute. The goal was to enroll 1 ,050 men 
by this year. Instead, stud Dr. Timothy J. 
wilt, the stutfy's director, who is at fee 
Mmneapotis Veterans Affidis Mefecal 
Center, only 315 have been enrolled. 

The reason is feat men do not want to 
let someone else decide on whether 
they have surgery , said Dr. Joseph Oes- 


teriing, the chief of urology at the Uui- 
verrity of Minnesota. Dr. Oesteriing 
said that he had asked about 300 men 
wife newly dlagpofied prostate cancer 
whefeer fe^ would like to enter the 
stutfy and that only four agreed. And, 
Dr. Oesteriing tw cannot 
femn. After all, these inen are facing a 
deadly disease. But few of them, he 
said, want to have their treatment de- 
temtined by a coin flip. 

And yet Dr. Oesteriing and ofeer 
doctors agree diat the trial was central 
to ibe fen^nt debate about what h) do 
about cancer. As many as 

of all American men in tiieir 6 (h are 
now being screened for the cancer wife 
a blood test, called PS^ for prostate 
specific antigen. An estimated 3 1 7,000 
be found to have the disease this 
year and 48,000 will die fiom iL 

Many are treated wife surgery, a 
radical prostatectomy, that removes the 
prostate gland. Although the operation 
leaves many meo. unpoteot and iocoo- 
tinent, surgeons aigw that removing 
tite cancerous gland saves lives. 

But skeptics note that prostate cancer 
tends to occur late in life — 95 percent 
of all prostate cancer patients are older 
than a^ 55 and fee typical patient is in 
his 60s — and fee cancer lends to grow 


very slowly. It might oeva- and 

cause a problem in a man’s lifetime, in 
which case surgery mi^ be urme- 
cessary. But sometunes it grows rap- 
idly, metastariziiig and IdUing. In fet^ 
ntn^nmi , soigery might come too latw 
— fee cancer mi ghf already have 

r ad by the thne caiicer is foi^ aid 
gland removed. 

And so the veterans agency and the 

emrer iTi<ttinit»» began tfaw rlrniral tn,. 

al. “There is no other way to know if 
surgery prolongs life,’* said Dr. 
Timothy J. WUt, tbe diiectar of the 
study a^ an associate professev of 
medidne at fee Mmneapotis Veterans 
Affairs medical center. And, Dr. Wilt 
added, at tins pmiit, “selecting a treat- 
mem is really a best guess.’* 

But Dr. Oesteriing and several other 
tearfing surgeom say It is already too late 
for the study. People have tnade im their 
miods about treatment, though wife kss 
than perfect evidence. “Inis clinical 
trial feat everyone is so iiiterested in. 1 
can assure you feat it will never bqrpen 
imkss there is an actof Cou^ess sqrog 
tiiat every man vfeo wants to get tvrated 
murtear^** Dr. Oesteriing raid. “Men 
come in with very dgfimtp. opinions. 
They do not want to be guinra pgs. 
They warn to be in co n trol" 


SHUTTLE MISSION 


Improving Hubble’s View of the Universe 

Shufee sstror^auts left Tuesday on a mission to rernove 
instrument modules and install replacement componenls 
that promise deeper and dearer views of ^)ace. Earfe 
module k about the size and m^ of a phm booth. 

Space T alaicopa k ha glng Spadrograpb 
Improved epectropraph separates light 
gathered by the telescope into cbmporKnt 
colors to find chemical compo^ion of nnore 
distant objects. 

HubbteSpaea 



SaeceeNASA 


Near Infrared Camera and 
MuM-ObJadt Spactromatar 
Expand telesoope’s vision -to differMit 

wavelengths, so ^nt and distant phenomena 
can be bb^rved, Rke birth of stars and 
galaries and possiUy new planets. 


Stargazing: The View From Earth 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

ffettfVorisTbnes Sersice 



EW YORK — Ever since the 
reign of Louis XIV, wme 
bortira msnufectured in Par- 
is by Comp&gnic dc Smnt- 
GolMin have beeo giera — and so is the 
glass from which this old French com- 
pany cast tire 100 -inch-diametcr ( 2 SS- 
centimeter) minor far the Hooker ^e- 
scope <» Moufe Califemi^ 
The quaint wine- bottle color of the 
4.5-toa Hooker mirrar, which has plityed 
a gigaftrir folC 1917 m hnmanhy *a 

UDderstsnding d its place in the uni- 
verse, reminds its prraent-day user cf 

tfw iTu Un i mw i t ' « v enera ble TOOtB. PuT 

“100 inch," as astronomen affection- 
' s^y call it, has also becmiK a symbol of 
a lemadcable renairaance in ^ art of 
telescope ^ - «i g n- 

A wave of new techniques based cm 
feedback systems, new matftriaTs and 
mathematics hra enabled asAmomen not 
only to bcold a new ^rteratiaD of fiur moro 
powvifLil telescopes bat also to rejoven- 
ate older instruments wife devices rti«r 
culture almost ev^ photon ofli^fiom 
distant stars. Tbe Hooker instromezit, for 
example, was consigned to matfaballs as a 
museum piece for ei|ht years, bat it 1 ^ 
been brought back nom the as a 
ixemier research telescope. 

'l^.spa^ extent, astropcany has re- 
'tucried to me ^dand'aftei^tiiree deOades 
m which space-based inscrumeots have 

nftm <tnlen riw^ - lfwirfigtit 

Th^ irruiggg and n»tiTTTii»ri m Fjirth 

Iwjte Hubble Space Tdescope sipce its 
1993 xep^ — a cooiet hitriDg Jupilier. a 
stonn raging across thousands of mBes of 
Saturn’s sinfeCB and a nursery where 
stars are bom, for example — have 
amazed and delighfed nonscaentists as 
well as astronoiners. Astronauts cn the 
^pace fenttie Dtscovety areoow cm theiT 
way to the Hubble, where they are to 
replace two mstruments wife more ad- 
vanced ones, aod tune up guidance sys- 
tems so the telcKope will be iq> to date for 
forfeer cq)ioratioa (see gr^feic above). 


And in the last two years, tbe little 
Gafileo spacecraft has probed the npper 
atmosphere ofJupitera^seait back pic- 
tures fear Iwnr of marvels on the g»ant 


planet and its moons. 

The Cosmic Badegroand Ezqdom 
qwcecnft of tihe Natronal Aeronautics 
and Space Administration revolution- 
ized ^bth-centuiy with its dis- 

cover feat fee- microwave ed» of the 
Big Bang is not smooth, bat ^Ksks of. 
stiiKture even mttK esriiM epoch of the 
universe. And a ladio ante nna dSsfa 
scheduled Sot latnv^g this week will 
wodc in concert wife ladfio telesxjpes 
qnead across the Umied States, Australia 
and Europe to produce radio tmagp* so 
fine they win be cooqiBrable to observing 
a fbotpi^ on the moon from Enfe. 

WhQe scares of 01 ^ spacecraft hove 
also captured attBotion, new tedinolo|y 

have paved the way for a net^ pro- 
ductive era in gitmodhesedastixtociiny. 

Many of the new groundrfaased tele- 
scopes rival even the Hubble Space Tele- 
scope in their dnily of vssi^ so ef- 
fectivi^ can their computerized ^es 
piem Earth’s tmbuknt atntosphere, 
tritich makes stars twinkle and blocks 
some of the larfiation fiequendes imr 
portantto astronomy. 


ers capabift of 

size of the entire Earth; ^Kcial glasi 
mixtines that resist defoxmation while 
undergoing temperaiure changes and 
mudi more. 

Even NASA, wfeich traditionaUj 
supports q>ace sdence.nowhasanum- 
riatft to support ground-based . tele- 
scopes. 

iW eatample, the rom agency- wiq 
coniribote soine $ 1 S motion fijracotesoiy 
insliuments to be used wife tm ^ivatdyl 
buih Kiecfc tdescopes' in Hawra — r. tiia 
worid’s largest — and is supportmgpio-| 
jects at sev^ ofeer gronna-based obi 


O N every continent, inrinriing 
Amar^ca, new ground-, 
bared obrervatoiies are' 
sprin g in g Ep ID ooiiq>leinent 
the work orq»oebome observatories, 
vfeich, by their nature, are expensive and 
difficult to operate. 

Great though the Hubble Space Tele- 
sc(^ has proi^ to be, ft 
buud that since its mception, new tedor 
oologies have emceed endowing 
ground-based trJcscopes wife many of 
the advantages of those (^Krating in 
spacrt 

These new technologies include 
powerfol computers, new telescope 
momits, better observatory designs, 
feedback systems that sque^ the dis- 
tortive twinkling of stars, int erf e rom et- 


s e i vat o n es. 

The success of observatories lilre the! 
Kedc has led astronomer s to forecast fed 
fiYiminent dawmog of a goldcn age ou 
astronomy. Quefeons feat scamtisiy 
once consider beyond the reach cn 
. observation may soon fiiMiat least partial 
answers. Among them are there: : I 

• Is dim life — or are there at leasO 

habitable planets — b^ond the sr^ 
tystem? I 

-■ • How much does fee universe weighj 
and what are the unseen substances feas 
seem to make up much of its mass? | 

• Ifow does fee fbire of ^vity relate! 
to the three ottekitowiifiK^ of naturej 
the strong red weak nuclear fores and 
electromagnetism? 

• Wbat mechanism oeated galaxies 
arid large-scale structure in tbe nniversb 
soon after the Big Bang ciealion event? 

• What, exa&y, are mystodous 
things tike quasars and gamma-ray 
bursters? 

• How win the oniyiase end? . c . 

Dr. Frederick Qhaffee. director of the 

Keck Observatory in Etewaii, ascribes 
great importance to the search for ex.- 
tratenestiial life aod habitable planets 
outside fee solar syst^ 

“Tbe human ^nrit yeaiu to knotK 
whether we are akae." be said, “and dip 
to look fOT extraterrestrial life is 
not jurt a product of dre media and 
potiticiaus. For tbe first time in bistoiyi 
we have the tools to address diis great 
question scientifically.’*' 


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Too Much of a Good Thing: Is Low-Fat Diet a Recipe for Diahetes? 


iHE^nONAL MANj 

•“ersAmlv Urn 


By Denise Grady 

York Times Service 



EW YORK — People who 
eat lots of potati^ «feite 
bread and ^feite rice in die 

- mistaken belief that ft is fee 

best to fidlow a low-fat diet may be 
doing themselves more harm than good. 

A steady diet of such foods may ac- 
tuaUy be a recipe for diabetes, according 
to a study by Harvard researchers in Tbe 
Journal of tbe American Mefecal As- 
sociation. 

Tbe study, which tracked 65,173 wo- 
men for six years, found that those who 
tee a siarfey diet dun was also low in fiber 
and draiik a lot of soft drii^ 1 ^ two and 
a hrif dines dw rate of diabetes fbiuxl in 
women who ale less of those foods and 
more fiber, or rough^, specifically, 
more fiber from whole -grain Tn- 

fotmation about diet came from surveys 
filkd out by Ibe women as part of the 20- 
yesmold Nurses’ Health S^y projecL 

Tbe starchy, low-fiber ctiet moieased 
dK diabetes risk in all the wtxneii, in- 
dependent of other risk faaats 1 ^ age, 
ob^ty, exercise and family histray. In 


sqrar^ research to be published sore, 
dK scientists have fenmd a sirnilar effect 
in men, said tbe study director. Dr. Wal- 
ter a pR^essor of epkteoiiology 

and nutrition at dre Harvard &hool of 
Public Health. 

The study participants who became 
diabetic dewioped the most common 
form of the dise^, non-insuiin-depend- 
eot diabetes, which has also been ^led 
aduit-onset or Type II diabetes. 

The treatments for this type of dia- 
betes include diet and exercise to control 
weight, because obesity is a majm- rife 
factor. Insulin injections and ofew med- 
ications are also used to control blood 
sugar, but severe complications often 
occur even in qnte of treatment; tiiey 
include heart fesease, blindness, Itidney 
failure and circulation problems that 
lead to amputatioD of feet and 1 ^. 

Dr. Willett, offering a possible ex- 
planation for the new dietary finHmg s. 
suggested diat too tittle fiber and too 
much of the wroog type of carbefeydiate 
may be haimfuL It bas been known for at 
least IS years diat the carbohydrates in 
white bread, potatoes and v^te rice are 
quickly digested and absorbed, causing a 


big surge in blood sugar, or glucose, 
wUch m turns leads fee pancreas to 
secrete high levels of insatin. Ounce ftr 
ounce, tfam foods increase blood gluc- 
ose lewis more than eating su^ itself. 

Over dme, tugh blood sugar and in- 
sulin levels may make tte boity lea 
sensitive to ftisuUn, a cooditioa called 
insulin resistance, :md greater and great- 
er amounts of insalin are needed to meta- 
bolize glucose. 

The lack of fiber is detrimental be- 
cause fiber can slow the absorption of 
caibcfeydrates and prevent singes in tbe 
levels of blood sugar and insuUn. In 
addition. Dr. Willett said, micranuai- 
ents in fiber, particxilady Tna^iMchim^ 
may be important in preveaHng dia- 
betira. 


foods ridi in filber rather dian taking 
Twa^p-BTiTT* or other siqrplementB. 

&. Willett said he ejqrected that 
people trould be shocked to bear tbe bad 
news about white bread and rice, and 
especiatiy potatoes. ** Americans have 
bera told to load up on those things as if 
they're magical foods becaase they’re 
low in be said. “The base of Ibe 
food pynmkl is 11 servings a diQr of 


carbohydrates, and it includes pota- 
toes.’*. 

But his fioefings' do not dnllengift tfae 
basic idea of the fbodpyramid, be said, or 
siqjport any cf dK poniW ditt books tfate 
urge people to abtexiba caibotQFdrates in 
hrkx of Idfe-proiem feeta. Cnto- 
hydales should still be the iwpi? of 
(&t. Dr. Willett said, but be cautioned, 
“Be careful wUdi ones you eaL’* 


“Bread, rice and pasta should be in 
fee wtaoito-gesun form: brown rice and 
whole-grain pastas and breads," he adi 
ded. “And go easy on the potatoesl 
Potatoes have been a staple wfara people 
faced starvation and needed calories, but 



potatoes 
ammuits, and not every day;-" 


BOOKS 


P REVIOUS studies have sug- 

crease fee bo^^srashivity 
to infflilin, casiog fee stress on 
the pancreas. In this study, feough, it 
was impossible to vrtN^er it was 
magnesinm or some odier fiber ingredi- 
ent that jHOtected people from diabetes, 
so Dr. Willett recommended earing 


TOUBlSTSr 

How Fastest Grown^ 
Indiutry Is CSianging the Wbrid 
By lorry Krotz 238 pages. S24SfS. Faber 
andPaber, 


By Alan Tniscort 


I F your partner opens one 
no-trump and you have a 
sttiid nunor suit and tittle else, 
ft is simide to raise to three 
no-trump. 

If your opponent imer- 
veaes, three no-tnimp is s^ 
leaso^le, sinoe ft is until^y 
that opener has two weak 
suits. 

Tournament players can 
niard arainst thu sti^ 
danger. They nse a direct 
three no-tnimp to deny a Stop- 
per and a Lebenscfel two no- 
trump, forcfeg a feiee-club 
leqxxise, to promise a stigh 
per. There is no standard solu- 
tion, however, ufeoi an op- 
poo^ shows two Suits. 

Id the diagramed deal 


pla^ in a Senior Pairs event 
m waldwick. New Jeis^, 
East’s oveicall of two hearts 
promised both major suits. 

South should have bid a 
simple three no-ttuizq). al- 
tiKMi^ that would proltebly 
not have ended the biddiug. 
East would no douto have 
ventured four hearts, in the 
teeth of the vulnerability, and 
would have fuled by one trick 
against accurate defimse. If 
Ebt played the spade kmg 
early, be would succeed u 
North failed to hold up his 
ace. 

Instead South bid five tfior 
monds, which was in jeop- 
aidy when West led a heart. 
East was Al Pagao of West- 
wood, New Jersey, ufeo tofe 
two heart tikks. 

He feen nude the only play 


to insure defeat, by leading a 
third heart. Hie hoped to pro- 
mote a bump bcnior in his 
partner’s hmd, mid mic- 
ceeded. The best South could 
do was to discard a spade 
loser. The diamond ten 
scored, and South made tbe 
rest for down one. 

The heart play would have 
been disastrous if Soufe’s 
diamonds had beeu solid. 
nulling the spade kiiig would 
also have been a gamble. 
South would have won in 
dummy and played many 
trumps. Eventually be would 
have had to make a decirioa 
in clubs. A normal finesse 
would have resulted in a tw<^ 
trick defeat, vriiile playing the 
A-K, to insurs 10 ttwks, 
would have made fee con- 
tracL 


NORTH 

♦ AI 42 
9XJ 
093 ' 

♦ AKJ 93 


WEST 

41973 

952 

419879 

A109S4 


EAST 
♦ XQJS 
9 AQU 9 S 91 
0 — 

4 Q 9 


SOUTH (EQ 

499 

974 

4AKQJ942 

472 


East and west VCR vatacnUe. Ibe 
Udi^: 


Sooth 

Wtet 

Itafli 

Ent 

Pan 

Pass 

LKT. 

29 

S4 

Pais 

Pan 

Plte 

Ves led the besrt Sre 



-- • - 






1 


Reviefwed by James T. Yenckel 

M ^T of ns ate toorists at ooB time 
or another, and tourism, as Low 
Krotz tells os, is changing tbe world is 
fee change for bette r ex' for worse? Tbe 
answer, Ee cooclades, is bofe. OvenU, 
his book prints a gloomy picture, whidi 
shouldn't surprise anyone who wft- 
neraed tiM vacation condo spsawi that 
affli^ many of the world’s loveliest 
beaches. But be is optimistic that aiKw, 
more sensitive ere of tourism is aposi ns 
tiite may be fele to preserve the integrity 
of a deteftiatioa nfeer than destroy it 
As tourists, eager to ree distant lands 
or simply tbe next village up the road, are 
we the vlllaias ufeo aregwlty of blem- 
is^g pristme landsoqies and corropt- 
ing other cultures? ShouJd we saybemae 
to spare ite world furtiier harm? Well L 
for one, do not accqpt blame, and I plan 
tokeeptravding; Krotz, a creative writ- 
ing instructor at the UniveEsity of Maor 
ft^ m Winnqteg, • would seem io 
agree. 

Ife is an avid traveler who. in his 
research on tbe effects of mass tourisoi, 
visited Gennany, Africa, Nttrfe Dakota 
(jute across the horde from his home) 
andBetire, which be argues is in danger 
of being overdeveloped As in so many 
ofeer popular the natural 

beauty feat drew tbe first visftorato that 
Ckotrri American itatiod ft beuig binied 
in concrete to accommodate the bodes 
following in their footsteps. 


As Krotz points out, tourism has be- 
come “the biggest emplo^vr and festest 
^wing industry in dk wcnld'' Vir- 
tnally everybody — exc^peiiuqis oil- 
xiebBnufi Aiatm -^.ft 
tourism because it is a Jabor-inleosive 
nKmqanfeer, and ft can stinmlace such 
rolDover industries as agriculture (fb^ 
fori estwirante )a nd haiM fea afis(toten 4 >t 
shoppers). Even North Dalrola, never on 
ai^body’s list of dream vacation spots, 
ft Hying to grfe its feare of the tourist 
dotito by yrtlighting the state’s frontier 
history, wmdi acm^y ft a worthy en- 
deavor. 

At its bes^ touririn can qnir nwrinne 
and communities to preserve feeir nat- 
ural and cubural treasures. Tbe prospect 
of loorftt dollars has transfiamed Bal- 
timore's waterfroot a Uvdiy mar- 
Iceqdaoe, and firii t^aueftoo owes its 
reroarniiig cable cars to tbfe intema- 
tional smeaL Afncaa- wildtife. once 
seemingly doomed, eofttys new value as 

atoarfttmrefopboto sararis. lutiM kmg 

nm, Califopua^ redwoods will prove 

more valnaUe left Standing qmght th^ 

cbofmed ftv lumber. Old San Juan, Pu- 
erto Kico, a major cruise port, bas never 
looked bteter thanks to touiism-spaiked 
restorationeffims. 

At its worst, tourian is a d^tioyer. 
Pve just ttemned from fee qmet, bucolic 
ftbmd of Sl Ctoix in fee U.S. Vi^ 
Iriands. To draw more vftftois, some^ 
Onoix' interests want to open a casino 

vriudL could change the character of the 
ftland fo Hawaii, lovely Maui is a voy 
{mpolar vacation dfeth^on, but visftora 

ttioe have to pot op wfth mrinland-4ike 

ttaCBc jams, Isitift the paradise travekrs 

are looldng for? In summer, the 
Rim of the Grand Canyon can seem as 


crowded as New Yofe’s Rffe Avenue.i 

What can be done to foster the bear 
efits aod reduce the pfifaiis of inras 
tourism? Third World couzitries such as 
Belize nu^t set iwwitatiwn* od how 
moefa growth will be permitted, but-tfais 
ft asking a lot of a poor nation eyeing tiie 
flow of new money. ' 

A ccwde of years ago, razigers attfae 
Gr and Ca nyon urged travelers to avoid 
uK summer crush — to save fee — 

and many stayed away.-But motel op* 
erators io nearby Flagstaff voiced out- 
rage because they were losmg btisinres: 
p tzme, perhaps tourism promoters win 
learn dte value of lestzrint ^ 

, T ourism’s inqzact on fee worid is aq 
unponant issiK. and Krotz- ft-to be com’' 
jnooded for irising ft. But his booK 
leaves too much unanswered to be a 
useftil guide for anyeme. As a frequent 
riav rier, I read it wife iperearing <fisj 
ai^mtment and frustxation. 

What can 1 do, as an individual, to 
avoid causiiig ham when I travel?' Iii 
Mewro OT tiw Caribbean, I shop ^ 
ftSMtoade oafts, which I think ft nurr 
tiffing the preservation of local ridlft. I 
tiy to stay m locally owned lodgings, so 
that the mon^ I ig in die- 
co fUTnnn ity rather than prnna m a-fbi* 
mjgn-owiied chain Anti I. sever take 
foshi~scetng excursions ihc^ 

^^ 0 ^ inttusions on any locale- Am | 

Answeis to these and many inioie 
2 *®stiOtis will have to wait until a' nioiq 
ti^ou^ study of tourism’s role in fee 
wp™ uiideriakeu. - 





I S 










remes T. Yenckel writes tht weef^ 
fearless Traveler column cn the Sunday 
Travel section of The Wash^gton Post.' 




•«*, . ■ .y* ‘•'S. 

I’'"! 


*e» i 





INTEKTUIKHUL 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


R 


IHUBSDAX; FEBRUARY 13, 1997 


PAGE 11 




Most Firms 
In U.S. Stay 
Calm Amid 
Dollar’s Rise 


By Keith Bradsher 

New Forlfc 7I»ie» Senio r 

DETROIT — When the dollar was 
soaring a draen years many 
American manufacturers wanted that 
zh^ busioe^es would be severefy^ in- 
jured by an influx of cbeiqi J^ianese 
tractors, cars and other inqxuts. 

The dollar be^ sttaring wgnin 
this winter, but this time, die oomber of 
U.S. companies expressing alarm has 
been smprisin^y small. 

In recent days, offidals at Boeing 
Co., General Efectiic Co. and Intel 
Corp. have dismissed worries about 
the dollar. Even Cateipillar Ibc^ wtuch 
led the complaints in the mid-1980s, 
has said almost nodiing latel y about Ihc 
dollar’s surge, although its diairman, 
Dmaid Htes, some concern 

last summer. 

While the doUar’srise still thrwitwng 
grave harm to some industries, BOtal^ 
carmakers in Detroit, many odier U.S. 
companies are insuteted from its ef- 
fects by expanded prodn^cm over- 
seas, a de»de of n^^ressave cost-cut- 
ting and active hedgmg of cutrendes. 

U.S. madtme-tod makers, tnany of 
whidi were nearly driven out of 1^- 
ness in the mid-19^ by low-priced 
Japanese imports, have been resnaric- 
d)ly quiet about the Lmsst rise in the 
dollar. 

**We can expmt our machines to 
Japan and Europe widi a landed cost 
that is competiOTe,” even at current 
exchai^ rales, said James Gleasm, 
chairman of Gteuon Corp., amachine- 
tool manufacturer based m Rodhesrer, 
New York. 

Mr. Gleason gave several reasons. 
For example, he said, the company has 
sh^iy redu^ its costs over the past 
dec£^ and abstuned from significant 



TfeNewYdfkTSno 

A fk*oDt fine in the battle of the currancies: an assembly liiie at a General Motors Corp. plant in Baltimore. 


price increases — Japan^ madune- 
tool producers have had little room to 
cot pmoes lately because they did not 
raise them mudi when the dollar was 
weak — and it has agnificantly 'ex- 
panded production overseas. 

Moving prodnctitMi to countries 
where costs are lower allows compa- 
nies to sell conqretitively priced go^ 

Economic data step up the iMessore 
on Britain to raise rates. Page 13. 

and bold market share even when the 
doDar is rising, although profits earned 
elsewhere also translate inio fewer doJ- 
lats when the U.S. currency is strong. 

Some ecwionuste say th^ while the 
dollar has risen about 54 percent 
against the yen sinoe its low m April 
19^, it has ai^)redated mudi 1^, 
around 17 peremt, in tradepweighted 
tetn^ «4iidi measures it against cur- 
Ttaicies majes' tcaidng partners. 

llie U.S. dollar has bc^ neaibi' un- 
changed in that period against the Ca- 
nadian dollar, rar example, and the 
currency ’s recent steep rise against the 


; reached in tiie mid-1980s. 

As a result, while some cogqwties, 
noeddy automakers, are 
concern now about the dollar’s 
strength, others are not, particulaciy 
thorn thA have iniovedpart or all of tireir 
inannfactuihig operatiom oBslxxe. 

This mi^t only mean that U.S. 
CMinianies ate bemg slow to recognize 
the daogeis of a stroqg dollar, as tb^ 
were in the 1980$. 

The Ingber U.S. rate of inflation 
compared witii Sspaa means the dollar 
sbouM be ftiling 2 peac^ 
a year^DSt to ke^ price leveiis in the two 
ooemtnes ctnmaraUe. Adjusted for dif- 
ferences in inflation, the dollar-yen ex- 
change rate is neara six-year 

Tbe rising dollar is cleady harming 
some sectors of tbe economy already. 

Sonre economists argue tint h hurts 
Amoican workers even if it does not 
hurt multinational corporations based 
in the United States. 

The busmesses tiiat are saSering 
from the strong dollar now fell into 
tinee smnetimes overiapping categor- 
ies: Qimtiiodxty prodneers tl^ 


on small maigfns are finding their 

profits eroded by foreign coiiq)e!titoss; 
busmesses widiout operations that ex- 
port, or that have to compete with 
rnqxnts, siifi pM* many of tbe disadvant- 
age of a strene dollar witiiout feie 
altili^ to ejqjand production in coun- 
tries wife weak cutrendes; and smne 
companies that cmnpete mainly wife 
imports from Japan are struggling. 

Tbe louder complaims latefy have 
come from Detroit's Big Three auto- 
makers tfa^ fair into all three 

cat^oiie of volnefdxlity. They mainly 
con^cte with Iqianese ioqxxts in fee 
U.S. market and have steadily 
losiDg iDffifcet feme to them receiUly. 

While tile Big Ttuee have extensive 
operations in they have min- 

imal sale in Jwan and do not feiectiy 
own any assemmy plants there, so they 
are not msnigted against the yen’s de- 
cide. In addttioo, there are signs that 
antomobOes are becoming commod- 
itie, sdd as basic transpmtalicm at 
razor-thin margins that can evaporate 
when exdtange rates change. The Big 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 


in Rejects HilWs Bid 
Of $10.5 Billkm for Firm 

Target Calls Offer Low and Problematic 

CtmpeaIbfOm’StifiFiti»a^MiriKs CTOWth. 


NEW YORK— ITT 
Hfltm Hotels Corp.’s SIOJ t^on hos- 
tile takeover ofier Wednesday as too low 
and too pnfelemaiic, setting back 
IfiltOD’s bid to becoTO the world’s 
Inggest owner of large hotels and casi- 
nos. 

nr said the SSS-a-share ofier had not 
fairly valued the company an d ha d 
raised too many cmflicts between ITT’s 
Sheraton chain and Hiltoa's hotels. 

TIT added tint it believed it would 
have brighter projects if it stayed in- 
depend^ and buudizig its own hotels 
and casinos. 

IClton executives were not ixmne- 
(fiately available to comment <»i whether 
IQton would raise its bid, which emn- 
I $63 billioo in stock and about $4 
lion in assumed debt 

Hilton has said it would be willing to 
raise it s offe r once it gets a chance to 
lot Ate rTFs bodes. 

m also sdd it would file a lawsuit in 
federal court in Nevada to block tiie bid. It 
charged tint JfiltoQ misused confidential 
infoEmatioo on ITT tint Hilton obtained 
vriiea it acquired Bally Botertaininent 
Corp. in June 1996 for about $ 3 billion, 
nr also had been in talks to buy Bally. 

“There are serious business conflicts 
vtiiidi have always confronted a 
Sheraion-EGltancombmatioo — owning 

and managing innlrip lft hotels under each 

brand in dozens of tin same cities creates 
unterial confl icts of intereA’’ Rand 
Arariteg. nTs chief executive, said. 

Hilton’s plan to link tbe Sheraton 
chain wife Inc., which franduses 
such lower-priced motel c hains as Days 
Inn, also raised questions, TTT said. 

ITT has already undergone a wiendi- 
ing leomanization to try to sharps its 
focus. Tra company, once the e^tome 
of a conglomerate in some eyes, com- 
pleted a three-way i^lit in December 
1995, spinm^ on insurance and 
industrial businesses. 

Mr. Araskog said the company 
planned to focus on its Sheraton hotels 
and Caesars carinos and to avtud busi- 
nesses tiiat did not produce high profit 


growth. 

AnalysK said (bat meant ITT would 
probably sell all its assets except 
Sheraton and Caesars. 

“They’re going to sell anything not 
having to do wkb hotels and ganung,” 
said Steve Cohen, a partner at die money 
man a gem ent finn of Kellner. DiLeo & 
Co. in New York. 

Stephen Bollenbach. chief executive 
of Hilton, has rorticuiarly targeted 
Madison ^uare Garden aim the New 
Yoric Knicks and Rangers professional 
sports teams as businesses that do not 
mesh well wife riT's main b usine ss. 

Mr. BoUenbach also said riT’s re- 
cently launched joint-venture televirion 
station with Dow Jones & Co., called 
WB1S+, and the company’s phone-efir- 
ectory and technical-schools businesses 
would also come up fix* review 'd Hilton 
took over. 

He has said he wants his company to 
lead a wave of takeovers in tbe casino 
busmess. HUton, which owns the 
Flamingo Hilton in Las Vegas in ad- 
dition to the Brily pnqierties, would 
gain 415 hotels with more than 130J100 
rooms and 14 carinos with more than 
320,000 square feet (29,700 square me- 
ters) of gaming space in Las Ve^ and 
Atlmtic Gty, New Jersey, if the 
takeover vrent through. 

Hilton’s hotel busmess has 240 prop- 
erties with nearly 100.(X)0 rooms and 16 
casinos with more th^ 900,000 square 
feet of space. Traders srid ITT might 
use proceeds from a sale of its noncore 
assets to buy beck stock, initiate a self- 
tender ofier or further invest in Caesars 
and Sberac<Ni. 

. They added, however, that it would 
depend on whethn* nr got a good inice 
for its holdings. 

“It might be embarrassing for them if 
they don’t get a good price for 
sometiiing like Madison Square 
Garden, because they paid a lot for it,” 
on e tra der said. 

ITT shares were quoted at $57375 in 
late trading, up $1,375. Hilton was 
down 873 cents at $2735. 

(AP, Reuters) 


y 






% 


9 Limsy Led by Lufthansa and^^ U^ Plan Links to Counter BA- American 


Reuun 

LONtX)N—Nirte major airlinesplan 

to form a alliance to counter the 
competitive threat posi^ hy tiie proposed 
Hid: between Britirii Airw^' and Amer- 
ican Airiines, airline oCfid^ said Wed- 
nesday. 

The club is being formed by “Uke- 
min^ companies of shnilar quality 
and wife a coxnmoo ^tision,” sam 
Zachary Clark, Air Cmutda’s general 
f naiiaggr of passenger sales in Europe. 


Headed Iq^ United Airlines and 
Lufoiansa, tiie new gnnqnng would In- 
clude lines from Norfe America, 
Enrcgte, Aria and Latin Ainerica. 

Ofeer membeis would indude Air 
Canada, Scamforavian Airimes, Thai In- 
ternational and Varig of Brarii. Linea 
suds as All-Nippon Airways, South Af- 
rican Aiiw^ and Britirii Midhmd are 
li^y to join, semrees added. 

Tba plan is part of an industrywide 
realignment aimed at' inqirovmg effi- 


and higher ^tields tinough closer 
coordsnaiiori, Mr. Claric said. 

l^equeot-flyer programs would be 
merged so tim passengers could earn 
nnlrage credb on the woridwide oetw^ 
of aD nine airlines, be said. 

Jodustiy sources said tbe aHiancct, to 
be launched in mid-May, would accoont 
for 13 percent of aO revenue pas^ger 
Idlomettrs flown scheduled airiines 
aad tlat it would be ofiOeially launched 
as an integral airihie product wife its 


INTERNiaiOIIAL MANAGER 


Intel’s Andy Grove Goes Hollywood 


By Richard Covington 

jBtemalip»/l Herald Wbeae 

■ CANNES — Not content with churn- 
ing out record profits fw hisjnvesiore, 
Intel's chief executive officer, Andy 
Gro^ is trying his hand at magic. ^ 

: His latest trick involves leveraging 
tiie company’s souped-up MMX com- 
puter diip to move mountains — to 
towering Alp of the global entettam- 
mem industry, lo be exact. 

The $21 -billion chip manufectura 
has already negotiated agreements wth 
NBC, CNN. MTV and other television 
networks to showcase MMX’s new in- 
teractive cap^ilities. A major mvrai- 
ment with global media parrois su efa^ 
Walt Disney Co.. Sony or Dreamworks 
SKG is the next 

“We’re urging ti« Sl-tnUion cmer- 

tinjintignt industty to target a new play- 
er,’* said Ron Whittier, 
fienior vice prraid^ 

SOO-member c<»»®*** 
sedts 10 develop new appltotions w 
technology. Mr. ^mer and an 


arm y of Istd cqxiatives were burily. 
spreading the MMX gospel to the 9,000 
{B^neera, publishers and developers 
who gafeered this w^ at hfilia, an 
inieniational multimetfia maricethere. ' 


users fhroiigih the Intemet according to 

thfttri » - - 


is peppering the wxirids of film, tete- 
viriem, niu^ nuiltiiriedia, phofogcaph- 
ic processiiig and the nether regtotts of 
emergent tedmolc^ wife strat^c in- 
vestments intended to lure cusfomets 
for ever-more sqptusticated computers. 

“We want fee e ntertamm ent aul 
softvraie industries to add an interactive 
component to tbeir films, muric, games 
and programs tiiat Ireeps tbe same level 
of qual^.’’ Mr. Whittier said. Sinoe 
these content mfeisatries have been slow 
to embrace experimental interactive 
technologies, Intel is taking tbe initi- 
ative, he eiqilaiiied: 

By inter^ve, be means recein in- 
novatiems suefe as multiplayer ga me s 
played via computer videoffeODe, tele- 
vised sports events that allow viewers to 
look up player statistics and back- 


jf someone came im wife an in- 
teractive verrioQ of 'liidepteideiice 
Day,’ we would seriooi^ ctmride r in- 
vesting in it,*' be said. Tlte doonuday 
movie has earned neady $800 mzllion 
wraldwide. 

So &r, the coin^ay has pnngsed 
more fea« half a rallioo doU^ mto 
about 50 venttnes, but that amount is 
expected to climb sharply over tiie com- 
ing mondis. ftpjecte range firan in- 
teractively ftfitianeing teJcvised NBA 
basketball games to staging Intranet 
rock conceits Hootie md tiie Blow- 
fish and devising games in Chinese 
from a 7()-^Xnoo software lab in Shang- 
hai. 

Chief among the projects is ahi^ 
todb media lab intend^ to encontage 
Hollywood profeicers tt> give their fimi 
and television programs an interactive 
twisL The lab is a ocdlaborative project 
vrith Creative Artists Agency, the 


See INTEL, Page 15 



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own brand name. The allian ce aims to 
get ab^ of the proposed BA-Amraican 
alliance and to counter its potential 
dominance of sudb airline hubs as Lon- 
don and Dallas. 

Before United can pailidpate, 
however, it must have assurances of an- 
titrust inwnimiiy from all potential part- 
ner airihies’ goveamPRnts to allow tiie 
creation of common feres in tiie gioup. 
So far, only United, Lufthansa imd SAS 
can ot^otiate common feres. 

LafuBosa’s geoeral manager for al- 
liances, Cfarisliane Reube, dMlined to 
discuss the new venture. 

“All I can say is that, aJoog wife our 
alliance partners, we are pr ep ari ng to 
ofier our customer s a seamess amine 
product,” he sakL 

The German carrier signed code- 
sharing agreements wife United in 1994, 
wilhT TiaihteT r«tional i" 199S and with 
SAS and South African in 1996. 


The groop’s first “universal riapon 
loonge” is to be to Bangkok, with joint 
reservations and tidteti^ offices to be 
set up around .tile wrald. 

L&e several other aiiline alliances, 
Mr. Gafe said, this one is being driven by 
a “certmn di^ee of paranoia at the pros- 
pect of a BA- American jpaitaershi^ 

That partnership is still awaiting gov- 
emmeat clearance. 

A United spokesman in London said: 
“We think tiim riiould be a competitive 
counterbalance to the BA-Amertean al- 
lianoe-WbatBAandAmericanareplan- 
omg is m nKmt^ulire lAXidoo Heatinow, 
and it rixNilda't be aOowed to happen.” 

■ More Ixaffic Expected 

British Airways’ chief executive. Bob 
Ayling, said be expected 20 percent more 
flights between tiie Utriied States and 
Heathrow Airport in London if BA’s 
jxoposed alltmne vnfe American Air- 


lines is ai^HOved. Bloomberg News xe-' 
ported. Mr. Ayling. speridng at the Avi- 
ation Qub m Ixindon, said growfe would 
come from the 168 weekly takeoff and 
landing riote at Heatiuow that tbe airlines 
have ariced to teve up legulaiois.- 
Ife said rivals woum be able to earn $1' 
billion annually from the slots, maridng 
the fiik time the ablioe has fxit a mon- 
etary value on them. 

Ayling's remarks were regarded 
as p^ <» a canqiaign to sway public 
opuwui in favor of an aniarvwt feat has 
drawn scrutiny from regulators and 
complamts it\^. 

Tte two airlines, which want to unite 
their trans-Atlantic flights, feres and 
marketing, now carry almost two of 
eve^ ti^ passengers between tbe 
Uni^ States and Britain. 

They also cany 100 percent of those 
on routes such as London-Dallas and 
London-Boston. 


Kohl’s Call for Sacrifice Angers Unions 


Cim f U iFbrOwBi^Flem tkj e aeka 

FRANKFURT — CbaoceUorHdmut 
Kohl, touching a raw nerve uife unions 
angry at record uneinpioymeat, said 
Wednesfery tint Germans should accept 
little or no real increase in wages over the 
next ^ years to befo tty to create jote 
i/b. told the Bild newspaper his 

Iffoposal did not mean real cuts “but 
merely doing without growfe in 
Foqieri^” and that Boim's bid to get 



the jobless rate. 

S^Muately. the DIW research insti- 
tute said Ea^ German wages should be 
frozen Ah' the next few years to increase 
co rp ora te earnings in the re^oiu stim- 
uIbq^ investment and job-creation. 

oMoal figures showed last week tiiat 
Queagticyment had soared in Gesmany to 
a post-Werid War H record of 12.2 ya- 
cent <rf tiie wosk force. The j(feless rate in 
Eastern Gennany is 18.7 percent 


German union leaders condemned 
Mr. Kohl’s proposal, saying workers 
had seen virtually no wage in- 
creases over the past few ye^ because 
of risir^ taxes and social-security 
charges impleoiented by Bram. 

“1 Uimk: tilis p rcyosal shows die Krtiil 
go v ernment is jpre^ deqierate,” Annin 
Kayser of SBC Waibi^ said. “MaiQr 
penile stiQ remember his pledgB tiiat we 
wc^ see Uossoming larx&apes in 
Ragfrni Gennaiiy a few years al^ uni- 
ficatioiL” 

Unions steiqied up demands that Mr. 
Kohl’s government stop protecting em- 
ployers — who d^ say have failed to 
fiimll long-stanfeng promises u> add 
workers — and increase public spend- 
ing, wttich has been slashed to reduce 
tiie federal Ixidget deficiL 

* ’Profits and share prices keep rising, 
exports hum along, and unemidoynient 
alro just keeps on rising,'’ s^ Klaus 
Zwickel, Icteira' of the IG Metall metal- 


wt^ters’ union. He said the unemploy- 
ment rate had doubled since Mr. Kohl 
took office in 1982. 

“The unroQS have done enough; it is 
time for employers and fee goventment 
to act," said Hmierc Mai, prudent of the 
OeTV union for public-sector workers. 

The Gorman policy of seeking con- 
sensus among government, unions and 
empicwers leoeived a blow late last year 
when w. KoU implemented a series of 
measures aimed at cutting employinent 
costs, includmg a failed attempt at re- 
dudog sick-ray benefits that led m 
strikes. (jReurers. AFP. Bloomberg) 

■ France to Freeze Spraidlng 

The French gewemment pledged to 
freeze ^tending this year to make sure it 
hit its bodget-dmeit goal after missing it 
in 1996. Blocxnberg News reported fr^ 
Paris. It said its 1996 deficit was 295 
billioi francs ($52.25 ttiUion), compared 
a forecast of 288 billim francs. 


Mitsubishi Gets Harassment Guide 


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CHICAGO — Mitsubifei Mo^ 
Manufectnrmg of America Inc., which 


tufsmfmt at iis plant in Illinois, should 
adopt a “zero mleranoe” unit at tite 
exeemive's level to assure fair 
treannent of worioras, a task force 
headed fay fonner UB. Labor Secretaiy 
Lynn Maitin said Wednesday. 

The recommendation is one of 34 
iasned after a nine-montii review of Mit- 
subishi’s woskplace jxactices. 

The task force also urged improved 


sive 

anJa^ . . 
tor Manufecturing is a unit of Tolgro- 
based bfiteibisbl Motors Carp. 

The repost does not contain any spe- 
ftifie 6w»feigfi on tbe harassment alle- 
gatiODs, tiiough its recomniendatioiis 


suggest substantial need for improve- 
ment of working comUtions at the plant 
in Nixmal, Illinois. 

“This rqxnt is fahmt, assessing 
weakness, btti it is not involved in as- 
sessing Uame,” Ms. Martin said in a 
prepared staiemeoL “The time for tiiat 
ismssed.” 

Tbe top executive of Mitsuinshi’s 
U.S. unit said it would heed the Martin 
report, and would develc^ a “model 
workplaoe” to ensore harassment com- 
plaints are taken seriously. 

“I believe the recommendations in 
her repeal are the ri^t things for our 
company to do,” said Tsuneo Ohin- 
ooye, diainnan and chief executive of 
M^tu^ Motor Manufacturing. “We 
have committed to her tiiat we will 
ft^ow the letter and the spirit of fee 
recommendations.” 

The U3. Equal Enqiloyment Oppor- 


tuni^ Commission sued Mitsubishi in 
April, after investigating chaiges feat as 
many as 700 women alleg^y were 
grabbed, assaulted or subjected to ob- 
scene jfeone calls at the company’s 
plantinNonnal. 

Since beginning her work wife the 
cofflprmy, Ms. Mkrtin has raid Mit- 
subishi has promoted women and 
minorities. She said rtfher plants in the 
auto ^usipr have been ^nagued witii 
MmilflT racial and sexual 
ivoblems. 

In July, Mitsubishi hired a “director 
of opportum^’ ’ programs and took otii- 
er sAeps to prevent harassment and 
crimiiiatioD. 

Wmkers at tbe Normal plant, Ms. 
Martin said, are eager to coirea tiie 
woriqilace problems because they fear if 
sales fell b^use of the puWichy, they 
will lose tiieir jobs. (Bloomberg, AP) 


nammtMFiSoai- 



PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL w™at.D TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAX PEPRUABY 1-2, IW 


INIERNATIOI^ HERALD IRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBl^jARY 1$, 1997 



THE AMERICAS 





30-Year T-Bond YieJd 


-■ 


■ — \— n 




•’ s o N D J F 
1996 1997 

Exchange Index 

NYSE TheObw 


NYSe • S&P TOO 
NYSE Composte ' 

^tes^fewCol^yos 

AMEX MartetVaae.; 
Toronto TSE Index 
SdoPaulo Bovespa 
Mexico City Bdea • . 

Buenos Aires Merval ' •• . 
S antiago IPSAGeneral 
Caracas CapBai Genecai' 
Source: Bloambe/g. Reuteis 


"" S' O N ' 0 ■ J 'F ■ -i 

1996 1997 ; 

<04191' ' .GfiSte-’-"-. 

. 686W' 


...1WC«4 


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Marital VK7 ^ ' / 

Bovespa ^ • 7-E67b^ i4^. 

Bote ~ 

Meival • •• \ V 71^ 

CapBai Gene^' - 

a. Reuteis huenatMoglHBi^Jnlme 


Very briefly: 

Nine West Plans to Cut 1,000 Jobs 

STAMFORD. Connecticut (Bloombergl — Nine West 
Group Inc. said Wednesday it would close mree plwts and cut 
1 .000 jobs as part of a massive restructuriDg plan. 

llie maker of i^y Spirit and Evan Kcone shoes said it 
would dose plants in Madison. Indiana; Crothe^s^dlle, In- 
diana. and Flemingbuig. Kentucky. The plant closings are to 
begin in .April and continue throu^ late 1997. Nine West also 
said it planned to drop or reconfiguFe some operations at two 
other plants in Vancebuig, Kentucky. 

The company also said it would move its Cincinnati-based 
raw-materials warehouse and its Hatrison. Ohio, product-de- 
velopment center to a new facility in Hebron, Kentucky. The 
moves ore pan of Nine West’s efforts to * ’be a low-cost 
producer of consistently high-quality products,” the company's 
president. Noel Hord, said. Nine West, which also makes 9&Co. 
and Pappagallo brand shoes, sells its products through more 
than 7.000 retailers in more dtan 16,000 locations worldwide. 

•Campbell SoiipCo. said its eamins rose 7 percent fiom a 
>'ear earlier, to £276 million, or $1.18 a share, in the quarter 
ended Jan. 26, lifted by strong results in its international 
division. 

• Advanced Micro Devices Inc. said it was on target to be^ 
shipping its K6 microprocessor in the second quarter and mat 
the chip’s price would be ^ut 25 percent lower that of 
Intel Corp/s Pendum Pro chip. 

•Netscape Communications Corp. said it planned to raise 
prices on much of its ccMporate^intranet software line. 

• Digilal Equipment Oh^. said it had reduced to about $500 

million from about $550 million its estimated cost of complettog 
a restructuring that bad cut its payroll in half since the 1980s. 
•Ameritech Corp. said it would withdraw a request to 
provide long-distance service to its own customers in 
Michigan, just days after federal regulators rejected a key 
component of the applicadon. AP. Reuters. Bloomberg 


AMEX 


A Stay in EU-U.S, Trade Spat 

Brussek Seeks to Settle Crisis Over 2 Sanctions Laws 


By Tom Bueride 

lutenuoioiu^ Herald Tribune 


Seeking to ] 


Cuba from undermining the Wortd Trade Oiga- 
nization, the European union on Wednesday re- 
quest^ a one-week delay in fomiing a WTO dispute 
panel in mrier to pursue a negotia^ settlement of 
U.S. trade sanctions with President Bill Clinton’s 
adrainisixatioD. 

The European move, which was welcomed by 
senior U.S. officials, lai^ hopes on both sidto of a 
solution to the worst U.S.-EU trade dispute since the 
eaily 19^. 

The one-week delay will allow for high-level 
negotiations. Officials said they expected the issue 
would be high on the agenda when Secreta^ of State 
Madeleine Allnight tours European c^itals next 
week, including a stop in Bniss^ on Twsday for 
talks with the European Commission ^resUent, 
Jacques Santer, and the EU trade cotmnissioner. Sir 
Leon Brittan. 

But officials cautioned that the political obstacles 
to a were omnerous. and the time to resolve them 

was short 

In announcing the delay. Sir Leon said the Union 
was not ^king a showdown with Washington but 
was determined to defend European commercial 
interests. 

’”rhis is why we are eager to achieve an overall 
settlement of our differences with the United States 
over the unacceptable extraienitorial effects of die 
Helms-Burton and D'Amato acts,” he said. The 
Helffls-Burtoo Act contains sanctions for foreign 
companies that use expropriated properties in Cu& 
The D'Amato Act allows the government to withhold 
U.S. financing and contracts from foreign companies 
that tiade wtfo Iran and Libya. 

The request for adelay, coming just one day before 
the Viro director-general was due to appoint a three- 
persoD panel to rale on the legally of the U.S. 
sanctions, reflected growing European concern that 
the United States would justify its sanctions on 
national security grounds and refuse to cooperate 
with the Geneva-based trade organization. 


Sudi hardball tactics would leave the WTO, 
launched just two yem ago widi a mission resolv- 
ing glob^ trade diqnites. ”irameasunibly dam- 
aged,” Sir Leon said. 

But Sir Leon rejected any hint of a European climb- 
down in the delay. He said that the Union would press 
its WTO case by F^. 20 if a settlement was not 
readied, and that he was confident of vict^. 

”lt is jKtf credible to suggesnfaax protection of U.S. 
national security requires interference in the legit- 
imate trade of European companies witii Cuba,” he 
said. 

Sir Leon said that he has be e n in fiequent tele- 
jrfione contact with Stuart Eizenstac, the U.S. un- 
dersecretary of commerce who is Mr. CUnton's spe- 
cial envoy on Cuba, but Washington’s talk has 
fallen to short of Eimqte’s donands. 

“We’ve b ee n involved in discussums with the 
Europeans,” hfr. Szenstat said in a statement, **and 
we appreciate tiw additional time to see if w can 
come iq> widi an amicable resolution of this mat- 
ter.” 

What Europe is seeking. Sir Leon and odier EU 
officials said, were guarantees from the adminis- 
tration not to use Heli^Burton provisions to bar any 
more European executives from entering the United 
States. 

The State Department last year barred two Britisfa 
executives on the board of Sheiritt International 
Coip., a fjinadian mining company, because Shemtl 
is a major investor in Cuba. 

In addition. Sir Leon said the EU was seeking to 
protect Eunqiean companies from the reach of the 
D'Amato Act 

With the Republican Congress still strongly sup- 
portive of die two pieces of legislation and European 
governments aHaniant ^}out resisting what they view 
as American attempts to impose its laws overseas, 
officials said it would be difficult for n^otiators on 
botii sides to cut a deal and sell it at home by Feb. 
20 . 

But EU officials said tiiey hoped a delay would de- 
escalate the dispute and reduce the ri^ that the 
United States mi^t walk out on a WTO panel 


Easing of Profit Fears U 
lifts Stocks to Record^ 

• • 'T 

pectation that demand 

NFW YORK — Stock urices be strong_ in 1997 and_ that the dl 


NEW YORK — Stock prices 
rose to records Wednesday as in- 
vestors put aside recent concern 
about garningg tiiat had sent down 
Glares of some of America's fast- 
est-growing compa ni es. 

*^Pecm1e still think tiiis market 
can deUver on eanuA|S,” said 
James Ma^trd, chief e^ty officer 
at Rainier mvestment Maitegement 
with $3.S billion in assets. ”Tbe 
fear diat dominated tills market is 
giving way to oppmtunity.” 

Tbe Dow Jones indu^al aver-, 
age closed at 6,961.63 points, up 
103J2, yet another record for the 
blue-chip 30-stock index. Advan- 
cing issues outnumbered dec liners 
by mewe a 2-to-l ratio on die 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index 
rose 13.23 points to 802.77, also a 
record. The tedinology-heavy Nas- 
Composite Index rose 27.45 
points to a record 1 358.96. 

Stocks briefly retreated from 
their highs as bond yields junqied 
after a Treasury bond auctimi met 
with tepid demand. 

The yield on the benchmark 30- 
year Tteasuiy bond was at 6.72 
percent late Wednesday, up from 
6.70 percent Tuesday. 

“Any movement in rates has a 
big impact on this market,” smd 
Joto f^edCTberger, a money man- 
ager at /^vanced Investment Man- 
agemenu 

Oil and technology shares gained 
as investors sought to c^i^ize on 
a recent d^tine in share prices for 
tile fast-growing industries. 

“People just sold some of these 
companies down too far, and now 
tii^ are buying,” Mr. Margard 
said. Oil shares rose on tiie ex- 


supply will not be raised by any 
suddra production inoeases, ana- 
Wsts said Gainers included Mobil. 
]^c« and Chevron. 


OU-service riures also gained! 
led by Noble Affiliates. Shares ol 
oil-service companies tend to rise iff 
tandem with rising profits at oil 
compand: When.oil profits are upi 
companies leod to increase explos? 
ation efforts. q 

Unexpectedly strong eanungs 
from Aj^lied Materi^s sent comt 
puter-related shares higher. Ap« w- 
plied Matoials, a maker of waf^ 

U.S. STOCKS ^ 

febricatiMi equipment, rose sharply 
to its highest level ance ^'tovembot 
1995. (Sher semiconductor equi^ 
ment-ielated companies also ro^ 
including Novellus Systems arid 
Advanced Micro Devices. b 
Cisco Systems, a perennial on the 
Nasdaq most active list, rose ford 
second day after having feilen moid 
16 percent fro m its Jan. .21 hi^ 
expectations that tiie oetworld 
equipment company's earain^ anc 
revenue growth would slow;! . 

United Technologies also rose| . 
for a second day. *rhe ccanpany'i A 
president, George David, told ana- 
lysts he expected to accelerate the 
company's stock-buyback prograir 
and {xedicted that 15 percent earn- 
ings growth would continue. 

IBM fell after Meirrill Lynch sue 
U would lower its earnings estimate 
for 1997 by SO cents, to £1230 a 
share, because of the adverse effeci 
of the strong dollar bn the mul- 
tinational company's results. 

(Bloomberg, AP. 


DOULAR: Most U.S. Manufacturers Find They Are Cushioned From Effects of the Currency's Climb . 


Coatmiied from Page 11 

Three also have not been sby about 
raising prices to rause profite now. 


Not surprisingly, the Big Three's 
inventory of unsold cars has bal- 
looned, to the equivalent of 85 days’ 
sales at tbe end of January from a 


industries. Cheaper inmmts tend to 
mean less inflation. That means 
lenders are willing fo acc^ lower 
interest rates. Many industries 


sometunes at the expense of market more typical 60 days at the end of whose customers borrow a lot of 


share. A study released Monday by 
Automotive News showed that tiiie 
Big Three had raised vehicle prices 
by an average of £39 since Jaiu 1, 
vdiile Japanese automakers had left 
their prices undianged. 

The Big Three — General Motors 
Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler 
Corp. — also raised prices by an 


September. money benefit from low interest 

American auto executives have rates, notably home-buildas. 
begun hinting at string up their Truddng companies have also 
cost-<:utti^ efforts if^the dollar con- been pleat^ betkuse they tend to 
tmues to rise, altlKmgh they have not bau! a lot of building materials and 


begun hinting at stroping up their 
cost-cutting efforts if the dollar con- 


yet mentioned the possibility of lay- 
offs. 

If layoffs do come, they would be 
one sign that American workers 


imported products, such as video- 
cass^ reoni^ksrs and cars. 


would not try to halt its rise by But tite currency later went higbe^ 

selling die U3. cunency, for a second day, sugg^ting traders 
Bloomberg News reported from were largely dismissing a recenq 
New Yoilc. statement from the Group of Sevea 

The dollar closed at 1 .6870 leading industrial nations that sug-i 
Deutsche marics, up from 1 .6778 gested tibat the dollar had risen fai| 
DM on Tuesday, and u 1^375 enou^. i 

yen, up frmn 123350 yen. - U.S. Treasuiy Secretaiy Roberi 

Traders are also ccM^deni that a Rubin said Washington’s polit^ 
strong economy with low inflation was unchanged from last weel^ 


and comparatively high interest 
rates womd lute investors to tiie 
United States, spuiring demand for 
the dollar. 


average of $386 at tbe begiiining of may be bearing the brunt of a rising 
the current model year Oct l.w^e dollar, even if big corporations wifo 


their Japanese rivals did so by an 
average of just $8. 


-DoUarMainUteRally 

ay be bearing the biiim of a rising The dollar rose against the Remarks by Finance 
)Uar, even if big corporations wifo Deutsche mark and y^ as traders HOroshi Mitsuzuka of Jap 
global operations are not. surmised that offidals of the Bundesbank official knot 

Butarisingdollardoeshelpafew . world's leading indu^rial nations doUar from its early highs. 

• . .u y■l . ■- '■* <. 


when he said “tiie dollar has beeif 
strong for smne time now.“ | 
• A^inst other correndes. the doli 
lar ended in New Yoik at 1.4S2Q 


Remarks by Finance bfinister Swiss fhutes, tm from 1.4375 franc^ 
HQroshi Mitsuzuka of Japan and a and at 5.6890 French francs, 
Bundesbank official kn^ed the from 5.6605 francs. The pouin 


slipped to S1.6305 from $1.6371. - 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


We<h«esday*s 4 P JW. Close 

Die icp 300 most ociive stores 
up Id the closing on Wall Sheet. 
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JSTEBNJOIOSAL HERAT.D TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


french Rail Jirni Picks 
Generale des Eaiix-BT 
For Telecom Project 


Blpombcrg Sen's 

PARIS — France’s statesnvned 
railway system chose a venture of 
Generale des Eaux SA and British 
Telecommuiiications PLC on Wed- 
nesday as its partner to deliver tefe- 
cranmunications services over die 
r^lyray *s fiber-optic network in com- 
pMOon with Pnm Telecom SA 
.. Tlte railwjy system, Societe Na- 
timal des Qiemins de Fa, said it 
would now begin negotiations with 
ccmsoaum with die ^ ctf fi- 
aalrang^ lems of the agreement 
by March 31. 

- The partnership will get a sig- 
nificant head start in the rac^ 
raepare for the fuU opening of 
France’s ^8 billion telecommuni- 
cations maiket in 1998, witii access 
to tile SNCF’s re^y-madb Icmg- 
distance network. 

*■ But it will also inherit tense re- 
isnons with labor unions, which 
have resisted the government’s 


Alitalia Sees 
^996 Loss of 

$790 Million 


Bloomberg Sews 

ROME — Alitalia SpA wUl 
post a loss of about 13 trilltoa 
lire ($790 million) for 1996, 
Tieasuiy hfinisier ^rio Azeglio 
Gampi said Wethiesday. 

Speaking to a committee of 
die lower bouse of Parliament, 
Mr. Ciau^ alw said he was 
* ’optimistic” that the European 
Union would ajqnove a gov- 
ernment bailout for the tiation^i 
earner. 

Alitalia has lost 1.1 trillion 
lirerince IS^.includiimaloss 
Ipf 3 1 0 billion lire in tbe&st half 
w 1996. The airline narrowed 
its loss to 91 billion lire in 1995 
through ooe-time gains. 

The goveitiment’s plan to in- 
ject 13 trillion lire into Alitalia 
18 being investigated the 
European CommissioD to deter- 
mine wbedier it constimtes 
state aid that ^r[olaIes £U rules. 


plms for refonning die SNCF. 

*T his will marir a further step to- 
ward _ liberaligirtg 
tioDS in f¥ance and esrahiich a very 
stron^^ c om pe tilor to Bance Tafe- 
com, ’ Helen Pickance, an analyst at 
Dataquest, said. Merras in ote 
European countries, incinHtng Ger- 
many, and the Nedieriands, to 
link dieir i^ways with mirdHp. part- 
ners have f(Min^ the higgea com- 
petimrs to those nations' operatixs. 

The winner will buy a 49.9 percent 
stake in die Telecom DeveJopment 
subsiduDy of SNCF. The un& wm 
dien form a joint venture to devek^a 
fill] range of services across the net- 
work. SNCF will have a mfnnr iry 
stake in that company. 

Analysts estimated the cost of en- 
tering into Telecom Develcq(miait at 
about 2 InllioD to 3 hntinn Bench 
francs (^63 miUion to $545 mil- 
hon). They put die cost ctf bulling 
its network to cover ah of E ra ooe at 
10 billion to 12binionfianagthmuph 
2000. Other Udders for the SNCF 
partnership iachided a consorti um of 
Bouygues SA of Franco and STKl' 
SpA of Italy, as well as AT&T-Uiii- 
source. a jmnt venture of AT&T 
Coip. and the main telephone 
conqianies of dte Netbedands,- Spain, 
Sweden and Switzerland. AT&T- 
Unisouice is aibeady a partner with 
Germany's Deutsche Bahn AG in a 
telecomromicafioos venture 

The agreement is a oiiyor blow to 
Bouygues, which had been the 
favoi^ candidate but vdiose finan- 
cial troubles and weak cash flow have 
lead analysts and investors to ques- 
tion its abiliiy to become a w^d- 
class tetecommunications company. 

Bouygues, only entei^ the 
teHecoaimutdcatioDS mafket as 
Bance’s third mobile-phone oper- 
ator in May 1996, does not have an 
extenave infiasdiictuie. Generale 
des Eaux already has an infiastruo- 
ture widi its water necwoik, as 
Bmoe’s secc«d-l»ggest cable tele- 
visioo and mobile-phone operasac 
and dnt)U£^ agreemenis with high- 
way covering 1,700 kiloiD^ 
(1,060 miles). 

It is also negotiating widi the cqp- 
er^or of Paris’s Metro system to use 
its communkatiops lin^ 

Shares of Generale des Eaux 
closed at 776 fiancs, up 6, and 
Bouygues rose 3 to 583. 


Britain Feels Rate Pressure 

Central Bank’s Call and Election Calendar Oash 


ByEriklpseo 

■ /lOeniatiOiial BeridTi^mie 

LONDON — Presane on the 
gpveaaunent K> raise mferesr rates 
modnled Wednesd^ witii rqxsts 
showing a drop, in unenqiloyiDeQt 
twx» as lag as expected and gams in 
workers* weekly eamina nimiing 
weB above the rare of inflation. 

Those repeats coincided with 
fresh calls fiom the Bank of Eng- 
land,, in its quartody report cm in- 
flation,, to raise inreiest rares. 

* ' We aiw fca amodente rise.” 
Mervyn flSng, chief economist d 
the of Boland, said, cafling 
it only ’’niuural” dwt rates would 
climb in an economic upturn. 

What would not be nasdial, 
however, vmuldbefDrinteiestxates 
to go up with a general election no 
mote than three months away. Witi) 
that in mmtt, many ecoDOnusts bet 
that the chancellor of the Ex- 
• dieqaer, Kemedi Clatke. the man 
who ultimate^ srts the cost of bor- 
rowing in Britain, will coatinoe to 
resist calls for changes. 

'There are two thmgs close to 
Ken Claike's heart — the man- 
u&cturing sector and the voter,” 
Jdm Baity, ai eoononust widi 
Deutsdie Mo^^ Greofisll, ”and 
both suggest that there wiQ be no 
tare rise.” 

The British economy, which 
23 peiceot last year, is 
widely fixecast to grow 33 per- 
cent diis year. Wednesd^'s fig- 
ures. sbo^g a decline in the 
number o£ (hose out of woric and 
seeldng bene fi ts to 1,815,000 in 
January, the lowest level in six 
years tuid a fldl of 67,800 from the 


previous ffiontii, only added to tiiat 
bullish jnetur^ 

In a recovery tiiat is now five 
years old, many economists — in- 
cluding (hose at the Bank of Eng- 
land — argue that such a of 
growth is nothing short of infla- 
tionaiy, or at least would be under 
normal circumstances. 

These, though are not oonnal 
times in Britiun. The pound, one of 
Eon^’s more downtrodden cur^ 
rencies in tbepastfew decades, has 
soared 15 percent since Augosc, on 
a trade-weighied basis. 

The mme valuable pound, in 
tum^ has led to declines mprices of 
imports that are only beguming to 
feM through (he ecmiomy and diat 
eomranirts suggest will cut the 
overall rare of itifiati^Mi riri« year. 
That expected decline in infl^oo 
has robbed the interest-rate debate 
of much of its urgency, if not its 
stridency. 

“No matter bow wacky your 
eccaxxnte model is, if ypu factor in 
a IS percent sq^neciation in your 
current, you wul see that infl^on 
getscnffil^” said lian Amstad, an 
ecoDOoiia Bankers Trust 

Even the Bank of England, 
known for its zeal in guarding 

a gainst inflatirm. has sli gh tly 

changed its nine about interest rates. 
In Deceoflier it warned that if a 
quarter-pennt rate rise did not come 
that mondi (whidi it did not), the 
central bank would push fex an in- 
crease of double that amoimt in 
Februaiy. 

As of Wednesday, however, a 
senior bank official was still pul- 
ing for a rise of only a quarter of a 
poinL Many analy^ say that a 


spate of numbers showing a slow- 
ctows in the economy ’s growth — 
principally, figures showing that 
retail sales fell 03 percent in 
December — lies behind the 
bank's moderation. 

Others suggest that the bank is 
simply taking account of devel- 
opi^ots in its currency, which 
continued Its upward march 
against the Deutsche mark Wed- 
nesday before felling b^k on 
mndiy bullish words from the 
Bundrabank about the mark. The 

S )UDd traded as high as 2.7720 
M, Its highest le^ since jurt 
before the pound left the Eiuopean 
cunency ^id in September \ 9^. 

"In an ideal world, the chan- 
cellor would raise interest rates,'' 
said John O'Sullivan, an eccmo- 
mist with NatWest M^ets. "But 
ance we are only talkmg about a 
quarter of a perceni^e point, a 
delay of a few months is not going 
to hurt much.” 

■ Balitical Fin on Europe 

Britain came under renewed 
political fire over its attitude to- 
ward Europe after another major 
company warned dial it would re- 
consider plans to invest there if the 
counby stayed out of a single Euro- 
pean currency, Reuters reported. 

Niall FitzGerald, chanman of 
the British-Dutch consumer- 
products and industrial conglom- 
erate Unilever Group, said in an 
interview published in Hie Guard- 
ian thtt "u Britain absented itself. 
rhat would certainly lead to re- 
considoration of certain investment 
decisions.” Toyota Motor Ccxp. 
issued a similar warning recently. 


Commerzhank Plans a U.S. Purchuse 


BleoHUfag News 

SAN FRANCISCO ~ Com- 
mexdiank AG plans to amioimce the 

S^^^fenagement IJ*, a 
dsco-based money manager with $8 
l^OD in assets, a spokesman for the 
Gennan bank said Wednesday. 

"NegOtiatimiS are co nrinntng^ 
and 1 expect those negotiations TO be 
compkxra by the end of the mmith,’* 
Curiu Hoxter, a Commerzbank 


spokesman in New Yoik, said. 

Pecqile familiar with the deal said 
Commozbank, Germany's third- 
largest banking company, was ex- 
pected to pay about $SMX) miUioa for 
Montgomery Asset Management 
The compai^ is a growing 
mutual-lUKl giT^ wife about half its 
assets, OT $4 billic^ spread among 19 
mutual fisids. Mon^mneiy Securi- 
ties lac. owns a majority stake in the 
manager, and swiinr maiHigfs - 


meot craitrols about 40 pe^nt 

Stephen Doyle, diairman of 
Montgomery Asset Management, 
declined to comment Wednesday. 

Coonmerzbaidc htrids a controlling 
stake in Martingale Asset Manage- 
ment LP of Boston, and its name 
surfaced last year as a possible ladder 
for Columbia Mana^ment Co., an 
asset nuoiager in Poitland, Oregon. 
Columbia Management remains an 
independendy run company. 


Investor’s Europe 


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iMBUMtcnul HerWMbont 

Very briefly: 


• PotyGram NV shares rose 6 pe r cent, to 883 guildera 
($47.20) as it reported 2996 earnings feat were better fean 
analysts expected. The emertaimnent unit of PhiUps NV said 
fxofitfeu 18percent,to608millionguilders,includii^acbarge 
of 160 miilirai guilders to restructure music operations. Sales 
rose 8 percent to 9.49 billion guilders. PoIyGrampl^tosetup 
a fifan-distribution network in the United States this year. 

• Bou^ues SA, France's largest construction company, said 
fourfh-quo^ stdes fell 5 percem, to 223 billion Fr^h francs 
(S3.99 billion), as the govenunent reduced qien^ig on roads 
and public btnldxngs. Bouygues said ^xogre ss in international 
construction and services such as real-estate and telecom- 
municatioas helped offset declines in Bench construction. 

• SA des Galeries Lafayette, the Bench retailer, said sales 
rose 5 percent in the fourth quarter, to 837 billion fiancs, 
raisiira hopes that die sUde in French consumer spoifeng has 
halted. Annual sales were steady, at 28.72 billirai francs. The 
news comes on top of a government report that consumer 
confidence rose in Januaiy for the third straight monfe. 

• Axa SA, fee larg^ Bench insurer, said its 1996 net profit 
was between 33 billion francs and 3.8 billion francs, in line 
with expectations; the company, which took over a rival. 
Union des Assurances de Paris, late last year in a $9 billion 
stock swap, would not provide specific figures. 

• Hafshmd Nycomed A^ a Norwegian energy conqiany, said 
1996 pretax profit fell 4 percent, to 327 milli on kro^ ($49.4 
million), as low water leveb slowed hydroelectric power 
production. Sales rose 15 percent, to 130 Inllion kroner. 

•Italy's treasury minister. Carlo Ciampi, confirmed that fee 
merger between Societa Fintmzaria Telef onica, the tele- 
communications holding company known as STET SpA, and 
its ma in subs idiary, Tdecom Italia SpA, would take j^ace 1^ 
June; STCT is scheduled to be privatized in the autumn. 


AFP, Bloomberg, Bridge News 


World stock markets 


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^3 

■fUi 


PI1IIVXPVI3 

AllaA 

4450 


4X00 

K20 

BmdB 

19LK 

19V 

1720 

CMMXCPO 

3140 

3020 

3X0 

3X60 

OtaC 

1124 

11.10 

TI22 

11.M 


4420 

K25 

4450 

Kin 

GneOeneAl 

KV 

47.0 

ax 

KV 

GwPbibdiaBi 

SehOWeiBi 

2520 


ax 

2X30 

17B30 16540 17X10 UI40 

TamvtanCPO 

M7V 10650 10K6i 10430 

WMvL 

1X26 

1X24 

1X60 

1X24 


AtaMAbn 595 577 505 587 

AavUAP 31040 367 37250 37940 

BoDCafee 735 700 730 700 

BtC 913 897 909 90S 

BNP 241 231 21750 2295D 

emdPha 1170 1159 1168 116S 

Coentanr 3387 3333 3305 3336 

QKno 34090 247 24750 247 

CCF 275J0 268 274 26050 

CWlMB 731 6M TOO 691 

artdhwDlor 900 890 890 192 

a5.0c9daFnai SI* 521 534 521 

CM0A«llak UML10 12601260.10 1261 
OOMM 648 837 845 839 

BMqgBWt 512 5« 555 551 

EridODtaBS 903 893 OM 989 

Emtoomi 750 7.10 IX 755 

GtaEcNK 707 7)5 776 770 

Hows 447 440 44550 44lK 

OmM 877 an 065 877 

Ldoipe 370 3SB 368.10 36250 

iMWd 958 935 *45 290 

iu^ 20a 1966 2010 1999 

LVMH 1443 1433 1425 1415 

LmEon 579 W 569 aO 

MdNina 340 Si 33550 34I5D 

PMfenA «0 39X50 39050 39050 

Pnod MCBd 313 305.10 30550 309 

Peogeoiat 634 609 6U 514 

PImrt-PiM 1499 2393 2401 2444 

Pramdes 1655 1630 1650 1620 

RnoA 129 12250 13650 120 

RMN 1721 1695 1705 1730 

MfPwimcA 1IS5D IK 184 10250 

TUMWlUOif 1540 1590 1531 1531 

Sanaa 593 563 -574 SSQ 

39950 292.10 298 291.10 


Sciwl def 
SUThOBBon S75D 38X30 


SteGanarali 
SodBdn 
aeabw 
son 


6S0 


TMdB 

Usinor 

VUM 


6K 
2713 
ass 

27X70 26550 
6V SIO 
OF I7Z4B 169 


386 

651 


2687 2708 
■30 845 


47L40 47040 47330 460.10 
■250 7950 01.10 7955 
39050 307.10 39B.N 390 


Sao Paulo 


Milen 


MB1 




13055 13200 12930 
3470 3500 36SD 
46» 4620 4600 
1350 1360 I486 
19700 197S0 201H 
- 3410 2500 


CVRDPfd 



7210 

n«50 1 L.. 

1304 .1390 
34V 3SV 
3565 3565 
16200 16200 1^ 
ITBSO 180D0 17710 
114)5 11415 115*5 
mv Bin Rv 

4500 4505 4545 
4725 4725 40n 


BMlSjulwluL 0670630 
PreWNS 1316550 
955 850 950 830 

73430 7)030 73100 TOSlOO 
5030 4030 KOO 4730 
6230 5930 6150 5950 
1540 1X10 1540 1631 
46130 44930 45630 44030 
55030 51530 54B99 51M 
41130 39030 41130 39230 
33X18 33939 32939 38730 
PM 22630 21030 22330 

9740 9430 9730 9350 
16030 1430 15030 14030 
16730 15600 16X00 15X00 
38730 36030 28530 36M 
3*38 3030 3*30 37370 
27.15 2640 2650 2610 


71250 

Prevtooc 71X43 
114000 113500 115000 113500 
S50 3008 5020 51A 
16000 15700 15700 15000 
28000 27SN 27BOO 2700 
7500 7300 7300 __7M0 
545000 537000 
1^ 19600 19600 
sftee ^0 43200 42600 
57SOO 54200 sm 5£M 
11000 10700 18900 10900 


Singapore 


smi»Tto«nM.M 

pml0W:2lf735 


RNIcemqi 
RTZn 


Jot 




d%SmAB 


Johannesburg 

USSmM ^ sjg. 

CC -_S08 » 2455 15055 JV 

STSSS! »» rdt fii 

C6MBT 


samiwr 
•|W.T«vpa 


423 

XSI 

XV 

429 

626 

423 

621 

425 

335 

947 

US 

925 

338 

946- 

m 

X33 

X10 

XV 

220 

620 

XII 

XU 

X1B 

9.12 

■ 9 

9J2 

uo 

173 

XA 

XN 

139 

524 

327 


XV 

.329 

XU 

X13 

1725 

17A 

17A 

170 

XH 

6K 

X91 

xn 

324 

156 

XA 

xn 

.229 

325 

• 220 

M 

7J4 

7.10 

7.15 

727 

1X65 

1X0 

1022 

1026 



SodMOS* 


saomeiK 


S£sr 

mr- 

nr 


•M2 

X« 

045 

747 

IM. 

117 

440 

348 
675- 
550 
X26 
- 2S3 


V7I 1J9 
034 050 

74) 744 

7JB 748 
7.19 U2 
758 036 
43S. 637 
339* 238- 
657 6M 
521 536 

113 X17 
2K 251 


M3 

UD 

X5B 

744 

XU 

439 

645 

533 

535 

2J9 


Oslo 


AteA 

BOMMOVA 

OifiMaM 

OatfloKBSk 


lloMundA 

WanvAM 

IMlMv 

NookiSqA 

PadatCooSiK 

SnaPWnA 


OBXhdwSlUO 
PmWe 57737 

UZ.17MB 102 179 

IK 140 IK IK 
.2440 3340 2440 £140 

2* AM SK5D SSi 

KR 9730 10X50 V 
SO K4B SO 40JD 
3K 335 341 33140 

360 361 36140 36050 

■ 290 199 -TV IV 

ns H2 - 183 MS40 
so sax 50149 SV 
370 265 36* 365 

•ns 112 ru ti3 


UtdindiWU 

IMOtaBfcP 

WiVTe'HdBf 


XV 

X15 

X15 

1020 

1020 

1X0 

1520 

1X70 

15 

1X10 

1X90 

IXV 

021 

029 

on 

V 

1940 

V 

6 

xn 

xn 

XAS 

X7D 

X75 

1X40 

226 

13V 

is* 

1340 

197 

620 

X15 

XV 

IK 

ix 

XK 

11.10 

1X90 

11 

X22 

XU 

XV 

1940 

1020 

1940 

nv 

110 

1140 

X0 

XV 

XV 

X05 

8 

8 

1X50 

1340 

1320 

845 

040 

B4S 

V 

3X0 

V 

X84 

370 

XBi 

320 

132 

326 

XM 

X*3 

X10 

326 

152 

356 

125 

121 

IV 

16B0 

IXV 

1X0 

626 

440 

X54 


SkandhiFeis 

SkanstaB 

SKFB 

SpOftMDkenA 
SfeHtthypoMi A 
StonA 
SvHamaasA 
WdnB 


200 20* 204 206 

310 30740 310 306 

WJD 10440 10440 IBS 

1165D 11440 11640 114 

IV 18840 IV 1V40 

10X50 V40 10140 97 

19040 15X50 15840 IV 

m m 153 153 


.1194 .1992 1092 1100 
366 
665 
2700 

BS 

271 26240 
«B 503 
172 172 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBttig 

BHP 

Bend 

BranblBlnx 

CBA 

CCAonN 
MM MW 

OIA 

C« 

PoiieisBiw 

Gen Pmp True 

dOAiKraOa 

GooWniPM 

lOAwlndla 

JeluRiOtai 

LMd Lease 

MomHkkh* 

MUAHda 

NoiAiSKank 

NetAiimiMKde 

NewsCeip 

KenMnarNUn 

NortiM 

PodBeOunfep 

Pleneerlnn 

Pub Brandi 

OenWAInKiys 

Sodas 

Seulhcoip 

WeelhiineB 

WMC 

VWMMBldTrKl 


:347340 
PlHteUK 344X10 


X3$ 

834 

10 

X34 

823 

525 

XV 

822 

17.« 

>742 

17V 

170 

355 

147 

353 

346 

a 

220 

21V 

a 

14 

1U0 

1321 

1341 

1340 

11V 

1130 

1327 

sv 

XU 

XV 

X07 

xn 

60 

xn 

X70 

19 

1854 

IXV 

1X90 

425 

44B 

XS4 

AM 

166 

199 

10 

259 

IV 

146 

IK 

247 

347 

341 

146 

IK 

127 

10 

10 

10 

1170 

1240 

110 

110 

XU 

XQ2 

305 

XU 

020 

a 

ail 

2330 

725 

7M 

70 

70 

128 

1.74 

127 

1.76 

1X10 

1XU 

1X57 

i4n* 

IV 

ts 

10 

1U 

X79 

649 

X78 

647 

IV 

143 

10 

10 

X2S 

X15 

X22 

X17 

113 

lU 

112 

310 

XV 

30 

196 

383 

*UB 

622 

XB2 

624 

242 

228 

IK 

IV 

xn 

X74 

479 

424 

447 

425 

XK 

40 

90 

941 

*0 

90 

8 

70 

70 

70 

249 

146 

147 

20 

70 

70 

70 

70 

9L44 

923 

*39 

90 

IK 

324 

328 

324 


The Trib Index 


Piioes»aoi3MP.M.NBwYoik1m. 


Jan, T, ^9ea•MX^. 

L4MK 

Change 

Vchangn 

yenriodMa 

WorttfindMr " ‘ ' 

■151:96 • 

*O.BO '• 

+0.53 

%chMnge 

+15-25 

Rngkmal bdnxM 

Asia/Paafle 

109.83 

40.72 

+0.66 

-18J20 

Europe 

160.90 

-1417 

-a9i 

+1&61 

N. America 

177.91 

+3.37 

+1.93 

+38.69 

S.Amerka 

130.31 

+4.31 

+3.19 

+a&46 

MicMiWMann 

Capbalgoorte 

178.74 

+K31 

+1.31 

+34.51 

Consumer goods 

171.95 

■fl.94 

+1.14 

+24.54 

Energy 

178.87 

+2.32 

+1.3T 

+31.89 

Stance 

110.43 

+0.16 

+0.1S 

-1320 

Wsceaarteoue 

161.46 

-0.33 

-020 

+1839 

RawMalatiels 

188.26 

+1.30 

+0.72 

+2833 

Servhe 

142.09 

+2.35 

+1.B8 

+1K41 

imiBS 

133.63 

-fO.91 

+0.68 

+536 


T7iaOseinaianarH*r«ld7>liimMftaiMStoek5KMBre*ieta0i*Ua cMernOjoeo) 
OManwNewlV 5nM6oMe sMcIls Aom 25 eeteafe*. Fv nm* MmimOwl 5 Am 
booUW WmmSabm by eriiing to Vt9TiS>inOu(.iai Avenue coulee deGmie, 
9asaiNeoayCedex,Fianee. GoaphdbrSlooinbtrBNowa. 


Taipei 

(MhayUlelM 

CHeauntgBk 

□dmDevelDmt 

CMimSM 

PbstBenk 

Peimso Plesflc 

Hue Non Bk 

IndCeemBk 

Non Ye Pleas 

SUnKenoUM 

TrimnSenl 

TotufM 

UMJVllcnElK 

UWMMdOifei 


SMk MMel bWK74M.14 
Pieffwo; 741047 


IV 

m 

17A 

in 

IV 

167 

168 

1M 

M 

BUD 

fllSD 

mso 

M 

94 

V 

9X50 

250 

V 

7X10 

2XV 

178 

176 

176 

177 

71 

V 

00 

700 

144 

1K 

IK 

1410 

8150 

0 

BUO 

a 

0 

64 

64 

6450 

113 lOftV 

110 

iia 

K 

V 

a 

9 

S 

Kn 

V 

510 

410 

010 

400 

0 

7X0 

» 

n 

70 



High 

Lew 

dose 

Pnx 


KtV 

Lew 

Clese 

Prex 

NUPUl 

V4 

097 

902 

910 


44M 

4316 

44M 

K0 

MiUilPudaon 

12V 

110 

12V 

110 

Nennde Inc 

310 

320 

3246 

3846 

MBsulTiup 

734 

706 

70 

TV 

NoicnEasm 

3X65 

300 

3X55 

3X0 

MuiWAUg 

KA 

41U 

K0 

390 

NdMmTelecaa 

M 

9X0 

9746 

9X70 

NEC 

140 

140 

14N 

1390 


13 

1720 

IXV 

17.0 


1700 

16M 

160 

1570 


330 

2115 

23V 

73U 

NIttoSac 

660 

650 

654 

665 

PwemiPellffl 

5516 

S4ta 

5446 

0 

NIntende 

aoM 

7890 

aov 

700 

PetmCda 

700 

20V 

7X0 

2X0 

Men Dairew 

726 

715 

no 

TV 

MnKUKnMie 

7XV 

36ta 

37V 

77.15 

Nippeiira 

524 

516 

5)6 

5» 


1X10 

1X0 

IXV 

I3J5 

MbbenSM 

301 

2V 

3N 

20 

Potash Swk 

10X95 

in 10X35 

103JI0 

Nteaen Metier 

7M 

765 

70 

70 

DufMicMforw 

4X0 

4341 

*#> 

4X35 

NKK 

M3 

230 

90 

236 

RtaAlonm 

3U0 

310 

V.I5 

a 

NonMnSee 

1SU 

1SSD 

150 

150 

RoeenConlilB 

2X70 

3X10 

am 

26K 

HH 

BSTOe 

0440a 

RflOe 

845QV 

SaaoramCo 

S6XS 

S5h 

5XW 

560 

NTT Dele 

3240b 

321A 

3210b 

3200b 

SMO0A 

5XW 

5XV 

5X55 

W 


60 

656 

676 

652 

CteuwCeiiaAM 

200 

20V 

700 

200 

CadnGat 

302 

39(1 

?W 

3B 

Simw 

5*0 

S*A5 

590 

5*H 

Rksh 

140 

1390 

14V 

130 

TeBsnnnEiv 

450 

4435 

4X0$ 

4X90 


■6V 

•50 

06V 

02V 

ItaXB 

31 

3X0 

31 



677 

60 

677 

670 

Tategtobe 

41 J5 

m 

4?M 

3RV 


370 

250 

3710 

350 

Tatae 

31.U 

7X0 

71.1.5 

200 

SenunBonb 

13V 

1390 

17W 

12N 


a 

7746 

a 

VM 


506 

496 

4M 

492 

TMToaiBenk 

ax 

MX 

3*0 

2*0 


660 

640 

650 

4390 


1X20 

1*44 

IXV 

16K 


46n 

4450 

4600 

43V 

TnnaCUPtoe 

250 

2X15 

75JS 

2X15 

SKdadHonue 

100 

100 

MID 

low 

Titanortinnl 

4<ta 

4416 

4X0 

440 


73n 

710 

730 

700 


33M 

V0 

mo 

31V 

Sham 

16V 

ISM 

160 

1570 

TVXGOta 

1X0 

946 

IXV 

1X10 

1 

i 

+Mn 

2NQ 

70V 

sow 

wemeelEny 

2X9S 

2470 

7X0 

24JS 

SHfeHWQi 

230 

7M0 

73V 

220 

Wbsm 

74M 

74)6 

7M 

744t 

CMMMlmnii 

ion 

nan 

100 

lOV 






Selibonk 

11700 

1090 

1130 

1060 







0960 

060 

890 

850 







Tokyo 


NBKI22SS 1041X96 
Puituui, 10151.17 


AlNtoponAIr 
AsofflMnk 
AseMCben 
AaMGkBS 
BbTbkMMIw 
BkYMebenn 
Bildgestene 
Oewn 
QHlbuElK 


DalNWPrn 

Dei^Kong 

Mum Bonk 

Mum House 

DehnSec 

DOl 

DeMO 

Ear Japan Ar 
EM 
Fmc 
IBonk 
iPiuee 


1070 

771 

8)9 

647 

1070 

1070 

631 

21M 

3670 

2050 

2030 

2000 

1270 

SK 

1K0 

901 

nve 

2530 

SOtSa 

2270 


I860 

ns 

806 

639 

1050 

1840 

618 

2140 

3600 

2010 

2000 

1970 

1290 

497 

1410 

OM 

TDOOe 

2470 

4MS0 

Men 


1060 ion 

770 764 

806 n? 

6V 640 
1060 10S0 
1060 1030 
619 610 

2140 2130 
36» 2570 
20H 2M 
3000 3IB0 
1970 1990 

1250 1260 
SM 49$ 
1420 1410 

BV 891 
711V 716QU 
3510 2460 

586M 4*706 
2360 2» 


SunMemoBk 

SunffOMn 

SundMMElK 

SuMiaAelal 

SumitTiuM 

T(6a)MPtum 

TekedeOea 

TDK 

TelMtaiEfPw 

TekolBank 

TokfeNleibie 

TekyoBIPwr 

TelwEleann 

TeMGn 

TowCai*. 

Tonen 

TappenPrOd 

Toravind 

Team 

TM6en 

TevDTnst 

Toycao Motor 

YWenoucN 

KsmiKKixe 


1300 

458 

1680 

275 

930 

3950 

2SM 

0070 

3030 

915 

11)0 

22K 

KM 

302 

S51 

1359 

t4W 

714 

712 

2940 

760 

3370 

2360 


1200 12M 
4Sa 456 
1660 1670 

368 272 

923 925 

2810 2V0 
2510 2S50 
79S0 8010 
3000 3000 
902 905 

ino 10 M 

21M 21M 
4110 K60 
2M 294 
S5 536 
1220 1340 

T38D 1390 
696 no 
609 7M 
2910 29K 
738 738 

3290 3360 

2300 2360 


1360 

449 

1660 

270 

923 

2820 

2400 

TOW 

2630 

900 

10M 

2230 

4110 

302 

549 

1220 

T3B0 

694 

703 

2940 

760 

3250 


Vienna 

BBAG 702 

BoeMeMJddab B1X2S 
BmMinGeeM 686 
QedDmiPtd KL15 
EAKenenO 3440 
EVN 1730 

PIUBhafwWIen 570 
MnNAe^ 610 
OMV 13V 

OeSEIekMz 877 
■tadet4lera 48X10 
VASteW 4050 
VATedi 1050 

MtowoeeBwr)34LS8 
VftHerd 1446 


AIXMdo; 128X49 
PieiNei.UVK 

710 TOO 762 

ov ni as 
665 610 03 

410 K1.9S 41X20 
3405 34W 3«S 
1724T7S91M 1738 
560 570 5S9 

610 61X10 60150 
1379 13911379M 

865 87X10 an 

39X50 402 391 

440 441.10 K9 
1002 1003110X50 

3)1* 2ia 3118 
1440 1440 1449 


Toronto 


T5E1WMIIWB516XK 
P l M le ux 612652 


Sfockhobn 


PH»IUUl.t7W.6l 

105 1Q6JD 108 106 

946 9T6 929 93$ 

W 183 187 MXV 

361 354 35X50 3S7J0 

AflBCepMA 17^ 11^ W 17^ 

Atfjh 329 38 323 326 

MbnB «0 465 457 453 


ASAB 

ABBA 


riedilunlBk 
IflKM 
Honda MelBr 
IBJ 

nediu 

ifapYbtaxle 

JAL 

jetmTobecu 

Jim 

tASnin 

KonsolEiW 

KV 

KOMPdJHvr 
KoM Steal 
KbiMNIppRT 
taOi B i B w e iy 
mesao 

KemoM 

Kubeto 

KfVW 

mmtwEloc 
LTCB ^ 
Mwberi 
JMCBlri 

MebuEleclnd 

MpWEkcWk 

AWsiiMM 

MRsuMiOl 

MltsuUaMQ 

JMIsuUaMEsI 

MVoBMIHw 

MBSDbWdilM 

MBsufabMTt- 


360 

3sa 

360 

V7D 

120 

120 

120 

120 

390 

3790 

3*0 

370 

120 

lao 

12V 

120 

100 

10V 

lOV 

100 

low 

1070 

MW 

low 

350 

340 

3510 

330 

14V 

13W 

13M 

ItfO 

575 

sa 

573 

$65 


5SW 

sao 

560 

5490 

50 

SM 

506 

505 

8170 

3000 

llUe 

won 

45M 

3390 

340 

3K0 

70 

m 

737 

Ml 

210 

210 

n0 

710 

13V 

»W 

1.1V 

130 

497 

487 

08 

407 

305 

797 

30 

2M 

TV 

770 

774 

777 

100 

low 

MV 

100 

2)1 

703 

7M 


sn 

R0 

80 

845 


554 

554 

31 


710 

7710 

700 

2060 

20V 

?ov 

SON 

390 

383 

383 

385 

4M 

476 

00 

481 

19V 

inn 

100 

160 

19V 

100 

19)0 

ISM 

1030 

1010 

10V 

iMn 

110 

1110 

1IV 

nw 

30 

333 

04 

335 

6M 

603 

687 

579 

13V 

17W 

130 


rnTt 

80 

OM 

B56 

897 

m 

090 

892 

120 

13V 

120 

12V 


AftertoEMiw 
WnnAfa iw . 

bomSimm 

BCE 

CdaWdltaB 

cviWRa 

CdnOoddPrt 

CdAPoeSe 


Denrtor 

DeneheeA 

DuPoatCdoA 

EdperGiwip 

EimNevMng 

FdrfnFW 

RdeeniHte 

pieldiifqai.A 

Fleece Neuodo 


i^LE, 


7T 




21V 

3X60 

47J8 

16*6 

38A0 

71.10 

31 

M.T. 

2X65 

gss 

SM 

6616 

sJ 

39 

2X65 

12 

2X1S 

33 

3LK 

37,e 

300 

3X15 

21A0 

» 

1X35 

6(N 

47 

41M 

17.V 

4816 

17J0 

73 

U20 

MAS 


31AD 21AS 
3X*5 30)6 
4X70 47JD 
1X55 1X45 
«90 SO 
5X6S 3X70 
34*t 3X35 

7X30 71.10 
3XN 38.95 
NX M.T. 
2X40 2X45 
3X60 3M 
W.JH 3180 
52 SX3S 
6X20 4X45 
5IJ0 51J0 
31A5 34 

ZM 3335 
3X15 3X45 
38J0 38S 
26.15 2630 
11.90 11.9S 
26 3X15 
3X70 32J0 
2130 3tJ8 
3X30 37AS 
297 2V 
VJO 3X15 
21« ZIM 
58.10 SX85 
1005 1IM 
6430 6A4S 
4X95 46.60 
40X5 4XN 
17M 1700 
4716 47.N 
1705 17V 
7040 71K 
1319 U)8 
2X35 38M 


22 N Wellington 


AIrNZeeldB 
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INTEBNildlONAIi HERALD POBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1997 

ASlA/PAOFIC 

apan’s Securities Industry 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 
t»fefvatiawilJ/ffuUTrifv ne 

TOKYO — Michio Maisui has 
^ten up Japan’s clubby securities 
iiuniscry, and not only likve his ef 
forts hfs competitors 

tave b^ for^ to follow Im lead 
Mr. Matsui, 43. is pcesidem of 
Matsui Sccunties, which by some 
is Japan’s most piof- 
teble hrckt^ fem. In the past 
five y^. the company’s custo^ 
base has increased nearly seven- 
fold. Matsui has cmsistently 
money with a staff of 150 spread 
am(»g only duee branches. 

• J the presideais of 

omer brokerages at industry meet- 
ttgs all die time,” Mr. Matsui 
▼and they look at me as though 1 
was an alien and say *Whal do yra 
dUnk you're doins?”' 

.Just what has Mr. Matsui done? 
Two weeks ago. he announoed that 
his company would halve the com- 
missions on trading in shares 
bn Jiqian’s over-die-counter 
starting March 3. 

■ Until now, J^nnesebroAoage coo- 

cems have ail charged idenii^ccaD- 


stocfe. Kaneju Securities Co., Mlp- 
pon Securities Co. and Naruse 
mmties Go., all based in T(*yo, said 

ttteir new fee structure would t»Vp 
effect this week. 

11*6 Tokyo branch of Paribas Se- 
cunties also followed Mr. MatriiTs 
nwvB on the comnagiogis. A bnAer 
utte caDed Mr. Maisni one o£ Japan’s 
most mnovuive business executives. 
l^st year. Mr. Matsui angered his peas 
^hfiering to stone costmaefs* riaie 
ceniJCcato for fiee. Japanese bnAer^ 
&S^9picallyriiaige for this service.- ' 

Mr. Maisui s e ani n giy never tires 


trfJy an’s finarasial mdustiy, nor is be 
soaid to predict the wnrninwnt col- 
lapse of as many as 140 of its 200 
bokerage cou^mbubs. Only a few of 


sbeiatioQ. an. industiy groqi. Japan’s 
brokers rely on comn^ioas for the 
bulk (tf dieir income. 

But last week, three midsised 
brol»nige iimis said they, too, 

r d cut in half their conumssions 
trades of over-the-coimter 


the past five years. 

yA^ Fve really done," Mr. Mat- 
su! said, *’is stidc lay banH ju ihe an 
and say thm I'm gmiK to compete.” 

Tlie anhnos^ Im. Matsiti has 
provoked for his initiatives refVyts 
the fragility of Xman’s brokerage 
mdustiy. It also Itipili^its tiie anxi- 
ety many brokers ^dabont Jtqnu’s 
looming *‘Bjg Bang,” m whK^ au- 
tiimities have vow^ to Timim the 
coim^'s fmancSal sectm as com- 
petitive as those in America and 
Britain by 2001. 

”In the past 30 yeazs, tiiere has 
not been a sii^ benknqjtcy in Ja- 
pan’s tffokoage indnstiy, it 

has been compl^ety fr^ 

competition,” }4t. Matsui said. 


’'The only way to stand out was to 
add staff or branches. 

**So what you have is 200 mini- 
Nomuras offoring exactly tite same, 
services,” ite add^ leftnuig m J*^ 

S m’s laigest bindEeiiiige cmcern, 
omnia Securities Co. 

Id Japan, tnukerage companies 
bt^ and seU stocks and bmi^ for 
customers aid fen- tbeir'own ac- 
coQDts. The lai|ger ones also bau^ 
stockHDoaricet listii^ and bmtd is- 
sues;. To protect existing companies, 
.the Pinanoe Mznistiy has frozen the 
q^noval of licenses for new 
anese Ixokerage &ms for 30 years. 

”]f Japan’s Imtoage industry 
had been firee and we wem going to 
make it freer, then that would be one 
tiling,” Mr. Matsui said. “But it’s 
motected for so long tfarn tile 
'“Big^ang” will probably trigger 
the coOmise of between half and 
twD-tfairds.trf Jifian’s brokerages. 
What we are facing here is essen- 
tially the coll^ise of the mdustiy as 
it is today and the emogesce ot a 
oooqiletcdy new industry.” 

■ in the nixal Nagano Pte- 

fecstiae west of Tokyo, hfr. Maisui 
stored ecoQoznics at Hhotsu bashi 




At that time, Jqian’s sttippiiig in- 
dustry was as coraeted as the coun- 
try’s brtAeiage industry is today. But 
the growth ofglobaltrs^ soon threw 
J^ian’s slti^mig conqiai^ into di- 
rect conqietmoa with moire efficient 


Michio Matsui, in his office. 

overseas shippers and forced them to 
innovaiB and cut costs to survive. It 
was during his 11 years at NYK that 
Mr. Maisui teamed the freemaiket 
doctrines he preadies and practices. 

‘T just ifa^ tibe ^ods I expe- 
rienced the libexalizatioD of JtQsan’s 
riiqiimig industiy and that 1 now 
have the chance to apply the fessons 
1 learned to a busing as protec^ 
as stockbroking” in Japan, he said 
hfr. Matsui joined Mat^ Secu- 
rities — which his family founded in 


1918 — in 1987. He then spent 18 
months training at NDcko Securities 
Co., one of Japan’s Big Four broker- 
age concert^ before becoming 
managing director at Matsui in 
1988, senior managing director two 
yean later and president and chief 
operating officer in 1995. 

One of his first steps afrer the 
collapse of Japan’s stock maitet in 
the early 1990s was to abaadon 
door-to-door and cold-call tele- 
phone sales and launch a nationwide 
newroaper advertxsiog ranfmaign 

“Nobody had he^ of Matsui 
Securities, so the idea was to makf 
ourselves known and to ^ in- 
vestors to come to us,” he sad. 

It worked. Since 1990, Matsui 
Securities’ customer tmal has risen 
firota 3,000 to about 20,000. The 
company posted an operating profo 
of 560 million yen ($4.5 million) in 
the year that ended March 31, 19^ 
up from 112 rnUlitm yra a year 
earlier. Alttiongh Matsm is tmly Ja- 
pan's 67tb-laigest brokerage in 
teims of capital, its return on capital 
for the year of 1 1 percent maw it 
J^jan’s most jmtihable broker^. 

Pot the y^ endhig Mardi 31, 
operating profit will be around 700 
million yra and return cm capita] 
around 13 percen^ Mr. Matsui sdd. 

“So fa. I’ve just been locky,” 
Mr. Matsui said. “AU I’m doing is 
preparing for the day when Japan’s 
bntiterage industry becomes free 
and open. Ihat’s when tiie com- 
petition will really start.” 


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Soune:Tslelaus 


InMitMloial HenM TVibime 


Qievron’s Kazak Success Sets Example 

Oil Companies Follow Lead in Hanture Into Former Soviet Lands 


By Agis Salpukas 

New York Tima Service 

NHW YORK — Vi^iea Chevron 
Corp. began spending what would be- 
come $700 nthiion on the T engiz oil 
■ fields of Kazakstan, its competitor 
were at best skqitical. 

They saw the republics of tie fonner 
^oviet Uniem as unstable and danger- 
. ous. not as places to commit tiieir in- 
vestment ca^tal. The San Branc^o- 

• based oil giant became a favorite target 
among top executives of ofoer major 
producers who liked to pennt out the 
folly of speiu^ big money tiiere be- 

‘ fore the ^litical situation had sorted 
itself out 

For a white, tiiOT skepticism seemed 
justffiesd. Even when Chevrem was ^le 
to get oil out of tiie ground, it could not 
always ship it, bet^ise of pctiitital in- 
fighung aim lifted pipelme.qEpadty. 

Recently, however, many of tho 
skqxics had to swaDow tbejr w<xds.l 

Most big oil coDtpai^ have 
dianged their nundr~and foUoiwed 
, Chevron’s lead into the fenmer Soviet 
' lands. MobQ Coiix has evoi bought a 
stake in the Chevron venture. 

' And Wednesday, Jeet Bindra, xe- 
ceinly named preodeot of the Chevron 
4 .|ipe Line Co., was expected to tell 
; stock analysts at a meeting in New 
York tb^ Chevron made well over $80 
; million from the oil field last yea, way 
^ up from $1 minion in 199S. 

• The profit — tiie exact amount will 
. be disclosed in the company’s annual 


rqpmt, which -will come out in six 
wedrs — isoolyasmallfiactkmofthe 
$1.1 billion tiiat Chevron earned over- 
seas in 1 996 from exploiatioD and jffo- 
dnetioa 

Nim^ietess, it is more tfan many 
ejqiected. Chevrem, die only Western 
«wnpany to ejqxift rigriifii^t quan- 
tities of oO from fonna Soviet ter- 


Starting to Click 


Annuai averags prod 
the Tengiz c^nekL 

-200,000 baiT^Sday 



1993 1996.16631 1696 1997 -I996 
. Jen. Jan. 


ritoiy, attributes its success to^sp- 
pros^ from whidi an parties benefit 

Nick Zaoa, diitctor general erf Ten- 
giz Chevroil, a joint coaqiaiiy that <q>- 
entes the field, noted that Rnssra 
willing fo open more i^tdine ctqnd^ 
when die patnentit^ offered to sh^ 
crude oil to some Russian refineries to 
help keep them running and dien ship 
tiie refined products. 

The streogtiiened financial expec- 


tations for the Tbngiz field — situated 
on the nortiieastem shore of the Caspi- 
an Sea — were encoura^g to some 
analysts. They were still cautious, 
fhoi^ih, as to vriietber tiie project would 
live up to its vast potentiaL 

“Oieyxoa weatio tiiere first and it is 
finally starting to elide,” s«id Adam 
Siemmski ^NatWest Securities. He 
calculated Cfaevron was tnairing 
close to $4 a barrel on die oil frmn the 
Tengiz fields, an «mmmr in line with 
the profit from its other foreign fields. 

But the quantities of oil are still not 
laige. He csdculated tiiat QievroD's 
sh^ of the oil shipped last yea av- 
eraged 51,000 banels a day and would 
rise to about 85.000 bands a day tins 
yea. 

But IVfr. Sieminsld said the big pay- 
off would emne when a coeosortium — 
TnnHp! up of tiie governments of Rusria, 
Kazakstan «nd the Gulf sultanate of 
Oman, as well as eight energy compa- 
nies — builds a pipefine tiiat is to run 
frem western Kazakstan to-a Russtan . 
port, Novorossiysk, cm the Black Sea. 

TliB pipetine, ea^ected to cost about 
$2 tnllioQ and to be conqilded by 1 999, 
could ev«itna^ lead to the export of 
about 1.5 mOlion banels a ds^. 

Chevron fanned tiie joint venture 
witii the Kazak govemment in 1993, 
each ownhig^ percenL Mobn bou^ 
half of the Kazak stake last May for 
about $1 bOIiMi. And last month 
fiilrnilj Ihe giatitRiM^an oil eompany, 
bought a S percent Stake from Otevroo 
for abom SOO mfilicML 


jONTEL: Andy Grove Puts the Chips on the Entertainment Industry 


Cootinoed frvm Page 11 

powerful talent agency built by ^ 
ipnner Disney executive MQchael Ovitz. 
It (qiened in December in the i^ei^’a 
Bevaly IBUs offices with a digital 
panoy DeVito trumpeting the computer 
iodustty’s itiunge into entertaimneiiL 
* ’ ‘^c’re ayiiQ to get HoUywood to 
the ativuitages of making tiie PC 
temha channel for their fibns,” said 
Andre Bertrand, a content spedalist at 
ImeL 

: Indus&y analysts welcome Intel s 
Nourishing ’emttent’ investments, but 
Rjmain highly skeptical about the di^ 
ihaker's prospects for fuD-Uown media 
owneiship. A number of tecdmology 
compaiues have tried sailing into con- 
tait deveiopmeat waters and ended 
fiamdering m a sea of red ink. AT&T’s 
ahempt to gc r»erate material for its iU- 
(iued <m-line .ventures, for example, lost 
hundreds of ThlUi nns of dollars.^ 

“h would be a much further junqi for 
hem away fromtiieir core business dian 

t has been for Microsoft,” said Gene 
>Ro 8C, president of Jupiter Commu- 
licatioiis, L.L.C., a New Yoik company. 


that tracks the computer and oo-line 
industiy. 

With investments in MSNBC, die re- 
conlutg industiy and a broad plectrum of 
multimedia publirinng, hfiezosofr has 
chaiged aggressively into the business 
(rf creating me^ 

“Intel riiould invest in content like 
fijm, TV and otiier me^ but not own it 
outri^ They’re stDl a Ihtte dunky for 
tbat,*^Mr. D^ose said. “Now tiiac 

th^'re having tn evawgftligfethMr MMX 
tecbnology to consumers on a mass 
scale, foey have todevelopCQDieatcom- 
pelling enough ^ make buying a new 
computer wmtii the expose,” be ex- 
plaWwL 

With an overall mvestment of ficxm $3 
twiiittn to $S billion in tiie devddpmeot 
of tiie MMX d^, according to Mr. 
Whittier, fritel muA take an agpessive 
in g epe i ating the interactive 
films, video and mugctiiat would make 
it worthwhile forcoosataers to ibzk mit 
$3,000 for a newly imgraded computer. 
“Better content accelerates the need for 
processors,” he said. 

The so-called Welnsodes d ie w m- 
pany has conjured up with CNET, an 


Mr. Bertrand. 

Mr. Wlrittier said Intel is e:g>ectiDg to 
sen 2 mniioa MMX enhanced com- 
puters Iw the end of tite yea, \rith more 
man 200 new CD-ROM and game titles 
exploiting the new tecbnology avdlable 
^ die Christmas seasML 

■ Stock Options for Enqdoyees 

Intel, aglow with record revenues and 
profits, is sharing die wealtii. The As- 
sociated Press reported from San Jose. 
California. 

The world’s largest maker of com- 
puter diips said Tuttday that it will gnmt 
pcxentially lucrative stock options to vir-. 
tually an its neady 60,000 employees. 


iOnMarthlS, the InierttationalffeTaidTribwte 
; wiff pobUsA a Sponsored Section on-- 

: / Office Equipment 

'Ainoi^ the topics to be covered are: 

'• Intranets * advantages and drawbocts- 
;* Multi-founcti<KK machines. 

• ftnlaWecompatCTS -■ advances in scre^ 

design and batt^ technology. 


executive. . 

' A mndoTO on the features and advantages 
of Sim Microsystem's Jav& . . 


■■■ 


^ (33^1) 

’Tmg woRiJfyfi nATTY NEWSPAPER 


1HE MikA*ltkS FUND 

Sociele d'invesKasement 6 capital variable 
2/ boulevard Emmanuel Seivais, 

1 - 2535 Luxembourg 

ILC.IB4B1S9 


NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL 
MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Notice is hereby ^ea that an ExtaaonfinBiy Gcoersl Meeting 
-of THE M*A'*R*S fund Slcav \nD be bdd at die office of 
M' Pnmefc NiXaiy retiiSiiie in Unemboiiig - 17, me 

des Bubs, L - 1212, on Mond^ 17 March, 1997 at 2KX1 pju* 
inth the following - 

1. hoppsal of the. Board at Dhfeetors to proeeod iriih 
■ the liigBidatioB of the ffieav; 

Z. AiqpoiBimeni of • (iqnidalor; 

• 3. Soadry. 

SbarehoUen are advised that reqiured qaonntt for the above 
iDoelHig ^ bo $099 of the a^hai of the Company, r^resentol 
by shmbibUen present or represented hfvtoxf. Rmutions 
.wul be adopted fay a nullity of two thirds or the votes issnes by 
sharehtdden present or F^cesenled. 

Bated: PdMuaiy.S, 1997. 

llw Board of INrecton. 


Sonyas Latest Toy: 
Digital Animation 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Sony Com- 
puter Eatertainmeot lac., the 
lodeo-gane maker Namco 
Ltd. Old Polygon Pictures 
Idc. said Wednesday they 
planned to establirii a digital- 
animation studio to make 
movies simila to Walt Dis- 
ney Co.’s ‘Toy Story.” 

The Japan-based venture, 
to be called Dream Pictures 
Studio Idc., is to be capit- 
alized at 200 mDUon yen 
($1.6 millitm). Sony Com- 
puter Entertainment and 
Namco each will own 45 per- 
cent, and Polygon will take 
die remainiDg 10 percent. 

“Hollywood has tamed dra- 
matical^ EO digitaftyarinn ’* 
said Torinfumi Kawab^a, 
(xesident of the new studio, 
who is joinii% it from Polygon. 
‘O^iaD .ne^ a cranpuier- 
gr^tucs studio to cxHnpetc 
those in the U.S.” 

Tlte studio aims to inoduce 
a full-length movie animated 
entirely by computer by 
Christmas 1999. The initial 
budga for the film, whidi tile 
conmany plans to release in 
the United Staes and Japan, 
is S60 millioo. 

“Pm confident we can 
make as much money as Toy 
Stety,' ” Mr. Kawahara said. 


‘Toy Story,” produced by 
Walt Disney and tiie cc»n- 
(Xiter-griqrfucs studio Pixa 
Inc., grossed $180 million 
after us faoUday-season re- 
lease. It was the first fiiU- 
lengtfa movie to be ftiMmatwi 
by computer. 

The studio also plans to 
animate computer games, 
said Shigeo Maruyama, pres- 
ident of Sony Omputer En- 
tertainmenL. * 'The new studio 
will make all types of ^giud 
contents — not just movies,” 
be said. 

Sony Computer Entertain- 
ment, winch makes the Play- 
Station video-game maefaioe, 
is a subsidiary of Sony Co^. 
and Sony Music Entertain- 
ment (Japan) luc., bodi of 
which own half. 

Privately held Potygon Rc- 
tuies has produced digitally 
animafed televisicai commer- 
cials. tncluduig a well-known 
spot for hair gel that feamres a 
penguin with spiked hair. 

Sony Coip. mares rose 350 
yen, or 4.1 peroent, to 8.SKX}, 
after the news, while Sony 
Muric shares rose 130. or 3.1 
peroeDt, to 4,390. Shares in 
Namco, whi(A also 
computa games and operates 
arcades, rose 40, or 1.2 per- 
cent, to 3 J70. 


Xatemet broadcaster and Web site de- 
velqpa, are examples of tins new con- I 
tent 

On compoters equqmed with the 
MMX users can cu up a series of j 
interactive games, concerts and video | 
over the Imaxiet that are downloaded in ' 
a matter of seconds and possess more 
nnanced sound without the need for a 
$300 sou^ card. 

The improves overaD co mpute r 


Living in the U.S.? 

Nomr printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

lb subeoribe, call 

1-800-8822884 
Cm New York, caU 212-752-3890) 


Very briefly: 

•Taiwan, the woiid's third-laisesi produca of computer 
equipment, will scrap tariffs on 201 information-technology 
mixtucts in four sta^ ending Jan. I , 2000, the Board of 
Foreign Trade said. The govemment will eliminate tariffs on 
ei^t other items — mainly telecommunications noducts — 
by Jan. 1,2002. 

• Thtiland’s stock benchznazk. the Stock Exchange of Thtu- 
land Index, fell 1 1.42 points, or 1,56 percent, to 722J7, its 
lowest level rince June 1992, on fears of a weaker baht 

• MBf Ca|Hta] BiuL, owner of Malaysaa's lafgert finance 
company, soared to a record in Kuala Lunqxir; the stock cl(»ed 
a 4.^ ringgit ($1.96), up 0.14, or 3 peccent 

• Indonesian stocks rose to a record as institutional investors 
bid up bank and tobacco shares. The Jakarta Stock Market 
Compile hidex rose 6.77 points, or 0.98 percent, to 701 .CIS. 
breaching the 700 level for tbe firrt time, 

• Swiss Bank Corp. said it would Ixiy the 49.9 percent of its 
Australian investment-banking ann, SBC Warburg Aus- 
tralia, Aat it did not already own. It will buy the shares from 
a group of SBC Warbuig Australia executives; the price was 
ncK di^Iosed. 

• DSM NV, a Dutchplastics and chemicals producer, said it bad 

Kieed to set up a jomt venture witii Japan Synthetic Rubber 
Co. as of ^iril 1 . The Tokyo-based venture, to be called DSM- 
JSR Engmeering Plastics, concentrate (XI the oiarketing and 

sale ^ engtneering pasties in Jqian, DSM sai(L 

• Western Mining Corp. posted a sharp drop in half-yea net 
proffi but predicted a better second half . Consolidated net pr^ 
feD 46 percent from a y^ eaiiier, to 100.7 millicxi Australian 
dollars ($765 millicm), in the period ended Dec. 31. Tbe remit 
included a ooe-thne loss of 10.6 nuUion debars. 

•Seven Network Ltd., an Australian television broadcaster, 
reported first-half net profit of 63 milUcm Australian dollars 
($47.9 milhon), down 32 percent. 

• Canon Inc. said pretax profit rose 56 percent in 1996 from 
a yea earlier, to a record 125.23 billion yen (51 billion), as 
revenue rose 13 percent, to 1.4 oilUon yen, aummberg.AFP 


WORLD BALANCED FUND 

5ICAV 

2, boulevard Royal, 
L-2953LUXEhiTOURG 

ILC LUXEROKMURG B- 24 S 72 

Notice u hereby given lo the «hercholde;s, that (he 


of shanholden ot VOBID BALANCED FUND will be held «t 
the offices of Benque Inlemallonsle a Luxembourg, 69, route 
d'Eech, Lrl470 Luxembourg od February 21, 19^ at 1 IK)0 
ajik with the following agenoa: 

1. Submission of the Report of the Board of DirecLors 
and of the Anditors; 

2 . Approval of the Statement of Net Assets at November 
36, 1996 and the Statement of Operations for the rear 
ended November 30, 1996$ 

3. Allocation of the Net results; 

4. Discharge to (he Directors; 

5. Statutory Appointments; 

6. Miscdlaneoas 

Tlie shareholders are advised that no quorum is mjuirrd for 
the itCHM on the agenda of the Annual General Meeting and 
that dedsions will be taken on a simple majority of (he Mures 
present or represented at the Meeting with no restrictions, 
in order to attend the Annual General Meeting the owners of 
bearer shares will have to deposit their shares five dear days 
before the meeting with Banime Internationale tk Luxembourg 
SA., 69, route dTsch, L-1470 uixembourg 

IHE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


THEWDRUySaunrWEWSBtPEB. 



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PAGE 2 


\ 

I 



international HERALD 




Sports 


PAGE 18 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1997 


World Roundup 


Victory for Becker 


TENNIS Boris Becker lifted his 
\991 record to one victory and one 
defeat Wednesday when he beat 
fellow German Marc Coellner in 
the first round of the Si million 
Dubai Open. Becker, who lost in 
the first round of the Australian 
^en. woo 6-2. 6-7 (5-7), 6-2. Car- 
los Moya, who b^t Becker in 
Sydney, was knocked out 2-6. 6-0, 
7-5 to Czech Jiri Novak. 

• Top-seed Martina Hingis 
sprinted past Silvia Farina of It^y 
at the $480,(XX) WTA Paris Open, 
6-3, 6-4, to avenge a defeat at the 
same stage of last year's tourna- 
ment, when Farina won 6-3, 6-1. 

• ^igi Bniguera of Spain beat 

Cedric Fioline 6-1, 6-7 (11-9) 6-1 
on Wednesday in the ATP tour- 
nament in Marseilles. Moline had 
played in France’s Davis Cup loss 
in Australia, which ended Monday. 
He said be was suffering from jrt 
lag. lAFP) 



Bob HoraiMscace FnocC'ABMe 

Spain's Ser^ Bniguera hitting 
a backhand to Citric Pioliiie. 


Belle Bet on Sports 


Quiet Van Gruenigen Silences Tomba’s Supporters 










By Christopher Oaiey 

/jwnM*'*'™! fierabt Trtintne 


slaloms have been getting steadily fast^ 


&k r .fabw| ; ^A y i i>^l *i iim I h u T 

Alberto Tomba stnig^ing tiirougb a turn on his lU-fated run in the giant slalom at the World Championships. 


Avalanche Buries Los Angeles Kings 

Fiset’s 48 Saves Aren’t Enough to Ward Off Colorado Victory 


BASEBALL Albert Belle has said 
in court that he recently lost as 
much as $40,000 gambling on pro 
football games and college basl^- 
ball games, the Cleveland Plain 
Dealer reported Wednesday. 

The newspaper said Belle, who 
moved to dtt Chicago White Sox 
from the Geveland Indians last fall, 
rnade the statement under oalh Tues- 
day while answering questions in a 
lawsuit over a cmifrmiation he had 
with Halloween pranksters. 

Sandra Abdul-Razzaaq, a teen- 
age boy's guardian, says Belle in- 
jured the boy when ch^ing him in 
his uuck. The suit seeks $300,000 
damages. (AP) 


Olympic Threat 


SKIING Japanese environmental 
groups have said they will attack 
the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics 
if the men's downhill starts inside a 
national park, the world skiing 
body said Wednesday. 

Marc Hodler. president of the In- 
ternational Ski Federation, which 
has been lobbying for the start to be 
moved higher to make the course 
longer and allow it to include a 
spcciuculnr jump. “There is still a 
possibility that we can fold an a^ee- 
mem with those groups,’* he said. 

“The Olympics are. as you 
know, a theater. A very-much ap- 
preeiaied theater for whatever op- 
position there is going, from 
protests to dcmonstmiions to ler- 
roriM acts.” (Reutersi 


The Associated Press 

As shot after shot came flying at him 
in the first period, Los Angeles goalie 
Stephane Fiset must have felt he was die 


OQ^ Kinp player on the ice. 


nset faced a record 29 Colorado 


shots in the first period — si 


— and made 48 saves in 


itoppmg 
aU. Bui 


28 


But it 


NHI, RoVMRVB 


was not enough against his former team- 
mates as the Avalmiche defopred an 
undeimanned Los Angeles, 3-1. 

‘T have had games before where 1 
faced 50 or more shots, before I turned 
pro, but not 29 in ooe period," Hset 
said. 

Referring to the Avalanche goalie. 
Patrick Roy, he added, “What made it 


tough was Patrick was so good on the 
othaend.” 

Despite being dominated fimn the 
outset, the Kmgs managed to escape the 
first period tied 1-1, but Rc^ made 31 
saves limiting the Kings to a short- 
handed goal in the first period. Ad^ 
Deadmarsh scored his 23d goal and 
added an assist for the Avalanche, 
whose Mike Ricci md Val^ Kar 
inensky also scored. 

namu5,Brainal At Calgary, Trevor 
Kidd made 31 saves to lead the Flames 
to their season-high tfainl straight win. 

Jonas Hoglund, Dave Gagner and 
Ronnie Stem each had a goal and an 
assist for the Flames. 

Kidd, making his ninth straight start, 
was esp^ally sl^ m the second peri- 
od, makmg 13 saves. He sb^Tped Ray 


Bourque's slap shot from the top of the 
foce-off drcle with a darling glove save. 
But Bany Richter spoiled Kidd's shutout 
bid with 1:20 left in the third period. 

Capitala S, CMiefcs 2 Peter Boodra 
had two goals and an assist for Wash- 
ington, v^ch won for only die second 
tiine in nine games. 

Alexander Mogilny had both goals 
for Vancouver, which has lo^ seven of 
10 games. 

i^anden 5, Semtois 5 Mai^ Mcln- 
nis’ goal with 1 : 1 1 left m the third period 
gave New York a de with visiting Ot- 
tawa. Meinnis tocA a pass from Derek 
King and beat goalie Damian Rhodes 
gP^ of foe 

seas^ Aii»d^'^^isi:i^ twice for 
Ottawa; wludi lost'oiily once in its last 
five games. 


SESTRIERE, Italy — The bleacher 
section closest to the television caroe^ 
has been Italian ceiritory since ^ 
World Alpine Sid CharopionshiM 

began. Last week, it was briinining with 

baohomie and Deborah CompaCTcmi 
baniiers when she won two gold medals, 
and on Wednesday morning, it was 
brimming with optimism and Alberto 
Tomba pbriers for the first run of the 
men's giant slalom. 

By die afternoon, the posters had 
come down, and foe ItaUan optimists 
had been replaced bjr Swiss and Aus- 
trian realists brandishing cowbells. 

Tomba, his sport’s main attraction, 
already bad missed most of foe World 
Cup ski season for a variety of reasons, 
and on Wednesday, be missed the 
second run of the giant slalom after 
missing a gate one minute into the fir^ 
run and sliding dispiritedly and anti- 
cUmactically to a halL 

“1 am angry, but I did my best," 
Tomba said. *T thought 1 had trained 
pretty well, but this course was more 
difficult than I imagined." 

Even if he had not missed foe gate, 
Tomba was in no position to threaten the 
eventiial gold medalist Michael Von 
Gruenigen of Switzerland. Only 2D 
seconds into his run, Tomba lost his 
haianr*» and appeared close to falling. 
Eight seconds later, be did go down 
h«»flriing into another turn but po$ 4 >oned 
disaster pushing off foe snow with 
his hand. 

The move was reminiscent of last 
year's Wold OianqMonships when 
Tomba bounced off the ground on his 
way tt) victory in the giant slalom, but this 
has been a less fbrtunaie and conadeiably 
less focused season for him. He lost 
precious time. When his next ^lit time of 
44.(n seconds flashed on foe scoF^xiaid. 
he already was a humiliating 3.53 
behind Von Gruenigen. 

“You can see it is not his snow and 


in recent years. .... t 

“If we aren’t careful, there will be iro 

difference between Super G and giant 
slalom." he said. “I set 61 gates todag, 
which is ri^t in the middle of wlmt to 
rules permit for a gradient like fois." . 

The second-nin co u rse, set by Frite 
2uger of Switzertand, pc^ conriddr- 


ably fewer problems, yon Gruenigea, 
who had bimt up a lead of more thaa^ 
second in foe moping, nvuntmned fo||L 
advantage wifo his customary style anef 


48.23 sec(»ds was 1.12 seconds beti^ 
than silver medalist Lasse Kjus oi Ncf- 
way and 1A5 seconds better than bro^ 
medalist Andreas SefoiShrer of Austria? 

It was foe third silver medal of these 
chamiHonships for Kjus,* who flaunted 
his versatility by reaching the podium in 
the downhilL Super G and giant slafon^ 
“I would rafoer have three silvers 
than one gold," Kjus said. 'T reall^ 
value being good in all tUsciptines,’* ^ 
Von Gruenigen is a ijUfforent sortr a 
technical specialist who has won U) 
giant slaloms since 1993 but no ofod* 


events. He is a skier’s skier, who elici& 


not bis day," Von Gruenigen said later 
as he watched a video of Izba's run. 


Dark Night for Scotland Against Estonia 


Tomba was not alone. The tight 
course set for the first nm by Nmwegian 
coach Valquist was a gauntlet Of 
the 15 seeded sfaers, six did not com- 
plete the run. Overall, 55 of the 108 
skiers entered failed to finish: an ex- 
tremely Ugh attrition rate. The unluck- 
iest was Sloyenia’s Rene Mlekuz who 
had to swerve to avoid a worker who had 
wandered onto foe course with a sfoovel. 
Mlekuz started again, failed to finish, 
and be was one of many skiers who 
ended up complaining. 

“I expected some casualties Imt not 
that many," Valquist admitted. 'Ttwas 
a difficult course, a difficult hill and 
difficult snow. There were three dif- 
ferent types of snow to worry about" 

Valquist said he wanted the course to 
feature tighter ftntis and more gates than 
usual b^ause, in his opinions, giant 


Ctafdtrf Oir Sb^Aor OtfaaolM 

MONTE CARLO — Estonia finally 
turned up for a World Cup qualifier that 
originally kicked off in TaUnn last Oc- 
tobw and unexpectedly held Scotland, 
foe leaders of European group four, to a 
0-0 tie. 

The Scots attacked for much of the 
game in Monaco on Tuesday but 
scorned several chances in front of a 
crowd of about 4,(XX), about half of 
them Scottish fens. 

When the Scots were on target they 
found Estonian goalkeeper Mart Pomn 
in inspired form. 

Scotland manager Craig Brown was 
so embarrassed by his side's di^lay that 
he exinessed "extreme disappointment 
and apologies" to foe traveling fans. 


Celtic defender Tom Boyd came 
closest to breaking foe deadlock when 
he hit tile crossbar in the first half. 

The match was played in Monaco 


plavti 

after a dispute over foe floodli^ting for 


SoccirRobndvr 


the originai match in T allinn last Oc- 
tober. The Estonian team failed to turn 
up at a revised kick-off time. Scotland 
kicked off unopposed and were awarded 
a 3-0 victory, but Estonia appealed 
ENGLAND Glerm Hoddle’s plan to 
surprise Italy by naming Matthew Le 
Tissier to his team an hour before Wed- 
nesday !s World Cup qualifier at Wemb- 
ley was ruined by the player's brother 
Kad. 


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Hoddle, foe England manner, had 
told the press he would pick Paul 
Gascoigne in midfield On Tuesday, 
Hoddle told Le Tissier that he would 
play. Le Tissier phooed his family on 
Guernsey 'm the Channel Islands and his 
brother then told a local ra^ station. 

snuN Carlos Alberto Silva agreed 
Wednesday to take over from Jolm 
Toshack as coach at Deportivo La Co- 
runa until foe end of the season. 

Silva has managed some of Brazil’s 
most prestigious sides and has worked 
as a scout for Deportivo, which has a 
number of Brazilians in its squad in- 
cluding defender Mauro Silva, mid- 
fielders Rivaldo, Donato and Flavto 
Conceicao and striker Renaldo. 

Lids Aragones remains the most 
likely candidate to take over in the sum- 
mer. Spanish league rules forbid him to 
take over now because be had already 
fwanagftri Valencia this season. 

(Reuters, AP) 


stqierlatives from his peers for his c 
turns arid grace. 

“He skis like in the textbooks,” 
Norway's Kjetil-Andre AomodL 
The last time Von Gruenigen skied 
off a course in the ^ant slalom was ^ 
the Winter Olympics in 1994, when he 
a gate near tiie fini^ of 
second nm and a medal. SinCfc 

then, he, not Tomba, has dominated this 
event, although the Italian beat him s 
last year's world champitxiships. ^ 

“Last year, I didn’t nandie die pre^ 
sure,” Von Gruenigen said “But I 
learned a lot from that, and this year, J 
Think I put foe pressure on-eveiymie 
else." \ 

Von Gruenigen and Tomba have little 
in common. The Italian is a diild of 
privilege who grew up in a cosmt^ 
politan city, Bologn^ and is a natuiql 
extrovert. Von Gruenigoi was 
at 9 and raised by his older sisters, 
grew up in the small German 
vilia^ of Schoeniied and is ra se 
contained that die Swiss joke that one igf 
his hobbies is silence. 

' He was hardly sUoit after the race, 

competition tiiuTsILson. Tomba flirted 
with retirement in the off-season, dien 
broke his right wrist ia October. But 
since reniming to the circuit, he has 
slopped several laces and feU in his only 
giant slaliHn prior to Sestriere. 

*To me, it's siding that should beat 
foeforefi^oni'’"Von'Gruemgen^j^ ^ 

• “ff someone wants to party arid^only 
be interested in the World (tampion- 
ships foat's his business. I do aB foe 
events. Alberto has deliberately decideri 
to coocemraie onl^ on diis one. and ina 
certain sense, that is not fair to the oti^ 
guys who race all the time.” 


An Olympic Rivalry for 2008 


Washington Post Sendee 

WASHINGTON — The friendly 
rivalry between Washington and Bal- 
timore is ^xNSt to become more intense 
as both cities prepare to make runs at 
holding the 2(X)8 Olympic Games. 

Rqiresentatives from each city 
were to attend a seminar in Phil- 
adelphia on Wednesday sponsored by 
the U.S. Olympic Committee for or- 
ganizations consideiiiig a M on foe 
Olympics or an Ol^pic^lated 
event. 

Seven people from the Washington 
Exploratory Committee and tiiTK 
firoin the state of Maryland were to be 
amcxig die 83 people from 38 sports 
and developnum organizations at- 
tending the session. 

The competition will be intense and 


Washington's financial and crime'J 
problems will not help. Nevertheless^v 
who would have believed Atlanta 
would have won the ri^t to sponsor-* 
the 1996 Olympics? t 

The Washington and Baltimore i 
groups said tiiat million in cur- : 
rent stadium consmictitMi as well as 
billions in airport improvements, rail 
Unks and highways makes the Wash-«j 
ington-Baltimore area an attractive |[ 
h(^t f(»- an Olympics. 

The fritematfonal Olympic Com-> 
mictee will not name a host city for foe i 
3008 Games until late 2001 or earli^^ 
2002, accor^g to the U.S. Olympi^l 
Committee. E^t cities, including |; 
New York, Se^e and Boston, ate « 
purstiiog foe committee's approval as { 
foe American entry. i 


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international herald tribone, THORSDAI; FEBRUART 13, 1997 


PAGE 19 




SPORTS 


% Jordan Shines 

si\y As Bulls \^in 


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.1 . 


Cenfilnl^OwSt^FnmDiift^ 
Dennis Rodman rejmned 

the Chicago Bulls after an 11- 

gaine suspension for kicking a 
courtside iriiotograi:^, but 
^was overdiadowed on die 
Murt by Michael Jordan as the 
Bulls beat Chariotte 103-100. 

Jordan sank the winning 
jbiee-point shot at the buzzer 
^ finished with 43 points. 

, Hie Hornets were led Iw 
Glen Rice, the All-Star Game 
ost Valuable Player, who 




scored 32 points. Rodman fin- 
ished whh three points, 14 re- 
bounds and several ovations. 

. Rodman jplayed showman 
be doped over a TV 
.cameraman. Tommy Skimier. 
Ito's the scenario that got 
him into trouble lak nxmth in 
ji/Gnnesota. Rodman patted the 
bameraman on his chest and 
a^Mized into die camera. 
r< Berore die game, the 
.Chicago fans greeted Rod- 
man with a ch^ almost as 
Jbud as the one reserved for 
Jordan. Rodman had said he 
tepecied the fans to ‘*boo the 
out of me.*’ 

■ “We’re just h^ipy to have 
back.” said gumi Steve 
.j^err. ”He gives us energy 
w intensity, not to mention 
^fense and rebotmding.*’ 

, In winning their ISto con- 
secutive home game, the 
Bulls ended Chariotte's four- 
game winning streak. 

. MuggsyB^gues hit a three- 
pointer with 9.5 seconds left 
to tie the score 1 00- 1 00, Ihen 
Jordan shot over Dell Curry 
as die clock ticked to zero. 

•' A syndicated television 
network hroit^t Rodman's 
father. Philander to the game 
•'horn the Philippines. Rod- 
1 was quoted as saying he 
no interest in seeing a 


man he bad not seen in 30 
years. Bulls officials (fid their 
bKt to Ice^ the two apart. 

”My reaction to my dad is 
be comes to see one of his Itj dg 
and only one rtf Us kids has 
money, * said Rodman. Ptdl- 
says he has &tbeied 27 
children. 

Knieks 97, P ui le to 92 Jeff 
Van Gundy, the New York 
coach, pull^ his eatiie stait- 
ing five after Washington, 
playing ai home under a new 
coach, scored 20 of die 
game’s first 28 points. 

The Knicks rallied in die 
third quarter to send Bullets 
coach Bemie Bickerstaff to a 
loss in his Hat^iy 

Patrick Ewing, retuxning 
from an injuiy tfot k^ him 
out of die .All-Star Game, 
scored 18 pcunts for die 
Knicks, as did John Staiks. 

CawaGM* 105, 76m 94 Al- 
len Iverson leturoed to Qev- 
eland, site of. the All-Star 
Game, and failed to do what 
he (Hedicted — get even with 
Cavs fans ndio booed htm 
when he won die MVP award 
at the All-Star nxikie game. 

Iverson scored 21 points, 
but shot just S-fbr-22. 

”1 locdced real bed out there 
on my shot,” said Ivecsoo, 
who really heard it from the 
hecklers when be shot an air- 
ball on a 3-pomter with 2:34 
left. ‘Tjustplayedabad game. 
I have a lot more games CD 
in diis arena, so dip’ll 
more ***"<v^ to boo me.” 

Reefcate 106, Qi'inllM 97 

Oiarles Barkley returned 
from an inJuiy a /id 
wifli 13 points, eifi^t assists 
and six reboinKu against 
Vancouver in Houston. 

St yr Scwi cj 10^ ifciggatj 

81 At Seattle, Shaim Kemp 
was benched for the start of 
eadi half because be missed 
Monday’s practice, but die 



Sim 

Aothooj Mason of the Charlotte Hornets strag^fa^ the Bolls’ Deottis Rodznaii. 


Sonics hardly needed him as 
they beat Denver. 

Gtty Payton scoed 28 
points, and Nate McMill^ 
who missfA almost the entire 
seascm because of a tmn grain 
muscle, played 16 minutes 
and had five asdsts, three 
steals and a blocked shot 
Jaa 120 l ia«4 98 Kail 
Malone answered Sacra- 
mento’s trash taik widi 30 

pntnfee, trwrluding 14 ID the 

third quailCT for vidting UtalL 
“Sometimes when you talk, 
yew forget to play,” Malone 
said. 


HMt 104, PiaiMM »1 At 
Miami, Tun Hardaway 
scored 31 pmnts, and Alonzo 
Monreing added 29 to help 
Miami, ranked 24th in the 
NBA in scoring, top 100 
points for the fifth time in its 
seven-game winning streak. 

Spinl 1 1 , Mmvicfcs 97 At 

Dall^, Vernon Maxwell 
scored 34 points as the Spun 
won for toe 12di time this 
geayofi _ and the third 
against the Mavericks. 

Ikaa rr 111, Sum 106 

At PoBlland, Kenny Andersem 
scared 19 of Us 33 ptrints in 


China^s Basketball Marvel 

He Ebis Tools, but How About the Drive? 


By Tun Noonan 

Internationa Htrald Tribute 


the fouith quarter, including 
five free tUws in toe last 30 

Cfkmwv 11^ CaMea 112 

i^lik Sealy scc^ 21 points, 
and Loy Vaught scored 16 of 
his 1 8 points in toe second half, 
includmg a baseline jumper 
with idl remaining that put 
the Clippers ahead for good. 

Bueka IM, Raptors 96 At 
Mil waulcee , Via B aker scored 
eight of Mllrwaukee's final 10 
points and blocked several 
shots in the final 3:49 as the 
Bucks ended a five-game los- 
ing streak. I'NJT. AP) 


SHANGHAI — At 7 foot, 1 inch, China’s 

all the tools. He n^’u^shoots^like a small 
guard, while rebounding and shot-blocking 
uke the behemoto he is. But at only 18, Wang 
is also proving that potential may be the most 
damning ofpTOphecieS. 

He was Gm sighted at 16 on the Chinese 
national team that eventually won the Asian 
Basiri-thnii Cc^ederation chami»onship. 
Since then, he has helped tiie Chinese national 
team (qualify for the Olympics. 

In his fim year of pj^essional basketball, 
his club, whicto at the time was called August 
1 and based In S hanghai , went a perfect 25 and 
0 and won the Chinese National Basketball 
le title. 

Pang was also the most valuable player as 
China captured the Asian junior champion- 
ship shortly a^ the Olympics. 

This year, his team, whi^ has ebansed its 
name to toe Bayi Roc^u. moved to in 
central China at the betest of Mark Mc- 
Cormack’s International Management Group, 
which has helped run toe Chinese league for 
three years. 

^^Tbere are not more than one or two 18 
years olds in the world who can do the things 
that be does,” said Larry Farmer. As the 
coach of Kuwait’s junior team, which also 
plays in Asian championships. Fanner has 
seen a fair bit of Wang. As a former coach at 
UCLA, Farmer thinks that Wang would not be 
out of place in top-level U.S. college bas- 
ketball. 

“To see that type of talent and coordination 
in a big man is extremely rare,* ’ Fanner said. 
“It’s toe type of talent toat makes college 
recruiters and N^ scouts drool.” 

Georgetown, Louisiana State University 
and Mnquette have already expressed in- 
terest in the precocious Wang. 

Yet for all the talk of potential greamess, 
(be youngster who has a good chance of being 
the first Asian native to pU^ in the NBA 
seems slightly less than enthusiastic during 
his second professional season. 

“You can see it in his play, particularly on 
defense,” said Tom McCa^y, diief exec- 
utive of the promotions arm of the Asian 
Basketi»ll Confaderation and an analyst with 
Asia’s Star Sports, a satellite br^casnng 
company. 

McCarthy once coached a teenage Patrick 


Ewing, now the star (»nter for the New York 
Knicks. and said the only similarity between 
Wang and Ewing at si^ar stages in toeir 
careers was their might. 

“Wang Zhizhi is much better offensively 
than Patrick was at his ^ and his passing and 
shooting are on par with the best players in 
American college basketball,” McCarthy 
saiA “However, Patrick had a ferocious work 
ethic toat you cannot teach. Wang must be 
exhausted because he has played nonstop all 
over the world for the last 1 8 months. Still, if 
he wants to be g^t he has to do more than go 
through the motions. ' * 

Wane spent last summer bangii^ up 
against Shaquille O’Neal, Hakeem Olajuwon 
and David Robinson at toe Atlanta Olympics. 
China was soundly beaten by toe U.S. Dream 
Team and Wang scored only 6 points to go 
wito 3 rebounds in 25 minutes of play. 

“It was a great learning experience and 1 
think because 1 am much younger than those 
players, that I was at a disadvantage,” Wang 
said. “But I was stUl disappointed by my 
peifonnance.” 

Compounding the problem for Wang is a 
lack of competition. 

“Hncfing .someone to challenge him in 
China is a major prcMem right now,” said 
Wang Fei. the Bayi coach. '‘There is no 
question about Wang Zhtzhi's talent 
However, he needs to add some bulk to his 
bexiy and work on his fundamentals to get up 
to the next level, which is a sizable slept. ’ ’ 

Meanwhile, Wang’s potential is not re- 
stricted to the court. China’s rapidly expand- 
ing consumer class voraciously buys all sons 
or NBA merchandise. The rewards for a 
Chinese NBA player could be huge. 

Already. Wang has unwittingly become a 
pawn in toe fierce competition between 
China’s rival leagues. His Rockets are the 
promotional anchor ^ the more established 
and respex^ Chinese Notional Basketball 
League, which has been around for more than 
30 years. But toe China New Basketball Al- 
liance, which was formed in 1996, aspires to 
become the premier league. The competition 
between them may make toe Rockets more 
reluctant to allow Wang to leave. 

Wang’s behavior is very different from that 
of many young NBA players. He has no tattoos, 
no earrings and very little attitude. He is the son 
of two Beijing teachers and has a congenial and 
acco mmodatin g nature. When as)^ if he 
would like to play in the NBA, he replies 
simply and unhesitatingly. “Of course.” 


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PAGE 2 


international: 


PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL mgRAT.n TRIBUNE, THURSDAY FEBRUARY 12, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Candidate at 14 



W ASHINGTON — I 
ashed a i4-jwoJd ac- 
quaintance of mine tuimari 
Adam Maries, **What do you 
want to be when 
yougtmvup?" 

He replied 
without hesita- 
tion, ‘*1 want 
to be president 
of the United 
States." 

• “Tliai's ad- 
mirable," I sakL 
"Butyou'rego- 
ing to need a good education to 
get into the White House." 

*'I don’t need an education. 
1 need S2 billion.” 

"That’s ridiculous," I told 
him. **!n any case, where 
would you get $2 billion?" 

"1 read that there are thou- 
sands of people in America 
who can tc persuaded to give 
money to help a candidate be- 
come president of the United 
States.” 


Buchwald 


mercials. That’s why I need all 
the soft money 1 can geL ’ ' 
"Aren’t you afiaid that if 
you accept money from 
donors you’ll owe them fa- 
vors?” 

"I*m more a£raid of losing 
the election. Anyone who 
gives me 5250,000 wili be 
allowed to sleep over at the 
White House. For an extra 
$50,000, ril give them a cup 
of Maxwell House coffee in 
die moming." 

"But as president, don't 
you have any other plans for 
thecounny? * 

"I don’t wish to discuss 
them until I find out over 
lunch what the bankers 
wanL" 


□ 


□ 


"Bite your tongue. Adam. 
You can't buy a presidential 
election with cash." 

“I have to have a slush fund 
to pay fm’my advertising cora- 


The Best of Lincoln 


The Associated Press 

SPRINGFIELD, lUinois 
— Before be became pres- 
ident. Ateduun Lincoln was a 
prolific lawyer who produced 
hundreds of le^ documents, 
some scrawled in quill orpra- 
cil. These will soon be avail- 
able on CD-ROM in a 20-<Usk 
box set for 52,000. ^xiut 
250.000 pages of documents 
from 6.000 cases have been 
collected, ranging from court 
dockets to bri^ Lincoln 
wrote himself. The project 
was begun in 1985 to doc- 
ument the quaiter-centu^ 
that Lincoln pnuticed law in 
Dlinois. 


"Adam, there's something 
weird about your ambition. I 
don't know whether you want 
to be president of the United 
States so you can ask favors 
of the heavy givers, or wheth- 
er you want to be president so 
th^ can ask them of you. Set 
die money issue aside for a 
moment What is your true 
ambition with regaid to your 
role as leader of the Free 
World?” 

"Well, I’m not ^ing to 
stop Asians from giving to my 
campaign, and I’m going to 
make sure that someone on 
my staff always t^ the 
Buddhists. 'The best way to 
hold a free electicxi is for 
everybody to contribute to it. 
Pm even thinking of letting 
pMple who donate 5100,000 
hit golf bolls with me on the 
White House lawn.” 

"Adam, I can tell you right 
DOW that I don't want you to 
be president You only seem 
to be interested in raising 
cash.” 

"What choice will I have 
when my opponent starts run- 
ning commeFciais accusing 
me of having scrambled eggs 
whh lobto'ists?” 


The Breathless Life and Times of Cyndi Lauper 




By Mike Zweiio 

hilenuihonal Herald Tribaiie 


P ARIS —Here to prmote her 
new album, "Sisters of 
Avalon” (Epic), Cynthia Ann 
Stephanie Lauper. 43, tells her sto- 
ry breathlessly. Her New York oot- 
er-boFough accent is eccentrically 
consonant 

As far back as she can remember 
she wanted to be an actress. She'd 
wdk out of movies imagining her- 
self dte star, talking and moving 
like her. She was cmsideied 
kooky, she was always in trouble. 
'Tlie mins in die Catholic school she 
attended (she grew up in Queens) 
said, "She’s such an actress.” 
Mining she cjqKCted q)ecial 
treatment Once, as punishment for 
tall^g with the b(^, she had to eat 
lunch with them in ibeir cafeteria. 
'The sisters thought tiiat none of the 
boys womd talk to her, she’d feel 
osoacized and that would be that 
While she felt like: "Oh boy. I'll 
^et to see how the other half 
lives.” 

Every morning, the students 
were awakened at 5. They made 
their b^. took a shower, got aU tbe 
"chuich things” out of the way and 
then went to breakfast Cyndi was 
dways sick. 

Sbe wasn't faldng it she was just 
not a moming person. Actually, she 
dkb't really mind getting sick every 
moming because the punishment 
was sitting widi the nuns for an hour, 
and she liked tbe sisters. She was 
always singing and the^ kept saying 
"she has a (ffmessionaf voice.” One 
way oranctiier, however, she bredee 
so many rules that she tfaou^ the 
sistexs were keeping a list of sins. 
But she could take it After all, it was 
her first name. 

She entertained the other kids 
during recess with impersonations, 
and excerpts from Bit^way plays. 
"She should be uained,” tbe sisters 
said. 

Her mother listeoed to 6-year-old 
Cyndi change her voice iwk and 
fc^ to play all die parts — young 
and old, rime and female — and 
memorize aU die lyrics and melod- 


ies along whh the recording of 
"The King and L" It was <^vu»s 
her little giri had taleat Some kids **»**a»J^^ 
play with dolls, Cjmchplayed with 
records. Sbe played "'The King arid 
I” ro often h^grandinodier finally 
came downstmrs, rock the record 
off the turntable and sraadied it 

Sometimes ber mother drove 
Cyndi and her sister to Gieeowicfa 
Vill^ to look at ^ h^ies and 
die beatniks. Her mother diought 
th^ were interesting people. 

'There was a wild stie^ in her 
modier "they” tried to break. By 
"they" Cyiim means ber grand- 
parents and the people in the neigh- 
borhood. Sie remembers most of 
them as being nice oiough, but 
"they were conservative people.” 

Her modier tried to fit in but 
couldn’t Her Idds were even 
wilder. "T hank goodness,” Cyndi 
thought getting thrown out of a 
high schMl she didn’t like. Sbe 
looks up with gratitude: "There isa 
God.” 

Her modier was raising her two 
daughters alone, sbe was poor. The 
cards were stacked against.her, and 
her Italian immigrant parents were 
not about to help because — and 
this isCyndi's take — they thought 
that if it got really tou^ she mi^t 
back together with Cyndi’s 


Her modier took her to ev^ 
church activity. She liked singitig 
in the choir, She felt safe up diere 
near the paintings of the angels. 


The imag^ of people burning and 
, for some reasem she 


suffering were, 
couldn't figme out, lower down. 
Onedaybermotbersaid: "^Cyn, 
if only you were bom to a ridi 
family. They could affrnd to train 
your voice.'’ Her modier was 
heartbroken. Sbe even sobbed that 
maybe she should put Cyndi up for 
addition by a ridi family. 

Cyndi hugged her and said: 
"Ma, you're going a litde over- 
board here.” 

She wanted to go to Music and 
Alt ifigh School but fiiiled the test. 
She loved to paint too. All told, she 
was thrown out of dirce high 
schools. She could memorize song 



depressing because Cyndi 

walking cliche ' - . . ->| 

' Walking down Jatiteica Avenhe^ j 
in Queens one day "I wasna. 
drugs, a messi 1 hated eveiydunn ■ 
want^ nodiing” -^she^jotteda' 

sign next to a beautifnl piling in a * 

stoefront window. It said "art les^ 
sons i^tfiairs,” 9ie' went -m 
walked a; 


sons i^isiairs.” 9ie",wait 

I and met BaneU,'a 


puuiicr wuw uvGu _ unweea rmqpr 
of great work and too mbeh 
cohoL’* who died in relative 
scuriiy — and «4 k> changed !]»• 
life. 

. He listened to John Cdt^ : 
niiile painting. "He told herabgii> 
Thoreaii, Gandhi, Mutin Lufeb^ ; 

tfinp anci thft K«nnerivs. Slw framJ' 


herself reasofiipg fof heraelfiv ^ 
first time. Pertiapsihe wi» not sqT. 
pid after alL Qmdi could' not 
^ne what Bob was do'uag mi 
maica Avenue but "lu^y.-tne,’.* 

She went re an art colle^ A 
VeiTnont and painted for aftritile;: 
The trouble was diat at m ghr j^ -. 
would dreami she was' ringog* 


a proft^ional voice, Sbe’d te: 
her friends’ farmhouse in a bow' 


patch and play the mtair and the ' 
foUL songs widi 


Cyndi Lauper on ber promotionai dash tiiroiigh Paris. 


lyrics and melodies but had (rouble 
with the three Rs. Now she knows 
thcro’s a name for it — dyslexic. 
But at the time she was sure riie was 
just snipid. Sihe finally graduated 
from the fourth one. Her uncle, who 
was a designer, suggested sbe go to 
a fariiion industry school 


The naysayers told her mother it 
would be better for Cyntiua to leam 
a trade than end up a waitress, like 
her. "My ma was so manipu- 
lated,” ^odi reflects. "It was so 
red." She learned industrial sew- 
ing and then found herself in a 
ah oemflldng class. This was really 


recorder and sing 
them. 

Bade in New York, she firsBy' 
got professional about it -She ^ 
ditioned and fonhed bands mi ' 
worked on Long Island. Perfi^ 
ing in Manhattan for die' first - 

sbe saw tiiat pe<q>le ^ tiie 
tually stc^^ed drinking- ..an^ 
listened to hCT. ^ 

Her first solo album, "She’s So 
Unusual,” sold a million cr^eg. 

. and produced fourhit singles. 
of them, "Girls Just Want to 
Fun,’ ’ becaiitte asort of cdtapflN^ 
for independent yoou. waneo.' 
Another, "Time AnerThne,'' was 
recorded by Miles Davis ^ Cynfi . 
thought that if Miles wanted tophgr 
her songs maybe they wnent so. 
bad after all. 

When rite became famous, ki^ 
would come re her mother’s door 
on Halloween ni^t tridc or .tieK- 
ing disguised as 


NOT ON THE MENU 


PEOPLE 


It 


All About Harry’s: Back Talk by Cipriani 


By Alex Witchel 

New Vorh Times Service 


N ew YORK — Arrigo Cipriani 
peers at a customer's p^. "what 
are you having?” he asks. 

"Spaghetti and meatballs,” comes die 
T^y. a dish not on die menu at Haity 
Cqrnani, die Mrmhattan restaurant that is 
a sister to die famed Harry's Bar in 
Venice. 

Cipriani smiles benignly at die meat- 
balls before returning to his own table. 
' 'Incredible," he says. "He saw someone 
else eating it a few days ago. People 
always lo^ at other people's tables and 
want the same thing. In Venice we had a 
lawyer who would come in always very 
hun^. The moment he would sit down 
he wanted something, before be ordered 
dinner. We would give hina any thing we 
had in the kitchen, sometinies a chicken 
wing from the day before. Then everyone 
else wanted it. reo." 

After 45 years in the restaurant busi- 
ness. first at Harry's Bar, co-founded in 
1931 by his father. Giuseppe, and its 
namesake. Harry Pickering, an Amer- 
ican. Cipriani knows the v^e of a sat- 
isfied clientele and the tremendous ef- 
fort needed to keep it that way: in 1950, 
when a customer was forbidden by her 
iloclor to eat cooked meat, Giuseppe 
Cipriani went into the kitchen of Harry's 
Bar. cut raw filet mignon into psqier-thin 
slices and fanned them out on a plate 
with a mayonnaise sauce. He named it 
carpaccio after the Renaissance artist’s 
red and white paintings. Talk tteout ser- 
vice. 

Which Cipriani does, at great length 
in his new book, "Harry's Ban The Life 
and Times of the Legendary Venice 
Landmark” (Arcade). 

"lam always trying to make people 
feel comfortable and important,” he 
says, sipping an espresso at Harry Cipri- 
ani. in the Sherry-Netheriand Hotel. 
"Sometimes, in Venice especially, 
people try to make it difficult. The hard- 
est people 1 ever had were the Italian 
aristocrats. 'They were spoiled. 'They 
knew everything about food and service, 
and they had not much money left.” He 
smiles. "But they were my teachm.” 



LwL. Rariri'Tbu- 'Vn> lufk Tine 

Cipriani greeting a customer. 


Cifmani, 64, seems genuinely to like 
Americans, but he d<^ acknwledge 
that tbe ugly ones still exist. "If you are 
extremely land, you take greund away 
from them,” he says, graciously. "In- 
stead of being tough, you are even 
kinder.” 

Certainly, upon entering Harry Cipri- 
ani. a customer feels imrnediately tall. 
Not only is the welcome warm but the 
ceiling is low. 

Luck, Cipriani says. 'The space just 
happen^ to come that way. And re take 
the illusion even further, the tables are 
dime-size, the silverware dessen-size. 
Nothing upstages the customer, includ- 
ing the owner. 

Cipriani, who was trained as a lawyer 
and holds a black belt in karate, is 
dressed impeccably in a dark suit, mov- 
ing among the tables with an unlikely 
physical grace. When the man eating 
meatballs motions him to come closer, 
as if to tell a secret, Cipriani bends 
forward while leaving a definable space 
between them. He never gets too close. 


never speaks too loudly, never stays too 
"his 


long at a table. For all his reputation and 


ttte history he carries of Harry’s Bar and 
his father before him, he has an uncanny 
ability re fold himself up at a moment’s 
notice, becoming gray and silait, barely 
notice^le. as the parade of stunningly 
dressed women and their dashing escorts 
goby. 

But there is anotiira: side to Airigo 
Cipriani, who was bom the year after 
Harry’s Bar opened and was named for 
Harry Pickering. It is the side that does 
not follow his flier's example, does not 
respect personal spa^ or compliment 
the waiter cm the quality of tbe espresso, 
ft is the side of mm that writes, 
everything from novels to short stories 
to newsp^ier columns to nasty liters re 
the editor — any editor — about res- 
taurant critics, a group he universally 
despises. Print is where Cipriam, freed 
of his ironclad manners, bursts into tan- 
trums of purple and gold 

In 1987. he took out an advertisement 
in The New Yoik Times addressed 
"Dear Food Editor.” lambasting Bryan 
Miller, the 'Times’s restaurant cntic who 
had panned Harry Cipriani and Betlini 
by Cipriani, now cloWd After bis re- 
view of Harry Cipriani, Cipriani refused 
to serve MIUct when he went to review 
Bellini. Undeterred Miller wore a dis- 
guise and ate tiiere anyway. 

Cipriani's latest sldmiish came last 
spring when Gael Greene of New York 
magaune negatively reviewed Down- 
town. a restaurant in SoHo owned and 
operated by Cipriani's son, Giuseppe. 
She said smne of the food tas^ 
"frozen, thawed and rewatmed” and 
dubbed (he hamburger "chewy as 
bubble gum.” 

Hie elder Cipriani retaliated with a 
letter printed in the magazine saying, in 
part, "In her case, 1 thuik it is possible 
that she forgot to remove the condom 
from her tOQgue before tasting the 
food" 

He shrugs. "In Italy 1 am known to 
fi^t the foM critics,” be saj«, his eyes 
amused "A restaurant like mine has our 
own customers. 'They will always come. 
So tbe idea for oie is that critics 
shouldn’t talk about it at alL” 

Greene did not return sed^g 
cominent. 


A n annual trans-Atiantic ocoitest was 
settled as a Kansas schoolteadier 
won the Pam^ke Day footrace in 58.57 
bcXlting tite ^nDOer of a awnilar 
race held erdier in Britain almost 5 
seconds. Christina Wiibers’s victory 
meant that Liberal, Kansas, took die lead 
in tbe series whh OLoqt, England which 
has held the Shrove Tu^day footrace on 
and off since 1445. Before Wilbers's vic- 
reiy, the soies had been tied at 23 a{riece. 
Aviil Som^ a housewife, wtxi this 
year’s race in Olney whh a time of 63 J 
seconds. 


□ 


Hong Kong, 

the world over for its daily clamor, have 
proposed that spectators wear head- 
phones for two concerts tins summer by 
Eltra John because of the noise. Con- 
certs at Hmig Kong Stadium, where Jdm 
is to tqipear, have been halted by tbe 
Urban ^uncil because of complaints 
about noise from nei^bors. Jolm was 
booked fee the 40J)00-seat stadium on 
June 28 and June 29, one of many events 
ju^ b^ore the June 30 handover from 
British to Chinese sovereignty. Noise has 
caused controversy since tiie stadium was opened in March 
1 994. White gloves were given out to tbe audience at one show 
by a local star to mteSle die sound of die clause. But 
local inhflhitantg stiU coTiqilained Under the councillors* 
latest proposal, up to 18.000 people sitting reward the back of 



SPIKING THE NET — Tbe filmm^er Spike Lee, right, with Rob 
Glaser, the CEO of Progressive Network, showing one of the ^ee 
minute film shorts that Lee has developed for Ae interBefc' 


for synovial sarcoma, a rare form of cancer tiiat attacks Ite 
joints and can spread to tbe lungs. 


□ 


Lawmakers in Richmond, Vtrgtei^ bned to recnA.ite 


die stedium would see the pop singer tenhear Him only Grammy winner Bruce Hornsby to write a new state s^k>[ 
hK « replace "Carry Me Back to Old Vi rginia. " Nothing dr^ 

said the Williamsburg bard. "Why even bother witii a stet 

son^" be said. "It’s really hard to write a song like (bat sod 


through headsets tuned to a simultaneons broadcast on radio. 

□ 

Ro mania has announced the forr»yT monari ;»h . King 
Midi^ win soon have his citizenship restored. His citizenship 
was strq^ied by die Communists in 1948. 

□ 



do 

maudlin 

song, but be called'his regional 
and songs often with a dark twisL That’s hardly sti^ son? 
material." 


Robert Downey Jr., who spent time in and rriiab- 
Qitation in California fix* drug abuse last y^, is hrqipy to be 
working ^aiiL Yfe showed up at a cast party in New York for 
the just-fiiushed film * ‘Two Giris andaGuy.” "New York has 
oeraijily been a welcome dian^ of pace for me," Downey 
told USA Today. He is next hea£ng to Los Angeles re visit hu 
wife, Debrwafa Falcontf, who leonidy recon^ed with him- 
Then he will go on location in Georgia re maifft "The 
Girigeiixead Man,” which co-stars Keoj^h Brandi. 


□ 


□ 


Fresh from his battle with cancer, (he actor Robert Uriefa 
will return to television this month as host of a new medi<^l 


series. "Viral Signs,” which piemiexes Fd>. 27' on ABC. 
features doctors and paints m re-enactments of m^iral 
crises diey have.faced. Urich underwent surgery in November 


A New York judge has dismissed charges that the publi^ 
Chuck Jones -harassed Marla Maples Trump ty ftidiis- 
doctored nude photos of h^ to the niedia and to -her ins’, 
band’s enreloyees. The court ruled that prosecutors were tov 
slow in making tiieir case gainst Jones, citing a state law (M 
gave them 90 days. Jones was charged with harffismentlB’ 
October 199S for faxing fhe^otogrrqihs to tiie Plaza 
where Donald Trump has omces. He aHmin^ dial be 
Che {rfiotos but said be sent them only re people who reque^ 
them. Tnmq) said the {Aore shows somebody else’^ bo^ ' 
witii his wife's head superimposed on it Jones was c<»vi^ 
in February 1994 of buiglariziiig Marla Tramp's apartofft 
and taking 70 pairs of sh^ and boots, as well as her iotirndBi 
apparel. ... 



Every (nuntiy has its own Access Number which 
makes calling from France and other countries mally 
easy, just dial foe AFST Access Number for the country 
you’re calling from and you'll get the fastest, clearest 
connections. And be sure to cha^ your ^ills on your 
ATSff Calling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill and save you ip to 6096f 
So please check the list for AT&T Aaxss Numbers. 


KXXt Access Nnsbers 



liSEi lUiIoBiIb frira orascflsi 


Ljust dial the flftT Access Number 
[tf thf ountir ^ are eating hm 
2. Dial Ae phone aumberpou're calling 

5^Dtat the caOiog caid number lated 
abo« your name. 


EUROPE • 

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MDR*1IV:* 

naiu 




ImlaDd 


Raft* 

Natterl8Rte« 

RiBM*A(Bloseow]> 
Spalso 

...IfrDlMtil 

; .79HW* 

....JODDl.M-fl 


..D2i-7«Mt1 

suHBduBds 

...:inH>4in 

IMMOguitaBA 

....MIIHBitt 

MIDDLE EAST 

EDnrt*(CAo)f 

Isnal 

SudlAnUao 



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AFRICA . 


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XoqfaA ... 

SmfliMrfBS 

....... JHMH9 . 


Bad the Access Nuabcr&ir the Gountiyyuu'ioallliig from? Just okay eplaalsriir-.' 
gm'PlrceffSente,ofilsltonrVid>atettht»a»sw»jifac aii i/t n p «ler .. 


in the springtime. 



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