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INTERNATION, 


w *7\ 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND* 


WASHINGTON POST 


The World's Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Friday, February 14, 1997 


No. 35.445 ^ 


When a Car Phone 
Drives to Distraction 

It’s Particularly Helpful After the Crash 


* By Gina Kolata 

* New ytv*ifr Tirticrj Service 

NEW YORK — Talking on acellular 
telephone while driving may not cause 
brain cancer, as was once suggested, but 
two Canadian researchers have evi- 
dence that it is hazardous to health. 

The investigators report that talking 
on a cellular telephone while driving is 
as dangerous as driving while slightly 
drunk, and for the same reason: the risk 
of an accident. 

Of course, the researchers point out, 
cellular telephones do have some com- 
pensating benefits: 39 percent of the 
drivers used them to call for help after 
the crashes. 

. And. the researchers suggested, it 
could be the content of the conver- 


U.S. Stocks 
Surge Past 
7,000 Level 


The Dow Jones industrial av- 
- crage crossed 7.000 points 
Thursday for the first time, and 
despite a rally that has seen the 
blue-chip indicator rise more than 8 
percent so far this year, the feeling 
on Wall Street seemed to be that 
further gains were in the cards. 

The 30-stock average closed at a 
7.022.44. up 60.81 for the day. 
Broader market indexes also were 
in record territory, although gains 
were moderate for the Nasdaq in- 
dex. which includes many smaller 
issues. 

The rise in stocks has been fueled 
by American retirement savings, 
foreign investors attracted by a 
strong dollar, rising corporate 
profits and a benign inflation out- 
look — all of which should con- 
tinue, analysts said. Page 13. 


The Dollar 


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jp Vm 124.405 124.275 

IFF 5.686 5.689 


The Dow 




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+60.81 7022.44 6961.83 


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+9.06 811.83 802.77 


Pact Opens 
Way in U.S. 
For RU486 


By Caryle Murphy 

W'jshinc/o* Part Srnicr 

WASHINGTON — The holder of the 
U.S. marketing rights to the French 
abortion pill has settled a lawsuit and 
will now try to bring the drug to the 
United States by the end of the year. 

The settlement, announced Wednes- 
day, ended a dispute between the rights 
holder, a nonprofit family-planning or- 
ganization in N> w York called the Pop- 
ulation Council, and a California busi- 
nessman. Joseph Pike, over control of 
selling the pill. 

The council had contracted with Mr. 
Pike in 1 995 to market and distribute the 
drug, mifepristone, known as RU486. 
Under the settlement. Mr. Pike retained 
a small equity interest in the product. 
The council also announced that it 
4\had set up a new company, Advances 
< * for Choice, to sell it. 

Taken in the early; weeks of preg- 
nancy. mifepristone induces an abor- 
tion. The U.S. Food and Drug Admin- 
istration said in September that the drug 
was “ appro v able," meaning it was safe 
and effective, but asked for more in- 
formation on manufacturing and la- 

PILL, See Page 12 

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sarions that accounts for die increased 
risk. A person who is not on the phone 
cannot be distracted by a shouting match 
with a boss or a significant other. 

The study, by Donald Redelmeier, a 
professor of medicine, and Robert Tib- 
shzrani, a statistician, both of the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, involved 699 drivers 
who Had cellular telephones and who had 
been involved in accidents. Tbe re- 
searches got permission fiomthedri vers 
to examine their telephone records from 
the week before their accidents. 

After analyzing 26,798 calls, they 
concluded that the risk of having an 
accident increased fourfold when 
drivers were on the telephone. Their 
paper, published Thursday in The New 
England Journal of Medicine, said it was 
tbe same risk as when a person’s blood 
alcohol level is at the legal limit, which 
Dr. Redelmeier put at .10 percent. 

“I think people should avoid unne- 
cessary calls and keep their conver- 
sations brief," while they are driving. 
Dr. Redelmeier said. Asked if drivers 
should be banned from using their 
phones while driving, he said: "As a 
scientist, my role is to provide objective 
data on risks and benefits." 

"I think a public debate is needed." 
on whether legislation is desirable, be 
added. 

The Cellular Telecommunications 
Industry Association, a Washington 
trade group, concurred with the study's 
findings, out said it did not favor laws to 
restrict drivers' use of cellular {drones. 

At the end of 1996, there were 137 
million cellular phones worldwide, die 
association said, citing statistics from 
the Swedish telecommunications com- 
pany Ericsson, a 57 percent increase 
over 1995. 

Michael Goodman, an engineering re- 
search psychologist at the National 
Transportation Safety Administration, 
noted that several countries, including 
Brazil. Israel and Switzerland, have laws 
restricting drivers from using cellular 
phones. There are no such laws in the 



I ; ' 




PUSS' 

■■..^1 11 ■■ lliAlJ'fllfiU. 


United Stares or many other countries. 

With more than 35 milli on cellular 
phones in use in the United States and 
more than 80 million expected to be in 
use by 2000, Dr. Goodman said, "it's a 
growing problem if it is a problem." 

The study pleased some statisticians 
because, they said, it so cleverly 
answered a seemingly unanswerable 
question. That is. how to determine that 
what looks like troth really is true: Driv- 

See PHONES, Page 12 


l ill Buipv^ Rnitm 

Chinese police outside tbe South Korean Embassy in Beijing on Thursday after Seoul requested tighter security. 

Desertion New Blow to Pyongyang 

By Kevin Sullivan 
and Steven Mofson 

Washington Post Service 

BEIJING — Armed soldiers ring die 
building and Communist agents lurk in 
parked cars. Diplomais trade frosty 
Cold War accusations of kidnapping 
and treachery; others whisper of body- 
doubles. Cloistered behind the walls, at 
the center of all the intrigue, a silver- 
haired defector with a head full of 
secrets straddles the worlds of com- 
munism and democracy. 

It is so much like a spy novel it ought 
to have page numbers. But tbe goings- 
on ai tbe South Korean Embassy in 

Beijing are a real-life drama with enor- _ _ _ 

mous consequences that reach from Ageoa Fnaa-pru. 

East Asia to Washington. A photo released by Seoul on Thursday that it said showed Hwang Jang Yop 

The man inside the embassy is writing his statement at the South Korean diplomatic compound in Beijing. 
Hwang Jang Yop. 72, the highest-rank- 
ing defector ever to betray the Stalinist But the North Koreans say the South her of the Workers' Party of Korea, is 
regime in North Korea. He and an aide Koreans have kidnapped Mr. Hwang, being held against his will, 
arrived at the embassy in a taxi Wed- die North's leading theoretician, a top North Korean officials sit in parked 
nesday morning, supporting his request aide to leader Kim Jong II and a chief cars outside the compound, and Seoul 
for asylum with a handwritten statement architect of die North’s guiding philo- officials say agents of Pyongyang tried 
denouncing North Korea, according to sophy of juche, or self-reliance. 

South Korea. They say Mr. Hwang, a leading mem- See BEIJING. Page 12 



But the North Koreans say the South 
Koreans have kidnapped Mr. Hwang, 
die North’s leading theoretician, a top 
aide to leader Kim Jong n and a chief 
architect of die North’s guiding philo- 
sophy of juche, or self-reliance. 

They say Mr. Hwang, a leading mem- 


ber of the Workers' Party of Korea, is 
being held against his will. 

North Korean officials sit in parked 
cars outside the compound, and Seoul 
officials say agents of Pyongyang tried 

See BEIJING, Page 12 


(Genius of Termites Provides 
Model for an Office Complex 


By Donald G. McNeil Jr. 

New York Tones Service 

HARARE, Zimbabwe — Africa owes its 
termite mounds a Iol Prospectors mine them, 
looking for specks of gold carried up from hun- 
dreds of feet below. Africans building mud huts 
love them, because the grainy soil inside is just 
the right consistency fra hard-packed floors. And 
of course, to aardvarks and other insectivores 
they are giant helpings of baked alaska. 

Now, Africa is paying an offbeat tribute to 
these ugly towers of bug-holed mud. Harare’s 
newest office complex is said to be the only one 
in the world to use the same cooling and heating 
principles as the termite mound. 

Termite mounds are marvels of engineering. 
Deep inside, the insects farm a fungus, theironly 
food. It must be kept at exactly 87 degrees Fahren- 
heit (30.5 centigrade), while die temperatures on 
the African veld outside range from 35 at night to 
104 Fahrenheit during the day (1.6 to 40 cen- 
tigrade). 

They do it by venting breezes in at die base of 
rite mound, down into chambers cooled by wet 
mud carried up from water tables far below, and 
up through a flue to the peak. Toiling with the 
tirelessly compulsive work ethic of all ants, they 
constantly dig new vents and plug old ones to 
regulate the temperature. 

Temperature regulation is a struggle familiar 
to any architect Mick Pearce of the Pearce 
Partnership was given a challenge by Old Mu- 


tual, an insurance and real estate conglomerate: 
build an office block that would be livable with 
no air-conditioning and almost no heating. 

Eastgate. tbe result, has been open for only nine 
months, but so far Mr. Pearce seems to be suc- 
ceeding. The complex has been using less than 10 
percent of ibe energy of a conventional building 
its size. Old Mutual saved S3.5 million on a $36 
million building because an air-conditioning plant 
didn’t have to be imported. The savings on elec- 
tricity are passed on to tenants, so rents axe 20 
percent lower than those in a building next door. 

The complex is actually two buildings linked 
by bridges across a shady, glass-roofed atrium 
open to the breezes. Fans suck fresh air in from the 
atrium, blow it upstairs through hollow spaces 
under the floors and from there into each office 
through baseboard vents. As it rises and warms, it 
is drawn out through ceiling vents. Finally, it exits 
through 48 round brick chimneys that make the 
roof look to some tike the chimney pots of Dick- 
ensian London and to others tike the smokestacks 
of the Queen Mary. 

To keep the harsh high veld sun from heating 
die interior, no more than 25 percent of the 
outside is glass, and all the windows are screened 
by an unusual form of sunshade: racks of cement 
arches that jut out more than a yard. 

During summer's cool nights, big fans flush 
air through the building seven times an hour to 
chill die hollow floors. By day, smaller fans blow 



ANTS, See Page 12 


K»HU \lrlA4pll r IV V«i liroew 

Harare’s new office complex, built on termite principles. 


AGENDA 


Tajik Warlord Kills UN Hostage 


DUSHANBE Tajikistan (AP) — 
A Tajik warlord had one of his gun- 
men shoot and kill a UN military 
observer, one of 14 people who are 
being held hostage in die former So- 
viet republic, Russian news agencies 

J TL.».Jaii 


reported Thursday. . 

The warlord, Bakhram Sachrov, 
had promised to free die hostages — 
eight LIN workers, four Russian jour- 
nalists, their driver and the Tajik se- 

PAQETWO 

Communis ts in Today's Germany 

THE AMERICAS Pag«3. 

Israel, and Al bright's Heritage. 

EUROPE 

(/-S. Boosts Aid to Milosevic Foes 


curity minister — once 40 guerrillas 
were flown home from neighboring 
Afghanistan. 

Itar-Tass and Interfax quoted their 
correspondents, who are among the 
hostages, on the shooting. The kid- 
nappers have been allowing their 
journalist hostages to call their Rus- 
sian agencies by satellite telephone. 

A UN official in New York sad the 
report had yet to be confirmed. 

ASUUPACTF1C Pag* 7. 

India’s Limited Talks Proposal 

Books Page 9. 


Secular Turks Are Alarmed 
By Resurgence of Religion 


Crossword 

Opinion _ 

Sports 

atten MU BnW rhMHl Bcf 


Page 9. 

Pages 8-9. 

Pages 20-21. 


By Stephen Kinzer 

,Vw York Time i Srmee 

SINCAN, Turkey — Scenes that un- 
folded in tin’s working-class suburb of 
Ankara over the last few days have 
stunned millions of Turks who want to 
believe that their country , even though it 
is now governed by an Islamist prime 
minister, will remain a secular demo- 
cracy. 

On one recent evening, several hun- 
dred people jammed a hail in Sincan to 
celebrate "Jerusalem Day," a holiday 
proclaimed 17 years ago by Ayatollah 
Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran. Their host 
was the local mayor, and the evening’s 
guest of honor was the Iranian am- 
bassador, Muhammed Reza Bagheri. 

When Mr. Bagheri arrived, the crowd 
erupted with chants of “Down with 


Israel! Down with Arafat!" He then 
stepped to the podium and delivered a 
fiery speech demanding ihai Muslims 
obey the Sharia, the law of the Koran. 

“On behalf of Muslims all over the 
world. I say that we can wait no longer.” 
the ambassador declared. “Do not be 
afraid to call yourselves fundamental- 
ists. Fundamentalists are those who fol- 
low the words and actions of the Proph- 
et. God has promised them the final 
victory” 

Tensions between religious and sec- 
ular Turks have been rising in recent 
months, and the Sincan episode con- 
vinced senior military officers, who 
view themselves as defenders of the 
secularist ideology that has guided Tur- 
key since 1923. that it was time to 

See TURKEY, Page 12 


Defector Has 
China Tom 
Between 
Two Koreas 

Seoul Says Official 
Wrote Letter Depicting 
A North Gone Mad 


pWh Om Sh&Fnm i Dupwftrs 

SEOUL — China was tom between 
loyally to a communist comrade and its 
new capitalist friend Thursday as the 
two Koreas squabbled over the fate of a 
Pyongyang defector protected by 
Chinese troops in Seoul's mission in 
Beijing. 

In a bid to win freedom for Hwang 
Jang Yop. a pillar of North Korea's 
Stalinist establishment. South Korea re- 
leased a letter it said was from the 
defector describing the agony of his 
flight from a starving nation he said had 
gone mad. 

China deployed troops around the 
building, partly to stop North Koreans 
lurking in cars outside from bursting in. 
But in an apparent sign of impatience 
with Seoul ’s public diplomacy. Chinese 
officials avoided meeting an envoy sent 
by the South Korean government. 

Seoul increased the state of alert of its 
military, and Pyongyang warned of un- 
specified countermeasures against 
South Korea. 

“1 tormented and tormented over 
this,” Mr. Hwang is reported to have 
said in the four-page signed note written 
in the diplomatic compound, where he 
arrived with an aide by taxi on Wed- 
nesday. 

The letter said that Mr. Hwang, a 
member of the Communist Party Cen- 
tral Committee, did not believe North 
Korea would collapse, despite wide- 
spread food shortages and a crumbling 
economy. 

While acknowledging that his "fam- 
ily and others will think me crazy,” in 
the letter. Mr. Hwang attacked those in 
the North who talked of turning the 
South into a “sea of fire" while pro- 
posing national unification. 

"How could you regard this as the 
behavior of sane people?" asked Mr. 
Hwang, one of the architects of Pyong- 
yang’s self-reliance philosophy, 
known as juche, and the most senior 
official ever to seek refuge in the 
South. 

“Can we call people sane when they 
talk of having built a utopia for the 

See KOREAN , Page 12 


U.S. Probes 
Chinese Role 
In Funding 
Democrats 


By Bob Woodward 
and Brian Duffy 

Washington Post Sen-ire 

WASHINGTON — A Justice De- 
partment investigation into improper 
political fund-raising activities has un- 
covered evidence thar representatives of 
the Chinese government sought to direct 
contributions from foreign sources to 
the Democratic National Committee be- 
fore the 1996 presidential campaign, 
officials familiar with the inquiry saul. 

Sensitive intelligence information 
shows that the Chinese Embassy in 
Washington was used for planning con- 
tributions to the Democratic committee, 
the sources said. Some information was 
obtained through electronic eavesdrop- 
ping conducted by federal agencies. 

Hie information gives the Justice De- 
partment inquiry what is known as a 
foreign counterintelligence component, 
elevating the seriousness of the fund- 
raising controversy, according to some 
officials. 

The sources declined to provide de- 
tails aboui the scope of the evidence 
relating to the alleged efforts by the 
Chinese representatives. They also de- 
clined ro specify what foreign contri- 
butions might have been involved, but 
they said ihai the new evidence being 
scrutinized was serious. 

A Chinese Embassy spokesman 
denied Wednesday that his government 
had anything to do with improper efforts 
to influence the Clinton administration. 
“We have done nothing of that sort.” 
the spokesman said. 

The evidence relating to the Chinese 
government led Justice Department 
lawyers and FBI officials to increase the 
number of FBI special agents working 
on an investigative task force from a 
handful to 25, including several spe- 
cialists in foreign counterintelligence 
investigations, the sources said. 

The new dimension io the fund-rais- 
ing investigation could result in At- 
torney General Janet Reno's eventually 

See EMBASSY, Page 12 


,**-» 

-55* 


— t 


» 






PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAT, FEBRUARY 1-2, IW7 






INTERNATIONAL TTFBAT.n TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


New Respectability / Despised by Some, Ignored by Nobody 

East German Communists Come Out of the Cold 


By John Schmid 

Intemarioniil Herald Tribune 


S UHL, Germany — When the East 
German Communist Party col- 
lapsed with the Berlin Wall, true 
believers like Klaus Lamprechi 
were left in the political wilderness. 

Few saw any hope for the new party of 
reformed Communists that limped out of 
the ruins of the old regime. Mainstream 
parties ostracized them. Membership fell to 
100,000 from 2.3 million. Many leftovers 
were elderly and died off. Others resigned in 
disgrace because of links to the hated secret 
police. Because of his activism for the old 
regime. Mr. Lamprecht himself was fired in 
1994 from his job as a grade-school teach- 
er. 

Today, the renamed Party of Democratic 
Socialism has become a vigorous political 
force, boasting a solid base in its home 
territory in Eastern Germany and causing 
political dilemmas for the mainstream 
parties in Western Germany. 

“ l believe in striving toward a society 
based on social equality'* said Mr. 
Lamprecht, a self-proclaimed socialist and 
city councilman in Suhl, an East German 
city of 54.000 where the Party of Demo- 
cratic Socialism controls the biggest bloc of 
seats. 

Other mainstream parties may continue 
to despise the former Communists, but they 
no longer can ignore a party that success- 
fully exploits the disillusion of unification, 
making it the third biggest in the East. 

The Party of Democratic Socialism has 
mayors in 180 cities and 6.000 city coun- 
c ilmen spread across the eastern region. It 
holds 30 of the 652 seats in die federal 
Parliament and it brokers the balance of 
power in the Saxony-Anhalt stale ho use, 
where a teetering minority coalition of So- 
cial Democrats and Greens would collapse 
if the Democratic Socialist bloc ceased to 
“tolerate" it any longer. 

P OLLS give the Democratic Social- 
ists about 20 percent of the vote in 
the eastern states, up from 8 percent 
in 1990. 

Although their support in the West is 
almost negligible, the Democratic Social- 
ists want to break out of their role as per- 
manent opposition and have enlisted a 
roster of well-known supporters, such as the 
author Guenter Grass, mainstream trade 
unionists, theologians and even members of 
the main leftist opposition blocs, die Social 
Democratic Party and the ecologist Green 
Party. 

The comeback coincides with a slumping 
East German economy, mass unemploy- 
ment, a year of spectacular bankruptcies in 
the east and a charge led by politicians in 
Western Germany to diminish welfare en- 
titlements. 

"What we always used to say about 
capitalism has proved itself correct," said 
Mr. Lamprecht, sitting in the Suhl party 



Gabi Zimmer, a leader of the former Communists: 


Aflara htincf-I V tm t 

‘We are not arrogant” 


office, where the bookshelves are lined with 
the complete works of Marx, Engels and 
Lenin. 

The Party of Democratic Socialism has 
begun grooming itself as an acceptable 
party of the democratic left, able to enter 
into alliances and coalitions. It devoted its 
national party convention last month to 
modernizing itself and repressing its hard- 
line Marxist anti-capitalists. 

The centerpiece of the party’s congress 
was the adoption of an ambitious resolution 
’'to put an end to die conservative he- 
gemony” by teaming up in a three-party 
coalition with the Social Democrats and 
Greens in next year's national elections to 
unseat Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s center- 
right alliance. 

Any Democratic Socialist-Social Demo- 
cratic link would be anathema to many West 
German voters, who make up 80 percent of 
the electorate. Social Democratic and Green 
Party leaders rejected the offer, even though 
the Democratic Socialists could constitute 
crucial support for a leftist alliance. 

Working to end their status as political 
pariahs, the Democratic Socialists have 
aligned many of their positions with die 


moderate left in Western Germany. Like the 
Social Democrats they resist Mr. .Kohl's 
efforts to scale back welfare. Like the west- 
ern labor unions, they endorse a cut in 
working hours to redistribute work to the 
unemployed, and they defend nationwide 
collective bargaining. Like the Greens, they 
oppose sending German troops abroad. 

T HEY also claim they are openly 
critical of the totalitarian excesses 
of die old regime and want to work 
within the new democratic frame- 
work. even as many espouse Marxism as 
their underlying ideology. 

The party's old radical streak still shows. 
It wants to delay a single European currency 
in 1999. again with an argument aimed at its 
eastern constituents: Germany’s shotgun 
1990 currency onion using the hard 
Deutsche mark obliterated eastern jobs, in- 
dustry and exports. 

As Bonn struggles to lower its deficits, die 
Democratic Socialists have few qualms 
about deficit spending and instead propose 
new spending on job creation. And they are 
vague on what many see as the main drag cm 
the economy, high labor costs and payroll 



NYT 


deductions to finance costly social benefits. 

In cities where the Democratic Socialists 
dominate, the quality -of-life difference is 
more rhetorical than political. That is be- 
cause East German politicians of ail stripes, 
not just the Democratic Socialists, demand 
higher subsidies and more state-sponsored 
jobs as their top priority. 

B UT the Democratic Socialists say 
they press their demands with 
more passion, often borrowing 
language from die old system that 
still resonates strongly with East Germans, 
according to Gabi Zimm er, a high-ranking 
party leader from its reform wing. Miss 
Zimme r talks about the “f undam ental hu- 
man right” to have a job; Mr. Lamprecht 
speaks fondly of his parly Genosse, using 
the old East German Communist Party term 
far comrade. 

“One of our roles is making sure that the 
issue of mass unemployment does not fall 
from the table," Miss Zimmer said. She 
added: “Many do not expect us to help, but 
we do listen and we are not arrogant'’ 
Drawing attention to the party’s banner 
issue. Muss Zimm er speaks of a “second 
wave of de-industrializatioa” in Easton 
Germany. Record bankruptcy statistics 
across die five eastern states bear her out 
Many in the East and West refuse to 
legitimize the Democratic Socialist party, 
which the federal Interior Ministry warns 
has ties to leftist extremists. Just before 
Christmas, eight prominent Social Demo- 
cratic and Green members defected all the 
way across the spectrum to Mr. Kohl’s 
conservative Christian Democrats because 
their parties were flirting with die Demo- 
cratic Socialists. 

All this has heartened Mr. Kohl’s 
strategists, wbo reckon that anti-Commu- 
nist fears will drive West German voters 
into Mr. Kohl’s arms. 

But Mr. Kohl’s own advisers and polls 
reportedly say that red-baiting risks ali- 
enating voters in the East. 


Bucaram Assails 
Ecuador’s ‘Coup’ 

He Seeks Argentine Support 


Agence FnoKe-Prme 

BUENOS AIRES — The 
deposed Ecuadoran presi- 
dent, Abdala Bucaram, said. 
Thursday that he was ousted 
by a coup d’fitat and that his 
country was now run by a 
dictatorial regime. 

“I am the president be- 
cause I was never beaten in 
elections, and now there's a 
dictatorship in Ecuador,” Mr. 
Bucaram said after flying in 
from Panama for a private 
visit 

The National Congress de- 
clared Mr. Bucaram “men- 
tally incompetent" last week 
after protests against austerity 
measures that sent prices for 
basic goods soaring. 

After an interim period that 
at one point had three people 
c laiming to be president, the 
former leader of the legis- 
lature, Fabian Alarcon 
Riven, was elected interim 
president Tuesday by 57 of 65 
lawmakers present He re- 
placed Vice FresidentRosalia 
Arteaga, wbo held the pres- 
idency for two days. 

Mr. Bucaram is now tour- 
ing Latin America to drum up 
support for his reinstate- 
ment. 

While in Argentina, he was 
scheduled to meet with Pres- 
ident Carlos Saul Menem, 
who Wednesday pledged his 
“unqualified support" to 
restoring peace and demo- 
cracy in Ecuador but did not 
mention either Mr. Bucaram 
or Mr. Alarcon. 

■ On Stage, the Dancer 

Diana Jean Schema of The 
New York Times reported 
from Quito, Ecuador: 

With the congressional 
election of Mr. Alarcon as 
interim president, a flamboy- 
ant and unpredictable leader 
nicknamed El Loco, or the 
madman, has been replaced 
by his virtual opposite: a con- 
summate deal-maker known 
as El BaiUarino. the dancer. 

While Mir. Bucaram rapidly 
alienated his country with his 
economic austerity measures, 
Mr. Alarcon has no known 
economic orientation or blue- 
print for the country. The con- 
gressional resolution that 
brought him to office nullified 
his predecessor’s policies. 

But some analysts say that 
Mr. Alarcon, 49, a career 


never 


. 8* 
has -17 




I Won a Bet of Cosmic Singularity, and Got This T-Shirt 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

,Vtn- Yt'rk Times Scn-we 

NEW YORK — Dr. Stephen 
Hawking of Cambridge University 
— the brilliant theorist regarded as 
one of Albert Einstein's intellectual 
successors — has conceded defeat in 
a famous bet he made six years ago 
on a matter of cosmic significance. 

The bet he made with two pro- 
fessors at the California Institute of 
Technology was that naked singu- 
larities could not exist, and now, it 
seems, they could — maybe. 

During a visit to Caltech last 
week. Dr. Hawking, the author of 
“A Brief Histoiy of Time." a book 
that delves into the origins of the 
universe, conceded defeat “on a 
technicality” to Dr. John Preskill 
and Dr. Kip Thome. The stake was 
for £100 plus clothing “em- 
broidered with a suitable conces- 
sionary message." 

A singularity is a mathematical 
point at which space and time are 
infinitely distorted, where matter is 
infinitely dense and where the rules 
of relativistic physics and quantum 
mechanics break down. 


Singularities are believed to lurk 
at the hearts of black holes, which 
conceal their existence from the out- 
er world. A naked singularity would 
be a singularity bereft of a con- 
cealing black-hole shell and there- 
fore visible, in principle, to outside 
observers. 

Although neither light nor any 
other kind of signal can escape from 
them, a half dozen or so black holes 
have been revealed by their grav- 
itational effects on nearby stars. 

Black holes have also betrayed 
their presence by sucking in matter 
from nearby space. As it spirals to- 
ward the hole, the matter is heated to 
incandescence and the emission of 
X-rays and other radiation has been 
detected by observatories in space 
and on the ground. 

Dr. Hawking, Dr. Preskill and Dr. 
Thome are leaders in the study of 
relativity as applied to cosmology, 
and they meet often at scientific 
symposiums. 

Subjects they take up often in- 
clude conjectures about time ma- 
chines, relativistic tunnels called 
wormholes to distant points in space 
and time, and the origin of the uni- 


verse. It was at such a meeting in 
1991 that Dr. Hawking, although he 
was unable to prove his disbelief in 
naked singularities, proposed his bet 
to Dr. Preskill and Dr. Thome. Be- 
cause of its far-reaching theoretical 
implications, news of their bet 
spread among physicists throughout 
the world 

Dr. Preskill and Dr. Thome won 
the bet last week on the strength of 
supercomputer calculations by Dr. 

'There 1 s one naked 
singularity that 
existed: the Big Bang 
- the universe itself . 9 

Matthew Choptuik of the University 
of Texas in Austin. Dr. Choptuik 
concluded from his mathematical 
analysis that there could be spe- 
cialcircumstances in which a naked 
singularity might be created from a 
collapsing black hole, either by 
nature or perhaps even by some ad- 
vanced civilization. 

The chance of this happening. Dr. 


Choptuik said in an interview, 
would be comparable to standing a 
pencil upright on its sharpened tip 
— although it is improbable, it is 
theoretically possible. 

No one has ever seen or directly 
detected a singularity, much less a 
naked singularity. The very word 
“singularity” reflects the failure of 
scientists to adequately explain 
what this bizarre object is, what it 
does and how it stands in relation to 
the rest of the universe or parallel 
universes- 

SinguLarities within black holes 
are deduced from relativity theory as 
the result of the gravitational collapse 
of degenerate stars 1.6 times the mass 
of die sun or greater. At a certain 
point, the space around the collapsing 
object becomes infinitely curved, 
trapping any light that might impinge 
on it and forming a black hole. 

Some theorists believe in a cos- 
mic censorship that is supposed to 
thwart all efforts to see naked sin- 
gularities. But some weighty ques- 
tions may be resolved by investi- 
gating naked singularities, 
including an explanation of the Big 
Bang, a naked singularity that is 


physic 

But 


American Airline Walkout Looms 

WASHINGTON tAP) — With a strike deadline looming 
Friday, American Airline officials Thursday took a hardline 
against a compromise offered by its pilots. 

The onion representing American pilots told the company 
that it would agree to lower salaries for pilots operating 
regional jets if the company accepted its other demands. 

American Airlines was scheduling its passengers on otter 
airlines to assure their planes were not left overseas if that 
was a pilot walkout. AU Friday flights to Europe, Japan, the 
Caribbean, Central and South America were canceled. 

India Calls for Anti-Crash Radar 

NEW DELHI (AFP) — India is to ban aircraft from" its 
airspace unless they are equipped with anti-collision radar, 
ig — the universe it- officials said Thursday. 

Sources at the Director General of Civil Aviation, a gov- 
ernment watchdog agency, said the safety rules would be 
applied from March or April for planes with a capacity of 10 or 
more passengers. 


believed to have created man's uni- 
verse 15 billion years ago (and per- 
haps an infinity of ocher universes in 
other spaces and times). 

Dr. Hawking, who is paralyzed 
but speaks electronically by tapping 
out words cm a telegraph key, said 
that even in light of the new cal- 
culations, there is no * ‘generic” way 
in which naked singularities might 
form according to the known laws of 
ics. 

I ui Dr. Preskill replied: “Steph- 
en, I’m surprised to hear you, of all 
people, say that. There’s one naked 


the Big 
self.” 

Dr. Hawking declined to yield un- 
equivocally on his bet. He made an- 
other bet with the Caltech physicists 
last week that although a very lim- 
ited set of conditions had been found 
for creating naked singularities, no 
general conditions would be found. 

And wbat was supposed to be the 
concessionary message from the bet 
that Dr. Hawking had printed on the 
T-shirts was hardly an admission of 
defeat: “Nature Abhors a Naked 
Singularity.” 


The Spanish national confederation of taxis on Thursday 
urged its members nationwide to join a week-long truckers’ 
strike on Monday to support the truckers’ demands for low# 
fuel prices and a lower retirement age. (AFB) 

Hong Kong is to open for traffic Thursday two major 
access roads linking the new Chek Lap Kok airport, built oo" 
reclaimed land on I -antan island, and the adjoining town Tims 
Chung to Hong Kong island. (AF&) 


Spanish Trucker Is Killed in Strike Violence 


WEATHER 


Alienee Frjncc-Prvsse 

MADRID — A week long 
trucker* ' strike that has para- 
lyzed major roads across 
Spain turned violent Thurs- 
day with the death of a striker 
and acts of sabotage against 
foreign and nonstriking truck 
drivers. 

Carmclo Ausin Pena was 
run over in the northern city 
of Burgos overnight after try- 
ing to stop a French truck 
driver from forcing his way 
through a picket line on a na- 
tional highway tunning to the 
Portuguese border. 


The strikers are demanding 
retirement at 60. recognition 
of professional illnesses and a 
reduction in the cost of gas- 
oline. 

Their roadblocks have 
caused virtual gridlock on 
major roads across the coun- 
try, particularly in the 
Basque. Santander and Cata- 
lonia regions in northern 
Spain, running up millions of 
dollars in losses. 

Organized by the national 
Federation of Transport As- 
sociations, the strike has had 
an impact outside Spain due 


to sabotage by Spanish truck- 
ers against foreign or non- 
striking drivers. 

In Santander, where 
strikers are preventing about 
300 Spanish and foreign 
drivers from continuing their 
journeys to the north, a 
French trucker, Alain Grand- 
jacques. accused the strikers 
of “beating us, slashing our 
tires, ripping our tarpaulins.” 
He called it “unacceptable, 
gratuitous violence. ’ ’ 

About 500 Portuguese 
truckers, reacting to the vi- 
olence, are refusing to cross 


the border into Spain, and 
French authorities have ad- 
vised French drivers to avoid 
deliveries in the north of the 
country. 

The truckers’ union chose 
to boycott a meeting called by 
the government Thursday to 
discuss problems in the in- 
dustry. 

The strike movement 
broadened Thursday with taxi 
unions calling on its members 
to back the truckers by starting 
a strike Monday. They also 
want to take part in any ne- 
gotiations with the truckers. 


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Russians Sue Forbes Magazine for Libel 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Forbes magazine has been 
sued for libel by a leading Russian gov- 
ernment security official over an article that 
tied him to a highly publicized murder. 

The official, Boris Berezovsky, deputy sec- 
retary of Russia's Security Council and one of 
Russia's most influential businessmen, filed 
the suit Wednesday in London's High Court. 

Joining him in the suit against Forbes Inc. is 


Nikolai Gloushkov, first deputy managing di- 
rector of Aeroflot, Russia's national airline. 

In Forbes’s Dec. 30 issue, an article head- 
lined “Godfather of the Kremlin?” called Mr. 
Berezovsky a “powerful gangland boss and 
the prime suspect in Russia's most famous 
murder investigation” — • that of the slain 
television executive Vladislav Listyev. Forbes 
also reported that Mr. Gloushkov was con- 
victed in 1982 for the theft of state property. 


Europe 





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of clear-cut policies any 
his considerable negotiating 
skills. ‘ 

Mr. Alarcon, who will goy. 
era until August 1998, has 
never run for national office. 
But be has held the preskkxt- 
cy of Congress three times,- ' 
even though his party, tin* 
Radical Altarista Front, hgs 
held- more - than tmg 

Simon Pachano, a profes- 
sor at the. Latin American 
Academy forSocial Science^, 
called tbe new interim pres- . 
ident a ‘‘typical product” qf 
Ecuador's highly splintered 
i system. The 82- 


political 
member 
political parties. 

“He's situated hm^tf ^ 
fee extreme center, giving him 
the ability to bargain very eas- 
ily with the right, left and pop- 
ulists,’ ’ Mr. Pachano said 
The man he replaces, Mr. 
Bucaram, accused of corrup- 
tion and nepotism, was re- 
moved within six months of^ 
his election as nationwide? 
protests spread agamy his 
economic measures.: ~ f t 

Although it was. Mr. Bok 
caram’s economic polickfe 
that undermined his mandate, 
Mr. Alarcon isnot considered 
an opponent of privatization 
or government subsidies. . - \ 
“He is only known ia d^ 
political field as being , 
skillful,” said Alt 
Acosta, an economist. .? i 
Some analysts contend th^t 
the political deal-making 
qualities that won hhn tfe 
presidency are also -a hgjadfr 

C *¥ie has made anliki^^ 
liairas over time and < 
them when they no.- 
served him. 

One diplomat here i 
Alarcon was carried ' 
political winds, rising^ 
cause there is nothing f 
him.” That was 
opposite, he added, 

Ecuador needed to 
its problems. 

“Somebody has 
straight and honest . ttM 
Ecuadoran people, open-' 
the bank vault and say, ' 
there ain’t much here;* ” difc 
diplomat said, 
national . lines of 
shut off, this country 
down the chute.” • 



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PAGE 3 



•A 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


TBEAMERICAS 


s 4 Israel Long Knew of Albright’s Jewish Roots, and Kept Silent 


Uh 




By Barton Gellman 

Washington Post Serna 


JERUSALEM . — More than two 
years ago, long before last week's dis- 
closure and before the U.S. secretary of 
flaw. Madeleine Albright, said she 
.xnew herself, the Israeli government 
learned of her Jewish roots and treated 
"diem as a sensitive diplomatic confi- 

who served alongside 
Mrs. Albright in New York as Israel’s 


, , , * via cu uuic.1 a 

ambassador to the United Nations, said 
•he received “v**™ >««~i - — » 


-he received “very hard and strong in- 

*“ matter” in late 
I95W from the British publishing mae- 
5?"* George Wekfenfeld, an Atiariao- 
bom Jew who knew Mrs. Albright’s 
tather m London during World War DL 
A "* r teaming additional details 


•aboutMre. Albright ’s father, Josef Kor- 
■?$*• from Israeli Jews of Czech origin, 
■Mr. Yaacobi said he briefed the prime 


. V4V UilU JC- 

‘minister at the tune. Yitzhak Rabin. He 
later told Mr. Rabin’s successor, Shi- 
mon Peres. 

*1 didn’t think I should share this 
information with people who might 
’misinterpret it," Mr. Yaacobi said. “I 
trusted very much the judgment of Ra- 
i3in and Peres in these matters. I shared it 
in private calks, not in writing.” 

It was of paramount importance to 
Israel, two current officials said on con- 
dition of anonymity, not to embarrass a 
^Jwoman they regarded as an influential 
'’'friend in the Clinton administration. 


They said Israel was careful not to thrust 
upon her information she might cot 
wish to know or discuss.. 

Some officials also believed it was 
not in Israel's , interest for Mrs. Al- 
bright's Jewish roots to. be widely 
known. lest she fed pressure to prove 
her evenhandedness at Israel’s ex- 
pense. 

Since the disclosure of Mrs. Al- 
bright’s family history, which includes 
three grandparents killed in die Holo- 
caust, the Jewish state has maintained a 
slightly awkward silence. 

What small enthusiasm there has 
been, such as die large-type headline of 
the tabloid Yedioth Abaronoth ■ — “One 
of Us” — is muted by an undercurrent 
of wonder, and from some quarters dis- 
approval, at Mrs. Albright’s seeming 
lade of interest-in exploring her Jewish 
origins. .... 

Israel's substantial community of 
. Czech Jews, winch includes a few who 
knew Mrs. Albright's parents, also 
tends to be less than enthusiastic about 
Che decision of Josef and Mandate Kor- 
bd to convert to Catholicism around the 
time of World War IL 

By Jewish tradition and religious law, 
Mrs. Albright was. bom and remains a 
Jew despite her upbringing as a Catholic 
and her present identification: as an 
Episcopalian. 

But it was precisely the hope of Mrs. 
Albright’s father, according to an Israeli 
who said he knew him well, to strip 


bel in London in the Czechoslovak dip- 
lomatic service. • 

Mr. Pa gan worked alongside Mr. 
Korbel in the Czechoslovak govem- 
jneut-in-exile that opposed die German 
occupation of their homeland, begin- 
ning in 1939. Mr.iCorbeL he said, be- 
lieved a Jew could never reach the top of 
die Czechoslovak foreign service. 

Mr. Korbel’s’ Jewishness was “not 
only gone,” .said Mr. Dagan, who 
moved to Israel in 1949 and served as its 
ambassador to Poland, Norway and 
Austria, “there was an active desire to 
get rid of everything.” . 

“This came between ns,” he added. 
“He simply refused to acknowledge 
that he was bom as a Jew, and this was 
something I hated.” 

Mrs. Albright’s maternal grandpar- 
ents, whom Mr. Dagan had known in 
Czechoslovakia, were more comfort- 
able with their roots. Mr. Dagan said 
they lived in an eastern Bohemian town 
along with about 30 Jewish families and 
went to synagogue for Judaism's high 
holy days, Rosb Hashanah and Yom 


are Jewish, you are 


84, spent the war years with Josef 


:li commentators tend to agree 
that the Jewish state is far less obsessed 
today about Jews in high positions 
abroad than it used to be. Henry Kis- 
singer, the first Jewish U.S. secretary of 
stale, endured a good deal of diplomatic 
abuse here during the Nixon admin- 
istration- A historian, Tom Segev, said 
the prevailing hypothesis about anyone 
who seemed critical of Israel then was, 
“If you are not Jewish, you’re an anti- 


Semite, and if ; 
eaten up by sel 
Colette A vital, the Israeli consul gen- 
eral in New York, said Israeli society had 
since matured, 'While making that point 
in a lecture last mo nr h, she even referred 
openly — largely unnoticed at the time 
— to Mrs. Albright’s background. 

“Here, less than 20 years after Kis- 
singer,” she said in the lecture de- 
livered in Hebrew cm Jan. 14 ai Tel Aviv 
University, “the American peace ngim 
is composed of two Jews, Dennis Ross 
and Aaron Miller.” 

She went on to list other Jews in the 
U.S. administration, such as the U.S. 
ambassador to Israel, Martin Indyk, the 
national security adviser, Samuel Ber- 
ger, and his deputy James Steinberg. 

“Even die new secretary of state, 
Madeleine Albright, is of Jewish ori- 
gin,” she added. “These appointments 
now appear to be something that can be 
taken for granted.” 

Mr. Yaacobi said he never discussed 
what he knew about Mrs. Albright’s 
roots. As a guest at a Passover Seder at 
his home in 1 9 95, he said, Mrs. Albright 
told him she was “quite familiar with 
the Jewish tradition because there was a 
very prominent and influential Jewish 
community in Prague.” 

“She knew very well that I am the 
Israeli ambassador, that 1 am Jewish, 
and I thought that if she knows about her 
background, perhaps one day she’ll tell 
me,” Mr. Yaacobi said. *T left it un- 
touched by me in our many conver- 
sations.” 



L MnUAccnce Hnocr tVr* 

Mrs. Albright with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel on 
Thursday. Mr. Netanyahu was in Washington to discuss the peace process. 



POLITICAL N OTES 


Abortion Foes Lose Vote 


WASHINGTON — Overcoming opposition 
from anti-abortion lawmakers, the House of Rep- 
resentatives on Thursday approved the release of 
funds for international family -planning programs. 

In the first abortion test vote of the new Con- 
gress, the House approved a resolution by a 220- 
to-209 margin to begin providing $385 million in 
overseas family-planning funds on March 1. The 
Senate is to take up the measure soon. 

Supporters of the bill won over many moderate 
Republicans by stressing that increased family 
planning aid could prevent millions of abortions. 

Opponents of the funding will have another 
chance to protest when the House takes up a 
separate bill that ties the release of the hinds to 
tighter restrictions an abortion. That bill has little 
chance of surviving the Senate if it passes the 
-House, and would face a presidential veto. (AP) 


Delaware, the committee chairman, said Wed- 
nesday dial he and Senator Daniel Patrick Moyni- 
hac, Democrat of New York, would introduce 
legislation as early as this week to establish a 15- 
member advisory panel to propose solutions to 
Medicare’s financial woes. 

Mr. Clinton has said on several occasions that he 
is sympathetic to the idea of using a bipartisan 
commission to devise solutions to Medicare’s fi- 
nancial problems. But he has made no move to 


absolutely will turn around drug abuse by young- 
sters,” said Barry McCaffrey, chief of the White 
House drug office, who would direct the campaign 
With illicit drug use either declining or stable 
among adults, Mr. McCaffrey said Wednesday, 
attacking die problem among teenagers should 
take priority. (WP) 


appoint such a group. 

Medicare, the federal health insurance program 


Clinton Library Is Planned 


for die elderly and the disabled, provides benefits 


ti,prtn 

for 37 million Americans. The Medicare trust fund 
used to pay beneficiaries* hospital expenses is 
projected to run out of funds by 200 1 in die absence 
of action by Congress and the president. (WP) 


TV: Weapon in War on Drugs 


Rescue Plan for Medicare 


WASHINGTON — la a move aimed at pro- 
voking bolder action from President Bill Clinton, 
the Senate Finance Committee's chairman and its 
ranking Democrat plan to call for die creation of a 

nwironrwMje n , ,» . l 4 . . . , m J na T r ^."^ rwim! commission to draft a long-term rescue proposal 

DIFFERENCES ~ Douglas Peterson, left, nominee for ambassador to Vietnam, for Medicare 

being confronted by a veteran Thursday over normalua&g relations with Hanot. Senator William Roth Jr.. Republican of 


WASHINGTON — The Clinton administration 
hopes to make prime-time television a major bat- 
tlefield in the war on drags with an unprecedented 
$350 million media campaign designed to counter 
rapidly increasing teenage chug abuse. 

Under the plan, the federal government and the 
private sector would equally divide die cost of an 
advertising blitz so huge feat the anti-drug mes- 
sage would be virtually inescapable on the pro- 
gramming that captures younger audiences. 

“There is eveiy reason to believe that this 


WASHINGTON — The records of the Clinton 
White House, together with the president's letters, 
musings and memorabilia, are to be preserved in a 
library at the University of Arkansas at Little 
Rock, the White House has announced. 

Hie location and financing are to be determined. 
But Alan Sugg, president of the University of 
Arkansas, said Wednesday that there would be 
both a Clinton Library, to house die records, and a 
Clinton Center, for the study of policy. While the 
federal government will operate the library, the 
university will run the center. (NYT) 


Quote /Unquote 


Governor Roy Romer of Colorado, die new 
general chairman of the Democratic Party, de- 
fending die informal White House meetings that 
have been linked to improper donations to the 
party: “The president has to have coffees.” (WP) 



as Well as Hoped 


iil \\ .llktfif’l' 1 


By Jon Nordheimer 

Alw York Times Service 


NEW YORK — In his Stale of the Union 
Address last week. President Bill Clinton 
bailed five giant corporations for their pi- 
oneering efforts to put welfare recipients to 
work. But the limited progress of those 
companies is evidence of the daunting scope 
of the project 

While the five companies together employ 


t«ariy 700,000 workers in the United States, 
they have hired only a few hundred welfare 
through targeted efforts since the 
i MU was signed last summer. Most of 
those workers were put on the payroll by just 
one company. United Parcel Service of Amer- 
ica. 

Officials of all the companies — die others 
are Burger King, Sprint, Monsanto and 
United Airlines — said they were making a 
long-term commitment to hire welfare re- 


cipients, though market forces would ulti- 
mately determine die number of jobs the 
companies provide. 

“This thing is not based on getting 100 
people or 1 million people off welfare,” said 
Joseph Schneider, vice president of human 
resources for UPS. “It’s based on our need for 


lince signing the landmark legislation in 
August that ended the federal entitlement to 
welfare benefits and required most recipients 


\ :r; i 


[iJ“ 




House Again Rejects Any Limits on Terms 


By Adam Clymer 

New York Tunes Service 


WASHINGTON — The movement to im- 
pose term limits on members of Congress 
suffered a devastating defeat when a proposed 
constitutional amendment not only failed in. 
the House but also received fewer votes than it 
did two years ago. 

The vote late Wednesday marked the end of 
rany serious effort to enact a term-limits 
-amendment, which served as the battle flag of 

.1. ■ til..!.! ... tt flMlI UMTC Dim rtf 


prospects in the Senate had always been dim. 

The vote of 217 to 21 1 fell 69 votes short of 
the two- thirds majority required for consti- 
tutional amendments. The ayes were also 10 
below the 227 in 1995. 

This vote, the House’s first legislative ac- 
tion of the year, was promised two years ago 
by the speaker. Newt Gingrich, at the time of 
the 1995 defeat. He said then dial Republican 
supporters would prevail this time. 

The amendment would have prevented 
anyone from serving more than 1 2 years in the 
House or the Senate, although he or she could 
serve up to 12 years in each for a total of 24. 


The final vote came after a day of debating 
1 1 variations of the amendment, an exercise 
that demonstrated the factional divisions that 
supporters said hurt their cause. 

The most popular version, and the one that 
was ultimately defeated, allowed six two-year 
terms in the House and two six-yeartenns in the 
Senate. Bur seven amendments sought to allow 
just three two-year terms for the House, with 
minor variations in wording or numbering. 

Under referendums passed in nine states, 
representatives from those states were dir- 
ected to vote for their state’s version and to 
oppose all others. 


to find work within two years, Mr. Clinton has 
looked to private business to create those jobs. 
'Td like to say to every employer in this 
country who has ever criticized the old wel- 
fare system, 'You cannot blame the old sys- 
tem anymore,’ ” Mr. Clinton said in his Stare 
of the Union Address on Feb. 4. “We have 
tom it down. Now do your pan. Give someone 
on welfare the chance to work.” 

Mr. Clinton’s proposed budget includes an 
estimated S600 milhon in tax credits over the 
next four years intended to subsidize the hir- 
ing of 120,000 or more welfare beneficiaries 
by private businesses. Employers would get a 
tax credit of 50 percent of the first $10,000 
paid to newly hired workers who had been on 
welfare ai least 18 months. 

Other companies than those cited by Mr. 
Clinton have more experience in hiring from 
the welfare rolls; indeed, four of the five cited, 
not UPS, said they were either just devising 
programs or having limited success finding 
job candidates who met their standards. 

But all expressed optimism that the new 
relationships they were forging with social 
agencies and community-based groups would 
bear frail. 

Officials of some business groups said, 
however, that more leadership was needed 
from government if the smaller companies 
that create most jobs are to enlist in Mr. 
Clinton’s campaign. 


Away From 
Politics 


• O- J. Simpson rejected an 
offer from Red Goldman that 
would • have allowed the 
^ form er football star to keep 
his money in exchange for a 
signed, detailed confession of 
murder. “No matter how 
much money I am offered, I 
would never confess to a 
crime which I did not com- 
mit,” he said. (AP) 


y 


y 


• Ob rimtati prosecutors 

dropped a jaywalking charge 
against Jeff Frtedlander, a 
J>Hnd man who was struck by 
a pickup truck. “While this 
person technically was in vi- 
olation. there just was no pur- 
pose in continuing wife the 
prosecution at this point,” the 
deputy prosecutor, Charlie 
Rubensteih, said. (AP) 


■ y 


• The average award in libel 

cases and related trials against 

the media in 1996 was $2.| 
million, an increase of 51.6 
million over Ac average award 
in each of the last two yeais, a 
study found. The media lost 1 0 
out of 14 trials in 1996. (AP) 




M A A S T R I C H T 

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■ 4 










PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRLOAX, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Germany’s Cable-TV Clamor: 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tunes Service 


cable-television channel, a man 
dressed as a middle-aged blond woman 
conducts an earnest debate with a 
couple whose marriage has lost its 
zing. 

“What can be done?” asks Lilo 
Wanders, also known as Ernie Rein- 
hardt, the nationally recognized host of 
the show “Liebe Suende” (a play cm 
words that can be translated as “dear 
sin" or “Jove sin"). For the next five 
minutes or so, the two million weekly 
viewers find out, quite graphically, how 
other couples guard the libidinous 
flame. 

Here is a couple showing off a swing- 
like contraption affixed to their bed- 
room ceiling. Here are couples at a so- 
called swingers' club who seem to have 


less trouble unleashing their libidos than 
figuring oat how to do so collectively in 
an indoor swimming pool. And here is 
an agency that, for a fee, will arrange an 
extramarital affair with the avowed aim 
of revitalizing the marriages to be be- 
trayed. 

Enough! some viewers might czy, 
and channel-surf on to the late news or a 
movie, skipping over the documentary 
on the rival RTL channel that illustrates 
the core concepts of adultery. 

Bid, the country’s program planners 
say, it is not enough at aQ. As Ger- 
many's cable television industry se- 
cures its place as Europe's richest, 
multimillioa-doLlar advertising market- 
place, more and more cable planners are 
demanding greater freedom to show 
programs featuring nudity and graphic 
sexual acts. 

The contest between licentiousness 
and censorship has long roots in Ger- 
many’s 20th-century history. In die 


1920s, Berlin became widely known 
internationally as a fast-living city of 
cabarets and transvestite shows. 

The Third Reich, by contrast, 
frowned on what were considered 
shows of public degeneracy, even to the 
extent of banishing Impressionist art, 
although some Nazi leaders were no- 
toriously fond of pornography in 
private. 

T HE LATEST debate has illumin- 
ated a long-running trend in Ger- 
many toward permitting visual 
sex that started with the spread of sex 
shops, moved to late-night television 
and now fuels a debate about controlling 
pornography on the Internet. 

The cable program directors are de- 
manding a change in the 1968 German 
law that defines pornography in loose 
terms, forbidding anything that causes 
sexual stimulation, turns people into sex 
objects or makes a vulgar display of 


genitals — concepts which, obviously, 
are subject to a wide range of inter- 
pretation. 

To some late-night viewers, however, 
much obscenity is already available, 
although the shows on German tele- 
vision stop well short of the triple-X 
brand of hard-core pornography round 
in movie houses and sex shops along 


Eighth Avenue in New York City. 

“The law urgently needs' to be lib- 
eralized and brought up to date,” An- 
dreas Vrede, the program director of a 
major pay-TV channel, told a gathering 
of politicians, academics and journalists 
in Hamburg, a port city known for the 
raw vulgarity of its Reeperbahn vice 
district. “We need to be a part of the 
new media landscape." 

Two other channels seeking cable 
licenses have backed the call- for sexu- 
ally explicit programs after midnight on 
channels using a decoder to prevail 
accidental viewing by children — a 


system already muse for ate 
shows on British satellite pay -televi- 
sion. 

Elsewhere, pornographic movies are 
available on some French pay-channcls, 
and German' program directors say 
Sweden, Denmark and the Netherlands 
all offer mare sexually explicit material 
than they do. - - - • - 

The urge toward extramarital and 
other stimulants is deep-robted'm tins 
affluent society, which helped pioneer 
sex tourism to Asia and whose riches 
have encouraged growing prostitution 
rings in impoverished Eastern European 
border towns. 

One-chain of sex stores has been so 
successful that last year it opened a 
Museum of Exotica in Berlin to bolster 
its share of the market A recent opinion 
survey discovered that half of the adult 
respondents were in favor of more ex- 
plicit sex on television. 

The fascination also has a dark side. 


A German couple was arrested last 
month for advertising sadomasochistic 
pedophile sex on (be Intemet/offermg , 

. to sell t or ture devices and eyeaprom- r 
ising to dispose of bodies of victims for \ 
mextra $2,0(X). And Germany lmbeefi > 
as shocked as other European nations at ‘ 
what seems to be an upsurge in pe- ! 
dophtie sex crimes. -i — | 

E VEfObe cable prog^ 

acknowledge marm the currenr^ 
mood of revulsion, a loosening ert* 
the nocnography-law is unlikely; *T~ 
don t think the law will be changed at 
the moment because after all these cases 

involv^diildrea.kisvcrydSffiatitfbr 
politicians to take a stand in favor oL 
■— •* *-r. VrwSgli 


more sex dn television," Mr. Vredqj 
said. . _ 

In any case, some politicians say, the 

muei^as intetCTed"^ms to porno- 
graphy on the Internet. . 


1 ^ iatE 


' ■ ' |U»* * 

! f M*' V 


{J i. 


A Lonely Tapie 
Wants to Be With 
Fellow Prisoners 


Agence France-Presse 

PARIS — The bankrupt French ty- 
coon Bernard Tapie has asked to be 
transferred out of the special prison cell 
where he has been held for 10 days and 
to be housed with other inmates as he is 
very lonely, one of his lawyers said 
Thursday. 

Mr. Tapie, who is serving an eight- 
month sentence for a 1993 soccer 
match-fixing scandal, “in addition to 
not being free, is greatly suffering from 
being isolated and the total lack of com- 
munication,'' said the attorney, Bernard 
Lagaide. 

“He wants to be placed under normal 
confinement conditions, to eat with oth- 
ers. to take a walk with other inmates 
and to eventually be able to work and 
talk with his neighbors." 

But the newspaper Le Monde said 
Mr. Tapie's request was unlikely to be 
granted and quoted a guard at the Saute 
prison where he is being held as saying 
be would just need time to get used to his 
confinement 

Mr. Tapie, who spent his first nigh 1 
behind bare on Feb. 3 ate turning him- 
self in ur the Paris prison, said at rbe time 
that he did not know how he would cope 
with prison life. 

“To lose my freedom is very hard for 
me and for those who love me. But as it 
is the first time, I cannot say how I will 
react" he told Le Figaro. 

A man from humble working class 
beginnings, 2k made a fortune in the 
1980s by buying companies in trouble, 
stripping their assets and selling them 
off at a profit 


BRIEFLY 


Russia Denies It Sold 
SS-4 Missiles to Iran 

MOSCOW — The Russian foreign 
intelligence service has denied any 
knowledge of an alleged sale of ad- 
vanced Russian SS-4 missile technology 
to Iran, Interfax news agency quoted a 
spokeswoman as saying Thursday. 

A representative of Russia's main 
arms exporting company also denied 
that any sale ted taken place, Interfax 
added. 

Konstantin Makenko, an expert at the 
Russian Center for Political Studies 
here, said that if a report in the Los 
Angeles Times was correct the deal had 
breached export rules, die agency said. 

“Some Russian military specialists, 
living on miserable salaries, could have 
made the sale without referring to the 
state services," he suggested. (AFP) 

Zaire Rebels Advance 

UVIRA, Zaire — The Zairian rebel 
leader Laurent Kabila said Thursday that 
his forces were advancing on multiple 
fronts despite government warplanes 
dropping na palm and that they had 
seized the main town in the northeast 
comer of Zaire. 

“Our forces captured Faradje,” Mr. 
Kabila said in this eastern town facing 
Burundi. “They have now cleared the 
way up to the Sudan border." 

u true, die capture of Faradje would 
mean that since October die rebels have 
captured a swath of eastern territory 
nearly 1.100 kilometers long bordering 
Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Tan- 
zania 


Faradje is die most northeasterly town 
in Zaire, but rebels had already taken 
Isiro, 260 kilometers to the southwest. 
Kinshasa said Isiro fell to the rebels 
Wednesday night, a day ate rebels said 
they had seized it (Reuters) 

17 Algeria Troops Die 

BONN — Seventeen Algerian sol- 
diers were killed last week in an ambush 
by the Islamic Salvation Army near die 
coastal town of Jijd, east of Algiers, a 
source close to the banned Islamic Sal- 
vation Front said here Thursday. 

The operation was confirmed by in- 
dependent sources in Europe, who put 
the toll at 15 dead aid several 
wounded. (AFP) 

Union Threatens 
Swaziland Blockade 

JOHANNESBURG — Sooth Afri- 
ca's mam trade union grouping, 
COSATU, threatened Thursday to im- 
pose a one-day border blockade of 
neighboring S waziland in support of a 
national stake in the troubled southern 
African kingdom. 

The blockade would be part of a 
“massive operation to bring the Swazi- 
land government to its senses," Sam 
Shilowa, the general secretary of die 
Congress of South African Trade Uni- 
ons, said at a press conference here. 

To avert the blockade, Mr. Shilowa 
said, Swaziland would have to free four 
leaders of the Swaziland Federation of 
Trade Unions who were arrested before 
the national strike was launched on Feb. 
3. (AFP) 




KnAtaIbtfA|MalteefMk 

MODEL EMPLOYEES — Yoichf Tanaka, a Japanese Importer, showing off 
vinyl models of <k Safe-T-Man” on Thursday in Tokyo. The ILS.-made man- 
nequins are meant to simulate bodyguards for the eWeriy or night workers. 


Hernu’s Sons 
Seek Damages 
From Magazine 

Reuters > 

PARIS — ; The sons of t 
Charles Henw, the former j 
Socialist defense minster, J 
urged a French court on* 
Thursday to oideramagaanej : 
to pay' 30 million francs in j 

toefrlStoerspied^r^Com; ! 

nunustUoc. ' •' . : : -V\ • » 

L'Express pnbtisbeddbc-J 
aments m October and Jeno- f 
ary purporting to show that ( 
Mr. Hernu, under the code- ! 
name “Andre,” had been a j 
Soviet, Romanian and Bul- 
garian agent in die 1950s ate 
1960s. 

Mr. Hemu, defense min- 
ister from 1981 to 198^died 
in 1990. ; * 

The magazine , said Mr. I 
Hernu was paid for supplying f 
general information on I 
French politics and other suth g 
jects. In 1958, te reportedly v 
told the Soviet ambassador in ! 
Paris the size of die French j 
Army lighting rebels in Al- 
geria. 

Serge Lewiseh, die lawyer 
representing Hernu sons 
Jean-Michel, Jean-Charles 
and Patrice, said dial the doc- 
uments published by L ’Ex- 
press might be fake, and that 
they had been mistakenly- 

t ranslate d hy % magimnp 

Mr. Lewisch also stressed 
that the information allegedly 
supplied by Mr. Hemu wasof-\ 
little importance. 


^ors® lE . 

I sailing ship 





Ft* 

=: - ■**’■ 

Iteni. i.v •• • 

2H 


Mi OFF! - - 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAYS 


HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 

Appears 
on Page 1 1 


HAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
te adore! eknliecl. brad and preserved 
throughout tin world, now and to row. 
Sacred Heart orf Jesus pay far us. Sant 
Jude, water d mracies pen lor is. 
San Jufe helper « On hopeless. pray 
brus. tana Say As prayer nw tires 
a day. hy to iw« day your prayer wfi 
te aswrad A has new test team 
to lad Pttfcaten must te promi se d. UK 


HAY TT£ SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
be adored, glorified, bind and presented 
throughout *w world, now and forever. 
Sacred Head of Jesus, pray tar us. 
SaW Judo, waiter of Wins, pray tor 
Us. SaW Jude, helper of to hopeless, 
pay for i*. Amen Say this prayer rtne 
times a day, by the nmtii day. you 
prayer writ be answered. It hu ram 
been biown D tail PifiaNon nut be 
pronto! MOTT. 


HAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
be adore! domed, loved & presaved 
throughout me world, raw and forever. 
Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray tar is. Saw 
Jude Worker of miradas, pray tar us. 
Sett Jude Mper of tie hopeless, pray 
tar us. Sey Ns prayer g times a itay tor 
9 days • your prayer w* be erawnre! 
PuMcaeon oust be pronto! SG. 


HAY THE SACRED M-ART OF JESUS 
be adore! gkrtad, km d and presaned 


throughout the world. now end lorew. 
Sacrad heart of Jesus, pray tar ue. Sort 
Jude, water of atodes. pray la us. 
Sain Aide helper of the hopeless, pay 
tar in Amen, ifcarik you B. 


THANK YOU SACRED fffiART 
01 Jesus and San Jude for payers 
answers! SS 


TANYA- HAPPY BIRTHDAY 
We dorr! wart to artrol you or change 
you. We juet want to watch you snw» 
and hear your voice. But mortal a! we 
wart to hold you hen! Much km - 
Daddy. Debra, 05, Af. Jonathan & Sera! 


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DIVORCE 1-DAY cen m 
Cal or Fa [714} 968-6695. Write 16767 
Beach BM. 1137. Hurthgton Beach, CA 
82648 USA- mb I - u&xmOfwtuan 


DIVORCE M 1 DAY. No travel Writs 
Bern 377. Suituy. MA 01776 USA Tet 
508*4434367, Fax SW4430TB1 



(la New York cafl 2t2 7S2 388(8 
n»M«ui>i»ii wira 


VWV VALENTINE S DAY MESSAGES 


My sweet wHe 
IKYNA 


Valentines 


ANTE AM0UREUX 

You am my (moon of 
Maori 

mySol Soktar 

your touch teats my heart 
yetfftes mates me 
pointless 

yua exBtanm wmy 
narcotic 

i adcre y« contoWy 


OXFORD 

Ste acted no the sany sky 
Stews sprang 

She hand W tom cash and largo oi 
tts syntfony 
She was faanAg 

Sne to a mantle d km descend upon 
her 

Ste wgpw aU 
EXETER 


TO A WONDERFUL, GORGEOUS AND 
STUNNING WOMAN - ANNE, even 
tough you're fausands rt mto away I 
tael yow senses. I dose my eyes am I 
see you. I am tost I am kray and 
rtudt by m ml tepptaK. You're my 
Hta H of heaven here on earth. 1 wart 
to pul you ckue to me end hold you 
tight I nto you I low you. STEVE 


Low. 0 lyric Love, 

— -1-JI ■ M UT— J 

•>8® ■n nw ora, 
And rf a wonder 
■nd a wOd dtsbv. 


FROM THE GOLDEH HKMQY Cm, 
Zntosi 18 m. UUUUHK.JMJ. that 
means low to al his hiends: Jenny 
Rene Chne Smart Gate Sam Hrttie 
Sgrid Oucegm lagan Manhenta kma 
Nek Time Carlo Gtmatna mis Dawn 
Joe. 


FOR HEM VAUEHIVKiCHATZL 
I LYWM and always wfl you era the 
most wondartut, caring. Icnmg husband 
and to efl me test Daddy for Noa 


T9t YEARS. Alter in yeas I to nto 
you when Tm far from you. I taw you 
Bjpu and 1 even km you non n fts 
wonderfttiay. Androa. 


ACLOR, 

Non <fmo«ca_ ma. 
AiatolK 


A SPECIAL MESSAGE 
For Safettin Safiar Supnse! 

Hsppy St Vateranes Day! Erw® 


HAPPY VALENTVES DAY 
To our Dear F®NA 
tint Peter aid Pan. 


JANET - 
I love you 
You Happy Cal 


BARBIE AS 24 

AU 14 FEVRIEH 1957 
Pro Hon TVA an dense locate 
g raran io n asponiSB » (wnenda) 
Reoytos fes baraaes arterieun 

FRANCE (ana q a FH - TVA 20j» 
GOc 4B4 Far. 231 

scar; sju scsp. 532 

UK en£/!-TVA17£%(8od W] 

GO: 05363 FDD 1 ; 03(76 

ALLEHAGNE (mu 1} DUfl - TVA 15% 
ZONE I - G : 

GO. tj09 

ZONE ff -I: 

GO: 1JB SCSP: 1,44 

ZONE M-F: 

GO: 1JDB SCSP: 1,43 

2DIEV-F: 

SCSP 1,42 

ZONE N-G: 

00:139 FOO. 0,65 

BBjGKXE en FBI - TVA 21% 

GO: 22,73 F0D: 1096 

SC97: 3339 SCSP: 31,49 

H0LLAHE (zone2) NLGfl - TVA 17j5% 
GO: 1273 

LUXEMBOURG « LUFS - TVA 15% 

GO: 2000 

ESPAGNE (aw A) en PTASfl-TVA 16% 
GDC m2 

SCBt: 102.41 SCSP: 10338 

' Usage ragtenste 


Business Opportunities 


OFFSHORE LICENSED BANKS. Cal 
GensawTBfc +48 (17Z21 807 587 Foe 
+49 (230] 779 381 Agents are wrtoome 


Brussels. Loodon ant Paris Shoe 1975. 
liton No seBnp. Fte +3S0338232 








K 89 NOS GEK VAN J0U 
D. 


DANS 1000 ANS to aicheoloaues « 
tiema ndemrt encore dtau sortent ces 
tenglyftoi plains de awn et debav 
« tauart tee^staaeur pforaen 20U6. 
Le pen mml jku de wus 


CARLA- lly heart end I agree, you're 
ttwortyonekirrnellwHIawYOu 
dwourti ewnty Ksppy Vateftnes Day 
tram Gay Pan* 1 lew- See! 


S.R. fttort owe ewer grewng. Pnctous 
tnomems ol sanpte toys UteomtircraL 
yet al consurang 1 am ei kne Hth you 
my dearest tone Lsve.mXOXO 



COACH BS4JY: Thanks lor s 
cortrad about stayng any 

tietps' 


C0HAL- 
I low you. 
-Andrea 


DARLMG P 

'Ain't no tnounan tagn enourtL 
Aiit no nw deep anougtf £ 


Forewer std a Day* 
tore, Cany 


DEM LP. 

HB1ES TO ANOTHER S5 YEARS 
OF LOVE M LONDON. YOUR HWW. 


We ten you mere tor wads can sey. 
Dam & S«y 


FOB ILLS. 

Each Day u Vstetne't Day 
ILY. From m 


FOR STEVE, 

■to does nor raao iw tookt Tour! 
inn forever. Berate 


GENEVCVE -One more Urfenkne’s Day 
cara end gone, a dance to say agam 
you're tamer (to Al km A 


KEVIN LOVES NBAN£ 

From New Yah to Like Tahoe, 

HvpyVrterthrtDayd 


LEIGH 
I LOVE YOU 
ANDREW 


love aw nsses 
ton to medten dad pet 
to the flogjeoushonBy briny. 


I4ARIA FULLONE 

On ties Vatettw Day I wart to : 

I tew you now & ferevK ANSI 


ULAN 

tty km ie lower. 
PGM. 


SCHKAUZL 
Al my lore. 
AWT A. 


C0MPANES & TRUSTS 
■ ASSET PROTECTION 


Gusmess Services 


Kallback 

Offers 

Lowest Rates 
Ever! 

Er^oy evmi greater savings on 
htemaUoart cate. Bewfil from Die 
same taw rates Wraurs b day. Wg 
secure tire deentsl and most raSatte 
ines. Use KaBback from home, work - 
or hotels and save. 

Cel now nd are mm today! 

Td 1-206-284-8600 

fox 1-206^6686 
Unas open 24 hnns. 

Agate taqutos wekame/ 


Business Travel 


1«t/Bustoes* Cten Frequent TtereDoa 
MtorRMUa. Up to 50* aLNo coipone, 
no rostrtaltans. Imparial Canada Tab 
■ 1*«41-7227 Fax: 1-514-841-7998. 
e-mail address: Imperiaieiofltajwt 

Ijtn [^- LuJmi ridHwre 

Bupurmuo^iMAnpcriai 


Senrkxd Offices 


Wwtt-Wkte 
Business Centres 
Network® 

mfiteinlaiiM lmi>!ithnf iJfiiu 

twww Bomsm, nrosnoa onc8&> 


A Vtarza 

Tet +43-T 514 74 666 
Fax *43-1 514 74 300 

CH ZatahlBtskAmeOetf 
StGrtUZao 


Tet 441-1 214 82 62 
Feat 441-1 214 fi5 19 
UurenralGeneva 
Tat 441-21 641 1313 
fa +41-21 B41 1310 

D DuneldortAedieflfAugrtaawl 

n-Jt-M i-i wi ■ - .i * 

DmVUHOj|m>ri<uiui3nV 



RoroerTUrin/Verana 
Tat 4392 491 94271 
Fttt *39-2 480 13233 


NL AMwtimlBruisefcr 
MktdmreHnre 

B Tet 431^0 320 W 
Fax +3M0 320 7510 

P UebooParto 

Tet 4351-1 355 7435 
Fax +351-1 355 7854 


SNUGGLE B II R my sn ugtfaen rtu r 



SUNSKIE YOU ROCK HT WOftJJ 
I taw yon. 
note Boucher 


SUSAN: 

Wi you be our Vaterton?- 
Boboo, YbYb A Party Wart. 


TO HY DEAREST PP 
BEST WISHES 
ffiOMI€R2UGHAN 


Obtain Perrnrart Reskfcncy: 2nd 
Qhrenshyt & 2nd Passport eia Economic 
kwraanert, iom le^ Goreromert 
ftoffams, soring a SSDOO, tamed in 
96 to 180 days, Fends held ti Escrow 
uril you reoore yon documents. 
M&WTONAL ATTORNEYS SA 
CARIBBEAN: Fto 290 581 
or fa 46901290684 
E4NUL WTATTOAOLCOM 


n=.' 'J; 


Tracing, merfrq,' expensing, dert tree, 
eel taitong ban (L0J + Fining o- 
tettehmm bond -t-bartc fees raeptoed). 
RncC+afli«zaiL44a. 


OFFSHORE COHPAMES. For h» tuo- 
churo or achts Tet Londoo 44 ibi 741 
1224 Fax 44 181 748 65506338 
awauntaenctuA 


UK S02S 

■Bence ...SOX 

Sirtortaad S13B 

Siredan S025 

Saudi Arabia «nra 

Cal Fbr M Rato 
2» Cootossfan 
Agents Wataoraet 

KallMart 

•Tet Mfl7-7J7-4222Fac 1-W7-777-64I1 


TOUR OFFICE M LONDON 

Bon! Stoat - Mai Phone. Fax, Tetoc 
T*44 171 489 919! fa 171 499 7517 


BMpfc Tet 441-1 214 62 62 

fa 441-1 2146619 
G roat 1015 273011 
Hca n punenaan 
ISA: Tet *1-212 60S 0200 

fa +1412 308 9834 
ateticnHaoUan 



A Special Advertising Banner 
scheduled to appear 
in the Im 


February 21, 1997 


lb place an ad in (Ms special 
Tamara Crawford: 

Tel (1-212) 752-3890 
or Fax: 0*212) 755-8785 



VENTURE CAPTTAL ‘ 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE ■ 

Long tern cototeral - ■ 
SkpporBd Guarantees 
nrisstan earned otiy qronfadtag) 
table grandees to scan fearing 
tar rate projects arranged by: 

BANCOR 

OF ASIA V.4-. 

fa (9346 B1MSH - . .£& 
Tet #0^ 194-5351 

Brctas Connterton Assrreti^^ 


Large.Projeoe 



































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 




REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


eal Estate 
>r Sale 


CARIBBEAN 


Ausftafo ' 

W6TRAUA - SYDNEY, Doom (350 

r ) _on 7D0 land as rew far 

S6Q9 3217. Write In, 
in ungbnd st Wants! PS* 2 JH 


mustique I 


lr " m V 


Private Island Paradise 

i. Balinese villa with pool 
3 bedrooms. hish hillside, garden 

Fax: 604-926-8300 


AQGOfrG 

!t BEDROOM APARTMENT, 90 *qjn. 
■new. qtfat. botany, swam mom, park- 

Sttff&g' 9m - * 


•ONTARIO, CANADA, pfcfcnmpe 
.-tfabburton commercial resort property 
_«er ZB Hectares rife ora 200 metes 
Dl shoreline on pristine late Kushog. m- 
pnanmstdy 200 Wometres northeast of 
Tororto. totog 8Wot trader park. U- 
"c»isb » bub 7 new ^bedroom dates. 
Area karoo tor fitting l boat™ as wet 
as wtoler sports. Health reasons cause 
cfletro fete find ta sale. Saras msi- 
rfes onty, please. Contact omen by fax: 


1850. JAflDW Aim 
C^refcg kxsSon kt fa /mot Tote 
Mtoes, naar stopas, 140 am. apart- 
rarttn efuding latge Mm wife strew, 

5 beftooros, 4 fats. cab, sti don fa. 

awtekg. T* aw +33 368^ 

MKEVEROCfBRWE -2 betafir 
wfa 75 + 30 sun. +5 toOfltt, 2 Oaths, 
Sfwwr, is floor, new, nearSopes. 
Gaa®. cefct NO repfe FF13A.OOO 
+ FR00A».Tefc +33(0)1 34 88 92 34 

French Provinces 

EXCBmOHAL HAS PROVB4CAL' b 

• Its V*. 12 acres MIM lease wtt 
tower. 300 stun, ferns space, 3 bed 
rooos, 2 bathflxHB, 65 eqjn. sKfeg 
room, dntog mm * Ebrary + office. 
Geest house 3 bedrooms. 3 bafemoms. 
AO sjjn. tHBvatoK Swiremi no poof, 
sauna, vbreyarts, fruit trees. FF&JIL 
Cal 433 (Qft4Z3B2746 / (0)493347400. 

ATLANTIC COAST, NEAR LA SAULE, 
tracHonat house 600m beech & port, 
nw fff comae, fens. tafanege wfch 
dbBB, mmsm, txxboom, hate. WC. 

FRANCE 


BUY WJTHOUT COtfeMSSOH 
Red Resaive reafcffe al your home, 
a selection of red estate ccnaspondra 
to wo demand. Fax® 4 67 S3 Sa n 
orstte [£ PARIBOiffi BJBOPEEN 
34237 Mortptefler cede* OS, France' 

YOUR SEAL ESTATE CONTACT W 
PROVENCE - Best tttoc&fe of vfcga 
■antfeoutoy pnaarfej tor safe or rate, 
enact ewaTctARX • uiberon 

IMVEST2SSEMENTS - GQfiDES - Ta) 
+33(0}49072C7K. Fax +33(0)480720097. 

PICTURESQUE COUNTRY LIVING 
iJOh sooHWeft Pads. Chanting home 
on 5,000 son. landscaped w, fiui 
trees. Uwetexaxfaon, recant taxoro- 
merits. Garagatjws flat FroSOK. 
Tafftt 433 (91.47 86 30 94 

frjuke i restaurant* 100 sax/ 

34 sates & Bite & Breakfast & Fenriy 
Hone. Wage near Aa-en-Provenca. 
$1,2000)0. Tek +33 [0)4 42 SB 87 27.. 
Fac «33 (0)4 42 28 67.37. 

T2 KH RUMfiHEV ACSflSl Um- 
ry, now opto, 200 tejm. 4 teteoona, a 
bahroaw.2 garages, oaiwtouv dew. 
Tetfim +41 21 BZ5 10 45. 

DORDOGIC XVth caolwyMQ 3q.m. 
tsmteouse wBi nm ow 35J)00 sq.m. 
awn grounds. Compfata reoovaftm a 
MUST. F350000- 1 55210G8) 


FmoehUMora 

■ CAUSES CALSFOfU&E 60 «U>L «W 
ItediDom flaL Mn new. papoonc sea 
ib^'ibkMmrDKbtbmai: 
+33 (0) 4 ® 99 73 12, monfags A mres 




FOR SALE 

Sailing ship “LE PHOCEA” 

Winner of the 1988 Atlantic Crossing 



- 74 meters long (4 masts) 
r 1650 sqjn. of sails 

-■ 850 horsepower diesel motor 

- about 20-passenger capacity 

- VBRFTAS class 1.3/3E 


presently anchored at 

Port cf Antibes 
FRANCE 

Qua/ des Millfardaires 


For all informatkin: the offices of - 
Maftre Jean-ClaudePlERREL 
Mandataire Judiciaire 
211 boulevard Vince nt-Au rid 
75013 PARIS-FRANCE 
m- 33 (0)1 45.8635.00 . 

33 (0)1 45.86.44.00 
33(0)1 45.86.71.55 
Fax: 33(0)145.86.56.00 

ALL OFFERS must be deposited at 
the above offices before MARCH 1, 1997 



PORT LA 6AlB£(ireaf Cams) soperti 
aDedwaa flat, 'exdusta aeterirenl do- 
nah top security, na atoe. Q5OD0Q. 
Coast i Gonfey T6t +33(0)483753107. 


SresT Britagi • . 

• H 0 «SEARCH LONDON LTD Let ue 
saseft for you. We find homes I fteS 
to toy and wt For tnoMdoels and 
ccrcpfiftes+ FbO Coipoma Retocadon 
Seivicss. 7 daM+wet Tel: +44 171 
038 1066 Fax + 44 171 B38 1077 
MhArwwJxineseaittecojM^ 

CLOSE TO PLYMOUTH, sedtfedY 
badtoom flat chasaaw old fait Heated 
outdoor swimtag pod, terns courts, 

r es tartar 8 haadL htur Partx« & 
Loady saa viaws & coastal web. 
OSjOUL-TelFu +33 (ft 2 5135 0369 


Greece 

SYROS SLA®, GREECE. BJBO-sqjn 
bit wife 100 m. wate rfm nt Stem a 3 
m Inuse cf 4 bedreama, 3 bate, sta- 
ble hate, IVntecs, htiy tonbhed US$ 
L5 or DM 22 mBBca Fw kdher Wo od 
. Effliauy (+49) 0221 - 496189. 

AlOftOS BLAND. New tradNondatyta^ 
tease. 62 aqja. on 1300 sq.m. tend. 
Son me port. Sliejoo. Tet +301- 
8017069 (7-IOpog fisc +301-7732288 


- 

'*± 


FOR SALE BY OWNER, teo fabdous 
perkhouses tn floma, abort Piazza d 
S^gna. Bold separately or joined. 3000 
ajl wflh 7800 sq. t brace ami 7900 
sq. 8. wife 1900 iq. fL tenacs. &»ctecu- 
kr panownfc Nbws d Rome, for more 
Wo cal/tax A. DM te (212^)6-0642. 
USA, Of [6) 4782 2003. (WyT Broken 
phase sfastah. 


NewZBaland 

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND. New 
hirfwte, BmCfey daws, 2 epartnwts 
• hfly Uiistwi S275W$1B0K US. (Uas. 
Fax USA: 510447-7337. 


Paris and Suburbs 


CSOfSSY-SUR-SaE 

YVHJNES 

9 BRAND NEW HOUSES . 
ArtfaUe 0 1907 
Near transput RSI 
Frcm FF 1,600000 Id ff 2.70X000 
Tat +33 (0)1 39 76 SB 65 

92 SEVRES, 1W> card. TOWNHOUSE 
500 spa an 300 spm pi den Chabf 
(i930j, extension in 1940 4 floors. Ire- 
ptacae. Needs re sto ring. 10 mtes Pais. 
FF05M. Tst owner +33(0)1 46 26 01 63 

6th LATH QUARTHf-New Kadsnea 
64 RUE D'ASSAS. Near Luxsrtourg 
QBders. &op6ond ffifeha wfei terace. 
Parkkigs. Offlca also open weekandc 
10-lpnrS 3-7pB 01 42 22 78 92 

PARS 1ST, PENTHOUSE, Jarfo *5 
Mee, In 17th certury buk^g, 5&i ta, 
davetor, 75 aqiiL beams, tn^ cakn, 
fid oi dianiL FF1 .950,000. Tet Owner 
+33 (D)M23S8445. fiK (0)142210203: 

YAL DTSSJE, PRIVATE CHALET - 
Unlqpe spd an edge of atopee, Sadi 
aposure. EeaettraJ wew. 5 Deonxm, 
auna, tows. F8£ M negcMfa. Tet 
1 4SD7 0009 1 tet 4507 1282 

NEULLY ST JAMB lfepft»t 130 
eqin. ’Bcugeok* Suaiy, w of gram 
eiy. Parted condtlon. refined dBcon- 
fions. F3JDOODOO Tet 049380 6010. 


PAHt&NBmiYWOQDS Class, 140 
avn. faubte Sufag, 3 bedpans, Z.tatbs. 
peifdng, bakxmy, 4fe ta. Perfect mnd- 
ooo H$xm Owner 01456Z 0398. 

NEUILLY - BEAUTIFUL DUPLEX 
SO stun. + terrace, 2 partings, Ngh 
wndards. us&pxfm. ALGA Tet +33 
(01147455553, FfflC +33(0)147458090 

IBh, Near AVE FOC^Tow*ousT70o’ 
5 oja + 700 stun garden, hbh dase. 
lit ConMon. FF33L 014225 0300 

18th, LA BUTTE44ONTIJARTRM50^ 
sq.m. ‘ATBJER* LutL Mca layout, wood- 
ed court F3300JD0 Tat 06 1172 0718 

NEUHJLY. 3 rooms. 5lli floor, claradar 
buHra. Daite exposuelbrigta. Fi J6H 
URGair. Owner +33 (0) 1 47 47 42 « 


Portugal 

POR71MAQ. LUXURY HOUSE, 300 
sqm. on prwate gefl cause. GuesdnuBe 
100 sum pod Price USS650K Tet 
+464F5KI 36200 Fax +466-560 36205 


Singapore 

AMBASSADOR'S CHOICE Pentane 
702 sqm Own private pooL Only black 
an 14,000 stun. IBS (L5 niton. Tet 
+6M6M9004 fitx +€58613133 


IIAfl BELLA 

VERY ATTRACTIVE ACOUEmOft 
2 hnuiam funshed e ptet—te. Htf4y 
equipped titchens in the golden Mile 
area beteean Pixte ttonno and Pom 
Bants. Each apartmed 330 srf.ni 
composed of 4 bedrooms with bath en 
afa 6 sea new, vary race Mng and 
dnng. Please all +41 22 860 6600 
or Fax +41 22 669 16 09 


COSTA BLANCA, SPAfl. Btiusire » 
top reddenca. Bp— afar wews. 2 
acres 4 bate, 5 baths. PooL PRIVATE 
SALE IKE 675000. Tat (346) 640 8456 
Far (34ft 649 7387 


Switzerland 


□ LAKE GENEVA & ALPS 

Sale to tatoies authorized 
our spedamy afnee 1975 

Afeacnw pmparfae In MO NTNEU X 
VEVEY, VELARS, DIABLERETS, 
CHANS4IWTANA. eh 1 to 5 bed 
rooms, SPr. 200(000 to 15 tela 
REV AC 

52, M m ttrthnt CH-1211 Germ 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 <0 Fax 734 12 20 


UMQUE RESUKKTlAlRNVESTIfEffT 
OPPORTUNITY. Modem, spacious 4- 
bedroom house wflh 8,000 sq.m, land 
Bid vineyards In quiet cotady taiion. 
150 meters above Lac Leman, giving 
one of fee worttfs best wnb. Acceabs 
to Lausanne and Genera (30 Wna). 
Pnce about USS3 mtai For sale as 
whole or pens. For details please tax 
+41 21 608 5321. 


USA Residential 

HANTS HOST SPECTACULAR water- 
bort.condos S245JD0Q. oceantoto vck. 
K. Shabartoi (305) 663^184, Realtor. 
E-mafc 100711 32756 conpfiBvacan 


CtURLOm, VSUKXfT 
coumr ESTATE 

110 acreE. ponds, teres oimL meadows 
and ecodi Em onanar y eetfeig wfcn 
a cat to YBaw (fetog. 5j00 sqJL 
residence. 3 Parton stone feaptoss, 

5 bedtwns, saus. office wte. 
ofatetoea. 2D Kins u Buington 
M aiport, 2 hous e McrtaL 
31/2 ham to Boston, 5 rates to Ute 

Ctemptek EzupGarb. L^OC'^CO 
Contact A Sector at REMAX Pnfetad 
Tab (1) 602-668-2331 (txL 1ft 
or e+nafl preiao ©together rert 


NYC/W£A/7trs 2500 si 

WARM & WONDERFUL HOME 

For both comfortable forma and 
entertaining. Offers 3 Bedrooms/ 
3.5 baths. Dining Room/den, Eat-In 
Krfcbsn & office. Prime too. Lon. 
Fifty fumtehed Mow ta WH 
Maddy Tyree 

212-780-9888*6. 212-7244880 

DOUGLAS ELUHAN 


NVCSfeArtreu IS Room 

DBEAU CONDOUmi 

EtoOBe, spacious, 1250 s( 1 Beioonv. 
Great Psrt/Rter Views. XXX mBM 
cQixfllion titchen. Dining area. 
Presfige Corefa. 

EtoteDd Vale 

212dMBl6IRas. 212-734-2S3 

DOUGLAS ELUMAN 


NEW YORK CTTf 
a ROOM MANSION 

Farmto stonsse, French paneled 
farary, marifa btehs end fireplaces, 
7 tods, duptex offices, atetor. 
PHCE RBNJCED! 

Cel Mr. Jordan 212-2464004 
tetpdhmMxoroflte^afaan 


ICW YORWUNGSPOKT LL 
Bar* Closure - USS 2 kObn 
Oostog Price - USS 15 Mffion 
Cetebnty House. French Colonial 1.5 
acres, 8 bedrooms, 6.5 bathrooms, 
matos' cyteitos. haded poot certto ax / 
heal I security systems. Tet (305) 937 
5007 Fax p05] 937 5016 


FHb Avanus The SherryNathertand 
SodhBed comer. 23rd floor, 1,050 sq. 
L 30 fl. king room. 25 1 maser 
be broom, teasing room, feme beth wto 
bto end shower, kttohen, 5th Aranue 
mow, 11 wintered J490J)00. 

C A 212-751-106 


MAJESTIC FLOfflDA LAKffROMT 
Enpfafa 4 bedroom custom pooVspa 
home wHt dock tn sacurtygafad 
comnuifly. Offtae otity. S688K. 
Cd Beanorta Evas, Gafripn 
Realty he. 1-813642-1111 


Real Estate 
for Rent 

French Provinces 

LAWUHXJC, S. FRANCE. We sh*B be 
labia ov h% equated (steeps fl) 
beau&iri. sectoded house, with Isge 
soreamg pool, tor 12 weeks fas sun- 
D 0 . Fat tor ore colour brochure i you 
Ue a rens h tor 1 week or 12 
weeks. H is beaidrtuE Please Fax UJL 
+44 1483 414220 


French Rhriera 



PR F^iTnF 


FmCHRMERA 

SAMT-JEAtMAP-FERRAT 

Atoadhe vfa teeing unobsnucted 
views on fee sea, 5 bednans, 

3 aaftroams. terraces. Sw«nrreng pool 
Choice of ota vM» lor rant. 

19, Bid ita Genanl Laden: 
C6310 BEAIJLEU-SUR IER 
M +33 (0)4 93 01 04 13. 

Fasc +33 (01* B3 01 11 96. 


Great Britain 

BELStZE PARK, LONDON Luoxious 2 
betemn ItaL Eatflen coreWcr. 
FurwheO by Hanods E385 pm week 
Tel 0171 483 23150181 675 8176 

GROSVENQf? SQUARE LONDONW1, 

1 bedroom ksoxy BN. 075 ow week. 
Tet 0181 02 4501 


Holland 


mmrousB tfTBmmuL 
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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


EUROPE 


U.S. Boosts Aid to Foes of Milosevic 


Increase Is New Sign of Growing Shift From Serbian Leader 


By Steven Erlanger 

Nr h 1 York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — The United 
Stales is significantly expanding its sup- 
port of newspapers, radio stations and 
trade unions opposed to President 
Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia, senior 
U.S. officials say. 

While the money to be distributed in 
1 997 is small — about $2 million — it is 
five times the amount provided last year. 
The officials said the increase was a 
direct result of the daily pro-democracy 
demonstrations in Belgrade and other 
cities against the authoritarian rule of 
Mr. Milosevic. 

The aid is another indication of a shift 
in policy away from Mr. Milosevic, who 
was a crucial supporter of the Dayton 
peace accords of December 1 995, which 
halted the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. 
U.S. officials now say he is no longer 
critical to stability in Bosnia. 

“His days are numbered,” one of- 
ficial said. “Now it’s a matter of when 
his era ends, not if. and how it does. Even 
if he survives, he won’t be able to ex- 
ercise the same unbridled rule. The rules 
have changed.” 

Some of the money can be delivered 
immediately through the U.S. Embassy 
in Belgrade in small grants valued at 
$5,000 to $ 1 0,000. the officials said. The 
support is to be given not in cash but in 
goods, for example, computers, news- 
paper ink or technical assistance for a 
business plan. 

Most of the aid, which has already 
been appropriated, is to be funneled 
through U.S. groups like the National 
Endowment for Democracy, the Nation- 


al Democratic Institute,-the International 
Foundation for Electoral Systems and the 
International Republican Institute. Some 
of these want to do their own assessments 
of recipients' needs and usually provide 
support faster than the Agency for In- 
ternational Development can. 

The groups, officials said, will organ- 
ize progr ams to train journalists, union 
leaders and political parties in the ways of 
democracy, hi other countries this has 
included teaching political parties how to 
use polling data and advertising, and to 
draw up party platforms. 


While praising the program, some 
representatives of the groups criticized 


the administration for being so late. In 
1 996, they point out, the government aid 
of $400,000 was dwarfed by funds 
provided by the private Open Society 
Institute. led by the financier George 
Soros, and by European countries. 

Senator Richard Lugar, Republican of 
Indiana, has been prominent in urging 
more support for independent news me- 
dia in Serbia. 

The effort was hampered last year by 
U.S. sanctions against Serbia and by the 
general atmosphere of suppression. U.S. 
officials say. Efforts by the embassy to 
find worthy recipients independent of 
the government were made difficult by 
the “reticence” of Serbian organiza- 
tions to seek or accept aid from Amer- 
icans, a senior official said. 

But after the demonstrators, who de- 
manded the reinstatement of opposition 
victories in local elections in November, 
began to chip away at Mr. Milosevic's 
rale. Serbian organizations were more 
willing to come forward. 

And U.S. credibility with the oppo- 


sition was helped by die decision in 
December to incorporate reports from 
the independent radio station B92 into 
tr ansmis sions of Radio Bee Europe 
when Mr. Milosevic tried to shut it 
down. The Voice of America also broad- 
cast interviews with B92 reporters. 

“People have shed their fears about 
operating in public,” one senior official 
said of the opposition’s new promi- 
nence. “People are more approachable, 
and more willing to take risks in ap- 
proaching American officials.” 

A successful program will still require 
the tolerance of the Serbian government, 
which could withhold visas for U.S. aid 
workers and experts working for the 
American groups, or prevent Serbs from 
traveling to the United States for training 
and study. 


“If they do that, we have big prob- 
lems,” the official said. “But we’re 


plunging ahead in expectation of ap- 
proval of the Serbian government to 
work in Bell — A “ " 


Nicholas Burns, the State Department 
spokesman, said: ‘ ’The idea is to demon- 
strate concrete support for the media and 
to help the evolution toward democracy, 
not authoritarianism. We understand 
there will be an evolution in Serbia, and 
there's an argument about which di- 
rection it will take, and we want to push 
it in a democratic direction.” 


Serbian Opposition a Step Closer 
As Belgrade Confirms Victory 


Agence Fronn-Presse 

BELGRADE — The Serbian oppo- 
sition came a step closer to taking power 
in the Belgrade city assembly on 
Thursday when the local electoral com- 
mission confirmed its victory as ceded in 
a parliamentary vote. 

The commission's action was the 
latest in a complex process set in motion 
by die parliamentary vote Tuesday, 
which confirmed President Slobodan 
Milosevic's dramatic retreat on the elec- 
tions. That bill became law Wednesday 
when it was published in the official 
government gazette. 

Other local commissions must also 
confirm the opposition victories as an- 


nounced in the bilL The next step is for 
the speaker of the Serbian Parliament to 
actually convene all 14 of the disputed 
assemblies included in the law. He has 
five days to do it. and they must convene 
within 10 days after that. 

In Belgrade, the president of the local 
electoral commission. Radomir Lazar- 
evic, said the opposition coalition Za- 
jedno had won 61 of the 1 10 seats in the 
assembly. 

The outgoing Socialists and their neo- 
communist allies in the Yugoslav Left 
party have 24 seats, while die Serbian 
ultranationalist Radical Party controls 
17 and the Serbian Democratic Party has 
2 seats. 


■ Belgrade Threatens Ban 

Serbia has threatened to ban members 
of the U.S. Congress who have sup- 
ported the pro-democracy movement, a 
move that diplomats said Thursday 
would backfire on Mr. Milosevic, The 
Associated Press reported from Bel- 
grade. 

The Foreign Ministry of Serbian- 
dominated Yugoslavia has protested to 
the State Department against members 
of Congress who have taken part in pro- 
democracy rallies. 

It said it would refuse visas to pro- 
spective Congressional delegations be- 
cause its members “abused Yugoslav 
hospitality” by “meddling” in the 
country's internal affairs. 

The U.S. Embassy issued a statement 
Thursday stressing that Y ugoslavia, now 
made up of Serbia and Montenegro, “re- 
mains subject to agreements guarantee- 
ing free expression.” 

It warned that refusing visas “to pro- 
spective Congressional delegations 
would only backfire against Yugo- 
slavia.” 

The embassy said the protest was 
made late last month, and Belgrade's 
independent media reported Thursday 
that die protest was made to U.S. of- 
ficials verbally. 



The Russian interior minister, Anatoli Kulikov, left, meeting Thursday with President Boris Yettsi iu 


Policeman Killed in Albania 


VLORE, Albania — Protesters staged a ninth day of anti- 
government demonstrations in this Adriatic port on 
Thursday, hours after a policeman was shot dead in what the 
authorities described as a gangland killing. 

Prosecutors said the shooting was unrelated to tills 
week's clashes in Vlore, scene of some of the worst unrest 
Albania has seen since Communism was toppled in 1990. 
One man was shot dead and two others died of heart attacks 
during pitched battles between protesters and police. 

“First indications suggest this was a personal settling of 
accounts linked to a previous murder,” Ramazan flica, an 
investigating prosecutor, said. (Reuters) 


Thursday as his political foes prepared a fresh attack, 

Mr. ICulikov said Mr. Yeltsin, who is stiU convalescing 
from his illness at a country residence outside Moscow, was 
in “good working form” during their 40-minute meeting. 

The State Duma, which is dominated by Communists and 
nationalists, is due to discuss a resolution on Friday, calling 
on Mr. Yeltsin to quit on health grounds. (Reuters) 


U.K. and Ireland Condemn IRA 


Yeltsin in ‘Good Working FomC 


MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin, keeping up a 
steady workload as he recovers from pneumonia, met 
Interior Minister Anatoli Kulikov in die Kremlin on 


BELFAST — Britain and Ireland on Thursday closed 
ranks against the IRA's political wing, Sinn Fein, after a 
suspected IRA sniper killed a soldier in Northern Ireland. 

• Prime Minister John Major of Britain vowed he would 
not give in to the “murderous efforts” of the Irish Re- 
publican Army to force his government to invite Sinn Ffeiii 
to peace talks. 

Prime Minister John Bruton of Ireland said the shooting 
was “an expression of something we wish to eradicate from 
our society: die use of violence to achieve political ends.” 

(Reuters) 


r I 


lu 




Bosnian Flash Point Defused, for Now 


ft 

n i 


iy Mich? 
id Bradlc 


and Bradley Graham 

Washington Post Service 



WASHINGTON — ' An 
American arbitrator has ten- 
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area, according to U.S. and 
West European officials. 

The decision, which still 
must be reviewed by the full 
arbitration commission, ef- 
fectively sidesteps taking a 
firm position on a potentially 


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explosive territorial dispute 
pitting Bosnian Muslims and 
their Croatian allies against 
the Bosnian Serbs. Officials 
said it was likely to be com- 
bined with the announcement 
of a beefed-up international 
police presence in Brcko to 
provide security for returning 
refugees. 

Brcko's location, on a nar- 
row corridor connecting 
Serb-held territories in north- 
ern and eastern Bosnia, has 
made it a flash point for the 
continuing tensions between 
Bosnia's rival ethnic groups. 

The district bad a prewar pop- sought to 
ulation of 87,000, and was ' mise, an] 
seized by Serb forces at the 
begriming of the three-and-a- 
half-year Bosnian war. 

Officials said the Americ- 
an arbitrator, Roberts Owen, 
has sought to avoid issuing a 
black-and-white judgment 
awarding Brcko to tbe "Serbs 
or the Muslim-Croarian fed- 
eration, which would inevit- 
ably lead to renewed conflict 
Instead, he has sought to pre- 
serve many elements of die 
present political and military 
balance for at least another 
year while making it possible 
for some Croats and Muslims 
to return to their homes and 
allowing access across the 
corridor to the Sava River. 

The final arbitration de- 
cision on Brcko is to be an- 
nounced Friday, probably in 
Rome, in the presence of rep- 
resentatives of all three fac- 
tions . and die five -nation 


izing tfae civilian provisions 
of the 1995 Dayton peace ac- 
cord. 

Under the Dayton agree- 
ment, Mr. Owen Iras authority 
to make a final /toricfmi on the 
future status of Brcko, even 
though be must consider the 
opinions of arbitrators ap- 
pointed by the Bosnian Serbs 
and the Muslim-Croat feder- 
ation. The arbitration de- 
cision was originally sched- 
uled for last December, but 
waspostponed two months at' 
the request of Bosnian Serbs. 

While Mr. Owen has 
reach a compro- 
any resettlement of 


ration process said top!? 
Pentagon officials, including 1 ' 


the new defense secretary, 
William Cohen, have resisted*! 
any solution for Brcko that u 
would ' involve commitment 
of further American military 1 
resources or increased re3 
sponsibiiities for the 31 ,000-'* 
member peacekeeping force. 

. “We have been very oori-ij 
cemed that there not be mis^ 
sion creep, that the military, 
force not take over the mis- 
sion of being- a police forced 
for Brcko,’’ aPentagon of-' 
ficial said. 

Officials said the Brcko 


district, whose prewar pop-, 
Muslim ' and Croatian ulation was 44 percent •] 
refugees in Brcko is bound to Muslim, 24 percent Croat. "V- 
be bitterly resisted by the Serb and 21 percent Serb, probably ■ jw 
population, and may prove would be placed under su-T 
«-• - ’ ’ pervision of a “deputy high 

representative” under Mr. 
BUdt A final decision on the 
-status of the town wifi be fur - ' | 
ther delayed at least a year. 

In reaching his judgment, ') 
Mr. Owen was obliged to 
steer between conflicting 
political pressures, not only | 
within Bosnia but ■ also • 
abroad. West European gov- ' I 


Western contact group of me- 
diators for Bosnia. Wednes- 
day, Mr. Owen met with fel- 
low arbitrators in Washington 
to inform them of his de- 
cision. He also consulted with 
Carl Bfidt, the international 
official responsible fororgan- 


un possible without a sizable 
commitment of military 
force, officials acknowledge. 
Over, die past, six months, 
there have been several se- 
' nous clashes between armed 
Serbs and Muslim refugees 
seeking to return to their 
homes, in the 4-ki lometer 
(2.5-mile) zone of separation 
patrolled by U.S. peacekeep- 
ing troops. 

A Pentagon official said 
the United States initially had 
proposed a special interna- 
tional police face for Brcko. 
but this drew little support 
from European allies. For 
now, the plan is to increase 
the unarmed international po- 
lice. monitors soon to 100 
from around 20. The United 
States is still discussing apian 
to recruit additional interna- 
tional monitors with West 
European allies, but the of- 
ficial said it would be weeks 
before the new force is in 
place. 

People close to the arbit- 


eraments opposed a proposal 


In this Saturday's 










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TOE WORLDS PAI1Y NEWSPAPER 


by Mr. Owen to place Brcko 1 *) 
under authority of the central jej 
Bosnian government, which" 
in theory represents all thiw 
ethnic groups but in practia 
is weak, on die ground it 
could disrupt an already f rah 
gile status quo, according to i 
U.S. and European officials. 
Perhaps inevitably, Mr. 
Owen appears to have suc- 
ceeded in pleasing almost 
nobody. 

West European officials 
have complained that he has 
taken an “excessively theor- 
etic^ approach,” while people 
sympathetic to the Musfen 
cause say his judgment wUdo 
little more than “(tick the dan 
down the road.” 

“They have postponed a 
real decision for another year, 
and are hoping against hope 
that the pohtical situation mil 
change to the point where they 
can settle h peacefully,'’ one 
U.S. peace negotiator said. 

State Department officials 
argue that Mr; Owen’s judg- 
ment, Which is likely to. in- 
volve a building program; to 
provide homes for ramming 
refugees, goes beyond pre- 
serving die status quo. ‘‘ft 
also includes a large stabil- 
ization package that- is meant 
to stabilize the region, r jone 
official said “It is an attempt 
to put together somethingdKd 
is actually implemen tabled ’ 

. In congressional testimony 
Wednesday, Mr. Cohen said 
budget pressures and other 
considerations required the 
United States to be more se- 
lective in the future about 
where ir commits American 
troops. On Bosnia, he said 
some sort of international 
military force would be nec- 
essary past raid- 1998, when 
the cimem NATO-led mis- 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 7 



Tung Chee-hwa, the future chief executive, waving to reporters Thursday at his office in Hong Kong. 

^Hong Kong Chief- to-Be Assails Critics 


Hewers 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong’s lead- 
er-in-waiting, Tung Chee-hwa. accused 
Hong Kong Democrats on Thursday of 
spreading gloom abroad about die fu- 
ture of the territory under Chinese rule. 

“Recently, some well-known 
people, including the Democratic Party, 
have blackened the reputation of Hong 
Kong overseas,” Mr. Tung said, adding 
that they had given “the impression that 
Hong Kong is collapsing.” 

He said the Democratic Party was 
doing a disservice to Hong Kong and its 
6.3 million people, who will come under 
Chinese sovereignty July 1. 

“This. 1 feel, is not very good,” said 
Mr. Tune, die future chief executive 
'i appointed by Beijing. 

' He spoke Thursday as be unveiled 
offices dial will be his base during the 
final months of British rule. 

; ■*' We may have different views on the 

[ pace of democracy, but we can discuss 
it,” Mr. Tung said. 

“But we should discuss this in Hong 
Kong,” be added. “Is there the heed to 
go abroad to blacken the name of Hong - 

“Is there the need for foreigners to 
come to Hong Kong and tell us, the 
Hong Kong people, what to do in the 


future? Why can't we be the master of 
our own destiny and fate?” 

Beijing has described the leaders of 
the Democratic Party as subversives, 
and sidelined diem from die committees 
and caucuses responsible for shaping 
the future of Hong Kong after the han- 
dover in July. 

The Democrats' leader, Martin Lee, 
has been visiting Europe tins month to 
express concerns that China will reduce 
Hong Kong's civil liberties despite 
Beijing's promises to maintain die 
freedoms and capitalist way of life for 
50 years. 

Mr. Lee has urged the European Uni- 
on to oppose China's plan to dilute 
human rights laws in Hong Kong and 
dismantle its elected legislature upon 
die transfer. 

Mr. Lee told Hong Kong radio that Mr. 
Tung must do more to defend Hong Kang 
against Beijing's Communist rulers. 

“We want Mr. Tong to change die 
un h a p py fete drat awaits Hong Kong,* ’ 
he said, urging the appointee to “talk to 
die Chinese leaders, get diem to wind 191 
that appointed illegal legislature.” 

Mr. Lee added, “Then our worries 
will be over and overseas investors will 
be very happy to come to Hong Kong 
and invest more.” 


Foreign Secretary Malcolm Riflrind 
of Britam, who is in Singapore for talks 
with Foreign Minister Qian Qicben of 
China and win visit Hong Kong this 
weekend, again condemned Beijing’s 
plan to install on July 1 a “provisional 
legislature” in place of Hong Kong's 
elected Legislative Council. 

He said it clashed with a 1984 han- 
dover treaty and with the constitution 
covering the transition. 

■ Belgium May Ease Visa Rules 

Foreign Minister Erik Derycke of 
Belgium said Thursday that his country 
would try to grant visa-free entry to 
Hoqg Kong people after July 1, Reuters 
reported from Singapore. 

But Mr. Derycke, in Singapore for a 
meeting of Asian and European foreign 
ministers, said it would be difficult for 
Brussels to reach a decision on the issue 
before die handover. 

The Hong Kong government, mean- 
while, announced it would propose a bill 
that would rescind legislation that allows 
British subjects to stay in Hong Kong 
without visas. 

Under die bill, the amount of time 
British tourists could stay in the territory 
withoul a visa would be cut to 6 months 
from 12 months, starting April 1. 


India Proposes 
Talks, Except 
On Kashmir, 
With Pakistan 


Coa&kd tf Or S*#Fhm Mpaoks 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 
H.D. Deve Gowda of India was quoted 
Thursday as saying he would send Ins 
foreign minister to Pakistan for talks if 
Islamabad extended an invitation. 

“As soon as I receive the invitation, I 
will ask ibe external affairs minister to 
go to Pakistan for talks,” fee Press Trust 
of India quoted fee prime minister as 
telling troops in Kashmir. “We want to 
improve our relations wife Islama- 
bad.” 

But Mr. Deve Gowda said fee min- 
ister, Inder Kumar GujraL, would not 
discuss Kashmir, where a Muslim sep- 
aratist campaign has cost thousands of 
lives. 

“The Kashmir chapter is closed and 
any talks with Pakistan will be on trade 
and culture,” he told a public rally in 
Uri, a town in Jammu and Kashmir 
state, 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the 
Pakistani border. 

“Sharif has given me some indica- 
tion on having good relations wife In- 
dia,” Mr. Deve Gowda said, speaking 
of the new Pakistani prime minister, 
Mian Nawaz Sharif. “Very soon there 
will be foreign ministry-level talks be- 
tween the two countries and later 00 
both prime ministers will meet.” 

India and Pakistan have fought three 
wars since independence in 1 947, two of 
them over the Himalayan region of 
Kashmir. 

Pakistan has long insisted the two 
nations resolve their differences over 
Kashmir before taking up other issues. 

Mr. Deve Gowda and former Prime 
Minister Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan ex- 
changed letters after the Indian became 
prime minister in June, but they did not 
lead to high-level bilateral talks, which 
were last held in January 1994. 

The overwhelming victory in elec- 
tions tins month by Mr. Sharif's party 
has raised hopes that peace talks could 
be resumed. 

“Mr. Sharif’s initial views have been 
favorable, and 1 hope that the new gov- 
ernment in Pakistan will show a positive 
approach in this regard,” Mr. Deve 
Gowda said. 

Analysts said Mr. Deve Gowda's will- 
ingness to dispatch his foreign minister to 
Pakistan underscored his seriousness in 
reopening a dialogue with Islamabad. 
But New Delhi has rejected Islamabad's 
insistence feat an internationally super- 
vised plebiscite to determine Kashmir's 
future status. ( Reuters , AFP) 


BRIEF1Y 


South Korea Arrests Ex- Cabinet Minister 

SEOUL — Prosecutors in South Korea arrested a farmer cabinet minister 
and two lawmakers on Thursday over a loan scandal that has badly damaged 
the credibility of President Kim Young Sam. 

A prosecution official said Kim Woo Suk, who resigned Wednesday as 
home affairs minister, was detained on charges of accepting bribes from fee 
failed Hanbo Steel & General Construction. 

The fanner minister and one of fee two arrested legislators, Hwang Byung 
Tai, belong to a party faction that becked President Kim's rise to power. Mr. 
Hwang and the other lawmaker, Kwon Roh Kap, a top aide to the chief 
opposition leader. Kim Dae Jung, were also charged with bribery. (Reuters) 

Karen Rebels Flee Their Base inBurma 

BANGKOK — Outnumbered by 1,500 Burmese troops, 500 ethnic Karen 
insurgents abandoned their headquarters Thursday, fleeing into fee jungle after 
setting fire to the base. 

Thai television and border residents said Burmese troops occupied the 
burned-out base in Teakaplaw in eastern Burma. 

Tbe government launched an offensive late Tuesday against the only two 
areas in Burma still controlled by the Karen National Union, which has been 
fighting for autonomy for fee Karen people since 1948. (AP) 

Pakistani Muslim Preachers Visit China 

ISLAMABAD — Pakistan acknowledged Thursday that a Muslim preach- 
ing group based here had made visits to the northwestern Xinjiang region of 
Quna, felt it said the group bad not interfered in China’s internal affairs. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman also denied a newspaper report that China 
had protested to Pakistan about tbe alleged shipment of religious literature by 
tbe Tableeghi Jamaai group to indie unrest in Xinjiang, which borders 
northern Pakistan. 

“We are studying the situation and watching fee situation,” tbe official said 
when asked about riots in Xinjiang by members of the Muslim Uighur 
minority, in which at least 10 people died last week. (Reuters) 

Sri Lankan Legislator Urged to Surrender 

COLOMBO — Sri Lanka’s main opposition party ordered one of its 
members of Parliament to surrender to the authorities in connection with the 
assassination of a legislator from fee governing party. 

Ranil Wickremesmghe, a former prime minister and head of tbe United 
National Party, ordered Susan tha Punch inilame to surrender as the police 
offered a reward of 1 million rupees ($17,500) for his arrest. 

The slaying Tuesday of Nalanda Ellawela and a bodyguard has brought back 
memories of political and other extrajudicial killings that were rampant dining 
fee 17 years that the United National Party held power, analysts said. (AFP) 

Indonesia Cracks Down on Race Rioters 

JAKARTA — The Indonesian military said Thursday that it was cracking 
down on rioters in the country's West Kalimantan province on Borneo island 
after fee deaths of a number of people in race riots since late December. 

An armed forces spokesman said, “We will take action regardless of fee 
people’s ethnicity or religion.” The spokesman said a number of people had 
been killed during riots between the native Dayaks and Muslim migrants from 
Madura island off eastern Java. (Reuters) 

For the Record 

The Taleban Islamic militia in Afghanistan has decreed that foreign 
journalists and other foreigners can no longer hire taxis or private cars and must 
use only Tourism Department vehicles. (Reuters) 

Hundreds of marines and police were deployed in Jolo, a Muslim- 
dominated Philippine town, ahead of Friday's burial of a Roman Catholic 
bishop, Benjamin de Jesusa. who was slain by suspected Islamic extremists on 
Feb. 4. (AFP) 



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INTERNATIONAL HBBAT.n TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 


. • t. * 




PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 

EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Jtcralb 



PUBUSHEO WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Demolition Job 


rib uite Incumbency, Not Ideology, Is Leaders ’ Concern 

7 wses= 3 ~ *>*-*-** SSSSsSli 


The Senate's consideration of the 
nomination of Anthony Lake to be 
director of central intelligence is be- 
ginning to look more like a demolition 
job than a reasoned review of his qual- 
ifications. Senator Richard Shelby of 
Alabama, chairman of the Intelligence 
Committee, has an obligation to ex- 
amine Mr. Like's fitness to run one of 
the government's most sensitive and 
troubled agencies. But Mr. Shelby 
keeps postponing hearings and raising 
new issues, leaving the impression that 
he would rather undermine the nom- 
ination than vote on it. 

The dynamic of a damaged nom- 
ination is hard to reverse in Washington 
once it gains momentum. It is unfair to 
Mr. Lake and unworthy of the Senate to 
conduct the confirmation process by 
innuendo and cryptic comment, which 
has been Mr. Shelby's recent practice. 

Some questions about Mr. Lake’s 
suitability deserve careful review, in- 
cluding the issues of his independence, 
management skills and commitment to 
reform the CIA and other intelligence 
organizations. 

Mr. Shelby, quite properly, wants to 
know whether Mr. Lake and his staff 
became Involved in political fund- 
raising activities while serving as 


White House national security aides 
the last four years. 

Mr. Lake's failure to sell stock hold- 
ings as directed by the White House 
while he was President Bill Clinton’s 
national security adviser is troubling, 
even though the Justice Department 
found the lapse unintentional. His de- 
cision to keep Congress uninformed 
about the 1994 acquiescence in Iran's 
aiming of the Bosnian Army was 
wrong. 

Mr. Shelby complains that some of 
the committee’s questions remain un- 
answered by Mr. Lake and the White 
House. That can be remedied quickly 
in a public hearing, where any dodging 
by the nominee will be obvious to the 
senators who must vote on his ap- 
pointment. Mr. Shelby has also raised a 
slew of foreign policy issues, ranging 
-from Haiti to Somalia, as if this were a 
review of Mr. Clinton's first term 
rather than an examination of one 
man's qualifications. 

Mr. Lake deserves a chance to ad- 
dress the criticisms and to make the 
case for confirmation. Hearings should 
commence this month, not in March or 
on some other date that suits a strategy 
of attrition. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Campaign Cash 


President Bill Clinton went to the 
Capitol the other day and agreed with 
congressional leaders on five legislative 
areas where they might be able to make 
some quick bipartisan progress. Cam- 
paign finance reform didn’t make the 
cul The White House said not to worry. 
Everyone knows campaign finance re- 
form is an issue on which there are 
major differences both between and 
within the parties. It couldn’t be put on a 
list for possible quick hits, but that sig- 
nals no lessening of the president's com- 
mitment, he having asked that a bill be 
sent to him for his signature by July 4. 

Maybe so. bur the omission raises a 
question. The president has rightly said 
that the bill will likely die if delayed, as 
has happened so often in the past How 
does the White House then propose to 
break it loose? What will the president 
and his presumed Democratic support- 
ers on the Hill try to do to force con- 
sideration of the measure? We're still 
waiting on that one. 

What we and others fear is a repeat 
of the same old game with just a couple 
of tweaks here and there to suit current 
circumstances. The president and 
Democrats are under a fair amount of 
pressure to show their dedication to 
reform — who could be against any- 
thing called reform, after all? — be- 
cause of the kind of Iet-no-dollar-lie- 
unsolicited fund-raising in which be 
engaged in last year’s campaign. As the 
president has himself pointed out. die 
Republicans raised more — and raised 
some questions about how they did it, 
too. It's his tactics nonetheless that 


have become the center of attention. 

He and the Democrats will get well, 
or try to, by clamoring for passage of 
the reform bill. The Republicans, who 
mostly oppose it, will meanwhile show 
their devotion to good government by 
attacking the president’s own fund- 
raising. The first order of business, 
they will say, should be not to change 
die rules but to find out how the rules 
have been bent. They are setting up 
bearings, which is a good thing. The 
danger is that they will drag the hear- 
ings on ... and on ... and let then- 
existence postpone legislative action, 
on the theory that you shouldn't le- 
gislate before you have all the facts. 
What could be more virtuous than that? 
The longer the bearings go on, the less 
time will be left to legislate; back to 
delay. If in the meantime the focus of 
the hearings can be kept on the pres- 
idential campaigns, so much the better 
for Congress, whose own practices 
will escape equal scrutiny. 

In the end. they once again won't do 
anything but will have each other to 
blame for the inaction. The Congress 
will end without a bill, and the va- 
cuuming of the interest groups and the 
rest of the electorate for funds will go 
happily on. 

That's the fear, reinforced by too 
many years of experience. 

It’s why folks noticed when cam- 
paign finance didn't make the Tuesday 
list, and it's why we once again ask the 
question: What does the president pro- 
pose to do to try to make this happen? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Annan So Far 


Kofi Annan has been secretary-gen- 
eral of the United Nations for six 
weeks, and some in Washington are 
already grousing that he is not doing 
enough to reform the UN. 

It is true that Mr. Annan has not yet 
turned the organization upside down. 
But he faces a Herculean task. He must 
refocus and restructure the UN for a 
world no longer defined by the ideo- 
logical conflict of the Cold War. It will 
take time to make changes. But in this 
case patience may be rewarded by the 
development of an international body 
(hat can finally live up to the great 
promise that attended its birth. 

Mr. Annan, an experienced man of 
proven managerial ability, is up to the 
job. He has the executive and dip- 
lomatic skills to reform the UN. 

He recognizes that continued Amer- 
ican support for the organization re- 
quires an overhaul, and that some steps 
must be taken soon. But he must set the 
pace and direction of change without 
badgering from Washington. The more 
beholden he seems to the United 
States, the less he will accomplish in an 
institution of 1 85 member states. 

Mr. Annan plans to unveil his reform 
plan this summer. It should include ad- 
ministrative changes such as an end to 
permanent tenure for UN officials, and a 
commitment by governments to refrain 
from using UN agencies as dumping 
grounds for mediocre bureaucrats. Du- 
plicative agencies in development trade 
and agriculture should be consolidated, 
while ensuring that changes do not 
slight the needs of poor nations. 


The UN should play a larger role in 
helping to end regional arms races, 
eliminate land mines and control bio- 
logical weapons. 

Washington owes die United Na- 
tions at least $1 billion in dues. This is 
an embarrassment The dues are not 
optional, but part of America's ob- 
ligation to its fellow members. The 
Clinton administration has proposed 
paying $100 million this year and 
$900 million in 1998 if a series of still 
unspecified reform benchmarks are 
met 

Mr. Annan has the political instincts 
to take some early actions that signal 
his intention to change the UN. He can 
do so on matters be directly controls, 
like the operation of his own office. He 
has already eliminated a layer of bu- 
reaucracy, delegated more authority 
and gotten rid of some high-level 
officials. 

He should consider doing more to 
consolidate offices and replace inef- 
ficient staff. While waiting until sum- 
mer to be specific on major reforms, he 
can draw on his long UN experience to 
propose a few changes now and use the 
consultation process to build support. 

Washington, for its part, would be 
wise to back off a bit The Clinton 
administration and Congress have 
been right to push for reform, but they 
are undermining their cause by leaning 
too hard on Mr. Annan. Those who are 
impatient might consider what land of 
scorecard they would have earned after 
six weeks on the job. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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W ASHINGTON — The world’s 
most important countries are now 
led by men more interested in being in 
office than in being in power. Today's 
national chief executives bold with 
rather than shape their times. 

Voyaging between Washington and 
Moscow over die past 10 days brought 
this view of world leadership sharply 
into focus for me. I arrived back here as 
President Bill Clinton was seeing off 
Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin 
of Russia last week and preparing to 
welcome Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu of Israel this week. 

The Israeli and Russian leaders, men 
of different generations and principles, 
have this in common with their Amer- 
ican host: They have made pragmatic 
retreats on principle recently when 
defeat or stalemate loomed. Ideology 
is secondary to them; staying in 
power is primary, even if that power is 
constrained by circumstance or their 
opponents. 

Ever thus in politics, the art of 
the possible? Perhaps. But the unfold- 
ing of die first decade after the Cold 
War has brought to the fore leaders 
who do not pursue grand principles or 
ideas that they push forward by reach- 
ing compromise with opponents. They 
pursue co m pro m ise, to stay in office 
and to enjoy its attributes. They turn 


incumbency into a specialization. 

The CUoton-Neianyabu meeting is it- 
self emblematic of this phenomenon. 
Mr. Clinton skillfully, withheld this 
White House visit far the Likud leader 
until he reached agreement with Yasser 
Arafat on the Hebron withdrawal plan. 
The White House photo-op with Mr. 
Clinton, who is genuinely popular in 
Israel, was the icing on a deal dot Mr. 
Netanyahu was compelled to make by 
bis own domestic opinion. 

“The generation of politicians com- 
ing to office now understands electoral 
politics better than we ever did. But 
they have little concept of die use of 
power,” one of Western Europe’s se- 
nior political leaders told me recently in 
a conversation in which he singled out 
Mr. Clin too, Mr. Netanyahu and Po- 
land’s Aleksander Kwasniewski as rep- 
resenting “exactly the mood of tins 
time of the professional politician.” 

But events in Russia and elsewhere 
demonstrate that tins is not merely a 
generational phenomenon. Indeed, one 
of the great compromises to stay in 
power has been made by the aged Len- 
inists who run China and who have 
sacrificed Marxism to buy public ac- 
quiescence to their repressive rule. 


The transformation of Russia s 
economy has come to a grinding halt as 
the gov erning has abandoned any 
serious effort at economic reform. Ice 
objective of Boris Yeltsin’s gowero- 
ment has become perpetuation of 
t ransition and the vast fortunes it has 
created for some insiders, on a per- 
manent basis if possible. 

The great inequalities in income and 
imftnV nw nanAip arrangements of pOSt- 
Soviet Russia once could be seen as 
unfortunate but temporary hardships 
needed to get a capitalist system jump- 


conservative nor liberal,'* - ^ys the 
former presidential candidate, Grigori 
Yavlinsky. /‘It is merely greedy, and 

rapacious." , ■ ■ ; 

As a consequence, the Glutton afc 
ministration no longer has an active _ 
Russia policy. There are -no .serious 
reform programs or reformers jn power, 
-to support in Moscow. . 

Ideology is also out in Britain despite 
an impending election campaigmTbny . 


Blairs New Labourites promise.not to 
raise taxes or change much else, if' 
voters toss out Prime Minister . John’ 
Major's astonishingly insular and 


^^ Bitt&betWdearln . Major’s unuMW W M 

^^tlSm^tiis that the excesses are tired Corutexvabv^ hi 

the objective for those who run the idem Jacques Chirac - has - made a 
me oojecuve iur tnox wuw * . - f , starts toward domestic 


system. They are doing nothing to bring 

them to an end and. everything to pro- 
long them. . „ 

In the government, Mr. Yeltsin s 
young chid of staff, Anatoli Ch ub ais, 

who headed a privatization program that 

in retrospect must be judged as adisaster 
of histone p ro p ortions, spends all of his 
time struggling to stay in office rather 
rfran to pushing reform. Mr. Cherno- 
myr riin finds himsftlf m the same boat as 
he shuts off wage and penaon payments 
fix* mouths to keep inflation at Say so the 
International Monetary Fund will lend 
new money to Russia. 

“The new r uling elite is neither 
democratic nor communist, neither 


series of false starts toward domestic 
change that he has quickly .abandoned- 
in the face of public protest. Only Ger- 
many's Helmut Kotu, in power Tor 14;; 
years, stands out as a leader pursuing 
his own agenda with confidence and 
conviction. 

Those who debate whether leaders 
create history or history creates the. 
leaders it needs can suroerxl their de- 
liberations in this era. of opportunistic 
iiKaeinentalism. Today’s political lead- ■ 
ers create themselves — as an act of , 
will That leaves them free to be what 
they need to be, on a daily basis if 
necessary. 

The Washington Post. 


Will Britain Be the Hong Kong of Europe? Not at This Rate A 


L ondon — a constant 

theme of British ministers, 
for some time now, has been the 
contrast between the sputtering 
German and Bench economies, 
burdened by a rigid, high-cost 
labor market and the red tape of 
social regulation, and the de- 
regulated, lower-wage British 
economy, now forging ahead. 

The British growth rate pro- 
jected for 1997 is nearly half 
again as much as either the 
Bench or German; British un- 
employment is f allin g dramat- 
ically; inflation is low, and for- 
eign firms, attracted by low 
wages and deregulation, are 
flocking to invest in Britain. In 
1995, Britain had two- fifths of 
all foreign investment in the 
European Union. 

Does this mean that, as Prime 
Minister John Major is fond of 
suggesting, Britain is set to be- 
come the Hong Kong of 
Europe? 

There are three sets of rea- 
sons for doubting this propo- 
sition. 

First, the continental model 
has done better than the above 
comments imply. Between 
1960 and 1995, average annual 
growth of GDP was 3 percent in 
the United States, 2.9 in Ger- 
many, 3.1 in France and 22 in 
the United Kingdom. Over a 


By Roy Penman 


shorter time frame, the 20 years 
after the oil shock, Germany 
(2.4) outperformed both the 
United Kingdom (1 5) and the 
United States (2J2). Social co- 
hesion is not necessarily inferi- 
or to hire and fire. 

Moreover, on the Continent 
the need for change is recog- 
nized and changes have been and 
are being made. More needs to 
be done. But both Germany and 
France are r unning a substantial 
surplus on visible trade, and are 
confident of next year meeting 
the budget deficit criterion for a 
single currency. Britain has a 
massive deficit on visible trade 
and a ballooning public sector 
borrowing requirement. 

Second, the recent British 
performance is not as glittering 
as pre-election Conservative 
hype would suggest. 

The fall in unemployment 
can largely be explained by 
people, such as early retirees, 
leaving the job market. There 
are 1.1 million fewer employed 
than in 1990. 

Spurts of high growth have 
been seen in' Britain before, but 
they have never lasted because 
the fundamental problems of 
the British economy have never 
been tackled. 


These are an educational sys- 
tem woefully inferior to those of 
our European competitors, a 
disdain for engineering worthy 
of a French nobleman before the 
Revolution and low investment. 
Over the years 1963 to 1992, 
investment as a share of GDP 
was broadly constant in Britain 
at 18 percent; in France and 
Germany it was consistently be- 
tween 26 and 27 peroenL Not 
surprisingly, a Granfiekf School 
of Management study last year 
found that foreign-owned firms 
in the United Kingdom (some 
10 percent of total capital stock) 
were 40 percent more produc- 
tive than domestic industry. 

Third, the United Kingdom 
seems about to refuse — at least 
for some years — to join a 
single European currency. If the 
Conservatives are returned to 
office, entry can be dismissed 
for the foreseeable future. If 
Tony Blair is elected, he will be 
saddled with the doubts on 
monetary union that he had to 
voice in the election campaign 
to avoid being labeled toe 
poodle of Brussels. And he will 
find that the public, influenced 
by the media-hungry Euroskep- 
tics of the Conservative Party 
and the largely foreign-owned 


British press, has gone sour on 
Europe. Should he later decide 
to go for monetary union, he 
could hardly win wholehearted 
national consent before the gen- 
eral election due in 2002 . 

Early next year, the compo- 
sition of the single currency 
bloc will be decided. The con- 
sequence of Britain’s being out- 
side would be an imm ediate and 
massive drain of foreign invest- 
ment from Britain to the Con- 
tinent. International firms in- 
vesting in Britain are above all 
concerned with access to the 
wider European market. They 
would see very quickly that 
British exports would be at risk 
if any factor — a sterling de- 
valuation forced by specula- 
tion, or low wages (social 
dumping ) — was seen by the 
inn«r group as giv ing Britain an 
unfafr competitive advantage in 
a angle market Britain would 
effectively be out of foe Euro- 
pean Union. 

This is the stark choice that is 
being concealed .from foe Brit- 
ish public. Either Britain goes 
forward with its partners to 
build a politically integrated 
economic union or it is outside. 
There is no middle course. Talk 
about “renegotiating our terms 
of entry.” or “retaining our 
sovereignty'* or crying from die 


sidelines, “You rotters are 
fud ging foe criteria” is shout 3 
ing m the wind. 

Some major firms have 
already made this clear. On Jan< 
16, Jurgen Gehrels, the chief 
executive of Siemens UK, said 
publicly that his company 
would never have committed 
itself to investing up to $1.4 
billion in a microchip plant iif 
Newcastle if it had realized that 
Britain might be out of a single 
European currency . On Jan. 22, 
Alan Marsh, the vicechainnat? 
of Toyota Motor Europe, 
warned that effective exclusion 
from the European Union ; 
“could have serious con- 
sequences for Toyota in foe 

TTTr tt 


It looks as though the civil ; 
war on Europe within the Com 
servative Party will land Britain f 
in the situation not of the off* 
shore Hong Kong of Europe but . 
as a depressed fringe. Such is ; 
the result of the British political i, 
class' failure to understand ; 
events across, the Channel and . 
to govern a country that was, 50 • ' 
years ago, the toast of Europe.! 

The writer, a farmer reprer j 
sentadve af the European Com* ■ 
mission in Washington, contrib- 1 
tiled this comment to thd : 
International Herald Tribune. > « 


. - l 

Argentina Once Again Confronts the Specter of Absolutism 


By Toman Eloy Martinez 


N EW YORK — The great 
majority of human beings 
do not have foe chance to see 
how absolutism grows. 

But over the past 40 years, 
the Argentine people have en- 
joyed this privilege cm three oc- 
casions. 

The first time was when the 
provisional president Juan Car- 
los Ongania — who usurped 
power in July 1966, after en- 
gineering a coup against foe 
constitutional president, Arturo 
Illia — promised two decades 
of peace and order. Mr. 
Ongania began his mandate by 
ordering the infamous “Night 
of the Long Sticks,” when the 
police moved into the Uni- 
versity of Buenos Aires and 
bludgeoned scores of science 
professors. 

Thanks to the repression and 
the subsequent exile of dozens 
of scholars, scientific research 

An adviser to the 
police chief of 
Buenos Aires 
province has been 
linked to the two 
Jewish center 
attacks . 

in Argentina was set back about 
50 years. 

The second time was when 
the former police sergeant Jose 
Lopez Rega. the sinister body- 
guard, secretary and astrologer 
of General Juan Peron, man- 
aged to win the trust of Isabel 
Ftaon — who became president 
after her husband's death, in 
July 1974. 

Mr. Lopez Rega, aided by 
two commissars and a squad of 
noncommissioned police of- 
ficers, created the “Triple A,” 
or Anticommunist Argentine 
Alliance. Their rightist death 
squads hunted human beings in 
the streets of Buenos Abes be- 
tween September 1 974 and July 
1975. 

The third time — foe 
worst — was the massacre or- 
ganized by foe last military 
dictatorship, between 1976 
and 1983, which instituted a 
culture of impunity, of un- 
speakable hatred for human 


life, of intolerance, violence 
and fanaticism whose echoes 
still reverberate. 

Now foe horizon darkens 
again. A new form of absolute 
power, no less perverse than foe 
others, looms above institutions, 
the state; the Jaw and all civ- 
ilized languages of coexistence. 

This power is growing in the 
soil of the Argentine govern- 
ment's inability or reluctance to 
find the culprits in such scan- 
dalous crimes as the bombings 
of the Israeli Embassy in March 
1992 and of a Jewish commu- 
nity center in July 1994, both in 
Buenos Aires. 

On Jan. 25. Jose Luis 
Cabezas, a journalist for the 
weekly magazine Noticias, was 
killed in Pinamar, an upscale 
Atlantic beach resort 250 miles 
south of Buenos Aires. 

In a style reminiscent of the 
mafia-style crimes organized 
decades ago by Mr. Lopez 
Rega. Mr. Cabezas’ s corpse was 
found inside an incinerated car. 

According to foe police, Mr. 
Cabezas had been kidnapped, 
handcuffed, shot and then 
burned alive, after leaving a 
party attended by business ex- 
ecutives, politicians and celeb- 
rities in Pinamar. 

Mr. Cabezas had been inves- 
tigating foe links between a net- 
work of drug traffickers and 
several policemen in Buenos 
Aires province. Eduardo 
Duhalde, governor of Buenos 
Aires province, is the likely suc- 
cessor to President Carlos Saul 
Menem. 

Beyond this. Mr. Cabezas had 
also unveiled the links between 
some officials of the national 
government and foe “czar” of 
foe corrupt private postal ser- 
vices, Alfredo Yabran. 

The assassination of Mr. 
Cabezas is no less serious than 
foe bombings — still unsolved 
— of the Israeli Embassy and 
the Jewish organizations, in 
which more than 100 people 
died. It is true Mr. Cabezas was 
only one human being, but be 
represents all foe journalists 
working in peril to expose the 
growth of a comipuon that 
could, once again, destroy foe 
dignity and moral health of the 
Argentine people. 

If Mr. Cabezas ’s killers are 
not found — or if the police take 
too much time finding them — 


his blood will rebuke foe good 
name of Argentina. And it will 
spill on foe deteriorated prestige 
of a government that, in its sev- 
en years of rule, has endured for 
too many atrocities to ascribe 
them all to bad luck. 

In foe case of the Jewish cen- 
ter bombings. President Menem 
and Mr. Duhalde had said they 
would seek the death penalty 
for foe culprits — once they 
were found. Because foe death 
penalty is unconstitutional in 

Carlos Menem’ s 
government seems 
unwilling to find 
the culprits in the 
fatal bombings. 

Argentina, these statements 
prompted a huge debate, which 
shifted attention from foe main 
point; solving foe crime. 

More than a year ago, Mr. 
Cabezas and other journalists 
learned that an adviser to 
Buenos Aires province’s chief 
of police was an accessory in 
foe bombing of foe Jewish or- 
ganizations, if not the man re- 
sponsible. Mr. Duhalde stepped 
out to defend his police, saying 
they were “the best we have in 
this country.” 

Bat two days later, over- 
whelmed by the evidence, Mr. 
Duhalde had to order die resig- 
nation of his police chief, who 
then took refuge, most likely, in 
same Central American coun- 

*y- 

All eyes are on Mr. Menem 
and Mr. Duhalde, but in fact foe 
Argentine people doubt the 
competence or resolve of either 
to stop foe crimes of absolute 
power now looming above foe 
nation. 

Impunity is like a poisonous 
chrysalis that explodes, sud- 
denly revealing the features of 
absolute power. The habits of 
that creature are well known. It 
feeds on fear, passivity and in- 
difference. But its principal 
food is silence. 

The writer, the author of 
’The Peron NoveV’ and “Sama 
Evita” is chairman of the Latin 
American studies department at 
Rutgers University. This com - ■ 
ment was distributed by New 
York Times Special Features. 



ByCAJAS. CaWSjwtta*. > 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO! 

1897: Dervish Rumors tractive costume, making a gaV 


CAIRO — Rumors have been 
circulated about the dervish- 
es’ movements south of the 
newly reco nquered provinces. 
The troth is that parties 
of dervish camel men are 
in the desert between Dongola 
and Omdurman, in foe Sou- 
dan. It is reported that a raid 
on the province of Dongola 
is at present in contemplation. 

1922: Pope Coronated 

ROME — Amid a scene that 
was i like a living page out of a 
book o f medieval splendour, foe 
coronation of Pope Pius XT took 
place Sunday [Feb. 123 . The 
whole church, capable of hoJd- 


mg 100,00 0 people, was full 
me ceremony, and thousands 
remained in foe square. A Iona 
was led by two Swiss 

Guards. Then came all foe hiph 

prelates and dignitaries of foe 
Vatican household, each in dis- 


tractive costume, making a gaj 1 A 
medley of colour. The singing p 
of the Sistine Chapel Choir j 
filled the church with mellow I 
liquid melody and heralded the . 
enhance of nearly 60 scarlet- \ , 
caped cardinals followed by foe ! j 
Pope sitting in foe “sedia gest- , i 
^oria” (the chair of command) ■ 1 
supported Ity 12 carriers. I : 

1947: Polish Amne sty • 

WARSAW — President • 
Boleslaw Bienit announced ^ 
today [Feb. 12] a sweating am- ■ 
nesty program that will empty . 

SStS, Jad ?- 0 ^ “o® °f their 
70,000 political and other pris- 
oners and mean full pardon for 
members of the anti-govent- 
raent underground except for. 
those charged with murder. It is 
foe most important step taken by 
foe newly-elected government^ 
for the restoration of internal ® 
peace and order in the country • 

and, if SUCCeSSfuL will haw vast 

influence on Poland's future. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


PAGE 9 




OPINION/LETTERS 


h 


•s 


itl 




f. ibstilulk 



China ’s Princelings 5 Play It Smart 



By William Satire 


ASHINGTON — The 4,000 u tai zi 
dang — 


newly reasonable 


rebnuuy 
s bought 

idem ofiheUnited'sScv with pres ‘ 


Wh<*n f ^ February Tiananmen debate in the United States about 

J ills wav Into 3 4 °°J° T ]o u s members bought Chinapolicy is outdated. In dial old debate,*© 
< ius way mro a coffee chat with ~~~ i _ i 


‘coffee 


■ i 1 ” ,s 1 D ^ lnn P h « arranged by the Demo- 

1 Ccmnmtee ftrough a Clinton 

&iendj Charies Yah Lin Trie, was made pos- 
; stole by a lapse of security among raoney^ 

** P^cebng’s sponsors, 
i Lm ™ SUS R«*^ Mr- WaQ g- »nof a Long 
i J*™, of to run 2,000 AK-47 

■ canes iif .v^^PP^L^r tfae of street rewarcUng Chinese repression, 
known S i? e ^*2?^ States; Mr. Wang is now? Engagement is a done deal. 

: Known to be a middleman in purchases by the ««» a*k, 

punese army of missies from Russia. 


h uman ri ghts crowd argued that trade sanc- 
tions and incentives could improve Chinese 
behavior; the business-first crowd argued that 
freedom would come in the wake of economic 
progress. That debate ended when the Asian 
Connection persuaded Bill Clinton to open the 
floodgates of China trade. Beijing's leaders 
and their princelings, unrestrained, jailed all 
dissidents. Although it turned out the human 
rights crowd was right about the foolishness of 
rewarding Chinese repression, who cares 


i ,^ s ^ch thug was able to buy a 
handshake with the U.S. president, and could 
then use that demonstration of access in im- 
pressing other princelings, is symbolic of the 
new attitude toward the United States of a 
pangerous new class in 

i c* '^ arI atJ itod e is 3 contempt for 

JJ .S. greed; the princelings are convinced that 
{American politicians and business' leaders 
will do anything, or put up with anything the 
phinese do, for a buck. The other part is 
rooted in a need for self-protection from or- 
dinary Chinese not bom to power, which the 
princelings handle by transferring that re- 
sentment to America as the people's enemy. 

These fixerpreneurs are the Chinese wave 
of the future. They are coining into power in 
the army, in the Forbidden City, in me state- . 
subsidized industries, in the favored hanW 
taking over Hong Kong's prizes. They need 


Now we will have a new debate. On one 
side are the Clintooites, writers with a stake in 
Chinese official favor and business seekers of 
cheap labor. They still hope feat prosperity 
anil lead — someday — to democracy, and 
set up a straw -man argument that we have no 
right to “h ntnniate ” China with OUT plOUS 
bias about freedom, or to “isolate" a billion 


industrious people. 

On the other side are veteran China-watch- 


an international enemy — an imagined thr ea t 
of a superpower seeking the dreaded 


he- 


gemony” — and America is iL 
At the same time, because drey need Amer- 
ica ’s market, capital and trade secrets for thezr 
speeded-up development, princelings are 
Working on two tracks. 

- Internally, America is depicted as the se- 
ducer of Taiwan, container of offshore ex- 
pansion and subverter of order wife prattle 
about human rights. Externally, America is to 
be wooed wife mutual visitations of leaders, 
all culminating this summer in a summit 


eis become New China Hands, who bold fear 
China’s princelings and their gerontocrat par- 
ents are bent cm keeping centralized power, 
that fear of an outside hegemon is necessary 
to their propaganda; and that by mindlessly 
fueling China's economic expansion, Amer- 
ica helps build up an anti-democratic su- 
perpower rival that will dominate Japan and 
all its Pacific neighbors. 

Kissirigerians and other longtime China, 
openers are tom by this new realpolitik. They 
read articles by Robert Kagan in The Weekly 
Standard, brace themselves for a new book 
tilled * ‘The Coining Conflict Wife China,’' by 
Richard Bernstein and Ross H. Monro, and 
wonder Are these New China Hands the real- 
ists? 

A decade from now, will America’s smug 
supporters of China’s dominance be reviled 
as naive fellow travelers who neglected U.S. 
strategic interests while betraying U.S. prin- 
ciples? 

First let’s find out all about Wang Jun's 
road to fee White House. 

The New York Times. 


Today’s Coed Army 
Needs a Legal Drill 


By Richard Cohen 


W ASHINGTON — Ai 
Fort Dix, where I did 
my basic training, we bud- 
ding soldiers were told that 
fee infantryman was fee Ul- 
timate Weapon. No longer, 
though, can any grant be- 
lieve such nonsense. The ul- 
timate weapon in today’s 


As for Mr. McKinney, be 
said nothing like this 


MEANWHILE 


army is a charge of sexual 
harassment 

The latest to fall victim to 
ibis modern-day dumdum 
bullet is the very sergeant 
major of the army. Gene 
McKinney. The highest- 
ranking enlisted of them 

all, a 29-year veteran and a 
Legion of Merit holder, he 
was accused of sexual har- 
assment by yet another ser- 
geant major, the 'recently re- 
tired Brenda Hosier, and — 
after a principled pause — 
suspended from his job. In 
effect, he has been fired. 

As is often fee case in such 
matters, tins is a he-says, 
she- says situation in which 
what Ms. Hosier says ap- 
pears to have great credi- 
bility. Those who saw her 
interviewed on the CBS pro- 
”60 Minutes’' — I 
not — came away 
impressed. 

She alleges that when she 
was serving as Mr. McKin- 
ney’s public affairs special- 
ist, he demanded sex from 
her while on an official trip. 
She also says he grabbed her 
and kissed her. 


ou may or may not be- 
lieve him — frankly, I have 
my doubts — but feat is not 
the point. He remains, in the 
tradition for which he has 
solemnly pledged to give his 
life, innocent until found 
guilty. This, touchingly, was 
the army’s initial position. 

“We are in a country 
where allegations are not 
proven fact, where charges 
are not convictions, where 
accuse ds, no matter the se- 
riousness of fee charge, are 
not assumed guilty until 
proven guilty," said Togo D. 
West Jr., the secretary of the 
army. 

A day later, he folded. It 
toms out we Americans are 
in a country where you are 
assumed gmlty until proven 
innocent. It is but a minor 
variation on the old theme. 

As is often fee case, the 
army sounded retreat when it 
looked into the eyes of the 
Congress. 

There, various members 
wondered why drill ser- 
geants charged wife sexual 
harassment were immedi- 
ately suspended, while fee 
sergeant major was not 
Drill sergeants, though. 



are the authorized petty des- 
pots of fee troops they com- 


mand. Their powers are so 
vast that if mine suddenly 
materialized I think I would 
still bolt out of my chair and 
bellow out, “Good After- 


noon. Sir!" Sergeant majors 
never had that effect on me. 

f entertain no jolly boys- 
wiU-be-boys casualness 
about sexual harassment. It 
is serious stuff. But fee fight 
against it cannot take pre- 
cedence over traditional no- 
tions of fair play. 

In Mr. McKinney’s case, 
however, not only was he 
virtually fired from his job 
but we have now learned — 
on the front page of The New 
York Times (/ HT \ Feb. 12). 
no less — feat maybe two 
other women also have com- 
plained about him. 

“We’re not talking phys- 
ical stuff,” an anonymous 
source told The Times. ‘ ‘We 
may be talking about ap- 
proaches to women.” 


Approaches to women? Is 
is front-page news? Is this 
a firing offense? Is this even 


this 


true? We cannot, of course, 
know. But we do know that 


fee flimsiest and yet fee most 
poisonous of charges have 
been aired about a man 
whose career, 1 take it, has 
been exemplary'. 

By now. there is ample 
evidence to suggest feat fee 
military is stumbling around 
in a state of shock from Its 
various sexual scandals and 
outrages. 

A politically correct men- 
tality grips fee services. It 
seems "officers may beach 
their ships or lose their 
planes, but they better not 
commit adultery or have 
been anywhere near the 1991 
Tailhook convention. 

One navy officer had a 
promotion denied for watch- 
ing a stripper strip — not, 
mind you, for participating 
in any of fee activities that 
made Tailhook synonymous 
with barbaric behavior. 

When it comes to inte- 
grating women into what 


was a men -only occupation, 
that of warrior, the military 
has its work cut out for it- 
self. In some respects — 
joint training of men and 
women, for instance — it 
may have attempted the 
impractical. 

The rest of society 
watches transfixed: Why 
else is a single alleged epi- 
sode involving two obscure 
noncoms given front-page 
treatment? 

In Mr. McKinney's case, 
it may Uim out that he 
dehumanized Ms. Hosier, 
turning her into an object. 
But that does not excuse or 
permit his own dehumaniz- 
ation. Until guilty, he is 
innocent. 

He may no longer be 
the ultimate weapon, but fee 
presumption of innocence 
still remains our ultimate 
value. 

The Washington Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Alx>ut Swiss Neutrality 


Regarding “ What Switzerland Most 
Needs to Open Are Its Moral Accounts * r 


> Open 

(Opinion, Feb. 6) by Thomas Friedman : 
• The Swiss are surely incompetent in 


erally encircled by dangerous neigh- 
bors. 

MALCOLM BONE. 

Zurich. 


public relations. But this is no reason to 
allow Mr. Friedman to sustain his open 
season for Swiss character assassination. 

■ For half a century before fee war, fee 
Swiss accepted universal military ser- 
vice and paid high taxes to maintain the 
‘ ‘neutral posture” he so despises. Should 
the wartime leaders of Switzerland have 
announced feat those sacrifices were in 
vain and that they should now put them- 
selves under the Hiller boot? 

Instead, they did it the American way, 
leaving Western Europe, Britain, Soufe- 
1 east Asia and (by a few days) fee Soviet 
Union to fend for themselves until fee 
fortuitous infamy of Pearl Harbor 
provided fee American electorate wife 
$ome of the global education previously 
denied to it by its government and its 
media. 

HENRY A SANDQZ. 

Paris. 


We fee Swiss, do not deserve this 
discredit. We are a fastidious people, 
true, but a decent one. We are not likely 
to be extravagant, either in deeds or 
words, or to overextend ourselves, even 
for a good purpose. 

But we have a strong sense of duty and 
responsibility, and we are generous, as 
fee extent of our private contributions 
demonstrates whenever funds are being 
collected for humanitarian causes, ahd 
as is apparent, yes, in our actions in both 
world wars. 

L. BODMER. 

Zollikon, Switzerland. 


Banking Brouhaha, Swiss and Jews Ben- 
efit” (Opinion, Feb. 4), when be wrote: 
“Neutrality was better than occupation; 
it meant helping both fee Axis and the 
Allies (with Allen Dulles of the Amer- 
ican Office of Strategic Services op- 
erating a valuable likening post in 
Switzerland).” 

ARI SIGMOND. 

La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland. 


Excesses of Liberalization 


Enforcing Human Rights 


Regarding “Economic Reform and 
Safety Nets Co Together ” ( Opinion . 
Jan 9) by Bimal Ghosh: 

1 agree wife fee writer’s reasoning. 
His solution, however, is a palliative, 
not a cure. Recently, John Williamson, 
fee godfather of the “Washington con- 
sensus” on liberalization and global- 
ization, expressed fee view feat things 
have gone too ter in terms of reduction 


Abilities and 
govern- 


or abolition of state 
feat a strong state is 
ability and growth. 

Better late than never, but one hopes 
that those who have suffered severely 
from excessive measures imposed in the 
name of liberalization will be given 
rehabilitation and compensation. 

Development of an equitable and sus- 
tainable kind will never be achieved by a 
formula feat concentrates resources, 
power and riches in fee hands of an 


unaccountable elite, whether at the na- 
tional or global level. Even some of the 
major players in liberalization and glo- 
balization are beginning to acknow- 
ledge fee social and environmental ex- 
cesses inherent in the current formula. 

Correct fee excesses, integrate social, 
environmental and economic priorities 
into unified, concerted action, and 
safety nets will not be needed. 

KEVIN LYONETTE. 

Nyon, Switzerland, 


The article was unfair and unpleasant 
Presumably Mr. Friedman would have 
preferred Switzerland to have declared 
itself hostile to Nazi Germany, to have 
been swiftly swallowed up, and suffered 
fee tele of occupied Europe. In that case, 
fee Swiss Jewish community would un- 
doubtedly have been liquidated and the 
country systematically looted, including 
the banks. 

Even fee United States severely re- 
stricted the entry of European Jewish 
refugees before the outbreak of World 
War II. One need not agree wife all of 
Switzerland's actions during fee war. 
Bur feev are understandable in the con- 
text of it small, landlocked country lit- 


As a Swiss bom. after the war, I am 
ashamed of some aspects of Switzer- 
land’s position during that period. It 
succeeded, nonetheless, in mam tsFo inga 
considerable trade and financial rela- 
tionship wife fee Alfred countries, which 
was veay useful to their war effort 
If there was a moral failure vis-i-vis 
totalitarian regimes, it was feared wife 
the rest of Europe, if not by a whole 
civilization. 

. . . STEVEN BERNARD. 

Switzerland. 


Recanting “Wartime History Haunts 
the Swiss* (Feb. 10 ): ' 

The Hetze against Switzerland is 
really going too far when an article refers 
to “collaboration wife Hitler.” To col- 
laborate means “to cooperate, usually 
■willingly, wife an enemy occupying 
one’s country.” A neutral country can- 
not collaborate with another country. 
And what is meant by neutrality was 
explained clearly by William S afire ( “In 


Regarding “UN and US. Get Pres- 
sure on Rights" (Feb. 3): 

Kenneth Roth of Human Rights 
Watch is correct to criticize the United 
Nations Commission on Human Rights 
for focusing disproportionate atten- 
tion on certain countries while ignoring 
gross violations by others. Some 
commission members' attempts to re- 
form the agenda by proposing a un- 
animity clause is indeed cause for con- 
cern. Such a change could rally stall 
progress on human rights by giving any 
country veto power over fee commis- 
sion’s actions. 

The power of countries wife abysmal 
human rights records must be dimin- 
ished, not increased. Of fee 53 members 
of the commission. Freedom House, an 
independent research institute monitor- 
ing democracy and human rights, rated 
more than 20 percent “not free” and 
almost 40 percent only ‘ ‘partly free” in 
terms of political rights and civil liber- 
ties in its December 1996 annual report. 
Human rights are too important to be left 
to those who do not hold them in the 
highest regard. 

ERIC BERMAN. 

Geneva. 


BOOKS 


The writer is the executive director of 
UN Watch. 


CROSSWORD 


THE LANGUAGE OF NAMES 

By Justin Kaplan and Anne Bemays. 256 
pages. $22. Simon & Schuster. 
Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehinann-Haupt 

N OT. until fee final chapter of their 
new book do Justin Kaplan and 
Anne Bemays arrive at the philosoph- 
ical heart of fee subject they explore 
wife such variety in “The Language of 
Names. ’ ’ Here they sum up “Cratylus, ’ ’ 
Plato’s fourth-century B.C. dialogue 
about fee origin of language and nam- 
ing. 

On one side, Cratylus argues that 
names are natural and real. On the other 
side, Hennogenes says they are con- 
ventional ana arbitrary. In fee middle, 
Socrates concludes, in the authors' 
words, “feat names, being fee product 
of a rational process — language — are 
based on nature but also modified by 
convention and usage.” 

That the authors saved this summary 
for the end is probably just as well. It 
leads them to a description of the formal 
study of names, called onomastics, 
which they describe as “an ungainly 
word, wife irrelevant echoes of mastec- 
tomy, mastication, masturbation and the 
paving material called mastic.’ ’ 


accomplishment (One might argue just 
as logically feat being nominally chal- 
lenged drives you into the isolation of 
scholarship:) 


Elsewhere they note in passing feat 


“a 1971 study found there were three 
tiroes as many ‘juniors' in psychiatric 
treatment as in die general population.” 
They kindly make no connection be- 
tween this and “fee extreme case of the 
prizefighter George Foreman,” who 
named every one of his sons George. 

They report that “in 1994-1995 the 
most popular name for Hispanic boys in 
New York City and for Asian boys there 
and in San Francisco and Florida” was 
Kevin, which is the diminutive for 
“comely, beloved.” in Gaelic. 

In their chapter on black naming, they 
sensitively trace what Ebony magazine 
has called “an old and controversial 
issue.” They conclude feat black par- 
ents who are now coining neologisms as 
names — from a single public-school 
roster in Chicago they cite Bogumila, 
GonorJeaihia, Iniahase, Quadrinea, Xr- 
meng and Zikkiyyia — are simply try- 
ing to declare their children unique. 


19 Fiddle with 

20 Czech 


ACROSS 

1 Certain tdote 

■ Vet's treasure janAeak 

IS Morose sort rt Capua* ■ 

ts Worthless (music 

it They may grow company) 

up to bo bald ^ ^ 

is Relative* ■ 


as Rotafds target 

ZB Frank 
aaQo-davS 
*a Obscures 
2* Litigation 
30 Ones loaded 
with Valentine's 
gifts 
atfiefief 



33 Lacquered 
mswenre 


3* UX carrier or 
old 

3SPfcM,e.g. 

37 A/TTtOfre 

anwnathws 

40 Canoeists' 
peril 

41 'Marjorie 
Moningatar’ 
novelist 

4f Academic - 

periods: Abbr. 

44 Be to (help 

out) 

41 1964 Glenn 
Ford Him 
«• Crude 
47l 

Spec:/ 
4S"Nutsr 
4* Vermont 
quarrying town 
91 LBcasome 
modem carpets 

asEarty dwstfor 
along the Deed 
See 

as Aggravation 
M Stab, in a way 
97 Generous 
spirit 

sa Despair 


a Gay refrain 
i incapable of 
moving 
4 Hamlet, e.g. 

' s European 
border river 
alt might be 

placed in 
Nevada 
7 Name 
appendages 

•Tightwads 

• Coalition 
is Homecomings? 
ii Numbers on a 
board: Apt*. 

12 ‘Kay’ menu 


13 Natural habitat 

14 Cheery 

30 Blockheads 
z» Sincere 
a* Brought forth 

23 Product 
package into 
17‘NoWddngr 
2 f Classical 
haptad 
*i Brown and 
others 
at Was 
. emboldened 
34 Cloud 
as Japanese beer 
sa Words before . 

'9$, "97, etc. 

37 Fur 

as Baked dish 
served cold 



It leads them as well to a sampling of 
articles written on the subject, like “Ob- 


jectionable Sport Team Designations," 
“Dinosaur Place Names in Colorado" 
and “The Effect of First Names on Pier- 
ions of Female Attractiveness." 


ception 

(“The results indicated feat fee impact of 
a desirable or undesirable first name on 
attractiveness is minimal.”) 

By contrast, fee authors of “The Lan- 
guage of Names” have some fun wife 
their subject Married and, respectively, a 
biographer and a novelist, Kaplan and 
Bemays relish oddities. For instance, 
they cull a single college faculty roster to 
find names like Sherlock Bronson Gass, 
Prosser Hall Frye and Melanchihon B. 
Possoo, and coochide that having an un- 
usual name doesn’t necessarily impede 


K APLAN and Bemays even take a 
position on the Socratic debate in 
“Cratylus.” insofar as they insist that, 
whether natural or arbitrary, one’s name 
becomes essential to one’s identity. As 
they explain in their preface, they each 
feel strongly about this because of their 
own experiences growing up: Bemays 
as the daughter of a mother who 


couldn’t make up her mind whether to 
be Miss Doris E. Fleischman or Mrs. 


Edward L. Bemays; Kaplan as a child 
who was Justin until he was 7, Joseph 
until he was 12, then both thereafter, 
leaving him with “a double first-name 
identity, as well as a confusion in school 
and medical records.” 

One wishes they had gone further in 
several different directions. One wishes. 


for instance, feat they had attempted 
‘or the 


some explanation for the extreme fear of 
women that they see in men who are 
reluctant to allow their wives fee in- 


dependence of having their own 
names. 

They cite the theory of Sir James 
Frazer, author of "The Golden Bough,” 
feat, in their words, “fee human race is 
slowly crawling out of the magic mode 
up to and through the religious and will 
finally emeige in the sunlight of science 
and rationality.” But on "fee measure- 
less dread of women” that this dubious 
proposition entails, they have nothing to 
add . 

At another extreme, one wishes they 
had been even more playful. They men- 
tion Ima Hogg, the Texas hostess, and 
the fact that she actually had no sister 
named Ura Hogg. But they fail to point 
out that Bill Lear, the designer of the 
LearJet, named a daughter Shan da. And 
they make no reference at all to the 
famous exchange of letters in fee 1950s 
between fee poet Marianne Moore and 
Ford Motor Co. in which the corre- 
spondents tried to come up wife a name 
for fee new car feat fee company ended 
up calling the Edsel. Talk about the 
language of Dames! 

Still, this book has its practical uses as 
well as its entertaining ones. In a chapter 
called “Rules of Engagement; The 
Etiquette of Names,” they quote fee 
observation by the columnist William 
Raspberry feat “there are only two 
kinds of people in America: those who 
go around calling strangers and other 
nonintimates by their fust names and 
those who resent it.” 

For those who resent it. the authors 
recommend the strategy proposed by 
Judith Martin, author of “Miss Man- 
ners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct 
Behavior,” which is: “Address fee of- 
fenders by their last names, no matter 
how many times they urge you not to. If 
they tell you only a first name or say, 
'Call me Sam,’ then address feat person 
as Mr. Sam.*'' 

Then relax and curl up wife “The 
Language of Names. ” 


Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on 
the staff of The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


© New York Times/Edited by Will Shorts. 


By Alan Tmscott 


Solution to Puzzle of Feb. 13 


DOWN 


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conviction 
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■2 ft pro ceeds with 
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T HERE are two trophies 
named for fee late Albert 
, Morebead, who wrote this 
column for 28 years. One is 
awarded to the Grand National 
Team Champion, and fee other 
goes to fee winners of fee New 
England Knockout Teams. 

Morebead was South on fee 
diagramed deal, played in 
1931 at fee Lovejoy Bridge 
Studio in Manhattan. His 
three no-trump contract was 
optimistic, because his partner 
responded to rate bean with 
inadequate values. A club was 
led to the ace, and East re- 
turned the suit. Convinced 
that fee finesse of the jack 


would fail. South took fee 
king and exited wife fee jack. 

west took two dub tricks, 
on which South gave up two 
spades from fee dummy ami a 
heart from his hand. A heart 
was led to the king and ace, 
and Morebead cashed fee dia- 
mond ace. The ten suggested 
feat West held the long, for 
lacking feat card a shift to a 
diamond from a J-IG holding 
would have been likely rather 
than a heart. (Modem players 
would be guided by die prin- 
ciple of restricted choice, not 
known in those days.) 

South followed wife the 
diamond nine, preserving a 
fourth-round entry to the 
dummy. On winning with fee 
diamond king. West played a 


which gave up two 
tricks: He was squeezed later 
in fee major suits when Sooth 
took two spade tricks and two 
diamond tricks ending in the 
dummy. 

Making the game helped 
Morebead achieve a remark- 
able feat: five times in six 
games he had scores of more 
than 70 percent This made 
him very unpopular wife the 
club owner, Mrs. Lovejoy, 
who had offered a large cash 
prize for the best six scores in 
a 1 0- week period. Wife More- 
head sure to win. nobody else 
wanted to play in fee remain- 
ing weeks. She refused to pay 
the prize, but appointed him 
assistant manager at fee hand- 
some wage of $25 weekly. 


NORTH 
4 Q J 854 

68532 

*85 


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bidding; 

South 

West 

North 

East 

19 

Pass 

1* 

Pass 

3 NT. 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

West led the drib three. 



\ 



iklll Si *»»»!****** ** %*”»*«« * 


PAGE 2 


PSTEBNATIONAI. BT PBAT H TRIBUNE, SATllRDAY-SUNPAy, FEBRUARY tA W 7 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 



D | N I N • 


At the Table, 
Odes to the 
Southwest 


P ARIS — While many of France's top- 
ranking chefs continue to bicker about 
the future of their indusny — shall we 
or shall we not remain traditional 
French? — Alain Dutoumier continues along on 
his own, well-chosen way. Along with his wife, 
Nicole, Dutoumier runs two of the city's steadiest 
and most stable establishments, always creating 
trends rather than slavishly following them. 

Perhaps it's because more than many other 
elevated French chefs, Dutoumier has true roots 
in the country, the southwest of France, that 
continue to nourish his mind and his souL He’s 
also a serious eater and a lover of good times , and 
that passion shows in his food and on his table. 

That’s not to say he’s not affected by France’s 
tough economic times. I remember the days 
when a two-week wait was standard for a table at 
the cozy Belie Epoque Au Trou Gascon, just off 
Place Felix Eboue in. the 12th arrondissemenL 
The other weekday evening, the restaurant was 
one-third full, despite the bargain 285 -franc 
(S50) menu that assures wine "jusqu'a plus 
soif," until you’re no longer thirsty! Diners in 
search of honest value and serious food could do 
much worse than dig into Au Trou Gascon’s 
classic paid chaud, a warm and soothing foie gras 
and potato terrine. Or better yet, a platter of 
sparkling fresh oysters accompanied by grilled 
homemade sausages. 

Main course offerings include an astonishing 
platter of roasted brebis, tender lamb from the 
southwest, with a rich, robust flavor not soon to be 
forgotten. As ever, the intensely flavored sheep V 
mili c cheese served with a tiny salad forms a 
perfect close. Accompanying the 285-franc menu 
are the Tursan blanc and the dark, vigorous 
Madiran, the red from Domaine Capmartin. 

Note that die restaurant is now open on Sat- 
urday nights. 

THI MANDEB PLACE At the “big house,” Du- 
toumier’s Carre des Feuillants off Place 
Vendome, the chef continues to innovate and 
upgrade. The 11-year-old restaurant has re- 
ceived a minor face-lift, with new art on the 
walls and a new menu, but die same rustic- 
elegant charm continues to attract a faithful 
clientele. Dutoumier’s food has never bear bet- 
ter or showed greater maturity. His flavors are 
clean, clear and without confusion, and his mar- 
riages of flavors and textures continue along a 
solidly innovative lioe. _ 

Favorites of a recent dinner include a soothing 
layered ‘‘gateau” of nutty Jerusalem artichokes, 
black mimes and foie gras, a perfectly seasonal 
opener that marries the noble truffle and foie gras 
with the highly underutilized topinambour. But 
my preferred dish of the moment is his expertly 
roasted baby, milk-fed lamb from die Pyrenees, 
served with a delicious escauton of com, actually 
a coarse polenta stuffed with fresh black truffles. 

Desserts fallow form, with an updated version 
of a classic — pears poached in sweet muscat 
wine and served with a vibrant ginger and rose- 
mary ice cream. 

Wine lovers are always in for a treat here, with 
a chance to sample a different glass of wine with 
each course on the truffle menu or to discover 
various wines by die glass a la carte. Some 
discoveries include such rare wines as Romania's 
sweet Murfatlar from the chardonnay grape, and 
Hungary's sweet and aromatic Tokaji Aszu. 

Au Trou Gascon. 40 Rue Taine, Paris 12; tel: 
01-13-44-34-26. Closed Sunday. Credit Cards: 
American Express, Diners Club, Visa. 190-franc 
lunch menu; 285 -franc dinner menu f including 
service and winel. A la carte. 235 to 4 10 francs, 
including service bid not wine. 

Carre des Feuillants. 14 Rue de Castiglione, 
Paris I: tel: 01-42-86-82-82 , Closed Saturday 
lunch and all day Sunday. Credit cards: Amer- 
ican Express. Diners Club. Visa. 285 franc 
lunch menu, inchuling sen' ice but nor wine; 850- 
franc truffle menu. A la carte. 470 to 610 francs, 
including service but not vine. 


By Patricia Wells 

Inumarianal Herald Tribune 


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The old Korea stands side by side with the new: pagoda and park against the skyscrapers and a market scene in Seoul; below, Kunjonjon Pavilion at Kyongbokkung Palace. 

Beyond the Crowds to the Heart of Seoul 


By Neil Weinberg 

S EOUL — If you're among the swelling 
ranks making the corporate rounds in 
Seoul these days don’t despair. Yes, 
Seoul is bigger, uglier and more 
crowded than ever. But it’s also packed with 
cultural diversions, virtually free or street crime 
and still a good place to shop. 


nightclub and duty-free shops. Room charges 


drat once launched charter shopping flights from 
the U.S. West Coast are fewer and harder to find 
these days. Prosperity has also spawned hor- 
rendous gridlock, so getting around Seoul is 
more unpredictable than ever. 

Count on an hour to get from Kiznpo In- 
ternational Airport to most hotels. Since few 
first-class properties have sprouted up since the 
1988 Seoul Olympics even though the flow of 
businessmen and Japanese tourists has increased 
steadily, the city's best hotels are busy places 
these days. It pays to book early. 

Given the traffic, you should also carefully 
consider your choice among Seoul’s 10 or so 
deluxe hotels. Smack in the center of town is the 
Hotel Lotte. Virtually a city withlnacity, Lotte’s 
labyrinth of underground shopping arcades and 
the Lotte Department Store contain just about 
everything you could desire. Two quieter 
choices nearby: the elegant Westin Chosun. 
which served as General Douglas Mac Arthur’s 
headquarters during the Korean War, and the 
Seoul Plaza Hotel near City HalL 

■ooms with A viaw Other good though 
slightly less convenient choices are the Hilton 
International, up Namsan Mountain from Seoul 
Station, and the Grand Hyatt, five minutes by 
cab from the It’aewon shopping district Both 
offer attractive city views, attentive service and a 
bit of refuge from the city. The Hotel Inter- 
Continental and new Ritz Carlton also rate well 
but are several miles south and could cost you 
dearly in commuting time. Farther out still is the 
Sheraton Walker Hill with a casino open to 
foreign visitors. 

Seoul's best hotel is probably the Shilla. A 
few miles east of Lotte, it is the choice of many 
heads of state and corporate bigwigs. Executive- 
floor rooms come with Mercedes-Benz airport 
limousine service and use of a secretary and 
butler. 

AU leading hotels offer business centers, fit- 
ness clubs, pools, several restaurants, a 






corporate discounts. 

Much of Seoul’s best non-Korean dining is 
still found in hotels, with a number of good 
choices. Try the Chosun’s Ninth Gate for nou- 
velle cuisine or the Shilla’s Palsun for an elegant 
Chinese meal. 

Of course the real culinary treat is Korea’s own 
spicy fare. For pulgogi (Korean barbecue) a good 
bet is Woo Lae Oak, a short cab ride from the city 
center (brandies in New York, Wash- ■ 
ington and Los Angeles). The de- 
cor and service are no-frills but 
the marinated beef; cooked 
at your table and eaten 
wrapped in lettuce with 
red pepper paste and 
garlic, is among the 
best Dinner, includ- 
ing a bowl of cold i 
noodles to extin- / 
gukb your nuxph, I 
runs $30 to $50 pw I 
person. 1 

Another Korean i 
treat is Dae Won \ 

Gak, a beautifully 
landscaped restaurant 
snaking up the side of a 
hill north of the city. 

Book in advance for four 
or more people and you’ll 
be served in a private thatched 
cottage surrounded by pots of — 
fdmchi and farm tools. The set menu 
($80 per parson) includes course after course of 
Korean delicacies — vegetable fritters, sauteed 
squid, barbecued beef, grilled fish, kimchi and 
Korean sashimi, among others. 

Fora buffet meal and Korean dance show try 
Korea House. Sanch'on in the Insa^dong arts 
and-crafis-district is a more quaint eat-and-be- 
entertauied combo. The restaurant is run by Kim 
Yon Shik, a former Buddhist monk, and serves a 
course of vegetarian temple cuisine ($30). 
Dance and drum performances begin at 8 P_M. 

For sightseeing, Seoul’s three main palaces 
are well worth a look. A short walk from central 
hotels is Toksugung Palace, notable for its beau- 
tiful 15tir-centtny-style buildings -and out-of- 
place neoclassical addition in tire rear. 

Kyongbokkung Palace, one mile north, is a 


KIDS 






sprawling complex first built in the 14th century 
feat’s ideal for an afternoon strolL The grounds 
house the National Folk Museum and, until 
recently, were also home to the National Mu- 
seum of Korea. The govenmeitt recently razed 
the Japanese colonial building housing the state 
ait collection as an affront to the nation, seven 
years before the replacement will be complete. 
Until tfaen, only a small part of it is oaview ata 
temporary site inside Kyongbokkung. 

Seoul’s third grand palace, Ch’angdokknng, 
is still home to members of the royal ramify and 
requires a guide. English-language tours are 
available three times a day and include 
- palace h i hiding s and the 78-acre 

Pi won (Secret Garden). 
Korean War veterans and 
history buffs shouldn't 
miss the War Memorial 
Museum. Completed 
in 1994nearfeelt'ao- 
■ won shopping dis- 
trict, fee spacious 
grounds contain a 
lame collection of ■ 
military , hardware 
— everything from 
a B-52 bomber to 
Soviet tanks. Inside 
is an impressive ex- 
hibit of Korea’s mil- 
itary history. If short of 
time, skip to the Korean 
War exhibits. 

For contemporary art 
fans, two good choices are the 
— Ho- Am Art Gallery in central 

Seoul and the Museum of Contem- 
porary Art, one houraway by cab. Another worth- 
while day nip from Seoul is the Korean Folk 
VDIage. The oiltural capital of Kyongju is about 
four hours south by train. 

Seoul’s other big attraction is shopping. 
Though you might not buy much, don’t miss 
Namdaemun (South Gate) Market, Korea's 
largest general wholesale market Its 1,200-plus . 
shops and stalls sprawl for several blocks be- 
tween the Chosun and Hilton hotels. On sale is 
everything from designer knock-offs to deer- 
antler extract and cooked pig's beads. 

Insa-dong is the most reliable place in town to 
buy crafts and antiques, including celadon and 
white porcelain pottery, carved wooden masks 
and prints. Not far from the city center, Insa- 
dong also has many restaurants and coffee 


houses (including Sanch’on) and can make far a 
pleasant night out. 

- For a glimpse of Seoul's fashion scent, check 
out Myocg-dang east of the Hotel Lotte. But be 
forewarned: Or weekends it's a teenage mob 


- More upscale is newly trendy Apkujong-dong 
south of the Han River and home to thousands of 
Korea’s nouveau riche. The main drag, nick- 
named Rodeo Drive, is anchored by the Galleria 1 
and Hyundai department stares, two of Seoul’s 
most exclusive. boutiques, restaurants and cof- 
fee houses (many wife English menus but few 
foreigners) trickle for blocks along die thor- 
oughfare and narrow surrounding streets. Ap- 
kujong is most alive at night when designer 
clothes, flashy cars (preferably imported) and 
potable phones are de rigueur. 

For down-to-earth shopping, It'acwon is still 
year best bet The area originally served fee IDS. 
Eighth Army base nearby andretams some qf the 
bawdy attraction and tar gjris who frequented ^ 
even upscale hotels in a. less prosperous era. 
.It’aewon also includes 1,500 shops specializing .. 
in clofemg. .stwes, Jqggage, . handcrafts and : 
spotting goods. 

It isn't Savfle Row but many business trav- . 
elers pick up tailored suits, shuts and leather , 
goods. Suits run from around $300 to $2,000, 
depending on the shop and fabric. Some tailors 
will turn around jobs m as little as a day or two,-: 
but remember: You get what you pay form time 
and money. 

T AILORED cashmere coats start at roughly 
$700, leather jackets at $100 and cotton 
shirts at $2Q. It pays to shop around and 
bargain. Another option are the tailors in and 
around die major hotels, where suits start at 
aroand $800 and require two days to a week from 
the first fitting. 

Also check out the many off-fee-rack bargains 
and antique Korean furniture. Chosun Antiques 
east of the Hamilton Hotel sells antique and 
“old” chests of drawers, medicine cases and 
other items from about $300 to several thousand 
dollars. Most shops will ship overseas but be 
sure to specify door-to-port or door-to-door de- ; 
livery. 

The Korea National T ourist Organization is a 
good source for travel information. It has offices 
m major cities abroach 

Ned Weinberg is the Tokyo bureau chief of 
Forbes. 




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HobateUUrr 


_ 0 jecting her panenteto a battery of tests including 

By Susan Keselenko Coll a pop quiz and an IQ test, and a driver’s test with 

such questions as whether yon can legally eat a 

W ASHINGTON — Not so very sandwich while driving in toe United States. 

long ago, a lame coloring book or Several of the card games were also fun, 

a deck of cards — maybe even a particularly University Games' travel version of 
set of magnetic checkers if one Truth or Dare, which kept everyone occupied 
was really lucky- — were among the few tools for long stretches but, alas, requires participants 
available to distract the kid who was otherwise to double-check the color of their underwear or 
intenton opening the aircraft's emergency exitor pour water ova - thedr heads orgive an occasional 
on doing handstands in fee backseat of fee car. bloodcurdling scream — activities which may 
An increasing number of simple but inno- not be appreciated by fellow passengers, 
v alive travel games have begun to appear rat the Other card games —- some civilized enough 

market, ranging from minature versions of fa- to encourage adult participation — include 
miliar board gam es to activity books, card games, ASAP, the Quick-Think game, as well as amire- 
and puzzles. Jeff Pinsker, of University Games, Lag spins on old games, such as Old Bachelor 
based in Burlingame, California, notes that oyer and Near- Violent. PoliticaHy-Correct War. 
the past four or five years travel games have Chronicle Books’ card decks of 52 Fun Things 
become more interactive, and are not simply to Do in fee Car, or, alternatively, on the Plane, 
intended to keep the kids quiet in the backseat also offer good diversions. 

The champs are good that, if y our child is old There is, of course, a distinction between 

enough to drool, then someone out there. tas games that are simply small enough to travel 
designed a product to amuse even fee most with, and gamds that can cross continents intact, 
implacable traveler. Ai least for a minute or with out having their co untle ss bits strewn 
two, ' throughout an .aircraft, or stuffed irretrievably 

In a random sampling of about 40 books and behind the car upholstery. Hotshot Basketball, 
games, Milton Bradley's Clue Jr. was one of the for example, was an instant hit with my son. but 
more popular items with my children, aged 11, with its tmy balls, It would be better stashed in a 
8, and 7. Not only is the game entertaining, but suitcase for later nse than played on an airplane 
itis well designed for tram, with a minimum of tray table. 

losable pieces. " " .One of the more creative puzzles — albeit 

■ • : one with smallish, losable pieces — is “Rush 

The Sandwich Quutiom . to recentiy retased by Binary Arts Cor- 

. .. porauon. The ‘traffic jam puzzle” presents a 

“Kids Travel,” a “Backsear Survival Kit” series of vehicular snaris, fee goal being to get 
put out byKlotz Press, was also a big Ml The one’s own automobile free of a tangle or trucks 
book advertises itself as .“Complete, wife andcars.lt is also good practice for becoming a 
everything we could possibly think ofr" and >aiiring garage attendant one day. 
indeed, has kept my U-year-old daughter ghied ... . There is do shortage of travel workbooks avail- 
to the kitchen table for fee past week, learning, abk which, in my experience, are always goodfor 
sign language and decoding messages and sub- -lriJEngan hour or two. Rand McNally, for one. 


puts out a range of “backseat books,” which 
feature puzzles and mazes and taamteasas. - 
For the very young traveler, of course, pray- 
ers for a swift arrival are probably more useful 
than 10 overhead compartments filled with fee 
newest fengled games. Still, there are a few 
items worth checking out: 

Hungry Hungry Hippos — where two plastic 
hippos compete to gobble up the most plastic 
tails — was recentiy introduced in a travel- 
sized version. While fee game is perhaps not the 
most intellectually challenging, it is at least 
packaged such that it is impossible to Itise the 
pieces unless your toddler has slipped a sledge- 
hammer into the diaper bag 

A POCKET-SIZED Etch A Sketch comes 
with a book of games and Instructions 
on how to develop one’s latent Etch A 
SKetcb talents by drawing good-looking curves 
and diagonals, as well as the more advanced art 
of writing Egyptian hieroglyphs, or drawing 
Pi<**es °f pancakes stuck to the ceiling. 

_ feere is the One fish two fish red fish go 
S ame - which comes wife a cassette of 

fee Seuss Book and is designed to make tlte 

Cio Rsh card game at least somewhat more 
fra* parents and children alike. 
Schlepping along every game on the market is, 

of course, no guarantee of a painless journey, but 

who has traveled long disten os s with 
small dzudnai can testify, no price is too high for 
to t rep 6 ** on why one chose to 
bong the lads on a 12-hour flight in the firet place, 
fteafes, you never know what you might leam. It 
. ti> eat a sandwich and drive at the 
toe m fee United States, but one is advised to 
cneck wife local authorities in other countries. 

Keselenko CoU is a Washington-based 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


PAGE 11 



s* . s *a 


M 


4, 

SI, 


_ T HE HEQUEMT traveler 


Internet Tickets : A Skeptic’s View 

“ By Roger Collis home and I give up after 45 minutes; the rambling cm short-haul flights within 

* ffTWria,w * *i*mU Ttih uiu> line always ringsbusy.. Europe. Debonair's fleet of BAe 146- 

T HE Internet ! s ™ u i L - . “We believe that travelers will see the 200 “whisper jets” has been fitted with 

the travel kteroetmore an infor mational than a seat-back video touch screens. Passen- 

some oundits^ ^ according to transachonalmedmirL Yon live in Paris, gers have a choice of 20 movies, video 
travelers the * - "““X ^ to Zurich or New York regulariyon games, such as Soper Mario and Batman 



By Roger Collis 

l ntet ™fo » wi Herald Tribal 

T SJSS?!®?, “ revolutionizing 

the travel industry, according to 
some pundns. But for many 
travelers the Internet is still 

Kriora f wa^m nlUre P 1 Wound than a 
S Th^ fi y ^5* a sales trip to 
Aaa. The future ts still tomorrow. 

so you’ve signed ud with a 

ORlff America 

P™® or Microsoft Network, and 
logged on. If you know exactly what you 

s~ 3 ^ 2«rvB.n?: 

engine like Yahoo, AltaVista, or Web- 


pum wnere you start surfing 
around. It s trial and error. Next stage 
may be searching within, say, an airline 

Site fOT a flight nnrl knnlnn* Tv 


home and I give m> after 45 minutes; the 
line always rings busy. 

“We believe that travelers will see the 
Internet more as an informational than a 
transactional medium. Yon live in Paris, 
fly to Zurich or New York regularly on 
business, yon know the jams, die car- 
riers. It seems reasonable to think: you 
might log on, check availability, book 
tickets electronically. That's what we 
define as simple low-risk transactions. 
But say you live in London, you want to 
come over to Orlando with your family, 
never been here before, you don't know 
the ah tires, tire hotels. That to ns is a 
complex, high-risk transaction, where 
you wouldn't want to use the Internet.” 

A MAJOR WORRY Gerald McKewan, 
information develnmnmt nunaMr. 


travel and transporation, at IBM in Lon- 
don, says: “Security is a major weary 
that everybody has. When yon send a 


rambling on short-haul flights within 
Europe. Debonair’s fleet of BAe 146- 
200 '‘whisper jets” has been fitted with 
seat-back video touch screens. Passen- 
gers have a choice of 20 movies, video 
games, such as Super Mario and Batman 
or electronic poker, blackjack and slot 
machines. To get started you pull down 
the tray in front of yon and swipe your 
credit card through it. 

But what happens if an executive 
loses die corporate shirt, as it were, by 
playing five-stud poker with corporate 
plastic? 

“With gambling, you set your own 
limit,' ’ Mancassola says. “But as we 
.put back more than 96 percent of the 
takings, the chance of you losing a great 
deal of money is remote. You can win 10 


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**■ Are you happy about the prospect of 
;. sending your credit card details into 
? cyberspace for anyone to intercept? 
r . *5*“* Yesawich, president and CEO 

* of ^ Yesawich, Pepperdine & Brown in 
: Onando, Florida, co-publishers with 

- Y^tkelovitch Partners of the Business 

* Travel Monitor, says: “While 11 percent 

, of business travelers tell us they consult 

* rite Internet for travel information, only 

- four percent have made reservations on 
■ the Net But 55 percent of travelers say 
‘ they would be raterested in using the 
■' Internet to to get information on travel or 

make a reservation. That's a huge gap. 

“The Internet is like the Wild west 
right now. It’s a very disorganized, 
chaotic kind of process that people have 
to go through when they don't quite 
know where to go. It takes as long as 
nine months for service providers to get 
listed in these search-engines because 
there's been such an avalanche of new 
products that people are trying to put up 
on the Net Access is so congested to the 
point where people can't get on. I tried 
to log on AOL [America Online] at 


A^-aai Xli i Ui uuui UW T»DU bUG VJ 

another, yon have absolutely no control 
over where that message goes — any- 
body can intercept it. Lots of people out 
there playing with algorithms. ’ ’ 

“The biggest obstacle, in my view, is 
lack of user-friendliness,” Yesawich 
says. "‘People will just not have the 
patience and take the time; busy signals 
and so forth. It’s easier to pick □» the 
phone and call your travel agency. Right 
now the Internet takes slot of energy. A 
fascinating tiling 'for people to dabble 
with; but I don’t think it will funda- 
mentally alter the landscape — certainly 
in terms- of how travel is transacted — 
until we have touch screens, simple pro- 


cedures, and more discipline in cyber- 
space. Forty percent of people who 
bought a PC last year tell us they spend 
more time tryingto figure outhow to use 
it than using iL That’s my point.’ ’ 


Deb onair — a “no-frills” airline 
based at London’s Luton Airport — 
claims to be the first carrier to offer in- 
flight movies, electronic games and 


you can. lose is £200 [about $320J.If you 
lose it all, the screen goes blank. I’ve 
played three times for two hours at a 




M7. A UU Will 9UIUC, JUU 1WC 8VUK, & 

system is more designed to entertain." 

But, of course, whatever the max- 
imum stake, should you lose, there is 
nothing to stop you swiping another 
card to start again. 


A simple way to compare frequent- 
flier plans is how much yon have to 
travel on a particular route to earn free 


Carlson Wago nlit Travel has com- 
pared eight FFPs on the basis of how 
many round-trips in business-class are 
required to earn a free round-trip econ- 
omy ticket on selected routes from Lon- 
don. Here are some examples: 

London-Paris: British Airways, 2.81; 
British Midland, 3.0, Air UK, 7.14; Air 
France, 5.0, Enrostar, 5J3. 

London-New York: British Airways, 
4.86; Continental, 3.57; American Air- 
lines, 5.78; United Airlines, 5.77; Vir- 
gin Atlantic, 2.89. 

London-Tokyo: British Airways, 
13 J; Virgin Atlantic, 2.41; Japan Air- 
lines, 3.53. 


THE CAR COLUMN 




-V, 



A New Roofline in Mercedes SKL 


By Gavin Green 


O NE of the many novel fea- 
tures of the new Mercedes 
SLK is that you can’t buy it 
The waiting list for delivery 
stretches well into 1999 in most coun- 
tries. Ins read of trying to butter up po- 
tential customers and come on all 
' smooth and smarmy, the car salesmen at 

: Mercedes are almost dying to deter cus- 
; tomers — at least until the waiting list 
starts to dwindle. 

The car’s appeal is no surprise. Mer- 
‘ cedes seems to style either supennod- 
els-in-steel (latest SL, old S-cuus, old 
E-class wagons) or gawky if massively 
imposing eyesores (latest 5-class, re- 
cent CL coupe). 

But when Mercedes does well, it does 
• very very well, and it hasn't done much 
better than the new SLK. It looks gor- 
geous. Add the unmatched kudos of the 
r three-pointed star and a surprisingly low 
; price, and it all adds up to aching de- 
i suability. 

; what elcc •« niw? Apart from the 
i fact that Mercedes dealers don’t have 
. any to sell, other novelties include a 
: supercharged engine (only quirky Bnt- 
: ish makers Aston Martin and Jaguar 
currenttv use a similar type of forced 
' induction) and a metal roof that does 
i more gymnastics when being either 


raised or lowered than Olga Korbut in 
•her heyday. At the push of a button , that 
roof lifts off and bends and then folds 
into the trunk to give — presto — a 
slinky full convertible. 

The advantages in top-up mode over 
a rag roofer are obvious. Better looks 
(canvas roofs always look like unsightly 
excrescences atop dainty sports cars) 
and greater security too. 

There's just one big drawback. When 
folded in the trunk, it takes up about half 
the capacity. And, what's more, it folds 
co top of your luggage. To get out big 
bags, you need to put up the roof again. 

Like everything else in life, convert- 
ible roof designs are compromises. And 
it seems tome that the magic metal roof 
of the SLK is, on balance, a boon in corf 
Northern European orJapmese climates, 
where you’ll mostly be in cop-up trim. 
But in southern Fiance or Southern Cali- 
fornia — where rain is about as common 
as an intellectually uplifting episode of 
“Baywatch" — having to lift and fold 
the roof merely to getro the Louis Vnit- 
ton strikes me as being a bit of a hassle. 
Where are sales likely to be greatest? In 
Southern California, of course. 

The great looks extend to the cabin. 
Although the mock carbon-fiber dash 
panels are a little suspect — at least it 
makes a change from gray plastic — the 
big round white instruments ringed by 
delicate chrome are as lovely as any 
watch fax- The switches too are tag and 


chunky and substantial and reinforce the 
impression of solidity, which is the hall- 
mark of all Mercedes cars. The solidity 
extends to tire driving experience: Here 
is one convertible that is as rattle-free and 
rigid as a machined chunk of metaL 
Performance from the supercharged 
four-cylinder engine is strong, but the 
motor does not make the inspired music 
that engines from BMW and Porsche 
do. Sure, you can go fast, but the mu- 
sical accompaniment sounds rather 
limp, a bit like trying to do hard exercise 
to “The Birdie Song.” The handling 
and ride are first rate. 


W ELL, OJC, it could sound 
better and maybe the fold- 
away roof design is flawed if 
you never need to put the roof np, but Td 
still love an SLK and I'd buy one over the 
equally new BMW 23 or Porsche Bol- 
ster convertibles. If only they’d let me. 

• Mercedes-Benz SLK. About 
$45,000. Fbur-cylinder supercharged 
engine, 2295cc, 193 BHP at 5J500 rpm. 
Five-speed automatic gearbox (five- 
speed manual also available). Top 
speed: 227 kph (141 mph). Acceler- 
ation: 0-100 kph in 7.4 seconds. Average 
fuel consumption: 11.4 liters/100 km. 

Next: Opel Vectra turbodiesel 

Gavin Green is the editor in chief of 
Car magazine. 


ARTS GUIDE 


1 BRITAIN 

TbteSSSy. tel: (151) 
dosed Mondays. Tb Aprfl 13- 
■■Paula Rego." Works by tt» 1 
tuauese painter {bom 1935) JJJ" 
cK^a selection of Eta**"* 8 ** 
preparatory drawings. Know" tor 
SSarge. narrative paintingsm ac- 
rytic or pastel, Rf9° '"j*® 
tween extremes to JjJ® 

areas of ambivalence wftch con- 
dition ourUves. 

nSSAcademy of Arts, ^ 7 I? 

494-5615. open daily. To jJPJjL« 
“Rraoue* The Late Works. 
Throughout hte life, Braque re- 
pea toSy relumed to the idees^ and 
ffiimsues of the early y ears of the 


Rosemary Joshua and Harry van 
der Kamp. Feb. 24, 26, 28- 

Ru» 

Grand Palais, tat 01-44-13-17- 
17, dosed Mondays. Continuing/ 
To May 26. “Angkor et Dot Siectes 
cfArt Khmer." 150 stone, bronze 
and wood statues from Cambodia, 


lastSOyeara, tjh » 

gSsswgs 

^ST^PalrtclaBardon, 


UOUMM I1WIU uw 

Opera Comlque, tel: 01-42-44- 
45-46. Benjamin Britten’s “Owen 
Wing rave." Directed by Pierre Bar- 
rat. conducted by SoottSandmeter 
and sung by PT ' ppe Le Chevalier/ 
Jacques-Francofs Lofeeteur des 
Loogchamns and Christian Tag- 
uter. Feb. 21. 22, 24 and 25. 

■ EH MANY I Z 


MlARCH 

HausderKunst, tab (89)21 1-270, 
open daily. To April 13: "Richard 
Undner Paintings and WWercoi- 
ors, 1 943-1977.” The exhtoition in- 
troduces the bold, iconic figures^ 

the Qwman-bom Annerican artist 
corset-dad women, child proefl- 

(rjes. archetypes from New York's- 
underworld and caricataea. 

EZ»r«" 

KjUUfMMA 

Yokohama Huwuin of Art, tat 
( 45 ) 221-0300, dosed Thursdays 
(except March. 20) and March 21. 


To March 30; “Absolute Land- 
scape: Between Illusion and Real- 
ity." The show presenting land- 
scapes In photography indudes 97 
works by 16 contemporary pho- 
tographers. such as Lewis Baltz. 
lany Clark, Noritoshi Htrakawa 
and Ma XJao-Huare. 

E»»niu«»~ 

AHSTXRDAai 

Rqksmusetan, tet (20) 673-2121 , 
open daily. To M^4; “Rritecfions 
on the Everyday. Dutch Genre 
Prints (torn the 1 Sth and 1 7th cen- 
tury." Prints of everyday-Sa 
scenes by woodcut artists and en- 
gravers. Lucas van Leyden. Ron* 
brendt and Adriaen van Ostade are 
rapmsented. 

■ IEAIH ~ 

Muno 

Teatro de La Zarzuela, tel; (1) 
524-5400. ROSSWS "Tbnawfi." 
Directed by Pier Luig} Pizza, con- 
ducted by AfcertoZfedda, with Mar- 
Urn Dupuy, Stanford Olsen and 
Bote Martteovlc.Feb.20, 22.24, 26 
and 28. 

■ >!iiT .»nnr 

Natw York - 

Me tro poftan Museum of Mod- 
em Arttei: (212) 5703791, 


dosed Mondays, lb May 4: “The 
Florane M. Schoenborn Bequest 
Artists at the School of Paris." The 
bequests Include three paintings 
by George Braque, six by Picasso, 
and single paintings by De Chirico, 
Dubuffet Roger de La Fresrtaye. 
Juan Gris, Fernand Leger, Joan 
Mira, Modigliani, and Georges 
Rouault Two sculptors, Con- 
stantin Brancusi and Henri Ma- 
tisse, are also represented. 

New Museum, tel: (212) 219- 
1355. dosed Mondays and Tues- 
days, lb Aprfl 1 3: “Remote: Airmail 
Paintings.' 11 Features paintings by 
Eugenio Dittbom. In the 1980s, the 
Chilean artist began sending ftis 
paintings through international air- 
man to exhibitions around the 
world to circumvent state censor- 
ship and boycotts Imposed from 
other countries to protest that re- 
gime. 

Wasmmqton ’ 

Corcoran Gaflery of Art, te<; (202) 
639-1703, dosed Tuesdays. To 
April 7: “Joyful Noise: The Art of 
Lari Pittman.” Comprehensive sur- 
vey of the Los Angdes4iased artist 
(bom 1052). Pitmen explores ln- 
dfvidual Identity and celebrates the 
idealism of American culture. His 
works are made of Juxtapositions 
of apparently unrelated images, 
exclamatory text and colorful dec- 
orations. 



GOOD TRAVEL DEALS 




BRITISH 

AIRWAYS 

CITY BIRD 


CZECH 

AIRLINES 


ELAL 


Paris to New York 

Brussels to United 
Stales/Mexico 

London to Prague 
Paris to Tel Aviv 


Britain to Qdtt/AsuJ 
Africa/Australia 


London to Sydney 


London to Ireland 
or Scotland 



Economy round-trip for 1,995 francs ($355). Conditions apply. Until 
Dec. 32. 

One-way fares with start-up airline: New York, from 6315 Belgian francs 
($185); Mranu/Odando, 8315 francs; Los Angeles/San Francisco, 9,815 
francs; Mexico City, 10.980 francs. Tel: (32-2) 752-52-52. 

Midweek round-trip with one night at Forum Hotel (no Saturday night 
restriction) for £279 ($453) saves 50 percent on normal fare. Fregara 
Travel tel; (44-171) 451-7000. 

Round-trip for 1,990 francs ($354). Minimum stay: Saturday night; 
maximum stay: one month. For departure before April 2. 


First- and business-class passengers from London to Dubai, or onward 
destinations in Africa, Asia or Australia can claim a free economy ticket 
upon their return for the route they have traveled. This ticket is flexible 
and transferable and is valid for one year. 


Business-class round trip for£l ,843 ($2,990), via Amsterdam, includes 
optional stopovers in Singapore in each direction and four domestic 
flights in Australia on Ansea Airlines. Same fare from some provincial 
cities in Britain. Travel must be completed by June 30. Trail finders: tel: 
(44-171) 938-3444. 


“Friends Fly Free” promotion offers two-for-one on low-fare 
flexible fares on all Ryanair services which include London 
(Stansted)-DublinyCork/KnockyGlasgow. Tickets available until 
Feb. 28. Travel by March 12. 


Round trip from London or provincial airports for £323 ($525). 
Minimum stay seven days. Travel must be completed by March 30. 
Trailfinders: tel: (44-171) 938-3939. 



HYATT 


MARCO POLO 


NEW YORK 
HILTON & 
TOWERS 


Beijing 


Asia-Pacific 


Xiamen, China 


New York 


($178). Until March 27. 


Forty percent discount off published rates on all rooms. This 
includes American buffet breakfast; room upgrade; 20 percent 
discount on laundry; late check-out; for Priority Club members. 
Until March 15. 


“Great Deal” promotion offers up to 45 percent off normal rates at 39 
properties. Until Feb. 28. 


50 percent off published prices at newly opened lakeside hotel, 15 
minutes from airport. Discounted rates start at $95. Until Feb 28. 


“Business Saver” rate of $199 a night includes free local calls and fax, 
and use of fitness center. Until March 31 . 


M tTT cwsMV dMKhB Itaw pious b« torvwamM Ah mmd apeM maty b» unmw o< ltwi), or imabto to book ihwn. 


Dante's Peak 

Directed by Roger Donald- 
son. US. 

As foe camera pans down die 
mountain to foe town where a 
Pioneer Days festival is taking 
place, you’re counting foe 
minutes before foe eruption 
wipes it all away. like nigh! 
follows day, foe blast is com- 
ing. “Dame’s Peak” is pre- 
dictable from start to finish, 
but foe video-game style ac- 
tion and effects never let up 
long enough for you to re- 
member how absurd it all is. 
It’s a blast Other than foe 
quaint little town waiting to 
get buried, what boilerplate 
ingredients do we have? 
There’s foe Dashing Loner 
(Pierce Brosnan, surprisingly 
engaging), a volcanologist 
carrying foe torch far his 
sweetie who was killed by a 
volcano; foe lovely single 
mean (Linda Hamilton), also 
mayor of foe little town; her 
two smart-aleck kids; her 
surly ex-mother-in-law, who 
won’t evacuate; foe adorable 
pooch (I wonder who gets 
“lost” in the eruption?); a 
team of experts who don’t 
agree with tne Dashing Loner 
that foe mountain’s about to 
blow; and a slew of vehicles 
unattended and ready 
whenever foe Dashing Loner 
needs one. You get foe pic- 
ture. (>i to foe important stoff: 
special effects. “Twister”? 
Kiirget it “Independence 
Day’’? Ha! This is a whole 


National Museum of Women In 
the Arts, tel: (202) 783-5000, open 
daily. To May 4. "A History of Wo- 
men Photographers." The exhib- 
ition presents 234 images made 
between 1850 and 1975 in Europe, 
the Americas and parts of Aria by 
more than 200 photographers, in- 
cluding the pictoriaflsts Julia Mar- 
garet Cameron and Gertrude 
Kasebier, the documentarian 
Dorothea Lange; the modernists 
Imogen Cunningham, Tma 

Modotf. Usatte Model and Diane 
Arbus; toe photqjoumalists Mar- 
garet Bourke-White and Mary El- 
ian Mark, and postmodernist Cindy 
Sherman. 

CLOSING SOON 

Feb. 15: “Retrospective Giorgio 
MoranCB." Musee Mafltot, Paris. 
Feb. 16: “Tiepolo und de Zefchan- 
kunst Venedigs (Tiepolo and the 
Venetian Sketches);' Staata- 
galerte, Stuttgart 
Fab. 16: “Edouard Baidus: Haflo- 
gravuras.” Art Gaflery of Ontario, 
Toronto. 

Feb. IB: “Ferdinand Hodler.” 
Koge Skftsesamflng, Koge. 

Feb. 16: "Works by Goya." Duff 
House* Edinburgh. 

Feb. 17: “Aim an et PArt Africaln." 
Musee national de* Arts 
d'Afrique at rf Oceania, Paris. 


MOVIE GUIDE 





Brosnan and Hamilton in "Dante’s Peak.’ 


new league. You can’t help 
thinking how much fan foe 
special-effects guys bad mak- 
ing models then mowing them 
up. (Eric Brace, WP) 

Beverly Hills Ninja 

Directed by Dennis Dugan. 
US. 

A Japanese martial arts clan is 
taught that a white child will 
one day appear to become the 
greatest ninja of them alL 
Sure enough, at foe beginning 
of foe lively, funny “Beverly 
Hills Ninja,” a steamer trunk 
with a white male baby inside 
washes up on foe beach near 
the clan's retreat But the kid 
mows up to be hefty Chris 
Farley. Given the name Haru, 
be is raised by foe clan's lov- 
ing sansei (Soon-Tek Oh) 
alongside the master's own 
son (Robin Shou). But Haru 


is such a hopeless self-delud- 
ing klutz that even his kindly 
foster father is forced to admit 
in exasperation that, “He’s 
fat, a fool and an embarrass- 
ment to ninja everywhere.” 
While everyone else is off to a 
competition, Haru is alone at 
the retreat when a striking 
blonde (Nicollette Sheridan) 
shows up looking to hire a 
ninja to (ail her boyfriend 
(Nathaniel Parker) to a meet- 
ing at a nearby harbor. She 
explains she's beginning to 
suspect that he’s up to no 
good — and not merely two- 
timing her. A couple of fast 
plot developments sends 
Haru off to Beverly Hills to 
try to locate Sheridan, con- 
vinced she's a lady in distress, 
and right smack in foe middle 
of Parker’s international 
counterfeiting schemes. “Be- 


verly Hills Ninja” isn't a 
foigh-slapper, but it’s divert- 
ing and affectionate — a sat- 
isfying and sturdy vehicle for 
Farley that ought to please his 
fans. (Kevin Thomas, LAT) 

Duo 

Directed by Nobuhiw Suwa. 
Japan . 

Yu lives with KeL She works 
in a shop, he wants to be an 
actor. Theirs is a common di- 
lemma. They cannot live with 
each other and they cannot 
live without each other. He 
thinks marriage will solve the 
problem. She is not so sure. 
One day she leaves. A banal 
story, happens every day — 
but that is foe poinL Truisms 
are true if you can burnish 
them again bright enough. 
This is what Nobuhiro Suws 
does in his first film. Proceed- 
ing with intelligence and tact 
be has made a common situ- 
ation extraordinary. His meth- 
ods are radical. He asked his 
actors to read the script anc 
then forget about it. Through 
rehearsals he molded theii 
version of the forgotten scrip 
— all movement, all dialogue 
is their own. The cameraman 
Masaki Tamura. is as much ; 
part of the action as they are 
watching attentively, pa 
tiently, always in control, al 
ways generously relinquish 
ing iL One is reminded o 
Cassavetes — gentler, kinde 
perhaps, but just as honest 
( Donald Richie, IHT 


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INTERNATIONAL HTO4 1P T RIBUNE, SAXinMlAY-SUNDAY, rKHRUAKV 1-^19^ 




PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAS, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Turks Sign 
$543 Million 
In Air Deals 


ANKARA — Turkey’s plans to mod- 
ernize its military were aided Thursday 
with the signing of helicopter deals 
worth $543 million with the French- 


vere aided Thursday 
of helicopter deals 


German group Eurocopter and die U.S. 
concern Sikorsky. 

“With the signing of these contracts 
with Eurocopter and Sikorsky, our 
aimed forces will have taken a concrete 
step towards modernization for the fu- 
ture,” Yalcin Burcak, Turkey’s defense 
industry undersecretary, said at a ce- 
remony before die deals were initialed. 

The deals could fuel Western gov- 
ernments’ concerns of an arms race in 
the eastern Mediterranean. The latest 
accords are part of Turkey's goal to 
accelerate annual military spending to 
$5 billion from around $2.5 billion to $3 
billion as part of a $150 billion program 
to die year 2030. 

Turkey’s main rival, Greece, plans 
around $8.5 billion in military spending 
by the year 2000. The two countries are 
disputing territorial rights in the Aegean 
Sea and the divided island of Cyprus. 

The Eurocopter deal to build 30 Cou- 
gar helicopters from 1999 to 2002 is part 
of an effort to foster Turkey's domestic 
defense industry and teach ambitious tar- 
gets for development of the armed 
forces. 

Turkey’s state defense company. 
Turkish Aerospace Industries, and other 
Turkish concerns will account for 30 
percent of the $430 million deal with 
Eurocopter, owned by French state-run 
Aerospatiale and Germany's Daimler- 
Benz Aerospace. 

“In this way. technology will be ac- 
quired, savings will be made and work 
possibilities will be created for our in- 
dustry,*' Defense Minister Turhan Tay- 
han said at the signing ceremony. 

In a separate $113 milli on deal with 
Sikorsky Aircraft, a unit of United 
Technology, the Turkish Navy will buy 
four Sikorsky Sea Hawk helicopters 
over three years. 


ANTS: 

Design by Termites 

Continued from Page 1 

two changes of air an hour through the 
building, taking advantage of what Mr. 
Pearce calls “the coolth in the slab.” 
For winter days, there are small heaters 
in die vents. 

This is all possible only because Har- 
are is 5.400 feet (1,645 meters) above 
sea level, has cloudless skies, little hu- 
midity and wide temperature swings. 

“You couldn’t do this in New York, 
with its fantastically hot summers and 
fantastically cold winters,” Mr. Pearce 
said. But then his eyes lit up ar the 
challenge. “Perhaps you could store the 
summer’s heat in water somehow.” 

The engineering firm of Ove Arup & 
Partners, which worked with him on the 
design, monitors daily temperatures 
outside, under the floors and at knee, 
desk and ceiling level. "This isn’t all 
dancing around m the moonlight,” Mr. 
Pearce said. “It’s real science." 

Ove Amp's graphs show that the 
building has generally fluctuated be- 
tween 73 and 77 degrees (about 23 to 25 
centigrade), with the exception of the 
annual hot spell just before the summer 
rains in October and of three days in 
November, when a janitor switched off 
the fans at night The atrium, which fun- 
nels the winds, can be much cooler. 

“It’s only about three weeks of the 
year we gel complaints.” Mr. Pearce 
said. "The rest of the year is fine.” 
Turning on the fans larer at night during 
hot spells seems to help. 

As far as beauty goes, Mr. Pearce, 
disdaining glass skins as “igloos in the 
Sahara.” calls his building “spiky.” 

The signature “tiaras” over the en- 
trances are meant to resemble die por- 
cupine-quill headdresses of the local 
Shona tribe, but to non-Shonas they look 
like the innards of supermarket bread- 
slicing machines. Elevators were de- 
signed to look like mine-shaft cages; 
their contra Ls resemble ship binnacles. 
The fan covers, chevrons in granite, are 
echoes of Great Zimbabwe, the ruins that 
give the country its name. 

The deluge of designs “is one of my 
problems — I’m a bit Gothic," Mr. 
Pearce admitted. 

Standing on a roof catwalk, peering 
down inside at people as small as ter- 
mites below, he said he hoped the plants 
would grow wild and pigeons ana bats 
would move into the atrium, tempering 
the whole “natural machine” metaphor 
with a bit more nature — like that termite 
fungus. "But,” be confided, “the client 
hates it when I talk like that.” 



Continued from Page 1 

respond. They ordered tanks to roll 
through Sincan’s streets, a clear warning 
that their patience is wearing thin, 

[A Turkish security court on 
Thursday charged the mayor, Baku 
Yildiz, with serious public order of- 
fenses for organizing the anti-Israeli 
protest, Reuters reported, quoting the 
Anatolian news agency.] 

After hurried consultations between 
officials in Ankara and Tehran, Turkish 
officials said Mr. Bagheri would soon 
give up his post and return home. 

Turkey is on edge these days. After 
eight months in power, the Muslim- 
oriented Welfare Party has begun to take 
steps that many Turks fear are aimed at 
undermining die secular state. 

Prime Minister Neeme trin Erbakan 
has backed away from his most militan t 
campaign promises. He no longer talks 
of expelling U.S. troops or cutting ties to 
Israel. But he evidently now feels strong 
enough to press ahead with other plans 
that, taken together, strike secularist 
Turks as little short of terrifying: 

• He is urging the construction of a 
large mosque in Istanbul — in Taksim 
Square, the cosmopolitan heart of mod- 
em Turkey — and another in the 
Cankaya quarter of Ankara, where the 
presidential palace, a commanding sym- 
bol of secularism, is now the most im- 
portant building. 

• He wants to repeal laws that forbid 
women who are civil servants and stu- 
dents at public universities to wear veils 
or bead scarves. 

• He has built a corps of uniformed 
Welfare Party bodyguards and has be- 
gun to rely on them rather than on gov- 
ernment security agents. 

• He is encouraging young people to 
study at religious academies, and says 
graduates of such academies should be 
eligible for appointment as military of- 
ficers. 

• He is quietly moving fundamen- 
talists into positions in many govern- 
ment agencies. 

These steps, coupled with outbreaks of 


fundamentalism like die one in Sincan, 
have led many Turks to fear that the 
secular identity of their country is being 
threa ten ed. Many others — it is im- 
possible to know how many — welcome 
the moves. 

At die heart of secularist fears is the 
realization thar their ideology has not yet 
taken full hold in the hearts of Turks. It 
has been just 74 years since Mustafa 
Kemal Ataturk proclaimed the doctrine, 
now known as rCemalism, that Turkey 
should be a Western-oriented republic in 
which religion plays no public role. That 
is a short time compared with the cen- 
turies during which Turks were subjects 
of a theocratic empire. 

As a result, secularists fear that giving 
Turks full freedom of choice in deter- 
mining die role of religion in public life 
migh t open (he way to (he f s amrzati oa 
of society. 

“This country has a past, and it’s abit 
naive not to understand what that 
means,” said Sennet Atacanli, a spokes- 
man for die Foreign Ministry, which is a 
strong bastion of Turkish secularism. 

“Christians had a period of brutal 
fanaticism, but you also had your 
Renaissance,” he said. “You have had 
hundreds of years to distance yourself 
from religious extremism, so now when 
your president puts his hand on the Bible 
to take die oath of office yon don't see 
anything wrong. But in Turkey, our 
Renaissance began with Ataturk. We 
need time to let these ideas take hold.” 

Debate over these issues has come to 
dominate public discourse in Turkey, 
raising sensitive issues that many people 
here have never before confronted. 

“A veil is lilting in Turkey,” said a 
foreign resident of Ankara who is a 
specialist in Islamic ideology. “As it 
lifts, we’re seeing that this country is 
more religious than people think, and a 
milli on tunes more than secularists 
would like. The idea of a greater role for 
religion in public life has widespread 
support in Turkey. So as the country 
becomes more democratic, you see more 
Islamic influence.” 

Many Turks are asking whether their 





Afeoce fasT-Prcne 

STANDING GUARD — Former supporters of the Islamic Salvation Army wielding axes and knives 
Thursday to protect Medea, Algeria, from an attack by the fundamentalist Armed Islamic Group, which 
has killed more than 39 people in the region in retribution for their support of tfae rivai organization. 


EMBASSY: Chinese Role in Fund-Raising? 

Continued from Page 1 

recommending that the maner be turned 

mg to one well-placed source. . “ 'Z-' honk&Hoae Kora 

■ Ms. Reno has declined requests far an holdmgsm^c . Huangwas 

independent counsel. sariSg that the Chinese 
JustteeD^amnenttask force can con- avicep^idMtm 
duct a full and independent inquiry and corporation run by ute 8° 

that there was no specific and credible eminent ■ . Rpnresenlaiive Gerald 


««ft3T5S£ 

covered bv the Counsel chairman of the Hrase Rules Commit 


a finding would nave to oe u*s . ****** t =___ 
the Justice Department task to investigate Mr. Huang aadthe Uppo 
reMs.Reaoc^drec^nend Group with an eye *®.- 
“rfSSa^counseL nomic espiona# a^flSLfoe Itored 
h she declined^comment States by a tei^corpc^o^havmg 
the alterations, die deputy direct ties to the People S Republic of 


directly on the allegations, the deputy direct 
attorney general, Jamie Gore lick, said China. 
Thursday rtmr the rask force had not Mr. 


»niL 

Mr. Solomon said then that he was 


imirsa&y mar me tasx rorce nau im H 

found any evidence that would require concerned about Mr. Huang s access to 
appointing an independent counsel to intelligence mfoonMim 
investigate the^STrSc Associated dozrais of p^-from 

Press reported from Washington. the Commerce Department to the Lippo 

{The White Housepress secretary, Mi- Group. . f 

chad McCary, said that President Bfll _ Mr. Huang^e^loyerialLq^Q^ 
ninmn was nuzzled by die allegations nine years before be joined the uxn- 
and had White House lawyers to meroe Department as deputy assistant 
contact Justice Department attorneys secretary for international economic 
- ! _ .im ' i_ Uic cwMum* narkspc tram 


about the allegations. “The people we 
have spoken to here have no knowledge 
of these allegations,” be said.] . 


ilicy. His severance package from 
ppo totaled $788,750. . 

He was given a top-secret clearance at 

_ TV ■ • A - - iiiliAi 


MatecAAJCkMTkQMnrrodrTmn 

Students leaving an Islamic school in Konya, Turkey. Many Turks fear the secular state is bang undermined. 

TURKEY: A Resurgence of Religion Has Secularists on Edge 


uiuiocaucmiuiQ, 1 1 — t* . . *v _ _ . 

Some investigators suspected a the Commerce Department after what 
rhmftte counectioD to the frmd-raising Republicans have called a lax back- 
scandal because several contributors to ground investigation. - - 

i n j : £■ T„ ■ i w> i mnitinn Trtr ms TOO at DK LODT- 


and fund-raisers for the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee bad ties to Beijing. 

V . T- , 1 V.L T L. lUa a 


Tn preparation for his job at the Com- 
merce Department. Mr. Huang received 

• • f — ... «U1 b 


Last February, Charles Yah lin Trie, a an interim security clearance while he 
fund-raiser for die committee, used his was still working at Lippo. But QMn- 


inSuence with officials to b ring Wang roerce Department officials said it did not 

t t j 4: .... him rn anv ITlrfYr- 


iitn of a weapons trading company entitle him to see any classified mfor- 
ownedbythe(2riiiesemilitaty.toaWbite mation and they insist that he saw none. 
House coffee with Mr. Clinton. Because of a bureaucratic error, die 

Mr. Clinton has since said he should officials said, Mr. Huai 
not have met with Mr. Wang, and secret clearance after 


left foe Coen- 


$640,000 in checks that Mr. Trie de- merce Department to become a deputy 
livered to foe president’s legal defense chairman of foe Democratic National 
fund has been returned because of ques- Committee in December 1995. Dining 
tions about foe source of foe funds. his 18 months at the Commerce De- 

An other reason investigators sospec- partment, Mr. Huang was scheduled to 
ted a Chinese connection was the role of attend 37 intelligence briefings, includ- 
John Huang, a f o r m er Commerce De- ing briefings on China, and saw more 
partment official »nd Democratic Na- than two dozen intelligence reports. 

-1 O £ 1 .. ■).. Pr f .^ 1 hie Cf Mnmwf p TV*nnrtnu*nt ftf. 


tional Committee fund-raiser at foe cen- 
ter of foe controversy. 


From his Commerce Department of- 
fice, Mr. Huang made more than 70 


A U.S* citizen who was bora in China phone nails to a Lippo-controDed bank 
and raised in Taiwan, Mr. Huang has in Los Angeles. The calls are being 
— i- v.. — i- -w — i.u..., ™ .Mih'nWui fog Justice Department 


said be has no friends or relatives in scrutinized 
China, But Mr. Huang is a former ex- task force. 


BEIJING: A New Blow for North Korea 


Bakir Yildiz, Islamist mayor of Sin- 
can, in a police car after his arrest. 

secular system can withstand- Mr. 
Erbakan’s role. Some believe that be is 
at heart a conciliator who will never try 
to push the country too for toward fun- 
damentalism. 

Others consider him a radical deter- 
mined to chip away at foe foundations of 
secularism until the system collapses. 

Whatever the troth, Mr. Erbakan has 
shown himself to be a shrewd politician 
who knows when it is time to retreat. 
Apparently alarmed by foe reaction to 
his recent moves, he issued a statement 
over the weekend pledging his support 
for “pluralist political democracy.' 

But even if his government now pulls 
hack from some of its proposals, it has 
fundamentally and perhaps permanently 
reshaped foe terms of political and social 
debate. Military leaders, who have 
staged three coups since 1960. are watch- 
ing foe government’s every move. 


Continued from Page 1 

to break into the building Wednesday 
night 

Caught between its longtime Com- 
munist ally and its improving and be- 
neficial relations with wealthy South 
Korea, China has appealed for calm. It 
has stationed dozens of soldiers outside 
die embassy, and a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman called Thursday for “cool 
and proper” handling of foe case by'all 
involved. 

South Korea sent a high-level team of 
diplomats to Beijing to ask foe Chinese 
to allow Mr. Hwang to be taken to Seoul. 
Foreign ministers Yoo Chong Ha of 
South Korea and Qian Qicfcen of China 
are preparing to discuss the matter at a 
meeting of Asian and European leaders 
in Singapore. 

Beyond all foe cloak-and-dagger in- 
trigue, analysts say Mr. Hwang’s ap- 
parent defection has dealt a severe blow 
to the pide of North Korea — and a 
wounded and defensive North Korea is 
even more danger ous than noial 

“I think this is going to be extremely 
difficult for them to handle psycholo- 
gically, coming on top of everything 
else, ” said Donald Gregg, a formerU.S. 
ambassador to Sooth Korea and to 

China. 

North Korea is already battling severe 
food Shortages that- hamanitnrian aid 
agencies say are close to famine levels. 
Its economy is crumbling so much that it 
is raising foreign capital by agreeing to 
accept shiploads of nuclear waste from 
Taiwan. 

Now foe apparent defection of such a 
respected eider statesman, a man who 


Now the apparent defection of such a 
respected eider statesman, a man who 
taught Marxism-Leninism to Kim Jong 
D when (he present leader was a college 
student, has to be extremely painful and 
divisive among North Korea's ruling 
cabal, analysts said. 

“He’s a dignified man with a certain 


persona and appeal,” said one U.S. of- 
ficial who has met Mr. Hwang. “His 
personal manner was not that of a party 
zealot, but of a dignified and serene and 
warm man.” 

Despite North Korea’s communism, 
foe official added, it is still a Confucian 
society that prizes education, so a schol- 
ar such as Mr. Hwang commanded tre- 
mendous respect among his peers. 

Although average North Koreans will 
probably never be told of Mr. Hwang’s 
defection, the betrayal of such a man 
will have a jarring impact on his col- 
leagues in foe rating elite, the official 


“Some people will be angry,’’ he 
said, “some wifi be dismayed and 


PHONES: Calling and Driving a Health Hazard, Study Finds PILL: Accord Paves Way for Sale in U.S. 


Continued from Page 1 

ng while talking on a cellular 
ihone is dangerous. 

Bradley Efron, a professor 
if statistics at Stanford Uni- 
versity. said he thought at first 
hat deciding whether cellular 
fooncs are a hazard to drivers 
‘looked like an impossible 
hing to prove, even it was 
rue.” The problems were sev- 
*rai: any study would have to 
ictcrmine whether phones 
vere being used at or near the 
ime of car accidents, and 
vhefoer foe confluence of 
foone use and car crashes was 
note than coincidence. 

Mr. Efron said he changed 
ns mind when he read the 


paper: “It was pretty ingeni- 
ous. When 1 saw foe evidence 
I had to admit it was pretty 
dam good.” 

Dr. Redelmeier hit on the 
idea of studying people who 
he knew had car phones and 
had had car accidents. Then 
he looked at records of phone 
usage to see if the connection 
of conversations and crashes 
was something other than 
random. For him, rite study 
also addressed a nagging per- 
sonal concern. 

“One day. at the end of foe 
day, I was returning phone 
calls and I. reached a patient 
on her cellular phone,” while 
she drove her car, he said. In 
the middle oF the conversa- 


tion. he said, the woman told 
him she bad just been hit from 
the rear and would have to 
call him back. ‘ ’ft was only & 
fender bender, but boy did it 
worry me,” Dr. Redelmeier 
said. “I kept thi nking of foe 
old clich£. ’Physician, do no 
harm.' ” 

“A couple of days later ii 
clicked in my mind that 

n le are not fully aware of 
nutations of their atten- 
tion,” he said. 

Talking on a telephone, he 
said, is not the sameas talking 
to a fellow passenger, who 
might know to stop talking 
when a driver is about to 
change lanes or turn left And, 
he said, “a fellow passenger 


is unlikely to be a major client 
or your immediate super- 
visor.” 

The incident with his pa- 
tient’s accident led Dr. Re- 
delmeier to organize his 
study. With foe results in 
hand, he said that foe only 
thing that had saved nations 
from a plague of cellular 
phone-initiated accidents was 
that foe calls are still so ex- 
pensive. 

“As long as the prices stay 
high,” he said, calls will re- 
main “brief and infrequent.’' 
That, he said, “explains why 
foe rapid growth of foe tech- 
nology was not associated 
whh a rapid increase in col- 
lision rates.” 


Continued from Page 1 

beiing. Final approval by die food and 
drug agency is expected to be routine. 

Anti -abortion groups in the United 
Stales oppose the sale of mifepristone, 
which is already in use in France, 
Sweden. England, Scotland and China. 

The recommended regimen for use in 
foe United States would be the same as it 
is in those countries, involving three 
visits to a clink or physician's office 
over a period of about 15 days. 

On foe first visit, the woman would 
receive a physical examination, checking 
her overall condition and ensuring she 
was within foe first 49 days of pregnancy. 
She would also receive counseling on 
side effects, which can include bleeding, 
cramping, nausea and vomiting. If foe. 
wished to proceed, foe would be given 


mifepristone tablets and sent home. 

Two days later, she would return to foe 
physician’s office and take another med- 
ication, misoprostol, to initiate contrac- 
tions. On this visit, she would be asked to 
remain at the office for four horns to 
watch- fra- complications and confirm 
that the fetus had been expelled. 

Twelve to. 14 days later, foe patient 
woaldreormtobe examined for side effects 
and to ensure foot bra pregnancy had been 
terminated. The pills would be available 
only to health-care professionals, not to 
women to administer <m their own. 

Tlw Population Council became re- 
sponsible fra U.S. manufacture and dis- 
tribution when no major US. drug com- 
pany was willing to take on the 
politically sensitive pill. The council 
was granted a U-S. parent by foe French 
pharmaceutical firm Roussel Uclaf. 


s<n Be will lose heart and confidence 
themselves in the North Korean sys- 
tem.” . • 

. The defection could further aggravate 
foe split between moderate North 
Korean leaders who counsel more en- 
gagement with foe international com- 
munity and more hawkish leaders who 
advocate self-reliance and a strong mil- 
itary, he added. 

• “They’re boxed in more and more, 
-and that has to cause' anger and frus- 
tration,” foe U.S. official said. ‘Td 
imagine there are some very angry meet- 
ings about wbai to do going on today in 
Pyongyang.” 

said the Umte^S^tofand South Korea 
must be careful not to gloat about Mr. 
Hwang's defection. 

“I think it’s time for compassion, 
because this is a very touchy time,” he 
said. “I think they are beginning to 
disintegrate up there — parts are flying 
off foe machine. I’m not saying this 
means they're going to fell apart im- 
mediately, but it’s another significant 
layer of foe onion that has been peeled 
off." 

KOREAN: 

China in the Middle 

Continued from Page 1 

'workers and the fanners when foe work- 
ers and farmers are starving? ” he is said 
to have written. 

Foreign Minister Yoo Chong Ha of 
South Korea was scheduled to meet his 
Chinese counterpart. Qian Qichen, in 
Singapore on Friday to lobby for Mr. 
Hwang's safe passage. 

Seoul also asked fra beefed-up se- 
curity around its mission, sa ying Hist as 
many as 10 North Koreans triedforcing 
their way in Wednesday night, presum- 
ably to try to get Mr. Hwang. 

North Korean diplomats challenged 
the Chinese police a g^in late Thursday. 
After watching foe building for hours 
without making a move, witnesses said, 
about a dozen North Koreans walked up 
to police lines but were ruined away 
when they tried to go past. 

Chinese police immediately widened 
the security zone, ordering reporters and 
the North Koreans in embassy cars to 
park a block away. 

North Korea insists that Mr. Hwang 
must have been kidnapped by South 
Koreans, ca ll i ng his defection “incon- 
ceivable,” but Seoul has dismissed the 
accusation. (Reuters. API 


U.S. to Close More Bases, 
But Forces Remain Same 

Agrwe France-Pretse 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
military w3I close a dozen install, 
ations in Europe by foe end of 1 998, 
returning the sites to their host 
countries, Germany and Turkey, foe 
Pentagon announced Thursday. 

'This will not affect force levels 
ui Europe,” a Pentagon spokesman 
said. More than 800 U.S. defense 
facilities in Europe have been 
closed as part of the reduction of 
American forces since die end of 
*e Cold War. 

All but one of the facilities, 
which include barracks, bousing 
complexes, warehouses, training 
areas and storage areas, are in Ger- 
many. 









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HfTBOtmONAL 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Massive Charges Doom Philips to Quarterly and Yearly Losses 


G**^tyOurSuffftm,DupBK*tt 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands — In- 
creased costs, sluggish sales and huge 
charges caused Philips Elec- 
tronics NV to post a loss for the fourth 

qv ^fK ***! 811 of 1996 ’ ** company 
said Thursday. 

,{996 an “extreme disap- 
pointment, Philips did not provide a 
orecast for 1997 but said that its busi- 


its decision to sever its responsibility for 
the unprofitable German electronics 
company, Gtundig AG. 

Another 1.8 billion guilders .in 
charges to cover restructuring at dif- 
ferent divisions had been previously an- 
nounced. 

Philips* full-year net loss totaled 590 


- — i uui mu 

nesses should continue to grow. 

> mvesi 


Phipps* shares rose as Investors ap- 
parently concluded that the worst was 
over, at least for the time being. 

In 1996, Philips took. Z57 billion 
guilders ($1.36 billion) in one-time 
charges, including an unexpected 
charge of 725 million guilders to cover 


For the fourth quarter, the company 
reported a act loss of 949 million guild- 
ers, compared with a 652 million-guild- 
er profit a year earlier. 

Philips’ chief executive. Cor Boon- 
stra, smd there would be no further news 
of reorganization until the end of 1997 
or the beginning of 1998, bat that after 


that time he planned to organize the 
company into 100 business units. 

“fee process of building these busi- 
ness units will be finalized at the end of 
this year,” Mr. Boonstra said. “It does 
not lead automatically to divestment 
Clarity is needed.” 

Despite die company’s losses, Mr. 
Boonstra said die dividend would remain 
unchanged at 1.60 guilder, because 
“we’re confident wc'U produce a result 
in 1997 in line with expectations.” 

Sales in 1996 rose 7 percent, but 
when ' adjusted for consolidation 
changes and currency effects, the in- 
crease was only 6 percent, co mpared 
with arise of 11 percent in 1995. 
Philips shares rose 2 SO guilders on 


Thursday to close ata 19-mooth high of 81 
guilders. 

Calling foe losses related to Grundig 
“die biggest disappointment” of the 
year, Dudley Eustace, Philips' chief fi- 
nancial officer, said the company had 
reserved 600 milli on guilders to buy 
itself out of an agreement to bear 
Grundig 's losses ana pay its founding 
family trust a yearly dividend, regard- 
less of results. 

Mr. Eustace said he “sincerely be- 
lieved” the 600 million guilders would 
cover die .cost of whatever agreement 
ggme from calkg with the Gnmdig family. 

. Figures presented by the German 
company in December 1996 mined out 
to deviate ’'substantially” from das true 


stale of affairs, Mr. Eustace added. 

Mr. Boonstra said be hoped to return 
to “nonnal" reorganizing charges of 
about 200 million to 300 million guild- 
ers annually next year. 

Some analysts said die 1996 writeoffs 
were taken as a sign of confidence in Mr. 
Boonstra. Heak Slofooom, head of re- 
search at the brokerage Amst^eldNV, said: 
“He is proving his dedication to share- 
holders by saying, 'shareholders first.’ ” 
Not everyone agreed. “We thought it 
was a sign of weakness that he remained 
unclear about future growth strategy,” 
said Marco van den Broek, a fund manager 
at F. Van Laoschot BatdtiosNV. “He is 
keeping us all on hold for a bit longer.” 
Mr. Boonstra, who took over as chair- 


man last October, has vowed to make 


Philips competitive ai any cost. He has 
dealt with Gnmdig, closed the com- 


ub video-store chain, 
television interests up 


pany’s Si 
and put 
for sale. 

On Thursday, be said Philips had 
signed a letter of intent to sell its smart- 
card business. Philips Smart Card & 
Systems, to De La Rue PLC of Britain, 
fee division, based in France, posted 
revenue in 1996 of around 100 million 
guilders. 

Also on Thursday, $3.1 billion in 

bj^Moody’s Investors Service Inc. All 
the debt being reviewed carries 
Moody’s top rating. ( Bloomberg . API 


For An lericans’ Pilots, 
Big Risk in Stable Time 


Strong Emotions Point to Saturday Strike 


By Adam Bryant 

New York Tones Service 


With high profits in thedr industry and 
stability in the labor force, this should be 
a comforting time for airline workers 
who have endured the wrenching effects 
of airline deregulation for years. 

But rather than putting the past behind 
them, pilots at American Airlines are 
preparing for a strike that would start 
Saturday morning. 

At firet, their dispute seems to be over 
issues that might be resolved fairly eas- 
ily , such as wage rises that roughly track 
inflation. 

But the current talks are charged with 


dispute overissues of respect, trust 
the role of pilots within the company. 
The dispute also has broader resonance 
throughout corporate America, bringing 
to a crucial point such issues as flexible 
pay and the degree to which employees 
should share in the strong profits that 
many companies are enjoying. 

A spokesman for the pilots said Wed- 
nesday that a strike was “mare likely 
than not” 

And that was not bluster, said Joseph 
Blasi, a professor of management-labor 
relations at Rutgers University who has 


studied many airline labor disputes. 

“I think a strike is 99 percent in- 
evitable, ’ ’ Mr. BlaSi said, “fee reason is 
that these parties hate each other. This 
has become a test of wills more than- a 
good-faith bargaining effort.” 

If a strike occurs, Mr. Blasi said, is will 
probably be more difficult to resolve than 
the most recent labor dispute at Amer- 
ican, in which flight attendants went on 
strike just before Thanksgiving in 1993. 
Ill that case, the airitite mntiiwwd to 
operate a limited schedule. In this case, 
however, because pilots cannot be re- 
placed, American Ires said it will simply 
shut down the airline if they strike. 

The flight attendants said they would 
strike only for 1 1 days; foepilots have put 
no such limit cm any possible job action. 
The pilots and the company have also 
said publicly that they cannot budge from 
their positions, which are now for apart 
hi some ways, the complexion of the 
dispute ispeciuiar to the amine industry. 
As a group, pilots have long seen them- 
selves as foe equal of top managers, and 
believe that missteps in strategy have led 
in part to deep losses. In 1993, far ex- 
ample, the pilots commissioned a report 
that suggested a different way to use 



. . ■ ■*< ■? 
*• x .J« v */. 


See PILOTS, Page 17 


J Dwrtd Akc/Rawn 

An American Airlines first officer, Joe Hflburn, picketing in front of the airline’s terminal in San Francisco. 


Pearson Has 
£100 Million 
Book Error 


Penguin Unit Granted 
Improper 9 Discounts 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New York Times Semce 


LONDON — Pearson PLC, the me- 
dia company that publishes die Finan- 
cial Times and owns half of The Econ- 
omist magazine, said Thursday it could 
be forced to take a write-off of £100 
million ($163.4 million) because of 
“improper accounting” at its Penguin 
USA book publishing unit. 

The news sent the company’s shares 
sliding as much as 8 percent initially, 
but the stock recovered to close at 750 


pence, down 14 pence, or 2 percent. 

lid that under its previous 


The Dollar’s Rise? It’s Fundamental 


By Jonathan Fuerhringer 

New York Tima Service 


NEW YORK — Treasury Secretary 
Robert Rubin of die United. States and 
his allies in the Group of Seven industrial 
nations are trying to rein in die dollar, 
which has jumped 14 percent against foe 
German mark and 16 percent against the 
Japanese yen in the last year. 

But in the statement they ispied in 
Berlin (Hi Saturday backing this goal, 
they included one sentence that may have 
unintentionally given currency traders a 
reason to push the dollar even high er -- - 
particularly against the German marie 
and other European currencies. 

The key words are these: “We re- 
affirmed our views that exchange rates 
should reflect economic fundamentals.” 
Thidera are looking at those 11 words, 
along with new indications that basic 


economic fundamentals will continue to 
support die dollar — higher interest 
rates and attractive economic growth. 

“This highlights the thought that the 
dollar should be able to trade higher” 
currencies, said 

Audrey] 


exchange sales at 
Co. 


“The one thing that we took awry 
from that statement was that foe central 
banks are serious and that they think that 
fundamentals should drive foe dollar,” 
Ms. McNiff said. “You made a lot of 
money last year by listening to tbe cen- 
tral banks. 

that recent gains in unem- 
ployment in Germany and Switzerland, 
ana pessimistic reports from foe business 
communities in both countries were be- 
fog taken as signs “of a worsening of foe 
economic situation in Europe.” That 


means intoest rates are more likely to foil 
or remain sable and growth could be 
sluggish, all factors that favor the dollar. 

What tins means for Mr. Rubin and 
the Clinton administration is that they, 
together with their allies, could be 
footed sooner than they might like to 
follow their words with actions. 

That effort could begin with dearer 
statements from Mr. Rubin and other 
finance ministers and follow with in- 
tervention by flic United States and oth- 
er countries tint would sell dollars to 
lower the value of foe currency. 

But those actions are Hkdy to have no 
more than a temporary effect, analysts 
say, if the economic fundamentals that 


move currencies — interest rates, growth 
and capital flows — do not cease to favor 
the dollar, as they do now. 


See DOLLAR, Page 14 


Telecom Talks Edge Closer to Global Accord 


Those developments Thursday signal foe two-year-old 
talks sponsored by the World 
more than 60 countries I ? 

market could reach a broad accord ahead of a Saturday 
deadline. First, however, negotiators must *^ ve * 
sticking point: Canada insists that Canadians own at least 64 

a*,* 

an accorfo “We are extremely encouraged by the increasing 


number of countries that are participating and the growing 
number of good offers,” said Beverly Andrews, a negotiator 
for Comsat Coip. and bead of the U.S. Council for In- 
ternational Business, an industry group. 

An agreement, would mean slashing costs for consumers, 
opening new avenues for corporate profits and making ad- 
vanced telecom services available over the next two decades 
to billions of people around the world. 

Akemi Yaznaguchi, Japan's vice mirrictBr of international 
affairs, said that Japan would present a more attractive offer to 
open its telecom market only if die United States agrees to 
boost foreign investment caps in its radio sector. The United 
States says foreigners may only buy up to 20 percent of 
domestic radio operators. (Bloomberg, AFP) 


Stocks Roar Past 7,000 Level; 
Street Predicts Further Gains 


By Mitchell Martin 

bttemaaooai Hendd Tribune 


NEW YORK — The Dow Jones 
industrial average crossed foe 7,000- 
poimmaik Thursday for foe first time, 
and despite a rally that has seen the 
blue-chip indicator rise more than 8 
percent so fortius year, the feeling on 
Wall Street seemed to be that further 
gains are in the cards. 

The rise in stocks has been fueled 
by American retirement savings, for- 
eign investors attracted by a strong 
dollar, rising corporate profits and a 
benign inflation outlook, analysts 
said. 

“The U.S. stock market continues 
to attract funds from all over the 
world,” said Alan Ackerman, exec- 
utive vice president of Fahnestock & 
Co. “Tbe market appears to be fueled 
by tbe best of all worlds: moderate 
economic growth, muted inflation 
and mated interest rates, together 
with an earnings stream that has been 


favorable for most stocks in the big- 
cap universe.” 

Indeed, while the Dow closed at a 
record 7,022.44 points Thursday, up 
60.81 for the day, the Nasdaq com- 
posite index, which includes many 
smaller stocks, remained below its 
high mark of 1388, set Jan. 22. It 
finished at 1 370.70, up 1 1 .74 points, 
although the broader Standard & 
Poor’s 500-stock index closed at a 
record 81 1 .83, up 9.06. The S&P is up 
about 9 percent this year, while foe 
Nasdaq gauge has risen only 6 per- 
cent. 

The lagging performance of the 
smaller stocks oners opportunities to 
investors who think foe market has 
more room to rise but who fear that 


too far too fast. 

“It’s tbe momentum stocks, high- 
liquidity issues that people are buy- 
ing,” said James Fraser, president of 


See MARKET, Page 14 


Pearson said 
management, the U.S. subsidiary had 
given unauthorized discounts to some 
retailers beginning in 1991. Analysts 
said one consequence might be de- 
mands from irate customers who failed 
to benefit from such discounts. 

“I think foe worrying aspect of it was 
that retailers who did not get those dis- 
counts back then may claim compen- 
sation.” said Louise Barton, a media 
analyst at Henderson Crosth waite, a 
London-based merchant bank. “It 
really reflects the loose nature of the old 
management,” Ms. Barton said. 

In a widely publicized move, Pearson 
appointed an American woman, Mar- 
jorie Scardino, 49, as its new chief ex- 
ecutive beginning this year. The de- 
cision was seen as a generational change 
with foe goal of shaking up a stodgy, but 
potentially rich company, which is seen 
by some as too slow-moving and 
weighted down with many non-media 
businesses. Tbe change was also re- 
volutionary because of Ms. Scardino’s 
gender and American origin. 

The discovery of irregular accounting 
practices was made by Michael Lynton, 
Penguin’s new chief executive, who took 
over on Jan. 1 , succeeding Peter Mayer. 

“Those found to be responsible have 
been and will be appropriately dealt 
with,” Pearson said. 

Some analysis said an ongoing review 
by the new management may unearth 
more problems. “You have to hope it is 
not repeated elsewhere,” said Caroline 
Slater, an analyst with London's Klein- 
wort Benson investment firm. 

[Paul Richards, an analyst at Pan- 
mure Gordon, said tbe revelation of foe 
problems reignited speculation that 
Pearson was a vulnerable takeover tar- 
get, AFX News reported from London. 
That speculation led to foe Thursday 
recovery in foe stock price, he said.] 

Pearson said tbe charge announced 
Thursday would be taken against last 
year’s pretax profits, which are expec- 
ted to be in foe range £254 million. 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Good and Bad News for America Online 


By Steve Lohr 

New York Times Service 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


Feb. is Li tXd-Ubor Rates 


Feb. 13 



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NEW YORK — America Online Inc. 
has long split Wall Street into two 
sharply divided camps. To its support- 
ers, tbe online service is a pioneer in a 
new medium, well on its way to building 
foe first mass-market brand name in 
cyberspace. To its detractors. America 
Online is simply an aggressive marketer 
with mounting losses. 

America Online’s executives have 
replied to critics by asserting that near- 
term losses were not losses at all but 
astute investments — foe necessary cost 
of attracting a big audience online. 
Build the audience, they assured in- 
vestors, and the profits will follow be- 
fore long. ( 

But smee the company reported its 
quarterly results last Thuraday, analysts 
have raised new .questions about how 
costly America Online’s business 
strategy is proving to be. whether the 
company has the cash to execute its 
plans, and how long it will take for foe 
company to show steady profits. 

In the December quarter, America 



of Digital Video Investments, a New 
York research adviser to institutional 
investors. “America Online is running 
out of cash.” 

By contrast, the ad and electronic 
commerce field is expected to yield 


higher profit margins. 
These trem 


tm 


liabilities — fell to $38.8 million by the 

millk 


December quarter, from 55 1 2-5 million 
in June. 


Analysts have raised questions 
whether America Online is facing a cash 


trends have apparently caused 
even some of America Online’s Wall 
Street loyalists to have qualms. Last 
Friday, Mary Meeker of Morgan Stan- 
ley & Co. cut her rating on America 
Online from “strong buy” to “out- 
perform.” 

In a research note to clients, Ms. 
Meeker wrote, “AOL is a company 
with a split personality — it always does 
good sniff and bad stuff.” 

She added: ”The good news: Our 
instincts tell us that AOL is on the cusp 


squeeze. In particular, they point to a 

liabilities. 


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Online reported strong growth in rev- 
r $409 million, out ; ' 


enueto $409 million, but also a sizable 
loss of $155 million, both essentially in 
line with Wall Street expectations. 

America Online has absorbed big 
losses in the last six months. As a result, 
the shareholders’ equity — assets minus 


sharp jump in its current 
Those liabilities, falling due within a 
year, include the costs of laying off 
workers, shutting offices, scrapping 
outdated marketing materials, and cred- 
its and refunds to customers, as pan of a 
recent settlement with stales represent- 
ing subscribers who have been unable to 
connect to America Online's service. 

Today, the company's current lia- 
bilities dwarf its cash, accounts receiv- 
able and other current assets. "The key 
issue for America Online is cash flow," 
said David Simons, managing director 


of breaking out with a profitable btisi- 
el( " 


ness model (after years of building) and 
that foe stock price (after a lapse or two) 
should continue its recent steady climb. 
The bad news: The numbers tell us we 


are wrong. 

For their part. America Online ex- 
ecutives reply that the company's tran- 
sition is going smoothly. They say that 
the big losses recently, and the impact 
on America Online’s balance sheet, is 
mainly a one-time housecleaning as part 
of its new business plan rather than 
evidence of a frightening trend. 

The company s shares stood at $37 J 
in afternoon trading, up 37.5 cents. 






X 





PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 



PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


30~Year T-Bond Yretd 


(Goldman Hunts Small Investor 




By Peter Truell 

New York Times Service 



115 


S O N D J F 
1996 1997 


Exchange ^ '• Ww 


S 0 N D J F 
1996 1997 


The Dow • 




WSE . S&P 1QQ. y.o .. • 

NYSE Compos to ^ 

OS. : Nasdaq CeggOdte 1 

AMEX - Marta* Vato, 

Toronto . TSEIntfgx , . „ . . 

SaoPauto ^ : 

MaxfatoCtty Bofaa.. . . ' . 

Buenos Aires Mental ~ . " 7a&»s; ■' ^3**3*. 

■ Santfago IPSA General ! fiassag . ■ 
i Caracas CepteS General 


NEW YORK — Goldman, Sachs 
& Co. is negotiating:© sell its mu- 
tual funds through Charles Schwab 
Coip.. the big discount broker, as 
Wall Street pursues its latest en- 
thusiasm, the Main Street investor. 

Goldman Sachs, along with its 
main competitors at Merrill 
Lynch & Co. and Morgan Stanley 
& Co., has been rapidly building 
its asset management businesses, 
including its mutual fund divi- 
sion, which was created just under 
five years ago. 

The rush of money into mutual 


fund companies has increasingly 
attracted the attention of such big 
Wall Street firms as Goldman 
Sachs that are best known for ad- 
vising governments and huge 
companies. 

Just last week, Morgan Stanley 
said that it would merge with Dean 
Witter, Discover & Co., in part be- 
cause it is attracted by that firm's 
big nationwide network of broker- 
age offices and its huge mutual fund 
business. 

Neither Goldman Sachs nor 
Sdrwab officials would confirm the 
talks, although people at both firms 
who spoke anonymously said late 
Wednesday that there were discus- 


sions concerning the distribution of 
Goldman's funds through Schwab. 

“We are in discussion with many 
different fund companies," said 
Thomas Taggart, a spokesman for 
Schwab in San Francisco, who 
would not comment on the talks. 
Peter Rose, a Goldman Sachs 
spokesman, also declined to com- 
ment on die discussions. 

Goldman Sachs now has about 
34 funds, with assets totaling about 
$45 billion. The firm has sought 
many outlets for its funds, but has 
always insisted that there be an in- 
termediary, such as a broker, cer- 
tified financial adviser, insurance 
agent, bank or corporation. 


Investors Add $24 Billion 
To Mutual Fund Holdings 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Investors 
demonstrated their lingering en- 
thusiasm for stocks by pouring an 
estimated $24 billion into mutual 
funds last month, the fouith- 
Iargest total on record, a mutual 

fund trade group reported. 

But investors put more than 
half of the new dollars into money 
market funds, generally the safest 
type of mutual fund. 

January is a big month for mu- 
tual funds, and last month was no 


exception, though the inflows to 
stock finds fell short of die record 
$28.9 billion recorded in January 
1996 as well as the levels reached . 
in April and May of last year. 

But where stock . funds fell 
shot, money market funds took 
up the slack. According to figures 
from the Investment Company In- 
stitute and from AMG Data Ser- 
vices, they added about $32 billion 
in January, apparently taking in a 
bigger portion of overall fund in- 
vestments than in January 1996. 


MARKET: Dow Jones Average Crosses 7,000-Point Mark for First Time; Further Gains Predicted 


Continued from Page 13 


Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


IntcmaOooaJ UnU Tribune 


Very briefly: 

American General to Buy USLife 


NEW YORK (AP) — American General Corp. said 
Thursday that it would buy its rival insurer USLife Corp. for 
$ 1 .8 billion in stock as the industry consolidates in the face of 
increasing competition from securities firms and banks. 

The agreement would mark the Houston-based financial 
services company’s biggest acquisition to date and would 
create a company with $74 billion in assets and a value in the 
stock market of more than $10 billion. 


Fraser Management Associates in Burlington, 
Vermont. “With the cash flow coming into 
mutual funds, most mutual-fund managers are 
happier with stocks that are easy to buy.” 

Inis trend has led to some remarkable 
valuations for popular stocks, many of which 
are in the computer industry. Mr. Fraser noted 
that die market value of Intel Corp., the com- 
pany that makes the processing chips that are 
the brains of most of the world’s personal 
computers, is now significantly higher than 
the combined capitalizations of the Big Three 
U.S. automakers: 

At its late afternoon price of 157%, up Vi for 
the day, Intel was worth $ 129 billion. Together, 
General Motors, up IM at 58%, Ford Motor, 
unchanged at 32%, and Chrysler, down % at 
34%, were worth about $105 billion. 

"You have a high concentration of money 
and energy going into not too many compa- 


nies, and that's got to change somewhere 
along the way, even if you do have a steady 
incoming cash flow from the Baby Boom 
generation in the next 15 years," Mr. Fraser 
said. He added that if the blue-chip rally 
cooled down, managers of large pension and 
investment funds would spread their money 
out among smaller stocks that offered good 


U.S. STOCKS 


values, compared with shares that have be- 
come too popular. 

Meanwhile, the equity market has been 
buoyed by rising bond prices. Late last month. 


buoyed by rising bond prices. Late last month. 
30-year Treasury bond yields were approach- 
ing 7 percent, a level considered dangerous 
for the stock market. On Thursday, however, 
the government sold $10 billion of the bonds 
at an average yield of 6.64 percent. 

The bond market, which is sensitive to in- 
flation. g« a brief lifr from a government repeat 


that U.S. retail sales rose a modest 0.6 percent in 
January. Analysts noted that Americans bought 
fewer goods in December than had been es- 
timated, with the government revising the ad- 
vance from November to 03 percent from 0.6 
percent. Factoring out automobiles, there was 
no change in December sales. 

Ken Mayland, chief economist of Keycorp, 
the Cleveland-based banking company, pre- 
dicted the Federal Reserve Board would be 
pleased with the figures, and central-bank 
policymakers are therefore unlikely to raise 
interest rates in the near term. 

The chief central banker, Alan Greenspan, 
did no barm to the financial markets by re- 
fusing to comment on their levels. After testi- 
fying to a congressional subcommittee in 
Washington, he was asked if he cared to 
comment about market prices. Bloomberg 
News reported, but he replied, “I will restrain 
myself. On Dec. 5, Mr. Greenspan ques- 
tioned whether an “irrational exuberance” in 


the markets had "unduly escalated" values of 
finanrial assets. 

Those comments rattled financial markets 
around the world but at the time* the Dow was 
trading ar just 6,437. 

The Washington Post reported Thursday 
that Mr. Greenspan and other officials in 
Washington have been worried about high 
stock valuations for more than a year. 

Yet the central bank has not altered its 
interest-rale policy during that period,- and 
modest yields on fixed-income investments 
are providing some support to the stock mar- 
ket, according to Thomas Van Leuven of JP. 
Morgan Securities Inc. 

Mr. Van Leuven said the bank, which was 
"cautious" about equities, looked at stock 


valuations relative to bond yields as a way of 
measuring the outlook for Wall Street. The 
lower yields in recent sessions keeps the out- 
look for equities from deteriorating when 
compared with the credit market, he said. 


Hilton Tells ITT Not to Sell Assets 


BEVERLY HILLS. California (Bloomberg) — The chief 
executive of Hilton Hotels Corp., Stephen BoUenbach, urged 
ITT Corp. on Thursday not to quickly sell assets unrelated to 
its hotel and casino businesses in fending off Hilton's $10.5 
billion bid. 

In a letter to Rand Araskog, chief executive of ITT, Mr. 
Bollenbach said he was "concerned" by statements that ITT 
would be “unloading" assets like its stake in Madison Square 
Gard en and the New York Knicks and Rangers sports teams. 
IIT on Wednesday rejected Hilton's takeover oner. 

• Exxon Corp. filed documents with the U.S. District Court in 
Anchorage, Alaska, appealing the $5.06 billion judgment 
stemming from Exxon's Valdez oil spill case. 


DOLLAR: Currency’s Level Should Reflect Economic Fundamentals, G-7 Says, and Traders Listen 


Continued from Page 13 


United Healthcare Corp. said its fourth-quarter earnings 
ill 13 percent to $95.1 milli on from $109.9 milli on a year 


fell 13 percent to $95.1 million from $109.9 milli on a year 
earlier as its costs of providing medical services rose faster 
than revenue. 


• Muslcland Stores Corp. will closea total of 75 stores by the 
end of the month, and is looking for new investors to shore up 
its financial position. 


• The International Monetary Fund approved a $223 mil- 
lion loan to help Peru complete the restructuring of its 
commercial bank debt Bloomberg 


outlook is for solid US. growth and 
lower inflation, disappointment 
about the outlook on European 
growth and pessimism about Japan’s 
economy and policy outlook, there is 
no reason to see a turn in the dollar’s 
climb," said John Lipsky, the chief 
economist at Chase Manhattan 
Bank. 

"The intriguing question is when 
the G-7 ministers think their cred- 
ibility is at stake and they have to do 
something," he said. 

"The notion that there might be 
some new policy action behind die 
new policy is highly inconceivable,” 
Mr. Lipsky said, adding that be 
would not expect the Federal Re- 
serve to undermine the dollar by cut- 
ting its target for short-term races. 


Ms. McNifF said that the short- 
term outlook against the yen should 
be more stable than against tbe mark, 
unless there is new information 
showing that the Japanese economy 
is in worse shape or that policy ini- 
tiatives are floundering. “Traders 
will give the benefit of the doubt in 
the short tenn," she said, because the 


while Carl Weinberg, the- chief 


economist at High Frequency Eco- 
nomics, said all it had was “six 
verbs.” 

The key sentences about their 
concern about the dollar were these: 
"We believe that major misalign- 
ments in exchange markets noted in 
our April 1995 communique have 
been corrected.” And, “We agreed 
to monitor developments in ex- 
change markets and cooperate as 
appropriate.” 

In the April 25. 1995, statement, 
when the G-7 met as the dollar was 
foiling to its lowest levels since 
World War Q, their statement was 
more forcefuL 

They said that tire dollar had 
fallen "beyond the levels justified 
by underlying economic conditions 
in the major countries.” And the G- 
7 “agreed that orderly reversal of 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


current Japanese problems — a weak 
economy, lower interest rates and 
uncertain government policies — all 
are well known. 

Analysts and traders noted that 
the statement issued by tbe Group of 
Seven, which is made up of tbe 
United States. Japan, Germany, 
France, Italy, Britain and Canada, 
was not very strong. 

Ms. Lipsky called it "indistinct,’ ' 


those movements is desirable.” 

Nicholas Sargen, J. P. Morgan's 
market strategist for private clients, 
says tbe G-7 "is worried about the 
foreign-exchange market over- 
shooting” and is telling traders 
"let’s not get the dollar too 
strong.” 

But he adds "that is their di- 
lemma, because the fundamentals 
support a stronger dollar.” 

■ Bundesbank Calms Dollar 


The dollar was lower against the 
Deutsche mark in late trading 
Thursday after the vice president of 
the Bundesbank said me German 
central bank did not want tbe U.S. 
currency to rise further, news agen- 
cies reported. 

Johann Wilhelm Gaddum said 
that the recent rise of tiie dollar to its 
highest level in almost three years 


was a manor of "concern-' to Ger- 
many. A continuation of the ad- 
vance is “not in the interest of the 
Bundesbank.” he said at a confer- 
ence in Bangkok. 

In Washington, C Fred Bergsten, 
the head of the Institute for later- 
national Economics, said the G-7 
was “boand to intervene” in cur- 
rency markets if the dollar rises 
much further. 

"I’d be surprised not to see in- 
tervention if the dollar continued to 
rise much further,” Mr. Bergsten 
said. 

The dollar slipped to 1.6837 DM 
from 1.6870 DM, and to 5.6818 
French francs from 5.6890. But it 
rose to 124.355 yen from 124.275, 
and to 1.4550 Swiss francs from 
1.4520. The pound dropped to 
$1.6235 from $1.6305. 

(Bloomberg, Bridge News) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNAWONAL FUTURES 


Thursday’s 4 PM. Close 

The top 300 most odive shore* 
up to the dosing on Wal Street. 

The Associated Press 


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Dow Jones 

Open U 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


Feb. 13, 1997 


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Mgh law dan Chge OpM 


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35312 39ft 
34*25 63ft 
33984 59 
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UtWIes 20003 19X50 200 j03 

Finance 9251 9U5 9XS1 

SP 500 802.77 7B9.59 802.77 

5P100 78X14 77025 7BX14 


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PepsiCo* 32173 32ft 
I8M 31534 148ft 

HDBOnt 71241 7ft 
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TelAtex 77339 41 
FariMac 27136 43ft 

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iOOObu mMmum- cm* perbuiM 
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Alta* 97 273 271ft 273ft *1 87.014 

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ER. softs HA. WoTi 90ftS 49.356 
Wed's open W 329.123 up 4Mt 


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l mod n&^atnptrb, 

AW 97 7740 7455 76JB +235 1X428 

MOV 97 BUB 7750 8005 +130 1728 

Jul97 84.15 8150 8135 +1.95 3530 

Sep 97 8750 8450 8625 +155 2589 

EsL safes HA. Wed's, sries 7fiO 
Wecfsopenrt 16,177 up 1067 


WYEARI FRENCH OOV. BONDS CAAAT1F) 
FF500000- pboflOO pet 
AW 9713156 131,76 13152 +0.18144,172 
JOT 97 13064 13050 13064 +018 1&032 
Sep 97 12096 12096 12096 +018 876 

Dec 97 NX NX 9022 +018 0 

EsT. volume: 110443 .Open tot: 160880 up 
1 , 202 . 


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114754 114251 114754 +1075 
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SOYBEAN MEAUCB0T1 
100 too- dollars per tan 
AW 97 24850 81450 8«L5D +1JB 33J96 

May 97 8020 241.10 8010 *150 25543 

Jul97 24070 23950 24X40 +U0 213*4 

Aug 97 23750 236.10 237 JO *050 4J63 

Sep 97 231 JO 23 JO 230.51 -050 1029 

Oct 97 22150 22000 22050 -0.10 1.178 

EsL sates HA. Wed's, soles 34430 
Wed's open ir# 94522 up 3929 


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100 rrwox.- donors per trenraz. 

Feb 97 JUM 34380 344J0 -060 
AW 97 34490 

Apr 97 34X10 34170 34X90 — 1J0 
7W1 97 347 JO 34640 3*650 -AM 
Aug 97 35050 3«JD 35050 -410 
Od97 35250 

Dec 97 35540 3SU0 35440 —1.10 
Fob 98 357 JO 35620 35620 -150 
Est.tahB HA. Wed's, sales 82JB1 
wetfs open Ira 199,169 UP 3894 


SOYBEAN OR. lawn 
60000 per ta 

AW 97 2454 2166 2X0 -0.15 37419 

Mar 97 3655 3455 2125 -4110 3U95 

Jill 97 24J7 8650 2451 -0.11 15,917 

Aug 97 2443 24J5 2477 -459 X25I 

Sep 97 2550 24J0 24J8 -045 2J3S 

Od 97 2505 2L00 2345 -057 864 

EsL sales ha. Weds, soles 73467 
WtcrsapenM 91490 UP 1277 


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10 urates 

10023 

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10 Industrials 

10053 

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AW 97 11040 10740 10845 +0.H 
Apr 97 IIP JO 10650 10545 -010 
May 97 10680 10L50 10*55 +QJ0 
Jun97 M240 10250 10345 + 0.10 
JUI97 10445 10250 102J5 +045 
Aug 97 10140 

Sep 97 10240 10150 HO90 
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Est. SOM NA. Weds.sdas 7,199 
WPdYoptnin 53402 off 40 


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W e d ' s open ini 176576 up 6910 


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2207 1665 

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5400 bu minimum- cents per bushM 
Mar 97 363 357 358ft +lft 

May 97 358ft 353 356 +1 

JUI97 343ft 339ft 343 +1 

Sep 97 347 343ft 345ft +16 

Ed. safes HA wed’s, sate 22J83 
Wed’s open pit 725*3 up 2749 


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Fed 97 51233 

AW 97 51840 510150 51X50 * 240 

Apr 97 51X58 51551 H9J» +340 

May 77 52240 51640 S20JO +240 

Jul97 527.00 52040 5H50 +340 

Sa>97 53040 52750 53250 +460 

Dec 97 SHOO 531 JB 53840 +340 

Jot 90 53B.1D 

EsL sales HA Wed'S. 5 >u 6X843 
Wed's open fra 97471 up 6392 


rnUiAN 60VEMUAENT BOND (UPTO 
ITL2D0 hiBdt - pis of 100 pd 
MB97 1X1.17 130J0 me —041110626 

JIM97 13045 12951 129.99 —053 14670 

Sep97 HT. HT. 12949 -051 600 

EsL safe* 78.151 Piev. sales 62470 
PrawapenlRL 125J96 up 2.742 
EURODOLLARS (CMER) 
si in — an pw etiOflPd. „ 

Feb 97 94J0 M49 96J0 19,926 

AW 97 9441 9467 9441 393^81 

Apr 97 9445 9442 9*44 +842 L831 

Jun97 9449 «JM 94J8 +043 379.774 

Sep 97 909 9421 94JB +047 291462 

Dec 97 96.10 9643 9449 +046 210,199 

AW 98 MOD 9192 9349 +8071(10522 

JOT 98 9X90 9XS1 9X89 +007 140441 

50.98 9X82 9X73 9341 +047 104434 

Dec 98 9170 9343 069 +UB B2.918 

AW 99 9X17 93M UB +047 66477 

Jur 99 9341 1X55 9341 +047 6X175 

EsL Wes NA Wed's, ides BUS 
Wad's open int 239,168 OP XXS 
BRfnSH POUND (CMERJ 
62 JD 0 pounds. Spar pound 
AW 97 14346 14180 14214 3X222 

Jur 97 14278 14156 14SS3 238 

5ep97 14362 1JM0 

Dec 97 14226 I 

EsLvfes HA Wed’s. wees 6J94 
HfedYapenM 37480 Off M3 
CANADIAN DOLLAR ICMER) 
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SObOOORB.-OBnlSPM'lL 
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Mar 97 75J0 7448 7445 -027 34.02 

JUt97 7640 7540 7545 — O® 9J55 

Oct 97 76JD 75JO 75JO -038 U75 

Dec 97 76JD 7SJ9I 7645 -025 12472 

MorM 77.10 7740 7740 -077 til 

EsL sales HA Wed'S, safes 12411 
WerTsopenW 65J 59 up W5 


auaaaaL cent, per eal _ 

AW 97 61-20 59.90 5945 — L20 

Apr 97 5885 57.90 57 JO -092 

Mar 97 5748 5640 5640 -077 

Jun 97 S6J0 5540 5580 -052 

Julf7 B80 J51S0 5t» -022 

Aug 97 5640 55.95 5645 +003 

Stp 97 5685 5650 5650 -002 

0097 SJO 57.W 5740 -042 

Nor 97 5785 57JD 5749 +A2I 

Dec 97 5040 57 JO 5785 -047 

Etf.tfes ha Wed's. safes 52404 
Wed's Open M 10X536 up 3769 


LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMBQ 
TABS bhL- (Wkvs w bM. 

AW97 2246 2150 7148 -Oil SL3D7 

Apr 97 21J6 2U5 2144 -019 7X10* 

May 97 21 j« 2097 21.14 -020 40178 

Jun 97 21. M 2078 2094 -015 3S422 

All 97 2095 53.SS 2043 -003 16439 

Aug 97 2071 2S4S 2050 -015 15468 


Sep 97 2050 2025 2033 -014 15840 j| 
Ocf 97 2BJ9 MUS M.32 -0JD IUD2 ■# 


AW 97 

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7390 

7401 

Jun 97 

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7444 

7457 

STP 9/ 

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JAW 

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Dec 97 

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7540 

7534 

Est.sates HA. 

_VMffs.sa4es. 6206 


OcJ 97 2BJ9 XL» 2022 -OJS 7UD2 

No»97 2010 2045 1989 -047 8491 

Dec 97 20.10 1940 19.90 -042 2L312 

Jan 98 1981 1988 1980 +OI0 1X154 

FNJ9B 1945 1948 1940 +048 7,970 

AW98 »J2 WJO 1985 +O10 2.166 

EsL sales NA. wed’s.Kdts 157^34 
Wad's open kd 390436 up 12897 


WedrsupenM 5X997 off 209 


Market Sales 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMERJ 


PLATI4UM (NNIER) 
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Apr 97 37X50 36950 37040 —140 

Jur 97 mst mm srsiu +ui 
Del 97 37550 37X50 37X50 -240 
Jot 90 37630 

ES. sales HA WBTLSdB 186 
WerfkapenM 26408 0B 1343 


GERMAN MASK (CMER) 

12 X 080 mortis, s per mat 

AW97 5976 5927 5951 9X7B6 

JOT 97 5972 5968 59*1 

Sep 97 4015 4004 JWM Z3&2 

Dec 97 MBS 2D 

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Wed’emniM 101,966 off 97<S2 


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1465 4‘+ 61, 

9T Ift IM 

III U1» II 1 , 


IM *M 
2 Cft *M 
IIM ft 

n +M 

fM *M 

lift *1» 
3H1 *M 
*6 _ 

'lit * 
13 *ft 

IM .ft 
Ift <M 
4ft ,ft 
,J 1 M ft 
10 *ft 


Coenpany Per Ant 

IRREGULAR 

British Petrol b 1886 

British Sky Brt b 4333 

Reuters HaUngs b 1.107 

STOCK SPLIT 
ComobeB Soup 2 ter 1 spflt 
NudearMeta&2forl spfl. 

Redraan Assoc 2 for 1 mBL 


Ml 5-6 
2*21 4-11 
>19 5-2 


cScCor? 


N^Sd% 

Noaalnd A.I 


INCREASED 

AffledCapCarp 0 J33 

AtifedCPplL a A 3 

HaurtdruChem S _09 

Indana Common S ,18 

Sendee Cara mi 0 MS 

Varsity SphS Q JJ55 

WMtmpRes Q 45 

OMITTED 

SOfesCfeV 


>14 >31 
>14 3-31 
>28 4-11 
2- 28 >28 
4-15 4-30 
>24 3-6 

>14 4-1 



Per And 
REGULAR 

O .18 
S .19 

0 JS 

a 42 
a 41 

Q 45 
a 493 
Q .1875 
Q 45 
Q 45 
Q .13 
a 48 
Q JIB 
S .10 
Q M 
_ 415 


4-15 5-1 

>7 >21 

3- 31 4-30 
>26 >14 

4- 10 5-1 

4-4 5-6 

>19 >28 
>3 >14 
3-7 4-15 
3-31 4-TS 
>28 4-15 

>17 4-1 

>14 3-3 

34 >24 

>24 3-6 
2-28 >14 


Apr 97 6655 6572 4635 +056 

Jun 97 6430 6X75 64.15 +027 

Aug 97 6385 6352 617S +0.15 

Oct 97 67 JO 6640 675S +038 

Dec 77 6837 6OB0 69-S) +855 

Feb 76 7040 70.10 7045 +055 

Ed.sWs HA wad's. safes 15450 
Wed's open kd 181,170 an 432 

HM SlB t CATTLE (CMER7 
30JOO Bk- cents per n. 

tSS^rr 6X« 4757 «.ir + 0.17 

Apr 97 4942 6X60 PL95 +OJ27 

Mar 97 7055 OX 7D52 +OSS 

AM97 7X45 7X32 7X70 +S5D 

S»97 7620 7X75 7432 +062 

Od 97 7485 74JS 7X« +057 

EsL sties HA Wetfs-srtes X118 
Wed's open ini I2J3S off 100 


dose 

LONDON METALS <LME) 
DoOcns per metric ton 
A l e anfiw Oagb CraOtO 


Said 154X00 154600 152600 152X00 
Farword 1575JN 157600 155716 155&J00 


651 JW 65X00 64600 *44 on 

*57% 65X00 65X00 65X00 


Spat 7820 JO 783X00 778X00 7795LD0 

Forward 791000 791500 787000 788000 


Spot 583000 588500 586500 587500 

Forward 593BOO swam 593000 594000 


Forward 593800 SWUM 593000 594UOO 
Ztac Bppctal Htab Crate] 


HOQS-Lera (CMB0 

aimfeL-caMNrb. 

Apr 97 7467 76W 7440 -Xffl 

Jun 97 79.61 22 79-77 +BJ0 

Jul97 77*5 77J5 77J0 +0J0 

Aug 97 7638 7190 7637 +M0 

Od 97 674D 67.15 047 +035 

Dec 97 6525 6500 65JI +M7 

Es. safes NA .Wed's. 7061 
Wed's open M 34329 o« 610 


Spat 1201JW 120200 116100 110*00 
Forward 122300 122600 1188D0 178900 


High Low Ctase Chge OpM 


Financial 


JAPANESE YEN {CMERJ 
ns mOton yen. 1 Mr no van 
AW 97 OHO J0S6 JNB0 B1JH7 

JOT 97 5210 4167 4183 XSi 

Sep 97 4285 414 

Est.sates HA HWiate T7J7V 
Wed'supwiH 85023 up 1673 

SWISS nUUICKMBl) 

12MO0 Cranes. S pa- franc 

■S 51 -® 1 -6901 47,772 

JOT97 -7010 4950 mb £m 

JQjQ im 

Est sales ha. viws. ides MJB9 
WetFsepenM 52A74 off 103 
MMNTM EUROMAIIK OIPPE) 

DM) mason -rax at hubc? 

W 3S 

s W ™ ISSzgsS 

» SS S3 ££=££$§ 

H ss 


NATURAL GAS (NMER} 

1DA00 mm Hu's. S per nvn Mu 
AW 97 2BH 1.990 1495 

Apr 97 2DZ IJ85 1J98 
May 97 2JB25 1470 1578 

JOT 97 2.025 1-970 1.9*1 

Jut 97 IM 1485 1510 
Aug 97 2545 1595 2JD0 

Sep 77 2.055 7JM ZOOS 

0097 2565 2510 2515 

Non 97 216! 2120 2730 

Dec 97 2575 2230 2230 

JOT 98 2JQ0 2270 2265 

EHWet HA Wed’s. sdes 47.938 
Wed's open W 1*4771 up 4273 




iMLEADBIGASOLHEMMER) 

4200a otL cams par oat 
Mar 97 6X48 *140 . 6270 -419 27^89 

APT 97 6*20 tin 6620 -454 2X511 

MW97 6*75 6100 6620 -430 0890 

WlW 6601 6190 6130 -430 8^93 

A8 97 6260 ©J® SUQ +040 6959 

Aug 97 61-00 U1J5 48J0 +0JH 3512 

EsLsdes HA Wed's. sdes 31,123 
Wed's open int BSJD7 up 21*9 


GASOIL OPE] 
U-S. debars per 


UA. debars per metric ton- tats oM 00 tons 
aSlS 17K5Q 1 0400-21 J» 14X76 


nimsewi ™ SIAM lOpi/a 

£P* * 176JJ0 17EOO-15JXI 7J38 

uSS 3?® >»^S-12J5 6234 

17625 17*40 -Ms X239 
-* u,9 7 17740 176.08 17*55 — 8J5 X967 

S-J- N-T. 177J5 —755 L3S4 

Sept 97 HT. HT. 17840 — *40 1,060 

l]<s EsL sates: 16564. Open hiL: *1567 off 


PORK BBJJB (CMBU 


sbamMDRr mroMe to cwortatads: 


if? ‘1? 

12 S 3 


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17, 1|M 

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IV. It', 
in 1 " 
1 ; - II' 


II 111. II 

14 IJM 14 

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39. 

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16 

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Stock TaUes Explained 

Sales figures are unofficial. Yeortjr highs and tom reflect toe previous 52 weeks plus trie 


Feb 97 7952 7740 7950 +1.M 983 

HW97 7940 77J) 7XB +4» 2542 

Marl? 00.10 78JB 79.17 +0.55 14U 

MV 7X20 7720 78.W +087 714 

Aug 97 7600 76ffl 76M +U7 518 

EsLsfeBS HA WBfS.SOteS X771 
Wed'S OTOT int <3D UP 


US T. BILLS ICMBU 
si nriBen- sn or me pcl 
IIW97 9550 9699 9679 +051 69« 

JOT 97 9690 9688 9450 +051 XXI! 

59P97 9676 9676 9676 +8JB BK 

Dec 97 9641 BI7 

Es. sides NA, Wfeirs.safes 247 

Wed's open int 9.17* off 41 


Si£ v*- 

S5 SS +«» 2 s.w 

“Id ra.n 95.T3 * nrv> me* * 

ra- 1 1 ton 11 KWr. Pnr.Mte; 1 49573 
W»PilL' 1.187,126 up Eg 1 
I-MONTH STERUNO OJPFE) 
BorLoeo.ftjrfioopd 

S3 9349 ?X70 — 002 106*05 

25 SiS 5<£ —042 1 iM?i 
55 52 5® — tun 8X701 
2-iJ M.12 ttis — am Sun 
9X09 9353 93JS — 401 3744$ 

S« S5 37^ 

S H M ^ ™ 

BEE ® 

3j> OHTHP I8QR(MATlR 

Jw; S 9f72 9473 lam S!^ 

+OD0 1UT0 

VStS +«m tzm 

^5 X g£ &3SS m 

DecW 9SD3 95.03 95JM +®J2 l^jy 
^EsL seluma: 39,159. Open mu 26A370 off 

gnr- 

*Sm 

§ ££ SS gS'SS S™ 

xss as 3 
ftswsrw 


permtar nont tots been paw. trie tears high-low rangrand dMdend utesl stu n A ar Hie nen 
stodksanty. Unless athnwfaentded, rote of dhrfdend* araannualdlshureafliaift toSOd Oti 
the latest dedaratton. 

fl- dividend ataeexha (s). _ ^ . L ^ m _, 

b - annual rate of dMtiend plus stock HL antoiown. 

e^BRui Mating dMftmL ? In nrarndtoa 13 

d^new^rtytow s - stock spa. Dividend begins wffri date al 

dd - loss m the last 12 monftn. i— 


3 TR. TREASURY (C8CTTJ 

smooo Brin- M>«, csRHief u» m 

Mar 97 107-41 186-65 106-63 +08 189J96 

JOT 97 104-47 106-43 106-50 +18 1X951 

SOT 97 106-34 

Est. sales NA Wed's, safes 46X2 

Mfed'saoenH 28BJ4S up KRM 


COCOA (NCSE) 

ft) rneplc tans- S pw ran 


AW 97 

Uffl 

1217 

1227 

— J 

5736 

AW 97 

1390 

1271 

1277 

+3 

3X447 

JU97 

1320 

non 

1307 

+ 1 

I7J/2 

Sep 97 

no 

1337 

1335 

+3 

9575 

Doc 97 

1381 

1340 

7340 

+J 

%*&2 


1* YK TREASURY <CT0T} 

SIDOADOnrin- Mi 8.BndsaMMp0 
Mcr 97 109-23 109-15 iomo +05 380434 
JOTT7 109-03 1 0B-3B 109-03 + 07 40481 

Sep97M>t7 108-17.188-17 + 85 1515 

EsLwfe* NA wed's. scries p,m 
WedrsopenH 34x233 off 1088 


IM 4, 
14ft 
IT* 

(nr 

11 

,4V« .ft 


e-dMdenddedniwiar pom in preceding 12 r- dMdfeid paM to stock in preceding 12 
, , . mantas, estimated cosh value on ewfi. 


^^ual rale, increased on last decks- 

4 Ub i** ,w v-tfSSnB'hSieS'^ 

i non-re stoonen tax. ri • in bontouptcyornNifeon 

1 1- dividend dectored offer spRt-ap or stock mamontoed undartap Bonkn 
dWkfend. Mniiftcmmiml hu nirt, m 


Est.sates HA VMffxsfeay.M* 
Wed’s open Int 90051 08 2» 


I4M 

W*r ft 
lift «ft 
ITU ft 
irv, , 1 , 
in* -a. 
l»ft 

IT>» ft 
146* ft 


l5 Ta raw-fesMancB to*-_ ri - in bookruplCY Of recehfef^hlp or belny 

l - dividend declared offer sofll-op or stock reorganized under trio Bonknjplcy Aa. or 
dwidand. eMiiittUw t«.M i^>M«»irri,,»ii p nnfeK 

|-dMdendpaidthisyeacibntoeadefened,ar wd - when dfetribuled. 
noodiwiolanatliaesi d N ae n d mecfetiL wl- when issued 


Cm I LLCQ8CSE) 

37^BS Jte. -aeoUtwfc. 

MO-97 1BL00 17X00 180JH +820 
MW97 MUD 16610 M9J0 +U0 
Jill 97 162*5 159 JO 16ZBS +42S 
Sea 97 15640 15X00 155-95 +195 
Est. KriK HA WOT'S.MW T7J89 
Wed's open Int 42617 ail 953 


US TREASURY BONDS fCBOTI 

nwa +n 

JOT 97 10-13 111-30 112-81 +18 *2,3*1 

SIPW 111-18 Ill-ia 111-31 +15 WJ91 

DbcW DUB 1974 

EflWis HA wunufet 382879 

Vtad'topenM 542J30 up USB 




a^ajjm-BNarimpa 

ito^ m® 10X19 + oop 24S.151 


k - ttatoend dectored or peid Ms an ww-wftawuiiuuts. 
occur. We issue wttadMdends in mm. x-«wfi»toerid« ex-rights, 
m • r nial rate, tedHOed an lost deciam- h»- ex-dtsbtoirioa 
non. xw-wUhoyt warrants, 

n- new Issue hi me past 52 weeks. The ragh- y-a*-dWd«idond*4itosInh4L 
tow range begins wtmtoe start ct imflna. tid-yiad. 

ad - n«t day dethery. i-snieslnhitL 


SUGAR-WORLD It (NCSE) 

nuMix-amNrh 

Morn 1073 10J3 UM -OB 


AtaW 101J7 1(033 10X34 rOJO 1W9 
EHsafe® 155.971. PRM.safes: 229X7 
PraiOTWllaL; 266030 up 1009* 


Mn 1038 WAS -<UB 

Od 97 1041 1X38 1041 — XtO 

EST. arid NA w«fs. soles MJ1I 
WNfsspcnM 145.133 Of IS* 


lMGcilt ojppe] 

Boooo-pfefcaidjufinopd 

USS !m2« H*® 3 11>W — (MM 190380 


Juu97 112-22 112-18 112-27 —M* *164 
^retas 7JS65. Prerreles 9L77I 
PmY.ojwnlnL 2064*4 *4408 


Stock Indexes 


5BPCOMP.MDEX KMER) 

SOOrMn 

Mw 97 81090 80675 81X80 +3JS 182,140 

HK 5 SHS SS-* tAJ0 

Sep 97 82740 B24J0 827JD +441 1,657 

DKWBSJB BB3 SBJB +S 1^ 

&srtes HA. wurisafes bum 

Wed's open int 196J95 up 37S7 


S tmw 

4*00 + 174 1.901 

Pre». Mux 11457 
open tut.- 67J70 up 70 


SPB-w» 

Feb 


26365 +2950 27J*5 
' » JO 21038 

$2 n ff-I' N - T - 28100+2050 *093 
^ N-T, N.T. jflBJ +29JO n 
Mor 9ft M.T. H.T,aw3i2?no 7J29 
SffPW HT. HTlSulSig ™ 
i 17^«tuTWs1i10tO p «ntoL:6fiJ52op 


Commodity Indexes 


Moodyu 
Reuters 
DJ. Futures 
CRB 


Owe r rainnos 

l^LBO 148080 

1»WL40 1,96000 

,S4JS 

23038 W<Mto 




ToH f! 


-ilf 


Ii':- . -. • 

i‘- ,s V 






Clnil' 11 '' l : ' 
ihil’^ 1 v; 

Hulmr*" 11 ' ' 


WOKI.II 'I "I K M \ It k I 


Thursday, f cb i J 


Amsteriir 


Bangkok 


to - . 

3cv,i , ,- J 

■ 


Spenh ‘,>r 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14,1997 


EUROPE 


Siemens Chief Defends 
Slow Earnings Growth 
To Restless Investors 


Bloomberg News 

BERLIN — Siemens AG’s chief 
ex«»tive. Heinrich von Pierer, had 
wrely begun addressing the com- 
pany s annual shareholders’ meet- 
ing m Berlin on Thursday when he 
was forced from the podium by 
hecklers. 7 

The chants came from a group 
quickly ejected from the acting 
hall, demanding that Siemens com- 
pensate slave laborers for work they 
were forced to perform for the com- 
pany during World War IL 

“ ™ as no* a good omen for Mr. 
von Pierer, who is under increasing 
pressure from investors and a nal ysts 
to increase profits more quickly. 
German publications such as the 
weekly Der Spiegel have already 
begun speculating that Mr. von Pier- 
er could be forced from his post as 
head of Germany’s largest electron- 
ics and engineering company. 

When be retook the podium, Mr. 
von Pierer, who has been chief ex- 
ecutive officer since 1992, held fast 
to his view that Siemens can im- 

Chubb’s Talks 
On Possible Sale 
Bolster Shares 

Carq>8ed br Of Stag FmetDiqrttcita 

LONDON — Chubb Secu- 
rity PLC said Thursday it was in 
talks that might lead to a sale of 
the company for as much as 
£1.27 bulion ($2.1 billion), 
prompting the company’s stock 
to surge 23 percent 

The company, which makes 
products ranging from closed- 
circuit television equipment to 
fire extinguishers, said it was 
looking for a buyer. 

But Chubb said it did not 
expect a buyer to value the com- 
pany at more than 450 pence per 
share. Chubb’s shares closed 
Thursday at 420 pence, up 79. 

Analysts said there were no 
obvious Udders in Britain for 
Chubb, which holds about 11 
percent of the global security- 
systems market in which it op- 
erates. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


prove its earnings without steep job 
cuts or other radical measures. 

’’One should not get mired down 
in a conflict between investors and 
employees,'* Mr. von Pierer told the 
gathering, which coincided with die 
company's 150th annivexsary. “Se- 
cure jobs and motivated employees 
as well as profitable companies and 
motivated shareholders are two 
sides of the same coin.” 

Mr. von Pierer also refused to 
feed shareholder hopes for higher 
earnings in its finaViai year of 
1997. He repeated forecasts that 
Siemens expected earnings for foe 
year to be die same as they were last 
year, with gains coming only in foe 
1998 financial year. 

Net profit was 2.5 billion 
Deutsche mads ($1 .49 billion), not 
counting one-time gains, in the fi- 
nancial year ended Sept 30, 1996. 

“We expect an increase in new 
orders and sales that wSl be above 
the original conservative plan” in 
financial 1997, Mr. von Pierer said. 
He cited favorable currency rates 
and low interest rates. 

He also said dial “in the fore- 
seeable future,” Siemens planned to 
sell units with sales of 3 billion DM, 
after selling units with sales of 2 .5 
billion DM in financial 1996. The 
sales would amount to about 32 
percent of Siemens total sales last 
year of 94.2 billion DM. They win 
be offset by acquisitions in some 
areas, he said. 

The company said in December it 1 
expected to cot about 6,000 jobs 
timing the financial year out of a 
work force of 203,000. Only a few 


will come from normal attrition. In- 
deed, Siemens continues to make 
“considerable additions” to its 
work force, Mr. von Pierer said. 

But investors want more. 

“There’s certainly movement in 
foe company, but it’s only super- 
ficial,” said Daniela Beredolt, a 
representative of a shareholder ad- 
vocacy group at the Thursday meet- 
ing. “Don’t fall back into monopoly 
practices. The problems aren’t 
solved.” 

Siemens shares closed down 40 
pfennig at 86.53 DM in electronic 
trading, as the benchmark D AX in- 
dex surged to close at its 1 1th con- 
secutive record high. 


2.5% French Growth Foreseen 

OECD Report Lifts Government Credibility on EMU 


By Carl Gewirtz 

- Imerntmanal Herald Tribune . 

PARIS - — With monetary conditions currently “for 
easier” than in any year since the mid-1980s, French 
economic growth should expand 2_5 percent this year 
and again tn 1998, foe Organization for Economic 
Cooptation and Development forecast Thursday. 

This pickup from last year’s anemic 13 percent 
enhances foe government’s credibility to get its 
budget deficit to 3 percent of total output — the target 
needed to qualify for membership m the European 
monetary union. 

La fact, the OECD sees this year’s budget deficit at 
335 percent But it said that “there would appear to 
be room to cope with any slippage-in future budget 
amendments” to keep foe figure at 3 percent 

The 1997 budget outcome is important because it 
will serve as foe benchmark when governments meet 
m the spring of 1998 to determine which EU coun- 
tries qualify for entry into tbe monetary union, which 
is to begin on Jan. 1,1999. 

Despite the stronger economic performance, 
however, the OECD expects little improvement in 
nnempkmnent, which it predicts win remain near 12 
percent nance’s unemployment rare was 12.7 per- 
cent in. December. 

The report also warns that the government’s me- 
dium -term deficit reduction targets “do not appear 
ambitious enough” to keep it capped at 3 percent 


beyond the year 2000, when demographic changes 
will start to push up spending. Without vigorous 
cutbacks in spending, foe deficit could be running 
close to 5jpercent by foe year 2015. 

To achieve foe needed spending cuts, the report 
called on foe government to speed up reforms in the 
management of core public services and in the re- 
structuring of state-owned enterprises. 

The report said that regulatory reform was needed 
to ease (lie administrative burden on French compa- 
nies to increase competition and to make France “a 
more lightly regulated country.” It said that further 
liberalization in the transport, telecommunications, 
energy and distribution sectors would lead to “con- 
si doable economy-wide benefits.” 

It also repeated its call for greater flexibility on 
wages and urged a reassessment of the role of foe 
mi n imum wage in order to open job opportunities. 

■ Business Leaders Cut Investment Plans 

French business leaders polled in January revised 
downward their plans for new plants and machinery 
this year, Bloomberg News reported from Paris. 

bi a blow to foe government's hopes to see in- 
vestment become foe main engine for growth, business 
leaders in the manufacturing industry said they 
planned to increase the value of investment by 4 
percent in 1997 after a 1 percent rise in 1996, according 
to INSEE, the national bureau of statistics. In October, 
they had planned a 7 percent increase in 1997. 


Frio* tori. .tooaiw* Farts *'< 

OAX • ■ \ TSTWfrfex : 

3250 — — — 2700 — — - 

31® -j-’ 4400 |:i 2550 

m - ; 4250 - 

: m — yl*— 4100 7 \r~ 

265o^L 3950 21®^- 

2500s n vi n i c ■' 3800 .. m F\ t c ' ' 1950'S o' u' 


4400 


4100—. 


SON DJF " 

1998 1997 

a ton"-'-.. Index . 


SON DJF 

1996 1997 


SON 

1998 


Soriaaga 

Ahtstontem 


Tpmsttay •Prove.'-:' 
* v .qtoae .>'C3w» .'.-•< 


Copenhagen Stock Mark# - > . J- j 


■ Otio'-. •• ••' 

lx»ntd<w r '.. ;, ’ ry 

■■*wpno 

mm • , \ 

r»» 

Ylonpq • : 

Source: Tetekurs 


06)5- 

'StocfcExc 

.MfSTH.. 

SX16 v, 
•ATX.* 
■SB-’' 


:,&&&* .SBW - +1.43 
■ 4 £Z7?-W ■ 43043& +053 

JtZfi&jQb. 12<4«)^O.+a70 
£82&4* .p092» p +t;12 

■S&mjSt ' ^,78797 +0.49 
A&ZXto 1.208.40 +029 
. 2,82*34 2#*&29 -0.07 

fiacnuiwMJ Hcnld Trgjanc 


Stock Splits Fuel Rise in Shell Shares 


LONDON — The Royal Dutch/ 
Shell Group announced Thursday 
stock splits and a surprisingly strong 
114 percent jump in fourth-quarter 
net income, touching off a rise in foe 
shares of its British and Dutch par- 
ent companies. 

Europe's biggest oil company 
said net profit for foe quarter was 
£1.29 buHon (S2.ll billion), as 
higher oil prices and better refining 
earnings offset a weaker perfor- 
mance in chemicals. The results 


pushed Shell’s 1996 net earnings op 
23 percent, to £53 billion. 

Royal Dutch/Shell said its return 
on investment was 13.2 percent, sur- 
passing its target of 12 percent. 

The company also said it would 
increase over the next five years the 
share of its capital spending devoted 
to exploration and production. 

Shares surged for both parent 
companies. Royal Dutch Petroleum 
Co. and Shell Transport & Trading 
Co. Royal Dutch shares rose 11.70 
guilders ($632) to 34730 guilders 


in Amsterdam. Shell shares rose 26 
pence to 1,088 pence m London. 

The stock spirts involve Royal 
Dutch issuing four new shares for 
every one held, while Shell will issue 
two new shares for every one held. 

Royal Dutch, the company that 
controls 60 percent of the group, 
raised its dividend to 635 guilders a 
share from 5.60. 

London-based Shell lifted its di- 
vidend to 22 3 pence a share from 
20.4 pence. 

(Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters) 


sSS&Ssss Bonn Opposition Applauds Tax Move 


Reuters 

BONN — Tbe Social Democratic Party on Thursday 
greeted Finance Minister Tbeo Waigel’s offer to begin 
implementing his tax-reform plan next year instead of 
in 1999 as a step in foe right direction. 

But foe opposition party stood by its demand that the 


whole package — which aims to simplify the tax system 
and includes 30 billion Deutsche marks ($17.88 billion) 
in tax cuts — should be implemented in 1998. 

“Purchasing power in Germany is so bad that de- 
mand is faltering,” said Ingrid Matthaeus-Maier, an 
economics spokesman for foe Social Democrats. 


Very brief lys 

•Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG said that its 1 996 result was 
“substantially better” than foe loss of 4.18 billion Deutsche 
marks ($2.48 billion) reported in 1995, aided by cost-cutting 
measures and a boom in new orders. Tbe unit of Daimler* 
Benz AG said sales rose 13 percent to 13.0 billion DM. Sales 
were expected to rise to 14 billion DM in 1997. 

•Nokia Oy of Finland, the world’s second-largest mobile- 
phone maker after Motorola Inc., said its fourth-quarter pretax 
profit rose 76 percent to 1 .67 billion markkas ($337.5 million) 
and forecast “strong growth” for this year. 

•South African Airways denied reports that it was one of 
nine airlines planning an alliance to counter the threat of a 
proposed linkup between British Airways PLC and AMR 
Corp.’s American Airlines. 

• Coca-Cola Co. said it outsold its arch-rival, PepsiCo Inc., 
in Russia for the first time last year to become tire number one 
soft-drink producer in foe country. 

• Brau und Brun nen AG, foe German beer and soft-drink 
maker, said its chief executive, Friedrich Ebeling, had 
resigned and would be replaced by Rainer Verstynen, chief 
executive of foe textile concern Augsbiirger Dieng Holding 
AG, cm July 1 1. No interim chief was to be named. 

• Atlas Copco AB, the Swedish tools and mining-materials 
group, said its pretax profit in 1996 rose 8 percent to 3.07 
billion kronor ($412.6 million), lifted by strong sales outside 
its core European market. 

■Lukoil, Russia’s largest oil company, said it had obtained 
permission from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission 
to sell American depositary receipts for its p refer re d stock. 

• ITT Corp. sold 3 million shares of Alcatel Alsthom to a 

• Targe American investment fund’ ’ for roughly $300 million, 

reducing its stake in the French telecommunications company 
tO 2.8 percent from 4.9 percent. Bloomberg, Reuien.AFP 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


- Thursday, Feb. 13 

Prices hi toad currencies. 

Tetekurs 

M* lM dm Prate 

Amsterdam 

rTPWK/IUI 


ABN-AMRO 
Arson 
AMO 
Atm Nobel 
Boon Co. 

Bob Wen cm 

CSMom 

DonKdwPtf 

£&» . 
Fata Arne* 
Getrania 
G-Bracoio 

UtaMftakflr 

ffiST 

Hoogmanscva 

HurfOcwBtai 

INC Group 

tCLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

!£»* 

OttGtfJWI 

ptmoEioe 


RaptOatti 
Unfa ir ow 
Vends Mt 
VNU 

WMMKleva 

Bangkok 

AOvlnfoSvc 
Bangkok BhF 

KNfloTMBk 
PTTExptar 
Mara Cement F 
SomCflnBKF 
TctM u no M n 
TTaUAIrwm _ 
Thai Farm BkF 
UtdCom 

Bombay 

BoMMtO 
HtoWUUewr 
MtadusrPrihn 
bid Dev Bk 
rrc 

MohenagarTd 


Hu* Bk total 
sum Authority 
Tata Eng Loco 


Brussels 


EtecXaftaa 
Ports AG 
Gewert 
GIB 
GW. 

GanBaaoof 

Kndkrtbonk 

Ftamita 

Poweffin- 

RavtaoBtaK 

acftoMj 

SoW , 

TrodeOH 

DCS 

Union MW** 


12 IM I2SJD 
11£90 m 
11X90 11X10 
284.10 287XD 
KUO 8BJC 
3450 3440 
11X50 11150 
367 JO 35430 
WJO 17WO 
29 JO 29.10 
7070 70 

61J0 a 

Sftj* ani 
MU0 HRJ0 
31*20 3U70 
7850 77 JQ 
13150 13120 
71 JO 7B80 
5410 5410 
40.70 4J-10 
4420 4440 
2L5C S5M 
777A3 274 

23650 23450 
81 78.10 
8410 8850 
13SJ0 13440 
160-50 159J0 
60J0 61 JO 
14X40 16190 
109 JO 10958 
347J0 33550 
TOW 336 
87 JO 0410 
39^0 3BJ8 
227.60 22550 


5en»ta*m»t 

PRriWR 72257 

228 206 200 226 
2W Iffl 202 

W5 3U8 * 

330 314 316 326 

752 664 664 696 

153 136 139 154 

44 4250 M 4ZJ5 
37 3450 37 3475 

jg g jg 

5250 920 924^ 

915 90050 W2S 91*S 
NL50 37125 380 37450 

77K 9450 9475 9475 
416 41175 AIMS 
C2J5 Z» 24050 24050 

280 276 27750 277 25 

22jD 22J5 22J5 22JK 
BJ5 329 33150 331 


BEUMtateimM 

F reitatataePjO 

1 125 ?S 1 288 ’IS 
1 SS 

i jm JSS. J2S 

1 "SS *322 ^232 

1 3355 3370 3320 

2340 2300 3305 

( 1272 72W 1262 

i 114 115 .115 

i' 14900 15675 15175 
I 2025 2045 2035 
gSS BOOO Bft50 
! 32SB ^ gn 


1595 ISO 
4655 4630 

11700 ll|s 

77" J® 

aSs 

1489) 1ADD 
95100 vau 

■ 2575 2555 


Copenhagen 

Codon Foil ™ 
FLStadB W 

toss, i 

Trvg nofflffl . g 


. HV> uw 

B e fa l d fl lt « - 99. 8O--9U0- 
BMW ' 1184 ira 

QomMizJtMitdt 4X4S 43-75 
Dataller Bonr IK 124 
Degaow 719 716 

DaatcdKBaafc 8141 8490 
OetaTeMM 32J2 3250 
DmsdnerBai* 5X70 5x30 
F mental 322 M5) 

PitmtaMcd 147 JO 147 
FftatKtapP 265 257 - » 
Geha 116 114 

HebMbgZral 141 140 

HanfcripW 8120 8750 
Hadtaet 75 77 JO 

HaacM - «L60 7i25 

tovtcrit 515 507 

Undo 1134 TO 85 

LuMaua 2A05 Z3JS 
MAN 44250 431 

Monneimi*» 689 677 

MftdaettfechBft 33 3X81 
Mara 13250 131 

MunditaradcR 4070 4no 
Ptwsug 41750 414 

RWE 75.90 7450 

SAP pfd - 257 JO 25550 

Sduntag M7 jo V4SJ0 

StanefB 8750 BiSQ 

Thraen 32480 322 

Veba 96L30 9450 

VEIN 504 5M 

Vtafl 709 70050 

VoSsmsgen 819 87550 


Helsinki 


•ML5B. 9450 • 

nc ns? 

AM 4250 

12430 12435 
71650 720 

85.10 I4JB 
3253 3263 
53J0 5240 
322 324 

147.40 148 

25759 340 

115 1T6JB 
14050 141 

87 JS WAS 
72 75JQ 
7S40 7550 
509 517 

IMS 1118 
2355 ZL93 
442 429 

48) 60750 
32J83 3X01 
131J5 13150 
4070 3775 
41650 4050 
7550 7425 
25648 25650 
14550 147 JO 
8755 S7J2S 
324 »!!« 
9635 9355 
50Q SOS 
7tS 71250 
AS 80250 


GF5A 

base 

UbartyHdB* 

UbertjUto 


Refidnmcft Gp 

Rkticnatf 

Rnd Ptafinwa 

SABmndes 

Sanuncar 

Sosol 

swe 

TlBWOfliS 


High Lour Oaso 

Prate 


High 

Urn 

Close 

PWte 

High La* Close 

Piw. 


High 

Low 

Oase 

Pwv. 

118 115 118 

113 

Unlewr 

MN 

1470 

14X1 

1470 

ScMbdort 

130 

135 13630 

Ill 

Ericsson B 

253 

247 JO 

2 ® 

246 

355 357 160 

360 

l/td Assurance 

5X7 

538 

537 

5X6 

Tponsoaxm Off 

S 

375 386 

373 

HennesS 

1065 

1025 

1027 

10*5 

345 345 345 243J0 

Uta Hears 

672 

£60 

£70 

669 

StareburodAsa 

3970 

39 39.10 

39 

JrtarrthtA 

536 

528 

535 

530 

130. 12875 129JS 

129 

Utd umes 

£80 

6J3 

£79 

6 X0 





bniEstaiB 

346JB 

343 34330 

341 

107 JB 10630 106JS 

10625 

Vendarot touts 

497 

490 

491 

495 





MoDoB 

230 

225 

226 

223 


1750 19 19J0 

78J5 7X75 7775 
4740 4755 4750 
62 6250 62 

6625 6X50 6350 
13150 136 13125 

55 57 » 

5150 52 5173 

186 186 187 

n 72 71 


Kuala Lumpur 


Geaflno 

MdtSs&tpF 

PelrenosGfls 


1720 17 17.10 17 

30 2925 2950 2950 
635 615 620 625 

9.10 9 925 9.18 

5-15 4J6 iH 4J2 

1240 12JQ 1240 1140 
940 9 JO 920 9J5 

19 JO 19,40 1950 1930 
1250 1220 12J0 12J0 
Z&O 2330 mo 2140 


WttomsHdBS 

WobdPy 

WPPCkwp 


Madrid 

Aceiim 

ACESA 

AouBBoRidDn 

Araomnifa 

BBV 

Hanoita 

Bonktatr 

Bee Centra W*p 

BoiBdeder 

taPcpoto 

Bat Santander 

CEPSA 

CurflMrte 


KemJro 

Kesko 

MertttA 

MttraB 

Metaa-SfdaB 

Neste 

NoMoA 

Orion- YHyiaoe 

OUKdMnwA 


215 216 

5640 57 

7) 7256 
1750 1731 
28B 295 

3X40 4050 
132 132 

318 319 

179 180 

70 » 

4250 4450 
429 433 

99* 101J0 
M 9130 


London 

Adder Nall 
MtadOBteOCQ 
Anolan VMer 

AsocBrnods 

BAA 


BtoaOde 
BOC Grata) 
Betas 
BPS tnd 
MMp 
BrtAln rays 
BrttG« 
Brit Land 
BrtPtetai 


FT-SE 100: 027.10 


Hong Kong u-jjsegiggM £*2^ 

niuniw camd Union 

Aimtan 

Bk But Asia ---- 


Bk East Asia 
Cattoy Pocfflc 
Cfteung Kong 
CKItfrosOwl 
CWnUoM 
OtanOaeasU 

OAl Estate 


1585 15W 

4640 4635 

1MB 12525 
1M2S 116M 
12375 H9M 
4 059 4» 
7740 7590 
2775 2725 

m' ass 

’gS’SS 


Casco Pocfflc 

rSfSSi? 

GMBtadongmr 

Quota Grogo 

Hoaguntabw 

Nano Seas Ok 

MMenontM 

HeadwsonLd 

HKRlnll 

HKQdnGai 

HK Beane 

HKSMagKta 

HKTetecsan 

HuKMnaWfli 

Hd9 

KemPraos 
NaNTMtuai 
NewWO tal.L-; 

NWoridMosta 

Oriental Prra 
PtariOri adBl 

SeuUaAdD 

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SwtePocA . 


7J85 9 JO 1005 

3320 3170 

1150 11.90 1205 
71J5 72 74J5 

2140 2150 2150 
35 35.10 35JO 
333 350 AM 

1555 1575 16« 
845 855 850 

37.40 3750 
9.10 9.15 
3840 3X60 
It IT 
3250 3250 
670 670 650 

4270 4270 4350 
1575 1580 1570 
8950 8958 9CUS 
WWW 
60 69 71 

1140 1145 1150 
1445 1450 1455 
2680 2680 27 

1X75 13* 1375 
1X20 13JO 1350 
US US 4 
18550 18550 107. 
S675 5675 __ 

27 JS 27 JS £40 
2340 2340 2340 
1950 19J0 19X5 
040 XS0 840 
4SJ0 4X30 W 
33J0 2170 23L2D 
278 280 255 

610 620 615 

2620 SJO 29 
10JS 1X75 10L75 
8X75 8X75 ‘ 89 

550 550 555 

8-70 - BJ0 US 
<5 i5 4« 
S7J5 67J5 6625 


BrifSlee! 

Mteteoaoi 

BTR 

BurnoU Costal 

Barren Go 

C00MWMM 

CodbeTTSdM 

CdritaaOson 

Consri Unton 

CoaaastGO 


EMIGravp 

r^ravOWKlDi 

GtartAcddent 

G€C 

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Granada Go 
Grand MM 
CUE 

GwonoBeGp 

Gtaen«3« 

GUS 

HflJUOO 

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UVBH1M 

LdndSoc 

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LagMCeMGip 
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LieasVirtr 
Macks Spencer 
MEPC 

Moan Asset 

taftKMGtt 

MPveer 

Ncawesc 

NOJ 


SMMe»« 

Fmfacs5se.il 

• 2a» m » 

406 4W 410 

970 900 975 

343 366 M5 

S9 S65 560 

269000 J66000 

1OTW W30W W6OO0 

R1 M 164 

S US m 

SS7 » 

MA.6S 916 920 

3M 367J7 *U4 

W 3S 3“ 

317 350 350 


vnwtMK 3550 34 ■ 34 3530 

vnSartT VJS 2050 -2050 2U0 


Jakarta 

asmM - 

BkMftaOai 

Bkwgaa 

GodnngCaw 

Inttnmcit 

indoteoa 

todcscU 

iSSSST 

Tefckoflwn*nsf 


orararaBe toiler 70737 

.. Fm toasc 70U5 

6350 6380 - 6350 5300 
1925 1*50 1925 WSO 

177S 1700 1775 IT* 
11400 llBJO 11M 11« 
3100 35S 3400 3525 
<400 5300 S» 5273 

no 7050 7150 6975 

15^ M9oo i«oo ism 

7425 7300 7400 7075 

«ss 4225 <225 


Frankfurt 

AMBS 

aikiaw 

AMBttKdB - 
Altana ' 
BkBeiW 
BASF 

BaytaHWOBk- 

M^wetasHtok 

Bte* 


BAX; 32294* 
PitM i os: 3214.M 

1010 1000 »0» 9» 

53 jSS 

4X09 Ojo «M4 

5140 5150 51.45 
ttM -OJO 6350 0.97 
PM 47J0 67J6 67.90 


Johannesburg 

s-sasasr ™ ™ ^ 

SSSJSSp 777JS 27150 m CT 

•KteGdd 315 311 315 30550 

iSScnind • 179 ITS 17050 125 

SSr 5250 5150 5150 5150 

cSsoan . 3605 2625 2605 25.15 

QTEtt« -152J5T40JS 14675 1535 
4550 4350 4425 4350 

FstNoHBk 

Conor 


27 JO 2675 2675 7750 
1950 19J0 1940 1205 


RdBWckPP 
Ratal Grow 

RedtaCoka 

fadond 

Routes tugs 

Km 

RACOtata - 

Rofatora 

RDMlMScrt 

RtlKJ 

RMil.5WAl 

Sdmfas 

SotNmcntfe 

Seta Robot 

5M2Rlcnr 

SnenvTfieM 

SdTiBtapR 

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Sitato Ketaww 
AaMOm 
StaRknM 
snemBoe 
StagecaoUi 
Stand Cnoder 
TWo l Lyle 
Tbsob 

ThowesVtaoer 

aiGraop 

TlGnup 

Tsoifctos 


7J9 751 

639 4Jfi 
632 625 

670 650 

1.18 1.14 

5 4M 
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1282 1170 
161 852 

525 5.18 

356 150 

4,72 603 

950 827 

iSS 687 
340 129 

13 1152 
559 577 

240 227 

5-25 5.12 

725 693 

665 653 

143 140 

446 425 

245 229 

1125 iaw 
151 140 

520 5.06 

453 451 

565 £45 

722 7.13 

740 722 

388 383 

5 489 

b4.1t 611 
7185 7157 
645 637 

158 155 

868 855 

325 181 

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asa o «6 

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1694 14~ 
765 7. 

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674 666 

2J8 22S 

751 723 

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614 609 

5JU 457 
2 754 

427 428 

473 465 

1170 1234 
227 200 

Sir 5J35 
8JB 803 

524 568 

117 113 
6J0 660 

776 658 

124 108 

662 650 

U9 c ” 

525 
192 184 
4JS 615 
759 725 

357 341 
11 1067 

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953 962 
11 S’ 119 
630 458 

9.13 922 
607 690 

24? 157 

3.10 332 

1723 1750 
695 680 

350 154 

300 159 

723 727 

11.10 10 
928 955 
129 U9 

.128 157 

753' 7J2 
770 750 
707 700 

612 7.95 

447 435 

345 337 

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520. . 5.18 
221 290 


752 753 

424 422 

625 630 

453 653 

1.15 1.15 

459 457 

564 561 

1126 1171 
854 tjl 
503 525 

152 151 

455 429 

B37 966 

691 60? 

132 361 

tow mo 

5.96 521 

2J0 239 
SJS 513 
69? 751 

640 654 
160 161 

460 46? 
26) 262 
1071 10J5 

160 168 
470 509 

604 679 
551 £67 

7.17 726 

761 700 
127 186 

409 471 

413 416 
1172 1152 

637 630 

157 156 

UO 163 
183 184 

965 9J6 

1803 10.10 
9632 691 

46S *42 

197 255 

569 559 

641 648 

622 6J0 

M? 088 

675 566 
1674 1693 

767 759 

414 619 

668 LB 
250 US 
7J6 756 

136 139 

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499 

158 IS* 

424 .601 
470 457 

U24 U69 
2X5 2X4 

SJS 671 

u* ajs 

676 669 

2.15 215 

52 655 

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01 L2S 

654 655 

X 23 £37 
£83 5J9 

355 321 

415 623 
750 735 
M 354 

1192 16JD 
606 609 

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9.48 9AS 
119 200 
698 611 
9.11 9X2 

5X1 5X4 

252 357 
£16 114 
1758 1758 

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7X7 7.1S 

1X88 r a 
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753 754 

1 55 752 

707 702 

739 &JU 
60 637 
362 130 

6X5 634 

5J5 £24 

£10 £17 

253 291 


FECSA 
Gos Nfflural 


Tdefonloi 
UKtoaFenosa 
Vtoeac Cement 


Manila 


Awtalxotf 

BkPtaaptsi 

OR Hcra« 

Mod to Elec A 

MakoBott 

Peooa 

PCffiorii 

PMUogOtet 

ScnMIgoeiB 

SMFikneHdg 


Mexico 

ABBA 
Banned B 
Crana CPO 
OffflC 

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GpoQnSBAl 

GpoFtoMxBsa 

KkBfaOBrtJMa 

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2X2 2X0 

£15 6.76 

136 135 

603 457 

264 245 

1759 1732 


0o8 a tad er. 477.il 

Pic«Ine47U1 

18860 19750 18830 
1740 1755 1750 

5700 57)0 5790 

5750 5750 SB40 

363Q 8750 008 

1090 10W ?ff«J 

19860 19950 1W0 
3795 38W 3795 

2BOS 2860 2650 

25550 25800 2330 
WOO 9230 WE 

4400 4490 4400 

2560 2S85 2568 

8140 8150 8170 

9290 9320 9430 

1230 1340 1265 

33260 33440 32000 
1605 1610 1615 

2705 2710 2695 

5650 5690 5620 

1385 1395 1360 

6490 6590 6610 

3345 3345 3350 

ns 7170 1170 

1455 1490 1 495 


X 29 JO 
JL50 X 

196 100 

1150 13 

IX 136 

740 725 

71 7073 

385 360 

1620 1565 

102 99 

7X0 7X0 


29 JO 29 JO 
X 32 

195 IBS 

1125 T7J7S 

126 IX 

735 725 

U II 

305 310 

1590 1560 

101 90 

7X0 7JD 


44X0 417B 
19.14 18X4 
30X0 30.10 
TJ.16 7072 
45X0 4645 
4020 46J5 
2£5C 27X0 
170X0 168X0 
107.10 1 02X0 
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44X0 4445 
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28X0 28X1 
169X0 170X0 
152X0 7 07XO 
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Bcc Mot Coca 
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BCJKUiW 

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CCF 

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CAC4te262£fl 

PmfaBC2mJ3 

139 749 730 

jo 19410 m 

715 92fi 913 
>66 573 565 

M 377X0 37290 
H7 725 720 

H2 904 909 

05 23670 33750 

175 n79 1168 

U6 3422 3385 
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710 700 

881 890 

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PtrafaK 13490X0 

1500 12960 13460 13200 
B30 3375 34« 3500 
1795 4565 4795 4420 

376 1319 1370 1363 

□00 19910 KH95 197S) 
!415 2320 2340 2410 
mo 9520 10000 9505 

060 8905 «5C 892S 

350 5245 S350 S29S 

250 32730 32950 32900 
TWO 15500 15630 15900 
OS 2315 23® 2335 

W0 6300 6515 6500 

J30 7255 7300 725S 

nas lias tins uom 

386 TZ71 1288 1290 
!5?0 2395 2445 2505 

1650 3525 3600 3565 

390 16060 16)40 16200 
960 17500 17800 180Q0 
700 1)265 17700 114U 
1485 8170 8485 8160 
«00 4400 4600 4505 

1770 468S 4755 4725 


lesM nlstadra: 300436 
Pietauuta 0997X0 
42 42 42 JO 

23V5 2410 ZJVi 

3» 32J0 22J0 

J?I4 31« 3170 
1430 1435 1435 
22.15 27!* 2218 

38X0 3£70 39ft 
26J0 2490 36ft 
14X0 17 16X0 

1&90 1405 16X5 
28ft 2850 25X5 
26ft 26X0 34X0 
25 2115 2514 
US £80 195 

5420 58X0 5C20 


OBX index SB9J4 

PrntaBE 581X4 

wo 181 182 

V« 143JC 142 

25 2£70 34X0 
29J& 3030 28X0 
101JO WL50 101 JO 
48 4050 50 

342 342 341 

360 301 36150 

203 295 199 

105 HUSO 103 
SJS 5OSJ0 501 JO 
269 275 269 

11450 115 114 


BradescaPtt 

Brahma Pfd 

OrntoMd 

CE^Pfd 

Copei 

Elefrabna 

ttaubonooPfa 

Us«5«vfcS85 

LlgMpor 

PetrabrnsPfd 

TrietaatPte 

Teienda 

Tetej 

TekspPfd 

Urftanco 

CVRD Pfd 


Seoul 

Docora 

Daevroa Heavy 

GjMOob 

terecBPWf 

Koran Eh* Bk 

tow«O0 7el 

LGSeroicon 

Poteta0kwSI 


9J5 9X0 

750X0 733X1 
50.10 *5-50 
62X0 61X0 
15X0 15J5 
469X0 430X0 
588X0 548X0 
432J0 390.00 
34SX0 336X0 
229X0 207X0 
TOIXO 96X0 
163X0 16000 
148X0 166X0 
307X0 2BSXC 
40J1 39X1 

27X0 25X0 


1 370 3 mo 

945 9*5 

2050 2018 
1414 1425 

595 5(9 

34040 37650 
404J0 39050 
312JO 30180 
612 6)4 

2428 2401 

1577 1650 
130 126J0 
1695 1705 

latxo is* 

563 574 

307 J0 290 

1 108 1092 
400 306 

686 651 

2768 2706 
151 045 

27180 27? 

597 605 

170 172 

469X0 473J0 
83X0 B1.10 
388X0 M50 


9.10 9J8 
735X0 733X0 

48.10 49X0 
61 A0 61 JO 

1SJ50 15X0 
452X0 456X0 
540X0 54199 
39000 411X0 
336X0 329.99 
222X0 223J0 
99X0 9750 
160X0 158X0 
165X0 145.00 
305X0 285-00 
40J1 39X0 

2150 26J0 


CecapasBa1nniE716Jl 

fafatalM 

124000 117000 124000 115000 
51 B0 5D0Q SD00 5020 
75800 7SW 155*0 1S7W 
28500 27900 28180 27800 
73» 7150 7220 7300 

55800 544000 5UOOO 5*5000 
21100 19900 21180 19600 
45006 43300 >4*00 43200 
608CG 565QO 59800 56300 
10900 10709 10700 10900 


Singapore 

MbPorSiew &U 
Cra»«Poe 
OJrDwOi 

SSM- aM 

§SS 1ST ^ 

For East Lintao 6X5 
Fnser&Mecne 13X0 
HKLond* 159 
jxdMotfiesn' AX 
Jrod Strategic* 3J2 

W*« ^ 

Jrtten 19X0 

OSUtaOBBkF 11J1) 
PortwyHdgs m 
SeniboMong BJS 
StagAlrtawtai 1160 
StasLtPd £K 

Staff PrassF 29 JO 
Stag Tech tad 3X6 
staoTdancam 3X4 
SMtSSMn 
TM Lea Baft 
UUlndusbU ... 
UttCrSeaBkF 17-0 
WtagTtaHdgs 4X2 
“taUJdBflBs, 

Stockholm 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AsslOo ra ra 

AsttaA 

AlasCapCDA 

AUfefi* 

OeanknB 


Pi ra tal ) £ 22X64 

5 8 £15 

1040 1070 1030 
1A90 15,10 15 

14X0 UX0 14X0 

IU9 £79 0X0 

1970 19J0 » 

W5 6X£ 5J0 

64S UO 4J5 
1330 1140 13X0 
2J0 2J0 2J7 

6 t «0 

140 3X0 143 

11 11 11 
4J0 432 420 

19X0 19X0 19-40 
DJ0 DJO 11X0 
£95 5-95 195 

BBS BJS 8 
13X0 13J0 
£45 8X0 8X5 

23JD 28J0 29 

3X2 32X 3X4 

3J6 3X8 3J4 

110 «0 £» 

3J8 3X2 154 

fS 1 J 0 us 

1660 16J0 16X0 
454 456 454 


SXlttadBcttOUl 

PirataasaroJT 


»*on«x»)k»n 
Ptsms^plttei 
SokMKB 
Scania B 
SCAB 

S~EBama»A 

StaAFin 

StarastaiB 

SKFB 

Sparbanken A 

sfadstirpotafcA 
Storo A 
SsHomBesA 

VoCvoB 

Sydney 

Aoicsr 

AKZBUog 

BMP 

Sorai 

Brornttralna 

CBA 

CCAmnlfl 
Caies Myer 
Ounokji 
CRA 
CSR 

Pastes Braw 

Gen Pno Tract 

GJOAostoto 

Goodman Hd 

id Aostrala 

Jafrn FaCrta 

LaadUne 

MoywKMdss 

MIUHdra 

Nat Ausi Bank 

UatMoMHOo 

Hew Carp 

IMRBraidTMta 

NankLM 

Pocfflc Dunlap 

Pteesrlnfl 

Pnb Braodcasl 

Oaatas Alrwavs 

Sartos 

Southaxp 

Weslanners 

WMC 

WesKkMTrast 

WestpacBUag 

WooarideW 

Wataworths 

Taipei 

Cotboy Life Ins 
ChoigHwaBk 
OtaaTlnsBk 
OiktaDevetomt 
China Stad 
FMBwk 
Fonsoso Pteto 
Him Han Bk 
tax Caaen Bk 
Mon YBPtefla 

Stan Kaog Ufe 

Taterai 


Elec 

UUWoMOto 

Tokyo 

ABnacn ato 

AJH boon Air 

ASOMBtaft 

AsoWOiera 

Asata Gloss 

Bk Tokyo MBsu 

BkYDkBhaaa 

Bridpestane 

Cbm 

CtetoElK 

CDogakuEtac 
DoliftRiPrirt 
DoMadKone 
DatwaBonk 
Dohea House 

Daw Sec 

out 

Denso 

Eas t Japa n fer 


230J0 22£5B 229X0 22450 
270 36950 97550 36950 
199 197 197.50 19730 

196 193 19550 191 JO 

166 161 165 160 

71.50 70 7TL50 69-50 

309 36*50 30450 204 

313 309 JO 310 310 

W 186 187 18450 

117 115J0 116J0 116J0 
109 188 188JD 18* 

1Q35D 108 103 10150 

191JD 189 JO 190 188J0 
104 180JD 18050 183 


PreffeBE M73JS 


8X0 035 
£38 £30 

18XB 17J8 
160 353 

22X0 22.90 
13J3 13X1 
13X6 1130 
5J0 5J0 

4X5 430 

19X9 1£92 
4X0 4J4 

2X8 2X5 
2X8 2X9 

3J3 3X6 

1J7 1J7 

12JS 12X8 
110 105 

23 23.11 
7X2 7X9 

1^3 1.77 

16J2 16X7 
IS* 1X8 
471 6J6 
1JI 1X9 
423 422 

3.13 £12 

£90 £96 

486 6X2 

2X2 2X2 

4X8 479 

4X7 4X2 

9.97 9X2 

£19 755 

2X6 2X7 

7X3 7X0 

9J4 9J9 

137 £38 


Pantos: 7424J0 


111 

108 

109 

960 

918 

918 

190 

187 109 JO 

3® 

356 35650 

176 

173 

173 

329 

222 

323 

460 

451 

453 


HacSSunf ok 

HtocM 

Kendo Motor 

IBJ 

IHdw 

fte-VijCadfl 

JAL 

Japan Tot*ca» 

JUKB 

Ksfata 

KQnalEto: 

Kao 

KoMBtadHuy 

Kora Sled 

WtaOWppRy 

WnB re na y 

KotoSted 

Konotoi 

Kubota 

Kyecm 

as"* 

Mra ubBii 

Maul 

MssuEJecInd 

MotwQocm 

iltmhtakl 

wnsvowi 

M05iAish)Cn 

MBsobisH £1 

MlbubWIEd 

AU2S0HstaH«r 

MksubWilMoi 

MItoibbMTr 


176 178 

168 170 

32.50 

94-50 101 JO 
25.10 2520 
176 178 

89 6950 
U2 14320 

92.50 83J0 

64 65 

11050 114 

62 6150 
52J0 5150 
40X0 46J0 
70 70 


Mkkd22S:>0MBAf 
Pentane 18418X6 

1080 1090 1060 

775 791 770 

813 013 806 

632 632 639 

1070 1070 1060 

1900 1910 1860 

570 570 619 

2240 2280 2160 

2730 2750 200 

2010 2010 7020 
2000 2000 
1970 WO 

1260 1260 1250 

501 500 

1360 1370 1420 

901 901 WS 

6350a 6980a 71 JOB 
2550 2550 2S10 

SOOOb 5000a 50400 
2370 2388 2360 
3690 3800 360 
1250 1260 1740 

4030 4120 3940 

1230 1248 1230 
1020 1049 1090 

lllfi 1120 1090 
3580 36® 3510 
1410 1410 1390 
580 590 573 

5750 5750 4650 
501 501 506 

M0a 8110a 8H0n 
3440 3510 3*40 
710 710 737 

3050 2050 2100 
1300 1300 1320 

4*2 488 

314 305 

722 734 724 

1050 1«0 1070 
206 207 204 

871 BBS 048 

540 545 554 

7160 7170 7210 
2C0 9040 XX 

385 385 383 

477 478' 490 

1780 1780 1880 
I960 1950 1910 

mo vao lox 
1100 1110 1120 
325 325 334 

601 699 682 

1330 1330 1300 
907 884 

890 898 090 

1270 U70 1250 


The Trib Index 

Jan. 1. 1992a 109 Ur 


Worid Index 
Regional Indoa — 
Asa/Pad/k 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 


PriooB « at 3570 PM. Now Yoric time. 


Laval 

Change 

%changa 

year to data 
% change 

153.26 

+1.28 

+0.84 

+16-22 

110.56 

♦0.73 

+0.66 

-17.65 

161.77 

+0J7 

+054 

+16JS 

180.39 

+2.48 

+1.39 

+40.62 

139.87 

+0.56 

+0.40 

+57.09 

180.54 

+1^0 

+1.01 

+3587 

174.01 

+2-06 

+120 

+26.03 

180.74 

+1.87 

+1.05 

+3327 

111.10 

+0.67 

♦0.61 

-12.68 

161.09 

-0.37 

-0.23 

♦taoi 

183.15 

+0^9 

♦0.49 

+29.16 

143.16 

+1.07 

+0.75 

+19.30 

133-67 

-0.16 

-0.12 

+5.14 


Capita] goods 18054 +1.80 +1.01 +35-87 

Consumer goods 174.01 + 2-06 + 1.20 +25.03 

Energy 180.74 +1.87 +1.05 +3327 

Finance 111.10 +0.67 +0.61 -12-68 

Misceffeneous 161.09 -0.37 -023 + 18.61 

Raw Materials 183.15 +029 +0.49 +29.16 

Service 143.16 +1.07 +0.75 +19.30 

Umes 133.67 -0.16 -0.12 +S.14 

TbeMBmoiionalHamktT/eiurm World Stock Index C Back* the U.S. cfafer tehwc* 
290 IntmTOtu na lylmaslabiB Blocks from 2Scotmtiles. For man Momotion, a Imo 

bootaof <s avaSotto by writftg to Tho Trb Incktx. 101 Avonuo Charios do GauOa. 

92521 NeuOy Codex. France. CornptodbyBkxxnborgNews. 


MflarfFudesn 

Mitsui Trust 

MunrioMig 

NEC 

Ktoin 

NB*0Sec 

Nintendo 


WBOonOO 
mpeon Steel 
WssxtaMrtcr 
NKK 

NonucoSec 

MTT 

KIT Data 
OP Paper 
OsdaGis 

Rtaih 

Ram 

SakvroBk 

Sonkju 

SamuBanA 

Sanyo Elec 

Seann 

SetauRwy 

Sokisui House 

5e»ea- Sevan 

Shrap 

SMnkuBPw 
Shln-rtnj Ch 
SMzuokaBk 
Somxsrk 
Sony 

5untaofBo 

SwrtkwaB* 

SuraOCheni 

SuntaanoElec 

SaadMatal 

SunfflTnisI 

TofcitaPlwin 

Tatotadwn 

TDK 

TanotoEIPknr 
TotoiBank 
Tokta Marine 
TakcoSPwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Carp. 
Tones 

Tappan Print 
Tom lad 
Toshiba 
To6ton 
Toro Trwsi 
Toyota Atotor 
YaamaKN 


Mlgb LM 

914 905 

1250 1220 

728 708 

4380 4350 

1480 1450 

1780 1730 

676 660 

8180 8080 
72B 713 

524 500 

312 304 

BID 795 
251 245 

1650 1W0 

5780a 0670a 
•w +yrmyinno 
695 678 

XI 290 
1530 1480 

9100 8710 

700 676 

3900 3560 

1330 1280 

514 501 

6650 6710 

4300 4650 

1090 1030 

7590 7340 

1670 1640 

2010 1W0 

470 2380 

.060 1010 
11900 1)200 
9160 9060 

924 900 

1340 1300 

469 45B 

1710 1680 

279 274 

975 9*6 

2960 2BS0 
2700 2620 

8588 8180 

2010 1980 

925 916 
1180 1100 
2210 2120 
4470 OH 

XC 294 
553 536 

1280 1240 

1420 1X00 

730 711 

723 711 

2970 2870 

746 738 

35)8 3400 

2460 2390 


905 902 

1230 1220 

70B 708 

4350 4150 
1450 1 430 

1750 1680 
475 454 

800 8030 
715 718 

50B 516 

309 301 

795 7B3 

251 240 

1610 1568 

0720a 8510a 
3120b 3210b 
678 676 

290 292 

1510 1430 

91» 8630 

630 673 

3630 3710 

1280 1290 

503 496 

675D 6550 

4650 4600 
1040 1070 

7590 7390 

1640 1600 

1990 2020 

2440 7rx\ 
10)0 1040 

112W 11300 
9070 8900 

900 898 

1300 1280 

465 454 

1680 1670 

275 272 

955 925 

2890 3890 
2700 2550 
8500 8010 

1980 3000 

916 905 

1100 1090 

2130 1190 

4390 4340 

301 294 

536 536 

1240 1240 

7400 7380 

711 710 

715 70* 

2870 2*40 

744 738 

3410 3360 
2430 2360 


lltaaitalilnn V— i 
i ww yi— I 

Norandalnc 
Noccan Energr 

NtwnTetown 

Now 

Onex 

Pancon Petto 

Petra Cda 

PtawDonie 

pocopem 

Potash Soak 

Renctesance 

RtoAfeom 

Rogers Canto B 

SMormoCo 

STttficdaA 

Stone Comald 

Sunosr 

Tofemon Eny 

Tec* a 

Tdeotobe 

Tain 

Thomson 

TorOomBank 

Tnatsctaa 

TrmtiCda Pipe 

TrkncahFM 

Trine Kafet 

TVXGdd 

Westerns! Eny 

Weston 


Vienna 


BBAG 775 

Boetuer-Uddeh 829 

Brau-Un Grass 678 
Credhnnst Pfd 426 
EA-GeneraB 3445 
EVN 1731 

FtavwtanWlm 581 
Mon-Mtanboi 630 
OMV 1404JO 

CtesTEIekMz B7S 
Rodcx-Hon 411 
VA Start 447 J0 

VA Tech 1B36 . 50 
menertKig Bau 2151 
VMM 1460 


4£10 45XS 
32X5 32X5 
30X5 30.90 
98ft IOO 
12J0 13X5 
ZUO 23J0 
5*40 54* 

20X5 20)9 

27X0 28 

1430 1420 
1D8U 109J5 
44ft 44J5 
32 32X5 
26 26 
5590 56.10 
55ft S5X5 
2035 2055 
59X5 59ft 
4£60 4630 
30X0 30.95 
41ft 41J90 
21.15 21 J0 
2755 20AS 
39 JO 30X5 
1A4S 16» 
25X0 25X5 
4455 45 

22X5 3245 
KUO 1035 
24X5 24X5 
74ft 7470 


ATX fake 1212X3 
PnetooK 1200X9 

721 755J0 
811 821 JD 
67105 675 680 

41960 421 42195 

3390 3405 3405 
1710 17291729.98 

560.10 566 578 

615 615 6t£10 

1388139490 139] 

870.10 872JD 872.10 

405 410 402 

443J0 446 441.10 

1799 1814 1803 

2123 2145 2133 
1440 1449 1440 


KxHtokrxtjm 


Wellington nrsExotodna 2219.15 

9 PiMme 232637 


Toronto 


AU8M Price 
Aflwta Enaqr 
AieaaAkm 
Andersen Cup! 

BkMartrccf 
Bk Non Scotia 
BonkkGaH 
BCE 
BCTetocomcn 
Btodiem Phorm 
BanbocderB 
BkacadA 
aKWnM 
Caraeco 
CffiC 

CdnNakRaB 
CteiMaRes 
GtoOccWPd 
am Pocfflc 
Contra 
Defers) 

Donor 
DonsdorA 
Da Port Cda A 
Edper Group 
EunmeMng 
FaktaxFH 
FakaMnWge 
RdetwrGboflA 
FroaNmta 
GutfCda Res 
IrnpertaiOf 
toco 
1PLI 
LokBnr 
Laewen Groap 
MoentaBidi 
MaunoHIA 
Mdhanes 
Moore 


tomZ enldB 3X1 3X0 3X0 £80 

Bfteiykrri ija 135 136 134 

Canu Honard 330 3J7 330 339 

Ftetctl O) BldQ 445 458 465 457 

FJetthOrEnr 4.10 4X5 4.10 405 

5SS91S5. VI 111 115 111 

FMktiOiPaper 2X3 2J9 2X2 2X3 

UwMdtoi 3X0 3L57 160 165 

Telecom KZ 7X4 639 7 JR ojja 

wfaaiHamn 11 jn 11 JO mo njo 


TSE lodostriais; 6220J1 
Previous; 6165X8 


22.15 21X5 
3230 3035 
47ft 46ft 
I7XS UA0 
50ft 49 JO 
53 52ft 
37.® 3630 
71X0 71.15 
31 30X5 
78 

25JS 2£3S 
soft 30J5 
2490 23.16 
5318 52.15 
66X5 66ft 
52X0 5110 
35ft 305 
2410 22X5 
35X0 35JB 
38ft 38ft 
26 25K 

11X5 11X5 
200 26.15 
32.95 32J5 
21 JS 21ft 
38 37.10 
298 298 

WO 30.15 
22X5 21X0 
59X5 50ft 
ii ion 
64ft 64 
47.55 «X5 
40X0 40ft 
1£10 17X5 
48U 47ft 
1£10 17 JO 
73 71 JC 
1440 1420 
29ft 28X0 


22.15 21.95 
3! 3035 

47.10 46.90 

17.15 16ft 
50ft «X0 

52.90 5240 

3645 36U 

71X0 71.10 

30.90 30.95 
78 74ft 

2535 25X0 
3035 3070 
24ft 22-78 
5115 52ft 
66ft 6635 
52X0 9? , W 
3435 34X5 
2410 23® 
3£60 35X5 
3840 38ft 
25ft 2620 

11.90 11JS 
2630 26.15 
3270 32-70 
2135 2135 
37XS 3735 

398 298 

30ft 3SH 
22X5 21 JO 

59.10 58.10 

laxs 10 ft 

64X0 64ft 
4730 46X5 
4045 40X0 
1£10 17X0 
48ft 47J5 
1£1B 17.90 
73 7135 
1435 1410 
2930 28X5 


Zurich 

AS8 9 
Adeao S 
AtasulHOR 
Ans-SennoB 
AMR 

BotofteHdoR 
BKVWon 
OariontR 
CMSubseGpR 
EtawwdiB 
Bns-Ownfe 


HesfeR 
HonrtbR 
tagetaHWB 
PlMHVtauB 
RktienoidA 
Radr HdgPC 
SBCR 
SG5B 
SMHB 
SdiffR 
SwtastotosR 
SwtaotrR 
OSSB 
WnferikurR 
Zurich AssurR 


5P|tadBe 283434 
PmtaO; 282639 

810 1839 IMS 
435 441 43SJ0 

1157 1157 1177 

490 1500 1505 
84! 841 057 

9W 2900 2915 
BIB 825 830 

668 674 £75 

£25 14935 14975 
538 540 539 

m 5625 5400 
560 461S 4600 
076 HB3 1080 
6M 1612 1615 
734 1740 1742 
m 1500 ?500 
737 741 741 

A40 2055 3020 
MS 12*70 12470 
UO 274 27450 
32» 3359 
938 953 

97B 971 

461 1461 1468 

311 1325 13® 
265 1777 1275 

BM 872 865 

W 427 43 


X 



PAGE 16 


Thursday’s 4 P.M. Close 

NtffionwKtepfkranrtrefledtogto 

noAaaotiateiPim. 


wJh’tS' 5 *k* Hi VH PE t£ HU Lot lam Qrjo 


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04 Ip* I7H 17 

[m; iH «3«i J 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 


maters^:: 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


LM stock Hr w PE m tugb 


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Arts 

& Aitciques 


Appears every Saturday. 

To advertise contact 
Kimberly Guerrand-Betrancourt. 
Tel: + 33 ( 0 ) 1 41 43 94 76 
Fax: + 33 ( 0 ) 1 41 43 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative. 


INTERNATIONAL 


nkw ram thus uv m washnctw post 

DAI Of NEWSPAPER 


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LOB 1 M CRflol Hip Lob M DM YU PE MOU 




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Continued on Pom> IX 


a 




































































PAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Thais Battle Baht Speculators 

Central Bank Chief Vows to Keep Interest Rates High 


Oar 

f^p^OK — Thailand's cen- 
tal bank chief vowed Thursday to 
battle traders speculating against the 
baht as a lack of confidence in rhe 
currency battered the 
stock market. 

The 


country’s 


come down, money will start Jeav- 
Wg,” said Todd. Martin, banking 
analyst in Bangkok for SBC War- 
burg. 



Mr. Amnuay said the baht would 
not be on the official agenda of the 
two-day 3 2d. Southeast Asian Cen-. 
tral Bank Governors' meeting, 
which started here Thursday. 

But he said Mr. Remgchai would 
discuss the issue with Lee Ek Tieng. 


less attractive. 


ine governor of the t m wo.ud, a jo- aiscuss me issue wun cee e* neng. 

Thailand, Rerngchai Marat mwmH J? 0 ”* low* on concern over managing director of the Monetary 
said that auftonties! wouMmSSi ? ^1®* omency debt Authority of Singapore, the de facto 

hich short-term and financial institutions, analysts central bank, over the next few 

said. days. 

Banks, such as Thai Farmers Mr. 

Bank, and construction issues led 

the decline as companies have 

suffered front bad loans in the 

S.Thursdiv from h:.~ 11 *''“>-«« Rubied property sector. Farmers 

interest rates 081 for lower Bank 8180 announced that it was 
m merest rates, savins easier rrMit 


make speculation 
expens 
inforcii 


more expensive.” 

Reinforcing official efforts to 
shore up the baht. Finance Minister 
Amnuay Viravan retreated 


saying easier credit 
alone would not solve "fundament- 
al economic problems. 

Benchmark borrowing costs are 
near fi ve-year highs because the cen- 
tral tank is trying to fend off an attack 

oo the baht, which some traders say 
may be devalued. Mr. Amnuay hi 
repeatedly denied the government 
will devalue the currency. 

"If interest rates are allowed to 


increasing its bad-loan provisions. 

Dealers cited a recent Goldman. 
Sachs report predicting the baht 
would be devalued w ithin six 
months as the basis for die fresh 
pessimism oo-tfae currency, despite 
repealed official denials of devalu- 
ation plans. 

"The baht devaluation rumor is 
the most damaging," an Asia Credit 
analyst said. 


Remgchai said he believed an 
improving economic outlook and 
cuts, in government spending an- 
nounced this week would help sup- 
port the currency. 

Government and stale :enterpnse 
budget cuts amounting to 99 billion 
baht ($3.82 billion), approved by tbe 
cabinet Tuesday, would have tbe 
effect of reducing speculative in- 
terest in the baht, he said. 

In Singapore trading, the dollar 
closed at 26 baht, up from 25 .99 baht 
on Wednesday. 

Tbe central bank has kept the rate 
near 25 baht for more than a decade. 

(AFP. Bloomberg. Reuters) 


Asian Bankers Question Monetary Policy 


f. wnfti/fd t*/ iIht Srqff Frrm LH^ptadtes 

< BANGKOK — Central h ank 
governors from 15 Asian countries 
sounded a rare note of doubt 
Thursday on the usefulness of mon- 
etary policy to cure economic ills. 

But the delegates to tbe 3 2d an- 
nual conference of Southeast Asian 
Central Banks also asserted their 
financial strength, touting economic 
growth figures that far outstripped 
the global average. 


In his opening address of the two- 
day meeting. Finance Minister Am- 
nuay Viravan of Thailan d, whose 
country is seeing a decade of boom- 
ing economic growth falter on a 
huge current-account deficit and 
plunging stock market, warned of 
overreliance on monetary policy. 

"Reliance on monetary policy 
alone to address fundamental weak- 
ness in the real economy will usu- 
ally not be effective and may, due to 


their pervasive effect, cause more 
harm than good,” he said 
Despite economic ills, however, 
Asian countries managed to achieve 
average economic growth of around 
7 percent in 1996, compared to a 
world average of 3.8 percent, Mr. 
Amnuay said The conference coun- 
tries have accumulated as much as 
one-fifth of tbe world’s reserves of 
foreign currency — $250 billion — 
in all, Mr. Amnuay said (AP. AFP) 


POSCO to Acquire 
Units of Sammi Steel 


Bloomberg Nms 

SEOUL — Pohang Iron & 
Steel Co., tbe world’s second- 
largest steel producer after Nip- 
pon Steel Corp. of Japan, agreed 
Thursday to buy several busi- 
nesses from debt-ridden Sammi 
Steel Co. for 719.4 billion won 
($827.5 milli on). 

The purchase closed a remark- 
able six-year chapter for Sammi, a 
South Korean specialty steel- 
maker that profited at home but 
expanded overseas beyond its 
means, racking up more than $1.2 
billion in debt. 

Sammi accepted the offer after 
a two-hour meeting with POSCO 
officials chaired by Sammi ’s 
chairman, Kim Hyun Bae. Sammi 
had earlier refused the offer, de- 
manding 1. 1 39 trillion won for the 
businesses, a 55 percent premium 
above POSCO’s bid 

“Our management eventually 
decided to accept Pohang ’s of- 
fer," a Sammi spokesman said 
He did not explain the sudden 
change of heart. 

- A POSCO spokesman said the 
company signed a preliminary 
contract to buy tbe businesses 
from Sammi. The final contract is 
to be signed Monday. It values 
S ammi ’s assets, including plant 
and equipment, at 619.4 billion 
won and adds a 100 billion-won 
technology-transfer payment 

Sammi shares fell 130 won 
Thursday to 4,450. POSCO rose 
600 won to close at 43,800. 

Under terms of the deal, PO- 
SCO will buy Sammi 's steel-bar 
and steel-pipe businesses, which 
account for half its annual sales of 


about $1.2 billion. POSCO may 
also buy Sammi ’s North Amer- 
ican units, which contribute a 
third of the company’s sales. 

"We are still negotiating terms 
for Sam mi's North American sub- 
sidiaries," the POSCO spokes- 
man said. 

Sammi has offered to sell 
Sammi Atlas Inc., its Canadian 
subsidiary with plants in Ontario 
and Quebec, and U.S.-based 
Sammi Aliech Specialty Steel 
Corp., with facilities in the state of 
New York. Sammi said it inten- 
ded to keep its stainless-steel pro- 
duction line. 

While the sale will reduce 
Sammi’s debt problem, analysts 
said it would undermine the long- 
term profitability of its parent, the 
Sammi group, now South Korea's 
27th-biggest chaebol, or indus- 
trial group. Sammi Steel accoun- 
ted for about 70 percent of the 
group's total sales last year. 

POSCO is one of the world's 
most profitable steel producers, 
combining top quality with low 
production costs. The company 
earned $1.16 billion in net profit 
in 1995. Net profit in tbe first six 
months of last year rose 1 6.4 per- 
cent to 385.8 billion won. 

The Sammi deal increases the 
odds that state-controlled POSCO 
will be asked by the government 
to take over Hanbo Steel & Gen- 
eral Construction Co., Korea's 
second-biggest steel producer be- 
hind POSCO. Hanbo collapsed 
last month under $6 billion of 
debt. POSCO has agreed to man- 
age Hanbo’s facilities until a buy- 
er can be found. 


Investor’s Asia 


ftoigKmg 


Singapore •: 
JSbaite Times 



Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 


r s ’o n' d j’ f 

1996 1997 


jTb’ N D J’ F" 
1996 1997 


; Index ■ ' 

Hong Kong • HansSeng. .. 


22000 
21000 
20000 
1900D - 
18000- 

170W-S- OND J F 
1996 1997 

Ptev. ft , 

Close " .Close. Change) 
%3yS3SJ}S 13,462.61 -1.65 



Singapore 

.Sira&s Tiroes 

‘ 2^SA68 

2324.64 

+1.35 

Sydney 

AS Ordinaries 

2.49&40 

• 2,473.50 

+0.93 

Tokyo .. ■ 

mtasAZSS . 

18,6684$ 18,410.96 +1.81 

Km** toHBptir Composite 

1,259.10 

1JS4.42 

+0.37 

Bangkok . 

set 

698.06 

722.57 

-3.39 

Spoiti 

Composte index 

716.71 

712L50 

+0.59 

Taipei .... 

Stack Market index .7,536.28 

7,424.10 

+1.51 

Manila 

PSE 

3,335.73 

3,339.83 

-0.12 

Jakarta 

Composte.todex . 

70737 

701.05 

+0.90 

We&ngtan -. 

NZS&40 . 

2339.15 

2.326.27 

+0.55 

Bombay '. 

Bensfflve Inctec 

3,492.65 

3,483.48 

+0.26 

Source: Tetekurs 


jMcnulunu! Hii,Jd litSiw 

Very briefly: 


P ILOTS: A Risk for American Airlines Personnel in Stable Times ZillC Deal F alters Again 


Continued from Page 13 

American's fleet. In re- 
. ^ponse. Robert Crandall, the 
Yiiriine's chairman, erupted ar 
a meeting with Wall Street 
analysts. 

“If the pilots were in 
charge, Columbus would still 
be in port." he said. "They 
believe the assertion that tbe 
world is flat." 

In fact, pilots believe they 
are a key pan of the airline’s 
success and should therefore 
share in die fruits, reflected in 
American's $854 million 
profit last year. They also 
want to make up for losses to 
inflation as their wages have 
held steady. 

American officials say the 
pilots have already benefited, 
noting that over the last six 
years, the company has 
shared $ 136 million in profit- 
sharing with pilots, exactly 
▼the same total return to all its 
public shareholders over the 
same period. 

Separately, the pilots have 
signaled that they value high- 
er wages over more stock op- 
tions. This is also a point of 
contention at United Airlines, 
where pilots and other em- 
ployees traded wages and 
other concessions to buy a 
majority of the company's 
stock in 1994. 

But now that United pilots 
own the shares, which have 
more than doubled in value, 
they also want big wage in- 
creases in order to share more 
immediately in the record 
Jrfofits. 

■ "The entire fixed-wage 
system," Mr. Blast said, "is 
in the process of collapse as 
companies attempt to link pay 
to performance for their 
CEOs and for rank-and-file 
workers alike." 

American pilots say they 


are also concerned that tbe 
airline is trying to use lower- 
paid pilots in some of their 
jobs. 

American wants to place 
so-called regional jets into its 
American Eagle commuter 
fleet, a move that would 
match changes by competit- 
ors who have replaced tur- 
boprops with the small jets 
that many travelers prefer. 

The pilots say such a move 
will dun more flying and jobs 
to American Eagle, where pi- 
lots are represented by an- 
other union. But this is an 
emotional issue for the pilots, 
a group of whom use the 
phrase "Defending the Pro- 
fession" to convey their be?- ; 
lief that they are better trained 
to fly tbe jets than the com- 
muter pilots. 

Until last month, such 
emotions were considered 
little more than background 
tension at the airline, as a 
strike at American was con- 
sidered by most indnstry ex- 
perts a remote possibility. 

In November, the leaders of 
the union, the Allied Pilots As- 
sociation, reached an agree- 
ment that called for a 5 percent 
wage increase over four years 
and 5.75 million stock options 
to be distributed among die 
9,200 pilots at American. 

That agreement was imme- 
diately followed by Americ- 
an’s trumpeting of a huge or- 
der for more titan 100 new 
Boeing jets. The airline, 
however, made that order 
contingent upon a unanimous 
vote by tbe pilots in favor of 
die agreement. 

But in early January, the 
union members showed their 
distaste for the labor contract 
by voting it down. Last week, 
the pilots announced their 
new demands: an 11 percent 
raise spread over four years 


and 7.25 million stock op- 
tions, as well as their insist- 
ence that all jet flying be done 
by American pilots. 

American's managers say 
those demands are unreason- 
able because such a contract 
would make the airline's cost 
structure uncompetitive. The 
airline a dds that jtS pilots are 
among the highest paid in the 
industry: A pilot who started a 
30-year career at American 
last year can expea to earn 
$125,000 a year, on average, 
in 1996 dollars. 

But for the pilots, the issue 
is not how much they are paid, 
but the trend line of shrinking 
wages while the airline's 
profits rise. Such differing 
perceptions lead at times to a 
sense that the two sides are 
speaking a different lan- 
guage. 


In an article for members of 
the Allied Pilots Association 
published last March, the uni- 
on wrote: "Last year. AMR's 
CEO and its new president 
assured APA that American’s 
pilots could have whatever 
kind of contract we wanted, 
and they would simply adjust 
tbe airline’s business plan to 
fit. 

"This approach raised a lot 
of hope among our group — 
tbe logic behind it is ines- 
capable, especially since AA 
pilots’ compensation repre- 
sents less than 10 percent of 
American's total expenses." 

A spokesman for Americ- 
an said it did tell the pilots that 
they could have whatever 
contract they wanted, but 
with a big caveat: they would 
have to live with a shrinking 
airline. 


Bloomberg News 

MOUNT ISA, Australia — 
Century Zinc Ltd. and abori- 
ginal groups failed to meet a 
midnight deadline for an 
agreement on the company's 
proposed development of the 
world's largest untapped zinc 
deposit. 

The mine project, which 
has been valued at 1.1 billion 
Australian dollars ($831 mil- 
lion) and is located in the 
northwestern part of Aus- 
tralia’s Queensland stale, has 
been delayed for two and a 
half years by negotiations 


with aboriginal communities 
around the mine. Rick Farley, 
the Australian Native Title 
Tribunal's mediator for the 
talks between Century Zinc, 
the state government and the 
aboriginal groups, said some 
of the aboriginal claimants 
had decided to meet Friday 
morning for more discussions 
of die offer made by tbe com- 
pany and die government 
Mr. Farley said the com- 
pany would withdraw a com- 
pensation package of 60 mil- 
lion Australian dollars that it 
had been offering. 


• The South Korean won. which is not yet fully convertible, 
fell to a seven-year low against the dollar despite intervention 
by the central bank. The dollar rose to 875 won from 870. 
Stocks, meanwhile, rose to a ten-week high as investors bet 
memory -chip prices would rise: the Korea composite index 
rose 4.21 points, to 716.71. 

• Tbe Korean Confederation of Trade Unions has decided 
to postpone strikes until after it sees how Parliament handles 
the revision of a controversial new labor law. The outlawed 
confederation said it w ould go on strike Feb. 24 if the revision 
of the law was not acceptable. 

• Taiwan has ended a 25-year ban on imports of Japanese 
cars. Tbe Board of Foreign Trade will let nine Japanese 
carmakers ship a total of 7.700 units to the island this year. 

• NEC Corp. has unveiled the world's smallest liquid-crystal 
display digital camera that allows pictures to be viewed on a 
monitor and operates on standard AA batteries. The 1 85-gram 
(6.6 ounce) Picona stores 35 pictures on its memory card and 
is compatible with most World Wide Web browsers. It is 
priced at 69,800 yen ($564). 

• Nippon Credit Bank Ltd. shares surged 31 yen. or 15 
percent, to 235 yen after a senior official from Japan's ruling 
Liberal Democratic Party called on thegovemment to consider 
guaranteeing the bank’s debentures. The shares had plunged 
recently on speculation that die smallest of Japan's three long- 
term credit banks would be unable to pay off its debts. 

• Singapore stocks rose to a seven-month high, led by Singa- 
pore Telecommunications Ltd,, as foreign investors bid up 
shares on expectations of strong economic growth. The 30-stock 
Straits Times industrials index rose 30.04 points, to 2,254.68. 

• China overtook Smith Korea as the second-largest market 
in Asia for personal computers after Japan. International Data 
Corp. said PC sales in China rose 39 percent, to 2 . 12 million 
units. PC sales also rose 39 percent in Japan, to 8.10 million. 

• Australia created 38,400 new jobs in January, the strongest 

rise in 14 months, but the unemployment rate remained 
unchanged, at 8.6 percent Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters 


NOTICE B HEREBY GIVEN THATTHE ANNUALGENERALMEEHNGOF 

PANCUUS INC. 

E DUE TO TAKE PLACE ON THE 28th FEBRUARY 1997 AT 
COMOSA BUILDING, 15* FLOOR, SAMUEL LEWB AVENUE, 
PANAMA CITY, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA 
CO MMENCING AT 9J0 AJA 

The meeting will have the following agenda: 

(1) Election of aChaiiman of the Meeting. 

(2) Election of a Secretary to the Meeting. 

(3) The Directors'/Managers' report 

(4) Presentation of the accounts to 30th June 1996 with the 
auditors' report 

(5) Discharge to the Directors and the Managers. 

(6) Election of Directors. 

(7) Discharge to tbe Auditors. 

(8) Election of new Auditors, Abacab Sari Luxembourg, 
Member of DFK International. 

(9) Approval of the remuneration of the Directors and the 
Auditors. 

for SANNE MANAGEMENT COMPANY &A. 
as Managers of PANCURRI INC. 


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PAGE 2 


ttvtprn 4TIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUWDAY, FEBRUAItf l ^ 1W 


































































































































































































































-4 a 5ta ’» -i •» Bii 


INTERKATIONAX. mam.ll TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 



PAGE 30 


Hf ralb^^fefSribune 

Sports 


FKUODAX, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 - 


World Roundup 


Wiberg Misses Out 

SKIING High winds Thursday 
forced the postponement of the 
downhill run of die women's com- 
bined event at the World Cham- 
pionships in Sesmere, Italy. But 
when it is skied Friday, Pemilla 
Wiberg. the defending champion, 
will not be there. She straddled a 
gate on the first of the combined 
event's two slalom runs Thursday 
and was eliminated. (AFP, AP) 

Becker Fights Back 

tennis Boris Becker came from 
14 down to win the first set in a 
debreaker on his way to a7-6 (9-7), 
6-1 victory over Sandon Stolle of 
Australia on Thursday in the Dubai 
Open. Richard Krajicek, Goran 
Ivanisevic and Wayne Ferreira also 
reached the quarterfinals. 

■ Andre Agassi struggled in his fast 
match on the tour since November, 
before beating Bahamian Mark 
Knowles, 644-6 6-2, in the first round 
of the Sybase Open. (AFP. AP) 

Kluivert Picks Milan 

soccer Patrick Kluivert, the 
Dutch striker, said Thursday that be 
would move horn Ajax to AC Milan 
after the season. Kluivert, whose 
contract ends this summer, said he 
would sign a four-year contract with 
the Italian team. {Reuters) 

Douglas Wins Easily 

boxing Buster Douglas, die 
former world heavyweight cham- 
pion, easily outpointed Dickie Ryan 
in his third comeback fight. (AP) 

Cowboy Sues Police 

football The Dallas Cowboys 
lineman Erik Williams, falsely 
named in a rape case with his team- 
mate Michael Irvin, has sued the 
police and a television station in 
two lawsuits. (AP) 

Prost Will Own Team 

formula one Alain Prost, who 
won the world drivers’ champion- 
ship four times, has reached an 
agreement to take over the Ligier 
team Peugeot, die French car man- 
ufacturer said Thursday. (Reuters) 


England Outfoxed 
By Favorite Italian 


By Rob Hughes 

International Herald Tribune 


England lost the game and the plot 
when it was beaten 1-0 by Italy in a 
crucial World Cup qualifying match at 
Wembley Stadium. 

A spy within outwitted England. Gi- 
anfranco Zola, the imp who has become 
Prime Minister John Major's favorite 
player since joining Chelsea four months 
ago, scored the goal after 18 minutes. 

Zola exploited his knowledge of Eng- 
lishmen, specifically his relish of dart- 
ing between lumbering defenders. He is 
a pimpernel in blue, an elusive mover 
the English cannot trap. 

So when Alessandro- Costacuita 
lobbed the ball forward, Zola scampered 
behind Stuart Pearce. Pearce is a prac- 
ticing coach as well as a 73-times i 
defender, yet he took his eye off Zol 
Sol Campbell, a big but inexperi- 
enced Londoner, realized a fraction too 
late how grave the danger was. As Zola 
deftly controlled the ball with his left 
foot, then shot strongly with his right, 
Campbell lunged The ball deviated 
slightly off Campbell’s boot, but goalie 
Ian Walker was in any case badly po- 
sitioned to prevent die goal at his near 
post. Ecstasy for Italy, despair for Eng- 
land excuses for the goalkeeper. 

He was cold barely 10 hours before 
kickoff to prepare for his first interna- 
tional start. First-choice keeper David 
Seaman was nursing a sore knee, but 
Walker was also hiding an injury. He 
needed injections of cortisone and paink- 
iller into an inflamed left shoulder. Ap- 
parently Walker tried to conceal the in- 
jury for weeks before his club, Tottenham 
Hotspur, asked why he had tried go save a 
shot with his right rather than left hand 
That goal, almost a month ago, was 
scored by Roberto di Matteo, so Italy 
knew England's little secret Indeed, it 
knew a lot of English secrets. 

“I was surprised but pleased when 
they played Matthew Le Tissier," said 
Costacuita. “Somebody like Ian Wright 
would have made it far more difficult 
for me. Luckily, Wright is bottom of 
coach Glenn Hoddle’s list" 

Wright's pace and Les Ferdinand's 
might were withheld until late in die 
game while England attempted to out- 
fox Italy with unfamiliar players and 
tactics. By then, Italy was master of die 
game, undeniably more cohesive, more 


composed, more skilled 

“if they played Ferdinand from the 
stan it would have given us more prob- 
lems," said Zola. 

It made an old man very happy. 
Cesare Maldini, 65, had trained Italy's 
Under 21 team for 10 years but never, 
until Wednesday, taken charge of the 
real Azzurri. He works by consulting 
senior players, particularly his son 
Paolo, the team captain. 

England tried to be too clever. Hoddle 
did not rehearse his lineup, trying to 
bemuse Italy by laying false trails and 
keeping secret even from his own players 
the style and personnel of the selection. 

“Such ploys went out of fashion in 
Italy 15 to 20 years ago," said Maldini. 
“These days in every corner of the 
world there is a TV set, and we know all 
the En glish players, their defects and 
bilities." 

riddle fooled nobody. On Thursday, 
England’s Football Association started a 
bunt to find the “mole" who divulged 
the England lineup to the media on Tues- 
day. The time would be better spent 
studying why I talians outsmarted, out- 
passed. and outperformed that team. 

■ Spain Beats Malta. 4-0 - 

Alfonso Perez scored twice as Spain 
beat Malta 4-0 in World Cup qualifying, 
Reuters reported from Alicante. Spam 


leads its group 
Yugoslavia. 


by four points from 



I Win tijwrfi'ii aCT Hwft mr 

Colombia’s Ivan Rene Valendano taking to the air while Argentina’s Pablo Paz goes to ground trying to tackle. 


Argentina Wreaks World Cup Revenge in Colombia 


Reuters 

Argentina gained revenge for one of 
its greatest soccer humiliations when it 
beat Colombia 1-0 in the South Amer- 
ican World Cup qualifiers. 

Argentina, which lost 5-0 at home 
against Colombia in 1993, on Wed- 
nesday ended Colombia's unbeaten run 
in the competition and got its own cam- 
paign back on track after some poor 
results. 

As the marathon competition — in 
which all the South American nations 
play in one group — reached the halfway 
mark, Paraguay rose to a tie with Colom- 
bia on points at the top of the group. 

A mistake by Colombia goalkeeper 
Farid Mondragon allowed Claudio 
Lopez to score the ninth-minute goal that 


won the match. Mondragon thought that 
Lopez’s innocuous-looking shot was go- 
ing out of play and casually let it past him 
only to see it bounce into the net “Hie 
ball had a strange spin on it," he said. 

Argentine defender Eduardo Berizzo 
was sent off in the 45th minute for a 
foul. Then Colombia midfielder Maur- 
icio Sema missed die goal altogether 
with a 54th minute penalty. 

Shops and offices in both countries 
shut for the game and thousands ran 
onto the streets of Buenos Aires to cel- 
ebrate Argentina’s triumph. 

Argentina's victory put it third, one 
point ahead of surprising Ecuador, 
which thrashed Uruguay, one of soc- 
cer’s traditional powers, 4-0. 

Paraguay 2 , Para 1 The Paraguayans 


took full advantage ofCtriombia’s slip by 
winning at home and trail Colombia on 
goal difference. Aristides Rojas scored 
die winner two minutes before halftime. 
Paraguay plays five of its remaining 
eight games in its intimidating “De- 
fenders of the Chaco" stadium. 

Ecuador 4, Uruguay o While Colombia 
struggled. Francisco Maturana, the man 
whofed it to the last two World Cups, 
coached Ecuador — yet to play in the 
World Cup finals — to an emphatic 
victory at altitude in Quito. 

Three Uruguayans were ejected near 
die end, by which time die result had 
been settled 

Alex Aguinaga put Ecuador ahead 
from close range in the sixth minute. 
Two goals by Agustin Delgado in an 


eight-minute spell in the second half 
sealed die game. Substitute KleberChala 
added a fourth in the 88th min ute. 

Uruguay had been warned by FIFA, 
world soccer’s governing body, after 
seven of its players received yellow ^ 
cards against Chile last year. v 

Gustavo Mendez was dismissed for a 
violent tackle and Daniel Fonseca and 
Nelson Abeijon for arguing with Ar- 
gentine referee Javier Castrilli 
known as “Lawman" in his own coun- 
try for his hard-line approach. 

Bolivia 1, CNto 1 Bolivia, dropped two 
more home points when it was held by 
Chile. It was Bolivia's fourth draw In six 
games in La Paz, where it enjoys the 
advantage of playing at 3.600 meters 
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Some Old Golfers Reach Heaven a 



By Don Greenberg 

International Herald Tribune 


TAMPA. Florida — Take a 
job at a driving range teaching 
beginners. Peddle fancy shins 
ana trousers from an upmar- 
ket pro shop. Bore friends 
with stories of golfing glory 
days. Maybe return home to 
irritate the wife and spoil the 
grandchildren. 

There used to be few op- 
tions for 50-something tour- 
ing golf professionals, who 
lost the strength, length and 
putting nerve. But a select 
few have found unpreceden- 
ted golfing and finan cial nir- 
vana in America on the Se- 
niors Tour, many winning 
more money in one season 
than in 20 or more years of 
their “junior” careers. 

The U.S. Seniors Tour is 
just a teenager itself. It began 
m 1 980 with two tournaments 
and a total prize fund of 
5250,000. Today the Tour 
boasts 44 full-field events and 
a staggering $40.8 million in 


purses, and that doesn't in- 
clude big-money special 
events such as skins games, 
senior slams, legends tourna- 
ments and competitions 
against die other pro tours. 

Virtually every event is on 
U.S. television, the players 
are wined and dined even 
more lavishly than on the reg- 
ular Tour and, best of all to the 
privileged pros who qualify 
for the Seniors, most events 
are three rounds wife no 36- 
hole cut, meaning everyone 
who tees it up on Friday is 
guaranteed of a check come 
Sunday. 

Each week there's a tour- 
nament within a tournament 
for the “super seniors, ’ ’ play- 
ers over 60 who play the first 
two rounds for a separate 
purse of about $100,000. At 
most events, the seniors can 
cruise around in a cart, and 
because there's a limited field 
there are few crack-of-dawn 
starting times and no sprint- 
ing to beat the twilight 

“You could say we've died 


and gone to heaven, but Tm 
not so sure heaven would be 
this nice or rewarding," said 
Lee Trevino, who has won 27 
Senior Tour events in eight 
seasons and earned 56.8 mil- 
lion. double what he won in 
24 years on the regular Tour. 

"We play on fantastic 
courses in beautiful condition 
for more money than I thought 
possible. The fans are tre- 
mendously supportive, die 
sponsors more than generous 
and there's terrific competition 
every week, bur not quite the 
cut-throat atmosphere we had 
when we were younger." 

There's a catch. The Se- 
niors Tour is not for every pro. 
A few qualify automatically 
because of their regular-tour 
career earnings. Some get 
sponsor's exemptions. Most 
have to qualify in the dreaded 
Tour School, an annual open 
competition that draws more 
than 1,000 hopefuls but only 
awards fully qualified spots to 
eight players. 

Those who fail, and they 


include such luminaries as 
Tony Jacklin, the former Brit- 
ish and U.S. Open champion, 
must rely on sponsors exemp- 
tions or the nerve-wracking 
Monday qualifying. 

This week, about 144 play- 
ers paid entry fees as high at 
$315 and tinned up at Fox 
Hollow Golf Club near 
Tampa to try fo r one of die 
four spots for the GTE Classic 
Open, which begins Friday at 
the Tournament Players Club 
of Tampa Bay. 

“We never tell somebody 
they shouldn't try,'’ said Bert 
Weaver, an official with the 
Senior Tour. “But we do 
wonder why so many come 
ouL I can see 20 or 30 guys 
who would figure to have a 
chance. I suppose they all 
have it in their minds that the 
good Lord will smile on them 
cue day." 

Three former European 
Tour veterans who have start- 
ed wiih Monday qualification 
and ended by winning the lot- 
tery-winner are Vincente 


Fernandez of Argentina, John 
Bland of South Africa and 
Brian Barnes of Scotland. 
Each has reaped career-record 
earnings. Bland has won four 
events and more than 515 
milli on since September 
1995. Fernandez had one vic- 
tory and raked in $605,251 as 
a rookie last year and Barnes 
finished second twice in 1996, 
banked $538,000 and wound 
up 21st on the money list. 

“As for why I'm doing so 
much better now than before, 
it’s tough to say," said 
Fernandez. “I dunk staying 
in good shape and taking care 
of myself is one reason. And I 
suppose you could say I'm a 
late bloomer." 

“I’m over the moon, en- 
joying myself as never be- 
fore, Barnes said. “You’d 
be nuts not to relish every 
moment of this. The courses, 
the weather, the way the 
sponsors treat you and, of 
course, the money — I guess 
you call it living the Amer- 
ican Dream." 



t 


WUUn Wotf Afcnce RancaABM 

Lucas Parsons hitting an 
iron shot on Thursday. 

■ Parsons Eclipses Tiger 

Lucas Parsons equaled the 
course record Thursday with a 
nine under par 64 to take the 
lead after the first round of the ■ 
Australian Masters, Reuters £- 
reported from Melbourne. An- 
other Australian. Peter O’Mal- 
ley, was a stroke back an 65. 

Tiger Woods, who won the 
Bangkok Classic in Thailand 
on Sunday, finished five un- 
der par at 68 for a share of 
fifth place. 


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Islanders Foil Lemieux, 
Gain Rare Road Victory 


The Associated Press 
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road wins in the NHL; five in 
27 road games this season. 

The Islanders not only won 
with relative ease, they held 
Lemieux without a point. It 
was only the ninth time in 52 
games this season that the 
NHL’s scoring leader had 
been blanked. 

Jason Holland scored his 
first NHL goal and Ziggy 
Palffy got his 32d of the sea- 
son in the Islanders’ victory. 

Mta. a, Lightning 2 

Kooert Svehla broke a tie with 
the first of three third-period 
goals for Florida, which took 
oyer the lead in th e Eastern 
Conference by beating visit- 
ing Tampa Bay. 

A Whale™ 2 Dave 

Andreychuk scored widi 3:44 
left in the third period as New 
Jersey extended its season- 


high undefeated string to 
eight games by winning at 
Hartford. 

Safe™* 2, Canadian* 2 At 

Buffalo, backup goal tender 
Steve Shields stopped 43 
shots as the Sabres blew a 
two-goal lead but still man- 
aged to salvage a tie with 
Montreal. 

Canadiens goalie Jocelyn 
Thibault made 32 saves. 

Rad Wings 7, Sharks 1 

Brendan Shanahan broke 
open a tight game with three 
consecutive second-period 
goals as Detroit beat San Jose, 
keeping the Sharks winless in 
II regular-season games in 
the Motor City. 

Coyote* 5, stan 0 Damn 
Shannon scored twice as 
Phoenix snapped the Stars' 
four-game home winning 
streak. 

°he™4,Bfuin*3 Rem Mur- 
ray scored with 4:58 left in the 
third period to lead Edmonton 
past visiting Boston. 

WgMy Duck* 5, Mapfa 
L*«t* 2 Guy Hebert stopped 
39 shots as Anaheim defeated 
visiting Toronto. 

Jari Kurri. Roman Oksiutfl 
and Paul Kariya each had a 
goal and an assist for the 
Mighty Ducks, who lost four 
of their previous five games. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


SPORTS 


, Lakers Pound Minnesota 

Shaq’s Comeback Thwarted by Another Injury 


The Associated Press 

After missing two games and the AD-Star 
gamebeeause ofa mildly sprained right knee. 
ShaquiUe O Neal made a slamrmng start 
Wednesday mght when he dunked an alley- 
oop pass only six seconds into the Los 
Angeles Lakers’ game at Minnesota. 

But he strained his left knee a few minutes 
later when he became entangled with Min- 
nesota’s Dean Garrett on another lob and 

MBA ICB HftBf 

lan(^ awkwardly. Following four more 
dunks, O Neal left the game for good late in 
die first quarter with die Lakers already on 
course toward a 100-84 road victory. 

“It doesn’t look too bad,” Lakers coach 
Del Harris said. “We just didn’t want to 
any chances.” 

, . never trailed aflra- Robert Hottv 

hit 0 Neal for the alley-oop in the opening 
seconds. Elden Campbell scored 21 points and 
Eddie Jones had 19 for the Lakers, and Hony 
had 1 1 points and 10 rebounds. Los Angeles 
woo for the eighth time in nine games. 

Stephon Marbury returned to the Timber- 
wolves' starting lineup after missing eight 
games because of a thigh bruise. He had 13 
points and eight assists. 

Suns i3i a Ca tties ioo Kevin Johnson a 
triple-double by halftime and Phoenix rooted 
short-handed Boston in a meetin g of last- 
place teams. 

Johnson finished with 22 points, 17 assists 
and 1 1 rebounds in only 34 minutes Wesley 
Person hit 13 of 14 shots and scored a career- 


lost their fourth in a row. They trailed 106-66 
with 1:30 left, but then die Suns started using 
all their bench players. 

O m a fi aa ioo, Spurs ioi Vancouver won a 
season series fen: die first time in its two-year 
history, led by Bryant Reeves’s 31 points. 

The Grizzlies have the worst record in die 
league at 10-43, but have won three of four 
against San Antonio. Earlier in die day, the 
injury-depleted Spurs found out that two-rime 
All-Star Sean Elliott might miss the rest of the 
season because of tendinitis in his right knee . 

Vernon Maxwell mate all five of his 3- 
point shots for the host Spurs and became the 
fifth player in NBA history to hit 1,000 career 
| j 3-pointers. 

Pistons 96, Manic 87 Grant Hill posted his 


fifth triple-double of the season, including 
four in the last month, and helped Detroit beat 
visiting Orlando. 

Hill had 31 points, 10 rebounds and 10 
assists. He had consecutive three-point plays, 
highl i g htin g a 13-2 ran in die third quarter as 
the Pistons overcame a 54-50 deficit 


Penny Hardaway scored 16 points for die 
Magic, but shot just 3-for-I5 and fouled out 

Homots 113, Nats ioo Vlade Divac 
Mocked a team-record 12 shots as Charlotte 
stopped visiting New Jersey. 

Divac set a career-high for blocks. He also 
had 18 points and nine rebounds. 

GlenRice scored 27 points for die Hornets, 
and Muggsy Bogues had 16 points and a 
season-high 15 assists. - 

Shawn Bradley, the 7 -foot-6 center for the 
Nets, blocked one shot and increased his 
league-leading total to 151. 

cmflMi 63, Pacm 78 Terrell Brandon 
had 22 points, a career-high 12 rebounds and 
nine assists as Cleveland won at Indiana. 

Chris Mills had 17 points for the Cavaliers. 
Reggie Miller scored 22, and Rik Stmts had 
17 for Indiana. 

Hawks toe, Raptors 84 Jon Barry hit three 
3-pointers dining a 25-0 run in the fourth 
quarter, pulling Atlanta on course for its 20th 
straight home win. 

Eakembe Mutoxnbo had 22 points and 1 1 
rebounds to the Hawks. 

Toronto, which lost its fifth in a row on die 
road, led 64-63 with 2:45 left in the third 
period. 

Atlanta responded with a 33-4 burst, in- 
cluding the 25-0 run led by Mookie Blay- 
lock's seven points. Blaylock had 19 points, 
1 1 assists and eight rebounds. 

■ Blaylock Faces Marijuana Charge 

The Atlanta guard Mookie Blaylock was 
charged with marijuana possession in Van- 
couver, British Columbia, while still on pro- 
. barion to a similar charge in Georgia. B tit it is 
unlikely the new charge will have any re- 
percussions here, a prosecutor said. 

Seargent Willy Laurie of the Royal Ca- 
nadian Mounted Police said Blaylock was 
arrested for carrying about two ounces of 
marijuana cm Feb. 1 as the Hawks prepared to 
board a plane from Vancouver to Phoenix. 

He was ordered to return for a court ap- 
pearance May 14, Seargent Laurie told The 
Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 

Blaylock had been sentenced to a year’s 



Erie Milla/Rcuinr 


Minnesota’s Doug West fooling the Lakers’ Kobe Bryant while blocking his shoL 


Kentucky Victory 
Narrows SEC Gap 


probation Feb. 8, 1996. in suburban Cobb 
Comity to a 1995 arrest on marijuana pos- 
session and drunken driving charges. 

Hie Canadian arrest is not likely to have 


repercussions because Cobb County author- 
ities did not find out about it until after the 
Georgia probation had expired, said Ben 
Smith, a Cobb county prosecutor. 


The Associated Press 

South Carolina lost its un- 
beaten record in the South- 
eastern Conference while 
Kentucky, the reigning 
NCAA champion, won to 
close the gap m the race to 
the conference title. 

After rhe No. 12 Game- 
cocks lost. 77-74, to Georgia 
on Wednesday, and the No. 4 
Wildcats won, 84-48, over 
LSU, the gap between the two 
teams shrunk to 1 16 games. 

South Carolina (17-6) is 

11- 1 in the SEC. while Ken- 
tucky (23-3) is 9-2 in 

the conference. The Game- 
cocks play three of their next 
four games on the road. 

Ray Harrison scored 23 
points and sparked a late 13-0 
run that helped Georgia (18- 
5, 7-4) snap South Carolina's 

12- game winning streak. 

Kentucky rolled over LSU 

(9- 1 6, 2- 1 0) behind the sharp- 
shooting of Anthony Epps, 
who scored all of his career- 
high 1 8 points on 3 -pointers. 

No.1 Kansas 104, Oklahoma 
St. 72 At Lawrence, Raef La- 
Fnentz had a 14-0 run to start 
the second half as Kansas 
stretched its home winning 
streak to 41. The Jayhawks 
(24-1. 10-1 Big 12) hit seven 
of their first 1 0 shots at the start 
of each half and were never 
threatened by the outmarmed 
Cowboys (12-1 1. 4-7). 

No. 2 Waka Forest 55, No. 7 
ctemaon 49 At Winston- 
Salem, Tim Duncan had 18 
points and 16 rebounds, and 
Wake Forest held Clemson 
( 1 9-5, 7-4 Atlantic Coast 
Conference) to one field goal 
in a span of 18 minutes. 

Wake Forest (20-2, 9-2) 
guaranteed its school-record 
fifth consecutive 20-victory 
season. 


Mb. 3 IfinciMota 70, Purdue 

67 Minnesota survived a late 
charge to snap a 14-game los- 
ing streak at Purdue's 
Mackey Arena. Sam Jacob- 
son and Bobby Jackson each 
scored 13 points for Min- 
nesota (21-2, 10-1 Big Ten), 
which led by 13 points in the 
second half before Purdue 
(13-9, 8-4) rallied. 

Oklahoma 91, No. 15 Color- 
ado «6 Nate Erdmann scored 
31 points to outduel Chaun- 
cey Billups, and Oklahoma 
used a strong first half to beat 
visiting Colorado. 

The Sooners ( 14-7, 6-5 Big 
12) won iheir eighth in a row 
over Colorado ( 1 7-6, 8-3). 

Plttatawgh 95, No. 1 8 VfUen- 

ovm 89 At Pittsburgh, Jason 
Made scored 40 points, the 
most by a Bn player in 40 
years, and the Panthers shot 
71 percent during a 60-point 
second half to upset Villan- 
ova. Made scored 28 points 
after halftime as Pitt (13-11, 
7-6 Big East) went on a 21-3 
ran to take the lead. Alvin 
Williams scored 27 points for 
Villanova (17-7. 8-5). which 
has lost four of seven. 

Wisconsin 62, No. 20 Hffnois 
45 At Madison, Sam Okey 
scored 16 points and Wiscon- 
sin kept Illinois withouta field 
goal to a 13-minute stretch in 
the second half. Okey scored 
eight points in a 21-0 second- 
half run for Wisconsin (14-7, 
7-5 Big Ten). The Badgers 
have won five of six games to 
move into a fifth-place tie 
with die mini (17-7. 7-5). 

No. 9 Iowa St. 87, Missouri 

59 Dedric Willoughby scored 
22 of his 29 points in the first 
half, and Iowa State (17-4. 8- 
3 Big 12) used an 18-1 run in 
the middle of the game to beat 
visiting Missouri. Wil- 
loughby made all five of his 
3-point shots in the first half 
and finished 6-to-8. 


NBA Standi Ho* 


ATLANTIC OmSKON 



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NewJereey 27 as 23 24— 10* 

Charlotte 24 23 31 33 — 113 

MJj G8 M0 HM3 24, KMtt 9-18 23 23, 
o race 10-1* *4 27, Mono 8-12 5-4 21. 
Ita b—oi U M a w Jersey 51 (WBtaras 11), 
OwrtoHe 51 (Mum 18). Assists— New 
Jersey 7\ (Gift KWes &. Chariot* 33 
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Terrain 11 24 23 18— M 

SM 27 26 18 3S— 186 

P. Wfltaras ft* 54 IS Staudanrire 5-11 M 
1ft Canfey 6-13 2-2 1ft A:Mukmbo7-ll 8-12 
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CIWU— d 24 18 21 28-83 

Iritaa 21 25 13 It— 75 

C: Brandon 9-20 45 22, MBs 8-12 1-1 17>fc 
Miller 7-M « a SkiRs 8-17 1-2 
17 Be>— its deielond 42 (Brandon 12), 
Mdm 37 (anus 71. JtssUB-Oevetand 19 
(Brandon 99, Indiana 16 (Bat 9. 

Ortaato 22 21 2* 18-17 

DtMT 24 22 2S 25-9* 

0c Anderson 7-13 3-4 2ft Grad 8-15 1-1 
17, D: HOI 11-19 9-]2 31. Dumon 8-14 84 
ai.m w ri s O r tando 34 (Grant 8),oraob 
55 (HB 103. Assists— Oriondo 20 (SefcaJyS), 
Detroit 21 (HB1®. 

LALdm 29 29 24 18-180 

MB SMSOta . 24 22 24 14- 84 

UAj Campbell 9-19 3-3 21, Jones 8-1* 2-2 - 
19» Ms Garrett 7-14 24 17, Gogtelta 4-17 89 
16. Rsboorots— Los Angeles 57 (Hony IQ. 
Mknesota 58 (Gantt 10). Mrisfc-Ln 
Angelas Z3 (Hony 8). Minnesota 19 (Mcrtwry 

a. 

VtaRM rar 37 24 23 22-18* 

SuAaBoB 23 25 25 28-401 

V. Reeves 9-14 13-14 31, Anthony 6-9 8-9 
24 SJL MoanS 5-165-519, M.WBtans 5-10 


54 15Jtafcbrad»— Vancouver 41 (Reeves 
121, San Antonio 48 (Herrera 10). 
Asislifi— Vdnoosnier 25 (Anthony 11), San 
Antonio 25 (Johnson. Del Negro *). 

Boston 21 17 26 29-IN 

Pbooak 38 36 34 23-131 

B: Writer 12-ffl 8* 29, Wesley 7-13 2-21/j 
P: Person 13-M 7-8 31 Johnson 7-9 6ft 22. 
Rriaeata— Boston 43 (Writer 9). Ptowta 
*0 (Johnson 11). Assists— Boston 24 (Fan, 
Wtatoy ?)• Phoenbt 33 (Johnson 171. 

EuroLeaoue 


Spta, Croatia, 7ft Etas PfisenTuricey 56 
Baroriona Spain. 7ft Pontoon Belgrade, Yu- 
goslavia 73 

St— a— Etas Pttsen 2* prints, 
Batatara 2ft Ponton Belgrade 2ft Spot 22. 
Kinder Batoaia ttriy, 2a Bayar Lmeriaisea 
Germany, 1& 

- emoupa 

SwBla Spata, 7ft Ponalhtaritea Greece 87 
Paa Ron® 77, LM^anaStovado 71 
iraNeo PanothBaBras 27 printa 
vnewhmmRanoa24,Liuto(iora34SevB- 
la 22, Pau 21. Dymmo Moscow 17. 


NHL Standimos 


XIUlimeDMSKM 

W L T PIS GF GA 


N.Y. Islanders 18 28 10 4* 154 1*7 

Tampa Bay 19 28 « 44 142 1*8 

NOffnCAdT DWMON 

W L T Pis GF GA 
Buffalo 29 19 9 *7 159 141 

Pittsburgh X 20 5 *5 206 173 

Montreal 21 27 11 S3 18S 210 

Hartfart 21 26 7 49 157 177 

Ottawa 18 24 12 48 151 1*1 


Boston 

20 29 7 

47 

160 

CENTRAL OmaON 



W L T 

Pto 

GF 

Dotes 

32 21 4 

*8 172 

Detroit 

26 18 10 

62 

ire 

St Louis 

26 25 6 

58 

172 

Ptuertix 

25 27 4 

54 

156 

Chhnga 

21 27 8 

50 

143 

Tonoto 

21 34 1 43 
PACmCDMSION 

160 


W L T 

Pts 

GF 

Cotoutio 

33 14 8 

74 

187 

bamonran 

23 23 5 

61 

178 

Vancouver 

25 2B 2 

52 

176 

Anaheim 

22 28 * 

50 

159 

Cotgary 

22 28 6 

50 

149 

San Jose 

20 29 6 

46 

143 

Los Angela 

wn 

19 31 * 

44 

148 

S 


Haddo 

DhftutahiMi 

nDHMapnn 

ILY. Ranges 

NewJetsey 

VtasMngtan 


28 IS 13 *9 1*1 128 


30 1* B 60 173 136 

N 22 7 43 197 IN 

27 17 9 63 142 130 

22 27 6 50 144 152 


New Jersey 1 1 1—3 

Halted 1 0 1-3 

Hr* Period: H-J&mhetm 9 (Mavtarvfle) 
(sh). ft N-L-Podecsen 8 (MdCoft Zetaputdn) 
Cpp). Seoead Period: N-L-Pedeson 9 
(Ctarafaea. McKay) TIM Perk* H-Caraefc 
1* (EmeBaa Sanderson) Cpp). ft N-L- 
Andreytaruk 21 (McKay, Dacytei) Shots aa 
goat NJr 11-7-4-22. H-6BB-22. Codex 
NJ.-Bradeuc. H- Burks. 

N.Y. tstaadere 1 2 3-5 

pmsbunpi 1 o 8-1 

Hist Period: New Ytak, Lntawnce 3 
(Green, McCabe) ft P-Frands 21 Uogr, 


Moran] (pp). Stood Period: Now York, 
Anda m an 7 (PnHIfe SmoBnskO 4 New York, 
HoUand l (Jcnssea Wood) Thbd Period: 
New Yak, Green 14 (tang. Bawd) (pp). ft 
New Yak, Pofffy 32 (Smadnsia Jonseon) 
Shots an goal: New Yak 7-15-7-39. P- 14-9- 

8- 31. Batatas New Yak. Sota. P-Lnflme. 

Mentrcri 8 2 0 8-2 

Britain 1 1 0 8—2 

FbsT Period; B-Audette 18 mod, 
Hotztager) Second Period: B-Dawe 16 (Peca 
Ronan) ft M-Motokhov 7 {Stevenson 
Cuterare) 4, M-, Rudnsky 20 rBure. 
Doraphousse) Third Period: None. 

Overtime Nare. Shots on 900 k M- 16-1 4-12- 
3—45. 8- 5-13-12-4-34. Codes: M- 
Ttritanitt. B-Shletds. 

TompoBoy l 1 0-2 

Florida 1 1 3-5 

T *ri Pata ta T-Oou2CromsYfcboert)ftF- 
Nemhovtay 3 (Muphft Dram*) Seaad Period 
FMMtal (CBlmer, ftodoflon) ft T-CkxareB 20 
(Utanra Houtaa) IBM Period: FArehta 10 
(Matenreiyeo Guetakson) (ppLft F-Sbrim A 
(SveHa Nendwsky) 7, FOnrafc 14 (Strata, 
HriO (PPL Shea u gnat T- 859-22. F- WO- 

9- 34. Gateee T-T«toaoctt Stfeah, 
TtafaaraaL F-, Ntadriesfaraudi 

San Jose 8 1 8-1 

Detrrit 1 3 3-7 

Hret Period: D-KomtaaBwr 3 CStmdiaa 
Ytenrem) Second Period D-Shanohon 33 
amtonov) ft D-Shanhan 34 (McCarty, 
Dandenaum ft Or Shonrinn 35 (McCarty, 
Udsfewn) (pp). ft SJ^Tancfl 3 (Htesea 
Kiwpa) (PPL TIBd Pcriota D-Konatan8nov 4 
(Larionov, Lkttam) 7, D-Fedorw 21 
(Konstantinov, Udsfewn) ft D5andstran 10 
(Fedorov, KtinetaitoiuH) Sara oa fsteSJ.- ft 
13-9 — 28. D- 1 686— 30. GoaOit: SJ.- 
HriMrty. COsgood. 

Pboadx 2 0 3-6 

Dodos 0 0 0-0 


Hnt Patod: Phoend, Gortner 23 OOig} ft 
Phoenk, Skeleton 2 (Nawrirwn Gartner) 
(pp). Second Perio d. None. Ttbd Perio d. 
Ptioenh, Ronrdng 14 (Gartner, Tverriovsfcy) 
(pp). ft Ptioata, Shannon 6 (Coriaira, 
Tverdavsfcy) (pp). ft Phoenix, Shaman 7 
(Mansart Stapleton) Starts an geafc Phoeita 
11-10-12—31 D- 5-10-10-25. Codes 
Phoenfet KhNOwBn. D-Moog. 

Bostae 1 1 1-3 

Efteardea 1 2 1-4 

First Period. e-Mardwnt 1 1, ft B-Bouigue 
12 (Oates) second Period: B-T.Sweeray 3 
(Tocchet DSweeney) 4, E-Smyth 26 
(Weight, CzeriunnkO (pp). ft E-Satan 16 
(Weight McArentand) (pp). Third Period: B- 
Donato 20 (Moger, StumpeO 7, E-Munny 9 
(Grier, OerkawskO Starts ea goat B- 11-12- 
7-30. E- 811-10-29. Coshes: 8Ta8as. E- 
Jaseph. 

Toronto 0 1 1—2 

AaNe te 2 0 3-5 

Flat Period— A-MIranov 9 (RutxWa Von 
hope), ft A-Okriuta 6 (Kuril, DoUas) (pp). 
Socoad Period: T-Gflirwur 12 (Bererirv 
Sundln) Tkhd Period: A-Kartya 25- ft A- 
Kurtt 9 (OksMa Volk) ft T-BerezJn 15 
(Zentaa Murphy) 7, A-Bellows B (Kartya, 
Sefcme) (pp). Shots on go eft T- 12-16- 
13-41. A- 12-6-19-37. Gordies: T-PoMR. A- 
Hebert. 


EUROPEAN ZONE 
CROUP 2 

Engtond ft Italy 1: 

f ai n a si England 9, Italy 9, Poland ft 
Georgia ft Moktavo ft 


GROUP • 

Spain ft Malta 0: 

— ~ a Spain 16 points. Yugoslavia 

lft Slovakia 9, Czech RepubSc ft Faroe Is- 
lands ft Malta 0. 

SOUTH AMERICAN ZOie 
Ecuador ft Uruguay 0 
Bolivia 1, Chita 1, He 
Cotambla ft Argentina 1 
Paraguay 2, Peru 1 

« f mMhiiw 1. Cotori bta 17polnts, 2. 
Paraguay 17, 3. Argentina lft 4. Ecuada lft 
5. Uruguay lft ft BoBvta lft 7. artte9, & Peru 
9,9. Venezuela 1. 

ntmuwinifi re wan it 

Turkey l.HMondl 

DflNCBP 

SRDROUWt 

WBtaoi II Tlburg ft Graaigen 0 
PSV Eta d h ora n ft AZ AHunoa3 
C2-2 otter 90 odnutaG AZwnn with suddav 
deutti “golde n gocd“ ta extra ttrne) 

mo's cup 

THURSOCV, M BANGKOK 
ThoJland 1. Romnda 0 
Sweden!. Japan 0 

ewtahei |oiw w mo Sweden 7 
points TMtand 5, Japan ft Romania 1. 

( Nad moMme Feb. 14, 3d place — Japan 
vs. Romania. Final — Sweden vs. ThoDandJ 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMElbCMI LEAGUE 

hew Turk— A greed to tarns with OF 
Barrio WIBoih on 1 -year contract. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

HOUSTO N Agr e ed to tarns vrtttiP Manuel 
Barrios, P Ryan Creek, P Mike Grzankfi, P 
Oscar HerriquK, P Tom Martin, P Trever 


Mil a, P CJ. Nitkowski aid P Mike Walter, 
INF COrios Gnillai and OF Richard Hidalgo. 

new Yoac-Agroed to terras with RHP 
Greg McMidiael on 8year contract and R H P 
Bobby Jones on a one-year contracL 

san ntAMasco-AcquIred RHP Rem 
Arocha from the 51 Louis Cardinals to com- 
plete the December trade for C Tom Lamp- 
kin. 

natuu 

NATIONAL FOO TB ALL LEAG U E 

Carolina — Agreed la terras wttti RB An- 
thony Johnson on 3-year contract. 

GREEN BAY— Signed DT Michael Thomp- 
saa DL Walter Scan, WR Eric Matthews, LB 
Reggie Clark, LB Dion Foxx, FS Monty Gram, 
DE Eric Johnson, CB Busier Ower& G An- 
t*ew Peterson and TE LoveB Pkkney. 
Waived CB Michael Robinson. 

Washington— Released L Rod Stephen 
5S Darryl Morrison, CB Muhammad OBver 
andT Brian Thure. 

COLLSm 

MBsaum-KANSAS city— S uspended luniar 
G Vinson Sadth and tedor F Lonnie Afessn- 
da- tor toe rest at the season tor undsdosed 
viotattans. 

Northwestern— Hrad Ricky Byidsong, 
itteire baskatban coadw eftodhe ot the end at 
the season. 

prairie view— N amed Greg Johnson toot- 
baUcoadL 

sacred heart— Announced Gary Rehab 
taoibaBfloodbhasreiraiulsfietfribcoodiing 
duties to booanie operations raanogor of ttw 
ottdettc center. 

ucLA-Announced that mars Interim bas- 
kefbas coach Steve Lavln has been named 
pennonent coach and signed to ly w r oon- 
Iratt 

wtscDMSni-MiLWAincEB— Suspended G 
KaMn Andenoa F Roderick Johnson and F 
Sean Stackhouse tor viatattag team rules. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUWDAK, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 



PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY FEBRUARY 14, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Defining a Cynic 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — After all 
ibai hoo-hab about mon- 
ey corrupting the recent elec- 
tions, you expected the Wash- 
ington crowd to plunge right 
in and do something about it? 
Of course you didn't. 

That's because you are 
cynical. Shame! 

How depressing this cyn- 
icism is to Congress. It de- 
presses the president too. He 
worries about “this toxic at- 
mosphere of cynicism.’ ’ 

And yet — 

While deploring cynicism 
it is all very well to put on a 
pious face, but it can't hurt to 
ponder Ambrose Bierce’s 
definition of a cynic in his 
“Devil’s Dictionary”: 
“Cynic — a blackguard 
whose faulty vision sees 
things as they are. not as they 
ought to be.” 


struction, and everybody, es- 
pecially Republicans, wanted 
a colorful way — a consti- 
tutional amendment, by 
George! — to display their 
devotion to the cause. 

Without arguing the merits 
of the balanced-budget 
amendment, one point is ob- 
vious. A Congress that needs 
a constitutional amendment 


to stop its own wanton spend- 
ing of tax money must also be 


□ 


In the world as it ought to 
Clinton 


be. Congress and 
would already be perspiring 
heavily in the struggle to save 
our political system from de- 
struction by the high price of 
TV political ads. 

At the end of that squalid 
1996 presidential campaign, 
politicians and press spoke of 
little else but the urgency of 
saving the democratic system 
from smothering in money. 

Meanwhile, back at the 
world as it is. what is die first 
order of Washington busi- 
ness? A constitutional amend- 
ment to require perpetual bal- 
ance in the federal budget. 

All sides had a dandy polit- 
ical dust-up just two years ago 
with this one. There has been 
powerful political catnip in 
the words ‘ 'balanced budget’ ’ 
ever since Ross Perot dis- 
closed that millions think bal- 
ancing the budget will pull us 
back from the brink of de- 


powerless to stop its own 
wanton campaign spending 
by passing a mere law. 

Well, the trick here. ladies 
and gents, is to stay enter- 
tained. Staying entertained by 
politics helps stave off cyn- 
ical thoughts. 

The entertainment lies in 
Congress' hatred of its own 
powers, the very powers em- 
bedded in the Constitution it 
now wants to amend in order 
to weaken itself. 

Think of Congress as a hu- 
man sunk in incurable vice — 
alcohol, narcotics, sexual 
lust, serial murder. It simply 


cannot stop itself from spend- 
ing and spending again. It c 


lean 


balance the budget by voting 
against this and that, but it 
cannot bear to cast such votes, 
because folks back home 
want the budget balanced, but 
not at their expense. 

So Congress votes to spend 
and scrawls desperate pleas to 


the police: ‘ ‘Stop me before I 
spend again.” The balanced- 


budget amendment is one 
such plea. Maybe the Con- 
stitution will stop this terrible 
addiction. 

Congress' power to control 
spending derives from the 
British House of Commons, 
which fought a civil war to 
win it from kings in the 17th 
century. Now Congress is 
busy trying to give it back. 
Why should it cost so much to 
keep re-electing such a meek 
litter of pussycats? 


Dr. Seuss’ Cat in the Hat Finally Goes to Market 


By Dinitia Smith 

New York Tunes Service 


Yertle the Turtle 
And Horton Hears Who 
On T-shirts, in movies. 

And on TV too. 

They're coming to theme parks. 
They never can rest 
Till they’re bigger than big 
And better than best. 


N 


EW YORK — Yes, the empire of Dr. 
Seuss, the fabled writer of children’s 


books that have sold more than 100 million 
copies worldwide, a man who haled all forms 
of commercial exploitation of his work, is 
finally being franchised. 

"The Wubbulous World of 
Dr. Seuss” is on Nick- 
elodeon. Esprit clothing is 
expanding a Dr. Seuss line 
that runs from bats to boxer 
shorts. Universal City in Or- 
lando, Florida, is building a 
25-acre theme park based on 
Seuss characters, Steven 
Spielberg is developing a 
movie based on “The Cat in 
the Hat” and Dr. Seuss En- 
terprises. represented by the 
talent agency ICM, is ne-. 
gotiatmg with producers to 
make two Broadway shows 
from Seuss books. 

Throughout his career, the 
reclusive and perfectionist 
Dr. Seuss — Theodor Seuss 
Geisel — resisted almost 
every attempt to merchandise his mythical 
creatures fearing that the proliferation of the 
images he created would diminish their qual- 
ity. 

In his lifetime. Geisel earned $500 million 
in book royalties, and by all accounts left his 
widow, Audrey, generously provided for. 

But soon after his death in 1991 at age 87, 
Mrs. Geisel made the decision to allow the 
Seuss nam e to be marketed. 

Mrs. Geisel says the decision was nec- 
essary to protect the Dr. Seuss trademark. 
Friends of her husband suggest that the wid- 
ow, 18 years Geisel’s junior, is intent on 
keeping alive his flame. Though always big 
business. Dr. Seuss is now bigger than 


according to Business Week, it has earned $7 
million to $10 million a year in residuals, 
primarily from books and television spe- 
cials. Two years ago at Christmas, when 
Macy’s offered Cat in the Hat Toys for 
$13.95, about 200,000 were sold. 

It is a situation unthinkable in Dr. Seuss’ 
lifetime. “I’d rather go into the Guinness 
Book of Records as the writer who refused 
the most money per word,” Geisel said after 
one particularly lucrative offer. 

When Geisel died, Mrs . Geisel planned to 
follow her husband’s wishes not to com- 
mercialize the Seuss name, she said in a 
telephone interview recently from her home 
in La Jolla, California. But after a rash of 


and Ted and I don’t want to say too much. 
But if he were around, he would be ito- 
solutely resisting this, or riding herd like the 
perfectionist be was. I hope things remam 
true to his vision. Sometimes people think if 
you write asOly word and make up a thyme, 
you’ve written a Seuss Rhyme. But it’s not 
that way.” 

Theodor Geisel, the son of a parks su- 
perintendent in Springfield, Massachusetts. 


gawky, elastic-looking animal wearing a 

^Tb^ouiOTne. written in Gejs*Ts trade- 
mark anapestic tetrameter, was The Cat tn 
the HaL” The critic Clifton Fadiman said the 
book was “probably the most influential 
fust-grade reader since the McGuffey. 
Newsweek called it “the Muppets 

^taalL, Geisel wrote and illustrated 44 books. 


counterfeit Dr. Seuss products, including T- 

: in the Hat 



Would Geisel approve? 


New York Times Service 


The privately held Dr. Seuss Enterprises 
does not report income, but in recent years. 


shirts with the Cat i 
smoking marijuana and 
flashing a peace sign, she 
decided to allow the char- 
acters to be merchandised. 

“It was a daily, daily 
struggle,” said Mrs. Geisel, 
who today speaks of the Cat 
as if he were a living being. 
“I wish the Cat to go on 
indefinitely, as a literary cat, 
not a cartoon cat. The al- 
ternative was to kill it.” 

One reason to license the 
Seuss products, said Karl Zo- 
Bell, who is a trustee with 
Mrs. Geisel for Dr. Seuss En- 
terprises, is to protect the 
Seuss trademark. “Under the 
rules governing trade- 
marks," he said, “if you 
don’t defend them or use 
them, you lose them and they fell into toe 
public domain. In order to protect the char- 
acters, we had to go into the marketplace.” 
Not everyone agrees that Dr. Seuss had to 
expand this m uch. “Dr. Seuss’ characters 
are so famous that this expansion is not really 
necessary to get the kind of protection they 
feelthey need." said Andrew Baiun, a trade- 
mark lawyer with the New York City firm of 
Darby & Darby. 

And some of those who knew Geisel say 
he would have hated the whole thing. “You 
look back: there weren't even T-shirts,” said 
Judith Morgan, who with her husband, Neil, 
wrote die 1994 biography “Dr. Seuss and 
GeiseL” “I do not think he would have 
allowed it.’ ’ Christopher Cerf, whose father, 
Bennett, was Geisers publisher at Random 
House, said: “I’m friends with both Audrey 





N— knMtn/Thr iN-» Vsffc'Itoi 

Among items now being franchised are Cat in the Hat boxer shorts and slippers. 


started drawing as a child, making doodles 
on his bedroom wall of the animals m the zoo 


his father supervised. In 1 937, he had his first 

‘Aid to Think Tht 


That I Saw It on 


success: 

Mulberry Street." 

From toe start, Seuss figures were dif- 
ferent from those of animators like Walt 
Disney. They weren't conventionally cute. 
There was a distinct lack of sentimentality in 
their clean lines and pure colors. Above all, 
they may have looked like animals but in toe 
end, unlike Disney characters, they were 

h uman. 

The Dr. Seuss books became popular at 
die same time that children began devoting 
long hours to watching television, raising 
concerns about literacy. Geisel believed that 
children learned to read by repeating the 
same words over and over again. His most 
famous creation, “The Cat in the Hat” was 
written in 1955 on a bet with William 
Spaulding, tire director of Houghton Miff- 
lin’s educational division, who challenged 
him to write a reading primer using a vocab- 
ulary of 225 words. 

Spaulding gave him toe words. And in his 
studio tower in La Jolla, where Geisel drew 
his cheeky creatures, he came up with a 


and wrote 14 more. His books were translated 
into 20 languages. Over the years, they were 
big business for Random House. “We es- 
timate that about 20 percent of the first-bom 
children in toe United States have a Dr. Seuss 
book,” said Harold Clarke, toe president of 
Random House Children’s Publishing. 

But throughout his life. Geisel was wary 
of success and zealously guarded the quality 
of his images, worrying over the colors of toe 
inifg and the paper in his books. 

In 1951, “Hk 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T” was 
m into a film by Stanley Kramer. Geisel’ s 
biographers describe him as “in despair” at 
toe film’s screening because of tire com- 
promises made. It was “a scene of acute 
professional embarrassment that h au nted Ted 
for toe rest of his life," toe Morgans wrote. 

In 1987. when Coleco, the manufacturers 
of Cabbage Patch dolls developed a doll 
based on tire Cat, Geisel canceled toe con- 
tract because he felt toe cat’s smile looked 
likeasmfrk. 

“I think the Cat has to be exposed to life as 
it is,” Mrs. Geisel said. “Nothing is static in 
this world. Nothing remains in limbo. I ho 
my thrill will register with Ted. wherever 
is.” 




DAWN PATROL 


PEOPLE 


BBC ‘Today 9 : Setting the British Agenda 


H ARVARD University reportedly 
has accepted Chelsea Clinton. 


By Warren Hoge 

New York Times Service 


L ONDON — It is hard to imagine a 
more convincing example of one 
broadcast's impact on its own culture 
than toe one that recently emerged about 
Britain's leading news program. 

In a new book on postwar politics, the 
historian Peter Hennessy reported that 
he had discovered toe procedure that toe 
commander of a Royal Navy submarine 
somewhere in the depths of the North 
Atlantic was officially counseled to fol- 
low to find out whether Britain would 
have survived a nuclear strike. 

As the final step before opening 
sealed orders on retaliation, the skipper 
was to tune in to die BBC and listen for 
the network’s “Today” program. “If 
the Trident commander could not pick 
up ‘Today,’ that would be that," Hen- 
nessy wrote. “He would then have to 
decide whether to launch toe missiles or 
go off to New Zealand. He would know 
that there was no point in going back to 
base.” 

Many Britons — at least those 4 mil- 
lion who tune in to the program each 
morning — would not quarrel with that 
definition of the show’s indispensability 
to British life. More than any 
other news program, it sets 
the agenda for public discus- 
sion in a country with a par- 
ticular appetite and talent for 
debate. The Evening Stan- 


The major figures in public life clamor 
for the chance to appear on the pro gr am , 
even though it means a bracing encounter 
with aggressive interrogators and a ride 
across Xoodon to the Broadcast House 
studios in the predawn hours or a remote 
feed truck parked in torir driveways in toe 
middle of the night 
Contrary to prevailing trends on radio 
and television, “Today” has made its 
content increasingly serious in recent 
years. Politicians from Britain’s two 
biggest parties have smarted from toe 
sharper-edged questions, and. in a series 
of attention-gelling episodes, set out to 
discredit their tormenters, though always 
unsuccessfully. “They’ve learned that 
when you lose your temper that eaiiy in 
the morning, you lose,” said Justin 
Everard, a spokesman for “Today.” 
“Grown-up politicians like a tough 
interview,” said Hiunphrys, who is toe 
most prosecutorial in style of the three 
hosts — known as presenters. Last 
month, when Prime Minister John Ma- 
jor wanted to address his falling fortunes 
in a BBC interview from his home, he 
requested that Humphiys be the ques- 
tioner. “Of course we get letters saying 
you were hard on so-and-so,” 
Humphry s noted. “You got it wrong 


dard recently called toe pro- 
gram “toe unacknowledged 


legislator of 1990s Britain,” 
while its most famous host 
over 40 years. Brian Red- 
head, called it the best way of 
"dropping a word in the ear 
of the nation.” 

The current hosts of 
"Today.” John Humphrys. 
Sue MacGregor and James 
Naughtie. are as well known 
here as the anchors of net- 
work newscasts are in toe 
United States, although they 
are on radio, not television, 
and their program is broad- 
cast at 6:30 A.M. 



and all that kind of thing. But when it 
comes to our aftintri* to the politicians 
— especially the politicians — toe mes- 
sage overwhelmingly is, ‘Don’t let the 
bastards get you down; stick it to them.’ 
In feet, we want you to be tougher.” 

Americans might see their methods 
as verging on hectoring, but “the British 
would feel betrayed if we didn't ask 
tough questions,” Naughtie said. 

The three hosts rotate through toe six- 
day-a-week schedule so that two of them 
are on every morning. They have a joc- 
ular camaraderie on me air, but also con- 
sider themselves surrogates for their no- 
nonsense-please listeners, the people who 
fill letters-to-the editor columns with la- 
ments signed “Disgusted of Chelten- 
ham” ana the Eke. 

On a recent morning, the program had 
a typical mixture of subjects: business 
and sports reports, toe reviews of the 
morning paperc and the interviews — a 
Labor Party victory in an off-year elec- 
tion, proposed new restrictions on com- 
bat knives, a tuition increase at the Lon- 
don School of Economics, a meeting of 
European leaders in Dublin, over- 
crowding in British prisons, the effects 
of toe embargo on Iraq and the news- 
paper-circulation war between The 
Times and The Daily Tele- 
graph. 

The interviewing is civil, 
articulate and when possible, 
contrarian. When Peter 
Stothard, editor of The 
Times, took his seat prepared 
to argue that his papers in- 
creased circulation stemmed 
from its improving quality, 
McGregor began toe ques- 
tioning by saying, "Now it’s 
really the price cuts, isn’t it?” 
“The most exasperating 
thing for us and for the listen- 
ers,” HumphtyS said, “is to 
allow the interviewee to 
ramble and obfuscate.” 
When a harried Cabinet 
member accused him of hav- 


Now the question is: Will the president’s 
daughter accept Harvard? President 
BCD Clinton’s daughter was one of 985 
prospective freshman accepted far early 
admission out of about 4,000 candi- 
dates, the Los Angeles Times reported. 
She has until May 1 to commit herself to 
being a member of the Harvard class of 
2001. Chelsea and her m other , Hillar y 
Rodham Clinton, visited Harvard last 
August, along with Amherst, Brown, 
Yale, Princeton and Wellesley, where 
Mrs. Clinton was graduated in 1969. 


□ 


Michael Jackson is the father of a 
baby boy. A spokesman for toe Cedars- 
Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles 
said Jackson's wife, Debbie Rowe, and 
the baby bad left toe hospital on 
Thursday. * ‘They’re both doing fine,” 
he said. He declined to say when the 
baby had been bora. Reporters, pho- 
tographers and fans had waited outside 
die hospital, while six uniformed 
guards stood watch in the lobby to keep 
the media out. Other guards were pos- 
ted in toe third-floor maternity unit. 
Jackson announced in November that 
Rowe, then a nurse at one of his doc- 
tor’s offices, was six months pregnant 
with his child. The couple wed later 
that month. 



nndafc* Bnmltan 


The baby watch: A Michael Jackson fan, loaded with all manna 1 of 
Jackson memorabilia, keeping vigil outside the Los Angeles hospital. 


□ 


France will bestow the Order of die 
Legion of Honor on the German con- 
ductor Kurt Master on Friday. Masur, 
69. musical director of the New York 
Philharmonic since 1991, led Leipzig’s 
Gewandhaus Orchestra from 1970 to toe 
end of 1996. 


Elizabeth — A Celebration of Life," will 
be held Sunday, and Taylor’s doctors 
said she would be well enough to attend. 
But the Monday operation will be 
delayed. “She will be hospitalized next 
week and undergo tests, but they will 
have to wait for her flu to subside before 
surgery,” a spokesman said. 


□ 


David Bowie has become toe 2,083d 
celebrity to have a star dedicated to him 
on toe Hollywood Walk of Fame. 


n 


iaaaha PfajetfThe Nrw Ycrt Ttaei 

From left. Sue MacGregor, James Naughtie and John 
Humphrys, “Today's” three presenters in the studio. 


ing interru p t e d 32 times in 10 
minutes, Humphrys rushed to 


correct him. It was only five 
minutes, he said. 


An operation on a benign brain tumor 
that Elizabeth Taylor was to undergo 
has been delayed because she has the flu. 
This is toe second postponement of toe 
operation. Earlier this month, she delayed 
it so she coaid attend a gala to celebrate 
her 65to birthday ami raise money to fight 
AIDS. The gala, "Happy Birthday, 


Candice Bergen is returning to 
“Murphy Brown” after alL She had 
said mat this year would be her last in 
the television sitcom, but CBS has an- 
nounced that she trill return for the 
show’s 10th year. Last fall Bergen said: 
“For die first time, it’s difficult for 
me.” Her husband, the film director 
Louis Malle, died in November 1995. 


charges. American Express alleges that 
Knight and the attorney, David Ken- 
ner, chalked up the expenses on char- 
tering planes, luxury Las Vegas and 
Beverly Hills hotel rooms, meals and 1 
cigars. How did they manage to rack up 
such a tab without having their cards 
yanked? An American Express spokes- 
man said they had “been members in 
good standing for quite some time.” 


□ 


□ 


American Express has filed a $1.6 
million suit against toe Death Row Re- 
cords rap mogul Marion (Suge) Knight 
and the company’s lawyer for unpaid 


Noel Gallagher of the British pop 
group Oasis has canceled his wedding 
just days after his younger brother 
called off his wedding, the Mirror re- 
ported. Noel Gallagher had planned to 
wed Meg Matthews on Valentine's 
Day white toe media’s attention was 
focused on toe wedding of his brother 
Liam. But Liam Gallagher scrapped his 
wedding to Patsy Kensit at toe. last 
minute on Monday, blaming “obsess- 
ive and intrusive media attention” for 
the change in plans. 



n 



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