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' ' The World’s Daily Newspaper 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST / 

— _ — — __ — — — — — 

R Paris, Wednesday, February 19, 1997 \ 


No. 35,449 


Deng ‘Clearly Sick,’ but Sicker Now? 


£ — 

In Israel Held With Comrades 

By John Lancaster 

'Washington Post Service 

CAIRO — Lebanese security farces have anuft^ 
to to ax members of the Japanese Red Army, one of 
the world s most notorious terrorist groups, raising 
hopes among Western diplomats ihar t may 

finally be moving to clean up its image as a crossroads 
of global terrorism. 

Among those arrested Saturday in the in 
eastern Lebanon was Kozo Okaxnoto, 49. convicted as 
oiks of three Red Army members who carri ed out the 
May 1972 grenade and machine-gun attack on Tel 
Aviv’s Lod airport that killed 25 people, according to 
news reports from Lebanon and Japan. 

The attests appeared to represent a conspicuous 
Awlicy change for Lebanon and, more important, Syria, 
which d o minat es Lebanese decision-making and con- 
trols the Bekaa, a center for Lebanese and foreign 
terrorists since the earliest days of the 1975-1990 Le- 
banese civil war. 

To the dismay of many Lebanese government of- 
ficials, who are eager to rebuild an economy rtwit was 
destroyed by civil war, Syria has done little to curb 
terrorists’ activities. Bat Syria has come under growing 
pressure to do so, not only from the United States, but 
also from Arab countries such as Sandi Arabia, which 
has cited a possible link between training camps in the 
Bekaa and two bomb attacks on the American military 
in Saudi Arabia in 1995 and 1996. 

Most diplomats assume Lebanon would not have ar- 
rested die Red Army members without Syrian approval. 

“I hope i it’s because they’re trying to please us,” a 
Western diplomat said by telephone fromBciroL "If it 
turns out to be true, I think we owe them a bravo." 
r News of the arrests first surfaced in reports Tuesday 
^morning in Japan. Later Tuesday, Pome Minister 
* RyutaroHashimoto of Japan told reporters that he had 

See TERRORISTS, Page 6 



A policeman directing traffic Tuesday before a mural of China’s paramount leader, Deng 
Xiaoping, in the dty of Shenzhen. U.S. officials believe his condition has worsened. Page 4. 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Post Service 


y SEOUL — A North Korean Air Forcepilot, Captain 

; Lee Chul Soo;tornedhisMiG^j«fighter«Kitiiwaid 
in May and made a daring high-speed dash to freedom 
and a new life in South Korea. 

One of the first lessons Captain Lee learned in his 
new capitalist home was the curious arithmetic of 
defection: Information is literally worth its weight m 
gold- South Korea gives North Korean defectors cash 
f payments based on die quality of the intelligence they 
■ provide, tied to the gold standard. For the most 
mundane tidbits, defectors receive the price of 50 


grams of gold (about $620); for the best, they receive 
20,000 grams tif gold (about $250,000). 

Captain Lee got the maximum $250,000 far his 
valuable military information, phis another $250,000 
fin 1 the airplane, plus about $1O£0O4> get him settled 
in Ins new Kfo as a member of die South Korean Air 
Fbrce, fighting against his old comrades. 

The ctoak-endklagger staff of defectors, brazen 
betrayals in Soviet-built jet aircraft and payments in 
gold may seem like some Hollywood spy fantasy. But 
here oo the Korean Peninsula, the last hving musemn 
of die Cold War, it is a real and dangerous way of 
life, ... 

The highest-level North Korean defector ever. 


Hwang Jang Yop, a Communist Party official, sought 
asylum in the South Korean Consulate in Beijing last 
week, touching off a diplomatic furor that threatens 
security cm die tense peninsula. While die two Koreas 
and China debate his fate and Chinese -seddiera patrol 
outside die consulate, Mr. Hwang remains barricaded 
inside waiting for passage to Seoul 
Then cm Saturday, another high-profile North 
Korean who defected in 1982 was gunned down near 
SeouL South Korean officials say the shooting of Lee 
Han Young, 36, nephew of the first wife of the North 
Korean leader, Kim Jong II, was carried out by North 


See KOREA, Page 6 


From Pollsters in Britaii 
A Cry in the Wilderness 




By Eriklpsen 

. International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Something once 
thought essential has aU but vanished 
.from British politics. 

V With dm genera/ election now no 
' mat than- three months away, voter 

r 'ceo surveys charting die ebb and 
in the parties’ femmes should 
dominate die news. Instead, one leading 
pollster groans, you are lucky if you can 
find the latest poll results on “Page 14" 
of the morning newspapers. 
r This descent into obscurity has a his- 
tory. Five years after Britain’s pollsters 
committed a spectacular miscalculation, 
theyare still struggling to claw their way 
back to their accustomed pre-election 
prominence at the elbow of television 
anchormen and parry strategists. 

* M Ih 1992 the industry hit a brick 
Wall," said David Cowling, a political 
analyst, at . Hams Research. Today, 


many pollsters themselves refer to that 
event as "cataclysmic.” 

En masse they predicted that year dot 
the Labour Party would emerge vic- 
torious from parliamentary elections. 
But Labour lost and lost big, trailing tbe 
Conservative Party by nearly 8 per- 
centage points. 

While Labour seems to have bounced 
back, the pollsters have not proved so 
resilient. Certainly, no one can accuse 
them of presenting a clear and con- 
sistent picture of the current mood of the 
British voter. 

Last month, the four major polls 
offered numbers across the spectrum — 
from a cut in Labour’s lead by up to 19 

percent to an actual gain for Labour of 5 
percent. 

"It looks a bit odd," said Michael 
Warren, di rector general of tbe Market 
Research Society. “The press and the 

See POLLS, Page 6 







ItcAaodmlPSH 

GREETINGS — Yasser Arafat and Boris Yeltsin at the Kremlin, where 
the Palestinian and Russian leaders discussed the Middle East Page 7. 


Albright Proposes 
That NATO Talks 
End by December 

To Ease Moscow’s Concerns, 
She Offers Joint Military Unit 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Post Service 

BRUSSELS — Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright accelerated the 
pace of East-West diplomacy on Tues- 
day by calling for negotiations on ad- 
mitting former Soviet-bloc states to the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization to 


be completed by the end of this year. 

Addressing representatives of NATO 
countries in Brussels on tbe fourth leg of 
her round-the-world tour, Mrs. Albright 
also sought to allay concerns in Russia 
about die planned eastward expansion 
of the Western alliance to the borders of 
die former Soviet Union. 

Sire suggested the establishment of a 
joint NATO-Russian military unit and 
said that Russian and NATO planners 
could woric together at the alliance's 
major militar y co mmand s. 


The Spy-Film World of Defectors in South Korea 


AOBNPA 

Police Question 
Israeli Leader 

JERUSALEM (AFP) — Israeli po- 
lice questioned Prime Minister Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu on Tuesday on al- 
leged high-level corruption sur- 
rounding ms short-lived appointment 
last month of a dose political associate 
as attorney general. 

A team of three policemen led by 
the chief investigator, Sandro Mazes:, 
met with Mr. Netanyahu at his Je- 
rusalem office Tuesday afternoon 
about the appointment Jan. 10 of Roni 
Bar-On as farad’s top judicial official. 
Officials said the interrogation could 
take several hours. 


PAOETWO 


EUROPE 


Pag* 5. 


Britain's Murder Trial by Newspaper US. Troops Befriend a Bosnian linen 


Books Page 9. 

Crossword.- Page 10. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 22-23. 

fl ito un to ld C h wM w/ Pmqm4. 

Sponsored Section Pegee 18 - 20 . 

HobSe Comamnlcetlane: GSM end Beyond 


Mrs. Albright’s appearance before 
NATO's North Atlantic Council coin- 
cided with an agreement in principle by 
alliance members on a new approach to 
conventional troop limi ts in Europe to 
reflect the dramatic geostrategic 
changes that have resulted mom the col- 
lapse of the Soviet Union and the end of 
the Cold War. 

Officials of die United States and 
NATO said that tbe breakthrough would 
give Mrs. Albright something concrete 
to lake with her to Moscow on Wed- 
nesday during her 1 1-day tour. 

The Western proposal for changes in 
the 1990 Treaty on Conventional Faroes 
in Europe is designed to ease Russian 
concerns about the planned eastward 
expansion of NATO to include several 
former Soviet-bloc countries. 

Negotiations are under way between 
NATO and Russia on a series of other 
inducements that U.S. officials hope 
will make it easier far the Kremlin to 
swallow its objections to NATO en- 
largement. These include the creation of 
a special NATO-Rnssia council to per- 
mit virtually continuous consultations 
over matters such as nuclear nonpro- 
liferation, nuclear safety, and crisis 
managemeiff, 

Mrs. Albright has repeatedly insisted 
that NATO expansion will go ahead 
regardless of any Russian objections, 
despite some reservations by West 


European governments over tbe com- 
pressed timetable. 

During his campaign for re-election 
last year, President Bill Clinton com- 
mitted himself to announcing an official 
list of candidates for NATO member- 
ship at a meeting in Madrid in early July 
and accepting them into the alliance by 
1999. 

In her speech at NATO, Mrs. Al- 
bright said that the alliance should pur- 
sue the goal of completing “member- 
ship negotiations by the end of this year, 
so that we can sign accession instru- 
ments at our meeting in December." 

She said this would give the par- 
liaments of member countries ample 
time to ratify changes in the London 
treaty of 1949. 

Mrs. Albright said that she had raised 
the idea of forming a NATO-Russia 
military brigade in order to demonstrate 
ways in which Moscow could cooperate 
with the alliance in the future. Tbe 
concept is modeled on experience in 

See NATO, Page 7 


Prosecutor’s 
Plan to Leave: 
Will It Divert 
Whitewater? 


By Stephen Labalon 

New York Tunes Sendee 

WASHINGTON — Kenneth Starr, 
the Whitewater prosecutor, will step 
down by August to become the dean of 
the law and public policy schools of 
Pepperdine University in California, the 
university and aides to Mr. Starr said. 

His aides cautioned against reading 
too much into his decision to step away 
from a series of investigations involving 
President Bill Clinton and his closest 
allies. Bat the announcement immedi- 
ately raised questions about whether the 
prosecutor would decide to leave office 
if be were on the verge of seeking 
charges against the president or the first 
laity, Hillary Rodham Clinton. 

m addition to his examination of the 
Clintons' Whitewater land dealings, 
Mr. Starr has been investigating wheth- 
er anyone in the White House obstruc- 
ted justice in withholding important ev- 
idence in the inquiry, the white House’s 
questionable use of FBI files, the dis- 
missal of White House travel office 
employees in 1993, and fund-raising for 
Mr. Clinton’s campaigns in Arkansas. 

At the White House, Mr. Starr’s ca- 
reer move raised hopes that neither the 
president nor Mrs. Clinton would face 
any charges arising from the three-year 
investigation. 

1 ‘Would a guy about to indict Hillary 
Clinton or the president take a job at 
Pepperdine?* ' said an administration of- 
ficial who insisted on anonymity. “It 
could be very telling." 

But aides to Mr. Starr said that in- 
vestigators were far from concluding 
their inquiry, and that his anticipated 
resignation did not mean it was drawing 
to an end. 

“It would definitely be a mistake for 
this to be read as, ‘O.K., everything has 

See STARR, Page 7 


Cuban Smoke Gets in Officials 9 Eyes 


By Pierre Thomas 

> Washington Post Service 

* WASHINGTON — The heady 
aroma of hand-rolled cigars may have 
tome United States businessmen and 
' celebrities blowing smoke at U.S. travel 
restrictions to Cuba. 

About 600 cigar lovers from 4Ua- 
tions are expected to attend a $500-a- 


- Nowmetend Prices — 

■Andorra 10,00 FF Lebanon U.3.000 

Anffltes. u „1Z50FF Morocco — .-..JjJDn 

.Cameroon ..1.000 CFA Qatar. 10.00 Rate 

Egypt EES50 RAmton 12-50 Ff 

Pmnc*„, „10.00FF Satrf Arabia -10JJ0R. 

.Oabon^L..1100CFA Senegal — .1.100 CPA 
Gmeee ........... JSS0 Dr. Spain — 22B PTAS 

iwy to....... -2. B00 Lire TUnWa 1 - 260 j*M 

IwyCoaat.iasOCFA UAE. — ...1000 Dkh 
Jordan 1.250 JD UJS. Ml (Eur.)~.-S1-2° 


dinn er at Havana’s. Ttopicana 
Club on Feb. 28 in celebration of tbe 
30th anniv ersary of the Cohiba cigar, a 
cmnlre so fine that Fidel Castro and 
many other connoisseurs rate it as 
Cuba’s best. Nearly 10D Americans are 

among those invited to light up ax what 
' is described as die premier marketing 
event far Cuba’s $200 auUicm cigar 

industry. i-i: ■ 

These is just one problem though, The 
United States has had restrictioro on 
trade and travel to the Communist na- 
tion for more than 30 years. No wonder 
the list of those invited apparently is 
classified, although news reports have 
identified a number of celebrities, who 
may or may not be attending. 

“I don’t difofc we will know feorcer- 
tam who is going to attend until people . 
walk into the Tropicana Chib that 
night," said JohnKavulich, president of 
the U.S.-Cuba Trade and Economic 
Council, a private nonprofit organiaa- , 
non ihar provides information on Cuba. 
“We are unaware of any senior-level 
U.S. company executives ttaveling to 
Cuba for this event. To om taowledge, 
everyone who is going, is going legally. 


People should not take this as U.S. cor- 
porations participating. These are just 
individuals who are going because they 
like cigars." . . 

Mr. Kavulich said the gala — at- 
tended by senior Cuba government of- 
ficials and perhaps even Castro himself 
— has been described as the Super Bowl 
of such events. 

Travel to Cnba. generally requires 
Treasury Department approval, unless 
theperson is a journalist or a diplomat. 
If Treasury grants a license to travel to 
Cuba, those persons are largely pro- 
hibhed from purchasing more man $100 
worth of Cuban products. That means a 
Inmt of oo mews than 10 of the $10 
Goinbas, four of the big $25 cigars. That 
ought not be worth the flight or the 
scrutiny of U.S. Customs officials upon 
return. 

Treasury Department sources could 
c o n firm no applications far licenses to 
attend foe cigar celebration at the TVop- 
icana. One way to sidestep the travel 
prohibition is 'to have a foreign country, 
company or individual jay the bflJfora 

See CIG ARS, Page 7 



in Zaire’s Rebels Wage 2 Battles 

^ Insurgents Aim to Prove They Can Protect Their Gains 


The Dollar 


•nmttey Q4PM 
1.885 
1.6081 
123J9S 
5.6895 


IViraiar AmWIOT 


pravtartctaw 

1.6674 

1.682 

124.35 

5.6895 


-nancy o 4 pm 
816.29 


pmiousdoM 

606.45 


By Stephen Buckley 

Washingum Post Service 

UVIRA. Zaire — As rebels in eastern 
Zaire scramble to smother a government 
counteroffensive, they are waging an- 
other war that is just as crucial to their 
efforts to overthrow President Mobutu 
Sese Seko. 

This campaign, at least as complex as 
the battle in tbe field, involves recruiting 
thousands of new soldiers to protect 
cities the rebels have taken. It involves 
resurrecting long-paralyzed economies 
in those rebel-held areas. And it involves 
convincing one of Africa’s most eth- 
nically and politically fractious coun- 
tries that the Alliance of Democratic 
Forces for the Liberation- of Congo- 
Zaire is a nationwide movement. 

Even if the rebels do bulldoze then- 
way to the capital, Kinshasa, failure to 
successfully tackle these issues amid 
heighten the possibility of a protracted 
civil war in a mineral-neb country riven 
by political crises throughout Marshal 
Mobutu’s 32-year reign. 


A rebel movement, the insurgency 
leader Laurent Kabila said last week, 
“is a complicated thing." He said his 
“big task’’ was to recruit new soldiers. 
The rebellion has drawn about 20.000 
new troops, he said, but be wants 75,000 
more by tbe end of March to stabilize 
territories foe rebels have taken since 
late October. 

The movement needs new troops be- 
cause its best soldiers are on the front 
lines. And some who should be on the 
front lines are compelled instead to 
guard die 1,440 kilometers (900 miles) 
of rebel-held towns and cities. 

Mr. Kabila tries to attract new troops 
by insisting that his force will not be like 
tbe notorious government army. 

At an induction ceremony for recruits 
last week in Bukavu, a major com- 
mercial city in eastern Zaire, soldiers 
were fired with enthusiasm. They spor- 
ted fresh uniforms. Most held new AK- 
47 rifles. They strutted in new Wel- 
lington boots. They clapped, danced and 

See ZAIRE, Page 7 





Dn^EBNA!nOI l lALB£RAlJ)TKOBUI^ WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Trial by Newspaper? / An Audacious Accusation 


.. . • 


Britain Re-examines a 



By Warren Hoge 

New York Tunes Service 


L ONDON — Stephea Lawrence, 18, a 
promising high school student of Ja- 
maican parentage, was stabbed to death 
by a group of white youths cursing him 
with shouts of “nigger” as be waited far a ride 
home at a southeast London bos stop on an April 
nigfat nearly four years ago. 

The notorious case, in which rive haughty 
youths with a history of white supremacist agit- 
ation have been implicated but never convicted, 
set off vigils against racism and a series of 
investigations that proved inconclusive. 

Now the case has burnt back into public at- 
tention, provoking a new outcry about police 
competence and sensitivity in racial crimes, the 
rights of defendants to be presumed innocent, 
and the responsibilities of the press. 

Last week, all five men were summoned to a 
reopened coroner's jury investigation into the 
killing, and they invoked their common-law 
privilege of remaining silent, refusing with de- 
fiant chuckles and winks to acknowledge oven 
their names. Then they marched out of the quaint 
Victorian courthouse amid the dreary tenement 
blocks of Southwark and sped away in two 
sedans with three female companions. 

After their appearance, the jury returned a 
verdict of “unlawful tailing ,” saying that Mr. 
Lawrence had died “in a completely unpro- 
voked racist attack by five white youths.'’ The 
jury supplied no names, but die next morning the 
tabloid The Daily Mail did. 

The newspaper devoted its front page to head 
shots and identifications of the five white men 
beneath the underscored headline “Murderers” 
and a challenge in bold letters: “The Mail ac- 
cuses these men of killing. If we arc wrong, let 
them sue us.” 

The tabloid’s publication of murder accusa- 
tions against unconvicted people was strikingly 
audacious in a country where the press is gen- 
erally inhibited by libel laws that affo rd suspects 
greater protection than in the United Stales. 

“What happened to Stephen Lawrence is a 
vile and wicked killing carried put by evil ra- 
cists.” said Nigel Pascoe, chairman of the Bar 
Council’s public affairs committee. But he ad- 
ded that “it is not for the press to act as judge and 
jury.” A number of judges have denounced the 
newspaper's action, and a spokesman for the 
attorney general’s office said Monday that it was 
exploring a formal contempt charge. 

Over the weekend, Britain’s Channel 4 tele- 
vision station added to the furor by broadcasting 
a film recorded by a secretly placed Metropolitan 
Police camera showing one of die five men 
telling the others that black men should be 
skinned, dismembered, and set on fixe. 

He then demonstrated a knife attack, in a way 
that bore a chilling resemblance to how Mr. 




Lawrence had been murdered. Asked at one 

of Mr/Lawrence weren’t “laughing” now, the 
2 V-y ear-old man smiled knowingly, and said; 
‘ ‘They are definitely doing that, mate.” 

The victim's family says it now plans to bring 
civil proceedings against the men, citing fee 
latest OJ. Simpson trial in California as pre- 
cedent. As in tiie United States, the burden of 
proof would be less than in a criminal case, 
dependent upon only “a balance of probab- 
ilities” rather than proof “beyond reasonable 
doubt” British law does not permit a civil case 
of murder, so tiie most severe charge available to 
fee Lawrences would be assault and battery. 

All five men accused are unemployed and 
have no resources, and so no money damages 
would ever be recovered 
even if they were found 
liable for Mr. Lawrence’s 

But the family feels it is 
fee oily way to gain any 
satisfaction from a police 
and judicial system it ar- 
gues is stacked against 
non white victims. “The 
value that this white racist 

is evident*!*) see since the 
killing of my son," 

Doreen Lawrence, the 
young man’s mother, told 
fee inquest last week. 

The request, which took 
only 30 minutes to return 
its verdict, provided little 
solace to fee family and 
others eager to see justice 
done. 

Its decision was seen as 
symbolizing the widely 
perceived failure of the 
police and the courts to 
assemble evidence against 
five young men, who 
come from a racially troubled neighborhood. 

I n Eltbam, a predominantly white middle- 
class neighborhood of brick semi-detached 
homes where the five men live and where 
the killing took place, the few black and 
Asian families have complained of racial har- 
assment. The Asian merchants who run the 
newsstands and candy stores in the area routinely 
scrub racist graffiti off their storefronts and say 
they are regularly taunted by young residents. 

Mrs. Lawrence' said that a week after the 
killing, a white neighbor verbally accosted her in 
a parking lot, saying that her son would still be 
alive if she had not come to this country in the 
first place. 

Murder charges against two of the five men 


were dismissed in 1993. The other three were 
a trial a year ago. In both cases, fee 
they had found no one willing tso 

testify. 

Mrs. Lawrence, a teacher, and -tier husband, 
Neville, a plasterer and decorator, came to Bri- 
tain from Jamaica in 1 962 and live in Woolwich. 
A second son now goes to university, and Steph- 
en, a high school senior with a record of aca- 
demic honors, was planning to go to college to 
study architecture. 

On April 22, 1993, at 1030 PJtL, Mr. 
Lawrence and a friend, Duwayne Brooks,- also 18, 
were waiting for a bus home wben they were set 
upon by five white men. Mr. Lawrence was 
stabbed in the chest and the arm and succeeded in 
running 130 yards before he fdL The attack®? ran 


Mrs. Lawrence told fee IhquesL 41 l fie was black, 
then he must be a criminal, aid they set about to 

■ ... Ti ■ . , • • t J 


two wo&s, and feat allowed vital evidence to be 

lost.” Later, fee police found that potential wfl- 
nesses were unwilling to speak' for attribution, 
saying they feared retaliation. 


S 



Jonathan Cainer: How you I 
can find your Valentine 



The Mail accuses time mea of kffliog 




The Daily Mail's murder accusations against unconvicted 
people were brave, considering Britain's tough libel laws. 


away, and Mr. Brooks hailed a passing off-duty 
Diiceman who su mm o n ed an ambulance. Me. 
died at fee hospital from hemor- 


In fee hours after fee crime, the police col- 
lected forensic evidence and searched for 
weapons but did not find witnesses among the 
large number of passing motorists, bus pas- 
sengers, and residents who might have seen die 
jnciHwii The Lawrence family olwims that the 
police were more interested in Es tablishing 
whether their son was a member of a gang than 
who his kiOers might be. On her first visit to the 
precinct bouse, bus. Lawrence said she gave an 
officer a list of names of suspects, and the officer 
crumpled it into a ball. 

“My son was stereotyped by fee police,” 


ir Montague Levine, fee Soutitwaak oor- 
oner. characterized the community re- 
sponse this wed: as “a wall of silence 
and fear.” Two months after the crime, 
the police charged two youths, 19 and 20 years 
old, wife murder, but fee inability to persuade 
any witnesses to testify caused the court to 
dismiss fee charges a month later. - 
In frustration, the family. resorted to an ap- 
proach used only three times before this 
century, sponsoring a private investi- 

fhaf fad ta nundC TOrageS against 

two originally dunged by the police 
plus the youth who appeared in recent 
days in fee Channel 4 videotape. The 
principal witness was Duwayne Brooks, 
who bad picked the three out of police 
lineups. 

But it emerged in court that Mr. Brooks 
had never dearly seen their faces the 

night «f thft y nd that he had heard 

rumors of fee involvement erf the three 
before he was asked to view fee lumps. 
The judge ruled that his testimony was 
consequently “contaminated and 
flawed.” All three men were acquitted. 

“The suggestion that any police of- 
ficer wouldinvestigate a murder less 
competently because the victim was 
black is an absolute disgrace,” saidDav- 
idOxland. the former deputy assistant 
police commissioner who was in c har ge 
of die investigation. 

But Sir Herman Ouseley, fee chair- 
man of tiie Commission for Racial 
Equality, said, “This case has added to 
the sense of mistrust that many in the 
ethnic minority communities have about 
the police and the criminal justice system.” 
Leaders of dvil rights groups g re e te d the 
action of The Daily Mail wanly since fee news- 
paper, traditionally has paid little attention to 
min ority communities and had accused civil 
rights advocates of having “hijacked” tiie 
Lawrence killing far their own purposes. 

But one official, Trevor Phillips, chairman of 
the Runnymede Trust, an independent research 
group on race issues, said be hoped that the 
assistance from an unexpected quarter like Tbe 
Daily Mail meant that the case was having wider 
repercussions. “It gives me hope tint unlike 
America, where two completely different nations 
live inside one border, it is at least possible for 
Middle Britain to understand Black Britain’s 
pain and in some way identify wife it,” he said. 


Jewish Agency Plans Search of Swiss Archives 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


" ^Associated Press 

■ JERUSALEM -i- Investigators will be sent 
to search Switzerland’s government archives 
for duplicates of .Swiss bank records about 
holdings of Holocaust victims that may have 
been destroyed; tbe-head of fee Jewish Agency 
said Tuesday. 

The official,- Avraham Burg, said tbe gov- 
ernment archives could help establish the scope 
of accounts held by Jews who died in World 
WarIL 

Mr. Burg said be had information feat the 
archives did contain duplicates of bank records, 
but (hat he could not be sure until researchers 
were sent to examine them. It would be ‘ ‘the one 


place where no one shredded a thing,” he said. 

Apparently referring to Swiss officials, Mr. 
Burg said: “They told us something, although I 
don’t yet have exact information, that there is 
intact information in tbe governmental 
archives. 

“If there is a copy of everything somewhere 
in fee government basements, we will be in a 
very good position.” 

Andreas Kellerhals, deputy director of the 
Swiss Federal Archive, said government re- 
cords from before 1960 were open to fee public. 
The archive does contain some bank records — 
including reports on dormant accounts — but 
are not complete, he said. 


- Mr. Burg said he believed there were enough 
safeguards in place to prevent a repetition of a 
recent incident in which a Swiss bank sent 
records, including some from fee World War II 
era, to be shredded. Bank officials blamed an 
archivist who decided the papers were without 
value, and said the shredding was not intended 
to thwart inquiries into the extent of unsettled 
accounts. 

“I’m not happy with the past shredding 
process,” Mr. Burg said. “I’m not at all sure 
that what we discovered at the Union Bank of 
Switzerland was tbe only tiring feat happened ar 
tiie time. And I was not fully peisuaded that it 
was just an archivist's fault ” 


Chien-Shiung Wu, U.S. Physicist, Dies at 84 


New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — Chien-Shiung Wu, 84, a 
physicist who performed a historic experiment 
overturning what had been considered a fun- 
damental law of nature, died on Sunday at St. 
Lnke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in Manhat- 
tan. 

Tbe cause was a stroke, according to her 
husband, Luke C.L. Yuan, a retired exper- 
imental physicist 

Ms. Wu, fee Michael I. Pupin Professor 
Emeritus of Physics at Columbia University, 
where she carried out research and taught for 
37 years, was known throughout her career as a 
meticulously accurate experimental physicist 
who was in demand to put new theories to the 
test 

In her most famous experiment announced 


in 1 957, she and her colleagues overthrew alaw 
of symmetry in physics called tiie principle of 
conservation of parity that had been considered 
immutable for 30 years. It held feat in nuclear 
reactions, nature in effect does not differentiate 
between left and righL But Ms. Wu's ex- 
periment proved that nature does differentiate 
between left and right and the results were 
confirmed by other experiments. 

Marion J. Epley Jr., 89, Ex-President 
Steered Texaco Through Expansion 

Marion J. Epley Jr., 89, a former president 
and chairman of Texaco Inc., died Saturday at 
Harbour's Edge, a nursing home in Defray 
Beach, Florida, his family said, according to 
The New York Times. 

Mr. Epley, a lawyer by training, became 


president of Texaco in 1964, and ran tbe com- 
pany during a period of rapid change and 
expansion, a corporate ■ spokesman said 
Monday. 

Mr. Epley was chairman of tbe company for 
about a year until his retirement in 1971. 

Nora Beloff, 78, Journalist, Britain’s 
First Woman Political Correspondent 
LONDON (AP) — Nora Beloff, 78, fee first 
female political correspondent in Britain ami a 

-i._* r j r i_ - a !«.. j i 


opinions, died Wednesday after a short il 
Miss Beloff s journalism career started in 
1946 when she worked for the Reuters news 
agency and then The Economist magazine in 
Paris. In 1947, she began a 30-year tenure at The 
Observer as tbe weekly ’s Paris correspondent. 



railroad ministry hopes to lay 1,271 
track, open 1,260 kilometers of tine and baild 
lometers of electrified tines. 


1,750 ki- 
(AFP) 


U.S. Will Pay f; 
N.Y. Hospitals 
Not to Train 
Physicians 


By Elisabeth Rosenthal 
New York Tones Serace 


- 




EU Drafts Plan for Air Safety 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — The E u rope a n Commission has 
agreed on draft pLans requiring EU countries to increase safety 
checks mi commercial aircraft using their airports and to 
ground any found to be breaking international rules. - 

The plans approved Monday include draft rules for safety 
checks on third-country aircraft and a data -exchange system 
to alert other EU countries to fee possible dangers posed by 
aircraft from any particular company or state, an EU spokes- 
man said. The plans must win approval from the European 
Parliament and EU countries to go into effect - 

“Recent experience has shown that carriers from third 
countries do not always apply the minimum international 
safety standards while having access to Community airports,” 
said a text of tbe proposal. 

Tivoli Gardens, Copenhagen’s 153-year-old amusement 
park, has agreed to license its name to a park to be built on fee 
same concept in Berlin. The Berlin park will have no plastic or 
neon lights, will be filled wife trees and is to be set in fee 
central Brandenburg neighborhood. (AP) 

A strike t h at has closed the Acropolis in Athens and other 
monuments for a week has been extended indefinitely, Greek 
Culture Ministry employees stud Tuesday. The workers are 
demanding higher wages and bonuses. (Reuters) 

Cross-Channel ferry services by the British company 
Peninsula and Orient were slowed overnight Monday when 
striking French drivers of the P and O-owned trucking com- 
pany Ferrymastere prevented ferries from docking. Tbe 
French driven are protesting plans to replace them wife 
cheaper British drivers. (AFP) 

China will 
on its rai 


NEW YORK — In a plan that health 
expats greeted as brilliant and bizarre, 
federal regulators have announced that 
for the next six years they will pay New 
York state hospitals not to tram phy- 
sicians. 

Just as tbe federal government for ^ 
many years paid com farmers to let 
fields he fallow, 41 of New York state's 
tea ching hospitals will be paid $400 
milli on to not cultivate so many new 
doctors, tfaeir main cash crop. 

The plan’s primary purpose is to stem 
a growing surplus of doctors in parts of 
the nation and to save government 
mooey. But the payments are manna to 
New Yak’s cash-starved hospitals, 
which are struggling to trim fee size of 
their staffs and adapt to the world of 
managed care. 

Health care experts across the coun- 
try were stunned by the plan, which is 
officially titled the Medicare Graduate 
Med*”*! Education Demonstration Pro- 
ject ft was approved by the Health Care 
Financ e A dmini stration, which is part 
of tbe Department of Health and Human '?£ 
Services. - 

“ft’s an amazing treatment of health 
care as a commodity — like grain or milk 
or meat,” said Dr. Alan Hillman, a pro- 
fessor of health policy at fee University 
of Pennsylvania. “I've never heard any- 
thing this before. But I really can't 
find any fault with iL Maybe this is one 
of fee first rational collaborations be- 
tween hospitals and fee government.” 

The plan required no congressional 
action and feus was not debated by sen- 
ators and re p re s e ntatives from other 
stiaes.But hospital executives around fee 
nation expressed concern thai fee federal 
gency was playing favorites wife New 
fork hospitals because of their political 
connections and financial clout 

by officials of fee Greater New^Ywk 
Hospital Association, a powerful in- ’ 
dusoy group. New York senators, 
Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Alfonse 
D’ Amato, are among die most influ- 
ential legislators in fee country, espe- 
cially on matters of health policy, and 
New York — including its hospital uni- 
on — strongly supported President Bill 
Clinton's re-election last year. 

New York trains 15 percent of the 
United States' doctors, making it by far 
tiie country's leading producer of new 
phyricians. The next largest is Cali- 
fornia, at 9 percent. The federal gov- 
ernment finances much of that training 
through its Medicare program, which 
pays hospitals up to about S100.000 a 
year for each resident they train. 

Under tiie new program, 41 hospitals 
in the state have agreed to reduce the 
number of residents they train by 20 
percent to 25 percent over fee next six 
years, resulting in 2,000 fewerresidems 
in fee state. In exchange. Medicare will 
initially continue to pay participating 
hospitals as if those young doctors were 
still there, slowly phasing out fee pay- 
ments over the next six years. 

The plan is a novel approach to con- 
fronting a perpetual sticking point in 
health care: fee oversupply of doctors in 
many specialties and m many parts of 
the country, which health economists 
say results in unnecessary tests and pro- 
cedures and drives up medical costs. 

Although health experts have been 
complaining for almost a decade that the 
country has been producing too many 
doctors, generous Medicare training 
subsidies have meant that hospitals con- 
tinue to chum them out 

“I believe this will be a pathbreaking 
project,” said Bruce Vladeck, tbe adrft 
ministrator of tbe Health Care Financ- ' 
ing Administration, who announced fee 
program. “For the first time in 20 years 
our goals for graduate medical edu- 
cation and the financial incentives will 
be in line wife one another.” 

Dr. Bruce SiegeL president of Tampa 
General Hospital in Florida, admitted to 
some resentment that hospitals in other 
parts of the country were not involved. 

“This is a real coup for New York 
teaching hospitals,” he said. “How can 
we get in on it?" 




Corrections 

Because several lines were dropped, an article Monday 
inadequately explained fee protests in France against a gov- 
ernment immigration proposal. The measure would require 
residents to inform the authorities about the departure of 
foreigners to whom they gave hospitality. 

An article in the February 8-9 editions gave an incorrect 
location for the painting “The Polish Rider!.” It is at tbe Frick 
Collection in New Yoric City. 




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Saturday, February 22 
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HOTEL SOFITEL 
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8 zue Jean Coujon - Paris 8th 


Paris and Algiers Nearing 
Accord to Resume Flights 

French airlines to Algeria 
after tbe hijacking of an Air 
France jet in Algiers in 
December 1994. 

Air Algerie subsequently 
canceled its flights to Paris in 
a dispute wife French offi- 
cials over flight security. 

Meanwhile, an armed 
group shot, hacked or burned 
to death 33 villagers south of 
Algeria's capital, a newspa- 
per reported Tuesday, as 
battles intensified between 
the army and Muslim milit- 
ants. 

About 30 men armed with 
guns and knives descended 
on the village near Blida, 50 
kilometers (30 miles) south of 
Algiers, late Sunday night, 
the independent daily Libeite 
reported. (Reuters. AP) 


WEATHER 


Cm p M by ftrSqf From qi^Mehei 

PARIS — France and Al- 
geria are nearing agreement on 
a resumption of flights by Al- 
geria's national airline be- 
tween Paris and Algiers, 
French officials said Tuesday. 
The flights were halted in 1995 
in a dispute over security. 

The officials said talks 
were on course for Air Al- 
gerie to provide three or four 
round-tnp flights a day to fee 
French capital beginning 
about April 1 . 

But a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman. Jacques Rum- 
melhardt, denied a published 
report that an agreement bad 

been concluded. 

Air Algerie bad no imme- 
diate comment 

France ended all flights by 




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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu Waalher. Asia 


North America 

Urw— mnafaty mild across 
rtie eastern third of the 
nation through Saturday, 
however, a shot of eftty ar 

w> mow tram the northern 
Robs Mo ft* Greet Lsfcas 
for Saontay. Dry and mM 
weather is slated for the 
West, while windy and 
rainy weather affects the 
Gre* Lakes and EastT-d- 
day. 


Europe 

Near- to above-normal 
lent pe returns wiH prevail 
across much of the conti- 
nert wtti Spebi end Portu- 
gal being the wannest. 
Wimly and unsettled 
weather wtti spread hprn 
London and Paris Warhas- 
dey into eastern Europe 
Thursday, prior weather 
-Should return to western 
Europe by Fddey. 


Asia 

A stain wjt bring snow ta 
pwt» of ■» Korean p*rfn- 
euta and western Japan 
Thursday while bringing 
mowers to Tokyo ana 
Osaka. Following that 
stom. It wM be brisk end 
cold Friday. Sunshine 
Thursday through Saturday 
ta Begmfl and Shanghai. 
Chance at rein law this 
h Hong Kong. 



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im’ERNATKJNAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 



aignLaws to Finance N.Y. Candidates 


By Leslie Wayne 

New York Times Service. 


WASfflNGTON — William Jordan. a North 
Carolina doctor .thought he was helping to elect 

SESo taJtion lS5S*“ 116 a 

which isjteaded by Senator Alfonse D’Amato of 
New Yoric and which has as its mission the 

for RepuWian 

In Detroit. Matty Maroun, a tracking exec- 
imve, thought the same when he wrote a $20,000 
choat to the Republican committee, as did John 

ttsWS&ZSr* “ wh0 

. - But the checks never got to any Republican 
T -Senate candidates. r 

■ Instead, unbeknown to Dr. Jordan, Mr. 
Maroun or Mr. Dehaan, through a labyrinth of 


committees and financial transfers, their dona- 
tions ended up in die campaign war chest of 
Governor George Pataki of New Yodc. 

How the money got rooted from a committee 
to elect Republican Senate candidates and into 
fee hands of die governor of New York is a tale of 
die long reach oiMr. D’ Amato, a champion fund- 
raiser both far his party's candidates and far his 
own re-election campaign. 

Generally, donors wrote their checks out to 
“The National Republican Senatorial Commit- 
tee — noofederal account.” This is the party’s 
soft-money account, which accepts unlimited 
donations for Senate races. 

But a number of checks were deposited into 
one of two state-level accounts. Some were given 
to a “New York Stale Victory Committee™ that 
made a $1.9 million campaign donation to Mr. 
Pataki and gave more than $300,000 to help 
finance the election of three Republicans to the 
New York Supreme Court. Other checks, totaling 
$360,000, woo sent to fee state Republican 


’ or soft-money, account, which 
finances New York’s Republican Party. - 
Mir. D- Amato defends his actions. ‘There is 
. nothing wrong wife what I did," be said in a 
telephone interview. “There was no intent to 
deceive. To suggest otherwise would be inap- 


acknowledges, however, feat few donors 
were told about fee check transfers. 

“It’s not necessary to tell people where their 
checks- went, 7 ' he added. “There is nothing 
wrong wife that We don’t have an obligation to 
tell people. Money is fungible.' 7 

hi his role as chairman of fee National Re- 
publican Senatorial Committee, Mr. D’Amato 
worked around the constraints of state and fed- 
eral campaign finance laws feat put limits on 
direct donations to candidates but allow un- 
limited contributions to parties — known as soft 
money. Through this array of committees, Mr. 
D' Amato was able to convert large contributions 
to a national account into donations to specific 


New York state races, where state law tightly 
restricts bow much an individual can give. 

Senator D 7 Amato’s methods also enabled him 
to tap into a base of big national donors, to whom 
Mr. Pataki and other New York candidates would 
not have easy access. 

Among those whose checks were transferred to 
New York races — and who said they were 
surprised when told about it later — were blue-chip 
donors like fee New York cosmetics executive 
Ronald Lauder; senior executives of tie invest- 
ment company Goldman Sachs; such companies 
as US West Communications and Browning-Fer- 
ns industries, and fee Wall Street firms of Paine 
Webber Group and Morgan Stanley. 

“It was our perception that fee donation was 
going to U.S. Senate races.” said Mickey B lash- 
field. a spokesman for Mr. Maroun. who donated 
$20,000 to fee Senate campaign committee. * 4 We 
were informed, after the fact, that it went to fee 
New York Victory Committee. But that wasn’t 
part of fee information up front at all.” 


While not illegal, experts in campaign finance 
say, die transfer of contributions would have 
violated New York and federal laws had the 
donations been made directly. 

Drawing heavily on the Wall Street interests 
whose concerns come before the Senate Banking 
Committee he also heads, Mr. D’Amato has 
amassed $6.8 million so fxrforhis 2 99 8 re-election 
race. $4 million more than any other senator. 

Both major parties commonly ship donations 
from national committees to stales in ways feat are 
often hard to follow. But these transfers are gen- 
erally done to aid congressional candidates in tight 
races — not stare politicians. And (he transfers are 
usually made directly from fee national party to the 
state party, not through iniermediaiy committees. 

“This is a money-laundering operation,” said 
Charles Lewis, director of fee Center for Public 
Integrity. “And democracy gets left in the dark. 
D ’Amato is funneling money that came into the party 
nationally to New York and he is building a powerful 
local structure feat will help him in 1998. 


POLITICALS 


♦ 


r.:jh 

“ 11 V. 
*■ 'v* ' 
1 i.T. 


It 


tv 



Brew’s Name Adds Fuel to Indian Ire 

Native Americans Seek Ban on Crazy Horse Malt Liquor 


natWka/ncABOcHcdh* 

CHINA POLICY REVISITED - — Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger at the opening of an exhibit 
on Asia and the American presidency at the Nixon Library in Yorba Linda, California. In the 
background is a photograph of President Richard Nixon’s arrival in Bering in February of 1972. 

new law makes feat illegal if fee purpose is to qualify for 
Medicaid. It is not entirely clear which transactions may 
result in criminal charges. Critics cite this ambiguity as a 
serious defect in the law. 

Bruce Vladei^ administtator of the Federal Health Care 
Financing Administration, which supervises Medicaid, said 
Congress should repeal fee criminal penalties, which took 
effect on Jan. 1. (NTT) 


AFL-CIO Defies Republicans 

LOS ANGELES — John Sweeney, the president of the 
AFL-CIO, has issued a defiant “make my day' 7 declaration 
to Republicans in Congress who want revenge on the labor 
movement for its puU-out-fee-stops drive to defeat them in - 
last fall's elections. * 

“We’re going to resist and oppose any efforts feat are 
made toward recriminations for any of the good work we did 
last year,” Mr. Sweeney said at a news conference during 
fee federation’s winter meeting here. “If there is going to be 
any attempt at retribution, we'll bens out front as we have 
been on any other issue.” 

The AFL-CIO spent $25 million bn its anti-Republican 
broadcast spots last year. Several Republicans have pro- 
posed legislation that would forbid unions to use a mem- 
ber's dues on campaigns unless be or she had signed an 
authorization card. But AFL-CIO lobbyists say they are not; 
alarmed, because numerous Republican moderates, shaken 
by last fell's assault, have told union leaders they intend to 
remain close to labor. (NYT) 

Medicaid Crackdown Under Fire 


WASHINGTON — Clinton administration officials 4 . ITT * 

have urged Congress to repeal a new law feat makes it a f fOOtCl UllQUOte 
federal crime to dispose of assets to qualify for Medicaid *- * 

coverage of nursing home expenses. They said feat such 
abuses were not common. • 

Medicaid helps pay the bills for two- thuds of fee 1.6 
million people in nursing homes in fee United States. 

Families can easily exhaust their assets on nursing home 
care, far which fee costs average more than $100 a day. 

Many elderly people give assets 10 their children. But fee 


China Denies Fund Allegation 

BEIJING — China on Tuesday dismissed reports fear it 
had sought to channel funds to President Bill Clinton’s 
Democratic Party as “totally fabricated.” 

“We express serious dissatisfaction wife this kind of 
utterly irresponsible report,” said a Chinese Foreign Ministry 
Sp okesman, Tan g Guoqiang. 

The Washington Post reported last week that evidence 
had emerged that fee Chinese Embassy in Washington was 
interested in providing money to the Democrats. Thar would 
be illegal under U.S. law, and no proof has been presented 
dial the Chinese did so. 

Mr. Tang said China adhered to fee principle of not 
interfering in other countries’ affairs. (AP) 


Senator Bob Kerrey, Democrat of Nebraska, war hero 
and former governor and presidential candidate, who after 
nearly four years has finished a draft of a book about his 
father, Janies, who died in 1988, and his unde, who was 
killed daring World War II in fee Philippines: “I think it’s 
going to be published posthumously, at the rale I’m go- 
ing.” . (WP) 


By Michael A. Fletcher 

Washington Pan Service 

ST. PAUL, Minnesota — 
For better or worse, Sefe Big 
Crow Sr. had grown accus- 
tomed to the almost daily in- 
sults that American Indians 
face in a nation where sports 
fans celebrate the Atlanta 
Braves or fee Washington 
Redskins by performing 
“war chants” and “toma- 
hawk chops.” 

But when a New York 
company started selling 40- 
ounce (1.2-liter) bottles of a 
high-powered malt liquor un- 
der fee name of Crazy Horse, 
fee Sioux chief of the Oglala 
tribe and spiritual leader, the 
cultural disrespect was more 
than Big Crow could bear. 

“To fee people who put 
this out, it’s nothing but a way 
to make, money. For them, 
everything is there to make 
money off of,” said Big 
Crow, a descendant of Crazy 
Horse, who is best known 
among non-Indians for help- 
ing annihilate Colonel 
George Custer's troops at fee 
Battle of fee Little Bighorn in 
Montana. ‘’But there are 
many things that we honor 
and cherish and we are going 
to defend them.” 

True to bis word. Big Crow 
has joined forces wife other 
Native American activists in 
a legal and public relations 
b attl e to have Crazy Horse’s 
name removed from the malt 
liquor. But the fight over 
Crazy Horae is really about 
much more than a brand 
name. Activists call it part of 
an ongoing battle to establish 
fee kind of basic respect for 
the culture of fee nation's 2 
million Indians that is now 
taken for granted by any other 
minority groups. 

“Everybody would under- 
stand how insulting it would 
be to have, say, a Martin 
Luther King Jr. Dark Ale or a 
Golda Men Stout,” said a 
Democratic state representa- 
tive, Andy Dawkins, who in- 
troduced legislation that 
briefly banned the hew in 
Minnesota. “But when it 
comes to Native Americans, 
somehow it’s a different 
thing.” 

For years, Indian activists 
have struggled wife limited 
success against the use of 
sports mascots and team 


names feat they find offen- 
sive. They say those efforts 
have prompted at least 600 
high school and college teams 
— including fee St John’s 
University Redmen and the 
Marquette University Warri- 
ors — to change their names. 
They also have persuaded a 
handful of newspapers not to 
print fee offensive names. But 
fee campaign has had little 
impact on professional fran- 
chises. 

For almost five years, a 
case has been pending before 
fee U.S. Patent and Trade- 
mark Office that would can- 
cel fee use of the Redskins 
trademark because many con- 
sider the name a slur roughly 
equivalent to fee term “nig- 
ger." The owner of the Red- 
skins. Jack Kent Cooke, has 
disputed that assertion, say- 
ing his team’s name honors 
Native Americans. 

“The settlers did not honor 
us 100 years ago, and they are 
not honoring us now^” said 
Vernon Bellecourt, a founder 
of fee National American In- 
dian Movement; which has 
led fee fight against the team 
names. “That is the hypo- 
crisy of this issue.” 

Beyond the team names, 
there is a growing movement 
in several states to remove 
from geographic designations 
the word squaw, which of- 
fends many Indians because 


they believe it is derived from 
a French term meaning va- 
gina. But activists concede 
feat progress has been slow 
on this issue because, as wife 
the team names, few people 
seem convinced that Indians 
should take offense if none is 
intended. 

“They’re so callous about 
it. they don’t see it,” said 
Phyllis Tousey Frederick, a 
St Paul lawyer who is na- 
tional coordinator of fee 
Crazy Horse Defense Project, 
which is waging a low-budget 
campaign to remove fee malt 
liquor from fee market. 
4 ‘They say, ‘It’s your opinion 
feat you’re offended.’ ” 

Crazy Horse Malt Liquor 
was Launched in 1992 by Hor- 
ne 11 Brewing Co., which con- 
tracts wife fee G. Heileman 
Brewing Co. of LaCrosse. 
Wisconsin, to brew fee 
product. The founders of Hor- 
nell, John Ferolito and Don 
Vultaggio, are former Brook- 


Commander of Bombed Saudi Base Is on the Hook Again 


By Eric Schmitt 

New York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — Under pressure from 
Congress and top aides to Defense Secretary 
William Cohen, fee U.S. Air Force is re- 
luctantly considering reversing its decision to 
exonerate fee general in charge of a housing 
.complex in Saudi Arabia where 19^ American 

airmen were killed by a truck bomb last June. 

In a confidential memorandum sent to top 
air force leaders late last month. Deputy De- 
fense Secretary John White called the air 


force’s justification “not sufficient,” and 
ordered it to review the evidence and decide if 
someone should be punished for fee disaster. 

Senior aides to Mr. Cohen, who was sworn 
in as defense secretary on Jan. 24, and Mr. 
White insist they simply want fee air force to 
support its casebetter, and are not searching 
for a scapegoar to quell congressional cri- 
ticism that no one is being held accountable for 
the deaths. But some senior air force officers 
say the subtext to Mr. White’s memorandum is 
dear. “The airforce fed not come up wife fee 
right answer,” an officer said. 


Much of fee dispute centers on whether fee 
general in charge. Brigadier General Tenyl 
Schwalier, took enough precautions against 
potential threats. The air force report said 
General Schwalier took prudent steps given 
fee intelligence available to him. 

, In theory, if fee air force and its Pentagon 
bosses disagreed on what final action to take, 
Mr. Cohen could overrule the air force. But 
feat would be an extraordinary step, and both 
sides are frying to avoid it. 

In fee meantime, the air force has delayed 
the promotion of General Schwalier to two- 


star rank until its top military lawyer. Major 
General Bryan Hawley, and the air force 
inspector general. Lieutenant General 
Richard Swope, complete fee review. The 
promotion had been scheduled to take effect 
Feb. 1. 

The air force’s exoneration of General 
Schwalier in December contradicted fee con- 
clusion of a separate Pentagon inquiry in 
September, which singled out fee general for 
failing to set up adequate measures to safe- 
guard personnel at die Khobar Towers apart- 
ment complex in Dhahran. 




A 


/ 


Away From 
Politics 

■ A Nobel Prize-winning scient- 
ist, Dr. Daniel Carleton Gajdusek. 
73, pleaded guilty to two counts of 
child abuse for molesting a 15- 
year-old boy he brought to Maty- 
land from a research trip in fee 
South Pacific. (A?) 

•A coyote mauled a 4-year-old 
girl as die played in the snow near 
South Lake Tahoe, a ski resort in 
California. She was saved by her 
father and was hospitalized m 
stable condition. t™* 

•Virginia lawmakers voted, 100 

to 0, to retire a state song that critics 

say glorifies slavery. (APi 

• Vandals wielding baseball tats 
or ham mers bash ed more than 
2^*00 of the 15,777 pariringmetere 
in Washington. ■ ... (Reuters) 


High Court Backs Ex-Employees Fired in Retaliation 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Companies can be sued 
by former employees who say they suffered 
retaliation, such as a bad job reference, for 
a r-jnnang fee employer of discrimination, die 
Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. 

Voting unanimously in a Maryland case, fee 
justices said a federal job-bias law gives former 
employees fee same protection against retal- 


iation as current employees and job applicants. 

Justice Clarence Thomas wrote for fee court 
feat die Clinton administration argued per- 
suasively feat barrfeg such protection to framer 
employees “would provide a perverse incent- 
ive fra* employers to fire employees who might 
bring” claims under the law. 

It also would allow “the threat of post- 
employment retaliation to deter victims of dis- 


crimination from complaining” to fee federal 
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 
wrote Justice Thomas, who once led feat 
agency. 

In another decision, the court ruled unan- 
imously in a California case feat states may 
enforce their own prevailing-wage laws, which 
set trade-by-trade minimum compensation for 
workers on state construction projects. 


Tuneup Over, Hubble Ready to Resume Exploration 


. .The Associated Press 

SPACE CENTER, Houston — 
wife new instruments and its sun-wrinkTedskin 
smoothed out, fee Hubble space telescope was 
ready Tuesday to be returned to orbit and 
resume its spectacular photographic surveys. 

An apparent glitch on ftsteenng component 
of fee telescope turned out not tbbe a problem 


after all, and officials ordered fee shuttle to take 
fee Hubble to an orbit nine miles (15 kilo- 
meters) higher to decrease the dwn« feat fee 
atmosphere would drag it down. 

The release of fee spacecraft from fee shuttle 
repair platform was set for Wednesday. 

Early Tuesday, two spacewaikers finished 
firing Hubble’s insulating cover, which had 


been damaged by extreme temperature 
changes. 

Until fee steering component was declared 
healthy, there was a possibility that an un- 
precedented sixth spacewalk would be needed 
to replace it wife a spare. But after three hours 
of tests, Mission Control determined fee part — 
a reaction wheel — was working properly. 


-. - x. 


V 

\ 


lyn truck drivers who say they 
launched Crazy Horse as fee 
first in a series of beverages 
wife an Old West theme. Oth- 
er planned offerings include 
James Bowie Kentucky Pils- 
ner. Wild Bill Hickok Porter 
and Annie Oakley Lite. 

“My clients didn't ever 
know that Crazy Horse was 
actually ever a living per- 
son,” said Lawrence Fox, a 
lawyer who represents Hor- 
nell. “To them, he was just a 
symbol of the Old West." 

Crazy Horse bottles feature 
an Indian in headdress and an 
inscription about “a land 
where wailful winds whisper 
of Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse 
and Custer” — drawing an 
undeniable link to fee revered 
leader of fee Oglala Sioux. 

To many Indians , that is an 
insult bordering on blas- 
phemy. 

Crazy Horse is reputed to 
have spoken out against 
drinking liquor, saying h 
would lead to fee downfall of 
his people. Today. Native 
Americans suffer a rate of al- 
coholism feat is as much as 
five times greater than that of 
the general population, ac- 
cording to federal health stat- 
istics. 

Mr. Fox says Homell is on 


firm legal ground using fee 
Crazy Horse name, which he 
says has been attached to hun- 
dreds of products from bars to 
clothing. 

“My clients are not fighting 
this because they make so 
much money on this product,” 
Mr. Fox said. “People have a 
right to feel it is insensitive, 
but my clients believe they 
also have a right to do this.” 

So far. Homell has pre- 
vailed in most of the legal 
skirmishes fought over Crazy 
Horse. The brew effectively 
is banned in Nebraska and 
Washington state. But in 
Minnesota, a state law feat 
barred the sale of fee malt 
liquor was overturned by a 
state appeals court last fall. 

In 1992, Representative 
Frank Wolf, a Virginia Re- 
publican, sponsored a federal 
measure that banned the use 
of fee Crazy Horse name na- 
tionwide. But a federal ap- 
peals court overturned the 
law the following year, say- 
ing it violated Homell *s right 
to free commercial speech. 

In fee face of these legal 
defeats, the Crazy Horse De- 
fense Project has mounted a 
boycott of a product feat 
makes milli ons of dollars for 
Homell: AriZona Ice Tea. 


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PAGE 2 


ESTERNATIONAL HERA LD TRIBUNE, SAXUHPAY-SCWDA£, f3SBRtTARY 1-2 , 1997 



Deng’s Condition Worse, 
Clinton Officials Believe 


Bustle of Beijing Leadership Cited 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Clinton admin- 
istration officials say they believe that 
the health of China's paramount leader, 
Deng Xiaoping, has deteriorated sig- 
nificantly in recent days and was the 
reason for the sudden return to Beijing 
this weekend of several other lop 
Chinese leaders. 

Mr. Deng, who is 92 and has not been 
seen in public since he visited Shanghai 
in 1994, has often been reported to be on 
the verge of death in die last few years. 

“Thu could be another one of tbe 
false warnings,” said a senior American 
official who monitored internal gov- 
ernment reports about Mr. Deng’s 
health during the weekend. "But there 
is dearly a lot of activity on the part of 
the leadership, and there is clearly a 
belief in Beijing that a bad situation has 
turned worse.” 

Another administration official said: 
"Clearly, he is very sick, but it’s not 
clear how much sicker than the usual 
very sick.” 

For years, officials in Washington 
have debated what impact tbe death of 
Mir. Deng, whose economic reforms re- 
made China into one of tbe powerhouse 
economies of the world, may have on 
China's succession struggles and its 
dealings with the United States. 

But Mr. Deng has survived for so long 
that many China- watchers and policy- 
makers hoe routinely say they now be- 
lieve that the bulk of die transition of 
power has already taken place. If Mr. 
Deng dies in the coming months, they 
speculate, political events in Beijing can 
be frozen until tbe next Communist 
Party congress, in October. 

■ Health Reports Rock Shares 

China played down fears over tbe 
health of Mr. Deng on Tuesday, saying 
there was "no big change” in his con- 
dition, Reuters reported from Beijing. 

Tang Guoqiang, a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, said at a news briefing: 
"There has been no big change in Com- 
rade Deng Xiaoping's health.” 

Mr. Tang de clined to say if there had 
been a small change or explain what 
would be considered a major change. 

Officials of the State Council, or cab- 
inet. who usually answer queries about 
Mr. Deng's health with the official line 
that he is as well as can be expected for 
a man of his age. could say only they 
were investigating the situation. 

Rumors about Mr. Deng’s health often 
have an impact on China-related bourses, 
where his demise is seen by same as a 
potentially drestahilmng {actor. 

Worries over Mr. Deng’s health 


helped to push shares on Shanghai and 
Shenzhen stock exchanges sharply lower 
by their close Tuesday and also rocked 
share prices in Taiwan and Hong Kong. 

Mr. Deng has not been sera in public 
since the 1994 Chinese Lunar New Year 
festival, when be appeared frail and 
faltering. He is thought to be in fragile 
health and with fading lucidity. 

Officials declined to comment direct- 
ly on the rumors floating around the 
Htincst* capital about his condition, but 
diplomats said his health had very likdy 
deteriorated recently. 

"It’s been clear for a while that 
things” have been "going downhill,” 
said a Western diplomat 
One indication of Mr. Deng’s 
worsening state was that officials and 
family members had backed off from 
forecasts that he would travel to Hong 
Kong to witness Beijing's resumption 
of rule over the British colony at mid- 
night on June 30, the diplomat said. 


"Clearly, things are a bit cm shaky 
ground,” he said. 


A Taiwan newspaper. United Daily 
News, quoted the island's top official on 
mainland affairs. Chang Kmg-yuh, as 
saying Mr. Deng’s condition was serious. 
Officials said they were closely mon- 
itoring his health. 



Mr. Sobhraj, left, speaking to reporters, from a police bus in New Delhi on Tuesday. 


eCana/Afcaeff HBMff-Acm 


India Seeking to Deport French Murder Suspect 


deport 
who ha 


The Associated press 

NEW DELHI — India wants to 
a notorious m order suspect 
io has spent 21 years in a New Delhi 
prison, prosecutors said Tuesday. 

Prosecutors asked a judge to with- 
draw an escape charge — the only 
Indian case against the suspect, 
Charles Sobhraj, a French citizen — 
so that he can be expelled, tbe news 


agency Pres Trust of India reported. 

Judge Y.N. Jonwal said he would 
consider the request Friday. Mr. 
Sobhraj was freed on bond' in fee case 
Monday, but was immediately arrested 
for invalid travel papas. 

He was arrested in New Delhi in 
1976 on charges of murdering and 
robbing two tourists. He was convicted 
of then, but acquitted in fee murders. 


He also faced 14 murder charges in 
T hailand , but avoided being extra- 
dited by keeping his case before the 
courts m India until fee Ibai cases 
expired in 1996. In Thailand, he 
would have faced the death penalty. 

In 1986, his sentence ending, he 
briefly escaped in an apparent effort to 
ensure a continued detention that 


would keep him out of Thailand. 


:’s Son 
Files Suit 
Over Hanbo 


Opposition Politicians 
Are Accused of Libel 


pie Associated Press ' 

SEOUL — A son of South Korea’s 
president filed a libel suit Tuesday ac- 
cusing six opposition po l iti ci a n s of 
falsely implicating him in a bribery 
scandal surrounding bankruptcy <rf a 
steel company. 


Tbe six named in tbe_lawsuiJt filed bg 


BRIEFLY 


EU Seeks to Scrap Burma’s 
Farming Trade Preferences 


BRUSSELS — The European Commission on 
Tuesday proposed ending trade preferences far 
Burma’s agricultural exports following an inquiry 
into the use of farced labor by rite militar y regime. 

The European Union’s executive body has already 
proposed a similar suspension of the general system 
of preferences far Burma’s industrial goods. 

In a statement, fee commission said it took the 
measure after Burma failed to cooperate wife an 
investigation into allegations that the use of forced 
labor in Burma is commonplace. 

Forced labor is incompatible with tbe granting of a 
general system of preferences to a developing nation, 
the statement said. The commission’s proposal has to 
be approved by fee IS EU member states. (API 


ised feat Cambodia would join fee 

They said an earlier statement to that i 
by fee Cambodian foreign minister, Sok An, after a 
meeting between government officials and a visiting 
Indonesian delegation, had been misunderstood. The 
timing of Cambodia's admission into fee regional 
grouping — as well as that of Laos and Banna — was 
still not certain. 

The Indonesian foreign minister, Ali Alatas, said, 
"Cambodia enjoys full support and we hope that by 
July they can realize fall membership.” But he said 
fear a decision on entry would have to wail because it 
would involve all ASEAN heads of stare and gov- 
ernment. (AFP) 


1991, the government has sent home 9,700 Vi- 
etnamese. 

All die Vietnamese must leave before July 1, when 
the British colony reverts to Chinese rule. China has 
made it clear it wants them gone by then. (APJ 


Ramos Says He’ll Not Run 


Hong Kong Sends Home 
Another 198 Vietnamese 


MANILA — President Fidel Ramos of the Phil- 
ippines assured critics Tuesday that he was not 
seeking a second term, despite rumors that he wants 
to amend fee constitution so be can run again. 

“As far as I am concerned six years for President 
Fidel Ramos, according to our 1937 constitution, is 
enough,” Mr. Ramos told a gathering of war vet- 
erans from members of the Association of South East 
Asian Nations. His single six-year term ends next 
year. ( AP ) 


Ministers Deny Date Whs Set 
For Cambodia ASEAN Entry 


PHNOM PENH — The foreign ministers of Cam- 
bodia and Indonesia on Tuesday denied that the 
Association of South East Asian Nations had prom- 


HONG KONG — Hong Kong repatriated 198 
Vietnamese on Tuesday, reducing fee asylum- 
seekers population to about 6, 100, down from a 1991 
peak of 60.000. 

The 127 meyi, 38 women and 33 children were 
flown to Hanoi on two flights. The Vietnamese are 
left over from the waves of people who fled after 
South Vietnam fell to the Communist North in 1975. 
Since the beginning of the forced repatriation in 


U.S. Urges Peace Overtures 


JAMMU, India — Pakistan and India should start 
peace negotiations quickly, and India, as tire larger, 
more powerful nation, should show "accommo- 
dation” in bilateral talks, the U.S. ambassador to 
India, Frank Wisner, told a conference in Jammu and 
Kashmir state. (Reuters) 


fee son, Kim Hyun Chid, 38, are 
members of tire leading opposition 
party, tire National Congress for New 
Politics, led by Kim Dae Jung. They 
include five legislators aid tire party's 
chief public relations officer. - 
Kim Hyun Chul, second son of Pres- 
ident Young Sam, has been a main 

target of criticism by opposition parties 
since tire Hanbo Steel and General Con- 
struction Co., a unit of Sooth Korea’s 
14 fe largest con^omerate, was declared 
insolvent Jan. 23, mainly because of 5 
trillion won ($5.7 billion) in loan debt. 

Kim Hyun Chul holdsno government 
position but bas been active in social 
and political affairs. He is reported to 
have played an importantrole in helping 
his father win election in 1992. . 

The opposition has named the junior ' 
trim as a major backer of Hanbo in 
obtaining bank loans that exceeded col- 
lateral. Many South Korean banks are 
government-controlled, and decisions 
about bank loans often have political 
elements . 

In tire suit, Mr. Kim said tire law- 
makers defamed him “by spreading false 
nwnnrs that he was the behind-fee-scenes 
backer of tire special loans to Hanbo.” 
The No. 2 opposition party, feeUmted 
Liberal Democrats, also accused Mr. 
Kim of involvement in tire Hanbo case, 
bur his suit did not name any membera. 

The president’s son denies any re- 
lationship with Hanbo, but more (ban 
10,000 copies of his biography were 
found in a Hanbo warehouse last week 
Hanbo’s failure already has led to fee 0 
arrests of nine people, including a cab- 
inet minister, two governing party le- 
gislators, an opposition lawmaker, tire 
company’s founder and two bank pres- 
idents. They are charged wife taking or 
giving millions of dollars in bribes in 
obtaining the loans. 

The state prosecutor’s office says it 
has ended its investigation into the 
Hanbo affair, but Parliament confirmed 
Monday that it would open a separate 
inquiry after accusations that prosecu- 
tors were not revealing all they knew 
about tbe affair. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Personals 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 

EUROPE 


Atmospherics Improve, but French-U.S. Divide Runs Deep 


By Joseph Fitchett 

InienKainihil Her ald Tribune 

PARIS — A decision by Washington 
and Pans; ‘not to squabble in front of the 
children has cleared the air and eli- 
cited minor concessions in both capitals 
— without changing any fundamentals 
between the often-fraciious couple 
u.S. and French diplomats said Tues- 
day. 

The phrase about restraint — Foreign 
Minister Herve de Charerte attributed it 
to Madeleine AJbrighr — seemed to 
rapture the significance and the limits of 
the new start that both governments 
have sought under the new U S sec- 
retary of state. 

Relations have see-sawed giddily in 
the last two years as the initial view in 
Washington of President Jacques Chir- 
ac as a key ally darkened last year when 
Pans challenged a series of key Amer- 


ican policies around the world, includ- 
ing positions on the North Atlantic 
Treaty Or ganizatio n, 

Mrs. Albright’s appointment has 
been seized on by both governments as 
an opportunity to try to break out of the 
cycle of antagonism. 

Describing the tenor of a working 
dinner Monday night, an American par- 
ticipant recounted an exchange in which 
Mr. de Chare tie evoked the “ups and 
downs’* in relations, and Mrs. Albright 
interjected: “And don't you think it's 
time for an up?” 

Along with the improvement in at- 
mospherics have came signs of a con- . 
vergence on several sticking points . — 
ranging from Zaire and Iran to con- 
ventional weapons c-uts in Europe — 
that should facilitate progress on larger 
disputes, U.S. officials said. 

Mrs. Albright did not produce — and 
apparently did not seek — any fun- 


Outcast Bosnian Town 
Finds Unlikely Friends 

U-S. Troops Care for Refugees in Srebrenica 


By Dana Priest 

Washington Post Service 

SREBRENICA, Bosnia — This shell 
of a town, a notorious symbol of what 
went wrong in the Bosnian war, has 
become a ppiah, blacklisted by UiS. 
and international aid agencies that are 
helping to rebuild other communities 
throughout the country. 

It was here in far eastern Bosnia, in 
July 1995, that Serbian fighters forrad 
Dutch United Nations peacekeepers to 
turn over thousands of Muslim women 
and children under their protection. In- 
vestigators say more than 6.500 Muslim 
men were killed and dumped into rivers 
and pits. The Srebrenica killings, which 
an international tribunal has railed war 
crimes, were among die largest in 
Europe since World War II ana even- 
tually pushed the United States and its 
allies to stage air strikes against Serb 
forces. 

The Serbian fighters and execution- 
ers are long gone. In their place have 
come 15,000 Serbian refugees from 
neighborhoods elsewhere drat Croat 
and Muslim armies emptied in retal- 
iation for the Srebrenica atrocities and 
other such killings. With foreign gov- 
ernments and agencies still repelled by 
the memories of Srebrenica, about the 
only support the refugees here receive is 
from a small-scale charity drive un- 
officially mounted by the U.S. Army 
troops who patrol the region as a part of 
the NATO peaceke^mg forced 

“What the world doesn't know is that 
the people who committed the war 
atrocities don’t live here anymore,’ ? - 
said Major Randy Dunlap, acivil affairs' 
officer assigned to work with schools 
and officials in the area. ’’These people 
are refugees. They want a chance to 
raise their families and take care of 
them.” 

The refugees, who moved into 
bombed-out Muslim homes, have no 
drinkable water, littie food and only 
intermittent electricity. The two schools 
are weeks, and the hospital is so cold 
and supplies so low that almost every- 
one is turned away. 

The ambulance that carries patients to 
a medical center 40 kilometers (25 
miles) away is a filthy, 1 5-y ear-old Rus- 
sian Lada with a flat tire. Unemploy- 
ment runs about 90 percent. 

With no international aid agencies set 
up anywhere near here, no telephone 
lines linking the Serb Republic and die 
Muslim-Croat federation and no safe 
way to drive from here to Sarajevo, 
where aid applications are negotiated, 
Srebrenica lacks even the ability to 
plead its case. 

Both Washington and Pale, the de 
facto capital of the Bosnian Serb gov- 
ernment, are refusing to help the 
refugees because of the bad publicity 
they fear would result, according to 
several U.S. officials interviewed m 

Bo 50 * 3 - . 

U.S. troops from the 720th Military 
Police Battalion regularly patrol parts of 
the Serb-controlled portion of Bosnia, 


including Srebrenica, which is the name 
of both the town and the surrounding 
area. 

When the troops arrived, refugees 
and others from Srebrenica were hostile 
toward them, knowing the United States 
had sided with their enemies and not 
knowing what the troops had been sent 
here to do. 

As the hostility has turned to cautious 
trust, the Serbs have turned to the Amer- 
icans for help. 

The troops, who had heard the worst 
about Srebrenica, discovered that the 
vast majority of the people who live 
here now were not combatants. The 
soldiers are under strict orders not to get 
involved in rebuilding the town — that 
is supposed to be left to civil aid or- 
ganizations — but the soldiers have 
found ways to pitch in nonetheless. 

They brought in medics from Camp 
Demi for a makeshift “doc in the box” 
clinic until army headquarters nixed it 
as “mission creep.” 

They sought, and won, army approval 
to play basketball games with local 
teams. They needed a waiver from strict 
army regulations to take off their hel- 
mets and bulletproof vests to play. 
(They beat the Srebrenica team by one 
point three weeks ago.) 

In January, the soldiers' families at 
Fort Hood, Texas, where the 720th bal- 


TJw Associated Press 

BELGRADE — Cracks appeared 
Tuesday within the pro-democracy op- 
position whose protests against Pres- 
ident Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia se- 
riously shook his autocratic rule. 

As studen ts carried their protest into its 
89th day, a man drove his car into the 
crowd, injuring up to five demonstrat- 
ors. 

The rifts within the three-party co- 
alition were over who was going to hold 
which post in Belgrade’s first govern- 
ment in 52 years not held by the Com- 
munists or their Socialist successors. 

One of the opposition leaders, Zoran 
Djindjic, was hoping to become the cap- 
ital’s mayor Friday. Danica Draskovic, 
the wife of another opposition leader, 
Vuk Draskovic, had announced her can- 
didacy for the head of greater Bel- 
grade’s government, a separate post. 

The outspoken Mrs. Draskovic has 
several times harshly criticized Mr. 
Djindjic, the leader of the Democratic 
Party. 

Mr. Draskovic said in an interview 
published by the Dnevni Telepaf and 

wife’s candidacy because it would ap- 
pear undemocratic to have her in the post 
Mr. Milosevic unofficially shares power 
with his wife, Mbjaira Markovic. 


BRIEFLY 


damemal breakthroughs on such issues 
as the future of NATO’s southern 
headquarters in Naples or U.S. sanc- 
tions on foreign, companies that trade 
with Cuba.' 

But hints of French concessions 
emerged on NATO. 

For example, French officials have 
started to play, down the suggestion — 
unwelcome in Washington — of a five- 
power meeting in France to seek agree- 
ment with Russia on the enlargement of 
the Atlantic alliance. r 

In a separate move aimed ai winning 
Russian acceptance of expansion, 
France and Germany have reached 
agreement with the United States about 
a plan for weapons cuts, to be put for- 
ward this week in Vienna. 

Earlier, Paris and Bonn had objected 
to an American proposal that they said 
would reduce their own forces to allow 
room for troops in prospective NATO 


member states in Central Europe. 

Emphasizing the newly affaole tone, 
which clearly extended beyond photo 
opportunities to suffuse her talks with 
Mr. Chirac. French officials made much 
of Mrs. Albright 's fluency in French and 
familiarity with European concerns. 

Mr. de Chare tie said that “it is always 
easier to talk with someone who speaks 
with sincerity and frankness.” 

Mrs. Albright’s blunt manner, which 
officials here used to interpret as boor- 
ish, apparently is now welcomed be- 
cause it contrasts with what they saw as 
the colorlessness of her predecessor, 
Warren Christopher. 

While suggesting that temperamental 
differences were largely to blame for 
past differences. Mr. de Chare tie also 
sounded more conciliatory about 
French demands for Washington to re- 
linquish the NATO command slot in 
Naples to a European. 


If the deadlock is not solved by the 
NATO summit meeting in July. Mr. de 
Charerte said Tuesday. Paris will simply 
hold up further steps to integrate French 
forces into die alliance’s command sys- 
tem. 

France had previously threatened to 
distance itself even further from 
NATO. 

Meanwhile, citing American efforts 
at closer cooperation, a Foreign Min- 
istry official said that Mrs. Albright had 
said that both the United States and 
France needed to take a new look at their 
policies toward Iran. 

And as for Africa, the official said, 
Washington now appeared ready to 
back a French plan to keep Zaire from 
breaking up by promoting a national 
reconciliation conference between the 
government and rebels who have taken 
a vast pan of the eastern region of the 
central African nation. 



IpftSB ' 


mm 

t ' 1. 




AnJmVDlc Wuinuftra hnl 

Corporal Paco Madden, Sergeant James Barr and Staff Sergeant Mitchell Smith giving balloons to Serbian 
children in Srebrenica, Bosnia, where U.S. troops have mounted a small-scale unofficial charity drive. 


tab' on is based, collected 1,000 pounds 
of winter clothes, and the unit com- 
mander cajoled the military into flying 
the donations to Bosnia and allowing 
the troops to deliver them to local 
schools. 

Last week, an officer delivered a 
couple of boxes .of medical supplies 
donated by a troop of Girl Scouts. One 
of the intelligence officers has his fa- 


ther’s civic group back home collecting 
food. 

The commander of the 720th, Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Mary Frels, said. “We 
are the only people they have access 
to.” 

Nada Jovanovic, a nurse from the 
Sarajevo area who arrived in Srebrenica 
in September, wants nothing more than 
to go home. 


Instead, she spends her days in the 
hospital’s cigarette smoke-filled firsi- 
aid room helping to cut gauze rolls, 
marked sterile, into bandages. 

Surrounding her as she and an am- 
bulance driver puffed away on cigarette 
after cigarette were boxes of expired 
medicines she said were sent by the 
International Committee of the Red 
Cross. 


Albright 
Sweet-Talks 
The French 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washinguvi Past Scnii «■ 

PARIS — The United Stales has 
rolled our a new diplomatic weapon 
in its on-ugain, off-again squabbles 
with France: a secretary of state 
who speaks French. 

No sooner had Madeleine Al- 
bright landed in Paris on the second 
leg of her 1 1-day around -the- world 
tour than she was using French at a 
tree-planting ceremony in memory 
of the late U.S. ambassador, 
Pamela Hardman. 

Mrs. Albright practiced some 
more on President Jacques Chirac, 
who speaks pretty good English, 
and Foreign Minister Herve de 
Charetie. who speaks English as 
little as possible. 

By the end of the day Monday, 
the secretary’s enthusiasm for 
speaking foreign languages was 
blossoming. 

When a Russian journalist asked 
a question about Alexander Lebed, 
the Russian politician who also was 
visiting Paris, she replied in pass- 
able Russian, and then provided a 
translation for the bewildered press 
corps. 

In most countries, which lan- 
guage a diplomat chooses to speak 
probably would be a secondary 
consideration. But in France, it is of 
considerable importance. To spjeak 
fluent French, as Mrs. Albright 
does, is to pay tribute to French 
civilization and France's concept of 
itself as a country that still counts 
for something. This, after all, is the 
country that virtually invented di- 
plomacy. 

“We are very sensitive to such 
things." said Francois He isbourg. a 
former government official and for- 
eign policy commentator. 

Mr. Heisbourg added. “In an age 
when the French are more and more 
uncertain of their standing in the 
world, the fact that an American 
secretary of state speaks French 
makes us feel good.” 

The daughter of a Czechoslovak 
diplomat, Mrs. Albright learned her 
French at boarding school in 
Switzerland and likes to say that 
she was forced to leant it in order io 
eat. Her accent is good enough for 
the French to forgive her a few 
grammatical mistakes. 


Still, Mr. Draskovic questioned 
whether Mr. Djindjic should automat- 
ically become Belgrade mayor — afore- 
gone conclusion just a few days ago. 

Mr. Draskovic said members of his 
party, the Serbian Renewal Movement, 
had been offended by .five claim that 
there is no better candidate than Mr. 
Djindjic. They demanded that the party 
put up its own candidates, he said. 

The Dnevni Telegraf said Tuesday that 
Mr. Djindjic’s party was ready to publish 
doctors' findings that Mrs. Draskovic 
was “totally unfit for the job. ' ’ There was 
no elaboration on what the findings con- 
tained, but her opponents have suggested 
that she is mentally unstable. 

The unity of the opposition is crucial 
for the possible defeat of Mr. Milosevic 
in elections later this year. Until the 
three-party coalition, called Zajedno, or 
Together, was formed late last year, the 
opposition was fractured by discord and 
too weak to challenge him. 

The dispute surfaced just days after 
the suspension of three months of op- 
position protests following Mr. Milo- 
sevic’s decision to recognize opposition 
victories in municipal elections in Bel- 
grade and 1 3 other cities and towns. But 
Mr. Milosevic still faces a wave of 
strikes and workers* protests that could 
further erode his authority. 


■lUtfil 


DUTY FREE 




W®RLD 


Juppe Hints nt Retreat on Bill 

PARIS — Prime Minister Alain Juppe hinted Tuesday he 
might back down in the face of mounting (^position to an 
immigration bill that would oblige femch citizens to report 
to the Dolice when foreign guests left their home. 

Mr hippe told Parliament his conservative government 
was “ opento discussion” if legislatorssuggest^lan ef- 
fective alternative way of checking that foreigners did not 

OV Kd!h£ government was "open to dismission as long 
as the objective of an effective control on entry and de- 

nTju^TalStad the state could take over rospon- 
m.-.cZL:*. - fnr fiimerv sine the presence of Thud 


"To 3Tof MM SE and show business 
penalities have signed appeals c^ounang the kps- 
Lilian and calling for civil disobedience. - {Reuters) 

European Commission Underfire 

jhey would hack ™ 

of the public mtffit 

Parliament s repon on the fatal 

encephalopathy. The re- 


port attacks the commission forgiving protection of the beef 
market priority over public health and Britain for failing to 
enforce.eradication measures. (Reuters) 

Russian MiGs Face Grounding 

MOSCOW — The Russian Air Force commander said he 
may ground the country's most advanced fighter jet, the MiG- 

31, if more money cannot be found to train pilots and maintain 
the sophisticated aircraft, a newspaper reported Tuesday. 

“If we do not manage to raise die level of maintenance 
and pilots’ training this year. I will order a ban on ali MiG- 
31 flights,” the commander. General Victor Prudnikov. was 
quoted as saying in the daily Sevodnya. 

He said that the MiG-31 requires pilots who need at least 
100 hours of flying time each year, but that Russian pilots on 
average logged omy 19 hours of flying time in 1996. (AP) 

Births on the Rise in Germany 

BONN — Births in Germany increased last year for the 
first time since unification in 1990, helped by a steep rise in 
the formerly Communist cast, the Federal Statistics Office 
said Tuesday. 

- Deaths still outnumbered births by 90.000, but the gap 
was sharply smaller than in 1995. Live births rose by 3.8 
percent to 789.000. while deaths declined by 0.4 percent, the 
office said. 

Births in the East plummeted after unification forced East 
Germans to adapt to capitalism almost overnight and threw ' 
about 20 percent of them out of work. 

Now, many East Germans are having babies they delayed 
because of unification shock, said Juergen Dorbritz. a 
government demographics analyst. (API 



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INTTEKNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SAJUBDAY-SUNPfl(, FEPRUARY I-2, jjgT 






PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Russian’s Rocky Journey in His Adopted Afghanistan 

A Convert to Islam, He Fears Taleban 


By John F. Bums 

New hi rL Times Service 

KHINJAN. Afghanistan — The 
troubles of Alexei Ivanovich Olenin 
began on a snowy day in November 1982. 
In the morning, commanders summoned 
Soviet troops in Afghanistan to tell them 
that Leonid Brezhnev, the Soviet dictator, 
had died at the age of 75. 

For many of the men. the news was 
not unwelcome, since Mr. Brezhnev had 
committed Soviet troops to their Afghan 
venture three winters earlier, with results 
that were already becoming a disaster. 

But for Mr. Olenin, the news from 
Moscow proved to be a false dawn on a 
day that was to change his life in more 
fundamental ways. 

Toward dusk, he had driven his fuel 
tanker nonh from Kabul, the capita), 
over the Salang Pass through the Hindu 
Kush, and down the northern slopes of 
the mountains on the last leg of the run to 
a vast Soviet military camp. But the 
truck motor was misfiring, and he fell 
behind the military convoy. Alone on a 
deserted road, he was ambushed. 


ban force that captured Kabul in Septem- 
ber sweeping nonh, with attitudes that 
night not be friendly to any remnant of 
the Soviet occupation. 

His solution, Mr. Olenin said, might 
be to head west to Iran, another Muslim 
state with a militant government, but one 
he thinks might give him a home. Al- 
though the Muslim-ruled country he has 
taken as his own has proven to be a place 
of violence and disorder, be offers a 
similar rationale to the one that, toward 
the end of communist rule, many Rus- 
sians offered about communism. 

“The fault in Afghanistan is not with 
Islam. “ he said. “The fault is in the way 
that Islam has been corrupted here.” 

Asked if he thought matters would be 
better in Iran, he laughed mirthlessly. * T 
can hope so,” be said. 

And what of the choice he made io 
turn his back on his homeland and em- 
brace Afghanistan? 

* ‘Russia is my country, and my family 
is there.” he said. “But God has put 
something in my heart, something that 
makes me want to go on searching, 
searching for honesty and justice and 


His captors were members of one of humanity. I haven’t found it here, but 



r* . 

1 


the many Muslim guerrilla groups that God has given me an ocean of patieno 

had tied down a Soviet occupation force Perhaps, in Iran, my luck will change. 

of 1 10.000 men, drawing Moscow ever 

deeper into a morass that was hastening " — 

the demise of the Soviet Union. J’L’DUAUTCTC* J 

The guerrillas fired rockets into Mr. X XLXVXVv/XVJL^ ltJ«I 
Olenin's truck, then led him off. hands 

roped into the mountains that were to be Continued from Page I 

his home for the next 10 years. 

After a few weeks, hungry and been informed by Lebanese officials < 
frightened, he made a deal. In return for the arrest on Saturday of ‘ ‘five or six 


inhn K R«m»/n»r Nr« Yorii Han 


Alexei Ivanovich Olenin pausing beside the wreck of a tank with several of bis adopted countrymen. 


TERRORISTS: Long a Haven for Killers , Lebanon Arrests Japan Red Army Suspects 


Continued from Page I questioned. “There are some Japanese 

citizens who are supposed to be members 
been informed by Lebanese officials of of the Japanese Red Army and who are 


frightened, he made a deal. In return for the arrest on Saturday of “five or six” now with the Lebanese security forces” 
better treatment, he followed other Red Army members in the Bekaa, where under intenogation, Mr. Bouez said, 
young Russians captured by the guerrilla they apparently had been living for Japanese diplomats met Tuesday with 

groups and agreed to convert to the years. Besides Mr. Okamoto, Japanese Lebanon’s prosecutor general. Adrian 


groups and agreed to convert to the 
Muslim faith of his captors. 

For months, he took, instructions from 
a mullah, who was the son of the guer- 
rilla group's commander. Soon, the 
young Russian was treated as a member 
of the guerrilla group, and assigned to 
work as a paramedic. 

When the guerrillas arranged prisoner 
exchanges with Soviet commanders, or 
accepted Soviet bounties for releasing 
their prisoners, he chose not to go back. 
When one of the other young Russians 
who had converted to Islam was ex- 
changed. he heard that the man had been 
taken to a Soviet camp, paraded before 
the troops, then run over by a tank. 

Mr. Olenin decided that he was safer 
with the guerrillas, and. anyway, he felt 
comfortable as a Muslim. 

“I saw something sacred in Islam that 
1 had not found in communism, or for 


reports named four of the others as 
Kazuo Tohira, 44; Hisashi Maisuda, 48; 
Mariko Yamamoto. 56; and Masao Ada- 
chi, 57. 

In Beirut, Foreign Minister Fans Bouez 
said that the suspected Red Army mem- 
bers had been arrested and were being 


Addourn. In Tokyo, government spokes- 
men said Japan would send a team to 
Lebanon to identify the captives and 
would seek their extradition if they 
turned out to belong to the group, ac- 
cording to wire service reports. 

Turning over the suspects would 


amount to a low-cost gesture for Syria 
and Lebanon, given the marginal im- 
portance of the Red Army when com- 
pared with other, more active extremist 
organizations that use the Bekaa as a 
base. 

A violent leftist group with close ties 
to Palestinian extremists, the Red Army 
made its name with a series of high- 
profile terrorist attacks in the 1970s. One 
of the most notorious was the 1972 air- 
port massacre, carried out by Mr. 
Okamoto and two other Red Army mem- 
bers. 


KOREA: From Gold to Bullets, the Spy-Film World of Defectors 


Continued from Page I 

Korean agents as a blunt warning to Mr. 
Hwang and other potential defectors that 
they are nor safe anywhere. 

The recent events are a chilling re- 
minder of North Korea's brutality for the 
estimated 600 to 750 North Korean de- 


sound even more ruthless and inhos- 
pitable than it actually is. While their 
stories may well be true, they are im- 
possible to prove and often seem too 
horrific or too rehearsed to be credible. 

The transition to life in South Korea is 
often extremely difficult for defectors. 
The South Korean government until 


feciois who live in South Korea, and the now has provided little job training or 


that matter, in Orthodoxy.’ ' he said on a ever-increasing number who are risking help in acclimating them to a new cul- 


recent afternoon, referring to the Rus- their lives to follow them southward, 
sian Orthodox faith of his forebears in “I couldn't stand near windows of my 

Kuibyshev, the Volga River city, now house because I feared that somebody is 
renamed Samara, where he was raised, watching me and will try to kill me,' ' one 
In the back seat of a car rolling north- recent North Korean defector told the 
ward from the Hindu Kush, Mr. Olenin Korea Times this week. “When I see a 
fell silent, then said; “Besides, the Soviet shadow appear on a wall, I automatically 
forces never took care of me. They recoil and reach for a knife I always hide 
treated me as if I was worthless, as though underneath the bedding just in case.’ ' 
they didn’t care if 1 lived or died.' 1 Ko Chong Song. 37, who defected in 

Mr. Olean had hitched a ride to Pul-i- 1993, told the newspaper “I feel angry 
Khumri, an hour's drive to the north, and nervous at the same time after seeing 
where he recently married an Afghan one of my fellow defectors slain so eas- 
woman. The journey put him on the road ily.” 


rare. For many North Koreans, partic- 
ularly farmers who live in the barren 


house because I feared that somebody is countryside of North Korea, arriving in 


watching me and will try to kill me,' ’ one 
recent North Korean defector told the 
Korea Times this week. “When I see a 
shadow appear on a wall, I automatically 
recoil and reach for a knife I always hide 
underneath the bedding just in case.' ' 


bustling, raucous South Korea is like 
landing on another planet. 

North Korea also is believed to send 
families of defectors to concentration 
camps as a lesson to others who might be 
tempted to defect, which also weighs 


day that “cowards" who wanted to 
leave the councy should go ahead and do 
so. The Associated Press reported. 

Mr. Kim's statement, in a domestic 
radio broadcast monitored in Tokyo, did 
not specifically mention Mr. Hwang, 
who entered the South Korean Con- 
sulate on Wednesday and requested 
asylum. 

Mr. Kim did not personally read the 
statement. 

“As the revolutionary song says, 
cowards, if you want to go, then go 


Israeli officials said they have no out- 
standing claim against Mr. Okamoto. the 
only surviving member of . the team. 
Captured at the time and sentenced to 
life in prison, Mr. Okamoto was said by 
Israeli officials to have suffered a mental 
breakdown behind bars. He was released 
as part of a 1985 prisoner swap between 
Israel and the Ahmed Jibril organization. 
More than 1,000 Palestinian, prisoners, 
along with Mr. Okamoto, were ex- 
changed for three Israeli soldiers cap- 
tured in the 1982 Lebanon war. 

The Red Army was said to have 
staged die Lod attack in solidarity with 
Georges Habash’s Popular Front for die 
Liberation of Palestine. It is not known 
to have targeted Israeli interests since. 

The news that Mr. Okamoto and Red 
Army members may have been hiding 
out in the Bekaa will hardly come as 
revelation to those familiar with its repu- 
tation. “For as long as die Bekaa has 
been a haven for such sorts of people 
being trained, they've been there,” the 
Beirut-based diplomat said. 

The Lebanese government exercises 
little sovereignty in the valley, which 
runs north to south parallel to Lebanon's 
two mountain ranges. It has long been 
fertile ground for extremists, most no- 
tably Hezbollah, whose Lebanese Shiite 


where he was captured 15 years ago. 

Once, the car stopped, for a pho- 
tograph of Mr. Olenin beside a tank. 
Quickly, he was surrounded by Afghan 
children and villagers. 

“Shuravi!" they said, laughing, using 
the word Afghans use for Russians. 

“No." he said. “Not Russian. 
Afghan.” 

When the Soviet Union collapsed, 
Mr. Olenin went home. In 1993, with an 
Afghan passport, he obtained a Russian 
visa, and made an overland journey to 
Samara. Within weeks, an article ap- 
peared in a local newspaper, describing 
him as a deserter. 

Friends with contacts in the local po- 
lice told him, he said, that if he applied 
for Russian documents, he would be 
arrested. 

Mr. Olenin headed back to Afghan- 
istan. where he opened small store trading 
in groceries in Pul-i-Khumri. When it was 
robbed, he took to the road, buying and 
selling commodities like oranges in the 
towns that dot the northern plains, earning 
the equivalent of a dollar or two a day. 

Now. with his marriage failing, he 
faces the possibility of the militant Tale- 


Ko Chong Song. 37, who defected in heavily on the minds of some defectors. 
1993, told the newspaper: “I feel angry Mr. Hwang, the defector in Beijing, 
and nervous at the same time after see mg wrote a memo outlining his reasons for 
one of my fellow defectors slain so eas- defecting in which he told his wife and 
ily.” four children to consider him dead. 

■ ‘Cowards’ Can Leave 

the clock police protection to 77 of the The North Korean leader said Tues- 


South Korean police have stepped up 
security for defectors, providing round- 
the clock police protection to 77 of the 
highest-level defectors. Before 1 990. the 
government routinely gave defectors 
five years of police protection, but be- 
cause so many defectors have come to 
the South in recent years, protection is 
now usually limited to two years. 

The defectors themselves generally 
take extensive precautions. Many move 
frequently and change telephone num- 
bers. Mr. Lee, the man who was shot 
Saturday, reportedly underwent plastic 
surgery to disguise himself to elude po- 
tential assassins. 

While defectors are certainly an in- 
valuable source of information for South 
Korean and U.S. intelligence officials, 
the stories they tell publicly are usually 
received with a certain skepticism by 
dispassionate observers. 

Analysts say many defectors are 


away. We will defend the red flag of Muslim fighters ate trained and armed 
revolution to the end.” the statement by Iran. Most of Syria’s 35,000 troops in 
said. Lebanon are in the valley. . 

The broadcast probably was aimed at * The Bekati has been the 'home ttfejfc 
the few high-ranking officials in" the trenusfS from Egypt," " Baling , -SSodi 
isolated Stalinist nation who may have Arabia. Kuwait Sudan. Bosriia and even 
learned of die attempted defection, said the French Basque region, as well 'as 
Shinya Kato, an editor at Radio Press. Kurdish separatists fighting for inde- 
the monitoring service that reported the pendence from Turkey, according to 
remarks. Western and Arab intelligence reports. 

“It can be seen as a warning.” Mr. It is because of Syria’s tolerance of 
Kato said, noting, however, that the vast such activities that the Ihnted Stales keeps 
majority of North Koreans have no the country on its terrorism list and re- 
knowledge of the defection. . stricts the export of some goods to Syria. 


Kohl Drops 
Another Hint 
On Plans for 
’98 Election 


• Reuters ■ 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut Ktfol, 
who has declined to commit himself to 
running for re-election in 1998, said 
Tuesday at a meeting of his patty that he 
knew “his duty," participants said. .' 

Mr. Kohl told members of the Chris- 
tian Democratic Union that he would not 
be forced into making a decision before 
he was ready . But he said he knew he had 
& responsibility to die party, adding: “1 
know my duty.” Deputies greeted the 
remark with a long round of applause. 

Mr. Kohl is under pressure to give his 
party and the coalition government — 
divided over major reforms to the tax 
and pensions systems and struggling to 
stem unemployment — ■ a boost by an- 
nouncing he would run a gain in October . 

1998. 

' The chancellor sparked the latest 
round of speculation 10 days ago with an 
interview on French television inwhich 
he said he ' would ponder running again 
after a European Union summit meeting 
on reform in June. 

Many in his party were dismayed-that 
he appeared in the interview to have 
introduced a new note of uncertainty at a 
time when the government was under 
such pressure and badly in need of strong 
leadership. 

A wave of criticism from within the 
party at die way the reform projects were 
being conducted suggested to some that 
Mr. Kohl was losing a bit of his le- 
gendary grip over internal dissent, and 
that be might not be able to provide foe 
authority and new ideas required. 

Mr. Kohl, who has been in office for 
15 years, has spoken before of doing his 
“duty,” most recently in a weekend 
interview with the daily Frankfurter 
AUgerneine Zeitung. 

“I know my duty and 1 don’t need any 
remedial help on this,” he said, adding 
that he wiil make Ins decision known 
* ‘when I consider the time to be right.’' 

Party officials say Mr. Kohl is betting 
he can regain his public standing by 
forging on with reforms to Germany V 
creaking tax and pension systems. 

“The chancellor is dead set on push- 
ing through these ref onus,” one party 
official said. “Everything else is spec- 
ulation.” 

A showcase for the chancellor to an- . 
noimce his decision to nw again could be : 
foe party’s annual congress in October. 
By mat time unemployment — which 
leaped by a half million last month — 
might have receded a little, and foe re- - 
forms could have taken shape. . 


by Iran. Most of Syria’s 35,000 troop® in 

Lebanon are in the valley. '* 1 ■ . - " ; 

■ TheBejoatas been tog l^ljgti^whiakeis RefiMT 

trenusfe from Egypt, Bahnqn, SShdi ‘ ■ • • ... ...r 

Arabia. Kuwait SudaiuBoaiia and even 1© bmd Oiler to race OiargCS 
foe French Basque region, as well 'as ttnom 


■ ANKARA — Parliament voted, 327 to 
172, against sending Deputy Prime Min- 
ister Tansu Ciller to court in the first of 


It is because of Syria’s tolerance of two corruption-charge votes Tuesday. 


such activi ties that foe United States keeps 
the country on its terrorism list and re- 
stricts the export of seme goods to Syria. 


Sbe has been accu sed o f involvement 
in corruption at the TED AS electricity 
company. 


POLLS : Britain’s Opinion Mavens Vie to Restore Their Credibility After the Fiasco of ’92 


Continued from Page 1 

public will expect poll results to con- 
verge as we get closer to foe election 
since there is ultimately only one reality 
being measured here.” 

Crucially, the pollsters’ humiliation in 
1992 has cost them powerful support in 
the media. The mighty BBC has led the 
retreat. Its new skepticism is now en- 
shrined in a rewritten section of its of- 
ficial “guidelines" for news producers. 
"Do not use language,” the BBC's 
bosses warn, “which gives greater cred- 
ibility to the polls than they deserve: 


MORI Poll, one of Britain’s biggest 
pollsters, has other words for the BBC’s 
new approach; “I have written to them 
and asked why they are censoring opin- 
ion polls.” 

In the long run, the only hope for 
pollsters is to Figure out what went wrong 
in 1992 and to get it right this rime. By 
most accounts a problem that increas- 
ingly bedevils polling organizations 
around the world, the so-called spiral of 
science, gets much of the blame. 


supporters of the far right' National 
Front, only half of whom typically will 
admit their true feelings td pollsters. 


John Kennedy's actual total of 50.4 per- 
cent of foe ballots in the 1960 election 
grew to 55 percent in polls conducted a 


“In Britain at times it has been more year later, and to 70 percent by 1962. 


with which they hope to tweek foe un- 


The phrase describes the reluctance of decideds off the statistical fence. 


people who committed crimes or ran into polls ‘suggest’ but never ‘prove’ or even unpopular 
some other problems in North Korea, ‘show.’ ’ Topping news broadcasts In the 1 


some other problems in North Korea, 
and fled to avoid punishment. Others are 
believed to embellish their stories with 
coaching from South Korean authorities, 
who want them to make North Korea 


‘show.’ ” Topping news broadcasts 
with poll results is now also prohibited 
“It is part of learning from expe- 
rience," a BBC spokesman said 
But Robert Worcester, head of the 


voters, especially conservative voters, to 
own up to what might be regarded as 
unpopular voting intentions. 

In the U.S. presidential elections in 
November, experts say, the spiral con- 
tributed to an underestimation of the 
strength of Republican voting. In France, 
the phenomenon reaches its peak with 


popular to call yourself a serial killer than To accommodate such quirks nearly 

a Conservative.” Mr. Cowling said all’ of Britain's pollsters reave altered 
To overcome that reticence and to their methods. No longer employing foe 
plumbfoemysteriesqffoe20percentor same methodology, they have fanned 
so of voters who typically record their out in every direction imaginable. Some 
feelings as “undecided,” pollsters now have switched to telephone polling, 
probe deeper, using additional questions Some ignore the undecided voter en- 
with which they hope to tweek foe un- tirely. Others insist they can extrapolate 
decideds off foe statistical fence. foe undecideds' true sentiments. 

Some polling organizations simply For foe Conservatives, foe pollsters' 
ask the ‘ ‘don’t knows” how they voted suspect credibility may prove a blessing, 
the last time. The problem is that those allowing the party to transcend the 
retrospective queries fail to improve bleaker readings, 
withage.^ “It is just like the last election." said 

Voters’ selective editing of their a Conservative Party spokeswoman, 
memory banks has long frustrated poll- “The polls do not reflect what we are 
sters. In foe United States, for example, hearing on the street. ’ ’ 


Some polling organizations simply 
ask the “don’t knows” how they voted 
the la st time. The problem is that those 
retrospective queries fail to improve 
with age. 

Voters’ selective editing of their 
memory banks has long frustrated poll- 
sters. In foe United States, for example. 








PAGE 7 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


1 


ZAIRE: Rebels Scramble to Hold Ground 


Continued from Page 1 


sang. <, Moban^’BSysteInwi^faQscx)Il T ,, 

they bellowed before an audience of 
about 10,000 people. “Kabila is ahead 
and we are behind him.'* 

The induction ceremonies in Bukavu 
and here in Uvixa revealed (hat some 
recruits are greener than their new uni- 
forms. Some did not know where to go 
during formations. Lines zig-zagged. 
Timing was sometimes ragged 
Biaknmbu Minda said he had never 
used a gun before his three-month train- 
ing by fee rebels. But the Uvira resident 
said he joined the insurgency because “I 
was a trader, and fee old army would steal 

my goods. It made me very angry.” - 
Another Uvira recruit, Samungu 
■ Ba guma . 18, explained his reason for 
% joining the rebels: “I couldn’t smdy and 
I OTul&’t get any jobs. I believe in 
Kabila because he has a mind to mayp 
changes for our future.” 

Again and again, soldiers cited eco- 
nomic reasons for supporting Mr. Kab- 
ila. Official corruption and mismanage- 
ment shredded fee Zairian economy 
years ago, and the rebel l e ad er knows 
feat the alliance’s credibility rests on 
how quickly it can reverse fee profound 
poverty that blankets the country’s east- 
ern region. 

Four-digit inflation has afflic ted east- 
ern Zaire, like the rest of the nation, for 
several years. No government services 
are available. The few hospitals fear are 
open are without basic supplies and 
equipment. Decent roads are a cruel ru- 
mor. Jobs are scarce. 


The economy was further battered as 
die rebels smashed through eastern Zaire 
fro™ late October through December, 
sending many business people scurrying 
for safety in Kinshasa nr ip fld g hhonng 

countries. In recent weeks, some have 
returned. 

“We are looking at fee economy so 
that we can start ncnaal life again, ” Mr. 
Kabila said in Uvira last week. “We 
have to start something new so that die 

people can live in peace, without oor- 
^on, and live better than they did 


Cities such as Bukavu and Uvira de- 
pend heavily on impests and exports. 
The rebel alliance has tried to open those 
markets again in recent weeks, hut 
“there are. some governments feat mil 
not do business in these areas because 
they dunk-feat would m«m they are 
us as a government,” Mr. 


Nonetheless, in Bukavu, across from 
Rwanda’s southwest border, 80 kflome- 
ters north of Uvira, shops are again well- 
stocked. The picturesque city along 
glistening Lake Kivu is again exporting 
Coffee and tea. Inflation hag fatten; A 

sack of rice, $60 a few months ago, sells 
for $35. Exchange rates have stabilized. 

The rebel alliance, knowing the econ- 
omy died largely from government cor- 
ruption, also is hustfog to assemble new 
administrations in eastern Zaire. 

Economic progress in eastern Zaire 
could help Mr. Kabila solve his thorniest 
problem: convincing the rest of the 
country that it should take his movement 
seriously. 


NATO: Albright Wants to Speed Up Talks 


Continued from Page 1 

Bosnia, where American and Russian 
peacekeepers are working side-by-side 
to deter an renewed outbreak of the 
worst fighting in Europe mn». World 
WarlL 

“Russia will have a voice, but Russia 
will not have a veto.” Mrs. Albright told 
journalists. “We will try as much as 
possible to act with Russia, but when we 
cannot, we will act as an alliance.” 

Mrs. Albright will go to Moscow on 

CIGARS: 

A Lure From Cuba 

Continued from Page 1 

visiting American. Those persons would 
not be allowed to buy any Cuban goods 
wife UJS. currency, a Treasury Depart- 
menr spokesman said last night Butthey 
could smoke all the cigars they wanted 
until they returned. 

Cuban cigars are part of a growing 
black market industry in the United 
States, with about 5 million sold illegally 
in die country last year, some experts 
say. The Cohiba is one of 30 brands 
exported by Cuba. Of 70 million cigars 
produced in Cuba annually, only about 3 
million are Cohibas. 

Named after an Indian word for to- 
bacco, Cohibas received Castro’s sanc- 
tioning shortly after the Communist re- 
volution of the late 1950s. Castro, 
himself, bas given up smoking. 


German Soldiers Try 
To Defend Ex-Foes 

Reuters 

BONN — Germany’s soldiers 
asked Bonn on Tuesday to give res- 
idence rights to about 600 of their 
former Cold War foes, deserters 
from the former Soviet Army in 
East Germany facing imminent re- 
patriation and probable jail terms. 

' ‘The deportation of these young 
soldiers would be a blow to human 
rights, because at home in today’s 
Commonwealth of Independent 
States they would face incompar- 
ably high punishment and. perse- 
cution,” fee chairman of fee Ger- 
man Army Association, Colonel 
Bernhard Gertz, said in a state- 
ment 

Russian law prescribes a sentence 
of up to 10 years for desertion. 


Wednesday evening in thelatesr stage of 
the American rampai gn to overcome 
Russian objections to NATO expansion. 
Aides said feather stopover in Brussels 
was designed in large measure to put an 
end to Russian attempts to exploit dif- 
ferences among NATO members over 
the enlargement of fee alliance. 

The proposals for changes in fee 
Treaty on Conventional Forces are in- 
tended to meet Russian co mplaints feat 
the treaty fails to take into consideration 
huge geostrategic changes in Europe 
caused by fee collapse of the Soviet-lied 
Warsaw Pact- 

According to Western figures, NATO 
now enjoys a two-fold to three-fold mil- 
itary superiority over Russia in many 
categories of conventional weapons, in- 
cluding tanks, armored personnel car- 
riers, and artillery pieces. 

Under the new proposal, the old 
concept of bloc-to-Woc and zonal limits 
will be replaced by country-to-countiy 
limits. The United States will also agree 
to makp. a unilateral reduction in certain 
categories of stored equipment, such as 
tanks, in order to reduce the disparity 
between NATO and Russia.. 

Agree m ent was reached in principle 
on fee NATO proposal at an overnight 
session in Brussels of fee alliance’s 
high-level task force, bat a formal an- 
nouncemenl was ddayed by 48 hours to 
allow diplomats to repost back to their 
governments. 

The proposal does rot make any men- 
tion of n um erical limits for different 
categories of weapons, which will be 
subject to negotiation at fee conven- 
tional aims talks m Vienna. 



Cwraittr DirfWRrvfcn 


The leader of the anti -Mobutu rebels, Laurent Kabila, chatting animatedly with newly trained troops. 


There already are signs this is hap- 
pening. In the past several weeks, op- 
position members of Parliament repre- 
senting various regions have visited Mr. 
gahfla . Eady fete month, the opposition 
led a successful one-day general strike in 
Kinshasa. But such support is tenuous at 
best in a country where 200 tribes and 


numerous political interests covet the 
power long held by Marshal Mobutu. 

To take his movement nationwide, 
Mr. Kabila must first persuade Zairians 
fear his rebellion is not being run by 
Rwanda and Uganda. Both countries, 
and Burundi to a lessor extent, have 
helped the rebels. The three deny being 


BRIEFLY 


involved but Rwandan soldiers have 
been seen ai work in eastern Zaire along- 
side fellow Tutsi in the alliance. 

“There are a lot of people who feel 
like Zaire has been invaded.” said one 
international aid worker in Bukavu. 
“They feel like they've been colon- 
ized.” 


Yeltsin Meets Arafat in Kremlin 

MOSCOW — A visibly stronger President Boris Yeltsin 
of Russia discussed peace efforts in fee Middle East with the 
Palestinian leader, Yasser Arafat, on Tuesday. 

It was fee first time since Mr. Yeltsin underwent heart 
surgery in November that be has met a foreign leader in the 
KranHn, rather than atacotmtiy residence. SaaUng broadly and 
moviqg more easOy than in recent weeks, Mr. Yetein qjpeared 
to be growing stronger after his bout wife pneumonia 

“Reaching a comprehensive and fair peaceful settlement 
in the Middle East remains one of the priority tasks of 
Russian foreign policy,” the presidential press service 
quoted Mr. Yeltsin as saying. 

Speaking to reporters after the meeting, Mr. Arafat 
described itas “warm and friendly” and said it “even went 
bey raid the protocol” He also said he had invited Mr. 
Yeltsin to talus part in celebrations in Bethlehem to mark the 
2,000th anniversary of Christianity. Mr. Arafat also met 
wife Foreign Minister Yevgeni Primakov and Gennadi 
Seleznyov, speaker of the State Duma. (API 

Waving Cher Israeli Facility 

JERUSALEM — A secretive biological research facility 
that handles defense projects may pose a danger to people 
living nearby and should be moved, an Israeli lawmaker 
said Tuesday. 

“Life and death cannot be held hostage to one experiment 
gone wrong,” said Rafi, Elul, tread of Parliament’s Science 
and Technology Committee, which held a hearing on tire 
issue Tuesday . 

The research facility, the Nes Tsiona Institute, is in 
densely populated central Israel near Tel Aviv. 

Mr. Bui demanded that lawmakers be given access to the 
facility, saying. “It’s something secret, it is very closed.” 
He said he expected that a group of legislators would be 
permitted go tour Nes Tsiona next month. 

Mr. Elul said the director of the facility, Avigdor Shefer- 
man, had said at tire committee hearing Tuesday fear tire 


center did some work for fee Defense Ministry, but that he 
had not revealed details. Dr. Sheferman said the facility was 
not a danger to people living nearby. 

The facility was established in 1952, when only a few 
families lived nearby in relative isolation. But as the com- 
munity and the country have grown, Nes Tsiona has become 
part of the Tel Aviv metropolitan area. (AP) 

Poor Farmers March in Brasil 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Thousands of poor farmers across 
Brazil started a march feat will converge on the capital in 
two months to demand speedy land reform and a stop to the 
violent repression of protests. 

Organizers expect more than 5,000 members of tire 
Movement of the Landless to converge on Brasilia on April 
17, the first anniversary of the killings — allegedly by 
military police — of 19 fanners who had occupied a private 
ranch in Para state. 

The protesters are demanding quick implementation by 
the government of its promised land reforms, and an in- 
vestigation into who carried out the April 19 massacre and 
other unsolved crimes against Brazil ’s poor. (AFP) 

Colombians Reach Labor Pact 

BOGOTA — Union leaders and government ministers in 
Colombia reached an agreement Tuesday to end fee na- 
tion's largest public sector strike in 20 years. 

The accord, hammered out in talks thai lasted 30 hours, 
granted a pay increase of as much as 20 percent to state 
workers. It also will establish a panel to analyze the gov- 
ernment’s privatization plans on a sector-by-sector bans. 

Labor leaders hailed the deal as “justice and dignity 1 ” for 
fee estimated 800,000 workers who took part in tire week- 
long strike. They ordered it to end immediately. 

Interior Minister Horatio Serpa described the strike as a 
test for Colombian democracy, and said fee agreement with 
the unions would not knock tire government's economic 
policy off course. (Reuters) 


Zaire Bombs 
Rebel Towns 
For 2d Day 

Throngs Flee Bukavu 
As 21 More Are Killed 


CtmfaedlpOtrSl&FnmDUpiMu 

KINSHASA, Zaire — Zaire rained 
more bombs Tuesday on rebel-lreld 
towns, putting thousands of panic- 
stricken residents to flight, officials and 
aid workers said. 

A Defense Ministry official in Kin- 
shasa said government planes bombed 
the eastern towns of Bukavu, Shabunda 
and Walikale, continuing attacks begun 
Monday. 

“Bombardments resumed this morn- 
ing in all the three towns,” the official 
said. “We don't have any assessment 
yet, but we know (hat all the targets were 
hit.” 

Marcel van Soest of Doctors Without 
Borders, speaking in the eastern rebel 
headquarters city of Gama, said: “There 
is a continuous flow of movement from 
Bukavu. It does not exceed perhaps 20 
percent of the population but it is in tire 
thousands.” 

“People in panic are fleeing in all 
directions,” said an aid worker near 
Bukavu. 

Aid workers keeping track of bodies 
pulled from rubble put the latest deaih 
toll at 21. with 37 people wounded. 

Diplomats and military experts said 
they doubted the air strikes would 
change tire tide of war. 

“From a strategic point of view I’m 
not sure that it’s changed anything, not 
tactically, although it would have caused 
a bit of panic,” said Paul Beaver, 
spokesman for Jane’s Defense Weekly. 

era say Present Mobutu Sese Seko, ail- 
ing with prostate cancer, is coming under 
increased pressure from his own party ro 
open talks with Laurent Kabila, the rebel 
leader, but has refused to proceed. 

The intensifying air war is fee first 
tangible move in a faltering government 
counteroffensive to retake territory from 
rebels waging a f oar-month campaign in 
eastern Zaire. 

The special UN envoy charged with 
ending fee war, Mohammed Sahnoun. 
called for urgent steps to defuse the 
violence and avert a wider conflict. 

“That implies tire withdrawal of all 
foreign forces from east Zaire, including 
mercenaries,” Mr. Sahnoun said after 
talks Wife Zairian officials. 

European mercenaries, notably Serbs, 
are helping Zaire's bedraggled army to 
retake the initiative in the war after a 
string of losses at the hands of highly 
motivated rebels. 

Marshal Mobutu hired the mercen- 
aries and acquired Russian-made fighter 
jets and helicopter gunships after ac- 
cusing the armies of Rwanda, Uganda 
and Burundi of joining the rebels. All 
three neighbors denied tins. 

The UN high commissioner for 
refugees, Sadako Ogata, said Tuesday 
that fee expanding war was threatening 
humanitarian work, and she called for an 
end to the air raids. (Reuters, AP) 


STARR: What Do the Independent Counsel’s Plans to Step Down Mean for the Whitewater Investigation? 


Continued from Page I 

been resolved,’ or even that we’re at tire 
endgame of the investigation," said a 
close adviser to Mr. Starr. 

Mr. Starr, reached as be disembarked 
from a plane at the Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas, airport, where Ire flew Monday even- 
ing from Washington, coafirmed be had 
accepted fee pmperdme job and played 
down the significance ofhis departure on 
tire investigations he had overseen. 

He said his job for now remained that 
of the Whitewater independent coimsel 
and that his investigation was “very 
much ongoing.”. 

Implying feat others stood ready to 
continue tire, weak, he said, “One of my 
tasks has been to gather together a very 
accomplished team of prosecutors and 
investigators, and we have done that.’ ’ 

He added that the precise date of his 
departure had yet to be determined. The 


only finn decision he has made is feat he 
will begin bis new duties Aug. 1. 

4 ‘I would read nothing into this except 
it is an extraordinary opportunity for 
me,” Mr. Starr said. ‘ ‘That it came when 
it did is merely a happy coincidence, and 
I had no control over tire timing. What 
we are trying to do is conclude this as 
promptly as possible but consistent with 
a very thorough investigation, which at 
this point is very active. ' 

As for a successor, he said that would 
be up to the special division of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Appeals Court, which 
appointed Mr. Starr. 

As independent counsel since August 
1994, Mr. Starr has continued his jarivate 
law practice, and there was nothing in 
the announcement Monday that said he 
would be stepping aside as the chief 
Whitewater prosecutor. 

But officials at Feoperdi n e and cm tire 
independent counsel’s staff said the an- 


nouncement meant that Mr. Starr would 
resign as the Whitewater independent 
counsel when he took his new job. 

“Aug. I is the date of his arrival at 
Pepperdine, and be has indicated to us 
that when he arrives, he will leave be- 
hind his other responsibilities,” said 
Steven Lemley, the provost of Pep- 
perdine, in Malibu, California. 

Aides said there was plenty of time for 
the prosecutor to reach decisions about 
whether to bring further charges. 

“The investigation is proceeding with 
no interruption full steam ahead.” said a 
statement released Monday afternoon 
under Mr. Starr’s name from his office in 
Little Rock. 

Lanny Davis, a White House special 
counsel and David Kendall, the Clin- 
tons' personal lawyer, declined to com- 
ment on tire development 

[The White House press secretary. 
Michael McCrary, expressed surprise. 


The Associated Press reported. “No 
clue what it means and no comment” be 
said Monday.] 

But Clinton aides appeared overjoyed 
by the news Monday, which they saw as 
evidence that the investigation would be 
conducted soon without any charges 
against the president or Mrs. Clinton. 

“There are a lot of smiles around here 
today,” an aide said. 

Lawyers, prosecutors and others who 
have been closely following the inves- 
tigation said that it was impossible to 
know what Mr. Starr’s decision really 
meant. 

They said some prosecutors had 
resigned before the end of an investi- 
gation because they saw it had no future. 
Others had left their office after an im- 
portant indictment had been handed up. 
but before a trial had begun. Still others 
had left for purely private reasons. 

4 ’This all makes great fodder for wild 


speculation,” said Michael Chertoff, a 
former U.S. attorney in New Jersey who 
was the Republican chief counsel of tire 
Senate Whitewater committee. “People 
tend to make these decisions for personal 
reasons that we just can’t know. Anyone 
who says they know what this means is 
just reading the tea leaves.” 

The Whitewater independent counsel's 
office may likely continue to have work 
after Mr. Starr leaves. The framer gov- 
ernor of Arkansas. Jim Guy Tucker, and 
two associates are scheduled to be tried in 
September on charges of tax evasion. 

On Aug. 5, 1994, Mr. Starr was ap- 
pointed by a special federal court to re- 
place Robot Fiske Jr. as the independent 
counsel. Mr. Starr’s investigation, which 
began as a look at the Clintons' role in the 
Whitewater land venture and fee cir- 
cumstances surrounding tire suicide of 
the White House deputy counsel Vincent 
Foster Jr., has gradually expanded. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERAID TRIBUNE, SATUKDAT-SBKDAE, FEBM1ABY1-2, 1997 




PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 

EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Markets Too Free 


Britain and New Zealand Are Showing the Way 


When asked why the Albanian gov- 
ernment had not stepped in to end 
recent pyramid schemes before they 
swindled Albanians out of hundreds of 
millions of dollars. President Sali Ber- 
isha said his inaction was a sign of the 
government's commitment to the free 
market. Even assuming that ideology, 
not corruption, explains his govern' 
merit’s failure, his view is disturbing. 
Such a misreading of capitalism has 
caused widespread misery in former 
communist countries, which are still 
learning that the free market works 
best when not completely free. 

The United States learned this only 
after decades of scandals and crashes. 
The first federal regulations came only 
after the stock market crash of 1929. 
The same thing is happening now in 
most of Eastern Europe and the former 
Soviet bloc. Albania's wrenching ex- 
periences, which have sparked protests 
that now threaten to bring down Mr. 
Berisha’s government, followed foe 
collapse of similar Poozi schemes in 
Russia. Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia. 

Russia's experience was typical. In 
1994 a gigantic pyramid scheme called 
MMM took $ 1 billion from the Russian 
people before it was finally closed 
down by the tax police, foe only agency 
with the legal powers to do so. After its 
collapse. Russia began ro set up the 
Federal Commission for foe Securities 
Market. That agency currently em- 
ploys only 100 people, but it is growing 
and would probably be able to prevent 
a similar scheme. Regulators, however, 
warn that some Russian banks and 
private pension funds, which are not 
covered by foe securities commission, 
are in danger of collapse. 

People who have spent their lives 
under co mmunism are particularly sus- 
ceptible to such schemes. Anyone who 
idealized capitalism from a distance for 


decades tends not to be wary of swind- 
lers promising interest rales of 30 per- 
cent a month without explaining how 
such profits are possible. Many people 
watch in anger as those who thrived 

under communism now get rich through 

shady deals. The pyramid scams seem 
like equalizers, opportunities for or- 
dinary citizens to get something, too. 
Few people living on $20 a month 
woulonot jump at the chance. 

Poland, which has suffered no major 
scandals, was the only newly capitalist 
country that started out with regula- 
tions on investment offerings. It could 
do so because its economy had been 
less deformed by communism than 
others and it did not need to restructure 
by essentially starting from scratch and 
letting anyone bid for investment. 

Other nations were more stunted. 
Some leaders assumed that capitalism 
was simply the opposite of commun- 
ism. They knew that ovenegulation can 
stifle die economy but did not know 
about foe dangers of underregulation. 
Many of the countries still have little 
adminis trative law to help regulators 
do their jobs. Citizens are accustomed 
to a system in which the law is ignored 
and foe powerful are free to make deals 
with their friends, habits that also flour- 
ish under unfettered capitalism. 

It is urgent for governments to do 
everything they can to punish fraud 
and end the widespread practice of 
ignoring mounting problems. But true 
protection for investors mil probably 
have to wait for more modem eco- 
nomies. The most important regulation 
comes from foe market itself. Compa- 
nies and brokers that want long-term 
business need to behave themselves. 
So far, few companies in the get-rich- 
quick c lima te of Eastern Europe are 
worrying about their reputation. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Yes, Global Warming 


We now know that the old saying 
attributed to Mark Twain, “We all 
grumble about foe weather but nothing 
is done about it," is not quite true. By 
virtue of the coal we bum and the 
gasoline we use and in a thousand other 
ways, we all have a great effect on foe 
weather. The earth has grown warmer 
by about two centigrade degrees, on 
average, during foe last century, and 
scientists believe that foe process is 
accelerating. If nothing is done to slow 
global wanning, foe consequences in 
foe next century are likely to be dire. 
Much turns on decisions that foe U.S. 
government must make this year. 

After years of debate, few now dis- 
pute foal foe burning of fossil fuels 
releases gases into foe atmosphere 
which then trap more of the sun’s 
warmth than the planet would oth- 
erwise retain. The effects of this are 
more complex than foe term “global 
warming" suggests. Some pans of the 
earth are likely to become colder, oth- 
ers drier; monsoon and hurricane paths 
may shift; storms may become more 
extreme; sea levels will rise. Many 
small islands and low-lying coastal 
areas are at risk. Relatively small tem- 
perature changes could have a dra- 
matic impact on agriculture and even 
on the spread of disease. 

At the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de 
Janeiro, tire United States — which 
produces something like one-quarter 
of the world's greenhouse gas emis- 
sions — vowed to reduce them to 1990 
levels by foe year 2000. It seemed a 
modest goal, but it won't be met. So 


last year the administration accepted, 
in principle, the notion of binding tar- 
gets. Now nations are negotiating those 
targets — -amounts and dates — hoping 
to reach agreement at yet another con- 
ference, in Kyoto in December. 

Opponents of meaningful action, led 
by parts of the energy and utilities in- 
dustries, have shifted their strategy 
from attacking foe scientists to warning 
of dire economic consequences. But 
this month more than 2,000 economists 
signed a statement challenging the in- 
dustry claims. The broad array of eco- 
nomists. led by Nobel laureates Ken- 
neth J. Arrow and Robert M. Solow, 
said that measures to reduce greenhouse 
gas emissions need not harm the eco- 
nomy and “may in fact improve U.S. 
productivity in die longer ran. " That is 
because there are many innovative and 
energy-efficient technologies just 
awaiting the right financial incentives 
to enter the market. In many such fields, 
U.S. industry leads the way. 

The key, then, is for foe United States 
to set a goal that is not pushed off to 
some distant dare like 2020 or beyond. 
A near-term date would send the signal 
that industry needs to begin seriously 
investing in more efficient technolo- 
gies. and the commercialization of such 
technologies would offer an alternative 
path for development to giants like 
China and India. Their economies are 
sure to grow in coming decades; and if 
they follow the U.S. path to prosperity, 
we will all be doing more than just 
grumbling about the weather. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Hot Sauces Are Hot 

Hot, hot, hot. America is sizzling 
with a new dining addiction. Sauces, 
relishes — anything laced with hot 
chili peppers. The alkaloid capsaicin, 
which accounts for the heat m chili 
peppers (there are more than 200 vari- 
eties). has Americans breathing, and 
inhaling, fire. 

Ah- foe changing American palate. 
Dousing hot and spicy condiments on 
tepid foods of European origin was 
once confined to foe Southwest and 
Louisiana (from which hails the oldest 
— 1 868 — and best-known red pepper 
sauce. Tabasco). Now high-spice con- 
diments are flocking in from Mexico, 
the Caribbean, Thailand. Vietnam and 
India in a sort of global gasp attack. 

Beware the simple phrase “ethnic 
cuisine." for while spice is nice both 
on the palate and among the popu- 
lation, some varieties can be downright 
hostile. The prime example is Mexican 


salsa. In 1991, salsa sales surpassed 
catsup in the United States. 

Now there are about 450 hot sauce 
labels in American markets and res- 
taurants. Among them is foe fiery red 
Tuong Ot brand "sriracha" relish, a 
traditional Southeast Asian sauce 
named after a seaside Thai town. 
Tuong Ot claims fans among the in- 
mates at the California men's prison at 
San Luis Obispo. 

Even A-l Steak Sauce and the ven- 
erable Tabasco are offering spicier ver- 
sions to keep up with the dramatic shift 
in American taste toward hot-hot in foe 
past two decades. 

There are spice specialty stores, 
catalogues and magazines. Hot and 
spicy food shows are burning a path 
across the country. This bastion of 
meat and potatoes and pumpkin pie is 

under assault. Pass the sriracha, please, 
and maybe a couple of those heartburn 
pills. Temperature rising. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


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W ASHINGTON — Pick up a new 
book by David Osborne and Peter 
Plastrik, “Banishing Bureaucracy," 
and two startling messages strike you. 

‘ The first is that foe United States is 
not foe world leader of government 
reinventiori- Britain and New Zealand, 
with their faster acting parliamentary 
systems, are putting American efforts 
ro shame, starring in performance gains 
andpublic satisfaction. 

The second message is that world- 
class government reinvention requires a 
radical divorce between the two parts of 
government the top levels of executive 
departments that set policy, and foe 
agencies that actually deliver services. 

In a colorful distinction between 
steering and rowing, Mr. Osborne 
made a s imilar point in a 1992 book 
with Ted Gaebler, “Reinventing Gov- 
ernment." But ‘ ‘ Banishing Bureaucra- 
cy” (co-author Plastrik is former guid- 
ing light behind Michigan's economic 
development efforts) goes further. 

The basic setup of government (foe 
equivalent of its DNA) has to be re- 
engineered. In a fast moving, globally 
competitive information age, organ- 
isms that do not readapt face the fate of 
the dinosaurs. Periodic bousecleaning 
and reorganization won't do. Govern- 
ment has to learn Co be entrepreneurial, 
competitive and focused on improve- 
ment all the time, not just sometimes. 
Otherwise bureaucracy will smother 
reform and drag down economies. 


By Neal Peirce 

Heroes of foe British success, which 
has culminated in a Citizen's Charter 
for responsive government, are the 
Tory Prime Ministers Margaret 
Thatcher and John Major. The New 

Tfwlanri reform, which tffin inatcri aTS- 

y ear-old civil service system, revoking 
government workers’ life tenure and 
curbing collective bargaining, was au- 
thored by a Labor government. 

Mrs. Thatcher, elected in 1979 at a 
time of rising inflation and declining 
productivity, first launched a classic 

A new standard of 
government excellence 
has clearly been bom. 

efficiency cam paign to rout out waste 
in government. She also took on trade 
unions and began privatizing some 40 
big state-owned enterprises. 

But after seven years, despite re- 
peated efficiency studies and “jamming 
the bureaucracy,” Mrs. Thatcher had 
failed to get more performance from the 
core civil service of 600X100 employ- 
ees. The next step was a first-ever sur- 
vey of foe bureaucrats to see what they 
thought. Mrs. Thatcher learned that 
working-level managers were so tied in 


red tapejacking real powers, that they 
could not manage effectively. 

The answer, said her advisers: Un- 
couple policy-making (steering) and 
administration (rowing). Put foe service 
delivery agencies on performance con- 
tracts, give than broad discretion oyer 
budget and personnel. Do a competitive 
public-private search for executives, 
pay fo**" market salaries, deny lifetime 
tenure, make 20 percent of foeir pay 
dependent on perfor m ance. 

Mrs. Thatcher agreed, and foe for- 
mula worked. At latesi count nearly 75. 
percent of the traditional civil service 
has left its old status and been em- 
ployed by 126 new quasi-govemmental 
service agencies. Every five years, each 
agency is put on trial for its life with 
decisions made on its future status 
(from abolition to competitive con- 
tracting ro status quo). 

Finally, the Tories got concerned 
about how the public feh. John Major 
started bis favorite reform, foe Citizen’s 
Charter. AU agencies must agree, with 
customer input,to service standard*. Be-, 
ample: Trams should arrive within TO 
minates of foe scheduled time, ot British . 
Rail will give you a discount on your 
next commuter pass. When you tele- 
phone a job center, your calls should be 

answered in 30 seconds. 

The British government started pub- 
lishing comparative performance tab- 
les on local government services, 
schools and health services. Public 


agencies scoring high — . on such eri- 
teria as customer satisfaction and in- 
dependent valuation of services are 
allowed the coveted new “Charter 
Mark” designation, for public-sector 
quality. But they, can keep it only three 
years antes they shaw evidence of 
continued performance improvement 
The cumulative results., have been 
lowered costs, slimmed payrolls, ma- 
terially improved performance. 

New Zealand’s Labor government 

criming to -power in 1987, not only 
auctioned off billions of dollars’ worth 
of publicly owned busi n esses bat ex- 
posed other public agencies to marker 
competition, streamlining and breaking 
up the country's public bureaucracies. 

New Zealand, took top policy units, 
separated them from cabinet mmisters. 
put them under contract and made them 
accountable for performance. - 
The British and New Zealaad're- 
fonns, and more limited Australian and 
Canadian efforts, are works in pro- 
gress. The same is true of U.S. ini- 
tiatives that Mr. Osborne and Mr. 
Plastrik cite — among them Indiana- 
polis's competitive bidding for ser- 
vices, the Oregon “benchmarks ! *■ pro- 
cess and school choice in Minnesota. 

A new standard of governmental ex- 
cellence, based neither on pampering 
nor on abusing public servants, but 
rather on a new competitive public ser- 
vice DNA, has dearly been bora. 

Washington Poet Writers Croup. 


Why the Transformed NATO Deserves to Survive and Enlarge 


W ASHINGTON — U.S. 

Secretary of State Mad- 
eleine Albright and Russian 
Foreign Minister Yevgeni Pri- 
makov are scheduled to meet in 
Moscow this Thursday to dis- 
cuss ways to strengthen ties be- 
tween NATO and Russia — de- 
spite Russian objections to the 
alliance’s decision to bring in 
new members. The chances of 
progress will be greater if the 
Russians understand not just; 
the inevitability of enlargement 
but the reasons for it 
The decision to expand foe 
alliance began with a question. 
After foe breakup of me Soviet 
Union and foe dissolution of the 
Warsaw Pact, should there re- 
main, on the landscape of 
Europe, a military alliance, or 
should NATO retire voluntarily 
to foe ash hem of history? 

When President Bill Clinton 
begat his first term in 1993, he 
concluded that an alliance was 
still necessary because there 
would continue ro be threats to 
the security of the member states 
and to Europe as a whole. 

He was concerned about sev- 
eral contingencies. One was re- 
gional conflict or instability, 
stemming from ethnic and other 
tensions arising inside or be- 
tween European states. Another 
was an external threat from the 
south or from the east Such 
possibilities may seem remote 
but they are not unthinkable , 
especially in an' era when mis- 
sile technology and weapons of 
mass destruction are spreading. 

Another question arose: Is 
NATO too much identified with 
foe Cold War to cope with new 
challenges and to take advantage 
of new opportunities? Should a 
new alliance be created? 


By Strobe Talbott 

The writer is the US. deputy secretary of state. 


The president decided to ad- 
apt foe existing alliance for 
three reasons. Fust, it is easier 
and cheaper ro build on what 
already exists than to start from 
scratch. Second, NATO must 
remain foe anchor of American 
commitment to foe defense of 
Europe. Third, NATO is a 
proven force for peaceful in- 
tegration and democratic devel- 
opment on the continent. 

NATO has never been solely 
a military instrument; it has al- 
ways served a political function 


A decision not to 
enlarge would 
send an unhelpful 
message. 


as welL After World War II foe 
alliance helped Italy and Ger- 
many become part of the trans- 
Allan tic community. It pro- 
moted the consolidation of ci- 
vilian-led democracy in Spain. 
It spurred reconciliation be- 
tween France and Germany, 
laying foe ground for foe Euro- 
pean Union. Its unified com- 
mand removed foe incentive for 
military competition among 
West European powers. It 
helped keep the peace between 
Greece and Turkey. 

In the past, particularly in the 
19th century, alliances not only 
served to wage or deter war bat 
also helped manage relations 
among their member states. In- 
sofar as NATO follows in this 


tradition, foe end of the Cold 
War has actually buttressed its 
rationale — and should make it 
easier for those who earlier re- 
garded foe alliance as a nec- 
essary but temporary evil to see 
it instead as a lasting good. 

While retaining its military 
capacity and its core identity as 
a defense treaty, NATO can 
concentrate increasingly on its 
political function. Indeed, it can 
extend that mission to the 
former member states of the 
Warsaw Pact. 

That consideration was in foe 
president's mind when he faced 
foe most difficult question: 
whether to enlarge the alliance. 
There were only two possible 
answers: yes or no. “Maybe,” 
or “later but not now,” would 
amount to “no,” or at least 
would be taken that way by the 
Central Europeans. 

There were several reasons 
why tiie answer had to be 
“yes.” Part of NATO's post- 
Cold War mission is to open its 
doors to the new democracies 
that have regained their sov- 
ereignty. They aspire and de- 
serve to be part of the trans- 
Aliantic community. All of 
Europe will be safer and more 
prosperous if these post-com- 
munist lands continue to evolve 
toward civil society, market 
economics and harmonious re- 
lations with their neighbors. 

The very prospect of NATO 
membership encourages those 
trends. In pursuit of their goal to 
join NATO, a number of Cen- 
tral European states have 
already accelerated their intern- 


Red Lines on Netanyahu’s Map 


N EW YORK — Prime 
Minister Benjamin Net- 
anyahu spread out Israel's 
“red line* map before Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton at the White 
House last week. It showed 
territory he said Israel would 
insist on holding as essential 
to the defense of the country. 

Even beyond the demar- 
cation lines, foe map is im- 
portant as a reflection of ques- 
tions and risks that will remain 
with Israel after any peace 
treaty is signed. Will the Pal- 
estinian government be even 
more hostile after the Israeli 
withdrawal? What about other 
neighbors that have started 
wars with Israel — Jordan, 
Egypt, Syria? 

The defeated Labor govern- 
ment never talked much about 
those questions, nor does Mr. 
Netanyahu publicly now — in 
itself a risky policy. But foe 
map is his plan to keep certain 
military positions, in case the 
answers turn out desperately 
wrong far Israel. 

In the eastern part of the 
West Bank, I am informed, foe 
map shows Israel in control of 
tiie largely unpopulated but 
strategically critical territory 
along the Jordan River, ro 
meet an attack launched from 
Jordan. 

In the west, the map has a 
thin buffer strip to give Tel 
Aviv and Haifa a sliver more 
' time to meet attack from Arab 
Palestine a few miles away. 
The plan calls for Israeli con- 
trol of militar y roads running 
from near Tel Aviv to the 
Iordan River. 

West Bank land would be 
divided about half and half 
between Israeli and Palestin- 
ian controL Towns, cities and 
about 99 percent of the pop- 


By A.M. Rosenthal 


illation would be under Pal- 
estinian role. 

The questions and risks im- 
plicit in the map are: 

After a treaty, with whom 
will Israel be dealing to en- 
force safeguards against ter- 
rorism — foe Yasser Arafat of 
the White House lawn or the 
Arafat of last September, who 
let his soldiers use automatic 
rifles against Israeli troops to 
m ake a psychological point? 
And when he is replaced, will 
it be with any of the groups 
pledged to the destruction of 
Israel even more fanatically 
than his own — say, Hamas? 

Will Jordan be ran by the 
present King Hussein, pleas- 
ant to Israel, or by the King 
Hussein who backed Saddam 
Hussein in the Gulf War, until 
Iraq lost? Or will anti-Israeli 
Palestinians, the great major- 
ity of Jordan’s population, 
turn Jordan into a warehouse 
and take-off point for armed 
action across Palestinian-run 
land to Israel? 

Will Syria be ran by Hafez 
Assad’s Israel-harers, or by 
successors eager to move 
again from hating to killing? 

In Egypt, how about the in- 
tellectuals shrieldngly anti -Is- 
rael, or Cairo newspapers that 
print stories about Israeli doc- 
tors injecting Palestinian chil- 
dren with AIDS? They give 
their answer already: Never 
peace with Israel. 

Failure of Israeli leaders or 
their friends to outline those 
risks publicly creates foe 
fantasy that Israel tenet taking 
much of a gamble fa- peace, 
when it is risking more than 
any other country has ever 


been called on to do. That leads 
to more pressure on Israel — 
crane on, get on with it. 

During foe Netanyahu visit, 
the United States suggested 
that in the first of three more 
Israeli withdrawals, set for 
March 7, Israel "redeploy” 
out of an additional 10 percent 
of the West Bank. That would 
give Palestinians complete or 
civilian control of about 30 
percent of the territory. 

That kind of speedup would 
amount to a withdrawal set- 
tlement before a political or 
'military settlement Mr. Net- 
anyahu was not charmed by 
that thought. 

Palestinian promises or acts 
of “reciprocity” are revers- 
ible. Mr. Arafat has so often 
promised to delete the dwuh 
warrant for Israel built into the 
Palestinian Charter, and col- 
lected so often, that a revision 
becomes nasty comedy, of 
little value even if carried out. 

Israeli actions — like 
pulling back borders by sur- 
rendering land, or giving the 
Palestinians the powers of 
statehood — are irreversible. 
So an “asymmetry” exists in 
the reciprocity that after 
Hebron was supposed ro be the 
basis for peace negotiations. 
Mr. Netanyahu, who had in- 
sisted on reciprocity, made the 
point candidly in New York. 

Making as secure a peace as 
possible will need more candor 
about risks and bow ro meet 
them, as pressure increases on 
Israel to come on, get on with 
iL The map shown at the White 
House was a good start — no 
pretense that after foe nego- 
tiations would come lasting 
peace, but, if carried out care- 
fully, a reasonable hope. 

The New York Times. 


al reforms and improved rela- 
tions with each otter. 

A decision not to enlarge 
NATO, thus freezing a post- 
ed War NATOin its Cold War 
configuration, would send an 
unwelcome and unhelpful mes- 
sage to foe Central Europeans, ft 
would imply that they are con- 
signed to a permanent buffo- 
zone between East and West. 

It would be the height of in- 
justice and irony — the ultimate 
in double jeopardy — if these 
countries were, in effect, pun- 
ished for foe next SO years be- 
cause foey had been, very much 
against foe will of their people, 
part of the Warsaw Pact for foe 
past 50. The resulting sense of 
isolation and vulnerability 
would be discouraging and po- 
tentially destabilizing. 

We must, of course, face 
squarely foe issue of Russia's 
opposition to NATO enlarge- 
ment But we should also re- 
cognize it fra what it is — an 
issue primarily of perception, of 
political sensitivities, not one of 
military reality. 

The new NATO is not a 
threat to Russia, any more than 
a democratic Russia is a threat 
to foe alliance. Enlargement has 
become a target of convenience 
for Russian fears and resent- 
ments rooted in uncertainties 
over Russia’s post-Soviet iden- 
tity and role in foe world. 

Many Russian reformers and 
democrats, along with some 
prominent Western experts, 
warn that enlargement will in- 
flame nationalistic. anti-West- 
ern and militaristic forces in 
Russia. This danger, while real, 
^ exaggerated and manageable. 
Alarmism about NATO has 
more resonance within the Rus- 
sian political elite than in the 
population at large. Polling in- 
dicates that the average Russian 
worries far more about domes- 
tic issues — salaries, pensions 
and crime. 

This is not to dismiss foe im- 
portance of perceptions as a 
factor in politics and diploma- 
cy. But those Russians who are 
currently lashing out against an 
anachronistic stereotype of 
NATO have it within then- 
power to bring perceptions 
more into line with reality. 

Instead of seeing enlarge- 
ment as a blow to Russian pnde 
and as a Western vote of no 
confidence in Russia's future, 
they should accept it as part of a 
larger process of evolution from 
which Russia itself can and 
should benefit 

After all, Russia, too, has an 
interest in a stable Central 
Europe. The Russian people 
came to grief twice in this cen- 


tury because of wars that ori- 
ginated in precisely that region. 

An important part of NA- 
TO’s opening to foe East is its 
willingness to. take account of 
Russia's legitimate political and 
security interests. Identifying 
common interests, common 
task s and ways to deepen and . 
broaden co^dence-omldihg 
between the alliance and Russia 
is a major goal not only of Sec- 
retary Albright’s visit to Mos- 
cow this week but of President 
Clinton's scheduled s ummit - 
meeting with President Boris 
Yeltsin in Helsinki next month. 

Cooperation between NATO , 
and Russia, of foe sort now un- 
der way in the former Yugo- 
slavia, provides a model for- 
dealing with future Bosnias. 
American forces in Europe, 
today do not spend their time 

Europe. Rather, foey 
train for peacekeeping opera- 
tions with NATO allies and oth- 
erpartnera.mcladmgscmetiines - 
with foe Russians themselves. 

Today, at NATO headauar- 
tezs in Brussels, there is a Rus- 
sian liaison. We have suggested . 
expanding these exchanges and 
including Russian officers at all 
the top levels of foe alliance 
command str u ct u re. Tins kind , 
of interaction with NATO can 
help foe Russian military ad- 
ding its difficulties in trying to 
modernize. 

Some have predicted that en- 
largement will increase the rok 
of nuclear weapons in European 
security. The opposite should- 
be true. 

With the end of the Cold 
War, foe alliance has already 
reduced foe number of nuclear - 
weapons in its arsenal by 90 
percent Moreover, if foe alli- 
ance were not to enlarge, the 
consequent danger of renewed 
nationalism and military rivalry 
in Central Europe would cany 
with it the potential fbrnuclear- 

N^VTO^has already changed, 1 
profoundly, beneficially and 
lastingly. An important part of 
the new mission of the new 
NATO is to wok with a new 
Russia in bringing about the 
transformation of Europe as a 
whole. 

The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publi- 
cation should be addressed 
“ Letters to the Editor” and 
contain the writer’s signature, 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be re- 
sponsible fir the return of un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: No Blockade cution comes under the Federal 
„ law concerning foe use of the 

PARIS — - For foe present, foe mails to defraud, which is 
idea of blo ckadin g Greece, strictly enforced. Many coloured 
which was suggested by foe people here still have confidence 

German Emperor, appears to in Garvey, saying thru the efforts 
have been abandoned. Great to discredit him are purely foe 
Britain does not oppose foe result of white prejudice, 
blockade, but would not take any 

1947: Palestine Terror 

Italy has not yet made known her JERUSALEM — Palestine’s 
intenfc ons, but it is thought that three-week holiday from terror 
she would testate very much, if ended tonight (Feb. 181 when a 
sie did not absolutely refuse her British Army track was blown 
co-operanon. up on the outskirts of Jerusalem, 

injuring four soldiers, while ex- 
1922: Garvey Indicted plosions cut foe mam railroad 
WNT>T , „ from Jaffa to Haifa. The 

NEW YORK ■ — Known as foe troubled country had hoped for 
“African King” and the weeks of peace. Some even be* 
Negro Moses, Marcus Gar- lieved that following Foreign 
vey was indicted on the charge Secretary Ernest Bevin’s de- 
of obtaining money from other cision to take the Palestine case 
Negroes under false pretences, to the United Nations there 
daurnng thaihe was purchasing would be no further clashes be- 
ships in which to transport them tween the two Jewish tenor or- 
t° and settle foem m/ The Re- gamzations, the Irgun and 
public of Africa. The prose- Stem groups, and the British- 



J 

1 V 


9 $\ 








r, H 


BVTERNATIONAl HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 


PAGE 9 


y 

• . t 

1 
",fe 
‘ h 


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4 a,, <l Enlap 


7 


)} 


OPINION/LETTERS 


1 


A PPfy Campaign Reform 
To the Republicans, Too 


By Fred Wertheimer 


W ^™°TON — Congres. 

▼ T Monal Republica ns say thay 
urc committed to uncovering the 
whole truth about campaign fi- 
nance practices in President Bill 
Climon s 1996 re-election effort. 
But Democrats are not the only 
ones whose fund-raising should 
be investigated. The coming in- 
quiry should examine Republican 
activities as well. 

This is not to question the im- 
portance of documenting the un- 
precedented. destructive and im- 

Tke other party also 
may have violated 
campaign finance 
and tax laws in last 
year's race. 


proper ways in which the Glimnn 
campaign and the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee raised and spent 
money. 

A crucial question is whether 
Democrats were selling access for 
nuge ‘‘soft money” contribu- 
tions. supposedly aimed at party- 
building. 

It is an issue that also ap pl ies to 
Republicans. Under the 
licans' "season ticket-hoi 
program, at least 75 corporations 
and individuals each reportedly 
gave $250,000 or more in soft 
money to the party in 1996. 
Whether such contributions were 
solicited in return fra: access to 
congressional Republicans needs 
to be investigated. 

Then there is the Republicans* 
postelection wanting to the Busi- 
ness Roundtable, a group of 200 
chief executive officers, to stop^ 
writing big checks to the Demo- 
crats. Haley Barbour, then die Re- 
publican Party chairman, re- 
portedly led an effort to let the 
businessmen know that they 
would be denied access to Re- 
publicans if they kept trying to 
have it both ways by contributing 
to both parties. 

Soft money poured into con- 
gressional races as well as into the 
presidential campaign. In October 
1996, die Republican National 
Committee tinned over some 
$4.6 million to Americans fen 
Tax Reform. : - 

That group, in turn, made 4 
million phone calls to voters and 


Sent OUt 19 millio n mailing* chal- 
lenging Democratic claims about 
Medicare cuts. But as a nonprofit, 
tax-exempt organization, Amer- 
icans for Tax Reform is not per- 
. nutted to engage in partisan activ- 
ities. Tins raises the question of 
whether the group violated cam- 
paign finance and tax laws and 
whether the Republican transfer 
of the money was proper. 

After all; the Republicans have 
been loudly protesting the pro- 
priety of ti>e AJPL-CIO’s $35 mil- 
lion television and radio adver- 
tising campaign aimed at 
defeating a number of House Re- 
publicans. The AFL-CIO main- 
tains that these ads could be le- 
gally financed with money from 
union dues because they were 
about issues, not candidates. But if 
the labor organization coordinated 
its activities with Democratic can- 
didates in the target districts, the 
money spent on the ads would be 
considered an illegal ccxnribulion. 
This should be investigated. 

Fred Thompson, the Tennes- 
see Republican who chairs the 
Senate committee conducting 
the investigation of campaign 
finance abuses, says he wants it 
to be fair and bipartisan. But 
already there have been partisan 
battles over how broad the inquiry 
should be and how much money 
should be spent oh it And Demo- 
cratic and Republican leaders 
have reportedly discussed a 
self-serving deal to exempt 
congressional rmwipaigns from 
the mvestigation. 

The real test’ of this Congress 
will be whether it adopts effective 
campaign finance reform. If it 
hlocks such reform, as Repub- 
lican leaders ke trying to do, Con- 
gress will be cynically ignoring - 
the voters and further wrecking 
America’s democratic system - 

The writer is president of 
Democracy 21. a public policy 
group. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 



Microcredit: A Weapon 
In Fighting Extremism 


By Alan Jolis 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed u Letters 
to the Editor'', and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


Switzerland’s War 

Regarding “ Auschwitz's Ghosts 
. Come to Call on Switzerland' 
(Opinion, Feb. 5) by Richard Co- 
. hen and “What Switzerland Most 
Needs to Open Are Its Moral Ac- 
counts" (Opinion. Feb. 6) by 
Thomas L. Friedman: 

Mr. Cohen’s article claims that 
Switzerland was, initially at least, 
“a country whose establishment 
was largely pro-fascist." This is a 
blatant untruth. I was raised in that 
“establishment” during the war 
years and can certify that it was 
almost unanimo usly anti-Nazi. 
This -was not mainly because of 
Germany's persecution of the 
Jews, that still mostly unkn own 
in its foil horror, but because of 
Swiss hostility to Germany's he- 
gemony over Europe and its sus- 
pected intention of annexing 
Swrtzeriand- 

As to Mr. Friedman's condem- 
nation of Swiss neutrality in the 
face of Nazism, it is totally be- 
sides the point. Neutrality does 
not apply to political parties and 
their ideologies, but to sovereign 
states. Swiss neutrality did not 
prevent Swiss public opinion and 
media from being virulently anti- 
Nazi. This was amply proven by 
the German government’s numer- 
ous protests against what it con- 
sidered tiie hostile bias of the 
Swiss media against Germany. 

One also tends to forget that the 
ASies’ hostility was (Greeted not 


primarily at Nazi ideology, to 
which before the war they bad 
raised little or no objection, but 
at Germany's hegemony over 
Europe. Furthermore, it is now 
known that the Allies suppressed 
intelligence received even before 
the end of the war about the Holo- 
caust, for reasons the morality of 
which they are left to explain. 

JEAN BOURGEOIS. 

Sotogrande, Spain. 

In suggesting that the Swiss 
build a Holocaust memorial in 
their country, Mr. Friedman has 
perhaps let his anger distort his 
objectivity. The truths of history 
must certainly be faced with hon- 
esty, but surely by all who have 
wroqged others. 

If it were thought appropriate 
fra: a Holocaust memorial to be 
built in Switzerland, it would be 
equally appropriate for many 
countries to build memorials to 
teach citizens of their forbears* 
unspeakable actions. 

ROYE SKINNER. 

Seewen, Switzerland. 

Any fair-mindedperson can ac- 
cept that it was difficult to refuse 
tiie likes of Adolf Hitler and his 
brutal war machine, but no one 
forced the Swiss banks to keep the 
deposits of Holocaust victims 
long after Hitler was just an ugly 
memory. For shame! 

SUSAN McCORMICK. 

Heidelberg, Germany. 


Son of Saddam 

Regarding “Saddam's Clan Is 
Reeling From Blows and Threats” 
(Feb. 11): 

I found the article about the 
"disruptions" in Saddam Hus- 
sein's family interesting. To say 
tiie least, it's very disturbing to be 
reminded that people such as his 
son Udai exist in this world and, 
worse, are able to act with relative 
impunity (in TJdai’s case, at least, 
until Dec. 12, 1996. when he was 
shot in Baghdad). 

I am writing, however, because 
I was struck by a line in the 
article. It said that "numerous 
Iraqi and foreign reports say 
Udai regularly snatched young 
women off the street, married or 
not, dragging them off to be 
raped antT beaten.” I have two 
observations: 

One, the sentence implies that, 
for some reason, it would be less 
shocking to snatch a young un- 
married wo man off the street to be 
raped and beaten than a young 
married woman (or perhaps it im- 
plies the reverse). 

As a young woman, now mar- 
ried, once unmarried, I find either 
of these implications offensive. 

Two. could it be possible that 
someone with Udai Hussein's 
mentality would care whether the 
women he snatched off the street 
were married or not? 

LAURA J. SNYDER. 

Vnoflay, France. 


P ARIS — The success of 
microcredit in combating 
poverty is finally being recog- 
nized. Early this month, Hillary 
Clinton opened the World Sum- 
mit on Microcredit in Washing- 
ton. The occasion highlighted the 
effectiveness of using tmy loans 
to help the most destitute people 
on earth pull themselves and their 
families out of poverty. But there 
is another, astonishing side of this 

MEANWHILE 

story: the political consequences of 
putting capitalism to work for the 
□ave-nots. Microcredit not only 
liberates the poorest of the poor 
from hunger, it liberates them, and 
us, from fanatical extremists. 

Microcredit was invented 20 
years ago in Bangladesh by Mo- 
hammed Yunus. Today, Professor 
Yunus's Grameen Bank and 
copycat organizations have 3.5 
milli on women borrowers; adding 
their dependents, that amounts to 
about 20 percent of Bangladesh's 
population. In the latest elections, 
held on June 12, 1996. these 
newly enfranchised flexed their 
muscle. The Islamic Society, the 
fundamentalist part}’ antagonistic 
to the West that wants to keep 
women at home, lost 14 of its 17 
seats in Parliament. 

Imm ediate ly after the vote, Mr. 
Yunus began getting angry phone 
calls from people blaming him for 
the results. But Mr. Yunus assured 
them that fundamentalists bad only 
themselves to blame. It was their 
supporters who burned down mi- 
crocredit bonks, attacked borrow- 
ers and condemned microcredit as 
im-lslamic because it helps women 
become self-employed. 

Every woman borrower I in- 
terviewed in Dhaka, Chittagong 
and Cox’s Bazaar had suffered 
enormously at the hands of fun- 
damentalists. Some were beaten; 
others were told they would be 
denied proper Islamic burial; still 
others that Grameen would sell 
them into slavery, feed them to 
tigers, take them out to sea and 
drown them, or tattoo their arms 
with a number and secretly turn 
them into Christians. 

Having braved physical and 
mental abuse — and used mi- 
crocredit to build decent housing, 
freshwater wells and sanitary toi- 
lets for their families — it’s not 
surprising that these women went 


to the polls and voted against the 
mullahs. 

The exact number of women 
who voted is not known, bur ob- 
servers across Bangladesh estim- 
ated that for the first time, more 
women voted than men. 

At a meeting of the Council of 
the Americas in New York, geo- 
strategists astonished by how mi- 
crocredit worked to combat fun- 
damentalism peppered Mr. Yunus 
with questions. He explained thar 
microcredit was not at war with 
anyone, certainly not with Islam; it 
avoids all use of force and relies on 
future borrowers to convince vil- 
lage patriarchs to invite banks in. 

Giving those whom society 
treats as less than human access to 
personal profit and self-esteem 
unlocks a static hierarchy. It al- 
lows social mobility. Suddenly, 
the old repressive, patriarchal 
ways become less relevant. 

Microcredit does what billions 
of dollars worth of AW ACS and 
Patriot missiles cannot. For de- 
cades. the West has tried to defeat 
fanatical extremists militarily; this 
has been bloody, costly and highly 
unsuccessful. But quietly, every 
day, the attraction of militant Islam 
is being blunted, at the ballot box 
and in people's hearts and minds, 
thanks to the economic develop- 
ment of the poor. 

We have known thar micro- 
credit helps solve a host of in- 
tractable, long-term social ills re- 
lated to poverty: In Norway's arc- 
tic circle, it is helping repopulate 
the Lofoten Islands. In Oklahoma, 
thanks to Chief Wilma Mankiller 
of the Cherokee Nation, micro- 
credit is helping reduce alcohol- 
ism. In Chicago, it is helping get 
unwed mothers off welfare. 

But we should not overlook 
microcredit’s political dividends. 
If the West is truly concerned 
about pariah stales exporting ter- 
rorism, it should get behind mi- 
crocredit and support it with more 
than just lip service. 

What is needed is patient start- 
up capital: 99 percent of the loans 
are repaid. After 20 years, 
Grameen is a commercially prof- 
itable bank. But more important, it 
saves its borrowers’ lives — and it 
can save ouis, too. 


The writer, a novelist, is writing 
a biography ofMohammed Yunus. 
He contributed this comment to 
the Herald Tribune. 


THE DESTINY 
OF NATHALIE X 
And Other Stories 

Bv William Boyd. 177 pages. 
$22. Knopf. 

Reviewed by Carolyn See 

I T’S indicative of William 
Boyd's confidence in his 
ability to turn clich6 to his own 
uses that the title story in this 
collection is about corny old 
Hollywood. “The Destiny of 
Nathalie X” features a large 
cast of stereotypical characters 
— venal producer, shark 
agent, child-woman actress, 
has-been writer — all ponti- 
ficating predictably and an- 
noyingly about "this town, 
this place." But Boyd cuts this 
deck of hackneyed cards with 
a wild one: His director here is 
an immensely absent-minded 
African layabout from the 
People’s Republic of Kiq 
named Aurelien No. 

Aurelien has already matte 
an avant-garde film, “The 
Destiny of Nathalie X," in 
Fans, in which a nice actress 
named Delphine got up, put 
on her makeup stark naked, 
went to a neighboring bar and 
got hugely drunk. With the 


awardmoney he has received 
from this dubious project, he 
and Delphine fly to Holly- 
wood, where they head un- 
erringly to the staid suburb of 
Westchesterandsetaboathil- 
ariously repeating the “Nath- 
alie” scenario- The stray is, 
then, a bizarre combination erf 
cltehdsso old they creak and a 
peculiar newness brought 
about by the crossing of cul- 
tures, the introduction of 


„ of these stories scan 
to be tins way. The characters 
— even the situations, with 
one woiKkafid exception — 
seem superficially ordinary, 
almost commonplace; lovers 
betray each other or go on un- 
successful dates, a man gets 
fired, a woman finds herself in 
an unexpectedly good job, 
young men 'compete over 
good-looking women. But 
shifts in time, space and es- 
pecially geography brighten 
t hese tales and ' make them 
new. Boyd’s people move 
through Loodon. Lisbon, Los 
Angeles, provincial Germany, 
the South of Ranee. The ten- 
sion between places serves as 
wirdike structure — a stylized 
yearning through distance. 


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In “Never Saw Brazil" a 

young Rn gHshmon named 

Wesley Brighr yearns for 
“BraaL** a place where the 
sun shines and. the mangoes 
are as big as rugby balls. He's 
mad for an esoteric brand of 
Brazilian music, the chor- 
inho, to the irritation of his 
family, friends and fianefe. 
Wesley doesn’t Klee his life or 
his name, and he takes com- 
fort in a Brazilian alter ego, 
his daydreamed hero Senator 
Dom Liceu • - Maxizntliano 
. Lobo, a totally cool dude 
-who’s a colonel when he's not 
a senator or a professor or a 
doctor or a guitar-playing 
genius who brings astonish- 
ing new depth to the chor- 
inho. This is waiter hfitty an- 
other way, hot Boyd's 
Brazilian hfe looks so good 
that Wesley's plight seems 
heartbrealringly dcw. 

And it could be argued that 
' ‘TTm Persistence of Vision'' 
is a homage to Katherine 
Mansfield’s “Bliss.*' The 
protagonist, deluded hus- 
band instead of deluded wife, 
experiences his married life 
as a series of exquisitely 
beautiful images that add up 
to an existence beautifully 
and judiciously lived: "A 
lone yacht on a silver bay. 
The immaculate dicing of a 
- garlic clove. The dark trees 
of Carlyle Square, Oursins a 
la provencale. ... A tin of 
cumin. A taxi claxorring in 
the lane." He experiences an 
“almost ins u ppo rta ble feel- 
ing of happiness.’’ Except 
his wife doesn’t love him. 
and leaves for another man. 

"Transfigured Night" and 
“Loose Continuity’’ can be 
seen as traditional war stories, 
one from the Great War and 
rate from the Second, but 
they're both distinguished by 
alarmingly original settiogs 
and, again; a reaching with 


longing through time and 
space. “Loose Continuity, 
particularly, comes up fresh 
and clean, as a young woman 
who studied textiles and 
design in prewar Germany 
ends up designing a “stream- 
line modeme” sandwich sign 
fora coffee shop at the comer 
of Wilshire ana Westwood in 
LJl, as she serenely remem- 
bers the precepts of Moholy- 
Nagy , a framer classmate and 
old buddy of hers. 

Cultures bleed into each 
other, like ink into milk, and 
.color our bland lives. But 
what if you can’t go any- 
where, if you have no pros- 
pects and no money? You 
can only imagine; you most 
make your life up. 

In my favorite story here, 
"Cork, ’ an English- widow 
who lives in Lisbon in the 
’30s is courted by an employ- 
ee in her husband's cork fac- 
tory. Their times together are 
mysterious, unique, unforget- 
table. The employee has 
nodtmji to offer the woman 
but an imagination poised on 
the brink of insanity. The 
widow has the unstated cour- 
age to go along with his 
plans. 

After reading these stories, 
you want to pick up and go 
somewhere else, immedi- 
ately. To where they play the 
chorinbo. Or to a rain- 
spattered beach resort on a 
desolate Portuguese shore. Or 
back to decadent Germany in 
the poverty-stricken days be- 
fore the war. In her novel 
'The Mandarins," Simone 
de Beauvoir called the wish 
for “somewhere else” the 
strongest human desire. Wil- 
liam Boyd taps into all that for 
these appealing stories. 

Carolyn See reviews book 
weekly for The Washington 
Post. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUBPAY-SUNPAX, FEB RUARY / , , _ 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 
PAGE 10 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 



At the Studios in Hollywood, It’s Crying Time 


By Bernard Weinraub 

JVr«- York Times Service 


L OS ANGELES — Days after 
the Academy Award nomina- 
tions, movie executives are still 
riveted — and in some cases 
angered — by a question that cuts to the 


heart of the creative quagmire that ap- 
pear to grip Hollywood: How could the 
studios have released 163 movies last 
year and have only one, “Jerry 
Maguire," turn out to be a serious con- 
tender for the Oscars? 

With most of the Oscar ruminations 
going to independent films like 
Miramax's “The English Patient,” 
Fine Line’s “Shine” and Gramercy’s 


“Fargo,” the judgment by the voters of 
the Academy of Motioa Picture Am 
and Sciences seemed an implicit cri- 
ticism not only of studio movies bat also 
of the very system that craned them. 

Even executives within the major stu- 
dios say the high costs of making films, 
the increasing importance of the over- 
seas market which favors action and 
high-tech blockbusters, and the eager- 
ness of many studios to make franchise 
films to merchandise at stores or exploit 
in theme parks all contribute to die de- 
cline of more serious, grown-up fare. 

Perhaps even more important is the 
deepening fear among executives that 

box office will mean their dismissal. 


This leads to a bizarre business practice 
endemic to Hollywood: Studios like 
Universal prefer to make tepid but de- 
rivative action-adventure films like 
“Daylight,” which cost about $70 mil- 
lion, and ’’Dante's Peak,” about $100 
million, that may have appeal overseas, 
rather titan, say, a delicate $4 million 
film like “Shine.” 

What has emerged in Hollywood is 
what John Peak, a veteran agent, called 
“Broadway and Off Broadway.” That 
is, studios lavish most of their money 
and attention on spectacles while in- 
dependents, some of them actually 
owned by conglomerates, focus on 
edgier, more provocative dramas. 

“It's not so much that all independent 


films are so great,” Peak said. “It's that 
studios have let than loose and aren’t 
covering that territory much anymore.” 

Several of tie most powerful movie 
executives tacitly agreed; yet they spoke 
with blunt anger about the criticisms 
against studios. Moreover, the execu- 
tives said that studio efforts to make 
riskier films were often flayed unjustly 
by critics, ignored by the 5,000 mem- 
bers of the academy and treated with a 
double standard, 

“I resent this; I resent this business of 
looking down an studios; I resent this 
attitude that studio executives are boorish 
and loots and can’t wake up in the morn- 
ing without tying their shoelaces 
wrong," said William Mechanic, chair- 


man of Fox Filmed EnrertainmenL 
‘There’s something very due to say 
you’re on independent. It’s chic ca Mi- 
ramax to say they’re independent when 
they're owned by Disney. If a studio aid 
the sfrm i* pictures, they’d get killed.’ 

He cited various Fox films that were 
serious but were largely ignored by the 
Oscar voters and critics: “The Cru- 
cible,” “Courage Under Fire” and 
“Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.'’ 
Acknowledging that the studio had, at 
the last moment, dropped out of making 
“The English Patient” because of 
budget and casting issues. Mecha ni c 
said, “If we stayed with ‘The English 
Patient,’ we’d be criticized: ‘What are 
they doing with this?* " 


Other executives concur. 
“What’s a little disingenuous on ^ 
the part of the indgxxwents is when T 
they say that studios don’t care about 
quality, that studios are stupid and 
couldn’t tell a good-quality script from a 
bad-quality script,” said Joe Roth, 
chairman of Walt Disney Studios. 

But he added: “The focus of our 
efforts has got to be on the mainstream. 
The size of these companies, the 
amounts of money you spend to make 
and market a film, our agenda of dis- 
tributing these films all over the world 
— with die size of die staff we have — 
puts the bulk of o ur at te ntion, on making 
movies that will be accessible to as 
many people as possible.” 


A Cannes Festival for New Music? 


P ARIS — “Presences,” Radio 
France's three-week jamboree 
of contemporary music, a lot of 
it brand new, is in its seventh 
year and looking as if it has hit its 
stride. 

‘ ’ Contemporary,” in this context, ba- 
sically means the second half of the 20th 
century, beginning with the immediate 
postwar period ana running up to about 
the day before yesterday. The formula 
of “Presences” is to have a composer 
worthy of retrospective treatment and a 
theme, preferably related. 

This year die composer in chief is 
Luciano Berio, perhaps the most mu- 
sically congenial of the composers bore 
in the mid- '20s and who appeared on the 
scene in the 1950s, and the theme is die 
current production by the youngest Itali- 
an generation of composers. 

"Presences” is the brainchild of 
Claude Samuel, onetime music critic, 
radio program producer, sometime 
artistic director or adviser of contem- 
porary music festivals (Royan, La 
Rochelle) and from 1989 until recently 
director of music at Radio France. It was 
this last post that gave Samuel, a kind of 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 


practical evangelist, the chance to put 
his idea for a festival into action. 

“I wanted to do something in Paris to 
promote world musical creativity, to 
make it fix' contemporary music what 
Canoes is for contemporary film — the 
place to go to see or hear the latest." be 
said. Also, a Paris festival would avoid 
transporting musicians, whole orchestras 
and public to a remote site — remote 
from Paris, that is, which is where most of 
the above have to come from. 

The first "Presences,” in 1991, had a 
theme of American composers and was 
held in the upmarket Theatre des 
Champs-Elysees. “It was not the place.' ' 
Samuel recalled. Too many of its 2,000 
seats were empty and the box office 
returns negligible. So concerts were 
moved to the Radio France building on 
the Seine, where the largest auditorium 
holds about 1,000. The box office prob- 
lem was solved by making ail concerts 
free — a luxury available to an orga- 
nization like Radio France, with its large 
musical establishment, including two 
symphony orchestras and an all-music 
radio network. 

That did not guarantee a public. 
Samuel noted. “There are the profes- 
sionals, 200 or 250 of them, who come 
anyway,” he said. “What I wanted to 


do is reach the curious, those who might 
be interested from the start, and even 
more those who might be wary or skep- 
tical but still interested. 

“Even if the concerts are free, people 
still have to cross town to get there and 
get in line to get a ticket, and most of die 
music is totally new to them. Everyone 
takes a risk — those are the rules of die 
game.” 

Earlier festivals have had Maurido 
KageL, Gyorgy Ligeti and Sofia Gubaid- 
ulina as featured composers, and new 
Russian and Qiinese music as themes. 
Last year’s affair drew a total of more 
than 10,000 listeners, and this year's 
may well exceed that. 

About 200 people had to be turned 
away from one of the opening concerts, 
conducted by Berio in his relaxed, un- 
conductoriai manner, with Aldo Benici 
as viola soloist in “Vod,” and Andrea 
Lucchesini the brilliant piano soloist in 
the piano concerto “Echoing Curves.” 
At a later concert die Arditti Quartet 
gave a haunting performance of Berio’s 
“Notmrno.” 

The festival goes on until Feb. 27, 
with a total of 18 of Berio's works 



•Si-v'SrX: \ 1 •. ' M 




jj. 



Andrew O’Connor, Joyce Springer and Clive Carter in Murray Schisgal's “Luv” at the Jerntyn Street Theatre . 


scattered throughout the 23 concerts, as 
well as some by his cont em por ar ies like 
Bruno Madema and Luigi Nona. 


Heathcliff, Go Back to the Moors 


Parsifal’: Time Equals Space 


By Sheridan Moriey 

International Herald Tribune 


By Paul Griffiths 

New York Tunes Service 


A msterdam — one of die 

great Wagner productions, 
Klaus Michael Grueber’s 
staging of “Parsifal” for the 
Netherlands Opera, is bowing out mag- 
nificently in a sequence of performanc- 
es conducted by Simon Rattle. 

The production has been sold to a 
consoru um of other European theaters, 
in Brussels, Florence and Paris, but 
these places cannot offer the Cinema- 
scope expanse of the 80-foot (25-me- 
ter) Amsterdam stage, for which this 
"Parsifal" was designed, which it 
needs, and which it embraces. 

"Parsifal” is an opera in which 
space famously folds into time, and 
Grueber's use of space has an effect on 
how time is seen. Distance becomes 
slowness; the isolated individual or 
group suggests waiting. 

The stage is not so much empty as 
full of this vital, expectant space, full 


of potential, and it’s kept that way by 
an avoidance of mass activity. There 
are no processions, the solemn march 
music being used in other ways (to 
slide on an enormous supper table In 
the first act, and for the chorus men to 
push forward their useless suits of 
armor in the third); the flower maid- 
ens spend most of their time on the 
floor. 

Importance is achieved without 
granmloquence. What matters is often a 
detail- bow, for example, a young at- 
tendant looks away as he lewis on the 
wounded king, Amfortas. Most re- 
markable is the calm. The production is 
neither abased nor frightened by its 
reaxmsibilities. It has no empty pride 
and no false shame. This, it says, is die 
best we can do. 

So it responds to the challenge of 
the work. The gods have gone. We are 
on our own now. “Parsifal” in this 
production does not understate the 
task, but it arrives at a sure and steady 
hope as a veil of light descends to 


leave only Parsifal with us, no hero but 
a man. 

Rattle, whose enthusiasm for this 
production made him want to make it 
the occasion of his first Wagner in any 
theater, conducts to match. His tempos 
are often slow, but never groaning or 
enfeebled. The sound produced by the 
Rotterdam Philharmonic is rich and 
alive and unfailingly present the brass 
produce a splendid sound, there are 
fine woodwind solos, and die strings 
use a quick vibrato to intensify sus- 
tained tones. 

The singers excel. Robert Lloyd 
must have sung Guroemanz a hundred 
times, and only be will know if he has 
ever been so consistently strong, 
gentle, and humane. I doubt he has. 
Foul Elming as Parsifal has a thrilling 
ring and a striking unforced presence: 
He is a bright blank page across which 
the music can write its story. Violeta 
Urmana gives a warm, feeling per- 
formance as Kundry, and Wolfgang 
Schoene towers in distress. 


L ondon — ft is difficult to 
describe the sheer awfulness of 
Cliff Richard’s “Heathcliff” 
(Apollo in Hammersmith) 
without risking a severe haodbagging 
by his myriad fans. If you can bring 
yourself to imagine Liberace as “King 
Lear,” you will perhaps have some 
concept of what takes place in what is 
indubitably the worst musical since Mel 
Brooks's "Springtime for Hitler." 

As the doomed Cathy, Helen Hob- 
son wanders among the plastic crags of 
this Yorkshire Disneyland with all the 
agonized despair of someone who has 
not only read Sir Cliff’s script but also 
had to learn and rehearse it with him. 
Sir Tun Rice's lyrics (and at this point 
we should, I suggest, withdraw both 
knighthoods for the duration of the run) 
are mercifully inaudible thanks to a 
bizarre sound system at die Apollo 
whereby the orchestra sits not in the 
usual pit but in a kind of Portakabin by 
the stage door. An extremely small 
supporting cast tries to pretend it is not 
there at all, lest they never work again, 
and I would advise arriving with sev- 
eral handkerchiefs, not to wipe away 
tears but to stuff in The mouth to prevent 
unseemly guffaws at a collector's piece 
of such bizarre and baroque mad- 


The Bible Belt Comes to Berlin Opera 


show. The Hammersmith Apollo, built 
in the heyday of the picture palaces, 
resembles some vast Egyptian tomb, 
probably as good a place as any to 
witness the living death of the British 
musical at 20 quid a ticket. 

Who now recalls Lambert LeRoux? 
The question Is, I hope, purely rhe- 
torical; 12 years ago, LeRoux was die 
demon newspaper proprietor of Bnsnton 
and Hare's “Pravda,” one of the 
greatest and most charismatic villains in 
postwar British theater and the character 
dial set Anthony Hopkins back on the 
road to his present stardom. 

Now, another decade down die line, 
we have another great play about news- 


of television. But we never get to meet 
die happy couple, nor even their proud 
parents, fix’ behind die scales, an all- 
powerful British Sunday newspaper 
(and it’ll you at most die first 10 
seconds of the play to guess which) is 
being remodeled for the millennium, a 
remodeling that involves wholesale 
bloodshed in die newsroom and die ar- 
rival of a team of marketing murderers 
out for the skins of eveiy decent jour- 
nalist still to be found larking in its 


papers (making three this century if you 


LONDON THEATER 


start, as we always should, with Hecht 
and Mac Arthur’s “The Front Page”). 
True, journalists will always warm to a 
play about journalists, even one that 
holds up a minor so horrible to our 
current trade that by the end of it you are 
seriously wondering whether yoa are 
still yoong enough to take up some more 
honorable profession. 


In what might sound a rather familiar 
scenario, Lucie rings some subtle and 
witty changes: The one truly noble 
character turns out to be an Australian, 
and it is Jane Asher, at her most 
achingly vulnerable, who as a deserted 
and forlorn newsroom widow articu- 
lates the play’s central thesis about the 
utter corruption of politics, journalism 
and hence the nation over the last 20 


For what, in essence, Doug Lucie’s 
unmissable and unbeatable “The Shal- 


By James Helme 
Sutcliffe 


B ERLIN — February 
may just turn out to 
be a red-letter 
month for American 
opera in Germany's opera 
houses. Not that Carlisle 
Floyd's “Susannah.” pre- 
miered in 1955 at New York 
City Opera, is exactly new, 
but its popular success at the 
first Berlin performance her- 
alded a new attitude toward 
opera in English, sung in Eng- 


lish. Beginning with Britten’s 
operas in Cologne, his “Peter 
Grimes' ' in Munich and Han- 
del's “Semele” at Berlin’s 
Staatsoper this season, 
“Susannah” continued a 
trend in a country where Itali- 
an and French opera has been 
sung in the original languages 
for some 15 years. 

The honors must go to Goa 
Friedrich, the director of the 


Deutsche Oper, and his Amer- 
ican wife, the soprano Karan 
Armstrong, who sang the title 
role. Not only did they as- 
semble a fine, largely Amer- 


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ican cast to sing the rural Ten- 
nessee English in which Floyd 
wrote the libretto, but they 
invited the composer, 70 last 
year, to Berlin for the occa- 
sion and engaged Germany's 
most prominent American 
stage director, John Dew (di- 
rector of Dortmund’s opera 
house) to stage the work. 

“Susannah” is a dramat- 
ically powerful version of the 
Biblical story of Susannah and 
the Elders set in the South’s 
Bible Belt about tbe time the 
opera was created. 

Dean Peterson, seductive 
of voice and appearance, ap- 
peared as Preacher Blitch. 
The small but crucial role of 
“Little Bai" McClean was 
sung and acted to the hilt by 
Richard Maridey from Chica- 
go's Lyric Opera. Lucy Pea- 
cock, Catherine Gayor, Lenus 
Carlson, Stefano Algieri, 


Mariana Cioromila and Peter 
Mans created thoroughly nas- 
ty portraits of the town dig- 
nitaries. 

But it was the thrilling 
singing and acting of the 
chorus (prepared by Hell wart 
Matthiesen) in the Act 2 re- 
vival scene that took the Ber- 
lin audience by storm. As in 
the New York premiere, this 
is the strongest part of 
Floyd’s otherwise bland and 
folksy score, conducted as if 
the style felt strange to her by 
Marie -Jeanne Dufour, music- 
al director of the Meiningen 
Opera. 

“Susannah” stays in the 
repertory of the Deutsche Op- 
er Berlin for seven further 
performances, until May 19. 


equacy, cobbled together as it has been 
out of old Palladium pantomimes and 


out of old Palladium pantomimes and 
leftover bits of “Peer GynL” 

Sir Cliff appears in a series of fetch- 
ingly dry-cleaned carpets, and when he 
sings to Cathy’s grave, it whizzes 
around on a turntable like the star prize 
in some bizarre necrophiliac game 


low End” (Royal Court Theatre Down- 
stairs at tbe Duke of York’s) tells us is 
that not only has nothing got better in 
this particular rag trade since 
“Pravda,’ ’ but it has all got even more 
horrible to contemplate. His frame is 
simple and stunning: We are in slavish 
country house atteiuiing the wedding of 
a multinational newspaper proprietor's 
favorite daughter to the son of some 
equally powerful baron from die world 


years. 

‘"The Shallow End” belies its own 
title; it is a cynical, thoughtful, vicious, 
witty and brilliant hatchet job on a 
newspaper empire, and through that on 
the society that we still take a lunatic 
pride in calling civilized. Robin Lefevre 
marvelously spotlights a company of 
tbe best character actors in town led by 
Asher, Julia Ford, Nigel Terry aria 
James Aubrey. I doubt we shall get a 
better new play this year. 

And finally, at Jermyn Street, the 
welcome return of “Luv,” Murray 
Schisgal’s 1964 oxnedy of love ana 
loss on a Brooklyn bridge. Neil Marcus 
has lined up a strong trio in Clive Carter, 
Joyce Springer ana Andrew O'Connor, 
all of whom bring his tiny stage to rich 
comic life. 


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■ WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 PAGE 11 



Twin-towered bead quarters in Frankfort of Deutsche B ank, the largest h ank in Germany and Europe. 

Deutsche Bank on the Prowl in U.S. 


By John Schmid 

International Heraid Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Europe’s biggest 
bank once again is scooting for an 
acquisition. 

Just as its Wall Street competitors 
are wondering how much further 
Deutsche Bank AG plans to keep 
pushing into the high-risk, high-re- 
ward world of global investment bank- 
ing, the German giant has signaled that 
it wants a piece of the action in their 
home turf — the United States. 

Taking the rare step of using a pub- 
lic speech to signal the bank's in- 
tentions, a Deutsche Bank director, 
Ronaldo Schmitz, this month told an 
international bankers’ forum; “I am 
firmly convinced that the Europeans 
do not have any long-term chance to 
establish themselves among the 
worldwide leading investment banks 
if they do not also achieve, a critical 
mass in the U.S.A.” 

That single sentence in a 14-page 
speech was meant as a wink and a nod, 
officials close to the bank explained 


afterwards. The executive did not even 
have a specific takeover target in 
mind, they added: Mr. Schmitz, in 
effect, was inviting offers from U.S. 
companies. 

Echoing Frank S inatr a’s New York 
anthem, Mr. Schmitz added, “If you 
can make it there, you can make it 
anywhere.” 

Deutsche Bank, which reported 
Tuesday a surprisingly strong 38 per- 
cent increase in 1996 operating profit, 
is clearly not about to slow down its 
empire building. Its goal is to become 
one of the top-ranked global invest- 
ment banks, competing far interna- 
tional deals in the same powerhouse 
league with established Wall Street 
players like Merrill Lynch & Co. and 
Goldman, Sachs & Co. 

The bank's stock rose ] .97 DM to 
8835 DM on Tuesday. 

It has expanded at breakneck speed, 
building its new operations virtually 
from scratch. To the amazement of its 
competitors, h has added more than 
2,000 investment bankers in only two 
years. 


In the process, it has stepped on the 
toes of its rivals. Offering salaries un- 
heard-ofbackhpmeinGennany.it has 
lured some of tbe brightest capital- 
market specialists away from Merrill 
Lynch, Citibank, SBC Warburg and 
ING Barings Bazik. 

The strategy ha s both admirers and 
skeptics, but all are unanimously in 
awe of the raw sums involved. 

“Something of this scale h«g never 
been done before,” said Neil 
Crowder, industry analyst at Goldman 
Sachs. 

The surge in 1996 groupwide op- 
erating profit to 5.8 billion Deutsche 
marks ($3.42 billion) from 42 billion 
DM amid blunt some of the criticism 
of die expansion, depending on dis- 
closures in die detailed annual report 
due on March 26. analysts said. Most 
of the gains are presumed to stem from 
operations broadly grouped under 
“investment banking” — such as as- 
set management and securities trading 
— that benefited from bullish world 

See EXPAND, Page 15 


By Tom Buerkle 

■ International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — European Union of- 
ficials signaled Tuesday that die bloc 
would not drop its legal challenge of 
U.S. sanctions against companies trad- 
ing with Cuba, but they stressed their 
desire for a negotiated solution of die 
dispute with Washington. 

Jacques San ter, die president of the 
European Commission, and the EU 
trade commissioner. Sir Leon Brittan, 
appealed for an easing of tensions over 
die Helms-Burton act at a meeting with 
Secretary of State Madeline Albright at 
die headquarters of the EU executive 
agency here. 

“We would like to get the issue into 
perspect i ve and focus on the positive 
side of the relationship,” an EU official 
said. 

Mrs. Albright also expressed a desire 
to defuse die dispute, but she did not 
indicate how Washington would react if 
the Union pr oc ee ded with its legal chal- 
lenge to the sanctions at the World 
Trade Organization. 

“We think there are ways to find an 
amicable solution.” Mrs. Albright said 
Tuesday at NATO headquarters outside 
Brussels. 

The EU appeal came two days before 


die head of the Geneva-based trade or- 
ganization was due to appoint a three- 
on panel to investigate EU charges 
the U.S. legislation violates global 
trade rules. 

The Clinton administration has urged 
Europe to drop the case, contending that 
Cuba is a foreign-policy matter that 
does not belong at the World Trade 
Organization. 

That stance has aroused fear in 
Europe that Washington will invoke the 
rarely used national security clause of 
global trade rules and refuse to cooper- 
ate with the panel, a step that officials on 
both sides of the Atlantic acknowledge 
would seriously undermine the author- 
ity of the trade organization. 

Although the Union raised U.S. 
hopes last week by moving for a one- 
week delay in the case. Mr. Santer and 
Sir Leon made dear that barring last- 
minute concessions by Washington. 
Europe would insist that the WTO panel 
be named Thursday by Renate Rug- 
giero, the organization's director-gen- 
eral. 

Sir Leon said the prospects of resolv- 
ing the dispute before Thursday were 
“not so good” because the Clinton ad- 
ministration was refusing to insulate 
European companies from the reach of 
the legislation, a commission spokes- 


man said. But he stressed that even after 
the naming of a panel, Europe and the 
United Stares would have six months to 
seek a negotiated settlement before a 
verdict by the panel was due. 

The German economics minister, 
Guenter Rexrodt, on Tuesday under- 
lined the vehemence of European sen- 
timent toward the Helms-Bunon act 

“Laws with extraterritorial impact 
contradict the principles of civil law and 
of the multilateral trading system,” he 
said. “They are unacceptable to the 
German government” 

The European Union is seeking guar- 
antees that the United States will not use 
provisions of the legislation to refuse 
visas to executives of European compa- 
nies that trade in Cuba using property 
expropriated from U.S. citizens during 
the revolution. 

EU officials note that the Union 
toughened its policy toward Cuba in 
December by linking further economic 
and political cooperation with Havana 
to improvements in human rights and 
democracy. 

That move prompted President Bill 
Clinton to indefinitely waive the 
toughest Helms-Bunon sanctions, the 
right of U.S. citizens to sue foreign 
companies for compensation for expro- 
priated properties. 


EU Seeks to Calm Cuba Dispute 

U.S. Hopes for 6 Amicable ’ Solution, Albright Says 



Younger Managers, Higher Returns 


By Floyd Norris 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — As the stock market 
has soared during the last several years, 
it has often seemed as if the manager of 
the latest hot mu dial fund is barely out of 
college. Is that a coincidence? Or is 
youth an advantage when it comes to 
running money? 

The answer, according to a new study 
published by the National Bureau of 
Economic Research, appears to be that it 
is not a coincidence. 

“We find that younger managers can 
earn much higher returns than older 
managers,” wrote Judith Chevalier and 
Glenn Ellison. 

Their study, based on the perfor- 
mance of growth and income equity 
mutual funds from 1988 through 1994, 
concluded that the younger the man- 


ager, the better the performance. 

Mr. unis on, an associate professor of 
economics at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, said that all things con- 
sidered, the study showed that young 
.managers “get about three basis points 
per year.” In other words, a 29-year-old 
manager would be expected, on average, 
to show a return of about 03 percent 
higher than that of a 30-year-old. And 
that 30-year-old would do about half a 
percentage point better than a 48-year- 
old. 

The instinctive reaction of many an 
older manager, particularly in this bull 
market, is that such performance may 
have something to do with risk. Younger 
managers, having never seen a bear mar- 
ket, may be more likely to swing for the 
fences. For most of the period covered in 
the study, that was a very good strategy. 

But Mr. Ellison, who is 31, and Ms. 


Chevalier, a 29-year-old assistant pro- 
fessor of economics at the University of 
Chicago business school, say that they 
have attempted to control for such risk- 
taking, ana that risk does not appear to 
explain the phenomenon. In fact, they 
say. it appears that older managers are 
more likely to buy stocks largely be- 
cause they are going up. 

What may explain the difference, at 
least in part, is that die study also in- 
dicates that younger managers with poor 
performance are more likely to be dis- 
missed titan are older managers who do 
poorly. That could create a selection bias 
in which poorer young managers are 
weeded out leaving only better ones to 
make it lode as if young is better. 

But die authors say they have ad- 
justed for that, too. and that without that 
adjustment the advantage of youth ap- 
pears to be even greater. 


MEDIA MARKEY5 


Sparks Fly in Spain Over Digital TV 


By Barry James 

International HeraldTrUme 


A fight for control of die digital-TV 
market in Spain has opened a deep di- 
vision among rival political and media 
groups, with accusations of bad faith 
and betrayal flying on all sides. 

A group of private TV operators, 
including Canal Plus, that began digital 
satellite transmissions at the end of last 
month accuses the conservative gov- 
ernment of obstructionism and of abus- 
ing its powers in order to launch a rival 
group later this year. The government 
will have a direct interest in the rival 
group through state-owned television 

The battle has readied the highest 
political level, with fonner Prime Min- 
ister Felipe Gonzalez accusing his suc- 
cessor, Jose Maria Aznar, of supporting 
“Stalinist” methods to aid his friends 
and sabotage the new digital platform. 
Canal Satelite Digital. 

Both Spanish companies. Canal Satel- 
ite and Canal Hus, are controlled by 
Spain’s most powerful media baron, Je- 
sus de Polanco. Under the Socialists, 
rvmfli plus had been part of die gov- 
ernment-sponsored digital-TV group, 
which included the then stale-owned tele- 
phone monopoly. The deal fell apart after 
Mr. Aznar’ s Popular Party won elections 

last year, and Mr. Polanco went ahead an 

his own with allies that now include the 
private television channel, Antena 3, and 
several regional television channels. 

The newspaper El Phis, also part of 
Mr. de Polanco s media empire, said foe 
government was out to “finish on Po- 


lanco” because of his close relationship 
with Mr. Gonzalez and the Socialists. 

platform will inchtd^Se'tetepbone op- 
erator Telefonica de Espana SA and me 
Mexican tefeviriori network, Televisa, as 
well as the state radio and television 
network. Radio Television Espanola. 

Shortly after Canal Satelite Digital 
was launched at the aid of January, the 

decoder brought onto the market would 
have to be compatible with several di- 
ll says Canal Satelite ’s 
identical to those used by 
Canal Plus in fiance, do not meet the 
new norm, which the government 
claims is designed to bring Spain into 
line with other European countries. 

The government also more than 
doubled, to 16 percent, the value-added 
tax on Canal Satelite’s decoders. 

The presklent of Antena 3, Antonio 
Asensio. meanwhile, said he bad been 
called in for questioning by government 
anti -corruption investigators on die 
basis of an anonymous tip. 

Antena 3 had' previously been allied 
with the rival RTVE-Televisa-Telefon- 
ica group, but defected last year when 
Mr. Asensio signed a deal with Mr. de 
Polanco on Christmas Eve for die ex- 
clusive broadcasting rights to first di- 
vision soccer games. The government 
seeks to reverse that deal by opening 
football rights to all channels. 

Throughout the dispute, two conser- 
vative newspapers — die monarchist 
ABC and die radically anti -Socialist El 
Mundo — have kept up a drumbeat of 


praise for what they describe as the 
sventamono- 
: market. Luis 
Anson, the editor of ABC, said 
the p a rtic i pation of Mexico’s Televisa 
in foe rival s ate l lite group would give 
Spanish viewers unparalleled choice, 
with die ability to watch up to 200 
channels from Latin America, the 
United States and elsewhere. 

Socialist critics say the government 
has abused its powers, not to defend the 
rights of citizens orensure a free market, 
but to ensure an opening for its chosen 
interests. Government officials reply 
that foe Socialists, when they were in 
power, introduced measures to help 
their friends, prominent among whom 
was Mr. de Polanco. 

Rafael Arias Salgado, the minister of 
public works, told Parliament that the 
previous government had granted “im- 
moral favors” to Canal Plus by allow- 
ing a favorable rate of value-added tax 
andby approving a secret deal involving 
foe network and the telephone mono- 
poly, Telefonica. 

Amid protests from Socialist legis- 
lators be raid Canal Phis had been ableio 
benefit from Telefonica’s cash flow and 
client base. “This was probably the most 
immoral agreement in the history of 
Spanish democracy,” Mr. Arias said 

Mr. Aznar's key Catalan coalition 
ally, meanwhile, has objected to the 
government’s attempts to impose di- 
1 -television regulations by decree. 
Convergenda i Unio group is in- 
sisting foal the measures be folly de- 
bated in Parliament. 


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PACE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY TmBmJA^S^t^ ^ 




THE AMERICAS 


ra~jwwr<m »n i f in ii —ri i warm ~t — irr — tt — i~ I 


Investor’s America 



Slocks Make Advance ’ | ju $ 


Hostile Bid for Savings Giant ^ Record Territory *P 


By Saul HanseU 

New York Times Service 


with the offer said Ian Campbell, a 
spokesman for Great Western, 


KicaJ. 

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NEW YORK — HE. Ahman- 
son, die holding company for the 
largest U.S. savings and loan in- 
stitution, has made a hostile offs' 
to buy the Great Western Financial 
Carp., die second-largest U.S. sav- 
ings institution, for $5.8 billion. 

Both companies are based in the 
Los Angeles suburbs and mainly 
serve California and Florida. 

Hie offer was made in a letter 
sent Monday to Great Western's 
board by Charles Rinehart, Ah- 
manson's chairman. He proposed 
exchanging 1.05 shares oi Altman- 
son stock, which ended at $44,875, 
up $4375, in New York trading 
Tuesday, for each share of Great 
Western. The shares of Great 
Western closed at $44.75, up 
$1050. 

Mr. Rinehart spoke to John Ma- 
her, Great Western's chief exec- 
utive, briefly by telephone on 
Monday night, people familiar 


spokesman for Great Western, 
said the company was studying the 
proposal by Ahmanson, which 
owns the Home Savings of Amer- 
ica savings and loan company. 
“Our response will be dictated by 
what is in the best interests of our 
shareholders," he said. - 

Ahmanson, which is based in 
Irwindale, California, and Great 
Western, which is based in Chats- 
worth, California, have informally 
discussed a potential merger on 
and off for years. The two compa- 
nies have substantial overlapping 
operations, both in California and 
in southern Florida. 

Indeed, Ahmanson predicted 
that nearly 200 of the two compa- 
nies’ roughly 800 branches would 
be dosed as a result of a merger. 
That is expected to save $400 mil- 
lion a year in expenses. 

Despite rhe branch dosings and 
the inevitable layoffs, Ahmanson 
is trying to promote the deal as a 
boon to Southern California. The 


combined company would be-ooe 

of the largest financial mgritririr^ 
in the country andccrtdd SI the 
rap left when tire First Interstate 
Banconv was boughr&y WeBs 


was one of the few" .-hostile 1 
takeovers m the hanking industry. 
Ahmanson has assesa±4edd« same 
team of advisers dial Wdl§ Fargo . 
used: Credit Suisse First Boston, - 
Montgomery Securities and Sul- 
Iivan & Cromwell, the law finn.- - ' 
Should Great Western chfwseto ; 
fight titebid, Ahmanson may have - 
a more 'difficult time wanting ' 
througft-a hostile deal than Wells;, '■ 
Fargo <5d. •> ■ - 

Great Western has long beat . 
seen rathe nwst attractive xemaiB- 
ingenhy vehicle foranara-of-state . 


r^veCal2bniia marked ‘ ‘ 

And so there are a number ofbig ; 
bank holding comp ani es tfakt' 
would cfmftfrier bidding fo Great - 
Western. 


NEW YORK — Stories made a 
late jump m a record high Tuesday, 
led by Philip Moms on expecta- 
tions that ci garette makers will ne- 
gotiate a settiement'af nmltih 01 ion- 
doUar lawsuits. 

“We are stiH 'u good shape,” 
stud Timothy Moans, chief invest- 
ment officer at BessemecTnist Co. 
: “Wehavea good economy, rates 
will continue to bead- stetb and 
■earnings have dearly been better 
than most people «qx» 6 l ” 

. The -Dow rones industrial aver- 
age dosed. 78.59 pomtt higher at 
7,067.46, after spendi ng most offhe 
day flucteating.-'S^w^ nr^aave 

ahdpasfcivc tectihary. TheDowpre- 
Srictasly . cifosed/above 7,000. on 
Thrasda*,: ^ jrtfcri it coded at 
7.022.44. The mfaaket was closed bn 

' • ii -i ^ ■■ 


computer maker’s 1*97 anting 
estimate was cut to 70cents from 85 


US. STOCKS 


port on consumer prices Wed- 
nesday would provide more -evi- 
dence of slow inflation. 

The new benchmark 30-year 

. - T; in') .UU.ita 


bond fell 5/32 to 101 3/32, mfctaits 
yield up to 655 percent from 652 
percent on Friday. - 

“The market seeds to catch ns 
breath a tittle here,” afterataHy last 
Week th at drove yields to two- 
month lows, said Wavne Schmidt 
of Advanhis Capital Management 
in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

■ Stocks were also helped by a 
grnn£ of acquisitions in the health- 
care, media, hotel and. financial in- 
dustries. 

The financials gained after H. F. 
Ahmanson & Co., the largest U3. 
thrift, said it would buy Great West- 
ern F inancial, the nation’s second- 
largest thrift 

Glendale Federal Bank FSB rose, 
as did Golden West Financial. 

“There is still room to nm here,” 
said Timothy Morris, chief invest*- 
ment officer at Bessemer Trust. 

-Chancellor Broadcasting fell 
after Evergreen Media said it would 
buy the company for stock and debt 
The combined company that said it 
would buy Viacom’s radio stations, 
lifting Viacom's shares. 

Renaissance Hotel Group NV 
gained after Marriott International 
said it agreed to buy the company] 

Destec Energy rose after AES 
andNGC said they would pay $137 
billion, or $2155 a share, for the 


I Herald Tribont 


Very briefly; 

Chief Executive of WMX Resigns 


’ •• j* ' But tin*. 

Evergreen Buys Radio Stations' 


OAK BROOK, Illinois (Bloomberg) — The chief executive 
and president of WMX Technologies Inc., Phillip Rooney, 
resigned Tuesday amid pressure from shareholders dissatisfied 
with the company's plans to retrench and boost its stock. 

The company chairman. Dean Buntrock, will serve as 
acting chief executive while the waste management company 
searches for a replacement, WMX said in a statement. WMX 
has faced criticism for its underperforming stock. 


Cmf^edtyOteSeffFtmiDi^aKha 

NEW YORK — Evergreen Me- 
& Corp.’s offer Tuesday to buy 


dia Corp.’s offer Tuesday to buy 
Chancellor Broadcasting Co. and 
Viacom Inc.’s radio stations for a 


• Coca-Cola Co, unveiled a contour-shaped aluminum can, 
saying the new packaging innovation would be test-marketed 


in five U.S. markets early next month. 


• Befl Atlantic Cora, said its Virginia unit will combine 
networks with Cox ribemet Commercial Services and Cox 


networks with Cox Hbernet Commercial Services and Cox 
Fibemet Access Services, which will be able to connect to tite 
Bril Atlantic network to provide local telephone services. 

• State Street Global Advisors of Boston and Emerging 
Europe Asset Management of Prague plan to start a venture 
to advise investors about the markets in Central and Eastern 

Europe. Reuters. Bloomberg 


combined $258 billion In stock, 
cash and debt, led a group of ac- 
quisition announcements in the 
health-care, hotel and chemical 
sectors. 

Evergreen said it would pay 
about $15 billion fra- Chancellor 
and its 51 stations, and $1.08 bU- 
lion cash for Viacom’s 10 stations, 
moves that would make it the 
country’s largest independent ra- 
dio broadcaster, with 103 stations. 


Other acquisition announce- 
ments included: 

• HealthSouth Corp., the largest 
U5. operator of oatpatient and re- 
habilitation clinics, agreed to buy 
Horieon/CMS Healthcare Crap, 
for $1.65 billion in stock and debt. 

HealthSouth. with 1,000 facil- 
ities, will pay with stock valued at 
about $951 milli on and assume 
$700 milli on of debt. Each Ho- 
rizon/CMS shareholder will re- 
ceive 0.442 shares of HealthSouth 
for each Horizoc/CMS share. 

• Sun Healthcare Group Inc. 
said it agreed to buy rival nursing- 
home operator Retirement Care 


Associates and its Contour .Med- , 
ical Inc. unit for $328 minion in' 
cash, stock and assumed debt. 

•NGC Crap, plans to acquire 
Dow Chemical Co.’s Destec En- 
ergy Inc. unit in a deal valued at 
$137 billion. Dow Chemical said 
it would use the majority of the 
sale proceeds to continue repur- 
chases of its own shares. 

• Marriott International Inc. has: 
agreed to buy Renaissance Hold 
Group NV for $1 billion in cash 
and assumed debt, topping a $890 
ntiHion bid from Doubletree Crap. 

fbr the Upscale Inrigmc Hhwfn 

(AFX, AP, Bloomberg) 


. Advancing issues outnumbered 
decline** by a ratio oil the 

New York Stock Exchange. 

The S&FSQO-stock index was up 
7.81 points at 816.29. 

But the technology-laden Nas- 
daq composite index was down 
VM points at 1565.79. 

■ Tobacco shares rore after people 
involved, in the negotiations said 
com p any tobacco representatives 
have held , talks with anti-tobacco 
lawyers and state officials to settle 
all beahb-relazed lawsuits fbr as 
much as $250 billion. A settlement 
could cost ciga re tte makers as much 
as $10 trillion & year. 

Philip Mams, RJR Nabisco 
Holdings and UST rose. 

But the- technology sector 
slumped. “People have made lots 
of money in the technology area; it 
is no surprise that when there is 
some confusion about the future, 
people start seQiqg,” an analyst 


Digital Equipment fell after the 


Weekend Box Office 


Dollar Falls on Fears About Single Currency 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Star Wars’* dominated the U.S. box 
office over the weekend, with a gross of $213 million. Fol- 
lowing are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday rich* 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


1. Star Won 
2.4UHOftrf>POMr 
3. Daria* Peak 
*Vfcpas Vocation 
5. Foals Rush In 
A. That Dam Cot 
7.JcnyMogufc« 
s. The EntfMi Patent 
9. Scream 
ID. Shine 


amGMayfi* 
(CatnmOts) 
(Universal} 
IWtmerBmsJ 
(Columbia HdlrasJ 
(WaB Disney) 

(Trt- Start 
CMJtamas} 
(Dimension FBms) 
(Ftoe Una Features) 


SZlJadHon 

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flXlnman 

SMLDmnoa 

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SXSmHton 


Omy&d byOtrSaffFmUsptgcha 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
tumbled against most other major 
currencies Tuesday amid concern 
Europe's planned monetary union 
may unravel and that the Bank of 
Japan will sell dollars to halt the 
U.S. currency’s rally. 

Signs of difficulty toward achiev- 
ing the currency union, which in- 
cludes plans for a single currency 
known as the euro, help the Deutsche 
mark, because it is expected to re- 
main Europe’s primary currency un- 


til the euro comes into existence. 

The dollar was at at 1.6850 DM, 
down from 1.6874 DM. It was at 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


123595 yen, down from its 12435 
yen close on Friday.The dollar was 


also at 1.4701 Swiss francs, up from 
1.4640 francs, and at 5.6880 French 


for tiie Presidents’ Day holiday. 

On Monday, Germany’s deputy 
finance minister, Juergen Static, said 
the go v e rnmen t was considering a 
spending freeze to cut its budget gap 
this year. 

Mr. Stark’s comments "show die 
inability of Germany to come up with 
die required numbers,” said James 


francs, down from 5.6895 francs. 

The pound was at $1.6081, down 
from $1.6220. 

U.S. markets were closed Monday 


McGroarty, chief currency manager 
at Potomac Bahson Inc. ‘ T If it looks 


likeEMU wiH be derailed, we could 
see a strong flow of money out of the 
dollar and into the mark.” 


The dollar slumped against the yen 
as traders fretted the Bank of Japan 
might sell dollars to keep ft tan 
rising further. Gnncem that central 
banks might acr to stem the dollar’s 
rise has spread since the Group of 
Seven nations issued a statement on 
Feb. 8 indicating the currency has - 
risen enough during the - past 22 
months. 

“The fear of intervention is 
lingering in people’s minds,” said 
Mr. McGroarty. 

(Bloomberg. AFX, Market News) 


“Corporate America views the 
market as attractively valued, 
whereas most market pundits view 
the market as somewhat overval- 


ued,’’ said Joseph DeMarco, head 
of trading at HSBC Asset Man- 


of trading at HSBC Asset Man- 
agement. 

- WMX Technologies rose after 
PhflHp Rooney, its chief executive ^ 
and president resigned, effective 
immediately, amid mounting pres- 
sure from shareholders who telt the 
company has performed poorly. £ 

( Bloomberg. AP ) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


TiMaday 1 * 4P.IL Close 

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MLB7 199.92 20024 20053 
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VOL HWi 

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RJRNS) 51725 
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Atmans 34*77 Oft 
WOTlT 3*336 35 
AT&T 8 34195 «'* 

MereAi SOP 2ft 
CntenTft 37W2 4ft 
WMXTC 29639 Mft 
Wbvr 27834 130ft 
HtMfk* 25173 50ft 
PW*C08 2436 Sfft 
Mmcfc 24S0 98ft 
BaicOng 23777 44ft 
VMMart 33476 34% 


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Morfl 20 275% 287% +9 90674 

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Sep 97 040 BUS H 49 +140 240 

Estates NA. FrTs-ites 4757 
Fifs«panH ZUB7 W 275 


Atar 97 lazEl 13246 13246 +032134713 
Jrii 2 W1JS W1.14 13144 +430 17,134 
Sop 97 VBJS& 129A4 129JS6 +032 U89 
Dec 97 H.T. H.T. 9490 +432 0 

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lett-Packard declined. . . 

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EUROPE 


Swedbank to Acquire 

Rival in Stock Deal 


Swedbank announced it would bu< 

tSS 

1 J e «»nfa>ned bank would havi 
assets of 620 billion kronor, secow 
to Svenska HanddsbS 
AB, the region s biggest hanir 
which has assets of 869billion. Tba 
total includes Stadshypotek, the 
mortgage bank Handelsbanken i 
PWj? billion kronor to acquire 
i Swedbank closed Tuesday a 
1 3 u ^0 kronor, up 19.50 kronor 

on 1 0erem ngsbanken closed a 
43;20 kronor, up 4.70 kronor. 

The acquisition “was very mud 
expected, ' said a Paribas analyst 
Peter Thom. 

On Monday, the hanlcc an . 
nounced they had restarted nego 
nations to combine their operations 
to try to remain competitive ii 
Sweden’s consolidating financial, 
services industry. 

After years of opposing Swed- 
bank s advances, Foerenings- 
banken’s board agreed to the offer 
as did more than 40 percent of its 
shareholders. 

“The increased competition in 
the finance industry is expected tc 
lead to further drops in interest rate 
margins." the banks said in a joint 
statement * ‘ Integration in the Euro- 
pean Union and the planned cur- 
rency cooperation creates adjust- 
ment costs for banks and intensified 
competition." 

The value of the acquisition ex- 
cludes a bonus dividend, totaling 1 
billion kronor, that Foerenings- 
banken will give its shareholders ii 
the takeover is completed. 


“Swedbank and Foerexungs- 
banken will be quite a good deal/' 
said Robert Grant, an analyst at CS 
first Boston. “The question now 
wiB be if S-E-Banken and Nord- 
banken get back to the table.” 

Skanmnaviska Enskilda Ranb^n 
and Nordbanken abandoned m er g er 
talks a few weeks ago after failing to 
agree on terms. 

Meanwhile, Swedbank and Foe- 
renings banken posted their 1996 re- 
sults on Tuesday. 

Swedbank 's numbers wars better 
than expected. The bank posted a 20 
percentrise in oper^mg profit, to 530 
billion kronor, while Foerenings- 
banken announced a 14 percent rise in 
1996 operating p rofi t, to 1.16 bHUon 
kronor. (Bloomberg, AFP, Reuters) 

■ Prices of Bank Stocks Soar 

Swedish bank stocks soared as 
leading banks released higher-than- 
expected 1996 earnings, news agen- 
cies reported. 

“X think 1996 was a particularly 
good season, partly due to the sharp 
decline in interest rates, ’ * an analyst 
said. "We wifi not see the same kmd 
of profit rises now that we have seen 
in the past few years but restruc- 
turing talks will continue/* 

Handelsb anken reported a 33 per- 
cent rise in operating profit in 1996, 
to 6.72 billion kronor, as the bank 
benefited from restructuring its bond 
portfolio. Its shares rose 650 kronor 
to 20750 kronor. 

State-controlled Nordbanken re- 
potted a 10 percent rise in 1996 
operating profit, to 7.432 billion 
kronor. Its shares woe 20 kronor 
higher at 2S5 kronor. 

Shares of S-E-Banken, which 
posted a better-than-expected 68 
percent leap in 1996 profit, edged up 
050 krona to 7550 kronor. 

(Bloomberg, AFP, Reuters) 


Mondadori Shares 
Drop on Resignation 

Chief of Publisher Quits After 6 Months 

Bloomberg News 

MILAN — Arnoldo Mondadori Editors SpA shares plunged 10 
percent Tuesday, a day after Paolo Forlin unexpectedly quit as chief 
executive of the company, Italy's largest book and magazine pub- 
lisher. 

Shares closed at 12,400 lire ($7.42). down 1576 lire, a decline of 
more than 10 percent That prompted mandatory trading halts under 
Italian Stock Exchange rules. 

The company said Mr, Forlin, 61, who tendered his resignation late 
Monday, was leaving for personal reasons, and the executive himself 
did not comment. Analysts speculated that Mondadari’s largest share- 
holder, Fininvest SpA, opposed the executive’s plans to reorganize the 
company. Mondadori said the board will meet Feb. 20 to discuss his 
successor. 

Forlin objected to the auditing controls imposed by^Rninvest, which 
owns 47 percent of Mondadori, and because Fininvest had not ap- 
proved his five-year plan to improve the group’s magazine division. 

The departure comes just six months after Mr. Fortin, the former 
chairman of the paper company Scott SpA, was named to succeed 
Franco Tato. 

"Obviously, this is not a positive signal," said Federico Milla, an 
analyst at Congest in Milan, which manages more than SOO trillion lire 
in investments and owns Mondadori shares. “Hie just got there to turn 
things in anew direction and come up with a new strategy." 

Shares had climbed by one-third in Mr. Fortin's tenure. Pretax profit 
estimates for the second half of 19% were not available. 

The resignation “probably stems from the fact that he came from a 
different industry and be found publishing harder than he thought," 
said Garistian Oddono, an equity analyst at Actinvest Group Ltd. 

1 ‘Fininvestprobably put a very tight control on the company and Forlin 
wasn’t happy." 

Mr. Fomn came to the company with the promise of improving 
Mondadari’s revenues after Mr. Tato spent much of his tenure cutting 
costs and laying off workers. 

Mr. Tato resigned in June to take over the electrical utility Knei SpA. 
While at Mondadori, Mr. Tato frequently sparred with Fininvest over 
strategic decisions. Finin vest is the holding company controlled by 
Silvio Berlusconi, the former prime minister, and also controls the 
broadcaster Mediaset SpA. 

Mr. Forlin was expected to focus on strengthening Mondadori’s 
yellow-pages business, and increasing advertising revenues and the 
marlcer shame of its magazines, which include the Pano rama weekly 
news magazine and the women's monthly ma gazine s Dornia Modema 
and the Italian version of Marie Claire. 


Day One for Palestinian Stock Market: 4 Trades 


Agence France- Prase 
NABLUS. West Bank — The 
first Palestinian stock market 
opened its doors Tuesday aiming to 
establish a "Jerusalem Index" but 
marked up only four transactions 
during the first day of trading. 

The bourse, located in the West 
Bank city of Nablus, now under 


Palestinian rule, opened with 23 
companies for a three- week intro- 
ductory training period, during 
which one session of trading will be 
held each week, said its chief, 
Safwah Bataina. 

“This was our first live session, 
on a trial basis," he said. “We are 
very confident about this market" 


"A total of 50 companies in the 
West Bank and Gaza Strip totaling 
$700 milli on in capital are qualified 
to be put on the stock market and we 
hope to have them on board by the 
end of the year," Mr. Bataina said. 

He said they hope to have a total 
capital of $2 billion on the market by 
the year 2000. 


Once enough companies are lis- 
ted on the market, trading will be 
stepped up and information will be 
ed for a daily stock index, 
ere are a number of sugges- 
tions for the name of the index, but 
we're seriously considering naming 
it the Jerusalem Index," Mr. 
Bataina said. 



Usinor Stock 
Surges After 
Prediction of 
Turnaround 


CoifdM by Our SuffFnm Diqxachn 

PARIS — Usinor Sacilor SA’s 
shares dosed at a 17-month high 
Tuesday as Europe’s largest steel- 
maker forecast an earnings recovery 
in April and said that accelerating 
economic growth would raise de- 
mand and prices. 

The company announced a 66 
percent decline in 1996 net profit, to 
1.49 billion French francs ($2605 
million), and a 9 percent fall in sales, 
to 71 .06 billion tiancs. It also cut its 
dividend, as expected. In addition, 
the company said it had halved its 
debt, saving 718 million francs in 
finance costs, and said prices and 
sales had begun to rise. 

Usinor shares, which have been 
traded since July 1995, when it was 
sold by the government, closed 3.2 
percent higher at 87.20 francs. 

Usinor* s forecast of a recovery 
also sparked buying of the shares of 
German and British steelmakers, 
amid hopes that economic recov- 
eries worldwide would bring higher 
sales by the end of the year. 

Shares in Thy s sen AG of Ger- 
many and British Steel PLC rose 
after Usinor’ s announcement. In 
Frankfurt, Thyssen climbed 2.4 per- 
cent, to 327.1 Deutsche marks, 
while in London, British Steel rose 
0.7 percent, to 141 pence. 

“It's not so much the results that 
we like, it’s the fact that they’ve 
slashed their debt." said Lam ent 
Truchi. a fund manager at GTT Fi- 
nance. "They’ve also made positive 
statements on the outlook for 1997 
and the cut in dividend wasn't nearly 
as bad as some had feared either." 

The company said demand and 
prices had improved, although av- 
erage selling prices in the first half 
will be below those for last year. 

"Since tbe beginning of this year, 
the situation has been very different 
Prices are coming back,’ ’ said Fran- 
cis Mer, Usinor s chairman. "The 
first quarter won’t be brilliant but 
from the second quarter, we will do 
better than in 1996." 

Earnings at Usinor. whose steel is 
used in products such as Renault SA 
cars and Swatch watches, are directly 
affected by economic growth. If the 
economy shrinks, demand for steel 
falls. (Bloomberg. Reuters, AFX) 



Frankfurt 

dax 

' t ArtAwi Paris. 

FTSlftOO index ' • GAC 40 

f 





A m 


J 

29 J : 

■j ■ 42 S) 

/ : ™ A 

7 


. -mrn Af 


r 





■ O N 

1996 

. Exchange 

Amsterdam 

DJF.^S ON 
1997 . 1996 

■Max, f 

.AEX. .• 

D J F- l,BU S O N 
1997 v 1996 

Tliesday. * Ptw. 
Ctose. Close 

• 7 ssj «' ' mj& 

D J F 
1997 

% 

Swinge 

+ 0.47 

Brussel* 

B&.-28 

2,11151 2,09652 

+ 0.71 

- ro** - •■fii 1 rot 

DWBWJ . 

DAX 

8 J 76 . 1 S 3 J 232 J 7 

+ 1.35 

■ Co|»wlaigaR 

StodtMwtet 

5 45 J& .: 54055 . 

+076 

WaAtM. 

HEX General 

■ 2^6082 2 . 863.42 

+ 0.08 

O^o ... 

O BK 

611.00 600.80 

+ 1^3 

LtokUr : 

FTSE 100 . 

4 £ 3 U 0 4 ^ 37^0 

-ai 3 

ww .... 

■^tDds.Bffihanjp 

. 481.29 461.95 

- 0.14 

Wit 

m&m. . 

12 ^ 38.00 12 , 361 .00 

-uoo 

Ms 

S CAC 4 Q. ' 

2 £T 7.52 2334.48 

- 0^4 

Sto^chota 

sk ie/ 

2 , 816^9 2 , 835^2 

-tusr 

Vhnm 

A-DC 

IJEKkM 1 JS 1220 

- 0.11 

Zurich . 

SPI 

2 , 863.96 2 . 866.19 

-043 


Source; Tetekurs Intmuioul Herald Tkitxmr 


Very briefly; 

• Telefonica de Espana SA will sell the stare’s remaining 21 
percent stake to the public for 3,239 pesetas ($2259) a snare, 
and for 3360 pesetas a share to institutional investors. The 
sale is expected to raise about 739 billion pesetas. 

■ Groupe Bull, a French computer maker, said second-half 
net profit doubled, to 988 million francs ($ 1 72.8 million), after 
it sold Zenith Data Systems, an unprofitable personal-com- 
puter company. 

• NCC AB and Slab AB, two Swedish construction and real 
estate groups, confirmed that they would merge in a deal worth 
about 2.47 billion kronor (S334.7 million). 

• Deutsche Babcock AG will reorganize its core businesses 
into three groups by 1 998 as part of a restructuring program. 

• Scania AB, a Swedish truckmaker, said net profit fell 39.6 
percent in 1996, to 1.98 billion kronor, because of a stronger 
krona and weaker European sales in the fourth quarter. 

■ SmJthKline Beecham PLC, a British pharmaceutical com- 
pany, said fourth-quarter pretax profit rose 14 percent, to £442 
million ($714.6 million), lifted by sales of new products. 

• Bayerische Veransbank AG’s net profit rose “about" 30 
percent in 1 996 from 657 million Deutsche marks ($386 million) 
last year as interest and commission income rose, the company 's 
chief executive, Albrecht Schmidt, said. 

• Fiat SpA will hire 1 ,600 workers to meet rising car demand 
fueled by a government incentive program. 

•Barclays PLC’s pretax profit rose 13 percent in 1996, to 
£2.36 billion, at the low end of expectations, as poor in- 
vestment banking results offset steady growth in traditional 
banking. 

• Philipp Holzmann AG, a construction company, broke 
even in 1996, after a net loss of 443.2 million DM in 1995, as 
the sale of assets and surging foreign orders offset write-offs 

of 1 billion DM. “ Bloomberg. AFX. AFP. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Tuesday Feb. 18 

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12450 
28550 
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369.90 
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23250 
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369.70 
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13450 13550 
12250 12450 
121 122.10 
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3350 3350 
11570 11650 
36270 36240 
18470 185 

2950 2970 
77 73.10 
6170 6250 
5920 59 JO 
14950 14950 
32570 329.10 
7750 78.10 
139 14050 
7370 74.10 
5110 5450 
4150 4170 
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57 5750 
204 90670 
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79.10 8170 
8670 07 

135 140 

16250 16250 
6170 6150 
16770 16770 
11070 11050 
34150 34150 
35950 35970 
SUB 8070 
3850 39 

228 23650 


13350 

12150 

12150 

28250 

94 

3450 

11550 

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186 

2950 

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149.10 
32650 
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57.70 

28550 

24070 

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135 

16350 

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16770 

110.10 
34670 
36770 

9060 

39.10 

22770 


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Krapp taesdl 26150 360 860 

‘ 11490 11511555 

13850 13750 138 

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7750 7440 76,90 
523 516 52258 

1127 U1B 1125 
2355 2290 23 

454 451 452 

c 69750 491 49150 

MetaflgeMBKtafl3195 3325 3330 
Metro 13650 13550 136.1® 

Munch Knack R 4215 4150 £95 


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Karstodt 

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RWE 
SAP pH 
Swing 


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VEW 


41750 410 45450 

7650 7X80 7430 
26150 25370 259J0 
14550 14450 14465 
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32950 327 227.10 

96.10 9X75 9X95 
500 500 500 

707 701 704 

80850 SOI 80050 


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4255 . 
122.15 
71250 
8430 
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51250 
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2110 
45350 
695 
3180 
13420 
4120 
415 
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14480 
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7K 
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Low 

dose 

PfNL 


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GFSA "■ 

12275 

119 12275 119X0 

UaBner 

1622 

l£M 

1602 

1605 

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3JB 

3L54 

154 

155 

Utd Assurance 

£53 

£40 

£40 

£42 

UbertyHcfgs 

344 

342 

343 

342 

UlriNmfS 

£8T 

£57 

50 

AM 

UberfyLlfc 

13025 129 JO 

130 129 JO 

utounoa 

*85 

£/? 

600 

UK 

Maoeca.. •• . 

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-105 

105 

.106 

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.*89 

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1920 

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221 

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207 

203 

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79 

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007 

750 

754 

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48 

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470© 

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308 

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450 

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77 

73 

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273 

7 JR 

209 

707 

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141 JD 

140 141 JD D9JB 

Zeneca 

1750 

1744 

177B 

1778 


Sronanoro 5575 5475 5475 5535 

Sasoi 5175 51 5175 5075 

SBIC 183 180 180 182 

Tiger Oats - 7150 73 73 7250 


Kuala Lumpur 


Coding 
Med Bonking 
Mai hid Ship F 
PetronasGas 


Resorts Mxld 
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1720 

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1220 

12 

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906 

926 

925 


670 
9 
496 
12 
940 

1950 1970 1970 1948 

1130 12 . 1150 

2250 23 2340 


London 


FF-SE 108:413278 
PmVw:4337J8 


Abbey Natl 757 778 

ABtedDanwcq 439 478 

ADtfkmWMw 432 678 


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Helsinki hex 


Bangkok 

Ad* Into Sue 
Bangkok BfcF 
Krona TMBk 
PTTEjgjte 
StonCenealF 
Stem Cam BkF 
Tetooomasta 
Thai Mwon 
Tirol Farm BkF 
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224 

4075 

340 

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142 

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PlWfcOK 78871 

220 23) 220 

216 224 222 

38 39 39 JO 

326 328 336 

620 W8 *40 

139 I» J4J 

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3725 3725 38J0 

130 IS IS 

152 153 153 


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7158 7520 7380 
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4180 42 42 

134 13850 136 

306 306 30820 

17920 182 180 

8180 83 8160 

4450 45 4440 

449 447 437 

10350 105 10450 

94 95 94 


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BAA 
Baidays 
Bast 
BAT tad 
BankSadtand 
Btua dicta 
BOC Group 
Bools 
BPS tad 
BiBAaraso 


427 672 

1.17 1.15 
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5 JO £25 
12 1T.05 
B53 848 

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359 347 

398 377 

943 955 

788 683 

348 344 

1253 1253 


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Bata] Auto 
HnmLmr 
Hindus PeRm 
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MohonogarTel 
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390 

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42650 

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277 

295 

2258 

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384 387 38875 

96 97 10025 

411 41425 42650 
237 24025 241 50 
26975 27225 27775 
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21325 

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3305 

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14900 

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Brit Land X27 531 

MPeHn 736 695 

BStaB 652 £14 

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BTR • 245 238 

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HSBC Htagt - K43 1473 

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175 ITS 
£25 .532 
69? 691 

634 690 

141 141 

*38 442 

243 240 

1X36 1X34 

194 192 

596 £10 

*89 *86 

593 592 

7.19 736 

7.14 730 

276 280 

£16 £1S 

*16 *15 

1232 12 

649 <49 

199 197 

846 848 

275 279 

932 936 

*97 *55 

195 298 

X95 X55 

“>3 

£76 532 

*15 *23 

662 £70 

236 237 

738 734 

234 240 

499 438 

£29 £19 

199 : 2 

*91 *N 
473 449 

1343 1330 
206 110 

5 £07 
&ld X34 

6 £96 

2.15 2.15 

£54 £60 
748 7M 
133 1-32 

646 £46 

5JB £32 
592 £74 

297 392 
*11 *22 

-796 796 

X4B 348 
7192 1X87 
. *N 492 
£55 £48 
223 125 

939 940 
231 220 

£19 £21 

0.15 Ml 
■ £03 5 

390 359 
116 115 
1748 1748 
£77 635 

152 353 
213 211 

£95 794 
1X96 1099 

795 996 

1.90 19? 
892 892 

737 775 

746 755 

£90 7.M 
£04 £05 
443 447 

243 ■ 243 
648 648. 
£25 527 
£27 £25 

186 209 


Madrid 


Beta todec 41129 


PreriTO 48105 

Acerinw 

21300 

an 

20190 

20990 

ACE5A 

1775 

1725 

1735 

1756 

Agws Broaden 

5840 

■ 5780 

5700 

5741 

Agjjntakj 

5760 

9910 

5MB 

>770 

5700 

8050 

5740 

8920 

BfflMdo 

1110 

1085 

1086 

11BS 

BanHntar 

21210 

20*10 

30630 

20910 

BooCerdroHlsp 

3940 

ai» 

3666 

3906 

Ben Estate 

2850 

acts 

2040 

2835 

Ben Popular 

27330 

26530 

26860 

2/100 

BcoSartmder 

9820 

9670 

9/60 

9620 

CEPSA 

4385 

4275 

*776 

4330 

ConOnente 

2666 

2505 

7696 

3636 

CarpMapfra 

0140 

>030 

8060 

null 

Endesa 

9240 

Wo 

9140 

9150 

FECSA 

1260 

1215 

1200 

Gas MnSurai 

34800 

33600 

34UC0 

34300 

Ibentnda 

1710 

1650 

1670 

1640 

Piyta 

2795 

2 730 

2755 

2750 

Eepsm 

5600 

6600 

5640 

5570 

SevOanaElec 

1415 

1380 

UK) 

1370 

Tabacotaa 

<720 

*600 

6640 

646SI 

Ttatoalea 

3370 

3360 

3365 

3360 


1230 

1165 

1186 

1170 

Wrienc Cement 

15B0 

1480 

1500 

1485 

Manila 







Muu 



Prmrnef: 331404 

Ajsria B 

30 

29J0 

30 

29 JO 

Ayala Land 
BkPWto W 

30151 

» 

30 

30 

192 

190 

190 

191 

CAP Homes 

1230 

12 

1226 

1230 

Mata Bee A 

125 

123 

123 

124 

Metro Bank 

740 

730 

740 

740 


1050 

1025 

1025 

1X25 

PCIBnnk 

40230 

m 

395 4D2J0 

PMUngDUt 

1575 

1550 

1550 

1570 

Swjf.ltaWlB 

99 

9X50 

99 

V830 

5M Prime Hdg 

770 

7 JO 

700 

7JO 

Mexico 


Bobo 

kuMK. 

KH2? 


Pterion*: 385X44 

Alto A 

4*90 

4*40 

4*70 

4470 

Banned B 

19.10 

1X96 

1900 

1X96 


3125 

3080 

3X96 

3X90 

CBaC 

1100 

1104 

11J8 

1106 


4*10 

4620 

4520 

£jn 


4870 

4820 

4820 

Jl!K 

Goo Hn Hibaoo 
«mb Oak Mb 

yno 

2785 

2706 

2820 

16X40 16X60 

16900 16800 

TelmrisaCPD 

10100 

9970 10020 10070 

TelMexL 

]£68 

1X48 

15J0 

1564 

Milan 

MIB Tetamatka: rasaoo 


PreriMK 1230108 

ABmnmAntr 

13000 

12800 

12850 

vaiM 

Boi Cnaun M 

3660 

3480 

34U 

3666 


4670 

4660 

46110 

4606 

BcoRo 

1360 

1324 

1327 

1350 

BeneBon 


19650 

19650 

20150 

OjdtataOro- 

m 


2350 

9420 

2380 

M75 

EN1 

9060 

mo 

8930 

MBS 

FU 

5195 

6030 

5030 

5190 


WW1 

31680 

31780 

31900 

IM1 

15370 

16165 

15335 


IMA 

23K 

2280 

2790 

2310 

IWgos 

6530 

7300 

6330 

7160 

6435 

7235 

6400 

72S0 


11700 


inao 

11580 

maw 

1257 

1227 

ran 

<wm 

650 

tat, 

634 

627 


2500 

33M1 

7385 

2470 

Ptefl 

354S 

3480 

3520 

3475 

RAS 

15900 

15725 

15785 

1595 


!58» 

17500 

11125 

17795 

ITfK 


11500 

U2M 

11590 

Stef 

8705 

amn 

MMi 

SI 45 


4475 

■MM 

*405 

4410 

TIM 

4640 

*655 

4585 

4666 

Montreal 

hdoteUs fate: 302903 


PnttoesaeuLM 

BwMobCsm 

4220 

4220 

4220 

*220 

CdnTlreA 

2X85 

2*90 

75 AS 

3*70 

CdnliOA 

3270 

3X40 

3700 

am 

CTFU1SK 

31 JO 

fa 

3L5D 

3125 

Go: Metro 

1600 

1640 

1625 

Gi-West u:*m 

22.90 

2205 

22 90 

2216 


3705 

371k 

3700 

37.90 

tarastonGtp 

20 


2B 

» 

L&UowCm 

17.16 

17 

1725 

1£90 

MaOBKQmtfD 

16 

£8 

15.95 

1550 

Power CMp 
Power Art 

291* 

79te 

29.10 

27 

2£M 

2605 

2605 

Q^racerB 

25 

24ft 

a 

24U 

RageaCoawB 

900 

98 

9.90 

920 

Royal Bk Cita 

- 55 

5445 

5*50 

5*55 


Oslo 


AkerA 


DennrotteBk 

EBcwn 

HnSundA 

KraemrAso 

Hoak Hydro 

HerskeSugA 

HycanedA 

OridoAsnA 

PtataGeeSwc 

SogaPeOm A 


701 
147 
2X40 
3176 
1W 
4940 
341 
363 
210 
107 JO 
560 
. 294 
125 


oaxtadae 61190 
Pnvtaac 40040 

179 T8X50 190 

142 147 141 

2640 2790 2640 
3040 3190 3X50 
107 »H 10650 
AM 49 4X70 

363 357^50 


208 

10230 

549 

286 

120 


104 107 


High Low Ckse Prw. 


142 13B 138 140 

iOff » m m 35T 

StoRbnaxf Asa 42 4040 42 4110 


High Low dose Prey. 


Paris 


CAC-4X: 26)7.52 
P rwte m. 263*48 


Accor 

AGF 

Ak-Undde 

AlcaMAMtl 

AndJAP 

Braun Ire 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Pha 
CaiEfour 

On!j» 

ca= 

cetaleiw 

artdknDtar 

CLF-Oexta Fran 

Qwffl Agricale 

Danone 

BFAqaflatae 

ElManlaBS 

Hi n f jinn — 1 

cuiDwitnei 

GexEaux 


linetid 

Lafarge 

Lrarabd 

Ldrad 

LVMM 

LynLEom 

MUNlnB 

Paiibm A 

Pernod Rkrori 

Peugeot CB 

PtandFPiW 

Pranodes 


Rem 

Rh-PtwtencA 

Sanafl 

SdineUer 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
steGeneraie 
Sododio 
StGebafn 
Soex 


tantaetabo 

TnransonC 


Total B 
Uslnar 
Video 


CSF 


790 

20190 

ns 

eas 

37740 

705 

934 

246 

1158 

3517 

24? 

27490 

719 

B90 

527 

1266 

882 

576 

939 

7.15 

806 

465 

838 

364 

952 

2116 

1434 

572 

354 

40140 

317 

584 

2460 

1717 

121.90 

1708 

20220 

575 

309 

1119 

402JB 

703 

2870 

850 

27570 

600 

17X50 

473 

89.90 

383 


764 
197 JO 
871 
585 
370 
689 
922 
23X10 
1121 
3550 
24*10 
267 JO 
692 
875 
516 
1266 
863 
556 
924 
7 
794 
455 
>13 
35298 
938 
236/ 
1410 
565 
33X80 
397 JO 
310 
567 
2402 
1668 
11X50 
1690 
19470 
553 
2%10 
1104 
399 
685 
Z765 
822 
270 
581 
17110 
462 
86 
37DJD 


764 

19X50 

m 

589 

37050 

690 

926 


780 

197 

916 

<01 

374 

703 

934 


24X90 24*90 
1137 1147 

24X60 24X20 
267-50 27] JD 
692 71» 

675 m- 
521 523 

1266 1270 
864 875 

560 571 

924 927 

7JB 705 
794 793 

45X80 462 

824 838 

352JO m 
942 947 

3®S7 2073 

1415 1408 
568 568 

3500 337 JO 
399.90 397 JO 
310 31*90 
573 572 

2418 2417 
1668 1687 
119.50 11X90 
1700 1710 

199 19X10 
560 571 

29970 30X90 
1104 1110 

399 400 

685 6X7 

2840 2820 

>24 841 

270 27X40 
557 600 

mM 171.90 
462 466J0 
87 JO 8*50 
37*70 379 JO 


Ericsson B 

I tomes B 

IncenfveA 

Investor B 

M 0 D 0 B 

Nontbadron 

ftamnAlpWm 

SaotMkB 

Santa B 

SCAB 

£E BcnlceD A 
Stamm For* 
siinnstaB 
SKFB 

SpratKHitan A 
SdshypakkA 
StoraA 
5v Mindies A 


253 24X50 
1055 1028 
XU 52B 
349 343 
239 22X50 
255 230 


283 
19X50 
19X50 
171 
77 JO 
20*50 
324 JD 
187 
143 


271 

191 

189 

161 

75 

202 

311 


246 250 
1030 low 
529 528 
345 346 
228 23350 
255 235 


281 

19150 

191 

16*50 

75J0 

202 

310 


280 

195 

196 
169 

75 

205 

311 


S3 O PaulO Bew yatadm BM3>*0 


sms' 


UgmSentdos 

b. 


Total 
TBj aspPM 

ciram 


9^0 9.10 
75*00 74200 
4 800 47 JO 
61Gffi 6060 
1500 15*0 
46200 44900 
580X0 57100 
41200391030 
32SJ6S 3T150 
22500 22000 
1 01-40 99 JO 
15X99151090 
16*30 15900 
29600 29001 
4X55 4X30 
27.10 BUS 


: 881 4*80 
9J9 9.40 

75*00 74000 
47.40 4800 
6100 6200 
1X70 1500 

mm 454.00 

58000 58X00 
41 200 397.00 
31900 32200 
22X00 mm 
10130 10X40 
15X90 15600 
16430 16000 
29300 29500 
6030 4100 
2709 2£«9 


Seoul 

DdEdffl 

asissx 

Kona Mob Tel 
LGSemican 

i SI 


Cerogarttotaitar TB4J4 
* ■ : 71293 




116500 113000 114000 IT 6500 
5130 5010 5050 5D50 

15800 15300 15700 15600 
27300 27300 27800 27600 
7010 6860 6900 7010 

550000 535000 541000 541000 
25000 22800 23000 24500 
43000 42000 43000 42700 
Sfm 55500 56900 56000 
10800 10600 10600 10X00 


Ada Pac Brew 
cental Pnc 

Oy Be* 

QdeCOnfcne 
Daky From art* 
DBSIOrafgn 


Strata Tiroes; 2229J9 
PnytaBC 225*10 


OBS1 , 

For East Urtag 

Praser&NeM 

HKLand* 

JordMaltaGn* 

jflrtsmjtoglc* 


OTUntaiflkF 

PakwayHOgs 

sHP 1 " 

So Press F 
Sing Tech hid 

see 

iiSS^F 

WtogTalHdgs 


800 

X25 

800 

800 

1000 

1020 

1X20 

1000 

1X10 

1*9) 

1*60 

1X10 

1X50 

1X20 

1530 

1530 

X00 

X76 

X76 

086 

2X50 

2X20 

2000 

2000 

£10 

6 

6M 

£05 

£20 

£05 

£10 

620 

1320 

1110 

1320 

1320 

206 

201 

203 

206 

£10 

6 

AIK 

£05 

3L3B 

322 

132 

128 

1000 

1000 

1000 

1X80 

*30 

*26 

*28 

*28 

1900 

1900 

1900 

1900 

1120 

1100 

1120 

1120 

£15 

£95 

6 

6 

£40 

0 

• 

840 

1320 

1110 

1320 

1320 

9.10 

9 

905 

9 

2970 

» 

29 JO 

2900 

* 

1BX 

308 

4 

3J6 

322 

324 

136 

£10 

505 

505 

£10 

£74 

308 

320 

174 

122 

128 

120 

121 

1720 

1720 

17 JO 

1720 

*56 

*02 

436 

*52 


Stockholm 

AGAB 
ABBA 


393 

123 


284 

119 





SX If tadBE 281649 


FrerienK 283532 

107 

106 

106 

W 

922 

903 

910 

m 

191 30 

188 

189 

m 

367 

359 

360 

363 

17*50 

173 17350 17JJ0 

332 

327 


328 

450 

440 

460 

■4*3 


Sydney 

-UHJ0 U8 180 18350 

All Ortaroks: 250120 
Pierian M93J0 

Amcor 

846 

801 

842 

£46 

ANZBktag 

£53 

806 

832 

844 

BHP 

1805 

1700 

I/0S 

1708 

Bond 

303 

156 

303 

339 

Bnsri^te ind. 

2200 

2210 

2239 

2238 

CBA 

1145 

1138 

1302 

113/ 

CCAmotfl 

.1288 

1212 

121V 

1294 

Coles ftSysr 

£35 

£20 

£30 

SJfl 


£70 

661 

£70 

£70 

CRA 

19 

1886 

1X99 

1887 

CSR 

*66 

*51 

*66 

*67 


2/1 

268 

269 

207 

Gen Prop Tiusl 
GIO AiaJinUa 

247 

245 

247 

246 

303 

159 

303 

302 

GooSnronFkl 

132 

14/ 

132 

133 

KIAwitailto 

1200 

1209 

1280 

1280 


111 

307 

111 

309 


2340 

MM 

2139 

23.25 

Moyne Mlddss 

7.78 

739 

702 

725 

MIM Hdn 
Nat Ausl Bonk 

104 

102. 

103 

103 

17.15 

1603 

17.15 

1£M 

NalMahMl 

Hdg 

103 

1.90 

103 

102 

£70 

64B 

£68 

£70 

NormrotoyMJn 
Nam Lid 

1.71 

427 

132 

*19 

126 

*27 

L/4 

*21 

PocfBc Duntoo 

117 

110 

116 

114 

Pioneer inti 

*06 

4 

*06 

*03 

Pub Braadcnsl 

60S 

£78 

£80 

£84 

Pantos Alnunys 

2J8 

227 

2JH 

234 


*05 

*70 

*80 

404 


*60 

*49 

*37 

431 

Weafcnmeis 

1X15 

10 

1X10 

10 

WMC 

£H 

824 

£37 

£77 

WtatfleU Tiusl 

247 

244 

246 

244 

MtosfpocBUng 

WboaSdePet 

704 

929 

U\ 

931 

704 

940 

729 

921 

WWwrttE 

300 

139 

159 

139 

Taipei 

Stock Market todoc 76003 
Pierian 70721 


178 

176 

176 

179 

ChtagHwa Bk 

169 

168 

168 

170 

B9 

66J50 

8X50 

» 

CMna Devrijxro 

1Q5JD 

100 

104 

107 JO 

mia Steel 

2X70 

2X30 

2X40 

2X00 


178 

176 

177 

1/9 


74 

7030 

74 

7X50 


1*2 

141 

14130 

143 


83 

82 

82 

8330 

NaiVaPkEte 

6X50 

6X30 

6X58 

6630 

SMnKmgUe 

115 

6X50 

112 

59 

113 

IfiMi 

11630 

51 

Tatung 

Uto Micro Elec 

5150 

4JJ0 

53 

3900 

5150 

3900 

5330 

4X20 

UM World CWn 

7X50 

70 

7DJ0 

71 


Tokyo 


Kyocera 

Moral 

Matsu Elec Wk 





H0M *» 1B47X75 


PlHtoOK 1873X65 

1070 

1050 

1050 

ion 


803 

820 

80S 

Bin 

807 

807 

812 

£34 

626 

620 

<34 

lira 

1090 

1090 

1090 

1920 

1800 

1880 

1900 

599 

594 

5M 

595 

7230 

2200 

7770 

2250 

2778 

V/lll 

2710 

2/80 

20/0 

2040 

7050 

7050 

2020 

2010 

2010 

2010 

7030 

1990 

2000 

2000 

1280 

1250 

1280 

1270 

514 

505 

505 

504 

1360 

1300 

1310 

1380 

975 

945 

951 

9X0 

7O0a 

7380a 

7320a 

7370a 

2610 

75K) 

7530 

764(1 

mm 

4940a 

4940a 

4970a 

2360 


2330 

23M 

3800 

3710 

3/10 

3720 

1290 

1270 

127D 

127(1 

4100 

3980 

3400 

4110 

1240 

1220 

1220 

1230 

1050 

I030 

1030 

1040 

inn 

1150 

1140 

1160 

3800 

3660 

.1710 

3690 

1440 

1470 

1470 

1440 

585 

571 

571 

590 

CAU1 

5360 

5390 

X410 

509 

5ID 

500 

502 

7990a 

7BM- 

7890a 

001 0b 

3500 

3440 

3470 

3500 

695 

677 

67/ 

6VB 

2140 

7108 

2100 

2100 

1340 

1310 

1310 

1320 

517 

495 

506 

520 

330 

321 

326 

333 

728 

723 

721 

725 

1030 

1010 

1010 

1030 

221 

217 

217 

222 

8/J 

845 

m; 

876 

ffifl 

532 

532 

440 

7290 


7710 

7790 

2050 

2030 

2030 

20)0 

405 

388 

388 

3*9 

402 

. 470 

471 

474 

1810 

1760 

17BQ 

1780 

2000 

1970 

19M 

1990 

102S 

lno 

1011) 

1070 

1130 

1100 

1120 

1130 

345 

335 

340 

328 

717 

691 

711 

774 

1360 

1330 

1340 

1350 


185 187 18*50 

130 13950 120 

190 18930 18950 1B9JD 
10350 10150 10150 103 

211 201 20758 201 


The Trib Index 

Prices aaot 3:00 P.M. Now Yotk time. 

Jan, 1. 1992 rr too. 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to data 
% change 
+15.87 

World Index 

152. BO 

• 0.02 

-001 

Regional tadWM 





Asia/Pacific 

110.76 

-0.36 

-0.32 

-1750 

Europe 

160.63 

■0.40 

-0.25 

+15.41 

N. America 

179.78 

*0.61 

40.34 

+40.15 

S. America 

Industrie! butane 

141.16 

40.81 

+0.58 

+58.54 

Capital goods 

177.95 

■0.78 

-0.44 

+33.92 

Consumer goods 

174.48 

4 O.B 6 

4050 

+2857 

Energy 

17865 

-1.19 

- 0.66 

+31.73 

Finance 

111.36 

-0.25 

- 0^2 

-12.47 

MsceUaneaus 

158.81 

+ 0.02 

+ 0.01 

+1654 

Raw Materials 

183.79 

■0.31 

-0.17 

+29.81 

Service 

142.17 

■OOI 

- 0.01 

+18.47 

Utilities 

133.90 

+128 

+0.95 

+5.32 

The tntamatiaml Herald Tribune IVraVStodt tadtor O frocks ifw U.& doBar vaims ot 
280 hironaitonadytaiiMstoblesfcete tarn 25 countries. For more information, a free 
booUetbavaBabteOymUIngtoTha Trib kKku.131 Avenue Cheries de Oeule. 

92521 Neu&y Cede*. Fiance. Competed oy Bloomberg News. 

High Low 

dose Prev. 


High Low 

Close Prev. 


MtauWflH H*y 

m 


095 

912 

MoanB Bldl 

1BV. 

1005 

1X15 

MtoubWilMot 

■iii 

El 

915 

918 

fiAoarwlntiA 

7*30 

72ft 

7205 

Mfeaifeislll Tr 

1310 

1280 

1280 

1310 

Mdnrarcx 

14 

1305 

1195 

MBsai 

902 

895 

B96 

906 

Moore 

3X40 

2900 

3025 

fiS&BJj Fmtosn 

1260 

1230 

12011 

1260 

Newbridge Net 

4£15 

44ft 

45ft 

MHsol Trust 

715 

AX 

AX 

712 

Namnda me 

32+ 

3705 

32ft 

Murato Mfg 

4310 

4240 

4280 

4280 

Moreen Enemy 

30ft 

3X40 

30ft 

NEC 

1460 

1430 

1440 

1470 


101 

9920 10055 

NBmn 

1850 

1790 

1790 

1060 

Now 

13 

1200 

13 

NDdmSec 

716 

pn 

703 

718 


2X10 

23U 

25 


8410 

8140 

8140 

8350 

Pancdn Pe»n 

5700 

5600 

5X90 


712 

708 

709 

719 

Peiro Cda 

2XBS 

2060 

2X70 

NlpponOII 


«7 

487 

500 

Placer Dame 

29 

2830 

29 

SJtppon Steel 

332 

325 

325 

315 

Poco Pedra 

I4I> 

H 

14 

Mbson fAute 

782 

760 

760 

m 

Potash Sre* 

no 

108ft 

109ft 

HKK 

266 

259 

261 

262 

Renabsonce 

4*35 

43ft 

42.V0 


1630 

1590 

1680 

1600 

RtoAStfwn 

3270 

32ft 

32.70 

NTT 

0870a 

8720a 

8800 a 

8790a 

Rogers Quitel B 

26ft 

2£70 

26U 

NTT DOM 

3220k 

31 toll 

3170b 

3200b 


5X90 

XX40 

5605 

Oil Paper 

673 

665 

665 

662 

SIwSCdaA 

57ft 

5660 

5/ft 

Osaka Gas 

300 

294 

29* 

297 

Stone ConsoW 

2*65 

23A5 

23ft 

Rfcoli 

1470 

1430 

1450 

1470 


»ft 

59 

59.05 

Rohm 

8830 

8680 

8680 

8950 

TafemanEnr 

46ft 

*Sft 

4*40 

Sckuni Bk 

702 

690 

699 

695 

TettB 

31.10 

3000 

3X90 


3570 

3400 

3490 

3470 

Tefegtota 

41.10 

4000 

41 


1330 

1300 

1300 

1310 

Trim 

21 JO 

2005 

21.10 


522 

SOW 

511 

509 

Thomson 

2X30 

2X10 

2tUU 


6610 

65X0 

6570 

6570 

TwDom Bank 

39ft 

39ft 

39.70 


4710 

4630 

4600 

4500 

Tronsnlto 

17.15 

16ft 

17.10 

SeWsal House 

1080 

1060 

1070 

10BO 

TiunsCdoPIpe 

2X65 

2£40 

25ft 


7660 

7440 

7440 

7670 

Titmoik FW 

4X40 

44ft 

4*80 


1630 

1580 

1590 

1630 


32 

31*5 

31ft 

SWmu El Pwr 

1990 

1970 

1900 

1900 

TVXGOW 

1105 

1000 

11 

SlUn-easn CH 

2460 

2420 

2420 

2440 

WKfcxnstEny 


2*90 

2*95 

Sh&iK&aBk 

1020 

1000 

1010 

1000 

Weston 

74ft 

73ft 

74 


Safltmk 
Sony 
Sumitomo 
Sumitomo Bk 
SwnttChem 
SemnomoEtec 
Sum# Metal 
SomB Trust 
TaWwPtmmj 
Tatasto Chera 
TDK 

Tohoku EiPwr 
Total Baik 
T 0 W 0 Marine 
Trttya EIPwr 
Tokyo Electron 

Tokyo Gas 

Tokyo Crop. 

Total 

Togpor Print 

Taraylnd 

Testae 

Tntan 

TayoTrusl 

Teyan Motor 

Yomanoucbl 

eiltoftrlta 


11700 now 11000 11600 
8970 8700 8800 9000 

893 882 882 893 

1390 1340 1360 1350 

467 457 457 *59 

1720 1700 1710 1710 

296 283 283 277 


1X20 

7*10 

13.95 
29N 

4X90 
3» 
30JD 
100 .AO 

13 

2100 

56V 

2X70 

2X40 

1*30 

109 JO 
4*45 
325S 
26 
5570 
5655 
23JS 
59W 
4*30 
3ffh 
4X90 
21.05 
2X30 
39 JS 
1600 
2X60 
451k 
32.10 

10.95 
25 

7*35 


985 

2930 

26® 

8270 

imn 

933 

1120 

2170 

4390 

309 

544 

1190 

1426 

735 

751 

2740 

757 

3450 

2610 


977 980 

MM) 2810 
2580 2590 

8050 BI18 
2000 20GO 
923 929 

1090 1090 

2133 2140 

4250 4250 
300 30* 

538 538 

1170 1170 
1409 1410 
717 719 

727 727 

2650 2660 

733 755 

3380 3390 

2530 2550 


970 

29X 

2630 

8280 

2000 

978 

1110 

2150 

4490 

305 

544 

1190 

1410 

723 

750 

2760 

735 

3410 

2550 


Vienna 


ATX ladmc 121BJ0 


Pravtoas: 12T2J8 

BBAG 

750 

732 

733 

751 

BeetUeMJddeii 


845 

B46J0 

045 

Broo-Un Goess 

665 

66X10 

665 

660 


427 

423 

42X60 <2400 

EA -General 

3450 

3420 

3440 

3435 

EVN 

1768 

1743 

77431756J0 

FtoTOtofen Wlm 

570 

565 

567 

5&5iO 

Marr+tekmol 

611 

601 

*11 

606 

OMV 

1385 

1370 l374JQ1379.ro 

OesIBekMi 

B71-35 05X10 

861 

868 


413 

*04 412J0 

411 

VAStoN 

46X50 45220 

457 

4S3 

VATech 

1815 178900 17B9.90 

l/W 

Wleneibrog 

Bau 

Wolford 

2154 

2125 

2154 

2130 

1440 

1410142X10 

1445 


Wellington HZSE-roMerozmja 

Praifeasc 23Z704 


Toronto 

T5E lodniUte 622605 




AfaBU Price 

2180 

23ft 

23x0 

2110 

Atoern Energy 

31.10 

3000 

31 

31.15 

Aknn Atom 

47 JD 

4/ JO 

47.45 

47ft 

Anderson Espi 

1£90 

16.70 

1600 

1605 

BkMimteal 

5X10 

4900 

49.95 

49 44 

BkNaw Scuta 

5205 

52.14 

5X40 

5X20 

BarricfcGaid 

3X40 

34ft 

3£40 

3*05 

BCE 

71 Ji 

7005 

71 

71ft 


31 

3X80 

3X95 

31100 

BiectwmPtanti 

82.90 

79 Ji 

79.54 

8X80 

BomOan&B 

2X95 

2£65 

25ft 

75ft 


31*5 

3120 

3140 

3120 


22.70 

2X45 

2IM 

SB 


52 

51 JO 

41.60 

42 

OBC 

65JO 

65ft 

ASM 

6£65 

CdnNaORafl 

5200 

52.10 

57 JJ 

52IM 

CdnNat Res 

34.30 

33.V0 

3194 

3420 

CtbiOcddPet 

2*70 

2*40 

2445 

2*45 

CdnPadSe 

3X55 

3520 

34.55 



38 

3/ft 

3764 

38ft 


7*60 

2*40 

2*45 

2*55 


12 

11.90 

11.90 

12 

DeaetweA 

2X15. 

2Sta 

26 

24.95 

DuPadCitoA 

32ft 

31 JO 

32ft 

31ft 


23 

27ft 

2190 

2115 


39ft 

39 

3920 

3X66 


299 

299 

299 

299 

FakateUte 

tolA* 

3X35 

3045 

3X60 

FtetdMrClMllA 

22^5 

2230 

2240 

23ft 

Franca Ne&uto 

59.15 

MW* 

58.95 

5X70 

Gi* can Res 

11 

10 JO 

11 

10.95 

hnpeiWOa 

6*15 

64 

6*10 

64 

men 

47*0 


47ft 

4745 

iPLEnew 

4X85 

40ft 

4884 

40 W 


18ft 

1X10 

1H 70 

1X20 

uewniGtouo 

5X55 

4yjo 

5020 

4X35 


Ak-HZealdB 

307 

305 

307 

306 

Briefly Inri 

126 

125 

124 

126 

Coder Hen rod 

3J8 

328 

130 

323 

ReteJiOi Bldg 

*40 

*48 

*49 

*50 

ReraiOi Eny 

*07 

199 

199 

*07 

FwctiaiFora 

2.20 

2.W 

119 

7.19 

Fletch Ch Pspec 

2.87 

IBS 

206 

206 


1*4 

343 

165 

163 

TeteawiNZ 

6.96 

607 

£95 

£06 

WRsen Hroun 

1120 

1120 

1120 

1120 


Zurich 

ABBB 
Adecco B 
Alusulsseft 
Ares- Senna B 
am a 

BatobeHdgR 
BK Vision 
OroioatR 

cm subs* GpR 

EKMawntlB 

EmfrCtamto 

ESECHdg 

UfilfdroHwMlf □ 
iNKienJun b 

NessOR 

Nowrtaft 

Pargesu HU B 

PharmVbuiB 

RttwnontA 

RndwHdgPC 

SBC R 

SGS B 

5MHB 

SutznrR 

Stria RetnsR 

SwfeUlrR 

UBSB 

WWerttwR 

Zurich AssurR 


SPI Mec 285U0 
PtovtootJM*!? 


426 

1224 

W 

2925 

3? 

15*50 


1825 1829 
410 426 

1104 1205 

1480 1500 
863 865 

2875 2885 2900 
834 838 845 

676 694 67* 

15175 15125 151 JO 


1829 

1208 

1500 

865 


540 

538 

54) 

540 

5710 

4650 

5650 

56911 

4700 

4550 

4610 

4700 

1110 

1086 

1093 

1060 

1669 

1638 

1641 

1649 

1774 

17ST 

1757 

1764 

1514 

1400 

ISflO 

1505 

755 

738 

748 

7» 

2145 

2100 

2100 

2090 

12850 

12570 

12570 

12710 

281 JO 

278 27X50 

380 

3364 

3265 

3264 

33«5 

9B5 

947 

951 

902 

908 

973 

980 

984 

1504 

1489 

1493 

1480 

1325 

1796 

1309 

1327 

1326 

1294 

1295 

1319 

896 

m 

683 

883 

435 

430 

430 

433 



Sa44tM?*Z4*W9, 


PAGE 2 


READERS ABEADVISB> 

that thm AMmarbnu) I I mnaU 
Tribuna caaaatbm baM imiptwt 
slbh i far lass or d amaflM 

ift imi mt i at O I MU lrfl MMW 


Business Opportunities 


moats which a ppo ar In our 
popmr. IT a thorofor* rm ew 
mmM that roaden make 
appropriate k t qm r los boform 
smotBng any money or U ta ii fl 


OfFSHOffi BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
HflGRATIOWASSPORTS 
THADtWAKCE 


finport&port 


ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES LTD 


ITALIAN TRADMG COVANY exports 
ta owrlto anUsny Undo! pratate 
mb in BnpB and tents wy JW 
products tram al ner tba Mdd far t» 
Bmpnn oohoBt boll lor Musatri usa 
and wh ananas. Gate pm {ten 


K Part Sort, Doo^fa te of fao 


BrtUfata - 

Tefc 01624 626531 


sand vwr requests amt*r offirs a* 
caMnue ana prica M by tn or mail 

tt ■ 20123 MLANO * TEUFAX +38 2 
6056143 

IKNERiC CIGARETTES, Amratean 


Fas 01624 625126 

£ Mte fa ntanBarteprfaajHt 


blend tobacco, burnt prices, ntata 
bbeflng ante*. FAX USA; 1 {954) 


CELLULAR TELEPHONE GEM Stan- 
tent ©ratal prices, wkana porteas 
a* Tsfabx USA *054474366. 


NASDAQ LISTINGS 

Our ton are financial 
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» oBstm {ncn LIE} fcw. 

Wa are looten to «*hg pft 
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FAMOUS BRAND FOODS, heaHti & 
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SSS»«rty.teW«86fiUSA 


LEVI Sol’S. Used and New. Ouoity 

a tired tram tte USA. Honest and 
a. Fee S&62M749 USA 


NEED CEMENT, STEEL RODS, asphalt 
aid bdumoi. lave sawn finer. Ftesa 
contact Fax 662 3 7BB08 


-Arranging taste ter Kng shares. 

OUR fnatETSTE 
VWVJMXHTOCKSJXM 
OR BY FAX PL AMBTJ 604-325441 S. 


QUALITY USS> JEANS al brands men. 
eomen, al sizes. Also Levi SOI'a. 
Fax 506 594 MS USA 


US. OR EUROPEAN BUSINESS. Wa 
ta he* you And eamoHm to ssl {our 
preduds. Fw 508 SB4 9483 USA 


USED LEVI SOI JEANS • Al colon 8 
mate Forma fat FAX: 801-561-3849 

kTrecyoewear 


WE EXPORT Ota 01 ax) Cereal Craps 
tram Greets. For taqutou Fte *301 - 
6251290 


DELAWARE KCs, UCs 

Deal tired elb Daknrera aosrt, saw 
money on USA company formation. 
Detarare Int « LLC. 5350 USE. Fast, 
ratable, complete service In al US 
teas. Frea Wo. CM or tec 
CaroAnarfoL tec. 

30 Old RuMdt lane, DapL H 
Dow, DE 19901 
Tab 302-738-4300 
Fax 3OE-73WB0} 

Hunt MfadtaMootparnari&ooni 


2nd PASSPORTS I Driving Ucancee / 


WE EXPORT -Vegetable al, biter, 
dtaan legs, m ft. ate* pater, butter, 
beans. faTcsnada (902} 6854070. 


Baric Actxxnts. GM, PX). Box 70302, 
Athens 16610, Greece. Fax B962152, 
M^faMWQkftrirnDeeyxas 


INT L FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 


the computer training 

INDUSTRY SHOULD DOUBLE 
IN FIVE YEARS. AND ONLY 
A HANDFUL OF PEOPLE WILL 
BENEF1T-FROM IT. 


take advantage of that potential. 
j If you have the financial qualifications, the entre- 
preneurial spirit, and if you're wfllmg to fallow a 
proven system, there are prime locations still available. 
For more Info rmatio n, contact Thierry Gourdon at: 
phone: +33.(0)3.443&8L90, fax: +33.(0)J.44.58^9.30, 
e-mail: 7541L433@axnpuserve.COTL 

New Horizon^ 


Conpuiar Ltirning Csnlsri 

mnowiboijnuAmi 


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Extensive initial arid on-going training, marketing, adver- 
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contact; 

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P.O. Box 1290 • Troy, Ml 48007-1290 USA 
TEL 1-810-588-4100 • FAX: 1-810-588-0718 


& Insurance Restoration 


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■ Operating since 1948 

■ Specializing in fadocar EnvCr onm cacat Services 

■ Specializing in Xnomnee Disaster Recently 

■ Offering a proves system to birild i Franchise network 

■ Z2 Proprietary Patents & U Profit Centers 
■ 400 Franchises in 20 countries . 

■ Franchises Available throughout mou of Europe 

e Complete Draining * Field Suppon^^^D^^^ 


Fbr an appobiEaent to men with Scott white DlfCMndutei 
be is tayoor area, call or tax BUI Stas. iTr-XLy. » 

1-817-332-1575 PAX: 817435^118*^|5!!^®!fj& 


JUST PUBLISHED 

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INTERNATIONAL MASTER FRANCHISE 
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The definitive guide devoted solely to internatioaal franchising. 
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SmdtelHT Guide, PA Bo* 12488, Osthnd. CA M604 Cash, Money Order, Vta 
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or Fax: 15 10) 547-3245 or soorcehoofifSt 

HcmU^SS^Erlbixiic 


INTERNATIOJ 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, ] 


OFFSHORE C0MPANB 


READY HADE QUi. FULL JW« 
TRADE EXXXABnS AfO UC 


CW(A BUS2JESS SERVICES 


Contact Site Ho far famtiriB 
aenras A cwipsy bnchM 
MACS Lm Room imAbatte 
2-6 Gnuivie Read, TST, Knfaon, 


SMflT YOUR BUStaESS In ta Mk 
arfteda. Mtei pert d Bstpe. Prartria* 
address. Funteod ofiesr. Eriuon 
njornt WarixxBBs. Vateaddedienfc- 
a Smtedri auxri. SUU srita aad 
sterikig stai Td. A Fn SnfasL On 
Ids oonmuMta nstert. Oxter ran- 
agsoanL Lopc&e managmed LboV 
ante Pmack Trade Canter Tri: 431 
(6)B»674S1, Rbc +31 39 ttl 2«l 


Hong Kona. s-anW: 
TekmmtlXBFrn 


WE ARE A BK, FWK1E TRADE BN- 
TH5WE - vhtariv to PsM / m 


Pofah nwtel tface at ysofl / flpedri- 
tzad h hast tan Fta East ri Urea lor 
produefen ri bags / ternfat and Bdnri /, 
zkmer bps and scesarnfas. We m 

com v praesaona parar • w 
Mdte'Htn »• help us sffli dofag fas 
burinen / mragamart, nw'conraeraW 
coabscte. Ws n atdf lonter prapos* 
teToftionliraynninrianscon- 
tect ut by fax PH. V amort 48 


migration opfamms 

Cbteto RtRoaMrt ResUtncy, art 
ObmHp 6 2nd Pnsnxt fa Eaxmrie 
taraabiMt UJWMGowflmeni - 
Prapares, saving at S28X0IV tesnad fa 
90 to 180 days, Finds held in Eaoo* 


LADIES A GENTLEMEN WANTED 
uorttada as (retexfi HBrtS to Hfcs 
contacts for recoooantidlons to Ngh 
c te a W tM ectebfirinaRb. We edit 
rinca 19S2 and pay btft oonrisateos. 
Operate «Wi sifa-agen* fn your hare 
imtf InrtL Write to: C&C, PM 
224, CH8056 aticfaSteartaid of fax 
(*41) 1-371 7106. . 


PRIVATE NSNCAL CLJNC, PRAGUE 
far nta Na* HA Md 300 aqjn. rib 
tad of 1^00 sq.ra. indurJng private 
pairing, bi a prengloiB hcrifoii Pras- 
ante used (Or ptafcsuwry, brtansi- 
bo ba mod far other naricri pnfatakn. 
For taiber irtonatton contact FAX 
+42-2-7525SB 


HJMWG LETTERS 


Top SO World Be* tauad. 
r tSnation fax 817 55 943 


17 YEAR OLO COMPANY Ejputfng 
icridndB cla* serious Income fa 
ameritnead enthuiadB business people 
vitaWfaim. Andy NOW to: 

Tte Steal Canta AA<) 44171 6444814 
*Fbc 44 181 905 4fB2 
Ered: nGtaWnaUtogacojIt 


mtlai fix 617 55 943 6M 
Moo Bote. Audita 


SHALL CHARMNG DOTH* 21 tate 
reams in Gsnano near Roms - rttii 
park - convention feefttea - large 
restaurant - panoramic location fa Roman 
M - ttari tonnseings h nbored ten®- 


-YOUR OWN SWISS BRANCtt- 
Ttere are mny good reesocsto have 
your own Srtss Brandv « to opens 
part of your aetata Smug ft a fata 
company. Wa hefp you to svatate lire 
best solution for your personal needs. 
For tarnation fax +41 1 364 62 12 


SAUMBKXSinBUTOfB Wanted lor 
a tomtit mtetaed Anredcao a tann ti re 
matk-S! energetic coanutobsd dsvfcs. 


tptam. Conbcf aerer to asgotak ssfa. 
BceVent price. Please fax to Italy 
+3909364277. 


maacaf, enirgetic aanutabed darics. 
E xperienced safes psopte nacassay. No 
tfare wasters. Contecf K Portar CK Lid 
Tel UK 01660 200494 Internet 
1QS642,1412tcorepmsw 


DfSTIlfBUTORS WANTED FOR: 
US nads wter coder holfcctid *#i bui 
nputaatio^notesriaafaiBaiw^ng 
tawed bcities. Cost of dee crisp tala: 
adf aumtimsteir t caol per Bur. 
Please fax Norarofi to the USA: 
201-618-M5& 


ENlBEPfSEURS: Om rrf WMrfV 
larges! network marketing cernpues 
coatog soon fa Brad, Tltaand and tc 


M, I f , if.nmifiiiri >m| r(_. 

nappno. nn nww m cot- 
mend saff tetaL Top 300 aicans 
S747K jr. Fsr 301480057 Dr. Bandy. 


OFFSHORE COKHMESL fir tos bn- 
due or advice Tat Londcn 44 161 741 
1224 Far 44 161 746 855818338 
mnuppietonixu* 


StNAGAPORE. From USJ1700 
^teMpsoanriatesantoerteidpri- 
vtetoar gride inefaded. Serge Hay« 
Tired Comritaft. Tri I ftx +352 51 76 
03 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 




PROVID€SI>«ECTnNAiiaAiSBrVICg 

TO APPfU>VH> PROJECTS AND TRAW8ACTK»IS 
LOANS FUNDS DRAFTS 
DOCUMENTAKT LETTER OF CREDIT 
CREDIT ENHANCEMENT 
FINANCIAL GUARANTEES 
BANK KTT 09 SWIFT VERIFIED 
ALL BROKERS AND INTERMEDMRIES 
INVITED AND PROTECTED 
For further information contact the Fnandal Services 
DMshnofthe Company dredfy 
Contact Office: U.K. 

Tel: 0171 365 5075 Fax: 0171 355 5050 
MknMstiathfw Office: Costa Rica 
Tel: 506 293 1244 Fax: 506 293 1237 
Australia: 

Tet 301 422 8910 Tel: 02 9873 3055 
Tet 301 422 6915 Fax: 02 9071 8983 


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Any Phone, Fax or Cellular • Call for All Our New Rates 


24 Hr. Personal Service « No Confusing Bills 
Check Out Our Bates To U.SJL From : 


France 32 * 

Germany 33 * 

Switzerland ...36£ 

UK 25* 

Hong Kong AH 

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Netherlands 39* 

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Canada 35 * 

Spain m 

Belgium 55* 

Austria .50* 

mowmsite 

HTTPV/ fYPN.com / KaJIMart 

47SHwj.AU, 

StiMta Bach F1329S USA 
BflM£757K17Cec«np{iserraj06i 


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Philippine 35* 

hdonesla 41i)3 

Thailand 41JJ2 

Taroan ^ 


^ (m 

mt 


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^^VUX .-.^e FRANCE 354 

^^p^CERWAiir, 37# SWITZERLAND -37* 

Call Hans at 44 171 360 5037 . . 

fiac 44 171 360 5036 

Oread otrllS. ofSce at pW} 907-5166 or bocfiDll 907-5M4 
Mitifc tribune lftwwrtorldlflltconj 
hflpy/w*w^re»w«tttetexiri ■ ■ ■ HL.wc.a 


g*gg»OtjgteCDWCrCHtagWHa«4P> M nc »» ■ II I trr I 111 




IBQHEKjQWB RMDH&BAMK 

Tracing, Imitaft tittering, dpbt Jre% ' 

raff ktafatttp baa A-OJ '* FWfaj' w» . 

fabtabreartboral + ba*ttawainfai$ 1 

Fac (*30) 21Z281-443S. 


IB COmUff.^RfaHm B loom. 

spea of -US ontdaefund ppodi and 
tart* far I aodret coontaorL 
Brand (USA), toe. (Rasn. Tat 


FOR SALE- Fril aarviea tori age 
OMponte AtatantaLOrerarytt 
oa ritf v* rente, caaremr 
rey- Ffix 9QW2V0C9. ' 


CM 'ftev pnteeSM Stefa revt 
FM veal's tndaetioa 1RI pfacas. 
Pronrean price: USS3. Order not IP 
ote sure. Fac +33 $1 45 61 22 St. 


SSricflaBOnwctnat. 

2» PA3SP0RTS. Vta bn trori J ’ 
btridag back door to Spain A tU. 
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Nissan Aims to Cut 
Development Time 
On Vehicles by 40 % 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Bre-X Wins Race for Gold 

Deal on Borneo Mine Ends Months of Bid ding 


Reuters 

TOKYO '-—Nissan Motor Co. said 
Tuesday it had introduced a system 
for producing new models that would 
aa the tune to develop a vehicle by 
40 percent, to just 19 months. 

A company spokesman said the 
move was expected to cut devel- 
opment costs by almost a third and 
was aimed at raising Nissan's do- 
mestic competitiveness in sales of 
recreational vehicles, a market sec- 
tor in which it has lagged its rivals 


tween completing the design and the 
start of mass production. 

The first model to be developed 
under the new system will hit the 

showrooms in the second half of this 

year, and all new models after rtwr 
will have been developed in the 
shorter tune frame, said the spokes- 
man, who insisted on anonymity 

Nissan would then be the world’s 
first auto manufacturer to cut de- 
velopment time for all its new 
vehicles to less than 20 months, the 
spokesman said. 

The industry's current average 
development time for a new model 
is about 30 months, he said. 

Nissan hopes to achieve a 25 per- 
cent share of the domestic vehicle 
market by 2000. Its domestic share 
fell to a record low of 20.8 percent in 
1996. 

Under the new system, design and 
production divisions weak together 
more closely than before, frequently 
exchanging design data before a 
vehicle design is finalized. This al- 


lows the company to eataHwh the 
production plan for new models at 
the same time as the design is com- 
pleted, the spokesman said. 

The change is not expected to 
affect Nissan’s overseas operations 
because the company conducts most 
product development in Japan, 

Nissan, which has been lagging 
rivals such as Honda Motor Co. and 
Toyota Motor Coro, on develop- 
ment of recreational vehicles, said 
the change would allow it to be more 




“We were well behind other 
makers like Honda on the devel- 
opment of recreational vehicles, but 
we can introduce new models, in- 
cluding recreational models, 
quickly under the new system,” the 
Nissan spokesman said. 

■ VWs Slated for Malaysia 

Proton Pilipinas Cwp., exclusive 
assembler and distributor of Volks- 
wagen cars in the Philippines, said it 
would also export Volkswagens to 
Malaysia, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Manila. 

The vehicles will be assembled in 
Proton's new plant in Pan g/asinan 
Province. The company said it had 
signed an agreement with Auto 
Dunia of Malaysia, which will serve 
as die exclusive distributor for the 
vehicles in that country. Auto Dunia 
is an affiliate of Tan Chung Motors 
of Malaysia and Singapore. 

Proton is a subsidiary of Perusa- 
haan Otomobil National Bhd. of 
Malaysia. 


Central Bank Rules Out 
Devaluation of Thai Baht 


Bloomberg Ness's 

JAKARTA — Indonesia has 
approved a plan for Bre-X Min- 
erals Ltd. to develop one of the 
world's biggest gold finds with 
Ereeport-McMoRan Copper & 
Gold Inc., LB. Sudjana. minister of 
mines and energy, said Tuesday, in 
an announcement that definitively 
ended a dispute over control of the 
mine. 

' UmJer the 30-year mining deal, 
announced Monday, Bre-X will 
own 45 percent of the min e. Free- 
port-McMoRan 15 percent, the In- 
donesian government 10 percent 
and the Indonesian partners of 
Freeport, led by Mohammed (Bob) 
Hasan, the remaining 30 percent. 
The accord required government 
approval. The Busang mine is situ- 
ated in the Indonesian portion of 
Borneo. 

Kuntoro Mon gkosubroto, In- 
donesia's director general for gen- 
eral mining, said Indonesia was 
“very happy" with the Bre-X plan 
and would issue a permit to de- 
velop the mine ‘ ‘as quickly as pos- 
sible.” 

The terms of the agreement for 
the mine's development “will 
have a positive effect on foreign 
investment’* in Indonesia, Mr. 
Kuntoro said. Another 68 con- 
tracts of work, which have been 
held up by the dispute over the 
Busang deposit, will now be ap- 
proved, he said. 

But FT Tambang Tlmah, a state- 
owned tin mine that is owned by 
tiie government, will not be al- 
lowed to take a stake in the mine 
until it goes into production, in 
2000, Mr. Kuntoro said. There had 
been speculation that Timah 
would be allowed to buy or be 
given the government’s stake in 
the mine. 


control to Barrick, had led to in- 
ternational scrutiny of Indonesian 
mining regulations. 

Anthony DePalma of The New 
York Times reported earlier from 
Toronto: 

The Indonesian government's 
announcement Tuesday brought to 
a close several months of bidding 
among some of the world’s lead- 
ing mining companies. Analysts 
say there may be more gold deep in 
South African mines, but what 
makes the Indonesian find fab- 
ulous is that no strike has ever gone 
from bare dirt to what could even- 
tually be as much as 100 million 
ounces of gold reserves as quickly 
as Busang. 

By comparison. South Africa, 
long the world's leading gold pro- 
ducer, mines about 18 million 
ounces of gold a year, and its 
biggest mine has produced about 
half what the Busang mine is ex- 
pected to yield. 

Bre-X struck the mother lode 
late in 1995, after several other 
exploration companies had walked 
away from the area. 

The allure of so much gold, 
within such easy reach, impelled 
the competing companies to use 
whatever means they could to 
close a deal. 

This included tapping the In- 
donesian government’s inclination 
to make deals based on personal 
alliances, and playing up to vari- 
ous members of tire family of Pres- 
ident Suharto, the nation's leader 
since 1965. In the end, success 
went to the company with the 
closest contacts with the president 
and his advisers, and the longest 

=:= fir. 


CanpdrdbyOir Stuff Fnm Dispatcher 

BANGKOK — The B ank of 
Thailand ruled out Tuesday any de- 
valuation of the baht, saying it was 
“definitely not a policy option’* to 
tackle the country's current eco- 
nomic problems. 

The central bank said (hat de- 
valuation “would do more harm 
than good," and that the current 
system of pegging the baht to a 
basket of currencies, including the 
U.S. dollar, continued to provide 
overall stability. 

The statement followed a week 
where the baht reached .its lowest 
grates against the dollar in years, 
spurred by a major credit-rating 
agency putting Thailand's sover- 
eign debt under review for down- 
grading. 

i The dollar rose to 26.03 baht this 
week, after hovering near 25.00 baht 
for more than a decade. 

The central bank, which has per- 
sistently argued against the need for 
a devaluation as the baht came under 


speculative attack in recent weeks, 
acknowledged "some weakening” 
of the baht in light of a sharp ap- 
preciation of the dollar. 

“ButiD real effective terms,” the 
central bank said, “the baht remains 
fairly valued. Because die baht is not 
fundamentally misaligned, there is 
no case for a realignment of die baht 
through devaluation.** 

The central bank attributed Thai- 
land’s high current-account deficit 
primarily to unduly rapid expansion 
of investment rather than currency 
misalignment and said that adjust- 
ments by the government were 
slowly taking effect 
Prime Minister Chaovalit Yong- 
ebaiyut said Tuesday that rumors 
that die baht might be devalued 
would fade when the economy 
showed obvious improvement. 

He forecast dial the effects of the 
government’s measures to boost the 
economy would be visible by the 
end of the month. 

(AFP, Reuters, AP) 


Busang is the world's largest 
gold find; on Monday, Bre-X in- 
creased its reserve estimation by 
24 percent, to 70.95 million 
ounces. 

A dispute over the development 
of the mine, and a previous threat 
from the ministry of mines that 
Bre-X could lose control of the 
deposit if it did not agree to sell 




experience in playing by Indone- 
sia's rules. 

“It’s no coincidence that Free- 
port got it.” said Pierre Vaillan- 
court, a gold analyst with HSBC 
James Capel Canada, alluding to 
Freeport -Me MoRan’s links with 
die ruling family. “These are the 
relationships that get you the deal 
at die end of the day.” 

Bre-X Minerals, an ups tan ex- 
ploration company, watched its 
shares skyrocket from 30 Cana- 
dian cents in 1 993 ro more than 23 
Canadian dollars ($17) after the 
gold discovery and a 10-for-l 
split. 

After malting the big find. Bre- 
X failed to get immediate legal 
control. When others came 
around, it tried to protect its stake 
by allying with Mr. Suharto's son, 
Sigit Haijojudanto. In November, 
the government told Bre-X that it 
should have a partner. 

Barrick Gold Corp. of Toronto, 
the world’s second-largest gold 
producer, was selected by the In- 
donesian government as Bre-X's 
partner, but eventually lost oul 

Freeport-McMoRan, a com- 
pany with revenue last year of $1.9 
billion, was no stranger to the in- 
ternational scene. It had once op- 
erated a nickel mine in Cuba, and 
started mining copper and gold in 
Indonesia 30 years ago. 

A key participant in die deal was 
Mr. Hasan, an insider, trusted 
friend and twice-a-week golfing 
partner of Mr. Suharto. Mr. Hasan 
manages the investments of Mr. 
Suharto's charitable foundations, 
and has business interests in tim- 
ber, banking and automobile pro- 
duction. 

Recently he also acquired a 
piece of Freeport's existing In- 
donesian mine. 

Most of the serious contenders 
for a piece of Busang were Ca- 
nadian companies with easiest ac- 
cess to the vast amounts of money 
required, said David Davidson, a 
gold analyst at CIBC Wood Gundy 
in Toronto. 

Freeport- McMoRan , however, 
had financial backing as well as the 
right connections. 


Key Astra Role for Suharto Associate? 


Compiled by Our Stt& From Dispatches 

JAKARTA — Mohammed 
(Bob) Hasan, a close associate of 
President Suharto of Indonesia, is 
expected to take a key role in the 
country.’slargestcannakCT,PT As- 
tra International, brokers mid ana- 
lysts said Tuesday. 

Brokers said there was spec- 
ulation that Mr. Hasan would be 
appointed chief commissioner of 
Astra, maker of the nation's most 
popular Kijang car, at the com- 
pany's extraordinary general 
meeting Wednesday. 

But Mr. Hasan said be had told 
the paper Bisnis Indonesia that if 


he were named c hairman, he 
would tty to raise local content, 
increase exports, and make sure 
Astra “brings more profit to In- 
donesians.’' 

Mr. Hasan's Nusamba group 
holds 10 percent of Astra’s stock, 
the largest single stake in die com- 
pany. Nusamba is 80 percent 
owned by charitable foundations 
headed by Mr. Suharto. 

Mr. Hasan and the president's 
eldest son, Sigit Haijojudanto, 
each own a 10 percent stake hi 
Nusamba. 

Analysts said the speculation on 
changes in Astra’s board of com- 


missioners was no longer affecting 
sentiment in shares of the firm, 
which dominates the local car mar- 
ket with die Toyota, Daihatsu, Isu- 
zu, BMW, Peugeot and Nissan 
brands. Astra also makes Honda 
motorcycles. 

Its shares closed at 6350 rupiah 
($2.60), up 50 rupiah. 

David O'Neil, analyst of BZW 
Niaga Securities, said changes in 
Astra’s board of commissioners 
could add value to the firm. 

“In terms of earnings growth, 
Astra will do superbly well for the 
next three or four years,” Mr. 
O'Neil said. (Reiners, Bloomberg) 


EXPAND: Deutsche Bank on the Prowl in U.S.for an Acquisition 


Continued from Page 11 

markets in 1996. In its short 
statement on Tuesday, the 
bank did not give reasons for 
the increase. 

I The classic business of in- 
vestment bankers — issuing 
'and distributing freshly min- 
ted seenrities and advising on 
privatizations, mergers and 
acquisitions — has been a 
staple of Deutsche Bank 
within its home German mar- 
ket for more than a centuiy. 

But muscling into far-flung 
global markets has come with 
a colossal price tag that the 
•hank: has not disclosed. Mr. 
Crowder estimates that 
Deutsche Bank has allocated 
as much as 6 billion DM so 
far, including the 1990 buy- 
~out of Morgan Grenfell, a 
British merchant bank. That 
•amounts to a fifth of the 
Stroup's total equity capital. 

Stuart Graham at HSBC 
James Capel notes the figure 
will only rise if Deutsche 
Bank makes an expensive 
iWall Street acquisition. 

“It is a high-risk strategy 
and you have to have faith 
because it will take years be- 
fore it really feeds through, 
•said Mark Hoge, an analyst at 
Credit Suisse First Boston. 

The strategy is partly de- 
fensive. Big U.S- banks, with 
tentacles all over the world, 
have begun to pry German 
blue-chip companies away 
from their traditional house 
bank. It was only prudent for ; 
Ithe German bank to also de- 
velop the savvy to offer well- ] 


Prowcl Vour Perew* 1 

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priced financing, wide place- 
ment for equities, and the skill 
to execute cross-bonier deals. 
To engineer exotic transac- 
tions denominated in 
everything from Australian 
dollars to yen and sometimes 
both at the same time, 
Deutsche Bank says it needs 
talent all over the globe. 

Analysts at competing in- 
vestment houses have begun 
to wonder out loud about the 
fast-growing newcomer, 
which last year successfully 


helped lead-manage the huge 
15 billion DM privatization 
of Deutsche Telekom AG. 


“I am convinced, as an 
analyst, that this is a dreadful 
thing for shareholder value 
for Deutsche Bank,’ ’ said lan 
McEwen, analyst in London 
at Lehman Brothers. 


“It will cost a lot of money. 
I doubt it will yield the return 
on equity that they think it 
would. And even if h does 
yield that return on equity, 
that is not enough because 
you need a high return on 
equity for a high-risk busi- 
ness,” Mr. McEwen said. 

At Goldman Sachs, Mr. 
Crowder concurs that the 
yields so far do not justify the 
investments, but that could 
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get a return," he said. 

“Margins are tightening 
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banking,” added Matthew 
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ing analyst at Salomon Broth- 
ers. If and when the bull mar- 
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even more difficult to generate 


a return on the sums invested 
in the business, he said. 

Surging markets last year 
helped mask the dwindling 
profit margins in its tradition- 
al European corporate and re- 
tail lending businesses, which 
has been one of the main rea- 
sons for Deutsche Bank to , 
break into a new business. 

The bank’s formal goal is to i 
have a presence in the United | 
States similar to the consid- 
erable role that such major 
U.S. firms as Goldman Sadis 
have within Europe. The ap- 
pointment of Rolf-Emst 
Brener, the director who 
spearheaded the Grenfell ex- 
pansion, to succeed the retiring 
chairman. Hilmar Kopper, in 
May was widely seen as a con- 
firmation that the h ank would 
continue the strategy. 


INDOSUEZ HIGH YIELD BOND FUND 

Sodete cf Investissement A Capital Variable 1 

Registered Office: 39, Allde Scheffer 1 

L-2520 Luxembourg 

RC Luxembourg B: 43.962 jj 

NOTICE TO THE SHAREHOLDERS 

This is to inform the Shareholders of the INDOSUEZ 
HIGH YIELD BOND FUND Sicav that the Board of 
Directors' Meeting held on February 12, 1997 decided to 
pay a dividend of USD 5.50 per share to the holders of 
Distribution Shares. 

The shares will go ex-dividend on February 18, 1997 
and toe payment of toe dividend will be carried out on 
February 25, 1997. 

The Board of Directors 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

15000 

14000 


■ Singapore " ’ - Tokyo 
• S&aits Times"-.' Nikkei 225 


- 2250—-— -j. 

r 2200 

"■2fc£" 


22000 

2i®o/^VAr — 

20000- 4— 

18000 


IDOOOrg-rjj x q J F 2000 's O N D ST ™'S'0'N' D J F 

1996 1997 1996 1997 1996 1997 

Exchange • • Index Tuesday.- Prev. % 

Close Close Change 
BoogKong - Hang Seng ' 13,1(034 13.144.B2 -0.32 

Singapore Strafe Timas - 2*229.79 &258.10 -1.17 
Sydney AHOrdinarias 2^01.70 2,49320 +0.34 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 18,470.75 18,750.65" -1~49 

Kuala UmyttfODgiposifo 1,247-90 1.252.48 -0-37 

Bangkok SET . 700.15 70820 -1.14 

Seoul Composite Index 70634 712.93 -0.84 


Stock Market Index 7,6424)3 7.687.18 -039 


PSE 3,306.43 3,314.84 -025 


13,10234 13,144.62 -0.32 

2*229.79 23258-10 -1.17 

2^01.70 2,493^+0.34 

18,470.75 18,750.65 -1.49 

L247-BO 1.252.48 -0.37 

709.15 70820 -1.14 

__ __ __ 


Jakarta 

'.Composite Index 

695.22 

701.77 

-0.93 

Wellington 

NZS&-40 

2^31.32 

2.327.84 

+0.15 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

3,53023 

3,58029 

-1.40 


Source: Tetekurs 


lnlnuitonil HcraU TnNmr 


Very briefly 


• Megaworld Properties & Holdings Inc., a Philippine 
builder of high-rise office and residential buildings, said brisk 
condominium sales drove net profit up 1 81 percent in 1 996. to 
2.69 billion pesos (Si 02.1 million). 

• John Govett (Asia) Ltd., a fund-management company, 
appointed Tan Jee Say, a former aide to Singapore's prime 
minister, as managing'director. 

• Singapore's gross domestic product rose 5.8 percent in the 
fourth quarter, up from a 3. 3 percent increase in the third quarter, 
led by gains in toe business-services and construction sectors. 

• Pertamina, Indonesia's state-owned oil and gas company, 
will sell a 1 3 percent stake in a $20 billion offshore gas project 
in the South China Sea to Japanese investors. 

• Japan's economy is in a gradual state of recovery, with 
growth in plant investment and consumption, the Bank of 
Japan said. 

• Microsoft Corp. has reached a settlement with software 

pirates in Singapore under which the copyright violators will 
pay damages, apologize publicly and donate computers to 
charity, the company said. Bioombnrf;. AP. afp 


Japan Banks Under Watch 

CouqnMbyOta StqffFiem Oupotchn 

TOKYO — Already battered on the Tokyo slock exchange, 
Japan’s three long-term credit banks were dealt a fresh blow 
Tuesday by Moody’s Investors Service Inc., a U.S. credit- 
rating agency, which placed them under review. 

Industrial Bank of Japan Ltd., Long-Term Credit Bank of 
Japan Ltd. and Nippon Credit Bank Ltd. were placed under 
review for possible downgrade because of concerns about 
’rising investor risk as Japan moves to deregulate its financial 
sector, tiie agency said. 

If their ratings are cut, the banks will have to pay more to 
raise funds. Shinji Okabe, vice president of Moody's Japan 
Ltd., said toe government was “increasingly asking banks to 
improve their financial health chi their own” and was showing 
less commitment to rescuing them. 

Shares in Nippon Credit fell 12 yen (9.6 U.S. cents) to 228 
yen. Industrial Bank of Japan fell 20 yen to 1,420, and Long- 
Term Credit Bank fell 1 1 yen to 388. (AFP, Bloomberg) 


LUXFUND SICAV 

2, Boulevard Royal 
LUXEMBOURG 

R-C. Luxembourg B-7237 

Notice is hereby given toil an 

Extraordinary General Meeting 

of shareholders of LUXHUIVD (the “Fund”) will be held at 
Banquc Internationale a Luxembourg, 69 route d'Eich, on 
March 3rd, 1997 at 3.00 pjn. with the following agenda: 

1. decision to liquidate the Fund; 

2. appointment of a liquidate and approval of his powers and 
remuneration; 

The quorum required for the meeting i* of 50% of the shares 
outstanding and the passing of resolution Nr. 1 requires (he consent of 
2/3 of the shares represented at the meeting. 

Shareholders are informed that the Calculation of the Net Asset 
Value, subscriptions and redemptions have been suspended 
from February 7lh, 1 997. 

Holders of bearer shares who wish to attend the meeting or 
vote at the meeting by proxy, should deposit their share 
certificates with Banque Internationale a Luxembourg SA, 69, 
route d'Each. L-J470 Luxembourg, at least five clear days 
before the dale of the meeting. 

The Bond of Directors 


FIDELITY FRONTIER FUND 

Soci6t£ dlnvestissement k Capital Variable 
Kansalhs House - Place de 1'EtoUe 
L-1021 Luxembourg 
R.C. No B 20494 


NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 

NOTICE is hereby given that an Extraordinary General Meeting of toe Shareholders of 
Fidelity Frontier Fund Sicav (“the Company") will be held at the registered office of toe 
Comply in Luxembourg on February 28, 1997 at 11.00 am, or on any adjourned date, to 
consider toe following agenda: 

1 To resolve to liquidate fidelity Frontier Fund. 

V To appoint Fidelity Investments Luxembourg SA as toe Liquidator and to determine 
toe powers to be granted to the Liquidator and the liquidation procedure. 

1 To fix toe tone of the second shareholders Meeting to hear the report of toe Liquidator 
" and to appoint Coopers & Lybrand as the Auditors of toe Company. 

4 To fix toe rinte of toe third meeting of shareholders to hear the report of the auditor 
and to decide the close of the liquidation of toe Company. 

In order to deliberate validly on item 1 of toe agenda, at least 50& of the shares issued must 
hr reoresented at the Meeting, and a decision in favour of toe resolution must be ap- 
proved by shareholders holding at least 2/3 of toe shares represented at toe Meeting. 

Cnhiect to the limitations imposed by the Articles of Incorporation of the Company with 
ioard to ownership of shares which constitute in toe aggregate more than three percent 
( 3 %) of the outstanding shares, each share is entitled to one vote. A shareholder may act 

at any Meeting by proxy. 

Dated: November 28, 19?6 
By Order of the Board of Directors 



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PAGE 2 


PAGE 18 


SPONSORED SECTION 


INTERNATI ONAL HERALD TRIBU NE, SATURllAY^UNPAX FEBRUARY 1 -2, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 


Mobile Communications: GSM and B eyond 


Headed? 


F irst promoted as a 
compatible standard 
for pan-European ser- 
vices back in 1991, Global 
System for Mobile Com- 
munications (GSM) net- 
works have now been 
installed by 178 operators 
in 1 10 countries. 

Along the way. the digital 


'Pons theoretical 
engineering is wonderful. 
But the mat question Is: 
What demand Is then?’ 


mobile standard operating 
at 900 megahertz has 
accommodated higher 
bands in the Digital 
Cellular Svstem’s 1SOO 
MHz (DCS* 1800) and the 
Personal Communications 
System’s 1900 MHz (PCS 
1900). 

This shrewd move not 
only ratcheted up the sys- 
tem's capacity to manage 
the evolving needs of per- 
sonal-communications net- 
works but also drove down 
the price of increasingly 
powerful handsets by gain- 
ing new market share. 

Now’ the ubiquitous stan- 
dard is facing another 
major challenge. Some- 
where along the informa- 
tion superhighway. GSM - 
or something very much 
like it - will be called upon 
to deliver more than voice 
and data. 

“Any such system will 
have to deal with multi- 
media and higher data 
transmission rates,” says 
Adriana Nugter, who repre- 
sents Swedish GSM opera- 
tor Europolitan and who is 
soon to take over as chair- 
person of the GSM MoU 
(Memorandum of Under- 
standing) Association. “Our 
task is to be at the forefront 
of developments.” 

“The greatest challenge 
is to create a common 
vision for evolution toward 


the third generation,” says 
Friedhelm Hillebrand, a 
long-time advocate of the 
standard and Technical 
Committee chairman of the 
European Telecommuni- 
cations Standards Institute 
since lost year. 

Earlier this month, the 
organization signed off on 
his team's core specifica- 
tions for the latest set of 
GSM-network features. 
Release 96. which shows 
the shape of things to come. 
CAMEL (Customized Ap- 
plication of Mobile En- 
hanced Logic) provides the 
mobile user with a Virtual 
Home Environment, a con- 
cept that means users will 
be able to access the same 
services from a “visited” 
network as from their 
“home" networks. 

Dual- or tripie-band 
GSM 900. DCS 1800 and 
PCS 1900 phones will have 
direct access to higher- 
speed data and network- 
identification functions. 

But these are only first 
steps toward a 21st century 
standard, points out Mr. 
Hillebrand. 

“We’ve benchmarked the 
standard for seamless evo- 
lution into the next millen- 
nium,” he says. “But if we 
thought we had the answers 
already, we would be 
wrong. We would not be 
demanding enough.” 

Citing the unforeseen 
development of three- 
micron microchips, much 
more powerful than previ- 
ous ones, that made pocket- 
sized handsets possible, he 
says: “We need to look a lit- 
tle further. The standard 
maker's task is not re- 
search; it's about building 
consensus and solutions 
that are really viable.” 

Gretel Holcomb Hoff- 
man. the GSM MoU Asso- 
ciation's chairperson, has 
her eyes on the market. 
'There's not a one-size-fits- 
a 11 solution. GSM technolo- 
gy lets you build all types 


of products,” she says. 
“The real question is: What 
demand is there? Pure theo- 
retical engineering is won- 
derful, but we need feasi- 
bility studies to be part of 
the process, too. One of the 
biggest challenges we face 
is keeping the GSM com- 
munity together to generate 
economies of scale while 
ensuring that it remains rel- 
evant to the needs of both 
developed and developing 
countries.” 

“It’s very important to 
take the stage of market 
development into account,” 
agrees Adriana Nugter, 
who will be taking over as 
the head of the 208-mem- 
ber GSM MoU Association 
in March. 

Third-generation stan- 
dards being developed by 
ETSI (called Universal 
Mobile Telecommunica- 
tions System) and by the 
International Telecom- 
munication Union (called 
Future Public Land Mobile 
Telecommunication 
System) should be comple- 
mentary, says Ms. Nugter 
“We don’t think UMTS is 
the only way. It’s important 

7Be st auda rd maker's 
task is not research it’s 
about bodtBng consensus 



Quick, what was that URL? 


e 


speed data. In practice, it 
means that the eventual 
third-generation service 
will be spectrum-limited. 

“Spectrum is a big issue,” 
says Thomas Beijer of 
Telia, who heads the 
UMTS forum, “because if 
the amount you need to 
allocate to each operator 
becomes too wide, [you 
will] run into regulatory 


problems.” But, he adds, 
“Standardization is about 
development; it’s creative 
process. We can’t start from 
limitations” 

The spectrum currently 
foreseen for these so-called 
third generation services, 
says Mr. Hillebrand, is in 
fact “less than what we 
have for GSM today.” And 
with the mass market as the 


ultimate target for these ser- 
vices, he adds, mere band- 
width is necessary. 

Wth around $800 billion 
invested in infrastructure 
and a predicted 150 million 
subscribers worldwide by 
the year 2000, GSM net- 
works are certainly going to 
be wife us for the foresee- 
able future. But with its 
new services, revised air 




interface (ETSI has agreed 
that a new radio-transrais- 
sion system should be stan- 
dardized) and extended fre- 
quency band, will they still 
be called GSM? Or 
UMTS? 

“Customers don't care so 
long as die company they 
are^subscribing to can get 
them the service they want 
at a price they can afford,” 


says Gretel Holcomb 
Hoffman, who recently 
joined America’s new 
Pocket Communications 
network. “Hie packaging is 
a commercial challenge. 
Do they want one number? 
Or a one-stop shop for ser-. 
vices that they can access, 
anywhere - in the car, ax' 
home and in the office? 1 " 

Steven Bartlett 


Across the Pond 

W ireless carriers in of four national win 
North America operators in Cannria, is 
are proving that a planning to offer conn 


iygY Miqratin^~south? 


and solutions that am 
maHy Wable* 

that we continue to see it as 
part of the ITU’s FPLMTS 
family.” 

But will today's GSM 
technology be able to sup- 
port a system that's suitable 
for 1 0-kilobit-per-second 
voice services as well as for 
data and multimedia ser- 
vices, both of which require 
much higher transmission 
speeds? 

In theory, that can be 
done by managing a service 
mix of speech and high- 




W ireless carriers in 
North America 
are proving that a 
digital technology platform 
spawned and nurtured in 
Europe has a welcome 
home across the Atlantic. 

According to the GSM 
(Global System for Mobile 
Communications) North 
American Interest Group 
(NAIG). Federal Com- 
munications Commission 
spectrum auctions have 
produced a national foot- 
print for the technology in 
the United States. 

In auctions held over the 
last three years - three for 
30 megahertz spectrum 
blocks and three more fra: 
10 MHz blocks - wireless 
operators leaning toward 
adopting GSM acquired 
licenses covering more 
than 260 million potential 
customers. Microcell, one 


Gsr-nr 

ONIT IN ITALY 


my 




idyl 




of four national wireless 
operators in Cannria, is also 
planning to offer commer- 
cial GSM service across 
the country. 

For a region where the 
wireless industry is largely 
defined by a schism over 
three disparate digital-tech- 
nology standards, having a 
crack at that much of the 
North American population 
seems unlikely. But the car- 
riers that settled on GSM 
did so because they recog- 
nized the advantages of an 
established technology that 
has already enjoyed inter- 
national success - and the 
value of getting to market 
firsL 

“It’s a cost-effective 
technology to deploy, and it 
has minimal risk for a new 
market entrant," says 
Lyndon Daniels, president 
and chief executive officer 
for Pacific Bell Mobile 
Services and chairman of 
the GSM North American 
Interest Group. 

Cost savings for GSM 
are largely a result of net- 
work-equipment refine- 
ments that operators and 
system suppliers have 
made to fix problems along 
foe way. “Any technology 
needs to shake out its bugs 
and get foe experience that 
allows a vendor to sell 
cheaper,” says Don 
Warkenrin. president of 
Aerial Communications. 
Hie reduction in size and 







increase in functionality of 
GSM equipment has 
allowed operators to build 
systems at a much lower 
cost than three years ago, 
be says. 

One of foe appealing 

North American earners 
that have chosen GSM 
etto the advantages 
of an established 
technolo gy and quick 
tomarisut times 

characteristics of GSM as 
an import is that it is fully 
standardized, which means 
network and customer 
equipment is specified from 
end to end. 

Because of that, foe 
process for a system based 
on the technology is largely 
the same no matter where 


in foe world it is deployed. 

The primary difference 
between Europe and North 
America is that different 
versions of network-signal- 
ing protocol are used. 
Frequency bands also dif- 
fer. but European experi- 
ences in both the 900 and 
1800 MHz bands helped 
prove to 1900 MHz North 
American operators that the 
technology would work. 

Beyond foe core technol- 
ogy platform, wireless 
operators throughout the 
world add features that help 
customize their service. 

“We ride on top of - but 
are not restricted to - foe 
European specifications for 
GSM.” says Cole Brad- 
man, director of technology 
development at Western 
Wireless. Because of foe 
number of operators that 
have already experimented 
with different features, 
GSM has a jump on rival 


standards, he says. “Down 
the Une, there will be a lot 
of feature parity, but at least 
for some period of time- 
GSM has the lead.” 

Both the GSM NAIG and' 
foe worldwide GSM MoU 
Association help facilitate a 
strictly defined worldwide 
specification that has intel- 
ligent-network functionali- 
ty flexible enough for ser- 
vice differentiation, provid- 
ing what GSM MoU 
Association chairperson 
Gretel Hoffman calls “stan- 
dardization with options.” 
“The association is stay- 
ing foctised on GSM as a 
platform.” says Ms. 
Hoffman, who is vice pres- s 
idem of business develop-- # 
ment and industry relations' 
at Pocket Communications. 
“From there, any particular 
operator can pick and 
choose what meets foe 
needs of their markets.” 

Jason Meyers 


k 

/S 






my 



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The prepaid and rechargeable 
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A Rival to Europe’s Fixed Networks? 

M obile communica- number of subscribers rose advent of prepaid airtime based Mobile System! 
tions is one of foe - by around 25 million last schemes for GSM, among International, has a differ 
most rapidly ex- year alone, according to other tariff plans, has done ent view: *Tn the short term 


M obile communica- 
tions is one of foe 
most rapidly ex- 
panding sectors of tele- 
communications; sometime 
between 2000 and 2005, 
the mobile connection rate 
will supersede that of fixed 
lines. Currently, says Fried- 
helm Hillebrand of the 
European Telecommuni- 
cations Standards Institute, 
net growth in mobile sub- 
scriptions is higher than in 
fixed networks m Europe. 

Almost every European 
country has in place at least 
one Global System for 
Mobile (GSM) network, 
and many even have more 
than one “next-generation” 
GSM-derived network, 
commonly known as 
Personal Communication 
Network or System (PCN 
or PCS), in operation. 

In Scandinavian coun- 
tries, it is common for more 
than 30 oat of every 100 
inhabitants to have a 
mobile phone, higher than 
the so-called ordinary 
fixed-line teledensity in 
most countries. 

Furthermore, foe GSM 
subscriber rate is soaring. 
In Italy, for example, foe 


number of subscribers rose 
by around 25 million last 
year alone, according to 
Angelo Cianciosi, director 
of Tariff Strategy with 
Telecom Italia Mobile and 
chairman of foe Communi- 
cations Strategy Group 
within foe GSM MoU 
Association. 

This whirlwind progress 


incr oaab qg/y becoming a 
commosBty product is 


begs foe question: Will 
GSM soon rival fixed net- 
works in Europe?. 

“This is a very complex 
issued” says Mr. Cianciosi. 
“One factor to take into 
consideration is that in 
many countries - including 
Germany, France and 
Switzerland - the dominant 
fixed-network operator also 
runs a mobile network, and 
they have to balance this 
potential conflict through 
integration of services and 
strategies.’* 

Nevertheless, he says, foe 


advent of prepaid airtime 
schemes for GSM, among 
other tariff plans, has done 
much to take GSM beyond 
being a “premium” busi- 
ness service and has made 
it available to ordinary 
users. He cites the Italian, 
Spanish, Portuguese and 
German markets as proof 
foot “mobile is for every- 
body and is increasingly 
becoming a commodity 
product in foe mainstream.” 
Neil Lilly, head of tech- 
nology with Orange, a PCN 
operator in foe United 
Kingdom, muses that the 
situation will vary widely, 
“depending on what the 
subscriber mix is.” He sug- 
gests that perhaps foe 
biggest generators of traffic 
on GSM networks will con- 
tinue to be business users 
whose phones are included 
in their employers’ corpo- 
rate virtual private net- 
works, which are provided 
across public infrakructure 
but act like private, dedicat- 
ed networks. “We could see 
a situation where 5 percent 
of users account for 60 per- 
cent of foe volume.” 

John Carrington, manag- 
ing director of London- 


based Mobile Systems' 
International, has a differ- 
ent view: “In foe short term, 
essentially because of the 
volumes of traffic involved, r 
GSM will not rival fixed' •, 
networks. People look to 
mobile to provide a flexible 
way to stay in touch, and so 
it sits alongside the fixed 
network.” 

As a result of an exten- 
sive, user-based survey of 
existing and potential users 
of GSM data services in 
Europe, John Davison, 
senior consultant with 
London-based consultancy 
Ovum, is more sanguine. 

He says, “Users we spoke 
to saw the main barrier to 
using GSM as an alterna- 
tive to other methods of 
sending data to be cost; 
operators should wake up 
to the tremendous pent-up 
demand for the service. It is 
early days yet, with opera- 
tors striving to recoup the 
cost of building the net- tt 
works, and they often do" 
not yet see GSM as their 
core business. They are 
busy building up their sub- 
scriber base for basic voice 
service.” 

Annie Turner 


“Mobile Communications: GSM and 

was produced in its entirety by the Advertising Department of the International Herald Tribune 
WRITERS: Steven Bartlett in France: Jason Meyers in the United Slates: Stuart Sharrock. Annie Turner and John Williamson 
in the United Kingdom; Peggy Salz-Tnuttman and Terry Swartzberg in Ger^y WUluunson 

Illustrations; Karen Sheckler-WUson. 

Procram Director: Bill Mahder. 

“Mobile COMMUNICATIONS: GSM AND Beyond” was a joint initiative of the 1HT. ETSf and the GSM MoU Association. 


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Telecom Itafia Mobile 


THE UPBLPS purr NEWBtfBr 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 19. 1997 


T.w:f. i ,J 


T D SKCTfON 


Mobile Communications: GSM and Beyond 


% 


http://www.ghark.edu/gjgfense/tactics/ 


Bridges Between Worlds 



Mobile Multimedia: More Than Just Talk 


. A ccording to Net- 
Edge, a U.S.-head- 
X ^quartered broad- 
band-networking firm, data 
traffic in some wire-line 
telephone networks is 
growing at the rate of 30 
percent per year, compared 
tp voice traffic's annual 

I growth of 3 percent. 

The company further pre- 
jJTdicts that by the year I99S. 
j volumes of data’ traffic in 

Hie mobde repertoire 
caadd extend to 
reaHSme image transfer, 
interactive video and 
broadband multimedia 
document retrieval 


these wired networks will 

/ equal those of voice. 

The level of data traffic in 
■ GSM (Global System for 
L Mobile Communications) 
* digital networks is present- 
ly much more modest, but 
non-voice utilization is set 
tp boom when a number of 
current initiatives by the 
European Telecommuni- 
cations Standards Institute 
(JETSI) are finalized. 
Ultimately, say industry 
experts, the repertoire of 
wireless terminals could 
extend to real-time image 
transfer, interactive video 
and broadband multimedia 
document retrieval.- ■■•... 

. Many theories have been 
advanced to account for the 
relatively low level of con- 
temporary non-voice GSM 
u.sage. 

.* _ One is that the GSM net- 


works and terminals 
presently available are not 
n.ecessarily suitable for all 
data applications. 

; Transmission speed is an 


important consideration, 
with data being sent over 
GSM networks at 9,600 
bits per second. 'The abili- 
ty to transmit data and 
access the Internet over 
GSM is a real landmark 
achievement for the indus- 
try.’' observes Gretel Hol- 
comb Hoffman, chairper- 
son of the GSM MoU 
(Memorandum of Under- 
standing) Association. 

“You can send data at 
9,600 bits per second over 
GSM, and you can transmit 
up to four times faster than 
that with compression tech- 
niques. although increases 
in speed of throughput are 
coming and will be wel- 
comed," says Ms. Hoff- 
man. "We as an industry are 
keen to promote and 
increase levels of mobile 
data awareness and adop- 
tion in whatever way we 
can." 

Another problem is the 
technical difficulty of plug- 
ging in and using a GSM 
terminal for anything other 
than a voice conversation. 

“Fait of the reason why 
data services have not been 
more extensively used is 
because it's quite cumber- 
some for (he end user to 
connect up," says Fetter 
Pedersen, senior adviser to 
Norwegian cellular opera- 
tor Telenor Mobil. Citing 
compatibility problems 
with different GSM phones 
and different generations of 
data interfaces, Mr. 
Pedersen notes: “It’s not 
that simple for an average 
user to relate to all these 
things. In the beginning, 
users needed a lot of differ- 
ent software if they wanted 
to make a file transfer or 
access the Internet and so 
on.” 

A third reason may be a 
lack of awareness in the 


business community of the 
data possibilities of the cel- 
lular medium. “The prob- 
lem seems to be that there's 
not an awareness of the 
capability of wireless to 
communicate data," says 
Johann Weber, Intel’s 
Munich-based director of 
wireless data communica- 
tion. "The cost benefits are 
not well understood- We 
need to educate people that 
they can do much more to 
improve business efficien- 
cy.” 

It’s not all bad news, 
though. As Mr. Pedersen 
notes, improved tools for 
handling data are now 
appearing on the market. 
He cites the example of 
Nokia’s 9000 GSM phone, 
which combines voice, fax, 
e-mail, Internet and person- 
al-organizer capabilities. 


Global HktithnetBa 
MobtBty, a standanBza- 
Bob framework proposed 
by ETSI, wM take accorart 
of existed and emerging 
technologies and enable 
voice ami multimedia 
services to be provided 
across a variety of fixed 
and mobile, pnbBc and 
private networks 

GSM's short message ser- 
vice (SMS) is also proving 
very popular. “We have 
seen recently that SMS is 
taking off very quickly” 
says Mr. Pedersen. 

Strides are being made in 
the education process, too. 
Intel, for example, has been 
working to bring the PC 


world, mobile-communica- 
tions manufacturers and 
network operators together. 
Some 35 companies in 
these sectors are participat- 
ing in the Mobile Data 
Initiative to help create 
awareness of the capabili- 
ties and ease of use of mod- 
em mobile data products 
and services. It also hap- 
pens to be the case, remarks 
Mr. Weber, that GSM is a 
good platform for data ser- 
vices: “GSM in place today 
is very good, even though 
there’s room to improve it 
for data." 

Two current ETSI pro- 
jects aim to do just that 

In its ■ first phase, the 
High-Speed Circuit- 
Switched Data (HSCSD) 
initiative will enable users 
to access several GSM time 
slots simultaneously. In a 
later phase, up to eight time 
slots could be dynamically 
allocated for a single data 
call, in the process expand- 
ing GSM data speeds from 
9,600 bits per second to 
64,000 bits per second, and 
even faster with compres- 
sion. This will facilitate the 
introduction of applications 
such as multimedia access, 
videoconferencing and 
World Wide Web-page 
download. 

As its name suggests, 
ETSI’s General Packet 
Radio Service (GPRS) 
“packetizes" data. Since 
each packet contains a des- 
tination address, there is no 
need to establish a dedicat- 
ed path through the GSM 
network, and transmission 
resources are only occupied 
when data is actually being 
transmitted. GPRS is suit- 
able for “bursty” traffic - in 
which bunches of data are 
sent intermittently - typical 
of Internet and corporate 
Intranet access, and, with 


Stitching Services and Systems 
Together and Hiding the Seams 


I s it really so hard for mo bile -com- 
munications systems to work 
together? 

• For the telecoms cognoscenti, the 
•reasons for the apparently artificial 
\ Carriers among different communica- 
tions technologies are self-evident. In 
large pan. they are bom of the tech- 
nologies’ evolving in different 
timescales and through different sec- 
tors of the industry, each of which has 
had to grapple with its own set of 
technical, operational and commercial 
challenges. 

. The situation is set to become more 
complex with the imminent launch of 
4 whole new generation of satellite- 
based global mobile systems. 

Common sense 

Nevertheless, the mobile-communi- 
cations industry recognizes that these 
issues are not the concern of cus- 
’.nmers, who are only interested in 
being able to buy the services they 
want at a price they are prepared to 
pay- 

. “Common sense must prevail," 
%ays Mohammed Sheikh, group mar- 
keting director with London-based 
?s Mobile Systems International (MSB. 
’-Applications need to be independent 
«?f networks. For ordinary users, it 
makes no sense that there are different 
Standards for mobile. and cordless 
office systems, for example." 

The international standards bodies 
- whose job it is to ensure that net- 
works are designed to work with each 
Other and constantly improve the level 
pf integration among them - are mak- 
ing great efforts to address these kn oi- 
ly customer issues. 

Future framework 
The International Telecommunication 
Union (ITU) has developed the 
Future Public Land Mobile Telephone 
Service ( FPLMTS). The aim is for so- 
called third-generation cellular, cord- 
less. satellite and fixed applications to 
|*sIot” into the FPLMTS framework 
that they will work together as effi- 
4 vicntly and seamlessly as possible. 

' ; Fo* - historical and cultural reasons, 
at least three regional versions ■ with 


the same overall aims arc being devel- 
oped in Japan, the United States and 
Europe. By accommodating their 
existing and developing regional stan- 
dards as well as complying with 
FPLMTS, the vaunted degree of inte- 
gration among networks should 
become a reality in the next few years. 

Europe's effort is called UMTS, for 
Universal Mobile Telecommuni- 
cations System, and is currently being 
standardized by the European Tele- 
communications Standards Institute 
(ETSU. which has long been respon- 
sible for the development of the 
Global System for Mobile Com- 
munications (GSM), the most com- 
plete set of standards existing to date 
for digital mobile services. 


re not 

the concern of consumers, 

wbo are only interested In being 
aMs to boy the services they 
wmtt at the price they are 
prepared to pay 

ETSI is being helped in its task by 
the GSM MoU (Memorandum of 
Understanding) Association, which is 
concerned that the needs of users 
could be subsumed by the technical 
issues involved. 

To this end, the Third Generation 
Interest Group (3GIG) was estab- 
lished. Neil Lilly, head of technology 
with Orange, a mobile operator in 
Britain, is 3GIG’s chairman. He says, 
“Modular design and open interfaces 
are the key to being able to support a 
number of third-generation applica- 
tions. If a single handset is to be able 
to use different technologies as appro- 
priate, then we need to move toward 
having radios that are software- 
defined, rather than functions fixed in 
hardware.” 

Mr. Lilly explains: “This would 
mean that a European user in Japan, 
say, could simply download the nec- 


essary "service logic’ by infrared link 
or over-tbe-air interface so that their 
mobile phone would work on the 
Japanese network." 

Certainly, progress is afooL In 
Singapore, MSI is working on a pro- 
ject looking at more than 100 build- 
ings to examine how private cordless 
networks and the public network 
could best be integrated. 

British Telecom is working with its 
partner Viag in Germany on how best 
to address the issue of fully integrat- 
ing the fixed and mobile networks. Its 
ability to do that would give it a 
tremendous edge in Europe^ biggest 
market, which is on the veige of being 
folly opened up to competition. 

Although Mr. Lilly is optimistic 
about the progress being made, he 
comments, “Unfortunately, to some 
extent, some standards efforts are still 
driven by the classical [fixed] Public 
Telephone Operator approach, so that 
third-generation network capabilities 
and protocols are predicated by what 
is in the fixed network now, rather 
than by mobile's potential." 

Toward a mass market 
There are many reasons to be cheer- 
ful. Another informal body beavering 
to keep the customer’s needs foremost 
in die thoughts of standards bodies 
and operators is the UMTS Forum. 

Ken Blakeslee is director of 
Business Development for Mobility 
Applications for equipment-maker 
Nortel. He is also the vice chairman of 
the forum's Market Aspects Group. 
“In the end," he predicts, “you won’t 
be able to see the join between [net- 
works]." 

He adds, “Users will want [and 
have] highly personalized phones 
which might, tor example, support, 
ordinary telephony and Web brows- 
ing, if that is what an individual 
needs. We are definitely moving 
toward personalized multimedia ser- 
vices from a single handset" 

MSI’s Mohammed Sheikh con- 
cludes, “The real hope is that cus- 
tomers will demand changes once 
they realize the potential.” 

A.T. 


multi-slot transmission, a 
data speed of over 115,000 
bits per second is feasible. 
“I want capability in my 
network such that users 
don’t tie up entire channels 
while they’re sitting there 
reading the information 
they've just got" says Ms. 
Hoffman, who is vice pres- 
ident of business develop- 
ment and industry relations 
at Pocket Communications, 
a PCS 1 900 operator in the 
United States. “GPRS is the 
product that'll let you do 
that” 

The ETSI initiative 
Global Multimedia Mo- 
bility (GMM) is proposing 
a standardization frame- 
work that will take account 
of existing and emerging 
systems such as GSM and 
UMTS and enable a range 
of voice and multimedia 
services to be provided 
across an increasing variety 
of fixed and mobile, public 
and private networks. 
“However, this cannot be 
done by just ETSI," wrote 
Kiritkumar Lathia, the 
chairman of the organiza- 
tion's Program Advisory 
Committee, in the foreword 
to ETSI's GMM report, 
published in October 1996: 
"Indeed, international 
cooperation is a prerequi- 
site for its success.” 

John Williamson 


W hile standards-developing bodies 
are waking toward a framework 
into which all the “next genera- 
tion” communications applications - via 
fixed, mobile and satellite networks - will 
be integrated, today's mobile "worlds"’ are 
still rather disparate, though converging. 

One way of bridging these worldsnow is 
via mobile telephones that work on differ- 
ent frequencies and with different stan- 
dards. says Anders LindqyisL manager for 
Mobile Terminals at Telia Mobile of 
Sweden and chairman of the GSM MoU 
(Memorandum of Understanding) Asso- 
ciation’s Terminal Working Group. 

Multi-band phones 

Networks based on Global System for 
Mobile Communications (GSM) operate al 
three frequency bands - 900 megahertz. 
1800 megahertz and 1900 megahertz. 
“GSM is busy integrating the different 
GSM bonds into a seamless multi -bund 
standard,” says Mr. LindqvisL “This will 
benefit roamers as well as add capacity and 
flexibility to both single- and multi-band 
operators.” 

A number of manufacturers offer dual- 
band (900 MHz/1800 MHz) phones, and 
Adriana Nugter. who will take over as 
chairperson of the GSM MoU Association 
in March, says that tri-band (including 
1900 MHz) is a priority. She points out that 
while GSM users can take their mobile 
numbers abroad "the necessary arrange- 
ments are complex. So tri-band is better. 
Our customers need it now” she says. 
According to Gretel Hoffman." current 
chairperson of the association, the specifi- 
cations are ready; the question is whether 
sufficient orders will be forthcoming to 
make a tri-band phone affordable. 

“I can foresee strong market interest in 
such a multi-band handset or a GSM 
900/PCS 1900 dual-band handset,” says 
Mr. LindqvisL “Both of these would give 
Americans overseas roaming capabilities 
and vice-versa.” And he seconds Ms. 
Hoffman's concerns about price: “Of 
course, this market interest is dependent on 
the handsets being competitively designed 
and priced. Nobody would want to buy a 
bulkier, more expensive handset just so 
that he wouldn't have to rent one while 
traveling.” 

Multi-mode phones 

The commercial issues in multi-band 
involve price and volume, but when it 
comes to multi-mode, or multi -technology, 
phones, the main concern is about billing 
among operators. 

Last year. Ericsson came out with what 


Was reported!) i’:c firs! Dj± f fUrgUa: 
Enhanced Comic v* tvyrnmir-i- 
cations” j-GSM dual-inode Jy 

phone designed vr cor-.rT. * ^ ’ 
then, pilot dual-mode ::C’syt rV - rw’-e 
launched In Gerrsins. arcr’.r - -t-i 
S weden. The f.L*:v.uti nJvorfc. 
around Berlin and opraicJ by 
Telekom, failure'. :huc •miiK..: 
pafits" (ciuI-iiv-t; equ-pi' .-. 1 . 

-mode phones.. The S lt - vi...":,. r’~ 

by Telia, is i unre * J a: 

Despite (hi; great promise *- r - 
size of tliese tests, how sluing die market - 
for dual -mi i Jc remain.- 
According to mar.; :nohi ! c 
experts, the world's t pv.:i.'rs :/v : 
ing the quest- on wite: .'Not very. it Jc^-* 
not yet.” ... 

"Rather titan foe pn-s y* 
develop menu the i.'ick of .-’.vjkeJ 
meni is mostly due to.; sample commerce; 
problem.” say* Herrir.rd Si crzlvcn, 
nwbile-c» >ni nu miens mu ■ expert 

Munich's GPP CimbH. a dj* Izr.jr of mV: - 
inalion anti communu'nrions network 
"The operators haver*’ nail jptw 
urgency about silling d-.*-.vrs u::d '".g’uir.e 
out how to di\vy up the billing re\f. ’risi- 
bility and revenues anwji :r= -r. " 

Jan Ahrenhnng. hc-*i of marketing for 
Ericsson's mobile Telephone JivSi.-n. 
agrees. “All technologic.: i problem*- 
dated with the dizi-rr.o.L ;;e:v.ors> ’mv. 
been solved Jt's now a q:c*ik-r. of ve.* - liv- 
ing the commercial issues." 

Mobile communications via satellite? 
will have to he added to litis (erresma: 
equation, points out Let-:? Chicheporticlre. 
head of marketing at Texas Insiro;::e:iS 
Europe's wireless enjnp’uniealions bit%i- 
ncss division. “The first GMPCS iGinru. 
Mobile Personal Communication?. f>’ 
Satellite) networks will be launched in the 
third quarter of 1998. That's very soon. 
The operators of these network* won't be 
able to provide universal coverage - >■• 'tee- 
thing they've committed Ihemseb.cs t<« Jo 
- without concluding roaming agreement', 
with various local GSM >y stems, Titet 
means they're going to need ciwi-nTde 
telephones - in farce eventides." 

This s'atcmeM v.r- :r,e u.. - 

September signing . •- :.r .;eree:;te::: 
between .Asia Cellular Satellite, operator i: 
a fledgling satellite-hoed mobile telecom- 
munication system, and Ericsson. The 
agreement stipulate* that Encs-on \v:i ; 
develop and deliver suiciiitJ-GSM satel- 

lite- A VTPS i a mobile technology j-.-d 
widely mi the United States; dual-modes by 
1999. The order is worth $225 million. 

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INTERNATIONAL w^baU) TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDA^, FEBRUARY 1 



PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 


SPONSORED SECTION 


SPONS O R E D SEC H ON 


Mobile Communications: GSM and Beyond 


Have Phone, 
Will Travel 


No, just roaming! 


R oaming - making 
cadis from a mobile 
phone while outside 
the network to which the 
user subscribes - anywhere 
in the world is close to 
becoming possible now 
that a critical mass of wire' 
less operators has adopted 
the GSM (Global System 
for Mobile Communi- 
cations) standard. 

As of February, there 


past chairman of the GSM 
Moll ( Memorandum of 


Formerly 

Ermted to Europe, 
the GSM roaming 
market now embraces 
North America, A ust r alia , 
Africa and a number of 
Asian co un tr ie s 


were an estimated 178 
GSM networks in 110 
countries, and between 
2.000 and 3.000 roaming 
agreements exist between 
operators. 

“The GSM standard 
automatically facilitates 
roaming . . . and allows 
country borders to be prac- 
tically invisible to the cus- 
tomer,” notes Mike Short, 


Understanding) Asso- 
ciation and a director of 
Cell net in Britain. 

Formerly Limited to 
Europe, the GSM roaming 
market now embraces 
North America. Australia, 
Africa and a number of 
Asian countries. 

“GSM is in more coun- 
tries than McDonald’s,” 
Mr. Short says. Tt contin- 
ues to flourish because the 
range and reach of services 
continue to grow." 

In the United States, 
more than 50 GSM net- 
works provide a previously 
missing link in global 
roaming. 

“Wireless is really taking 
off in the United States.” 
says Anne Scheile, vice 
president of External 
Affairs at American 
Personal Communications, 
which provides Sprint 
Spectrum services in the 
Washington, D.C-/Balti- 
more area. “We expect the 
country to be covered (by 
GSM] by the end of 1998.” 

Combining GSM and 
Intelligent Network capa- 
bilities will allow users 
access to customized ser- 
vices while outside their 



home networks. “Cus- 
tomers want more than 
mobility,” says Annin 
Toepfer, chairman of the 
association’s Services Ex- 
pert Group. “When the cus- 
tomer can enjoy the ser- 
vices he knows within his 
home network anywhere in 
the world . . . then roaming 
will really take off even 
more.” 

The European Tele- 
communications Standards 
Institute has completed 
work on the first standards, 
known as CAMEL 
(Customized Applications 
for Mobile Enhanced 
Logic) and has defined a 
platform based on an open 
interface and protocol. 

“CAMEL is die tool box 
for tomorrow’s services,” 
Mr. Toepfer explains. 
These include call screen- 
ing, on-line access, e-mail 


and fax forwarding as well 
as flexible billing. 

While roaming functions 
well for the users, it does 
require careful manage- 
ment by operators. Con- 
sistent end-to-end network 
monitoring and testing is 


often required in areas 
where fixed-network inter- 
connections are unstable or 
overburdened. This is a 
complicated and costly pro- 
cess - and one that threat- 
ens to stunt the growth of 
roaming in Eastern Europe 
and the Far East. 

“Operators build their 
networks to achieve prof- 
itability, and roaming must 


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allow them to be prof- 
itable,” says Franco Setti- 
mo, chairman of the GSM 
MoU Association’s Inter- 
national Roaming Expert 
Group (IREG). “We are 
focused on establishing a 
more automated testing 
procedure to increase effi- 
ciency and cut costs.” 

Another problem is the 
optimal routing of mobile- 
to-mobile calls and of calls 
forwarded to the home net- 
work when the customer is 
unreachable or busy. 

Currently, a call between 
two subscribers who find 
themselves in the same area 
while both aze away from 
their home networks is 
charged as an international 
call. Technical specifica- 
tions needed to resolve the 
problem have been decid- 
ed, says Mr. Settuno. 

Peggy Salz-Trautroan 


S ix weeks ago today, the first global 
personal satellite phoDe service went 
commercial. 

Planet I from Comsat provides commu- 
nications from portable, notebook-sized 
phones, targeted at international travelers 
and workers in remote areas. “Virtually 
anywhere they can see the sky, they can 
place a call,” says Chris Leber, vice presi- 
dent and general manager of Comsat 
Personal Communications. 

Planet 1 is just the beginning. Four other 
systems soon to be launched will also pro- 
vide personal communications services 
worldwide, but these new systems will use 
small hand-held terminals. And they will 
interwork with existing terrestrial wireless 
networks such as GSM (Global System for 
Mobile Communications). 

Originally dubbed Big LEOs (low earth 
orbits), the Globalstar; ICO, Iridium and 
Odyssey systems are now referred to by die 
less memorable but more accurate 
acronym GMPCS — Global Mobile 
Personal Communications by Satellite. 
Each company will blanket the globe with 
constellations of satellites flying close to 
the Earth’s surface. 

Roaming between GMPCS and existing 
wireless networks offers a new dimension 
to GSM. Today’s loose federation of 
national GSM networks - spanning die 
globe but without genuine worldwide cov- 
erage - will be extended by umbrella satel- 
lite networks covering the entire world. 
GMPCS promises true global access for 
GSM. 

Two GMPCS systems have chosen code- 
division. multiple-access (CDMA) tech- 
nology for their radio-access method; the 
others use time-division, multiple-access 
(TDMA) as in GSM. Unlike for terrestrial 
networks, this is not a contentious issue for 
satellite networks. “The TDMA/CDMA 
debate as applied to terrestrial networks is 
irrelevant,” explains David Bemardi, vice 
president of system procurement at 
Tfeieglobe, one of the partners in Odyssey. 
“There is no trace of TDMA in the network 
portion of the GSM standards. Seen from 
the outside world, all GMPCS systems will 
look like GSM networks.” 

David Benton, manager of public rela- 
tions with Globalstar, reinforces this view- 


point. “The Globalstar system was 
designed from its inception io be a dual- 
mode [terrestrial and satellite] system that 
would extend out and be easily interopera- 
ble with existing tenestrial networks,” says 
Mr. Benton. 

The GSM MoU (Memorandum of 
Understanding) Association now regards 
GMPCS networks as inherent parts of the 
GSM world. There is no more talk of. 


•roaming between GSM and mobile sauriV: 
— .... correct phraseology 

is “roaming between terrestrial and satellite 


lites.” The poiitacau: 
3 between 
GSM networks.” 


GMPCS 

(Global Mobile P ersonal 
CoounuMcetioas by SmteVtu) 
offers a new fSmmkm to terrestrial 
wirel e ss networks Ore GSM - 
true global access .. 


Roaming procedures are now being 
finalized within the standardization bodies. - 
No fundamental problems have emerged 
current preoccupations focus bn specifying • 
type-approval procedures for dual-mode, 
phones and defining common numbering 
schemes. 

The future is less certain. The next gen- 
eration of mobile systems, dubbed UMTS 
(Universal Mobile Telecommunications 
System), is intended to be global - it needs 
GMPCS as part of its portfolio. But 
GMPCS satellites will be unreachable in 
orbit long before the next generation stan- 
dards are finalized. 

Not a problem, according to Mr. 
BernardL “UMTS has nothing to fear from 
satellite systems,” he says, noting (hat the , 
satellite market is less than 1 percent of the 1 
total. . t 

But ICO is less sanguine about the 


future. “In Europe, our view is that the cur£ 


rent digital systems will gradually evoh 
into UMTS,” says an ICO spokesperson. 
“However, in other parts of the world, the 
process might require a more revolutionary 
development” 

Stuart Sharrock 


GSM World Congress Opens Today 


“Strategies and Solutions for Operator Profitability” is the, theme of the 1997 
GSM World Congress, which opens Wednesday in Cannes, France and runs 
through Feb. 21. More than 2,000 participants from 68 countries are expected 
to attend. Speakers, panels and “Ask the Specialists” forums will look at issues 
like customer loyalty, new services, fighting fraud, profiting from the Internet, 
billing, and roaming agreements. 


The congress opens with a keynote address by Stephen Nachtsheim, vice 
of Intel Corp.. on how the wireless communications industry can leant 


idem* 


)m industries and companies that have already achieved success in the mar- 
ket for consumer products and services. Gretel Holcomb Hoffman, chairperson 
of the GSM MoU (Memorandum of Understanding) Association, will tell the 
congress about the developments in GSM and the achievements of the associa- - 
tion over the past year. Karl Heinz Rosenbrock, director-general of the 
European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), will address 
“Worldwide Influence on the GSM Standard,” which is in use in more than 100 
countries. 

Adriana Nugter, who will take over as chairperson of the GSM MoU . 
Association in March, will head a panel discussion on Wednesday and outline • 
her objectives for the coming year at a press conference on Thursday. The win- ■ 
ners of the 1997 GSM World Awards will also be announced on Thursday. 


GSM MoU Association on the Web: http://www.gsmworld.com 
ETSI on the Web: http://www.etsi.ff 


Getting Smarter, and Soon* 


I ntelligent Networks (IN) are set to make numbers can be run using GSM rather than 
a big impact on Global System for just fixed networks, “which will be vay 
Mobile Communications (GSM) ser- useful for small and medium-sized busi- 
vices. They have been promising to trans- nesses, which could set up 0800 campaigns 
farm ordinary fixed telephone services for quickly and run them on the hoof ramer 
years, but progress has been slow. The idea than have to go through bureaus or rent 
behind IN is to implement new services premises.” 

uickly and easily using a standard PC at CAMEL will also allow users who are 
_he edge of the telephone network, rather traveling abroad to die services they 
than have to tangle wife millions of lines of enjoy at home, a -facility known as intefli- 


code in the huge switches at fee core of the 
infrastructure. 

The most familiar types of IN -supported 
services on the ordinary telephone net- 
works include follow-me, calling cards, fax 
on demand, broadcast fax and 
all types of voice mail and 
voice-response-based ser- 
vices. INs are also flexible, 
making ongoing amendments 
such as number changes a fast, 
simple process. 

Basic IN technology is 
inherent in GSM networks, 
which rely on it for fundamen- 
tal tasks like locating users for 
fee origination and delivery of 
calls. At the other end of the 
scale, GSM operators are 


'CAMEL wM bring 


enabBng aB sorts of 


Instead of just 
supporting basic 


looking to external IN to support advanced 
services that will help differentiate them 


from their competitors and increase rev- 
enue. 

Earlier in February, work was completed 
on the first batch of a set of pan-European 
standards known as CAMEL (for 
Customized Applications for Mobile 
Enhanced Logic). 


gent roaming. For example, users abroad 
could use their home operator’s “location” 
services, which provides the user with 
details on how to find things like the near- 
est jazz club, police station, Chinese restau- 
rant. hospital or garage. Eric 
Tholomd, GSM product man- 
ager for IN and Advanced 
Sendees at Nortel, says opera- 
tors could provide a list of 
whatever customers want, so 
that they simply press a singly, 
digit to dial fee company d?’ 
their choice. 

CAMEL will also help con- 
trol fraud across borders. 
Currently, if a phone is repeat- * 
ed stolen or any other abuse is 
spotted, feat phone would not 
be automatically recognized in a foreign 
country. CAMEL will provide better pro- 
Z 01 " °P CTalor and customer alike. 

GSM users will also be able to take 
advantage^ the cost savings of being 
simulated into a corporate Vim ml private 
Network (VPN). The service is provided 
across fee public infrastructure but ads tike 

n nnunfa i • . 




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Neil Lilly ¥head of technology with net " ork - °SM 

Orange, an innovative mobile operator in costs down -md ^ 

Britain, and is chairman of fee GSM MoU eaa ^ 

(Memorandum of Understanding) soS ^ ^ f 

Association Third Generation Interest an idea $liLf pecI ^ c ac * vertI smg through 
Group. He says: “CAMEL °wili bring 

together GSM and IN, enabling all sorts of malLftl sl £ pp !?? 

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Wife CAMEL, says Mr. LiUy, toll-free w " second commercial first. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SAJURDAY-SUNPAy, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 


. % ... j ** 




: : 


PAGE 22 


licral bl^fej Sributtf 

Sports 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 


World Roundup 


South Africa Coach Quits 

rugot UNION Andra Markgraaff 
resigned as coach of Sou* Africa on 
Tuesday following allegations that 
he had made racial slurs. 

The South African Rugby Foot- 
ball Union was to have held an 
investigation Wednesday into the 
allegations that Markgraaff was the 
man making racist slurs in 
Afrikaans in a secretly taped con- 
versation broadcast on national 
television on Monday. 

‘Tm not making excuses; if I 
said it I ask for forgiveness,’* said 
Markgraaff on Tuesday. “I wish to 
apologize to blacks in this country 
and also to the whites for embar- 
rassing them. ' ’ (Reuters) 

Soccer Star in Hiding 

SOCCER Ilia Ivic, a Yugoslav in- 
ternational striker who plays for the 
Greek league leaders, Olympiakos, 
was in hiding for the fifth day on 
Tuesday after being charged with 
assaulting his girlfriend. 

Club officials said Ivic had 
talked to the coach Dusan Bajevic 
and that he was continuing treat- 
ment on a knee injury that means be 
cannot play for at least another 
| month. 

“He told Bajevic that he had a 
simple fight with his girlfriend,” a 
club official said. 

Police said Monday that Ivic had 
allegedly punched Eleni Petroulaki 
— Greece’s best known gymnast 
and star of her own aerobics show 
on television — several times in the 
face on Friday after she told him 
she wanted to end their affair. 

(Reuters) 

• A Turkish soccer fan beat his 
wife and threw himself out of a 
fifth-floor window after his club, | 
Fenerbahce. lost to Besiktas, 1 - 0 , 
during the weekend, a Turkish 
newspaper said reported Tuesday. 

The paper said Ali Sirkecioglu 
got drunk and beat his wife — a 
Besiktas supporter — unconscious. 
He then went out on to the balcony 
of his flat, shouted: “I leave my 
children to my mother,” and 
jumped Sirkecioglu suffered 
broken ribs and legs and was taken 
to the same hospital as his wife. 
Semiha. ( Reuters ) 

Steders Re-Sign Bettis 

football The Pittsburgh Steel- 
ers signed Jerome Bettis to a four- 
year contract that makes him the 
NFL’s third highest-paid running 
back. The deal is worth slightly 
more than $14 million. Bettis, the 
league's No. 3 rusher in his first 
season in Pittsburgh, is the first 
starter to re-sign with die Steelers in 
five years of NFL free agency. 

• Gilbert Brown, one of the 
NFL’s top run blockers, re-signed 
with tire Green Bay Packers Tues- 
day after turning down a $3 million- 
a-year offer from JacksonvUle.(AP) 



Gene I. FikWaF 

Jerome Bettis announcing that 
he was staying with Pittsburgh. 


Scoreboard 



Who Is Solo Sailor— 
Hero or Thrill-Seeker? 

Answer Depends on the Culture 


■»■■■ y) r -i !•’: 


• f \ • 


By Christopher Clarey 

International Herald Tribune 

kARIS — So how should we judge 
Christopbe Augoin? Is the small, 
intense Frenchman who sailed tri- 


while the Anglo-Saxons have a culture 
that’s more oriented toward collective 
accomplishment. We seem to have 
trouble getting organized as a group.” 
There is also a gladiatorial element at 
work. The Vendee Globe has an allure > 
similar to bullfights or die Paris-Dakar 


umphantly into the Atlantic port of Les similar » mumguB or™™ 
SabtesdTOlomie on Monday morning a 
hero? An athlete? An adventurer? A 


ST v . • v •> ••• 7 “. 



AteST** the I98(WT7 BOC Challenge, the solo 
round-the-world race m four legs that 

^TlSLwer depends partly on culture, stans 
Is some areas or&e world, a man who since the fi^^*°* 
left behind a wife and young son for 105 has been billed as an extreme event; the 
days to compete in a nonstop, solo, Everest of the oceans, as Jeantot says, 
round-the-world sailing race would be No lives were lost in 1990. but di«e 
0 were two deaths associated with the 

Vamta* cPoimt second race in 1993. An American, 

Mike PlanL, disappeared before reaching 

conskleredhiesponrible or selfish. In oth- the starting line, as hisboM cmjsized 
er countries, the entire endeavor would be mysteriously en route from the United 
deemed pointless in this era of instant Sates. . 

co mmunfcttiop 91 ^ nw« Jo pg -haul trans- Nigel Burgess, a Bnton, was swept 


STRETCH PLAY — Chicago Cubs’ pitcher Terry MulhoUand Umbering up in spring training in Mesa, Arizona. 

Goalie Juggles Two Soccer Balls 

U.S. Star Must Choose Between Club and Country 

International Herald Tribune ^ 

L ONDON— Kasey Keller is a stu- World Soccer / Rob Hdomks 

dious American with twin sporting 

ambitions that are burning him dates for all World Cup qualifying less, said he regretted Dundee’s ab- 


co mmunfcttiop and mass long-haul trans- 
it and accorded little interest — Magellan, 
after all, has been there and done that. 
Butin France the Vendee Globe Chal- 


overboard in a storm shortly after the 
start. 

This tune, the death toll could have 'a* 

. . ■« -c . .tn... W. 


lenge, the race Auguin won Monday, is a been higher if not forthewuragpof Pete 
major ha mwiin c and, fnr many , a major GOSS, the racer whosavea a fellow sail- 
inspiration in the midst of their nation’s or, Raphael Dinelli, in huge seas; and the 
current malaiaM a celebration of man’s efficiency and largesse of die Australian 
and, fhfc year, woman "s ability to push Navy, which fished Thierry Dubois and 
the limits. Tony Bullimore out of the angry south- 

“You are an example for an entire cm oceans. Gerry Roufs of Canada is 
generation,” Prime Minister Alain still missing, having last made contact 
Juppe told Augoin on Monday. “Your six weeks ago. 


World Soccer / RobHdomks 


He wants to be America’s No. 1 soc- 
cer goalie, and to cany on playing for 
Leicester City in England s Premier 
League. In the prime of athletic life. 
Keller has the ability, but maybe not the 
time, to do both. 

Keller, who graduated from Uni- 
versity of Portland in Oregon five years 
ago. has worked to prove himself, first 
with London's dockland club Mill wall 
in the English first division. 

Ac 6 feet I inch, he isn't the biggest 
goalkeeper. But he has established a 
reputation for quick movement and 
courageous shot-stopping. 

Leicester, newly promoted to Eng- 
land’s top division, last summer paid 
Millwall $2 million for Keller. This was 
his chance, his time. Week after week he 
appears on television; every save is trans- 
mitted back home where Steve Sampson, 
the U.S. coach, monitors Keller’s pro- 
gress against world-rated finishers. 

Sampson has habimaliy alternated his 
goalkeepers — Keller, Brad Friedel. a 
much bigger man, and Jurgen Sommer. 

Friedel, who was not granted a British 
government work permit to join English 
teams, lacks day to day experience. 
Sommer suffered when his London 
club. Queens Park Rangers, dropped out 
of die Premier League in May. 

Sampson said earlier this month that 
Keller would “most likely” be fust 
choice for the U.S. World Cup games in 
Much. The coach was in Leicester last 
Sunday, checking Keller’s form. 

So everything is within Keller's 
grasp, except that everything comes at 
once. Leicester has reached the semi- 
final of England’s Coca Cola Cup, it is 
still in die more prestigious FA Cup but 
in the Premier League it is not yet clear 
of the danger of relegation. The club’s 
finances, and its status as a top team, 
depends on a schedule of eight games in 
three weeks. In that same period, the 
United States plays Jamaica in Kingston 
on March 2. Canada on March 16, and 
Costa Rica at San Jose on March 23. 

Off duty, Keller, in dark suit and 
glasses, may resemble a clerk; but he is 
no Dark Kent Not even Concorde 
could fly him across the Atlantic fast 
enough. 

“The present situation is going to get 
worse.” he suggests.’Tt’suptoHFAto 
take a lead in the situation. They ’re the 
only ones who can sort it exit, and die 
logical solution would be to have fixed 


dates for all World Cup qualifying 
m atche s on aQ continents.” 

FIFA, the governing body of world 
soccer, acknowledges the principle but 
apart from Europe, cannot persuade the 
continents to agree on timetables. Keller 


less, said he regretted Dundee's ab- 
sence. The young player, an irrepress- 
ible scorer of goals for Karlsruhe m the 
Bundesliga, brashly announced that his 
heart was set on playing alongside Jur- 
gen Klinsmann for Germany. In 


victory opens up a path of hope for all 
those in our society who are assailed by 
doubt and are looking for clues on how to 
give meaning to their lives.” 

In Asia and die Americas, professional 
solo sailors have as high a profile as 
weekend water skiers, but in France off- 
shore racers such as Auguin, Isabelle 
Autissier, Florence Arthaud, Alain Gau- 
tier and Bruno and Lok^P^ron are stars. 


Auguin and others agree that 
something has to change before the next 
race in 2000. It may be the route, the 
qualifying process for skippers or die 
boat designs, which have increased 
speed but reduced safety. 

“We can't make the Australians lake 
off from the airstrips to save the racers 
every time we sail round die world,” 
Auguin said. "We have to act. In four 


LVUL1J K.L1LO LU a^lVb Ull UiliUUUJl^q. IVllUAmaUII iui \JW1JUHIJ. XII UW4 ailUWIUUWUliUl^vtva* • "“Cl . ” — — — ~ I 

sees the problem, indeed, he is a most December he was granted citizenship. After the charismatic Arthaud became the years time, we should be able to right a jj 
nhcwuMt faiinw min-, unketniwm tn hie nthor factor than ic normal m Cotm anv first woman to win Route du Rhum in 60 -foot boat that has capsized.” - ” 


observant fellow who unbeknown to his 
Millwall teammates used them for his 
Masters thesis on “sexual infidelities of 
professional sportsmen.” 

He is married himself and. for the first 
time since coming to England, Kasey 
and Kristin Keller have revested in a 
bouse of their own. 

“We’re currently doing quite a bit of 
work on it, creating our little bit of 
America in the heart of the English 
countryside,” he says. 

Adapting his lifestyle isn’t a problem. 
Flying the Atlantic between perfor- 
mances does not bother him (be says he 
didn’t suffer jet lag between rushing 
from Costa Rica to shut out Manchester 
United last December). 

But reaching for the stare and stripes 
is turning into an insoluble club versus 
country dilemma 

“We have a saying in America about 
being either feast or famine,” he told 
Leicester supporters this week in the 
club’s Foxes Magazine. “I’m caught 
right in the middle, and I don’t know 
how its going to develop. If I was push- 
ing the wrong side of 30 and had played 
in a few World Cups, then I might retire 
from international soccer. But I’m 27 
and I’ve not played in a World Cup. 
We’ve a great chance of getting to 
France and, yes. I want to be pan if it” 

Keller is not alone in limbo. His fel- 
low Americans Tom Dooley and Ernie 
Stewart have to juggle clubs in Germany 
and the Netherlands and the U.S. team. 

How can a young man weigh pat- 
riotism against loyalty to the club which 
gives him his daily bread and his op- 
portunity to go on improving? 

Leicester needs him. It lost the only 
two league marches he has missed; he 
was playing for the United States. 

Whatever the outcome, it would be 
melodramatic to suggest Kasey Keller 
might regret being bom in the land of the 
free and wanting to represent iL 

Sean Dundee, bom and raised a South 
African, has taken a different path. He 
has rejected his homeland for Germany. 

Dundee, a dashing white redhead, 
refused South Africa's call 13 months 
ago when it staged, and won. the Af- 
rican Nations Cup. Nelson Mandela, no 


rather faster than is normal in Germany 
and on Tuesday, Dundee was named in 
Germany's squad to play a friendly 
against Israel in Tel Aviv. 


1990, polls showed she was the country’s 
most popular sports figure. 

Past of the explanation is that sailing 


“One of the thing s that’s important puts France at the forefront of world sport 
r me is who is top of the Bundesliga andgives it a reason to be proud. But mere 


for me is who is top of the Bundesliga 
scoring charts,” said Bern Vogts, Ger- 
many's team coach. Dundee is top. 

“After that, we shall see how be fits 
into the team, how he trains, how be 
deals with our fast pace.' ’ 

There are plenty of rivals. Dundee has 
come far, has relinquished his nation- 
ality. and still might not get what he 
wants. Keller, by contrast, has too much 
on his plate. - - - 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 


is more than jingoism to the french fas- 


The irony, of course, is that the slew of 
misadventures, not Auguin' s cool ex- 
pertise, are what made the biggest head- 
lines. Goss was dubbed a hero by some. 
So were Dubois, Dinelli and Bullimore. 
But is it really heroism when you perform 


dnarion with the Vendee Globe and in- brave deeds within die artificial confines 
divj duals such as Gerard d’Aboville. die of a dangerous sporting event? 


French m an who rowed alone across the 
Pacific several years ago. 

“1 think die French like solitary her- 


The answer again depends partly cm 
culture. What is not relative is that Au- 
guin has participated in three solo 


oes; adventurers, travelers. It’s quite a round-the-world races: two BOC Chal- 


part of our culture with colonialism, the 
exploration of America and all the rest, ” 


lenges and one Vendee Globe. He has 
won all three. He might not be a star. 


said Autissier, who failed, to. complete hero or role model in Asia, America or 
this race. “I dunk our culture is more even in Germany or Italy. But he clearly 
oriented toward the individual exploit is an exceptional sailor. 


England Subdues Kiwis 
To Win Test and Series 


Reuters 

CHRISTCHURCH. New 
Zealand — England ground its 
way to victory Tuesday on the 
final day of the third cricket 
test against New Zealand. The 
result gave England a 2-0 vic- 
tory in the three-march series. 

Set 305 to win by New Zea- 
land, England won by four 


Hussain, his deputy, moved 
England cautiously toward 
victory. Atherton was out for 
1 18, caught by Adam Parore, 
the wicketkeeper, playing a 
tired shot against Nathan 
Astle. He batted nearly seven 
hours and hit 11 fours in his 
11 th test century. 

At 79 runs from victoiy. 


wickets in the final session of England staged one of its char- 
the day. It was only the second acteristic wobbles. With the 


time in England’s cricket his- 
tory that it has passed 300 in its 
second innings to win. The last 
time was against Australia on 
die tour of 1928/29. 

England started the day at 
118 runs for two wickets and 
lost only one wicket before 
lunch — nigfatwatchman An- 
drew Caddick. well caught by 
Stephen Fleming, the New 
Zealand captain, trying to 
hammer away a ball from Si- 
mon Doull. Mike Atherton, the 


England captain, and Nasser nership of 7i 


score on 226, Nasser Hussein 
played a sloppy defensive 
stroke against Daniel Vettori 
and ballooned a gentle catch to 
Fleming. 

At 231, Graham Thorpe, a 
left-handed batsman who has 
struggled against Vettori’s 
left-arm spin, attempted to 
launch a counterattack and in- 
stead lobbed an easy catch. But 
John Crawley and Dominic 
Cork inched England to vic- 
tory with a painstaking pait- 



-H, 

RonSnfatVThc Auacjued Pm 

England s Dominic Cork celebrating as his 
team won the third test against New Zealand. 


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340 

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mohmtiumkii 
MUHMK 23 22 34 H— 93 

Washington X 34 is 23— 95 

NV GffHam 5*10 M0 17, Altai 4-15 0-0 IK 
Baker 6-15 3-5 f£ W: Howard 9-22 2-2 20. 
SlrieklaM 6-13 5*7 IS. RttnaKb-MBwcufer 
40 (Gillian 15], Wasningjon 42 (Howard, 
Mimen 0). AhWs— AW weufcM 21 1 Pent 
7). WfliNnflWi 20 (Cheaney 5). 


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amond 31 21 24 30— in 

N-l- GW 12-22 4-5 30. KRUes 10-21 4-4 30; 
C Brandon 7-18 2-3 22, HW 4-11 5-4 17. 
•Wteaads— New Jersey 39 (GW 9), Cleveknul 
47 (HB 19). Assists— New Jersey 23 (Wittes 
9), Cleveland 28 (Brandon 7). 

Toronto 36 23 23 13—103 

ladfcna 29 20 21 28-105 

T: sraodtBWie 7-19*^ 2X Chrtsile 6-13 6-6 
21; I: RMIDerA.12 12-14 2& Rase 8-13 1-318. 
Kebwmb— ranxrto 38 (OJHOter 8). Indiana 
40 IA-D«rvts i3j. Assists— Toronto 21 
(Stoudantfrell). taSona 16 (Best 71. 
Orlando » » 17 29— JJO 

OWo* 30 34 32 28—124 

OtAfldHUn 10-240-229. Scan 7-15 1-1 1ft 
C: Rice 12-24 lo-io 4ft Meson 11-11 4-7 28. 
Mamds— Ortanda 55 (Gram IBL Chartalle 
45 (Mason 121. Assists— Ortaudo 27 (Show 
91, Ota done 37 (Mason. Bagues 9). 

Adorno 27 39 25 26— 98 

Hmstaa 29 36 35 29—127 

A: Smith 10-19 4-4 2& Bkqffotft /-IT 2-2 ]ft 
H: Bander 4-12 B-U 21. Ola'nraron 7-102-2 14. 
Malone? 5-10 2-2 Id. Retewds— AAoma 29 
(Lotftner 81, Houston 56 {Wins la). 

Assists Afeuita 20 (BlaylockS), Houston 29 
(Pile* 7). 

Boston 29 25 26 24-189 

Seam* 37 28 27 31—113 

B: WoRwr 11-173-5 27. Day 4-103-3 1ft S: 
Payton 10-20 4-5 tf, SeftremjM 9-16 44 24. 
MaMdS-'fiaston 34 (Walter 12)iScattte43 
(Kemp 7). Assists — Boston 77 (Wesley 8), 
5eqme 29 (Payson I®. 

DOdat 31 30 IS 34-100 

VOKDUMT 22 29 17 27— 95 

D; Finley 8-16 3-5 21. Green 9-12 3-4 31; V: 
R«ves 11-19 5-4 27. Abdur-Rahini 12-18041 
24. Rctands— Dallas 54 (Green IS), 
Vancouver 27 (Edwards 7J, Atsftfs— DM 
21 (Harper 9), Vancouver 25 (AAltnny B. 

The AP Top 25 

7lmap38t— m»lnUiiAo i Q cl a to dl * i — 1 » 
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tram In paremheon. racanis thnngfi Fab. 
l& ratal poms hosed an 25 palms lor a Rist- 


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N.Y. Minders 19 29 to 

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171 

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Tampa Bay 

20 29 

7 

47 

153 

177 


Record 

Pts 

Pre 

NORTHEAST DMSION 



1. Kansas (68) 

25-1 

1,748 

1 


W L 

T 

Pt> 

GF 

GA 

2. Minnesota CD 

22-2 

1.649 

3 

Buffalo 

30 19 

9 

69 

165 

143 

X Kentucky 

24-3 

1422 

4 

Pittsburgh 

30 22 

5 

65 

209 

1B4 

4. Wake Forest 

20-3 

1J12 

2 

Montreal 

22 28 11 

55 

190 

215 

5. Utah 

ISA-3 

1/447 

5 

■ 1 ■■■EEii.i | 

mji imu 

22 28 

7 

51 

16) 

186 

6. Duke 

Zl-5 

1.438 

6 

Ottawa 

19 26 12 

50 

158 

149 

7, knva SI. 

18-4 

1/264 

9 

Boston 

20 30 

7 

47 

164 

201 

8, German 

20-S 

1J47 

7 

WCSRRHCOH 

188 

DK 

8 


9. South Caraftoa 

18-6 

T.I29 

!2 


CBrmALomsnw 



la New Mexico 

20-4 

1,091 

13 


W L 

T 

Pts 

GP 

GA 

ll.Ondnncll 

1M 

906 

8 

Dallas 

34 21 

4 

72 

178 

147 

12.NaritiCaroHno 

17-6 

906 

14 

Driiott 

27 19 11 

65 

180 

138 

11 Arizona 

144 

882 

11 

SL Louis 

28 24 

6 

62 

1B3 

185 

14. Maryland 

19-4 

874 

10 

Phoeidx 

26 28 

4 

56 

163 

179 

15. Lootsvae 

19-5 

707 

17 

CWcngo 

23 28 

e 

54 

154 

1SS 

1ft Xavier, CWo 

184 

6*6 

19 

Toronto 

21 35 

2 

44 

144 

204 

17. UCLA 

15-7 

565 

24 


PACsneamwoN 



IS. Michigan 

17-7 

558 

14 


W L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

19.VBanara 

1B*7 

320 

18 

Catomto 

35 14 

a 

79 

195 

133 

2a StantorO 

154 

3T9 

22 

Etenanton 

a 25 

6 

62 

183 

169 

21.Caiarede 

17-7 

268 

15 

Vancouver 

24 a 

2 

54 

180 

191 

22.ColLetaniteston 

23-2 

252 

25 

Grigory 

24 a 

6 

54 

155 

145 

23. tends 

18-7 

249 

20 

Anaheim 

23 29 

6 

52 

166 

177 

24. Indfona 

20-7 

186 



San Jaw 

20 31 

6 

46 

148 

191 

25. CnttfatrVa 

18-6 

171 

— 

Los Angeles 

19 32 

8 

44 

155 

199 


Ortrers rec eMn q vote: GerxgJo 119, Texas 
Tech 97, st. Josephs 84, prrMda m e 61 
HmraB 5ft Tulsa 47, Massodnnem 38 New 
Orleans 3ft Princeton 2& Wisconsin 23, 
amoRe 2a lama I?. 7 Urn 12. Team II, 
Southern Cal la Pacific 6, Bauan COIege 5, 
&awfl ng Green & Rhode bland & Artante* 4, 
Temple 4 Fresno Sr. a AHaraf 1 IBnob St. Z 
Long Islmm U.l.Mcm pte l. Oral Roberta!. 


HOCKEY 


NHL STAHtHHOS 

■AXTUM COMMMMCA 

ATLAWTte DIVISION 

W L T 7b CF « 
IRHO 33 16 8 74 Isa 141 


PNtadelpHn 
Florida 
New Jersey 
W.V. Rengen 
Washington 


33 16 8 74 188 141 

28 17 13 49 143 133 

29 17 10 48 152 133 

28 24 8 44 2» T44 
23 ZB 6 52 150 140 


SUNDAY'S UflHtt 
Montreal 2 0 2-4 

iLY.Istedon 1 • 0—1 

Hat Period: New York, «ng M (Mdnnl*. 

Ciwfi} z M-Beo*i27 «ohu sawfle; x «- 
Bure 10 (Rudnsfcy, Boon] Second Met 
None. TNiti Period: M>5avage 22 (Kaftu, 
ReccOO-S M-6onMeov 2 Sheb (a 
gote M- 9-5-11—25. New YOrt 15-1 4-8—37. 
Scales: M-Theadore. New YariL Safa. 

MwJeney 0 114-2 

N.Y. Rangers 0 114-2 

First Period: None. Second Period: NJ.- 
TTi areas 7 (Ralston, Steens) 2. New Ybtfc 
SandsTram 19 {Grefzfo Sanwetswn) 7&M 
Ported: NJ.Zelepiddn? (MacLdOft ZseO 4, 
Horn Yort, Noonan 8 (Gretzky. Larigdari) 
Owr Uu. None. Sfaats aa gaeft N_L- 12-17- 
10-1—40. New York 11-10-10-1— 32. Goodes 
NJ.-Bradeur. New York, Rlcmer. 

Ddas 0 1 1-2 

LMAagate T a o-i 

Hnt PmM: LJL-ODanmd 4 IB tote 


Nurminen) (pp). Second Period: O-cnaotar 
9 (Zubov, Harvey) Tted Porto* O-Modano 
24 (GOdrrist, Hmvey) Stats an gord: D- 9-13- 
15-37. L-A-r 15-11-9-35. OoMlo r . P-Moog. 

LA-Rset 

Dated 1 8 2 4—3 

Trnopa Bay 2 0 1 4-3 

Hnt Palotfc T-Sbow 1 (Langfaw, 

OccoreJIO 2. D-Sbarwhon 28 (LJds&aaO 

(pp).lT-,Zamunerll (Andonaon. Grattan) 
Secead Perio* Norm, tbw Porto* d- 
Fedonw 23 (Ydarnn, Urteaai) & D- 
Sandstiwi 11 (YTwnwi, Fedorov) ft T-, 
Langkow 10 (Bun, Seftranaw overthao: 
Nona 5MS6B gaafe D- T- 14- 

7-4-2-29. GaadOE D-VWntov. T-TaboraccL 
Friwontno 4 14-1 

Aordwlio 3 * W 

Rref perio* A-Treaa 1 Uoarptre) Z *> 
Sacco 10 0/oft, Dates) X A-Kartye 27 
(RuccNn Trobi) (Stt- Soeond Period: A- 
Setanne 34 (Rvcddn) 5. B-McAiomood 10 
(DeVries) ft A-Rucctiln 13 (Ddtos) (pp). 
Third Period: None. Stetson goab E- 1(M1- 
14-01. A- 7-4-1 3-26. Goatee EJasepts 
Essensa.A-Hetert. 

aUcaoo 2 0 8-2 

SL Loots 2 1 »—4 

First Perio* LL-Yark 12 (PeUerti, 
Murphrt; Z &i--P«er*i 7 i X C-Datt 13 
(OieBas, sutor) (pp). C-DaWen 13 (AiaonW 
Second Perio* SO— Tuiaean 18 (Court™* 
Hu 01 (pp). 7hftd ten). 

Shots ee gw* C- 8-14.13-3S. SJ.- W0- 
1 1-30. GDtecst OHacMt. Si^FrAr. 


Stomdasa for dw Ryrtor Cw <a be plsred 
50PL 2MB at WdOTTO*a In Sottgrendo. 

8pte».7ftatopH) dul> lm * q u4 W)r*arttwi2. 

man teams mri U& aophrin Tom ffl» and 
Earepeon eopUta Save Olfliitemo eat* 
hare m u wq o . Lo rd z t i u l c n r ■ 
UMTBZUTE8 

1. Tom Lehman 74428ft 2. Maik.0Wleoffl 
72flm 3. DflVlS LAW IB 52SI)0a ft Mtelt 

Breaks 5T9J3aft PM MMrihaa 501 JSftft 

Stem Jones 489280, 7. Tiger Wands MSJOft 


ft Scoff Haeti 404^80. P.ICemry Ferry 271 55a 

10. Fred Couples 3STJ9ft 11. Jte Fteyfc 
347 J0a 12. Sieve SWdter 34250ft IX John 
Cook 341 jooa 14. Tconray Toons 330*5. 15. 
Oarid Duval 3201100. 

EUROPE 

1. Cafti Mantganwrift ScoHand 311,711.66 

2. Miguel Angel Manta Spain 25541309 

3. Ttwaios B|ora Denmark 23845740 
ft GostonNna Rocca Italy 1824)14* 

£ Damn Oorte N. Bekmd 7814C275 

4. Jean Van de Vekte France 150,17139 
7. San Torrance. Scotland 147947.50 

& PerUhiUetaanssan, Sweden 14«B3JB 
9. Paul fireadtiunL England 12487&76 
la. Ian WoasnaiaWal8Sll3467.il 

11. Lae Westwood England 10441&32 

12. Podndg H ar rin g to n . Iratond 102489 J5 
IX Peter MBchoO. England 97.99X57 

lft Miguel Angel Jhnencz. Spate 9U57J8 
15. OavTd GBtont Eogtjnd 8X24443 


CRICKET 


S> AND POWU. TEST 
NEW ZEALAND VS. OTOLAM) 
TUESDAY IN CHreSTCMJRCM 
New Zeaterr* 346 and IBft 
Eatfand;228and 307 lor she wickets 
England won by four wiekete, 
epgland wan the three m ukJ i series 2-0L 


TRANSITIONS 


■IAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
NATIONAL LEAOUE 

eurenuTi-Ptaead RH R jase n)o an the 
4»risy«HMEdBa. 

eoidBADO— Agreed to terras wtfn LHP 
Rabble Bebtetron T-year cenmet. 

us anckles— A^ eed to terns vwm INF 
Chad FanvUeen T -year coated 
HEW mOL-Agreed to tom* artttr RHP 
Mire Welrti an 1-year oomad 
. reftU WH A g re e d to terms «a 
RHP Mfte Grace, INF Scon Rolen and of 


wandee Atopee Jr. an liearcaranxis. 

sr.uwis-AgreedtotenrawmiRHPMan- 
nyAsbar, RHP CuritsKbig, RHP Brady Raa- 

gto- RHP Bk*e Stela C EH Manerft C Mfte 
DtfeBce, INF Mike GuLai and INF Lute Or- 
daz, an l-iera' contracts. 


NATIONAL RASXETBAU ASSOCIATION 
CHAHurTTW-Put G Anthony GokMre an 
lnlured QsL AUteated F Scott Burred from 
infilled list 

BAUAS-Adholed F SamaW Wofter from 
Entured isr. 

ub A N c rm ojppres-PuT c stonfev 
Roberts on Mured HsL Activated C Kevto 
Dudcwordi from Infured Bet 
^-nPTOOTA-tetoiaed F vhgWus 

new jehsey— T raded C Shown Sradfcy, F 
Ed OBannari. G KhaH Reeves and G Robert 
Pack tattle Dates Mavavsa for C Eric Mon- 

woss, C Jtor Jociaoa F< Chris Ganna F-G 
aito G Sara CoadLPloced 

te^FjrtHS^r R *' 

iPROWTD— Nomad Brendan Suhrasstenurr 

GOOCh. 

FOOTSAU 

HAIKimiRiaTmn ipir. g 

Wtoon w 2-year contract. Exercised thdr 
apaton aa LB Terry Irvhtg for 1997 aeaean. 
Dedned to bwrIm their option an G Dim 

LJMa 

caeouha— R eleased OT Mark Oereds. 

toeB^nara Ravens far 1997 2nd-round 
CaQu ptOL 

* 1TOS “Wi T Brad 
Hopkke on muhfyear contract 
JAl * S0,re tt«-Slgn« OB Sieve Tone*. 
J^^^^loneytiai DE Jose WhheaSd 
WR kentufcke BvKard to the Wond League, 
“*«»-Slgnad GJabn Elmarck qb Spence 
FMier, DE Larry Jackson FB Les McCOn- 
Mflre SMitan. Waived DT Stove 

NBwyMKfiUms^WHved PiHlkn Horan 


5 Jesse Carapbefl. Agreed to lam vrilti 
DT Kebh Hamflton and P Sam Player. 

new yo«c jets— A nnounced lft* relhe- 
irHWofLBXyfcOMon. 

PHiLAircrpHiA— DecOned to eMtdseihetr 
ytan on OB Rodney Peete. Tendered ex- 
clusive righto arten to DT Michael Samson, 
WR ^Freddfe sotomon. DT HaWsTtenras, OL 
Morris Uninoa, RB Derrick WHherepoen end 
DE-LB Sylvester WrigM. Tendered quaWy 
mg afters to DT Bonnie Dtna S James 
HHier, RB ChaDe Gamer and OL Joe 
Panes. * 

Oa kland— s igned QB Jeff BeorgetoeBye- I 

tear contract. Also signed C6 Teny Me- 
Prertet Released DTJenyBrriLPJeltGfOS- 
*sn. S Loreruo Lynch and FB Derrick Fenner. 
Arewuneed me renreraem or OT Chortos 
Treaed qb B«y Joe Habert to me 
BtiHato Blits tar an unaisdased *nff choice. 

rnrseoacN— signed RB Jerome Berth to 
4-year contract 

sr. unis— S igned LB Chmtte Ctemans. 

, san Dieso -signedCB Dwayne Horeerto 
A-^cen^.TermfoqttelhecontroqofC 
gwfny Hag and ftdled to tender exclustve 
ng^ qffore ip LB (Men Young. LB Arnold Ale 

and TE Maurice HaneL 

MN WANeoai-Waived C Jesse Sepato 
and FB Tammy Vordeft. 

SEATTi E-Agread ip terms wBftCBWMIle 

wwarra on 4-ye ar cumm o. 

’^wv-Re-slgnedT Pouf Gruoerto> 
rewcantraci. 

nockrt 

WTKWALNOCKOf LEAGUE 

toe San Jose snorts S7J00 
"wnw Vancouver Canucks SiSOO as OtesulT 

^rawicrerartacrmcang an offictol M- 

■owing a 3.2 or Mss in Montreal on Fab. 8. 

J^^^C«T-^«|»ndod Beslan U. 
^^iFTunHAwrrioblforancgameta 
*** o» No ejwtkm term a Feb. 13 gome. 
*UMMA-SiBpendad G George Brawn 

R *“* *ndeflnBclv from mem i 
“wwlteOtoani. A 

> W«MAw-AiHiaunced me redgnanan of ^ 
basketteu caocn. at me 

BTy3 “ Sftnon. 


r^:;- 

! iS* 

i 


i 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 PAGE 23 

. SPORTS 


*Nets and Mavs Make 9-Man Trade 

Don Nelson Finishes Clean Sweep of Dallas Roster 


The Associated Press 


In °ne of the biggest trades in National 
Basketball Association history, the Dal- 
las Mavericks and New Jersey Nets have 
exchanged a total of nine players. 

The biggest names included the 7- 
foot-6 (2.3-meter) center Shawn Brad- 
ley. who went to Dallas, and Jim Jack- 
son and Chris Gatling, an All-Star who 
went the other way. 

The trade continued Don Nelson’s 
drastic remake of the Mavericks Nel- 
son was named Dallas’s general "man- 
ager on Feb. 7. He immediately released 
the overweight center Oliver Miller and 
x then traded Jamal Mashbum to the 
™ Miami Heat for three players. 

Nelson continued the purge Monday 
night with a trade that brought Bradley, 
forward Ed O'Bannon and point guards 
Robert Pack and Khalid Reeves ta Dal- 
las. 

The Nets, whose rookie head coach, 
John Calipari, had been busy exploring 
trade possibilities, also received guards 
Sam Cassell and George McCloud and 
center Eric Montross. 

The trade is believed to be the largest 
between two NBA teams in at least 25 
years, said Chris Brienza. a league 
spokesman. 

In 1964, there was an eight-player 
deal between Detroit and Baltimore in- 
volving Bailey Howell, Bob Ferry and 
Rod Thorn, now an NBA vice pres- 
J fl idem. 

The Mavericks’ blockbuster swap 
followed Friday's trade of Mashbum to 
the Heat for three players and the 
December deal that sent Jason Kidd to 
Phoenix in exchange for Cassell, A.C. 
Green and Michael Finley. 

“There were just so many negative 
things about this ball club,” Nelson 
said. “This locker room shocked me. I 
observed it, watched it and basically got 
sick about it.” 

The Mavericks' coach, Jim Clea- 
mons, whose team is 16-31 in his first 
season, looked and sounded stunned. 

“Obviously, Nellie thought there 
were things that had to be done, and he 
came in and made some changes," 
Cleamons said. “Hopefully, this will 
come to a point in time where we can get 
^ settled for the rest of the year. We’re 
going to sit down and evaluate them and 
see what we have." 


Dallas has so players remaining from 
last season's roster. The rookie forward 
Sa maki Walker has been on the Mav- 
ericks' roster the longest, after being 
drafted last June. Derek Harper, a vet- 
eran guard, was signed in July. 

‘ ‘from the beginning of the season to 
now. we have traded away our top seven 
players,’’ said McCloud, who is on his 
way to the Nets and watched from the 


NBA Roundup 


stands as Dallas bear Vancouver on 
Monday despite suiting up only eight 
players. “I don’t know if that’s ever 
beat done in this league before, but Don 
has done it." 

The Nets, meanwhile, freed up $14 
million under the salary cap in the next 
two years, allowing Calipari to pursue 
top free agents. 

’’This is a trade for the future,'* Cali- 
pari said. ’ 

Both teams are straggling — New 
Jersey is 15-36 — and the trade is not 
likely to make either a playoff contender 
this season. 

Calipari made his comments as the 
Nets fliew home on a team charter from 
Cleveland after a 108-101 loss. 

At the time. Bradley and Reeves had 
not been told of the trade. Pack and 
O’Bannon, the Nets' No. I draft choice 
two years ago, were injured and not with 
the team. 

The four were expected to join Dallas 
in time for Thursday's home game 
against Milwaukee. All the players must 
pass physicals before the deal is fi- 
nalized. 

Unnricfct 100, SriofiM 05 Walker, 
the Dallas rookie, was activated from 
the injured list before the game in Van- 
couver. 

"The game was fun," said Harper, 
who had 17 points in 40 minutes. 

Green led the Mavericks with season 
highs of 21 points and 15 rebounds. 
Finley added 21 points. 

Cwrfui ion, Nets ioi In Cleveland, 
Terrell Brandon scored 22 points and 
Tyrone Hill added 17 and 19 rebounds as 
Cleveland won its third straight. 

Kendall Gill and rookie Kerry Kitties 
scored 30 points apiece for New Jersey. 
Kittles mane six 3-pointers — all in the 
second half — to keep the Nets close. 


Pacers 105, Raptors 103 In Indiana- 
polis. Reggie Miller made three free 
throws after being fouled with one-tenth 
of a second remaining. 

Miller, who finished with 25 points, 
took a last-second, off balance 3-pointer 
with his team down 103-102. 

When Doug Christie was whistled for 
the foul with less than a second left, 
Toronto’s coach, Darrell Walker, ar- 
gued vehemently, grabbed the ball from 
referee Monty McCutcben and 
slammed it to the floor. He was charged 
with a technical foul and ejected. 

Miller hit the technical to tie it. then 
sank two of three foul shots to win it. 

Roefcpts 197, Hawk* 98 Charles 
Barkley scored 21 points and Hakeem 
Olajuwon led an early second-half 
charge for Houston, which handed vis- 
iting Atlanta its sixth straight loss. 

BuBats 95, Buds 93 Juwan Howard 
bad 20 points and nine rebounds as 
Washington escaped with a home vic- 
tory after blowing a 10-point fourth- 
quarter lead. 

Rod Strickland’s free throw with 6.1 
seconds remaining gave Washington 
the lead, and the Milwaukee rookie Ray 
Alien missed a 14-foot (4-meter) 
baseline jumper as time expired. 

Sonic* 113, cattle* 108 Gary Payton 
scored 26 points and Detlef Schrempf 
added 24 as Seattle won its fourth 
straight The Celtics lost their seventh in 
a row. Their road record dropped to 2- 
23, the worst in the NBA. 

Hornets 124, Hapc 110 At Charlotte. 
Glen Rice scored 40 points to lead the 
Hornets past Orlando and its embattled 
coach, Brian Hill. 

■ Magic Fires Coach Hill 

Brian Hifi was fired Tuesday as coach 
of the Orlando Magic, dismissed less 
than two seasons after taking tiie team to 
the NBA finals. The Associated Press 
reported from Orlando. 

John Gahriel, the general manner, 
met with the players ana told them ofthe 
decision to replace Hill, probably with 
Magic assistant Richie Adubato. 

The firing reportedly was prompted by 
complaints from players that Hill's re- 
lationship with the team was deterior- 
ating ana that a change was needed if the 
tram was to have any chance of salvaging 
the season. 


St. Louis Ends a Drought 


on Home Ice 


The Associated Press his eighth game- winning goal of tile 

The St Louis Blues ended a six-game season with 2:03 left in the third period, 
w ini ess streak at home against the leading Dallas over Los Angeles. 
Chicago Blackhawks with a 4-2 vie- Andy Moog made 34 saves for vis- 
tory. iting Dallas, unbeaten In its last seven 

Before Monday. St Louis was win- games against the Kings, 
less against Chicago at home since Ajpril - i tofu 2^ P**H» g In New. York, the 
5, 1994, when the team was still playing goatoender Martin Brodetir extended his 

at the St Louis Arena. unbeaten streak to 12 games, and the 

The fans were glad they could see a . . i 

victory of any kind at home, where the NHL Roundup 

Blues have a mediocre 12-16-1 record — : ; 

this season. Devils extended their unbeaten streak to 

f| ‘ ‘The stadium was rocking,’’ said the 11 — six of them ties — the longest in 
Blues defenseman Igor Kravchuk. “It’s team history. 

nice, and it's appreciated. They’ve been Wayne Gretzky’s goal-scoring 
paying a lot of money to see us and drought leached 20 games but he as- 
we’ve got to win our games at home.” sisted an both Rangers goals. Brian 
Scott Pellerin had a goal and an assist Noonanand Niklas Sundstrom scored 
as the Blues ended Chicago’s three- forNew York, while Steve Thomas and 
game winning streak. VaJbri 25efcpnlrin scored for the Devils. 

Sl Louis blew a 2-0 lead before canwBm 4, Mwdant Mark Recchi 

Pierre Turgeon scored the game-winner and Valeri Bure scored late in the first 
on a 5-ou-3 power play at 8:08 of the period, and Jose Theodore made 36 
second period saves as the Canadiens beat the 1s- 

stara 2, King*i Mike Modano scored landers. Brian Savage and Sebasuen 


Bordeleau also scored for Montreal. 
Bure broke a 1-1 tie on a rebound with 
10 seconds remaining in the first. 

R*4 Whoa 3, Lightning 3 Daymond 

Langkow scored with 25 seconds left in 
the third period, lifting Tampa Bay into 
a tie with visiting Detroit 

Third-period goals by Sergei Fe- 
dorov and Tomas Sandstrom had given 
Detroit a 3-2 lead. 

Mighty Ducks 5. Oil*fsl StCVC RlXCChin 
had a goal and two assists, and Dan Trebil 
started Anaheim rolling with his first 
National Hockey League goal as the 
Ducks beat Edmonton in a game marred 
by 33 penalties. 

The Mighty Ducks were whistled 1 8 
times for a franchise-record 88 penalty 
minutes, and tire visiting Oilers bad 55 
penally minutes. 

The Ducks took command early 
when Trebil scored 134 into the con- 
test Joe Sacco, Paul Kariya, Teemu 
Selanne and Ruccbin also scored for the 
Ducks. Dean McAmmonrt scored for 
Edmonton. 



Tim Ifhl'.iiB* Tin* < 4 |i-i| IVm. 


The Atlanta Hawks' Dikembe Mutombo, left, going head-to-head with the Houston Rockets* Hakeem Olajuwon. 


How to Get Asked to the NCAA Dance 


By Anthony Cotton 

Washin gton Past Service 

WASHINGTON — This is the time of 
year when college basketball teams start 
dancing to the tune of the National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association men’s bas- 
ketball tournament selection committee. 

The tune has 17 notes — the criteria 
used by the committee to compare teams 
bidding for the 34 at-large spots in the 64- 
team field With conference tournaments 
on the horizon, coaches and players are 
wondering if the committee will like the 
way their teams move to the beat 
“I’m very much aware of it," said 
John Kresse, the coach at the College of 
Charleston. “I find myself looking for 
top 25 teams getting upset or otber teams 
in situations like ours having miscues." 

The Cougars are 23-2, ranked 25di. 
and will get one of the NCAA tour- 
nament’s 30 automatic bids if they win 
the Trans America Athletic Conference 
tournament They will be the top seed in 
that event because they are 14-0 in 
TAAC play and the next-best team is 10- 
4. But if they lose the championship, they 
will be compared to every other team that 
has not won its conference title. 

Last season, they could not take part 
in the TAAC tournament because they 
had not been in Division I long enough 
to be eligible for an automatic NCAA 
tournament bid. Despite a 23-4 record 
they did not receive an at-large spot 
This season. Pacific is in a similar 
situation. The Tigers (18-3, 9-3) lead the 
Big West Conference Pacific Division, 
but have lost two recent games — to 
CalifbrmarSanta Barbara (10-12) and 
California Polytecbnic-San Luis Obispo 
(12-13). Without a tournament title, they 
would have to worry about how they 
stack up against teams such as Virginia, 
which has played a difficult schedule but 
is 15-10 (5-8 in the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference) with games remaining against 
North Carolina State, Wake Forest. Vir- 
ginia Tech and Maryland 


“There area lot of good teams,’’ said 
Craig Thompson, the Sun Belt Con- 
ference commissioner and a member of 
die NCAA selection committee. “1 also 
think that this year as opposed to other 
years, there will be more teams getting 
in with a fewer number of wins, a result 
of the parity that's out there." 

That could be good news for teams 
such as Rhode Island (15-8. 9-4 Atlantic 
10). which scored a key victory Sunday 
over Temple (14-8,7-5). Marquette is 15- 
7 (6-4 in Conference USA), but could 
improve its profile in games against 
Louisville and Cincinnati. 

Seemingly deserving teams are omit- 
ted every season. Last year. Minnesota 
was left out even though it was 19-13, 
and had won seven of its last nine games, 
rallying from a 3-6 start in the Big Ten. 

The Golden Gophers seemed to have 
met much of the criteria, which include 
a team's record in its last 10 games. 


conference record and overall Ratings 
Percentage Index, a formula used to 
rank teams across the nation. 

This season, Minnesota has eliminated 
any doubt with its 22-2 record. But what 
of Big Ten rivals Iowa (16-8. 7-5). and 
Purdue (8-5 Big Ten but 13-10 overall) 

The selection committee has to take 
into account upset losses in conference 
tournaments, which sometimes results in 
two bids going to a conference that oth- 
erwise receives one. Last season, for 
example, Portland was 7-7 in West Coast 
Conference regular season play but won 
its tournament title. That meant a pre- 
cious at-large hid went to Santa Clara, 
which beat Maryland in the first round. 

Kresse hopes his team's upgraded 
schedule and victories over Stanford and 
Arizona State will help his team. “You 
definitely need to take some higher- 
caliber teams to put yourself in position 
for an NCAA at-large bid," he said. 


Kansas Gets Revenge on Missouri 


The Associated Press 

Kansas, ranked No. 1, took its re- 
venge on Missouri, the only team to 
beat the Jayhawks tins season. 

It was the Jayhawks’ 43d straight 


K 


home victory and the longest current 
streak in Division L 

“Missouri presents some real 
match-up problems for us," the Kan- 
sas coach, Roy Williams, said after 
the 79-67 victory. “ Of course, that 
old sucker down on the other bench 
knows bow to make the most of those 
match-ups." 

That old sucker — Missouri's 
coach. Norm Stewart — kept finding 
a way for Tyronn Lee or Derek 
Grimm to thwart every run the Jay- 


hawks (26-1 overall, 12-1 Big 12) 
tried to make. Lee wound up with a 
career-best 20 points for the Tigers 
(13-13, 5-8), who bear Kansas, 96-94, 
in double overtime on Feb. 4. 

The game nearly turned into a brawl 
with 31 seconds left. Grimm hit Raef 
LaFrentz with a forearm, knocking the 
6-foot- 11 (2.1-meter) junior to the 
floor. Players from both sides rushed 
toward each other as officials and 
coaches pulled them away. 

“It was a very physical game, and 
that's the kind of game you expect 
from Missouri," said LaFrentz, who 
matched his career high with 31 
points, topping 20 for the eighth game 
in a row. * 'I’m not going to say that it 
was a cheap shot, but it was a hard, 
sharp blow. I’m no Arnold Schwar- 
zenegger. but I can hold my own." 


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PACE 2 


PAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALPTWBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNBAY, FE BRUARY 1-2,19»7 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997 


POSTCARD 


Angry? Hire a Pro 


How Do You Say Culture in Hong Kong Chinese? 


By Phil McCombs 

KctfAwpaw Pott Service 

W ASHINGTON — You 
arc “appalled.” You 
arc “shocked." Never have 
you encountered such “slip- 
shod methods of manage- 
ment,” such “a shoddy 
device," “atrocious manner ’ 
or “horrendous experience." 

For a modest fee. Ellen 
Phillips will take your out- 
rage and pain, filter the facts 
of the case remorselessly 
through the computer she 
calls her brain, and — like a 
shark closing in on a tuna — 
attack the object of wrath with 
a letter calculated to raise 
beads of cold sweat along the 
spine of the most callous CEO 
or government official. 

1 ‘I enjoy having people get 
what they deserve, she says. 
“All too often we sit back and 
let people walk over us. We 
don't make a stand!" 

She's obtained medical 
costs for a man hos p i t alized 
with a nutshell lodged in his 
throat after eating a famous 
brand of ice cream, a job trans- 
fer for a harassed government 
secretary, $15,000 in back 
child support for an impov- 
erished mother, disability re- 
tirement for a teacher injured 
on a field trip .and a green card 
for a man who, her letter in- 
formed die Immigration and 
Naturalization Service, would 
be “captured, tortured, and 
put to death" if forced to re- 
turn to his native land. 

She claims a 90 percent 
success rate. 


For $15 per 100 words, 
Phillips offers an alternative 
to swallowing your rage, or 
chiving like a maniac: satis- 
faction via reasoned, respon- 
sible. persistent action. 
Through her own fiercely 
pounding inner determination 
— and some quirk of per- 


sonality and intellect — Phil- 
lips has developed techniques 
that somehow cut through 
barriers and get attention. 

‘ * We always thought of the 
X as a reputable hotel which 
treated its guests like guests; 
obviously, we were wrong,” 
she sniffe d cm behalf of a 
sleepless couple. (Result: a 
$175 gift certificate by return 
mail.) “I have flown with X 
over the years and have been 
satisfied. Now, however, I 
find that this lack of concern 
and compassion will force me 
to seek other airlines . . . un- 
less . . (Free ticket) 


Though her letters can be 
full of righteous indignation, 
they never veerover the line of 
decency. The writer is ag- 
grieved. An injustice has taken 
place (or will). Dte recipient is 
responsible, and in a position 
to make amends. The writer is 
utterly certain the recipient de- 
sires to do the right dung. The 
writer is prepared to remain in 
the face of the recipient until 
the last dog dies. 

Her cheats are thrilled. 

“She writes in a powerful 
way, and clearly manages an- 
ger very effectively,’ says 
Elizabeth Ketz- Robinson, a 
psychotherapist who has used 

Phillips’s services to success- 
fully battle a mortgage com- 
pany and even the (yesl) U.S. 
Postal Sendee. “She is quite 
amazing. She does it in a de- 
tached manner. " 

This, along with the lack of 
overt hostility or sarcasm in 
the letters, Ketz-Robinson ex- 
plains, allows the full power 
of a writer’s anger to come to 
bear in urging a satisfactory 
resolution of the case — 
rather than being wasted in 
all-too-familiar angry fire- 
works. “You get closure," 
site says. “It’s very healing, 
and you have a sense of res- 
olution." 


By Edward A. Gargan 

Sew York Tunes Serine* 

H ONG KONG— Hong Kong’s 
63 million people produce 
more wealth in a year per capita 
than then- British counterparts, yet 
there is no Globe Theater hoe. 
Hong Kong’s streets are dogged 
with more Rolls-Royces than Lon- 
don’s, yet there is nothing skin to 
the British Museum. 

Hong Kong, it is said, and it is 
widely believed, is a single-minded 
place, and its mind is on money. 
Hong Kong, it is widely believed, 
and it is routinely said, is a cultural 
wasteland. 

But tucked away in tiny studios 
or down red-brick arcades or in 
small mirrored halls, canvases are 
being daubed with oils, actors 
struggle with new scripts, and dan- 
cers pirouette over worn boards. 
Indeed, art is being bom hoe, in 
solitude and coHaborativejy, in de- 
fiance, almost, of a social aesthetic 
that prizes money above all else. 

And it is art, often, that is rooted 
not in any grand Chinese tradition 
but in Hong Kong’s peculiar cir- 
cumstances and culture. It is ait, as 
well, that at times shudders at the 

S aspect of impending unity with 
e giant totalitarian neighbor to 
tiie north. 

“For the true Hong Kong 
artists," explains Johnson Chang, 
the owner of Hanart, a gallery that 
displays both prominent mainland 
painters and Hoag Kong artists, 
’’it's always in the back of their 
mind: the awareness of tins his- 
torical era, of tins unknown, is very 
unsettling. But it is what malot i 
Hong Kong Hong Kong. The one 
tiling that has changed quite a bit in 
the last few years is that people arc 
looking at specifically what makes 
Hoag Kong Hong Kong . *’ 

Over the last 150 years, Hong 
Kong has been ruled mostly by 
plumed, beribboned and brocaded 
emissaries from London buttressed 
by legions of mostly second-rate 
British bureaucrats, all in the ser- 
vice of the great British trading 
houses. Nowhere in their thinking 


was there much room for Hong 
Kong's local population, who until 
recent memory were barred from 
the clubs, management suites and 
halls of government. 

British colonial culture here con- 
sisted largely of Chinese seascapes 
by British artists, and portraits, trav- 
eling string quartets and tte Christ- 
mas pantomime, w hic h marc often 
than not poked fun at local ways. 

To the colonialists, and the for- 
eign traders and bankers who fol- 
lowed them, tins was Hong Kong’s 
culture. But here, as Hong Kong 
grew from a cluster of villages to 
one of the world's foremost econ- 
omies, the territory 's culture 
evolved in ways neither completely 
Chinese nor mimetically British — 
in ways that were distinctly Hong 
Kong, suffused by the transient 
nature of life here and by the influx 
of millions of refugees fleeing 
communism, a nd epit omiz ed by a 
language tiiat emeiged at some dis- 
tance from that spoken just over die 
fence in China. 

Now, with China resuming sov- 
ereignty of Hong Kong in less than 
five months, many of Hong Kong’s 
leading artists are contemplating a 
future littered with more unknowns 
than certainties. Questions of artist- 
ic freedom, sources of fina n ci n g, 
die looming shadow of mainland 
artistry, whether state-sponsored or 
not, ail lingo- on a horizon that lias 
grown startlingly close. 

And while some artists continue 
to work unruffled by the thought of 
impending Chinese suzerainty, 
others find tile prospect threaten- 
ing, not only because of the cen- 
sorship and pressures so prevalent 
on tiie mainland but especially be- 
cause the nurturing of an indig- 
enous culture and art scene is so 
very recent and, in the eyes of 
some, so very fragile. 

“Part of the colonial strategy," 
argues Oscar Ho Hing-kay, an 
artist who has moved from sculp- 
ture to drawing in charcoal, “has 
been to get people to make money. 
This has been the whole model of 
educational philosophy here. Look 
at how insignificant art courses are 












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“Art is about asking questions, being rebellious,” says Oscar Ho Hing-kay, a Hong Kong artist 


here." (Hong Kong does not pos- 
sess a full-time academy.) “And 
die nice thing about this for co- 
lonial rule is that yon don’t ask 
ideological questions. You just 
TnflVe money. Art is about asking 
questions, bung rebellious.” 

Gaylord Chan, Hang Kong’s eld- 
est, and perhaps its most important, 
artist, contends that artists, and the 
art scene in Hong Kong, will in- 
evitably change under Chinese rule. 
“The audience will change to some 
extent,’ ’he says. “Some artists will 
respond to that. But those artists 
who do art for the sake of art, they 
wouldn’t care less." 

The advent of Chinese rule is but 
<me constraint facing artists in 
Hong Kong, according to another 
local post, Lucia Cheung. More 
troubling in some ways, she feels, is 
an esthetic indifference to Hong 
Kong’s own artists, a feeling that 
the only thing of value In Hong 


HOTEL OR MUSEUM ? 


“Before, nobody caredabout art in 
Hoag Kong," she explains. “Now 
it’s changing a bit. But people pay 
modi more attention to imported 
art Local art is not good enough." 

At a gallery and theater space 
called the fringe, its director. 
B eany insisted the di- 
versity of artistic impulse and cre- 
ativity, whether on stage or in gal- 
leries, were both important 
expressions of Hong Kong’s iden- 
tity and a vibrant sign of a blos- 
soming, independent culture. 

Bat with Chinese rule looming. 
Qua wonders what the landscape 
far artists will lode like in six 
months, “ft must occur to eveiy 
artist whether there will be the 
same degree of freedom after 
1997,” be says. “We know you 
can create impressive works of art 
in the most repressive environ- 
ment But as far as I can cell, the 


PEOPLE 


government has no wish to close ks 
doors on the rest of the world," 

On die other haul. Qua argues, 
“There are a number of things 
Hong Kong will benefit from after 
1997. Psychologically, you will feel 
like you belong toa larger space. In. 
virion, Hong Kong is a very small 
place. People will start to lode at 
what you can do wifeChina.‘ v 
Chang, of Hanart, contends that 
Hong Kong artists win continue to 
face obstacles simply because of the 
kind of society Hong Kongii *Tir 
Hong Kcmg, artists are really .an; 
underground," he says. 1( Ndbody 
buys their work. Nobody is inter-, 
ested in their work. Nobodytatea. 
them seriously. There is no art scene 
in Hong Koog, like you have in 
New York. The real reason k, Hong 
Kong is an emigre society. Meat 
people consider the real native cul- 
ture China, not here. ‘True 1 Chinese 
art must be from the mainland.” 



A STAR-STUDDED French film 
making its world premiere at the 



EduklUiinbKMMIaa 

The Pera Palace, built in Istanbul in 1892 for passengers arriving on the Orient Express, and its elegant lobby. 

Mata Hari Slept Here ( and So Did Trotsky) 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Sew toft Times Service 

I STANBUL — Standing like an aging 
but still proud matriarc h , command- 
ing one of die world’s most spectacular 
vistas and guarding mare than a century 
of secrets, the Pera Palace Hotel is a relic 
of Istanbul's most elegant era. 

To enter its lobby from die bustling 
street outside is to pass into a vanished 
world once inhabited by kings, cour- 
tesans, aristocrats and spies. The light- 
ing is muted, die tiled trails and marble 
columns imposing but restrained! 

Upstairs, the doors to several dozen of 
the 145 guest rooms bear silver plaques 
engraved with the names of former res- 
idents. They are enough to spade even 
the dullest of imaginations. 

Whom did Greta Garbo entertain in 
room 103, or Mata Hari in 104, or Sarah 
Bernhardt in 304? What plots did Trot- 
sky hatch in 204, or fee shah of Iran in 
202? Was it all work for Ernest Hem- 
ingway in 218, and all play for Jac- 
queline Kennedy Onassis in 308? 

The most frequently reserved room is 
411. where Agatha Christie wrote 
“Murder on the Orient Express." Some 


say her spirit still hangs in the air, and 
from time to time believers in the 
paranormal gather there for seances. 

The Pera Palace is so rich in history 
and emotion that it sometimes feels more 
like a musenm rtmp a mere hotel. 

Precisely this sensation has now 
moved some preservationists in Istanbul 
to suggest that the hotel be transformed 
into a showcase of Istanbul history. Yas- 
ar Karayel, head of die city’s cultural 
affairs department, wants to make it the 
Pera Palace Museum, a repository of all 
that was grand about tins city in the last 
decades of the Ottoman Empire and the 
first heady years of the Turkish Republic 
founded in 1923. 


we want it to beprotected by the state, 
Karayel said, “lx’s now being managed 
by a private person. We don't know what 
they are doing in there. Our goal is to 
preserve tt for future generations." 

Never, say fee hotel's proprietors. 
The hotel is making money, ana even in 
the slow winter months it is sometimes 
filled to capacity. 

“Every couple of years they float this 
idea," said Ley la Taskin, one of the hotel 
managers. “I understand why they want 


this place. It’s fee only old hotel left, not 
just in Istanbul but in all of Turkey. But 
we have reservations through 2000, and 
we plan to honor them. Nothing is going 
to change here.” 

The Pera Palace was built in 1892 to 
house passengers arriving in Istanbul 
aboard the Orient Express. For a time, 
guests were carried from fee train station 
to fee hotel in cushioned compartments 
on fee shoulders of sweating bearers. 

For many years, the Pera Palace, with 
its impeccable service and majestic view 
across the Golden Horn inlet toward the 
domes and minarets of the old city, was 
fee only luxury hotel in Istanbul 

But hotels offering mare modem 
comforts sprang up after fee war, and 
today there are more than a dozen that 
surpass the Pera Palace in luxury. Guest 
rooms have been allowed to fade. 

“The place needs a complete renov- 
ation," said one recent guest “It’s a 
shame, but you get the feeling feat they 
don’t have the money to keep it up. " 

Whether or not the preservationists 
succeed in turning Pera Palace into a 
museum, ghosts of former guests Tan- 
ging from Josephine Baker to Tito are 
likely to own the place forever. 


Berlin Film Festival met an icy reception 

that Ipfr Alain Hrinn anH I Jim w B flrall 

shaken at an acrimonious news con- 
ference. The film “Le Jour et la Ntrit" 
(Day and Night), wilhRendiheaitthrob 
Deion and die legendary Bacall, was 
thrashed by critics and journalists, many 
of whom cheered in derision during the 
premiere screening when the film's hero 
is killed. Hundreds simply left before fee 
end of the film. “I get the impression 
that same of you didn’t Him the film,” 
Delon said, triggering loud applause 
from hundreds of journalists after the 
screening. Laughter brake out when the 
director, Bernard-Henri Levy, known 
in France as a “new philosopher" was 
asked to explain what the film was 
about. At one point die film’s blonde 
blue-eyed starlet Arielle Dombasle, 
Levy’s wife, lashed out at a journalist 
who asked why there were so many 
naked bodies and so little plot in the film. 
Delon, acting in his first film in three 
years, plays an aging boxer and bumed- 
out author. Bacall plays an American 
expatriate in wham be confides. “I 
wanted to produce cinema, not liter- 
ature," said Levy, who was booed when 
he was introduced. “It is an ambitious 
film, an international film wife all of 
Europe in iL It is a lyric, romantic 
cinema feat we had in fee 1950s.” 


The director Spike Lee, who is also in 
Berlin, expressed annoyance Tuesday 
that his films that focus an African- 
American issues were often withheld 
from foreign markets by distributors 
who failed to see their universal appeaL 
Speaking after his film “Get On The 
Bus” mad e its international premiere, 
Lee said Hollywood executives were 
wrong to assume foreign audiences were 
not interested in African-American sub- 
jects. His film was warmly received by 
an international audience. 




JmBwi/nwteiNduuini” 

Lannn Bacall and Alain Delon In Berlin, where critics hated their film. 


never using the word incest — Harrison 
recounts the relationship that she began 
with her preacher father when die was 
20. He left fee family when she was a 
baby, sent away by hex mother’s parents, 
and ?fee had minimal contact wife him 
during her childhood. After her mother 
died, Harrison ended the sex. She has, 
she told the New York Observer, “been 
writing this book in my head for years.” 
Champions of the author, now 35 and the 
wife of novelist and Harper’s magazine 
editor Colin Harrison, call fee work 
brave and beautifully crafted. Critics call 
it exploitative and manipulative. Hex fa- 
ther-in-law, Earl Harrison Jr., calls it 
“a bold and redemptive reflection." 


The New York literary world already 
has taken sides about a book that has 
generated an enormous prepublicity 
buzz. In a memoir called **The Kiss," 
die writer Kathryn Harrison describes 
her four-year affair with her father. In 
chaste and often lilting prose — and 


Ruby Bridges is having a reunion of 
sorts with Jesse Grider and Charles 
Burkes. In 1960, she was a little girl 
integrating one of New Orleans’ public 
schools; they were federal marshals es- 
corting her to class. She and her guard- 
ians were die subject of a Norman 
Rockwell painting. Bridges, now an 
educator, is fee keynote speaker at a 


Marshals Service observance of African 
American History Month in Arlington, 
Virginia. Grider and Burkes, both of. 
whom are now retired, plan to attend. 


A new museum in fee Spanish Basque 
country is pushing to get Picasso’s , 
“Guernica" moved to fee region that J*. 
inspired the painting’s haunting images 
of war and death. The director of fee 
Guggenheim museum, opening in 
September in the Basque city of Bilbao, 
said he would press Spanish authorities 
to hand over fee anti-war masterpiece. 
The museum opening would be the best 
time to show “Guernica" in fee Basqoe 
country, Juan Ignacio Vidarte sad. 
The black-and-white mural, which 
hangs in fee state-run Reina Sofia Mu- 
seum in Madrid, depicts the 1937 Nazi 
air bombing of the small town of Guer- 
nica, east of Bilbao. Basques have long 
argued that the painting should be dis- 


played in their region. But the Culture 
Ministry, Picasso's heirs and many ah 
experts oppose fee idea, fearing fee 
painting may be damaged. 




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