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kittranwnmjpe^^amffliARY 21. 1997 


INTEBNATIO' 



nbunc. 




The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

R London, Thursday, February 20, 1997 


No. 35.450 


Deng Xiaoping, Who Transformed China, Dies 

Death of Paramount Leader Certain to Touch Off Succession Struggle 





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Mr. Deng: Economic pragmatist, political hard-liner. 


Washington Pop Service 

Deng Xiaoping. China’s paramount leader 
who led his people out of the trauma, chaos 
and isolation of die Mao years into a period of 
unprecedented economic growth, died late 
Wednesday, the Chinese press agency Xin- 
hua reported. He was 92. 

Mr. Deng suffered from the advanced stage 
of Parkinson’s disease, complicated by lung 
infections, and died from respiratory failure 
after emergency treatment, Xinhua said. It 
said that Deng died at 9:08 P.M. and that an 
announcement was issued to all Communist 
Party, government and military offices. 

Hour armed guards stood outside the alley 
to Mr. Deng’s home in Beijing, near the 
palace China’s emperors used for 500 years. 
But there were no other signs of troop move- 
ments in the capital. 

Xinhua said the funeral committee bad 
already been selected, with President Jiang 
Zemin as its chairman. 

The formation of the funeral committee is 
tremendously significant in China’s secretive 
political system, since its composition can 
identify the leader who will succeed to the 
s upre me power be held until his death. 

All members of the 18-man Politburo were 
on the committee, as were two other veterans of 
China's communist revolution, former Pres- 
ident Yang Shangkim, 89, and the former par- 


liament chairman, Peng Zhen, 95, both dose 
colleagues of Mr. Deng and contenders for the 
mantle of behind-the-scenes kingmaker. 

No date was given for the funeral and Xinhua 
did not specify if Mr. Deng would be buried or 
cremated. No foreign dignitaries will be invited 
to the funeral, in lias with national practice, the 
funeral committee announced. 

Mr. Deng was last seen in public three 
years ago. His death is expected to sharpen 
political maneuvering for power that has been 
intensifying behind the scenes as Mr. Deng’s 
health has waned. 

Mr. Deng's third hand-picked successor, Ji- 
ang Zemin, re-elected as CammnnistParty chief 
at the 13th party congress in 1992 that elevated 
Mr. Deng's capitalist market economic theories 
to communist gospel, will take over a system in 
which Mr. Deng has Ailed to set in place 
mechanisms for a transfer of power. 

But be leaves his heir to almost certain 
factional warfare. Mr. Jiang's two prede- 
cessors, Zhao Ziyang and Hu Yaobang, were 
both toppled by hard-liners after outbreaks of 
unrest Mr. Zhao was purged in 1989, days 
after troops moved into Tiananmen Square to 
crush student protesters, and two years after 
Deng’s first protdgS, Mr. Hu, lost his position 
in a similar power struggle. 

Crucial to the Deng succession is the lack 
of an identifiable heir with the clout and 


charisma U) seize control of the world’s fast- 
est-growing economy and govern a popu- 
lation that makes up one-fifth of humanity. 

Now that Mr. Deng has ’’gone to meet 
Mars,** as Mao said, China faces the prospect 
of collective leadership by a group of people 
steeped in the tradition of Communist auto- 
cracy. 

Mr. Jiang. 70, holds the posts of president. 
Communist Party secretary general and chair- 
man of the powerful Central Military Com- 
mission. But Mr. Jiang is widely seen as a 
tempor ar y figurehead, a dour and uninspiring 
figure who lacks the personality and power 
base to retain his position in the event of an 
all-out leadership struggle. 

“Jiang has managed to push his role as 
senior statesman recently and has been mak- 
ing noticeable efforts to woo die military, but 
be is not seen as a decision-maker and prob- 
ably realizes be is something of a compromise 
figure,” said a Western diplomat. 

Waiting in the win^s are Mr. Jiang's chief 
rivals — Prime Minister Li Peng and the 
country’s economic czar. Deputy Frane Min- 
ister Zhu Rongji. 

Li Peng, 66, enjoys the strong backing of 
conservative party elders but, as the leader 
most widely associated with crushing of the 
1989 Ti ananmen Square uprising, he is un- 
popular. 


Meanwhile, Mr. Zhu, 66, has enjoyed a 
stellar rise through the party ranks, but his 
power base is limited and his star inextricably 
attached to the success or failure of economic 
reforms. 

Regardless of which man rises to supreme 
power, no successor can expect to approach 
Mr. Deng in standing and authority. 

But Mr. Deng's own power never matched 
that of his longtime comrade. Moo Zedong, 
and his prestige declined in his later years 
because of conuption, inequalities in the 
Communist system, and the deadly crack- 
down in June 1989 against student protesters 
around Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. 

To crush the uprising, Mr. Deng had to ally 
himself with rival leaders who questioned the 
scope, pace and side effects of his reforms and 
who feared that he would destroy the cent- 
rally planned economy. 

The army crackdown, which left hundreds 
dead, was followed by infighting among lead- 
ers over Mr. Deng’s moves to decentralize the 
economy and introduce market forces. 

Although be formally retired from his last 
government post in 1990, Mr. Deng con- 
tinued to influence important domestic and 
foreign policy decisions. 

As a pragmatist in economics, Mr. Deng 

See DENG, Page 6 


Mexico Dismisses Chief 
'HJflts Drug Program 

: General Charged With Abetting Trafficking 


By Julia Preston 

New York Tima Service 

GUADALAJARA, Mexico — The 
- army general who headed Mexico’s na- 
• tional drug agency has been dismissed 
from the armed forces and arrested on 
charges that he collaborated with one of 
Mexico’s most notorious drug barons. 
Defense Minister Enrique Cervantes- 
Agtrine announced- 

General Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, 
who was chosen by President Ernesto 
Zedillo to take over the drug program 
only two months ago, was detained on 
^charges of abetting cocaine trafficking, 
paid the attorney general, Jorge Mad- 
r razo Cuellar. 

[General Gutierrez was in a military 
hospital recovering from an apparent 
heart attack suffered when authorities 
confronted him with the evidence 
against him. The Associated Press re- 
ported.! 

“We have a well-founded presump- 
tion that the general and personnel un- 
der his command have been and are 
collaborators of the CTirainal organiza- 
tion headed by Amado Carrillo 
Fuentes," the defense minister said, re- 
ferring to a drug trafficker who is be- 
lieved to lead the most powerful and 
wealthy of Mexico's drug rings. 


Speaking at an unusual and crowded 
news conference at tbe Defense Min- 
istry in Mexico City late Tuesday, Mr. 
Cervantes said that General Gutierrez, 
an officer with a 42-year military career, 
had “cheated his superiors” and “acted 
against the national security of Mex- 
ico.” 

The stunning announcement, was a 
clear, sign duff the leaders of Mexico’s - 
drag, rings, have penetrated, the highest 
ranks of Mexico’s anti-narcotics insti- 
tutions. 

The charges against General Guti- 
errez also raise central questions about 
the information that UJS. officials have 
about Mexico’s drug program. 

The White House drug policy di- 
rector, General Barry McCamey, went 
out of his way to lavish praise on Gen- 
eral Gutierrez when he was appointed to 
bead the National Institute to Combat 
Drugs, calling him “a guy of absolute 

'"General Gutierrez’s dismissal (brows 
Mexico’s onti-narootics campaign into 
turmoil only days before President Bill 
Clinton must report to Congress on 
whether Mexico will be certified as a 
cooperative partner infighting drug traf- 
ficking. The report is due by March 1. 

See MEXICO, Page 6 



Stasi Agents on Trial 
Over Terrorist Links 

Case May Reveal East’s Secrets 




General Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, who was Mexico’s highest ranking anti- 
drug official, remained hospitalized after suffering a heart attack Feb. 6. 


Wall Street Wonders: How High Is Too High? 


By Tom Petruno 

Los Anodes Tones 

Like a rich but crazy relative, tbe U.S. stock 
market is something that people are not quite sure 
hew to talk about these days. . 

On mie hand, it seems wrong to speak ill of it, 
because so many Americans are hoping to eventually 
cash in oo its largesse. J . 

On the other hand, the market’s actions seem so 
outlandish — as it continually scales new heights 
as to be bordering on frightening, making it difficult 
to just look askance. _ 

The Dow Jones industrial average s hurdling of 
the 7,000 mark last week was another reminder of 
how spectacular this six-year-old bull market has 


been, and how its intensity appears to be building 
rather than ebbing. 

Bttt wife each new high in the Dow, Wall Street has 
become preoccupied with a debate that is at once 
esoteric and yet enormously consequential for millions 
of small investors: Have stock prices reached absurd 
levels that could invite a ruinous, long-lasting decline? 
Or is there something fundamentally different about 
the economy today, and the market, that mates stocks 
inherently more valuable than at any time in history? 

The questions are more than academic, of coarse, 
because the burgeoning popularity of automatic re- 
tirement investment programs, such as corporate 
401 (k) plans, means that toe future financial health of 
many American families depends more than ever 
before on what happens to stock prices over time. 


Yet that aspect of the 1990s bull market also adds 
an ironic twist to the “bow-higfa-is-too-high-fbr- 
stocks” debate: Many Wall Street pros who believe 
that share prices are reaching excessive levels blame 
the very public that is being constantly exhorted to 
save and invest mere, and not worry about tbe 
market's short-term trends. 

Certainly, the short-term trend has become tough to 
ignore. Of the nearly 200 percent rise in tbe Dow since 
October 1990, nearly half of the advance has occurred 
just in the last two years. By one key measure, the 
market value of U.S. stocks now stands at $7.7 trillion, 
which means U.S. shareholders have seen their stock 
wealth balloon by $1.6 trillion in the last year alone. 

See SHARES, Page 12 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

BERLIN — Id a case involving one 
of tbe best-kept secrets of tbe Cold War, 
four farmer East German intelligence 
officers went on trial Wednesday on 
charges of helping some of the West’s 
most wanted terrorists change their 
identities and start new lives in the 
Communist state. 

Tbe sensational dial is expected to 
shed new light on the extent to which 
Communist states in the old Soviet em- 
pire supported international terrorism, 
even as they insisted to Western gov- 
ernments that they had nothing to do 
with assisting anti-capitalist groups 
such as the Red Army Faction. 

The accused include Harry Dahl, 67, 
the former head of counterterrorism in 
the Ministry for State Security, or Stasi, 
that maintained such tight surveillance 
that East Germany’s 16 million citizens 
were considered the most spied-upon 
people in history. 

Mr. Dahl is being tried with three 
senior security officers, Guentex Jackel, 
62; Hans Peteold, 53, andGendZaumseil, 
48, on charges of preventing 10 Red 
Army Faction members from being 
brought to justice for a campaign of 
murders and ki dn appings against West 
Germany in the late 1970s. 

The chief state prosecutor said that 
Mr. Dahl and his associates provided 
false identities, financial support, jobs 
and a par tments to help them assimilate 
into East German society. Although 
former citizens of East Germany are 
usually punished for misdeeds under the 
law of the defunct stale, the prosecutor 
has argued that Mr. Dahl and his men 
should be treated differently because 
their actions had a profound impact on 
blocking justice in west Germany. 

In response, Mr. Dahl told the court 
that the terrorists were sheltered on or- 
ders from the highest authorities, in- 
cluding the Stasi boss, Erich Mielke, 
and East Germany ’s head of state, Erich 
Honecker. He also claimed thai such 
protections served a useful purpose in 
thwarting further terrorist incidents. 

“The RAF members asked to be taken 
in. We did not approve of their deeds, but 


their anti-capitalist positions were close 
to ours,” Mr. Dahl said. “And we 
wanted to prevent a terrorist scene from 
developing in East Germany.” 

Mr. Dahl insisted that he and his 
officers inflicted no political or security 

See STASI, Page 6 

AGENDA 

Truckers End 
Strike in Spain 

MADRID (Reuters) — Truckers 
in Spain said Wednesday that they 
were calling off a strike that had 
gone on for two weeks after a meet- 
ing with government officials. 

‘ ‘It’s been decided not to continue 
with the current work stoppage be- 
cause of the economic con- 
sequences,” said Jose Maria Ara- 
mbarri, a spokesman fertile truckers’ 
organization leading the strike. 
“There’s been no type of deal.” 
Earlier article. Page 5 






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fluro Might Split Europe, 
Rijkind Wbms in Bonn 


BONN — Foreign Secretary Malcolm 
Rifkind of Britain said Wednesday that 
Chancellor Helmut KoW of Germany 
was wrong on European integra tion a nd 
warned tMt tbe planned single currency 
might divide Europe for decades. 

newsstand Pricas 

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Dennalc.„i<ooDXr. Oman — .1250FUate 
Finland 12.00 F.M. Qatar ^lOtiOffiab . 

Cfcmftaf.^^JEO^Rep- Ireland ^.IR£1XlQ 
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Jordan.. 1.250 JD UAE. laOODfrh 

KanyaZjCSH.160 U.S.ML (Eur.)-5 120 
Kuwait 600 Rs 2rT*ab^.~2m$S1100 



0294 u 80504 


“We would be embarking on a di- 
vided Europe for a whole generation,” 
Mr. Rifldnd said: “As we say in Britain, 
fee single currency is ih^ just for Christ- 
mas. It is forever.” 

In a speech here to a political foun- 
dation. Mr. Rifldnd said he thought it 
“unlikely” that Britain would want to 
join the single currency in 1999. but said 
the country would not , make a final 
decision for some time. His comments 
received a cool reception from German 
politici ans, journalists and bureaucrats, 
many of whom roared with laughter 
when he said Britain was the least na- # 
tionslist of all members of tbeEsropean * 
Union- 

Mr. Rifbnd said be <hd not agree with' 

Mr. Kohl that further integration of the 
European Union was an issue of war and 
peaceT*T don't myself believe lus ana- . 
lySsis correct,” he said. “The new 
Europe is nor the Europe of tbe 19tfa : 
centnry.” 

Mr. Rifkind also warned against go- 



China Relents on Touchy News 

It Reports Week- Old Defection as North Korea Softens 


British Foreign Secretary Malcolm 
Rifkind in Bonn on Wednesday. 

ing ahead with one of Mr. Kohl’s pet 
projects, economic and monetary union, 
with only a few participants. 

Mr. Rifkind sent shock waves 
through his own Conservative. Party 
when be said in an earlier BBC radio 
interview that, “on balance, 7 ’ Prime 
Minister John Major’s government was 
hostile to a single currency. The remark 
ruptured a carefully brokered cabinet 
agreement of studied neutrality on tbe 

See EUROPE, Page 6 


CompBat tp Our SujfFnan Dbpaacha 

BEIJING — In the first mention in its 
domestic media of the Cold War drama 
unfolding in its capital, China indicated 
Wednesday that Hwang Jang Yop, a 
senior aide to North Korea's top leader, 
Kim Jong D, had willingly sought refuge 
in Seoul’s consular compound. 

The official Xinhua press agency, 
citing Foreign Ministry sources, said 
Wednesday that Mr. Hwang had spent 
the night of Feb. 1 1 in the North Korean 
Embassy in Beijing, while en route to 
Pyongyang after a trip to Japan. 

“He left there in fee morning of the 
following day and ran away into the 
embassy of South Korea in Beijing. “ 
Xinhua said in a repeat broadcast on state 
radio. 

Pyongyang, which previously main- 
tained mat Mr. Hwang, 74, had been 
kidnapped, has suggested that it may be 
ready to give up attempts to win back the 
man ranked 24th in the North's hier- 
archy and the designer of is governing 
ideology of Juche, or self '■reliance. 

Tight security has surrounded Mr. 


Hwang since he walked into the South 
Korean Embassy in Beijing a week ago 
and requested asylum. It was the 
highest-level defection from the iso- 
lationist, Stalinist regime. 

“It is hoped that the relevant parties 
will, with a calm and objective altitude, 
judge the nature of this incident and 
wont to seek a proper solution to it,” 
Xinhua said. 

Mr. Hwang remained stranded in 
Seoul’s heavily guarded consular com- 
pound after talks between South Korean 
and Chinese officials failed to resolve 
his fate. 

“Unfortunately, we have not made 
any real progress in our talks with 
China,” said Lee Kyu Hyung, a South 
Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman. 

Speaking wife reporters in Seoul, 
Ryu Kwang Suk, chief of fee South 
Korean Foreign Ministry's Asia-Pacific 
Bureau, said that it appeared that China 
had not yet decided if it could let Mr. 
Hwang leave for South Korea. 

See DEFECTOR, Page 4 


too MaqumefTbr Awculed heu 

Senator John Glenn is expec- 
ted to announce that he will 
not seek a fifth term. Page 3. 

PAGE TWO 

Museums Seeking Out the Young 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Starr Insists Probe Will Continue 

ASIAJPACIFIC Page 4 . 

North Korea Unlikely to Collapse 

Books — Page 7. 

Crossword Page 10. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19. 

ImnmaUunat CXoasJfiorf Page A 


The Dollar 


NawYwfc Waawaday O a P.M. previous Qtse 

DM 1.SSB1 1.685 

Pound 1.6153 1.6061 

Yen 124.425 123.885 

FF 5.734 5.6885 


■47.33 7020.13 7067.46 

Chengs W«*ie*tey 0 4 P M. prsvtoun ctooa 
-362 812.47 816.29 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


‘ Multiple Visit Program ’ /A Chance to Enrich Teaching 

Museums Try Cultivating the Young at Art 


By Carol Vogel 

New Yart Times Service 

N ineteen pairs of sixth-grade eyes were 
riveted to the floor of the East Building at 
the National Gallery of Art in Wash- 
ington. While some of die children simply 
stared down at their feet, a bit uncertain, others got 
on their knees and began copying the floor’s tri- 
angular patterns For a math lesson on isosceles 
triangles and parallelograms. That done, die chil- 
dren, very much at home, moved from one pan of 
the museum to another, chatring with the gallery's 
team of educators and docents like old friends. 

Unlike the one-day museum field trips that 
schools have subscribed to for decades, this one 
involved children who had spent two years using the 
National Gallery as one erf their classrooms, hi 
addition, the museum's staff has regularly visited 
them at school. 

Across tte United States, museums in small 
towns and big cities alike have begun reaching out to 
local schools asa way to build future followings, and 
are getting private financing to do so. Many museum 
officials say the same corporations that have sig- 
nificantly reduced their sponsorship of art exhib- 
itions are eager to underwrite education programs. 

And for schools, dealing with severe budget cuts 
that in many cases have meant eliminating art and 
music from their curriculums, the chance to form 
close ties with local museums, in what educators 
and museum officials call a "multiple visit pro- 
gram," amounts to a chance to enrich teaching. 

"It’s the roost exciting and least-known program 
happening in education right now." said Diane 
Frankel. director of the- Institute of Museum and 
Library Services, a federal agency that helps fi- 
nance libraries and museums. “The time for this 
sort of teaching is right. As schools are assessing 
different ways kids can best learn, and museums are 
taking their educational roles more seriously, the 
two have come to an interesting meeting point" 

So interesting that in 1994, the federal gov- 
ernment scattered seed money to encourage such 
programs, providing SO institutions one-year 
matching grants of up to $40,000 each. The grants 
went to a variety of institutions ranging fium the 
Mint Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina, to the 
Museum of Modem A it in New York. 

Besides their potential for bolstering a museum's 
future paying attendance — and therefore the bot- 
tom line — through a lifetime of interest among 
those for whom adulthood is now only on die 
horizon, multiple-visit programs can enable students 
to grasp concepts in a more integrated fashion than 
the teaching of isolated subjects allows, particularly 
given the explosion in cyberspace learning. 

“As we move into the new century, more in- 
formation we receive is visual," said LeDani Lattin 
Duke, director of the Getty Education Institute for 
the Arts in Los Angeles. '‘And we need to educate 
students to decode and unwrap these images." 

The children who visited the National Gallery on 
a recent afternoon were from the Thomson School, 
a high-achieving public school of predominantly 
Hispanic and African-American students in down- 
town Washington- Thomson is a participant in one 
multiple-visit effort, the National Gallery's Art 
Around the Comer p rog ram . 

Standing among die works of Alexander Calder, 
Robert Rauschenberg and Gerhard Richter, the chil- 
dren talked about symbols relating to what they had 
seen at the Gallery’s “Olmec Ait of Ancient Mex- 
ico" exhibition. They also talked of architecture, 
discussing what LM. Pei created when be designed 
the Gallery's East Building. 

And they were asked to talk about themselves by 
taking the concept of a symbol and relating it to their 
own lives. Each child was given the outline of a vase 
on a piece of white paper and was told to decorate it 
with personal symbols. 

Several weeks later, three of foe Gallery’s staff 
educators and 10 volunteer docents piled into a van 
and went to the Thomson School for a follow-up 


Egypt Frees 17 
After Cult Raids 

The Assoc i mnl Press 


visit- Ttey were met there by several children wear- 
ing maroon T-shirts and matching berets that bare the 
acronym Swart (Students Waiting Artists Readiness 
Team). These pupils, artistically gifted fifth and 
sixth-graders, escorted foe Gallery's docents and 
educators to their respective home rooms. 

la one class, foe children took turns describing the 
symbols they had drawn at foe Gallery. Vaughn 
Willis had filled in his vase with solid blocks of 
different shades. “The colors represent the moods in 
my life," he said. “Good times and bad times.' ’His 
classmate Hen Le. a Vietnamese immigrant, had 
drawn colorful images of dragons and mountains. “1 
saw die dragons on TV," be said. “And when I flew 
to America from Vietnam. 1 saw mountains." 

Linda Downs, head of the National Gallery’s 
education programs, said Art Around foe Comer 
was the idea of taro African-American interns at the 
museum. “The Gallery sent a formal letter to 12 
schools in the immediate neighborhood," she said, 
“and we got three responses." 


Art Around foe Comer has since grown steadily. 
“We originally had 60 students and two classes 
Ms. Downs said. “Now we have nearly 290 stu- 
dents," from four schools. 

Robert Bracy, who has been foe principal of the 
Thomson School for 15 years, believes in the im- 
portance of arL “These children look forward to 
their visits to the Gallery," Mr. Bracy said. “It 
allows them to express themselves in different ways. 
Some chi ldre n don't do well in the classroom, but 
when they get outride of school they’re totally 
different. I’ve seen their self-esteem go sky-high." 

While museums are eager to keep expanding 
their reach to the public schools, they sometimes 
find that cooperation of principals and teachers is 
lacking. 

“The biggest problem is that most teachers got 
little in the way of art education." said Ms. Duke, of 
the Getty Education Institute for the Arts. “It's 
astounding, but we find many teachers are in- 
timidated by museums.” 






_ _ ££&* 

AqrDnMynk No* Yak Tima 

A guide in the East Wing of the National Gallery of Art in Washington diseasing the geometry 
of the building with students from the Thomson School, which specializes in high achievers. 

Louvre Opens Wings to Youths 

, ByBarryta.es I 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — like many art museums in Europe the 
Louvre here actively tries to interest young people 
from kindergarten to university age in its collections 
and varied cultural offerings. 

“We do it in a spirit of public service,’ ’ said Jean 
Galard. chief of the museum’s cultural service. 
“The museum is paid for by taxpayers, and we 
reason that it should not be reserved to its traditional 
habituees " 

Besides, Mr. Galard said, he and other museum staff 
can team a lot by bringing in young people from a 
variety of different backgrounds, including those from 
sane of the city’s tough neighborhoods where art is 
mare likely to mean graffiti than Gauguin. 

The museum's outreach program, in effect since 
1988. seems to be paying off. Last year, more than 
one million children, adolescents and young adults 
visited foe Louvre out of a total of 5 milli on patrons. 
That figure is remarkable considering that most of 
the young people were French while 65 percent of 
the total visitors were foreigners. 

With foe ongoing program to expand the Louvre, 
there was a proposal to build a special museum for 
young people, Mr. Galard said. But that idea was 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


that helps children and young adults see the 
Louvre's mam collections with foe help of special 
lectures, pedagogical materials and a staff trained to 
deal with young visitors. 

The museum has, however, set aside an area for 
students and their teachers where &Q can learn not 
mly about paintings and ait history but about 
various artistic techniques. 

The museum has sold more than 20,000 young 
people's season tickets since introducing them in 
1995, giving unlimited access for a year at a cost of 
100 fianes. There is no single-entry charge to the 
museum for visitors under the age of 18. 

Mailings are often sent out to tire youths with 
information about forthcoming attractions. Mr. 
Galard said the number of young visitors was 
noticeably increasing as a result. 

While the museum has long had programs to 
introduce school children to art, Mir. Galard said, the 
Louvre had paid particular attention to reaching 
university students. Unless they were studying sub- 
jects closely related to art or art history , they tended 
to abandon museum-going in favor of movies and 
popular music. But if they can be persuaded to visit 
a few times, he said, they frequently become loyal 
supporters of the museum. 


Fighter Pilot Knew 727 
Was Passenger Aircraft 

Air Force Defends F-16’s Close Flyby 


By Matthew L. Wald 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The pilot of an 
F-16 fighter jet that came too close to a 
commercial airliner off the New Jersey 
coast two weeks ago had actually iden- 
tified it as a passenger jet miles in ad- 
vance, but continued to chase foe Boe- 
ing 727 as an intruder into his closed 
militar y airspace, U.S. Air Force of- 
ficials said. 

At one point, the pilot, who was in- 
structing a trainee, told foe trainee to 
stay out of the way “till this, uh, bozo 
gets out of the airspace,' ’ according to a 
transcript of conversations made public 
by the air force Tuesday. 

The fighter came within 1,000 fee! 
horizontally and 400 feet vertically of 
the civilian plane, setting off an anti- 
collision system in the big jet's cockpit 
a nd pushing it into evasive maneuvers 
that threw three people to foe floor. 

The chair man of the National Trans- 
portation Safety Board, which is in- 
vestigating the incident, said ax a sep- 
arate briefing that the close encounter 
on Feb. 5 between the F-16 from the Air 
National Guard in Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, and a Nations Airplane carrying 
about 80 people was the most serious of 
four encounters that week. 

“Thankfully, there were no reported 
injuries in this incident, but the potential 
(or very unfortunate results was clearly 
there." said the chairman. James HalL 

U.S. Air Force officials had said im- 
mediately after the incident that the pilot 
flew close to the jetliner to identify it and 
perhaps to determine whether it was in 
distress. On Tuesday, officials said that 
while the military pilot already knew he 
was dealing with a 727, be may have 
been trying to get close enough to read 
the tail number so he could report what 
he saw as a traffic violation of airspace 
that was closed to civilian aircraft 

Major Genual Donald Peterson, the 
assistant deputy chief of staff for the air 
force, said the pilot might have wanted to 
make sure that the other plane left Gen- 
eral Peterson stressed that the pilot, who 
has not been identified, broke no rules. 

He was eventually ordered to break off 
the chase by a navy air traffic controller, 
but the command may have been delayed 
because foe fighter pilot was on the 
wrong frequency, foe air force said. 

Civilian investigators said that the 
two F-16s were turned loose to conduct 
tactical exercises in foe area but were 
not advised to stay away from two ci- 
vilian planes, the 727 and a DC-8, that 
were moving through the area. Under 
agreements between the Federal Avi- 
ation Administration and the navy, 
which coordinates the military drills, 
the civilian planes should have been 
allowed to complete their trip without 
interference. 

Lieutenant Colonel John Dwyer, a 
spokesman for foe New Jersey Air Na- 
tional Guard, agreed that the F-16 pilot 
knew throughout foe incident that the 
727 was a civilian jetliner. But he said 
foe pilot had to close to within 1 .000 feet 
of foe jet to “ascertain his intentions and 
assure he cleared foe training area." 

“This pilot didn’t know what foe jet 
was doing there in a closed military 
area," Colonel Dwyer said. “He was 


t fe.wwiw Hong Kong Opens First Link 

menffreed if Jte.il Si Of Corridor to New Airport 


Wednesday who were ac- HONG KONG — Hong Kong’s chief secretary, An- 
cused of indecency and son Chan, officially opened on Wednesday foe first 
scorning religion as part of a section of the expressway network system to foe ter- 
nng of reputed devil wor- ritory’s new airport. The 34-kilometer (21-mile) trans- 


with TWA this month that provides for joint reservations 
and coordinated schedules, foe Greek national carrier 
said Wednesday in Athens. The accord is to go into force Agence France-Pnsse 

after TWA suspends its flights to Athens in April. PARIS — The French 
Olympic said it was working on similar alliances. (AP) oceanographer Jacques -Yves 

Cousteau, 86, has teen in foe 
A stoppage by French bus drivers gripped several hospital here for tire past two 
provincial cities Wednesday for the 14th successive day weeks, sources said Wednes- 
m their challenge to the government of Prime Minister day. 

Alain Juppe over shorter working hours and earlier The sources did not say 
retirement. ( Reuters ) what was wrong with Mr. 

Cousteau, the celebrated cap- 
Indoneria will ban smoking on all domestic flights of tain of die Calypso, but sard 
under two hours as of June 1, in line with international be was “fully conscious” 
standards, the Antara news agency said. (AFP) and that his doctors bad de- 


Cousteau Is Hospitalized 
For Undisclosed Ailment 


th at sho cked Egypt port condor will link Chek Lap Kok Airport and ad- 
Those freed were among joining Tung Chung new town to Hong Kong island. 


76 students picked up by the Chek Lap Kok Airport, built on reclaimed land on 
police Jan. 22 from their Lantau island, will open in April next year after Hong 
homes in raids that followed a Kong reverts to China on July l. It will be lmWiri to Hong 
senes of parties in foe desert Kong island and Kowloon by tunnels, bridges and high- 
and ui Cairo hotels. ways. 

. said that rituals A rail link will also be built from foe Central district to 

nad been held al the parties to the airport, which will take over flights from the saturated 
worship Satan, and that sex, one-runway Kai Tafc Airport on Kowloon. (AFP) 
drugs and heavy metal music 


A stoppage by French bus drivers gripped several 
provincial cities Wednesday for the 14th successive day 
m their challenge to the government of Prime Minister 
Alain Juppe over shorter working hours and earlier 
retirement. (Reuters) 


were common. 


Ground staff workers at SAS issued a strike warning 
Tuesday for March 7 over the collapse of wage talks with 
the airline on Feb. 6. The issue now goes to foe Danish 


Olympic Airways is to sign a code-sharing agreement government's conciliation board 


(Bloomberg) 


be was “fully conscious” 
and that his doctors bad de- 
cided to make no statement 
fa the time being. 

Mr. Cousteau, one of the 
most popular men in France, 
is famous the world over fa 


his books and documentary 
films. 

A member of the French 
Academy, Mr. Cousteau is a 
ardent defender of foe en- 
vironment. He bad studied 
ecological and overpopula- 
tion problems within foe 
Council for the Rights of 
Future Generations, set up 
by foe French government 
in 1993. 

Mr. Cousteau resigned 
from that body in September 
1995 in protest against Pres- 
ident Jacques Chirac’s de- 
cision to resume nuclear test- 
ing in the South Pacific. 


assuring foe box was dear before he 
started mane overs." Colonel Dwyer 
said the F-16 pilot's calling the 727 a 
bozo was not derogatory, “It’s probably 
kinder than I'd be." be said. "He’s up 
there and all of a sudden there’s this 
unidentified blip on his radar." 

General Peterson said that as a result 
of the incident, fighters would now be 
required to try first to identify aircraft 
they perceived as intruders bv checking 
with air traffic controllers. Only if that 
failed would they' intercept foe planes, 
he said. 

He also said that all air force pilots 
would get training in the operation of 
the ann-collision systems on civilian 
planes. 

The chairman of the safety board said 
that neither foe Feb. 5 episode, which 
involved a Nations Air flight from San 
Juan, Puerto Rico, to Kennedy Inter- 
national Airport, nor three other recent 
episodes of F-16s coming too close to 
civilian jets posed areal threat of midair 
collision. 

But in their first public comments on 
that encounter, safety board officials 
suggested that the problem was the in- 
formation given to foe pilots of the two i 
F~16s from the Air National Guard base 
by a navy air traffic controller in Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia. 


Israel to Build 
Settlement in 
East Jerusalem 


Reuters 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu pledged on Wed- 
nesday to build a new Jewish neigh- 
borhood in Arab East Jerusalem over 
Palestinian objections, his spokesman 
said. 

Mr. Netanyahu went to Parliament 
fa talks with opposition and govern- 
ment lawmakers on foe plan to construct 
6J>00 homes at Jabal Abu Ghneim or 
Har Homo, a hill of pine trees between 
Jerusalem and Bethlehem that was cap- 
tured by Israel in 1967. 

Rightist coalition partners and sev- 
eral members of foe main opposition 
Labor Party have been pressing Mr. 
Netanyahu to give the green light fa the 
construction. 

“The prime minister told Parliament 
members he intends to build in all parts 
of Jerusalem including in foe Har Horoa 
neighborhood,” a spokesman fa Mr. 
Netanyahu said. “The decision on a 
date will be made at the meeting of the 
ministerial committee on Jerusalem 
next week." 

Mr. Netanyahu also told lawmakers 
that the possibility of building Arab 
homes in part of Har Homa was “under 
examination,” foe spokesman said. 

The Palestinian Authority of Yasser | 
Arafat wants Arab East Jerusalem, cap- i 
tured by Israel along with foe rest of the j 
West Bank in 1 967, to be the capital of a i 
future Palestinian state and has caned J 
Israeli housing projects an attempt to 
cement the Jewish state’s bold overall I 
of foe city. Israel views all of Jerusalem 
as its capital. 

Faisal Husseini, the Palestinian of- 
ficial responsible for Jerusalem, said 
that Mr. Netanyahu's approval of the 
Har Homa plan would be viewed as a 
“decision of war.” I 

■ New West Bank Settlement \ 

Israeli developers have begun build- ^ 
mg a Dew settlement in the West Bank I 
despite government statements that no • 
new Jewish communities were being j 
created in the occupied Palestinian ■ 
areas, Agence France Presse quoted lo- 1 
cal Israeli officials as saying. 

Fifty homes have been built so Ear at | 
Kfar Oranim, near foe “green line” \ 
marking tire separation between Israel ; 
and foe occupied Palestinian territory, | 
the local officials said. ■ 

They said that plans called for a lux- 
ury residential community of 600 
homes at the site. 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


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110 

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Europe 


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WEATHER 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWoalher. 



North America 

Stormy weather w« move 
Into the Great Lakes Fri- 
day. then exit the East Sat- 
urday Wowed by a return 
of diffly air Saturday and 

Sunday, rwpedfvdy. Very 
mid ata wB ta found ahead 
of this system. Dry and 
mSd in the Wed with sea- 
sonable weather in the 
Rcddea and nafcio. 


Europe 

Near- 10 above-normal 
temperatures will prevail 
across much of the oonv- 
nent with southern Europe 
likely being Ihe warmest. 
Searefnavta w 9 be stormy, 
while unseated weather w«i 
dampen the British idee 
and northern tier from 
Amsterdam la Warsaw. 
Wet In southern Turkey 
and the Mkfate East 


Asia 

Mairdy dry and unseason- 
ably mid weather win pre- 
vail across northeast China 
and both Koreas through- 
out tea weekend, dthou^i 
ahowen may reach Bepig 
Sunday. Turning drier and 
milder across southern 
Japan, including Tokyo, 
whfe northern Japan stays 
cakL Seasonable In Hong 
Kona 


North America 


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*XBCEfc4lJ>T^TBTlNir. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 2L J997 


PAGE 1? 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


PAGES 


THE AMERICAS 




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Starr Insists 
Inquiry Will 
Be Pursued 

Whitewater Is ‘Active,’ 
Prosecutor Declares 

^P^tjOarSB^FnmD^odKt 

WASHINGTON — The Whitewater 
mvesaganon that has dogged the CHwtftw 
. House is far from over. Renrefe 

♦' Starr, the special prosecutor mtte affair, 
sard Wednesday. 

“Those who argue that this inves- 
tigation is over are wrong,” Mr. Starr told 

a gathering of lawyers in suburban Wash- 
ingto n. Mr. Stair said Monday be would 
step down from the investigation to be- 
come dean, effective Aug. 1, of Pep- 
penfine University School of Law in 
Malibu, California, and h*a H the uni- 
versity’s new school of public policy. 

His announcement stirred specula- 
tion that the inquiry would end when he 
leaves and that no charges would be 
made against President Bill Clinton or 
his wife. Hiltary Rodham Clinton . 

The Whitewater scandal, which 
sprang from a fraudodant bankruptcy 
that sent several Clinton associates to 
n jail, dates from the 1970s, when Mr. 

1 Clinton was governor of Arkansas. 

“This investigation is active and at a 
sensitive stage,” said Mr. Starr, who 
was named independent prosecutor in 
the case in August 1994. “It is wrong, 
indeed it is dangerous, to draw any 
conclusions from my personal situ- 
ation,” he added. 

Even after he leaves fer the Pepperdine 
post this summer, a court-appointed suc- 
cessor will continue his work. 

Mr. Starr told die Fairfax County Bar 
Association in Virginia on Wednesday 
that it would not be necessary for him to 
remain on die job if he decided to seek 
indictments. Experienced prosecutors 
on his staff could handle the cases in 
court, he said. (AFP, AP) 

■ Departure Is Criticized 

Susan Schmidt of The Washington 
Post reported Tuesday : 

Although Mr. Starr insists fear his 
decision to leave hispost as Whitewater 
independent counsel does not mean his 
office will not be bringing high-profile 
prosecutions, his protestations failed to 
convince even his conservative allies 
and some friends. 

“If he was about to embark on a 
prosecution of histone proportions, then 
he wouldn’t at the same time be planning 
on leaving,” said Theodore Olson, a 
friend of Mr. Starr’s who represents 
David Hale, a former Arkansas munici- 
pal jinlge and one of the key witnesses 
accusing the Oinqms of,wrougdgmg. 

“It's bardibrna? to believe be would 
be bringing any significant cases after 
he has announced Jus departure,” said a 
former U.S. attorney, Joseph E. diGen- 
ova. “It would be.almost unseemly.*’ 
The news of Mr. Starr’s departure 
IJ comes as his staff is in the final stages of 
preparing a long memo on the pros and 
cons or bringing criminal charges 
against die Clintons and others. 

Several lawyers familiar with die in- 
vestigation smd that Mr. Starr's departure 
might make it even harder to gam the - 
testimony of several witnesses who have 
been uncooperative. 

The independent counsel’s office is 
interested m acquiring information 
from Susan McDougai, a fanner sav- 
ings and loan co-owner and a partner 
with the Clintons in the Whitewater real 
estate . investment; Webster H u bbell, 
former associate attorney general and 
former taw partner of Mrs. Clinton's, 
and Jim Guy Tucker, fanner governor 
of Arkansas. Mr. Starr’s office won 
, convictions against Mrs. McDougai and 
Mr. Tucker on Whitewater-related 
charges, and Mr. Hubbell pleaded guilty 
to defrauding clients and nis taw firm . 

All three have refused to disclose 
what, if anything, they know about 
questionable behavior by die Clintons. 

If Mr. Starr did not intend to signal no 
charges against the Clintons, be will 
have plenty of explaining to do about 
why he is leaving, said lawyers mid 
others who have observed or been in- 
volved in the investigation. 

*‘If he leaves July 1 and there is an 
indictment pending against die pres- 
ident and die first lady, he’s going to 
take a lot of heat for walking away from 
it,” said Mark Tuohey, Mr. Stair’s 
former deputy. 

" James McKay . the independent coun- 
sel who investigated two Reagan ad- 
ministration officials, Lyn Nofzager and 
Edwin Meese 3d, said he was stunned 
by Mr. Starr’s decision. 

‘ ‘I'm just amazed someone given a 
specific job to do leaves. before it is 
completed. It’s like the captam jumping 
A off the ship before everyone gets off, 

• he said. “If he has something really 
vitally important, he wouldn’t leave at 

this point’’ . 

Several people close to Mr. Stair noted 
that he is known for having a tm ear 
politically and suggested he may not nave 
thought through die conclusions mat 
would be drawn from his actions. 

“I *hink ii is dangerous to speculate 
on what the activity of any one person 
might mean,” Mr. Starr said in a state- 
ment. “The investigation is going to 8° 
tm for some time. It is not one in- 
dividual. It is a process that involves a 
nitmhw of very skilled professionals 

who are committed to doing the best 
possible job.” ^ . ,■ .. 

John Bates, Mr. Starr’s deputy, said 
Mr. Starr was presented with a unique 
opportunity at Peppeflfiue and that he 
‘"couldn't control the timing. He was 
formally offered the job two weeks ago ■ 
Mr. Stare, 50, was appointed a federal 



Glenn Plans to Retire From Senate 

Former Astronaut ’s Exit Would Give Republicans a Boost 


JdTMiidKfl/Rcatm 


Kenneth Starr speaking to the press In little Rock, Arkansas. 


By Katharine Q. Seelye 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Senator John 
Glenn, Democrat of Ohio, the former 
astronaut who was the first American to 
orbit Earth, is expected to announce 
Thursday that he will not seek re-elec- 
tion to a fifth term next year. 

Mr. Glenn’s announcement will co- 
incide with the 35th anniversary of his 
flight into space. 

Mr. Glenn, 75, was first elected to the 
Senate in 1974. He has told friends that 
be is ready to retire and wants to spend 
more time with Jus wife, his childho od 
sweetheart 

At the sanw limn, George Voinovich, 
the popular governor ofOhio and a 
Republican, has long made clear his 
intention to challenge Mr. Glenn and 
has raised $13 milli on for the 1998 
Senate race. Mr. Glenn’s campaign 
committee remains $3 million in debt 
from bis quest for the 1984 Democratic 
presidential nomination. 

But his treasurer said Mr. Glenn was 
awaiting a Federal Election Commis- 
sion ruling that would allow him to pay 
his creditors a portion of what be owes 
and declare bis debt paid. 

Mr. Glenn and Mr. Voinovich are die 
two titans of Ohio politics, and Mr. 
Glenn’s retirement would most likely 
clear the way for Mr.' Voinovich to take 
his seat. If so, the swap would move the 


POLITICAL 


Senate a notch to the right, replacing 
Mr. Glenn, a moderate Democrat who 
supports abortion rights, with Mr. 
Voinovich, a moderate Republican who 
opposes abortion and supports a bal- 
anced-budget amendment to the con- 
stitution. 

With the Republicans now in control 
of Ac Senate, 55 to 45, President Bill 
Clinton and other Democratic Party 
leaders have beseecbed Mr. Glenn to 
run one mare time. But all indications 
are that he will bow out Thursday at an 
appearance at bis alma mater, Musking- 
um College in Ohio. 

Gordon Hensley, a spokesman for the 
National Republican Senatorial Com- 
mittee. said: “The mission here in the 
next cycle is to increase the size of the 
Republican majority, and Senator 
Glenn's expected departure can only be 
characterized as a disaster in Ohio for the 
Democrats. Governor Voinovich will be 
very weUptaced to pick that seal up.” 

Mr. Glenn is expected to be the 
second senator, and the first Democrat, 
to say he is not seeking re-election in 
1 998. Senator Dan Coats. Republican of 
Indiana, has already said he will not tun 
a gain 

Mr. Glenn made his mark in the Sen- 
ate as a nuclear proliferation expert. He 
was touched by the Keating Five scan- 
dal, in which five lawmakers were ac- 
cused of doing favors for a wealthy 
campaign contributor, but the ethics 


committee said only that Mr. Glenn had 
“exercised poor judgment” in arran- 
ging a meeting. 

But nothing be accomplished in. 
Washington ever gained him the kind of; 
notice he received when he was cata- 
pulted into space on Feb. 20, 1962, in a 
tiny Mercury capsule dubbed Friend- 
ship 7. 

President John F. Kennedy kepi in 
communication with Mr. Glenn during 
the nearly five-hour flight, which was: 
broadcast around the world. 

Mr. Glenn was ihe first American in 
orbit, but two Russians had preceded, 
him. 

“John Glenn will primarily be re- 
membered for being an astronaut,” said 
John Green, a political analyst at the 
University of Akron. 

Mr. Green said Mr. Glenn had an 1 
apolitical, almost naive political ap- 
proach that appealed to voters, who! 
liked what Mr. Green called Mr. 
Glenn’s “acme sense of fair play." 

Still, Mr. Green said, that apolitical 
quality prevented Mr. Glenn from be- 
coming a real player in the Senate and: 
doomed his presidential candidacy. 

“I don't mow if be was unwilling or 
unable.” Mr. Green said, “but he 
couldn't do the sort of things a Demo- 
cratic nominee needs to do to reach out 
to all the constituencies. He wanted to 
play it straight, but people didn’t find 
him palatable.” 


Labor Nomination Deemed Doomed 

WASHINGTON — Some White House officials are increas- 
ingly pessimistic that Alexis Herman can be confirmed as secretary 
of tabor, fearing that her nomination will become a victim of the 
swelling Democratic fund-raising controversy, administration of- 
ficials said. 

Although the White House chief of staff, Erskine Bowles, 
insisted that President Bill Clinton remained committed to the 
nominee and expected her to be confirmed, some aides privately 
conceded that the no minati on faced many further weeks of delay 
and may fail. 

Ms. Herman, director of the White House Office of Public 
Liaison, is undo* scrutiny by the Senate Labor and Human Re- 
sources Committee, which is investigating her political and busi- 
ness background. The panel’s chairman, James Jeffords of Ver- 
mont, has not set a hearing on the nomination or issued any estimate 
of when the inquiry would be completed. 

A senior White House aide predicted that Labor Committee 
Republicans would delay public testimony on Ms. Herman's 
nomination until a separate congressional inquiry into campaign 
donations had reviewed her White House political activities. 


“That’ll be sometime in 1999.” the official said sardonically. 

Another White House aide involved in trying to win Ms. 
Herman’s confirmation said that he believed the committee’s 
strategy was to subject the nominee to “death by a thousand cuts” 
and that there was little the administration could do. 

Joseph Karpinski, the Labor Committee spokesman, denied that 
the parrel would await die outcome of the fund-raising inquiry by 
the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee. (NYT) 

No Contracts for Labor Law Violators 

LOS ANGELES — Vice President AI Gore has told AFL-CIO 
leaders that the Clinto n administration will soon issue regulations 
imposing new restrictions on federal contracts to companies that 
violate taws on occupational safety, overtime and union organizing. 

The tabor movement has pushed for years for restrictions to 
punish companies that flout taws protecting workers. But it was 
only after the AFL-CIO last year undertook its largest campaign 
ever to elect Democrats that Mr. Gore announced the new pro- 
curement rules. 

Under the administration’s new policy, made public by the vice 
president at the federation’s four-day meeting here, companies' 
adherence to labor taws is to be taken into account for the first time 


in the awarding of federal contracts, and those that have violated 
such laws could be barred from receiving them. 

“We’re going to send a message to companies that want to do 
business with the federal government: How you treat employees 
and how you treat unions counts wife us,” Mr. Gore said Tuesday, 
standing wife John Sweeney, the president of fee federation, the 
largest U.S. tabor organization. “If you want to do business with 
fee federal government, you'd better maintain a safe workplace and 
respect civil, human and union rights.” 

Mr. Gore announced the new policy on a day when he and the 
House Democratic leader, Richard Gephardt of Missouri, appealed 
before the federation's executive council in what was widely 
viewed as a beauty contest between two future presidential can- 
didates vying for labor’s dollars and endorsement. (NYT) 


Quote! Unquote 


Bill Richardson, fee new chief U.S. delegate to fee United 
Nations, after a visit to the UN cafeteria sent security guards 
scurrying and had his own aides fretting about the possibility of an 
inopportune photo opportunity wife a diplomat from an adversary 
/, Libya: “If I err, it will be on the side of action, not 


tike, say, 
inaction.” 


(NYT) 



Yet Defiant 


By John F. Harris 

Washington Post Service 


NEW YORK — President Bill Clin- 
ton was defiant in one breath and apo- ' 
logetic in the next as be ventured to an 
opulent Upper East Side town house 
decorated wife gold-painted chairs and 
yard-high candles to help Senate Demo- 
crats raise a million dollars. 

Mr. Clinton appeared Tuesday night 
at fee fund-raiser for the Democratic 
Senatorial Campaign Committee even 
as he is engulfed in controversy over 
whether his administration granted im- 
proper access and influence to large 
contributors to the Democratic National 
Committee. 

He thanked the contributors, some of 
whom gave $25,000 or more, for help- 
ing Democrats despite fee controversy 
and even “knowing you might be tar- 
geted for fee exercise of your consti- 
tutional right” to give money. He told 
the donors he regretted * ‘everything you 
have had to endure, including some of 
the calls you have received.” 

Mr. Clinton said the controversy in- 


volved only a small number of con- 
tributions “involving less than 2 per- 
cent of fee money we raised.” 

Even so, he acknowledged that “for 
reasons I cannot explain or defend, our 
party did not check all the contributions 

that were giv- 

en.” He urged 
fee contributors 
to support the bi- 
partisan cam- 
paign finance re- 
form be has 
endorsed, which 
would outlaw 
unlimited “soft 
money” gifts of 

fee sort feat the fund-raiser was col- 
lecting Tuesday night 

If Mr. Clinton had thought fee furor 
over Democratic fund-raising was 
strictly a Washington obsession, he 
could have learned otherwise Tuesday 
rooming by glancing out the window of 
hislimousme. 

As the presidential motorcade cruised 
down the West Side Highway in Man- 
hattan, it passed an electronic billboard 


‘Hey, Mr; Clinton, 

Coffee at Fairway is 65 
cents. Coffee at the 
White House is $200,000. 
And ours tastes better. 9 


where a grocery store was running an 
advertisement feat poked fun at recent 
revelations of White House coffees that 
included people who wrote big checks to 
fee Democratic National Committee. 

"Hey, Mr. Clinton,” the message 
read. “Coffee at 
“ Fairway is 65 
cents. Coffee at 
the White House 
is $200,000. 
And ours tastes 
better.” 

That is the 
kind of elbow- 
to-fee-gut hu- 
morthat this city 
and it neatly captured bow 
Clinton’s jaunt to Manhattan was 
dominated by the money controversy. 
Evening news coverage focused less on 
Mr. Clinton’s speeches, promoting bow 
to find jobs for welfare recipients, and 
more on fee fund-raiser. 

Proponents of campaign finance re- 
form called Mr. Clinton a hypocrite last 
week far agreeing to attend fee event 
Tuesday. This is because the group has 


not agreed to abide by fee same curbs on 
contributions of the sort that Mr. Clinton 
last month installed at the Democratic 
National Committee when he boasted of 
his determination to purge the influence 
of big money in politics. 

After being severely criticized for its 
fund-raising methods — which in 1996 
pulled in record sums, but also brought 
in more than $1 million feat had to be 
returned as illegal or improper — the 
Democratic committee, at Mr. Clinton's 
direction, agreed not to take gifts from 
foreign nationals or gifts of more than 
$100,000. 

But the Democratic Senatorial Cam- 
paign Committee and its House coun- 
terpart, the Democratic Congressional 
Campaign Committee, say they have no 
plans to join Mr. Clinton in imposing 
voluntary restraints, and fee White 
House has not objected to fee decision. 

The event Tuesday was a lavish affair. 
Mr. Clinton made clear he was impressed 
by fee luxurious sunoundings. “This 
makes the White House look luce public 
housing,” he said, adding, “It is won- 
derful public housing.'’ 


Away From Politics 

> , r 

• The creW df the space shuttle Dis- 
covery has released the Hubble Space 
Telescope “to study the stars” after a,' 
$350 million refurbishment. ( Reuters > 

• The success rate in coring patients; 
and not just the quality of staff and 
equipment will be considered for the 
first time when deciding which hos- 
pitals to approve, fee group feat ac- 
credits U.S. hospitals said. Eventually, 
those facilities feat fail to meet specified 
standards could lose their accreditation, 
the Joint Commission on Accreditation 
of Healthcare Organizations said. (WP) 

• District of Columbus police would 
be able to fight crime better if Mayor 
Marion Barry had less power over the 
department and fee police chief, Larry 
Soulsby, had more, sources familiar 
wife a report by fee Booz-AJlen & 
Hamilton consulting firm said, ( WP) 

• A homeless man living in a shanty 
under a highway in Brooklyn died when 
his makeshift home caught fire and a 
companion was unable to pull him from 
the flames, the police said. Four others 
have died in similar incidents. (NYT) 


Abortion Foes Win ‘Up Close’ 

Supreme Court Backs Sidewalk Confrontations 



peidinc’a »» _ 
board of visitors, and received an hon- 
orary degree there last year- 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Anti-abortion demon- 
strators have a free- speech right to confront 
clinic patients and staffers up close on public 
streets and sidewalks as long as they stay 
more than IS feet away from fee clinic, fee 
Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. 

In splintered voting, the court struck down a 
federal judge’s order feat had kept most 
demonstrators at abortion clinics in fee Buffalo 
and Rochester, New York, areas 15 feet (about 
43 meters) away from any patient or staff 
member. The court said that a floating buffer 
zone” on public ways violates demonstrators’ 
free-speedi rights, as guaranteed by fee First 
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. 

- But it upheld a fixed buffer zone feat keeps 
demonstrators at least 15 feet away from clime 
doorways, driveways and driveway entrances. 

The court also upheld a part of the federal 
judge’s order requiring so-called sidewalk 
counselors who approach patients within fee 
fixed buffer zones to retreai when patients 
indicate a desire not to be counseled. 

"We strike down the floating buffer zones 
around people entering and leaving the clinics 
because they burden more speech than is 
necessary to serve the relevant government 
interests,” Chief Justice William Rehnquist ' 
wrote for the couit 

“The floating buffer zones prevent de- 
fendants — except for two sidewalk coun- 
selors while they are tolerated by the targeted ' 
individual — from communicating a message 
from a normal conversational distance or 
banding leaflets to people enteritig or leaving 
fee climes who are walking on the public 
sidewalks,” be wrote. 

“Leafleting and commenting on matters of 
publicconcemare classic forms of speech feat 
lie at fee heart of the Hist Amendment” 

Karen Swallow Prior, an organizer of 1992 


anti-abortion protests in Buffalo, rejoiced and 
said, “The ruling basically says that pro-lifers 
have the same First Amendment rights that 
fee rest of Americans do.” 

The vote was 8 to 1 to strike down as 
unconstitutional fee floating buffer zones. All 
bat Justice Stephen Breyer joined that pan of 
Justice Rehnquist’s opinion. 

The vote to uphold as constitutional die 
fixed 15-foot buffer zone around clinic en- 
trances and parking lots was 6 to 3. 

Justice Rehnquist was joined in that part of 
his opinion by Justices Breyer, John Paul 
Stevens, Sandra Day O'Connor, David 
Souter and Ruth Bader Gins burg. 

Justices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy 
and Clarence Thomas voted to strike down ail 
of fee judge’s order. 

The nation's highest court reaffirmed fee 
right to abortion in 1992. Since then, its focus 
largely has been oa protesters’ tactics during a 
time feat has seen many violent acts at abor- 
tion dirties, including five killings. 

In another case, die court ruled Wednesda' 
that the police could order passengers, as 
as drivers, to get out of vehicles during traffic 
stops. Ruling, 7 to 2, in a Maryland case in 
which Attorney General Janet Reno atgued as a 
friend-of-fee-court, die justices said the need to 
protect police officers’ safety justified the 
“minimal” intrusion on passengers’ rights. 

“Regrettably, traffic stops may be danger- 
ous encounters,” Chief Justice Rehnquist 
wrote for die court. He noted that 11 police 
officers had been killed and thousands more 
assaulted during traffic stops in 1994. "Danger 
to an officer from a traffic stop is likely to be 
greater when there arepassengers in addition to 
the driver in the stopped car,” he wrote 

The ruling reversed a Maryland appeals 
court derision that said crack cocaine found in 
a 1994 stop could not be used as evidence. 


saay 

well 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


California’s Gold Rush: 

The 1997 Version 

Rumors of gold have sparked a 
new minirush into fee famous mother 
lode country of California. Waves of 
prospectors have been swooping 
down cm the rivers of fee Sierra and 
their tributaries, lugging along picks 
and shovels, metal detectors and 
sluice boxes. 

They come in the wake of Janu- 
ary ’s floods, hoping feat the turbulent 
rivers caused by pounding rains will 
have dredged and eroded river bot- 
toms, exposing bedrock never 
touched by miner’s pick. 

Weekend prospectors usually 
don’t turn out in any numbers until 
spring. 

But merchants who cater to 
miners’ needs say business has been 
exceptionally brisk, reports fee Los 
Angeles Times. “If it wasn’t so damn 
busy,” one equipment supplier said, 
“I’d be out there right now my- 
self.” 

So far, pickings have apparently 
been fairly slim. “Oh, we’ve found a 
few pieces.” said one man, standing 
beside a fork of the Stanislaus River, 
“but nothing fantastic/’ 

The current enthusiasm, of course, 
has been nothing like fee great 1849 
gold rush, which attracted thousands of 


miners and made millionaires of some. 
Still, the lure remains. One white- 
bearded, rustic-looking fellow 
summed it up this way: “Up here you 
might be one foot away from a million 
dollars, and you might be a million feet 
away from your next dollar. You never 
know. Thai’s what keeps them com- 
ing.” 

Short Takes 

Soul of the Machine: Tuesday be- 
tween 2 AJW. and 3 AM. is the 
quietest tune for demands on Amer- 
ica’s automatic teller machines; 
Sunday is fee busiest, and fee time 
when fee largest purchases are made, 
probably because of grocery shop- 
ping. The lowest approval rate far 
cash withdrawals comes in fee early 
hours — apparently because of errors 
of judgment associated with alcohol 
and late-night partying. 

Airport officials at the California 
desert resort of Palm Springs had 
been getting complaints about cab 
drivers . . . mostly muttered complaints 
about body odor and bad breath. Wor- 
ried feat tourists would take serious 
offense, they have proposed a list of 
regulations for cabbies, calling on 
them to shower with soap, brush teeth 
with toothpaste, and use breath mints 
daily. Cabbies are insulted and en- 
raged — all the more so because of the 
smirks and snide comments of the 
doormen they deal with at pricey ho- 
tels. “These regulations are crazy,” 
one driver. George Turner, said. “I 
was just surprised they didn’t tell me 
whai brand of toothpaste to use.” 

International Herald Tribune 


See our 

Read Estate Marketplace 

every Friday 


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AMERICA ONE" 


Now, finafy you can listen too. 

WnataiigM nuqn a s tt any Arena 
OatolLwy Sw* d-M9JBMasH 
EHs4«jJmrriaoed*ptt»9, Amato Ok 
b guana) li pal bgrUdon AB IN bkram. 


-KJ— ~ ' 




PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERAUfr 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 . 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


» Starvation Looms in North Korea, Not Collapse, U.S. 


By Brian Knowlton 

Intcnuaianai Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — As dire as the 
food shortage feeing North Korea is, and 
as cruel a blow as the recent high-profile 
defection of a Pyongyang official may be, 
U.S. officials and Korea specialists say 
they see no sign that die Stalinist gov- 
ernment is about Co collapse. 

Despite a withering economy — it has 
contracted 30 percent since 1990 — and 
looming starvation. North Korean lead- 
ers appear to be able to cling to power for 
some years, the officials and specialists 
Said this week. 

The UJ5. hope, buffeted but apparently 
unbowed by recent events, is that con- . 
famed efforts to engage Pyongyang can 
help guide it toward a “soft landing.'' 
reducing its sense of isolation and curb- 


ing its unpredictability en route to the 
ultimate goal of Korean reunification. 

Charles Kartman. acting assistant sec- 
retary of state for East Asian affairs, 
made it clear this week that the Clinton 
administration intended to keep fee hu- 
man needs of North Koreans separate 
from its political distaste for the Kim 


Jong II government 

Extensive flooding in 1995 and 1996 
devastated rice fields, killed livestock, 
and displaced a half-million people, pro- 
ducing dramatic food shortages. 

*‘Ic has reached fee point," Mr. Kart- 
man said, “where malnutrition is turn- 
ing into starvation." The question now, 
he said, was not whether to help the 
North, but "how to best address the 
humanitarian concerns in the great tra- 
dition of our country." 

A U.S. reply to the latest appeal for aid 


is due soon, he said, and it will be “very 
much consistent wife what we’ve done 
elsewhere in fee world." 

But South Korea blames North Korea 
for a series of brutal acts — bombings 
and terrorist attacks including, al- 
legedly, the recent shooting of a defector 
in Seoul. This has reheated the debate 
about whether Washington and Seoul 
should actively, or passively, assist in 
Pyongyang’s demise. 

John Merrill, a State Department ana- 
lyst, insisted that U.S. diplomatic efforts 
at engagement are proper, and are wak- 
ing, at least marginally. 

“Diplomatic engagement has created 
a kind of crisis stability, or new mech- 
anisms for crisis stability, which did not 
exist before,” be said, adding feat he 
was not necessarily expressing State De- 
partment policy. 


But that very stability, others argued, 
might help preserve what many refer to 
as an “outlaw regime,” giving indirect 
succor to fee North Korean Army, more 
fejm a Tnrnion strong. 

Either way, officials and analysts at a 
Korea conference at the University of 
Maryland said, die Pyongyang govern- 
ment is unlikely to leave fee scene 
soon. 

“South Korea is stuck with a North 
Korean regime,” said Hy Sang Lee, a 
North Korea specialist at the University 
of Wisconsin, “which win not reform 
and which will opt fall apart." 

The defection of Hwang Jang Yop, 
and fee shooting in Seoul of a man who 
defected yean ago — coming soon after 
the grounding off fee Sooth Korean coast 
of a North Korean submarine carrying 
commandos — have been interpreted by 


some analysts as signs feat Pyongyang is 
acting wife increasing desperation as its 
society plumme ts into misery. 

Mr. Kar tman said be had been asked 
repeatedly whether those incidents might 
bectanected.“Ithinkfeatfeere’safaiily- 

compeQing cncumstantial thread- that 
runs through all these events," he said, 
while adding feat they also raised sub- 
stantial unanswered questions, such as 
whether the defection is “ authen tic." 

There is no doubt, he added, that 
North Korea remained a source of 
danger. The submarine incident, hes&id, 
showed “a willingness to take very pro- 
found risks wife fee peace on fee Korean 
Peninsula." 

But Mr. Kartman said fee recent events 
also pointed to the existence of a faction 
in Pyongyang that believes feat “change 
is necessary m order to survive.” 


C Kenneth Quinones, of fee State 
Department bureau of intelligence and 
research, emphasized feat “our whole 
effort" wife North Korea ‘w to more 
away from containment, toward engage- 
ment." 

■ $10 MUfionttS,.' Aid Expected 

The United States is expected to give 
$10 million in food aid to North Korea to 
help it avert widespreadfaminc, Agence 
prance-Presse reported Wednesday 
fro m Washington, quoting a source. 

The U.S. contribution would amount 
to about a quarter of the $41.6 million 
appeal launched by the UN WortdJFood 

ifSSd be fee third UB. contribution 
of food aid to North Korea following an 
initial $8.2 million package in 1995 and 
$6.2 million last year. 



Prosecutors Indict 10 
In Hanbo Steel Affair 


Reuters 

SEOUL — South Korean state prosecutors indicted 10 
people Wednesday over fee collapse of Hanbo Steel & 
General Construction Co. in a loans-for-kickbacks scan- 
dal that has rocked the government of President Kim 
Young Sam. 

Nine of those indicted, including three close aides to 
Mr. Kim, are in detention in connection wife the scandaL 
The lOfe is in jail over an unrelated case. 

Prosecutors said their investigation into what is prob- 
ably fee biggest corporate collapse in Sooth Korean 
history was at the halfway point. 

Choi Byung Koog, a senior prosecutor, said the in- 
vestigation had ran into problems because key evidence 
had been destroyed, including Hanbo’s accounr books 
before 1993. Cash bribes woe hard to track down. 

The prosecution was depending heavily on testimony 
by the Hanbo Group's founder, Chung Tai Soo, one of 
those detained along wife fee former company treasurer, 
Kim Jong Kook. 

Hanbo Steel & General Construction Coilagship of the ‘ 
Hanbo Group. South Korea’s 14th biggest conglomerate, 
was declared insolvent on Jan. 23 after running up five 
trillion won ($5.8 billion) in debt 

“So far, we’ve had a hard time finding truth behind fee 
case that would dear up all suspicions,” Mr. Choi said. 

Mr. Choi said fee prosecution was still trying to 
account for 25 billion won in loans. 

Those in President Kim's inner circle who were indicted 
were fee former home affairs minister, Kim Woo Suk, who 
resigned Jan. 12 before detention on charges of accepting 
bribes, and Hong In Gil and Hwang Byung Tai. lawmakers 
and key members of a faction that backed Mr. Kim's rise to 
power. 

Another member of Parliament, Chung Jae Chul). tire 
highest-ranking official in the governing New Korea 
Party after the president and party chairman, also was 
indicted. 

Three bankers were indicted, including two former 
presidents of Korea First Bank, Hanbo's major creditor. 
One of the former bank presidents. Rhee Chul Soo, is 
serving a three-year jail sentence for bribery in a separate 
case. The other is Sheen Kwang Shik. 

The third banker to be indicted was Woo Chan Mok, 
head of Cbo Hung Bank. 

KwonRohKap, a top aide to the opposition leader Kim 
Dae Jung, was also indicted. 



DEFECTOR: China Finally Reports Incident 


Ok* BakafOo AoobMdfKn 

A crowd staring past a police cordon on Wednesday near the South Korean 
consular compound in Beijing, where Hwang Jang Yop took reftige on Feb. 12. 


Continued from Page 1 

Beijing has found itself an unwilling third 
party in the episode, but has indicated it hopes 
the two Koreas can scat out fee problem 
themselves. Officials in Seoul have said such 
a solution is impossible. 

“We are telling fee Chinese there’s no 
dialogue channel and it is impossible to re- 
solve a sensitive defection issue in direct talks 
wife the North,’* a South Korean Foreign 
Ministry official said. 

South Korean officials in Beijing said talks 
wife Chinese officials were continuing tut de- 
clined to comment on their content, saying only 
that a solution was Ifloriy take some tune. 

“But wife North Korea changing its at- 
titude, we hope there will be progress in our 
negotiations," fee official said. 

More and more Chinese have gathered 
daily near fee cordoned-off streets surround- 
ing die South Korean consulate. The onlook- 
ers can see serv^al armored personnel carriers 
beyond fee cordons manned by large numbers 


Pakistani Wins Confidence Vote 

ISLAMABAD — Pakistan's new prime minister, Mian Nawaz 
Sharif, won a strong vote of Wednesday in fee 217-seat 

National Assembly, fee lower house of Parliament, and then vowed 
to move fast to cany out a reform program. 

The assembly speaker, Haiti Balchsh Soomro, said 181 members, 
oat of 200 sworn in so far.had voted in favor of Mr. Sharif, who has 
yet to announce the composition of Ins cabinet 

The house elected Mr. Sharif prime minister on Monday, 177 
votes to 16. The confidence vote Wednesday was a constitutional 
formality required within 60 days of his election. 

“We will use tins mandate in the interest of the nation," Mr. 
Sharif said after the voce. (Reuters) 

Party Won’t Move Against Deve Gowda 

NEW DELHI — The Congress Party said Wednesday that it 
would not immediately move to topple the UmtedFnmt government 
it has reluctantly supported for nine months. 

“It won’t fall tins year," a Congress spokesman, Vithal Gadgfi, 


said when asked if Prime Minister HJD. Deve Gowda’s government 

nrigfafaUdnring tire three-month budget sesrion of Parliament that 
opens Thursday. 

“It will at least survive the budget session," Mr. Gadgil said. 
Mr. Deve Gowda has fewer than 200 deputies in the 545 -member 
lower house of Parliament. The Congress Party, which controls 
about 140 deputies, said over fee weekend fear its support for the 
government was no longer unconditional. (Reuters) 

Japan Lawmaker Indicted in Fraud 

TOKYO — A prominent Japanese lawmaker was indicted Wed- 
nesday in connection wife a fasUioo-yen investment fraud scandal 
involving his family members and possibly top-level opposition 
politicians, a Tokyo District Prosecutors Office spokesman said.- . 

Tatsuo Tomobe. 68, a member of fee Upper House, is the latest of 
five people, including his wife, Mikiko.M^and thedr son Mamop, . 
29. to be indicted in the affan involving a bankrupt investors’ group. 
Orange Kyosai Knnriai, the official said. 

Tomobfcs wife headed and his son managed the Orange group, 
winch prosecutors allege collected billions of yen from in- 
vestors. (Reuters) 


of police. Thai such highly visible security 
measures could go unreported in the state-run 
media for a week shows fee difficult position 
Mr. Hwang’s defection places Beijing in. 

(Reuters y AP, AFP ) 

■ ‘Cowards’ Can Go, North Says 

Andrew Pollack of The New York Times 

reported earlier firm Seoul: 

In another sign that North Korea might 
accept fee defection of a top official, Kim 
Jong B said in an official radio broadcast that 
“cowards" were welcome to leave. 

“As fee revolutionary song says: 'Cow- 
ards, leave if you want to. We will defend the 
red flag of revolution to the end, ' *’ Mr. Kim 
was quoted as saying in a Radio Pyongyang 
broadcast that was monitored in Tokyo. 

The remark, by Mr. Kim. as well as as- 
sertions in the last few days by U.S. and South 
Korean officials that they still intend to aqiply 
food to North Korea, raise the prospect feat fee 
defection, as well as the shooting in Seoul to 
Saturday of another North Korean defector, 
might not seriously derail recent efforts to 
improve relations on the Korean Peninsula. 

Some doubt has emerged that the shooting 
of Lee Han Young, a prominent defector, was 
carried oin by agents of fee North in retaliation / 
for tire defection of Mr. Hwang. Mr. Lee is 
brain dead and is being kept alive by a ns- 
pirator. A bullet used in fee shooting might not 
have been fired by a Browning pistol, the type 
favored by North Korean agents, the author- 
ities said. Also, officials said the apartment in 
which Mr. Lee was staying received a mys- 
terious phone call asking ins whereabouts a 
week before Mr. Hwang’s defection. : 

There has been some speculation in Seoul 
that North Korea is preparing to accept Mr. 
Hwang’s defection so that it would not jeop- 
ardize tire food and other economic aid that 
the North desperately needs. But it is not dear 
if feere is any explicit effort under way to 
trade Mr. Hwang’s freedom for aid. 

' ‘A semor'Amencan official safiTffianhext 
was no connection between North Korea’s 
actions involving Mr. Hwang and the pro- 
vision of food aid to fee North. “We will 
respond wife only one criterion, which is 
humanitarian need,’’ the official said. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


PAGE 5 




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Leftists Meet to Examine 
Their Future, and Italy’s 


EUROPE 


Roam 

— At a congress six years 
o. the Italian Communist Party 


its philosophy in an effort to 
woo moderate voters and get into gov- 
ernment, and so recast itself as fee 

Democratic Patty of the Left 

Tire move to repudiate co mmunism 
paid off and fee party, now fee biggest 
member of Italy's nine-monthrOld cen- 
tcr“-j®ft Olive Tree coalition, gathers 
again this week to work out where to go 
from here. 

Massimo D'Alema, the party lwwiw 
is unopposed far re-election, wants 
to transform his party still farther, mm a 
broad social-democratic farce to con- 
solidate its power in Italian politics. 

^ In contrast to fee gathering in 1991, 
fee f our-day congress feat opens 
Thursday is not yet ready to come up 
with a new name and logo. But im- 
proving the party and Italy is high on its 
agenda. 

‘ ‘I think fee impulse towards reforms 
will certainly be part of our congress," 
said Cesare Sam, fee party’s leader in 
the Senate. 

De puty Prime Minister Walter Vel- 
troni opens the congress Thursday in a 
Rome suburb, and fee first session will 

U.S. Lawmakers Urge 
Bonn to Honor Vogel, 
Who Set Up Spy Swaps 

The Associated Pros 

BONN — Two U.S. congressmen 
appealed to Germany on Wednesday to 
recogni 2 epabhcly the achievements of 
a former East German lawyer who cov- 
ertly brokered spectacular East-West 
spy and dissident exchanges dining the 

"The re’s been a lack of recognition” 
by die German government of 
Wolfgang Vogel, complained Repre- 
sentative Benjamin Gilman, Republican 
of New York and chairman of fee House 
Committee on International Relations. 

He was joined by Representative 
Tom Lantos, Democrat of California. 

As a negotiator for fee East German 
Communists, Mr. Vogel was secretly 
involved in Moscow’s release in 1962 
of the U-2 spy pilot Rands Gary 
Powers, whose plane had been shot 
down over fee Soviet Union, for the 
Soviet spy Rudolf AbeL Mr. Vogel also 
had a role in swapping fee Soviet dis- 
sident Natan Sharansky for several East 
Bloc spies in 1986. . :« . \ : 


be given over to debate of tire left and its 
role in government. 

H»e patty won just over 21peicent of 
the vote in last April’s general election, 
propelling tire left into power after de- 
cades in which “Reds” woe deemed 
too risky to join the establishment. 

The patty’s power is pivotal to Rime 
Minister Romano Prom’s government 
— when Mr. D'Alema paid a visit to 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl the day before' 

an Traliaiu f Vnnim grmrmit inuring re- 
cently, many were convinced it proved 
feat he, not Mr. Prodi, was in charge. 

But tire party, despite its changes, has 
yet to win over centrist Italian voters. 

Mr. D’Alema’s strategy is to portray 
his party as tire trustworthy, “senccs” 
option in Italian politics. The aloof- 
looking 47-year-old, who has led the 
party since 1994, heads an im portant 
parliamentary commission working to 
re v a m p Italy’s constitution and make 
government mate stable. 

At tire congress, however, one of the 
hottest debates will revolve around bow 
to shake up the welfare state and pen- 
sion system. The expected 1,130 del- 
egates will debate a plan to reform so- 
cial spending, rare of tire thorniest 
political topics npw. 



Parliament Censures EC 
For ‘Mad Cow 9 Bungling 


CRASH IN FRANKFURT — A worker assessing the damage after two 
trains collided and burned Wednesday near the city’s South station. 


BRIEFLY 


CofBut bj 0»r Saffian Oapadta 

STRASBOURG — The European 
Parliament censured tire European 
Commission and Britain on Wednes- 
day, accusing them of serious etnas in 
the handling of the ‘■‘mad cow” crisis. 

But it stopped short of imposing any 
punishment or penally on either party. 

The Parliament adopted a scathing 

^t a CCTy^g^ tnmi)!q ' n " a nH Rntam 
of giving the beef market priority over 
pablic health, failing to enforce erad- 
ication measures and minimizing tire 
risks of the disease, bovine spongiform 
encephalopathy. 

The Parliament voted by 422 to 49 
wife 48 abstentions in favor of a joint 
resolution on tire report, introduced by 
tire Parliament’s three main political 
groups — tire Socialists. Christian 
Democrats and Liberals. 

Tbe resolution gave tire commission a 
November deadline to imp rove its man- 
agement of health policy across tbe 15- 
nation bloc, or face apariiamentary vote 
of no-confidence. Such a measure could 
lead to tire eventual dismissal of tire 
entire 20-member EU executive body. 

Wednesday's resolution also criticized 
Britain's role in pitying down tire crisis. 
Britain's agriculture minister, Douglas 


Hogg, was singled out for refusing to 
app e ar before the parliamentary inquiry 
committee dial drafted tire report. 

Bnt the Parliament rejected Sfl but one of 
12amctKh™mTstothcn^ntio^ 
a demand that the enmmkgjfwi take leg al 
action against lire British government. 

On Tuesday, European Commission 
President Jacques Santer tried to per- 
suade tire Parliament that the reforms 
the commission planned to take would 
be sufficient These included a shake-up 
of tire commission's food-safety ser- 
vices that would put the consumer-af- 
fairs Chief. Etnma Bn ninn in overall 
control. (Reuters. AP) 

■ Gelatin Exports Said to Go On 

A leading researcher into 
Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease said Wednes- 
day feat Britain was exporting 600.000 
metric tons of gelatin a month despite a 
European Union ban. Reuteis reported 
from Strasbourg. 

A professor, Richard Lacey, said that 
Britain’s junior farm minister Angela 
Browning, had told tire British Parlia- 
ment in November that gelatin exports 
were continuing and that neither gov- 
ernment nor industry knew whether the 
raw materials used came from cows or 
from other animals. 


Strike in Spain Brakes 
Automakers in Europe 

MADRID — A strike by thousands of 
Spanish truck drivers was crippling produc- 
tion at some European automakers Wednes- 
day as fee stoppage entered- its 14th day. 
Scattered violence was reported. 

Opel, a General Motors subsidiary, told 
most of its 20,000 employees in Germany to 
stay home became car ports bad faded to 
arrive from Spain. Tbe company said all its. 
plants could be forced to halt production by 
the end of the week. Volkswagen in Wolfs- 
burg, Germany, said about 3,500 winkers also 
were told to stay home from work because of 
alack of pacts, which has halted production of 
VW’s Polo car. 

Renault’s plant at Palznela, south of Lisbon, 
was forced to stop production of tire Clio, a 
popular model of tire French automaker. Opel 
and Fend said they would halt production at 
their Portuguese plants Wednesday. 

One engine-parts manufacturer, Fundimo- 
tor, began sidestepping the strikers by flying 
its products by helicopter from its plant in 
Santanderto the naitbemcity’s airport. There, 


tiiey were loaded ratio planes and flown to car- 
manufacturing factories in England, France 
and Italy. (AP) 

Parliament Clears Ciller 

ANKARA — The T urkish Parliament 
cleared Foreign Minister Tansu COler on 
Wednesday of charges of corruption over her 
personal assets, said fee deputy speaker, 
Kamer Grate. 

A day earlier. Parliament cleared Mrs. 
CSDer of corruption charges over the dealings 
of a state-run company and privatization dur- 
ing her time as prune minister. In that vote, 
deputies from her conservative True Path 
Party and her coalition partners, the pro-Is- 
lamic Welfare Party of Prime Minister Nec- 
mettin Erbakan, supp o rte d her. Most of the 
opposition backed calls for her to face tri- 
aL (AFP) 

An 'American ’ Solution 

PARIS — French parliamentarians put for- 
ward an “American” solution Wednesday to 
proposed immigra tion laws, removing a dis- 
puted requirement that citizens declare for- 


eign guests to fee authorities. The new amend- 
ment is intended to appease a mountingpublic 
call to boycott laws requiring people to inform 
their local mayor of the departure of foreign 
visitors. 

A conservative lawmaker, Pierre Mazeaud, 
proposed removing any legal responsibility 
from French citizens. Instead, foreign visitors 
would have to notify authorities themselves of 
their arrival and departure, as in tire United 
States. (AP) 

Albanians Seek Greek Visa 

TIRANA. Albania — Hundreds of destitute 
Albanians lined up outride the Greek Em- 
bassy on Wednesday, seeking visas to work in 
the neighboring Balkan country after losing 
their lire savings in fraudulent pyramid in- 
vestment schemes at home. 

Most of the would-be immigrants told the 
same stray: They had sunk cash from years of 
menial illegal work into the get-rich-quick 
schemes and lost everything. 

Most of those lining up to leave Albania 
came from the region around Vlare, a southern 
port feat was rocked by riots over tbe foiled 
Gjallica fund last week. Three people died 
during clashes wife riot police. (Reuters) 



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Albright in Moscow: Her Background Unnerves Russians 


By Aiessandra Stanley 

Hew York Tima Service 


MOSCOW — In the first interview on 
’ Russian television with the new Amer- 
ican secretary of state, Russia’s most 

‘ respected television journalist, Yevgeni 
Z Kiselyov, leaned forward and asked the 
‘ question most pressing to Russian view- 
ers. 

“Miss Albright,” he said intently, 
“Please tell me how the circumstances 
of your life, your immigrant past, the fact 
dun you had to leave your native 
Czechoslovakia because the Commu- 
nists had taken power with Moscow's 
’ support, how has all this influenced your 
J attitude to Russia?” 

*1 Madeleine Albright, who was filmed in 
her Washington office on the eve of her 


worldwide tour, replied father tartly that 
her views of communism were not very 
different from those of most Russians. 

“They also suffered,” she said 

As the secretary of stale prepared for 
her first official visit to Moscow on 
Thursday to discuss, among other 
things, die thorny issue of NATO ex- 
pansion, Russians are bracing them- 
selves for lots of tea and no sympathy. 

Russian foreign policy expats fret 
dial her Eastern European background 
has shaped her ideology and hardened 
her views about excluding Russia from 
an enlarged form of NATO. 

Some Russian officials complain 
privately that she is tough, but “emo- 
tional.” 

Mainstream democratic newspapers 
like Izvestia and Segodnya describe her 


as a hawk who will inevitably worsen 
U.S.- Russia relations. One of the more 


ably w 
of the 

nationalist newspapers, Sovetskaya 
Rossiya, a pro-Commonist daily, de- 
scribed Mis. Albright’s recent discovery 
that hex parents were Jewish as a “per- 
sonal embarrassment” that could also 
seriously affect U.S. foreign policy in 
the Middle East. 

“She doesn’t have her own grand 
vision,” said a government official, who 
spoke on the condition of anonymity. 
“But she will follow tbe positions pre- 
scribed to her in a bullish manner. He 
added dial Russians were looking for 
compromise oo NATO expansion, and 
feared that Mrs. Albright lacked the de- 
sired flexibility. 

“Lets face it. there has to be a psy- 
chological factor in the fact that she was 


an Eastern European immigrant Sub- 
consciously, she is going to want to be 
much tougher than a native-born Amer- 
ican would be.” 

Mrs. Albright, who is expected to 
meet with President Boris Yeltsin and 
Foreign Mini star Yevgeni Primakov, is 
well aware of Russian fears that she is 
biased against them. She has taken pains 
to smooth the path, telling Russian in- 
terviewers how much she admires the 


Russian langua ge and culture. Hoping to 
soften Moscow*® opposition to NATO 


expansion before the summit meeting 
next month, she proposed Tuesday in 
Brussels that tbe U.S. and Russia form a 
joint military bri gade for pe ac ek e eping 
operations in Europe. 

The Russian government has not of- 
ficially reacted to the proposal, but of- 


ficials inside the Foreign Ministry say 
privately that while such a task force 
might be acceptable, it is unlikely to 
change Moscow’s insistence that Russia 
be given die power to veto actions by an 
expanded NATO. 

■ Albright Stresses NATO Growth 

Mrs. Albright and British leados re- 
asserted Wednesday the case for NATO 

enlargement and a new military ami se- 
curity relationship between N ATO and 
Russia, Agence Rance-Presse reported 
from London. 

In evening sessions with Prime Min- 
ister John Major, and then Foreign Sec- 
retary Malcolm Rifldnd, Mrs. Albright 


SXASI: 

Trial of 4 Opens 

Continued from Page 1 


damage on West or East Germany. On 

the contrary, jailing them would have led 
to more attacks. We closed the vicious 
circle,” he said. 

Defense lawyers have not disputed 
die charges that their clients assisted the 
terrorists for nearly a decade, from the 


time they sought sanctuary in the early 
1980s until their arrest by West German 
investigators in 1990. But they have 


ICUUJ WUUVtlMU AI M " ^ 

preached tbe inevitability of NATO ex- 
pansion into the former sow 

i L- r 1 


pansion into me uriuct uJviet bloc, said 
her chief spokesman, Nicholas Bums. 


urged leniency in arguing that the se- 
curity officers managed to defuse the 
campaign of violence by taking tbe ter- 
rorists out of circulation and feeping a 
close vigil on their activities. 

Of the 1 0 Red Army Faction members 
packed down in the East, eight have 
been convicted and se n t enc ed to serve 
up to 13 years is jail for their roles in 


DENG; Leader Who Transformed China After Mao Era Dies 


Continued from Page 1 


held the balance between radical and 
r moderate reformers. He tilted the bal- 
, ance in late January 1992 when he 
emerged in South China from months in 
' seclusion and urged die party leadership 
„ to “speed up the pace” of economic 
change and boldly absorb the most ad- 
vanced elements of capitalism. 

But Mr. Deng was a hard-liner in 
politics. A diminutive, blunt man of ac- 
' cion and a survivor of war and two peri- 
ods of disgrace under Mao, Mr. Deng 
; ’ strongly defended the Chinese Commu- 
f ‘ nist Party’s monopoly on power. He led 
several crackdowns on dissidents over 
the years, arguing that Western-style 
; democracy would lead to chaos. 

In contrast with the isolationism of his 
predecessor. Mao. however. Mr. Deng 


championed an “open door" policy to- 
of the We 


ward the capitalist nations of the West. 
- welcoming foreign trade and investment 
Z to energize the Chinese economy. While 
cautioning against the “worship” of 
. capitalism. Mr. Deng argued that China 
I could achieve its goal of modernization 
' on ly by adopting new technologies from 
, . the WesL 

Mr. Deng opened diplomatic relations 
1 with the United States, concluded a 
: peace treaty with Japan, and oversaw an 
agreement with Britain for Hong Kong’s 
return to Chinese control in 1997. 

Mr. Deng's greatest success was in 
China’s countryside, where 7 of 10 
, Chinese live. In the late 1970s, Mr. Deng 
- ; and his reformist allies loosened central 
controls, broke up farm communes, al- 
‘ lowed a renewal of family farming, and 
. gave farmere a chance to sell their pro- 
. duce on free markets. Agricultural out- 
! put tripled as a result. 

1 . But Mr. Deng’s moves encountered^ 
heavy resistance in the. cities, where. 
’ Communist Party bureaucrats and some 
. ( factory workers held guaranteed lifetime 
. ‘ jobs. They resented moves to eliminate 
unprofitable factories and fire their 
bloated work forces. 

A major failure was Mr. Deng's in- 
ability to achieve a price reform. Id 
1988! Mr. Deng impulsively proposed 
.. such a reform, prompting panic buying 
and accelerated inflation, and was forced 
, . to drop the proposal. 

But officials with access to raw ma- 
terials could easily manipulate die half- 
. reformed pricing system for profit The 
, resulting corruption, together with the 
inflation, was a source of dissatisfaction 
' and unrest and one of the causes of the 
1989 protests at Tiananmen Square. 

Deng Xiaoping, bom Aug. 22, 1904, 
was the eldest son of a landlord who 
owned about 25 acres of land, a huge 
piece of land compared with the average 
plot Chinese peasants farm today. When 
foreign journalists were given permis- 
sion in 1985 to visit Mr. Deng's old 
home in Sichuan Province, they found a 
large 16-room farmhouse with stucco 
walls sitting among rice paddies and tall 
bamboo. 

In 1920. at age 16, Mr. Deng traveled 
to France for a work-study program. 
During a five-year stay in France, he 
worked in shoe and automobile factories 
and joined a branch of the Chinese Com- 
munist Youth League organized by 
Zhou Enlai. Mr. Deng’s mentor and the 
future prime minister of China. Mr. 
Deng helped to edit a Communist youth 
magazine and because of the many mi- 
meographed tracts he produced he be- 
came known as the “doctor of duplic- 
ation.” 

Back in China in J926 after a brief 
period of study in Moscow, Mr. Deng 
taught in a military academy, worked in 
the Communist Party underground in 
Shanghai, and later helped to organize 
i he Communist strategy of using rural 
guerrillas in a protracted struggle rather 
than urban forces to fight the Nationalist 
Chinese. 

Opponents in the Communist lead- 
ership at first overruled Mao on the 
strategy, accusing him and Mr. Deng of 
defeatism. But Nationalist attacks forced 
the Communists to halt their internal 


After China’s disastrous Great Leap 
Forward, an ill -planned attempt to ac- 
celerate industrialization that resulted in 
one of history's worst famines and die 
deaths of 20 million Chinese, Mr. Deng 
and Mao’s designated successor, Liu 
Shaoqi, attempted to restore the econ- 
omy through pragmatic policies that 
foreshadowed the economic reforms ini- 
tiated by Mr. Deng more than a decade 
later. But Mao believed that Mr. Deng 
and Mr. Liu were imdennining his plans 
for collectivization of agriculture. 

In 1966. as he launched die “Great 
Cultural Revolution,” an upheaval 
which pitted radical Red Guards against 
the party hierarchy, Mao ousted Mr. 
Deng ana Mr. Liu from power, and Mr. 
Deng was forced to confess that be had 
adapted tbe “capitalist reactionary 
line.” 

Mao complained that for several years 
Mr. Deng never consulted him and de- 
liberately sat far from Mao at meetings 
with his deaf right ear turned toward the 


Albright Urges 
Smooth Transiti 


Reuters 

LONDON — Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright said here Wednesday 
that it would be agreat advantage to China 
and to the rest of tbe world jf there were a 
smooth transition of power in Beijing 
following the death of Deng Xiaoping. 

Speaking after talks with the British 
foreign minister, Malcolm Rifkind, Mrs. 
Albright called Mr. Deng “a historic 
figure.” Mr. Rifkind said he assumed 
tberc would be a -short period of un- 
certainty' in 'China until a new leader 
emerged but that be hoped tbe reform 
process would then soon regain speed. 

Mrs. Albrigfrt said officials were con- 
sulting with Beijing to determine wheth- 
er it was still convenient for her to visit 
China next week, as scheduled. 

In Boston. President Bill Clinton said 
be was saddened to learn of Mr. Deng’s 
death, calling the Chinese leader an “ex- 
traordinary figure on the world stage 
over the past two decades.” 

U.S. officials added that the death 
would probably have little effect on the 
functioning of China. 


chairman. Indeed, their long association 
seemed to carry with it some bitterness. 
In later years, while praising Mao for his 
role in founding the People’s Republic 
of China, Mr. Deng criticized Mao as 
having a leadership style he considered 
feudal, patriarchal, and out of touch with 
reality. 

For his part, Mao seemed at times to 
admire Mr. Deng and at times to mistrust 
him. In the 1960s, as if in warning, Mao 
drew Mr. Khrushchev’s attention to Mr. 
Deng: “See that tittle man over tfaere7” 
said Mao. “He is highly intelligent.” 

In 1966, Mr. Deng was purged from 
power for seven years. From 1969 to 
1 973, he lived through some of his worst 
moments. Chough be was spared the 
severe punishment handed to Mr. Liu, 
who died a sick and broken man in 1969 
after be was refused medical aid. Mr. 


Deng was fenced for more than two years 
to live in exile from Beijing in tie south 
of China in an abandoned two-story 
bouse under armed guard. He and his 
wife spent their mornings in a tractor 
factory, where Mr. Deng worked as a 
machine parts fitter. 

In February 1973, Mr. Deng was 
called back to Beijing and reinstated as 
vice prime minister under Zhou Enlai. 
Mr. Zhou died in January 1976, and Mr. 
Deng gave tbe memorial speech. But the 
radical leaders known as the Gang of 
Four tried to suppress a popular out- 
pouring of mourning for Mr. Zhou, re- 
moving wreaths laid in Tiananmen 
Square in his memory , and protests erup- 
ted. Mr. Deng was held responsible for 
tbe protests and. with Mao’s acquies- 
cence, dismissed from office. 

In September 1976, Mao died. Within 
a month, members of the Gang of Four 
were themselves purged and arrested. In 
July 1977. Mr. Deng made his first pub- 
lic appearance since his second fall from 
power and was reinstated once again. He 
isolated Mao’s designated successor, 
Hua Guofeng and, without formally re- 
moving him from office, eased him out 
of power. 

By late 1978, Mr. Deng was able to 
tighten his grip on die party, govern- 
ment, and army. Back in power. Mr. 
Deng returned to die pragmatic ideas 
that had troubled Mao. He never re- 
linquished ids belief in Communist ideo- 
logy but was less dogmatic than Mao. 

“It doesn’t matter whether a cat is 
black or white as long as it catches 
mice,” Mr. Deng once said concerning 
agricultural production. It became one of 
his best-known comments. 

Mr. Deng redefined Marxism to make 
productivity — not the class straggle 
Mao championed — the measure of sue- 1 
cess. He and his reformist colleagues 
abandoned the Stalinist, and Maoi^em- 
phasis on heavy industry and placed 
more stress on decentralization and tbe 
development of agriculture and light in- 
dustry. 

Id order for China to modernize. Mr. 
Deng advocated sending tens of thou- 
sands of Chinese students to study 
abroad, including more than 40,000 who 
are still studying in tbe United States. 

Mr. Deng drew inspiration for his 
economic reforms not only from other 
communist states, such as Yugoslavia 
and Hungary, but also from die cap- 
italistic “little dragons’ ’ of Asia, such as 
Taiwan. Singapore and South Korea. 

He opened Special Economic Zones 
along the southern China coast, offering 
foreign investors lower tax rates than 
elsewhere in China and ocher conces- 



p lotting murders and kidn appi ngs. Two 
were freed 


because of the statute of 

limitation on their crimes. 

Several woman who sought shelter in 
die East were considered architects of 
some of die most spectacular attacks. 
Susanne Albrecht was sought for her role 
in the 1977 slaying of Juergen Ponro, 
chairman of Dresdner Bank in Frankfurt 
Silke Maier-WIti and Monika Helbmg 
were wanted in connection with the kid- 


napping and killing in the same year of 

Hanns-Martin 


. Schley er, the head of j 

West Germany’s employers’ federation. V 

West German authorities were per- 
suaded that many fugitive suspects had 
found refuge in Libya or Lebanon. East 
German agents planted photographs 
showing them in such settings. 

Ms. Albrecht was given a false iden- 
tity in 1980 and employed as a lab- 
oratory technician in Grttbus. She mar- 
ried and had a child with an East German 
scientist who never was informed about 
her past. 

Ms. Maier-Witt worked in Erfurt as a 
nurse until 1986, when an East Gennan 
who fled to die West reported her to the 
police. The Stasi quickly destroyed any 
evidence of her presence in Erfurt, even 
♦aicTTtg pains to eliminate fmgaprint < 
traces in her apartment Doctors at one of ^ 
East Gennan s best hospitals per fo rmed a 
a nose operation to change her appear- j 
ance. She was given a new identity and a 
job in the town of Neubrandenburg. 


EUROPE: 

Rifkind Speaks Out 

Continued from Page 1 


Mao conferring with Mr. Deng in 1959 in Shandong Province, before the 
purge of his senior comrade. Mr. Deng later criticized Mao as feudal. 


sions. 

The result of Mr. Deng’s opening to 
(he outside world was widely considered 
a success for China, but tbe country also 
paid a price. Foreign investment was 
heavily concentrated in afew coastal and 
inland provinces. The transfer of new 
technologies to China which was sup- 
posed to come through the Special Eco- 
nomic Zones was limited for die most 
part to unsophisticated technologies. 
New forms of corruption emerged in 
these zones, with millions of dollars lost 
to land speculators and exporters ille- 
gally depositing their earnings over- 
seas. 

Mr. Deng believed in dealing harshly 


with criminals and lannrheri a rampawgn 

in 1983. that, according to Amnesty In- 
ternational, the London-based human 
rights organization, led to tens of thou- 
sands of arrests and several thousand 
executions. 

Mr. Deng supported China’s “one 
couple, one child” birth control pro- 
gram, which succeeded in lowering birth 
rates. But critics said that the program 
involved widespread coercion and 
forced abortions. 

Like some of die emp er ors before 
him, Mr. Deng believed that he could 
import Western skills and technology 
while rejecting Western political ideas. 
He believed that he could reform and 
decentralize tbe Chinese economy while 
maintaining centralized control over the 
political system. 

His crackdown on democracy move- 
ments showed that be did not believe, as 
many young Chinese intellectuals did, 
that economic modernization had to be 
accompanied by political liberalization. 
In his view, the country would be 
plunged into anarchy if it allowed an 
alternative to one-party rule. 

But Mr. Deng’s opening to the West 
brought in new ideas and his reforms 
encouraged more independent thinking 
among students and other intellectuals, 
who inevitably demanded a more liberal, 
and less corrupt political system. 

Although Mr. Deng was concerned 
about the corruption of entrenched Com- 
munist Party bureaucrats, he most feared 


disunity and chaos. * 

Mr. Deng apparently saw in the stu- 
dent protesters of 1989 a revival of tbe 
anarchy of the Cultural Revolution and a 
direct threat to Communist Party rule. It 
was Mr. Deng who decided that the 
Tiananmen student movement consti- 
tuted “turmoil." From that moment on. 
a crackdown was inevitable. 

Mr. Deng, in his reaction to this chal- 
lenge, proved that he was more like Mao 
than many of his admirers in the West 
had come to believe he was. Mr. Deng 
was a man of many feces but his hard line 
toward popular political challenges re- 
mained consistent throughout his ca- 
reer. 

Unlike Mao, Mr. Deng never allowed 
a cult of personality to develop around 
him. But he never attempted a complete 
dismantling of Mao’s image, possibly 
because this would have led to a ques- 
tioning of tbe Communist Party's lead- 
ership as a whole. 

By foe time of his death, Mr. Deng 
was one of a number of Communist 
Party elders who shared power in a kind 
of gerontocracy, overseeing the work of 
younger leaders. 

He no longer held a seat in foe Party 
Politburo but long exerted influence 
through his prestige and personal con- 
nections, including close ties with many 
of China’s military leaders. 


issue ahead of general elections. 

Britain's finance minister, Kenneth 
Clarke, said Mr. Rifkind had made “a 
slip of the tongue.” But Mir. Rifldnd, just 
hofos fel£^; : stood by hii comment, de- 
lighting- saddled ’ in' the 

ruling party. • • " 

“Qa balance we are hostile to a single 
currency, but we accept you have to 
think very carefully about these matters 
before you rule them out completely,” 
said Mr. Rifkind, who has become stead- i 
ily more Euroskeptic in recent months. 1 
He later passed up an opportunity to 
calm the controversy by saying he did 
not regret using foe word “hostile.” 

“I don’t regret it because, in the con- 
text in which I was using it, it made sense 
and it was consistent with what the gov- 
ernment’s policy is,” be said 
hi arguing against further European 
political integration, Mr. Rifkind also 
called on EU leaders to come out and say 
more specifically what kind of Europe 
they wanted. 

He said that while Britain believed 
clearly in a Europe of nation states, not a 
federal superstate, there was much am- 
biguity among other European leaders 
regarding their visions for the Europe of 
foe future. 

Mr. Rifldnd acknowledged that Euro- ^ 


Galileo to Get a Close Look for Life, if Any, on a Jupiter Moon 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Scientists who 
believe there may be life on Jupiter’s 
moon Europa will get their closest look 
yet at its icy surface when the un- 
manned Galileo 
nearby Thursday. 

Europa, with an ocean that could be 
60 miles (.100 kilometers) deep, ap- 
pears to have a fractured crust of icy 
slabs that may be sliding on a warmer 


layer of slush or water. If true, that 
would give Europa two ingredients es- 
sential for life: water and a source of 
internal heaL 

The spacecraft will come within 360 
miles of Europa on Thursday morning, 
said William O’Neil, the Galileo pro- 
ject manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion 
Laboratory in Pasadena. 

“Everything is working just right," 
Mr. O'Neil sard, noting that a glitch- 


prone onboard tape recorder was op- 
erating properly. During a Dec. 19 en- 
counter with Europa, the tape recorder 
that stores data from Galileo’s scientif- 
ic instruments blacked out about 35 
hours before it was to have begun re- 
cording. Aggressive work from foe 
ground brought it bade a little more 
than an hour before it was needed. 

During this pass by Jupiter, Galileo 
will also record information on two 


small moons, Amahhea, which is about 
100 miles across, and Thebe, which is 
about 25 miles across. 

The spacecraft will also monitor the 
plumes of gas from tbe volcanic moon 
lo, examine Jupiter's rings mid observe a 
white oval storm just above its surface. 

Tbe playback of tbe recorded images 
wfll begin Saturday. The first images 
will emerge from the computer on 
Monday. 


battles and organize the famous Long 
March to the" northwest of China in 
1934-35. The march across China con- 
firmed Mao’s leadership and raised Mr. 
Deng to a position as a high-level polit- 
ical commissar in the Red Army. During 
that period. Mr. Deng became a close 
confidant of Mao. 

Mr. Deng’s troops fought the Jap- 
anese from 1937 to 1945 and the Na- 
tionalists from 1945 until 1949 in one of 
history's deadliest civil wars. In 1948- 
49. \ir. Deng helped to organize a mil- 
itary campaign which contributed heav- 
ily to the Communists’ victory over the 
Nationalists. 

In 1952. Mr. Deng was appointed a 
vice prime minister and by 1956, he was 
one of the Communist Party’s top lead- 
ers. Mr. Deng traveled to Moscow in that 
year and heard Nikita Khrushchev’s fa- 
mous denunciation of Stalin but dis- 
approved of Khrushchev’s de-Staliniz- 
ation campaign. In 1 959, he emerged as 
a forceful critic of the Soviet Union and 
in 1960 led the Chinese attack on Mr. 
Khrushchev at a meeting in Moscow of 
the world communist parties. 


dgedd 

pean leaders such as Mr. Kohl had said 
they did not foresee a federal Europe, bat 
he asked whai die difference was be- 
tween that concept and “foe land of 
ever-closer union they are simultaneous- 
ly advocating.” 

“How far down the road of inte- 
gration do leaders in Germany and else- 
where think Europe should go?” be 
asked. “The problem with what is pro- 
posed is that, in almost every case, it 
means taking power away from insti- 
tutions which are more legi timate , and 
giving it to institutions which are less 
le&timate.” 

Mr- Rifkind warned rtiar a system of 
decisions by majority vote would im- 
pose policies on governments par- 
liaments for which they hart no popular 
mandate . “Every time a majority vote is 
taken, a democratically elected govern- 
ment is somewhere overruled,” be 
sain 

Mr. Rifldnd said debate in the current 
intergovernmental conference on the fu- 
ture of the European Union should focus x 
on the next 20 or 30 years, not just the W 
next few weeks. (Reuters. AP J 


MEXICO: Nation 9 s Drug Agency Chief Is Fired and Arrested TLarry Flynt 9 Posters Stir Auger in France 


Continued from Page 1 


General Gutierrez was handpicked by Mr. Zedillo to 
be narcotics coordinator, according to a presidential 
aide. Mr. Zedillo was impressed with the general’s work 
in dismantling foe operations of a notorious narcotics 
trafficker based in foe Guadalajara region. Hector Litis 
Palma. 

But Mr. Cervantes, tbe defense minister, asserted that 
General Gutierrez had vigorously pursued some drug 
cartels at tbe same time as he “consciously and de- 
liberately served the interests” of the cartel run by Mr. 
Carrillo Fuentes. 


Military investigators were tipped off to General Gu- 
tierrez’s links to the Carrillo Puentes 


after a shoot-out nearby between the police and members 
of the Carrillo Fuentes organization. 

Tbe officials said an arrest warrant is also being issued 
for Horario Montenegro Ortiz, a former intelligence 
captain who was expelled from die army for suspected 
times to drug traffickers but was hired anyway by General 
Gutierrez to be his deputy in the drag institute. 

Another ride to General Gutierrez, Javier Garcia 
Hernandez, also feces arrest, Mr. Madrazo said. 

hi a statement, Mr. Zedillo said Tuesday's actions 
“confirm our unshakable determination to pursue and 
punish drug trafficking and combat corruption,” 
General Gutierrez is tbe third of Mexico’s recent 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 


tierrez’s links to the Carrillo Fuentes gang after he was 
appointed drug coordinator and moved into a “sump- 
tuous” apartment in Mexico City foal appeared to be 
beyond his means as a military officer and civil servant. 

The investigators discovered that the apartment was 
provided to tbe general by a trafficker namwl Eduar do 
Gonzalez Quirate, who was described by tbe defense 
minister as the “lieutenant” of Mr. Carrillo Fuentes. 

Mr. Gonzalez was said to have lived in the apartment 
until November 1993 when be was forced to abandon it 


national drug coordinators to have been tied to payments 
iffickers. 


from traffic! 

Javier CoeDo Trejo, a deputy attorney general who 
saved in 1989 and 1990 as President Carlos Salinas de 


Gortari’s first drag czar, was said in sworn testimony in a 
1994 federal narcotics trial in Texas to have received huge 


from a trafficker, Juan Garcia Abrego. And 
> Ruiz Massieu. who coordinated the country’s drug 
program in 1993 and 1994, has been accused by federal 
prosecutors in Texas of accepting narcotics money after 
his ride ferried $9 million cash to Houston in suitcases. 


PARIS — A movie poster showing a man 
nearly nude in a position suggesting cru- 
cifixion superimposed on foe body of a wo- 
man was banned Wednesday in Versailles and 
was under legal attack in the rest of the France 

by outraged Catholics. 

But the Roman Catholic bishops said they 
would not get involved in the dispute because, 
in foe words of a spokesman, 1 ‘there are better 
things to do.” 

Bishop Louis-Marie Bille said that if the 
church protested the poster advertising the 
movie *' The People vs. Lany Flynr.* ’ it would 
weaken izs credibility on more serious issues. 

Catholic sources said foe bishops may have 
been deterred from getting involved m fids 
issue because some of these bringing com- 
plaints against tbe poster were believed to be 
associated with a far-right group, and the 
church would not wish to be officially as- 
sociated with them at a time when the ex- 


tremist National Front has just scored an 
important election victory. 

Previous cases of alleged insults against 
religion have touched off serious clashes in 
mncemvolving rightist youths, who in 1988 
stacked or fireborobed movie theaters show- 

mg m Laa Temptation of Christ” and a 
rtmch fflm about abortion. Hie church com- 
pfem«i a few years ago when posters ap- 
P«rea during Lent advertising a movie about 

a homosexual priest 

^Columbia Pictures, die distributor, said the 

F^ n W £L choscn b > ** director, Mflos 
Fmm^because it symbolized the fete of foe 

22555^ who was “ctu- 

cified for his ideas/ Although foe poster was 

J2S2 m ^ted States! Coltn&huaid it 

52S2 M& oa cu^ lay il ” Fra “* 4 

lawyer rcmp.v^nttn<t 


T l um r J w '-uiuire. 


™jont to Christians during Lent. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


PAGE 7 


INTERNATIONAL 


Zaire, in Arming the Hutu, Is Making Human Shields of the Refugees 


By Howard W. French 

New York Tones Service 


ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast— H* Zairi- 
an . government has stepped op a cam- 
paign to aim Hutu guerrillas living 
population rf 
Rwandan refugees stffl m Zaire, effec- 
uvely nuking human shields of tens of 
thousands of refugees, according to dip- 
tomate and mteroatioual relief workere. 

DJJ^nats and aid weakens say that, in 
recent days, so many weapons have been 
Sown mto the Tingi-Tingi That they 
tore mtaamtad relief shipments. The 
^?*Pj 200 kflometers southwest of 
Zaire s mod-largest city, Kisangani, is a 
jungle village that has swelled to 150,000 
Deo P_ e ®s Rwandan Hum fleeing the 
dog in the east flocked there. 


The arming of Hum refugees also 
threatens to set off another wave of 
ethnic kffimgs as Zaire’s embattled gov- 
ernment Ham to right an ad- 

vancing rebel army led mostly by Tutsi. 
And it poses uncomfortable questions 
for aid workers who must decide wheth- 
er they can safely stay in the camp to help 
refugees, many of whom axe implicated 
in previous massacres of Tutsi. 

According to an h-itra-ral UN report on 
the situation at Trn g i-Tmgi, '“arms, uni- 


daily in the camp itself.” The report 
went on to describe a “well-defined area 
at the eastern edge of The landing strip'’ 
that is being used as an armory by the 
Zairian Array and its Hutu allies. 

On Friday, the UN secretary-general, 
Kofi Annan of Ghana, called upon die 


Zaire .10 end die militarization of the 
Tmgi-Tingi camp, which be said “is 
endangering the lives of innocent 
refugees and humanitarian workers.” 
Zairian officials denied the reports 
and bitterly attacked the United Nations 
for faffing to repatriate 'Rwandan Hum 
populations earlier. However, military 
authorities in Kisangani told the UN 
High Commissioner for Refugees that 
“efforts would be made to scop military 
activiiyin the camp.” 

The rebels are less than 65 kilometers 
from die Tmgi-Tmgi camp, and have 
threatened to attack the settlement in 
coming days unless the Zairian gov- 
ernment or the international community 
disarms Hum fighters there. 

Zaire’s vrar began in late October as a 
rebeffim by edmic Tata, who had been 


stripped of their Zairian citizenship by the 
government in Kinshasa despite haring 
d in Zaire for several generations. 


U: 


Diplomats say that Rwanda, and later 

and Burundi, supported the 


whose first mission appeared 10 
be forcing armed Hum refugees away 
from the Zairian border region, from 
Where they bad attacked Rwanda. 

Journalists who visited die Tmgi- 
Tingi camp last week were able to ob- 
serve die unloading of what appeared to 
be crates of ammunition and mortar 
rounds from an old, chartered transport 
plane by Hutn refugees. Relief workers 
also told of a forbidden area at the edge 
of the camp that is said to be a Hutu 

t raining ground. 

The relief planes, 50-year-old South 
African-owned DC-3s that land on a 


narrow highway that runs through me 
settlement, are chartered by the Zairian 
Army and humanitarian groups alike. In 
recent days, as the ar mament effort has 
accelerated, aid workers have com- 
plained mat their flights to the camp 
have been repeatedly delayed. 

To prevent the flights from landing at 
moments of intense military activity, 
diplomats say that reiKria members and 
Zairian soldiers guarding the camp have 
parked vehicles an the landing strip, 
moving them only when they have fin- 
ished their work. 

On Monday, aid workers reported that 
relief flights were blocked altogether 
when the Zairian government moved 
portable aviation refueling equipment 
from Kisangani to the eastern cuy of 
Kindu, where it was used by Zairian jets 


flying bombing runs over the rebel-con- 
trolled bonier city of Bukavu. 

Relief officials say Thai 30 to 50 
have been dying each day in 
ji-Tingi, which in recent weeks has 
only been receiving about one-third of 
the 100 tons of food a day needed to feed 
the population there. That shortfall 
stems partly from the arms shipment s , 
but ala) from a debate among inter- 
national relief agencies over how many 
Hutu refugees were in the forests of east- 
central Zaire. 

For many here, the situation at the 
Tingi-Tmgi camp recalls the scenes at 
of the fig 


the start 


igbting in Zaire, when 
rebels shelled a huge UN -run refugee 


camp in the eastern city of Goxna, where 
Hum fighters lived alongside a large 
don of Rwandan Hutu refugees. 


BOOKS 


GRAND TOURS AND 
COOK’S TOURS; 

A History of Leisure 
Travel, 1750 to 1915 

By Lynne Withey. 401 pages. 
$30. Morrow. 


Reviewed by Alan Ryan 

A rthur frommer 

changed my life. In 
1966, against all advice and 
armed only with a copy of his 
“Europe on $5 a Day” and a 
little cash, I set off on my own 
three-month grand tour. I’m 
certain now that my first 
breath of jet-fnel-scented 
Heathrow air was no more 
intoxicating to me than the 
smells of Calais or Ostende 
were to travelers in the last 
century. But it was Thomas 
Cook who change d their 
lives, delivering them to the 
Continent thoroughly booked 
and bevouchered. 

Code, like Frommer in our 
time, changed human history. 
Until the middle of die 19th 
century, when be recognized 
and expanded the possibilit- 
ies of a business he had ac- 
tually started as a sideline, 
travel had been the exclusive 
pleasure of the rich. 

The history of that change 
— from fee lengthy and ex- 
pensive grand tour made by 
scions of the British upper 
classes to the shorter and 
cheaper group trips arranged 
by Code and others — is the 
subject of Lynne Withey's in- 
formative and highly readable 
“Grand Toms and . ^qok’s 
Tours: . A History of Leisure , 
Tiavei^7^a 19IS.” Setting, 
sensible I w ts bn a hnge and 
amorphous mass of infonna- 
uon, Withey omits explorers 
and business travelers from 
her tale, and she deals wisely 
and briefly with the tiresome 
distinction some writers still 
want to make between “trav- 
eler” and “tourist” 

The 18th-century grand 
tour was mainly educational 
(not excluding sex education 
— one stop, Venice, was con- 
sidered ‘the brothel of 
Europe”), and “the appear- 
ance of a gentleman” was re- 
quired for admission to Ver- 
sailles — if you lacked the 
necessary sword, however, 
one could be rented on the 

r Withey makes good use 
travel narratives by 
Boswell, Smollett, Goethe. 
William Beckford, Arthur 
Young and many others to il- 
lustrate. the delights, the 
dangers, and, all too often, the 
disappointments of foreign 
travel. Changing tastes in art 
and literature were both cause 
and effect of changing atti- 
tudes. Withey demonstrates 
how an early view of moun- 


tains as ominous and unat- 
tractive gave way to a search 
for picturesque landscapes 
and “c omp laints about over- 
crowding and desecration of 
pristine scenery.” Tourists, it 
seems, have always and every- 
where resented other tourists. 

Withey’s range of relevant 
subjects is immense, and she 
deals gracefully with such 
topics as tile En glishman 
abroad, the innxrrtance of 
roads built by Napoleon, tire 
growing prosperity of tire 

social distinctions in travel, 
tire earliest guidebooks by 
John Murray and - - Karl 
Baedeker, the new habit of 
riming in public restaurants, 
tire growing view of travel as 
“escape,” tire increasing 


popularity of travel among 


women, the expansion of: 
roads, and the ways in which 
easier and more comfortable 
travel robbed tire experience 
of its “foreiguness.’ 

A parade of colorful char- 
acters moves through tire sto- 
ry: Thomas Cook. WJL 
Smith, George Pullman, Cesar 
Rite, Auguste Escoffier, and 
many others. And there are the 
sights themselves, of course, 
as well as hotels, from tireFera 
Palace in Constantinople and 
Shepheard’s in Cairo to tire 

flaftslrill Mn rmtwin House. 

Less successful are a sec- - 
tkmoa Switzerland (of interest 
mainly to readers of a moun- 
tain-climbing inclination) and 
a wearyingly long closing 
charter on the development of 
die American^ West There are 
someoddomissioas, too, such 
-asFrancis Gabon's 1855 “The-. * 
ArtctfTravd,” which, for four 
decades, gave advice 00 
everything from the correct 
way to roll 19 shirt sleeves to 
the ‘‘management of sav- 
ages.” And a history of for- • 
■ta g n navel in Mexico, totally 

ignored here, would have been 

livelier and more relevant than 
tire lengthy and familiar suxy 
of UJ5. railroads. - 
Still, tire broad subject of 
travel touches every field of 
human effort and a dizzying 
spectrum of attitudes and as- 
— Overall, ’ Withey 


of raaf- 
• into a 
stray of 
trawled 


shating all tins t 
lively and revc ^ 
why and how | 
in the past and the ways in 
which, just Bke us, drey have 
gawked at, been puzzled by, 
have condemned, and,' occa- 
sionally, have praised the 
places and people they met - 


Alan Ryan, whose latest 
“ Reader’s Companion'' 

volumes, on Cuba and 
Alaska, wll be published in 
April, wrote this for The 
Washington Post. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


i-uAui hand shown in the dia- 
gram would have no trouble 
after his partner bid one spade. 
He would bid three spades, 
promising four-card spado 
support and the values for die 


Bra in tire mo dem style, 
three spades would simply in- 
vite game and the North hand 
is slightly too good. He needs a 
su bstitute for a forci ng raise , 
which may be two no-trump. 

ffraAdscussedtinswitfahis 
partner he is in trouble, and 
may have to temporize by bid- 
ding a minor suit. 

Two clubs was the curious 
choice in a duplicate game in 
Manhattan. It left South in the 
dark, but offered some hope ctf 
inhibiting a dub lead. 

Sooth pushed ou aggress- 


-vious lead of tire diamond king 
would have been no better. _ 

South won the first trick in 
trig hand and immediately fin- 
essed the heart jade success- 
fully. So far, so good- He then 
cashed two heart winners, dis- 
carding a diamond, not a 
dub. 

Next, he played tire dia- 
mond ace aim surrendered a 
diam ond. Hc could not be pre- 
vented from ruffing a diamond 
high in his hand, drawing 
trumps, and throwing his club 
. loser cm dummy’s established 
diamond. 

The, combination of the 
heart finesse and tire even, efia- 
mond spHt gave North-South a 
lucky dam. Unsurprisingly, 

nobody else bid it. 


r Blackwood cn route to 

stam. Since he would have 
been in difficulty if his partner 
had shown one ace, a mmor- 
q ^t ate-bidvtouldhavcb wri.^ 
*- choree on the third 



NORTH 
* A IDS 5.. . 

<7 AK J 
0 9753 . 

4(4 

• EAST 
■ * — 

. 911431 
4 JlfiB 
AJlflSSS 


better 
round. 

As it tamed out, North’s 
two-club bid did tire trick, 
since it would have taken a 
ebb lead to defeat tire slam. 

West's pasrive trump lead was. 
a curious choice, but tire 00 - 


SOOTH (D) 
A X QJ8-4 J 

sm • 

OA52 

*A! 


ding: 

Son* 

1 * 

3* 

4 N.T. 

(4 

WMtMtbe 


West 


North 

14 

'4 4 '.'. 

SO 


BRIEFLY 


Two Hutu Plead Not Guilty 


ARUSHA, Tanzania — Two men accused of playing a 
major role in the slaughter of more than 500,000 civilians 
dnnng Rwanda’s 1994 civil war pleaded not guilty Wed- 
nesday to charges of inciting genocide and crimes against 
humanity. 

Anatole Nsengiyumva. 46, who was commander of 
military operations in the northwestern Gisenyi region 
during tire three-month war, and Ferdinand Nahimana, 
also 46. who was one of the founders of tire notorious 
Radio bfille CoDines, appeared before the International 
Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda here. 

Mr. Nsengiyumva, who was a lieutenant colonel in tire 
Hutu army, was accused of killing a Tutsi with a machete 
and urgjng soldiers anri mifitjamen to kill T utsi. 

Mr. Nahimana was accused of using Radio Mille 
Collines to mate Hutn to kill Tutsi. (AFP) 


Sudan General Said to Switch 


CAIRO — The Sudanese opposition said Wednesday 
that a Sudanese general and some of his men had joined 
the rebel forces m their fight against tire fundamentalist 
Muslim government. 

“We welcome Major General Ali Seddique, com- 
mander of tire second infantry brigade,” tire opposition 
National Democratic Alliance said. 

The opposition group said tire general defected Tues- 
day near tire town of Khashm el Girba. 400 kilometers 
(250 miles) east of Khartoum. It did not say how many 
soldiers defected with him. 

In January, tire alliance began an offensive along 
Sudan's eastern borders in hopes of provoking a popular 
uprising in Khartoum. The fi ghtin g appears to have 
reached a stalemate, with the rebels holding at least two 
towns close to tire Ethiopian border. (Reuters) 


Tupac Rebels Lower Sights 

JUNIN.Ferii — A senior leader of Peru’s Marxist rebel 


group considered it unlikely that the government would 
meet its demand to release all its jaOed members. 

In an interview earlier this week at a secret jungle 
location, . the. Hfoup, -tire Tupac Amaru Revolutionary 
Movement, saw pcbficly far the first tune its takeover of 
tire Japanese ambassador's home. Dec. 17 would probably 
not achieve its objective. 

“I (kinotthinkaD of tire 400-plus are going to get out,’’ 
said a man who identffiedhixnself as Comrade Alejandro, 
a member of the group’s high command. 

He said tire group was prepared to negotiate how many 
comrades should be freed. (Reuters) 


47 Found Dead in Peru Mud 


CUZCO, Peru — Rescue workers dug through mud 
Wednesday looking far at least 150 villagers feared 
buried after an Andean mountainside collapsed in heavy 
rain and swept away two villages. 

Officials said 47 bodies had already been found after 
tire villages of Ccocha and Pumarama in eastern Peru 
were buried early Tuesday. (Reuters) 



Hutu population, which included 
of former members of the 


thousands 
Rwandan Army and Hutu militiac who 
were responsible for tire 1994 massacres 
of hundreds of thousands of Tutsi, fled. 
While most have since returned to 
Rwanda, as many as 300,000 Hutu 
refugees, perhaps still including several 
thousand guearxUas, remain in Zaire. 


As they fled Goma and other parts of 
relief of- 


eastem Zaire, diplomats and 
Baals say that the Zairian Army re- 
ly armed Hutu refugees in the 



that they would stop the westward 
of the 1 


OFF TO LIBERIA — A Ghanaian soldier, one of 300 leaving Accra to 
join peacekeeping forces in Liberia, with two of the 200 American 
servicemen who are providing transportation and logistical support. 


rebels. 

/ '-Tingi, diplomats 
workers say that 
Zaire is arming tbe Hutu, who are using 
other refugees as human shields to pre- 
vent an attack by the advancing rebels. 

“You just know that a lot of the 
people you are helping are people who 
have lolled and will go out and kill 
again,” a relief worker at Tmgi-Tmgi 
said. “At the same time, you look at 
these people, and so many of than are 
just desperate. Don't we have an ob- 
ligation to help them?” 


Mandela Proposes Talks for Zaire Foes 


Reuters 

KINSHASA. Zaire — African for- 
eign ministers visited Zaire on a peace 
mission Wednesday, and President Nel- 
son Mandela of South Africa said he 
would be host to a meeting between the 
waning parties. 

Sooth Africa’s foreign minister, Al- 
fred Nzo, was among four African min- 
isters visiting Kinshasa, but there was no 
immediate Zairian government confirm- 
ation of any meeting. The other three 
foreign ministers were from Tanzania, 
Zimbabwe and Kenya. 

Representatives of the two sides have 
made a request that they would like to 
meet in South Africa, Mr. Mandela said 
in Cape Town, “to be able to discuss 
'their problems.” 

He said South Africa would said air 


cBtfBport to pick up Zaire’s rebel leader, 
Laurent Kabila, at Kigali, the capital of 


Rwanda. He said he hoped the talks 
could take place Thursday. 

Zaire has repeatedly rejected talks 
with Mr. Kabila, dismissing him as a 
puppet of Rwanda, Uganda and Burun- 
di, which it accuses of invading in sup- 
pot of the rebels. All three deny the 
allegation. 

Earlier, Zaire criticized as too “tim- 
id” a UN Security Council resolution 
calling fora truce m the civil war. Zaire 
said the resolution should have con- 
demned aggressors in the conflict. 

Foreign Minister Kamanda wa 
Kamanda also said there could be no 


truce without a withdrawal of all foreign 
troops. 

Tuesday's Security Council call was 
part of a five-point UN peace plan. It 
followed a request from a UN special 
envoy, Mohammed Sahnoun. who left 
Kinshasa for Rwanda on Wednesday. 

Rwanda dismissed the resolution as 
“absurd,” saying it did not take account 
of rebel views. 

Ethnic Tutsi, known as Banyaniu- 
lenge, took up aims in October, accusing 
the Zaire authorities of denying them 
nationality and of seeking to expel than 
to Rwanda, their ancestral home. They 
hold towns and territory along the border 
with Rwanda, Burundi and Uganda. 

Zaire, which launched a counterof- 
fensive on Jan. 20,. opened. a new phase 
of tiie war Monday by. bombing rebel- 
held towns in the east. Relief workers 
said at least 19 people were killed in two 
days of air raids. 

The UN plan envisages an immediate 


cease-fire, withdrawal of all foreign 
forces, including mercenaries and respect 
for the territorial integrity of Zaire. 

Mr. Kamanda said that the resolution 
did not specify how the withdrawal of 
foreign troops would be accomplished 
or monitored. “If the foreign troops do 
not pull out, we consider that there is no 
cessation of hostilities,” he added. 

The plans also called fra protection of 
refugees and displaced persons and a 
peaceful settlement of the crisis through 
dialogue, elections and the convening of 
an international conference on peace, 
security and development. 

The secretary-general of the Orga- 
nization of African Unity, Salim Ahmed 
Salim, himself expected in Kinshasa, 
said during a visit to Cameroon that tbe 
OAU might organize a summit meeting 
on tiie conflict 

“We feel very strongly that every 
effort most be made to contain tbe situ- 
ation and find a solution.” he said. 


Algeria Adopts Proportional Representation 


Agence Fronce-Presse 

ALGIERS — Algeria’s interim par- 
liament approved a new electoral law 
Wednesday, replacing die majority vot- 
ing system with proportional represent- 
ation before legislative elections slated 
for later this year, officials said. 

The new law replaces the 1990 elec- 
toral code, under which the Islamic Sal- 


vation From made sweeping gains in tbe 
December 1991 elections. 

ft was approved a day after tiie interim 
parliament; the National Transition Coun- 
cil, approved another electoral law that 
banned tiie creation of political parties 
along religious lines. That legislation was 
in fine with constitutional cha n ges ap- 
proved in a referendum last year. 


Oversea 


V V V 


ers 


Managing people, making decisions, 
masterminding strategies - and all on 
an international leveL It’s what our 
19% Reader Survey tells us over 70% 
of you who work, spend your time 
doing. 

Understandable then, that you also 
spend an enjoyable half hour of your 
day following the ways of the world 
via your EHT 

For summaries of the surveys from 
which these facts are taken, please calk 
in Europe, James McLeod on (33) 
1 41 43 93 8k in Asia, Andrew Thomas 
on (65) 223 6478; in the Americas, 
Richard Lynch on (212) 752 3890. 



THE WORLD’S 


DAILY NEWSPAPER 




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PAGE 8 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


lleralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 



mjbushkd *nn the sew yoke times and the Washington post 


Starr Can’t Just Leave 

rr /x „ D / ._ /ir i but had been a rising star in two Re- 

Jtie l/U^6o W IxOpOTT publican aHininistnrt«yM - Ronald Re- 

aoan had made him the vouncest nidge 


The last thing Whitewater independ- 
ent counsel. Kenneth Starr can want is 
to go down in the record books as the 
Fellow who walked away from the 
enormous public responsibility of in- 
vestigating a sitting president when the 
job was only half done. He is, or so it 
has seemed to us. too proactive of his 
professional reputation to risk having 
such an asterisk after his name. That is 
why we find it hard to believe that he 
won't somehow wrap up his inquiry as 
to the president and. we would presume 
also, Mrs. Clinton, before moving on to 
become a dean at Pepperdine Uni- 
versity this summer. No matter wbat he 
says to the contrary about the quality of 
the staff that he has assembled and will 
leave behind, he would be abandoning 
and to some extent stranding the in- 
quiry were he to do otherwise. 

Before he leaves, it seems to us be 
has an obligation to make and an- 
nounce a decision as to whether the 
Clintons, in the manifold matters under 
his jurisdiction, have corami tied any 
offense! s) for which they could be 
charged. He needs as well to make 
some kind of report, laying out his 
view of those matters. What is the 
evidence as to what happened? Who 
did what? Such reports are expected of 
independent counsels, above all in 
cases where charges are not brought. 
They help to clarify, if not exactly to 
exonerate, and to put whatever the case 
may have been to rest 

It is especially important that Mr. 
Starr make such a report- Much was 
made of his credentials when be was 
named. He was not just independent 


ever to serve os toe U.S. Court of 
Appeals for the District of Columbia; 
George Bosh then made him solicitor 
general, having also considered him for 
the Supreme Court. The whole idea of 
the independent counsel act is to avoid 
the conflict of interest that can occur 
lyfretl an adpiiniRfratkYn is investigating 
the conduct of one of its own high 
officials. Surely Mr. Stair would 
provide die kind of careful scrubbing 
that the law intends; he would follow 
the evidence wherever it led. So it was 
said, and he seemed rather to enjoy 
what yoo might call the notoriety. 
Now. one way or die other, he has me 
obligation to deliver on that promise. 

Whitewater began with the question; 
Were the Clintons witting participants 
in die looting of a failed federally in- 
sured Arkansas savings and loan for 
either their personal or his political ben- 
efit prior to his election as president? 
Mr. Starr cast a somewhat broader net 
than t hat-, involving, among much else, 
whether there were efforts to obstruct 
assorted Whitewater inquiries after Mr. 
Clinton became president He has 
caaght some lesser chough by no means 
minor fish and has been squeezing 
them. Lately he and his staff have beat 
exploring the evidence that they do and 
don't have with regard to toe Clintons. 

The rest of the complicated case, 
while hardly unimportant or uninform- 
ative. has been incidental. What Mr. 
Starr owes, before be goes anywhere, 
is a report on ihe propriety of the 
president's own behavior. That is the 
subject he was hired to address. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Hold On a Minute 


Kenneth Starr's decision to leave his 
post as independent counsel in toe 
Whitewater affair by August reflects a 
selfish indifference to his important 
civic obligations. Mr. Stan is not in- 
vestigating some obscure town com- 
missioner. The matters he has been 
asked to look into involve a sitting 
president of toe United States, the first 
lady and a score of senior officials. 

This is unquestionably one of toe 
most important prosecutorial jobs in 
the country right now, and Mr. Stan- 
should not have taken it unless he were 
willing to see it through. The White 
House took his decision as a happy 
sign that neither President Bill Clinton 
nor his wife will face any charges. For 
his part, Mr. Starr told reporters that his 
departure would have little impact and 
that it would be unwise to draw in- 
ferences about future indictments. 

The fact is that nobody really knows 
what the consequences will be. What 
we do know, however, is that the in- 
vestigation has reached a sensitive 
stage. In recent weeks, for example, 
James McDougal, the Clintons' part- 
ner in the Whitewater real estate ven- 
ture, has reportedly reversed his testi- 
mony and told investigators that Mr. 
Clinron helped arrange for an improper 
loan, pan of which was used to shore 
up his Whitewater investment 

Yet Mr. Starr is behaving as if he had 


no greater responsibility titan to tend to 
his career. He did not even have the 
good manners to break the news him- 
self. Congress and a public that had 
been relying on him to get to the bot- 
tom of toe Whitewater mess were told 
of his plans in a press release and 
follow-up statements from Pepperdine 
University in Malibu, California, 
where he will become dean of the law 
and public policy school next fall. 

This is only the latest sign that Mr. 
Starr has never fully appreciated the 
gravity of his role. Despite criticism, 
he continued his high-profile, polit- 
ically tinged private law practice, thus 
s haking confidence in his dedication. 

Many questions may still be un- 
resolved when Mr. Starr leaves on 
Aug. 1 . But even if the investigation is 
largely wrapped up by then, the an- 
nouncement itself has to be disrupting 
to his team, since their leader, emo- 
tionally if not physically, has one foot 
oat the door. In addition, recalcitrant 
witnesses, learning that he is getting 
ready to leave, may feel less pressure 
to cooperate. 

Mr. Starr should reconsider his de- 
parture. No one forced him to take the 
job of independent counsel. Having 
taken it, he has an obligation not to bail 
out prematurely. When all is done, there 
should be no room fra- questions that the 
investigation was somehow truncated, 
or that hard choices were ducked, be- 
cause of his race fra the exit. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Better to Speak Softly 


It is fair to ask. as some Republican 
lawmakers do, how toe new treaty ban- 
ning chemical weapons will deter toe 
likes of Iraq, Iran or Libya, flagrant 
international scofflaws all. But it is 
unwise for these lawmakers to compel 
the president, as a condition of their 
ratification of the treaty, to threaten 
nuclear retaliation against chemical 
auack on American troops. Nor should 
President Bill Clinton be accepting 
any restraints, even implied ones, cer- 
tainly not legislated ones, on his au- 
thority as the commander in chief of ail 
American forces. 

it is not that a rogue state or terrorist 
should be free to use nerve gas against 
Americans with impunity. Obviously, 
this is not so. But the American po- 
sition has been that a chemical mal- 
efactor would be liable to the whole 
range of retaliatory weapons in the 
U.S. inventory, and that is a suffi- 
ciently precise and comprehensive 
prospect to make deterrence real. 

Deterrence finally proceeds, after 
all. not from a set of words forced out 
of one political branch of government 
by the other in a tense treaty-ratifi- 
cation endgame. Rather it arises from 
the projection at one end and toe per- 
ception at the other end of an overall 


determination to protect American in- 
terests. It is simply not possible — it is 
dangerous to try — to predict the par- 
ticular elements that would shape re- 
sponses in a given chemical-attack 
situation. There is no good reason and 
no practical way to bind a president to 
a specific policy. 

The Republican senators whose 
anxieties are driving die call to lean 
toward nuclear response are charging 
rudely into a realm of policy — the 
conditions of nuclear use — that ex- 
perience shows requires great subtlety. 
The immediate focus of attention in 
Washington may be on ensuring that 
American troops are not left exposed to 
chemical attack. But the larger and 
continuing purpose must be to serve 
the overwhelming American interest 
in nuclear nonproliferation, specifical- 
ly, to avoid setting an explicit pre- 
cedent of nuclear utility and of first 
nuclear use that others might then ap- 
ply to justify toe nuclear program or 
doctrine of their choice. 

As always, there has been a certain 
gap between maintaining robust de- 
terrence and avoiding setting a provoc- 
ative nuclear example. It is best treated 
by carrying a stick but speaking softly. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 





Beyond the Market, a Different Kind of Equity 

J 7 VV _ , of the most powerful 


greatest 
toe 


W ASHINGTON — Tbe 
economic chaltaige 
world is the need to create an inter- 
national system that not only maximizes 
global gnwh but also achieves a greater 
measure of equity, a system that both 
integrates emerging economic powers 

and awiitls currently marginalised coun- 
tries in their efforts to participate in 
worldwide economic expansion. 

In toe midst of today's global polit- 
ical and economic revolution, national 
governments alone amply cannot cope 
with the challenges presented by a bor- 
derless economic system. The most im- 
portant means available to secure peace 
and prosperity into the future is to de- 
velop efrecti' 


ByBsterD. Sutherland 



perspeem 

the OECD uo wi lc P*“r ,1 l • — - __ s ii ;U1IUU . 1U , w . * , 

economic community. Their capacity ^ ^otutions they created must 

to set and pursue global economic ob with positive support. . 

jectives or provide direction, while un coun|J ^ es and poor countries 


rtomies simply because market access 

has been provided. I do not believe that 4 . . . Klcn — r. . ... . 

we in toe global community will ad- doubcedly important, is limited- should windy appty ti* 11 mteilectual 

equatdy lh«iq)tocftirrc^XB3sibiIity if Wehave,mshort,asmJCturaId^cK caoacity to identifying new approaches 
we have done no more than provide the in the world economy, in trams bom ot nmblems of marginalization and 

~ — 1 “ — » *»- ~ — - — - toe making of policies and of then ex- 

ecutioo. The structures for coordination de w _°^^ a ^hated responsibility. ffe\ 
of international economic issues at tne «*.ii-beingof the poor of this planet, 

highest political level must be rws^. rapidly globalizing economy, . 

they tac* b. rep- 

resentaoveemm^ to command the nec- u pr responsibility aggress- 

essay consensus fra effcctive scuo^^ mwtEW 


velop effective multilateral approaches 
and institutions. 

For a millennium , Europe and the 
United States have dominated the 
world economically, but this predom- 
inance is coming to an end. The past 
two decades have been a period of 
spectacular economic advance. Within 
the next 15 years we may well see three 
developing countries among the 
world’s six largest economies. 


poorest people and toe poorest coun- 
tries with, an opportunity to socoeed. 
We must also provide them witoa foun- 
dation from which they have a rea- 
sonable chance of seizing that oppor- 
tunity — decent health care, primary 
education, basic infrastructure. 

We have an opportunity *h»r man- 
kind has never had before: to develop 
relationships based on something more 
morally accep tab le rh^m alliances bom 
of fear of a common threat, and to 
fashion structures that enable us to live 
and grow together. 

New creativity x 


m 


^heexistingfraums 
for toe development of global econom- 
ic policy initiatives are inadequate. The 


No new bureaucracy is needed- The 
existing instinmons . — to® IMF, toe 
WraldBank, tote World Trade Orga- 
nization, toe OECD — have toe lead- 
ership and toe capacity to meet toe 
world’s need for greater coherence and 
greater representation in global eco- 
nomic policy-making. 

But to do so, they require toe full 
support of their membership. This 
me***? , in toe first instance, providing 
resources. The lamentable practice in 


governments working more cooperat- 
ive 1 v together to support efficient, well- 
functioning international agencies. 


The writer is chairman of Goldman 
Sachs International and also cf the 
Overseas Development Council, a non- 
profit international policy research in- 
stitute based in Washington. He can, 
tributed this comment to the Inter-.. 

national Herald Tribune. 


However, other countries, especially 

reced- 


in Africa, have experienced unprr 


exited decline. The world has become 
more and mare polarized as the gulf 
between rich and poor has widened. 

Some in toe rich countries are made 
uncomfortable by the success of other 
nations. There is a sense erf insecurity 
among those who feel that toe radical 
changes taking place challenge our so- 
cieties and our comforts. 

After the collapse of ideological con- 
flict between East and West, there has 
also been a disturbing tendency to look 
upon toe widening gap between rich 
and poor with ^difference. Some even 
sre tire reduction m support for toe poor 
and the increase in earnings of toe 
wealthy as a positive encouragement 
for economic growth. 

There are those who oppose redis- 
tribution policies in principle, whether 
in the domestic or the international 
context Tins is wrong. It is morally 
wrong, it is pragmatically wrong, and 
we ought not be ashamed to say so. 

I have been personally and deeply 
committed to promoting feemaricet sys- 
tem through my entire caree r . Yet it is 
quite obvious to me that the market will 
never provide all of the answers to the 
problems of poverty and inequality. 

The fact is that there are those who 
will not be able to develop their eco- 


Don’t Blame the World for Your Own Failures 


/CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — 
■V_^ Many observers seem determined to 
blame global marinas far a host of eco- 
nomic and social ilk, even when the 
point unmistakably to domestic — 
and usually political — causes. 

For example, policy in France is 
paralyzed not by impersonal market 
traces but by the determination of its 
prestige-conscious politicians not to let 
the franc decline against the German 
mark. B ritain, which has let toe pound 
gmir relative to tote mark, has steadily 
reduced its unemployment rate. 

The cause of France's paralysis is 
political rather than economic. And 
what about the United States? 

Critics of die global economy in- 
variably reply that America may be 
creating lots of jobs but that they are 
tenuous because of the prevalence of 
downsizing, which is a reaction to in- 
ternational competition (a line of reas- 
oning that also provides a good excuse 
fra companies undertaking layoffs). 

Of course, international competition 
plays a role in some downsizings, but it 
is hardly the most important cause of the 
phenomenon. To my knowledge there 
are no Japanese keiretsu c omp e tin g to 


By Ban! Krugraan 


carry my long-distance calls, or South 
Korean conglomerates offering me lo- 
cal service. Nor have many Americans 
started buying their home appliances at 
Mexican stares or smoking French ci- 
garettes. I cannot fly Cathay Pacific 
□ran Boston to New York. 

What explains this propensity to 
overstate tore importance of global mar- 
kets? In part, it sounds sophisticated. 
Pontificating about globalization is an 
easy way to get attention. But there is 
also a deeper cause — an odd sort of 
tacit agreement between the left and the 
right to pretend that exotic global 
forces are at work even when the real 
action is prosaically domestic. 

Many on toe left dislike the global 
marketplace because it epitomizes 
what they dislike about markets in gen- 
eral: the feet that nobody is in charge. 

Meanwhile, many on the right use 
the rhetoric of globalization to argue 
that business can no longer be expected 
to meet any social obligations. It has 
become standard for opponents of en- 
vironmental regulations to raise toe 


banner of “competitiveness'’ and to 
warn that anything that raises costs fbc 
American businesses will price Amer- 
ican goods out of world markets. ■ 
The overheated oratory encourages 
f atalis m, a sense that we cannot co ny to - 
grips with our problems because they 
are bigger than we are. Such fatalism is 
already well advanced in Western 
Europe, where the public speaks 
vaguely of the * ‘economic honor 1 * in- 
flicted by world markets instead of 
turning a critical eye on the domestic 
leaders whose policies have failed. 

None of toe important constraints on 
American economic and social policy 
come from abroad. Americans have the 
resources to take for better care of their 
poor and unlucky than they do. a : 
If policies have become increasingly 
mean-spirited, that is a political choice, 
not something imposed by anonymous 
forces. We cannot evade responsibility 
for our actions by claiming that global ; 
markets made us do it 


The writer, a pnjfessor of economics 
at the Massachusetts Institute cfTedt-' 
oology, contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


Watch Out for Commercial Fractures in America’s Alliances 


L ONDON —The relation of 
the United States to its allies 
was for many years a win-win 
affair, as a games theorist would 
put it America offered security , 
investment and trade, and re- 
ceived enhancement of its own 
security plus considerable eco- 
nomic advantage. The allies be- 
nefited most during toe early 
postwar reconstruction years, 
and could complain only (as did 
France) that they were taken fra 


By William Pfaff 


Now die allied relationship is 
a great deal more complicated. 
There are elements in it of the 
zero-sum game. One player 
loses when another gains. 

It is considered correct to cast 
a certain ideological veil over 
this, particularly where eco- 
nomics is concerned, compe- 
tition and trade being held to 
produce ultimate good for 
losers as well as for winners. 

It is not so simple as that. 


Losses are resented and resist- 
ed, witti^blitical consequences. 
Take aircraft 

Boeing has just bought Mo 
Donnell Douglas. In November 
the latter company was ruled 
out of the competition fra what 
is supposed to become an enor- 
mous Pentagon contract to 
build a new-generation, all-ser- 
vice fighter-bomber, the Joint 
Strike Hghter. That decision by 
the U.S. government seemed to 
role out a future for McDonnell 
Douglas as a major military air- 
craft producer, and. the Pent- 
agon oversaw the subsequent 
takeover by Boeing. 

However, it was Airbus, the 
European airliner consortium, 
which really knocked McDon- 
nell Douglas ora of business as 
an m dependent company. 

The Douglas part of McDD 
was once the wand’s dominant 


manufacturer of passenger 
planes (the DC-3 to DC-7 
series). It lost first place when 
Boeing converted the Air Force 
KC-135/137 jet tanker into the 
first successful commercial jet 
airliner, the Boeing 707. Boeing 
then went on to become the 
world's leader in the field. 

But McDonnell Douglas re- 
mained a player, producing 
commercial jets as weD as mil- 
itary aircraft It was looking for 
new commercial jet orders as 
late as last year. Lockheed was 
also for many years a competitor 
in making commercial jets, with 
its TriStars, but now it is out of 
the business. Both companies 
are our because of Airbus- 

Airbus started out with the 
ambition to claim a quarter to a 
third of the world’s big-jet mar- 
ket. It now aims at half die 
world market. 


Arab Intellectuals Out of Tune 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


C ASABLANCA. Morocco 
— When Benjamin Net- 
anyahu signed toe Hebron ac- 
cord it signaled a fundamental 
relit on toe ri g ht in IsraeL 
Those who argued iliac for re- 
ligious,. nationalist or security 
reasons Israel must never cede 
any of the West Bank were left 
behind, as a large «ynait of 
toe right joined the land-for- 
peace camp, creating a broad 
new center. 

Now toe only debate left in 
Israel is not whether there will 
be a Palestinian state in the 
West Bank, but what size will 
it be. The answer to that ques- 
tion will depend, in part, on 
whether the split on the Jewish 
right will be mirrored now by 
a split on the Arab left. Up to 
now the Arab intellectual left, 
as well as toe unions of Arab 
doctors, lawyers and writers, 
have refused to reconcile 
tbemsclves to Israel, even 
though their regimes have. 

A tiny split in the Arab left 
is opening, but it has a long, 
long way to go before it be- 
comes a politically significant 
movement dial could really 
influence toe debate in IsraeL 
Ibis week some important 
Arab media, such as A1 Mns- 
sawar magazine, the widely 
watched television show fea- 
turing Egypt's Hamdi Qandil 
and even leftist "newspapers 
like A1 Ahali have been fined 
with this budding debate: Was 
it proper fra Arab intellectu- 
als, ted by Egypt’s Lutfi al- 
Kboli and Abdel Moneim 
Said, to take part in a recent 
dialogue with centrist Israeli 
intellectuals in Copenhagen? 


The Arab intellectual left bad 
previously decreed that rally a 
dialogue with non-Zionist Is- 
raelis was legitimate. 

But those who went to 
Copenhagen argued that it has 
not been the boycott of Israel 
by Arab intellectuals that has 
brought toe Palestinians their 
first ch unks of land from Is- 
raeL Rather ft was the pressure 
first of the Palestinian upris- 
ing and then of the Israeli 
peace movement. Therefore, 
if Arab intellectuals really 
want to help Palestinians, they 
will engage directly with the 
peace forces in Israel, even the 
Likud, and try to nurture the 
land-for-peace lobby there. 

The Nobel prize- winning 
Egyptian author Naguib Mab- 
fouz told A1 Abram: “Accus- 
ing those who participated. [in. 
Copenhagen] erf treason is 
nonsense. I support the ad- 
vocates of peace on toe Arab 
ride getting in touch with the 
advocates of peace in IsraeL 
This is a patriotic act/’. .- 

But this is- still a. minority 
view. I just participated in a 
roundtable discussion with 50. 
Moroccan professors at King 
Nassau H University in Cas- 
ablanca, and I heard attacks on 
■ Israel that were so bitter I fi- 
nally said to them: “Ifedasif 
I've entered a time warp and 
woken up at an Arab Leagoe 
meeting m I960.” 

For these Moroccan intel- 
lectuals. Hebron didn’t exist, 
Oslo didn’t exist, Yasser Ara- 
fat was misguided. They 
spoke from the heart about toe 
“rape of Arab land” that, toe 
Jewish state represented. 


Qadri ffifoi. an Egyptian 
expert on Israel, summed up 
their mind-set in A1 Mus- 
sawar, saying: "The cultural 
domain is the last bastion of 
normalization. Let us [intel- 
lectuals] be careful If boy- 
cotting Israel would hurt it, 
let’s maintain that strategy." 

Hard-line Arab intellectuals 
seem to be seeking not with- 
drawals but atonement. They 
want an ideological victory, 
they want an apology, they 
want tiie Jews to stand up and 
say "Sorry, we never should 
have built a state here.” 
Further complicating the 
picture is anew element: Some 
intellectuals seem to be intim- 
idated by the rising influence 
Of Islamic fimrbgnt»nf'ali:B tg or 
fascinated by their power. and 
would like «> mobilize it. Mo- 
hammed Imara, a leading 
Egyptian Islamist, argued that 
toe role of the Arab intellectual 
was "to nourish the memory 
of our nation about the entirety 
of its rigfrts until the balance of 
power can be corrected.’’ 

Even those intellectuals 
realty to engage Israelis do so 
on the assumption that Israel 
will retum to the 1967 lines. 
Bui the real debate in Israel will . 
not be whether to return 100 
percent of the West Bank, but 
whether to return 40 to 50per- 
cent or 80 to 90 percent 
I am not sure that even the 
most dovish Arab intellectuals 
are ready to take sides in feat 
debate. In that sense. ' Ali 
Salem, a prominent Egyptian 
writer, may be right to $ay: 
"The call fra a dialogue -..with 


tified,fcw£ it came too late.” 

The Neiv York Tones. 


The Joint Strike Fighter, the 
latest American fighter project, 
has years of prototype compe- 
tition between Lockheed and 
Boeing ahead before the 
Pentagon makes a final choice; 
Then Congress has to come up 
with production funding, which 
is likely to be a controversial 
affair, after unhappy recent ex- 
periences with the cost of the B- 
2 Stealth bomber, and wife the 
delayed F-22 fighter. 

The F-22 was supposed to 
have begun production two 
years ago. The Brussels aero- 
space newsletter "Context" 
says that initial deliveries now 
are not expected until 2002- 
2003, at more than three times 
the original projected cost 

The American fighter aircraft 
on the world market today are 
versions of planes developed in 
the 1960s. The F-15 flew first in 
1969, and both toe F-16 and the 
prototype from which the F-18- 
was derived in 1973. 

In Europe, the troubled Brit- 
ish-German-Itaiian Eurofighter 
program is at last on the verge of 
firm production orders from 
Bonn and Landoa, and the 
French Dassault Rafale is in pre- 
production. Both are new-tech- 
nology, aearodynamicalfy “un- 
stable" fly-by-wire aircraft. The 
United States will not have a 
fully competitive aircraft on toe 
market until well into the 21st 
century. In short, it has fallen a 
generation behind Us allies in 

^^^Gtaeof the earlycOTtrfouting 
factors to. the p rogram for 
NATO expansion was anus in- 
dustry interest in furnishing, 
“force modernization" equip- 
ment to new NATO members. 
These countries were expected 
to buy NATO-proven and 
NATO-standard . combat air- 


IN OUR PAGES: 100,75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Spanish Advance 


MANILA —— The Spanish ad- 
vance column commanded by 
General Barraquer, has estab- 
lished artillery redoubts within 
1,400 m&tres of the bridge 
crossing the river Zapote. The 
fire of die redoubts, combined 
with that of the fleet, commands 
toe neighborhood of the beach, 
causing severe losses to the 
rebels, who are entrenched on 
both sides of the river. 


seas State Checker Association 
after a cripple at Brockto n was 
convicted fra playing toe game 
on Sunday in a public place. The 
proposed bfll was an amendment 
to toe Sunday Sports Law which 
permits “athletic outdoor games 
or sports" to be played on Sundays. 


1947: Midlands Plan 


1922: Games Outlawed 


BOSTON — Sunday checkers 
and chess in Massachusetts fell 


****** Uf w mAvn j u | ft XQl 

to their doom when the House of 
Represraitatiyes shot down a bill 
Sunday playing of 


permitting 
those game 


games. As a result, under 
the present statute of outlawry, 
persons --engaged in pushing 
checkers across the squared 
board on -toe Sabbath are to be 

dassed as desperados. The mea- 
sure was filed by the Massadm- 


LONDON — Prime Minister 
Clement Attlee announced 
today [Feb. 19] plans for a par- 
tial resumption of industry in 
the Midlands. His plan, revealed 
after industry in half toe country 
has been paralyzed fra 10 days, 
will go into operation next 
Monday [Feb. 24}. Mr. Attlee’s 
announcement, which was toe 

first sign of a break in toe power 

crisis that has thrown more than 
2.000.000 people out of work, 
was received coldly by indus- 
trialists. They said toe plan ig- 
nored toe fact that many of them 
lacked toe coal supplies needed 
to start their plants again. 



- 1 N-r*' 

.(4- 


W 


craft — Le M American aircraft. 
However, die governments 
concerned have proved very, 
resistant to the sales offers 

made to them, arguing that they 
have more urgent demands an 
their money, and also to keep 
pressure on the United Stares to 
speed their alliance entry. _ 

All of this illustrates toe com- 
plexity of trans-Atlantic alli- 
ance relations. An equivalent 
complexity is developing in 
Asia, centered on toe financial 
and commercial trade-offs im- 
plicit in toe continuing U.S. stra- 
tegic deployment in the region. 

Commercial rivalries in toe 
alliance are- politically compli- 
cated by prospective Chinese 
and North Korean succession 
crises, toe developing brutality 
of toe Hong Kong takeover, 
China’s arrogant maneuvers to 
manipulate Clinton administra- 
tion policies, and toe issue of 
“Aslan values’* versus West- 
ern human rights and labor stan- 
dards demands. 

There now are winners and 
losers in these alliances — or 
wins and losses. Governments 
more tom ever are iindter pres- 
sure to frame security policy in 
trams of toe commercial in- 
terests of .powerful industries. 
National interest as politically 
defined, may — indeed, some- 
times must — conflict with 
commercial interest 

Managing such asituationre- 
quires a more disc rimin a tin g 
view of the national interest 
than usually expressed by 
politicians or press. Lacking 
that America’s Atlantic and 
Pacific alliances could both de- 
velop cracks. That should be 
understood now, in ah the al- 
liance capitals. 

International Herald Tribune. 

. © Los Angeles Tones Syndicate 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


Get Serious and Ask Lake About Iraq 


XITASHINGTON — Sen- 
▼ V ator Richard C. Shelby 
is half-right about the con- 
firmation hearings on Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton’s controver- 
sial nomination of Anthony 
Lake to head the Central in- 
telligence Agency: They 

should form a thorough and 
pai ns ta ki ng inquiry into the 
suitability of Mr. Lake to take 
charge of a seriously troubled 
or ga nization. There should be 
no rubber stamp here. 

But the Alabama Repub- 
lican goes about the right 
dung die wrong way. He has 
focused on peripheral is sues 
and stalled the beginning of 
tbe hearings to March 1 1 . Mr. 
Shelby plays Mr. Micawber, 
the character in Dickens 
who is always waiting for 
something to turn up. 

Mb'. Shelby, who heads tbe 
Senate Intelligence Commit- 
tee, seems to be waiting for 
something scandalous to turn 
up. to sink die no minati on But 
the half-dozen questions that 
should determine Mr. Lake's 
fate exist under the senator’s 
nose. They would have more 
Impact being put to Mr. Lake 
directly and expeditiously. 

These questions do not in- 
volve the matters Mr. Shelby 
and other conservative Re- 
publicans focus on: Mr. 
Lake’s inattention to small 
stock market transactions by 
his broker; the ludicrous idea 
that Mr. Lake was an inspir- 
ational leader of left-wing 
think tanks in Washington, 


By Jim Hoagland 


and his role in keeping Con- 
gress and the public in die 
dark on the president's de- 
cision not tO OppOSe fr rrm a n 
arms shipments to Bosma. 

The problems with Mr. 
Lake’s n ominati on fie else- 
where. While Mr. Shelby has 
left him twisting in the wind, 
Mr. Lake has engaged in a 
semipublic lobbying effort 
among CIA agents and of- 
ficials and is courting nl- 
traconservatives to intercede 
with Mr. Shelby. This raises 
questions about bow effective 
a leader Mr. Lake carr become 
after starting fro m a position 
of perceived weakness. 

"This could wank out,” an 
agency veteran told a friend 
recently. “Tony may now be 
satisfied to get confirmed and 
immediately stair a four-year 
tour of tbe world to visit all the 
stations, and we will be left to 
get on with our jobs.” 

But the biggest danger lies 
in tbe built-in conflict of in- 
terest the president has created 
by choosing as his new in- 
telligence coordinator ids old 
national security adviser, who 
urged particular poUdes on the 
president and men oversaw 
their 

In pleading with Mr. Shelby 
tO' get <m With the hearing? 
President Gmton told report- 
ers that Mr. Lake was the ar- 
chitect ofU.S. Bosnian policy. 
He was also an early advocate 
of NATO expansion, relaxing 



opp osition to <Twn» and stick- 
ing a finger in Britain’s eye by 
pushing for a settlement in 
Northern Ireland. - 

On these issues and others, 
will die president get an 
unvarnished view from 
Langley? I doubt King So- 
lomon would have die de- 
tachment and perspective 
needed so disentangle such 
past advocacy from present 
analysis- Because of his back- 
ground, a heavy burden of 
proof will lie on Mr. Lake at 
the CIA. He will constantly 
have to show that he can en- 
courage the CIA to conduct 
intelligence assessments and 
operations with absolute in- 
tegrity, even if they cost Bill 
Chnton politically and tbe 
CIA bureaucraticallv. 

John Deutch, the last CIA 
director, showed that kind of 
courage and intellectual hon- 
esty when he was asked by 


sew s mffitary occupation of 
northern Iraq last September. 

Despite whim House state- 
ments to the contrary, Mr. 
Deutch told foe truth: Mr. 
Saddam had been politically 
strengthened by foe move. 

That was ti>e last straw for 
Mr. Deutch’s ambitions to re- 
main in the cabinet. He was 
unceremon i ously dumped by 
Mr. Clinton. Mr. Shelby’s 
co m mi ttee should look into 
Mr. Lake’s reaction to Mr. 
Deutch’s testimony on Iraq, 


and Mr. Lake’s role. If any. in 
removing Mr. Deutch from the 
office Mr. Lake now seeks. 

Iraq is tiie CIA’s greatest 
covert fiasco of tins decade. 
Tbe agency’s failures in north- 
ern Iraq, and its continuing in- 
ability to organize an effective 
p ro g r am against ML Sadd am , 
should be the focus of the 
questions that matter in 
judging whether Mr. Lake will 
have the tfararfww^nt and per- 
spective needed to rebuild a 
wounded organization. 

Is Mr. Lake prepared to ac- 
knowledge the agency’s dis- 
mal performance in Iraq? 
What will he do to improve it? 
Is tiie agency honestly report- 
ing that the economic and dip- 
lomatic sanctions that have 
hpip ad certain Mr. Snririam 
are now eroding? What can be 
done to stop that erosion? Why 
is the administration continu- 
ing to negotiate with the Kurd- 
ish leader Massoud Barzani 
despite Mr. Barzani’s refusal 
to disassociate himself from 
Mr. Saddam? Does Mr. Lake 
stiO honor the pOedges he gave 
to the Iraqi National Congress 
to help it become a democratic 
opposition to Mr. Saddam? 

These are the questions t hat 
Mr. Shelby and his committee 
need to ask Mr. Lake. With 
the resources at his command, 
if Mr. Lake cannot get Iraq 
right he is not the man for the 
important job of rescuing an 
organization th«f has lost not 
only its mission but its way. 

The Washington Post. 


A Raw Nerve in American Jewish History 

C HICAGO — At a dinner party last By Fra nk Rich effort to find out how her grandparent 

Saturday, I found myself seated " died? Or turns her back on a cousii 


among some of the most loyal of Clin- 
ton enthusiasts in this most loyally 
Democratic of cities. But when I raised 
the question of Madeleine Albright’s 
sudden discovery of her roots, there 
was only eye-rolling and sarcasm. One 
prominent Jewish friend of both the 
Clintons and the secretary of stale 
didn ’t hesitate to characterize Mrs. Al- 
bright's professed ignorance about her 
past ‘'She didn't want to know from 
Jewish.” 

The question of what Madeleine Al- 
bright knew about her past and when 
she knew it is hardly of Watergate 
significance. Her religion, whatever ir 
is, is irrelevant to berjob, for which she 
is abundantly qualified. But her story 
isn't going away just yet, in port be- 
cause it upsets more than a few Amer- 
ican Jews, and in part because she 
seems to be shading the truth. In the 
classic Clinton administration manner, 
so reminiscent of Bill Clinton’s shift- 
ing accounts of his draft history or A1 
Gore’s varying recollections of his 
misadventures at a Buddhist temple, 
Mrs. Albright has with her own words 
turned a fascinating, poignant but po- 
tentially short-lived story into what 
might be called (though presumably 
not by her) a big megillah. 

When Michael Dobbs of Tbe Wash- 
ington Post first reported (IHT. Feb. 6) 
that Mrs. Albright’s parents were Jew- 
ish converts to Catholicism and that 
she had lost three of her grandparents 
(among other close relatives) to the 
Holocaust, she pronounced these rev- 
elations “obviously amajor surprise.” 


But it turned out that others had written 
letters to tell her of these facts in years 
past — including the mayor of her 
father's hometown and a Jewish first 
cousin who had lived with her family in 
exile in London during the war. Her 
paternal grandparents' deaths are also 

MEANWHILE 

recorded on a memorial list published 
in Terezin in 199? of Czech Jew s who 
died in the Holocaust. 

Now Mrs. Albright — whose much- 
admired catchphrase until recently was 
“I tell h like it is” — is changing her 
story. In a relentless interview by Lally 
Weymouth in this week’s Newsweek. 
Mrs. Albright says that her initial re- 
sponse to The Post's findings was mis- 
quoted. “I was not surprised about my 
Jewish origin,” she says. “What I was 
surprised about was that my grand- 
parents died in concentration camps.” 
But as recently as in a “60 Minutes” 
interview aired on Feb. 9. she told Ed 
Bradley that both her Jewish origins 
and her grandparents' fate had been 
“totally” unknown to her. 

This prevarication, unlike her family 
history, does reflect cm Mrs. Albright's 
credibility as a public servant. But 
what is more troubling io many Jews, 
myself among them, is her lack of 
curiosity about her roots from the start, 
no matter whether she found out the 
facts this month or years ago. What 
smart, serious, sensitive student of his- 
tory, let alone Nazi refugee, makes no 


effort to find out how her grandparents 
died? Or turns her back on a cousin 
with whom she lived like a sister dur- 
ing her most formative years? 

Such a determined ignorance about 
one's own family is so out of character 
tor a woman of Mrs. Albrighi's in- 
telligence and quality. Jewish or not 
that It has prompted a floating national 
kaffeeklatsch of armchair psychoana- 
lysis. Deborah LipsladL a professor of 
Jewish studies at Emory University who 
has long charted .America's conflicted 
relationship with the Holocaust, argues 
that for Mrs. Albright to question her. 
father’s version of her history would be 
tantamount to destroying the hero and 
role model who most shaped her life. 

But whatever the explanation. Mrs. 
Albright's story also fascinates and 
troubles because it exposes a raw nerve 
in American Jewish history. In the 
postwar .America in which Mrs. Al- 
bright came of age. it was not. as Ms. 
Lipstadt puls it, “convenient to be 
Jewish”: not if you wanted an un- 
impeded path to Wellesley or the nicest 
suburbs or the best jobs. It was the time 
for heavy-duty assimilation, for name 
changes and nose jobs: even the Holo- 
caust was not talked about too loudly 
among American Jews in tbe 1950s. 

However unintentionally. Made- 
leine Albright actually lived the 
darkest fantasy of the most assimil- 
ation isl American Jews of that time. 
Her family's obliteration of its Jewish 
past — extreme case though it may be 
— wouldn’t resonate so loudly if it 
didn't awaken guilty memories in so 
many other American homes. 

Thr New Vwfc Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


About France 

Regarding “ A Somber 
France, Racked by Doubt " 
(Feb. 12): 

The article is interesting 
and candid, putting forth in its 
very first lines the idea that is 
then developed at length: that 
France should follow tbe 
Californian, or American, 
way. 

As a longtime observer of 
America, I have also been 
racked by doubt — at the 
sight of its streets, towns, 
courts, television shows and, 
more generally speaking, the 
American way of life. As a 
consequence , I dunk it is very 
presumptuous to propose that 
way as a model to others. 

So, still racked by doubt, I 
would rather stick to our own 
French way, worked out by 
our people throughout cen- 
turies, sometimes in blood 
and sorrow, and ignore such 
American reproaches. 

GEORGES JURAS. 

Cannes. 

Regarding “French Intel- 
lectuals Take On the National 
Front" (Feb. 15): 

I have doubts about the 

credibility of French “intel- 
lectuals'’ because they them- 
selves have championed du- 
bious causes in the past — 
communism, for example. . 

PETER b. martin. 

Monteuq. France. . 

Regarding “ Back in die 
Difficult Present, Will the Eton 
Ever Materialize?" (Opinion, 
Feb. 4) by WHUam Pftzff: . 

If a group of countries, in- 
cluding Prance, dp eventually 
create European Monetary 
Union and the euro, how can 
this union stand if it is a house 
divided against itself?' 

France is acting in ways 
that run completely counter to 
those of the other potential 
EMU roembers. lt is lowering 
the retirement age for cat- 
egories of workers; reducing 
hours of work but not pay, and 
has made a specialty of 
cravenly giving in to special 
interest groups that have foe 
power to cause econo mic dis-.. 
ruption across foe country. ; 

Will tbe other members or 


the monetary union have to 
coverforfiraicb folly in order 
to maintai n the value of foe 

Common currency? 

ESK3LSVANE. j 
Pouzols, France. j 

Europe and America 

Regarding “While Amerir j 
cans Fret, Foreigners Applaud \ 
US. Success ” (Opinion, Feb. 
II) by Stephen S. Rosenfeld: 

Mr. Rosenfeld's article ex- 1 
emplifies the self-aggran- 
dizement that Americans are 
so well known for, but wifoa 
twist. Europeans, be says, 
concur with us! 

Who has Mr. Rosenfeld 
been meeting? Iu my expe- 
rience, very few Europeans 
view tbe “American way” in | 
such a favorable light. While 
Europeans may well be 
“amazed” at America’s re- 
cent economic achievements, 
they are loath to bear tbe tre- 
mendous social costs of 
homelessness, crime and so- 
cial inequality. 

Indeed, if the United States j 
were sogreatly, revered, foe 
various countries of Europe , 
would be casting off foe 
“burden” of foe social, wel- 
fare state wife alacrity. Ob- 
viously. this is not foe case, i 
Perhaps Mr. Rosenfeld 
should rethink just how pos- 
itively America’s economic 
decisions are regarded; a trip 
to Europe may surprise him. 

; NGKKI MONTOYA. 

. Frankfort 

Harmnan’s Grit 

Like so many writers, 
Maureen Dowd (“Great Wo- ' 
men of Georgetown ,* Opin- 
ion. Feb. 17) concentrates on i 
foe men in Pamela Harri- I 
man’s life and not her worthy 
accomplishments- Just like 
Katharine Graham, Mrs-THar- j 
rim an also made it by "grit, j 
intelligence and hard work.” 

Pamela Hamman lovedtbe i 
United Stares and worked I 
hard for it At the time of her 
deafo she was working under 
jjemendous pressure trying to ! 
resolve the problems between 
prance and the United States. 

. PATRICIA TL CLARK. 

' . Puis. I 




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PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD 


TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SGNDAY, FEBRUARY 1^2, 1997 




PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HRBALU TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


A Matter of Taste; How Genes Affect Preferences 


Researchers find that a quarter of people are supertasters, who react vioterrtfy to a bitter test chemical; half are 
medium tasters, a quarter nontasters. Genetics seems to determine characteristics of tasting apparatus. 


Pores on papillae on tip of tongue 
are conduits for taste stimuli to 
reach taste buds. 



Supertaster 

Supertasters have many more 
papillae, very dosefy arranged, 
but much smaller. 


Nontaster 

Nontasters have many fewer 
papillae, with far fewer pores, 
though they are larger. 


Tongue — 

Fungiform 
papilla 


Sounds: Dr. Linda Bartoshuk, Dr. Valerie Duffy 
and Dr. Laurio LuccHna; T7w AMA Enqietapedte 
of UeMna (Random House) 



NY T 


Like Broccoli? It's in the Genes 


By Sandra Blakeslee 

New York Tunas Service 


S EATTLE — Babies are bom 
with a number of obvious ge- 
netic traits, like brown or blue 
eyes, black or red hair, dark or 

S t skin. But patents take note: Infants 
enter this world equipped with a 
genetically determined number of taste 
buds embedded into the tips of tbeir tiny 
tongues. Some have a few hundred or so 
buds while others are endowed with tens 
of thousands of receptors for sweet, 
sour, salty or bitter foods. 

Emm birth to old age, this inborn 
characteristic helps determine what 
foods people crave or leave on tbeir 
plates, scientists say. It explains why 
some people detest double chocolate 
fudge hosting on cake while others 
deftly maneuver themselves into getting 
an end piece with twice as much goop. u 
sheds light on why some individuals 


sight, cm the premise that they require 
more calories for brawny pursuits. 

Research has shown that people in- 
habit vastly different taste worlds, said 
Dr. i.inrta Baitoshuk, co-organizer of a 
symposium oo the genetics of taste held 
here during the annual meeting of the 
American Association for die Advance- 
ment of Science. Genetic differences in 
taste lead people to eat or refuse certain 


how bitter it was. yet Dr. Fox tasted 
nothing. Intrigued, Dr. Fox handed out 
crystals of the chemical at the 1932 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science meeting, asking how 
many passers-by could taste it. About a 
quarter of foe people were nontasters, 
while everyone else said it was bitter. 
Dr. Baitoshuk said. 


foods and play a role in how fat or thin 
ud Dr. Baitoshuk. a professor 


juice, while others look forward to eat- 
ing those foods every day. 

It is foe reason some people like food 
close to room temperature and others 
like it hot, or cold, why certain people 
can gobble down spicy foods laced with 
red chili pepper, why some children are 
notoriously picky eaters and why many 
older people lose their appetites. 

It may even play a role in evolution, 
leading pregnant women to avoid bitter 
foods that might be toxic to foe fetus and 
prompting men to eat everything in 


(bey are, said 

of surgery at Yale University. 

Such differences may even influence 
who gets cancer, said Dr. Adam 
Drewnowski, foe symposium's other 
co-organizer and a- professor of public 
health, psychology and psychiatry at foe 
University of Michigan in Arm Arbor. 
He speculated that those who avoided 
foe sharp or bitter nwres of many fonts 
and vegetables might be at a higher risk 
for some diseases. 

Given that food preferences and eat- 
ing habits are profoundly influenced by 
a person’s family and life experiences, 
ana cultural factors, “it’s really amaz- 
ing that a biological variable like taste 
genetics shows up at all,’ 1 * Dr. Bartoshuk 
said. “But foe tongue is hardwired for 
behavior in ways scientists are only 
beginning to understand.*' 

The study of human taste genetics got 
under way in 1931 when Dr. Arthur Fox, 
a chemist at DuPont Co., synthesized a 
chemical called phenylfoiocarbamide. 
After some of foe chemical exploded 
into the air, a colleague commented on 


T 


HAT fascinated the scientists 
of the day. They determined 
that nontasters carried two re- 
cessive genes that played a 
role, still unknown, in taste physiology 
and that tasters carried at least one dom- 
inant gene for foe trait 
* ‘We now divide the world into three 
groups," Dr. Bartoshuk said. A quarter 
of all people tested are nontasters, half 
are regular tasters and a quarter are 
supertasters — people who react vi- 
olently to a similar compound. Regular 
tasters say the substance is bitter, bat 
they are less sensitive than supertasters 
to small concentrations. 

In looking at people's tongues with a 
special blue dye, researchers have found 
that supertasters have up to 100 times 
more taste buds than nontasters. 

Each taste bud feeds information into 


The Hysterectomy Debate 



By Natalie Asgier 

New York Tunas Service 


such a major operation continues to be 


woman's lifelong 



EW YORK — Hippo- 
crates thought foe uterus 
wandered and so drove 
women to hysteria, but in 
that belief he was foe mad one. if 
anything, the womb is foe body’s At- 
las, bearing the weight not only of foe 
human future but of bitter social and 
medical disputes. 

The abortion debate can be viewed 
as a question of who owns the womb 
— woman or embryo. The most com- 
mon surgical procedure in foe United 
States is foe much-criticized Caesar- 
ean section. And the second most com- 
mon is another, mare radical storming 
of foe uterus, foe hysterectomy. 

The debate over hysterectomies is 
one of quiet foxy. Nobody bombs sur- 
gical suites in protest, bat for years 
critics have assailed what they call tire 
hysterectomy industry. 

They have campaigned vigorously 

appearing on television and^writing 
articles and books with names like 
“The Hysterectomy Hoax" and “No 
More Hysterectomies." 

They have com plain ed that doctors 
are too quick to take out foe uterus, 
particularly with middle-aged women 
for whom foe organ is supposedly past 
its purpose anyway. They have 
blamed greed by doctors and hos- 
pitals. noting foal hysterectomies con- 
stitute a S3 billion a year business. 
They have accused surgeons of lazi- 
ness, of liking hysterectomies because 


almost routine. They say too many 
to tile hysterectomy as 


th ^procedure is relativel^easy. 


Each year, about 56Q,UUO women m 
the United States undergo a hyster- 
ectomy, a rate that is among foe- 
world’s highest. 

Now medical experts and women 
alike are struggling to understand why 


doctors ding 
the fixst-tine solution to any gyneco- 
logical problem of middle-aged pa- 
tients can be patronizing or dis- 
missive when a woman asks about 
alternative treatments. 

Some experts predict that foe num- 
ber of hysterectomies win decline in 
foe near future, perhaps dramatically, 

as baby boomer women pass the peak 

hysterectomy years of ages 40 to 50. 
Moreover, new alternatives to hys- 
terectomy are starting to gain attention 
in riinfefli trials. Finally, as managed 
care takes over the medical industry, 
hysterectomies may no longer be 
automatically covered, for they are 
often considered elective procedures. 

Whatever happens, hysterectomies 
are a staple of gynecological surgery. 
By the age of 60, one in three Amer- 
ican women will have had her uterus 
removed. In Daly, by comparison, foe 
figure is rate in six women, while in 
France, it is only one in 18. 

The reasons for having a hyster- 
ectomy vary widely. Few would argue 
against a hysterectomy in cases of 
cancer of the uteius, cervix or ovaries, 
but such instances account for only 10 
percent of foe total. The roost frequent 
impetus for having a hysterectomy is 
foe presence of fibroids, benign 
growths of the uterine muscle that, 
depending cm their location, can cause 
considerable pain and bleeding. 

Other common reasons are sus- 
tained heavy bleeding, hormonal im- 
balances, endometriosis — the ab- 
normal and sometimes painful growth 
of uterine lining tissue outside the 
uterus — and pelvic discomfort that 
cannot be explained. 

Critics of the widespread use of hys- 
terectomies emphasize not only the 
dangers of major surgery, , bur foe role 


SK foe shape and 
upside-down pear, has been regarded 

SSyas an incubator * acute 

Snd distensible baby sac that can be- 
come, in foe words of cw gynecdogw* 
a “nuisance" after chUdbeanng. 

v** enffle researchers insist that foe 


Yet some researchers , 

uteres is an integral part of foe body s 
endocrine system ana that it continues 
to perform essential functions even 
after menopause. Not only does u re- 
spond to honneoes — as everybody 

who has menstruated is weU aware — n 

creates a few compounds of its own. 


A 


MONG these are beta-en- 
dorphins, the body's innate 
p n m k illers, and a type of 
__ prostaglandin called pros- 

tacyclin, which inhibits blood clot- 
ting. The loss of this source of prosta- 
cyclin could help explain why women 
who have bad hysterectomies are 
prone to cardiovascular problems. 

Nora Coffey, director of Hyster- 
ectomy Education Resources and Ser- 
vices, a nonprofit counseling and in- 
formation organization in Bala- 
jvania, that she stan- 


after her own hysterectomy at age 
36, contends that the effects oi 


effects of a hys- 
terectomy are profound and that wo- 
men must be warned of them in detail 
before undergoing the operation. 

Dr. Sam Kirschner, a psychologist in 
P hiladelphia who has counseled many 
women with hysterectomies, said that 
some became depressed and lost their 
sexual appetite without realizing foe 
surgery might have something to do 
with it For a number of women, the 
rhythmic contractions of the uterus and 


cervix ditrfno orgasm are an important 
beloss of 


pen of their pleasure, and the 
thay cauadry can leave them with a 
sense 


Selenium: Cinderella Nutrient? 


By Jane E. Brody 

Not fork Tones Service 


Chief Sources of Selenium 



two types of nerves. Dr. Baitoshuk. said. 

One seeds taste signals to the brain for , jTt ^ , ift ^ ^ 


EW YORK — Selenium, a 
mineral long feared for its 
toxicity, is on foe toad to 
becoming a Cinderella nu- 
trient. As foe last of 40 nutrients to be 
proved essential to human health, sel- 
enium is now the subject of both human 
apd animal studies that suggest it can 
help prevent foe two leading killers in the 
Western world: heart disease and cancer. 


processing. A second senses pain, tem- 
perature and touch. “This is really crit- 
ical." she said. “It tells us that super- 
tasters are superfeelers and superpain- 
peredvers, at least with tbeir tongues.*' 


CROSSWORD 


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Rogers cjuip 
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as Idas America, to 


swrarthforths 

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correctly 


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la die latest published study, sdea- ; 
ium supplements taken for 10 years' 
failed in their primary mission, to pro- 
tect against foe development erf skin 
cancels, but they were incidentally 
found to reduce ofoer cancers by a third 
and to cut overall cancer deaths in half. 

This effect of a daily 200-microgram 
supplement was so dramatic that foe 
researchers are convinced that it is real, 
not just a statistical fluke, even though 
foe study was designed to examine a 
different question. 

Earlier studies had linked low dietary 
intakes of selenium to an elevated risk 
of heart attacks, strokes and other dis- 
eases related to high blood pressure. 

People with low levels of selenium in 
their blood were shown to be force times 
as likely to die of a heart attack as those 
with higher selenium levels, a finding 
that may be related to selenium's ap- 
parent ability to raise blood levels of 
HDL, foe “good" cholesterol, which 


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jvements in well-being have 
also been noted in selenium studies. In a 
15- week study by Dr. James Pezzland, a 
psychologist at the Grand Forks, North 
Dakota, Human Nutrition Research 
Center of the Agricultural Research Ser- 
vice, 15 men who were fed a selenium- 
rich diet reported a significant improve- 
ment in mood, feeling more clearheaded 
and elated at foe end of the study than at 
the start A comparable group of men 

g 'ven a selenium-poor diet repeated 
eling worse. The test diet contained 
240 micrograms of selenium daily. 


More than 80 percent of the 
selenium in the American c Set 
comes from just a few foods. 


o! individual diet 


White broad 
Chicken 


14.2 




White rolls 



Turkey 
Total percentage 


Soun&GatWF.OaitnJrJComdl Unhandy NYT 


more than triple foe currently recom- 
mended amount 

But researchers, though optimistic, 
remain very cautious about advising 
people to start gulping down selenium 
tablets. They point out that in indus- 
trialized countries, where foods come 


Heart Disease: Treatment vs. Diet 


By Lawrence K. Altman 

New York Tones Service 


W ASHINGTON 
— Medical and 
surgical treat- 
ments for heart 
patients have been much 
more important in the decline 


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in heart-disease deaths in re- 
cent years than widespread 
changes in diet and other 
means of basic prevention, a 
new statistical study has 
found. 

About 70 percent of the 
drop in foe number of deaths 
from coronary arteiy disease 
can be attributed to use of 
dot-dissolving drugs, like 
streptokinase and tissue plas- 
minogen activator, and pro- 
cedures fibs angioplasty and 
bypass surgery for people 
with coronary artery disease, 
according to foe study, pub- 
lished Wednesday in The 
Journal of the American 
Medical Association. 

Dietary changes in the gen- 
eral population aimed at pre- 
venting coronary artery dis- 
ease accounted for only about 
25 percent of foe drop' be- 
tween 1980 and 1990, said foe 
study’s lead author. Dr. Maria 
GJ4. Hunink, of foe Harvard 
School of Public Health and 
University of Groningen in 
the Netherlands. 

Dr. Hunink said in a tele- 
phone interview from Groom- 
gen that her team had been 


pact than prevention on foe 
incidence of coronary artery 
disease, the most co mm on 
type of heart disease. & re- 
mains foe InaHmg cause of 
death of Americans, despite a 
decline of fnxn 2 percent to 4 
percent each year in recent 
years. 

Scientists have been uncer- 
tain about the relative contri- 
butions of treatment and 
~~ * — — preventing the 

o£ of the disease 
rather man its recurrence — to 
foe drop in deaths from cor- 
onary artery disease. Dr. 
Hunink said that before the 
study, she would have guessed 
basic prevention would ac- 
count far at least half the 
drop. 


is that die costs of various 
treatments and prevention 
methods were not part of foe 
study, which relied oo a com- 
puter simulation model based 
on national health statistics 
and clinical trials. Dr. Hunink 
said her team was «rp»nding 
the study to find the costs ana 
benefits of specific treatment 


andpreventibn factors. 
The so 


'amazed" to leant that med- 
ical treatment had a larger im- 


D R. Hunink pointed 
out in the interview 
that primary pre- 
vention measures, 
like changing the diet and 
stopping smoking, were still 
important. The study did not 
suggest that such prevention 
was ineffective, merely foat 
treating people who were 
already ill had a bigger ef- 


study found that, as a 
basic prevention step, stop- 
ping smoking accounted for 3 
percent of the decline in 
deaths and foat the improve- 
ment in lipoprotein levels ac- 
counted for 16 percent As a 
preventive step among those 
who had already developed 
coronary artery disease, stop* 
ping smoking accounted for a 
4 percent decline in the num- 
ber of deaths and the improve- 
ment in lipoprotein levels ac- 
counted for 18 percent. 

A limitation of the study 
was that it did not take into 
account exercise and the use 
of aspirin and estrogen to pre- 
vent heart disease because not 
enough data were available, 
Dr. Hunink said. But she ad- 
ded that such factors would 


**•— wAsfeiiac 





fji" 


lie' 


.(liarto I 

I!"-' 

[Hir-ii* 




from many areas, it is possible to con- 
sume amounts of selenium that appear 
to be protective as part of a wholesome 
diet. 

And selenium in foods appears to be 
used better by the body than the form 
found in most supplements. While foe 
promise erf benefit from a daily sup- 
plement is strong, it has not been 
proved, and foe possibility of. toxicity 
for those who overdo it is serious. 

The Food and Nutrition Board of foe 
National Academy of Sciences con- 
■ skiers a daily intake of between 50 mi- 
: crogi?nns aQd2C©miax>grtonstobe^afc 
ana adequate, and it has established 
recommended dietary amounts of 5S 
micrograms daily for adult women and 
70 micro grams for adult men. For in- 
fants and children up to age 14, re- 
commended daily dietary amounts 
range from 10 to 45 micro grams daily. 

Most Americans seem to consume 
enough selenium in their food to satisfy 
the current recommendation. Surveys 
have indicated that foe average Amer- 
ican consumes about lOOmicrograms of 
selenium daily, although in one study in 
Maryland, 17 percent of adults took in 
less than 50 micrograms. 

Selenium tends to be richest in foods 
high in protein. Fish, for example, is an 
excellent source. The main sources of 
selenium in foe American diet are 
meats, poultry, fish, cereals and other 
grains. 

Among vegetables, mushrooms and 
asparagus are good sources. Brazil nuts, 
especially those sold with their shells 
on, are loaded with selenium; two nuts a 
day can more than meet the daily need. 

The question now, though, is how 
much is enough. Selenium is an an- 
tioxidant that can help to prevent the 
degradation of fats and cell membranes 
and block the action of cancer-causing 
chemicals. More than 100 studies con- 
ducted in laboratory animals treated 
with carcinogens have shown that sel- 
enium added to the animals * usual diet 
protected them agains t a number of can- 
cers, including cancers of the breast, 
esophagus and liver. 




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INTERNATIONAL 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


THURSDAY FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


PAGE 11 


Daimler Buoys U.S. Presence by Buying Ford’s Heavy-Truck Unit 


By John Sc hmid 

International Hentid Tribune 


. — Daimlfir-Ben2 AG 

has agreed to buy the heavy-truck op- 
erations of Ford Motor Co. m the Ge£ 
mao conglomerate’s first big-ticket ac- 

quisiOOTismceitsoldoffordosedatiiinl 

of its businesses in the past two yeare. 


Terms were not dr^d osed. 

Although each company has a dif- 
ferent strategic interest, the agreement 
signals that two of the world's leading 
motor-vehicle makers intend to 
s^ngthen their respective lines of tra- 
totoxud businesses in North America. 

Ne ws of Daimler's acquisition miw- 
as a surprise because many observers 
had expected die German company’s 
first expansion step to be in Asia, a 
region it has targeted for expansion. But 


it does show Daimler's determination to 
broaden its base -beyond Germany’s 
high- wage, high-cost base, analysts 
said. 

For Ford, the divestiture of its heavy- 
trnck business means tin* company ran 
concentrate on passenger cars and light 
trucks, which make np virtually all orits 
$147 billion in 1996 worldwide sales, a 
company spokesman said- In recent 
years. Fora has sold its activities' in 
tractors, aerospace, steel, 
leasing, and even a C~ ,: * 
savings and loan bank. 

In Daimler’s case, it shows that the 
German company’s failed 1980s ex- 
pansion into sectors ranging from air- 
craft to microwave ovens will not pre- 
vent it from taking on new investments 
in its time-honored and profitable 
vehicles businesses, a company spokes- 
man said. 


Since Daimler’s chai rman, Juergen 
took over in May 1995, be 
Jy reversed the expansion and 
iced die portfolio of operating di- 
visions to 23 from 35, jettisoning many 
of its aerospace activities. 

Under Mr. Schrempp, the company is 
determined to concentrate once again on 
motor vehicles, which accounted for 
four-fifths of Daimler’s sales of 106 
bQlion Deutsche marks ($62.9 billion) 
in 1996 sales. Daimler is the parent 
company of Mercedes-Benz AG. 

Through its Freight liner Corp. sub- 
sidiary, based in Portland, Oregon, 
Daintier already ranks as the biggest 
maker ofheavy trucks in North America 
with 30 percent of the market It is also 
the leading U.S. exporter of heavy-duty 
trucks, the company said. 

“Unlike the acquisitions of the past. 
this is a business that Daimler under- 


stands,*' said Stephen Reitman, in- 
dustry analyst in London at Merrill 
Lynch & Co. 

- “Freightliner is one of the real suc- 
cess stones of the Daintier group,’’ he 
added “In that sense, it isa good deal. It 
is the strong getting stronger.'* Ford's 
operations wifi add more than $1 billion 
in annual sales to Freighdiner, which 
posted 1996 sales of S5 billion, and will 
increase Freigh timer’s North American 
market share to nearly 40 percent 

“We have completed a thorough, 
strategic review of our heavy-truck op- 
erations and concluded that Fold re- 
sources can be better focused on our 
light and medium trucks with higher 
volumes as a core business,’ ' said a Ford 
vice president, Jim Donaldson. 

While terms were not disclosed, a 
source close to the companies said 
Daimler would be able to finance the 


acquisition costs in installments 
through its own cash flow and reserves 
without resorting to new credit lines. 

Daimler also will benefit the source 
said, because the cost of the acquisition 
will be less than what Ford spent to 
develop a new line of heavy utility 
trucks called the NH80 AenoMax series, 
which fills a gap in Freightliner’s ex- 
isting lineup of freight haulers. The 
NH80 platform is used for construction 
vehicles, fire trucks, oil delivery, 
tankers and snow plows. 

Ford declined to comment on its 
heavy-truck business, but indicated that 
earnings in the business were weak, at 
best. “If we were satisfied with the 
returns, we would not be doing what we 
are doing,” said Mr. Jarvis, the Ford 
spokesman. 

Ford has agreed to sell the licenses for 
its truck lines, all of its technology and 


manufacturing equipment, and the parts' 
business. Fold, however, will keep its 
plant in Louisville, Kentucky, as well as 
the plant's 3,900 workers. Ford will 
retool the plant, the largest truck plant in 
North America, and produce light 
trucks there starting in 1 998. 

Freighdiner will produce the Ford 
vehicles as a second line from one of its 
six existing North American plants, 
where analysts believe it has better con- 
trol of manufacturing costs for heavy- 
trucks than Ford. 

By converting its plant to light truck 
use. Ford will expand capacity for its 
highest-volume North American busi- 
ness. “We sold more light trucks than 
cars in North America last year and are 
the world's leading truck manufac- 
turer,” said Chris Vinyard. a spokes- 
man at Ford’s headquarters in Dear- 
born. Michigan. 


Suharto Friend 
Does Business, 
Indonesia -Style 

CtnviUdbfOmSkgPnmDbpeKha 

JAKARTA — In Indonesia, doing business is 
largely a matter of whom you know. Few executives 
know more people than M ohammad (Bob) Thtsnn. 

Mr. Hasan just helped settle a tussle for control of 
the world’s largest gold deposit, in the process en- 
suring himself and President Suharto a multibillion-, 
dollar share of the mine. On Wednesday, Mr. Hasan 
was elected president-commissioner of PT Astra 
Internatio nal, Indonesia’s biggest automaker. 

Mr. Hasan formed a close relationship with Mr. 
Suharto during the 1950s when the president was 
regional military commander in central Java. . 

‘ l I have been friends with President Suharto since 
40 years ago when the Communists were still in 
Indonesia,’’ Mr. Hasan said after an Astra share- 
holders’ meeting Wednesday. 

Then-Colonel Suharto was serving under General 
Gatot Subroto, who took Mr. Hasan, an ethnic Chinese 
who later converted to Islam, under his wing. 

“Bob Hasan is truly trusted by President Suharto,” 
said Christianio Wibisono, an economist at theprivate 
Indonesia Business Data Centre consultancy. 

“If Suharto is the commander in chief. Bob is the 
fleet commander.” he added. “He is sort of good 
uncle to Suharto's children.” 

Mr. Hasan, a sports lover and Mr. Suharto’s reg- 
ular golfing partner, is regarded as -a key business 
adviser to the president! ft- 1 Canadian executive de- 
-scriMdMr.Jfasan as l&^Se xtrem elyiiiflueptial pet- . 
sdnwhdknbW's tow m f 

“He has 4- good grasp of details and knows how 
things work,” he said. 

Not long before his high-profile plunge into the 
Busang gold-mining project, Mr. Hasan s business 
life had largely centered on tbetimber business, 
where be heads a number of plywood producers. 

Mr. Hasan is also president commissioner of PT 
Bank Umum Nasional, the private banks Bank 
Bukopin and Bank Duta and die paper maker PT 
Kiani Kertas. He is also a ' commissioner of the 
insurance company PT Tugu Pratama Indonesia. 



Agewr KnacvhcaM/Rnun 

Mr. Hasan, left, outfitting his strategy for Astra, is a regular golf partner of Mr. Suharto. 


The Hasan-led Nusamba _ 

inttrests in the local partners of Bre-X Minerals Ltd., 
the small Canadian exploration company that dis- 
covered the Busang gold in 1994. Nusamba is 80 
t-owned by three foundations headed by Mr. 
and 10 percent each by Mr. Hasan and Mr. 
Suharto's eldest son, Sigit Harjojudanto. 

Tlte tale ofhow the gold dispute got settled isagood 
example of bow business gets dime in Indonesia. 

The gold, an'& ihtorie d 71 million ounces (9.8 
million MJk)grams) v ^yorih SS5-biUjon at cdrrect- 
prices. Bre-X does trot oavfe the expertise to mi ne all 
mat gold. So Mining Minister LB-Sndjana insisted it 
sell two-thirds of its stake to Banick Gold Corp., a 
Canadian company in partnership with a company 
controlled by Siti Hardiyanti Rnkamana, Mr. 
Suharto’s eldest daughter. 

The minister had threatened to revoke Bre-X’s 
rights to the mine if it did not come to terms. 

It is not nncammoo to find Mr. Suharto and his six 
children samewbereln a big Indonesian business deaL 
He has run the world’s fourth-most populous nation 
for 30 years, pushing it into prosperity in which his 


family has been a major beneficiary. But the children 
have begun to fight among themselves. With the gold 
mine, for instance, Ms eldest daughter squeezed out 
her brother by maneuvering Banick into the deaL 

At the beginning of December, in the middle of 
this unusually public spat over the gold, Mr. Hasan 
met with Mr. Suharto, mining executives said. He 
took along a friend. Chairman James Moffett of 
Freepoit-Mc MoRah Copper & Gold Inc. 

• After Mr.JHasan, Mr. Suharto and Mr. Moffett 
met, Nusamba bought controlling interests in Bre- 
X’s local partners.. 

Bre-X amxnmceaMonday that it had found a new 
partner — Freeport. Under die deal Mr. Hasan 
brokered, Bre-X will get a 45 percent stake, compared 
with fee 22J5 percent under the deal with Banick. 
Freeport gets 15 percent and must contribute $400 
million toward the cost of the mine. It has also arranged 
a $1.2 billion loan toward the rest of the costs. The big 
difference from the earlier deal is die 30 percent for 
Bre-X’s local partners, the biggest being Mr. Suharto 
and Mr. Hasan. There may be room for other investors, 
Mr. Hasan said (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Thomson-CSF on Sale, 
But This Time by Itself 

Paris Makes It Clear: Non-Europeans 
Aren’t Welcome to Bid for Defense Giant 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 


U.S. Trade Deficit Last Year Was Widest Since ’88 


CameritdbfOmSe^FmDapaldta 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. for- 
eign-trade deficit in goods and services 
surged to $1 14.2 bilHon last year, the 
worst performance since 1988, as the 
de fi cit with China hit a record high and 
the price of-crude oil rose to its highest 
level in six years, govern m e nt figures 
released Wednesday showed. 

In December alone, the deficit 
jumped 29.6 percent from November, to 
$10.3 billion, the Commerce Depart- 
ment said. The U.S. trade deficit for 
1995 was $105.1 billion. 

Exports, a key engine of domestic 
growth, declined in December. Imparts, 

a gauge of consumer and business spend- 
ing, rose to a monthly record. Th at co m- 
bination pointed to more subdued growth 
in the U.S. economy, analysts said. ^ 
Manufacturers remained conce rned 
that the strong dollar would hurt exports, 
said William Sullivan, an economist at 
die investment house Dean Witter 
Reynolds in New York. “Ow products 

are apt to get less competitive.” 

In December, exports of goods 2 md 

services fell 1.6 percent to $7139 bil- 


lion, led by a decline in foods, auto- 
mobiles, capital goods and consumer 
goods. Imports rose 1.5 percent to 
$81.68 bulion, reflecting increased 
shipments of oil, consumer goods and 
capital goods. 

Exporters have complained that the 
dollar’s appreciation against the yen and 
other foreign currencies have made 
UJS.-made products too expensive for 
overseas buyers, hurting foreign sales of 
goods and services. 

But the U.S. trade deficit with Japan 
declined to $47.68 billion, the lowest 
since 1991. 

Japan, meanwhile, said Wednesday 
that ns overall trade surplus fell sharply 
in January but that its surplus in trade 
with the United States soared 82 percent 
because of an increase in the value of 
exported automobiles. 

The Finance Ministry said Japan's 
overall surplus skidded to $4 L9 million 
last month from $507 million a year 
earlier. It Mamed seasonal factors for 
the decline and said Japan’s surplus 
would have been $5,19 billion in Janu- 
ary if such factors were excluded. The 


overall surplus was $7.1 billion in 
December. 

- But Japan’s surplus with the United 
States soared to $2.4 billion as the value 
of exported automobiles climbed 78 
percent 

The U.S. data showed that America’s 
trade gap with China jumped 17 percent 
last year to $39-5 Mlfion. lt marked the 
11th straight aramal increase in the de- 
ficit with China, and some analysts said 
the tread would very likely result in the 
deficit with China surpassing the im- 
balance with Japan this year. 

Total U.S. exports of goods climbed 
6J2 percent to a record $611.7 billion 
last year. But imports of goods were also 
a record, rising 6.6 percent to $7993 
billion- 

The U.S. aviation industry was an 
export leader. Boeing Co.’s orders for 
new aircraft almost doubled last year, 
bringing in a record $53 billion to give 
the Seattle-based company almost two- 
thirds of the world’s commercial jetliner 
market. Boeing delivered 218 airplanes 
in 1996. tip from 206 in 1995. 

Inc., the Peoria, ntinois- 


based manufacturer of construction 
equipment, announced last week it 
would form a joint venture with the 
German farm-equipment maker Claas 
Group Worldwide to make and sell har- 
vesters and tractors in Europe and North 
America. 

On the import side, a variety of major 
American brands depend of foreign pro- 
duction, ranging from Nike Inc., which 
produces 30 percent of its athletic foot- 
wear in China, to Mattel Inc., which 
depends of Chinese workers to make its 
Barbie dolls. (AP, Bloomberg ) 


PARIS — The French government 
announced Wednesdayfoat it would sell 
the defense company Thomson-CSF as 
a single unit at auction this year, but 
made it clear that Asian or American 
buyers need not apply. 

An attempt to sell off Thomson SA 
was stymied in December when the 
National Assembly’s privatization 
commission rejected the part of a deal 
that called for sellingthe consumer elec- 
tronics subsidiary, Thomson Multime- 
dia SA to Daewoo Electronics Co. of 
South Korea. 

The Finance Ministry specified Wed- 
nesday that it would sell Thomson-CSF 
as one bloc to a French or European 
company in the defease sector. The gov- 
ernment would retain a significant 
share, the ministry said, to “preserve 
the interests of national defense and to 
avoid a breakup of the company.” 

Emptoyees will^b av e the right to buy 

Thomson-CSF, valued at approximately 
12 billion francs ($2.09 billion). 

Officials said the government de- 
cided against a public share offering in 

to facilitate* 5 consolit^on^^dte in- 
dustry. The government also has argued 
that a public share offering would 
stretch the capacity of the Pans Stock 
Exchange, which will have to absorb the 
d privatization of part of France 
elecom, tire state telephone and com- 
munications operator, this year. 

Thomson managers would have pre- 
ferred a public share offering because it 
would have enabled the company to 
preserve its independence. 

In the bidding last year, Lagardere 
Group was awarded the whole ofThom- 
son over Alcatel Alsthom. Lagardere 
planned to merge Thomson-CSF with 
its own Matra and other defense in- 
terests, with Daewoo caking the con- 
sumer electronic subsidiary. 

The entire deal fell apart when the 
privatization committee on Dec. 4 
turned down the proposal to sell the 
consumer division to Daewoo after 
protests by Thomson Multimedia work- 
ers and die opposition Socialist Party. 

The government now says it will put 
Thomson Multimedia, which makes 


?! 


televisions, video recorders and other 
consumer electronics, onto the market 
in a separate deal later this year. 

Lagardere said the government’s 
plans for the relaunching of the sale 
vindicated foe proposal foot the com- 
pany had made last year. It said a Thum- 
son-Matra merger was still the best op- 
tion for foe industry. 

But Lagardere now faces a reinforced 
Alcatel Alsthom. The engineering and 
electronics giant recently announced it 
would ally with the state-owned 
aerospace company Aerospatiale and 
the privately owned Dassault Aviation 
SA to bid for Thomson-CSF. Alcatel 
announced earlier this month foal it was 
selling pan of its stake in the media 
group conglomerate Havas SA to raise 
the cash for foe renewed bid. 

For the French government, the sale 
of Thomson-CSF is not merely a major 
part of its privatization program but an 
attempt to create an integrated company 
capable of competing against foe U.S. 
defense behemoths that have formed 
through a series of acquisitions in recent 
years. 

“The government wants the widest 
possible grouping of industrial capa- 
city,” the finance, defense and industry 
ministries said in a joint statement. 

They said foe government was open to 
consolidation of the industry at either the 
French or the European level, combining 
French companies with defense concerns 
in Britain, Germany and elsewhere. 

Lagardere has already merged its 
missile operations with British 
Aerospace PLC and its space and com- 
munications activities with GEC-Mar- 
coni Ltd., also of Britain. 

President Jacques Chirac has made 
no secret of his desire to see an eventual 
consolidation between Lagardere and 
Alcatel Alsthom. But officials concede 
that foe rivalry over Thomson-CSF 
makes this unlikely at present, 

Thomson-CSF would be a major asset 
in any consolidated European def ise 
concern. It is the biggest defense .ec- 
tronics manufacturer on the Con «ent. 
specializing in missile, communiu tions, 
signal-processing and underwater acous- 
tic systems. Measured by value, it ex- 
ports about 40 percent of its production, 
and 35 percent of sales come from such 
civilian sectors as air traffic equipment 
and management, computing, health care 
products and automobile electronics. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


GM Discovers the Use of Government 


By Keith Bradsher 

iVpH 1 York Times Service 


DETROIT — Just four years ago, a 
senior General Motors Corp. executive 
appalled a roomful of diplomats and 
trade negotiators at an embassy dinner 
in Washington by arguing loudly drat 
the nation's capital did not really mat- 
ter because it did not manufacture any- 
thing. 

' That altitude, once common at the 
largest U.S. company, is fading 
quickly. As the autmnaker builds fac- 
tories in Poland. Thailand and Argen- 
tina, and as die resurgent dollar helps 
propel sales of foreign cars in America, 
GM is becoming much more active rm 
public policy issues. 

The dollar’s ascent has underscored 
foe change of heart. This winter, GM 
executives were among the first to warn 
about the bruising effects of foe dollar's 
rise mi American industry and to lead 
efforts to persuade Treasury Secretary 
Robert Rubin that the dollar was too 
higjb in currency markets. Adozen years 
ago, when foe dollar was also soaring, 
Qri was one of foe last big manu- 
facturers to push for government relief. 

Louis Hughes, the president of GM*s 
international operations, has become 
an outspoken critic of plans fora single 
European currency, because be fears it 
could initially squeeze profits and slow 
economic growth. The automaker’s 


bying on issues like global warming, 
and the board has just added two di- 


rectors known for their outspoken but 
different views on international trade. 

Even Chairman John Smith Jr., who 
remains visibly uncomfortable discuss- 
ing public policy issues, says GM will 
inevitably take more public positions as 
it expands overseas. He pomts out that 
it strongly favored the renewal last year 
of China's most-favored-nation status. 

One reason is that GM is rapidly 
expanding its operations in many Asian 
and Latin American markets where 
overcoming trade restrictions and win- 
ning gove rn m en t approval for factories 
are often crucial for success. SoGMhas 
been taming to Washington for the same 
support that foreign automakers have 
long sought from their governments. 

It is impossible for GM to run its 
worldwide operations, said foe vice 
chairman, Hairy Pearce, “without as- 
suming some responsibility for being a 
well -informed participant in public 
policy debates and issues.” 

Current and former executives say 
one reason GM is no longer foe cor- 
porate wallflower on policy issues foot 
it used to be « the recovery from its 
management crisis in foe early 3990s. 
Executives have more time to spend on 
longer-term issues. 

Another reason is that GM’s public 
policy decision-making has shifted 
away from the financial staff in New 
York City, where a laissez-faire ethos 
has long been strong. Decisions are 
increasingly being made in Detroit by 
Mr. Pearce, a lawyer who made his 
reputation handling product-liability 


issues in Washington and in 
courtrooms around foe country. 

During the mid-1980s, the ambi- 
valence of the New York operations on 
dollar policy created tensions within 
GM. “Back in those days, some of foe 
operating people felt we should have 
been more vocal than we were,' ’ said a 
former president, Lloyd Reuss. 

The question now is whether GM's 
next step will be to seek restrictions on 
auto imports. Any such move would 
break a long corporate tradition of sup- 
port for free trade. 

In foe late 1970s, GM declined to 
take pan in an attempt by Ford Motor 
Co. to win protection from Japanese 
imports, effectively dooming the effort. 
As recently as 1993. GM pulled out of 
lawsuit preparations by Ford and 
Chrysler Corp., which wanted billions 
of dollars in tariffs im{ 
cars 

low prices 

GM has just added two directors 
with very different views on trade. 

One, George Fisher, foe chairman of 
Eastman Kodak Co., has made re- 
peated use of unilateral American trade 
laws in trying to break open the Jap- 
anese market and restrict the sale of 
supposedly underpriced Japanese 
goods in the United States. 

Percy Bamevik, chairman of ABB 
Asea Brown Boveri Lid., die Swiss- 
Swedish engineering giant, is also out- 
spoken on trade policy, but this new 
board member strongly supports inter- 
national limits on unilateral trade laws. 




PAGE 2 


DSTERNAXIONAIi HERALD ^tlNE. SAIPBDtf-SUND^ FEBRUARY 1-2, 19W 






PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


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Capm General 

• HA-.'':.': -v— i- 

Source. Bioomberg, Reuters 

Imeraaoonal HenUTribone 

briefly: 


A Take-No-Prisoner Takeover 


By Saul Hansell 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — For a chief executive, Charles 
Rinehart has Long been unusually glum about the 
prospects of the company he runs. His new recipe: Buy 
another company dial is in just as bad a position and 
dismiss thousands of redundant employees. 

He beads H-F. Ahmanson & Co., the largest sav- 
ings and loan institution in die United States. Late 
Monday it made an unsolicited offer to buy Great 
Western financial Corp. the country's second-largest 
savings institution, for stock worth $6.6 billion. 

But there is little profit in the traditional savings 
and loan business of making mortgage loans with 
money raised from certificates of deposit, and this 
deal will not change that. Nor will it eliminate the tens 
of billions of dollars in loans the two companies made 
in the late 1980s to finance California homes now 
worth far less than the mortgage balances due. 

Mr. Rinehart hopes that the combined companies 
can move more quickly toward being more like 
banks. Most of all. he hopes to close 201 branches, 
primarily in California, and cut expenses by $400 
million a year. 

Ahmanson declined to say how many people 
would lose their jobs should the deal go through. But 
in a voice-mail message to Ahmanson employees 
Tuesday. Mr. Rinehart said that none of them would 
lose their jobs or receive reduced responsibilities as a 


result of the acquisition. The policy in most mergers 
is to choose the best from either company. 

“We felt we had to dance with the ones that brung 
us," Mr. Rinehart said Tuesday, adding that most 
companies do not do enough to motivate and reward 
their employees. 

The deal would combine two institutions that 
fjpun^H the construction of many of the suburbs that 
b lanke ted Southern California after World War IL 
Ahmanson 's Home Savings of America built mono- 
lithic, mural-clad bank branches amid the new de- 
velopments. Great Western wnphugrawi cowboy im- 
agery in its ads. with John Wayne and later Dennis 
Weaver as spokesmen. 

But as it did for the cowboy , the sun is setting on the 
savings and loan. Both Great Western and Ahmanson 
are malting far fewer new mortgage loans titan they 
did a few years ago. Perhaps the best indicator is that 
two weeks ago Great Western said it would end its 
cowboy ads and dismiss Dennis Weaver. 

For most of the last two decades shares of die two 
companies have traded within about $1 of each other. 
But m the last year, Ahmanson has surged ahead. On 
Friday, Ahmanson shares closed at $40.50, against 
Great Western’s share price of S34.25. 

Wall Street embraced the prospects of a merger, 
running Ahmanson ’s stock up by $4375, to $44,875. 
That means its offer to Great Western shareholders is 
now worth $47.11 a share. Great Western’s stock 
jumped $10,625 a share, to $44,875. 


VALUE: A Wary Watch on Wall Street 

Continued from Page 1 


BM Developing Network Software 4% in U.S. Work for Foreign Firms 

SAN JOSE, California (Bloomberg) — International Busi- J Q 

ness Machines Corp. said Wednesday it would spend hun- 


dreds of millions of dollars during die next few years to create 
software for large corporate networks based on Sun Mi- 
crosystem [nc.'s Java language. 

The computer maker said it had software programmers 
working 24 hours a day, with development teams stationed in 
China. India. Latvia and the United Stales, writing programs 
that companies can use to create in-house software. 

The developers are working on VisualAge PartPaks, a 
group of products that businesses can use to create their own 
software programs, ranging from market research to training. 
The PartPaks products are expected later this year. 

• American Express Co.’s American Express Travel Related 
Services Co. unit said merchants could use the Internet to 
obtain credit-card authorizations and submit billings for trans- 
actions. cutting die cost of processing transactions. 

© Mexico's central bank plans to use about $440 million of the 
proceeds from two recent bond sales to repay part of its debt to 
the international Monetary Fund. 

© Leri Strauss & Co. will lay off about 1.000 U.S. employees 
this year in an effort to cut $80 million in costs, according to a 
newspaper report. 

© Marco Landi, an executive who until recently was Apple 
Computer Inc.'s chief operating officer, has resigned amid a 
reorganization of the company's sales operations, which will 
now report directly to Gilbert Amelio, Apple's chairman. 

© Hershey Foods Corp. said its $440 million purchase of 
Leaf Inc/s North American confectionery businesses will cut 
its earnings by 5 cents to 10 cents a share through die 1997 
financial year, but will begin adding to earnings in 1998. 

© Polaris Industries Inc_ the world's largest snowmobile 
manufacturer, will begin making motorcycles under the brand 
name Victory in 1 998. Bloomberg. AP. NYT 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Underscor- 
ing the increasing influence of the 
global economy on the United 
States, the number of Americans 
working for foreign companies has 
more than doubled since 1980 to 
nearly 5 milli on, according to a new 
study. 

The Organization for International 
Investment, a Washington trade as- 
sociation for foreign companies with 
U.S. operations, said in the study 
released on Tuesday that the largest 
concentration of these jobs in Cali- 


fornia, New York and Texas — ac- 
counting for a fourth of the total. 

The number of Americans work- 
ing for the subsidiaries of foreij 
companies increased from 2.03 1 
lion in 1980 to 4.87 million in 1994, 
the latest year for which statistics are 
available, the trade association said. 

This represented a 140 percent 
increase compared with a gain in 
total U.S. jobs during this period of 
24 percent 

The report said workers at the 
foreign-own ed companies received 
wages that on average were 26 per- 


cent higher than wages paid to 
workers at other U3. businesses. 

“International investment means 
good paying jobs for American 
workers," said Richard Goldstein, 
the chief executive officer of Uni- 
lever Unired States and head of the 
trade group. 

In 1980, the 2.03 million Amer- 
icans working for foreign-owned 
companies represented 2 percent of 
die total civilian work fence, while 
the 4.87 million total for 1994 rep- 
resented 4 percent of the total work 
force. 


Already this year, the index is up 

9 TVaU^treet professionals and 
most individual investors alike can, 
of course, recite the litany of good 
reasons for stocks* stunning 1990s 
advance, now the longest-ninnmg 
bull market ever: the global rise of 
capitalism; freer trade; declining 
government budget deficits; sur- 
ging corporate earnings; rising in- 
vestment by aging baby boomers; 

and, most important, a plunge in 
inflati on worldwide, which has al- 
lowed interest rates to remain re- 
latively benign. 

Yet even the stock market is sup- 
posed to be bound by certamlimits. 
Historically, prices of individual 
shares have been restricted by three 
factors: underlying corporate earn- 
ings, expected future earnings 
growth, and market interest rates. 

By many accounts, U.S. share 
prices now are pushing the envel- 
ope in terms of their levels relative 
to those factors. That, in turn, has 
fueled the idea that the new gen- 
eration of American investors, are 
consciously or subconsciously set- 
ting higher “fair" levels for share 
prices than previous generations. 

The soaring price of Coca-Cola 
Co. shares, one of die 30 blue-chip 
stocks in the Dow index, perhaps 
best illustrates the sacking of many 
old Wall Street paradigms. The 
stock currently sells at almost 44 
times the $1.40 per share that die 
company actually generated in 
earning s for stockholders last year. 

Over die last 17 years. Coke 
stock’s price-to-eamiogs ratio, or P/ 
E as it is called , has averaged about 
1 9. So investors are willing to pay far 
more for $1 worth of Crate’s earn- 
ings than they have in the recent 
past 

The danger in paying an ever 
higher P/E ratio fora stock is that, as 
a shareholder, there is less of 
something substantive backing up 
your investment. Even if Coke’s 
earnings continue to grow, the high- 


Dollar Chugs Ahead Despite Warnings by Bundesbank 


O n p ieH bj Oft- Sutf From D ijp k WMj 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
mostly higher Wednesday against 
other major currencies, shrugging 
off the Bundesbank's attempt to take 
the wind out of the U.S. currency’s 
recent rally. The German central 
bank also dashed hopes for another 
cut in German interest rales. 

The market also showed little re- 
sponse to news of the death of Deng 
Xiaoping, senior leader of China. 

“I think in the West, Deng was 


largely viewed as a figurehead, so I 
wouldn't expect much reaction," 
said Michael Metz, chief investment 
strategist at Oppenheimer & Co. 
“ft’s really been several years since 
he faded to the background and die 
power there has already been passed 
on to others." 

Traders keep their attention on a 
comment by the president of the 
Bundesbank, Hans Tietmeyer, who 
told a German newspaper of his 
“hopes" that the dollar’s advance 


had “come to an end,' ' signaling the 
central bank's discontent with a de- 
cline in the Deutsche mark that 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

could bring faster inflation in its 
wake. 

Mr. Tietmeyer’ s comment 

knocked the dollar off its high of 
1.7048 DM reached Tuesday. The 
U3. currency was at 1.6981 DM, up 
from 1.6850 DM, in late trading. 


“These remarks show clearly die 
Bundesbank is not happy with the 
dollar going above the 1.70 level," 
said Timo Klein, an economist at 
MMS International. 

Interest-rate policy should have a 
clear orientation toward stability 
and not “provide speculative ex- 
aggerations with a breeding 
ground," the Bundesbank said in its 
monthly report, a remark that may 
have been designed to suppress talk 
of further rate cuts. 


The repot said using rates to stim- 
ulate economic growth could run the 
risk of pushing up inflation and result 
in a loss of credibility with financial 
markets. 

The dollar was also at 124.425 
yen. up from 123.895 yen. 

The U.S. currency was also at 
1 .4857 Swiss francs, up from 1.4701 
francs, and at 5.7340 French francs, 
up from 5.6895 francs. 

The pound was at $1.6153, up 
from $1.6081 /Reuter.?, Bloomberg) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY~~ 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Wednesday's 3:45 P.M. 

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Indexes 
Dow Jones 

emm m m m at 

Indus 70653 7B71A 7D3LM 7WUJ7 — 5J9 
TnvB nS523 71SJ* 2347R3 23«J7 -4R1 
LWJ 23U7 231 Jt 230.1* 2RL*4 -1.12 

cm 71 * 3.17 noJB 2 i 5 Rn sua -ui 
Standard & Poors 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


C*ntenTs 

Hmr 

NWcmT 
CSWFn 
AT&T 5 


Hlgk Low a Me 

950.96 939SS 950.90 
5034 5S7A9 56123 
70054 29936 70053 
9631 94.91 9631 
81529 80634 81629 
77359 78437 77359 


T«toy 

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94636, 

SS935 

19908 

9536 

813.71 

79105 


»*7HB 

TaiMec 

P yoiCa i 

AJ,i u i5 


NYSE 


Nasdaq 


»T 3 AMEX 


427R3 47587 477 14 ,0479 
SB. 10 532 JO 23410 tOSA 
3*642 3*448 3*4.92 — 1J4 
77654 37*5* 27583 —031 

401.91 399J1 40148 tOJ* 


Hah m m a*. 

1370.15 130124 13*923 *144 
114649 11418* 114387 —111 
1-04.14 141830 142337 *U1 
158120 14*738 150270 >1SS 
177602 176198 177440 *1038 
0031 8*443 8041 *221 


Rjrwoo 

PMMr 

Nasdaq 


C-CUBE 



Hon LOT VM 

CO*. 


*0043 597.73 997J4 

♦ 1 M. 

Dow Jones Bond 



Prates 

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103L52 

103X3 

louaum 

100.43 

10039 

lOtatfislrids 

106X2 

106X8 


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Trading Activity 
NYSE 


AMEX 


AAmoed 

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TaMisBiO 

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117* 153S 
119* 109 
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Now Lows 

Mortcet Sates 


NYSE 
Aims 
Nasdaq 
tn nt&Scns. 


1010 2045 

1781 2072 

7160 1635 

5751 572 

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42 18 


Feb. 19, 1997 

HI 0 I Law Qom Chgo OpU 

Grains 

CORNfGBOT? 

SJWI tM mWmum- cwos oer bianel 
Mqr97 289’*, 2 B 1 V, 2fi4 *3* *6030 

8*07*7 BM 287 *3 105527 

Jul*7 288 Vi VW* 28SV: +4 7 R 57 S 

StS 97 281 274 278% *3 HIM 

Doc 97 2801* 273 277% *3 S1^» 

Estates NA TuVRStes 143538 
Tue'sesenM E1.1I5 up 20089 

SOYBBANASAL (CBOTJ 
UN Knf> Odtn Bar Wn 

MW 77 25730 25620 25670 -0J0 32424 
May *7 25230 1*50 Vnm -690 29^3 
JW97 3(650 *050 3SSJ0 -070 ZX771. 
Aap97 3*630 241JI 141 JO -QJ0 4371 

Sea 97 23L20 23450 23450 -050 VH6 

0397 73600 27230 72253 4840 U3S 

Estate* NA -nws.swes 35596 
Tue’soPte W *9378 up 2*85 

SOYBEAN 08. (007) 

40000 ftp. cans Mr a 

Mcr97 J4JB 235* ZL91 -«t 32419 

Moy97 2438 24477 1631 Z7J11 

All 97 36H 364* 2670 +ILB3 16*14 

Alfl97 2535 36*5 2438 +05B 3370 

5ep57 2£M 3452 21425 ffil 4 2J2t 

Ort 97 25.15 2451 25.U + 8 .W 93S 

Est. soles NA. Tuff's, ates 214*5 
IWimin 095*5 off 10023* 

SOYBEANS ICBOT) 

6000 Du mk*num- cants per buWMl 
Met 97 J3M 775 777 5640 

May 97 78S 7758* 777% -11* 50577 

Art 97 7MV> 775W 777 —V* 37544 

Au(j97 77815 7*9 770 — IW 7582 

Sep *7 739 732 V, 735 l «12 

Est.sdn NA TueH. sate 7953* 

Tub's open H 17123* up 3029 

WHEAT ICBOn 

6000 Du mkifentan' cents par Isahal 
Ota-97 363 362V, 363 —11* 

May 97 366ft 361ft 362 —I 

3*97 354 34 6* 3«ft t-1* 

Sec 97 3S6ft 351 354 +3V* 

Estate* NA Tuff'S, ates 15572 
TuViOPeninr 7437* UP 40* 


High Low Ckae CUge CUnt 

ORANGE JUKE (NON) 

ISIRlDi-aniiffpR 

Ota 97 7870 7730 7X55 -0.15 8A67 

Mar 97 8150 8046 B1A0 -020 9J93 

±497 86*0 Hie am im 

Sep 97 87 JO 8680 8750 -RIO 2.909 

EsLstes NA TOVAtan X»* 
Tuff'sooenW 26230 oR 5*9 


Metals 

eoLoatauo 

100 Dor **.- dotal mb- »por o*. 

Fed 97 34040 347 JO 30 JO 4030 2 JM 

Ota 97 3475D *6 

Apr 97 349.10 3*7 JD 3<7J0 -030 94J87 

JUT 97 351.10 34930 3080 *ILK 35JD4 

Aug 97 35240 3S240 3S2J0 »840 10617 

Od 97 3S5JD 3S5JO 35523 -HU0 5,177 

D*C 97 35830 35740 3S7J08 *1130 1US3 

Ft© 98 39930 35930 3S9JO 3410 

EcL sales NA Tuff's, sales 2IJB3 
Tile's open ini 1*4394 aft 2361 

H GRADE C0PFBI (NCM» 


HV> Lew Owe Chge Op W 
BERMAN GOVBRNUENT BUND OJPFE) 


DM250000 -phoflOl pd 
Mart? 10X4* » 


10X44 10039 —032 34U9B 

JUH97 10X02 182.73 1024* — 0^ 35458 
Estsota 23X3M. mesota imw 
Pier, men tnL: 281.156 up 6792 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMAT1F) 


Mar 971324* 13242 13243—006142434 
Jun 97 13140 131 JO 13138 — 046 20,714 
Sep 97 129 JO 129J2 12940 — 046 \M* 
Dec 97 N.T, N.T. 98.92 - 046 0 

Est. taunw: 15749S . Open Mt: 16X212 up 
13,106 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (LIFFB 
m .200 uNBoa-pIsof 100 pd 
MOI97 13015 12930 12947 UndL 12X582 
JunW 12940 12X98 12941 —041 17,903 
Estates; 86918. Predates 111.926 
Pnr.mealHtt U2MS up XOO 


HJflD Leer Oose Chge OpAit 

3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 

FF 5 rnBBon - pts d 100 pcf 
Mar 97 9AM 9AM 9A6? - H03 AZH33 
Jun 97 9672 9667 9668 — 0.05 494*5 
Sep 97 9670 966S 9667— D.N 36120 
Ok 97 9665 9660 9661 -004 29.133 
Mar 98 9656 9651 9653-0.03 18450 
Jun 98 9643 9639 9640— (HO 16308 
Sep 98 9626 9622 9624 — CL 02 11,967 
Dec 98 9606 9604 9605-041 10410 
Mar 99 9545 9542 9542-002 1X676 
Jun 99 9541 9557 9540—601 64 1 4 
Sep 99 9639 9536 9637-042 X789 
Dec 99 95.17 95.15 95.15-042 2.185 
Est volume; A6762. Opaa fnL: 259.070 ofl 
1491. 


Fad V 
Mar 97 

Apr 97 . . .. 

Mar 97 108*0 10540 10118 *118 10408 

Jun 97 10678 106*0 10660 + 1 J 0 *65 

Art 97 10600 WS40 10540 +140 6761 

AU097 10L80 10440 10440 +150 <21 

Sep 77 F1EL75 MXOO 10178 +146 24D 

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-V. 


usVrfn 

447 

in 

n. 

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cudMee 

tfil 

it 

lift 

15ft 

ft 


VSff'VB 

SO 

H 

mt 

S3 

♦ ft 


uiriS* 

104 

IT: 

12 ft 



fitlML 

ICS 

J»» 

a. 

4911 

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231 

S'. 

5*» 

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• ft 

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w 

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UK 

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158 

loh 

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488 

4 

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095 

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31 

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1 rated t 
T*«» 

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HIK 


interns 

IfiCffl 

yedS 

Vlaan 

Mk 0 _, 

UkiHE 

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vesrtc 

anr 

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whbEs 

Mtell 

KEBSern 

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rv. 

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I4fe 

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13ta 

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5ft 

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17ft 

17 

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17ft 

17ft 

17ft 

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4A 

4ft 

4ft 

-ft 

111 ! 

n 

111 * 


UU 

14ft 

14V 

-ft 

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14ft 

u*a 

-ft 

114ft 

lift, 


-ft 

lift. 


W. 

•V 

lift 

lift 

12 ft 

■ft 

l!ft 

lift 

lift 


lift 

1 } 

15ft 

+*v 

ft 

v. 

. ft 

-ft 

1 ft 

ift 

■ft 


STOCK SPLIT 

Crass TlaiDatsOB 3 lor 2 spHL 
R»rCo3far2spBL 
PenttEnMtpr2*ori spSL 

INCREASED 

AiaertBa* 

Arrow Infl 
CRyHakDnra 
AiefiaWesrBJr 
Nil Bn Canada 9 
SYBancotp 
UAPinep 


- HFNCFna 


O 

.14 

3-78 

>14 

U 

JUS 

2-28 

3-IJ 

M 

.18 

H 

> 1 / 

9 

X3 

2-9B 

3-U 

.15 

3-27 

S-l 

Q 

.13 

.1-14 

4-1 

O .105 
UAL 

2 28 

3-15 

- 

5X8 

34 

3-18 


BkYotbo Undo 
CUB Rid NY n 
Crass TlmiinOln 
Donne#yCp An 
Tribune Con 


AtadW-Pilceg 
AconNafnc 
Bader Inti 
BetowrrtBncp 
OGNAWlnat 
CnBOer Sysfera 
Cham plan Road 9 
QaytanHanas 
CoonN me 
EnranCtiPsw 
Gaylord Entertain 
GerHoutetare* 
Gu^aGatf 

GuWtwiCofp 
HPNC Rnn 
KeBhfey tnetram 
KeOr Sees A&B, 

Kecaek Wto 

Mim* fr+arp n 

NKWteADRt Biaqatea In 1 
nwottiy; OOuarTerf*} i 



X5 

0-7 

3-31 

— 

.12 

2-28 

>10 

m 

X55 

3-12 

>19 

m 

.10 

3-14 

4-1 

_ 

. 1 * 

3-3 

>13 

ILAJ* 



O 

.10 

3-3 

4-1 

a 

30 

3-24 

>10 

Q -2R25 

3-10 

4-1 

a 

.17 

>17 

>28 

M X675 

2-28 

>10 

Q 

.18 

4-15 

5-1 

0 

05 

>12 

4-2 

0 

m 

>26 

4-1* 

0 

ATS 

3-3 

>17 

a 

25 

2-28 

>14 

Q 

.10 

>3 

>17 

0 

xe 

>M 

>28 

0 

.06 

>17 

4-4 

a 

375 

>10 

4-1 

Q 

JUS 

>4 

>18 

a 

B 7 

>4 

>18 

Q-03125 

>14 

3-31 

O 

31 

3-3 

>14 

- 

XZ 

MS 

>26 


Apr 97 67.97 6675 6777 +141 

Jim 77 (445 6XS5 6*32 + 040 

AU077 6X95 6345 6100 +042 

Od 97 67 JO 67.12 6740 +042 

Dec97 6990 6943 6*72 + 040 

Ft** 7CJ0 7tL63 JOB +A40 
Ed. sates KA Tup's, sole* 144D 
Tie's open W 102411 up 110 

PS3NER CATTLE (OMOBQ 
50J00 ta- cants per ft. 

**ar 97 4775 CIS 6745 +192 

Ate 97 4679 6795 6845 +€Lft5 

May 97 7970 6945 7047 +077 

Aw97 7420 7345 7410 +LB2 

&P»7 74*5 7345 7435 +045 

Qc<97 75J0 7425 7i9S +090 

Est.sdee NA TuVisotes 4955 
Tuff's own Ini 22JT3 all 381 

HOes-Uaa (CMBU 
4tLoaa IDs.- cxatB w Ol 
A te 97 7245 7195 7240 +132 

Jun97 77S7 7735 7747 *042 

Jul97 7*70 7650 763 +047 

Auo97 7340 7X00 7155 +045 

Od97 iASS 66J0 4651 +075 

Obc97 6445 6400 6445 +035 

Ed-Stes NA Tub's, site* 8418 
Tie's open in! 34322 up 314 


429*4 

165*1 

19.15* 

IZ4M 

4H5 

2377, 


5473 

i4 £3 

5.W5 

4317 

1480 

1,944 


16129 

24B2 

2372 

vra 

7*1 


11270 11800 11250 +245 1333 

112J0 10935 112J8 +240 22401 

11X00 K»40 IWJ8 +250 19*0 

10660 10550 108.10 

W6J0 1*640 10640 

10*50 WS30 10540 

10480 10480 10480 

10270 mjK 10178 

MXOO 10350 M100 

Ed. sites NA Tie's, sites 
Tie's open H 5597* up >87* 

S8.VBR(Naua 

Mia frar carts oar tner oe. 

Fet>97 52X70 14 

Mar 97 52400 51SJ0 51150 -180 49406 

Ate 97 52496 2 

Wav 97 5950 taLOO 52450 —198 25412 

Jo 1 97 53190 52550 SS50 -22> M523 

Sep 97 S35J0 53150 53X50 -849 3311 

Dec 97 54250 53600 5*090 -290 S39 

JtfflM 5080 9 

Estates NA Tie’s. sate 17967 
TtasaponM 993*3 UP 537 


PLATINUM (NMtaO 
ID tar Dfc- doPon pa-n» ca. 

Apr 97 27250 3*890 36660 -28B 193*5 

98 97 37X50 372J0 37150 -090 3397 

0097 S150 37X00 37X00 -150 24® 

Jen 91 37990 37950 37950 +130 1,120 

ESL sales NA Vue's, solas 1119 
Tuff's open W 25392 aB 882 


Ctate 

LONDON METALS {LMEJ 
DoUaraper metric ton 


Previous 


ISrant 


TotW 1544ft 1545ft 
160&JDD 1*0400 157600 1S7990 


^rant 


mW 2 tcerh m&xdo S« 9 o 
234290 234390 2285-00 228800 

*5890 45990 *51 ft 632ft 

66490 68790 6*090 66190 


Spot 779590 730590 7*00 90 
Forward 


Tiff 


789090 790090 770090 


jpgf *0102X7 8020 90 8070 90 802090 

Po ward 

Zinc Bests* 

I 1 " 

rorm*u i 


405590 406090 <05000 <0*090 
Old MO 

1200ft 1192ft 1193ft 
123190 > 21590 171800 

High law date age OpbiT 


PORK 1 


ICCMBI} 


fe0 97 74B5 7290 7450 +132 448 

MaTT 75.10 7130 J4» +132 1417 

*tor97 7195 7160 7552 +1^ 3958 

Art *7 7X05 7X60 J4JH +1JS 826 

Aw 97 77 JO 69JS 77 40 tZIS 0 

EsLscte NA Tuff's, fetes 3376 
Tilt's open M 7378 up 12 * 


Food 


Stock Tobies Explained 

Sato Rows am unaflkM. YeaV HtfE and tom tefleo it* prerfaus S wda aka tie cumnr 
rwto bed na ta M ouna t^ day. Wherasj st rt8 o rsiuJLqWdendgraMrtfciflteaS p te C« iR « wore 
has been pete, the yens hpviow range aid (flrVJendtw VwmfarfwnnrsJoctaoiYy, IJntos 
dhsvdsented. rales iridMderto an annudetebunernds based an the kteattedanflan. 
a - dMdarm atn edra (s). b - annunl rale of dMdmd plus stodi AMead. c - liootoiDng 
dMdend. oc - PE enDeeds 99^d -culled. d - new yeoriy km. dd - loss bi the hat 12 morths. 
• - dMdmd declared or paid In precetsng 12 monftK. f ■ aimuol rate, bossed on ks> 
decfcmiilarL 5 -tBMdendlnCnnailiDnfimi&.atoeci to 15% noiHBideflcn fas. I +dMtfanil 

■ dedared after ^m^raontoe*dM<letnl.l-dMdend paid this yeot, era Bled, date « A0f no 

acton taken n blest dMdend mowing, k ■ dMdand dedond or paM this pm an 
pc&mAriftviBue wOfidMdeods m amors, m- annual rats redocod on bef dBcMtaa. 

■ - now tone In the past 52 araela. The Mglitoui range begins wttti the start of trocBng. 
dd - nest day deOvary. p - InHIal flwtdend, annual rate unknown. P/E - prtce-oamlnuS iWto. 
q-dosed-ond flwfwri fund. r-dMdend dectaredorpma b pracBdba 12nwnths, plus stodc 
Aridend. s - stock spBt Dhridend begins wflti date of split sb - sales, t - dMdetHt paid In 
sladsin praceiSna 12 months. esrimOed ash value an aMiMdend or OHlsbMan data. 
•-tnryBMf ftf^Lff-Pafiig hatted. «!• in btadcniptcrornorieefshlp or being RteBonbed 
gnaerBieBankruptey Act or securities assumed by such corqpantes.wd- when distributor 
wl - when bsttecV ww - wBh warranty * - mwIMderd » ta-rlflfrts. xdb - M-dtetribwtion. 
w -wntiourwaTTnrtx. g. atdMdand and sales b fun. yto -yield. 1 - salealn fuB, 


COCOA (NOE) 

1 S metric era- L per ton 


Morto 

1231 

1225 

7ZJ5 

*5 


136 

12*8 

127* 

+9 

JU97 

1308 

7300 

no* 

+7 

Sap to 

1335 

US 

7335 

+» 

& 

US 

rasa 


+13 

* NA 

Tub's, sates 

4X33 


Tua'ieoenH 90,908 up 5B0 


ECOKSEl 
Iff 300 Bt.- cents sar to. 

Morn 17333 1 050 17533 «U 
M0Y97 1*590 15*90 1*590 -7J5 
Art 97 15730 14898 1SSC +530 

Sev97 M9J0 Ml JO 14990 +4 S 
Estsato NA TueXsertes it 321 
rue's open rt 47988 0 B 5M 

SU3AK-W3RU7 It MCSE} 

1 1X000 Soj- Dents pw to. 

Mte97 1197 m» 113* +03* 

Mm>97 11.1* 1083 71.15 +027 

Art 97 mas MJ3 1895 +030 

Od77 1022 1038 1028 +8.11 

ESf-BrtK NA tub's. sertes UrB* 
Tie's open irt ia« 7 off 2717 


1399 


83S2 

2fcl2* 

e , m 

3319 


3*381 

42331 

293*5 

21379 


Financial 

U5T.BBJJCCMBO 

ST maaon-pteof loopd- 

Mar 97 fSJM 95 ju no* *om srsi 

Jun 97 9455 M93 H93 -092 X*S4 

Sep 97 9484 0(83 9484 1907 

Dec 97 9448 . _ 8(7 

EsLstes NA TUB'S. *tes 13*8 
TUrtCOBlW 10422 

5 YR.7ReA5URT IC80TJ 
*ia090B arli»-PiB& MOtstrt lWect _ 
Mar97U7-2B W-H lOff-W -O ItSJM 

Jun 97 W-P* 106-60 107-08 — O* 2450 

Sep 97 104-52 

Estates NA Tub's. sites 4533* 

Tuff'S open Ir* 289357 oB 003 


EURODOLLARS K3SU 
si mCBuo-pwor loopex 
McrOO 9X53 9339 9349 —093 

Junto 9248 9344 9344 -093 

Sep® 9X4* 5040 SQ« — 803 

Dec 00 9X36 9333 9X32 -OJQ 

Mar 01 5035 9132 9133 -092 

Jun 01 «J0 9128 9128 -092 

Sep 01 9X27 9123 9124 -093 

Deem 9219 911* 9114 —093 

Mted2 911B 91W 9117 —tLOB 

junto «.n air kli 2 -aoz 

Sep 02 91M 9X0B 9X08 -092 

Decto 9390 9299 9100 -002 

Est sales NA Uteisate 3*L«9 
TueH open inf 1310488 off U565 

BnmSHPOUffifCMBO ~ 
g ja e pounds.* ear wxwd 
Mte97 13170 13040 13140 
Jun 97 13130 130® 13090 

Sap 97 1 &n 

Dae 97 1-356 

Est totes NA Tub's, sites lUfl 
Toe's open W 38388 up HB7 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

MUM* doaora. s aer Cda. fffc- 
fftx 97 74M J3S1 J3S4 

Jun97 J4« J405 3406 

Sep 97 3482 J+» J«0 

Dec 97 J512 J4B3 J482 

EsLssHs HA Tub's, soto 7J73 
TWsopenlnt 56328 up 82B 

6SUI4KMUK(CMaO 
1S400D mteta, s per mark 
Mcrto JK1 38® MK 

Jun 97 3964 -9927 J922 

Steto 3977 5954 .5956 

Dec 97 3057 

Estates NA Toe'S. sertBS 35348 
rue’s open W 95.936 off 770 

JAPANBEY8N (CMBO 
J 2 J mmn vwv * Par lee ven 
Mar 97 3129 3060 3066 

Jun 97 3SI JIG JIG 

Sec 97 3317 3300 3300 

EsLsotos NA Tue-s.**** 14739 
Tuff's open irtf 82937 off 822 

SWISS FRANC (CMBO 
l 2 S^n 06 uu,f purffanc 
Mite 97 3833 3722 3733 

Jun 97 3800 3785 3790 

Sec 97 jm 

Esl sales NA TUe's.sates 21393 
Tuff'S open irt 55315 up 2577 

34WHTN STERUHC Oin>El 
awaoo- tool wow 
Mte97 917S 93J1 9174 r 033 

Junto 93m 9X52 9X3* * OJS 

S-S SJ+ 9X38 UrKh. 

PK*7 nx 9124 —401 

9X20 9113 9114 — BJJZ 

9X12 9105 91 M -Sa 

5« 9239 9X99 —004 

9X97 9232 *192 -SS 

91S3 9236 9X15 —QOS 

9286 97-79 92-79 — SjS 

9230 9176 9174 -qjb 

9U4 9170 - 

84351 . Pw - 

Pre+. open lre_- 906321 


40,109 

31370 

3UM 

25394 

2U62 

21319 

12.120 

9J99 

53M 

5356 

5.119 

5313 


un 

1459 

8 


4L4P5 

9374 

3314. 

745 


173*9 

*.151 

2394 

to 


77331 

33M 

(71 


50358 

3372 

1,964 


MertB 
Junto 

£3 

S3 ... _ _ 

tttto tov-tesR^nt 


005 


100501 

IIR9I9 

BX3S9 

57.123 

39391 

37.1*6 

2X051 

18399 

8636 

7380 

7343 

4822 


WYR.TREASWW POD 
uaMOOMto-toaiMtaaiioopa 
Mar to 110-11 11040 »M» -83 

Jlllto 109+23 109-14 W-M -D* 

Septo US-83 

Estjetes NA WUdS 79JB7 
Tub's ocen M 351737 ip 3542 

U5 TREASURY BOWS KBOD 
(BpewmMOpo * 32jdrteMDprJJ 
44ar 97114-0* 10-16 U3-ZJ —04 

Jimn m-21 m-oo m-a -« 

Seato 112-34 H3-® 10-31 —« 

Decto 10-0 H2-® TO40 —01 
Esl.stes KA TUCS.steS 303363 
Tuff's open W W® off 249 

LONBCRLT CUFfO 

esaon - to*3M annws 

MS to 113-K 113-06 11349 —049 30X10 
Junto 113-08 112-29 U2-B — HO 13 
EAetos 7X791 Ptav.Mos: 9X092 
nar-amlnL 2173K «p £Z!« 


aocoto 

412® 

1*10 




atpn™ SVKOU URK OlFFB 

W97 

tato *6te 9*87 9685 — nin 

Moyto 96W 96JS 963* — Dffl 

JUW7 9*89 9*85 9685 — flS 

5«57 9683 9677 9671 —004 

D«S7 96J9 96*3 96*4 —So, 

Ms® 9653 9647 96M -Offi 

JW9B 9615 9629 9629 -IB 

50098 96.14 964B 96JK —us 

M KM 9SM SS-SS 

9443 ~ <ua 

Junto 9X45 9531 9140 — n m 

tepto 952! 9X17 Si/ -OJQ 

Dta9 MH 9421 9432 -OS 

MOW fll» 9471 9471 

JunOO 9452 9482 9450 —am 

SS Iff W ZZzE 

M*O HTHE BROURAftJppp 

SS SS 9X74 yndv 

¥22? SS Wktt 93L78 — fin ? 

*W8 9182 91iB 9177 — X01 

w 3 Sn52'- 

rraxapnax: 27X9X1 up U 7 g 


191280 

1310 

17628* 

m 

12&14S 

MM 

%% 

w 

31,14* 

7® 

1,774 


90OS1 

9X1® 

4&55B 

am 

1X237 

1X732 


Induatrtats 

COTTON! (NCTN) 

yy. ODQ Rbc- oontE D®r |h 

Morto 72.10 7170 7105 +030 13308 

Mar 97 TUT 71® 7157 +038 30.104 

Art 97 7X05 7470 74.95 +X03 117*1 

Octto 74.10 7575 7570 +X10 1337 

Decto 76.10 7580 7585 —0.17 11215 

Mte® 77.00 7*55 7X55 -027 9® 

EES. sales na Tub's, sites 29jos 
Tuff's Cften n 71J21 IP 3717 

HEATB8SOB. DMER) 
exooo pert, cents per am 
Morto *R15 59.15 5980 +a« 308*1 

Ateto 5X70 5785 5X30 *033 27797 

May 97 5785 5*70 S.U +037 93U 

Am 97 5688 5*10 5*55 +047 JM5 

Julto 5*80 5*70 5*50 +052 XB34 

Augto 5695 5*70 56.95 +082 4360 

Steto 56JD 5*50 5*50 —031 334 

CWto 57 J* 23*7 

Nwto 5050 5X15 5X50 +0*2 1,9® 

Dteto 59.15 5X70 5980 +032 5835 

estsalss KA Tug's. sett* 3X833 
rue's wen W 1063*9 i» 2187 

UGHTS9ISTCRUDE (9M80 
IrtBOObL-aaOtesaarDoL 
Morto 72.75 2150 22J4 +X22 40857 

Ateto 2232 22JD 22J9 +XT7 7*B71 

Morto 7188 2123 TUB +0® 41330 

Junto 21-64 2133 2182 +111 37,733 

Julto 2133 21.15 2135 +XU 1*8*9 

Ateto 7U» 3098 21M 7*010 

Sffpto 20JB 20J0 2085 -OBI 15.981 

Odto 2X80 2086 2X70 +X0l 1130 

N»97 2X56 2055 2X56 +XQ2 9J18 

OffCto 2X45 2X34 2035 +0X3 2*9*8 

JCB98 204) 2032 2X32 1X871 

Feb 98 2031 2035 2031 +0X6 8.172 

My». M5. 7035 BUS *BXU 1191 

Bxswes NA. Tub’s, setea 9X1® 
Tbe'sonentaf 391874 off 2221 
NATURAL OAS CNMER} 
lUOOitm twCA. t nr nan Hu 
Morto 1050 1J» 1030 3X725 

Ateto HUB 7.93 2010 3*6)1 

MWto 2JD30 1JU UPS 1*721 

3xi 97 2315 7.9B0 U10 KUJ39 

Jiuto um 1.775 lino mu 

aw to 1030 u® 1030 7317 

Sep 97 1040 1000 raw 73® 

Odto 1050 1028 1050 0319 

N a/97 12C0 2720 Z7J0 

Decto 2320 1235 1290 *270 

Jun® 232 1250 1330 LD4 

EAtae* na Tue's.ptes 47X73 
tub's Open W 172.989 ip 3374 

UNLEADED GASOUffi (NMER) 
fioaowL cans tar eat 
Mteto **85 6X70 6485 +X49 2S8B4 

fteto 6*25 6535 6*05 ,033 to«0 

Morto 553S *530 *580 +033 14352 

8«to (S.M (430 *495 +038 933/ 

Art 97 080 5330 63JQ ,083 1194 

Aueto. 0 .15 6110 42.IQ +883 * 0 z 7 

NA Tuff's. sc*es so73» 
Tbe*lRMnH B9J89 Ip uc 
GASOIL OPE} 

UA Mara per metric ton- lots on DO tans 

Mteto 177.25 17530 17630 +1.00 19.943 
Apl 97 177X0 175X0 176X0 +X7S 9 1W 
SEyto 176X0 17535 176J00 +135 5X15 
Junto 17X25 17530 176X5 +130 8X84 
J irt 97 177X0 174.75 177X0 +1.75 3X40 

SSlS S'J* 177 *« +1J5 tlO? 

Septto N.T. N.T. 17X75 +2X0 1X68 
OcTto N.T. N.T. 179JS +SS l38* 
Nor to N.T. N.T. 18030 +2X5 596 

Decto 18030 180X5 18135 +1 S S2S6 
esLstriea;&<75. OpenlnL:5&7S4upl8 


Stock indexes 

SBPGDMP.BH3EX (CMBU 

SDitam 

BUD 81150 B19JB 
Junto 87780 BOSS 82730 
SWto HUB 833X0 S33J0 
Decto MM 

jt*. Tuo'a.sctei 


+0JB I8WH1 
+ 135 12.173 
-405 1X» 

1 X 41 

*1385 


Tuff's open rt 380 X 77 UP 303 *' 
Pnei«(URFE 3 


61® 

1X01 


CAC40 (MATIF) 

Feb 2 pax 2S99X- 20X0 20X87 

Mar V7263SX 260QX 2*053— 2HOO SS 




er the share price you pay relative to 
those eamings-.thc greater the po- 
tential decline m the stock *h<Hdd 
investors suddenly sour on Coke, 
for whatever reason. 

■ Stocks Under Pressure 

Stocks tumbled in a latc-day slide 
amid concern that share prices may 
have overshot earnings prospects, 
Bloomberg News reported. 

Adding pressure lo the market 
was news of the death ol Deng 
Xiaoping, China's senior leader. 

Bra traders said any reaction to the 

Chinese leader's death would be 
brief. “I don’t dunk it has any im- 
plications for U.S. or European mar- 
kets.*’ said John Williams, managing 
director ar Bankers Trust. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 4733 points lower at 
7,020.13. Declining issues were 
even with advancers on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

. The Standard & Poor s 500 Index 
fell 3,82 to 812.47. while the Nas- 
daq composite index, dominated by 
computer-related issues. Fell 0.23 to 
1.365.56. . . , . 

Ear lier computer stocks had ral- 
lied on unexpectedly strong earn- 
ings from Hewlett-Packard. 

Tfewletf-PacJcard soared after it 
sajd net income rose 15 percent to 
$912 million in the quarter ended 
Jan. 31, on sales of $10.3 billion. 

But one analyst said. "There are 
an increasing number of people who 
think this market is overvaluetL 

Bond prices fell as traders dis- 
missed a consumer prices report 
showing tittle inflation and fretted 
that a robust economy and low un- 
employment will drive prices and 
interest rates higher. 

The benchmark 30-year Treas- 
ury bond was down 1 0/32 at 1 00 24/ 
32. taking the yield up to 6-57 per- 
cent from 6.55 percent. 

The U.S. reported that the con- 
sumer price index inched tq> 0.1 per- 
cent, the smallest gain in seven 
months, buoyed the belief that in- 
flation will remain tame this year. 

( Bloomberg , AP) 


AW 97 
Jun 97 
Sep 97 
Doc 97 
Mar 98 
Sep 98 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


PAGE 13 


/ 


\ 


EUROPE 


'/'hi, Protli Sets New Cuts; 
Communists Object 


CoeftaV In Ow Fwa D^atcHa 

ROME — Prime Minister Ro- 
mano Prodi said Wednesday he had 

prepared the framework for a fresh 
budget to ensure that Italy is a 
founding member of die single 


European currency and would "be 
introducin ~ 


ui 


lucing the package in the corn- 
weeks. 

"But the Refounded Communist 
Party, which secures Mr. Prodi’s 
majority in the lower house of Par- 
liament, asked whether new budget- 


, aiy pain was worth the cost and cast 
"doubt on prospects for European 


'» I ail, 


'rp. 


economic and monetary union. 

Just two months after presenting a 
budget for 1997 that contained a 
total of 62 3 trillion lire ($37.2 bil- 
lion) in spending cuts and new taxes, 
Mr. Proth’s office said Italy 
more measures Co tame the public- 
sector deficit and meet cough criteria 
for the monetary union. 

Financial markets expect the sup- 
plemental budget to contain 14 to IS 
trillion lire in new cuts. 

Mr. Prodi said the package of 
measures would be introduced in the 
coming weeks, as soon as the Treas- 
ury knew how much money had to 
be raised. Official state accounts are 
due in March. 

$ “This budget, tied to progress 
1 already made, will allow Italy to 
meet the necessary objectives 
needed to fully satisfy the 
Maastricht treaty," a statement is- 
sued by die prime minister’s office 
said. 

Mr. Prodi has visited Germany 
twice in the past two weeks to press 
Italy’s case to be a founder of the 
. single currency. 

Meanwhile, doubts over Italian 
participation in the start of monetary 
union put pressure on the lira. The 
Deutsche mark rose to 995 lire on 
Wednesday from 989.05 lire on 
Tuesday. 

An analyst at HSBC Markets. 
Philip Tyson, said that the Italian 


currency “was suffering from un- 
certainties surrounding its particraa- 
tion in EMU/* 

Separately, the European Com- 
mission said its statistics division 
would rule Friday on accounting 
methods used by the Italian gov- 
ernment to reduce its budget rfefiriT 
in order to qualify for the planned 
common currency. 

The commission finance spokes- 
man, Patrick Child, said be expected 
the announcement by Eurostat to 
cover such items as die one-tune 
“tax for Europe’’ and interest pay- 
ments on state railroad loans. 

The tax would cut the deficit by 
0.6 percent to 0.7 percent of gross 
domestic prodnet, bringing Italy to- 
ward tbe target of 3 percent of GDP 
for adopting the single currency. 

Last year's deficit was about 7 per- 
cent of GDP. {Reuters, Bloomberg) 

■ German GDP Stagnates 

German gross domestic product 
stagnated in die last quarter of 1996 
compared with the third, but was np 
by about 2 percent from the last 
quarter of 1995. the Bundesbank said 
in its February report to be released 
Thursday, news agencies repeated 
from Frankfurt. 

The c entr al bank also railed on 
the government to make every effort 
to hold to the 1997 budget, and said 
the dollar’s appreciation against the 
mark was due to the strong U.S. 
economy and an interest rate dif- 
ferential in the dollar’s favor. 

Separately, the DIW research in- 
stitute said GDP would probably 
drop in tbe first quarter from the 
previous three months because 
slumping export demand had caused 
new orders to dive. 

“The latest information about 
new order mmlre from industry, as 
well as tbe development of tbe un- 
employment figures, show no up- 
ward trend," the institute said. 

(AFP, Bloomberg) 


‘Serious Error’ on Computer 

Silicon Graphics Regrets a Sale in Russia 


By David EL Sanger 

Sr* YorkThno Service 


■ WASHINGTON — The chairman of Silicon 
Graphics Inc. said his company “made some serious 
judgmental errors" when it shipped two small su- 
percomputer systems last month to a Russian lab- 
oratory that designs nuclear weapons and performs 
computer simutorious of nuclear earotosion s. 

“It is posable we were draped," Edward Mc- 
Cracken, die chairman and chief executive of the 
company, said Tuesday. 

ILS. officials, who had turned down applications 
from IBM Carp, and Hewlett-Packard Co. to ship 
c ompara ble mmputMi e to die same laboratory, have 
referred die case to tbe U.S. attorney in San Jose, 
California, which has opened an investigation. 

Silicon Graphics, which is based in Mountain 
View, California, acquired Cray Research Lux, tbe 
nation's premier supercomputer maker, last year. But 
the computers shipped to Chelyabinsk-70, where 
most Russian nuclear warheads were designed during 
tbe Cold War, were designed by Silicon Graphics 
before the Cray acquisition. 

They are “parallel processors" equipped with 
eight R1000 processors made by MIPS Technologies 
Inc., a m a nufac t ur er of specialized, high-speed mi- 


kind of processor found in advanced personal com- 
puters. But strung together they can form the basis of 
a supercomputer. Silicon Graphics recently sold afar 
more powerful 3 .000- p r o cessor machine to Los 
Alamos National Laboratory, which also does ad- 
vanced weapons design. 

The Commerce Department began an investiga- 
tion into Silicon Graphics’ shipment to Chelyabinsk- 
70 because h appeared that it violated tbe guidelines 
that now govern exports to Russia. Post-Cold War 
export-control regulations require that any products 
sold to a customer known to be a “weapons pro- 
tiferaior” have to be licensed. 

The sale became known to die Commerce De- 
partment last month when it was announced by the 
Russian government 

[Mr. McCracken said his company (fid not realize 
the customer in the $650,000 sale — die All-Sci- 


entific Research Institute for Technical Physics 

ay. The, 


A s- 


crqprqcessors. 

Individually, those processors are legal to ship to 
Russia; they are not much more powerful than the 


was actually a nuclear weapons laboratory, 
sociared Press reported.] 

Mr. McCracken said that his company’s proce- 
dures for selling computers to Russia have now bear 
revised so that be must personally approve any sale. 

The question that investigators are researching is 
who is re sp o nsible for the sale — the Russian gov- 
ernment; a Russian “systems integrator” that put tbe 
system together, named Catalyst Silicon Solutions; or 
Silicon Graphics* own office in Moscow, which is 
run by Russians. 


Investor's Europe 



4550 


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Source: Tetekurs 

taocnWMaul HraMTrriume 

Very briefly: 


Car Sales Give Volvo Profit a Lift 


STOCKHOLM— Volvo AB re- 
greater-than-expected 
■ profit Wednesday as 


the comparable period a year earlier. 
Analysts had expected a 26 percent 
derJinfr- Quaneny sales were un- 


improved earnings at the car di- 
vision helped offset a continuing 


slump in truck sales. 

Tbe Swedish auto company also 
said it would boy back 5 percent of 
its &ock at a premium to tbe currest 
share price. 

Fourth-quarter pretax profit fen 5 
peromtito2.17bflhonkrcmor($2S93 
minion ) from 2.3ft bOlioQ kronor in 


changed at 424 billion kronor. 

Volvo Cars swung to a fourth- 
quarter operating profit of 925 mil- 
lion kronor, compared with a loss of 
841 million in the fourth quarter of 
last year. 

But tbe truck unit suffered a 56 
pe r cent decline in profit to 465 mil- 
lion kronor in the quarter. 

Full-year profit rose 9 percent, to 
14.2 bimoo kronor, including one- 


time gains such as profit from the 
sale of Pharmacia & Upjohn shares. 
But Volvo sales fell to 156.06 bil- 
lion kronor from 171-51 billion. 

Volvo shares closed at 179 
kronor, down 1 krona. 

“Tbe figures look quite good,” 
said Colin Gibson, analyst at UBS in 
London. “The share buyback is 
good news. Qeariy. they don’t think 
they can invest all of it in their core 
businesses, so this is a good thing to 
do with the money.” 

( Bloomberg . AFP ) 


• Austria has drafted legislation opening its stale-controlled 
broadcasting market to private radio and television stations. 

• Allianz AG's 1996 net profit rose 10 percent, to 2J2 billion 
Deutsche marks ($1.29 billion), fueled by reduced under- 
writing losses and favorable currency rates thai helped lift 
premium income by 6 percent, to 74.7 billion DM. 

• Forges de Clabecq SA lost its legal authority to continue 
steel operations after creditor banks declined to make emer- 
gency loans to tbe Belgian steel company that was declared 
bankrupt last month, the Belga national news agency reported. 
Judge Luc Versloys also ordered tbe caretaker administration 
to concentrate on finding a buyer for the steel works. 

• Virgin Group has won a 15-year franchise to operate 
Britain's Intercity West Coast rail services between London 
and Scotland. 


HSBC Unit Purchases U.K. Rolling Stock Firm Eversholt 


Viliam* 


Bloomberg New 

LONDON — A leasing and fi- 
nance unit of HSBC Holdings PLC 
said Wednesday that it had agreed to 
buy the British train-leasing com- 
pany Eversholt Holdings Ltd. for 


£726.5 million ($1.16 billion), 
drawing the ire of tire opposition 
Labour Party. 

The unit agreed to pay £410.9 
milli on in cash and another £42.5 
milli on in loan notes for Eversholt. 


Tbe sale comes a year after the 
Conservative government sold Ever- 
sholt, which owns a third of Britain’s 
rolling stock, to a management buy- 
out team for £580 xmfiion as part of 
its plan to sell off British 


Labour, on bearing of the sale be- 
fare it was formally announced, com- 
plained Tuesday that the company 
would be sold too cheaply and would 
leave managers who participated in 
tile buyout with windfall profits. 


Forward Trust, tbe HSBC unit, 
dismissed the charges. 

“We are not opportunistic,” Chief 
Executive Graham Pkken said. 
“We’re making a long-term com- 
mitment to the UJC rail sector." 


• WPP Group PLC's 1996 net profit increased 46 percent, to 
£102.7 million ($164.5 million), as sales increased 8 percent, 
to £7.08 billion, amid stronger international advertising. 

• Bombardier Inc. will invest £130 million and hire 1,000 
people at tbe Canadian planemaker's Short Brothers PLC unit 
m Northern Ireland to work on two new jets. 

• Medeva PLC’s 1996 pretax profit fell 52 percent, to £383 
million, due to restructuring costs. Profit before one-time 
charges rose 33 percent, to £105.1 million, as sales rose 29 
percent, to £331.8 million, led by tbe hyperactivity drug 
meihylpbenidaie. 

• Tbe European Commission has ordered Kesko Oy to sell 
most of Tukknkauppojen Oy to restore its share of tbe 
market to the level the No. 1 Finnish retailer held before 
acquiring the rival. 

•Iberia has resigned itself to losses from the closure this 
week of Venezolana Intemacional de Aviadon SA, a com- 
ly representative said. The Spanish airline is Viasa's 
creditor. Bloomberg. Reuters. AP. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Kftfc Um Oh am. 


t am Once Plw 


Mtfi lorn data Pm 


GP3A 


122-75 


1420 15JB 15J6 1402 


Wednesday, Feb. 19 

Prices tatoari currencies. 
Tetekurs 


Um Don 


Amsterdam 


. ABN-AMRO 


Aegon 

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96d» *£»- 940 
BMW - 116850 11© 116* 

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Degmsn 718 713 711 

Oe5*5»Bank BUS It'D tt.lt 
OearreMm XUt 3828 2230 
Drearier Boo* 5485 5X80 5*0 
Franks 3*550 333 3*40 

Reset** Mod 1*490 146 1*470 

1 I& vSt 

13730 135 13X50 

WW 8650 8680 
77 7630 7625 

75.10 7*60 7*70 

525 520 533 

IBM 1083 1W3 

•1320 rt 2110 

445 44DJB 441.50 

608 677 JO 67* 

MMoUgnetsdnO 3355 3140 3160 
Mefin 1*050 1 39-88 13950 

MuacbPMdER 41 70 *120 *120 
414 - 409 411 JO 
7530 7180 7110 
MO 257 25740 
T4140 MUD 1*230 

86.10 8*70 8S48 

VET 

504 SB 504 
696 69050 69050 
798 75150 798 



157 154 

154 

154 

uidAsurancB 

5*7 

50 

5*4 

50 

34158 34X58 34X50 

343 

UtdNetaS 

6*6 

6*4 

633 

6*7 

13075 129 JO 13075 

138 

UMUOHes 

6352 

67* 

638 

6JD 

104 18X58 10X58 

105 

VenriootaLsuts 

435 

480 

483 

425 

19 JO 1915 

19 JB 

1158 


3 

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236 

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79J5 7825 

7X75 

79 


797 

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139 

7-9* 

47 JO 46JBD 

47 JO 

*7*0 

wtfloaaHdgi 

112 

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110 

10/ 

6475 6*25 

6450 

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485 

487 

417 

7&5B 7450 

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WPP GW 

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1*1 JO 13835 

10 


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10JS 

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1/31 


ScHbsM 13650 133 335 

TnucoceanOff 383 360 380 

Storebrand tea 4220 41JD *2 


138 EriessooB 


391 Hnm B 
41 SocutmA 
Investor B 
MoOo B 


Paris 


CA04fc2M76 
: 261752 


PfearaWU^fofin 


5475 

51 

IBS 

7125 


5475 5475 

5150 52 

100 185 

73 73 


5175 

180 

73 


Madrid 


Kuala Lumpur 


PmtelWJO 


AoriNK 

ACESA 


17 

1490 

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1490 

29JD- 

2175 

29 

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635 

415 

425 

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9 

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494 

431 

494 

1X20 

11J0 

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935 

935 

930 

9JS 

190 

19.10 

1930 

1930 

1X30 

12 

1X10 

12 

2X18 

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23 

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Beta 

■ feifra 

48X28 


PitarieoK 4S139 

20290 

19750 

19938 

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1735 

5760 

5670 

5/20 

5700 

5810 

5720 

5770 

5700 

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DM 

8800 

HKO 

1100 

UMS 

1090 

1085 

20800 

20120 

2(1170 

28630 

3895 

37/5 

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2835 

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280 

26880 

26210 

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4260 

4213 

2595 

250 

2555 

2595 

8090 

7960 

8000 

8060 

9150 

1980 

9000 

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120 

1215 

1230 

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34680 

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33360 

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1690 

1660 

1665 

1670 

2166 

2/00 

2700 

2755 

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5*20 

5628 

560 

1395 

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T3B0 

6700 

6530 

6650 

6660 

3365 

3360 

3364 

3365 

1209 

1175 

1180 

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1500 

1490 

105 

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740 218 236 22* 

41 JS 38-50 4150 39 

344 320 34* 328 

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246 

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1830 

531 

525 

528 

529 

347 

342 345 J 0 

345 

231 

222 

228 

228 

280 

258 

280 

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19 SJ 0 19350 

194 

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108 

179 

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331 323 32B 320 

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190 18950 190 78950 

10358 • 99 10150 10150 

220 207 21650 20750 

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830 820 823 824 

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202 196.10 199 JO 199 
564 543 5C 56Q 

301 29050 25080 299 JO 

1188 1090 10W 110* 

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17*8 

17*8 

17J5 

170 

3*2 

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2*3 

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2272 

2X59 

1373 

1153 

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13*2 

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11.U 

110 

1X19 

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£33 

£46 

330 

63S 

473 

480 

470 

19.08 

1875 

1875 

1X99 

4*9 

463 

467 

4*6 

2*9 

262 

2*3 

2*9 

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X47 

20 

2*7 

375 

3*5 

170 

3*3 

153 

150 

10 

152 

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12*0 

1166 

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109 

109 

in 

23*0 

230 

220 

2379 

7*4 

750 

752 

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XII 

173 

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1494 

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17.15 

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190 

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153 

479 

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178 

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17* 

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422 

423 

477 

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409 

401 

402 

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482 

678 

471 

630 

142 

236 

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477 

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446 

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834 

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875 

832 

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2*7 

20 

20 

7J5 

773 

774 

7J4 

9JD 

9.18 

924 

90 

3*4 

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355 

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The THb Index 

Pii»sm>at3$0PMNawYa*time. 

Jon. 1. iBOOm 100. 

Lovot 

Change 

% chartga 

yrartodsla 

Worid Index 

152J7 

40.17 

+0.11 

+16.00 

Ragkxra butaxos 





Asia/Pactfic 

110.11 

-0.65 

-0-59 

-17.89 

Europe 

160.51 

-0.12 

-0.07 

+15.33 

N. America 

181.08 

+1^0 

+0.72 

+41.16 

S. America 

141.40 

+0^4 

+0.17 

+58.81 

InduotiW Indracoa 





Capital goods 

178.70 

■♦0.75 

+0-42 

+34.48 

Consumer goods 

17K26 

*0.78 

+0-45 

+26.94 

Energy 

179.10 

90.45 

+0_25 

+32.06 

Finance 

110R1 

-0.55 

-0.49 

-12.91 

UjBcaSanBOus 

159.56 

-*C.75 

+0.47 

+17.49 

Flaw Materials 

163^2 

-0J»7 

-asi 

+2951 

Service 

14250 

+0.33 

+0.23 

♦18.TO 

urntfes 

132B9 

-0^1 

-0.68 

+4.50 

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ASIA/PACIFIC 


Broadcaster Urges 
A Single Cable for 
Australian Pay TV 


A New Crack in Hong Kong? 

Tang May Supervise Its Central Bank Directly 


Bloomberg News 

SYDNEY — Kerry Stokes, the 
chairman of Seven Network Ltd., 
proposed Wednesday that Aus- 
tralia’s bUlion-doIIar cable net- 
works merge to stem the massive 
losses that are occurring in the 
fledgling pay-television industry. 

“At the end of the day, we should 
have one national infrastructure in 
cable," Mr. Stokes said. “I’m sug- 
gesting there be one cable— it could 

be jointly owned, couldn't it?" 

Telstra Carp., the state-owned 
telecommunications company, and 
Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. 
jointly operate the Foxtel pay-tele- 
vision service. Optus Communica- 
tions, Australia's privately owned 
telecommunications company, 
owns 46.5 percent of the Optus Vi- 
sion pay-television company, with 
U.S. West Media Groiq) Inc.’s Con- 
tinental Cable vision Inc. also own- 
ing 46.5 percent Kerry Packer’s 
Publishing & Broadcasting l jh 
owns 5 percent of Optus Vision. 

Seven, Australia's second-ranked 
broadcast network, has a 2 percent 
stake in Optus Vision. 

"Every month that goes past, as 
long as they continue to duplicate, 
it’s going to cost this country 100 
million dollars a month," Mr. 
Stokes said. 

"One thing we don’t want to 
achieve is having monopolies in 
various areas, so there’s got to be 
coming together of the ownership of 
a cable system." 

Mr. Stokes also criticized the 


Australian government for “frac- 
tured policy’’ decisions and lack of 
leadbrchip in developing the Aus- 


Optns Vision, according to The 


is said to have smug its aerial cable 
past nearly 2 million homes, with 
estimated subscribers of 180,000. 
Telstra is said to have cabled about 
1.1 million homes, with 140,000 
subscribers. 

Seven currently is involved in le- 
gal action against other Optus Vi- 
sion shareholders, contending that it 
has a right to buy their stakes be- 
cause they breached a shareholders’ 
agreement by giving Publishing & 
Broadcasting enhanced equity 
rights in Optus Vision. 

The dispute will be heard in the 
New South Wales state Supreme 
Court on Monday. 

■ A National Network Sale? 

The Aust ralian firm nr*! minister, 
John Fahey, said the government 
had hired business and legal ad- 
visers to study the possible sale of 
the national transmission network, 
which carries television and radio 
signals, Bloomberg News reported 
from Canberra. 

The network is used to broadcast 
the government-owned Australian 
Broadcasting Carp, and the Special 
Broadcasting Service. It is run by 
tire National Transmission Agency. 

The Office of Asset Sales, which 
would handle a sale, hopes to have 
the study completed by March. 


Bloomberg News 

HONG KONG — The Hong 
Kong Monetary Authority and its 
S64 billion in reserves may soon 
answer to Oma’s man. 

Tung Chee-hwa, who will be 
chief executive when Hong Kang 
reverts to Chinese rule, may con- 
sider making the head of the ter- 
ritory's carnal bank report direct- 
ly to him, a spokesman for Mr. 
Tong’s office said Wednesday. 

Right now, the authority — 
which safeguards die Hang Kong 
dollar and vows to remain inde- 
pendent — reports to the finance 
secretary. That post is usually 
filled from the ranks of Hong 
Kong’s highly regarded, and po- 
litically neutral, civil service. 

Fbr China, “independence of 
state bodies with pies of cash, 
such as the HKMA. is hardly to be 
expected," said Daniel Hemmanr 
of Guinness Flight Asset Manage- 
ment Lid. 

Such a move effectively would 
demote Finance Secretary Donald 

last month after he critidze^Hs 
'plats to roll back some civil liber- 
ties laws once the British colony 
returns to China on July 1. 

It also would strengthen Mr. 
Tung’s control over the world's 
third-largest store of foreign re- 
serves mid call into question his 
commitment to ensuing that Hong 
Kong keeps “a high degree of 
autonomy,’’ as Beijing has prom- 
ised. Some fund managers and 
bankers said the authority’s free- 
dom to set monetary policy free of 
political concerns might be eroded. 


Because a currency depends hi 
large part on the value of foreign 
reserves, politicians rarely use them 
for expenditures. Mr. Tung is wide- 
ly semi as a savvy business leader 
unlikely to pot the Hong Kong (fol- 
iar at ask. 

Aspoke^omanforMr. Tung's 
office declined to say whether such 
a change in supervision of the au- 
thority was imminent, saying only 
that it was oik: of a number of 
possibilities that might be studied. 
Mr. Tung met Wednesday with 
officials in Beijing and is expected 
to release a first list of ms top 
officials upon his return Thursday. 
The position, of chief executive of 
the monetary authority will not be 
on that list, the Official said. 

The Finance Secretary’s office 
said Mr. Tong bad not discussed 
the matter with it. 

Officials af fee aufeority and fee 
People’s Bank of China maintain 
that the authority will remain in- 
dependent. Da a series of confer- 
ences in New York and Tokyo this 
month, Joseph Yam, the author- 
ity’s chief executive, pledged with 
officers of the Chinese central 
bank to keep the Hong Kong dollar 
pegged to its U.S. counterpart 

Still, few say that bringing the 
authority under Mr. Tung’s direct 
supervision would help Tt remain 
independent 

Mr. Tung, a shipping magnate 
who was picked by a Beijing-se- 
lected body , has supported China’s 
plans to roll back the local bill of 
rights and asked local journalists to 
write “patriotic" stories about 
Hong Kong's return to China. 


If politics sway die monetary au- 
thority, rt may no longer stand with 
the Federal Reserve System, fee 
Bundesbank and other central 
banks that usually operate outside 
the political sphere to preserve the 
value of their currencies and help 
steer their economies. 

Any change in control over the 
monetary authority could muddy 
the waters by weakening the sep- 
aration of money and politics m 
Hong Kong. 

The suggestion that Mr. Tung 
might assert his power over the 
authority suggests Beijing “cares 
more about money than ideology,’* 
said Emily 1 au. a legislator of the 
United Democrats of Hong Kong. 

“They want someone they can 
trust very much," she added, 
“rather than someone picked by 
Chris Patten. ’ ’ Both Mr. Tsangand 
Mr. Yam were selected by Chris 
Fatten, the last British governor. 

But since Mr. Tung's duties as 
chief executive will be much great- 
er and broader than Mr. Patten’s, 
said Ian Perkin, chief economist at 
the Hong Kong Chamber of Com- 
merce, ms taking direct control of 
the monetary authority might be 
logical. 

Mr. Yam has said that the au- 
thority’s freedom to set monetary 
policy will actually expand under 
the Basic Law that is to govern 
Hong Kong after June 30. Beijing 
has guaranteed in the quasrcon- 
stitution that it will maintain the 
separation between Hong Kong's 
and China's currencies, banking 
systems, stock markets and for- 
eign-exchange reserves. 


HriagKorig Sjogoporo 

HangSeog • Straits Times ' 

15000- — .. 2250 -jitl 

KQDO * - 2200+- -A/-- 

' 130M-— 2150-fV-f 

12000 2100 * U- — 

lira/- 2050 — 

. IMOO'r. ■ rv ki 1 p» rr 2000 c ■ ft sr - f 


'SO N D J F 
1996 199(7 


ftrateTlmes Ntkksl225.' 

2200 *- -A/- ’V- 21000 /A A- 

2l5D-fV—f ' 20000* — A- 

2100* (4- '19000 — -A— 

2050 — 10000 W- 

2000 {To* iT 0“J r F’ . 17WB, s~ r o' n "dTF’ 

1996 1997 1996 1997 

l Wednesday Prev. % 


Exchange index. • . Wecfoesday Prev. % ■ 

Close Close C 

Noqo Kmo Hapcj Seng . . 13.106J32 .13, 102*4 +0.03 


Singapore: ' Straits Tunes • 2,20639 2,229.70 +0.77 


‘ 1&599.12 18.470.75 +0.69 


1,258.64 L247.90 <008 


■2SS 


tGaaJ*LranpurGompos8e 


Seoul 

Gomposte index 

. 71&67 

■706.94 

+0.9S 

Taipei 

Stock Market index 7,658-85 

7,642.03 

+0.19 

IfeftBa 

PSE 

3515^2 

3,306.43 

+027 

Jakarta . 

Composite index 

6M.6& 

68522 

-0.05 

We&ngteo 

NXSE-40 


2^3152 

-0436 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 


3£3023 

-Q2& 


Source: TeMorrs 


hmamul Hmld TnUfflr 


Investors Punish 
Coca-Cola Amatil 

Bloomberg News 

SYDNEY — Shares in Coca-Cola Amatil Ltd. dropped 
5.8 percent Wednesday, fee third successive day of 
decline on concerns about its earnings outlook and fee 
credibility of management following disappointing 1996 
earnings figures. 

“There is a big credibility issue in terras of man- 
agement that they have to overcome,” said Paul Xiradis, 
associate director at Barclays Global Managers. 

Coca-Cola Amatil officials could not be reached for 
comment Wednesday. 

The company’s shares fell to 1 1.485 Australian dollars 
($8-80), down 70.5 cents . . 

The shares have fallen 36.7percent from their high of 
18.15 dollars on Nov. 10. 1996. ; . \ 

In November, Coca-Cola Amatil, which is 36.1 percent 
owned by Coca-Cola Co„ warned tfaatits net prafitm 1996 
would be little changed from 1995, which at feat time was 
as much as 20 percent below expectarioos. 

In feet, net profit, announced Friday, was 25 percent 
higher than 1995 at 142.1 million dollars. Bat the profit 
was helped by a lower-fean-expected tax rate and by 
income from a damages settlement wife the brewer Lion 
Nathan Ltd. 

“On an operating basis fee earnings were actually 
lower than fee previous year, Mr. Xiradis said. ^ . . 

The company had told analysts in October, during a 
visit to its bast European operations, that it was 00 track 
to meet profit growth forecasts in the mid-teens. 


Baht Rallies as Devaluation Fears Fade 


Bloomberg News 

SINGAPORE — The Thai 


not overvalued," he said. 

The Bank of Thailand said 


baht rallied Wednesday after Tuesday it would not devalue 
reaching a 10-year low onFri- fee baht. 


day, as concern about a pos~ The baht's rally and de~ 
able devaluation ebbed, clining interest rates helped 
traders said. the benchmark Thai stock in- 

Tbe dollar fell to 25.985 dex post its biggest gain in 
baht, a fall of 0.8 percent from four and a half months, 
its high of 2620 baht Friday. The Stock Exchange of 

That was fee biggest three- Thailand index rose 3159 
day gain for fee baht since points, or 45 percent, to 


“The economy is on track 
and there is no need for de- 
valuation actions," Mr. Sutee 
said. He expects the deficit to 
shrink 30 percent in 1997, 


The baht's rally and de~ shrink 30 percent in 1997, 
dining interest rates helped from about 400 billion baht in 
the benchmark Thai stock in- 1996. Thailand’s deficit is 
dex post its biggest gain in about 8 percent of the coun- 
four and a half months. try’s gross domestic product. 


January 1995. 

"People are selling dollars 


dex post its biggest gain in about 8 percent of fee coun- 
four and a half months. try’s gross domestic product. 

The Stock Exchange of among world’s highest. 
Thailand index rose 3159 The government will re- 
points, or 45 percent, to lease its 1996 trade figures on 
731.74, its biggest one-day Feb. 27. 


gam since Sept 30 and its 


to buy back fee baht," said highest dose in a week. 


Sutee; Iris 
manager at 


onkul, treasury 
akornfeon Bank 


A contraction in the cur- 
rent-account deficit makes 


The economy expanded at good because it would raise 
afi.7 percent rate last year and fee cost of imports and make 


in Bangkok. Investors under- the baht more attractive be- 
stand that “the current-ac- cause there is relatively less 


should do better this year, 
economists said. Standard 
Chartered Bank's chief econ- 
omist for Southeast Asia, 


count deficit is shrinking” 
and that means “the baht is 


demand for dollars to pay for Wong Yit Fan, sees growth of other dropped to 135 percent traha, in which Air New Zeal 


imports. 


up to 7 percent this year. 


since nor. rung s aunes as _ _ __ _ __ 

xecutive will be much great- Very briefly Z 

broader than Mr. Panen’s. 

n Perkin, chief economist at • India will overshoot its deficit target of 5 percent of gross 

ng Kong Chamber of Com- domestic product for the fiscal year ending March 3 1 and the 
, ms taking direct control of government is searching for new sources of revenue to fill a 
anetary authority might be shortfall in next year's budget, economists said. 

■ , • Mosel Vitelic Inc, one of Taiwan’s largest makers of 

Yam has said dial the au~ computer-memory chips, plans to invest up to 100 billion 

s freedomto set monetary Taiwan dollars (S3 .63 billion) in semiconductor production 

will actually expand under facilities by 2003 to meet expected growth in world demand. 

*The 115. Federal Maritime Commission will announce 
that it win impose $100,000 docking fees on Japan's topihree 
m am it *r,o<nt»; n th* shipping companies — Nippon YusenKR, Kawasaki Risen 

KsBtaXtd. and Mitsui OSK Lines Ltd. — after talks to 
increase access ,o Japanese polls broke down. 

is, stock markets and for- • A Philippine court dismissed a petition to prevent the 

(change reserves. privatization of Manila's waterworks, clearing the way for 

two consortia of British, French, U.S. and Filipino firms to 
take over the concession. 

• Malaysia confirmed that it was considering joining a group 

i | i ■ that will take over the ailing Dutch jet maker FokkerNV. 

ears raae •Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party and its allies will try to 

reach an agreement this week on lifting a ban cm holding 
. , . , . companies, an parly official said. Reuters. Bloomberg ,afp 

Investors betting feat the ^ 

government would devalue 

drive the currencyto its weak> Air New Zealand Net Falls 

est standing in a decade last 

week. Moody's Investors cawMbrow-ssfFmUgmria 

Service fee. helped speed fee WELLINGTON — Air New Zealand said Wednesday that 

decline when it said it might first-half earnings fell 43 percent, in line with analysts* 
cut its rating on Thailand’s expectations, reflecting fee rising New Zealand dollar and 
sovereign debt higher fuel prices. 

Government officials and The carrier also warned that its full-year profit would also 
economists say a devaluation be down because of a cost-cutting project, which aims to trim 
would do more harm than expenses by more than 100 million New Zealand dollars ($69 
good because it would raise million) a year. 

fee cost of imports and make Profit for fee last half of 1996 fell to 76.7 million dollars 

it more expensive to repay from. 1 35.1 million dollarsa yeareariier. Sales fell 1 .9 percent, 
dollar-denominated debts. to 1. 1 8 billion dollars. 

The overnight rate ai which Competition from the now defunct airline Kiwi International 

hanks lend money to each Airlines and a “disappointing’’ performance by Ansett Aus- 
other dropped to 135 percent traha, in which Air New Zealand holds a stake of 50 percent, 
from 14 percent. also hurt profit, the airline said. (Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


it more expensive to repay 
doHar-denominated debts. 

The overnight rate at which 
hanks lend money to each 


from 14 percent. 


also hurt profit, the airline said. 




Sribi 




On March 14, the International Herald Tribune 
will publish a Special Report on: 

The Computer 
Industry 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

• Who will control the lines of communica- 
tions? THecoms or computer companies? 

• The Internet - questions of free speech. 

• “Information Stress Syndrome” in the 
computerized workplace. 

• Do palmtop computers hove a future? 

• Where are savvy investors putting their money? 



Ting section coincides with the CeBIT bir In flannowr. 
Bor a hill synopsis and advertising rates, please eoolact 
the Supplements department in Paris. 

Fax: (33-1) 41 43 92 IS or e-mail: BuppIemen(s@ih(.com 

THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 



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RHONE-POULENC'S 1 996 FINANCIAL RESULTS 


1996 net income: an increase of 28.4% 


24 HOUR FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


spreads; no commission 
• Minimum transaction SI 00,000 
— — • Competitive margin rotes 

IG Indw pic. 1 Mfamfcic Raw, London SWTE 5BI Grant Britain , 


Tol: - 44-171-896-0022 Fa*: -44-171-396-0010 


"In 1996, we progressed in 
the implementation of our 
strategy : 

• our life science business- 
es ( pharmaceuticals , 
animal and plant health) 
continued to grow and 
improve their profita- 
bility, due to the commer- 
cial success of our new 
products and the integra- 
tion ofFisons; 

• in chemicals and fibers, 
there was a marked im- 

■ provement in the majority 
of businesses and new 
restructuring measures 
have been undertaken; 

• we have continued to 
refocus our business 
portfolio and in 1996 
divested FF 6.8 billion of 
assets. 

In 1997, we will continue 
with this strategy and 
confirm our objectives of 
achieving improved peijbr- 
mance in earnings per 
share and reducing the net 
debt to equity ratio to less 
than 0.5". 

Jean- Rene Fourtou 

. Chairman 
and Chi^f Executive Officer 


The Group's consolidated 
sales were FF 85.818 billion, 
an increase of + 1,2% on an 
historic basis and +3% on a 
comparable basis. 

Earnings from operating 
activities rose to FF 7.721 
billion (+ 22.2%) due to sales 
growth and improvement in 
productivity. 


• contribute 
to the prevention 
and cure of diseases 
in humans, 
animals and plants 

• improve the quality 
and safety of products 
used in daily life 

These are 
Rhone-Poulenc's 
objectives. 



Rhone-Poulenc, 
a global company 
focusing 

on growing markets 
in pharmaceuticals, 
vaccines, animal and 
plant health 
and specialty chemicals. 


Net income rose to FF 2.740 
billion, an increase of +28.4%, 
essentially due to earnings 
growth in the pharmaceuti- 
cals and animal and plant 
health businesses, which 
represent 87% of the group’s 
earnings from operating* 
activities. 

Earnings per share were 
FF 8.44, an increase of 25.8%. 
Before amortization of good- 
will, earnings per share amount- 
ed to FF 11.54, compared to 
FF 9:12 in 1995 (+26.5%). 

A gross dividend (dividend 
plus tax credit) per ordinary 
share “A" of FF 5.25 (+16.7%) 
will be proposed by the Board 
of Directors to the General 
Meeting of Shareholders. 

The net debt to equity ratio 
was 0.61 at the end of 1996, 
compared to 0.72 at the end 
of 1995, in line with the 
objective of returning to a net 
debt to equity ratio of less 
than 0.5 by the end of 1997. 

” Operating income + equity in net 
earnings of affiliated companies 
in wfaiqh Rhdne-Poulenc owns 
an interest of between 20 and 
50 percent, on a comparable basis. 


1997 calendar: 

General Meeting 
of Shareholders: 

April 23, 1997 

(second convocation) 

Quarterly results: 

1st quarter: April 30 
2nd quarter July 25 
3rd quarter: October 30 


Hbfine-Pouleac investor 
Contact Phone: 

908 821 3487 

http://www-Rh6oe-Pouieac.CQjn 


RHONE-POULENC 











i 1 I J 1 P.? Jj? B3’I , J7'i'* m n'»>r»»«nti»ipPsocwoti'^ | OC!i7'»»jc.'£»i 


PACE 2 


rarralVATinNAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAy-StHSttAY, FEBRUAHY 1-2, 1W 
































































































































World Roundup|^| 


Bios Limps On 


Marcelo Rios of Chile, 
[he No. 2 seed, beat die Romanian 
Adrian Voinea, 6-1 6-4. Wednesday 
in the European Community cham- 
pionship. Rios fell behind, 2-0, in the 
second set but fought back to take 
die match in just over an hour. 

Francisco Clave t of Spain upset 
the third seed Thomas Enqvist of 
Sweden. 4-6 7-6 (7-4) 6-3. 

Rios, who withdrew from the fi- 
nal in Marseilles on Sunday because 
of a leg injury, became the top seed 
remaining in the tournament when 
Goran Ivanisevic pulled out Tues- 
day with tendinitis in his shoulder. 
Boris Becker also withdrew Tues- 
day because of an injury. (Reuters) 

Norton Takes Gloves Off 

boxing USA Boxing vetoed an 
entry from Ken Norton Jr., a line- 
backer with the San Francisco 49ers, 
for a Golden Gloves tournament in 
Dallas. Federation rules say pros 
from any sport cannot fight in am- 
ateur contests. Norton, son of former 
world heavyweight champion Ken 
Norton, had* never boxed-fAFJ 

Romania Bans Runner 

athletics lulia Negura of Ro- 
mania has been banned for two 
years and stripped of ber 1996 
European women's cross-country 
championship title for foiling a 
dope test, the Romanian Athletic 
Federation said Wednesday. (Reu- 
ters) 

World Cup for U.S. 

soccst he Uaited Soles will 
hold the 1 999 women's World Cup. 
The event will be held across the 
U.S. the last 10 days in June and the 
first 10 days in July. (Bloomberg) 


Sports in Brief 


• Peter Forsberg, a center for the 

Colorado Avalanche of the NHL, 
signed a three-year contract worth 
up to $12.8 million. ( AP ) 

•The Seattle Seahawks of foe 
NFL traded quarterback Rick Mirer 
to Chicago for a first-round draft 
pick — the 1 1* overall. (AP) 

• Newcastle, an English rugby 
union club, paid the rugby league 
dub Wigan £500,000 ($808,000) for 
Va’aiga Tuigamala. The Western 
Samoan’s five year contract makes 
the deal worth more than £1 million. 

(Reuters) 



South African Rugby 
Plays a Losing Game 

Sport Struggles With Its Image 
As Coach Quits Over Racist Slurs 


tc i 


By lan Thomsen ‘ 

International Herald Tribune 


O 


FFICIALS in charge of South 
African rugby, foe white man's 
favorite same, were trying to 
day from 


KnQtKnhMcallMi 

WHITE WATER — Darren Rorabaugh driving his team out onto the frozen Yukon River near Eagle, Alaska, 
in Uie Yukon International Sled Dog Race from Whitehorse, Canada, to Fairbanks Alaska. Rorabangh is 11th. 

Stormy Weather or Not, It’s a Bike Race 


Iruermaional Herald Tribune 

K OTA KINABULU, Malaysia — 
Warnings of winds up to 70 ki- 
lometers an hour were posted, 
the tide in the South China Sea was 
expected to rise a meter and a wild 
rainstorm drummed on the roof, but 
Gianni Bugno was undaunted. 

“We have riders who love this kind 
of weather," foe star Italian bicycle 
racer said. "We left them at home. 
Otherwise, there wouldn’t have been 
any competition. ’ ’ 

Presumably he referred to the Belgian 
contingent of his Mapei team, which 
brought Italian riders to Le Tour de 
Langkawi, Asia's richest bicycle race. 
And presumably Bugno was adding — 
even Belgians would rate this as heavy 
weather. 

The island of Borneo, whose north- 
east is occupied by foe Malaysian state 
of Sabah, has the second-largest rain 
forest in foe world, after Brazil's, and 
those trees grow a foot or two overnight 
Not for nothing did ancient seafarers 
refer to Sabah as “The Land Below the 
Wind." 


frontage Point/ SamuelAbt 


Bugno spoke Tuesday as the storm 
raged. On Wednesday, although the sky 
was low, the rain held off as 150 riders, in 


25 teams of six men each, began foe 12- 
day Tour de Langkawi. They sought hon- 
or, glory and, it goes without saying, a 
piece of the overall prize money of 1 
million ringgit ($425,000). 

Eric Wohlbezg of the Canadian am- 
ateur team won the first stage, a 19- 
kilometer{ 12-mile) individual time trial 
in and around Kota Kinabalu, Sabah's 
capital. Second was Andrei Mizourov of 
the Kazakstan team, another amateur. 

Riding on national teams, other am- 
ateurs come from such countries as Fin- 
land. China, the Philippines, Indonesia, 
Japan, South Korea, Ireland. South 
Africa and, of course, Malaysia. 

Professional teams include Mapei 
and MG, two Italian powerhouses. 
Casino from France, Cedico from Bel- 

S ’um, Saturn from foe United States and 
font from Australia. Damian McDon- 
ald of Giant won the race in its initial 
edition last year. 

The first stage was run in muggy, 
weather and headwinds off foe ocean, if 
not demonstrative, spectators wessnie- 
spectful, lining foe sidewalk near foe 
finish as workers spilled out of such 


Senators, Doormats No More, Stop Capitals, 6-1 


The Associated Press 

The Ottawa Senators aren't allowing 
themselves to be kicked around any- 
more. 

"They have improved tremendously 
offensively," Washington defenseman 
Sylvain Cote said after the Senators beat 
the Capitals, 6-1. Tuesday nighL 
“They’re quick; they get on the loose 
puck and they're on a roll right now." 

In their first four seasons, the Sen- 
ators were the laughingstock of the 
NHL as they lost 224 of 298 games. The 
Senators never earned more than 4 1 
points in a season. After Tuesday’s road 
victory, they have 52 points and are in 
foe running fora playoff berth. 

Daniel Alfredsson and Randy Cunney- 
wortft gave Ottawa control with goals 84 
seconds apart in foe second period. The 
victory gave foe Senators a 3-0 record 


against the Capitals this season. 

Pb ii uiwm 4, PmUtmrn 2 At Pitt sburgh , 
Mario Lemieux scored his 40th goal of 
foe season to break a third period tie as 
the Penguins beat Florida to end a four- 
game losing streak. Then Lemieux 
sealed foe victoiy with an empty-net 
goal at 19:02. 

S ai bma 5, Bwi 5 Ron Stern and 
Aaron Gavey scored 27 seconds apart 

NHL Rophppp 

late in foe third period as to give Calgary 
a tie in Buffalo. The Sabres built a two- 
lead on goals by Michael Peca and 
‘ :w Bamaby before Stem cut foe 
margin to 5-4. Gavey scored moments 
later. 

Coyotes s. Kings i In Phoenix, Jim 
McKenzie scored foe first hat trick of 


Iris c a reer, and Nikolai Khabibulin 
stopped 27 shots and weathered four 
Los Angeles power plays. 

Claude Lemieux scored on a power play 
goal with 3.8 seconds left in overtime as 
foe Avalanche won their fourth straight. 

Mople Loafs 6, Cancfca 5 Doug 
Gilmour and Seigci Berezin scored two 
goals apiece to pace Toronto in Van- 
couver. Their goals built a 6-2 lead 
before foe Canucks made it a game in 
the third period 

Martin Gelinas scored twice within a 
2:06 span to make it 6-4 at 9:57, and 
Alexander Mogilny made it 6-5 on a 
power play at 16:02. 

Shark* a, star* i At San Jose. Kelly 
Hrudey made 29 saves as foe Sharks 
beat Dallas to snap a four-game losing 
streak. 


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ffighla 


establishments as the Chin Chi Printing 
Works and an abnormal number of shops 
dedicated to re-covering cushions. 

More passion was shown at foe Restor- 
an Jubilee, an open-air eatery where the 
specialty is fish-head curry and where 
diners rose from their tables to wave at 
riders. In foe outskirts, a goodly number 
of childr en sat in front of foe Proposed 
Wisma Perindnstri an, a 17-story office 
building under construction, and cried 
"Fast, fast" in the English that most 
Malaysians speak. 

LeTour de Langkawi will cross both 
of Malaysia’s states on Borneo and the 
11 on the peninsula, and will have 
covered 1 ,608.5 kilometers when it ends 
March 2 on the island of Langkawi. 

The overall course is mainly flat and 
foe major day to weed out the contenders 
should be Monday, stage six, which corn- 
three climbs irao foe Genting 

Ighhmdx rorlivfrng fop finish up a grade 
. that measures 16 percent in part. Another 
big test will be foe 10th stage, Feb., 2 8, 
across Malaysia’s main mountain range 
and including a 50-kflometer ascent 

Along foe way, according to the race 
manual, will be such exotic locales as 
the start of the fifth daily stage at foe 
Sultan Abdul Samad Budding, the bo- 
nus sprint at the Shah Alam Mosque 
(also foe fifth stage), foe Maran Mosque 
(seventh stage) and the passage past the 
prime minister's birthplace (kilometer 
134.5 on foe 1 Ifo stage). 

The prime minister. Mahathir bin 
Mohamad, is foe highly active patron of 
the race, which is designed to give 
Malaysians experience in staging big 
intranational sports events before Kuala 
Lumpur is host to the Commonwealth 
Games in September 1998. 

Stage two will be held Thursday in 
Sarawak. Malaysia’s second state ou 
Borneo. Since, as in Sabah, foe rainy 
season is nearing its end there, dicey 
weather is likely. After that and a two- 
hour flight to foe peninsula, where foe 
rainy season was over months ago, the 
forecast is for heavy heat and dear 
skies. Farewell, pewter clouds. Adi os, 
rain. Welcome, sunshine, welcome. Or, 
as they say in Malay, selomat daiang. 


distance themselves Wednesday 
racist comments that resulted in Andre 
MarkgraafTs quitting as coach of the 
national team. At the same time, 
however, they vowed to boycott a gov- 
ernment inquiry into foe sport. 

The mounting scandal will be inves- 
tigated by Sports Minister Steve Tsh- 
wete, who openly wants rugby to suc- 
ceed in the new South Africa. Tshwete 
used to satisfy his love for the game by 
organizing matches on Robben Island 
among his fellow political prisoners. His 
persistent calls for foe integration of 
rugby have not been heeded by the 
Springboks, foe national rugby team, de- 
spite a phalanx of public-relations prom- 
ises that seemed transparent even as they 
were being made by foe South African 
Rugby Football Union when it was host 
of me 1995 Rugby World Cup. 

While announcing his resignation 
Tuesday, Markgraaff apologized pub- 
licly to Tshwete and President Nelson 
Mandela. Markgraaff tacitly admitted 
that his was foe voice on a secretly 
recorded tape that referred to Mack 
members of the governing National 
Sports Council as "(expletive) kaffirs," 
a term of gross abuse in South Africa. 

The statements were recorded illicitly 
by one of the Springbok players after 
MarkgraafTs disputed decision to drop 
Francois Pienaar from the team in Oc- 
tober. Pienaar had captained South 
Africa to its sensational World Cup vic- 
tory two years ago. When he and Man- 
dela appeared cm the victory stand in 
identical No. 6 Springbok jerseys, it was 
foe first authentic sign that foe Spring- 
boks would merge with foe majority of 
South Africans. However, Pienaar, who 
is white, was ousted 16 months later. 
Chester Williams remains the only non- 
white player in tire squad. 

The voice on the secret recording was 
beard blaming blacks on the National 
Sports Council for the groundswell of 
support for Pienaar after bis-axing. 

"If I said it, I ask for forgiveness."- 
Markgraaff said weakly at a news con- 
ference. “I wish to apologize to blacks 
in this country and also to the whites for 
embarrassing them." 

’'It is a serious blow to South African 
rugby,” Pienaar said Wednesday while 
training in London with Saracens, the 
club he joined after leaving South 
Africa, "we spent a lot of time building 
up trust among the communities, and 
now this happens." 

"I can’t make any sense out of it," 
Pienaar added. "But people must re- 
member it is the irresponsible views of 
one person and not the views of the 
whole country, or foe views of die play- 
ers. Even so, the feeling over here now is 
going to be, have there actually been so 
many changes in sport in South Africa? 
It’s a serious blow.” 

The one indisputable change is the 
color and sensibility of the sport’s 
judge. In the old days of South African 
rugby, which were not so long ago. the 
scandalized officials might have been 
confident of escaping with little (rouble. 
This week, however, foe secret record- 
ing was handed over to the respected 


Tshwete along with evidence ot alleged 
financial irregularities by the rugby uni- 
on compiled by a former rugby olfi- 
ci&l* 

The ru^bv union is claiming that it is 
foe victim of a personal vendetta. It has 
dented allocations that it had been tiying 
to cover up foe rape-recording since 
November, ami « threatened to boycott 
a meeting Friday with Tshwete s com- 
mission of inquiry on the technical 
around that the commission includes a 
ntember of the National Olympic Com- 
mittee of South Africa. Rugby is not 
affiliated with the Olympics. 

The ongoing trauma over the Spring- 
boks is symbolic of other more important 
issues of reconciliation and compromise 
in South Africa. Last year. Mandela and* 
Tshwete approved the selection of the 
front-row forward Henry' Tromp, who in 
February 1992 helped his father bear to 
death, with a fan bell, a 16-ycar farm 
worker who was suspected ot stealing 75 
rand (about S25 at the lime). Both men 
had been sentenced to two years im- 
prisonment for assault with intent to 
cause grievous bodily harm; they had 
appealed the sentences and had been 
released after four months. 

There arc signs that Tshwete might 
alter bis forgiving approach. Last year, 
he accused rugby administrator'; of 
shirking their commitment to bring 
black players into foe game. A stronger 
statement was made by Finance Min- 
ister Trevor Manuel when he openly 
cheered for New Zealand's All Blacks 
against the Springboks. In the upanheid f 
era. South Africa's majority population 
of blacks — Mandela and Tshwete in- 
cluded — would openly root for the 
Springboks to lose, so strong was the 
link between rugby and the white power 
structure. 

Mandela's governing African Na- 
tional Congress criticized foe racist 
statements by Markgraaff as "unac- 
ceptable." 

"Hus behavior consolidates foe per- 
ception that conservative elements 
within SARFU arc resisting transform- 
ation of the union into a nonracial en- 
tity." an ANC statement read. 



Ache? Fnace-Pnu 


Andre Markgraaff at his emotion-' 
ally charged press conference. 


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Scoreboard 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


jouuimci 

W 

Miami 40 

NewYortc 38 

Orton do 34 

Washington 34 

New Jenoy 15 

PtttadeipMD IS 

71 


L pet GB 

12 JtS — 

14 731 2 

25 JSC 14^ 

27 Mi 7519 

36 39* 24% 

39 735 TTY, 

40 J74 2816 


CWcuflo 

Detnl! 

AflaWa 

Omtatb 

anetond 

tndtana 

AUwmdee 

Toronto 


46 

37 

33 

31 

28 

24 

24 

17 


6 JUS — 

13 J« B 

17 MO 12 

21 .596 15 

22 StO 17 

26 <480 71 

27 .471 21V» 

34 J33 2BK 


Chicago 47 (Rodman 131. Aactate—Oama- 
28 Clodaon 10), Otago 42 (Jordan 12). 
DO** 12 13 23 14~« 

ULOfepon 32 18 21 15-87 

D: Rntary 7-15 3-4 1& Harper 7-1 2 34 17; 
UAj Sooty 9-13 4-5 21 Rogon 5-11 1-2 
ll.Retooadt-Oata 46 (Groan ID, Los 
Angeles 49 (Vouch* 9). AsxWv-Oota* 16 

(How 5), Lot Angeles IB (Mortal S- 

MlMwh 23 16 22 22- 84 

So uiou e uto 29 30 15 21 — 95 

M.-Gwsrttotoll-226-42taMartoury9-21 2-2 
21; S: Richmond 8-242-420. Potynta 7-703- 
4 17, Owens 7-13 3-3 17. 

Rohowoti Mlmrmuto 53 (GogBorto 18k 
Soaomemo 67 (Pointer 21). 

AssMs— Minnesota 15 (Matbury 7L 
Socnmntozj (WOimond 7). 


HOCKEY 


NHL STAtftHMCW 


Utah 

Houston 

Minnesota 

Deltas 

Denver 

San Antonia 

Vancouver 

l_A.U*ers 
Semite 
Portkotd 
Sacramento 
LA, cuppers 
Gotten More 
FhMflfc 


MOWEST OIV»OM 

W- L Pet GB 

37 14 .725 — 

34 II 654 )» 

25 27 .481 12W 

17 32 347 19 

17 36 J3I 21 

12 38 240 24M 

11 44 _200 28 


PMaddpMa 
Rortdo 
New Jersey 
N.Y. Rangers 
We sUngJon 
N.Y. tstonders 
Tampa Bay 


14 .725 — 

15 .706 1 

U 538 fh 

29 .453 14 

27 .438 14U 


19 30 388 17 

19 34 JB8 19 

DwiariHMn 

38 27 15 22—94 
NM1M 22 25 25 23-95 

Pr Poison 8-l3M2a- CtaDos 7J23a J* 
N.Yj Erring 1M7 5-7 31, Starts 6-11 0-0 
15.Rrteirad» Phnmfc 44 aWTioiu 8). 
NH York si COokky 151. AsSrRS— PSoantt 
26 OOdd \3b New Yta* 21 (OArts 7). 

Monti 29 24 26 22-111 

pttBedilptalo 23 21 21 16-83 

M: Hairtmray 11-21 5429, MosNtaim 6-10 
2-2 )&ft$W»0use5-157-lT ItaMwLeon 
6-145617- IMitaUr M Irani 55 (Mounting 
lt», PtttaMptta 62 (WDIobs 10). 
Astasfe— Mfainl 28 (HanUnwr «, 
PMadetpMall (Mrjcni). 

SnAntattO M 22 28 41—105 

UtOfe 25 35 23 38-113 

SA: WUdns 10-18 12-133Z Del Negro 10- 
1355286 U:Mal0tt 12-17 13-1737, StodOon 
Ml 7.7 19. taWta -S* Antonio 45 
(WBUnj ID. UMit 37 (Ostaftog 10B. 
Astfsts-San Aatoafe 18 (DU Nsgm 7}. Utah 
33 (Stockton 10). 

Doner 27 27 25 44-123 

Chicago 38 « 35 0-134 

D: D-EWs9-11 5-5 27, Md7tas9-H 7-933; 
C PtaPen 19-27 7-747, Jordon 10-18 3-4 24. 
Reeooods— Corner 41 (McOyess 7). 



ATLATCnC DCVtStOM 

W L T PH 
33 16 a 

28 18 13 

29 17 10 
28 24 B 
23 29 6 

19 29 10 

20 29 7 

fWWTMBMT MVOMM 
W L T Pta 
40 19 10 70 
31 22 5 67 
22 2B 11 55 

2D 26 12 52 

22 28 7 51 

» 31 7 47 


Gf GA 
188 141 
765 J37 

152 133 
200 166 
151 166 
156 171 

153 177 


DsBos 

DeJrort 

St Louis 

PtaKnb 

Otago 

Toronto 



B 2 0-2 
PRBM* 10 3-4 

FH Porta* P-Mota 4 CNortWA. Moron) 

(pp). SoCXtod Period: F-MisrpTrf S fDwvnk. 

Swrtta) (ppl. X F-HougH 6 ( F I Lgsu i rt . 
Lous) TOM Ported; P-Mumiy 8 (Johnson. 
Lemieux) & PMbtt*Vh, Lemieux 40 

UtacOBf. Hotdwrt 6, P-Uaoteux 41 

(Nertoed, Toraeri (en). Shots on god: F- 8-8- 
12-26. P- 11-10-11 — 32. GooBos: f- 


VtaibtasbRXKk. P-Wregget 
CoJgory 2 12 0-5 

Befttto 2 1 2 8-5 

Pirn ported: B4»oco 13 (Dme) Z C-. 
Mtaen 10 (5taip9on) 1 C-Hogiund 15,4 8- 
AiideSo 21 (Mom- CtdJey) Second Ported: 
C-lglnta 17 (Hoglund, TTtwj (pp>. 4. s- 
Htaoger 16 (Moorti Goney) TWrt Ported: 
e-Peco U Oh).& 8- Bamaby 15 (HoUnger, 
GoSey} tpp). 9, C-Slentl (Sinimn Ttawl la 
C43avoy 7 CHtusttto) OiBltaK None. Starts 
on goafc C- 15-11-14-2—42. B- 9-15-5-3—32 
6odeK C-Khld. Ratoeon. B-Haeek. 

Ortmso J 2 

WusktagioB 0 1 O-i 

w Ported: O-Gtonke 9 (Zhottot) 
Second Ported: W-8ondro 36. (op). 1 O-, 
AHrwteon 21 (Bonk. Yashin) 4. o- 
Cunneyworffi 10 (DoJgte, Von Alton) Third 
Period: Q- Duchesne io (Yashin. 

McEodimrO & O-Ootgte 22 (Von ABen, 
Cimneynwft) & O-, McEodiem 6 (Ytehla 
Dodttffl Shots oo goob O- 1 2-9-8-29. W- 7- 
15-10-32. Geodes: 0-TugnuW. W-Corey. 
Boston 18 10-2 

Getando 111 1 — 3 

Fks Parted: B-T.Sw®eney 4 [Ome% 
Tacdten. Z C- Keane 9 rOcoHnsh, Ktatn 
Seated Ported: C-QmBrsh 19 (tendeux, 
Konwtsfcy) (pp). Third Pertod; B-Oonalo 21 
CStumpel Odgem) Overtime: 5, C-Lemteus 5 
(Forsberg, Sakfd (pp). Shots ou goto: B- 8- 
10-6-1 — 25. C- 12-10-9-5—36. GorteK B- 
Rontomc-Roy. 

LosAege to s D , g_, 

PftOHOt 4 2 

F*a Period: Phoenta, King X Z Phoeidx, 
MdCanzie 2 (More, StopWon) 3. Phoenb, 
Mdtomfe 3 (Gartner; Stapleton) 4, Phoenix, 
Staler 25 INuamtliwi) Second P eriod: 
LArJotaemn l (Uatoyefto) 6. Ptnatlx. 
*cK«Bie4 (Staptowi) 7. Phoentx, Shannon 
9 (Rntetf T*W Perfect Mono. Shots an god: 
LA.- 14-10-4—28. Phoenix 17-124-37. 
CmUea l_A.-oaFaa. Ptamfet KheMbuUn. 
TtoWto 3 2 1_4 

1 1 3-5 

first Period: T-Bemn 17 (Suntan, 
iwodta) Z T-G Bmour 14, 1 V-Walker 2 
W«septa Undent 4. T-Berertn is fSuncfti 
Wflhmta) Second Period: v-Tfclanen 10 
(Otffidc, Walkert. 6. T-Zeflter Z 7. T-GHmour 
15 (Deronsey, Zefttor) Tkini Pertoct T-Ctort 
1B (Wotanta) 9. V-. Geanos 16 (QourtnolL 
Undw) lta V-GeUnas 17 [Courtncjjj n. V- 

Mogtaiy 24 (Unden) (ppj. aots oe seoh T- 
n-ii-9-ai. v- 9-15-11 — as. coshes; t- 

Pterin. v-HicZean. Hfesai. 

1 ■ 8-1 

fteiJow 7 1 J — 3 

nw PHled: Sj.-Guota> 7 (Rognoraaan. 
OT2, D-Braten 4 (ReM, Ludwig) Secoito 
raw* SJ.-Gmnatu 16 (Oonaran) Thlnl 
Period: SJ.-Frtesen 18. (eni. Shots an goat: 
D- 12-7-11—30. Sj^ 8-5-6—19. CoaSee n. 
liba. &_k-Hiudey. 


CRICKET 


DATMOfT SO OVERS HATCH 
BOLAND V& AUSTRALIA 
TUE9CMV, IN RMm. SOUTH AFRICA 
Aushatkr. 319-3 In 50 oven 
Sotand.' 269 aM out In 47.2 avws 
AustraBo won hy 50 nms. 


Compostata 2 Sevflta 0 

«odrtt56,ZB«cetono 
5tt 3J?eol Beds 46. 4J3ejxytlvo Coruna 41, 
S.Real Sodedad 41. 6AHeltaj Madrid «L 
7. V0D000M 37, AAlhtoBc BSbaoM P.Rsdng 
Santander M 10-Tenertfe 3i 1 1 .VUeneta 33. 
12Xelta Vigo 29, UOvfedo 28. 14Xoat- 
postetaaa. 15£spanyai2& l6.Sf»rifng G4fon 
«, i7Jigyo Vaflocano 24, iBZanigan 22, 
19.Loarone322i20ArvBta 21.21. Exnwmdii- 

m 19. 22.Herades 19. 

■WU»UUU«P 

UMPmAL.lBTUEG 
Lefamtor a Wimbledon D 


TRANSITIONS 


i 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 

ammcaulbaqub 

MKLMfP-Agnm] ta terms «Wt 38 Scan 
Brwlw on 1-yoor co n iiuu. 

HATONALLEAQUE 

ainirmn-Agraed ft terms with OF 
Glenn Murray on 1 -year contract. 

«0E1«-Agraed ft terms wffii RHP 
Ahrfn Brown on 1 Meteor amtroa 

■MBTUU 

N*mONALBASHETIMU ASSOCIATION 
Blten tea coach. Named 
Hlchto Aduboto Interim coach. 

AWiuu 

NATIONAL POOTBALL L£AOUE 

_ cw *a co— Acquired qb RJckMlrertatmBM 

Somob Seahawks tar dtelr 1997 lta-raund 
draff oidc. 

Gdmtti on ntauryoor contract ond TE Lulher 
Monts. Released OL Jason CMhts. 

?***» NT Gfiberf Brown. 

*^ r u ^|) qtq> ~^ tllIied ^ ****** n 9 h> 
tampa 84V— Reigned TE OoveMooro. 
HOCKlY 

NATIONAL HOC»*Y LEAGUE 

Cn)OR Wo Aroftnehe L« 1 
Hrent Smeryn lor two gomes without pay far ^ 
hoonts to fnsflgow 0 figW 

ngalnst Phoenix an Fab. n 
CT UtRADo ^sigwtd C post Rwbera to 3- 
rtar conTracl. 

COUMi 

,0< * jan CoocJL » become 
ftwboll coach at Austin Poay. 


■>*i a « «, 











-TRTRTIStFLJERrnAY- FEBRUARY .21U997. 


PAGE 17 


> 

Mlv 


SPORTS 




‘it’i It) Bui| 

ionium i 

Jmisfc 


The Dream Shot 
That Saved Knicks 


By Clifton Brown 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — It was the 
kind of shot that children 
dream about Your team is 
down by 2 points. The bah is 
in your bands for a 3-pointer. 
The buzzer sounds. And the 
ball swishes through the net 
for victory. 

That was exactly how it 
happened Tuesday night for 
■^John Starks. 

His game-winning 3-point 
jumper at the buzzer lifted 
New York to an emotional 
95-94 home victory over the 

Phoenix Suns. It was fitting that 
Starks made the game- winner 
because he kept the Knicks 
alive late, scoring 1 1 of his 15 
points in the fourth quarter. 

The Knicks were lucky to 
win, and they even got a break 
on the final play. With New 
York trailing by 2, Allan Hou- 
ston ’s 3-point attempt was 
short with four seconds left. 

- Starks retrieved the long 
Ifrebound. Danny Manning 
flew at him. Starks gave Man- 
ning a head fake, calmly 
waited for him to fly by and 
then shot from behind the 3- 
point circle an eyelash before 
the final buzzer sounded. 

The shot was all net. 

Several Suns players ar- 
gued that Starks had not 
beaten the buzzer, but 
Phoenix's coach, Danny 
Ainge, quickly signaled to 
them that the shot was good. 

“When Allan's shot went 
up, I saw it was going to come 
off," Starks said. “1 just shot 
out there, grabbed the ball, 
and looked down the other end 
to see how much time I had. 
£There were two seconds left 
on the clock. 1 pumped-faked 
and took my time. I squared up 
and knocked the shot down." 

Ewing and Wesley Person 
of Phoenix each scored 22 
points, and Jason Kidd added 
17 points and 13 assists. 

Kidd gave Phoenix its last 
lead with a 20-foot jumper 


over Lany Johnson with 28.2 
seconds to play. Kidd simply 
took two quick dribbles to 
gather his fret, then released a 
sweet shot over Johnson's 
outstretched arms. 

In other games, The As- 
sociated Press reported: 

Butte 134 , Niwte 123 

Scottie Pippen stole the spot- 
light from Michael Jor dan. 

Pippen scored a career- 
bigh 47pomts and Jordan had 
24 as Chicago beat Denver. 

“My teammates were 
looking for me, I was in a 
good rhythm, nobody was 
playing much defense and the 
basket looked Teal big to 
me," said Propen. 

“This is tike my All-Star 
break. I'm dishing the ball off 
and letting the other guys get 
involved," said Jordan, who 
bad a season-high 12 assists. 

The 134 points by Chicago 
were the most by a National 
Basketball Association team 
this season. 

ttaat 111, 7«m 83 Tim 

Hardaway scored 29 points as 
visiting Miami won its 10th 
consecutive game. 

Jamal Mashbum, playing 
his second game for the Heat 
since being obtained in a trade 
with Dallas, scared IS 
points. 

Jazz 113 , Spurs los In Salt 
Lake City, Karl Malone had 
37 points, eight assists and 
seven rebounds as Utah beat 
San Antonio. 

dippers 87, — everf cfcs 89 

Malik Sealy scored 23 points 
as Los Angeles beat over- 
hauled and undermanned 
Dallas for its season-high 
fifth straight home victory. 
Michael Finley scored 18 
points, and Derek Harper ad- 
ded 17 for the Mavericks, 
who have lost 12 of 17. 

Dallas dressed only eight 
players for die second time 
since the nine-player trade 
Monday with New Jersey. 

Kings 88, T i m be nw olv— 84 

Mitch Richmond scored 20 
points and Mahmoud Abdul- 
Rauf had eight straight points 
late in die game as Sacramento 
beat visiting Minnesota. 



Nelson Commits a Huge Turnover 

Dallas GM Has Only Helped the Nets and the Celtics 


Washington Fast Service 

W ASHINGTON — Imagine that 
as general manager of a pro- 
fessional sports team, any 
team, you call one of your counterparts 
and jokingly ask, “Why don’t you trade 
ine five of your best playerc and in return 


Vantage Point / MichablWilbon 


Sara WDnaflltc AMocband Pna 

The Jazz’s Shandon Anderson, right, crashing into 
fiie Spars’ Carl Herrera on his way to the basket 


1 and to your absolute shock 
be says, “O JL, let’s do it" 

What the Nets and Mavericks (fid 
wasn’t atrade.it was Manhattan for S24. 
Even worse: It’s a talk-radio trade. 

Virmy from Passaic: ‘ ‘ Aaah, look I’m 
a Nets fen and I think we ougfata go and 
get somebody who can score 25 a game, 
a guy who could be the best sixth man in 
the league, a point guard who’s woo a 
couple of NBA championships, a good 
three-point; shooter and a seven-footer 
who can throw a well-placed elbow.” 
Talk showbost: "And who should the 
Nets give up, Viimy7” 

Virmy: ’'Let’s give ’em Shawn Brad- 
ley ’cause he’s a stiff Robert Pack be- 
cause he’s always hurt, Ed 0*6811000 
'cause he can’t play, and Khalid Reeves 
’cause, you know, that way it won’t seem 
too one-sided.” 

Don Nelson, ladies and gentlemen, 
has dramati call y altered three trams by 

o^f^Q-conceived, moronic, one-sided 
trade imaginable. 

These are the players he unloaded: 
Jim Jackson, a 26-year-old swingman 
who averaged 25.7 points per game two 
years ago and has averaged 20 points per 
through his career; Sam Cassell, a 27- 
year-old point guard and key member of 
the two-nme champion Houston Rock- 
ets; Chris Gatling, the 6-10 forward 
who’s a virtual lode for the league’s 
sixth man award and who made the all- 
star team this year, Eric Montross, a 
serviceable 7-foot center with good 
work habits whom the Mavericks just 
got in exchange for a No. 1 draft pick; 


George McCloud, a late-blooming 
three-point bomber who has become one 
of the most reliable long-range threats in 
the league. Not one of these players is 30 
years old and all of them would be 
welcomed by the two or three besi teams 
in the league. 

In return. Nelson got Shawn Bradley, 
a huge talent but a man with no dis- 
cernible work habits. By April every 
year, Bradley looks ready to break 
through- By October, it’s evident he 
spent the summer doing nothing; Ed 
O’Bannon, the nicest kid in the world but 
a playin' who has no semblance of a 
game; Pack, a fine assist man who’s been 
ny'ured three years straight for four 
teams; Reeves, who has made a career of 
being included in big trades (Glen Rice 
for Alonzo Mourning, Kendall GQI for 
Kenny Anderson). There’s not one guy 
of the four who’s even a front-line player. 
OJC, maybe Pack when he’s healthy. 

H ERE’S HOW the trade is being 
perceived around the league. 
5 ’One of the NBA executives go- 
ing over the contracts wanted to call 
back to see if I was sane," Nelson told 
The Associated Press. 

Nellie has traded away Mitch Rich- 
mond, Penny Hardaway, Chris Webber, 
Tyrone HiQ, Jamal Mashbum. phis all of 
the above. They got tired of him at Golden 
State, tired of lum real quick in New York, 
where he didn't last even a half-season. 

The player with the longest tenure on 
the Mavericks is Samaki Walker, a rook- 
ie. Tbe best player is Derek Harper, but by 
the time you read this Nellie may have 
shipped him to Houston. 

Poor Jim Cleamons. If ever a coach 
didn’t deserve this, it’s Cleamons, who 
went from perhaps the most stable fran- 
chise in the league in Chicago to this 


mess in Dallas. The NBA should grant 
Cleamons a Juwan Howard deal, send- 
ing him back to the Bulls. 

Though Nelson, to be fair, was once a 
very worthy coach, he’s always been 
overrated. And now he appears to be 
turning into former Cleveland owner Ted 
Stepien. who made so many bad trades in 
consecutive years the NBA created a rule 
that said you couldn't trade your No. 1 
pick in consecutive years, u two is a 
straight line, three is a pattern. Nellie, 
having unloaded Mashbum, Jackson, 
Gatling, Cassell and McCloud for noth- 
ing in two deals, is dangerously close. 

And Nelson’s deals not only kill his 
own team, but could dramatically affect 
the Nets as well as the Celtics. 

The Nets now have a squad because 
John Nash and John Calipari managed to 
swindle Nellie while holding onto Kerry 
Kittles, Kendall Gill and Jayson Wil- 
liams. Put Cassell and Gill in the back- 
court, with Williams. McCloud and 
Mon trass up front and you've got a 
pretty decent starting five. Tbe bench, 
featuring Gatling and Kitties, would be 
one of tire best in the league. Perhaps you 
noticed 1 haven't mentioned Jimmy 
Jackson? That’s because he could go to 
Cleveland for Tyrone Hill, giving tire 
Nets another capable big man. 

The Celtics also benefit They not rally 
have the Mavericks’ first-round pick, 
they also have their own first-rounder. 
Thai’s a lot of balls in the hopper with 
Tun Duncan’s face on them. Since 
Toronto and Vancouver aren’t eligible 
for the No. 1 pick, it’s not farfetched that 
Boston could have the first two picks or 
the first and third picks in the draft. How 
about Duncan ana Keith Van Horn on a 
front line with Antonie Walker? 

And there's still 24 hours before the 
trading deadline. 


Tut a Foot on Their Throat 5 

Gossage Returns to Yankees to Teach Closer’s Code 

By Harvey Araton 

New York Times Service 


Purdue Downs Indiana in OT 


The Associated Press 

Chad Austin nailed a 15-foot fadeaway jumper in-tire 
final second ^overtime to give Purdue an 89-87 victory 
over Indiana in Bloomington. Last year, Austin made a 
game-winning shot with 14 seconds left to beat Indiana. 

Austin’s shot Tuesday night had a lot riding on it a 

loss would have seriously damaged Purdue’s abeady- 
shaky hopes of making the NCAA tournament. The 
Boilermakers (14-10, 9-5 Big Ten) will probably need 
three victories in their last four regular-season games to 
have a shot at a berth. 

Indiana (20-8, 7-7) could find itself inreharacterist- 
ically left out of the tournament because six other Big Ten 
teams have better conference records. 

No. e Duka 84, No. a ci mm mi 77 In Durham, North 
Carolina, Trajan Langdon scored a career-high 34 points 
as the Blue Devils (22-5, 1 1-3 Atlantic Coast Conference) 
beat tire slumping Tigere (20-6, 5^5) to move a game ahead 
of No. 4 Wake Forest in tbe race for the ACC tide. 


T AMPA, Honda— Per- 
haps one lazy spring 
day here at Legends 
Held, Mariano Rivera, tire 
new Yanke e closer, will sit 
(town with Rich (Goose) 
Gossage for a power chat 
about power pitching- The 
Yankees’- new instructional 
aide would be happy to begin 
with October 1978. 

The Yankees were in Bos- 
ton to play the Red Sox in a 
rare-game playoff for tire pen- 
nant Restless in his hotel 
room, Gossage closed his 
eyes and imagined how tire 
game might conclude. Him 
on the mound in Fenway 
Parit As dreamers often do, 
he heightened tire drama, put- 
ting Cari Yastrzemski in the 
batter’s box. This was the way 
he had drifted off to sleep. 

The next afternoon, tire ty- 
ing ran at third, the winning 
nm at first. Gossage gripped 
tbe ball and here came Yaz. 

“Just tire way I’d pictured 
it,” he said. 


Gossage had been 
summoned with one out in the 
seventh, those being tire days 
when closets were no qmdre- 
eating. one-inning wanders. 

“I was scattered that whole 
day," he said. "The pressure 
was so great that by tire time 
Yaz came up, I was all over tire 
place. Breathing heavy, heart 
pounding. It was about then, 
that I had tins conversation 
with myself. I said: This is 
what you wanted. The worst 
that can happen is that you’ll 
be home in Colorado tomor- 
row. It’s not life and death. ’ 

“Then it was like this eerie 
calm came over me. I was 
relaxed. I mean, really relaxed, 
with this amazingly controlled 
aggression. I locked in at Yaz 
and actually told myself, ‘This 
is fun.’ And when 1 got him to 
pop out and the game was 
over, Thurman Munson told 
me I had about a foot more on 
that than any other 

pitch I’d thrown that day." 

“You’ve got to want to 
bury them,” he said. “Put 
your foot on their throat" 

Passion comes to 


Gossage’s voice as he speaks 
of saving baseball games. His 
eyes narrow. A fist clenches. 
The barrel chest and cbeek- 
to-cheek mustache complete 
the picture of intimidation 
But- Gossage says appear^ 
ances can be deceiving. There 
were times, mean as he 
looked, when he was faking. 
Possessing tire veneer and 
even the firearm is rare thing. 
Having the nerve is another. 

Ron Davis, in Gossage's 
opinion, was aclassic example 
of “a tremendous set-up guy” 
who did not fit the psycho- 
logical profile of a closer. 

"Wbsn be was with us, be 
would say, T could dose,* ” 
Gossage said. “I knew he 
couldn’t Just knew from 
knowing him, his makeup. He 
saved some games when he 
went to Minnesota but that’s 
because you get so many 
rhannus, starting tire ninth in- 
ning with nobody an. He just 
wasn’t cut out for being tire guy 
with no rare behind you." 

One mista ke , you take 
everyone down. The fear can 
be mind-altering. Perhaps, 



Jim Mat^Ibo Aiaodanod fast 

SPECTATOR IN THE OUTFIELD — Kirby Puckett, who was forced to retire last 
summer by eye problems, watching a Minnesota workout at Fort Myers, Florida. 


Gossage mused, it explains 
why Atlanta’s Marie Wohlers 
bolstered his 98-miles-per- 
hour fastball and threw a 
cheesy slider to Jim Leyritz 
that became tire three-run 
hraoer, turning around Game 4 
and the World Series last falL 
“He made a mistake that 


no closer ever should,” 
Gossage said. “Got beat on 
what wasn't his best pitch." 

He shook his head. 

"Did that once or twice 
when I was young," be said. 
“But you’ve got to learn to 
deal with failure." 

The other day, Joe Tone 


mused how be would miss the 
sight of John Wetteland on the 
dugout steps before a game, 
heated toward tire bullpen, 
shoulders hunched, exuding 
attitude. Torre would say, 
“See you in three hours." 

Wetteland would just cod, 
like John Wayne. 


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PAGE 2 


INTERNATIONAL 


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PAGE 20 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


What About Names ? 


Lights! Camera! Philosophy! Birth of a Turkey 


W ASHINGTON — At 
this time what the Clin- 


' T Y this time what the Clin- 
ton administration lacks is a 
Charles Colson, an HR. Hal- 
demao, ora John Ehrlichman. 
We are aware that all kinds of 
mischief has been committed 
in the Clinton White House 
but we don’t 
have fee names 
of those who 
did it 

For example, 
we know feat 
someone in the 
White House 
said to an aims 
dealer from R . „ 

; China, “Come Bud”™ 4 * 
an by far breakfast with the 
president," or to a Phffippmo 
businessman, “The president 
would love to hear your story 
as he is jusr about to put his 
trade policy on the Internet." 


plate of corned-beef hash at 
the White House, “If you 
don't tell us what you want, 
how will we ever find out 
what would really make you 
happy?" 

The American people have 
a light to know who inter- 
ceded with their elected lead- 
er when it came to tapping fee 
big donors for money. 

Somebody had to say to a 
generous benefactor, “Would 
you like a smoking or a 
nonsmoking Lincoln Bed- 
room for the night?” Maybe 
it's wrong to sell out the Ex- 
ecutive Mansion, bat you need 
to win an election to be able to 
let the high rollers use the 


International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Bernard -Henri Levy has lost 
his shirt. Instead of the vanilla (washday 
white for TV appearances) long-collared 
and deeply unbuttoned shirt that has been 
his trademark since he was acclaimed a 
nouveau philosophy, or new philosopher, 
on the television program “Apostrophes" 
in 1977, he is in all fee current French 
magazines bronzed and bare-chested, only a 
slight roll around his middle suggesting 
long hours spent in thought at the Cafe de 
Flore. 

The occasion is the release last week ofhis 
first feature film, "Le Jour et La Nirit,” 
starring Levy's wife, the sculptural actress 


MARYBLUME 


bowling auey. 

Don’t misunderstand me. I 


We know that somebody 
uttered these words but we 
don't know if it was an aide, a 
fund-raiser or the butler. There 
were hundreds of breakfasts, 
golf games and sleepovers 
with the first family — all of 
them bad to be authorized. 

Many people can’t help 
wondenng who said to a 
small group of bankers, over a 


don’t want to send anyone to 
JaiL I just want names to go 
with die face* of those m 
charge of granting favors to 
tag donors to the Democratic 
National Committee. 

The country slept better at 
night knowing that Colson, 
HaJdeman, Ehrlichman and 
all the other Watergate play- 
ers were responsible for cor- 
rupting fee Nixon adminis- 
tration — but so far, the 
public doesn ’t have any Clin- 


ton names. 


Signs of Ancient Ireland 


Reuters 

DUBLIN — A wooden ca- 
noe, found in the mud flats of 
the Shannon estuary in the 
west of Ireland, may be one of 
the oldest signs of a human 
settlement in fee country. 
Carbon dating shows that it 
dates from 4,800 B.C. and is 
about 2,000 years older than 
other canoes found in Ireland, 
said Ronan O "Flaherty, man- 
ager of the discovery pro- 
gram. 


Rumor has it that the DNC 
is trying to find a scapegoat 
— someone they can blame 
for all the money scams the 
party has resorted to. But I 
can't wait that long. I want to 
find out today who sold the 
White House. 

I am also curious to know 
what the going rate is for hav- 


Arielle Dorobasle. Alain Delon and Lauren 
Bacall as a character with the premonitory 
name of Mrs. Blench. 

The film is set and was shot in Mexico, 
the reason for Levy's newly rugged he-man 
appearance, and because the critics were 

much knew what ^it 'w^is al- 

lowed to see the film they were none the 
wiser despite such lines as “the Mexican 
sun is pitiless," references to Faust, and 
what might be the picture 's epigraph; * *1 am 
making an experiment, I suppose. But I 
don’t know what it is.") 

Instead of reviews the press, Jed by the 
satirical weekly Le Canard Enchain e and 
followed by the usually stately Le Monde, 
has amused itself by a taxonomy of the 
magazine covers, interviews and TV time 
garnered by the film; cover stories on Delon 
(“The Delon Enigma,” in Le Point, 
“Tender and Rebellious; The Private De- 
lon” in Figaro magazine), interviews in 
every form of publication with the possible 
exception of those devoted to cyberspace, 
extensive TV coverage including Delon as 
guest commentator on the respected weekly 
news review, “Sept sur Sept,” a cover 



The magaane Le Point, as Lc Monde 
poke oui?g?ve *e film eight W*** 
described it as ambitious. ronten^ ^se- 
ductive, BHL writes a weekly column for Le 
Point' and co-wrote the film s scenario wife 
one of its executives. And, ^ 

Le Point’s film critic wrote fee P^s ™ 

^Levy^Slfwoie about making fee film 
in fee weekly L’Express. His chum feemo- 
ducer Daniel Toscan du Planner praised rt m 
Figaro magazine and, along with former 
Mutisterof Culture Jack Lang, says the 
Canard, got fee film accepted, out of com- 
petition, by the Berlin Festival al though the 
festival's director found it so unrotentionauy 
funny that tears ran (town his cheeks. Le 
Nouvel Observateur may have been banned 
from screenings but one of. its columnists, 
Francoise Giroud. a friend and author wife. 


STO * VM 

l’Cul«> 


Bernard- Henri Levy during the filming of “Le Jour eit La Nnit.” 


(M.WV 


ably courteous, asks Levy can we reveal the 
plot, the master strategist smoothly replies, 
“No, it’s too soon. Let people discover it for 
themselves.” 

The reason for all the typically Parisian 


photo in Paris-Match of Dombasle and De- 
lon and. inside, six oases of Lew and Delon 


ing a bagel with President 
CuntoEL If I don’t set a name 


Clinton. If I don’t get a name 
soon I'U start to think that the 
president himself came up 
with “Breakfast in the Club" 
idea, and that would be a very 
sad thought to have. 


ion and, inside, sLx pages of Levy and Delon 
exchanging compliments. Levy on Delon: 
“a history of cinema on his own . . . one of 
fee most mysterious people of our times”; 
Delon on BhL, as he is widely known: “He 
is a great strategist.'' 

When Delon, whose performance on 
screen and in the press has been commend- 


was never tense and trembling on television, 
like so many French intellectuals”), has wife 
“Le Jour et La Nuit" proved himself gifted 
to excess in his ability to renvayer Cas- 
censeur, literally to send back down fee 
elevator — that is, to profitably return fa- 
vors, a favored Parisian skill 
Wife a film opening fee same week as 


Woody Allen’s “Everyone Says I Love 
You,” even BHL must have know there was 
trouble ahead. 

So he jot a little help from his friends, as 
detailed m Le Canard and Le Monde. Ac- 
cording toLe Canard, Levy, indignant at the 
poor reviews received by his recent play, 
decided to re-invent a better behaved press. 
The means: Do not invite critics to sercen- 


Levy of a book about love, bad already 
visited the set in Mexico and described & 
Delon “subjugated by BHL, the intellectual, 
the writer who directs as if feat were his 

profession.” . 

, As for fee vast coverage m Paris-Match. 
fee Canard recalls that when the magazineV 
publisher was widely criticized and fined by 
a court for printing photographs of Francois 
Mitterrand on his deathbed. BHL wrote in 
his Point column, “The verdict is stupid 
because the photographs are very beauti- 
ful.” 

After a week of distinctly Parisian fun, 
reality finally struck as it will and the film 
opened At this point, says Michele Stouven- 
ot in Le Journal duDimanche, what had been ; 
a Parisian event became a nonevent, a mere 
turkey. The critics finally had to see it. Le 
Monde found it at once excessive and pre- 
dictable and sensibly latched on to one of the 
Levy’s metaphorical and smvingly original 
visual images, the three hot-air balloons feat 
move across the Mexican landscape. A hot- 
air balloon contains — hot air. 


l*!' 

t'. 7i If -i-' 


•; r; 

r .. ,» [ u ■ ; 


magazine editor drums, and other people of 

inftugnrg. 

As if by magic, fee media extruded dozens 
of features in which the unseen film was 
described by its participants and not by its 
critics. 


The film’s success will shortly be judged 
by box office earnings. The biggest pros in 
fee business, the cashiers and ticket tellers, 
did not seem too sanguine. Asked how long 

Innt* a rwrliisr ntnliwl “Oft* hiwr 


ticket taker wife a cheeky grin. Too late, the 
ticket had been bought, but be was absolutely 
right. 




PEOPLE 


T HE late U.S. ambassador Pamela 
Hairiman, ina will she signed only 





A Hairiman, in a will she signed only 
one moofe before her death, left the bulk 
of her estate to be divided equally be- 
tween her only son. Winston S. 
Churchill, and his estranged wife, 
Mary Churchill. The estate includes 
property, paintings, jewelry and cloth- 
ing. Lawyers and sources close to Har- 
iiman, who died Feb. 5, were reluctant 
to put a value on the estate. Two years 
ago. following a bruising legal battle 
wife fee heirs of her late husband, fee 


The person most notably left out of fee 
will is Harriman's longtime assistant, 
Janet Howard, who had worked for her 
in Washington and Paris. “If the 
gardener and the cook are named in the 
will and Janet Howard is not, that’s a 
real surprise,” said Christopher Og- 
den, WOO wrote a book on Har riman. 


students and reporters who covered fee 
visit, including Klein, a fanner News- 
week columnist who now writes for The 
New Yorker. Robert Sack, lawyer for 
Klein and Random House, mid fee 
Times feat any resemblance between 
fee librarian in the book and Carter- 
Qark was unintended. 


daughter, granddaughter and great- 
granddaughter of prime ministers of Ite 
dia, was married in New Delhi to 
Robert Vadra, 27, an exporter. The 
traditional two-hour Hindu wedding , ce- 
remony was held at the home of Sonia 
Gandhi, the bride’s mother. There was 
heavy security. The brideY-father, 


diplomat and financier W. AvereU 
Harriman, her liquid assets were es- 


timated to be about $10 million — afar 
cry from the $100 million estate he had 
left her. Averell Harriman’s descen- 
dants are not mentioned directly in the 
will, but an obligation to pay a trust $2 
million is. That trust is probably for fee 
benefit of the heirs, as are proceeds of a 
life insurance policy of undetermined 


value, according to sources familiar 
with fee will. Other gifts in Harriman’s 
will included ^ $25 0,000 to each of her 
four grandchildren; $100,000 to her 
brother. Lord Edward Digby; $20,000 
each to her two gardeners, her cook and 
Jier chauffeur, and $ 1 0,000 to her bnder. 


Susa* WuWTIk Au90CM*d Pre** 

CMC — Mel Gibson wearing the “Cross Your Braveheart Bra” while 
being feted as Man of the Year by Harvard’s Hasty Pudding club. 


A Harlem librarian is seeing red over 
. "frimaryColarc,” fee Joe IPem book 
site contends has people thinking she 
slept with President BUI Clinton. “My 
acquaintances do fltinklhadanaflEair," 
Daria Carter-Clark, who is suing 
Klein for $100 million, told The New 
York Times, “ft’s ridiculous, ft’s in- 
decent It’s ludicrous." She sued Klein 
and his publisher. Random House, in 
December, but at the time she would not 
comment beyond fee court papers. 
Carter-Clark said fee first chapter of 
“Primary Colors" — in which a mar- 
ried Southern governor running for 
president sleeps with a Harlem librarian 
— echoes a 1991 visit that Clinton, then 
a candidate, made to her library. Carter- 
Clark said she and Clinton did have “a 
very private conversation" away from 


A1 Pacino, who used fee Globe 
Theatre in London, fee new replica of 
S h akespeare’s original theater, as a set 
for his documentary “Looking far 
Richard,” will continue feat associ- 
ation, He has been named a member of 
its artistic directorate, which advises 
Mark Rylance, fee theater's artistic 
director. "A1 Pacino came down to the 
Globe to film ’Looking for Richard’ in 
1994,” said a spokeswoman far fee 
Globe, “and he went to fee Globe’s 
production of "The Two Gentlemen of 
Verona’ at the New Victory Theater on 
42d Street in January when he had along 
chat wife Mark Rylance. He was very 
keen to get involved." 


Rajiv Gandhi, was assassinated , in 
1991 dining an election campaign. Her. 


1991 dining an election campaign. Her, 
grandmother, Indira Gandhi, was as- 
sassinated in 1984. Her great-grandfath- 
er Jawaharlal "Nehru <Jjed in 1964* 


Priyanka Gandhi, fee 25-year-old 


The movie “Evita" premiered in Ar- 
gentina to huge fanfare but was de^ 
trounced by critics as historically in- 
accurate and for sullying fee image of 
fee nation's most popular icon. As fee 
director Alan Parker watched his film 
at&Buenos Aires cinema, the protests of 
older followers of Eva Peron outside 
were drowned out by cheers of young 
fans of Madonna, who portrays the 
former first lady. The hype sinrounding 
the premiere, and a government rec- 
ommendation to boycott “Evita,” ap- 
peared likely to fuel interest in the film 
which opens to the public Thursday. 



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