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— 1 . .nraCTiitttmi iT uvstAI XLTRTOTTTSTF. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 21-1997 


PAGE l 


INTERNATIONAL 


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The Worlds Daily Newspaper 


U.S. Rebuffs 
WTO Probe 
Of Cuba 
Sanctions 

Bui Talks WiU Go On 
WithEU in Hope of 
‘Prompt Settlement 9 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 


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; In a move that significantly raised the 
stakes in the trans-Atlantic dispute over 
Cuba, the Clinton administration served 
notice Thursday that it would refuse to 
j cooperate with an inte rnational inves- 
\f ligation of its trade sanctions heeanw 
they served UJS. national security in- 
terests. 

. Washington left the door open for 
negotiated resolution of the dispute, 
however, saying it would pursue faTfrg 


with the European Union m hopes of 
“Hhievinjg a “prompt settlement." 

Both U.S. and EU officials asserted 


v. 


fr»t , 


that high-level negotiations on the issue 
had made good progress in recent days, 
but they indicated that a deal was not 
immine nt. 

The announcement in Washington by 
Stuart Eizenstat, the undersecretary of 
commerce who serves as President Bill 
Clinton’s special envoy on Cuba, came 
hours after the head of the World Trade 
Organization appointed a three-person 
dispute settlement panel to investigate 
^ European contentions that die U.S. 
sanctions violate global trade rules. 

The statement appeared designed to 
keep up the pressure on Europe to back 
down and to reassure U.S. congression- 
al critics of die World Trade Orga- 
nization without triggering a showdown 
that could undermine the authority of 
the Geneva-based trade o rganizati on. 

EU officials reacted with camions 
optimism, saying they were encouraged 
that the United States did not seek to 
block the appointment of the panel and 
would continue to negotiate. 

"It will remain our aim to achieve a 
negotiated settlement, and of course the 
panel procedure can be. halted or sus- 
pended at any time if die parties reach- 
agreement, 1 ' said Sir Leon Brittan, die 
EU trade commissioner. 

“Our expectation is that this is going 
to be resolved," said a WTO official. 

__ who spoke on condition of anonymity. 

“There seems to be areal detire to settle 
■ the thing." 

The aim on both sides is to resolve the 
dispute before the panel reaches a de- 
cision, which should take six months. A 
verdict that endorsed Washington’s view 
could blow ahole in global trade rates by 
setting a precedent for other countries to 
cite national security, white a decision in 
favor of Europe amid arouse protec- 
tionist forces m die United States that ’ 
bitterly oppose foe trade organization. 

Despite the signs of goodwill, the 
United States and Europe remain for 
apart over the sanctions contained in foe 
Helms -Burton act, as well as foe role the 
World Trade Organization should play 
ip resolving foe dispute. 

Sir Leon reiterated the European view 
. that the act was objectionable in psin- 
/dple, representing & bla tan t attempt by 
r Congress to impose its laws on Amer- 
ica's trading partners. He is firmly 
backed by all IS EU members, who 
agreed unanimously last week to proceed 
with the WTO case despite strong pres- 
sure from Washington to abandon 4 . 

But a senior U.S. official dismissed the 
EU arguments, insisting that Europeans 
as well as opponents on the act in Ca nada 
and Mexico had a distorted view of U.S. 
policy. : 

The Helms-Burton sanctions were a 
‘’firm and measured” respons e to the 
shooting down of a civilian aircraft off 
Cuba last year, said this official, who 
spoke on condition of anonymity- The 

See WTO, Page 6 


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The Dow 


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THmdseidam P rawtou,dow> 


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chmfl* THunnHy O 4 PM. pi«vtom do— 
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Jordan. L25DJD US. Mi {Eur.)--5150 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON PO 


R 


Paris, Friday, February 21, 1997 



China Looks to the Next Generation 


Taiwan and Hong Kong 
Face New Uncertainties 


By Edward A. Gargan 

New York Times Service . 

HONG KONG — The death of Deng Xiaoping has raised 
new uncertainties about the future both here and in Taiwan. 

While both teiritbries axe regarded by Beijing as integral parts 
of the Chinese nation, both Hong Kong and Taiwan see them- 
selves as distiller — politically, col rurally and economically — 
from the mix of socialism and capitalism within tlx: totalitarian 
political order of China itself. 

Although Hong Kong — one of Asia's most vigorous econ- 
omies and most free societies — will foil tinder China's flag in 
less than five months, foe 21 million people of Taiwan seem 
more determined than ever to go their own way. 

In 1982, as China’s undisputed and supremely confident 
leader, Mr. Deng made it abundantly clear to Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher of Britom-tfaaf China would resume sov- 
ereignty of Hong Kong cm July 1, 1997. China, be declared. 

Virtually all of Hong Kong’s top civil servants win be 
allowed to stay in office after China’s takeover. Page 4. 

woold run Hong Kong, already showing sijps of being one of 
Asia's economic dragons, and it would stanon troops from the 
People ’s Liberation Army here. 

But despite Mr. Deng's aggressive stance toward a Britain 
that entertained notions of continuing to administer Hong Kong 
in some fashion under China’s sovereignty, he also, somewhat 
ironically, became Hong Kong’s defender against Communist 
Party hard-liners, who wanted to rein in foe territory's free- 
wheeling economy and growing civil liberties. 

Instead, Mr.Deng ordered, Hong Kong would retain its 
ritalist economy and a political system different from 
's, operating with, as be pot it. “high degree of 

See HONG KONG, Page 4 . 



Mourning Deng 

• Shenzen, once a sleepy, 
nondescript fishing village 
lost in the shadow of Hong 
Kong, , owes its phenomenal 
and development to 
ig. Page 2. 

•When Mao died in 1976, 
China was paralyzed by grief. 
But despite foe prosperity Mr. 
Deng bipughi to the nation, few 
tears are beihg shed for him 
now.Phge ~ w 

• ■•■Mr. Deng’s funeral will be 
an im portant opening act for 
President Jiang Zemin -os he 
tries to cement his hold on 
power. Page 4. 

•Asian stocks rose as in- 
vestors put recent uncertainty 
behind mexn,.Page 13. - 


-. .1 . \.t V » 


. . ... 

. ! T ■' ! - * 


p‘ 


mm 

u ♦. ■ 



The Chinese flag at half- 
staff Thursday in Bey rag. 


Mnudi Crarii/ \fmrr Ynore- IVi-w 

Jiang Zemin, 70, China’s new paramount leader, is a technocrat. 

A New Kind of Leader 

Jiang Zemin Made Mark as an Intellectual 

By Nicholas D. Kristof 

• New York Times Service ' 

The man anointed to follow in foe footsteps of Mao Zedong and Deng 
Xiaoping to role China in the coming years, Jiang Zemin, is a mild- 
mannered intellectual who likes to quote Lincoln and who would be the first 
leader in Chinese history with a college degree. 

Mr. Jiang, a portly 70-year-old who holds foe titles of president. 
Communist Party general secretary, and chairman of the Central Military 
Commission, was picked by Mr. Deng in 1989 to be foe country’s next 
paramount leader. 

The apparent ascendancy of Mr. Jiang, at least for now, marks a transition 
to anew kind of leaden an urban, college-educated technocrat, in place of 
poorly educated peasant leaders like Mao and Mr. Deng. Indeed, Mr. Jiang 
was chosen in part because foe elderly leaders were impressed by his 
intellectual inclinations and his ability to speak foreign languages. While 

See JIANG, Page 2 


Bereft of Deng’s Mantle, 
Successors Seek Mandate 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Sn York Times Smite 

BEIJING — For thousands of years, foe Chinese have looked 
up to one overarching authority — whether emperor or com- 
missar — to rule them with the “mandate of heaven.' ' 

Deng Xiaoping's deteriorating health had long left him 
inactive and all but invisible, but bis presence conferred a 
reassuring sense of order and direction on a fractious leadership 
struggling to sustain an economic miracle, to contend with an 
ambitious military and to extend China's influence in a sus- 
picious world. 

Now Mr. Deng, foe last of China's revolutionary titans, has 
passed the mandate to a collective of younger men centered 
around Jiang Zemin, a 70-year-old power engineer turned pony 
boss, and Prune Minister Li Peng, a tenacious political survivor 
best known to foe world as the face of authoritarianism that 
crushed the Tiananmen Square pro-democracy uprising in 
1989. 

These men hold foe titles and the power, but it is not at all 
clear either can inherit the imperial authority needed to unite 
China as it deals with new. divisive challenges. 

Among them are pressures for greater economic liberal- 
ization and a more open debate of the past — and for greater 
attention to human rights and political liberty — as well as foe 
corrosive influence of corruption and Beijing’s delicate re- 
lations with Hong Kong and Taiwan. 

Mr. Jiang's lade of stature in comparison with Mao and Mr. 
Deng has already consigned him to a life of political maneuver 
and compromise among foe tangle of factions and families that 
dominates foe hierarchy of foe Communist Party. And it has 
forced him into an uneasy alliance with Mr. Li, who day to day 
wields foe machinery of government and foe management of 
foreign policy. 

Perhaps most important, Mr. Jiang's relative political weak- 
ness has forced him to accommodate the growing demands of 
the military for larger budgets and a more bellicose posture 
toward Taiwan. 

The good news for foe president in foe seven years since Mr. 
Deng nudged him into place as general secretary of the party in 
foe aftermath of Tiananmen is that he has maneuvered so 
effectively that none of his potential rivals has been able to 
seriously fault his leadership. But he has always had foe mantle 
of Mr. Deng’s authority to fall back on. 

Now it is gone. 

A new mandate of heaven must now be fashioned in China, 
and Mr. Deng’s prodigious legacy of economic reform that 
delivered such a rising tide of prosperity for foe Chinese cannot 
quite overcome one glaring omission: foe failure to provide a 
constitutional or legal framework for political succession. 

Despite efforts to establish the rule of law, when it comes to 
picking a leader, the Communist Party still resembles Mao’s 
revolutionary tribe, where seniority in the party and ties to the 
military or to heroic events in the Communist past create the 
seating chart in the high councils of foe party that must agree on 
anew leader. 

That was the manner employed in selecting Mr. Jiang when 
the wreckage of Tiananmen forced Mr. Deng to abandon an 
earlier handpicked heir. Zhao Ziyang. 

The world saw it as Mr. Deng’s decision — and his hand was 
certainly uppermost — but foe selection of Mr. Jiang was 
carefully vetted am wig revolutionary elders, men whose names 

See MANDATE, Page 4 



STRAPPED — Investors outside the offices of a pyramid investment scheme in Tirana, 
Albania, on Thursday. Clashes broke out after an anti-government protest Page 5, 

Lost Decade in the Balkans 

Turmoil Is Born of Rage in the ‘European Losers 5 Club 5 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Port Service 


BELGRADE — -To the jarring accompani- 
ment of kazoos and car horns ■ — and, occa- 
sionally, tear gas and truncheons — popular 
discontent in the Balkans has spilled noisily into 

the streets this winter, toppling one government, 

badly shaking two others and. erupting into vi- 
olent spasms in all three . 

The triggers of foe current turmoil vary from 
an economic meltdown in Bulgaria to the spec- 



tbecost. ■ _ i 

But tiie rising resentment m the Balkans has 
some common roots. Not least is the strong sense 
throughout the region — ■ on thronged streets, 
rtytg intellectuals and in diplomatic circles — 
that by refusing or delaying basic democratic or 
economic reforms,, governments have cheated 
foeir people and left them out of .an otherwise 
prosperous and advancing continent. . 

Iiuaeasindy, the 1990s arebegumingto look 
KVft die Balkans’ great lost decade, and- foe 


hundreds of thousands of people who have taken 
to foe strews of dozens of cities and towns are 
furious at being left in Europe’s dust 
-- “We all feel like we belong to the European 
losers’ club,’’ said Predrag Simic, director of foe 
Institute of Internationa] Politics and Economics 
in Belgrade. “We’re just way behind the rest of 
foe continent, including Central Europe." 

What is particularly galling to many is the 
realization that the neighbors to the north — 
Hungary, the Czech Republic and Poland — are 
comparative models of democratic harmony and 
free-raaiket prosperity. 

Television has shown them that, and it dazzles 

life. Even -in Tirana.* for decades* one of*the 
world’s most isolated capitals, a flowering of 
.satellite dishes testifies to a subversive famili- 
arity with sitcoms and films from Italy, Al- 
bania’s neighbor across the Adriatic Sea. 

“People watch American movies; they know 
what a. decent. life is,” said Slobodan Vuk- 
sanovic, an opposition lawmaker in Serbia. 
“And now, after foe freedom of the demon- 

See BALKANS, Page 6 


Of Fund-Raisers and Felons 

Asian Accuses Democrat Ex-Con, Seeking a Pardon, 

Of Trying to Mask Donors Spoke Privately to Clinton 


By Lena Sun 

Washington Post Service 


By Bob Woodward 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — An executive of an Asian- 
American business association said he was ap- 
proached by a Democratic fund-raiser, John Huang, 
last summer ami asked to funnel more than $250,000 
from Mr. Huang through its members as contri- 
butions to the Democratic National Committee in 
return for a $45,000 payment to the group. 

Rawlein Soberano, vice president of the Asian 
American Business Roundtable, based in Fairfax, 
Virginia,' said there was no discussion of where the 


money was to have come from, and that he rejected 
Mr. Huang’s offer immediately. 

*‘I said ‘no,’" Mr. Soberano said in an in- 
terview, “I knew when you do this kind of thing, 
it's no different from laundering money from the 
drug lords." 

Mr. Huang, through an attorney who declined to 
be identified by name, denied having made the 
proposal to Mr. Soberano. “Mr. Huang would 
never have said anything other than that we need 
your help," the attorney said Wednesday. "The 
rest did not happen." 

Mr. Soberano ’s account is the first direct al- 
See FUNDS, Page 6 


WASHINGTON — A twice-convicted felon 
who met with President Bill Clinton at one of the 
small White House coffee receptions in 1995 at- 
tended four other Democratic National Committee 
fimd-raising events involving Mr. Clinton last 
year, according to records and interviews with 
Democratic Party officials. 

At a Democratic National Committee event in 
California last year, witnesses said foe convicted 
felon. Eric Wynn, who has been trying to win a 
pardon, spoke with Mr. Clinton in foe presence of 
his attorney. Richard T. Mays, who is a longtime 
friend of me president's. 

The White House press secretary, Michael Mc- 
Curry, said the president did not recall meeting or 
speaking with Mr. Wynn at the March 9, 1996, 
fund-raiser in the San Francisco area. Mr. McCrary 
emphasized that the president would not have 
permitted Mr. Wynn or his attorney to discuss a 
possible pardon. 

Mr. wynn has been arrested five times during 
foe last six months while out on bail, according to 
police records introduced in a New Jersey federal 


See FELON, Page 6 


AGENDA 


Food Aid Could End Standoff on Defector 

Food aid promised to North Korea could help 
lead to the resolution of the standoff over a high- 
ranking North Korean defector who has been in 
the South Korea mission in Beijing since he took 
refuge there Feb. 12. 

Some observers familiar say that prospects are 



progress 

the negotiations was slow. 

“we are neither pessimistic or optimistic,' 1 
senior government official said. Page 4. 


Wall Street Heaps Scorn on Clinton Budget 


Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin said it would 
not happen, but financial analysts have found 
much fault with the administration's proposed 
badget for the fiscal year that starts Oct. 1. 

Mr. Rubin's old firm, Goldman Sachs, has led 


the charge, finding in a report that the president’s 
plan was riddled with timeworn accounting 
tricks” and other “highly dubious elements.” 
Congressional Republicans have also come in 
fra- criticism, over proposed tax cuts. Page 13. 


AMERICAS Pag* 3. Books ...... Page 3. 

Mexico’s Drug Arrest Shakes VS. Agencies Crossword — ■■■■* Page 17. 

■ ~ ■ Opinion — Pages 8-9. 


INTERNATIONAL 


Pages- Sports. 


...... Pages 29-21. 


NATO Offers to 3faJce Dramatic Gas in Arsenals int n maaaaaemmd 


Page 7. 




't 












i r A • 


PAGE 2 


IHTEBNATIONAI. HERALD TRIBUNE, SA3TJMMY-SWPAX, FEMtUARY 1-2, 1997 



PAGE 2 


USTERNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAS, FEBRUARY 21^1997 


Mourning Deng / 'It's a Different Time' 


A City Pays Respects 
To Source of Its Wealth 


Hundreds Gather in Bustling Shenzhen, 
Where Both Sides of Deng Legacy Thrive 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Post Senice 


SHENZHEN, China — Not too long 
ago, this Chinese city was little more 
than a sleepy, nondescript fishing vil- 
lage lost in the shadow of the pros- 
perous, British-run colony of Hoag 
Kong just across die border. 

But today it seems as much like Shen- 
zhen is outshining the sloping hills of 
Hong Kong's frontierfand next door. As 
the Hong Kong train enters the station at 
the Lo Wu crossing point, a knot of 
glistening new skyscrapers appears 
seemingly out of nowhere, all different 
shapes and sizes, some with tinted glass 
sides and others, still incomplete, with 
giant yellow construction cranes affixed 
to their tops. 

This city’s phenomenal growth and 
development can be attributed to one 
man — Deng Xiaoping, China’s para- 
mount leader, who died Wednesday in 
Beijing. It was only in 1980 that Mr. 
Deng declared Shenzhen one of his 
handpicked “special economic zones" 
that would enjoy privileged tax and in- 
vestment policies aimed at attracting 
foreign manufacturing firms. Mr. Deng 
himself visited here in 1992 on his final 
major domestic tour, and he gave Shen- 
zhen his personal nod of approval. 

So it might be expected that if any 
place in China showed a genuine pop- 
ular outpouring of grief for the alien 
paramount leader, it would be in the city 
he virtually created. Indeed, in the small 
grassy park where Mr. Deng's huge 
billboard likeness gazes contentedly 
over the city, hundreds of people — 
young and old, the business elite and the 
beggars from the streets — all gathered 
to set up wreaths on large stands, to take 
photographs, to mingle and to mourn. 

“I like Deng,' ’ said one young man, a 
driver by trade, who identified himself 
as Wong. “Without Deng Xiaoping, 
there would be no Shenzhen." 

In a country where any type of un- 
authorized gathering is strictly pro- 
scribed, this apparently impromptu pub- 
lic demonstration of grief and affection 
seemed nothing short of startling. 

At times, it also seemed to unnerve 
the local police, who were out in large 
numbers but also apparently unsure 
whether to break up the silent gathering 


on the grass. Groups of policemen at 
various times stood by, nonchalantly 
watching the growing crowds and then 
trying to prevent more people from en- 
tering the ropcd-off area. 

“Last week, if we had stood here on 
the grass, we would have been fined 20 
yuan," said a grizzled old veteran in a 
faded army cap. The fine would have 
been worth $2.50. “But this is a special 
day." 

He held up a copy of the local news- 
paper with the banner headline on Mr. 
Deng’s death and a picture of the pat- 
riarch in younger days, saying, “He is a 
great man." 

“He's China’s No. 1," said another 
eldeiiy visitor. "He was good.’ ’ he says, 
flashing his visitor a thumbs-up sign. 

“Yes, I like Mm very much," said a 
young woman with a black armband. 

Elsewhere in Shenzhen, away from 
his one large likeness, it was difficult to 
find any public reaction to Mr. Deng’s 
death. The Chinese flag of five gold 
stars on a field of red was flying at half- 
staff over government buildings. Near 
the train station, a copy of the day’s 
Economic Journal newspaper, with a 
story about Mb*. Deng cut the front was 
posted in a glass display case for public 
reading, but only a few people stopped 
for a passing glimpse. 

But the consumer frenzy that die 
leader’s reforms have wrought was fully 
in evidence here Thursday — as was the 
concurrent set of problems that many 
here see as the underside of China's 
unrestrained rush to double-digit 
growth. 

Outside the tourist hotels and shops, 
hawkers woe busy handing our leaflets 
and cards advertising everything from 
cheap rooms to cheap, traditional mas- 
sages for the aching hands and feet 

A police officer was pulling over 
taxicabs and issuing traffic citations. 
Huge Marlboro billboards exhort young 
Chinese to smoke to look macho, and 
prostitutes in massive heels and penned 
hair troll in front of hotels. 

One side-effect of die transformation 
of China’s economy has been a growing 
gap between the rich and poor, the haves 
and the have-nots, those who live in the 
affluent coastal regions like this one, 
and the largely rural migrants from die 
interior who flock here in search of 




Land That Wept for Mao * 

Goes About Its Business, 
As His Successor Wanted 


By Steven Mufson 

Wdtkingnm Post Soviet _ 


BEDING —When Mao Zedong died 
in 1976. Liu Chengyin, his family and 
200 to 300 other people dressed in their 
drab cotton. Mao suits hurried to their 
work unit to cram* around a black-and- 
white television set that was the only one 
available in the entire neighborhood. 

People wept, and the Lius’ hometown 
of Kunshan, about an hour’s drive out- 
side Shanghai, like the rest of C hin a, 
was paralyzed by anxiety and grief. 

On Tbinsday, the Liu family was able 
to watch news of Deng Xiaoping’s 
A»ath on a color Panasonic television 
in the comfort of the living rooms of 
their separate one and two-bedroom 
apartments, tape the broadcast on their 
VCR, talk it aver on a mobile phone, 
or over a routine dinner of pork, rice 
and fruit tha t in Mao’s day would have 
been considered a feast fit for an em- 
peror. 

Yet there were few tears being shed in 
China on Thursday over Mr. Deng’s 
passing, despite fee vast improvement 
his reign brought about in fee lives of 
ordinary Chinese people and the tower- 
ing figure the diminutive leader cut 
across most of fee 20th century. 

“There isn’t much love for Deng 
Xiaoping," said Mr. Liu’s son, Iiu 
Mushi. : 

“It’s a different time," Liu Mushi 
said. “Back fees was the peak of Mao 
worship. You don’t have that for 


China, which has suffered trauma ai 
virtually every change in leadership, 
survived the first day of the post-Deng 
era without incident or anxiety- 
And that’s the way Mr. Deng would 
probably have wanted it. He always said 
that he wanted to avoid fee sort of 
personality cult that the charismatic but 
tyrannical' M30 cultivated. As a result, 
no portrait of Mr. Deng hangs over the 
Gate of Heavenly Peace 


opposite 'A-, 


‘Ordinary residents fee! 
that Deng was a very 
great man, but just a 
man, not a god . 5 


Tiananmen Square, where Mao hung 
his own image. No bust of Mr. Deng 
graces fee Chinese currency. There are 
no statues of him in city squares. 

“Otdinary residents feel feat Deng 
was a very great man. but just a man. not 
a god,” said Victor Yuan, president of 
Horizon, a Beijing-based polling firm. 


ll’fl 1 ' 


1 o 



‘Partly because of Deng’s own wishes 
there is no cult of personality to match 
feat of Mao- Most Chinese know Deng 
did a lot for fee country and that he also 
bad imperfections. He did not leave a 

I 3 * — an aiapfi 


lacquered image and that is vety much 
toms credit. Tne 


seemed to reflect the prevailing 


GameBoMin 

Shenzhen residents arranging flowers and wreaths Thursday in front of 
a billboard photo of Mr. Deng in the southern city near Hong Kong. 


view in China on Thursday, where few 
seemed to be mourning Mr. Deng as 


work. That gnawing disparity — ana- 
thema to traditional communists — 
stands as much a part of Mr. Deng's 
legacy as die gleaming new glass-sided 
skyscrapers. 

On one street, a small street child wife 
a metal bowl followed after passers-by. 


tugging at their pant -legs for a spare 
com. On 


a pedestrian overpass, not far 
from the Deng billboard, a legless man 
crawled on his stomach wife a tin cup 
extended before him. Nearer the train 
station, a line of beggars — old women 
wife white hair, men wife missing 
limbs, dirty-faced children — stood 
with hands outstretched. 


Shenzhen has also developed a darkly 
violent side, a place where gangsterism 
has become so rampmt that one foreign 
businessman here said he never traveled 
anywhere without an armed bodyguard. 

Analysts say that wife China set to 
resume control of Hong Kong in just 28 
weeks, any policy changes affecting die 
status of the special economic zones — 
and Shenzhen particularly — seem 
highly unlikely, because of fee detri- 


mental impact any change might have 
rKongi 


on Hong Kong itself. So for the moment 
at least, this most visible of Mr. Deng's 
legacies, problems and all, seems likely 
to persist. ■ 


much as they once mourned Mao. 

Instead, for most people in Grina, it 
was business as usual: bucking morning 
traffic, putting in a day at fee office or 
factory, going to class, or shopping at 
stores and markets. 

The stock markets in Hong Kong and 
Shanghai, after sharp drops on Tuesday. 
stabilized and ended the day slightly 
higher. The police presence on fee 
streets, usually relatively modest in size, 
a p pea r ed to be the same as usuaL 

“As long as I get paid, it doesn’t 
matter who dies,” said a woman selling 
tea on fee street of Beijing's busy 

Tltes^eer ba^t^offoe day and the 
absence ofany outpouring of grief was a 
measure of Mr. Deng’s success. 


w leaders of China have 

been somewhat reduced to a more hu- 
man sole.” 

The Lius are thankful for their 
prosperity, and yet they feel nostalgic 
for life in the 1950s and 1960s, which 
they remember as a simpler tune. 

“Back then, people’s morality was 
higher,” Liu Mushi said. “People had 
more faith in the Communist Party.” 

“There was both more control and 
more morality," said his father. 
“Nowadays, if you ride a bike and fall 
<m the street, a bunch of people will see A 
you and no one would come to help you. 
Back then feat wouldn’t happen.’ 


l happen.’ 

Mr. Yuan, the pollster in Beijing, 
said: “People think Deng brought about 
much better living conditions and a 
much more open society and more op- 
portunity. Bui they also complain feat 
the present society has too many people 
who just talk about money and the man- 
agement of fee country looks not so 
clean and hottest." 


Away Freni Pohtu 


l!" 


JIANG: An Intellectual Who Is a New Kind of Leader for Chinese 


Continued from Page I 


Chinese officials say Mr. Jiang is 
already secure in his role as China’s 
strongman, power struggles have been 
rumored in Beijing for some time, and 
Mr. Jiang has attracted some resentment 
for his tendency to amass titles beyond, 
his critics say, his talents. 

The assiduousness wife which he has 
cultivated military leaders bespeaks his 
political shrewdness, but it also signals 
one of his weaknesses and apparently 
his nervousness about fee possibility of 
a military coup. 

Judging Mr. Jiang's future course is 
difficult because he has been dubbed the 
“weafeervane" for his tendency to shift 
wife the political winds, and he has 
generally been more associated wife 
caution than leadership. He is also lim- 
ited because he is the fust top Chinese 
Communist leader without military ex- 
perience, meaning that he commands 
less respect from the armed forces than 
Mr. Deng did. 

Yet, he has courted and promoted a 
series of military leaders, and by most 
accounts he has done better than anyone 
expected in winning friends among the 
generals. More broadly, Mr. Jiang has 
been underestimated throughout ms ca- 
reer. and he has proven a better politi- 
cian and more tenacious figure m the 
last few years than most critics expec- 
ted. 

A Russian-trained engineer. Mr. Ji- 
ang speaks fluent Russian and some 


English and Romanian, learned during 
stints working in a factory in Romania. 
He greets Japanese visitors with a few 
words of Japanese, impresses Romani- 
ans by quoting fee Romanian poet Mi- 
hai Eminescu, and sometimes quotes 
from Lincoln's Gettysburg address in 
English, particularly the tine about 
“government of the people, by the 
people, for fee people. 

Even Mr. Jiang’s diminished stature, 
compared to fee leaders of the past, may 
make him a man to match the times. 
Mao was one of fee most powerful 
rulers in Chinese history, presiding at a 
time when the Communist Party was a 
totalitarian institution. Mr. Deng was 
also powerful, though much less so, at a 
time when the party was still important 
but less so than under Mao. 

These days, fee Communist Party, no 
longer much connected to communism, 
rules the political process but not fee 
daily lives of fee Chinese people. Mr. 
Jiang emerges as fee diminished leader 
of a diminished party, and many 
Chinese are perfectly happy wife that 
arrangement. 

While Mao and Mr. Deng were both 
bold visionaries, Mr. Jiang has been 
much less impetuous. He ravors eco- 
nomic tiberaiiiation but at a moderate 
pace, and he seems to feel feat fee 
government should still play an im- 
portant role in the economy. 

Mr. Deng often seemed roost enthu- 
siastic about southern Chinese cities 
like Shenzhen, where the economy 


boomed because of private enterprises 
and joint ventures with foreign compa- 
nies, where living standards soared but 
social problems also emerged and die 
Communist Party lost some of its rel- 
evance. 

Mr. Jiang, in contrast, has always 
seemed most enchanted by the econom- 
ic model of Shanghai, the city where he 
served as mayor and Communist Party 
leader, where the government plays a 
major role in guiding the economy and 
large, modern companies build their 
glass-and-steel offices. 

Mr. Jiang does not seem bothered so 
much by fee ideological challenges of 
free enterprise in a socialist country as 
by the practical political problems.. He 
seems hesitant about privatizing state- 
owned companies, not because .feat 
would be incompatible wife Commu- 
nist Party role but because of concerns 
about whether 1 aid-off workers would 
take to the streets and protest. 

In fee political world, Mr. Jiang is 
also a moderate authoritarian compared 
to Ms predecessors. He met with, pro- 
democracy student protesters in 1987 to 
urge them to go back to their studies, 
and at times he tolerated a bit of dissent. 
He played no direct role in the 1989 
military assault on student protesters, 
because he was in Shanghai at the 
time. 

Yet, Mr. Bang clearly has a firm 
hand. He closed the nation’s most out- 
spoken newspaper in Shanghai in 1989. 
well before the crackdown, and he 


. :r : 


The Chinese Leadership After Deng 


TRAVEL UPDATE 






.Bang Zemin, 70, 
president. Chairman 
of the Chinese 
Communist Party. A party 
member since 1946 and 
a former mayor of 
Shanghai, Jiang was 
catapjted into the 
leadership in tfu wake 
afterthe 1989 crackdown 
on pcwtemocracy 
demonstrators. Learned 
English at an American 
mhsranary school. 



U Pang, 68, prime 
minister. 

Bectedin1988Jietost 
control of economic 
poky in 1990 to Zhu 
Ron#. Li is a major 
symbol of the bloody 
crackdown on 
demonstrators in 1989 
in Bepng. having signed 
the martial few order 
for troops to intervene. 
Stodted hydroelectric 
enspneering in Moscow: 



New York’s Airports 
Yield on Luggage Carts 


Zhu Rongji, 68, deputy 
prime mbristar and 
governor of the 
People's Bank 
of China. A career 

economic planner vtoo 
wasrehfeffitadBdby 
Deng in 1979, Zhu is 
CHnafe economic czar. 
Succeeded iang as 
mayor of Shanghai) 
1988. His blurt manner 
and tough economic 
programs have made 
him many enemies in 
China. 


(Sao Shi, 72, chairman 

of the Nabonai People's 
Congees. Qiao made 
his career in party 
security and inteffigonce. 
He is head of the secrete 
protecSon committee 
and a strong stpporter 
of the economic reform 
poBdes initiated by 
Deng. Widely beSeved 
by Chinese analysts to 
have abstained In the 
vote for the use force in 
the 1989 crackdown, He 
tes a British-educated 
son and a U.S.-educated 
daughter-.,. 


IHT 


NEW YORK (NYD — After endless 
complaints from airline passengers, • 
self-service luggage carts will soon be f 
available without charge in the inter- 
national arrival terminals at the three 
major airports in fee New York area. 

Passengers on domestic flights will 
still have to pay $1.50 for a cart The 
change at Kennedy International Airport 
La Gnardia Airport and Newark Inter- 
national Airport is expected this spring. 


Hong Kong Christens 
Chek Lap Kok Airport 


HONG KONG (AFP) — Hong 
Kong's new multibill ion dollar Chek 
Lap Kok airport was christened 
Thursday when a government twin-en- 


gme^rfane landed on its runway. 



US. Adds 311 
As Police Line 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON— In 
an effort to free up an 
emergency system 
clogged with calls about 
irksome but not urgent 
situations, the Federal 
Communications Com- 
mission has designated 
311 as the number for re- 
porting nonemergencies. 

The panel acted in re- 
sponse to a request from 
President Bill Clinton last 
July for a number feat 
would be “as easy to use 
and remember as 91 2.” 

So far, only Baltimore 
has a 311 system. 


ordered a string of executions imme- 
diately after fee 1989 crackdown. In 
recent years be has also presided over a 
tightening of political controls, so feat 
dissidents have virtually all been exiled 
or imprisoned. 

Bom in fee city of Yangzhou in cen- 
tral China, Mr. Jiang joined the Com- 
munist Party in 1946 but did little work 
in the party before the Communist re- 
volution of )949. After studying electric 


motors at a Shanghai university, he 
worked as a manager in a series of 
factories and studied engineering in the 
Soviet Union. • v . •• . 

After embracing fee Cultural Revolu- 
tion. and emerging largely unscathed 
when it ended m 1976, be became a 
government official and rose to be deputy 
minister of the electronics industry in 
I982>Tbe key step came when be was 
appointed mayor of Shanghai in 1986. 


“The first landing shows we are well A- 
on track to open fee new airport in AprilT 
1998,” said the airport authority chair- 
man, Wong Po-yan. 


The Czech Republic and Slovakia 

phone caJ^ftxun abroad March 1, when 
the codes will be 420 for the Czech 
Republic and 421 for Slovakia (API 


cr- 


Tbe marble frieze of the Athena 
Nike Temple at the entrance of the 
Acropolis will be moved soon to pre- 
vent it being destroyed by pollution, an 
archaeological source said. I AFP) 


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Forecast tor Saturday through Monday, as provided by AocuWeather. 


Asia 





North America 

Stormy a/ea Bier mill exit 
the East Saturday, fol- 
lowed by a shot of cold air 
kno B» Northeast and mid- 
Atlantic Sunday and Mon- 
day. CoW and metWy dry 
weather w3 prevail across 
the Great Lakes. Dry and 
mod m dm West and north- 
ern Roddoa. 


Europe 

Near- ta above-normal 
temperatures trill prevail 
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nent. Stormy weather mill 
return to the British teles 
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Sunday and Monday. 
Southeast Europe trill be 
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milder, while ahowera 
could reach into Spain 
Sunday. . . 


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UnseaeonaMy mild naatfi- 
ar wB continue In Bering. 

both Karens, including 
Seoul, and southern 
Japan. These areas will 
abo atw dry thna4£i Mon- 
d/iy- Tokyo and the Ml of 
Japan wtf onlay a moder- 
ating bend. Hong Kong wA 



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PAGE 17 




!CTimi MiTjAiM ALx m ii uL n TRreiiMLin? m 4v -FEBRUARY 21-1997 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


Starr Leaves Himself a Way Out of Quitting 


POLITICAL 


% 


By Susan Schmidt 

Washington Post Sen-fa 


if the ‘*Dn«» in a • ■ u n « ve , Deen P™*™" by the ftcror his departure announcement has geo- 

?mpSifc enued. Edhorfflkk the country's major n£*s- 

' ®““ a year OT two Papers accused him of abandoning his obiigalioa to 

romD&^i- OUld !“ **“ to **** Whitewater investigator to conchision. 
37£yA? 0 1 rmVK ^ He ^ dfc Senate Aden Specter, Republican of 
standing' * with p^LiJ? 3 * fas cu ? Tent under- Pennsylvania, sent a letter urging Mr. Stair to see 
S “ Pepperdine, suggesting that the the job through. 

P In a news corfen*nc f» "Your departnre will have a very serious, if not 

before the Fairf^/^vr^ a breakfast speech devastating, effect on die investigation/' Mr. 
c,„_. Vir S i nia, Bar Association, Mr. Specter wrote. “Prom my own experience as a 

^ °. whether he would make prosecuting attorney. 1 know that leadership and 

aecisions oetore his departure about whether to momentum are critical. There are many witnesses 

1 arl! t ^u^^ S f^r iUas f Bill Clinton, HD- or potential witnesses who will be dissuaded by 

)ary Komam Cunton or their White House aides, your departure as a sign that the fesuftg will not be 
ne acknowledged it would be difficult for a new pursued with the same diligence. I share that con- 
mde pendent counsel to carry through on major cem.” 

indictments prepared under his direction. Lawyers familiar with the investigation have 


“That could present difficulties if the individual said Mr. Starr's departure will make it even harder 
had no prior involvement with the case,” said Mr. to gain the testimony of Susan McDoagai and 
Stair, hinting strongly be would recommend his others who have refused to cooperate, 
successor be chosen ffom among the lawyers on his Mrs. McDoqgaL who along with her ex-husband 

staff. That choice will be made by a special appeals- is a former business partner of Mr. Clinton, is 
court paneL serving a sentence far contempt for refusing to 

Mr.StaiT seemed unprepared for and taken aback answer before a grand jury when asked if Mr. 
by the furor Ms departure announcement has geo- Clinton had testified truthfully at her trial for 
erated. Editorials in the country’s major news- fraud. 

papers accused him of abandoning his obligation to Asked about gaining cooperation of witnesses, 

see the Whitewater investigation to conclusion. Mr. Stan: said: “The country would be better off 
Senator Alien Specter, Republican of and the nation would be well served if tibe witnesses 
Pennsylvania, sent a letter urging Mr. Starr to see came forward.” 


Mr. Starr said Wednesday that “nothing has a 
larger priority than the faithful discharge of these 
duties.” The timing of the Pepperdine offer was 


Specter wrote. '’From my own experience as a outside his control, he said, adding ihai the decision 
prosecuting attorney. I know that leadership and to accept it now had been "difficult for me per- 
momentum are critical. There are many witnesses sonally.” 


icult for me per- 


tarture as a sign that die issues will not be 
with the same diligence. I share that con- 


At Pepperdine. Mr. Starr will be dean of the law 
school and founding dean of a school for public 
policy. He said he had delayed as long as possible in 
accepting the offer from the university in Malibu, 
California. 


Arrest of Mexico Drug Czar Shakes U.S. Agencies 


By Pierre Thomas 

•• Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Fed- 
eral law-enforcement agen- 
cies have ordered extensive 
'damage assessments after the 
/arrest of Mexico’s top anti- 
drug official, who had broad 
'access to classified U.S. in- 
formation, including <WaiU 
‘about drug investigations, 
; wiretaps and sensitive 
‘sources. 

A senior administration of- 
. firial said the official. Gen- 
"eral Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo. 
.named 10 weeks ago as di- 
rector of the National Insti- 
tute to Combat Drugs, “was 
given sensitive information, 
‘lots of it.” 

General Gutierrez, 62. a 
/42-year army veteran, has 
been charged by Mexican of- 
ficials with aiding the trans- 
portation of cocaine, bribery 
and maladministration of 
justice. Mexican officials also 
■say that General Gutierrez 
“brought criminals with drug 


contacts into the agency, and could be considerable,” said 
U.S. officials said the damage a senior law-enforcement of- 


those subordinates might 
have done would also have to 
be assessed. 

The damage assessments 
were discussed Wednesday at 
a meeting of representatives 
of the State Department, Na- 
tional Security Council, tbs 


could be considerable, ” said of the U^. Office of National 
a senior law-enforcement of- Drug Control Policy, was de- 
ficiaL The official expressed scribed as shocked at the 


concern that General Gutier- news that General Gutierrez 
rez might have passed along had been arrested in a cor- 
information about covert U.S. rnption investigation tied to 
law-enforcement techniques Amado Cape lin Fuentes, pur- 
to thug dealers, allowing ported leader of Mexico's 
them to counter the tactics. 


Stunned 


law-en- 


Office of National Drag Con- forcemeat officials, including 
trol Policy and the Depart- previously staunch support- 


ment of Justice. 


ers of Mexico's efforts to 


The assessments, likened combat drugs, conceded that 
to those undertaken in espi- the arrest had to be factored 


onage cases, wtD also include 
die analysis of intelligence 
previously provided to the 
Mexican government, which 
General Gutierrez had access 
to as that country’s highest 


into President Bill Clinton's 

coming decision on whether Juarez drug cartel and re- 
to cer tify Mexico as a trust- garded as the country’s most 
worthy partner in anti-narcot- powerful drug lord, 
ics programs. A report on General McCaffrey, who 


General Gutierrez had access ics programs. A report on General McCaffrey, who 
to as that country’s highest such certification is dne had praised General Gutier- 
ranking drug fighter, officials March 1; if Mexico is deemed rez as an “honest man ” and 
said. In addition to conceals untrustworthy, it would U.S. touted Mexico's efforts to 
about what U.S. intelligence aid for drug-fighting pro- fight drugs, has canceled the 
General Gutierrez obtained, grams. scheduled release Friday of a 

There is also considerable “It's sad and troubling that U.S. -Mexico white paper 
worry about what he learned in fact corrupt i on has reached analyzing drug trafficking. 


i. Office of National orities. The briefings in- 
trol Policy, was de- chided information on border 
ts shocked at the drug-smuggling activity, in- 
: General Gutierrez tenuction efforts and an as- 
arrested in a cor- sessment of world cocaine- 
tvestigation tied to distribution networks, law- 
arrillo Fuentes, pur- enforcement and administra- 
ader of Mexico's tion officials said. 

The Gutierrez inquiry be- 
. . _ came public in Mexico last 

I be potential for weekend, when army troops 

damage could Be SSSXS C2M 

considerable.’ Gutierrez owns in the west- 

central city of Guadalajara. 

The operation was carried out 
ug cartel and re- without the knowledge or co- 
the country’s most operation of General Gutier- 
irug lord. rez's agency or the attorney 

s McCaffrey, who general's office, which over- 
id General Gutier- sees die anti-drug institute, 
“honest man” and In a statement, Mexico’s 
exico’s efforts to defense minister. Enrique 
$, has canceled the Cervantes Aguirre, said the 
release Friday of a investigation began Feb. 6. 



>11 Huh* llruiri* 


Mrs. Clinton reading in a Kansas City hospital — a traditional first-lady touch. 


MiJInrv Clinfnn Tbcfe known as Team 100 because iheir dona- 

muury bunion lesis tions at $100,000 apiece, win be 

Npui Public Annrnnrh ““e* 1 10 * lthe mcn P acka e e of mem - 

uew? ruUUL Stppruucn berahip benefits of any political organi- 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — The sci- “S*-” 
ence experiment was straightforward D ^ expenses at the 

enough. With Hillary RodhaSi Clinton mshlly i 00 ? 

helping out, the gaggle of squirmy grade- to $2,100. Expenses for the members 
schoolers dropped one object after another ° f Congress are picked up by the Repub- 


into a plastic rub of water to see which 
would sink and which would float The 
marble sank. The pencil floated. 

In her own fashion. Mrs. Clinton these 
days is conducting a sink-or-floar exper- 
iment. too. testir.g out political themes and 


lican National Committee — in other 
words, by its 1.2 million donors, including 
Team 100. 

The three-day private event featured an 
address to the contributors Wednesday by 
Mr. Gingrich. On Thursdav. congressional 


techniques to find the right combination for * ea ^ e |^ l °°k pur} in panel discuss ions on the 
the second Clinton term P^y s legislative agenda. Friday is for 

Her first major trip outside of Wash- * p)f ’ tennis and boating. tNYT) 

ington since the inauguration could serve as n i .a j 
a metaphor for how she intends to proceed. IJUCLget Amendment 
During a two-day swing through the Mid- o«ir PC? 

west that ended Wednesday night she died MXlSKS LjOSS Ot iJUDDOrwr 
a blend of soft-and-fuzzy, traditional first- J 

lady types of events — such as reading to WASHINGTON — Senator Tim John- 
children in a hospital — and more policy- son has decided to oppose a proposed bal- 


of his country's efforts in the an individual at this level,” 


more than two months be has 
been on the job. 

“The potential for damage 


U.S. -Mexico while paper 
analyzing drug trafficking. 

. On a visit to Washington 


said a State Department three weeks ago. General Go- 
spokesman. Glyn Davies. tierrez was briefed on U.S. 
Barry McCaffrey, director narcotics strategies and pri- 


Away From Politics 

• The Georgian diplomat involved in 
a car crash that killed a 16-year-old 
girl surrendered to Washington police. 
Tbe police handcuffed Geuorgui 
Makharadze, 35, and booked him on 


California more than 10 years ago of 
raping a 15-year-okl girl and then 
chopping off her arms, was in custody 


“band of boose wives” as couriers, 
figuring they would slide through cus- 
toms easily, federal drug agents said. 


one count of involuntary manslaughter fauna would take him, and he spent 
and four counts of aggravated assault almost a month at San ^Quentin pnson 


in Tampa, Florida, facing charges of Some of the women were single, btn 
murdering an unidentifiedwoman. Mr. most had children; some bad jobs, and 
Singleton, 69, served eight years of a some were on welfare. The Long Island 
14-year sentence in California. When women allegedly got up to $10,000 
he was paroled, no community in Cali- each to cany the drugs. (AP) 


in the Ian. 3 crash. 


fAP) fief orei 


; to Florida. (Reuters) 


• Lawrence Singleton, convicted in • A drug-smuggling ring used a 


BOOKS 


•NASA's Hubble tune-up crew hung , 
upthefr space suite and prep are d tor a - 
rare nighttime landing at the Kennedy 
Space Center in Florida. ( Reuters ) 


BLOOD AND ‘WATER: izttwito deuterium oxide as a byproduct. 

Sabotaging Hitler's Bomb 

.By Dan Kurzman. 274 pages. $27.50. and from about mid- 1942, when intel- 
- Henry Holt . ligence officers and atomic specialists 

■ ■, r became alanned at potential Gennmde- 

Reviewed by John Prados velopment p rograms, there was a grow- 

A S emphasized with some regularity ing detennmation to do something to stop 
/TLin the recent controversy over the them. 

Smithsonian Institution’s exhibit cm the "Blood and Watt 
'atomic bomb and the Enola Gay, the count of Allied effo 
frightful weapon was originally built to liquid the Germans 
"combat Germany, not Japan. The fear bomb. Dan Kurzmai 
that Adolf Hitler’s Germany co ul d a tt ai n viously on subjects. 

'such an explosive first, and use it to win Spanish QvO War to 
World War E, provided powerful im- on the" Warsaw Ghett 
. penis in the decision to make the bomb to produce eyewitnes 
V .and the drive to design it What wait ana Water” is no ext 
1 mostly unexamined in tbe story of die Kurzman even m 
atomic bomb — until Dan Kurzman survivor of the ferry Si 


gave us “Blood and Water” — was the 
_ other side of the coin: the efforts of the 
"Allied powers to prevent Germany 's at- 
. tainmem of an atomic capability direct- 
ly, by destroying necessary equipment 
.-and raw materials. 

The water of the title is a reference to 
.' so-called heavy water, deutenum oxide, 
,a hydrogen-loaded variant liquid that 
■ physicists discovered could be used as a 
■'moderator, or control mechanism, in a 
nuclear reactor. The reactor would be a 
key step along the road to a bomb be- 
*cause it could be used to prepare bomb 
materials as well as to demonstrate that 
the nuclear chain reaction necessary to 
make a bomb work was possible. 

German physicists led by Werner 

Heisenberg were known to be on the road 
to a reactor. The question was what could 
be done to keep them from operating Que- 
ll happens that the Germans’ mam source 
of heavy water was a plant captured when 
Hitler took Norway in 1940. The triaot, 
Norsk-Hydro, produced chemical fertti- 


By Alan Truscott 

A LMOST all team events 
place a premium on part- 
.nership experience and so- 
phistication. 

The one exception, re- 
warding adaptability, is the 
Betty Kaplan Teams of the 
Greater New York Bridge 
Association, in which four 


“Blood and Water” is a lively ac- 
count of Allied efforts to destroy the 
liquid the Germans needed for the 
bomb. Dan Kurzman has written pre- 
viously on subjects, ranting from die 
Spanish Civil War to the German attack 
on the Warsaw Ghetto, and always tries 

an^Wato’^ijfno exception^ 

Kurzman- even managed to find a 
survivor of the ferry Sinking m which the 
Norwegian Resistance finally managed 
to doom the Germans’ heavy water ship- 
ment He does not tell us what led him to 
decide to write about sabotaging Hitler’s 
atomic bomb, but one ciuft resides in the 
feet that another of Rnraman’s books 
(“Fatal Voyage”) concerns the sinking 
of toe American cruiser the Indiana- 
polis, the ship used to cany the core 
components ofU-S. atomic bombs to the 
Pacific Islands from which the final 
raids would be laun ch ed. 

Hie story of the campaign against 
Hitler’s bomb unfolds as a series of 
successive actions, since for a long time 
die attempts flopped or fell short of 
complete success. A commando raid by 
the British in November 1942 failed 
tragically when gliders carrying toe 
raiders crashed and one of two tow 
planes was lost as well. 

Norwegian Resistance fighters man- 
aged to get into Norsk-Hydro and dy- 
namite machinery in February 1943, but 
in a few months' toe Gormans had toe 


heavy water plant running again. That 
September a massive air raid of almost 
400 American strategic bombers made 
another try at Norsk-Hydro, but failed to 
hit the containers holding stocks of 
heavy water. The ferry incident in Feb- 
ruary 1944 — in which the Resistance 

g amed scuttling charges of explosives 
dew decks, just before Germans 
loaded the ship with their accumulated 
supply of heavy water — finally 
crowned the campaign against die Ger- 
man A-bomb with victory. At each step 
of the way Kurzman lets us see through 
tbe eyes of characters as different as toe 
Norwegian shipping manager for Norsk- 
Hydro and an American B-17 pilot 

I N contrast to all this action, however, 
toe background and strategic de- 
cisions are handled far more sketchily. 
Enormous quantities of wartime doc- 
uments and formerly secret information 
are now in toe public domain — toe 
author cites quite a few of these records. 
They could have been of use here. What 
did Churchill say to his generals and 
intelligence chieftains about attacking 
toe German bomb? Were there con- 
versations between Churchill and FDR? 
If so, whar did they say? 

The events in Norway surrounding the 
German heavy water program constitute 
one of the most heroic chapters in the 
saga of resistance to the German oc- 
cupation there. Eclipsed to some degree 
because toe German atomic bomb never 
materialized, the campaign to stop ir is an 
unsung success of World War IL In 
“Blood and Water” Dan Kurzman 
brings that success to life with verve. 

John Prados, the author, most re- 
cently, of u Presidents' Secret Wars,” 
wrote this for The Washington Post. 


after the authorities received a 
tip tiiar the new drug czar had 
moved into an expensive 
apartment in Mexico City 
whose cost seemed beyond 
his lawful means. General 
Cervantes said the investiga- 
tion revealed tbe apartment 
had been made available to 
General Gutierrez by an em- 
ployee of Mr. Carrillo’s. 

Mr. Carrillo is widely 
known as the ‘‘Lord of the 
Skies” because he is said to 
have pioneered the use of 
Boeing 727 aircraft to trans- 
port large-scale shipments of 
cocaine from Colombia to 
northern Mexico, from where 
itis then shipped to toe United 
States by various means. 

Mexican authorities also 
obtained a recording of a tele- 
phone conversation that they 
say is between General Gu- 
tierrez and Mr. Carrillo about 
payments to be made to Gen- 
eral Gutierrez in exchange for 
his cooperation. 

■ Clinton Troubled 

President Clinton on 
Thursday called the accusa- 
tions against General Gutier- 
rez "deeply troubling,” but 
said he was pleased toe gov- 
ernment had acted promptly 
to deal with it, Reuters re- 
ported from Washington. 


oriented speeches where she jawboned lo- 
cal officials and community leaders about 
their responsibilities to reshape welfare. 

“You have different needs at different 
points in time.” she said during a brief 
interview. “We are living in a more en- 
trepreneurial time, so that you have to be 
constantly evaluating the solutions that 
you’re bringing." (WP) 

Republicans Fete Givers 
At Fancy Florida Resort 

PALM BEACH. Florida — Just as Re- 
publicans in Washington are preparing to 
investigate fund-raising practices by 
Democrats, top Republicans gathered here 
at a century-old, oceanfront luxury resort as 
a reward to their biggest contributors. 


anced budget amendment to the consti- 
tution, Democratic sources said Thursday, 
dealing a sharp blow to the measure's 
chances for passage. 

The South Dakota Democrat voted for 
the same amendment two years ago while a 
member of toe House. But the sources, 
speaking on the condition they not be iden- 
tified, said he had been heavily influenced 
by concerns that Social Security would be 
threatened by the amendment. 

His opposition would give foes of the 
amendment 33 sure votes, according to 
tallies kept on both sides of the issue, one 
shy of toe total needed to assure its defeat 
Other than Mr. Johnson, only two sen- 
ators remain publicly uncommitted on the 
issue, which is expected to come to a final 
vote in the Senate by early March. 

The amendment would require a bal- 


By giving at least $175,000 over four by 2002 and require a three- 


years to the Republican National Com- fifths vote of both bouses of Congress to run 
mitiee, more than 200 corporations and a deficit in any year thereafter. f.iP) 
individuals earned invitations to the Italian ^ /tt 

Renaissance-style Breakers Hotel. The xJUOte/ UnQUOte 

chief draw: rh#* rhanrp to nih plhnws a’irft X 


chief draw: the chance to rub elbows with 
tbe nation's Republican leaders, including 


President Bill Clinton, describing his ap- 


the Senate majority leader. Trent Lon of proach to crime as he outlined a package of 
Mississippi, toe House speaker. Newt Gin- legislation aimed at youth violence and 
grich of Georgia, and toe chairman of the particularly gang activity: "Tough when 
House Appropriations Committee, Robert you should be tough, sman when you 
Livingston of Jtouisiona. should be smart, compassionate when you 

Party literature says the contributors, should be compassionate.” fli’P) 


Antonio de Almeida, Conductor, Dies 


The Associated Press 

PITTSBURGH — Antonio 
de Almeida, 69, music direc- 
tor of die Moscow Symphony 
Orchestra and an authority ot 


Yorker article into the book 
“The Education of Hyman 
Kaplan,” and followed it up 
with two sequels. 


French classical music, died permanent posts included mu- 
of cancer here Tuesday. sical directorships with the 


BRIDGE 


after an overcall in diamonds, 
cue-bid in that suit and con- 
tinued toe game. 

Her partner, Barry Rigal 
could seelittlehqpe of success 
after the opening lead of toe 
heart four. Leading toe dia- 
mond nine from dummy 
offered little hope, and be 
chose to win the first trick in 
his hand. 

He then made a move en- 


But West was confident — 
overconfident — that his 
partner held a diamond honor, 
so he played low. Rigal cheer- 
fully called for dummy's dia- 
mond nine by saying, "Win 
it!” and was ooto pleased and 
astonished to find that he had 
done so. It was then an easy 
matter to enteritis hand with a 
trump lead and ruff out the 
diamond ace. 

His diamond- winner even- 


NORTH (D) 
+ AJ2 
7 Q 98032 


Mr. de Almeida researched, 
performed and recorded an 
unusual repertoire. At his 
death, he was recording all toe 
symphonic works of toe 20th 
century French composer 
Henri SaugueL He was in- 
volved in the revival of rarely 
performed 19th century 
French operas, and conducted 
the first complete recordings 
of Halevy’s “La Juive” and 
Thomas’s “Hamlet.” 

He was a leading authority 
on toe operettas of Offenbach 
and general editor of a critical 
edition of the composer's 
works and of a complete 
thematic catalogue. Several 
years ago he conducted a 
scholarly version of “The 
Tales of Hoffmann,” using 
unpublished material left by 
the composer, who died be- 
fore completing toe opera. 

He studied music in Ar- 
gentina with Alberto Ginas- 


tera and later with Paul Yorker article into the book 0989), two mystery novels 
Hindemith at Yale. “The Education of Hyman and numerous screenplays. 

Before his appointment Kaplan,” and followed it up 
with the Moscow Symphony with two sequels. Warren Weaver Jr., 74, 

in 1993, Mr. de Almeida's Mr. R os ten also wrote a who covered politics and 
permanent posts included mu- sociological examination of government in Albany, New 
sical directorships with toe toe film industry, “Holly- York, in Washington and 
Stuttgart Philharmonic and tbe wood: The Movie Colony, the across the country for The 
Nice Opera and Philharmonic, Movie Makers” (1941). a New York Times for virtually 
as well as numerous regular study of toe Washington all his 42 years as a reporter, 
guest conducting posts. press corps, “The Washing- died Wednesday in Washing- 

iwiDncton Hnmnrict 1011 Correspondents” (1937), ton of complications of dia- 
Leo Kosien, Humorist Joys of yinglish” betes. 


Nice Opera and Philharmonic, 
as well as numerous regular 
guest conducting posts. 

Leo Rosten, Humorist 
And Expert on Yiddish 

NEW YORK (AP) — Leo 
Rosien. 88. a Yiddish lexico- 
grapher and humorist whose 
works introduced mainstream 
America to ‘ ‘The Joys of Yid- 
dish.” died Wednesday. 

Mr. Rosten wrote dozens 
of works of fiction and non- 
fiction in a six-decade career. 
His 1 968 best-selling guide to 
Yiddish expressions, “The 
Joys of Yiddish," has be- 
come toe standard work on 
tbe language. 

He emigrated from Poland 
with his family in 1911. and 
earned a doctorate in political 
science at toe University of 
Chicago in the 1930s. In 
1937, he expanded a New 


New York Times for virtually 
all his 42 years as a reporter, 
died Wednesday in Washing- 
ton of complications of dia- 
betes. 


men 


VEST 

♦ K3 
9J4 

$ A J 18 732 
*A98 


- EAST 
4Q8878S 
97 
084 

♦ K MTS 


ptayei^ust rotate pmfoer- Y appropriate for one who nis^ provided a discard for a 

ships. The winners at the New yapp»u ______ _ AinK inw m tfm ftrmi m v arvt 


York Helrasley Hotel, were has 
George and Claire Tomay, dec 
Judy Tucker and August moi 
‘Boehm. 

The best trick of toe day wh< 

occurred on toe diagramed bon 
deaL Kathy FaBenius, as him 
North, was excited when hw trid 


recently written a book on 
deceptive play- He led the dia- 
mond, five. IBs main thought 
was that West might wm 
when field a doubleton 
honor, which would allow 
him to develop two diamond 
nicks subsequently. 


club loser in the dummy, and 
there was no way for the de- 
fense to take more than three 
tricks. 

Making four hearts gained 
10 imps, for in toe replay 
North was the declarer in four 
heans and was d efeated. 


SOUTH 
*104 
9AK18S 
4KQS5 
* J43 

Neuter sfcfe vtihien&i&Tte M* 

dbg: 



Did You Miss A Dm 
This Week? 


This past week's front pages are 
available for viewing on the IHT 
site on the World wide Web. 


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Meet the New Government 
of Romania! 

WITH THE LAST ELECTIONS, ROMANIA 
ACHIEVED ITS DEMOCRATIC PROCESS - THANKS 
TO THE NEW GOVERNMENT WHICH ENJOYS A 
STRONG SUPPORT FROM THE INTERNATIONAL 
COMMUNITY, THE SECOND IMPORTANT 
COUNTRY IN CENTRAL EUROPE IS NOW AN 
EXCEPTIONAL PLACE FOR TRADE EXCHANGES 
AND INVESTMENT IN A CONFIDENT AND 
PEACEFUL ATMOSPHERE - THE PRESIDENT OF 
ROMANIA MR E. CONSTANT1NESCU, THE 
PRIME MINISTER MR V. GORBEA AND THE 
GOVERNMENT OF ROMANIA INVITE YOU TO 
PARTICIPATE IN THE NEXT. 

Crans Montana Forum in Bucharest 

MEET THE NEW GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS CIRCLES OF ROMANIA 

Bucharest, March 20 to 23 , 1997 

INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION: 

FORUM DE CRANS MONTANA, 3 COURS DE RIVE CH- 1204-GENEVA 
PHONE: 4122.3109395 FAX: 4122.3109905 

INTERNET: http^/www.cmf.ch 


i 


1 




PACE 2 


INTERNATIONAL 


— ^ ^milNR SATURPAy-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2, 1997 





PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE; FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 

ASIA/ PACIFIC 


■fun' 


Carrot Approach Might End Impasse Over Korean Defector 


By Andrew Pollack 

Hew York Times Service 

SEOUL — Food aid that South 
Korea and the United States say they 
will provide to North Korea could help 
lead to a resolution of the impasse over 
a high-ranking North Korean defect- 
or. 

Some people familiar with the situ- 
ation say that prospects are brightening 
that the defector. Hwang Jang Yop. 
will be able to come to Seoul from 
Beijing, where he has been holed up in 
the South Korean Consulate seeking 
asylum since Feb. 12. 


But South Korean officials stud pro- 
gress in die negotiations was slow. 

“We are neither pessimistic or op- 
timistic,” said a senior government 
official. 

China, which wants to maintain 
good relations with North and South 
Korea has been in a delicate position 
regarding Mr. Hwang and has said 
resolving the problem would take 
time. 

After first insisting that Mr. Hwang 
had been kidnapped, though, North 
Korea has now made statements saying 
he is a “renegade” and implying he 
could leave. If those public statements 


truly reflea North Korea's stance, then 
China will have found an opening and 
could move swiftly, some officials 
said. 

South Korean officials insist Ihe 
question of food aid is not linked to that 
of Mr. Hwang and was under dis- 
cussion well before his defection. But 
South Korea's decision to go ahead 
with its aid could hasten North Korea's 
acceptance of Mr. Hwang's defection, 
the senior official said. 

South Korea announced Thursday 
that it would provide $6 million in 
assistance to North Korea through the 
United Nations, up from the $35 mil- 


lion it gave last year. The announce- 
ment followed one by the United States 
in Washington that it would donaie $10 
million, up from S6-2 million last 
year. 

Both aid packages will go toward 
helping relieve widespread starvation 
in the Communist nation that has been 
brought about by severe floods, the 
loss of aid after the Soviet Union col- 
lapsed and a general economic break- 
down. 

Norm Korea has also agreed to attend 

a briefing by South Korea and Wash- 
ington on proposed peace talks aimed 
at formally ending the Korean War, 


10,000 to Honor Deng 
At Great Hall of People 

Funeral Is Expected to Bolster Jiang 


By Steven Mufson 

W ashington Past Service 

BEUING — Ten thousand invited 
guests will pay tribute to Deng Xiaoping 
at a televised memorial meeting at the 
Great Hall of the People on Tuesday, the 
committee planning Mr. Deng's funeral 
announced Thursday. 

Unlike Mao. whose body was viewed 
by 300.000 people and then embalmed 
and placed in a mausoleum in the 
middle of Tiananmen Square. Mr. Deng 
requested cremation. He asked that his 
corneas be donated to an eye bank, his 
body dissected for the purpose of med- 
ical research, and his ashes cast into the 
sea, his family said in a Feb. IS letter 
made public Thursday by the official 
Xinhua press agency. There will be no 
ceremony for paying last respects to his 
remains, tile funeral committee said. 


A Man Who Loved 
Milk and Cigarettes 

Reuters 

BEUING — Deng Xiaoping was 
an avid bridge player who relished a 
croissant and a glass of milk — a 
taste he acquired in France as a 
youth — loved playing at the sea- 
side with his gramkhildren and did 
not balk at sending in troops to crush 
unarmed, rebellious students. 

A chain-smoker who was fond of 
keeping a spittoon at his feet in 
meetings with foreign dignitaries, 
the diminutive , ruler possessed a 
personality as peppery as the cuisine 
of his native Sichuan Province. 

In his book “Mandate of Heav- 
en," Orville Schell wrote of Mr. 
Deng: “Unsentimental and humor- 
less, he seemed to have few qualms 
of conscience, and little compunc- 
tion to ingratiate himself with oth- 
ers through convivial chatter." 

He was a “nasty little man,” 
Henry Kissinger, the former U.S. 
secretary of state, said of the man 
who ruled China in the 1980s and 
much of the '90s and stood just 1.5 
meters (5 feet) high in the white 
socks he preferred. 

It was in internal exile that Mr. 
Deng honed his skill at bridge by 
playing all four hands and studying 
the intricacies of strategy. 


‘ ‘Comrade Xiaoping always believed 
in simple and frugal funerals,” Mr. 
Deng's family said in the letter sent to 
the Communist Party chief, Jiang 
Zemin, and the party’s Central Com- 
mittee. “We hope that the last thing we 
do for him will reflect the essence of his 
mental outlook, and express our grief in 
an utterly plain and solemn way." 

The funeral will not only be the clos- 
ing political act for Mr. Deng, who 
entered politics in his midteens, but also 
be the opening act of a highly political 
year that will climax in a major Com- 
munist Party congress in the fall of this 
year that is expected to reshuffle several 
of tiie top posts. 

For Mr. Jiang, who is China's pres- 
ident as well as foe party chief , the funeral 
offers an opportunity to tty to further 
cement his position as the country's top 
leader. He will be seen on national tele- 
vision inheriting the mantle of leadership 
from the man who handpicked him in 
1989. and leading the call to rally around 
flag, party and leadership. 

“Party organizations at all levels 
should organize officials and the masses 
to listen to or watch tin live trans- 
mission of the memorial meeting,” the 
funeral committee said in a statement 

Mr. Jiang also is acting as chairman of 
Mr. Deng’s funeral committee. Though 
such committees for top Communist 
leaders frequently have one or more 
deputy chairmen, Mr. Deng's funeral 
committee has none, which some ana- 
lysts saw as an attempt by Mr. Jiang to 
set himself apart from potential rivals. 

■ Condolences From Leaders 

Messages of condolence and praise 
poured in from around the world, news 
agencies reported. 

“In the course of this century, few 
men have, as much as he, led a vast 
human community through such pro- 
found and determining changes," said 
President Jacques Chirac of France. 

President Boris Yeltsin of Russia said 
dial Mr. Deng had made a great con- 
tribution to “removing the vestiges of 
the past from Russian-Chinese rela- 
tions and pushed die former rivals to an 
“equitable and trustful partnership." 

In Washington, President Bill Clinton 
expressed his sadness and called Mr. 
Deng an “extraordinary figure on the 
world stage over the past two decades." 

He said he did not expect Mr. Deng's 
death to lead to sharp deviations from 
China’s present course. 




Hie U.S. State Department said a trip 
to China next week by Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright was expected to 
proceed as planned. 

The office of Prime Minister John 
Major of Britain said that Mr. Deng's 
“initiative played the crucial pan in 
creating today's economically dynamic 
and successful China. ” 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany 
said that Mr. Deng “counts as one of the 
great leadership personalities of China’s 


MANDATE: China Chiefs Seek to Hold Authority Given by Deng 


Continued from Page 1 

are scarcely known outside China but 
whose seniority and contribution to the 
party always gave them a seat at Mr. 
Deng's table. 

Some of them, like Chen Yun and 
Yao Yilin. have died. But a powerful 
constellation remains, among them 
Peng Zhen. the former mayor of 
Beijing, and Song Ping, a party ideo- 
logue, Bo Yibo, Song Renqiong, Wan 
Li and Yang Shangkun. 

None cuts the profile of Mr. Deng, 
but their power is as certain as it is 
invisible. 

After lingering for so long, Mr. Deng 
could not have departed at a more sen- 
sitive moment — as the party prepares 
to celebrate the return of Hong Kong to 
Chinese sovereignty, one 
of Mr. Deng's greatest g 

achievements, and as it After In 

prepares for a major con- , _ j 

gross to ratify the lead- de] 

ersbip lineup that will gg flu* p 
lead China into the next * 

century. year to 1 

The congress this year 

will be the first at which 
Mr. Jiang stands alone. 

“As long as Deng was alive, Jiang’s 
position was unassailable,” said Ken- 
neth Lieberthal, a professor of political 
science at the University of Michigan. 

Mr. Deng's death opens up two key 
areas for political discussion that were 
off-limits while he was alive, in Mr. 
Lieberthal's view: criticism of Mr. 
Deng himself and a reappraisal of the 
1989 crackdown. 

“Jiang's position is still very 
strong," Mr. Lieberthal said. “But hav- 
ing said that, with Deng now gone, those 
who wish to cut back Jiang’s role can do 
so by criticizing Deng. They can say that 
Deng was a great man but that he made 
some mistakes. Since one of Deng's acts 
was to pick Jiang, it opens the door for 
critics of Jiang." 

As a witness to the last party con- 
gress, in 1992, when Mr. Deng cho- 
reographed the resignations and pro- 
motions that enhanced Mr. Jiang's 
chances to consolidate his own position 
at the top of the party, Mr. Jiang un- 


derstands how much he is now flying 
solo. 

The most difficult question he faces is 
what to do with Mr. Li, who must step 
down a year from now after two con- 
secutive five-year terms as prime min- 
ister. 

With Mr. Deng gone, the Chinese 
will want to know whether their pres- 
ident has the ability to pull off a major 
reshaping of the jiarty or whether his 
vision and authority will be challenged 
by some collection of opponents who, 
freed by Mr. Deng's death, will make 
their move. 

There is no shortage of challengers. 

It was just five years ago that many 
Chinese looked to Yang Shangkun, now 
90, as the man who would inherit Mr. 
Deng's role as paramount leader, leav- 


Afiter lingering for so long, Mr. Deng could not 
have departed at a more sensitive moment — 
as die party prepares for a major congress this 
year to ratify China’s leadership lineup. 


mg Mr. Jiang to run the party and Mr. Li 
to run the government. 

But Mr. Yang, an old revolutionary 
like Mr. Deng, met his political demise 
in the summer of 2992 when he turned 
against (be Deng leadership team of Mr. 
Jiang and Mr. O. 

Many Chinese who lost their jobs or 
went into exile after the events of 
Tiananmen have harbored the bope that 
Mr. Yang could stage a political 
comeback after Mr. Deng's death and 
demand (he rehabilitation of Mr. Zhao, 
the former prime minister and party 
general secretary, as the party’s pree- 
minent reformer. 

Mr. Zhao was stripped of all of his 
titles after refusing to order a military 
assault on the student demonstrators in 
1989, but he retains his party mem- 
bership even as he lives out his days in a 
closely guarded courtyard home in cen- 
tral Beijing. 

These political exiles and reformers- 
in-waiting see Mr. Zhao's rehabilitation 
as the key that would unlock a whole 


series of possibilities for democratic re- 
form and bring to an end the hard-line 
rule that has characterized the era of the 
current leadership. 

Such bold steps would immediately 

_ .u. .i 


reopen the question of the party's con- 
demnation of the Tiananmen uprising as 
a “counterrevolutionary rebellion/' a 


judgment that still divides Chinese so- 
ciety here and abroad. 

Like no other event in modem 
Chinese history, the 1989 massacres, 
played out before a global television 
audience, changed a buoyant world 
view of emergent China and replaced it 
with a paradigm of the repressive state 
that jails its political and religious dis- 
sidents and traffics in nuclear techno- 
logy and ballistic missiles to unstable 
parte of the world 

But the party may not 
1 be ready for such a 

lid not wrenching and dangerous 

re-evaluation, as it would 
immediately raise the is- 
2SS this culpability for the 

hundreds, if not thou- 
sands. of deaths that oc- 

curred during the military 

crackdown. 

It is hard for many Chinese to ima- 
gine that such a re-evaluation could 
occur while Mr. Li is in power, which is 
also undoubtedly one of the reasons 
why the prime minister so tenaciously 
holds on to power. 

He is now fighting to stay on in a key 
role after he steps (town next year, and 
be need only look at South Korea's 
treatment of retired leaders who sent 
troops against unarmed students for his 
motivation to remain on the political 


u is his best protection. 

But Mr. Li has a host of enemies who 
would like to to change the face of 
China’s future by foreclosing his and 
resurrecting the earlier and more prom- 
ising paradigm of China as a more open 
and tolerant society interested in polit- 
ical reform. 

Mr. Dong, who fought so hard to 
resist any idea of revisiting the Com- 
munist Party's decision to send tanks 
and machine guns against the pro- 
democracy movement, may, in his dy- 


precious ranniana by curbing tne 
traditional practice of burial of the 
dead and by encouraging cremation 
instead. 

Mr. Deng’s predecessor , Mao 
Zedong, received a different treat- 
ment His corpse was preserved 
after his death in 1976 and is dis- 
played in a mausoleum built in his 
memory in central Beijing’s vast 
Tiananm en Square. 


ing, have allowed debate on the matter 
to begin. 


l It may take more time than many 

ig. who fought so hard to Chinese hope, but as Mr. Deng’s datigh- 
idea of revisiting the Cora- ter and biographer said in 1995, re- 


Chinese hope, but as Mr. Deng's daugh- 
ter and biographer said in 1995, re- 
versing flie verdict of Tiananmen “is 
for the people who come after” to de- 
bate. 


Jaw Rcid/Rcuttn 

Tung Chee-hwa, Hong Kong’s future leader, mourning Deng Xiaoping. 


recent history.” Prime Minister Ryu- 
taro Hashimoto of Japan said he was 
filled with great sadness at Mr. Deng's 
death and hoped his passing would not 
affect Japanese -Chinese relations, 
which be said were of growing im- 
portance for peace and stability of the 
world. 

President Kim Young Sam of South 
Korea said be was saddened but hoped 
that Seoul’s friendly ties with Beijing 
would strengthen. (Reuters, AP) 


Deng’s Ashes to Get 
Special Treatment 
At Crematorium 


Reuters 

BEIJING — The crematorium 
used to incinerate top Chinese lead- 
ers will use a new, specially pur- 
chased inc^eiator to cremate Deng 
Xiaoping to avoid mixing his ashes 
with those of lesser men, people 
close to the matter said Thursday. 

The Babaoshan c remat orium in 
western Beijing, used for almost all 
Chinese leaders who have “gone to 
meet Marx,” had arranged in ad- 
vance to import and install a new 
furnace for Mr. Deng, who died late 
Wednesday, they said. 

Officials at the crematorium bad 
been afraid that, if an existing in- 
cinerator were used, some of Mr. 
Deng’s ashes could be mixed with 
those of other clients, these people 
said. 

A Babaoshan official said that he 
was unaware of new incinerator 
purchases and that the crematorium 
bad yet to receive any directions on 
handling Mr. Deng’s remains. 

“We are not clear at the moment 
if Deng Xiaoping's funeral will be 
held here,” he said. 


U.S. and Sou* Korean officials said. 

■ Deng’s Death Delays Talks 
Talks on the fare of Mr. Hwang have 

been pw on hold by the death of Deng 

Xiaoping, Reuters reported from 
Seoul, quoting Sou* Korean officials 
Thursday. 

“China and Sou* Korea snare tne 
same Asian tradition, and you just 
don’t want to disturb mourning 
people," a Seoul Foreign Ministry of- 
ficial said of the talks on Mr. Hwang. 
“We will refrain from raising 
Hwang's issue with Chinese officials 
for tiie time being." 


Civil Servants 
In Hong Kong 
Will Remain 
After Takeover 


GmpM by Ow Stag Fnm Dispatrha 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong got a 
powerful confidence boost on Thursday 
as the chief executive-designate Tung 
Chee-hwa announced that virtually all 
of the territory's top civil servants 
would be allowed to stay in office after 
China takes over on July 1. 

Hong Kong’s popular and influential 
chief secretary, Anson Chan, deputy to 
foe departing British governor, Chris 
Patten, will serve as Mr. Tung’s No. 2 
when Hong Kong reverts to China on 
July I. Her post will be renamed ad- 
ministrative secretary. 

Financial Secretary Donald Tsang will 
also stay cm as Hong Kong's top eco- 
nomic policy planner, a decision likely to 
be welcomed by the markets. 

Mr. Tsang said his principal con- 
sideration was “that they are good,” 
and second, font it is most important 
during the transition that there are as 
few changes as possible. He was speak- 
ing upon his return from Beijing, where 
be won approval for his list. 

Although unconnected with the death 
Wednesday of Deng Xiaoping, China's 
senior leader, the announcement was a 
timely one. It is likely to have a calming 
effect OT those in Hong Kong who fear 
instability now that Mr. Deng is dead. 

Mr. 'Ding said Beijing’s almost in- 
stant approval showed “tremendous 
confidence not only in myself, but in 
Hong Kong, and our ability to manage 
our own affairs.” 

The fate of foe 23 top officials in the 
outgoing British colonial rcgjme had 
aroused intense guesswork and fears 
that those seen as out of step with 
Beijing's thinking would be fired. 

!&. Tom's list of tap officials showed 
only two departures: Attorney General 
Jeremy Mathews is British and would 
not have met the nationality criteria for 
high office in postcolonial Hong Kong, 
ana Michael Leung had already decided 
to retire as bead of the Independent 
Commission Against Corruption. 

Mr. Mathews will be replaced by 
Elsie Leung, and Lily Yam wul take JVfr. 
Leung’s place. 

Mr. Patten welcomed the announce- 
ment, calling it “reassuring news.” 

One key position not yet chosen is 
that of chin executive of the Hong 
Kong Monetary Authority, the territo- 
ry’s central bank. It is currently held by 
Joseph Yam. (AP, Reuters) 


Eight Die in Attack 
On Iranian Center 

MULTAN. Pakistan — Gunmen 
attacked an Iranian cultural center 
in Punjab Province on Thursday, 
killing eight people, including its 
Iranian director, government offi- 
cials stud. 

They said gunman had forced 
their way into the cultural center in 
Multan, in southern Punjab, and 
started shooting indiscriminately. 

A government statement said 
foal, apart from the center's di- 
rector, Mohammed Ali Rahimi. the 
seven other people killed were 
Pakistanis, including a policeman 
and a civilian guard. 

Ir was the second attack on an 
Iranian cultural center in Pakistan 
in a little over a month. A center in 
Lahore was burned Jan. 19. 

A statement by foe Iranian con- 
sulate general in Lahore blamed 
unspecified "and -Islamic agents of 
world imperialism” for the attack 
Thursday, but Shiite groups in 
Pakistan attributed the attack to 
Sunni Muslims. 

The Punjab police chief, Mo- 
hammad Amin, said suspects had 
been arrested, but he would not 
disclose (heir identity. (Reuters) 

Cambodia Fighters 
Hold 15 Hostages 

PHNOM PENH — Hun Sen, one 
of Cambodia's co-prime ministers, 
said Thursday that the Khmer 
Rouge was holding 15 government 
officials as hostages. 

* T am worried about the safety of 
our brothers, but we are trying to 
find a solution,' 1 he said. 

The officials, who include the 
deputy governor of Siem Reap 
province. Hem Bunheng. had 
flown to the Khmer Rouge base at 
Anlong Veng, on foe Thai border, 
last week in die hopes of recruiting 
defectors to the government side, 
but never returned from their mis- 
sion. 

Government officials fear the 
missing team is being used to win 
leverage in negotiations for further 
defections. (Reuters) 

Thailand Closes 
Vietnamese Camp 

BANGKOK — The last camp 
for Vietnamese refugees in Thai- 
land was officially dosed 
Thursday, more than two decades 
after the first asylum-seekers ar- 
rived. 

A relief official said “no more 
than a handful” of refugees re- 
mained in die Sikhiu refugee camp 
after a busload left for a flight to 
Vietnam under foe voluntary re- 
patriation program. 

Those remaining would either 
have to sign up for voluntary return, 
which gives incentives to the re- 
turnees, or get sent back forcibly, 
the official said. (AFP) 

VOICES From Asia 

Lakshman Kadirgamar, for- 
eign minister of Sri Lanka, ruling 
out third-party mediation to end the 
13-year-old separatist war “Third 
parties coming here is absolutely 
out of the question. This is an in- 
ternal matter.” (Reuters) 


HONG KONG: New Uncertainties Ahead 


. Continued from Page 1 

autonomy.” Now, with only 130 days 
remaining before the Union Jack is 
Lowered fix the final time, China’s em- 
brace of Hong Kong has already be- 
come more snug. 

China has invested more than S25 
billion in Hong Kong, with Chinese 
companies and banks assuming control 
or influence over major strategic in- 
dustries, including the local airline and 
the power company. 

And Hong Kong has been the over- 
whelming source of foreign investment 
in fTimfl, ranging from small clothing 
companies to power plants, and from 
roads to the sprouting skyscrapers of 
Shanghai. 

China has already established Hong 
Kong’s next government: Tung Chee- 
hwa, a shipping magnate, has been 
named the territory’s first Chinese chief 
executive and a hand-picked legislature 
has been chosen. An advance contin- 
gent of Chinese troops is expected to 
arrive here soon. 

But now that Mr. Deng is dead it 
remains to be seen whether Hong Kong 
can resist the encroachments from 
China, not only from Beijing, but also 
from vast numbers of Chinese national, 
provincial and municipal companies, as 
well as from the children of high-rank- 
ing officials who have emerged as 
wheelers and dealers in China. 

According to Andrew Nathan, a pro- 
fessor of Chinese politics at Columbia 
University, “Hong Kong is a happy 

... J»f r 


tector,” he said. “1 don’t know if Jiang 
Zemin” — China’s president and foe 
head of the Communist Party — “has 
the ability to tangle with these 
people,” 

Still, Hong Kong’s return to China is 
all but accomplished. What remains un- 
settled in the minds of China's leaders is 
foe stubborn rebelliousness of Taiwan. 

Indeed, the fete ofTai wan — which is 
becoming a full democracy and moving 
vigorously to expand its mtemfltinnfll 
stature — is very likely to become 
bound up in foe power struggles in 



lK ir ~ r 

in n, 


.-if * • ■ ? 

j 



Beijing that wiD grip China's leadership 
now that Mr. Deng is dead. 

Despite (he disparate and competing 
interests of China* s leaders — who are 
divided by regional prejudices, differ- 
ing economic strategies, military pres- 
sures and ideological divides — the 
single flag around which the leadership 
rallies is the banner of nationalism. And 
at the heart of this nationalist passion is 
foe goal of retaking Taiwan. 

“The voices that advocate keeping a 
very tough tine on Taiwan will De 
louder,” said Professor Nathan. “I 
think Taiwan, Hong Kong and Japan 
should be concerned about this. There is 
a line of argument in China that the U.S. 
is hostile, that it is using Taiwan as a 
Trojan horse against China.” 

Last year, as Taiwan wait to the polls 
in the island’s first presidential election, 
China fired a series of missiles off 
Taiwan’s coast and staged large-scale 
military exercises to intimidate Taiwan. 
The United States responded by sta- 
tioning two aircraft earner battle groups 
off Taiwan’s coast 

an official told Reuters that the Taiwan 
government would not alter its approach 
toward China now that Mr. Deng was 
dead. 

“We hope that people treat this mat- 
ter calmly,” said Shi Hwei-you, the 
vice-chairman of the Mainland Affairs 
Council, the body that sets Taiwan's 
policies toward Beijing. “The govern- 
ment has already had policies for the 
post-Deng period. It will not change 
policies.” 

Still, most political leaders »nd dip- 
lomats in Asia do not expect Beijing to 
focus intensely on Taiwan until after 
Hong Kong returns to Chinese sover- 
eignty. And if Hong Kong manages to 
remain tiie vibrant place it is today, 
China’s leaders will offer it as an ex- 
ample of how Taiwan could return to 
China while retaining its distinctive way 
of life. 

This was Mr. Deng’s strategy. A man 
who was known for keeping ms prom- 
ises, Mr. Deng vowed to be present 
when the five-starred Ch jnase flag was 
raised over Hong Kong. It was one 
promise he could not keep. 












.iKTEmiiBanmi ngP U ILTRIRIIttE! GKlTtAV FEBRUARY W 1 007 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


RAGE 17 
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Eurocrats , ? f/ie Faceless Functionaries That Everyone Loves to Hate 


By Craig Whitney 

Nnr York Times Sen-ice 


STRASBOURG - “Sateless functionaries 

SttMSST® 

ff»ouJd make BmAa^ofSSS 

RS^rPrh C ‘ ^ re l e tfi e London Paris and 
Balm to the status of U.S. state capitals 

Tradmonally, even before Mrs! Thatcher's 

£ ■*" so ~ caIled Eurocrats have 
bean accused of trying to regulate European life 

2 for «nythmg from 

thesize of condoms to the number of bacteria 
permitted in ninny cheese, and forcing Germans 
to buy small bananas from the Caribbean instead 
or the bigger ones from Latin America that they 
preferred. 3 

While EU quotas on Latin American bananas 
were, indeed, imposed, it is sometimes difficult 
to distinguish fact Grom Eurorumor, ^ the 


public always serais to believe the worst wbenit 
erases to bureaucrats. Indeed, even when they 
just mind their own business, tbe Eurocrats seem 
to court punishment, as two cases this week 
demonstrated. 

On Wednesday, the European Parliament, dis- 
cussing “mad cow” disease, determined that 
European Union officials . hadn't meddled 
enough: They voted to censure the European 
Commission, the ElTs executive body, and its 


Britain on three people for causing bodily harm 
while indulging in sado-masochistic sexual 
activities, leaving itself open to criticism by 
backers of EU provisions protecting the behavior 
of consenting adults. 

The 15-xnetnber European Union and its ex- 
ecutive body are based in Brussels, which is 
home to about 13,200 Eurocrats with various 
duties. The European Conn and the elected 
European Parliament are based in Strasbourg. 
Overall there are about 22, 000 Eurocrats. 


from 1990 to last year, when action was taken. 

“Consumers should be entitled to know 
where meat is coming from," Agnes Setter- 
huber, an Austrian deputy, said Wednesday. 
“Now it is up to the commission to take technical 
measures that will help small fanners." 

In other words, the bureaucrats should now 
come up with still more regulations. 

Also on Wednesday, the judges of the Euro- 
pean Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg de- 
clined to invalidate prison sentences imposed by 


fears 


Tbe people in EU countries have their own 
, chiefly that more and more decisions that 


used to be made in national capitals by elected 
officials whose names everybody knows are 

O to be made, in the Europe of the future, by 
ss people who almost nobody knows. 
After 1999, if all goes according to plan, 
anonymous European central bankers in Frank- 
fort may decide what a new common currency 
called tire euro is worth, with or without die 
express consent of the elected national leaders 
who now have more control over the French 


franc or the Deutsche mark. Many of the same 
people who are quick to attack the bureaucrats in 
Brussels look to European institutions like the 
Court of Human Rights, which is connected to 
tbe 40-member Strasbourg-based Council of 
Europe, to protect them from what they see as 
Injustice at home. 

That, for example, was what Roland Jaggard, 
Anthony Brown and Colin Laskey expected in 
1993 after their unsuccessful appeals in Britain 
against convictions for having caused bodily 
harm in tbe course of sado-masochistic activities 
involving them and more than 40 other men. Mr. 
Laskey died of 3 heart attack in May 1995. 

The men’s lawyers argued that the injuries 
suffered were minor, and a result of consensual 
homosexual activity that harmed nobody outside 
their sado-masochistic circle, and asked the 
European court to rule that arresting, prosecuting 
and jailing tbe men wasa violation of a provision 
of the European Convention on Human Rights. 

Tbe convention guarantees the right to respect 
for private life and outlaws interference with that 


right by public authorities in the interest of 
public safety, health or morals. 

“In sum, the court finds that the national 
authorities were entitled to consider that the 
prosecution and conviction of the applicants were 
necessary in a democratic society for the pro- 
tection of health,” the court ruled Wednesday. 

While that ruling will draw flak from some, 
had the court overturned the convictions — 
which had been upheld by the British House of 
Lords — it would probably have been attacked 
by xenophobic British newspapers for yet an- 
other assault on ancient sovereign British in- 
stitutions. 

Many assaults on bureaucrats do turn out to be 
Eurorumors. “Never did the European Union 
envisage reducing the diameter of cigarettes, 
requiring firefighters of member states to wear 
navy blue pants, or protecting maggots by ban- 
ning their use in fishing.” the French magazine 
Le Point wrote two years ago. But many people 
still believe it did. just as they believe that it 
decreed a standard size for male contraceptives. 


Clashes Erupt 
In Tirana Over 
Fraud Losses 


TIRANA, Albania — More than 

4.000 anti-govemroent protesters 
clashed with the police Thursday as they 
tried to march toward Tirana's central 
square following a rally at which speak- 
ers demanded that the governing party 
step down. 

The crowd, angered by the govern- 
ment’s handling of the pyramid-scheme 
crisis, threw rocks as they breached 
police lines. Plainclothes and uniformed 
police threw tbe stones back. Rein- 
forced by riot police, they forced most 
of the crowd to retreat. 

One officer fired warning shots, riot 
police beat back protesters with sticks, 
and two cars careered toward tbe demon- 
strators, sending people scurrying. One 
man's face was bloodied, ami another 
man was bleeding from the hand. 

About 150 people managed to push 
through the lines, but were blocked by 
the police. The group then sat down in 
the road, shouting that President Sail 
Berisha was to blame for the crisis. 

The clashes took place after about 

7.000 anti-govemroent protesters 
demonstrated peacefully at a soccer 
Held in an outer suburb of tbe capital. 

Witnesses said a group of demon- 
strators broke off from the main group 
and started to march toward the city 
center. 

They breached a police cordon in the 
capital that had been set up to hold them 
back, crating up against riot police. 



Unemployment 
Will Plague EU, 
Dutch Chief Says 


BRIEFLY 


By Tam Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 


THE HAGUE — Giving a sober as- 


sessment of Europe ’s economic outlook, 
linister Wira Kok of tbe Neth- 


Hefeor Pttfcayn* Aaochtod Picu 


A woman breaking down in tears in Tirana on Wednesday after she 
learned that she conld no longer collect interest on money she invested in 
VEFA Holding, a pyramid investment scheme that declared insolvency. 


Many demonstrators chanted, 
“Vlore, Vlore. Down with die dictat- 
orship.” They were referring to die 
southern Albanian town where three 
people died in riots last week. 

Witnesses said that die police had 
taken control but that protesters were 
again trying to move toward Tirana’s 
center. 

Albania has been rocked by a month 
of riots and protests since five fraud- 
ulent pyramid investment schemes col- 


lapsed in January, wiping out tbe sav- 
ings of tens of thousands of people. 

Investors have blamed the govern- 
ment, saying it failed to regulate the 
schemes or to warn investors of 
danger. 

The police permitted the demonstra- 
tion by opposition parties in die distant 
suburb Thursday while Mr. Berisha ad- 
dressed a peaceful rally of about 5,000 
supporters in the center of the capital. 

(AP. Reuters) 


Prune Minister 
erlands on Thursday cautioned that the 
European Union’s high unemployment 
rate would take years to bring down, and 
he effectively criticized fellow national 
leaders for dragging their feet on labor- 
market and welfare reform. 

But die economic weakness should 
not deter Europe from going ahead with a 
single currency in 1999. Mr. Kok said, 
even if it involved only a snail number of 
countries at first. Monetary union would 
bind Europe economically and politi- 
cally , he said, and die reforms required to 
meet the single-currency criteria “will 
give a stronger basis far Europe’s com- 
petitive position in the world.’ ’ 

In an interview at his office in the 
Dutch capital. Mr. Kok said he had no 
concerns about Germany’s ability to re- 
duce its deficit to the single-currency 
requirement, despite high unemploy- 
ment. He also endorsed German demands 
for strict compliance with the criteria and 
expressed hope that as many of tbe 15 EU 
countries as possible would do so. 

Mr. Kok said governments should 
accelerate their efforts at labor-market 
and welfare reform. “The speed of 
change and adapting to tbe new realities 
is somewhat slower than the urgencies 
of globalization,’' he said. 


Italy’s Ex-Marxists 
Urge Leftist Unity 


ROME — The leader of tbe Demo- 
cratic Party of the Left, the former 
Communists and the largest group in 
Italy's governing coalition, opened a 
party congress Thursday with an ap- 
peal for leftist unity as it mulls over its 
future in Europe. ’ 

“We want to create in Italy a left 
that is more united, tied to Europe.” 
the party leader, Massimo D’Alema, 
told the congress. Mr. D’Alema urged 
the gathering to “rethink and re- 
launch the cause of the left and see to 
it that tbe Italian left becomes more 
united and stronger.” (Reuters l 


buildings to Jewish communities in 
Poland and allows an international 
Jewish organization to take part in 
their maintenance. 

Restitution of Jewish private prop- 
erty confiscated during World War II 
will be legislated separately. 

The lower house voted, 339 to 34 
with 30 abstentions, to return Jewish 
religious property to the ownership of 
the nine Jewish communities in Po- 
land. (AP) 


French Poster Stands 


Truckers End. Strike 


MADRID — Spanish truckers 
went back to work Thursday after a 
two-week strike that caused billions 
of pesetas of losses but was seen as a 
victory for the young conservative 
government in its first big labor con- 
flict 

The truckers called off the strike 
late Wednesday after the government 
met some of their demands. Tbe 
truckers won promises for a cut in 
diesel prices, but not for retirement at 
age 60. (Reuters) 


PARIS — Two judges refused 
Thursday to ban posters advertising 
“The People vs. Larry Flyni.” a Hol- 
lywood film about pornography and 
press freedom, after complaints that 
they offended Christians. 

The judges rejected pleas by a 
group of Roman Catholics and a 
rightist association that the posters, 
showing a semi-nude actor in a cru- 
cifix-like position against a backdrop 
of a woman's loins, were an infringe- 
ment on religious freedom. (Reuters) 


E U Censure Fails 


Polish Vote for Jews 


WARSAW — Parliament ap- 
proved a law Thursday that returns 
cemeteries, synagogues and religious 


BRUSSELS — Heeding promises 
by the European Commission to im- 
prove consumer health protection, the 
European Parliament rejected a no- 
confidence motion Thursday that 
would have forced the resignation of 
the EU *s executive because of its han- 
dling of the “mad cow” crisis. 

The censure motion was defeated 
by a vote of 326 to 118, with 15 
abstentions. (AP) 


■■ V 


TOWARD A GLOBAL CIVILIZATION: Constructive Ideas For A Better Future 


Soka Gakkai International President 
Daisaku Ikeda’s 1997 Peace Proposal 

These figures present a portrait of our world. 

A world of violence, inequality, and disregard for human dignity. 
Is this the kind of world we want to leave for future generations? 
. . Don’t they deserve better? 

Don’t we? 






ate 



Hunger, armed conflict, environmental degradation and the worldwide refugee population increase 
at shocking rates. The facts are so mind-boggling that it’s hard to absorb die portrait of our world 
they contain. However the numbers speak for themselves, and people concerned for the well-being 
of their fellow human beings cannot ignore this reality. We cannot afford to bury our heads in the 
sand. Yet what practical steps can be taken to reverse these overwhelming trends? Soka Gakkai Inter- 
national (SGI) President Daisaku Ikeda tackles these issues in his 1997 Peace Proposal titled “Toward 
A Global Civilization. " His ideas on peace, published annually in a peace proposal format, focus this 
year mostly on nuclear disarmament and environmental protection. 


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an presently endanaered and mu 


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Change Begins With The Individual 

It is impossible, he believes, to create lasting structural changes without first addressing the needs 
of the individual. This concepvwhich he refers to as "human revolution," is centered on the belief 
that an empowerment and fundamental positive change within even one person has the energy to 
affect human society as a whole. Each person therefore deserves utmost respect, and no human life 
should ever be sacrificed for any so-called "greater" ideal. The Buddhist philosophy that Mr. Ikeda 
embraces teaches that the ills of society reflect the collective ills of the individuals that make up that 
society, so the solution to these problems may only be found beginning with each individual. 


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Nuclear Disarmament 

In the peace-proposal, nuclear-weapon states are urged to initiate negotiations toward the early con- 
clusion of an international convention banning nuclear weapons based on the example of the 
Chemical Weapons Convention. This Convention, slated to enter into force this April, is a precedent- 
setting treaty with the kind of broad-based verification regime that assures transparency and 
reliability. Nuclear-weapon states, moreover, should make public commitments not to permit 
an increase In the size of existing stockpiles of weapons. Nations possessing nuclear weapons should 



also offer guarantees not to use or threaten the use of nuclear weapons against non-nuclear-weapon 
states. According to Me Ikeda's proposal, it's important to consider peace as more than merely the 




absence of wax. The concept of national security needs to be supplanted with the concept of "human 
security." Peace needs to be understood as the guarantee of those conditions in which each individual 
fulfill-] 


can fulfill his or her highest creative potential. 


billion « y*w, “ ‘J* 1 ** JZfing a eon coat $300 to 

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\V 




Sustainable Development 

The concept of sustainable development is an expression of what environmental ethicists refer to as 
intergenerational justice.. At the same time, the North-South development gap forces the consideration 
of social justice on a global scale. This year is the first year of the International Decade for the 
Eradication of Poverty, which provides new opportunities for international society, under the aegis 
of the United Nations (UN), to face the challenges of human development. A sense of solidarity 
with future generations compels us to resolve the present crisis in our lifetime. The Charter of the UN 
begins with the inspiring words "We the peoples." Now, more than ever, it is necessary to return to 
the original, democratic ideals of the international organization and listen to the voices of all the 
inhabitants of this planet 




SaXx. 


Ibis proposal is an invitation to envision a different future. 
A future that starts with you. 

A future th^t starts now. . 





\ 


i 



... 

' . : IT. 


INTERNATIONAL 


Kremlin Unmoved as Albright Tries to Allay NATO Fears 


By Michael Dobbs and David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright met a cool reception Thursday as she sought 
to persuade Russian leaders that they had nothing to 
fear from the proposed expansion of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization to the borders of the 
former Soviet Union. 

As Mrs. Albright flew into Moscow, on the sixth 
leg of her 1 1-day roumJ-the-world tour, a senior 
foreign policy adviser to President Boris Yeltsin 
described the NATO expansion plan as “totally 
aggressive toward Russia and exceptionally dan- 
gerous for the West itself." The Kremlin is de- 


manding major changes In the plan, including a 
legally binding agreement between Russia and 
NATO and guarantees that Western military equip- 
ment will not be moved closer to Russia's bor- 
ders. 

U.S. officials said that Mis. Albright attempted 
to allay Russian concerns by outlining a new west- 
ern proposal on conventional weapons limits in 
Europe that could lead to a significant reduction in 
American arms stocks on the Continent. The 
United States is also offering to formalize the 
practice of political and military consultations with 
Moscow by setting up a Russia-N ATO council with 
its own permanent secretariat. 

Hie Western proposals for a special relationship 


between Russia and NATO, as outlined by Mrs. 
Albright to Foreign Minister Yevgeni Primakov, 
still rail well short of Moscow's minimum de- 
mands. Nevertheless, the process of diplomatic 
haggling has now clearly gotten under way. Ji 
remains to be seen whether die two sides will 
succeed in closing the gap by next July, when 
NATO is due to announce a formal list of can- 
didates for membership at a summit meeting in 
Madrid. 

Mrs. Albright will see Mr. Yeltsin on Friday 
before wrapping up the European portion of her 
world tour and heading for Asia, where she has 
scops scheduled in Seoul, Tokyo and Beijing. 
Thursday’s blast from Mr. Yeltsin's deputy na- 


tional security adviser, Boris Berezovsky, suggests 
that the Kremlin intends to continue to campaign 
vigorously against the Clinton administration s 
plan to form a military alliance with former Soviet 
bloc countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic 
and Hungary. 

' Writing for the Moscow newspaper Neza- 
visbnaya Gazeta, Mr. Berezovsky said dial the 
West was bn the verge of making a hugely “mis- 
taken" geopolitical choice for the second time in. 
the 20th century. He compared the plan to expand 
NATO with what he depicted as the lack ofWestero 
support for Russian reforms during the years before 
the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, when Russia made 
its first hesitant steps away from czarist autocracy. 


NATO Offers Russia New Arms Cuts 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pair Service 


BRUSSELS — The United States and 
its NATO allies offered Thursday to 
make dramatic new cuts in their con- 
ventional weapons arsenals in Europe as 
a way to reassure Russia that they harbor 
no aggressive designs in expanding the 
Western military alliance to include 
former Communist states in the East 

Javier Solatia Madariaga, the NATO 
secretary-general, described the latest 
Western arms control proposal as a key 
ingredient in the package of induce- 
ments the alliance is dangling before die 
Russian government in the hope that 
Moscow will chop its opposition to 
NATO's expansion plans. 

‘ ‘The Russians are the largest country 
in Europe, and they need to play a more 
constructive role." Mr. Solana said in an 
interview Thursday at NATO headquar- 
ters. “For the moment they prefer to 
remain isolated, but we want to bring 
them into the process of creating a Euro- 
pean security model for the 21st cen- 
tury.” 

Mr. Solana said he would spell out the 
details of the conventional arms ini- 
tiative and other features of a special 
security partnership when he receives 
Russia's foreign minister, Yevgeni Pri- 
makov. here Sunday for another round 
of talks on the enlargement controversy. 
The two men opened negotiations at a 
meeting last month near Moscow when 
they discussed the idea of a new charter 
that would outline a new era of har- 
monious relations between the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization and Rus- 
sia. 

“We want to create a joint council, 
where NATO and Russia can work to- 
gether on peacekeeping and other issues 
of mutual concern." Mr. Solana said. 
“The process is important because by 
consulting often you can build up trust 
and overcome a lot of your quarrels." 

The latest Western aims control ini- 
tiative was put forward at a Vienna se- 
curity conference, where NATO coun- 
tries are seeking to accommodate 
Russian demands for changes in die 
1990 treaty on conventional forces in 
Europe. The treaty was originally con- 
ceived as a bloc-to-bloc agreement be- 
tween NATO and the now-defunct 
Warsaw Pact 

NATO officials said all alliance mem- 
bers had now accepted Russia's argu- 
ment that the earlier bloc arrangements 
are outmoded and should be replaced by 
reduced quotas on tanks, artillery, and 
aircraft deployed by individual coun- 
tries. Under die NATO plan, the amount 
of American weaponry stockpiled in 
Europe could be slashed by 50 percent, 
the officials said. 

■ Tank Cuts for Central Europe 

Joseph Fitchett of the International 
Herald Tribune reported from Paris: 

NATO favors drastic cuts in the num- 
ber of tanks in Central Europe to reduce 
tension there and to show that an en- 
larged alliance will not pose a military 
threat to Russia. U.S. and French dip- 
lomats said Thursday. 

The plan is basically a concept for 
reducing the risk of surprise attack, with 
the actual numbers of tanks and other 
offensive armaments to emerge from 
negotiations. But as a suggested order of 
magnitude, a French expert said, Poland 
would probably have to accept a ceiling 
of perhaps 700 heavy tanks — less than 
half its current strength. 

The arras control plan will be sub- 
mitted to a conference of 30 nations, 
including Russia, in Vienna on Friday, 
as Secretary of State Madeleine Albright 
continues expansion talks in Moscow 
with Russian leaders. 

Of the 30 nations, seven would be 
subjected to especially stringent mea- 


sures in what the treaty on conventional 
forces in Europe calls a “stability zone" 
in Central Europe. This zone would cov- 
er three nations that axe candidates to join 
NATO — Poland, Hungary, and the 
Czech Republic — as well as Slovakia. 
Several areas directly to the east — west- 
ern Ukraine, Belarus and Kaliningrad, a 
Russian enclave on the Baltic Sea, would 
also be included. None of these three is 
considered likely to become part of 
NATO's military structure. 

In this zone, temporary surges in 
equipment will be authorized for 
manuevers or in emergencies, but the 
ceilings will be permanent. While small 
amounts of NATO weaponry will be al- 
lowed on allied countries' soil, tbs NATO 
draft bars the stationing of any Russian 
equipment above the ceilings in Kalin- 
ingrad, Belarus an d western Ukraine. 

Although it sounds one-sided, this ar- 
rangement reflects the fact that Russia 
has vast reserves east of the Urals that 
could be sent westward, whereas U.S. 
reinforcements are an ocean away. 

Under the numerical ceilings, coun- 
tries can modernize armaments covered 
by the treaty — tanks, armored per- 
sonnel carriers, artillery and other equip- 
ment needed for a ground offensive. 

Bur “ thinning out the hardware in this 

old battleground means that there will be 
more warning time and therefore more 
reassurance tor the next ring of coun- 
tries, say Russia and Germany,” a 
French military planner said. 

The plan is a radical redesign of the 
1990 treaty on conventional forces in 
Europe. Lake that treaty, it does not 
cover troop numbers or warplanes. 

A key change involves scrapp in g die 
concept of balancing forces between 


BRIEFLY 


Pretoria Bans Mines 
That Kill Humans 

CAPE TOWN — Sooth Aftica 
oq Thursday issued a blanket ban on 
die use and stockpiling of anti-per- 
sonnel land mines, and announced it 
will destroy 160,000 of the lethal 
devices. 

Defense Minister Joe Modise 
said the cabinet had decided Wed- 
nesday to ban foe use, development, 
production and stockpiling of land 
mines specifically designed to kill 
and maim humans. (AFP) 

Stricter Dress Code 
For Women in Iran 

TEHRAN — Iran issued a new 
stricter Islamic dress code for wo- 
men Thursday as part of its campaign 
to turn back Western influences. 

The conservative newspaper 
Resalat published foe guidelines 
laid out by foe Martyr Ghodusi ju- 
dicial center. Punishment for failing 
to follow Islamic law, as interpreted 
here, calls for prison terms of three 
months to one year, or fines and up 
to 74 lashes of the whip. (AFP) 

U.S.-Bogota Pact 
On Drug Shipping 

BOGOTA — Colombia signed an 
accord Thursday wifo Washington 
that allows U.S. Coast Guard of- 
ficials to board Colombian ships sus- 
pected of drug smuggling. On Wed- 
nesday, Bogota toughened penalties 
for drag trafficking in an effort to 
stave off threatened U.S. economic 
sanctions. (Reuters) 


BALKANS: The ‘European Losers 9 Club’ 


Continued from Page 1 

strations. they know they can achieve 
something with their own hands, 
whistles and feet." 

But despite the achievements of street 
protests in Bulgaria, where the govern- 
ment fell Feb. 4, and Serbia, where it 
made major concessions to foe oppo- 
sition the same day, the region's tra- 
ditions and history will make its renewal 
slow going, analysts say. 

Most of Serbia, and all of Bulgaria 
and Albania, were under Turkish rule for 
centuries , isolating them from the rest of 
Europe and leaving a culturally mixed 
society where intolerance flourishes. 

' Economically, too. history has left its 
marie cm the Balkans with a structure of 
centralized control that is rigid even by 
Eastern Europe's standards. 

* 'The Balkans have different econom- 
ic histories and traditions — including 
very strong involvement of foe state in 
the economy even before foe Commu- 
nists came along — - and in the Com- 
munist period this difference was pre- 
served," said Roumen Avramov, an 
economic historian at the Center for 
Liberal Strategies in Sofia. “Until 
1989, nobody here learned Western 
economics. This was a big difference 


NATO and foe Warsaw Pact by imposing 
deep cuts at the front line and then al- 
lowing higher numbers in rear areas. 

In -framing its proposal, NATO sought 
to reconcile two conflicting pressures — 
Russian objections to a NATO build-up 
to foe east and the prospective new mem- 
ber states' right to have allied forces on 
their soiL As finally hammered out be- 
tween the United States, France and Ger- 
many, NATO's concept calls for coun- 
tries to have “national ceilings" on their 
own armaments and “territorial ceil- 
ings" that are slightly higher to allow for 
allied equipment 

For Kalining rad, Belarus and western 
Ukraine, these two ceilings are identical, 
since no reinforcements are permitted in 
these areas. In exchange, NATO is ready 
to accept low ceilings on its own equip- 
ment in foe stabilization zone, partly be- 
cause Western planners no longer worry 
about a Russian ground offensive. 

Farther away, ceilings will be high so 
that foe big countries, including Russia, 
will have ample forces for missions out- 
side Europe. This new approach, a U.S. 
ambassador in Europe said, “should 

S 've us the flexibility we need and give 
[oscow proof that we have no intention 
of using enlargement to pose a threat 
now wifo our conventional forces.” 
Outside foe stability zone, there are 
so-called flank areas, including eastern 
Ukraine, where special provisions ap- 
ply. For example, a treaty adjustment in 
May allowed more Russian firepower in 
areas near Chechnya and potential 
trouble spots on Russia’s southern rim. 

The NATO proposal was settled this 
week after member states discreetly 
pressed prospective new members for 
concessions. 



Plwl ftyUjwWlMlJI 


A Polish soldier climbing to attack an “enemy" during a military exercise 
Thursday near Warsaw that was viewed by a U.S. congressional delegation. 


FELON: Ex-Con, Seeking a Pardon, Spoke Privately With Clinton 


Continued from Page 1 

courtroom Wednesday. A judge is con- 
sidering revoking Mr. Wynn’s $100,000 
bail while he awaits sentencing on a 
conviction for securities fraud. Mr. 
Wynn’s recent arrests are for aggravated 
assault on a police officer, resisting ar- 
rest, aggravated assault wifo a motor 
vehicle, violation of a restraining order, 
terroristic threats and driving while in- 
toxicated. All occurred between Aug. 
31. 1996. and Feb. 10. 

Mr. Wynn was convicted in 1995 of 
criminal securities fraud that benefited a 
member of the Bonanno organized 
crime family. He also served two years 
in prison after a 1989 guilty plea on theft 
and tax charges. 

Mr. Wynn gained entree to major 
Democratic National Committee events 
through two friends: Mr. Mays, his at- 


torney, who served as a Clinton ap- 
point ee on the Arkansas Supreme Court 
in the early 1980s, and Richard Tienken. 
a New Jersey man who has ties to or- 
ganized crime figures, according to 
court testimony. 

Mr. Mays helped organize foe March 
9 fund-raiser ax the Hillsborough, Cali- 
fornia, home of Victor MacFariane, a 
real estate developer. A Democratic of- 
ficial said he saw Mr. Mays and Mr. 
Wynn have foeir picture taken wifo Mr. 
Clinton in foe study, but did not see them 
j. An attorney who attended die 
l-raiser said he saw Mr. Clinton, Mr. 
Mays and Mr. Wynn slip into a study for 
five to 10 minutes. 

On April 29, 1996, Mr. Wynn and Mr. 
Mays were among about 50 people who 
attended a $25,000-a-person dinner wifo 
Mr. Clinton at the home of Marvin Rosen, 
the finance chairman for die Democratic 


committee, in Coral Gables. Florida, ac- 
cording to witnesses mid records. 

Two months after the dinner at Mr. 
Rosen’s home, Mr. Wynn appeared in a 
federal courtroom in=N ewrJ wsey'.-seek^ 
ing to have his 1995 techrities fraud 
conviction overturned. 

On Aug. 18, Mr. Wynn next atte n ded 
Mr. Clinton’s 50th birthday party cel- 
ebration at Radio City Music Hall, ac- 
cording to two witnesses. 

On Sept. 12, Mr. Wynn was one of 
about 250 people who attended a 
512,500-a-pCTSon dinner far Mr. Clinton 
at the mansion owned by supermarket 
magnate Ron Burfcle in Beverly Hills. 

As questions about Democratic fund- 
raising practices began to be raised last 
fall, officials did a routine check and 
discovered reports of Mr. Tienken ’s al- 
leged ties to the Luchese organized 
crime family. 


FUNDS: Democrat Is Accused of Trying to Mask Donor Identities 


Continued from Page 1 

legation that Mr. Huang, whose fund- 
raising activities among Asian Amer- 
icans are under investigation, cried to 
mask foe source of campaign contri- 
butions to die Democratic National 
Committee and enlist the help of others 
in falsely reporting the origins of large 
donations. 

A Justice Department task force is 
investigating Mr. Huang in connection 
wifo possible illegal campaign contri- 
butions from foreign sources, including 
foreign governments, eager to win in- 
fluence wifo the Clinton administration. 

Under federal election law, only U.S. 
citizens and legal permanent residents 
can donate money to political cam- 
paigns. The law also requires individuals 
to make political donations in their own 
names. 


Mr. Huang raised $3.4 million in 
Asian and Asian- American contribu- 
tions for the Democrats’ 1996 campaign. 
Nearly half of that has since been re- 
turned because of questions about foe 
source of funds. Among the major con- 
tributions returned were from: an In- 
donesian couple ($450,000) because 
they had not filed a UJS. income tax 
return; a .Californian ($325,000) because 
the Democratic National Committee 
could not substantiate that be had the 
money, and a South Korean business- 
man ($250,000) because his American 
subsidiary had yet to earn any revenue in 
foe United States. 

Mr. Soberano is vice president for 
business development and cxrmmunity 
outreach at the Asian American Busi- 
ness Roundtable, a national organization 
of nearly 700 Asian-Ameri can-owned 
small businesses. Mr. Huang was deputy 


assistant commerce secretary from July 
1994 until December 1995, when hie 
joined the Democratic National Com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Soberano said he and Mr. Huang 
lunched at Washington's Mayflower 
hotel in late July or early August. 

“He said, ‘Can you help us out?’ ” 
Mr. Soberano said in an interview this 
week. Mr. Soberano said Mr. Huang 
wanted to give him $300,000 and have 
the Asian American Business 
Roundtable “write it bade to the DNC 
through die membership." 

“He said we could keep 15 percent for 
ourselves,'* Mr. Soberano added. 

“1 said, 'John, tins conversation never 
took place,’ ” Mr. Soberano said. 

Mr. Huang’s attorney denied that foe 
luncheon meeting at the Mayflower bad 
taken place, saying that Mr. Huang was 
in California for most of July. 


Zaire Talks 
Fail to Start; 
Blackout Set 
For News 


cape TOWN — Peace talks be- 
tween the Zairian government and 
rebel forces failed to get underway 
here Thureday. but Sown African 
officials were holding “consulta- 
tions’ ’ with parties to the conflict, a 
top official said. 

Parks Mankahiana. spokesman to 
President Nelson Mandela, said in 
Johannesburg that South African 
officials were consulting ’’with 
various parties involved in the con- 
flict, possibly in more than one 

place." ■ , 

He denied press reports that 
Zairian rebels and official envoys 
had met behind closed doors in 
Cape Town with South Africa’s 
deputy president, Thabo Mbeki. 

*Tm no! aware of any physical 
meeting going on between the Zairi- 
ans in South Africa,” Mr. Mankah- 
iana said, refusing to comment on 
whether envoys from either side had 
arrived. „ . __ . 

South Africa’s foreign affairs de- 
partment placed a news blackout on 
the talks , which Mr. Mandela had 
said would involve Laurent Kabila, 
who leads the rebel Alliance of 
Democratic Forces for the Liber- 
ation of foe Congo (Zaire), and of- 
ficials representing President 
Mobutu Sese Seko. 

Diplomats had said talks were 
likely to begin here Thursday, even 
though Kinshasa government offi- 
cials distanced themselves from the 
initiative launched by President 
Yoweri Museveni of Uganda. 

In Kinshasa, Zaire’s government 
said Thursday that it would launch 
fresh air strikes against enemy po- 
sitions in the rebel-held east and 
advised civilians to leave the war 
zone. 

A Defense Ministry statement 
said the army was determined to 
recapture ail enemy-held territo- 
ry. (AFP, Reuters) 

■ Awaiting a Breakthrough 

Lynne Duke of The Washington 
Post reported from Johannesburg: 

If tiie Cape Town meeting does 
take place, it would marie the most 
significant breakthrough in efforts 
by foreign nations to resolve almost 
four months of war between Mar- 
shal Mobutu’s army and a rebel 
force that controls a 1,500-kUome- 
ter swath along Zaire's eastern bor- : 

.-det v--- ••<>*' ,■.»* - j. - ..it". • 

Diplomats and • i nt er n ati o nal 
agencies have expressed fear that 
foe escalating war in Zaire threatens 
to plunge tiie region into deeper 
turmoiL 

On hand to assist Mr. Mandela's 
efforts are the U.S. assistant sec- 
retary of state for Africa, George 
Moose, and Susan Rice, foe Clinton 
administration's senior National 
Security Council adviser for Africa, 
a U.S. official said. Mr, Moose and 
Ms. Rice traveled to Cape Town 
wifo Vice President A1 Gore last 
weekend and have remained behind 
to help Mr. Mandela wifo the Zaire 
talks, the official said. 

The ailing Marshal Mobutu, 
Zaire's ruler for 31 years, consis- 
tently has refused to negotiate wifo 
foe rebels who have faced little 
anny resistance while seizing ter- 
ritory along Zaire’s borders wifo 
Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, 
Uganda and Sudan. In recent days, 
the rebels have said they were 
poised to move westward to Kisan- 
gani, a key city that is the gov- 
ernment's easternmost military 
command base. On Monday, after 
receiving Mr. Mandela’s invitation 
for talks, Marshal Mobutu's armed 
forces began bombing rebel-held 
areas. On Tuesday, Mobutu’s gov- 
ernment rejected a UN Security 
Council appeal for a truce. 

Mr. Kabila, a longtime Mobutu 
foe, has urged negotiations for 
months. 

His movement, be has frequently 
said, seeks foe overthrow of Mar- 
shal Mobutu and foe installation of 
an elected government. 


) ’ 


compared wifo Poland and Hungary.” 
Indeed, throughout the Balkans there 
is enormous skepticism that a change in 
government would necessarily usher in a 
new era of tranquillity and wealth. 

“Everybody here has been partly re- 
sponsible," said Nikolai Kamov, a re- 
spected Bulgarian lawmaker who 
resigned this month from the governing 
Socialist Party. “We’ve all had our 
chance since 1990 — an unexpected 
chance — and we all proved we were 
unprepared for reforms." 

Taken together, it makes for an ex- 
plosive mix of social discontent 
The Serbian opposition, after nearly 
three months of daily marches, has 
forced the government of President 
Slobodan Milosevic to bow to its central 
demand: that its victories in Belgrade 
and 13 other cities in the November 
elections be recognized. But the expe- 
rience of stolen elections, as well as 
mounting doubts that Mr. Milosevic will 
respect foe constitution and leave office 
when his second term ends this fell, 
underscores the stagnation in Belgrade. 

“Something natural in all other coun- 
tries — that you can change political 
power by the vote — is still being fought 
here.” said Novak Pribicevic, a retired 
ambassador. 



Balkan Malcontents 


O • 160 

__ Population in millions and gross 

Romania domestic product in U.S. dollars. 



Serbia 




S1,500 


Bulgaria 




$3,830 



Albania $1,100 

Source: European Bank for 
Reconstnrctton end Development ^ 


WTO: U.S. to Invoke National Security 


“This has been about democracy and 
freedom," said Mr. Simic, tiie analyst in 
Belgrade. 4 ‘In force months, though, there 
will be workers on the streets, too.” 

In Albania, the protests’ mutation 
began last month in shock and anger at an 
economic cataclysm — foe crash of huge 
pyramid schemes — that has robbed 
perhaps a third of the country’s pop- 
ulation of its life savings. But demon- 
strators quickly began venting their out- 
rage at the government in broader terms, 
for retaining some of tiie more odious 
features of tiie country’s Stalinist past 
By contrast, Bulgaria has racked up a 
solid record of democratic reform. It has 


held seven fair elections in seven years, 
changed governments more or less 
smoothly and opened the media to op- 
posing views. 

But the Socialist Party — former 
Communists — has held or controlled 
power for five of foe last seven years and 
balked at even the most modest eco- 
nomic reforms. The resulting financial 
catastrophe finally infuriated a previ- 
ously quiescent people, who took to the 
streets, protesting daily for a month to 
demand the government’s resignation. 
On Feb. 4, foe Socialists finally gave up 
power, yielding to a caretaker govern- 
ment until elections in ApriL . 


Continued from Page 1 

law does not bar foreign companies from 
trading with Cuba or investing time but 

nies thafuse assets seized^firwflLS^^- 
izens daring the Cuban revolution, be 
added. 

Washington also demonstrated its 
commitment tn the trade or ganization by 
agreeing last week to a WTO deal to 
liberalize telecommunications services 
and by pushing for an agreement to elim- 
inate tariffs on information technology 
products, this official said. 

"We do not believe the panel is com- 
petent to rule on this issue because it 
involves essential foreign policy and na- 
tional security concerns,” the official 
said. “By bringing noncommercial mat- 
ters into the WTO, foe EU may well 
jeopardize what we and others have 
waked so hard to achieve." 

U.S. officials also criticized Sir Leon 
for showing his negotiating hand in pub- 
lic. He said last week that Europe was 
demanding guarantees that Washington 
would indefinitely suspend a Heuns- 
Barton provision allowing U.S. citizens 
to sue foreign companies for compen- 
sation over Cuban properties, and that if 
would ikk use a separate provision that 


could bar EU executives from entering 
foe United States. Although Mr. Clinton 
indicated last month he would waive the 
lawsuit provision indefinitely, he does 
hot have discretion to waive any visa 
restrictions, the U.S. official said. 


German Daily Refers 
To Rifkind as a Jew 

International Herald Tribune 
FRANKFURT — The respected 
frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 
called attention Thursday to the fact 
that foe British foreign secretary. 
Malcolm Rifkind, is a Jew in its 
coverage of Mr. Rifkind's speech 
Wednesday in Bonn. 

Mr. Rifkind expressed criticism 
to foe speech of the plan for Euro- 
pean monetary union. An account 
on Page 2 ended with this sentence: 
As though he was not fully con- 
vinced by his own speech, foe Jew 
Rifkmd, ironically apologetic, con- 
cluded wifo the German phrase by 

‘Here I stand, I cannot do 
other.' ” 




f ! 




jwnznNATinMAT. Hmi-n.TRnniNR ram ay EEB&UABX. 2L, 1997 
EVTEKNATIOI'UL HERAIJ) TRIBUNE, FRIDA!', FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


PAGE 17 
RAGE 7 


INTERNATIONAL 


U.S. and Israel Skirt Extradition 


By Serge Schmemann 

Ww York Times Service 


JERUSALEM — Israeli and 
American officials are quietly look- 
ing for ways to avoid extraditin'* to 
Israel a Palestinian Islamic leader., 
Mousa Mohammed Abu MarzooL 
who has been detained in a New York 
jail for more than 19 months, ac- 
cording to Israeli officials. 

The officials gave no details, and 
neither American nor Israeli officials 
would publicly confirm that such an 
effort was under way. 

Mr. Abu Marzook’s lawyers said 
that while they had heard reports of 
such discussions between the two na- 
tions. they had not been contacted 
directly. 

But Israeli officials, speaking on 
the condition of anonymity, said 
"all sorts of options are being dis- 
cussed' ' about sending Mr. Abu Mar- 
zook to a third country to avoid put- 
ting him on trial in Israel and risking a 


wave of retaliatory terror attacks. 

Last week, the Israeli newspaper 
Yedioth Ahroooth reported mat 
Jordan had been approached, but there 
were other reports that the Jordanians 
were reluctant to accept a prominent 
Islamic leader. Jordan has its own 
difficulties wnfa a militant Islami c op-' 
position, and would be wary of the 
problems Mr. Abu Marzook could 
create in hs relations with Israel 

According to Israeli repeals, the 
bead of the international division of 
the Israeli State Attorney ’s Office, hit 
Kahan. went to Washington last week 
to discuss the case with American 
officials. Mrs. Kahan reportedly . 
briefed Beniamin Netanyahu when he 
subsequently went to Washington, 
raising speculation that the Israeli 
prime minister discussed the issue 
with President Bill Clinton. US. of- 
ficials declined to comment. 

Mr. Abu Marzook, who has been 
described as a senior political leader of 
Hamas, a militant Islamic movement 


whose militar y wing has taken respon- 
siTnfit y for many of the terror attacks id 
I srael, was detained at Kennedy Air- 
port in New Yoik on July 2. 1995, and 
has been held in a federal jail in Man- 
hattan ever since, pending the outcome 
erf an Israeli extradition requesL 

Israel charged that Mr. Abu Mar- 
zook financed "terrorist activities 
again ct soidiers and civilians" and 
helped supervise the Hamas military 
wing. He claimed that his work for 
Hamas consisted only of raising 
money for social services, which, ac- 
cording to Israeli intelligence, ac- 
count for 95 .percent of the Islamic 
movement’s work. 

On Jan. 28, however, Mr. Abu Mar- 
zook’s lawyers made the surprise an- 
nouncement that he would no longer 
fight extradition. 

But the Israeli government evid- 
ently concluded that putting Mr. Abu 
Marzook on trial in Israel would cre- 
ate a major risk of terror attacks. 
There was also some question about 


Algerian Islamists 
Claim 180 Killed 


Reuters 

PARIS — The Islamic Sal- 
vation Army said Thursday that 
its guerrillas had killed more than 
180 members of tbe security 
forces in recent clashes in 13 
regions across Algeria. 

It said that among the govern- 
ment forces killed were about 80 
soldiers and paramilitaries who 
were shot in fighting in tbe west- 
ern Saida region. It was not pos- 
sible to verify the statement by the 
group, the armed wing of an out- 
lawed political party, the Islamic 
Salvation Front. 


the strength of the legal case against 
him, which was based on statements 
made by a Palestinian who sub- 
sequently claimed he had been tor- 
tured by Israeli interrogators and was 
forced to sign a confession in Hebrew, 
which he could not understand. 


American Fed Secrets to Israel 


By Roberto Suro and Barton Gellman 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — A civilian engineer 
working at a U.S. Army command facility 
near Detroit has admitted divulging classified 
military information to Israeli officials over 
the last 10 years, and his home has been 
searched under a warrant that cited probable 
violation of espionage statutes, according to 
federal court papers. 

The engineer. David Tenenbaum of South- 
field, Michigan, has not been arrested or 
charged with any crime but is under inves- 
tigation, FBI officials said. He told Pentagon 
investigators that he had "inadvertently" 
provided Israeli arms purchasing officials 
with secret data on the performance of the 
Patriot missile defense system, the Bradley 
fighting vehicle, new forms of ceramic armor 
and other weapons systems, according to an 
FBI affidavit filed to obtain a search warrant 
of Mr. Tenenbaum ’s home. 

The admission was made during a security 
clearance interview last Thursday, and the 
search was conducted over the weekend. 

Mr. Tenenbaum had contact with Israeli 


officials because his command was involved 
with the production of weapons sold to for- 
eign governments. 

The Israeli government denied any wrong- 
doing in dealings with him. 

"There has been no improper contact be- 
tween Tenenbaum and any official body or 
institution of the state of Israel," David Bar- 
Dan. chief spokesman for Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu, said late Wednesday in 
Jerusalem. 

The Israeli Defense Ministry also issued a 
brief statement that said Israeli's in the United 
States "are under the most explicit and cat- 
egorical instructions to decline any and all 
offers of classified U.S. information, other 
than that which is transmitted to them in an 
orderly fashion" through "authorized official 
channels." 

Israeli security officials said those instruc- 
tions dated from the aftermath of the Jonathan 
Jay Pollard case. Mr. Pollard, a U.S. Navy 
analyst, was convicted in 1 986 and sentenced 
to life in prison for spying for Israel. 

Mr. Tenenbaum is a mechanical engineer at 
the headquarters of the U.S. Army Tank Auto- 
motive and Armaments Command. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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Real Estate 
for Sale 


Australia 


AUSTRALIA - SYDNEY, houa (350 
st)4n} on 700 sqm land, as nm tor 
sale. Far +«12 BOOS 3217. Write Ivan, 
19 Unbend St, VMfflPs* 2164 


Canada 


CANADA, OUVBL OKANAGAN, B.C, 
2-year old log house tor sale, Vmm. 
ideal holiday home, good year round 
access. For information cortact Karen 
Lens / Fax: 001 604 48B 3733. 


Costa Rica 


COSTA RCA, CENTRAL AMERICA'S 
SWITZERLAND. BesuMii, Gemren run 
coflee tom , 48 acres, al tooWk of »F 
etna 20 min. bom aiport. wnttf bert 
cBmaa. Chairning Spamstudyte ctartgr 
home (500 sqm)i garaga Mty equma 
gym, Sumtoeted tonne court, pool wMi 
ms*U, jacuzzL 5 phone Nta iW 
aFs house, Held eqiiiremerL $1 J mb. 
Fax +P6J-OB 4®18 


French Provinces 


BUY to France WITHOUT Comatabn 
ebrediy from the seSerl FREE OF 
CHARGE. For addhiwl Wwmaftm: 
INTEFWET Mta^iiver8flH»rinflB.fr. 
Fax: +33 (OH 67 IS 89 90 Bjtew 
write to: UNIVERSAL PARTNERS, 
34055 MONTPELLIER CBdex 1, France 

CARIBBEAN 


MUSTIQUE 

Private Island Paradise 
Balinese villa with pool 
3 bedrooms. lush hillside, garden 

Fax: 604-926-8300 


EXCEPTIONAL HAS PROVENCAL* in 
toe Var, 12 seres tail Man house wB> 
tower. 300 stun. Mng space, 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 bathroom, 65 sqm. shfing 
mom, (Sntog mom + Bxvy + office. 
Guta taae 3 bedrooms, 3 bathnons. 


YOUR REAL ESTATE CONTACT M 
PROVBCE - Bast aetaettoa ol vitoge 
and country prooedte* tor sate or ram. 
Contact GWaTciARK - LU8ER0N 
wvEsnssaens ■ goroes - Tei 

+33P)480720755.Fax+33(p)490720897. 


12 « FROM GSCYA CB4THL Luxu- 
iy.iww ttapiex. 200 sqm. 4 taetkooms, 3 
bstaooms, 2 gereges. marvelous view 
Ttaax +41 21 825 10 45. 


DORDOGNE XVh certuy 900 sqm 
tasiuuse wtto Mew ota 34000 sqm 
own grounds. Complete mnovatton a 
MUST F354004 +33 (0) 1 3210020 


French Riviera 



HACSSMANN Group 
CAPFERRAT 

MAGMHCENT SEA VIEW 
VllA. TSWLCES. GARDB4 
PRICE : FWWUM0 
Cnead Mr KAMI 
Tit +33 m 4 92 00 48 49 
Fax +33OT493 00 40 88 


CAP- PAIL 

CtHim pmptaf. nafmoL 
via on flsn mrata. knely gantaxAh ' 
sMtaxaSig pooL beadtadng taw oatbe 
xea. very sumy. Detached house lor 
AS & gange. Vety Heiesflng pree. 


La Mt Pateca 
25 ranue da la Cuata 
. HC 98800 Marti Ctao 
T»fc B77) 93 2515W 
Free pT) 13 25 35 33 
lwaamoteemojnofcade^wk agenca 


FRANCE 


Auction Sale at the Palais tie Justice de SEN LIS (Oise) 

TUESDAY, MARCH 1 1 , 1997 at 1 1 a.nu 

VERY BEAUTIFUL ESTATE 

located in 

oouvuux (oM 

Avenue du CftifiraJ-BalfMiifer 
on grounds of 3 6a. 55 a. 63ta_ 
with TENTHS and Induduig aMWN ___ 

1st bxemenl with beating room, Jaundiy idool *®e ceite; gtanes twin. 

washiooitL WC - 2 nd basement adtii billiari - gr^nd 

WBV- large IJvinfr bedroom with 

?nd baSoonTdinlng mom, ^ - 

and kitchen - 1st floor wftb 8 bedrooms, 5batte2WCs- 
tareelaraRe - GUEST HW^ grotind ' 

S^ll hSwC bath,0 ®^! t 

bathroom, wasfmxxn - Garage - ATELuac, 

STARTWO PRICE FF 5 , 000,000 ' 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


CANNES CAUFORME 60 a^n. one 
bedroom 1st. Bo new. panoramic sea 
taw, part, pool, near Cmtaito. FFI.5M. 
+33 (0)4 94 99 73 12. Rurmv Sew 


Or eat Britain 


CLOSE TO PLYMOUTH, secluded 2 - 
bedroom flat chara cter old fort Heated 
aAfoor swbrmtog pooL tennis courts, 
private heritor S beach. Indoor Paten S 
BL Lovely sea views S coastal waks. 
asm Wax +33 (D) 2 5135 0369 


HOHESEARCH LONDON LTD Lat us 
- seared hr vou. Wb tad home / flats 
to buy and rani For indvjduta and 
connarees +■ Fidl Corporase Retacatton 
Sowcee. 7 days-Mnek Tat +44 171 
838 1066 Fax +-4* 171 838 1077 
NqdhMwJnmesBardvauMnm 


Italy 


FOR BALE BY OWNER, two fabulous 
Mriboues In Roma, above Piazza tU 
Ebaoia, sold aapetataiy or joined. 3000 
sq. £ w» 1800 sq. t tanecB and 1900 
sq. I nth 1300 sq. it taraca aactecu- 
tar panorami c views ol Roma. For more 
Wo caKax A. DM at (212)»MB42, 
USA, or (6) 4782 2D03. IM^SntafS 
phase abstain. 


ITALY, THE MARCHES 
COUNTRY HOUSES CASTIE8, VILAS 
Tei +39 360 713^9 fin 737 830S1 

ItaMaaaMtta to flta ta c ti B 


New Zealand 


AUCKLAND, IEW ZEALAND. Nov 
WgtHta, BtaCta vtews, 2 marenents 
t*y dartashed, S275KA19QK U5. dofcra. 
Fax USA: 510347-7B37. 


Paris and Suburbs 


PARS 101b, iadng bote dase 300 
squiL aparimeni. 1st Boot Sumy. En- 
trance M, recaption reom,aifitintag lin- 
ing mom. Batami facing bok 5 bed- 
ran, 3 bets w 3 tawere. Eqdpped 
tteden. indoor stascasa wft access to 
ground floor studb open onto prtrata 
garden 100 sqm + roaxTi room with . 
shower + unAiiuuund garage + 3cai- 
bra Tet +33 $1 45*56® 


PARIS 1ST, PENTHOUSE Jaain d» 
Hafee. h 171) caAtiy buU«. tot. 
atew tor, 75 aqm, beam, w# i, cakn, 
U oi charm. ms»J)00. Tet Owner 
+33 $142336446. Rue (5)142210201 


6b LATH QUARTS* • Ha* 1 
64 RUE D’ASSAS. Near Lorareboug 
GaataK. Esepttonel difta; xdb raracei 
Partdnos. OfBoa atao open wnolmnds: 
10-1pm&3-7pm01 42 22 78 82 


BOULOGNE • don to Roland Gam, 
35 sqm studio, modem bidding. 5th 
floor, dewior, afl cantata, imerabte, 
certrei hsaing. Price FfiOOJOO. Owner 
Tet +33 (0) 1 48 00 07 88 star 6 pn 


7Vq PREST1GKXIS AREA - Uotpolabta 
kirehw 1 BM Tower view, 200 am 
taotaienl + 45 atm ttrso ta hlrii ctass 
fxtang.TA owner +33 5^1 45 51 49 66 


7th, Petata BaurbonAfanee ifOtsay, 
Unexpected on 1st floor, eiegaid, 374 
rooms whh real terrace, partem. 
FRL7DQOQO. DW SI 44 18 07 07. 


Hi - Wgh dtass bUtohn, 210 sqm, 
4 bedrooms. 2 Mb. high float, suny. 
metfsstuitaposdtataDeixatitocinfl- 
fan. FF4^00JjQ0. Tei +33 (QJ13Q2447Z5. 


NEUU1Y - BEAUTIFUL DUPLEX 
2S0 sqjtL + tanas, 7 paritoa, high 
staoduds. USfll wm ALGA % +33 
(W474SS51 Fk +33(i9f4745BQ9S 


16b, Near AVE FOCH Twnhow 700 
700eqA gastoR, high bass. 
.014225 0300 


FOR SALE 

WAUQUSZ 47 tt. Safing YaoM, 
M 1989, lyiq Besuleu sur Mer. 
Veiy «efl equipped. 

JONGBTT 22C8 02 flj SaNng Yacht, 
tab 1988, ^rg fionfa, exaimely 
wel equfped end in atow condom. 

Births tor sale; 

fttaa da Mona Oh da Mer laafim 
Baato ar Mo I 2 atal 5 ta. 

MMC 1 NL ta +33 (OH « 33 71 70 
pro) or +1 207 7 BS 4384 (USA). 


lift, LA BUTTE-MONTMARTRE 150 
eqra 'ATHJBT Loft. Ifts layout wod- 
ed caul P33XL00O Tft 06 1172 0716 

NEURIT, 3 rooms, 5ft flow, chaoctar 
tarttag. Dodfa amaureftrigll F13SN . 
IMOT. Owner +S(D) 1 47 47 42 41 

Spain 

FOR SALE HADRD. 72 eqra tap kau- 
ry 2-bedraorn trt Pres Pfe 32,000000. 
Cartad Tel/Fax +34-52-77 63 82 

Switzerland 


yriuKEGaraws 

L JSatetofareimwsauftoared 
■ .B ocr apacteityMnga 1)77^ 

Artacfaa Broperew to MONTRSIX 
VEVEY, VR1ARS, DtABIBCTS 
CRANS-MONTANA, ate. 1 to 5 tod 
noon, SFr. 200000 to 3^ bud 
REVAC 

52, Mortbrilacf CH-1231 Genera 2 
Til 4122734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 

USA Residential 

KEY VEST LUXURY a renowned Euro- 
pean BEftefB radad Kay Wed master- 
work lilted irift Pfiip Stare® fixtures, 
Portugese faneetwie flows, and t poof 
ftaft a wort of art. On over an aero of 
open water lard, complete wft a fefly tor 
entertaining, electric gates tor privacy, 
boat sips tor tout. And more. Much 
more. 53,500,000. Contact Lym Xauflst 
(3ffi)294-51S. 71)0 Pnatadtof Knight 
Rasly, toe. 

FBr Avenue Tha Stony Nafteriand 
Souheast comer, 23rd llow, 1.050 sq. 
ft, 30 fl. iwng room. 25 tt. maater 
bertoom, dressing room, brae baft wth 
tub and shower, acton, 5ft Avenue 
view. 11 wtadows, $490000. 

Cifc 2tH5M08B 

NEW YDRK-xnespoitr UL 

Bank Cfoeua - USE 2 Mffion 
CbNu Price • USS 15 Nltn 
CeleWy House. Frendi Colorial U 
acres, 8 bedrooms. 6.5 bathrooms, 
maijs’ quartos, haated pooL cerfial tf / . 
heal / saewty systems. Tet (305) 837 
5007 Fra (305) 837 5016 

HAJESIK FLORIDA LAKEFRONT 

Bqutofle 4 beftoom cuttortl poolipfl 

hwaa wrti dart to seartyjaed 
coomrty. OMwre eaRy, SE80C 
Cat BsemoGI Evens, Garrigaa 
Ready toe. 1413942-1111 

LONGBOAT KEY, R: An kfand pare- 
dke. luxury restoancss. S. Oper, Ron 
BeMwta « Assoc, Fac 841-3839248 
(USA), Em lSK78)wixconi 

Boats A Yachts 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Belgium 


ANTWERP - ONE HOOM PUT, a 
sqm, near central station + Dinara. 
Rad to taexly stogie. Rad FB 14,400 
morttey * cods. TeL +32-W274507. 


French Riviera 


ST.THOPEZ REGION (CROIX VALUER) 
Spadoire tar#y home extarww grouxfa 
ctore to oeadBL Lame stwirmB pool 
y FFlftOOO per week 


. 1 8110 . Mey I 
Juw A Septenter FF15.000 per week, 
jjy & August FF20D0O per wei ' 
CM UK 44 171 221 8515 


GRASSE • RENOVATED FARMHOUSE, 
Fuly e q uipped. ISO acres, pooL -6 Bed- 
rooms -1 Drag Room - 2 Using Rooms. 
Monthly rental (Gardener, pool serve*, 
tidy wntani. Tel USA (TO 33M290 - 
Far ( 773 > 334-0944 


FRANCE: COTE D’AZUR lor rerttah, 
Estate 5 bedrooms, 5 tods, 600 sqm. 
part 5.000 sqra. solarium, jacuza. 
sauna, pool caretaker's house. TeL *33 
(0)493204343. Far (0)493228979. 


CAP OANTBES - Near beaches A got 
Outstanding vita with pod. Steeps 7, 
4 bedrooms, 2 baths. At corafflonmg, 
sumy. garden. April to Oct Tei: wiw 
.33 (0)483616021. Far (0)493617863. 


Holland 


RERIKN8E WTERNAT10NAL 
No 1 n Hdbnd 

tor (semi) tomtahed hewes/flats. 
Tet 3V2CF6448751 Fac 31-203465909 
Nhoven 19-21, 1083 Am Amsterdam 



k J bN a zanmodafatr stxta5 bedrooms 
OubBv and service asaiBd 
READY TO DOVE H 
Tel +33(0)1 47538013. Fra (0)1 45617577 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARS 
Tel: +33 (0)1 47-2030.05 


CAPfTALE ’ PARTNERS 
HenqilcKEd quaBy apanmena, el sizes 
Pteta and suburbs 

Tel +33(0)1-^148211. Fter(D}MBl482» 
1h tnlp you but l 


HEART OF MONTMARTRE U& tamer, 
cteratog. faUy apuipoed 2-rocm apart- 
ment Cable TV WeaMcr bustneraman 
v COUPto. F1J5D netM. F6JOO netanx 
Short v loin term. Tel: (0)1-41439364 
oflea eta loam or hone OT-4S470K 


16th Hem Marta (near), 6 moms, N$ 
dess, 245 sqm, 3rd floor, B, recrofan, 
4 bedrooms, 2 baths, parting. F25JJ0O. 
AgBree HERVER Tat +33 (0)142527832. 


6ft SAWT GERMAIN. 85 sqm, high 
standard. 1 bedroom. My equipped, top 
low, overtaking Sake Sufabe. FFBflOO 
par worth. TeVFax Italy (392) 904219 


CHARACTER FURNISHED t 
5th U0NGE, 3 rooms + garden: F11500 
3rd UARAJS, 3 rooms, dasc F12.765. 
IP - Tet +33 p)1 48 83 32 BB. 


7TH, 1 block from Eitfel Tower, 
luxurious 4 bedrooms. Fufly 
Tet 31CME2280 USA 


7ft, Rite Sevres, rice 3 rooms, 85 sqm, 
modem, Bth flow. Sft, balcony, parting. 
F12JOO AgenceHanrer +39(0)142527632 


HE SAINT LOWS, tsetog Souft Quae 
the moei ctaman apartment, very ele- 
gant Tet +33(0) 1-4051.7851. 


LE HARMS, CENTER, beaitoU apari- 
menl 68 sqm. tanishad wft batoroom. 
F7JXC net Tet W M2 77 59 E. 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


BDFLANDR1N 

OLDBULDMG 

BEAUTIFLR. 7 rooms, targe reception, 
237 EqjJL, FFI9800 
+ charges, central heatm 
Tat *33 (0) 1 48 02 35 80 

GFF 


33 AVENUE FOCH 
2 rooms, 50 Bqjn.. 5th flow, 
patong. Hart: FRWOO charges 
Trt: +3) (Q1 45 S3 07 24 


HEART OF MARAIS, owner rwis BN m 
17th cartwy towntowse. 1st flow. 4M 
coCngs. 3 bedrooms, 1 living room. 1 
teftrown, 1 shower room, rwiy redone. 
F16.000 + key money. Tat 01 42781818 


W LUXEMBOURG GARDENS - 220 
sqm 7 rooms, 3 bahs, 3rd flow, newly 
ndsne Tel naming +33 © 1 4924 0406 


Spain 


JAVEA (AUCANTEL AUTHOR'S 
HOUSE, 3 bottrie bedims, 2 baths, 
pooL paravane vtevre, rentals Easter I 
' Augul Deefe: Sana Monsel Fac 
164602.17. 


USA 


NYC FURMSHED APAHT1EHTS. 

1 seek to 1 year. Great Locations. Ctfl 
Pat/Chiqur: 212-448-9223. Fax: 
212-4498226 &Ma± athomeMatacom. 


SAN DIEGO: 2 Bed/Bah Beach Condo. 
Gated, pod, amenities, recreation. 
Tour/Wort, Wadt/Monti 603624-5790 


Real Estate Wanted/Exchange 


SEEK tor company let, furnished high 
class ha, 3 bedrooms, 2 btahs. MaM. 
north 1 £dl Tet +33 HB1 40 04 92 61 . 



Mountain Chalets 
& Ski Apartments 



■ GSTAAD 
CHATEAU D'OEX 

FOR SALE 

xmissksi forforeigneB ivaDable} 
m best kKKkms 
Ubedmxn 
Stating 5Ft 

AGENCY C * E. MATH 
CH-3780 CkuoiL Sw+Bnlmd 
T+fc +41-33/744 86 85 
— Rr +41-33/7*4 69 64 «= 


French Alps 


CMBLOUX. IEAR ICGEVL tortntoef 
ObIbL bwtetete view on *Mora Btanc*. 
100 sqra to 1500 ayn. gardsL 2 Boon 
+ bas&wri. 2 balconies. No agents. 
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PAGE & 


FB1DAX, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Itcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


n<Bu.siin> with tub ks» vobk. twes and tiie Washington post 


After Deng Xiaoping 


Mere Mortals ’ Turn 

A sense of historic passage marks 
the death of China’s veteran leader 
Deng Xiaoping. At the end he was sick 
and in his nineties, an old man clinging 
to filaments of his former power. But 
he had lived a notable 20th century life, 
not merely coming out a survivor in 
China’s political wars but taking apart 
in great struggles to modernize a vast 
land. Just how his life will be evaluated 
in China is uncertain; the political sys- 
tem he leaves behind does not encour- 
age honest obituaries. Elsewhere, he 
will probably be regarded as a reformer 
of substantial achievement who, in de- 
parting from active political life some 
years ago, left much undone. 

Mr. Deng was of the band of Com- 
munist revolutionaries in China who 
took power in 1949. He was fully in- 
vested in the campaigns and cruelties 
attendant to the imposition of single- 
parry totalitarian rule on an often re- 
sisting populace. But at some point 
during Moo Zedong’s murder of tens 
of millions of Chinese in his “Cultural 
Revolution” he developed different 
reform ideas. There followed his his- 
toric post-Mao effort to open up China 
economically, while maintaining the 
party’s unchallenged political controL 
.All ’this began a decade before the 
Berlin Wall came down. 


That Mr. Deng’s market reforms 
quickened the whole national eco- 
nomy and lifted 150 million or more 
people out of abject poverty is es- 
tablished. It is less clear that his re- 
forms can satisfy the aroused expec- 
tations of the hill Chinese population 
or that they can do so without prompt- 
ing a measure of fragmentation and 
instability deeply threatening to the 
regime. And of course the question that 
fascinates the West, whether economic 
reform will lead on to political reform, 
is also unanswered. Mr. Deng encour- 
aged participation in local governance 
and sought to regularize daily matters 
formerly reserved to party discretion. 
But anything smacking of political dis- 
sidence he crushed without reserve. 

His death brings China to the end of 
what has been called “great leader’* 
dominance. Hence, mere mortals role 
and vie to rule. The man already for- 
mally holding the top party, state and 
armed forces slots is 70-year-old Jiang 
Jemin. Deng Xiaoping sought foe 
stable Chinese-American relations es- 
sential to a focus on domestic growth. 
By the time of his death, that growth 
had put China into a situation or some 
tension with Washington. The meeting 
already scheduled between Mr. Jiang 
and Vice President A1 Gore next month 
gives them an occasion to continue 
working on the problems. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Two Good Ideas Imperiled by Mediocre Politics 

JL , ,,, , TK* jwcults would affl 


P ARIS — The big debates in what has 
come to be called the Euro-Atlantic 
community have taken a sour and dan- 
gerous turn. They are on the eastward 
expansion of NATO and establishment 
of a single European currency, to be 
followed in stages by foe eastward ex- 
pansion of European Union. 

The objective is to promote security 
and economic growth in Europe. Polit- 
ical leaders have already made the cru- 
cial policy decisions and behave as if it 
were only a matter now of negotiating 
the details. But they are losing their 
constituents in their failure to realize 
that they can’t achieve such deep, long- 
lasting changes without generating 
broad public support 
There is still a misguided attempt to 
urge a trade-off between “Euro-’ and 
“Atlantic.” suggesting (hat since se- 
curity risks are not immediate and the 
Easterners want so badly to join the 
Western club, let them into the eco- 
nomic union first and deal with NATO 
Jater. This woa’t and cannot work, be- 
cause foe nature of the new obligations 
involved are so different. 

The economic transformations re- 
quired are so big. and inevitably pain- 
ful, that they can be approached only 
gradually, with plenty of adjustment 
time, while an enlargement of NATO is 
straightforward politics. The direction 
and the sequence are set. 


By Flora Levis 


But all the pobiic is tearing is a 
clutch of assorted complaints that these 
are bad ideas, that their countries are 
being herded into co mmitting irrepar- 
able mistakes, that they are losing con- 
trol of their destiny. The politicians 
aren't doing their basic job, which is to 
explain and convince .electorates that 
foe changes are not only necessary but 
will be beneficial once they are di- 
gested. They have made their decisions 
on foe basis of long-term analysis. 

With foe exception, of Britain, which 
has abdicated its natural influence by 
choosing to stay on the sidelines, the 
leaders are driven by what they con- 
sider such obvious requirements ahead 
for their countries that they don’t stop 
to spell them out. The remit is a pe- 
culiar, and rare, situation where the 
leaders are so farsighted that they risk 
stumbling and falling on the obstacles 
that preoccupy their voters. 

Victor Halberstadt, a Dutch eco- 
nomist folly committed to the idea of 
European union, thinks foe reason is 
that the political decisions were drafted 
by technocrats who made mistakes that 
it would be too embarrassing to admit 
and try to correct now. He points out 
that there are only 400 working days 
before the 1 999 target date for rbe euro. 


not long enough to rewrite the pro- 
visions for a common economic and 
monetary policy that could be reas- 
onably implemented. 

In a dream scenario, foe American 
financier George Sotos imagines that 
foe sense of impending crisis suddenly 
sti mulates a real debate op the nee d for a 
political Europe, provoking a great 
Congress that would issue a Declaration 
of Interdependence and proceed to write 
a democratic constitution for European 
Union. He knows it isn’t likely, but he 
has a real foreboding that otherwise foe 
fight over the euro will destroy foe 
whole concept of unity, and foe Euro- 
Atlantic community in its wake. 

Intolerable unemployment figures, 
sluggish growth and the apparently ab- 
solute dedication to fighting inflation 
and debt above all other economic 
goals are making fears of pursuing foe 
technocrats' prescriptions overwhelm- 
ing. And about all foe leaders offer in 
defense of their position is that it will 
“protect us from dollar hegemony” 
(Jacques Chirac) and reduce transac- 
tion costs in exchanging currencies. 

The positive advantages are seldom 
mentioned: the real benefits of a huge 
domestic market,, escape from foe 
damage of exchange rate competition 
and uncertainty, encouragement of 
investment, improved ability to com- 
pete on foe world market from a large. 


Rniid base. The results would affect 
daily life, whefoer people travel a™** 

a *Bw%^teve not been told m any 

any case but are afraid to renounce. 

The problem is essentially one or 
democracy, of giving people the sense 
that they are making a choi^ on me 

basis of sound information. Mr. boros 

is right about i hat Bui it won’t happen 
in a cfaeam. Without a much bigger 
effort of foe political leaders to lay out 
what they are doing., and why. and 
where it is to lead, their followers will 
not trust and accept their decisions, . 

These are really epochal changes in 
foe way people have been accustomed 
to live and the wav nations get on with 
each other. Interdependence is un- 
avoidable, but it cannot be imposed D> 
fiat on democratic countries without 
provoking pernicious reacnom*. 

So there is a risk of destructive back- 
lash. It would not be the first tune in 
history that shortsighted, narrow am- 
bitions destroyed good ideas, but it is 
terrible to contemplate its happening 
.min aftw havinv come so far. 


A Great Reformer Who Brought China Into the Modern Age 


Incomplete Reforms 

Physical frailty had relegated Deng 
Xiaoping to a backstage role in recent 
years, but he remained a decisive fac- 
tor in China's politics right up to his 
death at age 92. Although he retired 
from his lust official post in 1989. none 
dared risk his displeasure or criticize 
any of his major decisions so long as he 
remained alive. 

His longevity in power was a tribute 
to his political skills and the dynamism 
of his reforms. But his inability Co 
transfer ultimate authority while alive, 
and the uneasy succession likely to 
follow his death, are telling reminders 
of how incomplete and therefore tenu- 
ous those reforms remain. 

Power in China remains personal, 
and leadership requires a capacity to 
rally the disparate interests of Com- 
munist Party barons, army generals, 
economic technocrats and foe general 
population. Mr. Deng, like Mao Ze- 
dong. did this through personal ties 
forged over decades of leadership dat- 
ing back to foe Long Man* in the 
1930s. That revolutionary generation 
has now departed, and its successors 
will not be able to role the same way. 

Formal leadership now passes to a 
handful of temporarily united party 
functionaries under' President Jiang 
Zemin. All agree on a general formula 
of “continued reform,” but those 
plastic words are subject to radically 
different interpretations. While Mr. 
Deng gave primacy to accelerating eco- 
nomic development, Mr. Jiang seems 
more inclined to revitalize key tenets of 
socialist ideology and flex some of 
China’s newfound military muscle. 

Mr. Deng, whose career began in the 
1920s, was not always a reformer. In 
foe 1950s he helped lead foe Anti- 
Rightist Campaign, an orgy of denun- 
ciation and punishment chat ruined 
hundreds of thousands of lives. A de- 
cade later, during the Cultural Revolu- 
tion. he was himself purged as a right- 
ist. After a brief return to power, he was 
purged again in 1976 as “an unre- 


pentant capitalist loader.” Those ex- 
periences inoculated him against 
Maoist mass mobilizations, but did not 
teach him tolerance. His own legacy is 
stained by foe relentless persecution of 
democracy campaigners like Wei Jing- 
sheng, and most dramatically by itis 
dispatch of tanks against peaceful pro- 
testers in Tiananmen Square. China's 
official verdict on that shattering and 
costly episode may be re-examined in 
the years to come. 

But Deng Xiaoping is likely to be best 
remembered for his economic reforms. 
These transformed China from an im- 
poverished country of giant agricultural 
communes, inefficient state industries 
and bureaucratic barriers to trade and 
investment into a global growth leader 
with rapidly rising living standards for 
many of its 12 billion people. 

These reforms, however, are incom- 
plete. Building up a market economy 
within a framework of central planning 
and alongside a still huge state sector 
has brought shortages of raw materials, 
systematic corruption and chronic in- 
flation. Meanwhile, foreign investors 
have discovered that they cannot always 
count on Chinese law or contracts. 

The late stages of Mr. Deng’s rule 
brought policy inflexibility as major 
decisions about China’s future direc- 
tion were simply deferred. Now those 
issues must be faced, starting with foe 
succession itself. 

Other issues include what to do 
about unproductive state industries, 
widespread dislocations of agricultural 
labor, shrinking government revenues 
and foe absence of an adequate safety 
net for the millions made insecure by 
rapid economic change. China's new 
leaders also must attend to a soured 
relationship with Washington, demil- 
itarize relations with Taiwan and man- 
age foe absorption of Hong Kong. 

The long era of role by Communist 
China’s founding generation has finally 
come to an end. The world will now 
learn whether foe regime it left behind 
is capable of leading China to a stable, 
prosperous and peaceful future. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


A Legacy of Oppression 

[Wednesday] saw the passing of one 
of the Long Marchers, that group of 
revolutionaries which enabled China 
to "stand up” after its humiliation at 
the hands of the West and Japan. Their 
legacy is a country respected for its 
size and determination but reviled for 
oppression, from the colonization of 
Tibet to attempts to limit the birthrate, 
from the labor camps to foe show trials 
of dissidents. Deng Xiaoping will go 
down in history as a great man. but we 
hope never to see his like again. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 

China’s future is shadowed by chaos 
because the phantom stability that 
Deng Xiaoping created through op- 
pression, repression and massacre can- 
not hold. The apparent stability in 
Beijing. Shanghai and other large cit- 
ies has been purchased through what 


might be called political deficit spend- 
ing that bankrupts the future legitim- 
acy of foe central authorities. Someday 
the bills will come due. 

Some people believe that if China 
continues along foe path of economic 
transformation, a stable and democrat- 
ic society will emerge after a certain 
threshold. The unpleasant facts are foe 
opposite: Despite a continually rising 
GNP. China is closer to chaos today 
than it was five years ago. 

— Fang Lizhi, writing for New 
Perspectives Quarterly ( Los Angeles). 

Although we can doubt foe effec- 
tiveness of containment, which would 
restore a climate of Cold War, we must 
hope for a minimum of clear-sighted- 
ness in foe West. “Constructive en- 
gagement” with Beijing cannot mean 
giving up defease of certain principles, 
starting with concern for civil liberties. 

— Le Monde ( Paris). 



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S TANFORD, California — Deng 
Xiaoping relisted portraying himself 
to foreigners as a m baozi — a country 
bumpkin. In the dozen or so meetings 
1 had with him from 1977 to 1989, tie 
never failed to mention it He came from 
Sichuan Province, an overwhelmingly 
rural society closer at his birth to the Iron 
Age than to foe modem era. 

When he became China's paramount 
leader, he clung to this rural Chinese 
identity. He always wore his Sun Yar- 
sen tunic, even when his contemporaries 
began wearing a Western coat and tie. 
He was never afraid to keep his country 
ways. He often spit with great effect. 
Once, to underscore a derisive point 
about Soviet expansionism, he punc- 
tuated his remarks right into a spttoon. 

Because of his reverence for tradition, 
he won the loyalty of the many nativists 
in the Communist Party. But while he 
had one foot firmly planted in foe 
Chinese past, he was also responsible for 
China's leap into the modem age. 


By Michel Oksenberg 


Mr. Deng knew that he had to improve 
the lives of his people, and he succeeded 
in large part. In his era. real incomes 
more than doubled. 

He also recognized early on that 
China must become part of the world and 
the world must become part of China. I 
was at foe meeting in Beijing in July 
1978 when he proposed to send Chinese 
students to the United Stales. This pro- 
posal took our delegation so much tty 
surprise that we had to bold a caucus. 
Did he really say that? 

We thought that such an exchange 
could not possibly happen until relations 
were normalized, and decided to ask for 
a clarification. Indeed, we had heard 
right Chinese students arrived in the 
United States by early 1979. 

Mr. Deng acred with similar swiftness 
to normalize relations. In 1978 he stated 
that it took one second to sign a peace 


and friendship agreement with Japan, so 
it would take two seconds to normalize 
relations with America. Negotiations to 
do just that had been occurring peri- 
odically for foe previous six months. But 
he stepped in, and in one meeting with 
Leonard Woodcock, the American am- 
bassador, they made the deaL 

Few leaders' global vision matched 
Mr. Deng’s. In our meetings with him 
during the Carter administration, he was 
always ready to disrnas world affairs. He 
immediately understood foe implica- 
tions of the Soviet invasion of Afghan- 
istan. He understood that die fall of the 
shah of Iran had profound implications 
for the entire Mioeast. 

He was a Chinese leader in the tra- 
dition of Zhou Enlai and was an ex- 
cellent partner in strategic dialogue with 
a succession of American statesmen — 
Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski 
and Brent Scowcroft 
He had no Elusions about foe world or 
China. He and his generation repelled foe 


Japanese invasion, unified their country 
after a century of civil war and strife, and 
restored China’s place in foe world. 

Unfortunately, the use of force was 
central to his achievements. He could be 
a witty interlocutor, but foe sardonic 
laugh and biting scorn he used to dismiss 
his perceived enemies revealed a darker 
side. He led the 1957 suppression of 
intellectuals, enthusiastically supported 
Mao Zedong’s disastrous Great Leap 
Forward, and cracked down on the pro- 
testers of 1989. 

But Deng Xiaoping was an extraor- 
dinary transitional figure and will be 
remembered as a great reformer. His 
unmistakable goal was to achieve wealth 
and power for China. 

The writer, a member of the National 
Security Council during the Carter ad - 
ministration, is a senior fellow cf the 
Institute for International Studies at 
Stanford. He contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


A Discredited Regime Inherits the Setting for Bitter Turmoil 


P RINCETON, New Jersey 
— The People’s Liberation 
Army has been preoccupied re- 
cently with expanding its 
moneymaking activities, and 
has turned into a kind of bloated 
economic monstrosity. It deals 
arms internationally, smuggles, 
runs hotels and dance halls and 
pursues a wide range of other 
economic activities both legal 
and illegal. 

The PLA has always been its 
own nation within a nation, en- 
joying all kinds of special priv- 
ileges and exemptions from foe 
laws that govern others. Bui foe 
army’s mercenary activities 
have corroded and undermined 
it tembly. 

Is civil war possible in post- 
Deng China? Nationwide war 
seems out of the question, but 
local conflicts over economic 


By Liu Binyan 


interests among groups within 
foe army, or between the army 
and the People’s Armed Police, 
are likely to increase. The tens of 
millions of unemployed peas- 
ants who wander around China 
are a natural source of inexpens- 
ive manpower for the mercenary 
forces of vested interests. 

During the past two years an 
irregular armed force of peas- 
ants and retired military men, 
falsely claiming to be part of the 
PLA, has arisen in the impov- 
erished province of Shanxi. The 
group set up its own munitions 
factories and network of rep- 
resentatives in neighboring pro- 
vinces. The development is sig- 
nificant because it suggests a 
reappearance of traditional war- 
lordism in embryonic form. A 


second level of armed force, 
feeding off the regular army for 
guns, ammunition and other 
supplies, is here again. 

But foe first turmoil we 
should expect in post-Deng 
China will not be political or 
military but social. 

At present the most difficult 
problem facing the regime is 
inflation, which is caused 
primarily by the deficits of 
state-owned enterprises. Simp- 
ly to close those enterprises 
would generate millions of un- 
employed. 

The fear of another Tianan- 
men-type movement, this one 
composed of workers, has for 
several years now prevented the 
regime from taking such a 
drastic step. In 1994, merely a 


Only the Truth , Awful as It Is 


W ASHINGTON — The 
image from a recent 
newscast sticks in my mind. 
Desmond Turn, resplendent in 
the red vestments of his recent 
office of Anglican archbishop, 
is leaning forward, his head on 
foe conference table of the 
Truth and Reconciliation Com- 
mission. which be chairs. He is 
sobbing audibly over some 
paiticulariy awful atrocity dis- 
closed by an officer of foe old 
apartheid government 
This gentle man, who 
thought be knew the worst of 
what his erstwhile oppressors 
did, is temporarily overcome at 
foe enormity of foe newest dis- 
closure, and he weeps. 

Then he rights himself and, 
as the camera rolls, resumes 
his extraordinary work 
It is extraordinary. The very 
idea of granting amnesty to 
agents of what was foe world’s 
most universally hared re- 
gime, requiring only that they 
tell foe truth about their role in 
the atrocities, is extraordinary. 
And only extraordinary hu- 
man beings, like Archbishop 
Tutu and the truly astounding 
President Nelson Mandela, 
could have any hope of car- 
tying it out in a way that pro- 
duces a decent amount of both 
truth and reconciliation. 

I am an unabashed Man- 
del aphile. Few human beings 
now living could have under- 
taken so bold a plan for bring- 
ing closure to years of vir- 
ulent, bloody racism and 
moving forward to build a 
democracy. 

What keeps foe Tutu image 
in my mind, though, is that it 
reminds me foot this is no 


By William Raspberry 


simple fbrgjve-and-J 
opera, no weak-sister irresol- 
ution masquerading as Chris- 
tianity. The commission is 
hearing awful stuff: govern- 
ment-sanctioned slaughter of 
African National Congress ac- 
tivists carried out in a way to 
make it look like black-on- 
blaick killing; arming of Man- 
gosufou Bufoelezi’s thugs to 
no battle against the M^wiriant 
ANC; open-pit burning of a 
murder victim while his killers 
feast on beef barbecue; murder 
of Steve Biko. the Black Con- 
sciousness philosopher whose 
disdain of apartheid’s power 
made him its enemy. 

The Biko affair shows how 
enormously difficult is die 
work that the Troth and Re- 
conciliation Commission is 
attempting. Few doubted that 
Mr. Biko, who died in police 
detention in 1977, was killed 
by his captors. But there was 
still some thought that foe 
death was less than felly de- 
liberate, that perhaps they hit 
him harder than they intended, 
or broke his skull when they 
knocked him down stairs. 

But now four apartheid-era 
cops who were there have 
confessed their role in Mr. 
Biko’s death and in at least 
nine other political murders 
— stabbings, burnings and 
mutilations carried out in be- 
half of the white regime. 

Mr. Biko’s wife says she 
will oppose the killers* ap- 
plication for amnesty. I am not 
prepared to say she is wrong. 
Surely from her point of view 


confession without punish- 
ment — without even requir- 
ing an assertion of remorse — 
is no justice. 

But what would be? What 
would be justice for the sur- 
vivors of thousands of black 
South Africans who were 
killed or savaged by foe regime 
during the period foe commis- 
sion is investigating? A South 
African version of the Nazi 
hunters who, half a century 
after foe Holocaust, are still 
seeking to bring soldiers and 
officials of Hitler’s govern- 
ment to justice? After a while, 
it all seems to be pointless. 

But is the amnesty that foe 
Mandela government is offer- 
ing so easily achieved as to be 
equally pointless? 

I don’t thick so, and for two 
reasons. The first is that with- 
out some such arrangement, 
most of the murderers would 
never have been known for 
sure. The offer to come for- 
ward to own up to their of- 
ficial bestiality in exchange 
for a possible amnesty will at 
least solve hundreds of un- 
solved murders. That must be 
worth something. 

Mr. Mandela, in signing foe 
bill creating the commission, 
offered foe more salient ra- 
tionale: “We can now deal 
with our past, establish the 
truth which has so long been 
denied ns r and lay the basis for 
genuine reconciliation. Only 


foe truth can put foe past to 
rest.” It is, to repeat^ an ex- 
traordinary gesture. And, it 
needs to be said, one that may 
not work. But surely nothing 
else wilL 

The Washington Post. 


few bankruptcies and instances 
of mabfiiiy to issue wages were 
already enough to stimulate a 
spate of worker protests. 

On foe other hand, to main- 
tain the status quo, with its 
built-in inflation, can only con- 
tinue to incite unrest among 
peasants and low-income urb- 
anites. Looming inflation and 
unemployment have already 
brought many parts of China to 
the verge of instability. 

The state continues to sub- 
sidize the cities at foe expense 
of a colonized countryside, for- 
cing peasants to sell their grain 
at one-third below market 
prices. During the past 10 years 
there have been violent protests 
in the countryside, and recently 
they have been increasing. 

Peasant villages have risen to 
plunder property and goods; 
bands have robbed and vandal- 
ized military and civilian fa- 
cilities, including overhead 
power lines and aerial, under- 
ground and oceanic telegraph 
wires. They have attacked urb- 
an targets and every kind of 
transporation route — rail- 
roads. highways, inland rivers 
and coastal shipping lanes. 

The scale arm momentum of 
these events are reminiscent of 
the unrest that underlay the 
Communist-led peasant war 
that drove foe Chinese Nation- 
alists into exile in 1949. In the 
post-Deng period we can expect 
more such outbreaks of peasant 
revenge against foe regime and 
foe cities. 



billing the carrots of economic 
incentive and modest individual 
freedom with the sticks of 
bloody repression and high po- 
litical pressure. The policy has 
had considerable success in de- 
moralizing and demobilizing the 
people politically. But their cyn- 
icism and feelings of powerless- 
ness will now fade as China’s 
general stability unravels. 

Every contestant in foe post- 
Deng succession struggle will 
be eager to play die card of 
reversing the verdict on the 1989 
Tiananmen movement But 
when this reversal comes it will 
release in foe former protesters a 
festering resentment against foe 
Communist regime foot has 
been bottled up for six years but 
is still several times stronger 
than foe resentment that fueled 
foe original movement 

New hope will catch fire. The 
passion of throwing oneself into 
a struggle to change loathsome 
conditions will cause foe Chi- 
nese people, who are now so 
atomized, to coalesce as they 
did in many cities in 1989. They 
will be surprised, as they were 
that year, to discover how much 
they agree with one another. 

Nowhere in the world, ob- 
viously, is there a ready-made 
model that China can use. It 
seems inevitable that the 
Chinese people still have a dif- 
ficult road to travel, a road that 
will demand some heavy toils 
on them and consume at least 20 
more years of their time. 

The writer, a Chinese jour- 
nalist in exile . contributed this 
comment to the Los Angeles 
Tunes Syndicate . 


IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: German Position 

BERLIN — The Norddeutsche 
AUgemeine Zeitung this evening 
[Feb. 20] contains the follow- 
ing: “The German Government 
is prepared to enter into nego- 
tiations with the Powers regard- 
ing foe future organization of 
Crete on two conditions. First, 
annexation by Greece must be 
put out of consideration, be- 
cause it would afford no guar- 
antee for a settled state of tilings 
in the island, while creating a 
dangerous precedent for other 
Balkan States. Secondly, before 
negotiations are entered into a 
stop must be put to the action of 
Greece, which is comrary to in- 
ternational law, and the continu- 
ance of which would constitute 
a growing danger of war.” 

1922: Society fiancee 

CHICAGO — Mr. Harold F. 
McCormick today 20] an- 
nounced foe engagement of Ms 


dau ghte r. Miss Maihilde Mc- 
Cormick. to Max Oser, the pro- 
prietor of a riding academy at 
Zurich. The wedding will take 
place in Chicago, probably in the 
McCormicks’ Lake Shore Drive 
mansion. No date was men- 
tioned. Friends of Mr. Mc- 
Cormick say that foe announce- 
ment means that the consent of 
Mr John D. Rockefeller, the 
gill's grandfather, was gained. 

1947: Leaving India 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
Clement Attlee announced to the 
House of Commons today [Feb. 
20] that Britain will withdraw 
from India "by a da te not later 
than June 1948.” no matter what 
foe internal political situation of 
foe country. He also announced 
foe present Viceroy, Field 
Marshal Viscount WaveU, will 
be replaced next month by Rear 
Admiral Viscount Mounfoatten, 
war-time Supreme Allied Com- 
mander in Southeast Asia. 










M uder 


n V 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


DAAE IT 

PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


Counsel Without a Crime: 
Good Riddance to Starr 


By Richard Cohen 


illrr Fiirnu 


w ASHINGTON^Tq under- 

▼ T stand the problem of Ken- 
neth Starr, the Whitewater inde- 
pendent counsel, imagine him as 
the fictional Inspector Poirot 
He d assemble the likes of Tun 
McDougal, Susan McDougal Bill 
Clinton, Hillary Clinton and much 
of the White House staff in a large 
room adorned with several potted 
palms, and dramatically announce 
that all the suspects were present 
Only the crime is missing. 

Where, Monsieur, is the body*> 

So far. none has been found. On 
the contrary, Whitewater remains 
a chaotic confection of real estate 
deals, bank loans and — in the 
case of both McDougals — just 
plain bizarre behavior/ Maybe 
something criminal has been done 
by the Clintons, but if so it now 
seems Ken Stair has not found it 
He has announced he will quit as 
independent counsel in August 
and take a post at Pepperdine Uni- 
versity in California. 

Good riddance, say L This an- 
nouncement is just the latest in- 
dication that Ken Starr is not the 
man for die job, assuming, of 
course, that tKere is a job to be 
done. On that score, incidentally, 
Mr. Starr himself is mum. His 
leaving should not be interpreted 
one way or the other, he insists. 

This is preposterous. Two of the 
people in Mr. Starr's chamber are 
the president of the United States 
and the first lady. The independent 
counsel cannot coyly announce 
that, come August, he’s going to 
be doing something else and leave 
the nation — not to mention the 
first family — wondering if some 
pretty serious indictments are 
around the comer. Mr. Starr is 
wrong when he says nothing 
should be read into his statement. 
How about arrogance, Mr. Starr? 
Surely, you’ll grant yoar behavior 
warrants that judgment. 

Last September, when President 
Clinton told a television interview- 
er that be thought Mr. Starr was 
carrying on a political vendetta, I 
rook the president to task. Where 
was the proof? There is sdll none. 

Nevertheless, Mr. Starr has 
conducted himself in his office in 
a manner that — however eth- 
ically punctilious — is just down- . 
right weird. Among other things, 
he has continued to donate money 
to Republican political candi- 


dates. The law says he’s entitled. 
Still, it looks bad. 

Similarly, the law permits Mr. 
Starr to continue his legal prac- 
tice. But one of his clients is the 
tobacco industry, which, as we all 
know, is no particular Mend of the 
president's. 

Slate, the on-line magazine, has 
been conducting a debate between 
Michael Tinpen, a lawyer and 
former Oklahoma attorney general, 
and Theodore Olson, an ac c i grant 
attorney general in die Reagan ad- 
ministration and a friend of Mr. 
Stair’s. The subject? Mr. Starr’s 
conduct as independent counsel. 

It’s hard to say who’s gotten the 
better of this dialogue, but cer- 
tainly Mr. Tuipen has put his fin- 
ger on matte rs that have bothered 
me. They include Mr. Starr’s in- 
sistence on makin g speeches. He 
has appeared before the Detroit 
Economic Club, the Oklahoma 
Bar Association and Pal Rob- 
ertson’s Regent University. Li 
Oklahoma. Mr. Starr talked a bit 
about his investigation. 

This selectivity is maddening. 
Here is a man — a public servant, 
mind you — who takes another job 
and yet will not say what that 
means to the president of the 
United Stales. On the other hand, 
he wfll speak to a bar group here or 
a college there. 

Much about Whitewater re- 
mains troubling, not the least of it 
being the friendship and business 
partnership between the Clintons 
and the McDougals. Here we are 
some 20 years later, and the Clin- 
tons are in the White House and 
both McDougals appear headed to 
the Big House. Many questions 
remain unanswered: Where were 
those Rose Law Firm billing re- 
cords? Why did Hillary Clinton 
deny knowing about a real estate 
deal that, logically, should have 
been familiar to her? 

Now, Ken Starr adds to the 
muritiness of Whitewater. If he is 
leaving because his family has had 
it with his travels, then he ought to 
say so. If he is leaving because he 
doesn't have a case, then he ought 
to say that Whatever his reason, he 
cannot coy ly insist that he owes the 
American people — not to mention 
the Clintons — no explanation. 
He's free to go, of course, but ii 
would be nice if he said why. 

The Washington Pott. 


You Can Bet Air Travel 
Will Only Get Worse 


By Daniel S. Greenberg 


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F-lfci fecnwG ro « 

Too CLOSE. tVfeilWt ' .S' 

THouWOTNKUrteBS 






W ASHINGTON — The in- 
dignities and inconveni- 
ences that are built into air travel 
are now being joined by a high- 
tech menace that makes a chat- 
terbox seatmare seem relatively 
appealing. 

Airlines are installing in-flight 
gambling games, viewed on 
back-cf-tbe seat screens, with 

MEANWHILE 

credit cards electronically re- 
cording winnings and losses. 

By the end of the year, ac- 
cording to Aviation Week 
magazine, Swissair wjU have 15 
planes equipped with a system 
that offers video slots, keno and a 
Swiss game called Risiko, plus 
10 movies. Singapore Airlines 
will offer blackjack, keno and 
poker. Alitalia and Qantas are 
upgrading their in-flight enter- 
tainment to include gambling, 
and BE Aerospace reports that it 
has installed the systems on more 
than 20,000 seats. 

Airborne gambling, by U.S. 
and foreign amines, is forbidden 
by federal law in U.S. airspace, 
and thus the prohibition poses no 
direct competitive disadvantage 
to domestic American carriers. 
But, on the bass of reports that 
foreign lines will reap nearly $500 
milli on per year from gamblers 


aloft, the pressures for lifting the 
ban on American flights are in- 
evitably mounting. Interest has 
perked up in Congress, and the 
Department of Transportation is 
studying the matter. 

The outcome must be an em- 
phatic no, unless U.S. govern- 
ment policy is malignly commit- 
ted to further deterioration in the 
handling and management of the 
traveling public. 

With the exception of the ex- 
orbitantly overpriced seats in the 
first-class and business sections, 
seating on today’s aircraft has 
been compressed to the extreme 
contortioiial limits of the human 
body. The food appears to be 
sanitary and of some nutritional 
value. But. unless desperate, few 
would seek these meals. 

At one time ft seemed that the 
discomforts and annoyances of 
air travel had bottomed our. But 
then the cellular telephone came 
aboard, turning all within a radius 
of five rows into captive auditors 
of what are usually strikingly in- 
ane conversations. 

And into this melange of un- 
pleasantness. the airlines want to 
introduce gambling, an enterprise 
not notable for inducing emotion- 
al calm in its participants. 

With their customary expres- 
sions of solicitude for the well- 
being of their victims, fire 



gambling promoters say that 
losses are capped at $350 per 
flight while winnings can rise as 
high as $3,500. Upward creep in 
these amounts is, of course, to be 
expected after gambling becomes 
a familiar adjunct of air travel. 
But even at the stated figures, the 
introduction of tbe gambling am- 
biance into the confines of cattle- 
car aviation is awful to envisage. 

Gamblers tend to gasp, moan 
and gesticulate, according to bow 
their luck is Tunning. The slots do 
not inspire a stoical demeanor. 
Moreover, even without gamb- 
ling, violent and bizarre behavior 


by airline passengers seems to be 
on the rise. On several occasions 
recently, aircraft have made un- 
scheduled stops to expel passen- 
gers who have attacked me m be r s 
of die cabin staff or committed 
some other nasty offense. 

In-flight movies and television 
generally have a calming effect 
on passengers. Gambling, how- 
ever. feeds on hopes and anxi- 
eties. And when losses are hard to 
bear, the emotional impact can 
lead to depression or a range of 
unpleasant behaviors all tbe way 
to serious violence. Blowing the 
family *s wad en route to vacation 


can be an upsetting event — and 
difficult to deal with in a crowded 
airplane. 

No solace should be drawn 
from the apparent lack of horror 
stories from the foreign airlines 
that have already adopted 
gambling. Conceivably there are 
none, though airlines understand- 
ably opt for silence about anything 
that might scare off customers. 

The real issue is tbe rising dis- 
comfort of air travel. It won’t be 
made any better by an agitated 
seatmate screeching for a win- 
ning combo. 

& Daniel S. Greenberg 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


America and the W TO 

I thoroughly agree with your 
appeal for calm (“Don't Risk the 
WTO,” Editorial, Feb. 18) in the 
trans-Atlantic dispute over U.S. 
extraterritorial laws. This is in- 
deed the tone that the European 
Commission adopted with Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Albright 
in Brussels on Tuesday. 

However, the purpose of the 
World Trade Organization is not 
only to “prevent countries from 
adopting protectionist or discrim- 
inatory trade practices for com- 
mercial advantage.’’ The WTO 
also aims to guarantee access to 
other countries for products and 


services through legally binding 
trade agreements, and under pre- 
dictable market conditions. The 
European Union’s case against 
tiie United States on the Helms- 
Burton legislation is taken under 
this heading, since the law denies 
us the access that the United 
States (and/or Cuba) have guar- 
anteed under such agreements. 

The European Union is every 
bit as determined as America to 
coax Cuba into the democratic 
community of nations, and I be- 
lieve we can and must work to- 
gether toward that goal. Our fear 
is that if nobody challenges one 
country's self-proclaimed right to 
block trade between two others on 


unjustified grounds, extraterrit- 
orial laws could proliferate and 
America, Europe and the WTO 
would be the worse off. 

It is also not acceptable to argue 
that this is too sensitive a case for 
the WTO to consider, and that 
bringing it to the WTO risks los- 
ing support for the organization in 
the United States. The WTO has 
already shown itself well able to 
handle difficult disputes, and we 
only undermine it if we cast 
doubts about its capacity to handle 
this one. The United States has in 
fact been the biggest single user of 
the WTO dispute settlement sys- 
tem up to now. But America can- 
not expect to win every case. Its 


strong interest in the maintenance 
of the system should be constantly 
and publicly stressed. That would 
be much more constructive than to 
anticipate in advance negative 

g ubtic reactions if the United 
tales loses its case. 

LEON BRITT AN. 
Brussels. 

The writer is vice president of 
the European Commission and 
the chief European trade nego- 
tiator. 

Trouble in a Bottle 

Regarding “ Sad Message in a 
Bottle: Drug Testing at Home ” 


( Meanwhile . Feb. 11) by Ellen 
Goodman: 

It seems to me that parents who 
force their kids to submit to ur- 
inanalysis have more problems 
than chugs in store for them. 

Parents who show such dis- 
respect for their children are 
likely to wind up breeding con- 
tempt for themselves. That con- 
tempt, in turn, may lead to the 
very thing the parents are testing 
for drug use by their children. 
Yes, urinanalysis could be a gate- 
way to drugs! 

Why not just try to commu- 
nicate with children instead? 

GLENN UNGLE. 

Santa Monica, California. 


V 


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TORffe-... 







FORT LAUDERDALE, Saturday, Juty^-^How 

to locate something a customer can’t describe” is 
not a course wre offer-employees at American Express. . 
So how Donna Merritt, a supervisor in one of our ~ 
Florida offices, ever.helped a Cardmember recover a 
;u .-yery unusual etching, is beyond us. . r. 

-Our guess istbat Donna, like a lot of the people;/ . 

. : who worfcfot American Express, knows ^omething -- 

- ^about the art of customer service. Mainly, thatitisn’t a 
/ ^crace, but lots of services— many of which, don’t have 

- • names or procedure 

or restrictions. Come 

- in think pf it,itValso 














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PAGE 2 


INTERNATI 

d&sJ* J*, 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRED AST, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


m 


PAGE 10 


Nagasaki, Where Beauty and Tragedy Live Side by Side 


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Clockwise from above: Inside the Atomic Bomb Museum; in Glover Carden, the oldest Western-style building in Japan; near the port, a statue of Japanese who studied abroad, and the fountain in Peace Park. 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Tuna Service 

AGASAKL, Japan — 
There may be prettier cit- 
ies in Japan than Naga- 
saki, but there is none 
where beauty and tragedy 
are so intertwined, where a walk 
through the streets makes one altern- 
ately smile at die colorful carp in the 
canals and gasp at a plaque recording 
the city’s wrenching pasywhere the hot 
springs in the surrounding hills — the 
delight of countless tourists — are also 
filled with memories of torture and 
death. 

Largely obliterated by the atomic 
bombing of Aug. 9, 1945, three days 
after the destruction of Hiroshima, Na- 
gasaki has been rebuilt on die rubble and 
ashes of the old city. Set against a hill- 
side overlooking a great natural harbor, 
Nagasaki is now a sprawling city of 
440,000 on the southern island of Ky- 
ushu. Temples and mansions set among - 
gardens on the hill preside over the 
bustle of office buildings and noodle 
shops on the winding streets below. 
Most of Nagasaki’s historical sites and 
monuments are within walking distance 
of the center of the city, while a couple 
of miles away on the other side of town 
is a cluster of sights related to the bomb- 
ing, including the new Nagasaki Atomic 
Bomb Museum, which gives powerful 
testimony to one of the pivotal events of 
the 20th century. 

Relioious History 

So Nagasaki is Asia's answer to 
Dresden, a city of light whose name is 
also almost synonymous with pain. Like 
Dresden, Nagasaki is thought of today 
mostly in connection with its wartime 
destruction, but Nagasaki resonated 
with tragedy even before 1 1 :02 A.M. on 
Aug. 9, 1$45, when an atomic bomb 
exploded over the northern part of the 
city, missing its militaiy target by a few 
miles and vaporizing a slum containing 
the largest Christian community in Ja- 
pan. 

As the most cosmopolitan city in 
Japan from the 16th through the 19th 
centuries, Nagasaki was a center for 
Christian missionaries — and, accord- 
ingly, the center of religious persecu- 
tion. This month marks the 400th an- 
niversary of the first group of 
executions, when 26 Christians were 
crucified on a hill in Nagasaki. The city 
is marking the anniversary with special 
Catholic Masses and with a new Jap- 
anese-language opera, based on the sto- 
ry of tire executions, to have its 
premiere in November. 

During my latest visit, in October, 1 
couldn't help contemplating those cru- 
cifixions as 1 visited the museums and 


memorials that recall Nagasaki’s proud 
and tragic past. 

J began near Dejima, an artificial 
island built in 1634 to house European 
traders in the city. Because of landfills. 
Dejima is no longer an island, and it is 
hard to tell where it starts and ends, bat 
there are still some signs of its past. 
Reproductions show what Dejima 
looked like in the old days: an island 
protruding into the great harbor that for 
centuries was the center for Japanese 
trade. These day s the port is a minor one, 
but it is still filled with ships and gives 
Nagasaki a focal point — as well as 
great views, since the city rises steeply 
into the hills from die bay. Sometimes 
called the “San Francisco of Japan” 
because of its hills, Nagasaki has the 
same salty charm as Hong Kong and the 
same historic links with Western 
traders. 

Portuguese traders arrived in Naga- 
saki in 1571, and . the authorities built 
Dejima to. isolate them frprn Japanese 
society. The 130-acre (52-bectare) Is- 
land was big enough to accommodate 
the Portuguese with their homes and 
warehouses and fields where their oxen 
and sheep could graze. After 1639, 
when the shogun ordered the Por- 
tuguese to -leave Japan, Dutch traders 
were allowed to stay, but on condition 
dim they move to Dejima. For more than 
two centuries after that, Japan tried to 
seal itself off from the outside world. 
Nagasaki was the only exception, and a 
tiny one: A few Chinese were allowed in 
a settlement in one part of the city , and a 
few Dutch were allowed to carry on 
their trade from Dejima. 

The main Dejima Museum is closed 
indefinitely for renovation, but a nearby 
museum -in Jurokuban Mansion, built in 
1860 to bouse American consular staff , 
contains a museum with artifacts from 
the Dutch and Portuguese who lived on 
Dejima. The museum has no English 
labels on its exhibits, but it is cbock- 
ablock with old European telescopes, 
clocks, guns and other antiques. 


O NE of the main imports ar- 
ranged by the Europeans was 
Christianity, and it is said that 
Hideyoshi, the great unifier and ruler of 
Japan, toyed with the idea of converting 
until be realized that he would be al- 
lowed ooly one wife. But the shoguns 
grew alarmed at bow rapidly mission- 
aries had converted some 300,000 Jap- 
anese, particularly around Nagasaki, 
and in 1597 the government crucified 
six European missionaries and 20 of 
their Japanese followers. 

The government introduced all kinds 
of campaigns to stamp out Christianity, 
and it is said that Okunchi, an annum 
Shinto festival in Nagasaki, was foun- 
ded for that purpose. Okunchi, which 
takes place every year from Oct. 7 to 9. 


is one of the most famous festivals in 
Japan, with its 200-year-old floats and 
its dragon dances supplied by the 
Chinese. One of the aims, however, was 
to search for those who did not attend 
and therefore might be secret Chris- 
tians. 

An exhibit with floats from Okunchi 
and videos of past festivals is the center- 
piece of the Nagasaki Museum of Tra- 
ditional Performing Arts, erne of many 
buildings in Clover Garden, a settle- 
ment cod taming the homes of the Euro- 
pean traders who renamed to Nagasaki 
after American gunbpats opened up Jar 
pan in 1853. The centerpiece of this 
large outdoor complex is the home of 
Thomas Glover, a British merchant who 
came to Japan in 1859 at the age of 21, 
married a geisha and conspired with 
local lords to overthrow the shogon. 

SfftOLUNO IN TH 0AUINS The 

home, btrilt in 1863, is large and pleas- 
ant but it would be unremarkable if it 
were not the oldest Western-style build- 
ing in Japan. It is fun, though, to me- 
ander through the gardens and other 
Western hones, which are redolent of 
history. In Glover Garden these West- 
ern traders played on Japan’s first tennis 
court, laid down Japan’s first pavedroad 
and planned production of the beer now 
known as Kirin. Glover himself foun- 
ded the Kirin brewing company, whose 
name apparently came from a couple of 
statues depicting him as a mustachioed 
Iririn, a mythical Asian animal 

Chinese traders also left a mark on 
Nagasaki, apparent in the temples 
scattered on the hillside above Dejima. 
The oldest temple is Kofuku, built in 
1620, which presides sternly over tile 
city below. Its peaked roofs and 
scattered halls surround a series of 
pleasant- Lawns and gardens, while 
forests begin just behind the temple. 
Most of Nagasaki is full of tourists, 
mostly Japanese schoolchildren, but 
Kofuku Temple was deserted when I 
wandered through its gardens and the 
cemetery behind it. 

A more modem Chinese icon in Na- 
gasaki is the Confucius Shrine, built at j 
tbe end of tbe last century, but because 
there are few Chinese living in Nagasaki I 
now, it has none of the authentic flavor ! 
of a Chinese temple, and the only people 
lighting incense and praying are giggly 
Japanese schoolgirls hoping to get into a 
good university. I am also suspicious of 
the temple’s efficacy, for when J paid 
' 100 yen (loss than a dollar) for my. 
fortune, the machine spat out a red slip 
of paper that advised me: “You will 
enjoy easy childbirth and bear a son." 
Not likely. 

But the mosth aunting part of any visit 
to Nagasaki, particularly for an Amer- 
ican, is the other end of town. As it 
happened, the atomic bomb was dropped , 


on those who had already suffered the 
most, for the Urakami neighborhood that 
was hit worst was a slum inhabited by 
Christians and by social outcasts known 
as burokumn. often described as the 
“untouchables” of Japan. 

About 75, 000 people died in the blast, 
and several memorials record the 
bomb’s power. A pillar marks the epi- 
center of the explosion, and remains of 
the Urakami church are' scattered 
around it on the ground, especially 
sculptures of saints, looking reproach- 
fully at us. The area is now a pair of 
parks, bordered by a canal, and the 
peacefulness and prettiness are in a 
strange way disturbing. 

The Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum 
opened nearby last year. The exhibits are 
stark^a dimly lighted room with twisted 
debris and wrenching laree-screeo 
videos taken at the time of charred 


corpses and whitened skulls. Extensive 
displays show what Nagasaki looked 
like before the bombing and explain how 
the bomb worked, as well as offering 
hideous photos of victims and pictures 
of human shadows on rock and wood — 
the only thing remaining when those 
near tins epicenter were vaporized. 

T HE problem with the museum is 
that it has almost no context Tbe 
atomic bombing is presetted Like 
a typhoon that suddenly swept in from 
the ocean for no reason. Tbe subtext is 
not anti-American; it is anti-historicaL 
There is in one tiny nook a time line that 
mentions in a cursory way Japan’s war- . 
time activities. Butthisprovokeda furor 
in Japan because of its reference to die 
Nanjing massacre, the incident in which 
the Japanese killed tens of thousands of 
Chinese civilians in 1937. Some Jap- 


anese deny that the massacre took place, 
and tbe photo that had illustrated it has 
been replaced by a blurred and rather 
meaningless picture of a crowd. 

To leave Nagasaki on a more hopeful 
note, it is worth visiting the nearby home 
of Dr. Takeshi Nagai, a doctor and theo- 
logian who was a bit like a Japanese 
version of Dr. Albert Schweitzer. Nagai’s 
wife was (tilled in the blast, and he lived 
with his two small children in a tiny hut, 
where he wrote powerful books explor- 
ing the meaning of what had happened. 
The most famous of these, “The Bells of 
Nagasaki,'' was once widely available in 
English but is now hard to find. 

Nagai died in 1951 . at the age of 43, 
and a little museum in his honor stands 
by the wooden shack where he lived and 
worked, a reminder that Nagasaki wit- 
nessed some of the best of humanity as 
well as some of tbe worst. 




letnamese rood tor Wine JLovers 


By Patricia Wells 

IniematuMol Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Walk through the 
simple red doorway of Tan 
Dinh and you enter a cozy, 
welcoming world where 

3 ers are greeted as friends and 
il clients as port of the family. This 
most Parisian of Vietnamese restaurants 
serves as a club where everyone be- 
comes an instant member. 

The real family is named Vifian, with 
father Robert and sons Robert and 
Freddy holding court, tending the stove, 
embellishing the wine cellar to enhance 
their customer's enjoyment as well as 
their own. It is not too much to say that 
dais bistro-like restaurant is unique in 
the wold, with a compact list of South 
Vietnamese specialties and a volumin- 
ous selection of wines from the around 
the globe. For those uninitiated in the 
ways of the Vifians, it may seem sac- 
rilegious to j»ir a rare Pomerol with 
deep-fried spring rolls, or a prioey Cote 
Rone with pasta and spicy shrimp. But 




OT 1 


trust me. Trust Robert and Robert and 
Freddy to steer you to wine heaven. 

Like many wonderful tilings in ' the 
world, the food at the 29-year-old red, 
white and black Tan Dinh is deceptively 
simple. Son Robert may. woik lus way 
through a recipe with a dozen different 
versions of the original, using native 
cooks — 1 from his mother to aunts to 
total strangers — as resources. And so 
his much-studied spring rolls come off 
fresh and refreshing, studded with herbs 
and chicken and right for pairing with 


his 1990. Domains de Chastelet, a stun- 
ning and rare Bordeaux ros 6 made in a 
Burgundian style. Or sample, with his 
brochettes of veal (delicately perfumed 
with cardamom), a peppy 1993 Sav- 
igny-les-Beaiine “Les Srapentiers.” 

Whether his light and easily digest- 
ible fare is steamed, sauteed, gently 

is a cuisine that’s stu^eS^nd tihen re- 
invented and refined for today’s palates 
and, most importantly, designed to go 
with wines. Instead of ravioli filled with 
beef, the family from Saigon fQls them 
with smoked goose, the better to pair 
with a fulfilling white Graves. The ul- 
trafresh whole bar (sea bass) is sprin- 
kled with a symphony of Asian spices, 
and boned Bresse chicken is wok-fried 
with a light, crunchy mix of red onions, 
broccoli, zucchini, all gently spiced 
with a touch of star anise. 

Tan Dink, 60 rue de Vemeuil, Paris 7; 
tel: 01 .45.44.04b4. Closed Sunday and 
August. No credit cards ji Id carte , 245 
to 3 &5 francs , including service but not 
wine. ■ '* 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


RAGE 11 


* 

f m 



LEISURE 


K 


French Roots: An African American’s Historic Tour of Paris 



By Gary Lee 

Washington Post Sen-ice 


W ashington — i 

began my latest nip to 
Pans with a lick and 
ended it with a kick. 

« ne lick signaled my approval of the 
special — barbecued ribs and black- 
eyed peas at Haynes, the Pigalle soul 
food restaurant where a generation oi 
poets from Harlem and jazzmen from 
New Orleans have met to celebrate 
Thanksgiving dinner. 

The lack was a salute of another kind, 
delivered outside the Bobino. the Mont- 
parnasse music hall where Josephine 
Baker retired her banana skirt and 
the world a triumphant farewell. 

In between came a stroll down the 
lane of James Baldwin's memories, 
from the Left Bank hostel where be first 
arrived from New York with $40 to the 
noisy cafes where he scribbled his wav 
lo literary fame. 

Th* s was a sojourn to the Paris of 
African Americans. Ever since the early 
1920s. when Baker sallied before 
Parisians wearing nothing but a few 
white feathers, blacks from the States 
have occupied a coveted place on Par- 
is's cultural stage. Jt was m the french 
capital that the author of “Native Sot,” 
Richard Wright, escaping the racism of 
1940s America, found public accept- 
ance and social stature. And when the 
soprano saxophonist Sidney Bechet 
tired of U.S. jazz clubs, he settled here 
and forged a major role for jazz in the 
city's vibrant music scene. 

Sentimental Journey 


Curious about whai had become of 
that chapter of history, I made a journey 
across the Atlantic to find out. One part 
of the pip was a tribute to expatriate 
nostalgia. I used it to revisit the defunct 
club where Bechet brought Parisians to 
tears with his rendition of “Song of 
Songs,” the cafe where Baldwin and 
Wright had the quarrel that ended their 



U* Wnluoftoe Poo 


friendship and the hotel where Langston 
Hughes lived among African students. 

I also discovered a Paris sparkling 
with a fresh infusion of black culture. 
Here were the influences of every new 
trend from back home, from gangsca rap 
to the dance called the lade. And there 
was a new generation of African Amer- 
ican writers and musicians takin g its 
place on the city’s arts scene. 

My sojourn was. in a sense, a return to 
long-lost stomping grounds. An African 
American, and a Puis apart m en t owner 

in France fo/ almost all my adult life^ 
My introduction to black Paris came 
from someone no more black than 
Dwight Eisenhower. Francis was a 
French art historian and a student of 
every culture from the 18th-cennny 
Italians to 1960s Californians. But he 
embraced none more passionately than 
negritude. that mix of African, Afro- 
American and Caribbean cultures that 
has flowered in Paris since the J950s. 

■ WAS living in central Europe at the 
time, but Tran cis kepi me in touch 
with black life in Paris. He knew 
how to snag tickets to sold-out jazz 
concerts, kept a schedule in his head of 
upcoming readings by visiting black 
scholars and poets, and once tracked 
down where Diana Ross was staying 
during a Paris appearance. 

The historical bond between African 
Americans and Parisians. I learned over 
time, is best illustrated by personal re- 
lationships. There was Bud Powell's 
close link to Francis Paudras, an un- 
usually emotional bond between tenor 
saxophonist and jazz fan immortalized 
in the 1986 feature film “Round Mid- 
night.” And then there was the remark- 
able case of Baker. Relatively unknown 
when she arrived in Paris, she was re- 
ceived with a warm and personal em- 
brace by the whole (french nation as 
entertainer extraordinaire and later as 
grande dame, even as Time magazine 
dismissed her as a “slightly bucked- 
tooth young Negro woman.” 


The painter Lois Mailou Jones. 

Sometimes the tales of affection be- 
tween French and American blacks 
seem apocryphal. In the recent book 
“Paris Noir: African Americans in the 
City of Light,” an in-depth look at 
American blacks in the French capital 
the author Tyler Stovall tells a post- 
Worid War I story of a group of French- 


men beating a young man to a pulp just 
for being American. When the light- 
skinned American convinced the attack- 
ers that be was black, according to 
Stovall, they immediately stopped 
fighting and apologized. 

Many African Americans receive a 
level of appreciation here they lack at 


home. * 'Black women can come to Paris 
and feel instantly relieved of all of the 
burdens that come with their stature in 
the States,” said Patricia Laplame- 
Collins. a native of Atlanta who now 
lives in Paris. “Here they can be ro 
manced in the way that they deserve.” 

A rich arts scine The aura and 
architecture of the (french capital have 
moved artists from every comer to great 
accomplishments, and African Amer- 
icans are no exception. Few writers have 
captured the colorful scenes of the Left 
Bank's back alleys and cafes or the 
markets of Les Halles quite like Bald- 
win's portrayals in “Giovanni's 
Room.” Few painters have reproduced 
the courtyards of Sl Michel and Mont- 
parnasse with the sense of perspective 
and the light displayed in the ivories of 
Lois Mailou Jones. Few sculptors have 
managed to grasp the scope of the city 
and mold it into the brilliant kind of 
brass works made by Harold Cousins. 

It is a late November evening at Le 
Due des Lombards, but the saxophonist 
Noah Howard is blowing his horn with 
enough fire to take me back to sometime 
in summer and somewhere south of 
Miami. Closing ray eyes, I float on the 
warm notes to a warm lagoon some- 
where in the Caribbean. The drums 
come on slowly, bringing a welcome 
ripple to the water. The bass follows 
quickly behind, rounding out my late- 
night swim with a sonorous rhythm. 

There are enough jazz clubs like this 
in Paris to constitute a scene. New 
Morning, in the shadows of the Gare du 
Nord. has featured every great from 
McCoy Tyner to Betty Carter. In bust- 
ling St. Michel Le (relit Journal spe- 
cializes in New Orieans-style music by 
French and Italian bands. In fashionable 
Sl Germain, there is Latitudes, where 
brothers and sisters from back home 
heat up a jam most every night 

Many of the regular musicians on this 
circuit are expatriate African Americans. 
Howard is a saxophonist who moved 
here from New Orleans in the 1960s 


when rock seemed to be drowning out 
the U.S- interest in jazz. Hal Singer, a 
saxophonist transplanted from Ok- 
lahoma, regularly pops up on stage at a 
number of clubs. The vocalist Dee Dee 
Bridgewater, from Bint. Michigan, uses 
her deep, made-for-jazz voice and foxy 
presence to continue the performing tra- 
dition forged by Josephine Baker. 

This is the house that Sidney Bechet 
builL The New Orleans saxophonist 
originally came ro Paris in the 1920s but 
was forced out of town after a gun 
brawl. He returned in the 1950s and 
eventually attracted such a following 
that, when a ticket seller announced that 
a conceit was sold out, the crowd picked 
up his kiosk and marched it away in 
protest, 

T HE 1 990s have brought variations 
to the traditional Paris jazz scene. 
Up in funky Montmartre, a young- 
er generation is grooving alternately to 
acid jazz and funk, or to poetry welded 
out of a curious mix of French and black 
rap. This is the stuff of the artist 
formerly known as Prince. 

The social schedule in black Paris 
fills up quickly. The resident black 
American population, estimated at 
about 1.000. has carved out its own 
place on that scene. Some events 
sponsored by the community are for 
causes, including fundraisers for black 
politicians, lectures and political rallies. 
Other gatherings are for fellowship. 

Much of the communing and net- 
working takes places in cafes and res- 
taurants. Like Chester Himes, Wright 
and others before them, today’s expat- 
riates have staked out their favorite wa- 
tering holes and use them as places to 
meet old and new friends. 

The Beat poet Ted Joans, a veteran of 
the expatriate scene, holds forth every 
afternoon at the Cafe le Rouquet. Ana 
on Sundays, blacks from as far off as 
Dallas and Los Angeles meet at 
Chesterfield Cafe, a restaurant off the 
Champs Elysees. for an afternoon of 
gospel and omelets. 


From Beach to Rain Forest, the Tides and Trails of Costa Rica 



By Wanen Hoge 

jVm' York Times Service 

T AMARINDO, 

Costa Rica — Faced 
with the multitudin- 
ous life choices that 
confront a child 
growing up in New York City, 
my son on turning 13 settled 
on his. He wanted to be a 


surfer. The challenge was how 
to accommodate this obses- 
sion of my soa’s along wife 
my hope of devoting fee fam- 
ily summer vacation to rain- 
forest exploration. We found a 
harmonious solution on fee 
Pacific coast of Costa Rica. 

The country has some of 
fee largest untouched primary 
forests in the world and a gov- 


ernment and population wife 
a commitment to protecting 
them unequaled in Latin 
America. Costa Rica also fig- 
ures in globe-trotting films 
modeled after “The Endless 
Summer” as one of fee far- 
flung places on the planer 
where surf pilgrims go in pur- 
suit of the perfect wave. 

We decided on two spots. 


one at fee tip of the remote 
Osa Peninsula in the south 
and the other on the busier 
coast of Guanacaste Province 
in the north. 

Fought over in fee 19th 
century by Nicaragua and 
Costa Rica, Guanacaste has 
been a conflicted part of the 
country in recent times. It 
served as a staging area for 


The Finished Article 


ichronicity, even with each of the eight 
Ions sliding up and down at more than 
iundred timls a second under ^plosive 
ces that can measure up to 5.7 tonnes. 


Freudeamfiahren 


the Sandinista rebels in fee 
1970s, and in fee 1980s it 
became fee site of secret air- 
strips and supply centers for 
the contras who sought to oust 
fee victorious Sandinistas 
from Managua. 

Osa, on the other hand, had 
always been cut off from the 
world and even from the rest of 
Costa Rica. A dirt road linking 
the peninsula to fee mainland 
was completed only in 1986. 

If you need writing paper in 
Tamarindo, ail you'll find is a 
notepad of sheets made from 
banana^leaf fibers. The sham- 
poo on sale is biodegradable 
and carries a label, itself made 
of recycled paper, feat assures 
that no animals were mis- 
treated in fee manufacture of 
the contents. The sho refront 
Hotel Las Tortugas was built 
wife no ocean views to fee 
south because light can dis- 
tract giant leatherback turtles 
that use the beach there to lay 
their eggs. 

The same hotel is 
headquarters to surfers who 
consider the beach there, 
Playa Grande, the finest ven- 
ue in fee area. Ar Playa 
Grande, my son. Nick, and his 
schoolmate Wyndham saw 
what they had been missing 
on Long Island. Long waves 
began on one side of the 


widely curved beach and 
peeled across fee horizon, 
curling cleanly and showing 
nothing but a shimmering 
smooth surface to the morn- 
ing sun until disappearing in- 
to frenzies of foam on the 
other side. 

The boys were intimidated 
by the wave heights at first, 
but enchantment and exhilar- 
ation overcame their initial 
fear, and they soon were riding 
across the glassy wave faces. 

We adults found the surf to 
be challenging but manage- 
able. And there was the keen 
pleasure of looking back and 
seeing only mangrove forests, 
palms and banyans bursting 
explosively from their midst, 
and distant gray-green moun- 
tains wife clouds lounging in 
the valleys. 

ABUNDANCE of Ufe Every 
time we wandered off into 
those forests, we got a lesson 
in fee abundance of life feat 
inhabits tropical shorelines. 
The microscopic organisms 
that fee ocean washes over its 
reefs, rock and beaches feed a 
voluminous array of tiny 
creatures that in concert wife 
plants support a vast commu- 
nity of crabs, snails, shrimps, 
iguanas, squirrels, egrets, her- 
ons and other creatures. 


We were particularly in- 
trigued by hermit crabs and 
fee delicate orange-legged, 
purple-shelled crabs feat 
make fee land itself seem an- 
imate as they skitter by the 
thousands into their forest 
burrows at fee approach of an 
intruder. Each April these 
crabs make spectacular migra- 
tions to the sea to breed, wife 
each female releasing tens of 
thousands of eggs, which be- 
come larvae drifting in fee 
waves until six weeks laser, 
when they all march inland 
and begin fee cycle again. 

At week's end we drove 
back to San Jose, gave up our 
vehicle and caught our flight 
to Puerto Jimenez, the only 
town on the Osa Peninsula. 
Waiting for us by fee gravel 
airstrip was Jonathan Seid- 
roan, a 27-year-old forestry 
and conservation graduate of 
Kent State University who has 
worked there as guide for five 
years. 

He drove us into town, a 
laid-back frontier outpost 
wife a soccer field, a boat 
dock and fee only block of 
paved road on the entire pen- 
insula. We bought flashlights 
and simple knee-high rubber 
boots for die rain-forest treks, 
then drove out along the coast 
of die Golfo Dulce and up 


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muddy roads to our lodge. 
Bosque del Cabo. 

The only contact with fee 
outside world is by radio 
phone, and there is electricity 
only in fee kitchen. Night 
fells early in Costa Rica in fee 
summer, usually about 6 
PJML, and from that hour on. 
Bosque lives by candlelighL 

W ITHIN minutes of 
leaving Bosque 
our first afternoon. 
Jon announced that we were in 
primary forest, undeveloped, 
undisturbed, its reproductive 
cycles intact and humming. 
We found ourselves at the 
base of immense trees, some 
rising 180 feet above the 
forest floor, closing out all but 
about 10 percent of the light 
shining down on the canopy. 
The sight induced a feeling of 
wonder and reverence. The 
great cathedral-like space 
captured the forest’s mists and 
held them in fee shards of 
sunlight, like fine particles of 
dust that hang suspended in 
the streaks of light shining 
through stained-glass win- 
dows in great naves. 

The profound silence was a 
quietness feat throbbed wife 
activity as Jon pointed out all 
die life going on around us — 
hummingbirds pollinating the 
voluptuous orange and red 
heliconia plants, cowtrees (so 
called because when cut wife a 
knife they secrete a digestive 
lalexl, larvae of frogs and tad- 
poles in tightly joined leaf 
bases where water had col- 
lected, earnest parades of leaf- 
cutting ants carrying their im- 
mense burdens from trees to 
anthills, golden silk orb- 
weavers spinning perfectly 
symmetrical lace patterns, 
mimosa leaves that fold in on 
themselves protectively on be- 
ing touched, woodpeckers tap- 
ping in pursuit of termites. 

URING our treks, gi- 
ant frigate birds wife 
their wingspans of 
more than six feet wheeled 
into view overhead. Lovely 
little immaculate antbirds 
called out to one another in 
sweet bell tones, laughing fal- 
cons guffawed and. in the 
forest counterpart to hoisting 
the cocktail flag, parrots, the 
most social of birds, gathered 
in flocks at day’s end and 
raised a happy ruckus. 

There are four kinds of 
monkeys in this part of the 
rain forest — squirrel, spider, 
white-faced capuchin and 
howler — and we saw them 
all. The howlers pur up a son- 
orous groan, using their for- 
midable sound equipment and 
then amplifying it wife a bel- 
lows-like movement of their 
jowls. The spiders chaner ex- 
citedly and perform spectac- 
ular acrobatics in fee trees. 

We swam in waterfalls and 
splashed in pools in reef form- 
ations on the beach feat 
emerge as the tide ebbs, pro- 
ducing a whirlpool-bath ef- 
fect We walked on beaches 
where fee only signs of human 
life were our own footprints, 
and we hiked the forest paths 
in the midst of thunderstorms 
and marveled at how little rain 
fell on us. 


i 


i 






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!NTE»NAnONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SAlXIRPAY-SUNDAy, FEBBKARY 1-2, 1997 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


MOVIE GUIDE 


ARTS GUIDE 




ISiil 








r : 


3 M 


Clint Eastwood (a thief), Laura Unney ( his daughter). Gene Hackman (president) in "Absolute Power . 1 


Absolute Power 

Directed 6v Clint Eastwood. 
US. 

“Absolute Power” is a 
hoot, a riot, a kick in the 
funny pants. Unfortunately, 
these are not qualities you 
seek in a Washington con- 
spiracy thriUer. After an in- 
triguing beginning, Clint 
Eastwood’s latest movie — 
which he coproduced, dir- 
ected and stars in — de- 
volves into such utter 
ludicrousness, the best re- 
sponse (other than avoiding 
the thing in the first place) is 
to laugh. In the film, which 
William Goldman adapted 
from the David Baldacci 
bestseller, Luther Whitney 
(Eastwood) is a master thief 
with a checkered past. We 
meet him as be prepares for 
his last job. a painstakingly 
orchestrated burglary in the 
mansion of Walter Sullivan 
(E.G. Marshall). But Whit- 
ney is totally unprepared for 
what transpires. After 
filling his bag with jewelry 
from Sullivan 's secret vault, 
he hears voices. Retreating 
into the vault and closing the 
entrance, he realizes that the 
room looks into the master 
bedroom through a two-way 
mirror. Whitney is forced to 
witness a secret liaison be- 
tween Sullivan's inebriated 
wife (Melora Hardin) and 
an equally soused gentle- 


man — played by an actor 
who’s very familiar to us. 
It’s not long before we learn 
the significance of this char- 
acter's identity. The seduc- 
tion turns ugly. The man 
gets too rough. There’s a 
struggle. When she grabs a 
letter opener ro stab him, 
gunshots ring out. The wo- 
man is dead. Whitney 
watches with mute horror as 
two men, accompanied by a 
stern woman, emerge to 
mop up the evidence. When 
they leave, Whitney picks 
up something they forgot — 
the bloodied letter opener! 
— and makes off. But the 
killers catch him making an 
escape. Whitney reaches his 
parked van in time, but the 
pursuers note down his li- 
cense plate. When he’s 
chased by Secret Service 
agents, Whitney realizes 
he’s dabbling with higher 
powers. He also learns that 
Sullivan is a chum of the 
president (Gene Hackman). 
Now in danger, he keeps 
clear of homicide inspector 
Seth frank (Ed Harris play- 
ing Ed Harris), who's con- 
vinced that Whitney wit- 
nessed the killing. That's 
about as clear as I can make 
it without giving the game 
away. But boy do things get 
dumb, especially when 
“Absolute Power’’ reveals 
its boneheaded punch line. 

(Desson Howe. WP) 


Tesis 

Directed by Alejandro 
Amenabar. Spain. 

A spine-chilling thriller is 
what the 23-year-old direc- 
tor Alejandro Amenabar 
submits for his first movie. 
He also wrote the script and 
the score. His main goal 
seemed to be making ibis 
film so tense that viewers 
would be too frightened to 
leave their seats. Angela 
(Ana Torrent) is preparing 
her thesis at die university 
of Madrid, exploring vio- 
lence in movies and tele- 
vision. At school, she 
stumbles upon a secret copy 
of a “snuff movie,’’ a 
ghastly genre that contains 
footage of real-life torture 
and murder. The director 
wisely keeps most of the vi- 
olence off screen. Instead, 
we sense it through die hor- 
rified looks on the faces of 
Angela and her friends and 
foes. She soon realizes dial 
she is in danger of becoming 
the next victim. While she’s 
trying to survive , the direc- 
tor throws in timely humor 
and some sharp criticism of 
violence, using an urbane 
professor to tell film class 
students. “The important 
thing is to give the public 
what they want to see.” Yet 
while acknowledging that 
he'd like to work with some 
other topic. Amenabar him- 


•’ V-' ^ 


4 



**V>- 


You can understand computers 
now. Or wait for your children 
to explain them to you later. 


self seems to be seduced by 
the commercial appeal of 
blood and gore. Thais are a 
few flaws, but it is a very 
promising debut. 

(AI Goodman. IHT) 

Focus 

Directed by Satoshi Isaka. 
Japan. 

A young nerd gets off on 
ham radio — listening to the 
neighbors, the fire depart- 
ment. the cops. An equally 
obsessed TV news director 
bullies him into a program. 
Midway they pick up a y ak- 
uza telephone conversation 
about a gun transfer and 
themselves get the gun. 
From then on it is one logical 
accident after another as 
power takes over — the 
power of a TV camera, a 
wiretap, a gun. Isaka in this 
brilliant firet film shows the 
whole thing through die lens 
of the TV camera, complete 
with the glitches, the retakes, 
the asides that were meant to 
be cut, and the b linkin g and 
ominous “Battery Low” 
si gnal. The reality of wbat is 
happening twice removed 
— once through a purported 
TV program, again through 
the movie we are seeing — is 
both endistanced and intens- 
ified. The result is one of die 
most unsettling and accom- 
plished films of die year. 

(Donald Richie. IHT) 




B BELGIUM 

Brussels 

Palais des Beeux-Arts, lei: (2) 
507-84-66, dosed Mondays. To 
May 25: “L'Art de CoDecbonner 
Les Musees Neertandais etPArt du 
20e Siede.” Focusing on the dif- 
ferent art movements in the Netiv- 
eriands, the exhibition features 
Mondnan, Kees van Dongen, Char- 
ley Toorop and Jan DIbbets, shown 
in parallel with their foreign con- 
temporaries, inducting Matevitch, 
Picasso, Braque and Lager, Dubuf- 
fet. Yves Klein, Fontana and David 
Smith. 


BRITAIN 


Bath 

The Royal Photographic Society 

tel: (225) 46-28-41. open daily. To 
March 31: "Bruce GBden: Haiti." 
Gikten's photographic study of the 
Haitians started in 1984 under the 
Duvaiier regime. QSden was struck 
by the Haitians' propensity to os- 
cillate between extremes of pas- 
sion and apathy: resifienoe and 
desperation. His photographs cap- 
ture. in a surreal way, the duality of 
a country rife with centuries of des- 
potism and unrest, and powerless 
to unite against tyranny. 

London 

Barbican Art Gallery, tel: (171) 
636-6691. open daily. To May 26: 
"Lucie Rie and Hans Coper Pot- 
ters in Parallel.” The show exam- 
ines the parallel careers of the two 
contemporary artists, displaying 
more than 350 pieces, such as- 
ceramic buttons, jewel ry and table- 
ware characterized by their simple 
tines and monochrome schemes. 
Also. “Modem Art in Britain 1910- 
1914." More than 150 works by 
Cezanne. Gauguin, van Gogh. 
Matisse and Picasso, and by the 
British artists they inspired, 
Vanessa Be 0, David Bomberg, 
Roger Fry, Duncan Grant and Au- 
gustus John reveal the range of 
modem art introduced to Britain 
during this period. 

National Portrait Gallery, tel:. 
(171) 306-0055. open daily. To 
June 8: "Auguste Sander ‘In Pho- 
tography There Are No Unex- 
plained Shadows.’" Selection of 
about 200 photographs by the 
German artist (1076-1964). 
Sander studied the contemporary 
German society, from the farmers, 
moving through industry, the pro- 
fessions, intellectuals and aristo- 
crats, and finishing with ihe out- 
casts of society, the sick and the 
dying. 

Royal Opera at Covent Garden, 
tel: (171) 304-4000. "Die Meister- 
smger von Numberg." Directed by 
Graham Vick, conducted by Bern- 
ard Haitink, with John Tomlinson, 
Thomas Allen and Nancy Gust- 
afson. March 15. 18. 21 and 24. 
Tate Gallery, tel: (171) 887-8000. 
open daity. To May 4: “Lovis Cor- 
inth." Retrospective of the expres- 
sionist artist (1858-1925), includ- 
ing more than 90 oil paintings and 
70 watercolors. drawings and 
prints. Influenced by Velazquez. 
Rubens and Rembrandt Corinth 
applied modern sensibility and 
style to traditional subjects: the 
Bible, history, mythology, the nude, 
portraiture, landscape and still 

| life. 

j E PEN MARK 
HUMLESAEX 

I Louisiana Museum of Modem 

I Art, tel: 49-1 9-07-1 9. open daffy.To 

; May 25: “Men and Gods: New Dis- 
coveries from Ancient China." Ex- 
amining the religious and mytho- 
logical human figures during the 
emergence ot Chinese civilization, 
the exhibition shows more than 
200 objects, found in graves, which 
express beliefs about We after 
death. 

M FI NL A iTp 

Helsinky 

Museum of Foreign Art, tel: (0) 
17-33-61, dosed Tuesdays. To 
May 5: The Tiger's Gaze: Tra- 
ditional Korean Paintings." Land- 
scape panoramas made up of sev- 
eral paper scrolls, crabs crawling 
on the shore, birds flying over the 
reeds, and faces deep In medit- 
ation tell the story of the devel- 



Bruce Gildens photographs exploring the Haitian 
people and culture are on show in Bath, England. 


opmant of Korean art from the 1 8th 
century to the 20th. 

B TRANCE ~ 

Nice 

Muses <f Art Modems et tTArt 
Contemporsin, tel: 04-93-13-23- 
30, dosed Tuesdays. To June 9: 
"Man Ray: Retrospective 1912- 
1976." Focuses on the multidiscip- 
linary works of the artist (1890- 
1976) inducing drawings, paint- 
ings. Dadaist and surrealist collage 
and combinations of objects, pho- 
tographs. portraits, documentaries 
aid movies. 

Paris 

ChapeDe de la Sortxmne, tel: 01- 
43-07-32-97. open daffy. To March 
30: “La Pieta: Oeuvre Divine." More 
than 100 photographs of Michelan- 
gelo's Pieta in Sant Peter’s in 
Rome by Robert Hupka (bom 1 919) 
are delayed, as well as a copy of 
La Pieta “BondaninI," the fourth 
Pieta sculpted by Michelangelo. 
Institut du Monde Arabs, tei: 01- 
40-51-38-38, dosed Mondays. To 
Aug. 31 : “Soudan: Royaumes sur 
le NiL” An exploration of archae- 
ological finds from Sudan: Nubian 
statues, vases and zoomorph fig. 
ures; colossal statues from the 
Napaia Kingdom (650 to 300 B.C.) 
and objects from Meroe, where the 
treasure of Queen Amanishakheto 
was discovered in 1834. 

Musee d’Orsay, tei: 01-40-43-48- . 
14. dosed Mondays. To May 18. 
“Auguste P result 1809-1879.” 
Survey ot the scuptoCs works in 


the 1830s and 1840s, including fu- 
neral sculptures, portraits, medal- 
lions and pubflc commands. 
Opera Bastille, to): 01-44-73-13- 
oo. A new production of Bizet’s 
“Carmen ” Directed by Alfredo 
Aria, conducted by Gary Bertinl. 
with Nell Schioofl. Elena Zaremba 
and Angela Gheorghiu. Feb. 22. 
26, March 2 and 6. 

Valenciennes 

Musee des Beaux-Arts, tel: 27- 
22-57-20. closed Tuesdays. To 
May 4: “L'Ane station du Christ de 
Jordaens.-" The exhibition pre- 
sents’ a scientific study of the 
painting and the different phases 
of its restoration, the painting itself 
and a display of 17th-century 
works on the theme of the arrest of 
Christ 

■ «««■»»»? ZJZ 

Bonn 

Kunst- und Aussteflungshalle 
der Bundesrepubllk Deutsch- 
land, tel: (228) 9171-200. To May 
11: “Tbs Great Collections VI: The 
Two Faces of the Hermitage." Fo- 
cuses on two subjects: First. 150 
objects of Scythian gold provide a 
glimpse of the Hermitage’s archae- 
ological collection. Also, jewelry, 
weapons amf religious objects offer 
insights into the culture of the 
horsemen from the nothem coast o# 
the Black Sea and the Altai Moun- 
tains of southern Siberia. Second, 
65 paintings and. 50 drawings of 
Baroque art, as well as examples of 
landscape, genre painting, sffl fifes 


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vaggto. Carracci- Rertj - VCfezqua? 
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ITALY ..... 

?^8lU, SMll tel ISTSOfF. 
44 Alban Berg's "Wbzzeck. dir- 
aefed by Jurgen Fjimm, conducted 
bv Giuseppe Sinopoh with Cath- 
arine Malttano. Kim Begley and 
Franz Grundheber. Feb 28. March 
2, 4. 6, 8 and 9. 

Rag io. tet: (77) 88151. 
Pucanrs "Tosca." Conducted by 
Christian Badea. wilti fiaina 
Kabatvanska and Keith Olson. 
Feb. 22, 23, 25 and 26 

M n i Thkrlan ps ~~ 

Rotterdam 

Museum voor VoTkenku nde, tel: . 
(10) 441-9400. dosed Mondays. 
To August 10: "2000 years on the ■ 
Silk Road; Treasures from Uzbek- . 
istan." Display of more than 300 
objects, including manuscripts, - 
ceramics, metalwork and textiles. * 

| iwtniN ; 

Stockholm 

Modems Muscat, tet: (8) 668-42- ■ 
50, dosed Mondays. To May 19. 
"Picasso and the Mediterranean i 
Myth." Concentrates on the pednts ■ 
of contact between Picasso's 1 
works and the art ol the ancient ! 
world. The exhibition features , 
more than 100 works by Picasso ■ 
between 1904 and 7967. including * 
paintings, sculpture, drawings. ' 
pnnts and ceramics. The classical ; 
part of the show consists of about . 
60 works from Cydadic, Mycenae- < 
an. Archaic, Iberian, Etruscan and ; 
Greco-Roman cultures. ’ 

■ UNITIP STATES 1 

— I 

Chicago 

Art Institute, tei: (312) 443-3800. \ 
open daily. To M3y 11: “Ivan AI- » 
bright" More than 120 paintings. » 
sculptures and works on paper by ‘ 
the Chicago artist (1897-1983). m- t 
eluding "The Picture of Dorian , 
Gray." AtorigW's works 'mefude stin • 
irtes, character studies and self- - 
portraits with intricate details and ) 
multiple colors. , 

NewYowc 

Museum of Modem Art, tel: (21 2) 
708-9400, dosed Wednesdays. To , 
May 18: “Manuel Alvarez Bravo: 
Rare Vintage Prints Featured, In- - 
chiding 80 Works From the Artist's : 
Personal Collection.” Comprehen- [ 
stve survey of the Mexican artist's . 
career (bom 1902) from his early . 
experiments with abstraction, • 
through modernist works inspired J 
by international trends such as sur- ; 
realism, to the realization of a per- 
sonal style concerned with Mex- > 
lean customs and rituals. 

LosAmob.es 

Los Angelos County Museum of 
Art, tel: (213) 857-6000, closed ' 
Mondays. To May 11: "Exiles and 
Emigres: The Flight of European 
Artists from Hitler.” The exhibition 
explores the impact of emigration * 
and forced exile on the lives and ' 
works of European artists during 
the years of Nazi domination. 
Paintings, sculptures, photo- 
graphs, architectural models, 
graphics as well as posters, books, ' 
pamphlets, letters, and journals 
are on display: 23 artists are • 
presented, including Chagall. Dali. * 
Ernst. Kandinsky, Kokoschka, 
Lege rand Mondrian. 

Skiiball Cultural Center and Mu- - 
sewn, (et (310) 440-4500. To July » 
25: “Georges Segal: Works from 1 
the Bible." Five monumental ' 
sculptures present the artist's per- 
sonal interpretation of significant - 
themes from the Book of Genesis. 
Segal is best known for his down- . 
to-earth scenes of humble char- 
acters set in real environments. 

Washington 

National Gallery of Art, tel: (202)- 
737-4215, open daily. To May 11: 
The Victorians: British Painting in 
the Reign of Queen Victoria, 1 837- ' 
1901.” 70 paintings by 36 artists 
inducting American artists John J 
Singer Sargent and James McNeill • 
Whistler; French, James Tissot 
German, Franz Xaver W1 medial- '. 
ter, and British, Edward Bume-‘ 
Jones, J.M.W. Turner, Edwin' * 
Landseer, William Powell Frith, 1 
Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Augustus i 
Leopold Egg, Albert Moore and*; 
Wflfam Holman Hunt 

CLOSING SOON : 

Feb. 22: “L’Amerique de la De- 
pression: Artistes Engages des T 
Annees 30." Musee-Galerie de te . 
Setts, Parte. 

Feb. 23: "Cite Interdlte: Vie Pub-.-; 
Ilque et Privee des Empereurs de 
Chine." Musee du Petit Palais, ‘ 
Parte. 

Feb. 23: “Picasso and the Theater. 
Parade. Pulctnelia. Mercura.".' 
Aluseu Picasso, Barcelona 'j 

Feb. 23: “StW Tima" KunsthaL- r 
Rotterdam. „ 5 

Feb. 23: “Double Vision: Nine-; 
leenttvCentury Stereoscopic Pho- . • 
tography." Scottish National Por- - 
traft Gallery, Edinburgh. 

To Feb, 23: "Portrait Miniatures 0 
from the Collection of the Duke of 
Buodeuch.” Scottish National 
Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh. 

Feb. 23: “Howard Hodgkins: Paint- *. 
fogs." Hayward Gallery, Lon-’ 
don. b 

Feb. 23: "Beyond Reason: Art and t 
Psychosis: Works from the Prtn - 71 
zhom Collection." Hayward Gat-..; 
Fery, London. 

Feb. 23: "Nicholas Pope: The-., 
Apostles Speaking in Tongues."' 
Tate Gallery, London. 

Feb. 23: “De Va I lotion a Dubuffet" - 
Musee Cantonal des Beaux-' 
Arts, Lausanne. 

Feb. 23: “Toulouse-Lautrec.’' Fun-, 
dacion Juan March, Madrid. 

Feb. 23: “New York Dada: 1973- 
1923." Whitney Museum of 
American Art, New York. 

Feb. 23: "Russian Enamels: Kiev-, i 
an Russe to Faberge." Waiters- ' 
Art Gallery, Baltimore. 

Feb. 23: "Memory: Luba Art and;’ 
the Making of History. ^ National-! 
Museum of African Art, Wash- - 
Ington. 

Feb. 25: “Souvenirs of Savings^ 
Miniature Bank Buddings from the 
Collection of Ace Architects." Mu- 
seum of Modern Art, San Fran-'* 
cisco. 

Feb. 26: “Surrealist Games. Ex-.s 
quisrte Corpse: Collective works- 
by Picasso, Miro, Dali. Breton, Etu- L 
ard, Tanguy, Peret, elc." Fun-, 
tiaeion Thyssen-Bomemisza,, . 

Madrid. 








PAGE 17 


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Heralb^K^nbuite 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


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PAGE 13 


Europe Lags the Rail-Freight Revolution 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Service 


!l<*r Turn 


ROME — You would not think Europe coaid 
leant anything about r unnin g rail mads from the 
United States. Europe has the bullet-like TGVs 
and tilting trains; the United States has Amtrak. 

But while it is true that European passenger 
service is a heavily used showcase of comfort and 
speed, freight shipping is another world entirely. 
Borders are bottlenecks where shipments must be 
hauled off one train and put on another to ac- 
commodate changes in track gauge — there are 
three widths in Europe, not to tnantirm seven elec- 
trical standards and a jumble of signal systems. 

Featherbedding is still common, and customers 
can be few and far between. Rail's share of total 
freight movement in Britain has slipped to just 6 
percent, measured by tonnage and distance, com- 
pared with 41 percent in die United Stares. In short, 
thepainful shakeout that reshaped the U.S. industry 
in the 1 980s has not yet happened in Europe. 

“It's tike the United States lOyears ago." said 
Marty Vanderbroek. & rail specialist in the Lon- 
don office of Mercer Management Consulting, a 
transport consulting firm. 

But now that Europe is preparing for economic 
unification, planners are introducing new rail 
technology, like so-calle d mt crm odalsystems that 
move containers by road and rati. They are break- 
ing up inefficient state rad monopolies into com- 
mercially viable pieces. In an increasing number 


of cases, they are even opening the door to outside 
' com petition — including UB. companies. 

The early arrivals include Wisconsin Central 
Transportation Cozjx, a specialist in turning 
around troubled freight companies, which leads 
the consortium feat bought Britain's freight sys- 
tem in 1994. when die government sold off its 
nafionfllimri rail service. CSX Corp., the big 
Virginia-based rail and shipping company, and its 
Sea-Land subsidiary are in joint ventures with the 
Europeans to introduce American-style freight 
shuttles. Mercer Management, a unit erf Marsh & 
McLennan, was sought out by the European Uni- 
on for its advice on rad-freight deregulation. 

The Americans are bringing c apical and a rich 
trove of expertise. 

Asked about the contribution erf American part- 
ners such as CSX, Rene Holden, a spokesman for 
NS Cargo, a 'Dutch freight company, said: “The 
whole am n i m stratioQ has changed. It’s now aQ com- 
puterized: the trading and tracing of rad cars, for 
example, so you can always find a car for a client, 
even if it's very late. Under die old-fashioned na- 
tional systems, with phones and faxes, you relied on 
offices, and they were often empty late at night" 
will not come smoothly. Europe’s 
unions are fighting a rear-guard action 
t guarantees tense moments and more than ,afew 
costly disraptions. Earlier this month, for example, 
rad workers in Ranee staged a daylong strike to 
protest government plans to restructure the un- 
profitable state-owned railway SNCF. 



The underlying catalyst for change is the real- 
ization thaT Europe simply cannot afford any longer 
tn have snch a cottly and inefficient frei g ht sys t«ni- 

ln 1994, according to European Commission fig- 
ures. the cumulative debt of Europe’s railways 
came to $135 bdtion. an amount that has grown 
since. In France and Italy, railway debt was equi- 
valent respectively, to 2J5 percent and 5.0 percent 
of gross domestic product. Much of that debt came 
from fee generous financing of passenger service, 
which has benefited disproport i onately from up- 
grades to fee rail system. But at least the passenger 
lines attracted more and more customers. 

As gove rnments scramble to cut spending to 
meet the requirements for a single European 
currency, the days of endless rad subsidies are fast 
dwindling. 

Late last year, the European Commission’s 
senior transport official, Neal Kinnock, warned 
the 15 member go vernm ents that future rad as- 
sistance would be subject to co mmissio n ap- 
proval. as subsidies to airlines and other industries 
already are. Beginning in 1998, Mr. Kinnock said, 
radway subsidies would be authorized only if 
accompanied by strict cost reduction proposals. 

Anticipating snch an endgame, several coun- 
tries, including Germany, Sweden and the Neth- 
erlands, have cut up their national rail systems 
into divisions for passengers, freight and the 
marnterranno of infrastructure like tracks and sig- 
nal systems. France plans similar steps, despite 
the union resistance. 


Publicis and True North End Ad Feud With Smiles 


By Stuart Elliott 

New York Tones Service 


NEW YORK — What has 
been perhaps fee most frac- 
tious dispute in advertising 
ended surprisingly peacefully 
late Wednesday when two big 
agency companies — True 
North Communications Inc. 
in Chicago and Publicis S A in 
Paris — agreed to settle ad 
outstanding differences con- 
cerning the dissolution of a 
global business alliance. 

The settlement was an- 


had been owned 51 percent by 
Pubhds and 49 percent by 
True North. 

The profits from feat ven- 
ture had accounted for 40 per- 
cent of True North’s annual 
profits, though True North 
executives say that figure had 


MEDIA MARKETS 


nounced by True North, 
which is No. 7 worldwide 


wife billings estimated at $7.5 
billion, and Publicis, which is 
No. 13 with billings estim- 
ated at $4.1 billion. 

The toms of the deal, ap- 
proved by the boards of both 
companies, seemed to favor 
Publicis: it will acquir e 100 
percent of a joint-venture 
agency network m Europe — 

The largest in the market — feat 


decreased last year to less 
than 25 percent 

Even so, the settlement was 
beneficial for True North, 
which owns agencies like 
Foote, Cone & fielding and 
works fear giant marketers like 
S. C Johnson Wax and 
Mazda Motor Corp. It ends 
almost four years of bitter 
fighting that analysts said had 
ham pered fee p e rf o r mance of 
True North’s publicly traded 
shares, which have lagged be- 
hind those of rivals lure the 
Jntexpublic Group of Cos. and 
Omiucom Group. 

Bruce Mason, chairman 


and chief executive at True 
North, said Wednesday of the 
settlement “We got what we 
needed; we solved what we 
had to. We finally have a 
smDe on our face.” 

Maurice Levy, chairman 
and chief executive at Pub- 
licis, was cheerful, and not 
only because his birthday was 
Tuesday. 

“I also feel happy,” he 
said in an interview from Par- 
is, “because we finally got an 
agreement and fee deal is 
quite good for both of us.” 

It does seem better for Pub- 
licis, though, because of the 
change in ownership in fee 
joint-venture European 
agency network, known as 


mg renamed Publicis Europe. 
In exchange for its 49 percent 
interest. True North will get 
four offices that had been part 
of that joint venture, in Athens, 
Lisbon, London and Paris. 

Those offices are to be- 
come the foundation of a sep- 
arate European network for 
Foote, Cone feat True North 
will form by merging them 
vrifeWilkens International, a 
European agency network 
based in Hamburg that True 
North acquired Feb. 4. 

Agencies owrted by and af- 
filiated wife Wtikens operate 
in 19 European countries, the 
same number feat the new 


Foote, Cone Europe network 
tr. Mason 


Publicis FCB Europe, which 
od Publicis 


co- 


Trne North and 
founded in 1988. 

Publicis FCB 
exs 31 countries and 
accounts worth an estimated 
$33 billion in billings. 

Pubfids FCB Europe is be- 


will serve. Mr. Mason estim- 
ated feat the hilling s of the 
new separate Foote. Cone 
Europe would be more than 
$1 billion. 

Troe North will also re- 
ceive a larger stake in Publicis 
Communication, the advert- 
ising unit of Publicis SA, 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


'l 


Cross Rates .. ^ 

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fob. 20 LibkMJbor Rates 


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T-raoOtfl 5ft -5ft 3* -3ft lft- ’Pft 6-fl* 3ft -3V» ft-M 4ft -<ft 
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RtriaapfiKait&io Herbert <*pesks of S) nBtae mtobnaa brmMeaO. 


Key Money Rates 
UKKdSWtW a 

DtaaMtrate 


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Other DoUar Values 


wteyCDs a i te r 
ISMoy CP tecers 
3 MBA TrtoHvy MD- 


Cmn WrS 
AisMtpos 0J998 
AnMnft 12992 
ABOrimsck. 11 SO* 
Brad real 12581 
OtentyuH 82264 
CndUnrana 2BJS 
OaMtan 6X329 
BgffLpumi 3JW5 
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.$ 1X275 


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SSSat S 3? BT 

DKMfibtMHi 1X834 1X803 . tX7» - - . i fn.ihnr ' 



Pnw 
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500 

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1 i—tefcteffh 

SYk 

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527 

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7.12 

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578 

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titarwiiBox rate 

” iio 

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517 

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529 

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558 

3 ■ante fcrtcfteteh 

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AM. PJA. CVgt 


450 XjD 
Oil 015 
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020 'OH 
020 Olt 
5X4 5X9 


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NA. 34525 +125 
34425 34100 -025 
MUO .352X0. +100 
_ UA dDCnpraifleo Londbff offiefef 

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(April) • 

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which will increase to 26 J5 
percent from 20.8 percent. 
Publicis Europe will become 
a wholly owned unit of Pub- 
licis Communication. Publi- 
cis SA maintains its status as 
True North’s largest share- 
holder, owning 20 percent 

“True North has tried for 
20 years to achieve a presence 
in Europe, without much suc- 
cess," said Alan Gottesman, 
managing director at West 
End Commnni cab ons/Con- 
sufting in New York, which 
follows fee agency industry. 

“Twenty years later,” he 
added, “it’s back to square 
one almost." 

Mr. Mason took issue with 
that assessm e nt. “We were 
able to get what we wanted," 
be said. “We’re still a major 
owner of a joint venture said 
we will control 100 percent of 
a network. We’ve got the best 
of both worlds." 

The deal came almost a 
after True North and 
ids ended a global co- 
operative agreement under 
which they were bound to co- 
operate outside Europe. Both 
then began a series of separate 
acquisitions feat served to pit 

the PubSds^l«u^t 

control of agencies in Mex- 
ico, Brazil, Canada, Singa- 
pore and fee Philippines. 

True North countered with 
purchases in Canada. Chile 
and the United States, which 
were followed by fee Wilkens 
acquisition. That was the first 
expansion by either True 
North or Publicis in Europe 
after they had agreed to dis- 
agree as of Feb. 29, 1996. 

That acquisition appar- 
ently set in motion fee set- 
tlement leached Wednesday, 
as did an agreement in 
December that established 
the process for each agency 
c ompany to move accounts 
out of their joint operations if 
clients so desired. That ac- 
cord arose from a squabble in 
Mexico City, where Publicis 
had tried to shift a Nestle SA 
account from the Foote, Cone 
office there into a local shop 
that Publicis had acquired, j 






py. 


y- 

\ 


.: .. . v 


Asian Stock Markets Rise 
On News of Deng’s Death 

Event Dispels a (loud of Uncertainty 


Canned by (ha St&fran Daparin 

HONG KONG — Stock markets in China, 
Hoag Kong and Taiwan rose Thursday after 
fee death erf China’s paramount leader, Deng 
Xiaoping, allowed investors to put recent un- 
certainty behind them. 

* ‘This is somerhing that stock markets have 
been gearing up for for some considerable 
time.' said Peter Churchouse, regional 
strategist at Morgan Stanley in Hong Kong. 

“People have got used to the idea and 
thought long Kid hard about likely directions 
in China post-Deng anyway. People have got 
their own views ana have become more or less 
comfortable with them." he added. 

The single most sensitive and volatile 
factor for fee markets in and around r*hina in 
recent years had been the health of Mr. Deng. 
Suddenly, fee issue is not there anymore. 

Stocks had been sliding this week on re- 
ports that Mr. Deng’s health was deterior- 
ating. But word from China late Wednesday 
that Mr. Deng, 92. had died brought investors 
back on Thursday. 


greater openness in fee political sphere," said 
David Goodman, a biographer of Mr. Deng. 

Closed-end mutual funds that invest in 
greater China were tittle changed after Mr. 
Deng’s death was announced by Communist 
Party officials. 

On commodity markets, rallies in U.S. 
corn, wheat and oilseed contracts were cut 
short after news of Mr. Deng’s death cir- 
culated in Chicago’s trading pits Wednesday. 
Traders speculated that Cbma, a large buyer 
of U.S. agricultural products, might scale 
back its purchases. 

The mild reaction to speculation earlier this 
week that Mr. Deng was near death stands in 
sharp contrast to January 1995, when reports 


snat p contrast to January 1995, when reports 
of his death roiled Hong Kong stocks, driving 
the benchmark Hang Seng Index down by a 


Hong Kong's benchmark Hang Seng index 
se 233 pexcer 


rose 233 percent to close at 13.41 133 points, 
up 305.01. 

In Shenzhen, the benchmark index of B- 
class shares, which foreigners may buy, 
closed up 135 percent, while in Shan gh ai , fee 
domestically traded A-share index closed up 
03 percent. 

Taipei’s benchmark index closed up 038 
p erc e nt, recovering from a 1 percent drop. 

The stability of the stock markets is in- 
dicative of die widespread belief that the 
economic reforms Mr. Deng pioneered are too 


firmly anchored to be uprooted now. 


'You’re not going to see a power straggle. 


You’re not going to see bickering in the back 

Fch 


rooms of Beijing," said Aurole Foong. a fund 
manager ai Peregrine Asset Management. 

For fee most part, Mr. Deng had already 
faded from the scene. While his death marks 
the end of a chapter in China’s history, h is 
likely to mean little for investors and may 
even speed reforms in fee political arena. 

“Things that Deng wouldn’t countenance 
will probably now come to pass, including 


sixth in a month. 

In the past week, by comparison, the Hang 
fell less than 3 percent. 

’s Communist Party boss, Jiang 
Zemin, took advantage of Mr. Deng’s failing 
health to move China away from behind-the- 
scenes political leadership by elderly revolu- 
tionaries like Mr. Deng to consensus derision- 
making amongyouEger technocrats. 

One reason for investor confidence may be 
fee pervasive reach of Mr. Deng's economic 
reforms. Mr. Deng opened China to market 
economics and foreign investment after three 
decades of socialist isolation under Mao 
Zedong. He accepted enough of fee tenets of 
capitalism to attract billions of dollars in 
foreign investment and achieve an average 
economic growth rate of about 10 percent ui 
the last 10 years. 

At times, though, Mr. Deng’s enthusiasm 
for growth led to excess. In 1 992, his vision of 
dotting China’s coast with economic power- 
houses like Shenzhen led to high inflation. 

Mr. Jiang and his economics chief, Zhu 
Rongji, responded wife three years of gov- 
ernment loan restrictions feat cut the inflation 
rate to 6 percent last year from 21 .7 percent in 
1994. They used interest rates as a means of 
fine-tuning the economy, clamped down on 
corruption and focused on attracting foreign 
investment. (Reuters, Bloomberg. AFP) 


Wall Street Finds Much Fault 
In White House Budget Plan 

Analysts’ Scorn Contrasts With Previous Respect 


By Gay Chandler 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — Treasury Secretary 
Robot Rubin rarely misses an o pport u nity to 
remind listeners of his “26 years on Wall 
Street.” But when it comes to sizing up Pres- 
ident Bill Qinton's latest budget plan, Mr. 
Rubin and his former colleagues do not quite 
see eye to eye. 

Analysts at most of the big New York 
investment houses are heaping scorn on Mr. 
Clinton's proposal. Among fee most con- 
temptuous: analy sts at Goldman Sachs & Co., 
where Mr. Rubio was co-chairman before 
joining fee administration. 

The plan proposes “No Meaningful Fiscal 
Restraint Before fee MOIennium," scoffed fee 
headline of an analysis fee brokerage sent last 
week to clients. It said the proposed budget was 
riddled wife “timeworn accounting tricks" 
and o ther “highly dubious elements.” 

“Even on its own terms," fee financial 
advisers concluded, the proposal “would re- 
quire essentially no further belt-tightening 
through the end of this deca d e." 

While the report concluded fear fee pros- 
pects for a balanced budget deal remained 
favorable this year, the budget-writing process 
“should not mkerially alleviate concerns about 
the long-term outlook for federal finances." 

The Treasury Department declined to com- 
ment on die Goldman Sachs analysis. 

Such sentiments contrast with fee grudging 
artmirarinn Mr. Clinton earned from many 
Wall Street analysts in the first year of his 
presidency. His first budget proposals were 
bitterly resisted by Republicans, who opposed 
raising taxes op upper-income ho u s eh o l ds, but 
many economists and market analysts credit 
the Democrat’s 1993 deficit reduction pack- 
age for the subsequent drop in interest rates. 

When Mr. Clinton unveOed his proposed 
federal budget for fee fiscal year feat starts Oct 


1, Mr. Rubin said markets would treat it with 
respect The reaction, he asserted, would be far 
different from when Mr. Clinton’s Republican 
predecessors announced their budgets and big 
Wall Street firms Hke his “would write up 
little research reports and we would deride the 
assumptions — and rightly so.” 

But many Wall Street analysts have assailed 
Mr. Qinton’s plan wife just the scat of in- 
dignation they directed at the budgets of the 
Reagan and Bush era. The plan “does not 
appear to be an aggressive budget,” said econ- 
omists at Smith Barney kac. “Only small cuts in 
entitlement spending are proposed.” 

What cuts it does call for, they added, 
“appear to be concentrated in fee final two to 
three years of the budget horizon." 

“As a remit,” they said, “these cuts prob- 
ably have to be regained as ‘speculative.’ *’ 

Wall Street criticism is not just directed at 
fee administration, of course. Bondholders 
also are wary of efforts by congressional 
Republicans to push through sweeping tax 
cuts. The Goldman Sachs analysis, for ex- 
ample, faults the Republicans and Mr. Clinton 
alike for pushing tax relief at fee expense of 
deficit reduction and ducking action to con- 
cun fee huge cost increases projected in the 
next century for such federal benefitprograms 
as Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. 

David Monro, an economist at High Fre- 
quency Economics, said the White House's 
economic assumptions were more realistic 
fhap those of the Bush and Reagan admin- 
istrations. But he said he doubted that Mr. 
Clinton’s budget would lower deficits nearly 
as much as the White House claims. 

The administration's deficit projections as- 
sume that fee nation’s economy will grow at 
an animal, inflation-adjusted rate of 2 percent 
in 1997 and 1998, and at a rate of 2.3 percent 
for each of the following three years. That 
forecast is only a bit more optimistic than fee 
latest from the Congressional Budget Office. 


CAPITAL GROWTH COMPANY, S.A. (Costa Rica), 
CAPITAL GROWTH FUND and 
CAPITAL GROWTH REAL ESTATE FOND. INC. 


Michael F. Armstrong, as the Receiver of Capital Growth Co., S.A. (Costa Rica) and 
Capital Growth Co., SA. (Panama), successors to the Capital Growth Fund and Capital 
Real Estate Fund, Inc. (collectively referred to as “Capital Growth Companies"), has 
applied for an order from the federal court to terminate the receivership in 
Securities and Exchange Commission v. Capital Growth Co. SA- (Costa Rica) et al., 
■to make certain final payments to the attorneys who assisted the Receiver, and to 
make a final distribution of the assets of the receivership. The Court has scheduled a 
hearing for August 1 5. 1 997. regarding the approval of fee Receiver’s plan. In order to 
have the opportunity to participate in fee distribution of the assets of Capital Growth 
Companies, any creditors and holders of shares or debentures of the Capital Growth 
Companies must file your application with the Receiver, Michael F. Armstrong, 1251 
Avenue of the Americas, 45th Floor, New York, N.Y. 1 0020-1 104 so that he receives 
your application by no later than May 23, 1997. THIS IS YOUR LAST AND ONLY 
CHANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF ASSETS. In order to meet 
this deadline, you should write to the Receiver at the above address immediately, or 
at the latest within four weeks of the date of this publication, requesting the 
application, if the Receiver does not receive your application by May 23, 1 997, then 
you will be barred from participating in the distribution of the assets, in response to 
your letter stating your desire to participate in the distribution, the Receiver will 
send you a copy of the Proposed Plan of Distribution, a claim form, and a letter 
summarizing the procedures of the Proposed Plan. The hearing may be adjourned 
from time to time by the Court without further notice. 

Michael F. Armstrong, Receiver 














PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL BERAIJO TRIBUNE, FRIDAXi FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


a nw at gact «a — wwm u a^ mmfcg J p eaa roc ro . 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-YeaF T-Bond Yield 


r 







5690 


Dollar in Deutsche marks n Dollar in Yen 



S O N D J F ’ ? ' 5 ' O N D J F 

1996 1997 1996 1997 





GM May Sell 20% of Delphi 


By Robyn Meredith 

Netv York Tima Service 

DETROIT — General Motors 
Corp. is considering selling as 
much as 20 percent of its huge 
automotive electronics and auto 
parts imits, said John Smith Jr, 
GM’s chairman and chief exec- 
utive officer. 

GM is in the process of adding 
its Delco Electronics Corp. to its 
Delphi Automotive Systems unit 
to form die world's hugest auto 
supplier, with 210.000 employees 
ana revenue of approximately $32 
billion. GM also acknowledged 
Wednesday drat it was cooperating 
with the Justice Department, 
which is investigating whether 


employees of GM or Volkswagen 
AG accepted kickbacks to steer 
contracts to auto suppliers. 

Mr. Stniih said that Delphi, race 
Delco is merged with it, “is es- 
sentially going to be a smart sys- 
tems, smart parts operation with a 
focus cm growth.” Delco is a sub- 
sidiary of GM’s Hughes Electron- 
ics Corp. 

GM announced last month that 
it would merge Delco with Delphi 
and that it would sell Hughes’ mil- 
itary businesses to Raytheon Co. 
for die equivalent of $9-5 billion, 
pending approval by die Pentagon 
and the Justice Department. 

Delco designs mid builds auto- 
motive electronics including ste- 
reos. collision wanting systems. 


electronic engine controls, nav- 
igation systems and air bag and 
anti-lock brake modules. Delphi 
makes brakes, radiators, heating 
and air-conditioning modules, 
ignitions, seats, axles and other 
automotive parts mid seUsthem 
to GM and other automakers. 

' If GM decides to sell part of 
Delphi, the stake sold “would not 
b e me at than 20 percent,” Mr. 
Snath sad. Companies incur 
if they sell mere than 20 percent of 
aunit. 

“Overall, the general reaction 
in the market would be to see it as 
a bigjpfus. for GM and for Delphi 
and for GM shareholders,” said 
David Bradley ,an analyst with JP. 
Morgan Securities. 


Acrophobia Sparks 

Wall Street Sell-Off 


Brill Is Selling Stake in Court TV 


Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


By 

and Paul Fs 

Washington Post Service 


Very briefly: 


CME to Drop Reuters Trade System 

CHICAGO (Bloomberg) — The Chicago Mercantile Ex- 
change will drop Reuters Holdings PLC’s electronic trading 
system and adopt a system developed by the french stock 
market authority, exchange officials said Thursday. 

“It clearly is a march forward and it’s in line wuh what the 
new century’s going to look tike,” said Leo Melamed, a 
former mercantile exchange c hairman . Officials cautioned 
that the exchanges signed a letter of intent and have not yet 
reached agreement. 

The exchanges that will be linked under the new system will 
be the CME; the New York Mercantile Exchange; the 
Nymex’s Comex division in the United States; the Matif, 
France's futures exchange; the SBF Paris-Bourse, the French 
stock market; and the Marches des Options Negociables, the 
French options exchange. 

• Compaq Computer Corp. is entering the market for per- 
sonal computers that are priced less titan $ 1,000 with a 
machine based on a new chip produced by Cyrix Corp. 

• CompuServe Corp. reported a loss for the financial third 
quarter of $14.2 million. A year earlier, the on-line service 
earned $9.4 million, or 13 cents a share. 

• Borland International Inc. will dismiss 300 workers, or 30 
percent of its work force, the second restructuring in die i 
four months for the software maker based in Scotts V* 
California. 

• Viasa, die troubled Venezuelan state airline, appeared 
doomed after Venezuelan government officials announced 
they would spend no more money to save the company. The 
airline’s principal owners, Iberia Airlines of Spain and the 
Venezuelan Investment Fund had raised hopes with a tentative 
deal in Madrid last month to save the airline. 

• Goldman, Sachs & Co., the Wall Street partnership, has 
named two new vice chairmen, Roy Zuckerberg and Robert 
Hurst, who will succeed Henry Paulson Jr. nyt. Bloomberg 


WASHINGTON — Steve Brill, 
the former lawyer who created a 
multimedia legal empire, pl? n< ? to 
sell his stake in the Conn TV cable 
channel and other interests to his 
corporate partner, Time Warner Inc. 

Mr. Bnll. whose channel gained 
attention by bringing gavel-to-gavel 
coverage of die OJ. Simpson crim- 
inal trial to millions of living rooms, 
is selling his share of American 
Lawyer-Media, the company that 
publishes American Lawyer and 


Legal Times Magazine, and Coun- 
sel Connect, an on-fine service for 
lawyers. Terms were not disclosed. 

Toe deal ends Mr. Brill’s rela- 
tionship with Time Warner. He and 
the media company have b«ri in- 
creasingly rocky negotiations for 
several months over the fate of the 
lemd publishing and TV holdings. 

This also rads Mr. Brill’s in- 
volvement in legal publishing, a 
field be entered as a 28-year-old 
lawyer and journalist nearly two de- 
cades ago. Mr. Brill said Wednes- 
day that he planned to stay in foe 
media business, but would not be 
specific about his plans. 


Time Warner will now own 46 
percent of Court TV, while NBC 
and the cable operator Liberty Me- 
dia Corp. will each own a 27 percent 
share. 

New York-based Hme Warner 
said it intended to sell American 
Lawyer-Media and Counsel Connect 
to reduce its debt. Once it buys Mr. 
Brill's holdings in American Law- 
yer. Time Warner will be able to sell 
a 90 percrat share of foat company; 
tiie balance is held by ihe Daily Mini 
& Trust, a British media company. 

Mr. BtiU, 46. said that selling his 
holdings was “emotionally 3ifS- 

CUlL” 


QmpMhy On r SvfFhm Dm**" 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
Thursday as money managers began 
to question whether they could ex- 
pect much more from foe market 
this year after the 10 parent gmos 
already posted by blue-chip issues- 

Stock prices may already reflect 
even foe most optimistic outlook for 
profits and economic, growth in 
199 7; analysts said. 

“It is impossible that we can 
■ continue at this. rare,’ ’ said Jeff Er- 
ickson, a money manager at Ad- 
vannis Capital Management Inc. 
“Earnings can’t be that sood.” 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
dosed down 92.75 points at 
6,92738, while losing issues rat- 
paced raining ones by a 7 -k> 4 ratio 
on tire New York Stock Exchange- 

The Standard & Poor’s 50B- 
share Index fell 9.72 points, to 
802.77. 

A drop in Treasury bond prices, 
and tire resulting higher yields, also 
weighed on stocks because of tire 
prospect of higher borrowing costs 
for companies. 

The price of the benchmark 30- 
year issue plunged 27/32 points, to 
99 24/32, taking the yield up to 6.64 
percent from 638 percent on Wed- 
nesday. 

Bond prices fell after reports on 
manufacturing and labor suggested 
foe economy may be strong enough 
to quicken inflation. 

The Federal Reserve Bank of 
Philadelphia said its regional eco- 
nomic index rose, in February, as 
did its index of prices paid to man- 
ufacturers, The government report- 


ed, meanwhile, that tire number of 
Americans applying for nrst-nme 
unemployment benefits rose less 
than expected last week, a sign the 
labor market remains strong. 

“Most of the economic news 
we’ve got points io lower inflation, 
but there are worries front d* kbar 

STOCKS 

marker.’’ said David Connors, head 
government trader at Credit Suisse 
First Boston. 

The government also said that 
housing starts rose 2 percent in 
January afterdropping 1 1 percent in 
December. 

The bond-market weakness sent 
financial issues lower, with Fleet 
Financial Group, Citicorp and First 

Ul p«t^ nn^odak fell after unveil- 
ing an Internet service that wifi let 
consumers view photos they have 
taken, order reprints and send Enmail 
pictures to friends and relatives. 

Drug stocks were lower as in- 
vestors took profits in a sector that 
has outperformed the broader mar- 
ket this year. Johnson & Johnson, 
Merck, Pfizer and Abbott Labo- 
ratories dropped. 

But there were some bright spots. 
Hasbro rose after the toymoker de- 
clared a 3-for-2 stock split and 
raised its quarterly dividend 20 per- 
cent. 

WellPoint Health Networks rose 
after it reported fourth -quarter earn- 
ings almost quadrupled as mem- 
bership in its managed heahh-care 
plans increased. (Bloomberg, API 


Japanese Stock Rally Forces Dollar Down Against Yen 


Ca^MbyOarSaffFnaDmpaeka 

NEW YORK — The dollar re- 
gistered its biggest one-day decline 
against the yen since September 
1995 on Thursday, as Japanese 
stocks soared amid optimism die 
government will buy depressed 
property held by banks. 

“If foe government buys up the 
property, that means better pro spects 
for economic growth, which helps 
foe yen,” said Matthew Robertson, 
an international bond portfolio man- 
ager at Neubexger & Berman. 

He noted that rising stocks also 
had the potential to draw foreign 
investors, who would need to buy 
yen in order to buy Japanese stocks. 
Japan's Nikkei 225-stock index rose 
to a six-week high Thursday. 


The dollar also dropped a gainst 
the Deutsche maik as bigger-than- 
expected increases in German money 
supply and business confidence rat 
speculation the Bundesbank would 
cut interest rates soon. 

The dollar closed at 122.455 yen, 
down from 124.425 yen Wednesday, 
at 1.6835 Deutsche marks, down 
from 1.6981 DM. at 5.6840 French 
francs, down from 5.7340 francs and 
at 1.4740 Swiss francs, down from 
1.4857 francs. The pound fell to 
$1.6114 from $1.6353. 

The dollar was pressured against 
foe mark by news that Germany’s 
M-3 money supply, the Bundes- 
bank's main inflation indicator, 
grew an annualized 1 1.7 percent in 
January from foe fourth quarter, 


more than double expectations and 
well above the Bundesbank’s 4 per- 
cent to 7 percent target range. 

Also, foe Ifo research institute 
announced that its business confi- 
dence index for Western Germany 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

rose 2.6 points In January, to 933, 
its highest level in more than a year. 
“The numbers suggest that pessi- 
mism over foe German economy is 
overdone,” said Marc Chandler, a 
currency trader at Deutsche Morgan 
Grenfell 

Germany's finance minister, 
Tbeo Waigel, added to pressure on 
the dollar when he said foreign ex- 
change rates were “now more in 


line with fundamentals.” 

Still, many analysts said they ex- 
pected the dollar to ultimately re- 
sume ihe rally that lifted it to a four- 
year high against the yen Friday and 
near a three-year peak versus the 
mark on Monday. Stronger econom- 
ic growth and higher interest rates in 
the United States than in Germany 
and Japan will push the dollar up, 
traders said. 

’ ‘In the long run, you want to boy 
dollars and sell marks, Swiss francs 
and yen.” said Ben Strauss, a cur- 
rency trader at Bank Julius Baer. 

“It’s an interest-rate play.” he 
added, based on economic growth 
differentials between foe United 
States and other countries. 

But Mr. Strauss and others agreed 


foe dollar would have difficulty sur- 
passing 125 yen in the next month. 
Finance ministers and central bankers 
from foe Group of Seven industri? 
alized nations said in a statement Feb. 
8 that the dollar has risen enough. 

“The G-7 was more worried about 
foe yen titan the marie,” said Okrv 
Trygg, head of foreign exchange at 
Swodbank. “Probably 125 yea is foe 
target they don't want broken.’* 

The Cr-7 comprises the United 
States, Japan, cWmany, Britain. 
France, Italy rad Canada. 

. News Wednesday that foe U.S. 
trade deficit with Japan grew 82 
percent in January from a year earli- 
er, according to Japanese figures, 
also weighed on the dollar. 

(Bloomberg, Market Mews) 


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U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


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Trading Activity 
NYSE 

Not ovtftote at prew Hme 


Nasdaq 


AMEX 

NOW 

ffw. 

Market Sates 

AdMonetd 

1M 

— 


□eefinw 

UntJanoTO 

TWolbsues 

NnyHftra 

06 

11* 

631 

a 

273 

110 

743 

ST 

NYSE 

Amro 

Npsdop 

New Lows 

5 

2 • 

tanVSha*. 


Nol nwtnti l u 81 pnwo Hwo 




Prrr. 

<3 


481 >42 

7222 

S41J77 676.70 


Dividends 

Cowptray Par Ant Roe Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Batco Indus * sm 2-25 3-73 

Goiomb 

A-appmsiHWTfj 

Moilne PcfrolTr _ 3199 2-28 3-28 

Mesa RoyaRyTr _ 29*3 2-28 4-30 

PadflcDuo- X -QS32 6-9 7-11 

tepADR 

PIQX QlDQunL: 

- W38 2-28 >14 



STOCK SPLIT 

griffon* KoontzCop 4 lor Iron 
pateI»Mralo« 3 ttr 7 spS • 
Habnj toe 3 for 2 spSL 
Penn Enterprises 2 farl spot 

sasSSffa^ 


Per Ant Rcc pay 

MWCoonBcnfc Q .185 >17 J-31 

OWoCrawBy Q J2 3-3 >10 

PoslPwperfia Q J95 3-31 4-11 

SbOTOMC O -Z7 >18 >2 

Slani PodflcftES 0 J1 4-17 >1 

WesBantnlnc O 39 >14 4-1 

INITIAL 

Ftffod Bqhn _ JOS M >17 

Hasbro Inc n _ J38 5-1 S-15 

Pw-AauG<wm - M >70 >20 

REDUCED 1 

M .705 209 >14 


AtoponSkm 


BvftsGoMMJ 

Hawkins □ 


STOCK 

_ 7«6 2*74 >28 
- S* >28 4-11 


B* 


in 

i 


Jk 


♦Ik 

♦e 

♦» 


.M 

ft 

ft 

ft 

-.ft 

-Ik 

♦to 

♦ft 

♦to 

♦ft 

•to 


lOiemleol 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
ErocuTonefaifSystsl for3rerenemflt 

INCREASED 

g^oloCo Q .14 >15 4.1 

HowUnsOwn S .09 >28 4-11 

MsyflqirerOOp Q .is >4 >11 


REGULAR 

AimrShMaFnd a 31 

Block HR. 

MSB Rid Inc 
MtmltawocCo 
AiarvJxOS, lister 
New YOric Times 
Nfln4s«i Cflfp 
NaRMrombK 
No rttniJ nB7 
TnatnaiR Core 
WasMn^OARirr. 


stert ADR; B^oyaM to 

ai ai oolfo j vg u ai toN . I 



Stock Tables Explained 

SrivApm ae onoflifiML and toas eflacr me pmUmSt aeeta pks AeOMent 

HttKMaoIttiftletenodngboy.WhBHi^jeiorskxkdMdendaiTVHJrtkigtoiSpenxntorfiiore 
h»berop^ttwtoortli)glvKwireige aid Midend aesftownloi lie new ri odBerty.Uitoai 
«*ewten2lBaiBtoafdfcWeii<fcateainwl<»« itia iiBn to b«gWoiiRefcd M<ifct t ii i Rt bL 
a - Arfdend a Em odra ( 2 }. b - oflmwt rele of Addend plus stock dhttead. e - BqoWattDfl 
dMdemL oc~ PE eocoedaWdOd -odled « - now yeailr lo».«d- toBlnitia last 12 onidtis. 
e • dfliftfcnd dedored or paM fa mttdH 12 mcntfi*. f - amual mlto Increased on fcst 
dedatOlaa. a - Aridond In CaiodiBn funds, sil^ocJto 15% imresMeneBiox. I - iMdend 
decRnel after sptt-ap or stodiiMdoniM-dMfeitdpiM Oils jmamittaiLdofoireiL or no 
oeffon token at talwt dvtdond modfag. K - dMdena declared or paU IIA year, an 
acaimuUtire issue w«i dMdends fa ansare. a - annual reto, reduced on last dedanrften. 
n - new Issue In the pat 52 weeks. Tire htfHow mg* begins with the rtafl of trading. 
ad> next day defarery. p-taBU dNfdsmL annual irte untoiowi. pflE - pffcB-eainlnas ralto. 
Q-dasad-ana mutual fuwLr>(MdBid declared vpaid faprecedfaglS amttito plwalodc 
Addend, i - stock split DMdend bepfai wflh dole of «NJL do -»Jea. f-Mddond paU Id 
stocX in preatfing 12 manta, esftnaied cash valire an «-*ridond oro*dtaWtadliin da». 
■-newyeaily TUgfi. y-trodfashaMed.il -In bankruptcy or rectfvtntiip orbefaB reapaabed 
undvilieBank7ii|RCrAc&orseanlllaa3*ianedtysvdicorede7Vi*.Ml'teReiidbffa)vtsd. 
wl - when issuetf «■ - wttii wainnls. 1 - ex-dMdend or atedaMto xCt - attfsMrelkn. 
xw^ - wWnut warants.r- BHMdend nd ndea in ¥A yM -yield. 2 - sola in UL 


Freb. 20, 1997 

Kan Law One age Opfat 


Grains 

CORN (C80T1 

MtenMiHii-ewiiirbuM 
«or»7 2K 2B» 78656 +3 96400 

May 97 2Wli HJ* 23716 +Jft HKJZ7 

Jul97 arto 7B 7 87ft +4to 7toVB 

SepW 2S2 I76to JRJto tJ* 1X175 

DeeW SOM 27« 279 *3 5L« 9 

BLR* s TLA. Wetfisdes 1594M3 
VtotTsownW 38L6C up USD 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

IM tarn- oaOont mt ton 
Mar 97 2X30 2070 2SIH) +470 SUM 

May 97 252.40 J4XX 2SU0 **» 29^83 

JUI97 3494)0 264» 2031 *150 21771 

Aug 97 34L50 2*1 JO 24L30 +3J» 

Sea 97 237 JB 21158 2J74B *12D 2X16 

0df7 2KH0 271 JD 2X00 +3J0 U3S 

Bst sales HA. WUXscfaS 3U51 
WKfsawiel 1081892 up 104 

SOYBEAN OMaan 

auaotoft-cMMiMrB) 

Mtr97 MX6 234Q 2U5 +US 324nf 

MW 97 2M) 2U0 2135 +(LX 77337 

J1677 XB5 X* 2*81 +0J8 14-514 

Align 3LS7 2L6B 7497 +<U1 1270 

Sean 2£5B TUB 25JX +CL22 173 

CU77 25.15 2195 25.15 +ET7 935 

Etosates HA. Wed's, sates ZL593 
AWse tmvt sunt off 589 

50YBEATS rCBOU 
MOO bu w lnfcnuwv- onto per towh*l 
Mcr97 7 S5ft 772 783 aMB 

HatW 781 773* 78314 +10ft 5M77 

JJ77 78515 774 7*3 +101* 37J64 

Acs 97 777V. 7S7 777 +9 74B2 

Sep 97 7M 73M 738ft +5* 2412 

EsLsotes HA. Wed’s, sates 95J21 . 

Wed's open In* 180788 up 2552 

WHEAT (OK7T1 

ASOO bu minimum- cents pro HjsM 
Ntr 97 365 3£1 363 +3ft 20481 

Atovf 7 363ft 356ft 347 +51* 20366 

•MW 353 346 351ft +*ft 20557 

SOP 97 3Hto 3SD 2Sto +Sto 3JB 

Est sates NA WKT&.SC 68 S 19A16 
WecrsopeaM 7A938 up 50 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMBQ 
40000 Ob- crocs per to. 
APT97 6BJD 6772 
Jun97 65JB 600 
AUB97 6430 6172 

Od 77 aas 67 JD 
Dec 97 TOUT 6965 
Feb 98 7L56 7V0 


Hfgh Low Am Opa Opfar 


ORANSE JUKE oteno 

1A0W to*.- croft pro te. 

Mar 97 82.15 BOJO (250 +120 

MOV 97 M80 S2J0 IU0 +2JB 

jwre 8770 sm vjo * 20 s 

sen 97 9<ua S4d 9uo + 1.45 

Etf-sdes NX Wed’s, scats X5BQ 

Wort's apron ) off 2S237 


Metals 

GOLD (NCM70 

TOO tmy ul, OaOm pw tr u y m. 
Rift 97 35Z3Q 34670 35233 
Mar 97 3*7.* 

APT97 35138 3H58 3SUJ3 
Jon 57 355JD MX 35480 
A0097 357 JO 15280 35780 
Od97 358 JB 3SU0 359.SI 
Deere 36150 35550 16U0 
Feb 98 355-10 

Est.ft*ps HA. Wtoft-sateo 
weftoprow 192 ^« off 23*6 


AUS 

9377 

xvn 


+ 480 1817 

23 

+i00 94287 
♦500 354« 
♦MO 1043* 
+5 l20 S.T27 

♦49 14500 
3427 

3M*0 


MBA L0» Close Chgo OpM 

10-YEAR FRENCH 60V. BONDS (MATOT 
FFSOtWOO-panllOOpct 
Mar 97 13242 132.10 132426— 046142439 
Jtai 97 1314X1 13082 1 3D. 94— 034 20517 
Sep 97 12932 12956 1294B— 0X2 1478 
Doc 97 HT. HT. 9056-036 0 

ESt VRtaBK 185^405. Open fat 164534 off 
678. 

ITALIAN OOVRRNMEMT BOND CUFFH) 
ITL200imMM.p|»0<raopd 
NUV7 73158 72930 .13056 +849 7214« 
Jtm97 129 JO 12a80 129 J2 +081 10969 
Sop97 12942 12940 12983 >066 600 

BA softs 9M^Prer.*ties.»lll 


M0h Law am Ogo OpM 


Industrials 
COTTON 2 weno 
SPDQ Bn. -Croft ptrto. 

Mar 97 7239 72J0 7145 +042 T04B5 

Mov 97 7445 7190 7420 +035 3Wfl 

JuU7 7565 7535 7S48 +03* 1130* 

0097 BUS 1375 

acre 7UD 7407 7430 +033 H4*B 

M0P1I 77 JM 7780 7780 +0.12 910 

EV. softs HA WmTs sates 30000 
wort's open M I off 7U20 


NBA1WSOL (NMBO 


HI QRAOECOPPBt MCM» 

25800 BB^oroft pro IB. 

Fab 97 rnjo in JO 11185 -0*0 1391 

McrW 1U80 1I0M 11140 -030 2331* 

Apr 97 W980 10930 109J 2816 

Moyre 10840 W780 H*LOO +085 0238 

J0T97 10470 M4JB KAJP +(L» 065 

8497 10170 WUO 1QS30 +415 47*1 

AUB97 10415 0 - . .. ■ 

Srore HUD 10320 70320 +005 2861 

Oet97 KOJS 

EH softs HA Wrors.srtes 11*81 - 
Wert’s open int SL378 op 3303 


Pre«. span lot: 14KS3 op U68 
EURODOLLARS (CMBQ 

SimfltorveftDOaPpct. 

*to 00 9387 9145 9346 —OR* 448» 

JunOO 9387 9X*0 9141 -404 34852 

S*P 00 9138 9136 9137 -08} 312H 

Dec 00 9131 9028 91* -OJO 2 53# 

McrOl 9130 9338 93J5 — OM 24888 

JunOl 9335 9123 9021 -OW 21309 

Sep 01 9331 21)9 5020 —AM 14952 

Dec 01 9X13 9X11 9112 —00* 9806 

Mcr02 9X1* 9X11 9X12 -4)8* UO 

JunM 91W 9X06 9X07 -40* 5896 

sap 02 9X05 9382 9183 -OJK 5801 

Dec 02 UM 9294 9295 -08* 5JB9 

Est. soles HA WoiTLSdas 3*7379 
MtaftOPTOtt 2334577 OP 240V 
BWTEH POUND ICMBO 


MorW 3980 
Apr 97 SLfa 
May 97 57.70 
Junre 5660 
JulW 5*30 
Aua 97 56J0 
Sep 97 5730 

0097 5 JO 
NOV97 9L*0 

Deere 9LB4 


58.10 

5630 

KJ 0 

55JO 

5X60 

5*30 

5*39 

57.15 

5730 

5885 


5836 —139 3X021 
5490 -430 27J97 
J6JB —7.79 9J8I 
2LH -189 7865 
5530 -089 4SU 
5420 -4174 4068 
5470 -039 UM 
5730 -039 33B 
5730 —039 im 
-VS SM 


6479 

6420 

6783 

6987 

71.15 


♦037 *459* 
+142 18J86 
♦445 19,150 
♦085 12330 
+032 4633 
+425 UM 


EAvOes NA Wetfs.« 8 es md0 
Wert's open M 19X556 op " 

l+B«8 CATTLg CCMafl 
58800 tos^ eroa pot ft. 

M3T97 sue BA 7 MM +080 S3B 

Aprre m3 6440 »J7 +a*J x*a 

Ma*97 7LK 7225 XX +837 XBB 

A OB 97 7440 73J0 7415 

Sep 97 7495 7425 7480 +087 180 

Od97 7585 7585 7535 +032 288 


SLVBtOeOOO 

moo kw ot- croft pro fto» ■> 

Pro 57 510) 14 

**cr 97 52400 9480 52X50 +450 «,185 

APT97 5218* 2 

MB797 53080 51980 5M80 +430 24114 

JJ77 SHJC SUB 5*400 +i*P 70,777 

SBP97 S39JD 52450 5»J0 +580 X15B 

Dec 97 5*780 5349 5*7JB +7^ 5355 

JanN 54291 9 

Est sates NA Wert's, sates 198*0 
Wert's open kt 99882 up 419 

PLATWUM (NMBU 
Rkno^MmM'kwsi 
Aprre 37X50 31480 3723B +380 T4«l 

JulW 37450 37400 37450 *130 X401 

0097 37889 37088 S75JB +231 1397 

Jal98 . 37580 1,111 

EHsfaes HA Wnfisotes 2894 
Wert's open W 3413* off 6*0 

One Previous 

LONDON METALS OJA El 
D oflara permt5cjaa_ _ 

w^ Gr iw*ft 1572ft 1573ft 
Fwwort 1605JJQ 16O6J70 160580 160680 


Mar 97 2*186 ljEBSS 18M2 
Jro97 18124 18040 18080 
Sft- 97 18088 

□acre ^ JJ052 

Estsates NA Wort's. softs 7393 
WftfsoproW 39877 up 197 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBO 


XflSXO^lS^ZTft 2429ft 
233380 233580 23*280 234X00 


♦080 
+ 0*7 
+837 
+035 
+447 

+032 

Bt softs NA Wed's. ltfB X7*3 

Wert's open H 22*49 off 6* 

HOSS-Lfftl (CMBO 
40800 tos- orois pro to. 

AjrW 7X25 7X40 7280 

Jun97 7920 7530 7473 

JW97 7789 7470 7785 

AUB97 7430 7X35 7385 

Od 97 6780 6475 66J0 

Dec 77 65.17 64*0 6440 

Ert. softs NA Wert's. 


^cal 


66080 

667M 


66280 

66980 


65880 

66680 


Mv97 3 365 I3U 7363 
Jon97 7426 740* 7487 

srore 7473 74 a j*o 
Deere 7505 7500 7509 

Est soft* ha Vtod'sftte s \2AK 
Rftrtft open ini 56779 up TOO 
HERMAN MARK (QIBU 
12 SM 00 mortis, s pro more 
Mer97 J951 3890 8936 

7*1 97 M00 MSB J9U 
Sep 97 M73 

DTO97 . MHO 

Stsates NA WHfcsotes 79MB 
WetfsopenBrt 9730 up 2027 
JAPAiesffYEN {CMWl 
IZJmBSanyan, * pro 108 vro 
MOT 97 JUS 80*6 JU1 

Junre 8206 8200 82*8 
Srore 8272 

FA son NA fttefi rotes J7JB3 
WadMroenW 01718 off 3D 
smsontANCianst) 

UMBO francs, sacr Crane 
Ha 97 ABM 8737 8783 

Jun^ 8057 4803 68*0 

Sro 97 jm 

£st softs na Hftrtft.roftr 34212 
Wert's open W SUP 


34212 

2766 

1891 

8 


42371 

9879 

XMO 

74* 


998U 

urr 

2819 

38 


77.131 

4732 

675 


518*0 

2.901 

1805 


318M 

27J83 

1589 

law 

9887 

8808 

78** 

98» 

3.16* 

4*07 

7JC 


+LU 168*6 
♦035 9871 

+ai5 4255 
-QJ 2 2 JW 
— 0J0 1^1 
-435 779 

tom 


Wed's open M 34160 off H6Z 

P0RKBaXtt5(CMet) 

4M00 Ds-cra pro to 
FTO97 7535 7X40 7389 -487 

Mar 97 7580 . 7190 7450 -425 

Wav 97 7UD 74E 7XE +0JS 

MV 75^ 7190 7*88 +032 

AW 97 7380 71 TO 71® . +0J0 

Est sates HA WTO's, sales UB 

WlrfSopwW 783* off 24* 


3*4 

2858 

XSM 

SSI 

525 


a. 

U 8 S 

10377 

SM 


Food 

amuNCSE) 

M metric kns- 5 partea 
Mtr97 123 1710 1H5 —40 

Me* 97 u M UH asr 42 

JulW 017 T2M T299 — 10 

Sep 97 1342 132* 027 -4 

Deere U6i os vk — « 

BS. sates HA Wftfs. sates 1974 

WetfsTOiw lure oir no 

coFrsacotaa 

DJBOte- (torts Pro b. 

Mrore 1115} 17*80 17MB +170 5887 
MavW 17180 16280 W-B +129 22836 
Julf7 UM 15400 16025 +495 6.145 
Scare 15788 UUB 15L80 —480 38*0 
Est. toes HA Wed's, toes 2UW 
Vteftopentef 4UI* Off 3* 


Spot 774000 775008 779530 790530 
Rrroted 783080 7B4080 789080 790080 
Til 

SMB - 5W08P 597080 601000 602000 
Sward 601080 602080 605580 606000 
ZhK Spodal IMGradW 
Spat 1195ft 1196ft 1207ft 1200ft 
Forward 121880 121880 123480 123180 

Wgft Law dose Chgo Optot 

Rnandal 

UST.MLLS (CMTOQ 
Sl m— on BtsoriOBpe*. 

War 97 9584 9583 9SB* +481 5802 
Jun97 9435 94S8 949* -401 4713 

Sep 97 9482 IMS 

□row 9*88 are 

Estates HA Wert's. sates 388 
WftftroenM 10871 up 39 

5 YR. TREASURY KSOTJ 

S104000 Prtn- pb A 4ftM«100 pel 

MorreW-12 107-00 H9-45 —10 18U14 

Junf7 18680 106-50 106-S5 — 09 345*3 

Sro 97 166-0 

Est sates NA W Hfxsdn 40,952 

Wert's open W 270,10? up S« 

nYH TREASURY (OtoT) . 

SMOrtNprtn-pft 4 3M0 0* N8PO 
Wrrenui 100-2* US-26 —06 364099 

JUTl97 1DM2 149-05 10-08 -00 

srore ■ w-s 38W 

Est toes HA MW*, toes 9280 
MrtftopenW 349J75 off 310 

US TREA9KY RONDS CC8UT7 
Mnc M jjMroroite32Hfl»ari80Pto 
*Ar97nx4t 113-05 113-00 -12 C3885 

Jon 97 117-03 TU-22 1134* . -13 47850 

srore n>u n>n m-n — n nji? 
dk re lo-oi m-a 112-01 —ns xtta 

Est toes .NA WKfSMte 38I8SB 
wetfsroeote* 50JS6 u> su . 

UMCGUTOIPra) 

WlttB 



|A® -081 107811 

&S=23 Sg 

9684 -081 )«4« 

S S= 8 ffi JSS 

ss am 

w 

ssz r 

9451 —I 


E3t to ui. 24U765. PlteUlR 1SQ.147 
PJTO.eproftL- UHa* to 3263 


181183* UP 

««^rr^ua 6 fUFra 
SSOMpQ.iroglJOO.-- 
toff ns 

Jonre 9159 

srore 9X41 

Oe&7 9X38 9330 9337 

«22? g-17 9X10 9X17 

Jo«98 9109 9X03 9X89 

STOJB 9382 9237 9Xffl 

DeOO 9235 9239 9235 

Mafft 9289 9X83 92JB 

«5S 

Detf9 927? 92JJ 92,73 +o 

EsLsaftc 64362. Pmr, softs KUU ~~ ~"~ 

Piw-roro 88 : 514M5 up 1M*4 

XjWQHTH Pi BOR IMAT1P) 

FF5B«on-pteefl00pel 

ssfisg 


T24fl6 

tag ^fg 

+ 403 2X114 

+4.03 iaa» 

+ O 0 * 886 * 

+ M* 7807 

+ 083 7p<H 


^.toes HA ftfttfs. sates 2S.W5 
WNTsopTOim 104215 UP 1516 

UQHT SWEET CRUDE (HMH0 
ItiOObftL-OUtanaroabL 
Mar 97 2278 2156 2155 -083 *4*01 

97 22JD 2U3 2170 -463 768H 

May 97 218* HJJ 2183 —051 41,230 

Xnjr 2183 2183 5170 -0*3 37733 

tore UM 2088 —<M7 16869 

2-5! S3 5 71 -041 tton 

5BB97 20JU 2050 3OS0 — ILO 15581 

0097 2063 2035 240 -L3S i Sp 

NWW 2M6 ffl85 2MS -0.14 ?3» 

Deere 20.T5 20.15 -031 1490 

Jan 98 2X25 20.15 20.15 — 0JD 13J71 

RAW 8125 2X12 2X12 —0.17 4172 

Mgr» 2X22 1X00 2088 -423 1W1 

Eststees HA WOcTs. so*bs 85845 
Wert's open irtf 384946 off 7920 

NATURAL CAS 04MSU 
lUOOmm bnr*.Snro mm b*u 
«O r 97 2JO0 IJ35 1975 

to* - ’ 7 2815 1830 1.945 

Moyre 2820 U5B 1765 

toire 2805 1J5D 1.988 

tore mo L965 18B5 

to'O’? 170 1790 

Srore 2825 2800 2810 

OOV7 2MI zm tax 

Jtorre 2J75 1150 2 IB 

Dto 97 2285 2870 2J7D 

toiM 2820 2JOO X3M 

Sjates NA Wed’s toes 4&J22 
WTO 's open int 174752 Off 2237 
UNLEADB3GASOUHE (UMBO 
*ue» roc eron pro pal 
Mro 97 *460 620 (295 -U3 3580* 

to* - 97 *680 6420 6450 -186 V.fS 

Moyre 6X90 6435 6455 -181 14752 

toire «.» t3JD *405 —186 9817 

tore *370 4270 070 -181 5.1M 

tote 97 Stop. 6280 C2JDB -071 4031 

tttos 17JBI 

nenoMiH 90.107 to 710 
GAS OIL (I PH 

rtoRoro per metric to - tote a* 100 Ions ■ 

"SB !S® -280 30879 

A« 97 17675 17X25 17375 —275 9882 
MorW 17680 17X50 17480 -VS0 
■JWire 1J5» 17580 17580 —175 
J«97 17675 17*80 17680 —180 
to097 N.T. HT. 17780 -QJ5 
Sepjre N.T. NT. 17880 -075 
OCJ97 HT. N.T. 178.75 —180 

No* re 10080 17980 17980 - 1.00 

Dto 97181808080 18025 —1,00 5832 
EsLsatate 17,234. open faU 57827 up 7*3 
BRENT Q| LOPP 

U*- ri^0OM|»rfaBfref- ftte 0*18001 benrah 
Morn 1 2082 2087 2080 —085 *2.99 
2026 1978 1979 —083 30809 
IM? 1982 ^fiU3 

19to 19A3 -0J» 

1980 1982 1980 —075 
]9-*9 19-49 19.19 —072 

l ’- 10 

K-5 32*11 J ,jn -tus 

19.1* l&ta 1853 -022 
JJ2 ’W9 IM5 -0.19 
1880 1876, 1876 —0.18 




Si 


son 

888 * 

X640 

ys 


1289* 

4319 

5818 

4066 

ISO 

451* 

3J73 

005 


UHl 


pd. softs: 907?!. nro toro&cs 


♦ ooMJanp 

+ H0 17871 . 


: Stoip-iPlnto - . 

SS' llS TU5 ^ tw 

tore we jag idjv -to* jure ^reiaSmio laiso +0012*0210 

yre MU». M8S 1X76 +00 Ztlli Junre 10X69 10227 1BU9 + MS 43flU 

sties 2SM83. Rwr;*0teBMU79 

Werfj ocro Int 1*7,106 UP MS PiteLoorobde BU8 ■ «p 4973 


SB ^=SSiKS 

££ £ 5% 9530^037 jqiS 

™ 2 958* 9585—085 ui, 

£0 99 9583 «21 

DOC 99 9530 9580 SS-OM 7J97 

1^*^*67229^ ^^alf 

waasgjsjipp; 


toirre 

May 97 

Jura re 
toy re 

toi#re 

Sure 
0097 
No* 97 
DOC 97 
■ton 98 

19,901. Open Ent: 152,1*2 up 

Stack Indoxwo 

3?££-"***»**> 

Sb ss SS B ^S’SS 

w 

irt »!5x 1 up a 853 WO 

{■**> 9^908 5§6 Eo 258X0— 17JM24.W1 
JWW2S9U 25755 2589 0— 16J0 23.79* 
V. *®t0 2589.5 — 17.50 217 


*v 


Mare 

Junre 

srore 

□acre 

MotH 
/w9S | 


Ire 

s ss mm am 


nmLmSSfnt 25-*** M,N 

ww-OBTOhL: 294260 op UJ5 


*R 

l J ^£ s ^ w * u,n * 2a93AOp«taU 67342 off 


“S" H - T HT 43008 + 2J0 1801 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


PAGE 17 
PAGE 15 


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EVG Seeks 
In the U.S. 


an Insurer 
and Allies 


In Europe Banking 


B loomberg News 

■ AMSTERDAM — Tm™ 

i. _ micrna- 



. — . x M»»uici..wmie in- 
creasing its European activities be- 
fore the introduction of the single 
currency, the euro. ^ 

„ focusing on both,” said 

Rudd Polet, a spokesman for the 
Dutch bank and insurer. “We cchS 

W r 51 ^ Europe now as a new region a 
* new country.” 

• No specific talks were under way 

yet in the United States, Mr. Polet 
sud, but ING hopes to complete a 
deal this year or in 1998. 

, “Jhey’ve got about 23 billion to 
3 billion guilders to spend m the U.S^ 
.Without additional capital needed,'"* 
said Jean-Raul van Bavel of F. van 

Tax Bill Erodes 
Mannesmann Net 


Bloomberg News 

DUSSELDORF — Mannes mann 
AG, a machinery and telecommu- 
nications company, said Thursday 
its 1996 net profit fell 14 percent 
because ofhigher taxes and one-time 
charges at its engineering division. 

Net profit fell to about 600 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks ($3543 mil- 
lion), according to preliminary fig- 
ures. from 701 million DM. 

- A surge in sales at its telecom- 
munications division, however, 
helped 1996 pretax profit rise 10 
percent, to about 1 billion DM, in line 
with expectations. Mannesmann said 
it would raise its dividend to 9 DM 
from S DM. Shares in die company 
fell 5.50 DM. to 67150 DM. 

Sales rose a better- than-ext 
8 percent in 1996, to 34.7 
DM. as revenue from telecommu- 
nications surged. Profit at Mannes- 
mann ’s telecommunications divi- 
sion more than doubled from 464 
million marks in 1995, leading to a 
higher tax bill for 1996. 

Mannesmann said the number of 
subscribers to its D2 mobile-phone 
service grew to 2.3 million by the 
end of 1996, an average of 70,000 
new customers per month since 
rates were cut in October. 


Lanschot Banldcrs NV. “They have 
good possibilities, and they want to 
increase their U.S. portfolio.” 
Aegon NV, a Dutch rival, outbid 
December when it bought 
Providian Coip.’s insurance unit for 
$33 bilfion in stock and 
debt. Aegon is the No. 22 European 
insurer. ING is No. 12. 

“We were almost successful” 
with Providian, Mr. Polet said, “but 
another company's bid was higher 
than what we wanted to pay.” 

ING is capable of buying 
something on the scale of the Aegon 
purchase, said Henk Brouwer of 
Bank Bangert Pontier. 

In Europe, where ING ranks 
No. 26 among batiks in temre of 
assets, the company is looking more 
at alliances and joint ventures than 
acquisitions, Mr. Polet said. 

The Netherlands is expected to be 
among the first members of the 
single currency planned for 1999. 

The cost to iNfr of adapting to the 
euro, said the chairman. Aad Jacobs, 
would be 200 mjlltpn to 300 milli on 
guilds ($105.1 million to $157.7 
million). For the first nine months of 
1997, ING has put aside 150 million 
guilders on the insurance side and 
125 milli on on tbe banking side. 

“ING has to be more broadly 
based in other countries,” said Peter 
van Doesburg of Stroeve Eflfecten- 
bank. “A good solution would be 
cross-holdings — not necessarily 
takeovers. A joint venture would be 
good for ING.” • . 

ING will very likely look in 
France and Gennany for possible 
alliances, he said. 

“These are the real countries 
where you have to consider alli- 
ances or takeovers,” Mr. van Does- 
bizrg said. “But there you have high 
prices with relatively low profits.” 
ING owns 20 percent of Bauque 
Bruxelles Lambert SA of Belgium, 
and analysts suggested it would aim 


to jump from Belgium to France. 

“We are not going 10 undertake a 
large number of small projects over 
the full range of our activities,” Mr. 
Jacobs said. “Instead we will focus 
on specific segments in which we 
inlead to build up significant marke t 
positions. ” These include direct mar- 
keting, employee benefits, corporate 
finance and asset management 


Prodi Mini-Budget Stirs Debate 

Move to Cut More Spending Rankles Allies and Foes 


Renters 

ROME — Prime Minister Ro- 
mano Prodi ran info trouble from 
die opposition and bis coalition 
allies Thursday after announcing 
he would pass a mini-budget to 
ensure Italy was in shape to be- 
come one of the founding members 

of foe European single currency. 

Economic commentators, echo- 
ing foe fears of ordinary Italians, 
wondered whore Mr. Prodi was 
going to find foe cash for fresh cuts 
in a runaway deficit just two 
months after passing a 1997 
budget- He has already promised 
there would be no new taxes. 

“It's time to leave ambiguity 
behind,” urged foe financial daily 
Q Sole 24 Ore in an editorial. 


The ruling “majority must 
choose a precise line and show its 
cohesion, if it has any,” foe news- 
paper said. 

Mr. Prodi's sudden decision to 
move ahead with foe long-rumored 
mini-budget exposed strains in his 
ruling center-left coalition. 

Massimo D’Alema, foe leader 
of the Democratic Party of the Left, 
the former Communists who are 
the largest partner in foe govern- 
ment, had said Monday that a mini- 
budget was inevitable but Mr. 
Prodi had retorted within hours 
that no decision had been made. 

■ When, on Wednesday, Mr. Prodi 
said be had decided to pass a mini- 
budget after all, foe party deman- 
ded an urgent meeting to clarify the 


measures h would contain. 

Mr. Prodi has said he would wait 
until official accounts are out next 
month before detailing the size and 
scope of the mini-budget, but news- 
paper reports said it was expected 
to contain a “contribution’ from 
pensioners, changes in severance 
pay, health cuts, a rise in the cos: of 
gasoline and cigarettes and pos- 
sibly an increase in foe sates tax. 

The plan also sparked criticism 
from the hard-line Refounded 
Communist Party, whose support 
gives Mr. Plrodi a parliamentary 
majority. The party leader, Fausto 
Bertinotti, set down two conditions 

— no spending cuts, no new taxes 

— for its support. Union Leaders 
have also attacked the pb» 


Bonn Asks Multiparty Jobs Drive 


Reuters 

BONN — Germany's coalition 
government appealed Thursday 
for a cross-party drive to battle a 
national jobs crisis and said that, 
despite strained state finances, it 
would plow more cash into job- 
creating investments. 

But, days before coalition lead- 
ers were to meet over tax reform 
with chiefs of the opposition Social 
Democratic Party, leaden of that 
party assailed the government for 
policies that they asserted had put 
4.7 millio n people out ofwork. 

The Social Democratic parlia- 
mentary leader, Rudolf Scharping, 
said that government tax and wel- 
fare reform proposals had “de- 


generated into meaningless prom- 
ises and false starts — nothing 
more.” 

“The greatest risk to Germany as 
an industrial center is foe policy of 
this government,” he said in par- 
liamentary debate on the govern- 
ment’s annual economic report 

Turning his fire on the 14-year 
record of Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 
who did not speak, Mr. Scharping 
sai± '‘No government has lied to 
the people as often as this one. Like 
no government before, you have 
failed to plan for the future.” 

Economics Minister Guenter 
Rexrodt stood by foe official fore- 
cast of 23 percent growth in 1997, 
urging support from all sides to 


achieve a turnaround on employ- 
ment this year. To create jobs, he 
said, 30 billion Deutsche marks 
($17.8 billion) in tax cuts must 
been enacted quickly. Mr. Rexrodt 
reaffirmed the government goal of 
halving unemployment by the year 
2000. 

Finance Minister Theo Waigel 
announced an investment drive to 
help the so-called Mi tie Island of 
smaller companies. He said a 
budget deficit of 2 3 percent of 
gross domestic product — meeting 
the Maastricht deficit target of 3 
percent to quality for European 
monetary uruon in 1999 — could 
be achieved with Social Demo- 
cratic cooperation. 


Intershop Sets Investor Paybacks 


Bloomberg News 

ZURICH — Intershop Holding 
AG said Thursday it planned to pay 
back 137 million Swiss francs 
($923 nuDion) in capital to in- 
vestors. joining a growing number 
of Swiss companies in paying more 
attention to shareholders’ demands. 

The move comes after foe com- 
pany ’s major investors, Winterthur 
Insurance Co. and BZ Group, took 
control of Intershop, pressed for a 


change in management of the real- 
estate company and called for a 
greater focus on earnings. Intershop 
also said it would sell its U.S. prop- 
erty portfolio and focus on Europe 
in a bid to increase earnings. 

“Intershop’s decision to concen- 
trate on shareholder value bears foe. 
signatures of its main sharehold- 
ers,” said Alain Oberhuber, an ana- 
lyst at Union Bank of Switzerland, 
whose biggest shareholder is BZ 


Investor’s Europe 


London ' 
FTSE 100 Index 

; 4550 • 

- 4400 - 



Parle 

CAC40 


2500 s orTo T f 

1996 1907 


38,10 ' 8 "CrN D'J'F" 

1996 1997 



1950: S’O N r DJ'F’ 

1996 1997 


Exchange 

Index ■ 

Thursday 

.Close 

Piev. 

Close 

% 

□range 

Amatsdrat 

A£X 

733.71 

73623 

-0.61 

Bnasoia 

f&r20 

2,103,33 

2,104.65 

-0.06 

Frankfurt 

OAK 

3,196.03 

3^33.75 

-1.17 

Copenhagen 

Stock Mffiket 

548,92 

549J22 

+0.13 

Helsinki 

HEXGwiaral- 

2,903.18 

2,660,51 

+1.49 

Oslo 

OBX 

62JL40 

620.75 

+057 

London 

FTSElOO 

4y3S6.10 

4,357.40 

-0.03 

Ma skhi 

Stock Excharge 

4752B 

481.20 

-1.23 

m tan 

mbtel 

12^57.00 12.160.00 +1.62 j 

Paris 

CAC40 

Z575^4 

2,594.76 

-0.75 

StBddwki 

SX 16 

2,795.69 

2^19.14 

-0.83 

Vienne 

ATX 

1^13.10 

1^13.75 

-0.05 

Ztalch 

SPI 

2,875.19 

2,870.95 

+0.15 

Sotmx: Tetekurs 


ImciAolRaLaJ lIciakSTnbunc 

Very briefly: 


Group. “It has to be a positive de- 
velopment” 

The announcement follows cap- 
ital paybacks by several other Swiss 
companies, including Danzas AG, 
the transport and distribution com- 
pany, and ABB AG. parent of the 
engineering company ABB Asea 
Brown Boveri Ltd. Swiss compa- 
nies launch capital paybacks be- 
cause of the unfavorable tax treat- 
ment of share buybacks. 


• Investor AB, the main financial vehicle of Sweden's Wal- 
lenberg family, said 1996 pretax profit more than tripled as it 
posted a rate-time gain of 12.4 billion kronor ($1.67 billion) 
from the sale of 55 percent of the track and bus maker Scania 
AB. Pretax profit rose to 9.60 billion kronor from 3.05 billion 
kronor in 1 995. Earnings suffered from an operating loss of 1.40 
billion kronor in Saab AB, its wholly owned aircraft unit. 

• GEC-Marconi. the defense unit of General Electric Co, of 
Britain, plans to cooperate with Thomson-CSF of France to 
develop missile guidance systems. General Electric has said it 
would like tighter links with Thomson-CSF, although it is 
unlikely to bid for the company. 

• Rank Group PLC, the British leisure company that op- 
erates Hard Rock Cafes around the world, plans to create 
3,000 full-time jobs in Britain this year. The company said 
1 996 profit, after an exceptional charge of £232 million ($375 
million), was £65 million, down from £515 million in 1995. 

• Compagftie Bancaire SA posted a 1996 net loss of 1.23 
billion French francs ($215.1 million), compared with a net 
profit of 602 million francs in 1995. The company took rate- 
time charges to cover real-estate losses and reorganization 
costs. 

• Dresdner Bank AG said operating profit rose 40 percent, to 
2.8 billion Deutsche marks ($1 .65 billion). The bank will raise 
its 1996 dividend to 1.45 DM from 1.35 DM and pay a special 
bonus of 10 pfennig to commemorate its 125th anniversary. 

• Moody's Investors Service said it was highly probable 
European monetary union would start on time in 1999; the 
credit rating agency said Austria, Belgium, Finland, France. 
Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg and foe Netherlands were 
likely to be in the “first wave'* of participants. 

• Volvo AB has offered to buy Champion Road Machinery 
Ltd., a Canadian maker of road-building equipment, for 173 
milli on Canadian dollars ($1273 million). Bloomberg. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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BJ4 842 645 8J2 

690 3 180 375 

980 TJX 9J2 9.13 

“ 1033 1036 1035 

651 9J4 929 

4JD 466 461 

298 295 295 297 

.656 651 651 633 

480 420 454 444 

682 660 675 640 

096 0JB 039 689 

677 520 671 676 

1620 1494 1616 14*6 

782 787 7J7 782 

460 380 423 429 

663 5 659 680 

240 2 2X4 233 

735 777 731 779 

285 220 - 233 137 

412 401 410 402 

545 5J* 61* 632 

2 181 184 1.94 

492 4*5 487 488 

477 472 *74 473 

1X50 1387 13*0 1349 
211 207 208 289 

. 5 48* 493 532 

BIB 786 6U 885 
699 6*3 583 585 
2J2 209 2 JO 212 

687 S 667 651 
787 747 787 7 JO 

180 131 132 132 

664 640 643 64S 

533 615 615 633 

662 5 584 581 

42S lUM 419 401 
4*5 419 4*5 414 

780 780 779 781 

280 343 X46 249 

1187' 202 1187 1186 
47B 471 473 474 

605 662 673 681 

328 11B 220 326 

940 930 98* 933 

240 230 220 -tJJS 

67] 627 428 *25 

1050 ' 9 986 9.11 
604 492 493 505 

264 is zb xa 

3J9 113 111 XJ£ 

17 J* 1781 1784 1780 
670 660 687 672 

159 we IS 151 

337 11* 128 158 

7 690 693 7 

1085 1080 1173 1081 
975 *83 987 988 

183 180 182 UT 

923 *88 943 941 

778 781 781 

742 740 740 

.7 685 7 696 

4.16 081. .ITT 60S 

19 UT 157 450 

160 3 140 145 

678 670 674 .670 

630 583 583 586 

523 610 S20 . 623 

288 245 207 286 


Madrid 


**fSiSSs 

osa 

CM2 


190M 

19310 

19570 

19930 

ACESA 

1730 

1710 

1/15 

1730 

Agora Bwotai 

S«» 

5650 

5660 

5790 

Anmksla 

BBV 

5790 

050 

5/40 

8640 

5780 

8670 

S/A> 

8000 


1100 

1085 

1095 

1090 

3«n*taiw 

2M» 

20070 

2 raw 


Bco CBrtre Hlsp 

3770 

3/2b 

3770 

3/95 

Bco Exterior 

2850 

2815 

7835 

2035 

Bat Popular 

26790 

26400 

26/ /0 

26000 

BcaSontatar 

9860 

97BC 

9/W 

9880 

CEPSA 

4250 

4Z10 

4215 

4260 

Caffinerte 

2555 

1485 

2506 

2555 

IK*" 

N10 

9040 

7B40 

8868 

7040 

9020 

8000 

9000 

fecsa 

1230 

120b 

1205 

1230 

GralWorel 

33490 

33060 

33140 

33360 


1660 

1538 

1640 

1666 


2680 

015 

2660 

2700 

Rapsd 

563) 

5590 

56)0 

5620 

SevfflanoElec 

1390 

U» 

1350 

13/5 

Tafeaatara 

6620 

6320 

6630 

6650 

Telefonica 

3165 

330b 

X U) 

336b 

UrawFanosa 

1175 

7765 

11/6 

1180 

VWonc Cement 

1490 

1485 

1480 

1495 

Manila 


PSE 

tatacXIILtt 


Prestos: 381 532 

AyofcB 

30 

29 JO 

29 JO 

30 

AwldLnd 

Bkpuopm 

30JB 

30 

30 

3050 

189 

lira 

189 

W 

C&P Homes 

1250 

123b 

1730 

Manta EtacA 

1S4 

123 

123 

123 

Msto Ban* 

740 

730 

rs u 

/40 

Petran 

1075 

1025 

1025 

1035 

PO Ban* 

395 39250 

395 

395 

PMLoagDW 

1575 

1570 

1575 

1560 

SanMJgusJB 

96JB 

9630 

9650 

9650 

SM Prims Hdg 

730 

7 JO 

/40 

730 

Mexico 


BoSa 

tote: 

>5292 


Pnrffeas 387X04 

AttlA 

4530 

4*95 

4530 

4500 


1922 

1930 

19.10 

1930 

ChtwxCPO 

3(1.45 

3135 

314b 

313b 

CBtoC 

1224 

1X00 

1118 

123b 


4535 

4530 

45.00 



4725 

4620 

4620 

4725 

GpoHnlotano 2030 27 J8 2B30 
KnCWMB 17130 17IL50 17DJ0 

2020 

17020 

TeMsaCPO 

10330 10230 

102*0 

10280 

TriMesL 

1526 

1530 

1556 

1572 

Milan 

AUBittaiMSermsUD 


PrmtaOK 121 6008 

AfleqmnAMic 

12765 

12640 

12765 

12740 

3750 

3610 

3760 

3620 


473b 

4580 

4/3b 

4690 


1353 

1311 

13b? 

1316 


20400 

19950 

70300 

19670 


2420 

2380 

2400 

2300 

ESatn 

9745 

«st> 

9675 


ENi 

9025 

8915 

8995 

0555 

Rat 

5190 

5080 

5190 

5120 

General Assic 

it tm 

31500 

:<uao 

31560 

IM1 

iswo 

14/JO 

15400 

14890 

INA 

2340 

2298 

2340 

2285 

tedgra 

■MeSraef 

6560 

7240 

6430 

7120 

6560 

7170 

6405 

7120 

Mtatewnco 

11900 

11220 

11700 

11275 

MnMun 

1256 

1235 

1260 

1222 


650 

636 

650 

631 


2400 

2200 

2255 

w® 

Ptrefl 

3465 

3390 

346b 

3405 

RAS ~ 

19960 

1557S 

15960 

15598 


17980 

17700 

1106 

17980 

17780 

S Paata Torino 

11450 

11280 

1100Q 

SW 

8115 

N 00 

810U 

/HAb 

Tetacmn Mta 

4495 

4380 

4495 

4 345 

TIM - 

4690 

*565 

4690 

4600 

Montreal 

bteflMOfcMKSOrUJ 
Pirafaae 30CV.16 

BcaMebCen 

4285 

42H 

4230 

■cm 

CdnTtaA 

2520 

2SV* 

2530 

25J0 

CdnUttA 

VX 

27. HI 


3240 

CTFWSK 

3120 

3120 

3120 

3120 

Gat AW® 

1660 

1630 

1*40 

1630 

GHWMUlCO 

ml 

“t 

2265 

2230 

WTWT^m 

36.10 

3720 .3X20 

fms^»Grp 


27h 

-27W 

27W 

LOMOWCOS 

1630 


1630 

1670 

HallBkQrato 

16 

1530 

1535 

15.9S 

Potter Carp 
nniitei- rr»i 

29 

m 

m 

2XV9 

27 

27 

31 

7i.n 

QHbacsrB 

954b 

«» 

■3S9t 

7SL55 

RogwsCoremB 

920 

940 

9JD 

935 

RoidteCda 

£05 

5*15 

5*30 

55.10 


9 


Oslo 

AtarA 

BaresmOfA 

OmtantaB* 

DenmrieBk 

HaMUndA 

KMetaerAsD 

HailkHWre 

HwSattogj 


GBXMk 62240 
Prtrim OL75 




Sdttsted 

138 

134 

134 

135 


380 

360 

366 

3B0 

Statorand Asa 

4240 

4150 

42 

42 

Paris 


CAC-4t 2J75J4 
PlWtoas: 259*76 

Aooor 

776 

764 

775 

768 

AGF 

Mr on 

196 

19920 

198 

AlrLtaoUe 

AJcataAJsth 

894 

595 

B72 

578 

890 

587 

090 

585 

aspUap 

3/0J0 

36550 

369 

369 JO 

BaaadrF 

694 

673 

680 

676 

BtC 


913 

92/ 

920 

BNP 

240 

23150 230JO 

23b 

CdisflPtus 

1128 

mi 

1122 

1135 

Qirefcw 

3519 

3490 

3504 

3530 

Catno 

264 

24520 

2*4 2*720 

CCF 

26620 

26030 

261 

26*70 

GeW sm 

703 

690 

697 

69* 


870 

85* 

160 

876 

CLFOralaRan 

.518 

506 

51) 

512 

CredO Aoriarir 

1266 

1266 

1266 

1266 


8*7 

839 

Bril 

W9 

Etf-Aqutoine 

556 

546 

554 

55/ 

EridaataBS 

901 

890 

094 

905 


7.15 

7 

/.I0 

7 

GeaEata 

778 

761 

765 

781 


*49 

44550 

448 45220 


827 

815 

823 

8J3 

Latoge 

350 

346.18 34BJ0 35270 

LMrafld 

LOrtm 

920 

3025 

907 

1985 

916 

2006 

916 

2026 

LVMH 

1391 

13*6 

1378 

1397 

UmaEaus 

MtodnB 

567 

55B 

562 

561 

3S4J0 

346 

35060 

XVOJO 

PtBlMSA 

39*30 

38060 39130 

39*50 

PerwJracort 

30*50 

300 

301 

304 

PeagaotCB 

579 

540 

563 

562 

PhauB-Prinl 

239B 

2330 

2339 

2409 


1699 

1639 

1646 

1657 


12X50 

1699 

121 

12330 13120 

Rexri 

16B5 

1699 

1700 

Rh-PoutsneA 

19830 

196 

197.10 199 JO 

SCTXJfl 

5*8 

535 

539 

548 

Sdswtdw 

290 

28530 28*40 29X80 

SEB 

1)08 

1C7B 

1095 

1090 

SG5 Thomson 

39650 

386 

392 399 JO 

S3* Generate 

686 

6/6 

683 

685 

Sodexho 

2865 

2 no 

2154 

2796 

SiGotxta 

825 

809 

m 

822 

Suez 

267 JO 

26530 26670 27030 

SmlMobo 

TtorasanCSF 

574 
181 JO 

566 

178J0 

573 

180 

572 

182 

Total B 

43 

451.10 *5530 458.10 

UsJaor 

07.10 

8230 

86 

6830 

Vote) 

377 

3*9 

S/5 

377 


Sao Paulo 


BiodescaPfd 
EUrtsna Pfd 
CamtaPtt 
CESPPW 


ItnubcacoPW 

LlgMSeniWas 

I 8 &. 



984 

72600 

<7.10 

saoi 

16H 

45930 

57430 

43130 

32200 

22130 

10130 

15330 

14530 

28600 




Hfgb 

Law 

Oo » 

Proa. 

tecertto A 

531 

522 

572 

52S 

IrwedwB 

347 

335 

VKCA 

34550 

MoOo B 

230 

21b 

779.50 

228 

Nardbanken 

275 

268 

271 

2B0 

PtnnnflJaiohn 

SariMkB 

27X50 

27250 

374 

279 

195 

197.50 

193 

194 

Samta S 

181 

176 

178 

183 

SCAB 

165 

160 

162 

16*50 

S-E BOfltertA 

8X50 

79 

81 

80 

Stamdta Foa 

20X50 

199 

202 

203 

StamUaB 

33BJ0 

379 

332 

328 

SKFB 

IBS 

180 

1R750 

184 

Sparaaonn A 
SMshypaMA 

154 

10936 

140 

18950 

15250 

10950 

154 

190 

Store A 

103 

9*50 

99 

10) JO 

SvHorWtes A 

21*50 

21330 

215J0 

21*50 

Volvo B 

18X58 

1/8 

101 

179 

Sydney 


U0r*wtlK 20*38 
Pm tori- 3471 Jl 

Amcor 

*48 

*41 

*45 

*44 

AHZBXkn 

83* 

*35 

*37 

*56 

BMP 

1720 

17 JO 

1/60 

1768 


X63 

3J6 

XiV 

164 

BroaMes Ind. 

22 

31 J9 

2126 

2232 

CBA 

1X54 

1132 

1133 

I35S 

CCAntoi 

11-65 

1130 

11J1 

llril 

Cotes Myw 

XS 

*42 

553 

*46 

ComakB 

627 

6.12 

624 

6-80 

CRA 

1*87 

1*75 

nuts 

1825 

CSR 

A/4 

*63 

468 

46 1 

Fasten Brew 

166 

731 

263 

263 

Gan Prep Tiwt 
GWAlB&aOa 

X49 

2 M 

249 

249 

323 

366 

369 

ip 


132 

1JD 

152 

1J0 

IQAuSnda 

1230 

1268 

1220 

1266 


X15 

309 

*15 

109 


2330 

233b 

2X54 

2348 

MmwNIcktef 
MIMHdra 
Nal AuriBank 

7J2 

1J0 

/rib 

120 

7ri7 

1-00 

/5? 

1J1 

1*99 

1664 

1664 

16J5 

Nat Mutual 
Hdg 

1J0 

137 

IJ9 

IJ2 

*74 

*68 

*70 

628 

NomandsMta 
North UT 

123 

435 

168 

*19 

168 

434 

124 

433 


116 

110 

XI2 

115 

PtanwWl 

4 

X93 

X96 

432 


*78 

620 

621 

428 


1*6 

238 

2ri6 

241 


*18 

107 

*09 

*1? 

Sarta* 1 ™ 

429 

424 

*75 

428 


*56 

*48 

*5? 

*51 

Wasfttanw* 

10A5 

1030 

1040 

1045 

WMC 

*26 

*1/ 

833 

835 

tUesfltedTreri 

X4P 

2ri7 

?ri/ 

2ri8 

Wralpoc Bring 
woKtodeP# 

727 

935 

764 

9.10 

768 

930 

724 

934 

WoohwrthJ 

335 

150 

351 

3JS 

Taipei 

i 

li 

as 

11 

QdhoyLJfBim 

178 

175 

175 

178 

ChongHwBk 
CWooTung Bt 

172 
87 30 

168 

8430 

169 

86 

169 
07 JO 

CMnoDmetoM 

10630 

102 

IDS 

103 

OSna Steel 

2540 

2*10 

2560 

2540 

FWBar* 

1B0 

176 

176 

178 


74 

7150 

72 W 

/I5D 

Hua Nan Bit 

145 

141 

4150 

4250 

tflttCommBk 

1250 

fll 

01 JU 

8250 

NttaYoPtarilCS 

68 

6*b0 

66 

66JD 

Shin King Ufe 

113 

61 

no 

57 

110 

60 

■J3 

6050 

Tatung 

UMMboEtee 

5X50 

5250 

5350 

5350 

41 

39 JO 

4020 

«3D 

IHdVyDridCHn 

70 

69 

6950 

70 


The Trib Index 


Priam ta of 300 PM. Now York tena 


Jon. 1. 1993 - IOO. 

Laval 

Chonga 

% change 

yaw to rtaia 
%etanga 

+16.03 

World index 

158.01 

+0.04 

+O.03 

Rogionai krinw 

Asta/PecSc 

113.79 

+3.66 

+3.34 

-15.25 

Europe 

160.98 

-»Ori7 

+029 

+15.66 

N. America 

177^1 

-3.17 

-1.75 

+38.69 

S. America 

138.44 

-2.96 

-2.09 

+55.48 

Industrial hdoxm 
Capital goods 

178.85 

-2 fr5 

-1.15 

+32^4 

Consumer goods 

17433 

-0.73 

-0.42 

+26.41 

Energy 

177.19 

-151 

-1.07 

+30.65 

Finance 

1ia41 

+2^0 

+2.35 

-1036 

NBsceBaneous 

16^21 

+2.65 

+1.68 

+19.44 

Raw Materials 

182.86 

-0.38 

-0-20 

+26.96 

Service 

141.61 

-0.89 

-0.62 

+18.01 

utmts 

13237 

-ae2 

-0.47 

+4.11 


77w MamoSonolHmakl TtOtm Woriri Stodt Max O tracks dm U& doOor vokmo ot 
BOO kvoirmrionoBy bwoauUm stocks from 25 couaMoo. Formom MMmtabn .■ trim 
boolrimb*uaaa^brmaingto , n»TriblnilKK.1B1Avww*CtiutaodoGmah. . 

32527 NeuNyCariax. Franco. Canpjadlty Bkxmbarg Nowa. 


Mitsui 

MBsiiFudosn 

MBsui Trust 
itWnMJg 
NEC 
Mfcon 
N MU) Sec 


i£ SM 

fflssanMidor 

NKK 

NanwaSK 

MTT 

HTT Date 

op Paper 

Osaka G<a 

Rksh 

Rato 

SakuraBk 

Sanfcia 

SamwBor* 

Sanya Elec 

Sscani 

Setni Rwy 

SekM House 

Snen-Efencn 

Shore 



High 

Low 

Qost 

Pro*. 


High 

Low 

□010 

Prt*. 

907 

098 

907 

896 

NevrbridgaNsI 

Norandarnc 

46J5 

44.60 

44.90 

46 

1341 

1280 

1300 

1240 

33* 

33 

33 

331 

701 

716 

749 

704 


30iy 

30H 

30V* 

30ri0 

4340 

£770 

4220 

4250 


103 

10116 

101 ■i 

lOSM 

1460 

1430 

lASO 

1440 

Nova 

13 

ms 

lira 

1190 

1810 

1700 

1/10 

1800 


2*05 

241+ 

24S» 

75 

743 

ni 

730 

707 

Pa nato Petto) 

60 

58 

58 

5600 

0390 

B2S0 

0350 

B210 

Petra Cdo 


20 

2040 

2*40 

739 

714 

739 

717 


30 

2855 

29 JO 

29.10 

909 

495 

509 

495 

PocoPeflm 

13b 

13t» 

13b 

1X65 

343 

333 

340 

330 

Potash Sash 

109 

107 

108 

109 

BOO 

m 

/9C 

764 


4170 

4214 

47ri5 

42 JO 

260 

360 

263 

258 


3X10 

33V: 

32 M 

3120 

1670 

1610 

1670 

1400 

Rog us Cartel B 


25% 

2SJ0 

25* 

8840a 

8/Sflo 

8780a 

8700a 

Seagram Co. 
SisnCda A 

5*45 

5*15 

5b>6 

5M) 

3240b 

3200b 

3200b 

3200b 

5*05 

57 JO 

58 

S7JS 

6B6 

6/0 

605 

674 

Stone Cansold 

23V: 

2314 

23*4 

HV: 

302 

295 

301 

291 

Suncor 

S9.90 

59b. 

5914 

5908 

1470 

1430 

1450 

1440 

TaBsmnnEny 

4H4 

4*80 

4*00 

4500 

8730 

0/30 

8730 

8420 

TedtB 

33W 

3)00 

33ta 

32.10 

756 

709 

750 

696 

Tetegiobe 

4Wi 

4*60 

40L 

40*i 

3540 

3*10 

3410 

3510 

TWUS 

JUS 

21.15 

21.15 

JUb 

1420 

1330 

1400 

1300 


28*5 

2*20 

2*55 

28J0 

522 

512 

515 

508 

TarOora Bank 

3945 

3*60 

3*65 

w.ra 

17.05 

6760 

6640 

6710 

6690 


17.15 

1*95 

17.15 

5100 

4670 

5070 

4680 

TransCOa Pfee 

2514 

2*45 

25 JS 

25.70 

1090 

1060 

1070 

1060 

TitowkFH 

**20 

43V5 

44J5 

4X35 

7550 

7430 

7490 

7490 


31-40 

2V BO 

31 

31!) 

1600 

1570 

1990 

1580 

TVXGokJ 

mi 

11.05 

im 

m< 

2040 

1990 

2040 

1980 

*9estoariEny 

2*05 

74.90 

25.05 

2*90 

2450 

1050 

2410 

1010 

2430 

1050 

2440 

1000 

Weston 

76 

74*5 

7bh 

7405 


11400 10900 
B950 8810 

928 910 


10900 11100 
8890 8830 
924 895 

1480 1390 

474 460 

1710 1700 

291 2B3 

1060 1000 

2850 2840 

2550 2570 

8300 8170 

2050 2000 

986 923 

1170 1130 

2180 2150 

4190 4200 

315 308 

567 544 

1200 1Z20 

1430 1410 

733 718 

742 738 

7660 2670 

803 768 

3340 3290 

2500 2530 


TSE Industrials: £22228 
Prewsac 43086 


Vienna 

BBAG 

BMhlsrUddeh 

Brau-UnGoess 

CredtemdPa 

EAGenerafl 

HVN 

Rughafen IMen 

Mtmr-MeWwi 

OMV 

OcstEUMz 

RWet-Hern 

VAStoM 

VATeeh 

Wlenerbere Bou 

Wolford 


ATX HR 121210 
Piwloa&lllUS 


70S 

697 

704 

705 

BS5 

847 

146.90 

846 

669 

659 

669 

669 


424.10 41730 47X50 41738 
3450 3395 3405 3420 

1740T73X6O 1745 1746 

574 561 569 JO 569 

601 590 59* 603 

140030 1390 1395 1400 

066 BS610 865 86120 

414 411 JO 41X90 41250 
475 452 47155 465 

1771 1751 1766 1771 

2154 2125 2150 21S5 

1438 1410 1415 1430 


Wellington 

P1HNBB83S 


2X40 

2X70 

2X10 

2X45 

30.35 

29.90 

29.90 

3*10 

4930 

4840 

49 

4845 

16JO 

1530 

1*40 

1500 

49.90 

4*68 

4860 

49.90 

5X40 

51.40 

51.40 

5230 

3690 

3SH 

36V9 

35J0 

7*65 

7*10 

ALIO 

/US6 

3IU 

30MB 

xua 

31 

75 

75 

75 

79V, 

26J0 

3*35 

26/5 


31.95 

31k 

31k 

3UV 

2110 

71.90 

rawn 

71V» 

5UD 

blk 

5140 

HIM 

651b 


6*70 

6bk 

R7k 

51*5 

5105 

52k 

32k 

31k 

31 JO 

37 Ji 

7416 

2X90 

2X90 

2*1* 

35k 

3Ub 

3SM 

3SVb 

40 

39 

3916 

39X5 

2*60 

2*35 

54rib 

2*30 

17k 

12.10 

12.10 

12 IS 

2*60 

26 IS 

26Vb 

7*10 

32Vb 

3216 

32V) 

3245 

23k 

2X20 

7X60 

23k 

4X65 

39.4b 

4*40 

39 JO 

300 

2» 

298 Vi 

799 

3216 

31k 

31.95 

3145 

2205 

22rib 

27J5 

2X55 

621b 

6*15 

6105 

6*30 

ICUU 

1*65 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


PAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


J apanese Firms Hope to Land Orbiting Business 


Bloomberg Nem 

EJecmc Corp. s Kamakura Works satellite 
plant outside Tokyo, sam>hire-colored solar 
panels and a golden, weblike antenna glisten 
on an antiseptic factory floor S 

“We've got state-of-the-art facilities but 
have only landed one major order every three 
years, said Kiyotoshi Fumy a. manager of 

Mitsu^ Eleetric. the high-tech arm of 
the powerful Mitsubishi group, has supplied 
satellite parts for almost 30 years. Yet^ has 

e ? m ^ elIite sy^ra to a single 
company, only to the Japanese government. 

. . T hey * _ nof ° n the radar at this point,” 

ShiJS 86 ? C f np t dI ' 3X1 aeros P ace analyst at 
l^hman Brothers Inc. in New York 

rhe Electronics Co.. 

*e unit of the U.S.-based General Motors 

Lorp. that chums out an average of one satel- 
lite ner mnnfh 


Loral Space & Communications, Aerospa- 
tiale of France and the French -British venture 
Matra Marconi Space in the lucrative com- 
mercial satellite market. 

To do that, they must slash production 
costs, shrink output times and hone tech- 
nology. 

Don't count them out, analysts say. “One 
never dis- 


misses the 
large, well- 
managed 
multination- 
al," said 
Howard Ru- 
be L, who is 


lites to connect computer users to the In- 
ternet. 

These space birds will beam down data for 
auto navigation, systems, digital television 
prog r a m ming,' cellular phone service and air- 
borne links to personal computers early in the 
next millennium. 

Technological advances allow many satel- 
lites to fly 


percent of its annual sales of 2.76 trillion yen. 
to come from sales of satellite components 
and ground systems. 

Within five years, Mitsubishi wants to 
double sales and profits. That would bring its 
ratio of sales to profits in line with the 10 
percent level that is enjoyed by U.S. man- 
ufacturers. 


But Japanese companies must slash 
production costs, shrink output times and 
hone technology to be competitive. 


lite per month. 
Hud 


lughes, which has annual sales of $14.86 
biihon, currently commands almost half the 
global market for commercial satellites, 
which is valued at $5 billion. 

Mitsubishi, NEC Coro, and Toshiba Corp., 
Japan s biggest electronics companies, plan to 
vie with Hughes, Lockheed Martin Corp., 


ice analyst at Goldman, Sachs & Co. 
in New York. 

Mitsubishi wants to enter the business by 
the year 2000. said NaoJri Hashimoio, a di- 
rector in Mitsubishi's electronic products and 
systems group. 

Analysts expect several billion dollars of 
orders for satellites over the next decade with 
the debut of space-based telecommunications 
services like mobile phones and links to per- 
sonal computers. 

A project mat is currently backed by Mi- 
crosoft Corp., for example, plans to use more 
than 800 small, lightweight, low-orbit saiel- 


much closer 
to Earth than 
the standard 
flight path, 
normally ar 
an altitude 
of 2Z000 


The company has cut costs, shrunk and 
standardized equipment and increased econ- 


miles (35,000 kilometers), allowing dearer 
transmission. 

The expected surge in demand for the low- 
orbit satellites comes on top of projected 
annual growth of 10 percent to 20 percent for 
the broadcast and meteorological business in 
the crowded "geostationary” orbit, where 
most satellites orbit. 

Mitsubishi Electric has served as the prime 
contractor for more than half of the non- 
commercial satellite projects sponsored by 
Japan’s space agency. 

For the year ending in March, Mitsubishi 
expects 60 billion yen ($482 billion), or 2 


omies of scale. 

From 1993 to 1995, it halved ihe cost and 
production time for its 10 best-selling satellite 
components. 

NEC, one of the world’s largest producers 
of computer chips, is breaking even in its 
satellite business with annual sales of 30 
billion yen. and the company aims for a profit 
within the next decade. 

Now, the company that built Japan's first 
domestically made satellite, which was 
launched in 1970, is making efforts to reduce 
costs. 

NEC is incorporating more off-the-shelf 
parts such as high-grade semiconductors and 
eliminating redundancy in subsystems like 
beat control and power supply. 

"We have the technology; it’s just a matter 
of cutting costs,” said Takenori Yanase, a 
vice president of space systems at NEC. 


Tokyo Set to Bolster 
Real-Estate Market? 

Shares Rise on Signal of State Role 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — The Japanese gov- 
ernment said Thursday it might buy 
real estate to help banks rid them- 
selves of trillions of yen in bad loans, 
a move that sent bank, construction 
and real-estate stocks soaring. 

Tadashi Ogawa. the vice minister 
of finance, said the government 
could buy property that banks are 
holding as collateral and have been 
unable to sell during a six-year prop- 
erty slump. Mr. Ogawa did not say 
how the project would be financed. 

The news sent Japanese stocks to 
a six-week high, led by banking and 
property shares. 

But analysts were skeptical that 
the government could find enough 


‘Super Dry’ 
Lifts Profit 
At Asahi 


CmpOrJbrOn'S^FnmiDapmdta 

TOKYO — Asahi Breweries 1 
Ltd. said Thursday that its 
pretax profit rose 18 percent 
last year, led by record sales of 
its flagship brand, Asahi Super 
Dry. which has been Japan's 
No. I beer since June. 

Asahi said its profit increased 
to 25.7 billion yen ($206.6 mil- 
lion) in 1996 as sales rose 7 
percent, to 931.2 billion yen. 

A rival, Kirin Brewery Co., 
said its pretax profit fell .24.2 
percent, to 67.43 billion yen, on 
sluggish sales of its prime 
brands. 

Asahi said earlier this month 
that it had surpassed Kirin as 
Japan's top beer seller by volume 
for the first time in 44 years. 

“Asahi will hang on to its 
No. 1 position,” said Ayako 
Sugaya, a beverage analyst at 
the brokerage Dresdner Klein- 
wort Benson. "At least until 
Kirin comes up with a product 
that can compete with Super 
Dry.” ( Bloomberg , Reuters) 


money to turn thereal-estate market 
around, especially since the gov- 
ernment has its own debt problems. 

"It’s unrealistic to be optimistic 
about the government buying a large 
chunk of property using public money 
because it faces the problem of cutting 
public spending,’^ said Toshihiko 
Okmo, analyst at Scfarodexs Japan. 
“It’s a clear contradiction. 7 * 

The government has racked up 
about 520 trillion yen ($4.18 tril- 
lion) in fiscal deficits, including lo- 
cal-government debt, and it is ex- 
pected to add another 33 trillion yen 
m debt by March 1998. 

For their part, Japan’s banks bold 
as much as 50 trillion yen in bad debt 
related to property holdings, accord- 
ing to analysts’ estimates. The 
banks, analysts said, are unwilling 
to revalue the bad debt on then- 
books because they are hoping the 
market will recover. 

Until they revalue the debt, 
however, they will not be. able to 
lend money to buyers, keeping de- 
mand weak and depressing prices. 

Real-estate stocks on the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange rose as much as 5.67 
percent on. the, news, while bank 
stocks rose 5.29 percent and con- 
struction stocks gained 3.28 percent 

Those sectors drove the bench- 
mark Nikkei 225 Stock Index high- 
er, to 19.051.7, up 2.4 percent, or 
452.6 points. 

"The measures may give a tem- 
porary psychological boost to in- 
vestors, wit I don’t think they will be 
effective in reversing Japan's real- 


Moody’s Raps 3 Korea Banks 


CMptirii by Oxr Stiff Frrra Dupexbrs 

SEOUL — The credit ratings of 
three leading South Korean banks 
were lowered on Thursday by 
Moody’s Investors Service Inc., re- 
flecting the banks' exposure to the 
collapse of Hanbo Steel & Con- 
struction Co. 

About $6.3 billion of debt se- 
curities sold by Korea First Bank, 
Korea Exchange Bank and Cho 
Hung Bank are affected. 

"All have substantial exposures 
to the Hanbo Group,” Moody's 
said, adding that Korea Develop- 
ment Bank was also a major lender 
to Hanbo, but that its solvency was 
guaranteed by the government. 

Hanbo Steel, the counby 's No. 2 
steelmaker and tire flagship of the 


Hanbo Group, filed for court pro- 
tection from creditors after piling 
up 5 trillion won ($5.72 billion) in 
debt, about 20 times its net worth. 

The opposition has accused the 
government of messing banks to 
lend to Hanbo. Ten persons were 
indicted Wednesday in connection 
with the affair, including two 
former presidents of Korea First 
Bank — Rhee Chul Soo and Seen 
Kwang Shik — and Woo Chan 
Mok, die bead of Cho Hung Bank. 

Moody's lowered Korea First's 
long-term debt and deposit ratings 
to Baa-2 from Baa and also cut its 
financial strength rating. A bond 
with a Baa rating lacks outstanding 
investment characteristics and is 
considered speculative. 


Hie U.S. raring agency lowered 
long-term debt and deposit ratings 
of Korea Exchange Bank and Cho 
Hung Bank from A-3 to Boa-1.' 

But Joseph Lau. a portfolio man- 
ager at Jardine Fleming Invest- 
ment, said, "A lot of the bad news 
has already been discounted.” 
Meanwhile, a senior prosecutor 
in Seoul. Choi Byung Koog, said 
that Kim Hyun Chul, a son of 
president Kim Young Sam, had 
been called in for questioning Fri- 
day over his libel complaint 
against six opposition politicians 
who accused him of peddling in- 
fluence in connection with the 
loans. Kim Hyun Chul has said he 
had nothing to do with the loans. 

(Bloomberg, AFP, Reuters ) 



Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

Singapore Tokyo 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


15KB - - • 

- - 2250 - • - 

m 22000 


14000 - ~ 


/■V 210Q0 

- 

■13X0— AP 

^ 2150 f\ I 

■20000* - 

b- 


2W0* H-- 

19000 • - 

A j 

11CKF - - 

- 2055 - hr 

- 18000 

lr 

« eb s'6 , n‘ djf 2000 s on 

1996 1997 1998 

OJF 1 170M 'S'O’n' 
1997 1996 

DJF 

1997 

Exchange 

Index . 

Thuraday 

Close 

Prev, 

Close 

% 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

13,411.33 

13,106.32 +2.33 1 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2JJS1.98 

2,246.99 

+0.22 

Sydney 

AR Ordinaries- 

2,476.30 

2,491.00 

-059 

Tokyo 

Nikfcd 225 

18051.71 

18399.12 +2,43 1 

[ Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,26622 

1.258 64 

+0.60 

Bangkok 

SET 

747.70 

731.74 

+2.18 

Seoul 

Compose Index 

711.13 

713.67 

-0.36 

Taipei 

Stock Market Index 7.678.04 

7,656.85 

+028 

Manila 

PSE 

3,31043 

3,315.52 

-0.15 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

698*7 

69438 

+035 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 

2£2&85 

2.329.35 

-0.15 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

3,40440 

3,520,50 

-0.74 

Source: Teiekurs 


InlniulHituI HcruU Tnhunr 

Very briefly: 


• Nissan Motor Co. plans to increase capital investment by 38 
percent in the business year beginning in April, to about 1 10 
billion yen (SSS6 million). Hie company intends to draw 
savings from cost-cutting and the weakening yen and invest 
more heavily in development of new models. ' 

• Qantas Airways Ltd., Australia's national carrier, said its 
first-half net profit rose 2.4 percent from a year earlier, to 1 5 1 .6 
million Australian dollars ($1 16.0 million) as cost cuts offset 
a slowdown in revenue growth. Sales rose 25 percent, to 4 
billion dollars. The airline plans "modest fleet expansion and 
continued cost cuts and emeu 


imency improvements. 

■ The Philippines' current -account deficit jumped 75 percent 
last year, to $3.47 billion. The government said the rise in 
imports was not a serious problem because imports have 
included many capital goods, such as heavy machinery, that 
will help the economy grow. 

• Toyota Motor Corp. said vehicle exports rose 71 percent in 
January from a year ago, to 132.191 units. Nissan said its 
January vehicle exports rose 12 percent, to 53.123. 


• Jiangling Motors Corp.. the Chinese carmaker of which 
i Motoi 


Ford Motor Co. owns 20 percent, saw its B-sharcs rise 5 
percent, to 3.48 Hong Kong dollars (45 U.S. cents) on news 

that Ford will raise its Stake. AFP, AP. Bloombrru. Reuters 


Too Late to Change Philippines to ‘Graduate 5 From IMF Program 
Fixed-Rate System, 

Thai Minister Says 


estate slump.” sai&Akiy oshi Inoue, 
"rtf 


president of Sanyu System Real Es- 
tate Financing, a consultancy. 

“What the government has to do 
is stimulate properly demand by of- 
fering tax incentives, such as redu- 
cing taxes levied on land ownership, 
sales and purchases,” he said. 

During the past few years, real- 
estate stocks have risen on spec- 
ulation the government would lower 
land-transaction and capital-gains 
taxes to stimulate demand. 

The taxes were imposed in the 
1990s to limit demand during a spec- 
ulative bubble that had resulted 1 in 
Japan's total real estate being valued 
at four times lite worth of the total real 
estate in the United States. 


CtxopdrJFr Our SteffFnm Dapmdrt 

BANGKOK — Thailand’s commerce min- 
ister. Narongchai Akrasanee. said Thursday that 
the economy had grown too fragile to risk chang- 
ing it 

Before becoming commerce minister late last 
year. Mr.. Narongchai had said that slower eco- 
nomic growthwas caused primarily by die fixed 
exchange-rate system which pegs the baht to a 
basket of currencies including the dollar, yen and 
Deutsche mark. 

But on Thursday, Mr. Narongchai said the 
opportunity for changing the system had 
passed 

‘ 'At the moment, when we’re on the way down 
in terms of die value of the our currency and face 
international speculators, flexibility would do 
more barm than gbod," Mr. Narongchai said 

The statement echoed that of the Bank of 
Thailand which earlier this week ruled outa baht 
devaluation and helped calm jittery currency 
investors. 

But Mr. Narongchai ran afoul of the central 
bank Thursday by asserting that foreign reserves 
had fallen by $1 5 billion in December while the 
Bank of Thailand fought to defend the baht 

A senior central bank official denied that, say- 
ing that reserves had declined just $900 million. 
In the face of currency fears and vanishing 


Bloomberg News 

MANILA — The Philip- 
pines and the International 
Monetary Fund agreed 
Thursday on a program that 
will allow the country to end 
three decades of IMF super- 
vision of its economic 
policies in June. 

The program, which aims 
far slower inflation and a 
fourth year of budget sur- 
' pluses, would build on a set of 
policies that have increased 
the country's economic 
growth rate to SJ percent in 
1996, the swiftest expansion 
since 1989. 

The IMF negotiating team, 
while praising the govern- 
ment's management of the 
economy, said other chal- 
lenges needed to be met if the 
country were to match its 
Asian neighbors* history of 
rapid expansion. In particu- 


lar, the IMF called for the 
passage of a bill that will sim- 
plify the tax code and increase 
government revenue. 

With the current IMF pro- 
gram, its 23rd since 1962. die 
Philippines has access to as 
much as $650 million in emer- 
gency credits. The country 
has had little use for the cred- 
its, and has drawn just $50 
null ion from the IMF facility. 
Rising foreign investment and 
overseas bond sales have 
helped raise the central bank's 
foreign-currency reserves to a 
record $12 billion. 

Analysts said that gradu- 
ation from the IMF's condi- 
tional lending program may 
add momentum to the Phil- 
ippines’ efforts to have its 
credit ratings upgraded. 

Under the program agreed 
upon Thursday, Manila prom- 
ised to limit growth of M-3 — 


the broadest measure of 
money supply — to 21 3 per- 
cent this year. Base money 
supply growth, which refers 
mainly to cash in circulation, 
was capped at 16.2 percent 

Meeting the money-supply 
targets will ensure that infla- 
tion slows to between 6 per- 
cent and 7 percent this year, 
from 8.4 percent in 1996. 

John Hicklin, assistant di- 
rector of the IMF’s Asia-Pa- 
cific department, said the Phil- 
ippines, besides improving 
tax collections, must also take 
steps to improve agricultural 


productivity and watch the 


burgeoning trade deficit. 
Rober 


oberto de Ocampo, the 
Philippine finance secretary, 
said legislators had promised 
the passage of tax reforms, 
including those that will re- 
duce the top tax rate to 30 
percent from 35 percent to en- 
courage payment, by May 1. 

Overhauling the tax code is 
4 ‘critical in helping to provide 
a solid revenue base for the 
government, allowing it to 
meet the country’s large in- 
frastructure and social 
needs," the IMF said. 


investor confidence, Mr. Narongchai said the 
government was shifting its priorities away from 
me policies that have kept growth levels at 8 to 9 
percent over the last decade to favor financial 
market stability over growth. He said that he 
expected the economy to grow between 6 and 7 
percent in 1997. (AP, AFP) 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

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lectern 
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PAGE 20 


World Roundup 


England Wins 

cricket A partnership of 170 
between Alec Stewart and Graham 
Thorpe carried England to a four- 
wicket victory over New Zealand 
Thursday in a one-day international 
in Christchurch. England spinner 
Phil Tufoell had taken four for 22 as 
New Zealand made 222 for six wick- 
ets in its innings. (Reuters) 

Senna Trial Adjourned 

formula one The trial of Frank 
Williams, the bead of the Williams 
team, and rive others accused of 
manslaughter over the death of the 
driver Ayrton Senna opened on 
Thursday and was then adjourned 
until Feb. 28 when the presiding 
judge will rule on defense requests 
to limit evidence. ( Reuters ) 

Danim Knocks Out Rios 

temnis Marcelo Rios of Chile, 
hampered by a leg injury, lost 4-67- 
5 7-6 on Thursday to Martin Damm 
of the Czech Republic in the second 
round of the European Community 
championship in Antwerp. (Reu- 
ters) 

• Gustavo Kuerten of Brazil 

beat Andre Agassi. 6-2, 6-4, in the 
St. Jude Classic in Memphis. 
Agassi reinjured his left ankle in the 
second set and will be out 1-2 
weeks. (AP) 

• Opel, a subsidiary of General 
Motors, said Thursday it had signed 
a three-year sponsorship deal with 
Switzerland's 16-year-old Aus- 
tralian Open champion. Martina 
Hingis. Last month Hingis signed a 
$ 1 0 million contract to promote the 
Italian sportswear label Sergio Tac- 


chini. Opel did not reveal the sum 
involved The company ended its 
sponsorship of Steffi Graf in Oc- 
tober after 1 0 years. (Reuters) 

‘Flasher* Is Fired 

soccer The Dutch second di- 
vision team Eindhoven fired Patrick 
Deckers for dropping his shorts and 
“flashing” the crowd after he was 
shown the red card and booed by 
fans in a match on Monday. 

“Showing ones' genitals in pub- 
lic is forbidden by law and is seen as 
disturbing public order,” the dub 
said on Thursday. ( Reuters ) 


Sports 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


Leading Belgian Club 
Says It Paid Blackmail 


[leni Onk/tlk iWuH Knot 

Fernando Hierro, center, of Real Madrid leaping against De Quintela, left and Gonzalez of Rayo Vallecano. 


Reuters 

Belgian police are investigating 
match fixing allegations surrounding 
the 1984 UEFA Cup semifinal between 
Anderlecht and England’s Nottingham 
Forest. 

The investigation was begun after the 
Belgian dub told the police it was being 
blackmailed by a man who claimed to 
have acted as an intermediary to fix the 
second leg match, which the Belgian side 
won, 3-0, after losing the first leg, 2-0. 

Michel Verschueren, the Anderlecht 
manager, confirmed that police had been 

WOMPlOMU 

asked to investigate the alleged black- 
mail attempt He denied the central al- 
legation that the dob used an inter- 
mediary to try to “buy” the game. 

A Belgium television station said a 
former official of the dub had paid about 
20 million francs ($572,000) to a black- 
mailer, who rlawwgrf to have a taped 
recording backing up his claims. 

Verschueren said a blackmail attempt 
had been successful but declined to say 
how much had been paid. He said die 
tape was a forgery, made up of an am- 
algam of recordings, edited to give a false 
impression about a conversation said to 


3 Pro Teams Balk at Logistics in Asian Bike Race 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 

KUCHING. Malaysia — There’s trouble in para- 
dise. The second stage of Le Tourdc Langkawi. Asia’s 
richest bicycle race, was officially canceled Thursday 
because the three major professional teams refused to 
participate. Then a shortened version of the stage was 
held, unofficially. 

That meant the daily stage did not count in overall 
standings. And that technicality allowed the three 
teams to continue to take part Friday in the 12 -stage 
nice — if they decided to do so. Late Thursday night, 
that was uncertain. 

If the second stage had been official, the three teams 
would have been eliminated from further competition, 
depriving the race of its stars. 

The reams — Mapei and MG from Italy and Casino 
from France — were protesting extraordinarily long 
delays in getting the riders, their luggage and their 
bicycles on and off planes since they amved in Malay- 
sia this week. They had a point Baggage to the riders 
was not delivered until 1 A31 Thursday, about three 


hours after they would ordinarily have been asleep. 

Most of them were still awake, not only because they 
were awaiting their bags but also because they had 
arrived in Kuching, the vibrant capital of Sarawak, about 
10 PJvL What was a two-hour flight from Sabah took 
one group of riders five bouts, including a three-hour 
wait at a military airfield for their DC-10 to get aloft 

They were lucky. The second group of riders had a 
six-hour wait at the field. 

The problem seemed to focus on cargo handlers, 
who are not available in large enough numbers at such 
provincial airports as those in Sabah and Sarawak, let 
alone military airfields. 

Discomenr with logistical delays began Monday in 
Kuala Lumpur, the capital, when the field of ISO riders 
and their managers, masseurs and mechanics spent 
seven hours in the airport, waiting for all their baggage 
to pass through security checks, for tickets to be issued 
one by one and for their charter flight to be loaded. 

When they arrived in Sabah, the riders first had to 
attend a ceremonial dinner welcoming them. 

Mutters were heard from members of the Mapei and 
MG entourage, who had started their red-eye flight 


from Europe more than 24 hours earlier. 

Skipping die unofficial stage, die three professional 
reams left Sarawak about noon Thursday, theoretically 
arriving bock on the mainland in midaftemoon and in 
good time for rest and a training ride. The remaining 22 
t eams , mainly amateurs, competed in a circuit race of 
Kuching that was halved to six laps of 8.8 kilometers (5 
miles) each. Tbe prize, money was reduced by only 10 
percent, a generous gesture by tbe organizers. 

Frank McCormack of the Saturn team from die 
United States was the easy winner of tbe race in a sprint, 
with Glen Mitchell of New Zealand second and Mariano 
Friedick. another American with Saturn, third. 

Norm Al vis, the leader of the Saturn team, explained 
why his professional team decided to take part. 

“It beats staying in the hotel,'* Ire said. “We sort of 
owe it to the race. too. Even with everything that has 
gone on. I’m reserving judgment on whesherl'd come 
back. This race has a lot of potential/’ 

Speaking for the amateurs, Eric Wohlberg, the race 
leader from Canada, said: “I'm sick — air conditioning, 
no air conditioning, the waits. But I came here to race 
and that's what I'm going to keep doing, race.'* 


have taken place about Che 1984 game. 

BRAZIL Cr uze iro played two matches- 
in one night on Wednesday as it tenled 
its way through a crowded schedule. 

Cruzeiro fielded a team of reserves, 
which tied. 4-*. against Vila Nova m the 
Minas Gerais championship, a Brazilian 
regional competition. 

Xess than a half-hour later, ns regular 
first team plaved its opening match in tbe 
Libertadores'Cup South American s lop 
club competition — at home to follow 
Brazilians Greroio. However, for that 
game the team only had rive players on 
die bench instead of the permitted seven 
and lost a violent game. 2- 1. 

Spain Spanish league leader Real 
Madrid lost its unbeaten league record 
after losing 1-0 to Rayo Vallecano. the 
poorest and smallest of Madrid s three 
first-division clubs. 

Rayo. which fired manager Paquito 
Garcia earlier in the week, scored 
through midfielder Ezequiel Castillo in 
the 35th minute. 

It was Real's first deteat in 25 league 
games this season. 

“The refereeing was scandalous," 
said Lorenzo Sanz. the Real chairman. 

Sanz also made vague threats with- 
draw his team from the Spanish fed- 
eration if a booking on defender 
Fernando Hierro from last Saturday's 
game with Betis is not overruled. 

England Andy Cole, starting for tire 
first time this season, reaffirmed his 
return to form by scoring one goal and 
creating another as Manchester United 
beat one of his former clubs. Arsenal. 2- 
1, to stay top of the English premier 
league on Wednesday night. 

Cole, who has struggled with injury 
and poor form, put the champions ahead 
after 18 minutes. He set up Norway's 
Ole Gunnar Solskjaer for United’s 
second 14 minutes later and although 
Dutch striker Dennis Bergkamp scored 
for Arsenal after the break the Lon- 
doners could not find an equalizer. 

United's victory kept it a point clear of 
Liverpool which spoilt lan Rush's return 
to Anfield by beating Leeds, 4-0. 

Rush, who scored 229 league goals 
for Liverpool before being released by 
die club fast summer, started as a sub- 
stitute but came on with 17 minutes 
remaining to a thunderous reception. 

Robbie Fowler put Liverpool ahead 
with a close range effort after 21 
minutes, and Stan CoUymorc scored 
twice in two minutes to wrap up the 
points before halftime. 


Scoreboard 


BASKETBALL 


MBA Stampinos 
mnHKomM 

ATLANTIC DflflBION 



24 

29 

LA Coppers 

21 

27 

Golden State 

2D 

33 

Phoenix 

19 

35 

wntasursus 

Pboeaix 

25 

37 

Cbartette 

27 

41 









W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Miami 

40 

12 

.769 

— 

New York 

38 

14 

J31 

2 

Orlando 

25 

25 

500 

M 

Washtagton 

24 

28 

-462 

16 

TlrtiM laaeuAi 
IM.I* dllXf 

IS 

34 

J294 

?4V4 

Pbllodeiphia 

12 

39 

31 5 

Wh 

Boston 

11 

41 

-212 

2* 


carnuLDrviaoN 



Ctocaga 

46 

6 

-385 

— 

Defrt* 

38 

13 

.745 

Th 

Atlanta 

34 

17 

Ml 

l)Vi 

Chaitotte 

32 

31 

.604 

14H 

Oeyetond 

29 

22 

-569 

16W 

Indiana 

24 

27 

-471 

21 ’A 

Mlhraukee 

24 

27 

.471 

21V. 

Toronto 18 

34 

•346 

28 

•ISWEST BVttoON 

IO 



W 

L 

ra 

GB 

Utah 

37 

14 

325 

— 

Houston 

34 

18 

454 

3*A 

Minnesota 

26 

27 

-491 

12 

DaUm 

17 

32 

-347 

19 

Denver 

17 

36 

-321 

21 

Son Antanta 

12 

39 

-235 

25 

Vancouver 

11 

45 

.196 

2S» 


FACtarcoivaraN 



LJL Laken 

37 

15 

•712 

_ 

Soottte 

36 

15 

.706 

Vi 

Portiond 

28 

25 

-S2B 

944 


— T*;— 1 icw-wjy/, lira, nuawi, imott 

and sport — afl from on sdwriatxxtai perspective. 

1m odwrtogerffallmiWoppcrtjnHyta^ the Intemcrtono l Herald 

Tribune with a low cost, 2-montn bid subscription and enjoy delivery to your 
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DENMARK 

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FINLAND 

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GREAT BRITAIN 

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PUad^tWa 0 3 0 0-2 

Pbst Puled: H-Dtoeer 14 ! Cossets. 

Lesdiysrtyn) (pp).Sea»d Period; P-LeOatr 
36 (BrtntfAniowr, Tlwrierr) Ipp). 3, P- 
Svobada 1 (Drucs, Des|anSns) 4. H-Dtneen 
15 (Cdssete Raatted TWrd Period: None. 
O mttue. wane. PenoWes— None, stats an 
goat: H- 9-9-82-26. P- 811-943-25. 
Garries: H-MunottL P-Snow. 

Calgary 0 9 0-8 

Detroit 1 2 1-4 

First Period: D-SaraWrom 12 (Yzemtan) 
Second Period: D-MeCoriy 14 (Y2etrarov 
Larionov) (Mi), a D-Sandsbam 13 (KozIm. 
YzemorO TbW Pwtort D-LMiMl 10 
(Kratov, Rouse) Shots a* goafcC- 12-7-9—28. 
D- 1813-10-38. Goodes C-tOdd. D- 
Osgood. 

Toronto 1 1 3-5 

Edaoafen 3 3 0-6 

Phsr period: E-Mardiant 12 (Wtegti LawU z 
BCmhonM 16 (Amort, Norton) % E-, 
OericawM 17 (McArrenencL McGte 4 T- 
Orofc 19 CGttmouri Second Period: E- 
CMftarwste 18 (MarchonD 6, E-Grler 7 
(Mrana* VtWghO 7, SMcAmnoM 11 
(OettowakD 8, T-Ma*phy 6 (Barem Gtenourt 
Cap). TTrid Period: T-Bemdn 19 (Sundbv 
Eton) (PC), la T-Nedved 3 (GOroouri II, T- 
□katfDMinpft&Gtbnotn) (pp).Statsongeal: 
T* 74816—36. E-. 18187-29. Gotes T- 
Potrirv CousfneoiL E-Jawph. 


SOCCER 


Real Beds i.Crito Vigo t 

TenerlteT, VOtendc 1 
Oviedo a Earomoduro 0 
Rodng SootonderS, vmodaDd 0 
Zarogcm 5, Spatting Gtym 0 
Rayo VaBecsno 1, Real Madrid 0 
Alietla Madrid 2. Logrones 0 
H wartas l, Departtvo Conmo 3 
Esponyal a AtWertc Btexw 2 
n i WMS i I, Root Madrid 56 paints a 

Pu raolon u 5a- 8 Rec* Baris 47) 4 Departtvo 
Corona 44 & Attottco Madrid 41 4 Red 
5adodod 41; 7, Athtoffc BObao 39: 8.ftadna 
Sanhstdar37,9, VOOatoSd 37; iaT«wrtfe36: 
11, Volendo 33»ia Carta Vigo » 13, Oviedo 
ta K Gompastofa 23i 1& Rayo VUecano27; 
16, Espanyol 2a 17, SpotWg G*on ia 
Zarovsa 25r 19, Logrones 22; 2tL SeviOa 21; 
21, Ejdremoduro 20; 22. Hercules 19. 

•auuuicv 

au/unsimiuu 

Kartsrutie SCI, Bayern Murdcho 

ntounronuniiMaa 

Aisenon, Manchester unded 2 
Aston VBa 2 Coventry T 
Deity 1 Sheffield Wednesday 2 
Liverpool 4 Leeds 0 
West Horn vs. NewaMe, ppcL 
it MWnOSi 1, Manchester united S3 
Priids; 2. Uverpaat 52; a Arsenal 48; 4 New- 
caste 45: & Aston VHa 4% & Chrisaa 41; 7. 

WtoiMedan 39: a ShofflWd Wednesday 38 9. 
Tottenhom 3fc la Everton 31; 11, Leeds » 
la Darby 29, la Sunderland 29r 14 Bladc- 
ham 27, is Lricnter27. 16, Coventry 27i 17, 

Nottingham Forest 2£ )& West Ham 2& ) & 
8outhoapton2a 2a NUdrieshrouoh 19. 
NtelWdrieriirough deducted 3 points 
taWBMMWtetal PMtWPtlAg 
Greece 0. Portugal 0 
Guammatol, Mericol 
Costo BarS Venezuela 2 


48 151 192 bostoh— S igned Of= Adam Hyrtu OF Roy 

46 156 205 PacBla LHP RnfOcI OreHano and LHP Ron 
injw Manny to 1 -year connects. 

1 0 |_t nriVEUuro— Slgneu RHP Travis DrisML 

f 0 0—7 RHP Gordon, LHP ttlko Molttiewi 
8 tmtnliin RHP Teddy Warredwr. LHP Casey WfflneA 

21 INFDdmteiJocksoaiNFRJctileSersonand 
sfHL None. OF Bruce Avert to 1 -yen r contracts. 

N.Y.- 13-4-8 tkxas— A greed to terms wflh 2B EdMn 

k.y.- Diaz an 1 -year contract. 

NATION JU. LEAGUE 

1 g e_2 ATVjutTA— Agreed to terms with INF Mite 

3 e 0-2 Mantel an 1-ywn contract. 
t (Cossets. CHtCAOO— Agreed to terms with INF Rev 

rirP-LeCkrir Sanchez on 1-year contract. 

\pp). % p. cwomr»T>— Signed INF Aaron Brow to 

4 H-Dtneen l-ywr rontracL 
criod: None. "ew ronc-Agreed to terms with RHP 
ne. Shots on MRewelcn an 1-yeor contract. 
r-11-9-0— 25. PWiLUDeiPHiA— Agreed to terms With 

RHP MBre Groce, INF Scott Rolen and OF 
0 g 0— « Wenaefl Mogee Jr. on 1-yeor contracts. 


CRICKET 


MUDMnawu. 

ENOLAND VS. lew ZEALANQ 
TMUB80AV. W amraiCHUHCH 
New Zealand innings: 222-6 

Engkmd tnntogs: 226-6 

Resott Engtond won by 4 wfctets 


transitions 


MAJOR LEAUIE BMtBAU. 
MamcrwuMne 

amahbm— S igned RHP Geoff Edsefl. RHP 
PeteJw dciaRHPFourioMacoy, LHP Maty 
c tel HemptiBl and INF Chris 
PriMietito 1 -year enrdrads. 


NATIONAL BASKET BAU ASSOCIATION 
nba— H ned Tarawa coach DarreO Water 
$7 J00 tor verbally abusing referees and W- 
H» to terwe court to ftnety manner following 
Msetodtanfrom Feb. 17 game ot tndtona. 

charlotte— P ut G Anthony GohMre on 
Mfurnd lot Activated F Scott Burred fro® 
Injured nst. 

LOS ANOfiLB cuppers— Put c Stanley 
Roberta and F Robert Horry on Injured Dst. 
Activated C Kevin Duckworth from IHuted 
Slst. 

Portland— A ctivated C Arvydos S aborts 
from Injured RsL Released G Ruben Mem- 
bhaid. 

TOAoerra-Nomed Brendan Suhr Bssbtaot 
coach. 

WASNtNCTOJV— Put G Tiro Legter at the 
Injured tet. 

POOItaAUL 

MATKtMAL KM2TBAU. LEAGUE 
Arizona— A greed to terms DT Bernard 
Wttsan on 2-year contract. Exercised their 
option on LB Terry taring tor 1977 season. 
Decbted to eauctae their option an G Dwd 
Lave. 

DWVER-Aequlred OT Tony janes from 
the Bafltonro Ravens far 1997 2nd-ramd 
draft pick. 

green bay— S igned S Brad Edwards. 
HOusTow-Agreed to terms wrn T Bred 
Hopkins on muMyear contract. 

Jacksonville — S igned OB Steve Teney- 
MB. Asstgrted TaneyWII, DE Jow WMte and 
WR Kendriche Button) to Worid LeoguO- 
MUxei-Signed G John Etmoia QB Spates 
FtaOter, DE Lorry Jottson, FB Les Mct»n- 
to" ond T MSre She) don. Waken DT Stave 
Emtman. 

QRLEAMS-Reteased LB Rutos Porter 
ond OB Tommy Hodson. 

N.Y. giants— W oWad P Mtae Horan ond S 
Jesse Campbell. Agreed to terms vrttfi DT 
Keith HomBton ond P Scoff Player. 

«-y, Announced reareraenT of iB 
Kyteamon. 

philaoclphia— D eclined » eicwdse the* 
option an QB Rodney Peete. Tendered e»- 
ctoslve rights offm to DT Michael Samson. 
WR Freddie Solomon. DT HoISs Thomos. OL 
Morris Unutoa. RB Derrick Witherspoon and 
DE-LB Sylvester WrighL Tendered quo«y- 
tng offers n DT Ronnie Dbcon. 5 James 
Fofler, RB Choifle Gamer ond OL Joe 
P° nos. 

Oakland— 5 (gned OB Jeft George la 8 
yeor contract Also signed CB Tary mc- 
DonleL Rstoased DT Jeny Bad P Jetf Gofl‘ 
setts Lorenzo Lynch and FBDerrfA Fenner. 
Announced retireme n t of OT Charles 
McRae. 

*an DIEGO— Signed CB Dwaynu Horoor to 
4*war contract. Terminated amtraef of C 
Courtney Naff png taflod to tondar okdusfve 
rftettaoffcrsto LB Oien Young, LB Arnold Ale 
onaTE Maurice Harrell. 

San FKAkasco-Wohred C Jesse SopaHl 
ond fb Tammy VarddL Agreed to terms wflh 
OL Kevin Gogon on 6-year contract. Nomert 
Pnt Morris tight ends eoodt. 
..^fATITE-Agreed to terms with CB Wlte 
WRtomj. 

Tampa BAY-Re-sfgncdTPmifGrobertoJ- 
yeor contract. 

teASHiMQTOH— signed QB Mark Harts* 
FB Jim wit4 DB Gregory Evans. TE Slew 
Brooks. DT Mite Rriey and WR ToderR* 
Moiona end assigned them to World 
League. 

wwwr 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEMUC 
nhl— R ned Son Jon 37.500 and Vo«oo- 
reria500 as result of muttlpfayeranercafloiw 
mjon. 27 gome. Fined Hartford F KoW 
Lttooe site tor puaBe rtmarlu crtndzbiB 
oflfcfal toUowtoD loss to Momreoi on Fob. B. 

beTBOn-Signed G Norm Monde to 3- 
reorcamrocL 






1 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


SPORTS 


v Second Sex Scandal 
1 W'mh Shakes Ice Hockey 



The Associated Press 

TORONTO — Over many years the 
boys came to Maple Leaf Garins hop- 
njg for a glimpse of their favorite hockey 
P wfu’ P 61 ? 3 ^ even s* an autograph. 

What they got. say two psycholo- 
gically scarred men who came forward 

f nd P" , " , P ted Perils dozens 
of others to call the police, was sexual 
abuse from those who provided access 
to their sports heroes. 

While Leafs* fans watched the game, 

f the men say. they were lying naked on 
blankets somewhere in the birildin® 
performing sexual acts for the grati- 
fication of Gardens* employees. 

“TTte phone’s been ringing off the 
wall. Dave Tredrea, a detective, said 
Wednesday after Gordon Stuckless, 47. 
a former Gardens employee, appeared 
tn court on charges of committing an 
indecent assault and gross indecency. 

“It has been dozens and dozens, lit- 
erally,’’ the detective said of the calls. 
“Etch one of these people will have to 
be interviewed, and we’ll see what ev- 
idence they can bring Forward.” 

Stuck! ess. once a backstage helper 
for concerts and hockey games, is in 
custody until a bail bearing next week. 

His accuser, Martin Kmze, 34, says he 
and other hockey fans were lured as boys 
W to the Gardens with promises of free 
’ tickets, hockey sticks and autographs. 

It is the second major scandal to hit 
Canada's national pastime this year. In 
■ January, a junior league coach, Graham 
James, was sentenced to 3V4 years in 
prison. The Boston Bruins’ wing Shel- 
don Kennedy went public with a story 
about years of abuse by James, his 
former Western Hockey League coach. 

Kmze said abuse at the Gardens start- 
ed in 1975 when he was 13 and con- 
tinued until 1982. At least three Gar- 
dens’ workers were involved, he said. 


The abase included orgies in back 
rooms, sometimes during 
The ringleader. Kmze said, was a 
former equipment handler, George Han- 
nah, who died 13 years ago. A third man 
is still employed as an usher, he said. 

“No victims have come forward yet in 
regards to that person.” Tredrea said. 

Gerry McNamara, the Leafs’ general- 
manager from 1981 until 1988, said he 
spent many hours In the Gardens during 
the time of the alleged assaults but 
no idea they were happ enin g 

“It’s horrible, horrible,” McNamara 
said. “It just goes 10 show you that stuff 
can be going on right underneath your 
nose and you’d never know about it** 
Hannan was a diabetic and had other 
health problems that Jed to a foot am- 
putation, McNamara said. 

Counseling gave Kraze the strength 
to finally come forward. Kennedy’s ad- 
missions might have helped. And 
Kruze’s willingness to go public ap- 
pears to have spurred other potential 
victims to contact the police. 

One man who spoke on condition of 
anonymity told the Toronto Star that 
Hannah forced him to take part in sexual 
acts ‘‘about 50 tunes” over two years 
when he was in his early teens. 

He said he wonders if the Gardens’ 
management knew about die assaults. 

In the case of Stuckless and Hannah. 
The Maple Leaf Gardens and Maple 
Leafs- hockey club were aware of 
Kruze’s allegations when he sued the 
Gardens in 1993. They hired a private 
detective who, according to the arena’s 
president. Cliff Fletcher, was unable to 
substantiate Kruze’s stray. 

Still, they settled out of court for 
about $60,000, with the stipulation that 
Kruze not go public. He was also paid 
$2 7.000 by the Criminal Injuries Com- 
pensation Board in February 1995. 


Tar Heels Cut Down Wake Forest 
As ACC Title Race Grows Tighter 


The Associated Press 

North Carolina moved within 2 Vi 
games of first place in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference with a 74-60 victory over 
No. 4 Wake Forest 

“We're on a roll right now,” said 
Antawn Jamison, who had 12 points and 
10 rebounds for tire 12th ranked Tar 
Heels (1 8-6. 8-5) who moved into a 

Couiai Basketball 

fourth-place tie with Clemson. They are 
now one game behind Maryland and 
Wake Forest (20-4, 9-4), who are tied 
for second behind Duke. 

The Demon Deacons lost consecutive 
, games fra* the first time since the middle 
of the 1994-95 season and lost on the 
road for the first time this season. 

Vince Carter scored 21 of his career- 
high 26 points in the first half for the Tar 
Heels, who led 38-18 at halftime. 

“It was just amazing to me,” he said. 
“That hasn’t happened to me since I had 
a big game like that in high schooL It was 
like, ‘Wow, dial’s what it felt like.’” 

Tim Duncan, Wake Forest’s All- 
America center, finished with 20 points 
‘ and 17 rebounds. The Demon Deacons 
trailed by 24 points and closed within 
' seven with a furious 23-6 rally. 

“They made it interesting,” Smith 
said. "You knew they would.” 


No. 2 HbmMota 60, Ohio St. 48 Bobby 
Jackson scored 15 points to lead the 
Golden Gophers (23-2, 12-1 Big Ten) to 
their eighth straight victory and 18th in 
19 games. Minnesota extended its lead 
to 3 Vi games over Purdue with five 
games. Damon Stringer scored 21 points 
for the visiting Buckeyes (10-12, 5-8). 

No. 3 Kmtucfcy 75, Alabama 61 Ron 
Mercer scored 23 points, including two 
3-pointers down the stretch, as the vis- 
iting Wildcats (25-3, 1 1-2 Southeastern 
Conference) won despite shooting just 
38 percent. Brian Williams had 18 for 
the Crimson Tide (14-12, 4-9). 

Tmxmm 57, No. 7 Iowa St. 56 Dennis 
Jordan tipped in a rebound with 3.3 
seconds left to give the Longhorns (15- 


8, 9-4 Big 12) victory over the visiting 
Cyclones. Kenny Pratt’s layup with II 
seconds to play had put Iowa State (18- 


5, 9-4) 56-55 ahead before Jordan 
scored off A1 Coleman’s miss. 

No. 14 Maryland 76, Goorgia Taefc 68 

Keith Booth scored 1 1 of his 26 points 
over the final IQ minutes as the Ter- 
rapins (204,9-4 ACC) beat the Yellow 
Jackets (9-14, 3-10) in Atlanta for only 
the second time since 1981. 

No. 17 UCLA 82, Sootham California 

60 Toby Bailey scored 24 points and die 
Brains (16-7, 1 1-3) retained first place in 
thePac-10. David Crouse led the visiting 
Trojans (14-9, 10-4) with 18 points. 



Bill kirtun'IV .Vouulnl tV-> 


The Devils’ goalkeeper, Martin Brodeur, making the save on a shot by the Rangers' Wayne Gretzky, far right. 

Osgood Dazzles on Big Night for Goalies 


The Associated Press 

Chris Osgood stopped all 28 shots he 
faced — some with dazzling saves — 
for his fifth shutout of the season as the 
Red Wings blanked the Calgary Flames, 
4-0, on a night when goalkeepers starred 
throughout the National Hockey 
League. 

But goalkeepers don’t always wel- 
come attention, according to Osgood. . 

“You get more attention when you 

play bad than when you play good and 
win,” said Osgood. “It gets tiresome 
sometimes.” 

Tomas Sandstrom scored two goals 
as Detroit snapped Calgary’s six-game 
unbeaten streak. Osgood’s 13th career 
shutoor gave him a 4-1 record in his last 
five starts after going 1-3-1 in the pre- 
vious five games. 

“1 just wasn’t getting the breaks.” 
Osgood said. ‘ ‘It's just apart of growing 
up and coming of age.” 


Sandstrom has scored four goals — 
three in his last two games — since the 
Red Wings obtained him in a trade Jan. 
27 with Pittsburgh. 

Playing in his 1 ,000th regular-season 
game, Steve Yzennao assisted on De- 
troit *s first three goals, including both of 
Sandstrom’s. 

Jason Muzzatti of Hartford stopped 
23 of 25 shots in the Whalers* im- 
pressive 2-2 tie on the road against the 
Philadelphia Flyers, one of the top scor- 
ing teams in the NHL. 

And Mike Richter made three great 
saves late in the game as the New York 
Rangers posted their second straight tie 
with the New Jersey Devils, 1-1 . 

Whalers 2 , Flyers 2 Kevin Dineen 
scored both of Hartford’s goals. But it 
was Muzzatti’ s sparkling goaltending 
that let the Whalers snap a three-game 
losing streak on the road. 

4 ’He made some good saves, no ques- 
tion,” Hartford’s coach, Paul Maurice, 
said “That’s what we need against a 
team like that, with big shooters.” 


Muzzatti was especially strong in the 
third period, when the Flyers failed to 
score on three power plays. 

Rangers i,Ds«asi In East Rutherford, 
New Jersey. Richter stopped 3 1 shots as 
New York remained unbeaten in four 
games against New Jersey this season. 

“He really rises to the occasion 
against us,” said the Devils’ captain, 
Scott Stevens, who was stopped by 
Richter with nine seconds left in over- 
time. 

In four games, Richter has faced 1 59 
shots by New Jersey and allowed four 
goals. Steve Thomas got the only one 
Wednesday for the Devils — his second 
in as many games. 

Martin Brodeur made 22 saves for the 
Devils to stretch his personal unbeaten 
streak to 13 games. 

Oiler* 6, Leafs 5 In Edmonton. Mari- 
usz Czerkawski had three goals and an 
assist as the Oilers took a 6-1 lead before 
Toronto's third-period rally. 

It was Edmonton's first victory in 
four games. 


Japanese Seek 
New Field of 
Dreams in U.S. 

The Associated Press 

The sounds of baseballs hitting leath- 
er can be heard in Florida and Arizona. 
Another sound being heard, one de- 
cidedly less familiar, is that of the Jap- 
anese language. 

For years, American baseball players • 
have been going to Japan. Now. a grow- 
ing number of Japanese are in the united 
States, trying to find a lucrative baseball 
career. That’s mainly thanks to HI dec 
Nomo. the 1995 National League Rook- 
ie of the Year, currently in the second 
year of a three-year, S4.4 million con- 
tract with the Los .Angeles Dodgers. 

Until this year, the only Japanese to 
play in the U.S. major leagues were 
pitchers: Nomo. Maisanori Murakami, 
a relief pitcher for the San Francisco 
Giants in 1964-65, and Makoro Suzuki, 
up briefly with Seattle last year. He is 
expected to pitch for a Mariners' Triple- 
A club this season. 

Of the 12 Japanese signed by major- 
league clubs this season, most are pitch- 
ers. While they might not be able to say- 
curve or fast toll — “Good morning” is 
the extent of Kohichi Taniguchi's Eng- 
lish in the New York Mels' camp — they 
certainly can throw those pitches. 

“He knows what he's doing and 
knows how to pitch," Terry Collins, 
manager of the Anaheim Angels, said 
after getting his first look at right-hander 
Shigetoshi Hasegawa. “You can tell he 
came here ready and determined to make 
an impact right away.’ ’ 

Hasegawa. 29. was granted free 
agency- by the Orix Blue Wave before he 
became eligible to play in the United 
States. Anaheim outbid Seattle and Oak- 
land for the pitcher, giving $1 million to 
Orix and $350,000 to Hasegawa. 

A problem facing Japanese wanting 
to play in the United States is free agency 
and the question of whether a Japanese 
team can trade a player's rights ex- 
clusively to a U.S. major league club. 

Players with more than six years of 
service in the U.S. major leagues are 
eligible for free agency. In Japan, it's 10 
years. Also, the Major League Players 
Association wants any club to be able to 
sign a Japanese player. 

Probably the most sought-after Jap- 
anese player is a right-handed pitcher. 
Hideki Irabu. His team, Chiba Lotte, 
assigned his rights to the San Diego 
Padres, but the New York Yankees also 
want to sign him. 


For Magic Coach in Debut , Victory Is Bittersweet 


The Associated Press 

The Orlando Magic gave Richie 
Adubato a triumph in his first game as 
their interim coach, beating the Portland 
Trail Blazers, 95-84. But it wasn’t a 
completely happy night for Adubato 
because he got die job after his friend 
Brian Hill was fired. 

Adubato, who coached Hill in high 
school and was an assistant under him 
for 314 seasons in Orlando, said: ’Tm 
really happy that the players came oat 
and gave me the effort But still, it’s a 
tough situation.” 

Hill was dismissed Tuesday after his 
players complained aboat the way he 
handled the team, which was off to a 24- 
25 start Magic fans showed their dis- 
pleasure Wednesday with the firing by 
booing starters Penny Hardaway, Hor- 
ace Grant Dermis Scott and Nick An- 
derson during pregame introductions. 

“That's afl right. We still love the 


fans,” Scott said. * ‘Thanks for booing us. 
because it motivated us even more.” 
Hardaway scored 7 of his 21 points in 
the last three minutes for Orlando, 

NBA Roundup 

which put the game away with a 13-2 
surge after their center, Rony Seikaiy, 
was ejected for arguing. 

Hawks 100, Raears 87 Dikembe 
Mutombo had 17 points. 10 rebounds 
and four blocks as Atlanta won for the 
21st time in its last 22 home games. 

Homate 123, Suns 115 In Charlotte, 
Glen Rice scored 36 points, and the Hor- 
nets tied a club record with 14 3-pointers 
as they won for die 14th time in 19 games. 
Rice was 11 of 24 from the field, in- 
cluding six of eigfri from 3-point range. 
Kevin Johnson had 25 points and 14 
assists for the Suns. 

Pistons i oo, Bulats as Lindsey Hunter 


scored 25 points and Grant Hfll 24 as 
Detroit won its fourth straight. Juwan 
Howard scored 25 points for visiting 
Washington, which is 2-3 since Beanie 
Bickerstaff replaced Jim Lynam as 
coach. 

Raptors 125, Spurs 92 At San Ant- 
onio, Damon Stoudamaire scored 21 
points, and Toronto made a team-record 
15 3-pointers to hand the Spurs their 
worst loss of the season. The Raptors 
made 15 of 25 from 3-point range, in- 
cluding 7 of 10 in the third quarter. 
Dominique Wilkins and Carl Herrera 
each scored 17 points fortbe Spurs, who 
dressed only eight players. 

T i inb a n wol WO * 84, OrizzBu 73 Dean 
Garrett, a 30-year-old rookie, scored a ' 
career-high 25 points, and Minnesota 
matched a franchise record with its 
ninth road victory of the season. Garrett, 
who joined tile Tunberwolves last sum- 
mer after playing six seasons in Italy, 


finished 1 1 -for- 15 from the field and 
also grabbed 10 rebounds 

Cavaliers 103, Lakers 84 Terrell 
Brandon scared 19 of his 30 points in the 
fourth quarter, and Tyrone Hill had a 
season-high 24 points and 12 rebounds 
as Cleveland beat the short-handed 
Lakers in Los Angeles. 

El den Campbell had 23 points and 
eight rebounds for the Lakers, who 
played without injured starters Sha- 
qume O’Neal and Robert Horry. 

Warriors 11 2 , Catties ItH At San Jose, 
Laired Sprewed scored 41 points, and 
Chris Mullin had a triple-double as 
Golden State handed Boston its eighth 
straight loss. Mudin, who has been the 
subject of trade rumors, had 19 points. 
10 rebounds and 12 assise. He also tied 
Nate Thurmond’s club record by play- 
ing in his 757th regular-season game for 
Golden State. Todd Day led the Celtics 
with 27 points. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 
P^SSTT] ! LgSr '"1 ykskJduke 



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IMEHNAXIONAL 

Kecrcitheivt 

Appears every Monday. 

■pi advertise contact 

ffed Ronao - .. 
ToL: + 33 (0)1 41 439391 
Fax: + 33feUie9370- 
or your nearest HfF office 
or r e p resentative. - 


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T0SEE anew - owe there? . 

BASEBALL glove., y, 11 > M 





CALVIN AND HOBBES 


GLAD W BOW CDJID 03ME. 
THANK 'fcU raRTULNCE. . 
PRESENT. GCC0-WE. -X 






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piece cf Cake and ice 

CREAM MEfQc. BRa46M5 WBt 


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PAGE 2 
PAGE 18 

PAGE 22 


evxeknational HERALDTBIBUNE, SAXOBDAY-SUrrt)Ay, Fi»KUAKtl-2,19y? 


■ -S 



POSTCARD 


Everyman’s Internet 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Times Service 

W ASHINGTON — Ex- 
actly a hundred years 
ago, in 1S97, the Library of 
Congress’s Jefferson bund- 
ing opened, inaugurating a 
new, populist era in the his- 
tory of one of the world’s 
great repositories of know- 
ledge. For the first time, die 
library’s books were avail- 
able not just to members of 
Congress and their staffs, not 
just to scholars and special- 
ists, but to Everyman. 

Now die library is doing 
the same thing with its special 
collections, the more than 70 
million items in nonbook 
format that it holds, such as 
the papers of eminent men 
and women, including those 
of the first 23 presidents of the 
United States, Mathew 
Brady's Civil War photo- 
graphs, newspaper cartoons, 
maps — 6 million of them — 
Gershwin scores and theat- 
rical posters. 

Somewhat to the library's 
surprise, it has a smash hit on 
its hands. 

□ 

The goal is to put S million 
items on the Internet by 2000. 
Already, the library has raised 
$23.5 milli on from private 
sources and has won com- 
mitments of$I5 million more 
from Congress, more than 
halfway toward a goal of $60 
million. The telecommunica- 
tions billionaire John Kluge 
and a foundation starred by 
the late David Packard, the 
California computer mag- 
nate. have each given more 
than $5 million. 

Without much fanfare, the 
library has begun the 
painstaking process of trans- 
lating images on film and pa- 
per into the digital form com- 
prehensible to computers. 
Eventually, Americana from 


other libraries will also be 
brought into the project, 
which is called the National 
Digital Li bray Program. 

So far, 300.000 items from 
the library's own collection 
are available (www.loc.gov), 
. in 17 collections un- 
tie name American 
Memory, including photo- 
graphs documenting life dur- 
ing the Degression, theatrical 
memorabilia illustrating the 
career of Hany Houdini and 
the Yiddish theater, speeches 
from the 1920 campaign, Af- 
rican-American pamphlets 
and films of the San Francisco 
earthquake. 

□ 

All of this is “plain 
v anilla, " in the words of 
James Billington, the librar- 
ian of Congress — original 
documentary sources, uned- 
ited, unexplained. 

According to Robert Zich, 
the library's director of elec- 
tronic programs, its web site 
attracts more than 20 million 
“hits’ ' a month, most of theta 
in search of American 
Memory items. Many of the 
visitors are schoolchildren. 

The scope of the collec- 
tions available to Zich and 
Laura Campbell, the director 
of the digital library, is almost 
incomprehensible. 

Among the items awaiting 
digitalization are: The New 
York Times from page from 
the day Lincoln was shot 
(“Awful Event,” the headline 
says), an 1812 handbill offer- 
ing a reward for the return of 
an indentured servant, one of 
John Hancock’s tax bills, an 
old menu from the Tremont 
House hotel in Boston, a draw- 
ing and description of the first 
gerrymander, and the first 
Betty Crocker cookbook- Phis 
the original scores of John 
Sousa, and one of the 
,’s great collections of 
early movies. 


INTERNE TRIBUNEJFRIDAX TEBWJABiL2I- 1391. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1997 


Andrew Wyeth s Portrait of a Scowling Man 


By Ralph Blumenthal 

New York Times Service 


C HADDS FORD, Pennsylvania — An- 
drew Wyeth is still alive. He proved it 
the other day by ordering a Bloody Mary, a 
shrimp cocktail (“Five shrimp, please”) and 
sweet-potato fries. 

Sure, he said over lunch at the colonial 
Chadds Ford Inn in the Brandywine country 
of Pennsylvania — home to three gener- 
ations of painting Wyeths — be and his wife, 
Betsy, had resisted publication of a con- 
fidant’s revealing new biography. 

And now here was the book, “Andrew 
Wyeth: A Secret Life.” with his scowling 
countenance staring from bookstore shelves. 
People may have thought he had died, and 
more than a few critics may have wished he 
bad. But no, he said, his impish face seamed 
with leathery creases over a worn gray Irish 
sweater, “I’m not dead yet.” 

At 79. Wyeth, who has conjured some of 
the most arresting popular images of the age 
and reaped extraordinary .financial success, 
still paints every day, plowing through fields 
and riverbeds in a beat-up GMC Suburban 
with a sketch pad on tile seat. 

Despite the near-fatal loss of most of a 
lung many years ago, along with a recent hip 
operation and some frailties of age, he works 
in a frenzy and always has. He bridles at 
labels, including the seemingly irrefutable 
one of “realist,” calling himself “elusive” 
instead. 

He has, of course, long been the bane of 
much of the art establishment, and critics 
have over the years dismissed him as a pop 
icon and sentimentalist, a glorified Norman 
Rockwell, too accessible, successful and 
popular with the public to be important 
It is, in fact, in repudiation of their scorn, 
as well as to demonstrate that his subjects are 
not mere conceits but real slices of Amer- 
icana, that Wyeth has used the publication of 
the biography to break a long silence. (He did 
cooperate with Thomas Having, a longtime 
supporter and former director of the Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art, in “Autobio- 
graphy,” an annotated bode based on an 
exhibition of his works, in 199S.) 

“To say Fm this or I’m that” he said, 
impatiently waving off categorization. “What 
you have to do is break all the rules.” 

He said he was out to capture “the depth in 
every object” and he believed, like Con- 
stable. that “yon don’t have to make things 
up, you don’t have to put in animals or 



.... SmMvVIheNmhiktiaa 

Wyeth, 79, visiting the studio of his father. Says the painter, “I’m not dead yet’ 1 
people, you just have to sit these, and it will 


a daylong conversation that 
coursed from (be studio where he learned to 
draw at the feet of his father, the renowned 
illustrator Newell Coavers Wyeth, to fee 
settings and subjects of some of his most 
famous works, Wyeth talked, about his life 


of it. “Betsy read me two chapters,” he 
added. “I said, ‘No more, I might not like 
him anymore.”* 

The book, coupling admiration for 
Wyeth’s work with striking revelations 
about his personal affairs, has received 
mixed reviews. Based on many years of 

. . conversations with the Wyeths and vrith 

today, his family history and his art. family members, it recounts the overpower- 

“I can’t get going cm a picture unless I mg influence of N.C. Wyeth on his children 
1 * s “* __ ' and Andrew’s fescanation with fee violence 

underlying everyday life, his fear of con- 
finement, his compulsive secrecy and his 
strong attachments to his models. 

One of these, a neighbor, Helga Testorf, 
became the focus of a 15-year artistic ob- 
session dial genuinely rocked the Wyeths’ 
marriage, despite the enduring! skepticism of 
critics who insist that the affair was con- 
cocted for publicity. 

Meryman is a former writer and editor for 


. . — line 

excited.” he said. “I have to feel me hair 
raised on my neck. It's all strictly uncon- 
scious.” 

Although the new biography, by Richard 
Meryman, a longtime friend of the Wyeths, 
offers a warts-and-all look at a strange if 
gifted clan, Wyeth voiced no regrets at hav- 
ing cooperated with the author. “I wanted it 
so tough that I wouldn’t read it,’ ’ he said wife 
a laugh. In fact, he said, be did notread most 


Life magazine and the son of a 
^it^S^rtraitist, also 
whwdirectedthe art 

Gallery in Washington vxfoe 19^ and .us. 
Sfost interviewed tte Wyeths 
worked toward the book over the new 
veara, although fee Wyeths, he *** 1 
Stlbr formal interviews want h,m 10 takc 

notes intheir presence. .. 

The writer remains close to ^ Janug. 
bound to it by a shared tragedy that 1 ^ 
fee menace behind so many 

newborn daughter, the baby. laid to steep in 
the Wyeths’ Gving room, regurgitated milk 

and choked to death. . 

Although some critics have deemed the 
book credulous and partisan, Meiyman in- 
sisted that he was no “apologist and wor- 
shiper” of fee artist He said he bad written a 
tough, investigative book that explored 
Wyeth’s fascination with the grotesque and 
left few family skeletons untouched. 

Chadds Ford, between Philadelphia and 
Wilmington, Delaware, is a kind of 
“Wyeth’s World,” as austere and haunting 
in its way as “Christina's World, Wyeth’s 
widely known painting of his crippled friend 
Christina Olson crawling toward her des- 
olate farmhouse in Maine. This time of year, 
■the wintry ground stretches tight like skin 
over fee bare hills, and the stubbly brown 
grass is finely crosshatched, as if by strokes 
of the artist’s brush. . 

At the Chadds Ford Inn, Wyeth occupied 
his regular seat at a comer table. He had 
arrived laic, explaining that he did not wear a • 
watch, for fear, he said, of anything external 
telling Him when to stem painting. 

Why, he was asked, does he seem to 
antagonize so much of fee ait world? _ 

It is because he dismissed as boring so 
much of fee abstract art that critics say is 
good for people, Wyeth said. 

“I believe in the principle of what I’m 
doing,’’ he said. “That challenges them, 
threatens them. 2’m nor interested in their 
profound thoughts on art.” 

“It’s a boring period in art." he said. 
“They’ve gone as far as they can. Go look at 
a ■ blank picture. Something has to take its 
place. Abstraction has become predictable." 

Wyeth said he was just going to keep 
painting, critics be damned. “I'm not going 
to let them disrupt my old age.” he said. 


COUNTER-COUNTERCULTURE 


PEOPLE 


Can The Village Voice Graduate to the 9 90s ? 

miners, has been ^a^csn off ah 1 bv a 

Q tamers, has been taken on fee air by a 


By Elisabeth Bumiller 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — The 
writers of The Village 
Voice knew their alternative 
world was chan g in g yet again 
when their new leader gave 
them an introductory pep talk 
by quoting a favorite, now- 
dead editor of The New York 
Post. 

“He once told me, ‘Lemme 
tell you something, kid,’ " 
the new Voice editor told his 
staff. “ ‘You gotta grab the 
reader by the throat. He’s on 
fee train. It’s hoc He’s trying 
to hit on his secretary, die’s 
not giving him the time of 
day. His wife is mad at him. 
His kid needs braces; he 
doesn’t have the money. The 
guy next to him stinks. It’s 
crowded. You want him to 
read your story? You better 
make it interesting.’ ” 

The famously cantankerous 
writers, a youngish rainbow 
coalition of color and sexual 
preference, exchanged side- 
ways looks. This sounded like 
bad Ben Hecht, or New York 
at the time of the 1964 World’s 
Fair. Clearly, he was not de- 
scribing the typical Voice 
reader. Who was this guy? 

Donald Forst, that's who. a 
cocky, prepsychedelic, 64- 
year-old white heterosexual 
male, the former bad-boy ed- 
itor of New York Newsday 
who led feat paper to two 
Pulitzer Prizes but also 
reveled in front-page cheese- 
cake photos of Maria Maples 
and Donna Rice. 

By universal acclaim, Forst 
is the oddest choice to edit the 
41 -year-old leftist weekly 
since Clay Felker, the New 
York magazine founder and 
prince of the where -to-find- 
the -best -pastrami story, who 
once ordered two stricken 



MoahiA hn rid«OheNnThifcT1at« 


Forst: “You gotta grab the reader by the throat 9 


Voice writers to stop using 
only lower case. 

“Why did I take tois7” 
Forst said of his job the other 
day. “Because it was insane. 
It’s what Karl Wallenda said: 
‘Life is on fee wire. All the 
rest is waiting.’ 

"Yeah, this is a very ex- 
citing place. It’s got hetero- 
sexuals, homosexuals, lesbi- 
ans, carnivores, vegetarians. 
Stalinists, Trotskyites.” 

Forst 's mandate, as out- 
lined by the Voice's publish- 


er, David Schneidennan, is to 
create a newsier Voice aimed 
at fee 32-year-old computer 
executive with a vaguely Bo- 
hemian drift 

“I want the Voice to be a 
journalistic player in tills 
town and not a cute little thing 
from the 60s that amuses 
everyone from time to time 
with its own internal food 
fights,” Schneidennan said. 
(He was not speaking meta- 
phorically. An angry Voice 
writer once threw potato salad 


at the letters editor, according 
to Richard Goldstein, the 
Voice’s executive editor.) 

So far, what the clash of 
Forstian tabloid culture with 
Voicean leftist and identity- 
based politics has done is to 
bring hope to Voice news 
writers that Forst will make 
the weekly relevant — and 
fear to the feature writers that 
he will dumb down the coun- 
terculture's once-great news- 
paper of record. 

*Tm worried that literary 
quality is not something he’s 
interested in,” said Robert 
Christgau, fee Voice’s rock- 
and-roll writer. 

Forst is not unaware of 
staff sentiment. “There is one 
group feat was immediately 
on my side,” he said. “The 
rest of fee people are waiting 
to see if I’m feedeviL” 

The larger question is 
where Forst takes the house 
organ for a house that burned 
down a long time ago. If the 
left is dead, or at least no 
longer able to support advert- 
isers, will Forst, who says he 
has no politics and has never 
registered to vote, turn his at- 
tention solely to Generation 
X readers? 

“There’s nobody at the 
barricades these days,” Forst 
said. “There’s AIDS. There's 
gay rights. There’s lesbian 
rights. There ’s desegregation. 
Those are issues that we still 
address, but they’re not fire- 
fights.” 

Forst said that he would 
serve youth (“In a certain- 
sense, they're almost my gen- 
eration. the silent genera- 
tion”), but that The Voice 
would not be mainstream. He 
said he would fight smaller 
injustices. 

“This paper,” he added, 
“should always have an edge 
to fee left” 


tamers, has been taken off tire air by a 
national religious television network 
after showing up at the American Music 
Awards dressed like a heavy-metal rode 
singer. Boone’s weekly half-hour show 
was dropped by fee Trinity Broadcasting 
Network after the network received 
thousands of phone calls and letters from 
contributors who were shocked by 
Boone’s bare-chested leather costume 
— augmented by faux tattoos and a 
studded dog collar — at fee awards 
show, broadcast Jan. 27 by ABC “A lot 
of our ‘partners’ had a real problem with 
that, more than a lot,’ ’ said an employee 
of Trinity, whore programming is car- 
ried by nearly 400 cable systems and 
television stations worldwide. Known 
for decades for his squeaky clean ap- 
pearance, Boone, 62, said Trinity’s 
move was “real unexpected,” adding, 
“I thought everybody saw it for what it 
was, sort of a parody, just a send-up.” 


□ 

When Barbara Walters 



composer Andrew Lloyd Webber for 
ABC News’ “20/20.” she took care to 
address what some viewers might have 
seen as a conflict of interest. Yes, she 
explained, ABC’s parent company does 
business wife Lloyd Webber, but she 
added “that’s not why wc did fee 
piece.” What Walters failed to tell the 
audience — and her bosses — was that 
she had invested 5100,000 in his Broad- 
way production of ‘ ‘Sunset Boulevard.” 
Now she has conceded that she should 
have mentioned it “In retrospect, I 
should have disclosed the investment,” 
Walters raid in a statement “I didn’t 
even think about it, since I haven't in- 
vested in another Broadway show before 
or since, ft won’t happen again.” 

□ 

Three former detectives who Were 
once colleagues investigating O-J. 
Simpson are now taking aim at each, 
other — ■ wife words. Tom Lange and 
Philip Vannatter denounced Mark 
Fuhnnao foroammenis in his new book 
trashing them as incompetents who blew 
the Simpson care. In a withering 15- 
page statement, Lange and Vannatter 
blasted Ftferman’s "Murtkr in Brent- 
wood,” as “a desperate, cynical and 


TTw AMocfarttrf (tot 

led the Horsing around in “Fanny Business,” one of two new Russian sitcoms. 


cowardly attempt to redeem himself at 
our expense.” Fuhrman responded by 
accusing the two senior detectives of 
writing fiction in their own book, “Ev- 
idenoe Dismissed. ” 

□ 

Jeanne Calment, officially the oldest 
woman in the world, celebrates her 122d 
birthday Friday in alife that began in an 
era before films, telephones, cars or air- 
craft. Blind, confined to a wheelchair 
and all but deaf, Calment will spend her 
birtlKiayattfaeAtosonduLacretirement 
home in Arles, the southern French town 
where she has always lived and, as a girl, 
met van Gogh. Cahnem’s sense of hu- 
mor has won her fame as much as her 
longevity. A long-time smoker who en- 
joys a glass of port, Calment has said a 
smile is her recipe for long life. “I’ve 
only ever bad one wrinkle .and I'm sitting 
on it,” she once remarked. Another 
time, she predicted: “1 will die laugh- 
ing.” 


A Ipt of people think it’s a radical, 
even a doomed, idea, but a handful of 
creative Russians have put something . 


new on the airwaves: the country's first 
sitcoms. “No one believes they can pull 
it off.” said Inga Ugolnikova at TV 
Park, a son of Russian TV Guide. For 
one tiling, no one’s quite sure wfaat 
makes Russians laugh anymore. In So- 
viet times, funny was easy: You mocked 
the system, “lr was fee humor of a 
totalitarian regime,” says Yuri Briinky, . 
director of “Cafe Strawberry,” one of 
the two new shows. Now he’s staying 
away from politics. In his show, a com- 
of errors akin to “Cheers,” the 
*s proprietors and their friends and 
patrons get hopelessly entangled in 
mixups or imstmda^tandings. Toe other 
new show, “Funny Business, Family 
Business," centers on a middle-class 
family trying to get by in today's Russia. 
The action takes place at their apartment 
and at fee laundry they opened after 
losing their savings in a pyramid 
scheme. The often biting show is the 
brainchild of brothers Dawd and Tigran 
Keossaian, who say they find all their 
material “out there on the streets, ” Both, 
shows premiered last month. The critics 
have so far ignored “Funny Business” 
and panned “Cafe Strawberry ” one 
celling it “profoundly stupid.” 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling from France and other countries really 
easy. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country 
. you’re calling from and you’ll get the fastest, clearest 
connections. And be sure to charge your calls on your 
AT&T Galling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to fe? 
So please check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. . : 



tiftrmoretx 


LJust dial die AT&T Access ffamtar 
fix the country yju are calling from. 

2. Dial the phene minteyou'fe calling 
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AT&T Access Numbers 

- EtlBfflPE ~~ 

022*983-011 

8-800-188-10 

W8MMB11 

013W810 

, , , 08-889-1311 

1-808-SS8-080 

BE? 172 ' 1il1 

08-922-9111 

RM*to«A<K<weo»IJ» 760-5642 

5**®° 980-99-00-11 

522= ...ttMUMtt 

M0MM811 

UntfjdM afdaa* 8M8-8M011 

“ 

I AFRICA 

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