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INTERNATIONAL 



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^The World’s Daily Newspaper 

DutchVow 

EU Reform, 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Paris, Wednesday, January 8, 1997 


No. 35,413 


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Is in Doubt 

Leader Meets Major 
In Ejfortto Break 
Impasse on Ifetpes 

ByTomBiiedde 

^ ___ Infenuawnal Herald Tribune ■ 

^ THE HAGUE — Opening its six- 
won* presidency of foe European Uni- 
on, the Dutch government promised 
Tuesday to push tor political reforms to 
prepare the bloc to expand into Kacwy n 
Europe, but acknowledged that mrem*) 
divisions could delay an agree ment be- 
yond a June target date. * 

- Prime Minister Wim Kok put sub- 
stance before timing- on EU reform, 
saying the Union must inake sub stantial 
progress m overhauling its' governing 
institutions and in deepening cooper- 
ation in areas ranging from forei gn 
policy and combating organized crime 
to employment and the envir onment. 

Paraphrasing John Kennedy's appeal 
that Americans ask hot what their coun- 
try could do for them, Mr. Kok said, 
“The question is what we can do for our 
common Attune, because, our Amue lies 
in Europe.’VMr. Kok’s comments woe 
in keeping with the Dutch tradition of 
being among the most ardent advocates 
jpf European integration, which this 
small trading nation regards as vital to 
its prosperity and security. . . 

But ECJ officials hope the pragmatism 
of the 58-year-old former union reader, 
who eschews talk of a federalist Europe 
and refuses to lock his gove rnment mtn 
a June deadline, will succeed m break- 
ing the impasse on the Union's r efbn n . 
negotiations: 

Mr. Kok wasted no time in agoing to 
the heart of the impasse, inviting the 
British prime minister. John Major, to a 
private dinner here Tuesday evening. 

He said he. wanted to ptobe for any 
sign of softening m IVfr. Majdr’s public 
opposition 46 matt of the reform pro--' * 

of^gl^oantrie^wi^o^J policies. 
He also plannedtoa^peal for a cahning 
of the Aetoric in Britain, which Dutch 
officials fear could limit London’s abil- 
ity to compromise even if Tooy.Blair’s 
Labour Party defeats Mr. Major's ruling : - 
Conservatives in Jfce, general election 
that must te held by May 22... 

"Wewamtot^andtonegotiateina 
very serious way with the British gov- 
enunenu” Mr,'Kpk jaii “We are not 
just sitting back arid waiting for foe 
electi ons. Wedoo’t have the luxury of 
time/’ But in a sign of. how. far Euro- 
skeptics in Britain have drifted the de- 
bate, Mr. Major foaod himself defend- 
ing Britain’s EU membershtp rather 
than discussing future reforms. 

“1 don’t believe when you examine 
the implications of leaving the European 
Union that there is any remotely plaus- 
ible case to be made for leaving,” he 
said at a press conference in London. 

See EUROPE, Page 7 



Gingrich Weathers 
U.S. House Storm 

Re-elected, Speaker Expresses 
Regrets for Any Misconduct 


. _ dude* la AibBffHtflbr.imaeiMlrtl l!m 

Newt Gingrich on a cellular phone as he and his wife leftaprayer service in Washington early Tuesday. 


By Brian Know] ton 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Quelling a small 
but potentially threatening rebellion. 
Newt Gingrich was re-elected Tuesday 
as speaker of the House of Represen- 
tatives, overcoming the opposition of 
some Republicans who feared his eth- 
ical breaches could fatally weaken his 
leadership. 

House members, meeting on the first 
day of the 105th Congress, gave Mr. 
Gingrich 216 votes, to 205 for the 
Democratic leader of the chamber. 
Richard Gephardt. Five Republicans 
and Mr. Gephardt abstained, ami four 
cast votes for others. Four members 
were absent or not voting. 

That meant that Republican leaders 
had narrowly succeeded in limiting an 
incipient uprising to a small core of 
defectors concerned about Mr. Gin- 
grich’s stewardship of the House at a 
time when ethics charges against him 
are pending. 

A House committee is to deride by 


Jan. 21 what punishment to propose 
after an investigation of Mr. Gingrich's 
admitted misuse of tax-exempt funds 
for political ends. 

Mr. Gingrich. 53. thus achieved his 
goal of becoming the first Republican 
speaker to be re-elected in 68 years. In 
the succession to the presidency, the 
speaker stands behind only the vice 
president. 

But it was the first time since 1 923 
that a speaker had been elected by a 
majority of those present rather than by 
a majority of all the 435 members of the 
lower house of Congress. 

Analysts say Mr. Gingrich is unlikely 
to be able to lead with anything like the 
confident grasp of power he enjoyed 
early in the last Congress. 

In an acceptance speech, he spoke in 
apologetic tones of the ethics case, and 
of charges that he hurt the Republican 
cause through personal arrogance in the 
early days of the last Congress. 

’‘To the degree I was too brash, too 

See GINGRICH, Page 7 


By Celestine Bohlen 

. . . New York Times Service ■ 

ROME — The Roman Catholic Church 
rarely talks these days ofheresy, a vodict that 
carries eerie echoes of the requisition and 
~ea*fe - jn .automatic excommumcarion, the 
harshest peaaltyjq canon law.. And so theo- 
logians took note when the Vatican’s doc- 
trinal authorities found -6 72-year-old Sri 
. Lankan priest and scholar guilty, of having 
• “deviated from foe integrity of the troth of the 
CathoUc Imtb,’’^ind formally cast him out of 
the communion of the church last week. 

. The harshness of the verdict, and foe pun- 
ishment, promise to make the case of the 
Revereixt Tissa Balasuriya something of a 
cause cqlebre among Third World theolo- 
gians who have followed his ordeal before the 
Vatican authorities with both sympathy and 
(head. The only other public case of ex- 
communication -in recent times was against 
Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre in 1 988, after he 
continued to flout tbe reforms of the Second 
Vatican Council. 

" , Father Balasuriya was accused of chal- 
lenging such basic Roman Catholic beliefs as 
original sin and the immaculate conception. 

. Reached by telephone in Colombo, the Sri 
Tanlqm capital, be said that calls and tele- 
grams were coming in from around the world, 
as well as a petition of support signed by 
colleagues from tbe Ecumenical Association 
of ThfidWorid Theologians. 



'*»qvMi n 

Amanita L.<(uitEipwncftclaJllcuift 

Father Tissa Balasuriya, who has been excommunicated, displaying his book 
“Mary and Human Liberation” at his office in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on Tuesday. 


“They all say they will always treat me as 
a priest and a Catholic,” said Father Balas- 
unya, a member of the missionary order of the 
Oblates of Mary Immaculate for 51 years. He 
added that his four-year battle with the de- 
fenders of Catholic orthodoxy had made him 
* ‘more Catholic than ever. ” 

Father Balasuriya’s views, which blend 
some elements of “liberation” theology with 
a pluralist, anti-dogmatic theology that has 


taken root in India, echo some of the themes 
of a ‘ ‘relativistic” approach io religion that 
has set off alarms among keepers of foe faith 
at foe Vatican. 

“Relativism,” recently described by one 
top church official as the gravest threat to 
dogmatic faith since Marxism, holds that no 
faith has a unique claim to the truth and that no 

See HERESY, Page 6 


Toward a Market 
That Truly Rules? 

Social Security Plan Scares Some 

By David E. Sanger 

Nr»‘ York Times Sen-ire 

WASHINGTON — Every week a president and cabinet 
members make decisions, large and small, that move markets. 
Should the United States go to war against Saddam Hussein to 
protect Kuwait and maintain access to oil? Should it agree to 
a series of spending cuts foal make a balanced budget within 
six years more likely? Should it agree to cut the capital gains 
tax? 

Now. foe recommendation that foe country place a large 
part of the Social Security trust fund in the stock market, 
where it should be able to reap greater returns and avoid a 
revenue problem early in the next ceniury, raises a host of 
questions about how such ■ . ■ ■ - ■ 
decisions of slate might NEWS ANALYSIS 

be affected. Under foe 

most modest investment plan suggested Monday by foe 
Advisory Council on Social Security. $1 trillion in gov- 
ernment money could be placed in the stock market by 2015. 
Under the most aggressive plan, the figure would exceed S 4 
trillion. 

Could any president — or a Treasury secretary or Federal 
Reserve head — ignore that fact in making decisions that 
could send foe markets into the tank, imperiling foe returns on 
funds in which, as the committee noted, “every American 
family would have a stake?” 

That is only one of the many questions prompted by foe 
conclusions of the Advisory Council, which was sharply 
divided on whether investing in foe market was necessary to 
save the system — and, if necessary, whether Social Security 
beneficiaries should be given broad powers to manage their 
individual accounts. 

That would turn the system into something akin to a 
See MARKET, Page 7 


New UN Chief Is Old U S. Hand 


By BaiBara Crpssette. 

Nev Per* Timex Service . 

UNITED NATIONS, New York Kofi Annan’s 
discovery of America began in foe turbulent 1 960s, on 
a Midwestern college campus that flew a UN flag. It 
fwas an era ofeivilrights protests and passionate policy 
/debates over a world of causes. 

. Now. as Mr. Annan takes over as the seventh 
secretary-general of tfaeJLtatted Nations, .the United 
States seems to him a different place, estranged from 
the toiernational organization, more wary of involve- 
ment in the outside world. • _ • ; 

His election owed modi to American antipathy 
toward his predecessor and skepticism over the or- 
ganization’s performance. One of his biggest chal- 
lenges, he says, wfll be to help repair foe relationship. 


Few would dispute that Mr. Annan," 58, has the 
aedeotials to do this. No secrcrary-genttal has known 
the United Status es intimately of for as long as this 
Ghanaian, foe first black African elected to the job. 
And unEke ids predecessors; Mr. Arman has not only 
enjoyed diplomatic society in New York, but also 
nurtured a deep, decades-long fascination with Af- 
rican-American life across tbe United States. 

It began, he says, in 1959 when, as a student from 
newly independent Ghana, he began to watch as “tbe 
African diaspora in America woke up and embraced 
Africa.” 

.. “It was an exerting period,” he said man interview 
after his first hectic d^s in his new office atop the UN 
Sec re tariat building; “I had come from Ghana, and we 

See ANNAN, Page 7 



A New High-Tech Code: 
From Widgets to Service 


_ IVfc-r Hofjssn/Kajevi* 

Secretary-General Ko(i Annan at tbe UN. 


By Claudia H. Deutsch 

Nen' York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — It gives “postin- 
dustrial” a whole new meaning: From 
General Electric Co. to Wang Labo- 
ratories Inc., from Xerox Corp. to Hew- 
lett-Packard Co., American companies 
that a few years ago got almost all Then- 
profits from selling widgets are rapidly 
transforming themselves into service 
providers. 

Computer companies like Unisys 


Up 

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Up 

0.15% 

149.81 


Tup*, rib 
1 .5643 
1.6948 
115.195 
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Newsstand Prices 


Tokyo Poses ASEAN Puzzle 

Haslumoto’s Visit Takes Up the Japan-China Balance 

— — — : : — rr r — - — — Bin Southeast Asian officials said 


AGENDA 


Andorra — J.V0DQFF Lebanon U- 3,000 

Antties — 12iOFF. Morocco 16 Dh 

Cameroon .1^00 CFA Qatar tObOFSato 

Egypt-— :.SE550Fyunion— ^.1250FF 

France 1QJMFF SaixfiAn*ta._ 10-00 R. 

Gabon _1 100 CPA SeoegaL___1.100 CFA 

Greece 3S0Dr. Spafifi . 225 PTAS 

Italy ^2,800 ti» Turasie; 1250 Ob 

Ivory Coast. 1550 CPA UAE' — __ 10.00 Dafh 
Jordan 1250 JD 05. M8.{EurJ,«Sl20 



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. SINGAPORE — As Prime Minister .Tu 
Ryu taro Hashimoto' of' Japan 'began a gk 
lour of Southeast Asm. on Tuesday, he it < 
bro ught with him a puzzle fry fee region: ofl 
bow to balance the interests of Japan 
with tbe growing influence ofChiua for ..an 
the benefit of other Asian, coantries. : to* 

Mr. Hashimoto arrived in Brand — flk 
fi»fit«rtoponavishthatwiUtakehjm Br 
to Malaysia. Indonesia, Vietnam and of 
Singapore over the next seven days — im 
intent on gaining support for his pro- 
posal that Japan and ASEAN, the* As- sai 
sociation of South Eatt' Asian Nations,, ck 
should hold regular summit meetings to gn 
strengfoen'ties. . po 

“J would like to deepen that rela- hel 
tioiiship,” he said shortly before, he left bil 
Tokyo. “I think h would be a good idea 
lffoerewas a forum where foe leaders of 


.Tuesday that most countries in the re- 
gjoa were wary of the proposal, fearing 
it could offend China unless Beijing is 
offered similar treatment 

ASEAN does not want to make such 
an offer until China clarifies its intentions 
toward Southeast Aria, where it has con- 
flicting claims with Vietnam, Malaysia, 
Bnroei and tbe Philippines to ownership 
of foe Spratly Jslands in a strategically 
important part of^te South China Sea. 

Instead, Southeast Asian officials 
said that Japan should work more 
closely with ASEAN in drawing China 
gradually into a network of economic, 
political and security ties that would 


A Baseball Legend Is Up for Sale 

The Los Angeles Dodgers, the last major league 
AM baseball team owned by a family as its sole business, is 

/ f/lltmk for sale, according to Peter O’Malley, one of the team’s 

y7\*n(Pr!!?* Wo ° wners - 

One of the most glamorous and successful franchises 
fj*fl in professional sports history moved 40 years ago, 

/ controversially, from Brooklyn. New York, to the West 

' Coast, where it has continued to flourish. (Page 18) 


RAGE TWO 

Dying Mon Defends His Right to Die 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Diplomatic Immunity Is Strained 


Books Page 9. 

Crossword — Page 6. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19. 


Explosion Rocks Iraqi Capital 


pouncaj ana security ties tear wooia 
help resolve tensions and maintain sta- 
bility in the Asia-Pacific region. In ad- 

See ASIA, Page 6 


BAGHDAD (Reuters) — An ex- 
plosion rocked Baghdad on Tuesday, 
wounding five people and wrecking a 
hospital laboratory, an Iraq-based Ira- 


nian rebel group said, A Mujahidin 
Khalq source said foe explosion was 
caused tty a mortar shell that had been 
directed at the group’s headquarters. 


Corp. and IBM Coip- are designing, 
installing and running other companies' 
computer operations. Document pro- 
cessors like Xerox and Pitney Bowes 
Inc. now run mail rooms and copy cen- 
ters and distribute documents electron- 
ically. 

Honeywell redesigns refineries. 
Hewlett-Packard not only designs and 
operates data systems, but also pays for 
the whole package and then leases it out. 
“Customers want to finance a solution, 
not a little piece of it,” said Ann Liv- 
ermore. vice president of Hewlett-Pack- 
ard’s service operations. 

The move to services is one of the 
hottest strategies in U.S. business, and ir 
is driven by changes ai tbe very found- 
ations of manufacturing. 

Intense competition has made equip- 
ment margins si iver thin, whi le foe trend 
for customers to outsource many of their 
internal systems has put a premium on 
expertise. 

“Services generate huge cash flows, 
and today's businesses are run for cash 
flow.” said Nicholas Heymann. an ana- 
lyst with Nat West Securities. 

Enough manufacturers are switching 
to services these days to pose a real 
threat to Electronic Data Systems Corp.. 
Andersen Consulting and other tech- 
nological consultants. And the compe- 
tition is getting nasty, with the pure 
consultants saying that equipment 
makers cannot be trusted to be objective 
advisers. 

“An awful lot of manufacturers are in 
services just to pull through their hard- 
ware.” said John Harris, a vice pres- 
ident ai EDS. 

The technology consultants are fight- 
ing back with more than innuendo. EDS 

See SERVICE, Page 7 


-r 


\ 



PAGE TWO 


Where Assisted Suicide Is Illegal / Suffering and Dignity 

One Who Staunchly Defends His Right to Die 


By Laurie Goodstein 

Washington Past Service 

L INCOLN. Rhode Island — Hie fainter his 
voice has grown, the louder Noel David 
Earley’s message has resounded. He lies 
wooden and still as a log under a pink 
blanket on a blue rec liner in his living room. With 
his right hand — the last extremity he can control — 
clenched in a frozen curl he fumbles to pinch a 
cigarette from a pack tying on his chest. 

Two years ago, Mr. Earley played tennis, baked 
bread, sailed on the bay. But Lou Gehrig’s disease, 
or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, has swiftly stilled 
his muscles, nearly snuffed out his breath and 
silenced his voice. 

Mr. Earley, who turned 48 on Christmas, has said 
publicly dial he will commit suicide before he loses 
the dexterity to jab bis vein with a hypodermic 
needle filled with a lethal mix of morphine and 
Demerol. He has to do it before he needs someone’s 
help: Rhode bland passed a law last year making it 
a crime to assist in a suicide. 

Thirty-four other states have adopted similar 
laws banning assisted suicide, and on Wednesday, 
die U.S. Supreme Court will consider the question 
of whether liberty and justice for all also guarantees 
sick, people the freedom to die with a doctor's help. 
In one of his final acts of physical exertion, Mr. 
Earley pecked out a letter at his computer to each of 
the justices, pleading with them to picture him at 
home in his final weeks, lungs filling with fluid, 
mind alert, desperate to die. 

“No one should have to suffer, at any time,” Mr. 
Earley said recently, gasping for breath only days 
before he lost his voice completely. “There are 
thousands of people across the country like me who 
are terminal, and die medical community has 
largely abandoned them. I'm fighting for them.’’ 
Mr. Earley has spent what are likely to be his final 
months offering himself as “Exhibit A” fen* die 
right-to-die cause. He has provided the public an 
intimate, visceral diary of a person slowly losing 
control over his life — and determined not to lose 
control of his death. 

He phoned the Providence Journal-Bulletin with 
his story, and the paper assigned a photographer and 
reporter to chronicle his decline. He responded to an 
aa in a newsletter of the Hemlock Society, a right-to- 
die advocacy group, seeking a terminally ill person 
willing to bare his soul on television. The resulting 
program is scheduled to air Wednesday on ABC's 
“Nigbtiine." He railed against the proposed Rhode 
Island law before a state Senate committee. When it 
passed anyway. Mr. Earley contacted the American 
Civil Liberties Union, which plans to challenge the 
law and name Mr. Earley as a plaintiff. 

An Associated Press story last month sent a 
stream of reporters and camera crews to Mr. Earley's 
basement apartment: NBC, U.S. News & World 
Report, and TV crews from Brazil and Germany. 

Mail arrives in bundles: letters of support, people 
(Haying for him. a package from Louisiana containing 
a New Testament and a note saying, ‘ ‘Please read this 
beginning with the gospel of John.” Mr. Earley, a 
lapsed Presbyterian, says he has already read the 
Bible. And the Koran. And the Bhagavad Gita. 

Maria Parker, die Catholic lobbyist for the Diocese 
of Providence, despairs that the attention to Mr. 
Earley is drowning out ber message of the potential 
danger of allowing doctors to assist suicide. “Hie 
more we focus on this man and his poor plight,'’ Ms. 
Parker said, the less people realize “the societal 
impact of what will happen if people are allowed to 
decide whether some people should live or die.” 
What has given Mr. Earley’s story its power is 
that he is articulate, funny and passionate, and has 
promised the ultimate finale. He invited the Journal- 
Bulletin photographer and the “Nightline” pro- 
ducer to record his suicide, but the paper declined, 
and “Nightline” is leaning against it, their spokes- 
men say. In late September, he announced that he 
would kill himself on Dec. 4 because he anticipated 
that by then he would no longer be able to speak. 

But on Dec. 3. he said be was postponing die 
suicide for as long as he could voice his concerns. In 
one subsequent interview, he said he did not expect 



Jerusalem as Spoiler? 

For Jews, Shifting Views # 

Survey Shows Room for Compromise 


Noel David Earley, who is suffering from Lou Gehrig's disease , holding a news 
conference in his apartment on Dec. 3 to announce the postponement of his 
suicide, which he had set for the following day. 


to live past his birthday. In another, hr said he did 
not expect to see 1997. 

But Mr. Earley has lingered, buoyed, he says, by 
the attention his crusade has garnered, “I don't 
expect to win in my life,” he said. “I expect 
whoever picks up the banner to win. As long as 
somebody wins. I'm a team player.” 


E VEN before the disease struck, Mr. Earley 
says he supported the right to assisted sui- 
cide. His experience running a day-care 
program for patients with Alzheimer’s dis- 
ease left a deep impression on him. “In their lucid 
moments, there were patients who told me they 
would have preferred to die,” Mr. Earley said. 

Mr. Earley has few relatives to talk him out of 
taking his own life. He and his second wife divorced 
last year. He says he has a girlfriend who is “in 
denial.” He has no children. His parents are dead, as 
is the grandmother who raised him in Port Jefferson, 
New York. He has an older brother who now visits 
weekly, but Mr. Earley says they are not close. 

Fifty old friends from across the country showed 
up at a “going-away party’ ' for him last month. One 
friend drives more than an hour every morning to lift 
Mr. Earley from his bed to his recliner. Another 
comes each evening to put him back in bed. 

Some opponents of assisted suicide say for the 
record that they have * ‘compassion’ ’ for Mr. Earley, 
while off the record they depict him as a pathetic and 
impoverished loner with little to live for. 

“Baloney,” Mr. Earley says in response. “Do 
you think it's going to be easy for me to jam aneedle 
in my vein? It takes courage, just as much as the 
passive act of suffering. You’re yielding to the 
disease. I will aot yield.” 

The first signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 


appeared in the spring of 1995, when Mr. Earley 
reached for a Mariner’s Dictionary on an upper shelf 
and noticed he could not stand on his tiptoes. He was 
diagnosed a few weeks later at the local Veterans 
Administration hospital, where he goes for medical 
care because he served in Vietnam. 

ALS is a cruel disease for which there is no 
known cause or cure. The voluntary muscles begin 
to twitch uncontrollably and eventually atrophy, but 
the mind remains alert Most patients succumb 
when die diaphragm and rib muscles become para- 
lyzed, and breathing becomes impossible. Some 
continue breathing on ventilators, but many die 
quickly from pneumonia or infections. 

Mr. Earley says he would have considered living 
longer on a ventilator if he could have had the 
assurance that, once he became paralyzed, a doctor 
could help him die. But under Rhode Island’s new 
law, anyone who assists in a suicide faces 10 years 
in prison and a $10,000 fine, and the state attorney 
general says he will enforce the law. 

“My premature demise is a result of the nar- 
rowness of the law,” Mr. Earley wrote to the 
Supreme Court 

A dutch of bubbly hospice workers now attends 
to Mr. Earley during the day. They come in pairs so 
that none of them can be accused of assisting in his 
death. Mr. Earley says that a friend he will not name 
drove out of state several weeks ago to buy the 
morphine and equipment he needs to kill himself. 

A Catholic nun brought him a painring of Jesus that 
sits on a shelf that Mr. Earley calls his “shrine.” The 
nun spent hours at ins bedside , Mr. Earley said, trying 
to convince him of the dignity of suffering. 

“We argued,” he said. “Dignity is defined as 
self-worth, self-image, self-reliance. None of those 
things are drawn from suffering.” 


By Barton Gellman 

Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM— With the final stage 
of IsraeU-Palestinian talks set to begin 
this year, negotiators are turning at- 
tention to the difficult issues they agreed 
to save for last: Palestinian statehood, 
boundaries, Jewish settlements, Pales- 
tinian refugees and — perhaps most 
intractable of all — Jerusalem. 

A new survey of Israeli Jews, pub- 
lished Monday, suggests dial Jerusalem 
mi ght not be the deal-breaker it is often 

supposed. The poll results cast doubt on 
the widespread view that tins oft- 
conquered city, holy to three religions 
and claimed as capi tal by Palestinians as 
well as by Jews, is the rock on which the 
miles are likeliest to founder. 

The survey, while confirming Israeli 
Jews as inflexible over (he fete of Je- 
rusalem in principle, breaks significant 
new groundby probing deeply into what 
they mean by Jerusalem and where they 
draw its lines. Though virtually an re- 
spondents said Jerusalem wasimponant 
or very impor t an t to them and four- 
fifths opposed any bargaming on its 
future, further questioning revealed 
dear distinctions between neighbor- 
hoods. 

Every political faction, from right to 
left, showed strikingly less attachment 
to the areas where Jerusalem’s Arabs 
live than to Jewish neighborhoods. 
When asked about the outlying Arab 
neighborhoods annexed to Jerusalem 
after Israel’s victory in die 1967 Middle 
East War, more Israeli Jews were pre- 
pared to “seriously consider” trans- 
Wing them to Palestinian sovereignty 
than rejected the idea outright 

Nearly all such compromise propos- 
als fell short of majorities in the survey, 
and there was no significant support for 
what Palestinians frame as their basic 
negotiating demand: all of East Jeru- 
salem, including the walled Old City, as 
the capital of an independent state. Even 
so, according to its generally dovish 
authors, toe survey suggests a good deal 
more room for maneuver by the Israeli 
government, if die government wants it, 
than most analysts previously sup- 
posed. 

“If there’s anything this study can do, 
it can legitimize serious political dis- 
cussions about Jerusalem,' said one of 
its co-authors, Jerome Segal, who wrote 
a 1989 book arguing for a Palestinian 
state. “It can embolden political lead- 
ership.” 

Few surveys, if any, have delved as 
deeply into Israeli altitudes over Je- 
rusalem. The authors of ddsone^ Elihii 
Katz and Shlomit Levy of Israel's 
Gunman Institute and Mr. Segal of the 
University of Maryland,' asked 100 
questions in face-to-face, interviews 
with 1,530 Israeli Jews between 
September 1995 and January 1996. The 
survey claims a margin of sampling 
error of 4 percent 

A major purpose of the study was to 
discover the connections between what 
Mr. Katz called “toe mental map of the 
city” in the minds of Israeli Jews and 
the actual municipal boundaries drawn 
by the Israeli government after the 1967 
war. 

Few Israelis, it emerged, recalled that 
the government not only “reunified” 
die city after expelling Jordanian forces 
but expanded East Jerusalem roughly 


Army Bus Bomb 
In logos Kills 2 
And Wounds 29 


Reuters 

LAGOS — A bomb blew up a Ni- 
gerian Army bus inside' a military camp 
in Lagos on Tuesday, killing 2 soldiers 
and wounding 29 persons. 

It was the third bombing against army 
targets in politically troubled Nigeria 
since December. 

Witnesses said the bomb went off in a 
bus carrying soldiers in an army camp in 
the Surulere district of Lagos and that 
the area had been cordoned off by se- 
curity authorities. 

The state radio confirmed the deaths 
and the news agency NAN said that 27 
soldiers and 2 civilians had been 
wounded. 

The assistant police commissioner, 
Mohammed Biu. was quoted by toe 
state news agency as having said that the 
pattern of the blast was similar to the 
two other explosions. 

“We will try to find the people be- 
hind these explosions now that we can 
compare three different types in less 
than five weeks,” Mr. Biu said. 

The two bombs last month clearly 
targeted the military administrator of 
Lagos state. Colonel Mohammed Mar- 
wa, a dose aide of the military ruler. 
General Sani Abacba. 

Colonel Marwa was unhurt but about 
20 soldiers were critically wounded in 
the two explosions. 

No one has claimed responsibility for 
the blasts. 


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Some Bad News, Some Good, as Europe’s Freeze Continues 


Agenee France-Presse 

PARIS — As farmers, insurers and 
builders add up losses from more than 
two weeks of frost and snow across 
Europe, business is fine for plumbers, 
salt merchants and energy suppliers. 

Consumers face soaring prices of 
fresh vegetables. The price of leeks has 
jumped more than fivefold at the Paris 
wholesale food market and vegetable 
soup has become almost a luxury dish. 
But farmers said there was no risk of a 
long-term shortage because once the 
thaw sets in, vegetables now in die fields 
would still be edible. 

The frost, which affects the setting of 


concrete, has also plunged the building 
industry into difficulty although the 
French National Builders’ Federation 
said the situation was ”not dramatic." 

In Germany , river navigation has been 
paralyzed, with more than half of the 
country’s 7,300 kilometers (4,500 miles) 
of waterways iced over, in places a half- 
meter (20 inches) thick. Most of the 
3,000 registered river boats are stranded 
in ports at a daily fee of 1,500 to 2,000 
Deutsche marks ($1,000 to $1300). 

The Inter-Mutuelles Assistance, 
France’s biggest assistance organiza- 
tion. has been receiving 2,000 to 2,500 
calls for help a day — up to 70 percent 


more than normal. On Jan. 2, Mondial 
Assistance in France processed 80 per- 
cent more calls than usual, mainly from 
motorists in difficulty and for injuries 
caused by falls. 

In Britain, insurers said payouts 
would at least equal the £500 million 
($840 million) paid last year, mainly for 
damage caused by burst pipes. 

But plumbers are wonting overtime, 
and business will increase when the 
expected thaw comes at the end of toe 
week and water starts spurting from 
cracked pipes. 

Suppliers of heating appliances and 
energy are having trouble keeping up 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


with demand, and with the tons of salt 
needed on icy roads, toe Mines de Po- 
tasse d’ Alsace salt mines in eastern 
France have been working around toe 
clock. Since the beginning of January, 
500 trucks and three or four trains 
loaded with salt have left the mines 
daily, mainly for eastern and northern 
France. The Satins du Midi in southern 
France are just as busy. 

Energy consumption in France, 
winch dropped slightly around Christ- 
mas, has surged since die beginning of 
die year, and in Germany, energy con- 
sumption rose by 10 percent during the 
festive season. 


WEATHER 


ten-fold, incorporating Wes tokArah 
villages such as Sur Baficr, L m Tu ba, 
Beit Safafa and the Shuafa refugee 
camp. . . 

But the respondents knew clearly; 
which parts of toe city were Jewish and 
which Arab, and they valued them ac-: 

cordingiy. . . . - 

That result is not entirely smpramg. 

For a decade now, since toe intifada, ot 
uprising, of 1987-93, West Jerusalem: 
taxi drivers have been reluctant to drive, 
to East Jerusalem's Arab neighb or- 
hoods, unmoved by the government!, 
position that the entire city was Israd’s 
“unified, eternal capital. ” ’ 

The new survey quantifies the ex iftA L 
to which Israeli Jews divide toe city 
psychologically into “ours* and 1 ‘not 
ours-" 

Of toe 99 percent of those surveyed 
who said they had been to Jerusalem, TO 
percent said they have never been to any 
of toe Arab neighborhoods outside toe 
Old City. Another 23 percent had beeff k 
no more than “once” or “a few times,” ■ 

and a handful had never heard of the; 

■ neighborhoods at ati. 

Mr. Katz, a leading authority on Is- 
raeli public opinion, said the survey- 
identified three large blocs of Jewish; 
adults — each about a fifth of toe pop- 
ulation — prepar ed to consider some' 
degree of compromise on Jerusalem. ' 

Only tiie most dovish group, 21 per- 
cent, s upp ort ed the broad principle of 
“negotiations on Jerusalem within the 
peace process.” 

But twice that many respondents, 45 
percent, said they would consider sc* 
riously or very seriously a proposal to. 
‘‘transfer to Palestinian sovereignty the 
Arab settlements and villages previ-. 
ously in the West Bank which are now; 
witbim the bmders of Jerusalem. ” 

Support reached 59 percent for 
roughly toe same proposal when it was; 
framed as “redefining the city limits”, 
to exclude Arab neighborhoods “in or-* 
der to ensure a Jewish majority.” . 

■ Arab Boy Kills One With Car • 

A 15-year-old Palestinian boy 
crashed a car into a bakery on Jem-.' 
salem’s mam sho p p ing street Tuesday,- 
killing one Israeli and injuring four,’ 
police mid hospital officials said, ac- 
cording to an Associated Press report 
from Jerusalem. 

Witnesses said toe car headed from 
an alley across toe street straight into the 
bakery ax full speed. “I have no doubt 
that it was intentional,” said Ovadia 
Haba, an employee at the bakery. The 
police, however, said they were check- 
mg whether the crash was an accident on 
an aftsMik. 

Israeli Demand 
Irks Palestinians 

Reuters 

JERUSALEM — Palestinian uegtK 
tiaiors said Tuesday that an Israeli de- ■" 
mand to delay by two years a promised 
troop pullback from West Bank areas 
was a key obstacle to a deal on handing 
over most of the city of Hebron to' 
Palestinian self-rule. 

Meanwhile, the LLS. Middle East 
peace envoy, Dennis Ross, renewed his 
efforts to mediate between Prime Min- 
ister Benjamin Netanyahu and toe Pal- 
estinian leader, Yasser ArafeL 

Mr. Netanyahu ’s c ommunicati ons di- 
rector, David Bar-Dan, said Israel and 
the Palestinians had agreed on most 
points but were wrangling over moves, 
that would follow a pullout from- 
Hebron. Mr. Bar-Dan confirmed that' 
Israel wanted to postponenntil 1999 foe 
last of three Israeli redeployments from 
occupied rural West Bank areas. Under, 
a 1995 interim deal, these were to be- 
completed by September 1997. 

Mr. Bar-Dan said Mr. Netanyahu, at a- 
predawn meeting with Mr. Ross, pro-! 
posed that Israel complete further West- 


Bank pullouts by the spring of 1999,; 
when the two sides are stanyt to com-' 
plete “final status” peace negotiations.’ 
Palestinian officials assailed the pro-.’ 
posal as a violation of timetables set _ 
under toe original peace deal signed^ 
with Israel’s previous government. 


Delta Is Set to Expand 
Trans- Atlantic Flights 

NEW YORK (AFX) — Delta Air 
Lines said Tuesday it planned to add 
more flights to its trans-Atlantic routes 
by the end of June and to restructure its 
operations in Frankfurt The carrier said 
it would discontinue its intra-Europe 
service from Frankfurt to six cities and 
stop trans-Atlantic service to Frankfurt 
from three U.S. cities. 

Delta said it will add a daily Adama- 
to-Stuttgart flight and a second daily 
flight from Atlanta to Zurich. It added 
that it would increase services from JFK 
Airport in New York to six European 
cities. Delta said it would enhance its 
North Atlantic service by adding new 
nonstop service from JFK Airport to 
Istanbul Madrid and Manchester. 

More Alitalia Fare Cuts 

ROME (AP) — Alitalia, toe Italian 
national airline, plans another round of 


fare cuts, starting Saturday and running 
through March 23. 

For example, a weekday flight be- 
tween 10 AuM. and 3 PM. between 
Rome and Milan would cost 288,000 
lire ($185). instead of the normal fare of 
471,000 ($310). 

Windsor Castle Slated 
To Reopen Next Year 

LONDON (Reuters) — Windsor 
Castle, ravaged by fire in 1992. is to 
reopen ahead of schedule at the start of 
next year, officials said Tuesday. 

The final phase of a £38 million ($64 
million) restoration project was 
launched when three giant oak columns 
were hoisted into place by crane in the 
castle’s Octagon anteroom. 

Hie Royal collection spokesman. 
Dickie Arbiter, said toe castle would be 
open to toe public again from toe start of 
1998. “With toe help of good con- 
tractors and architects, we are able to 
finish ahead of schedule,” he said. 


Europe 


wW 

or or 


Forecast for Thursday throutfi Saturday, as provided by AccuWesdher. Asia 


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North America 

Cold air wiB cover araaa 
town the Plains to (he mid- 
AtanBc Into this mu fcan d 
with the core ot the arctic 
air rnovtng from the north- 
ern Plain* te the Great 
Lakes by Saturday. Florida 
and the Deep Southeast 
will oooi toward normal, 
while the West stays dry 
and rather mid 


Europe 

Eastern Europe and mast- 
em Russia wfll remote cold 

Into tfre weekend, while 
western Europe, tedudteo 
London/ Paris and Amster- 
dam. gradually moderate 
toward normal. In tact, 
Spain and Portugal will 
became itfid by die weefc- 
end Italy and ooufoafem 
Europe will be wet with 
bce*y heavy rah praribfe. 




Sans" trtfl tMs 

Asia 

Ufweesonahly oold air w» 
cptp much ot northeastern 
China, the Korea* and 
moat ot Japan Into the 
weekend: however, the 
cold may ease a bit in 
northeastern Chtea Satur- 
day. MeanwhBa, far south- 
ern Japan wffl be do« to 
normal. ftwffl be season- 
able in Hong Kong and 
Southeast Aria. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


By Steven Exlanser 

► Ney * y<?r * Tunes Service 

, n WA^IGTON - Responding 
to a public furorabotit the conduct of 
roreign diplomats ut the Uhited 
States after the death of a menage 
gin in Washington and* an aiter- 
«^on with police officers in New 
J ^ American officials have 
defended the concept of diplomatic 
immunity. But they said that the 
united States would pursue lifting 
immunity Jot anyone charged with 
serious offenses. 

The officials said requests for 
such immunity were normally gran- 
ted only in minor cases, like 
shoplifting. But they could rhfoir of 
no case since 1989 in winch a gov- 
ernment has waived immunity in a 
circumstance as serious as the 
Washington case, in whicha dip- 
lomat from the former Soviet re- 
public of Georgia, who the police 
say was drunk and speeding, was 
involved in an accident that kilted 
ioviane Wa) trick, 16, of Kensing- 
ton, Mary land * 

Almost .invariably, the 


said, diplomats in such cases are 
caOed home by their governments. 
Or expelled by the host government, 
and ao not lace c riminal charges 
• But- some officials expressed die 
hope that die Georgian president, 
Eduard Shevardnadze, who has 
close ties to the United States and 
who has already written a letter of 
condolence to die Wahrick family, 
would. waive the immunity of his 
second-ranking diplomat here, Gue- 
orgniMakharadze, who was (hiving 
the car. 

Michael McCurry, die presidential 
spokesman, said Monday, that Mr. 
Shevardnadze was looting for a 
“satisfactory” resolution and that 
“good consultations are under way 
with the government of Georgia.” 

Mr. Shevardnadze; in his letter, 
wrote that . the diplomat “must bear 
responsibility for the tragic incident 
in accordance with norms.” But a 
senior €3inton administration offi- 
cial said h was not clear that the 
Georgians had focused on how se- 
rious . the charges - against Mr. . 
Makharadze were likely to be. 

Serious cases themselves in- 


state Department officials saii[ with 
about- 10 co 15 cases a war that are 
nearly all questions of shoplifting or 
drunken driving, and usnaBy involve 
die dependents of diplomats. In 

An official said it was 
not dear the Georgians 
had focused on how 
serious the charges - 
were likely to be. 

about half of those cases, immunity 
is waived and fines are paid. 

In 1989, when a staff member of 
the Belgian Embassy was charged 
with homicide, immunity was 
waived, but foe defendant was 
judged mentally ilL 
But the New York case has be- 
come in some ways more politically 
charged. In that incident, a Russian 
and a Belarussian diplomat accred- 
ited to. the United Nations fought 
with police officers trying to ticket 


their car near a fire hydrant. The 
Russian government has protested to 
Washington about the actions of the 
New York City police, saying they 
dragged the diplomats from the car 
and broke the arm of the Russian. 

On Sunday, Alexander Sychou. 
the permanent representative of Be- 
larus to the United Nations, sent a 
letter to Mayor Rudolph Giuliani 
ignoring the mayor's demand to re- 
move the diplomat. He also said he 
expected from the United States “a 
thorough investigation of the incid- 
ent. official explanations and apo- 
logies” as well as "disciplinary ac- 
tion against the culprits.” namely 
the two police officers involved in 
tiie incident 

Mr. Giuliani, in a letter mailed 
Monday, responded tersely that sev- 
en witnesses bad come forward to 
support the officers’ account of 
what happened, and he praised the 
officers for averting “any potential 
tragedy on our city’s streets.” 

Speaking of the Washington in- 
cident, Henrik Liljegren, the 
Swedish ambassador to the United 
States, said that his country was 


e Collide 


strict in respecting the immunity of 
accredited foreign diplomats but 
also held Swedish diplomats to strict 
standards of behavior in their host 
countries. In principle, he said. 
Swedish diplomats believed guilty 
of serious offenses, including 
drunken driving, are recalled home 
and “face punishment at home ac- 
cording to Swedish law.” 

Mr. Liljegren remembered a case 
in Stockholm when 3 drunken dip- 
lomat refused to leave his car at the 
request of the police, who wanted to 
drive him home. Instead, they towed 
him home in his car. “Respecting 
his immunity on the one hand, but 
wanting to protect Swedish citizens 
on the other, they towed him home 
in his car and we asked him to leave 
Sweden,” he said. 

In a recent case in France, a Zairi- 
an diplomat was accused of killing 
two youths while speeding to a 
meeting with President Mobutu 
Sese Seko at his residence on the 
Riviera. French officials demanded 
that his immunity be lifted to allow 
prosecution, but Zaire refused, and 
the diplomat left the country. 



TnlllntMiSHnar*. 


: Gene Roberts, on horseback, trying to.corral bis dairy cows stranded by flooding near Modesto, California. 

‘ "1 v f »••• - ' ] < 

3 Flood Damage: $775 Million and Rising 


Reuters 

SAN FRANCISCO — The floods in 
California tins month are among the 
costliest in the state’s history, with the 
initial bill for storm damage m just mne 
counties estimated at $775 mfltiaa, state 
officials said. 

- The state’s first official estimate of 
flood damage was issued Tuesday as 
several parts of California were still un- 
der water arid as officials were keeping a 
close watch onfragile levees. 

. The California Office of Emergency 
Services said losses totaled $775 mflKoai 
in the nine California comities and me 
city litarl^tepoitedmhialdaaz^^- 
urcs han 10 days of storms and floods. 

- That is less than a quarter of the 41 
counties where a state of emergency has 
been declared By Caltforaia’s governor, 
Pete Wilson. - 

Many of the Central Valley counties 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

WanttoBidldaKeef? 

. Call Out the U.S. Navy 

The latest foray by the ravy’s. A^6 
Intruder attack jets is no unw elcom e 
intrusion at aB. A squadron of the retired 
jets — veterans of tite Vietnam War and 
the Gulf War, much loved by navy 
• pilots for their sturdy reliability — has 
been deposited in me ocean off north- 
east Florida to build a habitat for fish. 

In its latest version, the A-6E, the 
plane is the navy’s most accurate and 
longest-range attack craft with both 
conventional and nuclear capabilities; 
reports the Smithsonian’s Air & Space 
magazine . But maintenance and up- 
date were becoming unduly costiy. 

When the Intruder program was 
canceled, six of the planes were sent to 
m us e ums and a few others went to 
naval bases to be mounted on poles as 
“gate guards.” Butthai barely made a 
dent in the pile of planes awaiting 
destruction at the NorthropGru mman 
plant in St. Augustine, Florida. 

Then Steve Blalock, a .Grumman 
production manager, hatched a plan. 
As a diver; he knew that some of the 
best fishing off the Florida coast was 
around artificial reefs of concrete 
rubble that have been deposited on 
whar otherwise is a largely featureless 
ocean bottom; but that nibble, sought 
by recyclets onshore, has become ex- 
pensive. He also knew that the wrecks 
of military planes that had craribed into 
area waters harbored excellent fishing. 


hardest hit by die floods have yet to 
report, and a spokesman for the emer- 
gency services office said the total “def- 
initely will rise.” 

Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Wash- 
ington have also suffered widespread 
damage from floods and landslides, and 
at least 20 people have been killed in the 
region. 

The weather was diy in northern Cali- 
fornia on Tuesday, and rivers were re- 
ceding m some areas. 

Tens of thousands of evacuees were 
allowed to return to their homes in Yuba 
City and Marysville, near Sacramento, 
over the weekend, and only about 3,800 
people remained in 25 shelters, officials 


Buthundreds of homes and thousands 
of acres of farmland remained sub- 
merged in Yuba and Sutter counties 
north of Sacramento and in the Modesto 



apparently because fish were attracted 
to the aluminum. 

The navy and state environmental 
authorities quickly approved plans to 
build a reef using decontaminated and 
demilitarized Intruders, and the reef 
was constructed in mid-1995. Now 
fish like the amberjack, the king mack- 
erel and others inhabit the site m great 
numbers. So far, however, no pilot fish 
have been spotted. 

Short Takes ... 

- The people of Nome, Alaska, have 
a rather special recycling project of 
their own. After the year-end holidays, 
residents of the windswept , town on 
Norton Sound haul their trees out onto 
the frozen sea, planting each one in a 
hole bared into the ice. That creates a 
temporary “forest” — odd, but ap- 
preciated in tins area, where perma- 
frost keeps nK>st trees from taking root. 
While the forest is there, pet owners 


walk their dogs through it and ele- 
mentary school classes make it die 
object of field trips. Before the ice 
breaks up in springtime, high school 
students salvage branches to be placed 
in streams as cover for newly hatched 
salmon. 

Deep under New York City, work 
proceeds on one of the biggest en- 
gineering projects of the century; a 
mammoth water tunnel, 64 miles (100 
kilometers') long, 10 to 24 fees (3 to 7 .2 
meters) in diame ter and up to 800 feet 
uHteqpxnind. Called the Third Tunnel, 
it is being built to supplement the city’s 
two existing water tunnels, which are 
already operating beyond their expec- 
ted capacity. Construction has been 
under way since 1970 and is not ex- 
pected to end before 2015. Twenty- 
one men have died building it, many in 
the days before the use of explosives 
was replaced by die work of giant, 
steel-bladed boring machines. The 
tunnel may already be familiar to 
moviegoers. in “Die Hard Whha Ven- 
geance,” robbers drove trucks full of 
Federal Reserve gold through it. 

In the latest bow to political cor- 
rectness, and to guests complaints, 
designers ai die Disneyland theme 
.park in California are adapting the 
popular Pirates of the Caribbean nde to 
take a bit of the gleam out of the 
buccaneers' eyes. Though they will 
still pillage when the ride reopens in 
March, they will no longer lustily 
chase women — well, not exactly. 
They will still run after women, but the 
women will now cany trays of food, 
reports the Los Angeles Times. Dis- 
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cided that gluttony ranks below Iusl 

Internat ional Herald Tribune 


See our 

Real Estate Marketplace 

every Friday 


Rights Role Seen 
As Gaining at State 

Albright Could Strengthen Policy 


area in the state's fertile Central Val- 
ley.’. 

■ Storms Sweep Southwest 

Snow and ice shut down parts of the 
Southwest on Tuesday, stranding hun- 
dreds of travelers along closed highways 
across southern Arizona and New Mex- 
ico and turning deserts white with snow. 
The Associated Press reported. 

Up to dime feet (about a meter) of 
snow fell in the mountains of New Mex- 
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snow in almost six years. Snow also 
coated grassy areas as far east as Dallas. 

Interetate 10 was closed Tuesday for 
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western New Mexico to the Texas state 
line, and 130 miles of north- south 1-25 
was shut down in southern New Mex- 


By Steven Eri anger 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — When 
he was elected four years ago. 
President Bill Clinton prom- 
ised to be a human-rights 
president and refuse to 
“coddle dictators.” 

As a sign of that intention 
be named John Sbanuck, who 
had a background as a top 
official at Amnesty Interna- 
tional and die American Civil 
Liberties Union, as the State 
Department's point man for 
the promotion of human 
rights abroad. 

But the human rights re- 
cord of the first Clinton term 
was mixed. Mr. Clinton’s re- 
luctance to get lough on the 
abuses of big trading partners 
like China. Saudi Arabia, Ni- 
geria and Indonesia left rights 
advocates frustrated, even as 
they applauded the adminis- 
tration's . encouragement of 
democracy in places like 
Haiti and Bosnia. 

. Many proponents of human 
rights agreed with Aryeh Nei- 
er, president of a private 
foundation called the Open 
Society Institute, who said 
that Mr. Clinton had embraced 
a new post-Cokf War double 
standard: Before, Washington 
excused repressive anti -Com- 
munist allies while attacking 
the ample abuses of Commu- 
nist countries. Today, he 
notes, the new dividing lines 
are trade and security. 

Now, the prospect of a more 
outspoken and forceful human 
rights advocate in Madeleine 
Albright, the secretary of 
state -designate whose Senate 
confirmation hearings begin 
Wednesday, has heartened 
human rights lobbyists. 

; It has also raised the pros- 
pects, officials say, that the 
often disheartened Mr. Sbat- 
tuck will stay for a second 
term and play a more central 
part in foreign policy. 

Human : rights advocates 
expect to have a strong ally in 
Mrs. Albright, whose con- 
firmation is a virtual cer- 
tainty. She is expected to be 
“more willing to excoriate 
dictators as dictators.” said 
Thomas Carothers, a senior 
associate at the Carnegie En- 
dowment . A former refugee 
from Nazism and Commun- 
ism, she believes in the power 
of the American example. 

By the standards of human 
rights advocates, Mr. Clinton 
had notable, if fragile, achieve- 
ments in Haiti, where U.S. 
troops overthrew a military 
dictatorship and restored an 
elected president, and in Bos- 
nia, where belated but robust 
intervention axled the fighting 
and imposed a peace that at 
least gives democracy a 
chance. 

But more often, Mr. Shat- 
tuck found himself forced in- 
to a sort of “hum an -rights 
ghetto” in a larger State De- 
partment bureaucracy, and 
lost many arguments to 
powerful advocates for trade 


and jobs in the Commerce and 
Treasury departments or be- 
cause of Pentagon concerns. 

Perhaps the biggest disap- 
pointment of human rights 
proponents is China. The pres- 
ident flip-flopped on policy, 
first insisting that China's 
trade privileges be tied to its 
human rights record, and then 
changing his mind The de- 
cision undermined his cred- 
ibility with Beijing, and 
China's rights record 
worsened, if anything, as it 
rearrested political opponents 
and tried to stamp out dissent 

Critics accuse the admin- 
istration of abandoning its 
moral goals in the face of 
pressure from American busi- 
nesses and hot rhetoric from 
the Chinese. 

In general, officials ac- 
knowledge, human-rights 
concerns under Mr. Clinton 
have had a bigger effect on 
policy in smaller, more ob- 
scure countries like Burma 
than in places like China, 
Russia, or Saudi Arabia, 
where moral issues were sub- 
ordinated to security, trade, 
and economic concerns. 

But better than others be- 
fore him, even critics agree. 
Mr. Shattuck, 53, has pushed 
back. He says he has had to 
learn to fight his comer, seek- 
ing allies and biding his time, 
even within the State Depart- 
ment itself. 

He has had some institu- 
tional successes, enlarging 
the area in which he can op- 
erate. Human rights records 
can now be used as criteria for 
panting countries loans and 
aid. 

In the former Yugoslavia, 
Mr. Shattuck sees an impor- 
tant change in a re-elected ad- 
ministration’s willingness 
both to confront President 
Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia 
over election fraud and to 
consider more seriously, of- 
ficials assert, using the mil- 
itary to hum down war crim- 
inals in Bosnia. 

Adrian Karatnycky. pres- 
ident of Freedom House, 
which monitors democracy 
and human rights worldwide, 
said: “China is the one great 
counter-example and an im- 
portant one. But in Haiti. Bos- 
nia, Burma, and now in Ser- 
bia, there's a decent and 
credible record. This is an ac- 
tivist administration that 
looks for opportunities to 
press things in the right dir- 
ection. when we can exert in- 
fluence and lend our voice to 
ongoing events, like Serbia.” 

While acknowledging that 
human rights have often 
taken a back seat, senior gov- 
ernment officials say there are 
strong arguments that coun- 
tries like Saudi Arabia and 
Russia may be too fragile to 
weaken further by making 
human rights an overriding 
priority, outweighing Amer- 
ica's thirst for oil. regional 
security or, as in Russia’s 
case, the prospects for demo- 
cracy itself. 


Gulf War Study Extended 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton on Tuesday 
instructed a commission be appointed to keep looking for a 
cause for mysterious illnesses afflicting Gulf War veterans. 
“We don't have all the answers.” he said. 

The Presidential Advisory Committee on Gulf War Vet- 
erans' Illnesses was set to expire after issuing a fired report 
Tuesday that attributes the sicknesses in part to the physical 
and psychological stresses of war. 

Mr. Clinton extended the commission's mandate for nine 
months after receiving the report 


POLITICAL /V 07^5 


Think Tank Would Toss Cabinet 
Onto History’s Rubbish Heap 

WASHINGTON — If you're worried that all the 
recent talk about ddtente between a newly huggabJe 
Congress and a touchy-feely White House means that the 
conservative revolution is taking a vacation, relax. 
They're still out there. 

In a couple of days, the Heritage Foundation will 
release “Mandate for Leadership IV: Turning Ideas into 
Actions. ’ ' a 760-page tome that, among other things, aims 
to get rid of most of the federal government. 

Don't look for ideological comer-cutting here. Her- 
itage, true to its doctrinaire traditions, is pretty clear on 
what it wants: “We could not justify keeping more than 
five Cabinet departments,” said a Heritage spokesman. 
Herb Berko witz. Clear enough. Herb. 

The lucky five are State. Defense, Treasury. Justice and 
Health and Human Services. The rest should be dis- 
appeared — merged with the survivors, bunched with 
other agencies that do the same thing, or. as Trotsky 
wished, simply tossed onto history’s garbage heap. 

The Heritage approach, a haunting echo of the House 
Republican agenda of 1 995, was not on the menu Tues- 
day. when the new “pragmatic” Congress took office to 
seek allegedly bipartisan, compromise solutions. 

But Mr. Berkowitz said that Heritage had heard “the 
songs being sung by White House and the conservative 
Congress” and decided that its time had come. In other 
words, the Clinton administration appears to be moving 
right. ( Guy Cugliona, WP) 

Clinton to Strike Up the Bands 

WASHINGTON — A little bit country, a little bit rock- 
and-roll. And gospeL folk and Broadway. This year's 
Presidential Gala, the celebrity salute to President Bill 
Clinton on Jan. 19, is shaping up to be another star- 
studded traffic jam. 

Inaugural organizers confirm that Michael Douglas, 
Whoopi Goldberg and Candice Bergen will serve as co- 
hosts for the two-hour show at US Air Arena. Stevie 
Wonder, Trisha Yearwood, Kenny Rogers, Aretha Frank- 
lin, James Taylor. Bernadette Peters and Sandi Patti will 
sing. Mikhail Baryshnikov will dance. Kenny G, Yo-Yo 
Ma and the Dave Matthews Band will perform, along 
with the cast of the Broadway musicals “Chicago” and 
“Bring In 'da Noise, Bring In 'da Funk." 

The bad news is that only 1 1.000 of the president's 
supporters can buy a ticket for the Inauguration Eve 
performance. The good news is that the show will be 
broadcast on CBS later that night. (WP) 

Planning to Miss a Deadline 

WASHINGTON — Mr. Clinton may wait until a week 
after the legal Feb. 3 deadline before sending Congress 
his annual budget, according to White House aides. 

The administration's numbcr-cninchers expect to have 
their work done in plenty of time. It's the White House’s 
image crafters who are stalling. 

They don’t want to make the fiscal 1998 budget public 
until after Mr. Clinton has delivered the State of the Union 
address, tentatively scheduled for Feb. 5. (WP) 


Quote/ Unquote 


Steve Blum, a doorman at the Willard Inter-Con- 
tinental Hotel in Washington, on Inauguration Day: “To 
be politically correct, it doesn't matter if it’s an in- 
auguration for Democrats or Republicans. Bui to be 
honest, the Republicans are much better tippers.” (WP J 


Away From Politics 

• Mattel Inc. is withdrawing its Cabbage Patch doll 

that mimics eating, and is offering consumers $40 refunds 
in response to about 100 reports of children getting hair 
and fingers caught in the doll's battery-powered mouth. 
The doll has no on-off switch. (AP) 

• Tugboats pulled the Brightfield freighter away from 

the hotel and mall in New Orleans that it smashed into a 
month ago. moving it downriver for repairs. (AP) 

• FBI agents found 17 pieces of jewelry, in a safe 

deposit box rented by Earl Edwin Pitts, a former FBI 
agent accused of trying to sell secrets to Moscow. Agents 
who conducted searches two days after Mr. Pitts was 
arrested Dec. 18 also found numerous articles and books 
about other espionage cases in Mr. Pitts’s office, as well 
as materials on how to conduct an insanity defense, 
according to affidavits filed in a U.S. District Court in 
Alexandria. Virginia. (WP) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


.1 


New Dominican Regime Pushes Slums Out of Poverty 


By Larry Rohter 

New York Tutus Service 


SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic 
— Of all the public works projects Joaquin 
Balaguer Ricardo dedicated during 22 years 
as president, none meant more to him than the 
colossal monument to Christopher Columbus 
that dominates the skyline of this Caribbean 
capital. 

But one thing always rankled: the view 
westward from the 10-story. $70-million 
tower takes in one of the city's poorest 
slums. 

So to rid himself of that eyesore. Mr. Bal- 
aguer sought for five years, through legal 
sleight of hand and intimidation, to drive 
residents of the Cienega and Guandules set- 
tlements from their humble dwellings on the 
banks of the Ozama River. 

Today, both barrios are still intact, while 
the 90-year-old strongman left office in mid- 
August. replaced by a government that has 
quickly proved sympathetic to the residents. 

For their pan. the 65.000 inhabitants of the 
slum can scarcely believe that they have made 
a dent in the authoritarian structure set up 
during the 30-year dictatorship of Mr. Bal- 
aguer's mentor. Rafael Trujillo. Hardened by 
decades of official deviousness and corrup- 
tion. they seem surprised, even amazed, to 
find government working in their behalf. 

“We knew that nothing would ever change 


with the old regime, that we just had to tough 
it out" said Tomas Villaman Gonzalez, prin- 
cipal of the Virgen del Carmen elementary 
school in the heart of La Cienega. “Bui now 
life is finally improving, and we have hope for 
the future. ' 

The struggle began in September 1991, 
more than a year before the dedication of the 
Columbus monument, when Mr. Balaguer 
signed a decree declaring the neighborhoods 
“inappropriate for residential purposes." 


sailors from a nearby naval base to seal both 
ends of the slum, inspect all vehicles entering 
the community and seize all prohibited ma- 
terial. But it was not long before the heavily 
armed guards were demanding bribes from 
the poor residents in return for overlooking 
violations. 

“They wouldn’t Jet even a plate or a nail 
come in without demanding some kind of 
payoff,” said Jorge Brito, a 22-year-old stu- 
dent. He said the “standard toU” was 30 pesos 


Hardened by decades of official deviousness and corruption, the 
inhabitants of the slums seem surprised, even amazed, to find 
the government working in their behalf. 


Rather than risk the outright resistance and 
damage to his political image that would 
accompany any mass expulsion, he included a 
provision declaring it illegal to make any 
improvement to the 13,000 existing houses. 

As residents quickly discovered, that meant 
they could no longer bring in cement, cor- 
rugated metal, lumber, nails, or cinder blocks 
to repair or expand their makeshift abodes. 
Their dismay grew when they found that they 
were also not allowed to replace whatever 
television sets, refrigerators, fans, stoves and 
other appliances they had. 

To enforce the edict. Mr. Balaguer ordered 


l$3) a trip, “but you could have to pay up to 
triple that, depending on the size of the stuff 
you were trying to bring in.” 

To encourage people further to leave “vol- 


untarily,” the decree also promised to provide 
for the “relocation” of residents to gov- 


for the “relocation” of residents to gov- 
ernment-built projects. But that offer was 
extended only to “those who qualify through 
their education, standard of living and social 
habits,” a formulation that community lead- 
ens saw as a trick to dump them on the 
outskirts of the capital without homes. 

Barely a month after Leonel Fernandez was 
sworn in as the country's president on Aug. 


16, community groups organized a protest 
outside the National Palace to publicize their 
plight. To their surprise, they were not driven 
away by the police but invited into the main 
salon to meet with the president, who listened 
to their complaints and signed a new decree 
that same day revoking Mr. Balaguer's edict 
and ordering the military to withdraw. 

In addition, Mr. Fernandez, 43, pledged 
chat his government would pave the slum's 
main street and build a new school. If res- 
idents could agree chi what other projects were 
needed, be told them, he would be willing to 
consider some of those as well. 

Since the palace meeting, Mr. Fernandez 
has twice gone to La Cienega to check on the 
progress of the improvements he promised. 

“This is a very new and different way of 
doing things, and it is really quite astonishing 
for us," said Mr. Villaman. the school prin- 
cipal, who has been designated to be the 
intermediary with the government “We are 
going about this with our eyes still open, but 
expectations are high, because not since the 
time of Trujillo have people here been able to 
breathe.” 

In a recent interview at the presidential 
palace. Mr. Fernandez would not criticize his 
predecessor's original decree, saying merely 
that “it was done with good intentions." But 
he said that it was his aim to make La Cienega 
and Los Guandules “a little model of what a 
poor barrio can be.” 


Predawn Gunfire Heard 
At Hostage Site in Lima 


AsMKtateJ Pros 

LIMA - Gunfire was heard before dawn Tuesday a 
the”japanese° ambassador's residence 
terrorists have been holding #4 hostages for LJtt 

W< The police said that the sounds appeared to £ auto- 
malic weapon fire but that they had no reports of in- 

ilU Suvian television using night vision camera^ ed 
a man, apparently a rebel without a bandana on hto face, 
running mthe compound yard with an assault rifle. 

The shots were heaid immediaiel>'aft^^ 

It was the second rime since the standoff Dec. ** 
that there has been a detonation inside the wnjw^ OB 
Dec. 26. an explosion was attributed to one of ^ am- 
bassador's two dogs, which tripped a land mine and was 

^ Tte terrorists have said they have mined approaches to 
the residence, which they took over during a gala cocktail 

Pa Chances for a dialogue that would end the hostage 
crisis appearto be fading since the government choked on 
all officialinforinaiion and prevented rebel contact with 
the outside. 

The government’s chief negotiator, who has mrt with 
the terrorists only once since they took over the residence, 
told El Comercio newspaper that the government would 
not meet them again without a “clear sign that the rebels 
want dialogue. 

Each side is blaming the other for the lack of progress. 





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EUROPE 


Trial Is Actor’s Justice’ 


■ By Alan Cowell 

- N *»rork TJmes Sehtix 

pwamtors on Tuesday accused East 
s former espionage chief of 

KUUlaDmnir_ IwwirmW jn 


spy likened to “vkaor’s 


— . . — > >v« uiia, m u, aim 

n icknam ed “the man without a 
» aCc ’ represent a second effort to pn>- 
secule him following a Supreme Coim 
Ailing in 1 995 that quashed a six-year jail 
term he had been ordered to serve fol- 
lowing a 1 993 conviction for treason. . 

■ Since Germany’s reunification, Mr. 
Wolf has repeatedly argued that he com- 
nutied no crimes under EastGennanlaw 
as he pursued often-successful efforts to 
wufitraie agents in tbe West. 

* “Neither the constitution nor the laws 
pf the country I served were violated,” he 
ag ain insisted Tuesday, denying tbe 
.charges against him and accusing Ger-. 

nun CtOtP nmeAmtwr . « 


»“on a par with common criminals,'' ■ 

‘ “1 declare myself to be not guilty:” he 
£ said. 

L The trial has stined feelings among 
some Germans that the prosecutors are 
beha ving vindictively toward Mr. Wolf, 
particularly since the 1995 ruling by the 


: Supreme Court had already established 
' that the East Gentian inteiH^w*. lead- 
ership may not be punished for espi- 
onage activities carried out under orders 
from East Beilin. 

Mr. Wolf has sought to exploit that 
sentiment in' pretrial interviews. “The 
wnmos of the Cold War are behaving Hke 
bad lasers,” he told Der Spiegel magazine 
in an interview published Monday. 

“The impression retrains that the vic- 
tors of Gterman unity are not concerned 
about reconciliation but about ven- 
geance and score-settling.” he said. 

Since the 1995 Supreme Court ruling 
protected Mr. Wolf from treason 
charges, state prosecutors have reached 
into his past for alleged criminal acts not 
covered under East German law by the 
same statute of limitations as in the 
Western German criminal code. 

Thus, they have accused him on three 
counts in 1955, 1959andl962 of ordering 
Jridnapptogs in low-grade operations. 

Mr. Wolf's better tIoqowu coups in- 
clude the infiltration of a spy into tbe 
office, of Wmy Branch, the former West 
German chancellor, and die placing of a 
high-r anking agent at the tvadry mrtpn; of 
tie North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

Ihe discovery of the spy in Mr. Brandt's 
office, Gnenter Giriflanme, brought down 
the West Goman government in 1974, 
cementing tbe reputation of East German 
intelligence as one of die most corrosive 
influences in West Germany. 


Mr. Wolf, a former general in the East 
German stale security apparatus, sought 
to belittle the latest charges against him. 
. . “Despite their greatest efforts, tbe ac- 
cusers have been able to produce nothing 
beyond what was commonplace for all 
intelligence services,” Mr. Wolf said 
Tuesday. 

“If this trial was really about the 
accusations, then virtually every oper- 
ative of intelligence agencies in die East 
and West could be sitting here in the 
dock with me.” Mr. Wolf said, calling 
tbe trial a “political process.” 

The state prosecutor, Joachim Lampe. 
said that, in the first of the three charges 
against him, Mr/ Wolf ordered the ab- 
duction in 1955 of Christa Trapp, a sec- 
retary working for U.S. authorities in 
West Berlin. She was released a day later 
after refusing to spy bn her American 
employers and returned to West Berlin. 

m 1959, Mr. Lampe said, Mr. Wolf 
ordered tbe arrest of a typesetter, Georg 
Angerer, who had been in exile with Mr. 
Brandt in Norway during World War IL 
He was held for more than six months 
while East German interrogators pressed 
him to denounce Mr, Brandt — at that 
time the mayor of West Berlin — as a 
Nazi collaborator. 

' Mr. Wolf is also accused of involve- 
ment the 1962 kidnapping in Austria of 
Walter Thraene, an East German de- 
fector who subsequently spent 10 years 
in an East German prison. 



lAanio OtmWAgentr ftanor-Pleu 

Markus Wolf, the East German spy 
chief, arriving in court Tuesday. 

Mr. Wolf defended himself against 
the fust charge by saying that, while he 
had no recollection of it. abductions of 
potential agents were common in the 
Berlin of the 1950s and were practiced 
by both Eastern and Western intelli- 
gence services. 

He sought to explain the interrogation 
of Mr. Angerer by saying it reflected the 
“legitimate task” of uncovering former 
Nazi sympathizers. 

He said the alleged abduction of Mr. 
Thraene was beyond his competence 
and had been ordered by a higher au- 
thority. 


Swiss Offer Dormant Funds 
As Holocaust Compensation 


By Alan Cowell 

.\Vm Y.'rt Times Srr iw 

BONN — Seeking to defuse the 
deepening crisis over irs financial deal- 
ings during the Nazi era. the Swiss 
government offered Tuesday to use 
money from unclaimed bank' accounts 
dating from World War D to set up a 
fund “in favor of Holocaust victims and 
their descendants.” 

But the offer failed io deflect a tide of 
Jewish anger over recent remarks by a 
high Swiss official who called Jewish 
demands for compensation from 
Switzerland “extortion and black- 
mail." Jewish groups had demanded an 
apology for the remarks by Jean-Pascal 
Delamuraz, now economics minister, 
but the government statement offering 
to set up a Holocaust memorial fund 
made no reference to an apology. 

The confrontation between Switzer- 
land and Jewish groups in the United 
States and Israel has been building since 
last year, fueled by assertions that Swiss 
banks profited from wartime dealings in 
Nazi gold and subsequently hoarded 
bank deposits belonging (o Jews who 
perished in the Holocaust. 

But in recent days, the conflict has 
assumed ever more somber overtones 
for Switzerland with talk among Jewish 
groups of an organized boycott of Swiss 


banks and the first tangible indications 
of financial repercussions yesterday, 
when Swiss bank shares dipped in stock 
market trading. 

The seven ministers in Switzerland's 
Federal Council issued a statement 
Tuesday saying the 40 million Swiss 
francs, or. S29.5 million, discovered so 
far in dormant accounts should be “put 
to proper use." 

“In this respect, the Federal Council 
is ready io immediately take up dis- 
cussions with the banks and the in- 
terested organizations regarding tbe cre- 
ation of a fund in favor of Holocaust 
victims and their descendants,” die 
statement said. 

The developments in Bern, the Swiss 
capital, elicited an angry response from 
Avraham Burg, the chairman of the 
Jewish Agency in Jerusalem, who is 
supposed to be pan of an investigative 

S anel to search for funds belonging to 
lolocaust victims in Swiss accounts. 
“The Swiss are again playing with 
words, attacking marginal issues and ig- 
noring the central issues,” an aide quoted 
Mr Burg as saying. “They’re trying to 
buy us with money that’s not theirs.” 
After meeting Swiss officials in Je- 
rusalem, moreover, Mr. Burg said a 
decision would be reached within four 
weeks on whether to urge a boycott of 
dealings with Swiss banks. 



l ' 






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iwuntimi 

ftuud. 

FvJJ 

9% ill 


MARRAKESH, Morocco-^ Richard Branscm and two co- 


iir ii a I yi' dl y?, * yly l, 1 !*? V " f 





BRIEFLY 


R C P £ 


Leader Nominated m Bulgaria 

SOFIA — The governing Socialist Partynominated . 
the intend minister, Nikolai Dobrev, T uesday to bead the 
ninth Bulgarian government rinre the end. of one-party 
nde in ‘ 1989. If bis nomination as prime minister is 
approved by Parliament^ Mr. Dobrev, 49, will form a 
cabinet to confront die country's economic crisis. Zban 
Videnov quit as prime minster and party leader Dec. 21. 


i,v in r~-*a * I.*-.*' im*’!!) ' i ■; 9 t 


saidTuesdayrt was stepping up anti-go vern 
in its call for eariy parbameBtaiy elcctions. 


(Reuters) 


Bosnian Hijacks Austrian Plane 

BERLIN — A Bosnian hijacker held a knife to ihe 
throat of an Austrian Airlines pilot Tuesday, forcing the 
plane to laml m Berlin. 

During negotiations, a policeman sneaked in the back 
nfthe Diane and shoved the hiiacker out an open door. The 


hijacker, 39, wasthen arrested. Ncraeof tbe 
or five crew members on the flight bound for Vienna was 
injured, said Walter Bock, the airline’s chief pilot. 

The hijacker said he feared deportation from Germany 
after his appeal for asylum was refused. . .. (AP) 

Greek Police Arrest 7 Migrants 

ATHENS — Greek police on Tuesday took into cus- 
tody seven migrants wbo escaped after illegally landing 
on the country’s southern shores with more than 100 
refugees from Sri Lan ka , Pakistan and India. 

The migrants disembarked Dec. 29 from a cargo ship 
near the southern port city of Nafjplion. , _ 

The arrests came as die Public Order Ministry said it 
continued to doubt testimony that about 300 of migrants 
had drowned after their ship collided with another vessel 
in the Malta-Sicilydhannel on Christmas Day. (AP) 

4 Questioned in IRA Attack 

BELFAST — Northern Ireland police questioned four 
men on Tuesday over a dayfight IRA rocket attack on the 
main courthouse in Belfast that raised fears of retaliation 
by unionist gunmen. _ ' r . , 

Security forces were cat high alert after the M 
Republican Army carried our its firs* "attack of 1997, 
wmch injured a policeman in a guard post (Reuters) 

Council Might Expel Belarus 

STRASBOURG — Belarus risks' losing its special 
sr pros on the Council of Europe following protests over a 
disputed referendum thargave itspresident sweeping new 
powers, officials said Tuesday. 

Tbe council ’s40-memberpoli!ical committee is to nteet 

this month to consider a proposal to expel Belarus after 
President Alexander Lukashenko ignored proteste over 
the November referendum, tbe officials said. (AFP) 

_ FROM JANUARY 6TH TO I11H 1997 — . 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIO NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANIFAR Y 8, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Seoul Attributes Strikes 
To ‘Misunderstanding’ 

Korea Calls New Labor Laws Necessary 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Post Service 


SEOUL — President Kim Young 
Sara said Tuesday that a ‘‘big mis- 
understanding” by workers about con- 
troversial new labor laws was to blame 
for strikes that have hobbled the nation 
for nearly two weeks. 

* ‘The labor laws have been revised to 
be more in line with those of advanced 
countries.” the South Korean president 
said during a nationally televised news 
conference, his first in two years. “The 
laws haven’t been revised in 43 years — 


BRIEFLY- SI A 


Top Sikh Militant 
To Be Extradited 

NEW DELHI — A U.S. court 
has cleared the extradition to India 
of a suspected top Sikh militant 
leader who is wanted by New Delhi 
for a bus bombing and an attempted 
political assassination, the author- 
ities said Tuesday. 

Officials of the Central Bureau 
of Investigation. India's federal po- 
lice agency, said a Texas court had 
cleared the way for the extradition 
of Daya Singh Sandhu. who was 
arrested in Minneapolis in 1995. 
Mr. Sandhu is believed to be one of 
the leaders of the Khali start Lib- 
eration Force, a group fighting for a 
separate Sikh nation in the northern 
stare of Punjab. ( Reuters ) 

Deng: 6 'No Change 9 

BEIJING — A government 
spokesman dismissed reports that 
Deng Xiaoping’s health deterior- 
ated last week, saying “there has 
been no big change” in the senior 
leader's condition. 

Hong Kong newspapers had re- 
ported that Mr. Deng. 92. had been 
rushed to a hospital. The Foreign 
Ministry spokesman. Shen Guo- 
fang, said he had no new infor- 
mation about Mr. Deng's health. 

(API 

Warning by Bhutto 

ISLAMABAD — Benazir 
Bhutto, the ousted prime minister, 
said Tuesday that she would not 
accept the result of next month’s 
election if it is held under President 
Farooq Leghari, who dismissed her 
two months ago. 

At a news conference held to 
issue a new election manifesto of 
her Pakistan People’s Patty, she 
opposed a presidential decree is- 
sued Monday creating a new coun- 
cil that gives the armed forces a 
formal advisory role in govern- 
ment. She said the decree was an 
attempt to drag the military into 
politics. She said that she would not 
boycott the Feb. 3 vote, but that her 
party was considering whether to 
begin protests. (Reuters) 

Indonesia Protests 

JAKARTA — Supporters of 
Megawati Sukarnoputri, the ousted 
Indonesian minority party leader, 
demonstrated Tuesday in two cities, 
demanding the right to run in elec- 
tions this May. Some 400 members 
of the Indonesian Democratic Party 
gathered at the General Election 
Institute in Jakarta to protest that 
body’s rejection of Mrs. Mega- 
wati's candidates for the May 29 
polls. In Surabaya, witnesses sad 
more than 2,000 Megawati backers 
marched on the East Java office of 
the election body. (Reuters) 


you wouldn’t wear the same clothes for 
43 years.” 

Hundreds of thousands of South 
Korean workers have staged strikes and 
protest rallies since Dec. 26, when Mr. 
Kim's ruling New Korea Party used a 
secret session of the National Assembly 
to pass new labor laws. The laws allow 
companies to lay off workers, set more 
flexible work hours and hire temporary 
help — all previously unheard-of in the 
nearly guaranteed lifetime employment 
system in South Korea. 

Mr. Kim said Tuesday that the new 
laws were in line with those of the 
member nations of the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Develop- 
ment. which South Korea joined last 
month. 

He called for “industrial peace” to 
keep domestic and foreign companies 
from leaving South Korea, and to pro- 
tect the world's 1 1 th largest economy, 
which is experiencing its most serious 
economic downturn in years. 

The South Korean government said 
Tuesday that the strikes had cost the 
country about $1.4 billion in lost pro- 
duction and profits. 

“It is nice to redistribute the national 
wealth.” Mr. Kim said, “but there has 
to be some national wealth left to re- 
distribute.” 

Employers have threatened to sue the 
strikers, and prosecutors on Monday 
issued summonses to question about 
200 labor leaders. The union leaders 
ignored the summonses, leaving the 
government to decide whether to arrest 
them. 

" 'No one wants to leave their families 
and go to prison,” a labor leader. Bae 
Suk Bum told Reuters, “but I am 
honored to be part of this fi ght and am 
willing to sacrifice myself.” 

Mr. Kim’s no-compromise stand on 
Tuesday angered Mr. Bae and other 
labor leaders camping out in protest in 
the snow at a downtown Seoul cathed- 
ral. 

“We have no choice but to intensify 
our strikes.” said Kwon Young D, pres- 
ident of the Korean Confederation of 
Trade Unions, a technically illegal um- 
brella group that represents 500.000 
workers. “We are saddened that the 
president, who should be in charge of 
governing the nation, does not know the 
seriousness of this crisis.” 

Thousands of hospital workere and 
employees at the four big Korean broad- 
cast networks — including the state-run 
Korea Broadcasting System — joined 
the strike, which has already idled vital 
automakers and shipbuilding yards. 

. Union officials estimated that 
230,000 workers were on strike Tues- 
day. down from a high of about 350.000 
before the strike was suspended last 
week to observe the New Year's hol- 
iday. 

At his news conference. Mr. Kim also 
reaffirmed his commitment to talks 
among North Korea. South Korea, the 
United States and China aimed at put- 
ting a formal end to the Korean War of 
1950-53. replacing the fragile 
armistice. 

Mr. Kim and President Bill Clinton 
proposed the talks last April, but Mr. 
Kim withdrew his participation after a 
North Korean submarine incursion into 
South Korean waters in September. 
After North Korea apologized last week 
for the incident, Mr. Kim renewed his 
intention to hold the talks. 

“We hope that North Korea will drop 
its anachronistic dream of comrauniz- 
ing and unifying the Korean Peninsula 
by force of arms, and instead join us in 
opening a new chapter of peace and 
cooperation,” Mr. Kim said. “To that 
end. this year must see the proposed 
four-party meeting realized, laying a 
foundation for lasting peace on the pen- 
insula.” 

North Korea has agreed to attend a 
preliminary briefing on the talks with 
South Korean and U.S. officials. Mr. 
Kim said Tuesday that the briefing 
would be held later this month. 



Shipwreck’s Oil Is Fouling 
Long Shoreline in Japan 




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MDCUNL Japan — Waves of oil 
washed onto Japan's north-central 
shoreline Tuesday, fouling the coast and 
threatening fish aid wildlife. 

Oil slicks had hit shore along a 100- 
kilometer (60-mile) stretch from Kyoto 
Prefecture to Fukui Prefecture, a Mari- 
time Safety Agency spokesman said. 
The rocky coast" is dotted with fish 
farms, fishing ports and tourist re- 
sorts- 

At a beach at Mikuni. about 330 
kilometers northwest of Tokyo, villa- 
gers grimaced at the pungent odor of 
heavy oil as they surveyed the wreck of 
the ship that has caused Japan's second- 
worst oil spilL 

Id Mikuni, a fishing town of 20.000 
people, the spill threatened to wipe out 
the port’s annual fishing income. 

Fishermen and fisheries officials pre- 
dicted that the slick would destroy this 
year’s harvests of abalone and turbine 
shell, both shellfish delicacies, and sea- 
weed, which is eaten in Japan. 

Intermittent snow and cold have 
dogged efforts to stop die spill —7 or 
even confirm its size — since aRussian- 
registered ship, the Nakhodka, sank and 
broke In two during storms in the Sea of 



dri r» r ' 


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Japan last Thursday. 


TokToSUatenmoJ 

The bow section of the Russian-registered oil tanker drifting in rough 
seas off north-central Japan on Tuesday as a salvage vessel kept watch. 


Maritime Safely Agency spokes- 
man said tHaf high seas had prevented an 
oil dispersal operation using detergent 
chemicals. 

“We still have no idea of how much 
oil escaped from the vessel,” he ad- 
ded. 


XVT 


The weather also thwarted efforts ter 
put up an oil fence to stop the slicks from 
spreading. 

The spiD worsened Monday when oil 
started seeping from ruptured t a nks in 
the stem of the vessel, where most of the 
ship’s 133.000 barrels of heavy fuel oil 
was stored. 

Until the stem tanks started leaking, rf 
was estimated that 26.000 barrels of oil 
had escaped from ruptured tanks in the 
bow. ■ 

Japan’s biggest oil spill occurred irf 
197L 

The Nakhodka was built 26 years 
ago, and authorities said the age of die 
ship, which was beading to Russia from 
China, was a factor in its breaking apart. 
The 31 crewmen were rescued but the 
captain was missing. (AP, Reuters) 


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HERESY: Sri Lankan Priest Excommunicated by Vatican May Become a Cause Celebre . 


Continued from Page 1 

spiritual figure, such as Jesus, can claim 
to be the only savior. 

Father Balasuriya's defiance has set 
his case apart from other disputes that 
have pitted theologians against Cardinal 
Joseph Ratzinger. the formidable head 
of the Congregation for the Doctrine of 
the Faith, which adjudicates doctrinal 
matters. 

The strict discipline imposed by Pope 
John Paul n has been exercised an die 
Swiss theologian Hans Kueng, a pro- 
fessor at Tuebingen University in Ger- 
many; the Reverend Charles Curran, 
who taught at Catholic University in 


Washington, D.C.; and die school of 
liberation theologians from Latin 
America whose anti -establishment, 
populist views often overlapped with 
leftist social ideals in the 1970s and 
’80s. But the Vatican stopped short of 
excommunicating Father Kueng and 
Father Curran, and only barred them 
from teaching Catholic theology. 

“This is much tougher,” Father 
Kueng said in a telephone interview 
about Father Balasuriya’s case, “per- 
haps because he is a Third World theo- 
logian. It is very serious for this man, 
and it is very unjust, but it is the coo- 
sequence of the system. This is the 
system as it works, and as it will work as 


long as Catholicism doesn’t get rid of a 
doctrine that says that the Pope is al- 
ways right.” 

m an address to heads of doctrinal 
commissions from around the world 
who met in May in Guadalajara, Mex- 
ico, CardmalRatzmger, who is seen as 
Pope John Paul ITs principal doctrinal 
watchdog, laid oat the dangers of a blend 
of the West's secular relativism and the 
“philosophical and religious intuitions 
of Asia, especially and surprisingly with 
those of the Indian subcontinent.” 

From the marriage of these trends, he 
said, is bom the religious relativism that 
is unacceptable for doe Catholic Church. 

“The faith, together with its practice. 


ASIA: Hashimoto ' s Visit Poses a Puzzle on Japan - China Balance 


Continued from Page 1 

dition to the countries he will visit in the 
next week. Mr. Hashimoto traveled to 
the two other ASEAN slates. Thailand 
and the Philippines, last year. 

Since then, concerns have arisen in 
Southeast Asia that resurgent Japanese 
nationalism may be unduly influencing 
Mr. Hashimoto ’s government, prompt- 
ing it to take a more confrontational 
approach to China over a number of 
issues, including disputed islands in the 
East China Sea known to the Japanese 
as the Senkakus and to the Chinese as 
the Diaoyus. 

Singapore's senior minister, Lee 
Kuan Yew. praised China's restraint in 
the dispute when he was in Tokyo re- 
cently. 

“Although its leaders could have 
used this issue to stir up nationalist 
passions and gain support for them- 
selves. there have been no boatloads of 
Chinese from the mainland, unlike the 
Chinese in Taiwan and Hong Kong, to 
the islands.” he said “This reflects the 
high priority China places on stable 
relations with Japan and its neighbors, 
in order to get more capital, technology, 
trade and investments for its growth. 

Japan’s trade with the five Southeast 
Asian countries on Mr. Hashimoto 's 
itinerary amounted to S74 billion in 
1995, and its cumulative investment in 
the area stood at S33 billion — far 
eclipsing China's direct economic stake 
in the region. Japan is also the largest 
source of aid 10 ASEAN countries, and 


it gets 80 percent of its natural gas 
imports, which are vital for power gen- 
eration. and 10 percent of its oil from 
Southeast Asia 

But ASEAN sees China as a future 
economic and military heavyweight in 
the region. 

In seeking to balance Japan and 
China, which have a history of bitter 
conflict in the last century. Southeast 
Asian countries are looking ahead two 
or three decades when Japan and China 
will, for the first lime, be major powers 
at the same time. 

“How they relate to each other will 
have a profound influence on Asia and 
the world,” Mr. Lee said. “The synergy 
of these two complementary economies 
will boost growth and development 
throughout East Asia, and rapid growth 
in this the most dynamic region could 
become the growth engine for the world. 
Conversely, if relations go wrong be- 
tween China and Japan, East Asia and 
the world will be affected.” 

Analysts said that ASEAN countries 
feared that a more assertive Japan under 
Mr. Hashimoto could weaken its long- 
standing alliance with the United States 
and lead to Japanese rearmament, pro- 
voking a similar response from China. 

“The Japan-U.S. alliance is the an- 
chor of stability and peace for the region 
in the foreseeable future,” said Jusuf 
Wanandi, chairman of the supervisory 
board of the Center for Strategic and 


International Studies in Jakarta. “It puts 
Japan in a structure that is accepted by 
the Japanese public and by the region, 
including China.’* 

While emphasizing the importance of 
the Japan-U.S. security alliance. Mr. 
Hashimoto said at a New Year's Eve 
news conference in Tokyo that the days 
in which Japan could * ‘act, taking peace 
and prosperity for granted in the in- 
ternational community under the United 
States wing, have already passed.” 

He said that the “time has come for 
Japan to spread its own values and 
philosophy in the world.” 

Jeff Kingston, director of the Institute 
for Pacific Rim Studies at Temple Uni- 
versity in Japan, said that the Hashimoto 
government wanted to shed Japan's im- 
age as the “meek man” of Asia. 

He said that Mr. Hashimoto. as 
former president of the War Bereaved 
Families’ Association in Japan, had 
long sympathized with those who re- 
garded the country as a victim rather 
titan an aggressor in World War IL 

“It is up to the Japanese government 
to reassure its neighbors about its in- 
tentions and reaffirm a responsible for- 
eign policy,” Mr. Kingston said. “It can 
leam much from the diplomacy of 
ASEAN, which has sought to engage 
China in dialogue and confidence- 
building measures as a means of 
dampening tensions over disputed ter- 
ritories-” 




either comes to us from the Lord 
through his church and the sapametual ; 
ministry, or it does not exist in ab- 
solute,' ’ Cardinal Ratzinger said. ' ' 

By excommunicating Father Balas- 
uriya, the Vatican has sent its message tC' 1 ’- 
in an even more forceful way. 

The case against Father Balasuriya 
began in 1993, when the Catholic Bish- 
ops' Conference in Sri Lanka called fen*;., 
an investigation into his latest book. 9 ': 
“Mary and Human Liberation.” The _ 
book took a critical look at the cult of the r 

Virgin Mary, in particular her image as a 
“Mary of the capitalist, patriarchal, co 1 ' 

loniaiist first world of Christendom'-* 
whose “perpetual virginity makes her 
“a dehydrated figure who is not quite 
human/ ' Father Balasuriya argued that 
Christianity and Catholicism must go 
further to acknowledge the legitimacy 
of other faiths. 

By July 1994. the Congregation for 
the Doctnne of the Faith compiled an 
1 1 -page critique of Father Balasuriya's 
views. muchof which he later dismissed 
as a ^“misrepresentation-” ln due 
course, he sent off a 55-page response to 
which he received a one-word reply! 
“Unsatisfactory.” • 

Father Balasuriya argued that the 
Vatican was in no position to judge the 
rights and wrongs of scholars working 
in multidenominationai cultures like Sri 
Lanka, where most people, about 69 
percent, are Buddhists, about 1 5 percent 
are Hindus, and Christians and Muslims 
each make up less than 8 percent of the 
population. 

Finally, in May 1996, the Vatican; 
clearly exasperated by the drawn-out 
epistolary exchange, seat Father Balas- 
uriya a long "profession of faith.” 
which it insisted he sign “to verify if 
you accept the truths” taught by the 
Catholic Church. Included was a para- 
graph explicitly acknowledging the 
Vatican’s hard-line position against the 
ordination of women. 

For this and other reasons. Father 
Balasuriya refused to sign and opted 
i ns t ead to sign a similar one, without the 
clause on women priests. That approach 
was rejected by the Vatican and, after a 
last-minute appeal to Pope John Paul 13 
himself, the congregation started to 
move slowly bot inexorably toward its 
final judgment. 


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IMERNATIONAL 




Milosevic 

, Opposition Vows 

It Will Pursue 
Criminal Charges 

The Associated Press ■ 

i .® EL 9 RADE — Pteskfent Slobodan 
Milosevic s political foes accused some 
ms closest associates Tuesday of or- 
ganizing police beatings of demonstrat- 
ors, and said their lawyers would pursue 
“ling criminal charges. 

■ The Serbian capital was quiet Tues- 
day as people celebrated Ghrigrtrwc ac- 
cording to tbe Orthodox calendar, but an 
opposition rally was planned for the 
evening. . On Monday night, Christmas 
Eve. more than 200,000 people turned 
out for a combination protest march and 
holiday celebration. 

The celebration was marred by an ex- 
plosion Monday' evening, very 0ce4y 
caused by a grenade, on the grounds of the 
headquarters of a parly allied with Mr. 
Milosevic. No ore was hurt in the blast, 
which went off at offices of the Yugoslav 
united Left, the party of Mr. MSlosevk’s 
^ wife, Mirjana Markovic. 

Zajedno, the opposition coalition 

whose name means Together, has backed 

seven weeks of protests since courts and 
election commissions controlled by die 
Serbian leader annulled local elections 
Nov. 17 that the opposition won. 

• The coalition said in a statement feat 
its lawyers would seek criminal charges 
against Interim 1 Minister Zoran Soko- 
lovic and his assistant, Radovan Stojcic, 
both of whom are very close to Mr. 
Milosevic, because of die beating of 
demonstrators last month. 

On Tuesday, a top official from 
Montenegro, Serbia's junior partner in 
the Yugoslav federation, warned Mr. 
Milosevic to “urgently” recognize the 
opposition's victory. He warned that 
Montenegro might boycott federal in- 
stitutions. 

■ Court Said to Favor Opposition 

■ Serbia's supreme court basiecogmzed 
tbe opposition's victory in the town of 
Lapovo, an Official from the Zajedno 

Coalition told Agence France-Presse. 

• The court’s decision concurs with re- 
c o mmendations of the Organization for 
Security and Cooperation in Europe, 
which confirmed opposition victories in 
14 Serbian towns and rides, including 
Lapovo. 


ering Beatings 


Car Bomb in Algiers Kills 6, 
With Reports of 100 Injured 


C'*ny*f*J 6v Om Sh# Frm Daftathrs 

ALGIERS — A powerful car 
bomb exploded Tuesday afternoon in 
the heart of the Algerian capital, 
killing at least 6 people and wound- 
ing at least 20. 

Hospital officials said the bomb 
exploded near Place Audin. a bust- 
ling shopping district in central Al- 
giers. The government announced 
the death and injury toll. 

Sources quoted by Agence France- 
Presse said that 13 people had died 
about 100 bad been wounded. 

It was the deadliest car bomb at- 
tack in Algiers in several months. No 


one immediately claimed responsi- 
bility for the bombing, the latest in a 
five-year insurgency in Algeria that 
has killed at least 60,000 people. 

In other recent attacks, an armed 
group killed IS people Monday and 
wounded 18 others in a raid on the 
coastal town of Douaouda-Marine, 
west of Algiers, security forces in the 
capital said. Witnesses said the at- 
tackers had threatened to return. 

On Sunday, 16 people — includ- 
ing two children — were killed in an 
attack on the village of Benachour, in 
the Btida region 50 kilometers (30 
miles) south of Algiers. (AP, AFP) 


ANNAN: New UN Chief Is Old U.S. Hand 


A Serbian woman fighting candies in a Sarajevo church Tuesday during a Mass celebrating the Orthodox 
Quistmas. About 200,000 people joined a combination street protest and holiday fete the night before. 


Shalikoshvili Meets 
ScaidiDefense Chief 

; Reuters 

DUBAT — The chairman of the 
U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, General 
John Shalikasbvili, met Tuesday 
with the Saudi defense minister and 
discussed bilateral relations, the of- 
ficial Saudi Press Agency said. 

The meeting with Prince Sultan 
ibn Abdul aziz as Saud, the Saudi 
defense and aviation minister, was 
also attended by senior U.S. dip- 
lomats and officers of tbe Saudi 
armed forces. Tbe agency did not or 
give further details of General Sha- 
Iikashvili’s visit. 

■About 5.700 UJS. troops are sta- 
tioned in the kingdom as part of 
coalition forces policing a “no 
flight” zone over soathem Iraq.- 


Mercenaries Recruited to Stem 
Rebels in Zaire, French Reports Say 

the region but denied any official French 
involvement, saying Paris was tbe vic- 
tim of a smear campaign in the media. 

“People are pointing the finger at us 
when we're doing nothing, ” he said. 

Asked about the report in Le Monde, 
the French presidency said it had no 
connection with, or knowledge of, a 
mercenary force. 

“If such a force exists,” a spokes- 
woman said, “it is in total contradiction 
with French policy in the region and 
therefore to be condemned.” 

Le Monde, however, quoted uniden- 
tified French military sources that con- 
firmed they knew the force existed and 
would “buy time” for President 
Mobutu Sese Seko's government. 


Reuters 

PARIS — A force of several hundred 
European and African mercenaries, 
some- recruited by a former chief of 
security at the French presidency, is as- 
sembling in eastern Zaire to help stem 
advances by rebels backed by Rwanda, 
Le Monde said Tuesday. 

Le Monde reported that the face 
numbered between 200 and 3 00, but was 
expected to grow rapidly when more 
men left Europe in two weeks* time to 
join South African, French, Belgian. 
British, Angolan and Mozambican sol- 
diers of fortune. 

Tbe French cooperation minister. 
Jacques Godfrain, said there were mer- 
cenaries from some European nations in 


Continued from Page 1 

had just gone through our own struggle 
for independence. Ghana became inde- 
pendent in 1957. only two years earlier. 
People of my generation, having seen 
the change that took place in Ghana, 
grew up t hinking all was possible. 

“When I came to the States, the social 
upheaval reminded me of some things 
that hadgone on there.” he added, sitting 
in an office still largely undecorated ex- 
cept for flowers, an African woodcarving 
and an abstract painting by his wife, 
Nane, a Swedish lawyer-tumed-artisL 
Mr. Annan arrived in the United 
States on a scholarship from the Foreign 
Students Leadership Project of the Fad 
Foundation, which scouted the world for 
promising future leaders. 

He also remembers 1959 as the year of 
the earmuffs. “I entered tbe United 
States at Boston, and did a summer pro- 
gram at Harvard,” be said. “I then 
moved on to Macalester College in Min- 
nesota. It was my first winter ever, and 
that was quite an experience. 

“Intellectually, I knew about the sea- 
sons.” he said, his elegant English 
softened by a lilting West African ca- 
dence. “I knew about snow. I knew 
about winter. But I had never expe- 
rienced it until I got to Minnesota.” 
Unwillingly, he bundled up in cum- 
bersome clothes. But he drew the line at 
earmuffs. which looked ridiculous. 

“I resisted as long as I could, until one 
day, going to get something to eat. my 
ears nearly froze,” he recalled. “So 1 
went and bought the biggest pair I could 


SERVICE: U.S. Technology Companies Find a New Key to Profit GINGRICH: Speaker Is Re-elected 


Continued from Page I . . 

has been hiring “people who understand 
business, hot just technology,” Mr. Har- 
ris said. “Ouremphasis has shifted from 
solving technology. problems, to using 
technology to solve business prob- 
lems.” 

Still, the potential rewards are so rich 
that few companies are frightenedaway. 
No one has amassed statistics about all 
the disparate service businesses. 

. But most experts say the hugest is 
global irfcvmation^ecfralogy services, 
which encompasses desig ni ng, m ai m ai n - 
ing and installing information systems. 
According to the market-research film 
Dataquest, that business reached aboui 
$234 billion last year, and should top: 
$400 billion by tbe end of tbe decade. 

Although independent • consulting 
firms still rule that market, tire man- 
ufacturers are gaining. Xerox’s revenue 
from services went to $1.5 billion from 
SI billion in 1995 — maybe sot much 
compared.with the $13 billion that EDS 
clocked last year, but still a formi d a b le 
50 percent increase. 

Michael Critelli, the chairman of Pit- 
ney Bowes, expects his company's mail- 
and copier-related services to grow 15 
percent a year through 2000. “We know 
mail better than anyone outside the post 
office," Mr. Critelli said. 

Services are growing even faster for 
computer companies, which increas- 
ingly design and ran a client’s entire 
computer operations, from payroll to 
tracking orders. Hewlett-Packard's 1996 
service revenues were $53 bDIioo, 20 
percent above 1995. About $20 billion of 
IBM’s $70 billion in 1995 .revenues 
came from services, and Lloyd Water- 
house, a general manager of IBM Global 
^Services, says services are growing 
faster than either hardware or software. 

General Electric derived $7 billion of 
its $70 billion in. 1995 revenues from 
^uch services as repairing and main- 
taining locomotives, aircraft engines, 
power plants and medical equipment, 
land it expects such services to top $15 
billion by 2000. 

The company just formed a sovices 
council, where representatives from all 
its manufacturing businesses sbaretips 
on how to expand the services business, 
o For example, GE’s medical division. 


which uses its own equipment to in- 
terpret diagnostic test data that have 
beat electronically transmitted, has 
taught the aircraft engipps division to 
use- the- same, technology lo- figure' out 
what might be wrong with an airplane ai 
an airport thousands of miles away. 

“I can expand a lot faster by up- 
grading or maintaining the equipment I 
have installed than by trying to sell more 
omits,” said John Welch, GE’s chair- 
man, who says product-related services 
are growing at “two to three times the 
rate of products themselves.” 

ForGE, a hugely profitable company, 
pursuing services is just a way to grow. 
For many computer companies, it is a 
survival strategy.- 

Competition lias intensified, product- 
life cycles have shortened and the advent 
of “open architectures” — systems that 
allow companies to mix and match com- 
ponents from rival manufacturers — is 
enabling customers to shop around when 
they want to upgrade or expand. 

The situation is most dire fa compa- 
nies that make personal computers, 
mainframes and other equipment that 
has become so standardized that their 
“variations no longer matter as much as 
the services that need to be attached to 


them,” said Peter Kolesar, a professor at 
The Columbia Business School. 

A result is that manufacturing gross 
margins, which once went as high as 75 
percent, now .rarely exceed 30 percent. 
For services, gross margins can exceed 
50 percent 

“Consulting margins were never as 
high relative to manufacturing as now,” 
said Patrick Barker, a professor at the 
Wharton School. 

That is what the most beleaguered 
computer companies are banking on. At 
Unisys, which has faced vanishing profits 
on mainframes and PCs. computer-re- 
lated services now represent 63 percent of 
sales and 1(30 percent of hopes. 

“Equipment margins are so low dial 
services are. die only way to improve our 
bottom line.” said Dewaine Osman, a 
Unisys senior vice president. 

Similarly, Wang Laboratories has 
been bailing out of its ailing office- 
computer businesses since emerging 
from bankruptcy in 1993. It now con- 
centrates on designing and running local 
and wide area networks. 

“Services provide a high return on 
assets without plants, property or equip- 
ment,” said Joseph Tuca, chairman of 
Wang. 


Continued from Page I 

self confident or too pushy, I apolo- 
gize,!.’ he -said. “To whatever degree in 
any way that I brought controversy or 
inappropriate attention to the House, I 
apologize.” 

He added, “It is my intention to do 
everything l can to work with every 
member of this Congress. 

But as he was seeking to strike a less 
partisan tone, the Ethics Committee’s 
special counsel for the Gingrich case, 
James Cole, said it would not be possible 
to hold a House floor vote on sanctions 
against the speaker until after Jan. 21, a 
deadline set last month. 

Democrats were angry at the sug- 
gestion that a vote might be held on Jan. 
20, the day of President Bill Clinton's 
inauguration, at a time it would receive 
minimal media attention. 

House Republicans, who hold a 227- 
to-207 vote lead, with one independent, 
cheered the announcement of Mr. Gin- 
grich's election loudly, and many shook 
his hand as be went down the aisle. 

‘ ‘This is Newt's finest hour, ” a Cali- 
fornia Republican, Dana Rohrabacher. 
said shortly before the vote. 

Republicans said Mr. Gingrich owed 


much to a sense among party members 
that he had been a dynamic, galvanizing 
leader and a powerful intellectual force 
in the party's revitalization. 

But it was unclear how the challenge 
from within his party would play out over 
time. Representative Jim Leach of Iowa, 
a respected moderate who surprised and 
infuriated many colleagues Monday by 
announcing his opposition to Mr. Gin- 
grich. received 2 votes Tuesday. 

An attempt by the minority Demo- 
crats to postpone the vote on the speak- 
ership until the ethics committee’s de- 
cision on a punishment for Mr. Gingrich 
predictably failed. 

Asked how Mr. Clinton would work 
with the new House, the presidential 
spokesman, Michael McCurry, said: 
“There’s a lot of work 10 do. Tbe pres- 
ident looks forward to doing iL” 

The ethics committee begins work 
Wednesday on the punishment phase of 
the investigation.Two Republican mem- 
bers of the committee. Porter Goss of 
Florida and Steve Schiff of New Mex- 
ico, said Monday that the panel would 
provide no embarrassing surprises, in- 
dicating they would favor a simple rep- 
rimand fa Mr. Gingrich, which would 
allow him to retain the speakership. 


find. But even in that 1 learned a very 
important lesson. You never walk into a 
situation and believe that you know bet- 
ter than the natives. You have to listen 
and look around. Otherwise you can 
make some very serious mistakes.” 

Mr. Annan got his first look at the rest 
of the country the following summer in a 
new Rambler station wagon, the gift of 
George Romney, then president of 
American Motors and later governor of 
Michigan. With gasoline supplied free 
by a major oil company, he and other 
students — Sri Lantern, Greek, British 
and American — along with a faculty 
guide, Harry Morgan, director of the 
international journalism program, set 
out across the United States as “am- 
bassadors for friendship” — a grandiose 
title invented by Mr. Morgan, a former 
journalist at Reader’s Digest. 

“We stayed with families that were 
very comfortable," Mr. Annan said. 
“We stayed with sharecroppers. We 
even attempted to stay in jail at Dodge 
City just to see the conditions.” Turned 
down by a warden who said that in his 32 
years on the job nobody had ever asked 
to be locked up, they slept at the Sal- 
vation Army instead. 

“We did get into situations in some of 
die Southern states where they did not 
want to serve us because of the mixed 
jup,” he said. “In Las Vegas, the Sri 
was told he couldn't use the 
pooL He was extremely upset. But gen- 
erally people were hospitable.” 

“In the ’60s. I saw a very generous 
people.' ’ he said of his first acquaintance 
with Americans, in contrast to what he 
sometimes observes now. “Wien I see 
groups emerging that are so self- 
centered, so determined to keep out 
everybody, in a nation of immigrants — 
this distrust of people who are different 
— it is difficult to explain. ’ * 

But Mr. Annan is far from uncritical 
of his native continent. On a visit to 
Ghana with his family over Christinas, 
he lectured the Ghanaian Parliament on 
the importance of the rule of law and the 
careful exercise of power. 

“I will try very hard to solve the 
problems of the continent.” he said. 
“Bui for assistance to be effective, these 
governments must get their own house in 
order. They should open their political 
systems. TTiey should take steps to re- 
duce if not eliminate corruption. In a 
way, I think that comes with the opening 
of the economy.” 

Mr. Annan, who was bom into a prom- 
inent family among the Fame people of 
Ghana's Ashanti region, has worked as 
an international civil servant at the 
United Nations for most of his career. He 
has a reputation there as a level-headed 
and humane administrator. 

Mr. Annan intends to move quickly to 
open access and encourage discussion in 
the organization, which was run in a 
more hierarchical style by his prede- 
cessor, Boutros Boutros GhaJi. 

“Tbe building will breathe with in- 
formation,” said Mr. Annan’s spokes- 
man, Frederic EckharcL 


EUROPE: Dutch Pledge to Press Reform 


jlir.b*Kinrt rvr*« 


Jacques San ter, left, tbe EC president, and Who Kok, tbe Dutch prime minister, at The Hague 00 T uesday. 


Continued from Page 1 

For Mr. Kok, the success of the reform 
talks hinge on French-German proposals 
for increased flexibility that would en- 
able groups of EU countries to adopt 
common policies without hindrance 
from reluctant partners. Such flexibility 
will be vital to ensuring the Union's 
capacity 10 act if it takes in as many as 10 
new members from Eastern Europe. 

Unfortunately for the Dutch, after 
nine months of negotiations most EU 
capitals remain divided on how to put 
that flexibility into practice, and are di- 
vided on other reforms as well. 

Virtually all members but Britain 
agree in principle that Europe must cur- 
tail national vetoes and make more de- 
cisions by majority vote to prevent 
policy gridlock. In practice, few are will- 
ing to suggest where to start. As Hans 


van Mierio, the Dutch foreign minister, 
put it, the prevailing attitude is * ‘yes, we 
want more majority voting, but not in my 
backyard.” 

Tbe Dutch themselves are on the de- 
fensive over proposals advanced by 
France and Germany to enhance the 
voting power of large states at the ex- 
pense of smaller countries, and to strip 
some countries of their seat at the com- 
mission, the EU executive agency. 

Jockeying over monetary union also 
is likely to intensify during the Dutch 
presidency, a point that was driven home 
when Finance Minister Gerriti Zalm ap- 
peared to rule Spain and Italy out of 
contention fora single currency in 1 999, 
saying the euro “must start with a small 
group of countries to give it the nec- 
essary credibility." 

Conscious of die pitfalls. Mr. van 
Mierio will tour EU capitals soon in a bid 
to accelerate the intergovernmental con- 
ference on EU reform, or IGC, as it is 


MARKET: Big Questions Greet Proposed to Invest a Large Part of the Social Security Trust Fund in Stocks 


Conffimed from Page 1 

ana J 401(k) plan, the tax-deferred 
lenient accounts that millions of 
tors now manage for themselves, 
1 the sawiest investors reaping die 
;est rewards when they reach 65. 
he lobbying will be fierce. Wall 
et is ecstatic at the idea that billions 
1 baikfljsrnfiijollars that today are 
sled only hr government securities 
bt suddenly fuel the stock market. Its 
usiasm is hardly without self-in- 
st. GT fund manages are permitted to 
r fust 1 percent & management fees, 
juJd mean new. WaH Street revenues 
>10 billion to $40 billion' & year in 
j, andfar more after that. ■ 
abof unions say that it is not only 
f to rely on volatile markets, but that 
also a sunroder of the guarantees 

the Social Security system has come 

present. '•■.••• 


But what of die conflict of interest 
inherent in any system that places the 
most influential single market force, the 
federal government, in the position of 
being the single largest investor? Some 
officials say the conflict of interest is 
more theoretical than real. After all, bil- 
lions in state pension funds, and even 
some federal pension money, are already 
invested in tbe stock market. 

And so is the future of any politician 
who can count electoral votes. Just ask. 
President Bill Clinton, who abandoned 
many of the promises of his first cam- 
paign when it became apparent (hat the 
markets were dem an d in g fiscal discip- 
line. It was a risfcy.strattgy that, his aides 
said, paid off tremendously in Novem- 
ber- “People dismissed Bob Dole's ar- 
gument that the economy was in terrible 
share,” a top aide said, “because they 
knew that everyone was making money 
jn the market.” 


But others around Mr. Clinton note 
that pouring Social Security money into 
the markets would turn what has for 
decades been a close interconnection 
between Washington and Wall Street 
into an iron link. 

Market reactions, they say. are always 
a consideration in major government 
decisions. But they could loom over 
such decisions if the president, for ex- 
ample, was advised that the cost of send- 
ing troops to secure die peace on the 
Korean Peninsula might be a sell-off foal 
every U.S. worker would see reflected 
on statements that spelled out the value 
Of their “Personal Security Account.” 

“It's a serious question,” said an 
economist at Salomon Brothers, John 
.Lipsky. 

‘ "If you have the national government 
making decisions that will influence fi- 
nancial markets and if the government is 
directly involved in investing in those 


markets, it will undoubtedly affect de- 
cisions.” he said. 

The details of the advisory report 
aside, there are some areas of broad 
agreement whenever Washington 
policymakers take up tbe electric issue 
of messing with Social Security. 

But as soon as the subject’ turns to 
stock investment, tbe consensus fails 
Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin, 
former investment banker, has said 
many times he has “substantial con- 
cerns” about putting the sole source of 
retirement income for much of America 
at the mercies of the stock market 

Today, the Social Security trust fund 
earns a rate of return of 2.3 percent after 
inflation. Historically, the stock market 
has a rate of return of 7 percent. The 
difference, compounded over decades, 
is huge. But to some degree tbe national 
psychology is affected by the fact that 
die market has risen so dramatically. 


with only one major interruption, for 15 
years. That psychology could be rad- 
ically changed by a prolonged downturn. 
And if Social Security recipients were 
losing billions for several years, the 
pressure on the recipients of government 
bailouts would undoubtedly mourn. 

Some on tbe commission, including 
Thomas Jones, president of TIAA- 
CREF, which manages $180 billion in 
retirement money for professors and re- 
searchers, wonder whether the govern- 
ment or Social Security recipients 
should be put in that bind. 

“To me the bottom line is that half of 
America's workers have no other pen- 
sion plan,” Mr. Jones said. “Those are 
tbe people who absolutely need Social 
Security, with a guarantee. How rea- 
sonable is it to take away the guarantee, 
but say to them, ‘You can make it up 
with investing acumen?' It's just not 
appropriate to put them at risk.’’ 


known. 

But for many observers, the lack of 
consensus suggests that the conference 
will produce only modest changes, and 
that tbe prospects of deeper integration 
rest mainly with the single currency. 

"At best, the IGC will produce an 
environment that will facilitate mon- 
etary union and expansion.” said Ver- 
non Weaver, the U.S. chief delegate to 
the European Union. “And that's at best. 
At worst, maybe it won’t get in the 
way.” 


ETTA Claims Blasts in Santander 

The Associated Press 

SANTANDER, Spain — The armed 
Basque separatist group ETA took respon- 
sibility for planting a bomb at the base of 
an electricity pylon here Tuesday. 

The bomb, which was defused by police 
before it could explode, was discovered 
one day after tbe group claimed three small 
explosions that damaged electric lines. 



PACE 8 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 



licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


rUDLUHkD wmi THE W(l lURk TIMES AMD THE WASHINGTON post 


Delinquent Diplomats 


Thanks to a treaty that every nation 
respects, no diplomat serving abroad 
can be arrested or tried foracrime ina 
host country. This “diplomatic im- 
munity" benefits the United States as 
much as anyone. It meant during the 
Cold War that the Soviet Union could 
not drum up some charge and toss an 
embassy employee, or spouse or child, 
into a KGB cell. It means today thaL 
when a U.5. diplomat angers Cuba by 
reaching out to political dissidents. 
Cuba can ask her to leave but cannot 
throw her into jail. It reduces, but does 
not eliminate, the risks for diplomats 
who promote U.S. interests in hostile 
or authoritarian nations. 

Periodically, this worthy desire to 
protect diplomats collides with an 
equally legitimate belief that no one 
should be above the law. A most egre- 
gious case took place Friday nighL 
. when the second -ranking diplomat in 
the embassy of Georgia caused a traffic 
accident that took the life of a 1 6-year- 
old Kensington girl. Joviane Waltrick. 
The diplomat. George Makharadze, re- 
portedly ran a stop sign while driving 
extremely fast near Dupont Circle. Al- 
cohol may have been a factor, ac- 
cording to police. 

A second recent case, while not tra- 
gic in its results, also has inflamed 
emotions. Two diplomats assigned to 
the Unired Nations in New York, one 
Russian and one from Belarus, en- 
gaged in an altercation with New York 
policemen. Both nations have filed 
complaints with the U.S. State De- 
partment, alleging rough treatment. 
But New York Mayor Rudolph Giu- 
liani says that the two had parked at a 
fire hydrant and, when challenged by 
police, arte m pied to drive away, al- 
though they appeared to be intoxicated. 
The car they were driving had received 
386 summonses in 1996. Mr. Giuliani 
said — more than one pier day, and ail 
unpaid. Altogether, cars assigned to 
Russia's mission to the United Nations 
had been cited 14.437 times just in the 
first half of 1 996. The mayor called this 
“a backdrop of almost consistent flag- 
rant violations of a host country's rules 
and laws." We would call it arrogant, 
impudent and inexcusable. 


Diplomatic immunity does not 
mean, it should be stressed, thai dip- 
lomats are free to flout a host country’s 
laws. On the contrary. U.S. diplomats 
overseas, and foreign diplomats in 
America, are bound, by the same treaty, 
io obey local rules. When they do not, 
the host country can ask the offender’s 
government to waive diplomatic im- 
munity. Failing that, diplomatic crim- 
inals can only be asked to leave. Zaire's 
ambassador 'to France last month ran 
over two 13-year-old boys in a car 
accident and. despite a protest march 
by thousands of French citizens, went 
home to Zaire unpunished. 

State Department spokesman Nick 
Bums said on Monday that foreign 
countries not infrequently waive dip- 
lomatic immunity for lesser offenses 
committed in America, such as 
shoplifting, but he could not recall a 
case when a foreign nation has allowed 
a diplomat to be held for a serious 
offense such as murder or man- 
slaughter. Nor could U.S. officials cite 
any case in which America has allowed 
its diplomats to be tried overseas. 

Yet in a case as serious as the death 
of Joviane Waltrick — and as un- 
related to any diplomatic duties — 
Georgia should make its representa- 
tives available for a full investigation. 
If it turns out that Mr. Makharadze 
caused the girl's death through drunk 
and negligent driving, Georgia should 
waive his immunity and allow him to 
be suitably punished. 

As to the brazen disregard for local 
law cited by Mayor Giuliani — and 
repeated all too often in Washington as 
well — it should be made clear that 
diplomats who routinely abuse their 
immunity are not welcome in the 
United States. Driving drunk and park- 
ing at fire hydrants endanger the public 
safety. Mr. Bums was correct to defend 
the concept of diplomatic immunity. 
But he also expressed sympathy for its 
victims and promised, in response, “a 
renewed effort to make sure that dip- 
lomats here understand that we expect 
them to obey our laws." The public 
should watch attentively for that re- 
newed effort 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Collect That Uranium 


It does not take much highly en- 
riched uranium to make a small nuclear 
weapon. With a relatively simple bomb 
design, some 6 kilograms (less than 15 
pounds) of such enriched uranium can 
produce a weapon with the explosive 
power of 1,000 tons of TNT. Almost 
that much weapons-grade uranium 
now sits lightly guarded in Georgia, 
one of the newly independent states 
produced by the collapse of the Soviet 
Union in 1991. Russia, which prom- 
ised last September to take possession 
of the material and secure it, ought to 
do so without further delay. 

Georgia has no need for the 4.3 
kilograms of highly enriched uranium 
provided by Moscow early in the de- 
cade to fuel a research reactor no 
longer in use. President Eduard Shev- 
ardnadze says his country lacks the 
financial and technical resources to 
dispose of the uranium, but would hap- 
pily turn it over to the United States or 
Russia. Washington thought ithad won 
agreement from Moscow to take the 
material, but the Russian Ministry of 
Atomic Energy has been slow to ex- 
ecute the plan. A simple directive from 
President Boris Yeltsin or Prime Min- 
ister Viktor Chernomyrdin is needed to 
clear the bureaucratic obstacles. 

Georgia, still reeling from the after- 
shocks of a civil war that broke out 
shortly after independence, is precisely 
the kind of unstable place where nu- 


clear materials should not be stored. It 
is close to Iran and Iraq, two countries 
eager to develop nuclear weapons, and 
not far from Chechnya, until recently 
the site of a brutal war between Rus- 
sian forces and Chechen rebels. 

Rogue states or terrorist groups in- 
tent on making a nuclear weapon 
would not need sophisticated bomb- 
making technology. The primitive 
bomb design used 40 years ago by the 
United States would suffice to fab- 
ricate a crude but destructive weapon 
with not much more than the highly 
enriched uranium in Georgia. 

To speed removal of the uranium, 
the United States offered to pay Geor- 
gia $ 100,000 for the material, roughly 
its market value, and then promised to 
advance Moscow $1 million to cover 
tire cost of moving it. Political leaders 
in Moscow approved the plan, but 
since then it has been blocked by dis- 
putes over how to transport the ma- 
terial and how to dispose of an ad- 
ditional kilogram of spent fuel from the 
Georgian reactor. 

Russian vigilance, American assist- 
ance and a fair amount of good fortune 
have so far kept Russian nuclear 
weapons and materials secure since the 
disintegration of the Soviet Union. 
That record can be preserved if Mos- 
cow moves swiftly to collect Georgia's 
enriched uranium. 

— THE NEVf’ YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Call It a Lucky Country 

You don’t have to be deaf to the 
familiar litany of American problems 
to believe that the i-epublic is doing 
pretty well. The stock market, of 
course, has been astounding. Unem- 
ployment is the lowest it has been for 
decades, and inflation looks tamed. 

In the industries and technologies of 
tomorrow — software, telecommuni- 
cations and advanced materials — 
American companies have a stu- 
pendous lead over their competitors. 

At home, there is a growing sense that 
America is becoming a society divided 
by class. The new economy, where low- 
skilled high-paid jobs are’ shrinking in 
number, places a high premium on edu- 
carion. The difference in iifestvles be- 


tween rich and poor Americans is be- 
coming worryingly wide. 

Abroad, there is a growing sense of 
resentment of American power. Some 
dislike the Disneyfication of the world, 
others the propensity of the United 
States to throw its military weight 
around indiscriminately. 

Those who are richly blessed should 
never think that blessings will always 
come their way. 1 have long thought 
that, like the Australians. Americans 
should think of themselves as having 
not a country which deserves the gifts 
of Providence but, simply, a “lucky 
country." For luck runs out. and the 
chance that it might do so usefully 
keeps people on their toes. 

— Michael Elliott, commenting 
in The Washington Post. 


nTEH\«ins\L 


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Let’s Get Serious and Produce an AIDS Vaccine 


A TLANTA — After a government- 
appointed panel criticized the 
foundering AIDS vaccine effort, the 
U.S. National Institutes of Health last 
month called a brilliant microbiologist 
and Nobel laureate, David Baltimore, 
to the rescue. A newcomer to vaccine 
research, be will become pan -time 
chairman of yet another committee of 
outside advisers. This is unlikely to 
overcome the handicaps of the NIH in 
promptly developing a vaccine.' 

A vaccine is the only long-term solu- 
tion for the epidemic. 

The critical step for making an AIDS 
vaccine, growing the virus in a test 
tube, was discovered 13 years ago. Yet 
the NIH has been unable to bring any 
vaccine into testing to see if it works on 
humans. It still has no senior official 
with the necessary experience whose 
only responsibility is to produce an 
AIDS vaccine as soon as possible. 

History teaches that a different kind 
of organization should run an expedited 
vaccine program in the face of a public 
health emergency. Recall Jonas Salk's 
struggle to develop a vaccine for polio 
in the early 1950s. 

By 1949, John Enders and col- 
leagues had grown the polio virus in 
test tubes, ana were recognized with a 
Nobel prize. Dr. Salk applied this dis- 
covery in developing a vaccine. 


By Brace G. Weniger 
and Max Essex 

But Dr. Enders, along with Albeit 
Sabin and other eminent polio research- 
ers. fought to stop trials of the Salk 
vaccine. Scientific orthodoxy dictated 
that it would not work well enough, if at 
all. Galling Dr. Salk’s vaccine "quack- 
ery" and "kitchen chemistry,” they 
favored waiting for an ideal vaccine. 

The independent March of Dimes, 
whose principal mission was to stop 
polio, courageously put the Salk vac- 
cine to the test anyway. On April 12, 
2955, the headlines announced to an 
expectant world "It Works!” 

The Sabin oral polio vaccine came 
into use around 1 962, but availability of 
the Salk vaccine seven years earlier 
saved tens of thousands of lives. 

The saga of the polio vaccine il- 
lustrates the difference between the the- 
orists of academic science and the em- 
piricists of applied research. The 
theorists leisurely pursue new know- 
ledge to build models to explain the 
complexity of nature and pertiaps offer 
elegant solutions. The empiricists apply 
knowledge to seek pragmatic answers 
to urgent public health problems. 

These are complementary ap- 
proaches, but the AIDS vaccine effort 


is impeded by the NIH culture, which 
undervalues applied research. 

An impasse arose in June 1994, 
when the NIH halted plans to conduct 
human trials of the first generation of 
bio-engineered AIDS vaccines, over- 
ruling its own vaccine advisory panel. 
Ri ght years and $100 million of in- 
dustry inves tmen t had gone into these 
vaccines. They had successfully pro- 
tected chimpanzees from HIV, and 
were found safe for humans. _ 

Theorists opposed to trials criticized 
die vaccines based on fashionable but 
unproved theories for predicting 
whether an AIDS vaccine will work. 
Some feared that money for vaprine 
trials would be taken from their re- 
search progr ams and from studies of 
treatments and a cure. 

Empiricists favored trials to deter- 
mine if and how well the vaccines mijjght 
work. Vaccine development is a tnal- 
and-error process that requires cautious 

human studies to test designs and revise 
them accordingly. “You have no 
chance of success," Dr. Salk once said, 
"unless you are willing to fatL" 

The decision putting into limbo these 
AIDS vaccines sent shock waves 
through the biotechnology and phar- 
maceutical industries. Biogen, Bristol- 
Myers and Merck and Repligen re- 
portedly dropped their vaccine pro- 


tacts Chiron Bioctne Genentech and 
Therion Biologies scaled bade. _ 

Now then: are but afew vaccintsm 
development One unmed arategy that 
could have began aerate ago isa 
"killed whole virus design — used 

for vaccines to prevent vmtous human 

diseases and a form of AIDS m eats. 
The NIH does an owistandirw job m- 



develop a vaccine — - 

single-purpose organization, its director 
should be an accomplished vaccine sci- 
entist or pharmaceutical research man- 
ager, working closely with industry to 
pursue all potential vaccine strategies. 

The consensus among scientists 
today is that an effective vaccine to 
prevent AIDS is possible. John 
Kennedy galvanized America by set- 
ting a deadline to reach the moon. Bill 
Clinton could join with other world 
leaders to set a goal w develop an AIDS 
vaccine by the 50th anniversary of the 
Salk polio vaccine in 2005. 

Bruce G. Weniger is a member of tie 
Presidential Advisory Council on HIV 
and AIDS. Max Essex is a professor of 
virology at Harvard University and 
chairman of the Harvard AIDS Insti- 
tute. They contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


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Thailand Needs Political Reform and Economic Discipline 


1 for celebration of the golden 
jubilee of King Bhumipors ac~ 


jg ANGKOK — Last year was 

cession, and of Thailand’s dra- 
matic progress in those 50 years. 
This year the country must face 
up to harsh political and eco- 
nomic realities. 

Decisions in the coming 
months will help determine 
whether Thailand sustains its 
freewheeling mix of economic 
growth, parliamentary system 
and social development, or be- 
gins to slide into the mire of 
foreign debt and political con- 
fusion once associated with 
Latin America. 

Thailand's track record, its 
pragmatism and its open eco- 
nomy support an optimistic 
view, but nothing can be taken 
for granted. 

On the political front, the 
whole country knows that there 
is something seriously flawed 
about die Thai system, however 
democratic it may appear. That 
was shown by the performance 
of the late, unlamented govern- 
ment led by Banham Silpa- 


By Philip Bo wring 


Areha. and by the money-dom- 
inated electoral process that re- 
cendy brought to power a co- 
alition beaded by former General 
Chavalit Yongchaiyudh- 

Now there is a chance to do 
something about it. A Consti- 
tution Drafting Assembly has 
been set up to propose changes. 
All parties piously aver that the 
object is to make money less of 
a factor in getting elected, and to 
make it harder for members of 
Parliament from the governing 
parties to use public position to 
recoup their investment. 

One popular suggestion is to 
change from multi-member 
constituencies to a mix of 
single-member constituencies 
ana proportional party repres- 
entation, which would reduce 
the influence of small parties 
and regional factions. Others 
are to reduce the links between 
executive and legislature, and 
limit political spending. 

The constitutional assembly, 
elected by Pariiamenr on Dec. 


26, has got off to a difficult start 
The government has been widely 
accused of packing it with its 
own supporters, who have min- 
imal interest in major change, at 
the expense of expert and in- 
dependent members. Much will 
now depend on who chairs die 
body and whether toe views of 
respected members such as 
former Prime Minister Anand 
Panyarachun can outweigh the 
self-interests of the parties. 

Failure to improve the quality 
of democratic politics and re- 
verse the prevalence of greed 
and thuggery in government 
could bring forward toe day 
when ambitious generals again 
pose as saviors of the nation 
from chaos and corruption. Con- 
stitutional change is no panacea, 
but is an important symboL 

The current government will 
meanwhile be tested on whether 
it has the courage to face up to 
another year of relatively low 
economic growth that will cause 
casualties in the financial sector. 


The alternative is to muddle 
along hoping that something 
will tom up to ease the country’s 
biggest economic problem, its 
current account deficit 

This has been r unnin g at 8.2 
percent of GDP and shows 
scant signs of falling to the 5 
percent earlier deemed to be 
sustainable. The present level 
— $15 billion a year in real 
money — is sustainable so long 
as fickle markets do not worry 
about it. With gross debt 
(mostly bank Loans) now 
around $90 billion and likely to 
surpass $100 billion in 1997, 
markets may get fidgety. 

For now, official forecasts 
are for GDP growth to pick up 
to 7 percent this year while the 
current account deficit declines 
mar ginall y. This would hardly 
amount to the "austerity" be- 
ing promised. 

If the Bank of Thailand does . 
what it knows is right and keeps 
interest rates high, GDP and toe 
deficit will be significantly 
lower fh.-m forecast — and vari- 
ous property and finance 


ipanies 

that has happened, interest rates 
can foil — and the stock market 
will begin to recover from a 
four-year low. But it will burL 

Such strong medicine may be 
difficult for a poputi st-minded 
government in which leading 
bankers play a key role. Years 
of excessive credit, particularly 
to real estate, financed by too 
easy access to foreign loans, are 
at toe root of Thailand’s eco- 
nomic problems. Bankers nat- 
urally may prefer to try to en- 
gineer a soft landing for the . 
financial sector, using fiscal# 
rather than monetary policies. 

Thailand's sustainable GDP 
growth rale is now closer to 6 
than 8 percent. The sooner that 
is accepted by the government, 
the more likely that Thailand 
will remain in charge of its own 
economic destiny rather than 
face foreign financial market 
dictates. Likewise, the survival 
of toe political system will be 
determined by its ability to re- 
form itself. 

International Herald Tribune. 


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It’s the Palestinian Side That Blocks Agreement on Hebron 


N EW YORK — Western 
journalism last week 
grasped a reality about Israeli- 
Arab negotiations that had been 
known to Arab, Israeli and 
Western diplomats for at least a 
month: The delay in signing a 
Hebron agreement is due far 
more to Yasser Arafat *s strategy 
than to Benjamin Netanyahu’s. 

When Mr. Arafat's latest 
roadblock made that clear, he 
made an important statement: 
' ‘There are more burning issues 
than signing the agreement" 
Exactly — and he has known 
this all along. But for three 
months the issue of how and 
when the Israelis should pull 
out of the last major West Bank 


By A.M. Rosenthal 


town not yet turned over to toe 
Palestinians has been blown up 
by toe West and the Arabs as 
desperately critical. 

The hype was started in Oc- 
tober by President Bill Clinton, 
who declared it his top Mideast 
priority. Not Saddam Hussein, 
Turkey or Iran. Hebron. The 
atmosphere of do-or-die crisis 
smothered the central reality of 
Arab-Israeli relations. 

No agreement on Israeli 
evacuation of a particular town 
or patch of countryside can 
bring peace unless conditions 
for peace can be met. They are 
enduring security, reciprocity 


and national commitments to 
move toward peace, not use toe 
agreement to mount more pres- 
sures, more threats. This is not a 
sudden revelation but at least a 
half-century old. 

The world sees sets of Israeli- 
Arab negotiations as snapshots, 
unrelated to each other. They are 
really like a continuous motion 
picture, played over and over. 

First it showed Arab states 
answering Israel's creation by 
vowing to fight it to the death — 
toe real story line. Scene after 
scene then showed Arabs fol- 
lowing armistices by military 
and economic pressures. 


Yes , Russia as an American Ally 


W ASHINGTON — While 
Russia and the West 
quarrel noisily over NATO 
expansion, pro* Westerners in 
Russia have been plugging for 
a way out in which both sides 
win — by having Russia itself 
join NATO. Now they need 
the West to show that it is 
genuinely interested in having 
Russia as an ally. 

Ever since 1991. toe top 
Russian leadership has in- 
cluded people who are called 
"Atlanticists," meaning that 
they recognize the Atlantic 
grouping as the core of the 
international system and want 
Russia to join iL They have 
come to advocate political 
membership for Russia in 
NATO — that is, joining the 
North Atlantic Council — as 
the step which makes the most 
sense ai this time. 

This would not yet mean 
membership in the integrated 
command of NATO, since 
many military people on both 
sides are still afraid of thaL 
But it would provide Russia 
with the basic status of an ally, 
one that is seriously consulted 
and not marginalized. 

Once that was done, Russia 
would no longer have any ob- 
jection to other countries join- 
ing NATO. 

Ivan Rybkin. who replaced 
Alexander Lebed as head of 
the Russian Security Council, 
proposed this solution in 
November. He has been sup- 
ported by Yuri Baturin, the 
head of the Russian Defense 
Council, and opposed by the 
foreign minister. Yevgeni Pri- 
makov, who is the leading 


By Ira Straus 


neutralist in Moscow. The 
government is thus split toe 
two top councils are for polit- 
ical membership in NATO, 
the foreign minister against 

In fact, this understates the 
extent of support in Russia for 
joining NATO. Polls show 
that far more Russians view 
the West as an ally than as an 
enemy. Many people in the 
Foreign Ministry itself would 
quietly favor joining NATO. 

What the neutralists argue is 
not that this would be undesir- 
able but that it is impossible 
because toe West is not in- 
terested They add that it is 
counterproductive to raise the 
idea, since it makes Russia look 
weak and undercuts its oppo- 
sition to NATO expansion. 

If the West responds favor- 
ably to toe Russian feelers on 
joining NATO, the anti-West- 
ern ere will be discredited, and 
many neutralists will come 
over to the Western side. 

Rejecting these feelers risks 
just the opposite — vindic- 
ating the anti-Western forces, 
and discrediting the pro-West- 
ern ones. 

Unfortunately, so far the 
West has ignored Russian ges- 
tures. When the secretary- 
general of NATO. Javier So- 
latia, was asked about them, 
he brushed the matter off with 
toe remark that Russia has not 
submitted a formal applica- 
tion to join NATO. But the 
fact is that a formal applica- 
tion at this moment could do 
damage to relations, since 


NATO hasn't even prepared 
itself to respond favorably. 

Andrei Kortunov, a leading 
Atlanticist among toe foreign 
policy experts in Moscow, 
was one of the major sources 
of toe Rybkin overture. Now 
that Mr. Rybkin has made the 
proposal publicly several 
times, he feels that it is es- 
sential for the West to give a 
favorable response. 

‘ ‘After all/’ he wrote to me 
on Dec. I, leading neutralists 
in Moscow “argue that it is 
the West that would not accept 
Russia in NATO.” 

At this critical juncture, the 
West needs to do three thing s: 

( 1 ) wake up and accept in prin- 
ciple the idea of including 
Russia as a member of the 
political organs of NATO in 
some form: ( 2 ) respond in a 
positive way to Mr. Rybkin’s 
trial balloon; and (3) begin 
serious discussions with Rus- 
sia on the subject 

To wake itself up, toe West 
needs to discuss the issue on a 
public level, outside of the 
channels that would reduce 
everything to a sterile ex- 
change of notes. 

This is a matter of high 
drama, not bureaucratic man- 
euver. We in the West will be 
able to make good on our op- 
tion of having Russia as an 
ally only if our leaders and our 
people become fully aware 
that we have the option. 

The writer. US. coordinator 
of the Committee on Eastern 
Europe and Russia in NATO, 
contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post. 


After Israel returned to Egypt 
toe huge Sinai Desert, captured 
in 1967 during one of the Arab 
wars against Israel. Egyptians 
made the agreed peace so nasty 
that it became not even cold 
peace but cold war. 

In 1 994, when toe Labor gov- 
ernment offered to return the 
Golan Heights to Syria, the lo- 
cal dictator recoiled in horror az 
the price: real peace. 

Now Mr. Netanyahu, at great 
political risk, is going along 
with toe Hebron turnover. 

He did not get all the security 
guarantees he wanted. But 
Natan Sharansky, the former 
Soviet freedom fighter and one 
of the most respected members 
of the Netanyahu cabinet, tells 
me that Israel got enough so that 
he can vote for the agreement. 
He adds that toe new Arafat 
condition, an automatic time- 
table for more withdrawals 
without regard to Palestinian 
conduct, cannot be accepted. 

Ever since his election, Arab 
reaction to Mr. Netanyahn has 
been revealing. The Egyptians 
distribute a sewer frill of vile 
articles about him. hi general, 
the Arab world acts as if Israelis 
had no right to change govern- 
ments, not unless the new one 
pleases them. The world nods in 
sympathy with Arab anger. 

Mr. Arafat is co ntinuing a 
tested and often successful 
policy — concentrate Western 
and Arab pressure bard a 
Israel when it displeases 


or resists their demands. Count 
on pressure, and terrorism, to 
soften IsraeL Then move on — 
next scene, same movie. 

Mr. Netanyahu has his own 
He wants to show the r 


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world be is negotiating in good 
faith, even within an Oslo 
agreement that he and his sup- 
porters distrust 

If Palestinians return the 
good faith, fine for alL If not, 
Mr. Netanyahu will theoretic- 
ally be free to say that Oslo did 
not work, and to insist oa 
something new: getting some- 
thing for something, like ac- 
ceptable security and boundar- 
ies. and tangible reciprocity, 
not uncashable IOUs. 

Meanwhile, he is subduing 
his own political personality 
and emphasis on of Palestinian 
noncompliance. There is a limit 
to how long he can do that. 

Mr. Netanyahu 's strategy has 
the United States in mind, per- 
haps too much. If it works, there 
can. be another party on toe 
White House lawn. If not, Mr. 
Clinton should give the Israeli 
leader something better. He can 
take U.S. pressure off Is rae l to 
sign agreements that cannot 
lead to peace. 

And he can back two out oft* 
toe three conditions for peace’ 
that Mr. Netanyahu outlined to 
Congress: security and recipro- 
city. The third, a democracy as 
negotiating partner, re mains of 
course a fantasy. 

The New York Times. 


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IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEabs Ann 


■ 


1897: Pulitzer Loses 

ST. LOUZS, Mo. — The Su- 
preme Court of toe State of Mis- 
souri decided against Mr, Joseph 

Pulitzer in the suit brought by 
him to regain control of the Post- 
Dispatch, which is held by Col- 
onel Charles H. Jones until 1901 

In 1894 the Post-Dispatch had 
senously declined in circulation, 

and Mr. Pulitzer turned to Col- 
onel Jones as toe man best fitted 
to retrieve matters, and made 
mm editor and manager. Col onel 
Jones soon put toe paper on its 
again, but Mr. Pulitzer still 
held toe majority of the stock and 
?™gh a Board of Directors 
toed to regain control 

1922s Irish Treaty 

DUBLIN — Ireland's treaty for 
its association with toe commu- 
nity of nations known as toe Brit- 
ish Commonwealth was ratified 
by 64 to 57. A provisio nal Gov- 
entoienL with Griffito and 


Collins as heads, proceeded m 
form. Collins made an apjpeal fee 
toe support of afl, to which De 
Valera replied: “We stood to- 
gether for four years” — and col- 
lapsed mto a chair, no longer 
being able to sneak. During Ire- 
land s new birth into liberty 
within the DaiL, Du blin and the 
country at large received it with 
every manifestation of joy. 

1947s Poland Warned 

WASHINGTON He United 
St^e« accused Poland of foiling 
promise to arrange 
«>r free elections, appealing to 
Russia apd Britain to join toe 
SSHf* A* least one-sixth of toe 
total Poli sh electorate will have 
no real choice in the January 19 
etecuonsbeeause the Left-wing 
bloc m the government has re- 
resedtte opposition, toe Polish 
“®sant party, die right to put up 
h ?® 5 “ *ose areas which 
^ Peasant 
party strongholds. 


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OPINION/LETTERS 


% 


For Peace in the Balkans, 
Indict Milosevic Now 

By Paul K. Wifliams and Norman Cigar 

?^ c< ^^ Sert ^ w a r criminals, 

Ki^SBSsS' SSB&ffiSfiSSS 
iErS?™ 2 SB35»J!JS: 

tiiat Mr. Milosevic is not the key 
to peace in the former Yugoslavia, 
but is rather the lock on the door. 

In trying to unlock that door, die 
United States most remember that 
m December 1992 the Depart- 
ment of State identified Mr. WB- 
tosevic as primarily responsible 
the c omm i s sion of war crimes 
in the f earner Yugoslavia. 

The United Stales, now more 
than ever, needs to support an 
investigation into Mr. Milosevic's 
responsibility for some of the 
worn war crimes in Europe since 
World War IL To sweep this issoe 


* 


jmiouuuuwj ouiura 

controlled by him committed gen- 
ocide. 

• Complicity. Mr. Milosevic 
aided the . commission of war 
crimes by directing Serbian Re- 
public forces and agencies under 
his control, including Serbia's 
Ministry of Defense and Ministry 
of Internal Affairs, to assist the 
orga ni z a tion and operation of Ser^ 
• bran paramilitary armies such as 
.Arfcan’s Tigers, Vppslav Seselj’s 
ChetmksandMnioJovjc’sWfrite 
Eagles. Specifically, h was Mr. 
Milosevic who provided these 
. paramilitary- . armies with 
weapons, training, money and 
w»?«spuiis issoe transportation to Bosnia, where 
under the rug of diplomacy will focywerc encouraged toslaughter 
untKiinme the deterrent value of civilians in areas secured by the 
justice, and calls for individual regular army. 
reve nge by ibb victims will be . • Command responsibility. Fi- 
^ Tbe genume peace nally. Mr. Milosevic may be in- 
we au seek from the Dayton ac- dieted on his overall command 
cmtx ana democracy in Serbia -responsibility for the Yugoslav 

■ — j r - j i r. 



Doctor-Aided Suicide: 
The Last Right 

By Ellen Goodman 




7- will be the victims of Amer- 
ica’s reluctance to act. 

An indictment of Mr. Milo- 
sevic can be sought on these 
grounds: 

• Direct responsibility. 
Whenever the Western powers, 

- under the leadership of the United 
. States, decide to act on their war 

- crimes rhetoric, they may rely 
upon the International War 

• Crimes Tribunal in Tbe Hague, 
' which, though its previoos pursuit 


Army and federal farces thar tried 
to carry out his plans for an eth- 
nically pure Greater Serbia. As 
the dominant member of the r — 
that controls tbe Yugoslav j 

— the Yugoslav Supreme 

itary Council, and its successor, 
the Supreme Defense Council — 
Mr. Milosevic was obligated un- 
der international law to prevent 
his forces from committing or en- 
couraging and enabling others to 
commit warcrimes. 


Unfortunately, ' the United 
States continues to delude itself 
that Mr. Milosevic is the only 
individual capable of ensuring 
that the Bosnian Serbs deliver on 
tbeir Dayton promises. U.S. 
policy makers simply ignore that 
none of-foe provisions of tbe 
Dayton agreement have truly been 
put into effect, aside from the 
tasks directly attributable to the 
NATO peace force. 

The obvious reason for this fail- 
ure is that although it was in Mr. 
Milosevic's interest to sign the 
Dayton agreement to avoid lc 
the war and to secure the lifting < 


sanctions, it is not in his interest to 

promote respect for human rights, 
& strong Bosnian government, and 
certainly not the arrest and ex- 
tradition of war criminals. 

It can no longer be business as 
usual for the West Mr. Milo- 
sevic’s responsibility far war 
crimes, coupled with his outright 
contempt for basic democratic 
principles, most be met with re- 
newed economic sanctions and 
diplomatic isolation. 

As the Belgrade demonstra- 
tions continue, the United States 
must recognize that the key to 
Dayton accords and 


assuring peace and democracy in 
the former Yugoslavia is not held 
by a war criminal. Instead, that 
key will be found by assisting the 
forces seeking to change Mr. Mi- 
losevic's increasingly illegitimate 
and repressive regime. 

Mr. Williams is a senior as- 
sociate at the Carnegie Endow- 
ment for International Peace. Mr. 
Cigar is professor of national se- 
curity studies ax the US. Marine 
Corps School of Advanced 
Warfighting. They contributed 
this comment to the International 
Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Croatia Responds 

The article “Croatian Chief 
Puts U^S. in the Doghouse” fDec. 

^ 23) inaccurately represents the 
state of relations between Croatia 
- and the United States and mis- 
represents the dements tint were 
considered relevant in the de- 
cision by Croatian Airlines to 
choose airplanes from Airbus 
over Boeing. 

Since foe United States recog- 
nized Croatia in April 1992. our 
bilateral relations have grown in 
scope and scale. Croatia firmly 
believes that the United States re- 
mains an indispensable nation in 


the evohdng hot often turbulent 
world order; the evidence for tins 
is overwhelming. Therefore. Croa- 
tia has and will continue to play a 
constructive rate in extending the 
European zone of peace and sta- 
bility, and the noons of Western 
cmhzatioa and democratic som- 
dards, in cooperation with the 
United States and NATO. . . 

The two presidential trade and 
business missions that came to 
Croatia last year, and meetings 
between the highest representa- 
tives of our countries, including 
very successful meetings between 
President Franjo Tudjman and 
Resident BiQ Clinton, exemplify 


the steady growth of our rela- 
tions. 

Tbe decision by Croatia Air- 
lines to purchase Airbus airplanes 
was based on commercial con- 
siderations, not Mr. Tudjman 's 
'“disaffection'* with the United 
States. Without gening into the 
details, the Airbus offer, with ad- 
ditional arrangements, provided 
more lucrative opportunities for 
Croatia’s inclusion in internation- 
al economic currents. 

MIOMIRZUZUL. 

Washington. 

The writer is Croatia’s ambas- 
sador to the United States. 


EU Interference 

Regarding “The EU Is Showing 
Its Interventionist Colors " by Re- 
ginald Dale (Nov. 19): 

Thank you, Reginald Dale, for 
daring to acknowledge tbe EU’s 
penchant for socialistic interven- 
tion. The arguments put forward 
are the commonplace of political 
debate in Britain, but rarely beard 
elsewhere in Europe. Perhaps the 
censorship and propaganda that 
have been harnessed to ensure the 
intellectual hijack of Europe has 
done the nick. That it hasn't si- 
lenced debate in Britain, however, 
is not surprising — it tested EU- 


style socialism to destruction dur- 
ing the 1970s. 

London's constant objections 
to the Brussels regulators are in- 
deed tiresome for everyone. Bri- 
tons included. But they are right 
economically, politically, morally 
and philosophically in ways that 
all the propaganda in the world 
cannot change. An EU in which 
socialistic regulation is imposed 
by diktat cm free peoples with no 
democratic or legal check is an 
EU worth dismantling — or, fail- 
ing that leaving before the in- 
evitable implosion. 

MICHAEL TAYLOR. 

York. England. 


B OSTON — By any defini- 
tion, these must be called 
landmark cases. They are de- 
scribed in just these terms of law 
and topography by everyone in- 
volved. 

This Wednesday, lawyers and 
doctors, patients and plaintiffs 

MEANWmJE " 

will carry the subject of death and 
dying over rough ethical and con- 
stitutional terrain into the U.S. Su- 
preme Court They will be asking 
the justices to point out a path 
across a treacherous landscape. 

The question arriving at the 
court from opposite ends of the 
country is whether a state can ban 
doctor-assisted suicide. Can it 
prohibit medical treatment that 
will bring the death of a com- 
petent, terminally ill patient? 

These cases may come from 
New York and Washington state, 
but the issue comes directly from 
tbe frontier of medical technology 
— the place where science “ad- 
vances,” and the rest of us trip 
along behind, struggling to keep 
pace and to keep control. 

Not that long ago, death came as 
naturally as a vuus or as childbirth. 
Today we live longer and die 
slower. We live with the images of 
breathing machines and feeding 
tubes, and the knowledge that there 
can be a fate worse than death. 

Understanding this, the Su- 
preme Court has acknowledged 
that competent patients must have 
the right to stop medical treatment. 
But now the highest court is being 
asked: Is there a crucial difference 
between stopping the treatment 
that is keeping a terminally ill pa- 
tient alive and providing foe drug 
that will hasten her death? Enough 
of a difference to turn a doctor who 
provides such assistance into a 
criminal? 

In Washington state, an appeals 
court struck down such a ban on 
the ground that it violated a fun- 
damental liberty. As Harvard Law 
School's Laurence Tribe will ar- 
gue; “For the state to deny the 
person the right to decide they’ve 
had enough suffering, or dial they 
don't want to spend their last days 
unconscious, is to deny them the 
only rights that are left. If one 
doesn’t have this liberty, one has 
no liberty." 

In New York, a second appeals 
court ruled against a similar ban. 


but this time on tbe grounds that it 
unfair ly discriminated between 
two kinds of dying citizens. The 
law. they said, unjustly allows a 
patient on life support a right to 
die while denying it to a patient 
not on such support. 

At the bean of tbe matter is 
what already happens in the real 
world of hospitals, doctors and 
patients. In a graphic and eloquent 
brief, Mr. Tribe describes the fate 
of those terminal patients, perhaps 
5 percent, dying in intractable 
pain. He describes a system based 
on “winks and nods,” not law. 

It is not unusual, under existing 
bans, for doctors to withdraw nu- 
trition. It's not unusual to prescribe 
“ terminal sedation” and place pa- 
tients in a barbiturate coma that 
eases the pain of a slow death by 
starvation or dehydration. 

This may abide by the letter of 
the current law, but it is hard to 
describe terminal sedation as 
either more natural or more mer- 
ciful. Dr. Timothy Quill, a New 
York plaintiff in this case, la- 
ments, "We would never put our 
pets through such a process.” 

More to the point, the fine dis- 
tinction the American Medical 
Association and others would 
make between a so-called natural 
deatii and an assisted suicide be- 
gins to seem, in Mr. Tribe's 
wards, “transparently phony.” 

This does not make the decision 
easy. Anyone who has watched 
the “suicide doctor” Jack Ke- 
vorkian at work approaches the 
subject of doctor-assisted suicide 
with deep reservations. So, too, 
anyone who knows the research 
about depression must be con- 
cerned about safeguards. And 
anyone who has dealt with the 
bureaucrats of managed health 
care must harbor second thoughts 
about supporting “a cost-effec- 
tive death.” 

But the current system of winks 
and nods and bans is not a con- 
servative alternative. It forces 
doctors to dissemble or to desert 
their patients at death. It leaves 
dying patients and families sur- 
reptitiously performing final 
exits. It prompts others to a pree- 
mptive suicide. 

On balance — a careful balance 
— it is tune to strike die bans on 
assisted suicide. In the world of 
medicine as it is and will be, they 
no longer make sense. 

The Boston Globe. 


BOOKS 


1 l 1 ; 


TINIStMA 

By Elena Ponkttowska. 
Translated from Spanish by 
Katherine Silver. 357 pages. 
$25. Farrar Straus Giroux. 
Reviewed by 

• . Alma Guill^nxioprielo 

S HE was always a quiet 
woman, and she withdrew 
further into sfleace with every 
p assing year »mtil at last the 
absence of words made bar 
almost invisible- And yet 
right through her final days 
' sire lived one of the most dra- 
matic and improbable fives of 
the 20th centinyr Tina 
Modotti, Italian immigrant's' 
daughter, local beauty, San 
Francisco bohemian, Holly- 
wood sflent-movie actress, 
disciple and lover of tire 
American photographer Ed- 
ward Weston and also of a 
stunningly handsome Cuban 
- revolutionary. Jnfio Antonio 
Mella, who was shot to death 
on the streets of Mexico City 
with Modetti by Ms side. 

Modotti met and . fell in 
love with Media in Mexico, 
where she had arrived with 
Weston in ' 1923. Within 
weeks of her arrival, her dark, 
dow-banung beauty was cet- 
ebrated in bohemian circles. 


She modeled ' for Diego 
Rivera and was also the sub- 
ject of some ofWeston'smost 
ravisbingly erotic studies, but 
under Weston’s guidance 
Modotti also developed as a 
photographer in Iter own 
rigfaL Her early photographic 
work was almost abstract — 
intense close-ups of flow era, 
stairs or doors marked by an 
unmistakable spare stillness. 

Modotti ’s beauty and 
achievements during this, 
period would have been 
enough to ensure her a place 
-in legend. Ind eed, earlier, 
well-known biographies of 
her, by Mildred Constantine 
and Margaret Hooks, focus in 
greatest detail on Modern's 
up to the tragic moment of 
Mafia's death. But her bio- 
graphers seem at aloss when 
it comes to chronicling the 
final years of ModottTs life, 
and tmdexstandably so, t or 
this bewitching and ulti- 
mately opaque woman went 
on to become a secret agent 
for Moscow’s htietnaiionai 
Red Aid— a de facto branch 
of the Comintern — at the 
height of foe Stalin era and a 
principal Red Aid represen- 
tative in Madrid during die 
Spanish Civil War. How can 
one explain tins fife-loving 


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bohemian’s transformation 
into a secret agent? 

‘‘Thrisima,’’ a beautifully 
produced, barely fictional- 
ized biography by Elena 
Pomatowska — who is Mex- 
ico’s pre-eminent woman of 
letters — delves most deeply 
into tins final period. Tbe in- 
formation she provides al- 
lows us to speculate that, in 
her inconsolable mourning 
for the revolutionary Mella, 
Modotti chose an alternate 
form of suicide: entombment 
in foe airless world of 
clandestine operations. 

This second, deadened part 
of Modotti ’s life began in 
1926, shortly after she sep- 
arated from Weston and made 
the decision to stay in Mex- 
ico. Under foe mentorship of 
a new lover, foe Mexican 
moralist Xavier Guerrero, she 
became an active member of 
the Mexican Communist 
Party, joining the company of 
a great many Mexican artists 
m yi intellectuals, including 
Diego Rivera, whose ap- 
proach fe revolution was al- 
ways rather festive. Guerrero, 
however, was orthodox, and 
under his guidance Modotti 
endeavored to make her pho- 
tography heroic and revolu- 
tionary. The strain of that ef- 
fort shows in much of her 
later work. 

Modotti then fell passion- 
ately in love with the Cuban 
revolutionary Mella, but 
within months he was to die in 
her arms from a bullet wound. 
Absurdly accused of foe as- 
sassination by tbe Mexican 
police, Modotti fled die coun- 
try in 1929. She had friends, 
family and strong toots in die 
United States, but rather than 
head -home she wound up in 
Moscow with Vittorio Vidali, 
an Italian revolutionary who 
was to become the Soviet 
Union’s most important — 
and infamous — military 


commander in foe Spanish 
CSvilWar. 

Poniatowska’s account of 
Modotti ’s final years is 
somber and riveting. Modotti 
ferried encoded messages, 
false passports and money 
from Moscow to every part of 
Europe. Transferred to Spain, 
she worked tirelessly far die 
Republican cause in Madrid 
while keeping an eye out for 
dissidents. She .never again 
took a photograph. 

Poniatowska is foe author 
of one of the very greatest 
novels of the Mexican 20th 
century: “Hasta no verte Je- 
sus mio" (roughly, “Until 1 
Don’t See You, My Jesus”). 
At her best, she has a driving 
tragic power that is easily foe 
match of the most tumultuous 
fife, but in “T^niriina” she 
forgoes her usual unsparing 
vision for breathless senti- 
mentality. In Poniatowska’s 
hands foe contradictory, im- 
pulsive and adventurous 
Modotti is never less than di- 
vine. (The author even man- 
ages to gush over the self- 
consciously slapdash — and 
very 1920s — punctuation of 
Modotti ’s love letters to We- 
ston: “She turned periods in- 
to dashes and exclamation 
marks into lightning bolts.”) 

Fortunately, a fife like 
Modem's can withstand an 
entire avalanche of this kind 
of adoring prose. And, de- 
spite the failings of foe book, 
Poniatowska’s meticulous 
account of Modotti's dark so- 
journ in the Soviet Union 
greatly contributes to our 
knowledge of a woman who 
wflj fascinate generations tq 
come. 


Abba GidUermoprieto. 

whose most recent book, “ The 
Heart that Bleeds is a com- 
pilation of her essays about 
Latin America, wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 


Living in the U.S.? 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 
PAGE 10 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


Mega Movies Equals Mega Anxiety in Hollywood 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New Jtvi Times Service 


L OS ANGELES — Movie stu- 
dio executives, who are gen- 
erally overpaid and over- 
stressed, are also overwhelmed 
with panic as die New Year begins. 

At the least, 12 blockbuster, and pos- 
sibly 14 or 15. will be released this year, 
each at a cost of Si 00 million or more. 
Never have so many movies been re- 
leased in a single year that cost so much. 
At stake is not just money but. with 
several of these films inevitably failing, 
some top-level jobs in Hollywood. 

“Somebody will fail — and when it 
fails at this level it’s real ugly," said 
Larry Gerbrandt. a senior analyst with 
Paul Kagen Associates, a research and 
consulting firm. “What we're seeing 


here is the inevitability of a train wreck. 
This time next year’ we'll be talking 
about some very large write-offs at some- 
body's studio. There’s going to be blood 
on the floor.” 

William M. Mechanic, chairman of 
Fox Filmed Entertainment, preferred an- 
other metaphor to describe the coming 
clash of the blockbusters. “We're setting 
off supertanker versus supertanker," be 
said. "You can lose a fortune now on one 
movie. If a couple of these fail there's 
going to be an echo all over town." 

Joe- Roth, chairman of Disney Studios, 
said: ‘ 'If we- had a couple of these and they 
didn't work. I'd expect to be unemployed 
Everybody believes they've got the suc- 
cessful ones. The ones that aren’t suc- 
cessful — people will lose their jobs." 

Compounding the anxiety of exec- 
utives at such studios as 20th Century 


Fox, Warner Brothers. Universal, Sony 
Pictures and Paramount is that the bulk 
of these films will open within a brief 
time span: the peak movie-going months 
of the summer. The result is that these 
action-adventure films — which are 
aimed basically at the same group, teen- 
agers and men in their 20s — will collide 
every weekend in June and July. 

“This causes everyone to be even 
more desperate for a free and clear 
weekend and adds considerably to the 
marketing costs to break through the 
clutter," said Harold Vogel, an analyst 
at Cowen & Co. (Studio chiefs are no- 
toriously elusive about the costs of a 
movie and often manage to avoid dis- 
closing how much money is doled out to 
marker a film, especially a blockbuster, 
whose promotion budget may reach at 
least S3G million, perhaps $40 million). 


The high-stakes battles have already 
started, as two mega-expensive movies 
about volcanoes clashed in the effort to 
open first Tbs films are Universal's 
"Dante's Peak," and Fox’s “Vol- 
cano.” Film editors and post-produc- 
tion staff at both studios worked fe- 
verishly to gain first position. Universal, 
which was ahead anyway, won. 
“Dante’s Peak" opens Rib. 7. “Vol- 
cano" will open in May or the fall. 


O THER films have frightened 
away competitors. Steven 
Spielberg's “The Lost 
World: Jurassic Park,' ’ the se- 
quel to “Jurassic Park” seems to have 
Memorial Day ro itself, but the July 4 
weekend has two blockbusters. Sony’s 
“Starship Troopers, ” Paul Verho- 
even’s epic about giant spiders, and 


Fox’s "Speed 2,” in which a boat re- 
places that bus. 

Other mega-films include James 
Cameron’s “Tetanic,'' about the giant 
ocean liner’s tragic maiden voyage, a 
movie whose costs are shared by Para- 
mount and Fox; Warner's ‘ ‘Batman and 
Robin,’* with George Clooney, Arnold 
Schwarzenegger, Uma Thurman and 
Chris O’Donnell, and directed by Joel 
Schumacher, Fox's "Alien 4: Resur- 
rection,” starring Sigourney Weaver, 
and Sony's “Men in Black," a science 
fiction comedy-drama starring Tommy 
Lee Jones and Will Smith and directed 
by Barry SonnenfekL 

The films that took in the most money 
at the box office in 1996 were two ex- 
travaganzas: Fox’s "Independence Day,’ ’ 
which grossed $306.2 million domest- 
ically, and Warner and Universal’s 


“Twister.’’ which hauled in 

$241 7 tnillioa- , 

“Visual effects have opened ^ 
up choices that didn’t exist be- 
fore ’’ said Lorenzo di Bonavenwra, 
Ssidem of theatrical production at . 
far™ “Before, filmmakers’ imagrn- ; 

atiembad to stop becausethere wasno 
way of solving certain special effects 
problems. Now there s no boundary at 
Sl And this costs money. ; 

But the risks of overspending — and 
allowing studios to be held virtually hos- 
tage by directors whose egos are some- 

times as big as their budgets is implicit 

in the, rush to make blockbusters. ’ 

“When you get a worid-class film- . 
maker involved, it’s hard not to back 
him all the way — and that may come at 
a cost," said Mark Canton, the farmer 
chair man of Col um b la/Tristar. 




'..■JK 


Retooling Charlie Chan for VOs 


By Somini Sengupta 


New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Charlie Chan, 
the cherubic Chinese detect- 
ive with the dainty step and a 
belly full of fortune-cookie 
wisdom, is about to be resurrected. This 
time, however, he will be played by a 
Chinese- American . 

Russell Wong, best known for his role 
in the syndicated television series ' * Van- 
ishing Son," will star as the new Chan, a 
Chan for the ’90s — hip, slim, cerebral, 
sexy and (what else?) a martial -arts mas- 
ter, says Cary Granaz. senior executive 
vice president at Miramax Films. 

Miramax has bought the rights to the 
franchise and hopes to produce several 
films based on the popular 1930s and 
’40s series in which first Warner Oland. 
and then Sidney Toler and Roland Win- 
ters, played the detective in 44 films. 
The studio has selected Steven Soder- 
bergh to direct the project. 

The old Charlie Chan films, drawn 
from the novels of Earl Derr Biggers. 
have come under attack by Asian -Amer- 
icans not only because Chan was played 
by a white man but also because many 
see the character as the stereotypically 
inscrutable Oriental. To some, in fact, he 
now comes across as the lovable coun- 
terpart to the diabolical Oriental genius 
of the 1930s. Fu Manchu. (Oland, who 
died in 1938, also starred in a couple of 
Fu Manchu films.) 

There have been several recent ad- 
aptations. In 1981 , Peter Ustinov starred 
in “Charlie Chan and the Curse of the 
Dragon Queen,” a slapstick Chan re- 



acting career, discouraged by the dearth 
of roles for Asian-American men in this 
country. "It was like. I’ve got to go out 
of my own country to make a living,” he 
recalled. "It was disheartening." 

In Hong Kong. Wong starred in a 
Chinese film similar to “Flashdan.ee” 
and was discovered by the producers of 
the 1986 movie “Tai-Pan." He re- 
turned to the United States for a part in 
Abel Ferrara's “China Girl” in 1987, 
then appeared in “Eat a Bowl of Tea” in 
1989 and “The Joy Luck Club” in 
1993. He Is currently at work on his first 
Miramax film, “Ash town.” The Chan 
films will bring him his first starring 
roles in the United States. 


Russell Wong will be the new Chan. 

make, and Wayne Wang's 1982 sleeper 
hit. “Chan Is Missing.” poked fun at the 
old Chan. More recently, die playwright 
David Henry Hwang, a Tony Award win- 
ner, wrote a screenplay in which Charlie 
Chan's son discovers his father's true 
identity: a white man in yellowface. That 
film was never made. 

Now audiences will be offered 
Miramax’s new Chan, a private detect- 
ive who is the old Chan’s grandson. 
"We're going to have a smart, deduct- 
ive action hero," Granat said, adding 
that studio executives had not yet de- 
cided whether the new Chan would also 
be named Charlie. 

For Wong, a 33-year-old native of 
Albany, New York, the three-picture 
deal with Miramax promises to be his 
biggest break. It was just 13 years ago 
that he went to Hong Kong to pursue an 


T HE imminent revival of Charlie 
Chan is drawing mixed reac- 
tions from Asian- Americans. 
Some are disgusted and others 
delighted, while still others are curious 
though skeptical. Bill Gee. executive 
director of Asian Cinevision, which pro- 
duces the annual Asian-American Film 
Festival in New York, said he hoped die 
films would buoy Wong's profile as an 
Asian-American action hero. “We hope 
they do it right,” said Gee. “I'm as- 
suming it will avoid die stereotypes.” 
But the playwright and n Tve list Frank 
Chin shot back that a new Chan would 
only revive an old racist notion of the 
asexual and servile Chinese man, re- 
gardless of the star. “Charlie Chan will 
always be a symbol of white racism, no 
matter who plays him,” he said. “If you 
put a black man in a hood, does that 
make the Ku Klux Klan a civil rights 
organization?” 


Young Musicians Have Their Day 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — The phenomenon of 
the youth orchestra looks like it 
is here to stay, probably because 
it is not just a feel-good idea, but 
fills a real gap in the continuity of pro- 
fessional musical development 

That gap is the transition between 
conservatory training and absorption in- 
to professional life. The modem youth 
orchestra is a kind of graduate school 
with a first-rate specialized faculty and 
the chance to perform under the likes of 
a Bernstein or an Abbado — great con- 
ductors with a penchant for teaching. 
One of the earliest of its kind must have 
been the All-American Youth Orches- 
tra. founded by Leopold Stokowski in 
1940, after his 25 years of creating the 
* ‘Philadelphia sound. 

The Orchestra Francais des Jeunes 


was created in 1982 by the Cultural 
Ministry on the model of existing en- 
terprises in other countries, mainly the 
United States, Britain and Germany. 

Every year a series of auditions be- 
ginning in the country’s leading con- 
servatories narrows a field of hundreds 
down to an orchestra of 90 musicians 
between the ages of 18 and 26. The main 
summer session of about six weeks is 
broken down into three sessions; one of 
working in instrumental groups under 
the Tutelage of First-desk players from 
leading orchestras, followed by full or- 
chestra rehearsals, and then a brief tour 
of public performances. 

Since 1 992 the principal conductor has 
been Marek Janowski, whose gifts as an 
orchestra builder have been amply 
demonstrated in a dozen years of re- 
shaping the French Radio’s Orchestra 
Philharmonique. And since 1 993. the or- 
chestra has had a home base in the spa 


atmosphere of Vichy, which has a charm- 
ing and recently renovated theater. 

This year, besides the regular late 
summer concerts, the orchestra was re- 
assembled for two Paris concerts during 
the year-end break. Under Janowski in 
the mam concert hall at the Cite de la 
Musique it gave a stunning demonstra- 
tion of professionalism reinforced by 
youthful enthusiasm. 

It was model of restraint and col- 


li antly refined reading of Prokofiev’s 
Violin Concerto No. 1, and the Beeth- 
oven Fourth Symphony was as energy- 
charged and solidly structured as almost 
any professional band could wish for. In 
the "Rosenkavaiier” suite that ended 
the evening the sheer exuberance that 
went with the virtuoso handling of 
Strauss’ dazzling shower of notes per- 
haps ran aw-ay with itself. 


REAL-TIME INFORMATION FROM 
THE PARIS STOCK EXCHANGE. 

People make decisions every doy. They need the most reliable 
source of information available. 

In France, they read Les Echos, France's leading newspaper. 

Les Echos is now accessible vio the net, offering preferential 
access to the Paris Stock Exchange. 

http://www.lesechos.com 




i-M 


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wmttSM/Tbc New Ya» T5mn 


Brenda Fassie, who combines elements of Kurt Cobain and Bette Midler, at her recording studio. 

Africa’s Self-Destructive Pop Diva 


By Donald G. McNeil Jr. 

New York Times Service 

J OHANNESBURG — 
For behavior that never 
fails to make news, 
even after 14 years as a 
pop star, Brenda Fassie is 
known as South Africa’s 
black Madonna. 

But in truth, she vacillates 
between nearly being its Kurt 
Cobain (flirting with drugs 
and suicide) and sometimes 
being its Bette Midler (moth- 
erly in a wacky way). 

Eighteen months ago, she 
was found comatose in a hotel 
bed next to her 21 -year-old 
lesbian lover, who was dead 
of a cocaine overdose. In 
September, a local reporter 
says, she tried to throw herself 
under a truck, missed and lay 
in the street until a driver beat 
her with a whip and a neigh- 
bor's cMld helped her home. 
She denies it. 

Recently, she was swig- 
ging alcoholic cider in her 
living room and explaining 
compound interest to her 12- 
year-old son, Bongani, who 
had just learned that she 
bought a certificate of de- 
posit in his name a few years 


EL >E;5>?.IA'TiE. 


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ago, when she had some 
money. 

Fassie should have more 
money. She was named best 
female vocalist of 1995 in the 
All-Africa Music Awards in 
September and is recording 
with Papa Wembe, one of 
Africa’s most popular artists. 
Her new album. “It’s My 
Time,” which came out last 
month, has already gone 
gold. 

Bui Africa is a poor con- 
tinent, where "going gold" 
means selling a mere 25,000 
copies rather than half a mil- 
lion, and she sometimes still 
performs at beauty contests 
and soccer games, changing 
before the snow in the back 
of a car. She drives a red 
sports car but has little fur- 
niture in her house in a run- 
down, mixed-race neighbor- 
hood of Johannesburg, and 
was on the phone recently 
with her manager, literally 
begging for $500. 

Most of the money she 
once made disappeared into 
crack binges ana supporting 
nine brothers and sisters. She 
once donated $ 10,000 in roy- 
alties to a fund for survivors 
of a massacre and was im- 


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mediately asked by her son’s 
school how she afforded that 
when his tuition hadn't been 
paid. 

In a house overrun far the 
holidays with children and 
relatives, a friend squatting 
to drink a mixture of cream. 

to touch her stomach in what 
was unmistakably a baby- 
check. Asked about it, she 
blushed, denied it, then said 
she wouldn't talk about it un- 
til she knew more. 

For all her contradictions, 
Fassie can be charming. She 
isn’t conventionally beauti- 
ful, but has the eyes of Eartha 
Kitt and the same eat-you- 
for-dinner smile. 

S HE had her first big 
hit at 19. in 1983, at 
the height of the 
struggle against 
apartheid, when she was 
what one critic called 
"young, black and bolshy, a 
mascot for the oppressed.” 
She was tiny, jittefbuggedin 


about everything from her re- 
sentment at being a married 
man’s “Weekend Special” 
to wanting to see Nelson 
Mandela freed from prison. 

She is an electric per- 
former who teases audiences 
in three languages, but she 
makes promoters nervous. 
She has been known not to 
show up and to refuse to go 
on. In the charged townships 
where she was performing, 
that has sparked riots in 
which people were killed. 

She denies trying to kill 
herself in September, saying 


die has a resurrected career, a 
son and a new boyfriend to 
live for. The local reporter, 
Elias Maluleke, insists that * 
neighbors saw the incident, • 
and that Fassie talked to him 
about her despondency for an 
hour in her kitchen after- 
ward. while he smelled crack 
smoke in the house. 

to Maluleke and is ofPco- 
caine, for which die has gone 1 
through three stays in rehab- 
ilitation dimes, paid for by ‘ 
her record company, winch 
has said it will cut her off if it 

happens agam. The pull of the 

drag is still strong. 

“When it comes,” she* 
said, “I tell my boyfriend to 
pretend to love me more. I go 
to movies. I never used to go ' 
to movies.” 

In interviews, the compar- 
ison to Madonna seems ri- 
diculous. Madonna is a study 
in calculation; Fassie is all ■ 
impulse. She cannot sit still, ' ’ 
leaps to answer phones that 
aren’t even hers, peremptor- 
ily sends people out for .' 
things like artificial finger- 
nails and ice cream bars. She , 
brags that she’ll tell anybody ■' 
who her sexual partner was ” 
theprevious night. 

She says she was "so 
happy when Nelson Mandela ' 
ysa Ik out that I slaughtered 
three cows,” then in foe same 4 
breath, she says die’s his r 
niece and calls him “that 1 ” 
bloody jailbird.” She quickly * 
explains that she’s really just a 1 ' 
member of the same Xbosa ’• 
dan as Mandela and gasps, 
Oooh, I didn’t say that " ^ 

about the jailbird comment 


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^Talk of Bids 
Lifts Shares 
Of Olivetti 

Zomissi President Sctid 
To Seek Part of PC Unit 

Ct^lMMtvOvSatfFnmOapm^ 

MILAN — Olivetti SpA shares 
soared more t h an 7 percent Tuesday 
amid expectations that the Italian office- 


newspaper 


eto s personal computer business for 
about 200 billion lire ($130 Tallinn ) 
Zanussi is owned try Electrolux AB. 
k It reported that Zanussi’s president, 
^Gianmario Rossignolo, might become 
president without operational respon- 
sibilities if the bid succeeded. He might 
also take a stake of up to 1 percent in 
Olivetti PC. 

Olivetti’s chief executive, Roberto 
Colaninno, said in October that the sale 
of some assets, including the personal 
computer business, would be concluded 
by tbe end of 1996, but no sales have yet 
been made, fat December, Mr. Cola- 
ninno said that the sale of the' personal 
computer business would take longer 
than he had expected: 

Two American financiers, Gary 
Klesch. and Bennett LeBow, who con- 
trol the Brooke Group T Jtri tobacco com- 
pany, offered less than 100 billion lire 
fear the business just before Christmas, a 
banker familiar with the bid said. 

Olivetti’s personal computer division 
! accounts for raw-fifth of Olivetti’s rev- 

enue, with sales in 1996 of 23 trillion 
lire. It is expected to report a loss of ISO 
♦billion lire to250 billion lire in 1996, the 
: wanker said. 

Regarding the reported participation 
of Zanosrix president in the bid, a 
i spokesman said, “We can only confirm 
that Gianmfflio Rossignolo is present in 

•k. .L.U .1 l. l 1 1 n. . •• 


5 An Olivetti spokesman declined to 
comment on the talks. Edward Gottes- 
man, die London-based lawyer who 
oversees Centenary, also declined. 

Investors, though, made their bets 
that Olivetti wouldxnanage to get rid of 
the business. Olivetti shares rose 40, to 
; 587. . (AFP, Bloomberg) 



BUSINESS/FINANCE 

WEDNESDAY, XANUAKY 8, 1997 

■ ■ 

B Hi 

rt "J' .**«• : ' f " • 

i 5 • A*. ♦■'-.r::;; 




VxtujnUpota/Tb- Utacsdrd PltM 

Toshihide Iguchi, the convicted Darwa braid trader, and the manuscript of a tell-all book he wrote in jail. 

DaiwaBond Trader Has His Say 


By Vefisarios Kattoulas 

‘ • ' International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — In a book written from 
his jail cell, the former Daiwa Bank 
trader at the- center of a $1.1 billion 
bond scandal in New York turns the 
tables on his accusers, portraying Jap- 
anese and U S. hanlring regulators as 
inept and accusing ms former em- 
ployer of complicity for trying to hide 
his illegal acts. 

. In the book, Toshihide Iguchi insists 
that U.S. and Japanese regulators and 
Daiwa Bank Ltd. were heaping all the 
Maine for the -scandal on him when 
they, too, were responsible. Last 
month, a U.S. judge confiscated Mr. 
Iguchi *s home, fined him $2.6 minimi 
and sentenced him to four years in 
jail. 

In early 1994, Mr. Iguchi writes in 
’‘The Confession,'’ Finance Ministry 
regulators visiting the bank's New 
York branch, where Mr. Iguchi was 
head bond trader, finished in one day 
inspections that were supposed to last 
one week. The regulators then visited 
Las Vegas on their way back to Japan. 
Mr. Iguchi writes. 

hi 1992, be writes. U.S. Federal Re- 
serve Bank regulators, one smelling 
strongly of alcohol, finished in 15 


minutes inspections that were supposed 
to last two days while Daiwa Bank tried 
to hide Mr. Iguchi’s suspicious trades 
by filling its New York trading room 
with cardboard boxes so regulaiors 
would think it was for storage. 

Mr. Iguchi contends that examiners 
from tbe U.S. central bank suspected 
improprieties at Daiwa as early as 
1993. The scandal strained ties be- 
tween Japan and the United States 
after U.S. regulators accused their Jap- 
anese counterparts of withholding 
knowledge of tbe illicit trades for 
nearly two months after they had been 
told about it by Daiwa, Japan’s 10th- 
larcest commercial bank. 

Japanese regulators and Daiwa 
Bank executives did not immediately 
respond to die allegations in the book. 
A spokesman for Daiwa Bank, Keizo 
Tsnjiyama, told Bloomberg Business 
News that the bank was not consulted 
on the project. 

A spokeswoman for the Federal Re- 
serve Bank of New York said Tuesday 
the bank had no comment on Mr. Igu- 
chi’s assertions. 

The book was written by Mr. Iguchi 
on loose sheets of paper in a Man- 
hattan jail while he was awaiting trial 
after confessing to incurring $1.1 bil- 
lion in losses on illegal bond trading. 


according to the publisher, Bungei 
Shunju, which will release tbe book 
for sale on Jan. 16. Excerpts were 
provided to reporters on Tuesday. 

Bungei Shunju declined to disclose 
how much it had paid Mr. Iguchi for 
bis story but said authors commonly 
received about 10 percent of sales as 
royalties for such books and that the 
initial printing would run to 40.000 
copies at 1 .500 yen ($12.96) each. 

Tbe book is an account of how Mr. 
Iguchi, 45, incurred and then hid the 
losses on U.S. Treasury bond trading 
during an 11-year period starting in 
1984, Bungei Shunju said. 

It also delves into the activities of 
U.S. and Japanese regulators and 
Daiwa Bank executives, to which Mr. 
Iguchi is said to have become familiar 
after the Fed asked him to read and 
translate 100 boxes of confidential let- 
ters and memorandums between the 
bank and regulators in both countries 
to help it with its investigation. 

Daiwa, which was fined $340 mil- 
lion and expelled from tbe United 
States for its role in covering up Mir. 
Iguchi’s losses, unveiled them in 
September 1995. Soon afterward, he 
was arrested and he pleaded guilty to 
hiding losses by making illegal trades 
and forging documents. 


PAGE 11 


Group Cuts Forecast 
For German Growth 

DIW Cites Sluggish Spending 


CarfjM /h Ota- Sstf Fim Dupasrhn 

BONN — One of Germany's leading 
economic institutes Tuesday lowered its 
forecast for 1997 growth to 2 percent 
and said Germany was likely to miss the 
deficit target for the first round of Euro- 
pean monetary union. 

In October, the institute, DIW, and its 
five peers, had forecast that Germany's 
gross domestic product would grow 2.5 
percent in 1997. 

“German budget policy is in a rut," 
the institute said, adding that the “eco- 
nomic rebound of the past few years has 
been by Mr the weakest*' in die Federal 
Republic’s history. 

In addition, the institute said “do- 
mestic demand has not so far given any 
visible boost to exports. Private con- 
sumption and industrial investment had 
difficulty in recovering in 1996.” 

The Berlin-based research institute, 
which is closely affiliated with labor 
unions, also raised its forecast for 1996 
growth to 1 J percent from a November 
forecast of 1.25 percent. The govern- 
ment will release 1996 data Thursday. 

DIW said Germany’s public-sector 
budget deficit was likely to be about 3.4 
percent of gross domestic product this 
year, down from 3.9 percent last year, 
but above tbe 3 percent required to join 
die planned single European currency. 

Data for 1997 are crucial because 
they will form the basis for deciding 
which countries will participate in Euro- 


pean monetary union at its planned start 
on Jan. I, 1999. 

The institute also said German un- 
employment could climb to a record 4.5 
million. Unemployment in November 
1996 was 3.9 million before seasonal 
adjustment. Jobless data for December 
also are due for release Thursday. 

Meanwhile, the Economics Ministry 
said Tuesday that industrial orders rose 

Austria said it was on target to join 
the single currency. Page 13. 

0.5 percent in November on a seasonally 
adjusted basis, after a 2.7 percent in- 
crease in October. 

Economists said the November fig- 
ures confirmed estimates for moderate 
economic growth in 1997 and rein- 
forced expectations that interest rates 
would not be changed. 

The president of the Bundesbank, 
Hans Tiermeyer. said Tuesday the Ger- 
man central bank did not need to cut 
rates again to stimulate growth because 
Europe's largest economy appeared 
headed toward its fourth consecutive 
quarter of expansion. 

‘ ‘The conditions for an economic up- 
swing are clearly in place," Mr. Tiet- 
meyer said in a newspaper interview. 
“There is no need to change our interest 
rate policy at the moment'' 

(Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


A Wall Street Pension Windfall? 


By Brett D. Fromson 

Wn fa'wjgtiwi Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The announce- 
ment that a U.S. presidential advisory 
council supports investment of Social 
Security payroll taxes in stocks could be 
good news for Wall Street- 

Under a proposal announced Monday, 
investment management and adminis- 
trative fees could total $240 billion from 
1998 to 2010, according to an actuary. 
David Langer. He calculates that under a 
second, less-radical option, fees would 
total $75 billion in the same period. 


“The numbers are mind-boggling,” 
Mr. Langer said. “Now you know why 
our big financial institutions are the 
major proponents of this. They have 
tried to remain in the political back- 
ground because of the size of money we 
are talking about.” 

There is a third proposal dial would 
generate minimal fees, in the range of a 
few billion dollars. The vast majority of 
Wall Street executives and lobbyists 
oppose (L 

Wall Street executives, who declined 
See STOCKS, Page 12 




Papers Wonder What to Do on the Web 


By Laurence Zuckennan 

New York Tunes Service 

. NEW YORK — When two suspects 

7 in the highly publicized rape and murder 


of a Philadelphia jogger were arrested 
one morning in November 1995, Bred 
Mann, the general manager of Phil- 
adelphia Online, the Internet site of The 
Philadelphia Daily News and The Phil- 
adelphia Inquirer, sraightoutthe editors 
of both newspapers to see if either 
would provide a breaking news report 
for on-une readers. 

‘ ‘We needed to get the news up right 
away,’’ Mr. Mann said recently, re- 
calling tbe intense coverage of the case 
bv local news organizations. 

' But because the newspapers] two ed- 
itors were worried about tipping then- 
hands to each other as well as to other 
competitors in radio and television, both 
refused to cooperate. 

Philadelp hia Online, which is run out 
of the same building that houses die two 
Knight-Ridder Inc. newspapers, ended 
up running news agency reports about 
the arrests until early tire following 
morning, when Tbe Inquirer .and The 
Daily News went to press. 

“That is an example of what we 
should not be doing,” Mr. Mann said. 
“It’s pretty silly.” 

* it also is still commonplace. 

” Virtually all of the hundreds of sites 
on the World Wide Web set up by U.S. 
newspapers still do not take fall ad- 
vantage of rare of the Internet’s most 
compelling features: its immediacy. 

Instead, most papers, including Tire 


Washington Post, The Los Angeles 
Times and The New York Times, rely on 
reports from news agencies to update 
their rites during the day, while holding 
back on what their own journalists have 
discovered until the actual papers are 

nearly on die street 

“The whole idea of scooping 
. ourselves is troubling to a lot of people, 
said Bob Ryan, tire director of Mercury 
Cotter, the Web site of The San Jose 
Mercury News of Caltfrania, which was 

one of the earliest newspapers to set up a 
Web site. “There are grave concerns 
within the newspaper industry about the 
extent to which new media are going to 
cannibalize the existing services that we 
provide to oar customers.” 

But as tire Internet matures and com- 
petition emerges from nontraditirajal 
publishers such as America Online Inc., 
Time Warner Inc.’s Cable News Net- 
work and Microsoft Corp., pressure is 
bonding on newspaper publishers to 
break down the walls between their print 
and digital publications, or risk losing 
their readers. 

“It is not a question of if but when,” 
said Nick Daaatiello, chief executive of 
Odyssey IP. a market research firm 
based in San Francisco that specializes 
in new media. “The whole idea that 10 
years from now editors will be able to 
hold back a newspaper until it comes out 
as ink on paper is not consistent with 
bow consumers have been behaving.” 

Newspapers are not alone in hoarding 
their most compelling content until their 
print versions appear. Most m a gazine s, 
including Time; Newsweek, winch is a 


unit of Washington Post Co.; and U.S, 
News & World Kepon, do the same. 

Instead, many publications prefer to 
take advantage of the Internet’s lim- 
itless space and interactivity by posting 
transcripts, documents and other sup- 
porting information about tire articles 
they have published and by playing host 
to on-line discussions. Several news- 
paper Web sites also have separate ed- 
itorial staffs that produce special reports 
and original articles that do not directly 
compete with their parent publications. 

Today, around-the-clock publishing 
is very different from what modem 
newspapers are used to. Having con- 
solidated over the past 20 years, the 
newspaper industry is now dominated 
by large monopoly papers in most cities. 
Lack of competition and a focus on 
ringing up more profits for Wall Street 
has caused many papers to cancel their 
early morning and afternoon editions to 
focus on a single morning edition. 

Publishing cm the Internet requires a 
return to tbe way print journalism was 


editions throughout the day, and re- 
porters phoned in updates hourly to re- 
write editors back in the newsroom. 

Because newspaper Web rites have 
only a fraction of tire readers that the 
paper itself attracts, few, if any, are 
profitable, and even their staunchest 
proponents are reluctant to predict when 
they might ever become so. 

Most are considered experimental and 

See WEB, Page 15 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 



Cross Rates 


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f.teMk'J.'.l. m (A.WM. 


At Republic National BonU we run «*ur 

tnsiness according! to one fundamental principle: 
to protect our clients’ capita) as we safeguard its 
purchasing power. 

It is a simple principle upon which we base 
our brand of financial conservatism: private banting 
built upon rigor, discipline and prudence. This 
sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, 


Rigorous, disciplined, prudent. 


AND PROUD OF IT. 


bas created a global private bank of exceptional stability, 
capable of weathering the roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republic's capitalization ratio, on a risk 
adjusted basis, is three times as great as that required 
by tb e world's international banicing regulators. 

To our way of thin ting, it is security as well 
as return that we must ensure each day. And in the 
process, to provide a unique quality of service, 
understanding and discretion. 



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^ Republic National Bank of New Yorkr 

Strength. Security. Service. 

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«* r^U-aal Ha.ll- .d \A m VPH* 




PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 


** 




THE AMERICAS 





Investor’s America 


1ST? 


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Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

Intcmiuonal Herald T ribone 

Very briefly: 


Viacom to Close 50 Music Stores 


NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Viacom Inc. said Tuesday it 
planned to take a fourth-quarter pretax chaige of $ 1 00 million 
to close 50 Blockbuster Music stores and relocate its Block- 
buster Entertainment unit's headquarters to Dallas from Fort 
Lauderdale. 

The company is closing the stores, which represent 10 
percent of all Blockbuster Music retail stores, because of 
sluggish sales. 


Cray-NEC Fight: For Naught? 

Research Center Looks to Hewlett-Packard 


By John Maikoff 

Nevj V«v* Times Service 


negotiated in the final contract 
Cray’s contention that NEC is 


SAN FRANCISCO — No mat- 
ter how the bitter dumping lawsuit 
brought by Cray Research Inc. 
against a Japanese supercomputer 
maker is resolved, it appears now 
that Cray may end up a loser. 

The federal weather-research 
center that had originally caused die 
dispute by deciding to buy a su- 
percomputer from NEC Corp., 
rather than from Cray, is now con- 
sidering a new option: buying a 
supercomputer from Hewlett-Pack- 
ard Co., one of Cray’s U.S. rivals. 

The move would be the latest 
twist in an international trade battle 
dial began in May when die Na- 
tional Center for Atmospheric Re- 


taking a loss to supply computers to 
the UJS. agency — an accusation 
NEC denies — is the crux of the 
dumping suit. 

Cray, which is now a subsidiary 
of Silicon Graphics Inc., brought 


the anri-dumping charge against 
he U.S. 


NEC before the U.S. International 
Trade Commission in July. 

The decision by the weather 
center, based in Boulder, Color- 


ado, to bay a $1.5 million 
massively parallel supercomputer 
from Hewlett’s Convex division 
will be announced in the next two 
or three weeks, several people fa- 
miliar with the deal said. 

By buying the Hewlett machine, 
the center would essentially be buy- 
ing an insurance policy against the 
loss of the NEC machine. If it is 
blocked from buying the NEC com- 


puter, die agency can expand the 
size of the Hewlett 


Apple Reveals Plans 
For Its New System 


search said it would spend as much 
iforapov 

supercomputer from NEC. 


as much $35 million i 


jwerful 


Such a purchase would have 
been a blow to US. supercomputer 
makers like Cray, which have long 
maintained that the Japanese have 
not been able to match the per- 
formance of their machines. 

At the time of the announce- 
ment, die weather research center 
said that the NEC computer was 
superior. 

The agency added that the ques- 
tion of whether the Japanese com- 
pany was selling the supercom- 
puter below cost would be 


Bloomberg Business News 

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple 
Computer Inc. unveiled its long- 
awaited plans for a new operating 
system Tuesday, saying it will be 
IS months before the software will 
show up on most Apple machines. 

Apple plans to release early ver- 
sions of the system in the middle of 
this year and early next year. 

The new operating system, 
which controls the logic functions 
of die computer, is crucial to Apple. 
The company has been losing mar- 
ket share because its customers are 
switching to computers that run the 
popular Windows 95 operating 
system from Microsoft Corp. 


dett computer until it 
can perform about a trillion cal- 
culations a second, about the speed 
of the NEC machine. 

Officials at die Boulder research 
center said that they were not ready 
to announce any decision on which 
computers they might buy. 

After the agreement with NEC 
was stalled last year by the Com- 
merce Department litigation, the 
weather center bought another su- 
percomputer from Cray Research. 
That machine is intended to be 
used as a fill-in for 12 to 18 
months, until the resolution of the 
Cray-NEC dispute. 

William Buzbee. the weather 
center’s scientific computing di- 
rector, would not comment on 
whether a formal decision to buy a 
computer from Hewlett had been 
made. 

Executives at both Cray Re- 
search and NEC also said they had 
not heard about the purchase. 


STOCKS: A Social Security Windfall? 


V 


Continued from Page 11 


to be identified, concurred with Mr. 
Langer that they and their finns did 
not want to be seen leading the 
charge for individual investment 
ac count s because of their obvious 
self-interest. 

One of the 13 members of the 
stdenrial panel said the mutual 

1 industry impressed on him the 

itiat rewards for Wall Street 
i under the more aggressive 
privatization options. 

Thomas Jones, vice chairman 
and chief operating officer of the 
Teachers Insurance & Annuity As- 
sociation-College Retirement 
Equities Fund, the nation’s largest 
private pension system, said he was 
approached a year ago by repre- 
sentatives of the Investment Com- 
pany Institute, the mutual fund lob- 


said they were t 

ed I didn’t support Option' 3, the 
proposal that generates the most rev- 
enue for the industry,” Mr. Jones 
said. "My response was dial I was 
appointed as a public member of the 
advisory council, not as a represen- 
tative of a company or an industry. 

“I also tola them that if the 
amount of overcharging and under- 
performance chat is common in the 
mutual fund business was any mea- 
sure. I was not optimistic about the 


JCI’s lobbying efforts sard that 
while Wall Street prefers Option X 
it may rally around Option - 
“Privatization requires tnai Lnn- 
ton and Gore get behind the idea, i 
the executive said. “Legislatio.J 
will be proposed this session oi 
Congress, but nothing will be 
passed. We could be looking at a 
bOlpassed four years from now in a 

Gore administration." 

■ Dow lodes Tops 6,600 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed above 6,600 points for 

the first time as computer-guided 
buy-orders lifted stocks back from 
earlier losses, news agencies report- 
ed from New York. 

The 30-stock index closed at 
6.600.66, up 33.48 points, as ad- 
vancing issues led declining ones 
by a 3-ro-2 ratio on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

Stocks struggled early against 

the worsening interest-rate back- 
drop in the bond market. Bonds fell 






on news that factory orders slipped 
in November, less 


only 0.4 percent in . .. 

than analysts had expected. 

The report fueled concerns that 
inflation may be picking up. That 
sent the yield on the 30-year Treas- 
ury bond — a key determinant of 


\i 1 




U^. STOCKS 


n 


free market taking care of dungs.” 
Julie Domenick, senior vice pres- 


Amex and AT&T Launch Venture 


MORRISTOWN, New Jersey (Bloomberg) — American 
Express Co. and AT&T Capital Corp. said Tuesday they 
formed a joint venture to provide small business loans for 
office equipment and heavy machinery. 

The joint venture will offer loans of as much as $25,000 to 
small businesses. 

• Morgan Stanley Group fnc/s net income rose 26 percent 
in the quarter ended Nov. 30, to $236 million, while Lehman 
Brothers Holdings Inc.'s earnings rose 84 percent, to $127 
million. Both firms cited growth in trading and investment 
banking. 

• General Instrument Corp. plans to split into three publicly 
traded companies in a bid to keep pace with rapid changes in 
the telecommunications industry. 

• Newmont Mining Corp. raised its unsolicited takeover bid 
for Santa Fe Pacific Gold Corp. to $1650 per share, or $2.2 
billion, in an attempt to derail the company ’s proposed merger 
with Homestake Mining Co. 


Instant-Settlement Bank Planned 


• Mexican stocks rose for a third day, lifting the Bolsa Index 
by 0.69 percent to a new record of 3.516.13. as local interest 


rates fell. 

• Nissan Motor Carp, plans to cm as many as 2,000 North 
American jobs through eariy retirement and buyout pack- 
ages. Reuters. Bloomberg. AP 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — To help keep one 
nation’s financial crises from 
spreading to others, a group of ma- 
jor banks plans to set up an in- 
ternational bank that can settle 
transactions in eight currencies si- 
multaneously. a Japanese banking 
executive said Tuesday. 

Major commercial banks from 
Japan, die United States and Europe 
will decide on the new bank at a 
meeting planned for next month in 
Germany, said the executive from 
Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, one of 
the banks involved. He spoke on 
condition of anonymity. 

When large-scale foreign ex- 
change transactions are not pro- 
cessed immediately, banks in one 
country can fall victim to rapid rate 
fluctuations or other events while 
waiting for transactions to go 


through. Immediate settlement 
means that one side knows exactly 
what to expect from the other. 


Tbe currencies to be handled by 
CLS 


the new bank, tentatively named 
Bank, will be die dollar, yen. 
Deutsche mark. French franc, British 
pound. Swiss franc, guilder and Ca- 
nadian dollar, the banker said. 


■ Dollar Slides Against Yen 

The dollar finished mixed against 
other major currencies Tuesday, 
slipping against the yen after three 
senior Japanese officials said they 
did not want the yen to fell too far. 
wire services reported. 

In New York the dollar closed at 
11 5. 195 yen. down from 115.770 yen 
Monday. The dollar slipped to 5 .2838 
French francs from 5.2840 francs and 
to 1 .3535 Swiss francs from 1 3540 
francs. But the dollar rose to 1 3643 


Deutsche marks from 13640 DM. 
Traders said purchases of yen for 
marks supported the dollar against 
die German currency. The pound 
rose to $1.6948 from $1.6935. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsu- 
zuka said an excessive decline in the 
yen against the dollar was undesir- 
able and (hat Tokyo would take “ap- 
propriate measures.” The interna- 
tional trade and industry minister. 
Sbinji Sato, added that it would “be a 
problem” if the yen fell too far, and 
the head of the Economic Planning 
Agency, Taro Aso, said a stable dol- 
lar/yen exchange rate was desirable. 

Traders said the dollar's slide 
against the yen was abetted by com- 
ments from a U.S. economist. Gail 
Foster, who said the dollar was 
overvalued against the yen by about 
15 percent. 

(AFP, Bloomberg. Bridge News) 


ident of ICI. said in response to Mr. 
Jones, “We’ve come to the view 
that whatever the option chosen, die 
government will look at fees. No 
one is interested in creating a high- 
cost option. I would disagree that 
this is fee-driven.” 

Mr. Jones is a supporter of the 
most limited of the three privat- 
ization options to emerge from the 
council. Option 1. Under this pro- 
posal, the money would remain in 
one pool invested in stock index 
funds managed by a dozen or so 
investment advisers. The advisers 
would be overseen by an invest- 
ment board nominated by the pres- 
ident and confirmed by fee Senate. 

“There is no money for Wall 
Street in Option 1,” hie said. Mr. 
Jones estimates feat in die first year, 
the investment management and 
administrative fees would be in fee 
range of $10 million. 

In contrast. Option 2 would cost 
$500 million, and Option 3 would 
cost $2 billion in tbe first year, 
according to Mr. Longer. 

The huge differences can be 
largely explained, Mr. Jones said, 
by the fact that it costs far less to 
invest and administer one giant pool 
of money than the 100 million or 
more individual accounts envi- 
sioned by the other options. A mu- 
tual fund executive involved in fee 


corporate and consumer borrowing 
costs — to 6.79 percent, up from 
6.77 percent Monday. Tbe price 
slipped 6/32 point, to 96 9/32. 

The inflation outlook hurt the 
stocks of companies feat pay big 
dividends. AT&T, the most active 
Big Board issue, fell % to 38 %. 

But investors’ expectations for 
slow, steady growth in the economy 
benefited companies whose earn- 
ings would not likely be susceptible 
to economic swings. Coca-Cola 
rose IK to 54H and Procter & 
Gamble gained 2 to lllM. 

Silicon Graphics fell IK to 2S!4. 
The maker of computer worksta- 
tions warned that manufacturing 
delays would result in break-even 
eammg g for its second quarter, 
which ended Dec. 31. 

American Express rose 2% to 
57Mt. A single trade of 1 million 
shares, made at the open of 
session, raised speculation that an 
investor was amassing shares for a 
takeover bid. 

Delta Airlines shares rose 2 14 to 
72'A the airline said it would in- 
crease its New Ymk City service and 
cut back on its European service, 
resulting in a $60 mUfian pretax 
in the current quarter 
technology-laden Nasdaq 




Composite index rose 7.86 points to 
1324.26. Intel, tbe most active is- 


sue, rose 416 to 143%. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


•'fl;.' '** ;v M 



AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


. 21 *. 




Tuesday’s 4 pan. Close 

The top 200 most-actw* titans. 


up Ui the dosing on WaB Smart. 
The Aasooautt Press 


SOM Unit Lw» Latest Qw 


Indexes 
Dow Jones 


Standard & Poors 



Lot Lost On. 


IndUi 654*71 460X35 651X51 640046 • 3X44 
Trpis 224043 22606b 2X16.71 2241SJ • 3Sj» 
US 22**! 23309 279.11 23XD9 *244 

Con*. raOTQ 205058 202132 205002 *1531 


ms* Low Oose at* 
B87.98 87403 B87.94 * 731 
5*1.99 53640 561.07 *104 
198*1 19 <l76 199.79 +JLOO 
01.77 80.86 01J7 +0.19 
75126 742.10 75X23 +X58 
73006 72601 73803 +7.2! 


Matt Lam Lott Ow. 


3*4.91 39105 394.90 
SSX76 *9541 50X75 
2SUJ 25040 25X45 
259.92 252 JO 29*.72 
35100 347.91 35107 


+ ZU 
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*001 


Most Actives 




NYSE 


WoL Hpfa 

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Lad 

aw. 

AT&T! 

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770* 77 

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Nasdaq 


V«L MOT 

LOW 

Lari 

CBB. 

OTel 

119499 1CVS 

137 

UJV* 

♦4Vl 


Jan. 7, 1997 

High lot Close Oje Oplnt 


HWi Lot Cost Ojt OpM 


Grains 


CORN(CBOT) 

MOO Ou murrain- «tn oar tassnU 
Mar 97 Z58* 256* 251* +001* 147,995 

MOV »7 100* Z5M 159* *000*54.161 

JU197 251* 250* 200* -000*55,190 

S*P 77 259* 250* 250* 450 

Dec 97 200 251* 259* VJll 

Esi. soles 8J39 Man's, sates 4X275 
Man's 305J45 up 30 


ORAMBE JUKZ ONCTN) 

15000 te.- cents par lx 

Jon 97 JIM 7850 7(55 +035 1033 

Mm 97 8X38 8150 8150 -0.10 19043 

MOV 77 1X70 BUD 0400 -XZ5 4044 

Arf9/ 88 » BUD 48 JO +420 1013 

Est safes HA. Man's, sales X*B 2 
Man's open krt 27,120 up IS 


Metals 


Lot Lost q*. 


137X2* 131304 137424 
177109 112304 71J109 
127X32 127305 127X32 
MSI .14 144X56 US1.14 
199X50 157X17 159237 
707 JO 70207 *0707 


‘706 

*455 

*236 

♦1.S3 

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ApptaC 46942 II* I TV] 17* 

WcrWCms 77494 27 26 27 

MO 77300 337* 2J«**. 33 

SunMtes 49809 27* 34* 27* 

A*enfl S5417 44« 61* 65 

RPWOT 54904 '/» Wm *a 

CSOJS 54514 481* 44* «f<4 

□eOCrts 68478 57 54* 54* 

Teva 47095 55* 51* S3* 

Mterasfl* 4S76B 8SY» S3* B5 

.TMe CfernA 45543 14* 13* 14* 

Melwt 45414 106* »* 104* 

22 20 > 1 * 

39544 10* 9* 9* 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

1 0 D tons- mumper tan 

JET 77 230J0 2SBJC 229.78 *100 9,71 B 

Mar 97 22X9 22 UC 22 X 20 +X90 3X238 

May 97 21 M 0 21700 71X20 *100 1|0M 

Ail 71 21X00 21X70 71 7 JO *070 1X380 

AU097 21830 71SJ0 71X00 +09 2075 

S*P 77 7139 2000 712J0 -OJO 2J4* 

EsLsOes HA. Mai's, saes 23.791 
Man's oaonM 79013 ib> 1053 


GOLD (NOW*) 

iao my doienpar iravor. 

Am 97 15800 +100 

Ft* 77 36070 35070 059.70 +1.0018X231 

MorW 36050 +100 

Apr 97 309 38X0 3619 +19 25,173 

A* 77 364.90 36X70 3078 +19 14031 

AuBf? 3469 36500 364.M +19 £636 

Oct 97 3699 36170 3689 +19 2075 

Dec 97 37140 3709 3709 *19 14664 

Est.sMes NA Man's, sties 43,111 
Man’s apeak* 201077 UP 2971 


Novell 


AMEX 


Mfeft LOT Last am. 
57 503 5719 S7503 *337 

Dow Jones Bond 


646 ie„ 
471 ?* 

144 1|* 

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4N 36 
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94 16* 

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Align 3X25 2406 7134 +031 2013 

S#p97 249 2433 249 +034 1371 

EsJ. xte HA. Man's, sates 28061 
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1041 



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1767 

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1661 

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5736 





170 

138 




New Lows 

65 

49 

AM EX 



Marfcet Sales 





Prev. 




Mood 

309 



TWar 


Decsrwid 






Uncnanaeri 

1R3 

167 

NYSE 

538.19 


Tddaua 

725 

737 







Nasdaq 

5 «02 

588.14 




mmSkwts. 




SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

5000 tu mtnhnum. OTMn Mr buvM 
Am 97 Af9 AW* 4.I9H +004* AW 
MOT 97 79* A95 700% -005* (7006 

MCV97 459* 494 699% +005 31 124 

AII97 499* 494% 499% +004*2002 
Aug 97 497* 694* 497* +606 3007 

Ed. sates NA. MOT’S, soles 45,1*4 
Mot s open M 145770 up 119 


WCRADE COPPER WCMX) 

24000 amixr ti 

Jan 97 10830 1M9 10830 +430 &4<] 

R*97 106.40 1BL7D 10445 +300 1345 

Mot 97 V0X55 10100 165.15 +300 23306 
Aar 97 hSLW 10170 miS -19 971 

71*0997 10X10 9900 KTL85 +205 4069 
Am 97 1HLB3 +XB 0 766 

AH 97 9905 97 JO 9905 +150 3082 

A*)0 97 9805 +205 501 

Sep 97 9700 9460 9705 +238 2092 
Esi. sales NA MaYssates 4047 
MaT too enW 51318 up ZB 

9LVER (NOfUQ 

SA00 troy or-- cant* per troy cs. 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

4800 mWmum- poUtn per buihal 
Mot 97 193 187 192* +804 32351 

May 97 171* 167 170 +(UB% 7AS 

AH 97 150 306% 309* +003 20031 

5ep97 154* 151 154* +004* 1016 

Est.sdes NA MOT'S. sOTes 14,903 
Man's open M 42,158 up 903 


to 97 

46*0 

4640 

4470 

+U 

41 

Feb 97 



469.1 

+ 50 

3 

Mor 97 

4760 

4653 

4710 

+&B 

41258 

Mav 97 

4790 

4730 

4750 

+53 

90M 

All 97 

4840 

47B0 

4793 

+59 

1356 

SOT 97 

440 

4B40 

4844 

+53 

1952 

Dec 97 

49X5 

ms 

4912 

+ 60 

5018 

JOT 91 



410 

+60 

9 


Eststes NA Mon's. srtea 11041 
Man's ocen ire t>Ot up 2126 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMSU 


SO trey ezr Wi pot Payee, 

Jan 97 36470 3CJ0 34150 +230 321 

APT 97 3*700 36500 367.10 +120 19074 

JW97 37000 3S803 3000 *110 2042 

Od 97 37300 37250 37110 +200 1157 

Jan 90 37478 +2J0 1093 

Estates na Mores. seta 1419 
Mon’s aoea ini 25087 oil 516 


Hlgfi Lot Ooee dige Op6it 
WEAK FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF3 

FFSooooo.ptsanoopd 
Mar 97 128.18 12700 12&82 +416116781 
Jtm 97 1247* 12632 12606 +0L14 6508 
Sep 97 12400 12400 12SJM +0.14 100 
Dec 97 NT. NT. M38— 002 O 
^Est. votome 126322. Open Wj 313000 up 

ITA1J MI GOV BUtMEttT BOHD QJRFE) 

Man *om nan 

Smtn 12700 127.12 12700 + 007 1000 
ENooIk 4307. Pfe*. sates: 7X398 
PtexapealN: 90585 op \fi23 
BRtODOLLARS (CMBQ 
*1 mnan-manoopet 
AM97 9(450 9403S 94445 240)8 

FU»97 94018 94000 94010 4040 

MOT-97 9C3X 91378 94380 41238* 

API97 94233 94170 942)0 33X581 

MOT 00 93360 91190 9X200 -30 39.194 

Am 00 93300 9X138 9X14) -30 360V 

Sep* 9X150 nSBO SQIW -X 31JB3 

Dec 80 91070 93000 91000 — « 25092 

Esi. sales 324320 Man's, srtes 237042 
Man's oimuint 209(334 up 9753 
BRmSH POUND {CMB« 
mjnpaundw SPOT Pound 
MOT97 10*6 108*4 10811 +8 41079 

An 97 10920 10860 10B72 +10 233* 

Sep 97 10826 +12 1027 

Dac« 10780 +14 7 

EsLBfes 4074 Aten's. ides 1X571 
Mart's omen hr J4M7 
CANADIAN IXXJAR (CMSt) 

N8A08 doBcn. s par om. dl 
Mar 77 7414 73S9 7401 +41 5ZOS7 

Am 99 .7455 7418 7*0 +47 4110 

Sep 97 74BS 74S 7477 +49 33 * 

D«C97 7512 7512 7510 +51 3S5 

Estjdes 14738 Men’xsOTes 14425 
Aten's open nl 6430 off 6654 
GeiMANMAIOCtCMEW 
774 06 0 matei. s per w ri t 
AAOT97 0666 04)6 0434 —1 6X137 

Am» 0482 04*0 0461 4,993 

0505 1375 

Dec 17 0546 17 

Elates JUO.Mon^sateS 2XSNI 
Mon's opotiW 64922 I 8 > 2024 
JAPANBETaVtOUEPO 

If 5 frMt>ony »T. Spot 1 10 van 

S? SSS3S! :s 

EOjsatei 14317 Mtrrt?S2 aSs 
Aten’s ooen in* 69.965 off tn 
smanuNctCMERj 


High Low CtoM Cbge OpM 
45* 


Mcr98 7705 -an 

Bit.sateS NA Mon’s. sales 4826 
Man's open M 5&.U4 off 288 
tSATMOOLOneu 


*3: 


• . 


Feb 97 
Morn 
Aar 97 
Mtrt<n 
Am 97 
Alt 97 
Aug 97 
S»97 
Ocf97 
Noe 97 
Ettaofc 

Man’s a 


7190 7100 TIM —1.15 44023 

7105 7X00 7X4* -073 14921 

*705 1485 6701 -003 8391 

6400 6X75 6339 -038 * «7 

6L7S 6X30 610* -038 45K 

6000 6000 6009 -038 3J00 

6044 —038 3007 
4808 4000 4044 -038 206* 

«L89 -038 1011 
61.14 -038 1336 
s NA Aten's, sales 4X963 
cnbt 99.13Z up 6169 


UCHT SMET CRUDE (HMBll 


Ftbf7 4X32 6422 40 2 —103 36010 

APT 97 6507 65.10 6507 -OS5 2*303 

Am 97 6X10 6X70 6X92 —018 1 0882 

Aug 97 6X97 6270 6207 -881 10J14 

00 97 6505 6508 6532 -008 4494 

Dec 97 67.15 67JX 6705 2090 

EP.sdes 22019 AAon's. sates 11375 
Men’s oomrr* 91,911 off 798752 


Close 

LONDON METALS OME) 
DoferspermeMcton 
Aiamtoum CHlgb eraael 


Previous 


Sprt 152500 10600 1520* 1621* 

Fomuni 


1 * 

II* if* 

14* 1«*i 

35* 35* 

3* +Vi 4 

16* M* __ 
17* 18* -V> 
13* 13* * * 

» 30+i +* 

33* 33* — * 

13* 14 +* 

10 * 10 * — * 
IS* 16 * +* 

21* 29 -* 

2* 2* -» 

v» 

6* 7* 

13* 14* +* 

* 


Per A 80 Rec Pay Company 

IRREGULAR 

tonmceivunldca b .1213 1-21 Ml 

FslABancePrm > jo 1-16 i-j7 

SaNneRoyolty . .126 115 1-29 

STOCK SPLIT 
Sand Teat A 2 (or 1 split. 

STOCK 

CoraBna FstCap - 20% 1-15 1-30 


Per Amt R*c Par 

YEAREMD 

Am -Pfttjburgfi . .10 1-17 1-31 


INCREASED 

Am o-PWsfiwun Q M 1-17 

Morgan StantevGo 0 JO 1-® 

PuaSrPtWi e .13 7-77 

c- dso payable on Uass B. 

REDUCED 

Cofanlal Wm«l M JOTS US 


1-31 

20 

2-3 


M 


Baser J. 

Bankart Corp 
CoroBno Fsl Corp 
CertfWflnd 
Cotordd IntrrarVtl 
CotaoWbtv Grd 
GcWen ErterpJfce 
AAasatectilnc 
Oxford Musi 
S^jman Quality 
SeUgmanSeH 
TB Woods 
UitoiBncp inc 
Upp Penn Energy 


SECULAR 

o 01 S 

Q .16 

o m 
0 & 
u 03 

M 0535 
0 .12 
0 “ 
a 


M 0782 
M 07 
Q 08 
. 035 

O 02 


MS 1-31 
1-15 1-30 
lOl 2-15 
1-24 2-7 

1*15 2-3 
1-15 2-3 

1- 17 1-29 
M3 2-10 

2- 14 3-1 

1-16 1-27 
l-lfl 1-27 
1-17 1-31 
1-16 1-23 
1-13 2-1 


I CATTLE (CMER) 

50000 Km.- cent! par*. 

Jan 97 *775 67 JB 67 JS —000 2056 

Mar 97 6015 *7 JO 67X1 -070 6011 

Aar 97 4B45 67.62 OJ0 —002 2044 

May 97 6095 6802 6X50 -QJC 1122 

A«97 7US JUX 7QJD — G.77 tC\ 

SeP 97 7840 1017 7DJ0 -023 3SD 

ESjmes X0B5 Man's odes 111 ; 
Atan’stmenw 1 x 086 uc 12 


HQOS-Lean (OuER) 


1S616 155700 155200 1553* 

-Qfftodes (Hl^ Orate) 
m5J» aaxoo 230200 230500 

art 221300 2214.00 219300 219500 

Leoq 

^52 689 - 00 69700 69000 
FOTWti 69100 69400 49900 70000 

HUM 

IP 0 * . «WO0O W550O 678000 679000 
Wnmrnl 703800 704000 686500 687000 

5p^ . m00 371500 569500 570500 
Fantnad 577000 577500 575500 576000 
1 Crude) 

104700 104500 104600 
106900 T066V5 106700 


9649 + 002 13645 
9*48 + 001127. 

♦ Ml 
95J97 + 002 
K£7 + 002 

525 + S« 

9507 +002 

9*79 +082 

9<S3 +«01 1X216 
9436 +002 Z4S9 


INITIAL 

Cjtmllnc First n _ 07 1-31 

FslUn RlEallnvA _ SOS 1-15 


2-15 

1-31 


0 u e u w A e- app r aflU e gmaont per 
aaOWPIfc y- p c y p Me te nrn m fln a feeds 
m-amteoiy; q-quadatR vsaaA-aamal 


Stack ToWes Explained 



WH 

'h 

TuMhgf 

7644 

I5te 

+■ 

IS* 

IS* 

i'f. 

I! 4 

*»U 

l^OP 

in 

IB'* 

Id 

11* 

9b 

91* 

-<* 

UTlEno 

181 

33 'A 

33* 

o 

271* 

24W 

3m* 

34K 

•2 

—'A 

IS 

459 

I10» 

«r» 

Vu 

4* 

* 

% 

1726 


-*» 

ftontr 

187 

466 

4*k 

& 

TJht 

3V|» 

•■A 

UriWU 

295 

31* 

3Vi# 

3* 

1!A 

ite 


ufqooa 

125 

1W 

I* 

1* 


nit 

-M 

UMOTH 

IS 

11* 

l» 

13* 

M 

'4 


058fa»f 

r26 

5* 

5* 

5* 

1II>U 

UVu 

-iv 

USOands 

3396 

15* 

1446 

11* 


4 »/u 


us Ceil 

198 

38* 

27* 

ms 

s*v. 

9V„ 

VKAdMZ 

101 

II* 

11* 

>3H 

14* 

• i* 

VKMAV 

116 

17* 

rj* 


cv to 

HV 

+ K 

Vtaom 

zm 

34* 

JJ* 

34* 

’Y« 

*■ 

•Vv 

VkKB 

4518 

35* 

I+. 

34* 

35* 


Sates figures an unoffldaL Yetaly Wgtn ond lows rrfled the previous 52 week* plus the 
current wee* but noMtie latest ftwfing da*. Where a s«H or sfetdt dMdend amounting to 25 
percent or n»« Has been pofd If* yeara WgWo* range hhJ *«eitdoresfwwnfor 1 heiWn 
stocks only. Unless atherarise noted, rales of dMdemJs are annual dlsbuisements bated an 
itieltaesiiledonitlan. 


Feaw 7X87 7X12 7X47 -030 

Apr 97 7X75 76J0 7467 +007 

Am 97 7900 7935 79 .QJD 

All 97 77J2 7652 7730 +0J0 

Aug 97 7192 7125 7190 . 678 

Oaf? 67 JO MT7 BJ i > n at 

ES. sales 5.92s Mon*x sates 7403 
Mon'seaenint 31088 is 75/ 

PORK BBXJE5 (CMER) 

40000 ids.- oWi pot e. 

FO>97 SIX SIX BIS! -CSS 

man 81 jo am? biju -ji-p 

May 97 8145 BOJSS 11.15 +X20 

All 97 79.97 79 JO 7907 +fll« 

AU0 97 7X46 7152 71B -050 

Es.wte 1,973 Men’s, safes U74 
Mai itsenlrj 4,977 up uc 


)3,»77 

6.703 

5002 

1317 

1,144 


Lew Ctase Otoe OpW 


1255 

1092 

810 

m 

■os 


♦ » 
+« 


275D 3 2* 7* 

102 14* I4'A 14* 
259 lOTi. 1'4 Ite 

205 I* 1 ]* 

W 17* 17* 17* 

4JT 17* 17 17* 

111 4* a* 

158 13 13* 

JO* 

10* 


a- Attend atsa extra (s). 

0 - annual talc of tflvWend plus stock di- 
vidend. 

C- BQVidaffnfl dhridend. 

«- PE exceeds 99. 

dd-caUed. 

d-newyeartytow, 

dd - loss in llie Iasi 12 mantns. 

t -dMdend declared repaid In preceding 12 

months. 

f . annual rate, increased on last dedo- 
ration. 


p- mfllol dividend, annual rate unknown. 
P/E - price-earnings ratio, 
q - closed-end mutual fund. 
r-dMdend declared arpaM In areadbia 12 
momtis. plus ssoek dividend. 

5-Steck Split. DMdend begins won date of 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE) 

10 metric Mrs- t POT Mi 


155 W» 
197 10* 


WEBGflT- 

1 Han 
JJwin 

■■-JUKn 

SUP 


100 10*1 
166 WA 
159 >J* 
16* I4>V„ 

in i 3 

91 15'* 

111 IS 
15794 * 

797 1* 


I0*i* UWi* 
UV h MK. 
15* 15* 

lW n lev,. 
IT** 13 
H‘V, 12* 

'J, >S 
1 * 


* 

4* — V,, 
13 * — * 
Iff* — * 
10 * 


^dividend Jn Conadbn funtfa, subject lo 


-Vu 
* -iC 

1* — * 


15% nan-resttence Hdl 
I - dividend declared offer sptrt-vp or stoO 
dividend. 

| - Attend paktsds year, anneddeteneUar 
no aaion token at kseskMdend rremim. 
k - dMdend dedared or pdd Ms year, a 
acEURMlaffre issue wlffidMdereb to anecn 
m - annual rate, reduced on Iasi dedara- 
Hqil 

n -new Issue tn the post 52 weeks. The higft- 
few ran^e begin; with tih slan of trading, 
nd - nett day delNery. 


sis -sales. 

I - dividend paid In slack In preceding 12 
months, esflmoted aish value an 
vidend or ex-dlshlbutlon date, 
a -new yearly high, 
v- trading halted. 

v» - In bankruptcy or receivership or being 
W9MW under »I« eonknrptcy Act or 


MOT 97 

13C 

1367 

1370 

May 97 

1404 

1388 

1391 

to 97 

im 

1412 

1417 

SCO 97 

1440 

1433 

1431 

Q8C97 

149 

I4S5 

1447 


J106D 

11958 

1A724 

7033 

1,922 


Man's ooenlrt 8X323 ah 141 


secuftltes assumed by such companies. 


wd-wfwndWrfb 
■I -when issued/ 
ww-nffliv/rarants. 
x - enJMdend or ex-fig rm. 
bSs- ex-distribution. 

» - wRhaut warrants. 

1- Ox -dividend and sales in fuJL 
yld-ylett. 

2 - sales mfuB. 


COFPffiCWCSEj 

47JBB - am POT te. 

Mar 77 1W0Q HUB 119JS +SJ0 19,750 

Mm-97 1I7J0 712 40 »7.«s „«n ’rS 

AP97 lliso 111.15 nils +430 2 JB 1 

Sec 77 m.« 10906 11156 -lifl its 

Eajan 14450 mot’s, srfl es 7 ,ct 
M arrtmteninl 3X2» off 417 

SUGAR-WORLD II (NCSE) 

r 12000 ms. - cotpi cot n 

Mot 77 10.99 1004 1DJ6 -0.11 7US8 

May 97 1106 1094 1105 -Q0S 3X653 

AS 97 ID 96 1086 igjl -Q05 &w 

0597 nu? iisj hut _ ain 1<V7a 

S-Mta 11473 MOT’xsotes 19003 
MOT’S open irt 15B02D up 1257 


Financial 
UST, 8LLS (CMBU 
SI mMtan- p* m MO pcL 
MOT 97 NW 9192 94J2 4An 

XtlV W7 W4 UJJ +W tSR 

9X58 -A01 38 

partes NA. MorYs. sates 772 
Mon's openw 7061 off IBS 

5 YR.TffiASURY (C80T1 
STOUHO prte- «ts X 3Mt aMOO pel 
MOT97 105-11 I0WM !06-£U _ at 15129? 
Am 97106-01 105+26 1Q5-Z7 — 04 1912 

Estates NA. Men's. sties TUB 
Man’sooeniit 157JO up AH 

10 YR. TREASURY RZOTl 
siaaaso BrtK Pisa snnsatigo pet 

.IBS-n IBM! I0W9 - 88 *99077 
AII197 108-00 107-19 HD-27 - U nSi 
HD-07 — 06 1 VO 
^t- rates NA Manrx sates 71319 
Mai's ooen W 310071 uo 6794 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

IB KHWRMk amtf MO « 3 J 
MOTW 111-17 1 10-22 110-28 — 13 435097 
JOTI97 11101 110-07 110-12 - 3 UJ34 
Sep® I IB-09 KB-Z7 HH0 — 13 5,131 

DKWW-R 109-13 109-16 - 13 jm 
» 0 aes NA mciyx totes 21X04 
Men's op« be 4«U14 up 4179 

jSw ^ Ss 

S: 5 ** l^tsrae* 107,173 

rm ooen Int; 20^70 off 2 JO 0 


-a 4U30 

tow JSU JtBB -a 1016 

WW JsJA mm3 1 jrra 

K-sOTBS 15001 Morft.scies 17JTO 

Mon's open SOT 49091 up 1783 

MttNTNEUftOHAIUCOLfFFE) 

D Mi mPoB- A or wond 

MOT97 9609 9607 9X85 + 001 207^7 

^ 22 ? 2 K! +O02T7U45 

raw raM 

DOOT 9X48 9X44 

MOT98 9X25 9X19 

a up 

Ml«99 9500 9505 

*4» 9400 9125 

SVTT 9454 9*JI 

Dec99 906 9*24 _ . _ 

1+0.190. Prev. safes 42079 
PiaxapnihA 993A78 up 7066 
4-MONTH STERLING OJPPB 
OBOan-PSOTIMnd 

£» ™ p :SS *"• 

SW7 92J9 92J4 9JJ9 + nn? 

"5 ?X41 9238 9m +002 22047 

JgJJ 9236 9233 9236 + 003 n« 

SSS fps na +xra isS 

jjjj? 9231 92.18 9 ZZt t P| u M2? 

£££ S-^ 9113 +ara IS 

mo mm £5? + !H n ^ 

0*99 9J0O 9139 7201 +003 la 

Mill; SUM 

Prw.opgntaL 391^73 Dp X700 

gjW Otfffl P1B0R (MATIH 

FT^ralWoij - pmonpQpo 

2rMr 

Mar 97 96J73 9607 9XJ1 +002 71953 
to 97 9673 9606 96 J 0 +003 3&451 
SjP 97 M64 9658 9602 +003 2X025 

»» +003 



MOT97 2X72 2540 K34 —0.12 4X465 

fly” 2500 3438 3403 -0.12 28015 

* 0 rjt i4£ 3*11 3*15 -0.12 I90S3 

toJ7 ag ao aa - 0.12 dcuu 

-W97 aoo ajo 2292 -an wjti 

AUP97 2X49 2239 2X41 —A 17 J3J67 

5-2 S’ 92 0*5 

2? 97 njB 71 id 2102 -0.12 9,173 
71.19 21.16 21.14 -an 100 

Okj7 nss 2 O 0 < KL84 -au n,m 

to» 3X68 2000 2061 -0.14 9,7*7 

DncOO l?^ 1955 1930 —024 75 

^.sOtes NA Man's, sates B7.1B0 
Mao's open M 373046 up 5548 

NATURAL GAS (NNBQ 
lUNirniMiXlMriOTMl 
Peb97 3399 3280 3034 —302 «■« 

MOT97 1310 2520 3026 -179-22,140 

ffrW 2JB 2500 2L5M -45 U0D 

Men 97 2500 1Z70 1316 — 94 " 
to 97 2315 2200 X220 -70 

-MI7 XHB 3J00 2210 —43 

**>97 2275 XT95 201* 

Sep97 2270 2JB0 X220 ~e 

Oc*97 X28B 22M X200 -70 

Nfe97 2375 3X0 2320 —4) 

Dec97 2460 2390 X4I0 —3D 

EBjOTes NA .Mon's sates 59.973 
MantUMlint 15X30 up 5268 

UMLEADEODASOUNE (MMBO 
4X000 am- emu pot ate 
R*i97 7200 71 JO 7X10 —042 

Mar 97 7X10 7125 71^ — OJ5 .... 

AW 97 . 732) 7140 7270 —038 LSS 

May 97 7225 7200 7105 —038 3051 

to 97 7070 7030 7031 —033 X415 

to 97 6801 4800 4801 -037 IJW 

sties NA Mon's.tates 15056 
MorTsapeniOT 61 342 up 2371 
GASOIL OPE) m 

iwniehlcton - Ms of 100 tenser 

SoSc S 9 -* — 250 1X346 

Feb 97 22825 22SJ5 TMM —gsS 22040 
Mar 97 21825 275 75 217.00 — 1.50 9077 

mes««3S 

,V. 19a “ l5tu » — 0-50 870 

L? NT. 18823 -025 478 

j-g. iSS Xa7S0 ,B8JX — <L50 WI 
Nw97 18700 18700 18700 —050 . 180 

EsX Sties; 2X049. Open bdj69033 off 747 






0 **/ . -V, 
rtmt.fr ! 




JHtetrtf,. 






r> 




m 


SSt’MSi.. 

.'Mir 
PTil 


3Sg£2 £ 


BRENT OIL OR 0 

UA daffim per barrel . 
2**£ 2*20 2402 
torW 24,14 2308 
97 23L5D TWi 
—,'97 2204 7 9 x+ 
toe 97 2208 2204 
21J4 2133 
hog 97 NT. NT. 
S»97 NT. NT. 
Oaw 2034 20.19 
NT. NT. 


Z3SBS&1 


■ te«s of 1000 brewb 

toJl —005 5*135 
2196 -0.13 4X473 
2W0 -fl.1 S 19,391 

504 — an 

a.17-0.13 1*844 

- 0,11 9^51 

MJ» -an was 
2040 -0.10 *895 
2005-009 X972 
1924 —009 2057 

Open K:1 6*822 up 


MW 98 9*33 9628 9631 +005 veiSi 

£?s “■« m iSotiSS 


Stock indexn 

S«P COMP. WDEX (CMBD 
tt*Mn 

Mot 97 757 30 74600 75730 +63010314 
to 97 76K0 75X30 7008 +630 lyOS 
Stt W 7MJ 0 »MD —UP W» 

Dy97. 7780 768.15 77240 +090 01 

ENoelgo HA Mai’s. sales 71249 
MHi'smnH 191366 off 1389 


'4T8H0P5 

'MS# 

**sbi 




» is wS IBS 


2^2 MS »SS ^02 &269 

«25 95L26 +&fl 


gg m «S3» OSiX&'BS 

S 475 9471 94J1 +OM Jjjny 
D«C 99 9407 9445 9406 +OD1 638 
whnw 4*724. Open ki: 22*657 up 


Jaa97 

S*P97 


41050 40820 —3*0 £U25 
NT NT 41320 —340 13® 



2022 . 

MeOWTMHmOURAIUPPB 

raiDrinsn-ptsofiaoiiri 


ENsste K io,7D< 


tJIai 
*jt r; 


WV -W7 
-oc-+sastyri 

+OiwH 


A«97 9X83 _ 

i sss 

tom 9338 9136 


$13? +003 g019 




9m +80j — , 

M0O +C03 30JS2 U— 
+003 VKm 

0401 +002 12,118 99P 

2013 


9197 +tun 


op £416 


LONG SILT OJFFB 
S5«-ira432ndig| 100 pd 


Sr^s- •** 

ffrev.openkt; 13X789 up S 06 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 
fMooea- cents bot n. 

“WW 7440 7154 7X4J -051 Sail 

Morn 7530 7106 7113 -047 n m 

to 97 7X80 7621 7*21 -027 Tjm 

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** 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 


PAGE 13 


tiriiy ft 




EUROPE 


Austria Says Deficit 
Will Meet Criteria 


* * 






■5 


Bloomberg Business News 

VIENNA — Austria said Tuesday 
- ^ had cut its government deficit 

1° 3.7 percent of gross domestic 
product in 1996 and was on target to 
•^join the proposed single European 
■' .currency m the first wave. 

The federal gove rnment deficit 
fell to 89.4 billion schillings ($8.12 
billion) at the end of 1996, according 
. to preliminary figures released by the 
^Finance Ministry. The deficit stood 
at 5.0 percent of GDP in 1995. 

, r Finance Minister Viktor Klima 
r ' said Austria was on target to meet 
it ‘ ibe requirements for monetary uni- 
son set out in the Maastricht treaty. 

- Creditanstalt Faces 
:.; A Friday Deadline 

” Bloomberg Business News 

VIENNA — Unless competitors 
raise their bids by Friday, the Aus- 
^ trian government said Tuesday it 
I >as poised to sell its controlling 
J ‘ stake in Creditanstah-Bankverein 
. AG to Bank Austria AG, leading to 
the fusion of the country's two' 
-^biggest banks. 

J ' Finance Minister Viktor Klima 
. said that the government's need for 
* '’funds may force him to accept the 
^ current high bid from Bank Austria, 

. .even though one party has threatened 
to pull out of the country’s ruling 

- L pohtical coalition and topple iL - 

•* u Bank Austria has bid 16.7 billion 
. t schillings ($1.52 billion) far the 
government's 70-percent voting 
'^‘stake in Creditanstalt, the highest of 
^three bids and about 3 billion 
n “ schillings more than a 13.8 billion 
•* ,J offer from a group led by EA-Gen- 
eraliAG. 

f ^ The emergence of Bank Austria 
^ as the top bidder for Creditanstalt 
H* has threatened to scuttle a one-year- 
r f old coalition of Social Democrats 
■ -and mainstream conservatives. 

Bank Austria is controlled by So- 
■‘Vcial Democrats, who hold a plurality 
, "’in Parliament and anoint most of 
^ 'the bank’s management board mem- 
“^bers. Creditanstalt Is controlled by 
the country’s conservative Pete’s 
Party, the junior partner in the coun- ■ 
-'try's ruling coalition. 


The treaty set out limits on interest 
races, inflati on, government deficits 
and total debt, which participating 
countries most meet by . the end of 
this year. 

“What this means is Austria will 
actually attain the goals in the 
Maastricht treaty,” Mr. Klima said. 
“This will be a very important and 
very decisive step for the country." 

Mr. Klima said that spending c uts 
and tax increases would further re- 
duce the country’s deficit to 2.7 per- 
cent of GDP by the end of 1997, 
beneath the 3.0 percent Maastricht 
limit. The overall deficit is seen 
dropping to 68 billion schillings. 

But analysts said that the growth 
of the economy, more than pre- 
arranged budget cuts and tax in- 
creases, would decide whether Aus- 
tria met Maastricht deficit goals. 
The government sees the economy 
growing 1.2 percent this year. 

"I thinlc die finance minister is 
being overly optimistic,” said Ro- 
man Friesacher, a currency trader at 
Deutsche Morgan GrenfelL “He’s 
saying Austria will be in the com- 
mon currency but the economy may 
not grow enough to get us there.” 

■ Mr. Kfima said Austria’s 1996 
government debt, at 1.4 trillion 
schillings, was “about 70 percent" 
of GDP. The debt will continue to 
fall this year, Mr. Klima said, al- 
though not enough to reach the 60 
percent Maastricht limit. 

Austria’s governing coalition last 
year adopted a two-year package of 
spending cats and tax increases to 
reduce deficits and debt to qualify 
for the single European currency. 

■ 7 Founders Predicted 

Seven countries led by Germany 
and France will join die single Euro- 
pean currency in the first round. Fi- 
nance Mmister Gerrit Zaim of the 
Netherlands predicted in a newspaper 
interview, Agence France-Presse re- 
ported from Lisbon. 

Mr. Zalm said that the launch on 
Jan. 1, 1999, would be best accom- 
plished by a “small and united” 
group of countries. He told the Di- 
ario Economico newspaper that 
such a group might be formed of 
France and Germany plus Belgium, 
the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Ire- 
land and possibly Austria. 


Telekom’s Local Foes 

Small Firms Take On Germany’s Giant 


Reuters 

BONN — NetCologne GmbH, 
a local telecommunications op- 
erator, said Tuesday it would 
launch a citywide on-line service 
□ext week and outlined long-term 
plans to capture a big piece of the 
- local telephone market 

The company comprises the 
teleco mmuni cations activities of 
three municipal companies in Co- 
logne and exemplifies the fierce 
competition facing Germany’s 
telecommunications giant 
Deutsche Telekom AG, when 
markets are opened next year. 

“We want to capture 20 per- 
cent of the city’s telecommuni- 
cations market by the year 2004,’ ’ 
said NetCologne ’s managing di- 
rector, Werner Hanf. 

Although it is a small company. 
NetCologne is just one of more 
than a dozen city networks that 
are entering the load communi- 
cations market by offering basic 
phone service, corporate net- 
works, Internet access and cable 
television. 

The city companies often have 
substantial local networks that al- 
low them to take on Telekom in a 
door-to-door battle for local cus- 
tomers. The local operators also 
could form strategic partnerships 
with the long-distance networks 
operated by bigger players and 
could have a significant impact on 
Telekom's market share. 

The German telecommunica- 
tions market is expected to be worth 
more than 100 billion Deutsche 
marks ($63.88 billion) by 2000. 
Analysts estimate Telekom's share 
of the market could fall to around 
70 percent by then. 


Cologne itself has slightly few- 
er than lmilIioninhabitants.lt is a 
major center for the arts, com- 
merce and media, hosting Ger- 
many's leading commercial 
broadcaster. Radio Television 
Luxembourg, and industry giants 
such as die German subsidiary of 
Ford Motor Co. 

NetCologne will expand its In- 
ternet services next week, when it 
launches “Columbus," an on- 
line city guide that offers access to 
government services and local 
businesses and entertainment. 

It already offers local custom- 
ers Internet access, electronic 
mail, a home page on the World 
Wide Web, Internet-based phone 
services and corporate network 
services. 

The company plans to invest 
300 million DM over the next 10 
years to expand its local network 
to cover the city center, outlying 
industry and, eventually, the entire 
greater Cologne region. 

Its strategy is to build a so- 
called full-service network — 
high-speed optical fiber lines that 
make it possible to merge cable 
television, Internet and basic tele- 
phone services in one network. 

Mr. Hanf predicted that 
Deutsche Telekom could lose an- 
other 20 percent of the Cologne 
market to other competitors such 
as DBKora GmbH, a joint venture 
created by an engineering con- 
glomerate, Mannesmann AG, a 
railroad, Deutsche Bahn AG, and 
AT&T Corp. of the United Stales. 
Another competitor is the joint 
venture between VEBA AG. 
RWE AG and Cable & Wireless 
PLC of Britain. 


Springer Sets 
Brakes On 
A Kirch Buy 


iV Suff Fra n Ou panJ tr i 

HAMBURG — Axel Springer 
Veriag AG said Tuesday that Kirch 
Group would not be allowed to raise 
its take in the satellite channel SAT- 
1 Satelliten Femsehen GmbH unless 
it obtains the approval of ar least 75 
percent of SAT-1 shareholders. 

Kirch Group said it had already 
raised its stake in SAT-1 to 59 per- 
cent from 43 percent by purchasing 
AV Euromedia/Holtzbrinck's 15 
percent stake and Ravensburger 
Film & TV GmbH's I percent stake 
in the company. 

But Axel Springer said it had 
asked Euromedia and Ravensburger 
to take note of a regulation in SAT- 
1 's company statutes that stipulates 
that shareholders may not sell stakes 
without shareholder approval. 

Axel Springer holds a direct stake 
of 20 percent in SAT- 1 and a further 
stake of 20 percent indirectly. 

"It doesn’t mean we're against the 
takeover,” said Edda Pels, a Spring- 
er spokeswoman. Springer has not 
yet derided how it views the move, 
she said, although it wants to make 
sure the provisions of the contract are 
followed. So far the provisions have 
not been fulfilled, she added. 

Kirch Group, which also owns a 
35 percent stake in Springer, said it 
believed the problems could be re- 
solved and the two companies could 
work together. 

Kirch Group said it was taking 
advantage of changes in German 
law that allowed companies to bold 
a majority stake in broadcasters. 
German regulatory authorities still 
must approve the sale. 

{AFX, Bloomberg j 


Investor’s Europe 


Rraaitrfurt* 

DAX 


London 

FTSE100 


Index CAC 40 

2325 



2450 a son 

O J 

A S O 

N D J 

i950 a s o n d j 

1996 

1997 

1996 

1997 

1996 

1997 

Exchange. 

Index 


Tuesciay 

Prev. 

% 




C3ose 

Close 

Change 

Anastanfewn-' 

EOS ' ‘ 


«4&29 

652.84 

-0.70 


Rrossote- ■ 

sa.-ao 

1391*94 

1,698,75 

-OU36 

Frankfurt 1 

DAX 

2£8&13 

2,881.32 

+0.17 

CDpenfingoin 

Stock Market . 

49348 

482.84 

+0.05 

Hetsb*l': • 

HEX General 

2,543-68 

2,517.20 

+7.05 

■Ctefe • 

OBX 


SS2.40 

+6.02 

Umdon ■■■' 

FTSE100 ' 

4,078.80 

4,106.50 

-0.67 

Mrid 

Stack 

447.57 

445^9 

+0.49 

Wan ■ ’■ V 

hBBTEL • 

10^92.00 10^73.00 +0.18 J 

Paris • 

CAC 40 

2^01.69 

2,306 JST 

-022 

Stockhrrim 

SX 16 

2^0.85 

2&Z44 

-008 

Vkxma • 

ATX 

1,137419 

1: 139.62 

*0.22 

Zurich / 

SPI 

2^11X80 

2^0&22 

+018 

Source: Tetekurs 


Immuuptkil Herald Tnhunc 

Very briefly: 


Italy’s Growth Surpasses Forecasts 


Reuters 

ROME — Italy’s economy grew 
slightly more than expected in the 
third quarter of 1 996. with imports and 
exports rising strongly, the national 
statistics office. Istat, said Tuesday. 

Italy's gross domestic product 
rose 0.7 percent year-on-year be- 
tween July and September, and rose 
0.6 percent by comparison with the 
second quarter, Istat said. 

Provisional data released by Istat 


in November pointed to a 0.5 per- 
cent increase in both cases. 

Over the first three quartets of the 
year, the economy grew by 0.9 per- 
cent from the comparable period in 
1995, with the construction, agri- 
culture and service sectors all show- 
ing gains. The* industry sector, 
however, declined 0.4 percent 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi’s 
center-left government has forecast 
growth of 0.8 percent for 19%. a 


goal that an Istat spokesman Tues- 
day described as realistic. 

Mr. Prodi’s government has pro- 
jected growth of 2 percent in 1 997, but 
most economists say this is optimistic 
given the 1997 austerity budget ap- 
proved by Parliament last month. Fur- 
ther budgetary measures will almost 
certainly be needed in early 1997 to 
cover a larger- than -expected public 
sector deficit in 1 996, partially caused 
by the sluggish economy. 


• Heineken NV plans to raise production of export beers by 
about 15 percent to meet growing demand, particularly from 
the United States. 

• Bloomberg Television, the Italian news agency ANSA and 
the private Telepiu television channel have launched an all- 
news channel in Italy. 

■ PolyGram NV, a unit of Philips NV. has acquired a 25 
percent stake in the four main music labels of Turkey's leading 
record company, Raks Muzik. 

• Canal Plus S A, the French pay TV company, has reached an 
exclusive agreement with PolyGram Filmed Entertainment 
on the rights to broadcast PolyGram films. 

• Britain recorded 2,025,450 new-car registrations in 1996. 
the highest total in seven years and a rise of more than 4 percent 
from 1995. Ford Motor Co.'s British unit sold the most cars, 
with a 19.6 percent market share, while General Motors 
Corp.'s Vauxhall brand came in second with 14.02 percent 

• Bayerische Motoren Werke AG said sales worldwide of its 
BMW cars rose 9 percent to 640,000 in 1 996, while those of 
its Rover division rose 6 percent to just over 500,000. U.S. 
sales of BMW cars rose 13 percent, to 105,761 . 

• KJoeckner-Humboldt-Deutz AG has shortened its name to 
Deutz AG. 

• The European Commission said it was still waiting fordetails 
from the French government on the latest restructuring plan for 
Credit Lyonnais, the loss-making state-owned bank. France 
was supposed to have provided details of the plan before the end 
of 1996 so the EU could see whether it broke antitrust rules. 

• Hachette-Filipacchi Presse, a French publishing company, 

plans to publish an English-language version of Elle magazine 
in India. The new edition, which will be the 2Sth international 
edition, will be launched as part of a joint venture with Indian 
industrial group Oogan. Bloomberg. AFP. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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179 ‘ 164 179 163 


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4235 

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7075 

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6565 

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435- 

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842 

CLF -Dexia Fnai 

458 

45*20 

45X50 

458* 

CnedB Agrta* 

1300 

1300 

I3DU 

T2SS 

Danone 

725 

715 

717 

725 

EH-Aquimine 

478.70 

475J0 

47X70 

477.70 

Eridanla BS 


B41 

843 

!W / 

Gen-Emsi 

■nil 

662 

6 ri 

661 

Hnsm 

3573) 

351.10 

35X10 

357 JO 


794 

770 

7B4 

776 


31680 

312J0 

31X30 

31X90 

Learend 

Ltireal 

KJ 

800 

090 

890 

1920 

I860 

1916 

1882 

LVMH 

1443 

1415 

1416 

1444 

Lvotl Emu 

492 

479 

485 

479 JO 

MldtattlB 

282 

277.10 

28060 

27960 


341* 

337 JO 

338 

141 JO 


29*70 

291.10 

39X30 

292 

PeuoeatOi 

572 

56(1 

565 

WO 

PtonuBJPrint 

2094 

3033 

20/2 

2032 



1406 

1406 

14X5 

Renoufl 

no 

10660 

108* 

107* 

Rexel 

1579 

1543 

1560 

1558 

Rb-PoutttC A 

171 JO 

16/ JO 

169.90 

1/1* 


1528 

1527 

1527 

1527 

Sanoll 

538 

525 

536 

535 

Schneider 

244 

339.10 

242. /0 

2*90 

SEB 

1195 

1106 

114) 

1115 

5GS ThonBon 

381.90 

3/340 

377 JO 

375 


545 

S3B 

541 

547 

Sodexho 

2800 

2/46 

2/50 

2784 

St Gabo In 

7* 

730 

733 

741 

Suez 

22050 

2IVJ0 

230 

Ml JO 

Smtheiaba 
Thomson CSF 

590 

175 

S79 
171 JO 

590 

173 

169 JO 

Total B 

420.10 

4I6./0 

41 /JO 

423 

UAP 

13380 

131.70 

13X50 

131.90 


78.90 

77 JO 

7X10 

7X80 

Valeo 

33680 

329 JO 

33X50 

332 

SSo Paulo 

BrodescaPfd 

8850 

7.710 

&80 

7.70 


57080 56580 56B80 56780 

CemtaPfd 

CESPPfd 

38.90 

3680 

3X00 3X810 

46J9 

42J00 

4580 

42.95 

Copci 

11-70 

11* 11650 

11* 


38380 37680 38000 37980 


4-x m 42081 

133 00 425 ho 

LiglitSenridre 

UahfDor 

m^bmsPtd 

37080 36080 36780 36880 
25680 251J90 25*00 25180 

18X01 

17581 

10080 

17581 

Tetebrus Pfd 

8380 

HIJ0 

8280 

8X95 

Tetonig 

14280 

12981 

13X99 

12980 

Tetorl 

13780 

13380 

[3X01 

13289 

TelespPM 

24280 23080 23580 22B80 

Untbanco 

39-70 

3&2D 

38.17 

3X20 

CVRD Pfd 

2280 

2180 

2180 

2080 

Seoul 

CbaaaMta take 61185 


Pmtoas: 63*87 

Daewoo Heavy 

5100 

49W 

4900 

5100 

Hyundai Ena 
Hyundai Motor 

22200 

70800 

21 IDO 

21900 

20900 

20000 

20000 

20000 

Korea El Pwr 

26100 

25400 

25900 

26000 

Korea Mob Tel 

439000 420000 422000 439000 

LG Electronics 

10200 

9900 

9900 

10100 

Pubong iron S) 

37300 

36500 

37000 

37000 

SrensungEtoc 

40900 

3VQ00 

39300 

40000 

Samsung Hvy 

9200 

7820 

8050 

0000 

Yu tamp 

16400 

159W 

16000 

16000 

Singapore 

StraBs Times: 2246J9 
Pmtoas: 2Z45J2 

Ceieb 06 Poc 

10.90 

10.70 

1&90 

1080 

City Devils 

13 

1280 

1280 

13 

Cyde Carriage 
DokyFonnkit* 

1X10 

085 

17* 

083 

1750 

084 

17.90 

083 

DBS 

985 

9 

9 

9 

DBS Lint 

5J5 

115 

530 

5J0 


1*50 

1*30 

1*30 

14,50 

HKLand* 

289 

2-8/ 

283 

287 

Hong Leona Rn 
JmdMaKiasn* 

N.T. 

675 

N.l. 

665 

N.T. 

X6S 

X28 

X7D 


X78 

X74 

X76 

X76 


njo 

X34 

10.90 

134 

11.10 

134 

11.10 

X24 

tune Orient 

oractorewi 

1J5 

1J2 

1J4 

1J1 

18 

17 JO 

1780 

17.90 


6*5 

6* 

X45 

X4S 


B 

780 

8 

780 

Sfii3 A/rOnus F 

1XU 

1X90 

13 

1X80 

sinaPim 

180 

1 00 

180 

1.M 

Sing Press F 
STAutuF 

29.10 

3060 

2X70 

2X40 

X20 

X12 

130 

X14 

ST Ship 

189 

18/ 

1.88 

188 

Stag Telecomm 
SbaBsStoam 

X34 

130 

XX 

332 

*64 

4* 

*58 

*44 

UtdindusW 

1.35 

1.19 

1.19 

130 

UMDSeaBkF 

16* 

1X10 

IX* 

1X10 

WlngTtriHdBS 
•: mu*. Mors. 

482 

m 

in 

3.96 



High 

Low 

Close 

Prev. 

AMOS Copco AF 
AwstaF 

165 

163 

16X50 

16250 

7X50 

7*50 

7X50 

7450 

Electrolux BF 

394 

385 

38X50 

39X50 

Ericsson BF 

313 

308 

300 

211 


1005 

944 

. 9»1 

982 

Incentive AF 

500 

493 

499 

49* 

Investor BF 

30X50 

300 

30150 

29950 

Kinnevik BF 

188 

IM 

185 

1B6 

Mo Do BF 

202 

197 

199 

19650 

PhareVUDphn 
Sandvik BF 

27*50 

2/1 

2/1 

273 

190 

18550 

10850 

1B4 

5CA BF 

14*50 

141 

1*250 

13950 

S-E Ban ken AF 

71 JO 

70 

7050 

7050 

5komfia Fors F 

192 

109 JO 

18950 

10950 


29X50 

295 

297 

29550 

5KFBF 

16250 

158 

16150 

158 

SSABBF 

119 

11X50 

11X50 

11X50 

Store AF 

97 

95 

96 

95 

5v Hamdes AF 

197 

19450 

19650 

196 

p 

f! 

■n 

ISO 

145 

150 

150 

96 

9X50 

9450 

94 

Volvo BF 

15X50 

16050 

15250 

15050 

Sydney 

AnOrtfwiCKMOOJO 
Previous: 240980 


X06 

7.94 

7.99 

X06 

ANZ BkJng 

886 

B83 

884 

885 

BHP 

17.90 

1/80 

1782 

17.94 


353 

147 

X53 

X54 


24 

2365 

2X90 

2*30 

Bums PttUp 

2J9 

234 

234 

235 


1286 

1X03 

1280 

1386 


1130 

1103 

1X20 

13 

Coles Myer 

ill 

586 

587 

X12 


651 

X43 

X*3 

660 

■«« y i i~ 

19J7 

I9JJ 

1961 

1955 


*36 

*30 

*33 

43* 


253 

250 

251 

253 

GIO Australia 

X1B 

114 

3.1/ 

117 

Goodman FW 

158 

1J6 

IJ8 

156 


12JD 

1265 

1170 

1175 

JWmFiwto 

2 83 

2.79 

280 

282 


9460 

3*15 

2*30 

2*55 

Moyne Nlckfes 
MlMHdis 

143 

8-30 

HJ2 

&*6 

1.78 

1J5 

1J7 

1J6 

1*00 

1*74 

1*76 

1480 

News Cup 

X70 

Sit) 

X70 

X65 

North LW 

360 

.155 

360 

362 

Pacific Dumop 

106 

3 

104 

109 

Ptaneerirel 

364 

3JH 

35H 

365 

Ptacer Pacific 

1.73 

160 

I6H 

IJ3 


587 

5 

582 

586 

Saufflcorp 

1*2 

1B6 

389 

192 


X70 

XX5 

X69 

X70 

Wlem Mining 

7J7 

/JO 

/J6 

7J2 

Westfield Tit 

261 

2JZ 

2J / 

2* 


7.10 

/.IS 

7.10 

7.16 

WOodside Pei 

955 

9* 

9J2 

9* 

Woofaunfis 

387 

101 

386 

385 

Taipei 

Asia Cement 
Cathay Life tns 
Owing N»a Bk 
CNno Steel 
Orina Trust 
Evergreen 
Far Eon Text 
First Bank 
Fortiuso D= 
Huan NmBk 
Huaton Tehran 
ICBC 

PrestderriErd 

TahMnCerri 

Toning 

5tod Market bides 687382 
Prevtouc 604*33 
5050 50 50 » 

173 in 173 172 

156 154 156 154 

25.40 25J0 25-30 2530 

52 51 5150 5T50 

54 53 53 53 

27 JO 27 JO 27 JO 27 JO 
)66 164 164 164 

42 4150 4150 43 

12850 127 12750 127 

2*80 2*20 2*50 2430 
03 B2 82 82 

A4.30 43* 43* 4XS0 
9950 5850 59 59 

53 5150 5250 S3 


The Trib Index 



Closing pnees 

Jan. i. 1992 = 100 

World Index 
Regional Indexes 

Level 

148.81 

Change 

+0.23 

%ehange 

+0.15 

year to date 
% change 
+13.60 

Asia/Pacific 

122.65 

-1.45 

-1.17 

-8 65 

Europe 

158.69 

-0.29 

-0.18 

+14 02 

N. America 

165.84 

+1.93 

+1.18 

+29.28 

S. America 

ktdlwMal Indexes 

120.16 

+2.33 

+1.98 

+34 95 

Capital goods 

173.80 

+1 07 

+0.62 

+30.79 

Consumer goods 

162 43 

+0.27 

+0.17 

+17.64 

Energy 

171.04 

+ 1.24 

+0.73 

+26.78 

Finance 

115.36 

■0.83 

-0.71 

-933 

MisceBaneous 

162.03 

+2.14 

+1.34 

+19.31 

Raw Materials 

175 98 

+0.27 

+0.15 

+24.10 

Service 

137.53 

+0.92 

+0.67 

+14.61 

Utilities 

142.67 

-1.00 

-0.70 

+12.21 

The fritoma Honal Herald Ti&une WoM Stock Index O tracks ma U S. doBar values ot 
280 mta mationafy muestaWe mocks from 25 connotes. For mom mlormaoon. a tree 
booklet Is available by writing to The Tnb Index. 181 Avenue Charles rip Gaute. 

92521 Neu&y Codex. France. Compiled by Bloomberg Busmees News. 

High lew 

Close Prev. 


High Low Ooso Prev. 


MuratoMtg 

NEC 

Nikto Sec 
Hintenda 
Nlpp CredV Bk 
Nlpp Express 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Paper 
ppon Steel 

ppanYuscn 
sson Motor 
NKK 

NorauiaSec 

m 


Tokyo 

AJlnonwo 
All Nippon Air 
AsaluBonK 
AsaWChem 
Asaht Glass 
Bk Tokyo Mltw 
BkYokfliana 

Brtdpeswne 
Canon 
Chiba Bank 
Chubu Elec 
□mpoku Elec 


Nftfcel 225: 1889619 
Pmtaa*: 1944600 


DaBcMKang 
□ohm Bank 
Dotun House 
OahmSK 
Denw 
Fanoc 
IBank 
I Photo 


Stockholm 


AGABF 
ABB AF 
AsalDomanF 
AflnAF 


SX 16 bdtoc 2528J5 
PmtoUB 252244 

10250 10150 102 10250 

7B9 780 7» 774 

180 185 1B750 107 

339 33550 336 337 


KHachi 

Hondo Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

Ito-Yakoda 

JAL 

JlfSCD 

KaptM 

Korea! Elec 

Kao 

KawaSM 

KDD 

HoUMppRy 

Kirtn Brewery 

KeboStod 

Konaisu 

Kubota 

Kyoara 

Kyushu Elec 

LTCB 

Marubeni 

Moral 

MniBi Else tad 

AMuiEkcWk 

Mltubfahl 

MHOufaisNOl 

MBsufaisHB 

MhsubUM ESI 

Mitsubishi Hvy 

MltsuWsMMol 

MttsubisMTr 

Mitsui 

Mitsui FlHtOM 
Mitsui Trusl 


1170 

873 

1000 

674 

1080 

2170 

773 

2260 

2400 

835 

2330 

2300 

B7S 

1670 

621 

1500 

1020 

2810 

3790 

1710 

3890 

1120 

1110 

3370 

2010 

505 

635 

5250 

627 

3980 

802 

2390 

1330 

325 

7830 

72B 

1170 

20 

Ml 

574 

7460 

2290 

629 

502 

3050 

1930 

1000 

1200 

384 

694 

1220 

936 

852 

1580 

943 

1140 

m 


uw 

860 

920 

647 

1060 

2130 

735 

2220 

2540 

798 

2310 

2270 

860 

1640 

610 

1460 

955 

2670 

3720 

1670 

3740 

1100 

1090 

3280 

1980 

495 

618 

5080 

610 

3940 

770 

2360 

1320 

311 

7710 

TIB 

1130 

230 

905 

535 

7370 

2260 

612 

495 

2000 

1880 

991 

1160 

370 

680 

1200 

916 

845 

1540 

931 

1100 

870 


1100 1160 
860 873 

920 1020 

647 664 

1060 1080 
2130 2170 
735 769 

2220 2240 

2540 2590 

799 810 

2310 7m 
2270 2200 

063 871 

1640 1680 

614 614 

1460 1500 

955 1030 

2670 2810 
3740 3700 
1670 1710 
3800 3840 

1110 I1W 
1090 1110 

3280 3340 

1990 2020 
497 513 

618 628 
5120 S2W 
610 636 

3940 3930 

771 811 

2360 2370 

1330 1330 
314 325 

7710 7850 
720 724 

1140 1170 
233 245 


Onof 
Osaka Gas 
Rkoh 
SataiiaBk 
Sankya 
Soma Baik 
Sanyo Etoc 
Secern 
SeJbuRwy 
Sefcfaul House 
Seven-Eleven 
Sharp 
Shbnlzu 

Snm-eBu Oi 
SHzuoiaBk 
Sony 

Sun homo 
Stun Homo Bk 
SumAOwn 
Sunttomo Etoc 
Suadl Metal 
SumB Trust 
Tabel 

Tatstn Pharm 
TokeaaCheni 
TDK 

TahakuEIPwr 

Total Bor*. 
Toklo Maine 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Tokyo Gas 
Takyu 
Tenet! 

Toppan Print 
Toiuylnd 


TayoSeikan 
Taya Trust 
Toyota Motor 
vaimricN Sec 
Y bm a ne mW 
YOsuda Rre 
Yasuda Trust 
ax 100 


3680 3830 

1480 1460 

848 800 

8350 8200 

303 298 

001 768 

602 585 

575 540 

337 330 

522 513 

703 688 

260 261 
1690 1580 

9140a 8980a 
780 754 

704 680 

3528 3470 

310 313 

1370 1330 

848 812 

33SB 3240 
1570 1540 

473 463 

7000 6860 

4550 *350 

1220 1200 
<840 6770 

1700 1 670 

852 794 

2130 2100 

1230 1190 

7750 7640 

945 915 

1720 1670 

454 444 

1650 1620 

293 285 

1178 um 
597 582 

2720 7660 

2460 2400 

7700 7540 

2350 2310 

1200 1170 

1070 1050 

2530 2450 

318 312 

651 630 

1*0 1350 
i m was 
747 734 

746 726 

2880 2790 
924 915 

33* 3270 

525 496 

2410 2320 

625 592 


3830 

1460 

803 

0200 

298 

776 

586 

540 

333 

514 

690 

262 

1580 

8980O 

754 

aso 

3500 

314 

13* 

813 

32* 

15* 

464 

6880 

4350 

12W 

6800 

1680 

797 

2110 

1190 

76* 

915 

1680 

445 

1630 

288 

1120 

585 

2670 

2410 

7590 

2310 

1170 

1050 

2450 

313 

630 

1350 

14* 

741 

727 

2800 

915 

3280 

510 

2330 

592 

478 


38* 

1460 

852 

B300 

304 

001 

599 

577 

334 

527 

696 

265 

1690 

9080a 

777 

694 

3510 

318 

1360 

B43 

3330 

1590 

476 

7000 

4480 

1220 

6630 

1678 

852 

2120 

12 * 

7700 

9SB 

1730 

451 

16X 

295 

1170 

601 

2680 

2458 

7620 

2330 

1200 

1060 

2530 

318 

651 

1410 

1460 

7 * 

746 

2880 

915 

3350 

524 

2420 

622 


Nermda Inc 
Norcen Energy 
Nttiem Telecom 
Nava 
Onn 

RaiKdnPetlm 
PaiaCda 
Placer Dame 
PocoPetftn 
Pahxsti Sask 
Renaissance 
Rto Algom 
Rogers Carrier B 
Seagram Co 
Shell CdaA 
Stone Caraold 
Suncor 
Talisman Eny 
Ted B 
Tetegiobe 
Telus 


31.15 

3QJ0 

88J0 

1260 

» 

54 

51- 30 
27.90 
1295 
119te 
47.70 
31-28 
27.80 

55 

52 - 40 
21 

56 
47.10 

31 

401% 

20-30 


30*. 31.15 
3QAS 30 JO 
8565 8814 

1260 1260 
1960 20 

S3Vt 53<* 

20.10 20J8 
TP/! 1760 

1260 1195 
118 11B.9S 
46.40 <7.70 
30 31.15 
2760 Z7* 

S3 .90 55 

51 1» 51.9S 
20* 20.95 
55 5?4 

461? 47,10 

30.10 31 

«tj5 ton 

20.10 2020 


3005 

30J0 

87.60 
12ib 

1960 

54 

2020 

I7V) 

12.90 

120V: 

46.60 
3035 
2765 
5*80 
5120 

20 Vr 
5560 
4600 
3090 
4060 
2020 


Thomson 

30.10 

2960 

29.90 

30.10 

T«Dam Bonk 

35 

3*to 

3*95 

3*9S 

Transana 

17.10 

1650 

17.10 

17.10 

TransCda Pipe 

MAS 

2X10 

2X60 

23 U. 

Trimark FW 

41W 

41.T0 

4IJ5 

41 

TrizecHalm 

29 n 

29.15 

29.15 

29to 

TVXGoid 

10 

y./o 

9.70 

9* 

Westcoast Eny 

23V. 

71.9b 

23.15 

m ns 

Weston 

70 

sow 

69V? 

69 

Vienna 


ATX ledec: 113789 


Prevtaos: 113962 

Ana Airlines 

15*0 

1540 

1500 

1500 


694 600 JO 

6V« 

6®. 


382 

382 

490 

490 

CrerXtansI Pfd 

499 

«/IO 

493 497 JO 


3240 

3130 

3140 

3190 

EVN 

1642 

1629 

1642163X10 


1+90 

1490 

1475 

1475 


6B0 

672 

672 

&B0 


281 

276 

276 

279 

Mdyr-Meinhof 

OMV 

547 JO 541 5*7 JD 5*3 
1215110X90118750120X10 


745 

735 

740 

735 

OssJElektrir 

B16 

810 

813 

11760 

VATocn 

inn&eaas 

16941609.9S 

Wtonorbeiger 

2100 

2092 2097 JO 

2100 


911 

535 


943 

566 


7410 7460 
2260 2290 


612 

495 


4C5 

sw 


2010 20* 
1880 1900 
994 994 

1160 1190 


375 

690 


376 

690 


17.18 1190 
920 930 

846 BSD 
15* 1570 
936 N6 
UW 1150 
070 886 


Toronto 

AbUbl Price 
Alberta Energy 
Alcan Atom 
Anderson Expl 
Bk Montreal 
BkNawSarita 
BanfckGald 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 
Blodiem Pham 
Bombardier B 
BmcanA 
Bre-sMhends 
Camea> 

CJBC 

CdnNalt Ral 

CdnNMRes 

CdnOcddPet 

CflnPndflc 

ConOnai 

Daimco 

Donaar 

DunoilueA 

Da Part CdaA 

EureNevMng 

RdrfdxRTI 

Rdmnbrtdge 

RekhardtoBA 
Franco Mevoda 
GultCcta Res 
imperial 01 
kwo 

IPL Eiway 

Lq Id law B 

Laewen Grow 

MacnflBldl 

MapnOlnBA 

ManaiBs 

Moore 

Newbridge Net 


T5ElMtosttta&5»4<J7 
Previous: 592071 

2115 2170 2115 2190 
3155 30V4 31,95 3IVy 


4830 6795 4865 
17JS 17J5 1760 


*<4 

17Vi 


4195 4105 4195 41* 
4605 4450 4505 4&9D 
3600 3635 3655 3615 
6555 65.15 61* 6560 
30 2944 29.90 2905 

6745 £705 67U 7060 

2635 25W 2611 25.* 

3060 301k 3060 3065 

21.90 2130 31U 2165 

55W 55 55VV 55 

5930 5865 5965 5960 
51<? 5044 5130 5160 

3714 3680 3765 364t 

2130 215® 22 2110 

3620 35W 3620 354s 

3*70 3*30 3470 3*65 
2665 3bW 2635 2660 


Wellington wzsE ^oiadae Moaa 

PrevloosrOTTJB 

AIrN Zeald B 
Brferfylnvt 
Carter Had ant 
Femr 

Usher Payker 
FC Forest 
Goodman Piter 
IndepNews 
Uan Human 
Nat Gas note 
NZReflnlM 
TekcamNZ 
Wilson Horton 


1155 1260 1155 
25.70 2415 25-70 

‘ 31 Vt 31i% 
37 3 7 JO 
292 300 

29W 29.15 
22.35 2105 22-35 
5960 58-20 5865 


31 i5 
37*4 
300 


12W 

25VS 

311k 

37V, 

297 


SWt 29 JO 
22 
5816 


HUS 1620 1630 1630 
6240 £3 w 

4*65 4*10 4*60 4460 
3955 39 Mr 39 J* 3965 
IS 17.20 18 1620 

56 55.15 5570 56 

19.10 1800 T9 19 

76U 7514 75U 7570 

13.10 12V 13.10 13 

27J5 2714 S7J5 S765 

3880 3785 3855 3844 


Zurich 

Adecco B 

Ahrsulsse R 

Ares-SeranoB 

BatatseHdgR 

ABB B 

BK Vision 

Boost B 

Cspmupn 

EtoaowntB 

RsdierB 

HBttPC 

HalderbankB 
JuLBaerHdBB 
NesaeR 
NOnrdSR 
OerflkanR 
Poigeso hid B 
PharmVbn B 
PlreUB 
Roche Hrig PC 
car 1 d 

Schlndte>B 

SG5B 

SMHB 

SutrarR 

Swiss Rains R 

SwuoirR 

UBS B 

VolomhdBR 

Winterthur K 
Zurich Assur R 


280 

X73 

X80 

X73 

134 

1J3 

)J4 

134 

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780 

6.95 

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150 

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128 

238 

2J8 

2X75 

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7J6 

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11 JO 

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356J0 

3*3 

356 

34550 

1128 

1119 

1127 

1130 

1325 

1305 

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1320 

2660 

2600 

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2665 

1671 

1652 

1655 

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716 

726 

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536 

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973 

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1400 

1438 

1422 

1432 

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137 JO 

136 

1490 

1461 

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Thailand 
Plans Sharp 
* Reductions 

In Spen ding 


BANGKOK — Hoping to restore 
confidence in the economy, Thai- 
land’s Finance Ministry said Tues- 
day it planned to reduce government 
spending by 100 billion baht ($3.90 
billion) over the next two years. ' 

The ministry said the cuts would 
be made by delaying implementa- 
tion of projects not deemed to have 
overriding importance to economic 
ttevelopment. Projects that would 
incur large foreign debts also are 
Ukely to be delayed. 

The decade-long economic boom 
that ma de Thailand a manufacturing 
powerhouse in Southeast Asia 
raftered in 1 996. Exports were flat for 
the year, compared with growth of 24 
percent the year before. The stock 

- market lost 35 percent of its value. 

Tuesday’s announcement helped 
^ the main Bangkok stock index rise 
“ 'about 4 percent, to 820.11 points. 

The central bank says the econ- 
omy grew by 6.7 percent in 1996 — 
high by the standards of most coun- 
tries, tut the lowest rate for Thailand 
. in a decade. The current-account 
deficit, the broadest measure of 
trade, reached 8.2 percent of gross 

- domestic product, one of the highest 
rates in the world. 

Finance Minister Amnnay Viravan 
said the g< w > nm pnf fflnM CTltfipPOd- 

ing by at least 5.1 percent “without 
any slowing of the economy.” 

The Finance Ministry has asked 
government bodies and state enter- 
prises to list projects that they would 
be able to delay or scrap. Officials 
said military spending also wookl be . 
cut, but they did not give details. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 15 


Toyota Flexes its Muscles at Home 


By Donald MacIntyre 
Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — At Tokyo Toyopet, the pressure 
is on. The dealer, one of Toyota Motor Corp.’s 
largest, has marked down the 1996 Crown 3000 
Royal Salon G by 13 percent. 

‘ ‘We’re trying to hit our own sales target,” 
Mario Sasakura, a Toyopet spokesman, said of 
the dealership’s effort to increase sales by 5 
percent. 14 We have a big target.” 


Mr. Okuda is beefing up Toyota’s line of analyst at Goldman, Sachs (Japan) Ltd. 


That is not the only target on the minds of models. 


sport-utility vehicles, minivans and station 
wagons, the one part of the domestic market 
where sales are booming. While Toyota got off 
to a slow start in this market, it has caught up 
with popular new models like the RAV4, the 
company's first big hit in the sport-utility mar- 
ket, the Ipsum mini van 
Toyota produced 1 1 new or fully remodeled 
vehicles last year. This year, Mr. Uchikawa said, 
the company plans between 10 and 14 new 


managers at Tokyo Toyopet, one cog in 
Toyota’s renowned sales machine. Ja- 
pan’s largest and best-known auto- 
maker was jolted last year when its 
share of the Japanese car and truck 
mark et slipped below 40 percent for 
first time in almost 15 years. 

Now, Toyota is determined to win 
back lost ground. From factory floors 
to dealer showrooms, the world’s No. 

3 automaker is pulling out the stops, 
and investors are responding. 

Toyota’s shares hit an all-time high of 
3330 yen ($28.72) on Monday, and 
although they slipped back to 3380 
yen on Tuesday, they are still up al- 
most 50 percent year-on-year. 

Toyota plans to roll out new models gi 
at the rate of almost one a month this ^ 
year. The company is aharpaning mar - mX 
keting skills and spending mare on The Rj 
advertising. It is co nin g costs quickly 
— by about 100 billion yen a year at the op- 
erating level — and is passing some of the 
savings cm to customers. 


“Toyota 


new-model launch 



The RAV4, Toyota's first big hit in the sport-utility market. 

the op- blitzkrieg,” said Chris RedL, an analyst at ING cent in 
of the Barings Securities (Japan) Ltd. will tur 

Mr. Okuda recently disclosed plans to pump models 


ThM is bad news for competitors, both at home $5 billion into sprucing up dealerships in Japan. 


and abroad. 

“Toyota can’t flex its muscles overseas 


Things are changin g on the shop floor, as well. 
At Toyota's newest assembly line, inside the 


wifoom a stable home base” said Susumu Uchi- Motomadn plant in western Japan, the auto- 
kawa, who heads domestic sales for the com- maker continues to rejigger its production sys- 


Tbe man behjnd foe message is Toyota’s pres- 
ident, Hiroshi Okuda, who 18 mo nths ago be- 
came only the company’s second president 


Known far his blunt style, Mr. Okuda is trying to 
energize a company that seemed asleep at foe 
wheel in foe early 1990s, when it watched its lead 
over the rest of the pack shrink. 


That has helped save at least 130 billion yen 
each year at the operating level for the past three 
years, Toyota says. That has provided addi- 
tional money for research and development, 
marketing ami discounting. 

What is more, foe weakening yen will add 


Toyota has already doubled advertising 
spending from in the past two years. 

‘ ’The other makers are so scared of Toyota's 
financial power,” Mr. Kurata said. 

Toyota's push is coming at a hard time for 
Japanese carmakers. Japanese consumers have 
been holding on to their cars longer, stretching 
out the so-called replacement cycle automakers 
depend on for sales. 

Mitsubishi Motors Corp.’s president, 
Takemune Kimura, predicts total vehicle sales in 
Japan at 7 million units this year, vir tuall y un- 
changed from last year. 

Yet most of Japan's carmakers see 
their own sales rising. Toyota sees a 4 
percent jump. Honda Motor Co. and 
Mitsubishi are targeting 5 percent, 
while Nissan Motor Co. sees a 4 per- 
cent increase. Even struggling Mazda 
is aiming high, predicting an 8 percent 
jump in sales. 

Some companies will be disap- 
pointed. 

Analysts say Mazda is the likeliest 
loser. The company is struggling to 
remake itself with help from Ford 
Motor Co., which now effectively 
controls Mazda. 

Mazda's shares have been hurt by 
concern it will not be able to counter 
Toyota's onslaught of new models. 
larkeL Stock in Mazda fell 32 yen Monday, 
to 373; the shares have fallen 20 per- 
cent in the past 12 months. Analysts say Mazda 
will turn out just two or three new or rejiggered 
models next year. 

Nissan, Japan's No. 2 carmaker, also will 
have trouble matchin g Mazda’s pace, analysts 
said. While Nissan has big plans for 1997 — 
eight new or fully remodeled vehicles — it was 
badly short of new models this year. 

That leaves Honda, the honest car company 
in Japan right now. Honda has snatched cus- 
tomers from Toyota with a string of trendy 
spon-utility vehicles and minivans. 

Analysts say Honda should be able to hold its 
own, so other automakers will end up taking the 
brunt of foe attack. Japan has 1 1 automakers. 


Tokyo , 
Nikkei 225 


13000 

12000 — 

mmr^- 

10000^ 


A S Oft D J 
1996 1997 


2300 22500 

± : =ip=ipr 

— 2060 —— hr 20025 

-j - * 20 ®'A"S r O'N DT , 192ffl A 'S’O 
997 1996 1997 1996 

index Ttieactey'- P«v. ' 


N D J 

1997 


' HungSeng . ! • . 13*20.16 13,443.03 4M9 
. ’ . . ' ' s - *004 

:$&&& V-i * 2,409.80 . 4X38 
I- 825 ;'. - .1*896.19 • 19*46^9- *83 

tfa^uiH^wOoo^® Tijunm , i wot 

SatKjkpk' jSET- ' ^ 820.11 790.23 - '+3.78 

Seoul 7 611.05 . S2&37. . • . -2^2 

SKj^ Maitet Mex ■« 1 S7W» 6344.76 

" ; •• 1 ''imtr '*i8$ar ,; *0-29 

Index .68R37 . . 663.96" *0.98 

v • • ' • ' 2&/M 


Source: Tetekuis 


Internal vxuJ Herald Tribune 


160 billion yen to Toyota's coffers in the year and the smaller ones could get swallowed up if 
through March, according to Kauru Kurata, an the market gets any rougher. 


Very briefly; 

• Microsoft Corp. launched a Chinese version of its Win- 
dows NT 4.0 software, saying that China’s computer market 
offered great potential despite widespread copyright piracy. 

■ Asia is home to the world’s most expensive office space, 
with Tokyo, Hong Kong and Singapore topping the list, 
according to a survey by a Singapore consulting firm. 

• Singapore Airlines Ltd. may spin off subsidiaries such as 
its regional carrier, SilkAir, to lift its stock price, the com- 
pany's deputy chairman said 

• Tenaga Nasional BhdL, Malaysia's largest power utility, 
will sell $1 billion worth of bonds in the next three months to 
finance an expansion plan. 

• Mitsubishi Electric Corp. will double its monthly pro- 
duction of higher capacity computer chips to 2 million units by 
foe end of l w7 to meet rising U.S. demand 

•Japan's Fair Trade Commission may allow certain mer- 
gers to be done without its approval, paving the way for new 
tie-ups and strengthening the competitiveness of Japanese 
corporations. Reuters, Bloomberg. AP 


WEB: Publishers Are Wondering Just How They Should Exploit It Lingering Concern Over Bad Loans Hits Tokyo Stocks 


Continued front page 11 

are put out by small staffs who 
often are physically separated 
from the print newsroom. Asa 
result, few newspapers are 
. eager to divert too much of 
their scarce newsroom re- 
sources to enhance a fledgling 
electronic publication. 

“To turn ourselves into a 
continuous news operation is. 
a worthy tiling to do if the 
Internet ever rakes off," said 
Joseph Lelyyeld executive 
editor of The New York. 
Times Co. “T he problem is 
that usage is stiD at a low level - 
that doesn’t quite justify it” 

Like other newspapers. 
The Tiroes uses articles from 
news agencies to update its 
Web site throughout the day, 
until staff-written news arti- 
cles are available after the pa- 
per is published 

The site also supplements 
the newspaper’s articles with 
discussion Jorams and original 
technology coverage produced 
by freelance writers. 

The Wall Street Journal, 
which is owned by Dow Janes 
& Co. and has one of the few 


newspaper Web sices that 
charges a subscription fee, 
has gone further than most 
newspapers in terms of in- 
tegrating its on-line. publica- 
tion with the newspaper. 
Earlier this year, the paper 
ripped up its newsroom and 
placed foe editors of its Web 
site next to its national desk. 

Other on-line publications 
also are beginning to move in 
that direction. The San Jose 
Mercury News Web site fo- 
cuses a lot of attended on tech- 
nology news because of foe. 
paper’s presence in Silicon 
Valley. . - - 
Since many readers of The 
Mercury News in the com- 
puter industry are reading foe 
on-line publication rather 
than the actual newspaper, the 
technology reporters of The 
Mercury News have been 
more willing to file breaking 
news reports to the Internet- 
In one recent case, tire 
newspaper itself reversed 
course and published an ar- 
ticle about die opening night 
of a women 'stectorology con- 
ference that it had earlier re- 
jected, after the reporter wrote 


it for the on-line publication 
and the publisher saw iL 

“Basically, reporters don’t 
have to do anything for Mer- 
cury Center if they don’t want 
to,” said Janet Rae-Dupree, 
the reporter who wrote the 
article. “But if you have time 
to work wi th them, your story 
can have a bigger impact be- 
cause people all over the 
country can read iL” 

As the Internet continues its 
rapid expansion, the pressure 
chi jnim reporters to write early 
versions of their articles far the 
In ternet is tikely to grow. 

New channels of news de- 
signed explicitly for the In- 
ternet, such as MSNBC, the 
joint venture between Mi- 
crosoft Corp. and NBC News, 
which in turn is owned by 
General Electric Co.; CNN’s 
Web site; and CNET, a fast- 
growing Internet program- 
mer, are emphasizing origi- 
nal, breaking news. 

America Online, Yahoo 
Inc. and others also are rolling 
out new services that pose a 
potentially serious threat to the 
newspaper industry's angle 
most lucrative source of rev- 


enae: classified advertising. 

A recent study by Forrester 
Research, a consultant in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
predicted that newspapers 
.would lose as much as 14 
percent of their circulation to 
electronic publications by 
2001. 

On the other hand, several 
studies also show that the In- 
ternet is cutting into televi- 
sion viewing time, giving 
newspapers an opportunity to 
win back some of the readers 
they have lost to television 
over the past 30 years. 




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Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — Japanese stocks plunged 
to a 13-month low Tuesday, led by bank 
and brokerage shares, amid concern 
their profits will be squeezed by bad 
loans and deregulation measures. 

The Nikkei stock average fell 549.81 
points, or about 3 percent, to 18,896.19. 

Analyses predict slow growth for Ja- 


pan this year because foe government has 
pledged to cut spending and raise taxes. 
They also fear the planned deregulation 
of the finan cial sector will cause a shake- 
out among banking companies. 

Asahi Bank Ltd. was the biggest loser, 
declining 100 yen (86 cents), to 920. The 
Nihon Keizai Shim bun reported that 
Asahi would package 1 0 billion yen to 15 


billion yen in bad loans as securities, 
which will be sold by the end of March. 

The Nikkei's decline rekindled con- 
cern about whether leaders would be 
able to meet their schedule to write off 
unrecoverable loans this year. Many fi- 
nancial institutions have used profits 
from stock investment sales to finance 
such write-offs. 




| INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIE 

D 


Personate 


WBjCOME aboard 

TERENCE VAN THUWE 

Bom: Janoanr 1, a 1730 
Pros] Parsrts: Krt & 

E2g brofoar Neman 

COUGRATTJLATXWS TO ALL 
ESPECIALLY GRANDPA GUY 
LOVE YOUR FffiBDS XT HE MT 


» HARRY. HOPE ALL IS RNE. You 
ore greatly mesM already, n w» so 
vondoful b see and spend time wft al 
□fyOdUykwetoyou&tte famiy. A. 


Tender Notices 


S0NG0 S0NG0 GAS 
to ELEcnaatY project 

Ramon of Teteoninjnlcatnn Santo 
{Contract No. J494-105] 

h wft a ao n tor PraquaMtaBon 

1] Sonps, a Tanzanian Company Muse 
principal sharefuddere ml be 0TC 
{Ocelot Tanzania Inc. and TCPL Tanza- 
nia Inc.), TANESC0 (Tanzania Efectrfc 
Supply Company), TPDC (Tanzania 
Wrofeum Development CnpoaBon) end 
various muitiiaieral funding egendee 
inlands to pre-qoaHy contractors to 
provide EeteamfflTtncatton sento tor 
Bu Songo Songo Gas to Bectricfty Pro- 

S on a tuntay basis. GTC. assced by 
uonsuB. is actau as Project Manager 
far the will on barf of Songas. 

2] Trie Project invokes (he trensponaton 
ot processed natural ees Iran a gas 
field. In the wmny of Songo Songo 
Island, n the dty ol Dar es Salaam, 
sons 23Q km north d the island tor 
power generation aid oilier industrial 



3) TeiscaiHutonn services raqurad 
indude the provision of moHa radfa 
coverage along ths pipefine rtghl of way, 
wee, data and besmte mamneafions 
between the gas processau plant on 
Songo Songo Island, ine paper 
peneaswi ptn a Ubungo near Dar es 
Sefaamaid Songas haad office m Dar 
es Salaam. The proposed system may 
be e (enestrial radio system, e saBTite 
based system or a contmaiiond ranee- 
trial and aalsUe facflWes. S^nfikam 
ament and rtBroafanal eapalerce wflh 
mfamwaw and sotefie systems Is s 
mreiun ngqpnvnent far prequflficelm 

4) Copies o> the PrequaBttoioif 
Raqdtanents document wfl bearatafafe 
to interested companies on or about 
Janu&y 10. 1^7 and wB be torea/ded 
on neodpl d a written request (moB, 
couner, fax or E-mafi) al the Mowing 


ore, cib 

Tetaconsidt Uefied 
■200-1100 IIbMBb Street 
Vancouver, B.C. 

VBE4A5 
Tat SOM01-3000 
Fax: 604-667-7219 

Wemet gvondotogOufaconaijam 

O rianfloo : Hr. G. van rim Berg 

5) Appfcatkro mro to ctearty marked 
PrequaUpcaoon tor PitrrtMJi d RkBp 
S ystem, System hitegralion. and 
Tdacorwnuncailon Services (Cortract 
No. J494-105) aid chad be racehed at 
foe stave address no to® hen i&oo 
tours loca Hme on Feboay ?, 1397. 

CJTC, A Joim Veraure Between TCPL 
Tenzena be end Otaiot Tanzania Inc. 


TCPL 


A/mouncemenfs 


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PAGE 16 


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PAGE 18 


Sports 




orld Roundup 


Australia Collapses 

Cricket Pakistan recovered 
from a dismal barring collapse to 
bear Australia by 29 runs Tuesday in 
a low-scoring World Series limited 
overs march dominated by bowlers. 
Chasing Pakistan's total of 149 all 
out, Australia was dismissed for 120 
in Hobart, Tasmania. Mohammad 
Wasim’s 54 was the highest score of 
the match. Michael Sevan was top 
scorer for Australia with 24. (AP) 

Seles Drops Out 

TENNIS Monica Seles, the four- 
rime Australian Open champion, has 
broken a finger and will not defend 
her title next week at the year's first 
Grand Slam tournament. {Reuters) 

Injuries Suggest Rape 

football The w oman who ac- 
cused Dallas stars Michael Irvin and 
Erik Williams of sexual assault had 
bruises consistent with such an at- 
tack, an official told the Fort Worth 
Star-Telegram. 

The official said doctors found 
bruises on the woman's back and 
thighs and “vaginal bruising that's 
not consistent with voluntary sex.” 

The 23-year-old woman accused 
Williams and another man of raping 
her at Williams's home while Irvin 
held her at gunpoint None of the 
men has been charged. {API 

College Attendance Rises 

FOOTBALL Attendance at NCAA 
college football games in 1996 
totaled nearly 36 million, second- 
best in history. The attendance for 
games at the 566 NCAA schools 
with football teams rose 359.S47 to 
35.997,631. The record is 
36.459,896. set in 1994. 

Michigan led in team attendance 
for the 23d consecutive year, aver- 
aging 105,932 for its six home games, 
just ahead of Tennessee’s 105,418 in 
ns expanded stadium. (AP) 

Barnett Stays in School... 

FOOTBALL Gary Barnett, coach of 
Northwestern University, has de- 
cided not to interview for the vacant 
coaching job at the Detroit Lions 

"I am not a candidate for the 
Detroit Lions job or any other pro- 
fessional football position,” 
Barnett said in a one-sentence news 
release. (AP) 

... His Star Player Leaves 

football Darnell Autiy, the 
Northwestern running back, was 
one of five underclassmen to de- 
clare themselves eligible for the 
NFL draft The others were Orlando 
Pace, the Ohio State offensive 
tackle, who is a potential No. 1 draft 
pick; his teammate Shawn Springs; 
Peter Boulware, a defensive end at 
Florida State who led the nation in 
sacks; and All-America comerback 
Chris Canty of Kansas State. (API 

Vega Checks In 

SOCCER Ramon Vega, a Swiss 
international defender, completed a 
reported £3 million (S5.1 million) 
transfer to Tottenham Hotspur from 
Cagliari of Italy Tuesday. 

“England has become a Bosnian 
hotel, attracting very good interna- 
tional players — and I want to be 
part of it, " said Vega. (Reuters) 



Scon Obm/ftaiMn 

A determined Michael Jordan of the Bolls driving around Bryon Russell of the Jazz and heading for the hoop. 

Bulls Take Their Revenge on Utah 


The Associated Press 

CHICAGO — Michael Jordan shoved 
John Stockton. Dennis Rodman planted 
his forearm in Karl Malone’s back and 
kept it there most of the game. Scottie 
Pippen smothered Bryon Russell. 

Determined not to lose again to the 
Utah Jazz, the Chicago Bulls showed a 
physical side some don’t know they 
have. 

“We’re the target for everyone,” 
Jordan said Monday after the defending 
NBA champions reversed a November 
loss at Utah by racing to a 26-point lead 
and coasting to a 102-89 victory. 

“If we're going to sit here and be 
passive, let people come in and take 
what we have, we won’t have it for 
long,” said Jordan, who had 23 points. 
“We’ve got to defend what we have. 
It's toughness. It's not just a walk 
through the park.” 

Chicago lost only 10 rimes in winning 
an NBA-record 72 games last season. In 
rematches against teams that beat them, 
the Bulls went 6-0 — with an average 
victory margin of 21 points. 

And so it was again Monday nighr 
when they faced Utah, the first team to 
defeat them this season and the first to 
feel their wrath. 

’ ‘The guys experienced a little loss of 


pride," Phil Jackson, the Bulls coach, 
said of the 105-100 loss on Nov. 23. 
“We made it a point to do whatever it 
took to win this game.” 

If that included Jordan’s pushing 
Stockton to the floor near the end of the 
first half, so be it. 

‘ ’Sometimes he gets away with some 
of that sneaky stuff.” Jordan said. “I’m 


a veteran, too, so I tried to get away with 
something sneaky. 

“We’ve had some battles in the course 
of play, but that's the first rime that the 
fans got to see two competitors trying to 
find an edge,” Jordan said. “I have a lot 
of respect for John. We played on the 
Olympic team together. But he’s not go- 
ing to out-compete me here at home.” 

Said Stockton: “No big deal. Part of 
the game." 

What bothered Utah coach Jerry Sloan 
was that too few of his players were 
willing to mix it up with the Bulls. 

“They could have beaten us by 50 
points.” said Sloan, whose team is 6-7 
since scarring the season 17-2. “I was 
embarrassed. That’s one of the few 
times we came out and didn’t even com- 
pete. They did everything they wanted 


to do, and went everywhere they wanted 
to go. Ii was pretty easy fear them." 

In the November meeting, Malone 
had 36 points and 15 rebounds, while 
Rodman had 10 rebounds and said be 
was uninterested. Monday, Malone had 
27 points and 1 1 rebounds, but was only 
l-of-8 in the first half when the game 
was decided; Rodman had 16 rebounds. 

Russell outscored Pippen 17-16 and 
made seven of nine shots the first time 
the teams met Monday, Russell scored 
three points on l-for-12 shooting, Pip- 
pen scored 24 points. 

TtaH Blazon 88, Labors 84 At Port- 
land, Kenny Anderson scored Che 
Blazers' final eight points as they won 
their fifth straight and ended the Lakers' 
six-game winning screak. Shaquille 
O'Neal had 34 points and 12 rebrands 
for the Lakers, but he was only 4-for-14 
from the free-throw line. Arvydas Sa- 
bonis led the Blazers with 24 points. 

Hornets 100, Wurriora 101 At San 
Jose. Glen Rice scored a season-high 39 
points, and Anthony Mason added 27 

S )ints and 1 8 rebounds as Charlotte beat 
olden State. The Hornets made 13 of 
14 free throws down the stretch and 
finished 36-of-40 at the foul line. Latrell 
Sprewell had 26 points and seven assists 
for the Warriors. 


A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Super Bowl 


Washington Post Service 

G O Jacksonville. Go Carolina. I 
am rooting for the Expansion 
Bowl. 

(Though I am glad the Expansion 
Bowl will be played in that gourmet 
haven New Orleans, and not in either 
Charlotte, North Carolina, or Jackson- 
ville. Florida — since I have to be there 
for a week.) 

Just two years in the league, and 
Jacksonville and Carolina are already in 
their conference finals. Isn’t this a bit 
quick? What did the official expansion 
kit come with, yeast? 

All the major sports have had mul- 
tiple expansions, and no expansion 
teams ever shot to the top of the stand- 


lantage Point/ Tont Kosnheiseb 


ings like these two. In their second 
season, most expansion teams are still 
so far under water they go to camp 
wearing snorkels. Expansion is simply 
not supposed to be such a piece of cake. 
If it were, we should expect to watch 
Toronto and Vancouver in the National 
Basketball Association finals in June. 

What happened to paying your dues? 
Or were the dues waived with the ini- 
tiation fee? 

I never knew expansion could be so 
painless. Usually, the league tells the 
new teams. “The first few seasons will 
be rocky, but hang in there, and with a 


The Grass Will Be Greener 
When Packers Face Carolina 


By Frank Litsky 

New York Times Service 


By the time the Green Bay Packers 
finished whipping the San Francisco 
49ers Saturday in the National Foot- 
ball League playoffs, the grass ar the 
packers’ Lambeau Field had disin- 
tegrated, a victim of all-day freezing 
rain. 

On Sunday i when the Packers play 
the Carolina Panthers for the National 
Conference title and a Super Bowl 
berth, it will be a different field. 

After the game, the NFL and the 
Packers brought in Chip Toma, the 
league's field and turf consultant, to 
inspect the field. He and Todd Edle- 
beejc, the Packers’ ground supervisor, 
decided on a complete resodaing. 

Monday, the Kentucky bluegrass 


sod was being cut in 42-inch. 2,000- 
pound strips at the DecaTurf sod farm 
in Maryland. Reggie Roberts, an NFL 
spokesman, said the plan was to ioad 
the sod onto 25 to 30 trucks which 
were due to arrive in Green Bay late 
Tuesday and have the surface in place 
by Thursday. 

The grass is also new at Foxboro 
Stadium, where the New England 
Patriots will play the Jacksonville 
Jaguars on Sunday for the i^nerican 
Football Conference championship. 

After the Patriots beat the Jets Dec. 
8 in their final home game of the 
regular season, the field was a mess. 
With a month to go before their first 
playoff game, the Patriots resodded 
the' field, and it held up fine in 
Sunday's victory over the Pittsburgh 
Steelers. 


couple of good drafts and some smart 
trades, you’ll be a contender in five or 
six years.” 

This is incredible. In five or six years 
Jacksonville and Carolina will be re- 
building! ( And watch for Tom 1 
the Jacksonville coach, in “The 
Mutiny” in dinner cheater. Thar guy is 
wound tighter than a golf ball. For that 
matter so is Dom Capers. Carolina's 
coach.) 

The keys to Carolina's and Jackson- 
ville’s immediate flourishing are: 
double the amount of draff picks as 
everybody else and free agency. 

In past expansions, before free 
agency, a team had no way to acquire 1 
talented players except through the 
draft. So they’d languish at the bottom 
of the standings for years. But Jack- 
sonville and Carolina could target the 
players they wanted, and go get them — - 
especially since they had so much room 
cleared under the salary cap. 

Anybody who says Jacksonville and 
Carolina had no inherent advantage is 
simply crazy. They had a clean financial 
slate, and complete access to young 
talent and old talent. Thirty-five years 
worth of expansions in pro sports", and 
no teams ever had this kind of success in 
their second season. 

TTiat's merely a coincidence? That’s 
because Carolina and Jacksonville have 
the best owners, who hired the best 
coaches and the best general managers? 
Grow up. Of course Bill Polian, Car- 
olina's general manager, looks like a 
genius. He helped write the expansion 
rules. 

Honestly, what is going on in the- 
NFL? 

QUESTION: What do quarterbacks 
Steve Young. John Elway. Jim Kelly 
and Troy Aikman have in common? 
ANSWER: They're all going to the 


Hall of Fame — and none of them will get 
a sniff of this year’s Super Bowl. The 
same holds for Dallas's running track 
Emmitt Smith and Buffalo’s Thurman 
Thomas. 

In their places are babies’ Like the Jag- 
uars ’ quarterback. Mark Brunei!, who 
may be the next Young; the Patriots’ 
Drew Bledsoe, who may be the next 
Aikman; the Panthers’ Kerry Collins, 
who may be the next Kelly. Oh, and 
Green Bay’s Brett Favre, who is already 
Elway. (By the way, here is Green Bay’s 
depth chair at quarterback from three 
seasons ago: Favre, Brunell, Ty De truer. 
So obviously, someone up there in Wis- 
consin can do something with his head 
besides balancing a wedge of cheese.) In 
place of Smith and Thomas, there are the 
Patriots’ Curtis Martin and the Panthers’ 
Anthony Johnson. Kids. 

Maybe this isn't the Apocalypse. 
Maybe Dallas will be back next year. 
(And maybe by then the Cowboys’ wide 
receiver Deion Sanders will have re- 
gained consciousness. Lying on that cart 
as he was wheeled off die field, it looked 
like the aftermath of the barricades scene 
in “Les Miserabtes.”) 

Maybe a search party can find Pitts- 
burgh’s defense by then. And maybe 
they’ll find Denver's, too since El- 
way can’t bring you back if he doesn’t 
get the ball. 

Maybe with all the money the 49ers 
spend on coaching consultants, they can 
spend some on a running back so Steve 
Young doesn ’t have to hit the beach like 
the Marines at Iwo Jima. 

Or maybe it’s a whole new ball game 
in the NFL. Five years ago. Green Bay 
was coming off a 4-12 season. Four 
years ago. New England was coming off 
2-14. Three years ago Jacksonville and 
Carolina had fbetr noses pressed up 
agains t the windowpane of pro football. 

Maybe something is happening here, 
and you don’t know what it is, do you. 
Jeny Jones? 




WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 


For Sale: Dodgers, 
Last Family Team 


By Murray Chass 

New York Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — Peter O’Malley, a 
remnant of the dying days when fam- 
ilies owned major league baseball 
teams as their sole business, has pos- 
ted a ’ ‘for sale” sign in Los Angeles, 
declaring his intention to sell one of 
the most glamorous and successful . 
franchises in professional sports his- 
tory. 

At the start of the 40th anniversary 
of the announcement of the 
controversial but pioneer- 
ing move from Brooklyn, O’Malley 
said he and his sister, Terry Se idler, 
who own virtually 100 percent of the 
Dodgers, had decided this was the 
time to selL 

“The thought occurred to me with 
more and more frequency," O’Mal- 
ley said Monday at a news conference 
at Dodger Stadium. “It finally oc- 
curred to me that this is the time. My 
family supports the position com- 
pletely.” 

The transition, he said, “will be 
smooth; it will not be a circus." 

Die Dodgers, who have finished 
first or second 19 rimes in O ’Malley’s 
27 years as club president and have 
drawn more than 3 million in atten- 
dance 1 1 times in the last 19 years, 
will become the 13th major league 
team to be sold since June 1991. 
That’s half of the franchises that ex- 
isted that season. 

The Dodgers are the last of the 
teams owned by families like the 
Yawkeys of Boston, the Griffiths of 
Washington and Minnesota, the Car- 
penters of Philadelphia and die Stone- 
hams of New York and San Fran- 
cisco. 

“I think family ownership of sports 
today is probably a (tying breed,' ’ said 
O'Malley, whose family took control 
of the franchise in 1950. “If you look 
at all sports, it’s a high-risk business. 
Professional sports is as high risk as 
the oil business. You need a broader 
base than an individual family to 
carry you through the storms. Groups 


or corporations are probably the way 
of the future." 

The Dodgers’ package is a luc- 
rative one. It includes the team. 
Dodger Stadium, the property it 
Stands on, Dodgertown in Vero 
Beach, Florida, the Vero Beach Class 
A minor league team and a baseball 
complex in the Dominican Republic. 

One person familiar with the sale of 
franchises estimated that the package 
could sell for roughly $350 million. 
Another person with knowledge spe- 
cifically of baseball sales said $450 
million would not surprise him. Wal- 
ter O’Malley. Peter’s father, bought 
an initial interest in the Dodgers for a 
few hundred thousand dollars during 
the mid- 1 940s. 

Asked why he was selling, O’Mal- 
ley talked about estate planning and 
his and his sister’s families. He has 
three children, Mrs. Seidler 10. 

**It’s smart to plan for the next 
generation," he said. “That’s prob- 
ably die best reason." 

“On balance,” O’Malley said, 
“the family completely supports this 
decision. 1 haven't talked to any of our 
children about someday running the 
Dodgers. Your children should decide 
their own career path without any in- 
fluence. My dad didn’t put any pres- 
sure on me. He saw I was interested. I 
wouldn’t get in the way of my children 
in deciding what they wanted to do.” 

O’Malley’s father, who ran the 
team from 1950 to 1970. was the most 
powerful and persuasive owner in 
baseball during nis tenure. 

Peter, who became president in 
1 970 — nine years before his father’s 
death — and is the longest active 
president in baseball, never achieved 
that status, although he was a major 
supporter of Bowie Kuhn when Kuhn 
was commissioner. 

In recent years, O'Malley has be- 
come isolated from baseball’s center 
of power. He and Jerry Reinsdogf, the 
influential owner of the Chicago 
White Sox, hated each other and he 
and Bud Selig had a falling out after 
Selig became acting commissioner. 


Niekro Wins One More: 



By Claire Smith 

New York Times Service 


Phil Niekro, the knuckleball pitch- 
er who won 3 1 8 games, was elected to 
the baseball Hall of Fame in his fifth 
year of eligibility. 

While the doors opened toNkakro mi 
Monday, they stayed closed for Don 
Sutton, a 324-game winner, who re- 
mains one of only six pitchers, in- 
cluding Niekro, to win 300 games and 
strike out at least 3,000 bitters. Sutton 
missed by nine votes among tin record 
473 ballots cast 

Niekro, who pitched until age 48 in a 
24-year career, was named on 380 
ballots cast by members of the Baseball 
Writers Association of America who 
have covered baseball for at least 10 
consecutive years. Niekro was named 
cm 8034 percent of the ballots, well 
above the 75 percent needed. 

It marked the second straight year 
that Niekro and Sutton finished first 
and second on the ballot. Neither was 
elected in 1996becau.se both failed to 
get 75 percent of the vote. 

Sutton is the only 300-game winner 
eligible but not yet enshrined in 
Cooperstown. His prospects might 
worsen over the next few years as Gary 
Cartier, George Brett, Robin Yount and 
Nolan Ryan become eligible. He re- 
ceived 346 votes (73.15 percent). 

Niekro, 57, pitched most of Ids ca- 
reer for the Braves in Milwaukee ami 
Atlanta. He flourished thanks to a pitch 
more like a butterfly than a bullet. 

The right-hander started with the 
Braves in 1964. He also pitched for 
the Yankees, the Indians and the Blue 
Jays before retiring after the 1987 
season. He struck out 3342 batters, 
compiled 592 decisions and pitched 
5.404 innings. His career earned run 


nm 


ame 


average was 335. He won 20 games 
three times and lost 20 twice. In 1979 
he did both, going 21-20. He ranks 
13th in victories and 8th in strikeouts. 
Sutton ranks 1 1 th and 5th. 

Niekro was a five-tune Gold Glove 
winner and holds the National League 
record for pu touts by a pitcher (340). 
He shares the major league mark for 
most years working 200 or more in- 
i (19) with Cy Young. 

21 years Niekro’s career ran 
J with that of his brother, Joe, a 

/ knuddeballer. They pitched for 

a combined 46 years and won 538 
games, a record for brothers. 

Niekro won his 300th game, at 45, 
while with New York, pitching a com- 
plete game shutout against Toronto chi 
the final day of the 1985 season. 

Niekro said later that he threw only ' 
one knncfcleball in that landmark vic- 
tory — on the final pitch of the game. 
He said he had wanted to show that he 
did not need a trick pitch to win, but 
on the final pitch he wanted to pay 
homage to the pitch that carried oaty 
one other pitcher to the Hall of Fame 
— Hoyt Wilhelm in 1985. 

Niekro is the I74th player and 61st 
pitcher elected. 

The only other player named oo 
more than half the ballots was Tony 
Perez, the former All-Star first base- 
man for the Cinc innati Reds, who 

received 312 votes (65.96 percent). - 

Pete Rose, baseball’s hits leader 
whose ban from baseball because of 
gambling has made him ineligible fir 
the Hall of Fame ballot, received 20 
write-in votes. Joe Torre, now foe 
Yankees manager, and Dick Allen, a 
fwifef All-Star first and third 
for the PhilKes and White Sox, each 
finished with 79 votes in their 15fo and 
final year on the writers’ ballot 


Phil Niekro's Hall of Fame Numbers 


CAREER STATISTICS 


YEARS 


TOTAL 

24 


ILLRANK 

5 


GAMES 


VICTORIES 


310 


13 


TOTAL 

864 


U.LRANK 

15 


INNINGS 


5,403.2 


LOSSES 


274 


HITS 


5,044 


ERA 


3.35 


35* 


STRIKEOUTS 


3342 




.. ■ m 



2,337 S 

‘Pitchers with 3,000 or more career 
______ Innnings pitched. 


BY -THE 'NUMBERS 


538 Major league record for career 
victories by two brothers (J oe) 

340 National League record for 
most putouts by a pheher 

zoo National League record for 
most w3d pitches. 


2 **»««eball Pilchers in the 
Han Of Fame 


T against San 

Piegoln 1983. 

0 Major league record for ~ 

ir?Si sa f ificefll ® 8 aHowed . 

m Z84 innings, in 1984. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1997 


PAGE 19 


SPORTS 


Nigeria Is a Coach’s Dream and Nightmare 


Ser s , 


International Herald Tribane 

'• T ONDON — This is Africa cail- 
* I ^Somewhere out there is a 
* — /foreign coach big enough, bold 
enough and Imowtedgeable enough to 
lead Nigeria to its destiny. ' 

That, in soccer, could be nothing less 
man world champion. Nigeria is the 
Olympic champion, its youth has twice 
conquered the worid at Under 17 level. 
So now the nation is big-game hunting 
for a m a nag er-coach to harness this po- 
tential for the 1998 World Cnp. 

Nigeria is the rising force on a con- 
tinent that Sir S tanley Rents,' the H aft* 
president of FIFA world soccer’s gov- 
erning body, forecast -would win the 
World Cup this mitienninTn 
Time is short, Nigeria’s next qual- 
ifying match is in Kenya this weekend. 
The soccer federation had pledged on 
state TV to find a coach for this game. 

“We need a high profile man,” said 
Dailadi Bako, assistant director of Ni- 
geria’s Sports Ministry. * ‘We have got in 
touch with Kevin Keegan, Howard 
WiUrinsoD, Louis van (im l and Johan 
Cruyff and want to select one of them to 
manage the Super Eagles.” 

This is intriguing. 

Keegan is a millionaire and a messiah 
I in England's northeast, where has 
* raised Newcastle United fr om poverty 
to European prominence in die first 
third of his 10-year contract 
His charisma attracted backers and 
talentJCeegan exhales enthusiasm the 
way Newcastle folk used to inhale coal 


World Soccer / Ret Husnu 


dust Newcastle narrowly missed Eng- 
land’s league chammonShm Inn season. 


its team is fourth this year. But ebul- 
lience is turning to fear of failing. 

Keegan’s team At tack s like cavaliers 
but defends poorly. Normally the most 

o^a °press 1 confoTsnce^lmday, when 
quizzed about stories that he had offered 
to resign. 

Nigeria was not mentioned, but even 
if he left Newcastle, who could replace 
the idyllic En glish mansion, complete 
with stables for his daughters’ horses, 
built for Keegan on the Newcastle chair- 
man’s estate? 

What about van Gaal? Recommend- 
ations of his coaching at Ajax of Am- 
sterdam comes first hand from three 
Nigerians. Finidi George, the stealthy 
winger, was in van Gaal’s Ajax two 
. European Cup winning teams. Nwanko 
Kanu. center forward, captain and in- 
spiration of the Olympic triumph, was 
van Gael's prodigy -until Inter Milan 
bought him last summer. Another 
Olympian, Txjam Babangida is flying 
on Ajax’s right wing 

Van Gaal will leave Ajax in May, but 
probably to coach Bayern Munich. 

Joban Cruyff, sacked by Barcelona last 
summer, steadfastly refuses offers from 
the biggest clubs while he pursues the 
Barcelona president through the courts. 
Candidate number four, Howard W3km- 


son, this week accepted the $300,000-a- 
year post of technical director of the 
English Football Association. 

So four big-name candidates, and no 
appointment for Nigeria. The proposition 
must be enticing because of die rich talent 
of Nigeria’s players — their combination 
of muscle, strip and competitive instinct 
built through the endless hours when 
boys in poverty play with a ball. 

But the task of turning them into 
worid beaters has drawbacks. The coach 
works for General Sam Abacha, the mil- 
itary ruler. In victory, the general prom- 
ises lavish rewards; but be, his ministers 
and the minions at the soccer association 
put impediments in die way. 

rplHIS TIME last year Nigeria was 

I pulled out of the African Nations’ 
A. Cup in South Africa because 
Abacha was upset when Nelson Mandela 
denounced the execution of dissidents in 
Nigeria The team, bnxzght home from 
crabs in nme European countries, was 
left idle at its training camp. 

In the summer, the youngest of them 
came from behind against Brazil in the 
semifinal and against Argentina in the 
Olympic final. Johannes Bonfrere, the 
Dutchman who had been Nigeria's third 
coach in a matter of months, was dec- 
orated with the country’s highest honor 
and promised a 1.5 million naira 
(SI 45,000) bonus by the president 


Within weeks, Bonfrere was the ex- 
Nigeria coach. He claimed dial his 
S7.500 monthly check, never mind the 
bonus, was unpaid. The soccer associ- 
ation accused him of misusing the 
$25,000 budget fra Olympic preparation. 
So, like his predecessors. Clemens West- 
erhof, also Dutch, and Brazilian Carlos 
Alberto, he departed acrimoniously. 
Bonfrere took his astute tactical grasp to 
Qatar. His advice to any successor? 
“They promise the earth, but they want to 
tell you who to select. European coaches 
would not last a month before walking 
out because in Nigeria you are not only 
coach but manager, ball boy, nursemaid, 
transport organizer, everything. Most 
trainers would quickly go mad.” 

Yet, Bonfrere agrees, the potential is 
immense. 

At the ministry, Bako admitted: “We 
are desperate to have a new manager. 
The man to fill the vacancy must be able 
to fit into and operate withm the Nigerian 
situation. It will be criminal if we fail to 
qualify for the 1998 Worid Cup.'* 

Criminal, indeed. In Budapest on 
Tuesday Kalman Meszoly. formerly 
Hungary’s coach, claimed he was duped 
by a Nigerian asking $2,000 to fix an 
interview for the vacant position. 
Meszoly waited; The agent returned, and 
demanded a commission because, he 
said, Meszoly was short-listed. Niger- 
ia’s F. A. denies that Meszoly was ever a 
candidate. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 




Dew Id fUocock/Apcacc Fmr 

HITTING OUT — Amy Frazier delivering a backhand on her way to 
victory over No. 1 seed Arantxa Sanchez Vicario in the second round of 
the Sydney International, the last event before the Australian Open. 


Richter Saves Rangers in 2-2 Tie With Avalanche Sex Assault Shakes Canadian Junior Hockey 


The Associated Press 

Mike Richter, the New York 
Rangers’ goalie, extended his unbeaten 
streak to 1 6, making 38 saves in a 2-2 tie 
with tire Colorado Avalanche. 

Richter - allowed two power-play 
goals to the Avalanche on their first five 
shots, then stopped their next 35 as the 
Rangers rallied to extend their home-ice 
unbeaten streak to seven. 

It was a standoff between Richter and 
Colorado's goaltender. Patrick Roy. who 
will start for the Western Conference in 
the All-Star game Jan 18 in San Jose. 

$Roy made 30 saves in an equally stellar 
performance as Colorado also extended 
ns unbeaten streak to seven. 

“It was a super hockey game,” said 
Colorado’s Keith Jones, who scored a 
goal “It was playoff-type hockey.” 

Richter, overlooked for die All-Star 

game, was at his best in the third period 

when he made 16 saves. 


Florida’s John Vanbiesbrouck, Buf- 
falo's Dominflc Hasek and New Jersey’s 
Martin Brodeur are the goalies on the 
Eastern All-Star team. 

After giving up two goals in the 
second period, Roy stopped die Rangers 
the rest of the way. 

The Avalanche came into Monday 
night’s game with seven regulars out of 

HHi Robmpup 

the lineup, including three of their top 
four scorers — Joe Sakic, Peter Fors- 
berg and Valeri Kamensky. 

The Avalanche quickly put the 
Rangers into a hole with first-period 
goals by Jones and Jon Klemm. With 

Jones scored at *11: 16. The AvalanJbe 
still had a man advantage when Klemm 
scored at 12:49. 

The Rangers came back to tie it in the 


second as Bill Berg jammed the puck 
past Roy at 10:24, and Adam Graves 
scored at 17:32. 

Lightning 4, tmtert 3 Defenseman 
Bill Houlder scored his first goal of the 
season as visiting Tampa Bay beat Ot- 
tawa. Alexander Selivanov, Daymond 
Langkow and Shawn Burr also scored 
for Tampa, which withstood a Senators’ 
rally after taking a 4-1 lead on Haul der’s 
goal early in the third period. 

ChbAmh s, whalers 4 In Montreal, 
Vincent Damphonsse scored three 
goals, including the game-winrwrwidi 
3.4 seconds left in regulation, as the 
Canadiens extended their unbeaten 
streak to a season-high seven games. 

Canucks 5, Mighty Ducks i In Ana- 
heim, California, Pavel Bure scored 
twice and Mike Sillinger had a goal and 
two assists as Vancouver won its third 
straight Scott Walker scored his first 
NHL goal in more than a year. 


By Helene Elliott 

Lot Angeles Times . 

Sheldon Kennedy was sexually as- 
saulted by his junior hockey coach in 
Canada more than 350 times overa 10- 
year period — sometimes with a shot- 
gun pointed at him. 

Kennedy, a winger with the Boston 
Bruins, and another player who has 
maintained anonymity filed suit last 
summer against Graham James, long a 
successful coach in die junior ranks. 
James last week pleaded guilty to two 
counts of sexual assault between 1 984 
and 1994 and was sentenced to three 
and a half years in prison. He could be 
out on day parole in September. 

“ He took the youth right out of me,” 
Kennedy said in a television interview. 
“My years from 14 until now have kind 
of been a fog. IT! never forgive him." 


Many youth hockey coaches are 
parents who begin as volunteers and 
advance through the system without 
undergoing the type of screening an 
employer would run on a job-seeker. 
Canadian hockey officials are discuss- 
ing how to screen coaches, while law 
enforcement officials are trying to 
determine if there are other victims. 

Coaches can be powerful authority 
figures in the Canadian junior ranks, 
where kids often leave home at 14 or 
15 and live with local families as they 
take the first steps toward a National 
Hockey League career. 

“At 15 in the hockey worid.” 
Kennedy said, “it’s a tough thing to 
do. to say a man has touched you or 
made sexual moves on you. You don’t 
want to wreck your dreams." 

Every Tuesday and Thursday for six 
years, Kennedy went to James’s 


house. “He considered me his wife.” 
Kennedy said. 

Kennedy, who drank to hide his 
turmoil, kept his secret until he was 
with the Calgary Flames, his second 
NHL team. 

The James case is not the first such 
incident in Canadian minor hockey. 

In 1996. the Quebec Ice Hockey 
Federation barred Martin Dubuc from 
coaching after he was convicted of 
sexual assault. Former coach Jean Be- 
gin of Drummondville. Quebec, con- 
victed of seven counts of sexual as- 
sault in 1991, committed suicide in 
prison. Stephane Valois of Sore!, Que- 
bec, was charged with three counts of 
sexual assault on minors shortly after 
his team won the national midget 
championship in 1990. 

He was sentenced to five months m 
jail. 


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W L - Pci OB State* Sato 37 22 22 25-181 

24 8 J50 — CrRtaff 13-25 ft-B 39, Mason 7-14 13-1427; 

23 9 719 1 Spewed 9-20 55 26, XSortfi VI-20 1-1 

14 18 AX ID 23. MMMMfe— Onfafle 54 (Mason 181, 

10 19 345 12U Gdden State 52 (XSnWl IQ. 

t 21 JOl 14 Assists — Charlotte 22 (Mason 6). Golden 

' 8 23 .259 .1515 State 24 CSprwwH, Mu*n 7). 


Vancouver 

6 

27 

.182 

18M 


PMcmcomstoH 



LA. Lakes 

25 

10 

.714 

— 

Seattle — 

23 

11 

-jSIA 

Wr 

Portland 

19 

15 

559 

5W 

Sau omenta 

14 . 

. » 

^12 

low 

LA-CBppcrt 

13 

■ 19 

^06 

10% 

Golden State 

12 

19 

587 

11 

Ptaenbi. 

- W 

22 

J13 

13’4 


29 4 479 — 

24 7 .774 4 

21 W 477 7 

18 11 421 9 


The AP Top 25 

The top 23 tame to The A s so c! M ud Prose* 
-taDepr tas htati e n -pall, wth Orst-ptaco 
votes la perenOieeae. roeante through Jen. 

S, tdfat points based on 25 points tor a ttrst- 
ptoce sole through one paint tar a 25tM*rc» 
note, and last week's nmHng= 

Record pts Pro 

1 . Kansas (59) IM 1,739 1 

2. Woke Forest 01) 104) 1.685 2 


1 Kentucky 

4. lowest. 

5. (tensor 

6. CJndnnafl 

7. Arizona 
B.VBamna 
9. Utah 

1 a Duke 

11. Minnesota 

12. Xavier, Ohio 

13. North CanOno 
M.Lout»Be 

15. Indiana 

16. Michigan 

17. Oregon 

18. Now Merico 

19. Maiytond 
2a Texas Tech 
Zl-Stantatf 

22. Terns . 

23. Boston Coflege 

24. Georgia 


12-1 1,412 3 

104) 1-494 4 

12- 1 U91 5 

9-2 1373 6 

9-2 1,273 9 

11-1 U57 10 

9-2 1.149 7 

11-2 1,107 13 

13- 1 14)77 15 

10-0 932 17 


14-2 762 12 

10- 3 684 8 

1W) 635 20 

11- 2 508 16 

12- 1 444 19 

9-2 373 23 

8-2 360 21 

• 7-3 325 IB 

B-2 212 25 

1M 145 - 


25. H totals 11-3 94 24 

ORies receiving vales: Connecticut 74 
Mississippi 75. Florida St 6a Wisconsin 3& 
Providence 31, New Mtrico5L 19, Iowa IB. 
CoS. of Oiarteston 14, Atanjurite 1 4, CnflfomJa 
11, HawaB 11. Tens Chrtstfcm 11, UCLA 11. 
Padflc7,E. Michigan 4 trends SL4 Alabama 
X Oklahoma X Tuba 1 Georgetown z New 
Orleans 2, SW Mbsorni St. l. 


HOCKEY 


NHL STANDINGS 


PMtoddpNo 
FtaddD 
N.Y. Rongen 
New Jersey 
Washington 
Tampa Bay 
N-Y. t&tandera 


ATLANTIC HYSON 
W L T PIS 
I 25 12 4 54 


Bvffidp 

PlHsbwgh 

Hartford 

Manfred 

Boston 

Ottawa 


21 10 9 51 
m 22 16 6 50 

r 21 15 3 45 

i 17 20 4 38 

r 14 20 5 33 

era 12 -IV 8 32 

NORTHEAST DIVISION 

W L T PIS 
21 15 4 44 

21 15 4 46 

17 16 7 41 
16 18 8 40 
15 18 6 36 

12 20 7 31 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 



' WE 
HAVE TO 

. talk. . 


BUT HOU) CAN U?E \ 

TALK IF YOU'RE A ® 

006, ANP U06S -.A I 
CAN'T TALKJ^I 1 WOOFM | 




GARFIELD 


CENTRAL DtVtWON 

W L T Pts GF GA 
Daflrn 23 15 3 49 118 100 

Detroit 20 13 7 47 125 85 

Ptaenix 18 19 4 40 110 130 

5L Louis 18 20 4 40 120 136 

Oifcogo 15 21 7 37 111 120 

Toronto 17 24 0 34 125 146 

McmcanmnoN 

W L T Pts GF GA 

Colorado 24 TO 7 55 144 98 

Edmonton 18 19 4 40 136 127 

Vancouver 19 19 1 3» 124 130 

AnoMfen 14 21 5 33 113 126 

Cdgay 14 22 5 33 102 121 

San Jose 14 21 4 32 101 125 

LosAngeles 13 23 4 30 104 1 38 

WON OAT’S MSStTS 
Tampa Bay 2 1 1-4 

Ottawa 10 2—3 

First Period; T-5eflvonw II (Bannister. 
Tataraod) 2. T-Langkaw 8 (Gralton, 

Zamunert 3, &> Yasnto 17 (Duchesne. 
HIM S ec ond Period: T-Bwr 8 (Cullen. 
SeBvanov) TWrt Petted; T-HooWer 1 

(Ularwv, Ytataeit) 6, (V Pttfldc 3 (AHredssoo, 
Zent) 7, Dv Cmneyuortn 6 ahoHok, 

Laufcfcanen) (pp). Stats oa goat T- 12-8- 
6—26. O- 8-6-10-24. GoaBes: T-TotarocdL 
O-Rhodes. 

Hartford 1 2 1-4 

Manfred 2 1 2-5 


First Petted; M-WIBue 3 (Ttwmlon, 
Tuckerl (pp). 2. H -Cosset ll (Wesley. 
Sanderson) (pp). 1 M-Murray 3 (Pnteli 
Second Period: H-Grlmson 2 (MondervUle, 
Wesley) 5 M-Domphousse 17 {Savage. 
Recchl) A H -Cossets 12 (Sanderson) TbW 
Period: H-Kapanen 6 (Rice, Prlmeau) 8. M- 
Dnmphousse IB iPopovIc Savage] 9, M-. 
Damphouree 19(Receh(] Shots oagoak H- 9- 

10- 11-30. M- 5-6-15 — To. GoaBes; H- 
Muzraffl. M-TTiDmuO. 

Caterndo 2 0 0 0-2 

N.Y. Rangers 0 2 0 0-2 

Rut Period: C- Jones 1 5 (You ng. OzoBnslt) 
(pp). 2. C-tOemm 5 (Leratew. Jones) (pp). 
Second Period: New York, Berg 6 (Driver) e. 
New Yor*. Groves 14 (RobttalUe. Messier) 
(pp). TWrd Period: None. Ovemree. None. 
Stats an goal: C- 10-12-16-2-40. New York 

11- 13-6-2 — 32. GoaBes: C-Roy. New York, 
Richter. 

Vancouver 1 2 2—5 

Antaafae I 0 0-1 

Fint Period A-Sekmne 22 (Mfronav. 
Kartya). 2. v-WaAer 1 (SITIIngert Second 
Period: V-Bure 15 (Sfiftgert 4. v-stmnper 8, 
(sn). Third Period: v-Bure 16 (Tlkkonen) 
(sh). & V-Babydt 3 (Ridley, Ron On) (pp). 
Shots aa goto: v- 15-14-12-41. A- 15-6- 
10-31. GoaBes: V-McLean. A-Hetari. 


CRICKET 


UMimovBswoeuuuu 

AUGTHAUA VS. PAKISTAN 
TUESDAY. IN HOBART, AUSTRALIA 

Pakistan: 1 49 all out hi 45J avers 
Australia: 120 all out in 4IJ overa. 

Pakistan non by 29 runs. 

■«M d h i— : West Indies 6. Pakistan A 
Australia 4 . 

wuiMNisToee 

UNITED OVERS TOUR HATCH 
AUSTRALIAN COUNTRY XI VS. W. HPICS 
TOOWOOMBA, AUSTRALIA 

Australian Country XL 239 oil out In 495 
avers 

West Intfies: 275 tor seven In 50 overs 
West Indies won by 36 runs 


SOCCER 

'• • .I, - 


Real Betls '. Vatenda 1 
Wtad b if. Real Vlodrld 42, Barcelona 41. 
Deporttto Coruna 37. Real Bens 36. AiteOco 
Madrid 32. Retd Sodedad 31, VOBodUld 29. 
Tenerife 28. Annette BBboo 27, Radnp San- 
tander 25. Valencia 24 Rayo VoUecana 23. 
Gefla Vigo 23. Oviedo 22, Espanyol 19, Com- 
pasWa 19 , Sporting Gtyan 18. Logrones l& 
Zaragoza 14 Sevttta 14 Hercules 12, Ex- 
tremaduru 8. 


TRANSITIONS- 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOC1AHOH 

newj EBSEY-vwdvcd F Uoyd Daniels and 
C Robert werdann. 

00 lan do — A drvtned G Aidemee Hord- 
awoy from into red 8s). 

phoenix— S uspended F Robert Horry tor 
Mo games for throwing a towel at coach 
Poany Ainge In a Jon. 5 game. 

roaruu 

NAHOHAL FOOTBALL LEAOUE 
buffalo— R eassigned quaitertadis 

coach Jim Stainer to the learns scouting 
department. 

HOCKSY 

NATKMAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
COLORADO— Announced the resignation of 
Joel QuermevtOe, assistant coach. Named 
Mlie FaUgno assistanr coach. 

ST. Loais— Named Joel OuermevtUe roach, 
couiai 

Kentucky -A nnounced QB BJBy Jodi 
HasMns w8) transfer to Rhode Bland next 
ML 

Morehouse college— N amed Doug 
Williams football caadL 
SAN DIEM STATE— Announced mat C Aliya 
WTinans hca been dismissed (ram the wom- 
ens basketball team for Wakrilng team rules. 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


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”0h, don’t be silly! No thanks needed. 
Just take the brain - but tell that doctor 
you work for not to be such a stranger." 







If : 







PAGE 20 


LANGUAGE 


The 4-1-1 on Slang 


By Lynette Holloway 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — Ayo, 
listen up. The four-one- 
one is that the second volume 
of the Random House His- 
torical Dictionary of Slang 
promises to kick more flavor 
from the world of hip-hop. So 
even those of you chillin' in 
butter-smooth apartments on 
Paris Avenue can be down 
with the latest street slang. 

The first volume, pub- 
lished in 1994 and covering 
letters A through G, was 
heavy on Valley Girl-speak. 
But the next installment, 
which covers H through 0 
and is due this summer, lends 
more scholarship to hip-hop, 
with hundreds of examples 
gleaned from rap lyrics. 

"This volume will have 
more of the language, not only 
because the vocabulary has 
grown but it has become more 
widespread," said Jesse T. 
Sheid lower, the dictionary ed- 
itor at Random House Ref- 


erence. 


□ 


Of course. Mack shag has 
always contributed to the 
American vemacular.The pop- 
ularity of hip-hop has lifted the 
latest incarnation of black 
slang from the streets to new 
heights in pop culture. 

"More so than ever, the 
language is everywhere." 
said Bill Adler, a record pro- 
ducer and one-time spokes- 
man for groups like Public 
Enemy. "In a box-office hit 
‘Independence Day.' you 
have a rapper. Will Smith, 
playing the lead role. Nobody 
blinked when he spoke 
mostly hip-bop. " 

So how does an erudite ed- 
itor figure out the latest slang? 
Easy. Sheidlower watches a 
lot of "Martin." the Fox sit- 
com starring the comedian 
Martin Lawrence. He also 


reads liner notes and listens to 
rappers like Notorious 
Snoop Doggy Dogg and 
Mobb Deep. He has street in- 
formants whose names he 
prefers to keep on the down 
low. And he meets with stu- 
dents. reads publications like 
The Source and Rap Pages, 
and surfs Internet offerings 
like "The Totally Unofficial 
Rap Dictionary." 

His methods for gathering 
information are no different 
from most shorties — that is. 
young people — from the 
'hood. 

"I watch Fox and l/PN-9. 
said Jose Lopez, a 14-year- 
old from Harlem. “Most of 
their shows ai night are up on 
the latest words, no diggity." 

"The language is very 
transitory," said Tom 
Dalzell, the author of "Flap- 
pers 2 Rappers: American 
Youth Slang, published last 
fall by Merriam-Webster. 
“When you take a snapshot 
of what's being said in Oc- 
tober, it may not be said a 
month later." 

Ask Charlene Ortiz, 14, 
about the staying power of 
words. In the fall, "No 
doubt" was a favorite way of 
saying, "That’s the truth." 
Now, it’s "No diggity," she 
said, as in Blackkreet’s hit 
single "No Diggity.” “It just 
depends an what you're 
listening to," she said. 

But nobody is clowned for 
using a word that’s pass£, she 
said. You might get a look, 
though. 

Among the entries in the dic- 
tionary will be "kickin'.'' as in 
smelly, to relax or to give. 
"Mad," as in beautiful, very or 
a lot “Peeps," as in friends, to 
look at, or to be aware of 
"Mack." as in playboy, pimp, 
street-smart businessman or to 
rap to. “Four-one-one," mean- 
ing information “Butler." as 
in trice. "Down low," as in 
quiet 


For Wes Craven, Enough of Freddy Krueger 


By Robin Finn 

New York Tunes Service 


N EW YORK — He lives in the old Steve 
McQueen place, a Hollywood Hills aer- 
ie that he calls “Zenlikc," but the veteran 
fearmonger and director Wes Craven insists 
that his home shows no sign of being haunted 
by anybody. Present owner included. 

In Manhattan recently to discuss all that is 
terrifying not just about his newest Sim, 
"Scream," but about spending a quarter- 
century in tbe horror business. Craven 
looked so unalarming. with his muted Ar- 
en ani-ish threads and hint of California tan, 
that he fitted right in with the hip New York 


arts crowd trading lunchtime concepts and 
treatments at die TriBeCa Grill. 


No one clinking glasses at the clamorous 
restaurant, on the ground floor of Robert De 
Niro’s film-production headquarters, seem- 
ed to realize that there was a gourmet of gore 
in their midst. No one had checked the out- 
of-towner at the door to make sure that the 
man who conjured up Freddy Krueger, the 
archetypal bogeyman of "Nightmare on Elm 
Street,” hadn’t brought his own knives ... in 
place of fingers. 

It was quite the opposite of the recent 
welcome he received from Santa Rosa, Cali- 
fornia, which refused to let him shoot his 
new shocker in its high school because it was 
convinced he would corrupt the children. 

"I mean, really." Craven complained, 
surprised that a group of adults on "their 
moral high horse" could feel so strongly 
about keeping his cinematic vision out of 
their town. 

Now, he was fresh off a plane from Miami, 
where he had ducked in and out at the behest 
of the film's producer, Miramax, to promote 
the latest in his oeuvre of occasionally clas- 
sic fright films. 

“Scream" opens with the stalking and 
eventual evisceration of the character played 
by Drew Barrymore and, despite an infusion 
of camp and comedy, is not for the faint of 
heart Test-screened in Secaucus, New Jer- 
sey, before a local audience whose fright 
knew no bounds, "Scream" represents 
Craven’s 1 9th foray into big-screen horror. 

What scares Craven most is the possibility 
that he will never get a second chance to 
make a first impression. The man has a 
master's degree in philosophy and keeps a 
photo of his two grown children in his wallet, 
for goodness' sake, but even within his 
own milieu there is the perception that 



tissues and other practical flu fighters, 

Tbe world of genre pictures svjW 

to sort of sneer aland say t^Lsnta^but^ 

the game time it’s incredibly vital, said 

Craven, who insists that j!!!! 

the proper word to describe ha fasciMti 
with nightmares and the dark side of the 

shouldn’t be there jus! for 
the amusement of seeing people dicedand 
sliced, but you have to admit tlMsre s been a 
hell of a lot of slicing and dicing in i the ^course 
of human history,' be noted. Certainly 

there's an eternal evfl there. ^ - 

He grew up in an unlovely section of 
Cleveland where, if ‘be wasn’t actually ex- 
posed to violence, its specter lurked aroumf 
every corner, even in his own home, m 
parents broke up. and his father died when he 
was 5, although not without leaving a ter- 
rifying imprint. 


a lot 


“By my fifth birthday I'd been exposed to 
[ot of anger, and to death,” be said. It s 


Bart biTnca 

Wes Craven, at home in Hollywood: The charms of horror can pale. 


he lives and breathes for badness’s sake. 

Trapped in a world he created 24 years ago 
when his first film, “Last House on me 
Left,” overstepped its destination — a 
quirky Boston arts theater — to become a 
gory cult classic, the 5 7 -year-old director has 
found out just how it feels to be a victim of 
Hollywood typecasting. 


“People would literally grab their chil- 
dren ana run out of the room when they saw 


my name on the screen.” said Craven, who 
expected his first film to be a lark, not a life 
sentence. “And to the critics. I'm bor- 
rormeister this and slasher that. Sometimes 
I'm amazed at the stupidity of the critics. 
They take the whole genre as a swamp they 
don't want to go into." 

But now tbe write r and director of 
“Swamp Thing" (1982) is ready to get out. 
Well, nearly. He fervently hopes that 
“Scream" is his next-to-last genre flick. 

His delivery of tbe sufficiently scary but 
still R-rated “Scream" — the “R” makes it 
more bankable and advertiseable in the 
United States than a film with the more 
restrictive NC-17 rating — came with a 
carrot from Miramax: if he follows it with 
another genre gem, this (me starring were- 


wolves and motorcycles instead of Barry- 
more and Courteney Cox, Craven will be 
awarded his choice among a half-dozen pro- 
jects now awaiting development. 

He longs to make a feature based cm 
"Fiddlefest," a documentary also known as 
“S mall Wonders," which tracks a gifted 
cadre of New York youngsters from their 
poor neighborhoods to their violin conceit at 
Carnegie Hall. 

“They tell me I’m one picture away from 

making an art film, so there’s light at the end 
of the tunnel," be said. “Except I still get die 
feeling I'm looked at like one of those mass 
murderers who gets religion in prison: You 
know they'll never quite trust you.” 

What’s not to trust? 

At lunch, his appearance stopped just 
short of tweedy. (He was, after all, a college 
professor before be turned to horror.) Ins 
reading glasses dangled from a keeper 
around his neck, his beard was neatly 
groomed and the only force of evil pos- 
sessing him was a lingering case of early 
winter flu. He wasn’t carrying a Ftlofax and 
didn’t have a cellular phone glued to 
his ear; what he carried was a little black 
mesh bag stocked with decongestant. 


never quite left me, that perception that 
imrfer the surface there’s die potential for 
violence and chaos and things teat are not 
accounted for by rational thought. 

Craven was raised a brimstone Bapti st: to 
movies, no smoking, no drinking, no ca rd- 
p Laying. Problem was, he didn’t share his 
family s beliefs and was convinced every 
preacher in town knew he was faking it. 

“I failed to find Jesus, find redemption,” 
said Craven, who had the impression he 

would bum in bell as a nonbeliever. "I felt I 
was at fault, had a very dark view of my- 
self.” 

• At 11, he had a personal experience of 
terror that revisited nim much later in the 
farm of Krueger, the janitor who murdered 
children in their dreams. 

Craven was half asleep in his family’s 
second-floor apartment but was awakened 
by a shuffling sound fr o t h the street below. . 
When he looked out the window, a man in a 
fedora and overcoat leered up at him. Then 
the man walked to tee vestibule of the build* 
ing and entered. . 

Craven woke up his brother, who grabbed 
a baseball bat, but when they opened then- 
door, the man had disappeared. 

“Nothing actually happened,” be said. 
“The guy was probably just a drunk, "but I 
never forgot it, that feeling of the potential 
fhwt existed for an adult to take amusement 
from terrifying you. So that guy got the 
paradigm vote when it was time to create 
Freddy.” 




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CRUNCHES 


PEOPLE 


British Museum Suffers Shrinking Pains 


By Sarah Lyall 

New York Times Service 


L ONDON — Late last fall after a 
consultant advised tee British Mu- 
seum to impose admission charges as a 
way to ease its financial problems, tee 
museum seemed ready to break with 238 
yeais of tradition and force its 6 million 
annual visitors to pay at the door. 

But in a decision that speaks volumes 
about tee museum's sense of purpose, the 
23-member board of trustees voted not to 
impose tee fees, at least for now. Still, the 
trustees said that “the introduction of 
charges cannot be ruled out” 

The debate over admission fees is just 
a small part of a wider discussion taking 
place at the British Museum these days. 
Famous the world over for its vast col- 
lection of 6 .5 million treasures ranging 
from tee oldest Neolithic antiquities to 
20th-century manuscripts, tee museum 
is wondering how it can maintain its 
singular way of operating while cutting 
costs and making other necessary 
changes. 

The British government, which 
provides most of the museum’s $84.5 
million annual budget, announced late 
last year teat it would begin reducing its 
contribution. By 2000, the museum 
says, it will be left with a deficit of $25 
million to $34 million. 

The crunch comes, interestingly 
enough, as the museum is gearing up for 
a S 1 59 million development project that 
will turn its large courtyard, unseen for 
150 years, into a soaring vast atrium 
complete with an education center, lec- 
ture halls, seminar rooms, new shops 
and restaurants, and much better access 
to many of the museum’s galleries. 

At the same time, the Museum of 
Mankind, a department that houses the 
museum's respected ethnographic col- 
lection, is to move from a separate 
building into tee space in the main mu- 
seum left by tee removal of the British 
Library to new quarters. 

A $53 million study center where tee 
public will be able to watch the museum 
staff at work and have readier access to 
materials from the collections is also to 
be built. Much of tee money, at least for 


the atrium project, is coming from Na- 
tional Lottery programs: a 11 of it is en- 
tirely separate from tee museum's day- 
to-day financing. 

Museum officials are proud of tee 
plans, and are hoping the new additions 
will go a long way toward addressing 
growing concerns about tee institu- 
tion's other-era feel. 

Several recent events have contrib- 
uted to a sense teat tee museum is in 
trouble. A scathing report released in 
October by Andrew Edwards, a former 
deputy secretary at the Treasury De- 
partment. indicted the British Mu- 
seum's management style and its idio- 
syncratic methods. 

Though the report praised the mu- 
seum's scholarly work, tee dedication 
of its employees and its unparalleled 


A report depicted a place 
of chaotic finances with 
no qualified accountants. 


permanent collection, it depicted a place 
of chaotic finances with no qualified 
accountants on staff and where “with 
limited exceptions, no one knows what 
individual programs really cost." 

Tbe report further described how a 
fear of seeming vulgar or self-promot- 
ing meant teat “no special effort is 
made to inform the public what tee 
museum has to offer*’; how an inbred 
system had discouraged movement of 
employees from the museum to other 
institutions, allowing its staff to more 
than double since 1972. and how the 
museum’s information technology sys- 
tems were so primitive that few offices 
have electronic mail and most are not 
even hooked up to a computer. 

In short, the report said, tee British 
Museum is a formidable but often ana- 
chronistic institution that has done little 
to prepare for the future. 

"Everyone agrees that it needs to be 
reorganized,' ’ said a consultant who has 
worked with tbe museum in the past and 
who spoke on condition of anonymity. 
"It's a fantastic institution, but essen- 


tially it's living in another era. There is a 
feeling teat it needs to be brought into 
tee 20th century, if not tee 21sL" 

The museum appears to be run on 
very different principles from, say, the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, which has 
a suggested admission of $8 and is 
slickly laid out and organized for max- 
imum ease to tee visitor. At the British 
Museum, by contrast, modernized gal- 
leries sit near musty, overcrowded halls 
with haphazardly organized displays 
and outdated information. 

The bathrooms are inadequate, and 
on busy days the cloakroom fills up so 
quickly teal many visitors can't check 
their coats. 

What's more, because of constraints, 
the doors do not open tirniJ 230PJVL on 
Sundays, typically one of the most pop- 
ular days for museumgoing. Small signs 
ask people to make voluntary donations 
of £1 (about SI. 70) as they come in. but 
this raises only about £300.000 a year, a 
tiny amount for the museum. 

* ‘There has been a tendency to ignore 
the needs of visitors and regard teem as 
just something teat one has to put up 
with.” said a museum official who in- 
sisted on anonymity. 

But tee museum's director. Robert - 
Anderson, feels strongly that it should 
not go too far the other way, becoming 
self-aggrandizing at the expense of its 
quiet but powerful strengths. 

“All museums are different, and 
some do blow their horn very loudly 
indeed, but I don't think that in itself is 
necessarily a virtue,” Anderson said. 
“Edwards is talking about a new regime 
teat has come into being in some places, 
but it is by no means universal. It’s 
applicable in part to us, but I think it 
might go a bit far.” 

The museum is facing severe cuts in 
government financing. Among other 
measures. Anderson said, it is consid- 
ering reducing special exiubitions and 
loans to other museums and making 
substantial reductions in staff. 

But he argued teat the financial crisis 
arose not from gross fiscal misman- 
agement but from government cuts. 
“We're having to adjust to a new life 
with less money.” he said. 


T HE producer, songwriter 
and recording artist Ken- 
neth (Babyface) Edmonds 
was nominated for 12 Gram- 
my Awards, tying a record set 
14 years ago by Michael 
Jackson. Smashing Pump- 
kins received seven nomin- 
ations, including album of tee 
year for “Mellon Collie and 
tee Infini te Sadness," while 
Tracy Chapman and Vince 
Gill were each nominated for 
five awards. Babyface, as he 
is known, had a role in two of 
the nominees for song of the 
yea r, a songwriting award. 

He was nominated for writ- 
ing “Exhale (Sboop 
Shoop).” sung by Whitney 
Houston. He produced Eric 
Clapton's “Change the 
World,” for which song- 
writers Gordon Kennedy, 

Wayne Kirkpatrick and 
Tommy Sims were nomin- 
ated. Clapton's ’‘Change the 
World” was also nominated 
for record of the year, along 
with Chapman’s comeback 
hit, “Give Me One Reason,” 
tbe Canadian singer Celine Dion’s 
“Because You Loved Me,” Alanis 
Morissette's “Ironic” and Smashing 
Pumpkins’ “1979." In addition to tee 
two Babyf ace-related songs, nominees 
for song of the year were “Because You 
Loved Me.” LeAnn Rimes’s “Blue" 
and “Give Me One Reason.” Nom- 
inees for best new artist were tbe 13- 
ear-old country singer Rimes, the 
ony Rich Project, Jewel, Garbage 
and current chart-toppers No Doubt. 



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WIDE AWAKE — Two of the 16 teams participating in the 2d annual bed race in 
Rio de Janeiro leaping off the starting tine on the Copacabana beachfront. 


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' tee greatest poets working in tee Eng- 
lish language.” 


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future? AIL a Muslim, said: “Go to 
Mecca, pray five times a day and stay 
pretty.” 


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The Jerusalem International Book 
Fair awarded its annual literary prize to 
tiie Spanish writer and former culture 
minister Jorge Semprnn. 


□ 


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1996 


Beryl Bainbridge 

Whitbread award for best novel 


won Britain’s 


Tuesday, while Seamus Heaney took 
home the poetry award. Bainbridge’s 
book, “Every Man For Himself ' tells 
the story of the Titanic disaster of 1912 
through tee eyes of a young man. 
Heaney's winning work, “The Spirit 
Level” is his first new collection of 
poems in five years and his first since he 
won the Nobel Prize for literature in 
1995. “Quite simply, this was his best 
book,’’ tee judges said. “It confirms 
Seamus Heaney's reputation as one of 


Frank Sinatra was hospitalized for 
undisclosed reasons, two months after 
an eight-day hospital stay that led to 
sensational reports about his health. 
Sinatra tamed 82 on Dec. 12. A hospital . 
source speaking on condition on an- 
onymity said Sinatra wasn't suffering 
from anything life-threatening. 


“Breaking the Waves,” Lars von 
Trier’s harrowing tale of the spiritual 
odyssey of a sheltered young woman, 
was voted tbe best Sim of 1996 by tbe 
National Society of Rim Critics. Von 
Trier’s direction and Rob by Mailer’s 
rough-edged cinematography, . for 
“Breaking the Waves" were also' cited 
by tiie 48 -member group. Emil y "Wat- 
son, die star of “Breaking the Waves,”, 
was voted best actress. The group’s 
choice as best actor was Eddie Murphy 
for his multifaceted comic perform 
mance in “The Nutty Professor. Mar- . 
tin Donovan and Barbara Hershey! 
were named best supporting actor andK 
actress for their work in* ‘The Portrait of 


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Paririnsoa’s disease has slowed 

Muhammad Ali down, but the boxing 

legend called his illness “a blessing.” a Lady.” Best screenplay was “Moth- 
"I always liked to chase the girls,” he er,” wri t t e n by Albert Brooks and 
says in the current issue of People Monica Johnson. And “La Cere-. 
magazine. “Parkinson's stops all that, monie," Claude Chabrol's coolly el- 
Now I might have a chance to go to egant thriller, was voted best foreign 
heaven.” And what are his pl ans for the ' 


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