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INTERNATIONAL 




ribun^ 


t ■■■■ - 

>.* ■ The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

** London, Thursday, January 9, 1997 


No. 35,414 




$ 



$ 


By Nicholas D. Kiistof 

New York Times Sendee - - 

MWANABWrrp, Tanzania — Her face was 
caJm and soothing,' bar Mariam Karega ’$ eyes 
wunnKd with fear as she cradled 15-montfa-old 
Hussein and nursed him, trying to pump life into 
aim along with her milk 

‘‘I’m' losing hope,” Mrs,. Karega said, her 
aching eyes radiating die tenor or any parent 
bolding a dying child “He’s tiny andhe’s 
stopped growing. And although he’d started to 
walLnowhecan’tanvmore.Idtm't thiTilf • 
te’nmakeiL*’ — rr 

In this 'village of thatched mud hnts in 
rural Tanzania, inJEast Africa, the trauma 
of losing a child is almost as common as (Ana 
a scraped knee. The children are dying of' bifu, 
mosquito bites. 

In 1996 alone, between 1 million and 3 l - 

million people died of malaria, the mos- - \ 
qui to-borne disease that has struck the \ 
children in the village. Most alar ming is . y 
that the malaria is becoming resistant to > 
medications and .is expanding into new ‘^j 
areas and killing many more people than 
it did a few decades ago. f / 

For these reasons, the Worid Health '/ 
Organization recently declared that ‘ 'pub- 
lic health enemy No.l” is the mosquito. 


The extraordinary thing about the mosquito is that 
in the current battle against the best xniods of 20th- 
century science and medicine, it may be winning. 

In the 1950s, DDT and other insecticides led to 
a sharp reduction of mosquitoes and of the dis- 

First cf two articles 

ease. But the use of the chemicals was sharply 
curtailed beca u se of their dreadful environmental 
effects. Partly as a result, malaria began a long 
upswing around the work! in the 1960s and 


Malaria 

Mosquito 

(Anopheles 

bifurcatus) 


1970s, 

. “As a single disease, malaria has a 
bigger impact on the world than anything 
you can think of,” said Dr. Kazem Beh- 
behani, director of the division for con- 
trol of tropical diseases at the World 
Health Organization in Geneva. “And 
it’s spreading.’’ 

Between 300 million and 500 million 
people now get malaria each year, and 
someone dies of it about every 15 
seconds — mostly children and pregnant 
women. Over the last decade . malaria has 
killed about 10 times as many children as 
all wars combined have in that period. 

Doctors say that the children can usu- 

See HEALTH, Page 6 



\xiK4jtt l> krub'imK Ne 

Mariam Karega nursing her son. who is dying of malaria, in a village in Tanzania. 


N«h"UU knu..imwN» W-Timr* 


Rumor Mill 
On Deng 
Shifts Again 
TbHighGear 


By Seth Faison 

New York Timor Service 

SHANGHAI — Each night this 
week, China’s central television 
station is devoting an hour of its 
prime-time broadcast to a doca- 
mentaryon the Bfeof Deng, Xiao- 
ping. the nation’ sparamount leader 
for neatly M years.. 

Part ibstory, pan tor wo rs hi p, 
the broadcasts offer the kind of 
glowing idolization ofMr. Deng: 
that he never peamited while he 
was actively in power, and iscloser 
to somedrag that his predecessor,' 
Mao Zedong, a man of more cha- 
rismaMM^^^lomama, might 

Now 92, Dmis hail and 
infinn. He lives traetiy at banted 
central Beijing- And the fact that 
the documentary is beang shown, 
summing up Mr. Deng’s life and 
achievement in a conclusive way, is 
another sign that Ins days are near 
an end. 

Details of Mr. Deng’s condition 
are kept secret by the authorities, so 
it is difficult to verify or disprove, 
periodic rumdra that be has fallen 
seriously ill or is close to death. He 
last appeared in public three yeans 
ago, and he was doddering and 
barely able to walk. 

Last week, a newspaper in Hong 
Kong reported that Mr. Deng had 
been.takm to a miljhaiy hospital 
Beijing and, was in serious con- 
dition. 

As with dozens of similar reports 
over the past decade, it was hud to 
know if any troth was involved or if 
it was a rumor spread by someone 
trying to affect prices cm the Hong 
Kong stock exchange; 

A spokesman for the Chinese 
Foreign. Ministry, Shen Guo fang, 
said Tuesday at a briefing m 
Beijing tfaar the repeat was untrue 
and that Mr. Deng's condition had 
not changed. 

“For an old man, be is do mg 
relatively well/* said Mr. Shen, re- 



See DENG, Page 6 


Trib Index 


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7D294 1 




Albright Outlines Aggressive Agenda for U.S. 


By Brian Knowlton 

International HtraldTribune 

WASHINGTON — MacWeine Albright the sec- 
retary of state-designate, laid out a vision of a direct, 
engaged and rctivist diplomacy on Wednesday before 
the Senate panel that is considering her confirmation. 

“I can assure you that I’m going to tell it like it is 
and explain why it is that we need to be engaged,” 
she told die Senate Foreign Relations Committee. 

She listed NATO expansion, the maintenance of a 
strong relationship with Europe, the vigorous pursuit 


of peace in the Middle East and the building of a 
strong relationship with China as her priorities. 

The remarkably warm reception offered President 
Bill Clinton’s nominee by the Republican-led com- 

The secretary-designate’s record shows a con- 
cern for human rights. Page 3. 

mittee appeared to ensure an easy confirmation for 
Mbs. Albright. 

Beginning with die panel’s Republican chairman. 


Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina, virtually 
every committee member offered words of praise 
and at least tentative support. Mr. Helms promised 
that the hearing would be expeditious, and there 
seemed little doubt that the full Senate would ratify 
the panel's recommendation. 

Many committee members referred with admir- 
ation to the personal journey that took Mrs. Albright 
from childhood in a Czechoslovakia under first the 
Nazis and then the Communists, to the verge of 

See ALBRIGHT, Page 3 


Restored to Power, Gingrich Is 6 a Hero No More ! 


By RJW. Apple Jr. 

v New fork Times Service 


. WASHINGTON — They gave Newt Gingrich the 
benefit of the doubt. They gave him some Dme. But 
he neither looked nor sounded like the self-assured 
revolutionary of old, and few who watched him 
believe that he will ever again wield die kind of 
power that he once did. 

“A hero no ■more,” one of Representative Gin- 
grich's party colleagues said. 

It was also clear, from the tactics ofhis Democratic 


opponents, feat he will be under steady pressure from 
themas he seeks to rebuild his base. 

The speaker won re-election only narrowly. More 
important, his margin of victory was supplied by 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Republican representatives who said publicly or 
privately before Tuesday afternoon’s vote that if they 
backed him they would do so reluctantly, out of pure 
party loyalty. 

Those dozen or so will be the key figures in the 


next two weeks as public hearings delve into Mr. 
Gingricb’s admitted violations of House rules. At 
those hearings, James Cole, the former federal pros- 
ecutor who is serving as the ethics committee's 
special counsel, is to present his findings in detail. 

If the hearings produce new revelations, the speak- 
er’s support could shrink further, and if the evidence 
is strong enough, it could prompt the Republicans to 
vote for censure, which would force Mr. Gingrich to 
step down. Even if that does not happen, the speaker 


See GINGRICH, Page 3 


Pneumonia 
Detected as 
Yeltsin Goes 
To Hospital 

Latest Illness Casts 
Shadow on Hopes for 
Vigorous Leadership 

By David Hoffman 

Wasfrrngu-fi Post Sen we 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin 
was sent to the Central Clinical Hospital 
in Moscow on Wednesday night after 
doctors said they found “the first signs” 
that he had pneumonia, eight weeks after 
he underwent a heart bypass operation. 

The Kremlin, in a statement, did not 
provide details about what kind of pneu- 
monia had been detected or how serious 
Mr. Yeltsin's doctors regarded the de- 
velopment. Pneumonia is a term applied 
to any one of about 50 distinct inflam- 
matory diseases of the lung. 

The statement said that Mr. Yeltsin’s 
doctors decided to send him to the hos- 
pital after an evening examination. Hos- 
pitalization was necessary, the state- 
ment said, “for a more precise 
definition ofhis diagnosis and carrying 
out the corresponding treatment.” 

For most of the last 18 months. Mr. 
Yeltsin bas been in and out of hospitals 
because of a serious heart condition that 
led to quintuple bypass surgery Nov. 5. 
During that time. Mr. Yeltsin won re- 
election. but otherwise his rule has been 
characterized by drift and paralysis, 
partly because ofhis long absences. If he 
is seriously ill or hospitalized for a long 
period, it would again short-circuit hopes 
of his allies and many reformers that he 
could return to vigorous leadership. 

On Monday, Mr. Yeltsin. 65. cut 
short his schedule because of what 
Kremlin officials described as a bad 
cold. His spokesman. Sergei 
Yastrzhembsky, said that Mr. Yeltsin 
was “bound to return to normal” by the 
end of the week. He said Mr. Yeltsin had 
a fever and had retreated to a country 
residence outside Moscow. 

Mr. Yastrzhembsky also said then 
that Mr. Yeltsin was suffering from the 
flu. "A wave of flu that descended on 
Moscow has not spared the president's 
family.” he said. “Many in the pres- 
ident's family either have suffered from 
it, or have the flu now." 

On Tuesday, which was Russian Or- 
thodox Christmas, the Kremlin press 

See YELTSIN, Page 6 


AG E NO A 


Texaco Fires Executive 
In Racial Tape Scandal 

WHITE PLAINS, New York (Combined Dispatches) — 
— Texaco lha dismissed a top executive, suspend ancxber 
and dropped benefitsfor two retirees Wednesday for conduct 
revealed on racially inflammatory tape recordings. 

The company said it fired David Keough, who bad been 
chief financial officer of a Texaco subsidiary in Bermuda, 
and suspended Peter Meade foe two weeks. Mr. Meade is 
assistant general manager of fuel and marine marketing;. 

The retjrees include Richard Lund wall, the executive 
who made the tapes and released them to the plaintiffs in a 
race-discrimination suit That was then quickly settled by 
Texaco for $176 million in die face of a boycott. On the 
tapes, Texaco executives can be beard degrading minorities 
and discussing the possibility of destroying documents in 
die tace-dascnnrination case. (AP. Bloomberg) 


MUSE TWO UUUMOFIC . Pa«a4. 

Afirrw of German Politics Korean Unionist faces Jail 

THE AMERICAS Pago 3. EUROPE Pag«5. 

9 Who Defied the Speaker Branson hands His Balloon 

Books — ; Page 9. Opinion — Pages 8-9. 

Crossword Page 10. Sports Pages 18-19. 



Serbian Authorities Allow 
Major Opposition Victory 


■ >• * 
V • -L 


1 


MapaMiwURHUe 

A ROYAL FAMILY AFFAIR — Leaving a Mass 
on Wednesday to celebrate the 700th anniversary 
of the Grimaldi family's reign in Monaco were 
Prince Rainier and his children. Prince Albert, 
Princess Caroline, left, and Princess Stephanie. 


By Chris Hedges 

AVh- York Tones Service 

BELGRADE — The government of 
President Slobodan Milosevic, in the 
most significant concession since the 
seven-week political crisis began, said 
Wednesday that the opposition coali- 
tion had won control ofSerbia'ssecond- 
largest city. 

But, despite the magnitude of the 
concession, it appeared unlikely that the 
announcement would have much effect 
on the daily street protests. 

Not only did the concession fall far 
short of the opposition demand to honor 
the election victories by the coalition in 
14 of Serbia's 39 largest cities, but the 
election figures released by the gov- 
ernment gave the governing Socialists 
twice as many seats on the city assembly 
in Nis as they won in the November 
vote. 

Western diplomats said that the gov- 
ernment. while perhaps willing to con- 


UN's Rwanda Genocide Court: Is It Fit to Judge? 


By Barbara Cros setae 

- - New York Times Service 

UNTIED NATIONS, New 1 Yc«k — 
As the International Criminal Tribunal 
for Rwanda prepares for its first gen- 
ocide trial Thursday, there are growing 
fears that 'the court, based in Arusha, 
Tanzania, is barely functioning and is in 
danger of failure because of admin- 
istrative lapses and misconduct that the 
United Nations has been reluctant to 
face 8nd slow to correct 
- The problems in Arusha as described 
by employees and consultants to the 
tribunal include allegations of inexplic- 
able delays in disburiahg fonds; the tdr- 
mp of unqualified relatives, friends and 
^stresses; sexual harassment and in- 
timidation; questionable use of tribunal 
resources, such as aircraft; lack of sup- 


iss judicial process through the mon- 
jtorinc of judges' mail and phone calls. 

That list will present the UN sec- 
retaiy-geaeraL Kofi Annan, with a dif- 
ficult test case. 

A new chief of administration will 


soon have to be appointed to run the 
Arusha offices and there are growing 
calls for the removal of two other im- 
portant tribunal officials: the registrar, 
Andronico Adede of Kenya, who has 
considerable power over finance and 
personnel, and the deputy prosecutor, 
Honore Rakotomanana of Madagascar. 

The acting chief of administration is 
Mohammed Said, an Ethiopian. 

Africans want to keep me positions, 
and most other tribunal jobs, in African 
hands and are expected to put pressure 
on Mr. Annan as a fellow African. 

Several Western governments are ar- 
guing for appointments of better qual- 
ified managers, if necessary adminis- 
trators and experts from outside Africa. 

In Washington and in The Hague, 
where a Canadian judge. Louse Ar- 
bour, is now the chief prosecutor for 
both the Rwanda and Balkan tribunals, 
officials are awaiting a report by the UN 
inspector general’s office, which con- 
ducted an investigation last falL 

The United States, which has con- 
tributed more than $21 million to the 
tribunal and assigned 20 American ex- 


perts to assist it, conducted its own in- 
vestigation of the situation but does not 
plan to make its findings public, deferring 
to tile United Nations, which is respon- 
sible for staffing. 

The UN report is now circulating for 
comment among relevant officials and 
is not likely to be published fora number 
of weeks. “The sooner this report goes 
out,” Judge Arbour said Wednesday, 
“the sooner I feel I can start giving my 
own office the direction I'd like to." 

The Rwanda Uibunal has been beset 
from its inception in 1995 by unusual 
problems. 

Judge Arbour's prosecutors are based 
in Kigali, the Rwandan capital, but the 
court itself is in neighboring Tanzhniain 
a remote town where communications, 
particularly telephone links, are de- 
scribed as atrocious. 

Although die tribunal has indicted 21 
people and has 13 in custody, African 
nations have often been reluctant to 
cooperate in arresting suspects and 
transferring them to the courts custody. 
That is not unlike parties to the conflict 
in the former Yugoslavia and the NATO 


forces sent to keep the peace there. 

Id 3 trial scheduled this week, the first 
defendant is Jean -Paul Akayesu. a 
former mayor of a commune where 
2,000 Tutsi were massacred by Hutu 
gangs between April and June 1994. 

He is charged with genocide and 
crimes against humanity. 

Among four indicted Rwandans be- 
ing held in Cameroon is Colonel Theon- 
este Bagosora, whom Alison DesForges 
of Human Rights Watch Africa de- 
scribes as the creator of the regime 
responsible for the 1994 massacres. 

They followed the death that April in 
an air crash of the country’s president, 
Juvenal Habyarimana, a Hutu. 

“He gave the military orders in the 
first 24 hours," Ms. DesForges said of 
Colonel Bagosora. 

Hundreds of thousands of Rwandans, 
mostly Tutsi, were killed in the weeks 
that followed. 

The president of Cameroon, Paul 
Biya, has held up the transfer of Colonel 
Bagosora and the others for months. 

Ms. Arbour said that there was “no 
plausible explanation” for the delay. 


cede Nis and some smaller cities, still 
hopes to hold onto Belgrade, where the 
opposition also won decisively. As long 
as Mr. Milosevic struggles to keep Bel- 
grade. it will be difficult, these dip- 
lomats contend, to stanch the huge street 
demonstrations. 

But despite Mr. Milosevic's repu- 
tation as an autocratic and often ruthless 
political leader, he has also proven adept 
at compromise. He granted, for ex- 
ample, student demands during street 
protests in 1992. And he was instru- 
mental in pushing through the Dayton 
peace accord, a plan that brought an end 
to a war he had largely been responsible 
for starting. Those who know his op- 
erating style do not rule out the pos- 
sibility that concessions can slowly be 
pulled out of him. 

“The government is trying to work 
out a compromise, but ihat is unac- 
ceptable to us.” said Alexander Krstic, 

See SERBS, Page 6 


Foreign Legion 
Goes on Patrol 
In the Paris Metro 

Reuter* 

PARIS — The French Foreign 
Legion, one of most famed fighting 
units in tire world, has taken on a 
new assignment far from ihe trop- 
ical expanses where it usually op- 
erates — the Paris Metro. 

The army said Wednesday that a 
unit of some 320 legionnaires had 
fanned out in metro and regional 
express train stations this week. 
The action is part of the Vigipirate 
plan in which more than 2.000 sol- 
diers are helping the police patrol 
train and metro stations as well as 
airports. 

The security plan was put into 
operation shortly after a rush-hour 
bombing Dec. 3 of a commuter 
train that killed four people and 
wounded nearly 100. Algerian 
Muslim fundamentalists are sus- 
pected in the blast. 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Der Spiegel Turns 50 / 'Battering Ram of Democracy' 

An Unflattering Mirror of German Politics 


By John Schmid 

/mematumaf Herald Tribune 


H 


‘ AMBURG — Helmut 
Kohl, subject to years 
of unflattering com- 
.memaries from the 
news magazine Der Spiegel, 
which has depicted him as pro- 
vincial, clumsy and worse, has 
returned the favor. 

In a snub to the weekly 
magazine, which once called it- 
self the "battering ram of demo- 
cracy" for exposing nearly all of 
Germany's biggest posrwar scan- 
dais. the chancellor declined to 
attend. Spiegel's milestone 50th 
anniversary commemoration in 
Bonn next Wednesday. 

Mr. Kohl's well-known dis- 
pleasure with the magazine — he 
has never granted an interview 
and is said to tell visitors that be 
pays no attention to it — is hardly 
unusual. Appearing in Spiegel, a 
must-read every Monday for news 
junkies, is seldom an honor. 

"Sad to say, this rag is acruaily 
being read," former Chancellor 
Konrad Adenauer once said. 

Willy Brandt, another former 
chancellor, went on record calling 
it something more disparaging 
than toilet paper. 

“Anyone who talks to Spiegel 
puts his head into the jaws of a 
tiger,'* said Elisabeth Noelle- 
Neumann. a leading opinion 
maker and founder of the Ailens- 
bach polling institute. 

Der Spiegel, first published on 
Jan. 4, 1947, and two years older 
than the Federal Republic of Ger- 
many itself, has infuriated innu- 
merable politicians and delighted 
readers for five decades. It has 
ended political careers, become 
required reading in Bonn and 
many boardrooms, and is openly 
proud of its irreverent and some- 
times scathing style. 

In 1962. it caused the resig- 
nation of Defense Minister Franz- 
Josef Strauss and the jailing of its 
editors by Chancellor Adenauer. 

Spiegel’s subsequent record in- 

eludes disclosures in the 1980s 
that led to annihilating electoral defeat of a governor 
who had been spying on his challenger. In another 
scandal, known os the Flick affair, it revealed secret 
funding of political parties. 

Because of its considerable role in shaping the 
postwar nation as well as reporting on it. few deny 
that the magazine has become an institution. Sub- 
scribers include eveiy Foreign Ministry in Europe. 

When Der Spiegel arrives each Monday with a 
floppy thud — it averages 250 pages perissue — it 
serves up a spectrum of general news not confined 
to domestic politics. It covers economic, foreign 
and cultural affairs. On Jan. 16, it will outdo itself 
with a special anniversary issue weighing in at an 
unprecedented 364 pages. 

But after a half-century of growing authority and 
circulation, Der Spiegel — literally. The Mirror — 
looks to a future in which its unrivaled dominance 
might have peaked. 

Competitors have tried for decades to start a 
direct challenger and finally, three years ago. one 
succeeded. Focus, a color-splashed weekly with 
easier-to-read articles appeared in 1993, shrewdly 
contrasting with Spiegel's exhaustive columns of 
prose and time-honored resistance to color. 

Focus has gained rapidly and now matches 
Spiegel’s circulation of about 1 million. Last year. 
Focus, owned by the Munich-based Burda media 
group, sold more pages of advertising than Spiegel. 




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virtually anything ever printed 
anywhere about any German 
leader is indexed and stored. 
More than 100 full-time staff 
members, including 77 journa- 
lists. tend the archives and me- 
ticulously check facts. 

Perhaps the most acute ques- 
tion involves the ma g az in e’s fu- 
ture after its firebrand publisher 
and founder, 73-year-old Rudolf 
Augscein, leaves. His strong per- 
sonality, relentless ambition and 
often cocky writing have dom- 
inated the publication ever since 
its maiden 24-page issue. Mr. 
Augstein has been compared to 
Henry Luce, founder of Time 
magazine, and to the fictional Cit- 
izen Kane. 

Now a multimillionaire and no 
longer in the best of health, Mr. 
Augszein calls his editors several 
times a day from one of his homes 
— in Hamburg, the North Sea 
resort island of Sy It, Saint -Moritz 
in Switzerland or Saint-Tropez in 
France. He still writes and has no 
known plans to retire. 

But in Spiegel’s modernistic 
13-floor Hamburg tower, staff 
members say that Mr. Augstein is 
certain to leave a vacuum. They 
add that he has been around long 
enough to instill a healthy dis- 
respect for authority and a de- 
votion to investigative digging. 


F; 


Mr. Augstein shown being led to jail on treason charges in 1962k on 
the cover of an issue published after he was imprisoned. The police 
shut down Spiegel's offices , in a move intended to put the magazine 
out of business. But the staff continued to put out weekly issues. 


Focus held its own party in Bonn last November, 
evidently to preempt Spiegel's upcoming celeb- 
ration. Tellingly, Mr. Kohl made it a point to attend 
the Focus party. 

Breaking tradition and overcoming fierce in- 
ternal opposition, this week’s Spiegel for the fust 
time offers full-color pictures cover-to-cover and 
makes other concessions to reader friendliness, 
such as layout modifications and fresher typeface. 
The arrived of Focus, a surge in paper prices and the 
extensive use of four-color printing have taken a 
chunk out of Spiegel's earnings, according to a 
spokesman for Spiegel, Heinz LohfeldL 

Competition has forced Spiegel’s owner, Ham- 
burg-based Spiegel Verlag GmbH, to diversify. 
More than four-fifths of Spiegel Verlag’s 542 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks (5347 million) in sales last 
year stemmed from the namesake, with the re- 
mainder from newer operations like electronic pub- 
lishing. the Manager Magazine business monthly, 
and Spiegel TV GmbH, a television news 
magazine. 

Spiegel 's circulation has dipped from its zenith of 
nearly 1 2 million in the early 1990s, but it continues 
to average a healthy 1 million copies each week, 
enough to reach more than 6 million readers. It has 
13 offices in Germany and 20 in foreign capitals. 

Politicians are said to be nervous about its 
archives alone, the most extensive in Europe, where 


RESH from a stint as a 
German artillery officer 
on the eastern front, 
Rudolf Augstein was 
granted one of the first publishing 
licenses by the British occupying 
authorities in Hannover. 

Spiegel needed only a few 
months to gall the first postwar 
chancellor. It reported that sleepy 
Bonn had been chosen over Frank- 
furt as the provisional capital of 
West Germany, suggesting the 
reason was because Chancellor 
Adenauer owned a house nearby. 

One of the magazine’s finest 
moments came in 1962 with the 
legendary Spiegel affair. In a 12- 

page story, the magazine called 

into question the combat readiness 
of the German armed forces. Mr. Adenauer screamed 
of “treason” in Parliament, and the Bonn gov- 
ernment ordered the police to shut Spiegel’s offices 
and jail Mr. Augstein for 14 weeks. 

Given the magazine's thin resources at the time, 
the shutdown was intended to put Spiegel out of 
business. But the staff continued to put out weekly 
issues with borrowed office space, cajoled by 
memos sent from jail by Mr. Augstein. 

Mr. Strauss, the defense minister, was forced to 
quit under accusations that he abused his office by 
ordering the arrest in Spain of a Spiegel journalist. 
The journalist, who was vacationing there, had 
contributed to the inflammatory stray on the Ger- 
man armed forces. 

A rallying point for anti- government protests, the 
Spiegel affair became a watershed for Germany’s 
young democracy and an independent press. It also 
gave the magazine enormous, credibility and 
bolstered circulation. 

German reunification handed Spiegel another 
chance to excel. Mr. Augstein sent teams of re- 
porters into a region that had never seen modem 
aggressive investigative reporting, churning out 
weekly disclosures about poisoned drinking water, 
the miserable economic conditions and Stasi cor- 
ruption. 

“Without me,” Mr. Strauss once said, “what 
would Der Spiegel be?” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Hong Kong Ranking on Turnover 

HONG KONG (Reuters) — Hong Kong's hotels, res- 
taurants and shops expect a windfall of 250 million Hong 
Kong dollars ($32 million) from the 8,300 visitors expected 
for the British colony's handover to China, the government 
said Wednesday. Hong Kong reverts to Chinese sovereignty at 
midnight June 30 after more than 150 years of British rule. 

Southern Arizona Chills Out 

TUCSON, Arizona i AP) — Temperatures plummeted into 
the teens Fahrenheit on Wednesday morning m the old desert 
mining towns of southern Arizona, as ski resort operators 
rejoiced at deep mountain snow. 

The cold followed a snowstorm. The morning's low tem- 
perature in Tucson — home to many people from northern ' 


states who thought they had escaped winter weather — 
dropped to 29 degrees Fahrenheit (minus one centigrade), the 
National Weather Service said. 

Bangkok to Reduce Motorcades 

BANGKOK (API — Having failed to solve Bangkok’s 
legendary traffic jams, some politicians may lose the privilege 
of traveling with a police motorcade, city traffic officials said 
Wednesday. 

Traffic officials have asked the cabinet to restrict deputy 
ministers from using police-escort motorcades unless they are 
authorized by the police commissioner or a deputy. 

Dozens of politicians will keep their perk. Some have been 
known to authorize motorcades for their wives’ and children’s 
shopping trips. Other drivers have to wait for as long as an hour 
as jammed roads are cleared and blocked off to make way. 


Baboon Crossing; 
Make Why or Else 

Reuters 

CAPETOWN — Motorists on one of 
South Africa’s busiest highways are fa- 
cing a new hazard — a troop of baboons 
that ambushes them with showers of 
rocks. 

Traffic officials said Wednesday that 
three attacks had been reported in recent 
weeks on the highway between Cape 
Town and Johannesburg where it passes 
through a spectacular mountain pass. 

They said that no injuries or crashes 
had been caused, but that stone-throw- 
ing traffic police had engaged in a run- 
ning battle with the animals on Tuesday 
in an effort to drive them away. 


Peru and Japan Criticize 
Media Meddling in Crisif- 

TV Team Detained After Talk With Rebels! 


CenfOetty Ok Sug Fian Daptf&s 

LIMA — Peru and Japan criticized 
journalists Wednesday, asserting that 
they jeopardized efforts to end the dead- 
locked hostage crisis, now in its fourth 
week, with Marxist rebels still holding 
74 hostages. 

Fueling that anger were a reporter and 
a translator working for the Japanese 
television station TV Asahi, who sneaked 
past title police Tuesday for a two-hour 
meeting with rebels of the Tupac Amaru 
Revolutionary Movement. 

Peruvian anti-terrorism police de- 
tained the pair and confiscated their 
notebooks and cameras as they came out 
of the besieged Japanese ambassador's 
residence. Police sources said Wednes- 
day that die two would be held for at 
least five days at the anti-terrorism 
headquarters m central Lima while the 
authorities decided whether to press 
charges against them. 

Prone minister Ryutaro Hashixnoto of 
Japan, speaking oa a tour of Southeast 
Asia, criticized the reporter, saying he 
could have harmed efforts to solve the 
crisis. 

“It is very regrettable,” a Foreign 
Ministry official quoted Mr. Hashimoto 
as saying. “An act like that could create 
unforeseeable circumstances and disrupt 
the Peruvian government's efforts for a 
peaceful resolution and the release of all 


The action was an embarrassment . r 
the police, who immediately tighten^ 
security around the residence. . 

The rebels stormed tire residence A 
Dec. 17 and took about 500 hastads 
including ambassadors and senior PjJr- 
u vian government officials. Most off thefti 
were later released. Thro ughout cfe 
crisis, the local and foreign media tajie 
played a prominent role, covering evejjr 
slightest movement at the siege. . > 

The rebels sought to turn the ftap otpr 
TV Asahi to their advantage Wetkaesd*?, 
showing a placard that read: ‘‘ Nw jour- 
rraii-gc are arrested to hide the truth. _ f 
Trying to seize the public rehssjgs 
initiative from the rebels. President Al- 
berto Fujimori broke his silence on tiVe 
crisis Tuesday, speaking w ith rep orters 
and touring a prison where other 1 
Amaru rebels and hundreds of 
guerrillas are being held. £ 

“I hope, like everyone, for a peaceful 
solution,” Mr. Fujimori said. • 

(Reuters. APp 


. . Asahi named the two as Victor 
Boija, a Peruvian interpreter, and Tsuy- 
oshi Hit ami, a New York-based report- 
er. The Japanese government’s task 
force in Lima has banned them from 
their daily briefings. 

The pair’s entry into the residence, as 
well as the entry on New Year’s Eve by 
a larger group of journalists, was also 
condemned by Peru's prime minister, 
Alberto Pandolfi, as “damaging to the 
seriousness and fluidity of talks.' ' 

TV Asahi said it did not instruct Mr. 
Hitomi to enter the residence, Kyodo 
news agency reported. 


Syrian President 
Rests After Surgery 

Agenee Fnmce-Prrsse 

DAMASCUS — President 
Hafez Assad of Syria will stay in 
bed for several days of rest after 
undergoing successful prostate sur- 
gery, the official news agency, 
SANA, said Wednesday. 

No further details of the oper- 
ation, which was announced Tues- 
day, were provided, buz tire news 
agency said President Assad would 
resume his regular activities “in a 
few days.” 

The dato of tire operation was not 1 
specified by SANA or in a two-line 
official announcement published 
on the front pages of Syrian news- 
papers Wednesday. 


Jr 


In Raid After a Wedding, Mexico 
Arrests 27 Linked to Drug Cartel 


own 


By John Ward Anderson 

Washingto n Post Service 

MEXICO CITY — Fourteen police 
officers and 13 other people linked to 
the powerful Juarez drag cartel have 
been arrested after federal a* 
learned that three private jets 
from an airport near Mexico City were 
ferrying guests to a wedding involving 
the family of a reputed drag kingpin. 

The wedding was that ofi the sister of 
Amado Carrillo Puentes, who is said to 
be bead of the Juarez cartel. He has been 
indicted on several drug charges, and 
Mexican officials consider him the 
country's top drag lord. 

The ceremony took place Saturday — 
a day before the raid — at a private 
ranch called La Aurora near the town of 
N&volato, 15 miles (25 kilometers) west 
of Culiacan, capital of the Pacific 
coastal state of Sinaloa. The 14 po- 
licemen arrested apparently were can- 
ployed to provide security for the ce- 
remony. 

Mr. Carrillo was not one of those 
arrested in the operation. He is known as 
tire “Lord of tire Skies” because he is 
alleged to have pioneered the use of 
Boeing 727s to move cocaine shipments 
weighing as much as 15 tons between 
South America and the U.S.-Mexico 
border region. 

U.S. and Mexican anti-drag officials 
say that Mr. Carrillo owns many large 
ranches in the desert and mountainous 
regions of northern Mexico, but it is 
unclear if he owns La Aurora or even if 
he attended the wedding. Local news- 
papers said he left the ceremony before 
the raid. 

It was also unclear if any immediate 
members of his family or leaders of the 
drug cartel were among those arrested. 

The joint operation by the Mexican 
Army and tire National Institute to Com- 
bat Drugs — the Mexican equivalent of 
tire U.S. Drag Enforcement Adminis- 


tration — was the first major move 
against drug-trade suspects in Mexico 
since an army general took charge of the 

federal drag agency five weeks ago, and 

it hi g hli ghts the active role the military 
has taken on because of widespread 
poEce corruption. 

Three corporate-style jets were con- 
fiscated in the joint operation, and in- 
vestigators said they found traces of 
cocaine in each. The planes seat six' to 
eight people, are about 15 years old and 
have a combined value of SI 5 million 
to $2.5 million, according to an airline 
industry official Investigators also 
seized 22 handguns of various calibers, 
9 rifles and about $3,300 in Mexican 
and U.S. currency. 

U.S. officials say Mr. Carrillo, 41. 
represents a new breed of cartel leader, 
one who is more sophisticated than his 
rivals, keeps a low profile and is eagetf to 
compromise with competitors. At the 
same time, investigators blame his car- 
tel for as many as 400 drug-related 
killings. 


Correction 

An article Dec. 27 described a re- 
porter's efforts to find out how the ma- 
gician David Copperfield [performed his 
tricks in “Dreams and Nightmares,” a 
Broadway show. The article included an 
interview with a man identifying him- 
self as an audience “plant” who aided 
the magician. The man said he was 
disgruntled about being paid late for his 
work. He identified himself as Seth 
Greenspan, an employee of tire show, 
but that identification was false. After 
tire article was published in The New 
York Tunes, the show's producer vis- 
ited The Times with the real Seth Gram- 
span, who produced full identification. 

A telephone number at which the uh-r., 
~“*or was initially reached has 
disconnected. 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Retort 

Andorra 

Pas de la Casa 
Gokfeu 

osptfa 
L U 

130 180 
60 m 

Mtn. 

Pistes 

Good 

Good 

RC 9 . 

Pistes 

Open 

Op*i 

Soow Last 

Stahl Soow Cogneuts 

Pwfr an al Hk even 

Mr S /1 of 21 fits opan. mcoftrtsfcftiB 

Austria: 

techgl 

o 

140 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

4/1 

a* 41 Its epen. gam* good 

Knzbuhal 

to 

<7 

Ff* 

Some 

ifer 

25/12 

SSfOBbcpen 

Lech 

60 

190 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

471 

3* Mm opm. aaC/ goad 

May /hole n 

s 

70 

Hart 

Quad 

Port 

24712 

a a Us open, snow tanfrdto 

Obergurgl 

55 

155 

Good 

Open 

Pm* 

471 

al 2 ? Rs open «kb#M jtaw 

Saalbach 

30 

W 

Hart 

Open 

Mir 

35/1? 

a Ms open 

St Anion 

45 

190 

Good 


Var 

4/1 

tf&f/taoiNn«roat*stfng 

Canada 

Lake Louse 

110 

130 

Good 

Opwi 

Var 

7/1 

a» 1? m opan. oil itery 

Whistler 

120 2 SS 

Goad 

H« 

Vta 

777 

# Sens open, gma»/moem 

Franca 

AJpecTHiwz 

HO 

260 

Good 

Open 

var 

91 


Las Aits 

75 

175 

Good 

Opan 

tor 

SI 

wrtBbopn groaning 

AvQtfaz 

130 

150 

Good 

Open 

Vta 

271 

allfei open, aady part 

Chamonix 

20 

250 

Good 

Some 

Var 

571 

si 48 tab epen, gnu stag 

Courchevel 

100 

140 

Good 

Opan 

vw 

6/1 

■I 68 Ms opm ^aod wwyriiem 

Las Deux Alpes BO 

280 

Good 

Opan 

Var 

Sil 

a! S 3 Us open saxhnt eonR/ms 

Megeve 

60 

160 

Good 

Opan 

Petal 

571 

3 Mi Ms ppsn wrrgoidAaiigf 

Meribel 

65 

145 

Good 

Open 

VPr 

5/1 

# Me am. ncatantdano 

LaPtagra 

95 

ISO 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

sn 

775777 Us dfm. qemftsapM 

Sene CbevoSar izo 

250 

Good 

Opan 

\la 

5/1 

67775 Ml opan. psrtskag 

Tignas 

110 

200 

Good 

Open 

Var 

771 

■imtfi ss opan. ein*se*&® 

Vel crista 

100 270 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

571 

{0700 Ms opea apart *ing 

Val THonans 

140 

240 

Good 

Open 

V* 

sn 

alSntcpan, acsSntakSng 


O iraany 

Berchtesgadan 8 ) 30 
Obeiadori 2D 90 


Fair Closed PM 24/12 2S<21 flte qaav tpod Song 
Good Open Pefaf WT2 a#2s«sqjwt ot&atasone 


Resort 

Italy 

Bormio 

Cervtnia 

Cortina 

Courmayeur 

Livigno 

Madesftno 

Selva 


Ospffi Mtn Res. Soow Lott 

V. U Pistes Pistes stole Snow 


3a an 
iM «s 
70 140 
B0 250 Good 
105 200 
110 360 
30 no 


Good Open Pvrir 6/1 13/16 «s open, i 


Good Open to 
Good Open Pwtr 


Tn 
m 

n/a Part 5 n 


#51*3 00*11 


Good Opao War 7/1 3Wi fits open, p/stes, ste 

Good Opai Pwdr TPf 16/17 Bfe epun. praar c omm on s 

Good Own to 6/1 at Bt Ms and sab randb opal 


Norway 

Geita 

50 

50 

Good 

Had 

Wed 

iam 

at 16 as open, most /ins good 

Switzerland 

Crans Montana 

45 

190 

Good 

Open 

to 

4 71 

mi mom 

Davos 

a 

145 

Good 


PM 

471 

2U55l*septn.9B«**V 

Ktostem 

35 

145 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

471 

54/s Sto opan wry good ting 

Murren 

90 

160 

Good 

ty 

to 

4/1 

# /2ffls opan. moM/goain raw 

SaasFee 

90 

300 

Good 

Open 

to 

an 

rfaSfetwewsfetfsftfiig 

St Moritz 

SO 

210 

Good 

Open 


471 

ffa apm Attcgfr angadna vaity 

VaiWer 

50 

200 

Good 

fcy 

to 

471 

73/74 Ms open, goal tune Z200m 

Wongs n 

15 

100 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

<71 

# 33 Stls opm, gtxd sting 

Zermatt 

65 

m 

Good 

Opan 

to 

4/1 

7873 UU open auNHVzmmH 

IIA 

Aspen 

110 

125 

Good 

Ogen 

Petal 

yi 

IvBy orn. <*& groaned 

Bracken rWge 

120 

tn 

Good 

Open 

PcU 

571 

79 Ms and 740 (rads epen 

Created Butts 

145 

180 

Good 


PCtaJ 

471 

M 13 Stat/us and newts open 

Mammoth 

210 

350 

Good 

Open 

to 

571 

£U30 taS open, mated sting 

Park City 

155 

Z10 

Good 

0pB1 

Fdd 

VI 

ti 14 Ms and 99 tab open 

vai 

160 

160 

Good 

Open 

FcU 

Bfl 

3 Ms and 4»4 acres mat 

Winter Park 

135 

ISS 

Good 

Open 

Mrf 

Bn 

1803 Stem! TIB/121 Otis opan 




find ln ft xmaBon on over 100 of the woritfa leading ski resorts onflne 

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WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast tor Friday tfrough Sunday, as provided by AceuWeather. 


Asia 



IMS 7M4e 
2/3SOC 
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-6/22 -10/15 pc 
307 104*1 
-sc* «nee 
10*0 6/43 C 

22 m 16/61 » 

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1/34 -2/29 DC 
12/53 aorc 
11/52 4/39 e 

1/34 -1/31 5n 

-one -12/11 pc 

3/37 -3/27 eh 
9M0 fiMtai 
-M35 -fl/lBec 
-1/31 -3/27 pe 
-2/29 -arise 



Mgti 
C/F 
IB/81 
-2/28 
3/37 
i&m 
11/62 
4/30 
-4/25 
-1/31 
1494 
-1/31 -atzr « 

17/62 11/5B pc 

7/44 Q/43 ah 
307 307 e 
7/44 3/37 5/1 
-604 -7/20 pc 
409 -2/29 C 
-6/24 -13/B pc 
a/48 048*1 

22/71 17432 « 
19/59 13/59 C 
8/43 5/41 c 
9/46 7/44*1 
9Hfl M3 pc 
5/41 -2/29 C 

■7/20 - 12 m c 

■1/31 -4/25 Hi 
1305 4/39 pc 
■ana -139 pc 
V77 20Soc 
-2/29 .7/28 C 


North America 

A strong winter storm is 
exported to bettering mid- 
Atlantic end Northeast Fri- 
day into Saturday wth rain, 
ice and snow. Otherwise, 
anSBc ait will spread from 
the Plates to the East this 
weekend, although read- 
ings in the East will be 
ckwa to normal Friday. The 
West wiH be dry and add 


Europe 

Far western Europe, 
tndudkiQ Spain. Portugal 
and Ireland, wiB experience 
a dramatic warming trend 
through this weekend. The 
rest of western Europe, 
Including Peris, will stay 
near- to below-normal, 
whBa eastern Europe and 
western Russia wSI remain 
cold Stormy from Italy into 
sortheast Europe. 


Asia 

Unseasonably cold air wtn 
Qrtp nxxSi of northeastern 
China. Manchuria, the 
Kanes and most of Japan 
through the weekend. 

Stormy across southern 
and eastern Japan this 
weekend; otherwise, main- 
ly dn/ in tbssa areas, Main- 
ly dry end seasonably m — 

Hong Kong and much of Mnca 
Southeast Asia. T^T~ 


2804 24/73 c 

22/71 sues 
k Lumnn 3ioa run pc 
ttKMftefci Z7M aura pc 


PtmomPcnh 2304 was* 
30SB 17/82 pc 


SUBS 25/77 pc 
14/57 10*SO*fc 
8M8 0/32 pt 
BUSS 11/62 pc 


Trip* 

T(** 

Viwdana 



19(55 .7*44 *n 


KayUUI: DqMh in on on bear and ippw dopes. Utn. Platen ManantUa petes. Res. Plates Runs 
taring u noon Art, ArtBcJd snoe 

Aperts suppfetf by Oh SUCkbat Great Brash 


Home 13/2. 

9 l PWenOtnp ■60S 

7744 r 

■6716 e 

12/53 

-6/24 

7/44 an 

-ta/Bc 

North America 






Capa Tam 
CtoaUancB 

IBM 11/52 pc 
1M51 BMB c 

1988 11/52 pc 
17JB2 11/52 pc 

Strasbeum 

TeBm 

Venice 

-OTB 

4/30 

■sat 

035 

■WWpc 
-1/31 e 
-9716 c 
2QS sn 

-aw 

305 

-4QS 

4/33 

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-020 e 

-13/B pc 
UMr 

taW MOM 

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Tuna 

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2884 13/55 pc 

18*1 1182 c 

9088 22771 pe 
2904 13/66 pc 
14/57 7)44* 

Wain* 

Zurich 

■5*4 

■6719 g 

1/34 

-3*7 

-6/22 pc 

Mana 

Boston 

UffiO 3/37 r 
BOS 082* 

489 -2/apo 
4/33 -2/89 * 

Main 

■#10 -T2m pc 

-lOI -11/13 sn 

Latin America 






Cbkogc 

-2/29 -6719a7 

-682 -1674 rt 

Now York 

2/se 

082* 

8H3 -®29ah 

Buenos Jurat 

3086 23/75 ptl 


Middle East 




DonMT 

7M4 -ana pc 

BUO -181 pc 
-181 -178* 

Ortande 

Pnoartx 

Z7JBD 

14/57 

1/MSI pc 
6/43* 

21770 0481 
18184 7744 a 

Lkm 

2882 2060 C 

OStn OMSK 

26*2 2*71 pc 
2780 2088c 

Aar Dmi* 

Bshu 

Caen 

23/73 13/55 e 
IW 12/53 pc 
ea/n iano* 

23773 1063 a 
18*4 12/63 pc 
21770 11/52* 

HOMUu 

Houbi 

U» AnpMn 

27W0 1904 • 
7744 2/35 pe 
21 770 7744 a 

27190 2MB pa 
13*5 002 pe 
21770 MBs 

Son Fan 

8 mm 

Toma 

1881 

10/60 

■604 

7M4» 
7*44, 
-8718 pc 

16*1 Ml pc 

10*0 s/43 PC 
•387 -W/Ban 

UMwOty 1681 VST 6 
HoaaJmm a am 34/75 pc 
Sma«Bo 34/35 iiaes 

16*1 3/37* 

3B86 SmS 6 


l«1 

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14J67 

6M3 B 


28/62 21/70 pc 

24/79 mat 

WorNnam 

285 

M2* 

489 -2/29* 

Oceania 




21/70 

IlffiEc 

2271 

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21770 1782 C 
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PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 




■' V‘- -' V • 4 ■ 
;* .. :. ^ ircl '■; ': ' * /.W? ; 


Albright’s Record Shows Concern for Rights 


By Steven Erianger 

New fork Total Service 


ft 


v ‘ - - V 

'M ^ 

;#||i HI 


ill*!® 

lirfr '''liifcvs 

lit-" r® 


; Mrs. Albright appearing at the Foreign Relalions Committee Wednesday. 


WASHINGTON — In her long career, which has 
mixed academia, politics and government to an un- 
usual degree, Madeleine Albright has shown a con- 
sistent interest in issues of press freedom and in- 
dividual rights in authoritarian countries. 

Mrs. Albright came before the Senate Foreign Re- 
lations Committee on Wednesday for confirmation 
bearings as the first woman to be designated Amer- 
ica's secretary of state. But she would also be the Hrst 
secretary of state in memory to speak Russian, not to 
mention French, Polish and Czech, the language of her 
birthplace. She is expected to be confirmed easily. 

As a study of her published writings demonstrates, 
Mrs. Albright has devoted a considerable amount of 
her career to examining the way human rights and civil 
and press freedoms have worked to bring about long- 
term change and democratization, especially in Cen- 
tral and Eastern Europe. 

She has an abiding interest in European security, 
which is expected to be among the most important of 
this year's foreign-policy issues, along with a re- 
shaping of the United Nations and the American role 
within it, which has been the subject of many of her 
official speeches since she became chief delegate to 
the United Nations in January 1993. 

She has been moved and influenced by her many 
conversations with Vaclav Havel, the Czech playwright 
and dissident who rode the anti -Communist revolution 
to become the president of the Czech Republic. 

lb her UN role, sbe was also the highest-ranking 
American official to visit Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. the 
Burmese pro-democracy activist and Nobel Peace Prize 


; In Washington: Goliath 1, Davids 0 

I What Now for 9 Representatives Who Defied Their Speaker? 


winner, let alone to have written about it Mrs. Albright 
called the military government of Burma a "klepto- 
cracy” in The New Republic in December 1995. 

She has strongly defended the U.S. intervention in 
Haiti and Bosnia and the establishment of the War 
Crimes Tribunal to punish those guilty of war crimes 
in the Balkans. 

Mm. Albright's published work provides a strong 
sense of her political views. From her 1976 doctoral 
dissertation at Columbia University on “The Role of 
the Press in Political Orange" in 1968 Czechoslov- 
akia, toabook-lengto study of the same topic in Poland 
during the Solidarity period, published in 1 983, the 
"dynamics of liberation" and the power of the word 
have fascinated her. 

In periodical-length studies of "The Glorious Re- 
volution of 1989" that liberated Communist Europe 
from Moscow and of the "democratic pulse" of public 
opinion in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet 
Union, all published in 1992, she analyzed the major 
geopolitical shift of the last half of the century and how 
ordinary people reacted to it 

In "The Role of the United States in Central 
Europe," published in 1991 by the Academy of Polit- 
ical Science, she argued that America should * 'rethink 
its policy toward Europe." 

She called for America to support the emerging 
democracies in Europe. If those new democracies fail, 
she wrote, "they will be replaced by authoritarian 
governments, chaos or civil wars." which could then 
"infect the Soviet Union.” 

She argued that it was equally important for the Bush 
administration to stop treating Eastern -bloc countries 
as one entity and understand their "quite different 
historical experiences and political influences." 


POLITIC AINOTES 


- nvm 
ur l.^irtei 


By Katharine Q. Seelye 

■ New York Tima Service 

I . WASHINGTON — They are an odd 
; assortment of Davids who nearly 

■ toppled the House Goliath, with vtr- 
; tually nothing in common except, now, 
' the possibility that they will be ostra- 

rized by their party. 

. They range in ideology from conser- 
£vative to bberal. in geographyfrom east 
™to west, in stature from two sophomores 
*- to a lifer who, i : a committee chaimran, 
is part of the Republican hierarchy. 

Their reasons for not supporting 
Newt Gingrich on Tuesday in Iris bid to 
retain the speakership also varied, from 
a fear that something else in Mr. Gin- 
grich's ethics case ought drop later, to a 
view that he was damaged goods. 

. .. The rune dissenters^ who included Rep- 
..{nsentative Jim Leach of Iowa, die only 
l _ one known nationally, never organized 
' among themselves. And their vote? — - 
‘..five “present”; two for Mr.. Leads; one- 
•’ for. Bob Michel the former Republican 
“leader, and oneftrfc^nKrRqrieseMWive 
, Bob Walker of PeansyivMna — showed 
'they ted no strategy, 

*'_■ Most of diem had not even talked 
*, with each other before the House vote 
^Tuesday, which threatened a dramatic 
!r;revolt but now may only have sealed 
V their fates as.objects of retribution. 

"They won't be made chairman of 
fways and Means,” said Representative 
1 John Linder, whose Georgia district 
' abuts Mr. Gingrich's and who has 
. emerged as one of the speaker's most 
forceful allies. 

/'• Representative John Kasich, Repub- 
lican of Ohio and chairman of the 
’-budget committee, asked whether the 
“'defectors would, or should, be pon- 
< isbed, gave a philosophical answer that 


rambled all over the map. "I don’t 
know,” he finally said. "1 won’t spec- 
ulate on it” 

As for some of. the dissidents, they are 
pragmatic. “It depends on how much 
power Newt has, ” said an aide to one of 
the nine, referring to die final outcome 
of the speaker’s ethics case. "Our new 
office might be in a tent oat on the 
man. " 

The newly constituted Congress 
passed up a chance for an official sanc- 
tion on Tuesday, leaving Mr. Leach — 
who voted for Mr. Michel and whose 11 
toms in the House make him dean of the 
defectors — as chairman of the influ- 
ential banking committee. Still, some 
members were urging the leadership to 
faun of his chainnanship. which is 
possible. 

fa was Mr. Leach's unexpected an- 
nouncement Monday — calling Mr. 
Gingrich "ethically damaged" — that 
caused near-panic among party leaders 
who worried that a break by someone of 
his stature would ptovjde.cover to other 
'wavering medabers. • * 

Representative Frank Wolf of Vtr- 
gmia,. who voted “present/' also re- 
* tainted his chainnantoip of tire trans- 
portation subcommittee of the 
appropriations committee on Tuesday, 
at least for the time being. 

Linda Smith erf Washington, who Ims 
dashed with Mir. Gingrich in the past, 
particularly over campaign finance, said 
mat even if the speaker were her brother 
she would vote against him because he 
stood in tire way of reforming Wash- 
ington. Scott Klug of Wisconsin laughed 
when asked if be expected to pay a price 
fra his "present” vote. “I’m in trouble 
already, and I'm still here," he said. 

Constance Morelia of Maryland, who 
voted "present” said she thought it was 


“unconscionable" that members had to 
vote for speaker before they had all the 
facts from tire ethics committee. 

Tom Campbell of California said he 
agreed with Mr. Gingrich's own ad- 
mission that he bad brought discredit on 
the House by filing "inaccurate, in- 
complete and unreliable information." 
John Hoste tiler of Indiana said that Mr. 
Gingrich had a cloud over his head, and 
Mark Neumann of Wisconsin said Mr. 
Gingrich could not serve effectively. 

■ Ethics Committee Meets 

The House ethics committee on Wed- 
nesday began deciding whether to punish 
Mr. Gingnch, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. 

A day after Mr. Gingrich was re- 
elected speaker despite tire panel’s un- 
finished business, tire committee met 
behind closed doors to hear from its 
outside counsel and to prepare for a 
public bearing. It was meeting for the 
first time since the speaker confessed to 
ethical wrongdoing, 

Mr. Gingrich was investigated by a 
four-membef subcommittee and tire 
counsel, James Cole r The’meeting Wed- 
nesday was the first opportunity for the 
other six members of the ethics com- 
mittee to question the investigators. 

A partisan fight erupted over a re- 
quest by Mr. Cole for more rime to 
complete his woric. That would have 
necessitated an extension beyond the 
Jan. 21 date the ethics committee had set 
for wrapping up the case. The Demo- 
crats on tire committee moved to change 
tire Republican-proposed rules to ac- 
commodate Mr. Cole, but the Repub- 
licans refused. 

The subcommittee, two Republicans 
and two Democrats, had unanimously 
backed the extension. 


GINGRICH: Restored to Power os Speaker but ‘a Hero No More 9 


Con tinned from Page 1 

will have to operate mere as a coordin- 
ator than an autocrat in the months 
- ' '“ahead. 

Such powerful Republican commit- 
1 tee chairmen as Robert Livingstone of 
.‘ Louisiana, who beads the Appropri- 
“ Rations Committee, and Bill Archer of 
' .Texas, his examterpare at Ways and 
.V Means, are already building channels of 
" communication until tire While House. 
J . which, if not independent of Mr. Gin- 
T'erich, are close to it 

“■ ' * Not accidentally, he spoke cm Tues- 
' day of issues that he had asked other 
committee chairmen to deal with. 

The speaker's whole bearing on 
' SfcV Tuesday, and tire mood in the House, 
’ ' ™ contrasted starkly with the spirit of tri- 
umphalism that marked his accession to 
^ power two years ago and would or- 
dinarily have suffused the place, since it 
was the first time since 1929 that a 
. Republican had been re-elected to the 
- post. ■ 

' He received 216 votes, compared 
with 205 for Richard Gephardt, tire 
" Democratic leader of the House. Six 
• members voted only "present," four 
' votes were cast for others and four 
members were absent or not voting. 

Emotions were muted, and so was 
Mr. Gingrich. 

• . He said he taped- he could convince 
those who voted against him that he was 
worthy of the office. 

’ ■ 'Two years ago, when I became tire 

; first Republican speaker in 40 years. a> 


The longer this persists, tire more 
difficult h will be for President Bill 
Clinton to establish tire kind of 
tisan spirit that he keeps talking 
(and which Mr. Gingrich sought to pro- 
mote in his remarks on Tuesday). 

That is the most important thing 
about the whole Gingrich ethics episode 
— not tire fret that Mr. Gingrich, who 
came to prominence in the spring of 
1989 with his attacks on the ethics of 
Jim Wright, then the speaker, is now 
hoist by his own petard, and not tire fret 
thatbe distracts attention from Mr. Clin- 
ton’s ethical woes. 

In fret, Mr. Gingrich’s confessed 
sins, both his apparent misuse of tax- 


tire’ prospects for partisan peace are 
slight 

Mr. Clinton may talk, as he did on 
Monday, of * 'a spirit of reconciliation," 
and Mr. Gingrich may urge, as be did on 
Tuesday, that legislators "reach out be- 
yond party and beyond ideology." 

But when such appeals come from 
leaders under suspicion of skirting or 
evading the rules or tbe law, they ring 
less true and have much less chance of 
breaking through partisan instincts 
boned over political lifetimes. 


President Clinton 
Names New Counsel 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton has named Charles F. C. Ruff, 
a former Watergate special prosecu- 
tor, to be his fifth White House coun- 
sel, a job that has increasingly come to 
require deft handling of a host of 
ethics controversies and congression- 
al investigations. 

Mr. Ruff, the chief lawyer for the 
District of Columbia, edged out a 
dozen candidates after impressing 
Mr. Clinton at a two-hour meeting 
late last month, officials said. He will 
replace Jack Quinn, who resigned last 
year for family reasons. 

As the White House's lead lawyer, 
tire counsel's responsibilities are as 
diverse as advising the president on 
constitutional issues and policing 
White House ethics. During the Clin- 
ton yeaxs. the counsel has also be- 
come the White House's chief de- 
fender in battles with investigating 
committees of Congress. 

Mr. Ruff will inherit congressional 
and Justice Department investiga- 
tions into a group of Democratic fund- 
raisers and contributors andtoeir re- 
lations with the White House, as well 
as an independent counsel's inquiry 
into Whitewater-related issues! The 
Clintons also retain a private lawyer 
for Whitewater matters. 

Mr. Ruff is no stranger to political 
cases, having built a specialty in both 
defending and prosecuting them over 
the years. He became the Last of tbe 
four Watergate special prosecutors in 
1975 and won tire convictions of two 
members of Congress in tire Abscam 
investigation. (NYT) 

Georgian Diplomat 
Likely to Go Home 

WASHINGTON — Expectation is 
growing among U.S. officials that a 
diplomat for the Republic of Geoigia 
will be sent home rather than face 
possible charges in connection with a 
car crash that killed a 16-year-old girL 

fa is highly unusual for govern- 
ments to waive diplomatic immunity 
for fear of setting a precedent, and at 
least one American envoy has es- 
caped prosecution in a similar case in 
Moscow in recent years. 

Tbe State Department spokesman, 
Nicholas Burns, said: "If charges are 
brought — and charges ought to be 
brought against somebody for this 
crime — then we think this man ought 


to stand trial." But he added: "fa's 
more likely that the Georgian gov- 
ernment will probably elect to send 
him home or have him expelled. And 
that’s most unfortunate. 1 ' 

The Georgian Foreign Ministry 
said in a statement Wednesday that it 
would "cooperate in the investiga- 
tion of the tragedy." The statement 
did not say whether the diplomat 
would be summoned home. (APi 

Gloom, (Already?) 
For Bipartisan Era 

WASHINGTON — The 105th 
Congress opened formally with a vow 
by its leaders to keep controversies 
over high-level wrongdoing in both 
parties from derailing efforts to bal- 
ance the budget and pass other major 
legislation in the next two years. 

But they conceded that an esca- 
lating partisan furor over admitted 
ethical lapses by the House speaker. 
Newt Gingrich, and questionable 
fund-raising for President Clinton’s 
re-election campaign could dash the 
hopes for a new era of bipartisan 
cooperation. 

_ ‘ ‘It’s not a good atmosphere to find 
a bipartisan solution to some veiy 
important issues, but 1 think we can dcr ■ 
it," said the Senate majority leader. 
Trent Lott. He was referring to the 
continuing ethics inquiry of Mr. Gin- 
grich and plans in both houses for 
investigations into Democratic fund- 
raising practices. 

The Senate minority leader, 
Thomas Daschle, sard partisan excess 
over the investigations could be a 
"real threat" to the passage of le- 
gislation. But, like Mr. Lott, he con- 
tended that the two pursuits should be 
made along "septate tracks" to 
avoid such a risk, noting that this was 
done successfully with the Whitewa- 
ter hearings last year. 

A similar resolve was expressed in 
the House. “We’re not starting off on 
a good foot here, very obviously, so 
we’ve got to get beyond this," said 
Representative Jim Kolbe. (WP) 

Quote/Unquote 

Gerald Solomon, the New York 
Republican who is chairman of the 
House Rules Committee, proposing 
that the House develop a drug-testing 
program comparable to the one used 
by the executive branch, under which 
agencies screen workers in ‘ ‘sensitive 
positions": "We should be no dif- 
ferent than others in ensuring a drug- 
free workplace." (WP} 


sins, both his apparent misuse of tax- T T • \T IT T1VT • O \T C? I 1 

ssssffig U.S. Gives INew UIN tihiei INo black 


his lade of candor with tbe investigating 
committee, pale by comparison to the 
range of accusations against Mr. Clin- 
ton and his campaign fund-raisers — 
Whitewater, Travelgalfi, Paula Jones's 
sexual-harassment suit, the Asian cam- 
paign contributions, the missing files. 

But as The New Republic magazine 
said this week. "In moral m at ter s, there 
is such a'thing as small potatoes, but 
small potatoes are still potatoes.” 

That gives the Democrats' pursuit of 
Mr. Gingrich a certain credibility, lend- 
ing substance to what otherwise might 
look even more fake partisan grand- 
standing. 

Eventually, the Gingrich matter will 
be resolved, one way or the other. 

But then Washington will have to 
gird far the hearings mto dubious cam- 
paign contributions daring the 1996 


By Barbara Crosse tie 

New York Tima Service 


- the degree I was too brash, too self- campaign, and thosepromise to provide 

. . > , _ _ -i - — "ha DmnMiAMI! wim 3TT>Tll^ OfflYWlHDIfV 


; confident or too pushy, I apologize,” te 
■ said, in an all-out effort to convince his 
■'colleagues that he had learned his les- 
son. . . 

2. ‘ 'To whatever degree, tn any way & at 
_ I brought controversy or inapproprrate 
. attention to toe House, I apologize. ” 
The Democrats cut him no slack. 
They pressed pariiamentary qi«s- 
- tions to malm it as dear as possible mat 
_ Mr. Gingrich had won merely a majority 
of those voting; not a majority of toe 

• whole House. They squabbled with toe 
-Republicans over whether the timetable 
,'for the ethics inquny was bemst-rushed 


toe Republicans with 
to retake toe political odttensive. 

With scandal enveloping both ends of 
Pennsylvania Avenue, in other words. 


UNITED NATIONS — Secretary of 
Stale Warren Christopher came to tbe 
United Nations to congratulate the new 
secretary-general, Kofi Annan, telling 
him that toe Clinton administration was 
confident it could "now begin again to 
renew a close relationship" with the' 
organization, according to the State De- 
partment spokesman. 

But in a discussion Tuesday on how 
to reform the United Nations enough to 
persuade Congress to pay the $1.3 bil- 
lion debt Washington owes, it was clear 
after the generally cordial meeting that 
toe two rides were nor talking about 
exactly the same thing. 

Nicholas Bums, toe spokesman, said: 
"We believe that global issues — pro- 
liferation of weapons of mass destruc- 
tion, environmental problems, terror- 


ism. and narcotics — will be among the 
great challenges of the coming years, 
and the secretary of state said that he felt 
that tbe United Nations was the only 
world body with toe capacity and the 
scope and tbe mandate to be an in- 
ternational leader on those issues." 

"We would be quite willing to work 
under toe leadership of toe United Na- 
tions oo those issues," he added. 

On reform, however, Mr. Bums said 
that it meant that the organization 
"should be certainly reduced in size," 
despite the global leadership role Wash- 
ington seemed to be assigning it. 

Pied Eckhard, Mr. Arman’s spokes- 
man, said later that the secretary -gen- 
eral was looking at a range of proposals 
for changes that have been accumu- 
lating over a decade. Most of these, 
however, are not plans to slash toe or- 
ganization’s staff, which has been cut 
over the last two years, but rather for 


restructuring component parts to make 
them more relevant to the times. 

A majority of member stales would 
like to see the power of the Security 
Council ’5 permanent members reduced, 
for example, and permanent seats given 
to developing nations. Such changes are 
not on toe Clinton administration's 


"Governments need to come to an 
understanding what they want the 
United Nations to do," Mr. Eckhard 
said the secretary-general told Mr. 
Christopher. Agreeing on reforms often 
requires compromise, and the United 
States will need to work more closely 
with others, toe UN spokesman said. 

“Sometimes, a good leader must also 
be a good follower, ’Mr. Eckhard quoted 
tbe secretary-general as telling Mr. 
Christopher, reflecting a cautiously in- 
dependent approach mat Mr. Annan ap- 
pears to be taking toward Washington. 


Foreshadowing the fierce debate over NATO, Mrs. 
Albright, contemplating European and Soviet con- 
cerns about a united Germany, thought ft "more 
productive and forward-looking to concentrate on 
building a new all-European security system that 
would be based on NATO and the current Conference 
on Security and Cooperation in Europe than to focus 
on expanding NATO itself." 

Six years on. NATO is facing expansion, and it will 
fall in large part on Mrs. Albright to manage the tricky 
path to NATO's summit meeting in July. 

With a comparatively thin knowledge of Asia and 
the Middle East, Mrs. Albright will be more dependent 
on others to shape policy concerning those areas. But 

S ven the themes of her writings, her heritage and her 
nguages. she seems ideally prepared to shape the 
new Europe she could only analyze in 1991 . 

About the United Nations, its potential and an 
effective American role within it, Mrs. Albright's 
views are better known. 

Her many official speeches demonstrate commit- 
ment to a reformed United Nations that can deal with 
global issues such as terrorism, drugs, poverty, toe 
spread of nuclear weapons, peacekeeping, the en- 
vironment and demographic change. 

Mrs. Albright argues against American isolation 
and for multilateral engagement in a world "that 
reflects the interdependence of our age." The thuled 
Nations itself, she says, be used to promote democracy 
and American values. 

“The United Nations gives the good guys — the 
peacemakers, the freedom fighters' toe people who 
believe in human rights, those committed to devel- 
opment — an organized vehicle for achieving gains,' ' 
she said. 


ALBRIGHT: 

Aggressive Agenda 

Continued from Page 1 

confirmation as the most important 
American diplomat and toe highest- 
ranking woman in any administration. 
Her family emigrated to the United 
States when she was 1 1 . 

One area of explicit disagreement 
emerged, however. 

Mr. Helms, who has been sharply crit- 
ical of the United Nations, indicated that 
he would look skeptically at all foreign 
policy spending. But Mrs. Albright said 
char State Department operations, 
already trimmed substantially, could not 
responsibly be cut further. She also said 
that toe United States must pay its SI. 1 
billion in arrears to the United Nations. 

"The superb diplomatic represent- 
ation that our people deserve and our 
interests demand." she said, cannot be 
had "on toe cheap." 

Mr. Helms made it plain that, while 
he was happy with the departure from 
the United Nations of Secretary-Gen- 
eral Boutros Boutros Ghali — Mrs. Al- 
bright is widely understood to have en- 
gineered that, and indeed Mr. Helms 
thanked her for "bouncing Mr. Boutros 
Boutros Ghali’ ' — it did not mean he 
was prepared to drop his complaints 
about the organization’s inefficiencies 
and pay all U.S. arrears. 

"The ball is not in our court." he 
said, referring to toe Senate. 

Mrs. Albright agreed that "there's a 
lot more to be done” about reform, but 
that the United States needed to pay its 
dues "because we believe in die rule of 
law, and we believe that contracts are 
sacred." 

In an unusual move. Mrs. Albright 
was introduced to the committee by 
Secretary of State Warren Christopher, 
who called her "a magnificent choice" 
to succeed him. 

She. in turn, praised him, but later 
suggested that she would be a more en- 
ergetic secretary, seeking to steer events 
rather than react to them. "We must be 
more than an audience, more even than 
actors." she said. "We rousr be the au- 
thors of toe history of our age.” 

Americans, Mrs. Albright said, "are 
doers,” not complainers, and could best 
achieve their goals by "rejecting the 
temptations of isolation and by standing 
with those around the world who share 
our values." Those values, she added, 
would be defended by U.S. diplomats 
"with skill, knowledge and spine." 

She said the United States should 
stand ready to play a continuing '‘or 
increased role" in regional or civil wars, 
"supporting the peacemakers over toe 
bomb throwers." She called particular 
attention to the problems in Cyprus, 
Central Africa. South Asia, Nagorno- 
Karabakh and Northern Ireland. 

But she added: "We are not a charity 
or a fire department. We must be se- 
lective and disciplined in what we 
choose to do." 

Her interest has long centered on East- 
ern and Central Europe, and she said she 
would devote considerable efforts to 
supporting the cause of European in- 
tegration and NATO expansion. What 
the Atlantic alliance "must and will do.” 
Mre. Albright said, "is keep open the 
door to membership to every European 
nation while building a strong and en- 
during relationship with all of Europe’s 
democracies, including Russia." 

But she also stressed that she would 
play close attention to Asia, particularly 
China. The two countries have impor- 
tant differences, she said, over such 
issues as trade, weapons transfers and 
human rights, including China's dom- 
ination of Tibet. Bui the two had gain- 
fully cooperated, she said, on issues of 
crime, the environment, nuclear testing 
and toe frictions on the Korean Pen- 
insula. 

The United Stales, she said, needed to 
pursue "a strategy aimed at Chinese 
integration, not isolation." 



■was civil, 
-but do more in handtag toe gavel to Mr. 
-Gingrich after toe balloting. 


Away From Politics 

• Confronting issues of life and death, sev- 
eral Supreme Court justices expressed doubts 
about granting terminally 01 people a con- 
stitutional right to doctor-assisted suicide. 
“You're asking us in effect to declare un- 
constitutional toe laws of SO states," Justice 
Anthony Kennedy told a lawyer for doctors 
fighting toe state of Washington's ban. ( AP) 

• More people in Northern California were 
urged to evacuate homes along swollen rivers 


as damage estimates neared $2 billion and 
lawmakers were called into special session to 
deal with toe disaster. (AP) 

• Fire swept through Lionel Hampton’s 28th- 

floor apartment in Manhattan after a lamp 
tipped over. Injuring 27 people and destroying 
mementos of tbe jazz great’s seven-decade 
career. The 83-year-old musician, who uses a 
wheelchair, was rescued by two attendants 
working in his apartment, (AP) 

• Miami is a referendum away from becom- 
ing history now that enough signatures have 


been gathered on an abolition petition to put the 
matter to a vote. The referendum can be held as 
early as this spring. The wish for the ref- 
erendum comes as HoridaVJargest. most pop- 
ulous city is frying to climb back from a $68 
million budget shortfall. (AP) 

a In an attempt to stem toe flight of busi- 
nesses to toe suburbs, the District of Columbia 
Council has unanimously voted to reduce em- 
ployers' costs for unemployment insurance by 
$8.9 million this year and to lower the max- 
imum weekly benefit for all jobless workers in 
• to $309, from $359. (WP) 


toe city i 


!i The Discount Street for Arts de ia Table in Paris’ 




i ON ALL LEADING 

-A jl)' BRANDS: 

ruiMft rnvcsTai 


W 


CHINA CRYSTAL 
SILVERWARE 
& GIFTS 

SALES IN 
JANUARY 




I 


Rue de Paradis - Paris X' - Metro Poissonmeie/Gaie de 1’Esi 





• ;'v 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR IBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Korean Union Leader Resolutely Faces Jail 

... j 'n. AM rn-^k«n n i < w 9A in nmtest nf onlv the nresident but ail oth 


New York Tunes Service 

SEOUL — Kwon Young Kil was so 
busy coordinating the largest work stop- 
pages in South Korean history that he 
trussed his daughter's wedding on Dec. 
29. But Mr. Kwoq realizes he may not 
be able to avoid another engagement — 
a trip to jail. 

A former Paris correspondent for a 
South Korean newspaper. Mr. Kwon, 
55, is directing the strike from a plastic 
tent on the grounds of the Myongdong 
Cathedral, a major Roman Catholic 
church in Seoul. In protests and strikes 
over the years, the cathedral has 
provided some measure of sanctuary 
from the police. 

Prosecutors on Wednesday put on 
bold their move to seek arrest warrants 
for some 30 union leaders, including Mr. 


Kwon, saying the strikes seemed to be 
subsiding. Unionists denied the claim. 

But prosecutors said they would re- 
quest arrest warrants for union leaders 
on Thursday. The announcement came 
shortly after Interior Minister Kim Woo 
Suk said the government's only option 
was to take "ram action” so as to “pre- 
vent the strikes from aggravating die 
already difficult economic situation.* 

Mr. Kwon, the chairman of the 
Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, 
the militant labor group organizing the 
strike, would be one of those facing 
arrest for obstructing business and run- 
ning an illegal strike. 

“I’m not worried." said Mr. Kwon, 
who was arrested two years ago in con- 
nection with his labor activities- “I 
know it will happen." 


Break in Weather Gives 
Japan a Shot at Oil Slick 


Crsmfdrd Otr Svff Fnxn Dufvxiia 

MIKUNI, Japan — Government 
workers teamed up Wednesday with 
local volunteers to begin the long task of 
cleaning up about 100 kilometers of 
coastline fouled by one of the worst oil 
spills ever to hit Japan. 

They were helped by the first break in 
the weather since a Russian tanker split 
in two and started leaking oil on Jan. 2. 


Bangladesh General 
To Be Freed on Bail 


Reuters 

DHAKA — Bangladesh ’s former 
president Lieutenant General Hus- 
sain Mohammed Ershad. was gran- 
ted bail by the Supreme Court on 
Wednesday on the last of a series of 
corruption charges against him. 

General Ershad ’s lawyer, Yusuf 
Hussain Humayun. said his client 
would be released Thursday after 
settling administrative procedures. 

General Ershad, who seized 
power in a bloodless coup in 1982 
and was deposed in an opposition- 
led uprising in 1990, at one time 
faced 19 corruption charges. 

He was granted bail in November 
in what was the most sensational 
case against him — the charge of 
killing Major General Abul Manzur 
during an army mutiny in 1981. He 
has been a member of Parliament 
since June. 


The strike began Dec. 26 in protest of 
new labor legislation that would make it 
for companies to lay off workers 
and would make some union activities 
more difficult. 

The government says that $1.4 billion 


only the president but all other gov- 
ernment officials have reiterated that 
they will not meet with our leade rs .*’ 
President Kim said that labor law 
must be modernized, and that die iron- 
clad South Korean tradition of lifetime 


has been lost in production, and exports employment was too inflexible and its 
have been cut by $244 million since the history of “habitual strikes too dam- 
strike's inception, at a time when the aging to competitiveness. 

Korean trade deficit is already balloon- Mr. Kwon acknowledged dial work- 
ing and economic growth is slowing. era can be laid off m me united States 

Mr. Kwon said the strikes would con- and many other countries, but be aid that 
tinue until the law was repealed, a step those countries provide unemployment 
that he conceded was not likely. But be insurance and other forms of support. 
caid the gover nment could take a step to Tbc government, as a way of rcso rv- 

resolve the situation by entering talks ing the impasse, is getting re ady to 
with his confederation. propose some regulations to protect 

“If the strike is hurting the economy workers who lose their jobs, but Mr. 
so seriously, the president must try to Kwon said he doubted the measures 
talk to us.” Mr. Kwon said. “But not would be strong enough. 


The Maritime Safety Agency de- 
ployed 14 ships, two planes and four 
helicopters to by to find patches of oil 
drifting toward the shore, drop deter- 
gent on it and collect it before more of it 
reached land. 

The slicks that have already arrived 
along once- pristine waterfronts have 
damaged centuries-old fishing areas and 
turned the shoreline into areas of black 
sludge. 

But to some local people watching 
their livelihood slowly destroyed, the 
tireless efforts of fishermen divers — 
battling cresting waves of spilled oil by 
hand, scooping the sludge-laden surf 
with buckets — were no match for the 
massive slick. 

“I would tike some compensation, 
anything just to keep my family eat- 
ing," said a 67-year-old fisherman, 
Tadao Meiji. He predicted the sea 
urchins and seaweed harvested along 
the shore would take three or four years 
to recover. 

The worst affected stretch of coast, 
330 kilometers (about 200 miles) west 
of Tokyo, had been considered the best 
near-shore fishing grounds in the area 
and has scenic beaches. About 4.2 mil- 
lion visitors come here each year, 
mostly in the summer. 

The spill is already taking its toil on 
the tourism industry. Officials said that 
people had begun to cancel reservations 
after hearing of the spill. 

As fishermen passed buckets of oil 
Wednesday, Coast Guard helicopters 
dropped chemicals to try to dissolve 
some of the 3,700,000-liter (962,000- 
gallon) slick. 





£ -s 

' .... \V 


M Uufad«/Ttir .XmtruuJPnm 

A resident passing a bucket of oil on Wednesday near Mikuni, Japan. 


Authorities said that there were five 
major slicks heading for the coast, but 
thatthey still had no firm idea of the total 
amount of oil that could wash ashore. 

Russian authorities in Vladivostok 
said that both ends of the broken tanker 
were now leaking oiL 


Saioshi Horii, 32, an engineer who 
lives near Mikuni, said it was hard to 
believe the extent of the damage. 

“Who’s going to pay?” he said. 
“The Russians don’t have any money 
so they won’t help, and yet they are to 
blame. ’ ’ (Reuters, AP) 



CbooVoao Kons'Agcnr. Kuu IVu* 

Mr. Kwon announcing shrike plans. 


Censors in India 
Reel at Sex 
In ‘ Kama Sutra ’ 

Agenae Frame-Prase 

NEW DELHI — Indian censors have 
demanded major changes to a film based 
on an ancient sex treatise, kindling a 
debate over whether the country is ready 
for sex on the big screen. 

The Censor Board, a government- 
appointed moral watchdog, wants all 
nude scenes deleted from “Kama 
Sutra,” angering the director, Mira 
Nair, who says the film would then be 
like “a bird without wings.” 

“I don’t understand this hypocrisy,” 
said Miss Nair, who directed the crit- 
ically acclaimed films “Salaam Bom- 
bay” and “Mississippi Masala.” 

“My film has been made to counter 
perversity and obscenity and explore nat- 
ural sexuality,” she added. 

But she admitted she “hasn't used 
any safety blankets” in her film, due to 
be released in April. 

“Kama Sutra” is set in 16th-century 
India and is a story of sexual jealousy. 
Newspapers say it contains torrid scenes 
not normally shown in India. 

In a country where kissing on screen 
was taboo until recently. Miss Nair’s 
film has generated considerable heal. 

Sultan Ahmed, chairman of the In- 
dian Motion Pictures Association, said 
he thought Miss Nair’s movie sounded 
tike “those triple X-rated movies.” 

But the filmmake r Ketan Mehta said 
he thought the censors should let the 
people judge. 

**Wby can’t they leave the whole de- 
cision to the audience?” he was quoted as 
saying. “Morality is changing. It is a his- 
torical process that cannot be negated.” 


Unions Plan , 
Partial Return 
At Hyundai 

Cl ■ t mW fr **’’* Crrx rim ai c ba 

SEOUL — Workers will return to 
their jobs at Hyundai export plants for 
limited periods to encourage govern- 
ment concessions on a disputed labor 
law, union leaders said Wednesday. 

The plants will resume partial op* 
eration Thursday, with 80,000 workers 
on strike at Hyundai Motors Co. and 14 
other Hyundai plants working at least 
two hours a day until Tuesday, the uni- 
ons announced late Wednesday. 

Earlier, South Korea’s top strike lead- 
er issued an ultimatum to the gove rn- 
ment to scrap a new labor law wiflrin one 
week or face allrout work stoppages, 
including a public-sector shutdown. 

But the chairman of die governing 

New Korea Pany flatly rejected the de- 
mand. Another party official suggested 
me nfrh ran mi was a bluff and predicted 
strikes would soon fizzle. 

President Kim Young Sam is socking 
to toe new law, which be contends wia 
help pull the nation out of one of its 
worst economic downturns. " 

“Our action will give President Kim 
another chance to think,” said Kim My* 
oog Ho, a Hyundai union leader. Workers 
at Hyundai, the nation’s No. 1 car maker, 
will wok six hours Thursday, he said. \ 

Hyundai unions have led the nation s 
largest organized labor protests, begun 
Dec. 26, when Mr. Kim’s party rammed 
the labor law through Parliament m a 
secretive, predawn session, with no op- 
position members present. 

A union spokeswoman denied that 
the decision to work at Hyundai was a 
crack in union solidarity. All unions 
were taking different preparatory mea- 
sures for next week, she said. 

4 ‘We ft with them, and 

agreed that we should give time to the 
president to consider our ultimatum to 

repeal toe law,” she said, without saying 
whether other unions would follow suit 

“Other unions may also return to 
partial operation,” said Choi Myong 
Ah, an official at the outlawed Con- 
federation of Trade Unions, which 
organizing die nationwide strikes. ”We^ 
want to show the people that we are 
patient 

“But we also are preparing for the 
worst and holding our ranks to launch 
full-blown strikes.” 

Unions claimed that almost 220,000 
members were striking on Wednesday 1 , 
Tnrinriing about 50,000 car workers, a 
similar num ber of metalworkers and 
80,000 employees from the Hyundai 
Group. 

The Labor Ministry put the number at 
less than 65,000. (AP. Reuters. AFP) 


: ^ 


m 


BRIEFLY 


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The& Netherlander Hcralb^^feSrihune het/inanoeele dagblad 

THE WHIPS augfCTSRUtB 


Manila May Allow Activist’s Visit 

MANILA — The Philippines will allow the East 
Timorese Nobel laureate Jose Ramos-Horta to enter the 
country if the government is consulted before the visit. 
President Hdel Ramos said Wednesday. 

The g o vernm ent said earlier it had denied entry to the 
self-exiled East Timorese independence activist on toe 
recommendation of a cabinet committee on the basis of 
“national interest.” 

“National interest must be served if there is a mutually 
agreed time to visit, which must be based on some pre- 
liminary consultations.” he told reporters at his weekly 
news conference. 

The Manila Times said the decision to deny entry to Mr. 
Ramos-Horta was made to avoid embarrassing Indonesia, a 
close ally of the Philippines. (Reuters) 

India to Buy 2 Subs From Russia 

NEW DELHI — India plans to import two submarines 
from Russia and build two more of its own. Indian officials 
said Wednesday. 

“There is a plan to buy two submarines and to build two 
more locally,” a senior official told Reuters. 

The Press Trust of India on Wednesday quoted the 
journal U.S. Defense News as saying India had agreed to a 
$1.5 million deal to purchase two Kilo-class diesel sub- 


marines from Russia. But officials in New Delhi said the 
deal had not yet been approved by die Indian cabinet. 

(Reuters)-’ 

Hong Kong Plans Appeal in V.S. 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong is mounting an argent '■ 
appeal against a U.S. court’s refusal to extradite a fugitive to 
the British colony because of its impending handover to ’ 
fTiina, Governor Chris Patten said Wednesday. 

U.S. District Judge Joseph Tauro ruled on Tuesday 
against extraditing Jerry Lui Kin-hong, a former com--; 
mercial director of British-American Tobacco Co. (Hong ■’ 
Kong) Ltd, to face bribery and conspiracy charges relating ■- 
to cigarette smuggling. 

Mr. Lui arguedtoax be faced possible execution if returned ’• 
to Hoog Kong because his trial was unlikely to be completed 
before the June 30 handover to China. ( Reuters ) 

VOICES From Asia ? 

Fidel Ramos, president of die Philippines, saying he is ' 
keeping his options open on whom to endorse as his 
successor in elections next year. “All of this speculation 
about who is the ‘anointed* — these are all premature and as 
far as I am concerned unproductive, even counterpro- 
ductive. I would like to remind all ‘wannabes’ to look at it 
in that light.” (Reuters) 



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EUROPE 


Amkmra Ig Frustrated by EUand Greece 


By Nicholas Doughty 

Reuters - 


-■-jp. 


or a 
ons peace 


. : v' "" LONDON — Europe and Washing- 
‘ - lf ' £ ^jncreasm^y worried -by sigSs 

™* Turkey, a vital strategic partner 
raay be turning away from die West — 
® a . *ne of growing Greefc-TuiWsh 
‘ r * t ? n ®? n over *e European Union and 
- the divided island of Cyprus. 

Diplomals say a series of meetings 
wul try to assess the risks of anew crisis 
* ,, m southern Europe and just bow fair 

>T NEWS ANALYSIS 

3''^’ Turkc^. frustrated by its relations wife 
Hit Union, is prepared to change course. 
- A decision by Greek-nded Cyprus to 
buy Russian anti-aircraft missiles has 
raised the temperature at the worst 
sable time, as the West 
breakthrough on a United 
plan for the island. 

Jp Bu t Turkey, whose troops occupy the 
northern part of Cyprus, is already bii- 
terty disappointed at the lack, of progress 
m its relations with the 15-nation Ell. 

. A nkara blames Greece for blocking 
promised EU economic help, although 
the Union is also concerned about Tur- 
key's record on human ri ghts . Greece 
can block the aid because it is a member 
of the EU, while Turkey is not. Both 
countries are members of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization. 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel of 
Germany said Tuesday that Turkey was 
turning toward closer ties with its 
Muslim neighbors. - 
“Turkey feels that it is wrongly 
treated by Europe,” he said. “How can 
cue hold this against Turkey? Ankara 
has not profited by one penny from the 
customs union . with tee EU Wanw 
Greece puts the brakes on everything.'* 
Some diplomats say Turkey — an 
important ally for the West because it 
borders volatile regions of tee Caucasus 
^ynd tee Middle East — might block 
^NATO decisions in retaliation, includ- 
ing the alliance’s planned expansion 
into Eastern Europe. 

-. “There has been talk. of the Tories 
taking areally hardline because of what 
has happened,” a European diplomat 
said. “The warnings have, been there 
before but there may be reason to take it 
more seriously now.” 

.. The two NATO ades-bave gone to 
.the brink of war several limes, most 
recently last year in a territorial dispute 
in the Aegean Sea. Four people also died 
inaseries of clashes between the divided, 
communities oh Cyprus last year. 

Zr The island has been .dhodeg since 
'£974,' when Th^^mvSded' Md'oes- , 
copied its northern tend after a coup 
'engineered by the military government 
that ruled Greece at the time. - 
Washington and its allies have cri- 
.ticized Cyprus for the planned missile 
purchase, which they see as a threat to 
Itee peace hopes. 

The United States announced Taes- 

■ day that it would send a senior official to 
;the island this weekend, after U.S. of- 

* fidals meet then European counterparts 
■in The Hague on Friday. 

There is much sensitivity over how to 

■ tackle the problems between Greece and 
Turkey, partly because Richard Hol- 
;brooke — tee U.S., official who ne- 
gotiated tee peace deal for Bosnia-Her- 
zegovina — accused tee Europeans last 

ar of failing to deal with teem. 
European diplomats said the meeting 


BRIEFLY 


at The Hague would try to ensure teat 
tee .United States was coordinating its 
efforts with Europe and continuing to 
bade tee UN proposals for Cyprus. 

. “There is some concern,” one envoy 
said, “that the Americans might be pre- 
panng a Holbrooke-styie offensive for 
Cyprus all on their own, and we think 
that would be counterproductive. ’ ’ 
Another meeting, set for Jan. 29 in 
Rome, wiU address tire broader question 
of how to handle Turkey. 

Ankara has long wanted to join the 
Union but has received mo firm prom- 
ises, while a string of other countries 
from the Mediterranean and Eastern 
Europe have now officially joined tee 
line for membership. 

In addition, tee Islamic government 
of Prime Minister Necmettin Erbakan 
has made efforts in recent months to 
improve ties with Iran and other Muslim 
countries. Last weekend, he sponsored a 
meeting of ministers from eight Muslim 


uimunsieii. ixum eigm. ivuismn v,c*o*;ap«*c Hmctprrw 

)ps occupy tee romilrie^ aimed ar bolstering eccmomic DIAMONDS ON GOLDIE — The actress Goldie Hawn trying on a necklace to open a sale at Harrods in 
is already bit- cooperation among them . London. The chairman, Mobamed al Fayed, right, d (mated $25, Owl to a Hawn-backed cause to protect elephants, 

ick of progress ■■ ^ 

Blair Kicks Off His Campaign 6 With Confidence’ 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Pledging that he had no 
secret tax-raising agenda, the opposi- 
tion leader Tony Blair started his cam- 
Wednesday to become Britain’s 
Labour Patty prime minister in 


is 


>S 


."A:. 


the first time in a generation,” 
Mr. Blair, 43, safdt “Labour goes into a 
general election with. real confidence.” 
His appearance on a platform em- 
blazoned with tlx: slogan “Leading Bri- 
tain Into the Fixture r followed the be- 
ginning Monday of Prime Minister John 
Major's campaign, which polls indicate 
tee Conservative government wall lose. 

The election must be held by May, 
when tile Conservatives’ fourth success- 


ive term expires. But Labour, hoping to 
* the government with a no-con- 
vote in Parliament within weeks, 
an earlier election. 
Major, who lost his parliamen- 
tary majority in December, is holding 
out for a spring election. 

He hopes in a highly personalized 
campaign to persuade blue-collar and 
middle-class voters that a Labour gov- 
ernment would revert to socialist-style 
policies of high spending and high 
taxes. 

In contrast, Mr. Blair said: “There is 
no single spending commitment here 
anywhere in our proposals that require 
increases in personal taxation. That 
whole Tory case is a lie." 


Under Mr. Blair, a youthful-looking, 
telegenic leader who took over in 1994, 
the left-of-center Labour Parry has com- 
pleted a 10-year shift away from its old 
socialist policies. 

The party is doing well partly because 
Mr. Blair has so for succeeded in re- 
assuring many middle-class voters 
about taxes. 

He said improvements in health and 
education could be funded largely by a 
giant windfall tax on highly profitable 
utility companies, once state-owned and 
sold by the Conservatives. 

On Britain's souring relations with 
the rest of the European Union, another 
big problem for Mr. Major. Mr. Blau- 
said the Conservatives were “being 


pushed ever more towards a position of 
withdrawal from Europe.'* 

Robin Cook, set to become foreign 
secretary if Labour wins. said. “It is tee 
Labour Party which offer the country a 
government which can do business with 
Europe.” 

Mr. Major's problems in resisting 
closer integration of the Union are com- 
pounded by the fact teat other EU lead- 
ers expect him to be out of office before 
June, when a new treaty for tee Union is 
expected to be concluded. 

An opinion poll published Wednes- 
day in The Guardian showed Labour 
17 points ahead of tee Conservatives. 
The poll of 1,201 voters had a margin 
of error of about 3 percentage points. 


£1. 


IRA Asserts It Seeks 
Peace, but Reaffirms 
Goal of United Ireland 

Agence France-Presse 

j DUBLIN — The Irish Republican 
Army inastedlaie Wednesday that it was 
committed to “a just and lasting peace” 
in Northern Ireland bur reaffirmed its 
cp ra rm irocitf to a united Ireland. 

.In *:NeW Year’s message in' 
Thursday’s edition of An Phoblacht- 
Repnbtican News, tee weekly news- 
paper of die IRA’s Sinn Fern political 
wing, tee IRA claimed it sought peace. 

The statement, issued in the same 
week the IRA fixed a rocket at a Belfast 
courthouse sentry post and a mortar at a 
Lbndoodeoy police parol, repeated its 
responsibility for ending a 18-monte 
cease-fire last February with a bomb in 
London. 

“We remind John Major and his gov- 


Austrian Coalition Split Over Sale of Bank 


Reuters 

VIENNA — Cracks in Austria’s 
feuding government coalition widened 
Wednesday in a dispute over bow to 
privatize the country’s second-biggest 
bank, exposing deep divisions between 
tiie chancellor and his foreign minister. 

The sale of Cretetanstalt-Bankverein 
has led to . a split between tee Social 
Democrats oC Chancellor Franz Vran- 
itzky and tee cOTvservafive“Teople’s 
Party, led by Foreign Minister 


Wolfgang Schuessel. The deepening 
conflict prompted both party chiefs to 
agree to convene an emergency session 
of coalition leaders on Monday — the 
first time the committee will have met 
since a general election in December 
1995. 

Thar election was called after tee 
same coalition collapsed after foiling to 
agree to cuts in a huge budget deficit to 
prepare Austria for Europe’s planned 
economic and monetary union. 


Mr. Vranitzky, opening a conference 
of Social Democrats in tee southern 
town of Bad Taizmannsdorf. made it 
clear that his party would not be pushed 
around over tee privatization. 

He said the choice of a bidder for the 
bank was solely the decision of Finance 
Minister Viktor Klima, a Social Demo- 
crat 

“I stress again, it is Klima's de- 
cision,’ ’ tee chancellor said. ' ‘We are not 
going to be bullied into a derision." 


Crewman 
On Balloon 
Saves Day 
For Branson 


By Malcolm Browne 

Nm Yori Times Service 

NEW YORK — Hopes to be the 
first balloonists to make a nonstop 
voyage around the world were 
dashed Wednesday for the three 
crewmen of a British balloon — 
one of whom the entrepreneur 
Richard Branson — when its loss of 
lift forced them to land in the Sahara 
after less than a day aloft 

When the balloon began to lose 
altitude, die crew members tried to 
maintain height by throwing out 
ballast and teen heavy objects, but 
to no avail. When they tried to 
jettison an external fuel tank, they 
found it had jammed, and one of 
them, Alex Ritchie, wearing a para- 
chute, climbed outside tee crew 
capsule and freed tee tank. 

“We owe a debt of gratitude to 
Alex,” said Mr. Branson, the cap- 
tain of the team, after the balloon 
landed in tee Algerian desert. “He 
saved our lives. s 

None of the crew members were 
injured in the landing, and the valu- 
able crew capsule, packed with ex- 
pensive equipment, escaped seri- 
ous damage. The project director 
for the flight, Michael Kendrick, 
said in London that the cause of the 
failure had not been determined. 

Two other balloon teams, one 
Swiss and one American, are pre- 
paring their own attempts to fly 
around the world, with prospects of 
launching this weekend. Despite the 
discouragement of unremitting fail- 
ures by many aeronauts during tee 
past decade, long-duration balloon- 
ists with the necessary financial 
backing of many millions of dollars 
continue to vie for the last great goal 
of lighter-than-air aviation: a non- 
i circuit of the globe. 

Piccard, a Swiss psy- 
chiatrist and co-captain of tee 
Breitling Orbiter balloon, said Wed- 
nesday that he and his fellow pilot, 
Wim Versnaeten, expected to 
launch their balloon from Chateau 
d’Oex, Switzerland, on Sunday. An 
American contender. Steve Fosse tt, 
expects to launch his balloon about 
tee same time from Busch Stadium 
in St Lotus. Missouri. Mr. Fossett, 
unlike his competitors, will fly alone 
in an unpressurized crew capsule. In 
an attempt be made last year, he was 
forced to land after flying from 
South Dakota to eastern Canada. 




peace created by our initiative 18 months 
earlier had been graduaflystrangled to the 
print of extinction, ” tee statement said, 
“long before our decision to resume mil- 
itary operations.” The statement also 
commended those who, “despite British 
bad faith," continued to try to negotiate. 


Pope Plans His Longest Visit to Poland 


Reuters 

WARSAW — Pope John Paul II will pay a 
grueling 1 1-day visit to his native Poland from 
May 31 to June 10, tee Polish government 
information office said Wednesday. 

It will be the 76-year-old pontiffs sixth and 
longest trip to bis homeland smee his election in 
1978. He will travel to 12 towns in tee west and 
south, and will take a two-day break in tee ski 
resort of Zakopane. 

The Pope is also doe to meet with President 
Aleksander Kwasniewski and with Prime Min- 
ister Wlodzimierz CSmoszewicz. 


The trip is likely to be an emotional ex- 
perience for the pontiff, whose visits home be- 
fore the fall of communism in 1989 heartened 
those struggling for democracy. His last visit, for 
one day, was in May 1995. 

It also falls amid fierce campaigning for gen- 
eral elections late this year in which the ruling 
former Communists face a strong challenge 
from a new right-leaning alliance beaded by the 
pro-Catholic Solidarity trade union. 

Religious issues play a key role, especially 
because the government late last year eased a 
strict anti-abortion law, despite protests. 



■'tC 


J ■ A V 


Madrid Attacks Bear ETA Signs 

MADRID — An army officer was shot and killed 
Wednesday shortly before three civilians were wounded m 
ttmf hon° the hallm ar ks of the armed 
Basque separatist group ETA 

UeutenamCriwwl -Jesus Cuesta Abril was shot twice m 
the head as he got out ofhis car in front ofhis home, Spanish 
television reported He died soon afterward m a hospital. 
Less than an hour later, the police said, three unidentified 
civilians woe wounded when a car bomb exploded a short 
distance from where Colonel Cnesta, 49, was killed 

“It 1 ms all the sighs of being an ETA attack, although if 
is too early to be confirmed,’’ said Madrid's mayor, Jose 
Maria Alvarez deLManzano. (AP) 

Athens to Send Suspect to Berlin 

ATHENS — Greece plans to _extradiie a German 
woman in connection with a. 1986 disco bombing in West 
Berlin that killed three people and wounded 200, mostly 
UJS. militar y personnel. Justice Ministry officials smd 
Wednesday. ' ' , . 

The woman, 31 -year-old Andrea Hauslcr, was arrested 
in October in Hwticidilri near the northern pot city of 
Salonika at the request of German authorities. (Reuters) 

Bulgaria Gets New Leader 

SOFIA — Coalition allies of Bulgaria's governing 
Socialists approved Interior Minister Nikolai Etobrev as 
prime minister to replace Than Videnov, who resigned 
last monte, a party spokesman said Wednesday. 

Mr. Dobrev. nominated by the Bulgarian Somalia 
Party on Tuesday, said: “I will beready to discuss with all 
political forces tee problems of tee ecomroyandsooal 
order. I plan to cany out radical economic reforms mat 
will bolster economic growth/ r ' (Reuters) 

EUGets Tough on Compliance 


BRUSSELS — Lhiw^»> —— — — — — , . ... ■», 

ply with ratings from the European Court of Justice ww 
See mull^ffioiwWlar fines’ under a system adopted 
Wednesday by tee EU*S executive arm, fac.EimJ|W*n 
Comnrissioa. The move, using powers outlined in tee 
Maastricht treaty, represents growing frustration m Brus- 
sels ar tee 15 member states’ foot-dragging over oahooal 
implementation of legislation adopted at European level. 

Problems are most acute in single-market and ea- 
vironmental issues. Arecanlieport from the commission 

ro EUgtrremmenttsaMoitiy56per^oft^ro^^ 


law in all EU states. 


(AFP) 


Bern Might Add to Holocaust Fund 


Reuters 

ZURICH — The Swiss government 
may bolster the size of tee Holocaust 
memorial fund it proposed in a gesture of 
goodwill demanded by Jewish organi- 
zations, an authoritative Bern political 
source said Wednesday. 

A statement issued by tee Swiss cab- 
inet Tuesday deliberately left open tee 
door for adding government money to a 
planned fund drawing on about 40 million 
Swiss francs ($29.6 million) in dormant 
Swiss bank accounts, tee source said. 

Jewish leaders, who have pressed Bern 
to make restitution for alleged Swiss 
profiteering from the Holocaust, bad as- 
sailed the cabinet proposal for proposing 
other people’s abandoned bank accounts 
rather than Swiss public fends. 

But the Federal Council, or cabinet, 
included wording in its statement that 
would allow a quick payout of federal 
funds if Bern’s current research con- 
firms charges of Swiss wrongdoing to- 
ward Jews and other Nazi victims, tee 
source said. 

11 This sentence doesn’t mean much to 
most people, but this is a very important 
sentence, ’ said tee source, who de- 
clined to be named. 

The sentence in question reads; 
“Should substantiated facts be found 
teat require immediate action, even 
while tee investigation process is under 


way, the Federal Council will imme- 
diately take the necessary steps. 

‘“litis also applies to different de- 
mands regarding damage payments that 
have recently become ever more vocal,' ’ 
tee official statement added. 

Groups led by tee World Jewish Con- 
gress have suggested the Swiss make a 
good faith financial gesture soon, not- 
ably before the issuance of a repeat in 
two to five years by historians inves- 
tigating Swiss financial dealings with 
Jews and Nazis during World War n. 

The Bern source said this point would 
be stressed in talks with Jewish leaders, 
who last week threatened to call a boy- 
cott of Swiss banks. 

The wording of the statement meant the 


cabinet could decide on Holocaust pay- 
menu even before interim reports emerge 
from the panel of nine Swiss and foreign 
historians commissioned by the govern- 
ment last month, the source add e d. 

Switzerland gave 1 million francs 
(about $739,000) last year to the Aus- 
chwitz memorial and a counseling group 
for Holocaust survivors in a gesture of 
reconciliation after apologizing for a 
wartime policy of turning back Jewish 
refugees from Nazi terror. 

A Jewish source close to the talks said 
in New York that Bern had been re- 
ceptive to a Jewish proposal for a fi- 
nancial gesture to Holocaust victims and 
that a Swiss representative had proposed 
tee $250 million figure. 


\ Mad Cow 9 Disease on Decline, Swiss Report 


Agence Prance-Presse 

BERN — Swhzeflandrfflorted 45 cases 
of * ‘mad cow” disease in 1996, down from 
68 the previous year, and expects the toll to 
fall further in 1997, tlx: Federal Veterinary 
Office said Wednesday. 

“In 2000, bovine spongiform enceph- 
alopathy should be consigned to his- 
tory,” said a spokesman, Kart-Heinz 
Mueller. He added, however, that tee 
appearance of the disease last year in 


seven animals bom in the three years 
following a December 1990 ben on the 
use of animal carcasses in cattle feed was 
“embarrassing.” 

Switzerland, which has counted a 
total of 230 “mad cow" cases, em- 
barked this week on a plan to slaughter at 
least 1.500 head of cattle by tee end of 
February, Mr. Mueller said After Bri- 
tain, Switzerland has been the country 
worst affected by bans of beef exports. 


Waigel Calls Hiring of Foreign Workers ‘Grotesque’ 


Reuters 

BONN — Germany's conservative 
Christian Social Union, casting aside 
fears about inflaming racist sennmoits, 
called Wednesday for stricter limits on 
foreign workers as part of their new 
strategy to cut ^employment. 

Finance Minister Theo Waigel, chair- 
man of the Bavarian sister party to Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl's Christian Demo- 
crats, said it was “grotesque” teat 
millions of Germans were unemployed 
while so many foreigners worked boo. 

- Michael Glos, pariramentary leader of 
Christian Social Umom said fee system 


was at fault if more than 4 million Ger- 
mans were jobless while more than a 
million foreigners received work per- 
mits each year. Unemployment was 1 0.3 
percent in November. 

“It should be legitimate to look at 
ways to make sure Germans get the 
jobs.” Mr. Waigel said in an interview 
with the daily Sneddeutsche Zeftung. 

Tbe Christian Social Union, tee most 
right-wing of Germany's mainstream 
parties and ajunior partner in Mr. Kohl ’s 
coalition, has long been noted for its 
conservative views. 

But the Bavarians and other major 


parties have long refrained from directly 
linking high unemployment levels to tee 
8 million foreign residents, in part be- 
cause they want to avoid being accused 
of fomenting racial unrest. 

They have been especially careful 
since xenophobic violence erupted in 
Germany in the early 1990s. 

“It is schizophrenic that we give so 
many jobs to foreigners each year only 
because Germans don’t want to do this 
work,” Mr. Waigel said. “German em- 
ployers keep telling us they need, for 
example, seasonal workers from Poland. 
I call that grotesque.’ ’ 


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INTERNATIONAL 


Chirac Defends Army 

President Scorns Critics of Retaliation 
For Killings of 2 Soldiers in Bangui 


By Craig R. Whitney 

Se*- York Times Sen-ice 


PARIS — Criticized by the Socialist 
opposition here for ordering retaliation 
for the killings of two French soldiers in 
the Central African Republic by anti- 
government mutineers in that country. 
President Jacques Chirac on Wednesday 
staunchly defended his army's reaction. 

"No one should count on France's not 
reacting when its soldiers are assassin- 
ated,” Mr. Chirac told government min- 
isters , heaping scorn on critics of the 
decision to strike back. 

The two French soldiers were killed 
Saturday night in Bangui while escort- 
ing African mediators to a meeting with 
leaders of the mutiay, the third in the 
impoverished, landlocked former 
French colony in the past year. 

French troops based in Bangui struck 
back at the insurgents’ headquarters 
Sunday night, killing 10 of them, and 
turning over 30 others to the government 
of President Ange-Felix Patasse, 
France’s Defense Ministry said. 

Mr. Chirac's critics worried dial France 
had thereby taken sides and could be 
drawn into a civil conflict it had no busi- 
ness getting involved in- 

But since French paratroops helped 
depose the country's first postcolonial 
leader, the Emperor Jean Bedel Boknssa, 
in 1978, the worry appeared somewhat 
beside the poinL 

More than 2.000 French troops have 
been permanently stationed in die Central 
African Republic since it achieved in- 
dependence in 1960. using it as a jump- 
ing-off point for military interventions 
elsewhere and enabling France to fulfill 
die vocation it sees for itself as a world 
power, at least on the continent of 
Africa. 

’’This isn’t a country, it’s just a de- 


pendency." wrote Patrick de Saint-Exu- 
pery , a correspondent of the pro-French 
daily Le Figaro, from Bangui after the 
fighting died down. “Here. France is 
everything. Officially, no one will admit 
it, but some fictions are deliberately pre- 
served. and Central Africa is one of 

them, ’’ he informed his readers. 

France also has defease agreements 

providing it with military bases in seven 
other African states — Gabon, Senegal, 
Ivory Coast, Togo. Cameroon, Comoros 
and Djibouti — and has about 10.000 
troops deployed. 

Foreign Minister Herve de Cbarene 
insisted this week that France had no 
intention of interfering with mediation 
efforts in the Central African Republic 
that were begun by leaders of other 
French-speaking African countries after 
the latest mutiny began last month. 

Mr. Chirac met with African heads of 
state in Ouagadougou in early December 
and urged ‘'better governance” cm them 

then. 

France also led calls then for an in- 
ternational military expedition to protect 
refugees from Rwanda and Burundi who 
were camped out in eastern Zaire from 
the fighting that was spreading there. 
Canada agreed to lead a force, but the 
operation was called off after many of the 
refugees went home by themselves, driv- 
en along by the rebel forces in Zaire. 

French officials accused the United 
States of foot-dragging in the preparations 
for intervention m Zaire, and American 
and European skeptics voiced suspicions 
that the real French aim might have been 
simply to prop up the regime of Zaire’s 
ailing president. Marshal Mobutu Sese 
Seko, who returned to his country last 
month after undergoing extensive treat- 
ment for cancer in France and Switzer- 
land. 

About 1.000 French troops came to 



Arafat Rejects Proposal 
For Israeli Pullout in ’98 


Mfcfad Lpchkzfltac AuocMcU 

CHEERS — Pamela Harriman, US. ambassador to France, chatting 
with President Jacques Chirac at a reception Wednesday in Paris. 


his aid in an earlier rebellion in 199 1 and 
1992, and French forces intervened in 
Rwanda to end the ethnic slaughter there 
in 1994. Now, with anti-Mobutu rebels 
in control of much of eastern Zaire, the 
daily Le Monde reported Tuesday that a 
former chief of the French presidential 
security guard. Colonel Alain Le Caro, 
was in Zaire putting together a force of 
French and other European mercenaries 
to prop up Marshal Mobutu’s forces in 
the embattled east. 

After denials by French officials and 


Colonel Le Caro himself, the newspaper 
backed off that report Wednesday. 

Despite the frictions with Washington 
over the proposal for intervention in 
Zaire, the Foreign Ministry in Paris was 
evidently quite pleased by support from 
the State Department spokesman, Nich- 
olas Burns, for the French retaliation 
against the mutineers in Bangui. 

U.S. officials also had thanked the 
French in May for protecting American 
civilians in that capital during one of the 
two earlier mutinies last year. 


Mobutu Will Return to France on Thursday 


The Associated Press 

KINSHASA. Zaire — Less than a 
month after coming home to face a rebel 
uprising and other political crises. Pres- 
ident Mobutu Sese Seko will return to 
France on Thursday. 

The departure, which was confirmed 
by the marshal’s press secretary. Lum- 
bana Kapasa. raises questions about Mr. 
Mobutu's health and the severity of the 
prostate cancer that kept him in Europe 
from August until Dec. 17. two months 
after the start of the rebel war. 


The press official did not give a reason 
for Marshal Mobutu's departure or say 
how long he would be gone. He rearmed 
to Kinshasa only after rebels had run the 
Zairian Army out of key eastern cities 
and announced their intention to topple 
the president 

lire army’s humiliation prompted 
protests in the capital, in which demon- 
strators demanded the government’s 
ouster and accused Marshal Mobutu's 
prime minister of not giving the military 
the support it needed to fight the rebels. 


Marshal Mobutu, 66, came home to a 
tumultuous welcome Dec. 17 and said he 
had ignored doctors’ advice to stay in the 
hospital, saying he returned to Zaire to 
deal with its problems. He quickly ap- 
pointed a new army chief and formea a 
so-called crisis government, which in- 
cluded several new cabinet ministers but 
retained Prime Minister Leon Kengo wa 
Dondo. 

The changes have had little effect on 
the war with the rebels, who have cap- 
tured six major towns and a gold mine. 


Suicide at Eiffel Tower 

Agence France - Press* 

PARIS — A woman jumped to her 
death from the Eiffel Tower on Wed- 
nesday. her body remaining stuck half 
way down, forcing rescue works to climb 
the structure to retrieve it, officials said. 

The woman, who was in her 50s and 
worked at the Paris landmark, jumped 
from the second level of the tower. 

Her body became entangled in the 
metalwork near the first level at 58 me- 
ters. 

More than 350 suicides have been 
recorded from the 320-meter tower since 
it opened in 1889.- 


The Associated Press 

JERUSALEM — Yasser Arafat on 
Wednesday angrily rejected an Israeli 
compromise proposal to complete a 
West Bank withdrawal in 1998, a year 
earlier than initially proposed by Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. 

Dennis Ross, the U.S. special envoy, 
presented the compromise to the Pal- 
estinian leader in what an Arafat aide 
described as an “extremely tense six- 
hour meeting that lasted until early 
morning. . 

At the same time, a heLicopter waited 
outside Mr. Netanyahu’s Jerusalem of- 
fice, ready to fly the Israeli leader to the 
Gaza Strip if Mr. Ross had been able to 
persuade Mr. Arafat to accept die offer 
and pave the way for a summit meet- 
ing. 

Mr. Ross has been trying to arrange a 
second meeting between the two leaders 
— the first was held secretly Sunday 
night — so they could finally conclude 
agreement on Hebron and further West 
Bank withdrawals. 

Mr. Netanyahu offered May 1998 a s 
the new target date, a Palestinian official 
said on condition of anonymity. 

But Mr. Arafat insisted that the Israeli 
withdrawal from most of the West Bank 
be completed by September J997, as 
stipulated in the 1995 peace accord 
signed by Mr. Netanyahu's prede- 
cessors. 

“The talks have hit a serious crisis.” 
Nabil Abourdeoeh, an Arafat spokes- 
man, told die Voice of Palestine radio. 
“The Israelis are threatening the peace 
process by making such proposals.” 

■ Israeli Strike Reported 

Israeli warplanes twice raided sus- 
pected Hezbollah guerrilla targets in 
southern Lebanon on Wednesday night 
after Katyusha rockets hit northern Is- 
rael, security sources said, according to a 
Reuters report from Nabatiyeh, Leban- 
on. 

The planes fired five rockets into 
Iqlim al Toufah ridge, controlled by the 
pro-Iranian guerrillas. Earlier, one Is- 
raeli soldier was killed and four 
wounded in a clash with guerrillas in 
Israel's southern Lebanon occupation 
zone. 

The Islamic Resistance Movement, 
Hezbollah's military wing, said in a 
statement that its guerrillas “foiled an 
infiltration attempt by an Israeli com- 
mando force across die Litani river, near 
the enemy position in Detr Sirian.” 

There was no immediate word on 
casualties in the air strikes. 

Before the raids. pro-Israeli militia 
sources said several rockets fired from 
south Lebanon slammed into the western 
Galilee and 12 rockets hit the Israeii-hdd 
zone in an area near the border. 


Algeria Police Step Up Effort 
To Prevent Another Bombing 


Catydal by Ofcr Serf Fnm Da px itts 

ALGIERS — Security forces sealed 
off a district of the Algerian capital on 
Wednesday to deal wifi a suspected car 
bomb a day after a murderous blast in the 
same area. 

But despite rumors to the contrary, 
there had been no repeat of the Tuesday 
explosion, according to various 
sources. 

As tensions in the capital remained 

DENG: 

A Summing Up? 

Continued from Page 1 

“There has been no big change.” 

If he can hold on, Mr. Deng is less than 
six months away from seeing the real- 
ization of one of his major achieve- 
ments: the return of Hong Kong to main- 
land Chinese control on July 1 .Mr. Deng 
often voiced his determination to visit 
Hong Kong for die handover, when 
meeting with visiting foreign leaders, 
some of whom were unsure whether to 
take him seriously. 

That trip may not be possible now. 
Zhang Baifa, a deputy mayor of Beijing, 
said recently of Mr. Deng that although 
“for an old man. he is doing relatively 
welL,” it could be dangerous to transport 
him anywhere because in his condition, 
simply catching a cold could be very 
serious. 

In the past, so much in China has 
depended on the rule of one roan, and 
Mr. Deng assumed power at such a late 
age — he was 74 when he consolidated 
power in 1978 — that his health was 
long a matter of supreme interest to those 
who follow politics in Beijing. The 
city's political elite has often excitedly 
passed around news of Mr. Deng's 
death, greatly exaggerated each time. 

Mr. Deng formally retired from his 
last official position in November 1989. 
But because he continued to exercise 
broad authority in the years afterward, 
reading large-type documents at home 
and scribbling instructions in the mar- 
gins, it has never been clear to outsiders 
exactly when he retreated fully from 
power. 

His slow and gradual withdrawal has 
benefited Jiang Zemin, president and 
Communist Party chief, and the suc- 
cessor Mr. Deng chose just weeks after 
the Tiananmen crackdown on dissidents 
in June 1989. Mr. Jiang has gradually 
asserted himself with more authority in 
recent years, and appears to have blocked 
rivals from directly challenging him. 

The potentially cataclysmic power 
struggle once expected to follow Mi. 
Deng's death now seems unlikely, for 
the transition of power to a new gen- 
eration of leaders has already taken 
place, calmly and quietly. 


high alter a series of attacks by Muslim 
extremists, the security services sealed 
off Clos Salembier, the district hit by the 
Tuesday blast, to deal with a suspect car. 
It was not known, however, if the vehicle 
contained a bomb. 

The blast on Tuesday in the center of 
the capital lolled seven people, official 
sources said, while an independent 
newspaper reported a death toll of 20. 
Around 100 people were injured. 

Dozens of civilians have been killed 
in a recent upsurge of violence in the 
country. 

The independent El Watan daily re- 
ported that the terror campaign was be- 
ing orchestrated by a man named Farid 
Hamani, the city's new chief of the ex- 
tremist Armed Islamic Group. 

The newspaper added that a total of 1 7 
bombs had been defused by the security 
forces in different areas of the capital in 
the three-day period lasting from Dec. 
30 to Jan. 1. 

The newspaper Liberie reported that 
the security forces had intercepted a Hat 
loaded with explosives in the Birman- 
dreis area of the capital on Tuesday. 

El Watan said Mr. Hamani had 
warned in a New Year’s Eve statement 
that the guerrillas had prepared about 50 
bombs to be detonated in Algiers. 

Liberie said be had also been behind 
two bomb attacks late in December in 
the Algerian capital in which at least 18 
people died. (AFP, API 


Iraq Blames 
Tehran for 
Bomb Attack 


Reuters 

BAGHDAD — Iraq said Wed- 
nesday that three mortar bombs fired 
at the Baghdad headquarters of an 
Iranian opposition group killed one 
person arid wounded several others, 
and blamed Tehran for the attack. 

“At 10:20 P.M. yesterday night 
three mortar bombs were fired 
against the headquarters of the Ira- 
nian Mujahidin Khalq organization 
near al Andulis square in Bagh- 
dad,” an Iraqi Interior Ministry 
source said in a statement to the 
Iraqi News Agency. 

“The authorities concerned have 
started an investigation of the attack 
to capture the criminals and all in- 
dications show (hat the Iranian re- 
gime is involved in the terrorist at- 
tack." INA quoted the source, who 
also said one person died, as saying. 

■ Baghdad Cites 2d Spy Ring 

Iraq announced Wednesday it had 
dismantled an espionage ring work- 
ing for Israel and would broadcast the 
confessions of the “traitors,” 
Agence France-Presse reported. 

It was the second time since Pres- 
ident Saddam Hussein's eldest son. 
Udai, was wounded in an attack 
Dec. 12 that Iraq announced it bad 
smashed a spy ring. 


Ti 


ft! 


Israel Used 

f, 

Troops in Drug jj 
Experiments 

The Associated Press 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli ,;i 
Army forced soldiers to take ex- . 
perimental drags in the 1970s. Is- ; 
raeli radio reported Wednesday. 

The army confirmed that rt had 
fyy p testing drugs on recruits since 
the 1970s, but cud not respond to 
charges that the soldiers were 
forced. Testing continues to this 
day, the army said, but on a vol- 
untary basis. 

Two drugs that were tes t ed on 
troops have since been banned, Is- 
raeli radio said. 

The army said the records of the 
experiments from the 1970s and 
1 980 no longer existed- 

Alex S hamir , a soldier conscrip- 
ted to the armor corps in 1971, told 
Israeli radio that be and other re- 
cruits were forced to take pills three 
tifnfts a day and that officers made 
sure they swallowed them. 

“After a week to 10 days we felt 
as though everything in our bodies 
was Chang i ng. ’ he told foe radio. 
“We could hardly sleep at night.” 
He said they suffered diarrhea, 
vomiting and a total loss of appetite, 
and that he once became so ill foal 
he fell off his tank and took months 
to recover. 

The drug tested on Mr. Shamir's 
unit was one of the two sub- 
sequently banne d, the radio said. 

Brigadier Yehoshua Shemer, sur- 
geon-general of foe army, confirmed 
Wednesday that draftees had been 
used in medical experiments but said 
that participation now was voluntary. 
He said that participants must now 
sign consent forms and that their 
records were available to them. Dr. 
Shemer said all experiments carried 
out now are approved in advance by 
the Helsinki Commission on human 
rights. 

In (be latpgr experiment, carried 
out on recruits during basic training. 
30 percent chose not to take part, he 
said. Two months after the test the 
soldiers were examined for side ef- 
fects, and none were found, he said. 

An Israeli legislator, Alex Lub~ 
ovsky, said he would propose a spe- 
cial committee to oversee such ex- 
periments. - 


YELTSIN: President Is Hospitalized With ‘Signs’ of Pneumonia 


Continued from Page 1 

service said that Mr. Yeltsin was in bed 
but did not have a high temperature. “No 
visit to the Central Clinical Hospital is 
planned." thepress service said. 

Kremlin officials said then that they 
saw no need for calling a special meeting 
of Mr. Yeltsin’s doctors. The president 
was shown briefly on television earlier 
this week, standing stiffly and shaking 
hands with aides. 

Mr. Yeltsin underwent the quintuple 
coronary artery bypass in Moscow. His 
recuperation had appeared to be going 
smoothly, and he returned to the Krem- 
lin on Dec. 25. Aides prepared a series of 
meetings and announcements designed 
to demonstrate that he was back in action 
after a long period of drift 

Several doctors, including foe distin- 
guished Houston surgeon Michael De- 
Bakey, who helped advise the Russian 
team on Mr. Yeltsin’s surgery, had urged 
him to rest and Dot rush his recovery. 

[Dr. DeBakey said Wednesday that he 
expected a quick recovery by Mr. 
Yeltsin from what be said was likely a 
case of foe flu, Reuters reported from 
Houston. “I expect him to be all right, 
and I would say that in a matter of three 
days to a week you’re going to see 
improvement” and he will “probably 
leave foe hospital, ’ ’ Dr. DeBakey said in 
an interview on CNN.] 

Renat Akchurin, who led the team of 
surgeons that carried out foe operation, 
said earlier Wednesday that he did not 
think foe president’s cold was related to 
his recovery from the heart bypass. 


Mr. Yeltsin's decision to undergo 
heart bypass surgery, which he an- 
nounced publicly on national television, 
marked a watershed toward more open- 
ness about his health. Earlier this year, 
he and his aides had gone to great lengths 
to mask the seriousness of his problem. 

In late June, Mr. Yeltsin dropped out 
of sight because of what officials de- 
scribed as a cold and laryngitis. In fact, 
doctors later admitted he had undergone 
a mild heart attack, his third in less than 


two years. . 

■ White Home Comments 

In Washington, the White Hous$ 
press secretary. Michael McCurry. said; 
“We don't have independent confirms 
ation of those accounts” about pneuf 
monia. « 

He said Russia had reported that Mri 
Yeltsin had foe flu. “We don’t have 
anything beyond that officially coranui’ 
nicated to us on his condition.” ? 


SERBS: Major Opposition Victory Allowed 


Continued from Page I 

a leader of foe opposition reached by 
telephone in Nis. “This decision is a 
clear admission by foe government that 
it carried out fraud during the vote in 13 
voting stations. This is one small step 
forward in our drive to get the gov- 
ernment to honor the election results in 
Nis and the rest of Serbia." 

Nis, a bleak industrial town where 
huge state factories lie nearly idle and 
unemployment runs about 50 percent, is 
where die daily street protests began. It 
has proved the most militant city in foe 
country, and opposition leaders in Nis 
have built what the government views as 
a dangerous alliance with local police 
and military commanders. Military of- 
ficers in Nis, for example, guard city 
installations in civilian clothes most 
nights, and protesters in foe city are 
applauded by foe soldiers as they walk 


HEALTH: Third World Is Losing Battle Against Malaria as the Death Toll Escalates 


Continued from Page I 

ally be saved if they get prompt treat- 
ment But in foe Third World, well- 
trained doctors are scarce. 

Drugs are normally used to treat mal- 
aria, although drug-resistant strains are 
becoming a problem, especially in 
Southeast Asia. In addition, mosquitoes 
are emerging that are resistant to or- 
dinary insecticides, and, together, they 
make a ferocious combination: super 
mosquitoes armed with drag-resistant 
super malaria. 

But the situation is far from hopeless. 
A new drug called Malarone has done 
very well against malaria in clinical tri- 
als, both as a treatment and as a pre- 
ventive, according to data made public at 
a recent international conference. Ex- 
perts also argue that with time and 
money, a successful vaccine can prob- 
ably be developed. 

Until then, experts say, the best ap- 
proach is simply to keep mosquitoes 
from biting people. The anopheles mos- 
quito. the variety that carries malaria, 
tends to bite after dark. Several recent 
studies have suggested that sleeping in- 
side a mosquito net impregnated with 
insecticide can reduce malaria sharply. 

For now, however, foe impregnated 


nets are not widely available in street 
markets of developing countries, and the 
insecticide has to be reapplied at least' 
once every year. A more fundamental 
problem is fiat many people cannot af- 
ford even ordinary mosquito nets, which 
cost $5 or $10. 

“We have no blanket, no medicine, 
and not enough food to eat.” said Soy 
Phal. 31, a Cambodian who is herself 
feverish with malaria and whose husband 
died of the disease three years ago. “How 
can I afford a mosquito net? I spend my 
life being sick, so 1 have no time to earn 
money to get a mosquito net” 

Development economists note that 
malaria and other tropical maladies cre- 
ate a cycle in which disease hinders 
economic development and thereby sus- 
tains the disease. 

Nhem Yen, a Cambodian villager, has 
one small mosquito net. She has five 
children and two grandchildren in her 
little hut Every evening, she must figure 
out which children sleep outside the net 
and risk death. 

“It’s very hard to choose,” Mrs. 
Nhem Yen said. “But we have no 
money to buy another mosquito net.” 

Malaria remains a medical catastro- 
phe in part because it does not get much 
in the way of resources. Only about $85 


million a year is spent globally on mal- 
aria research, about half as much as is 
spent on asthma research. 

Money for research is meager largely 
because the disease primarily afflicts poor 
people, and Western drug companies 
doubt that Third World villagers would be 
able to pay much for a new malaria vac- 
cine even if it was developed. 

Another reason malaria is the excep- 
tion, a disease that is killing more people 
than three decades ago. rather than few- 
er, is that it is difficult to imagine a more 
vexing adversary than the mosquito. 

It is only foe female mosquito that 
bites — to get blood to nourish its eggs 
— and that is when it transmits diseases. 
The mosquito does not itself catch mal- 
aria or yellow fever or encephalitis or the 
many other ailments that it can carry. 

Malaria parasite cells multiply in the 
infected person’s liver and cause severe 
fevers with hot and cold chills. The 
patient can fall into a coma, have 
seizures, or suffer from anemia, kidney 
failure, or rupture of the spleen. 

Experts are learning some tidbits 
about mosquito habits: they are finicky, 
often preferring animal blood: they like 
dark colors: they are drawn to sweat; 
they respond to hormones and avoid 
menstruating women. Above all, mos- 


quitoes are enormously adaptable to new 
threats and environments, where they 
bring diseases with them. 

Some entomologists worry dial global 
wanning may expand the habitat of foe 
anopheles mosquito. The World Health 
Organization has warned that a result 
may be anopheles mosquitoes living in 
places like foe southern United States 
and southern Europe, and an extra 80 
million cases of malaria annually by foe 
end of foe next century. 

Malaria has cropped up recently in 
parts of the former Soviet Union, and it 
now is endemic in 91 countries. 

Malaria itself is not such a deadly 
threat when it strikes people who are 
healthy and rich. But in the Third World, 
few people are healthy to start with, and 
they lack foe resources to buy mosquito 
nets, to drain swamps, and even so get 
simple treatment that saves lives. 

Mrs. Karega, the Tanzanian woman 
who fears for foe life of her 15 -month-old 
toddler, said a nurse at a rural clinic told 
her to take him to the district hospital, 
where a doctor could perhaps save h™ 
Mrs. Karega bad worked out foe cost 
of foe trip and foe doctor's fees, search- 
ing for a way. to gather the money, and 
concluded, “We just can’t afford t ha t ” 
The amount is equivalent to $16.65. 


past the barracks. Opposition leaders id 
the dry praise foe work of foe local 
police officials, whom they describe aJ 
“friendly and helpful.” ] 

The official news agency TanjugJ 
which acts as the mouthpiece of thd 
Milosevic government, said Wednesday 
night that, following a Justice Ministry 
inquiry ordered by foe president late last 
month after a meeting with students from 
Nis, it has been determined that the op* 
position had taken control of the city. ! 

“On foe basis of documents inspected 
by foe Justice Ministry, foe Zajednq 
political organization won 37 seats, foe 
Socialist Party of Serbia 32 and th$ 
Serbian Radical Party one seat in Nil 
local council,' ’ Tanjug said. 

Opposition leaders in Nis, however 
said that foe Socialists had only won 1$- 
seats in the November vote, with 41 fbt 
the coalition, one for the Radical Parrj 
and that 12 remained in dispute. • 

Malaria Drug 
Shows Promise 

Reuters 

BOSTON — UJS. Army re- 
searchers may have found a vaccine 
for the deadliest form of malaria, 
according to a report in Thursday’s 
issue of the New England Journal of 
Medicine. 

The strain, known as plasmodium 
flaciparum Malaria, kills more than 
2 million people a year, the World 
Health Organization says. 

The researchers saidfoat in tests on 
seven volunteers who were injected 
with three doses of a drug called 
RTS,S, and then exposed to infected 
mosquitoes, only one developed mal- 
aria. In contrast, all 6 control subjects 
and 12 of 15 volunteers who wee 
given different formulations of the 
drug got the disease. 

The research team, ai the Walter^ 
Reed Army Institute of Research in 
Washington, warned that more stud- 
ies were needed to weed our some of 
foe drag’s side effects, to determine 

f l _ ■ • 


to see if it vraitedas weu iij lhcficld 
as it did in this snail study. 




PAGE 7 



TAXATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ADVERTISEMEIYT 


AN OPEN LETTER TO HELMUT KOHL 

Chancellor of the German Federal Republic 


Dear Chancellor Kohl: 

We have signed this letter to indicate our deep con- 
cern at the invidious discrimination against 
Scientologists practiced in your country and by your 
own party. We are not Scientologists, but we cannot just 
look the other way while this appalling situation con- 
tinues and grows. 

In the Germany of the 1930s, Hitler made religious 
intolerance official government policy. Jews were at 
first marginalized, then excluded from many activities, 
then vilified and ultimately subjected to unspeakable 
horrors. 

The world stood by in silence. Perhaps if people had 
spoken up, taken a stronger stand, history would tell a 
different story. We cannot change history, but we can 
try not to re-live it. 

In the 1930s, it was the Jews. Today it is the 
Scientologists. The issue is not whether one approves 
or disapproves of the teachings of Scientology. 
Organized governmental discrimination against any 
group on the basis of its beliefs is abhorrent even where 

the majority disagree with those beliefs. 

And, when individuals hold personal beliefs that 
they consider their religion, it is not the place of a 
democratic government to proclaim by fiat that they are 
not a religion in order to evade laws against religious 
discrimination. Besides, the German courts have held 
more than once that Scientology is, in fact, a religion. 

Individuals guilty of no crime but believing m 
Scientology are banned from German political parties, 
including your own. Scientologists cannot obtain 
employment by your government or contracts with that 


December 1996 

government. Children have been excluded from 
schools because their parents are Scientologists. Your 
Minister of Labor proposed the adoption of a ban on 
Scientologists from all positions of public service. And 
- like the book burning of the 1930s - your party has 
organized boycotts and seeks to ban performances of 
Tom Cruise, John Travolta, Chick Corea and any other 

artist who believes in Scientology. 

These acts are intolerable in any country that con- 
ceives of itself as a modern democracy. This organized 
oppression is beginning to sound familiar ... like the 
Germany of 1936 rather than 1996. It should be stopped 
now, before it spreads and increases in virulence as it 

did before. 

You may feel that, as non-Germans, this is not our 
business. But today’s World is a smaller, different place. 
We are far more dependent upon one another. When a 
modem nation demonstrates its unwillingness to pro- 
tect the basic rights of a group of its citizens, and, 
indeed, exhibits a willingness to condone and partici- 
pate in their persecution, right thinking people in other 
countries must speak out. Extremists of your party 
should not be permitted to believe that the rest of the 
World will look the other way. Not this time. 

Those who seek to gain political power or to indulge 
personal hatreds by repeating the deplorable tactics of 
the 1930s cannot be permitted that luxury. This time 

voices will be raised. 

We implore you to bring an end to this shameful pat- 
tern of organized persecution. It is a disgrace to the 
German nation. 


Robert Bookman 
John Galley 
Sanford R. Climan 
Constantin Costa-Gavras 
Bertram Fields 
Andrew M. Fogelson 
Larry Gordon 
Goldie Hawn 


Dustin Hoffman 
Alan Horn 
Kevin Huvane 
Larry King 
Lawrence M. Kopeikin 
Arnold Kopelson 
Raymond Kurtzman 
Sherry Lansing 


Michael Marcus 
Doug Morris 
Rick Nidta 
Morris Ostin 
Mario Puzo 
Jack Rapke 
Terry Semel 
Sid Sheinberg 



Casey Silver 
Tina Sinatra 
Aaron Spelling 
Sheldon Sroloff 
Oliver Stone 

Robert Towne 
Gore Vidal 
Paula Wagner 
Fred Westheimer 


1 






PAGE 8 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 

EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



. n.Buu>HLD «rrn thk mew iork TIMES *!«» TMR WASHINGTON POST 


Mischief in the House 


Economic Reform and Safety Nets Go Together 


(i:>\ ,L l*-* 

:..i^ 


After his re-election as speaker. 
Newt Gingrich was full of contrition 
and promises of bipartisan coopera- 
tion. But by immediately ramming 
through a measure shutting down the 
work of the House ethics committee 
before it can complete its work, be and 
bis Republican allies immediately be- 
trayed the spirit that be said he would 
try to create in the 1 05th Congress. 

In a breathtaking display of political 
servility. Representative Nancy John- 
son. Republican of Connecticut, who 
heads the ethics committee, has gone 
along with a shameful parliamentary' 
maneuver aimed at burying two years 
of work by her own committee. 

'Hie Republican actions are turning 
the entire ethics process into a travesty. 
First Mr. Gingrich's allies refused to 
put off the election of the speaker until 
after the ethics committee recom- 
mends a punishment for him for bring- 
ing discredit to the House. Now that he 
has been re-elected, the Republicans 
have set a deadline requiring that the 
subcommittee investigating him go out 
of business on Jan. 21. even though its 
special counsel. James Cole, says he 
cannot complete his work by then. 

Two Republican members of the 
ethics subcommittee on the Gingrich 
case. Porter Goss of Florida and Steven 
Schiff of New Mexico, agreed that they 
and Mr. Cole needed more time to 
finish their work. But Ms. Johnson 
caved in to the Republican leadership 
and agreed to truncate the ethics pro- 
cess. With this move, the Republicans 
thereby mimicked the kind of devious 
behavior for which they have criticized 
the Clinton White House in the White- 
water and fund-raising scandals. By 
resisting fair inquiry. Mr. Gingrich and 


the Republican leadership are creating 
an indelible suspicion of wrongdoing. 

Behind the Republican maneuver- 
ings is an important fact to remember. 
On Dec. 21 . the speaker in effect agreed 
to a plea bargain in which he accepted 
the subcommittee’s finding that he had 
reported “inaccurate, incomplete and 
unreliable information" to the ethics 
committee about a course he taught at 
colleges in Georgia. The courses were 
portrayed as nonpartisan, even though 
the evidence showed that they were pan 
of the Republican election machinery 
to take control of Congress. Before it 
can vote on the penalty for Mr. Gin- 
grich. the House needs to examine the 
evidence that led to that conclusion. 

If Ms. Johnson cannot rearrange the 
ethics committee's schedule or the 
vote in the House to give Mr. Cole 
enough time to complete his report her 
reputation as a leader on congressional 
reform will be irreparably destroyed. 

The next session of the House is 
scheduled for Jan. 20. the day of Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton's inauguration. If the 
ethics issues are still not resolved. 
Democrats and the handful of Repub- 
licans who have not sold out to the 
Gingrich protection effort must try to 
give Mr. Cole and the ethics committee 
enough time to complete their work. 
Only after it has been completed can 
there be a fair vote on punishment. 

Mr. Gingrich crowed on Tuesday 
thar he was the first Republican speak- 
er to win re-election in almost 70 years. 
but the high ground of principle that he 
once occupied as a House reformer is 
only a dim memory now. This is not a 
day that will be weft remembered in the 
annals of his party or the House. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Gulf War Mystery 


During the Gulf War six years ago. 
148 Americans were killed in combat 
— an amazingly low number given the 
scope of the' war prosecuted by 
697.000 U.S. troops. Yet after the war 
thousands of Gulf War veterans fell ill, 
with unexplained symptoms ranging 
from memory loss to debilitating” fa- 
tigue to joint pain and skin rashes. 
Many veterans believed that their Gulf 
service caused these illnesses. Many 
also complained that the Defense De- 
partment did not take their suffering or 
their suspicions seriously enough. 

A balanced and sober report from 
the Presidential Advisory Committee 
on Gulf War Veterans' 'illnesses has 
now shed some light on both aspects of 
the veterans' complaints. The com- 
mittee. which presented its final report 
on Tuesday, concluded that many vet- 
erans are indeed suffering from ill- 
nesses “likely to be connected to their 
service in the Gulf." But the com- 
mittee did not find evidence of a single 
syndrome, nor of any single cause. It 
suggested that stress will likely turn 
out to be a major contributing factor. 

For the most part, the committee 
endorsed the government's handling of 
Gulf War veterans and their illnesses. 
The continuing research program is 
mostly sound, and veterans are receiv- 
ing appropriate treatment it said. But it 
also found that the Defense Department 
at times has been “patronizing and 
dismissive of veterans' concerns." 

The most serious example of such 
official misbehavior involves the gov- 
ernment's repealed denials that any 


U.S. troops could have been exposed to 
chemical weapons, denials that were 
retracted only last summer after re- 
lentless prodding by the committee, 
congressional critics and veterans 
themselves. Now the Pentagon has ad- 
mitted that thousands of troops likely 
were exposed to low levels of nerve 
gas or other chemical weapons. 

“Regrettably, [the Pentagon] did 
not act in good faith in this regard. ’ ’ the 
presidential committee concludes. It 
was not just an honest mistake. De- 
fense Department investigators “had 
knowledge of documents' ' suggesting 
chemical weapons exposure long be- 
fore the Pentagon's public admissions, 
and official analyses “have lacked vig- 
or, fallen short on investigative 
grounds and stretched credibility.” 
The Pentagon officials' arrogance in 
this matter was insulting not only to 
veterans. Research on possible effects 
of low-level exposure to chemical 
weapons that could have started years 
ago is only now getting under way. 
And if, as many credible experts pre- 
dict, the chemical weapons exposure 
turns out not to be the cause of Gulf 
War illnesses, many veterans now will 
be reluctant to believe even legitimate 
evidence to that effect 
President Bill Clinton has asked com- 
mittee chair Dr. Joyce Lashof and her 
colleagues to continue serving in order 
to oversee Pentagon activities. They 
bring a welcome credibility to die pro- 
cess. Even so, the government has a long 
way to go to recover its credibility. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Caution in the Skies 


Two singularly horrible air crashes 
in America in 1996 — each one still 
unfinished business when it comes to 
definitive findings by investigators — 
raised public concerns about safety 
aloft to new, healthy altitudes. The 
scrutiny is pushing the federal gov- 
ernment to re-examine policies, tighten 
up its inspection act and require new 
equipment that should have been man- 
datory for all commercial aircraft all 
along. The question now is whether the 
Federal Aviation Administration.com- 
ing under new management, will main- 
tain the momentum. Safety require- 
ments that in the past were deemed too 
expensive deserve fresh reviews. 

This does not and should not have to 
mean that the requirements be linked to 
the troubles of VaiuJet Flight 592 or 
TWA Flight 800. And it does not con- 
stitute any admission or formal finding 
that air travel is less safe today than it 
has been; in fact, statistics can be cited 
to demonstrate that air travel is safer 
than ever. But it is also mass transit 
now, with more flights, more new air- 


lines and more sophisticated findings 
of what can cause troubles in flight. 

The whole business of contracted 
work — the failure to find out that 144 
oxygen generators loaded on the 
VaiuJet flight were mislabeled 
“empty” and that the paperwork on 
them was inaccurate as well — needs far 
tighter oversight. Fire safety, too, should 
be high on the list for action, including 
re-examinations of materials used for 
cabin interiors, fire detection equipment 
requirements for cargo planes as well as 
passenger airliners, and better emer- 
gency oxygen mask/smoke goggle 
equipment for cockpit crews. 

Linda Hall Daschle, who has been 
acting administrator of the FAA. notes 
that it has been drawing on the lessons of 
1996 to make changes, including in- 
tensifying regulation of newer carriers, 
banning oxygen generators as cargo and 
enforcing tighter conditions on contract 
work. This new activity must not be 
allowed to flag. The years ahead are sure 
to bring more traffic in the skies. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


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G ENEVA — The occupation of the 
Japanese ambassador's residence in 
Lima is an act of terrorism that deserves 
unqualified condemnation. But it is - a 
reminder of the malaise that now grips 
most of Latin America as the continent 
rides the waves of economic reform. 

One of the Peruvian guerrillas' aims 
is to protest against “neoliberal eco- 
nomic policies and violation of human 
rights." Such groans of protest are in- 
creasingly heard in Latin America. 

In Mexico, for example, the local 
priest in a scrubby hill town was re- 
cently reported as saying that 90 per- 
cent of the people “support the re- 
volutionary guerrillas in their heart" If 
the government did not act soon, said 
the priest this place would explode. 

The 1980s were a lost decade for 
Latin America. The early 1990s looked 
different as countries took to economic 
reform one after another. Market lib- 
eralization, privatization and fiscal and 
monetary prudence gained pace, and 
democratic regimes were once more 
widely embraced. Things looked more 
cheerful for a while. 

Inflation, which impinges so harshly 
on the poor, was brought under control, 
production increased and trade flour- 
ished. boosting economic growth. 


By Bimal Ghoah tetAiveo growth .with social jwtica 

jtsiwessi? Ftssst 

Despite these impressive gains, new economic growth in the developing rust, be left excluv 

ecoDomic liberalism has failed to countries in fee 1960s did not trickle noimc refonns ^ nuhless 

strengthen the foundations of stable down to ordinary people, economists tvelj^ matter te 

society. Many economic reforms have were puzzled. . C °K!5 , bv laws and socially ao- 

meant loss of jobs, bankruptcies, with- Things became worse m the 1 980s, and • 

drawal of state subsidies and increasing when austerity was imposed on debt- ceMmaezm ■ - f 

economic insecurity. Even in Aigen- ridden developing cowtntx urnier 

tina and Brazil, where income distn- monetary and financial st ab i liz ation reform must De 2 - 


By Bimal Ghosh ket-driven growth with social justice. 

J The search for harmonization of the 

two is not new. When the benefits of 
Despite these impressive gains, new economic growth in the developing 
economic liberalism has failed to countries in the 1960s did not trickle 
strengthen the foundations of stable down to ordinary people, economists 
society. Many economic reforms have were puzzled, 
meant loss of jobs, bankruptcies, with- ' Things became worse in the 1 980s, 


tina and Brazil, where income distri- 
bution may have improved slightly, 
there has been no real dent in poverty. 

The number of Latin America's poor 
today is twice what it was 40 years ago. 
In several countries, increased flows of 
foreign funds have added to the volat- 
ility of stock markets and fueled greed 
ana corruption among the affluent 

At their recent Santiago summit, Lat- 
in American leaders expressed concern 
about the rising popular resentment in 
the region and the imminent threats it 
poses to further economic reforms and 
democracy. 

Latin America is not aloDe in this 
dilemma. Countries in South Asia, in 
Africa and to some extent in Eastern 
Europe that have embraced rapid eco- 
nomic reforms and market liberaliz- 
ation have the similar problems. The 
challenge for all is to combine mar- 


measures and, subsequently, structural 
adjustment programs, sponsored or 
supported by the International Mon- 
etary Fund and the World Bank. Low- 
income groups were the hardest hit 

Since then, international financial 
institutions and governments have be- 
come more sensitive to the overriding 
need to lessen the pains and hardships 
that these programs, however essential, 
often cause to ordinary people. 

An extreme doctrine of economic 
liberalism that relied on the market as 
the final arbiter between profit-making 
and social interests gamed political 
primacy in the Tbatcher-Reagan era of 
the 1980s. Lately it has come under 
critical reappraisal. 

It is sad, though, that economists, no 
less than policymakers, are still not sure 
about how best to blend reform-related 


ferent income groups. 

Third, poverty alleviation should be , 
buift into the reform process. Safety- neo . 
should be extended to the needy as a way • 

of empowering them to participate m the 
economy and contribute to iL 

Economic reformers need to remem- ; 
ber that reform cannot make much : 
headway in the face of rising popular . 
disenchantment with the liberalization ■ 
process. Equally important, anti- t 
poverty lobbies must recognize feat 
without overdue reform, econom ic - 
stagnation will seriously curb efforts to 
improve the conditions of the poor. 

The writer, a former director in the . 
United Nations development system, is 
a consultant to international organi- 
zations. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


In a Changed World, Military Doctrine Has to Change as Well 


W ASHINGTON — Veer- 
ing along the erratic orbit 
it bas pursued since the extinc- 
tion of global communism, the 
hermit government of North 
Korea threatens war one day 
and embraces peace the nexL 
These wild oscillations are the 
death rattle of a regime that 
admits defeat but is uncertain 
how to end its agony. 

Pyongyang’s latest moves in- 
dicate that the regime may 
prefer to go out of business on a 
whimper, not a bang. 

In late December, it suddenly 
apologized for sending a spy 
submarine into South Korean 
waters in September, and then 
accepted Washington's long- 
standing demand that talks 
about ending conflict on the 
peninsula include Seoul. 

If sustained, these conces- 
sions point to a major diplo- 
matic triumph for BUI Clinton 
and his advisers, who endured 
sharp criticism for sending fuel 
and food aid to North Korea 


By Jim Hoagland 


after Pyongyang agreed in 1 994 
to freeze its secret development 
of a nuclear arsenal. 

But the significance of re- 
gime-ending change is much 
broader. The potential evolu- 
tion of North Korea into a non- 
threat alters the strategic basis 
of U.S. military policy globally, 
as elaborated by Colin Powell at 
die end of the Cold War. 

The United States has main- 
tained a military establishment 
of about 1.5 million men and 
women and an annual budget in 
the $250 billion to $300 billion 
range since the Berlin Wall came 
down. The U.S. force structure 
has remained constant even as 
ex-Warsaw Pacr nations beg to 
become members of NATO and 
Russia's military machine has 
come apart at the seams. 

The stated reason for keeping 
military readiness this high has 
been that America must be able 
to fight and win two near-si- 


multaneous major regional con- 
flicts — the “2 MRC" strategy, 
in Pentagon shorthand. The 
United States was to be able to 
deter North Korea from attack- 
ing the South, even if America 
was engaged in putting Iraq or 
Iran back m its Gulf box. 

It was a brilliant device for 
doing the necessary while not 
saying the obvious. America's 
armed forces continued in fact 
to be structured to fight Russia 
if it again became an aggress- 
ively hostile nuclear super- 
power. The 2 MRC strategy was 
above all an insurance policy, 
taken out against Russia but ex- 
plained in terms of Iraq and 
North Korea, a senior U.S. com- 
mander acknowledged to me 
some months ago. 

President Clinton simply re- 
newed the global Insurance 
policy in his first term. But 
events in North Korea, ex- 
Yugoslavia and Russia suggest 


that in his second term he must 
answer two questions he could 
defer until now: What capabil- 
ities are needed by the world's 
only military superpower to 
confront steadily declining 
global and regional threats? 
And what strategy explains how 
those capabilities will be used? 

Communism is obviously no 
longer a mobilizing force either 
globally or regionally. The final 
legacy of its failure, in war and 
in peace, is on display in Bel- 
grade and Pyongyang . 

Yugoslavia and North Korea 
kept their governments, mili- 
tary commands and economies 
out of Soviet control and ad- 
apted each to local conditions. 
But the Communist regimes 
that led these two maverick 
satellites are now crashing. 

China's Leninist geronto- 
cracy still poses a regional 
threat to US. interests. And 
North Korea still has the ca- 
pability to go out Moodily. But 
America faces a less threaten- 


The Euro? A Foolish Plan That Gould Do .Harm All Around 


W ASHINGTON — Eu- 
rope's plan to create a 
single currency, the euro, by 
1999 is a lunatic idea. It is bad 
for Europe and may be bad for 
America and everyone else. 

At year-end 1996 the unem- 
ployment rate for the 15 nations 
of the European Union ex- 
ceeded 1 1 percent. But what ails 
Europe has nothing to do with 
its multitude of currencies. 
After all, the same currencies 
existed in 1970. when unem- 
ployment averaged 3 percenL 
Europe suffers from an ob- 
session with economic security 
that translates into economic 
stagnation. It overregulates in- 
dustry. High wages and payroll 
taxes penalize hiring. The Euro- 
pean Monetary System fixes 
exchange rates and forces coun- 
tries to adopt Germany’s high 
interest rates. 

The argument is that the re- 


By Robert J, Samuelson 


quirements establishing the 
euro would force countries to 
make reforms that would re- 
vitalize their economies. These 
requirements mandate that 
countries reduce their budget 
deficits to 3 percent of GDP, 
have a national debt of no more 
than 60 percent of GDP, and 
maintain low inflation and 
stable exchange rates. 

Although seductive, the logic 
won’t wash. If all Europe’s 
countries met these require- 
ments, it is questionable wheth- 
er their economies would surge. 
Excessively restrictive taxes, 
regulations, labor practices and 
welfare programs would not ne- 
cessarily be affected. 

But many European coun- 
tries won't meet the require- 
ments any time soon. 

The requirements almost cer- 


tainly will be relaxed, then. If 
they are not, the single currency 
will never replace more than a 
few national currencies. And 
that would defeat the project's 
central purpose, which is more 
political than economic. That 
aim is to foster a European iden- 
tity — a step toward more 
“unity” — through the sym- 
bolism of a continental money. 

The idea is plain foolish. Eur- 
omoney won’t turn Belgians 
and Italians into “Europeans" 
any more than rubles changed 
Chechens into Russians. 

No matter. France regards a 
single currency regulate! by a 
single European central bank as 
a way of subordinating Ger- 
many's economic power to a 
larger European wifi. Germany 
views the single currency as an- 
other symbolic disavowal of 


What’s Going On in Damascus? 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


W ASHINGTON — On 
Dec. 31 a bomb ex- 
ploded on a bus in Damascus, 
killing 1 1 people and wound- 
ing 42 others. An official Syr- 
ian statement accused Israel of 
plotting the attack, but the Syr- 
ians offered no proof for such 
a wild allegation, which Israel 
denied as “sheer nonsense.” 
The fact that Syria accused 
Israel, a very serious allega- 
tion, reflects a nervousness 
that things are just not going 
Syria's way. Syria seemed to 
be trying to make a last-ditch 
effort to undermine the 
pending Hebron deal between 
Israelis and Palestinians. 

To say that Israeli agents 
blew up a bus in Damascus is 
another way of saying that it is 
open season for terrorists to 
undertake reciprocal actions 
against Israel. It is also a way 
of making life difficult for 
Yasser Arafat in the Arab 
street. "You. Arafat, are go- 
ing to sign another peace deal 
with an Israel that blows up 
Syrian civilians?” 

But the Syrian allegation 
against Israel also might be 
designed to divert attention 
from a suspicious trail that 
leads through Damascus right 
back to the June 25 bombing of 
the U.S. barracks in Dhahran. 
Saudi Arabia, in which 19 
Americans were killed. 

According to Arab press re- 
ports and other sources, one of 
fee suspects sought by Saudi 
Arabia in fee bombing, Jaafar 


Chueikhat, “committed sui- 
cide" while in Syrian hands. 
Mr. Chueikhat’s movements 
have become part of a behind- 
the-scenes drama involving 
Saudi Arabia. Syria and Iran. 

A Saudi Shiite, Mr. 
Chueikhat is suspected by the 
Saudis of being involved in 
the transport from the Syrian- 
con trolled Bekaa region in Le- 
banon to Saudi Arabia of ex- 
plosives used in the bombing. 
After fee Dhahran incident, 
die Saudis tracked him from 
Kuwait to Cairo to Syria. 
When the Saudis approached 
the Syrians to arrest him, the 
Syrians reportedly told them 
be had already fled to Iran. 

The Syrians apparently 
even gave Saudi Interior Min- 
ister Prince Nayef ibn Ab- 
dulaziz a letter stating that Mr. 
Chueikhat had gone to Iran. 
Sources say that when the 
Saudis confronted fee Iranians 
wife this letter, fee Iranians 
insisted that Mr. Chueikhat 
had never come to Tehran. 

The Syrians arrested Mr. 
Chueikhat in mid-September 
(supposedly after he returned 
from Tehran), and on Sept. 17 
he reportedly lulled himself in 
a Syrian jail, before the Saudis 
could interrogate him. The 
Saudis asked fee Syrians to 
show them his passport to see 
if he did travel to Iran, but it 
has not been turned over. 

Meanwhile, more funny 
business between Saudi Ar- 
abia and Tehran: Late last 


month, Prince Nayef denied 
Western press reports indica- 
ting that Saudi Arabia had 
concluded that Iran was be- 
hind fee Dhahran bombing. A 
few days later, after Iran trum- 
peted the Nayef statements as 
evidence that Iran had been 
cleared. Prince Nayef de- 
clared: ‘ ‘I have neither denied 
nor confirmed any outside 
connection to the bombing." 
Translation: Iran and Syria are 
still suspects. And both are 
clearly nervous about thaL 

The United States is still 
studying the Saudi data on fee 
Dhahran bombing. Since the 
Muslim holy month of Ra- 
madan begins this week, no 
U.S. military action would 
likely take place until Feb. 10 
at the earliest (if ever). 

U.S. officials believe feat 
Mr. Chueikhat did die in Dam- 
ascus. What they are not sure 
of is whether he died by his 
own hand (unlikely) or was 
killed by Syria at Iran’s be- 
hest, or was killed by Syria to 
cover its own tracks. 

Maybe all the Saudi evi- 
dence pointing to Syria or Iran 
is designed by Saudi Arabia to 
point fingers at outsiders, when 
this whole affair is really an 
uprising by disaffected Saudis. 
May be. But maybe not. 

The new secretary of State, 
Madeleine Albright, should 
not set foot in Damascus until 
she ascertains exactly what 
Happened to Jaafar Chueikhat 
— a suspect in the murder of 
19 Americans. 

The New York Times. 


World War Q and of tire danger 
that it might again try to dom- 
inate Europe. 

Says C. Red Bergsten of fee 
Institute for International Eco- 
nomics: “The Europeans have 
a bicycle theory of integration " 
— it’s got to go forward or it 
falls over. 

Why should Americans care? 
One reason is that, in trying to 
make their new money succeed, 
fee Europeans might trigger 
global protectionism. 

“The majority European 
view is that the euro is going to 
be a weak currency,” says Mr. 
Bergsten. If so, its exchange 
rate would drop against fee dol- 
lar. European imports would 
become cheaper in America, 
and U.S. exports would be more 
expensive. Europeans hope that 
the devaluation would revive 
their economies. 

It probably would not be- 
cause 60 percent of Europe’s 
trade is within Europe and 
would not be affected. But fee 
currency depreciation might fan 
U.S. protectionism, as imports 
surged and exports stagnated. 

Not all Europeans want a 
weak euro. The Germans es- 
pecially prefer a “strong" cur- 
rency, wife little inflation. To 
achieve that, Europe’s new cen- 
tral bank might have to main- 
tain high interest rates to con- 
vince skeptical multinational 
companies and foreign-ex- 
change traders to hold their new 
money. High interest rates in 
turn might further depress 
Europe’s economy. The con- 
sequences could be more social 
unrest and protectionism. 


A single currency (the dollar) 
works in the United States be- 
cause wages are flexible arid 
workers are mobile. Europe 
lacks these advantages. Wages' 
are rigid, and workers stay put* 
The French do not migrate eft 
masse to Germany. 

One way for countries ro off- 
set differences in competitive- 
ness is through flexible ex^ 
change rates. A single currency 
would eliminate this possibility.' 

The fixed-exchange-rate sy 
tern of the EMS shows how this 
can hurt countries. It partly ex- 
plains the contrast between Bri; 
tain and France. France fixes 
exchange rate and has unezn^ 
pJoymenr of 12.7 percenL Bri- 
tain does not and has unenri 
ployment of 7.9 percent. ri 

The great potential tragedjP 
here is that the single currency 
probably would backfire polity 
icaliy. It would spawn disunity: 
Europeans would quarrel over 
who was to blame for the single? 
currency failing to meet unreal 
istic expectations. There would 
be disillusion wife the larger idea 
of Europe. That, too, would b» 
bad for Americans. A weakened' 
resentful Europe would otit 
make fee partner America needs 
in the 2 1st century. r 

U.S. officials ought to stop 
treating the project with a re= 
spectful silence and express fee 
skepticism it deserves. Other'-!* 
wise, the only hope is feat fee 
Europeans will come to then: 
senses. The single currency is 
an economic version of the Mar 
gin ot Line. Like the euro, it was 
a grand delusion. 

Newsweek. it 


rN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO, 

1897: English Primate Ugowski, who seized this town 

in IQ'in a<t» riu 1 I 


LONDON — The new P rimate 
of All England, Dr. Temple, 
was formally enthroned in Can- 
terbury Cathedral About four 
hundred clergymen attended in 
their robes, headed by a dozen 
bishops and other ecclesiastical 
functionaries. The Archbishop 
was conducted to the ancient 
marble chair, and fee Archdeac- 
on administered to him his nsfe 
upon the Holy Gospel, after 
which the Dean, the residen- 
tiaries and the ministers of fee 
church formally promised obe- 
dience to fee Archbishop. 

1922: VilnaPlebiscite 

P ARIS — The plebiscite to de- 
cide whether the town and 
province of Vilna shall be in- 
cluded in Lithuania or Poland 
drew a large electorate although 
the result of the voting is not yet 

known. Poland's chum to Vilna 
was raised by General Ze- 


Ugowski, who seized this town 
in 1920, after the Poles had re- 
pelled fee Bolshevist invasion. 
He refused to withdraw from 
there, and the League of Na- 
tions arranged tire plebiscite. 
Vilna was originally a Polish 
city until fee end of the 18 tfi 
Century, when it was taken by 
Russia in fee partition of Poland 
and incorporated in Lithuania.; 

1947: Grand Welcomes 

ANKARA — Amid splendid 
Asiatic pomp. King Abdullah of 
Transjordan was welcomed to 
Turkey and greeted by President 
Ismet Inonu. The visit, expected 

to cul m i n ate in a treaty of friend^ 
ship, appears to be one more 
step in a careful Turkish prof 
gram to build close relations 
with the Arab world. The King 
refused to comment on the oM 
Tuzkish-Syrian dispute over Hiri 
lay Province, which the TurkS 
got in 1938 from the French 
mandate administration. 


ing world than it did when Gen- 
eral Powell drew up the post- 
Cold War military insurance 
policy. Adjustments should be 
made in U.S. strategic posture 
to reflect that changing reality.- 
Which adjustments? A 
glimpse of some of them can be 
seen in a new paper written for. 
the Rand Corporation by three 
leading UJS. defense thinkers; 
Robert BJackwiil of Harvard. 
Arnold Horetick of Rand and. 
ex-senator Sam Nunn. * 
Entitled “Stopping the De- 
cline in U.S .-Russian Rela- 
tions," fee paper identifies fee 
priority task as dealing with RusjV 
sia’s continuing weakness, 
through diplomacy rather than 
fresh rnilitaty spending. Whhoufi 
creative American initiative^ 
particularly on NATO expan-* 
sion, the authors fear that ihfe 
more peaceful world now seea%* 
ingly within grasp wifi elude i» 
again. Then we wifi need all fee 
insurance we cot buy. 

The Washington Post. 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 


OPINION/LETTERS 


■ f Gingrich Should Send 
Check to Taxpayers 


By Michael Giaetz 


ISJgW YORK - Rejecting 

De tf ‘ ^ was a political matter. 

But what be has done to tax- 
payers for his own political pur- 
poses is America's business. 

When President Bill Clinton 
and the Democrats were caught 
jajpng improper contributions 
from foreign donors during the 
campaign, they returned more 
million. Since Mr. Gin- 
grich has essentially acknow- 
ledged that he used money from 
tax-exempt foundations to fi- 
nance partisan activities — the 
equivalent of takingpolitical con- 
tributions from the C.S. Treasury 
— the American people should 
get their money back. 

Mr. Gingnch has acknow- 
ledged using two tax-exempt 
foundations, the Ab raham Lin- 
coln Opportunity Foundation and 
- *e Progress and Freedom Found- 
• nation, to finance a videotaped lec- 
ture series at two tax-exempt col- 


political charitable foundations. 

Contrary to what Mr. Gin- 
gnch s supporters say. die tax 
laws forbidding charities to spon- 


t 


It is the American 
people who really 
paid for the 
speaker’s political 
activities . 


leges and a series of partisan 
broadcasts on cable television. 

- The main advantage of char- 
itable entities is that donors can 
deduct gifts to them, whereas 
donations to political groups are 
taxed. 

" Thus, if a donor’s tax Tate was 
33 percent, he would have been 
able to give $150 to one of the 
“charitable’ ' foundations with no 
more out-of-pocket cost than if he 
^had given only $100 to GOPAC, 
^Mr. Gingrich's political action 
committee. 

Because such tax deductions 
increase the government's need to 
borrow. Mr. Gingrich's extra 
money really came from taxpay- 
ers. The contributions might have 
earned some investment income 
before they were spent, so he also 
would have avoided paying taxes 
on tire dividends. 

Using a tax-exempt education- 


efforts also makes it possible for a 
politician to raise funds from non~ 


activities are hanfly obscure. The 
Internal Revenue Service and the 
conns can easily distinguish be- 
tween organizations devoted to 
part isan politics and nonprofit 
groups such as the American Red 
Gross, which sometimes invite 
politicians to speak at events an d 
to sit on their boards. 

It is not unreasonable to expect 
a politician as savvy as Newtuin- 
gnch to have known the rules. Nor 
is it unreasonable to expect that 
the director of the Abraham Lin- 
coln Opportunity Foundation, 
Howard JET. (Bo) Callaway Jr., a 
former congressman whose fam- 
ily has run tax-exempt charitable 
enterprises for decades, would 
know of such restrictions. 

Mr. Gingrich’s arrangement 
went on for years. The tax de- 
ductions probably added up to 
hundreds of thousands of dollars. 
Unfortunately, taxpayers cannot 
use legal means to get financial 
restitution' for Mr. Gingrich’s 
lapses because the stature of lim- 
itations has run out on many of 
these improper deductions. • 

So the public,- as well as the 
ReptfoHcm leadership, should in- 
sist that he repay the U.S. Treas- 
ury. 

Mr. Gingrich and his found- 
ations and supporters should pay 
not only the taxes they saved over 
the years but also the standard 
interest that, other taxpayers are 

tiie foes for aif^fodependrat ac- 
counting company to figure out 
how much is owed. 

- And unless he can prove that 
his actions were truly just an over- 
sight, they should pay the pen- 
alties the tax code imposes for 
“intentional disregard of rules 
and regulations.” 

In his apology to the House, he 
called this “a controversy which 
could weaken the faith people 
have in their government" Ue 
can begin to restore that fiuth only 
by repaying the Treasury. 

The writer, a law professor at 
Yale, was deputy assistant sec- 
retary of the Treasury for tea 
policy in the Bush administration. 
He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


SO WE THOUGHT YOU 
COULD LEAD US IN 
SONG AT THE END 
OF EACH SESSION 
LORD WEBBER 




ee*. 

Soance Monitor 
Los Anr/elea Tick» Syndicate 


Andrew Lloyd Webber is inducted into the House of Lords . 


Pop Culture’s to Blame 
When Young Don ’t Learn 


Bv Jane K. Strauss 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Serbian Protests 

Regarding “Echoes of ' 89 
Aside, Milosevic Looks Safe" 
(Dec. 17): 

This article asserts that the 
in Belgrade are different 
those in otter Eastern Euro- 
pean cities in 1989 because com- 
munism in those capitals was not 
homegrown. What about Russia, 
where cnmnnmim has fallen de- 
spite its “homegrown" nature? 

It also suggests that the demon- 
strations are not enough, and that 
ordinary Serbs still support Mr. 
Milosevic. But over a quarter of a 
minion people have taken part in 
tile proteas in Belgrade recently. 
This is an extraordinary number 
of people, especially in a city with 
a population of only about 1.2 
million 

The article goes on to say that 
Serbs will (and perhaps should) 
continue to tolerate President 
Slobodan Milosevic because 
“Serbia was an aggressor in this 
war" in the Balkans and that * ‘al- 
most everyone has been com- 
promised by the war except the 
people who left” Whifo well-in- 
tentioned, the observation that 
Serbs need to reassess their role in 


the war is irrelevant. Germans 
have also had to come to terms 
with their roles in World War II. 
but they certainly did not need to 
do so under Hitler's rule. 

Over the past few years Mr. 
Milosevic has proven that he is an 
extremely canny politician. Al- 
ternately embracing and rejecting 
his Serbian brethren in Bosnia, 
Mr. Milosevic showed that he was 
a master of using war for political 
gain. Mr. Milosevic is not only 
cynically immoral, he has also 
been pointed out as a candidate for 
prosecution for war crimes at The 
Hague. The moment it became 
clear that he might be prosecuted 
be applied his considerable talents 
to the Dayton peace accords. 

Mr. Milosevic's days are 
numbered. During these crisis- 
filled days the international com- 
munity needs to do all it can to 
support the protesters. Mr. Mi- 
losevic should be treated as a pari- 
ah. It should be made clear to him 
that if he does not step down, and 
step down soon, be too can be 
prosecuted as a war criminal. 

Mr. Milosevic has proven will- 
ing to Ue and cheat to prevent the 
opposition from gaining power at 
even the local level. And it is 


frightening to think what he might 
do to hold on to power in pres- 
idential elections: he has already 
proven his willingness to engage 
in war to maintain his hold on the 
country. He is clearly not above 
fomenting conflict elsewhere in 
what is left of that country to whip 
up nationalist fervor and stifle 
protest. 

The international community 
should seize die opportunity, 
stand by the protesters, and nudge 
Mr. Milosevic from power before 
he is tempted to try his “war 
card" again. 

ERIC BECKETT WEAVER. 

Budapest. 

Throughout the Balkans con- 
flict the press has trotted out the 
same simplistic line: Serbs are 
blood-thirsty monsters; Bosnians 
are ravaged martyrs. Now, the 
same Serbian people the press has 
consistently slandered as "fas- 
cists’ ’ and "warmongers’ ’ are be- 
ing lavished with praise simply 
because they are railing against 
Slobodan Milosevic. Double stan- 
dard? 

RORY YEOMANS. 

Zwickau, Germany. 


W ashington — as those 

Of us who run America's 
public schools try to teach chil- 
dren to learn more and display 
more civic virtue, we need the rest 
of the community to help out 
wherever it can. 

These days, one of the best 
ways to help is to set high stan- 

MEANWHILE 

dards of conduct for the world 
those children inhabit — in other 
words, to help youngsters come to 
school ready to listen, behave and 
work hard. 

One of the most frustrating 
battles we face in the public 
schools is getting children to talk 
and behave better than their fa- 
vorite film, rock or rap stars. We 
would be grateful if today’s “civil 
libertarian" brigades had a great- 
er understanding of how pop cul- 
ture harms education. 

When teachers have to deal 
with students who speak or be- 
have abusively, precious time is 
taken from the task of teaching 
math, science or history. I can’t 
speak to whether profanity-filled 
music and videos laced with sex 
and violence cause adolescents to 
commit crimes, have early sex or 
behave badly in other ways. What 
1 do know is that students who are 
exposed to a heavy dose of pop- 
culture coarseness do not arrive at 
school ready to learn. 

Schoolteachers too often find 
themselves at cross purposes with 
the Time Warners and Calvin 
Kleins of die corporate culture, 
whose lawyers talk constantly of 
the right to free expression. Bui 
teachers have a duty to teach, and 
parents a duty to protect children 
from a debased cultural environ- 
ment. 

It’s time the word "adult" 
were affixed less often to the word 
"content" and more often to the 
word "duty.” That is why 1 thank 
the discount-store chain Wal- 
Mart for its courageous decision 
not to sell music that fails to meet 
reasonable community standards 
of taste. And I would applaud the 
video-rental chain Blockbuster or 
any other retail video outlet that 
refused to rent movies that are not 
edited to remove gratuitous vul- 
garity or violence. 

Some commentators have ac- 
cused Wal-Mart of censorship and 
philistinism for refusing to sell the 


old records of the foul-mouthed 
comedian Lenny Bruce. But 
we're not talking back-to-rhe- 
1950s here: Do they really know 
what's in the music racks these 
days? Over the span of just two 
generations. .America's adoles- 
cent culture has gorie from uptight 
to down-and-dirty. 

These civil libertarians should 
step out of their generational ce- 
ment and realize that the content 
of “free speech" today is very 
different from whai they recall 
from their young-adult days. 

It's also time to insert teachers 
and parents into the debate over 
television violence. The latest 
proposal would do nothing more 
than give ratings, similar to those 
for movies, of a program’s pro- 
fanity, sex and violence. Efforts to 
give parents more — real control 
over the levels of language, sex 
and violence their children can 
waich — have been resisted by 
industiy lobbyists and their "civil 
libertarian" friends. 

For a child, freedom of cultural 
choice can and must fit within 
adult (by which I mean grown-up t 
outer bounds. Wal-Mart's music 
rules enable parents to gram free- 
dom to their children to buy any- 
thing they wish, for themselves or 
as gifts for friends, without any- 
body’s having to decipher the lyr- 
ics or second-guess their child's 
choice. 

The same principle applies to 
other forms of retailing. If a major 
department-store chain declared 
that it would no longer sell major 
lines of children's clothing that 
use sexually suggestive advert- 
ising (or that promote clothing 
that is not appropriate for school ), 
that. too. would make many a par- 
ent’s job — and many a teacher's 
job — a little easier. 


The writer is a Democratic 
member of the Fairfax County 
{ Virginia ) School Board. She con- 
tributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed "Letters 
to the Editor" and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Leners should he brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


BOOKS 


OVER THERE 

By Kyle Jarrard. 2 84 pages. $21. 

Baskerville Publishers Inc. 

Reviewed by Ginger Danto 

I T is the novelist’s challenge to shape 
. the slippery imagination and bring to 
order the many mental noises that, once 
ascribed to characters, may Offer a co- 
herent story. Left unstructured, inspir- 
ation affords but a chaotic concert of 
events, uneasily distinguished as nar- 
rative. 

In Ids first novel, ‘ ‘Over There,” Kyle 
Jarrard, an editoratthe International Her- 
ald Tribune, offers up elements of a gc»d 
story, for the myriad vignettes that make 
up his book are often evocative, pithy, 
original. These parts, however, just as 
often foil to weave together, remaining 
separate, as so many scenes awash in a 
■ continuum teat owes its beginning and 
end only to die covers^ Jarrard says as 
much: "Don’t you understand this 
haphazard, scrapbook style yet? There is 
nothing here but the parts. Add as you 
wifi, but the sum could be zero.” 

. _ But somehow is it small comfort to 
know that the writer knows what he is 
doing. To know that free-fbnn thoughts 
fueling the text belong to deliberately 
indistinct voices, so that however we 
might follow one, we lose it amid foe 
words of another. To know that the con- 
stant jostling between the distant and 
— recent past confuses, along with a mn- 
Hilarly dispersed geography between 
in France, Mexico and rural 


Texas. 

Now remarkably poignant, now prone 
to ciich£, the style has the same uneven 
quality of its content, achieving an un- 
fortunate consistency. Indeed ip this 
choppy memoir in the guise of novel, the 
challenge falls to the reader, and it is one 

" As a clue, "Over There" acknow- 
ledges its structure as metaphor for its 


writer’s condition: muddled, with a 
mind prey to unruly memories and a 
heart to uosarted sentiment. .Writing is 
.intended to assuage, with this book the 
means to such end. That still leaves the 
need for subject, spottily gleaned from 
foe teller, an American expatriate not 
.■ unlike Jarrard. His name is Marc and he 
makes his living coming up with tire 
quick splashy answers to quiz show 
questions, answers typically heralded by 
whistles and beds, absurd arbitrary an- 
swers lost in foe cacophony of television 
showtime. These graceless sounds 
knock against Marc’s brain in mid-com- 
position or at rest, foe way people are 
unassailably haunted by their jobs while 
doing other tilings, their workday pre- 
occupations drowning out the din of 
everyday life. The avowed "quiz show 
long 1 ’ needed a vacation, and at the time 
of tins book’s writing, he is spending it 
outride Paris in the company of bis wife 
and their two children — one just bran. 

But is not clear that a month in the 
country, with all the attendant family 
ritual around a newborn, will be relaxing. 
An observant father, Marc is not above 
observing the nuisance of children. A 
seasoned husband, he resignedly reads 
the estran ge ment in his own marriage as 
the result ofhatHt, of the chilling quotidian 
his novel’s protagonists seek variously to 
escape. He describes one’s existence as 
"years pinned like a dry insect to a board 
and coveted with glass." As antidote 
Marc has his book, labeled nevertheless a 
desperate act in one of the asides that 
tarings the action around to the ostensible 
present “And where does desperation 
get you?" he asks in mock quiz format. 
“Nowhere, except maybe to mis point in 
the story." 

By then we have learned that the idea 
far foe stay occurred after an encounter 
with an elderly stranger rekindled in 
Mate intense memories erf bis paternal 
grandfather, Ansel Gifford. It seems the 
Texas-born Ansel, race widowed and 


lured abroad to live with his married 
daughter in France, disappeared one au- 
tumn into Mexico, perhaps even died 
there. Marc's father, Henri, went looking 
for Ansel at the behest his wife, distraught 
as a matier of course, but especially, 
albeit reasonably, regarding her absent 
father. A wry, spontaneous sort, Ansel 
when given voice remembers without 
fondness the hostage of another's borne. 
Not one for the tyranny of tiny comforts 
(handles in his bathroom, a card table in 
his bedroom), Ansel managed to flee, 
making of his final hour what his care- 
takers quietly feared most: a mystery. 

Marc recalls the details via partly in- 
ebriated accounts from Henri, who fol- 
lowed Ansel to a postal address in 
Patzquaro and onward, through an it- 

heav^ splioed*by other passages: An- 
sel's daughter fretting by the telephone, 
Marc revisiting tbe scene of his brother’s 
suicide, domestic squabbles, conspiring 
whores, secondary characters, all whose 
disjointed disclosure dilute tbe linear lo- 
gic of any of tbe fives concerned. 

Without transition, these scenarios 
seem as unconnected as dreams that 

slee^Marc offers his analogy: ^Writ- 
ing his one-month book, in bits and 
pieces strung out all over creation, he 
resembles a man who fishes with several 
lines at foe same time, straining to max- 
imize the catch." 

What matters then is not foe outcome 
of tbe story, but what be has captured 
along the way, for examined openly 
memories lose their menace, becoming, 
over time, mere anecdote. "To what end 
does a man explore the past, or reinvent 
it?" Mare asks early on. For once, the 
quiz wizard allowed himself the luxury 
of a long answer. In ah fairness, be might 
just be out of practice. 


Ginger Danto is a writer who lives in 
Paris. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


I 1 IKU twug 

i faith among duplicate play- 
ers that computer deals are 
mar kedly more distributional 
than “normal" deals gener- 
ated by humans. They are 
right about that, but wrong in 
concluding that there is a flaw 
is computer dealing. It is, we 
how know,, the "nonnal" 
deals that are abnormal. 

; This was recently, proved 
fey two Englishmen, Harry 
Freeman and Len Salmon 
who studied 334 duplicate 
tfoals played in as English 
club over several months. In 
an article in the Gctoter 1996 
issue of Bridge Magazine, 
they wrote that they had 
found that tbe hands were far 
flatter, and so far less dis-. 


tributional. than computer 
deals, which better conform 
to theoretical expectations. 

H itman dealing reduced 
the chance of a pre-emptive 
opening by more than 25 per- 
cent Similarly, the chance of 
abadsplitin a suit was greatly 
reduced. Tbe chance of pick- 
ing up a 4-4-3-2 band was 
greatly increased. 

The explanation is that die 
deck ahuman dealer picks up 
is rarely truly random, wheth- 
er the game is duplicate or 
social. If foe deck has just 
been used in play, it is ar- 
ranged m a manner diat tends 
to equalize the distribution 
and the shuffle will not pro- 
duce a random situation. A 
.distinct improvement is one 
’foat is forbidden by the laws 
of the game; deal foe cams 

into five groups, and then dis- 


tribute foe fifth hand until 
each player has 13 cards. 

The diagramed layout was 
a computer deal in a 1996 
British selection event and 
South, opening four hearts, 
was John Holland. In six 
hearts doubled, he received 
foe opening lead of foe ace of 
clubs, an error, a trump lead 
was indicated, and would 
have been derisive. 

South ruffed in dummy, 
cashed the spade ace and 
ruffed a spade, ne then led foe 
queen of clubs, which offered 
some chance of pinning foe 
jack or ten in the East hand, 
and when West covered with 
the king, dummy ruffed. 

Another spade niff was fol- 
lowed by a club niff and a 
third spade niff. How foe 
trump ace was cashed, and a 
trump was conceded to East’s 


queen. East was down to four 
diamonds, so foe dummy 
came back to life. The dia- 
mond ace and the established 
Spade took care of South's 
two remaining clubs, so foe 
doubled slam was made. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 

HEALTH/SCIENCE 


i 

Share a Laugh With Your Computer 


Rv Daniel finleman easier. Wearable computers could 

ST P«P k with chrome commons 
like severe asthma or high blood pres- 

N EW YORK — The phrase sure when they are becoming too 
“user friendly’ ’ is about to overwrought, 
lake on a more literal Bits and pieces of this emotionally 
meaning: computer scient- attuned cyber-future already exist, 
ists are creating machines that can Computer scientists at the Georgia 
recognize their users' most intimate Institute of Technology in Atlanta 
moods and respond like an empatb- have developed a computer system 
etic friend. that can recognize simple facial ex- 


moods and respond like an empatb- have developed a computer system 
etic friend. that can recognize simple facial ex- 

To be sure, the idea of a machine pressions of emotions like surprise 
cognizant of that human Achilles’ and sadness. At Northwestern Uni- 
heel. emotion, can conjure more sin- versity in Evanston. Illinois, and at 
ister images — like HAL, die savvy. Camegie-Mellon University in Pitts- 
menacing computer in “2001.” burgh, engineers have designed pro- 
whose fear that he would be un- grams that converse with people and 


One impetus for building these 
more sensitive computers is wide- 
spread frustration with the doltishness 
of present models. 

“Today’s computers are emotion- 
ally impaired.” said Dr. Roz Picard, a 
computer scientist at MTT who is 
leading the effort there to bring emo- 
tion to the all -too- rational universe of 
computing. “They blather on and on 
with pages of output whether or not 
you care. If they could recognize 


ister images — like HAL, die savvy. Camegie-Mellon University in Pitts- 
menacing computer in “2001.” burgh, engineers have designed pro- 
whose fear that he would be un- grams that converse with people and 
plugged led him to kill all but one of respond appropriately fo their emo 
the crew members on a space mis- tions. And at the Massachusetts In- 
sion. stitute of Technology, in Cambridge, 

Yet in a development welcome to where much of tbe work in what is 
some and alarming to others, as the being called “affective computing" 


and sadness. At Northwestern Uni- emotions Idee interest, pleasure and 
versity in Evanston. Illinois, and at distress, and respond accordingly. 


they'd be more tike an intelligent, 
friendly companion.” 


R. PICARD and her asso- speech, 
dates at MIT’s Media Lab Emoti 


for more realistic emotional inflec- 
tion. Such nuance. Dr. Picard said, 
“adds flavor and meaning to what we 
say,” adding: “With these abilities 
computers can communicate in a 
more natural, pleasant way. Mono- 
tonous voice-reminder systems 
could vary their voices, for example, 
to flag urgent information.” 

While warmer voices signal a small 
start, much of tbe work deals with 
more sophisticated aspects of emo- 
tional astuteness. Perhaps most pro- 
gress has come in creating machines 
that can read human emotion, a tech- 
nical challenge similar to having them 
recognize handwritten words or 


birth date of HAL in Arthur C. 
Clarke's novel approaches on Jan. 12, 
scientists have already constructed 
pieces of the technical groundwork 
for such machines. 

While the specter of robotic 
Frankenstein monsters captures the 
popular ima ginati on, computer sci- 
entists offer benign visions of a more 
humanlike technology, animating 
gentle cousins of Oz’s Tin Man. 

They foresee a time when com- 
puters in automobiles will sense when 
drivers are getting too drowsy or im- 
patient and so deliver wake-up mes- 
sages or switch on soothing music. 
Empathic computer tutors wul notice 
when their pupils are getting frus- 
trated or overwhelmed, and so offer 
encouraging words and make lessons 


is under way, a computer worn around 
the waist monitors its wearer's every 
shift of mood. 

No one claims that these more 
sensitive machines will come close 
to replica ting full human emotion. 


are developing prototypes 
of such sensitive machines 
that are not just portable, but wear- 
able. 

“A computer thai monitors your 
emotions might be worn on your 
shoulders, waist, in your shoes, any- 
where,” Dr. Picard said. “It could 
sense from your muscle tension or the 


And some skeptics question whether lightness of your step how you’re 


the work to mimic emotion in ma- 
chines is worth the effort. Pat 
Billingsley, an expert in human-ma- 
chine interfaces at the Merritt Group 
in Williamsburg. Massachusetts, 
said: ‘ 'People don’t want a computer 


feeling, and alert you if. say. you're 
getting too stressed. Or share that 
information with people you wanted 


to know, like your doctor or your that 


Emotions like fear, sadness and an- 
ger each announce themselves 
through a unique signature of changes 
in facial muscle, vocal inflection, 
physiological arousal, and other such 
cues. Building on techniques of par- 
tem recognition already used for 
computer comprehension of words 
and images. Dr. Irfan Essa, & com- 
puter scientist at Georgia Tech, con- 
structed the computer system that can 
read people’s emotions from changes 
in their facial expression. 

The system uses a special camera 


changes 


spouse. 

One immediate step toward wann- 


that cares about their mood so much er-seeming machines is giving them 


as one that makes what they’re trying 
to do easier. You want a very pre- 
dictable system, one you can rely on 


more emotionally realistic voices. 
While computerized speech has 
come across at best as a monotonous 


to behave the same way time after drone, computer 


muscles into digitized renderings of 
energy patterns; die computer com- 
pares each pattern to that of the person 
with a neutral expression. 

In pilot tests with people making 
deliberate expressions of emotions 
like anger, fear and surprise, the corn- 


time — you wouldn’t want your cheered by progress in designing puter read the emotions with up to 98 




gt: 




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computer to be too emotional.” 


automated voices with the capacity percent accuracy. 


Happiness and surprise: the computer sees facial muscles as energy patterns. \ 


What Makes a Teenager? 

It Might Be the Fat- Control Factor 


By Natalie Angier 

New York Times Service 

EW YORK — In- 
to every life a 
comic disaster 
must sweep: It’s 
called adolescence. One 
minute you are the sovereign 
of a perfectly respectable, 
smooth, blade-shaped body, 
and the next moment, out pop 
the hair, the acne, the secre- 
tions. die awkward depos- 
itions of fat. the inexplicable 
taste for tongue studs and 
Hermann Hesse. 

Like the rest of us, scient- 
ists have long wondered why. 
exactly, children must be- 
come teenagers. They have 
sought to identify the chem- 
ical signals that transform 
body and brain from youthful 
asexuality to reproductive 
maturity. Everybody knows 
that teenagers are flooded 
with hormones like testoster- 
one and estrogen, but what 
unleashes those hormonal 
tides in the first place? 

Now researchers from tile 
University of California at 
San Francisco propose that a 
principal initiator of puberty 
is leptin, a chemical already 
famed for its role in con- 
trolling body fat Leptin was 
identified several years ago as 
a protein secreted by adipose 
cells that tells the adult body, 
hey, you are far enough, you 
do not have to keep eating. 

But its biological role 
seems to be weightier still. 
Dr. Farid F. Chehab and his 
colleagues found that when 
they injected synthesized 
leptin into normal young fe- 
male mice, the mice reached 
sexual maturity much earlier 


than rodents injected with in- 
active saline solution. 

The new research, which 
appears in the current issue of 
the journal Science, lends 
biochemical credence to a 
long-standing proposal that 
puberty is somehow linked to 
body fat, particularly in girls. 
By this notion, called the 
“critical fat hypothesis,'' a 
girl must reach a certain 
weight before her brain feels 
comfortable that she is cap- 
able of sustaining a preg- 
nancy and thus unleashes the 
cascade of events culminat- 
ing in sexual maturity. The 
latest results suggest that tbe 
brain gauges its nutritional re- 
sources and derides yea or 
nay on puberty by monitoring 
blood levels of leptin. 

“The neural pathways in 
the brain need a signal that tells 
them there are enough energy 
stores in the body to turn on 
reproduction,” Dr. Chehab 
said in a telephone interview. 
“Leptin appears to be the sig- 
nal that reflects to the brain the 
amount of fat the individual 
has accumulated.' ' 

If the rodent results hold up 
in human studies, they could 
explain why chubby girls of- 
ten go through puberty early 
and why very thin or athletic 
girls are delayed in their onset 
of menstruation. Tbe re- 
searchers also believe that 
leptin helps orchestrate pu- 
berty in males, though exper- 
iments to demonstrate as 
much remain to be done. 

“Leptin is a gorgeous mo- 
lecule,” said Dr. Rose E. 
Frisch, a professor emeritus at 
the Harvard School of Public 
Health- “We published a pa- 
per back in 1 974 showing that 


a critical amount of (at was 
necessary for puberty and 
continual ovulation." Since 
then, she and her colleagues 
have published more than 100 
papers on the subject includ- 
ing a study using magnetic 
resonance imaging that 
showed female aihletes with 
low body fat lacked die hor- 
mones necessary for ovula- 
tion. It is “very exciting, and 
veiy satisfying,” Frisch ad- 
ded, to see in the new leptin 
findings molecular support 
for those decades of research. 

Dr. Melvin M. G mm bach 
of the University of California 
at San Francisco said: * ‘This is 
a really exciting and novel de- 
velopment opening a wedge 
in the study of factors that 
control the onset of puberty. 

But it’s important to em- 
phasize these are preliminary 
mouse studies that have yet to 
be shown to have relevance 
for humans.” Dr. G rum bach, 
who did not work rat the cur- 
rent project is a pioneer in 
puberty research. 


‘Brain Puberty 9 and Fat Levels: 
Possible Signal of Readiness 
To Reproduce 

In studies of female mice, injections of the hormone 
leptin signaled premature puberty and even 
reproduction. Here is how such a mechanism might 
work in setting off puberty in 
Hypothala mus human females. 

I INCREASED BODY FAT SIGNALS 

Pituitary change 

rffildllfffl Fat ^ 5 and secrete 

leptin into blood, from which it 
fjfKflWl reacfies the brain. At a certain 
3 J concentration, it may theoretically 

iaBS help activate the pulse generator 
in ** hypothalamus, signing it to 
PlSireraul release regular pulses, about 
every 90 minutes, of 

Uv \ f gonadotropin-releasing hormone 

I lf M HORMONES ARE RELEASED 

W Si GnRH stimulates the pituitary 
W 1 gland to release luteinizing 

M SL hormone (LH) and follide- 

stimulating hormone (FSH). 

SEXUAL ORGANS BECOME ACTIVE 

LH and FSH travel through the bloodstream to the 
ovaries, prompting them to release estrogen, the 
hormone that stimulates breast growth and other 
changes of puberty. 

Source: Dr. MeMnM. CrumbacMJnfvBrsity ofCa&omia. San Randsco 


The Panicky Darwin 


T HE scientists were 
inspired to consider 
leptin as a puberty 
factor by previous 
experiments in which they 
had worked with genetically 
altered mice lacking the lept- 
in gene. Such mice become 
obese, deprived as they are of 
the leptin signal to stop eat- 
ing; but in addition, they turn 
out to be sterile. Dr. Chehab 
and his co-workers reported 
last spring that they could re- 
store the rodents’ fertility by 
supplying them with leptin. 

In the current experiments, 
the researchers used normal 
young mice with the normal 


complement of leptin genes. 
But when the scientists injec- 
ted tiie rodents with extra 
doses of leptin, two things 
happened: The mice grew very 
lean, as their brains responded 
to the fake fat signal by 
prompting tbetn to eat less, 
and they matured early. 

Their ovaries and uteri 
grew larger; their reproduct- 
ive tracts opened; their levels 
of sex hormones soared; and, 
most persuasively, they 
began copulating and bearing 
young at an earlier age than 
the saline-treated mice. “We 
tricked the brain into believ- 
ing the body was fatter than 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Catch 
b Long Island 
airfield 
10 Bureau 
projection 
i« Nightmarish 
boss 


15 Rhone (seder 
is Actress Skye 
17 Class-action 
suit? 

20 Act gung-ho 

21 Dahl and 
Francis 


Esc 1911, Paris 
", Sonic Roo Doe Noo " 


A Space for Thought. 


22 They may have 
brand 

identification 

23 Globe part 
2 # Kind of call 
27 Magnetism 
32 ‘Roots.’ e.g. 

36 Emulate 
Odysseus 
sa Exxon Valdez. 

far one 
w Plays nil? 

42 Company that 
produced the 
game Pong 

43 Sans purpose 

44 Caricaturist 
Thomas 

49 Send back 

47 Think of it! 

48 Owl's hangout 
si Overcharges 
as Follow suit 

80 Knight's 
superior 
62 Trump suit? 

64 Actress 
Ba cl an ova of 

dd films 
os Soft palate 
ae Opponent 

87 Norman of 
sitcom fame 

68 Lift up 

88 Singer Russefl 
at 70 s music 


1 Alumni 

2 Instrument 

3 Fit lobe lied 

4 Madras milk 
s wife of Osiris 

e Fit to be tried 
? Record 
aptzano's 
conquest 
• Bradley 
University site 


10 Relative of a 
falcon 

11 You name it 

12 The joke's 

is Some parties 
18 Smart 
18 Uileharnmer 
event 

23 Disney hit of 
•92 

asTreesureofthe 
Sierra Madre 
26 Loughlin of 'Full 
House" 

28 Chib member 
since 1917 
28 it's near the 
crazy bone 
SO Bench's 
benchmates 
31 Formerly, once 
3* Traumatize 

33 Adenauer 
moniker Der 

34 ■Where 
America's Day 
Begins' 

35 “East of Eden" 
woman 

37 Salsa 
specification 

«o Storied sailor 
4f Alway 
4« It 's a case 
48 Israeli port 
so Party 

52 Neighborhood 

53 Fatuous 

84 Basil -based 
sauce 

as Stout vessel 
56 Ehns. for one 
67 Source of a leak 

38 Actress 
Swenson 

58 Rimsky- 
Korsakov's 
Saltan, e.g. 

60 Like some 
cham panne 



PuntabyCaBirl 


iVru York Times/Edited by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of Jan. 8 


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ei Zenith 
•3 Commercial 
suffix with Motor 



it was,” Dr. Chehab said. 

If leptin proves to be a ma- 
jor puberty signal in humans, 
it must operate not by starting 
something new, but by resus- 
citating something old. As 
Dr. Gntmbach and others 
have shown, puberty occurs 
through a surprising process 
of disinhibition. “Puberty in 
a sense begins in the fetus,” 
he said, with ail die mech- 
anisms necessary for sexual 
maturity in place in the brain 
by midgestation. But at 3 
years old or so, those neural 
mechanisms are shut down, to 
be revived a decade later at 
adolescence. 


By Curt Soplee 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — Charles Dar- 
win might never have revolu- 
tionized biology with his theory 
of evolution if he had not 
suffered from chronic mental illness that 
turned him into a scholarly recluse, a pro- 
vocative new study concludes. 

Before he was out of his 20s, Darwin suc- 
cumbed to a mysterious, debilitating condition 
that various authorities attributed over the 
years to bad nerves, tropical disease, arsenic 
poisoning, intellectual exhaustion, dyspepsia, 
“suppressed gout” or other complaints. 

That condition, two physicians argue intoe 
Journal of tbe Amen can Medical Associ- 
ation, was most likely a form of panic dis- 
order aggravated by agoraphobia. The com- 
bination kept the celebrated naturalist 
removed from society and probably forced ' 
him to focus on the epochal coocept of natural 
selection, according to Thomas J. Barloon 
and Russell Noyes Jr. of the University of 
Iowa College of Medicine. 

“Had it not been for this illness,” they 
write, ‘ ‘his theory of evolution might not have 
become the all-consuming passion that pro- 
duced ‘On the Origin of Species.’ ’ ’ 

Panic disorder, which afflicts an estimated 
13 million Americans, manifests itself in un- 
expected attacks of extreme anxiety, with 
symptoms including rapid heartbeat, short- 
ness of breath, trembling, sweating, nausea 
and dizziness. Some victims feel they axe 
losing their minds or are about to die. Many 
become so obsessively worried about sub- 
sequent attacks that they make major changes 
in their behaviors — shunning elevators, air- 
planes, buses, bridges or whatever situation 
may have initially prompted the panic. The 
condition frequently occurs in combination 
with agoraphobia, an acute dread of being 
outside the home alone. 

hi a journal, Darwin (1809-1882) described 
his malady as a “sensation of fear ... ac- 
companied by troubled beating of the heart, 
sweat, trembling of muscles.” It was exacer- 
bated by unfamiliar locations (particularly cit- 
ies) or the absence of a reassuring companion. 
Darwin often tamed down invitations to travel, 
citing foar of “novelty and excitement.” Even 
a brief stay in 1848 in Shrewsbury, his birth- 


place, prompted him to write to his wife about 
the oppressive “sounds of tbe town & black-* 
guards talking & want Of privacy.” and 10 
confess that “I do long to be with you & under 
your protection for then I feel safe.” - ' 
Tbe onset of panic disorder usually occncjl 
between laze adolescence and the mid-thirties. 
Darwin was 27 when his illness fust became 
severe. He had been a gregarious student, 
intrepid traveler and vigorous outdoorsrnan. 
But by 1837 — only a year after his return to 
England after a five-year voyage to South 
America and the Pacific aboard the Beagle — 
he began to complain of an “uncomfortable 
palpitation of the heart.” according to the 1991, 
biography by Adrian Desmond and James 


the “transmutation” of species over time, that 
22 years later would become his elaboration of 
the theory of evolutian. 


S YMPTOMS persisted intermit- 
tently following his marriage ana 
lasted until the Iasi decade of his 
life. He was tormented by anxiety 
and incessant stomach problems. "A third of 
his working life was spent doubled up, trem- 
bling, vomiting, and dousing himself in icy 
water,” Desmond and Moore write. 

The “water cure” was prescribed in 1849 
by a fashionable physician whose notion was 
that “cold water over the body” would 
“stimulate fee circulation and draw the bkxxj 
supply away from toe inflamed nerves erf tod 
stomach,” Darwin’s biographers write. » 
Rex Cowdry, deputy director of the Nth 
tional Institute of Mental Health, said that 
Darwin’s “history is certainly very suggest-! 
ive of panic disorder.” ■ \ 

James C. Balienger, chairman of the de* 
partment of psychiatry at the Medical Uni-? 
versity of South Carolina and a leading expert 
on panic disorder, called the new study “en- 
tirely credible and convincing.” Darwin’s 
gastrointestinal troubles are typical, he noted! 
“ About 30 percent of panic disorder, patients 
have irritable bowel syndrome.” Tbougb tod 
“water cure” may have had no physiological 
effect. Dr. Balienger said, “toe placebo effect 
is incredibly effective in panic disorder, and 
as many as 60 or 70 percent of patterns 
transiently lose their symptoms" if reassured 
that they’re getting superior treatment ; 


Target Earth 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK — Astronomers 
who scan toe sky for big 
rocks on a collision course 
with Earth are getting new 
support for their pet nightmares from 
once-secret military data. 

The readings show that the planet is 
continually struck by speeding boulders 
that explode in blasts toe size of atomic 
detonations, and that the rate of bom- 
bardment is higher than previously ob- 
served. 

The blasts light toe sky with brilliant 
fireballs but are seldom seen because 
they often occur over the sea or un- 
inhabited lands. The rocky objects that 
cause them arc anywhere from a meter 
in diameter to 25 or so meters wide. 
They vanish in titanic explosions high in 
toe atmosphere, since, though small, 
their enormous energy of motion is con- 
verted almost instantly into vast 
amounts of heaL 

Unlike their much larger cousins, 
they usually leave few or no traces on 
toe ground. 

Scientists at the Los Alamos National 
Laboratory in New Mexico are now 
releasing old and con temporary. obser- 
vations of such blasts made with mil- 
itary sensors. The ground-based sensors 
work like sensitive ears to detect very 
low-frequency sound waves, which ra- 
diate outward around the globe. 

The observed rate of bombardment is 
about 12 events a year. At a minimum, 
these cosmic intruders produce blasts as 
big as a nuclear warhead of one kiloton, 
equal to 1.000 tons of high explosive. 


The old rate, based on orbital data from 
early-warning satellites that watch for 
rocket firings and nuclear explosions 
with telescopes, was eight impacts a 
year. 

“The theoreticians are thrilled,” Dr. 
Douglas O. ReVelle, a meteorologist at 
Los Alamos who works on the detecti on 
project, said. “People weren’t aware 
mat you get these acoustic responses 
from objects entering the atmo- 
sphere.” 

For deca de s, astronomers, geolo gis ts 
and planetary scientists have hypothes- 
ized about the rate of terrestrial bom- 
bardment, with the Earth seen as an 
unwitting target in a cosmic shooting 
gallery. But their calculations have ten- 
ded to be long on surmise and short on 
fact 

Tbe disclosure of a high rate of im- 
pact from relatively small objects is 
seen as bolstering tbe idea that Earth is 
periodically subjected to strikes by even 

larger objects from space, including 
doomsday rocks a few kilometers wide. 
Objects this size are predicted to hit 
Once every 10 million years or so, caus- 
ing mayhem and death on a planetary 
scale. 

“frhelps refine the theory,” Dr. Dav- 
id Morrison, an expert on doomsday 
rocks at tbe Ames Research Center of 
toe National Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration in Mountain View. Cali- 
fornia, said of the new data “it’wouJd 
be very interesting scientifically to pin 
down the contemporary rate, as you 
could do from atmospheric observa- 
tions.” 

For ages, people gazing at toe night 
sky have been fascinated by, and at 


- wave iiaueneu 

hundreds of square kflometere of forest 
ana reverberated around toe world. 

I T WAS the Siberian event and, 
later, in tbe space age, the ob- 
servation of craters on the Moon; 
Mars, and distant planetary bodies 
that set scientists to pondering toe Dos* 
sibility that the Earth coexists in space 
with a swarm of doomsday rocks 


T 


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r.*/i firm 


times frightened by, sudden streaks of^ 
bright light. But scientists only recently 
have come to realize that the grain-or J 
sand-sized particles that regular] y blaze 
as shooting stars and meteor showerd 
are simply one end of a spectrum of 
cosmic debris that con tinually collid es 
with toe Earth as the planet sweeps 
though space. On occasion, the ht 
traders are large enough to survive the 
fiety plunge through the atmosphere t& 
strike the ground and dig large craters. 

Rough weather and geologic activity 
mean Earth has relatively few cosmic 
scars. In contrast, the Moon's highlands 
are sa tu ra t ed with rocky wounds that 
overlap rate another in profusion. \ 

Despite the erosional forces on E art h, 
it has Seen clear for some time toe 
planet occasionally gets hit. In 1908 

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surveys of planetary craters, and <rf 
comets and asteroids that o ccasion ally 
cOTtehurffipg near Earth, scientists in 
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awide range of threats. Big imnideis 
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ones striking once every 108 
million years or so. 


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HcralbisiSSribunc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


THURSDAY; JANUARY 9, 1997 


RAGE 11 


Sabena, Austrian and Swissair Strengthen Cooperation With Delta 


ZURICH — Swissair AO said Wed- 
it had agreed with, its European 
partners, Sabena SA and Austrian Air- 


rj — — — — ■ ■ m kwhimii rm, a 

anes, to eroand feeir cooperation with 
IT 6 . Atr Lines Inc. in a bid to. expand 
thttr snare of the trans-Atlantic market. 
Swissair said the alliance would offer 
joint reservation service ami 
rares as of Feb. 1, which allows any erf 
we fourpartnere’ flights to be booked* 
standardized fares. Revenae from the 
venture will be shared, Swissair said. 

. Swissair said the partners were **tak- 
jns ndl advantage/’ of U.S. antitrust 
unmunity they won last year. 11 ‘They are 
also conrotidating their own position in ■ 
a market likely to become' even more 
fiercely contested,” the airiw 
The move comes as the airlines arc 
trying to keep pace wife a series of 


cooperation agreements announced last 
year and as fee world’s taggesi airlines 

vie to grab a share of fee lucrative long- 
distance market 

The UJS. antitrust immunity ruling 
. allowed fee Swiss n*ti«wmi airline and 
its partners to discuss unified pricing 
and other forms of cooperation to in- 
; crease reve nue and cut costs as a means 
of offsetting falling ticket prices. 

FKght operations at Swissair and at 
Sabena, the Belgian national airline in 
which the Swiss company has a 49.5 
poeent stake, have been unprofitable 
for years. Austrian, of which Swissair 
owns 10 percent, is bandy profitable. 


it would realign its trans-Atlantic routes 
and all but eliminate its Frankfort hub, 
resulting in a $60 million pretax charge 
in fee current quarter, as it tries to shed 


Delta is feeing stiff competition in 
Frankfurt from Lufthansa AG and UAL 
Corp.’s United Air Uses, 

. “This will make Swissair znpre com- 
petitive,” said Susanne Borer, an ana- 
lyst at Bank J. Vcntobd & Co. AG. 
“These steps were necessary and were 
to be expected. Otherwise there would 
be no point in forming an alliance.” 
Last year, British Airways PLC an- 
nounced a sweeping irans- Atlantic pact 
with American Airlines,- while Air 
France ended a long search for a U.S. 
partner by signing accords wife Con- 
tinental Airlines Inc. and Delta. The two 

E burned alliances have not yet received 
f.S. antitrust clearance. 

Lufthansa, meanwhile, has formed 
pacts with Scandinavian Airlines Sys- 
tem AS, United, and Thai Airways In- 


ternational PLC. 

“The alliance between Delta. Swiss- 
air and fee other two partners will be one 
of the most wide-ranging in the in- 
dustry,” said Urs Kunz, analyst at Cred- 
it Suisse. 

When they received U.S. antitrust 
clearance last June, Swissair and its 
partners said they planned to set up a 
“seamless 1 ’ air transport system. In Oc- 
tober, Delta said it and its partners 
planned to operate “as one” across the 
A t l anti c while remaining separate 
companies. 

The four carriers, which said they 
would offer more shared flights, have a 
combined fleet of about 675aircraft. 

Delta will launch a new Atlanta-to- 
Zurich service June 1 2, while Sabena 
will offer nonstop Sights between Brus- 
sels and Cincinnati, Delta's second- 


largest hub, beginning May 15. 

Swissair said die alliance planned to 
increase its 12 percent share of the trans- 
Atlantic market but did not give a target. 
It also said it would introduce new fares 
to around 200 U.S. destinations from 
Switzerland. 

Swissair shares closed Wednesday in 
Zurich at 1,160 Swiss francs (5931.05;, 
up 30 francs, while Austrian shares fin- 
ished unchanged in Vienna, at 1,500 
schillings ($13651). In New York on 
Wednesday, Delta shares dosed at 
$73.00, up 875 cents. Sabena is not 
listed. (Bloomberg. AFX) 

■ Lobby Pleads for Liberalization 

An international industry group said 
that liberalization of global air transport 
would help the travel and tourism sec- 
tor, already fee world’s largest industry. 


create millions of new jobs, Reuters 
reported from Brussels. 

“Freer trade in the air will speed the 
growth of travel and tourism and make 
an important contribution to economic 
growth and employment,” the World 
Travel and Tourism Council said in a 
report entitled Air Transport und Freer 
World Trade. 

Bui it acknowledged that a global 
deal to liberalize aviation seemed “un- 
likely for many years.” It listed al- 
ternative ways forward, including 
agreements within and between regions 
as well as bilateral agreements. 

The lobbying group said the travel 
and tourism industry generates directly 
or indirectly more than 10 percent of 
global jobs, gross domestic product, and 
investment, a figure which could grow 
to more than 40 percent by 2007. 


L 



[. Raisio Group is looking for Biternational partners to spread Benecol, invented by Ingmar Wester (right). 


ines Health Food 


By Eriklpsen 

Inurnational Hcmld Tribune 


FatCfty 

Russia's stock oticfL 


■ - 400 


A year ago, when an obscure 
Finnish company began 
selling a m argari n e feat 
promised to significantly cot 
.cholesterol levels, few people 
-.bothered to notice. That was before 
>. Benecol, which at $10 a pound, more 
„ than six times fee price of regular 
margarine, started vanishing from 
.swre shelves. 

That was also before the company's 
• talk of a cholesterol-quashing con- 
quest of global markets drove its share 
_ price through the roof of the Helsinki 
t stock exchange — quintupling in less 
■, than a year. . 

' Now fee executives of fee Raisio 
Group, which started 57 years ago as a 
l farmers’ cooperative, find themselves 
reading case histories of Nutrasweet, 
the artificial sweetener that made a 
; fortune far its inventors more than a 
• decade ago. • 

Raisio plans to sell fee active in- 
gredieot from its margarine, which re- 
. mains an only-^n-Finland phenome- 
non, to food (xanpfflties around the 
world. By doing 'so, it hopes to make 
' the patented ingredient — which will 
also be called Benecol — as ubiquit- 
ous as Nutrasweet. Raisio hopes its 
product will transform products such 
as yogurt and breakfast bars into 
premium-priced cholesterol cutters. . 

Foreigners, who own 51 percent of 
Raisio’s shares, have piled on the eo- 
> couragement, insisting fear fee coro- 



cfaolesterol in the body.” 

He and ofeers point to studies show- 
ing that Benecol has no adverse side 
effects. They reckon that classed as a 
“generally regarded as safe” food in- 
gredient, it will get swift approval 
from health and food authorities. 

People like Mr. Youngman are busy 
tafiyingiq^lhebLQiomofdc^laraRaisfo 

irmmATTOim MANAGER 

could reap from its invention, and tout- 
ing the shares as a 1,000 markkaa 
(£21330) value, compared wife clos- 
ing price Wednesday of 303 markkaa. 

Executives at Raisio, meanwhile, 
are finally nearing a decision over 
which companies they should choose 
as their international partners. Jukka 
Maki, the company’s deputy chief ex- 
ecutive, said he had teen besieged 
wife partnership offers from leading 
food companies fee wodd over. “The 
demand is there,” he said. “We cannot 


‘ ‘This is much more significant than 
> Nutrasweet,” said Tim Y o ungm a n , an 
analyst with SBC Warburg in London. 
“This is not just another sugar or fat 
•. substitute; this is something more like 


pany, whose special, voting shares je- 
-tnain closely held by a small group of 
farmers, take its local success and rep- 
licate it abroad — even wife help from 
biggest and sawiest of partners? 


In Helsinki. 200 kilometers (124 
miles) southeast of Raisio’s headquar- 
ters, some analysis have dismissed 
Raisio’s invention as a fluke that will 
inevitably lead to a dead end. ‘‘I think 
feat we nave seen the best of the Be- 
necol effect already cm the price of fee 
shares,” a Furnish analyst said. “Tins 
is certainly not the kind of company 
anybody ever thought would come up 
wife anything this amazing.” 

Three crucial Finnish factors ex- 
plain why Raisio found its Benecol, 
while tiie tikes of Proctor & Gamble 
Co. of the United States toiled for 
yean without success on a similar feat 
of alchemy. 

Finland’s abundance of trees was 
one factor. It takes 15 tons of trees to 
make just one kilogram (2.2 pounds) 
of fee active cholesterol-cutting in- 
gredient in Benecol Second, Finland 
has a historical predilection for a diet 
so high in salt and fat and so low in 
fruit and vegetables that Finns had the 
highest rate of coronary heart disease 
in fee world a decade ago. Lastly, 
Finns love lunching on open-faced 
sandwiches — thick slices of bread 
slathered wife margarine and topped 
wife salmon or salami 

“Since people here eat sandwiches 
evexy day, it is a natural way to ad- 
minister the daily dose,” said Sten von 
Hellens, a Raisio spokesman. Raisio 
gives it to them by inserting com- 
pounds called sterols into fats in food. 
Sterols are present in all plants and are 
known to reduce cholesterol 

Normally, people consume 03 to 
03 grains of sterols a day simply by 
eating potatoes and vegetables. Be- 
necol concentrates those sterols and 
blends them wife margarine so that, as 

See FAT, Page 15 


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Philips Cedes Its Control of Grundig 


by Om Ssof} Fmm Dapcache^ 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands — 
Philips Electronics NV announced Wed- 
nesday it was relinquishing hs full control 
of Grundig AG of Germany to become a 
“passive minority shareholder.” 

The Dutch consuraer-electromcs gi- 
ant, which owns 31.6 percent of the Ger- 
man company, said the move was in line 
with its dedrion to create a single brand 
for its Sound and Visirm products. 

In February 1996, Philips said it 
would no longer be obliged to auto- 
matically cover the losses of Grundig, 
which makes consumer electronics in 
Germany. Under an agreement wife 
Grundig’s founding family’s trust. 
Philips has bad complete control over 
the company since 3984 and was liable 
for the German company’s losses. 

Philips said it had separated Grundig 
from its consolidated accounts Dec. 31. 

Battling depressed European con- 
sumer spending and fierce price com- 


petition. Grundig faces a loss of 300 
million Deutsche marks l$192 million) 
in 1996. compared with a 598 miliion- 
DM loss in 1995, according to analysts' 
estimates. Philips has not disclosed the 
extent of Grundig's losses, for which the 
Dutch company has taken charges of 
$955 million since 1984. 

Grundig does not expect to break even 
until next year because cost cuts will not 
have much impact until the second half. 

Grundig had about 8500 employees 
at the end of 1996. wife about half in 
Germany and half elsewhere in Europe. 

In a statement. Philips said it had be- 
gun negotiations with the Max Grundig 
Foundation to be released from contrac- 
tual obligations, including fee payment 
of an annual fixed dividend of 50 million 
DM to the widow of Max Grundig. 

Another contractual condition was 
that the foundation had a right to sell 
Philips its interest in Grundig in 2004. 

Ben Geerts. a Philips spokesman, said 


the severing of the Grundig connection 
has “unspecified financial implica- 
tions.” 

* 'Grundig will now determine its own 
future,” Mr. Geerts said, adding that he 
could not comment on the negotiations 
with the Max Grundig Foundation. 

Philips shares closed Wednesday in 
Amsterdam at 7 1 .9 guilders ( S40.95). up 
3.6 percent from 69.4 guilders Tuesday. 

Analysts said the family foundation 
that owns the rest of Grundig’s stock 
would probably buy Philips’ stake itself. 

Analysts expea Philips to sell its 
Grundig shares back to the foundation, or 
to try to sell the company to an Asian 
competitor. 

Siemens AG of Germany said it had 
| ‘completely ruled out” buying a stake 
in Grundig and said a European partner 
for Grundig is unlikely because the 
strongest consumer-electronics compa- 
nies are in the United States and Asia 
lAP, Bloomberg, AFP) 


Majority of Germans Want a Vote on the Euro 


Cmqricdbj dm SuffFnm Dupadia 

BONN — Nearly three-quarters of 
Germans, or 73 percent, want a ref- 
erendum on whether the Deutsche mark 
should be replaced by the euro, ac- 
cording to an opinion poll to be pub- 
lished by Die Woche newspaper on 
Thursday. 

Well over half — 56 percent — are 
against introduction of a single currency 
on Jaa 1, 1999, fee poll of 1,005 people 
by the Forsa Institute also found, com- 
pared wife 31 percent who favored it. 

A total of 1 1 percent want fee upper 
and lower bouses of Parliament to vote 
cm the issue, while 12 percent would be 
satisfied if the government alone de- 
cided. 

Only 15 percent of those polled be- 
lieved the euro would be as “hard” as 
fee mark, compared with 74 percent 
who believed fee opposite, the poll 
found. 

Norbert Walter, chief economist of 
Deutsche Bank, said Wednesday that he 


rated at only 55 percent the chances of 
European economic and monetary uni- 
on starting on time. 

The key obstacle beyond the national 
convergence criteria set in Maastricht 
was German opposition to Italy and 
Spain joining in the first wave of par- 
ticipants in the European monetary uni- 
on at fear date, he said. 

“Ido believe the chances for EMU to 
occur in 1999 are 55 percent, and the 
chances of failure are 45 percent,” he 
said 

Mr. Walter said the decision in 1998 
on the qualifying countries would have 
to be taken by a qualified majority of 
three-quarters of the 1 5 European Union 
countries. 

“The problem will feus be, how do 
you arrive at a majority decision without 
including these countries," Mr. Walter 
said, referring to Spain and Italy. 

Italy and Spain have both recently 
produced 1997 budgets designed to 
meet the Maastricht treaty’s target of 


getting public deficits down to 3 percent 
of gross domestic product in 1997 to 
qualify for monetary union in 1999. 

The ideal solution would be to con- 
vince them — notably through the ur- 
gjngs of President Jacques Chirac of 
France and Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
Germany — that they must wait for 
further economic convergence before 
joining the single-currency zone. 

Mr. Norbert said Italy could trade its 
vote in the decision-making process for 
a promise that “there be an unlimited 
commitment to support the iira.” 

Mr. Walter said he hoped monetary 
union would happen and underlined feat 
discussion on the criteria or a post- 
ponement could result in a * 'derailing of 
fee process" and feat this would be 
tragic for Europe. 

“Europe is closer to Yugoslavia than 
many people think,” he said, adding 
that failure would push EU countries to 
turn inward. "It would be back to tri- 
balism once again.” (AFP, Reuters) 


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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 



• • 

-/U-rV — 


: 30-Yeaf T-Bond -Yield- 1 




Computer Retailers Crashing 

More Consumers Turn to Direct Marketers 


Interest-Rate Worries ; 

Send Stocks Into Slide . . 



— no — 


146 A S O N D J 



By Jennifer Steinhauer 

New York Times Service 


* A S O N D 4 
1996 1997 


Exchange , index 


NYSE The Dow 

NYSE S&P500 

NYSE 5&P1QQ ■_ 

NYSE ■ Composite - 

VJ&. Naadaq Congtosfe 

AWEX • MaitetVaiua • 

Toronto TSEtadax 

Sfio Paulo Bavospa 

BexBeoOfty Bote' 

Buenos Aires Merval 

Santiago IPSA Generef . 
Caracas Capita! General : 
Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


SStfSM ,6603-86 -0.7$ 

738-41 7&3-23 

733 22 758^3- 

mqs t-.ag6.90. -*,42/ 

taaxas- ' ''1324.26 s - 0.30 

525.68 ' 

5329-98 "vgpififfi' ' -&38 

sssrar ' est&is'V^Tr.wi 

66458 ''■■863.43 7 
5161.83 '5087.21 
6736:94 6837^0 ' -1.48 


lmenuiional HemU Tribune 


Very briefly; 

SCI Withdraws Bid to Buy Loewen 


NEW YORK — - Have Amer- 
ican consumers fallen out of love 
with the home-computer store? If 
so, have they started a steamy af- 
fair with new merchants of con- 
sumer electronics? If sales figures 
and current stock prices of Amer- 
ica's computer retailers are any 
indication, the answer may be a 
resounding yes. 

As the numbers are tallied for 
the Christmas season, traditional 
consumer electronics retailers are 
repotting ted news almost daily. 

On Tuesday, Circuit City Stores 
Inc. reported a 13 percent drop in 
December sales. Last week, Tandy 
Corp. announced plans to dispose 
of its Incredible Universe electron- 
ics outlets. And Best Buy Co. has 
acknowledged that it failed to meet 
financial requirements stipulated 
under its bank loans. 

Indeed, even as sales of home 
computers rose nearly 15 percent 
in the fourth quarter, they fell 23 
percent at such stores, according to 


estimates by Computer lute Hi 
pence, a market research firm in L* 


HOUSTON lAFP) — Service Corp. International, an op- 
erator of funeral homes and cemeteries, said Wednesday it 
was withdrawing its S2.9 billion bid to acquire a Canadian 
rival, Loewen Group. 

“The cumulative effect of actions taken by Loewen since 
our offer was announced, and the disclosure of details related 
to certain of Loewen 's other transactions, have adversely 
impacted SCI's view of Loewen 's value to SCI sharehold- 
ers.’* said SCI's chairman. R.L. Waltrip. Loewen had op- 
posed the move, which SCI announced in September. 

The takeover would have created a company operating 
3.750 funeral homes and 600 cemeteries with estimated 
annual sales of $2.2 billion. 


gence. a market research firm in La 
Jolla, California. Hit less hard al- 
though not immune were the so- 
called computer superstores, like 
CompUSA Inc., whose stock was 
hammered last week cm a weak 
sales report, and Tandy’s Com- 
puter City. 

So where are people buying 
computers? The winners, analysts 
say. are die companies that market 
directly to consumers, like Gate- 
way 2000 Inc.. Dell Computer 
Corp.. and Micron Electronics 
Inc., and the catalogue marketers 


PC Connection and Computer Dis- 
count Warehouse. 

Indeed, sales at direct marketers 
were up an estimated 20 percent to 
30 percent in the fourth quarter 
over the like 1995 period, accord- 
ing to Computer Intelligence. 

The explanation for the shift, to 
a considerable extent, is that the 
retailers appear to be the victims of 
their own success. Today, an es- 
timated 65 percent of all home 
computers are sold to people who 
already own one personal com- 
puter or more, up from less than 50 
percent two years ago. And the 
sophisticates are shunning the 
stores that introduced them to 
computing. 

‘That’s having a big impart on 
retailers, as experienced PC own- 
ers buy more and more directly 
from companies like Gateway and 
Dell,” said Andy Bose, president 
of Access Media International, a 
technology consulting firm. 

To hear some retail analysts tell 
it, the consumer-electronics chains 
are stumbling only temporarily, 
and new products, like new satel- 
lite dishes and computers 
equipped with the Intel Corp.’s 
new multimedia chip, released 
Wednesday, will revive sales 
socm. 

Indeed, undaunted by this sea- 
son’s setbacks, some electronics 
retailers are ope mug new stores 
faster than they can dose foe un- 
derperforming ones. Circuit City 
announced this week that it would 
open 40 electronics superstores in 


S38 JO in June, closed Wednesday 
on foe New York Stock Exchange 
at $29 JO. 


Best Buy and CompUSA have 
ith lost more than 40 percent of 


both lost more than 40 percent of 
their market value over roughly 
the same period. 

“What this all means is that you 


stay away from this area,” said 
James McCall, a portfolio man- 


f ew York City by 1 999- 
Nonetheless, for foe 


Nonetheless, for the investor, 
computer retail stores are a dicey 
bet Circuit City, which traded at 


ager in Wayne, Pennsylvania, who 
just unloaded all of his shares in 
CompUSA “Because it is just 
clear there is a lot of potential for 
negative surprises. I am kind of 
avoiding the whole group.” 

This year there were few sig- 
nificant new retail products to fuel 
sales, as there were last year with 
Microsoft’s Windows 95 operat- 
ing software and Intel’s Pentium 
chips. 

Yet, foe sluggishness of sales to 
first-time computer buyers does 
raise the question of whether foe 
spread of personal computers into 
American households has stalled 
at its current 35 percent household 
penetration. 

Moreover, analysts note that 
there is a real limit to bow many 
$2,000 machines can be sold to the 
affluent households that are foe 
most prodigious computer con- 
sumers. Among families with in- 
comes of $60,000 or more. 65 per- 
cent already own computers, 
according to Scott Miller, an ana- 
lyst at foe research firm 
Dataquest. 

If electronics retailers are strug- 
gling in the home-computer market, 
foe manufacturers share their con- 
cerns. Accordingly, some produ- 
cers have opted out of the con- 
sumer-computer market altogether. 


CimpiatbjOor S*$Fnm Dapadsa 

NEW YORK — Stocks aimed 
sharply lower Wednesday in heavy 
trading after interest rates rose to- 
ward their highest level since late 
October in the bond market. 

Die Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age fell 51.18 points to close at 
6,549.48 after spending most of the 
day slightly below Tuesday's re- 
cord-high close of 6,600.6 6, foe 
first ever above 6,600 for the biue- 


seajrch for Argus Research Corp.. 
described his investment outlook a s 
the most cautious it has been in six. 
months. . 

“I don't think: profits are going to 
offset the negative impact of rising 
bond yields,’ be said. 

AT&T was foe Big Board’s most 


US. STOCKS 


chip barometer. 

Declining issues barely out- 


numbered advancing ones on foe 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The price of foe benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond foil to 95 19/32 
from 96 9/32 on Tuesday. The yield, 
which moves opposite to the price, 
rose to 6.84 percent, op from 6.79 
percent Tuesday. 

Interest rates have jumped over 
the past week in foe bond market 
amid unexpectedly strong econom- 
ic data that spurred inflation jitters. 

But a Fed official, trying to as- 
suage those fears, said Wednesday 
that U.S. economic growth was 
“steady and moderate” and foe rale 
of inflation was low. 


active issue, falling to 38VL In- 
flation fears tend to bun companies 
that pay big dividends. 

In rtber active trading, Loewen 
Group fell 4JA to 36% on reports that 
Service Corp- International had. 
withdrawn its takeover bid. Service 


Corp. shares rose VA to 29%. 

Motorola rose H6 to 63 after:. 
Morgan Stanley upgraded its re- 
commendation on the consumer, 
electronics company. 

The Nasdaq Composite index re- 
treated 738 points to 132035 after 
spending much of the day flirting 
with record levels. 

Netscape Communications fell 
10% to 47% after some cautious 
assessments of the Internet soft- 
ware company by Merrill Lynch 
and Deutsche Morgan Grenfell. 

Shiva, the most active Nasdaq 
issue, plunged 15% to 1914 after foe. 
computer networking concern 
warned of disappointing fourth-,, 
quarter earnings. 

Intel fell 1% to 142%, reversing 
early gains. The world's biggest 
maker of microprocessors mtn^- 
ducedtireMMXaspeefoCTchiptor 
presenting video and audio, but in- 
vestors questioned whether Intel’s 
13-point rise since last Thursday 
had already priced in any expected 
benefits from higher sales. 

iAP. Bloomberg h 


William McDonough, president 
foe Federal Reserve Bank of New 


of the Federal Reserve Bank of New 
York, said he did not see any large 
imbalances in the economy that 
would change its growth rate. “The 
risks to die economy are reasonably 
small,” said Mr. McDonough, who 
also serves as vi^e chairman of foe 
Fed's policy-setting Federal Open 
Market Committee. 

Analysts said that the outlook for 
rising corporate earnings had fueled 
foe Mock market’s spectacular rise, 
but that at this level, rates could 
pose a problem for stocks. 

James Solloway, director of re- 


• A MP Inc. will cut about 1 .000 jobs, or 2.2 percent of its work 
force, as part of a restructuring plan that will close or consolidate 
some plants and streamline certain product lines at the maker of 
electrical and electronic equipment. 


• Valero Energy Corp. said five energy and utility compa- 
nies would submit bids to buy its natural gas business, valued 
ai about $1.5 billion. 


Gold Sinks Amid Fears of Sales by European Central Banks 


• International Business Machines Corp. said it expected 
its Internet-related business ro break even this year. 


• The New York District Attorney's office said 53 brokers 
and the in. posters they allegedly paid to take their licensing 
exams would be charged in foe largest -ever case of brokerage 
test-taking fraud. 


• Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Co. sued Microsoft 
Corp.. alleging that a Microsoft software program due out 
later this month infringes on one of its trademarks. 


• Coca-Cola Co. has changed foe design of cans of Coca-Cola 
Classic, eliminating the vertical white nbbon and changing foe 
words to ‘ ‘Always Coca-Cola Classic. ’ ’ Bloomberg, ap 


CompJeJ by Our Staff From Dispiacbn 

LONDON — The price of gold 
has slumped to a more than three- 
year low on speculative selling 
prompted by fears that European 
central banks are disposing of some 
gold reserves in a bid to qualify for 
the European single currency, ana- 
lysts said Wednesday. 

The price of foe precious metal 
has fallen by almost $15 since foe 
start of the year, reaching $355.70 
per ounce Wednesday on foe Lon- 
don Bullion Market, the lowest level 
since October 1993. 

Prices have come under pressure 


primarily from selling by speculat- 
ive investors on the New York fu- 
tures market, analysts said. 

Gold futures for February deliv- 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


ery closed $2.90 lower at $356.80 in 
New York. 

U.S. investment funds have also 
become increasingly disenchanted 
with gold in recent weeks and many 
have reduced their holdings. 

Their main concern is foe alarm- 
ing possibility that European central 
banks mig Jit he selling some gold to 


reduce government deficits. 

Qualification for the first wave of 
countries to sign up for European 
monetary and economic union must 
be confirmed by foe spring of 1998. 
Countries adopting the euro will sur- 
render control of their gold reserves 
to the new European central bank. 

In Brussels, the European Com- 
mission stressed that sales by central 
banks would be permitted only to 
reduce national debt levels and not 
government deficits. 

■ Dollar Posts Gains 


against the Deutsche mark and rose 
against other major currencies Wed- 
nesday, deriving strength from Pres- 
ident Boris Yeltsin’s health prob- 
lems and speculation that Germany 
might lower interest rates, news 
agencies reported from New York. 

The dollar closed at 13750 
Deutsche marks, up from 13643 
DM on Tuesday* ana at 115.82 yen, 
op from 1 15.195 yen. 

Against other major currencies, 
foe dollar closed at 53205 French 
francs, up from 5J2838 francs, and at 


Die dollar hit a 2-year high 


13645 Swiss francs, up from 13535 
francs. The pound closed at 


$1.6880. down from $1.6948. 

The Deutsche slipped after a Ger- 
man news agency reported Decern -i 
her job figures, due Thursday, would 
show a record 4.1 million unem- 
ployed. The report spurred talk foe 
Bundesbank might cut interest rates. 

Falling stock prices in Japan sup> 
parted the dollar against the yen as 
investors who sold shares converted, 
the yen proceeds into other curren- 
cies, especially dollars, traders said 
“Japanese and foreign investors are 
seeking higher yields elsewhere,’* 
stud Paul Farrell, of Chase Maiv 
hattim Bank. ( Bloomberg , AFP, API 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Wednesdays 4 p.m. Close 

The top 300 rrosi-aciiva oharas. 

Up to the cfosmij on Wal StteL 
The Associated Press 


Series High LowLotttsr Owe 


Sales High Law Lorca Owe 


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123 11% 11% 11% .% 

1U2 1% 3% fti. — Um 

a $ $ 

& 'K T '?"■ =s 

ISO 1% 3% J% 

715 13% 12 13 —i 

MS 11% 10% 10% 

J453 3% » u Sr, -i-i, 

3W 3% 7V» 2% .% 

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1417 33% 31% 33 -l*« 

445 11% 11% 11% — % 

J6J S% 5% S% •'A, 

175 ia% ir. it ♦ % 

4SB 2% 7% 7*f,» ‘ 

IBM 7% 4% 7% 

155 5% 4% 5% 

171 % Or,, <%, — '/i* 

93i i 4U 4%u 'Mi 

24 10% la in — % 

155 17% 17% in* — % 

1551 30% 29% 30% - % 

187 31 Vh 3% 3% — % 

183 7% 7% 7%. -Vi, 

1747 11 10% II «% 

112 19 18% 19 — % 

219 11% 11% 11% *% 

Q 70% 10% 10% <■% 

1407 44% 45% 44% ♦ % 

TO 3%i 3 M, 

225 14% (4% 14% • % 

308 flu 8>v u 9 * %» 

127 71% 11% +% 

1837 ]% 3%, 3% +V, 

38W J0% 20% 20% — % 

03 8% 0% Wu — V„ 

774 9% <% 9 ,Hr 

125 7% 7% 7% —V, 

13W 10% 37V, 37% 

427 74% 24% J4% 

144 3 % 3W 3% -%< 

m 4 3>M. — «„ 

731 17% 17% 17% — '* 

4% 6% 4% — % 

749 7% 7*. 2V., — % 


Indexes 

Dow Jones 

Open Hwh low atom Ch*. 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


Jan. 8, 1997 


IndUi 4477.14 4477 7g 4534J8 45SA09 —1657 
Trim 274841 BOSS 77*541 22S7.W —17.63 
UI4 33X73 T34J7 732.74 23377 M7A3 
Cento 704487 704445 70CJ4 J04475—1147 


Standard & Poors 


n% 

18% 

10% 


3% 

J*u 

3 1 ., 

-’Ml 

2% 

3 Vi. 

2% 

.% 

im 

13% 

11% 


33% 

11% 

33 

»i*S 

11% 

11% 

m» 

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s% 

5% 

sw 

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ia% 

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7% 

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5P50S 

SP 100 


lOgti Low a me Chg. 
890M B7V.96 880-63 —741 
54341 53647 53949 —248 
20042 19949 19945 +0J» 
B2.90 81.77 81.91 +0.14 
755J2 747J1 74841 — <42 
74149 73240 73122 -541 


Nasdaq 


WbH LOW Lad One 


D% — % 
71% -% 

14% -1% 
17% — % 
33^1 *% 

14% 

7% — % 
Iff-l — % 

4% 

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7*% — W 
JI'j -% 


■^.Quaw 
PLC 
PlM 
PMCCT 
BanAinCn 
PavsnC 
PMGIfl 
PenRE 
PeorteTa 
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»%i 3% 3% -% 

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II 10% 11 .% 

19 18% 19 — % 

11% 11% l|% *% 

10% 10% 10% *■% 
46% 45% <6% * % 

3ft. 3W» W|. 

14% 14% 14% * % 

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20% 70% 20% —% 

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3% 3% 3% 

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4% 4% 4% — % 

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4% 4% 4te — % 

5% 5% 5*m 

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7% 7% 7%. *%. 

9% 8W» t% *% 


Composite 

indusmob 

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UtlBtv 

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398-79 39441 39545 -145 
SH4t 499J3 49942 -194 
35443 351-38 3524* _8 lT7 
14042 25845 258.94 -198 
35144 35130 35173 >044 


Nasdaq 


Vft. 

Htoh 

Law 

Lad 

oe- 

65744 

39 

30% 

3B% 

— % 

65081 

64 

62% 

63 

+i% 

58321 

34% 

33% 

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54385 

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52779 

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44709 

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36% 

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44581 

24% 

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43244 

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72% 

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41*04 43% 

41% 

42% 

tft 

40951 

4ffe 

4/ft 

48% 

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385*5 

26% 

25% 

26% 

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38411 

II 

10% 

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37248 

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14% 

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VaL 

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240369 

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156480 145% 14H%, 14216 

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97B69 

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66454 

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62857 HS’V*, 

83% 

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14% 

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High Low Owe Qtge OpH 


CORN (CB0T) 

54BO bu mWmm- dcuarj per bushel 
Mar 97 2J9% 257% 2JPV. *MI 148.911 
4*7997 ZX ZStn 159H M437 

AI97 141% 239% 24H7 -000% 55,170 
Sep 97 159% 257% 2J8% -0310% 4J93 
Dec 97 7J9J 157% 158% -001 37J92 

Estsafes IU Tub's. soles 384DJ 
Tile's open mu 306467 up 1502 


High 

Law 

Ouse 

Oioe 

OpM 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) 



1 U) 00 K».-c(nt»par lb. 




-ton 97 7930 

7030 

79.1S 

+060 

■51 

Mart? 8U0 

DOM 

w.ro 

-t/0 10045 

Mav 97 SSjOO 

8U0 

8X30 

-u 0 

4J80 

Jill 97 17/0 

86.55 

BUS 

— IA5 

992 

Eri.sda NA 

TueV scries 2J86 


Toe's open inf 

27-280 

UP 160 




Mgh Low dose Chon OpM 


High lob Ck»e dge Opttf ^ 


SOYBEAN MEAMCBCn 
HW tons- da«in mr ion 

JBi»7 22920 Z24J0 226 W -180 3.581 

Mar 97 22110 21940 220J0 -ZJ» 33483 
Way 97 21120 214J0 21470 -150 17.904 
M9T 211 39 7I«H 2Tt« — IJO 13X38 

Aim 97 21550 21480 715.10 -a« 1745 

Sep 97 21100 211 JO 2 11 JO -0,90 2JO 

Bst.wiw NA. Tue's. sales 17.124 
■Tub's omiM 81,255 up 19*0 


Law Lest as 


Canposite 

Mjshtob 

Bn 8i 

[Q Wonc e 

nikllCB 

Trim*. 


132891 132170 1323-39 -4J4 
II35J3 113149 1137.44 -0 43 
I2eij9 127434 1279J92 >1.91 
l«O20 143844 144041 -IILDZ 
16U88 1594J7 M02-S9 >742 
90840 90548 90649 —145 


ssa JBt% 
56540 22% 
54055 <8% 
54667 27% 
51449 33% 
4789S M 
47170 66% 


IIB% MB% — J» 
21% 211k 
66% 44% — 3 

24% 2Wu -«6» 
37% 32% — % 

84% 66% >2% 

63% 61% — VA 


SOYBEAN OB. (CBOT) 

«W0 e»- Mm I»r 100 Ite. 

Jan 77 2116 no mo -aas 4,495 

Mar 97 2154 2337 2145 -045 44308 

Mrw 97 2357 2172 2180 — OJM 15471 

.Jul97 24.15 24JE 2409 -OXB 18719 

AuB 97 24 JZ 2470 2471 -003 JJS 

SeP 97 24J2 -a* 27)91 

Est. sates NA Toe's, sates 24JB4 
TUB’S open inf B4J03 up 1107 


GOLD CNCMX) 

1 D 0 «w at- BoOors par trev to. 

Jen 97 35580 —100 

feb97 159.90 3S5J0 3S4J0 -498 

Mar 97 3S750 -108 

Apr?7 34150 35700 3050 —300 

Jun97 363L2D 359-28 34070 -OOO 

Aim 97 34400 34350 3070 -490 

0097 36550 —100 

Dec 97 3040 34450 34750 -1G3 

g*.ams NA Toe’s. sate 4SW 
Tub's open W 201512 un 35 


HlgD Lew Lap dig. 
577 A3 57540 57472 >109 

Dow Jones Bond 


70 Bands 
10 Uflltttes 
10 Industrials 


Orm e Ota*' 

103.19 +070 

10CL37 +074 

10601 +007 


VOL High 
17104 75W # 
14097 J% 
13921 7% 
I03W % 
9707 1 
MU iVu 
7m 10% 
4691 11% 
4224 34% 
5910 14% 


low LaH 
7«Uu 74 Mb 
2US. 3% 
6% «„ 
hi % 
7*7., 7% 

4 4% 

9% 10% 

10 % 10 % 
34% JS% 
15% 16% 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

5000 bu minimum, dtfknper bwVNri 
Jon 97 657% 673 655% -003 8J24 

Mar 77 75M4 4W% 4.95 -4LM%4WW 
May 97 750 694% 695% -003% 20 595 

JU)97 750 695 695% —403% 25423 

AuB 77 454% 6.94 6MM — 0JD% 350 

Est. sales NA Tub's, soles 35547 
Tub’s open M 146762 oft ion 


111 GRADE C0PPBI (NCMXI 

TSJWOfcs.- cents Prr llx 
Jan 97 10BJO 1Q7JD 10750 —IJO 

Feb97 10440 10500 MB.90 —0.55 

Mnr97 105 JO 10620 10400 -U,3i 

Aw97 1050 10350 302JP -CL35 

Mav 97 101.90 100JO WUii 

Jun97 100.15 -0JB 

Jul97 9940 9U9 9690 —HJ5 

AubW 98.00 —055 

S8P 97 9740 9750 9690 -055 

Est. sties NA Tim's, sales 17543 
Tub's opbiW 54J92 ua 2874 


7% 7¥» 7Vi* — 

74% 73% 24% ♦% 

3% Wu 3% -% 

8 % 8 % 8 % — % 
4% 4% 4% <•% 

n» 7 v« riu 

16 15% 15% — % 

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10% 9% ID — % 

1% 1V U 1%, — % 
{% ajj 8 V 1 , - . 

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Pnadfs 

PraArthrn 
ProcCT 
PsvcCp 
QC Ctoin 
QCtWwi 
RFPaw 
RcdErnp 
Retac 

RcoalBel 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Nasdaq 


AArtnciea 
Declined 
Unchmwd 
TdlalasuBS 
Now Mohs 
New Lows 


1252 1499 

1290 10*7 

til 791 

33S3 3337 

114 149 

79 Z7 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

54*0 Ito min«nwn- dallm no tualwl 
MorV7 357% 193% 195 +OJ02%32JM 

MOV 77 JJ5 171% 353% *0.02% 7/33 

71*97 152% IVVi 149% -040% 20524 

Sep 97 156 354 151 -600% 1,130 

Est. sales njv Tue’s. sates 10,142 
Tue’SOpenM 62.780 up 422 


SLVBItNCMX) 

MWrroyax.' earns per koy ox. 

JBI97 462J —iO 7 

f»97 444.1 —55 2 

Mor97 4715 444 j0 444.0 -5.0 40501 

May 97 4710 4 695 4TOJ —5.1 9,906 

■AH 97 4775 472J 474A —5.1 AJ48 

&P 97 4795 4Wj 4795 -SI 2552 

Dec »7 488.0 4845 484.1 -5.1 5503 

Jp"9B _ 4085 -5.1 » 

EsI. scries NA Tub'S.SCAh 1JL343 
Toe's ooeninf 9757T off 417 


Advanced 

DecftMd 


Tata banes 
New Mete 
New Lows 


3198 2305 
1*73 1747 
1658 1441 
5731 5733 
200 170 

a 45 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMER) 


Market Sales 


a ■_ 


fit 4 % triH ‘ 
10'.» 9'W U 10'^ ,% 

4v, SUn, 3*. — % 

1'^ 1H 1"., -*1, 
17'2 17 17% -s* 

Ml. 6 4% — % 

9 3*. 9 - 'M 

"u, % % 

7% 4'i 7% 

Z2% n 27% 

12% 12V, 17V, 

Uv, 1*i, l'« —Vi, 



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l’V M I Vi, I’M, >V M 

2V„ 2% 7% -% 

UVi 11 11% 

6% 6% 4% * % 

19% 19% 79% ,% 

37 31% 31% _i„ 

27% 27% 27% * % 

W|, J'in 3V* 


9% 9% 9% » W 

24% 24% — % 
17% 14% 14% — % 

11% 18% 18% — % 
11% 11% 11% -*i 


Advanced 
Dvdned 
U n d w KBH 
Tore* issues 
NewHigRs 
New Laws 


298 310. 

239 2J4 

184 181 

723 775 

28 n 


NYSE 

Anna 

Nasdaq 

InmOBona. 




40 M0 ftn. - canft per ft. 






Feb 77 

6452 

(MJ3 

6427 

— 0*5 

3SJB4 

Today 


Apr 97 

6570 

6SL27 

MM 

♦ 02B 25/63 

PVW. 

Jun 97 

6330 

6U2 

022 

*030 

11832 

CtaM 

etas. 

Aug 97 

6X27 

6290 

6113 

>025 

10.976 

556-59 

*49.90 

Od97 

66*7 

6570 

*607 

*030 

6,9ti 

3487 

2M1 

Dec 97 

67/7 

67.12 

67J7 

>037 

urn 

62496 

577J4 

fst.Mries U794 Ttw’L. scries 

21/08 



PLATINUM (NMSU 

SO nay ot- OoKcfs per iror ot 

Jan 97 MUD 3XJ0 3StM —4.10 Ui 

Apr 97 34750 34250 363.90 -120 19,519 

All 97 34750 36600 34640 —130 IMS 

Od 97 35950 3*750 36850 -1M 2,163 

Jon 98 371M -130 7,073 

Esf.sote* HA Tue't sales 25U 

Tue’s open bit 25.587 


ijYEARFRaiCMGW. BONOS (MATtF) 
FFSOMOO-Dlsof 700 pa 

12?- 14 1*** 2 *oxnnm 

Jun 97 12692 12660 126B4 +0.18 8^40 
Sep 97 12620 12550 12550 +0.16 100 

Dec 97 H.T. N.T. 96SB +050 0 

s E87. voLme: 102307. Open Jqfc 7Z&939 up 

EURODOUJUB (CMER) 

*1 mffllorwPs or 100 pa. 

JWI97 «64» M4» M54B -5 26043 

Feb 97 94630 96410 M410 ■ 6547 

Mar 97 96400 94370 94380 411582 

Jun 97 94i230 96180 96190 -10 337.828 

Mar 00 ms 93.170 91180 -20 363T2 

Jon 60 91190 *1110 91120 -20 3S52S 

Sep 00 91140 93550 93J77S -20 3437 

Dec 00 9349 92.970 92M1, -20 26B04 

Estsdes 381932 Tub’s, sales 319,149 
Tub's open int 2.110443 an 14519 
BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

M.SWpameli.lPW pound _ _ ' 

Mar 97 14934 14812 14848 -70 

Jun 97 U830 14770 1JS38 -44 1B1 

Sen 97 1.4748 -58 1407 

Dec 97 14738 -SJ 7 

Ea. sates 6517 Tue’s-stfes 6395 
Tie’s open int 46725 off 222 
CANADIAN OOUJUt (CMER) 
w uweitewgQh* 

Mar 97 JM5 J395 J433 *11 48.927 

Jun 97 JOBS J447 JOT *-Jl 7.«B 

Sep 97 JS.-3 7484 J500 + 31 34J4 

Dec 97 .7540 7530 JS4T +31 3S 

Est. sates 15427 Tue'S. safes 12.738 
Tup’s open ini 
GERMAN MARK (CMER} 

I2SA00 mwfcs, 8 aer mart 

Mar 97 44M 4360 4J77 -47 *2411 

Jun 97 4(32 4*00 4417 —47 6919 

Sep 77 to 5B —47 1,775 

Dec 97 4499 -47 .17 

Est. botes 19.215 Tile's, sales 15405 

Tub’s open W *9422 up 100 

JAPANESE VUN (CMSO 

173 melon yon, f par 100 van 

1*0-97 J8W75 408700 JW721 -43 0.783 

Jun 97 JMB38 408623 JfflBOM -47 1.897 

Sw97 408952 -46 370 

Ed. safes 12J43 Tub's, sales 214N 

Tue'S open H 71,117 up 1102 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

W540B Irancs, S per mi ne 

-2SSS -2S -« «IW 

Jun *7 JOT JOT 3 USA —62 1.545 

S(*>97 J5X J5I0 J514 —62 I41J 

Esr.srtes iw Tue’S. soas 14L367 

Tue'sopenM 5U60 up 1*9 


HEATHS (RLfNMER) 

42400 ool- cents per 90 

Fe097 7380 71 iE- 7120 -2.71 AUDI* 

Mare? 7U0 KM run -05* ML7W 

Apr 97 6750 6640 *7.80 - 3J* l«‘ 

Moy97 *620 *130 M2Q +W1 64*5 r 

Joa97 1280 *1.55 6145 -lit 5^49 . 

**77 0UB 48.00 M.60 -CH jJM- 

AUU97 3990 5990 599Q _0Al 3237. 

00 97 6U0 AUG 61J0 -061 1,111 

77 6145 *145 <145 -041 L23*j 

Fell 98 6070 flJJfl 63.7Q -021 8M- 

Esr. safes NA Tue's.sdes 2821 ' 

Tim's nperlnt 99J2I up 590 •. 


UGHTSWEETOWOE (NMBR) 

Jjstto ass.- daOars pw ttu. - 

FMlW 26*5 2585 2660 *037 914*2‘- 

MOT97 2555 25.17 2590 -03* 4SA96- 

APT97 2SJ2 2654 7520 * 037 29J78.. 

May 97 2440 MM 2440 -0J5 20.155. 

Jun 97 2US 23J2 ymp -030 31.05*. 

W77 OS 2323 -1U1 16*73- 

AUB97 2271 2220 2171 -0J0 134»« 

SSS I!-® *027 rusis 

CW97 11*7 2135 2147 +015 9206. 

Nov 97 2127 21.17 2U7 -021 8.D1 

Dec 97 21.10 2074 71.H -021 21771'. 

*>« 2043 7050 20.73 -a® 9.17*31 

Decoo 19*5 19X8 w.45 *025 

EN.SC6B6 NA Tire’s, safes 71425 v 

Tub's open nt 372J31 off 1015 “ 

NATURAL CAS (NMER1 > 

™» hhr*,s ntr mm on, '■ 

1D0 1320 3413 -179 3L899' 

H22 1,74 *!» 73J80- 

SSL” 7465 7.660 *94 12414 

MoyJ? ££0 2JM Z3JD *34 9JD 

JJ 98 1350 657' 

J750 2.180 2220 +1 749». 

M iM5 2.180 1215 —I 7JB7 

&M97 2348 2.1(0 2230 -1 tO? . 

2180 2JM -4 6J77- 

Nov 97 23S8 2J10 2JJS -5 1775- 

WSJ 2J90 2L4QO -» IflO- 

Esf. safes Na Tue'S, sales 49JS7 • - 
Tue’sepenutt 15649! up juts 

UNLEADED CASOUNE (NMER) * 

2£.« JJfS JS 70 -009 36 J*t 


. " - > 4 IlhfH 16,1* TILUf JIO , 

M«r97 72.10 70*0 71.92 +037 HJD0 ■ 

A*V97 7130 71*0 7120 *040 65SS_ 


** '■nw r r Jl-CU 

n,S 7140 -<WS 6227“ 

AA197 70.71 69 JO 2030 -059 1433 i 


\\i 


1 . .•» 


ir-, • \ 


M 


Oast 

LONDON METALS OME) 
Dalian uer mehlc ton 


a 88 & 


Tue'S open irt 91200 up 12*9 


AkutmflMMd 

Spot 154600 154600 15254W 152600 

Forward 1577JW 1577% ISS6’A 1S7J0 


M M -1 

.5% 5 S’* -% 


Dividends 

Company 


Per Amt Rec Pay Company 


Per Ant Rec Pay 


i‘« — u,, 

4 '. 4 — % 
30% -1% 


33 — % 

16% — 
8% — % 
8% 

10% 

37% — % 
7% -Vn 
5% 

11% — % 
15% — % 


3% —Mi 
6% 

TW -Vi 

19% — % 
2 >% 

35 

34% — % 
17% — % 
11% -% 


GrtcBuvC 

377 

U»„ 

tS 

1% 

-l-'u 

Grevtmd- 

367* 

4V,, 

45,. 

r:„ 

• % 

GrSmcc 

93 

3% 

3ft 

3% 

_ 

HolEP 

121 

9 

8% 

8% 

*% 


n 

9s„ 

ft 

Sft 

—6ft 

HcriiwMn 

113 

« 

14' 

15 

-% 

HitoOOr 

183 

6ft 

6% 

6% 

— ft 

rianvCw 

3764 

">i» 

% 

’■’*« 

_l' u 

Han MB 

136 

fel 




H»hen 

1*697 

Jft 

2 ,v n 

3% 

-ft 

Hntn 

U50 

37 Vi 

366, 

17% 

*% 

how Air 

163 


3'.1 

3*« 

— Vu 

ripom 

9707 

3 

?» 

Jfe 

—ft 

HoinrCo 

J75 

?»'• 

75% 

25% 

— % 

HomoVUn 

m 

lflft 

18 

lift 

•% 

nwnev*l 

181 

f'l 

B*„ 

1% 

•Vu 

HovnEn 

258 

-ft 

r,„ 

7% 


HunoTei 

98 

ID'-t 

m 

10% 

* Sr 

iCSCom 

R0 

16* 

16% 

life 

—ft 

ICS 

UA 

7ft 

Ml 

| 

iB 

lacm* 

2624 

*g 

4 

94a 

*ft 


5ubsMOus 
Sulcus 
jOftfJur 
SurefvC 
, TobPrd 
TaDia 
T«-eWch 
TnB, w) 
TejiMer 
Therrruo 
I Thrmfiton 

TOCars 

ThrTiWn 

ThmFtis 

Ttwtoil 

ThrOnBin 
ThrmOe 
T»irte«i 
TtoVdis 
ThrmaHe 
Tfrmof* 
TMcrv 
Tacfircc 
ToriPe* 
TownOv 
TWA wf 
TWA 
Tmvmn 
Tre nMea n 
Irwiaech 
TutaMen 
U5FCP 
UTl Eng 
UnMir 

uni an 
Urwmtn 
UFOOdA 
135 Bio wr 
US861Q 5 

US Cel 

IJlWlHV 

VKMAV 

VKSOBrtT 

Vacs 

VocurtC 

vtacwtE 

VisnGg 

Vilronic 

VayMN? 

WRIT 

W1RET 


71M 75JVn 7 * 1 - 6 , 7«fn -% 
551 SB’S 90Vu SCW„ —iv H 

>1 10% M -% 

704 lWi, 19u Via —V,, 

723 1%, 1 % IV, — )/„ 

m ?% rv u : — % 

ID I'Vi. 1% 1% ~Jla 

Z3S 4 % 4 % 4% *% 

.549 9% r* »% *1 

1«M 35% 34% 34% — % 

523 4% Ola 4% -K„ 

173 '<6, % _ 

4« 16% 16% 16% 

n<> 19% IB 18% — % 

ffl 14% 13% 14 -Vi. 

273 31% 30% 30% — % 

12 1 (0% 10% 10% — % 

380 9% 8% l'V„ 

^4 H% 37% J7% — % 

714 12% 11% 13% 4 % 

M 8%, 7% *>% -Vu 

214 14% 13% 13% — % 

133 TD% 10% 10% 4 % 

492 16% 16 16% 

4JB 30% 29% 29% •% 

92 4%, 4 % 4% — % 

OV TOi, TVu 7>^ 

SW 10% 10% 10% 

5OT Vu % V u 

102 4% 4 4 —V, 


IRREGULAR 

Cprap.Waan- .1396 8-7 2-21 


CWfeADR 

EmbcMIadrAntfl- 

no 

PMlraiPd 
Pfd Jnco Munoom- 

m 


- JB7 1-24 1-31 
. .007 1-24 7-31 


PW men Opptyfd 
Puael Sound Pwr 


- J173 1-24 1-31 

-.3543 1-17 2-15 


STOCK SPLIT 
Horizon Mental 3 lor 2 spot, 
division Techs 2 fori spOL 


Adobe Systems 
Alamo Group 
AD AmsrTm 
American List 
BeauHccmt Cosm 
Ceded Fnd 
Insurd Muirilnm 
Invest GidMunln 
Monacal HI Yld 


Mediants Rncp 
New HampHirfl 


STOCK 

- 5% 1-ao 2-3 


NewHampTT 
Orford Indus 
Pacfll c 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Synngy Re9Tecti 1 tar Sreverse spffi. 


INCREASED 

O 35 
O JO 


TaroefTrai ... 

vayageurAZMiml m Jt64 
VbngaurGO Mud m 5612 
Voyageur FL Muni M J063 
VdngeurMNMu M 43775 


O J25 1-16 1-30 
O .10 1-16 2-3 

M JOSS 1-16 1-31 
O 30 1-30 2-6 

Q .105 1-15 2-3 

Q J» 1-2* 2-7 

M A64 1-16 141 
M JITS 1-16 1-31 
M.1Q5D 7-16 141 
O .14 1-17 1-31 
Q .125 1-18 1-27 
Q 2D 2-14 3-1 

<2 36 1-21 2-14 

O M 1-17 2-15 
M JJ718 1-16 141 
M -064 1-17 1-28 
M .0612 1-17 1-28 
M JD63 1-17 1-28 
M 4)775 1-17 1-28 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER] 

SBJnalM.- owns pwr n. 

Jon 97 6757 67 JS 8LO +042 3/32 

Morn 68.10 6757 67.92 >050 6JS1 

Apr 97 68.45 6755 6IAD +070 

May 97 6955 68J0 68.95 *m5 3 JW 

AUB97 71.00 7068 7097 -OJ7 WM 

Sap 97 7075 7055 7072 >842 382 

Est. soles 2.752 Tue'S. soles 3jm 
Tue’S opeiM IB-353 up 267 


Gepper Cathodes (HMi fewta) 

Spat 2381.00 ZSOJX 223530 224000 
Fdnwmt 2242.00 2243410 221300 221-4410 
Lead 


£*5Z WAS «JD4 93457 + 005 89^723 

gw gji nst +005 54331 

QK97 nm 92/4 9247 +006 <1659 

MhM 92J1 915* +0457 3&128 

JuiSS 9320 93-45 V2JS + 04)7 TXm 

Sg™ BA 92.40 92A2 + OOfi losses 


"W 6030 ux I ju -0» IS' 

MW/ L a8 fc rv" > 

GASOIL OPE} ' 

. *^l wni ^*>» ,, -totsofl00tolis 
Jan 97 230 JO 2Z7.50 2304S +DJ3 10908 
Ffei>97 22025 22375 22000 —025 2&I6A 
21 *-25 ^&75 fc*SS 


AWS7 20675 2SSS55 20675 —025 810. 
May97 199.00 iSsSs iwoo 3,175 

uSrn ’W 7751 


Spat 689-00 69000 68800 689410 

Forward *974X9 *984)0 693410 694J00 


Spat 70604)0 7065J0O 695000 695SJM 
Forworn 71654)0 7166410 7D384» 70404)0 


8S S5 S3 1S,470 

*WW 9238 92.2S 9236 4 Bju 7jru 

WL21 92.18 92.79 + 0 M 5,113 

las s-12 s-ii 

2 73M 92JE 924H + B4E lATI 


jSJL fi-T- NT.imsa=aS £« 

,J*-T. N.T. 189 JO — DL50 1 JITS' 


Rsaeur-r^sr 

VBEBSnsS mm 

Ham 9*|l out 9690 ♦ 


Spar 57754)0 578000 57054)0 STISjOO 

Fdiwocd 58364)0 3340JM 57704)0 577S4M 
Ztac (SpeOcd HM Orude) 

SpOt^lMT^ lSS 10664)0 10674X) 
Forward 10704)0 10714» 10684)0 106900 


H0eS44nn (CMER) 
4UMU.-ce%pirh 
Fetl97 Tt B5 7750 77.45 —140 

Apr 77 7740 7590 76.05 -062 

JlBl 97 802S 7092 79.15 -063 

JUI97 7750 7470 7442 -0J8 

Alto 97 7407 73.10 7357 -053 
0097 47.45 tUO 67 W -0.15 

Est. sales 9590 Tue'S. series SJUS 
Toe's open Ini 31406 off 62 


2°97 188.75 187J5 187-50 — n on gfl' 

Now 97 188-00 187.50 1074)0 Urtch. 270. 
safes 17JB3. Often laL: 71237 df 


2??2 * Ml 211852 
«A? msz 96JB7 +004 16US4 

SSS ♦M612MM 

9*5* 9449 94S +OWI2H4B* 


Hinh Low Qoso owe opw 
Financial 


ijjgS k« M 

S £3 :ss 

S s» ss :gs s 


as 2-5 2-19 
JO 1-20 1-27 


oMuaM} tMppmbniite enout par 
sriore/ADfc 9-PoPririe In CModmi fuads 
nuBoeltily; q-fetartartf; s seal ■ t w ool 


PQRKBBJJES (CMER) 

4,000 fes- eairispeefe. 

Feb 97 8140 7967 7953 —LOO 

Mor97 AMS ra.90 78.95 -Z4K 

Mover SILO 79 JO 7965 —IJO 

JUI97 80.00 7M0 7892 — I4H 

Aug 77 7608 74J0 7430 —032 

Esf.soies 2671 Tub's, sales Mffl 
Tub's open ini 7,194 up 267 


1ST. BILLS (CMSt) 

SI mBHan-ptsiif IODpcL 

Mar 97 9494 9491 9491 -001 4,926 

Jun97 9479 9476 9476 —ADI 2J21 

5® 97 9461 9455 945S -040 51 

EsT.jtfM *37 Tub’s scries 319 

Tire's open Inr 7J00 to 1 32 


o «* tos sg §ji :§s 

tfsms&w 

igsaanir" 

**52? SS 9139 9840 + 04)1 94196 

$*07 VUG 9302 9384 +0JO 5A04 

5*pj7 9405 9401 9404 r 004 3TJJ07 

4M4 2*5} 2 407 +a04 1WT6 

JW98 9482 9359 9401 +flfl4 L9U 


S YfL TREASURY (CBOrtl 
tlOOMprtv-MSlMigMHra 
M»W 106-12 106-02 106-09 - 01 160499 
Jun 97 1 05-295 10S-K i»-» - 01 3,134 

Est. sales 35500 Tito's, soles txjm 
Tue’S open Irt 164835 up 6832 


13931 V* 6% Wu — Vi, 

139 14 13«i m — % 

619 17 14% 16 -1% 

170 4% 4% 4% -% 

PID 16% 15% 14% »% 

107 18% 18% 18% • % 

m 34% 33% 34% -1% 

419 5% 5% 5% 

OTS Vi, % % -J.S, 

l«0 4% 4% 4% . % 

)2S 1% W M 1IV„ -J/u 

231 S% 5% 5% • % 

3162 15% 14% 15% r% 

%m 39% 77% ?T% — % 

162 BV, 7% « > V, 

204 13% 12% 17% 

2139 25% 34% 35 .% 

*% 34% 35 % *% 


Stock Tables Explained 


•WftiitmEi 

WireKiTs 


VVBORan 

WEOCern 

WBBJbnn 

WEB Me* n 

XCLLM 

XYlron 


157 

15S 

fc 

Vu 

7% 

A 

- 

■07 

!»> 

1ft 

IVi, 


340 


IV* 

I'ft 

— Vu 

Toi 

17% 

17% 

17fe 

— % 

1075 

17% 

17% 

17% 

1% 

05 

13 

12% 

IJ 

.% 

331 

6% 

5% 

sa 

—ft 

521 

11% 

10% 

u 

-ft 

719 

I4V V 

MV,, 

Wu 

_ 

99 

14% 

14% 

14% 

—ft 

IW 

1711 

lWi 

12%i. 

—hi 

149 

13 1 .", 

12% 

13% 

>% 

10394 

ft 

*u 

% 


194 

1J iN 

IVu 

l'/i, 

• ft, 


Safes flgura are unoffidaL Yearly highs and lows refloct the pnvtaos 52 weeks oMs Hie 
Cumntweek, but not 1I» latosl tnnUng day. Wherea splHor stock dividend amoiinrtnB lo 2S 

Oertenf or nwra fias Ik«t paid. I/W nwra Wgf+Jcw ronue and dividend ore shown farthe new 

stocks only. Unless otherwise noted, rata at dividends are annual dtsbummarts based an 
the latest Adoration. 

a - dividend also adra Is}. It - annual rate of dhriddnet plus stock dMcknt c - HUldatlng 
dMtfefHl. cc- PE exceeds 99dM -coifed. d-rwwywntytow.ild-kiKS In lt»lBstl 2 nio«i 1 }is. 
e - dividend Sectored or paU In preceding 12 months. I - ontiodl rate. Increased on last 
tectaWton. g - UhtUem) In ConotUon fend* svbiM to 1 5% nm-residenc* tanl-OJvkfend 
riodared aflw spBi-up or stock dtvktend. dhr ktend paW tab yeat) onrittwl detelTOd, or no 
acHon taken of latest dividend meeting, k - dividend dadoed or pod this wot, an 
aaunwkrttve Issue with dividends tn mean, a - annual rata, reduced on knd defloration. 
0 - new Issue In toe past 52 weeks. The high-tom raise begins wttti the start of Irading. 
M - fBXt 6m (teftwy. p ■ Wtlal dMdend. armud rate unknown. Ffl£. - price-aamrng* rafla. 
q-ctosed-ei>drmiiwa1 tend r-dhriaenddedared or paid In precedVifl 12 months, ptus stack 
dividend, s- stock SpIR-DMdem begins with date of spRLsb- sales, t- dMdend paid bl 

dock In preceding 12 mantis, estimated casti value on ex-dhridend or en-tfisMbulloidatB. 
u- new yearly high, i -iradlno haked.vl - In Banknuptcy arieczhnshlparbelns reopoted 
imdeaihe Bankruptcy Act or secu (flies assarned by such companies. xnt-wtcndCsfilbuted. 
■ri - when bawd/ ww - witb warnirm. * - ex-dividend or ex-fKjttts. xrib - ejMflstrlbutton, 
nr - without wununls. 9* ex-dividend and sales In full. yH- yield, z- safes EnfulL 


COCOA (MOB) 

10 mewe urns - 1 oar ton 


MOT 97 

1368 

13S5 

1357 

-13 

39 JM 

MOV 97 

1389 

1378 

USD 

—It 

I4J38 

M77 

1412 

1AM 

MOO 

—n 

(0J69 

S8>97 

1430 

1420 

iao 

-13 

7 M 

Dec 9/ 

1442 

ua 

W4Q 

-9 

3/09 


10 VR. TREASURY (CBOT) 
SI00JI0qp>to-PR832MSnl l DO pet 
M°rW 106-20 108-05 106-06 - 01 301,902 
Jun 97 107-31 lO-W 107-21 - 0! 11JT4 
SOP 97 H22-06 - 9) 180 

Est. series *U56 Tue's.soias 79.703 
Tub’s aoenW 3IA3M ua 3843 


Est scries: n33A Pm safes: S09B1 
Piev-oow HTny.iT* vTvscr 


Est. safes 8A5 Tue'S. siriw IJ12 
Tue'sopenM o/n a» ssi 


COFFEE C(NC$E) 

St3U »*.- 1*«* Per to- 
Ha 97 12135 11825 HIM -MS 21,559 

May 97 119 JM 1I8» 1IL60 -0 45 7.125 

All 97 11850 11450 11100 -815 UK) 

Sea 97 moa 112-50 11290 —860 1,749 

EsL sees 1W Tito’v scries R4S3 
Tile's open irt 34/19 ua 2193 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT} 

ni>cMioojao-cm&3»tasoi inoai 
Mar 97 111-12 110-18 110-0 - 05 4*0,114 

Jim 97)10-26 110-03 >10-06 - 06 1J,M5 

Sep 97 110-11 109-23 109-24 — M 5.237 

Dec 97 109-34 WMQ 109-10 — 04 170 

Est. sdss, 320X00 Tue'S. safes 342.03 
Turtopenht 265,171 uP «77 


I^ONTHPIBORfMATin 

IHn +OJ* 282S3 

OOC t7 tbhou mjU 96J5£[ -mum Torn* 

Morn 9841 9835 9840 KUO 

rS2 ^22 +807 5W70 

Dec 99 94J2 94/8 94.52 + 80 * 734 


Stock htdoxes 
S^^.WDBCtCMSl) 

7S1 JD 751*0 —4-85 H6JT7'' 
73>5. 76230 8714 

7asa — U0 L53S - 

aSLSr-iaDrjt" 

M tT th sts :js 

nw.aptnfet: 48708 up TJB7 
§^40 (MATTF) 

Jm, 07^*1?*^^ 23080 +800 2Ull’ 
‘MO WS 

“H -mo lisa 

22775 +Q-00 825- 

rnrs +800 <U7to, 

""" N-T. 33080 +800 ua 

L)o! SLV8lUm * : 1Mlao **n ll«--5L83»00: 




V 1 K. 


Spot Commodities 




tWUAR-WOMJJH (NCSE) 

1UJMae.-eertiwritL 

Mor9T 1897 1885 10J7 -8*9 783*5 

Mav 97 TUB 1093 W.« -8.11 33.123 

AH 97 1092 1885 18*7 -808 26,103 

Od 97 18*9 18*1 10*4 -807 15*00 

Est. safes 18552 Toe's, sates I&3M 

Tue'S 159J81 UP s« 


GERMAN COVBINMEIh’ BUND (UPfta 

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EUROPE 




•ivatize 
iAerospace Company 

erger 




— The French state- 
® wne<1 aerospace company. 
•* eros P5feBle, . will merge with 


... , — ■*«< end of 

"“spwng. and tire new group will 
become private “as soon as pos- 
sible, a Defense Ministry official 
said Wednesday. 

’ put everything together,” 
the official said, “at the end of the 
spring, the merger will be entirely 
complete.” 

“As for the privatization of the 
new group, the government warns it 
to be done in the immediate after- 
math and will ask the two company 


chairmen to dunk about h now and 
make proposals,” the official said. 

The Finance Ministry said Tues- 
day that Aerospatiale and Dassault, 
France's biggest ai rc ra ft maker, 
would be combined to form a com- 
pany with a single supervisory 
board and one set of executive di- 
rectors. It called the merger the first 
stage in the privatization of die new 
group brat did not give a timetable 
fortheoperafion. 


Fiance's i 


ft 


Arianespace Seeks 
More Partnerships 



OmvMb yOuSxtfftvmJiipucAa 

1 PARIS — Europe’s Arianespace 
said Wednesday it expected to re- 
main the world leader in commer- 
cial satellite launches, but it con- 
ceded it could not maintain more 
than a 50 percent market share and 
would seek mote partnerships, 
f. "We will remain the leader, bat 
riot all alone,*’ the group’s chief 
executive, Charles Bigot, said at a 
press conference to discuss the 
group’s future. “We will have to 
diversify and have international co- 
operation.” 

While Ariane launched a record 
15 satellites in 1996 and won a re- 
cord 19 new contracts, it faces an 
erosion of its former near monopoly. 
Burgeoning demand for new tele- 
communications and multimedia 
services has produced the need for 
more satellite launches, drawing 
new competitor into the market, 

r ilysts said. 

In addition, Ariane is in the pro- 
cess of shifting satellite customers 
from its very reliable Ariane 4 rock- 
et to its more powerful but largely 
untested Ariane 5 vehicle, the pro- 
totype for which blew up last June. 

• A source close to die company 
said he expected Arianespace to 
post 1996 net profit of about 150 
million francs ($28.4 million), com- 
pared with 190.7 million in 1995. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


commission to make valuations for 
die two companies and role on die 
merger terms. Paris must then ap- 
prove die merger, which would be 
carried out after it was approved by 

stock market autho ritie s. 

The government’s decision to 
wait. for. the privatization commis- 
sion's approval before setting final 
terms is a sign that Paris is treading 
carefully, analysts said. 

Last year, the government aban- 
doned its plan to sell Thomson SA to 
Lagardere Group after the privat- 
ization commission objected to die 
subsequent sale 'of the Thomson 
Multimedia unit to Daewoo Elec- 
tronics Co. of South Korea. The 
decision to freeze the sale prompted 
an official protest from me South 
Korean government and scorn in 
.financial and political circles. 

The group formed from die mer- 
ger of Default and Aerospatiale' 
would pool much of its research and 
purc hasing, and create centralized 
departments to oversee finance, in- 
dustrial strategy, quality, human re- 
sources, communications, and legal 
affairs, the Finance Ministry sard 

The group’s industrial operations 
would be focused on units handling 
combat and business jets, passenger 
aircraft, space, defense, helicopters, 
and maintenance, it said. 

The official at the Defense Min- 
istry said Dassault Systemes SA, 
which specializes m. computer-as- 
sisted design and manufacturing 
programs, would not be part of the 
merged group “because of the 
nature, of its business and its cli- 
ents.” Dassault owns 39 percent of 
Dassault Systemes. 

The official said a name for the 
new company had not been chosen. 

(Reuters. AFP) 


Lazard Chief Plans to Stay 

David- Weill Denies Talk of Succession Battle 


B toomberg B ucbiesf New 

PARIS — The chairman of haz- 
ard Rreres & Co., Michel David- 
WeiU, has said that he has no im- 
mediate plans to step down and 
that be has not appointed a suc- 
cessor. 

Mr. David- Weill's remarks, 
Wednesday in Les 
a business daily, and Le 
Figaro, a national newspaper, were 
ins first public comments mi re- 
ports that Lazand is in the throes of 
a succession battle. 

The reports said Edouard Stem, 
a Lazard partner and Mr. David- 
Weill’s son-in-law, no longer was 
fee heir apparent at the investment 
company. 

A Lazard representative in Paris 
said be had nothing to add to the 
interviews. A spokeswoman in 
London also would not comment. 

“Edouard Stem is an important 
partner of Lazard, in whom l place 
full trust and who I believe is set to 
become a distinguished invest- 
ment banker,” Mr. David-Weill 
said, according to the published 
interviews. 


Asked whether Mr. Stem would 
still be at Lazard in a year, he said, 
“I truly believe ft.” 

He denied that Mr. Stem was 
ever singled out as next in line for 
the top job. 

“There never was a successor,” 
be said. 

Mr, David-Weill also denied re- 
that he excluded Mr. Stem 
Lazaid’s mergers-and- acqui- 
sitions team. He said he hoped Mr. 
Stem would help develop a venture- 
capital divirion at Lazard becaure ft 
had fee resources to do so. 

A report released in Paris this 
week showed feat Goldman, Sachs 
& Co„ a U.S. securities firm, had 
dethroned Lazard as fee foremost 
broker of French mergers and ac- 
quisitions in 1996. 

_ Goldman was an adviser on nine 
deals worth 107.5 billion francs 
($2037 billion), compared with 
hazard's 30 transactions worth 
106.4 billion francs, according to a 
ranking published by Capital Fi- 
nance, a weekly magazine. 

Mr. David-Weill, 64, indicated 
that be was in no rush to step down. 


He said it would be * ‘mad” for him 
io appoint an heir apparent be- 
cause if the person fed not take 
over within two years, he or she 
would have no authority. 

He said he was “not sure'* of 
the form of management that 
would be best suited to Lazard in 
fee future. He did not rule out a 
“collegial” management struc- 
ture such as fee one in place at 
some U.S. investment houses. 

Le Figaro quoted Mr. David- 
Weill as saying feat Lazard gen- 
erated record commissions of 
slightly less than 1 billion francs 
on advisory services last year. 

“We even had a record year in 
terms of profits,” Mr. David- 
Weill said, without elaborating. 

Lazard’s chairman told Le Figaro 
feat, in fee past, Lazard’s dominant 
position in fee French mergers-and- 
acquisitioDS market was due to the 
fact that it was unrivaled; Com- 
peting investment banks were na- 
tionalized by the incoming Socialist 
government in 1981. 

“That situation was an abnor- 
mal (me,” he said. 


Deutsche Bank Restructures to Cut Costs 


Bloomberg Business News 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Bank AG said Wednesday it 
planned to divide its domestic retail 
business into four separate units in a 
bid to reduce costs further. 

Under the new structure, .there 
will be separate units for branch 


sales and customer service; new 
sales strategies and operations pro- 
cessing; marketing and product 
management, and private banking. 

The reorganization is expected to 
save Germany’s biggest bank “a 
few hundred million marks” over 
fee next few years, said Teseen von 


j Investor's Europe Ji 

Frankfort 

London 

Paris 

DAX . 

■ FTSE100 index CAC40 

250 - 

4100 - • 

*- 23S- - i r 

223 


UV-* 250 M 

2750 - -r/ 

— 3900 

2175- - ~ 

2550 

- - 3800 / 

2100 - / - — 

2550 W--- 

- 3700 — - 

■ ' Wia A 

: ® A"SO N D j ■ A S O N D J 1S ® A- S O N D J ' 

1996 

1997 1996 

1097 1996 1997 

Befeange 

Index 

Wednesday Pret* . % 


Close Close Change 

Amsterdam 

EOE 

B5&34 64829 46-62 

Branals 

Ba.-ao 

1,904^2 1,891 .94 +0.68 

Frartcftot 

DAX 

2^0634 2^86.13 +0.70 

Copatfeagen 

^ockMaak^ 

486.65 48306 +0.74 

Heisanld 

HEXGmiertf 

2,616u71 2,54a68 *2J8T 

Osto 

OBX 

559S6 SK53. +1^4 

London 

FTSE1O0 

4fi87jS0 4,078.80 +021 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

■ 453L93 -447,57 +1*42 

MBen 

MOTEL 

1QJ3QJ30 10392.00+1^0 

Pad* 

CAC40 

2,331.62 2,301.63 +T.30 

Stockholm 

sxts 

238299 2^20 35 *ZA7 

Vienna 

ATX 

.1.137J2S 1.137.09 +a02 

Zurich 

SPI 

2^27.06 2^10.80 +0.65 

Source: Tetefcurs 


lMmHmiuJ Herald Tritreae 

Very briefly: 



Heydebreck. a Deutsche Bank man- 
agement board member. 

Deutsche Bank announced in July 
a reorganization of its global busi- 
nesses into four divisions. 

Deutsche shares rose Wednesday 
in Frankfurt by 1.90 Deutsche marks 
($132) to 73.95 DM. 


Citing Fraud, AOL Halts Russian Service 


CmeOelbyOwSxfFtom Oapac ha 

Wife its service costing an extra 
$34 an hour in Russia. America On- 
line Joe. became suspicious when ft 
noticed a surge in calls among sub- 
scriber. 

“When you start seeing people 
on-line for hours at a time, you begin 
to think ‘How can people afford 
this?’ ” an America Online spokes- 
woman said. 

The answer was, they could not. 


hi feet, AOL found so much fraud 
involving stolen credit-card num- 
bers, stolen account passwords and 
other fraudulent means to get free 
Internet access that on Dec. 14 it cut 
all direct service in Rusria. 

About 2,000 customers who 
travel or live in Russia have been 
affected by fee shutdown, AOL 
said. AOL access lines let customers 
connect to the service in about 40 
Russian cities, although the com- 


y does not market its service in 


The on-line service canceled 
some of the accounts it determined 
were being used fraudulently and is 
still investigating other accounts. 
AOL said it did not know when it 
would begin offering the Russian 
service again. 

AOL is the largest U.S. on-line 
service, wife about 7 million sub- 
scribers. (AP, Bloomberg } 


• Argentaria SA, a Spanish banking concern, raised its stake 
in Telefonica de Espana SA to 531 percent from 2.12 
percent, in an operation valued at 63.4 billion pesetas ($482.4 
million). The purchase comes only weeks before the tele- 
communication group is fully privatized and Argentaria said it 
did not rule out further purchases. 

• The French state will take responsibility for 134.2 billion 
francs ($25.43 billion) of delft relating to the infrastructures of 
fee national railway system, Soriete Nationale des Chemins 
de Fer Francois, as part of the reform of the SNCF. a source 
close to talks on the reform plan said. 

• Fidelity Brokerage Services, a European brokerage arm of 
FMR Corp.’s Fidelity Investments, said about 1 ,000 clients 
have complained about mistakes in its new computer system; 
they could be eligible for compensation. 

• Germany had stronger-rhan -expected demand for its new 
10-year bond, as fee Bundesbank sold 6.86 billion Deutsche 
marks ($439 billion) of the bond in its second tranche, 
satisfying less than a third of bids in its new year sale. Analysts 
said the strong sales highlighted expectations feat German 
inflation would remain low. 

• Ladbroke PLC’s Hilton International has agreed to buy a 
Spanish hotel company. Protnociones Eurobiiilding SA, for 
between 6' billion and 7 billion pesetas, the Spanish Se- 
curities Exchange Commission said. 

• Banca Antoniana Popolare Veneta SpA is in talks to 
acquire Inter banca SpA and as many as 75 branch offices 
from Banca di Roma SpA, Italy’s second largest commercial 
bank, fee two banks said. 

• Volkswagen AG will assemble up to 6.000 small-cylinder 
Polo cars at its Ptiznan factory in Poland during 1997. 

• Italian consumer prices rose by 3.9 percent in 1996. down 
from an increase of 5.4 percent in 1995, according to fee 

national Statistical institute. Reuters. AFP. A FX. Bloomberg 


■-K 


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The Trib Index 



doting prices. 

.ten. i. rase? * r«i 

level 

Change 

% change 

year to daw 
St change 
+ 13.29 

World Index 

143.40 

- 0.41 

-027 

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121.30 

• 1-35 

- 1.10 

- 9.65 

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- 1.17 

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+ 28.37 

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fanduetrUi tndexaa 

122.15 

+ 1.99 

+ 1.66 

+ 37.19 

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- 0.85 

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• 0.69 

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+ 17.14 

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- 0.15 

- 0.09 

+ 28.67 

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114.77 

- 0.59 

- 0.51 

- 0.79 

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162.64 

+ 0.61 

+ 0.39 

+ 19.76 

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175.69 

- 0.29 

- 0.16 

+ 23.90 

Service 

137.79 

+ 0.26 

+ 0.19 

+ 14.82 

UbUtias 

1 * 2-76 

+ 0.09 

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•> ^ ^Sr . : :■' •“ * - • 




N 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 


PAGE 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


NTT Phone Service 
Plans to Go Global 
For Business Clients 


TOKYO — Nippon Tele- 
£*?{* & Telephone Corp. 
saio Wednesday that it hoped 
■to start providing tnternatioo- 
■al telephone services to mul- 
.ttnafional companies in 
"Trope, the United States and 
■Asia by the end of this year. 

It wUl be the first step in tibe 
co mpany 's plan to enter the 
international telecomm unica- 
Jions market 

.. Using the company’s pro- 
posed service, muhroatir»nal 
fongiomerates will be able to' 
:?end voice and t brt» 

along international phone lines 

to group corapanieein Europe, 
the United States and Asia. 

NTT’s president, Junichiro 
Miyazu, said at a news con- 
ference that the company 
would apply for commuxricfe- 
lions business licenses in Bri- 
tsk tain, Germany and France. 

: The company added that it 
hoped to apply soon for snn- ■ 
liar licenses in the United 
States and Asia. 

' Under a service to be called 
NTT Global Service, die com- 
pany will not directly handle 
communications between Jar 
pan and the other countries. 

; Mr. Miyazu said NTT 
hoped to offer such services 
■from Japan as soon as a law 
on breaking up die company 


passes ParUamenL 
. The law will be discussed 
m the parliamentary session 
that starts later this month. 

„ Mr. Miyazu added that al- 
liances, investments in and 
Mergers with internati onal 
telecommunications operators 
were possible as NTT devel- 
ops its international services. 

The company will lease 
lines from outer companies to 
provide service in the initial 
stages, but said it could lay its 
own lines in due course. 

A spokesman said NTT 
would also help Japanese 
multinationals in the 
regions to construct in-house 
computer networks. 

The spokesman said profits 
would be small at first He did 
not give specific estimates for 
sales or investment 

NTT has long sought to 
break into the lucrative in- 
ternational market but its 
entry has been delayed by 
wrangling between managers 
and the government over 
whether the giant company, 
should be broken up. 

Under a compromise deal 
announced early last month, a 
set of companies will operate 
under a holding company. 
One company will be allowed 
to offer international ser- 
vices. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


& 


DAIWA JAPAN FUND 

StCAY 

2, boulevard Royal, Luxembourg 

R.C. LUXEMBOURG B-Z3761 


Notice n hereby given that an 

of share holders of DAIWA JAPAN FUND (the “Fund r ') will be 
held at Basque Internationale a Luxembourg 69 route 
d’Each, on January ] 7lh, 1997 at 2 pjn- with the following 
agenda; 

1. to resolve on the liquidation of the Fund. 

2. to appoint a liquidator 

The quorum required fmr the meeting is of 50% of the shares 
outstanding ana the passing of resolution Nr. I requires the 
consent oC2/3 of the mares represented at the meeting. 

It the quorum is not readied, a Second meeting will be held on 
February 20th 1997 at the same place at 2 pum. Wot resolve on 
(he same agenda. 

At such .reconvened. meeting, there shall.be.no quorum 
requirements. ■ 

Holden of bearer shares who wadi to attend the meeting or 
vote at the meeting Tiy proxy, should deposit their snare 
certificates with Banque Inte rna tionale i Luxembourg SA, 69, 
route d’fisch. L-1470 Luxembourg, prior to January I Oth, 
1996. 

The Board of Directors- 


South Korea Awaits Its ‘Big Bang’ 

President Forms Panel to Reform Financial Sector 


Cc^rMkrOwSKfiFnimDbp^eSa 

SEOUL — President Kim Young Sam's determination 
to lead a so-called financial “Big Bang*' may spur wel- 
come mergers among banks and other financial companies, 
analyses said Wednesday. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Kim said he would soon form a pnas- 
atentMcammitiBe“tt) reform tire financial sector to cope with 
world trends” and to “revive the vitality of companies.” 

The anzxwncetnent lifted shares in banks and other 
financial institutions Wednesday as investors bet the com- 
mittee would give momentum to government plans to 
promote mergers among the institutions. 

The benchmark Korea Composite index rose 1.7 percent, 
to 621.41, its biggest gain in three weeks. The index for 23 
listed banks rose7.8 percent. 

“The fact that the Ministry of Finance and Economy will 
not lead the reform means that die changes would be 
sweeping,” said Yoo Yong Joo, analyst with Daewoo 
Economic Research Institute. “The committee will first try 
to lower interest tares and then restructure tire whole 
financial industry.** 

Mr. Yoo said strong measures would be taken xo lower 
interest rates, which are so high that it is difficult for Korean 
companies to compete in global markets. He added that 
financial companies would be forced to streamline their 
management to cut their lending rates. 

The benchmark: three-year corporate bond yield is about 
12-5 percent, nearly double its equivalent in the United 
States. According to a government estimate, high interest 
rates cost Korean companies 5.6 percent of their revenue in 
1995, compared with 1.7 percent in Taiwan and 1.6 percent 
in Japan in 1994. 

The Naeway Economic Daily said the committee would 
study the possibility of mergers and acquisitions among 
leasing companies, credit-card companies, merchant banks 


and other lending companies. 

Mr. Yoo said the government would promote mergers 
among commercial banks in a bid to make them more 
competitive. He said at least one major bank merger is 
expected this year. 

Also on Wednesday, the Bank of Korea said the net 
inflow of foreign funds to the South Korean stock market 
last year was $4.45 billion, up from 52.43 billion in 1995. 

Last year, S12.41 billion flowed into stocks from over- 
seas, while outflows totaled $7.96 billion, the central bank 
said. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 

■ Lack of Confidence Pummels Japanese Stocks 

Japanese stocks fell sharply, reflecting the market's deep- 
ening despondency over the government's efforts to revive 
the flagging economy, news agencies reported from Tokyo. 

The Nikkei Stock Average of 225 leading shares fell 
215.81 points, or 1.1 percent, to close at 18,680.38. 

Banks, securities firms and construction companies, 
which are suffering from problems linked to bad loans, led 
the decline. 

Stocks have begun the new year by dropping almost 3.3 
percent (his week. And some investors said the market 
could slip even further. Investors are waiting for the econ- 
omy to shows signs of picking up or for the government to 
intervene with a stimulation measure, such as a tax cut or 
increased public speoding. 

“There are going to be some real problems if the Nikkei 
falls back to 16.000,” said Shigemi Nonaka. general man- 
ager at Sakura Asset Management Co. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mhsuzuku acknowledged that 
a tack of confidence in the economy was driving the Nikkei 
index down. “The fact that stock prices are continuing to 
fall means we must keep careful watch,” Mr. Mitsuzuka 
said. t Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


Investor’s Asia 


HongKong 

Hang Seng 

15030 

HMD - 

13003- - 

12000- ~t 

\m 
10000 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 




A S ON D J 
1996 1987 

index 


^■a'S'ONFj 


1996 


Exchange. 


16500 A SONDT 
1996 1997 

Change] 


1997 

Wednesday Prev. 
dose dose 


Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

13,45433 13.420.16 +0^6 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2£4&2B 

2.246^9 

-p.15 

Sydney 

ABOidtaaries 

2,41 SiM) 

2,400.70 

+o.eo 

Tokyo 

i«£kkei 225 

18,680.38 18,896.19 

-1.14 

i Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1^33.54 

1,23750 

+0.16 

Bangkok 

SET 

83153 

■820.11 

+1.44 

Seoul 

Con^jo&fte Index 

62141 

611.05 

+1.70 

Taipei 

Stock Market Index 7,019.43 

6,875.02 

+2.10 

Manite 

PSE 

3^06^9 

3,195.47 

+0-36 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

662J21 

66037 

+ai?8 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 

2,399.31 

2,408.28 

-0^7 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

8,28888 

3264.12 

+0.78 

Source: Tetekurs 


Imcrruiuuul Herald TnbtrfK 

Very briefly: 


Car-Export Boom Leaves Japan Short of Ships 


Bloomberg Business Mew 

TOKYO — Tbe good news for Jap- 
anese shippin gcompanies: Auto exports 
are surging. The bad news: Shippers 
have cut back their fleets, leaving them 
short of boats to take advantage of an 
unexpected boom. 

The shortage is so bad that Japanese 
sea cargo earners are resorting to modi- 
fying cold-storage ships, which nor- 
mally cany fruits and vegetables, so they 
can ferry more cars. 

“We can’t keep up with die demand 
from automakers.’’ said Hideaki 
Uemarsu, spokesman for the Japanese 
Sbipcr.vner’s Association, a trade group. 

Rising auto shipments could increase 
profits at major shippers, such as Kawa- 


saki Risen Kaisha Ltd. Mitsui OSK 
Lines Ltd. and Nippon Yusen Kabushiki 
Kaisha, the industry leader. 

Auto shipments make up only about a 
tenth of total revenue at Japan 's big three 
shipping companies, yet they account for 
between 20 and 50 percent of the profits 
from their core business, analysts say. 

While the increased orders are wel- 
comed by Japan's shippers, die surge 
evokes memories of the boom days be- 
fore Japanese manufactures relocated 
major production facilities overseas. 
After having scrapped surplus ships, 
cargo carriers now find themselves 
scr ambling to keep up with orders. 

“We're doing what we can, but the 
lack of capacity is pretty severe,” said 


Masahiro Takaya, assistant manager of 
Mitsui OSK's auto-ship mem section. 

Buoyed by the dollar's renewed vigor, 
auto exports from Japan reversed a 17- 
mamh fall in June. Since then they have 
risen every month- They gained 14 percent 
on die year in November, the most recent 
month for which data are available. 

But rising exports caught shippers by 
surprise. In recent years, a weak dollar 
had eroded the yen value of sales made 
abroad and increased pressure on Jap- 
anese manufactures to raise prices over- 
seas. They curtailed exports in favor of 
local production in the United Stales and 
elsewhere. Vehicle exports dropped 15 
percent in 1995, and continued falling 
through the first half of 1996. 


• Reuters Holdings PLC. a leading global distributor of 
financial information, has paid 44S million Thai baht (SI 7.4 
million) in cash for 49 percent of Bisnews Information 
Services Ltd- an on-line provider that sells real-time data and 
news to 7,600 customers in the Thai financial industry. 

• Thailand's central bank plans to sell 50 percent of its 65 
percent stake in the troubled Bangkok Bank of Commerce as 
part of a rehabilitation plan to be announced in March. 

• The Philippines plans to finish selling off government 
assets this year, including Manila’s water system, a copper 
smelting plant and a phosphate processing facility. 

• Malaysian stocks rose to a three-year high Wednesday, 
closing ’2.04 points higher at 1 ,239.54, as investors bet Tenaga 
National Bhd. would receive approval to raise electric rates. 

•Jade Technologies Singapore Ltd., a maker of semi- 
conductor components, is raising funds in Singapore in am 
initial public offering to expand its production. 

• Enterprise Oil PLC has suspended its offshore drilling 
program in Cambodian waters alter “disappointing results” 
in the amount of petroleum found in three wells. 

• Asahi Breweries Ltd- a Japanese beer maker, said it 

expected robust growth in sales to continue in 1997, while its 
two chief rivals. Kirin Brewery Co. and Sapporo Breweries 
Ltd- said they foresaw only a dribble of growth after a flat 
1996. Bloomberg. Af. AFP, AFX 


FAT: Finland’s Cholesterol-Reducing Margarine Begins to Spread 


Continued from Page 11 

Mr. von HeJlens said, “two of my sandwiches or four of my 
wife’s” contain the required 25 grains a day. 

la Sweden, where Raisio snapped up' the margarine maker 
Carishamn Mejeri AB in October, it will cake the same ap- 
px»xb,ranmgomitscholesUTOl-cutlmgsi»eadinthesuiinner, 

Further afield, though, the name Benecol will most likely take 
other forms. To be effective in cutting cholesterol, the active 
ingredient must be part of somethingconsumed daily. 

One of the biggest surprises for Raisio has been the high 
value Finns have placed on reducing cholesteroL Five years 


after research into a fiat-soluble form of sterol began, Raisio 
bad a product it was ready to field test — not for its market 
appeal but for its effectiveness in cutting cholesterol. 

'‘Our competitors saw what we were doing in the field but 
thought we would never roll it out as a commercial product,” 
said Ingmar Wester, a 37-year-old Raisio scientist who in- 
vented Benecol, “No one ever thought that consumers would 
be willing to pay the far higher price.” 

Encouraged by a report published a year ago in the New 
England Journal of Medicine thai concluded Benecol was 
effective in lowering cholesterol, Finns quickly shrugged off 
the cost question. 


Thailand to Privatize 

Cungulrrf bf C>w SvffFmm DapaJtn 

BANGKOK — Thailand will privatize new major 
infrastructure projects as its economy liberalizes and 
expands, Suwat liptapallop, the minister of transport and 
communications, said Wednesday. 

Mr. Suwat said that projects slated for privatization 
included interprovince bullet trains, highways, a second 
national airline, a new Bangkok airport and telephones. 

The minister said his ministry would soon invite private 
bids for a license to operate a second Thai national airline. He 
added that the government would seek private participation 
in building a second international airport in September. 

Meanwhile, Finance Minister Amnuay Virawan, said 
the government had received backing from the armed 
forces for its plan to cut state spending, despite heavy 
cutbacks on military spending. ( Reuters , AFP) 


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Kcralh^^Enbttne. 


PAGE 18 


World Roundup 



iif 




Jennifer Capriati hitting a fore* 
hand against Rene Simpson. 

Sampras Hits Form 

TENNIS Pete Sampras returned 
from a five-week break Wednesday 
and beat Michael Sdch 6-4, 7-5 in 
Melbourne in the Colonial Classic, 
an eight-player warm-up event for 
next week's Australian Open. 
Sampras won the Australian Open 
in 1994 but lost to Mark Phiiip- 
poussis in the third round last year. 

Sampras next faces Yevgeni 
Kafelnikov, who beat Jira Courier 7- 
6 ( 10-8 1, 6-4. Boris Becker won his 
first-round match 7-6 (7-3 ), 6- 1 over 
Andrei Medvedev and will play Mi- 
chael Chang, who fought back to 
beat Thomas Enqvisf 7-5. 6-4. (AP) 

• Jennifer Capriati reached the 
quarter-finals of the Sydney Inter- 
nationa]. a tournament she won 
four years ago at the age of 16, with 
a 6-2 6-3 victory Wednesday over 
Rene Simpson of Canada. 

Goran Ivanisevic, the top men's 
seed, lost die second set to love to 
Javier Sanchez before winning 6-4 
0-6 6-4. (Reiners) 

Eagles Win in Wales 

RUGBY UNION The United States 
warmed up for Saturday's 
against Wales with a 15-13 votary 
over a Pontypridd team playing one 
man short. Christian Martin, an Ar- 
gentine prop making his debut for 
die dub. was evicted from the 
match after 30 minutes for taking 
part in a brawl. (Reuters) 

Indians Pitcher Charged 

BASEBALL Jose Mesa. a Clev- 
eland Indians pitcher, and a friend. 
David Blanco, were charged Wed- 
nesday with gross sexual impos- 
ition. The police in the Cleveland 
suburb of Lakewood said two 26- 
year-old women reported that Mesa 
and Blanco fondled them in a motel 
room Dec. 22. Both men pleaded 
not guilty. 

They also face a charge of car- 
rying a concealed weapon after the 
arresting officers allegedly found a 
handgun in Mesa's vehicle. (AP) 

• The San Diego Padres signed 
pitcher Fernando Valenzuela to a 
new one-year contract. (Reuters) 

NFL Talks to Canadians 

FOOTBALL The NFL is discuss- 
ing plans to bankroll the struggling 
CFL as a player development 
league. The Toronto Star reported 
Wednesday. The newspaper, citing 
unidentified sources, said die NFL 
would provide some players to each 
team for the entire season. The NFL 
would pay those players' salaries 
and provide marketing money .(AP) 

Ross Visits Lions 


football Bobby Ross, the 
former San Diego Charger coach, 
met with the Detroit Lions to dis- 
cuss their coaching position. 

Ross met Saturday with die St 
Louis Rams. He also is expected to 
meet with the Atlanta Falcons.fAP) 

Schott To Sell Dealership 

BASEBALL Marge Schott, the 
owner of the Cincinnati Reds, says 
she is died of fighdngGeueral Mo- 
tors and will sell her Chevrolet-Qeo 
dealership alter being accused of 
faking car sales. She will keep her 
other dealership, Schott Buck. (API 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1991 

b 


Potential Bidders for the Dodgers Step Up to the Plate 


By Michael A. Hiltzik, 

Thomas S. Mulligan and Bob Nightengale 

, Los Angeles Times 

LOS ANGELES — As the smoke began to clear 
Tuesday from Peter O'Malley’s bombshell an- 
nouncement that his family planned to sell the Los 
Angeles Dodgers, the first potential bidders began 
to emerge for one of baseball’s premier franchises. 

Among those expressing concrete interest were 
Peter Ueberroth, the framer baseball commissioner, 
the celebrity lawyer Robert Shapiro, and Robert 
Daly, co-chairman of the music and film divisions of 
Time Warner. Each said he would consider mount- 
ing a bid as part of a syndicate of investors. 

Speculation in the sports and telecommunica- 
tions industries, however, focused on several en- 
tertainment companies that could incorporate own- 
ership of tbe Dodgers in their broadcasting, cable 
or production operations. Heading that list is Los 
Angeles-based Fox Television, a unit of Rupert 
Murdoch's News Corp. 

Observers say Murdoch is an exceptionally ag- 
gressive bidder for properties he wants. He would be 
well-positioned to profit from Dodger telecasts on 
his other communications holdings, which include 
satellite broadcasting systems around the world. 

tf buying the Dodgers '‘became part of the 
sports plan of Fox," Mr. Ueberroth said. "Rupert 
Murdoch would more titan likely be the successful 
bidder, in my view." 

Fox executives were unavailable for comment 


Other entertainment companies mentioned as 
possible bidders are Sony, MCA, Viacom, and 
ITT. Industry and corporate sources, however, 
played down the likelihood that any of those four 
companies might emerge as serious bidders. 

Sony has not yet fully resolved its problems at 
Columbia Pictures and other U.S. entertainment 
units. MCA's new chief, Edgar Bronfman Jr M is 
understood to oppose any investment in professional 
sports. Viacom is burdened by debt that might 
constrain its ability to make a bid for tbe Dodgers; 
indeed, the company recently sold its interest in the 
New York Knicks basketball team and the New 
York Rangers Hockey team to ITT. Sources at ITT. 
meanwhile, say the company is not interested in 
making a Dodgers bid. 

Industry observers say the Dodgers' high value as 
a prestige franchise, as well as the team’s extensive 
real estate holdings in Los Angeles, Vero Beach, 
Florida, and the Dominican Republic, could drive 
tbe sale price to about $300 milli on. That would be 
a record for a major league baseball team. 

That price would put a purchase well out of the 
range of any but the most well-heeled private 
investors or corporations that might exploit tbe 
team in ways that extend beyond the confines of 
Dodger Stadium. 

Individuals or syndicates of private investors 
without related interests would be hard-pressed to 
rationalize paying a high price, according to several 
analysts. 

"Our analysis would tell us this franchise will be 


sold for a record price," said Ueberroth, who said 
he would consider malting a bid even though the 
team “has a marquee value that would probably 
eliminate us because we are economic buyers." 

Daly agreed that private investors faced a high 
economic hurdle. "As individuals, the only way to 
do it is if you really have the passion. In cold dollars 
and sense terms, you probably can't get the re- 
turn.” 

Since the news came out that the Dodgers were 
for sale, Daly said he had received several calls 
from wealthy friends who have offered to join him 
in an investment group if he decided to go ahead. 

Some observers say the high-end estimates of 
the Dodgers’ value depend on questionable as- 
sumptions about tbe value of the 300-acre Chavez 
Ravine plot on which Dodger Stadium sits. 

The land, close to downtown Los Angeles, 
would have huge value if it could be developed 
commercially, but some local real-estate analysts 
doubt that tbe land can be fully exploited. 

"When they talked about putting an NFL sta- 
dium there, the local neighborhood was up in arms, 
saying there was already too much congestion," 
said Richard Hummer of Cushman & Wakefield, a 
Los Angeles real estate concern. Even assuming 
that the city would allow the site to be developed 
for something other than a ballpark, the cost of 
traffic measures sucb as widening roads would eat 
up most of the profits, Plummer said. 

Nevertheless, the allure of the Dodgers name is 
hard to nTvL»»»gtTfnai« "It’s the most valuable 


baseball franchise there is/’ ^ 

' aiiontey.“It T saveiy,veiyim««“Jg°g^™2; 

perhaps the last of the great opjwrtmnlies^!^ 

pirosaid he was disc^ingfc»^g^^^ 
group w ith several "individuals who can affOSQ 

executive at Walt 

ledged that his company might have been a biddM 
had it not bought a controlling interest m the 
Anaheim Angels this year. , .. -T 

“Hie dynamics of Anaheim work 
us," said Tony Tavares, president of Anaheim 
Sports, Disney’s sports franchise division, retWi 
ring to the clustering of the Angek Anatetm 
Stadium. Disneyland and the Pond, home or tne 
Mighty Ducks of the National Hockey League. 
“But you look at the Dodgers, who have been so 
successful and have a tradition of excellence, n s 
interesting." 

O’Malley said Tuesday that his phone was 
ringing off the hook all day, but thai h® bas yet to 
respond to any inquiries or proposals. We havener 
talked to anybody or listened to anybody yet. ' 

He did say that it is possible he would remain 
with the Dodgers in some capacity after die sale. Jk. 

"Anything's possible," be said. "It’s also pos- 
sible that the new owner would want me to stay 
here. If that happened, chances are I wouldn t turn 
them down." _ 

* Ttn not going to go into hiding or go to a ranch 
in Montana or anything,’’ he added. "If I could be 
of help, I would like to stay here." 


Parcells Jabs the Needle 
To Jump-Start Patriots 

Coach’s Target Is Star Runner, Martin, 
Whose Response Is Key to Playoff Hopes 


%■ * 

* 4 # j 


By Gerald Eskenazi 

New York Times Service 

Curtis Martin listens to what Bill Par- 
cells says and then wonders; What did 
he really mean by that? 

He is the latest recipient of a Parcells 
psych job. which is designed to produce 
a big game. And having succeeded last 
week. Parcells and his running backs 
coach. Maurice Carthon. will work on 
Martin again as the New England Pat- 
riots get set to face the Jacksonville 
Jaguars on Sunday for the American 
Conference championship. If they do a 
good job, if Martin produces, a drip to 
the Super Bowl will be all the more 
likely for New England. 

The reason is simple: Martin is a 
running back, and running the ball is 
what nearly every National Football 
League team wants to do in January 
games at cold-weather sites. Running is 
also what successful Parcells teams usu- 
ally do well. 

As the Patriots did last Sunday, when 
Martin had the second-longest touch- 
down run in playoff history — 78 yards 
— as part of a three-touchdown. 166- 
yard performance that helped demolish 
the Pittsburgh Steelers. 

“I took it to the house," Martin said 
proudly and with some relief. 

All last week. Martin had been hear- 
ing from Parcells and Carthon. who 
learned plenty under Parcells while 
serving as a blocking back with the New 
York Giants. What were they telling 
him? That Martin, who ran tor 1.487 
yards as a rookie last season, couldn’t 
"take it to the house." 

Thai be wasn't fast enough, that he 
wasn't making the cuts he should have 
to come up with the really big play. That 
he wasn't doing the old Martin stuff — 
especially in the last game of the regular 
season, when the Giants held him to 
nine yards on eight carries. 

"Take it to the house” was a way of 
saying that he would deliver. 

It mis become Martin’s favorite ex- 
pression now. 

What’s even more interesting is that 
Martin actually had a respectable sopho- 
more season as a pro. He had 14 rushing 
touchdowns this season, more titan any- 
one in pro football except for the Wash- 
ington Redskins' Tory Allen. He gen- 
erated 1,152 yards on tbe ground, not as 
much as last year but still impressive. 

But not good enough for Parcells. who 
advised Carthon to put on an old reel of 
film — last year's Patziou-Snelai game, 
in which Martin ran for 120 yards. 

"Where did that guy go?" Carthon 
said. 

With Parcells and Carthon leaning all 
over him, badgering, prodding, Martin 


had a nervous week of practice before tbe 
Steelers game. He was jumping too soon, 
he was going the wrong way. Somehow, 
by Sunday, though, he was focused. Par- 
cells 's needle had worked again. 

And if it's any solace to Martin. Par- 
cells, when coaching the Giants, even 
went after Lawrence Taylor. 

One day at Giants practice. Parcells 
said to Taylor. “I’m going to change 
your name from L.T. From now an, it's 
going to be * What' s-the -matter- with- 

Taylor said: "What do you mean?” 

"Guys in the press have been saying, 
‘What’s the matter with L.T. lately?’ " 
Parcells said. 

Taylor got the message. 

"Think they'll be asking you, 
‘What’s the matter with L.T.\ any 
more?” Taylor asked Parcells after the 
next game. 

Interestingly, when Martin faced the 
Jaguars in Game 4 this season, he scored 
a touchdown, gained 95 yards on 24 
carries and caught a pair of passes for 14 
yards. Those are typical numbers for the 
5-foot-l 1-inch, 203-pounder from the 
University of Pittsburgh. 

He is a shifty runner who will benefit 
from the weekend's expected weather. 
It is supposed to snow in the Foxboro, 
Massachusetts, area on Friday, but clear 
up on Saturday and Sunday. Tbe field 
that was so muddy and chewed up for 
the Pats’ last regular-season game at 
home, against the Jets, that it was resod- 
ded and held up well against the Steel- 
ers. 

Martin's success against the Steelers 
also came despite the absence of full- 
back Sam Gash, who was injured 
against the Jets and has been unable to 
play since. Keith Byars is now the fall- 
back, and be is not as good a blocker as 
Gash. Still, Martin managed all those 
yards last Sunday. 

His style is to change stride when be 
sees a better opening. He is neither a 
classic slithery runner nor the straight- 
ahead type. But he is quick enough to 
change direction. 

Because Martin broke an ankle in his 
second game as a college senior and 
missed the rest of the season, he was 
passed over in the first two rounds of the 
1995 draft. But in his first cany as a pro 
he ran for 30 yards. By the time the 
season was over, he had topped 100 
yards nine times. 

Now, approaching his first champi- 
onship game, he actually enjoys watch- 
ing Parcells and Carthon — his friendly 
tormentors — smile when tilings go 
well. 

"It’s what makes roe feel good,” 
Martin said, "knowing it’s making 
them feel good." 



wBi 



hirCii^DnrnrfancMfVii 

Anfernee Hardaway of the Orlando Magic, left, fighting Derrick Coleman of Philadelphia for a loose balL -I 

Hardaway 9 s Return Lifts Orlando 


The Associated Press 

Anfernee Hardaway returned to the 
Orlando lineup. He didn’t have a great 
game, but he helped his struggling team 
win. 

Sidelined most of the season because 
of knee problems, Hardaway had 15 
points, seven assists and six turnovers as 
tbe Magic beat Philadelphia 109-88 
Tuesday night 

“I was never nervous, just anxious to 
get out there on the floor and run up and 
down." Hardaway said. "I wasn’t reaBy 

worried about my knee. It was just a 
matter of how I was going to play. I see I 
had six turnovers, so Fm a little rusty." 


Orlando got a boost from tne return of 
Horace Grant and Nick Anderson, who 
also had been sidelined with injuries. 
Grant scored 20 points and Anderson 
had 12 points, eight rebounds and five 
assists tor the Magic, who had lost 13 of 
their previous 16 games. 

P i c a n 95, Cavaliers 90 Rik Smits 
also made his return Tuesday night He 
was rusty in his season debut but the 7- 
foot-4 center helped the Pacers by just 
being on the court. Smits contributed 
two points and five rebounds as Indiana 
beat Cleveland. 


the return of 


Indiana straggled to a 14-16 record 
without Smits. 

Tbe Pacers won without Reggie 
Miller, who was sidelined by the flu. 
Dale Davis, who shot 9-for-9 from the 
field, led the team with 21 points. Travis 
Best scored 19 points and Jalen Rose, 
Miller's replacement, scored 16. 

Hawks ios»Smel os Hemy James hit a 
3-pointer with one second left in overtime 
to give Atlanta its 12th straight home vic- 
tory. Christian Laetmer scored 30 points 
far the Hawks, and Dikembe Mutombo 
had 22 points and 21 rebounds. 

CSppars 97, R a ptor a 80 Loy Vaught 
had 21 points and 14 rebounds as vis- 
iting Los Angeles rallied to win its 
fourth straight Damon Stondamire 
scored 25 points for Toronto, which has 
lost four in a row. 

Kntcfcs 102, lliw w ric l n 72 In New 
York, Dallas barely avoided its lowest 
print total ever. The Mavs were in 
danger of breaking their franchise low of 
68 before backup center Greg Dreiling 
scored five points in tire final 32 seconds. 
Patrick Ewing had 18 points, 10 re- 
bounds and seven blocks for New York, 
which played without ailing starters 
Chris Childs and Larry Johnson. 

Nets so. Spurs 74 In New Jersey, 
Jayson Williams had 19 points and 16 
rebounds in his return for New Jersey 
after missing 10 games with injuries. 


Williams, who was sidelined with 
torn ligaments in his right thumb and a 
strained right knee, helped tbe Nets snap 
a three-game losing streak. 

Bock* 86, puhoa* 79 Vin Baker bad 
25 points and 12 rebounds, and Mil- 
waukee held Detroit to 28 points in the 
second half to win at the Palace of 
Auburn Hills. The Bucks snapped.’ a 
five-game losing streak and ended De- 
troit’s four-game winning streak. 

Srawrtn n icv 94, Heat 85 Seattle's 
Gary Payton scored 30 points and San 
Perkins scored 13 in the fourth quarter, 
including focj-3 -pointers. Tim Hardaway 
scored 28 points for Miami, which lostfts 
second straight on a West Coast trip after 
winning 14 in a row on the road. •? 

Rockets 104, TMtnwkw 98 Clyde 

Drexler scored a season-high 37 points and 
Hakeem Olajuwon shook off a poor shoot- 
ing performance with 14 fourth-quarter 
points. Tbe Joss snapped Minnesota's. 
hog* winning streak at four gamas ait#, 
unproved Houston’s road record to 13-2, 
best in the Western Conference. - 

Nug^ete 109, Kings 96 LaPhotlSO fil- 
hs scored 13 of his career-high 33 points 
m the third quarter as Denver won at 
Sacramento. Ellis, whose previous high 
was 30 against San Antonio in the Nug- 
B&s game, connected on 14 of 21 
snots from the field as Denver snapped a 
four-game losing streak. 


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Penguins Come From Behind to Wallop the Islanders 


Kcfin LuUnSTbr taxsrtcd Ro, 


Paul Kruse of New York, left, guiding tbe puck toward the Penguins' goaL 


The Associated Press 

Jaromir Jagr, Ron Francis and Mario 
Lemieux combined for seven points as 
tbe Pittsburgh Penguins beat the New 
York Islanders 5-3. That line has com- 
bined for 71 goals and 102 assists this 
season. 

“When you have Superman, Batman 
and Robin, they’re going to get a few,” 
said Travis Green of the Islanders. 

Also worthy of mention was goal- 
tender Patrick Lalune, who made 49 
saves, including 19 in the first period 
Tuesday night, in bolding New York to 
a 1-0 lead. 

Lalime was a wall until tbe Penguins' 
big guns cut loose in the second period. 
He stopped every shot in the first period 
except for Bryan Berard's 40-foot slap 
shot at 8:30. 

New York took a 2-0 lead at 3:48 in 
the second period on Bryan SraolinsJri’s 
1 1th goal of the season. 

“I thought we were playing pretty 
good, bur then they got on a roll, and 


they just exploded,” Islanders forward 
Marty Mcbmis said. 

Jagr scored at 6:47, Francis tied it at 
12:47, and Kevin Hatcher made it 3-2 at 
14:20. Lemieux assisted on each. 

"It hardly seems fair, but that’s the 
way it is,” Islanders coach Mike Mil 

NHL ttQUHPUP 

buiy said. “It’s totally unpredictable, 
totally fascinating to watch at times and 
frustrating when you’re the opponent, 
because even though you play outstand- 
ing hockey against them, they find a 
way to score.” 

"That line makes coaching as useful 
as an EdseL” Mil bury said. "We have 
some pretty good talent, but that group 
has three of the finest players ever to 
lace them up.” 

Ftymtt 7, kim 3 Eric Undrew is also 
doing a pretty good Superman imper- 
sonation. He had a goal and two assists 

a gains t visiting Rnslon trt ftxtearri his ffenr- 


ing streak to 17 games, (me shy of Bobby 
Clarke’s Philadelphia team record. 

The Flyers are 14-0-3 during Lin- 
dros’s run, the longest unbeaten run 
since Pittsburgh was undefeated in 18 
games in 1993. ■ 

Undros has 12 goals and 16 assists in 
Philadelphia’s unbeaten run. which has 
taken the Flyers to the top of the NHL. 

Otters 5, Bkass 2 Doug Weight had 
two goals and an assist as Edmonton 
spoiled the coaching debut at Sl Louis 
of Joel Quenneviile. 

Edmonton’s fourth victory in a row 
snapped a four-game unbeaten streak 
far the Blues. 

Edmonton’s Andrei Kovalenko ad- 
ded a goal and an assist to run his 
scoring streak to 11 games, second be- 
hind Lmdros among active streaks. 

name* 4, Maple- Leafs 3 In Calgary, 
TbeoFIeiuy forced overtune with a goal 
31 seconds from the end of regulation, 
and Dave Gagner scored with a minute 
left in overtime. Steve Chiasson assisted 


on Henry s goal and then got an assist 

when his slap shot was 
deflected into the net by Gamer. 

C * nM **?? Ed Olczyk scored 




had two as Los Angeles ended a fair* 
game losing streak. 

hJ? I ^L Smy ®. and P™* 1 " Khrissfch 
, ap ' Ke - Kevin 
Stevens scored oniy the third goal in 14 

the . second-worst 

power-play inm as the Kings ended 

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SPORTS 



Raphael Dindli, a French sailor, waving beside Pete Goss of Britain, hisSawT” 

After Rescues, Australia Presses 
For More Safety in Yacht Races 


' • By Iao Thomsen 

■* iniernaHomd Herald Tribune 

The distress beacon of a 
missing British sailor went 
dead Wednesday as the Aus- 
tralian government, which has 
been searching for capsized 
yachts since Christmas^ 
pleaded with organizers to 



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2000 Olympics in Sydney. 

The Australian Air Force 
has helped rescue one sailor 
from the Vendee Globe, a 
single-handed, nonstop race 
around the world. A second 
sailor was waiting in an Aus- 
tralian life raft to be picked up 
-by helicopter Thursday, fierce 
norms in (he Antarctic Ocean 
permitting. 

. The prospects for a third 
sailor, T ony BuUimore erf Bri- 
tain, diminished when no sign 
jpf him could be found near his 
capsized 18-meter (20-foot) 
yacht. Global Bride Chal- 
lenger, which was found 
about 2.600 kilometers ( 1 ,600 
miles) southwest of Australia. 
Before the beacon went quiet, 
Rescuers identified h as being 
Separated from the boat. 

“When it stopped, we 
thought at first he wanted to 
send us a signal that he was 
still alive,’ ’ said Philippe Jean- 


tot, director of the four-month 
race that began in France in 
November. T *We have now 
heard nothing for 12 hours.” 
A technical failure of the 
beacon Was unlikely, be said. 
The best hope was (hat Bui- 
fimons, 56. an estperienced 
t rains- Atlantic - sailor, hod 
moved foe beacon to another 
of foe lull, which was 
the gi gnfll 

Four Orion military aircraft 
have been searching Australi- 
an waters this week for saftacs 
of foe Vendee (Babe. A 
Frenchman, Thierry Dubois, 
was seen waving as he pre- 
pared far a cold, stormy mgbt 
in a life raft dropped to him Iks 
than 80 (diameters from where 
B nffimar e w «nf missing 
Yet another French sailor 
was rescued by life raft just 10 
minutes before his boat sank. 
Dinelli, a 28-year- 
unofficial competitor in 
foe race, began sinking on 
Christmas Day. He stood in 
the cold water washing across 
foe foredeck for almost 30 
horns in a. driving wind and a 
three-meter swell. After 
climbing into foe life raft he 
was picked up by a fellow 
racer, Peter Goss of Britain, 
who said he nursedDinelli for 
three or four days. They sailed 


into Hobart on Wednesday. 

Australia estimated foe cost 
of Dindli's relatively quick 
rescue at $123 XXX). that fig- 
ore would he dwarfed by foe 
other two rescue missions, said 
foe acting defense minister, 
Bronwyn Bishop. The govern- 
ment said it would not seek 
fix’ the rescues, 
man would have 
died if we hadn’t gone and 
rescued him,” she mL “It's 
as Rimptf! as *hat- ” 

The Australian sports min- 
ister, Warwick Smith, has 
written to Guy Dmr, the 
French sports minister and 
yachting federations, asking 
that race organizers work to 
find safer routes and to min- 
imize hazards. 

“I love no doubts about 
Australia’s obligations under 
international conventions to 
rescue yachtsmen in diffi- 
culty,” Smith said, addingthat 
these rescues, along with a res- 
cue two years ago of another 
French sailor, Isabelle Autis- 
sier, cals into question the or- 
ganization of such events. 

“I would like to suggest 
that the y achtsm en be re- 
quired to take a more north- 
erly route.” It is longer, he 
said, but “the experts say it is 
also fer safer.” 


Keegan Quits Newcastle in Mid-Season 


By Rob Hughes 

truemettionat Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Kevin Keegan, one 
of foe most charismatic of soccer 
managers, resigned Wednesday from 
Newcastle United, the English Premi- 
er League dub he has served for five 
years. 

The break was as simple as it was 
dramatic. “U was my decision alone” 
Keegan said in a prepared statement. 
“I feel I have taken foe dub as fer as I 
can and that it would be in the best 
interest of all concerned if I resign 
now.” 

Even though Nigeria recently tried 
to tempt Keegan to coach its World 
Cup team, he has nowhere to go in foe 
game. Newcastle and foe surrounding 
towns, geographically isolated in the 
northeast of England, have long been 
one of Britain's strongest and most 
passionate soccer areas. 

Keegan has said that Newcastle 
was tire only dub font could have 
tempted him back to a sport he left for 
eight years after playing; and it was 
said on his behalf Wednesday that he 
had no wish to manage another dub. 

Time will be the judge of that 
many managers express such doubts 


in the emotion of separation. But by 
dusk yesterday, foe bookmakers had 
made Kenny Dalglish a short odds 
favorite to replace Keegan, with Jo- 
han Cruyff the second favorite. 

Dalglish replaced Keegan as a 
player at Liverpool in 1977 when 
Keegan, the Mighty Mouth, chose to 
leave for SV Hamburg. 

Dalglish later managed Liverpool 
to England's championship and quit 
abruptly, claiming stress. He repeated 
foe process at Blackburn Rovers, 
where he won foe Premier League 
championship and soon resigned. 

Dalglish, like Cruyff, is currently 
out of management, and both are part- 
ners in a new commercial venture 
being launched in Amsterdam later 
this month an indoor version of foe 
game “World Soccer Sixes.” But foe 
flame of competitive soccer manage- 
ment usually draws gifted men back. 

The budget at Newcastle United is 
immense. Keegan had bought 28 
players for $91 million and sold 29 for 
$30 million: a loss of $60 million on a 
total turnover of $122 million. 

Newcastle could absorb the loss 
because Keegan has reunited the club 
with success. He charmed tens of 
thousands of fens back, be lifted a 


failing club toward European prom- 
inence. But he had not yet won a 
trophy, the ultimate sin in modem 
times. 

Keegan had rescued the club from a 
lower division. This season it could 
still could win foe Premier League 
tide and should finish in the top six for 
the fourth year in a row .The last time 
that happened was 1907-1910. 

Keegan had responded to soccer's 
increasingly global talent market like 
an inquisitive boy in the roy shop. He 
bought mainly exotic, attacking play- 
ers. He believed in characters such as 
Colombia's Faustino AsprUla and 
France's David Ginola. Their flair is 
hypnotic, but while Keegan dared to 
put them together, he neglected to 
secure the defense behind them. 

It was this fault — a blindness to 
the pragmatic side of soccer — that 
eventually caused him to resign. 

Sport is now business, and it is no 
longer enough to entertain. The spon- 
sors, banks and directors are taking 
Newcastle toward a stock market flot- 
ation. It is not surprising that some of 
them feared Keegan was spending 
money impulsively without proving 
that be could deliver a trophy. 

On foe day Keegan departed. 


Richard Branson, the intrepid bal- 
loonist. came swiftly down to earth. 
The last British adventurers had 
fallen. For now ai least, 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 

■ Player Given Leave 

Dean Holds worth, a striker with 
Wimbledoo, one of the pacesetters in 
foe Premier League, will miss his 
team's next two matches after being 
given compassionate leave by man- 
ager Joe Kinnear, who has told him to 
“sort your life out.” 

Holds worth, 28, married with two 
young sons, has been at the center of a 
scandal involving a teenage soft-pom 
model. Another teenager has said she 
was involved with foe player. 

Ho ids worth was arrested at his 
home on Saturday for being “drunk 
and incapable." His wife, Samantha, 
was awarded a nonmolestation order 
against him on Tuesday. 

This followed tabloid stories that 
he had been having an affair with a 
porn model. Linsey Dawn McKenzie, 
and that they had had sex in his wife’s 
car. 

“Dean’s family is more important 
than foothall,” Kirinear saitl( Reuters) 


The Buggy Takes on Motor Racing’s Giants 



Pllndt BoMrax/Tk Aaoovlrd fte» 


French driver Jean-Louis Schlesser racing the buggy he 
built through Mali in the Dakar-Agades-Dakar Rally 


By Brad Spurgeon 

/mrmutianal Herald Tribune 

It may look like something 
out of Mad Max, but the Sch- 
lesser-SEAT Original X 462, 
otherwise known as “the 
buggy,” is beating every oth- 
er two-wheel drive and al- 
most every four-wheel drive 
in the 19th Dakar rally. 

Jean Louis Schlesser and 
his car stood 4th overall Wed- 
nesday after the 5th stage of 
foe 16-day race through Sen- 
egal, Mali, Niger and Maur- 
itania. He trailed by 15 
minutes 21 seconds, having 
lost about 15 minutes Tuesday 
because of a navigation error. 

ST the privately made car 
beats comped toes carrying fa- 
miliar Japanese brand names 
when foe rally ends next week, 
then Schlesser will take more 
pleasure In collecting the 
trophy for the top constructor 
than for first-place driver. 

It is the realization of a 
dream for Schlesser that began 


in 1991, when he derided to 
stop driving other people’s 
cars and build his own. 

Schlesser said he had ‘ 'won 
in just about every discipline 
except Formula One. * * 

He was World Sports Car 
Champion twice for Mer- 
cedes in 1989 and ’90, (beat- 
ing future Formula One stars 
Michael Schumacher, Heinz 
Harald Frentzen, and Karl 
Wendlinger driving in anoth- 
er Mercedes). He had been 
champion in french Formula 
3, ana is foe French and foe 
German prototype sports car 
series, and baa driven for 
Williams in Formula One. 

He stud that be felt he “no 
longer had anything to 
prove” so he decided to build 
a car for foe World Rallying 
Championship. 

“what interested me,” he 
said, “was to have another 
challenge. But I wanted 
something that would allow 
me to surpass myself in an- 
other domain. I said to myself 


that it would be a fun challenge 
to try to make a car." 

“When I went to meet spon- 
sors,” he said, “they would 
accept to see me because my 
name was well known. All the 
doors were open, but each 
time I asked for something, 
they would respond very po- 
litely, ‘Well, please under- 
stand, Jean-Louis. You're a 


driver. If you continue driv- 
ing, we'll continue sponsor- 
ing you. But to make cars? It's 
not the same job." 1 

He managed to put togeth- 
er enough of his own money 
to hire one mechanic in 1991 
and to make a single buggy. 

The car looks unusual be- 
cause it was designed for ral- 
lying while most of its com- 


petitors are adapted from 
production-line models. 

He started racing it in the 
World Rallying Champion- 
ship in 1992. That year he 
won two races. 

“So I added a second mech- 
anic," he said, “and now 
today there are 14 of us, and 
we have sponsors, and we've 
won foe World Cup four 
times: ‘93 to '96.” 

His factory is near Cannes. 
The engine is supplied by 
SEAT. His tires are B.F. 
Goodrich/Michelin. His 
chassis is molded in foe United 
States to his design. 

He entered two buggies in 
foe Dakar-Agades-Dakar 
rally, and is driving one with 
navigator Philippe Mormet. 
who is equally adept in a 
yacht, having set a record in 
solitary circumnavigation of 
the world 10 years ago. 

Schlesser, 48. said he drives 
“for the pure fun of it/Vhile 
dreaming of expanding his 
business. 






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Atlanta 29 22 18 22 14-185 


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19; A: Loeitoer 1 1-22 6^ 3(k Mutomtao 7-9 B- 
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105 

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MORTHEAST DIVISION 




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22 

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118 

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20 13 

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18 21 

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122 

141 

Chicago 

15 21 

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111 

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15 22 

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102 

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Pittsburgh 0 4 1—5 

N.Y. Warden 1 1 1—3 

FW Period: Now York, Berard 5. Second 
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Shots aa goal: P- 1-17-4—22. New York 20- 
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Sato. 

Basfoa 0 2 7—3 

Madetobta 4 0 3—7 

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goal: E- 1I-6-I0-Z7. SX- 7-12- 13—32. 
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Taranto 111 0—3 

Ccrigory 0 12 1-4 


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San Jose 0 0 1 o— 1 

Pirsl Period: Nona. Second Period: B- 
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5- f.-Frfesen H (lotrate. Noion) QserHme: 
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BEETLE BAILEY 



CALVIN AND HOBBES 



THE FAR SIDE DOONESBURY 




PAGE 20 


tV. ffJ-' 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1997 



ART BUCHWALD 

What an Honor 


The Griot of the Military, a Man of Many Names 


W ASHINGTON — The 
Queen’s Honors List 
just came out, and it's the 
envy of ail of us who cherish 
titles. Once you get knighted 
in England you are guaran- 
teed a table at any halfway 
decent restaur- 
ant in London 
and served a 
tray of hot tea 
and biscuits dur- 
ing intermission 
at the theater. 

I only men- 
tion this be- 
cause. while Buchwald 
the United 
States bestows more honors 
on its citizens, none has the 
class of the Queen of England 
tapping you on the shoulder 
with a sword. 

Rather than royal titles. 
America bestows honors such 
as “Man of the Year" on its 
citizens. A "Man of the 


Year” award is always given 
at a dinner costing $1,000 a 
plate. The only other reason 
for holding the dinner is to 
raise money for charity. 
“Woman of the Year” ban- 
quets are occasionally held, 
but they don't sell as many 
tables as men. 


Once the “Man of the 
Year” is selected and the 
committee decides that it can 


And the First Winner. . . 

The Associated Press 

BEVERLY HILLS. Cali- 
fornia — Imax Corp. won the 
year’s first Oscar for its de- 
velopment of large-format 
movies, as Academy Awards 
for scientific and technical 
achievement were announced. 
The tmax award and 12 other 
honors given by the motion 
picture academy recognize in- 
ventions of value to the movie 
industry. 


get enough people to turn out 
for the evening, the call is 
made to the lucky recipient, 
telling him that the country 
wishes to pay homage to his 
civic and charitable work. 

The one rub is if the person 
is not available that night he 
can’t be “Man of the Year.” 
Everyone knows that you 
can’t have a ‘‘Man of the 
Year' ' dinner without a 
“Man.” So the committee 
says that it’s sorry, but it will 
have to find another “Man of 
the Year” — one who will 
show up. 

The “Man of the Year" 
dinners are very touching. 

This is because the ” Man ’ ’ 
being honored is counted on 
to buy 1 0 tables for his family. 
The other tables are sold to 
people who do business with 
him and are afraid not to buy 
in case they lose the account. 


Once everything is in 
place, the special guests of 
honor march across the dais to 
their seats. This honor costs 
$25,000, which is cheap, be- 
cause the rest of the gathering 
gets to see you while you are 
eating. 

The ceremony finally be- 
gins. The honoree's golfing 
partner, his tax attorney and 
grandson speak glowingly 
about him. while at the other 
end of the ballroom the chair- 
man is counting the take. 

The “Man of the Year" 
gets up to thank everyone in 
the room, including his broth- 
er who couldn't be there be- 
cause he was at a Celtics 
game. 

That’s the difference be- 
tween how America rewards 
its citizens and how Queen 
Elizabeth rewards hers. Some 
Americans believe that Her 
Majesty does a much better 
job because when the British 
are knighted they never have 
to buy tables. 


By Ken Ringle 

Washington Post Service 

F AIRHOPE, Alabama — Asa Gulf Coast 
sunset gilds the waterscape behind him, 
W.EJ3. Griffin, the grizzled griot of the war- 
rior breed, sets down his glass of cabernet and 
begins expl ainin g how the Nazis smuggled 
their World War H loot into Argentina. 

With him on his cedar deck overlooking 
Mobile Bay are the military writers Alex 
Baldwin, Webb Beech and Walker E. Blake, 
the children's author Edmund O. Schole- 
fieid. the romance novelists Eden Hughes 
and Allison Mitchell, the satirist WJE. But- 
terworth. the crime novelists Jack Dugan and 
John Kevin Dugan, and the auto racing 
writer James McM. Douglas, as well as 
Blakely Sl James, whose name adorns 
“Christina’s Passion.” a work of lesbian 
pornography. 

Yet when they all rise to go in to dinner, 
only Bill Buttenvorrh leaves his chair. He's 
the whole battalion — a rapid-fire 67 -year- 
old writing machine so popular and prolific 
he long ago lost track of exactly how many 
books he has written. A partial accounting 
compiled by his secretary lists 135. 

In the past 15 years alone, as W.EJJ. 
Griffin, he’s authored four separate series of 
novels — “The Brotherhood of War,” “The 
Corps.” “Badge of Honor” and “Honor 
Bound” — a total of 24 generally well- 
reviewed books that have sold more than 23 
million copies, netting him by conservative 
estimate at least SI million a year. 

Why all the pseudonyms? 

“Writing for me is a business,” he growls, 
“I decided long ago that if a librarian has a 
limited amount of money to spend, she's not 
going to spend it all on one writer. The more 
names you have, die more shots you r books 
have at being purchased." 

But he has more or less settled in as 
W.E.B. Griffin these days, and one of the 
ground rules negotiated for his first inter- 
view ever specifies that he be called Griffin 
from here on out. 

“That's how people know ray books these 
days. That's how 1 want them to know 
me.” 

In an era of talk show flackery and media 
hype. Griffin won't do book tours and he 
won’t do TV. “I still don't understand the 
point of all this.” he says, eyeing the tape 
recorder nervously. "My life hasn’t been very 
interesting.'' 

But two cigars later he begins talking 


about his years in army counterintelligence 
in postwar Germany (“Henry Kissinger was 
in CIC there too, you know”). And about 
three never-accounted-for U-boats. And 
about what he's discovered in recent years 
about World War H German loot in Ar- 
gentina. “Basically, we know one U-boat 
got there in the last days of the war. one was 
sunk trying,” he says. "The third? We just 
don't know. You can get an awful lot of 
money on one submarine.” 

To vast numbers of military and former 
military readers, Griffin has become the 
troubadour of the American serviceman. It's 
not that his books are paeans to combat 
Though be does the occasional battle scene 
— and does it well — his books are really 
about tire military as an institution and how 
its rituals, traditions and bureaucracy mold 
the character of itspeople and vice versa. His 
army and Marine Corps bave more than their 
share of cowards, sycophants and fools. But 
ultimately, he suggests, the services have 
been redeemed and driven by a core warrior 
culture characterized by a flinty and some- 
times maverick integrity. Griffin constantly 
asks us with his writing to consider how and 
why that integrity takes form. 

"There's no question the books are about 
values, but basically I'm a storyteller,” Griffin 
says. "I Like to think I'm a competent crafts- 
man. as writers go, but I am wholly devoid of 
literary ambitions or illusions. Pm just telling 
stories.” 

Unlike Tom Clancy, whose technology is 
usually more human than his characters, 
Griffin writes of a world still shaped by 
individual personalities — personalities that 
grow and mature from book to book. In the 
“Brotherhood of War” series it’s the world 
of Craig Lowell, a spoiled blue blood who 
discovers a talent for leadership and in- 
novation in an army struggling to define its 
mission in the years after World War EL. 

In "The Corps.” it’s the world of Kenneth 
(Killer) McCoy, a wily Depression-era drop- 
out who joins the Marines as a meal ticket out 
of his coal mine town and finds an outlet for 
his street-smart skills in the war against the 
Japanese. In ‘ ‘ Honor Bound" it's the world of 
Cietus Frade, a Guadalcanal veteran whose 
secret mission to sabotage Nazi opportunists 
in Argentina becomes a simultaneous search 
for his Argentine father and a heritage he 
never knew. 

If the books are genre page-turners of his- 
tory. adventure and suspense, they often carry 
os well a poignant undercurrent of loneliness 






Kanin Shamb-BaJunbr T»faagft>n 

Author Butterworth, 135 books later. 

and vulnerability. Familial estrangement 
stalks almost all of Griffin's novels. Prot- 
agonists rich and poor find a home in the 
military, in part because they have no other. 

In a sense that's Griffin’s story, too. He 
grew up with his mother in South Orange, 
New Jersey, the product of a broken home. 
He describes his father as a "charming 
scoundrel” with enough family money to 
live well as a M anhattan playboy of the 
1930s and '40s. “going to nightclubs and 
playing golf for other people’s money.” 

Griffin hims elf 4 ‘got thrown out of seven of 
the country's best prep schools” and grew up 
as a bookish and rebellious loner who "never 
felt sony for myself but also never felt I 
belonged” either in die adult world or with 
youngsters his age. His parents sent him into 
the army in 1946 as an enlisted man, “ex- 
pecting that it would give me discipline and 1 
would hate it” Instead he found both an 
education and an institutional structure he 


could understand. He also apparently found, 
some father figures. ' 

“There used to be a certain percentage of 
die officer corps who were really inspiring L 
people.” he says. ‘‘Great intelligence. Great * 
character. Great morality. Grear principles. L 
think we're losing that now. . . . Like any. 
bureaucracy the armed services are gening— 
perverted, anti with this political correctness 
business they’re promoting the wrong people. 

But I knew some extraordinary people in the 
army, and they got a its out of me- 

He joined up m the immediate aftermath of 
World Warn, and was trained in counterespi- 
onage and sent to college in Germany to keep 
an eye on ex-Nazis and budding comm unists . 
After a few years he left die army and came 
home for "the worst year of my life" as a 
cai>»CTnan for Karo svrup and Argo starch in 
Philadelphia. Then be was recalled during the 
Korean War as an aide to several officers he’d 
known in Germany, working first in coven 
operations in Korea and later as a staff nonconi 
and then a civilian planner helping develop the 
concept of armed helicopters that would play 
such a significant role in the Vietnam War. 

In I9597he says, while a civilian employee 
of the army at Fret Rucker, Alabama, he wrote 
his first book. “Comfort Me With Love," in 
three weeks and sent it to a former prep school 
classmate then working in publishing. To his 
surprise it was immediately accepted as an 
original paperback novel. He got a check for 

"I thou ght this was pretty good. Here I was 
with a wife and a couple of kids, making 
53,600 a year from the army, and in three 
weeks I had increased my income by more 
than 25 percent. So I wrote another one and 
got another SlJOOO. and then another. And 
after the third one, my old classmate told me, 
'You need an agent.’ And he got me one. And 
my fee went from S 1 ,000 to $3,500. And all of 
a sadden I was making more from my writing 
than I was from the army.” 

By 1980, Griffin had written more than 
100 books ranging from 12 "M*A’ r S*H" 
sequels to “The Girl in the Black Bikini” 
(1963) to "Dave White and the Electric- 
Wonder Car” (1973). 

Griffin, however, says he’s slowing down. 
These days, he says, it takes him as much as 
six months to write a novel — almost twice 
the time it took just afew years ago. He tries 
to be philosophical about rhac "The thing » 
to get in the groove and keep going,” he says. 

“I write in long spurts. And 1 always know 
when to quit. I quit when I’m empty." 




' -- < f * i ' 




MOVIES 


PEOPLE 


Geoffrey Rush Basks in His Sudden Fame 


By Bnice Weber 

.VfM~ York runes Service 

N EW YORK — Looking over ihe 
shoulder of her companion at the 
bar. a woman on a tall stool smiled an “I 
know you” smile across the room. 

Geoffrey Rush, who had been sitting 
over a Scotch for more than an hour, 
smiled back, waggling his fingers in 

E leased if somewhat sheepish acknow- 
idgment 

“I just had a New York experience.’ ' 
he said. "I think I’ve been recognized.” 
He paused a moment. “This is nice.” 


It's likely to happen with greater fre- 

a uency as his sudden fame spreads, bl- 
eed. his performance, in the film 


"Shine,” as David Helfgott, the Aus- 
tralian concert pianist who emerged 
from more than a decade of mental ill- 
ness to reclaim his place in the musical 
world, has made hun a show business 
clich£: at 46, after 25 years of diligent 
work as a stage actor. Rush has become 



R. Jxn haKrt/Tbe V- VutfcTn 


Che proverbial overnight sensation. 

In the last month. Rush, whose lanky 
build, long, rubbery face and slightly 
off-kilter good looks recall the Amer- 
ican actor James Woods ("a cuddly 
James Woods,” Rush said), has col- 
lected a cache of splashy honors. He was 
named best actor of the year by the Los 
Angeles Film Critics and by die New 
York Film Critics Circle, and he was 
nominated by the Hollywood Foreign 
Press Association in the best dramatic 
actor category — along with Liam 
Neeson, Woody Harrelson, Mel Gibson 
and Ralph Fiennes, movie stars and mat- 
inee idols all — for a Golden Globe, an 
award that has become something of a 
harbinger of the Oscar in recent years. 

"How do you wrap your head around 
that one?" he said, aware of both his 
good fortune and its potential pitfalls. 
Talking at the Knickerbocker Bar and 
Grill in Greenwich Village, unrecog- 
nized (nearly) by a gregarious holiday 
crowd, he sounded weary, having flown 
22 hours from his home in Melbourne 
for interviews in New York. 

“Sometimes things get accolades as 
good acting because the acting is ob- 
vious,” he said. “We like to see the thrill 


Rush: "I’ve been recognized.” 

of the fireworks, and yet the perfor- 
mance may not resonate afterwards as 
meaningful human interaction.” 

He spoke with a hint of understanding 
that the wide appreciation of his work in 
the film has occurred in the broad con- 
text of pop culture. 

The penchant of reviewers has been to 
compare his performance, as the child- 
ishly effervescent, profoundly self-con- 
scious Helfgott, to those of Daniel Day- 
Lewis in "My Left Foot” and Dustin 
Hoffman in "Rain Man,” celebrated 
roles that also required the actors to 
adopt the pronounced physical idiosyn- 
crasies of the handicapped. Helfgott’s 
speech — rapid-fire, mumbling, foil of 
reminiscence and association between 
present and past — testifies to the linger- 
ing effects of his illness. 

“People have been asking me, ‘How 
did you learn to speak so fast?' ” Rush 
said. "To me that’s like being asked, 
‘How do you remember the tines?’ I 
guess it's the fascination of an outsider 
being in awe of what we do as actors. I'm 
in awe of airline pilots. I coufdn ’t land a 
jumbo. They do it every day of their 


lives. But what we do is fly through 
lines. Thai’s just the homework.” 

But the homework is not always a 
breeze. 

“I had confusing reports of his con- 
dition,” said Rush, who listened to tapes 
of Helfgott speaking to the film's di- 
rector. Scott Hicks, and met the pianist 
himself. "I heard, ‘It’s a complex dis- 
order, a form of psychosis, a shattered 
ego.’ " 

Eventually. Rush said, he drew on 
Helfgott’s own self-assessment 

"In these audio tapes he made when 
he was talking to Scott” Rush said, “he 
always referred to the event the af- 
fliction. as the period when he was dam- 
aged. Thai’s a great key.” Rush slipped 
into cheerful, rambling Helfgott-speak. 
“I was damaged then, wasn't L darting? 
Wasn't I damaged? Yes, I was.” 

Rush paused. "You can't play psy- 
chiatric conditions,” he said. 

"And any actor knows that when a 
director says, ’Be more angry.' you think 
that's meaningless. But to play a scene 
as if the character has some kind of 
mental fog that has descended and 
clouded his thinking, that gives you a 
range of things to work with. So you 
haven’t got to actually explore the psy- 
chiatry of the character to reveal it.” 

He is a child of the stage, not the 
screen, and with only a handful of films 
to h is credit before ‘ ‘Shine, ’ ’ he remains 
unaccustomed to film acting. 

"What you have to get used to on a 
film set is that it’s an industrial work 
site” in which much of what goes on is 
out of the actor's control, he said. 

On "Shine,” be said, "everyone was 
telling me: ‘You’ve got to pull it back, 
pull it back, the audience is only nine 
inches away. It’s in the eyes. Think the 
thoughtand it’ll be there.' And I thought, 
‘Well, I've got a problem here, because 
the character I'm playing is spilling out- 
wards all the time.’ ” 

The movie tells the dramatic, tri- 
umphant story of Helfgott’s descent into 
madness, the mysterious re-unveiling of 
his gift 13 years later and the salvation it 
has brought him. Now 49 and perform- 
ing regularly again, he will make a tour 
of the United States in March. 


T HE “Hollywood madam,” Heidi Fleiss, has been sen- 
tenced to 37 months in prison for cheating cm her taxes, 
laundering call-girl profits and conspiring to hide her crimes. 
Fleiss, 30. tearfully told the judge just hours before sentencing 
that she was remorseful. Fleiss will serve her sentence in a 
minimum-security facility in Pleasanton, California. The judge 
fined her 5400, pin her on three years probation, and ordered her 
to serve 300 hours of community service and attend a substance 


abuse program. "When you are released from custody, hope- 
fully you’ll do many of the things you’ve dreamed about,” 
Judge Consuelo Marshall told Fleiss. “I believe you’ll be a 


thing s 

ildFIei 


you've dreamed about,” 


positive role model for other young women just by the ex- 
periences you've had. "At her trial, models-turned-prostitutes 
had recounted being sent around the globe to service Fleiss 
clients, sometimes earning $10,000 for a single assignment. 


Scathing criticism by a Swedish journalist of Queen Mar- 
greihe’s smoking habits lit a storm of fury in Denmark with 
tabloid newspapers slamming Swedes for “double stan- 
dards’ ’ and ‘ ‘hypocrisy.” ' ‘Smoke War against die Swedes,’ ’ 
said the popular tabloid Ekstra Bladet across its front page, 
“Let the Queen Smoke in Peace” read the headline of an 
article inside the daily. “Keep up the puffing. Margrethe” was 
another newspaper headline. In the Gothenburg Post, the 
columnist Hagge Geigert attacked the chain-smoking Danish 
monarch for being “a living advertisement for cancer-in- 
ducing' ' tobacco and setting the public a bad example. "The 
Danish queen has her own special servant who follows her 
around with an ashtray,” Geigert wrote. "She smokes every- 
where even in care centers.” 


Investigators in Chicago looking into the hang ing death of 
the mystery writer Eugene Izzi, 43, have found an un- 
published novel bearing striking similarities to the author’s 
own final chapter. The manuscript is contained in three 
computer disks found in Izzi's pants pockets, the Chicago 
Tribune reported. His body was round Dec. 7, hanging from 
the 14tb floor window of his office. The manuscript tells of a 
Chicago mystery writer attacked in his downtown office by 
members of a secret Indiana militia who loop a noose around 
his neck, tie the rope to a metal desk and throw him from a 14th 
floor window, the Tribune said. In both fact and fiction, the 
victim was wearing a bulletproof vest, canted a set of brass 
knuckles and a disabling chemical spray, and had a .38-caliber 
revolver in his office. The police believe Izzi killed himself. 


The bluesman Frank (Sou) Seals is recovering from a 
gunshot wound to his jaw that the police say was inflicted by 
his wife during a domestic argument. 

□ 

A federal judge in New York has thrown out a jury verdict 
that held Elizabeth Taylor liable for more than $600,000 in 
damages to the actress Cicely Tyson in a contract dispute. 
Judge John Martin ruled that Taylor was not personally 
liable for any breach in the contract between Tyson and a 


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Queen Margrethe U of Denmark, in a typical pose. 

production company affiliated with Taylor that bad hired 
Tyson to act in a 1993 production of “The Com Is Green.” 
After critics panned the performance, Tyson was fired for 
taking a night off to attend a Washington tribute to her then- 
husband, MSes Davis. 


Frank Sinatra Is out of the hospital in Los Angeles after an 
overnight stay and is “fine,” according to a spokeswoman. . 

D 

Brown University’s president, Vartan Gregorian, has 
resigned to take die presidency of the Carnegie Corp. 

□ 

The Microsoft mogul Bill Gates has an unusual deal with hi?' 
wife, Melinda, He gets to spend one long weekend every spring 
with an old flame, Ann VVinblad, Time magay.irw* reports. 
Gates broke up with Winbiad in 1987, but they have remained 
friends. Gates says the two spend their weekend vishs at her 
North Carolina beach cottage walking along foe and 
playing mini-golf. 


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Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which makes 
calling home or to other countries really easy, just dial the 
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bill and may save you up to 60V So use A3BT Direct - * Service and 
you won’t need the luck of the Irish to get the fastest and clearest 
connections home. Check the list for AI&T Access Numbers. 


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2 . Dial [he phone numba you’re calling. 
3 - Dial the calling card Dumber lis&d 

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