Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


1 


The World’s Da ily Newspaper 


** ' 


Paris, Friday, January 10, 1997 



A Chilling Rescue 
Near Antarctica 

Australian Ship finds Yachtsmen 
Who Spent 5 Freezing Days Adrift 

Omt Stiff From Dbfqazta 

SYDNEY— An Australian navy frigate was heading home 
inursday with two round-the-world yachtsmen safely aboard 
after a double rescue in icy seas near Antarctica. 

Thierry Dubois was plucked from a life raft by helicopter at 
dawn, and horns later a British solo sailor, Tony Bullttnorc, 
swam into the anns'of rescuers from the frigate Adelaide after 
five days inside his upturned yacht 

It was a horrific, traumatic experience, very difficult,'’ ‘ 
said Mr. Builiroore, a 56-year old former Royal Marine. “It 
was a case of me continuously praying and hoping thgt there 
was something happening above the water. It was sheer 
determination, a little water, a little chocolate: banging on in- 
there and believing something would happen.*' 

But as the four-day search for Mr. Builimore and Mr. 

Dubois ended Thursday, another began. • • 

New Z ealand and French officials announced that another 
competitor, Gerry Roufs of Canada, was missing in high seas 
south of Easier Island in Chile’s search and rescue region. , 

Ships in the area have been told to watch for him. 

The Australian rescue operation, 2,600 kilometers (1,600 ‘ 

miles) offshore, began after the two competitors in the Vendee . . .- . *«**_ « 

Globe Challenge activated distress beacons as their boats were boi iwn* 

Tony Builimore smiling sifter his rescue Thursday by an Australian Navy frigate in the 
See RESCUE, Page 20 Antarctic Ocean. Earlier Thursday, the ship rescued another solo sailor, Thierry Dubois. 

Court May Balk at Legalizing Assisted Suicide 



By Joan Biskupic 

Washington Past Service 


WASHINGTON — . Taking on one of the most 
‘-^important constitutional questions of the decade, the 
"Supreme Court has expressed grave concents over the 
implications of declaring that dying patients have a 
right to a doctor’s help in committing suicide. 

During a solemn two-hour hearing Wednesday, the 
Justices pursued . not just legal : questions, but also* 
evolving societal attitudes, the rofe of modem medi- 
cine. their own personal experiences and moral con- 
siderations that thread through this emotional issue. In 
the end, it appeared a majority would not vote to 
enshrine a right to physician-assisted suicide. 

Hundreds of demonstrators gathered on the white 
trouble plaza outside die courthouse, many of them In 
wheelchairs and caoying.signs that read “Not Dead 


Yet,’ ’ the name of a rights group for the disabled that 
opposes doctor-assisted smcide. Inside, the justices 
took up a pair of cases that could ultimately alter the 
way the. legal system recognizes the right to die in 
America. 

Although the issue had been simmering for some 
time, it burst onto die national agenda when two 
appeals courts, one from each coast, upheld aright to 

Outside the court building, activists wrangle over 
the complexities of the case. Page 2. 

doctor-assisted suicide. Officials from the two states 
Involved in those rulings. New Yoric and Washington, 
have brought the cases to the Supreme Court, hoping 
for a ruling that would overturn the lower courts and 
. uphold a state's right to ban assisted suicide. 


In a time of advancing medicine and an aging 
population, the issue has captured the public's at- 
tention in a way that few legal questions do, dividing 
the medical community, legal scholars and the ter- 
minally ill, who appear to have most at stake. Scores of 
people, some of whom had camped out in frigid 
temperatures in hopes of claiming one of the 50 seals 
available to the public, were turned away before 
arguments began. 

“Most of us have parents or other loved ones and 
we've lived through a dying experience that forces us 
to think about these things," Justice Ruth Bader 
Ginsburg said at one point. 

The Supreme Court first addressed the question of a 
right to die in 1990, when in the case of a Missouri 
woman thrust into a vegetative state by a car accident. 

See COURT, Page 4 





Of Poor in 
The World 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York ThncrServicg ■ ■ 

THANE, India — Children like the 
Bhagwani boys scamper about barefoot 
on the narrow muddy paths that wind 
through the labyrinth of a slum here, 
squatting and relieving themselves as 
the need arises, as casual about the filth 
as the bedraggled rats That nose about in 
the raw sewage trickling beside -the 
paths. . .. 

Parents, like Usha Bhagwani, a rail- 

Second of two articles 

thin 2 8 -year-old housemaid, point out 
their children . and fret about how to 
spend their rupees. Should they buy 
good food so that the children will get 
stronger? Or should they buy shoes so 
that the children will not get hook- 
worms? Or should they send their sons 
and daughters to school? Or should they 
fbuy kerosene to boil the water? 

There is not enough money for all of 
those needs, so parents must choose. 



Vnh»4»U krwtJIV \#-h WV 


Cam bodian children fetching their drinking water from a creek that is also used by villagers for bathing. 


It was to save money, as .well as to 
save time, that Mrs. Bhagwani was 
serving unboiled water the other day to 
her 5- and 7 -year-old boys in bo 1 one- 
room hovel Her bony face and sharp 
eyes softened as she watched them take 
the white plastic cup and gulp the deadly 
drink. The water has already killed two 
of her children, a 15-montb-old, San- 


tosh.a boy who died two years ago, and 
Sheetal, a frail 7 -month-old gin who 
died just a few months ago. But every- 
one in the stran drinks the water, usually 
without boiling it, and water seems so 
natural and nurturing that Mrs. Bhag- 
wani does not understand the menace it 
contains. 

*T try to boil die water," she said 


pleasantly. “But the boys sometimes 
insist on drinking right away because 
they're thirsty." 

Then, she said, there is the cosL To 
boil water consistently would cost the 
equivalent of about 54 a month in ker- 
osene, almost a third of Mrs. Bhagwani 's 

See HEALTH. Page 12 


Now, Red Wine Touted as Cancer Foe 

Inhibitor Substance in Grape Skins Could Be Made Synthetically 


By Jane E. Brody 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — Grapes and red 
wine, already heralded for their poten- 
tial to prevent hefcit disease, may also 
harbor a potent cancer inhibitor, ^- 
cording to findings to be published Fri- 
day in the journal Science. 


Newsstand Prices 


Andora. 


Cameroon - 

Egypt. 

Raws — 
Gabon — 
Greece 


IOjOOFF 

,1250 

1.60GCFA 

££550 


hwy Coast 
Jordan — 


10J30 FF 

.1100 CFA 
„.„550Dr. 
1I 2 r 8C0Lire 
.1.250 CFA 
...1250 JD 


Lebanon LL3fl00| 

Morocco— IBDh 

Qatar 1050 Bab 

Rdunion 12.50 FF 

Sax* Arabia -10 .00 ft 

fiam wat-. . 1.10QCFA 

String — 225PTAS 
Tunisia—. ,—1-250 Din 

UAE, IOjOOOWi 

U.S.MMBJr^l20 




- 'Researchers at the University of 
Illinois have shown in preliminary lab- 
oratory mid animal studies that the sub- 
stance, resverarrol, prominent in the 
$irin of grapes, may interfere with the 
development of cancer on several 
levels: by blocking the action _ of car- 
cinogens, inhibiting, the initiation and 
promotion of tumors and causing 
precancerous cells to revest to normal. 

It is not yet known, however, whether 
eating- grapes or drinking red yrine 
would result in biologically useful 
levels of iesveratrol in a person’s blood, 

. Researchers have not demonstrated that 
iesveratrol, which is soluble in alcohol, 
not water, is absorbed by humans who 
consume it through foods or wine. 

Resverarrol, a relatively simple 
chemical substance that could easily be 
made synthetically to produce a sup- 
plement, was found in previous Jab- 
oratory studies to lower blood.levels of 
cholesterol, block the formation of the 
kind of cholesterol thar clogs arteries 
and reduce the tendency of the Wood to 
form clots. But its usefulness as a pro- 
tector of *e human heart has not yet 


been established. Although the skin of 
grapes is at present the leading known 
food source of iesveratrol, it is also 
found in peanuts and in lilies and in 
some traditional Oriental medicines 
made from roots. 

The Illinois researchers originally iso- 
lated iesveratrol from a crude extract of 
the roots of a Peruvian tree, one of thou- 
. sands OF plant extracts they are screening 
for cancer-fighting potential under a 
giant from die rational Cancer Insti- 
tute. 

Dr. John Pezzuto, who oversees the 
research at the imiversily’s College of 
Pharmacy, said that resveratrol is a 
chemical defense agent that the plant 
produces in response to environmental 
stress, especially fungal infections. 

According to cancer prevention spe- 
cialists. the finding that resveratrol may 
inhibit cancer development suggests yet 
another reason why eating lots of fruits 
and vegetables is associated with a re- 
duced risk erf cancer. Dr, Peter Gre- 
enwald, director of the division of can- 

See GRAPES, Page 12 


AGE WP A 

2 Bombs Wound 13 
Near Tel Aviv Hub 

Two bombs exploded in an area 
near Tel Aviv’s central bus station 
Thursday, wounding 13 people. 
The police said the bombs were 
placed in trash bins, and they 
blamed Arab guerrillas. 

The blasts occurred as Dennis 
Ross, the U.S. special envoy, was 
making another effort to get Israel 
and the Palestinians together for a 
deal on the West Bank town of 
Hebron. Mr. Ross met with both the 
Israeli prime minister and Pales- 
tinian officials Thursday. Plage 12. 

EUROPE P»9» 2. 

Kohl Assails Pro-Scientologist Ad 

ASUUPACIFIC Page 6. 

Korean Union Calls Biggest Strike 


Book s- — 

Crossword 

Opinion 

Sports 


Page 9. 

Pages. 

Pages 8-9. 

.... Pages 20-21. 


GM and Volkswagen 
Settle Espionage Case 


U.S. Auto Firm to Drop Lawsuits; 
VWto Buy $1 Billion in GM Parts 


OwSugFr.tr. Oojtii Vi 

DETROIT — Volkswagen AG and 
General Motors Corp. on Thursday 
settled a four-year dispute in which the 
U.S. automaker accused its German 
rival of industrial espionage. 

GM agreed to drop its lawsuits 
against VW in exchange for the German 
automaker’s pledge to buy $1 billion of 
GM parts over seven years, the compa- 
nies said. In addition. VW would pay 
GM Si 00 million. 

The agreement requires GM to with- 
draw its civil lawsuits in Germany and 
the United States against Volkswagen, its 
executives and VW*s former purchasing 
chief. Jose Ignacio Lopez, de Arriortua. 

The suit stems from GM’s claims dial 
Mr. Lope 2 stole company secrets on fu- 
ture car models, pricing information and 
other dam and took them to VW when the 
German company hired him in 1993. 

Mr. Lopez faces criminal charges in 
Germany and is the subject of a criminal 
investigation by the U.S. Justice De- 
partment. Neither of those cases is af- 
fected by the settlement. 

An exchange of letters among the 
chairman of Volkswagen, Ferdinand 
Piech; GM's chairman, John Smith, and 
some board members expressed regret 
for some statements made during the 
dispute. 

“The agreement looks toward the 
resumption of normal business and 
competitive relationships between the 
companies." the companies said. 

The dispute began when Mr. Lopez, 
who was head of European purchasing 
for GM and about to be promoted to 
head of GM's North American oper- 
ations, moved to Volkswagen, Europe's 
biggest automaker. 

Mr. Lopez was accused of stealing 
thousands of pages of documents and 
computer diskettes when he went to VW 
along with seven other GM executives. 

Mr. Lopez, who resigned at the end of 
November as VW purchasing manager 
because of the affair, was charged by 


Tokyo Sell-Off 
Sets Off Jitters 

Share prices in Japan dropped 
sharply Thursday for the third 
straight day, falling to their lowest 
level in more than a year and raising 
concern among some economists 
that the stock market's steep losses 
risked derailing the nation’s fragile 
economic recovery. 

Share prices plunged 3.3 per- 
cent, their biggest decline in 21 
months, after losing 5 percent in the 
two previous days. 

If they. fall much further, some 
economists said, it could hobble the 
country's financial sector and 
prompt manufacturers to drop 
plans to invest heavily for the first 
time in five years in new factories 
and production lines. 

The benchmark Nikkei 225 
Stock Average finished Thursday 
down 606.51 points, at 18.073.87. 
(Page 13) 


Trib Index 



Down 

0 . 02 % J 



The Dollar _ _ 

Now Yortc Thurs. dose prevtos dose 


DM 


1.5765 


1.575 


Pound 


1.6985 


1.688 


Yen 


116.375 


115.82 


FF 


5.3223 


5.3205 


German prosecutors in December with 
stealing company secrets when he left 
GM. But the prosecutors concluded 
there was no evidence that VW ex- 
ecutives were complicit in the matter. 

Volkswagen had also been facing a 
lawsuit by GM in U.S. Federal court in 
Detroit claiming there was a criminal 
conspiracy to steal GM company 
secrets. That case, filed under an anti- 
racketeering law, could have resulted in 
VW having to pay three times the 
claimed damages, which GM has put at 
500 million to 1 billion Deutsche marks 
lS31 8 million to S636 million). 

GM shares rose J 25 cents Thursday, 
to S59.25, on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. Volkswagen shares closed in 
Frankfort at 690.50 Deutsche marks, up 
15 DM. ( Bloomberg . AP, AFP) 

Jobless Rate 
In Germany 
Hits a Peak 


By Alan Friedman 

h uemaiiemul Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Germany's unemploy- 
ment rate spiked up to a postwar high of 
1 0.8 percent m December, and the econ- 
omy weakened substantially in the clos- 
ing months of 1996, the government 
said Thursday. 

The gloomy data underscored the 
challenge Bonn faces as it seeks to spur 
recovery and lead Europe to a single 
currency. 

Reacting to the news. Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl immediately pledged to 
tackle the persisting jobs crisis and 
offered to be chairman of a conference 
aimed ar battling unemployment. 

But Germany's top trade union of- 
ficial — Dieter Schulte, head of the 
German Federation of Trade Unions — 
dismissed the idea of talks and charged 
that the government “Jacked the cour- 
age” to admit that its policies were 
increasing unemployment. 

The latest figure was a record in- 
dicating that 4.1 million Germans are 
out of work. The unemployment rate in 
November was 10.3 percent Western 
Germany's jobless rate rose to 9.6 per- 
cent from 92 percent, while unemploy- 
ment in Eastern Germany was 15.9 per- 
cent. up from 1 5.0 percent 

Economic growth in 1996, mean- 
while, was 1.4 percent, slightly less than 
most economists had expected. 

In the final three months of last year, 
the economy was estimated to have 
come to a virtual standstill, with gross 
domestic product almost unchanged 
after it grew by 0.8 percent in the third 
quarter. 

Although the government was stick- 
ing to its official forecast of 2.5 percent 
growth in 1997, almost all private sector 
economists say the country will be 
lucky to achieve 2 percent growth this 
year. 

Just as worrying as Bonn tries to pare 
its annual budget deficit to 3 percent to 
meet the key condition for European 
monetary union under the Maastricht 
treaty, the ratio jumped to 3.9 percent in 
1996 from 3 5 percent the previous 
year. 

Although many analysts continue to 
believe that Germany’s renowned dis- 
cipline plus a moderate economic re- 
covery will allow Bonn to achieve the 
goals for monetary union in 1997, fresh 
doubts have been raised lately. These 

See MARK, Page 15 


Washington Tells Ankara 
To Avoid Force in Cyprus 


CtwfAi/fn OwSu&Fnn OlspOUhn 

ANKARA — The United States 
warned Turkey against the use of force 
Thursday after Ankara said that it was 
considering a military strike if Cyprus 
deployed Russian anti-aircraft missiles 
on the divided island. 

“Ankara is seriously considering an 
operation against the missile launchers 
when the time comes if Turkey’s warn- 
ings to the Greek Cypriot administration 
are not heeded,” the Anatolian News 
Agency reported. 

Ankara has accused the Cypriot gov- 
ernment of trying to alter the balance of 
forces with a deal announced last week- 
end to buy Russian S-300 surface-to-air 
missiles that could neutralize Turkish 
air superiority on the island. 

Defense Minister Turban Tayan of 
Turkey was reported to have said Wed- 
nesday that Ankara would use all pos- 
sible means to halt the missile deploy- 
ment. It is unclear when the missiles will 
be delivered, but Washington said de- 
ployment was at least ) 6 months away. 

Nicosia says the missiles are defens- 


ive. The S-300 air defense system has a 
range of 150 kilometers (90 miles) and 
can down aircraft and missiles in flight. 

Turkey invaded Cyprus in 1974 in 
response to a Greek Cypriot coup in- 
spired by the military government then 
ruling Athens. Around 30.000 troops 
occupy northern Cyprus, which de- 
clared itself a Turkish Cypriot state in 
1983 but is recognized only by Ankara. 

Western governments fear the missile 
dispute, coupled with recent killings in 
die United Nations-parrolled buffer 
zone dividing Cyprus, could reignite old 
conflicts between Greece and Turkey. 

Athens is committed to the defense of 
the government in the Greek Cypriot- 
controlled south of the Mediterranean 
island and has said any Turkish military 
action on the island would lead to war 
between the two NATO allies. 

“This is no time for the Turkish gov- 
ernment to be making wild and dramatic 
statements which will not be supported 
by any sensible member of the inter- 

See CYPRUS, Page 12 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 

PAGE TWO 


Outside the Supreme Court / When Is It Time to Hasten Death? 


Kobl Attacks 


Activists Color the Gray Zones of Assisted Suicide sdentobglts 


By Laura Blumenfeld 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — At 5 AJvL, there 
is no ambiguity. The sky Ues blade 
and flat, clamped over the Supreme 
Court building like a coffin fid, no 


T t Court building like a coffin ud, no 
light leaking in. 

* ‘I think fife is an important value — period,” 
said Andrew Eiva, 48, bunkered down inside a 
booled parka. He stood first in line, and firm in 
his belief: He is a Catholic, and his religion 
dictates that it is wrong to help someone die. 

Mr. Eiva was shivering outside the building 
with a hundred other people, hoping for a ticket 
to watch arguments in one of the most significant 
Supreme Court cases since the Roe v. Wade 
abortion decision — whether terminally ill 
people have the constitutional right to doctor- 
assisted suicide. 

“Will nature take its course, or will we turn 
doctors into angels of death?” said Bob 
Castagna, executive director of the Oregon Cath- 
olic Conference, grasping die ticket a court of- 
ficer just handed him. 

For these two men, it is a black-and-white 
issue. But tick through the fine of people who 
have been waiting here all night — their eyes 
floating under blankets, their arms waggling, 
their feet stuttering out tap dances to keep warm 
— and a duskier picture emerges, one that mixes 
the complexity of the case with the doubts it 
inspires. 

“I'm more pro than con,” said Doris Kuehn, 
whose father, a right -to-die proponent, has lost a 
lung and seven ribs to tuberculosis. “But you 
can't pin it down. Does it have to be severe pain, 
or is it just a feeling that I want to die? I know 
there are gray areas.” 

For the people on the steps of the Supreme 
Court, the issue was all about the gray zones: the 
physical, religious, moral and legal uncertainties 
that surround a hastened death. 

Justice Antonin Scalia said recently that he 
felt like someone being asked to deliver cosmic 
wisdom. “Why would you leave that to nine 
lawyers, for heaven’s sake?” he asked. 

Physicians are also grappling with the awful 
responsibility. Some doctors who treat the ter- 
minally ill admit to administering massive doses 
of painkillers until their patients eventually stop 
breathing. The options — withholding care, dis- 
continuing care, administering a lethal dose of 
medication — fall along a continuum. 

Outside the court, night was sliding into day. 
The Capitol dome, glowing like a half-moon 



when she first heard that her mother warned to r - 
loll herself. But later, as she watched her suffer, 
riie changed hermind. v ' 

v “It’s prolonging death, instead 1 of prolonging 
life’” said Dan Driscoll, who said his grand- 
mother has Alzheimer's disease.- “Should the 
time come, we maynot give life support” 

To Eleanor Smith, an activist for the disabled, 
such declarations- are frightening. “ ‘Normal* 
people who warn to commit suicide are treated 
tike they’re nuts,” she said- “But if someone is 
deaf, blind or in a wheelchair, a doctor says, 
‘OJC2 Good idea!’ " Ms. Smith contracted polio 
when she was 3 and uses a wheelchair. “When 
you’re, not sweet and sexy anymore, you- get 
assisted out of this world.” 

As Ms. Smith spoke, Laurence Tribe hurried 
by, clutching his briefcase, smiling. The Harvard - 
bw professor was representing the group of New 
York doctors who want to help mentally com- 
petent terminally ill patients die: He looks like a 
nice man, Ms. -Smith-said, but she finds him 
scary. “It’s creepier than seeing a man with a 
gun. It’s like someone who’s killing you softly, 
whispering. This is for your own good.’ ” 


M S. SMITH is a member of Not Dead 
Yet, a tights group for die disabled 
that has tinned out to wave rank 
banners beneath die court’s fluted 
columns. “Hitler Would Be Proud.” a sign said,* 
another: “Your Mercy Is Killing Us. “One of the 
group’s mottoes is: “If death is the only choice 
available — what kind of choice is that?” 

The word “choice” kept surfacing as two 
men from opposing protest groups talked at a 
spot midway between their demonstration sites. 

“There’s no point when I'm half dead making 
me stay alive, said Roy Tomaso, a white- 
bearded, withered man from the Hemlock So- 
ciety, aright-to-die group. “The government has . 
no right to tell me I have to live and suffer.” 

Richard SL Denis, an activist with Not Dead 
Yet who uses a wheelchair, said. “People should 
make their own choices when they live or die.” 
“Exactly,” Mr. Torcaso said.' 

“Exactly,” said Mr. St. Denis, and they 
looked at each other funnily. ' - 
Nearby, a chorus sang: “We are strong and 
gentle people, and we are singing for our fives.” 
It was impossible to tell by the lyrics which side 
of tbe case they were supporting. 

It was 10 AlM_ and me oral arguments were 
beginning inside tbe court. Sunlight bubbled up 
from tbe marble plaza; there was brightness, but 
oo clarity. 


Ami IfaMlmnbe No rwiTtae* 


Demonstrators outside the Supreme Court included Paul Tassone, 
foreground, who said it is wrong to kelp someone die, and members of the 
Hemlock Society, rear, which wants bans on assisted suicide removed. 


minutes ago, was turning crater-gray . Tbe sky was 
equal parts dark and light, and the people were 
puffing out white clouds as they ai^ued over when 
the line between wrong and right is crossed. 

“Assisted suicide is self-mutilation,” said 
Marc Spindelman. 

“Disease is mutilation.” countered Carol 
Poenisch. Her mother had Lou Gehrig’s disease. 
“Have you ever seen a woman with cancer, 
where the bone gets eaten away, and her back 
collapses?” she asked. “Is that a life?” 

Mr. Spindelman retorted, ‘ ‘Whether it’s a life or 
not, I don't think the constitution supports sui- 
cide.” An American flag snapped in the wind 
above his head. He asked Ms. Poenisch why she 
flew here all the way from Michigan. 

“My mother was Number 19. she said. Her 


mother was Merian Frederick, Jack Kevorkian’s 
19th assisted suicide, killed in October 1993 by 
sucking on a plastic tube that fed her carbon 
monoxide. Before Mrs. Frederick died, she had 
lost the ability to speak. She wrote in a note to her 
three children: 

“I have 2 criteria for meaningful existence. 

“1) a posture that allows me to write without 
undue fatigue. 

“2) finger & forearm strength that allow 
typing & writing.” 

Then the 72-year-old mother outlined what 
sbe could not endure: 

“When I can’t go to the john without help 

“play my tape books 

“watch tv.” 

Ms. Poenisch said sbe was horrified and angry 


Abortion Not Linked to Breast Cancer, Study Says 


By Rick Weiss 

ftaduwgton Post -Service 

WASHINGTON — Women who 
get an abortion during the first 18 
weeks of pregnancy do not have an 
increased risk of getting breast cancer 
later in life, according to the largest 
study ever to look at the politically 
charged question. 

Several scientists said the new 
finding, published in Thursday’s is- 
sue of The New England Journal of 
Medicine, should largely settle a sci- 
entific and emotional debate that has 
raged for years over suggestions that 


an abortion can lead to breast cancer. 

“Women can be very assured that 
the overall risk is not increased,” said 
Mads Melbye. an epidemiologist with 
the Statens Serum Institut in Copen- 
hagen. who led the study with a col- 
league. Jan Wohlfahn. 

But Dr. Melbye and others said that 
the study leaves unanswered a linger- 
ing question of whether a late-term 
abortion may increase a woman's 
odds of getting breast cancer. The 
study found that women who got 
abortions after 18 weeks of gestation 
were almost twice as likely to even- 
tually get breast cancer as were wo- 


men who had no abortion or an early 
abortion. 

Very few women in the study had 
late abortions, however, raising the 
possibility that the apparent connec- 
tion was the result of chance alone, 
researchers said 

In the United Stales, the vast ma- 
jority of abortions are performed be- 
fore 18 weeks. 

Breast cells grow and divide during 
pregnancy, and some biologists have 
theorized that in the absence of hor- 
monal changes that come before de- 
livery. those cells may be left es- 
pecially prone to becoming 


Sandor Vegh, Mozart Specialist, Dies at 84 


The Associated Press 

SALZBURG — Sandor Vegh. 84, 
the renowned Hungarian-born viol- 
inist. conductor and interpreter of 
Mozart, died Tuesday after a long 
illness, his orchestra announced. 

A professor at tbe Salzburg Moz- 
arteum since 1978 and a founder of the 
chamber music festival in Cervo, Italy. 
Mr. Vegh made numerous recordings, 
conducted some of the world's fore- 
most orchestras, and was the leader of 
a string quartet and a chamber or- 
chestra that bore his name. 

His death is an “irreplaceable 
loss.” said the Came rata Academica 
in Salzburg, reporting the death of the 
musician who had directed it since 
I97S. 

Mr. Vegh was bom May 17. 1912, 
in a Transylvanian town that- under 
Hungarian "rule was called FColozsvar. 
now Cluj in Romania. He took violin 
lessons as a child, then began his stud- 


ies at the Budapest Academy of Music 
in 1924. where his professors included 
Leo Weiner and Zoltan Kodaly. 

After performing solo concerts 
throughout Europe for three years, 
Mr. Vegh founded tbe Hungarian 
String Quartet in 1934. They per- 
formed die premiere of Bela Bartok’s 
Fifth String Quartet in Barcelona, at 
the International Festival of Modem 
Music in 1936. 

In 1940, he founded the Vegh Quar- 
tet and was its first violinist for 40 
years of its existence. In 1941, be was 
appointed professor of the Hungarian 
Academy of Music. Between 1946 
and 1953, Mr. Vegh lived in France, 
becoming a French citizen. There he 
met the cellist Pablo Casals, at whose 
festivals in Prades he was a regular 
performer. For 10 years, the two 
taught a generation of musicians at 
summer courses in Zermatt, Switzer- 
land. In 1963 he founded the Festivale 


di Musica di Camera, in Cervo. 

Mr. Vegh’s major recordings in- 
cluded the complete Beethoven. Moz- 
art and Baitok quartets, as well as 
Beethoven trios and a Schubert quintet 
with Mr. Casals. In 1990, he com- 
pleted recordings of all Mozart piano 
concertos with die pianist Andras 
ScftifF and the Camerata Academica, ; 
and in 1991 recorded all Mozart's cas- 
sations. divertiirtenti and serenades, 

Edward Butler, 70, AP Editor 

NEW YORK (AP) — Edward But- 
ler, former deputy foreign editor of 
The Associated Press, has died of 
bone cancer al age 70. 

Mr. Butler, who died Sunday at New 
York University Medical Center, re- 
tired in 1992 after two decades as 
assistant and then deputy foreign editor 
of the news service, positions in which 
he oversaw production of feature ar- 
ticles from AP bureaus worldwide. 


cancerous. More than 40 studies have 
looked for a link between abortion 
and breast cancer, with inconsistent 
results. 

For the most part, studies that have 
suggested a positive link have been 
those with the poorest research 
design. But anti -abort ion activists 
have used them to fuel their cause. 

; The latest study, involving I ^mil- 
lion Danish women bom between 
1935 and 1978 whose medical his- 
tories were tracked in government 
registries, found that those who got 
abortions up to 18 weeks into then- 
pregnancy were no more likely to get 
breast cancer than those who never 
had an abortion. That was true re- 
gardless of whether the women ever 
had children — a factor that tends to 
lower the risk of breast cancer. 

Because the work was based on 
medical records that doctors are re- 
quired by law to m aintain, the Danish 
study bypassed the shortcoming of 
many U.3. studies on tbe subject 
Those studies generally asked women 
with breast cancer to recall whether 
they had ever had an abortion, then 
compared their history to that of wo- 
men without breast cancer. 

Studies have shown that women 
diagnosed with cancer are more likely 
to be honest about whether they have 
had an abortion, in the hope that they 
may best be helped by providing all 
the information they can. That study 
design favors an apparent but not ne- 
cessarily true association between 
breast cancer and abortions. 

The new study is "very persuas- 
ive” because it is so large arid because 
it overcomes “the suspected bias in 
other studies, which was the self-re- 
porting, ’ ' said Lynn Rosenberg, a pro- 
fessor of epidemiology at tbe Boston 
University School of Public Health. 


A Diagnostic Coup 
In ‘ Mad Cow ’ Cases 

Reuters 

LONDON — British scientists who are 
worried about a new variant of tbe human 
version of “madcow”diseasesaid in a report 
to be published Friday that they had identified 
a simple technique that they expected would 
allow early diagnosis. 

The discovery could help prevent panic if 
Britons faced an epidemic as a result of eating 
beef from cows that have bovine spongiform 
encephalopathy, they wrote in the British med- 
ical journal The Lancet. 

Fourteen cases of tbe- new variant of 
Creutzfeid- Jakob disease have been confirmed 
in Britain, where “mad cow” disease has been 
prevalent in cattle. One has been confirmed in 

But the scientists from the Imperial College 
School of Medicine, in London, said an epi- 
demic was possible if theories that Creutzfeld- 
Jakob disease was linked to eating contain-, 
mated beef years earlier were confirmed. 

In the past, confirmation that a patient has 
the disease has been possible only through a 
dangerous brain biopsy before death or a post- 
mortem examination. . 

Tbe scientists reported they bad discovered 
that a prion protein found in die brains of 
people with the disease was also present in tbe 
tonsil tissue of a 35-year-old woman who had 
died from yhe disease. 

This suggested it was possible .to check for 
die disease through a simple and safe pro- 
cedure under local anesthetic, which would be 
viable even for people who have had their 
tonsils out. 

But John CoUinge, bead of die Imperial 
College team, said further research was needed 
to assess bow useful the new technique would 
be. 

“We now need to extend this initial study 
and see how early in the disease this marker 
may be useful," be said. 


As ‘Rubbish’ 


BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl - 
on Thursday dismissed as “rubbish" ajL 
open letter from a group of American < ! 
celebrities who accuse Germany of per- ; : i 
securing Scientologists in the way Jews . 
were nnder Hitler. 

' Mr. Kohl said he bad no intention q£ 
replying to die letter, which was printer 
as a fidl-page advertisement in the Par- 
is-based International Herald Tribunj 
He said it was signed by people w? : 
were only displaying their ignorance 
Germany. ’ \ 

Stated by the actors Dustin Hoffmai. 
add Goldie Hawn, the director Oliver 
Stone, the novelists Mario Puzo anti 
Gore Vidal, along with 21 other en- 
tertainment figures, tbe letter urged ML 
Kohl to put “an end to this shameful 
pattern of organized persecution,” 
which it compared to Nazi Germany's 
treatmem of the Jews in the 1930s. 

“They don’t know anything about 
Germany and they don’t want te, < 
either,” Mr. Kohl said a news coil- *< ' 
ference in Bonn. “Otherwise, they ; 
wouldn't have talked such rubbish.” * 

Mr. Kohl said he had not seen die 
letter, addressed to “Dear Chancellor 
Kohl.” 

Asked if he planned to respond, he 
said: 

“No, I do not have any intention 
whatsoever of reacting. I haven't read 
the names of those who signed this 
thing. I coaly heard about it.” 

Toe letter writers said they were not 
members of the Church of Scientology 
but were deeply concerned that Ger- 
many and Mr. Kohl’s Christian Demo- 
cratic Union in particular were harass- . 
ing Scientologists because of their 
religious beliefs. * *■ . 

The letter likened the Nazi book 
buntings of the 1930$ to die boycott last 
summer called by the Christian Demo^- 
crats’ youth wing against the 1996 film, 
“Mission Impossible" because its star' 
Tom Cruise, is a well-known Sciento ; 
logist. 

The letter also cited boycotts in Ger ' 
many aimed at two other Scientologists, ; 
the actor John Travolta and the musiciafi 
Chick Corea, because of their religious 
beliefs. 

“In the Germany of the 1 930s. Hitler 
made religious intolerance official gov- 
ernment policy,” the letter stated. 
“Jews were first marginalized, then ex*- • 
eluded from many activities, then vif- 
ified and ultimately subjected to un- 
speakable horrors.” 

It added: “In the 1930s, it was the 
Jews. Today it is-the Scienrologists. ” ■ 

Al spokesman for the International 
Herald Tribune in Paris said the ad- 
vertisement was placed by the people ■< 
who signed iL - . 

He said it was sent to the newspaper 
from Los Angeles. He said a full-page 
ad typically costs $62,000. 

Heber Jentzsch. president of the 
Church of Scientology International, 
said in a statement released in London .. 
that he hoped “Chancellor Kohl heeds { ' 6 
their admonition to restore democratic? 
principles ialiis country.” 

Hie German federal and state gov; 
enunents agreed to a series of steps las 
month to counter what they called the : ’ 
Scientologists’ “expansionist aims and : 

claim to domination.” 

Hie authorities also agreed to con- 
sider putting Scientology under surveil- 
lance by the anti-extremist Office fojr . . 
the Protection of tbe Constitution. * . 

“These acts are intolerable in any/ 
country that conceives of itself as a-. 
modern democracy," the letter said ' 
“This organized oppression is begin.- . 
rung to sound familiar.” It said tbe 'i 
measures were “like the Germany of 
1936 rather than 1996." 

Tbe letter said the policy should be 
stopped, “now, before it spreads and 
increases in virulence as it did be- 
fore." 

Boon has published a booklet warn- 
ing of what it says are the dangers of the 
organization and Bavaria is making 
state employees fill out questionnaires, 
about ties to the group. The group says it* 
has 30,000 members in Germany, but. 
the government puts the figure at bey - 
tween 10,000 and 20,000. } 


General Denies Cover-Up 
On Gulf Chemical Weapons 


4. Out SAejFntaPafkEcha 

WASHINGTON — Nor- 
man Schwarzkopf, the retired 
U.S. general who commanded 
allied troops in the Gulf War, 
invited Senate investigators 
Thursday io examine his 
private logs for dues about 
releases of chemical weapons 
during the conflict. 

Calling suggestions of a 
cover-up "ridiculous,” he 
said he had no evidence of 
chemical weapons exposure 
during or after the conflict. 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S * DOCTORATE 
For Hfert. bfe atf Academe Experience 
Ttougfi Ccnvav&t Heme Study 

® ( 808 ) 537-1909 EXT. 23 
FAX: ( 310 ) 471-6456 
http: 1 NiWHfHUXsm 
or seal fleeted resune ter 
FR K EV ft UIAHfiH 

Pacific Western University 

1210 Auab Street. Deot. 23 
Honolulu, HI 968 144922 


Die Pentagon and other agen- 
cies are investigating whether 
exposure to chemical weapons 
may lie behind the mystery 
illnesses afflicting thousands 
of Gulf War veterans. 

“There is nothing in those 
logs at ail about chemical 
contamination of my troops.” 
General Schwarzkopf said. 
He added that he told a Senate 
committee staff member 
Thursday, “If you don’t be- 
lieve me, l welcome a. mem- 
ber or members of their staff 
to come down to my office” 
in Tampa, Florida, and “they 
could look through those logs 
to their heart’s content.” 

The existence of the logs 
was disclosed at a Senate 
hearing by Jay Rockefeller, a 
West Virginia Democrat who 
has championed the cause of 
Gulf War veterans with un- 
explained illnesses. 

The CIA’s two top officials 
told Mr. Rockefeller they 
were unaware of the logs’ ex- 
istence. (AP . AFP J 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
Transportation Strike Set in France 

PARIS (Reiners) — Six trade unions said Thursday that 
public transportation workers would strike nationwide for 24 
hours on Jan. 24 to press demands for retirement at 55 years of 
age and a cut in working hours, to 35 or 32 weekly. 

Th e unions, including the country’s three biggest — tbe 
CFDT.CGT and Force Ouvriere — said in a statement that the 
decision was made at a joint meeting Tuesday, 

Strikes to press similar demands hit tbe public transportation 
sector in several French cities in November and December. 

Saudis to Allow Palestinian Flight 

CAIRO (Reuters) — Saudi Arabia has given Palestinian 
Airlines permission to make its inaugural flight Friday morn- 
ing. the chairman of the airline said Thursday. 

One of the airline’s Fokker 50 aircraft will take off from 
Port Said with 48 Gazans bound for Jiddah in Saudi Arabia for 
the umra, or minor pilgrimage. 

The Palestinian Authority has built its own airport in the 
Gaza Strip, but Israel will not let Palestinians use it for regular 
flights. It has received only two flights — one carrying 
President Yasser Arafat, the other a Moroccan plane bringing 
aid for the Palestinians. 

Winter struck the United States with a vengeance 
Thursday as a series of storms spinning over the Eastern 
seaboard contributed to at least 1 1 deatfis in four states and 
spread snow and icy rain from the Great Plains to the Atlantic. 
Roads were shut down in the Dakotas; blowing snow turned 
back school buses in Minnesota, and snow in Chicago made 
the morning rush hour even more impossible. 


WEATHER 


Europe 


T«fcy Tooorrow 

M0i LowW Mgn Cam' 


Ccpwhtgen 
Ocm Del Sd 
Dunn 
Edtowg/i 


IMU 

urntw 

Laban 

Lam 


fe-PngniMg 

Stec tt u bn 

Snmaug 


OP OF 
18*4 1283 c 
■mo -ions pc 
4/38 -2fl9c 
1356 7*4* 

BM8 307 S 
043 4/WWi 
-3122 -OZZa 
-V2S 0i«pa 

W* -wrm 

-1/31 -4GS B 
T7/B2 1359 a 
BM3 00351 
307 -i«i e 
046 307 c 
-209 -fiSZpe 
2QS -SO* a 
■405 «1Bpe 

1050 flupc 

22m 17152s 
1691 1253 c 
209 -lOI c 
ItS 205 9 
BOG *08 9 
409 -case 
■11/13 -ItfO pc 
-208 -WSen 
12/53 307 pc 
-4 /a .ions pc 
W4 -3/27 C 
-367 -5718 s 
US* -U31 c 
12153 4/39* 
-602 >t»c 
-367 -760 ps 
to* se*c 
-662 -14/7 pe 
SM 032*1 
-1/31 -367 *f 
-662 0tSc 
-un - 409 * 


MddteEast 


23773 1356a 
17/8? US? pa 
IBM 1060 • 
13*5 4139s 
128 408 PC 
2M2 7*4 • 

on i«o* 


Man Cam'S 
OF OF 

tt*B 13/55 pe 
-028 -60BC 
*09 -029*1 
1*757 Met 
14S7 8H6PC 
4/39 -1/31 r 

028 -662 pe 
1/34 -1731 pc 
104 067c 
-1/31 029 pc 
21/10 1203 pc 
W57 1263 r 
M3 Ml r 
7M4 l/3«c 

029 -7E0pe 
307 -1/31 pe 
«1B -14/7 po 
T3I55 10Q0*l 
am IT/® s 
17*2 1365 k 
7/44 1/34 r 
UfiS M3 pc 
1263 8/48 pc 
409 -4/ZSps 

-760 -13/8 pc 
00? -700 a 
136S E/43 1 
«» -12/11 c 
«38 0*32 c 
•4 OS -S/ISpS 
2SS -IBIWi 
1162 0/43 *l 

010 .13/6 pe 
■268 -760 pc 
104 028 pc 
one -14/7 pc 
4/30 0BC 
-U31 -564c 
-465 -760 pc 
1/34 027 e 


am rani 
1AM 13/SSpe 
23m 1US1 
1E/E1 7/44' s 
(Ml TM» 


Forecast tor Saturday Through Monday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 




North America 
A strong whiter storm wX 
exit Now England Sah/r- 
dpy; otfwvdM, bfflttiV eott 
a* wfl put 8w deop froozs 
on tha Roddes and to he 
East only the deep South- 
east and Florida will b* 
do m to normal Much of 
Sn West w9 a^oy <ky and 
(nOd weather la dsarr up 
bora tfwtr recant HOailng. 


North America 


Europe 

A nofcwbto and wetoffw 
warm-up writ occur across 
madam Europo this week- 
end and hrto next weak. 
The milder weather will 
ttkefy reach London and 
Madrid Saturday w«h a bd 
slower warm-up hi Parts. 
Eastern Europe will stay 
cokt whBaitaiyandsouth- 
eeetam Eiaopa be cool 
and wet 


Asia 

Balling and northeast 
China win moderate to 
near rannaJ this weefcand 
before srother arctic blast 
arrives Monday . Seoci and 
Tokyo wB be ehay to coM 
into next week, although 
Seoul may sea eome mod- 
•aden by Monday, MaHy 


Gthnaew 

CWomoo 


HoChIMrti 

Hongfeng 


K-Unow 

K.Hnab<*> 

Man*, 

MM DM 
Ptnom Perb 


«0M» ' 
Caps Than 
C bm Mw w 


Tatter 

Mgb LowW 


OF OF - 
Anttanga 002 -466 m 

ttn 7/44 -564 pe 

Boston THA -3/27 cn 

CNcago -367 12711 sn 

HH 409 -720 1 

um -loi-tante. 
Dona -iov -a/w* 

Hand* 27K0 1W4s 

Howton 1305 OBi. 
U» A n gara 21/70 5m * 
am 22 m 


Lower 

OF 

-46SC Mnrapoto 
i «« uoneaal 
1 022c taw 
I -1B/0C Nra/YMc 
-0/14*1 Oifands 
•waa Pboww. . 
i -1B*lcr Sen Ran. 

I 19/06 pc eraSM 
' . -101 r tansmr 
r. 7MB' Vwkohvw 
1 1*57 * e w egat 


WgT&wW 
taf of 
-am -wort 

-lOt -6718*1 
2700 20581 
6/43 -1/31 r 
1M0 ' ®43po 
1008. SM»n 
US 7*44 pa 
1050 0*3*1 
.-1/31 -ZOOM 

am to* pc 

EW3 029*1 


Wsh Lower 
OF Cfl* 
-1WW4M1 « 
■SW -176 po 
94 / 75 ' 18*1 pe 
205 -405 pe 

15*1 7744 1 

18*4 -101*1 
14*7 S/40 ■ 
8/48 4/38 pe 
■7160 -ISO pc 
408 3/37 pc 
307 00 pc 


Toney 

M* LowW 
OF OF 
39*9 28/71 1 
31*8 21/70 pc 
■1*1 .7720 pc 
27*0 18*1 % 
2E/77 11/92 4 
2082 14fSTpc 
28*4 22/71 pe 
IBM 13*5 9 
32*9 1MB pc 
16*4 11*2i 
22171 307 po 
2BS4 24/75! 
24/75 8(48 a 
31*8 21/70 pc 
30*9 22/71 pc 
28*4 21/70 o 
22/71 3/37 pc 

2SA4 1M*pc. 
31*8 21/70 pc 
SUM 19*8 pc 
3/37 -6/22 DC 
8*3 0279 
3088 23/73 po 
14*7 1060 pe 
10(90 2/39 pe 
10*4 18*5 9 


13*5 341 en 

18*4 1050 pc 
18*4 11/52 pe 
28*2 11/52 9 
30*8 2071 pc 
20*4 13*5 pc 
13*5 6/43 Bh 


Latin America 

awwwairra 32*9 2077 DO 
Crow 28*2 2071 pc 
Ul» 27*0 20711 

“WwoO* 20*8 035 pc 
HodaliMn 31*8 2«75( 
S**Wi 32*8 .SMBs 


Oceania 


■^•wfcMurvw, popaMydflndy.&dPM^.il i ri wtf .Hli MiUMmu imrcA.atWKMiOuniBe. 
Bvcnow. Hce, W-MMSwr AB mra». ICMdraW nl |1W9 rrtertet by touW— 4/wr. tap, a 1397 


IBM 18*4 r 
24/79 IBM pc 


High LowW 
OF OF 
32*9 2071 I 
27*0 17/62 PC J 
307 -4/291 i 
27*0 IBM PC : 
24/75 1253 ■ 

18*1 pc 
28*2 22/71 pc 
18*4 1258 4 
31/88 21/70 pc 
16*1 1102 e 
2DEB 3079 ' 
2M4 24/751 
25/77 8 M 8 1 
31/88 23/73 pe 
28(84 eampe * 
28(82 !8(BBoc • 

asm so? • ■ 

2Me 21/70 pc j 
27*0 17*2 PC . 
am 17*2 pe 

3/37 .4/25 pe 
SK3 027 c . 
30nS 24/75 pc 

18*1 10(50 DC 
7744 1/34 pe 
17382 1055 t 


18*1 8M3PC 

zam 1305 s 

22/71 13*59 
28*2 aWa . 
28*4 2071 1 
28*4 13SS9 
13)55 0439(1 


31*8 21/70 pc 
2*84 207100 . 
27*o am? 
23/73 4(3Bpe 
27*0 2071 pO 
23*4 12(539 


25/77 18*1 pc 

18/84 1058c 


Imprimf par Offprint. 73 rue de TEvangite. 75018 Pails. 


i 







■l::- -'-y \ 






T- 

N * 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


rom the Last Liberal 


By David E. Sanger 

York Times Service 

WASHWGTON - O* of the 

Icmety liberals of the Clinton adnrin- 

is™°n^LU>OT Secretary Robert Reach, 
teavK Washington this week declaring 
that the government must lead a cam- 
paign to narrow a growing gap between 
nch and poor and to fight the policies of 

corporate America. 

In a draft of a speech delivered 
Thursday, a day before he leaves the 
Labor Departmem; Mr. Reich said he' 
. can t resist a last word.” He main- 
tained that the administration’s “un- 
finished agenda is to address widening 
inequality.” • 

. A^r- Reich insisted that his focus on an 
issue dial others in the administration 
generally avoid discussing was not in- 
tended as criticism of his colleagues or 
of President Clinton, a longtime friend 
he said, “harbors the sam e con- 
evictions as the young man j came to 
know in our student days.’ * 

.. But it may well be interpreted as 
thinly veiled criticism of the admin- 
.j strati on’s drift to the center, Twraiys r 
Mr. Reich questioned whether die 
..United States was abandoning “the im- 
■. pIicitsociaIcantract”itliasmairitaiDed 
f .with workers for a half-centiny. Once 
• again he baited corporate America for 
its treatment of workers in the pursuit of 
profits, a tack that other cabinet mem- 
bers, especially Treasury Secretary 
Robert Rubin, have persuaded Mr. Clin- 
-ton not to take. 


Mr. Reich specifically complained of 
a growing “benefits gap” in which 
top executives and their fa milies re- 
ceive ever more generous health ben- 
efits, and their pension benefits are scar- 
es in the form of compensation 
defeped until retirement.” Meanwhile, 


mdn types of retirement savings plans, 
known as 401(k) programs, and only 34 
percent are covered by a pension plan. 

In a phone conversation, Mr. Reicb, 
•who is resigning to spend more time 
with his two teenage boys in Boston, 
said that his speech was “not a parting 
shot but a parting benediction.” 

Yet, be also seemed acutely aware 
that his departure leaves only Donna 
Shalala, die secretary of health and hu- 
man services, as an outspoken liberal 
voice in the cabinet. But Ms. Shalala is 
not as pithy a speaker as the ever-quot- 
able Mr. Reich. 

“Bob acted as the liberal con- 
science,” an administration colleague 
said, “and in the new cabinet, you won't 
find one of those.” 

That may be by design. To the con- 
sternation of Mr. Clinton’s political ad- 
visers, Mr. Reicb often called for far 
more government efforts to intervene in 
the economy on behalf of ordinary 
workers than others in tire administra- 
tion, particularly Mr. Rubin, were will- 
ingto endorse. 

when Mr. Reich called for an al- 
ternative tax system that would favor 


corporations that extended grcaier ben- 
efits to workers, officials called report- 
ers to declare that he was not speaking 
for the administration. 

Whenever conflict with Mr. Clin- 
ton’s aides reached a fevered point, Mr. 
Reich would can his friend of 30 years 
to ask whether he should tone down his 
comments. The president, by all ac- 
counts. would tell Mr. Reich to go ahead 
with his views. 

On Wednesday night, at a farewell 
tribute to Mr. Reich, Mr. Rubin joked 
about their occasional policy clashes but 
insisted that their many areas of agree- 
ment were often ignored by the press. He 
said that Mr. Reich's influence over ad- 
ministration policy would continue even 
after he left Washington and that if he 
disagreed with the administration, “he 
will certainly call and let us know.” 

At the core of Mr. Reich’s speech, 
which was given to a nonprofit group 
that deals with economic and labor is- 
sues, was an attack on the argument that 
a growing economy will lift all boats — 
and that all American workers will 
prosper. 

“Some deny that inequality is 
rising,” he said, clearly addressing his 
critics but never naming names. 

“Simply said, they are wrong. They 
view widening inequality as a byproduct 
of structural changes in our economy — 
most notably technological advances 
and global economic integration, both 
of which tend to reward tire best-edu- 
cated and penalize those with the 
poorest education and skills.” be said. 


Party Time in D.C., but Wlio’s Paying? 


By Dan Morgan 

Washington Pew Service- 

WASHINGTON — Dur- 
ing the costly congressional 
campaigns last year, corpo- 
rate donors helped produce 
many a winner. 

Last Monday, they put on 
.their party duds and joined 
the victory celebrations all 
.over Washington, 
f At the Monocle restaurant 
on CapitoJ HiB, the U.S. Tele- 
phone Assoriatiomiepresent- 
ing the $ 1 00 billion-a-year lo- 
cal phone industry, sponsored 
an afternoon shindig with 
.wine, beer and finger foods 
for Sam Brownback, the 
pewly inducted Republican 
senator from Kansas. 

It was a chance to intro- 
duce dozens of phone lob- 
byists and fund-raisers to the 
.40-year-old lawmaker, 
whose sear on the Commerce 
Committee will position him 
to oversee the 1996 -legisla- 


tion that ends die long-stand- 
ing monopoly of the asso- 
ciation's members over local 
service. 

Across town at the May- 
flower Hotel, a $25,000 vic- 
tory bash worthy of one of 
the costliest campaigns of 
1996 was underway in honor 
of Senator Robert Torricelli, 
Democrat of New Jersey, 
courtesy of five companies 
based in his state. As the new 
senator greeted an overflow 
crowd of well-wishers at the 
entrance to die Main Ball- 
room, a four-piece band en- 
tertained hundreds of visitors 
inside as wine and beer 
flowed from free bars. 

So it went all day in hotels 
and restaurants, as well as in 
the U.S. Capitol and nearby 
• . congressional offices. The 
Chicago Mercantile Ex- 
change and the -Chicago 
Board of Trade put on a 
•• luncheon buffet for the fam- 
. . ily and support? rs of Senator . . 


Away From Politics 

• The US. attorney has asked for a waiver of diplomatic 
immunity to permit prosecution of a Republic of Georgia 
envoy, Gueorgm Makharadze, for tite death of a 1 6-year-old 

(Af} 


girl in a car crash in Washington. 


Three convicted murderers were executed within about 
r three hours in Varner, Arkansas,butthe last, Kirt Wainwright, 
. lay waiting to receive a lethal injection for about an hour, as 
the U.S. Supreme Court debated a last-minute appeal. The 
execution was finally carried out (NYT) 

• Hundreds of thousands of dollars in coins,- bills and food 

stamps rained down on a street in Overtown, Florida, when an 
armored truck overturned on an elevated highway. (AP) 

• California and Arizona will petition the Supreme Court to 
overturn a court ruling that rejected. their demands for federal 
reimbursement for the costs of illegal immigration. (WP) 

• UJS. marshals should be sent to The Citadel, the military 

college in Charleston, South Carolina, to brief cadets on 
federal law and reporting hazing, the Justice Department has 
suggested. Eleven cadets face disciplinary action m the hazing 
of two female cadets last year. (AP) 


Richard Durbin, Democrat of 
Illinois, in the Dirksen Build- 
ing. The Southern Co., the 
Nuclear Energy Institute and 
the Washington consulting 
firm of former Senator James 
McClure, Republican of 
Idaho, sponsored a victory 
celebration fora second-term 
Republican, Senator Larry 
Craig of Idaho, one floor be- 
low the Senate chamber. 

There was no mystery 
about the nuclear power in- 
dustry’s liking for Mr. Craig. 
He is die author of a bill to 
create a single temporary 
storage site fornuclear wastes 
that have been building up for 
decades at utility-company 
sites around the nation. 

All of these receptions 
took place as a new Congress 
opened Tuesday with prom- 
ises to address the issue of 
money in politics. Unlike 

lie enclosure is not required 
for these kinds of events. . 

Officials said that all the 
corporate-sponsored events 
had been cleared by the Sen- 
ate or House ethics commit- 
tees. But some members pre- 
ferred to celebrate with their 
own money, or use leftover 
campaign funds. Senator Ted 
Stevens, Republican of 
Alaska, dipped into cam- 


paign reserves to cover the 
costs of a reception in the 
ornate office of the Senate 
Appropriations Committee, 
which he is taking over as 
chairman. But some who 
crossed the electoral finish 
line did not have that luxury. 

Holloway Torricelli, a pro- 
fessional fund-raiser who 
helped organize the May- 
flower event for her former 
husband, the new senator 
from New Jersey, said: “We 
didn't have the money to pay 
fra- it out of campaign 
funds.” 

Senators and their staffs 
defended their acceptance of 
receptions in their honor paid 
for by corporate sponsors 
with an interest in legislation 
that could affect them. 

“It's just a reception.” 
said a spokesman for Mr. 
Brownback of the event in 
his honor sponsored by local 
phone companies. “He’ll 
drop -by and say ‘hi.’ It’s a ,| 
little different than a fund- 
raiser. There’s no money 


changing hands.’ 
Mr. Brownbai 


Mr. Brownback. an out- 
spoken advocate of cam- 
paign finance reform, was 
engulfed by telephone lob- 
byists and fund-raisers at the 
Monocle. He could not be 
reached for comment. 


y^acca/icrt 

' SALES 

FROM TQth TO 1 8 th JANUARY 


30 bis, rue de Paradis - 75010 PARIS - 01 47 70 64 30 


PAGE 3 


POLITICAL /VOTirS 


Gingrich ’s Penalty 
To Precede Report 

WASHINGTON — The House of 
Representatives will vote on whar 
punishment to impose on Speaker 
Newt Gingrich without having a full 
report from the ethics committee on 
his offenses. 

Mr. Gingrich. Republican of Geor- 
gia. has admitted bringing discredit on 
the House by giving the committee 
false information and failing to get 
sound tax-law advice on the financing 
of his televised college course, which 
an investigating subcommittee found 
was used for political purposes. 

The committee wrangled over pro- 
cedures for more than 12 hours Wed- 
nesday and early Thursday, spending 
one of the 1 4 days the House gave it on 
Tuesday to wrap up the case. 

The panel agreed to hold public 
hearings on the accusations against 
Mr. Gingrich next Monday and Tues- 
day. rejecting Democratic efforts to 
hold them before the weekend. 

After that decision. James Cole, the 
outside counsel who has led the in- 
vestigation for the last year, told the 
panel he could not finish a report by 
Jan. 21. when the House will vote on 
the question. His report will be made 
on Feb. 4, two weeks after represen- 
tatives have voted. 

Instead of a foil report, the ethics 
committee will recommend punish- 
ment and offer the House its reasons 
for its recommendation not later than 
Jan. 19. two days before the vote. 

The decision was a major victory 
for Representative Nancy Johnson. 
Republican of Connecticut, who heads 
the committee. Essentially, the com- 
mittee agreed to a timetable that she 
bad proposed over the objections of 
Democrats and Mr. Cole. (NYT) 

6 No 5 Vote, No Dinner, 
Republicans Decree 

WASHINGTON — Newt Gingrich 
said there would be no retribution and 
House Republican leaders said there 
would be no retribution, but Repub- 
lican Party officials apparently did not 
get the message. 

Republican lawmakers who did not 
vote to re-elect Mr Gingrich as speaker 
were told they were not welcome at the 
dinner Wednesday night honoring the 
Republican National Chairman. Halev 
Barbour, where Mr. Gingrich spoke.' 

The lawmakers were not asked flatly 
to stay away from the gala, but they 
were told that many Republican donors 
had asked not to be sealed with them. 

“We’re just informing members of 











■At# * 


< & 8; h • 


oNpt?-- ■ 

- 


Onr I'.nj-iB'Thc VviOaredVrr • 

CAPITAL MEW — A worker helping put up a tent on the Mall in 
Washington in preparation for the presidential inauguration Jan. 20. 


their sentiments." Edward W. 
Gillespie, the committee's communi- 
cations director, said Wednesday. 

* “It's more a matter of not wanting to 
have a member of Congress show up at 
a festive event and then have the con- 
versation come to a grinding halt when 
they sit down at the table.” he said. 

But Mr. G illespie did not dismiss the 
issue of loyalty as a factor and signaled 
that there would be consequences for 
not backing Mr. Gingrich. r WP) 

California Politicos 
Eye Sacramento 

WASHINGTON — The departing 
White House chief of staff. Leon Pan- 
etta, and Senator Dianne Feinstein. 
Democrat of California, have talked 
privately about which of them should 
run for" governor next year and have 
agreed that neither wants 3 primary 
bonle that would weaken the eventual 
Democratic nominee, according to Mr. 
Panetta. 


Mr. Panetta. a former California con- 
gressman. and Ms. Feinstein have both 
said they are considering the governor- 
ship. and both said this week they were 
undecided about it. But they appear to 
have reached one conclusion: They do 
not want to run against each other. 

‘ 'Senator Feinstein and 1 have a very 
good relationship, and both of us have 
talked to each other and sad we’re 
going to continue to talk.” Mr. Panetta 
said. 

Ms. Feinstein. through a spokes- 
man. confirmed that she had spoken 
several times with Mr. Panetta and that 
“politics has come up.” (LAT) 

Quote /Unquote 

Margaret Milner Richardson, the 
Internal Revenue commissioner, who 
plans to resign as soon as the Clinton 
administration finds a replacement, 
denying that she felt political pressure 
to leave the job she had held since May 
1993: "No. 1 certainly didn't. Just niy 
own personal pressure.” I/VVTJ 


, .ci 


■■■' y - ' • ' • ; : % •' V; '■ 

- •• -a>. <v.,„ > -7-: ' 

:• f Vv i \ ’ -V 

* -V’ 






?- ' "V. 'V V 


* 5 » 

■-a 

! . • — - •. .H* - : ■ , ••• . 


>‘Vv 



REAL-TIME INFORMATION FROM 
THE PARIS STOCK EXCHANGE. 

• ■ * " / .V;.. 

People moke decisions every day. They need the most reliable 
source of information available. 

In France, they readies Echos, France's leading newspaper. 

Les Echos is now accessible via the net, offering preferential 
access to the Paris Stock Exchange. 

http://www.lesechos.com 


LES ECHOS - NOTHING'S MORE RELIABLE. 



■ r A : yf 
■. ■ • *.'«* r 




Not for 


all the tea in 10811. 


Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which makes calling home ur to other countries really easy, just dial the 
AT&T Access Number for the country you’re calling from and you’ll get die fastest, dearest connections home. And be sure to 
charge your calk on your AT&T Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous phone charges on your hotel hill and sa\e ym up to 
60 %* (remember that old Chinese proverb — a yuan saved is a yuan earned). Check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


1 JiBidiald»?\T&T.Vtt»^intfvrfiiriheciiuiiirs)wiJaiiillirslr'«ir 2 lri.il ihr ph-ns. iwinKr cillln" $ hulilu citlin«euniiii]jiiwlr.utijNni' .miriuiiK 


EUflDPl 


SfBdBI 

020-795-611 



022-^83-011 

SwrfiH'aatJ* 

0806-69-0011 

acfgfania . „ 

1-806-105-10 

Uolttd KfaQiSeoA 

060666-0011 

Fnsce 

sme-w-ocm 

HIPDLE EAST 


fienawi 

B138-B01B 

Egyjll*(Calnj|' 

. . 5T8-02GS 

fincea* 

00-680-1311 

brail 

177-10B-Z727 

tetsffd 

1-»55M0 5 

Stall) Arete 

1 -880-10 

tt»ty». 

173-1011 

AFRIC* 


IHtaM* 

own-mu 

Ghasa . 

0191 

Raaia»*fateMw]i 

755-SM2 

Kerr, -3* 

0-800-10 

Span . 

9084M4-11 

fcmtti fllrta . . 

0-500-99-0123 


AT&T 


God Hr ATM Vvctf Muntw far At enwn >m'n- aflsiftfrrtU' Jum ** opr.flor (ur AST Pma‘*Scnta.-. 

rr vet nr Web u. tatp^fem -atutiia/mider 

ppmlpli Dtifam] III :iaV'" l - J ulh 1 -. Ik - 1 \ li'jj.-J ..lot'll, i |.rer.i\rv. - i-J"ir * ■a»iqnnilli.on 1 .iiii( a HiIlrtit'tl.<ir{lLin^h»«tJ.ai 

EaJfc.ru ii* I'.". IwWstih bt-vj .lie Wtluii' no-rip.l. (ink . ills' li^ihnoll Ir^ A-.ir.vill'> !■*-. .iiki llv rimiin in«u uliK.ii 1 ,- h,4fcl3.-n) 

EmiiB»'pnuWE’iiuiiA+-puifl!' ijilutv ..Exik rU-i'S cJlii; fc . .-nailM- <•< Oa ■ '-x ini' ' jntiiir- rr.fn'iir- isn- nK.u-n iit-iiOf irJl in ilv 1 ph&ji' uKlilii ii is! .inrp. tEbnt in i ih-nmnn .nu 

ta-jRoiC Inn cjjt caS [Sr I Invu Jl arndtr* leinl •I* f.ltitr Aydl ‘CiH.tr- r-;.ijrfilr u.iWei.ji.t) .-rti.iff ink rnuim- UJ «n {>» UMrt 'limit ? !(► EiJ/ 

UfcalUJ'iini.Mvit-.iini iSifc!»«irl(1iri*V-.a|nili .iutbl- \b<uin “'. I'M. T1\T 





PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL 


Uneasy in Lima’s Hostage Spotlight 

Fearing Reprisals, Japanese-Peruvians Prefer a Low Profile 


By Calvin Sims 

JV'fH- York Times Service 


LIMA — Ever since the first Jap- 
anese immigrants arrived in Peru as 
contract plantation laborers at the turn 
of the century, they have flourished, and 
today they are a prosperous, close-knit 
population. 

Japanese-Peruvians have long sought 
to maintain a low profile while quietly 
integrating into society ar large, but the 
guerrilla attack on the Japanese am- 
bassador's residence on Dec. 17 has 
suddenly thrust them unwillingly into 
the spotlight. About half of the 600 or so 
hostages taken weie Japanese or Per- 
uvians of Japanese descent 

The siege, which is in its fourth week, 
with 74 hostages still held, has tom a 
hole in the heart of Peru’s Japanese 
population. 

Many Japanese-Peruvians say they 
are worried that they will suffer re- 
percussions from the rebel attack, which 
has shattered Peru's hard-earned image 
as a reformed country free of terrorism. 
That image was forged by another Jap- 
anese -Peruvian. President Alberto 
Fujimori. 

**Just as there was a lot of pride and 
joy in the community that one of its 
own. President Fujimori, had achieved 
the highest office of the land, there was 
a lot of trepidation that if his govern- 


ment performed badly, we would suffer 
for it.” said Mary Fukumoto. an an- 


thropologist whose parents were Jap- 
anese immigrants. 

The Tupac Amaru guerrillas have 
said that they seiaed the ambassador's 
residence to protest the interference of 
Japan in Peru's internal affairs and its 
support of Mr. Fujimori's free-market 
economic program. 

Since his election, he has worked 
bard to cultivate ties with Japan, which 
has become one of Peru's major trading 
partners and sources of aid. 

According to a tally by the Japanese- 
Peruvian Cultural Center here, about 30 
of the remaining hostages are of Jap- 
anese origin, including the Japanese 
ambassador, Marihisha Aoki; the pres- 
ident's brother and adviser. Pedro 
Fujimori: Congressman Samuel Mat- 
suda; Ricardo Kamiya, the president's 
secretary -general, and several business- 
men and foreign diplomats. 

‘■There is nor a single person in our 
community who does not personally 
know someone who was taken hostage,” 
said Daniel Oscar Tagata, president of 
the cultural center. “We are hurting, 
mainly for those who are still being held 
inside, but we are also asking ourselves 
what this means for our future.” 

Juan Tokeshi, an architect for the 
Center For Promotion and Study of De- 
velopment, which builds housing in 
poor neighborhoods, said that he wor- 
ried that the hostage crisis could cause 
many in the Japanese-Peruvian com- 
munity to become more insular. 


The first Japanese immigrants en- 
dured long hours for little pay and often 
faced discrimination in the cotton fields 
and sugar plantations. Most pooled their 
resources and moved to coastal cities, 
where they became entrepreneurs. 

By World War n, immigrants and 
their children had become a prosperous 
community of about 1 5.000 concentrated 
around Lima. During the war, however, 
bands of nationalist thugs attacked Jap- 
anese businesses and the authorities de- 
ported 1,400 Japanese immigrants. The 
community continued to suffer blatant 
racist attacks well into the 1950s. 

There are about 80,000 Peruvians of 
Japanese origin in a country of more 
than 24 million people. It is the second 
largest Japanese community in Latin 
America, exceeded only by the million 
or so Japanese-Brazilians. 

Japanese-Peruvians have never fully 
become assimilated into the dominant 
mestizo culture, which has long respec- 
ted their work ethic, values and hu- 
mility. In recent years, however, many 
have branched outside what are con- 
sidered traditional roles. Only about 
half of the community speaks Japanese, 
and many are now marrying outside 
their ethnic group. 

The community has long been divided 
politically. When Mr. Fujimori was first 
elected in 1990, he won with scant sup- 
port from his fellow Japanese-Penivi- 
ans, who, fearing they would become a 
target of radical leftist guerrillas bent on 



COURT; 

Legalised Suicide? 

Continued from Page 1 


the court ruled that a 


has 2 con- 
stitutionally protected right to refuse 


& 


unwanted medical treatment- But that 
case — brought by parents who wanted 
to disconnect their daughter's feeding 
tube — involved the rather passive 
withdrawal of artificial life supports. 
Wednesday’s question posed a more 


difficult dilemma": one that puts the phy- 
jf bringing on 


Several hundred students marching near the ambassador's seized res- 
idence in Lima with Japanese and Peruvian flags to support hostages. 


ring the gc 
the writer Mario Vargas Llosa. 

“As a community, we are more Per- 
uvian today than ever before.” said 
Julio Higashi Lopez, a former hostage 
and president of Irnagen Noticias, a 


THE BEST OF EUROPEAN BUSINESS TRAVEL 


AMSTERDAM 


? iiunine' fa'm mu-c-um. ihoppint' area 
anti rcJaurjntv l*l nnmn<r- from bit. i ne- 
bcin, '71 minis, cvi-cuuvc floor jml 
iihx'fuu: mom- upro liKxt permit. 

live upj.-r.hk io <\ccuiivc 

!■»•« I.VI (*.• . *1 1 1 IrtT - «r\. n MCI 

Ant-UuLun I?£-|-U1 
10 7 BG Anworiim 
TVJ. i.'IOm.STJ ir* 

Fax : h*iSS 


iRvr 


LONDON 


r ic «. iImui 


|Owi>i London’' ith'H ctaoni and iratbrianal 
h Ktrfc. » irfi mj h. charm and .jrinnaf tty . 
Em iirt> 'muled in dkr hem 
|ul the W iM End and otcrioulm;: Great Pari. 
V™ an ITT Sttajim hold 


PwaJill). London. \\ IY 8BX 
Td:<4-*i n JWhj: i 
Fix: <■«. l0t<5 


DUSSELDORF 




27 room* up to l?ftl ptrr'.'n.t 

New lohbv a. rtsnuraiu 
CIo-c m culturaf ami buirws.canta- 
Fuiryround and jttpnn mix IOimn>uuat 


Georg-Glock-Slni'* 20 
4IUTA Du.s.>|durt 
Tot : 140-2 1 1 1 a3770 
Fax -141-21 It 4.'«?7 65fl 


LUGANO 


BEX-ves-S 


PANORAMA • COMFORT • BUSINESS 
a Iwre S» l-% Omtirj nwiT. lulun Hn*pnafU‘ 
I 'I r,«miN lultx aitx\indiiiiiiwd. 2 a-Mourani'. 

I Amcnt-an Ixir, mumiL- .uininun^pxil. 
puriin a Mcctim: Faciliue. up in 51* i per-on* 
■".-•1- - 1 c.oL»f>- n LIP «HRI wipe 
Via Canon In. C'H - Wl l' Luimiui 
Tel (4|.«J| inifj zy .*2 
Fax.i4l-uh*W4 , i5 is 


EDINBURGH 


© 

Sheraton Grand 


H U T I L 
CPI X HI HbH 


Thu Bor Howl in Edinburgh 


I Fonul Square 


Squj 

Edinburg EH 3 0SR Scoiland 


Tol • (44 1 13| 229*1131 
Fa* i44i |3| ::»h254 


MONTREUX 


IE UONTaciM »»1*CE 


. Thu uliimaw luxury in inwn 
in nusniJli.vni -uiri'Iindmii* 
Frcm.li -pcciuln- rc-muram. 
Han>s New -York Bar 
Fur « >ur Vlix-nnf & CunlcixtKv. . 

- La Pern Pubis - Onwcniiifl Center 


H**. Grand Kuc Mi Milieu \. Su-il/vriruHl 
Tel 141-211^2 12 12 
Fax; (41-21 1 H.2 17 17 


FRANKFURT 


STEIGENBERGER 
The Mom Famous HchcI in Frankfurt 


KuiMirnbu 

D-nIJI l Frankfurt. Germany 
Tel • 2J5 02 

FaxM-w-WiZI?'**! 


PARIS 


7,'^. 
/RMTa '-AIU5 


■X - . ITT Sill » %Tlr-. 1.1 XI ‘fr* CM) M11IIX 


Rcevnllj rvnmaicd m il\ imjniwl 


i(%<i\iini ai«vM i«» ^ »•( lj P". 

-pleu-Jiror. ihe hold is timed in Inc heart 


ol the cily I Mi yusi nmnis. ununnei 
rcsiaurtini. har. puiui. banquet i jcilitic-. 
limes' semre. 

33. atctiw. Gisim.- V - TSiiK Pjnv Innwe 
Tel : I33)ii| 53 1'. 77 77 
Fax; 1331 HI 33 23 7K 7K 


GENEVA 

HOTEL DU RHONE 




Boi dsm-nioHn Inca lion - Busincas ecnire - 
• Sbie ul ibe ori - meerinr and banqucJinc 
lacilius ■ Priiaie Tax in ever) room - 
T'.u>hijhh rated restaurant' 


Tel i4l-22i7J| os 31 - Fax : t4l-22i 732 45 JS 


PARIS 



The Only Hotel in Paris 
77wf I Like a Chateau 


Rmii))v In to l«*>F 
Tel i ’ 5| ul 4411? Ml Si 
Fjx • i33i()l 4J u5 S[ M2 


news agency. “I remember when the 
emperor visited Peru 30 years ago. In- 
stead of bowing like everybody else, I 
stretched out my hand, and everyone 
thought I was enuy. ” 

The success of the Japanese-Peruvian 
community is in stark contrast to the 
fortunes of Peru’s other ethnic groups, 
which generally live in extreme poverty. 
The Japanese-Peruvian Cultural Center 
is a testament to the community's 
prosperity. The center contains a clinic 
with 100 doctors and facilities including 

a g ymnas i um. 

■ Ransom Report Denied 

The rebels put a sign up in the Jap- 
anese ambassador's residence on 
Thursday denying government asser- 
tions that they were asking for ransom 
money from their captives, Reuters re- 
ported. 

“Do not lie. Mr. Fnjnnori,” the sign 
said. “Money does not interest us. The 
demand is freedom of our prisoners.” 

In the last two days. President 
Fujimori's government has urged Jap- 
anese companies with representatives 
held captive not to give in to what he 
called “blackmail.” 

Although the rebels have in the past 
kidnapped businessmen and politicians 
to raise money, there has been no ev- 
idence that this was their aim this time. 
Their principal demand has been the 
release of about 400 jailed comrades. 


sician in the active role oi . . 

rfrarh by providing the lethal injection 
or other means of ending a patient's life. 

If the Supreme Court were to uphold 
lower-court rulings finding a consnra- 
tional right to doctor-assisted suicide, 
states would be able to regulate the 
practice but not ban it, as a majority now- 
do. 

A decision in the paired cases will be 
handed down before the court recesses 
this summer. 

This is not an issue of simply “choos- 
ing to die," Chief Justice William H. 
Rehnquist said. “It’s that they warn 
assistance from a physician to do it. 
that's what we’re arguing about,” 

Justice David H. Sourer, one of the 
justices more inclined to protect issues 
of personal privacy, suggested it might 
be too soon for the court to assess the 
risks of making assisted suicide legal, or j| 
to weigh patients' interests in being free ■ 
of pain and suffering. “It may be im- 
possible for a court to assess that sens- 
ibly for a long time until there is more 
experience out in the world,” he said. 

Those who advocate a righi to phy- 
sician-assisted suicide, including some 
doctors, say cancer patients. AIDS vic- 
tims and others who are terminally ill 
should not have to suffer through a 
painful death. An individual’s right to 
privacy, they contend, should guarantee 
the choice to speed death with drugs or 
other methods prescribed by a doctor. In 
other words, people should have a 
choice in their own death. 

Those who oppose that view, includ- 
ing the Clinton administration and the 
Washington and New York state of- 
ficials arguing the case, voice an over- 
riding interest in protecting life and as- 
sert assisted suicide would be abused by 
unscrupulous doctors and greedy re- 
latives. They say it could force de- 
pressed or misguided patients into an^ 
irreversible choice. W 




Appears every Mondav 
To adwrtke rontoa Fred Ronan 
TeL + 33 1 41 439391 
Fax: + 33 Ml 43 93 70 

or your nearest IHT office 
or representative. 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Caribbean 

SAINT MAARTEN. Netherlands Antilles. 
Waartaw Home on Oysapond. * bed. 

4 bam. pod. taaniock wih 2 m depth. 
3000+ sqm land, direct ocean access: 
USS750/WL Fax (561) 273-5101 ISA. 

French ProWnces 

BUY W7H0UT COWtSSfON 

Free! Receive regJarty. at your hors, 
a seteefcn at neat estate corresponding 
to your daman! Fax (33) 4 67 B3 63 19 
or writer. LE PARTENARE EUROPHH 
34297 MorripeSer cedex OS, ftsncs 

French Riviera 

BEAULEU 

CHrmng fids vMs wSh a 
spectacular view on tha sea the harbour 
and Cap Feral. Good wntSuon. 
Interesting price for qracfc sale. 


Lb part pataca 

25 avenue de to Casta 

MC 96000 Monte Carlo 

Tel (377) 93 25 15 00 

Fax (377) 93 25 35 33 
wvwmoreecBfajTcfeadentafi agance 

MOUGtNS (rtote CANNES) 
large via on aw axe garden. 

5 bedrooms * keepsra' quarters 
r 2 garages. RestoemiaL Wrte to : 

Havas Reyes Cares No 9670R. 

BP 271. 06403 Carnes Cadsx. Franca 

NICE C9BE2. BeauSul firoom fiat. 185 
sqm. Located r park. Ft^M Ideal lor 
pratessote use. Tel- 01 5333 2302. 

WEST INDIES 

Pfplli 

| F«c 212-255^552 or 11 

l“Tet 2 12-807-1 (55 ext 221 USA,=|] 

SWITZERLAND 

TAX HAVEN | 


CAMPIONS - Lake Lugano 

and villas with laSuTview. 
immobfliare wehn<-r 
TeL:++419l tv»9 75 49 
I Fax.' -H-iiyi 64963 45 I 




HAUSSMANN Group 


CAPFERRAf 


magmrcent sea wew 

VILLA TERRACES, GARDEN 
PRICE ■ FFBflOaOOO 
Contact Hr KARIM 

Tet *33 (D) 4 92 DO 49 49 
F« *33 (0} 4 S3 89 « 88 


Great Britain 


NEW FOREST HAMPSHIRE England 
Oetached restored and modernised 
house and outage annex. MAIN HOUSE 
3 double beds. 2 bSftrooms, 3 recep- 
tions. fitted tatctai with Aga cooker gas 
fueled, built in hldgettieezer budi in 
neorowave and oven adjacent. Uundiy 
room, ctoatooom. gas fieo bokr tar cen- 
tral healing and domestic hot wter. 
COTTAGE ANNEX. Lounge, plus Mm 
My fined. Bahrain. 2 bedrooms, laun- 
dry room, fuf gas central heanng. hot 
water. EXTERNAL double garage, wel 
stocked garden 2 /ad acre, al mams wa- 
ter. gas, etecrtSty. Freehold 2240000 - 
or nearest otter. Would cansdn part &- 
change far smaller (tax n UK or over- 
seas, all propoatma coratered in confi- 
dence. Tet UK 01425 638738 


HOIIESEAHCM LONDON LTD Lei us 
search lor you We find homes / Rats 
to buy and rent For individuals and 
tampan rea. The puchasere profession- 
als. 7 day 5 -a -week. Tet +44 171 838 
1066 Fa* ♦ 44 171 838 1077 
WpAww7«meseartficoj*A«Ti 


Greece 


5YR0S ISLAND, GREECE. BPOO sun. 
land wnn 100 m. wierlrom. Swim oh 
your house at 4 bedrooms. 3 bate, ate- 
tnc treat, fireplace, fully furnished. liSS 
1 5 or DM 22 mfeon. For finite ido caS 
Germany (+49) 0221 - 496193. 


ALKY0H BAY, 70 km from Athens, at 
me seaside, small 2 -srory vita, qvaity 
constructed S iumsted, 1 100 sjm gar- 
den, quiet surroundings. USS 394.000 
negtaabie. Fax +301-2220933. 


Ireland 


IRELAND WEST COAST. Hetonc House 
on Donegal Bay Tasiehdy restored tor 
buswess or private use. Pease eoraam 
TeWas 3S3 733S367 


HELAND DONEGAL, Thatched Coaage. 
sea view, nicely kristeL 
TsHac 3S3 7335367 


Italy 


POSfTANO - AMALH COAST 
For sale prestigious villa, furnished or 
nol uwttaSang me sea - 2 apartments ♦ 
guest house - swmnung pool on the 
rocks. The vib 4 owned by an offshore 
company. Fa* (Swbedand) +4)911682 
92 49 



Paris and Suburbs 

PARIS ETOHE 

DIRECT OWNBL AVENUE NEL 
CHAWHG APARTUBIT 

4 rooms 110 sqm. fist Boor, sunny, 
double exposure, (an avenue & garden) 
entrance hall, hng. Ur equpped 
american totohm/bariiing. 2 betonoms, 

2 baits (1 nutria), cupboants. cetar 
(t cordortaUe , «udette'. 7th fiooftft 
exam renal revenue). F 11 mSor 

Tet 01 40 54 SO 87 Far 9147 5$ 47 10 

6 th, JARQW DU LUXEMBOURG, rue 
Guynemer on ganlen. Luxurious 120 
sq.m, modem flat My renovated with 
balcony. 3 bedrooms, 1 hath. 1 rfmm 
room, large Svng end tidier * parking. 

Oirect owner +33 (OJ f <2 22 77 31 

PORTE ST CLOUD OQrdermg Paris. 
Charming 45 sqjn. pied a tone with 
treed ran terras, Oriel Tower vnw, at 
contorts. FlSU. Trf +33 (UJ 1 46046074 
or 06 60 64 60 14. RENTAL PQSSRE 

LUXU90USCHAHHNG PENX3E FOR 

SALE ■RUTE DE L'OURCQf 28m X 2 
Henovaiiiw: tedt S Irieached ash Mod 

Full moblity 8 autonomy. At Port 
Champs^ysaes. F3A Tet 01*549 9708 

tail, 31 BID SUCHET - Excapttoral, 
luxuriausly decorated 130 sqm 05 
rooms, 3rd floor + maid’s roam, cetar 
Unbaatatfe price. Vtsi today 1 pm » 5pm 

7 Tat Owner 01 45 27 6*70. 

Portugal 

MARBLE Vast maibte properties n 

Portugal lor sale. Tet: BRUSSELS 

1+32-2} 707.64 08 

Switzerland 

pra LAKE GBCW& ALPS 

L JSa)atoforeiaier 5 authonzed 
■— te our upflcuOy since 1975 

Atuadiw propeites in MONTRBIX 

VEVEY, VtUARS, DIABLBfiTS. 
CRANS-MONTANA, tic. 1 fi) 5 bad 
rooms, SR. 285#W to 15 mio 

REYAC 

52, UonMIant 04-1211 Geneva 2 

Tel 4122-734 15 « Fax 734 12 20 

VELARS OLLQN Central krmtshed 91 
sq.m apartment tor sale. 2 bedrooms. 

2 bate Indoor serimmng pool Cal US 

15U) 737 14 56 ar fiSI4) 781 96 44 

USA Residential 

FLDRDA RETIREMENT 
ccmmr 

2 Bedroom. 2 bath, tuntohed corajo 

S3E500 

2 Bedroom. 2 bath ♦ dan 2 car garage 

condo Si 10,000 

3 fiedoon. 2 Oafft 2800 sq ft fusne on 

5219900 

CENTURY 21 BEGGHS EHTERPBBES 

1-613-634-H17 

ASK FOR JANET OR SHERRY 


BARZAN0 (COHO-MONZA), apartment 


m the green. swmn*w pool, tennis 
enwftvfew 


court bmgJ&ten 
bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. 
Ut 300000.000. Studio 
48009424. 


v. firepUce. 2 


et +39 2 


NYG9h AwnuaBQ Street i Bedroom 

LOCATION, LOCATION 

Fheshgnus Park mew bultfing. 1000 sJ 
sparaus 1 Bedroom apartment Side 
vcw oi Central Park. Mamienance 
Ireiides udKes. Ai price S3S0R 

44a Camanho (232) 893-7023 


DOUGLAS ELUHAN 


VAL VALLEY COLORADO. OPPOSITE 
AnowheaVBeavsr Creek Ski 8 Gall Re- 
sorts, above Sonnenab Gol Resort, lux- 
urious 3 bedroom. 4.5 bams, raranon. 
investment or private residence home. 
Panoramc wew. Wrap-around de* wrt 
hot lub. Loo of suvhme. S735K by own- 
er. FuBy fumehed extra. Negotiable. Tet 
870-926-4466: Far. F70-92644K. E- 
Mat RonaldFlW§aoLcom. 


S.W. FLOROA Usappa Itiand. Sector*- 
ed wateriranl yet dose to h. pod, ren- 
m. croquH; pnvate dedt cherry floors 6 
cetng, master ute ♦ 2 bedroom guest 
wrg. 4 decks, porch, fireplace; photos: 
906-654-3366 Fax: 906-232-2091 after 
Jan 24 Tet 941-2634742. 

WASHHGTON D.C.. (McLean) come- 
menBy located 5 bedroom cotonU, 2-car 
fi siege USS 374900 *1- 703 536 6277 

USA Farms A Ranches 

AHIS1NA-QWNER WIST SELL beauti- 
ful 80 acres ranchtarcL Take over total 
pace: 518.700.00. Just £250.00 down 6 
mnvriy. Wma: P.O. Box 3060, Uesqt*e. 
Nevada 89024 USA 

Real Estate 
for Rent 


Germany 

BERUN - WEST, CENTRE, superb My 
lumrstied fiat 170 sq.m.. 2 magnfeert 
receptions ,2 OTririe bedronns ,2 spaocus 
bate, presfseteirroam brgfmretemlfuly 
fitted totchen/breaktea room, parking. 

Tet -H» 3034 IT628. Fax; 3034 82164. 

Great Britain 

GflOSVENOR SQUARE Wl, 1 bedroom 
luxury BaL 075 per week. Teh 0181 692 
450IA71 71 629 54» 

Holland 

HENTHOUSE MTHtNATUHAL 

No I n Holand 

tor (semi) fumshed housesWfiate. 

Tet 31-016448751 Fax: 31-206465009 
NTxjwt 1S21. 1063 Am Amstentem 

Paris Area Furnished 

Embassy Service 

YOUniittL ESTATE 

AGENT IN PARIS 

Td: +33 (0}t 47iOJtLM 

10th. RUE DE LA POMPE 

BefiubU 2 wms, KBhwin. 

'oteftea eijNtel dressng 

T* +!b[0)1 «^85 62 

from 7pm to lQpm or leave message. 

CAPfTAi £ 1 PARTNERS 

Handpcked qudty apakuBris. $ sees 

Pans and sububs 

TW+ 33 (qi- 46148711 . Fsx(0)1-461M21S 

Ift you bast l 


120i. 'TO sq.m., Miednxm fiat (TV. 
yw, * pertong. i y» from Uarch. 
FIMOOfito. Ur Cam +53(iJfl44fiB87S7 
day or +3H0IMM457B {ate 7pm). 


0^4; 



Ideal axammodaiion. studto-5 tKdraoms 


OuaJjty and saw assured 
READY 


' TO HOVE IN 
Tel 01-4753 8013. Fax 01-4551 7577 


PICASSO's U0NTHARTRE, t mill, to 
Bateau Lara*. U.S. owner rents charm- 
ing. Wry sgupped 2 -mom apartment 
Cable TV. Weal tor busnessman or cou- 
ple. Week FI 550 no, monffi FB^QQ neL 
Tel (0) I4f 43 S3 04 oflee ate 10m 


NEULLY - 30 sqjn. STUDIO + kitchen 
♦ bathroom in chaining town house, 
beared in sedudad private news. F3£O0 
phis etedrioty Tel *33 0H 47 45 36 72 
(ask hr Jane, fiom 10 am to 8 pm). 


BOULOGJff n&x Maratsh^s, 55sjm 


fiat. M roams, newty redone, parting 
D net FF7.00Q lurirtstad. 


possible. FFBJJOO i 
Tel +33 {0| 1 48 05 48 07 Fax 46051833 


LARGE, LUXURIOUS, ELEGANT, 4 
bedrooms, next to Eiffel Tower. Fully 
equpped. Tet 310452-2280 USA 


SPECTACULAR views from 3 bateonies. 
Iiily fumshed 2 -bedroom penthouse m 
L» Hates Fll.000. Tat 0» 4013 9S71 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


PARC IS0NCEAU 

Prestigious upartnwa, newly redone. 

3 receptions ■+ Swig. 4 bedrooms. 

4 mm ♦ mad's room. 
FF35JXXI + FFSaXL 
LA GRAKOEHE TH. +33fD|1-«t2<77D0 


USA 


NYC FURN1SHS) APARTMENTS. 

1 week to 1 year. Greet Loeaions. Cal 
Pal'Chiqui: 21S-448-9223. Fax: 
2i244fisS6 E-Mat etooreezeteim 


Real Estate Wanted/Exchange 


WANTED: PAHS FURNISHED 2-3 bed- 
rooms; eteaor. tor n&ed prateesw. 
Ut. Fac fiatean 21H8fi5500 USA. 


TO PLACE 
AI\ A I) 
Irt THIS 
SECTIOrt 


Cod 

Fred HONAN 

in Paris 


(33-1) 41 43 Q3 9I 
(33-1) 41 43 93 70 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TOLUY’S 


HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 


Appears 
on Page / / 


Announcements 


BAHEUE AS 24 

AU 10 JANVB 1957 
Rfc Hot TVA ea dam facafa 
^acbcSon depootta an deraeade) 
Ronpto In teems otedeos 


FRANCE (zone C) en FFJ 1 -TVA 20tfi% 
GO: 3 S3 POO': 2,45 

SC97: Ml SCSR Sp 


IK 


«u-: 

05517 


FOOT 


AllflBAGNE {zone I) DMA - TVA 15\ 
ZONE I - fi ; 


CO: 1.10 
2DHEB-I: 


Eft 1 ,» 

SCSf^ 

Ul 

ZOHEB-F: 

e ft 1 JB 

SCSP; 

1.39 

ZOfEIV-F: 

SCSP: 1,40 

ZONEIV-G; 

GO: 1.10 

R»: 

0 JS 

BELSKNIE en FBfl ■ 

TVA 21% 


AU 0901/1537; 

GO: 

2322 

AU 1001/1997. 

RID; 

11 ® 

SC97: 33.06 

SCSP: 

31j07 


HOUjAIN* NLOI ■ TW 175% 


GOt 2Q.17 


ESPAGNEl 
sa 

SC97; 1«L4t 


fin PTASfiTVA 16% 
SCSP: 103,28 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S! 

m 


ff you enjoy readng ttie SfT 
n*bh you travel, why not 
also get I at heme? 
Sam&tiay defivery avaiabte 
in key U.S. dfies 


Cafi m 800 882 2884 


nuwinmmuwnig . 


Personals 


THANK YOU SACffiD HEART 
of Jesus an) SI Jude far prayers 
enswred JC. 


Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO DERGI FRANCE 
WEEKEND: FF515. 7 DAYS: FI 500. 
TB-" PAWS *33 (Off 43 68 Si 55. 


Legal Services 


MfORCE m 24 te. Lawyer. No Travel 
Since 1969. Tet ++9719.7718292, Fax 
9719.7718294. hltyc/tevwJisflo^ns- 
eLcomftfvoise. Cortenfel & docrete 


DIVORCE 1-DAY CERttRB) 

Cfi or Rax f714) 96MB95. Wte 18787 
Beach BM. «37. HunUngton Beach. CA 
92648 LLSA- eine] - Rstonne]ureuQm 


DIVORCE IN 1 DAY. No travel Wfte.- 
Bib 377, Sutxny. MA 01776 USA. Tet 
508W43®87, Ftoc 508/4434J1B1 


Business Opportunities 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
INSURANCE BANKS 
00KPAMES& TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
MaGRATOtWASSPOfTTS 
TRADEflNANCE 


ASTON CORPORATION 


TRUSTIES LTD 

19 PM Read, Dragto, Mi of Ifee 
Tet 01624 628591 
Fromm 625128 
London Tet ffTIJ 222 8066 
PR tITIJ 233 1M9. 

E Itafi Ita. arionflMhqidMtnt 


MAGHAnOH OPPORTUWnES 
OWn Penreneni Residency. 2nd 
Ofeenship & 2nd PaBaport fe Bancwic 
ImesfinOT. 100% fsgai Goremroenl 
nogoms, dating at S2BJXXL Issued h 
90 to 180 days. Finds laid In Escrow 
wS you recave your documnlB. 

WTBNATiONAL ATTOftNCYS &A. 

CARffiBEAft Fac +G90) 290 587 
re Fac *{90) 290 684 
E4IAL WMTTMCLCCW 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES. For tree bo- 
due or oUob Tat tundon 44 tBt 741 
1224 Far « 181 748 6556/8338 
HWKdPPteUnxOJfc 


Business Services 


TOWOflNCEfff LONDON 
Bond S&sel - UaB, Ptone, Fax, Telax 
Tel: 44 171 «9 9192 Fax 171 489 7517 


Kallback 

Offers 


Lowest Rates 
Ever! 


Enjoy even peaw savings on 
Heroational cate. Benefi from the 
same Km teas 24-hous a day- We 
secure the dearest and most refiafale 
fines. Use Ksftack from hone, work 
or hotels and sava 


Cal dob aid sae non today! 


Tel 14064844600 


Fax 1-206-282-6666 
lines open 24 hous. 
Ageite ngurias wdcate 


tijUkatl back 


417 Second Avenue West 
Seattle, wa gang USA 


Lowest Infl 


Telephone Rates! 

Cafi The USA Front 

Germany S033 

IK — SD2S 

Paya. S032 

Smtavland six 


Sate Arete 


-S 0 -25 


Cal For Al Ratos 
25% CanmMan 
Agnti Wteaeie! 


-SO-09 


KallMart 

T* 1-407-777-4222 Fax: 1-407-777-8411 


-If 


III 

\v 


\ 


f ';if& 


‘I'i 

v'.'Ux* 


■ri*’ !% • 


•'*-V 


i.-rl-fi- 

. 




• F- Y „ 


PRIME BANK 


GUARANTEES 
Vflfto Capsal Finance Avaiate 
hr Guvemraert Projects and 
Gavemmem Coonaoes 

, tai m far ate. 

Lotjb Projads ov Spadd^ 
Also, Iras Tam Finance for 
Large ana Sml Ccqpenc 
No commisson IWi Funded 




RsweauAJivE 
Neafcd to act as liteon 
Reese repfjrn En^fcfa 


VBOURE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 
teetaetf bnfan 
16311 Vxauri Bhrd, St* 999 

Btoino, CaBnmia 91436 USA. 
FiB fhu 9U) 905-1696 


«y • v-.j.- 


W ..*V 

A- 



.r , ■ ‘ ‘ ~ • '* ' \ 











































EUROPE 


N Opposition in Serbia 


;c. ?< ■■ 

a5JS| 

«*«*• '■ 

* *M • i 



But Marches WUI Continue Despite Ruling 


a 








’ -. “• i ia> 


- c 


- 'i : ^- 


'■ *7’ 


BHLG^DE — President Slobodan 
'.Milosevic on Thursday made bas third 
concession to protestors in, as .many 
$ays, but the opposition said m»re 
i'* e ^^stralions would continue. 

. Serbia’s Supreme.. Court, 'widely be- 
iUeved to be directed by Mr. MiJosevic, 

-announced that die opposition had, after 

.an. wonmfinicipal elections in Vxsac, 
°f Belgrade, in November. 

■- v ^ac -was on the list of six major 
towns flat Foreign Minister Milan 
Milutmovic said last week had been 
iWOT by the governing Socialist Party. 

But Zoran Petrov, an opposition 
-Spokesman, told the independent B-92 
.radio Thursday that the Supreme Court 
jhad accepted a complaint addressed to it 

.by opposition officials in the town. The 

court ruled that the oppositioh had won 
seats on die council, compared with 
? 1.9 for the Socialists, Mr. Petrov saii 
j, On Wednesday, Mr. Milosevic’s 
-government. confronted by tone than 
J j? 0 days of protests over its cancellation 

'J •• :■ «pf opposition election victories, recog- 
_nized that die opposition had won in 
-Nivihe second-largest city in Serbia.. 

The. announcement on Nis was “a 
positive development; but it doesn’t go 
Jtwriy far enough,” the U.S. State De- 
jrartmeiit spok^man, .Nicholas Bums, 
jsaid Thursday in Washington, 
i; Mr. Bums said that Mr. Milosevic 
Id not win weald applause by. “drib- 
° put minor concessions.” 
v *lie Serbian government does not 
^bave the right to grant the opposition 
{Victories that die opposition won on its 
cpwn in elections,’ * be said. “Govern- 
ment leaders do not decide elections, 
-people do. And Mr. MQoseyic doesn't 
-seem to have grasped that fundamental 
Tesson about what democracy is.” 

On Tuesday, the govermrwnt recbg- 
.nized an opposition victory in die town 
.pf Lapovo. But the opposition said 
.Thursday that these three concessions 
.would not stop the protests. , . 

“The moves show that the authorities 
; starting to ease their stance, but we 
are continuing with our protest’’ said 
-Zoran Djindjic of the Democratic- 
Party. 

Opposition leaders held a rally Thurs- 
day afternoon in central Belgrade, and 
student protesters blockaded a police 
cordon after forcing die police to back 
off at another location. 

Student leaders said they would con- 
tinue their actions until an official state- 
ment was issued to the police to not 
block die streets. They appealed to res- - 


to come out and support them 
jgbourtbe night. (AFP, Reuters} 

■ UN Identifies Bodies * 

United Nations war-crimes investi- 
gators ha.v« identified 60 of about 200 
bpdies exhumed from a mass grave in 
eastern Croatia, and confirmed that they 
tittre hospital patients executedby Ser- 
biajo forces in 1991, Croatian state me- 
dia said Thursday, Reuters reported 
from Zagreb. - 

. ON experts working for the inter- 
national war crimes tribunal at The Hag- 
ue confirmed that the victims had been 
patents who. had been taken from the 
hospital; in Vukovar by besieging Ser- 
bian troops. They were later executed in 
ttevionityaf the Ovcara grave, a few 
kilometers south of thetown.Theagency 
reported.*- 



Austrian Rightist Asserts 
Role in Bank Sale Dispute 


. Oman Mn'mvTbc A.u»-ixal Prrj, 

A man examining a car engine in central Belgrade during street 
protests. He carrieda sign reading, “I repair wrecks, well and quickly." 


RemcT'. 

VIENNA — The leader of the far 
right. Jcterg Haider, exploiting a split in 
Austria’s government, said Thursday 
that his Freedom Party was holding 
talks with conservatives in the govern- 
ing coalition over the planned privat- 
ization of the country's second-largest 
bank. 

Chancellor Fran 2 Vranitzky’s plan 
for the sale of Creditanstall-Bankverein 
AG has driven a wedge between his 
Social Democrats and "their conserva- 
tive allies, the People’s Party. 

Creditanstalt was once the bankers of 
the Habsburg imperial family and is still 
considered a conservative fiefdom. 

The People's Party fiercely objects to 
the prospect of the Creditanstalt's being 
taken over by a rival. Bank Austria AG. 
that is indirectly controlled by the Social 
Democrat-dominated city of Vienna. 

Mr. Haider, who has made strong 
electoral gains in recent years but was 



’s Crossroads: Two Paths to Oblivion? 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Post Service 




Mi;* 








■v; 


BELGRADE — Shortly after the 
eruption of Serbia's political crisis, a 
cargoon appeared in a local newspaper 
that summed op the critical choice fa- 
cing the last old-style Communist boss 
in Europe. The drawing showed Pres- 
ident Slobodan Milosevic of -Serbia 
standing at a fork in the road. A signpost 
offered him a choice of two directions: 
“Europe ’’and “Romania.” 

The newspaper readers understood 
“Europe” as shorthand _for the intro- 
duction of the rate of law. radical eco- 
nomic reform and an end to the in- 
ternational isolation rfpar resulted from 
Serbian involvement in the three-and-a- 
haff-ycar war in Bosnia. 

' ‘‘Romania,” by contrast, was the 
code word for a frill-blooded Commu- 
nist dictatorship cut off from the outside 
world and condemned to a future of 
economic penury. •. • • - . 

It has been more, than seven weeks 
sinceprocests erupted fh Belgrade over 
the alleged theft or local elections by the 
Milosevic government. Seemingly ob- 
livious to the political turmoil around 
him, the Serbian s tr on gm an has been 
hesitating in front of the imaginary sign- 
post, either unwilling or unable to take 
an irrevocable step, in one direction or 
another. La the view of most political 
analysts, time, is now running out for 
him to make a decision. 


“We are living on a knife edge,” said 
Ivan Stambolic, a former Serbian pres- 
ident and political mentor to Mr. Mi- 
losevic who was forced out of office in 
1987 after his protegfi embraced the 
cause of Serb nationalism. “Neither 
ride wants to resort to violence, but the 
situation isso tense that a single incident 
could spark a general conflagration.” 

Mr. Milosevic's problem, and the 
best explanation for his hesitation, is 
that either course leads to likely political 

• NEWS ANALYSIS ~ 

oblivion. The experience of Eastern 
Europe has shown that any Communist 
leader who introduces democracy and 
radical economic reform is almost certain 
to be booted out of office in the next 
election. If he restated to the Romanian 
variant, he might succeed in holding on to 
power a little longer, but could eventually 
suffer die fate of the Romanian dictator 
Nicoiae Ceausescu, who was executed 
by his own army on Dec. 25, 1989. 

One of the most striking things about ' 
die present crisis has teen Mr. Mi- 
losevic’s own silence. Bis last big pub- 
lic appearance was on Dec. 24, when he 
addressed a rally of his supporters in 
Belgrade. A week later, he gave a three- 
minute televised speech to mark New 
Year’s Eve. 

Over the past mouth, Mr. Milosevic 
has withdrawn into self-imposed seclu- 
sion, refusing to meet with Western 


diplomats or the more liberal wing of 
the ruling coalition- Instead, he has sur- 
rounded himself with political cronies 
and appears to be relying heavily for 
advice on his wife, Mirjana Markovic, a 
hard-boiled Marxist ideologist and 
founder of the hard-line Yugoslav 
United Left party. 

“In essence, he rules alone,’’ said a 
former political ally who recently fell 
out with Mr. Milosevic. “He has cre- 
ated a kind of virtual reality for himself. 
If something does not fit into his pi an. he 
thinks there is something wrong with 
reality and that h is simply necessary to 
change the person who was unable to 
carry out his orders.” 

This source compared Serbian politics 
to Indonesian shadow-puppet plays: 
“You can see the figures, but the real play 
is taking place in the shadows. There are 
two parallel systems of government, one 
of which is public and has no power. The 
other government exists in secret, and has 
all the power but no responsibility.” 

Western diplomats and Serbian of- 
ficials alike worry that there is prac- 
tically no one in Mr. Milosevic’s inner 
entourage who is prepared to tell him 
the truth. According to these accounts, 
one of the few people in Belgrade who 
are ready to speak frankly with the Ser- 
bian leader is the U.S. charge d'affaires, 
Richard Miles. Mr. Milosevic, 
however, has refused to meet with Mr. 
Miles or any other Western ambassador 
for the past month. 


“He is mad at the Americans because 
he thinks that they have cheated him,” 
said a pro-Milosevic politician, noting 
that the United States had relied on Mr. 
Milosevic to push through the 1995 
Dayton peace accord on Bosnia. “The 
hard-liners are playing on this anger.” 

According to this "source, Mr. Mi- 
losevic initially appeared willing to ac- 
cept the loss of Belgrade and other cities 
in the elections on Nov. 17. 

“They have a plane, but they don’t 
have a pilot.’ ' the Serbian president had 
said of the opposition. 

But it is widely assumed that his wife 
and other hard-liners in her party, a mem- 
ber of the ruling coalition, persuaded Mr. 
Milosevic not to risk allowing the op- 
position to gain such a prominent polit- 
ical platform for its views. 

“The only thing that Milosevic is 
concerned about is power, and that 
power is being eroded day by day.' ’ said 
Miodrag Perisic. a leader of the Demo- 
cratic Party, which belongs to the To- 
gether coalition. 

What started out as a relatively man- 
ageable protest against stolen elections 
has now mushroomed into a full- 
fledged democracy movement. Oppo- 
sition leaders have made clear that they 
will not be satisfied with partial con- 
cessions. The minimum political price 
is full access to the media and a level 
playing field for Serbia’s presidential 
and parliamentary elections, which are 
scheduled later this year. 


frozen out of power by the Socialist- 
conservative alliance, said at a news 
conference: “We have already had sev- 
eral rounds of talks with Famleitnerand 
his expens.” Economics Minister Jo- 
hann Famleitner is a member of the 
People’s Party. 

He said the two parties had found 
common ground on a number of points 
about the sale of the flagship bank but 
declined to give details. 

The People’s Party, led by Foreign 
Minister Wolfgang" Schuessel. has 
called for an emergency session of Par- 
liament nest Tuesday. It could turn into 
a showdown between the two governing 
parties. 

The conservatives, who could muster 
a majority in Parliament if supported by 
Mr. Haider's Freedom Party, would like 
to see Creditanstalt sold "to an inter- 
national consortium led by the Italian- 
controlled insurer EA-Generali. 

Mr. Vranitzky has called for a special 
session of coalition leaders Monday in 
an attempt to defuse the crisis in his 
year-old government. 

Finance Minister Viktor KJinm. a So- 
cial Democrat, who has sole responsi- 
bility for choosing the Creditanstalt buy- 
er. said he hoped the conservatives would 
not force a government breakdown. 

“That would mean fresh elections 
and. the only one to profit from it would 
be Haider.” he said in an interview in 
Thursday's edition of the current affairs 
magazine News. 

Mr. Haider's parry scored nearly 28 
percent in European elections last Oc- 
tober, just a few thousand votes behind 
the two big parties, which have gov- 
erned Austria alone or together since the 
end of World War II. 

Mr. Haider said he did not believe 
that the government would crumble 
over the Creditanstalt affair. 

The Final deadline for offers to buy 
Creditanstalt expires Friday. Creditan- 
stalt on Thursday reported what may be 
its last set of preliminary profit figures 
before the sale. Group net earnings in- 
creased to 2.6 billion schillings {$235 
million) in 1996 from 2.16 billion 
schillings a year earlier, helped by a 9- 
percent decline in risk provisions to 
about 3.1 billion schillings. 

■ Board Member Resigns 

A member of Creditanstalt-Bankver- 
ein’s policy-setting supervisory board 
resigned amid the anticipated takeover 
of the bank by Bank Austria. Bloomberg 
reported from Vienna. 

Paul Loebenstein. a three-year su- 
pervisory board member who repres- 
ented the interests of minority share- 
holders. has submined his resignation, 
the bank's chief executive said. 





Belgian B A Nuclear Link to Leukemia? 


\ 


2s 


*!«■ 








jan police searching for pedophile 
irishmen!! 


BRUSSELS — _ , r _ r . 

pornography raided 60 homes and other establishments 
around the country in a coordinated operation Thursday , the 
spokesman fora Brussels court said.. 

“Based on a list of addresses we received from France, 
and another from Great Britain, we carried out searches at 
60 or so places today,” said the spokes m an, Josef Colpjn. 

Mr. Colpin said about 20 of the searches were in and 
around Brussels- He declined to give details. ■ (Reuters ) , 

Jewish Agency Rebuffs Swiss / 

JERUSALEM — The chairman Of die Jewish' Agency 
.refused Thursday to meet with the Swiss ambassador to 
Israel in a growing dispute with Swhzextand-over com- 
pensation for Holocaust victims. . .. 

Jewish leaders are furious about dramatic by Switzerland's 
former president, Jean-Pascal Delamuraz, describing a sug- 
gestion to set up a condensation fund far elderly Holocaust 
survivors as “Wackmafl.” 

In a letter to the Swiss ambassador, Thomas Borer, 
Abraham Burg said he and his colleagues would not meet 
with representatives of the Swiss government ' ‘until such 
time as the appalling statement made bythe former pres- 
ident is retracted." -CAP) 


PARIS — A new study prepared for release Friday said 
that children playing on the beach neara Bench nuclear waste 
processing center in Normandy face a higher risk than others 
of developing leukemia. 

The report, in the British Medical Journal,' raised quesr 
tions about government monitoring of the state-owned 
company Cogema. which railed the study alarmist. 

Cogema’s La Hague plant west of Cherbourg, processes 
waste firm more than 50 nuclear powerplants across France. 
Researchers studied 27 cases of children with leukemia 
within a 35-kilameter (20-raile) radius of the plant. Two other 
nudear sites are in the regjoa. 

Jean-Francois Viel, a professor of public health bio- 
stahsdes and epidemiology at the University of Besancon. 
led the study. (AP) 

France Expels 89 Immigrants 

PARIS — France expelled 89 Moroccan and Malian 
immigrants who were in France illegally or who had “dis- 
turbed public order.” the Interior Ministry announced Wed- 
nesday . Of the total, 33 were recently released from prison. 

A specially chartered aircraft bound for Casablanca and 
Bamako camed30 Moroccans and47 Malians. Twelve other 
Moroccans were flown borne on a regular flight. f, AFP) 


CROSSWORD 


T-_ ' , 

ACROSS 

"» Whe'e NaCl is 

collected 


IB 1953 title 
heroine 
17 Classic 
adventurer 




8 First name m _ 

£ German politics . ■ , 


fiction 


Irvod 













Est. 1911, Paris 
“ Sank Roo Doe Noo ” 


A Space for Thought. 


ac Relative o!_ ■ ■ 

‘Fudael* ■ • - 
22 ‘Show Boat' 
composer 
. 23 Focal point 
- aa Potftico Bella - - 
27 Overty strict 
31 Kind or buddy 

35 Rate (be 

pettecu 

ae Vote In Quebec 
37 ’.Lite pf Christ’ ’. 

3 a Diana. of "Trie 

Avengers'.' 

38 <v6- Across. e.g. 

41 Senior tnemfier' 

. 42 Abbey Theater 
name • ■ . , ’ • • 
4 * Brigitte is on* 

45 About 
48 Four-time ' 

Emmy-winning ** 
series- 

■ <R Biminatlonganli 
4 * Detectives' info, 

.possibly 

si Health grp 
sa ‘Heartbreak-- . 

' Douse" winter. 

SB transportation : 

. Secretary 
beginning 193^- 

57 Wouldn't tiurl 

si He coined, the. 


♦ With tO- and 
15-Dowri.a 
FeHinl quae 
■ Prove to be 
successful 

8 Suffix with 
serior 

7 None-too- 
gerrtie landing 
.8 Frequency unit 

9 Jeff Lynne's 
. rock grp. 

. ioSee4*Oown 

11 Wee parasite 

12 Client 

13 Cousin ol 8 gull 
is See 4-Down 

2 t Epitome of 
simplicity 
24 Exchange, 
as Where: Lat. 

27 Utterance 

28 Mohawk Rjver 
city • 

28 Splendid 
30 Easier start 

32 Office assistant 

33 japan's 

Bay . .. 

”34 “Terraco at La 
_ Havre," e.g. 
JTKindof ' 
radiation 
40 Hardly 
ofd-fasf»oned 



I f I I L 

PUBtatyAASMOT 


CiVpir York Times/Edited by W ill Short* 


Solution to Puzzle of Jan. 9 


phrase 
“Harmony in 

* ArSdicwnberg's 

m 

□ 

a 

D □ 

a 

H 

D 

□ 

discord" 

' — -to 

0 

0 

□ 

0 

0 

a 

0 

□ 

0 

to Holdings 

Napoteon" 

D 

0 

□ 

0 a 

□ 

□ 

0 

a 

0 

65 Compliant one 

4a “Melrose place* ' 

0 

□ 

Q 

□a 

□ 

0 


□ 

□1 

8b Lifting ctevu* 

'• role 

0 

0 

13 

sa 



na 

a 


6s Defrauded 

DOWN ' 

.' 1 Common 
quotation 

*- attribution: Abbr. 
iUnsubstantiaf 
3 Italian body df 
. water 


M Impersonators 
. sa Worn but 
■3 Wanderer 

sa^lliad" figure 
5C-5BCredbuBof 
Egyptian myth 

■a Some son 

SB Start of : 
Massachusetts’ 
motto 


«o Made a tax 
.. valuation: Abbr._ 
e Medium grade 
84 Forbes rival 


me 


IN IE IT I 


|E L U M| 

it a ml 


A S Ej 
N T Tj 
£0 N! 


ni»r«SA.D«pt.wrzwifc-w.iniGa'— th<n4mimnawaia 



Begin your owi? tradition. 

Whatever innovations Patrk Philippe introduce, 
every watch is still rraftei by band. 

The mens Annual Calendar is the first self-winding calendar 
watch in the world to require resetting only once a year. 

And because of the exceptional workmanship, each one is a unique object. 

Which is perhaps why some people fed that you 

never actually own a Patek Philippe. 

You merely look after it for tbr next generation. 


❖ 

ROJEK PHILIPPE 



\ 










P4GE6 


Main Korean Union 
Urges Biggest Strike Yet 


Students and Workers Clash With Police 


CimpiLJ K Ow Dujutvha 

SEOUL — The main labor union 
group called Thursday for the biggest 
strike in South Korean history, while 
prosecutors threatened to send die po- 
lice to seize militant unionists holed up 
in a Seoul cathedral. 

Central Seoul was turned into a 
rubble-strewn battleground as about 
2,000 workers and students clashed 
with riot policemen as they tried to 
prevent the police from arresting leaders 
of an outlawed group who lead the 
walkouts over a new labor law. 

The workers and students clashed 
with hundreds of riot police in the My- 
ongdong shopping block. The police 
fired tear gas. forcing stores to shut 
down and shoppers to flee. Bui the 
protesters regrouped and fought back 
with rocks and metal pipes. 

The Federation of Korean Trade Uni- 
ons, a legal group thar claims I _2 million 
members, said a rwo-day strike would 
begin Tuesday to try to force the gov- 
ernment to abandon a new law that 
allows companies to lay off workers. 

The law gives management more 
power to fire workers and hire substitute 
labor, actions previously unheard-of in 
a country where lifetime employment 
was nearly guaranteed. It also grants 
greater powers to unions, but puts those 
powers on hold for three to five years. 

Power, port and railroad workers 
were urged to go on partial strike and all 
others to join a frill stoppage. City trans- 
port would stop, while hospitals, banks, 
hotels, and state industries would also 
be affected. 

Earlier in the day. as the strikes 
'mtered their third week. President Kira 
('oung Sam told his cabinet: “The on- 


going illegal strikes are disrupting so- 
cial order and worsening the state of the 
economy. They must be dealt with 
harshly bylaw.” 

He then ordered the ministers to lay 
off 10.000 public servants in phases — a 
measure that takes advantage of the 
freer hand allowed by the new (aw. 

Stale prosecutors issued warrants for 
seven leaders of the outlawed Korean 
Confederation of Trade Unions to ap- 
pear in court Friday. 

Several hundred riot police burst into 
the militant group's headquarters and 
offices late Thursday to seize docu- 
ments, a union official said. 

The president of the confederation, 
Kwon Young KH, and his lieutenants 
said they would refuse to comply with 
the order to appear in court. They were 
huddled in a plastic tent in the grounds 
of Myongdong Cathedral in Seoul. 

“If they don't appear tomorrow 
morning” in court, a prosecution of- 
ficial said, * ‘we will have to send a large 
number of police officers to execute the 
warrants." 

Any attempt to storm the church 
grounds would almost certainly spark 
fierce clashes and reignite strikes that 
began to fizzle Thursday as workers 
streamed back to shipyards and car 
plants in response to government 
threats. 

Earlier, a global trade union group, the 
International Confederation of Free 
Trade Unions, appealed to the Inter- 
national Labor Organization to intervene 
to prevent the arrests of the labor lead- 
ers. 

Mr. Kwon called for international 
pressure on Seoul to repeal the labor 
law. (Reuters. AP. AFP ) 



Students and workers fighting with the police Thursday in Seoul, in an effort to protect labor union leaders. 


Rebels Attack Town and Army Base in Sri Lanka 


CaapSedbyOtrSteffFroaiDiipmeha 

COLOMBO — Tamil Tiger guer- 
rillas attacked a key town and a mil- 
itary base in northern Sri Lanka on 
Thursday, but were repulsed after 
about 500 of their fighters were killed 
or wounded, the Sri Lankan Defense 
Ministry said. 

The ministry said that the Liberation 
Tigers of Tamil Eelam attacked the 
small town of Paranthan and the Ele- 
phant Pass military complex, and that 
fighting raged for most of the day. 

“Troops have recovered the bodies 
of 60 soldiers who died in the attack, * ' 
a military spokesman said. “We're 
still searching for more casualties.” 

The ministiy said earlier that 232 of 
its troops had been wounded. “The 
figure of our own troops killed in ac- 
tion is likely to increase, as the search 
is still going on.' ' the ministry said. 


The Elephant Pass camp is signi- 
ficant because the area links die main- 
land with the northern Jaffna Pen- 
insula, which government troops 
captured last year. Paranthan is the 
array's only link to die Kilinochchi 
area, which it recently captured. 

The Defense Ministry said it based 
its toll on the guerrilla casualties .on 
intercepted rebel radio transmissions. 

But a spokesman in London for the 
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam 
denied the army's figures. 

“The government claim is totally 


false.'' the spokesman, Anton Raja, 
said by telephone. 


“It routinely ex- 

LTTE deaths to. maintain 

agging morale among su p porters and 
troops.*' He said he had no details of 
die battle. 

The Tigers used human-wave tac- 
tics and suicide bombers to overrun 


the defenses at Paranthan, 280 kilo- 
meters (185 miles) north of the capital, 
Colombo, in the first major battle this 
year, military officials said. 

The army said it rushed aircraft and 
troop reinforcements to repel the at- 
tack. 

Government troops captured Par- 
anthan in July, and in September 
launched an offensive from there that 
took Kilinochchi in an eight-day battle. 
The government said 253 soldiers and 
690 rebels were lolled in the fighting. 

The rebels are seeking a homeland 
in the north and east of this Indian 
Ocean island nation, claiming that 
Tamils are discriminated against by 
the Sinhalese majority, which controls 
the government and the military. More 
than 46.000 people have been killed in 
the civil war since 1983. 

( Reuters , AP. AFP) 



China AirOnts 
flies to S0 cities 
around the world. 


Our pleasure. 





Mum seemed asleep... but the little one was slowly stirring; stretching out with a 
contented yawn. Stopping by to check the bassinet, the stewardess received a sleepy 
little smile for her concern. "Looks like he's enjoying it all, doesn't he..." whispered 
his mother. 

On China Airlines, the airline of Taiwan, it's always our pleasure to ensure 
yours. Which is why you'll notice new heights in our level of passenger 
service. In the air and on the ground. 

-\ As we head into the 21st century, a staunch commitment rides with us. 

■ I \ That of meeting your expectations of service excellence. And • 
exceeding them. For you,,. We blossom every day. 




Teipei. Haiwan, B.Q.C. IDAnDARHl ARflES , our subsidiary, will continue to care for our European passengers with a renewed commitment 




C hina airlines 


hnp:flWwwcHna-alrilrws,coiTi/ 


BRIEFLY AS/A 


Bangladesh Frees Ershad 


DHAKA, Bangladesh — Former President 
Hossain Mohammed Ershad was freed from 
prison Thursday and said he would soon re- 
sume an active political life. 

He denied opposition charges that his free- 
dom was the result of a deal between his Jatiya 
Dal party and the governing Awami League of 
Prime Minister Hasina Waxed. . . 

“I did not buy ray freedom through any- 
one’s mercy or by alliance with anyone,” he 
said at his home. 

Mr. Ershad faced 19 charges of corruption 
and had been in prison since he was toppled in 
a people’s uprising in December 1990. 

The opposition Bangladesh Nationalist 
Party of former Prime Minister Khaleda Zia 
descnbed Mr. Ershad’s release as the “out- 
come of a successful c ons p ira cy” between 
Jatiya Dal and die Awami League. (Reuters) 


China Warns Washington 


BEIJING — China warned tiie United States 
on Thursday that slowly wanning ties could 
become “more complicated” if Washington 


become more complicated tr wasningto 
decided to confront Beijing on human rights. 

“If the human rights question is made into 
an issue to interfere in Cmna’s internal affairs, 
then this problem will become more and more 
complicated,” the Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man. Sben Guofang, said at a news briefing. 

Differences in U.S. and Chinese views to- 
ward human rights were normal and could be 
resolved through talks, Mr. Shea said. 

“Bat if you are confrontational then the 
basis for dialogue will be lost,” he said in 
response to a question about China's reaction 
to comments by Secretary of State-designate 
Madeleine Albright, in which she criticized 
Beijing’s human rights record. ( Reuters ) 


In Jakarta, Mutual fines 


JAKARTA — The leaders of Japan and 
Indonesia on Thursday pledged mutual co- 
operation, stressing the importance of ties be- 
tween Tokyo and Southeast Asia. 

Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto of Japan 
said at a dinner held by President Suharto that 
the expected expansion of the Association of 
Southeast Asian Nations “provides die core 
for dramatic regional cooperation. ’ ’ 

It is essential, he said, for “our two coun- 
tries to further strengthen ties and work for 
stability and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific 
region.” 

Mr, Suharto thanked Japan for its “whole- 
hearted help” in his country's development, 
and said cooperation between ASEAN and 
Japp had improved economic growth in the 
fssgion. (Reuters) 


VOICES From Asia 


Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong of Singa- 
pore, in a written address to victorious par- 
liamentary candidates of his People’s Action 
Party, who now fill all but two of the as- 
sembly’s 83 seats after last week's elections: 
“Victory must not go to our heads. The re- 
sponsibilities we have to shoulder require us to 
be humble, not arrogant Start working now for 
the next general elections in 2002.” (Reuters) 


Oil Darkens 
More Than 


Village's Sea* 

Future of Small Town 

In Japan Is Threatened 


By Teresa Watanabe 

The Las Angeles Tunes 


M3KUNL Japan — Braving howling 
winds and icy sleet, the weathered fish- 
ermen and women of this picturesque 
town on the remote underside of Japan's 
western coast are pondering a future as 

Wack as the oily slop despoiling their 


sea. 


‘We fishermen are going to die, ’ 
Akira Shimizu said as he and others 
scooped out buckets of fuel oil leaked 
from a Russian tanker that ran aground 
last week and broke in two. “We can't 
make money off this polluted stuff. Who 
can we complain to?” . 

Wearing rubber boots and plastic rain 
gear, more than 100 fishermen fought to 
prevent the spreading oil slick from 
ravaging waters rich with crab, abalone 
and other tasty sea treasures so famed 
they are sent as gifts each year to the 
Imperial Family. 

But their primitive tools — long- 
handled pails and oil-absorbent mats — *■ 
seemed no match for the 962,000 gal- 
lons of oil that began leaking last week 
from the tanker, Nakhodka, which wa& 
bound for Russia's Kamchatka Penin- 
sula with 5 million gallons of oiL And 
even as the Japanese Coast Guard and 


_ L- 1 




-fU 


\£- 




0J- 


with vacuums and chemical neutral*- 
buns, powerful winds and five-mete? 
(16-foot) waves hampered their efforts. 

Most of the oil spilled from the ship’s 
bow section, now orange with nisi and 
run aground at Mikum. 320 kilometers 
(200 miles) west ofTokyo. But the other 
Half of the vessel could pose a major 
environmental disaster if it begins leak- 
ing the 4 million gallons of oil it holds. 
Officials are pondering ways to remove 
the oil from the ship's hull, which has . 
settled 600 meters under the sea. 0 

The amount of oil is far smaller thar. 1 
die 1 1 million gallons spilled from the 
Exxon Valdez in Alaska in 1989. But & 
ranks as one of Japan’s worst oil dis- 
asters. 

And far the seafaring souls who live 
in this village of 24300 people, the 
disaster was only the latest assault on 
their livelihoods: Fishing and fanning. 

uriiK-.fi (tkmIa im jin nMTMit nf the inhs V* 


- ^ 






which made up 40 percent of the jobs 35 
ago. now make up 1 1 percent. 


yearn ago. now make up 1 ! percent. 

Hie number of anta. the renowned 
women divers who once scoured the 
seabed in white kimono, has dwindled 
to 30. Their average age has climbed to 
55 as young women shun the sea for 
office jobs; the village is aging faster 
than Japan overall, . 

“Today’s young people think it's 
more fashionable to weak in a com- 


V 

I- 


u 


ii* 


in 




pany," lamented Noburo Dejima, a lo- 
cal fisherman; 


. and inn keeper. 

Mflcuni is blessed more than most 
villages in Japan. It has abundant sea- 
food and is famous for its towering cliffs 

But as new^about the spill spreads, 
officials are working hard to contain the 
damage. • 

At the MDcuni Tourist Association 
office, reporters and would-be visitors 
called every few minutes to ask about 
the spill. “Is the crab O.K.? Has the oil 
readied the area? Are the inns still op- 
erating?” an official of the association* 
Hire taka Kafo, said callers were ask* 
ing. 

• He said the association bad prepared 
a flyer asking reporters not to exag- 
gerate the damage, asserting that not all 
coastal areas have been hit Crate 


* — i 

M 


shrimp, flounder and other deep sea ftsb 
“have not been influenced at all” the 


flyer says. 

Still, he added that the association 
will not send the Imperial Family its gift 
of Echizen crab this year. And he noted 
that tiie full damage to the town’s tour- 
ism industry would not be known for 
months, when the seafood is harvested 
and examined for pollution. 

• Winds Whip Spreading Slicks ■ 

The battle against the oil spill grew 
more difficult Thursday as huge new 
slicks whipped by heavy winds quad* 
rupled the amount of coastline aflecters 
by the spill, Reuters reported front 

Mikimi . 

_ The Fisheries Agency said that 450 
kilometers of shoreline .were oorf 
threatened by the breakup of the Rus- 
sian tanker, spanning six prefectures art 
the Sea of Japan and stretching from 
around Kyoto to tiie Noto Peninsula. 

With oil continuing to spSJ, “the 
disaster could turn out to be one of the 
worst in the nation's history,” the Ky- 
odo news agency reported. * 

Oil reached the coastline of Hyogo 
Prefecture on Thursday morning, about 
160 kilometers from where tire bow of. 
the ruptured tanker washed up on the 
rocks in Mikuni. i 


J 



m 

' 

m 



•- 

-*•* *R 


' *!**• 

V 

e’. 

«rm- . 'm 

s. 

• 4 S 




* 4m 

IL.‘ • 

. i 

y 

>■ 
ij . ' 

■,-a 


' we-li 



1 



- *=% 

4 


33 


tap!. 






4 


In 




V.,*- 


To oar readers 
mBelghm 

It’s never been easier 
to subscribe and save. 


Just call toll free 
at 0 800 1 7538 


MMUWIlIPWWBa 


Living 


Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 


lo subscribe, call 
1-800-8822884 
(in New York, call 212-752-3890) 



Si* 


3 




.A 




** m 










■**■4*1 





■4 











If 01; 







V : v 


to-:i'''-^fe-^ ;vsfi 


INTERNATIONAL 


INTERNATIO NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10 - ^ 

ADVERTISEMENT 


PAGE 7 


advertisement 


ournment 


The Associated Press I 

• ARUSHA, Tanzania — A prosecutor on Thursday accused 
the fim suspect 10 go before a UN tribunal of trying to wipe out 
Rwanda's minorities so “ihe next generation of Rwandans will 
&sk: ‘What did die Tutsi look likef’ " 


ask: ’What did the Tutsi look like?* " 

. Jean-Paul Akayesu, a Hutu and a former mayor who is 
charged with genocide, . allegedly organized the Apiil l994 
massacre of 2,000 people in his village of Taba. His trial, 
delayed twice since May, began Thursday, but adjourned after 
opening statements until Friday because three prosecution 
witnesses failed to appear. 

_ The massacre was part of Rwanda’s -state-organized 
slaughter from April to. July 1994 of minority Tutsi and 
moderate Hutu. More than 500,000 people were killed, most 
of them hacked to death with machetes. 

In his opening remarks, the prosecutor, Yakob Haile Mari- 
am, said drat Mr. Akayesu’s trial was essential to end a culture 
of impunity in the central African nation. 

‘ ‘The objective of the defense and prosecution is the same: 
to eradicate the culture of impunity which has destroyed the 
social fabric of Rwanda," be said. “Our task is to obtain 
■justice, fair trials and national reconciliation!" 

Mr. Akayesu, flanked by two security guards, listened 
intently, at one point leaning luck on the wooden courtroom 
bench and raising his eyebrows as if in disbelief. ' 
s. “Beaten into years of submission and unquestioning obe- 
dience by a strong authoritarian state.*' Mr. Yakob said, 
peasants obeyed Mr. Akayesu’s orders "to kill their xwigb bots, | 
. sometimes their relatives, their wives and their children." | 
$ _ Mr. Akayesu, 43, is one of 21. people indicted . by the. 
International Cri minal Tribunal for Rwanda. He has pleaded 
not guilty to 12 counts of genocide, murder and torture. 

- Only six other suspects are in the tribunal's custody; the, 
others are being held in other countries. 

Shortly before the trial began, the tribunal announced that 
President Paul Biya of Cameroon had approved the transfer of 
four Rwandans that his country is holding. They are suspected 
of planning the genocide. ' ' " 


oi planning me gpnuuiuc. 

- The four were arrested a year ago when they fled to 

Cameroon. ... - • 

- Mr. Akayesu was arrested in Zambia, where he f led when me 

Tutsi overthrew the Hutu government that orchestrated the 
lrilHngjL He was transferred to Arusha in May, when the trial was 
to have started. It was postponed twice after he dismissed his 
tewyas. • ' ' . 


•• a man ana two women were / — 

Arusha on a special flight from Kigali,' Rwanda, but were 
delayed because of problems in obtaining their passports- 
Mr. Akayesu's two court-appointed lawyers said after ques- \ 
tioning 31 prosecution witnesses thar they would request a six- 
month delay to prepare then-witnesses. , ■ TT ..U^ 

. The maximum sentence that Mr. Akayesu feces attiwUmtoi 
Rations tribunal is life in prison. Six judges preside over the 
"court 






\: •:! 




mm 


i'V. ■ . '■ < 




mm 




‘dm ’>,» V/ ^ i 

r < 

















Ir 


Health in Question, I 

Mobutu Is in France I 

■Ct OwSttfFtnaDbpttdx*- ■ 

ROQUEBRUNE-CAP-MARTIN. .RbBg-T I 

Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaireremmed ■ 
Thursday, less than a month after going home to race a reoet m 

W MS^MoteJmVretoTraised ^Harare I 

war TheZairian government has not given a reason for |H 
Marshal Mobutu's trip or said how long te wouid be gone, ■ 
although members of- his entourage said last mpn* that he !■ 
would retum.to France, in wlyJmuwiy far medi^ care. ■ 

Marshal Mobutu returned to Zaire only after rebels hoi run ■ 
the government's army out of key eastern ones and bad ■ 
announced their intention to topple him. 9 

A French Foreign Ministry spokesman, Jacques Rum- n 
! melhaidt, saidThureday that Marshal Mobutu hoi requested a § 

three-month visa from the MSlM^situ F 

On his return to Zaire three weeks ago, MantodbfobuW 
rarried out a major reshuffle in his government and army high I 
command m preparation for an 

S^SimiS^rebelsholding a largetrartrfea^^re- 
TheSls, iS by Laurent Kabila, a longtime ojjponent of 
have vowed « march*, SSaahasa to 

SJSrhfr jasJsJifflKJSg 
i 3SSSSEWE 

France Plans to Rethink I 
Military Presence m Africa 

Cortp&tyOrSirtFrtmDdpx** l 

^ PARIS - France said Thursday that *)£v**™^ 
pS^Afnja in line with a plan to turn its 

army into an -view of our operations, 

ClS Mfllbn > 0,d .^P! n 1 c ^ wi ] ] re^amine 

..TsrryssM®”*- - • 

^Ssasssaassaa® 




nigfat by rcbds. wou ] d mean a decrease in the 

• Asked whether dierevifl^^Mr. MiUon answered: 
number of French sarne operational ef- 

“Our mm is %^L^^ e R C n C li soldiers spend on 

fi l en ^^l^ m whSter^hal^shoite n cd. or whether we 
African temtOTy. wnemer - WKnical problem, not a 
Will send rotating missions is a tecmu«u v . 

'y—^—aagg'JSBtafs 

extensive jian to *nod«Bwelhc^mmMr ^ J99g 
ability to operate ov^sfi^. ^ ^ drop from ahalf- 


!TJg^1S?52S tod for intervening in African 

srs-sssa ssJ-— <• 

^wfll ensure dietf^rotwbwj- past that France 

race on the- African decided in consultation with 


Like Chick Corea, millions 
have found that Scientology 
helped them achieve greater 
certainty, lasting happiness 
and real spiritual freedom. 
Here is what some of them 
had to say: 


W ith Scientology, I control 
my own life much more 
than ever, and I get 
immense satisfaction from my job. 

My entire Hfe, including my family life, 
has really changed for the better. 

• • •• Claudio Giovanni 

Dentist, Italy 


A s a nurse, I always wanted to 
help people. But I saw that 
while there were great devel- 
opments in medicine, there was 
nothing to compare in the field of the 
spirit Scientology filled this void for 
me. I really understand my patients 
and I am able now to really help 
others. 


Gertie Hiebler 
Nurse, Austria 


T wenty-two years ago, I lost the 
ability to play with my right 
hand. Scientology techniques 
helped me regain the use of my hand 
and I took up my concert career. I 


mm 




mufE 


understand my students better and 
I’m able to help them with their 
problems. I feel free of all nonsense 
and pain. I really understand myself 
now. I am just who I am. 

Jan Witn 
Concert pianist, 
Holland 


T hanks to Scientology’, I have 
found myself and the courage 
and confidence that lets me 
know that I will be able to achieve 
whatever I want to achieve. 

Teresa Gutierrez 

Antiques Restorer. 

Spain 


PO& MORE INFORMATION: 

Check the following lmemet sites for 
information about Scientology. Each is 
available in English, French, German. 

Italian and Spanish: 
http: //www. Scientology .org 
http://www Jronhubbard .org 
http://www.dkmetjcs.org 

wBbmasteresdenodogy.org 

VISIT OUR CHURCHES: Pay a visit to your 
nearest Church of Scientology. Addresses for 
our principal European Churches are given 
here. 

TORE INFORMATIONAL booklets 
AVAHABHS: You can obtain the address of 
die local church nearest you, and a free 
booklet about Scientology, by calling _ 
(33) 1 44 74 61 68. Or write to Church of 
Scientology Ile-de-France, 7, rue Jules C6sar, 
. 75012 Parts, France. 


Schottenfeldgasse 13<15 
1070 Wien. Austria 

Wol gtnm 

Church of Scientology 
European Human Rights 
and Public Affairs Office 
61 Rue du Prince Royal 
1050, Brussels, Belgium 


Denmark Germany 

Storekongensgade 55 Bcichstrasse - 

12(H Copenhagen K. Denmark 80S02 Miinchen. 

Germany 

France Italy 

7 Rue Jules Cesar Via Abeione, 10 

“5012 Paris. 2013 t Milanojia 

France .c-K—laods 


Church of 


Italy 

Via Abeione, 10 
201? T Milanojtaly 

Netherlands 

Nieuwe Zijds Vcobuigwal 271 
1012 RL Amsterdam, 
Netherlands 


my 


Norway 
Lille Grensen 3 
0159 Oslo, 
Norway 


Portugal 

Rua Actor Tabc-ta 90 5 
1000 Lisboa. Portugal 

Spain 

C/ Montera 20, 10 dcha. 

28013 Madrid. Spain 

Sweden 

Gotgsuen 105 

11662 Stockholm, Sweden 

Switzerland 
Badenersuasse 141 
8004 Zurich. Switzerland 

Great Britain 
68 Tottenham Court Rd 
London, England 9F1P OBB 


THIS MESSAGE WAS 

few HUM livmtt mi IBC 






PAGES 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Hcralb 



rtlmne 


IVBUSRSI WITH THE NEW YOKE TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON TOST 


Albright Speaks Up 


Too Much Caution 

If Madeleine Albright is contem- 
plating any significant shifts in Amer- 
ican foreign policy during Bill Clin- 
ton’s second term, she did agood job of 
disguising it on Wednesday. In a de- 
terminedly cautious appearance before 
a friendly Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee, President Clinton’s nom- 
inee for secretary of state stock mostly 
to platitudes and familiar strategies, 
clearly eager to avoid any surprises 
that might endanger her likely con- 
tinuation by the Senate. 

It is probably too' much to expect a 
second-term secretary of stale to pro- 
pose new initiatives that might appear 
critical of existing policies, particu- 
larly before assuming office, but Mrs. 
Albright showed disappointingly little 
of the tire she is known for on issues 
like democracy and human rights. She 
will prove more a custodian than an 
innovator if she manages American 
diplomacy according to the familiar 
outline she sketched on Wednesday. 

President Clinton’s foreign policy 
is not in need of a drastic overhaul. On 
many major issues his administration 
has shown good sense and diplomatic 
skill. Thanks in part to him and his 
tixsl-term national security team, there 
is peace instead of war in Bosnia, 
democracy survives in Russia, and the 
peace effort in the Middle East has not 
been extinguished. 

An American Story 

Secretary of state-designate Mad- 
eleine Albright, in her Senate con- 
firmation hearing on Wednesday, ob- 
served that she had not always 
dreamed of holding the job for which 
President Bill Clinton has now nom- 
inated her. She came to America at 
age 1 1, she said, her family having 
escaped both Nazism and commun- 
ism. “My ambition then was only to 
speak English well, please my parents, 
study hard and grow up to be an Amer- 
ican.*' she said. She claimed no sin- 
gularity in this immigrant's tale. In- 
deed, her testimony was all the more 
moving for being such an archetypal 
American story. 

But Ambassador Albright’s back- 
ground and record of achievement do 
more than make her the role model that 
several senators suggested she be. As 
“an embodiment,’’ in her words, “of 
the turbulence of the 20th century, as 
well as the tolerance and optimism of 
tire United States.” she also brings 
authenticity and emotion to the view 
that U.S. foreign policy should go be- 
yond an accountant's reckoning of ob- 
ligations and interests and extend in- 
stead to a vigorous promotion of 
.American democratic values. Turning 
a familiar adage on its head, she said 
that the United Slates has “no per- 
manent enemies, only permanent prin- 
ciples — respect for law, human dig- 
nity and freedom.” 

Facing the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee, she encountered little dis- 
sent and mostly admiration. Even the 
chairman. Senator Jesse Helms, who 
has found much to complain of in 
Clinton administration policy, said she 
had been a “joy” to work with as 


Mrs. Albright said she was com- 
mitted to continuing an assertive 
American role in the world to protect 
Washington’s vital interests. 

But m areas where she can and 
should make a difference, particularly 
Washington’s handling of C hina and 
the need to restore human rights as a 
centerpiece of American policy, Mrs. 
Albright seemed oddly restrained in 
her testimony. 

She called human rights a signature 
element of American foreign policy, 
and criticized die conduct of repressive 
regimes in Nigeria. Indonesia and 
Burma. But she seemed determined to 
mute her concerns and demonstrate her 
enthusiasm for other aspects of Amer- 
ican policy, particularly efforts to help 
open foreign markets to American 
business. 

On China, she spoke of pressing 
human rights issues, but made clear 
that those matters would be subor- 
dinated to the broader desire to im- 
prove relations with Beijing and coax it 
into bec oming a reliable member of die 

international community. 

Mrs. Albright likes to describe her- 
self as a pragmatist That is certainly an 
important attribute for a secretary of 
state. No less important, bat largely 
missing on Wednesday, is die passion 
for democracy and liberty that she has 
so often shown. It will be a loss for the 
nation if it is absent in her conduct as 
secretary of state. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 

ambassador to the United Nations. But 
she may soon find herself recalling 
Wednesday’s atmosphere of bipartisan 
warmth with consi doable nostalgia. 

The general principles she articu- 
lated will bump into challenges with no 
obvious solutions: to expand NATO 
without endangering the Baltic repub- 
lics or isolating Russia, to firmly man- 
age relations with China, to advance 
peace and security in the Middle East, 
to find a right role for America in die 
turmoil of Africa and many more, in 
places expected and unexpected. 

In all of these, the new secretary of 
state will find that the activist view of 
foreign policy she articulated on Wed- 
nesday is far from universally shared in 
this Congress. 

She was right when she said that 
America's status as a “model for those 
who love freedom” is neither acci- 
dental nor inevitable, but will continue 
only as long as American leadership 
makes it so. She was right to call far 
more generous funding of U.S. dip- 
lomacy, for money to pay the indefens- 
ible U .S. debt to foe United Nations, 
and for belated Senate confirmation of 
a treaty banning chemical weapons. 

When foe Cold War ended, some 
Americans — including, it might be 
said. President Clinton and some of his 
advisers — believed that die country 
could devote more attention to itself 
and less to U.S. military strength and 
overseas ties. But soon enough it be- 
came clear to many that U.S. peace and 
prosperity depend in very large part on 
world peace and prosperity. Mis. Al- 
lnight seems to understand that in her 
bones. “We must be more than an 
audience, more even than actors,” she 
said. “We must be the authors of the 
history of our age.' ’ 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Sanitized Pirates 


At the original Disneyland in Cali- 
fornia. they have shut down the “Pir- 
ates of the Caribbean” ride for two 
months for remodeling. When the at- 
traction opens again, the mechanical 
pirates who were formerly seen chas- 
ing buxom women around a tavern will 
be gone, replaced by computerized 
buccaneers who will be chasing not 
the women, you should understand, 
but the plattere of food that the women 
will be carrying. 

Disneyland had received a few com- 
plaints about the lascivious pirates, 
who have in fact been putting on this 
show’ for some 30 years, a period dur- 
ing which sensitivities have changed 
greatly about the lighthearted treat- 
ment of scenes of rapine and about a 
good many other things as well. 

And of course, this is no work of art 
being defaced but simply an amuse- 
ment park attraction being' refurbished, - 
so it is not as if the Sabine Women were 
about to be replaced by sacks of flour 
and sides of salt pork. ' 

A spokeswoman for Disneyland 
said the new and improved black- 
guards, their carnal desires redirected. 


will nevertheless “still behave like 
pirates.” This may be so (if you make 
allowance for the absence of such other 
piratical activities as murdering, pil- 
laging, burning and being hanged). 
There is, after all, nothing tike a couple 
of years at sea to help a fellow work 
up a good appetite. 

In the interests of authenticity, 
though, the Disney people ought to 
take care about what they put on 
those platters to be carried by the 
wench-persons. After long months of 
an unbalanced shipboard diet and 
the constant battle with scurvy, what 
a seaman really wanted when he hit 
town in those days was Vitamin C, 
and lots of it. 

So no sausages, capons, pig’s 
heads, puddings or beef roasts on those 
plates, please — just lots of high-fiber, 
vitamin-rich fruits, vegetables and 
cereals for the pirates of Disneyland 
as they bound around the tavern in 
pursuit of good health and regularity 
while singing a hearty (but never lusty) 
chorus of “Yo-ho-ho and a bottle 
of kale juice.” 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


i t mamnom m* * t 

lleralftsa^feenbune. 


humd ■itx m ns nfliwn • 


ESTABLISHED JSS7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen 

KATHARINE P. D ARROW. Mce Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher <£ Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GETLER, Executive Editor 

• WALTER WELLS. Managing Editor ■ PAUL H0RVH2, Depun Managing Editor 
• KATHERINE KNORR rad CHARLES M1TCHELM0RE. Dcpuy Editm • SAMUEL ABT aad 
CARL GEWTRTZ, AssocLec EJiion • ROBERT i. DONAHUE Editor of the Editorial Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE Btuinas and Finance Editor 
m RENE BONDV, Deputy Publisher • JAMES McLEOD, Advertising Director 
> Jl' ANITA L CASPARL International Development Director • DIDER BRUN. Circulation Director. 
Dm-leurde la PuHitSMm: Richard McClain 


Intenuuotul HrraMTntwne. lg| Ateoae Ouries-de-GasUc. 92521 NemUy snr Seine. France. 
Tel.: iTj4l 43.9300. Fax: Cm:.. (1t4i.43.0Hfl: Adv., 1 1)41.43.91 [1 E-Mail: OngaihLcgai 

EJtiv f.v. ' MickJel Rictenixm.5 Cxixrl>urt HI . Singapore 05 II . TeL (651472-7768 Fa. ftt5\274-2i34 
Mu- Dir Asm ft * IfP KrjnepdiI.5hCLvcenr Bd Hat- Kan;. TeL 852-2922 IIS8. Far #2-2922-1190 
Ger.. Ha Gow T &M8W Frudrtehp 15 . 0 <123 FmlfrtU TeL Fas. VW 1250-20 

I An VS ■ Hkhiel Geam.USO Third W . ft* Tort N.Y. 10622. Tel. (2/2) 752-3990 Fax: f 212 J 755-87# 
L'Ji. Advertising Office. 63 Lang Acre. London M3. Tel. 1 1711 836dS02. Fax: (171 j 240-22# 
SAS. iui capital i£‘ I dOOlW F. RCS NaiUrm B 7. 32021126. Commission Paritairc No. 61337 
*5/Wci. Ivmttitrd HraldTrUm Ml rights r rseneJ ISSN: EW-SQ52. 


Diplomacy Can Help Avert Explosion in Serbia 


P ARIS — It is something of a mir- 
acle that the mass demonstrations in 
Belgrade, which have taken place daily 
for seven weeks, have avoided large- 
scale violence. Hie determined civic 
spirit of the protesters wbo refuse to be 
provoked has been remarkable, and foe 
stem warnings of foe U.S. and Euro- 
pean countries against foe use of force 
have restrained Slobodan Milosevic. 

But it is too much to ejgiect the 
impasse to remain peaceable indefin- 
itely. The “preventive diplomat" 
that outgoing Secretary of fete War- 
ren Christopher liked to invoke is 
sorely needed while there is still a 
visible democratic way oat. 

That requires some initiative. The 
five-nation “contact group" set up to 
help end the war in Bosnia played a key 
role in achieving foe Dayton accord. It 
seems to have gone into hibernation. It 
should be reactivated for Serbia. 

A senior diplomat from the “group’ ’ 
countries (United States, France, Bri- 
tain, Germany and Russia) says how 
that the leaders don’t act until there is 
real trouble. They have plenty of pre- 
occupations, and attend to the crises of 
the moment They need to be jogged. 

Big trouble is foreseeable, just as the 
collapse of Yugoslavia and the ensuing 


By Flora Lewis 


ware were foreseeable. Tragically, noth- 
ing adequate was done in time, so mudi 
greater efforts had to be made afterward 
The mistake must not be repeated. 

It is still possible to organize a con- 
stitutional, nonviolent way out of Ser- 
bia’s civil confrontation. That would 
be of foe greatest importance for foe 
future development not only of Serbia 
but of foe rest of ex-Yugoslavia and 
other troubled parts of die Balkans. 

Mr. Milosevic has responded to the 
findings of foe Organization for Se- 
curity and Cooperation in Europe by 
offering partial recognition of oppo- 
sition electoral victories, bat his dis- 
dainful compromise in no way restores 
democratic legality. 

The “contact group” should send a 
mission to Belgrade to make that dear; 
it would have far more impact than 
occasional statements from foe cap- 
itals. Russia's participation is crucial. 

Averting an explosion in Serbia, 
which would renew dangers throughout 
the region, is quite as much in Mos- 
cow’s interest as in foe interest of the 
West. At a moment when tensions are 
mounting in U.S.-Russian relations, it 


would ala> help show foe capacity to 
support security with common action- . 

Legislative and presidential elec- 
tions are dire in Serbia this .year. • • 

The outside initiative should be firm . 
in insisting not only on recognition of . 
the mumapal resutis but on measures 
to make sure that national elections are- 
free mid fair, with international su- 
pervision. That must include reason- 
able Opposition access to the media, 
which have completely blacked out the . 
extraor dinary events in the capital. - 
To be.sure, the likelihood is that Mr. 
Milosevic would lose in decent elec- . 
tioos. Butfoe alternative far lam is pro- 
vocational a (ttribfe uprising that would 
throw him but and leave his country in 
much worse disaster than he has already 
brought Democracy offers advantages . 
to the losers as well as to the winners. 
They can leave power in honor and in 
safety which Mr. Milosevic does not 
deserve, but it would solve the crisis. - 
His army lias already said that it 
would refuse to intervene if ordered to 
pot down foe protests. The Orthodox 
Churifo, a faimidabie nationalist force 
which has supported him, is now 
abandoning h« ranw That a 

lot because it means that the rural pop- 
ulation, cut off from firsthand know- 


ledge of what has beat happening by 
foe state-owned media monopoly , will 
begin to learn what is at stake. 

So far, workers have not joined foe 
protests in large numbers, although they, 
too, have suffered from foe general de- 
gradation of foe economy, and Serbia's 
isolation. Mr. Milosevic relies basically 
on his huge, 80,000-man heavily armed 
police force, which could perhaps im- 
pose order at the cost of mueax bloodshed 
but could not revive the country. - 
If he thinks he still speaks far most 
Serbs, elections are the only way to 
prove iL It is at such a crossroads in a 
nation's history that democratic pro- 
cedures are foe most precious. . 

' The whole region will be affected by 
how Serbia emerges from tins ordeaL 
The arguments to be made are ob- 
vious. What matters is that they be 
made jointly, by Russia and foe major 
Western powers, so that Mr. Milosevic 
can have no illusion of being able to 
play between them. That is what “pre- 
ventive diplomacy” means. 

Undertaking it would demonstrate 
that even as it prepares to expand 
NATO, tiie West is completely serious 
aboat wanting to cooperate with Russia 
to assure Europe security. 

& Flora Lewis 


Advice for Avoiding Bad Trouble in U.S. -Russian Relations 


W ASHINGTON — Offi- 
cial Washington loses an 
important balance wheel this 
month when Defense Secretary 
William Feny steps down. Mr. 
Perry beads back to California 


By Jim Hoagland 


held view in Russia — It is going 
to take some years, I think, to 
get over that feeling. 

“During those years, there 


leaving behind some large, un- ' have to be some events bap- 
finished tades and some definite pening which, help give them 


thoughts about what must be 
done to prevent a new era of 
superpower confrontation. 

Mr. Perry’s low-key. steady- 
ing presence helped bring order 
out of tiie bureaucratic tumult 
he inherited at foe Pentagon in 
1994. He became Bill Clinton's 
most important ambassador in 
Washington, trying to persuade 
senior military leaders to put 
aside hostility to or skepticism 
about tiie youthful commander 
in chief who wriggled out of the 
draft in the Vietnam War. 

That unenviable, behind-the- 
scenes ambassadorial role now 
fan* to ex-Senator William Co- 
hen, the moderate Republican 
picked by Mr. Clinton to suc- 
ceed Mr. Perry. Mr. Cohen, 
who has never run a large bu- 
reaucracy or served in the mil- 
itary. will have to earn his own 
acceptance from a Pentagon 
still suspicious of the man who 
appointed him. ' 

In a departure interview at his; 
office, he characteristically 
avoided celeb rating accom- 
plishments. Instead he put 
heavy emphasis on the problems 
that lie ahead, especially with 
Russia and NATO expansion. 

His stark description of Rus- 
sian opposition to the expansion 
of the Atlantic Alliance into 
Central Europe contrasts 
sharply with the rosier scenario 
painted by foe White House, 
which routinely portrays Rus- 
sian objections as temporary, 
easily surmountable obstacles. 

Russian reaction to NATO 
expansion “ranges between be- 
ing unhappy to being very un- 
happy,” Mr. Perry said. “This 
is not just one or two or a few 
officials expressing a view, this 
is a very widely and very deeply 


reasons for getting over it.” 

Like what? 

Fust, be urged those Russian 
officials who recognize riiar 
NATO represents no military 
threat to begin telling that to 
their public in a consistent, vis- 
ible way. NATO in return 
should make clear statements 
ruling out establishing bases or 
putting nuclear weapons in the 
new member states. 

Those are familiar positions 
shared within the alliance. But 
what came next was neither. 

Mr. Percy began by under- 
lining the importance of a 
NATO-Russia charter on Euro- 
pean security. The United 
States would like the charter 
signed before the July NATO 
summit that will decide on ex- 
tending invitations to new 
members. But the Russians, he 
pointed out, are refusing to sign 
before July because of concern 
that “they will seem to be con- 
ceding NATO expansion.” 

The secretary believes that 
foe Russians will continue to 
refuse and will.* ‘take every ac- 
tion they can to by to dissuade 
NATO” from expanding. “ So I 
see some hard times ahead of us 
between now and July.” 

After the s ummi t, the Rus- 
sians will have to decide wheth- 
er to continue their hard-tine 
rejection or, as Mr. Percy hopes, 
accept a NATO-Russia charter 
“that gives Russia a real voice 
in the security issues that 
NATO is acting on.” 

Does “real voice” imply that 
Russia will share in NATO de- 
cision-making? This is pre- 
cisely what the Russians are 
asking for and what conserva- 
tive critics of the administration 
say must not be granted. 


Mr. Percy, a scientist by vo- 
cation, answered with a simple, 
precise “yes,” qualifying it 
only by adding that Russia 
would not be given a veto over 
NATO actions. 

He illustrated his view of 
Russia gaining a say on NATO 
decisions tty recalling that IS 
months ago NATO was asked 
to keep peace in Bosnia. 

“NATO met in its council, 
came to its decision, took its 
action and then invited Russia 
and other countries to join them. 
If the NATO-Russia Partner- 
ship Council had existed then 
iwAw this NATO-Russia char- 


ter, there would have been, a 
council meeting at which Rus- 
sia would participate in that dis- 
cussion.” NATO members 
would then have met and voted 
without Russia. . 

These are words on which to 
laimrh a strateg ic debate about 
tire fu t u re of global stability. 
The Perry proposition is at odds 
with U.S. allies, led by Ger- 
many, who would guarantee a 
serious effort at reaching con- 
sensus with Russia in the joint 
council. A separate NATO vote 
would be only a last resort. 

And while it is less than is 
demanded by foe Russians (they 
seek “co-decision” rights with 
NATO on European security). 


Mr. Percy’s proposal gives 
Moscow far more man many in 
tiie U.S. Senate will want to 
grant when they are asked to 
ratify NATO treaty revisions. 

Mr. Percy’s potentially con- 
troversial words are an effort to 
break tiie nasty logjam be sees 
farming in U.S.-Russian rela- 
tions and to warn against likely 
negative consequences of ahasty 
program of NATO expansion. 

He spoke so softly and pre- 
cisely in administration debates 
that his presence was frequently 
overlooked. It may be bis ab- 
sence that we notice in tiie 
heated debates to come about the . 
role of America in foe world, i 
The Washington Post. ® 


A Balance of Power for East Asia 


T OKYO — In Japan and oth- 
er Asia-Pacific countries, a 
futile search has begun far a 
foreign policy strategy to re- 
place the supposedly outmoded 
concept of balance of power. 
Senior Australian officials for- 
mulating a foreign policy white 


By Gerald Segal 


open, iules-based international 
economy, such a balance is an 
essential mechanism of man- 
aged, multilateral change. East 
Aria, like the wider woda, has a 


against states that trade with 
Cuba is in a poor moral position 
to critic™ a China that breaks 
the rules of the liberal trade or- 
der. A United States that tries to 
browbeat Japan and other coun- 
tries into buateral trade deals 
shows worrying tendencies of 


mutating a foreign policy white Asia, like the wider wood, has a snows worrying tendencies of 
paper are beard to talk of - major stake in a multilateral behaving like a bullying China, 
something as unreal as a “bal- trading system that has pro- A third use of power, in the 
ance of interests.” duced so much prosperity. political realm, is the attempt to 

It is true that states today are The challenges to the system, stifle the freedoms of others. 


It is true that states today are 
less sovereign and more inter- 
dependent than before, but it is 
as essential as ever to sustain a 
balance of power. The key is to 
understand that power is be- 
coming evermore multifaceted, 
and that the means of balancing 
it need to be equally complex. 

A modem strategic equilib- 
rium in East Asia requires tiie 
use of countervailing power of 
all kinds to prevent changes to 
the status quo by use of force. 

Critics of balance of power 
often argue that such thinking 
tries to freeze the situation at a 
time of dynamic change in an 
economically booming region. 
But a balance of power has in- 
built rules for change. For an 


or power ] 

An Auction, Not a TV Giveaway jgRi 


W ASHINGTON — My 
son the software de- 
veloper gave me a gadget for 
Christmas that plugs into my 
television set, with a wire that 
(dugs into the telephone jack 
on the waJL Are you with me 
so far? I don’t want to get too 
technical here. 

I press “power” on foe re- 
mote, and the screen comes 
alive with a sign announcing 
that it is dialing “WebTV,” to 
which I have just been sub- 
scribed at who knows what 
expense, and wbammo! There 
I am on foe Internet like a 
regular hacker. 

This enables me to call up 
the New York Tones home 
page and click to read my own 
column on the big screen. 

I do not venture a whole lot 
further (you could fall off the 
Earth), but the notion strikes 
me that foe computer on 
which I am writing this essay 
has a new competitor. For 
about $400, we instant cy- 
bemerds can “surf the Net” 
without a $2,000 computer, 
provided we are willing to 
block the rest of our family 
from watching television or 
using the phone. 

The lessons here are that ( 1) 
reading one’s column on the 
television screen is not much 
of a thrill after tiie first time; 
(2) refusing to be swamped 
with e-mail can now be done 
out of principle and not ig- 
norance; (3) competing for the 
consumer’s dollar is a power- 
ful farce for economic good. 

Surety this latest gizmo trill 
be leapfrogged by another car- 
rier, just as broadcast television 
was leapfrogged by cable. 


By William Safire 


which was le a pfrogged by 
sate flice, which is being leap- 
frogged by foetal television. 

Digital television, which 
used to be dreamed of as high- 
definition television, is die ul- 
tra-sharp picture you get when 
the old, beat-up analogue 
channel that broadcasters now 
use is split into a bunch of 
shiny new digital channels. 

Now here is where com- 
petition comes in. Fat-cat 
broadcasters, who got the 
daddy channel free from tiie 
public, want to keep all the 
valuable progeny of that gift 

Those digital channels are 
worth tens of billions; indeed, 
when a nonbroadcast part of 
the spectrum was put up for 
bids, the U.S. Treasury re- 
ceived more money than from 
any auction in foe history of 
the world. 

Why not put those craning 
digital channels up at public 
auction? When Bob Dole sug- 
gested that last year, the broad- 
casters’ lobby worked over 
every member of Congress to 
protect their giveaway. Trent 
Lott backed off, and Bill Clin- 
ton was not about to anger 
station owners who could af- 
fect his re-election. 

But on Wednesday, as the 
new Congress convened. Sen- 
ator John McCain, the Com- 
merce chairman, met quietly 
with Representative John 
Kasich, me House Budget 
chairman, to discuss the 
“Dirty Dozen” — 12 corpo- 
rate welfare items that ought 
to be knocked out of next 


year’s budget to bring it to- 
ward balance. Dirtiest of the 
dozen was the proposed di- 
gital spectrum giveaway. 

I spoke to both of these gutsy 
tree-market Republicans. Mr. 
Kasich said, ‘Tm going to take 
a much closer look at the 
broadcast spectrum.” 

Mr. McCain went further; 
“I’m all for an auction. Could 
turn up $30 billion to $35 bil- 
lion. But we’re up against tiie 
power of the broadcasting 
lobby, and it’s the strongest 
I’ve seen in Washington.’ 

Mr. McCain is hopeful that 
die president will bite the bul- 
let and include a broadcast 
spectrum auction in his budget 
proposal next month. The Fed- 
eral Communications Com- 
mission’s Reed Hundt should 
lean on his friend A1 Gore to 
push it as a way to preserve 
Head Start and Medicaid. 

This is not an issue that 
television network news will 
relish covering, nor is it likely 
to be reported on many local 
stations or in magazines and 
newspapers with broadcast in- 
terests. But perhaps some sa- 
lons in both parties would be 
emboldened if given political 
cover from the president and a 
few outspoken, budget-hawk- 
ish Republican leaders. 

Bring, on the “Dirty 
Dozen,” Mr. McCain and Mr. 
Kasich. Turn on your bosses, 
television reporters and edit- 
ors. Together you can shame 
the president into taking a 
stand that upsets the media- 
politico complex. Then we 
can read all about it in big type 
on our television screens. 

The New York Tones. 


and thus the components of a 
balance of power, come from 
three sources. 

First is the traditional use of 
military force to change foe 
status quo. When China 
threatens to attack Taiwan, the 
threat must be met by effective 
deterrence. The deployment of 
two American aircraft carrier 
battle groups in March was a 
clear demonstration of such tra- 
ditional balancing power. 

Hence the concern in 1995 in 
Southeast Asia when China 
seized new territory in the 
South China Sea, undeterred by 
any countervailing power. 

More positively, when China 
and Japan refrained from using 
force to settle their dispute over 
the Senkaku Islands in 1996, 
good sense and a robust balance 
of power prevailed in keeping 
foe peace. 

Second, a balance of power is 
need e d to rebuff those who . 
would use economic might, in 
violation of foe rules of the in- 
ternational trading system, to 
force submission to their wifl. 

When China tells its trade 
partners that their access to 
Chinese markets will be denied 
if tiie Dalai Lama is greeted tty 
senior leaders of their govern- 
ments, or if complaints me 
made publicly about China's 
abuse of human rig hts, there is 
clearly a need for a balance of 
economic power to force 
Beijing to desist. 

Of course, a United States that 
applies the Hebus-Burton act 


stifle the freedoms of others. 
When China tries to tell the Dis- 
ney corporation which films it 
can distribute in Kansas or 
Copenhagen, it is an implied 
threat of commercial retribution 
that needs to be rebuffed. China 
may not like foreign films about 
Tibet, just as Britain dislikes 
hagiographic movies about IRA 
terrorists, but Britain knows that 
it must not threaten American 
media companies with a denial 
of access to the British market 

In the contemporary world, 
these latter two types of threats 
to die balance of power loom 
larger because economic in- 
terests have become increas- 
ingly important since the end of 
the Cold War. But the ability to 
sustain a well-rounded strategic 
balance requires efforts in all 
three dimensions. 

Precisely because China and 
tiie United States sometimes 
seek to use their power is un- 
helpful ways, Japan and the lar- 
ger European states must help 
to keep them committed to de- 
fending a modem balance. The 
Clinton administration risks un- 
dermining efforts in East Asia 
to cope with China’s military 
challenge if Washington per- 
sists with unilateral economic 
policies. 

The writer, a senior fellow of 
the International Institute far 
Strategic Studies in London, is 
director ■ of Britain’s Pacific 
Asia Program. He contributed 
this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Alaskan Plaint 

PARIS — A resident of Sitka 

wrote in a letter to Zver. “When 
the Russian flag was hauled 
down in Alaska m 1867, there 
appeared an American order of 
mings- The Washington Gov- 
ernment promised all foe inhab- 


draft will be handed to M. Bri- 
and. It is a defensive agreement, 
designed to stabilise Europe and 
pave foe way for an era of peace. 
In return for securing this pact. 


dam and the rights of citizens of 
the Republic. There was to be 
special protection for the Ortho- 
dox religion and . telegraphic 
cnrnimmkaHon hetween AJaricn 
and the whole world.” Bnt they 
were just words. The Americans 
concluded that it would be more 
profitable to hand over the de- 
velopment of the natural re- 
sources to a mercantile com- 
pany, while drawing the com- 
pany’s tribute. , 

1922: Historic Pact 

CANNES?— The basis of future 
European politics is to be foe 
Anglo-French alliance, which 


the British economic plans for 
Europe, meaning a dispassion- 
ate handling of Germany's re- 
parations as pan of the general 
European problem. 

1947: Oil Contention 

PARIS — France indicated that 
die was prepared to fight dip- ' 
lomatically to have foe French 
shares in the Irak Petroleum ; 
Company reinstated. This com- \£' 
party, operating in a region 
whose importance has mounted 
with reports that American 
reservoirs are being, exhausted, 
was formed by international 
agreement in 1928, The French 
interests in the area were taken 
over by American and Rritfeh 
operators during France’s oc- 
cupation by foe Germans. 




"jrs-n'siFtfaMi 




'y)c^ va& 




'N 


1,1 *»-• - ■**' • 7*' 


'^|j 


hi ; Paula Jones Can Wait 
For a Later Day in Court 


ty' By Richard Cohen 

' V' '■ W ^Sin ® a^^Wa^riagtanPbaaodThe 

: ; Jones that drives iSS* YortTmuiS have mentioned 

- j ■ ualists havelr^f*^ 11 nUtS * &&casem numeioosstories. Her 
; V.; ■ “stations have been reported. 

■ ! story a vt— ° 5 c ^ sormg her And they are profotmdly trtmb- 


ialii 


• ““used of losing his mind, his 
; morals and his pants at littH* more 

mac i the mere sight of her. 

Mrs. Jones, wife her hair some- 
: what subdued, is back in the news 
— - on Newsweek’s cover actually. 

• n 6 k Monday’s Supreme 

• f-°urt argument over whether Pres- 

• ident Bill Clinton deserves “tem- 
porary immunity” from her sexual 

- harassment lawsuit on the ground 
: that he is, after all, the jwesukait of 
i the United States. The ma^yr 
; should be decided after Mr. Oin- 

• ton leaves office, the presi dent 's 
lawyers aigue* lest be and other 

' Residents bemundated with civil 
; suits filed for political reasons. 

Mr. Clinton is accused of hi tting 
■ oo Mrs. -Jones while he- was the 
^ governor of Arkansas and she was 
a state employee. He fa said to have 


the Governor's Quality Manage- 
ment Conference in ilaleRock, 
Arkansas, and sent a state trooper, 
Danny Fergosoo, go fetch her. She 

* says — and Mr. Feiguson supports 
her — that the trooper brought her 
to Mr. Clinton’s room. - - 

What happened next is any- 
one's guess. Mrs. Jones says Mr. 

' Clinton made advances and ex- 1 

* posed himself! The president says 
' that is nonsense and points out 

that Mrs. Jones, either oat of con- 
' viction or naivete, has allied her- 
self with Mr. Clinton’s bitterest 
political enemies. 

Since that May day in 1991 .the 

* Jones Lawsuit has become the stuff 
' of legend and myth. Mrs. Jones 

herself has been likened to Anita 


— anil sergeants and others sexu- 
ally harassing recruits. Some of 
those accused <rf wrongdoing may 
wonder why they are having to 
face the music without delay 
while, up the ol’ chain of com- 
mand, their ultimate boss gets to 
waltz around his accuser for the 
next four years. 

The answer, to quote at least 
two fonnerpresidents, is that life 
is not fair. The president remains 
the president, and while he should 
not be above the law^ he also 
ought to be protected from ca- 
pricious or politically inspired 
lawsuits while in office. Justice 
delayed is sometimes justice 
denied, but it’s hard to make that 
argument in this case. 

Mrs. Jones did not lose her job 
an account, of what did or did not 
happen in that hotel room. Her 
salary was neither increased' nor 
decreased and, in feet, die says she 
will not even keep any money 
awarded to her, should she win her 
suit. She seeks restitution of her 


J Hill, the lawyer who accused suit- She seeks restitution of her 
■’ Justice Clarence Thomas of bar- -good name — -a name none of us 
iffe assment, with conservatives ask- would have heard of had die her- 
ing liberals why one is a heroine of sdf not brought this suit and an- 
the woman’s movement and the * nounced it at a press conference. 
, other, so far, is not The answer, of Even so, her quest is quixotic. 

4« cours f» I s simple: Bill Clinton is 'fa the end, only two people 

t . U. not, like Justice Thomas, a coif know what happened that day in 

servative ideologue. It is also said Tittle Rock, and their stories are 

feat the press — - revolted by Mrs. not likely ever to conform. Mrs. 
'■ " Jones’s appearance and the law- Jones deserves her day in court — 
■ drinessofi^stmy— has virtually but not necessarily right away, 
' ignored the poor woman. Not so. and notif it ibeans that presidents 
The Wall Street Jbarual, hardly an can be legally harassed by their 
* obscure publication, published ex- political- enemies, 
cerpts of Mrs. Jones’s complaint, . . - The Washington Post. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


man’s boss, hitting on hfe em- 
ployed, with die usual implied 
promises/threats of promotion or 
pu ni sh m ent. And Mrs. Jones, with 
her ‘TraQer-iark trollop” appear- 
ance, has the look of someone 
with -‘victim” written all over her 
— someone lacking the armor of 
education, wealth. Connections 
that would make her more be- 
lievable. 

This case is serious. It is made 
even more so because tile US. 
Army,, of which Mr. Qinton is 
commander In chief, is in the 




. 7 

i v 1 (m la 

I FRANCE. 


The dreams of French intelligentsia 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Radio Free Asia 

Regarding “Radio Free Asia 
Has Trouble Finding Its Audi - 
ence“ (Dec. 28 f: 

As president of Radio Free 
Asia, I found this article inac- 
curate on several counts, begin- 
ning with the claim that Radio 
Free Aria’s broadcasts are not be- 
ing heard in China — a bewil- 
dering conclusion in ligbt of the 
reporter's several communica- 
tions with Daniel Southerland, 
our vice president for program- 
ming who provided details of the 
radio's monitoring network. 

Radio free Aria’s signals are 
tracked daily by unmanned mon- 
itoring systems in Beijing and 
Shanghai, and by a manned mon- 
itor in Hong Kong. These reports 
show that our signal has been 
heard every day since its first 
broadcast Sept 29. The monitor 
repents show that virtually every 
day the signal was rated “good” 
or “fair” in Beijing and Shanghai. 
Monitor reports also show that 
t ransmiss ions to Tibet, begun Dec. 
2. have been routinely rated “ex- 
cellent." fa addition, letters and 
calls have been received from 
listeners in China verifying their 
ability to hear us regularly. 

The reporter's other point in- 
volved our relationship to Dai 


Qing, a leading Chinese journalist 
whose thoughts on the Three 
Gorges Dam project were broad- 
cast on Radio Free Asia. When 
Ms. Dai later indicated that she 
did not want fa be p art of farther 
broadcasts, her wishes were re- 
spected. Radio Free Aria, despite 
the reporter’s assertion, is indeed 
aware of the possible peril faced 
by Chinese contributors. 

RICHARD RICHTER. 

Washington. 

Despite the negative tone of 
this article, the fact is that Radio 
Free Asia should have been start- 
ed many years ago. It almost cer- 
tainly requires more financing 
than h has, particularly for more 
powerful transmitters. 

If some American diplomats 
are upset because the broadcasts 
may make their contacts with 
Chinese officialdom awkward at 
times, that merely illustrates their 
lack of understanding of die role 
of public diplomacy. 

RALPH E. WALTER. 

Munich. 

Medical Marijuana 

Regarding “ Clinton Plan to 
Combat Laws Legalizing 
Marijuana Targets Doctors ” 
(Dec. 30): 


The article reports that the gov- 
ernment’s plan to fight the Cali- 
fornia referendum legalizing the 
medical use of marijuana “would 
threaten doctors with revocation 
of their federal registration and 
possible criminal prosecution if 
they prescribe the drug.” 

But under the law, doctors will 
not be prescribing or dispensing 
marijuana. Recommending mari- 
juana for a patient is a commu- 
nication to tiie state and local law 
enforcement authorities. It re- 
mains up to die patient to obtain 
the marijuana. How can that be a 
violation of prescription-writing 
rules? Since the federal govern- 
ment cannot legally move against 
the law or the doctors, the drug- 
warrior establishment is resorting 
to tenor tactics. 

GERALD M.SUTLIFF. 

Walnut Creek, California. 

When the minions of Bill Clin- 
ton say they will prosecute any 
doctor who suggests marijuana to 
patients, they make a mockery of 
the concept that government is 
“of the people and by the 
people.” It confirms instead that 
what is legal and allowed is what 
the political rulers say it is. not 
what the people say it is. 

WILLIAM W. MORGAN. 

Burpham, England. 


PAGE 9 


Bali Transvestites Dress 
In Ruling-Party Colors 


By Margot Cohen 


B ALL Indonesia — fa high- 
hrtled white pumps and 
matching white handbag, red lip- 
stick and smoothly cotffed hair, 
Susan Tolany is ready to hit the 
campaign trail. 

Her heart — or rather, his heart 
— belongs to Golkar. Indonesia’s 

MEA-WHILE 

governing party. As head of the 
Bali chapter of a nationwide trans- 
vestites association. Susan Tolany 
is determined to do his/her part to 
ensure another landslide victory 
for the party in parliamentary 
elections next spring. 

Given Golkar's recent over- 
tures to Indonesia's Muslim ma- 
jority, the Vicior/Victoria ap- 
proach may seem surprising, fa 
fact, it is consistent with the 
party's strategy to solicit support 
from ail sectors of society, not 
matter bow marginal. In this vast 
archipelago of nearly 200 million 
people, every single vote counts. 

Golkar first began wooing 
transvestites in the 1970*s, 
through an affiliated social orga- 
nization known by its initials as 
MKGR. Police raids on transvest- 
ite streetwalkers were known for 
turning violent, and after one 
jumped into a river and drowned 
trying to escape a beating, the 
MKGR decided it was lime to 
extend a protective hand. 

With the approval of President 
Suharto, a transvestites’ associ- 
ation was formed in Jakarta under 
the MKGR umbrella. Seventeen 
chapters have so far blossomed 
across the country. The Bali 
chapter was formed in 1996 and 
Susan Tolany brims with fresh 
enthusiasm. 

“Before, people treated us like 
garbage." sard the hair salon own- 
er. “ Now we are acknowledged by 
the government We're protected 
by law. We have gained some re- 
spect in the eyes of the public.” 

In recruiting members, Susan 
Tolany is careful to point out the. 
advantages of holding an MKGR 
identity card. If the transvestites 
fall ill, the laminated card entitles 
them to hospital insurance. (Sex- 
change operations, however, are 
not covered.) If they run into po- 
lice harassment they whip out the 
card and tensions ease. “1 always 
tell my friends. ‘Don’t leave home 
without it' ” Susan Tolany said. 
With weekly dues set at jus! 


1 .000 rupiahs < about 40 cents), the 
MKGR also provides a barrel or 
two of fan, in the form of beaut)’ 
contests, volleyball games ana 
band practice, ft also provides an 
informal employment neiwoik in 
the catering and garment indus- 
tries, with the aim of rescuing 
newcomers from the flesh trade. 

As elections approach. Susan 
Tolany is crisscrossing cities and 
towns in Bali searching for trans- 
vestites who have yet to sign up. 
The chapter has already attracted 
2CK) members, but Susan Tolany 
estimates at least 300 more votes 
beckon. 

To canvass the countryside 
without attracting too much at- 
tention, Susan Tolany participates 
in party functions held by the wo- 
men’s chapter of the MKGR. Few 
of the members appear perturbed 
by a transvestite among the ranks; 
some even want advice. 

“They often ask me whai they 
should do to keep their husbands 
from turning to other women." 
Susan Tolany said. 

Dearly, the transvestites them- 
selves are expected 10 remain 
faithful to Golkar. Considering 
the benefits provided by the MK- 
GR, “we wouldn’t think of stray- 
ing,” Susan Tolany insisted. 
After all, what have the other two 
legally authorized political parties 
in Indonesia done for them 
lately? 

On (he other hand, a little pos- 
itive reinforcement couldn’t hurt. 
The Bali chapter is pushing for a 
special polling place — in a local 
Golkar office or the local MKGR 
secretariat — so that members can 
cast their ballots en masse. 

So beneath the pancake make- 
up. it seems that Indonesia's 
transvestites have something in 
common with millions of fellow 
citizens. Under President 
Suharto's government, civil ser- 
vants vote in the office, factory 
workers at the plant and employ- 
ees at the workplace — ail under 
the supervision of their bosses. 

Some people wish that Election 
Day would be declared a holiday. 
so they could vote in their home 
districts. It might not be as radical 
as a sex change, but it could alter 
Indonesia's political complexion. 

The writer, a journalist based in 
Jakarta, contributed this com- 
ment to the International Herald 
Tribune. 


BOOKS 


SIMON WIESENTHAL: 

, A Life in Search of Justice 

. By Hella Pick. 349 pages. $2945. 

* Northeastern University Press. 7 
. Reviewed by Glenn Frankel 

* NE afternoon m September 1944, a 
.. V_y German concentration camp guard 
' named Merz fakes Sinxm WiesenthaL, 
. one of his Jewish prisoners, to scavenge 
■ the countryside for potatoes. As JfcHa 
’ Pick recounts in her new biography of 


during a break by asking, “Supposeyou 
= were taken on a magic carpet to tee 
‘ United States, what would you tell 
them? How it was in the concentration 
; camps? How they treated the Jews?”. 

’ Wiesenthal is aware that the wrong 

• answer might get him shot, but he. fi- 
nally replies, “I believe I would tell the 

:: • wash” "" V 

Merz's response: “Tliery woukt think 

' you are cta^.T&ywcwtidiieyer believe 

; ' you.”' - . ■ 

By a series of small miracles, Simon • 
Wiesenthal survived the war, and his 

• subsequent life as Holocaust archivist 

- and Nazi hunter has been one unceasing 

- attempt to make die world believe the 

- ■ unbelievable. ... 

fa his pursuit of war criminals ran-: 
■ fc png from the master' engineer of the 
killing machine, Adolf Eichmann, to the 
•- ■ lowliest brutal camp guard. Wiesenthal 
has followed the principle that guilt is 
M individual rather than collective, that 
* each person must be accountable for - 
■ what he or she did, and that each should 
1 be dealt with by legal means and not by 

- acts of retaliation or revenge. 

• ‘ Wiesenthal, who is now 87,‘has won 
fame and acclaim in the West and has 
even been portrayed as a heroic char- 
acter in two Hollywood movies: “The 
Odessa File” and “The Boys from 
> Brazil." -• 

Closer to home, however, be has al- 
f. v ways been under attack. Political lead- 
ers in his adopted Ttomelandof Austria 
l have reviled him for pursuing former 


Nazis in their ranks. Communists have 
falsely accused him of being an Amer- 
ican agent. 

But the criticism that has hurt most 
has come from fellow Jews. 

Other Nazi hunters belittled his role 
in the hunt for Eichmann, and leaders of 
the World Jewish Congress have ac- 
cused him of covering up Austrian pres- 
ident Kurt Waldheim’s Nazi past 

Wjesenthal’s towering ego, hyper- 
sensitivity to criticism and inability to 
work with others have not helped bis 
cause. 

Now comes Pick, former diplomatic 
editor of the Guardian newspaper in 
London and herself a Jewish refugee 
from prewar Austria, with a book mat 
sorts through the arguments and foe 
accusations.: 

She writes that she began as a neutral 
observer but gradually became per- 
^aaded^feai, roosted &, WiesenAaLis 
a unique hero. Her careful marshalling 
' of the evidence and her unadorned and 
judiciously plodding prose sfyle help 
persuade us of Wtesemhal’s virtue and 
integrity. 

- Pick retells the remarkable story of 
bow Wiesenthal survived 13 concen- 
tration camps, a half-dozen escape at- 
tempts, near-fatal injuries and illnesses 
and a failed suicide attempt When lib- 
erated he weighed 99 pounds. After the 
war, his photographic memory and 
sense of misson made him an invalu- 
able resource for American war-crimes 
investigators. But Wiesenthal quickly 
derided to set our on his own, gathering 
witnesses’ accounts, compiling lists of 
war criminals and pressing the German, 
American and Israeli authorities for ac- 
tion. ' 


/V Wiesenthal persisted in keeping 
track of Eichmann’s family, preventing 
his wife Vera from having him declared 
dead in 194-7 and deducting correctly in 
1953 that Eichmann had fled to Ar- 
gemma. Despite die claims of Isser 
Hare I. then-chief of Israel’s Mossad in- 


BRIDGE 


teliigeoce agency, that Wiesenthal *s 
contributions were useless. Pick con- 
cludes that he laid some of the important 
groundwork for the Mossad manhunt 
that led to Eichmann’s capture and ex- 
ecution. 

The dispute over Waldheim was even 
more corrosive. Wiesenthal insisted that 
while Waldheim was a “world-class 
liar” and Nazi collaborator, there was 
insufficient evidence to charge him with 
war crimes. The World Jewish Con- 
gress. which led the assault on Wald- 
heim, contended that Wiesenthal was 
merely covering up his own incom- 
petence because he had given Wald- 
heim a clean bill of health fa 1979 when 
he was asked informally by Israeli 
friends to look -at Waldheim’s war re- 
cord in the then- Yugoslavia. 

Pick concludes that Wiesenthal 
should have chig deeper in 1979 and that 
his later stubbornness may have 
stemmed from pride as well as from a 
long-standing feud with the WJC. But 
she exonerates him from the charge of 
coverup. She supports his conclusions 
that the WJC’s evidence fell short of 
proving war crimes, that the Yugoslav 
documents it relied upon were of du- 
bious validity and that its campaign 
against Waldheim was counterproduct- 
ive because it fanned the flames of Aus- 
trian xenophobia and anti-Semitism and 
helped guarantee Waldheim’s election 
as Austrian president. 

Pick’s calm, measured conclusions 
are unlikely to be die last word. She 
argues convincingly drat Wiesenthal de- 
serves better than the vituperation that 
the World Jewish Congress has 
showered upon him, despite his mis- 
takes fa judgment and his ego. She 
concludes dot he played a major rede in 
forcing world leaders and public opin- 
ion alike “to confront the memory of 
the Holocaust as a means of cleansing 
the moral fabric of present and future 
generations.” 

Glenn Frenkel is former Jerusalem 
bureau chief for The Washington Post. 


By Alan Truseott 

g uestion: If you. spend 
your working life OK- 
ing teeth, and your spare 
time extracting trumps, what 
, do you do when you retire? 

The answer, judging by Dr. 

. Albeit Sunriune of James- 
r port. Long Island, is that you 
become an American Con- 
• tract Bridge League accred- 
' ited teacher and instruct oth- 
, ers to extract trumps, and in 
■ other ways learn the elements 
L of bridge. - 

' On the diagramed deal 
.. from the Long Island Region- 
» 3 } Championship in Smith- 
town, Long Island, Dr. Sun- 
shine found himself fa the nn- ■ 


comfortable contract of five 
diam onds redoubled. Wheth- 
er the bidding of his wife, 
Victoria, who raised three 
diamonds to five diamonds 
and then redoubled, should be 
described as rash or optim- 
istic hinges on the outcome of 

rheptoy. , 

If East had opened with a 
weak, two-bid in spades, as 
one would expect. West 
would have led mat suit and 
the contract would probably 
have failed. As it was. West 
led the heart ten, giving South 
a useful clue: *e heart queen 
was probably on his right, 
since most pfayere tend to 
avoid leading from a queen 
and some, by agr ccn ^ nt ’* > 
not lead the ten from Q-10-9. 


The double suggested that 
West held the ace and queoa 
of trumps, so South won with 
the heart king in his hand and 
led the diamond king, giving 
up the normal diamond fin- 
esse. When West took the ace 
and led a low heart South put 
up toe ace and was rewarded 
by . the appearance of the 
queen on his right 

A second trump lead drove 
out the queen, and East was 
tumble to ruff when his part- 
ner led the heart nine. South 
won with the heart jack, 
rufied a spade; drew the miss- 
ing trump and played clubs. 
When the jack fell conveni- 
ently he had 1 1 tricks, making 
his redoubled game. 

“You are an optimist, my 


dear,” he informed the 
dummy in the- post-mortem. 

NORTH 

♦ JI07S 
9 A J76 

♦ 65 
*AKQ 

WEST EAST (B) 

* Q92 * A K8 5 4 3 

<31*984 9QS 

♦AQ 2 £ 9 * 

*J65 *043 

SOUTH 

♦ — 

9K32 

0 K J 10 6 4 3 
*19872 

Neuter sfcfe wwvutneralile. Tto bfcf- 


l h « : 

East 

Soam 

West 

North 

Pan 

34 

Pass 

34 

Pas* 

Pus 

DtL 

RdbL 

PUS 

pass 

Pass 


West ted the bean ten. 









two-month 
trial 

| A 

subscription. 




Save 


up 


60 


By maintaining a far-flung network of news-gathering resources, the World's Daily 
Newspaper brings you unrivalled coverage of world politics, business and economics, 
as well as science, technology, hovel, fashion, the arts and sport — all from on 
international perspective. 

lake advantage of this limited opportunity to fry the Internationa) Herald Tribune 
with a law cast, 2-month trial subscription and enjoy delivery to your home or office 
every morning. 


coutmf/GXBay 


DISCOUNT 

Off 

COVER PRICE 



SWEDB4 


SWTTZB8AN0 


ELSEWHERE 


* Far H&nndUl ttnofmina terfjJ dtlrmry in major ( 
G-raanr <ft 013WU SS 6 or fux [069|W 2 Sf I . 


German dfiai a/ lofl free IHT 


10-1-97* 

Yes, I would bke to skri facetting As International Herald Tribune. 

O My check is endued (paytdJe to rfie W77 
□ Pfaoie charge my. 

D Ame* D Diners dub □ VBA □ Accesi □ MasterCard □ Eurocord 
Credit card charges will be mode in French Francs c* current rates. 

Card Nn- - - Enp DrrfC.- 

Siyiafcro: ..... - — 

Far business orden. indicate your VAI No: 

JOT VAT t Ww FR7473202 )1 25} 

Mr/ Mrs/ Ms Farily No me — — — 

Firs Nome: .. Jab Title: — 

Mailing Addnrw: _ 


City / C o der _ . ■ 

Country:— i — . — — - — 

Heme W Nk Busineu Sd Nrc 

CUAWAdrl— ct- - - - — 

I got this copy of the IHT at □ fewk Dhole! □ affine □ other 
□ I do not wish to receive irfamarion from other coraUy screened companies 
Mai erfaxkv InlemtdmJ HerM Tribune 
1BI. ireanue Charles deGcJoL 925?J Nhu^CkIw. France. 

Fax: +33 I 41 43 92 10 
OB OUl +33 J 41 43 9341 

In Asia: +852 29 22 1 1 fa fhe US ffOB-faej! ) -800-682-2884. 
E-Mail Noe sufaflnLflM 

Offer *oSd far new subscriber; only. HA2M 


J 





































































PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 


INTERNATIONA 


Lingering Snags on Hebron Accord 
Hold Up Israeli-Palestinian Summit 


iL. A 


:• ■y-'K 


Ctx*pMbyQm-Su&FwmDupi*cbB 

GAZA CITY — Stubborn differences 
over a Hebron accord held up moves for 
a meeting of the Israeli and Palestinian 
leaders Thursday, despite new urgency 
given to concluding a deal by a shooting 
spree in the volatile city the day before. 

President Bill Clinton's Mideast's en- 
voy, Dennis Ross, met with the Pales- 
tinian leader, Yasser Arafat, to try to 
bridge the gaps and arrange a meeting 
with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
of Israel, but he apparently fell short. 

"We have not solved aU the remaining 
issues that still have to be resolved before 
having an agreement,” Mr. Ross said 
after the meeting here. “We are con- 
tinuing to work through the problems." 


Mr. Arafat said-after the talks (hat the 
meeting with Mr. Netanyahu had not 
been set. He added, however, that the 
two sides would meet 4 ‘ when the matters 
are completed and the talks finish and 
when we get close to the final agree- 
ment, which will be soon.” 

Before the meeting, the Palestinian 
information minister, Yasser Abed 
Rabbo, said there were ‘ ‘obstacles in the 
heart of the agreement," and Palestinian 
negotiators said Thursday that they 
would (lot sign any accord until Mr. 
Netanyahu committed himself to a de- 
tailed timetable for further troop with- 
drawals in the West Bank. 

Mr. Netanyahu has told the Pales- 
tinians that the so-called “further re- 


Soldier in Hebron Attack 
Sought to Avenge Deaths 


By Joel Greenberg 

Ne w York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — As new details 
emerged Thursday about his unstable 
emotional past, the soldier who shot up a 
Hebron marketplace Wednesday told in- 
vestigators that he wanted to avenge the 

estinians and the deaths^^te^mjlitant 
Rabbi Meir Kahane and Baruch Gold- 
stein, a Jewish settler who killed 29 
Muslims at prayer in Hebron in 1994. 

The police said they had arrested a 
second soldier in connection with the 
market shooting on suspicion of con- 
spiracy and failure to prevent a crime. 
The soldier. Yuval Jibti of Jerusalem, 
served on the same base with Noam 
Friedman, the conscript who opened tire 
Wednesday and wounded seven people. 

In separate court hearings Thursday, 
both soldiers were ordered held in cus- 
tody pending further investigations by 
the police. 

Brought before a judge in the town of 
Petah Tikva. Private Friedman repeated 
earlier assertions that he had acted to 

S event an expected agreement on an 
raeli Army withdrawal from most of 
Hebron. 

Manacled and wearing a black 
skullcap. Private Friedman declared: 
“When I heard that the agreement was 
about to be signed to surrender the holy 
city bought for 400 shekels of silver by 
our forefather Abraham. I decided that 
this can't be passed over in silence.” 

According to Biblical accounts, the 
Jewish patriarch, Abraham, bought a 
burial plot in Hebron for his wife, Sarah, 
and was later buried there, along with his 
sons, Isaac and Jacob, and their wives. 
The Tomb of the Patriarchs shrine in 
Hebron, holy to Muslims and Jews, is the 
traditional site of their graves. 

The police said that Private Friedman 
had told investigators that he acted to 
avenge the death of Corporal Nahshon 
Waxman, a soldier kidnapped in Oc- 
tober 1994 by militants from the Islamic 
movement Hamas and killed during a 
failed rescue attempt. 

The two soldiers had studied at the 
same religious high school in Jerusalem. 



HEBRON: Peace Process Survives Attack 


Continued from Page 1 

mandcr long imprisoned in and then 
expelled from Israel, Mr. Rajoub was a 
regular devil figure in Mr. Netanyahu’s 
campaign rhetoric. 

Mr. Netanyahu accused two former 
prime ministers. Yitzhak Rabin and Shi- 
mon Peres, of “subcontracting Israel's 
security" to “thugs" and 'Terrorists” 
like Mr. Rajoub. who runs the Pales- 
tinian Preventive Security Service in the 
West Bank. 

On Wednesday. Mr. Netanyahu's 
government did just what its prede- 
cessors did. 

In the aftermath of Mr. Friedman’s 
attack, the army and Shin Bet internal 
security service worked closely with Mr. 
Rajoub. inviting him to set up a com- 
mand center irTHebron’s Alia' Hospital 
with Tariq Zayad. the designated police 
chief for Hebron after Israel's withdraw- 
al. and the Palestinian Army command- 
er. Abdei Fatah Jawadi. 

Mr. Rajoub mode sure he was seen in 
public working with Major General Uzi 
Dayan of the Israeli Army and .Ami Ay- 
alon. the Shin Bet chief, to calm the city. 

According to Palestinian and Israeli 
sources alike, he sent plainclothes agents 
throughout the city to instruct stone- 
th rowing youths to go home, and Mr. 
Jawadi personally sped to the scene of 
one rioi'to defuse it. 


Zairian Rebels Capture Key Town 
As Regime Vows Counteroffensive 


fi llu i—Thn+l Di^rkfi 

BUNIA. Zaire — Rebels seized the 
strategic town of Bunia in northeastern 
Zaire and nearby gold mines in a fierce 
battle with government forces that left 
hundreds dead. re>idcnt.s said Thurs- 
day. 

"The fighting was terrible and there 
were bodies all over the streets," said a 
teacher. Pierre Lolo. "Those of us who 
hod not already fled to the forest had to 
stay in our homes." 

The city fell to the rebels, who are 
trying to carve territory out of the east, 
after a 1 2-hnur bailie on Dec. 24. The 
rebels said 307 government soldiers 
were killed while their own forces sus- 
tained 75 casualties. 

Meanwhile, the government of Mar- 
shal Mobutu Sese Seko announced plans 


NKbBBVAgEM firmer -P ikmc 

Noam Friedman smiling as be sat 
in a police car after the shooting. 

and Private Friedman visited the be- 
reaved family a few times after Corporal 
Waxman’s death. 

Yehuda Waxman, the dead soldier's 
father, recalled Thursday that Private 
Friedman, then a civilian, had appeared 
very upset and had warned that the Pal- 
estinians were going to bring on another 
Holocaust 

“He was very agitated by Nahshon 's 
murder,” Mr. Waxman said. "He was 
very concerned about the attempts to 
compromise with the Palestinians. He 
had a fear that the Palestinians were 
going to take over, that we would lose 
the country and go into exile. He ex- 
pressed feelings of revenge, and said that 
they can’t do this to us, that the terrorism 
always comes from one side. I tried to 
calm him down." 

The police said Private Friedman had 
also told them that he had wanted to 
avenge the death of the militant anti- 
Arab rabbi, Meir Kahane, who was as- 
sassinated in New York in 1990. 


deployment" would begin within six 
weeks of the signing of a Hebron agree- 
ment, but he has not said by when it 
would be completed. 

Jamil Tarifi, a Palestinian negotiator, 
said that the “most important thing for us 
are dates for die second and third stages 
of redeployment” in the West Bank. 

Hopes for a meeting Thursday had 
been raised after a marathon negotiating 
session the previous evening in Tel Aviv 
attended by Mr. Ross and led by die 
Israeli defense minister, Yitzhak Moc- 
dechai, and Mr. Arafat’s No. 2, Mah- 
moud Abbas. 

Heading into the session, Mr. Abbas 
had predicted a signing “within 24 to 48 
hours, if there are no bad surprises." But 
after that meeting, Mx. Mordechai said 
that while there was "agreement on the 
large majority of clauses,” there were 
* 1 still one or two which will be discussed 
Thursday by Netanyahu and Arafat." 

David Bar-Dan, Mr. Netanyahu’s 
spokesman, accused the Palestinians of 
“stalling" in the negotiations because 
* ‘they feel that the situation of no agree- 
ment favors them and is detrimental to 
us." 

Israel and the Palestinians have been 
wrangling since Oct. 6 over a formula 
for a Hebron handover after Mr. Net- 
anyahu's government demanded 
stronger guarantiees for die 400 Jewish 
sealers who live among die city's 
120,000 Palestinian residents. 

Both sides underlined die need for a 
quick resolution of the talks after a right- 
ist Israeli soldier opened tire on a 
crowded market in Hebron on Wed- 
nesday, wounding six Palestinians, in an 
effort to torpedo the accord. 

Mr. Netanyahu called Mr. Arafat im- 
mediately afterward to condemn the at- 
tack, insisting the two sides had to reach 
a deal on Hebron. Mr. Clinton also called 
Mr. Arafat to urge him to “bear down 
and get it done with.” 

Under the 1995 Oslo accords, Israel 
was to pull its troops out of 35 percent of 
Hebron, the last major West Bank town 
under Israeli occupation, to allow Pal- 
estinian police to take their place and 
bring Palestinian administration over the 
entire city. 

In addition to demands for an Israeli 
commitment to conduct more army re- 
deployments from West Bank rural areas, 
talk s have stuck over Palestinian demands 
for a role in guarding the Tomb of the 
Patriarchs, Hebron's central holy site. 

The Isireii internal security minister, 
Avigdor Kahalan, also cited problems 
previously said to be closed, including 
Palestinian demands to reopen a main 
street running directly in front of another 
Jewish settlement dial has long been 
closed by the army, and over security for 
Tel Rumeida, an enclave of seven Jewish 
families on one of Kelson’s hiUs. 

The United States said Thursday that 
it had received threats of increased ter- 
rorist attacks over the next two weeks in 
Israel and the West Bank, and warned 
Americans there to exercise caution. 

“There are indications of an in- 
creased likelihood of terrorist attacks 
over the next two weeks. U.S. citizens 
are advised to exercise caution in public 
areas, to avoid travel on public buses, to 
avoid congregating at bus stops," said 
the State Department spokesman, Nich- 
olas Bums. (AP, AFP, Reuters) 


■ 


vEV'. 


mm 






Nmytf HuMancm/Reuea 

A Palestinian in Hebron arguing Thursday with an Israeli settler in the West Bank city a day after an off-duty 
soldier opened fire on Arab shoppers in a market; wounding seven, in hopes of scuttling a pullout accord. 

U.S. Poised for Decision on Land Mines 

Supporters of Ban Fear Clinton Will Opt for Slow Track to a Treaty 


By Dana Priest 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The international 
campaign to ban anti-personnel land 
mines is at a crossroads, and President 
Bill Clinton will probably determine 
which way it goes. 

Mr. Clinton is set to decide whether to 
join several dozen countries ted by 
Canada that will begin next month to 
craft an international treaty banning the 
use, export, production ami stockpiling 
of anti-personnel mines. Although 
C hina and Russia say they will not sign 
the pact, supporters of the treaty say that 
it would be a quick first stem toward an 
eventual worldwide ban of the weapons, 
which are estimated to wound or kill 500 
people each week. 

Tne alternative for Mr. Clinton is to 
adopt a slower approach supported by 
the Pentagon and many in die White 
House. It calls for negotiating a ban 
through the United Nations Conference 
on Disarmament in search of a broad 
consensus shared by Beijing and Mos- 
cow, even though that is likely to take 
years to achieve. 

About 50 countries have expressed 
initial support for the fester Canadian 
effort, known as the Ottawa Conference. 
Backers include some nations with the 
biggest land-mine problems, like Af- 
ghanistan. Angola and Cambodia. 

The goal is to write a legally binding 
treaty mat would be signed in December 
by as many countries as possible. Sup- 


porters hope that the agreement will 
stigmatize the weapons and feat other 
countries eventually would feel com- 
pelled to sign, too. A first working ses- 
sion is set for February in Vienna. . Bel- 
gium, Norway and Switzerland have 
offered to sponsor follow-up meetings. 

Supporters of the treaty say that if 
Washington bows out, the pressure to 
participate will be off other wary coun- 
tries, like Britain and France. 

“What we're trying to do here is not 
capture the entire wand, but establish a 
moral authority,’ ' said Robert Lawson, a 
top Canadian disarmament official. 

The second track through the Con- 
ference on Disarmament, a famously 
slow international body, aims to create a 
but that all member countries would 
sign. Critics and supporters alike ac- 
knowledge that it could take years to 
reach even a narrow agreement. 

The Clinton administration is split on 
the subject, “in introspective disarray.” 
as one disarmament official put it. 

Some in the State Department favor 
lending U.S. prestige to the Canadian 
effort But Mr. Clinton in the past has 
taken his cue on the issue from the 
Pentagon, which favors fee slower ap- 
proach. 

Members of the National Security 
Council are said to be leaning toward the 
Pentagon’s position. But a high-ranking 
council official suggested in an interview 
that it might be possible to pursue both 
tracks simultaneously by giving rhetor- 
ical support to the Ottawa Conference 


Mr. Netanyahu had the advantage of 
knowing that there was no Netanyahu in 
opposition — no mainstream leader to 
his right who would condemn him. as he 
condemned Mr. Rabin and Mr. Peres, for 
reckless reliance on .Arabs instead of on 
Israel’s own might. 

A similar immunity permitted him to 
phone Yasser Arafat and condemn Mr. 
Friedman's shooting as a criminal act. 

He used language that drew explicit 
parallels between Jewish and Arab ter- 
rorism. a comparison he has not uttered 
before, and he also spoke a formula he 
had ridiculed when offered by his pre- 
decessors. "No crime and no act of 
violence." he said, would deflect his 
government from negotiating peace. 

Mr. Arafat, for his part, resisted many 
temptations Wednesday. 

Mr. Friedman's attack took place on 
fee anniversary of fee founding of Mr. 
Arafat's faction, Fatah, of fee Palestine 
Liberation Organization. Parades 
planned for the occasion, throughout fee 
West Bank and Gaza Strip, were a ready- 
made occasion for fervent nationalism, 
and it would not have taken many hints 
from Mr. Arafat to turn them violent 

But Mr. .Arafat chose not to speak at 
all at Gaza's parade, where he was the 
featured orator last year. 

Further. Palestinian radio and tele- 
vision featured Mr. Netanyahu’s apo- 
logy for the attack. 



MLuta VaMom/Ap'fHvHuiiir-nmMr 

Demonstrators in Belgrade talking with an opposition leader, Zoran Djindjic, right, during a rally Thursday. 


without committing to sign a treaty. 

The nongovernmental organizations 
that have led the international campaign 
fear feat a two-track strategy by fee 
United Stales would be harmful. 

“This is a humanitarian crisis, yet the 
U.S. is poised to make a policy derision 
that will slow down fee momentum," 
said Stephen Goose, director of a Human 
Rights Watch arms control project 

There are an estimated HO million 
land mines in the ground in 64 countries, 
and most of their victims are civilians. 
Land mines are po polar among armies 
and insurgencies oerause they are cheap 
to buy but expensive to clear. 

In May. Mr, Clinton endorsed the 
Pentagon-backed status quo position. It 
banned older * ‘dumb" mines, except in 
fee demilitarized zone between North 
and South Korea. 

Although an immediate ban on all 
anti-personnel mines was endorsed by 
15 retired generals, including General! 
Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of 
U.S. troops during the Gulf War, Mr. 
Clintcm. foDowed the Pentagon’s lead. 
Critics accused him of not wanting to 
rebuff the Defense Department during 
an election campaign. 

Key commanders, who dominate the 
Pentagon's thinking on the issue, want a 
worldwide ban on the newer, self-de- 
structing “smart" mires before agree- 
ing to give them up. They argue feat 
mines are crucial in “channeling" en- 
emy troops and are an irreplaceable early 
warning against enemy approaches. 


BELGRADE: 

Church Speaks Out 

Continued from Page 1 

losevic's style of leadership from other 
Yugoslav institutions, including the army 
and fee courts. In the opinion of many 
analysts, the only institution left feat is 
vital to Mr. Milosevic's hold on power is 
the 80,000-strong police force, which is 
well-trained and disciplined. 

“Milosevic has purposefully des- 
troyed every authority and every in- 
stitution in the country, with fee ex- 
ception of himself," said a former 
government official. “He has killed the 
middle class, the church, the media, the 
Academy of Sri.ences.the university, the 
army, the Supreme Court. He is fee sole 
authority left" 

■ Opposition Weighs New Tactics 

The opposition leader Vuk Draskovic 
indicated that new ways of conducting 
the protests may be announced in the 
coming days. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Belgrade. 

“Our battle for a democratic Serbia is 
entering a final phase," Mr. Draskovic* 
said. “We won't be demonstrating on 1 
streets forever.” He called on people to 
stage smaller rallies "behind fee police 
coitions" because “the next few days 
will be crucial for our decisive battle.” 


to rally the armed forces for a quick 
counteroffensive against fee rebels, who 
have captured a large swathe of ter- 
ritory. 

The eastern Zairian provinces of North 
and South Kivu have been in fee hands of 
Tutsi-led rebels for two months. 

The chief of the general staff will be 
granted “all necessaiy strategic and lo- 
gistical means to carry out the counter- 
offensive by the Zairian armed forces in 
fee shortest possible time," Defense 
Minister Likulia Bolongo said in a state- 
ment. 

The statement made available to 
Agence Zairc-Presse said fee counter- 
offensive would be “sweeping and 
crushing, without sparing any Zairian or 
foreign perpetrator who connives wife 
the enemy." ( Reuters. AFP | 


New UN Chief Starts 
Assembling His Staff 


UNITED NATlONS.New York— In 
his first day as UN secretary-general 
Thursday, Kofi Annan of Ghana an- 
nounced provisional appointments to his 
executive office, with Iqbal Riza of 
Pakistan named as chief of staff. 

Mr. Riza was a peacekeeping official 
from Pakistan and is a former UN rep- 
resentative to Bosnia. In addition, Rolf 
Knuttson of Sweden, director of political 
affairs, and Patrizia Civili of Italy, di- 
rector of economic and interagency af- 
fairs, were appointed to fee executive 
office. They both worked for Mr. Annan’s 
predecessor. Boutros Boutros Ghali. 

Mr. Annan also named two executive 
assistants. Elizabeth Lindenmayer of 
France and Shashi Tharoor of India. 

A spokesman. Fred Eckhard. said fee 
new secretary-general was also consid- 
ering appointing a deputy. 


NATO: In Hungary, Army Officers Are Learning the Wfestem Way 


Continued from Page 1 

eluding the chief of staff. General Ferenc 
Vegh, have gone to Britain, Canada, 
Germany or fee United States for 
lengthy stints of study. 

Considerable resources have been 
poured into English instruction, as well. 
In one innovation, Hungarian teachers of 
Russian were sent to the Defense De- 
partment English Language School in 
San Antonio and converted into English 
teachers. 

General Vegb, 48,- typifies whaz 
NATO and Hungarian officers hope will 
be a new breed of commander. 

Trained at the Military College of 
Tank Units in Moscow in fee late 1970s, 
General Vegh was sent to the Army War 
College and graduated in 1993, a year 
earlier than Colonel Nagy. 

“The beauty of Ferenc Vegh is that he 
was trained on both sides," said on 
American military officer. 


Adapting to true American style. Gen- 
eral Vegh sent around a vision statement 
for all 72,000 members of the armed 
forces (down from 150,000 in 1989 and 
heading for 60,000 in 1997). The state- 
ment read right out of the textbook on 
Western management: “In tbs case of 
officers, warrant officers and noncom- 
missioned officers. I consider commit- 
ment, knowledge, creative thinking, 
self-development, morality, strong 
mind, example-setting and healthy life- 
style to be basic values." 

The general is also stunningly frank. 
Downsizing, lower pay, poor working 
conditions and lack of public respect for 
the military have severely affected mor- 
ale. Those left in the army, he wrote, are 
“becoming more and more apathetic.” 

He also made bis debut by unveiling a 
new slinuned-down command structure 
based on fee American Joint Chiefs of 
Staff system. A 2,000-member top staff 
is to be trimmed to 600. soldiers,, lie 


announced. He then designated Colonel' 
Nagy’s 25th Mechanized Brigade to be 
the first Hungarian brigade to be NATO- 
ready. 

By January 1998, Colonel Nagy and’ 
bis men are supposed to be prepared to 
go on a NATO mission. 

In Colonel Nagy. General Vegh chose 
an officer fascinated with the American- 
military. On his bookshelves the colonel 
has a well-thumbed copy of "The Com- 
manders” by Bob. Woodward. A bio-" 
graphy of President Franklin DJ 
Roosevelt rests among a model of an- 
Abrams tank and other American nril-I 
itary equipment. I . 

Before forming his brigade out of the’ 
shards of a much larger Hungarian unit- 
headquartered in Tala. SO kilometers (50- 
miles) west of Budapest, Colonel Nagy' 

said he went to one of the NATO bases m- ' 
Germany; talked structure for. a week 
and then modeled hisbrigade on what he - 
had seen. 






LEISURE 



r - Ken Ringle 

§ ; - W »%‘Wftlffo T fc e 

* AMALIE, US 
Islands -T^ T± 

^fc#^J5^i Baber * most, of her 

• .^^^ 1 ^ atlves were easing into hol- 

^wndwarf^ong the north Sof 

££££f° *1* ;■**«»« 

S3?S'-L haalmg ropes, wrestling 
HjpSms ra the rain and mucking out the 

oocasronal marine toilet. 

ohyimaiioUday routine 
for oae. of the country’s wealthy blue 
Warfs--7-a^tescendam of Vandertalts. 
Biddles, Drexds aid DevereS^ 0 ^ 

6uttbn , niorneH(ywn , tl<«^d 


and the Sea: Not a Figurehead on the Tall Ships 


—.. — “-wwwuvrau i nave me most 
obvious wotfc^ either. For 
twoyem Ibe47-year-dd has gxut most 

other hfcas ap^d tan-shqi d^Sra^Z 

co round-the-clock watches at sea. soli-. 

CfTW W CDflU^nn - i _ V > 


_» „ . Oi SCO, spn- 

cmghjie,- swabbing decks and perform- 
rag ttovemgtwidfyihg chores aloft that 
have been terrifying and chalWi&mp ^-7. 
ors since the age of exploration^ 
“Actually, the best description is in 
my son s college entrance application 
essay, die said cmabreakbeW decks 
schooner Harvey Gamage. 
Whenever my mother has trouble 
with men, die runs away to sea,* he 
wrote. ‘Lo&xjf boys have gone to sea 
with their fathers, but Fm probably the 
only kid in the world who has furled a 
topgallant sail 100 feet off the deck of a 
^““J-gped ahq) in a gale with MY 


“If that doesn’t get him into Prin- 
ceton,nothing wilL’ r 
While plenty of women crew and 
even skipper traditional sailing ships 


Thome is unique on several 
For one tiring, she*s more than 

gnce the age of most <rf her shmmates. 
™ another, few others choose the 
^ificle-wre^iiiig subservience of a 
“eckhand s fife when they can afford to 

Or in ThomcYcase, do — own their 
own ship. . 

my master’s certificate for 
1 OCKoo vessels, as well as Coast Guard 
hcenses, as a mate arid able-bodied’ sea^- 
I. ve sailed my own yachts and 

Sod the most rewardmg. There’s 
so mething profoundly challenging and 
meaningful in the teamwork of crew life 
on sailing ships that’s hard to explain if 
you ve never experienced it" 

NoSucx r or Antoni 

“Nobody cares how old you are. 
Nobody cares who ypor family is or 
how much money yon have. Nobody 
cuts you any slack. You either can do 
tins very physical, veiy demanding 
work and stand your watches and do 
your part or you can’t If you can you’re 
accepted, and you team a great deal 
about yourself in the process. If yon 
can’t or won’t, you’re very quickly off 
the Slip.” *; »*.. 

It might have been awkward for C^>- 
tain Keo Neale to erect Thome from the 


tain Ken Neale to eject Thome from the 
Harvey Gamage. Alter all, she owns fee 
ship. She and her husband bought the 
130-foot _ (40-meter) schooner to help 
keep alive the sort tf life and skills sbe 
treasures. 

Her nonprofit foundation runs the 
Gamage as a school' ship, on which 


before the mast, learning math through 
navigation, learning history and lan- 
guages through travel and learning 
mahout life on the high seas. But she 
herself is infrequently aboard. 
v - . Immediately before her busman's hol- 
iday in die Caribbean, she had labored 
nine months straight as a paid seaman on 
HMS Rose, a 1 79-foot reproduction of an 
18th-century square-rigger that plies the 
Atlantic as one of die most demanding 
sailing vessels afloat. 

. . With her crew knife and marlmespike 
sheathed on her hip. with her blond hair, 
deep rail and muscular body , Thome so 
enthralled French journalists at a tail- 
ships festival last summer in Brest that 
they made her a sort of nautical center- 
fold pf one of the festival magazines. 
. But Thome is nobody’s boat bunny. In 
addition 10 hex chores as a crewman, she 
serves as a director of the American Sail 
Training Association and manages the 
$400,000 annual budget of the nonprofit 
Harvey. Gamage Foundation. , 

S HE spent part of foe Christmas 
holidays in a shipyard working on 
the reproduction of the HMS 
Bounty that Marion Brando sailed in 
“Mutiny on the Bounty.’’ 

It wasn’t that long ago when women 
were considered badhick on most work- 
ing sailing ships and even aboard many 
yachts. (Sowing up in Old Westbury, 
Connecticut, Alexandra Tower Thome 
remembers seeing the ent ire Maine 
schooner fleet anchor off her family’s 
summer home in Islesboro, Maine, on 
Friday nights, “bar they didn’t hire girls 
as crew.” 


In 1985 somebody got in touch with 
her about a fund-raising project. Corpus 
Christi wanted to sponsor a visit by the 
Elissa, a lovely square-rigged ship then 
in the final stages of a $4 million, 10- 
year restoration in Galveston. The plan 
was to finance the Elissa ’s trip to New 
York for the 100th annivereaiy of the 
Statue of Liberty id 1 986. 

“I threw myself into foe project right 
away, and raised about 5200,000 in so- 
licited gifts, including foe first $50,000 
of seed money,’' she remembers. “I 
worked very hard and was rewarded 
with a chance to sail on the trip as part of 
the crew.” 

initmjl suspicion But she was ini- 
tially looked upon with a bit of sus- 
picion, she says: Most of the other crew- 
men were “dirty hands*’ volunteers 
who had worked on the ship during her 
long rebirth. Thome was a latecomer 
and a fund-raiser, and “it was natural 
for them to thinkl might be some kind of 
dilettante who bad just bought my way 
onboard.” 




■ ■■ 




A *■ i 






5SE 





undertook all sorts of prevoyage chores. 
“I realized later that they were giving 
me the dirty work nobody else wanted to 
do, like bemg hoisted up the mast on a 
bosun’s chair to tar the rigging. But I 
found I really loved thingsfike tarring 
the rigging. I had always disliked do- 
mestic chares like cleaning house, but 
aboard a sailing ship the same sort of 
thing seemed curiously satisfying. It 
was more personal. And furling a top- 
gallant sail offshore I could say, ’This is 
really the way it was. Now I am living 
the fife I always wanted.’ ” 





Mr 


A/V/ * \ 

■ ■ "V 


. A : - 


t? 


■ 4S 
y 


To fight that perception, she says; she [ ■TsW^BbSl /■».’. 

bdertook all sorts of prevoyage chores, [. ‘ \ $ -■'**- .. 1 ■ 

[ realized later that they were giving - * ■ • ryfc.* *\ v ,p * 

t the dirty work nobody else wanted to ,v30||^^Bhv . fa ^ r : •& ' "* * i 

1, like being hoisted up the mast on a ; • jESlb? / 

isun’s chair to tar the rigging. But I .- K ' 7 

und I really loved thingsfike tarring » :>/ efr' _ >f .-^a 

5 rigging. I had always disliked do- W .wSNfeifc- -V .-fV^3 


MOVIE GUIDE 


K™ fi:^-k.Th<- WjiljrapDD ftjv 

Alix Thome on the bowsprit as she furls the jib on the Haney Carnage. 


RECORDINGS 


Thi Portrait op a Lady 

Directed by Jane Campion. New Zea- 
land, UX., US. 

Vivacious, pretty, intelligent and 
charming. Henry James's heroine Isa- 
bel Archer (Nicole Kidman) has a bevy 
of admirers, as did the author’s cousin 
Minny Temple, who inspired toe fic- 
tional character and died of tubercu- 
losis at 24. So determined is Isabel to 
make her own way in life that she toms 
down an American dream proposal 
from eminently suitable and bankable 
Lord W a ib urto n (Richard R. Grant). 
After inheriting a fortune of her own 
from hear unde Mrs Toochett (John 
Gielgud), Isabel goes to Italy where, 
with some prompting from her sntister 
new friend Madame Merle (Barbara 
Hersbey), she falls into the clntdies of 
(he dilettante, manipulative -sorondrel 
Gilbert Osmcnd’ (John MaQcovicb)* 
who marries her for her money. Os- 
mond's vite treatment tf Isabel and his 

illegitimate ifanghnw ; Pans y ( Vqlwilrna , 

Crcvi), and feabd’i deflarmnafion to 


remain loyal ncaietheless, form toe 
heart of James’s 'drama. Campion, 
; whose “An Angel at My Table’ f and 
“The Piano*' estabfished her iniema- 
tional reputation, has clearly ap- 
proached this adaptation of Jameses 
clas&c eariynovd, expensively shot on 
location in England and ltaly, with tre- 
mendous earnestness, preserving much 
of James’s dialogue. What they have 
j^tedfo convey on film is the author’s 
subtle and gripping psychological ana- 
lysis. Consequently, we simply don't 
get to know Isabel sufficiently to un- 
derstand what makes her tick, and ul- 
timately remain' baffled as to how she 
drald have fallen for such an obvious 
phony and rotter as Osmond in foe first 
place. Also alienming are the overused 
glgom^aden lighting effects, gimmicks 
such as slow-motion, and a cringe-mak- 
ing, anachronistic fantasy sequence 
where Isabel's suitors make love to her 
simultaneously , which uses special ef- 
fects reminiscent of “Ghostbusters.’ ’ 
(Roderick Conway Morris, 1HT) 


Michael 

Directed by Nora Ephron. US. 

John Travolta may be the only Hol- 
lywood star these days who can poll a 
movie out of a hat and make it dance oq 
the bead ofa pin. And in Nora Ephron's 
winsome, wafer-thin comedy, “Mi- 
chael,” his portrayal of a mischievous 
angel with toe appetites of a trucker and 
the table manners of a 2-year-old puts 
toe film on on its toes and sets it spin- 
ning. The character, a self-described 
archangel named Michael who is first 
encountered by a trioof journalists in an 
Iowa motel, makes one of toe year’s 
irmrem en yffttble movie (*nt pTtv^«: With 

a cigarette dangling from hi* month, his 

cumbersome angel wings looking sadly 
bedraggled, he plows into a bowl erf 
breakfast cereal onufoich he has braped 
enough sugar to send most ordinary 
mortals into shock. Michael is, in short, 
toe im pishly grinning slob that many of 
us would like to be if we thought we 
could get away with it Pure id, with a 
streak of the practical joker, he also has 


a redeeming heart of gold. Three of foe 
angel’s breakfast companions — Quin- 
lan (William Hurt), Huey (Robert 
Pastarelli), and Dorothy (Andie Mac- 
Dowel!) — are representatives of a 
sleazy tabloid callea The National Mir- 
ror and have flown all the way from 
New York, dollar signs dancing in their 
heads, to see if he’s for reaL The fourth. 
Pansy Milbank (Jean Stapleton), is foe 
motel proprietor who tipped them off. 
Like Ephron’s blockbuster hit, “Sleep- 
less in Seattle,” “Michael” uses pop 
songs with an unusually astute sense erf 
how to underline a moment Willie Nel- 
son sin g in g “What a Wonderful 
World,” Bonnie Raitt doing “Feels 
Like Home,” Van Morrison's “Bright 
Side of the Road” and Randy Newman 
drawling a witty "Heaven Is My 
Home” are among toe numbers that 
give the movie a smart pop gloss. But it 
is Travolta who gives the movie a heart 
that it probably wouldn’t have were any 
other actor to play the role. Well, maybe 
Tom Hanks. (Stephen Holden, NYT) 


JOSHUA IKDMAH “Freedom in the 
Groove' ’(WB): Is Redman going into a 
deeper groove or is he just getting more 
commercial? One way or another, 
something is obviously up. Spotless 
funk? His coherent and flawlessly ex- 
ecuted compositions are still free 
enough to keep you guessing. The im- 
provisations are at the same time sim- 
pler and more ambitious than in the past, 
and clichd-free for a change. Go fig- 
ure. 

MOL DUMOND The Ballad of Paul 
Desmond (BMG/France): With his bril- 
liant. self-deprecating sense of humor, 
the late altoman Desmond, author of 
“Take 5,” once said he wanted his 
instrument to sound “like a diy mar- 
tini.” The cultivated personality 
presented on this easy -on-the -spirit 
compilation reminds you of. as he was 
once described, “the perfect extra man 
at a dinner party.” Paul Desmond raised 
foe level of conversation wherever he 
went. 

nuu miKKELBOKO “Anything but 


Grey" (Columbia): The shadow of 
Miles Davis hangs over Copenhagen. 
Mikkelborg has led and composed 
(“Aura”) for the prestigious Danish 
Radio Big Band and he played with 
Dexter Gordon, Don Cherry and others. 
With “that” trumpet sound and those 
pretty melodies plus appropriate tech- 
nology and a wide variety of colors and 
grooves, if sounds almost like Miles 
summing himself up. 

JALAl “The Fruits of Rap" (On the 
One): Jalal, called “foe grandfather of 
rap,” was co-founder and is now the last 
of the original Last Poets. The Poets 
claimed their “Hustler’s Convention” 
( 1 973) to be the first gangsta rap album. 
Jalal here includes tales like “The Mas- 
ter's Counsel.” about a student named 
Hop and his master Hip. The stories and 
their recitation recall Lord Buckley — 
rap's percussive verses without attitude 
and with quick-wined rhymes worthy of 
a . . . poet. 

Mike Zwerin/THT 


ARTS GUIDE 


AUSTRIA 


KunatHau* Went tot (1) 71*04- 
. 95. open dally: Conthnibignb Jan. 
m 26: “Man Ftey "Morethan 150 vin- 
taseprintsand some Suneafist ob- 
jects. Wan Bay (1890-1976) is 
renowned for hfe portraits of the 
cultural. avant-garde in Paris and 
his piorMwfeo work-^ ^ori" expert- 
mefttal piwtojpapfty. - 

■ B ELG IR JH ~~ 

Awn W* / 

SfedeiqfcPrefltenfcabinaC,lBfc (3). 
232-24-55 .dosed Mondays. Coo- 
Unuing/To Jan. 19: “Jan Cox, 
1919-1980“ A selection of etch- 
ings, woodcuts, lithographs and 
sUkscreen prints by the Belgian 
painter: 


Lfl Momti+±k (2) 217-22-11. 
“Tristan und tookfe.* Directed by 
Achfen Freyer. <xwduc*ed by Ant- 
onio Pappano, with' Ronald 
HamSton and Anne Evans. Jan. 
22, 26 and 30.; t-‘ 


M t J 


Museum; voor M ada m e fQmst, 
tab (59) 50-81-18, ckxsad Mon 
days. ContknringAb ‘ Feb. Ik 
“[yEnswaDafvaux."150workaby. 
Beldan arfsfesjames Ensor, Leon 

Spfltaert, Rene Magritte, Constant 

< ^meke and Paul Deb/aux. 

, EMKBMtOH . 

’ Festival Theatre, tet (131) 520- 
6000. “La Boheme.” TJfeected "by 
Daniel Steter. cwiductedty Steftfv 
en dart®, with Claim Rutter and 
Ian Storey. Jan. 21 ,23 .and 25. V 
National Gallery of Scotland, teh 
(31) 332-2266, opernte^. To Jan. 
31 : “Turner Waterco tors. "The tra- 
ditional annual display of 38 Wa- 
tarcotors by the British painter 
. (1775-1851). These works are 

- shown durtog the. month of Janu-. 

. *; 'ary. when thermit teat its weakest 
_ and leas* de^ruefiva. 

I ruHtow 

. EngBsh National Opera, tefc (170 
-532-8300. A new production « 

■ '.‘The HaBan Gffl in Algieis." Dir- 
; : actad by Howard Davies, conduc- 
ted by WJentin Raymond arid sung. 

n English by Sally Burgess. 

. Charles Workman and Henry 
‘ Runey. Jart T8. 23, 25, 28 and 30 ; 

v v -toyal Acadteny «rf Aria, let (1 71 ) 

. . -139-7438. open daBy- OontJnu- 
' - ngfTo Jan. 19r"Fftxn Mantaffla to 

^•■^casso: Drawings from the Thaw 

■' ' /collection.* 100 drawings by Aft- 
'• Y ,, torfer, Rt*««, Canatettn, Goya 
. indMaSsw, among othtes. 

j 'vtiltcclrapol Art Gaflery, let 
- .171) 522-7888,'ctosed Mondays. 

, ' ' b March 9: Tony Cragg: Sculp- 
- -.■jre." Fifteen .bge wodts by tee 
- ■ rftish sculptor (bom 1949);;to- 
•/ucBng towering assemblages 
' /Tade from gfase vewefe and 
ooden works bitefflng with hooks. 

. iso Includes drawings, as we* as 
irtojpaphs and videos showing 
ie creation and Installation of re-' 
‘ mt works. 





Richard Lindner's 1954 u Boy with Machine" can be seen in Washington. 


■ C»H AB A _ ^ 

Tououro 

Art GaBary of Ontario, tet (416) 
979-8648. dosed Mondays .and 
Tuesdays. Cdnfowfngnb Jan. 28: 
“Prirtg by Edvard Munch.” A so- 
teefion ot 49 prints devoted to the 
themes of tow aM death that char- 
acterize flw imafl«y of the Nor- 
artist (1863-1944). 

J PIMMAIK 

lln—fgnr* 

LouWana Musetan rt Modem 
Art; tefc 49-19-35^5. openly. 
Oorttaulngrtb Jan. 19: Tto 

sand the Meditoneiwaa Juxla- 

' poses. ISO paintings, seulptoras. 
aaphlc wwte and ceramra tv P* - 
casso wife wort® from Cy°- 
{acfic, Mycenaean. Greekjaruscan 

end Greco-Roman periods. 


PABHr 

Grand Palais, tefc 01-44-13-17- 
17, Closed Tuesdays. Continuing/ 
To Jan. 20: “Picasso et to Por- 

traiL" .. . 

Jeu de Paume, tefc 01-47-03-12- 
50, dosed Mondays. To Feb. 16: 
“Jesus Rafael Soto." A retrospect- 
ive of fee works of the Venezuelan 
artist (bom 1923), associated wtfo 
Op Art. The atfitortton focuses on 
the artist’s serial works from the 
mkM950s- 

M uaee Qalort e de-la Sefta. tefc 
01.-45-56-60-17. dosed Sundays. 
To Feb. 22: “L’Ame rique de la De- 
pression; Artistes Engages dee 
Annees3a"Prfnte and engravings 
- created tmderlheaeglsoflhe Fed- 
eral Art Project, titat provided work 
.'for unemployed artiste during the 
New Deal era. The works, by 


artists such as Edward Hopper, 
Harry Brodsky and Rockwell Kent, 
document working conditions in 
America to the 1930s. 

Ihtsee national dee Arts 
d'Afrtqus at d'Oceanle, tel: 01- 
43-46-51-61, dosed Tuesdays. To 
Feb. 17: “Armen et PArt African." 
More than- 180 works Including 
masks, statues and reliquary fig- 
ures collected in Africa by the 
Franco- American sculptor (bom 
.1828). 

^ HHtAHP ~ 
Hama 

Museum of Contemporary Art, 
tek(p) 17-33-61. dosed Mondays. 
ContinuingPTb Jan. 26: 'Irving 
.Pern: Photographs.” Portraits, 
fashion p h o togr ap hs from fee 
1960s and stffl Bles by fee Amer- 
ican photographer (bom 1917). 


Toiuman t 

Bonn . 

Kunst-und Ausstettungshalle 
der Bundes republic Deutsch- 
land, tel: (228) 9171-200, dosed 
Mondays. To March 2: “The Great 
Collections V: Napoli.” More than 
1 00 Neapolitan Baroque paintings, 
statues, 16th-century tapestries 
and works In porcelain- Includes 
major works by Mantegna, 
Raphael, Titian. Carracci and 
Guido Reni. 

Munich 

Netionattheater, tel: (89) 21- 85- 
19-20. Hans Werner Henze's 
“Vfcnus and Adonis." Directed by 
Pierre Audi, conducted by Markus 
Stenzwffe Nadine Secunde, Chris 
Merritt and Ekkehatd Wteschfea. 
Jan. 11 , 17, 23, 27 and 30. 

SrurroAirr 

Staatsthaater, tefc 711-20320. 
"Boris Godunov." Directed by Inga 
Levant, conducted by Gabriele 
Ferro wtth Paata Burchutadze. 
Jan. 22 and 28. 

EDImE 

ilrnmni n> 

The terete Museum, let: (2) 708- 
811,opandaSy.ToJtme 1: "Empire 
of the Sultans: Ottoman Art from 
the Collection of Nassar D. Khaffll.” 
200 works Inducting calligraphy, 
Korans, manuscripts, arms and ar- 
mor, metalwork, ceramics, textiles 
and scientific Instruments. 

h iTAtir ~ ~ 

Florence 

Uuseo dl Storla deHa Fbtogrefta, 
tefc (55) 213-370, dosed Wednes- 
days. Contkmingn'o Jan. 15: “Au- 
^ist Sander La Fotografia non ha 
Ombre Oscua." Nearly 160 works 
by the German photographer. 

Tokyo 

Season Museum of Art, tel: (3) 59- 
92-01-55. To Fdb. 2: “Kancfinsky 
and Munter." German painterGab- 
riele Munter ( 1 877-1 962) was mar- 
ried to Kandinsky; they created 
works Inspired by each other while 
they Bved In Munich untH World 
War I. 

WITHUlAHPt 

AWTBOAM 

Rljksmuseum, let (20) 673-2121, 
open ddy. ContimfoigfTb Feb. 2: 
“Acquisitions; Drawings, Prints and 
Photogre^ahs (1993-1996)." Newly 
acquired drawings and prints dat- 
ing back to feel fife century, as well 
as 19th and 2Dth-certury photo- 
graphs and autochromas. 

■ SPAIN 

Uuseu Picasso, tel; (3) 319-63- 
10, closed Mondays. Continuing/. 
To Feb. 23; “Pfcasso and the 
Theatre: Parade, Puletoafla, Mer- 
cure." 160 pieces inducting part- 
ings, drawings, and other materials 
document Picasso's scenic con- 
tributions to balfet performances. 


Madrid 

Fun dad on Juan March, tek (1) 
435-42-40, open daily. Continu- 
lng/To Feb. 23: 'Toutouse- 
Lautrec.” More than 50 paintings 
by fee chronicler of fee Belle 
Epoque in Paris. 

M 1WITIIIUHP 

Basle 

Kunstmueeum, tel; (61) 271- 
0445, closed Mondays. Conti nu- 
tng/To Jan. 26: “Russian Avant- 
Garde, 1910-1924.” Works by the 
Soviet avant-garde that developed 
from the first revolution to the be- 
ginning of Stalin's rale. 

Geneva 

Musae d*Art et d'Hlstofre, tel; 
(22) 311-43-40, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing^ro May 4: “Lumieres 
de r Orient Chretien." More than 
140 Greek, Mekferte and Russian 
icons. 

Lausanne 

TML Opera Lausanne, tel: 21- 
310-164X). “II Barbiere di SivigUa." 
Directed by Stefano VizloB, con- 
ducted by Jonathan Darlington 
with Jeffrey F rands, Evgenij De- 
ment/iev and Laura Potverein. Jan. 
10 and 12. 

h BWI11P STATES 
nnmimnr 

The Walters Art Gallery, 1 ah (410) 
547-9000, closed Mondays. To 
Feb. 16, 1997: “Andrew Wyeth: 
America’s Painter.” 50 works, 
forty-nine of which have been 
loaned by an anonymous private 
collector. Included are landscapes, 
portraits, stiS fifes, nudes and in- 
teriors by Wyeth (bom 1917) 

Nest York 

The Jewish Museum, tel: (212) 
423-3200, dosed Fridays and Sat- 
urdays. To Jan. 19; "From Court 
Jews to the RothschBds: Art, Pat- 
ronage and Power, 1600-1800." 
Documents the cultural world of 
fee Court Jews who held Influential 
positions, such as artists, finan- 
ciers, diplomats and ministers in 
the royal courts of Central 
Europe. 

Metr op o li ta n Opera, tet: (212) 
382-6000. Simone Young con- 
ducts Mascagni’s “CavaJleria Rus- 
ticanaTwife Dofora ZapcWGhena 
Dimitrova, Fabio Amfliato/Kristjan 
Johannsson and Bruno Pola/ 
VasaH Gerello and LeoncavaBo’s 
“Pagfiacd,” with Diana Soviero/ 
Efcabetfi HoUeque, Johan Botha/ 
Vladmir Bogachov end Juan 
Pcvis/Leo NuCd. Jan. 16, 21, 25 
and 29. 

Wasunoton 

Hirsh bom Museum, tel: (202) ' 
357-2700, open daily. To Jan. 12: “ , 
Richard Lndner Paintings and 
Watercdore, 1948-1977.” The ex- 1 
htoHkin introduces the bold. Iconic 
figures at fee German-bom Amer- 1 
lean artist corset-dad women. 
chBd prodigies, archetypes from | 
New York’s underworld and can- 
catures.The exhibition wQI travel to | 
Mwtich. i 

National Gallery, tet (202) 737 - 1 

4215, open daily. To Jan. 26: “En- 1 


counters with Modem Art: Works 
from fee RofeschBd Family Col- 
lections.” The scope of the col- 
lectors’ purchases embraces fu- 
turism. cifeism. constructivism, 
and de Stijl. Juan Gris, Mondrian, 
Picabia, Brancusi and Gonchar- 
ova's works are featured in the ex- 
hibition. The exhibition will travel to 
Philadelphia. 

The Phillips Collection, tel: (202) 
387-2151. To Feb. 9: “Impression- 
ists on the Seine.” A selection of 
more than 50 Impressionist paint- 
ings gathered around Renoir's 
“Luncheon of the Boating Party.” 

CLOSING SOOM 

Jan. 12: “Madame de Sevigne." 
Uusee Cemavatet, Paris. 

Jan. 12: "Jan Steen: Schilder er. 
Vertetler.” Rljksmuseum, Ams- 
terdam. 

Jan. 12: “Star Trek: The Exhib- 
ition.' 1 Josef Haubrich-Kun- 
sthaDe, Cologne. 

Jan. 12: “Robert Motherwell." 
Fund acto Antoni Taples, Bar- 


celona. 

Jan. 12: “In the Light of Italy: Corot 
and Early Open-Air Paintings." 
Brooklyn Museum, New York. 
Jan. 13: "La Griffe et la Deni: 
Barye, Sculpteur Animalier (1795- 
1875)." Le Louvre, Paris. 

Jan. 13: “La Grece en Revo He: 
Delacroix et les Peirrtres Francais. 
1815-1848.” Musee National Eu- 
gene Delacroix, Paris. 

Jan. 13: "Paques fmperiaies: Les 
Oeuls en Porcelaine de I'Ennitage 
de Saint-Petersbourg” Musee 
Ariana, Geneva. 

Jan. 13: "Jan Van Goyen: Dutch 
Landscapes of the Golden Age." 
De Lakenhal, Leiden, The Neth- 
erlands. 

Jan. 13: “Fernando Pessoa’s Us- 
bons." Centre de Cultum Con- 
temporary a, Barcelona. 

Jan. 15: "August Sander: La Fo- 
toraria non ha Ombre Oscure.” 
Uuseo di Storla defla Fdtografia, 
Florence. 

Jan. 15: “Ellsworth Kelly." So- 
lomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
New York. 


HOLIDAYS AND TRAVEL 


Holiday Rentals 


SWH0UDAYS 

(Speda) hsuSng h? Ski Rentals) 
win be appeamg agm on Friday, 
Janary ITtii & February 7th. 

For more detels pteese ccrtact 
taelda Hue, Ctassfled Srias DepL 
HTHWJmOHJU. HSW10 TRBUHE 
TEL PAHS *33 (DJT 41 43 82 OS 
Wfc PARS 433 tel 41 43 03 70 
£msfc cttsslWeitcom 
Or your toed IHT aBk^reprasenGSw 


Bed & Breakfasts 


HANHATTAK L00GIMSS, NYC. too n 
stay hflony apartmsnB. supenor B 8 B 
registry, gresi toeatxws. lusted and 
unnosted. Manhattan Lodgings: 
T 0 t 2124755090 Fat 212477W0. 


Lebanon 

HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East Of BCtfuL 
5 star dSura. Excaptool beaten, au- 
nty. oomtoic, tins coshe, aHWflfons. 
business services, sOOb s TV. IB rrin 
transfer dm airport free IfTSi. Fat 
(til 212-4781391 I (+33) (0)147200007 


BSATHTAKHG YEW OF MEN YORK, 
20 ft. glass waL Centra! Pari & Cttj. 
Limriasiy tumehed pend, tet cable. 
For business, nwsidan or honeymoon 
code. 1 Wot* to Care* Hal, 2 to 
Latennm. 5 si Lkcoui Cenier. Must 
m. Theaters. Weedy. ItoANy, 3 day 
■eetends (ndninun) . or tong term. 
TeL/Fafc 212-262*1561 USA. 


Caribbean 

sr. siwmarr, f.wj_ over zoo 

PflIVATt VACATION VILLAS ■ beach- 
front to ftSsxfe evdr pools. Our agents 
ha-A nspeded all villas pononaDy Fa 
mservaflens on St Bans, a tolft An- 
gida. Baitiados. Uustique, toe Virgin is- 
lands.. Cal WlUCOffSIBARTH - U.S. 
1401)849 -SD12ttax 847-6290. Irom 
FRANCE 05 90 16 20 - ENGLAND 0 
-800^3-8316 


French Riviera 

LUXURY VHXA. GtXf SAMT TfiOREZ, 
pnvse beach, 5 bedrooms, boat moor- 
ing, matftaraater on ate Jdy + August 
1997. Justified Ugh price. Fax London 
44 171 6811474 or wBe to Bex 199. 

I JIT, 92521 Neu% Carter. France. 

(discount^ travel 


free DEuyntr of rove Ttoeers ]. 
AuT»suJvw#raoMPAms j 
REGULAR FLIGHTS RT : 6 

Tokyo 5,670 F f 

Maurice / Seychelles 4,650 F f 

maSnfsBaag.^gt i 

BARCELONA 1.730 F ? 

fUj/j-. »r. MW ft 4 

Fatece in CAIRO 3,840 F 

FM>D RT , tr.+J '• Us* * bG fr ■ >lJ< UwnJ 

MON ASTIR 1.575 F 

PighlRI- H OJV^ nc*n . h* bwr) 

KENYA 4.050 F 

rtgr* RT* hem s .inv ' igni} - r-wtJ 

MARRAKECH 2,520 F 

rttfBl an Kauri 4* 8 dtr/r r^nc - halt toirfl 

S AFAGA - fled Sea 3,120 P 

flqi-hji, 1 -Mcl «• 7 no *. . tjl* 

09473 

SANTO DOMINGO 4,740 F 


Mom 
le detiX dr 
ru poms 


J| tfbiBhxk 
|< SR H 

E ngOUri 


; ... r.r - c •; . 





PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Tax Increases Have Wealthy, White South Africa Crying Apartheid 


By Suzanne Daley 

New York raws Service 


SANDTON, South Africa — When 
Carol Burrell stared at her July property- 
tax tail and saw that it had gone from 
$ 120 to $400 in a single month, she made 
up her mind not to pay it 
It's not that she doesn't want to help 
South Africa’s blacks overcome years of 
discriminatory racial policies. But a 233 
percent tax increase to be handed over to 
a government she does not believe is 
capable of spending it properly was just 
too much. Sure, the surplus from her 
neighborhood was supposed to help put 
sewers and paved roads in poor town- 
ships. But would the money ever get 
there? 


“This size increase is just evil,” Mrs. 
Burrell said. “And it’s just steading. If 
one could see something happening in 
the townships. If one could see that 
things are better for the blacks. But all 
you see is government officials driving 
around in BMWs and wearing- flashy 
clothes.” 

Across most of South Africa, the bu- 
reaucracy of the new democracy has 
settled in with remarkably little fuss. Buz 
here in Sandton, die northern suburb of 
Johannesburg that may be South 
Africa's richest neighborhood, the cit- 
izens are in revolt. 

For the last six months, more than half 
of Sandton’s 35,000 households have 
been refusing to pay their tax bills, calling 
the increases too big and too arbitrary. 


The boycott has set off a bitter debate 
over how much money whites — par- 
ticularly rich ones — owe die new South 
Africa. And it has created a strange 
irony: wealthy whites using the same 
crippling weapon of mass nonpayment 
against the new government that blacks 
used to make the townships virtually 
ungovernable under the old one. 

The boycott could devastate the 
budget of greater Johannesburg, which 
was counting on a SlOO-miilion surplus 
from Sandton to pay for deficits in 
poorer neighborhoods. But on a larger 
scale, it is yet another symptom of a real 

crisis for the South African government: 
huge numbers of taxpayers of all races 
are not paying their local tax bills. 

The payment rate varies, widely 


throughout the country. In some white 
neighborhoods, it is more than 90 per- 
cent But in Alexandra, a tiny crowded 
black township inside Sandton, it is only 
3 percent. In Soweto, die sprawling 
black city a few miles from central Jo- 
hannesburg. the rate is 25 percent de- 
spite the government's campaign 
“Let Us-Build Together” — to persuade 
blacks to resume paying their taxes. 

Since 1994, when the new govern- 
ment took over, taxpayers have failed to 
pay $ 1.2 billion they owed by law. Some 
local governments are barely squeaking 
by. A survey, last June found that 95 of 

the country’s 800 local governments 

did not have enough cash on hand to 
cover one month's wages. In Sandton, 
local officials say they are losing about 


$4 5 million a month to the boycott 
- Meetings between local officials and 
representatives -of tte taxpayers have so 
far ended .only in name-caQing.- Officials 
talk of cutting off water ana attaching 
six-bedroom houses. Homeowners say 
they are ready to sue. . 

Commercial properrydwners.already 
have. Last month, several big landlords, 
including the Liberty Life, Sanlam, and 
Commercial Union conglomerates^ 
went. to. court to challenge the Johan- 
nesburg metropolitan-area, budget on 
several; fronts. The businesses said die 
Sandton increases were for. higher than 
'anyone else’s. would drive . away, in- 
vestors. and were unlawful on proce- 
dural grounds. 

They refused to discuss the matter 


Bombs Go Off 
As U.S. Envoy 
Tries to Get 
Mideast Deal 


Copied by Ore SuffFnm Dap&ctia 

JERUSALEM — A U.S. peace me- 
diator struggled to end an impasse over 
an Israel-PLO deal on Hebron on 
Thursday as two bombs that Israeli po- 
lice blamed on Arab guerrillas wounded 
13 people in Tel Aviv. 

Palestinians turned down a U.S. com- 
promise date for Israel's troop with- 
drawals in the West B ank, insisting the 
Washington make Israel respect the 
original timetable. 

While Dennis Ross, the U.S. envoy, 
met again with Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu, two explosions rocked an 
area near Tel Aviv's central bus station. 

The police said the bombs, placed in 
trash bins, were packed with nails, and 
were timed to explode 10 minutes and 
several meters apart 

David Bar-Dan, communications di- 
rector for Mr. Netanyahu, said it was too 
early to say if the explosions would 
affect the U.S.-brokered talks with the 
Palestine Liberation Organization. 

“I am sure the prime minister is re- 
ceiving detailed reports from people in 
the field and from security officials, and 
then we will reach the necessary con- 
clusions,” he told Israeli Army Radio. 



Yeltsin’s Physicians Call 



By David Hoffman 

Washington Pest Service 


.Uw Amarck/Thr .Wmntkd IW 

A Jewish settler boy watching Israeli soldiers on Thursday in Hebron. 


PLO officials declined comment. 

Mr. Ross is trying to close a long- 
delayed deal on an Israeli withdrawal in 
Hebron. But Yasser Arafat, suspicious of 
Mr. Netanyahu's commitment to wider 
Palestinian self-rule, has been holding 
out for guaranteed dates for three further 
pullbacks in the rest of the West Bank. 

Earlier Thursday, Mr. Ross met with 


the chief Palestinian negotiator, Saeb 
Erekat, and Mr. Arafat’s deputy, Mah- 
moud Abbas. 

In Hebron, the seeds of fresh con- 
frontation were planted as Jewish set- 
tlers put up scaffolding for a new apart- 
ment building certain to outrage 
Palestinians, who oppose any expansion 
of the settler presence. (Reuters, AP) 


MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin, suffering from pneumonia, was 
being treated with antibiotics Thursday 
as doctors said his condition was sat- 
isfactory and his temperature was nor- 
mal. 

But the Russian president faced a new 
spurt of open criticism from his political 
rivals. 

The Kremlin issued a brief statement 
that Mr. Yeltsin, 65. was being treated 
'‘with modem antibiotics and with gen- 
eral therapy.’ ’ The president was moved 
to the Central Clinical Hospital on Wed- 
nesday when the “first signs” of the 
sickness were detected. 

In a bulletin issued Thursday evening, 
(he Kremlin said there had been "no 
negative changes” in his condition. 

Mr. Yeltsin underwent a quintuple 
coronary artery bypass operation Nov. 5 
and was just beginning to resume work 
when he was again sidelined by illness. 

Antibiotics would normally be given 
to a patient suffering from bacterial 
pneumonia, which can be more acute 
than that caused by viruses. But the de- 
cision to give antibiotics to Mr. Yeltsin 
may have been cautionary and not in- 
dicative of his condition. No further de- 
tails about Mr. Yeltsin were released. 

Renat Akchurin, the surgeon who led 
the team dial operated on Mr. Yeltsin, said 


Friday that die pneumonia was not related 
to the surgery. He said he had been told by 
Mr. Yeltsin's doctors that the president 
was in “quite satisfactory condition.” 

Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin 
went ahead with plans for a short vacation 
outside of Moscow. The Kremljn said be 
and Mr. Yeltsin spoke by telephone. 

Mr. Yeltsin was in die hospital less 
than a few hours when his rivals resumed 
hurting epithets at him, as they had done 
last autumn before his .surgery. Grigori 
Yavlinsky, leader of the centrist 
Yabloko bloc in Parliament and a former 
presidential candidate, said in a radio 
interview- that Mr. Yeltsin symbolized 
Russia's drift 

“Nothing changes in the rule of Rus- 
sia,'’ he said according to Interfax, “no 
matter whether Yeltsin is in the Kremlin 
or in the Central Clinical Hospital.” 

• But Mr. Yavlinsky said be disagreed 
with the recent statements by the former 
security council chief, Alexander Lebed, 
calling on Mr. Yeltsin to step aside. 

“Russia elected Yeltsin such as he is. 
and it is necessary to respect the choice 
of Russians,” he said. “Yeltsin will 
remain the president for four years. 
However, I think this will be wasted time 
for Russia.” 

Mr. Lebed, meanwhile, renewed on 
Thursday his call for Mr. Yeltsin to 
resign. 

“There is no power in the country.” 
he said. "It's rudderless.” • 


with the press; but issued a statement 
saying: "Commercial property owners 
are not a bottomless pit from whiclj! 
money, can be siphoned off indiscrim- 
inately:” .. 

• There is perhaps no place in South 
Africa where the rich so abruptly meet 
the. poor as Johannesburg. The city is 
home to the stock exchange and major 
mining houses, but hundreds, of Thou- 
sands. of unemployed squatters still eke 
out an existence in tin-roofed shacks. 

: . While Sandton taxpayers are used to 
having t rimm ed lawns and maids who 
arrive at 7 A.M. to cook breakfast, most 
of the -Dew local government officials, 
members of the African National Con- 
gress, came our of the townships. They 
see the new tax rates as a logical con- 
tribution from those who have always 
lived a privileged life. . 

. The new rates stem from the gov- 
ernment’s decision to even out property 
.taxes. Some neighborhoods actually got 
reductions. ButSandton, which was pre- 
viously an independent municipality, 
had deliberately gone without amenities 
tike parks and bus service to keep taxes 
low. That was possible because most 
homeowners belonged to country clubs 
and had cars. It was hit hardest by the 
.new plan. . . > 

Government officials have little sym-]i. 
pathy. They are particularly outraged 
that Sandton 's powerful inhabitants did 
tittle to protest during years of apartheid 
and only now started a boycott 
"*‘tf people care about South Africa, 
they must understand where we have 
come from and the effects of apartheid 
where some people did not get a fan- 
chance,” said Stanley Khanyile, who 
heads the government team negotiating 
with, the taxpayers. "There shouldn't 
really be an argument ” 

But many of the whites here feel 
blameless for apartheid. They say that 
they never voted for the National Part)', 
which devised and carried out South 
Africa's repressive racial policies when 
it headed a white minority government, 
and that they were active in various 
charities. 

For instance, Mrs. Burrell said she 
used to make peanut butter cookies for 
poor black children in Pretoria and that 
her husband's firm sponsors an adult-^ 
literacy course for domestic servants. 1 jf 
Sandton residents have been meeting 
regularly for updates on the confronta- 
tion. The conference room at the Inanda 
Country Gub bare was packed on a recent 
evening, and the talk under the crystal 
chandeliers was of hardship. No matter 
that the parking lot was filled with Mer- 
cedeses and at least three Rolls-Royces. 


Sinatra Suffers 
Heart Attack 

tnOnrSu^Fram Dapatchn 

LOS ANGELES — Frank 
Sinatra was back in the hospital 
Thursday after suffering a heart at- 
tack, a month after celebrating his 
8 1st birthday. 

“He had an uncomplicated heart 
attack.” said the Cedars-Sinai med- 
ical center spokesman. “The pro- 
gnosis is good,” he added. 

Mr. Sinatra was undergoing a 
series of tests, the spokesman said. 

The entertainer was in the same 
hospital Monday night for an un- 
disclosed reason, but be was released 
Tuesday morning. (AFP, AP ) 


HEALTH: The Third Jfbrld’s Sanitation and Bad Water Continue to Take a Heavy Tolly Especially on Children 


Commuter Plane Crash Kills 28 

Af;ciu:e Fnmce-Pnsse 

DETROIT — A Delta ComAir com- 
muter plane crashed into a snow- 
covered cornfield 25 miles south of De- 
troit on Thursday, killing all 28 people 
on board, Detroit airport officials said. 

Witnesses said the Embraer- 120 Bra- 
silia turboprop dipped a wing, nosedived 
and exploded on impact. 

There were conflicting reports on 
whether the plane was headed to Detroit 
or whether it had taken off from there. 
One report said the aircraft had taken off 
from Cincinnati and was bound for De- 
troit. 


Continued from Page 1 

earnings. She could afford that, but then 
there would be less money for food. 

The water comes from a pipe that runs 
into the slum where the Bhagwanis live, in 
the city of Thane, near Bombay. The pipes 
are cracked and run in a ditch dial is filled 
with sewage. Even if the water was prop- 
erly treated at its origins, health workers 
say, sewage seeps into the water to pro- 
duce one of the most deadly ailments in 
the world today: diarrhea. Diarrheal dis- 
ease kills some 3.1 million people an- 
nually, almost all of them children. 

The larger issue is that the most fun- 
damental health challenge in the world at 
the end of the 20th century may be the 
same as it apparently was four millen- 
niums ago: sanitation. To families like 
Mrs. Bhagwani's, perhaps nothing 
would make more difference than clean 
water and a toilet. 

All in all, human wastes may be more 
menacing than nuclear wastes, for feces 
kill far more people than radioactive sub- 
stances. A huge range of diseases and 
parasites Infect people by the fecal-oral 
route, transmitted from one person's 
waste by food or water or poor hygiene 
into the mouth of a neighbor. Some of 
those ailments are fatal, while others 
weaken people and entire nations. Some 
2.9 billion people — 66 percent of the 
population in the Third World — have no 
access to a toilet, not even a decent ph 
latrine. 

The vast majority simply use a bush or 


a quiet piece of ground, and for them 
toilet paper is an unimaginable luxury. 
Most rely on leaves or a splash of water, 
and afterward few have the means and 
training to wash their hands thoroughly 
with soap and water. 

In some respects, sanitation in poor 
countries has worsened in the last few 
years. World Health Organization stat- 
istics show that in the First half of die 
1990s the proportion of people in the 
Third World with access to a toilet fell, 
from 36 percent to 34 percent. 

But over all, sanitation conditions and 
water supplies have improved notice- 
ably in the last few decades, and child 
death rates have fallen sharply. 

Packets of oral rehydration salts, pop- 
ularized by Unicef and now widely 
available in rural areas of the Third 
World, save the lives of countless chil- 
dren with diarrhea; improved water and 
the rehydration packets may together 
save the lives of more than a million 
children a year. 

In particular, most countries are re- 
gistering great progress in supplying 
potable water. In the first half of the 
1990s the proportion of people in the 
Third World with access to safe drinking 
water rose from 61 percent to 75 per- 
cent. 

"When you look at the last century, the 
greatest advance was not antibiotics.” 
said Dr. Graham Ogle, an Australian with 
long experience as a physician in Papua 
New Guinea. “It was sanitation and the 
provision of clean water.” 


Dr. Ogle, who has just started running 
a hospital in Phnom Penh, the Cam- 
bodian capital, noted that dirty water 
causes diamieal illnesses like gastroen- 
teritis that are not normally life-threat- 
ening but that cumulatively wear a pa- 
tient out 

. “It’s a vicious cycle,” he said. “If 
you've got a kid who’s a little bit mal- 
nourished. then he gets gastroenteritis, 
and he's more malnourished, and his im- 
munity drops. Then he can get pneumonia 
or tuberculosis, and while you or I might 
shrug it off. here a kid can die of it” 
Children are also weakened by 
worms, a common result of poor san- 
itation. Up to 60 percent ofhumanity has 
some kind of worms crawling in their 
bellies or under (heir skin. Sometimes 
these grow so numerous that they en- 
tirely block the intestines and cause 
death, but mostly they are simply pain- 
ful, distracting and debilitating. 

“You eat only so much food, and 
worms get some of that," Ogle said. 
“You get a bellyache, so you don’t feel 
like going to school or going to work. 
And worms give you anemia, so you feel 
lethargic and are less likely to develop 
your skills and grow. And in young 
children, anemia affects cognitive de- 
velopment, and that’s permanent. 

“It can shift down the learning ability 
of your entire population.” 

On the Bassac River just outside 
Phnom Penh is one of the most wretched 
slums in the world, a putrid slope of mud 
and excrement that is home to tens of 


thousands of people packed in rickety 
shacks on the bank of the river. 

There are latrines -of a sort, for en- 
trepreneurs have set up little" platforms 
over the water. These are open toilets 
where men and women squat behind 
half-barrels, a determined nonchalance 
substituting for privacy, as the toilet 
owners make money by raising fish on 
the sewage in fenced -off waters below 
the toilet platform. 

The fish may not sound appetizing, but 
the worst problem is that the slow river is 
used by the slum not only as its toilet, but 
also as its source of drinking water. 

Preung Sriy, a round-faced 27-year- 
old mother of three, uses buckets of river 
water for washing vegetables, for 
baching her children and for drinking. 
She says she normally boils the water 
before drinking it, but her 8-year-old son 
died a few years ago after a bad case of 
diarrhea, and her three other children 
also regularly get dianhea. 

Mrs. Preung Sriy says she went to 
school for a total of six months, and she 
is too lethargic — or anemic — to put 
any emphasis on hygiene. 

Soap is not such a problem, for it is 
relatively inexpensive; the greater chal- 
lenge is a recognition of (be importance 
of hand-washing and clean water to go 
with the soap. 

In Mrs. Preung Sriy’s case, the only 
water available for washing hands is the 
black liquid taken from between foe toi- 
lets in the river. “I sometimes wash my 
hands before making food, and my kids 


sometimes wash their bands before eat- 
ing and sometimes don't,” she said. 

. However grim eonditions sometimes 
seem to be today, the progress of the last 
few decades is striking. The record in a 
variety of countries is also important 
because it suggests that while there is no 
single magic bullet available, there are a 
myriad of approaches that help control 
sanitation-related diseases. 

Many development economists now 
emphasize the importance of operating 
banklike institutions that offer credit to 
poor people in Third-World cities and 
villages, so they can start small busi- 
nesses and generate some cash. The idea 
is that with a bit of money, people will be 
able to help themselves by building 
covered wells, buying mosquito nets and 
visiting doctors when necessary. 

Likewise, there is no doubt that one 
way for governments to save lives is to 
supply water to poor areas — not just 
clean water, but lots of it, even if it means 
charging for the service. 

One of the most persistent reasons for 
poor hygiene is simply that there is al- 
most no water to wash with in many 
parts of Africa, India and China. Hand- 
washing after defecation can seem like a 
luxury when the water must be lugged 
from a creek two hours away. 

India has cut dianhea-related deaths 
by providing many villages with covered 
wells. Bolivia managed to cut dianhea 
among children by showing people how 
to disinfect waier and then keep it at home 
in narrow-necked jugs with covers. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Escorts & Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON - PARIS 

THE FHEST S THE HOST SMCERE 
IB ■ 38* INTERNATIONAL 
BEAUTIFUL t ELEGANT STUDENTS 
SECRETARE5, AH HOSTESSES & 
MODELS ♦ 

AVAILABLE TOR Ail OCCASIONS 

BEVERLY HILLS 

NEW YORK 

SERVICE WORLDWIDE 

Escort Agtncy DwS Canls Wtfcon 

TEL LONDON * 44(0) 

0171 589 5237 


BRUSSELS 

VIP. 

Pis Class E Serwoe n Ch Gaptal 
dEuope Any ate an* language aval 
a» la* al occasem annere. eramg- 
pntes. weekends, wtornttg at he »■ 
port A Lnousw wi9> driver AS crasi 
aids acceotel 2W2i T flays, a 
PHONfc 646J0.93 
FAX: («3U) Hfl.71.ee 
EHTaJjnterodTjssdavoSinfctnanlbe 


GOLD AND PLATNM SERVICE 

ATLANTIC 

LONDON & PARIS OFFICE 
EUROPE A WORLDWDE 

++ 44 (0) 7000 77 04 1172233 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

(1) 212 7S5 1919 


VENUS IN FURS 

24HR WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERWCE 

LONDON 0171 382 7000 

AS cuds. Advance Imnfaip Kfcome 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

vtorttfs Fba & Lta Exclusive Sauce 
Modus, Beauty Oceans, AcMns 
Muflftngwl TiwM Compmfaos 

Hdqtn 212-765-7896 NY, USA 
Senxe KftMitie Cmit cards, checks 
accepted. Vfev* ftecs A phobs e Dice. 


ZURICH* AREA. HSS FRANCE 
* ITALY CHUR * S» AREA: BLACK 
USA TOP M00a “ VWUE " WH. 
ESCORT » TRAVEL SERVIC E LADES 
& GENTS ALL SWITZERLAND - 
7 DAYS. TEL *41 (S) 79 3S3 38 » • 
CREDIT CARDS. 


LE CIRCLE 

THE ESCORT AGBCY 
LONDON 

BI71 5SE 0059 

Star* to taf fa tte raid 
Qmdk Cards Accepted 


"SWITZERLAND + GERMANY* 

TcL +*31-20427 28 27 
ZOTCHGENEVA-BASELtiSfflE 
NEW: L0MJ0N - BRUSSELS - YIEMA 
COSMOS Escort Agency. Crwfl Cards 


HEWS HGH SOOEnrVEWtATAfflS 
COTE D'AZUR & ZURKH ' GOT 
(ntematanal Escort £ Travel Sanioe 
Vienna **43-1-5354104 J end) carts 


LONDON HEATHROW 

THE ULTMATE ESCORT SEWCE 
TEL 0171 349 0637 


GLAU0UR INTERNATIONAL 
LONDON ESCORT SERVICE 
017) 724 0771 


ELITE Escort Sendee 

NEW YORK CITY 
1-0M46MB7 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
5) Baadnp Pin, London SW1 
Tet 1171-584 0613 


"****** EUROCONTACT WTL *•*’***• 

Top local & travel sanies wnttride 
PAftS-STOaraJmAN-ROIIE 
RIVIEfiA'BRUSSELSTjQNDQN'VIBINA 
GENEVATUHCHXiCta GERMANY 

Escort Serves Ifara *443-1-21204 31 

GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 
BASEL. LAUSAIOE, HONTREUX 

Cal 022/348 00 89 Escort Agency 
’ ZURICH LUZERN 07/4832334 

LATIN 

CHARMNG EXCLUSIVE ESCORT 

SERVICE 

LONDON 0956 307 404 

8BLANT?OKTTALY*LO«DOrPA«S* 
BRUSSE1S1JJGANO*HADRO*MUMCH 
DDQRFRIVEHA’VIENNA Escort Ser- 
vo. Tel *39(0)348 220 18E2 Cads 

■•EXECUTIVE CLUB’* 
LONDON ESCORT SERVICE 

TEL 0171 72 9006 CrecB Carts 

■asaal 

t ••HIGHLIGHTS" 

FRAWRJRT WTL ESCORT SERVICE 
PLEASE CALL 069/55 68 26 

HELENA ESCORT SERVICE 

LOM10N HEATHROW 24 HRS 

TH.- 0950 173940 

JASBIT5 ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 9350664 

CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTS) 

“ MAOHD HARMONY “ 

EXCLUSIVE Top Escort Softs. EngEsti 

Tet *34 1 386 35 88 0190661 89 94 

BCKV Qanamfc, BsMU 

Piwb Escort Serace 

Kenstngui 0171 792 0981 

TANYA. BUCK. Begs* & Educated 
LondonlHeatow Pnafc Escort Semes. 

018) 9062261 Crctii Cards vmcoob 


AMSTERDAM BERNADETTE 
Escort Sauce & Dmar Dales 
Tet 631 S3 3S or 631 06 43 


VENXA-PRAGUE: KBWEDrS Escort 
Service. Fnrtfr, eknut attractive, 
eanfa Djy S ntfc {++431] 53350*4 


CYPRUS: 

U.S. Warns Turkey 

Continued from Page 1 

national community.” the State Depart- 
ment spokesman Nicholas Bums said in 
Washington. ' ‘It would be completely out 
of bounds for Turkey to take this ac- 
tion.” 

Saying the United States hoped the 
report citing Mr. Tayan was “incor- 
rect,” Mr. Bums added, “We hope it 
does not reflect in any way shape or form 
the views of foe Turkish government.” 

* ‘There can be no question,” he said, 
“that Turkey must respect foe rules of 
the road here, which are: No country, 
and specifically in fobs case Turkey, 
should threaten the use of military force 
against Cyprus; no country, specifically 
here Turkey, should undertake military 
force against Cyprus.’ 1 

Washington has condemned Nicosia 
for the missile deal, Mr. Boms added. 

Nicosia dismissed the threats of a mil- 
itary strike by Ankara as nothing new. 

“For us foe matter is over,” Foreign 
Minister Alekos Michaelides said- “We 
will not follow Turkey -with polemic 
statements. We are focusing our attention 
to the political solution of the problem." 

Earlier Thursday, Athens shrugged off 
similar hut less explicit threats by Tur- 
key, with Prime Minister Costas Simitis 
saying tensions should be defused. 

"We don’t need to worry,” be said- 
"We are not before a giant crisis.” 

"What is now happening in our re- 
gion is not new,” he added. “Statements 
have also been mode in foe past.” 

(Reuters. AP) 


GRAPESs Red Wine May Inhibit Cancer 


Continued from Page I 

cer prevention and control at foe 
National Cancer Institute, said, "More 
than 150 studies have clearly shown that 
groups of people who ear plenty of fruits 
and vegetables get less cancer at a num- 
ber of cancer sites.” . 

In addition to vitamins, minerals and 
fiber, many substances have been found 
in all kinds of plant foods that are be- 
lieved to be useful in preventing the 
development of cancer. Among them are 
antioxidants that block gene damage, 
enzyme-inducing substances that detox- 
ify carcinogens, sterols that stop the un- 
controlled growth of cells and genistein, 
found in soy-based foods, that interferes 
with foe blood supply to tumors. 

In the Illinois studies, resveratrol was 
initially singled out because it was 
shown to have anti-inflammatory activ- 
ity- 

Anti-inflammatory compounds like 
aspirin and indometftacin can inhibit tu- 
mor promotion and have been linked to a 
reduced risk of colorectal cancer in 
people. Further studies of resveratrol in 
cultures of laboratory cells showed that 
ft could block the action of. a known 
gene-damaging and cancer-causing 
agent and thai it could stimulate cells to. 
produce enzymes that detoxify carci- 
nogens. Another laboratory study 
showed that resveratrol could make hu- 
man leukemia cells stop proliferating. 

In addition, in labOratoiy cultures of 
mouse mammary tissue, resveratrol 
blocked the chemically triggered devel- 
opment of premalignant cells, and it re- 
duced the formation of skin cancer in 


mice whose skin was treated with a car- 
cinogen. The researchers, lead by Meshi- 
ang Jang, a graduate student, reported 
that there was no evidence of toxic effects 
of resveratrol in the treated animals. 

Dr. David Goldberg, clinical bio- 
chemist at the University of Toronto 
whose 70-page paper on resveratrol re- 
search will soon be published in the 
journal Clinical Biochemistry, said that, 
using cultures of human tumors, he has 
also been studying the ability of res- 
veratrol and other substances in wine to 
inhibit foe growth of cancers and foe 
action of cancer genes. 

He and his colleagues previously 
showed resveratrol to be a patent in- 
hibitor of clot formation in laboratory 
studies. 

“But we have yet to demonstrate a 
significant effect in human subjects 
drinking red wine with high resveratrol 
concentrations.” Dr. Goldberg said, "hi 

- human studies, foe effects of red wine . 
and white wine on coagulation were 
indistinguishable, suggesting that the ef- 
fects we observed were due to the al- 
cohol content, not resveratrol.” The 
amount of resveratrol in white wine is at 
best negligible, foe Toronto physician- . 
scientist said, because in making white If • 
wine foe skins are removed before foe 
juice is fermented. 

- Furthermore, he added, “when we 
gave volunteers huge amounts of red 
wine high in resveratrol. we were unable 
to detea the compound in their blood.” 

He added, "It doesn't matter how potent 
a compound is in ihe test tube. If it 
doesn’t get into the bloodstream, it 
won't have any effect” 



* 

v 




BUSINESS/FINANCE 


** 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 


PAGE 13 


►Showdown 
For Defense 
Unit at GM? 

{Raytheon Faces Off 
Grumman for Prize 

-r Bloomberg Business News 

~r General Motors Coro 
^ of $9 billion or more 

- ■ ** to Hu gk» 

>Hectromira Corp. subsidiary, ami thebid- 
. diijg is likely to go higher, sources fa- 
,mmar with the situation said Thursday 
. Raytheon Co. bid at least $9 billion. 

an amount thai is less than an off£ 
, subnutted by rival Northrop Gnmnnan 
*.. Corp., the sources said. 

. - The bids, which both included cash 
„ and stock, may still rise as Goldman, 
1 * G°- conducts an auction of 

, p. 1 ” s defense holdings. Because a 
higher bid would probably mean issuing 

m p re ««*. analysts said Raytheon had 
a better chance of w innin g 

* ‘ta the case of Raytheon, you ’ ve got 
. a far larger maricet cap, 1 ' said Paul Nis- 
bet, an analyst with JS A Research, who 
added that issuing $4 billion to $6 bil- 
lion in stock would hot be a problem for 
, die company. 

Northrop and Raytheon are in a race 
.to win Hughes, the last big defense 
business available after a broad con- 
■ .solidation in the industry. As defense 
budgets declined in recent years, con- 
tractors got bigger cm a bet mat doing so 
•.would allow them to win more business 
- from the U.S. Department of Defense, 
■by far the world's largest buyer of mil- 
V itary goods. 

Northrop’s bid exceeded that of its 
rival by $200 million to $500 million, 

. . according to the sources. 

Even so, analysts are betting dial 
\\ Raytheon will win because, for tax rea- 
A. sons, GM wants stock to be the biggest 
^portion of any bid. 

GM will be give a big share of the 
. ■ winner's stock to its shareholder, and it 
."wants to receive shares that are likely to 
appreciate strongly. The carmaker appears 
. T to be more optimistic about Raytheon's 
"prospects than those of Northrop. 

Northrop shares fell $1375 in New 
York to $77,875, while Raytheon de- 
-clined $135 to $4730. GM rose 123 
cents to $5935. 



T*u IjhuilAj' Vr c 

Compute* users in Japan accessing a video program on digital videodisk technology available there since Nov. 1. 

Hollywood Goes DVD, Cautiously 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Sen-ice 


: , LAS VEGAS — Makers of consumer 
electronics equipment and computers 
are betting that digital videodisks, or 
DVDs, may ultimately transform both 
of ttefr industries, replacing videocas- 
sette recorders and video games as well 
as computer aod audio compact disk 
sis- ■ 

consumers have yet to render 
their verdict, the fust trickle in what 
may become a torrent of DVD software 
was released Wednesday in Las Vegas, 
as Hollywood studios introduced their 
first movie tides in the new format. 

. Time Warner Inc. and its New Line 
Cinema Carp-, Sony Corp.’s Columbia 
Tri-Star Motion Pictures Cos., Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. and Philips Elec- 
tronics NV" s PoIyGram NV released a 
limited Dumber of their titles, cautiously 
-hoping that Americans will rash to ] 
chase £500 DVD player units when i 
become available in the United Stales 
this spring. 


Hollywood studio and consumer 
electronics executives are betting that 
consumers will forsake their VCRs for 
the new players, which offer movies 
with higher quality than even laser-disk 
players. 

The disks are the same size as ex- 
isting compact disks, but hold seven 
times as much data, enabling full-length 
feature movies to be stored on a single 
disk. 

The first generation of the disks will 
not be recordable, but later versions will 
allow users to record computer data and 
movies. 

One selling point for the format, its 
manufacturers say, is that the disks are 
compatible with die advanced televi- 
sion standard that will begin to appear 
next year. 

That digital videodisk technology ap- 
pears poised to reach consumers as early 
as tiiis quarter is itself a remarkable tale 
of political negotiation and compromise 
among virtually every major player in 
the electronics and entertainment in- 
dustries. 


The new technology was delayed for 
nine months as the industry wrangled 
over which of two technologies to Sick 
and then a further four months for a 
piracy protection system that would 
protect Hollywood from illegal copying 
of its films. 

A slew of DVD announcements are 
scheduled at the annual Consumer Elec- 
tronics Show, which opened here 
Thursday. 

But even the most ambitious Hol- 
lywood executives acknowledge that it 
is not just consumers who might be 
cautious. 

“Hollywood is behaving as it always 
behaves. “ said President Warren 
Lieberfarb of Warner’s home video 
unit. “It repeatedly finds itself caught in 
a difficult pregnancy as it tries to re- 
concile the arrival of a new media with 
its existing business." 

Most analysis maintain that the 
pieces are finally in place for the tech- 
nology. Optimists argue further that 

See DVD, Page 17 


Japan Stocks Spark 
Fear With Big Sell-Off 

Drop Puts New Investment at Risk 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

liuentMioihil Hi~rdld Tribune 

TOKYO — Share prices in Japan 
dropped sharply Thursday for the third 
straight day, falling to their lowest level 
in more than a year and raising concern 
among some economists that the stock 
market's steep losses risked derailing 
the nation's fragile economic recovery. 

Share prices plunged 33 percent, their 
biggest decline in 21 months, after losing 
5 percent in the two previous days. 

If they fall much further, some econ- 
omists said, it could hobble the coun- 
try's financial sector and prompt man- 
ufacturers to drop plans to invest 
heavily for the first time in five years in 
new factories and production lines. 

The benchmark Nikkei 225 Stock 
Average ended Thursday down 6063 J 
points, at 18,073.87. 

“Everything hinges on whether the 
Nikkei falls below 17.000," said Hide- 
toshi Tanaka, chief economist aL Sanwa 
Research Institute. “If it does, man- 
ufacturing firms could postpone or 
abandon planned investment in plant 
and machinery and the latent profits 
financial institutions have from their 
share portfolios could fall to zero." 

The Finance Ministry said last month 
that capital investment in die three 
months to September had risen 8.2 per- 
cent from a year earlier, the largest rise 
in more than five years. 

But some analysts cited concern 
Thursday that Japan's huge but shaky 
banking sector, and the financial mar- 
kers, could become trapped in a down- 
ward spiral, as continuing plunges in the 
stock market weakened the financial 
health of banks that were already 
weighed down by bad debts. 

Inis weakening could then in tum 
trigger further share sell-offs. 

The government has so far reacted 
coolly to this week's share price falls, 
and to the sharp decline of the yen 
against the dollar, which earlier this 
week fell to a near four-year low against 
the dollar. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsuzuka 
remained quiet about Thursday's stock- 
market decline, but he said Wednesday 


that the economy was far stronger than 
the weakness of the stock market and the 
yen. and suggested thai the government 
had no plans to prop up share prices. 

But unless the government took heed 
of market fears about the slow- pace of 
deregulation and the host of other prob- 
lems plaguing Japan's economy, it 
could soon Find itself faced with another 
recession. 

“Talk is cheap, and we've heard 
plenty of talk." said Andrew Shipley, 
an economist at lhe brokerage Sch- 
roders Japan. “What we need now is to 
see the authorities walk the w'aik as 
well." 

Kosaku in aba. the chairman of the 
Japan Chamber of Commerce, said Ja- 
pan would face a “grave problem" if 
share prices fell much further. 

"I feel the market is severely cri- 
ticizing the current state of the econ- 
omy.” Jiji news agency quoted the in- 
dustrialist as saying. 

Many of the reasons for the sharp 
declines this week are not new. Some 
have plagued Japanese share prices for 
years. 

They include worries that the finan- 
cial sector wilt be unable to cope with its 
mountain of irrecoverable loans, many 
of them relaied to real estate and made 
during the boom in share and property 
prices in the lace 19S0s. 

They also include fears that a recently 
unveiled 2 percent rise in the consump- 
tion tax and the end of a special 2 trillion 
yen ($17.33 billion) break in personal 
income taxes, both in April, will empty 
the country's department stores and su- 
permarkets and hurt consumption at a 
time when Japan's economy is too fra- 
gile for such trauma. 

But one of the stock market's biggest 
and most recent worries centers on 
whether Prime Minister Ryuiaro Ha- 
shimoto can deliver on repeated pledges 
to unravel the bureaucratic red tape 
stifling Japan’s economy, which before 
the stock market started to plunge was 
seen growing by up to 3 percent in the 
year to March. 

With Japan’s national debt approach- 
See TOKYO, Page 15 


i 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


A Fading Grand Design for Europe 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


W ASHINGTON — For more than half a mil- 
lennium, Europe has been at the center of 
world affairs — at first alone, more recently as 
part of the Western alliance alongside North 
America. According to one intriguing estimate, for a period 
of 200 years until the 1960s. the United States and Britain 
alone accounted for at least 40 percent of total world 
economic output. ' 

That era is now rapidly earning to an end. As the 20th 

century draws to a close, we are . 

entering a multipolar world in 
which power is shifting to nom- 
Westem nations, especially in 
Asia, many of which were 
European colonies only a few 


But while tire United States 
remains politically powerful 
and economically successful, . . . 
today's Europe seems mired in tire problems of its past and 
headed for raative decline. 

Arresting that decline has been one of the main rationales 
for the drive to closer European unity that began in tire mid- 
1950s. And with the iMd of the Cold War, it looked for a 
while — at least to die process’s more optimistic supporters 
— as if unity cooldmarch boldly toward according to a 
new Continental-scale grand design. 

European visionaries saw the Continent's two halves 
peacefully unified in an expanded European Union (and an 
enlarged North Atlantic Treaty Organization) in a way that 
neither Napoleon nor Hitler could achieve by conquest 

The Umon would have a single currency, common 
foreign and security policies and a unique new form of 
quasi-federal government The new Europe would forge 
close arid amicable relations with Russia and once again 
become a heavyweight player on the wodd stage. 

A virtuous circle wwld ensue. la the huge new pan- 
European zone of freedom and prosperity, it would be 


la the Union’s early years, the 
public wanted to move forward 
faster than governments, Now only a 
political elite wants to press ahead. 


easier for member nations to shed the burden of their 
welfare states and enact the reforms necessary to restore 
international competitiveness. The time seemed to call for 
great leaders and momentous decisions. 

It is now clear that it is not going to be like that. Most 
Europeans — at least in Western Europe — see the chal- 
lenges ahead as problems not opportunities. They regard the 
advent of the common currency, wrongly, as a cause of their 
current difficulties, not part of the solution. 

There are no popular demands for momentous decisions, 
and no great leaders to take them. In the Union's early years, 
tire public wanted to move forward faster than governments. 

Now only a political elite wants 
to press ahead, and much of the 
public is cynical or hostile. 

The visionary approach was 
always overoptimistic. But 
governments have now gone 
to the other extreme of com- 
plete minimalism. At each 
stage only the minimum will 
be agreed to avert disaster. 
There will be no grand design. 

The EU’s enlargement will proceed piecemeal, a few 
countries at a time. Common foreign and security policies 
will hang fire. Monetary union will probably go ahead, but 
many countries will be left out Initially. 

The intergovernmental conference due to conclude this 
year will fail to tackle tbe great issues of how a larger Union 
should be governed and how its institutions can be made 
more democratically accountable. 

The visionaries need not despair altogether. If economic 
and monetary union works, it will lead to much greater 
political and economic integration than most people realize. 

The new concept of flexibility will make it easier for 
integration to proceed in controversial areas — with some 
countries going ahead and otters catching up later. 

But there is a big difference now from the Cold War days. 
The rest of the world is no longer waiting for Europe. As 
other countries move toward ascendancy , Europe does not 
have the luxury of endless time to define its future. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


’Cross Rates 

( 

. ArastenJoa UW 

Brmstis 

■ FreoUurt U7» 

LotHftW (Ol W9C 

.MM 

NUtad lie* 

■ KnVMtCH — 

. Port* SJW 

■ Tokyo IISSB 

Toronto MW 

.ZWIdi UM 

.1 ECO lost 

1 SDR U» 


Ute l.BK 

55JD tell 
iffls — 

— um 
S430 UM 
TAX 
UMU 1545 
1MB £333 
1 9£» 7355 

22 « UK 

2J17B OMtf 
MX> JA53 

q jpQ 7 7^17 


DJL FjF. 


‘ ub on 
. wur — 

MBS IMS' W345 
um war um 
tm JfflMS UM 
1UM B587* 7UU 
SMB — ffUS 
52213 U3M# 177 
— tour 
2U7 0353 5S5I 

USB Ban* 0705 
a KM 00628* 0772) 
0589 WWW vm 
7 Ml 12KB IBM 


U. if. 
iw - 12XW 
— OH 

usw use 
sous rax 

un 97JBU 
CS* 1,12MB 
Mil LESS 
ubs txm 

asw un 
mss- a MO 

US' — 

am i m : 

* 6*42 USU 



Jan. 9 

UbkHJtwr Rates 




Jan.0 

'fm (J 

tern 



Swiss 

Frmtdi 



ISM* UUS 

UB* 

Dflfior 

D-MDTt 

Fume 

Staritag Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

sat ax 

1UB* 

1-month Sft-59k 

3-3M 

16S-1X 

6Vh-6Vn 3Y»-3V* 


4-*W 

ua* MOB 

UE2T 

3-montti 5V*-5U 

3 - 3t% 

1H-1« 

6H-616 3Vn-3Vi* 


4-4Wi 

mm uk 

mss 

6-mon*ti M-Sta 

3-3% 

IH-lta 

69H-6V* 3¥k-3Vh 


*-4Wi 

nun* hub* 

— 

1 -yfor sy-S^i 

2ta*-3Vk1VW-mii Oi-TVa 3Vk-3tt 


4-*Vk 


jmw y ii« 
114373 USX 13MB 
*5750 ■ 12371 *017’ 

— ms UM4 
US** — UJH- 

wr um uw* 

uun 15724 IASS 
165571 um MMf 

otnerantiHrsond 


Sources: 

Rales 


, Lloyds Bonk, 

jb Mr>rixmM depAsH* of SI mtOoo mtohntffl lor Cgi/fvoJertJ. 


ESS 


.Other Dollar Values 


armor 

AigMtpaa 

AtsNfcnS 

AW*««1L 

'BnaSitd 

r ato*w 

cocfekenm 

polish knot 

RM&PMOi 

Ba-Owrtta 


Peri 

OMW 

J.27W 

11JD8S 

2.04V 

83272 

awi 

&DM2 

USB 

*.7003 


Centner 

GMkdrac. 

Moos *«9 S 
HuafrMrtat 
tesJrarepe* 
Unto, rook* 
MAS 
Israeli shot 

Km (floor 

MotoV.flnS- 


nrs 

3*4JS 

1JM5 

iaiw 

35J5&5 

2352.15 

B4Q26 

12474 

0J9W 

X4826 


tart 

7517 
IS 14156 
&452S 

PM.JMU 3642 
nRshzMy 169 
POt-escwto 15H0 
(tmSRAK 5 SKJ> 

s a** UBS2 


Cwme* 

SuA&md 

S.KBr.’Sna 

Swa-tnoo 

TotwoaS 

TMMt 

THKMflm 

IMEM» 

VMw&MKL 


tars 

uuos 

8*6.79 

6.9292 

27.49 

2163 

109735. 

£6705 

*7575 


aMof owww 

uwo 1-6907 IfW SECT 
13492 1.3468 1J«* 

1.5717 1J688 1«S* 


MH toy VMa, Tfrdor 
H5J0 HUS 11472 
0603 TJ5M 0522 




(Toronto!/ IMF 


Kay .Money Rates 

Unfed State ante 

Dbowtrate- sao 

Prinwma 81* 

Federal tan* 5U 

ttMtarCDsfadm $jn 

iMMay CP deafen £33 

3 nwBtli Timwy bB 499 

T'fMrTtaaseiybffl £26 

2imf TfKWyMI 5.92 

S^aarnvflSfirflMB £25 

7^carTnasn9Mte ' 435 

VHWTMtsurrnole 449 

scHfcarTteasoty boat 6.75 

Men* Lynch XHtarAA .495 

iSISS 

Obetniidi 

Caflmnnr 
l-mtatataiinih 
hHnaalh tateMBk 
t -wun tt lBtetawh 
IdYearCevtbeM 
Comwny 
UnMnfteE 

CaBrnter 

l-aeOhMIechaek 
3-nMte M Htandt 
6-oo o Bi W ait nr k 
IDyeerBoMl 


OSB 

042 

052 

OS6 

056 

258 


«S0 

3.10 

3.15 

2.75 

£18 

589 


£00 

BU 

5N 

£43 

£30 

£02 

£30 

£54 

429 

440 

454 

479 

495 

050 

042 

055 
056. 

056 
1M 


450 

llfl 

£15 

115 

£18 

£58 


lB-y*wCtf 




400 600 

59k 6J» 

6V* 

ttk 6ta 
6% 6V* 

745 774 


£15 £15 

39. 3W 
3M 3Ve 
3M 3Vb 
3!t MV 
£81 5JW 


16-fBlT OAT 

Sources: Realm. BtooMtem, Merrill 
Lyoch. Bank at Tokro-Mlfiablsni. 
Coe m u iiwk CMX Lrutnais. 

Gold 


AM. PM. or pc 


Zurich 


US. 35570 -031 
35450 35650 -0.10 

NewYm as&no 35£w +ioo 

perounat Lorawi oflfcW 


qnoaealna Brices Nev W* c 
tFebJ 

SaKe Heaters. 


Hong Kong to Curb Property Speculators 


Cttifiini <1 Out Si 4f htmlhspm.hri 

HONG KONG — The Hong Kong 
government will introduce a series of 
measures next week to curb overheating 
in the booming property maricet. a gov- 
ernment source said Thursday. 

The warning came amid reports that 
rights to buy apartments in luxury de- 
velopments had been sold Wednesday 
for a record 2 million Hong Kong dol- 
lars ($258.4 million). 

Property developers also said that 
27,132 prospective buyers registered to 
buy apartments, the highest number in 
recent years. 


Thousands of people line up to re- 
gister for the computer ballots that de- 
cide who has the right to buy new apart- 
menLs, and the successful applicants can 
sell their positions to speculators. 

Recently, legislators and consumer 
and business lobbies have all voiced 
concerns over an increase of some 20 
percent to 30 percent in residential prop- 
erty prices in 1996. 

But analysts said that measures to stem 
property speculation could be bad news 
for the territory's economy as 70 percent 
of its companies invest in real estate. 

“Property prices have essentially 


gone to a level which is affecting the 
economic well-being of the general 
public." said Benjamin Cheng, exec- 
utive director at Goldman Sachs & Co. 

The source said the measures could 
include a tax on those who speculate on 
the sale of rights to buy apartments. Other 
steps could include a reduction in the 
number of apartments developers can sell 
to single buyers, and limits on the sale of 
uncompleted apartments. A Hong Kong 
Monetary Authority official also warned 
Thursday that it “cannot rule out” a 
tightening of lending criteria by banks. 

(Reuters. AFP, Bloomberg) 



CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


C3ll today for your complimentary copy of my latest research reports, 
market opinions and performance records. Learn how you can put 
my 19 years of professional trading experience to work directly for you. 


mm: 

FCM 


OUTSTANDING Analysis for All Major Markets 
EXCEPTIONAL Execution Forex or Futures 
COMMISSION Spot FX 2-5 Pip Price Spreads 


SUPERIOR Selection of Managed Accounts 
FREE Trading Software & Data 

COMMISSION Futures S12-S36 Per fVT 


Prepare forTomorrow’s MajorMarket Moves by Calling Toll-Free Toda 


luifra/ia 18001 25944 ftrfcixjff 0800 15880 Krtmud* 180087B4178 £ra;/rOOOS1 1921 5513 

t'ijiru< 08090605 Ornmark 80016132 77i./«nJ0800tt100«4 franc * 0800902246 

&>rmBitr 01 30829686 Won* Kang 8007209 /rrfaniMB0D559294 Ivwrl 1771000102 

Ja/ia» 00311 2G609 Karra 0038110243 luxrtnhourg 0800*552 Mexico 9580087841 78 

XAahlln 1 8009345757 .V. 7raf>irJ 080044 1880 05011 2B32 5iV>jfa^n-800120250l 

.5/1*111900931007 S*-rdr* 020793158 S.-ir.rtlMnd 0800897233 ThmU*m* 001 8001 19 230666 turkey 00800139219013 

I nirrdKinpJ.im 0600968632 VaitrdXterei 18009945757 ttS-7fl//>giff*714-37S-fl020 I’S-TaU Fat «-714-37S-8D25 


t nt, nubia 99012DB37 
t.rrnr 00800119213013 
#/«7r 167875928 
Xfihrrlandi 090 220657 
V. f/rii-a 0800996337 




International Foreign Exchange Corporation 

THE RELIABLE PARTNER 
SEE US ON NBC TEXT PAGES 355 & 356 
Discounted commissions - 24 hour trading desk 
Internet site: www.ifexco.ch - Reuters page IFEX 

86 Us route de Frontenex - 1208 Geneva - Switzerland 
Tel (41) 82 849 741 1 - 24hr (41) 22 B49 7440 - Fax 141 ) 22 700 1913 


BEVERLY HILLS 

Investment Manager Smart Chaussta offers U S. and non-U.S. dents 
■wsslmanls me experts recommend. *„ bnUent, too-performing, tax- 
efficient investments..." - Jonathan Dements. Walt Street Journal. Learn 
Why these nvestmonts can oulpartorm the majority of mutual funds, 
and brokers. Tax returns, wife, trusts i 
) for U.S. i 



avaSabtel 


— ... , , . Low lees. Fw a tree L 

31 l Q373i^.4MN§m^mS«l C f^ SiE ^' rBj ’ * 1 


i Drive Beuerty Hits. California 90210 


REHDER & PARTNER AG. ZUG - Switzerland 

5ENNWEJD5TRASSE 43 - 6312 STEJN HAUSEN 

FOREX 

Managed Accounts 
Please contact: 
i Martin (Hoot, Tel.: 0041 4! 74000 22 - Fax; 0«f 41 7400029 = 


24 HOUR FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


SUCCESSFUL FUTURES MARKETS 
PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 
HIGH RETURN LIMITED RISK 
NO MINIMUM PERIOD OF INVESTMENT 
PROVEN TRACK RECORDS 
ASK FOR A BROCHURE FREE OF CHARGE IN 
ENGLISH OR IN FRENCH 
GOLD HILL SERVICES SA 
RUE DE BOURG 6,1003 LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND 
TEL.(4121) 320 58 31 FAX (4 121) 320 58 35 
PORTFOLIO MANAGERS AND BROKERS SINCE 1 982 
MEMBER OF THE NEW YORK FUTURES EXCHANGE 


l A nnco 

UMwa Euro?* W ■ Ib|dtfi6 by tti SFA 
1#fi BUfY P o .-no iu , UowJou ECflA 1LE 


Tel: -44-171 -»90'002l Faxx -44^171-896-0010 I 1+44 (O) 171 256 6600 


* Keen spreads, no commission 
■ Minimum transaction SI 00,000 

* Competitive margin rates 

tO tad** pk. t Warwick Row. London SW1 £ 5E2, GfMf Britain 


Iretiw mnm a 


Your 'one stop' 
Brokerage connection 

totfas ureHtta 

Futures, Options 
& Forex markets 


For further details on bow to place your listing contact: Christopher- SETH in London 
TeL (44)171 836 48 02 -Fax: (44) 1 71 240 22$4 

JtfTalb^iCSribunc 


ini wi«UPtiiui>Miyirt> 









PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 





tor'* 


Thursday’s 4 p.m. Ciose 

ftofionwde Drees. nol reSecang laie trades else wneie. 
The Associated Press. 


25 * s * 

' < JO'S 


iS . : 


-i si 


'?* IJ 

r/4 !J ;i 
i' : 5? 


I'm &_s ;• fl‘." -I 
MO* - j»» * 

»* 


IK ,» _ 

tS i« 
- li 

'» 10 ii 

40 !• > 

W 2? _ 

» ii a 


isj i] 
U4 U . 
330 *0 U 

iS"i = 


I JO M _ 

IJM /J - 

iff 8 - 

m ion _ 
11* 71 14 

te z 4 n 

ijo u n 
IA U li 
_ V 
14 S O 
_ 17 
MSB 13 17 
07 7 _ 

i-B OlS _ 

104 10 21 

l.H> H H 
iOO AJ & 

1 54 li 14 

i« 93 a 
JB II • 

t-*W 47 - 

JOT 74 _ 
I4B Jf. . 

W H - 
WO j" . 

nun 
i* ii r 
1.0* S* I-' 


41 13 ll 

77 1., -t> 
it* JJ 11 

4JD 47 ~ 

19 40 . 

iK* 71 1* 


jsa gaagy 

M* &>Fcm«a» 
n> =7*l%r?3 
iffv, H FW 

in 

£& StsEHr* 

UKfe C>%ir«Md 


^fadvbCa 
M ipfcFilWWI^ 

et% 51 Fswti 

99% M>-PflFnc 

&.V83k 

gji iii.FaSnmi 

zsU mJSstoju 
u &'*no»cfw 
mv. rzrPjnww 

Si; 

« mnuoi 
in* liUFFWO 
II JI44P3P2.1 
ar* ruiotmm a 
ft* IhPSti 

*** Mtn€3i 
I llWRUHl 
ir> U%Rftp0C 
IP*. ?>%£3T&A* 
*** 38 AOiAD* 
47 hi J9>tFU$tovn 

0*A 

2A l7tPW®f 

»'4 19 FtfCd 

5*1 3M|Frwr 

IS5.2SES 

i Si: ’ESSES 

77 ^■^MFnrtO 
384% «4%RfFHP«£ 
3M% Hi.ntFriSP 
r» a'vFMEr 
20% N lFWnq 
lihi n htrtFD 


I4B lU 

3 B H j| K 

,3 S £ SS p 
*!J S* 

mu. 3* zm 

» Q . u iw 

XV! 3 R 
I » ! I £ 

■2 « s A I 

113 it n qi, tsS 

{I feifcfli 

m ii » m S* 

n Q !! Ui im 


as as 

4« an 
Al* 

»% n*Hi 

S « nn 
wu> 
m 


iSSSSS S r r 


2f% 2 S*sF*_Pw 2 S 
17 m U R.Pw Pf 
Mv.naPrco 

3^ I9 4R0WMT 
XtlAM 
71% £%FUV 


24' a 

AS «*&&?•* 

ans. t*Aif=rcr£n 
3 0% ll FrttSPB 

4ft%Fnw*fe 

w ihFmh* 
sri% ftviiwntr 
IH 

14% 73HfVnrjQA 


A Sl'nFTiC&Qa 
38% »iFMftCfC 
2 sim iMmcAm 
»’% tt*»FMCG 
4*'V 3THFr«niC 

A dfiBW" 

HH ?I^FrMrt 

M‘- SSViATfmiDl 
M% 73 FrWfKVln 
77% ITi^WV 
3J*. ir-^FrorffiCn 
A\ rn IB aFmtrtn 
J» Tl^F-Vn. 

W !7<hR»fdAni 

J»^i 19-aRiqucAn 


S A h 

M 57 4ft 

* if lilt 

SS iK 

5 ^IS 

r ft -a 

J! SS S5 


3fl* Al*i -44 

£H —^7 

34% » +V5 

1M UM — M 
ItfH HTi — > 

is! :s 

iP'is 

3W1 *« »■* 

sa a; rt 
sa ms 

0% *H — *4 

zm 2 S> -> 

m no, _*w 
tin! iw —MS 

17% 77% 

1 7JA 97% •% 

an 51% •% 
u«% un -j % 
m s% •% 

* =s 

4l 


12 M Ob n 

S: S3» 

a = jmp - 

41 _ » an 

ii g in nit 

_ . in n 
u3 ii mm in 
U 10 W 9» 
« - J » 
- - W J* 
u u ms aw 


S 'ffSS 
13 HW SR 


17% 17% 

S3 S5 


sa s H 

99 V9 


■«<• lOIG&Lfey 1^4 

SI'S *a CATS' 1.77 

W i Ur.OATX DU 1U 


iiu isoT^Mh jme 
ii*. IdlSTEEin '4* 
?9 uvXtpdC vtr In 

3i il GTEDSbCZ 2JI 
Z7 ft 5TEFAU 133 

3i -u tr'-rirsTam rja 
ICU TjijCOC* Ao 

« s^ssa*. ■* 

3 t awactoAUI 114 

11V. avauunoi J» 

14 |i|OW>L 

7,1, 30<^CCOMD' I 14 

09 W*inooob 

nv. w GOTidt 144 

H'l ll',Oa:% JO 


14 4UB IW, 

l MM 

z « as 

-:1S 

- 110 v% 

. w Ch 
7] jn am 
•I 32? *0 

l«S 

Q SS & 


S SR RG 

- joe 21 % 

= SS 


W* R # 

fejssr’ Js ii i? ' 

■18! 
’» Si : 
ri? « r« 
*# M 11 
■S ‘i S 

■1 3 & 


Arts 

& Abjtiques 

Appears every Saturday. 

To advertise contact 
Kimberly Guerrand-BetrancourL 
Tel: + 33 (0) 1 41 43 94 76 
Fax: + 33 (0) 1 41 43 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative. 

'Tit t < mEBsmmLmt ♦ t 

Itcral b^kfc nbnne 

PC9USHED imu IW W» lOM IWB «B IK '“VSaWGTOH TOST 

THE WORLD'S DAlli' NEWSRIPER - 


:® ST 

ft 1 Is h h 

II n ii M* M 

II »5 M 344, 3M 

. M t. 1 )lh 

ft W if- JR £& 

• no nn *fc m% 

iTS-Sw p 3S 

; -i ss Sr as 

id n On ir» in. 


ii * sa 

^ 7^4 ^ 

30 7977 Bl 1, 


nr* usv 

JS11 09 

in 3*» 


5 R 3S 

fil 

;3p 

_ 4 19 u 
ft Ml 21% 


') afl SS BS SS 
5 % -P L Jw 

_ 9*2 J7% 21% 

r ”8 4ft if P 

- J* J* 1 * I» 

_ pv IS 141, IA 

- MB 11* 111, I1W 

- sa *ta '*% 'fa 

n "s "4a Rw is? 

- m lji, IT IKa 

H ® i n* bs as 


1^4 14 15 

wai 

■* ^ a 

wo ii b 

1 li ' 


IV 3*1 99 74 

a .k as S'* 

f, 7174 So, «nj 
_ 770 34*4 3*11 


45 *S« 3719 719. 37 V. 

a n* lift 311, 

Uliuma a in 37- 

i* m «v «m o, 

n aH a*, a. 3» 

_ «• S5 £a 55, 

- S S, JM« BH 

a a, an iw 

a n i oh hh, kh, 

14 Bill U*« M 14H 

» lie 8** ss sz 

40 M 4**, «H 09 

ID _734 7SV. 3.V- 74*. 

18 BI7 Via ■'«, 

13 ay ,«* ,»w vo 

_ m IbH Uh itn 

„ ran U9 n nvi 
a m 7i s, jo!, 

- !SS oft an xj-> 

_ IW »■* M9 J7l, 

ran m, » 30*4 

IT 157 Ii UH IVo 
is s*e? s, jpi nn 
u as n>, sw m't, 
ise wi m 7* 
rr ni a*o a S9 

- “ 34H m »'4 

- 0,4 Tj ith 
iiTU&iian, oth urn, 

,S £ M % % 
10 7V. TH 39. 

_ IB Mh M 341, 

14 A T1 »«* W*. 

m xb on m on 

I, g 1ST. 15H 15*, 
M 9 ISM HO UA 

S 48* Si 3BV, 303, 
t IJTV MH 14H 14H 

31 .!L mv »*, mt 

. 144 11 is is 

ft U 3, 8, 3 

IB M8 1414. I3H |4 

_ MO 41H AH 41 14 
IJ ."11 I4W MH M*, 
11 “S* 3071 I, »i, 
IB B*a S'o i'-l 

“ «? a ?ss a 

_ o S, M W* 

_ *M an 15*9 SDH 

_ n 119 759 C.-M 

1 31 M M 4, 

J 3lF SH m 9W 

* 4 SH & 

li ira 4* *7n 4>% 

tt mu i in, 1139, mt, 
_ mi ni, 3 *h a, 

- .2 »> 54 ZSH 

x, J46 Si 77% r% 

SuS §S sij Sft 

« Mi II 10% I Oh 
12 11% H'*> 11% 


»Br J 

» I s 1 


J i Lii 

Is a = a 

11=1 

JiiSR 

i ! ’I J J 

l.lg is fs 

is ijo r S 

g g ,# f 

* « 5 I 


ah j* a im 

,51 

■£ ^ g WJ* 

’■* 'i S 

do Si’S 

S-jSj 

Ji?i 8 

a, r 5 

:iss - i fi 

331 ll - III 

= i *21 
- ^ ? 8 
-b j 

-ill 

JQP _ _ O0I 




“ ^ 1>4 

.5 g ? S 

•ff B ~ iB 
8:8 
m B r IB 

l«n U ~ S3 

a ll 0 m 

j|«4 

& & i'jfi 

m i » m 

ijo ^ g 1^1 

ta ,1 i pi 

» .3 .1 1 


tiph^tnw^aoa DA TM Hoa LawUgtaOi-Be 

is '•ijiEiii 

IK Sllflifti 

j jg 

® P® S fl A P E I :S 
i“ |p*' *1**fcfc53 

IS. SSElf h 1 5 *i 

I® Ulllp j 
JflS^ iff C"3 

% EBg 5* ^ fi !J ® ILS B * :ft 



1811 
s a 


ffaSa&l 


||@ 

III 


a 

UP U 13 


NSi 

1“ « g S 

b* a § 1 

to S f g 

r 


ns bi- 

sstoIs? 


s i a i % 

i"ii.ili 

2ri JO U BO JOg. 

f i3s s!| 

B. Horn IU 9 PB gVI 

jS B - 2 i# 

’ ;i%au 

1 ijo £3 10 jw nh 

ijg S B W 95 

. J 9 a as sa 

i w M : a? 55 


T & 

tu ffn 9* 

■li IB* —ft 


d B 


*5 S r 

JO »* - 


^ t r 

ado 
S 5 i 

n i3 u 


^ g ^ 15 B5 

“ n ?8 ah 7?5 

a s| « a 

SrlSP 


V. «5*l‘ 

09 IIHMMMBi 


O H IIHMMMBi 
9 Jj mton 

•Rfcsr 

341, 70*1 4*4 . 


jo 10 ii GST __ _ , 

34 ii ff ® u =?£ ¥ % :3 

a » ft S ^ iin K -5 

2 ti : ® m 5 s B 5 

•a « = i.a sa sg sa *5 

SI : 

jC ii : « f.5 S5 % 

is ^ SiBf ,r>^ # .is 
,a « ^ fi £ 35 JS 


*s*wg fe. -. 

P. ZtZZS! 0 ™ ix u 

“s JKsssr a 4 

«9 MMU un 7A 


30H iiamv 

UH * VtTjCxBV 
u rjrirctni, 
avb 1 , it of 

MH ■4 I «MMPd 

sdh aw flS 

gi^KSSf-D 

14 RmMjn 

m wmMm 

7 4>Dnvmn 

ffi i Rasis * 

SS ^BSS“‘ 
33 ^SS 1 ' 

14 li iihiMMn 


.;s &sr«« 

-Si? 

}i£.ss2r 



I7H 7V3JOJtoinn 
34 ilHJonunt 

«gv othjhiwoi 
m .THJonnstoi 

sausasa"* 


*H ^KSb. 

SS BEST 944 - - ^ 

r ^ * ?jg fig a «■ :a 

■9 HHItmor*: M 3B J? JHB SB, «H BU rl 

*19. » KMemv £5 2 / S is* m 30 m *w 

£2 « fn « S fi 2 I s 55 ! 5 t ^ 

r aKSf* 53 ^ iri is: Hw :c 

4 ShESS * 1 ISK^^SJ^^rS 

3 % T+Konob * a 1 M 51 » ,Wr - 

low ^MKatfttPf Mb ra _ 30 10% ton 10% 

ZMflKDyPL 142 9J li .05 Oh 22% B* •% 

miccsau JO Jf zz 104 **% an * * 1 % 

WhKxM^f JO 11 11 is 14% 141* MW - 

jn 13 n un dw n% -a «■% 

^ li t ? ^ 

•Lzzs* 'JSISB^SSSSEia-a 

moi if jo JJ - t#i im id nm - 

Jh® 1 S:S£«>-S 

jlliKriWMj II U _ » OH m OH .9 

P : 5 R S, Bav-g 
fXZcg* :l 

« " *» s» ss :s 

Jig if ij|ll j 

BMKoy^rp L3 U M M 51 •% ; 

ga& aipfl^ssaalS 

n Kmc dm u* ti — 38 24 rat Sfc T 

JSKr 

= * J % g S :£ 

BSk ^sSSiifl^ 

»S3» A 5 3 ’SS Ss KS S 2 *U 

!*tolAn«e S!j_lSsBHSBaS!'^ft 


"■"^iras 

U 4 U fi £ 4 M i£ Bl 

a a S ^ s* at » 

Mum HtoO AH 41 <9 41 

» *3 k ms S 
'I Ti § J k | £ 

o aStRI! 

4 a •* *» a a ** s 

2=151 

a a " i s e I 

“ “i! S 3S Sh ft 

5 a : 1 % “a ? 

4> jj >4 a n% i7% w; 

iu u _ £ =s;*> j&% ft 


ii « ws 3% * 

a ^ | s p g 

4 J 0 j 3 " IM & lib 

Ji IJ 34 7*344 P» 5119 

us li w 4 n in b 

“ S »g mi af 

A 42 g gjgSJb 


4i J n UM aw on a *i% 

Jp 11 II IS 14 % 141 * Ml - 

jj u ii un nvi n* n «-% 

T3 b «sa 4^* <5% _*i 


iKiaissa? c 

40 JTHKomBi 


74% sswrMc 

M* AKnnv 

3SS5& 

Sh 2 

2,'* J7Hi»E5C 

*?H jJS^wK 

W9 BHIOnrOBID 


is HP 

I7H iBHIUraoMi 
lift .SSSS* 
rri iakiwb; 


K it/tiv 

^ jaaa-i 

© JM» 


74 31 ff d iffc 

a ; p a ^ as 

«« = !■% 

a ,3 ? S Sa 
jgj=gs 

84=11 


i.is *3 n 

-a ^ ? 

u» *3 S J 

J3 U 13 


is a 

A .sfc 
SS -a 
^ “i 

r ^ 



a 8 ^ a al! k li 

2J w TX 3 7£* O U% — % 

a i i JE js 5* tS 
z 1 j i £ 15 S 3 

JiilEis 

:i ~ ^ IF iS 


S S5 IT a* *ft 

IffS Eft se 


IBs* 
s a j*g 
ii is i 


fej«CijSSiSf 

n 


I.u, m3 - 
IJO* 107 _ 

Iff* 

301. 


0 ig as 

» a 3S5 




Cg ^ i ft 

1 * ^M*n . ^ ic w 


InSSh^ iss 

KfW 1 .aJE ! 
£ 85KaS3™ * * S 


3&s sa a* a 

lams 

4PEr 

S M Ml W9 

tfH 

1111 



iS B ; S09w ; 

aB ?JfiS«ZE 





p 15 J| '^5 



as 

IM ISA ,W B» -^9- 

' ■ K 5"* 

g W 33 2 ? 

I v 1« « 

5 % ff E 

6 ff- fC 

f I S Us 

• I E g 



s ^ B 
mtV 


i&ass-* 


■ ■cl 
; 

® A 4* *»» 


53 ■ 

54 — > 

=S‘-t 

34H ■ ■> 

oL* .■ 


u cm. • r v-£ 



J KSS3^ 

liajsar 


f» 




jj « £ S> 

5 J| 1 gs 
E Is Is p 

fl'ES a ^ 
3 ' TO . ^ SS 

n 2 § £ 

r TS SS ^ 

ilET 
“ 1 ^ E 
= a k ffi 
= 3*5 

- » 'l 1 * 53? 

” VA 7*^ J22* 

r 40^ 2* % 2*t 

W.W8J ijj; ga 

5 ^ > 4T 

_ |Q 4h 4% 

; ill 

: Ik? 

K5 42 

- jS 

1 -S S 3 ^35 

?ifaS 

r S^; Im* 

fi s 

m j m tj 

I 4aS nS IH 
B )fn £• £w 

g 1 5* 54 

ilfcl 

«. 4ft ZT« J 

■ s|i 


{! 9 - 

"V - :- .rii wh p* 

y? 1 J 0 -V . .«> 


v^-^vuniTT. 


fi-s 


^*7. 

i 0* 
y*» _ 


*■’* -■- ■ 

i •••“t 

■ — 

:* 


^brieflr* 

W i J’aid (H*tl 


;?»» 488 


ElflH 3 ? 

'-js-Sk 


1 ll 29‘a 

s^as ss 


-••• ;; •••,■ , 7 r > jvt«i 

pr \ Xttb 

r „..' . *. &?> ‘dm* 

f -; '. v M 

H"w -■ ■-" ■*.* *mm 

\r ^sa«%» 

■s Airline Kile 

■Vi' 

,; . *• v 7 «.*» m 1 

^Vv-- .-•••-'«a*PO 

:iT ,”v • v.«« tayi 

. -tt L U> Ulilftfti 



nfnmfo 

isjyn 

:-.«**«** 


•IirruS.TM-: Ji ni > m w> || 

ai: .v 

ire j -' •-- - • ■••-£? ftrJMH 


•W 

v v 

*tT- ■ ■ . * *. j» 

* 1 

:’tt. • - V*f ftlfjff 

iTi-. ^ -t^hNnCSl 

.... -V 


|r JI||Sf 

* 'f i f J P fe 

* a as 

.1 ^ if If ss is 

r lAd^SSS 

^ i e s r I 

m i! « f »S S 

Elf 111 : 


-4 1 -V 

1 h 'gf •=, 

-> .f.* ■'< 

-• 9*. -** 


-. ■ 't ^ 


-• *■<*■ «■ 

9 «H. »* 

4 fH *' 


rr-?J 


H M “ 5 ®a S 
m s 8 ii i I 

f da Slffl 
■“ a 3 s ? 5 ss 

3 *! imsa St* 


giJsl! 

a 3S 

M — 2700 44 44 


*7,1 Cfl 

5tj 


.9* fH : 9dg'‘ 

^ C-* 


•2 ft 

^ *■« 

'i> F* 


'* n '.<*• 

*#;■ 

: * pa '*5; 

•' * ’>H - Jftf 

H* 42 -4 

S s E 
S B.-* 







r ” J i J B c 

‘>r S g 

I” ! a f f I ! 

t wIlAEM 


'& § p i ? S 

- iijBF 

^a?lP| 


1 st 


ip nip 

||ii( If if 

1 S = | » i.ftjj 

! i \ 1 1 ||-i 

|| || !||i 

§ 1 - 4 ^ ^ ^ -tit 

IldUk B 1 




*. .% 

=: % 
s & 


Tv s i t&rw, 

^ Page 19 


.-- ■• ••• ■ '• ••• - A ’■• L--T ;- •^- : Ev > 1 ;.. .. . 


































A 


1 ■-'= 


1 • *+«• :.T- ' T • • • 

_ yA-iisklV- ’ - - < — = * V. -• ■•» V T •; . 



INTERNATIONAL H ERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JANUARY 10, W7 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 15 



.’JCUB»S*i»tlS 

8 Investor’s America 


qgWMMtBWW JW il WW ■» « % 
| 


> 



Pilots’ Vote Stalls Boeing Sale 

American’s Pnrchaseof lOS Jets Hinged on Contract Approval 

- the union,” he said. “It's not even a que*- 

TORT WORTU^exas - American non of eventually. I think it s sooner rather 
Aiiiineshasdelay^aS 6 . 61 ^on«der^ ^oe£g said it was also confident the 

Boeing Co. jets after a pilots union bad ^^ g ^ ldevef0tuaIly proceed. 

rejected a contract proposal. ., iiirtr _ t r .* It » s unexpected, that's for sure.” a 
I company representative said, “but not in- 

Wednesdaythat 61 surai^m ^ assodalion + s 18 -mmnber 

had turned down a new Q f directors had scheduled to meet 

TTHsfom-yearcontrartprc^^ei^ in Fort Worth, 

modest pay mercies and jTSjm- A union spokesman, Gregg Overman, said 
lowed Amen can I»gle, American s wm dienesa step renegotiations might be up to the 
muter affiliate, to fly small jets with pilots N Board, which has over- 

represented by another union. *e iwo-and-a-half year labor dispute. 

American said ratification of *eco^^ Tbefederal panel could order American 
by the Allied andthe union back to the negotiating table 

ificationaftheAPAagreement,songfai ^ n bal news for the carriers. A strong 
tedmMyspealdng.teBoemgdg^off. k, high fares and fall 

said an adriinre gotesman. Rob Bnoon. as a resaU. drlines have re- 

American said expansion of its fleet p , a 

would have meant advanam^opporni- who often say that they are asked 

* . - _ < 1 ^ k..i nn> nni 


TOKYO: Stock-Market Drop Threatens Economy 


Continued from Page 13 — - ST5» JKSjg 

ing 500 trillion yen, or nearly hr which ^.yl^ HI 2 d 

1 (H) percent of gross domestic for every one that row. Ken Kaplan, a principal at 

product, and the Bank oi Ja- g Record for U.S. Slocks spare, Kaplan, Bischel &. As* 
pan’s discount rate at a his- F .. owinj , the lead of sociates in San Francisco, 
toric low of 0.5 percent, Japan FoUo g Occidental Petroleum 

has little room to bolsicr ns ^^^.S^recU. ^ dosed up KuMWmdUSX- 

S uSing gSSSSiSSFm JfTSl" &*»h«d 

tf 5 A for in- hiflariondespita robust eco- - 5 , to . 36 %. 


stance, Mr. Hashimoto's cab- nomic ,?£!!!£ 'New York ™^ 5 lol^^as [he company had 
inct approved a France Mm- «!“"££££«. 2 d after tire dose of nd»« 
istry budget plan for the y ;ear Tte LJbO J^fewholesale Wednesday that it would give 
from Apnl that drew criticism ported tna nercent in prosecutors an internal report 

for not slashing spendmg prices shot up 0.5 percent m P™*f“. indl ; ng of a „cc dis- 

deeply enough on politicly CTOTKS crimination suit. 

sensitive subsidies to farmers UJ. Interest rates retreated as 

and pubtic^rks projects- ^ increase meas- many retailers reported srrall 

But whai is new about the when the ^es increases in December.. 

latest stock maiket weakness sec- The weak results bolstered the 

is that it has joined the bst of volan^ food and energy sec ^ Onlhallheeconomy ’ s 

negative factors tomgdo^ “JEJSJ ^member any growth was slow enough ito 
on the economy, and promptea overall ecd- limit inflation, letting the Fed 

feare the stock market s own ume "hen me overan^ ^ pressure to increase 

fear of another recession could n °™! c .. AH Rivlin a Fed- benchmark lending rates, 
becotne.self-ftafillmg. ^Si^f stablelates lifted 

Yoshiaki Mitsuoka. a di- ml, Kese V 7 . laie bont£ with the benchmark 

rector at Daiwa Investment NewYmk 30 -year Treasury finishing up 

Trust & Management, told finished up 76.19 1 3/22 points, at 96 23 / 32 . 

£ ^e"Kreen.on 

—^ES'b’Si SiSSb * 1 W « - ho— 

sssasass 

, ' I 1 tT 2 SS gt-S^av^TSondof Fann^Mae.up!%.o 39 'A 
IS wrecking tile outiook on the ^ Manage - C-Phonerose 4 11/16 to 11 

economy, he said. ttoston i-o *> | i/f 6 after the comm uni ca- 

Reflecting wonteahon rn ‘gh, tocksarealn ong those tions sofmare developer said 
£ S va,uc. coney 

People are inciting for log Devices. fB/ruunberg. API 


2 % to 


nities for pilots, something it 


to make concessions in bad times but are not 


Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Very briefly:. 


hnovod»nJ HcrmkJ Tribune 


Disney Paid Ovitz $39 Mjlhon &sh 

BURBANK, California (Bloomberg) — Waft Disney Co. 
paid Michael Ovitz, its former president, $ 38.9 mimon and 3 
million stock options as part of a severance package, ac- 


Mr LMlz annoimced in December he would resign after a hopethat-^— - . 

. ssMs's.sawasws •xx&ssssz-** 

1995. Mr. Ovitz left the company Dec. 27 and the severance 

.* was paid to, acceding to 


strong motive bunion members to ac- dearly 

cept the contact oSct. signaling that it is time for payback. 

The association smd that of 8^606 piims don’t feel like we should lose buy- 

eHgiblctovo^a^i^or 96 percent had Sonwhen *c com panyis 

sentinbanotsbytheD«:.30d^me. mg pow^ profinfale said Glenn 

The airlinfi announcedi flie^ genera a^r ^ American pilot who voted 

stock markets had closed against the deal, which would have given 

s a cumnMve 5 percent 

parent, AMR Carp., closed M jwiowct » increase through 2000. 

§6:625 while Boemgs stock price was 0 f^i 0 mon Brother Inc. 

down 12J5 cents m 5UD. . llhaMfvnT caid. ‘ ‘At the end of the day, recent industry 
Mr. Bntton said American stiU h^drort ^^^ isleadingloi ncreasedlabor- 
ip e that a quick resolution of tite cmttract That's the real is- 

(A/ 9 . AFX , NYT) 


was pum lueu, «A«TT ^ TT rr„ in December to a Postwar Record as ’96 Economic Growth Dips 

US Airlines Riled Over Heathrow MARK: German Unemployment Up in U Januarv andifthiscon- hm* Tietmeyer, u» bank-* pw- 

ISgaSSSffiSSS Continued from Pngel ^ ^ g-- IRSMS SSSSs 

j=*sss m 2ff*£ 33 Basns« easKSS 


were 

sKssBfj™^ e f OT ^f^r?t^d 7 oTfl S lSt The Deutsche mark tumbled, set- 

Continehtal Airlines Inc. saul SrStmi’s d^since higher unemployment once the euro was . ^ jo£ crisis since the ployment rale ^ d ng a two-year low against the doi- 

— at London s many sm« M r . Kohl insisted that Germany* comernc j ^^ [oymcnl m another month or two. Lrafter the German jobless report 

122L. stabilisin' Ger- EconomisLs also fear *at the uit rate. wiuld 



^ N^SootlH^rCorp. a hostile JBJSMBrf the weakness, 

block the lockout provision- Blooml «*■ ^ 


from 115.820 yen. Ii£so we to 
1 Swiss francs from l.Jo 43 
francs and to 53223 French francs 
from 5.3205 francs. The pound rose 


■ iSi^l SMSSS 3 3 SKHHB -jrstsrw* =**-«- 


AMEX 


u. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


international futures 


Ttawwlmf* 4Mb ana 


op» 


The 


dorinaonVi 

AaoSmdf 


Ml' M Low Lrtntf Qw« 
574 lAh T« M» tS 

^ % » ift- 3 






■Jvtiig until mnUfcti O— 

fill 


ioft iS 4 a .Jg* ** 
33* +* 


Indexes 


-Dow Jones 


Most Actives 

NYSE M a* ui m om. 
aiAfe-Dft jnm 2 «* m in* 


Jan. 9, 1997 

High Lo» do* CIi»« OpW 


Hlgn Low a* 8 O90 °PW 


High Low Ooso OW OpM MH,h “Z 

_ necw 7505 75JS 76J0 — <W7 Mil 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIR t?JB 77 JO 76JS -Ml 


458 


l£i£S 5 T :» 


UB nuu +20.19 MOtaralO 


Grains 


_ 52545 11* m 11 ‘* 

s, 20 ^ 3 ^ 15 ®^ « sa» a :s «W 25 " 

Standard & ?«« | K MS 3 ®‘3 kS 

- __ VMAtart 38042 24* 33* 23* ♦* XI 97 Ml 2J9 

>OjX> LOW ao» ‘a* OccHVf 3B02B 74* 23% 24* +* 5^,97 2J9 7-H 


ORANGE JUKE (NCTNI 

TUB 4B jn E? Si \§& \un iBS +<& 

_ fis 2S g a ^’ss irls’w.’gs :ss ,0 s Smv » 

— J-W. BUS. voiufne: 15WB0 - Open Wj 131520 up ^ 70JO «» -}» 

4 J 81 - Apr® 7 _ 68.15 « 4 .« 033 


ES. soles MA 

vmrsopenirt VJB up 452 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BONO (UFFE) 


Metals 


sir a a y ^ Hj 

- 61 J0 40.95 ML78 —034 UJJ 


aubw iijo wri -Q 3 < ii® 


ms +* | McnonP.wt 



aaa 


BovMea 



S B ’I* ■ 1 f l - 

.vfp 

l l p s**S 


Co ma* 
tatantats 
TnW . 

ussy 


11 If! 

I | |t | ^ 

*■* 

i ll I - 

“ C i £ ^ & A*AEX 

Iff fl 

i & h 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTl 

srsT'S? m» « 


sasssssss :ig ssas. s « *3 gtni^arjaf 
* 3 ® cS5Ssc* ssss s =a - ,ff4 

- 1 > ji. IK® £3 ^ Jg Nasdaq m^.cboti 

S' & SP1M 74Z74 73X22 739-42 +A20 

« 

tiCIl 

m u» H» ! 1 £ +2 

1 1 

K* ♦* 


Z57* — OD1 6J90 COLO (NCMX) 

2J7* -EDO* E 1001nwot.lWI«lwlWBt 

Jan 97 35 / jo -2«. 


JOT97 128-38 12778 IZBJtf + 072 
ESLSdCK 5A486. PWr.sote 3A933 
Pro*. apwibl: 91525 up U45 


Cop 17 61.00 61.00 60.9J —4134 2«864 

MW tl-SS 41JS «•« -V* fl’ 

Nov 97 «L» 61J8 4LO 1J3B 

Eif. sates HA. Wed’s, sities 3M« 

Wed’s open M 100.713 up 991 


NVSE ^ 


Sn 359 JO 355J0 3SSJ0 -2J0 102,901 EURODOLLARS (Q«J 
FttW JSVJU , i00 S'mlSonKjBDllWPg- 

toZ<n m« 35*J0 34050 J2J0 28A4S Jan 97 94450 94435 1 uetn weei uhik i~— 

KIP® 111 ! ill 

“ Sen 91050 91940 93A50 


h IH s iS ®a.. ■*> s fi U ev ss mm. 4i » 

H H B :i n ^ is ® i T 3 ; Erb# ATA 


22J04 


EsLSDtes NJL Wetfs-soies MWli 
SarTopenw 1114.939 up 40M 


Nasdaq 


CBmMHBe 

MduElrioft 


HW> Law ' Lad Oft. 



« GRADE COPPER INOMO 

fSi K « »} -JJS HIsTiil IBS :jfl „ 

fflg, sb s» k .-s sB-arsrtb .» « s sss iss ss ■<* “g k ssj :s is :s is 

sassss :js ss« sss » s .» {KS ss is ss :S ss sss? !SS 'SS !SS :<5 ™ »” :ss :s ” 

imu imS wt +192 MB17 ®? 1 wt a«t m* A?w M48 XlO 7437 +0» Mg xJp7 10050 79 JO 10QJD +J40 UM Ed S*S NA WWS.SOle5 4879 

wKl IMA -1 JS ***** ^ B Auq 97 24« 305 2445 +0J4 130 £^97 MM^nirt 44.137 ufl 5M 

HHN M£A3 140454 +U0 MO «OOS 33* S’* M 9US +UI 2J91 9850 9E» WTO d *M0 2JB3 JaNAIMAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

9I4JZ 90155 911 JJ +S« „ EsLSCtieS 9 LA. VIM'S. StilM 19.940 ESJJfles , 00JJ4»«ie | Ms»^. S D^rQW- 

AMEX w«fs open Hit BSJ3B i# 727 Wetfsopenatt 5L597 o« 195 mit97 Jia Jfl3 MB — j “■J" 

Hhdi Law Lod ON. vm « 9 ti LW« Q» SOYBEANS (C 2 IOT) 5N.VB1 04CMXJ JTO JiS JOJ -1 L4M 

*** - — ■ — 643(5 3Wn 3* 3* ** sxoo &u 1™^™^?°*’^ ES, 01 ^^ .. tm MOOmn-o*.- wVipefiiwjh JS 4 ^, w J54A 7535 3540 —1 341 


& -.a a * j 
isl|| AIHF- 


CPCdOG 




^ ^ ^ + * 

’*■ ® s ™ ¥S 
“» US JS 


58L74 57632 SS134 +5J2 
Dow Jones Bond 




Ed. sales NA. Wetfs. sales VJJ77 


^ ssssu 


103DB 

10032 

10534 


M Jt 1 :S fiEff s ^ , : Fsl H :B«* wsot; 

OT - “ “ :5 -» »■» » 'Sir S S a -:i g SSSa'wru. 


♦ * MO 
+« Auo 97 7 JO 


694 


_SS- ’S® S K **A gSSks^NA. wetfs-Sei'iSb » 3 nS 53 SS ua ^ Sw Sw 

“Ss g-sr w a g *5 «»"“ i44 * ,si 4,1 °^2 “ si ? -ii 

-007 (Wort (775 27 an* 20* * WHEAT (CBOT) 


3 * 


OMJj 

iy cm*Awf 

? “2512 


M B It as + * l * as 

I ? 1 ^ 

H IS ij* 

a 1 : 
a 


a. a 

« U* ip 

g 1 E 


at'*» 
«. +» 

%T?* 




u* flk 

1 .r M 


. h if *i 

no 


s ss ® 
i !a'S 

so W« & 

■s 3s- S 

S % ^ fit 



Donrfv 


405 

S A 

all* 

• s ^ St|,w- 


Wu 



Trading Activity 

NYSE 

Clue 

Pie*. 

Nasdaq 


Frew., 

Advanced 

DnJneti . 

Undmaed 

Trtoltnue* 

NewHWK 

NSW LOW 

wn 

954 

764 

JM» 

219 

M 

I2S2 

1289 

■Ul 

3353 

184 

39 

Advartted 

Unchanged 

HM.ta* 

NeuftWl* 

MwLom 

2294 

1785 

1651 

5730 

226 

49 

1875 

1658 

5731 

206 

55. 

AMEX 



MartetSdes 

Tudor 

Pm. 


308 

>14 

234 

738 

33 

M 





Advanced 

DKfinea 

Undnwj 

ZM 

187 

723 

8IYSE 

Amax 

(Nasdaq 

55409 

29.97 

575A0 

67103 

30.18 

66649 

NwHkOI 

WtefLoa* 

7 

mtaBHom. 




Dec 97 4MJ 

jn)« 49(5 -75 

_ S anas NA. W«f S. sates 14391 

iS’r' W4J wetfs open W 89333 Id 412 

uSfV 173* 144 *•“” PtATWUMWMERl 


p£n iM85 — 14 

Ed. sates NA. Wetfs.st*s 25.932 
wwrsapenn 71297 UP 4275 


17 


Wad’s eperirt 43JH up 331 


Uvedock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

4472 a»4 LONDON METALMUAE) 

APT 97 t*A tig 4A» “■«» 


wetfsopaninJ 25J11 ofl 374 
dose 


£*« S3 £30 3434 -030 XM 
k m oj 7105 2X60 7177 —0.14 JiJW 
JU97 5125 2110 21J \ “JJJ 

Aug 97 23-75 7258 52-75 -0J7 13553 

fe?97 2237 22.10 2230 —8.14 11712 

rvs97 21 J5 7132 71.74 —0.19 

jijl 21 J 5 -032 AIM 
rve 97 JUD a .95 71.04 —US H .137 

20 J 15 ZH 05 20-05 — 0.13 12 ^ 

Dec 98 19-59 19-50 1955 - 01 * BJ 17 

S sides NA. Vltafs. sales 1 WJ 08 
Wed's aaen ini 370*11 up 3 ® 

NATURAL GAS INMER) 
lOjDOO mm Hu fc I oct mm Wu 
cJh 97 3 J 70 1258 1470 -43 32 A 28 

Mar 97 1150 2 . 9 M HDD — Wf 

Apr 97 7 6*5 ism 2500 —43 ll.W 

S 5 y 97 2350 1250 7320 -25 10 A 50 

Jun 97 2350 1170 2310 —35 BJM 

XI 97 23 W 2.120 I'W —35 7 . 7 D 

Aug 77 2305 1140 2.190 -30 7 J» 

Sep 77 9*7 L 165 1185 — 3 S 4 J 99 

M 97 1310 1175 2.190 -35 4 ,TO 

Hm 77 1370 2 JW 2 J 15 —15 1 M 6 

Dec 97 1430 2400 M 30 7590 

Est. soles NA. «Ws sides 
wed’s open irt 157.927 up 1531 

UNLEADED GASQLME (NMER) 

SMJQ 9 bc*- aeris per ooi 
RC 97 7135 70-40 70 A 0 — IJ 9 36..15 

Mar 97 71.90 TIM TOJO ~U 2 11 CT 

Apr 97 7135 7120 7120 — LOO 4 .M 0 

Mar 97 71 M 7100 7100 —830 L 014 

jm 77 70 J 5 70 J 0 T 0 JD —030 3,791 

jUTt? 6930 49 JO 4930 -030 1 J 4 T 

Ed.sdes NA Wed’s. sides 29 J 7 J 
Wed's oaenM 66 A 25 up 3224 
GASOIL (I RE) 


Ei jssrasTBrsn -is -+ ^ 

Ed-sdes NA. wed’s. sales 11450 Apr 77 367 id 344JD 344* -240 19,340 Mar ' Wa78' -O0BJM -» 

“ jm»7 370.00 37M0 -I® MW g J089I7 IW» MBW2 -« 370 

Orv07 371 JO -U*i i*lV* **: — >4 A WMfkSdlB 11.57' 

Jon 98 373JM 373.OT 37400 +1™ ^ tOJOS off 4W 

Ed- soles NA. .?{£? S. MfcS, j 2J90 FRANC (CMER) 

Ptevfous jSrW^JTC -7339 JM1 —35 45,1« uiSnBains p« mode 8>n - IrtsonOOIons 
Are 97 J4S8 J404 .7409 -IS .SO ? 235 J2S 232.75 73X75 +3J0 10.261 

SeP 97 .7525 J«5 7471 —3S 1J32 fSg» 231 JS 22R50 230.75 * 475 27-912 

Est. sales NA. Wed’s. sales 13.953 MnrU? 220.50 218-75 220 3S +400 10J44 

I 1546.00 wed's open <m 48JM H) 1494 21 DJ5 208.75 209.75 »lf® MR 

M«97 20100 200.50 201^5 +2-25 11M 

jlm97 IVbJM 194 JO 17525 +ZH 7353 

assssaisi g g- ss H yjgjgs ’S 


^ n SS ax aZ *i» u» 

Est. sales 20JSS Wed's, dties 14^85 
wecfsapanU 91278 u> 78 

ii iTimrnmrfi T 

SQpOOO ASK.- cents wrb. 


a IMJ IJUO IWOAW ^MOKinBvmwuuiMrrb. 

0 » i 9 BSShb ssss ®TW 3T2«Tj»5!?!sa 


E»d SSS 8SS S?5S 2^88 as g 9 9 


S31 

310 


Divideads 


Composy 


Par Ant Rsc Pay Company 

IRREGULAR 

Telefonica Espana b J9M 3-1 
STOCK SFUT 

5 Fet Home Bancorp^ for 3 spl*. 


StoW 55 s «.» MiW JH ST* 


REGULAR JSSw 7130 nno nS iSn 2 ^J Srt STSSJO sttsjo S775J0 S«wg ££ raj §5 Sin tsS ^ K^JSIPiVifrhS, 


94A4 94J5 MAS +0.10 1377 

[sated 240LS6S. Pim-Sdes: 1B»6 


EVoSoEn 


! 9 S % «S *- uosp«corp 2 fonspn. 

S. "J REVERSESroaSPUT 

■ IS ? i ts 1 i -« r- 

“£ T+V 11M =8- K w H* ISt S* w 


CA Independ Bn g Jl » y ^ W ® « oSS 8 » SB- SSS 3«SB «* 

1 5 i Is asfcrjrrs.”" p-^iaiTsaa M x 

£ J! £S ? K fSSo. isare ■«+« »»“ ' OT " J+S"S‘SiS lurFE 

s ■ 9 *ns“® aa -ffi « BW - — w — 3 ail i i S J S “HH jB « 


IffiW 

£ 3 S&% 

FbrtMofor 

Oort Food 
HoncodtPalPiOu 


Ui. donors oer barrel - lotsol I.MO! barrete 
Foh97 24.91 24-53 34 S> — (L23 42,745 

34J* S»9 24J0 -0-19 45+457 

2173 SS 23J» -0.W 18.194 

«S»«, »07 MJ4 c KJ8 -0.17 libera 


Q J8 S 1-30 3-1 AW^ tub 754B 7(02 -003 


0 j-?, jSw m 52 tSS HS Financial ® ^ Efl T&SS SSS HI? »■« ^ 


_ 2« w» £i ^ M nS iw IS UST.MLL5COWK1 J£g? ^ : SS ^ SSr« ^ =037 1§7 

^ llli^ ,3 17 1 s 1 525 “ 5 - “ - ,j “ si ° d “ ,vte “ 6 


ReRoSlarFnd 



news 

... If J vS 

." 4 S£ . - tSSEi 

401 SS *%• Tbrtnd ■ S 'HJ h" n" s RED1KED MPUarrm = 

“iiy S 1 * i £ Is «— 0 ” ” 4 M 

n» «* US -•+ DUT1AL 

MM? :« 


M M SS SS B =o« ,*9 mnMMM 


92.BJ 93-07 92.11 

Ed. mum. S7J21 
Pm. open lot- 4)1,118 W L* 1 


w ss s ss ^ s sa»ans5«7 , « s « 


;• ■ * agf* « i'C;- ■ 'ffl S» -SE iSC ^ 

■ :a liiba Mia 


_ .10 1-15 2-1 

-- 1-22 2-14 GHaemmyi W«*«niB 


a ^ tS &*■ & a « » 

Sr- £ i';S StotiTobteExploteed 

1 1 s.\ & W 1 1 J I . -15 sssss, 

1 * w- .15 +u un&a 55 3 S! J a «k +.¥■ 


^ ug ™ + 5 




€ St 56 ® tS 'SBS, 


Wfc W 


♦ Hi 
-K 


uahmr. 


W*}" 
HcneOr . 

R wr 2 £ 

HonudB 

H QfW" 

M 

nanpros 

Heomn 

HOfSvwi 

HWfo. 

musSfe 

HaunBi 

iCGCum 

Sfg« 

sss 

safr 


sr- 

» 


woBfcbotnotttGWesn*^ 


pkatadunwR cocoAMCse) 

ssrs'-s? 


irt" 7.488 ti® 12 Deal 

SUPCOMP- IMJEX (CMER) 

M^9T*764A0 752JD 761.90 » 640 IB9.^ 

ILI.EilJ 1 * Efsr'S'&aisHi si s s s J '1 

Food » W478 «S. r S ™ fSn&SEB 

IIW.+J 11*41! + 


I VO 

'.unless s; 130 1374 

itoUHtdodudon. i« OT ij|« 


SSfl w4S W-» - >2 ®12 [fuel 98 M) «-M o « 11 255 

Komi h jm : g »■’« ^ ^ SS^ -wSf. 

SSuKsssw 


Senff '®- 18 * J2 

, Sr.solw NA. Wed's Mies iMB 

I< ?*S Wed’s oaenW 3I08« W> ®2 

=* llS US TREASURY BONDS (CHOll . 

7.08 iBeci-iioojBJiwojMte^neptit^ Est yoiumtSl^JO. open II1I4 240J77 tip 


Sep 99 9X86 94.78 ?ifld t0D6 11B 
Dec 


99 94J0 9053 9058 +MW 944 


+46 


3707 3 SB- T* VioeB 

So 

% F 2* ^ *:S &g 

« b. s 

a a *-3 J 

itS j* « « =*■ 

3U? Btt W Sw _TA 

® s al* 

Ul' Mu. Mu 4 " — 


! 1 1 1 -f ■■ ( as^Ss£»«t§2SsS * H;|f i| : 1 1 

8 .flj 1 1 1M ass^’Ss-sfre’"" ^ ss afg •g'pS 

B It k »5 ^ tnetfna- > - dMdend deotMed » |”S «5* + «* J® gbsman government BUND lUFFEI DgJ “;{* Sti* IbS 

1*95 vL " note Wow m ..amNc mduced ontetfUeoantfon- ™L W lliL 25 nus i)5» DMjsoJoo-BboflMDfl ^S? «* 94j» *098 1087 

1 1 1 n 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

,0.17130217 SS =25 SIS 

MOV 97 75 Yt 7^00 7503 — Ojj 1W38 

fi* sa as as =s b 


AMU ABL0 Unco 50864 

JUR97 NT NT 4I10JO *U Ujj 

S^9) N.T NT 417L0 UndL 1-582 

Ed. soM IU»L Pre+. »*s->R 7 t 7 
Preti. open iff- Sldw id 382 

CAC40 (MATIF) 

Jon t ?7 P SSS a iS4Xl 2351 J) *15.00 25J98 
Feb 97 2354 J 233L5 23500 + 1SJ0 1555 
Mar 77 236U Tmo 2361 n ♦ I5J7J 10122 
Jun 97 23104 23050 23220 415.00 1,025 
Sea 97 N.T. N.T. 2332^ + 1500 6,276 
Mar 9823570 23570 2369J +1500 4,743 
Sep 98 23320 23320 29405+1350 660 

Erf. volume: 15,996. Open InU 54689 up 
2050. 


Commodity Indexes 


Sgiffin S® 

jSiuLo Ida iavu 

fr J-5 "»■ ^ 


fc - 08 


Mooches 
Peute^ 
DJ.Fuiures 
CRB . 


Dose 

1^41.90 
108500 
14BJ4 
241 J1 


PTCTXWS 

1X51-20 

107000 

148.13 

24117 


\ 









PAGE 16 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 

EUROPE 


Paribas Sells Credit du Nord 

Societe Generate Buys Bank as Industry Consolidates 


CoifiM Ovr Si^j Fnm Duj’uJrfcei 

PARIS — Compagnie Financiers 
de Paribas SA said Thursday it 
would sell Credit du Nord, its retail 
banking unit, to Societe Generate 
SA, eliminating what has long been 
a source of losses and refocusing on 
more lucrative investment banking 
and lending activities. 

Paribas will receive 22 billion 
French francs ($414 million) from 
Societe Generate over three years. 
The price is a 600 million-franc 
premium over Credit du Nord's 
book value, Paribas said. 

Societe Generate will also buy 2.5 
billion francs of Credit du Nord 
stock as part of an immediate capital 
increase designed to improve the 
retail bank's finances. 

The acquisition would allow Pari- 
bas. a financial-services company, 
to concentrate on its core businesses. 
The move also would swell Societe 
Gene rale’s domestic market share, 
allowing it to leap over its closest 
rivals, as the French banking in- 
dustry slowly consolidates. 

Paribas shares rose 4 percent to 
354.20 francs Thursday in Paris. 
Shares of Societe Generate. 
France’s biggest bank in terms of 


market capitalization, rose 2.2 per- 
cent to 552 francs. 

* ‘This is very good news for Pari- 
bas. both financially and strategic- 
ally/’ said Frederique Haftmann, a 
banking analyst with Cholet- 
Dupont CLS in Paris, “They're get- 
ting a good price for Credit du Nord 
and will now be able to specialize in 
investment banking and consumer 
lending." 

Anal ysis said the transaction's 
appeal was less obvious from So- 
ciete Generate’ s standpoint. 

“For Societe Generate, 4.7 bil- 
lion francs is a lot to spend on Credit 
du Nord," said Ms. Haftmann. 
“What are they getting in return? 
This is a small operation that is not 
going to beef up their market share 
significantly/' 

Buying Credit du Nord will raise 
Societe Generated retail banking 
market share to 7.55 percent from its 
current 6-35 percent, allowing it to 
jump from number six to number 
four, past rivals Banque Nation ale 
de Paris SA and Credit Mutuel. a 
mutually owned bank. 

Credit du Nord had posted annual 
losses since 1 992. chiefly because of 
difficulty with property loans. But 


the bank's earnings in the first half 
of 1 996 rose fivefold to 90. Z million 
francs, buoyed by a decline in loss 
provisions, after Paribas removed 
millions of francs of unprofitable 
real-estate assets from its books. 

(Bloomberg. AFX ) 

■ Credit Lyonnais Talks End 

A Credit Lyonnais SA board 
meeting to discuss die debt-ridden 
state-owned bank's third rescue 
plan ended up with Chairman Jean 
Peyrelevade refusing to comment, 
Bloomberg Business News reported 
from Paris. 

The plan is expected to entail a 
cash injection of between 8 billion 
to 12 billion francs by the French 
state to improve the finances of the 
unprofitable bank. 

The bank's two other bailouts, car- 
ried out in 1995 and 1996, will cost 
French taxpayers at least 100 billion 
francs, according to estimates. 

Mr. Peyrelevade has said the 
latest restructuring plan would in- 
volve tbe closing of between 1 00 and 
200 branches in France and would be 
coupled with about 5,000 job cuts by 
the end of next year, shrinking the 
bank's staff to 30,000. 


Italy Likely to Move Fast on Budget 


CumpOnl tn Our Stiff Fran Dapachcs 

MILAN — Italy is likely to push 
through a supplementary budget as 
early as next month to plug a gap in 
state finances, keeping alive a quest 
to join European economic and 
monetary union in the first round. 

Enrico Micheli, cabinet under- 
secretary. sent a powerful signal that 
action may be expected sooner 
rather than later when he said Wed- 
nesday night the government should 
not wait until a quarterly report on 
state accounts was published in 
March before making a move. 

Mr. Micheli said dial a supple- 
mentary budget was a possibility. 
“Perhaps we should not even wait 
for the quarterly accounts to reach a 
conclusion/' he said. 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi 
previously said that no steps would 
be taken until the quarterly accounts 
were out. 

The government pushed an un- 
compromising budget through Par- 
liament in December. 


The budget was tailored to slice 
62.5 trillion lire ($40.61 billion) off 
the public-sector deficit budget and 
ensure that Italy made the grade for 
European economic and monetary 
union membership at its outset in 
1999. 

But hopes of cutting the public- 
sector deficit to 3 percent of gross 
domestic product by the end of 1 997, 
thereby meeting one of the key qual- 
ifying criteria for joining tbe single 
European currency, were jolted 
when the Treasury revealed a larger- 
than-expected deficit for 1996. 

Thai left the government with an 
even higher mountain to climb to 
curb state spending. 

Treasury estimates published last 
week showed a 1996 public deficit of 
1 38-5 trillion lire, well above a revised 
government target of 123.0 trillion. 

Economists have estimated that a 
supplementary budget would have 
to raise up to 25 trillion lire through 
spending cuts and tax increases to 
keep Italy on course for the 3 percent 


deficit target 

But it is widely believed that the 
mini budget may be more modest in 
scope, possibly aiming to raise no 
more than 15 trillion lire. 

"If they do it quickly, the budget 
can be smaller in size than if they 
wait until April or May/' said Gio- 
vanna Mossetti. an economist at 
Cabo to SIM, the Milan investment 
house. 

“A 15 trillion lire budget will be 
hard enough to achieve politically, 
and anything bigger is difficult to 
imagine/* 

Giorgio Fossa, chairman of the busi- 
ness association Confindustria, said 
Thursday dial the government needed 
rapidly to cany out a supplementary 
1997 budget focusing on spending cuts 
to adjust public accounts. 

He said the government should 
avoid introducing new taxes and fo- 
cus on reducing spending for ‘’pen- 
sions. health care and public em- 
ployment that represent 80 percent 
of the outlay/’ (Reuters. AFX) 


Swiss Firms Turn 
To IPOs as Banks 
Hold Back on Credit 


Bloomberg Business Sears 

ZURICH — Swiss banks’ 
growing reluctance to lend is 
helping to fuel a boom in that 
country’s initial public offerings. 

In the past year, nine compa- 
nies raised 13 billion Swiss 
francs ($953 million), making it 
the busiest year in a decade for 
new offerings and the pace shows 
no signs of slowing. 

Novartis AG. the world's 
second-largest drugmaker bom of 
a merger between Ciba-Geigy AG 
and Sandoz AG. plans to list 
shares in Ciba- 
Geigy 's specialty 
chemicals unit by 
March. Kornex 
Holding AG, 
which builds ma- 
chines that make 
electronic wires, 
and the state- 
owned Swiss FTT 

Telecom are both 

planning to make debuts on the 
Swiss exchanges. 

“For a long time, Nasdaq was 
considered to be the only ex- 
change that offered a possibility 
for small-cap companies/’ said 
Sergio Terribilini, deputy director 
of Bank J. Vontobel. which man- 
aged four offerings last year. 
“Now Switzerland can bold its 
own in that respect" 

This surge in offerings, in a 
country that averages about three 
annually, is even more impressive 
considering it comes in the hefty 
shadow of Deutsche Telekom's 
$10 billion share sale in Novem- 
ber, die third-Iargest IPO ever. 

Switzerland’s hectic pace is 
happening for several reasons. 
The rising failures last year of 
small and mid-sized companies, 
which are expected to top the 
1993 record of 4,451 bank- 
ruptcies, are leaving creditors in 
the lurch and reluctant to lend. 

Credit Suisse Group, Switzer- 
land's second-largest financial 
services company, said recently it 
would take a one-time charge of 
5.1 billion francs to cover bad 
loans to failing small and mid- 
sized Swiss companies as well as 


Investors are only 
too happy to step 
in where Swiss 
banks now fear to 
tread. 


if a slump i 

tate. Union Bank of Switzerland 
and Swiss Bank Carp., the coun- 
try’s other major banks, said in the 
autumn they would absorb similar 
charges. 

Investors, most of them insti- 
tutional, are only too happy to step 
in where Swiss banks fear to 
tread. In December, for example, 
Elma Electronics AG, a spin-off 
of Sulzer AG, a maker of machine 
tools, offered 200,000 shares far 
275 Swiss francs each. The stock 
was heavily oversubscribed, ae- 

cording to SBC 

Warburg, which 
managed the sale, 
and Elma rose 7.2 
percent to 295 
francs on the first 
day of trading. 
The share closed 
Thursday at 
29130 francs. 

SEZ Holding 
AG, an Austrian semiconductor 
company, said in announcing its 
Swiss share sale last year that net 
profit had doubled to 43 million 
francs in the first nine months of 
last year, ami that sales grew by 67 
percent 

The higher the technology, tbe 
stronger the share’s popularity 


has generally been. SEZ was die 
third Swiss chip-industry share to 
go public last year. In March, tbe 
integrated circuits maker Micro- 
tias Semiconductor Holding AG 
went public, followed in June by 
Christ AG, which makes semi- 
conductor makers for water puri- 
fication plants. 

The boom in new shares is 
coming in a weak economy. Swiss 
gross domestic product is expec- 
ted to grow only 03 percent this 
year, its seventh consecutive lean 
year, after shrinking about 0.7 
percent in 1996. 

The gloomy economy has cre- 
ated a sharper appetite for stocks 
among institutional investors, 
such as banks and pension funds, 
and small capital funds, which can 
afford the relatively high-priced 
shares. Only about 6 percent of die 
Swiss population own equities. 



Investor’s Europe 


” 2950 



A S O N D J 
1996 1997 

"Thursday 




'■'Waft/' y/ 

'3,«8RZ 

1,904.82 




2^92.63 

2,906.34 


£^ntdnBKt 



486.65 


Hoiafa • 


•itmsr 

2.616.71 

■0- ! 1 ; 

.Sirr^v 


560.01 

559.96 

■lO.CT • 




4*067-50 

- 0.01 



ns&sa 

453.93 

+0.01 

. fAOBtt}. <s' . 

■WSlfe •• 

tifiooua 

10.730.00 4-3AM | 


iQteM&c:-. K. 


2,331-62 

W/a 



/2^aasi 

2^82-99 

+023 



lia&os 

1.13728 

-O.10 

*34*^'/* V, 

' w’. ^ * .v 


2.527.06 

+0.48 

Source: Tetekurs 


tamrurel HcraM Trv^-c 

Very briefly: 


• United & Philips Communications has bought 703 per- 
cent of Janco Kabel-TV AS, a Norwegian cable television 
network, for an undisclosed sum. UPC. a joint venture be- 
tween Philips Electronics NV of the Netherlands and United 
International Holdings of the United States, bought the stake 
from Helsinki Media, which will keep a minority stake. 
•British Airways PLC received approval from a French 
commercial court to rake over the administration of Air 
Liberte in a deal to rescue it from bankruptcy. British Airways 
has agreed to keep 1 ,250 ofthe airline’s current 1,400 staff and 
invest at least 630 million francs ($118.6 million). Combined 
with its French subsidiary TAT. the takeover will give British 
Airways 20 percent ofthe French domestic market. 

• Siemens AG's KWU power -generation unit plans to combine 
its fossil -fuel power operations in a joint venture with West- 
inghonse Inc of die United States, industry sources said. 

• Ktetovrort Benson. Securities Ltd. has been fined £30.000 
($50,650) by Britain's Securities and Futures Authority fax' 
irresponsible manag ement of its internal affairs. The regulator 
said h also reprimanded and fined two former Kleinwort 
employees for mistnarkmg, or recording the wrong dollar 
value, of convertible bonds and warrants on its own books. 

• France Telecom presented the highest bid for a 51 percent 
stake in Cl Telecom, die national carrier of Ivory Coast Tbe 
government will retain a 35 percent stake in die company, with 
the remaining shares offered to employees and local investors. 

• Rolls-Royce PLC’s chairman. Ralph Robins, said he ex- 
pected demand for the next generation of large-capacity four- 
engined airliners to be more titan 600 units. Rolls Royce has 
been developing engines for the so-called supeijumbos. 

• British Steel PLC shares fell after several brokerage houses 
cut their earnings estimates for the company on concern that 
the pound's strength will cut into profit. The shares closed at 
153 pence ($238), down 1 penny/ AFP. AFX. Bloomberg, tuum 


\ 


i .- 






fl 


1 


a 


m j 


' » . 1 r i * 


1 


T- & 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Higfir Low dose Piw. 


fijgft Low Ouse Pier. 


Thursday, Jan. 9 

Prices In (ocaJamendes. 

Tetekurs 

High Law Close Pier. 


Amsterdam 


E0EMBC6SUM 
Preriow: 65234 


ABM- AMRO 
Aegon 
AMd 
Alan Nobel 
Bran Co. 

Bot& wesson 
CSM CTO 
Dorrfrsd* Pel 
DSM 
Etserier 
ftwttsAmev 
Gentries 
G-Broccn 

Headmens on 

Hunt Douglas 
ING Group 
KLM 
KHPBT 
KPN 

£»* 
OceGrinten 
PtMpsElec 
‘ ra 


I Hdg 

Rotwcn 

Radranco 

Refloat 

Rorento 

Rows Dutch 

Unflevtrcva 
Vendee Inti 
VNU 

Woners Klcw 


112 
11X80 
107 
249 JO 
49 JO 
31 JO 
93X0 
32A20 
171 JO 
2X60 
6130 
49 JO 
0X0 
14220 
311 JO 
71 JO 
121 
644) 
48.10 
37 JO 
65J0 
47 JO 
263 

194.90 
72J0 
86.40 

729.W 

14460 

5040 

15060 

105.90 
304 

30060 
00-10 
37 JO 
22X50 


11020 

111 

10X80 

246JD 

6530 

31.10 
9120 
321 JO 

170 
28 
61.70 
49 
5U0 
140 
307 
69 JO 
119,50 
6340 
47.40 
3660 
63J0 
46J0 
260JO 
19X30 
71 
84.90 
727 JO 
14170 

50.10 
150 

105X0 

an 

298JD 

77.10 
3490 

220 


111JS0 111.60 
111.90 11X10 
10630 107.40 
24&30 24660 
6930 65.10 
31 AO 31.70 
9140 *430 
329.10 22X30 
131 JO 17060 
20.10 2860 
6X20 62-33 
490 49 JO 
53J0 54 

14050 1410 
309 JO 31X80 
6960 70 90 
12080 121 
6430 64JD 
48.10 47 JO 
3730 37.40 
6460 65.10 
47 JO 47 JO 
261 JO 26X70 
1*4 794J0 
7X10 71 JO 
86.40 8820 
129 JO 728 

I43J0 14440 
5SJ0 5020 
150 151 

10SJ0 10X70 
30X50 303.70 
30080 30038 
7960 8050 
37J0 37 JO 
221 22X90 


Bangkok 

ArhlntaS+c 
Bangkok BkF 
KnmgTita Bk 
PTT fcjptor 
Stan Cement F 
Siam Com Bk F 
Tetecomasla 

Thai Airways 
Thai Farm Bk F 
UtdCamm 


274 

262 

268 

256 

280 

272 

272 

272 

S6J0 

53 

5650 

51 JO 

388 

366 

386 

382 

884 

ft« 

868 

896 

206 

joo 

K2 

200 

S2J0 

so 

50 

52 

37 JO 

36J0 

36J0 


191 

184 

789 

784 

1B6 

183 

186 

183 


Bombay 

J Auto 
hist Lever 
Hindus] Peffin 
IndDwBk 
ITC 

MalmnagorTel 
ReOtmcelnd 
State Bklndta 
Steel Autnortiy 
Tata Eng Loco 


942 
875 
349J5 
10825 
330 JO 
238 
22X7S 
25150 
23J0 
351 


Brussels 

Abating 

Bara Ind 

BBL 

Bfltost 

CBR 

CNR 

cobem 

coctaiH 

Otatiyf 

Demote Don 

Etaarabd 

EJettefluo 

Falls AG 

Gevqert 

GIB 

G6L 

Gen Banque 
KietSettnnV 
Pafraflna 
Pawerftn 

Ramie Belee 
Sac Gen Bom 
Sohoy 
TrtWdri 
UCB 

Union Minton 


10650 10625 
52io sis® 

6780 6670 

1*400 19250 
31M 3075 

T?W 1970 
1248 1216 

122 120 
13900 13750 
1955 1940 
7540 7480 

3050 3015 
5320 5200 

2245 2205 

1525 1450 

4130 4115 
11575 11325 
10400 10250 
10975 10700 
4740 4720 

6700 6510 

2545 MM 
19900 19550 
14750 14615 
8*» «Z2» 
2130 2115 


BGBonk 

CriSergB 

Cotton Fm 

Dcnisco 

Den Donate Bk 

EVSSwmteBB 

WS1912B 

FLSIndB 

KobLufltonw 

NomNardtaB 

SwhusBorB 

TwDawnkB 

Two Baltics 

UntaonmmkA 


296 262 

400 393 

847.11 800 

359 355 

47B 473 

740500 235000 
167000 163000 
786 770 

651 641 

544 511 

765 759 

32682 31131 
326 316 

3Z7 321 


Frankfurt 

AMBB 

Adidas 

AfltatzHdg 

ADona 

BkBerfn 

BASF 

Boyer KTOoBk 

Boy.vawisUank 

flajer 




DAX: 2892X3 


PrerioBs 290644 

930 

915 

9lS 

912 

14450 

74220 

143 

141 

7695 

an 

2699 

urtl 

iOra 

1230 

1270 

7220 

1200 

31.15 

30J5 

31.10 

30J0 

5645 

5175 

56J5 

55 J? 

47 JS 

4676 

47.18 

4670 

61 JO 

60X0 

61 A8 

61.18 

5423 

59.10 

SPJ5 

59 JO 


High 

Befersdvf 7840 
BMW 1063 

Commerzbank 4230 
Dataller Benz 111.45 
Degussa 676 

Deutsche Bank 74.98 
Deal Telekom 31 A0 
DtesdnerBank 4870 
Fresraihrs 309 

FieseniinMed 139 JO 
Fried. Krapp 250 

Gene 97 jo 

HestelbgZnrt 127 JO 
Henkel erfd 8040 
Hochtief 6X80 

Hoed* 69 AS 

KmStodt 507 

Unde 993 

LuHtimsa 21J5 
MAM 40X90 

Ma nn esnarai 668 
Metolgeseitactaft3X2S 
Metro 12X70 

Mttndi Rueck R 3630 
Preussofl 379 JO 
RWc 
SAP pH 
Scaring 
Semens 

BBT 

VEW 




6SJ80 
215 
132J0 
77.15 
2B5JO 
91 JS 
49S 
631 
691 


Law 

77.10 77.10 

1051 1053 

42A0 42AS 
109 JO 109.90 

670 67250 
74.40 7480 
30.95 31.05 
4850 4865 
307 JO 307 JQ 
139 139 JQ 
248 248 

95 95 

127J0 127.90 

79.10 8810 
61 J5 6170 

69.10 69 JO 

497 507 

988 988 

21 JO 21.75 
399 4QJ0 
85870 65870 
31 A0 31.99 
119 120 

3600 3800 
370 379 JO 
*9 99 65lSH 
214 2(4 

131 JO 13X30 
75J0 7679 
283 285 

90X5 
495 495 

636 63850 
607 6900 


Close Pm. 


7810 

1053 

42A8 

11050 

674 
7195 
31J0 
49 JO 

30B 
13870 
251 
9620 
127 
BBJS 
61 A0 
69.90 
507 
998 
21J5 
40X50 

675 
31 AS 

123LS0 
3664 
377 JO 
6450 
21150 
13X50 
7440 
285JO 
9240 
495 
62850 
87850 


Helsinki hex Bre ad km c atiip 

PlCrims: 281471 


SET lodnc 84122 
P«itooss«SlJ3 


Cutter 1 
Era* A 
HuhtanafcU 
Kemkti 
Kesko 
Merita A 
MetraB 
Metsa-SerioB 
Neste 
NatiaA 
Orion- YMymoe 
Outokumpu A 


Outokumpu f 
RootonnmU 
Sampo Insar 
UPMKjmnwne 
Vaknei 


241 
39 JO 
119 
57140 
6450 
1430 
283 
36A0 
115 
29X50 
177 JO 
7850 
45 
372 
99 JO 
82J0 


342 

38J0 

215 

57 

88 

1410 

762 

35-70 

114 

2S4A0 

177 

78 

44 

388 

97 

81.90 


342 252 

3850 39 Jt 
218 218 
57 57 JO 
8430 6480 
1430 14JB 
262 283 

3440 3490 
115 115 

29X50 29050 
177 178J0 
7850 7850 
-S458 44S® 
370 368 

99.10 99 JO 
82 8X50 


5oasex 30 tadtac 336X39 
Presto* 328888 


914 941 917.75 

836JS 87X75 83825 

335J5 344 336 

100 108 100 

321 330 323 

231 238 231 

216J5 222 21825 

24875 255 250 

22J5 2125 23 

345.50 351 34475 


BEL-28 Moc 1939.62 
AlriHKlMUS 


10850 10825 
5210 srn 
6780 8660 

19400 19275 
3085 3090 

1990 I960 

1240 1220 
123 121 

13900 74 000 
1955 1945 

7520 7500 

3050 3050 
5310 5200 

2230 22S0 

1498 1 452 

4110 4115 
11575 11350 
10400 10250 
10950 10725 
4725 4730 

6690 6500 
2545 2495 

19900 19725 
14750 14725 
84950 82459 
2125 2120 


Hong Kong HaogsoBtisiTui 

9 9 Pterions: 1345493 

Amoy Props 
Bk Eos Asia 
Cottier Podfle 
Cheung Kudo 
CKInfroSnid 
CNraUght 
OMnaOseasLd 
China Res Ent 
Chin Estates 
ancPadBc 
Cons Bee Pwr 
Coxopoctfk 
DooHeraBk 
Rist Panic 
Grant Eos* 

Guangdcirg Ins 
Good Group 
Hong Lung beu 
Hong Seng Bk 
Hendenonlw 
Henderson Ld 
HKRItat 
HK Odra Gas 
HR Electric 
HK 5hcngHfls 
HK Tetecomm 


HSBCHdgs 
Hutchban Wh 
HrwnDn 
Jdhnsm El Hdg 


Copenhagen 


NoH I . .. 

New World Dev 
N WoiM Infresfr 
Otlemi Press 
Pearl Oriental 
Stotahol Indus 
Shsuri-Ld Alia 
SHKProps 
Shun Tok Hags 
Slno Land Co. 
501 CMna Post 
SvriroPocA 
Tskn Slid Tsui 
TV BroadaKts 
Wharf Hdgs 
Wheripck 


10.90 

10.55 

10JII 

300 

■sxto 

3670 

11.90 

11.75 

11 JO 

/4..M 

7IJ5 

72 J5 

21.75 

2U.90 

2IJ6 

:** 

3330 

337K1 

398 

4J0 

3X8 

1675 

161 It 

1640 

tt/X 

640 

850 

J9J0 

38.50 

39.10 

18.25 

1870 

I6J0 

47.5 

S4> 

SM 

J840 

38.70 

38.30 

9JS 

935 

950 

3UXI 

TOM 

32 70 

7 JO 

6 JO 

4.90 

4470 

4120 

<440 

16SD 

16 

1615 

92 

90JO 

91 

9 

lUIO 

6 W 

7525 

77 

n 

UM 

12X5 

12.90 

1480 

1450 

UM1 

27.16 

26X0 

2695 

1455 

14L2D 

14.10 

13-90 

1245 

1780 

480 

4X8 

471 

167 

16450 

1*6 

69.75 

67.W 

58 75 

30 

29 JO 

29 JO 

22.10 

2140 

31X0 

20.16 

20 

20 

7J5 

7X5 

7.10 

62X0 

49X0 

SI .25 

22J0 

».IO 

»*t 

3J3 

345 

350 

4X3 

4X3 

493 

2/45 

26W 

27 JD 

lun 

II. 40 

1145 

95 

91 JS 

92JS 

5J0 

64b 

5.70 

9J5 

8.90 


66 U 

6 

655 

7125 

71 SO 

77 

1 / 

1675 

1695 

3050 

30 

3050 

3840 

37 JO 

3610 

21 JO 

auu 

21 


9 

76 


4J0 


7.10 

54 

2X20 

150 

4J5 


410 

9JS 

425 


7\M 


294 290 

393 397 

B40 B20 

358 359 

476 478 

240500 238000 
165000 164500 
788 780 

644 650 

537 544 

763 762 

326 326 

321 321 

327 324 


Jakarta 

CampuBa tadrac 657X3 



PTHIMSMUl 

Astemfl 

54M 

S375 

S3JS 

UK 

Bklntllndon 

18/6 

1826 

1860 

1900 


1275 

1276 

1276 

1300 


11725 

iiaoo 

ri<t» 

11700 

irattoeinent 

3600 

3576 

3600 

3600 

Indotood 

4900 

4826 

48/6 

4900 


66/6 

6660 

6660 

6726 

5ani0oetMHM 

13450 

13260 

13376 

13250 


8000 

tm 

7600 

0060 

TetenmunltiBl 

<275 

4I5B 

41/6 

4776 


Johannesburg 

AmotaraiftfBfcs UX 2482 ZtSS 2495 
AngtoArri Cool 341 JO 341 JO 341 JO 341 JO 


AtwloAm< 
km Ind 


CG. Smffli 
De Beers 
DfWonWn 


25450 75275 2S4J5 

254 

34630 

335 

345 

339 

168 

167 JO 167J0 

160 

44 

43.75 

43J5 

43 

xt» 

23 

7.1 

HAS 

131 JO 

130 

131 

130.75 

44J0 

4150 

4450 

4436 


FstNotlBk 

Gencor 

GFSA 

ISCW 

UbertvHdgs 
Liberty LHe 
Mlnorco 
Nompak 
Nedcor 
Rembrandt Gp 
RJcnemoRt 
Rust PtatbiuBi 
SA Breweries 


Sasol 
SBIC 
Tiger Oats 


2425 

17J5 

120 

165 

322JS 

119 

97 

1890 

6150 

4X05 

65JS 

65 

121 

51X50 

56 

1B4JD 

65 


2X75 2175 
17 JO 17J0 

118 130 

3A8 363 

322 322J0 

11850 119 

96 9475 
1820 1875 
6425 6425 
41 JO 42 

<475 45 

65 65 

119 120.25 

52 53 

55J5 56 

18X75 18450 
6450 65 


2425 
17A0 
124 
3A9 
323 
119 
97 JS 
I8J0 
6425 
42 
65 
6875 
119 JO 
5X50 
5850 
1B5J5 
6450 


Kuala Lumpur 


Genflng 
6W Bonking 
Mol Inti Ship F 
PtmnosGas 
Renong 

Pju jliIl IlhiM 

Kesons word 
S hne Darter 
Telekom Mai 
Tenrao 
Uid Englnoers 


17A0 

2475 

725 

10J0 

4S6 

1X10 

1840 

2X10 

1X40 

2430 


London 


FT-6E 196; 4087 J« 


Prntoaa 408750 

Ahbmr Natl 
AffledDomecq 

7X7 

440 

7J8 

4J3 

7X5 

4J4 

757 

430 

Ang Han Water 

555 

5JS 

5X5 

558 

Argos 

7J6 

721 

732 

7J5 

Ansa Grow 
Assoc Br raids 

1J4 

459 

121 

453 

U3 

459 

133 

4X3 

BAA 

459 

477 

4X4 

4X7 

Btsdays 

10X0 

1015 

1038 

1039 

Bass 

BJ2 

114 

831 

822 

BAT (ltd 

4X7 

470 

4J3 

4X4 

Bra* Scotland 

257 

251 

295 

259 

Btoedrue 

177 

173 

374 

177 

B 0 C Group 

9 

122 

m 

8.M 

Boats 

623 

6.17 

630 

624 

BPB Ind 

187 

174 

176 

185 

BrttAerosp 

1157 

1240 

1253 

1246 

BritAkunys 

6X5 

558 

603 

198 

Brit Gas 

224 

219 

231 

221 

Brit Land 

530 

525 

538 

538 

Brit Pedro 

7X5 

6X8 

653 

695 

8 Ski® 

Brif&ri 

5J9 

154 

S33 

150 

547 

153 

138 

1 54 

BrttTekwHn 

355 

351 

194 

195 

BTR 

2X3 

257 

261 

2X0 

Bramah Castro) 

11X5 

10X0 

10X7 

11.10 

Burton Gp 

1X5 

152 

154 

IJ5 

Cable Wbetess 

184 

4J2 

479 

4J3 

CD*ury Setter 
CaHon Conm 

5 

4X3 

4X7 

496 

5 

488 

493 

499 

Caroml Unfan 

6X9 

6J1 

6X6 

679 

Compass Gp 
Courtoukts 

6.18 

4X2 

6.10 

3X6 

618 

3X8 

613 

154 

Dixons 

5.10 

459 

5JH 

5.16 

EfcdrucoiiiponfinlsASS 

450 

452 

453 

EMI Group 

1155 

1132 

1146 

1156 

EntetprtseOB 

FamCoionU 

629 

149 

622 

148 

636 

10 

639 

10 

GefflAcddent 

7X5 

745 

7X3 

7J3 

GEC 

404 

355 

4XZ 

198 

GXN 

10-17 

10X2 

10.15 

HUB 

OaroVMconu 

9 

IBS 

854 

497 

GrnneOa Gp 

8X3 

855 

BX1 

SX3 

Grand Mel 

5 

439 

445 

443 

GRE 

171 

2X4 

20 

20 

GreenaaiGp 

5X6 

5X1 

SX4 

5X5 

Gutaness 

442 

428 

434 

433 

GUS 

6X0 

551 

601 

615 

Hanson 

OB7 

0X4 

0X7 

0X6 

Hays 

H5BCHIdgs 

549 

5jfB 

547 

543 

1181 

12X7 

1276 

12X8 

IQ 

7X0 

746 

750 

7X7 

Imp! Tobacco 

185 

275 

07 II 

3X3 

Kbwflstier 

Lntfcrote 

645 

2X2 

637 

225 

643 

U1 

641 

233 

Loral Sec 

7J4 

7X5 

70 

7J3 

Lasmo 

240 

231 

240 

235 

Legal GeniGtp 

350 

3X0 

3X8 

3X5 

UoydiTSBGp 

451 

440 

448 

442 

LucaSVartty 

228 

22S 

2J8 

224 

Mans Spencer 

484 

477 

4X3 

482 

MEPC 

4X1 

457 

4X0 

4X4 

Merairy Asset 
NattraalGrid 

IZJ3 

2X7 

1228 

155 

1230 

2X1 

1232 

159 

Nad Power 

4X9 

4X0 

40 

4X4 

NfltWW 

7J4 

7.19 

734 

734 

Next 

154 


553 

5X2 

Orange 

150 

1.90 

10 

PAO 

650 

577 

5M 

191 


749 

7JS 

7 48 

737 

tSSSS, 

154 

;s 

149 

180 

10 

5X6 

153 

5X0 

Prandar FanuB 

658 

7X2 

7J2 

Prodenttai 

5X6 

497 

5X2 

499 

RritmtkPP 

354 

3X5 

3X7 

30 

Rank Group 

432 

428 

429 

436 

RectflnCoHn 

7.10 

7X2 

7X9 

7X5 

Red tart 

346 

128 

135 

342 

ReedlnH 

.1070 

1042 

1051 

1UJS 

RentaUbiBU 

431 

428 

431 

429 

Reuters Hdgs 

720 

659 

7XS 

721 


10 

10 

3X4 

1X8 

RMCGiaap 

957 

935 

935 

9JD 

sS 8 "" 

2J2 

549 

249 

543 

230 

548 

2J1 

SA7 

924 

9.19 

936 

973 

447 

441 

447 

443 

4X1 

153 

198 

358 

Strirnburr 

353 

182 

189 

3X8 

Sdtodere 

1565 

1550 

15X5 

1545 

SaBMewcasoe 

7X3 

650 

656 

664 

Sad Power 

145 

138 

139 

146 

Secutor 

2JS 

280 

2X0 

2J4 

Severn Trent 

,6X7 

675 

6X5 

6X3 

Shed TratspR 

10X5 

9X1 

957 

1083 

Stete 

1055 

1043 

1050 

1043 

SiidOi Nephew 

1X3 

1JB 

IJP 

10 

SmBWObe 

7J7 

70 

7J7 

7X3 

Smiths Ind 

820 

8.13 

830 

615 

Sftwn Sec 

7J9 

7 J9 

7J2 

70 

Stugecoodi 

7X5 

6.97 

7X5 

7X2 

Start Charter 

7X6 

65S 

7X6 

699 

TUe&Ute 

4X7 

47B 

4X7 

4X3 

Tem 

146 

10 

342 

146 

71 mnlrta 

inmiK *wiM 

6.12 

196 

601 

WM 

3! Group 

455 

487 

454 

452 


T! Group 

Tonkins 

Unlever 

lltd Assurance 

urd Noes 

UtaliHlues 

VendameUirh 

Vbdafone 

WNttnead 


572 860 

2J2 X71 

1194 1163 
4M 490 
490 4BS 
437 420 

5J5 810 

254 249 


845 875 

281 274 

1170 1X94 
490 496 

487 490 

428 435 

818 5J9 

251 X52 


C— gosHr. 123492 
Prerimac 1239 J4 

17 JO 1730 17J0 
2425 2475 2425 
7 JO 7J5 7 JO 

1810 1810 1820 
4JQ 456 452 

1160 11 JO 1U8 
1OJ0 10AQ 1030 
21 JQ 21 JO 2X10 
111Q 1X30 1240 

2180 2410 2190 


WMransHdgs 

347 

140 

143 

141 

Wofcdey 

4X7 

4M 

4X3 

4JI 

WPPGraiio 

243 

236 

238 

2X2 

ZOBKU 

1639 

1615 

160 

1633 

Madrid 


Baba Wtoc 45358 


Pmten 45193 

Acerinn 

18700 

17950 

18300 

1890Q 

ACESA 

1765 

1730 

1/65 

170 

Aguaa Bmceton 

550 0 

5440 

iiW 

553U 

Aroeniota 

BBv 

5850 

7300 

i/60 

7180 

5800 

7290 

5880 

7310 

Bonesta 

110 

IMS 

1)25 

M0 

BarAWcr 

ZOOM 

19830 

19900 

ivm 

Hco Centra HKp 

3450 

3315 

34M 

330 

Bco Exterior 

2845 

2770 

37W 

vn 

Bco Pnputa 

25350 

ftUOO 

25200 

25IM 

BcoSanttroSw 

8450 

HJH0 

B4U 

830 

CEPSA 

4175 

4075 

4175 

41/5 

Cnrmnero* 

2645 

2500 

2615 

2630 

Corp Mapfre 

7730 

7560 

7648 

760 

Endeso 

9520 

9150 

9500 

nm 

FECSA 

1275 

1715 

120 

1260 

Gasttatgral 

31300 

29940 

M/I 0 

Mxn 


1710 

1670 

1700 

1/05 

PVyai 

2575 

2MU 

2550 

2590 

Repsoi 

5370 

5230 

5340 

5320 

SftrilonaEteC 

1300 

12AU 

1285 

1300 

Tanajkra 

6020 

58/0 

.5910 

«M 

Ttsefanks 

3305 

3245 

32/5 

3280 

Untai Fanosa 

1230 

1185 

1225 

1245 

Videnc Ctanent 

1455 

1400 

1425 

140 

Manila 


PSEtodec 322336 


Previous: 32D69T 

Ayoto B 

30X0 

290 

30 

31 

AnriaLmte 

BkPMOptal 

29 X 

29 

» 

290 

170 

166 

1/0 

167 

CiP Homes 

15 

14 

140 

15 

Manna ElecA 

129 

1 26 

127 

m 

Marti Boult 

665 

650 

665 

650 

Psriitai 

9X0 

930 

9JQ 

90 

POBonk 

345 342J0 34230 3420 

PMIjongOsi 

1375 

1360 

1375 

1365 

Son Miguel B 

H« 

112 

116 

112 

SM Prime Hdg 

7 

690 

690 

7 

Mexico 


Baba tadae 357834 


Preriaac 3557X7 

Alfa A 

39X5 

38JS 

39-55 

380 

BanacdB 

1674 

1650 

160 

300 

1674 

CcroaCPO 

3050 

290 

29.70 

Cffra C 

9JB 

90 

9J6 

9X6 

Eaip Muderna 

41 XS 

40 JO 

41X5 

41.10 

Gpo Carso A1 

47X0 

45X5 

46X0 

4615 

Gpo Rn fnbursa 
Sri Cork Men 

28X0 

280 

280 

man 

161X0 100 160X0 16050 

Televisa CTO 

W7J0 10650 1070 1080 

TeWtasL 

1474 

140 

140 

1478 

Milan 

MIB TOeurikse 118990 


Previous: 10730X0 

AlmmnX'Kk' 

10900 

10160 

10900 

101 TO 

BcoCowraW 

2900 

2680 

2865 

2670 

BcoFMearom 

3WD 

3280 

3505 

3300 

BCDC0K64TO 

1260 

1175 

1230 

1174 

Batata, 

19580 

18725 

19355 

IWBO 


1789 

1685 

l/SS 

1638 

Fdtean 

9990 

9/85 

9990 

9780 

EMI 

S3 

8095 

8385 

8115 

Hat 

4175 

4445 

4325 

IMI 

S 

urn 


2/850 

13045 

IMA 

Z 

7350 

18/D 

190 

IKS 

SXei 

row 

4840 

7300 

66/0 

7010 


8750 

8100 

870 

8110 

Montoiftusfl 

llffi 

1116 

nm 

UID 


2535 

2435 

2520 


PM 

3040 

2940 

3000 

2950 

RAS 

14500 

13450 

14380 

13900 


■4900 

14450 

14870 

14525 

SPnato Torino 

9600 

9200 

9600 

9135 

Slot 

6950 

660 

6920 

6805 

Tttrran IfnA 1 

4XX 

410 

4770 

410 

TIM 

4095 

3950 

4085 

3990 

Montreal 

Industrie*) todccZfiSun 


reWteOE 28*6X9 

Bco Mob Com 

4470 

41.00 

m 

4} 

CdnTteA 

21 JS 

21.15 

2145 

JIM 

CdnUMA 

31 

00 

31 

3090 

CTFIrriSvc 

3245 

3K 

32A5 

32 


TUB 

l/Jt« 

1/3® 

17.70 

Gf-WsfLAai 


auo 

7114 

nv» 

Hots Irttl Sqi 

20X5 

»55 

200 

20J0 


3605 

3SXS 

m 

36 

hrrestixsGfii 

27 

27 

27 

2738 

1 fiTstaraCos 

1W 

1615 

LUO 

15X5 


11X0 


1165 

13U 

Power Core 
Power Bm 

PM 

7705 

270 

7730 

25 

34X0 

2495 

2490 

QitamcarB 

2435 

74 

2435 

24 

Rogers CananB 

Jfl» 

1640 

m 

I0H 

RapdBkCda 

4935 

49 . 15 

<9.15 

00 


Nlgfi Lam dm Pm. 

Sage Prim A 127 11850 125 12050 

SdBijsteri 129 124 126 122 

TftmsooeanOfl 429 422 429 436 

Storebrand Asa 38 37 JO 37 JO 3750 


High Low Close Prev. 


7J2 7A2 7 JO 7J4 


Oslo 

AterA 


DennenteBk 


HofslundA 

KnemerAsa 
Honk Hydro 
NonteSkogA 

NycoiNd A 
QridoAsoA 
PeflnGeoSK 


147 

152 

22J0 

2480 

11X50 

4850 

se 

K7J0 

215 

105 

487 

274 


OBXtadacSSUT 

Pterian:5S9Ji 

14450 147 U4J0 

149 150 152 

2X30 22-50 2X30 
26J0 2480 2450 

in in nxg 

4820 4850 4850 
312 317 SIS 

354 357 356 

210 Z10 31450 

HUSO 1M 10850 
460 467 488 

268 269 JO 290 


Paris 


Aaw 

AGP 

AtrLkjukle 

AltaWAbtti 

Aw 

Baaadre 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Phis 

Candour 

Onina 

CCF 

CeWem 

QuisttanDta 

CLF-Doda Run 

CmBAgriaito 

Danone 

EB- Aqulkibe 

Ertdaida BS 

Eurotunnel 

GenEnn 

Monos 

l metal 

Lalntge 

Lraptnid 

Ltfcal 

LVMH 

LmcEoux 

iWctritaB 

PoribasA 

Pernod Rfcnrt 

PeugeolCB 

Ptonilt-Print 

Promodes 

RenauB 

Rom 

BpPraMencA 

RouneLUdaf 

Sanofl 

Schneider 

5EB 

SGS Thomson 

SfeGrmurote 

Sodexho 

SIGatMta 

Sun 

SnritKtobo 

ThorosonCSF 

Total B 

IMP 

Uslnor 

Vritao 


657 

16490 

829 

438 

347.90 
625 
805 
201 

1139 
3365 
2484) 
33850 
■ 421 
857 
461 JO 
1250 
759 
487M 
840 
490 
TIB 
361 JO 
793 
320 
925 
1970 
1460 
504 
291 JO 
355.60 

380.90 
562 

2110 
1470 
11X50 
1620 
16450 
1528 
544 
24880 
1148 
379 JO 
560 
2700 
7B2 
21850 
572 
174 
42860 
13X» 
%J0 
352 


CACAO: 2349.08 
Pterion: 2331 A2 

649 655 40 

164 765 165 

817 829 827 

42810 431 427 JO 

339 JO 34450 34820 
614 622 620 

793 802 794 

19820 20810 19890 
1111 1120 1138 
3303 3357 3340 

241 JO 24X90 243J0 
234 237.2! 23470 
612 616 620 
M7 851 857 

4S4J0 481 459 

1250 1250 1282 
754 742 

478 48450 48X60 
830 833 M2 

480 6J85 490 

6B3 7ffiB 687 
35X30 35820 353 

775 779 793 

312 31933 313 

888 917 897 

1934 1962 1947 
1434 1443 14® 

49820 501 500 

286.10 35® 287 

35040 J54J0 34850 

298 299 JU :M_» 
547 555 582 

2082 2105 MW 

1429 1487 74» 

10960 111.10 111 

1550 1598 1808 

16X50 166LRJ 76420 
1527 1527 1528 

532 53S 538 

245 247 AO 245.80 

1131 1135 1150 

371 371 378 

533 553 548 

2650 2695 2695 

743 779 743 

21480 21X40 21410 
547 551 560 

169.10 173 17X00 

413 42050 42010 

13460 137AS 73420 
78 78J5 7865 
341 348JQ 345 


AHasCopenAP 
Avestn F 

1640 

161 

164 

100 

790 

77 

790 

780 

ElearoluxBF 

05 

393 

02 

394 

Ertcawn BF 

228 

220 

22 * 

222 

Hermes BF 

1010 

997 

mo 

1000 

incentive AP 

517 

504 

517 

503 

imestarBF 

310 

387 3080 

310 

KtanerikBP 

I960 

T92 

1970 

1900 

amDobf 

206 

200 

283 

2040 

PttarmAJptotin 
Sarah* BF 

2710 

267 

270 

270 

1920 

190 

Ifl 

1910 

SCABF 

146 

10 

10 

10 

S-E Banken AF 

71 

« 

70 

71 

SmaaFcnF 

19030 

10 

190 

1890 

SkandaBP 

300 

297 

299 

299 

SKFBF 

10 1580 

159 

1620 

S5ABBF 

1220 

120 1220 

1210 

SkxtJAF 

98 

96 

970 

980 

SvHandksAF 

195 1900 

193 

194 

SydkraftAF 

10 

152 

10 

152 

TfeOriaraBF 
voted BF 

109 

1610 

in 1 « 

156 1600 

97 

157 


Sao Paulo BanmlmSa:7450.lt 

PrerioBK 7427028 


Bmhmapfd 
Cerate PJd 
CESPPId 
Copel 


BJS 


4090 

48.00 

7119 


UgbJSerrideB 367.00 

UgMoar 27001 

Pern* raj P« i®ssi> 

TotabrasPtd B6J0 

TetanlB 141JK) 

Tetef 14400 

TatospPM 241 JO 
Vntaanco 340B 

CWRDPfd 22JQ 


409 425 

575J10 53000 
39 JO 4020 
4400 48X0 
1ZJ0 1X90 
374X0 37400 
436X0437X10 
359X0 360X0 
259 JO 27000 
176J0 177.980 
83JO 86X0 
134® 14050 
140X0 146X0 
236X0 237X0 
36X0 36,«1 
21X0 22.10 


8.18 

579X0 

39X0 

46J0 

1X45 

37400 

4417 


263X0 

181X0 

B490 

138X0 

145X0 

241X0 

37X8 

22X0 


Seoul 


Kia Motes 
Karoo El Pwr 
Korea Exch Bk 
XmoMitaTef 
LGSemlom 
Praang iroaSt 


SMnhan' 


Singapore stratereasTisajs 

Pieinu.2M3ji 

CerehosPOc 
CByDeutt* 

Cycle Contoae 
Dolrf fan W* 

DBS 

DBS Land 
FraserS. Meare 
HXLand* 

Horn Lnong Fin 
JratTMalbesn' 

JanJ Strategic* 

Kepgd 


NatauneOriara 
OCBCfotrign 
OSes Union Bk 


StagAMtaesF 

Ssp 

sssSf 

IMngToIHdgs 

irJeUXaUtBS. 


110 

11 

110 

1U0 

120 

13 

1690 

16X0 

1680 

as* 

aaj 

aaj 

9.10 

£55 

9XS 

5J0 

££ 

140 

14 

UIO 

104 

2X9 

2.93 

30 

328 

30 

ATS 

60 

6X5 

172 

320 

172 

110 

110 

110 

334 

128 

134 

1J5 

10 

1X4 

1150 

180 

1640 

Iff 

ff 

435 

610 

13 

120 

120 

N.T. 

N.T. 

KT. 

2670 

280 

2640 


30 

334 

10 

10 

10 


328 

30 

444 

44B 

40 

L24 

10 

10 

1680 

1640 

160 

416 

408 

416 


Stockholm «»» 


106 103 10SJO 1M 
m 793 794 802 


AGABF 
ABBAF 

AssOaraanF 191 188JO 190 191 

Astra AF 331 337 JO 234J0 338JD 


Sydney 


AIICMhwtasMlUO 

PnNtaoRM150 

Anrar 

609 

■ 

607 

604 

ANZBUng 

8X9 

8412 

tm 

8X6 

BHP 

1615 

1/0 

1612 

170 

Baraf 

30 

162 

30 

154 

Brambles Ind. 

23J1 

230 

2190 

2190 

Brans Pbfflp 

2X0 

233 

236 

239 

CB A 

120 

1114 

I1M 

120 

CCAma» 

1342 

1325 

1140 

1338 

Coles Myer 

5X2 

49/ 

5 

5 

Owaks 

635 

635 

6.50 

64U 

CRA Lid 

19 0 

190 

190 

190 

CSR 

452 

642 

449 

443 

Fosters Brew 
GtO Austrnla 

20 

232 

20 

2J5 

30 

116 

320 

119 

Gootlsian Rd 

10 

10 

1X7 

10 

ia Australia 

1112 

11/9 

1112 

12.92 

JatinFabtax 

2X1 

7JV 

20 

280 

Lend Lease 

24X3 

2435 

2445 

2440 


80 

TXT 

8 

1.78 

8 

1M 

624 

10 

1472 

140 

1466 

1473 


6J3 

672 

629 

6/7 

in 

3X7 

169 

3X8 

PodflcDunfe® 

116 

107 

113 

110 

Pioneer Inti 

30 

150 

151 

156 

Placer Pacttc 

IJ3 

1M 

123 

121 

Santos 

£13 

SM 

£H> 

m 

SmsBicora 

40 

4 

415 

Wesfamwn 

691 

678 

6W 

JUG 

Si 

8-15 

237 

7J1 

20 

8X7 

236 

7J5 

238 

WHdpacSJdng 

Woodddera 

70 

90 

7.17 

90 

7J6 

9X3 

723 

90 

"vOffninTO 

100 

3JM 

30 

3X5 

Taipei 

Stack MratoTtatteR 781676 
Pierian 7819X3 


500 

n 

W 

900 

CotaorUtaba 

181 

176 

id 

179 

Chang Horn Bk 

173 

166 

166 

Oltaa Steel 

2S0 

2630 

250 

250 

China Tnast 

530 

510 

510 

S3 

FgrS^Tatf 

540 

2620 

510 

770 

J30 

270 

54 

270 

First Bank 

180 

172 

173 

175 


43 

42 

47 

47 JO 

HusnNreiBk 

145 1390 

14? 

136 

HaatalTeJJran 

3430 

24 

24 

3440 

ICBC 

860 

3350 

84 

65 

Presided Eld 

440 

430 

44X0 

42X0 


<00 

580 

59 

<0 

Tatung 

530 

520 

S3 

0 


j The Trifo Index 



doungpoctra- 

Jan 1. lose* 100. 

Laval 

Ctenw 

Kctang* 

i rare to data 
•tecfrenn* 

+1357 

World Index 

148-37 

-0-03 

-0.02 

Raghrml birincM 

Asia/Pacific 

117J5 

-345 

-aa4 

-1252 

Europe 

160.00 

+0.94 

+059 

+14.98 

N. America 

166.46 

+1.81 

+1.10 

+2928 

S. America 

Industrial Irnlems 

122.44 

+028 

- +024 

+3751 

Capital goods 

174,08 

+1.13 

+055 

- +3101 

Consumer goods 

161^5 

■*021 

+0.13 

+1730 

Energy 

174.03 

^ +224 

+iib 

+2832 

Finance 

112.84 

-t-93 - 

-1.68 

.- -1131 

MbceBaneous 

162.72 

+0.08 

+0.05 

+1931 

Raw Materials 

176-73 

+1.04 

+059 

+24 63 

Service 

138.15 

+0i36 

+0.26 

+15.12 

UtiRies 

143.13 

+0^7 

+026 

+1258 

Trio Mom*k>nalHar*U Tribune Worid Stock Max Cuada the US OoOar variant* 
SBOirteirutkmaaykNoaMbleaodn riam2Smnriaa, For more Wbanaobn,n tee 
book** b mariauB by mtttng to Trio Tdb tndm. t81 Avaoua Criadaa de Gadh. 

B2521 Neuriy Ccffkm. France. .' OxripMby-BkKXj&atgBtnhesoNaux 

High Lore 

On 

PIWL 

WgA Ire Oase phk 


Moran Mg 

NEC 

MkkaSec 

NfcMmta 

NtapQedBBk 


CoaqMHaelrin: 619X7 
te i teB BUi 
83000 76000 83000 00000 
.5200 5000 5180 5140 

■T<&S» 7580C 1480S TJ« 
26400 25300 26100 2SS00 
9330 8650 9220 
435000 425000 471087 _ 
19100 19000 19000 T 

4oooo 37400 -sroa mm 
42500 40500 42000 42Q BQ 
12000 11200 11800 115DD 


Tokyo 

33a* 

Arahldun 
AsaW Gloss 
Bk Tokyo MBsu 


HBM22S:1M7187 

RnknciMUt 






thfotiL*? 


ATXtadaemSJte*^;^ 
PteriWKiiS* ■ 

’S2 ,fi S9 wa 

M2 30. 490- -400- 

« jn 48190 400 

KT !fr ^ ^ 

U u ^ 

81150 80491 818X8 - OOP 

1 .ws. . 

2090 wo 2oeo tm 


Wellington 

Piwdom: 2399X1' 



Donohue A 
DoPontCtta A 
EanHoiMaa 
FrifaxFW 
FtaCQflWdgo 

goteterCTtaBA 
Franoi Mpradn 
GoVOtaRes 
hnportoC* 

Inca 

LMvranGrawp 
MaanUBMl • 
Minna IHHA 
Mriwus 
Moore 

Nwhrtjpo Net 


TSEtatestrtafs:59S9J6 

PreriotoSSOMB 

mli S rm 

iffl ^ ^ 

43X5 43X0 4360 43J» 
45^) 45A0 4S4S 
3670 351* 36X5 3SJ5 

6A20 65A0 65X0 m, 
» M 29 JO 29 JO 290* 

2& ss 

56W 56 5&05 SS 

23A5 a m HH 

as s m & 

2M 25X5 
12W 7230 1145 
36J0. 25X0 2620 
314S 311k 31J0 St 

* *** “JS 

ssSg 
^25 isi S H 

44J0 a* “15 

^ 

5SA0 49U 49X5 

iuo m 

S & «| 


AteNZeoWB 

Brinfrimt 
garter Hod art 

rfinu 

UonlWtaB] 


WsonHortar 


H a a « 

» 3JS Z3S 

£ S 5% 

13; 2J4 2J5 2J9 

1J| U* 1 Js 7X0 
6X6 63S &S8 

157 3J3 

£D 125 225 120 
2E70 aJB 2170 2EJS 
7A6 73S 7J& 13a ■ 

11X0 11X0 1LM ll2 


Zurich 


4125 39X5 41.15 



S«lrieBB3M» 

I’lmfcteazrjt 

®L* 35BXD 3S8JO 
Jtt2 II45 nio 
1313 1330 .1330 
3640 JSgf 2675 

’S ® 

.730 739 - 741 . 

Jgsj& tas 

13 |a 134JB 13X50 
5S;j 535 536 

1®8 1433 - U» 
.892 


J JR..B: \,trl 
IS 



357X0 


UJ8 

1547 1S3 
,1* • W, 
1499 UBS 
09, 

204 
10530 
2S3JO 
i«4 ; i«o' 

823 031 ran 

1392 i!»r on 

a av*y- 

354 36&JS 367 




"s 


I 


n 

/V : 





•'-A- 
& . 


-n 

■' >*e 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 


RAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


China Adopts 
A Standard 
i From Japan 
For Phones 

Bloomberg Bupnesf News 

TOKYO — China has agreed to 
use Japan’s so-called personal 
^aypoone system for part of its 
telecommunications i nfr a st ructure, 
Japan’s Ministry of Posts & Tele- 
communications said Thursday. 

Tne decision to use the wireless 
Photte system, known as PHS, opens 
what is potentially the world’s' 
largest phone market to Japanese 
telephone-equipment makers. 

“It’s good news,” said Eric Gan, 
an analyst at Goldman Sachs (Ja- 
pan) Ltd. He said China was a prom- 
ising market because of its size and 
its underdeveloped communica- 
tions infrastructure^ 

The main beneficiaries of the de- 
cision are likely be NEC Core, 
which makes PHS base stations and 
Matsushita Co mmunicatio n Indu s- 
trial Co., which makes handsets. 

PHS is cheap and easy to fraq»» 
making it an attractive alternative to 
• stringing wires around a country. Un- 
Kke cellularphones, which require an 
expensive and powerful central base 
station, PHS transmits calls with 
small, low-power antennas. 

T ha i! ana, Indonesia, the Philip- 
pines, Guatemala and Colu mb ia 
have all adopted the system in one- 
form or another. 

The PHS market in Japan was 
worth ah estimated 497 billion yen 
(S4.3 1 billion) in Japan last year, or 
about 13 percent of the market for 
portable communications devices. 

Stock in Matsushita Communi- 
cation, which hopes to establish 
PHS as a standard throughout 
Southeast Asia, rose 30 yen to 3,000 
yen on Thursday, despite a 3 percent 
fall in the Nikkei stock average. . 

The company refused to give pro- 
jections for sales in China. 

NEC stock fell 40 yen to 1,430. : 


CITICs Red-Chip Status Starts to Fade 


Reuters 

HONGKONG — A plan for CITIC Pacific 
LttL ‘s parent to buy a stake in the company puts 
the Hong Kong conglomerate in danger of 
losing its so-called “red-chip” status as a com- 
pany highly prized for its China connections, 
analysts have said- 

. Qnce the “reddest of red chips,” the Hong 
Kong conglomerate's parent company, China 
International Trust & Investment Chip., is con- 
trolled by China’s State Council and was foun- 
ded by one of China’s vice presidents. 

But ClTlC Pacific’s shares have tumbled 13 
percent since its management said it would buy 
a major sake in the company, disappointing 
fans of China-related stocks despite the com- 
pany's wund f undamentals 
Analysts say red cbips^Hong Kong-based 
companies controlled by Chinese government 
agencies, are coveted because investors hope 
powerful staie-owned parent companies will 
continue their pattern of selling billions of 
dollars of mature assets to their Hong Kong 
units at bargain-ba semen t juices. But tire smart 
money how fears OTIC Pacific is becoming 
too independent to enjoy such, largesse. 

“The market knows that its past perception 
was wrong, and the red-chip factor that made 
the market willing to pay a high premium for the 
shares has begun toerode,” said Carl Wong, an 
associate director of HSBC James GapeL 
On Dec. 30, die company said a management 
team led by its chairman, Larry Yung, would 
buy a 1 5.47 percent stake in CITIC Pacific from 


its parent, CITIC Hong Kong. 

CITIC Hong Kong s interest in CITIC Pa- 
cific will be reduced to 26.45 percent from 
41 .92 after the share transfer. 

The news initially strengthened CITIC Pa- 
cific's shares, which reached a high of 45.60 
Hong Kong dollars ($5.89), on Dec. 30, 1996. 
But since the n, the shares have tumbled, closing 
Thursday at 39.80 dollars, 1.75 percent lower, 
or down 70 cents. 

Analysts said the stock had been among the 
market's best performers last year and that 
Would provide a profit-taking cushion for for- 
eign-fond managers who had the stock in their 
portfolio. 

“The market's perception is that its red-chip 
concept would fade out, but I think selling is a 
bit overdone.” said Herbert Lau, analyst at 
Vi ckers Balias Hong Kong Ltd. 

OTIC Hong Kong is the local arm of Cl'J lC 
Group, which was founded fay Rong Yiren, 
Beijing's "Red Capitalist.” who is one of China's 
vice p reside nts. Mr. Rong is also Mr. Yung's 
father. CTTIC Group is beaded by Wang Jun, a son 
of China’s late vice president, and by Wang Zhen, 
a veteran of Mao Zedong's' Long March. 

One analyst said some market-watchers sus- 
pect an internal rift exists between the Wangs 
and M r. Yung’s family, which c ould result in 
CmC Pacific being ignored by CITIC Group 
and losing its red-chip stat us. 

But some analysts said CTTIC Pacific was 
already operating independently and receives 
no tangible benefits from its Chinese parent. 


"The share transfer itself did not change the 
fundamentals,” Mr. L au said. "We believe 
CITIC Pacific, or CITIC HK, has been working 
independently from China, and that has not 
ch anged .” 

CTTIC Pacific still had strong earnings, a 
good balance sheet, the ability to find deals, and 
strong connections in China through its chair- 
man after the deal, said Mark Simpson, research 
director of JNG Barings. 

"In the medium term, wc still like the stock, 
and we think that there is strong earnings mo- 
mentum,’ ’ Mr. Simpson said. 

erne Pacific management has stressed that 
the firm is a Hong Kong company managed by 
Hong Kong people. It is mainly involved in 
property development and aviation through hs 25 
percent stake in Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. 

The recent heavy selling of the stock also 
reflected the market's negative feeling about 
the massive share-price discount given to the 
management team, analysts said. The shares 
were bought at 33 dollars each, compared with 
their close of 43.60 dollars each before the 
announcement. 

The silence of Mr. Yung and CITIC Pacific 's 
managing director, Henry Fan, concerning the 
deal has nieled uncertainty in the market, ana- 
lysts added. 

The two men garnered 97 percent of the 330 
million shares involved in the tr ansacti on. 

But they said the downside on CTTIC Pacific 
shares was limited, with net asset value seen at 
33.60 dollars a share. 


Japan’s Carmakers Are Winning the Battle at Home 


Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — - The fig ht for market share in 
Japan’s auto industry has claimed its first victim: 
imports. r 

Since tire introduction in September of their 
new prodnet lines, Japanese carmakers have 
chipped away at the small market share foreign 
manufacturers struggled to build. Many shoppers 
are buying now before the consumption tax is 
raised in April to5 percent from 3 percent. 

. ."Since September, the Japanese domestic 
market has been flooded with new cars as the 
automakers scramble to get as large a share of Ibe 


domestic pie as possible before the consumption 
tax goes up,” said Christopher Redl, an analyst 
at ENG Barings Securities. 

Japan's automakers have developed a number 
of models to compete with imports. Mr. Redl 
said. He cited Nissan's Stagia, a luxury station 
wagon that sells for about $3,400 less similar 
Volvos or BMWs. 

While sales of Japanese cars have risen for 
four straight months, with double-digit growth in 
November and December, sales of imports fell 
2. 1 percent in December, to 38,059 vehicles, the 
Japan Automobile Importers Association said. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

15300 


Singapore 
Shafts Times- 


Tokyo . 

Nikkei 225 



10000^ S r o N DJ 


1996 


1997 


2000 A SON'D j‘ 


18000 


1996 


19B7 


A S O'N D J 
1996 1997 


Exchange •. 

index .. 

■Thursday Frev.. ■ . % : 
Close ' dose Change 

Hang Kong 

Hang Seng 

13,138,11 13,454.93 -1.W 

Singapore 

SfrateTknes- 

253.73 ■ 2^*43.26- *43.47 

Sydney 

AS Ofxfinaries 

2^23^0 2,415.00 ;*0.34 

Tokyo 

Nfttei225 

18,073. 87 18,680.38 

Kuaia Lumpur Corriposfo? 

. 1,23592 .1,23954: -021 

Bangkok 

.‘SET. 

34322 83133 ; : +14? 

Seotd • 

Compqsatein&fx 

83087,. -.,621.41 /.4 237 

Tap* 

Stock Market index 7J310.7S 7,019.43 -0.12] 

Manila 

PSB 

3,223.36 3^0089 40J$% 

Maria 

Composite index 

657,43 662-21 \ "-4M2 

Wellington 

NZ5&40 

2,40238 . 2,39931- +0.13 

Bombay ■ 

Sensitive Inde* 

3,362-SS 3288.86 +£24 

Source: Tetakurs 


Intcnuejoral Herald Tnbanc 

Very briefly: 


That is the second decline since August 
Still, 1996 was a record year for imports. Total 
sales rose 10.1 percent from previous year, to 
427,525 vehicles, the third straight record year. 

German automakers continue to dominate the 
import market in Japan, with more than a 43 
percent share. German companies sold 184J536 
vehicles in 1 996, a rise of la percent. 

U.S. carmakers, meanwhile, sold 41,517 
vehicles in Japan in 1996, a rise of 9.0 percent 
4 4 While the Europeans have models unique to 
Japan, the Americans have not come tip with cars 
that Japanese want” Mr. Redl of ING said. 


• Air China has ordered two 747-400 jets from Boeing Co. 
valued at about $380 million, the U.S. plan era aker announced 
in Beijing. The planes are to be delivered in 1999. 

• China Yangtze Three Gorges Development Corp., the 
company in charge of building the world’s largest hydro- 
electric dare project, is issuing 1 billion yuan (SI20.1 million) 
in bonds. No terms were reported. 

• Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co.’s sales in 
1996 rose 37 percent, to 39.40 billion Taiwan dollars ($1 -43 
billion). Sales by Acer Inc., a maker of personal computers, 
fell 8 percent in 1996, to 57.90 billion dollars. 

• Hewlett-Packard Co. plans to raise its personal computer 
sales in the Asia-Pacific region by 35 percent a year over the 
next three years, focusing on portable models. 

• Japan risks being left behind in international aviation 
markets if it fails to consider U.S. "open-skies’ ’ proposals, as 
other Asian nations are doing, Alan Larson, the U.S. assistant 
secretary of stare for economic and business affairs, said. 

• Bangkok Bank PLC and Siam Commercial Bank Ltd. 
plan to help the government establish a 50 billion-baht ($1 .95 
billion) fund to prop up Thailand’s ailing property market. 

AP. Reuters. AFX. AFP 


r ; ■ >jDVD: Latest Hollywood Releases Come in a Format That Has Potential to Revolutionize Home Video and Computers 


Continued from Page 13 * 

DVD will be different from pre- 
vious consumer technologies be- 
cause it will affect almost all elec-: 
ironies markets, ranging from 
persona) computers to VCRs and 
advanced television. ■ 

"This is die first consumer 
product that will come into the 
home through two doors, both the 


‘ living room and the den,” said Lee 
Isgur, a consumer electronics ana- 
. iyst at Jefferies <& Co. in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Warner said it would release 30 
movies in, the format, including 
such classics as "Blade Runner,” 
"Casablanca,” - ' "Doctor Zhiv- 
ago” and 4 ’Gone . With’ the 
Wind.” 

- The company also plans simul- 


taneous release of future movies in 
. VHS and DVD formats. 

Warner’ s DVD manufacturing 
plant in Terre Haute, Indiana, has 
already manufactured 500.000 
disks, and the company said an- 
other 250.000 were already on 
shelves in Japan. 

But Sony was more cautious 
than Warner. Sony said it would 
introduce 20 titles in the next year. 


But it added that it was pricing its 
player at $900 and targeting the 
high -end videophile and audio- 
phile markets. 

Toshiba Coro., Matsushita Elec- 
tric Industrial Co. and other man- 
ufacturers started selling players in 
Japan on Nov. 1, but a shortage of 
software titles curtailed sales. 

-In Europe, Philips plans to start 
selling players in the summer, a 


spokeswoman told the Internation- 
al Herald Tribune. 

Intel Corp. executives said that 
the chipmaker would demonstrate 
a DVD-ROM drive for computers 
and that all major personal com- 
puter makers would introduce 
DVD-based systems by midyear. 
But those systems will initially be 
far more expensive than existing 
persona] computers. 


DVD would reach the main- 
stream of die personal computer 
market in 1998. Intel predicted, 
when machines based on its P6 
processor with the company's re- 
cently announced MMX multime- 
dia technology will be available. 

Those computers will have 
enough power to function as DVD 
players without additional hard- 
ware, the company said. 


THE NG SYSTEM 

ONCUHHSKCES 

I Year 1996 =^64,i%l 

REAL PERFORMANCE 
$3d£Q0JUIffi 1st 1996 
HAS BECOME 
. *4V20DBC31st1986 • 

AFTER ALL COIHB90NS 
PAST PERFORMANCES NOGUARAKTEE 
OF FUTURE PERFORMANCE 
DELAFON FUTURES 
33 Av. des Champs-Bysees. 
Paiis 75006, France 
TeL 01 45 62 IS 50 
Fax 01 45 62 15 55 



1 





PACE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE . FRIDAY. JANUARY 10 , 1997 


T'tf imsftisagJSSIJJjJS: 

1 1 sBtswEKfe-* 




INVESTMENT A SERVICES CO (EXI 
•5O2B08.FH 03M Tl SE23S 
IHl<E.C.1 S 146 Si 

Ut&a Rkowiv Fd s IJ*JZ 

RMUMH S 11737 


Gtobal Bonn Fd S 11737 

AMRO Bank. fcO. ta m Antmtan 

snwnm j 1*455 

lopi- Fund FI FI I46B9 

luroaf FondS ^ ^TJW 

AMRO f mK TM : EMHMt JM 
9 imnei:iB 0 LiflLf» 3 i 2 -C 4 WJ^ 
America Eq Fd i S2.9J. 


Unericn Eq Fd ( 52.94. 

jnertcoEgFB * 0 *M* 

1 am En MS I 6667* 

EauDt rd t 7S.1J- 

MByFd I 4447- 

E«#I Fd DM 14SW- 

gnd Fa $ 61 71* 

and fa I 6125* 

Fund 1 SvJZJr 

Bgnfl Fd B DM 110 U- 

ndFund PBHlOUiJS- 

EimpeEaFd DM M 8 .BS- 

3 bOUiTy Fd $ 46 J3— 

ICflsnd EqwFyFd SF 1M27. 

E PERFORMANCE TBM191 011X15 

mwooOonol LM S JlftX 

. fMulffl LM S »1W-M 

■ FUNDS 

1 1 00 

DM 1430 

5 20-37 

! 33-1' 

S 2*W 

1 7531 

s 2 sn 

S 2 iSD 

S 2*74 

i non 


n Caxandn S»PH Growm >► 1 

CAPITA!. INTERNATIONAL 
W CoWnWnri Fund | ■£" 

H COBital HdlB SA * ~'4 

CAPITAL INVESTMENT GROUP PLC 
■i uqiira GrwTTi Fund » 

cue INTERNATIONAL « iwjWM 

« CcPOnm Terne ff iwwm 

CHEMICAL INELAND IU ADM LTD 
TOSfelW PK ! 

n Keren SIS: CenhJY IWB * Sg 

. Th* Yellow SeuBWlCfl » ■■" 

cm BANK ILUKEMBOURW 5JL 
POB 1U3 LiaenDOOID Til 13531 4314I4-' 

: cranvwrowfll.aw* 5 

c* latavwfFGPUjp * 

a CRWieslFOPEa' g* 

4 CBtoresTFOPESP F**? 

a CBinreslSdWttf J 

j CHfcUiWW«USD * 

a CtorrencJeS DEM DM 

! CrtKunqna«C9P £ 

a cbbiitwims ’ , ® 1 - 

a GupofTN-A. E9u«> » 

- CIV** C*nt Eura £ V uiv f 

i LEbori UF Eauftt _ _£ 


H INTERNATIONAL FUNDS January 9 , 1997 | 

Advertisement ^ W “™HT/FUN/ funds-html I 

available on internet 


For Information on how to list your fund, fax Katy Hour! at (33-1) 41 43 92 12. 

E-mail : funds@iht.com 


i tajsn 

i 9AJ69J 
1 119.9083 
5 1226713 
* S 09-5618 
ECU 128-5391 
3 1 8? .2388 
t 153.4521 
5 64.9519 

% 1I4M 
I 14UC74 
I 13*0713 
1 273324* 
S 109.7414 
Ecu 14”5- 
£ 12932W 
DM 1»8A’0 

W !» 

"""I ,777.04 

DM M7S9 4S 
3 2282802 

■R0i& IR>M . _ 


S CTOOtTIAPEC 
i CBIbOBEoowc 
e cubon NJLS Bond 
d OflogrtEinn Sana c 

a Maori job S mCao 
a otioon iWtan Eouar 
e Omen us am Bond 
d Oitpofl US Ee Cw 
t> cmoMiUSSinCffl 
a annonllST Bond 
a ariDjri ii u bo „ , ' 

rq CL JLshjn Incan* Fund 
a CL MOD Cunwcy Fund 
u mmo Fooj* Funa 

a Nam Manager i 

- 

- OihelKI PM Cicalh Fd 

d aflsficcl PW EnhuiKrt Gdr 

an BANK IPARKl SJ~ 04701. -97 

j an96CcsG«B 

s an Avaupnai Ord Fd 


m AHL ONI Canaodl 6 M Ujd S 

.K 1 VJB Guaranttrt I9»6 UM S 

m r.taB LeiflmoWPw* LM | 

-1 MAP GuaniOMN 2000 * 

n MJPWU5001 | 

, MAN-GlmaMdM.S. * 

m WAN-IP 223 LSOIHW US* 
ERMITAOE LUA w 

■ EmrflaBe Into PaWS *™ 1 DM 

w snitino* s*cFvna | 

* Eimifcrjc E *w MMjFd J 

. ErWiOBFLIK VOIUFFO £ 

a EmifestOWyFund dk 

it EnniMgrOW'AWJJ 1 * 

eURDK* FUNDS UMITp 

j AroM*cn7i cquOV RllM J 

s AmodtenOOiVxiFwio l 

* Avon Equity Fd | 

n ElBTWnn Eqairr Fd 1 

EUROPEAN FINANOALCMUP EFO 
PPOTON FUND 

» Pmwi UM Cssti fd * 

. PioW E® Cnsh Ffl Ecu 

»■ PlBWi .'*05 France™ Sr 

n Prrtcn in Braid Fd-UM * 

« Pirncn in. 6 ota Filecu Ecn 

PBOTONIN7E3NATIONAL. FUND 


« 

f HUB 

3 I2J1 

I 1074 

5 10-21 

6 IS 14 


DM 1143 

1 90_59 

I 2085 

r 1S2I 

DK 12-1* 

1 1124 

S 45991 

5 50087 

S IW.J 2 

t S483 


S 40518J 
ECU 6994.13 
Sr 

S 

ECO 829283 

^VrSi'n'aSIHcOC&M' s 

. Pr=w Euiorftir.&lK ECJ 

, Proton Mian Eg Fd „ J '.tSil 

b PrefW US Inrt Cap Fd * 1«“ 

« Proton Jaocn Fd J 

: ssassaa^^ * 3 § 

„ iioeoi ooacrurtnes Fund S '£« 

» ProBn Fined lne o FF 

• Prom vium-Cr Ba Fd ff '’“S S 

• Praeon GAM Fund S !2 -*» 

EVEREST CAP IT C L qtt * 1-44 1-292- 3001 

-r, E*cr«iCmun'FraWfc»LM | 2 A»J 

■n E.fWQsWOllnuLId 5 2,1,1 

FAIRFIELD GREENWICH 6 RDUP 
n l*4tci4 jJMN Lid J -I3J4« 

« FoofCd im Lid » 3*80 

n FfflrWJSertfnia: J 

^ SOHO iwea LM 5 *463744 

?^szr mLa h 

S S 

m fiofon '^mraotir, Fd S IOjasb 

FERRtER LULLJN GROUP 
„ FLTnntAita . 

„ FL TfU»l Sarttertdnd sF 17686 

F1DEUTT INVESTMENT 

Te»- 00 353 ^135230 , M 

a nuv Euros* Fund * 

j '.Vurtd Fund | 'tH! 

o Fcr EcM Fund J 

- Frenun Fund \ J!-;' 

0 QUIP Fu nd | 

a WOCOI Fund * St. 

; SP9CICJ GTONTIi Fund * T *- 53 

FIN ANSA OROUPIFW MO 246 44M1 

.t: rnrSE AsroFranflerFurt J .2" 

m Tic vfletnom Pfortief Fund 5 

F1NMANAGEMEWT SA-UW»0|41 Jl/imiM 

- Mio Piaruan Crrp. * 130280 

FLEMING FUND 8 WUJACEMEKT 
LUXEMBOURG fT*f : 252 34 1011 

Tm£ OASIS FUND S1CAV 
. ir.lenroltaiai squRrFuod S 10-BcO 

FM OROWTN FUND t-JII 318S55 744 
a Tra8n.3C*iuue<™5lPN™ * 

FOKUS BANK AS. (Fb»d:«2-ni KOll) 

„ Futii rwi Grown Fd S 18S 

FOREIGN t COLONIAL EMERG MKTS LTD 
Tti:Lor.acn n 428IZM . 

0 Ajqwnnl* mirticoSco* * g8| 

3 BroBi-on inves Co SIC3» J -us 

b Cdonbon inwuCoaco* | Wg 

a Indian iiwtll u> Slcoj 5 5*2 

J L 8'0 Am*r EoraTleld Fd S 96941 

3 Laiin Aintnapi jmci Co S '“g 

- ■.To-uar liwrsJ Co Stew * 2 AW 

„ Penjulcn IhvdO Co 5 ICC S 645 

a Pda* mwll Co SKO S JAM 

e TianronimtCD . S U 00 

3 i3W Em ''MM in* LO Stai» S >“^1 

• Ruuton Imeshnenl Co S 9 61 

FORMULA GROUP 

1 ForniuM Fund NS S 19*4“ 

FRIEDBERG MULTI-SECTOR FUNDS 

TOO 14141 W-n n.-Ftpc (4141 36WW2 
m F<«bct 5 Cumroct | ,J*“ 

» FrMw! Fhed liww S 101B.J4 

m rrteetacra Eoidi) H ydg S 

n Fd«ae«s N« f Mkmd S 11MJ4 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID! 

?.0 3oi ;«l. HOTBton, BeroiuOa 
r- FMG Ctobo; 1307B9J J »7« 

=MG«4 Anwr C30NWI S 1*81 

1 p.«G Euiune rWNo») DM 21.79 

FMGE‘AC.MKTOONo.) S 383 

- FvcaaoNci * >J*S 

- FVG Fires 110N Q y) S 1167 

u . &jb J QcaJ Gitwh Ffi I F*.il 

FURMAN SELZF1KANOAL SERVl^ LTD 
Tei- -353 1 *F> ?«4 Fat - J53 1 4?» 772f 

3 xxaa USA Func 5 

c Aaaja USA Grerti Fuafl 5 *06.781= 

. cSSortCOClnOLM 517OA40| 

^ la,?no.HLM S13039J9E 

- GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS IFAX02S0S 
Ter JC I *7* 51 NL'Fc*: 153 1 674 0570 

*. Goto Hedge ii f 

*- I 

l SsasssKsa:. * »s 

GEFINOR FUNDS 

G*neM TM81-22 1356530 FB4J41 -3 7M01« 
n Scctlin VMdd Fund S 575-7230 

GENESEE FUND LM , _ 

a :i; Oemec Eoslr S 2 ,1S0 

— GLOBAL ASSET MANA GEM BfT 

iE^R U N^“o!^^Sa 


S 11199 90 

o oii SwSiBra* Gid Fd s lm i~S 

5 OTG 10 A-Jffl>.M«sFd \ 

a cm japwi >co ; 

a an Jbdoi 95 ; 11075 

d CO LOl AmerCaaCTd Fd j 5aj7;S 

CITIBANK GLOBAL ASSET IMOTUSW LM 

TO 00 1ST 2£68 *2« 052 2573 1 379 

e qiF iCnymoro As« Ea 5 ,2^V 

0 OF iCoyroom H.K. Eo * 

CJTlTRUST » tort 

-i Qitaeffwmooci 5 A j 

. T1R C-COd Eurtr Fund s ‘*464 

coMGesTOO-nMTBTSio 


LbWmSmWw SeK j^il 

™ 4 is 

Norm Aifwkn f 

C. Corf S lB S Ja 

355T ■> > 0 *™ 

liANCE CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 
Bank ol Bentuida I3S7-KL4*4339I 
AbmceUSGi SfrajcsA 5 -» 

VOdnceUSGr.SMoB S 11 J7 

4 ifcnce Ui Of saeje I S 

Adkmce US Gr. Slrgln N S 1 * 2g ' 

PH A FUND MANAGEMENT. L 1 ™ 

Pdf-La- VOW Rd. HOTMnHMIl Bend'® „ 
Alono Alim Fd U6NO.30 S Jg7l| 

AWK AB 6 J Fd HYC a 7*0930 J 

AhMAttsFd‘TcOL^9«30 5 J?J-§5 

4lSa Euraoe Fd INnBI Ecu 7T1.9I 

AWk. Future* Fd I NojKU 5 jS36j 

AtjUwWCoaiFd INO.XI | lg'71 

Aipna Hdg Fd O ANovX J 5*»«1 

aiSh hS Fd a ctfcx-30 ; 

tug LMw Amer INOvXI 5 415-31 

aSSSpSjucRIituwio) | JJJij 

flfpfjg SAM S I-* 

Atolio Stoat Fd INdvJO, f 4J-J5 

un lUdoW Fd lNo.301 S 21064 

BCA'AWK Am FAUnJO S JD’r.. 

BCA,A^tS;_ ..._ * ,i6, 

BSSeoEunSdq «w30 Ecu 

Corouunto Ull Am mo.*) > 11BC 

g 5 »«^S.xi | ISr* 

srFflffiWv-* s M 

Stand Poe Cop OfMl/NoirW 5 Je*-J? 

T* Pv*5Ja Fd (NmMI 5 'K-* 

MERICAK PHOENDCim PORTFOUO 

Eurooan Munuiattml PM S -*— ■ 

GtCOai MutWidOonfll Pfd S ;r£ 

US. Gfiwrtti C 6 ainon» PM S 15™ 

U.S. Real Esteie Sec PTO S , ' SB 

AS. BLEICHROCDER 

Tet 01 1 -S-999- E2-2T 
amu Curaoratoa' 5 

Aquflq IfUeroaOonM Fund S O5J-|0E 

DEFAseOOdteNV 1 ISJJS^E 

Eofde S*fca Firod 5 Jj”r£f 

FlrSEaq* Find _ 

Tne Gtobd BeveratK Fd S 110-lSS 

PERFORMANCE. 5ICAV 

TLAS CAPITAL MANAGEME NT LTD 

abS ioiTAlwnne Fd s jS;«' 

Cdr»n*ie AfWnJBe Fd s 

SeSJwd Ada* Areitorae S 10I&S3- 

T MANAGEMENT LIMITED 

«. Lonfion IVivOEE 
Fund 

~L 0 MNAV S *"-30 

ft «S^(FFft FF 2M080 

ConuettlOe Fd lUSSi S 46U4 

Inl e ngtomai Bond iUSSi S gj-ij 

Corofat Fund lUSSJ s 536.-6 

ANK BRUSSELS LAMBERT 132-11 1 SO 2037 
BBL uwesJ America Cap * . J&2 

8 BL NneM BelBiL-in u» BF 19993.ro 

BBL inuesl Jaoon uip ' 3<»“ 

BBLUiWMUiBnAnMCcc S OS 8 - 

BBLinue-iHKOCWnaCcc J a. >3 

BBL imest Auan GUO Cap S 2<7 av 

BBL Inwst UK Cep „ c 

BBL IU lw Cdcftnine* Cap J 1JJ9 

BBL (U Imesi! EWW» G 09 L F 1B3?-C0 

BBL <U htwil World Cap LF 42 

BBL iU aw BosjP Cap S 


r fflRBSe-' ' | 

CQNZETT HOLDINGS LTD 

: 8 StfSSw E 9R8 

Err^MtroMKIS O wjJ Fd Lid DM 9*a00 

COWEH ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Coa jpy wgPia Func N V. % 


CREDIS IBVHTM™TR»NDS 
t« ~ii i 333 asm to *4J ' —i 3*2j 


CJ PO*n Fl* Inc lOM> A DM JSSjo 

0 cs Pom FU IB* [DMI s DM 

e CS Pen, Rr Inc iSFR? * 5F !5g .1 
tr CS Fortf Fu Inc i5FP.' 3 Sr fi 

j C5 Fcrt, Fl« Inc '.USSI A S JSfU 

1 <3 Pflrtf Fl* UK lUSSi B S 

? aaessi 
i asssisii 
: s ^ 

0 CSPoml-":LliSA * M-S 

- CS PnN int US5 & * jlSuT; 

s asssyf&-w J ^ 

S sf |jt« 

1 W 6J931TO 

i ami & ii 

s SEfigg Ml 

c credtt .\v>npr Fd rn P>f» vvlS 

if CffflK Mom Mky Fd SF 5r 

a Ciraxs JUIofi^v MU Fd % J , 

d OwS* Money AlLlFdlw l. U ” 6 I-K 
j Croon MW «*i FdC_ * .1 ™ 


J CKOS M0IN9 M4t Fd C i -J”*' 

- CirmEoMEnm.UkB S 11500?. 

SdiJeSFdElrSueg .5 £« 3«-;3 


u SSji?HiSsuScnB DM »9-57 
c CmdB Ed =d France A FF I-ITD 
0 CiMH Ec Fd Fr ance B FF IJJJ^S 

a CiedBScrd'i.Tnaiir « DM 1 IW. 
j OeehEflFdGvnnPUB DM 

d Creflls Ea Fd Gold -lines * J 
a OcdA Ea Fd Gold .Mutn B £ 

•i CreatEaHKlMiaerA to 
0 CrediiEqFtf HIM UtcfB PU ^21880 

5 SSIS«ISRb b bssrs 

3 gSSSi3FSiSS.535 3p s v i^jg 


a CiedlsEa Fd LSI AIM 
• Crfdft Eq Fd Netoends A 
e Ciedis Ea Fd Ndtiertos B 
J IMIS Ea Fd Nffi Amet A 
a Credit £a Fd NuvAmerB 


S 98683. 
FL 731 JM 
FL 7s»^ 
t S7ua 
S ITLOI 
DM 23241 
DM 25643 


£ OeS E 2 Fd SnicO Coo Ger DM 9 ?otf 

0 Cr«Bs Ea Fa irodl Ca J n v 

; SSUlSwuTr 0 ’ P 

1 S&iS?Mro igjjf 

d droit rJOTC Fund _ __ ' *?£• 


a cirdli £a Fd NrvAmerB 5 
a CmdiiEu FOOfl 46- Prated A DM ^32- 1 

a Cicdtj Ea Fd Oeta-PiWN 6 DM 25*41 

5 drdh Eg Fa Small Cop Ear DM 144282 

fn* C - Fd Can Ger DM 92 ® 4. 


isSeii.MIdCaa! 
I Suntc to Ina 
eroinscf 
Ijerrund 
die • uticr 


BBL 1 LJ un lefeon A Modi 
BBL iFl uwesi France Cop 
BBL Prim Fd Inti Coo 
BBL Parrfcnonla) Bat Cap 
3BL R C Slt-MedUw* Cap 
BBL A MC Fund Camenflilet 


S 53SJ7 
* MM 3 
S 397JP 
T 32189 
S ,2129 
LF 183380 
LF *227 CO 
S 44983 


; 49#j: 

SF 1 9282 
SF 3y*C? 
1 rwc-Cfl 

4 T# 

! 12683 

5 "SS 

5F I47J7 

111 


_ n.™.- •irrflnnFil * lll.H 

m KSS&SaSnd * *05-47 

uSSSunHSolFd S 111.92 

" USSSrHFmdiKAOC SF I047J4 

iSSShr" £ S3I 

““SSfKfSSS . 

K, p 3ffi K FgS. , SS" L "' 

n 

= ite" 1 k 

lHTERlNVESTTBERMUDAl LTD 

w 

fWSS&*to- 

i raSStostaid - * 108000 

% gssssac 11 E 

” I 298KB 

t 5.4900 


usEs^sgsek 

0 Amertaan Grown 
d TLrtWKnn Enterprise 

<t Ada TtyrGrownr 

3 Aston Qn» Bond 
0 Aston cm Bold DM 
d DoPar Heswue 

5 ISSSiSSSfse 

S EMavUnd Fund 
a Gtow Lettuie j 

3 MISST* 


t 138200 
i RJ«B 
S 5J3D0 
S 13200 

4 58400 
3 i.vm 
t 102400 
f 5BD00 

DM 15500 
t 88800 
1 78400 

i 7S5S0 
I 56400 

5 Mtsm 

C 78100 
£ 58900 

S 9*400 


S 2245 

5 *135 

t 10*4 

t 587 

t 95961 

$ rasa 

S 7199 

S 1545 

5 1*03 

i 1*00 

1 1021 

% 967 


S 91653 
5 101896 

S 98183 
S 111636 


= fear J as 

* ««s 

| «ui» 

- SSSaSJudLMiV * 1 WIJJD 

: M^SSFdLJdlJ*31 * 1^00 

. Stonettonge (Dec I3EH1 S 504900 

JAR DINE FLEMING, GPO Bb 11440 Kg *9 
d JF ASEAN TM > 01.V 

d JF Fral EOSI WiMTr. S 8J1 

a JFOWMlCim.Tr * 11S5 

S FjSSSSw"' i 

% i I g» 

3 JF Ttodtond TruSI * ®-W 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 

a B artend SF 

d Com »r 

d Eoulron AmedcD S 

: ^nsg"” w 

: sac 6 


\Ws§ 

1 ^ 

il® 


wiSiONARy PCPTKdJO 

% 5 !^?S 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES RfH- _ 

i 8S5 I ™ 

DRAGON PORTFOL'O 

d OttnA l JjS 

0 COMB * 

MERRILL LYNCH GLOTAJ.OIBRE NCY 

BOND SERIES NAVtoNaWW 

ADJUSTABLE RATE SeCL'R! TIES PTFL 

fl Oo«A J Jg . 

ASlA^TKER BOND PORTFOLIO 

1 SSft * SS- 

d O0**B-2 S H 8 R 

AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d CUBA « 5fS 

a ram B Ai 21 

CAN ADI AN DOLLAR PCRTFOLIO 
a n«(L a ci i/3L 

% §SsB CS 17.19 

CORPORATE HIGH INCC-AE PTFL 
0 ncsA-l f ,'-S 

3 SSStl S S 

DEUTSCHE MARK PORTPOL'O 
0 DM 1480 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO JJJJ * 1 

3 S3S21 53 

5 8 EM m 

« nn t. B-? DA 19S 

EUROPEAN BONO PORTFOLIO tVSSJ 
0 DatlA-1 | *80 

d CMEA-2 S 

a CtastB-l S 

0 OcK B-7 1 11J& 

POUND STEPUNC- PORTFOLIO 

fl MA ; 5?S 

COOTORATE INUESTLIENT GRAM PTFL 

fl Ctois* ! IS 

0 CJauB * 1441 

TEN PORTFOLIO „ 

e CW*A l {S 

c Om^B V 1 "W 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

d CtouA-l | 10^ 

0 OBSA-7 * 2LP3 

fl Class B-l J 

a n-.. b-7 * BUI 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

a Clast A £ 2-Jt 

d CMSSB * ’-97 

MERRILL LYNCH INC 1 PORTFOLIO 

fl OmA S HS 

a CkesB 1 lias 

3 aS° S n.91 

MERRILL LVWCHMOJCAN INC PORT 
a MMCsn Mf S PJflaA S ^JO 

d McraincSFifiaB J 

0 Metodn Inc Pko Ptfl O a S 3.15 

a MeKcn lac Pesp pm □ B * 1,5 

MERRILL LTNOINAV a* MOftmiTT 

0 Pita® Rote PanfcAo 5 9.99 

DOLLAR ASSETS PORTFOLIO 
a tnsAuHonal I Snares S Jdo 

a UEttuOanai II Socret S 

i« r h im 5hn» 1 1-W 

METOLL LTNCHSHORJ-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 
A Class A J 787 

d OnstS s 7 -®' 

MILLENNIUM ASSET MA N AGLMENT 
m SMI Good LeWFSjefl J 

m SMI Qucm UrfBttojed 5 ^665 

in S«te Franc OmencvFd SF 10H-J2 

■n U 5 S Glatnl CimeKV rd S 113UM 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
m Lew raged Fuad. _ S , 


:f®aSSS.uM J S2 

v PuauloGfartiN | 'gS 

: r F M 

a Pkfef VabdEMlDtl Sr W 2 M 

PREMIER WVESTMBIT HJKBS LTV 
^FLOBatl 100 Gt. Grand CDyoMB . 

rsifsr r w 

S SSSSweSh™"” I 3SS 

% SSSESSfiSs'Fd i wjo 

PWMEO FUNDS 

m pnmeafimdA J JKa 

a PrtmFaodB S 11.19 

Asp* i i 



B: ’ 

V;" 

m 




\r~? 




[r~;^ 




Ry 

ifli " 

»y,i 

. - 

g -j 

ESS 

•Cj 

- 

Wj\ 



'H 


1;: 




§ 

I: 


r^r: 

3 


; OuariftinrFKoa N.V. 

rSE^BH 







1 


S I1B.112 
S 10085!- 
5 133541 

1 12*30 

i 217841 
t 10693c 
S 10384! 
S 13281! 
S 1 76-36- 
S 13487! 
S 15SJ7! 
S 17QA4Z 
S 230872 
• 146161 

5 145861 

5 1 40821 


rmr^ 

: sSessusw. « 


s 

FF 
SF 
SF 
At* 

DENMARK 

I Till 

S 14470 
Dkk 1*005 
DM 13045 
£ 11655 

Pfca 1321500 
SM 13680 
S 10585 
DM 10360 




5 10585 

DM 10360 

s 19.70 
S 99.10 
DM 11140 




< GAM £ Spec* Bona 
. GAAl ArpOicpe 
> GAM ASIAN 
!• GAM At*m Dr* MMS 
m. GAM AutfrofcJ 
■ GAM Bond £ 
m GAM Bora DM 
. C-AA-- Bond S= 
n GAM Bern US5 On) 

0 CAM Fend UUSpecKd 

n GAM Sri SUM 

. GAM casa-Matet 
. GAUDlwrjry 
0 GAV. Duller end IRtenX 


t 140.95 
S 536.10 
S 41844- 

V 106 IV 
i 769JJ9 
L 1B8A4 
DM 142.04 
SF 11613 


aid unentcuonal J 10141 


m Mr Hedge Ftrtjnc. * 

:g?S!SKar" i .as 

« wsixtiar im i m mm 

LEHMAN WNTTHEBOWW 
d GtaMAdvaonll NVA S 14.90 

J GtooS Advtoat MNy B J J4J9 

0 GUM AdVbars Pott NV A S 1885 
j MMAd9banPoit NVB * 1180 

s S»SSSv« i i« 

u!»iMne?..» im- 


m LewragMi-vad 

si Mooimi Pretax Sport 
m Maonm US Entntulse 

m Women US .Vaster ■ 

m MommHMI AUVMGOiei 
ip M omewu n fts te nti an cr 
in Nleatetdum Detjtnatcer 
m Momentum Lmrrcra 
Monentum .Yicacarcstn- 
Momentum NawBw Pwf j 'TSrS.. 

.Wcmrnfum Price * Paflnets J J3487! 
Alamentutn Rntotjon Fd S L55 J7! 

Matnmduni Sandafncad 
Moraitdii* SBXtoncBJer 
MamemsEi Tetoxn Pdtnen 
m itamenfum Unlwn Hedce 
m LURtntirei Vtdjemcsler 
MULTIMANAGER N.V. _ „„ 

ZfSSSZiSttS E v f 

: 2 j 

m Hedge 5 

NAM FOREX MANAGEMENT 
w NAM .Mom Hedge SF 1080 

-SWSSSM^rVMI 

. NA Hedge Fond S InTS 

NOMURA INTI- [HONS 'KONG) LTD 
0 Nomura Jakarta Fund s 1082 

NORTH STAR FUND MANAGEMENT 
T«L *45-33321 127 Fax. -4531326717 
. NStmeslinentFiind M 

w ns hi an Petfornance Fd D» JUM. 

p NS utma MtemBuanoi Fd DM 

• NSCcncrtFuna DU 2W«* 

• NS mroatianal Currency rd • ,^80* 

• N5 Bfl A Mortgage Fond Ott 15280* 

« 6 B»— *r is? 

: isss^isSrte. ^ 

• Dollar Maraged J 

0 Erwra Aston McrwuorWI J 7J06 

w PncHro Stortmsrke, S 5642 

w DaBor Soedc: 76flMI s I.M4 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC _____ 
WUPoms HOUM. Hom^an HMILBenmnto 
! TeL' 441 7^-101S to: 44l 295-2*74 

• A 1 S MMMge Fund s I7.W 

i . Ats VJOfMMdG Fiexl J ITIfi 

w FtosSuryGrouB f 


S 13780 
y. S 74180 

S 2RZ10UDO 

I 18580 

I 14U0 
S 20180 
I 32280 

«?*. g 56.17W 

a R 98091 

R 505500 

I Fl 518769 

1MEWT LTD 

S 7380 

Fd * *6918 

S OJ 1 
S. 745 

“ I I 

a 289 

t 489 

t 15.17 

1 1187 

trl S 1U7 

■" i n 

[ H 

Pka 113790 
Ecn 100863 

XT”, WM 

Fd | 10383 

S 1BU4 

Wd S 10677 

at Ffl * 10587 

nine s 10*00 

SFO J >2^5 

1 9982 

9d S 99.17 

t I 102SS 

fa t 10196 

a nn.12 

EU \ 

fig.'SS iE£ 

iFwM | jOMO 

V I 11980 

don I >0048 

I CUT ■ 10610 

t 16185+ 


nmKQHWS^jsnNP^MUli? DO 




a U5aw^cnoPre5rT.8 i*» __ 


F= IM732 
S =1» 



HiHSho 


S DMOOM BHd 
d Emoa uoaiFt, me a A 
a Caitra MU* Rx lac a B 
a US Garetnawnl 


SF 11*51 « 
BF TIV7JC 


^delkll 




ROTHSCHILD (GROUP 

GROUP FUNDS 

Tet 44 171 2463000 f^JC 




r W f 409. 


S 9318 
S 1,9187 


2472986 _ 

si n 


SF l6*L77 


* IG71W 
11S98C 


SJL- 


E*m 


FF A-S93 
LF 4S2-U3I 
LF 25T0280 
BF 11187080 
DM 504335- 


m GAM Eat! Alto _ J 
0 GAME rang 7AKIS -Vio+M S JJ996 

0 GAM Franc -vd SF 2W.« 

. GAM France ^ 

GAM C-AJVCO J T ® 11 

. GAV.Hqr tirtfl } 

. gam Hc+rg Lang J 

* GA.M .1 -icon 5 

p GAM ' VJ Europe C.M DM 

n GAM MIP-Eataoe U5S } 

» '3A.1A MuUi U S. DM DM 

w GAM.MuWUS USS 5 t,n try i 

0 GAWPodfle -I S, 14r I 

m GAM Pan Ewicga 5P 

0 GAM Pan Ewaperat s 

m GAMSdence * 

n <3AM SMedton -I 

0 GAM SF Special Band SF 

0 GAM StogaporarlWreotM J 

tr. GAM Ideas S 

» GAM TnxSngDM DM 

n GAM TraSrg USS } 

0 OAMTydie J 

w GAM tLS. £ 

w GAM Unl.iT.nl USS S 

0 GAM nonOttKM * 0691. 

» GAMetlCO _ * 

n C-AMut lim t imenW } 

0 GSAA.1 CHF CPBPOtJN SF 

■ GSAM CaapOSlfc S 

0 gsav. dm composite dm 

0 GSAM GBP Cwiqwslto £ 

w GSAM grade * 

0 &SAM Money Ukfl DM DM IWOT 

a GSAM Money Mkts SF SF 1808jT 

£ GSAM Money MkbSter t 10020 ; 

a GSAA 1 Money Mkfl USS . S ,10ftl9- 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 4_I-l-422 2424 
MutoebccKdnme 17LCH BQ3*Zurfcn 

tf GAM (CHI Euros* SF 125J0 

£ GAIA ICHI AlanaM SF 2 U 8 S 

0 GAM [CHi PodSc SF 282.15 

IRISH REGISTERED LOTS 
65-66 Lower Mattol SLOntl" 2jn-l-6T4040 
. OAM Ada ACC DM 9659 

> GAM Eurapa 6 PC DM 165.17 

0 GAMOdealAa DM 1«9* 

_ AAMToincAcc DW 1 

: GAMTSrBonaDMAa DM lCJI 

■ GAM Unhmd DM Aoc DM 24627 

SEC REGIST E PE D FUNDS 

x’smROwi „ „ 
: sasissrA I is 

• GAMGtt MD . . S 1*19 

• GAM gnetnaOand A 3 =86 

0 GAM lidWl rtondp S 32.78 

w GAM Japan COpM J 

• GAM Nontl Ametton S 12JD 

0 GAM Adon Capital S 9» 

« GAM PocHIc Baski A J J5J6 

0 GAMPadUc BcstnD J 15J0 

e* GAMHka Cosflal S 10.93 

hjfinvl and devt financing ltd 

0 roF GMMi S 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: (441) WlAO to(44ll 295*780 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 
w (A 1 Ortglnal InweSMwtl J IMS' 

0 lQ Rnandal & MetaH J 35] -« 

. fDi Glatal Dhmdfled I 

w if; G7 Currency S I16W 

■ iHI Yen FftiMCMI _ 5 J**-* 

w (IG toll Currency 8 . Band S 72. JO 

0 IU GHOar Ftoandat S 14*08 

GLOBAL PUTU RES I OPTKHiS SKAV 
m FFM brl Bd Pragr^HF □ SF 8494 

GORDON HOUSE ASSET MGT Up 
TetKJ 1461 3433.Fmcj 53 1661 3*6. 
m InrepandataSIrat Europe®, } 4A5 

m Optimal Fund S 5-M 

GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 
0 G Swap Fund Ecu 109637 

GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 

w Granin Capitol Equfly Fd * 177460 

GROUPE INDOSUE3 FUNDS 00,11 797 

TM : 13533 44 S4 24 470 

FBI -13521 *6 54 73 

BOND PORTFOLIOS „„ 

0 DEM Bond - 2*3 59 M 785 

d Dlrownd DfsT-73 SF 354 

0 DMKp Band DH23 , * 294 

0 European Ba_—Db I J4 to 169 

a Frerxf Franc — Dh 1024 FF IU 6 

a rubai Braid DN2JS 5 1 ® 

£ itoOan ura Bond UJ 11*8680 

0 Podflcineone S 2810 

0 Spniton Pewto Bond Ptas 29600 

EOUI1T PORTFOLIOS . 

d ASEAN J f46 

0 Ada Paulk * 671 

0 CanXmoal Eunroe Eco 212 

0 DewtoptoBMotoeW | 

j jss“ -S 

2 S5SSU, D 1 ira g 

1 iS5m “ "Sim 

a Japan Srrtaier Canpames \ *'*™ 

0 Norm Amertra * *™ 

a Sedn »“ 

a 5**tMnand SF *73 


BELGE ASSET 36GMT FUND 

ptoutor Guemrey *4148, 726614 
uulry Fund * 

inn Band Fund ; 

DaUorZmBflFd __ } 

Alto PodOc Region Fd J 

India Fund s 


IndtoFuod S 

StortnflEqupyFd £ 

Sledlno Ba Fd £ 

~ EDOUARD CONSTANTSA 
md Oil SF 

ecCM SF 

SwbsAinaC3<> '* 


na& | 

a Prime Can B 
dSMPt-f DM 


LH 2633*080 
U1 72431680 
PtoJ 2171803 


»8pSsTgs 

MrodmaFul.FdSn.2aC 

SSSSS^m a i&i SS 

Indotwr r*jK 1 W Bd Fa A 
0 Mou«HlgtiV1dMFd9 

5 InWwrfL^nriAmaia 

d indasueiMuMraedUiM 


I 9*22 
S 117J17 
i 108.120 
S 170.1*4 
S 125599 
S 0.10! 
S 104je 
I 13722 
Ptot. 12634100 
5 7.79 


iSSSKVSS 

Bend Fd Yens 
Bond Fd CA 
3WM.Fd.CB 


a immw u.u. ■ v. . 

0 IndanK! Ear SrrtCo to DM 

IND0SUE2ASSETMCTASIALTD 


Mrtmr Find 

Wxtz 


i m 

Y 70580 
5 1693 

1250 
7.74 
1269 
1*54 

-089 

419061 

HK I7J15I 
S 12510! 
s *aanz 
S 1677 
S 1081 


5 CaprtM DM 2000 

m. 


SF 6757 

I I 

J 1CQ23 
5 184.12 

SF 2MJ97 
SF 357.94 
S 102*97 
i I55SA4 
Y 111426M 
y I2»763OT 
l 55971 
E »04f9 
JM 20IS52 
JM 1761 JO 
Leu I79IJ4 
FF 1707.00 
SF 101*04 
E 1 1118 1 

OF 10172 
DM 1053 


DM 167.70 
S 146-17 
DM 117.17 
5 11357 

5 *7242- 

SF 14067 
S M1.73 


S 83*71 
S 62625 
I 1183-53 
SF 112-34 
- 41248 


DM 10088- 
SF 100JW 
t loazr 

I 10019- 


S 15078 
Ecu 169.11 
1 11199 

3 9704 

I 11226 
Ecu 1323b 
FF 12807 
SF 9956 
S 11146 
Ecu 11*05 

. rimri SF 10864 

» PWtade FF Reran* FF 11828 

BARCLAYS OLOBAL INVESTORS HONG KONG 
LTD JGoraen RUTH* 

S 10JQ9! 
£ 55916! 

5 1*2SB 

5 6604! 

S'- 6Z74T 
s jurat 
S 2 B 66 C 
S 243112 
S 221671 
% 9JWU 
t 39315* 



CREDIT COMMERCIAL DC PRANK 

0 EiyweNtoneWre FF 16987m 

tf Sam Artcnsti USD B S I2S192 

CREDIT LYONNAIS ROUSE IBCrttoa) U 6 

n ^scnrnrnd Ltd 5 *605 

CLP SELECT 3110-66 ILUX REGI 
m DMnlfiefl USS Old I 

m DMnlHed DM Ord DM 2 /J 1 

hi tHuereWM FFr Ord FF 70.94 

m DtoanHieel AS Did « J 

ffl DtrarsWed U5 Gntd May 99 S 1-78 

to Dlwnlfled AS Goto Jon 2000 AS I L55 

a Eqatryussora * .4-5 

n, EaoriY DM Old DM I*g 

BI Riuncfnl U55 0rd 5 

n, Fbundal DM CYd DM 1391 

THE VOLATILITY FUND 31-HW6 (LUX REGI 
m Tp* voiaflliy Fd USS Setiesl S 108S 
CREDIT SUISSE FUND MGMT {GUERNSEY) 

Wf TM 

IU Nam Eurooc DeH - ACC J Jg 

a. New Europe Debl- Inc S > M 

CURSITORFUND 

w Cunflcr ECN Adan Ed J ,**>6 

w ClKWwGMBaOPtS 4 Jg-JZ 

0 Cunltor GW GwIB iub-Fd S 15*87 

DARI EH HENT5CH GROUP 

o * 1 !Srt Tronuiy Pd SF iiiS'm 

fl PH Motor MameWFand SF 1174)51 


0 DH Mandarin PontoSo SF IM 

d DH Swtu (E* 5MI1 SF IU 

0 DH Talpap Pod |F >5 

j Somurai Parifoio SF 2 i 

UE LTEC P AHAMERICA ^UST CO. LTD 


SF 1019*15 
SF 1176)51 
SF 12*1814 
SF 1051*15 
SF IIU652 
SF 253819 


DeNeC Latin American Rd 
... DdtocWaMwkfelnc Fd 
m DelteC W YWd Fd 
DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 
0 Sam, Bd Mill Had Duhid 
0 sawn BdMDlO Hod OlF 


1 4169 

S 1447 
S 1175*17 

5 134524 

SF 1472J9 
FF 544*90 


sawn Bd Man Hod ojF 

o r « » 

SSHSflBfH J W 

sawn Bd M H Shed T DE7A DM 1020.11 


BARING INTL FD MNGfiS ORELAND1 
LTD IKON SIB RECOGNIZED! IFAX S2M 
a AusrcAa ' ® 

0 Japan Fund ; 

0 Mania t Singapore S 152 

0 Hem America S *3 


I 33 TT 
S 22.191 
S I52J7Z 
S 4*431 
1 4548* 

S 12009: 

„ .... S 2037- 

O Emopo Fund S 

0 Hanq Rang J 199-91 

0 Trtstar Woman! } 27.171 

0 Gtofaal Enwratofl Mkh S 11^ 

d Laftn America s 1421 

0 US DoOai Currency Fiwrd J Jlgr 

a Currency Fund Managed 1 M50i 

0 Korea Feeder Fund _ S S5 3z 

0 Eirtaoe Sefea Feeder Fund £ <U79x 

BEACON GLOBAL ADVISORS LTD 
ITT Gemini Can LH 8 504835 

m Cuapau ierte N LM S 97X52 

in Compass Senes E LM s 42CT20 

re Campau Series 8 LM S 81 ^8 9 

■n Coainau Scries W.Ud S 43038) 

BEUNVEST FUNDS . „, 10 

m Beirwes, Brain Seted Fd S 1ILI9+ 

0 BeOnm Rtoltv Fund FK * ll*83* 

0 B«ne9-MiMbana S 1430.M 

BERKSHIRE CMS ZURICH (<1.139*2729 
E-MAIumemd: oetxsi»ire»grttorfti.q>ni 
w Aflsfa Bto-MetBad Gwto S *40 

0 Artito Cap Gwin F i LM 5 9*9 

0 Artm High Ted) Grwtti S 617 

80 tTCN CAPITAL MGT 

0 imn Asia Fund S 116( 09 

w Zbangu Fund I 8.7472 

BSS UNIVERSAL FUND SKAV 
0 GWjoI Eu USD A [DM S 

5 177792 

S 2*6677 


.. Sawd BdMufl CHF 
0 Scant Bd Mu» USD 
■ Scam Ewfly Euwrai 
w scant Ea N. Arwrtal 
w Scam Ea French FF 
- Sawn Eq ;<nn 

ttfa?ss£e&. 


CHF 1017M 
S 1028.19 
ECU 103*12 
S 2587 03 
FF 10155 
Y 801.70 
S 111037 
t 1322.99 

a 114832 


0 GkMIEqUSOBIGapI * 209 43 

d OebdBgndlUSDAfetol S 177792 

0 Global Bands USD BICapI 5 2*6677 

d Gtobd Bands FPE A (Df.) FF 1223799 

0 Gtobal Bonds FRF BICOBl FF 1016468 

d Europe ECU A IDtvl to 183*275 

3 EUIWECUBICMI to 1X*M 

3 FattoUSDAtpiyi S SLSD79 

a Far E£B1 USD BiCaoi S 287998 

3 Japan JPY A IDhri Y 91*4374 

« Sffifit FF 

i 184*92 


d d F \ 18*72 

3 s U S B B ffi sc? S 

?VCBBSUr m 'Tlh 

: core a ,07 gS 


scan! Em Mto Pa doc _ 

> sawn Middl e Eari Brawl 

DISCOVER INVESTMENTS 
w DtsanerAsta S 7M 

w Dfccorsr Europe S "AS 

DOSSIER DEGESTWN COLLECTIVE 

0 Otobol S B7J9 

* America 

W Ewopf 9^ |MI " 

DRESDHER BANK INVESTMENT GROUP 
DfTDT INVE5TMENT -TRU5 T. FFM 
PO Bo 11044LD40ID9 FraiWirttoaa3i*to« 

MANAGEMENT SERVICES LTD 

Ln Tauctie House - ■ IFSC - D»* 0 n l 

DSB nromwaWI Am 5« Pd __ 

d CoAQuMotfor F«nd 1 

SfiaftSSSSFoKOrtoesirt 

s '®s 

EflC PUND MANAGERS Uonwrt CTD 

PfflfiMWt,.* 

m vnrixitf 5F *2_3&10 

ShT^JaTiONAL INCOME FUND 

1 SSlSS-DMK diSiBSS? 

ED* F MAN INVESTMENT PRODUCTS 
ToB Free *41 46 05 ill 14 
m muni unto) ■ pidtam r * 

n Mini Llraltod • bicroiw J " « 

a. MMGtdLM -Spec toe S 7*g 

nr MnrGtoDd-NyWP * 

■n Mail Did Currencies S 

m iWntGtoCunwidMMI S 734 

e. MlitlGGLFtami J '"J 

ffl MM Plus GM 2003 J J-*i 

m MH PIUS GH Bond s 

m AHrena GW FlAjik J 2J01 

ffl Altierur GW CurrerKlM J J-® 

m AifiarB W RncrYJflfc Caa S }«• 

n Amena Gto Fbpmdab kk J 

w AHL AJpM Kc 5 13*-g 

or AHL CaurtcS AyJl Fd | »■« 

n AHL Commodify ftffld S J 6 W 

m AHL Curt net Fund * 

ffl AHLDwGMLH J I3ZW 

or 6HLDIyC4dllUd J 

i. AHLDfvRc * 11W 

m AHL ftt-ru me Trad Fd | 

m AHL GW PMf Time Tld S JJAl 

m AHLOWCapfAwKlM 5 ,SJI> 


S 119*40 
S 111107 

„ , 1 113432 

s Hffifir J 

o FJSTIlFuno * .115}^ 

0 ^t‘|p E ( F 1 ^i l 

UPPO INVESTMENT 

TH IKUM&ai) 521 3672/71 
Fa naJM2iail 521-2677 , 

m Jaw Fund 

m IDH Money MailratFd S 146} 

it ManeSlan Gnmrtn Fd _ .. S . }»■” 

LLOYD - GEORGE MNGMT OS® B« 6831 !'• ' 

0 LGAfltonna Fiffld s HLU 

m LG Aston SmOtorpuPd * 

0 LG Indto Fond Ltd S 

w LG Japan Furta * 7.W 

: tSSs^Foud * ^ 

\^SBOSBB mm r ...66 

srrowatfTe 

fDAS^S^O^TUN^ ®“ 

1 sssr ” ss 


- K^F^edgeS. A 


cayman irar rt- nnyc rr 

Obnnwr Mar FF tliiged SW FF 291832 
flfacn. GicSal Hiwmaue Ecu 13060} 

;% 1 «cn. Hldfl Inti iAatBitn Ecu J*903i 

SVlrajL HldJ Kill Ser D to }«6O0 

Wincb HkiglnnSerF to 1911047 

Oitmara Gtobal H*d(* 


SF 472.18 
FF 63398 


0 Uidtod raitodjm* Ireland £ 

1 sfr Tf ss 

rEEff* i 39 

% v 

p Pound Storting £ ^?!1 

s sssm* • 2 £ 

\ E s“ f ^ 

d US DaOra Start Tenn I 1*70 

d HY Euro Cwr Dfwld Pay to 1234 

0 MssMutrtaitrency SF 19J» 

0 European Curronry Ecn 

s gr 3 H 

fl SdSb^DMJnd |F 1007 

1 asassp- 1 ^ § "W 

0 Dutofl Flortn MUBI R 1831 

1 zsi&S&S” {£ i 

0 DfflMOunrtSNWI Ten* CM* 10g 

% WSSASSSUm % !S£ 

0 arottfaiGaroi CHF-Oteutorikna SF JOM 

0 Mtdd Cun DWdbultog SF 3« 

0 NLG ffWfcmr- » _ H 1035 

LOMBARD ODIER INVEST 
0 smdkr European Caps DM 37-» 

d North Amrotea S 775 

d PodBc RSffl * ,1031 

0 jagroi arc Yen 123*00 

0 Eastern European DM 1*52 

NLD.SASS RE/ENTERPRISE INTL LTD 
re Class AA 01/10) * 1W5-* 

MAGNUM FUNDS 


* 

S T9JT 
S 2*97 
V 564500 
£ 32-81 

DM 2133 

Ff 2*01 

ECU *064 

SF 1562 

| 1*70 

Ecu 1224 

SF 19-80 

Ecn 2834 

BF 17*17 

I 19.41 

FF 199.14 

SF 1007 

sf iiaoo 

CS 1734 

Fl 1831 

SF "35 

SF l *87 

SF "J? 


» Vrtjcn.ReMt.AVdU.CuM * ,{ -ff 

tt OVnsiC tntl A-tinc^e S ISi-S 

0 Ofyrnuta nctuial Resources S 61008 

0 PPENHEIMER BCD. INC MS (Flrtn navi . 

1 Androae inleraaNcna S J«Jr lT 

i EnenjMMslnrtil S JSH 

l mn Hmtron Fund II ; Sa 

r Oppen Ccrdys: toll LM * 

f Opper. I nB Spri er Up S jag 

r Oppeo PongOi ml LM S 

f Oppeu votoe wo ud s Mass 

opncEsnoN park 

GROUPE MARTIN AtAUREL 
0 OpPgeiJ GW Frt-Rred Ire DM SJuja 

0 Cpltged Obi Fa-G«n 5«M P. DM 1026*6 

OPTIMA FUND MAN AGEME NT 

73 From SI MBr^mvBeroWla 809 2^6458 
w Groltcro Fin FtArrosUd f J'-S 

D OpOroa ABernaJreSIrai | J' S 

m Oporao Emeraw Ffl LM S 1J« 

• OptanaFund S 2*10 

f g 

- esssfaHS. i .i» 


S *86902 
S *1667! 
S 93066! 
S *32732 
S *66951 
f 6.10702 
S *52002 
S 0.40872 
a 1*89612 


nsSw'fa 

0 MognurarapCar Grow® * 

- | U7« 

S sis 

a, NeeJwm Omni Se r B S lg>to 

0 Raseoufl CnpOal GrowBr * 16*00 

MAGNUS BROS TOJU) BIS 01 34 
w BrtcCrowmFirt DM 1|» 

■e Barth: Grow* Fuafl Sek 1 SJ< 

MALABAR CAP MGMT (BmmM LTD 
m dtatabar mn Fund S 3*94 

' ILFUND 

S 11JW7 
I 5.9448 
S *7073 
S 1J0162 
a 2.1693 
5 21210 

3 11883 

J 23098 

1 Z0442 

a 21963 



W Grancro Fin tones LM | 

D Optima Arternajre «rar | J' S 

w opomo Emeraw Ffl LM S 1J« 

• OptanaFund | M-J" 

: ssssss® 1M f g 

: i »ss 

ORBIS INVEST6JEHT Bffltwfla (MMlftMO 

■ Odjis Global 12 Jam ; 

» orals Pp umd a tool s K25 

re Orbis Leveraged C Jml * 

ORBITEX OgOUFOF FUNDS 
Kassao Tel (809)3564450 Fan 869U2 80541 
irop-.'iat«eMeflL uiuah 

J omSa Com * JntoTech Ffl S *I 6 P! 

0 omara Grown Fd . __ S 
d Ortons Heann A Emm Ffl J *]«g 

0 Orbucr Japan Fd s 1'™^ 

0 OmitHLawj-SWt M * 

0 Ortowi Natural Rea Fd Cl 1*89612 

SJSffiSrtsniraTiii^usnwinsn 

a Inflnliv Fund LM | 

3 ^YJtodFfllM S 

3 ?ffiSW«eMFd i ^ 

5WBSaSBB«* G&. 

PARfflWGROUP , t „* 

1 BHC ^ 'i 

5 j ^as 

1 a ^ 

• R s *« 

5 

a POTesiOBBBenpiB LF 1077*00 

5 tonMWLOnlaB CS 24*16 

d pSSSowJhF SF 20/37 

j Porvm Obi-DKK. B DKK 1178.77 

0 PoriS! OM-OM B DM «*W 

3 pSSSS3ttoIa B Ett ll*5 

5 5 ,sa 

2 pSK3 sTbwFV&B BF 

3 SSI:TSSi b b £ 


wTan «9S461to: 3D lOl 906 

i 

^Ra mSi.L D ^OT MgMT (CD LTD 

rnMn 

SJUfTAWDEB NEW jBORLD INV. 

m Cuuu under Funl J 

to Ertner Fvid » 

SKANPINAVgKA ENSIOLD A BANKEN 

s 

0 Emopo Inc * 

0 Ftarron OOenr Me ? 

0 Global Inc » 

a LawnmdeUnc » 

fl VarMen Inc l 

d Jrnn Iik T 

.3 Mfcjlsre * 

fl Swerigi Inc «5 

d N w fl u aibrtkn Inc } 

d Swrtge'fentWand UK Sek 

A ArliBWitaQSlrwid Me S4ft U3S10 

SKAHDIFONDS . 

0 Etofflytat, A«x * V. HS 

0 Eaunyiroltac * 1*6™4 

A Equn»Gtotort . S, 

•fl Etpiny fiat Rcaoarcrs— 4 

a Eardty Japan t 

fl EqaByNORBc $ 

d EquOyUX _ J 

fl EgotyCflrtrrtolErtpe * 

fl EqaCr Mpfl ke r run trwi $ 

d Effl^NOrihAfflrtca | 

d mn Emerptao Markets s 

0 tori Eastern Europe £ 

a Bond inn Acc * 

fl Bond UNI Inc } 

0 Bond Europe Aoc * 

d Band Eunroe »c J 

j Band Sweden ACC sg 

d Bund Sweden me » 

fl Bard DEM ACC DM 

d Baad DEM Inc DM 

O Band DaflarUJ Acc | 

tf Bead D ojpr US t oe. _J 

0 Sweden FknltoeBd A* » 

fl Sweden Fvnfitfe Bd me Sck 

fl Short Bond USD. S 

n soon Band SwwWHOonor S* 




s 1547352 

a i5643a 

S 3170682 
S 097.112 
C « 6 JN 


•=-3 




JJrHi t .fn m W. 


lEt 5 

5 SI 

1 ESSE 

3 g 

| 

fl Prevustll 

s gg| 

111 



ypy _ 


1 r ■ 

j 

Irfel 

a 

tf 

T 

a noun i 
S 1792.171 

w 

* 








SOFA RIND LIMITED 
ffl aosn A 
m qo®30 






1 *46 

a s.7i 

Ecn 212 

DM 'HI 

LB 117123)0 

V 71900 

a *oa 

Pt04 342.00 

SF *73 

( 234 


i^SSSCS^a 1 . J**!* r^cS^ t T^ ER T Y ?iS 7 

■ro Capitol LM JanB DM I98430E • WtaSmSot * 111*00 


d United 7Jn^i t L04 

^^1^51769 DM 689, 

fl D^=DHL'a | 26g 

0 French toM 

0 Storing Reserve £ 

fl lenResem Y 

GRYPHON FUND MANAGE ME NT U**rreD 
ffl Gryphon Band Fund Lto * 9*B 

re awTortie Fund Lrd S 9766 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
r GCMimnxLw * "JJrt 

f GCM HR E*. Fd I 

1 GCM 59, Akkra Inf 1 ™-4ll 

> GCM UM SpodU * 125*152 

GUINNESS FLIGHT (44)1481 712176 

ifax raw - 


A GSFGtabarBand . 
u DSF fflobal High Inc BroM 
0 G5F Euro Htari me. Ban) 
0 GSF flffl fc S tofSog G grol^ 
a OSF Adar Lwrenty A Bd 
d GSF Gtabto Equrty _ 
fl GSF Ameftam Blue two 
d GSF Jam** 1 Poedte 
a GSFEinapean 
d GSF Hons Kong 

d GSF Gill PrhraBsoBan F 8 
d GSFAseon , 

0 GSF Aston SippIH W Cm 

0 OSF GWCl Bm.GrotoB 
0 IAF US DuBar Hlflh VdBd 
fl IAF Bin BrtSWK' GrtJWIh 


1 XI* 
! 2189 

\ K 

1 iuS 

1 ii 



NOKIA 


fl IAF PTH BOOncec evuran . 

HASENBIOU£RA»£T MAHGT^Mu^ 

: ssaassr* 0 \ w 

sKffisaspssss™ 

« HerarMNOrtl AntedaWM | 

re Homrj Band Fund 


□0-5211100) 

S 4*91 

Ft 1126” 

S 52-55 

Fl 7*18 

S 3*44 

S 93.18 

Fl S4JB 

FL 11560. 
IkSSO 5JL 

% 205*00 

SF 3712.42 

I 1749 17 

ECU 192998 


a mo 
DM 1864 
Ecu ,230 
S 1164 
ECU 1156 
S EMI 
SF 1*900 
S 11650 
SF 16S&D 
5 11610 

4IEHNU- Linvn cnrrelK MARKETS 
fl OBHA * 1094 

fl qSb s KL&4 

MERRILL LYNCH EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE 

sgsufflETasss , ^ 

rET™ ? m 

CONVERTIBLE SECUPIT1ES PTFL 

fl rtoac B S 15.90 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL I USD 

5 i 

global EOum portfolio 

% g£a J 

gi«alsmallcappo«tfdijo ims 

% ^Sb l Wit 

EURO EGJJITY PORTFOLIO 

d Si „ * 18 ^ 

LATINAMESICA PORTFOLIO 

0 a«B * 1 LZ 7 

PACWCEDUITV PORTFOLIO 

fl taS _ * HUM 

TECHTFOL-OOY portfolio 1cm 

tf 9 *“* K UQI 



P.CF VOfibWLLUJj PHK 

P p j&XS* 1 * H 

t&MKag 3 

WW 9 " i 

ia i 

P.F * Votcend DEM fund DM 

PJL Vtotomd to [Lib). to 

PFi. Vcflamd FRF I LIB) FF 

P.FJ, VWband CAP «UNJ „ £ 

PFJ.VUWndSFRtUfid SF 

PFX VaSwrid USD tLWJ 6 

PM1CF Vt«*l 4 

P fl! A CF VOIIHOIIKH S 

P.TF.2 StatoOr I 

P.iy iGMiai value s 

P.T.F. Auarratajifl f 

P.TR Eoueni Einroe DM 

P.1S. Eroara HUB (LINJ _ 5 








mm 




SB 


Communicator Th 9 data pw Mflh to M ffcWfteSinSnSteS SSnaSaS jnjtf rctS M e SbSbS FuSqSS to JyetotTS’ baaigBerbyHT orMcwp^ 

communicator Merapflaid ^ . 


"j’T.', 1 . .r,," 1 ,"! 1 .. , ..I. 1 '!.' 







































* u " SS % » 

'■S *i M " ^ a? 

»? S *8 B fi p 

•« 1 * tS S 5 5 fi L 
1 5 H « *15 *S 

* * e ? « * s 


* - »f“ g& £5 IS *2 

rsirgii^ 

H Bin! S» s Si •» 


1 “ a r sw sS 

ia i?J§ s» H ™ 


iS ii 15 HIM M» »* J£J »n 

I i Hrr p e 3 

* i S ‘Sj % >s '« -a 

* ,9 ? s ,s $ »S -* 

jm 1$ u jj hj m ™ .a 

ji'ltafc; 

















































PAGE 20 


Discrimination Suit 
Filed Against NCAA 


A public interest law group filed 
suit against the NCAA, which over- 
sees U.S. college sports, saying it 
discriminates against blacks be- 
cause ir uses standardized test 
scores to decide whether athletes 
can compete and receive scholar- 
ships. 

The NCAA replied by unveiling 
a study that it says show that its 
rules are contributing to increasing 
graduation rates for black athletes. 

High school seniors must score 
slightly better than 50 percent on 
either the Scholastic Assessment 
Test or the American College Test 
to compete as freshmen athletes. 
The rules, commonly known as 
Proposition *18. took effect in 1986 
and have since been toughened. 

In the lawsuit filed in U.S. Dis- 
trict Court in Philadelphia. Trial 
Lawyers for Public Justice said the 
rule violated the Civil Rights Act 
because black athletes are dispro- 
portionately affected. 

The NCAA says the number of 
black athletes enrolling in Division 
I schools that gram scholarships is 
recovering after falling when Pro- 
position 4S was adopted. The 
NCAA said blacks made up 27.3 
percent of athletes entering the 
schools in 1985. This fell to 23.6 
percent in 1986 but rose to 25 per- 
cent in 1989. 

The study showed a rise in gradu- 
ation rates among black male ath- 
letes: from 34 percent of the fresh- 
man class of 1985. the last year 
before Proposition 48. to 41 percent 
of 1986 freshmen, and 43 percent of 
19S9 freshmen. fAP. ll'Pl 


NBAs Top 10 Teams 


basketball The NBA has 
chosen the 10 best teams in its 50~ 
year-history, though it has not put 
them in any order. Wilt Chamber- 
lain. Michael Jordan and Dennis 
Rodman each played on two of the 
teams voted for by a media panel. 

Chamberlain starred on the 
1966-67 Philadelphia 76ers and 
1971-72 Los Angeles Lakers. 
Jordan led the 1991-92 and '95-96 
Chicago Bulls, and Rodman played 
on the 1988-89 Detroit Pistons and 
.995-96 Bulls. The 1964-65 Bos- 
ton Celtics, the 1 9&9-70 New York 
Knieks. 1982-83 76ers. 1985-86 
Celtics and 1986-87 Lakers were 
the other teams picked. (AP) 


Golota Convicted 


boxing Andrew Coioia received 
a two-year suspended prison sen- 
tence and a $7,000 fine Thursday in 
Warsaw for beating up a man in a 
May 1990 disco brawl. 

Prosecutors had originally 
charged Golota with assault and 
robbery with a deadly weapon. Go- 
lota admitted bearing up Pawel Bia- 
lostocki. but denied pointing a gun 
at him. 

Golota fled Poland in 1991 to 
avoid facing trial. He returned to 
Poland after the second of his two 
tights against Riddick Bowe. He 
was disqualified in both for low 
blows. According to media reports 
Golota agreed to pay Bialostocki 
$ 1 0.052 in compensation. ( AP) 


Italians Accused of Deceit 


soccer Roy Hodgson . an Eng- 
lishman who coaches inter Milan in 
Italy's Sene A. says Italian soccer 
players are cheats who try to trick 
referees and should learn from the 
British sense of fair play. 

“Whenever there's a dispute be- 
tween a player and a referee. I’m 
always on the referee’s side," he 
said. "Every Sunday, they have to 
face one ambush after another, one 
attempt to trick them after anoth- 
er. 

" I think that in Italy people need 
to work hard at the rules of be- 
havior. so as to eliminate this desire 
for deceit and their habit of com- 
plaining." t AFP 1 


Scoreboard 


HcralbS&ribunc 


Sports 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1W 


V,-i 0 


v 1' *i-' 


New World for Woods 


As PGA Tour Opens 

Can Golfs Wonder Keep Up Pace? 


By Larry Dorman 

AVi. Yt'rk Timex Service 


CARLSBAD. California — The 
middle-aged man thrust a piece of paper 
at Mark O'Meara as the golfer stepped 
from the 18th green at La Costa Resort 
and Spa. 

"Hey." he said, as O'Meara auto- 
graphed il '‘guess it was quite an ex- 
perience for you playing with Tiger 
Woods, huh?’ 5 

The pen paused, and O'Meara looked 
up, half-smiling. Here he was. the de- 
fending champion in the Mercedes 
Championship — the season-opening 
tournament for winners only that will 
begin Thursday — a 40-year-old vet- 
eran entering his 17th season on the 
PGA Tour, and he was supposed to be 
grateful because he got to play a practice 
round with a 21 -year-old? 

O'Meara started to laugh. 

"1 told him," O'Meara said. " ‘Hey. 
pal. I think you've got that backwards. 
I’m the guy with 12 tour wins, three 
Ryder Cups, eighth on the career money 
fist. I'm the defending champion here. 
This week. I'm the man. 1 think maybe 
Tiger Woods should be glad for the 
chance to play with Mark O'Meara. ' ” 

"Touche," the man replied. 

O'Meara's mock indignation was 
half put-on. He has befriended Woods, 
served as his mentor and golf partner at 
the Orlando course where both of them 
Jive, He knows exactly how good 
Woods is. and he appreciates his game. 
But as a competitor, he does not ap- 
preciate being slighted in comparison, 
and he does not mind telling people 
that. 

In a sense, this serves as a theme for 
the 1997 season: The world has learned 
about Woods, now it's his rum to learn 
about the world. He has arrived at La 
Costa for what used to be called the 
Tournament of Champions faster than 
anyone in the game’s history. His two 
victories in only seven events at the end 
of the 1 996 season cured plenty' of skep- 
ticism about whether he is the genuine 
article. 

Now begins the season where Woods 
will be competing against the best play- 
ers at each tournament he enters, be- 
ginning with this one. 

You can see the difference, up and 
down the range at La Costa. Warming 
up to the task at hand are Tom Lehman. 
Fred Couples, Nick Faldo. Corey Pavin 
and Phil Mickelson. 

It is true that there are 12 first-time 
champions in the field, all pan of the 
youthful wave that swept across the golf 
landscape last v«..u 1 14 of 44 tourna- 
ments were won" by players in their 20s), 
but the veterans are hardly ready to cede 
the keys to the kingdom. 


“Who knows what's going to un- 
fold?" Faldo said. “In truth, he’s been 
on tour for about five minutes, hasn't 
he? Give him a full year.” 

For his pan. the young man in the 
center of all this seems unchanged. He is 
outwardly calm, still smiles easily, still 
bombs his tee shots to almost unfathom- 
able spots on the golf course he has seen 
only three rimes now. 

“Hopefully. I'll get off to a good 
start.” Woods said. “This course sets 
up good for me. It's playing very long, 
and the rough is thick and lush so you'll 
have to be straight.” 

Woods once said that he comes into 
every tournament he plays believing he 
can win, with the goal to win. ano his 
performance so far has earned him the 
respect of one of the players who will be 
trying to beat his brains out weekly. 

“It’s refreshing to see somebody 
whose goal or whose primary concern is 
to win golf tournaments," Mickelson 
said. So far, Mickelson has nine vic- 
tories ar age 26. Can Woods get seven 
more in the next five years to match 
that? Can he surpass it? Can he come out 
here and dust the veterans in a con- 
tinuation of his amazing start? 

These are the sort of questions that 
most of the players on the PGA Tour 
haven't had to ponder about 21 -year-old 
kids. They do now. Most of them think 
it's a good thing. 

“Some guys might be hoping for 
Tiger to fail.’"* O'Meara said, “but not 
many. What I've tried to tell him not to 
lose sight of is that he's a human being 
and the people on the other side of the 
ropes are human beings, too. You need 
to treat those people right and you need 
to treat your fellow competitors right. 
Never lose sight of that." 

■ Healthy Tour Mav Get Healthier 



SIGN OF THE TIMES — Carlos Moya signing autographs after beating Patrick Rafter 7-6 <8-6?, 6-2 in { .- 
the quarterfinals of the Sydney International tennis tournament. Costa will face compatriot Albert Costa !- 1 


in the semi-finals. Costa beat Byron Black 6-4, 6-2. In the other men's semi-final, Goran Ivanisevic win I 
play Tim Henman. Ivanisevic beat Sandon Stolle 6-4 6-2. Henman beat Alex O'Brien 1-6 7-6 (7-3) 6-4. ■ 


U.S. Rugby’s Future: Huge 9 Fast 


The PGA Tour, already one of the 
healthiest sports entities in the world, 
will be among the major beneficiaries of 
Woods's huge appeal. The Washington 
Post reported. 

His presence comes at a wonderful 
time for the tour, which will start ne- 
gotiations with its major network and 
cable partners on new television con- 
tracts his year; the current ones expire 
after the 1998 season. There is talk Fox 
is interested in adding golf to its grow- 
ing sports empire. Another bidder 
means even higher purses to be shared 
by the players. 

Then again, they are not exactly play- 
ing for pocket change now. 

The tour will pay $70 million in prize 
money over the 19% season, a $6 mil- 
lion increase over 1995. following □ 
year when nine players earned at least 
$1 million or more, led by Mickelson 's 
$1,780,159. 


International HeraU Tribune 

CARDIFF. Wales — Two years ago 
Jack Clark found scientific proof for the 
experiment he was conducting in the 
United States. The proof was on the 
other side of the world, a 6 foot 6 inch 
( 1 .95 meter). 250 pound (.113 kilogram) 
New Zealand behemoth who single- 
handedly made England feel tiny, slow 
and bruised in a semifinal of the Rugby 
World Cup. 

For the rest of the world, the AH 
Blacks wing Jonah Lomu was a rev- 
elation — “a freak.” according to the 
beaten England captain Will Carling. 
To an American like Clark, however, 
Lomu embodied the future of nig by. It's 
a future pleasing to Americans. Where 
Clark comes from there is a surplus of 
athletes built like Lomu — indeed, some 
of them are looking for work. 

“Don’t get me wrong.” said Clark, 
the Californian head coach and genera] 
manager of the U.S. national rugby team, 
“We may have many gridiron players 
with Jonah's qualities athletically, but 
none of them have his instincts for rugby. 
Still, it would be a very interesting ex- 
periment for somebody to put together 
the biggest, fastest. Jonah Lomu-clone 
rugby team the world has ever seen.” 

The majority of those players, he 
believes, would come from America 
and it is his goal to put together such a 
team. 

The current U.S. team will meet 
Wales in a test on Saturday at hallowed 
Cardiff Arms Park. 


Vantage Point / Ian Thomsen 


At 41, Clark might be just young 
enough to see his project through. His 
team won four of 10 tests last year, an 
improvement on its previous best record 
of 2-7 in 1 99 1 ■ The United States seems 
likely to be one of three countries from 
the Americas to qualify for the 1999 
World Cup to be held in Wales. 

But the Americans are bracing for a 
difficult weekend against such inventive 
Welshmen as leu an Evans and Arwel 
Thomas. A huxnblingly small crowd is 
expected. Even if the Americans were to 
come up with a breakthrough victory in 
Cardiff, it would turn more heads around 
the world than in America. But publicity 
is not the issue fra- Clark at this stage. He 
thinks the sport will change dramatically 
in the next few years. Now dial there is 
money in rugby for the players, the game 
has a chance to catch the eye of the 
world's most athletically-gifted country. 

Rupert Murdoch's Sky TV seems to 
think so. A few months after signing the 
Southern Hemisphere powers to a long- 
term TV deal that forced rugby to turn 


B rofessional, Sky agreed to pay USA 
:ugby close to $ I million annually in a 
multiyear contract for broadcasting 


multiyear contract for broadcasting 
rights. 

"I suppose it's a better deal for us 
right now,” Clark said. "But something 
tells me in five years it’s going to be a 
better deal for Sky ihan it is for us." 

The idea of popularizing rugby in the 


RESCUE? Two Dramatic Recoveries , and a Search Opens for Another Missing Sailor 


Continued from Page \ 


swamped by a storm Sunday. The 
stricken vessels were spotted by an Aus- 
tral ian Air Force Orion the next day. 300 
kilometers south of where another 
French competitor. Raphael Dinelli. 
was saved from a sinking yacht on Dec. 
27. 

Mr. Dubois was spotted waving, but 
Mr. Bullimore, who was inside the cab- 
in of his upturned yacht, could not be 
seen. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Bullimore’s dis- 
tress beacon changed its frequency. He 
was either alive to make the change — 
or the switch could have been tripped as 
the beacon sloshed around the cabin of 
the boat and hit something. 

When Australian Navy rescuers 
reached the stranded craft, they did not 
know what to expect. 

The Adelaide launched an inflatable 
Zodiac with six crewmen, including 
divers and engineers. The rescuers 
rapped on the hull. They heard a tapping 
in response. 

Captain Ray don Gates, the com- 
mander of the Adelaide, said a “feeling 
of elation" ran through the ship when 
Mr. Bullimqre responded to knocks on 
the hull of his yacht. confirming for the 


9H 






ANTARCTICA 


first time since the boat capsized on 
Sunday that he was alive. 

“Can you get out?” the rescuers 
called. 

"No,” Mr. Bullimore yelled back. 

But just as they prepared to cut a hole 
in the hull, Mr. BuIIimore’s head 
bobbed to the surface of the 32-degree 
Fahrenheit (zero degree centigrade) wa- 
ter next to the Zodiac. He had swum out 
from under the boat 

He kissed his rescuers, said Captain 
Gates. 

"It's a Houdini-like act,” said David 


Gray, spokesman for the Australian 
Maritime Safety Authority. 

Captain Gates said Mr. Bullimore 
had not had any fresh water for two days 
and had possible frostbite on his feet. 

"His health is remarkably good. 
We’ve discovered he's missing the tip 
of his left little finger. He accidentally 
amputated that on a hatch two days ago, 
so it was while he was under the hull,’* 
said Colonel Andy Reynolds, an Aus- 
tralian Defense Department spokesman. 
“He is suffering from dehydration, he’s 
been without water for two days, he’s of 
course cold and that's understand- 
able." 

The Englishman's first request after 
going aboard the Adelaide was for a cup 
ofrea. 

Mr. Dubois's yacht overturned 
Sunday. He had stood helplessly on the 
hull of his capsized 65-foot (20-meter) 
yacht Amnesty International for 24 
hours before an Australian Air Force 
Orion rescue plane spotted him and 
dropped a life raft 

Mr. Dubois said be had despaired of 
being rescued just before the plane ar- 
rived. Then a wave washed him off the 
hull and into the freezing waters, and the 
life raft drifted out of reach. 

"At one moment I have no more 


feeling, no more raft, no more aircraft 
and T'm swimming in the middle of the 
Indian Ocean. And at this moment, for 
me, it's finished,” Mr. Dubois re- 
called 

• “My only question is how many 
minutes to die,” he said. 

But the plane returned and dropped 
another ran. Mr. Dubois struggled 
aboard and waited two more days until 
he was rescued. 

The 29-year-old Frenchman was 
plucked from the raft m a winch rescue 
by the crew of a Seahawk helicopter 
launched at dawn from the Adelaide. 

Captain Gates said Mr. Dubois 
suffered slight hypothermia and had 
saltwater sores on his hands and feet 
from exposure. 

“His first word was ‘Thanks',” Cap- 


United States will seem unlikely to 
those who have glanced at the tight 
scrumming, kicking game employ edbv 
England. Clearly Murdoch "hasn’t 
bought up rugby with that kind of play in 
mind. 

With Murdoch's television proper- 
ties spanning the globe, he wants Rugby 
to become a world game. Those who 
understand how TV has streamlined 
American sports can foresee the day - 
when rugby union will naturally grav- 
itate toward a sleeker. Lomu-powered 
style that attracts an audience beyond 
the current limited markets of the South- 
ern Hemisphere and parts of Western 
Europe. 

"Most of the gridiron players I know- 
have made the swatch to the game quite 
easily,” Clark said. “But I would hate 
for people to misunderstand: You' 
couldn’t make a gridiron player into a 
fly-half overnight. Just because you're 
big and fast doesn't mean you’re tough 
or you have the instincts for rugby." 

Recent generations of American foot- 
ball lineman who have grown larger 
than 300 pounds would find it im- 
possible to sustain the back-and-forth 
pace of die largest players in rugby. 
Much of American football is a bout 
push ing out, extending the arms to block 
or stiff-arm a tackier, which is why the 
bench press is such an important ex- 
ercise in the NFL; in rugby it's more 
important to pull to grab at the ball. 

Nonetheless, rugby’s new profes- 
sionalism has seen 10 Americans join 
international clubs to varying degrees of 
success. The 6 foot 9 Inch Luke Gross is 
a lock for Harlequins in London; a few 
years ago he was playing basketball at 
Indiana State, Larry Bird's old school. 

The best example for American 
rugby is its captain and flanker Dan 
Lyle, 6 feet 5 inches and 250 pounds, 
and now playing in the second row with 
Bath of England, one of the world’s, 
leading clubs. He was an honorable 
mention All- America tight end in 1992 
wbo took up rugby the following year to 
stay in shape for an NFL tryout with the 
Washington Redskins. 

‘ ‘He didn ’r get cm the field for a year, 
but we took him everywhere we went,’ ’ 
Clark said. “In his first test against 
Ireland in 1994 he was mas of die 
match.” 

Rugby remains strictly amateur on 
the American club leveL with 30.000 


tain Gates said. * ‘He did very little talk- players registered nationally. Yet Lyle 
J°n ° f Sm V ing - . ... is one of three players with NFL con- 

bome fellow solo yachtsmen, while nections who is likely to play Saturday 

marvfkhno nr Mr R»H mn«'r Tr.i - J 


marveling at Mr. BuUimore’s rescue, 
questioned the race rules and yacht 
safety. 

A Perth sailor, Jonathan Sanders, 
who has sailed solo around the world 
three times, said the rules of the race 
forced the yachts to sail too far south, 
putting them under pressure. 

(Reuters. AP, AFP ) 


If the new money in rugby finds its way 
to America, more like Lyle wiU want to 
pUy. 

“There will always be room for the 
clever player, but I think the game is* 
headed to being a very physical game 
with more and more big physical ath- 
letes running around the field,” Clark 
said He can hardly wait. 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CQNFtU MCI 
ATLANTIC (HVISIOK 



w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Miami 

25 

0 

.735 



New Tori 

44 

9 

.727 

'A 

Washington 

17 

15 

-531 

7 

Ofkntdo 

1? 

17 

-414 

10’A 

New Jersey 

9 

21 

J00 

14 

Boston 

8 

23 

259 

IS 1 * 

Philadelphia 

8 

25 

■342 

16'A 

CEimtaL UYBIOH 


Chicago 

29 

4 

.879 

— 

Oeirni 

24 

a 

.750 


Cleriflana 

21 

12 

A36 

a 

Atlanta 

19 

l) 

.633 

B'6 

Choriarir 

18 

15 

.545 

11 

Mltnoufcee 

17 

H 

J15 

12 

Indiana 

IS 

16 

■4W 

13 

Toronto 

10 

22 

313 

18H 

WCSTUM CUMKHHC1 


MnWESTOIVtSKW 




W 

L 

Pci 

GB 

Houston 

26 

8 

.764 

— 

Utah 

23 

10 

jW 

2 “i 

Minnesota 

14 

19 

.424 

nv» 

Dallas 

>1 

20 

3SS 

73", 

San Antonio 

9 

23 

.281 

16 

Denver 

9 

24 

J73 

76'* 

Vancouver 

7 

27 

J06 

19 


PACIFIC OtVBSON 



LA. Laken 

26 

10 

■722 

_ 

Seattle 

25 

11 

-694 

1 

Portland 

19 

16 

-543 

6'.4 

LA, Cllppere 

14 

1? 

.424 

lO'n 

Sacra reento 

14 

21 

400 

1154 

Golden State 

12 

20 

-375 

12 

Ptwnbr 

7(7 

24 

J94 

75 

WEDNUDU'SinUUS 


San Antooto 

2B 

21 

24 18— Kt 

Bonen 

25 

26 

32 24-107 


SAJ M-WUHoms 6- 7 2-2 14. Johnson S-» 4. 
7 K- B: Fta Ml 1-1 19, Wo Hurt 7-172-2 17. 
Rebounds— Son Antonio 49 (Perdue 1-tl, 
Boston 40 (Walker ill. Assists— Son Antonio 
17 (Maxwefl 71, Boston 29 (Wesley 91. 

Dates 20 41 27 21—11) 

PhteteWte 27 77 12 27- 93 

D: MCOoud 8-12 3-3 21 Catting 7-9 8-9 
22;P: Iverson 6-14 6-?22.Stodtfiousea-22 5-7 
2t. Rebounds — Dallas 46 (Finley 9). 
PltftKtefpMi S3 (Stockhouse 9). 
Assists— Dotes 23 (Harper B), PnteMpMo 
17 (Iverson 6). 

PteMA 30 35 19 23 A — 113 

Washington 23 36 27 JT 8—115 

P; Manning 10-160-2 2ft w: HmmnJ M38- 
10 24 StrleWand 9-18 4-5 TL 

Rebounds- Fho c na 39 (Manning 9J, 
wasMngionS? (Webber 9>. Assists— Proem* 
25 uoimon 9). Wellington 27 (Strickland 
121 . 

Houston M is 23 23— SI 

Omtand 13 21 24 20- 78 

H. EfcB-9 7-726. Ofafuwon 7-ISB-IO 23Xl 
Brandon Ml 5-5 26. Ptinta 9-18 4-S 21 
Nmoms — H ouston 51 (BotWey 131, 
deveisid 39 (Mflls 14). Assists— Houston 20 
(□rexler ot, Cleveland 19 (Brandon 7). 
Seattle 27 34 a 22—109 

Denver a a 75 19-99 

S: Kbiw 9-22 8-9 26. Schrempl 10-13 2-3 
24:0: D-EBs 9 16 4-5 26, L-EIHs 5-JS 12-12 
23JMHHMb— Seattle 54 (Kettlp II), Denver 
52 Ochnson 13). Asabis— Swtite 23 
(Scftempt. Snow 7), Denver 25 (Jackson 151. 
Utah a IS 32 a 13—112 

MtenekM IB » 27 M 20-119 

U: MeteM 15-27 8-10 » HomoceA 7-161-2 
17M Robinson 13-18 11-1538. Baker B-135-6 
21. Rebounds— Utah 48 (Malone 19). 
Mflmwtec 43 (Robinson. Baker 7). 

Assists — U: 96 (Mataw 8). M_- 22 (Baker 5). 
Miami 70 25 25 is- 85 

Portend 27 33 ia is- si 


M: Hardaway 10-21 3-5 28, Mourning 4-16 
9-12 17; P: Sabanfs 5- 18 6-9 17, Rtoer o-M 4-4 
17. Rebounds— Miami S3 (Brown 91. 
Portland 55 (Sobonfs IS). Assists— Miami 10 
iHardamn 7), Portland )5 (Anderson 7>- 
Qmrkrtfe 25 ZI 24 27— 97 

LA. Lakers 33 27 30 21—101 

C Rice 6-23 (HJ 27, Dlvoc 7-12 7-9 22, Li 
Q-Nnal 10-19 3-7 7X Jones 9-71 3-4 2ft 
KebotfMs— Oartane 55 (Mason 12). Los 
Angeles 54 IQUeai 1 6). Assfcrts-Chartotte 24 
•Mason 8). Los Angeles 23 Mm Exd 101. 
Vancouver 21 18 Z7 31—109 

GeMea surf* 30 19 21 25— PS 

V: Abdur-Rafllm 11-19 12-13 34. Reeves B- 
JJ 5-72I.-&3. SmWi 12-25 13-15 38. Spmwfl 
3-20 5-5 33. RetoBoes— Vancouver 54 
(Rogers 101, Golden Sftne So (Sorim 15). 
Assisfe— Vancouver 27 ( P e el er 10), Golden 
State 22 (Price, 5pn>ueU 9>. 


NY. Rangers 
New Jersey 
Washington 
Tampa Boy 
N.Y. islanders 


Pfltsburgh 

Buffalo 

Hartford 

Montreal 

Boston 

Ottawa 


ets 22 17 6 50 

r 2T 15 4 46 

it 17 3) 4 38 

r 75 20 5 35 

ers 12 20 8 32 

NORTHEAST DfKEJCW 
W L T Pts 
22 IS 4 46 
21 15 5 47 

17 16 7 41 

16 Tfl 8 40 

15 19 6 36 
12 20 7 3| 


CROUP F 

UlkorSpoi. Turfcey 7J, Cbena Zagreb, Croatia 
77 

GROUP a 

Pau-Grttta, France 95. VWeurtxrine. France 
97. 

Setnda Spain gl, UuMiona Slovenia 76 
GROUP H 

Uwrtasen, Germany 71 E6x PHasn Turtey 
73 


Cotorodo 

Edmankm 

Vancouver 

Anaheim 

Category 

Son Jose 

LnsAngdes 


CENTRAL OmStOM 

W L T Pti GF 61 

2-J IS 3 51 124 103 

20 1 4 7 67 128 91 

IB 19 4 60 110 IX 

IB 21 4 40 122 141 

16 21 7 39 115 121 

17 25 0 34 128 150 

PApne Division 

W L T PI* GF GA 

24 10 8 56 145 99 

19 20 4 4(2 T42 133 

19 M 1 39 126 136 

15 21 S 35 116 1 28 

15 23 5 35 106 1 24 

14 31 S 33 7® 726 

M 23 4 32 110 140 


NHL Standings 


usTtM«Mnuiia 

anjumconnsKM 

W L T Pts GF GA 
PltiloMphia 26 1 2 4 56 140 103 
Flwlte 21 11 9 51 120 95 


WEBrnsMY'SkUOiTS 

Tampa Bar 0 7 2—4 

H.Y. Roagen j j »_j 

Rrat PertWfc New Yarn, ueetor 70 
(Korpovtuv, Gntakyj (pp). SMtewH Per** 
New YorH, Messier 24 (Graves. LeetctiHsW. 
1 T-Gratlon 16 (Sedvamv, Bwrtstert (pp). 
* T-Zomuner 8 (Grama Houtder) 5, New 
Y01V, Kovalev 13 (Graves, Messier) TMrt 

PWOd: T-Boir 9.- 7. T-PauRn 8 (Wtoonav, 
Bmri Shots oo goat: T- 11-5-15-31. New 
■Tom 10-13-13—36. Gaatex T-Tabaracd. 
New YorV. Richter. 


Cotannlo 0 a 1 a — 1 

New Jersey 8 10 0—1 

Hrsf Parlort None. Secood Period: NJ.. 
Andreychuk 14 (Stevens, HofSit Third 
Period: C -Corbet 8 (Yelle) Orerflme Nose. 
5Ms on goak C- 7-73-75-2-35. NJ.- n-9- 
10-3-33. Goalies: C-Btengton. N_l.- 
BrMfMlT. 

Ednwatoa 0 0 1—1 

Quango 3 0 1—4 

First Period: C-Amonte 25 (MOter) 2. C-, 
Araonte 26 (Miter, Cravenl 1 C-Suter 4 
(Miter. Craven) Second Period; None. Third 
Period: E - Dndgren 5 ISmythl 5. C-. CheUos 7, 
(«n. Shots m goaf; E- 6-15-15— 3d C- 15-6- 
6-2T. Gaafies: E-Essensa. C-Hockett. 
Detroit 0 2 1—3 

DtUOS 1 2 3-6 

Rrst Period: D-Sossen 7 (Kennedy) tfennnj 
Period: D-Nleuwendyti 12 (Sydari ft O-Brawn 
6 (FeBsov. Konstamtniwj (pp).4 Ik Kotlov 74 
(Fttsov) S, D-Pfid B (Hravey, Zubov) Third 

Period: D- Harvey 2 iReid) 7, D-.Sfwwhffi 21 
(Yzermon, Oondenoog) a D-Rdd 9 (Honey) 
V,D-*tfdl0 (LcdyanL Sydor} Shots on goo): 

D- 13-10-8—37. D- 11-7-9 — 27. Games: D- 

Osgood.D-Turefc.Moog. 

Ftorite 1 1 8^2 

Awfcetat 3 B 8-3 

Rrel Period: A-Setanne 23 (ftuahto, 
toiwl 1 A^uccitln 9 itotrtya Miranovi i a- 
Byrtri 9 iBenovK) 4. F-undsoy 8 u_ousj 
Second Period: F-Nemiravsky 1 Uovanovski, 

Peried None. Shots on gwi: 

F- 7-15-10— 32. A- 9-13-5—27. Gaafies: F- 
Vbnbtatawrc*. A- Hebert. 


SPANISH COP 

SD ROUND. RRST LEO 
Cefln VlgoZ LogronesO 
Grraiada (III) ft Real Berts 1 
Villareal (ID ft Altdertc Bilbao 1 
Omswkt (IQ a, ROyo Voteamo 2 
Oviedo 1, Compostela 0 
Zaragasa 1. Racing Santander 1 
Espanyol 4 Sporting Glfcxi 1 
SevHo ft Deporflvo Corona 8 


■ncumukrcw 

oiuTenmALs 
Bolton ft Wimbledon 2 

MWdtesbreugh 2, Liverpool 1 


ABSIMIUH OPKN CUBBIM 

HEN'S MOLES 

1- Pete Sampras (US. 1) 

2- Mlchaet Chang (17J V 2) 

3- Goran iwnisMc (Croatia 3) 

4- Yevgeny Kafelnikov (Russia 41 

5- Thomos Muster (Austria 5) 
d-Borts Setter (Germany, 6} 

7-Thoma5 Enqvbt (Sweden. 9) 

B- Wayne Ferreira (South Africa 101 
MtorcetaRkH ((Mail) 

(O-AIOwf Costa (Spain, 13) 
n-JBm Courier (V A. 151 

12- Magnus Gustafcson (Sweden, l« 

13- Jon Hemertr* (Netherlands, 17) 
1*-Fel& MantWa (Spain, T» 

15- MWiaet SDcft (Germany. 19) 

16- A/berio Bemateguf (Spain, 20) 

WOMEN'S SINGLES 

1 - Steffi Gref (Germany, 7) 

2- Anmtn Sanchez Vlcario (Spain, 3) 

3- CandtitaMamner (Spate 4) 

*Marllna Hingis (Swftzeriand, 61 

5- Ank* KUber (Germmy, 7) 

6- tea Mafall (Croatia® 

7- LJndsay Davenport (U-S- 91 

8- lrlna Spirlea (Romania 10} 

9- Kortno Htuswtovo (StowMa 11) 

10- 6. Scfwflz -McCarthy (Netherlands, 12) 
tt-Jwfith Wiener (Austria, 13) 
72-ArnandaCoetier(Sourti AWca 14) 


13- Elena Uktovtssva (Russia Id) 

14- Mary Joe Fernandez (U A, 171 

15- Chanda RiUn (u js* 18} 

16- Sabine Appctmans (Bettfum.19). 

( Current wai« ranking is In brackets} 

BfTtnuimw 

TWmSptetW HOBART 
QUARTERFINALS 

Marianne Werdd-Wltaieyer. U.S.. def. SM 
Ting- Wang (6). Taiwan. 6-4, 6-2; ManaEnda 
Japan, tfet Annabel EBwoocL AustraTta. 3-6. 
6-4, 6-2 Oomtnfguo Van Roost Belgium, def. 
Lenka Cerium* tedi RepuMcM, 14 n- 
flreifc Els Cations. Borgtora, def. Ame-Gaefte 
Stdat FnmcG, 6-1 3-ft WL 


WOMEN'S SINGLES OUAATe7tf*tALS 

MflrtJw Htagts 03. 5wRzatal& detYbyi* 
BaraiM, Indonesia 7-6 (B-6J, 6-1; Jennifer 
CaptkO, unftetf States del. Amy note* uwp 
edSkdes,6-46-I;MaiyJoeRiniindei,UiHr- 
ed S WSa def. m Mojofl O), Create, 7-5. 6* 
Utesay Davenport United States (4), dec 
7tactoSownrrW5ftJflpc»v6a6-7(4.7),6-7. 

KEN’S GKGLEB OUAnTERHNALS 
Goran hndsevie (1J, GonSte; <fe& Sandon 
Stolle. AustraflatKfea Cories Moyo,Sp«*i. 
def. Patrick Rortec Australia 7-6 (3-43, 6-3: 

TlmHenman,Brttain,def.AifD((78rien,uiw- 
ed State* 1-& 7-6 Coring 

Spate, itef. Byton BtaduZbnbatiwa 64 M. 


MMBfl UUSUK BASOMU. 

TAWft BAT-Named Spoil Fletcher nrait- 

uflis crflteOioiteston jawrDoosofflw Jauta 

Altante League. Namea Howard Johnson 
Miky coodi and Denrtt* Rasmussen niw?- 
coach of Charleston. 

DETROIT— Agreed to twos wttti RHP Dan 

Mkafl 00 1 -year contract 


AMERICAN UEAOtN! 

CHICMO-Awcd to Senn* wHh ZB Nor- 
herta Marita on t^rear contract 
seatti£ -Agreed fe terms wflh RHP 

Rusty Meachem an ane-year aonracL 

HAnorML LEAGUE 

cmattKATi —Signed. LHP Noe Najera. 
Acraea to terms wffii LHP Pwe Schowek an 
1 -year context 

caUMADG-AgreedtotertnswWr RHP Jer- 
ry DtPota on 1 -year contract 
lds AiteELB-Agrmf to terras wBtr IB Er- 
ic Korns on 6ytcm corrtroo ant) 38 Jctw 
W ehne r on 1 -year cncrtnicL 

Pittsburgh —Released OF Mike 
W*to«T. 

SAS dieoo— S igned LHP Fernanda VqJct- 
*uela to ane*yeff contract Wahred IB Jason 
Thompson. 

samptmiiciscp Agra edtotermawWr RHP 
Doug Henry on 1 -year contract. 

unntti 

WOIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
MStprt -FOtao Pas/i had surgery anted 

kneecap and Is expected to ndss rest at sea- 
son. 

KOIHU 

•WTKNIAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
Atlanta— S igned LB Jestie Toggle to 2- 
yeraconrrocadensloo. 

*»o»ia - stgned K AKe umw to one- 

ytur contract 

WA5«mGTtu*-Hmaed Mfire Notoa defen- 
sheQ jUiJwror. Fired Bab Kormetawtcz.de- 
tensfee fine conch, and Mto Haiuchak. 
RBMtacMesoMite. 

nO CK BT 

MmotUL HOCKEY LEAGUE 

rmr ^ pe rated B oston Brutes F Ttay 
and Tum> Maple ante f mbw 
*»*“ po> and tteed 

teem each M^OP as 9 aswr at separate in- 



HI S 


I'dcA -I 






■ '■ ' ‘ l ' 'Z 1 ' ‘ .y 

■ * ' • ■ :* -A* r-'t 



■- . .> 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JANUARY I0 T 1997 


RACE 21 



SPORTS 


The Associate? Pm? 

seas<m nearefee halfway 
gjjnt, the Eastern Ottfereo be has es- 
taWjhed char superiority over the West 
NmeESaem teams have won more dim 
™ ; fftmes- lhe West has oriy five 
teara s wife winning records. - * 

s seven ffltacocfaeort ^^tt! 
One of fee five Weaem ieamK^Pw tianri; 
saw its five-game winning "streak bro- 


ken, 85i-81, by Miami. Tim Hardaway 
scored 21 of las 28 points in the second 
half to give the Heat their first-ever road 
victory over the Trail Blazers. 

Hardaway’s chitch 21-footer with 15.8 
seconds left was tbe game’s biggest shot 
The high-archmg jumper from a step 
inside the 3-point lme made-it 84-81. 

' T got the same feeling no w that I had 

with 


ominates 


second in arow for just the second time 
'this season -and had its largest victory 
"margin. 

r . Antcane Walker, sailing out of po- 
sitioa atceMerfor the second consecutive 
gamcrhsid 17 points and 1.1 xebomds. 

■ u4c«fstoi,Ht»rwt»»7 Rookie Derek 
Fisher drew an offensive fool from 
former Laker Vlade Divac with 64 
-seconds left, and Nick Van ExeJ made 
two' free throws' wife 5.1 seconds re- 

v Sh aqu il lc O’Neal had 23 points and 
. 16 rebounds, Eddie Jones scored 20 
points and Van Exel had 17 points and 
10 assists for the Lakes, who have won 
10 straight home games. 

EKvac had 22 points and 12 rebounds 
in his first game at toe Forum since the 
Lakers traded him last summer . . 
Rockets 81, Cutlinr 78 The first 

sellout crowd of the season at Gnnd 
Arena saw Houston win at Cleveland 
for file fourth straight season. - 
Mario Elie scored 26 points and Ha- 


— you know,. Magic, 

Miami coach Pat Riley said. “Thn got ... „ a 

ot one of his rolls and hit the Mg ace. . . keern Olmuwon had 22 co help offset a 
He s been doing it all year for ns. It was 2-fbr-12 night for Charles Barney and 

one of his best games of the year.” ' - - -- - — - - 

\ There were 54 fouls called in the 
game, 32 against Portland. 

Bucks 119, f a ir 112 Glenn Robinson 
scored 38 points, Vin Baker added 21 
and the two forwards scored tbe first 
eight points of overtime to put Mil- 
waukee ahead to stay. . 

The victory came exactly five years 
after the Bucks’ last victory overthe Jazz. 

Karl Malone had a season-high 38 points, 

1 9 rebounds and 8 assists for Utah, which 
lost its sixth straight on tha maH 

Bu Hate 118, Sum lia Calbert 
Cheaney scored the go-ahead basket 
with 4.6 seconds left in overtkae as 
Washington ended a 17-game losing 
streak against visiting Phoenix. 

Juwan Howard finished, with 24 
mts and Rod Strickland 22 as die 
iuilets notched their first victory 
against the Suns since March 9, 1988. 

Celtics lor, spun 83 Boston won its 


£ 


2 -for- 10 shooting by Clyde Dreader. 

• Msvwicks in, 78s n 83 At Phil- 
adelphia, it was a 48-point siring for 
DaOas. which lost by 30 the night before 
at New York. 

‘‘We just had. to forget about last 
night and come out and ptey bard,’ ’ said 
George McCloud, who had 16 points of 
his-23 points in the second penod. 

SoperSonica 109, Hug-ts 89 Shawn 
Kemp had 26 points -and 1 1 rebounds 
and Detlef Schrempf scared 24. 

Tbe Sonicswon for die ninth time in 
11 games, while the Nuggets lost their 
fourth straight at home. . . 

fthiBui 109, War rior s 95 Rookie 
Shareef Abdur-Rahim scored a season- 
high 34 points, and Vancouver won jnst 
its second road game of the season. 

Joe Smith had a career-high 38 points 
and 15 rebounds and scored 14 straight 
Golden Stale points, as. the Warriors 
tried to rally in the closing minutes. 


I ji- lijiTl, 


Goalie Andy Moog and Mike Lalor (18) of DaDas and Detroit's Mathieu Dandenault (lit hunting for the puck. 

Lightning Strikes Rangers Again, 4-3 


The Associated Press 

The New York Rangers bring out the 
best in the Tampa Bay Lightning. 

Four of die lightning’s 15 victories 
this season have come against the 
Rangers, including a 4-3 victory Wed- 
nesday night in New York that snapped 
goal tender Mike Richter’s unbeaten 
streak at 16 games. 

“We play frightened against them 
more than other teams because we know 
how powerful they are,” the light- 
ning’s coach, Terry Crisp, said. 


“Fear is a great motivator.” 

After the game, tbe Rangers were 

NHL Roundup 

fearful that they might lose Alexei Ko- 
valev for the season with a knee in- 
jury- 

Kovalev, who plays on the first line 
with Wayne Gretzky and Mark Messier, 
hurt his right knee when he got tangled 
with Alexander Selivanov behind the 
Rangers’ net in the second period. Ko- 


■Andre Rison’s Long, Wild Route to Green Bay 


By TJ. Simers 

■' Los Angeles Times . ' 


G 


REEN BAY, Wisconsin — It’s 
Christinas Eve, 1989, his Indi- 
anapolis Colts have just lost; to 
the New Orleans Saints to miss, die 
playoffs, and Andre Rison is clocked by 
the Highway Patrol going 128 mph in a 
55-niphzone. 

Rison’s response to the trooper. “JL 
thought I was only doing 94.“- 

Fast-forward to Atlanta, where Left 
Eye is looking, cross-eyed at her boy- 
friend, Andre Rison. who has-been out 
all night with the guys. ' ■ ■ _ . ; 

Rison has already, been charged with 
aggravated assault, discharging a fire- 
arm, simple battery and carrying a pistol 
without a license after a fight with Left 
Eye,- also known as Lisa Lopes of the 
singing trio TLC. Lopes also has been 
charged with attacking a police officer; 

Now Left Eye has -a bat and she's 
blasting fee windshields of Riscm’s cars. 
They argue he takes a walk to cool off. 
She starts afireindie suokeebadaubjand 
Rison’s two^tmy mansion, valued at 
more than $1 million, goes up in flames. 
Rison’s response: He inaroe& Left Eye. 

Still in Atlanta, Rison. misses a team 
bus and is benched for a quartex. Later, 
after committing his 1 9th team infraction. 


he is suspended for a game. Even so, a 
bidding war ensues forhis services. Clev- 
eland wins and paysthe wide receiver 
$17,075 million for five years, phis a $5 
million signing bonus. 

The experience immediaiely goes 
sour. Quarterback Vinny Testaverde 
likes to throw to spots. Rison likes to ran 
i routes, where be pleases, so tbe two 
j ever connect. 

The fans don’t think Rison is giving 
fiiBeffort and begin to boo. He responds 

’time he touches the 
balk A sign is hoisted at the Browns’ 
final game: “Dear Andre — The Fans 
of Cleveland Hope You Get a Very 
Warm Welcome in Baltimore.” Be- 
neath is a picture of. a house — on fire. 

Owner ArtModell has armounced thar 
he’s moving die team. He says a major 
reason for moving is Us desperate fi- 
nancial situation. He says he had to go to 
abank for a personal loan to pay Rison’s 
$5 million tonus. •' 

Bison's response to Cleveland fens: 
“Hey, Art Model! is cooL He just 
wanted a new stadium. I do too. We 
don’t-bave a home field. Our home is 
Baltimore. To hell with these fans.” 

.In Baltimore fee new Raven coach, 
Ted Marchibroda, gets a look at Rison 
and cuts him before fee season. Jack- 


sonville hands him a three-year, $6.6 
million contract, and Rison is the only 
player not to show up for a mandatory 
meet-fee -community dinner to start fee 
season. He’s fined. He’s late for more 
meetings, and he's fined some more. 

Quarterback Marie Brunei! throws 20 
interceptions. Insiders say most result 
from Rison’s turning fee wrong way on 
his patterns. The team loses, Rison 
blasts Coach Tom Coughlin, gets into a 
dispute with Bninell and is fired. Jack- 
sonville hasn’t lost a game since. 

Why in the world would the Green 
Bay Packers want Andre Rison? 

Quarterback Brett Favre. who was 
Rison’s teammate in Atlanta, advised 
fee Packer general manager, Ron Wolf, 
two years ago that it would be a mistake 
offering Rison big money. When Rison 
selected Cleveland over Green Bay, 
Wolf told reporters, “We lucked out.” 

But Robert Brooks went down with a 
season-ending injury. Antonio Freeman 
broke his arm, and tight end Mark 
Chmura was hurt. The Dallas Cowboys 
beat the Packers, and Green Bay’s re- 
serve wide receivers were ineffective. 

The next day fee Packers were on fee 
telephone wife Rison. who had boasted 
as a rookie feat he was as good as fee 
49ers’ Jerry Rice, who was wearing three 
Super Bowl rings at the time. “It used to 


really bother me that Jerry and I would 
have comparable numbers, but he was 
always considered up there on a level by 
himself.” Rison says. “Can you imagine 
me running routes for Montana or 
Marino? I wouldn’t have to fight for 
respect. 

“ 1 used to lay in bed and just say, '! 
wish } was in the West Coast offense.' 
And then you mil hear nothing from me. 
The only thing you will hear is, ‘Rison 
scored again.' ” 

Almost two monthsin Green Bay, and 
still not the slightest hint of trouble. 

Most everyone who has dealt wife 
Rison says what a likable person he is. 
Even Coughlin, a disciplinarian, said Ris- 
on was one of his favorite players, but he 
has been foiled by his own immaturity. 

In fee Packers' final regular-season 
game, Rison caught a touchdown pass 
and jumped into the stands, where the 
Cheeseheads embraced him. In Sat- 
urday’s playoff victory over fee 49ers, he 
injured a knee, was helped to the locker 
room but returned to the field with the 
fans giving him a standing ovation. 

“It was fee first time I heard, ‘We 
love you!’ outside of my wife, my kids 
or my mom.” says Rison. “It felt good. 
All the bull I took in fee last year and a 
half; all fee happiness, all fee glory that’s 
coming now makes up for il” 


valev was to have the knee examined 
Thursday, but teammates seemed to ex- 
pect fee worst. 

“People will find out just how valu- 
able he is to our team,” Messier said. 

Patrick Poulin scored the game-win- 
ner for Tampa Bay with 2:44 remaining 
in the third period. 

”We had chances and couldn’t put 
them away,” the Rangers’ coach, Colin 
Campbell, said. “They’re a scrappy 
team and they hung in there.” 

Davits 1. Avalanche 1 1n East Ruther- 
ford. New Jersey. Colorado's Rene 
Corbet scored on a third-period break- 
away as fee Avalanche extended their 
unbeaten streak to eight games, although 
it was also their third straight tie. Injury- 
plagued Colorado got 32 saves from 
backup goalie Craig Billington. Martin 
Brodeur made 34 saves for New Jersey. 

Blaefchmrfcs 4, Oiler* 1 Jeff Hackett 
made 35 saves and Tony Amonte scored 
twice before getting hurt with 3!£ 
minutes left as~ Chicago snapped Ed- 
monton's four-game winning streak. X- 
rays on Amonte 's left knee revealed no 
fracture, but he was taken to a Chicago 
hospital for further tests. 

Stars 6, Rad Wings 3 In Dallas, Dave 
Reid had three goals and an assist for a 
career-high four points, and rookie Ro- 
man Turek stopped 26 shots before he 
was injured late in the third period. 
Turek bruised his right thigh wife 5:51 
remaining in a collision wife Detroit's 
Brendan Shanahan. After Andy Moog 
replaced Turek. the Stare put fee game 
away when Reid scored twice in a span 
of 1 :46 in the third period. 

Mighty Ducks 3, Ptithers 2 Sieve 
Rucchin had a goal and an assist, and 
Guy Hebert made 30 saves as fee 
Mighty Ducks completed a two-game 
sweep of visiting Florida. Teemu 
Selanne and Warren Rychel also scored 
for Anaheim, while Paul Kariya had two 
assists. 

Florida's goalie, John Vanbies- 
brouck, who is scheduled to start for the 
Western Conference in fee All-Star 
game Jan. 18, gave up three goals on 
Anaheim's first nine shots. 


Lakers’ Owner 
Joins the List 
Eyeing Dodgers 

Los Angrtn Times 

LOS ANGELES — Jeny Buss, fee 
owner of fee Los Angeles Lakers bas- 
ketball ieam. says he is interested in 
buying fee Los Angeles Dodgers base- 
bail team. 

Buss, owner of the Lakers and the 
Forum sports auditorium since 1979 and 
fee first current sports owner to put his 
name forth, joined a growing list of 
potential buyers. Peter Ueberroth, a 
former baseball commissioner. Robert 
Shapiro, a celebrity lawyer, and Robert 
Daly, co-chairmanof the music and film 
divisions of Time Warner, have all in- 
dicated a desire to head, or be pan of. a 
purchasing group. 

But despite the interested parties, at 
least one potential bidder said the team 
has not yet taken such preliminary steps 
as preparing a financial package for 
investors or hiring investment bankers 
to appraise proposals. 

“He hasn't even started." said an 
entertainment executive involved in the 
sports business, referring to the Dodgers 
president. Peter O'Malley. There is “no 
book" of financial documentation, he 
said. 

Buss has never hid his interest in 
expanding his horizons to football or 
baseball. 

The owner of fee Los Angeles Kings 
hockey team from 1979 through early 
1988, Buss said Wednesday, through a 
spokesman, that he agreed feat family 
sports ownership was in the decline. But 
he added: "I’m fee biggest Dodgers' 
fan in Los Angeles. I'd like to be part of 
a group feat buys them." 

The Buss family is believed to own 
all but 1 0 percent of the Lakers, with the 
remainder owned by a television ex- 
ecutive. Bill Daniels' and a former star 
Laker player. Magic Johnson. 

Mayor Richard Riordan of Los 
Angeles, said that be had talked briefly 
wife some investors interested in ac- 
quiring fee team. 

It ^premature because Peter O'Mal- 
ley "hasn’t even set up a process yet” 
for accepting bids, said Riordan, who 
would not identify his contacts. 

Riordan. a multimillionaire business- 
man, also said he considered bidding for 
at least a part ownership in the team but 
quickly abandoned fee idea because it 
might conflicr wife his role as mayor. 

O’Malley's apparent go-slow ap- 
proach to fielding offers — a financier 
familiar wife the process said it might 
take from six months to two years — only 
encouraged speculation over bidders. 

Rumored names of other interested 
parties range from billionaires such as fee 
Pritzker family, fee founders of fee Hyan 
Hotel chain, to celebrities such as the 
actor Kevin Costner. 

The name most often mentioned con- 
tinued to be Rupert Murdoch, the media 
baron, mainly because of fee apparent 
logic of using the Dodgers to enhance the 
value of his regional Fox sports network. 
Bui Fox has refused to comment. 

On Wednesday the Dodgers showed 
feat baseball life continues even though 
the club is up for sale when they made 
first baseman Eric Karros their highest - 
paid player, signing him to a four-year, 
$20 million contract. 

The Dodgers also opened negoti- 
ations wife all-star catcher Mike Piazza, 
hired former Dodgers Steve Garvey and 
Ron Cey to their community and mar- 
keting departments and signed third 
baseman John Wehner to a one-year, 
$350,000 contract. 

Brett Butler, who has had cancer, said 
he will report to spring training and try 
to come back for one final season. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 





d m* tmim kxxA n t** 
on moot to art Hoft# fcna 
JtWCBMWjrWW 




PEROW 

L_ 

nTr: 

LD 


GHEKT 


TIE 



BsSSZD 


rnirp 




UCKE 

F 

X 



WHAT TH2 WRflaoR 
INSTALLER UKS? 
ID DO AT Tt* 
ENPOPTOECW 


J 


m 


u mi— ww 
tnMnNMMBV' 

guild ty>t*oi«aMBon. 


murnseem 

psMSBPareM) 
MMcELOER DOUSE t&OSt MAC 
Amor a taw «**)»**•* *■- 

ansio«Df ■ 


^diOoJomiH 

- © 

Munich .a 



.sc 
sTi 

0 ' 0 O •©--.-©!■' © 

Turin Cigfaan Goon tfcMBA • Voice IHtta 


Information <? 9 i 432 / 5 l 24<>4 


/uHjere\ / ujhere\ 

that's Wtf NEW 

IM PROUD OF VOL. 

l txJlLL IT )f WILL WHAri 

PHlL050fWf„ < ‘tiJHSKE 

IT SOUNDS LIKE * 

\AlLEND? /\AIL END?/ 

WILL IT ALL END?" 

Y0UVE em OOIH6 i 



SOME REAL - miN10N& ; | 

1 m 


fjy! 


GARFIELD 

VWWP0 W0WANT 
«£TO WAKE W0? 




BEETLE BAILEY 


THE FAR SIDE 


DOONESBURY 



‘P 6 A 8 BCMS! HJHJrrtWTHTHe 

soumsoasroFtWB^ee- 

ct*u&*BanaiSHpjv&can\ 


BLONDIE 

, I wort A PRIZE IN THE k-Nl 


HOT PVE MILLION OR A CAR OR 
ANVTH1N6...1 WON ONE OF THE | 
SVWtiER PRIZES... A OOFPSB 
GRINDS C 


The SftlNPER s WOCTN ABOUT 
TEN BUCKS. -THE RESTAURANT 
t*B W6 titETY... 1 «USS VM 






PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1997 


* 


OBSERVER 

Discarded Thoughts 


B y Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — Follow- 
ing are some subjects 
this column might have been 
about and the reasons they is 
not 

I. Professional football 
playoffs? 

Nah. Pete Rozelle. who in- 
vented this form of entertain- 
ment, just died and took pro- 
fessional football with him. 
How else explain why two 
teams called Jaguars and Pan- 
thers are playing for the cham- 
pionship? Only the most 
hardened sports addicts still 
care. Forget tL 

2. Moral squalor in the 
White House? 

Oh. no! Not again. Only 
the most hardened Republi- 
cans will stick it our while 
you take another lap around 
this track. 

3. Ten best movies, plays, 
books, recordings. TV 
shows, televised court trials, 
operas, tone poems, tele-' 
phone commercials and 
computer manuals of the 
year? 

Would have to lie. Truth is: 
Haven't seen 10 movies. 10 
plays or 10 operas all year. 

4. OJ. Simpson? 

I can’t believe f even 
thought that. 

5. How about ebonies? 
Maybe link the ebonies sto- 
ry to the latest release of 
Nixon White House tapes. 
Should schools start teach- 
ing Nixonics? 

Only if you want to be 
clubbed silly by outraged 
mail from three fronts: (a) 
Making light of the ebonies 
uproar will bring charges that 
you are racist, lb) Making 
light of Nixon will bring 
charges that you are an elitist 
liberal Nixon-haier. (c) Print- 
ing Nixonic language will 
bring charges that you are 


corrupting children by writ- 
ing such stuff in a family 
newspaper. 

6. Why not a nice “What- 
ever-happened-to” column 
asking things like, “What 
ever happened to insuffer- 
able kids saying ’Never 
trust anybody over 30’?" 
Or “What ever happened 
to the Excedrin headache?" 
Or “What ever happened 
to the man in the gray flan- 
nel suit?" Or “What ever 
happened to saying. ’Just 
the facts, ma'am,' the way 
Joe Fridav atwavs said 
it?" 

You're forgetting how 
short historical memory' is 
nowadays. You're writing for 
people to whom General 
Mac Arthur might be a guy 
who fought against .Alexan- 
der the Great at the Alamo. 

Joe Friday is as remote 
from their lives as St. Gen- 
esius of Arles. 

Stan reminiscing about the 
Excedrin headache and 
they'll write you off as a fogy. 
Sure, worse fate could come 
your way. Death, for in- 
stance. 

7. Why not something 
about the phony diversity of 
President Clinton's Cabin- 
et? So it includes a woman, a 
black, a Hispanic, a Repub- 
lican and so on, and so 
what? 

They are all big winners, 
top-of-the-heap people in 
the game of life. If Clinton 
really wanted a diverse cab- 
inet, shouldn't he include a 
welfare mother, somebody 
living in a homeless shelter, 
a high school dropout and at 
least one of the 40 million 
Americans who don't have 
health insurance? 

Forget it. Makes you sound 
like a crank with no respect 
for phoniness. In Showbiz- 
land whai else is there? 

iVVh- York Tutus Service 


By Saxophone or Plane, Kenny G Gets His Highs 


By Neil Strauss 

iVv Yi’tk Time* Sen-ice 

N EW YORK — Cruising 1,200 feet 
above the Statue of Liberty in a bright 
yellow seaplane. Kennv G spots something 
speeding toward him off to the left. 

It is another plane, and for a moment it 
doesn't seem to be aware that it has entered 
another craft s airspace. 

Just as Kenny G evasively turns to the 
right, swinging his seaplane back toward the 
tip of Manhattan, the other plane announces 
its presence over the radio. “O.K.. we got 
you." Kenny G replies into his headset. 

.And with that. the intruding plane dis- 
appears into the clouds, unaware that it just 
had a close shave with the world's most 
popular saxophonist. 

On land, Kenny G is a beautiful-music 
superstar, with his ninth album. "The Mo- 
ment." firmly ensconced in Billboard's Top 
1 0. He has become such a fixture in popular 
culture that even in children's cartoons, char- 
acters joke about using Kenny G instru- 
mentals to cure insomnia. Yet. it is this 
precisely palliative effect that Kenny G's 
funs, chief among them Bill Clinton, love 
about his music: they find it lush and sensual, 
euphonious and soothing, laced with gentle 
melodies to transport them out of life's 
everyday bustle. 

In the air. Kenny G is every inch a piloL 
Almost every day for the last two years in his 
native Seattle, he has taken his de Havilland 
Beaver, a 35 -year-old seaplane, out for a 
one- or two-hour spin. When he tours with 
his band in a leased Learjet. chances are he 
can be found in the co-pilot's seat. 

Recently, on a break from a promotional 
tour for his new album. Kenny G. 40, was 
taking the scenic route from Manhattan to 
lunch in Port Washington. New York, flying 
above the Statue of Liberty, up the Hudson 
and out over the Long Island Sound in a 
rented Beaver. 

He used to own a small pleasure craft, not 
a seaplane, he explained through his headset, 
adding: "But once I became a dad. I sold it. 
It's just not safe like these Beavers. 1 fly for 
fiin. I don't need to take risks." 

In the cockpit, as on record. Kenny G is 
smooth and confident, averse to risk but eager 
for perfection. He may be a pariah to jazz 
purists, but one thing is certain about Kenny 
G: He plays what he feels. And if everybody 
felt the way Kenny G did. the world would 
likely be a far more peaceful place. 



Kenny G. who's never happier than at the controls of a de Havilland Beaver. 


During conversations, he never talked 
about being mad. angry or mean. In his 
gentle voice, each word delivered slowly, 
thoughtfully and pleasantly — exactly like 
his saxophone solos — he referred to oc- 
casions when he felt "not so happy” or “a 
little bit less than my jovial self." 

He wasn't merely on time for this in- 
terview: he was half an hour early, standing 
alone on the edge of the seaplane dock on the 
East River, at 23d Street, wearing a leather 
jacket over an off-white turtleneck. At his 
feet lay a crumpled brown paper bag full of 
navigation maps he had bought for the jour- 
ney. 

No matter what question was asked, 
Kenny G (the G is for Goretick) was eager 
and forthcoming, willing to expound at 
length on anything from his favorite sushi 
restaurant (Nobu in Manhattan.) to his sax- 
ophone influences (primarily Grover Wash- 
ington Jr.). When asked about the chin 
stubble he's started sporting in recent pho- 
tographs. he answered with a 1 0-minute dis- 
cussion of the aesthetics of shaving. He even 
irons, cooks and does home repairs. He's the 
kind of boy who must have made his mother 
very proud. 

And he did. "She’s not alive anymore," 


he said, "but when I was a kid. I remember 
her always saying to other people that I was 
the first guy to try something. I’m not afraid 
to try anything. Even if I’m uncomfortable 
trying something that may be a good thing. 
I’ll give it a shot. Like vegetarianism — I 
tried it, and it wasn’t me." 

How about trying drugs'? 

“Oh. I’m not a drug user at all.’’ he 
replied, taken aback. “I would only try 
something that’s good for myself. No. not 
interested. I go into one of those restaurants 
in Seattle and get one of those micro brewery 
beers on tap. After one of those. I'm happy. 
That's about all I can take. That's good 
enough for me." 

By now, Kenny G was hovering over Port 
Washington, trying to figure out where he's 
supposed to land. He spotted a path winding 
between moored sailboats and pointed the 
plane downward toward Manhasset Bay, 
navigating a landing so smooth it was hard to 
tell when the plane touched the water. 

Directly at the end of the dock was Lat- 
itudes. a restaurant where he found a quiet 
table and began to talk more seriously about 
his music. 

Unlike most of his contemporaries, Kenny 
G isn't obsessed with music. He likes to 


balance his life with music, golf, sushi and 
family. On “Tuneless." his last major al- 
bum for Arista Records, which sold 1 5 mil- 
lion copies. Kenny G said he worked as 
much as 14 hows a day. Since his son. Max. 
was bom three years ago. he spent only three 
hours a day working on “The Moment. 

“i talk to some of my friends, and they say 
they've been recording for six cfc's 
straight,” he said. * ‘ Arid what did 1 do ? Vrell, 
I just kind of fooled around with my sea- 
plane. Me and my son went fishing. I used to 
feel a little guilty. Noi anymore. ' * 

Kenny G tried a little experiment when 
his wife, Lyndie Benson, was pregnant 
Whenever he could, he played saxophone 
to her midsection, hoping that when the 
baby was born, the music would have a 
soothing effect. But ft didn’t work. "It 
doesn't put him to sleep or anything, ’ 
Ke.my G said. “He gets excited. Actually, 
he's more enthusiastic about helping me 
put my saxophone together than hearing 
me play it." - , . . ■ 

How is Kenny G going to reel when his 
son starts watching cartoons and one day. by 
chance, sees his father being made fun of on 
television. “I like jokes," Kenny G respond- 
ed. “If a joke made ai my expense is funny. 
I’ll still laugh. I wouldn't get mad about 
something like that. It’s hard because when 
the people who work with me tell other 
people who they work for, a lot of times 
they're told that my music is so mellow and 
so light that there’s no substance. And I think 
they’re not hearing ft. They’re listening on 
one level. You’ve got to listen more 
deeply. 

"Music is something that you can’r cat- 
egorize and you can’t judge. It just is whai it is. 
as long as the artist does ft for the right reasons 
— not just money, fame and fortune. You're 
bom to play an instrument, you're bom to 
write certain music or sing. And if you do that, 
you feel good about that T want to be proud of 
what I put out 1 warn it to feel great to me. So 
if people don’t like it, I know that I did a good 
job and can live with myself." 

This doesn’t mean that Kenny G has any 
pretensions. One time when he was having 
dinner at the White House. President Clinton 
asked if he’d play “Happy Birthday” for a 
guest Did he reply, “I’m too much of an 
artist to do that?* 

“N-a-ah. I just walked over there and did 
it” KennyGsaid. That kind ofbebavior has 
gotten him invited back: he will play on Jan. 
19 as part the inaugural festivities. 



NIGHT LIFE 


PEOPLE 


The Clubby ‘21 9 Returns After a Facelift 


By Florence Fabricant 

AW Ytfrk Times Scmce 

N EW YORK — Martinis, steaks. 

Kelly bags and debutante balls are 
back. Arid the ”21" Club, another 
1950s icon, seems poised to join this 
renaissance. 

The London-based Orient-Express 
Hotels, which bought the speak-easy- 
tumed-restaurant in 1995. has been 
making changes in it hoping to restore 
die "21" Club's panache. 

In the three connecting brownstones 
decorated with jockey statues at 2 1 West 
5 2d Street that are home to the res- 
taurant:. floral upholstery on the wing 
chairs, a new logo (with jockeys) and a 
new chef are already in place. In the 
saloon-style dining room, hung with 
toys and trophies, regulars like the Kis- 
singers, the Kenncdys and the Tisches 
still have favorite tables. 

But the ugly kitchen door has been 
hidden in a new alcove. And the new 
chef. Erik Blau berg, whose food has 
been served to private parties in the 
Prohibition-era wine cellar for the last 
month, is revising the menu. 

It is not the first time that the res- 
taurant has undergone change. 

It was founded in 1922 in Greenwich 
Village by Jack Kriendler and Charlie 
Beras and moved to 52d Street, where it 
opened Dec. 3 1 . 1929. It was raided only 
once during Prohibition, in 1930. The 
result was the construction of a secret 
wine cellar, still in use, and an elaborate 
system of collapsing shelves in the bar. 
unlike most of the other 38 speakeasies 
on West 52d. Jack & Charlie’s “21" 
survived well beyond Prohibition. 

The “21" Club was owned by the 
Kriendler and Bems families until 1985. 
when Marshall Cogan and his former 
partner, Stephen Swid, took title. The 
result was some much needed redec- 
oration and. for a few years, confusion 
in the kitchen, with the appointment of 
Alain Sailhac and Anne Rosenzweig as 
co-chefs. Customers accustomed to eat- 
ing chicken hash and steak tartare did 
not know what io make of the new 
French- American menu. 


It is impossible to wipe a speck of 
dust from a hallowed New York in- 
stitution without causing a stir. The cur- 
rent face lift has cost $500,000 so far. 
and people are taking note. 

Preston Robert Tisch, the chairman of 
Loews Corp.. described a recent visit. 
“The food was fine, the place looked 
very festive and they've cleaned it up." 
Tisch said. “They 'got rid of that ugly 
kitchen door. And the same people are 
there, including Harry up front-’’ 

Harry is Harry Lavin. a suave. Gais- 
byesque figure who has been greeting 


The chef has tinkered 
with the famous 
hamburger, serving it 
with sauteed potatoes. 


guests at the front door for nearly 25 
years, who knows all the important cus- 
tomers and who enforces the restaur- 
ant’s dress code (jackets, please) with 
aplomb. In the dining room, one of the 
head waiters, Walter Weiss, has been at 
the restaurant for 50 years. 

Bryan McGuire, who is now the chief 
operating officer and has been at the 
restaurant since 1988. said: “People we 
haven’t seen in years are returning." 
Business showed a 3 percent gain in 
1 996. after falling 5 percent to 8 percent 
a year from 1988 to 1995, he added. 

James B. Sherwood, the chairman of 
Orient-Express, said the company paid 
about $21 million for the restaurant and 
anticipated a good return on the in- 
vestment. “It has done better than ex- 
pected.” he said, estimating that it 
would make about $3 million in 1996. 

For decades, the restaurant has cour- 
ted younger customers to supplement its 
loyal but aging regulars. Now, they are 
showing up, especially those in the fi- 
nancial world, and spending freely. 

Blauberg was hired after a worldwide 
search lasting several months. He suc- 
ceeded Michael Lomonaco. the chef of 
seven years, who left to open his own 
restaurant. In the interim. Orient-Ex- 


press engaged Julia Child as a con- 
sultant. Sherwood said he expected 
Blauberg to produce “the American- 
style cuisine for which ‘21 * is known.” 
Yet. those who know the New York 
food scene might regard this appoint- 
ment as controversial. 

Blauberg attracted attention at Colors 
for his elaborately innovative cooking, 
before leaving in 1994 to open the short- 
lived American Renaissance in TriBe- 
Ca. where he was known for silver knife 
rests and romato desserts. He rook a 
consulting job about six months ago in 
Florida, but returned to Manhattan in 
November to join the "21” Club. 
Blauberg would not reveal his salary, 
but neither he nor McGuire denied that it 
might he around $150,000. 

Blauberg said his style would be un- 
like anything he had done in the past. 
‘ ‘What I cook depends on the concept,' ' 
he said. “lam here to adapt the owner’s 
concept.” 

He plans dishes that make frugal use 
of butter and cream on a menu that will 
change with the seasons, he said. At 
present, his new dishes, like filet 
mignon with winter yams and crispy 
leeks, are featured as daily specials. He 
also plans to bake bread on the 
premises. 

Blauberg’s food has its stylish 
touches. For one thing, he likes to stack 
ingredients. “I redesigned the shrimp 
cocktail.” he said. "I starred layering it 
on a plate, serving it with fresh 
horseradish and painting the plate with 
cocktail sauce and flavored oils." 

Blauberg has also tinkered with the 
famous hamburger, serving it with 
sauteed potatoes and pickled vegetables 
instead of sweet-pepper slaw and french 
fries. So much for tire 1950s. 

The “21” Club is known for keeping 
bottles owned by famous patrons, in- 
cluding Ivan Boesky. Elizabeth Taylor 
and Malcolm S. Forbes. In fact, 
McGuire said, Julie Nixon Eisenhower 
called recently to check on her father's 
wine. “It’s still here," he said of 
Richard Nixon’s Dorn Perignon. “But 
we’re putting the brakes on this personal 
wine thing.” 


B UCKINGHAM Palace has an- 
nounced that Prince Charles, the 
heir to the British titrate, will visit over 
the next two months Kuwait, Bahrein 
and Qatar. Bangladesh and Saudi Ar- 
abia. According to the Daily Mail, the 
palace is launching a five-year cam- 
paign to try to persuade dubious Britons 
that Charles is fit to be the country’s 
king one day. The newspaper said the 
palace made the decision after a tele- 
vision poll showed Charles had slumped 
in popularity after his acrimonious di- 
vorce from Princess Diana last year 
and his adulterous affair with an old 
flame; Camilla Parker Bowies. “With 
support for the royal family seriously 
weakened by what are perceived to be 
the prince’s personal failings, his be- 
havior is now at the heart of the mon- 
archy's future.” the paper said. The 
palace will concentrate on selling 
Charles’s good deeds rather than trying 
to remake his image, a policy which had 
failed in the past, it said. 

□ 



Sint Wana/Rar-cr. 


YOU AIN'T NOTHIN’ BUT A . . . — Three Elvis impersonators, from • 
left, Tim Welch, Eddie Powers and Lawrence McMurray, relaxing 
before an Elvis Presley look-alike contest on the King 's Jan. 8 birthday. 


Liza Minnelli received a thundering 
ovation for her return to the Broadway 
stage this week after a 12-year absence. 
Minnelli stepped into the shoes of Julie 
Andrews in the Broadway adaptation of 
the musical film “Victor/victoria" 
about a woman pretending to be a fe- 
male impersonator. Minnelli made her 
stage appearance before an audience 
thar included the actors Harvey Keitel 
and Matthew Modine and the design- 
ers Bill Blass and Todd Oldham. She 
will stand in for Andrews for 31 per- 
formances. 

a 

Sir Paul McCartney is suing a 
former employee’s widow for the return 
of lyrics of a Beaties song he wrote 30 
years ago and which she believes could 
provide a nest egg for her old age. The 
millionaire star's lawyers have slapped 
an injunction on Lily Evans, preventing 
her from auctioning a scrap of paper on 
which he scribbled the words for “With 
A Little Help From My Friends.” In a 
BBC television investigation of die 
case. Evans said she found the classic 
song in papers left by her husband Mai, 
who was the Beaties's road manager for 
many years but died in a shooting ac- 
cident ’in the United States 21 years ago. 


leaving her without a pension. She said 
Sotheby's auction house had estimated 
the value of Sir Paul’s notes at up to 
£60.000 (about $100,000). 

□ 

The bodyguard of Princess 
Stephanie's former husband. Daniel 
Ducruet, has filed suit against the Itali- 
an magazine that published photos 
showing him and Ducruet frolicking 
barely clad with women friends. Alain 
Launois, who was part of the security 
detail for Monaco’s reigning Grimaldi 
family, was with Princess Stephanie’s 
former bodyguard-tumed-husband last 
September when they were both shown 
in compromising positions in photo- 
graphs that appeared in the weekly Eva 
Tremila. Princess Stephanie sub- 
sequently divorced Ducruet. father of 
her two children, after a 15 -month mar- 
riage. Launois's wife, who was preg- 
nant at the time, left him after under- 
going an abortion. He is seeking 1 
billion lira ($650,000) in damages. 

□ 

Marcia Clark, the Los Angeles pros- 
ecutor who didn't convict OJ. Simpson, 
won't return to her job in the district 
attorney’s office, saying she will devote 


her time to finishing a book and other 
projects, dark, who signed a S4.2 mil- 
lion book deal after the trial, has been on 
leave since Simpson was found not guilt}' 
in October 1995 in the deaths of his ex- 
wife and her friend. 

□ 

Time Warner Inc. has signed a deal 
with the Reverend Martin Luther 
King Jr.'s family to produce the first 
complete collection of the slain civil 
rights leader’s sermons, speeches and 
writings. Warner Books, announcing 
the agreement, said it was worth mil- 
lions of dollars but would not be more 
specific. The project will comprise sev- 
en works, including an autobiography 
of King compiled from his own words, 
an Internet site and a CD-ROM. King’s 
widow, Coretia Scott King, and son 
Dexter will write books. There also will 
be a book of King’s sermons and re- 
cordings of his speeches. 



Humphrey Bogart is joining Mar- 
ilyn Monroe and James Dean, becom- 
ing the third actor in die Postal Service's 
Legends of Hollywood stamp series. 
The stamp will be based on a poster for 
the 1946 movie “The Big Sleep." 



in the springtime. 


Even- country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling from France and other countries really 
easy. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country 
you’re calling from and you’ll get the fastest, dearest 
connections. .And be sure to charge your calls on your 
AT&T Calling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to 60%* 
So please check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 



0T*. ‘ .«83S£j 






■tmtioMOf fin* overseas: 


I- Just dial the AT&T Anns Number 
(or (be countiy you ae tailing fim 


1 Diaj the phone number jou're railing 


3. Dial the calling card cumber listed 
above your name. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


EUROPE 



Befflrai* 

Fiwce 

Germany 

Graetw 

Intend 

.822 -983-511 
.8-880-100-10 
0-88848-8011 

BWO-0B10 

.. 88-888-1311 

Rely* ... 

♦Whertaad** 



.172-1811 

.-08HEM111 

755-5842 

B88-8B4B-T1 

Sweden.? 

828-715^11 

SwiteHteatf# 

..’MBUOtttl 

Untied KteRdomA 

..8888-8B-0B11 

KIDDLE EAST 

EevuMCaintf ... suuom 

lainl.J '. 

Saudi AnMao 

.177-188-2727 
.1-880-18 

AFRICA 

wan 

Keya* 

Sooth Alilea 

Olfi 

MOO-JO 

U88494123 


ATKT Owed" Sertce, or dm oorWdj die a: tapMrwutLcaafander 


Tlr 




--■-MM 

.ftlr 

■V- 

■ : i . .