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The World’s Daily Newspaper 


INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
** Paris, Monday, January 13, 1997 




No. 35,416 



ror r resident 

The Supreme Court Weighs 
Civil Suit Against Clinton 

~~ - By R. W. Apple Jr. . - . 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Tbe Supreme Court will hear 
armiments Monday in a case fraught with political peril 
and potential personal humiliation for President BH1 
£*n*on ” sexual-harassment suit filed in 1994 by 
Jcmc5 - af 0T ID crstate government employee 

It is a situation . unprecedented in American legal 
history. No one has ever before filed a civil suit againsta 
srttuig president involving his private behavior. This one 
could force Mr. QJbaton to answer questions about his 
sexual conduct, either, in. open court or in a written 
deposition, or it could give rise to a new form of legal 
protection for presidents while in office. 

The court is to consider not the question of whether 
then-Govemor Clinton asked Ms. 
Jones cm May 8, 1991, to perform a 
sex act, as she alleges. 

It is to weigh a broader legal ques- 
tion: Can a sitting president, any sit- 
ting president, be brought to trial 
while in office, or must the resolution 
of any civil suit related to private 
behavior await fads term's end ■ — in 
this case, presumably, 2001. 

-Ms. Jones’s name may not even be 
ottered by the lawyers Monday. The 
proceedings are sure to be fomudand 
.af- dust-dry. But of all Mr. Clinton's 
Paula Jones manifold legal troubles^ none have a 

greater potential than the Jones case 
to complicate, even re discredit, bis second term, which 
begins Jan. 20. 

Mr. Clinton's reputation as a womanizer is already an 
important element in the relatively pom: showing he 
makes in the polls on * ‘the character issue. ” Bob Dole's 
late surge in me 1996 campaign came when he switched 
his attacks- on the president from economic policies to 
questions of personal probity. 

But the Jones case has the potential to amplify whis- 
pers of scandal into shouts. 2n a media age, that would 
damage Mr. Clinton and the presidency . 

The whole issue is suffused with politics. On the 
advice of Cliff Jackson, a Little Rock political operative 
with a long history of hostility tothe president, Ms. Jones 
first aired her charges in February 1994 at a Washington, 
news conference sponsored by the Conservative Political 
Action Conference. One of her lawyers, Gilbert Davis, a 
former scbooJteacberwhowiflstaiE Ms. Jonas Vcase in 
court, ohms re xunibjr attorney general of Virginia, and 
indeed, he fans already pledged to be “a feaness attorney 
who will . fight anyone who . does . wrong, including the 
president of the United States.” - 

Me. dinton's supporteas haw worked feverishly to dis- 
credit Ms. Jonesinwher lawsuit James CarviUe, the pres- 
ident's fonnercampaiga consultant, told areparter, “Drag a 

See CLWT.ON, Page 7 



An opposition backer brandishing his crutches Sunday during a rally in the center of Sofia, 

The EU Tax Collector Rings 

European Customers of Callback Services Face Sales Charge 


By Edmund L. Andrews 

' . • , • New York Tones Service 

European governments are preparing to steal 
some thunder from one of the United States' flour- 
ishing and most subversive exports: a backdoor 
way of making cheap international phone calls. 

Later this month, the European Union is ex- 
pected to adopt a rule dial will allow governments 
to impose heavy sales taxes on callback services, 

. which can cut the cost of international phone calls 
in half for European customers by having them dial 
through the Uruted States. 

France and Germany, which impose value-ad- 
ded taxes of 20.6 percent and 15 percent, re- 
spectively. on all goods and services, including 
telephone calls, have already announced plans to 
start imposing, the raxes immediately. Every other 
European country has asked the European Com- ■■ 
missionforijenriission as well, and are all expected 
to follow suit 

-But at least some of the callback entrepreneurs, 
who are all based in the United Stares, say the 
Europeans will never be able to collect 
. The customers may well be in Ranee or Ger- 
many, but the service and the billing is carried out 
in such places as Honda or New Jersey. 


Austria Leaders Cut Deal to Let No. 1 Bank Buy No. 2 


CcnpM by Ow SnjfFram Ditpadia 

VIENNA — Austria’s two governing 
political parties agreed Sunday on the 
privatization of Austria’s second- 

V 1 1. 


to wreck their coalition government 

Bank Austria AG, offering the largest 
sum of three bidders, win. take over 
Creditanstalt Bankverein AG for 17.16 
billion schillings ($1.55 trillion), buying 
some 70 percent of the state’s. share in 
the bank. 

The decision, which will lead to the 
fusion of the nation’s two largest banks, 
was reached after the country’s two 
major political parties agreed to set 


aside 50 years- of partisan control of 
competing banks. 

It also brings to an end the nearly six- 
year effortto sell the 142-year-old Cred- 
itanstalt, founded by the Rothschild 
family to finance the Austro-Hungarian 
Empire. The decision-making process 
on the sale was often clouded by polit- 
ical considerations. 

In Austria, where key industries and 
banks have been wholly or partly na- 
tionalized for decades, each of the two 
big parties, which have governed most of 
the time, has sought to avoid an increase 
in the other's political influence. 

Bank Austria has been historically 


controlled by the Social-Democratic 
Party through the appointment of key 
managers. Creditanstalt's management 
had born controlled by the conservative 
People’s Party. 

The People r s Party fiercely opposed a 
takeover of Creditanstalt by Bank Aus- 
tria because the dty of Vienna, a tra- 
ditional power base of the Social Demo- 
crats, holds a 45 percent stake in Bank 
Austria. Another 19 percent voting 
stake is held by the state. 

The conservatives, the junior partner 
in what looked like an increasingly 
shaky coalition, had argued that the rale 
of the state’s share in Creditanstalt was 


□o real privatization in view of Vienna's 
important stake in Bank Austria. 

The political squabble, played out in 
the news media for weeks amid mutual 
muds ringing, ended with a compromise 
after an 11-hour meeting of the two 
parties’ leaders that began Saturday. 

Under the agreement, Vienna's share 
in Bank Austria nil] be reduced to less 
than 25 percent within five years and 
Laier further cut to less than 20 percent 
In addition. Creditanstalt employees 
will be able to buy shares whose worth 
total 500 million schillings. Their jobs 

See AUSTRIA, Page 7 


In Halting Steps, Africa Heads Toward Democracy 


By Howard W. French 

New York Times Service 


ACCRA, Ghana ~ In 1990 President 
Francois Mitterrand- of France spoke 
enthusiastically of a “wind Wowing 
from Europe that has begun to sweep 
Africa.’’ The speech was widely cred- 
ited with speeding up moves toward 
democracy afoot in many countries in - 
the continent , : 

African democracy has experienced a 
handful of giddy highs and discouraging 
setbacks since then, leading many to 
conclude that the public enthusiasm of 
outsiders like Mr. Mitterrand, who cried 
a year ago, was premature. 

But well into what some have called 
the continent's deca d e of democraqr. last 
year saw 18 multiparty elections, more 
than ever in Africa m a single year. 

Now, Africans and outside students 
of the continent's affairs aKke say that 
two sharply divergent groups of coun- 
tries have begun to emerge: those m 

Newsstand Prices _ __ 

Andorra 1O00FF Latere*)-! — U-WJ 

Antiflea 1SJ0FF Morocco --ISDn 

Cameroon ,.1 £00 CFA Qatar-: — 

Egypt..., .££550 Reunion 12-50 Ff 

i France. 1050 FF Saudi Arabla...iaO0 ft 

Gabon. 1100 CFA Senegal — 1- 100 CFA 

I Greece 550 Dr. Spain ^25PTAS 

• Haly 2,800 Lira Tintfa — -1250 an 

J Ivory Coast.1250 CFA UAE. _l0h0l 
r Jordan ~,i .250 JO US. Ml (&jr.)~~$i-20 


which the spirit of true election com- 
petition is fast taking root, and others 


democracy behind which the power of 
incumbents faces minimal risks. 

In a radical change from the con- 
tinent's past, in which one-party dic- 
tatorships were the rule in most ^un- 
tries before the 1990s and presidents for 
tife, declared or otherwise, were com- 
monplace, now no government in sub- 
Saharan Africa feels secure dodging the 
question of popular choice altogether. 

The year 1996 included striking ex- 
amples Of what advocates of African 
democracy say are the best andthe worst 


treads. In countries like Chad. Niger and 
Gambia, former military leaders who 
seized power at gunpoint stage-man- 
aged their transformation into elected 
civilian leaders. Hus was achieved only 
by barring major opponents from run- 
ning. muzzling critics, and in the fust 
two instances, maintaining tight state 
control over the elections. 

A result in all three countries has been 
continued sharp political divisions at 
home, in which tibe opposition has boy- 
cotted the elections or contested the le- 
gitimacy of the government, and deeply 
strained relations with foreign donors. 

.. In Ghana, in die last major elections of 


the year, Jerry Rawlings, a former flight 
lieutenant who seized power in in 1979 
and. after a brief period of civilian rule, 
again in 1981, swept to victory last month 
in his second competitive presidential 
election. The vore was widely seen as 
fair. Unlike most African countries, the 
Ghanaian Constitution limits the pres- 
ident to two terms. 

The opposition asserted that Mr. 
Rawlings’s first electoral victory, in 
1992, was subject to blatant government 
manipulation, leading to a four-year par- 
liamentary boycott by the losers. 

See AFRICA, Page 7 




Tribal Tradition With a Twist 

To Protest, Zimbabwe Village Installs Woman as Chief 


Chief Mabhena, in traditional cos- 
tume, at her induction ceremony. 


By Donald G. McNeil Jr. 

New fort Times Servite 

NSWAZI, Zimbabwe — The chief s 
first meeting with her village since her 
installation had this agenda: 

The names of 20 people who had 
requested more farmland were read out. 

A date was set for an expedition into 
the surrounding forest to destroy 
witches’ charms hung on trees to create 
lightning. 

There was a debate over why the area 
gets so little rainfall, which produced 
arguments that the ancestors were angry 
because boys had cut down a prayer tree 
and because Christians were plowing on 
Wednesdays, the day kept holy by fol- 
lowers of traditionalist beliefs. 


A decision was made to send a del- 
egation to a national shrine to inform the 
ancestors that the father of the new 
chief, Sinqobile Mabhena, had died and 
that she had taken his place. 

One hem was struck: Chief Mabhena 
did not take nominations for her jury to 
tty land disputes and petty crimes like 
adultery, because she wasn't sure how 
many advisers Zimbabwean law en- 
titled her to. 

Standing about S feet ( i .5 meters) tall 
in her best hat and a bright red jacket. 
Miss Mabhena addressed her audience 
of 300 firmly, budgeting two hours to let 
everyone speak, in an African version of 
small-town democracy. "I'm used to 

See CHIEF, Page 7 


Bulgaria Opposition 
Gets Offer of Talks, 
But Steps Up Pressure 


“I don't see how they will be able to track us," said 
Eric Doescher, director of marketing for International 
{Callback, a Seattle-based company that boasts 90,000 
customers and about $100 million in sales. 

Callback services, most of which are garage- 
sized start-ups, have soared in popularity and so- 
phistication in the last several years European gov- 
ernment officials recently estimated that industry 
sales were $500 million last year and would prob- 
ably hit $1 billion in 1997. Even AT&T Carp., 
which fretted for years about the legality of call- 
back services, recently jumped into the market. 

The key to callback services is a clever way of 
exploiting the huge spread between telephone rates 
in the Uruted States — where heavy competition has 
brought prices down over the past decade — and the 
raies charged by stale-controlled monopolies in 
most other countries. 

Callback services essentially allow callers 'm 
Europe to reverse the charges. A customer in Paris 
who wants to call Dallas, for example, beans by 
dialing an automated callback service in die United 
States. 

The person hangs up as soot as the American 
phone rings, and the callback service dials the 

See CALLBACK, Page 7 


C.n/tJrJ ", Our Xttf Flam Di^ju 

SOFIA — Bulgaria’s embattled So- 
cialists, rocked by a wave of anti- gov- 
ernment street protests, offered Sunday 
to begin talks with the opposition on 
holding early elections. 

The announcement came from Georgi 
Parvanov. leader of the Socialists, the 
former Communists. He said on state 
television that talks could start Monday. 

He made it clear, however, that he 
expected his party to stay in power for at 
least another year to "stabilize" Bul- 
garia, which "is undergoing its worst 
economic crisis since 1989. 

That is unlikely to satisfy the op- 
position, which rallied 100,000 people 
is Sofia and tens of thousands of others 
in cities nationwide to back its demand 
for early elections. 

As pressure mounted on the Social- 
ists, protesters in the provinces took to 
the streets to denounce "hunger and 
misery,” the radio reported. 

Dockers, miners and taxi drivers said 
they would join a general strike dial the 
opposition is planning from Monday. 

Mr. Parvanov linked the offer of talks 
on early elections to an end to the 
protests. He said the opposition would 
have to “stop the confrontations'' and 
allow the Socialists to form a new gov- 
ernment "with a program for one or 
one-and-a-half years.' 

The demonstrators want the Sod al- 
ms to quit and call early elections in- 
stead of forming a new government 

Legislative elections are scheduled 
for December 1998. 

The protests began against a back- 
drop of political uncertainty. The out- 

E Socialist government of Prime 
ter Zban Videnov resigned in late 
December as accusations mounted that 
it was responsible for the deepening 
economic crisis. 

The Socialists hold 125 of 240 seats 
in Parliament They have rejected an 
attempt by President Zhelyu Zbelev, 
who leaves office this month, to mediate 
talks on early elections, asking him to 
allow Interior Minister Nikolai Dobrev 
to form a new government 
Mr. Zhelev has warned that the coun- 
try could explode in violence if die ruling 
former Communists do not meet op- 
position demands. The outgoing leader 
is due to hand over his office to Pres- 
ident-elect Pyotr Stoyanov on Jan. 22. 

On Sunday, the crowd in Sofia, wav- 
ing blue opposition flags, gathered out- 
side the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral 
and pledged to continue to protest every 


Belgrade Hints 
It May Back Down 

The Serbian government has 
shown the first signs of a political 
retreat in die eight-week crisis that 
has brought hundreds of thousands 
of demonstrators into the streets. 

President Slobodan Milosevic’s 
government met Saturday with stu- 
dents who have protested against the 
regime's refusal to recognize elec- 
tion victories by the opposition. 

Hinting that it may be willing to 
back down, die government gave a 
statement after the meeting, saying 
the will of the citizens "must be 
fully respected." (Page 7) 


day until early elections are called. 

"For a long time we supported the 
red mafia," said Ivan Kostov, president 
of the main opposition Union of Demo- 
cratic Forces. “Now we will not let it 
govern any more." 

The protest took place near the Par- 
liament building, which was the scene 
of violent clashes overnight Friday 
when scores of people — 258 according 
to the opposition — were injured. 

Protesters also rallied in the central 
Bulgarian town of Gabrovo, in Ruse and 
Svichov in the north, and in Samokov in 
the southwest, the radio said. 

A first hint of compromise had sur- 
faced earlier in the day when the Par- 
liament speaker, Blagovest Sendov, 
who is close to the Socialists but not a 
party member, said he favored early 

See BULGARIA, Page 7 


Serb Protests 
And Sofia: 

The Difference 
Is Economic 


By Thalia Griffiths 

Reuters 

SOFIA — Two of Eastern Europe’s 
last former Communist governments, in 
Bulgaria and in Yugoslavia, are under 
pressure from protests gathering thou- 
sands of people daily in defiance of riot 
policemen and freezing temperatures. 

But while Belgraders are in the streets 
to demand greater democracy and an 
end to one-party rule, Bulgarians, who 
enjoy political pluralism, are protesting 
against more fundamental problems of 
poverty and crime. 

"We should not forget that the 
protests in Serbia are based mainly on 
political demands, and the protests here 
are based on economic factors and so- 
cial discontent." said Bulgaria’s anti- 
Commurust president, Zhelyu Zhelev. 

‘ ‘The difference is dear, as the average 
salary in Serbia is $200 and in Bulgaria it 
is $30," he said. 

Serbia's opposition prides itself that 
after eight straight weeks, its style of 
peaceful, inventive and deafening mass 
protests has been adopted by others. 

"We have become a world school of 
peaceful democratic protests," one 
leader of the Zajedno opposition co- 
alition, Zoran Djindjic, told a rally in 
Belgrade last week. 

"In Bulgaria, the Bulgarian oppo- 
sition has taken up our model of 
whistles and eggs in an attempt to topple 
die Communists." 

Anastasia Moser, head of Bulgaria's 
opposition Agrarian Party, agreed their 
supporters had taken their inspiration 
from television pictures of Belgrade, 
and said she was confident they could 
hold out as long. 

"The rallies are becoming more and 
more numerous every day," she said 
"Participation is growing because public 

See PROTESTS, Page 7 


AGENDA 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY’ 13, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Money and Power / Capitalizing ©n ill© New Russia 


The Rise and Rise of Boris Berezovsky 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Past Service 


M OSCOW — On a recent afternoon. Bor- 
is Berezovsky, deputy chief of the 
Kremlin Security Council, wearing an 
impeccably tailored business suit, crisp 
white shin and red tie. negotiated a deal with Salman 
Raduyev. a battle-hardened, bearded Chechen mil- 


itary commander wearing combat fatigues. 
Than 


. day. Mr. Berezovsky won the release of 2 1 
Russian troops taken hostage by Mr. Raduyev *s 
militiamen in a potentially explosive dispute. 

The next day. Mr. Berezovsky, again perfectly 
attired, was honored ar a ceremony in Moscow. The 
Russian Association for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence and Education named him Philanthropist of the 
Year for his gift of SI. 3 million to support travel by 
Russian scientists to international conferences. 

The following evening. Mr. Berezovsky, indus- 
trialist and financier, was at his Moscow business 
club. a richly decorated old mansion, showing a 
visitor to his office and talking at length about the 
power of capitalists in the new Russian state. 

“I think two types of power are possible.” he 
said, speaking softly, but quicUy: “Either a power 
of ideology, or a power of capital. Ideology is now 
dead, and today we have a period of transition, from 
the power of ideology to the power of capital.” 
More than anyone else, Mr. Berezovsky epi- 
tomizes the dominance of the new Russian tycoons 
and their near total merger with affairs of state. His 
official title is deputy secretary of the Security 
Council, responsible for Chechnya — the war- 
ravaged southern region whose battle for indepen- 
dence from Moscow was halted by a cease-fire last 
autumn. But Mr. Berezovsky is much, much more. 

He is pan of a tight circle of financiers and 
business moguls who, by his own estimate, control 
half of Russia's economy. They are the new leading 
oligarchs of Russia, buccaneer bankers and in- 
dustrialists who are deeply entwined with the gov- 
ernment of President Boris Yeltsin. They are re- 
form-minded in the sense that they bankrolled Mr. 
Yeltsin's presidential campaign against his Com- 
munist rival last year, and they generally favor the 
country’s rocky transition to a free-market demo- 
cracy. which has made them fabulously wealthy. 
They all attained wealth in the violent, cor- 


ruption-ridden. high-stakes competition that fol- 


lowed the collapse of the Soviet Union five years 
ago, fighting for the juiciest pieces of the fallen 
empire. Virtually all of them capitalized on ob- 
taining. often for next to nothing, a valuable chunk 
of former state property to exploit. The scramble for 
wealth and power was carried out with brutal means, 
often including car bombs and assassinations. 

As the grasp of the Russian state continues to 
weaken, the role of the financial and industrial clans 
within it continues to grow. While the stale seems 
helpless to meet even such basic obligations as 
paying soldiers on time, mighty corporate interests 
are oii die march. They ran airlines, television 
stations, auto factories, newspapers, energy mono- 
polies and more. They get favorable treatment from 



Midud Enufinffi-virn 


More than anyone else, Mr. 
Berezovsky epitomizes the 
dominance of the new Russian 
tycoons and their near total 
merger with affairs of state. 


a Kremlin that still picks the winners and losers in 
the economy, and they give favors back to those in 
power — such as huge campaign contributions and 
flattering television news coverage. 

In their view, there is virtually no barrier between 
their interests and those of Russia itself. “I think 
that if something is advantageous to capital,” Mr. 
Berezovsky said, “it goes without saying that it’s 
advantageous to the nation. It's capital that is in a 
condition, to the greatest extent, to express the 
interests of the nation." 

Critics charge that the new capitalists have gone 
too far and used illicit or criminal means to grab 
their new wealth. Grigori Yavlinsky, leader of the 
centrist Yabloko faction in the State Duma, wrote 
recently thai the “main characteristic' * of Russia's 
power structure is that it is “profit-seeking.” 

Mr. Berezovsky. 50, epitomizes the new blend of 
Russian magnate' and politician. He and several 
other tycoons who benefited handsomely from Rus- 
sia's free-market reforms and the privatization of 


state property poured millions of dollars into Mr. 
Yeltsin’s campaign. According to Mr. Berezovsky, 
they believed they were acting not only in Russia s 
interest but defending themselves, because they 
feared a Communist victory would wipe them out 

‘‘l felt this especially acutely oo the eye of the 
presidential election,*’ Mr. Berezovsky said. ' ‘1 felt 
that everything we’ve done is under threat, because, 
completely realistically, the Communists could 
have come to power.” 

Money and power are the common deno min ator 
of this clan, many of whom were rivals in the past In 
addition to Mr. Berezovsky, they include Vladimir 
Gusinsky, a banking and media mogul who controls 
Russia's main commercial television station; Vladi- 
mir Potanin, now a deputy prime minister, who was 
head of Oneximbank; Mikhail Khodorovsky of the 
giant Menalep group; Pyotr Ayen, one of the orig- 
inal Kremlin reformists who is now president of 
Alpha Bank; Alexander Smolensky of Stolichny 
Bank and Vladimir Vinogradov of Ipko mbank . 


A FTER the World Economic Forum in 
Davos, Switzerland, last year, they played 
a key role in persuading Mr. Yeltsin to 
rehire Anatoli Chubais, the former pri- 
vatization chief, to run his re-election campaign. 
Then they helped persuade Mr. Yeltsin to dump the 
reactionaries in his entourage, including his long- 
time personal bodyguard, Alexander Korzhakov. 

Then they recruited as Security Council chief — 
and later helped depose — the charismatic Al- 
exander Lebed, whose brief alliance with Mr. 
Yeltsin lifted the president’s vote tally. 

After the election, the group discussed who 
among them should enter the government at a senior 
level to deal with economic affairs, according to one 
source. They settled on Mr. Potanin because he is an 


ethnic Russian; most of the rest of them, including 

rish.and 


Mr. Berezovsky and Mr. Gusinsky, are Jewish, 
they feared a nationalist backlash. 

Russia's new tycoons are not public heroes. Pop- 
ular resentments run deep over the vast sell-off of 
state property, which made many of them rich and 
left millions of Russians in poverty. The change was 
‘‘painful” for the rich, too, Mr. Berezovsky said, 
because “they place themselves under bullets.” He 
knows; he narrowly escaped a 1994 car-bomb as- 
sassination attempt that beheaded his driver. 

At the center of Mr. Berezovsky's empire is his 
holding company. Logovaz, through which he has 
controlling or partial interests in banks; the power- 
ful public television channel ORT; the newspaper 
Nezavisimaya Gazeta; Transaero, a successful Rus- 
sian airline: a Moscow television station; the 
weekly magazine Ogonyok; and Sibneft, Russia's 


seventh largest oil company. He also is involved in 
ting Russia's national airline. A 


managing Russia's national airline, Aeroflot 
But his most controversial venture has been into 
government Why does one of Russia's biggest 
tycoons want to be on the Security Council, han- 
dling the postwar headaches of Chechnya? 

Mr. Berezovsky said he took the job because 
"Chechnya today is the biggest destabilizing polit- 
ical factor in Russia.” 


Hebron Talks Butt Up 


Against a Larger Issue 

Test of Wills Over Future of West Bank 


By Serge Schmemarin 

Nnt York Tones Service 


JERUSALEM — What began as com- 
plex wrangling over who will patrol 
which street in Hebron has evolved dur- 
ing the last three months into a far more 
elemental and far more fateful test of 
wills between Benjamin Netanyahu and 
Yasser Arafat over the very foundations 
of the I srap-1 i -Palestinian effort to make 
peace. , . 

Mr. Arafat, the Palestinian leader, 
wants a firm cotmmtinent now that Mr. 
Netanyahu's government will comply 
with a fundamental tenet of the Israeli- 
patestinian agreements by withdrawing 
from most of file West Bank within a 


year. 


For Mr. Netanyahu's rightist con- 
stituents, that would mean surrendering 
Jewish lands and a critical bargaining 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Arab Frustration With Israel Is Turning to Rage 


By John Lancaster 

Wiu/u/igiofl Post Sen-ice 


CAIRO — A Jordanian newspaper 
columnist summed up the sorry state of 
Arab- Israeli relations with an anecdote 
about a shopkeeper. Enraged by the 


hand-line diplomacy of Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, the 


cm 


had posted a sign announ- 
b Jews, no dogs.” 
n the columnist. Rami Khouri, 
suggested to the shopkeeper that some 
customers might find the sign offensive, 
the man replied, “Indeed, some people 
objected ro the reference to dogs." Mr. 
Khouri wrote in the Jordan Tunes. 

While deploring the anti-Semitism 
behind the remark. Mr. Khouri de- 
scribed it as symptomatic of Arabs' 
anger over what they see as Mr. Net- 
anyahu's efforts to roll back Israel's 
commitments to its neighbors under 
terms of previous peace agreements. 
“We should not deny the association 
between the extreme new attitudes in 
Jordan and extreme new policies in Is- 
rael,” he wrote. 

Arab political leaders have taken note 
of the popular mood. Six mouths after 
Mr. Netanyahu’s victory over Shimon 
Peres, the Labor Party leader, moderate 
Arab states such as Egypt and Jordan are 
pressing their diplomatic campaign 


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against Israel on all fronts — freezing 
steps toward “normalization.'' raising 
the temperature of anti-Israel rhetoric in 
semiofficial newspapers and filling the 
air with prophecies of doom. 

In light of the current impasse be- 
tween Israel and the Palestinians over 
the future of Hebron, the last major 
West Bank city still occupied by Israel, 
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt last 
week described Arab frustration toward 
Israel as a potential “atomic bomb.” 

Such statements contain an element 
of hyperbole. For all the ftilminations of 
Arab leaders in Egypt, Jordan and else- 
where, and the growing fury of their 
people, few predict a return to the large- 
scale conflagrations of the past 

“I don't think that the international 
community will accept the military op- 
tion one way or another from either 
side,” said a diplomat from a pro- West- 
ern Arab country who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity. "I don't think the 
international community will accept 
prolonged violence. So there are new 
parameters to this which didn’t exist 
before." 

Other constraints include Israel’s un- 
disputed military superiority over its 
neighbors; the desire ro remain on good 
terms with Israel's superpower patron, 
the United States, and growing domestic 
and international pressure for political 
and economic reforms that have long 
taken a back seat to the struggle against 
Israel. “They are basically at a loss.” a 
Western diplomat said recently. “They 
don't have a lot of room to maneuver. 

Extremist groups, however, operate 
with no such constraints. Thursday 
night's unclaimed bombings in Tel 
Aviv, which wounded 13 people, may 
have been the opening salvo in a new 
terror campaign by Palestinian radicals. 
In southern Lebanon, where Israeli oc- 
cupation forces are battling Hezbollah 
guerrillas backed by Syria and Iran. 


tensions are rising following the un- 
explained launch Wednesday of a Katy- 
usha 


ia rocket into northern Israel. 

In a region that has witnessed four 
major Arab- Israeli wars since the 
founding of the Jewish state in 1 948, die 
deterioration in relations between Israel 
and its Arab neighbors has generated 
understandable alarm. 

After initially promising to give Mr. 
Netanyahu the benefit of the doubt, both 
Mr. Mubarak and King Hussein of 
Jordan have accused the Israeli leader of 
betraying their trust. 

They say he has failed to abide by the 
“land for peace” principle set forth at 
the U.S.-sponsored Madrid peace con- 
ference in 1991 — by which Israel 
would return captured Arab territory 
and Arab states would peacefully accept 
Israel as a neighbor. Thai conference 
was followed by Israel’s signmg of 
peace accords with the Palestinians in 
1993 and 1995 and with Jordan in 1994. 
Egypt made peace with Israel in 1979. 

The door also appeared to be opening 
to a pact with Syria, which demands the 
return of the Golan Heights, captured by 
Israel in 1967. But. citing security con- 
cerns. Mr. Netanyahu has said that Is- 
rael will not return the Golan Heights 
and has delayed Israeli troop withdraw- 
als from the West Bank, a pullback that 
was required by the peace accords. 

In June, shortly after Mr. Netanyahu ’s 
election, Arab leaders held a summit 
meeting in Cairo that produced a mildly 
worded threat to "reconsider" ties with 
Israel if its new government did not 
follow through on “land for peace.” 

So the breakdown in trust between 
Israel and the Palestinians — culmin- 
ating in three days of open warfare last 
fall — has fueled a surge of Arab anger. 

In responding to this anger, Egypt and 
other moderate Arab states have not 
hesitated to play the normalization card. 
Talks on regional issues such as arms' 


control, water resources, environmental 
issues and refugees have all but ground 
to a halt 

The Gulf state of Qatar — with 
Egypt’s hearty approval — has post- 
poned plans to open trade missions in 
Tel Aviv. 

“You're not going to talk about water 
sharing or regional economic cooper- 
ation or the environment when there's 
no peace process," an Arab official 
observed. While such measures may 
seem relatively mild, they are painful to 
Israelis eager to break out of their iso- 
lation in the Middle East- 


lever in even more difficult issues 
ahead, such as what to do about Je- 
rusalem or Israel’s borders. 

After weeks of maneuvering, accord- 
ing to officials close to the negotiations, 
alt that remains to seal an agreement is a 
political decision by the Israeli and Pal- 
estinian leaders. Without it, they said, 
there is no point in continuing to ne- 
gotiate. 

“If we finally do get an agreement, 
we’ll get not only Hebron, but also a 
gateway and a roadmap to the rest of the 
interim agreement,” said an American 
official. He did not give the alternative, 
but it would be hard to avoid new ten- 
sion and confrontation. 

The details of die withdrawal from 
most of Hebron, by all accounts, have 
been fully resolved. The issue now hold- 
ing up agreement is a demand by Mr. 
Arafat for a written guarantee from the 
United States that Israel will abide by 
existing agreements to withdraw from 
additional West Bank areas in three 
stages, ending next September. 

Mr. Netanyahu has agreed to set a 
date for the first stage, but has refused to 
propose a deadline for completing the 
Israeli withdrawals. 

After agreeing to cede control over 
most of Hebron, an ancient town that 
many of Mr. Netanyahu's religious and 
nationalist constituents regard as 
second only to Jerusalem in importance 
for the Jews, a commitment to pall bade 
from largely uninhabited tracts of die 
West Bank might not seem so difficult 

Yet however sensitive, most politi- 
cians of the left and of die right agree 
that withdrawal from Hebron is un- 
avoidable, because no ideology ran 
change the fact that 150,000 Palestin- 
ians five there. The only issue was how 
to accommodate a duster of Jewish 
enclaves in the city’s center. 

By contrast the “further redeploy- 
ments,” as the disputed obligations are 
termed, go to the very structure of the 
breakthrough agreements reached in 
Oslo between Mr. Arafat and Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin in September 
1993. The Olso “declaration of prin- 
ciples” established a series of stages in 
which the Palestinians would gain con- 
trol over occupied lands in die Gaza 
Strip and the West Bank. 

Tne first stage was control over Gaza 
and Jericho. The second stage, which 
began in September 1995, included Is- 
raeli withdrawal from Palestinian towns 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


U.S. Orders Inspection of 747s 

SEATTLE (Reuters) — The U.S. Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration has ordered an inspection of fuel pump wiring 
systems in older Boeing 747 jumbo jets to look for chafed 
wiring that could cause an explosion. 

The move is part of the agency's continuing inquiry into the 
cause of tbe explosion that destroyed TWA Flight 800 off Long m 

Island, New York, on July 17, killing all 230 people on board. This Week S Holidays 


The international airport of Dubai in the United Arab 
Emirates reported a record 8.5 million passengers in 1996, 
making it the second busiest in the region after Cairo. (AFP) 


.Torrential rainfall in central and southern Greece 
caused floods, mud slides and power outages Sunday, but no 
fatalities were reported. (AP) 


effect Jan 21. It covens the 433 oldest Boeing 747s still in 
service and gives airlines 120 days to do the inspections. 


Shanghai city officials have seized large quantities of 
hairy clams blamed for a rise in the hepatitis rate last fell, 
about 10 percent to 20 percent higher than in the same period 
in 1 995, the Business News reported Sunday. (Reuters) 


Banking and government offices will be closed or services 
curtailed in the following countries and their dependencies 
this week because of national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Puerto Rico, Tanzania. 

TUE SDAY: SdLub. 

WEDNESDAY: Japan, Malawi. >■’ 

Sources : JJ*. Morgan, Reuters. Bloomberg. 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by AecuWeather. Asia 


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in the West Bank, followed by the elec- 
tion of a Palestinian Legistem-e Council, 
then by further withdrawals in teee 
stages over 18 months. . 

Tbe final pullback was to be made in 
September 1997. 

At the same time, the two sides were 
to engage in ‘‘final status talks over 
Jerusalem, the Jewish settlements and 
benders, with die entire process con- 
cluding in May 1999. 

Under the Oslo accord, the Pales- 
tinians were to enter final status talks 
after already gaining control of as much 
as 85 percent of the West Bank- Cur- 
rently, the Palestinian Authority has di- 
rect control over towns that amount to 7 
percent of the area of the West Bank, 
and administr ative control in other 
settled areas that cover about 25 per- 
cent 

hi his writings before he came to of- 
fice, Mr. Netanyahu outlined a different 
vision. He visualized granting the Pal- 
estinians control over their population -• 
and areas in which they lived, but keep- =■ 
ing overall control arid sovereignty in 
Israeli hands, presumably leaving vacant 
areas of the West Bank free for Jewish 

In effect, he saw an arrangement 
much like the existing one. 

On his election last spring, Mr. Net- 
anyahu did not hide his aversion to the 
Oslo agreements, but pledged to abide 
by them. 

Mr. Arafat’s initial misgivings about 
the new leader soon turned to deep 
mistrust when Mr. Netanyahu suggested 
moving directly to final status talks after 
Hebron. 

To the Palestinians, that sounded like 
Mr. Netanyahu wanted to avoid any 
further redeployments and to use ter- 
ritory as a leverage in the final talks. 

So. from the very outset of nego- 
tiations over Hebron, Mr. Arafat de- 
manded that any agreement be accom- 
panied by written American assurances 
that Mr. Netanyahu would keep to the, 
Oslo timetable. V 

Mr. Netanyahu agreed to give a date 
for the first redeployment but Mr. Ara- 
fet demanded dates for all three. As 
Hebron issues came to be resolved, the 
battle focused on the timetable for fu- 
ture withdrawals. 

Mr. Arafat refused to budge. 

Members of Mr. Netanyahu’s coali- 
tion, who until then, like most Israelis, 
had focused on more tangible issues like 
Hebron and security and had not studied 
the agreements, came to realize tbe im- 
portance of fee issue. If fee government 
agreed to cede much of tbe West Bank 
before final status talks, the nationalist 
dream of fee “Land of Israel,” of Jew- 
ish settlements spreading across Judea 
and Samaria, was over. And the gov- 
ernment's biggest bargaining chip on 
the question of Jerusalem mid settle- 
ments was gone. 

From fee outset, Mr. Netanyahu had 
promised to hold a vote on any agree- 
ment by his cabinet, which includes 
ministers from all fee major factions in 
his coalition. 

Seven of fee 18 ministers have 
already said they will not vote for the 
Hebron agreement on principle. 

: Now other ministers, including 
Justice Minister Tzahi Hanegbi and 
Communications Minister Livor Livn- 
at, have declared dial they will not sup- 
: an agreement if it includes a dead- 
: for additional withdrawal. 


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THE AMERICAS 


Democrats and Republicans Escalate the Gingrich War 


<* 


By Brian Knowlton 

Jnurnationa i HemM - 

WASHINGTON -■ House R*. 


Rations Sunday overfeS 

*? “^operate in this new 
"-oneress nno i — n 


— 4T — r> 6 UUiiOW. 

ine Democrats, including the 
™“°nty leader, Richard Gephardt, 
°^ a / ‘cover-Up’' in criticizing 
the decision by the RepuWka^ 
. aommated ethics committee to 
delay and compress a public hearing 
on Mr. Gingrich to the days Leading 
“P to President Bill Clinton’s ii£ 
auguration on Jari. 20. 

L °°e Democrat, Martin Frost, of 
rexas, said the Republicans had 
. KMany poisoned the well for any 
.possible bipartisan cooperation.” 


In tttn; Republicans asserted lhat 
the reported taping and dissesnin- 
ation ma telephone co nference call, 
in which Mr. Gingrich and other 
House leaders discussed strategies 
for handling the case, amounted to a' 
felonious act by. an unidentified 
House Democrat. ; Tfcey contended 
that die. taping, should :be investi- 
gated by the Justice Department. 

'‘Whoever did this broke the 
law,” Representative Bill Pax on 
said Sunday on CNN. “If it is a 
member, they should either have the 
honor to resign or they should be 
expelled from die House.” 

The charges against Mr. Gin- 
grich, based on his admitted use of 
tax-exempt funds for partisan pur- 
poses, have polarized Congress. 

The furor over the charges, and 
how they might restrict Mr. Gin- 
grich's effectiveness, had already 


neatly cost- him die speakership, 
which be won Tuesday in a close 
vote of die full House. Democrats 
and a handful of Republicans said 

that Ac Georgia representative 

should have stepped aside, at least 
until the charges were resolved. 

Mr. Gephardt repeated that cad 
Sunday on NBC-TV. “Why the 
rush?” he asked, referring to the 
tight schedule for hearings and a 
vote on Mr. Gingrich. ‘T think it’s 
only to coveT it up, to make sure 
people don’t have the fads.*' 

As things stand, the report from 
the ethics committee ’s special coun- 
sel. James Cole, will be presented to 
die full House on Thursday. After a 
weekend of hearings, the House will 
vote on Mr. Gingrich's punishment, 
taking into consideration the com- 
mittee's recommendation. 

Republican leaders have said they 


.expea the mildest rebuke will be 
issued; a reprimand. Considered far 
less likely is censure, which might 
cost him me speakership, or a call for 
a Justice Department investigation. 

“I think that the most we’re talk- 
ing about is a reprimand.” Rep- 
resentative Bob Livingston, Repub- 
lican of Louisiana, said Sunday. “In 
fact. I’m not even sure that we're 
talking about that.” 

Asked why the Republicans ap- 
peared to be rushing the ethics case 
to a conclusion, Mr. Livingston, 
chairman of the House Appropri- 
ations Committee, said the attempts 
to delay the vote were coming from 
Democrats ’’eager to drag this 
whole thing out.” 

He said they wanted to distract 
Americans from a series of 
hanging over the White House. 

The ethics committee originally 


scheduled a week of public hear- 
ings. Later, Democrats on the panel 
denounced the Republicans for 
scheduling the hearings to begin 
days before Mr. Cole’s report was 
supposed to be available. They said 
that the House vote should be 
delayed to early February. The Re- 
publicans then said that they would 
delay the hearings to Thursday, to 
give Mr. Cole more time. 

But Democrats pointed out that 
the Republican shift came after a 40- 
minuie meeting between the com- 
mittee and the House majority lead- 
er, Richard Armey of Texas, in what 
some said appeared to be improper 
interference with the panel’s role. 

But reports about the recording of 
the Gingrich conference call gave 
Republicans a weapon to strike 
back, which they dia with their de- 
mands for an investigation. 


Hope for Talks in Peru Crisis 

y 1 Archbishop and Red (joss Envoy Visit Hostages 


The Associated Press 

LIMA — Two j 

‘in efforts to end the hostage 
crisis at the Japanese ambas- 
- sador’s residence here visited 
the 74 captives Sunday a>* nid 
hopes for new face-to-face 
.talks between the rebels and 
the government 
. Juan Luis Cipriani, the Ro- 
man Catholic archbishop of 
‘Ayacucho in southern Peru, 
spent more than two hours 
inside the diplomatic com- 
pound before leaving without 


hostages, also spent more than 
two hours in the residence on 
Saturday,' accompanied by 
another Red Cross worker. He 
left without speaking to re- 


Ttae Red Cross represen- 
tative. Michel M inni g, also 
visited the hostages. ‘‘The 
only thing I can tell you is the 
hostages are fine,” Mr. Min- 
nig said afterward. 

Previous visits by the pair 


Tupac Amaru leftists, 
who seized mote than 500 


attending a recepti 


on 

at the compound Dec. 

No hostages have been re- 
leased since Jan. 1. Ne^ 
ations stalled after the rel 
spoke to reporters on Dec. 3 1, 
violating an agreement with 
the government. 

The government negotiat- 
or, Domingo Pakrino, and 
.Nestor Cerpa, leader of die 
rebels, agreed in a radio con- 
■ venation Friday to a face-to-, 
’face meeting niside the com- 
i over the weekend. Brit 
Sunday afternoon, Mr. 
Palermo had not been seen 
’ near the residence. ; • 

Archbishop CrorianL who 
has celebrated Mass for the 


AWM# main 

pound i 
'by Sue 


porters but waved and flashed 
a smile, fueling speculation 
that progress was being made 
in arranging a release or new 
talks 

News of renewed contact 
between the two sides was 
welcomed in Tokyo, where 
concern renamed high over 
the Japanese diplomats and of- 
ficials still held. 

‘T expect direct negoti- 
ations ttus timo ro. be held, 
smoothly and vigorously and 
bring about a tangible reso- 
lution,” Foreign Minister 
Yukimko Breda told the NHK 
television network. 

President Alberto Fujimori 
has rejected the guerrillas’ de- 
mand that he relrase about 300 
rebels from Peruvian rails. But 
in an interview Friday, Mr. 
Rtpmori saidbe was confid- 
ent be could get die hostages 
freed without bloodshed. 

-His government has been 
in contact with other coun- 
tries Ti> arrange die possible 
safe passage -of die guerrillas 
fromjFeru should they release 
all of their captives. Officials 
refuse to identify which coun- 
tries have been consulted. 

The captives include Ja- 
'patfg ambassador; Motarisa 1 
AokL Pern's foreign minister, 
congressmen, judges and top 
security officials, - Japanese 
executives and Mr. Fujimori’s 
younger brother, Pedro. , 


Mr. Fujimori spent Sunday 
prep a ring for a visit by Pres- 
ident Abdala Bucaram of 
Ecuador on Monday, the first 
ever of an Ecuadoran head of 
state to Fern. The two coun- 
tries have clashed several 
times over their disputed bor- 
der, most recently m 1995. 

Load media have cited 
Ecuador as a possible des- 
tination for the guerrillas 
holed up inside the ambas- 
sador’s residence. 

Several thousand people 
marched near the compound 
Sunday to demand the hos- 
tages’ freedom, the largest 
demonstration smt* itic crisis 
be gan Graying hanngns, signs 
and a giant red^nd-white Per- 
uvian flag, the marchers 
chanted and sang to the sounds 
of xylophones, a tuba and 
drums. . 

“It’s gone on too long 
now: We just want peace. We 
want the hostages set free,” 
said Honoris Trujillo, a 
demonstrator. 

Police late Saturday re- 
leased a Japanese reporter and 
a Peruvian translator who had 
been detained since sneaking 
inside the compound Tuesday 
to interview the rebels. Tsuy- 
oahi Hhomi, a New York- 
based TV Asahi reporter, left 
lima late Saturday. His Per- 
uvian - i nterpre t e r, Victor 
Boaja, also Was released. 

A TV Asahi representative 
said the videotape the two re- 
corded inside the compound 
was turned over to Japanese 
Embassy officials in Lima. 



.At Civil Trial, Simpson Tells of a Happy Marriage 


.By B. Drummond Ayres Jr. 

New TortTanes Service 

SANTA MONICA, Cali- 
. fornia — With the end of his 
civil wrongful-death trial 
drawing near, O.J. Simpson 
has taken the stand and, gently 
nudged along by his lawyers. 
painted a picture of himself as 
a loving husband trad all- 
round good guy who could not 
have fatally slashed his fanner 
.wife Nicole Brown Sb 


• sad. her friend Ronald 
, man on June 12, 1994. 

Only once, he insisted, had 
he physically harmed Mrs. 
Simpson — mid then not with 
'■his fists but in wrestling her 
out of his locked bedroom 
after she- had somehow 

entered, angry, at the end of a 

New Year’s Eve bacchanal. 

4 What was more, he went 
on, the next morning, Jan. 1, 


1989, he was so “disappoint- 
ed” in himself for having 
mmitiMiHiMt hex that he had 
his lawyer draw* up a doc- 
ument that would punish him 
“to the tune of milli ons of 
dollars” should there ever be 
another such incident. 

There never was, he said, 
but be conceded that once they 
had an argument in which he 
kicked in a door, and that on 
another occasion they had ex- 
changed words ana he had. 
somewhat playfully, cracked 
the window on her Mercedes 
con votible with a baseball hat 
he was toying with. 

“We were very much in 
love,” Mr. Simpson said at one 
point m describing his mar- 
riage under friendly question- 
ing by his lead lawyer, Robert 
Baker, . who was seeking 
through Friday’s -testimony to 
end the defense’s case with the 


By Saxo Dillon 

. New York. Tunes Service 

MEXICO CITY — Three 
months after proclaiming thin 
a decomposed body found on 
a farm belonging to a former 
president’s brother would 
prove “conclusive” in solv- 
ing a political assass ina tio n, 
the Mexican authorities have 

acknowledgedthatthey could 

not identify the remains. .. 

The announcement Friday 
capped a week of new set- 
backs fOT.theoountiy’s crim- 
inal justice system and for 
president Ernesto Zedillo’s 
attempts to remake it-. 

When the sketeion.was dug 
up Oct. 9 on a farm near Mex- 
ico City, Attorney. General 
Antonio Lozano hinted that 
body was the • remains of 
-Manuel Munoz Rocha, a con- 
1 pr e ss man who has been miss- 
ing since 1994. and predicted 
that they would prove to he 
“conclusive” evidence in 
, showing that Raul Salinas de 
Gortari tod ordered the as- 


Mexico Fails to Solve 
Mystery of a Skeleton 

sassination of a prominent 
politician, Jose Francisco 

Ruiz Massieu- . 

The .government has ac- 
cused Mr. Safinas of asking 
Mr. Munoz Rocha to cany 

out the assassination and then 

ordering tire slaying of Mr. 
. Munoz Rocha as well. 

The farm was. the property 
ofMr. Safinas, brother ot Car- 
lo $ Salinas de Gortari, the 
forma" president' 

After presidential aides 
learned that results of forensic 
tests cast doubts on Mr. Loz- 

' ano’s concIusrocs,-Mr. Zedillo 

dismissed him Dec. 2, repla- 
cing him with a prominent hu- 
man rights lawyer . 

But tire government never 
clarified whether or not the 
skeleton was that of Mr. Mun- 
oz Rocha until a news con- 
ference Friday, where Deptiy 
Attorney General Jose Luis 
Ramos Rivera said they were 
not. After admitting that pros- 
ecutors had no leads as to tire 
body’s identity^ Mr. Ramos 
ffed the news conference, . 


best possible image of Us cli- 
ent fixed in tire jury’s mind. 

Mr. Simpson, who earlier 
in tbe trial spent almost three 
days on the stand going over 
much tire same testimonial 
territory, probably will testify 
for the better part of two days 
this time around, with his next 
i Monday. 

Friday’s questioning, 
Mr. Simpson recalled the 
early days of Ms marriage, 
when be said be and his wife 
bad happily traveled tire 
world. They lived the good 
life, be said, in various houses 
thqy owned — entertaining 
friends and relatives almost 
constantly, rtiaying tennis to- 
gether, golfing and tooting 
about in big. fast cars. 

- But, Mr. Simpson went on, 
tire once perfect marriage 
began to faiL There were ar- 
guments, be said, including 
the one that ended with Mrs. 
Simpson blade and blue from 
wrestling with him. ■ 

Divorce followed. After 
that, be said, a bad situation 
became wareewhrahtefbnner 
wife began to associate with 
drug' users and prostitutes. He 
said that deeply, worried him 
and, concerned for her and 
their two children, he said he 
once confronted her and asked, 
angrily. “WhattheheU are you 
doing with bookers?” 

Still, he insisted steadfastly 
that he had never hit or hurt 
his wife in -any way, .other 
than in the incident in 1989. 



JerTuMtHon 

BIG SNOWSTORM — Two women shoveling the walkway of their home in 
Buffalo, New York, where nearly two feet (half a meter) of snow fell Saturday. 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Dusty Arizona Border Town 
Struggles to Clean Up Image 

There is a lot of anger in the dusty air of 
Douglas, Arizona, a tough and scrappy 
town on the Mexican border, but the anger 
has galvanized attempts to build a stronger 
community. 

Douglas, wife a population of 15,000, is 
the only major town on the 1.900-mile 
(3,000-ktiometer) U.S.-Mexico border 
without a wall protecting the international 
line, notes the Los Angeles limes. So 
black-market activities are nothing new. 
The Arizona Rangers tried to rid the place 
of horse thieves and gunrunners at tire turn 
of the century. 

But a recent comment by an assistant 
U-S. attorney. Daniel Knauss, who called 
tire dusty outpost “seriously corrupt,” has 
left border agents on the verge of revolt and 
town officials straining to undo the damage 
to their efforts to lure tourists and industry. 

The assertion was not surprising to many 
locals. In 1990, a 270-foot (83-meter) co- 
caine traffickers’ tunnel was unearthed, 
running beneath the border to the Mexican 
town of Agua Prieta. Speculation was rife 
that tire smugglers could have undertaken 
so ambitious a project only with official 
collaboration on tire American side. 

But the town has tried to fight back. A 
warehouse at the U.S. terminus of the drag 
tunnel has been turned into a shelter for 
bartered women; a villa at tite Mexican end 
is now a job training center. And tins year, 
the town used $1.5 million in seized drug 
money to refurbish an old rail depot for use 
by tire local police department 

Short Takes 

In the new movie “Evita,” the pop star 
Madonna — in the role of Eva Peron, wife 
of the Argentine dictator Juan Peron — 
spends considerable time torridly tangoing 


across the screen. That, reports The Boston 
Globe, has helped spark a revival of the 
lascivious dance, bom in the brothels of 
Buenos Aires and once outlawed by the 
Vatican. Tango is suddenly the most pop- 
ular ballroom dance class in many dance 
schools; the crooners Julio Iglesias and 
Luis Miguel have released tango records; 
and the Macy's and Bloomingdale's de- 
partment stores are unveiling a line of 
Evitawear. Tango on. 


Northern California has had so much 
rain lately that even the fish can't handle it 
“There's probably too much water,” said 
one fisheries official. For decades, sea- 
running salmon like the Chinook and coho, 
along with the steelhead trout, have had 
little freshwater to spawn in and have dwin- 
dled close to extinction. Then, in the past 
three years, abundant rains had started a 
revival- But the recent flooding has been so 
extreme as to imperil eggs and newly 
hatched salmon in the rough currents of the 
San Francisco Bay ecosystem and the Sac- 
ramento-San Joaquin Delta. For en- 
dangered species like the chinook, a single 
bad spawning season can have repercus- 
sions for generations to come. 

Too much water in California, too 
many weeds in Florida. Last month, 
21,000 10-inch grass carp were dumped 
into the canals of South Florida. Voracious 
eaters of aquatic vegetation, their mission 
was to clean canal waters of weeds fouling 
floodgates and impeding flows. Introdu- 
cing imported species in Florida has back- 
fired more than once, of course. Accidental 
introductions have led to thriving popu- 
lations of such pests as the African giant 
snail, the cane toad, the monk parakeet and 
the fire a nr. State biologists were quite 
aware of that, and the carp being used were 
bred to be sterile — to eat weeds and then 
die. There are concerns, however, that tbe 
fish might end up on the wrong end of the 
food chain before they complete their job. 
Fishermen have shown their interest. And a 
Chinese-language newspaper in South 
Florida printed a recipe for steamed carp in 
a wine, soy and ginger sauce. 

International Herald Tribune 


Away From 
Politics 

• A 48- hour “amnesty” that 
allowed Miami residents to 
return money that disap- 
peared after a security truck 
crash ended with the police 
holding only about $20 in re- 
turned funds — out of the 
$500,000 in bundled currency 
and coin that is estimated to 
have rained onto an impov- 
erished neighborhood from a 
highway overpass. ( Reuters ) 

• Coloradans are the thin- 
nest, on average, of there in 
any of the contiguous states. 
Asmdy by the federal Centers 
for Disuse Control and Pre- 
vention and state health de- 


bits has found that only 
).9 percent of Coloradans 
are overweight, compared 
with the median of 26.7 per- 
cent for the nation. Hawaii 
was the only other state where 
residents are as thin, with 19.7 
being overweight. (NYT) 

• The parents of a 9-year- 

old San Diego girl have filed 
a S25.5 millian lawsuit claim- 
ing that the family will need 
therapy after a Cabbage Patch 
doll gnawed the girl's hair to 
her scalp. (AP) 

• The space shuttle Atlantis 
has blasted off for the Rus- 
sian space station Mir. where 
it will pick up the astronaut 


John Blaba and leave another 
American fix' a four-and-a- 
half-month stay. Atlantis is 
due to dock with Mir late 
Tuesday. (AP) 

• Investigators are analyz- 
ing tbe flight data and cock- 
pit voice recorders from a 
Comair commuter flight from 
Cincinnati that crashed near 
Detroit last week, killing all 
29 people aboard. The so- 
called black box was recov- 
ered from, an impact crater 4 
feet (IJ2 meters) deep. I AP ) 

• A fire at a University of 
Tetroessee-Martin dormit- 
ory left one student dead and 
five others injured. {AP) 


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POLITICAL NOTES 


Weekend Retreat for Cabinet 

WASHINGTON — Four years ago when President 
Bill Clinton wanted to brainstorm with his new cabinet, 
he called the officials to Camp David, the presidential 
retreat where professional “facilitators” led them 
through an evening group exercise in sharing confidences 
about major life experiences. 

But on Saturday, when Mr. Clinton held his retreat for 
the incoming and departing cabinets. New Age human 
relations exercises were out and pragmatism was in. The 
group gathered at the more prosaic Blair House across 
from the White House, with the only one facilitating 
being Mr. Clinton. 

“The president's pretty good at that himself,” said the 
White House press secretary. Michael McCuny. 

Mr. Clinton's aides described the daylong meeting as a 
set of discussion sessions intended to provoke thought 
about the challenges facing the administration, particularly 
in the crucial next few months, in which the president has 
an opportunity to set die tone for his second term. 

Tbe cabinet retreat Saturday was originally supposed 
to take place at Camp David and span the weekend, but 
tbe session was shortened so the president and staff 
members could watch the National Football League play- 
offs Sunday. ~ (NYT) 

Price of Presidential Souvenirs 

WASHINGTON — Organizers of the presidential 
inauguration, scrambling to try to pay for the glitzy 
events, are trying to boost their merchandising profits 
through what souvenir vendors call extraordinary pres- 
sure to corral the kitsch market. 

Attorneys for the Presidential Inaugural Committee 
have sent letters to merchants saying they may be fined for 
“invasion of privacy” for selling T-shirts, pennants or 
coffee mugs bearing the names of President Bill Clinton or 
Vice President A1 Gore — standard fare for souvenir 
designs. The comminee 's appointed salespeople have also 
told the merchants that U.S. marshals may raid their stores 
and seize inaugural items that were not provided by the 
official suppliers, according to numerous vendors. (WP) 

Clinton Assails Gang Crime 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton on Saturday 
pledged an all-out attack on the “scourge of juvenile 
crime and gangs' ' in his second term in office and said he 
would propose new legislation to prevent members of 
gangs from intimidating witnesses to crimes. 

Mr. Clinton’s announcement in his weekly radio ad- 
dress stressed his administration's anti-crime record, 
including its support for laws putting more police on the 
streets and banning the sale of assault weapons. 

In the next four years, Mr. Clinton said, he was “de- 
termined to break die backs of criminal gangs that have 
mined too many lives and stolen too many futures.” 

He added: “Too many people in too many communities 
will not testify about gang crimes, because they are afraid 
of violent reprisal. We must not allow the voice of justice to 
be frightened into silence by the threats of gangs.” (WP) 


Quote/Unquote 


Bud Burke, a Kansas state senator, on attempts to 
transfer power from the federal government to the stales: 
“Philosophically, everyone thinks this is the greatest thing 
since sliced bread. But once we get into the implementation 
stage, dial's when things will start to get sticky.” (NYT) 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. JANUARY 13, 1997 


CAREERS FOCUS 


Working for Family F 


By Stuart Silverstein 
and Denise Gellene 

Las Angeles Tunes 

LOS ANGELES — Family busi- 
nesses have a special place in the Amer- 
ican imagination, be they mom-and-pop 
grocerj- shops, friendly roadside diners, 
or a professional sports team like the 
Los Angeles Dodgers. 

When these companies sell out to 
wheeler-dealer investment syndicates 
or faceless corporations, employees, 
customers and the community are fre- 
quently assailed by a sense of loss. 

But what really happens when a family 
business is gobbled up by a large cor- 
poration? It's often not as bad as Dodgers 
fans and employees might fear in the 
wake of the announcement last week that 
die family-owned team is up for sale. 

At their best, family businesses, 
which make up the vast majority of 
businesses in America, possess “a very 
special culture.*’ with "values that typ- 
ically include great respecr for the in- 
dividual, mist and empathy," said Ann 


Ehringer. director of the Family & 
Closely Held Businesses Program at the 
University of Southern California. 

The fear when an admired family-run 
organization is on the selling block “is 
that maybe those values won't be so 
important any more," she said. 

Yet not all family enterprises are as 
praiseworthy as Malden Mills — whose 
owner, the grandson of the founder, kept 
paying employees and issued Christmas 
bonuses after the company's plant 
burned down in late 1995. 

There also are shoddily run busi- 
nesses where the incompetent brother- 
in-law of the owner gets an inflated 
salary to shuffle papers or where blacks 
and Hispanics need not apply. In those 
cases a corporate takeover can be a vast 
improvement 

Buyouts of family firms also may mean 
higher salaries, better benefits and more 
opportunity for workers who once had 
been outside the favored family circle. 

While statistics on how well family 
businesses pay are hard to come by, 
there are reliable figures showing that 


lrms: 


Lower Pay, but More Respect (Maybe) 


small firms — which tend to be faznily- 
owned — generally provide lower 
wages and fewer benefits than big 
companies. "The larger the company, 
the richer the benefits package, said 
Ken McDonnell, an analyst with the 
Employee Benefit Research Institute. 
“It’s solely a matter of economy of 
scale. General Motors can afford to give 
a richer package of benefits than a mom- 
and-pop store." 

Small family enterprises, when they 

are not professionally run, also may 
have casual hiring and employment 
policies that open die door to discrim- 
ination and other abuses. 

Sometimes ‘‘they’re too cheap to hire 
the talent" to ran the personnel office 
properly, said Joseph Posner, a lawyer 
who represents workers in disputes with 
employers. 

"They’ll take someone who’s been a 
personnel clerk," he said, “and then 
say, ‘You're die personnel director.’ " 

For Paula Kurtz, human resources 
director of an optical leas manufac- 
turing company in' Portland. Oregon, 


that passed from family hands to a suc- 
cession of corporate owners, the 
changes fiom-the old ways have brought 
pluses and minuses. 

Before the business was sold by the 
founding family in 1984, employees 
were assured of holding onto their jobs 
and their full 40-hour weeks whether 
business was busy or slow. Under cor- 
porate ownership, she said manage- 
ment has avoided big layoffs but has 
instead cut hours when there was not 
enough orders to keep the staff busy. 

Still, Ms. Kurte said workers readily 
accepted that change. “They knew 
people were standing around with noth- 
ing to do," sire said "They realized it 
was the logical thing to do." 

With corporate ownership, the busi- 
ness has become more professionally 
managed — a development that also has 
its good and bad aspects. Ms. Kurtz, 45, 
recounted how in the early 1970s, dur- 
ing a hiatus she cook from die company, 
one of the family owners called her to 
her to come back, 
oday, Ms. Kurtz said the company 


would formally post the job opening 
before making such an offer, to make 
sure everyone interested got a fair shot 
at the position. . 

Perhaps the most unsettling differ- 
ence, Ms. Kurtz said, is the insecurity 
that has crept into the organization. Now 
people ask whether there will be a hol- 
iday party, flu shots and raises — ben- 
efits once taken for granted The in- 
security, she said “permeates 
everything,” although she acknow- 
ledged that that could have happened 
even if the founders had not sold 

In any case, it is sometimes hard to 
distinguish family businesses from big 

corporations. In between the comer meat 

market and General Moms Corp. are 
many big companies that essentially are 
hybrids: their shares may be traded an 
the New York Stock Exchange, but they 
remain under control of a single family. 

Industry analysts, in fact, estimate 
that roughly half of the publicly traded 
companies in the United States — in- 
cluding Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Nord- 
strom Inc. — remain substantially under 



family control. In fact, more titan 90 
patent of ail American companies are 
believed to be owned by families, in- 
dividual proprietors or small closely 
tied groups, making it difficult to draw 
sweeping generalizations. 

Tire Dodgers baseball franchise is a 
case in point. With the team’s high 
profile and cachet, it is hardly a typical 
family business. Otherwise, dough, it 
has some of tire classic traits. Among 
other things, iis management has been 
passed from Walter O'Malley to hissoa, 
Peter, the current team presidem. The 
O’Malleys have owned tire team since 
1950. 

One possible problem for the 
Dodgers under new owners, some spe- 
cialists say, is that fan loyalty could be 
undermined. 

"In chang in g ownership, that is a big 
piece of heritage going by the way- 
side,” said David O'Hara, creative di- 
rector at the advertising firm Hal Riney 
& Partners. “It will be difficult for the 
Dodgers to convince people that they 
are still the Dodgers." 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


PLAN 

INTERNATIONAL 


INTERNATIONAL 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Salary package commensurate with position 





PLAN INTERNATIONAL is one of the world’s largest 
Non-Government Organisations delivering humanitarian, 
child focused development programmes. PLAN fa as do 
religious, political or governmental affiliation. Child 
sponsorship is the basic foundation of the organisation. It 
employs 4,000 staff world-wide, has an income of $300 
million and helped nearly one million children in 1996. 

The International Executive Director is the Chief 
Executive of Foster Parents Plan International and is 
responsible for running the field operations in over 40 
countries in the developing world. Polities and targets are set 
by the International Board. There is a high level of contact 
in program countries with development professionals. 

A successful leadership track record gained within a 
multi-national commercial organisation or a substantial 
multi-lateral or Non-Government Organisation is essential. 


General management skills, the maturity to gain 
acceptance and influence government officials and the 
stamina to undertake frequent international travel are all 
similarly important traits. Also, the ability to understand 
and direct international development programs and to 
initiate change and strategic discussions where necessary 
is vital. 

Age indicator is 45-S5. With an awareness, and preferably 
experience of developing countries and development 
issues, you will see this as your largest career challenge to 
date. The role will be based at the international 
headquarters in the UK at Woking, Surrey. 

Please write in confidence, in the first instance, to 
Robin Roberts at Egon Zehnder International, 
Devonshire House, Mayfair Place, London W1X 5FH 
quoting reference 3141/HT. 


General Positions Wanted 


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INTERNATIONAL H ER-ALD TRIBINE. MONDAY. JANUAR Y IN IW 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


c ! Striking'Workers Reject 

^ Seoul’s Appeal for Talks 

' w hat would be the biggest strike in South 

SEOUL — The South Korean government Korean history. 

- i: . appealed Sunday for talks with labor leaders On Saturday, about 20,000 workers calling 

on ending almost three weeks of unrest, but for the resignation of President Kim Young 
striking workers called the request a ploy and Sara clashed with riot police in the most, 
they would push on with plans for a violent street protests since the labor law was 
■ - J bigger strike unless the government repealed adopted at a' secret session of the National 
- • a contested labor law. Assembly on Dec. 26. • 

’ At least 3,000 workers and students fought Mr. Kwon said private research institutes 

Sunday with riot police as they tried to march had figures that showed public support for the 

strikes had risen from 55 percent to 64 percent 



out of Myoogdong Cathedral in central Seoul, 
where the labor leader Kwon Young Kil and 
Six other union leaders have sought sanctuary 
from prosecutors seeking their arrest. ' 

Police fired volleys or tear gas at the pro- 
testers to force them back. 

Mr. Kwon. speaking outside a makeshift 
tent on the grounds of the cathedral, said 
worker resolve was un diminished and public 
support for the protesters was increasing. 

“We will not accept the law,” Mr, Kwon 
said, referring to the contested labor legis- 
lation. He added. “The public and the op- 
position parties will also not accept the law.'* 
Mr. Kwon is president of the outlawed Korean 
Confederation of Trade Unions. 

“If the law comes into effect,” he said in an 
interview, “it will destroy 12 million work- 
ers’ lives find the public lire.” V " - 
On Saturday, the chief of the ruling New 
Korea Party, Lee; Hong Koo, in ah apparent 
attempt to avoid more confrontation, chal- 
lenged union leaden to a televised debate over 
the labor law. Mr. Kwon rejected the offer. 


since Mr. Khn took a tough stance against the 
strikes at a New Year's press conference. 

South Korean unions denounce the new 
legislation as an “evil law.”. while inter- 
national labor organizations have said it is 
even harsher (ban the law h replaced. Seoul 
officials, on the other hand, say the law is 
needed to rescue the economy. 

The government indicated Sunday that it. 
may be willing to revise the disputed law. The 
law makes it easier for companies to lay off 
workers, while limiting employees' union 
rights for three to five years. . 

Government officials were unnerved as re- 
ligious groups, opposition parties and pro- 
fessors — as well as international labor 
groups — threw their weight behind South 
Korean workers and cautioned against a gov- 
ernment crackdown.- 

Opposition parties demanded an immediate 
meeting with President Kim, saying the 
protest was a “crisis drat is getting out of 
hand.” 

Officials at the ruling New Korea Party said 


calling it a “propaganda ploy.” — • ^ v 

The main union body, the Federation of they would consider revising, the law if op- 
Korean Trade Unions, has also brushed aside - position parties submit a 


PAGE 5 


the offer to discuss the law. 

Mr. Kwon said his 500,000-member union 
would strike on Wednesday if the law was not 
scrapped. That would coincide with a call by 
the main union, which has 1.2 million mem- 
bers, to strike for two days starting Tuesday in 


insisted that the law must first be enforced. 

Meanwhile. South Korea’s largest auto- 
maker, Hyundai Motors Co., shut its plant 
Friday, saying it had suffered $465 million in 
lost production and could not afford to stay 
open. (AP. Reuters) 



China Sends a Message to Taiwan by Vetoing UN Peacekeeping Force 

• . „ 1 I H/Y7f»n niher The return of Hong Kong. Macau a 



By Patrick E. Tyler 

V fw Yerk Times Service 

BEUING — The Chinese government has 
-said that its decision to veto a United Nations 
■^resolution that would have sent peacekeepers 
to Guatemala was justified by Guatemala's 
long-standing diplomatic recognition of 
Taiwan, an affront to Quna’s sovereignty over , 
the island it regards as a renegade province. ’ 
“Guatemala cannot expect on the one bapa 
to do something that harms tite sovereignty and 

territorial integrity of China while do the other 
hand requesting China to cooperate- in peace- 
keeping,’’ said Shea Gupfan g, the C hinese 
government spokesman. IBs remarks were 
carried Saturday by the Xinhua press agency. 


• ‘ * We had no choice,’ ' Mr. Shen said of the 
veto cast Friday night in the Security Council, 
noting that China had no objection to the 
principle of sending UN monitors to help 
carry out the peace accord that is ending 36 
years of civil war in Guatemala. 

“Clearly, the government of Guatemala 
must be responsible,”, he said, for China s 
decision to use its authority as One of the five 
permanent members of the Security Council 
- to scuttle a resolution supported by a majority 
. of the 15-member council. 

Diplomats in New York indicated tharChma 

had signaled that it might be willing to re- 
consider its veto if Guatemala downgraded its 
■relations with Taiwan and ceased its support 
for Taiwan’s re-entry into tbe United Nations. 


Guatemala and more than two dozen other 
countries, mostly in Latin America, the Carib- 
bean and Africa, extend formal diplomatic 
recognition to Taiwan as the Republic of 
China, the political descendant of Chiang Kai- 
shek's government that fled the mainland in 
1949 after defeat by Mao Zedong’s Com- 
munists. , , , _ 

China's veto on Friday marked the first 
time in 24 years that Beijing bad used its 
“ no“ vote in a matter outside the selection of 
the secretary-general. It thus reflected a 
hardening of political attitudes in the Com- 
munist Party leadership in Beijing to confront 
Taiwan in a year when Hong Kong will return 
to Chinese rule after 150 years as a British 
colony. 


BRIEFLY/4SM 


The return of Hong Kong. Macau and 
Taiwan to Chinese sovereignty has been a 
longstanding objective of China’s rulers. 

Friday’s vote further internationalizes the 
dispute between Beijing and Taiwan. 

Beijing considers any recognition afforded 
Taiwan as a boost to pro-independence forces 
there that have wholeheartedly supported 
President Lee Teng-hui’s drive to raise 
Taiwan’s international standing as a sover- 
eign political entity. 

In Taiwan on Saturday, Foreign Minister 
John Chang rebuked Beijing’s veto. “It is 
extremely insensible and unreasonable for 
Communist China to mingle relations across 
the Taiwan Strait with a regional peacekeep- 
ing mission of the United Nations, he said. 


Fund Pays 7 ‘ Comfort Women 

TOKYO — Seven South Korean women who were 
used as sex slaves by the Japanese Army dunng Worid 
War II have each been paid 5 million yen ($43,0UUl, the 
Japanese fund set up to compensate the “comfort wo- 
men” said Sunday. _ , 

“Funds were paid from the Asian Women s Fund to 
seven women Saturday.” a spokesman for the funded- 
But the action provoked a biuer reaction from the ->ouui 
Korean government, which along with other Asian na- 
tions. has sharply criticized T okyo’ s handling of the issue. 
Most of the women forced into sexual service for the 
Japanese military have refused to accept any of the 
money, which comes from a private fund and not direcuy 

from the Japanese government. 

“The South Korean government regrets the Japanese 
action to deliver the money to the comfort women without 
acknowledging the seriousness of the issue, beoul 
said. f Reuters) 

India Launches Crash Inquiry 

NEW DELHI — Indian authorities launched on 
Sunday their official investigation into the world dead- 
liest midair collision, two months after the crash near tne 
capital left 349 dead, the Press Trust of India reported. 

The investigation was delayed by legal wrangles be- 
tween Indian officials and lawyers representing operators 
of the two aircraft: a Saudia jumbo jet and a Kazakh 

^TheSaudi Arabian airline wants to send the flight data 
and voice recorders from its plane to the West for 
decoding, while Kazakh authorities plan to return their 

data recorder to Russia. . . . , 

“The black box of the Kazakh Ulyshin-76 has been 
taken out from the debris with the help of special equip- 
ment flown in from Russia.” an aviation official told the 
Indian news agency after the recovery Saturday. (Arr) 

Slick Kept From Japan A-Plants 

VI A 1 71 JR U Japan — Workers from Japan’s maritime 
agency successfully kept heavy oil leaking out of a 
ruptured tanker from fouling the operations of several 

nuclear reactors Sunday. . , 

Oil from the Russian tanker Nakhodka drifted close to 
the 15 nuclear reactors lying along Wakasa Bay. but oil 
fences and cleanup operations kept it from intake pipes 
providing reactor cooling water, a spokesman said. 

Efforts to clean up oil that spilled after the Jan.2sphtof 
the ship are spread across a 450-kilometer (_85-mile» 
stretch of the coast But officials have concentrated on 
keeping the oil away from the power plants. (Reuters) 

For the Record 

Singapore hospital officials declined to comment 
Sunday on the condition of Lee Kuan Yew, the former 
prime minister who entered hospital Saturday for sched- 
uled tests on his bladder. (Reuters) 

Rebels of the Bodo tribe are suspected of detonating 
a land mine on a Indian road as a police bus was passing 
Saturday, killing two federal police officers and wound- 
ing 13 people, including five civilians, police said. The 
attack was the laiest in northeastern Assam state, where 
authorities say secessionist movements and tribal warfare 
led to the deaths of nearly 1 .000 people last year. (AP) 


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CATCHING ... A COLD — A hardy bunch huddling under 
plastic sheets as they fished through the ice of the Moscow River. 

8 Die in Northern Italian Train Wreck 

PIACENZA. Italy — Ar least eight people were killed and dozens were 
injured Sunday when a high-speed main traveling from Milan to Rome went 
off the rails near this town in northern Italy, rescue officials said. 

The two drivers of the Pendolino oiling train were among the dead. A total 
of 31 people were injured in the accident near Piacenza. A Railway spokes- 
man said it was not known what caused the crash. {AFP) 

Havel Had 2 Tumors, Paper Reports 

PRAGUE — Doctors found two tumors in President Vaclav Havel’s lungs 
when he underwent surgery for lung cancer last month, not a single tumor as 
originally reported, the Mlada Froma Dnes newspaper has reported. 

A presidential official confirmed the report. “The second tumor was 
benign and didn’t have any effect on the president’s health." the newspaper 
quoted an unidentified doctor attending Mr. Havel as saying. "The diagnosis 
was more interesting than important," (AP) 

Chirac Pleads for k Economic Realism ’ 

S ARRAN. France — President Jacques Chirac has warned France that a 
wave of labor unrest aimed at reducing the retirement age to 55 from 60 flew 
in the face of international economic realities. 

“Our compatriots wish to work less and retire earlier, and I understand this." 
Mr. Chirac said last weekend. “But I hope that our country will not forget the 
economic and demographic realities of the world we live in. ’ ’ (Reuters) 

The EU This Weeks 

International Herald Tribune 

Significant events in r he European Union this week; 

• Negotiators ar the intergovernmental conference on EU reform meet in 
Amsterdam on Monday and Tuesday to seek ways to accelerate the talks in an 
effort to reach agreement on revisions to EU treaties by June. A key issue will 
be bow to define a flexibility clause that would allow some Union members to 
deepen integration in certain areas without restraint from reluctant countries. 

• Hie Japanese trade minister. Shinji Sato, meets Monday with Trade 
Commissioner Sir Leon Brittan and other commissioners in Brussels ro discuss 
the follow-up to the World Trade Organization meeting in December. 

• The European Parliament elects a new president at its plenary session 
Tuesday in Strasbourg. Foreign Minister Hans van Mierlo discusses Dutch 
priorities for its EU presidency in the Parliament on Wednesday. 

• Parliament's special committee of inquiry into the beef crisis meets in 
Strasbourg beginning Monday to review a report criticizing Britain and 
attacking the European Commission for foiling to protect consumers. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1997 


EUROPE 


Bleak Debate in Berlin on Holocaust Memorial 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

BERLIN — Simply put, the question 
was this: How does the country that 
carried out the Holocaust commemorate 
it? 1116 answer was not so easy. 

In a Communist-era building here. 70 
eminent German historians, artists, pub- 
lic figures, architects and politicians 
gathered Iasi week to renew a debate over 
a projected Holocaust memorial that has 
raised troubling questions for years. 

But as speaker followed speaker, it 
became clear that for all the discussions, 
for all the competitions to choose a 
design for the monument, those most 
closely involved are as far from con- 
sensus as ever. 

Indeed, the divisions led to a broader 
conclusion: Half a century after World 
War n. and the killing of 6 million Jews 
by the Nazis, many Germans still cannot 
confront the defining horror of their 
modem history without anguished de- 
bate over how they should relate to it. 

At issue is a contentious project to 
place a Holocaust memorial near the 
Brandenburg Gate in a part of Berlin 
that evokes Germany's past as much as 
its future. 

Years of lobbying by an advocacy 
group led to a competition in 1995 that 
drew more than 500 entrants competing 
for a chance to design what is officially 
the Monument to the Murdered Jews of 
Europe. 

The winner was a proposal for a huge 
gravestone-shaped slab bearing the 
names of millions of Jews who were 
killed. But Chancellor Helmut Kohl re- 
jected the idea as overly gigantic. Now, in 
three sessions like Friday's between now 
and April, public discussions are to be 
held to shape a final decision to be made 
by the government in Bonn, by Beilin 
city authorities, and by the advocacy 
group that first promoted the idea. 

"The monument will be built," said 
Peter Rad unski. a Beilin official re- 
sponsible for cultural affairs, maintain- 
ing that neither the cost ($10 million), 
nor the location, nor the date for a 


foundation stone to be laid in 1 999 (Jan. 
27, the date of the liberation of Aus- 
chwitz in 1945) would be changed. 

Immediately, though, several speak- 
ers challenged Mr. Radunski, insisting 
that the debate be opened anew on the 
design and location of the monument. 

' “This monument needs broad public 
agreement, and it doesn't have that 
yet.*’ said Peter Cbnradi, a legislator 
from the opposition Social Democratic 
Party in Bonn. 

That in turn inspired a protest from 
Ignarz Bubis, the head of the Central 
Council of' Jews in Germany, who ar- 
gued that 10 years of debate had given 
everyone a chance to express a view and 
that further debate would "turn the 
clock back io zero." 

Despite the rawness of the emotion. 
Juergen Kocfca, a historian, maintained 
that 52 years after World War H. Ger- 


mans had largely come to terms with their 
past “The readiness to accept is strong; 
the urge to silence is weak," he said. 

Nonetheless, the debate revived 
many old issues: Should the memorial 
commemorate only Jews, or all victims 
of Nazi persecution? Should it be mo- 
numental. or a more modest place of 
reflection? Was its function to recall the 
past or merely provide what one par- 
ticipant called “an alibi of atonement" 
as Germany enters a new century seek- 
ing freedom from its past? 

“It must be smaller, more still, more 
contemplative than the previous 
designs," Mr. Kocka said. 

Another historian, Michael Stuerroer, 
said: “Monumental regret cannot be the 
answer to a monumental crime.' ’ 

Many insisted that the monument 
should not stand as an icon of collective 
guilL "Guilt is always individual, but 


responsibility is universal." Mr. Stuer- 
mer said. 

One of the many contentious issues is 
how future generations should be re- \ 
minded of the Holocaust 

“We are living through a change of 
generation after which there’ll be no . 
more living contact with the Nazi pen- .. 
od,” one speaker said “Already, three- ' 

quarters oftbe people in this country were . 
born after the Second World War. 

But some questioned whether a central \ 
monument in Berlin would not detract 
from other Holocaust memorial sites. 

“We have to ask ourselves what pur- 
pose can be served by a memorial 50 - 
vears later,*’ said Kuihrin Hoffmann- w 
Curtius. a member of the group that mel- 
on Friday. “Do we need a monument to 
remember, or does the new republic 
need a monument as a political insur- 
ance policy?" 


Swiss See Swift Action on Fund for Victims 


Reuters 

ZURICH — Interior Minister Ruth 
Dreifuss said Sunday that the Swiss 
government would waste no time in 
deciding on a memorial fund for victims 
of the Holocaust. 

In an interview in a Swiss paper. 
SonntagsZeitung, Ms. Dreifuss said the 
Federal Council was aware of the need 
to move swiftly and was ready to take 
action. 

“It is quite clear to the council that 
something has to be done fast," Ms. 
Dreifuss said. 

She also repeated that the council was 
aot planning to denounce recent re- 
marks by the economics minister, Jean- 
Pascal Delamuraz, who had described 
as blackmail calls for a quick Swiss 
restitution to Holocaust victims. 

“Normally the council as a collective 
group does not correct statements made by 
individual members," Ms. Dreifuss said 

Most Swiss seem to agree the gov- 
ernment should not denounce Mr. Del- 


amuraz, nor should he resign, according 
to recent polls. 

A survey by the Lucerne-based LINK 
institute, published by the Blick news- 
paper Saturday, showed that less than 
one-third of the Swiss surveyed thought 
the government should distance itself 
from Mr. Delamuraz. 

A survey by another Sunday paper, 
SonntagsBlick, showed that 80 percent 
of respondents did not think Mr. Del- 
amuraz should resign. 

Ms. Dreifuss said she regretted that 
Mr. Delamuraz’s remarks had led to a 
deterioration in the trust that had been 
built up between Switzerland and 
groups abroad. 

Mr. Deiamuraz’s remarks, made as 
he was completing his one-year term in 
the rotating Swiss presidency, outraged 
Israeli politicians and Jewish groups, 
who threatened to call for a boycott of 
Swiss banks. 

Two days after his remarks, Mr. Del- 
amuraz said he was sorry if he had 


offended any survivors of the Holocaust • 
and he regretted if his comments had - 
lead to any misunderstandings. ^ 

Ms. Dreifuss noted that Switzerland 
was not only the country having to face „ 
its actions toward Jews during and be- jjr 
fore World War IL Sweden, Norway, 
Hungary and France faced similar prob- - 
lems, but some of these countries had 
already set up funds. 

“We are also ready to take action." 

Ms. Dreifuss said. 

The government has said that it might * 
compensate Jewish victims of the Nazis , 
before a full inquiry was completed. 

According to the surveys, the Swiss ’ 
people also agree that a fund should be , 
set up, but most think that it should be 
done after the inquiry is completed. 

Groups led by the World Jewish Con- ■ 
grass say Switzerland's banks and gov- 
ernment profited cynically from the ■ 
Holocaust by holding on ro accounts left 
ownerless by Jewish victims and by buy- 
ing stolen gold from Nazi Germany. 


Yeltsin, Still in Hospital, Reported by Doctors to Be Working 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin, who is hospitalized witb pneu- 
monia, has become significantly more 
active and is working on documents, his 
doctors said Sunday. 

A medical bulletin made public 
through the Kremlin said Mr. Yeltsin 
was in stable condition with normal 
blood pressure, pulse and temperature. 

"To a significant degree, his ac- 


tivity has increased," the bulletin said. 

The chief Kremlin physician. Dr. 
Sergei Mironov, said Friday that Mr. 
Yeltsin, 65, had pneumonia “of medium 
gravity" in both lungs. Doctors are us- 
ing antibiotics to treat the condition. 

Mr. Yeltsin’s latest bout of ill health, 
just two months after he underwent mul- 
tiple heart bypass surgery, has opened 
up a debate on whether Russia should 
alter its constitution to shift power 


from the president to the legislature. 

At least one Moscow daily news- 
paper suggested that, because of his 
prol ongedulnesses, it might be time for 
Mr. Yeltsin to step down. 

“Regretfully, it is obvious that the 
president has no strength left to attend to 
affairs of state properly," the liberal 
Komsomoiskaya Pravda said Saturday. 

Mr. Yeltsin's most vocal rival, Al- 
exander Lebed, a former security chief. 


has called for the Kremlin chief to quit. ’ 
Ordinary Russians, many of whom i 
see little direct connection between their - 
daily lives and what happens in the „ 
Kremlin, appeared calmer about Mr. - 
Yeltsin *5 latest Alness. 

Financial markets also shrugged off 
reports on his health, sending Russian „ 
markets into record territory Friday. •; 
Some analysts said they expected more ‘ 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY; JANUARY 13, 1997 


oii 


INTERNATIONAL 


sssga 

1 "bstoigtonPostSer m» 

Q, ^ °f strength that has 
hundreds of thousands of 
de ™Mshatore roto the streets. 
doHhLi S®? would bea major 
ES21 reQlK “ by President Slobodan 
Mtofcvic came at a meeting between 
a^an government officials and stu- 
& W 5S> Ve ***" Protesting the re- 
Sjroe ? refusal to recognize opposition 
Atones m local elections NovV 17. 

After the meeting, the government 
issued a statetnem saying that the cit- 
,ze ? s will “must be fully respected 1 ' 


>~u‘ lilies iu me 

ensis. Foreign Minister 
i neodoros Pangalos of Greece said 
Sunday that a solution was possible 
based on a report by the Organization for 
oecunty and Cooperation in Europe, Re- 
u ^ s i r fPc ,r ted. The organimtion ’s report 
upheld opposition victories m ihe dis- 
puted elections. 

[Mr. Pangalos met with Mr. Milo- 
sevic and leaders of the opposition co- 
alition Zajedno, or Together. 

[The official press agency Tanjug said 
the Pan gal os- Milosevic mw>rinn was 
cordial. But h made dear the Serbian 
government resented growing interna- 
tional pressure to resolve the crisis, sug- 
gesting Mr. Pangalos’s mission had 
achieved little. Thousands of. whistle- 
blowing protesters rallied in central Bel- 
grade again Sunday.] 

A member of the ruling Socialist-led 
coalition said privately that Mn Mi- 
losevic, who.eariier appeared to be hop- 


ing the demonstrations would wane, 
now seemed eager to reach a swift res- 
olution of the eight-week crisis. 

In the Iasi few days, some of die 
president's supporters and key sections' 
of the Serbian business, cultural and 
political elite have abandoned him. 

In Brussels, John Kombtum, the UJS: 
assistant secretary of; state.for Europe, 
said Washington was considering a uni- 
' lateral, freeze on new trade deals and 
high-level visits to Belgrade as a means 
of maintaining the pressure on Mr. Mi- 
losevic to recognize the election results. 
He told reporters that a six-nation con- 
tact group on the former Yugoslavia had 
ruled out international sanctions against 
Serbia, but that individual countries 
were considering their own measures. 

Opposition leaders reacted skeptic 1 
ally to Belgrade’s conciliatory signals 
and pledged to continue protesting until 
their demands were met in full. The 
demands include an explicit acknow- 
ledgment of opposition victories in con- 
tests for the city assembly in Belgrade 
and 13 other towns, and guarantees that 
parliamentary and presidential elections 
scheduled for later this year will be free 
and fair. . 

Vuk Draskovic, a leader of the op- 
position Socialist Renewal Party, said he 
would not comment on “hearsay news' * 
about the. government’s intentions, and 
demanded an unambiguous statement 
cm election results. 

Addressing an opposition rail yin Bel- 
grade’s central square, Vesna Besic of 
the Civic Alliance stated that the pro- 
testers had no intention .of raying. 
“Thank you, Mr. Dictator.” 

She said, “We have not been here for 
53 days to say “Thank you.’ ** 

In its statement, the government said 
it would instruct the Justice Ministry to 
order the, “competent state bodies” to 
establish urgently the final results of 


local elections, but made ho mention of 
specific electoral contests. 

The initial results of the elections were 
overturned by a regime-controlled court 
on Nov. 24, in response to a series of 
appeals by the dominant Socialist Party 
citing alleged irregularities in the bal- 
loting. A further round of voting was then 
ordered, and the opposition boycotted it 

The combination of international and 
domestic pressure has seriously 
weakened Mr. Milosevic. There is a 
growing consensus in Belgrade thai using 
force to break up the daily street demon- 
strations is no longer a serious option. 

The only alternative, therefore, is to 
reach an accommodation with the op- 
position. But this would entail major 
concessions by the government, includ- 
ing the surrender of the state monopoly 
of electronic media. Thar would un- 
dermine Mr. Milosevic's ability to win 
the next presidential election, which 
must take place by the end of the year. 

■ Electoral ComnusatmRessts 

The electoral commission in Nis. the 
main city in southern Serbia, refused 
Sunday to bow to government demands 
and reinstate an opposition victory in the 
local elections, Agence France-Presse 
reported, quoting the opposition. 

Aleksandar Krstic, an opposition 
spokesman, said the commission was 
sticking to its original decision to call for 
a further ballot for nine remaining seats 
on the municipal council. A new vote 
could hand overall control of the body to 
Mr. Milosevic’s Socialist Party. 

“There is no question of accepting 
this decision by the electoral commis- 
sion,” Mr. Krstic said. “We shall start 
complaining tomorrow.” 

Belgrade has already conceded defeat 
in Nis and had ordered the electoral 
commission to recognize die opposition 
victory. 



GLINTON: Historic Issues os Supreme Court Weighs Jones Suit 


PROTESTS: In Serbia and Bulgaria, the Difference Is Economic 


; !'k 


w 


Continued from Page I 

discontent is growing, also.” 
In Bulgaria, the end of ooe- 
party rule has meant big price 
rises and a sharp increase in 
*vviolenr crime, a shock to pen- 
sioners who make up nearly a 
quarter of the population and 
traditionally vote for the So- 
cialists, the former Commu- 
nists, in hope of a return to the 
“good old days.” 

The election of Petar Stay-, 
anov, an opposition lawyer, 
to the Bulgarian presidency in 
November marked the start of 
a wave of opposition. to: the 
Bulgarian Socialist ftorty, 
which beaded seven of Bul- 
garia's eight governments 
since the end of Communist 
rule ia 1989. 

“If the BSP sees this as a 
coup, d’etat;., tire united, op- 
position sees iias the justified 
wrath of people who took to 
the streets because they .are 
hungry and see no figure for 
themselves,” Mr. Stoyauov, 
who is due to be swam m next 
Sunday, said be -Saturday 
after meeting European, am- 
fi bassadora in Sofia. 

**I asked ambassadors 
what would the -citizens of 
their countries do if their 
moodily wages were between 


$1 6 and $20 and. the price of 
bread is 50 cents,” Mr. Stoy- 
anov said.' ' 

Annual inflation of more, 
than 300.pexcent has eroded 
Bulgarians’ real incomes but 
the nation of 8.4 - million 
people is a-far mare firee so- 
ciety than Yugoslavia. 

. Sections areheld without 
interference, newspapers are 
. outspoken in theft criticism of 
the government and state tele- 
vision has' shown dramatic 
footage of the protests. 

The Serbian state press 
barely mentions the protest 
except to describe them as a 
foreign plot to destabilize die 
state, and the government at 
one stage took private radio 
station B-92^ which offers 
daily live coverage of the 
protests, off the air. . . . 

A mam difference between 
the two is that Serbian Com- 
munists, .. home-grown rather 
than -imposed:. by Moscow, 
have rated without interrupt 
’ tion in Belgrade smoe 1945, 
surviving the 1989 revolutions 
in Eastern Europe intact. 

Wben one-party rule start- 
ed collapsing elsewhere in the 
late- 1980$, the Communists 
in Belgrade under Slobodan - 
Milosevic regrouped as So- 
cialists, then whipped up na- - 


tional fervor, invoked a siege 
mentality and tightened their 
grip on die state media. 

Bulgaria’s veteran Com- 
munist . leader, Todor 
Zhivkov^ was overthrown in 
1989, but leading Commu- 
nists reformed as the Socialist 
Party, continuing to rule apart 
from an 11-momh interlude 
in 199Jr92. . 

While in both countries the 
protests have united squab- 
bling opposition parties, it re- 
mains to be seen whether the 


Socialists' critics can provide 
the political and economic 
leadership necessary to form 
governments, but their sup- 
porters are determined they 
should have the chance. 

“We want the whole world 
to see our suffering and the 
arrogance of the Socialists,” 
said Stoyan Georgiev, a pro- 
tester. “They will not frighten 
us with the brutality of the 
police because we have chosen 
our future, and in our future 
Socialists no longer exist” 


BULGARIA: Offer of Talks 


Continued from Page 1 

elections, according to Bul- 
garian television. 

With inflation at 31 1 per- 
cent and a fall in gross do- 
mestic product of 8 to 10 per- 
cent in 1996, Bulgaria has 
dropped to the bottom of the. 
table of Eastern European 
economies in transition. 

. The- protests come in the 
wake of eight weeks of rallies 
in neighboring Serbia, where 
another leftist government is 
reeling from opposition 
forces demanding the recog- 
nition of electoral victories. 

Mr. Stoyanov said that the 


Bulgarian protesters had been 
inspired by their Serbian 
counterparts, but stressed that 
they had different goals. 

“The Belgrade slogans are 
too abstract for tile starving 
Bulgarians.” he said. “The 
Serbians are fighting for 

S ilitical and press freedom. 

ere, the people are fighting 
for their survival, to be Site to 
buy bread and keep warm.” 
“We must hold elections 
at the beginning of June.” the 
president-elect told Agence 
France-Presse. “The people 
are desperate. They cannot 
survive on a salary of $20 a 
month.’' (AFP, AP) 


Continued from Page 1 

hundred dollars through a trailer park, and 
there’s no telling what you'll find’* 

Whatever the merits of Ms. Jones’s 
case — and an article in The American 
Lawyer and a cover story in Newsweek 
have argued that her charges deserve to 
be taken seriously — the legal history of 
the case to date suggests that the Su- 
preme Court could allow the case to go 
forward before 2001 . Even if it does not 
allow the trial to take place while Mr. 
Clinton is in the White House, it could 
allow pretrial examination now, with the 
trial postponed. 

A federal judge in Arkansas ruled in 
December 1 994 that a trial, in which Ms. 
Jones seeks 5700,000 in damages for 
alleged violations of her civil rights, 
should be delayed until Mr. Clinton 
leaves office, but said pretrial testimony 
could begin sooner. Mr. Clinton ap- 
pealed, and in January 1996. an appeals 
panel gave a ruling even more unfa- 
vorable to the president, saying the case 
could go to trial- 

In a 1982 whistle-blowing case. Nix- 
on v. Fitzgerald, the Supreme Court 
ruled that no sitting president could ever 
be sued for official acts but said nothing 
about private acts. 

Mr. Clinton’s lawyers have argued 
that permitting any phase of the lit- 
igation to take place before he leaves 
office would not only disrupt his con- 
duct of the presidency, but also open the 
gates for a flood of frivolous civil suits 
against himself and his successors. 

Attorney General Janet Reno said re- 
cently. “The Justice Department’s pos- 
ition is not that there be immunity, but 
considering the tremendous burdens on the 
presidency, the matter should be delayed 
until after the service as president” 

Susan Estiich, a professor at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California Law 
School who managed the 1988 pres- 
idential campaign of Michael Dukakis, 
said in a delate hi the on-line magazine 
Slate, “This is just one more political 
assault on the president, politically mo- 
tivated and politically pursued” . 

Ms. Estrich said she doubted that Ms. 
Jones really bad a case under the civil 
rights statutes, because by her own ac- 
count Ms. Jones rejected Mr. Clinton's 


overtures and he backed off. But putting 
that aside, she argued as follows on the 
question that will go before the court this 
week: 

“A role that says that if you want to 
sue the president,’ do it before be gets 
elected or wait till his term is done, is one 
that encourages valid claims to be 
brought before the election, when they 
can be considered by the electorate, not 
afterward.” 

Stuart Taylor Jr., who wrote the 
American Lawyer piece, said in the de- 
bate that a “day in court” delayed from 
1994 until 2001 was not satisfactory. He 
argued that “while the president’s time 
is a precious national resource," it 
would not take much of it for him to 
confirm or deny Ms. Jones's charges 
under oath, in a deposition his lawyer 
could prepare for his signature. 

Ms. Jones, now married with two chil- 
dren and living in California with her 
husband, Steve Jones, an airline-reser- 


vations clerk, does not plan to attend the 
court session Monday. She says she will 
donate any damages ultimately awarded 
by the court to charily and has forsworn 
earlier plans to seek deals for book and 
movie rights. 

Her suit contends dial she was invited 
to the then -governor's room at the Ex- 
celsior Hotel in Litde Rock by Mr. Clin- 
ton's bodyguard, Daniel Ferguson. That 
contention was confirmed in an inter- 
view with The New York Times in the 
summer of 1994 by Pamela Blackard, a 
co-worker of Ms. Jones’s in 1991 . who 
said she was at the hotel at the time. 

In the interview, which has not pre- 
viously been published, Ms. Blackard 
told Sara Rimer, a Tunes reporter, that 
Ms. Jones returned from the hotel room 
“in 10, 1 1, not even 13 minutes." and 
said: “He tried to come on to me. I'd 
push him away, say no. Pam, I'm so 
embarrassed. I should've known ber- 


AUSTRIA: Leaders Agree on Bank Sale 


Continued from Page 1 

were guaranteed for the time being. 

The two coalition partners also agreed 
that Creditanstalt would remain intact as 
a legal entity for five years. 

The big loser in Europe’s longest- 
running privatization process was an 
investors' consortium led by the insurer 
EA-Generali AG. an Austrian unit of the 
Italian insurer Assicurazioni Generali 
SpA. The third bidder was an industrial 
group led by the Austrian retail tycoon 
Kari Wlaschek. 

The only way the sale of Creditanstalt 
can be stopped is by a ruling of the 
European Commission, which began 
looking into the deal after the Generali 
consortium complained that Bank Aus- 
tria's bid might have violated European 
Union law if it was influenced by Vi- 
enna’s ties to the bank. 

Vice Chancellor Wolfgang Schuessel, 
chairman of the People’s Party, said the 
negotiations had been “hard but very 
good,” adding, “I regret there was the 
impression given that the coalition was 
somehow in question. I think it is always 


a good thing to meet regularly with our 
partner to discuss various issues." 

Chancellor Franz Vranitzky also ex- 
pressed satisfaction at the compromise. 

“I think we’ve come up with a very 
fair solution that will lead to long over- 
due privatization in the Austrian bank- 
ing sector," he said. “The coalition has 
worked well together, and we have a 
breakthrough on a number of fronts." 

The agreement is expected to initiate 
long-overdue consolidation of Austria's 
saturated banking sector, creating a 
dominant domestic bank with 400 
branches and assets of roughly 1.4 tril- 
lion schillings. 

Bank Austria has said its profit for 
1996 will fall to about 2 billion 
schillings from 2.17 billion schillings in 
1 995. The figures were for banking op- 
erations only, and did not include Bank 
Austria's extensive industrial portfolio. 

The consolidated bank will have 24 
percent of the domestic retail banking 
market and more than 17.000 workers, 
making it a bank with “European di- 
mensions," the Finance Ministry said. 

(AP, Bloomberg, Renters) 


CHIEF iZimbabwe ffl Tradition by Installing a Woman as Leader CALLBACK: EU Plans Tax on Phone Service 


Continued fron* Page 1 

crowds,’ 1 shesaid afterward, 
“because, as a teacher. I talk 
ropareuts.” _'•* 

Miss Mabhena: is the first 
woman to be a chief of the 
Ndebele tribe* and her nom- 
ination by her village, which 
has an official population of 
80,000, caused a furor. She 
has been threatened with both 
violence andwitchcraft, and 

ence at her instalES^^^re- 


ence at her installation ^ cere- 
mony on Dec. 22. 

The NdebeWa fifth of Zi- 
mbabwe’s population of 11 
million, are. descendants of 
Apnegade Zulu who invaded 
Yhe area in; the 1820s after 
their rebellion' against their 
king, Chaka, was crushed. 
They feel they have the mil-, 
itan’stic Zulu tradition to up- 
hold* and 100 chiefs met last 
year . to .oppose the nomina- 
tion of a 22 -year-old student 
teacher to take Iter father's 
place, even though the coun- 
try’s majority tribe, the 
Shona. ' have' four female 
chiefs. 

“A chief- is a leader in 
war,”' said George Moyo, 
president of the Ndebele Cul- 
tural Society, “and there are 


secrets crf wamors, Iike tac- 
tics and iruelezi, that a woman 
is not allowed to know.” 

Inldeza is war medicine 
sprinkled on soldiers. Mr. 
Moyo, who lives in Bulawayo 
township 60 mites . (100 ki- 
lometers) noth of Nswazi. is 
a songomo, or herbal doctor, 
and. brewing intelezj is 
something he knows about. 

Nor is it right, he and other 
traditionalists say, that a 
young woman sit in judgment 
on men accused of sleeping 
with other men's wives, (the 
fine is usually two cows), be- 
cause men would be ashamed 
to discuss sex with someone 
as young as their granddaugh- 
ters. .... 

Chiefs occupy an impor- 
tant rote in southern African 
societies; dispensing law and • 
traditional beliefs in equal - 
doses. British colonial admin- 
istrators left them ip place and 
even gave them stipends, be- 
cause they were useful: Vil- 
lagers respect them, and they 
resolve min or disputes . that 
would ' otherwise clog ' the 
courts. Chiefs’ ratings on 
civil and criminal problems 
can be appealed in court; nil-- 
ings on religious and tradi- 
tional matters can be ap- 


pealed to higher chiefs. 

Some modem African 
states have tried to do away 
with them but found they can- 
not. Under its new constitu- 
tion, South Africa sharply 
limits chiefs’ authority — 
particularly the power to con- 
trol communal land. But it 
continues to pay their sala- 
ries: TbeZulo kmg.Goodwili 
Zwetithini. receives $65,000 
plus palace expenses; lesser 
chiefs receive as little as 
$4,000. 

Zimbabwe stripped its 
duels of all powers after in- 
dependence in 1980 but re- 
stored them in 1994 after lo- 
ad officials, appointed for 
their political connections, 
proved ineffective and some 1 
times corrupt. Zn Zimbabwe, 
chiefs are paid about $1,200 a 
year. . . 

Miss Mabbena’s father 
(fied three years ago at 43, 
leaving four daughters. By 
Ndebele custom, a male re- 
lative is sought, but her father, 
a maverick, said he wanted 
his shy, studious eldest girl to 
succeed him. The village 
agreed, reaching a decision m 
the traditional way, by rough 
consensus, nor voce. Her 
name was forwarded to Har- 


are, the capital, for presiden- 
tial approval. 

When President Robert 
Mugabe officially appointed 
her in 1995, other chiefs and 
elders protested, provoking a 
yearlong battle. The objectors 
spread ugly gossip: They ac- 
cused her of secretly having 
bad children by a Shona man 
— she is childless — and of 
having made the district ad- 
ministrator and the minister 
of local affairs in Harare fall 
in' love with her. They tried 
nominating one of her great- 
uncles for the job instead. 

“But be was twice in pris- 
on for stealing cattle.” said 
her mother, Nomalanga Mab- 
fteoa. "so there was no 
chance he could be chief.” 
Under the law, a chief cannot 
have a rap sheet. 

The president’s decision, 
said John Nkomo, minister of 
local affairs, was neither a 
blow for women’s rights nor 
an appeal to die large majority 
of female voters in Zimbab- 
we, but simply a recognition, 
as the law requires, that she 
was the village’s choice. 

In any case, Zimbabwe 
outlaws sex discrimination, 
he added. There were female 
guerrilla commanders in the 


war for independence, and the 
deputy speaker of Parliament, 
several cabinet ministers and 
many judges and executives 
are women. 

But Mr. Moyo sees “cul- 
ture" as a chasm that no gov- 
ernment can leap. 

“For women to be mag- 
istrates does not affect us," 
he said. “For a woman to sit 
in a chiefs court is a different 
story. You are talking about 
people who are educated to do 
something different. In 
Africa, things do not change. 
Culture is just there." 

Mr. Moyo and many on the 
chiefs' council refused to at- 
tend the Dec. 22 induction 
ceremony. There, to the 
pounding of drums and dan- 
cing feet. Miss Mabhena was 
invested with the emblems of 
chieftainship, a mix of Zulu 
pride and lingering deference 
to colonialism: a leopard 
cloak, a white pith helmet and 
a black staff. The national 
seal is embossed in silver on 
the end of the staff, which was 
once used to crack skulls. 

Miss Mabhena is not the 
head-bashing type. She says 
Mr. Moyo needs to realize 
that the army, not chiefs, 
makes war nowadays. 


AFRICA: With Halting Steps, Continent’s Nations Are Moving Toward Democracy 


Continued from Page 1 

Changes since then, like the opening, 
of the process to include opposition 
participation iri drawing up veto- lists 
and the itseof transparent o»tot boxes, 
led the opposition to accept its defeat 
this time; and gave the country its nret 
multiparty legislature in 16 years. 

Ghana thus joined a select circle of 
Afrfcan countries, including Benin, 
Sierra Lewie and Uganda which con- 
ducted what were generally con- 
sidered free elections in 1996. . 

What made Ghana even more un- 
usual irr the often bitter setting P* 


r0$ 


foe’ winner* and Mr. Rawlings^ is his 


inauguration speech T uesday, reached 
out to the opposition; “Let us all* no 
matter what our differing opinions and 
party loyalties, work toward our com- 
mon goal, whichis the prosperity and 
well-being of aB Ghanaians.” 

AJ. Kufuor* the losing candidate,' 
. said in an Interview: “We are moving 
away from a nondemocnttic stale to- 
ward democracy. The glass is at least 
half full, and there Is a new spirit in 
which people are making the right 
noises. We must now add substance to 
those noises." 

This year promises to be equally 
pivotal, with important votes tentat- 
ively scheduled for Nigeria and Zaire, 
and national elections , m Kenya, 
Cameroon and Burkina Faso. 


, Already this year, Madagascar has 
seen what outsiders say is a successful 
democratic residential election, re- 
turning to office a former Marxist die-' 
tator, Didier Ratsiraka. Mali, which 
saw one of die continent's first demo- 
cratic transitions at the start of the 
decade, is expected to conduct another 
fair vote. 

For many other couniries, the pros- 
pect of truly democratic elections is 
considerably more muddled. 

In many of them, incumbents have 
already begun to lower expectations 
by arguing the care for government 
control and casting doubt about the 
appropriateness of “Western" demo- 
cracy for African countries. 

One of the most articulate advo- 


cates of this line is President Pascal 
Lissouba of Congo, whore country 
narrowly avoided a full-blown civil 
war earuer this decade. 

“There is nothing African, nothing 
from us, in the values of this imported 
democracy,” Mr. Lissouba said in an 
interview with the Paris-based Jeune 
Afirique. “We need a long transition 
to democracy, as long as possible so 
that we may assimilate and adapt it.” 

But for Mr. Lissouba ’s critics, this 
kind of language is seen as an excuse 
for perpetuating his grip on power. 

Nonetheless, elections in places 
like Ghana, in which the government 
and the opposition have largely 
agreed upon the rules, have begun to 
have powerful ripple effects. 


Continued from Page 1 

customer back moments later. 
The person then dials the 
number in Dallas, and the call 
is put through. 

The result: the call is billed 
at American rates rather than, 
say, those of France Telecom 
or Deutsche Telekom. The 
savings are so great, in fact, 
that a large percentage of cus- 
tomers dial through the 
American callback services 
to make calls within Europe. 

But now European govern- 
ments want to subject cus- 
tomers of callback services to 
their value-added taxes, 
which vary by country but are 
sometimes above 20 percent. 
Until now, the companies 
have been exempt from these 
taxes because their operations 
and billing have been from 
the United States. 

European officials contend 
that they are just trying to 
create a level playing field 
because customers who use 
France Telecom or Deutsche 
Telekom already pay the 
value-added tax. 

"The European Union is 
only trying to make it so that 
everyone starts on the same 
footing,” a representative of 
France Telecom said. 

With savings ranging from 
50 percent to 80 percent, the 
callback services would still 
retain a competitive edge 
even with the taxes, although 
some customers might find 
the slight inconvenience less 
worthwhile. 

The European Union’s 
new rules could also affect 
on-line services and Internet 
providers because they apply 
to all telecommunication ser- 
vices that are used by cus* 
tomers within a European 
country. 

. In theory, according to in- 
dustry analysts, a company in 
the United Stales that offers on- 
line shopping over the Internet 
or that sells information would 
be obligated to pay value-ad- 
ded taxes to the government of 


each customer’s country. 

That raises difficult prac- 
tical and legal issues because 
the Internet dissolves national 
boundaries and allows people 
to surf at random between 
sites around the world. 

To collect sales taxes, gov- 
ernments would have to know 
which customers were buying 
goods or services from which 
overseas companies and then 
somehow collect the tax. 

That prospect already rankles 
some European experts. 

"How can the European 
Community lake a U.S. com- 
pany and tell them that you are 
now a German citizen and you 


have to pay us taxes?” asked 
Thomas Ulrich, general man- 
ager of Bendig & Partners in 
Regensburg, Germany, which 
provides Internet sen,' ices and 
markets callback services 
based in the United States. 

Collecting raxes from call- 
back services may be more 
straightforward. Georg Hofer. 
genera] manager of Telepass- 
pon. which markets callback 
services in Frankfurt, said his 
company would make sure the 
taxes were paid if it had to. 

“We are still investigating 
it right now to see if it applies 
to us,” Mr. Hofer said. "But 
we are prepared to do it." 


Tuesday 

STYLE 


From Paris to Milan, from New York 
to Tokyo, fashion editor Suzy 
Menkes covers the fashion front 
With additional reporting on 
lifestyle issues, the Style section 
provides up-to-date information on 
developments in the changing world 
of creative design. 

Every Tuesday in the International 
Herald Tribune. 






EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


KBLISHtD WITH THE NEW 1MU TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POET 


The Case Against China 

When President Bill Clinton aban- States does not make clear soon that it 


doned his pledge to link trade priv- 
ileges to an improvement in China's 
human rights record, he promised nev- 
ertheless to stand up for freedom in 
China where dial was a proper Amer- 
ican role. Now the administration, and 
Secretary of State-designate Mad- 
eleine Albright, have an opportunity to 
show whether the administration 
meant what it said, or whether the 
United States will yield to Beijing even 
where it has promised otherwise. 

At stake is a forthcoming meeting of 
the UN Human Rights Commission. 
Ever since Chinese troops massacred 
hundreds of students in Beijing in 
1989, the commission has considered, 
but never approved, resolutions urging 
China to respect the human rights of its 
citizens. Two years ago the commis- 
sion came close to adopting such a 
statement. Last year, after fierce 
Chinese lobbying and no effective U.S. 
leadership, the international body 
agreed, on a close vote, not even to 
debate the mildest of resolutions. 

At her Senate confirmation hearing 
last week. Ambassador Albright 
adopted a wait-and-see position when 
asked whether the United States would 
seek a resolution this year. There is a 
need not to wait much longer. China 
already is campaigning hard to avoid 
censure. And. unlike the United States, 
it has not “de-Iinked” trade and hu- 
man rights; as always, economic 
threats and blandishments are integral 
to China's lobbying. If the United 


is prepared to lead at Geneva, it is sure 
to lose during die session, which runs 
from March 10 to April 18. 

More to the point, it is hard to see 
how anyone could question that 
China's human rights performance has 
worsened during the past year. Lead- 
ing dissidents have received long jail 
terms: the 1 1 -year sentence of former 
student leader Wang Dan is typical. 

Bishop Zeng Jingmu, 76, was sen- 
tenced to three years of “re-education 
through labor" for Masses not sanc- 
tioned by the official Catholic Church. 
On Dec. 27, a Tibetan music expert and 
former Fulbright scholar, Ngawang 
Choepel, 30. received a breat ht a k i n g 
18-year jail term for “espionage" after 
he returned to his homeland to film 
traditional music and dance. (The U.S. 
State Department mustered a state- 
ment of “concern.” not even a con- 
demnation.! 

In its suppression of minority rights 
and of speech, religion and assembly, 
China invites comparison with the So- 
viet KGB and gulag at their worst. 

The most encouraging reading of 
Mrs. Albright's statement is that the 
United States is leaving the door open, 
hoping for improvements in China be- 
tween now and March. But such a 
strategy, chancy at best, certainly 
cann ot succeed without a credible 
threat of a resolution. There can be no 
such credibility if the United States 
does not act soon. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Good for Shevardnadze 


Eduard Shevardnadze helped shatter 
Cold War orthodoxy when he served as 
Soviet foreign minister in the late 1980s. 
Now. as president of the former Soviet 
republic of Georgia, he has shown sim- 
ilar courage in handling the sensitive 
issue of diplomatic immunity. 

Mr. Shevardnadze announced on 
Friday that at the request of the United 
States, Gueorgui Makharadze. a senior 
Georgian diplomat facing probable 
criminal charges in a fatal Washington 
traffic crash, would remain in America 
until the investigation of the incident 
was complete. "Hie Georgian leader is 
also prepared to waive Mr. Mak- 
haradze ’s diplomatic immunity from 
prosecution and punishment if the case 
proceeds to criminal charges. 

No country has a stronger interest in 
upholding the tradition of diplomatic 
immunity than America. Immunity, 
guaranteed under international law. 
shields embassy and consular officials 
from arrest and prosecution in die coun- 
tries to which they are posted. Without 
it, U.S. Foreign Service officers would 
be tempting targets for prosecution by 
countries with less than evenhanded le- 
gal systems around the world. 

But the Clinton administration 
slighted neither law, tradition nor U.S. 
interests when it asked Mr. Shevard- 
nadze to waive Mr. Makharadze’s im- 
munity. The Georgian diplomat could 
face serious criminal charges in Wash- 
ington as a result of the car crash, which 


took the life of 16-year-old Joviane 
Waitrick on Jan. 3. There was good 
reason for Mr. Shevardnadze to break 
with normal precedent in this case. 

Justice Department prosecutors have 
not yet filed formal charges in the crash, 
but officials allege that Mr. Mak- 
haradze was speeding and under the 
influence of alcohol when he lost con- 
trol of his car in heavily traveled 
Dupont Circle. His diplomatic status 
should not shelter him from personal 
responsibility for his actions. Immunity 
is meant to let diplomats cany out their 
official responsibilities free from har- 
assment or retaliation against their 
countries' foreign policies. It confers no 
license for reckless personal behavior 
or for flouting local traffic laws. 

Governments occasionally agree to 
waive diplomatic immunity. But they 
typically do so for lesser crimes. like 
shoplifting, that cany lesser penalties. 
In serious criminal cases, the State 
Department has a standing policy of 
requesting waivers of immunity. These 
are rarely granted, and such cases gen- 
erally end with the expulsion of the 
accused diplomat. 

But Mr. Makharadze 's case, because 
it led to a loss of life, calls for a judicial 
resolution. Mr. Shevardnadze has nev- 
er stood rigidly by diplomatic custom. 
It is nice to see that he has lost none of 
the nerve and principle that made him 
such a distinguished statesman. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Budget 

President Bill Clinton's forthcom- 
ing budget will reportedly include, 
again, a Medicare gimmick so trans- 
parent and crude as to give gimmickry 
a bad name. To help keep the Medicare 
trust fund “solvent” for a pwiod of 
time, the administration will sup- 
posedly repeat the proposal it made last 
year to transfer certain home health 
care expenses out of the part of Medi- 
care that the trust fund supports, and 
into the part supported by general rev- 
enues. The president, if he follows last 
year’s script, will then claim to have 
accomplished something important — 
to have * ‘saved * * Medicare for die time 
being. But in fact, he won't have saved 
a thing. The only real-world effect of 
the action will be to add to the budget 
pressure on other programs, while per- 
haps convincing the Republicans that it 
remains unsafe to deal on Medicare, 
because the Democrats are unwilling 
to discuss the subject in good faith. 

What the president would help to 
solve with the transfer of the home 
health care costs is a fake problem. The 
trust fund he would strengthen is little 
more than an accounting convention. 
The very division of Medicare into two 
parts, each with its own source of 
funds, is artificial and an anachronism. 
What counts is the total cost of the 
giant program — if present trends con- 
tinue, in not too many years it will 


Gimmick 

overtake Social Security and be the 
largest in the budget — versus tire total 
resources of the government. The ac- 
counting transfer would affect neither 
of these. The deficit would be no smal- 
ler, the Medicare cost containment 
question no closer to solution. Only 
appearances would be affected — but 
the legerdemain would have a price. 

Under current rules, there is a kind of 
competition between home health care 
and other Medicare benefits for the 
money available each year within the 
trust fund. The transfer would serve to 
ease that competition. Some home costs 
would be paid instead from general rev- 
enues. But that would leave less such 
revenue for the many other programs 
that also look to general revenues for 
their funds. Medicare would be pro- 
tected at die unspoken expense of other 
programs, and no matter that the pres- 
ident who would thus be exposing these 
programs says he is determined to pro- 
tect a lot of them as well. 

The president is not running for re- 
election anymore. It is in his interest, to 
say nothing of the country’s, to have as 
honest and straightforward a discussion 
of the intert wined Medicare and budget 
problems as possible. Using a fake cut 
to solve a fake problem is not what we 
would call a promising beginning. 
Can't they do better than that? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



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Watch and Help as China Acquires a Free Press 


N EW YORK — China is going to 
have a free press. Oh, its leaders 
don’t know that yet, but they are being 
pushed straight in that direction. 

The two honest stock markets in 
Asia in 1996 were in China ■ — the 
Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges. 
From April 1 to Dec. 9, Shanghai’s 
composite index was up 120 percent, 
while Shenzhen's was up 313 percent. 

One reason was that they are so 
unregulated, and one reason they are so 
unregulated is that China has only the 
most rudimentary securities and ex- 
change system, and it has virtually no 
independent, responsible, uncorcupted 
financial press that can credibly high- 
light the quality stocks and brutally 
expose those flimflam Chinese compa- 
nies that don't report timely, accurate 
or transparent financial data. 

Last month, China's government 
realized that the two exchanges were 
out of control, because of all sorts of 
wild speculation and unsavory trading 
practices. But its tools for dealing with 


Bv Thomas L. Friedman 


this were limited to one sledgehammer 
the state-owned press. 

So on Dec. 16 the People's Daily 
published a blaring editorial warning 
that stock prices had been pushed to 
“irrational*' and “abnormal'’ levels. 

Guess what happened? Everyone 
tried to sell at once, both markets 
plunged, and a lot of little investors got 
hurt — so many that police had to kc*p 
order among furious investors who 
protested outside brokerage houses in 
several major Chinese cities. 

Today 21 million Chinese own 
stock. Lots of stock-oriented newspa- 

f rrs and magazines have sprung up. 

m none really reported effectively on 
regulatory lapses, or on the state-owned 
enterprises that were manipulating the 
markets, or on the Chinese banks that 
were improperly speculating on stocks, 
so these papers were little more than 
tout sheets at a horse racing track. 


Indeed, a commentary in the Com- 
munist Party newspaper Remain Ribao 
stated; “A number of media organi- 
zations have played a significant role in 
boosting the market by consistently 
predicting rises and seldom cautioning 
investors against risks." 

China’s rapid growth allows it to 
resist external pressure for change. It is 
so big now it can buy off everybody by 
dan glin g huge contracts. But its growth 
fuels internal pressures for change by 
creating new constituencies — like 
shareholders — who demand reform 
for their own self-interest. 

Over time, China's leaders cannot 
control and monitor their bursting free 
markets, or prevent little people from 
getting hurt and then rioting a gains t the 
government, without the other insti- 
tutions that go with free markets — 
from an effective Securities and Ex- 
change Commission to a free and re- 
sponsible press backed by rule of law. 

China’s authoritarian leaders don’t 
want a free and responsible {ness that 


might also criticize them. How do they 
balance that concern with thmr grow- 
ing self-interest in a press that could 
help them monitor markets? . . . 

fhat is their problem- But it is im- 
portant to understand that this is now 
their problem, and that there are these 

intend pressures on 
press differently, and that feerrime 
US. human rights policy on China 
should try to nurture that nend. 

(Send a delegation led by Arthur 
Levitt, head of the SEC and sonre big- 
time business editors — instead of more 
chest-pounding lectures from State De- 
partment human rights officers.) 

One thing that contributed to the 
Soviet Union's collapse was the nuclear 
meltdown at Chernobyl. Without afree 

press, Chernobyl rumors ran wild. They 

were even worse than reality, and they 
devastated what little confidence there 
was in the regime. I hope it won't take a 
meltdown of the S ha n g h ai stock market 
to spur a free press in China. 

The New York Times. 


Unstable and Dangerous, the Beijing Regime Is a Foe 


W ASHINGTON — The 
hermit Communists who 
run North Korea threaten war 
one day only to embrace peace 
the next. In Serbia, Europe’s 
last Communist-style boss. 
Slobodan Milosevic, hesitates 
between brute force and polit- 
ical concessions to overcome 
rising public anger. 

This is how global commun- 
ism ends. The oscillations in 
Pyongyang and Belgrade sound 
the death rattle of regimes that 
sense defeat but don't know' 
how to end their agony. 

The same aria of regirae- 
ending change is sung, in dif- 
ferent tempo, in Beijing. Hanoi 
and Havana. China is the prin- 
cipal case of Leninist rulers 
making desperate co mpr omises 
to hold power and privilege as 
long as they can. They, too. 
behave in schizophrenic fash- 
ion at home — opening the 
economy, brutally suppressing 
dissent — and abroad. 

The political schizophrenia 
of doomed Communist re- 
gimes now poses the greatest 
threat to global stability. 


By Jim HoagLond 


Spared a serious international 
crisis in his first terra. Bill 
Clinton is not likely to be that 
lucky the second tune around. 

He confronts an inherently 
unstable relationship with 
China that neither engagement 
nor containment will resolve. 
Unable or unwilling to mod- 
ernize political and military es- 
tablishments formed in World 
War n and the Cold War, the 
Chinese will swing back and 
forth between confrontation 
and cooperation, depending on 
the pressures of the moment 

Initial hopes in the Clinton 
administration that China could 
be wooed into long-term reas- 
onableness seem to be giving 
way to a more realistic assess- 
ment of the dangers presented 
by the unstable power equation 
in Beijing. Washington cannot 
advertise or even acknowledge 
such an assessment, but it is 
apparent in the pattern of con- 
tacts between the two capitals. 

While publicly playing 
down the belligerent threats is- 


sued against American cities 
during last spring's confron- 
tation with Beijing over 
Taiwan, U.S. analysts con- 
cluded that a significant fac- 
tion within China's aged polit- 
ical and military leadership 
had little understanding of tire 
devastation the U.S. mil- 
itary could and would inflict if 
hostilities erupted. 

The most apt comparison of 
the Chinese attitude seemed to 
be to Saddam Hussein's vain 
boasting before the Gulf War 
of Iraq's battlefield prowess. 

Such a misperception is dan- 
gerous. The Pentagon seemed 
to be trying to dispel it when it 
brought the Chinese defense 
minister and his vice chiefs of 
staff to America last month and 
ferried them around key bases. 
At one stop die Qrineac were 
frown over six miles (10 ki- 
iometeis) of armor, helicopters 
and other advanced weaponry. 

Has the message about the 
dangers of tugging on Uncle 
Sam’s cape been received? My 


own exposure to the Chinese 
delegation over a ceremonial 
dinner at die start of their tour- 
ney suggested that it would be 
a tough, uneven sell. 

But outgoing Defense Sec- 
retary William Perry seemed 
more optimistic in a recent in- 
terview, stressing that die ad- 
ministration is making progress 
in establishing “rules of the 
road” agreements to prevent 
accidental military confronta- 
tion. He compared the military- 
to-miliiary agreements to those 
that the United States struck 
with die Soviet Union at the 
height of die Cold War. 

Such agreements are appro- 
priate and necessary. They re- 
cognize ffrina as a dangerous 
emerging military power. Un- 
der its present leadership it is 
an adversary, not an ally and 
not just a giant market 

President Clinton and his 
diplomatic aides blur the mes- 
sage by continuing to soft- 
soap the adversarial relations. 

Recent developments in 
North Korea show the benefits 
of a carefully calibrated policy 


that combines visible vigil- 
ance with a willingness to re- 
duce tensions where possible. 

In late December, North 
Korea suddenly apologized for 
sending a spy submarine to 
South Korea m September, and 
then accepted Washington’s 
long-standing demand that 
ralirs about ending conflict in 
the peninsula include Seoul. 

North Korea may be willing 
to go with a whimper, not a 
bang. The same may just be true 
of Serbia’s Mr. Milosevic. 

The final Communist states 
are those that kept their gov- 
ernments. military commands 
and economies out of Soviet 
control and adapted to local 
conditions better than did die 
East European drag regimes 
that crashed in 1989. (Cuba, as 
always, is a partial exception.) 

This distance seems to have 
given diem later use-by dates 
than Honecfcer & Co. But they 
will not escape ihe Communist 
system’s fate. Influencing how 
they go out is one of America's 
most urgent tasks. 

The Washington Post. 


1* 

J* 


Why Should Workers Bear the Brunt of Globalization Pain? 


P ARIS — The explosion of 
labor protest in South Korea 
today resembles the strikes that 
paralyzed the French economy 
m December 1995. Beyond the 
national significance and na- 
tional peculiarities of both epis- 
odes, a revolt can be seen — a 
revolt against the idea that 
labor, rather than investors or 
management, should pay the 
cost of corporate globalization. 

Both sets of strikes have en- 
joyed -considerable popular 
sympathy, despite the public in- 
convenience they produced. 
Each became a strike by del- 
egation, in that the public de- 
cided that the issues were im- 
portant to the future of the 
society, and that the strikers 
were striking for them, too. 

The public puts up with the 
problems die strikes create and 
thereby provides indirect sup- 
port to labor in a conflict in 
which roost people have no di- 
rect involvement. 


By William Pfaff 


In Korea, since the govern- 
ment's decision on Thursday to 
bring legal charges against the 
strike leaders, the affair has as- 
sumed major political dimen- 
sions. The strikers emphasize 
this by holding their press con- 
ferences in the gardens of the 
Seoul Catholic cathedral, 
which, in South Korea’s author- 
itarian past, gave sanctuary to 
pro-democracy leaders — in- 
cluding the young Kim Young 
Sara, now president 

Mr. Kim touched off this 
crisis by calling a session of 
Parliament for 6 in the morning 
of Dec. 26, without informing 
the parliamentary opposition. 
In just seven minutes his party 
put through major changes in 
labor legislation. 

Large-scale “downsizing” 
Firings were authorized, togeth- 
er with eased temporary em- 
ployment and the replacement 


of -workers who strike. New 
working-hour rules were im- 
posed. New independentunions 
were forbidden until the year 
2000. The South Korean polit- 
ical police, which has a bad 
reputation, was strengthened 

The president said on Jan. 7, 
in a speech meant to appease the 
strikers, that the country must 
have a more flexible labor force, 
and that this new labor legis- 
lation was essential to improve 
international competitiveness 
and meet the demands of die 
OECD, which South Korea has 
just joined. The same argument 
is, of course, made elsewhere as 
nations compete to create in- 
creasingly flexible labor markets 
— usually meaning labor fences 
that are ill-paid ana docile. 

That does not describe South 
Korean labor. Only one nation- 
al union is legally authorized, 
and ordinarily cooperates with 


The Reality Is That It Happens 


W ASHINGTON — In 
April 1923. Sigmund 
Freud was found to have can- 
cer in die roof of his mouth. 
Over the next 16 years he 
stoically endured painful op- 
erations. But early on he told a 
new doctor. Max Schur: 
“Promise me one thing: that 
when the time comes, you 
won’t let me suffer unneces- 
sarily.” They shook hands. 

On Sept. 21, 1939, Freud 
told Schur: “My dear Schur, 
you certainly remember our 
first talk. You promised then 
not to forsake me when my 
time comes. Now it’s nothing 
but torture and makes no sense 
anymore.” 

Schur wrote later. “1 gave 
him a hypodermic of two cen- 
tigrams of morphine. ... the 
expression of pain and suf- 
fering was gone. I repeated 
this dose after about 12 hours. 
Freud was obviously so close 
to the end of his reserves that 
he lapsed into a coma and did 
not wake up again.” 

In that last scene of Freud's 
life we can see the issues at the 
heart of the debate over phy- 
sician-assisted suicide — the 
issues argued last week in the 
Supreme Court. 

“The reality is that in prac- 
tice it happens.” Justice Ruth 
Bader Ginsburg observed. A 
doctor gives large- doses of 
opiates or barbiturates to re- 
lieve pain: the patient slips 
into a coma and dies. 

Acting Solicitor General 
Walter Dellinger replied that 
that was not unlawful “so 
long as the physician's intent 


By Anthony Lewis 


was to relieve pain and not 
cause death.” Everything 
turned on the shadowy ques- 
tion of intent. 

In fact, counsel and the 
justices ail seem to agree that 
doctors who cross the shadow 
line are seldom prosecuted 
and never convicted. 

Kathryn Tucker of Seattle, 
urging the court to find a con- 
stitutionally protected liberty 
interest in the right to die, 
spoke of “the underground 
practice, available mainly to 
the educated and affluent.” 

Laurence Tribe of the Har- 
vard Law School argued that 
state laws drew a “constitu- 
tionally dubious” distinction 
between two ways of bringing 
about death. One, which is le- 
gal. is for the patient to refuse 
further medical treatment and 
order removal of tubes provid- 
ing nutrition and medication. 
The other, illegal, is to take a 
lethal dose. 

Justice Antonin Scaiia re- 
plied that the law had never 
countenanced suicide. He re- 
peatedly decried the effort to 
read the guarantee of liberty in 
the constitution as a protection 
of dignity in dying. 

Other justices, one after an- 
other, expressed doubt that the 
issues should be decided by 
the Supreme Court. There 
would be difficult problems. 
Justice Stephen Breyer said, 
for example, in making cer- 
tain that a decision to die was 
voluntary. Wouldn’t legis- 


latures be “far more suited to 
come up with an answer?’ ’ 

“ We 're not yet in a position 
as an institution,” Justice Da- 
vid Souter said, “to make die 
judgment on the extent of 
either the liberty interest or the 
interest of the state.” 

The court’s evident reluc- 
tance to take on the issue con- 
flicted. in a sense, with the 
very scene in the courtroom. 
For the argument was fascin- 
ating, illuminating the issues 
more effectively in two hours 
than weeks of legislative de- 
bate would likely do. 

Counsel and rite justices 
bad views, but there was an 
open-mindedness in their ex- 
changes that suggested a will- 
ingness to learn. And the dis- 
cussion ranged through realms 
of fact and philosophy. 

Legislatures do not get 
enough input from those who 
wish to die with dignity, Ms. 
Tucker said, because “people 
don't deal with it until they’re 
confronted with death.” 
Justice Souter commented: 
“The denial of death simply 
reflects the way we are, and 
that is a perfectly legitimate 
attitude to find its way into the 
legislative process.” 

Justice Breyer said there 
were statistics indicating that 
only I or 2 percent of people 
need to die in pain, given med- 
ical methods available today, 
but that 25 percent do die in 
pain. He worried about the con- 
stitutional consequences of let- 
ting the stale make people en- 
dure that in growing numbers. 

The New York Times. 


managem ent and government, 
but Korean wages are good (in 
■ key areas better than in Britain), 
even though hours are long. 

The OECD has nonetheless 
congratulated South Korea on 
its existing labor flexibility. 
(Unemployment is below 2 per- 
cent.) South Korea’s actual 
competitiveness problem today 
derives mainly mom high in- 
terest rates and speculatively 
high real estate costs, rather 
than from the cost of labor. 

However, the cost of labor is 

y inwhing yrni ran fin awiRthing 

about, or so the government 
thought. The threat to arrest the 
strife leaders fe expected to pro- 
voke wider unrest and cause the 
official Federation of Korea 
Trade Unions to join the un- 
official unions on strike. 

Like the French strikes of a 
year ago, these strikes are not 
protests against technological 
change or progress in industry 
and communications, even 
though -the dislocations in glob- 
al patterns of trade and indus- 
trial management are largely 
technological in origin. 

The stnfears are protesting the 
idea that workers are the ones 
who must pay for globalization. 
Not management — which in 
some places, above all in the 
United States .and Britain, has 
vastly increased its share in com- 
pany profits. And not investors. 
The doctrine that prevails in in- 
ternational business today is that 
maximizing return cm capital has 
priority over any other manage- 
naem responsibility. 

This priority, like the notion 
that increased industrial pro- 
ductivity and competitiveness 
must be exacted primarily from 
the labor force, is toe result of 


arbitrary decisions. No law of 
economics says that mum on 
capital is more important to so- 
ciety than benefit to a work 
force or to a community. 

The West European case is 
significant in this respect. 
Western Europe’s growth and 
export performance remain 
strong despite high wages and 
much labor “inflexibility” (as 

In addition to toe practical 
evidence this provides, Euro- 
peans can m ake an intellectual 
case in favor of high wages and 
stable work forces, and against 
the downward pressures on 
wages and employment exer- 
cised in the United States and 
Britain — and in South Korea. 

In Germany in particular, a 
well-paid, stable arid motivated 
labor force is widely considered 
an important corporate asset 
and investment in toe corporate 
future. The European model of 
“social capitalism” is still 
widely defended. 

The president of the French 
National Assembly, Philippe 
Sdguin, calls for a joint French- 
German reaffirmation of social 
capitalism, in opposition to toe 
threat of what he called “to- 
talitarian capitalism.” 

The unrest in South Korea is 
practical expression of a the- 
oretical debate that has scarcely 
begun, as capitalism reshapes 
itself under the pressure of tech- 
nological change. Ihe industri- 
al labor force and the publitjj 
have not until now had much or 
a say in that dehate. But they 
will in the future have an im- 
portant influence on how the 
debate ends. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Tunes Syndicate. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Niger Massacre 

LONDON — Official, confirm- 
ation has been received of toe 
massacre of toe British mission 
on the Niger. The expedition 
was quite unarmed and was en- 
deavoring to enter by peaceful 
means toe king’s city. All had 
African experience. The Niger 
Company believes there is no 
possibility of any of toe white 
party having escaped. Only sev- 
en of 250 carriers got away. The 
fact of the officers composing 
the mission to Benin having 
proceeded totally unarmed is 
inexplicable, especially as toe 
chief of Benin City was known 
to be hostile to the British. 

1922* Brand Resigns 

PARIS — “I have done what I 
could for my country. Another 
may do better.” With these 
words, M. Aristide Bmnri die 
French Premier, announced his 
resignation to toe Chamber of 


gotiations at Cannes and 
artiising toe plan for to 
posed European ecc 

confe rence. M. Poincarf. 

critic of toe Govenunen 
stood out against a policy t 
cessions on toe reparation: 
Allied conference, accep 
build a new Cabinet 

1947; Transport Si 

LONDON — The Laba 
eromern postponed toe < 
owef trows, bucks of the. 

Navy and Royal Air Fd 
move London's food 
tied up for toe last six 
strike of about 15,000 
workers. Thousands of ^ 
era were without meat rat 
even fish this weekend as ; 
of the strife. The strike 
nasnd “a forty-four-hom 
wpek, a regulated day. ai 
of the accumulative wort 
and twelve holidays with 




PAGE 9 


N 


’y)Cr* V- 5 £> 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAX JANUARY 13, 1997 


— _ language 

Going From Small Bore to Full Bore 


% William Safire 


— “Mr. Clinton 
* ▼ proses only small bar* i*- 

New Yo&ranes 

ache^haraiSJto 

aWgaijEs 

m f}£~ bore ’ hyphenated when used to 
a noon, is a Britishism that 
Am encaus are adopting flfte not to 
JJWTy ffltd jcts%i). Curiously, it is 
gffined m an American (fictionary, the 

Movmg or operating at (he greater 
speedor wife maximum power" is the 
Ratdom House definition. That 
e^’’ sense “ expressed in 
The New York Times ’s “£te economy 
u tow operating at./uU bore” 
where is ft from? “We arc woddng 

on an entry on full bon*' says John 
Simpson of the OED, “and our ev- 
idence shows that it derives from die 
bore meaning ‘cylinder.’ Full bon is 
me widest capacity of a cylinder.” 
Some lexicographers think the bon 
first measured an engine cylinder (and 
have a 1927 citation), while others 
t hink that lire origin is from the meas- 
urement ©f the inside of the barrel of a 
gun. ‘ ‘A .45-caliber gun can takea .44- 


sntall-bore connect with «*ari> other 
tec hnic ally as firearms terms,” says 
fted Mish at Memam-Webster, “drey 
are not opposites on die extended leveL 
Ope means ‘all-out,’ the other ‘tri- 

fKno •»» 


"T —mamm —v, avjHH WfC WUUKI UC 

me maximum-size load, in gn^t her 
sense, it means ‘maximum ^ qp a N e 
powder load.’ " 

Now what about those small-bore 
reforms ? “Though fitH-bon 


lt Winston Churchill wrote in 1898 of 
a hundred men wounded by the 
bullets of aexvifised force.** 
The OED has a citation only two years 
haer from the Congressional Record 

fotheextendedmettpira “No smaJJ- 
bon, two-by-four* radical politicians 
can hurt that great court.” unlike its 
Wg brother, small-bore is used only as a 
compound adjective and is almost al- 
ways hyphenated. A nice recent usage 
was by Dick Morris, die triangulating 
political strategist: “The issues Wash-, 
mgton speaks about every day are in 
many cases die true matt-ban issues, 
or at least die boring issues.” 

□ 

“Who mb these unreconstructed 
wankers?" demanded Tony Blair, 
head of Britain’s Labor Party and the 
man favored to become prime min- 
ister next spring, hi an unguarded mo- 
ment after getting a rough time from 
leftist journalists interviewing him in 
S co t land, Blair expressed bis irrita- 
tion by using a slang noon not widely 
understood m America. 

hi a commentary headed “Mind 
Your Language, Mr. Blair,” Magnus 
Linkfater of The Times of London 
recalled how- Prime Minister John 
Major’s use of the expletive “Bas- 
tards!” to describe some of his own 
right wingers had endeared the con- 
servative leader tn milli ons. 

“Whether wankers will do die 
same for Tony Blair is more doubtful; 
indeed, Fm not certain whether the 
editor of The Times will permit its use 
in these columns at all.’* 


The editor did, as editors here do on 
occasion, twamse the use of a vul- 
garism by a pro mine nt and respectable 
pnlirirfll figure — rather dun by an 
entertainer or other celebrity — invites 
reporting (perhaps with secret glee) on 
the fact or its use in the most august 
publications. 

The suppkanentto the Oxford Eng- 
lish Dictionary defines wanking, a late 
1940s word, as “of a male: (an act of) 
masturbation,” with an extended 
sense for wanker of " an objectionable 
or contemptible person or thing .*’ The 
supplement warns: ‘‘This word and its 
derivatives are not irv polite use.’ ’ 

The most insightful OED citation is 
a 1st of dialogue from the 1978 novel 
“Jake’s Thing,” by Kingsley Anris: 
“‘Damon, what’s a wanker?' . . . 
‘These days a waster, a shirker, 
someone who’s fixed himself a soft 
job or an exalted position by means of 
an undeserved reputation on which he 
now coasts.* ‘Oh. Nothing to do with 
tossing off then?’ ‘Well, connected 
with it, yes, but mere metaphorical 
than literal.’ ” 

Americans iniCTested in British ’elec- 
tions should not confuse the British 
slang verb wank, frequently associated 
with off, with the American slang noun 
wonk. lire latter may be rooted in the 
Chinese huang gou, “yellow dog,” 
noted in Herbert Allen Giles’s 1900 
glossary of Far East terms, perhaps 
recked up by sailors; wonkis defined m 
Frank Charles Bowen's 1929 “Sea 
Slang” as “a useless hand” and in a 
later naval slang work as a “mid- 
shipman. ”fn current use as a “nerdish 
grind,” wonk is a disparagement of 
excessive studiousness or c o ncern with 
minutiae, as in policy wonk (which 
Tories could accuse Blair, in the Clin- 
ton mold, of being). 

New York Tunes Service 


] WORLDLY GOODS: 
i A' New History of the 
! Renaissance 

| By Lisa Jardine, Illustrated. 470 pages. 

J $32 JO. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. 

7 Reviewed by 
{ Richard Bernstein 

W HEN the Portuguese navigator 
Ferdinand Magellan undertook 
j his fabled circumnavigation of the 
i world on behalfoftfae king of Spain, one 
ujf-the instruments he took with trim was 
a globe made by a former Gennan cloth 
merchant named Martin Behaim, who 
Stole some Of the precious info rmati on 
he needed to make It from a guarded, 
cartographic archive in Lisboa. 
t. The globe, which had tire latest in- 
- formation garnered from Portuguese ex- 
' plorations, was “cc^ottsiy^armotated, _ 
with insdijMbhs^etEiling me conunbd- ' 
'ities and tire nature of the business op- 
portunities at various key commercial 
■'locations in tire world.” 

Bebaim’s sphere, a beautiful dbjectin 
ritself, is an mem of evidence in: Lisa 
' Jardine’s reinterpretation of that fab- 
ulous epoch in human affairs known as 
'tire Renaissance. The globe’s mannfac- 
.ture was armed at insuring commercial 
„ ' success, and Jardme’s thesis in her ght- 
:reringW informational new book, 
‘“Warmly Goods,” is that tire restless 
’ quest fbr wealth and material possessions 
- was tee essential ingredient in tire zebxrfh 
‘of European civilization that took place 
in the mid- 15th to mid-16th centimes. 

1 Behaim’s globe was, in addition, tire 
product of a kind of enterprise that in- 


BOOiK 

volved not just a sea captain from Por- 
tn g al arid amaptnaker from Nuremberg 
but the wider international ex- 
change that ignored conventional 
boundaries and systems ofbelief. It was, 
in this sense, an artifact that prefigured 
the world today, especially what Jardine 
calls “our own exuberant nmfticultur- 

alfam and bravura rangmYv»ri«Tn ** 

Tn establishing .this th esis, Jardine, 
who is a professor of English at Queen 
MaryanoWestfield College, University 
of London, has written a fascinating 
book full of people, objects and events: 
often not tire people, objects and events 
tint are conventionally known about the 
Renaissance. Jardine’s interest is in 
what movie people might the back 
story, the trends, especially the com- 
mercial and economic ones, that gave 
rise to tire immortal works «nd the ti- 
tanic figures from the world of art and 
architecture that •are best rernembered 
today. • 

If there is a fanltin this approach, iris 
that Jardine piles op the evidence into 
such a large heap mat each individual 


There is a rambling, undifferentiated 
quality to this book, whose many actors 

lfrHrn^bifariine’s immense and seam^ 
less tableau than for their traits of char- 
acter. 

But “Wodtfiy Goods’* is nonetheless 
a notable achievement, less for Jar- 
dine’s reinterpretation, which is not 
startlingly origjnai, than for the depth 
imdridmessw tire historical panorama 
it presents. Her attention to the material 
side of firings, to the profusion of goods 


BRIDGE 


. By Alan Truscott 

'TN general, a declarer is wise 
JLto postpone as long as pos- 
-sible the play of a suit that 
I presents a problem. There is a 
-chance that helpful informa- 
tion might became available. 


'by leading the striL But there is 
one common situation in 
'which the reverse is (rue, as 
-Barry Rigal points out in his 
-new bock “Step-by-Step De- 
ceptive Declarer Kay.” 

When dummy has a K-J 
"combinati on and there are 
.small cards in the closed 


band, as in tire diagramed 
deal, a guess will be neces- 
sary sooner or later. Untyp- 
icafiy, sooner is better. 

Sooth is playing six dia- 
monds following a bride se- 
quence in which North has 
spumed an obvious opportu- 
nity to use Blackwood. The 
heart nine is led and won with 
dummy’s king. A routine 
player Would draw trumps 
and cash all tire major-suit 
winners before leading a dub 
from tire closed hand. 

But that makes tire defense 
very simple. If West has tire 
ace, he will duck promptly 
with tire certainty that there 


are no defensive tricks avail- 
able in the other suits. Now 
South has a complete guess, 
and wiH make his slam about 
half the time. 

An expert in the South seat 
will understand that clubs 
should be led quickly: He will 
cross to the diamond ace attire 
second trick and lead a dub. 
Now it is very difficult for 
West to duck smoothly. From 
his an g le . South could easily 
have a singleton club and a 
dock could be fatal. There 
could be an unavoidable loser 
in spades or trumps, and 
South’s only chance would be 
to steal tire club king. 


WEST 
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West leads the heart ntoe. 


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so Without thought 

57 Diving bird 

58 Chestnut or 
walnut 

50 Talk, talk, talk 
ao Unlock, in poetry 
oi Republicans, 


INTERNATIONAL 


China’s Neighbors Are Less Worried 


By Michael Richardson 

Inicmanortal Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Despite China’s 
rapid economic growth and military' 
modernization, Asian officials and oth- 
ers in the region say tire emerging giant 
is less of a threat than first feared. 

Two years after Beijing worried its 
neighbors by seizing Mischief Reef in 
the South China Sea from the Phil- 
ippines and nearly a year after it sent 
farther shock waves through the region 
by menacing Taiwan. Asia’s emerging 
giant is still- seen as a potential bully. 

But in a significant change of attitude, 
leaders here have pul the threat in a 
different perspective. 

“At present, when people refer to 
China as a great power, it is more dip- 
lomatic courtesy man reality.” said Lee 
Kuan Yew, tire Singaporean senior min- 
ister who frequently visits tire country 
for talks. 

Only by 2025, he said, would ffrina 
be “an economic heavyweight, with 
corresponding regional and global in- 
fluence.” 

Tensions between Beijing and Taipei 
have eased, but China’s large-scale war 
ga m es dose to Taiwan ahead of the 
island’s presidential elections in March 
showed major weaknesses in China's 
armed forces. 

“China’s defense budget and mil- 
itary capabilities started from a very low 
base, arid they still have a long way to go 
to acquire offensive capabilities,” said 
Jusuf Wanandi, chairman of the super- 
visory board of the Center for Strategic 
and International Studies in Indonesia. 

If efforts to engage China in mutually 
beneficial economic, political and se- 
curity ties failed, he said, and Beijing 
‘'does not play according to interna- 
tional and regional rules, she will suffer 
because a united front against her will 


definitely not be conducive for China’s 
modernization and development.” 

According to Asian officials and ana- 
lysis. a series of actions over tire last 
nine months by Beijing have helped to 
calm regional concerns that China 
might use its economic strength to 
quickly build dominant military muscle 
for use in winning the many territorial 
disputes ii has with its neighbors. 

fa an important gesture of cooperation, 
Beijing agreed to share with ihe PhiJ- 

S&SSSl member countries of 
the ASEAN Regional Forum to discuss 
confidence-building measures. 

When the forum — initiated by tire 
Association of South East Asian Nations 
— first met at ministerial level in 1994, 
C hi na was a reluctant participant in tire 
effort to defuse tensions and develop 
cooperative security arrangements. But 
officials said Beijing had since shown an 
increasingly positive approach. 

President Fidel Ramos of the Phil- 
ippines said recently that while Chinese 
officials continued to insist on their 
country’s indisputable sovereignty over 
the disputed Spratly Islands in the South 
China Sea, they were now ready to 
approach territorial disputes and con- 
flict over maritime rights and interests 
on the basis of international law. 

Taiwan, Vietnam. Malaysia and 
Brunei also claim all or parts of the 

» s, an area encompassing valuable 
gas fields and strategic shipping 
lanes that is far closer to Southeast Asia 
than to the Chinese mainland. 

Mr. Ramos said Beijing and Manila 
had agreed tn a code of corcluct in which 
both sides promised to settle their dispute 
over tire Spratlys, including Mischief 
Reef, without the use or threat of force. 

“Certainly, the atmosphere is better 
now than it was in early 1995." when 
China first occupied the reef, be said. 


“We must endeavor to integrate China 
into the Asia-Pacific community ; — 
economically through APEC, the Asia- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, 
and politically through the ASEAN Re- 
gional Forum — if we are to have en- 
during regional stability." 

In November, after attending the an- 
nual APEC summit meeting and making 
a state visit to the Philippines, President 
Jiang Zemin of China went to India and 
signed an agreement in which each side 
pledged not to attack each other across a 
disputed Himalayan border. They also 
agreed to pull back an unspecified num- 
ber of troops from the area. 

Dipankar Baneijee, a retired Indian 
army major-general who is co-director of 
the Institute for Peace and Conflict Stud- 
ies in New Delhi, said the agreement was 
“a powerful commitment towards peace 
ana comes close to a no-war pact 

Mr. Jiang’s visit, he added, was part 
of Beijing’s “ongoing attempt at im- 
proving bilateral relations with its 
neighbors, especially those with whom 
there are outstanding issues, such as 
Vietnam, the Central Asian republics 
and Russia.” 

China. Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz- 
stan and Ta jikistan reached an accord 
last month to reduce forces along their 
benders, after signing a treaty in April 
pledging not to attack each other and to 
give advance notice of any military ex- 
ercises in their frontier zones. 

“China's preoccupations are and will 
remain mainly domestic for a long time," 
Mr. Lee said, “ft needs good relations 
with its neighbors to be free to con- 
centrate on growth and development and 
to solve pressing problems of poverty, 
backwardness, and the uneven and un- 
equal growth between its coastal and 


that characterized the Renaissance and 
the varied energies expended in acquir- 
ing them, is an important explanatory 
complement to the many histories of tire 
period that have dwelt on its sublime 
works of art 

Jardine establishes her theme from 
tiie beginning with a lour of the Sains- 
bury Wing of the National Gallery in 
London. Here are the painting s that em- 
blemize the Renaissance as a “ ‘golden 
age restored,’ an age in which tire char- 
acteristic mood was a kind of lofty self- 
confidence, spiritual arrogance and an 
associated antique ideal ofAryan virtue 
or manliness.' f But, establishing her 
contrarian position, Jardine asks, 
“Why, then, do these paintings fail to 
live up to our expectations?” 

Her answer relates to her overall vi- 
sion of the Renaissance as a matter of 
avid fnafiBriaiigm rather fiimt sublime 
cultural achievement. 

Jardine’s subjects include the im- 
petuous development of tire internation- 
al trade io luxury goods, a trade that 
involved so powerral a profit motive 
that merchants and kings acquiesced in 
the conquest of Constantinople by die 
Ottoman Turks in 1453. so longas trade 
with tire East continued nnabared 
(which it did). She writes of the early 
development of book publishing, which 
she says was driven not so much by 
intellectuals interested in tire dissem- 
ination of ideas but by hardheaded print- 
ers looking to make money in a de- 
veloping new medium. 

Richard Bernstein is on the stetff of 
The New York Times. 




v * t t la W STS i 


y? $/> 


« We. 




The Orbiter lifting off Sunday from Chateau D’Oex, Switzerland. 


inland provinces. 

Such problems would take more than 
50 years to resolve, he added. 


Second Balloon 
Fails in Bid 
To Circle Globe 


CanpOedb) Our Fran Dispaxha 

GENEVA — A Swiss bid to circle 
the world in a balloon ended abruptly in 
the Mediterranean Sea on Sunday, just 
days after a British challenger, the en- 
trepreneur Richard Branson, narrowly 
escaped disaster in tire Algerian desert. 

Organizers said kerosene had leaked 
into the cabin, forcing the two pilots to 
abandon their flight less than six hours 
after they set out from the Swiss moun- 
tain resort of Chateau D’Oex. Kerosene 
is used to heat tire mixture of hot air and 
helium which allows die balloon to stay 
aloft 

The Orbiter balloon landed 30 ki- 
lometers (19 miles) south of the French 
town of Montpellier. Authorities sent a 
rescue helicopter to the scene. 

The two pilots, Bertrand Piccard of 
Switzerland and Wim Vers trae ten of 
Belgium, were “safe and sound,” said 
the sponsors, Breitling, in Geneva. 

The balloon was equipped with para- 
chutes in the event of an emergency 

landing . 

The two men had lifted off with die 
sunrise, hoping to circle the world in 
less than three weeks and so achieve die 
last unconquered feat of aviation. 

Their balloon was meant to head 
south toward Egypt and then pick up die 
fast jet stream winds. It aimed to be 
carried by the winds over the Himalayas. 
California and then back to Europe. 

But faced with breathing difficulties 
because of the kerosene, the two pilots 
decided to cut tireir losses and abort the 
journey, Breitling said. There were no 
immediate reports of damage to the bal- 
loon itself. 

“This failure a few days after Richard 
Branson's underlines again the diffi- 
culties” facing such projects, said Andre 
Roc hat, a spokesman for the trip. He said 
they “have to juggle technologies which 
are impossible to test in real conditions 
before they take off.” (AP, AFP) 


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Turned Tide 
In Spy Case 

RadtetemnglAnb 
Forced VW’s Hand 


By Edmund L. Andrews 

Wfw York Tunes Service 

RUSSELS HEIM, Germany — By 
the time be walked into a Washington 
law office last Tuesday for settlement 
negotiations, Jens Neumann, the chief 
lawyer for Volkswagen AG, knew 
who was bolding the cards: General 
Mourns Carp. 

For nearly four years, Mr. Neumann 
had been locked in a bitter and visceral 
legal battle with tbe rival automaker 
over accusations of industrial spying. 

As recently as a year ago, GM ap- 
peared to have been bogged down m 
bringing its case against Jose Ignacio 
Lopez de Arriortua, its former exec- 
utive whom it had accused of stesding 
thousands of documents when be de- 
fected to Volkswagen. 

pie turning point was GM's de- 
cision to take a chance last March and 
file a lawsuit against VW in Detroit that 
laid out in stunning detail how thou- 
sands of pages of documents allegedly 
taken by Mr. Lopez or bis assfiriatwe 
had contained confidential information 
about one of the most closely guarded 
subjects in the industry: what man- 
ufacturers pay for parts. The case also 
contended that Mr. Lopez had walked 
off with GM's secret plans for “Plant 
X*' a cost-efficient approach to as- 
sembling cars and trucks. 

By invoking tbe Racketeer-Influ- 
enced and Corrupt Organizations Act 
in some of its accusations. GM left 


Treading Carefully 


As GM aggressively pursued its lawsuit against 
Volkswagen, naming VW in connection with theft of 
corporate secrets, it worried about alienating 
consumers m Germany, one of its biggest markets. 


199S VEHICLE SALES IN THOUSANDS 


Germany 

Iglgi 




Soimm GM company reports 


SHARE OF CMS 
TOTAL SALES 


f i 4.5% 

:T\ 

■. ' 5 4.1% 

'v •v 

: f - ! n nv 


I 3E% 



flrmhmd hi,uir/S>ta>n 

Mr. Lopez, left, reveling in his role at Volkswagen before his exit, as VW’s chief, Mr. Piech, listened. 


VW open to triple damages if the U.S. 
charges held up in court. 

After that Lawsuit, and a series of 
court rulings brushing aside VW’s at- 
tempts to block a trial, settlement mtlrg 
began in earnest in September. 

By Thursday, both sides had a (teal. 
VW agreed in principle to pay GM 
$100 million, to buy at least $1 billion 
worth of GM parts over foe next seven 
years and to issue a statement that 
acknowledged GM's “concerns with 
respect to possible wrongdoing.” 

At its headquarters in Wolfsburg, 
Germany, Volkswagen executives 
were keeping a low profile but were 
clearly relieved to have reached a set- 
tlement that is only a fraction of the $3 
billion to $4 bUfian GM is said to have 
demanded. '"The compromise is a 
little- cloud on an otherwise bright 
sky,” a Volkswagen representative, 
Klaus Kooks, said Friday. 

Meanwhile, . Mr. Lopez, who 
resigned from VW several weeks ago 
and has been out of sight for months, 
will probably face a criminal trial later 
this year in Germany. Volkswagen, 
which had long insisted that it had 


never received any documents, has 
agreed to send GM back whatever is 
left from Mr. Lopez's hoard. 

“There really is no dispute any 
longer foal he took our confidential 
documents,” said Thomas Gooschalk, 
GM's general counsel. “They recog- 
nize that foai occurred.” 

The civil suit may also have gal- 
vanized German prosecutors. After 
mulling over foe evidence for nearly 
three years, they let it be known in 
October that they would probably be 
filing charges against Mr. Lopez and 
several of his associates. 

But foe conflict also posed a ticklish 
choice for GM, which may have had a 
great deal to do with its own eagerness 
to sign a peace pact. 

Put simply, the risk was that GM 
might win the battle against Volks- 
wagen but lose the war for consumers 
in Germany and elsewhere in Europe. 

GM's Adam Opel AG subsidiary 
manufactures 700,000 automobiles in 
Germany, second only to Volks- 
wagen. But if die company became 
branded as an American bully , foe cost 
to its image could have far outweighed 


the gains from a legal victory. If foe 
fight had actually reached the 
courtroom, Volkswagen would un- 
doubtedly have rallied tremendous 
political support in Germany. 

“We were right to bring the civil suit," 
said David Herman, chief executive of 
Opel “But it was never our interest to 
destroy Volkswagen, and we would nev- 
er have allowed it to happen." 

Peter Heckel. a lawyer who fought 
many of GM's court battles in Ger- 
many, put things more bluntly. 

“We always had to negotiate with 
one eye on the market,” be said. 

■ VW Backs Chief Executive 

Volkswagen on Sunday reaffirmed 
its confidence in its chief executive, 
Ferdinand Piech, and pledged to ex- 
tend his contract until 2003, Reuters 
reported from FranJrfurt 

“ Piech helped to bring about” foe 
GM settlement and was fully behind 
carrying it through.” foe head of the 
VW supervisory board, Klaus Uesen, 
said in an interview with foe Welt am 
Sonntag newspaper. 4 'There is no doubt 
that his contract will be extended” 


Seoul Faces Struggle Over Finance- Sector Reform 


Reuters 

SEOUL — Tbe government of South 
Korea, battling striking workers over 
, labor reform, also will face a struggle to 
cany out a restructuring of the finance 
sector needed to lift the sagging econ- 
omy, analysts said Sunday . . - - 

President Kim Young Sam said test 
week foot tbe heavily regulated sector 
urgently needed reform to bring it line 
wShglobal trends. He said a Committee 
for Financial Reform would be set up to 
draft proposals to improve competit- 
iveness. 

But analysts said Mr. Kim would face 
stiff opposition from powerful bureau- 
crats. 

“Almighty government officials will 
not give up their control easily,” said 
Koo Kyxmg of Dongwon Economic Re- 
search Institute. 

“Financial reforms have been a 
buzzword since Kim's inauguration in 
1993,” said Lee Hahn Kn, president of 
Daewoo Research Institute. “But tbe 
refreshed (^ftorefonn shows Kim has 


done fittle so far to improve tire financial 
industry.” 

Government officials said initial 
measures would cut interest rates, fol- 
lowed by more sweeping steps, such as 
foe scaling back of business barriers 
anteng'finaDcM-tostittitioos. 

To nnfoer open markets, economists 
have sai d, financial sector mergers and 
acquisitions will eventually be allowed 
Mr. Kim said foe committee would 

end of^tarchand a medium- and long- 
term plan at the end of the year. 

The Finance Ministry unveiled a com- 
prehensive schedule of reform in 1993. 
giving greater autonomy to banking in- 
stitutions so they could become more 
competitive. But not much has been 
accomplished since then, analysts said 
‘‘Banks continue to be remote-con- 
trolled by the ministry and foreed to be 
responsible for the Mure of the non- 
f friwnqial companies,” said Yoon Suk 
Eton of Korea Institute of Finance. 

Asa result, banks have been saddled 


with mounting nonperfomnng loans. No 
figures were immediately available. 

Tbe government's control over the 
financial sector stems from the 1960s. 
when South Korea used banks to chan- 
nel cash it raised overseas to industries 
deemed strategic to national develop- 
ment. 

Seoul has been under international 
pressure to liberalize its financial reg- 
ulations to allow more foreign invest- 
ment on foe stock market, which plunged 
last year during an economic slowdown 
prom p te d by falling export growth. 

A Daewoo Research report said eco- 
nomic growth would slow to 5.5 percent 
this year, against its original forecast of 
S.9 percent, if production losses from 
strikes over a controversial new labor 
tew match those of 19S9 strikes. Tbe 
economy grew an estimated 7 percent in 
1996. 

The new tew allows companies to lay 
off workers and hire temporary workers 
to break strikes, shattering a jobs- for- 
life tradition in South Korea. 


Official figures issued Saturday show 
production losses due to the three-week- 
old strikes bad reached $2 billion and 
export losses were at $345 million. 

■ Banks* Reserve Rate to Be Cut 

The Bank of Korea, South Korea's 
central bank, said it planned to cut foe 
bank reserve requirement ratio by about 
2 percentage points as part of its efforts 
to lower market interest rates and stim- 
ulate the economy. Bloomberg Busi- 
ness News reported from Seoul. 

A bank spokesman confirmed a report 
quoting Governor Lee Kyung Staik as 
saying he planned the reduction, to 3-5 
percent, in the first quarter. 

Analysts say a lower reserve ratio will 
cat interest payment costs for many 
Korean companies. Such costs, die gov- 
ernment says, are much higher than for 
Taiwanese and Japanese companies. 

The central bank test cut the reserve 
ratio — the percentage of deposits com- 
mercial banks must keep at the bank to 
protect depositors — in November. 


Time for Talk Is Over 
For Japanese Leader 

Tokyo Investors Want to See 
Swift Action to Prop Up Markets 


By Velisarios Katioulas 

[nJr manorial Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryu taro 
Hashimoto will find that the sharp de- 
cline in Japanese share prices has vaulted 
to the top of the list of issues demanding 
his attention when he returns Tuesday 
after a week-long trip to Southeast Asia. 

Amid signs that confidence is waning 
in Mr. Hashimoto 's ability to steer Japan 
smoothly out of its doldrums, tbe stock 
market Last week suffered its sharpest 
weekly drop since September 1990. 

Financial markets are also urgently 
awaiting Mr. Hashimoto’s response to 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

fears about a tax-and-spend draft budget 
unveiled last month, foe impact of re- 
form on the country's beleaguered fi- 
nancial system and' the health of tbe 
broader economy. 

“The next three months are going to 
be tough for Hashimoto because he has 
to pass the budget, and he ‘s going to be 
bombarded with conflicting demands,” 
said Christopher RedI, analyst at ING 
Barings. 

On Friday, government leaders had 
little to say in Mr. Hashimoto's absence as 
foe benchmark Nikkei 223 Stock Average 
ended 770-22 points lower, or down 4.26 
percent, at 1/303.65, leaving it down 
more than 2.000 points for the week. 

Afraid share prices could suffer more 
declines this week, foe country's busi- 
ness leaders, its fractured opposition 
parties and, analysts say, members of Mr. 
Hashimoto's own Liberal Democratic 
Party have called on die prime minister to 
act swiftly after be returns from his trip to 
limh the stock market's impact on tbe 
economy. Mr. Hashimoto has visited 
Brunei, Malaysia, Indonesia, Vietnam 
and Singapore to outline the country's 
policy on the Asia-Pacific region. 

Analysts say the economic recovery 
is so fragile that any miscalculation in 
government policy could send Japan 
back into recession. 

Mr. Hashimoto came to power a year 
ago and since tbe start of his second term 
in November he has repeatedly pledged 
to slash a ballooning budget deficit and 
deregulate the financial sector and the 
rest of the economy. He has praised the 
draft budget as a bold first step to im- 
plement iris planned reforms. 

But investors in Japanese shares saw 
little difference between the latest and 
past draft budgets. Their response was 
to go on the offensive, selling shares and 
pressing Mr. Hashimoto for fewer 
words and bolder actions. 

Tbe stock market started its slide after 
the cabinet's approval last month of a 
Finance Ministry draft budget for the 12 
months starting April 1. It contains tax 
rises of 7 trillion yen ($603 billion) and 
government spending increases on pro- 
jects with tittle perceived benefit for the 
broader economy of 3 trillion yen. 


But stock market investors, the busi- 
ness community and its bureaucrats 
were at odds over what should be given 
most priority in the budget: deficit re- 
duction or deregulation and economic 
growth. Mr. Redl said. 

Among the Finance Ministry offi- 
cials who drafted Japan's budgets there 
is a sense of urgency about cutting the 
national debt, which at around 400 tril- 
lion yen is seen as being out of controL 

Yet foe business community and 
stock market investors fear that foe Fi- 
nance Ministry's emphasis on raising 
taxes and cutting spending to lower foe 
budget deficit is misplaced and that foe 
economy needs tax cuts and deregu- 
lation to shrug off the pessimism. 

"What the economy needs is for the 
government to abolish taxes on share 
and land transactions and to drop its ban 
on holding companies,’ ' said Nobuyuki 
Nakahara, honorary chairman of Tonen 
Corp., an oil company. 

Mr. Hashimoto has also come under 
attack from opposition parties and from 
young members of bis own party. 

“There are concerns that the budget 
formed under the initiative of the Lib- 
eral Democratic Party has turned back 
the clock,” said Yukio Hatoyama, a co- 
leader of the Democratic Party. “At a 
time when afinancial crisis is seen to be 
emerging, politicians cannot just sit 
back and watch.” 


Fed’s Lindsey 
Sees Recession 
Ahead for U.S. 


Bloomberg Business News 

WASHINGTON — The United 
Stales will face a recession at some 
point in the future, a departing Federal 
Reserve Board governor, Lawrence 
Lindsey, said Sunday. 

“There will be a recession, I don’t 
know when it will happen.” Mr. Lind- 
sey said in a television interview. The 
Feld’s job, he said, “is to have an ex- 
pansion that’s as long as possible.’ ’ 

Mr. Lindsey will leave the Fed on 
Feb. 5. creating a second vacancy for 
President Bill Clinton to fill on the U.S. 
central bank’s board. Another Fed gov- 
ernor, Janet Yellen, has been appointed 
by Mr. Clinton to bead his Council of 
Economic Advisers. 

Mr. Lindsey said the U.S. economy 
was entering its seventh year of ex- 
pansion. “You want to try and prevent 
any excesses from building up in foe 
economy," he said. “I think we’ve 
done our job on the monetary front, and 
so far there have been no major mistakes 
on foe fiscal side." 


hi-' 


An Automated Way to Search the Web 


Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON— It 
seems to be a re- 
quirement these 
days: A company of any size 
must have a site mi tbe World 
Wide Web. Ofteai the material 
placed there is up-to-foe- 
. minute data of instant use to 
cus tom ers — fKgbt sched- 
ules, tbe delivery status of a 
package shipped a day earlier, 
stock prices. 

But so far there has been a 
real drawback in how tbe 
technology works. To get a 


specific piece of information, 
a human generally must con- 
nect to tire site and look for 
the data, one piece at a time.. 
Automation hardly exists. 
There is rid easy way, say, for 
a computer to query a Web 
site about how 100 different 
stocks are doing. 

Now .in a development that 
has many corporate computer 
programmers intrigued, a 
small software firm in Vir- 
ginia called TransadNet has 
released software designed to 
change that. It bolds open the 


Bens of information requests 
on the Web thatnow are done 


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slowly, manually, one at a 
time. 

"Tbe Web is a giant re- 
pository of data,” saidTrans- 
actNers founder and presi- 
dent, Phillip Merrick. “But 
accessing that data hasn’t 
been easy.” 

The implications are pro- 
found, computer experts say. 
For example, a company that 
sends thousands of overnight 
shipments every day could 
use TransactNet’s software to 
connect its computers to Fed- 
eral Express Corp/s Web site 
to automatically check the de- 
livery status of each parcel. 
There would be no need for 
rate person, to query that she 
over and over, each time typ- 
ing in the tracking number of 
a different package. 

Other companies, Mr. 
Merrick said, could use tbe 
software to automatically get 
any information from the 

At foe heart of Transact- 
Net’s software are complicat- 
ed instructions that help a 


Java was introduced with 
great fanfare two years ago. 
Much of its claim to fame is 
that small prog ra ms written in 
the language, called "applets,” 
can run on different types of 
computers connected to the 
same network. But so far Java’s 
main use has been to create 
simple animation cm Web 
screens — a waving banner in 
an ad is created by a small Java 
p ro g ram that has been sent 
from the Web she and runs on 
the user's computer. 

TransadNet plans to formal- 
ly unveil its software product, 
called Web Interface Toolkit, 
later this month, Mr. Merrick 
said. Already, more than 2XKX) 
people have picked up free test 
awies from the company’s 
Web site, and many of them 
have started using it to build 


die Web, separating the elec- 
tronic wheat from foe chaff. 
TransadNet’ s software is 
among foe first applications 
to use Java, foe industry’s, 
hottest new programming 
technology, for sophisticated 
computing. 


The software is not intended 
for hone conmuter owners. 
Before the software can be 
used, it must be customized to 
a particular company's needs, 
with several thousand more 
lines of programming. Tbe 
pric* isn't right for home users, 
either — customers will have 
topay TransadNet $2300 for 
each application they develop 
using foe Web Interface 
Tbdlkit, Mr. Merrick said. 

Internet address: 
CyberScape@iht.com. 


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PAGE 12 




CAPITAL MARKETS ON MONDAY 


Grim Bond Traders Look to Sales Data 


CVw y«/«! fn On- Sufi Firm Dupahrt 

NEW YORK — Treasury bond 
traders will look to December retail sales 
data for direction this week, after prices 
plunged Friday on surprisingly upbear 
December U.S. employment data. 

The price of the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond fell 1 14/32 point last 
week, to 95 20/32, with much of that 
drop coming Friday. The yield finished 
Friday at 6.84 percent, having begun the 
week at 6.73 percent. 

Investors, who had waited for the jobs 
report since New Year's, were surprised 
by the decided show of strength in non- 
farm payroll, which increased by 262.000 
jobs, and especially by a 0-5 percent 
increase in average hourly earnings. 

The rise in wages, a key component of 
inflation, was more than twice what ana- 
lysts had forecast, and followed a 0.8 
percent gain in November. The increase 
for all of 1996 was 3.8 percent. 

“'A lot of economists were looking for 


a downward revision of hourly earnings. 
Not only did they not get this, but they 
got another rise,” said Anthony Chan, 
chief economist at Banc One Investment 
Advisors. “It dealt the damaging 
blow," he added, to any bond-friendly 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

suggestion that the Federal Reserve 
Board would soon ease interest rates. 

Even though the holiday shopping 
season failed to live up to retailers’ high 
hopes, analysts forecast that the Decem- 
ber retail statistics would not be weak 
enough to revive hopes of lower rates. 

The most likely outlook is for Treas- 
ury prices to keep falling, most traders 
and investors said. 

David Rosenberg of Oppenheimer & 
Co. said the recent data indicated higher 
interest rates, but he said he did not 
expect a series of Fed increases, as in 
1994. Thus, he predicted, the yield on 


the 30-year Treasury bond was likely to 
challenge 7 percent, and probably reach 
725 percent, over the near term. 

"Strong numbers and thoughts of Fed 
tightening will still keep the market under 
pressure next week.” said John Ryding 
of Bear Steams & Co. But he predicted 
that effect would fade by the time the 
benchmark yield hit 7.04 percent 
Jan Terbrueggen of John Nuvceo <t 
Co. also predicted higher yields in the 
short term. “I’m afraid there’s nothing 
technical that shows any kind of stop this 
side of a 720 percent” yield for the 30- 
year bond, he said. 

Some analysts said they also would 
focus on another report due next week, 
the consumer price index for December. 
They planned to focus on the energy 
components of die index after the pro- 
ducer price index for the month rose 0.5 
percent, with most of that rise linked to a 
jump in energy prices. 

(Bridge News, Market News) 


Most Active International Bands 


The 250 most active international bonds traded 
Ihraugh the Euroctear system tor the week end- 
ing Jan. 10. Prices supplied by Tetekurs. 


Rnk Nose 

Cpa 

Maturity Price 

YieM 

Austrian Schilling 

224 Austria 

6*% 

0*2905 1061500 

6.4800 

Belgian Franc 

125 Belgium 

9 

03/28/03 1195600 

74400 

1 73 Belgium 

ID 

08TCAJ0 118-6000 

84300 

British Pound 

147 Britain 

7V% 

12/07/06 994313 

74700 

154 UBS London 

B 

01/0807 99.0000 

0.0600 

168 Britain 

7 

H/OcVOI 98-7500 

7JJ900 

211 Abbey Natl TS 

6 

OO/lOm 97.1250 

61800 

246 Salomon 

6906 11/26/01 99.6900 

69300 

Danish Krone 

6 Denmark 

B 

OCT S/06 109.4600 

74100 

29 Denmark 

9 

11/15/00 1135600 

7.9100 

35 Denmark 

8 

11/15/01 111.0500 

75000 

39 Denmark 

9 

11/15/98 1084500 

82800 

46 Denmark 

7 

11/10/24 934400 

7.4800 

51 Denmark 

7 

12/15/04 103.9500 

67300 

57 Denmark 

6 

12/1W99 1 03. 8500 

5.7800 

65 Denmark 

7 

11/1V07 101.4900 

69000 

69 Denmark 

B 

0CT5/03 110.6000 

723CO 

83 Denmark 

7 

02/15/98 103.4800 

67600 

110 Denmark 

6 

11/lSm 101.7000 

19000 

135 Denmark 

7 

08/15/97 101.9200 

68700 

146 Denmark 

6 

02/15/99 103J800 

5.7800 

loO Denmark 

zero 

044)1/97 99.2275 

3-1700 

Deutsche Mark 


Rnk None 

81 Treuhand 
Si Germany 

85 Treuhand 

86 Germany 
92 Germany 
94 Germany 
96 Germany 

96 Cop Credit Card 
101 Treuhand 
106 Germany 
109 Germany 
7 74 Germany 
116 Germany 
llSGermany 
HFTreuhand 
121 Germarry 
123 Treuhand 
130 Germany 
136 BA Credit Card 
148 Germany 

150 Germany 

161 Germany 
169 Treuhond 
177 BGB Fin Ireland 
ISO Germany 
184 Germany 

186 Germany 

187 Treuhond 

188 Germany 
192 Germany 
199 Germany 
220 Nordrheinwest 
221 Germany 

228 Austria 

229 Salomon Bias 

233 Germany 

234 Germany 

235 Bavaria 

237 Denmark 

238 Mexico 
249 Germany 


Cpn Maturity Price Yield Rnk Nome 


Cpa Maturity Price Yield 


6U 07/29/99 
bi* oaai/oo 

11/12/03 
09/22/97 
10/21/02 
6*<* 09/IS99 
5W 02/22/99 
54k 08/15/01 
6(6 tarnm 
02/24/99 
0 3/20/97 
02/25/98 
8*« 01/20/97 
5W 10/20/98 
S 3 - 04/29/99 
6*% 05/20/98 
6V» 06/25/98 
zero 01/17/97 

6 11/15/05 
6*1 05/02/03 

10/20/97 
08/20/97 
01/14/99 
10/04/01 
05/22/00 
6*6 08/14/98 
6W 05/2099 

7 11/25/99 
51* 05/2097 
7*2 02/21/00 
6*6 01/2Q/98 

6 12/2Q/06 
5*6 09/20/16 
6Vi 0I/KV24 
12/10/97 
6W 02/20/98 
6(6 03/2098 
5*8 01/08/09 
4*a 01/07/02 
fill 09/7<KM 
<51* 01/02/99 


6 

8 

7*2 


67/6 

8 

SI* 


714 

5*6 

5 

5*6 

8*2 


105.9500 
1135700 
1025514 
1035600 
1 71X2025 
1075800 
103.7467 
102.1566 
1035500 
1065600 
1005900 
102.1900 
100.1000 
103.1400 
3045500 
104.0600 
1018950 
99.9670 
101.0000 
1065000 
1030600 
1015200 
1025020 
102.0400 
1119100 
1045400 
1014900 
1012500 
1008100 
11045 
103.1300 
912100 
819620 
9511000 

1012500 

1035100 

90.1658 

99.7000 

>017000 

1055000 


5.9000 

74800 

58300 

75500 

65800 

62900 

5.1800 
55100 

5.9300 
64500 

7.9300 
5.1400 
13700 
5.0900 
55000 
6.1300 
5.9000 
15200 
5.9400 
65300 
7.0300 
54600 
48600 
55700 
78800 
6.1000 
58101 
64700 
54600 
7.0000 

6.1800 
6.1100 
65200 
68300 

60500 

5.9300 
5.9600 
4J600 
7.9100 
61600 


156 France B.T.A.N. 5% 
163 France OAT 7 Vj 
216 France OAT 8W 
231 France OAT 7* 
243 France B.TJLN. 4*4 


03/12/98 1017900 55900 
04/25/05 1124300 68700 
02/27/04 116.7200 7.0700 
04/25/06 1103400 65700 
04/12/99 1015400 4.6300 


Italian Lira 

167 Italy 
194 Italy 

if 

7.4200 

81500 

Japanese Yen 

162 Fufl Inti 
196 ADB 
198 Spain 
242 Worid Bank 

02/01/02 

3V% 06/29/05 1034750 
110 09/2006 102.7500 
41% (WHVD3 1141% 

III 

Portuguese Escudo 

209 Madeira 

07/1 0/06 


Spanish Peseta 

232 Spain 

880 04/3006 1125560 

74300 

Swedish Krona 

102 Sweden 
113 Sweden 1036 
145 Sweden 
182 Sweden 

11 01/21/99 1114880 9.7800 
1016 05/05/00 1154980 88700 
13 06/15/01 126877010.0900 
6 02/09/05 97.1040 61800 

U.S. Dollar 


Dutch Guilder 


? Germany 

2 Germany 

3 Germany 

4 .Germany 

5 Germany 

6 Germany 
9 Germany 

10 Germany 

11 Treuhand 

12 Germany 

13 Treuhand 

14 Germany 

15 Germany 

16 Germany 

18 Germany 

19 Germany 

20 Treuhand 

21 Germany 

22 Treuhand 

23 Treuhand 

24 Treuhand 

25 Germany 

26 Germany 
28 Treuhand 

30 Germany 

31 Germany 

32 Treuhand 

33 Germany 

36 Germany 

37 Germany 

41 Germany 

42 Germany 

43 Germany 

44 Germany 

45 Treuhand 

48 Germany 

49 Germany 

50 Germany 

55 Germany 

56 Treuhand 
58 Germany 

60 Germany 

61 Germany 

62 Germany 

63 Germany 

64 Germany 

66 Treuhand 

67 Germany 

72 Spain 

73 Treuhond 

74 Germany 

75 Germany 

76 Germany 

77 Germany 

78 Germany 

79 Germany 

80 Germany 


6<« 062606 
6'* 10/14/05 
7*% 01/03/05 
8 01/21/02 
05/12/05 
09/20/01 
05/200) 
05/21/01 
09/09,04 
DJ/KWJ6 
6Vb 07/09/03 
07/22/02 
09/) sm 
08/22/00 
07/20/00 
020606 
06/11/03 
12/18/98 
05/13/04 
12 / 02/02 
01/29/03 
07/1 503 
08/20/01 
07/01/99 
11/1 UM 
11/21/00 
1001/02 
12/22/97 
01/04/24 
07/21/97 
02/2101 
I (WWW 
10/20/97 
04/2203 
042303 
02/2001 
03/1500 
122000 
8*9 052101 
616 030404 
71% 12/20/02 
zero 04/18/97 

9 mown 

«% 01/20*98 
5* 08/20/98 
5*6 11/20/97 
5 12/17/98 

5*% 05/1500 
5*4 01/0307 
5%i 09/24/98 


6'% 

5 

5 

7>* 

6 


316 

5*» 

8*4 

6 

69* 

3V4 

614 

7*k 

7V% 

6Vi 

8*4 

6 *% 

m 

5V» 

7** 

7 

6b 

814 

514 

9 

7*6 

6*4 

61% 

81% 

6'4 

SHr 


7 

6 

6 

69% 

6 

614 


m/i 300 
0620/16 
02/20/98 
1202/98 
09/1503 
07/15AU 


2.995 09/3004 


102.1880 

103.9417 

IIOJMOO 

11245 

1066767 

114.0800 

101.7900 

101.9050 

1104633 

1004560 

1065525 

113.8900 

1001300 

1046700 

114.1900 

1004180 

107.7283 

99.9900 

1065371 

110.7400 

1095600 

1067700 

1160600 

1060500 

110.9300 

1025900 

1125067 

1015100 

93.0767 

1024000 

1024025 

H&5400 

1035500 

1075020 

105.9450 

1145900 

1069400 

1164800 

1145000 

1034500 

109.5500 

994314 

1160900 

1(04000 

1(06600 

101.7500 

1027400 

1054900 

967000 

1105700 

1085000 

93.1000 

1029800 

1060700 

1035783 

1065480 

99.1300 


61200 

62500 

67000 

74500 

64400 

74300 

49100 

49100 

67700 

5.9700 

62300 

74200 

35000 

64900 

7.6600 

5.9BDD 

63800 

35000 

65400 

66600 

65200 

61500 

75400 

64100 

67600 

54000 

64900 

67600 

67100 

84400 

5.1100 

7.7900 

74600 

62900 

61400 

7.4300 
60800 
74900 
75300 
60200 
6500 0 
24900 
7.7500 
64100 
55500 
5.1600 
44700 
55900 
5.9500 

5.4300 
64600 
64400 
54300 
64800 
54000 
65400 
3.0200 


27 Netherlands 
52 Netherlands 
88 Netherlands 
93 Netherlands 
95 Netherlands 
97 Netherlands 

104 Netherlands 

105 Netherlands 

107 Netherlands 

108 Netherlands 
112 Netherlands 
115 Netherlands 
117 Netherlands 
122 Netherlands 
124 Netherlands 
134 Netherlands 
138 Netherlands 

151 Netherlands 

152 Netherlands 
158 Netherlands 
164 Netherlands 
176 Netherlands 
178 Netherlands 
185 Netherlands SP 
190 Netherlands 
193 Netherlands 

201 Netherlands 

202 Netherlands 

203 Netherlands 
236 Netherlands 


07/15/98 
01/15/06 
01/15/01 
01/15/23 
OCT 5/01 
OCT 5/99 
09/15/01 
02/15/00 
09/15/02 
04/15/10 
06/1 5/02 
06/15/05 
04/15/03 
05/1 SAW 
01/15/04 
07/01/00 
asoi/oo 
02/15/99 
01/15/00 
02/15/07 
11/15/05 
zero 03/27/97 
7*% 06/15/99 
zero 01/15/23 
81% 06/01/06 
10/01/04 
11/15/99 
02/1 SAB 
02/15/02 
07/15/98 


6to 

6 

9 

71% 

81% 

7 

8 ** 

m 

5*6 

7*s 

81* 

7 

6Vs 

9 

5*6 

9 

8b 

6b 

7*6 

8b 

6b 


7b 

7*% 

7 

Bid 

6 'h 


104.1000 

101.8000 

1163000 

11140 

1144000 

1069500 

116*6 

111.9500 
103.4500 

112*6 
1 15V? 
1084500 
1069000 
1144000 

101.9500 
1161000 
1 134500 
1062500 
1104S00 

II8.20 

1069000 

994825 

70815500 

166500 

11940 

1104000 

1094500 

1094500 

1161000 

1044500 


60000 
54900 
74400 
67100 
7.4000 
65500 
7.4900 
74700 
65600 
64500 
7.1400 
64400 
60800 
74400 
54400 
74200 
74900 
63500 
7.0200 
69800 
63100 
2.9000 
69100 
7.1300 
7.1200 
65600 
68500 
63800 
7.1 7D0 
62200 


7 Brazil Cop 6L 
17 Argentina FRN 
34 Brazil 
38 Brazil L 
40 Argentina par L 
47 Mexico 

53 Venezuela par A 

54 Venezuela 
68 Brazil S3! 

70 Italy 

71 Bulgaria 
82 Brazfl SJL 
87 Mexico 

89 Mexico par A 

90 Argentina L 

91 Medea par B 

99 Mexico D 

100 Brazil par Z1 
103 Worid Bank 
111 Sallle Mae 
129 Argentina 

131 E1B 

132 Bulgaria 

133 Credit Lyonnais 
137 Ecuador par 

139 Ecuador 

140 Mydfa Trust 
141 MBL lull Fin 
144 Brazfl 6L 
149 Russia 

153 Mexico C 
155 Poland 


4V, 

6 % 
6Vt 
616 
5b 
nv% 
6b 
zero 
61% 
6V» 
6 'Vie 
69* 
79b 
6b 
6 *% 
6b 
6352 
5 

668 

4V% 

5>y* 

zero 

6Vn 

6*% 

3b 

3 

6V* 

3 

6*. 

9b 

6 *% 

4 


157 Brazil Cbond 6L 4V% 


ECU 


59 France OAT 
120 France B.T.A.N. 
126 France OAT 
127UKT-nc4e 

142 Britain 

143 France OAT 
IMUKT-nofe 
774 ttaJyCfe 
175 France OAT 
1B9 France B.TA.N. 
797 France OAT 
197 France OAT 
200 France B.TA.N. 
218UK T-nate 

240 Kommunlnvesl 

244 holy 

245 Holy 

248 France OAT 
250 Italy 


7 

7b 

7V= 

5 

9b 

6 

8 

645 

9Vi 

6 

70 

6b 

5 

5b 

9 

4.Q31 

716 

8b 

9b 


04/25/06 
03/1098 
04/25/05 
01/26/99 
02/2T All 
04/25/04 
01/27/98 
09/2tflB 
04/25/00 
03/16/01 
02/26/01 
04/25/02 
03/16/99 
01/21/97 
06/09199 
10/304)5 
07/26/99 
04/25/22 
03/07/11 


1045000 

1(05100 

1092500 

101-2450 

115b 

1008000 

103.86 25 

101-3000 

1143000 

1043300 

118-3000 

1064000 

1016300 

100.0100 

1095000 

99-0400 

1014500 

1112983 

1235000 


67000 

7.0000 

68600 

694Q0 

7.9000 

69500 

7.7000 

64200 

8J1Q0 

67600 

04500 

63400 

69200 

62500 

82200 

60700 

7.2500 

73800 

7.4900 


French Franc 


128 France OAT 


6b 10/25/03 1065100 62200 


159 Argentina 
765 Mexico 

170 Fenwrie State 

171 Poland 
772 Ontario 
179 Mexico A 
181 Mexico 
183 EIB 

195 Ontario 
204 Nigeria 
206 Wachovia BJr 

206 Italy A 

207 Bank America 

208 Argentina 
210 Argenta rfc 
212 Panama 
213ArgenMna 

214 Bk Nova Scotia 

21 5 Venezuela 
217 Argentina 
219 Canada 

222 Dean Witter 

223 Associates 

225 Bulgaria 

226 Forenlngstoteji 
2Z7 Brazfl 

230 Bay LB zent 
239 BOC Group 
241 Venezuela B 
247 Natl Aust Bk 


11 

M* 

91% 

61% 

7** 

6453 

11*% 

71% 

7*% 

6b 

7 

6 

zero 

m 

6*% 

4 

9b 

6473 

67* 

5546 

6V% 

$W* 

6b 

2b 

6335 

m 

61% 

SVt 

6b 

zero 


04/1504 
(XV29AJ5 
01/01/01 
04/154)6 
03/31/23 
Q5/15/26 
03/31/20 
12/184)7 
04/15/24 
09/27/23 
07/28/11 
04/15/12 
O&AK/Ol 
12/31/19 
03/31/23 
12/31/19 
12/20/19 
04/15/24 
09/27/99 
06/02/99 
04AJ1/D1 
11/06/26 
07/28/24 
12/31/99 
02/28/25 
02/28/15 
09/154)7 
11/304X2 
04/I5A19 
11/27/01 
12/31/19 
1007/14 
04/15/14 
1009/06 
021064)1 
07/06/09 
10/27/24 
06/04/Q2 
12/31/19 
09/15/16 
09/1806 
m/27/03 
11/15/20 
1007,08 
01/1001 
m/29/97 
12/2003 
02/14/06 
07/17/16 
02/234)1 
12/16/99 
03/31A>7 
12/28/99 
05/30450 
104)502 
10/31/01 
07/28/12 
12/1603 
11AJV01 
11/1 woi 
01/29/01 
03/31/20 
044)7/97 


78.0224 67)00 
84.9542 75000 
97.3760 66800 
885880 7-3400 
615120 64900 
105-5000 10.9000 
749000 9.0100 
875000 

78^4010 85900 
917500 75300 
505750 135800 
775980 64500 
1007500 7.5100 
72.7917 8-5900 
769510 85800 
72.7880 85900 
875796 7.2700 
614760 85000 
975421 55400 
960000 46900 
1217000 46000 
135000 75800 
55552011.9700 
965800 67300 
455450 7.1200 
625210 47800 
87.1600 75700 
1010000 19100 
812500 7.9800 
955750 94500 
875615 75000 
83-5260 47900 
816052 64500 
1017500 10.7100 
1010000 94700 
117*% 7.7600 
975240 66700 
1055500 7-3600 
875260 75700 
1055500 105100 
1016250 6M00 
1035500 7.1400 
675150 95800 
995500 7.0500 
985750 61000 


911250 

911250 

785000 

10Q-5000 

995100 

89.1023 

366750 

101-0000 

1004600 

99.7500 

375240 

995200 

99.6250 

995750 

975500 

748125 

967000 


69900 

65500 

61000 

95000 

54800 

75200 

155900 

64400 

69100 

67700 

69800 

63800 

69100 

65100 

60400 

9.0200 

55100 


The Week Ahead s World Economic Calendar. Jan. 13-17 

A ocftvtMo atttva meeka ocontmlcsnd Rnanoal wonts, oompBad tor tt*a kMmatkjnaJ HaraM TUbune OyBtoamdotgBuiUnasaNows. 


Asia-Pacific 

Expected Tokyo: The government will set up 
This Week a panel to discuss measures to cut 
Japan's deficit; Machine Tool 
Builders Association machine tool 
order figures for November. 


Europe 

Geneva:Trade Minister Sh'mji Sato 
of Japan meets with Renato Rug- 
giero, director-general of the World 
Trade Organization ; The Japanese 
official also will meet with the Eu- 
ropean Union trade commissioner. 
Sir Leon Brittan, and Germany’s eco- 
nomics minister, Guenter RexrodL 


Americas 

Fayetteville, North Carolina: An- 
nual Pork Producers conference 
and trade show, Cumberland Coun- 
ty Agricufture Expo Center. 

New York: National Retail Feder- 
ation’s annua) convention and expo, 
Jacob Javtts Convention Center. 


Monday Tokyo: Finance Ministry releases 
Jan. 13 current account figures for Novem- 
ber and merchandise trade figures 
for the first 20 days of December; 
Electronic industry Association of 
Japan releases color TV and VCR 
shipment figures for November. 


Basel, Switzerland: Hans Tietmey- 
er, president of the Bundesbank, 
leads monthly meeting of Group of 
10 central bank governors. 


Ottawa: Statistics Canada reports 
November building permits and 
November new motor vehicle sales. 
Washington: Agriculture Depart- 
ment releases its weekly report on 
planting progress lor seven crops. 


Tuesday Seoul: Saehan Merchant Banking 
Jan. 14 Corp. holds special meeting to ap- 
point new directors. 

Tokyo: Real Estate Economy Re- 
search Institute releases Tokyo con- 
dominium sales for December. 


London: British Retail Consortium 
publishes sales monitor figures for 
November. 

Paris: France's finance minister, 
Jean Arthuis, receives report from 
an informational committee on the 
banking system. 


Atlanta: Atlanta Federal Reserve 
Bank releases its monthly survey of 
area manufacturers for December. 
Washington: Labor Department re- 
ports consumer price index for De- 
cember; Commerce Department re- 
ports retail sales for December. 


Wednesday Manila: Philippine Long Distance 
.frm 15 Telephone Co. lists an additional 50 
million shares on the stock ex- 
change. 

Annual meetings: Cosmos Bottling 
Corp., Planters Development Bank. 


Louvain, Belgium: Man 
Greenspan, chairman of the Federal 
Reserve Board, speaks on the glob- 
al economy at the University of Lou- 
vain. 


Mexico City: Finance Ministry re- 
leases November industrial output. 
Washington: Commerce Depart- 
ment reports November business in- 
ventories and sales; Mortgage 
Bankers Association releases week- 
ly mortgage applications. 


Thursday Tokyo: Bank of Japan releases 
Jan. 16 1 bank Ending and deposit data tor 

December, Japan Iron and Steel As- 
sociation releases data on steel pro- 
duction for December; Economic 
Planning Agency releases data on 
machine orders tor November. 


London: Kenneth Clarke, the chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer, holds month- 
ly monetary policy meeting with Ed- 
die George, the governor ot the 
Bank of England. 


Philadelphia: Philadelphia Federal 
Reserve Bank releases its monthly 
survey of area manufacturers for 
January. 

Washington: Labor Department re- 
ports initial weekly stale unemploy- 
ment compensation claims. 


Fridav Tokyo: Bank of Japan releases mon- 

Jan 17 W supply figures for December; Eco- 

nomic Planning Agency releases 
household spending figures for 
November. 


Stockholm: December unemploy- 
ment figures. 

Copenhagen: October trade bal- 
ance and current account 


Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of 
Michigan releases its index of con- 
sumer sentiment for January. 
Washington: Commerce Depart- 
ment reports trade deficit in goods 
and services for November. 


New International Bond Issues 

Compiled by Laurence Desvileftes 




* 

issuer 

Amount 

(wffieosj 

Mat. 

Coop. 

% Pita 

Price 

end 

knob 

"vvn 

Tams 

Floating Rate Notes — 

Amsteel Finance fnff 

5100 

2000 

135 

10030 

— • 

0*r6™*rih Libor. Nerwr/toW*- FeesnoftJWUaWB- DEtxxTWMTO 115 ** 

FIXBd income^ - - 

Bank of Nova Scotia 

5250 

1999 

Vk t 

99,955 

— 

Below Jmanfti Uftor. NonaiaaMft T 1 *® 9 Dewmtaolkxo srftOOO. (UBS.) 

Caisse Centra le de Credit 
Immoblfler 

$200 

2000 

V* 

100JUS 

— 

Over 2-raorm Ubor. Nonadafale. Fe« 0.125%. Denrxrdrertom $10006 (BNFC^ 
MartetsJ 

Christiania Bank 

£150 

1999 

fiber 

lcxun 

— 

__ _ 

Corestates Copttat 2 

SI 50 

2027 

045 

97.988 

— 

OHerhnanffi Libor. Nonoollahle. Fees 0875%. (Ldwwn Bremers WU _ 

First Maryland Capitol 

S150 

2027 

1 

96075 

— 

OverJmoota l&er. MorraflaWt Fees 0875%. {Letaai BraHieralnai 

National Bank of Canada 

S300 

2002 

V * 

99.985 

— 

Over3-monlh Lteor. NoneotaUile. FeesO.15%. DenomtaoltonsSmAlw- tS»«« 

Toronto- Dominion Australia 

5150 

1999 

Vu 

99476 

— 

BeI«3-nwntaUI|or.Nantanobto Fees 00625%- OHBxntacrioKSlOOOttfBrxrwwForiMs 

Capital MarMtsO 

Bankers Trust InM 

£200 

2002 

ft 

9906 

— 

Over Ubor. NoncnfloMe. Fees ais%. (eamo«Tiusrirri« 

Lehman Brothers Hofafmgs 

£200 

2002 

*% 

99482 

— 

Oer 3^nontti Lfcor. Noocoitabte- Fees 0373%. Dwraarinoflons £106000. U-rriman B/ornos 
MU 

Catese Certfraie de Credit 
(mmobifier 

DM500 

2003 

0.15 

100.168 

— 

Over 3-mcxith Ubor. NoncoBobta. Fun^te'M»ouWiw*« , «» ,B ^^ lffl,0 ^ t81-25 
triBkm morio. Fees 030%. <HSBC TrtntousJ 

Fixed-Coupons 

Abbey National Treasury 
Services 

$500 

2000 

6<A 

100.965 

99.46 

iteoffersd m 19J9. Ncnarftable. Foes 1WK. tSBC WrrtwuJ 

Banque Generate du 
Luxembourg 

$100 

2001 

6*% 

101^0 

9935 

ReaftoEd rt 99JB0. Nona4«4e. 1*%%- (Banqoe Generate du LwanboaraJ 

Banque Internationale a 
Luxembourg 

$150 

1999 

6 

100.755 

9935 

Reoftoed ot 99 J6 NoncoHoNe. Fees 1 Wfc. (Banque NottanoSedePerisJ 

Bayerische Hypottietan und 
Wedtsel Bank 

$200 

2000 

6% 

101.135 

9937 

Reoftoed <499735. NoncnfaMe. Fees 16M6 {Bern Steams ta*D 

Bayerische Vereinsbank 

$200 

2001 

6Vt 

101.119 

99.12 

Reofteredet99J19.tloncxfl)o6te.Fees1*Vi6tAflN^MROHoamGovett) 

Beta Finance 

$300 

2002 

6W 

101^65 

99.12 

Raonered at 9964. NomsUtttjl* Fm !««». (SBC WurturoJ 

BNG 

$250 

2000 

~6W 

101.0095 

i 9936 

Reaffemd at 99^22. Noncoilatae. Fees not twoltabta. (Mkke Europe.) 

Denmark 

S300 

2002 

zero 

69.10 

60.55 

Ytotf64S%. NoncaSatfe. Proceeds S207 mflBan. Ftes (*20%. fftataeWenberlnrU 

Depfa Finance 

$200 

2001 

6% 

101.481 

9934 

Reoffeted at 99^56. NooaAable. H»sizvk>. fBarxjoeNonaDote OePortU 

Federal Home Loan 

Mortgage Corp. 

$500 

2007 

670 

999% 

98.95 

NoncaBabie. Fees 0325%. Otonura MU 

Federal National AAortgage 
Association 

$500 

2002 

6*fc 

99.852 

9960 

Semkmmxriy. NancoBrirte. Fee 62SS6 Danondnatlons SIOOOO. (Meirt) LyoditarU 

Halifax Building Society 

$500 

2002 

6V% 

101.248 

99.12 

NonafflaWe. Fees m (HSBC MaricebJ 

Inti Finance Corp. of 
Thailand 

$200 

2007 

7*i% 

99.624 

— 

Swakamuaby. NenafflaMe private ptacement Fen not Osdosed. (Menfli Lyneb inrU 

L-Bank 

$250 

2001 


101.15 

9930 

Reottered at 99*4. NoncaBaMe. Fees 1 Wflb. (NUtoEuopej 

Mexico 

$1,000 

2007 

m 

1(XL00 

99 JO 

Semionnuony. NoncaOttaie. Fees not avaflabte. UMenff Lynch Inti) 

Rabobank Nederland 

$250 

2001 

6*6 

101.341 

9932 

Reoftareri at 99.WL NanaOofatB. Pees 1*WL CN*to EurapeJ 

SmithKHne Beecham Capital 

$200 

2002 

6% 

99384 

9930 

NonooDoWe. Fees 0275%. OSeidstiw Maroon GrenfeBJ 

Sweden 

$300 

2000 

6*6 

10136 

9932 

Rcoriered « 99M. NaacaBaMe. Fees l*69t fflaiiqoe Pwttas CreMI AtarftelsJ 

Sweden 

$700 

2000 

560 

99.13 

— 

NancBltaWe. Fee* 020%. {YantocM frtfU 

BNG 

DM250 

2001 

4*% 

1014% 

9937 

Reoaered at 1 0616 Ncncaftriile. Fees 1 Wb. (SBC WotanreJ 

Deutsche Finance 

DM500 

2002 

49% 

101345 

10033 

Reoffend at 99J95. NoocoBatrte. Fees 2%. (Deutsctie Morgan GrentetL) 

DSL Finance 

DM200 

2002 

5 

10134 

10031 

Reaftotd at 10009. Noncoftrifle. Funsfetewtlti autstondtap Isua nflstno lolu) omoumto 4S0 
mUAon marts. Fees ML (C5 FhstBaitenJ 

DSL Finance 

DM1,000 

2007 

6 

1012)75 

98.94 

Reoffend at 9696 NanaAaUe. Fees 2W16 (Deutsdw Maroon GcmteU 

European Investment Bank 

DM500 

2003 

6 

103.14 

10337 

NoncolaMe. Fantfble wtm outstanding tasuw mMag term amount In 1 35 tfltoa marks. Fees 
630%. (Utaman BraOwreMU 

European Investment Bank 

DM500 

2026 

zero 

1610 

1175 

Yield 611%. NanadtaWe. Fuo^ble wtm outstanding Issne, mlsliifl taM face amoarrtta 1 S 
HlBon aioks. Fees 630%. (CS FM BaetaiL} 

General Electric Capital 
Corp. 

DM300 

2002 

49% 

101-59 

100.10 

Reaffemd at 9934. Nonaflable. Fees 2%. (Bmqae Parifaa CapW MakctsJ 

Rabobank Netherlands 

DM500 

2001 

4*6 

101525 

9930 

Reoffend 019946 Noncaflaue. Fees 615%. (Goldman Sachs mtu 

Sudwest LB Capital Markets 

DM1,500 

2002 

49% 

101.409 

9934 

Reafl%nd at 99499. NonaJlahfe. Fees 2% (SBC MtarfearoJ 

Worid Bank 

DM500 

2016 

zero 

7*39 

2830 

Readered at 2616^ YWd 659%. NaicaUabte. Proceeds 141 MBan maita. Fees 630%. 
(Bmque Paribas Omflal Maritosj 

Abbey National Treasury 
Services 

£250 

2002 

7% 

99-198 

— 

NoncaMSe. Rngfeie wJBi outstanding few* raUag taWt amount to COO mBan. Fees 630%. 
(ManfltLynditatu 

Bayerische Verdnsbank 

£100 

2000 

7*6 

100 66 

— 

Reoflend at 99486 MsnaaSabte. Fees 1*%%. (Haataras Bank) 

Commerzbank 

£150 

2002 

74% 

101*% 

— 

Reoffend at 99**. NanaaflaUBb Fees 1 W%. COommeaPreilO 

Deutsche Bank Finance 

£150 

1999 

716 

1003855 

— 

Reoffend at 99698. NoocoDoNe. Fms l*«6 (Deutsdre Morpon OenfeR) 

European Investment Bank 

£500 

2002 

716 

100^66 

— 

Reoffend at 96S41. Nonaflfable. Ft«sl H%.CBaicfciysdeZoete WeddJ 

Export-Import Bank of 
Japan 

£400 

2007 

8 

101.439 

— * 

Reoffered at 99 J64. NanaritaMe. Fees 2%. (Barclays de Zoete WeddJ 

Finland 

£150 

2000 

678 

99.10 

— 


General Electric Capital 
Corp. 

£125 

2000 

7*4 

1012)305 


NonaatUite. Fern 1*%%. (Barclays de Zode WeddJ 

UBS London 

£200 

2007 

8 

9668 

— 

NoncaBabie. FungMe v«ti oatskmflng bsae, raising tow amount to £4S0 ndfflan. Fees 0.35%. 
(UBSJ 

Royal Bank of Scotland 

£150 

2007 

8% 

99^1 

— 

NanoaMde. Fees 040%. DaaoaflMkms £106006 fllBU 

Sweden 

£200 

2002 

7Vi 

100.638 

— 

Reoffend at 99016 Nanccflabfa. F%es 1W%. (HSBC Credtal MarfceisJ 

Toyota Motor Finance 

£200 

2001 

7Vt 

107304 

— 

Reaffemd at 99J04. NoreaBuMe. Fees UW6 (SBC WWbuiBO 

WestLB Finance 

£150 

2007 

8*% 

101.127 

— 

Reaftared at 99477. NoncMabie. Fees 2%. (Lehman BretherelntU 

Whitbread 

£100 

2007 

8*6 

10a989 

— 

ReoRered at W364. Cotlafcto at iw onyttma Fees 2% (Baidays de Zoete WeddJ 

Boden-Wuerttemberg L- 
Flnance 

FF3M0 

2009 

6V% 

101.168 

9933 

Reaffemd at 99376 Nancnflobte Fan 2%. (Banque Ncdlanale de PortsJ 

DSL Finance 

FF1/500 

2002 

5Vs 

101.465 

10030 

Reoftcred at 9964. NoflcadoWe. Fees 7?%%. (Banque Naflanafe de PtalsJ 

Abbey National Treasury 
Services 

ITL300.000 

2002 

6.80 

101.70 

99.90 

f4oncaflabte.Feesl7M.(Cre(BtoNnlanoL) 

Bayerische Hypotheken und 
WectreeJ Bank 

ITL3(XWOO 

2002 

6*4 

101383 

99.75 

Nancalobta. Fees 1Z%%. (Banco Commarekite ttaianoJ 

Deutsche Finance 

ITL2^MXWOO 

2032 

zero 

730 

8.12 

ReoffQred at 741. Yield 756%. Nanateatite. Proceeds 155 bflton Ore. Fees 035%. (Deutsche 
MorpmGranMD 

Dresdner Finance 

ITL400000 

2007 

7*6 

10135 

9935 

Noncaflabie. Fees 2%. (Banque Naflonale de Fariv) 

NardLB 

iruawwo 

2002 

670 

101325 

99 JO 

Nonaflabta. Fees 1W%. (Cariptoj 

Adimea Hypothec kbank 

DF200 

2002 

5 

101.145 

99.91 

Reetfered at 9937. NoncaBabie. Fen nar ifisdased. (ABnwuwro Haa re Govetr.) 

Achtnea Hypattteekbank 

DF300 

2007 

6V% 

100315 

9935 

Reoffend at 9934. NoncaSobie. Fees not dfedased. (ABN-AMRO Hoore Go«IU 

Rabobank Nederland 

DF350 

2002 

5 

701.725 

100 60 

Reafferetl at 10616 NanaritaMe. Fees 19%%. (Rabobank InTL) 

European Investment Bank 

SP 36125 

2001 


100.10 


issue sp« lata 6 tranches, wlfli coupons ranging from to 450%. Redenurton amount wfli be 

Xnkadtatfiepartannanceaflfw Ibex staA index. Nonodfabie. l^aTo%^anratolta^ 
OENegndasJ 


& 


* 


z '.A. 


Services 


5 701542 70050 Rea/tared a) 106487. NancaflOTte. Fee* 74%%. (Banque Paribas capita MwfctisJ 


Kredlettoank InM Finance 


ECU15 


2005 4 10150 — 


FuntfbtewWiwmtandWB teww, raMng taw amount to 7P mHiPnuftMaf 
OCwMIianU 


Inti Finance Corp. 

Loan Participation Global 
Investment Company 


VI 2500 2000 455 100.00 S8iniamn«W.Radraip1lanarmal«Wy^bcta 

2001 “ 1-6° -10050 Hm^^taprtaatapiacaineflL Fees not esdo8e6DeaoMnotta« 100 oiOor ion. (Taliya. 


VI 0500 


Mitsubishi Corp. Finance 


Y5000C 1998 IVi 101.74 — NwK0»abte. Fees 0.125%. 


DenonUrwWws 100 tnBVan yen. (Dotwa EunyeO 


Nippon Steel 


VI 0500 2002 150 10050 — 




OesterrekJibche 

Kontrolibank 


VI 0500 2000 4J0 10050 - S 


Equity-Linked 


Volkswagen Inti Finance 


5250 


2002 


3 10050 — 3emloniiwfly.Q»HaMegtl02tal>9>.CDnrertlbiwats™w rnri u_ n;CT ^ ~~7~~ 

l-SM9roo*si»doUw.F, w a»%.o awBt n^ 


Last Week's Markets Euromarts 


Money Rates 


Stock Indexes 

Unara State 
DJIrutus. 

ojun. 

DJ Trans. 

S8P100 
S&P500 
S&PInd 
iftSEcg 
Nasdaq Cp 
Joann 
WM22S 
Briton 
FTSE100 
Canaan 
TSE Indus. 

Fiona 
CAC40 
Penwony 
DAX 

tow Kona 
Hons Seng 

WJtU 
MSCJP 

w«*d Aide* Ann Mopon Stonier Cqpmrf M Pwspecflw. 


Jan. ID 

Jon. 2 %Oi’pe 

united State Jm.10 

Jot. 3 

6.7(0.79 

634 439 

+244 

Discount rate 

5JOO 

500 

Z36J0 

0140 


Prime rate 

B<4 

816 

2J6346 

224689 

+666 

Federal funds rate 

5*% 

&DD 

744.94 

72999 

*235 




7 59 JO 

09152 

74603 

01030 

+1 53 
+133 

Japan 

DtKount 

050 

650 

40074 

35U 66 

+)J0 

CoBmoner 

641 

642 

1,33976 

130595 

*138 

3-nxnlh hteroonk 

056 

656 

7730X45 7934735 

— 1664 

Briton 

ftjflSwseraie 

6XO 

6J0D 




Call money 

99* 

«V» 

435640 

4009.50 

— 680 

SHnanta ktetsnk 

«*% 

6 tartk 

5,98493 

69)9.49 

+1.11 

France _ 

lntLi«aiifi<rt9 rale 
COB money 

115 

371 

115 

31% 




wnocfn tatertnnk 

3V* 

3*% 

2327 JO 

2302.76 

+ 196 

Gernmr 






Lowbort 

450 

450 

192X39 

245938 

+ 259 

Colt matey 

1)3 

112 




3-moflthlntobank 

115 

115 

73,191 JO 133227? 

— 034 







Goto Jan. 70 

Jpn.3%C7i%e 

81748 

B14JM 

+ 642 

London pjfl-fecJ 3S835 

36430 

-1J8 


Eurobond Yiekts 


Jat.u Jau YrNtpi vtm 

U5.6ioagteim 666 65B 64* 6B- 
UJ-EmdUUenn 478 473 618 O 


U.S.V Short terra 6JJ4 401 6ZJ6 60) 

Powdsatattm 761 753 742 757 

497 487 4?8 457 

752 753 754 722 
652 555 555 i§ 
611 619 619 611 

619 6T4 619 614 

tarn &01 496 5X4 496 

6M 540 6JJ8 680 
759 755 7-31 755 
7 56 755 7 56 739 
154 145 1.94 144 


French bones 
tWtanBre 
Dorfshkremr 
Swwflsh manor 

ISSisi'Si 

Cans 
Aus-S 
NiS 
Yon 


Weekly Sates 

Primary Marimt 

33S» 

S NMft 

Shufylib — 4341 

Conwrt. — 

745 Si x, 

Si £2?? 

™ 149835 11MQ4 

SwmrigyMaitot 


Jan.9 


EBreetear 
* NOBS 
— 2840 

5X0 494 

95960 
11iB284 10,1284 


f- 


SinzKLaKabeufffsiaatadimgc. 


Mai 

1 Si 

5315 

14,7114 67846 
11 *1B69 1LB4J 
ToW 364085 314565 


* Mbs 
194575 
1.9561 1418J 
3g^g»5 45594 
,B *““ 194343 
464694 


Libor Rates 


U5.S Sfa 5Vk 

Deutsche mark 3M 3V% 

Pound steribig W* . 6i% 

: Uofdt Book, Ruttws. 




m eSI®"™* 

. Yen 



‘ J 


PAGE 13 



HI 


?}« 


v*'r- 

* 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. JANUARY 13, 1997 


SHORT cover 


° f » Staie Unit 

engineering division 8 3 Stake “ *he British airline's 


business _ 

of wtemationai 

But a spokeswZm - not «*™« 

concemmgAesaieofthe%5S^‘^^ s confinned talks 
the fact that We wish to exollS^A^ 6 vemaden 0 secret of 
BA maintaining the jb^d-party investment, with 

^ we 

the unit as pail of^h|nTlocut V |?t^- y a minorit y stake in 

years b y sending more 

S w™fe Ue ^ ,x * es on Prospectuses 

ptmpecnises?obe “ d mu,ua! “ 

see^Ttn^Sf’ £ I ? ur chainnan of the SEC, has been 

legal prose of many cospome 
documents with simpler, more intelligible language ^ 

would ‘ A 5°? d h* 8 "bj® 01 to public comment, 

2“ n „ f general guidelines, but no directive on precise 
wording, for the cover, summary and risk-factor naces of 

S3TS2^ , 5Si? nq i sSSL SEC’s investor JSSon 
i***** - ' A” 100 ® * e company prospectuses to 
by ** would *<** fOT Sockmd bond 
offerings, mergers and limited partnerships, she said. 

iGermau Union Urges Job Creation 

PBAhHCFURT (Reuters) — Germany’s leading labor union 
renewed calls this weekend for job creation through reforms in 
working practices as reports of record unemployment gave 
"®sh impetus to the country’s jobs debate. 

The union’s message came after Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s 
Christian Democratic Party issued its second call in a week for 
a fresh jobs program involving the government, industry and 
unions. In a commentary in the Volksstmwie am Sonntag 
newspaper, the deputy director of the German Federation of 
Trade Unions, Urania Engel en-Kefer, urged companies to 
implement reforms that she said could create hundreds of 
thousands of jobs. 

Cutting overtime hours by half would create 370,000 jobs, 
additional part-time work would create 460.000 and a switch 
to a 35-hour week would take 570,000 people off the jobless 
rolls, Ms. Eagelen-Kefer said. 

Foreign Investment in Taman Rises 

TAIPEI (Bloomberg) — Overseas investors brought a 
record $2.74 billion of stock funds into Taiwan in 1996, the 
island’s central bank said Sunday. 

Most of the new foreign money entered during the first half 
of the year, when local stock investors pushed prices lower as 
military tensions between Beijing and Taipei escalated. 
^Foreign investors also were drawn by an easing of gov- 
ernment restrictions on overseas purchases and by the island’s 
inclusion in a group of closely-watched stock indexes. 

For the Record 

• Israel’s trade deficit in 1 996 reached $10.5 billion. 4 percent 
above the trade deficit in 1995. . 

• U.S. orders for machine tools dropped 22.8 percent in 

November, to an estimated $647 million, the Association for 
Manufacturing Technology and die American Machine Tool 
Distributor’s Association said Sunday. Biotmbtrx 


Euro Introduction Comes With a Big Price Tag 


By Barry James 

tiUeraeriomU/ienM Tribune 

PARIS — With few apparent 
hurdles remaining to European 
monetary union, banks and other 
companies are turning their atten- 
tion Co three daunting tasks at once: 
introducing a new currency in two 
years, preparing for what many be- 
lieve will he a boom in cross-border 
business, and selling the benefits of 
the change to a skeptical European 
consumer. 

The new currency will pose “real 
problems" for many companies, 
which will have to adapt not only 
their data processing programs, but 
in many cases their entire way of 
doing business, said Ulrich 
Schroeder, chief economist at 
Deutsche Bank AG in Frankfurt- 
The abolishing of exchange rates 
and currency transactions within the 
monetary zone will open wider ho- 
rizons for many companies, but 
bring new competitive pressures for 
others. 

“Up to now," Mr. Schroeder 
said, “many companies have been 
cautious about expanding because 
they never knew what next year's 
exchange rate would be. With mon- 
etary union, even small companies 
will have more confidence in ex- 
ploring markets, knowing that they 
can rely on stable rates. This in turn 
will give consumers a wider choice 
of products.” 

The trade lobby EuroCommerce 
estimates that the conversion to the 
new currency will cost up to $33.5 


billion, including the expense of re- 
writing computer programs. 

Adding to the complexity of the 
operation is that banks, companies, 
retail and wholesale businesses and, 
not least, governments will have ro 
deal in at least two values — the new 
euro and existing currencies — from 
Jan. 1, 1999. rami the withdrawal of 
the national currencies in mid- 
2002 . 

“We are going to have big prac- 
tical problems because of dual ac- 
counting and handling cash flows in 
two currencies," said Richard Des- 
mond, group treasurer of BAT In- 
dustries PLC. But in the long run, he 
said, the single money “is going to 
be very useful to us." 

The ending of transaction costs 
combined with instant settlement of 
accounts will save many large 
companies- millions of dollars a 
year, he said. 

A1 though the European Union 
agreed to move ahead to monetary 
union at the Dublin summit meeting 
in December, the countries joining 
the system will not be known until 
next year. They will be chosen on 
the basis of their economic perfor- 
mance this year, including their abil- 
ity to bold public deficits to 3 per- 
cent or less of gross domestic 
product 

Once the membership is decided, 
governments will be hard-pressed to 
print min t and store billions of bank 
notes and coins to be ready for the 
general introduction of the currency 
five years from now. 

business, there are risks in 


starting preparations too early but 
there are greater risks still in delay- 
ing them, says the Association for 
the Monetary Union of Europe. 
“The changeover to the single cur- 
rency should be viewed as a major 
project and handled as such." 

Zc recommends that companies 
should sian collecting information, 
set up a special euro unit identify 
areas that will require change and 
devise a changeover strategy, in- 
cluding a calendar and a budget. 

This goes for governments as 
well. France, which is determined to 

The new currency will 
help businesses, but 
what about consumers? 


be one of the founding members of 
the monetary muon, has just an- 
nounced a plan to coordinate prep- 
arations under the chairmanship of 
the finance minister. lean Anfauis. 

One factor so far left out of the 
planning is what the E. Leclerc su- 
permarket chain in France calls “the 
forgotten consumer." With the help 
of die European Commission, it lis- 
ted prices in euros as well as French 
francs as an experiment last year, 
and primed 1 5 million euro bills — 
worth about 6_5 francs — that cus- 
tomers could spend in its stores. 

Leclerc ’s conclusion that most 
customers were mystified — in fact, 
70 percent of them elected to pay 
with bank cards. 


Indeed, how useful the euro will 
be to the consumer remains an open 
question. 

Euro notes and coins will not be 
introduced until 2002. but people 
will be able to open bank accounts 
and conduct financial dealings in 
euros starting in 1999. 

Analysts say this is virtually cer- 
tain lo lead to more uniform banking 
policies across Europe. 

The French Association of 
Banks, for example, says that 
France will probably have to come 
into line with the rest of Europe by 
introducing interest-bearing bank 
accounts, at the cost of eliminating 
the free banking services available 
at present 

And travelers, of course, would 
no longer have to change money, 
and pay the resulting commissions, 
when they cross borders. 

Because it did not want to in- 
terfere in whai it considers to be an 
area of national prerogative, the 
European Commission, the EU's 
executive body, has left the task of 
informing the public about the cur- 
rency to governments and the fi- 
nancial services sector in each of the 
member countries. 

But governments and banks have 
been pmnarily concerned with tech- 
nicalities. They have allowed the 
initiative to slip to “Euroskeptics" 
who portray the new currency as a 
threat to national sovereignty and 
individual living standards. 

“Europe is thus seen to be ‘about’ 
deflation, higher taxes, slashed pro- 
grams and sour-faced bankers," 


said John Lloyd, a columnist in The 
Scotsman, one of the few British 
newspapers to support currency uni- 
on. 

Mr. Schroeder of Deutsche Bank 
said that banks will "obviously 
have to deal with a lot of propa- 
ganda' * against the euro as they seek 
to win over their customers to the 
new currency. 

This is a particular problem in 
Germany, where people believe that 
their investments will be less secure 
in euros than Deutsche marks. 

But recently, he said, the power- 
ful and independent Bundesbank 
has been sounding a tad more 
“Eurofiriendly" as a result of a sta- 
bility pact intended to ensure that 
countries stick to strict economic 
criteria. 

European Commission officials 
still have little idea of how the new 
money will be accepted psycholo- 
gically. 

People tend to be deeply attached 
to their national currency as a sym- 
bol of political power and sover- 
eignty. and are reluctant to change. 

Although consumers are wary 
now. “many believe that once Euro- 
pean Monetary Union is declared in 
the spring of’ 1988. the whole dy- 
namic will change," said Stanley 
Crossick. chairman of the Belmont 
European Policy Center, a think 
tank in Brussels. “It is still rather 
nebulous. You cannot seriously pro- 
mote die euro until a) you know it is 
going to happen for sure and b) you 
know which countries will be in 
it." 


As Stocks Rise, Portfolio Planners Warn Against Greed 


By Marcia Vickers 

New liar* Tones Service 


NEW YORK- — As investors per- 
form the January rite of reviewing 
their portfolios for the new year, the 
market’s 1996 gains and die result- 
ing enthusiasm for stocks put a par- 
ticular spin on die job. 

Because stocks have risen so 
much — by 26 percent in 1996 — 
they occupy a larger percentage of 
investors' holdings than they did 
before 1996. 

- This process of allocating assets 
among the basic classes of invest- 
ment — and regularly reviewing die 
allocation — is crucial to a port- 
folio's success, accounting for more 
than 90 percent of die differences in 
investors’ returns, planners say. 

Put another way, although in- 
vestors may spend much time 
choosing between two different 


stocks, it is the broader decision of 
how much to apportion to stocks, 
braids and cash that most powerfully 
affects returns. 

“The asset-allocation plan for 
each individual will most likely dif- 
fer according to age, income, fi- 
nancial goals, risk tolerance and oth- 
er factors." said Joel Isaacson, a 
New York financial planner. Even 
for the same person, planners will 
differ on the allocation they con- 
sider appropriate. 

“It’s more an art than a science," 
Mr. Isaacson said. 

But most analysts agree on cer- 
tain generalizations. A single, 25- 
year-old investor with a long-term 
horizon would invest most of a port- 
folio in equities, with the balance in 
bonds and cash. A couple in their 
30s with young children also would 
have much of their long-term money 
in stocks, though probably less than 


the 25-year-old. An older person 
about to retire might devote even 
less of a portfolio to equities. 

Whatever the preferred percent- 
ages, the 1996 bull market has made 
many investors stock-heavy. 

Bruce Bieber, a dentist in Plain- 
view, New York, is a case in point 

INVESTING 

He and his wife have two children. 

In view of the family's income, 
college plans and other factors, the 
Biebers' financial planner, Lewis 
AJtfest prescribed an asset alloc- 
ation plan that calls for 78 percent 
stocks. 1 7 percent bonds and 5 per- 
cent cash. But after the success of 
stocks last year, the Bieber portfolio 
now looks like this: 83 percent 
equities, 14 percent bonds and 3 
percent cash. 

The gains last year are not the 


only reason Mr. Altfesi wants to 
lighten up on the stocks in Bieber’s 
portfolio. Adding to the pressure is 
Mr. Aitfest's overall view of stocks 
for 1997. “I think the U.S. stock 
market is at the high end," he said. 
“I warn my clients who have a 
heavy equity exposure to be pre- 
pared for a possible correction. * 

Other analysts agree. “We think 
this year will be a moderately down 
year because we have had higher 
interest rates, declining earnings 
growth and very high price-earoings 
ratios." said David Shulman. equity 
stralegisi at Salomon Brothers Inc. 

In December, he shifted his re- 
commended portfolio from 50 per- 
cent stocks, 35 percent bonds and 15 
percent cash to 45 percent equities, 35 
percent bonds and 20 percent cash. 

As investors review their asset 
allocations they must avoid several 
common mistakes. For example . 


while the recent bull market may 
make many investors overly enam- 
ored of stocks, a common error in 
the past has been the reverse: top 
much in bonds and cash. 

Moreover, many people may res- 
ist changing an asset allocation if it 
means reducing the portion of a port- 
folio that has done well recently. 

Many investors instead want to 
increase that segment, but given that 
rapidly appreciating assets are often 
what puts an allocation plan off kil- 
ter, “that's usually the wrong ap- 
proach," Mr. Isaacson said. 

Finally, “I recommend that in- 
vestors never sell to rebalance a 
portfolio,” Mr. Markesesaid. “You 
only balance with new money. If 
investors can avoid selling by using 
cash flow from distributions, in- 
come or inheritances to rebalance a 
portfolio, in die long run they’ll 
come out ahead." 


I 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


Sates 

Slocks- Dw YU lowrtBh Lon ChcOw 



Safes 

Slocks Oh Yld lOfeMah Low OjeChQO 


«»* 




Continued on Page 14 


fMtV»SA.DN» WTZFO Snowtand TU'WZJIH -HU 



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The men's Annual Calendar is the first self-winding calendar 
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And because of the exceptional workmanship, each one is a unique object. 

Which is perhaps why some people pel that you 

never actually own iz Patch Philippe. 

You merely look after it fir the next generation. 




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PACE 16 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1997 


SPORTS 


Lucky Inter 
Closes In On 
Juventus 


Manchester United Wins 
After Liverpool Falters 


Ci*apdrilliyO*r&4[Fim Dapukhrt 

Inter Milan closed in on Juventus at 
the top of Italy's Serie A Sunday even 
though it did not play like a champion in 
its 2 - 1 victory over Napoli. 

Goalkeeper Gianluca Pagliuca kept 
Inter in the match with a series of superb 
saves, allowing his side to sneak victory 
with opportunist goals by Marco Branca 
and Youri Djorkaeff. 

Branca r s snap shot in the 43d minute 
surprised Giuseppe Taglialatela, the 
Napoli goalkeeper. Two minutes from 


Soccer Roundup 


time, Djorkaeff turned his marker and 
shot past Taglialatela in one smooth 
movement. 

It was the third time in successive 
away matches that Inter has taken points 
from a game they might have lost. 
Coach Roy Hodgson admitted: “We 
were lucky.” 

Napoli pulled a goal back through 
Nicola Caccia — a brilliant overhead 
kick — in the 90th minute. 

Juventus was held 0-0 by Atalanta in 
Turin. 

Juventus dominated the first half and 
Da vide Pinaio. tbe Atalanta goalkeeper, 
twice denied Alessandro Del Piero. 

In the second half. Gianluigi Lentini 
hit the post for Atalanta. 

Juve lost striker Alen Boksic with a 
leg injury. He will miss next Wednes- 
day’s European Supercup final first leg 
with Paris Sl Germain in France. 



hiapi L'pf/ll'f \npii intpj Vmm 

Francesco Totti of Roma trying to maneuver the ball away from Carmine Gautieri of Perugia. Roma won, 4-1. 


Vicenza dropped after losing 1-0 to 
Milan. Anigo Sacchi. 


the Milan coach, 
left Dejan Sa vice vie and Roberto Bag- 
gio on the bench and played Christopne 
Dugarry as a lone striker. The French- 
manheaded in the only goal from Marco 
Simone’s cross. Milan's Marcel De- 
sailly was sent off in die second half. 

BIGLAND David Beckham scored an- 
other spectacular goal Sunday as 
Manchester United belt Tottenham and 
move second in the Premier League. 

Beckham, who trained with Totten- 
ham as a schoolboy, had scored against 
Spurs in the F. A. Cup a week ago with a 
spectacular free kick. 

Steffen Iversen and Andy Sinton both 
hit the United cross bar before the vis- 
itors took the lead in the 23d minute 
when Norwegian Oie Gunnar Solskjaer 
slid the ball home. 


Rory Allen headed an equalizer for 
Spurs in the 44th minute. 

Beckham struck in the second half. 
He collected the ball just inside the 
Spurs half and strode forward before 
crashing a right-foot shot into the top 
comer of the goal from 25 meters. 

The victory allowed Manchester 
United to make the most of the failings 
of other leading clubs the day before. 
None of the top eight teams which 
played on Saturday won. 

Newcastle United showed just why 
Kevin Keegan's hair turned gray in four 
years before he quit as manager on 
Wednesday with a typical performance 
in a 2-2 draw with Aston Villa. 

Newcastle raced into a 2-0 lead after 
only 21 minutes thanks to goals from 
Alan Shearer and Lee Clark — but then 
were lucky to escape with a point thanks 
to a penalty save by goalkeeper Shaka 
His I op in the 61st minute. By then Villa 
had fought back with goals from Dwight 
Yorke and Savo Milosevic. 

Leader Liverpool was held 0-0 at 
home by W r est Ham. Second-placed Ar- 
senal lost 1-0 at Sunderland. 

Arsenal's Dutch striker Dennis Ber- 
gkamp was sent off for a dangerous 
tackle on Paul Brace well. Tony Adams, 
the Arsenal captain, scored the only goal, 
deflecting a cross into his own net. 


SPAIN 


Otto Konrad, the Zaragoza 
r. let in a goal just 30 seconds 
into his Spanish league debut Sunday as 
his new team lost 5-1 to champions 
Atietico Madrid. 

Real Madrid, the league leader, could 
only draw 0-0 away to Extremadura, the 
bottom club. Thud-placed Deportivo 
Coruna missed a late penalty in an ex- 
citing 1-1 draw at Valladolid. 

At Sevilla. Robert Prosinecki scored 
his second goal in the dying minutes to 
beat Oviedo and at Valencia, Jose Galvez 
scored the only goal of the game to beat 
Rayo Vallecano in the 90th minute. 

PORTUGAL Champion Porto 
tightened its grip on this season's race 
with an efficient 2-1 victory over 
second-place Benfica before a crowd of 
75,000 in the Stadium of Light in Lisboa 
on Saturday. 

Goals from Brazilian striker Mario 
Jardel and defender Jorge Costa, one in 
each half, were enough to sink a dis- 
appointing Benfica which fell eight 
points behind Porto. 

WORLD CUP Paraguay narrowed die 
gap on Colombia at the top of die South 
American qualifying group to three 
points Sunday with a 2-0 victory over 
Venezuela, which is bottom of the group. 
Miguel Angel Benitez shot Paraguay 
ahead in die fifth minute. Julio Enciso 


scored the second in the 62d minute. 

In African qualifying Group 1, Ni- 
geria was held to a draw by Kenya in 
Nairobi. Kenya took the lead in the 25th 
minute when Ken Simiyu who beat Ni- 
gerian goalkeeper Joseph Dosu with a 
header from after a corner. 

Jonathan Akpoborie equalized for the 
Olympic champion in the 48th minute, 
also with a header from a corner. 

Nigeria is seeded to reach the finals in 
France along with Zambia. Egypt, 
Cameroon and Morocco. 

Morocco conceded two goals in the 
last five minutes and drew 2-2 in Kumast, 
Ghana, in a Group 5 game which drew of 
80,000. Basr Hadjim put Morocco ahead 
after 41 minutes, Hadji Mustapha 
doubled the lead with 10 minutes to play. 
Sam Johnson scored for Ghana with five 
minutes left and Emmanuel Osei Kuffuor 
equalized in the final minute. 

Abu Kami scored in the first minute of 
die second half to give Siena Leone a 1- 
0 victory over Gabon in Group 5. Kanu 
saw goalkeeper Jacques Dekousshoud 
out of position and beat him with an 
angled lob. 

South Africa, the African champion, 
drew 0-0 in Zambia in Group 3. In 
Group 2, Liberia, without George Weah, 
drew 0-0 with Namibia in Wind- 
hoek. (Reuters, AP, AFP) 


Sykora Wins Easily; 
Wiberg Marches On 



CmfiMtKOirStg'FnmiDIsfiaHKS 

CHAMONIX, France — 'Hwinas 
Sykora cruised Sunday to his third 
successive World Cup slalom vic- 
tory. 

While his rivals struggled on a piste 
hardened by the cold, Sykora 
mastered the conditions and finished 
1.66 seconds ahead of Thomas Sian- 
gas singer. 

Sykora. a tall, stylish Austrian, 
clocked an aggregate time of 1:5638 
seconds. 

After the first leg, Sykora led Al- 
berto Tomba by more than a second. 
Tomba, who was suffering from flu, 
then dropped out to leave Sykora with 
a lead of 1.17 seconds to take into the 
second leg. 

“Everything was perfect today, 
starting with the snow,” Sykora said. 
‘‘It was man-made snow, and the 
Austrians train on that. Then I just had 
better feelings from the start better 
than everyone.” 

Sykora has won four of the five 
slaloms this winter while finishing 
second in the other. 

“I'm not getting tired of winning,” 
Sykora said. ‘ ‘Every time is different 
I’ve got no explanation for the form 
I’m in. It's just great” 

Tomba decided after the first leg 
that he would be better off spending 
the rest of the day in bed and Later 
withdrew from Tuesday’s giant sla- 
lom in Adelboden, Switzerland. 

Martin Hansson, a Swede, finished 
third. He earned the first podium 
place of his career with an aggregate 
time of 1:58.40, climbing from 15th 


merer (6,600-foot) Sttohsack piste. 
Isolde Kostner, the Italian who is 
world super-G champion, was second 

m Wiberg increased her leading total 
in the overall standings to 863 points. 
She won the super-G in Lake l^mise, 
in November and slaloms in 
Scunnering. Austria, and Maribor. 
Slovenia. .. 

Wibeig’s closest rival m the overall 
race, Kaija Seizinger of Germany, 
was third in 1:40.34 and ronam 
second in the standings with 649 
points. „ ... 

“The weather was perfect today, 
said Wiberg. “The slope was 
hardened by the cold overnight tem- 
peratures. ft was icy and that’s just the 
way J like it” 

“She risked the most,” Seizinger 
said of Wiberg. 

• Heidi Zurbriggen of Switzerland 
won the women’s downhill in Bad 
Kteinldrchheim on Saturday. The 
race had been postponed on Friday. 

Zurbriggen’s winning time was 
1:42.33 seconds. 

Hiide Gerg of Germany finished 
second in 1:42.69 and Austria's 
Stefanie Schuster was third in 
1:43.06, .01 second faster than a 
teammate, Renate Goetschl. 

Wiberg was fifth in 1:43.10. 

Zurbriggen’s victory was the first 
for the Swiss women's team this sea- 


M A 




. ‘-ii 


• Trf ». > 
•* 


son. 


with a fast second leg. Stangassinger, 
climbed from seventh to 


an Austrian, 
second in die second leg. 

Sykora holds a comfortable lead of 
200 points over Stangassinger in the 
slalom World Cup standings with 
four races remaining. 

Michael von Gruenigen of 
Switzerland, a giant slalom specialist, 
came in fourth to take first place in die 
overall World Cup standings from 
Austria's Hans Knauss. 

Knauss missed a gate in the second 
run of the slalom and was disqual- 
ified. 

• In Bad KJemkirchheim in Aus- 
tria, Femilla Wiberg of Sweden con- 
tinued her domination of the women’s 
World Cup circuit Sunday by record- 
ing her fourth victory of die season in 
a super-giant slalom. 

Wiberg posted a lime of 1:39.98 
seconds on die hard and icy 2,000- 


i In Chamonix, Kristian Ghedina 
of Italy won the men's downhill Sat- 
urday by the slimmest possible mar- 
gin — .01 second. 

The Italian skier was timed in 
2:0136 seconds, just ahead of A tie 
Skaardal of Norway. 

Third, at 2:01.67, was Werner 
Franz of Austria. (AP. Reuters ) 







- n 

■r* 




f jut 



*(iax haa-Pnn 

Wiberg on her way to winning 
the women’s Super-G Sunday. 






Scoreboard 


'77, 


•;ir 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


usnufcoNnuKi 

ATLANTIC OIVISION 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

New York 

26 

9 

J43 

— 

AUanil 

25 

10 

.714 

) 

WosWogton 

19 

IS 

-559 

615 

Oriondo 

12 

18 

-400 

11 Mr 

New Jersey 

9 

23 

-281 

155, 

Bmton 

8 

25 

30 

17 

PhtedelpMa 

B 

26 

-235 

1716 

ccrthal onnsiOM 



Chicago 

31 

4 

486 

— 

Detrab 

26 

8 

J6B 

4V, 

Altarria 

31 

11 

-656 

8 1 A 

Cleveland 

21 

13 

-618 

Vh 

Chariatte 

18 

16 

.529 

12W 

MBvroukee 

17 

17 

JOO 

1314 

Indiana 

16 

17 

<485 

14 

Toronto 

12 

23 

■353 

IBM 

Mnmn com 

■■■ 

•a 


MDWEBT MVIStON 




W 

L 

per 

GB 

Houston 

27 

9 

JSD 

— 

Utah 

23 

12 

467 

314 

Mlnnesoto 

16 

19 

.457 

IPV4 

Dalai 

12 

20 

375 

13 

San Antonio 

9 

25 

365 

17 

Denver 

9 

26 

357 

17Y4 

Vancouver 

7 

29 

.194 

20 

nkcnc DmEWM 



LA-Lokets 

37 

10 

730 

— 

Seattle 

26 

11 

703 

1 

Portland 

19 

16 

343 

7 

Sacramento 

IS 

21 

*17 

1114 

LA. Oppers 

14 

21 

-400 

12 

Golden State 

13 

20 

394 

12 

Phoenix 

11 

24 

314 

15 

ntMriHsmn 


New York 111, 

, Boston 98 




Houston 120, Phtedetohkr 99 



Washington 102, l_A. Oppers 98 


Detroit 84, San Antonio 78 



Chicago 1 16 AADwaukee 101 



Indiana 106 Denver 89 




Phoenix 1(0, Chariatte 90 




LA. Lakers 94, Mtoml 85: 




SJDlffil»AY<S MSaUS 


uw» 

19 

11 

25 22— 77 

Detroit 

X 

r 16 

27 17-87 


W: Strickland 8-10320. Howard 8-19 2-2 
IS; C Brandon 7-22 4-4 19, HD 4-9 4* )A 
Rebooms— Washington *6 (Hawcra 10), 
Cleveland 43 [HB 7). AssWs— vVbsHngfar 28 
(Webber, StiKMand 8). deveteri 18 
(Brandon 91. 

San Antonio 17 25 IS 28 5- 82 

Atlanta 17 23 14 23 10— 87 

SA.- Johnson 9-19 34 21, Perdue M2 1-3 1W 
fc Lnettner 10-17 « Muwmw +8 7-11 IS 
Smflh $-10 44 15, Btaykx* 6-14 00 IS. 
Mmmds— Son Antonio 54 (Perdue 171. Auanfa 
80 (MukmbO 20). Assists— San Artwtk 19 
OaNisonffl, ABorto 1J (BSwtort.5). 

Toronto 48 31 21 n— 123 

Hew Jersey 17 X V 30-10* 

T: W.WMams 9-18 7-9 28. Stoudamke 0-H 
4-4 2&MJ-Gffll(M 7 8-8 30. Kittles £-17:^4 IS 
Rebounds— -Taranto 53 (Jones, Canfey 9). 
New Jersey 56 (J.WHBams 111. 
Assists— TOraato 25 (Christa Stoudamtre 91. 
New Jersey 27 (Pack 151. 

I_A. Clippers 2* 27 17 23- 93 

Minnesota 20 21 25 29— 9S 

LAj Martin 7-141-1 19. Rogers 6-20 3-6 15. 
Wrtgtit 7-9 04) 15t M: GufllMta 11-28 Ml 2& 
Marbury 7-14 4-5 20. Rebound*— Las 
Angeles 57 (Wrtgta 15), Minnesota 43 
(Garrett 9). Assists— Los Angeles 14 (Marta 
5), Minnesota 22 (Gugflattp 7). 

Boston 26 24 20 29— 99 

NewYark 27 33 20 32-112 

B: Wotac M3 5-7 23. Minor 5-13 M 15; 
N.Y.: Ewing 10-13 10-12 30, Stalks 814 1-3 
20. Rebounds— Boston 44 (wtdher 9), New 


Sacramento 24 32 25 28—109 

Vancouver 33 23 23 22— 101 

S: RWmrand 11-17 7-8 32, Abaut-Rau! 10- 
U 4-5 27; V: Abdur-RaWm 14-24 9-11 37. 
Reeves U-2S2-5 30. Rebounds— Sacramento 
57 (Smftn !!), Vancouver 42 (Reeves Till. 
Assists-- Sacramento 29 (Richmond 13), 
Vancouver 25 (Mayberry a). 


EAST-WEST SHRINE CLASSIC 
SATURDAY. AT STANFORD, CALIF. 

East 17, West 13 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standings 


ATLANTIC OtVISION 


0: Malone 6-13 7-9 19, HomoceK 7-12 2-2 
16: D: hm 6-9 7-11 19, Hunter MS 6-8 19. 
R ebounds Utah 41 (OsteriaglOL Detroit 48 
( HU. Thorpe 11). AssWs-Utoti 25 (Stockton 
TO), Oefroti 19 (HOI 71. 

WasMogton 31 27 25 15- 98 

demon! 23 16 31 15—85 


York SB (OaMey, Ewing 12). Assists— Boston 
20 (Wfestey 8), New York 32 (Childs 81. 
Denver 18 3S 27 19—99 

Dotes 23 29 21 31—104 

D: LEWS 11-19 5-7 28, O.EtHs 7-13 2-2 1& 
Eh Golfing 7-12 7-10 21, McCloud 69 7-8 21. 
Rebounds— Denver *9 (Hammonds. D.EHIs. 
LBSs 6). Da Has 45 (Green 9). 
Assists— Denver 23 (Jackson 23), Dates )B 
(Harper 8). 

Houston 23 20 23 20— 86 

CMcngo 20 20 34 36—110 

K: Olaluwon 12-25 4-5 29. EDe 0-2 9-9 9, 
Maloney 3-7 0-0 9, Livingston 34 3-4 9: C 
Jordan 12-25 4-4 32, Kufux 8-13 0 -0 20. 
Rebound*— Houston 44 [Otafuwon 8). 
Chicago 59 (Rodman 18). Assists— Houston 
20 (Dimer 5), Chicago 29 (Jordan Plppen 
7). 

Intern 20 19 M 19-82 

Seattle 25 31 16 20— 92 

b Sams 9-16 2-4 MADqvts 8-14 M 17; 5: 
Hankins 9-12 04 19, Scbampf B-15 0-0 18. 
Rebounds— (nifiona 52 (Suite 13). Seattle 46 
rsetwerapt B). Assists— Imflona IS I Me Key 
5), Seattle 23 [Setuemot 12). 



tv 

L 

T 

Pis 

Of 

GA 

Phfiadetphfa 

34 

13 

5 

SI 

144 

109 

Florida 

22 

11 

9 

S3 

124 

96 

N.Y. Rangers 

22 

18 

6 

50 

156 

128 

New Jersey 

21 

15 

5 

47 

109 

105 

Washington 

18 

20 

S 

41 

114 

113 

Tampa Bay 

16 

20 

6 

38 

124 

135 

N.Y. (slanders 

12 

21 

9 

33 

10B 

127 

Northeast onnstON 




W 

L 

T 

PIS 

GF 

GA 

Pittsburgh 

23 

15 

5 

SI 

161 

135 

Buffalo 

21 

17 

5 

47 

127 

118 

Montreal 

17 

19 

8 

43 

146 

153 

Hartford 

17 

18 

7 

41 

127 

139 

Boston 

16 

20 

6 

38 

124 

153 

Ottawa 

12 

21 

8 

32 

110 

124 

WXS78MM 

WMfnDici 


CENTRAL aVtiUON 




W 

L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Dallas 

24 

16 

3 

51 

1Z7 

107 

Detroit 

21 

15 

) 

49 

134 

98 

Phoenix 

19 

30 

4 

42 

118 

138 

SI. Loafs 

19 

22 

4 

42 

127 

146 

Chfcogo 

17 

21 

8 

42 

121 

12S 

Toronto 

17 

26 

0 

34 

130 

153 

FACteC MVmON 




W 

L 

T 

PIS 

GF 

GA 

Colorado 

36 

10 

a 

60 

ISO 

101 

Edmonton 

19 

21 

4 

42 

143 

135 

Vancouver 

20 

20 

1 

41 

131 

139 

Anaheim 

16 

21 

5 

37 

121 

m 

Calgary 

14 

23 

5 

37 

110 

130 

Los Angeles 

>6 

23 

i 

36 

118 

144 

San Jcse 

IS 

23 

5 

35 

107 

131 

nUMkT'S HSOITS 



pmsbwgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 2 





Chicago 3, New Jersey 3, tie 
Phoenix 4, Dclta*3 
Vancouver & Hartford 3 
Anaheim 5, Buffalo Z 

MTtfMDAY' % WESVLTX 
Cbkoga 1 1 1-3 

Detroit 0 0 1—1 

First Period: C-Bkxfc 9 (Shantz, Amonte) 
Second Period: c-Prabert5 (Craven. Block) 
(pp). Tbini period: C-Anwnte 28 (Craven. 
W ciraHJi ) 4, P-SIwnohon 24 (Yzermon) (pp). 
State on SB* C- 6JM-19. D- 11-7-15-33. 
GaaSes; C-Betfour. D-Osgaod. 

WastUngton 0 3 0 0-3 

Pbtedetpbia l B 2 8-3 

First Period: P-tsOair 26 (Umbos. 
NBnlmaaj (pp)- Second Period: W-Bondra 25 
(Housfey) a W- Juneau 11 (Hunter, Colo) 
(pp). 4. W-. Cole 2 (Konmvaidiuk. Haustayl 
(pp). Third Period: P-Druce 4 (Nlnfcnaa, 
BrtncrAmour) A P-B rind Amour IS 

(DesjarrSna. LeCWri Overtone; None. State 
on goat W- 11-10-6-4-41. P- 104-10-2-30. 
GaaBes: W-KoUg. P-Snow. 

SaiJosa 0 1 1—2 

Edmonton 0 1 0—1 

First Period: Nona. Second Period: E- 
seton 1 4 (Norton VlWghl) (pp). a LLtafrate 
6 (Nichols, Kotov) Third Period: S_L- 
Kraupo 2 (GIB, Fitaaen) (pp). Shots on goal: 
SJ.- 11-16-9—36. E- 6-M-22. GaaBes: SJ.- 
Hradey. E- Joseph. 

N.Y. Islanders 2 2 0 0-4 

Tampa Bay 1 I 2 0—4 

Ftrsl Period: New York, Polffy 25 
(5monnskl. Anderson) l New York, tang 13 
(Mdimla, Green) 1 T-Zamuner 9 (penalty 
shcX) Second Period: NewYark. Hughes 4, 5. 
T-» Anderson 3 (Crass) 6 New York. Green 9 
(Mctrmts. Palfly) (pp). Third Period: T- 
CuHen 11 (Ysetweridcoorelll) 6T-Utanavl 
(Bannister, Grattan) Overtime: None. Shots 
an saab New York 9-9-6-2—26 T- 10-13-10- 

3- 36 GaaBes: New York, Sola T- 
TotwroccL 

Pitts trash 1 » 2 0-3 

Ottawa 1 i 1 0—3 

First Period: P-Nedwd 2a Z 0-, Atfredssoa 
IS (York, Yashin) Second Period: O-Yasttn 18 
(AHredsson) (pp). Third Period: P-Sondsbom 
8 (WoaUey, Lemtein) (ppl. & O-Dudtesne 6 
(Yoshia AHredsson) 6 P-BomeS 10 {HUcl 
D zIedzkJ Overtone: Norm. State oa goab P- 7- 

4- 8-1— 2a O- 12-9-13-0 — 34. Coates: P- 
LaHme. o- Rhodes. 

C c t or nd o 1 8 2—3 

Toronto 0 1 1-2 

Rnt Period: C-Janes 16 (Oeodmanh. 
Young) (pp). Second Period: T-Muller 13 
(Murphy, Nedved) (ppl. Third Period: C- 
OraHnsh 14 (Lemleux, Klemml (pp). 4, T- 


Wdntaer 9 (Murphy. Ponbd & C-, 
Deodmorsh 17 IC&ottnsh) Shots on goab C- 9- 
9-12-30. T- 11-19-9—39. Goates C-Roy. T- 
Pdvtn. 

Boston 1 2 0-3 

Mwtmri 0 4 2-6 

First Period: B- Bourque 5 (Slumpel 
Oates) (pp). SKBOd Parioct B-Ootes 13 
(Donato McLaren)- 1 M- Thornton 7 
(Quintal Tucker) 4 M-ReccM SO (Rfeet 
Damptmjssa) i M-Branei 6 (Rlchec 
BanMeau) 6 M -Richer 14 (BonMeau 
Bnnwt) 7, B- Bourque 6 (Onto* Stomp*) 
(pp). Thud Period: M-Baran 1 (BanfehKto 
Richer: 9. M-Reochi 21 (Savage, 

□amphousse) (en). State on goal; B- 9-7- 
)4-3a M- 4-10-9-23. Goalies: B-Taflas. 
Chevnbtoe M- JaUmsM. 

SL Louis 0 10—1 

Los Angeles 1 0 1—2 

First Period: UL-Sievera 7 (Boucher, 
Olczyk) (pp). Second Period: SJU-Hut 21 
ICourtnal. Turgeon) (pp). Tldrd Period.- 
L-A.-KhiMHch 12 (Tsypkdatv. Nunninen) 
teals an god: 6L.- 11 -12-5—26 LA- 8-6- 
7—21 . Goafies: S.L-Fnftr. LA-Datoe. 

Rortda 2 1 1—4 

Calgary 1 0 0—1 

First Period: F-Flttgendd 7 (Lowry, 
Sreftla) Z F- Sheppard 18 (Una. Garpeniov) 
3, C-Gavey 2 (McTavlsh, Hlushkol Seemed 
Period: F-Dvarak 10 (Sheppad, Gsperdm) 
TMrd Period: fMJndsoy 9 (Dvorak) (en). 
State en goab F- 13-13-12-36 C- 18-9- 
14—41. Goalies; F-vanUesbrauck. C- 
Rotoscrv 


(France! 15*63 15676/59B7), la AMs Vbgl 
(Germany) 15867 n«T3V5833). 

MMitendtafii 1. Sykora 480 points, 
2. Stangassinger 28G 3. Amis 208, 6 
Slfonsen 178. 5. Aaraodt 152. 6 Khnfnobu 
Wrnura (Japan) 149,7.VosfnSletUB 
8. Malta Homan CStwden) 128. 9. Vbn 
Gruenigai 117, la Afeetto Tomba (lioty) T12. 

WPSP O U HN , 
SATUBCWK ■* CNAWONU; FtUMCE 
1. Kristian Glwdlna (Holy) twaminutesOl 58 
9eoinds, 2. Alto Skaarriol (Norway) 201 57, 3, 
Weiner From (Austria) 25167, 6 WBtam 
Basse rSwBzeriand) 2 SUSA S. Luc Afcibanri 
(Fnmce) Mm 6 Josel Straw (Austria) 
20236 7. Btn» Kernen CSwRzerknO 
20231 6 Markus Hartmann {SwttzmtamD 
2024& 9. Howies TitoU (Austria) 2025(1 )fl. 
Wtsmer Pettahonm- (Holy) 20266 
bmn*a rt n..m n n « 1. Gtnfioa 366 
points, tie Alphand 363. 3. Skaardal 261, 6 
Franr 228, i. Josef 5fnata 202 6 Fritz Strata 
194, 7. WHam Basse (Switzerland) 172, B, 
Ptetra vttaDrtt otnty) 1331 9. Franco Gawgn 
(Switzerland) 121, 10. Adrien DuvOtant 
(France) 119. 

IE 


Log rones 1, Espanyal 0 
Compostela 1, Racing Santander 1 
ABettco Madrid & Zarogara 1 
eranvhiim 1-Reol Matald 43 potato 
2- Barcelona 4L 3J>iparihraGortina 70, 4J*e- 
ai Befc 36 6A1WICD Madrid 35. 6Reol So- 
dedad 34, 7.VtaHodaild 3a aTTnwtfe 2& 
9-Athicac B8hao2£t lavtaenda 27, ll.Roc- 
tag S<mtandar2&, iZCblto Vigo 24, l3.Rayo 
VoReanw 21 14JMeda 22, l5£ompastela 
2a Idfspaityal 19. 175porflng Gfcn la 
1 BJjDBranes l& 1 95evBta 17,2DLZdragaza 14 
21 .Hercules la 22AdnBMdora 9. 


uiai, Igto Austria — luge. Fll, Vlfartd 
Championships (ip Joa 19). 


Tuesday, Jan.1 4 



WEST MOTES VS. AUSTRALIA 
SUNDAY, M PERTH. AUSTRALIA 
AustraBft 267-7 In 50 overs 
West IncHes: 269-6 in 495 
Vfest Indies won by tour widute. 
Btantanmc west Lrefles 10 points. Pok- 
isnn 6 Australia 6 


l.GuenltierMaden Austria 402J3 (20250 
- 15953). 2. KfefK-Ambe AantocH, Norway 
403.91 (20351- 20070), 3. Brvno Ksman, 
Swttzeriand 40558 (20253-20365), 6 Finn 
Christen Jagge, Norway 40624 (207.15 - 
10959). S. ftn* Atroto SwttZwtond 40768 
00458 - 20173), 6 Fredrtc Nybog, Sweden 
40863 005.17 - 20346), 7. Kristen Ghfr- 
dlno, Italy 40963 (20166 - 20757), 8. An- 
dreas Schffterar. Austria *1036 00299 - 
20767), 9. Warner Franz. Austria *1162 
00167 -20955), TO. Ales Brwnvsek, Store- 
ilia*! 3J9 (20634 -20765)- 
Dnni rti A nmn 1. Michael Von Gm- 


Batagnaa Parmal 
Javerdus a Atakmto a 
MBan l, Vicenza 0 
NopoBl, Inter 2 
Piacenza a UdlneseO 
Reggkma a Fkwemtaa 0 

Romo 4, Perogtal 
Veronal, Lazto 1 
Sampdorto 4. CagOorl 1 
tendtarat T. Juventus 30 potato 2 Som- 
pdate 2& 3 lrrleraa* Vto(nBi2& & Ftaenttaa 
2S 6 MJtan 26 7. Parma 24. 1 Lazio 23 9. 
Roma 23, I0L Nopal 23, TL Bologna z 2, 12 
Atokmto 21, 13. Uifnese 19, 16 Piacenza 12 
16 Perugia 17, 16 Qsgflari K 17. VErana 11, 
l&ReggianalO. 


■temra, -Adelboden. 5witzertoid — mm 
Alptae World Cup, atorastohm; Predazza, 
IMy— FI6 Node Wartd Cun, NanBc 
combined do Jan. IS). 

cvwcKRTSjrSney, AqsJrafla — ana-day 
tatemnrionoL West imues vs. Puwaan. t 
BADMINTON, Tokyo — Japan National. 
Badminton Association. Yooex Jopar Open 
•97 (to Jan. 19). 


to 

-L-. 
. vie 

• - • a 


Wednesday, Jan.1 5 


Ports — UEFA, European , 
Super Cup, flnalflnUeg, Pate St. Germain 
vs. Juventus. 

OOLK bitten WefiaCoBfornic — wen. ■ 
UA PGA Tow; Bab Hope Chrysler Oassfc 
(to Jan. 19). 


*> 

- •> * 

■ 




Thursday, Jan.1 6 


TENNIS 


Marttaa Htagta TO, SwfiartantLdef. Jen- 
nifer Copriaft United States. 6-1- 5-7, 6-1. 
■ersNUL 

Dm Henman Britain deL Carios Maya, 
Spain 626-1. 

WUUAAMUUI nmtaf 


Mtabaume, Australia — ons- 
ddy Wanananal PaUslan vs. Aostrafla; 
Jafrainestang, Soatti Afrkn — cricket 
Smith Africa vs. btcfln total test 
■wneum. Anthotc naty— world Cup 
event (to Jan. 19). 

Btvtim, Sydney— Grand Prtx event (to 
Jan.19). 

■A*MT«*U. Men's EuraLeogue ’ 
second preOmbray roond at various sMes. * 


i 


Friday, Jam. 17 




attgen (SwO 497 points, l Thomas Sykora 
(Aut) 482, 3. Hans Knauss (AuO 468,6 WWD 
Antbe AomodJ (Nar) «1. 6 Kristen Ghedtaa 
Cffa) 415, 6 Luc Alphand (Fra) 397, 7. Guen- 
trier Mader (AuO 361. 6 Josef Strata (AuQ 
332, 9. Stew Locher (SwO 307, 10. SlegMea 
Vogbethrr <Aof) 303- 


HOBAHZA 

FINAL 

Dominique Von Roost. Belgium, net. Mar- 
tonne WenM-Wtaneyer. Utated State, M.4- 

3L 


ZN D4V OF 3-OAY lUlICH 
F1KE STATE vs. emu 
SUNDAY. IN BLOEWFONTEm, SOUTH 
Anucw 

Free State first Innings: 320-7 declared 
second innings: 69-0 
Intfia first tmtags 296-6 declared. 



RUGBY UNION 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


FOR MORE 
RECRUITMENT 
See Page 4 


Executive Positions Available 


A MAJOR US. MANUFACTURER OF 
nmai matm J teniiuiQ nqvpmam 
needs an agent to rcpttoit our product 
kre in Frans, UK, m Getmany. Ideal 
cardtiate nufl mw a safe) orgama- 
tion that concenWiK an ixfuetnaf ac- 
rnunte Wetwws in Europe ei be on- 
ducted March 6 - Match 17 Ptease 
conoct Laos fitotto. Weses JUanitac- 
nitwtg Company, P.0. Box 47. Lands- 
daie. pa 19447, USA. Phone. 
215-699-7031. Fas 215698-3636- 


OFFICE MAMAGBLUOSCOW, EHngual 
EngkstVRussan, pcstcn manognq op»- 
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stay hokn may be srt let Box 200, 
IX T 85fl Third Are.. 8th Boor. New 
Yak, N.Y. 10022. USA cr tax c 
U SAEOU 21J333-15B USA. 


tr 175,000 - FF 25QJU0 PER YEAR 
CAN YOU SELL ENGLISH? 

W1 language banhg is seeking t 
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team. Tefc Paris +33 (0)1 42 45 39 (7 


Executives Available 


CUSTOKR UJYALHY 
PROGAAHHE 

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PROGRAHE 

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HARDWORKING, WTEUJGEWr. nta 
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Third Art.. Bth Row. New York. N.Y 
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US EXEC recently repatriated tarn Eu- 
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COPY EDITOR 

ADVEHTBHG 
SUPPLEMENTS PROGRAM 


The International Herald TAute is 
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Supplements Program Irani March i to 
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matter on sattebcai tart). The ideal 
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Nrtng spercnce. prateraUy «dh srht- 
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Send letter, CV end dips to 
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speaker. poS&tHy flueffl to Sparato as 
Ml. tor a position n out InKRialtottal 
Tenders Department. Experience usmg 
Wndwts (Vtewcrt. E*ei) reqraed Tet 
*39 G 33) MPT, Fax *39 B 320 D031 


TIE AMERICAN CATHEORAL seeing 
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week S aimer work. Cal 014720 6633 
between MO t 4U0 lor more daefe. 


Educational Positions Available 


ENGLISH TEACHERS 
Experienced 


tor Busress People. 
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kWMa&c Teaching Uetoods. 
Pans-SUtaiBe. Wodag Papers. 
Couqrtw des Langues(D1) 45 61 53 56 


TEA OCRS WANTED ■ Very experi- 
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to tr am a F rench husm^wnstflart 
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Paris 16 th Please bx CV andtor pragg- 
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SCHOOL DIRECTOR; American Her 
naaonal Sctod ot IQNGSTCIM Jamna: 
M begm 7rtSWT Appfcaion package on 
totemei a) wwstedasrv'aisAhtoi 
AppkalOB due 16497 


WAUES VS. UWTED STKTES 
SATUHDAY. IN CARDIFF 

Wales 34. United States 14 


SKIING 


WORLD CUP 


womiN'iium-a 

SUNDAY. M BAD KLBNOROfilEHI. AUSTRIA 

1. Pemna Wiberg (Sweden) 1 mtauto 39.98 
seconds, z Isolde Kastnw (tody) 1*036. 1 
Kate Seizinger (Gemwiy) l:40-H * HHe 
Gerg (Geranny) luKLSa 6 Madina Eril (Ger- 
tnaofi 1:4697, h. Ka t he rin e Gttomnhn fOer- 
maryl 1:<U)7, 7. Regtao Hanoi (Gemiaiy) 
1U1J& x Alexandra Mecanltzer (Austria) 
1*1.26 9. Heidi Zurbriggen tSwbredcmdl 
ia Catherine BorgW (SwflzskniU 

1:4168 

■rewrasiwnieta— ■ 1. Wiberg 309 potato, 
2. Gerg ZBAlSeWncerllAA. Kostner 205, 5. 
Zdenskaya 152,6 Erf) )4&7.Masnadg 13), 
& Svetlana GlodlsMva (Russia) 136 9. Mon- 
Met 120, 10- Zurbrtggen 99. 

OnnH atendh«a*i 1- Pemllle Wtoerg 
(Stwden) 863 ptarteZ Kate Seizinger (Ger- 
many) 649 , 1 HWe Gerg (GeittMtay) 583, * 
Deborah Compognonl (Italy} 39& 5. Anita 
Wacffler (Austria) 365, 6 Unka Hravat 
(SkwenlaJ 359,7. Isolde Kastner(aa)y) 346 8. 
Marttaa en (Germany) 34a 9. HeM Zur- 
bdggen (SwKzetttnd) 304. ia Qaudla 
Rtotoa' (New Zealand) 289. 

Mur'd AXIOM 
SUWMV. M CHASSOMK. ra AMCC 

1. Thomas Sykora (Austria) 1 ndnute 5638 
seconds (iwv leg 5768 seonndiAeoDnd tog 
5680). 2. Thomas Siangasstnge’ lAustito) 
l-68.(M B9.1W5a.9fl, 3. Mortfn Harmon 
(Sweden) 1:58.40 (S9J2/S&68L 4. MJchoH 
von Graeidgen (SwBzeriaM) 158.4V 
(59JXK9.49), S-CSe Qirtstton Furoseth (Nor- 
way) 15651 (SV.lWfP.4l), 6 Ktadnabu 
Kiraura (Japan) 1 58-53 (sv JW59JS), 7. An- 
drea Bran (Switzerland) 1:5654 
159.83/58.71), 6 Tam Stnnsen (Norway) 
13863 (5670/5967), He Sebastten Aratoz 


AFHKANZOTM 
CBOUPONE 
Kenya I, Nfgerta l 
Buridno Faso a Guinea 2 
fiwdnm Gutarn 6 points, Wgerta A 
Kenya 1. Burkina Faso a 

GROUP TWO 
NamRria 6 Liberia 0 
Tuntoto 1 Egypt 0 

tn—rtWy . . Tunisia 6 pafatei Egypt 3, 
Uberto 1, NamBria 1. 

OROUP THREE 
Zambia a South Africa 0 
Zaire 1, Coagol 

muNm Congo a pobax South Africa < 
Zakel, Zambia l. 

GROW FOUR 
Cameroon a Angola 0 
Zimbabwe 3. TopoO 

m— vsn—i Cameroon 4 ponds, Angela < 
Zimbabwe 3, Togo 0. 

GROUP FIVE 
Sierra Leone 1, Gabon 0 
Ghana 2, Morocco 2 

ttiaiSnm Moracco 4 pabris, sierra 
Leone 1 Ghana 2, Gabon 1. 

SOUTH AMERICAN LOME 
Venezuela a Paraguay 2 
Batata 2, Ecuador 0 

Mmumowu. Hunan 
Lebanon 1 Algeria 2 

HWMUI HMW tlMte 
Aston vtlta z Newcastle 2 
Blodkbum A, Coventry 0 
Leeds 3. LelcesrerO 
Uverpoaia West HwnO 
Mldtaesbnwgfta Saattmnpton l 
Nottingham Fores! 1 Chelsea 0 
Sheffield Wednesday 2, Erencnl 
Sunderland l.AisenalO 
Wknofedoa l.Ocrty 1, 

Tottenham 1, Atendrester United 2 
t w in wg m 1. Uverpaol 43 petals, 2. 

MtsKhester Untied 41, i Arsenal 46 * New. 
castle 36 S- Wttnbtadon 36 6 Aston VBta 36 
7. ChebM 35, 6 Sheffield Wednesday 31, 9. 
Everton 26 11. Tottenham 2611 6underi«id 
37, lZLeeds25,lWteby26 t4.Btacuum 
2X l5£orertiy2» r6L«<CW*er 33. 17.Wcs) 
Ham H, lBJtoffingham Forest 2a 
WSouthompton 19, 26MkMMsbraugh 1& 

Etdremadura 6 Retd Madrid 0 
Tenerife a Real Sodedcdl 
AiMetlc Bfibao 2, Cetta Vigo 2 
VatodolW 1, Departlm Coruna 1 

vansKta l. Rayo vatecanoo 

Sevflta2.0v|ado1 


AUCKLAND. HEW ZEALAND 
aUARTGRRMALS 

Janas BJcrtwon, Sweden, det Ja»- 
MlChdei GatnMfi, U6. 64 Aft Manus On- 
druska South Africa. deL Marcsta ffias (1), 
ChBfc MM 6-3; Jiri Novak, Czech Rep, del 
Alex Rodufesat Gennany, 6-1 6-4, Kenneth 
Cartsen, Denrronk. deL Heman Gamy (5), 
Argentina 6-4 7-6 (7-5). 


sniHO, ZwhxeLGennony^- World Gup’ 
women's staioois (22/gtaitfstalora Os Jan.’ 
19); Btacteomtv Canada — mo* women. 
Freestyle World Cup, ocraskL dual moguls, 
o eriataoim btaed (fojan. (9). 

■pmiiamaimma, Motma Sweden- ■ 
menwomerclSU. European SborT Track • 
CharaptonsWps (to Jan. w). 

•occn, OaklaniL Fresna Futsrian • 
Posodwa Son Dtog^Terapa.Aitz.— soccer,' • 
mhttfitav U6.Cup 97, Pen* Denmark. 

Madca Untied States 0DJaa.ZS< **■ 

ATHurncs, Montreal — LAAF tadoar 
mealing. 


t- ir' 


■ ?/ * 


Km 


-*e»w 

T4* 


Janas Bforiama Sweden, dot AtarcasOn- 
draskn, South Africa, 6-1 6-1; Kenneth 

Cratsara Denmaiic deL Jbf Nonk. Czech Reo 

7-6 (7-5) 6-4. 


Satwmay, Jam. 18 


TRANSITIONS 


■AJM LEAGUE BASRALL 
ANEMCAH LEAGUE 

AHAHHM-Agreed to terms with RHP 
SNgetosH Hasegawa an 1 -year contract 
teSiw*— SttinedLHPSlewAieryla l-yeor 


ojresco-Agreed to terras with OF HaroM 
Baines and RHP Jason Bare on l-yeor con- 
taod, and RHP Roger McDaweD and C Tony 
Pena an ndnar-teague awracts. 

c Leroy McKlRnis 

fnmSmi Diego Padres lor OF Mark Smith. 
oRror-Aflieed to terras wffit C Brian 


r^YDwe-AgreedtotrsrrawtmOFMrA 

Whten and INF Ute So}o on l-year can- 
mas. 

MKLANO-Aoieed la forms wMi RHP Bred 
RjBjry, RH P Aaron Smafi, LH P Matt Duntrar, 
L HP Mott Dunbar, INF Stove Cm and INF 
JaaonMcDoMldan 1-)tnr contracts. 

tUntelAL LEAGUE 

oSSK^S£5 , - ,<sa,RHP 

rtnm!l te PemS "to QF 

Darryl HamUton on 2-year contract. Re- 
dgnedTed Rahkisoa broadcaster, to 2-year 
axirracJ. 

Mfniuu 

HATKWAL BARKE1BALL ASSOQffnON 
A IKCLES— Traded F CkMc CebaDas 

ntr F Robert Many and C Joe Heine. 


ROCCte t. Melbourne, Austruflo — Soccer 
Awtrafla, fcUHHltan tournament South 

Korea Nanwryt Amtiafiab New ZbatomL 

through Jan. 25. 

WWSVUHKW. Rve Nations: Dubdrv 
Ireland — Ireland v&. France: ErSnbuigh, 
S coWartd— Sgrilarntys. Wotes. 
oiicAM t Sydney. Aus&oflo- world ' 

S crt&fl naflngL 

J^wto^ridCujvdrrwnhffl, stalom ttoJan, 
iv); zwleseL Gennany — waowa Atplrw 

Vtarid Cup. super siakua stolom te 

-ton. 19). 

NonMcexMHa, LzMv Ftotam-mea- 
mmisn Itaut Wahj cur crosscountry: 

*toy. metrtsSOKand retoy' 
»J06J«).5LAtoltts swatefand- Nonfc 
•taridCuft Nonfc combined (to Jsl19l 

mo juhpwo, Sopporetjopm- 

Nordic World Cu* 90Kond 120K MU events 
do Jan. TV). 

Cu|fc two- into louHnnn oo 


• • i 





— -v4 

' r i 

-‘A*. 


H ®*iDa DI Ptne. naty 
~ nwa wentea Whrw Qra a, jbb, 19 , 
■teWO, Osaka. Japan — wnmHLVM 


ju oo, Osaka Jopoq _ wond 

'OJurio FMeiottm, wortocupito 


Joalfl. 

“ ° ta,r ^ u 


’• : r * 


SMK 3 =SR. u - 

=S«SSSSS£-- 

Rmy Oo Joa 23). Monaco 


9* 




^ m 


— OMDAY, Jam. 13 


Sunday, Jem, is 

Paris— European 


i " •: -■’‘ w 




















.,Vf nX i,/, 

V V'’" • 7 \ vVl r 4 i ■ r* 

feibii^fegfete 







PAGE 17 


SPORTS 


Bulls Show Rockets 
Who’s 



__ _ the Assodaied Press 

■ tiePilE^P 0 7- Mi<*aei Jordan. Scot- 

■ Sk^P^ ? Dd De ™ xs Rodman ont- 

• niSw! Ofejuwon. - Clyde 

• and Charles Barkley on Satu^ay 

• ^“c 3 ® 0 BuDs wbirthe'batde 

• ?* rtf? 041 Sasketball Association elite, 
; a over the Houston Rockets.' 

; One the most hyped gatros of jfie 
- season became just another lopsided 
; victory for the defending champions. 


% 


- whose 3) -4 record u the league’s best. 
> Smce Dec. 11, foe Bulls are 14-1 overall 
1 and 10-0 at home. r . 

i m The Rockets ( 28 - 10 ) came in. with an 

■ NBA-best 15-2 read . record, ' "but 
; sunfiensd their most decisive loss of the 
, season. They were playing theirfemrth 

■ game in five nights, all on the road. 
! Houston is 6-7 after a 21-2 start - 

• In the matchup of. terrific trios, 
; Jordan. Pippen and ROdnian gat'foe'best 
,of Olajuwon, Drexler and Barkley in 

y ' points (57-44), rebounds (31-2 1) and 
f. assists (18-9). ■ 

« Jordan scored 32 poinis, Pippen had 
! 17 points and Redman grabbed 18 re- 

■ bounds. They got . support from die 

; bench from Tom' Kukoc (20 points) and 
, Jason Caffey (12 points) 1 . ■ 

' Olajuwcb 'scored .29 poinb* but 
missed several layups and short jump- 
; ers. Drexler scored seven jxrihts on 5- 
! for- 1 1 shorting. Barkley finished with 8 

• points — 12 under his average and as 
; many as the low-scoring Rodman ■ — ■ 

. and seven rebounds. 

; Houston led by 43-40 at halftime. The 
! Bulls shot just 36 percent in the half but 

■ grabbed 11 offensive rebounds to stay 
| close. 

• The Bulls trailed by 58-57‘with four 
! minutes left in the thud before making 

■ three consecutive 3-pointers, one by 
'Jordan and two by Propen. After four 
! Houston free throws, Kukoc made a 3- 

• pointer for a 69-62 lead. 

Knhsks 11 2, CatOoo 96 Patrick Ewing 

• scored 30 points for the third time in 
, Jour games and the sixth tune this sea- 

• son to lead New York past Boston, 


The Knicks have won their last 17 
meetings with Boston, the longest 
Streak ever by a Celtics opponent. . ' , 
John Starks added 20 points, includ- 
ig 14 in the fourth quarter. and John 
Wallace had 19 points, a season high, as 
New York won its 12th straight home 
{game and beat the Celtics for the second 
tone in as many nights. 

Rapture 123, Mats toe Toronto set 
records by making 19 of 23 shots and 
scori ng 48 points in building a 31 -point 
fost-quarter lead en route 10 an easy 
victory over New Jersey. 

. The Raptors’ 48 points were a team 
record fora quarter and they came within 
two points of matching die NBA record 
for points in an opening quarter. Toronto 
also set aclub standard by shooting 32.6 
percent in- the period and the marks- 
manship earned into the second quarter 
when the lead ballooned to 75-33. 

' With 28 pouits. Damon Stoudamire 
and Walt Williams led the Raptors, who 
won for only die second time m 15 road 
games this season, both against New 
Jersey. .... 

B«fMsse,GraHera85 la Cleveland, 
Rod Strickland scored 20 points, in- 
cluding three late jumpers that thwarted 
a Cleveland comeback, as Washington 
wen its fourth straight game. 

" Cleveland, which lost its third game 
in 2 now, cut al 9-point halftime deficit 
to 85-7 6 with Terrell Brandon's juniper 
offtbe glass with 8:25Teft.- 
Butstrickland sankhis third jtnnper in 
five possessions to push Washington’s 

■ PMoM87 y 4«s77.GrantHil]^^19 
pointsand.il rebounds as Detroit handed 
Utah its eighth straight road Joss. 

The victory ended foe Pistons' nine- 
game losing streak against Utah. 

-TimbM-wolvro SO, coppers 93 In Min- 
neapolis, Stephen Marbury scored 20 
points, including 13 in the fourth quarter 
as Minnesota rallied past the Los 
Angeles Clivers. • ' 

Tom Gugliotta scored 28 points and 
added seven assists and seven rebounds 
far the Wolves, who have won eight of 
lOgames. 

Hawks 67, spurs 62 Steve Smith 



The Rockets’ Charles Barkley trying to maneuver past the Bulls' Dennis Rodman. Barkley was held to 8 points. 


scored six pouits in the final 1:38 of 
overtone, giving Atlanta its third straight 
overtime victory as the Hawks extended 
their winning streak at home to 13. 

Atlanta’s third consecutive overtime 
victory tiedan NBA record shared by 10 
other teams. The Hawks defeated 
Phoenix in overtone Tuesday and Or- 





y 



’ Seeks New Home 


By Scott Bowles 

Washington Post Service 






3 * >nr.i^b 




f *.-*■*' 


T HE LETTER, Michael Volpe ad- 
mits, started as an attempt to blow 
off steam at bis . otv^-fevonte 
baseball team, the San Francisco Chants, 
for malting whai he saw as another 
boneheaded trade. 

But he kept writing, and firming. He 
remembered all foe times foe Giants — - 
foe team he had foliowed^since foe 
J950s — released a player to save 
■money, raised the price of a bleacher 
ticket, dumped a treasured play-by-play 
man or packed tip and moved to a city 
with a shinier stadium. 

By the time he finished the letter ihat 
November morning, Volpe had de- 
clared himself a “free agent fan,’’ 
sparking an unprecedented bidding war 
_=— for his loyaftyl In letters to every 
other major league team, Volpe, 44, 
bffered hts fealty to one club font could 
prove it was worth rooting for. 

In doing so, foe Virginia professor 
and business consultant has become, 
baseball’s hottest prospect,^ symbol to 
-team owners of the typical fan: angry, 
disenchanted with' the spoitmg worirrs 
obsession with money, ready to throw in 
foe towel. 

1 More than a dozeti major league chibs 
and three minor league teams have writ- 
ten or telephoned. On Thursday, foe 
Baltimore Orioles ’general manager had 
him over for a lunch of crab cakes. He 
has appeared cm radio and television and 
' is getting calls from other fans cheering 
him on. 

Volpe is savoring the irony. 

“It’s playing their game, sure,” be 
said of his free ageitcy pose, “But some-, 
body needed to get foe message across 
foat fans are the most important part of ■ 
foe game, not profits and ticket sales." 

i — — 


The message has resonated, said Martin 
Ford, a sports psychologist, because “fans 
are feeling abandoned by their teams. In 
all sports, but especially baseball.” 

“A fan is nuking an emotional in- 
vestment pfteu be ppUs for a team,'’ said 
Ford, who" also is a professor of education 
at George Mason University. “But par- 
ticularly in foe past half-dozen years, 
that’s been hard to do, as teams make 
decisions based more on financial criteria 
than fan loyalty. As teams get rid of a fan’s 
hero, they’re casting aside foe fan. too.” 
Volpe said baseball was losing young 
fanS to other sports, and he said he was 
disappointed that the movers and shakers 
of the sport, including acting commis- 
sioner Bud Selig and players union chief 
. Donald Fehr — both received copies of 
the letter — had yet to acknowledge it 
Officials from 13 clubs have respond- 
ed. mostly with general promises that 
their teams would be fun to watch. But 
foe .answer from John Maroon, public 
relations director for the Orioles, was 
more involved, 

“Fans .are the straw that stirs the 
s,”’be said. “If we forget that, 
is going to be in trouble. The 
i mpor t a nt thing is not that he picks the 
Onoles; dm important thing is that he 
picks a baseball team.’ ’ 

,-i Marooar .sct. iip the lunch between 
Volpe and General Manager Pat Gillie*. 
The team forew ma jersey wifo his name 
emblazoned on the back. . 

“ft .was a good lunch,” Volpe said 
“Gillick had a lot of goodpomts. When 1 
asked him about rote models for my kids, 
he said he had two words: Cal Ripken.” 
Volpe said he had two of Ws own: 
Roberto Alomar, the Orioles inpelder 
who spat in foe face of an umpire last 
season. Gillick, Volpe said, “seemed to 
really regret that. He said it was an 
unfortunate incident. • 


Volpe’s own sports career never ec- 
lipsed childhood stickball games in 
lower Manhattan. His only baseball am- 
bition was for the Giants to stop making 
misguided trades. 

“ 1 Ve been a fan since 1 was a kid.' " he 
said. “I stuck with them when they left 
town for San Francisco, even through all 
of those very bad years in the ’70s." 

But when Volpe saw a midnight news 
flash that Giants stalwart Man Williams 
— a slugger who was immensely popular 
with the fans — had been traded to foe 
Cleveland Indians, it was the last straw. 
He marched upstairs and woke his wife, 
Mary Beth Volpe. to break the news. She 
asked him who Matt Williams was. 

“I’ve never read a sports section in 
my life,” she said. “I guess opposites 
attract. But I told him he should write an 
angry letter to the Giants. I just wanted 
to get back to sleep.’ ’ 

Volpe even got a letter from the Ari- 
zona Diamondbacks, mi expansion team 
set to join the league in 1998. They 
offered this enticement: “Possibly be- 
ing in foe National League, you will be 
able to root against the San Francisco 
Giants often.’ 

That may not be easy. Volpe says that 
although most of his Giants memor- 
abilia is gone, foe memories remain, 
ingrained in a childhood marked by 
evenings at foe ballpark or sitting in 
front of a small black-and-white tele- 
vision. “I still remember being 10 years 
old. watching foe World Series, my face 
glued to foe television while I ate a TV 
dinner on a Quickdraw McGraw TV 
tray," be said. “A part of me will al- 
ways be a Giants fan.” 

Which makes the modern game such 
a bittersweet experience for him. Por 
Volpe and millions of baseball fans, 
professional athletes have become less 
role models than cautionary tales. 


lando on Thursday. 

Christian Laetmer, who led Atlanta 
wifo 26 points, gave the Hawks the lead to 
stay at 81-79 wifo a layup with 2:21 left. 

Mavericks 104, Nuggets 99 George 
McCloud, a reserve, scored 21 points, 
including seven in foe final 63 seconds, 
as Dallas beat Denver. 

The game was the first at Reunion 
Arena for foe Nuggets’ coach. Dick 
Motia. since he was fired by the Mav- 
ericks after last season. 

■Gnus 109, Grizzlies 101 Mitch Rich- 
mond scored 32 points and Sacramento 
earned its first road victory in more than 
a month. 

The NBA’s fifth-leading scorer. 
Richmond shot 1 1 -for- 17 and added a 
season-high 13 assists. The Kings won 
on the road for just the fifth time this 


season and for the first time since de- 
feating Minnesota on Dec. 3. 

Shareef Abdur-Rahim. a rookie, had 
a career- and franchise-high 37 points 
for Vancouver. 

Sonics 92. Pacers 82 Detlef Schrempf 
had four steals as Seattle forced 23 
turnovers, held Reggie Miller to 1 1 
points and beat Indiana with smothering 
defense in Seattle. 

Miller only took eight shots in 33 
minutes, wifo the exception of Rik 
Smits’ 20-poini performance, the 
Pacers struggled. 

Hersey Hawkins led the Sonics with 
19 points on 9-for-12 shooting. He 
scored 10 points in the opening quarter 
and seven in the fourth quarter when 
Seattle opened up a 90-76 lead wifo two 
minutes remaining. 


Cowboy’s Irvin 
Is Innocent, 
Police Say 


By Christine Biederman 
- ■ Vo» li *rt7mm Sent? t 

DALLAS : — A woman has recanted 
her charges foal she was raped by a 
Dallas Cowboys offensive lineman. 
Erik Williams, and that his teammate. 
Michael Irvin, held a gun to her head, 
the police have said. 

“Through the investigation process, 
we have determined conclusively foal 
the allegations are not true and foat a 
sexual assault did not take place.” a 
Dallas police spokesman. Ed Spencer, 
said at a news conference Friday night. 

The police said they were continuing 
their investigation of foe 23-year-oJd 
Dallas woman, who they said could be 
charged wifo a misdemeanor for filing a 
false police report. 

The announcement came after the 
police confronted the woman with 
growing evidence foat contradicted her 
story, including foe statement of a third 
man who foe woman told the police had 
participated in foe rape. At foat point, 
the woman recanted her allegations, foe 
police said. 

Although foe police declined to an- 
swer questions about their investiga- 
tion, Royce West, an attorney for Irvin, 
said: “The police jumped the gun, but 
did foe department right the ship? Yes. 
they did. Michael took a beating from 
many of you in foe media. I don’t know 
what can be done in foe way of making 
reparations.” * 

Peter Ginsberg, Williams’s attorney, 
said: “We are thrilled that the police 
have confirmed what Erik has said all 
along. On the other hand we are ob- 
viously distressed that an unworthy 
source can make horrific allegations 
foat are endorsed by the police in an 
unfair and unprofessional manner.” 

Irvin said after the police announce- 
ment: “Rerun it, rewrite it, reprint it 
Just like you did. wifo the same intensity 
foat you did.” 

According to foe woman's affidavit, 
she said foal she was assaulted Dec. 29 
at Williams's house by Williams and a 
third man, who has nor been publicly 
identified. She said foat irvin held a gun 
to her head before foe assault. 

The allegations surfaced as foe Cow- 
boys were in foe midst of another play- 
off run, and it proved to be a major 
distraction. The Cowboys lost to the 
Carolina Panthers six days after the al- 
legations were -first reported. 

Friday night, coach Bany Switzer 
said he was pleased by foe vindication 
of his players: “We were confident. We 
knew it would come out this way.” 


-Deadmarsh’s Late Goal Lifts Avalanche 


,d 














The Associated Pros. 

Patrick Roy kept Colorado to toe 
game wifo his superb goal tending and 
Adam Deadmarsh's goal with 1*31 re- 
maining gave foe Avalanche a 3-2 vic- 
tory Saturday night. over the Maple 
Leafs in Toronto. 

Sandis Ozolinsb and Keith Jones also 
scored for the Avalanche, who are ^un- 
beaten in their last 10 games, evert 

MHHonwany . 

though they are without six 
players, including stars Joe Sakic, 
Forsbeig and Mike RiccL . 

Penguins 3, s*nvtor*3 Pittsburgh ex- 
tended its unbeaten streak to 11 games 
and rookie goaltender Patrick Lalimo 
ran his unbeaten streak to 13 with a tie 
against Ottawa. _ ' , 

Stu Barnes scored for Pittsburgh at 
6:41 of the third period to tie it 3-3. 

* Wfotlwtie,I^Imie{ll-(^2)nial<foed 

f foe former Philadelphia goalie Bob 
Froese wifo foe fond-longest unbeaten 
streak in NHL history. Froese went 12- 
0-1 duriqg foe 1982-83 season. 

3 . Capital* 3 In Philadelphia. 
Rod Brind’ Amour sored 1 wth .43 
seconds remaining as Philadelphia ral- 
lied to tie Washington. Washington is 
“unbeaten in its last five . 

John LeOair and John Dnwe also 
scored for foe Flyers- Peter Bondra, Joe 


Juneau and Sylvain Cote sewed Wash- 
ington’s "goals during a two-minute 
. stretch in foe second period, including 
two oh an extended power play. 

Cwwdlut 6p Brains 3 Montreal 
scored four times in three minutes in foe 
second period, rallying from a two-goal 
deficit. to, beat. Boston. 

: After Adam Oates gave Boston a 2-0 
lead 53 seconds into foe second period, 
Scott Thornton, Mark Recchi, Benoit 
Brunet and Stephane Richer scored on 
consecutive shots to chase goaltender 
Robbie Tafias. 

The win gave foe Canadiens a split of 
foe hotne-and-home series. The Bruins 
"beat Montreal 5-4 Thursday in Boston, 
ending Montreal's season-high seven- 
game unbeaten streak. 

Islander* 4»{j£htufrig 4 Igor Ulanov's 
shot from foe left point compleredatwo- 
goal third-period comeback as Tampa 
tied foe visiting New York Islanders. 

New York, which blew a lead en- 
tering the' final period, snapped a six- 
game losing streak. • 

Bi*cJitiaravK»3 ,R*d Wings 1 In Detroit, 
Chicago goaltender Ed Belfour ended a 
personal 10-game winless streak, stop- 
ping 32 shots as foe Blackhawks. beat 
slumping Detroit. 

Belfour had a 3-0 lead and was look- 
ing for his 31st career shutout before 
Brehdan Shanahan scored on a power- 
play for Detroit wifo 5: 19 left. 


Sbaifcs 2 , Otters i Defenseman Vlas- 
tinril Kroupa’s power-play goal mid- 
way through foe third period gave San 
Jose a victory in Edmonton. 

Kroupa, playing his sixth game of foe 
season for San Jose, fired a low shot 
from the blue line.tfaai went between the 
pads of Edmonton goalie Curtis Joseph, 
who was screened on foe play. 

Panthers 4, Flames 1 All-Star starter 
John Vanbiesbrouck made 40 saves and 
Ray Sheppard had a goal and an assist as 
visiting Florida beat Calgary. 

Tom Fitzgerald opened the scoring 
for Florida 3:34 into foe game. Las than 
two minutes later, Sheppard made it two 
goals on their first force shots as foe 
Panthers went ahead to stay. 

Vanbiesbrouck, who will start for die 
Eastern Conference in Saturday’s all- 
star game in San Jose, was sharp 
throughout — especially in the first 
period, when the Panthers were outshot 
18-13 but escaped with a 2-1 lead. 

Kings 2 , Bines 1 Dimitri Khristich 
scored with 33 seconds to play and 
Kevin Stevens stretched his scoring 
streak to three games with a power-piay 
goal as Los Angeles beat St Louis. 

Byron Dafoe started for foe first time 
in five games and his 27 saves helped the 
Kings stretch their winning streak to three 
games, matching their season high. 

Brett Hull scored on a power play for 
the Blues. 



mun spoHT 

***** 

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1 (ports TV channel, available via cable and satellite. 


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SOCCER Inter, Manchester United Close Lap. 16 FOOTBALL Irvin Is Cleared p. 1 7 BASEBALL Free- Agent Fan p.17 



PAGE 18 


** 


INNiRWrnnU W *1 

iicralo^sgg^fcnbunc 

Sports 


-. ..v"' «£y: 


MONDAV. JA.VLAR* 13. 199* -* 


World Roundup 


Tiger Pounces 

golf Tiger Woods stuck his lee 
shot at the first playoff hole within 
nine inches and tapped in for a 
birdie Sunday to bear T om Lehman 
in the Mercedes Championship. 

After rain forced the cancella- 
tion of the final round of the PGA 
tour opener in Carlsbad. Califor- 
nia. Lehmann and Woods, the 
joint leaders, went to a playoff. 

Woods collected S2 16.000 for 
first place, which took him to SI 
million in total winnings in just his 
ninth PGA start. The previous 
fastest millionaire was Ernie E(s. 
who took 27 events. 

Woods had shot a 65. the lowest 
round of the toumamenr Saturday, 
to catch Lehmann the leader after 
two rounds at 14 under, f AP. NYT) 

■ Annika Sorenstam, who was 
married eight days ago. shot a 6- 
under-par 66 to” win the LPGA 
Tournament of Champions by 
four shoes. 

“I’m walking on clouds.” she 
said. “I’m really happy inside, 
and I think that helped my golf 
game.” 

Sorenstam finished at 272. 16 
under par at the Weston Hills 
Country Club. She earned 
SI 15.0&0. Karrie Webb shot a 70 
and finished second at 276. (A P) 

Lara Hits Rapid 90 

CfUCKET Brian Lara smashed 90 
runs Sunday, and the West Indies 
scored 96 runs in the last 10 overs 
to beat Australia by four w ickets in 
Perth in the World Series Cup. The 
result eliminated Australia from 
the three-team tournament 

Mark Waugh made 92 as Aus- 
tralia reached 267 runs for seven 
wickets in its 50 oven.. The West 
Indies overhauled that total with 
four balls to spare. ( Reuters » 

Norris Keeps Titles 

boxing Terry Norris held onto 
his junior middleweight titles on 
Saturday, pummel ing Canadian 
Nick Rupa. who stood up to more 
punishment than seemed humanly 
possible before the fight was 
stopped in the 10th round. 

There were three other title 
fights on the card in Nashville. 
Tennessee. Khalid Rahilou of 
France took American Frankie 
Randall's World Boxing Associ- 
ation junior welterweight CTOwn. 

Felix Trinidad, the undefeated 
International Boxing Federation 
welterweight champion, came off 
the canvas in the second round and 
put away Briton Kevin Lueshing 
in the third. 

Henry Akinwande retained the 
lightly regarded World Boxing 
Organization heavy weight crown 
wiih a lopsided decision over fel- 
low Briton Scon Welch.fRfurersJ 

• In Boston, Daniel Zaragoza of 
Mexico narrowly held his World 
Boxing Council junior bantam- 
weight title with a split decision 
win over Ireland's Wayne Mc- 
Cullough in a bloody bout. ( API 

Wales Beats U.S. Eagles 

RUGBY UNION United States 
flanker Jay Wilkerson was sus- 
pended Sunday by his own coach. 
Jack Clark, for kicking Wales 
hooker Garin Jenkins during a 34- 
14 defeat in Cardiff on Saturday. 

Clark banned Wilkerson for 
four weeks after watching a video 
of the incident 

Wales had .struggled io victory 
in an unconvincing warmup for 
the Five Nations’ championship 
starting next weekend. {Reuters) 

Palmer Seeks Treatment 

golf Arnold Palmer piloted his 
private plane to Minnesota Sunday 
and will enter the Mayo Clinic for 
tests lo determine a course of treat- 
ment for prostate cancer. Palmer. 
67, found out Friday that a biopsy 
indicated he had cancer. f AP) 


Packers Run Over Panthers and Into Super Bowl 


Defense Shuts Down Carolina 
In a Frigid Green Bay 9 30-13 



Sam Mills of the Pathers, left, intercepting a pass intended for Packers’ Andre Rison in the first quarter Sunday. 


The Axsi\-tuieJ Press 

GREEN BAY. Wisconsin — The 
Green Bay Packers crushed the Carolina 
Panthers/ 30- 13. in the NFC champi- 
onship game Sunday, a victory’ that put 
them in the Super Bowl for the first time 
since Vince Lombardi's powerhouse 
played and beat Dallas in the “Ice 
Bowl” 29 years ago. 

This year's heroes were Brett Favre 
and Dorsey Levens. Antonio Freeman 
and Gilbert Brown, none of whom were 
bom when Lombardi's team gave "Tit- 
le town, USA" its fifth National Foot- 
ball League championship in seven sea- 
sons. 

The weather at 40-year-old Lam beau 
Field was not a big a factor this time. 

It was 3 degrees at game time with a 
wind-chill that smacked it into minus- 
17 — but that was 20 degrees warmer 
than the January day in 1968 when Bart 
Stare's quarterback sneak behind Jerry 
Kramer put the Pack in the second Super 
Bowl. 

Favre, whose two turnovers helped 
Carolina to an early lead, was 19 of 29 
for 292 yards, including touchdown 
passes of 29 yards to Levens and 6 yards 
to Freeman. 

Levens had 205 total yards — 88 
yards on 10 carries and 1 1 7 yards on five 
catches, including a 66-yard ramble on a 
screen pass that set up Edgar Bennett's 
four-yard touchdown run. 

The game was a contest for 29 
minutes, until the Packers scored 10 
points within 38 seconds in the first 
half s finaJ minute to rum a 10-7 deficit 
into a 17-10 lead. 

It was also a victory for sentiment. It 
means Reggie White. 35. the NFL's 
career sack leader, will go to his first 
Super Bowl, a goal that Favre and his 
teammates had aimed for all season. 

‘‘Green Bay. I hope you're proud of 


us because we're proud of you.” White 
told the crowd of 60,216 after the 
game. 

Carolina shocked the Packers by 
scoring 10 points after two turnovers by 
Favre. 

But it came down to the run. Green 
Bay did and Carolina didn't. The Pack- 
ers ran for 201 yards overall, the most 
against the Panthers this year. 

Brown sealed the middle of the Pack- 
er defense, shutting down Carolina and 
forcing the Panthers to do what they 
would prefer not to do — pass. 

So the Packers were running while 
the Panthers were leading, courtesy of 
an interception by Sam Mills off Favre 
that put the ball at the Green Bay 2, and 
led to Kerry Collins's three-yard touch- 
down pass to Howard Griffith. Score, 7- 
0. Carolina. 

But on the final play of the first 
quarter. Levens caught Carolina's zone 
blitz defense heading the wrong way 
and broke a 35-yard run to the Panthers' 
29. On the next play, the first of the 
second quarter, Favre found Levens for 
a touchdown that made it 7-7. 

Mike Fox forced a fumble by Favre 
thar set up John Kasay's 22-yard field 
goal that put Carolina ahead. 10-7. 

Then the Packers took control. 

First they drove 7 1 yards in 15 plays, 
chewing up 7 minutes 52 seconds, scor- 
ing on Favre' s 6-yarderto Freeman with 
48 seconds left in the half. 

It didn't even matter chat they were 
set back 15 yards for Freeman's illegal 
chop block — on the next play. Favre 
found Andre Rison for 22 yards. 

On Carolina's next play. Green Bay's 
Tyrone Williams made a one-handed in- 
terception of Collins's deep pass. Favre 
came back and hit Rison for 23 and 
Freeman for 25 to set up Jacke’s 31-yard 
field goal that made it 17-10 at halftime. 


It was 20-13 after Jacke and Kasay 
exchanged field goals. Then Favre and 
Levens again fooled the Carolina blitz 
with a screen thai carried to the Pan- 
thers' 4. Bennett took it in with 1 :58 left 
in the third quarter and it was 27-13. 

Green Bay inserted Jim McMahon 
for Favre on the final series. 

McMahon is one of two Packers with 
Super Bowl experience — he quarter- 
backed the Bears to a 46- 10 win over the 
New England Patriots 1 1 years ago. also 
in New Orleans. 

The Packers improved to 9-0 in the 
playoffs at their storied stadium and 
won their 18th straight overall there. 


Green Bay missed a trip to the Super 
Bow’l last season because of a 38-27 loss 
to Dallas in the NFC championship 
game. But this team, now 15-3, will 
head to New Orleans as the favorite over 
New England or Jacksonville to give the 
NFC its 13th straight title. 

“This team, on occasion, just likes to 
test me a little bit.” said Mike Holm- 
gren. the Packer coach, as he accepted 
the NFC trophy, "and today was no 
different. We deserve this, but we're not 
finished yet” 

Freeman said: “We weren't going to 
let it happen today like we did last year, 
when we lost it in the last 10 minutes.” 


■ A Pause That Refreshes 

A power outage with 7:32 remaining 
in the first half delayed the AFC Cham- 
pionship game between the Jackson- 
ville Jaguars and New England Patriots 
for 12 minutes. The Associated Press 
reported from Fox boro, Massachusetts. 

With Adam Vinatieri lining up to try 
a 29-yard field goal, about half the lights^! 
on the towers above Foxboro Stadium 
went out. Both teams were sent to the 
sidelines, where they discussed strategy 
during the delay. When the game re- 
sumed, Vinatieri made the field goal, 
giving the Patriots a 10-3 lead. 





Mi* Baier/Reums 


Michael Chang reaching for a volley in the final of the Colonial Classic in 
Melbourne. Chang defeated Pete Sampras, the world No. 1. 4-6, 6-4, 6-2. 


Stars Sparse at Australian Open 

Seles Injury Ruins Hopes of Showdown With Graf 


Sew York Times Service 

M elbourne — once again, 
the Australian Open, the first of 
the yearly quartet of Grand 
Slam tennis tournaments, is struggling to 
compose a star-studded field of con- 
tendere. 

Though the defending men’s cham- 
pion, Boris Becker, whose victory last 
year reve reed a five-year slide into Grand 
Slam obscurity, booked a return engage- 
ment. the women's titleholder did not. 

Last year Monica Seles, a four-time 
Australian Open champion, made a tri- 
umphant return to this hemisphere by 
capruring her first Grand Slam event 
since die 1993 Australian. 

But this year. Seles, who has had 
chronic health problems since her 
comeback in August 1995. has seen her 
chance to defend her title spoiled by a 
freakish injury. Reaching out her right 
hand to palm a ball during an exhibition 
warm-up last month, the ambidextrous 
Seles bent and broke her ring finger. 

So after previously spuming corrective 
shoulder surgery in part because it would 
have cost her the title defense she craved. 
Seles is out anyway. 

Seles said she was “very disappoint- 
ed.” after realizing she would miss the 
tournament that put her back into No. 1 
contention Iasi season. Thanks to the 
new ranking system on the women's 
circuit. Seles’s absence will leave her a 
distant No. 2 — at best. 

Very disappointed was the way Aus- 
tralian officials felt, too, when they real- 
ized their 1997 Open, beginning 
Monday, would not offer a showdown 
between Seles and Steffi Graf, who has 
been absent from this event three times 
in the last five years but has made ir her 
mission to compete this year. Like 
Seles. Graf is a four-time champion. 

Like Graf, the resurgent Becker has 
found his tax records under invest! ga- 


Vantage Point / Robin Finn 


lion in his native Germany, but neither 
that distraction, nor the residual aches of 
a dozen years on the circuit, have 
hampered his plans to defend his title. 

“Pain is normal," he said. “Some- 
times it’s die wrist, sometimes it's the 
knee or the back, but it really doesn't 
hamper my play. There’s two sides to 
everything, but the good side is now that 
I’m very fresh and eager to play.” 
Becker, ranked sixth, was dominant 
last year against every opponent in die 
Top 5, including Pete Sampras. 

f *We’ve developed a little rivalry,” 
said Sampras, a 1994 Australian Open 
champion wbo has won 10 of 17 meet- 
ings overall with Becker but lost two out 
of three in 1996. “1 still find him a threat 
on any surface, and he’ll definitely be a 
threat ar the Australian, and a threat to the 
ranking." 

Sampras said. "He’s been doing this 
for 10 or 12 years and he wants to end 
his career on a positive note.” 

Now a relatively ancient 29, Becker 
says he finished 1996 playing the best 
tennis of his career after rebounding 
from a serious wrist injury incurred at 
Wimbledon. Certainly it was the richest 
season of his career: helped along by a 
$1.8 million payday for winning the 
Grand Slam Cup, Becker won a tour- 
leading $4 million last year. 

Becker won Wimbledon as a teen- 
ager and, when his Grand Slam success 
dimmed after winning the 1991 Aus- 
tralian Open, he would always hint that 
he had "one Slam left” and that it 
would happen at Wimbledon. But he did 
nor argue when it rumed out to be the 
1 996 Australian Open that returned him 
to the Grand Slam winner's circle. 

“Now I'm in the autumn of my career 
and I’m not taking anything for granted." 


Becker said after defeating Michael 
Chang in four sets in last year’s finale. 

Andre Agassi, the 1995 Australian 
Open champion, announced a month 
ago Chat he deemed this Grand Slam 
hazardous to his schedule and. like Jana 
Novotna, was skipping it by choice. 

*T assessed what I would have to pull 
off and it became an impossibility," said 
Agassi, who made amends by” volun- 
teering for Davis Cup duty in Brazil next 
month. “I know I need to miss the Aus- 
tralian,” said Agassi, who won here on 
his first attempt and has not won any 
Grand Slam since. 

The men's side will also miss fourth- 
tanked Yevgeni Kafelnikov, the French 
Open champion, who broke his right 
hand last week; Wimbledon’s cham- 
pion, Richard Krajicek, who underwent 
knee surgery Dec. 9, and 12th-ranked 
Todd Martin, a 1994 finalist who with- 
drew because of a flare-up of tendinitis 
in his right shin. 

The drain of male seeded pi avers 
guaranteed that 19th-ranked Michael 
Stieh, the 1991 Wimbledon champion 
whose surprise trip to the 1996 French 
Open final showed that he. like Becker, 
can be dangerous anyplace, will move 
into a seeded spot. 

The two-time champion Courier, 
whose recent title in Doha. Qatar, has 
already equaled his title output from last 
year and moved his ranking to 15th. is 
hoping to again be a threat. Courier is/,' 
30-5 at this event. Only Becker (29-8^ 
and Sampras (.23-5) have had compa- 
rable success in Melbourne. 

• Mark Philippoussis of Australia 
withdrew from the Australian Open 
, 1 311 3011 injury. He was to 
play Tim Henman of Britain in the first 
round Monday. (AP) 




in the springtime. 


Even 1 country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling from France and other countries really 
easy. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country 
you're calling from and you’ll get the fastest, clearest 
connections. And be sure to charge your calls on your 
AT&T Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to 60%? 
So please check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


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Steps to loOow when catling 
kteraakraally (rani overseas: 

l.Just dial the AT&T Access Numher 

fwiheomntn yuu are calling fmm 
I Dial the phone number you're calling. 

5. Dial lhe ailing card number listed 
ahtue your lunte. 


Austria *o 
BaJglem* 


AT&T Access Num bers 

' EUROPE 


822-983-011 

_ . 9*808-180-10 

■™ MM-9M811 

• 0130-0010 

00-880-1311 

SJ" - 1-888-55MW 

H* - ••••• 172-1011 

NNwtlamlt* 86-022-9111 

Russia •*(Hoscm)» 755-5042 

908-9908-11 

‘ • . 020-795-811 

Switzerland* — 


MIDDLE EAST 


Eflipl*(Galro)T 


SaifllJArablso. 


510-8208 

177-188-27Z7 

..1-008-18 


Kenya* 

SmftAMca . ... 


AFRICA 

• ... -81* 

D-8D0-J0