Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


> 


.-•W-i 


M 



.n? = ^ p ■ 

- .-j. :.fJ- 


Is Booming -^Abroad 

Government's Measures Aren't Enough 
To Keep Firms From Moving Jobs East 


By John Schmid 

Inurnatwnta Herald TYibeM . 

FRANKFURT — : Even as Germany 
faces record unemptoyment, fWir.gr> 
companies plan to continue poshing 
jobs abroad, creating at least 300,000 
outside German borders in the next 
three years, most of them in low-cost, 

- ^low-wage locations in Eastern Europe, 
according to a recently released sur- 
vey. : 

‘ The findings, based on a survey late- 
last year of 7,500 companies by the 
German Industry and Trate Federation, 
or DKIT, indicate that Germany’s ef- 
forts in the last year to promote business 
and save jobs through lower payroll 
costs and deregulation measures “’are 
not enough,” the federation said. 

The survey indicates that the push by 
German industry to create jobs abroad 
win continue tmdhninished, or even ex- 
pand, until at least the end of the cen- 
tury, economists said. 

; ' The federation report casts further 
doubt on the. government’s ambitious 
goal of halving German unemployment 
by the turn of the centiny, said Walter 
Kaiser, a federation spokesman. 

Unemployment fan 4.1 million in 
December, or 1 0.8 percent of the work 
force, and is widely expected to surpass 
all previous postwar records in coming 
months by rising as high as 4.5 million, 
government officials and economists 
say. 

- Stesp labor costs were cited as the 
overriding reason for plans to create ‘ y at 


•; By James F. Clarity • 

• 1 New YorkTbrtegSerncr ■■■ '■■ ■ 

BELFAST The overwhelmingly 
Catholic huh Republican ^npy has ac- 
knowfcdgedtoatan increasing number of 
Catholics inBetfasthave begun to inform 
on toe guerrilla organization's planned 
violent attacks and has wanted toat it will 
punish such mfotmets. 

The IRA’s adaiOwtedginent and its 
■threat of reprisals do informers are rare 
occurrences, according toofficials,out- 
skfe specialises and Catoohcs^ who five in 
areas where for decades residents, often 
out of fear of violent pumshment, have 
connived at IRA guenula action whether 
ra nra they supported it 
British officials confirmed Monday 
toat the number of Catholic informers 
was rising, saying, without giving spe- 
cific figures; toat in recent weeks toe 
informers hart begun to telephone the 
police of the Royal Ulster Constabulary 
to disclose information they bad on 

the people of Belfast fear an 
upsurge in violence. Page 2. - 

violent operations being planned by the 
IRA. The police say they can tell toe 
informers live, in Catholic pei fibly r- 
hoods from the nature" of their infor- 
mation on particular JRA guerrillas 
already known to toe authorities^ 

A etty councilman, Jim Rodgers, said: 
"A lot of information is craning in from 
'nationalis t areas that wasn't coming in 
Wore. It’s of a very higfr quality.” 

. The information has helped thwart 
several bomb attacks, police and other 
officials say. Last week, toe TRA, in 
another rare public sta temen t, m ade r t 
: clear it intended to continue its cam- 
paign of violence . to end British sov- 
ereignty in predominantly Protestant 
Northern Ireland. . «. .. 

"More people are lifting toe tele- 
phone,” an official in Britain’s N orth- 
era Ireland Office, which admini s te rs 
the province, said of Belfast-areaCath- 
blics. ‘‘They are voting with their fin- 
gers. They’ve prevented quite a lot of 
nasty incidents: There isa tote nmnii^ 


- Politicians, specialists and ordinary 

H .. 1" *« nf DoYfUf* ly mfiw iwti 


umgac iranKu» wi 

the official account and said toe return 
fat tbe rise in informing was toe IRA s 
resumption of its campaign erf violence 
in Northern Ireland, where people had 

. r. tnffi VMTC nttpr 


least” 300,000 jobs abroad in the next 
three yean, with most of them ear- 
marked for Eastern Europe, the fed- 
eration survey sakL 

Thar perpetuates a maid in corporate 
Germany that inchides toe tnggesibhte- 
chips, such as -Daimler-Benz AG and 
Siemens AG, and armies of small 
companies. 

In toe federation poll, 28 percent of 
the companies surveyed intend to step 
up hiring outside Germany, up from 25 
percent when the poll was last taken in 

. Tbe 300,000 new jobs would com- 
pare with 237,000 in toe years 1992- 
1994, toe previous three-year period 
that toe federation tracked job growth 
abroad. 

To attack rising labor costs, toe gov- 
ernment last year risked social unrest 
with a package of pro-business dereg- 
ulation and welfare and entitletoeur 
cuts. 

The measures left German society 
polarizedahdpuf toe government under 
severe strain. They also damaged Ger- 
many’s system of bringing together 
workers, government and management 
to find consensus on toe country’s eco- 
nomic situation. „ 

Efforts have been under way in the 
first weeks of! this year to revive toe 
series of romdtable talks ted by Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl, winch include in- 
dustry and union officials. Mr. Kohl 
abandoned such middle-ground efforts 

See GERMANY, Page 6 


morm 




femes declared cease-fires in 1994. 

TbeslRA broke its 17-monto cease-fire 
in February 1996 with a series of bomb 
attacks in England.- But the increase in 
informers did not begin until toe out- 
lawed guerrilla organization began to at- 
tack again last autumn in the province. 

* In October, there was an IRA bomb 
attack on toe British Army headquarters’ 
at Lisburn, 10 miles (16 kilometers) 
south of Belfast, that killed one army 
officer and wounded 30 people, some of 
tfam civilians. 

- But qq New Year’s Eye, a planned 
bombing of Belfast Castle, a restaurant 
and meeting hall run by the Gfty Council, 
with a van holding 1,000 pounds (455 
kilograms) of explosives was aborted, 
police said, when they were called by an 
informer and nished Do the scene. In 
recent weeks, other attacks have been 
prevented by informers calling the spe- 
cial telephone number that is painfedTon 
toe ubiquitous police Land Rovers that 
patrol the streets of the dty. 

On Friday, toe IRA tied up traffic in 
Belfast with about ZOfalse bomb warn- 
ings that kept police and army troops 
ruriung around. - 
- None of the vehicles indicated by the 
IRA hoaxers turned out to have ex- 
plosives in them, suggesting that the 
jj mfyrfflas were responding to decreas- 
ing support among local Carbolics. 

One Catholic resident said it was no 
scat, in Catholic nationalist areas that 
many Carbolics who apee connived at 
IRA violence wore turning against h. The 
resident said that people in Catholic 
raghborfaoods usually knew the local 
Ir£ operatives and sometimes watched 

See INFORMERS, Page 6 


NawYortt Monday doM partem riew 

PM • 1.5887 1.s5si 

Pound 1JS7S5 !<® 

Yon 11*475 116.125 

FF 5.3805 &3506 


r 

The Dow 


-t&SO • 

6709.18 

070179 

1 S&P 500 | 

chang* 

Monday dote 

prawkMJBCtnaa 


in Nortoern Ireland, where people oo p rAA T n| 1p ¥ 

«en peace far more toan two years after 3 UlT MJluKX 

eu« PmtRfitant haraniilitary — ' 


toe IRA and Protestant paramilitary 

’ " HawaatandPng* 

Bahrain ^..IJJOO Kn 

Cyprus C. E1.00 Mfl«la- 125 £S , SS 

Danmark ...14jQQ DJfr. Otvm— 
Finiand.-.iaC»FJ4 
GbraBar £0.85 

Gnat Britain -SOSO Arabw R 
Egypt_i£ 550 a Africa -FttZ + VAT 
SSCHl^SO-® UAt^lO.OODkh 

Kenya.. K. SK 150 US. W. 

1 iSS: 000 Fite 2nrt*tfB~2SndBM0 

D3 


Ife Standard & Poor’s Compos- 
ite Index of 500 Snxks has been 





on Page 1. . 

TTieS&P500i»ovidesoneofthe 
broadest and most accurate mea- 
sures of the U.S. markers, repre- 
senting about 80 percent of the mar- 
ket value ofall issues traded on the 

as some Aroerican^rik&dutnge 
and Nasdaq stocks. 

"* Tbe Trio Index, toe doBar-de- 
oominated measure of worid mar- 
ket movements, can be found in the 
World Stock Markets table in the 



Middle Path Sought 
By Justices Weighing 
Clinton Sex Lawsuit 


By Joan Biskupic 

Washington Post Senice 

WASHINGTON — » Taking up the 
politically charged case of Paula Corbin 
Jones, Supreme Court justices appeared 
troubled Monday by toe notion of grant- 



ALGERIA MASSACRE — The wife and son of a man slain by 
Muslim extremists mourning Monday in a village outside Algiers. 
Tbe attackers killed 14 villagers and pat their beads on stakes. Car 
bombings and massacres have left 330 dead in two months. Page 6. 


a sexual harassment lawsuit or any other 
civil case until be leaves office. 

But the justices nonetheless were 
wary of burdening toe man who runs tbe 
nation, and were concerned about bal- 
ancing both President Bill Clinton's in- 
terests and those of Ms. Jones, who has 
alleged that Mr. Clinton sexually har- 
assed her in 1991 when Mr. C tin too was 
governor of Arkansas and she a low- 
level state employee. 

By toe end of toe hourlong session, it 
appeared toat tbe justices were looking 
for some middle ground that would ac- 
count for both toe demands on the pres- 
ident’s time and tbe interests of a com- 
plaining party. Justice Anthony Kennedy 
observed that a person ’s reputation could 
be turned and toe ultimate success of a 
case foiled if a president were protected 
from a court proceeding but able to use 
his high office against a litigant. 

"He is in a very dominant position,” 
Justice Kennedy said of the president 


The question before the justices is 
whether a sitting president is immune 
from a private civil -damages lawsuit 
until he leaves office. The case presents 
a significant constitutional dilemma 
toat would affect the institution of toe 
presidency and all who assume toe 
White House. 

But the case's immediate import has 
been political, as tbe occasion of the oral 
arguments have renewed attention on 
Ms. Jones’s allegations that Mr. Clinton 
made etude sexual advances and sought 
sex from her in an Arkansas hotel room. 
Mr. Clinton has denied making any sexu- 
al advances. 

The specific allegations — although 
not directly before toe justices — have 
become fodder for newspaper head- 
lines, magazine covers and television 
pundits. Heard exactly one week before 
Mr. Clinton's second inaugural, the case 
has the potential to haunt toe president 
throughout his second term. 

A packed courtroom, including about 
120 reporters and a few senior White 
House advisers, beard the justices vig- 
orously question lawyers for each side. 
Mr. Clinton’s lawyer, Robert Bennett, 
argued toat toe Constitution's separa- 

See COURT, Page 6 


In South Korea, a Harsh Revival of Intolerance 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Post Service 

SEOUL — The day after a North 
Korean submarine ran aground off 
South Korea list September and its 26 
armed crewmen came ashore, Yoon 
Seofc Jin posted a skeptical note on a 
domestic computer bulletin board. 

“Perhaps they ran aground by ac- 
cident,” wrote Mr. Yoon, 27, doubting 
initial South’ Korean government reports 
that'lhe submarine crewmen were spies. 

“1 have to question whether they are 
aimed commandos,” be wrote, suggest- 
ing toat toe Seoid government might have 
“deceived” the public into believing that 
a routine surveillance mission gone 
wrong was something mote sinister. 


Fra expressing those opinions. Mr. 
Yoon is paying dearly. South Korean 
police raided his home and confiscated 
his computer and disks. Prosecutors 
have asked a judge to sentence him to a 
year and a half in prison. A ruling is due 
this week. 

Mr. Yoon, an unemployed recent col- 
lege graduate, is charged with violating 
perhaps the most contradictory aspect of 
South Korea’s democracy: its strict Na- 
tional Security Law, which makes it 
illegal to “support, encourage or 
praise” Communist North Korea. Hun- 
dreds of people are charged every year 
with violating the law. 

from the early 1960s though the late 
1980s, South Korea was run by a mil- 
itary dictatorship, and critics of the se- 


curity law say it is a vestige of those 
more ruthless days, when riot police 
beat those who disagreed with the gov- 
ernment and tear gas was a standard 
law-enforcement tool. 

Two weeks ago. President Kim 
Young Sam restored powers to enforce 
the security law to tbe Agency for Na- 
tional Security Planning, toe domestic 
intelligence agency. In a much criti- 
cized secret session of toe legislature, 
ruling party members- gathered at 6 
AM., convening a quorum without 
telling opposition lawmakers, and ap- 
proved toe tougher security law. 

Another item on the agenda was new 
labor legislation that has so outraged 
union workers toat hundreds of thou- 
sands have gone on strike, idling auto 


Georgia Bridles at Russia’s Heavy Hand 

Feisty Republic Seeks to Conciliate Geography and New Identity 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New Tort Times Service 

TBILISI, Georgia — The Georgians 
were toe last to know. Without a hint of 
consultation with this country’s author- 
ities, toe Russian border guards who still 
patrol Georgia’s frontiers seized the Al- 
maz, a Ukrainian ship, and brought it to 
toe Georgian post of Batumi. 


r-JfcL-^ 

a ■»«&„ 


CHECHNYA^ 




ARMENIANS . ; ’ •" 


After being spirited to Russia and 
charged with smuggling during a pre- 
vious port call in Russia, the Ukrainian 
sailors were released. 

But toe heavy-handed and humili- 
ating demonstration of Russian military 
power has fanned toe debate here over 
toe continued presence of Russian 
troops and Georgia's search fra a new, 
more Western identity. 

“A general in Moscow of the border 
guards thinks and assumes tony without 
asking Georgia be can still confiscate 
the ship,” President Eduard Shevard- 
nadze said in an interview. “And toat is 
the continuation of inertia.” 

“Those who were in the center were 
used to the fact that their words had the 
force of law and toat all those in the 
periphery should obey,” said Mr. 
Shevardnadze, a former Soviet foreign 
minister. 

After gaining independence in the 
1991 breakup of the Soviet Union, this 
proud and poor nation of 5 J million has 
been redirecting its economy away from 
Russia and toward toe West. 

Turkey, not Russia, is now Georgia’s 


main trading partner. The West, not 
cash-strapped Moscow, is toe main 
source of credits and foreign assistance. 
The International Monetary Fund is tbe 
only foreign organization with an office 
in toe government building in Tbilisi. 

With an eye on Western trading part- 
ners, Georgia has big plans. In March, 
construction is to stair on a pipeline toat 
will carry oil from the Caspian Sea 
region to the Black Sea port of Supsa. 

The pipeline is expected to generate a 
modest 58 million in annual revenue. 
But Georgian officials say they hope it is 
a sign of Georgia's potential as a trading 
crossroads. Georgia is already emerging 
as a transit route for Uzbek cotton, the 
first time Uzbekistan has been able to 
get its conon to foreign markets without 
crossing Russian territory. 

Meanwhile, rail and road links be- 
tween Russia and Georgia remain cut, a 
casualty of instability in the breakaway 
Georgian province of Abkhazia and the 
war in neighboring Chechnya, which 
wants to break away from Russia. 

See GEORGIA, Page 6 


factories and shipyards and costing the 
country more than $1 billion in lost 
production. 

Kwon Young Kil, toe chief strike 
leader, says be believes toe two laws are 
related. Because the government fears 
the trade unions, it will attempt io paint 
them as Communist-controlled ana use 
toe security agency to break up strikes 
and toe union leaderships, he said. 

Mr. Kwon and many other critics 
argue that toe passage of the security 
law. along with toe clandestine way it 
was done, suggest that South Korea is 
retreating toward its authoritarian pasL 
By giving the domestic spy agency in- 
creased leeway in investigations and 

See KOREA, Page 4 


Russia Presses 
Belarus Unify 

An ailing President Boris Yeltsin 
is urging his counterpart in Belarus 
to move faster toward possible 
unity between their two countries, a 
spokesman disclosed Monday. 

Mr. Yeltsin suggested holding a 
referendum in each country on uni- 
on and possibly setting up a joint 
government, said toe spokesman, 
Sergei Yastrzhembsky. 

Mr. Yeltsin, who is hospitalized 
with double pneumonia, outlined a 
plan for unification “in some form 
or another” in a letter to President 
Alexander Lukashenko of Belarus, 
the spokesman said. 

The plan calls for a joint budget, 
currency and tax system, for mer- 
ging fuel and energy systems, and 
synchronizing economic reforms. 

Meanwhile, toe spokesman said 
that Mr. Yeltsin, 65, would prob- 
ably remain in toe hospital for ai 
least two more days and warned 
news organizations not to be “too 
oprimisne” about toe Kremlin 
chiefs release date. (Page 51 


Letter-Bomb Attack Wounds 2 
At Arab Newspaper in London 


AGENDA 


By Fred Barbash 

Washington Pott Service 

LONDON — A letter bomb exploded 
Monday morning at toe Loudon 
headquarters of toe Arable-language 
newspaper Al Hayat, wounding two se- 
curity guards. 

‘ Al Hayat is toe same publication tar- 
geted by letter-bombing in Washington 
this month. 

Shortly after tbe explosion Monday, 
toe police discovered four other suspect 
parcels and carried out controlled ex- 
plosions in the newspaper’s basement to 
make them safe. 

[A letter bomb addressed to toe paper 
farced toe evacuation Monday of at 
least two floors of the United Nations’ 
headquarters in New York, The As- 
sociated Press reported. 

[A UN spokesman, Fred Eckhard, said 
the device, addressed to toe UN bureau of 
Al Hayat, had been found in the central 
mail room at UN headquarters. UN 
sources told i±te Reuters news service that 
it bore an Alexandria, %ypt. postmark. 
Mr. Bckhard said that a second Tetter 
bomb bad been fomxl later in the day in a 


messinger room ai toe UN and that police 
specialists had been called in to dismantle 
it One of the letter bombs was blown up 
by bomb specialises in the UN basement 
garage, he said] 

Jihad Khazen, editor of tbe Saudi 
Arabian owned paper, continued to ex- 
press bewilderment at tbe motive for 
whar now appears to be an organized 
tenor campaign against toe paper, 
which is known for its balanced cov- 
erage of Middle Eastern affairs. 

As in the case of toe attempts in 
Washington, he said there had been no 
warning and no claim of responsibility 
for toe attack. As in Washington, be said 
be believed toe parcels in London had 
come from Alexandria. Egypt, though 
he said he was not certain of this. 

Al Hayat employs about a hundred 
editorial and business staff at its London 
base in toe Hammersmith neighborhood 
of West London. After tbe letter bombs 
were received in Washington, Al Hayat 
obtained a scanning machine designed 
to detect letter bombs and set up a mail 
room in its basement The letter toat 

See BLAST, Page 6 


Bulgarian Socialists 
Agree to Elections 

As Bulgarians continued toeir 
demonstrations, toe ruling Socialist 
Party chi Monday agreed, in principle. 
OO the holding of early elections, the 
main demand of toe protesters. Thou- 
sands of workers went on strike 
Monday in support of the protests, 
with wider walkouts planned for Tues- 
day and Wednesday, hi Sofia, about 
30,000 people marched through the 
city center Monday, the fourth straight 
day of demonstrations, (Page 2) 

AMERICAS P&043. 

More Gunfire ai Besieged Embassy 

ASUURACfFIC Pag»4. 

The Dalai Lama h to FTsft Taiwan 

BUSMESS/FINANCE Page 11. 

Airbus Mooed Toward Restructuring 


■A Y'ikz 









Page 10. 


............ Page 10. 

Opinion 

— Pages 8-9. 

Sprats — — ......... 

Pages 10-19. 


Steve HoHnd/The Auamfed pms 

DOWN AND OUT — Boris 
Becker, defending champion of 
the Australian Open, was upset 
in Monday's first round. Page 19. 














PAGE TWO 


4 Dangerous Times 7 / Tensions on the Rise 


Again, Fear Is Dogging Both Sides in Ulster 


By James F. Clarity 

Near }\vk Times Sen ice 


B ELFAST — The people of the 
predominantly Roman Cathol- 
ic working class neighborhood 
called The Markets, near the 
main railroad station, are jamming the 
steel bars behind their front doors again, 
bracing them against attacks. 

They fear that the Protestant paramil- 
itaries in this predominantly Protestant, 
British-ruled province are getting ready to 
end their self-imposed cease-fore in re- 
sponse to the recent increase in a cam- 
paign of violence by the overwhelmingly 
Roman Catholic Irish Republican Array. 

“People are frightened again." said Pau- 
line Hegney. 32, a Catholic mother of four 
whose husband. KarL a house painter, was 
shot and killed by Protestant gunmen five 
years ago as he walked home from a pub. 

“We're just waiting every night for 
the loyalists to strike," she said, re- 
ferring to Protestants who want British 
rule to continue. 

She noted that people had removed the 
steel bars after the IRA. and later the 
Protestants, had begun cease-fires in the 
autumn of 1994. The IRA ended its 
cease-fire 1 1 months ago, but so far, the 
Protestant cease-fire is still in effect. 

Mrs. Hegney disagrees with the IRA 
contention that it represents the interests 
of Catholics. Like many people in North- 
ern Ireland, she chinks that the IRA 
should restore its cease-fire and that Sinn 
Fein, its political wing, must be allowed 
into peace negotiations if there is to be 
any chance of ending (he violent conflict 
that has tom the province since 1969. 
killing 3 .210 people. 

“The tension had eased" Mrs. 

Hegney said "Now it’s back." Her 10- 
year-old daughter. Julia-Anne. eased into 
her mother’s arms in the neat living room, 
with a picture of Jesus on the wall, of their 
small red-brick house in a public housing 
complex. “I’m afraid of being shot,” 
JuJia-Anne whispered “I’m too 
young.” 

Gerry Adams, president of Sinn Fein, 
has described the sharp rise of IRA activ- 
ity here in recent weeks by saying: “The 
genie, in many ways, is back out of the 
bottle. We are looking once again at 
dangerous times.” 

No one from the Protestant majority or 
the Roman Catholic minority disagrees. 

Since Christmas week, the IRA has car- 
ried outaseriesof attacks on police and army troops 
and more than 20 hoax warnings of bomb attacks. 
The Irish News, the favorite paper of most Catholics 
here, said the IRA operations were the most ex- 
tensive in die province since before die cease-fire. 

Chi Jan. 6, the IRA demolished a guard box 
outside the High Court here with a rocket-propelled 
grenade, injuring a policeman. A man charged with 
complicity in the attack was identified as being 
from The Markets, which makes residents of the 
area fear that they are likely targets for a Protestant 
reprisal. Residents say the suspect, Brendan Mcll- 
venny, 27, is a minor IRA operative. 

On Thursday, die outlawed group, in a rare public 
statement of policy, made clear that it intended to 
continue to use violence in its campaign co end British 








■A .. . 

$PRWQFtEtp ; ' 


HD. 






JVist 


Uu, 


'V 






; . **>**!i£r 

'/•*! .v'.T 
.•v * 


•I'.r. 


V# 


The Irish Republican Army has made it clear that it 
intends to continue to use violence in its campaign to 
end British sovereignty in Northern Ireland. Many Ulster 
residents now fear that Protestant paramilitaries will 
end their self-imposed cease-fire. 


sovereignty in Northern Ireland. On Friday, the IRA 
snarled traffic and caused chaos in Belfast as its op- 
eratives, using recognized identification codes, made 
about 20 phone calls warning that car bombs were 
about to be detonated in various pans of the city. 

Police and army troops in camouflage combat 
uniforms carrying automatic rifles spent die after- 
noon and most of the night rushing around town with 
screeching sirens on armored Land Rovers, taping off 
areas and protectively destroying suspect vehicles 
with explosions that boomed across the city. 

Most of the calls proved to be hoaxes, intended, 
the police say, to terrorize civilians and emphasize 
that the IRA is still able to place bombs where and 
when it pleases. 

Catholic nationalists, who want closer ties with 


NYT 


the Irish Republic, as well as Protestant 
unionists, who want to remain part of 
Britain, have condemned the attacks. 
“We don’t want to go back to the dark 
days again,” said Jim Rodgers, a unionist 
city council member. 

“It’s like the bad old days again,” said 
David Davin-Power. die chief correspon- 
dent here for Dublin-based Irish national 
radio and television. 

EOPLE HERE say they feel that a 
new crisis is building that could 
further impede the peace talks 
that began here in June. The talks 
have been in check because the IRA 
ended its 17-month cease-fire last Feb- 
ruary with a series of attacks in England 
and Northern Ireland. 

Britain and Ireland have said that Sinn 
Fein cannot attend the talks until the IRA 
resumes its cease-fire, and Britain says 
there would have to be a waiting period to 
determine whether the IRA intends to 
abandon violence forever. The IRA in- 
dicates that it will not restore the cease-fire 
unless it is guaranteed that the move would 
result in the immediate inclusion of Sinn 
Fein in the talks. 

There is little expectation that this 
circle can be squared until after British 
parliamentary elections, which must take 
place before June. Until then, the best that 
officials say they can expect would be that 
the violence would get no worse. 

John Hume, leader of the mainstream, predom- 
inantly Catholic Social Democratic and Labor Party, 
notes that in the IRA policy statement there is a promise 
to cooperate in a “meaningful process.” But most 
people who follow the situation say the statement is 
another way of saying Sinn Fein must be allowed into 
the talks immediately, without conditions. 

“I can see the logic in the Republican position,” . 
said Paul Arthur, a political science professor at 
Ulster University, "hi their low-intensity war, the 
IRA is using violence to communicate, to say we 
haven’t gone away — we can switch it on and off. 
This keeps die activists relatively happy and united. 
But this is dangerous. One operation goes wrong 
and leads to an atrocity, killing civilians, and the 
whole thing spins out of control” 


ingou 


Bulgaria Socialists, in Shift, to Accept Early Vote 


ConpBoi by Otr SutfFrcm Dnpnrtei 

SOFIA — The governing Socialist 
Party accepted oq Monday the principle 
of early legislative elections in Bulgaria 
as called for by the opposition, the ex- 
ecutive committee of the former Com- 
munist Parly announced. 

“The party accepts the principle of 
early elections in die context of a na- 
tional anti-crisis program,” the party 
said in a statement read out on two 
television channels. 

Thousands of Bulgarians have 
demonstrated across the country for 10 
days, hitting the streets in Sofia since 
Friday, demanding that the unpopular 
government call immediate elections. 

Although the government resigned 
last month, the Socialist Party, the 
largest in Parliament, has refused to 
grant early elections. A vote is not 
scheduled until December 1998. 

Georgi Parvanov, chairman of the 
Socialist Party, which won the last elec- 
tions in 1994, agreed Sunday to open 
talks on early elections, but only on the 


condition that the opposition "scop the 
confrontations” and allow his party to 
form a new government with a program 
for at least a year. 

But the opposition wants die Social- 
ists to call elections immediately. 

Under die constitution, the Socialists, 
can continue ruling until the next elec- 
tion. 

The chances of that happening di- 
minished Friday after clashes around 
the Parliament between protesters and 
police. 

The opposition said 258 people were 
injured, while the Socialists put the fig- 
ure at 179. 

Monday, for the fourth straight day, 
about 30,000 people marched through 
the center of Sofia. 

The opposition, encouraged by daily 
demonstrations in neighboring Serbia 
against another unpopular regime, 
blames the Socialist Party for the grow- 
ing poverty and spiraling inflation that 
have made their country one of the 
paupers of Eastern Europe. 


Inflation in Bulgaria is currently es- 
timated at 311 percent, with the econ- 
omy verging on collapse. 

Shouting "Pobeda” (victory) and 
“Never again the Communists,” the 
demonstrators filed in front of the Al- 
exander Nevsky Cathedral, nexr to the 
scene of the violent clashes. 

“Governments come and go, people 
remain.” one fervent anti -Comm uni sc 
told the crowd. "We don’t have any 
alternative to victory to stop die red 
mafia pillaging Bulgaria.” 

Earlier Monday, students marched 
past the embassies of the United States, 
Italy and Austria and sent in petitions 
demanding the support of the United 
States, the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization and the European Union. 

They also called on the West to with- 
hold financial support for the country 
for as long as the former Communists 
remain in power. 

The opposition has called for a gen- 
eral strike to increase pressure on the 
Socialists, which could begin Wednes- 


day, according to Stefan Raicbev, chair- 
man of the strike committee of the Pro- 
mi ana union, close to die opposition. . 

On Monday, thousands of workers 
went on strike to push the government 
into a vote, and the country’s largest 
labor union pledged to stop work Tues- 
day. 

Krastyu Petkov, the leader of the 
Confederation of Independent Trade 
Unions, which claims 1.5 million mem- 
bers in this country of 8.5 million, said it 
would join labor protests called by the 
opposition to paralyze Bulgaria's 
already moribund economy and press its 
demand for early elections. Action will 
start Tuesday, Mr. Petkov told the 
private radio Darik. 

Another independent union, 
Podkrepa. representing several hundred 
thousand workers, said its members 
would join the nationwide strike Wed- 
nesday. 

The opposition has the support of 
incoming president Peter Stoyanov, 
who takes office on Jan. 22. (AFP, AP) 


Protests Open Up Rifts 
In Serbian Ruling Party 

Confusion Seen at the Center of Power 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Times Service 

BELGRADE — The battle for con- 
trol of Serbia’s key cities, which the 
opposition coalition appeared to win in 
November elections but lost when die 
government annulled the results, has 
opened serious rifts within the ruling 
Socialist Party. 

The faction that emerges triumphant 
from the power struggle will either pro- 
pel Serbia toward democracy, and to- 
ward compromise, or plunge the coun- 
try into an authoritarian rule that gives 
up any pretense of democracy. 

The often conflicting and contradic- 
tory measures taken by the government 
over the past few weeks. Western dip- 
lomats contend, are a measure of the 
confusion and lack of direction that cur- 
rently grips those around President 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

Slobodan Milosevic. Although the pres- 
ident has become even more reclusive 
and uncommunicative than in the past, 
refusing even to meet with Western 
ambassadors, many here say they see 
hints of a compromise to end the two- 
month-old political crisis. 

“Tensions have been simmering 
within the government for months,” 
said a senior Western diplomat, “but it 
took tens of thousands of proresters on 
the streets of Belgrade and other large 
cities to open these deep and perhaps 
permanent rifts. From what we see, the 
voices of reason are more numerous.” 

Many government workers no longer 
have the stomach to fight the opposition 
and to tarnish the country's image 
abroad even further, especially after the 
sanctions imposed on Serbia over Mr. 
Milosevic’s role in supporting Bosnian 
Serbs during the war in Bosnia. 

Two deputy prime ministers in Mr. 
Milosevic's Socialist government, in an 
unexpected move, said on Saturday that 
certain results in the Serbia-wide mu- 
nicipal elections should not have been 
canceled. They went on to say that the 
"genuine and final” outcome must be 
respected. 

Serbia's independent press has also 
reported that Prime Minister Mirko 
Marjanovic has been fired. And while 
the report has not been confirmed, stu- 
dent demonstrators who attempted to 
meet Mr. Marjanovic were told he was 
“absent.” 

The mayor of Belgrade, Nebojsa 
Covic. who reportedly was ready to 
hand over city hall to the opposition 
after the November vote, has also called 
on the government to respect the initial 
vote count. 

The decision by senior members of 
Mr. Milosevic's government to ques- 
tion the annulment publicly would have 
been unthinkable two months ago. And 
it seems to indicate, diplomats said, a 
depth of feeling within the governing 
party dial confrontation could be a fatal 
mistake. 

Most senior police officials, and 
nearly all senior military officials, have 
told die president that they will not use 
force to crush the street protests, West- 
ern diplomats said. 

“In many ways, Mr. Milosevic has 
no choice,” said a European diplomat. 

* * He may not want to compromise, but it 
doesn ’t look like he has a lot of choice. I 
think a lot of people within bis own 
party now see this. 

“This is a revolution; it is slow and 
laborious, but the centers of power will 
not be the same when this is over.” 

The Greek foreign minister, 
Theodoras Pangalos, after weekend 
talks with Mr. Milosevic, said dm he 
thought a solution "was possible soon' ’ 
based on a report by the Organization 
for Security and Cooperation m Europe, 
which was permitted by the government 
to review the election results, that up- 
held opposition victories in disputed 
elections. 

The Zajedno opposition coalition 
won control of 14 of Serbia’s 19 largest 
cities, including the capital, Belgrade, 
and second largest city, Nis. But the 
government hastily canceled the vic- 
tories, charging unspecified “irregular- 
ities.” The annulment sparked the eighL 
weeks of protests. 


A delegation led by the former prime 
minister of Spain, Felipe Gonza l ez, on 
behalf of the Organization for Security 
and Cooperation In Europe, declared the 
elections valid and called on the gov- 
ernment to respect the opposition vic- 
tories. - 2 

“From what we have discussed up to 
now, it seems that the Gonzalez report 
has to be applied totally, including the 
city council of Belgrade, ’ ’ Mr. Pangalos 
said, 

“My deep belief is that a solution is 
possible and those who should take the 
appropriate steps should take them in> 
mediately so as not to have con- 
sequences that will be extremely an- 
noying for the economy and the strength 
and existence of Serbia. 

Part of the division among the Sop 
cialists comes from the role of the 
Yugoslav United Left, founded three 
years ago and led by Mr. Milosevic's 
wife, Miijao 3 Markovic. 

Many in the Socialist Party voice _ 
open contempt for Miss Markov icVi 
party, a collection of neo-Communists 
that has siphoned power from the So- 
cialists and advocated a hard line 
against the daily street protests, calling 
the protesters “terrorists” and “foreign 
agents." 

The forays by the United Left party 
into government ministries, the art§. 
state-owned factories and the state-run 
media has annoyed old party stalwarts 
who made the switch from Communist 
rule to Mr. Milosevic's government. 

Any compromise would help open 
the political debate and lessen the gov- 
ernment's iron grip on state institutions. 

It would also assist the opposition co- 
alition in its struggle to topple Mr. Mi- 
losevic in elections later this year. 


Serb Coalition - 

. < 

Fears Protests - 
Face Violence ; 

Reuters 

BELGRADE — Organizing a huge 
Orthodox New Year’s Eve rally, Ser- 
bia’s opposition urged the army and 
police Monday to declare their position 
cm alleged demands tiiat the eight- week- 
old protests be crushed. 

“Top officials of the Socialist Party 
of Serbia and the Yugoslav United Left 
are demanding that the police use force 
to crush demonstrations in Serbia,” tf# 
Zajedno coalition said in a statement.* 

It alleged that the Socialist Party and 
the United Left were “obviously seek- 
ing to provoke large conflicts and im- 
pose an official state of emergency in 
Serbia. 

“The coalition therefore demands 
that the general staff of the army of 
Yugoslavia and the Serbian interior 
ministry protect the citizens and state 
interests of Serbia, which are being 
openly attacked and jeopardized” by 
the two parties, the coalition said. 

It did not reveal the source of its inr 
formation on the alleged plan to crack 
down on the democracy movement. 

But respected independent media 
have reported that a hard-line faction is 
pushing for drastic police action to get 
protesters off the streets. 

However, support for violent repres- 
sion was believed to be weak in the army 
and not so strong in the security police 
as in similar situations earlier in the 
decade-old rule of the autocratic pres-* 
ident, Slobodan Milosevic. 

At a recent meeting with Belgrade, 
students, who have sided with Zajedno 
in its peaceful daily protests, the 
Yugoslav Army chief. General Mom- 
cilo Perisic, said the military would stay* 
neutral, thus tacitly backing the pay- 
testers. 

Authoritative sources say most army 
officers would not back Mr. Milosevic 
after he humiliated them with wide- 
spread purges of their ranks after die 
unsuccessful 1991 war over Croatia's 
secession from Yugoslavia. 

The police have so far generally ex- , 
ercised restraint against protesters. _ £ 








Chirac Pledges to Protect 
The Endangered Baguette 

Reiners 

PARIS — President Jacques Chirac promised French 
bakers on Monday to push through a law to protect their 
crusty baguette loaves from cut-price rivals and su- 
permarkets if a new decree to that effect fails. 

Up to 5,000 shops selling bread in France have had to 
take down “bakery' ’ signs under die decree in force since 
Jan. 1. The decree states that bakers must select flour, 
knead dough and bake bread on their premises. 

Mr. Chirac told the National Bakers' Federation. “It 
would naturally be very easy to affirm our political 
determination with a law.” 



FROM 10 T » TO 18™ JANUARY 


30 bis, rue de Paradis - 75010 PARIS - 01 47 70 64 30 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Strikes in Greece On and Off 

ATHENS (Reuters) — Ships remained in port Monday in 
Greece after seamen renewed for 48 hours their strike for 
better benefits. 

In another labor dispute, garbage collectors in Athens' 
suspended their walkout until Feb. 20 after extensive floods 
swept tons of garbage onto the city’s streets. 

Five persons have been killed and one is missing in the 
floods, which choked towns and villages with masses of 
muddy rubble after the waters receded Monday. 

SAS to Cut Prices Further 

COPENHAGEN (Bloomberg) — Scandinavian Airlines 
and Lufthansa, its German partner, said they would cut prices 
further on discount tickets to about 55 European destin- 
ations. 

Fanes on its already discounted “Jackpot” rickets will be 
valid from Jan. 20 to March 23, SAS said. 

Dogs Imperil African Lions 

LONDON (AFPl — A disease carried and spread by dogs is 
devastating the lion population of Serengeti National Park in 
Tanzania, one of Africa’s biggest game preserves, conser- 
vationists warned here Monday. 

The World Society for the Protection of Animals said 
canine distemper had killed some 1,000 lions — a third of the 
park’s lion population — since 1994. 

Researchers said canine distemper was found to be passed 
to lions from domestic dogs owned by the Masai and other 
local communities through hyenas and jackals. 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Moms 

Airotonum 

Ankara 

Anwra 

Baroaeni 

EMffadn 

Bafltfi 


Copflnnagan 

Costa OH Sal 

Oman 

EtSftouiglt 

Florence 

FrenMun 

Geneva 

Bowlin 

U»U 
Uf Raima* 
L*8» 

London 

Madras 

Msflorea 

Mian 

UeaoMr 

Uundi 

Nve 

Oslo 

Pin* 

pngjo 

FtelA*BV* 

Rome 

Si. Petersburg 

SWdWwtn 

SrrasDOuy 

Tan HI 

Venoe 

Vw 

Waraaw 

Zunrji 


Today 

M0i LowW 
CfF OF 
17*2 12/531 
I'M 3/37 c 
8/*8 2/35 01 
II/S2 7/44*1 
12/53 307 oc 

4/39 1/31 DC 

307 1*4 c 

axe zos a 
1*4 -2/28 pc 
7/«4 J/37 c 

1060 PC 
14/57 BMSC 
12/53 7/44 C 

9/48 MS pc 

in* -802 pc 
8/43 1/34 pc 

134 -2/29 PC 
1000 409 e 

SOW 17*2*1* 
16*1 1 1*2 e 
8/46 409 9 
12/53 205 pc 
10*0 409 pc 

8/4« 1 04 a 

■U 22 -12/11 pc 
7Mt orn s 
13SS GMJpc 
2/35 -3/Z7C 
307 (V32C 

-307 -7/20 pc 
205 -10/ISC 
1203 409 pc 
104 405*1 
t»« 405 pc 
7 '44 205 pc 
205 -2/29 pc 
104 S 
-1/31 -3/27 c 
3/3J .1/31 e 
7-44 104 E 


Mgb 

OF 

16*1 

BMB 

307 

71/52 

11/52 

6/41 

7/44 

B/46 

307 

8/48 

16/01 

12/53 

11/52 
11/52 
236 
7/44 
409 
7/44 
3105 
14*7 
1953 
11/32 
10*0 
8M9 
-1/31 
7/44 
1305 
6/43 
7/44 
0/3 2 
■ana 

14/57 

307 

yyr 

7/44 

409 

11/52 

ana 

5/41 

8M3 


Middle East 


AfauDholfc 

B#*U1 

Can 

Oomaaoit 

-lensajam 

Luxor 

Norton 


24/75 14*7 1 
2271 1 6*1 i 
21/70 10501 
1W82 307 pc 
17*2 But an 
37*0 12/53 pc 
21/70 1 1/92 C 


34/75 14*7 a 
17*2 12*3 eh 
1M8 8/48 s 
ItVSO 336 c 
lOW 337 pc 
24/75 409* 
24775 1055 pc 


Fonacast tor Wednesday through Friday, as provided by AccuWeaffter. Asia 


Low W 

OF 
a/481 
4/39 po 
■SWi 
7444 c 
409 pc 
104 e 
409 pc 
409 pc 
-lOI pc 
307 pc 
3/48 St) 
8/46 c 
7/44 c 
409 PC 
■3/27 po 
2061 
-3/27i 
409 C 
17«2 pg 

9/48 01 
5/41 pc 
■1731 PC 
EMI pc 
2/36 5 
■4/25 C 
1/14 « 
7/44 pc 
002 PC 
307 pc 
■6/22 pc 
■8/18 pc 

8/43 pc 
-lOI *1 
■1/31 PG 
3/37 pc 
-2/291 
409 a 
307 pc 
002 po 
307* 



J Msmam 

North America 

Remaining cold across the 
northern Plains and Great 
Lakes, though not as 
extreme on recently. The 
mid- Atlantic and Northeast 
will be seasonable Into 
Thureday with snow possi- 
ble Thureday; mining cold- 
er Friday. Honda and the 
deep Southeast will be 
mild, white the West stays 
qui6L 


Europe 

Mjchof Europe wii be dry 
wtti near- to abownonnal 
temperatures through Fri- 
day. However, showers wK 
affeci the British Isles 
Thursday and Friday. Italy 
Into southeastern Europe 
will likely enjoy iha 
wmihastiwathar, wMa the 
Betties and tar northeast- 
ern Europe stay rather 
cold. 


North America 


Asia 

Northeastern China, 
Manchuria and both Kora- 
aa, as wgfl as Befrn and 
Seoul, wlO be mainly dry 
and cold through Friday. 
However, ilurnes could 
affect Beijing Thursday and 
Seoul Friday. Chilly In 
Tokyo Wednesday, then 
gradually turning milder. 
Seasonable in Sn 
and Hong Kong. 


Asia 


Tods. 



Ms* 

LowW 

Mrfi 

LowW 


OF 

OF 

OF 

OF 

BQi 

31/BD 

2W1 1 



Bangkok 

31/as 

IMS! 

31*8 21/70 cc 

Bopvff 

V34 

■aea% 

3-37 

-4/25 pc 


2fH32 

14*7 s 

27*0 

14/571 

CskMta 

23/73 

14*7 pc 


CntonuMot 

32/B9 



1QM fv* 

caaawxt 

30 <88 

22/71 pc 

29*4 ffi/71 PC 


21 /m 

16*1 (h 

21/70 

1QJG1 r 

HDCWUfeii 

3&8& 

21/70 pc 

32*9 22.71 S 


30*38 

an 

18*6 

16/59 c 

unmabad 

18*4 

SW Epc 

18*1 

307 pc 

Jakarta 


23/73 1 

29*4 24/751 

Karachi 

24/75 

&'46« 

2S/77 

awe* 

K. Lunpui 

31*8 

23/73 c 

31*8 22/71 l 

K. JQn&DOkj 

aoae 

26/77 pc 

31*8 34/75 pc 

Uartto 

ZM4 

tone pc 

SV&J 

19*68 PC 

NwDgft 

24/75 


24/76 


Phnom Forti 

3QW 21/791 

3 tw 22 m pc 

PIMM 

31/88 

13*6 8 

31*8 21/70 pe 

Rangoon 

31*8 

Hues ■ 

3Q096 

am pe 


2/35 

-10/151 



Shanghai 

8/43 

305 r 

ms 



31*9 

28/79 pc 

31*8 


Ta/psl 

20*8 

14*7 sn 

21/70 

16/81 sh 

v25£w 

11/52 

3/37 pc 

7M4 

Wi 


21/70 

17*2 sn 

21/70 

Mvo re 


fngapore Alike 


Anchorage 

AUtnu 

Boston 

Chicago 

Dteha 

Denvai 

Dernw 

HpnsUu 

Houston 

LOGATMiU 

Man* 


Htf^TowW 
OF Of 
0/32 -3/27 VI 
8*43 -1/31 pc 
2/35 -4/25 pc 
■10/15 -13/9 c 
MJ4 -829 c 
0/32 -S3Apc 
■ 8 / 18-1 ins po 
27/80 20Q8 PS 
VH 307 r 
14787 8143 It! 

23/73 17/62 tr, 


Tomorrow 
Mtfi LowW 
OF C IP 
WS -3/27 G 
10/80 4/39 pc 
2/35 -VSpo 
-3/27 -10/15 91 
8«3 1/3* PC 
■4BS 1578 pc 
-1/31 -7/20 sn 
28*2 iaB 6DC 
1069 B/4| c 
1864 7U4 pe 
28/79 10/861 


MhiiMSxie 


New York 


PhMwt 
Sen has. 


Vt«tw 


Today 

MgH Umw 
tw OF 
■12/11 -21 /-6 c 
■so* -ti/ia e 

34nS 19*61 
205 ■Q/avc 
18*6 11/52 pc 
1355 408 pc 
10/50 4/39 £ 
4/38 -lOI c 
■0E7 -7/29 sn 
409 -1/311 
205 -3/27 t 


Tomorrow 
Hfeh LowW 
OF OF 
■7/20 -1MB 
-S/24 >18/4 pc 
26/78 20*8 C 
206 -2/23 pc 
23/73 14/57* 
18*1 67*3 pc 
10/50 7M4 sn 
8/43 UMpc 
1*4 tfifloc 
«8 4/38* 
2/36 104 po 


Aimen 

17*2 

8(43 pc 

18*4 


CapsTosm 

27/80 

lew oc 

tt/73 


Cessuanea 

21/70 

ia«t 

17*2 

B/48< . 

Ham 

2B84 

iasss 

20*4 

rasa * : 

Lagos 

3DWe 

42/71 pc 

31*8 22/71 DC ' 

kshh 

□one 

1253 a 


TipiIs 

14/57 

8/43 pc 

14/57 

Wl« ■ 


Latin America 


Burma Auta MBS 2573s 

C«rac«i 25*2 22/71 c 
Unw 25/77 21/70 ah 

UHSEDCHy 17/B2 B/43 po 

reaoumbo 3 USB 24/751 
□2*9 1853S 


33*1 31/70 pc • 
23*4 S/71 PG < 
2679 20*8 pc. 

20*8 7744 pc . 

28*2 22Tn JX . 
30*6 1853.1 . 


Hhundsmtomw. i-rstn. id-snow Buwtes. 
wwnow. Hce. MM/Vaansr. Al m^s. lomcMta and Ms provWd by fa tuW se il ^ . Ire. Q 1897 


Oceania 


Auddmi 

Sydney 


13*5 13/55 pc 20*8 
2173 W*7i 24/73 


I * ■ 




Primed by Newsfax International, London. Registered as a newspaper at the past office. 





PAGE 3 

i 


. •! 
V 











ft 


% 


.oalit 
• Frol' 
^ iota 




** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JANUARY 14, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


U.S. Stalls CNN M 


f&shoigto 

V — — 

By Lany Rohier 

New York Tarn* Se™. 

J P hnsoQ ^ been 
“rough his share of tough ne- 
fKj®? 0 ^ 5 with government 

bureaucracy when he sought 
to set up a news office in 
“^.prepared him far the 
mfneulues of gening pennis- 
s«on to open a bureau in 
Havana. 

■■ This time, the problem is 
opt a recalcitrant Communist 

dictatorship; Cuba granted 
7r/ . permission to begin op- 
erations in Havana more flian 
two months ago. Inst^aj ft ^ 
the _Ointon administration 
“at is hemming and hawing 
as it debates me wisdom of 
allowing American news or- 
ga n izaaons to establish a per- 
manent foothold in Cuba, the 
object of a U-S. economic em- 
bargo for 34 years. 

* This has been a very loog 
■and difficult process, and of 
course we are somewhat con- 
cerned, to put it mildly/’ Mr. 
Johnson said in an interview 
in Miami. "That the U.S. 
government would resist in 
any way the opening of an 
independent news bureau by 
ah independent news organi- 
sation seems to us to run 
counter to all that this gov- 
ernment represents." 

Administration officials 
say they are responding in 
(Ait to what they describe as 
concerns expressed by "con-: 
stituencies” interested in Cu- 
bhn affairs. That, they said, 
includes rival news organi- 
zations worried that CNN 
will gain a competitive ad- 


ove in 


inPart, Concerns by iVeftnorfe’s Rivals 


vantage and distressed that 
Fidel Castro will have the 
right to .grant or withhold ac- 
cess to Cuba to U-S. media. 

That issue came to a 
Friday, when "Mr. Johnson 
flew in Miami ftogi Atlanta t o 
meet with David Lawrence 
Jr., publisher of The Miami 
.Herald. The meeting came 
abomaftcrMr.Jfbhnsouseaita 
fatter to Mr. Lawrence cri- 
ticizing him. for conducting 
what he called a * ‘campaign 
to convince the U-S. govern- 
ment to block" CNN’s re- 
quest to open a Havana bur- 
eau. 

. "I am astounded and dis- 
mayed that for purety com- 
petitive reasons you would 
call upon the U.S. govern- 
ment to hinder CNN's legit- 
imate news coverage ef- 
forts," Mr. Johnson wrote. 
"Your stance is contrary to 
your long record of support 
for a flee press and the First 
Amendment." 

CNN says it is required to 
obtain a U.S. government ‘‘li- 
cense” to open operations in 
Cuba because the embargo, 
which was extended last year 
by the Helms-Burton Act, 
strictly limits the sums Amer- 
ican citizens and corporations 
can spend in Cuba. 

If successful, CNN would 
be the first U.S. news orga- 
nization to have a bureau in 
Havana since the Cuban gov- 
ernment expelled the last res- 
ident Associated Press cor- 
respondent in 19 69- 

In a telephone interview, 
Mr. Lawrence said that The 
Miami Herald had never op- 
posed CNN’s effort to open ' 
an office in Cuba; Speaking 
after the meeting with Mr. 


Johnson, be added; ‘T think 
he underaaods that now." 

. The - Herald, which is 
owned by Knight-Ridder, has 
long sought increased access 
to Cuba, but has often been 
thwarted because Cuban of- 
ficials object to the substance 
and tram of the newspaper’s 
coverage. 

More half of all Cu- 
btm-Americans live in South 
Florida, and coverage of Cu- 
ban affairs is a major part of 
The Herald’s news coverage 
and the backbone of El Nuevo 
Herald, its daily Spanisb- lan- 
guage edition. 

Most Cuban exile leaders 
in Florida have insisted that 
Cuba must grant access to Ra- 
dio and TV Marti — Spanish- 
Ianguage outlets owned and 
operated by the U-S. govern- 
ment — as part of any ar- 
rangement in which private 
media organizations would 
open offices in Havana. 

Cuban exile groups have 
been especially critical of 
CNN’s coverage of Cuba, in 
because of the friendship 
Ted Turner, the net- 
work’s founder, and Mr, 
Castro. Mr. Johnson dis- 
missed accusations that CNN 
is soft on Cuba as "offensive 
personally and profession- 
ally,” adding, "we are not 
pulling any punches in our 
coverage.” 

Even if all this opposition 
is overcome, there still re- 
mains die" task of winning 
over the White House. "The 
issue remains as it was," an 
administration official said. 
"CNN made an application 
and it is under consideration. 
There’s no requirement to 
make a decision. ’’ 


Away From Politics 

•investigators of tire Comair commuter 
plane crash in Michigan that killed 29 people 
axe trying to discover whether three , controls 
meant to shut off the right engine and activate a 
fire extinguisher were turned on by foe crew, 
even though there are no signs of fire, or flipped 
on by the force of die crash. (AP) 

• A proposal to recoenizeblack English as a 
second language in the Oakland, California, 
schools has been reworded. The schools’ new 



suggestion that black 
i is ' ‘genetically based.” and cuts sev- 
references to it as the predominant 
primary language of black students. (AT) 

• The Georgian diplomat blamed for a fatal 

car crash in Washington has a history of 
drunken driving. President Eduard Shevard- 
nadze of Georgia disclosed. (AP) 

• The Globe supermarket tabloid defended 
its decision to run police photographs of the 
scene where 6-year-old JonBenet Ramsey 
was found slam in Boulder, Colorado. (AP) 



Miss Mentavlos, a cadet, says the school broke a promise. 


Alleging Harassment, 

2 Women Leave Citadel 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Two female cadets at The Citadel 
who had charged that male students harassed them and set 
their clothes on fire have announced they will not return to 
die South Carolina military college for the second 
semester of their freshman year. 

Kim Messer said die had been the victim of "sadistic 
illegal haring and disgusting incidents of sexual harass- 
ment.” Jeanie Mentavlos, the other cadet, said The Citadel 
had broken its promise that her freshman year would be 
"rough but safe.” Ho- older brother, reportedly only three 
credits shy of graduation, also announced that he would not 
be returning because of "current circumstances." 

The withdrawal of the women was the latest devel- 
opment in a four-year battle over the opening of public 
military colleges to women. The fight has cost millions of 
dollars and has been carried to die Supreme Court. 

Two other female cadets. Nancy Mace and Petra 
Lovetinska, have made no allegations of harassment. 


Simpson Admits to Infidelity, 
But Testifies He Isn’t a Liar 


The Associated Press 

SANTA MONICA, Cali- 
fornia — O.J. Simpson ac- 
knowledged Monday that 
"from time to time” he was 
unfaithful to Nicole Brown 
Simpson, conceding that the 
behavior was morally dishon- 
est but saying it did not mean 
he was a liar. 

The plaintiffs’ lawyer, 
Daniel Fetrocelli, conducted 
an aggressive cross-examin- 
ation after Mr. Simpson con- 
cluded five hours of friendly 
questioning Friday and 
Monday from his own law- 
yer. 

An objection by the de- 
fense brought the proceed- 
ings to a halt within minutes 
when Mr. Petrocelli tried to 
question Mr. Simpson about 
Mrs. Simpson's diary entries. 
They included one in which 
Mrs. Simpson wrote that Mr. 
Simpson had beat her before 
the couple’s well-known 
1989 argument and that they 
had lied to a doctor about the 
nature of her injuries. 

After the defense attorney. 
Robert Baker, objected, there 
was a long sidebar conference. 
The jury was sent out, and Mr. 
Simpson left toe stand for his 
seat in the courtroom. The 
judge then called a recess and 
went into his chambers with- 
out the lawyers. 

The proceedings did not re- 
sume until after the lunch 
break, so the nature of the 
defense's objection was not 
immediately known. 

During his direct testi- 
mony, Mr. Simpson was nev- 
er asked about the physical 


evidence, including 30 newly 
discovered photos purporting 
to show him wearing the same 
model shoes as the killer. 

Mr. Simpson ended the di- 
rect testimony by emotionally 
telling that he refrained from 
committing suicide during the 
infamous slow-speed Bronco 
chase of June 17. 1994. only 
because of his mother and hi's 
friend Ai Cowlings. 

*T was in a lot of pain," 
Mr. Simpson said Monday. "I 
was missing Nicole, and my 
kids didn’t cry.” He added 
that Tie felt that some people 
"had attacked me somewhat, 
and that hurt me. and 1 just 
didn't know what to do." 

Mr. Simpson said the only 
thing that saved him was Mr. 
Cowlings and memories of 
his mother saying that a per- 
son could not get into heaven 
if he killed himself. 

"I was totally ashamed of 
myself right after that, and 
I’m ashamed I ever thought” 
of suicide, Mr. Simpson said. 

Earlier, Mr. Simpson's 
voice wavered as he told jur- 
ors that he worried whether 
his children had seen the body 
of their mother after she was 
slabbed to death. 

Mr. Simpson spoke of an 
telephone discussion with a 
police officer after he was 
contacted in Chicago about 
tile death. Testifying in a fal- 
tering voice, he said: “I 
wanted to know if my kids had 
been exposed to anything." 

Mr. Simpson said he was 
told that the children, Sydney 
and Justin, had been asleep and 
did not see anything, and had 


been put in police custody. 

U was the first time Mr. 
Simpson has shown any emo- 
tion in two rounds of ques- 
tioning in the wrongful death 
trial. 

The lawsuit was filed by 
the families of Mrs. Simpson 
and Ronald Goldman, who 
were knifed to death on June, 
12, 1994. outside her con- 
dominium. 

Under hostile questioning 
by the plaintiffs' lawyers 
earlier in the trial, Mr. 
Simpson appeared nervous. 
After taking the stand for the 
defense's questioning, he has 
seemed relaxed and talkative. 

In his direct testimony 
Monday. Mr. Simpson also 
said — contradicting several 
other witnesses — that he was 
not in a bud mood the day of 
the killings. He described a 
golf course argument that 
morning as a normal spat be- 
tween friends. He said he also 
was not upset at a dance recital 
where he met Mrs. Simpson 
just hours before her death. 

Mr. Simpson was ques- 
tioned about other testimony 
from witnesses that he had 
known early on rhar Mrs. 
Simpson was killed by an at- 
tacker, not in a car accident or 
some other way. and that 
someone else was killed. 

The plaintiffs have used 
that testimony to suggest that 
Mr. Simpson knew more titan 
he should. Mr. Simpson said 
he was not sure whether he 
ever specifically asked the 
police or his daughter in tele- 
phone calls whether Mrs. 
Simpson had been murdered. 


7 Blacks Get Medal of Honor 

World War II Tribute fi Has Always Been Their Due 5 


f 


Gunfire Resounds in Captive Lima Residence 


■ The Associated Press 

'•LIMA — Several shots were fired 
Monday inside the Japanese ambas- 
sador's residence where 74 hostages 
are being held by leftist rebels, but no 
one was hurt. 

'■The shots were fired in rapid suc- 
cession minutes after & Rea Cross 
> Representative had left the com- 
‘ Round. 

No unusual activity was seen inside 
afterward, but it was the largest burst 
eff* gunfire since the lYqmc Amaru - 
guerrillas stormed the residence dur- 
ing a party ou tbe night of Dec. 17. 

“ Twice previously, the rebels had 
fired during the predawn hours in 
what the Red Cross was later told 
were wanting shots. 

■ "On Dec. 26, an explosion was at- 
tributed to one of the ambassador's 
dogs; it tripped a land mine and was 
killed. • . 

The gunfire Monday came minutes 
after a Red Cross representative, 
Michel Mining, walked out of the 
compound. Hours earlier, tire rebels 


POLITICAL 


had demanded a television interview 
to respond to a government proposal 
to form a peace commission to over- 
see negotiations. 

Mr. Mining went back inside tire 
residence after the gunfire, came outa 
short while later and said nobody was 
hurt. When asked tire reason for the 
shots, he answered, “We are trying to 
figure that out” 

Hopes for the first real progress in 
weeks in. Pern’s hostage crisis 
crumbled over tbe weekend, when 
guerrillas demanded that tire govern- 
ment produce a plan to free hundreds 
of thetr imprisoned comrades. 

The Tupac Amaru guerrillas have 
been firm in that demand since taking 
over tbe residence, and President Al- 
berto Fujimori has just as firmly said 
that he wSU not give-in to it. 

- The rebels and tire government ne- 
gotiator, Domingo Palermo, had tent- 
atively agreed to meet Sunday. 

But Mr. Palermo said no meeting 
was held because the rebels, in a mes- 
sage sent through the Red Cross, in- 


sisted that he "bring a proposal for tbe 
liberation of tbe prisoners.” 

He quoted the guerrillas as saying 
that "otherwise it is preferable that 
tire meeting not take place,’’ because 
there would be nothing to discuss. 

Mr. Palermo said be sent back a 
proposal to form a commission to help 
negotiate a settlement with tbe rebels. 

The panel would be composed of 
representatives from tbe government, 
the rebel group, the Red Cross and the 
Roman Catholic Church. It would 
agree on a place for negotiations and 
an agenda that would include "all 
thanes identified in previous con- 
tacts,” Mr. Palermo said. 

Tbe Vatican on Sunday named the 
archbishop of Ayacucho in southern 
Peru, Juan Luis Cipriani, as its rep- 
resentative to any peace commission 
fast might be formed, Mr. Palermo 
said. Archbishop Cipriani has been a 
key figure in tire negotiations. 

In a two-way radio conversation 
Friday, Mr. Palermo and foe rebel 
leader, Nestor CetpaCartolini, agreed 


to meet over tire weekend. Tbe con- 
versation was recorded and broadcast 
by local news media. 

Mr. Palermo criticized tire broad- 
cast Sunday, saying the unidentified 
reporter who recorded and distributed 
it was unethical and dishonorable. 

■ Ecuador Chief Arrives 

President Abdala Bucaram Ortiz of 
Ecuador arrived in Peru on Monday 
for an official visit aimed at easing 
tensions between the countries fol- 
lowing a brief border conflict last year, 
Reuters reported. 

It was the first official visit to Peru 
by an Ecuadoran bead of state. 
Ecuador aod Peru f ought a brief war 
in January last year. Since then, they 
have been locked in peace negoti- 
ations over the disputed frontier. 

The Tupac Amaru rebels bolding 
the hostages responded to Mr. Bu- 
caram's arrival by putting up a plac- 
ard ai a window of the house reading: 
"The people of Peru and Ecuador 
wish for peace with social justice." 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — Seven 
African-American heroes of 
World War n received long- 
delayed recognition Monday 
as President BUI Clinton 
presented them with the na- 
tion’s highest award for 
bravery in combat, the Medal 
of Honor. 

* ‘It’s a great day. We've all 
been vindicated,’’ said Ver- 
non Baker, 77, of St Maries, 
Idaho, the only one of the 
seven men still alive, after 
receiving a medal previously 
withheld from African- 
Americans who fought in the 
conflict. 

"No African-American 
who deserved the Medal of 
Honor for his service in 
World War II received it," 
Mr. Clinton said at a crowded 
White House ceremony. 
“Today we fill the gap in that 
picture and give a group of 
heroes who also loved peace, 
but adapted themselves to 
war, the tribute that has al- 
ways been their due.” 

in addition to Mr. Baker, 
the men honored were Ed- 
ward Carter Jr., John Fox, 
Willy James Jr., Ruben 
Rivers and Charles Thomas, 
all of whom fought in Europe, 
and George Watson, who was 
killed in action in the Pa- 
cific. 

"Today, we recognize sev- 
en men as being among the 


bravest of the brave." Mr. 
Clinton said. "Today, Amer- 
ica is profoundly thankful for 
the patriotism and the nobility 
of these men and for the ex- 
ample they set, which helped 
us to find a way to become a 
more just, more free nation." 

The award of the United 
States’ highest military dec- 
oration to Mr. Baker and his 
comrades-in-arms resulted 
from a study that started' in 
1993 when ihe acting army 
secretary at the time, John 


Shannon asked about the con- 
spicuous absence of black. 
Medal of Honor recipients in 
World War II. 

Conducted by Shaw Uni- 
versity, a historically black 
North Carolina institution, the 
study found no official doc- 
umentation for racial preju- 
dice in the awards process but 
concluded that the failure of 
blacks- to win the highest U.S. 
military awand lay in the racial 
climate and practices in the 
' armed services oflhat period. 


■A Breeze on Confirmations 

WASHINGTON — Bad news for anyone hoping for 


I, 


IliWY - “ 

inees; Word from the Senate and foe White House is that 
other hearings may not be love-ins, a la Madeleine Al- 
bright’s last week, but that there will not be much Wood 


The oily sure bet for alively brawl is the appearance of 
the national security adviser, Anthony Lake, before the 
Senate intelligence committee. The nominee to head the 
“CIA is certain to be hammered over his failure to sell 
-some stocks and for not telling Congress about Iranian 
•arms shipments to Bosnia. The problem for spectators is 

, that CIA hearings are part public and part private, so some 

_*of the best stuff may nor be in view. . 

Aside from Mr. Lake, it could be slim pickings — 
> hardly worth the price of a ticket. Blanw the Senate 
’majority leader. Trent Lott, Republican of Misasappi, 
who is "not hunting" for scalps, * source said. If a 
, problem arises — always a possibility — then of course 
ibe usual fight wHl ensue. \” r t 

No Timetable on Gingrich 

: WASHINGTON — With a week to go until foe House 
”is to vote on a punishment for Newt Gingrich, thespeaker, 
. there is still noSiule for l^hcbearmgs ot 
: violations to which he has admitted or anyP^ for * e 

between is anyone’s guess. J 


Quote /Unquote 





Sarion^;rf.andifshe^ord»p«adent«^W 

^dfcAhen her data ta&manoa would be 
guished.” 



It’s all part of Newsweek. 



THE JNTERNAnONAL NEWSMAGAZINE 

For subscription enquiries please telephone (44) 1753 524552 or fax (44) 1753 571617. 


Will vour merger or acquisition 
create value - or chaos? 
16-21 March 1997 

“Strategic Issues in Magas and Acquisitions' 


M« A aciivilv is far 
exceeding ihr previous 
record levels or 198 c 
And whilst iha umc ihe 
emphasis is on araicgK 
rasher than financial 
acquisitions, ihc pressure 
to justify ihc premiums 
paid is no less 

Every deal involves 
iwoekmmis. ihc analyiraJ 




Philipp* HuprsloRh. 
Pn>rcvu>r iiT 
Btulnrsv Unllrv. 
Prngnuanw 
Dirt nor. 


not just bv finance, 
sinnc^v or orgumsjUon. 
bui ihc tmcrplav between 
all three This programme, 
derived from wars of 
practical consulting and 
in-depih research, will 
help you organise ihe 
decision-making and 
integration processes. 
I) will provide vcm with 


- before ihe deal is done - and ihc- 
integration - afterwards II you 
manage niher wrongly, ihe deal fails- 
and manv do Some tecause the buyer 
simply paid 10 © much or ihe laigci 
turned out to be somewhat differeni 
from expectations More ojun 
however, because ihc acquiring 
company is unable 10 manage ihc 
integration prooss Asa result expected 
synergies - up 10 a third of ihc pnee - 
aK not achieved value is desimeed 
and ultimately (he potential u* harness 
ihc complemenuntv beltxecn boih 
tngmtsauons is lost completely 

Your success will be dcieimmcd 


Our new programme brochure is now available 
RgPl.Y TODAY FOR YOUR C ON D'ORl ENTARY COPY 


i Fax ihe compleicd dciaiL below to Janet Burddl.u on C331 tOll b0 74 55 13.1 
I e-maiteim^lftnscadfr.hupaAvww irscidrrrffposiihemianSEAD, Executive I 
* Education. Boulevard de Consanee, 77305 Fontainebleau Cedes. France. 


an approach to making the difficult 
inii-graiion l.-ade-oifa which is based 
on pnri; winning research by the 
faiuliv h vliII also give vou the 
opponunnv in benchmark wtih other 
senior evecutivcs in the tmdsi of 
anpiisiuon .wiuny 

Kcplv now fur cour complimentary 
copy uj our brochure Fax or post 
ihc completed details tclow with 
mur business card or phone Janci 
Burdillai on 33 tOi 1 bO 72 «2 90. 
e-m.uf mecedii'inscud If 

INSEAD 


Name . 


First Name , 


I .lob Title - - 
I Company Name _ 
I Company Address , 

1 

I Country - 

^ax 


.Mr/MrUDr 


. Posicodc/Zipcodc . 


..Telephone. 
E-mail — 







>- • my 

t \«S5 





ASIA/PACIFIC 


Dalai Lama Accepts 
Invitation to Taiwan 

Decision Defies Warning by Beijing 


Circled by Our Stuff Fnmi Dapmcha 

TAIPEI — The Dalai Lama, Tibet's 
spiritual leader, has accepted an invit- 
ation to make his first trip to Taiwan, 
despite a warning from China. 

The Chinese Buddhism Association, 
which made the invitation, said Monday 
that the Dalai Lama would limit his 
activities to visiting temples during his 
visit, tentatively scheduled for March. 

A visit by the Dalai Lama to the island 
almost certainly would provoke charges 
by Beijing of collusion between what it 
condemns as proponents of the seces- 
sion from China of two major territories 
— Taiwan and Tibet Last week, China 
warned Taiwan against extending the 
invitation. 

The head of Taiwan's private 
Chinese Buddhist Association, Chin 
Hsin, said the senior monk of Tibetan 
Buddhism would steer dear of the ex- 
iled Republic of China government 

“We will arrange one or two 
speeches, and be will visit some 
temples," Mr. Chin said on state tele- 
vision. “He will have absolutely no 
official contacts or activities." 

Even without official contacts, such a 
visit would doubly anger Beijing, which 


sees its struggles for the future of 
Taiwan and Tibet as core issues of 
Chinese sovereignty and territorial in- 
tegrity. 

Beijing assails the Dalai Lama, who 
went into exile in India in 1959. as a 
“splitist” seeking to divide Tibet from 
China and accuses governments that 
allow him to visit of meddling in 
China's internal affairs. 

Similarly, China regards Taiwan as a 
renegade province whose separation 
from the mainland since the civil war 
ended in 1949 can be resolved only 
through reunification under Beijing’s 
rule. 

In its quest to secure Taiwan, Beijing 
has been tightening a diplomatic em- 
bargo around the island and criticizing 
even friendly countries that allow visits 
by Taiwan leaders. 

Taiwan's governing Nationalists and 
the Dalai Lama deny advocating in- 
dependence for their territories, but both 
denounce Beijing's authoritarian rule 
and insist that reconciliation would ob- 
lige the Communists to accept funda- 
mental political reforms. 

President Lee Teng-hui of Taiwan 
was reported to have invited the Dalai 



n rur* -a* tat r »vn » 


CASTING A SHADOW — Construction workers on Monday building a reinforcement grid of iron bars 
for a power substation in Manila, which is part of a power-supply upgrade in the Philippine capital. 


Japan Pushes 
ASEAN Odefi 
To Upgrade ~ 
Ties to Tokyo - 



7 \ 


By Michael Richardson 

huernatkaal Herald Tribune 


. ^li jj.V.J 


Lama to Taiwan in an exchange of let- 
ters in May 1996. 

.Likewise, the Taiwan cabinet’s 
Mainland Affairs Commission has said 
that the Dalai Lama was free to visit 


Taiwan, but only in his capacity as a 
religious figure. 

Taipei's insistence that the Dalai 
Lama visit only as a monk suggests that 
the Taiwan government itself has re- 


servations about die Buddhist's vision of 
the Tibetan future. Ukethedr Communist 
rivals, the Nationalists regard Tibet as a 
pan of China and oppose its secession as 
an independent state. (AP, Reuters) 


SINGAPORE — Japan and Sourt^ 
Asian countries appeared close id 
agreement Monday on the seed for a 
major upgrading of their rel ati ons td 
help maintain the stability and econom- 
ic dynamism of the Asia-Pacific re- 

■„ »■* 

gion. 

Prime Minis ter Ryntaro Hasfaimoto 
of Japan said that in talks over die pa&t 
week with leaders of five members of 
the Association of Southeast Asian Na- 
tions he proposed that they hold summjj: 
meetings with Japan at least once a year 
to deepen ties. * 

**I tfiinir this idea I proposed can be 
realized,’* he said ai a press conference 
in Singapore, the last stop on bis tour of 
ASEAN x>un tries. “Ido not think theap 
was any leader who showed a passive or 
negative response to ^ idea. Tokyo ^ 


• r '. 


p n *-* 


!>' 


i .*■ 


tn 


i. «. 


Hong Kong Row 
Over Resignation 
To Be Detailed 


BRIEFLY /A 


A gene e France-Presse 

HONG KONG — The 
government is expected to give 
evidence Wednesday in a dispute over 
the sudden resignation last year of the 
territory's immigration director, 
Lawrence Leung, an official said 
Monday. 

Ip Kwok-him, chairman of the Le- 
gislative Council committee that is in- 
vestigating Mr. Leung's resignation last 
July, said that the civil service secretary. 
Lam Woon-kwong. would appear be- 
fore the panel Wednesday. 

He also said that Governor Chris Pat- 
ten and the government's chief secre- 
tary, Anson Chan, would be summoned 
before the panel “at a suitable time." 

Mr. Lam said last week that he would 
make a statement to clear the air, speak- 
ing immediately after Mr. Leung 
Stunned lawmakers by saying he had 
been forced out of his job following a 
corruption inquiry. 

Mr. Leung. 55. told legislators on 
Friday that he had been given an ul- 
timatum: leave or face further action. 
The nature of the investigations about 
him still has not been reveaied. 

Officials have defended their actions, 
saying that the government had not hid- 
den anything or lied since Mr. Leung’s 
retirement in July. 

There has been widespread concern 
that Mr. Leung may have given China 
secret data about Hong Kong residents 
who have sought to acquire foreign 
passports. 

Hundreds of thousands of Hong 
Kong citizens have foreign passports, 
which many view as security if the 
territory's handback to China on July 1 
goes awry. 


Afghan Factions Hold Talks 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Feuding Afghan fac- 
tions met in Islamabad under United Natrons aus- 
pices Monday in what a UN official described as a 
wide-ranging dialogue for peace. 

Hie UN special envoy for Afghanistan, Norbert 
Holl, said at a news conference that die talks, ex- 
pected to continue Tuesday and possibly Wednes- 
day, had no formal agenda. 

“This was the first meeting that we had today that 
did not end in disaster," the German diplomat said 
after the working group of rival factions met for 
several hours. “There was a free flow of ideas." be 
said. "There was a spirit of brotherhood in the 
meeting.” 

Mr. Holl gave no details and did not say if the two 
sides had reached agreement on a cease-fire or other 
peace proposals. ( Reuters) 


Monday to contain one of the largest oil spills in 
Japanese history, nearly doubling the number of 
boats mopping up the slicks, as thousands of vol- 
unteers helped clean up. 

Authorities also began studying photographs 
taken by a Canadian satellite over the weekend to 
better track the dozens of slicks that formed after oil 
spilled from a sunken Russian tanker Jan. 2. 

The Coast Guard increased to 50. from 30, the 
number of patrol boots clearing slicks that are threat- 
ening an 800-kilometer (500-mile) stretch of the 
western coastline, said a spokesman, Masakatsu 
HayashL (AP) 


leave the post of superior general, as her health is 
coming in her way," tire friend, Sunita Kumar, said 
in an interview. 

Mother Teresa has led the order since founding it 
in 1950. She tried to step down in 1990, but the other 
nuns re-elected her anyway. Mrs. Kumar said Mother 
Teresa believes her followers will yield to her wishes 
this time. 

Calcutta's Roman Catholic archbishop, Henry 
D'Souza, said Monday that a vote for mother superior 
Would be held Feb. 2. The nuns in die order will go on 


a retreat Jan. 20 to discuss the matter. 


(AP) 


Mother Teresa to Step Down 


For the Record 


Japan Hastens Oil Cleanup 

TOKYO — The government stepped up its effort 


CALCUTTA — The Missionaries of Charity or- 
der founded by Mother Teresa 47 years ago will elect 
a leader next month. Calcutta’s archbishop said 
Monday. 

His announcement came after a long-time friend 
said Mother Teresa, 86, confided last month that she 
wanted to step down because of health problems. 

“This time. Mother Teresa has finally decided to 


an 
resume 


Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew of S. 
has checked out of a hospital after being 
inflamed bladder and should be able to 
normal activities next week, an official statement 
said Monday. The 73-year-old former prime minister 
left the Singapore General Hospital on Sunday after 
doctors removed “a small area of chronic inflam- 
mation** from tire bladder, said a statement from the 
office of Prime Minister Goh Cbok Tong. (AFP) 


KOREA: Cracking Down, Seoul Revives Tough Security Regime 


Continued from Page 1 


interrogations. Mr. Kim has unnerved 
those who remember how it was used to 
muzzle political enemies. 

‘ ‘There are Communists in our coun- 
try, and we have no effective way of 
dealing with them. ’ ’ President Kim told 
the nation in a rare nationally televised 
news conference last week, defending 
his decision to tighten the security law. 

Mr. Kim. the first nonmilitary can- 
didate to be freely elected president in 
three decades, argues that some limits 
on free speech are die price South Korea 
must pay for living under constant threat 
from the heavily armed Stalinist regime 
50 kilometers north of the capital He 
says — and many agree — that le- 
gislative oversight and other curbs he 


previously imposed on the security 
agency have made it more accountable 
to the public. 

Hundreds of South Koreans are 
caught in the murky web of the anti-spy 
law every year. Last year, 464 people 
were arrested on security charges, up 
from 246 in 1995 and 367 in 1994. The 
government insists that it charges only 
those who make pro-North Korea state- 
ments that directly damage the South 
Korean government But many contend 
that the new. tougher security law will 
now put even more people behind bars 
for simply disagreeing with government 
policy toward the North and will lead to 
random searches and wiretapping of of- 
fices and homes. 


Kim Bars Easing 
Of Labor Law 


three months in jail for expressing his 
thoughts in cyberspace. His family and 
defenders'. 'outraged af'JiiS'jailiiig;- Shytt’ *. v ?- 1 ' ' * ■" ‘y ~~ ■ V -• 

is absurd that this democratic ally of the- •••' ca*pM*tby<*r 


Even if die judge releases Mr. Yoon 
ek. he win 1 


(his week. 


have spent almost 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 



Call today for your complimentary copy of my latest research reports, 
market opinions and performance records. Learn how you can put 
my 19 years of professional trading experience to work directly for you. 


mm 

FCM 


OUTSTANDING Analysis for All Major Markets 
EXCEPTIONAL Execution Forex or Futures 
COMMISSION SpotFX 2-5 Pip Price Spreads 


SUPERIOR Selection of Managed Accounts 
FREE Trading Software A Data 

COMMISSION Futures S12-S36 Per fVT 




Prepare for Tomorrow’s Major Market Moves bv Callinq Toll-Free Toda 


Auwrafia 1 800125944 
Cyprus 08090805 
Cmnanv 01308296 BS 
Japan 0031 12680* 


«<■/*(«« 08D0 15880 Bermuda 18008784178 Brazil 000811921 5513 

Denmari 80016132 tialandOSOOI1 10064 France 0800902246 
Haag Kang 8007209 Ireland 1800559294 Israel 1771000102 

Karra 0038110243 Luxembourg 08004552 Mexico 958008784178 


Columbia 980120837 
Crrrtr 00800119213013 
ImIi-1 67875928 
Netheeta* d* 06022065T 
S.t/riea 0800996337 


SwAmltte* 18009945757 ,V Zealand 0600441 880 Purlugal 0501 1 2632 Singapore 8001 202501 

Spain 90093 1007 Sweden 0207931 58 SninrHanJ 0800897233 Tbaihnd 001800119230666 Turkey 00800139219013 

United Kingdom 0 800888832 Culled Slain 18009945757 US-Tall J eke +714-376-8020 VS-Tott Fax +714-376-8025 


/FEXC 0 

International Foreign Exchange Corporation 


THE RELIABLE PARTNER 
SEE US ON NBC TEXT PAGES 355 & 356 
Discounted commissions - 24 hour trading desk 


Internet site: www.ifexco.ch - Reuters page IFEX 


86 bis route de Fronfene*- 1208 Geneva - Switzerland 
Tel (41) 22 849 7411 - 24hr (41) 22 849 7440 - Fax (41) 22 700 1913 


BEVERLY HILLS 



Investment 

investments the experts recommend. 

effiaenl investments..*- Jonathan Clements, 

GO investment can mfipa rto rm the ... 
and brokers. Tax retuns. wfls, trusts 


and non-U.S. efiente 





24 HOUR FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


• Keen spreads; no commission 

• Minimum transaction 5100,000 

• Competitive margin rata 
1C Index pk, 1 Warwick Row, London 5W1E 5ER, Groat Britain 


INDEX 

|rauKi«uciu«c> 


Tel: -44-171.896-0022 Fax: -44-171-896-0010 


SUCCESSFUL FUTURES MARKETS 
PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 
HIGH RETURN LIMITED RISK 
NO MINIMUM PERIOD OF INVESTMENT 
PROVEN TRACK RECORDS 
ASK FOR A BROCHURE FREE OF CHARGE IN 
ENGLISH OR IN FRENCH 
GOLD HILL SERVICES SA 
RUEDE BOURG 6,1003 LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND 
TEL.(4I.21) 320 58 31 fax C4 1.21) 320 58 35 
PORTFOLIO MANAGERS AND BROKERS SINCE 1982 
MEMBER OF THE NEW YORK FUTURES EXCHANGE 


For further details 
on bow to fdaceyour listing contact: 
CHRISTOPHER SETH in London 
TeL- (44) 1718364802 - Fax : (44) 171 240 2254 


iicral&SSft&rilraiie 


Your 'one stop* 
Brokerage connection 

tsOtinrid’i 

Futures, Options 
& Forex markets 

Lihnco 

Uww 8—pi U4 ■ n»a^*«J 

1M nrt>| l^lmin, UndH (ClA HI 

£kT.; Ti ■tll» WA 

a 



United States protects free speech — 
except when it comes to North Korea. 

“This law not only restricts freedom 
of expression, but freedom of thought, ’ ’ 
said Mr. Yoon's mother, Chung Ki Ja. 

At his news conference, Mr. Kim said 
he had decided "to revise the law to 
protect democracy as a last resort." 

He two “astonishing” events made 
the change necessary: the submarine 
incident and huge student demonstra- 
tions at Seoul's Yonsei University in 
September. He said the incidents proved 
that the North Korean threat was grow- 
ing and that North Korean agents were 
working in the South. 

More than 6,000 students were ar- 
rested in the Yonsei demonstrations, 
which were portrayed by the students as 
calling for peaceful reunification of the 
Korean Peninsula. The government 
contends that the protests were directly 
orchestrated by North Korea with the 
intention of disrupting social order in 
South Korea. 

Of those arrested, 190 were sen- 
tenced to prison terms. Attesting to its 
sensitivity about the national security 
law. the government will not disclose 
how many of those sentences were im- 
posed in compliance with that law. 


SEOUL — President Kim Young 
Sam has rejected calls to modify a labor 
law that has provoked strikes aid street 
violence, refusing Monday to yield to 
threats of expanded walkouts. 

Mr. Kim's stand raised fears that a 
new round of protests scheduled to be- 
gin Tuesday could further hurt the coun- 
try’s economy. 

“We cannot delay implementing it 
because the national fortune is depend- 
ing on it. " Mr. Kim said, referring to the 
law, at a meeting with governing party 
legislators. 

He spoke as hundreds of workers and 
policemen scuffled in central Seoul, 
some Catholic priests joined the demon- 
strators and militant union leaders re- 
buffed attempts for dialogue. 

The president called the new law an 
“inevitable choice" to help South 
Korean companies compete m world 
markets while the country is mimin g a 
record trade deficit of $20 billion. 

To pressure die government to back 
down, unions have called for expanded 
strikes Tuesday and Wednesday. 

Nearly 1 million workers at subways, 
phone companies, banks and (be na- ‘ 
tiocal mint are scheduled to take part in 
the walkout (AP, AFP) 


Mr. Hashrmoto will return to 
from Singapore on Tuesday after giving 
what Japanese officials say will be ‘a 
major policy speech on Aria. 

On his tour, he visited Brunei, In- 
donesia, Malay sia and Vietnam as weft 
as Singapore. He had earlier been to thq 
other two ASEAN countries — Thai- 
land and the Philippines. 

A Singapore Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said Monday that GohChok 
Tong, Singapore's prime minister, 
agreed with Mr. Hashimoto that it 
would be useful for ASEAN and Japan 
to have more consultations at the} 
highest levels. 

A Japanese official said that Indone- 
sia’s president, Suharto, would propose? 
regular summi t meetings with Japart 
when ASEAN leaders hold their nod 
annual meeting later this year. 

Japan already takes part in annual 
meetings with ASEAN — along with' 
til e United States, the European Union; 
China, Sooth Korea and other countries . 
— at foreign minister level. 

But having regular Japan- ASEAN; 1 
meetings of mime ministers and pres-* 
idenls, probably at the same time as! 
ASEAN leaders hold their mrmal meet-! 
mg, would give Tokyo an exclusive and 
preeminent relationship with die groups 
which is becoming one of tiie world's topi 
trading and investment blocs. ' 

For this reason, analysts said, some} 
ASEAN countries, including Malay si aj 
were likely to suggest that similar in-! 
vitatidns be issued to Qrin& and South' 
Korea as well to keep regional relations 
in better balance. ! 

Southeast Asian officials. s 
: whUe 'the Asia-Pacific regibfr' 
enjoying peaces and prosperity, 
tensions could lead to conflict and rap= 
idly undermine economic progress. | 

While many of those tensions are inj 
Northeast Asia — between the two) 
Koreas, China and Taiwan, China and! 
Japan, and Japan and Korea — prob-J 
lems also remain in Southeast Asia, 1 
especially over ownership of the Spratly? 
Islands, an uninhabited archipelago in; 
the South China Sea that may have vast) 
energy stores. The islands are disputed! 
by Brunei. China, Malaysia, the Pbil-J 
ippines, Taiwan and Vietnam. t 

In a speech at a dinner for Mr. Ha-! 
shimoto on Monday,. Mr. Goh said that; 
if “countries in the region work ten 
gether, these conflicts need not escalate! 
into unmanageable crises." 

He said that while a “continuing and! 
vibrant partnership" between Japan and- 
ASEAN could contribute to regional 1 
stability, Japan should emphasize its! 
interdependence and links with its; 
Asian neighbors “because the region is> 
aware that Japan perceives its society to! 
be unique.” 

Mr. Goh added that with “a good feel) 
and understanding for the sensitivities! 
and concerns of its Asian neighbors,' 
Japan’s leadership will be viewed more! 
positively.” ; 








l:.'.- \ iht 




INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Escorts 8 Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON - PARIS 


TOE HNEST ft THE MOST 5BCESE 
18 - 38t BfTEJWATWiAL 
B EAUTffU . 6 ELEGANT SIMBTO 
SECRETAIRES, AS HOSTESS & 
HOURS > 

AVAS-ABLE FOR All OCCASIONS 


BEVERLY HILLS 
NEW YORK 


SERV7CE WORUME 

Escort Agency Credit Cards Wetane 

TEL LONDON ++ 44 (0) 


0171 589 5237 


EUROPEAN B0DEIS Escort 
wrfdmfe. onfy International nuuew 
LONDON*PAHIS4JONACO+UADRJD 
STOCKHOlU+GOTtSOBG+HELSWB 
GENEVAtZUmCH+MlLANO+ROUE 
BRUSXLS+COPENHAQBi+CYPRus 
ISTANBUL+ATHENS+QSLO+USBON 
DUBAI & AREMAUSTEHDAM 8 whole 
GERMANY 4 UNITED STATES t ASIA 
ate Slops' +*431-796 21 56 
Office tew Yortc 212 287 3SS3 Canto 


AMSTERDAM BERNADETTE 
Escort Sw*8 A Draw Dates 

Tflt 631 S3 39 or SSI 05 41 


GOLD AW PLAHNUH SERVICE 

ATLANTIC 

LONDON S PARS OFHCE 
aiROPE & WORUnWE ESCORTS 

++ 44 (0) 7000 77 04 1.1/22/33 

NEW YORK OFRCE 

(1) 212 785 1919 

kisseaHtarxoo 

Wp^wwjWarxom 

■SWITZERLAND + CERIIANY* 

Tel: M3H9427 28 27 

amtoMsevAflAsa-eBrc 

NEW: L0W0N - BRUSSaS - VBMA 
COSMOS Escort Agsny. Cma Carts 

ELITE Escort Service 

NEW YORK CtTY 

1-8004646887 

ARBT0CAT5 Escort Senrice 

3 Sbodkfian a London W1 

0171 258 0098 

WTStfiAHONAL ESCORTS 

Wortfs FVsr 5 Most BeWva Service 
Uodris, Beautv Qom, Adrasaas 
thgteflrat Tkwl CoByariona 

Hdqtrs. 212-755-7896 NY, USA 

Service worldwide. Crad carts, cheeks 
accepted. View videos & photos in offica. 

ffiBR HfflH SOCCmflSOU'PARB 

COTE D’AZUR A ZURCH * t&Mr ■ 
WamsSonai Escort & Travel Sorts 

Vara ++43-1-5354104 al croft cads 

PUSf 

VENUS IN FURS 

24HR W0RUWDE ESCORT S01VJCE 

LOI0ON 0171 362 7000 

AI cerdA A6ms fnddngs Men 

SmZBUND 4 INTL Erant Sntea 
t aro. Hu Vhm S Brad. 

Chr + sfe aea. Bbdc USA top asdri. 

Mca befes A note. 74a/s- al auk. 

VF T* 441 R 79 353 3CT 

ISABELLA AQUINAS 

ESCORT SB1YICE 

TEL- LONDON 0171 488 5789 

QENEVA PHETTY WOMAN 
BASH, LAUSAtiC, MONTRaiX 

Cflfi 022046 00 89 Escort ten? 

* ZURCH USBVI 01M32& 

LATIN - 

CHARW4G EXCLUSIVE ESCORT 

SERVICE 

U3ND0N 0956 307 404 

CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 

St Bandana Phce. tmdog SW1 

Ttt 0171-584 K13 

* PARS k LOWOtt • GBEVA * 

exclusive, elegant a bjucated 
■ PRBT1GE * Escort Servi* 

London (171)W514S 


WUHHOMEITALYTnilXJlfPAaB- 

BRU^^lUGANtmDRnrMUNICH 

OD0RF*R!VIERA'VE#IA Escort Ser- 

VOB.T4. 39 (0)338 828 5D62 Cards 


- 


'iiUHlMfl 




r m 

'--*1 

•• 


• 

•-*KxSiiD 

■X **•< 




7- : 


■ARLENE 

Sootafcatad Abate Escort 
LONDON 0171-938 4445 
CreA Cants Wetane 


CDLOGNBflRAIKFURT-DOSSELDORF 
MESBADBUUMUg&fiSlG 
ears Escort Sente +43(0)171-5311805 


•‘EXECUTIVE CLUB* 
LONDON ESCORT SERVICE 
IBj 0171 722 5008 Cost Certs 


,_l 


MWWELLFS ESCORT SERVICE 
“ FRENCH SPEAKNG - 
LONDON 0171 282 2888 


•gene V A * P A R I S* 
BUTTBPlY fecort Santee 

TeL 022 / 731 90 81 


JASWTS ESCORT SERVICE 
LONDON 8171 835 0584 
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 


■0N0P0L FRANKFURT 
THE l£AD(NG ESCORT SERVICE 
OmCE NUMBER 059/ 955 a 774 


MUNICH** ELC0BE 
ESCQHT 8 GlflDE AGENCY 
Cafc 08801 23 14 or 0172870 1643 


“• MADRD HARMONY *•* 

BCCUSVE Tqj Escort Sams. End* 
Tel: -»94 T 38B 35 88 or 90S 81 89 64 


“ HUNCH - WONUGKT 
Sopfetfcatd EswftSorvto.g Oner 

OSes. Reese cal 009 - 33 78 26 


WCKY GhaAsadc, Bbhubu 
&ta* Eroi Semtea 
Kastogtofi 0171 793 0891 


A 






-i yt T 

■■m t 







•V 

•r» a-.t 


PR* TIE ENTERPRISES 
Escort Sorts In Naa Yak 
212-Z7M522 


-n > 


-»7 -^ 4 


TANYA. BLAC K, -Etegafl A. BfcjcaM 
LonWJMhoi Prtnta Escort Service. 
0181 906 2ZB1 CradkCMsYMcOne 


< 1' 




VBWHttGUE: XBMBTS Escort 
SeraiCB. - 
earth. Day & 1 


i t : .-V ? 


Mi 1) 53350(4 



V; ^ 


‘ : .TW 

\ ***** 






’ - ^ m 











EUROPE 


Upstart Challenges Power Brokers in Bid to Head E U Parliament 

By Tom Bueride 

— l J Ucr na*ionat Hernia Thbune 

democracvtft 1 whjch -seeks to extend 

^ behind fee Euro- 



w — — juauuniei 

P^^ndidacy of her own. 
t wEf? des P ltcthe expectation of her defeat in 
mStra&g. Mrs. LtfSC. 

SlStiSf’iSl* 6 ^ ra ? nms “to denouncea 
procedure that is almost anti-demo- 
cranc - ^ is a member of the Radical group. 


Her campaign has caught fire. among smaller 
political groups in die Parliament that have long 
chafed 'under the control of the two major party 
blocs, the Christian Democrats and Socialists, 
which trade die presidency between themselves, 
as well as legislators who resent that some of the 
. biggest decisions are made outside the chamber 
itself by Eure's leaders. 

“Toe Parliament should elect its president, 
not select its president,” said Gijs de Vries, the 
Dutch president of the Liberal group, the thir d- 
largest political bloc, which has given its support 
to Mrs. Lahxmxere. 

Pretests notwithstanding, the Parliament was 


tv wikhi of 

the Spanish conservative, Jose Maria Gil-] 
Gfl-Delgado, to take over as its president from 
Klaus Haeasch, a German Social Democrat 
The process is a textbook example of the way 
in which power is shared in Europe, relying on 


backroom deals that keep the peace between die 
Union's major countries and political parties but 
often give short shrift to the democratic ideals 
that die Union is supposed to champion. 

Since 1989. the Socialists and die Christian 
Democrats have agreed to share the presidency 
between themselves, with each party holding the 
post for half of the Parliament’s five-year term. 
While the arrangement has always rankled smal- 
ler political groups, the two parties have been 
able to impose their will because they control 
390 of the Parliament’s 626 seats. 

More and more, critics view the arrangement 
as outdated because of the growing political role 
of the Parliament and its president, and wide- 
spread concerns about a lack of popular support 
for EU institutions and policies. 

The Maastricht treaty on European Union has 
given Parliament the power of co-decision, 
alongside EU ministers, in many policy areas 


and provided for the Parliament's president to 
attend EU summit meetings, an opportunity that 
Mr. Haensch has used aggressively to promote 
the cause of European integration against a back- 
lash of nationalist skepticism. 

“It’s become a much more political job than it 
used to be,” Mr. de Vries said. “Parliament 
therefore should give itself the opportunity to 
select the individual best qualified to be the 
people's advocate." 

One of three Christian Democrats seeking the 
post, Mr. Gil-Robles, was nominated by the 
party when his two rivals. Nicole Fontaine of 
France and Georgias Anastassopouios of 
Greece, withdrew their candidacies on the eve of 
an internal party vote in November. 

Critics say party leaders forced them to with- 
draw to maintain a 1994 agreement between 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany and Prime 
Minister Jose Maria Aznar, then Spain’s op- 


position leader, to allow Spain to put forward the 
Christian Democratic candidate. 

“1 realised I didn't have a chance,” Mr. 
Anastassopouios said, explaining his decision to 
stand down for die party’s nomination. “It’s 
quite certain that there was an agreement that 
existed long before the election." 

Germany and Spain dominate the Christian 
Democratic bloc in the Parliament because Brit- 
ish, French and Italian conservatives were either 
routed in the 1994 elections or lost influence 
because of internal divisions. The designation of 
Mr. Gil-Robles promises to prolong what some 
members feel is an unhealthy dominance. Since 
1989, the presidency has rotated exclusively 
between Spain and Germany. 

“The game is sewn up between two coun- 
tries,” Mrs. Laluraiere said. “It is not right that 
13 other countries watch the ball get passed 
around without getting a touch.” 


Russia Presses Belarus Over Unity 

Yeltsin Suggests Twin Referendums and Joint Government 


Cem^byOmSl^FttmOl^mKlms 

n MOSCOW — An ailing President 
pons Yeltsin is urging his counterpart 
m Belarus to move faster toward pos- 
sible unity between their two countries, 
a spokesman disclosed Monday. 

- Mr- Yeltsin went so far as to suggest 
holding a referendum in each country on 
union and possibly setting up a joint 
government, said the gpfdrt»gmnn 
Sergei Yastrzhembsky. 

- Mr. Yeltsin, who is hospitalized wife 
double pneumonia, outlined a plan for 
Unification “tn some form or another” in 
a letter to President AlpaaivW Tit V nKtv>n - 
ko of Belarus, the spokesman 

The plan calls for a joint budget, 
currency and tax system, for merging 
fuel and energy systems, and synchron- 
izing economic reforms, he said. 

Mr. Yastrzhembsky did not say when ■ 


Mr.. Yeltsin sent the letter to Mr. 
Lukashenko, a hard-liner who rues the 
2991 collapse of the Soviet Union. 

The two {residents signed a union 
treaty last April calling for closer polit- 
ical and economic links, but stipulating 
that Russia and Belarus would remain 
separate countries. The Parliaments of 
both countries ratified the nacL 

The accord outraged Belarussian na- 
tionalists and provoked huge demon- 
strations. 

Mr. Lukashenko responded by crack- 
ing down on the opposition in a series of 
moves condemned in the West He has 
since pushed through a constitutional 
referendum that gives him sweeping 
powers. 

Belarus lags behind other former So- 
viet republics on many fronts. Market 
reforms have barely started, and many 


Yeltsin’s Hospital Stay Extended 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin probably will not be Leaving 
the hospital for at least the next two 
days, his spokesman said Monday. 

The Russian leader remained laid 
up for a sixth day Monday with 
double pneumonia, and his spokes- 
man, Sergei Yastrehembsky, said he 
would not be chairing out until he 
had made a full recovery. 

“There is no indication that Res- 
ident Yeltsin will be discharged to- 


morrow or the day after tomorrow.” 
Mr. Yastrzhembsky said, urging the 
news media not to be “too optimistic” 
about die president’s release date. 

Despite his illness, Mr. Yeltsin has 
been feeling well enough to do pa- 
in his suite in Moscow’s 
I Clinical Hospital. 

Mr. Yeltsin's wife Naina, who is in 
the same hospital with the flu, visited 
her husband along with other family 
members - Sunday - night, Mr. 
Yastrzhembsky said. 


observers doubt that Russia could 
shoulder the financial burden of a union 
with Belarus. 

A top Kremlin official, speaking last 
month on condition of anonymity, said 
that the Russian leadership was trying to 
decide how to respond to Mr. Lukashen- 
ko’s plan to bold a referendum in March 
on a possible union. 

The official admitted that the eco- 
nomic cost of a merger with Belarus 
would be huge for Moscow, but added 
that immediate political and long-term 
economic advantages were also obvi- 
ous. 

Russia says that NATO's enlarge- 
ment to take in former Soviet bloc coun- 
tries would threaten its security and 
create new divisions in Europe. The 
dispute appears to have been a decisive 
factor in Moscow's move to discuss a 
possible meager openly. 

Interfax news agency quoted Sergei 
Shakhrai, deputy head or the Kremlin 
administration, as saying Monday that 
unification could be the best response to 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion’s plans to expand eastward. 

(AP, Reuters) 

■ Special Status Suspended 

The 40-nation Council of Europe de- 
cided Monday to suspend Belarus’s spe- 
cial guest status, Reuters reported from 
Strasbourg. 

Leni Fischer, president of the Coun- 
cil’s parliamentary assembly, said the 
assembly's bureau had declared that Be- 
larus’s new constitution did not respect 
minimum democratic standards. 


BRIEFLY 


’ Resolution of NATO Dispute ? 

WASHINGTON — - A dispute between the United States 
and France over foe southern command of NATO will likely 
be resolved before a NATO sumruit meeting in July with 
U.S. officers holding the key post for fee foreseeable future, 
the U.S. NATO commander said Monday. 

But General George Joulwan did not rule out the pos- 
sibility of a European officer in charge of the Naples-based 
command at some point in die future. 

Asked if he envisioned a European ever leading fee 
NATO southern command. General Joulwan said: “Ever is 
a long time. I think for the foreseeable future we’U probably 
see an American there.” 

France has demanded that fee North Atlantic Treaty 
Or ganizati on's regional commands, including the southern 
command, be rotated among European officers. Wash- 
ington insists that the southern command stay tinder U.S. 
control because Naples is headquarters of the U.S. 6th Fleet 
and is vital to American strategic interests in the Medi- 
terranean and die Middle East. 

The dispute has held up the full return of France to 
NATO’s military str u cture as well as agreement on an 
overhaul of the alliance’s command structure. The alliance 
hopes to accomplish both of these objectives at the NATO 
summit meeting in Madrid this summer. . . 

“I would hope feat at the political level that could be 
worked out,” General Joulwan said. “1 think we can work 
it out at fee military-to-military level. But it’s at fee political 
level right now, and 1 am confident all of that will be 
resolved before the summit.” (AFP) 

: Germany Tightens Visa Rules 

BONN — Germany said Monday that h was tightening 
visa rules for foreign children- The measure means that tens 
of thousands of children born here to Turkish and Yugoslav 
parents will have to apply for residence permits. 

Until now, Bonn had waived visa requirements for chil- 
dren under 16 from Turkey, Morocco, Tunisia and the 
former Yugoslavia to allow them to come for up to three 
months to visit relatives among the more than 8 million 
foreign guest workers in Germany. ' 

But Interior Minister Manfred Kanfeersaid m a statement 


that such trips were being abused by parents to try to get 
their children into Germany permanently in fee hope of 
following on themselves. 

While only 198 children entered Germany alone under 
fee exemption in 1994, last year the number rose to 2,068. 

Mr. Kanther said fee latest restrictions would bring 
Germany in line wife fee European Union’s Schengen 
agreement, which dispenses with border formalities be- 
tween a number of member states. (Reuters) 

Activists Fail to Halt Nuclear Cargo 

CHERBOURG, France — A ship carrying 20 tons of 
highly radioactive nuclear waste reprocessed in Ranee left 
fen- Japan early Monday despite protests by environment- 
alists. 

In a final protest, activists from die environmental group 
Greenpeace spray-painted white radioactive symbols on fee 
pavement and put up signs reading. “No more repro- 
cessing” and “France is not a nuclear garbage can.” 

But fee British ship Pacific Teal left port, its two-month 
itinerary to be announced Tuesday by die French state- 
owned nuclear processing company Cogema and Japanese 

Coge™i Pl ^ciali > ^jd fee douWeJiulled ship was safe. 
Bni New Zeala n d demanded to know fee route, and whether 
the ship would pass through the country’s 200-mile (320- 
kilometer) exclusive economic zone. (AP) 

Militants Claim Attack in Corsica 

AJACCIO, Corsica — About 20 heavily armed militants 
in combat gear forced out die occupants of a seaside 
Corsican resort and then blew hup, almost totally destroying 
the villas and bungalows, the French police said Monday. 

There were no injuries in the attack Sunday night, which 
was the first claimed by the National Front for the Lib- 
eration of Corsica. 

In a communique, fee group said: “The target of our group 
today symbolizes what Corsica rejects: Tourist establish- 
ments serve as a screen for laundering dirty money.” 

The group is distinct from other factions of militants who 
also seek independence for fee French Mediterranean is- 
land, such as me front’s “historic wing” or its “regular 
wing.” (AP) 


Mitterrand Death Photo 
Brings Fine on Magazine 

The Associated Press 

- PARIS A court on Monday fined the director of the 

magazine Paris-Maich 100,000 francs for publishing a photo 
offormer President Francois Mitterrand on his deathbed. 
Roger Therond. convicted Of invasion of pnvacy. also was 

ordered to pay a symbolic 1 franc in damages to each membCT 

of fee Mitterrand family. Symbolic fines are common in such 

Ca ^ n E S C was published Jan. 25, 1996, more than two 

death on Jaa8atthe^eof79. 

The fine amounted to $18,800. 



££ on a bed in fee Paris apartment feat served as his 
tfier ending his tern in May. It caused a sMMtion, and 
queries about how such a snapshot could have been 

re quickly resolved fee mystery. The culprit, they smd, 
[key person in fee family circle” whocashed m on fee 
’Ship by selling fee picture for 4&MXK) 

MiOexrandTa Socialist, had suffered from prostate 
his 14-year presidency, it was revealed 

, . , — j k. mffsrMl from nmstnte 


SiSjutSgfat months after his second tean ended. 
; Chirac, a conservative, was elected. 


H—tefiwCter 


Ekris from just FF 1450 per night 
Explore Etuwpe with « “Hrert ef die Crly T&ekenil* from 

Inter- Continental Choose from 56 European hotels (or dud 
special weekend treat. 

For information or reservations contort vs torn the 
UK on 0345 581444, bom France on 05 90 85 55, or 
from Germany on 01 30 85 3955. 

Kate* par room per Li mfaj miliialiiy. FF 1450 xUe at tie Hotel 

lntwCoctjannia} Bait. ^biWiuU only 

0 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 

HOTELS and resorts 

Em* • He warn ta - - am rust • Tte Aamfca 



00 . 

A U.S. envoy, Carey Cavanaugh, watching Rauf Denktash take pictures of reporters Monday in Nicosia. 

Cyprus Crisis Defused, U.S. Aide Says 


C^np<M by Otr Su& From Oapatdm 

NICOSIA — A U.S. envoy said Monday that there was 
no crisis in Cyprus because its government had assured him 
that it would not bring any part of a new anti-aircraft missile 
system to the divided island for at least 16 months. 

“I believe that should effectively defuse this as a crisis 
issue for Cyprus,” the U.S. State Department official, 
Carey Cavanaugh, said after an hourlong meeting with 
President Glavkos Klerides on Monday morning. 

Turkey, which has occupied the northern third of the island 
since 1974, threatened military action several times last week 
to stop the deployment of the S-300 missiles. The Cypriot 
government said ft would acquire them from Russia. 

Mr. Cavanaugh, director of fee State Department's 
Southern European Affairs Department, made the com- 
ments before traveling north of the cease-fire line dividing 
the island for talks wife Rauf Deoktash, fee leader of the 
breakaway Turkish Cypriot republic. 

Mr. Cavanaugh also reiterated U.S. warnings against 


Turkey. Ankara had threatened to take both political and 
military action if the anti-aircraft missiles, capable of strik- 
ing targets in Turkish air space, were deployed. 

“We find intolerable any military response to that de- 
cision," Mr. Cavanaugh said, adding that he would lay out 
proposals for a peaceful resolution to the island's division. 

The Cypriot government spokesman. Yiannakis Cas- 
soutides, said his country was expecting progress in the 
peace talks over the next 16 months, adding that Mr. 
Klerides had reversed a previous decision and agreed to 
study a U.S, proposal banning military flights over fee 
island. (Reuters. AFP\ 

■ Earthquake Shakes Buildings on Cyprus 

Geologists said feat an earthquake measuring 5.8 on the 
Richter scale hit Cyprus atjtoon Monday, shaking call 
epor 
darr 


buildings, Reuters reported. There were no immediate re 
tsofei 


ports of casualties or damage from fee quake, which was felt 
as far away as Tel Aviv on fee Israeli coast. 


4%V> V ‘‘ V ' ■’ 


•xr: rsr. i**.,.-* p m- »ir\ 



in the springtime. 


Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which makes calling from France and other countries really easy. Just dial tire 
AT&T Access Number for fee counuy you’re calling from and you’ll gel fee fastest, clearest connections home. .And be 
sure to charge your calls on your AT&T Calling Card It’ll help you avoid outrageous phone charges on your hotel bill 
and save you beau coup de francs (up to 60%*). So please check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 

Ste ps IQ folloy for cas ? calfin c yoridvide 

J .Jus dial the ATST-taSB Xuraher for ihetounifr pan are calling irom. 2. Dial ihc phone number you're calling. 3. Inal lhc calling card number IweJ jN/,? vcuiriMn* 



• raw* 'vhj 

■ £nsv.W.T s?' 



ATftI.A«sfxJiiaDhcs 


EUROPE 


smM. 

na-m-aii 

ABttbao 

022 -MB-tni 

SwttZKtHO* . . .. 

-MOMMGII 

WBtan* 

.. MMMM-10 

Untied OaQdotB* 

-HHHMMKII 

ftma . 

MOMWffll 

KIBBLE EMT 


Gfinwoj 

... „ (naMffifi 


...51M2W 

firvac** 

..a *m-wi 

kmt 

..J77-UHMOT 

Mud 


SmtU Arabia''' . .... 


Wjr* 

tn-ioti 

AHUCt 


NriManfe* 


Blrna . 

HI 91 

Ranta«*(B*umr}t. 

755-5MJ 

Karyl* 

0-800-10 

Spalft-; 

. Mwwm-11 

SrotbJUita 

M0WW123 



Col find ihr .<T&T.vnz£ Nrirter for die enuotty sou'rt ofims Irani' Jw »sk anvopcrasurkiT AT&T tHrecf Sewc. 
or vtsli mu Vcfc sseat h ajx/tarv.ut. com/ traveler 

Faiefl, dares amrmjlons fron countries wUb vmcr cmmpc coropimi v> major US emwn on calk to the l 1 i Oenea bqstd on oriwnrf pHarr** Ksmp • Cumins! M^'tv.nr iuiro 

ta*d (nab totalis mtaghsIWS jvrnp kui be « k**r fcpaifljnf: Ufon hw britac rmSwd. tunt erf ifcqf. Imfflh < 4 all. to to lcid jwl tfr twn-w Iks «-virt» -. .j » cdb.t* 
IWd-ftf&i awniiis [wmn awmn-aHnunffv a/fin# aum* iw >.'5 cWIreJa&nft t *il«We(ntaCi un/f OsimnH^iw«^«tecnn»liinrifc!'ais{ii<aal)( | ‘((»r(. * in aiiL''u'ai fui-i,, 
ibr tuintn ytv m gall ing ’daicmal) ibr I'A bnm *U raunme. tem) pbantibpat " Ci)ln>g jralahtui AsttyutaJowiiWcs i»if> *Ln:iirJ JiaiUnIjl* OftJiit ffNj.ns ttijuja v»npr 
rrem during tbtt»U- »DU 'E' luo. «att>Caun ‘1 UwPaw (Cnfc Pih!«t G ISlIiTr^ifullK Ol < WAPi C< 10 *i 4 T&T 








.'y. a**-' 


; > \ (i 


PAGE 6 


BNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Garbage Smuggler Caught Up in the Bad Odor of U.S.- Chinese Ties * 

R V Cpfhpaicnn miscreant caught between two major try to evade detection by Chinese Cus- per has been prone to shoddybusiriess to samk 

By Seth Faison Mr fh*»n had th«» tnim Acervrtinp to the Xinhua news practices from aeents. arroarentlv includ- for China, even though it was not sane- ^ t _n ;+ 

New York Times Seniee 


SHANGHAI — In a Chinese 
courtroom here Monday, a U.S. busi- 
nessman was found guilty of smuggling 
contraband — California garbage. 

The case, it seems fair to say, was 
somewhat different from the day's other 
legal matters in Shanghai No. 1 People's 


miscreant caught between two major try to evade detection by Chinese Cus- per has been prone to shoddy business 
diplomatic powers. Mr, Chen had the toms. According to the Xinhua news practices from agents, apparently includ- 
misfortone of getting apprehended last agency, Mr. Chen was a smuggler, even mg Mr. Chen, who bring in containers 
June, just when the United States and if his contraband was low-grade. marked as recyclable paper but actually 


misfortune of getting apprehended last 
June, just when the United States and 
China were engaged in a high-stakes 
negotiation over intellectual property. 

Now, at least, he will be free. In the 
Shanghai courtroom Monday. Mr. Chen, 
56, was fined 560,000 and ordered ex- 
pelled from China. He was formally 


honed by the U.S. government, but 
rather the work of a handful of ua- 


“ William Chen ignored warnings full of trash, sometimes including med- 
from the Shanghai Environmental Pro- ical waste or scrap metal or worse. 


scrupulous agents like Mr. Chen. afreet the cuit 

At the rirw, U.S. trade officials were China relations. 


dme, by expelling him, it effectively 
frees him, ensuring that his case will nop 
affect the current wanning of U.S.- 


tection Department and defied objec- Used diapers even made their way 


dons from employees of his company’s into one shipment last year, Chinese iw u, — yf_- ■ cMitenced in !a 

Chinese partner,” the news agency re- newspapers reported, creating a steneb ure to comply with an agreement on how dire a U.S. , Hairy Wn. tfj r 

ported. wTaaions, the agency said, solSL U t£de the load for to fight p&acy of ^c.^vt^agd Oun« 


rhrw» toning to impose punitive sanctions 
for what they described as China’s fail- 


It was not immediately clear when 
Mr. Chen would be deported. The last. 


Intermediate Court. And not just be- sentenced to 10 years in prison, though 


cause of die pungent nature of the illicit 
goods. 

In the complex web of China-U.S. 
relations, this case is a single thread that, 
while looking insignificant by itself, is 
actually tied to a number of others. U.S. 
officials describe the businessman in 


his expulsion makes that term irrelev- 
ant 

Mr. Chen. China-bom and now a U.S. 
citizen, was found guilty of shipping 238 
tons of garbage into China from Cali- 
fornia on five occasions between July 
and December 1995, deliberately con- 


“ caused serious damage to Shanghai’s 
environment" 

The illegal dumping of garbage from 
overseas has gone on here for years. 
With a domestic paper shortage, Chinese 


officials to even approach, much less 
open and imped. 

Last spring, China ’s media began re- 
porting the problem widely and uni- 
formly. suggesting chat China’s lead- 


time. could not have been coincidental. 


companies import millions of dollars of ere hip had decided it was die right time 


this case. William Ping Chen, as a minor cealing the contents in 16 containers to 


waste paper each year, mainly from the 
United States, to be recycled. 

As a low-priority shipment, waste pa- 


With a June 17 deadline Zooming, 
Chinese authorities apprehended Mr. 
Chen on June 5. He has been in custody 
even since. Formally sentencing Mr. 


to publicize the issue. “Foreign 
garbage” became a nationalist rallying 


cry, directed against what was perceived Chen to 10 years offers a 


victed of spying* he was expelled within 

hours. _ • . -n 

A U.S. consular official. Richard 
Adams, attended Monday’s court ses- 
sion, but would not discuss it after-, 
ward. ■> 


More ‘Movement’ Needed 


In Hebron Negotiations, 
Washington Cautions 








14 Algerians 
Are Massacred- 






By Extremists 


C^mrdnl ty Ovr Sktf Fnm Dtip&dm 

WASHINGTON — Israel and the 
Palestinians need to make “additional 
movement’ ' before they can strike a deal 
on the West Bank town of Hebron, the 
U.S. State Department said Monday. 

“There is no deal yet. and there re- 
mains the need for additional movement 
and additional work by both the Israelis 
and Palestinians before there can be a 
deal," said die department spokesman. 
Nicholas Bums. 

Mr. Bums said, however, that Thanks 
to the weekend intervention of King 
Hussein of Jordan “a lot of progress" 
had been made on non-Hebron issues 
tied to an agreement 

The White House spokesman. Mi- 
chael McCuny, also warned against 
"exuberant degrees of optimism,” 
adding. “This is a process that requires 
hard woik.” 

Palestinian and U.S. negotiators were 
forced to suspend their talks briefly 
when they evacuated from a Jerusalem 
hotel under heavy security Monday and 
a bomb squad and sniffer dogs were 
brought in. witnesses said. 

Israeli television said information was 
received that a bomb had been planted at 
the hotel. Witnesses said the Israeli team 
remained in the meeting room on 
Laromme Hotel's eighth floor while the 
other negotiators were whisked away. 

An Israeli transfer of 80 percent of 
Hebron has seemed within reach many 
times in recent months, but concerns 
about the safety of the West Bank town 's 
400 Jews and 100,000 Arabs, along with 


other issueSs have delayed an agree- 
ment. 

Mediation on Sunday by King Hus- 
sein removed a major hurdle to an agree- 
ment. Under the compromise proposed 
by both Egypt and Jordan. Israel will 
complete three withdrawals from other. 








mostly rural occupied West Bank areas 
by mid- 1998. The Palestinians have 




by mid- 1998. The Palestinians have 
been reluctant to sign an accord without 
a co mmitm ent from Israel to carry out 
the additional West Bank pullbacks 
agreed in previous peace deals. 

Despite the Jordanian intervention, 
Mahmoud Abbas, a senior Palestinian 
negotiator, said that “some important 
problems’* on a Hebron agreement re- 
mained. He added, however, that “we 
hope we can conclude tonight and if we 
do, the summit and initialing will take 
place” Tuesday. 

News of an immin ent agreement 
angered members of Mr. Netanyahu’s 
rightist cabinet and Jewish settler lead- 
ers, who want to hold on to the lands 
occupied since 1967. 

In a related matter, the U.S. Middle 
East envoy in the talks, Dennis Ross, has 
been asked to stay on in the second 
Clinton administration that starts next 
week. Secretary of State Warren Chris- 









■ 


IS&bM 








The Associated Press 

ALGIERS — An aimed group at- 
tacked a village south of the capital 
overnight, killing 14 people by sl it t ing 
their throats and sticking some of their 
heads on stakes, witnesses said 
Monday. 

The attack, late r confirmed by se- 
curity forces, continued a wave of terror! 
surro undin g the fifth anniversary Ias£, 
Saturday of a military-led coup that 
scrapped elections and prompted a 
Muslim insurgency. ; 

The armed group descended on die' 
village of TBiset, near the highway, 
linking Algiers to the city of Blida, about ; 
SO kilometers (30 miles) south of the 




■ . £\>». \**r 




DtrndSfrmim/Rraten 


A Palestinian negotiator* Saeb Erekat, right, talking Monday with the UJS. envoy for the Mideast, Dennis Ross. 


BLAST: Letter Bomb Wounds 2 at Arab Newspaper in London 


Continued from Page 1 


topher said Monday during a speech at 
the Conference of Presidents of Major 
Jewish Organizations in Washington. 

Mr. Christopher's remarks did not 
make clear whether Mr. Ross would 
fulfill exactly the same role in the new 
administration, or for how long he would 
stay on. (Reuters, AP) 


exploded Monday set off an alarm in the 
scanner, Mr. Khazen said, prompting 
one of two security guards to retrieve it 
At that point it exploded in one face of 
one of the guards, injuring his eyes and 
abdomen, shortly after 9 A.M. 

Police sources said they believed the 
letter bomb had not detonated properly 
and had it done so, it could have been 
fataL The guard underwent surgery 


Monday afternoon. The second guard 
was treated for shock. 

The anti-terrorist squad of die London 
police force evacuated the building, 
sealed off the area and began looking for 
more suspicious letters or parcels. They 
found four, ami explosions could be heard 


as, one by one, a robot blew them up. 
On Jan. 2, police defused five let 


On Jan. 2, police defused five letter 
bombs sent to the Washington bureau of 
the paper. Three other devices were sent 
to the federal prison in . Leavenworth, 


Kansas, which houses, among others, 
Mohammed Salameh, a Jordanian of 
Palestinian descent who was convicted 
along with eight other people in the 
February 1993 bombing of the World 
Trade Center in New York. 

While the newspaper reported last 
week that it had recurved a phone call 
blaming Libya for die airarV in Wash- 
ington, Mr. Khazen said he had dis- 
counted this claim. “We don’t know 
who’s behind it,” he said. .. . . 


T’Binet, protected by volunteers or- 
ganized in state-sponsored “self-de- 
fense groups,’’ was the latest village 
attacked by militants seeking to under- 
mine the groups. 

About 10 men claiming to be mem,-! 
bers of the fundamentalists Armed Is- 
lamic Group cat the heads off their yierv 
tims and mutilated their bodies, said 
witnesses speaking an condition of an-' 
onymity. # 

Car bombings around the capital atiq-. 
massacres in rural areas have left about 
330 dead in the last two months, despite! 
assertions by the government of Presy 
idem Lamine Zeroual that the violence' 
was wily "residual terrorism." 

. More than 60,000 people have died 
since the government canceled the elect-! 
tions in January 1992 and banned tti$ 
Islamic Salvation Front, which had been 
poisedto wm the vote. The From aimed tq, 
establish a state based cm Islamic law. 


COURT: Justices Seek Middle Bath in Former Arkansas Employee’s Sex Lawsuit Against President Clinton 


Continued from Page 1 


non of powers doctrine stops 
judges from requiring a court ap- 
pearance by a sitting president 
and essentially dictating his 
■schedule. It would be "unpre- 
cedented" to subject the pres- 
ident to a trial in any court in the 
country, Mr. Bennett said. 

Joining in on the president's 
side was die government’s top 
lawyer at the court. Solicitor Gen- 
eral Walter Dellinger, who said, 
“Litigation can be aO consuming 
and all absorbing" and argued that 
any phase of a legal proceeding, 
including the interviewing of 
third-party witnesses before a trial 
would begin, would impinge mi 


the president’s time and energy. 

Gilbert Davis, representing Ms. 
Jones, told the justices that while a 


president can be protected from 
lawsuit for bis official actions — 


lawsuit for bis official actions — 
as the court so ruled in 1982 — be 
should not get immunity for his 
personal actions. Mr. Davis said a 
trial judge should postpone a trial 
only when a president demon- 
strates it would imminently in- 
terfere with the nation’s business. 
Any fixed delay, he argued, 
would hurt Ms. Jones's case and 
effectively deny her justice. 

A decision by the high court is 
expected before it recesses this 
summer. No matter how it rules, 
the basic litigation between Ms. 
Jones and Mr. Clinton is at such 


an early stage that no trial is Likely 
to begin soon on her allegations. 

One looming question is 
whether, even if a trial itself is 
postponed, lawyers would begin 
the process of interviewing wit- 
nesses and gathering documents 
related to Ms. Jones r s claim. 

Perhaps because this “discov- 
ery" phase could focus new pub- 
lic attention on previously report- 
ed comments from Arkansas 
troopers who said they helped 
arrange assignations for Mr. 
Clinton and could consume as 
much time of his time and energy 
as a trial, the president does not 
want discovery to begin while he 
is in the White House. 

On Monday, the justices were 


divided about their concerns over 
the discovery process. Chief 
Justice William Rehnquist noted 
that people's memories could 
fade aver time, and documents 
could be lost in intervening years. 
But Justice Ruth Bader Giosburg 
observed that the discovery pro- 
cess itself is draining. 

Mr. Bennett said that if several 
witnesses were allowed to be in- 
terviewed and their comments 
became public, die president 
would naturally be compelled to 


respond and defend himself. 
Ms. Jones filed her charge 


Ms. Jones filed her charges in 
1994, and when Mr. Clinton 
moved to dismiss them, a federal 
district court ruled that the pres- 
ident would not have to defend 


the case while in office, but that 
lawyers on both sides could begin 
interviewing witnesses. But in 
early 1996. the 8th U.S. Circuit 
Court of Appeals ruled fra Ms. 
Jones, declaring that all phases of 
the lawsuit could proceed. 

Hearing the president's appeal 
Monday, the justices were skep- 
tical that the Constitution would 
provide broad immunity from all 
phases of a proceeding and in all 
types of cases. But they were 
sympathetic to assertions from 
Mr. Clinton's lawyer and the U.S. 
solicitor general that a personal 
lawsuit would distract the pres- 
ident from his official duties. 

Some of the justices suggested 
that the best outcome might be to 


leave it to a trial judge, who. upon 
bearing the president’s grounds 
fra postponement and details of 
the imminent demands on his 
time, could delay the case for 
months or years. 

Justice Antonin Scalia, who 
dominated much of the give-and- 
take, said he did not find it “ter- 
ribly persuasive” that the pres- 
ident was so busy he could not 
devote time to a personal lawsuit 
He noted that the president could 
delegate duties and remarked thar 
he had seen presidents “riding 
horseback, chopping wood" and 
“playing golf. 

“This notion that he doesn’t 
have a minute to spare isn’t cred- 
ible,” he said.' 


U.S. Warns Pretoria ;* 
Against Arming Syria 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States warned Monday that it might be 
forced to end aid to South Africa -if 
Pretoria followed through with repented 
{dans to sett a tank-firing control system 
to Syria. -* 

“It’s a matter of very serious concern^ 
the State Department spokesman said. 

According to press reports in Souf£ 
Africa* the deputy president there, Thebq 
Mbekx, is studying whether the 3 bSliofl 
rand ($650 million) sale would violate 
the U.S. Countertrarorism Act, whiefr 
requires Washington to sanction coun- 
tries that provide lethal military equips 
ment to states that sponsor terrorism. 
Syria is on Washington’s terrorism list.. 


Sheldon Leonard, Actor and Producer, Dies 


Long Run in Hollywood Movies in 1940s Gave Way to a Career in TV in 1960s 


INFORMERS: 

Catholics vs. Violence 


GEORGIA: Seeking a Western Identity 


Continued from Page 1 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Sheldon Leonard, 
89, whoseperformances as snarling un- 
derworld figures in scores of Hollywood 
movies in the 1940s gave way to an 
equally prolific career producing and 
directing some of the most popular 
shows on television in the 1960s, died 
Friday at his home in Beverly Hills, 
California. 

Mr. Leonard's long, varied career 
pegged him as a Renaissance man of the 
entertainment industry, moving fluidly 
between theater and film, radio and tele- 
vision, acting and writing, directing and 
producing. 

His Brooklyn accent, imposing six- 
foot ( 1 .83 meter) frame and sinister face, 
which was sometimes decorated with a 
cigar, were indelible stamps on more 
than 150 movies, beginning with “The 
Thin Man" and including “Guys and 
Dolls," “Pocketful of Miracles' 1 and 
“It's a Wonderful Life,” in which he 
played the bartender who ejected James 
Stewart. 


It was in the television industry that 
Mr. Leonard — a man renowned for his 
unshakable confidence in his own abil- 
ities and his unassailable instincts about 
what viewers wanted — found his 
greatest wealth and made his greatest 
impact 


He appreciated early on the ascend- 
ancy of television as a popular art 
form. 

“It occupies a sizable portion of the 
waiting time of the majority of (he 
people in this country." Mr. Leonard 
told a reporter in 1965, whoa three 
shows he helped create — “The Dick 
Van Dyke Show," “The Andy Griffith 
Show” and “Gomer Pyle, U.SM.C.” 
— were among the 10 with the highest 
Nielsen ratings. 

He won two Emmy Awards, in 1957 
and 1961, for his directing work on 
“The Danny Thomas Show’ and a third 
Emmy in 1970 for producing “My 
World and Welcome to It," a situation 
comedy based loosely on the writings of 
James Thurber. 


Jean-Edem Hallier, 60* Author 
And Provocative TV Interviewer 

DEAUVILLE, France (AP). — Jean- 
Edem Hallier, 60. a provocative figure 
on France’s intellectual scene fra de- 
cades, died Sunday of a cerebral hem- 
orrhage while riding his bicycle here, the 
police said. 

Mr. Hallier was the author of several 
acclaimed novels, but was perhaps best 
known for his television talk stows, 
“Jean-Edem’s Gub" and “West of 
Edem. ’ ’ in which he interviewed authors 
and other intellectuals. Most of all, he 
was known as a provocative personality, 
who did not hesitate on television to 
throw books be did not like or tear them 
up. At fust an admirer of President Fran-, 
cois Mitterrand, he became a critic, writ- 
ing a book in 1992 called “L’Houneur 
Perdu de Francois Mitterrand" (The 
Lost Honor of Francois Mitterrand). Mr. 
Hallier said he was one of those who, in 
the 1980s* was wiretapped by Mr. Mit- 
terrand’s anti -terrorist team. 


Continued from Page 1 


them load cars with mortars and other 
weapons. 

Some Catholics, the resident said, have 
begun not rally to inform on the Provies, 
as they are called* but to upbraid them in 
street encounters, saying things like “I 
thought Gerry Adams was working for 
peace," referring to the president of Sinn 
Fein, the IRA political wing. 

The increase in informing resulted in an 
official IRA statement two days ago in a 
weekly newspaper, Anderstown News, 
published in a Catholic area; 

It said: “Over the past number of 
weeks, the Belfast Brigade of the IRA has 
become aware that a number of people in 
the Belfast area have compromised op- 
erations and placed the lives of volunteers 
in danger. These individuals have in- 
formed the RUC of the presence in our 
area by phone even after our volunteers 
had made it clear to them who they rep- 
resented. The Belfast Brigade will take 
action against anyone placing the lives of 
our volunteers in danger in Sis way." 


GERMANY: With High Labor Costs at Home, Companies Are Moving Their Jobs East 


Continued from Page 1 


early last year when he told the unions 
that his measures were indispensable to 
help Germany adapt to the challenge of 
world competition. Allies of Mr. Kohl 
called on industry and unions last week- 
end to resume die talks, which were 
aimed at helping the government achieve 
its goal of attacking unemployment 

The greatest problem lies in how few 
domestic jobs are being created to offset 
the lure of cheaper labor next door in 
Poland. Hungary and the Czech Repub- 
lic, said Gemot Nerb, an economist at 
Salomon Brothers foe. 

German insolvencies rose 16 percent 
in 1996, to a record high, recent data 


show. Many economists expect insolv- 
encies to rise 10 percent more this year. 

Direct investment abroad by German 
companies has singed to a record in 
recent years, rising to 48 billion 
Deutsche marks ($30.4 billion) in 1995, 
the last year such figures are available, 
from 27 billion DM a year earlier. 

Foreign companies, by contrast, 
pump only 10 billion DM each year into 
German-based subsidiaries, leaving 


Republic. Bavarian entrepreneurs set up 
most of their foreign shops in those 
countries, the federation survey found. 

Even in the new Eastern German 
states, those that set up foreign oper- 
ations turned predominantly to Polish 
and Czech sites. 

Apart from starkly lower wages. Cen- 
tral and East European countries have 


Germany with a deficit of nearly 
button DM in business investment 


new appeal for German industry 
For other reasons, the federation said. 
Hungarian, Czech and Polish businesses 
have become surprisingly avid buyers of 
German exports, to such a degree that 
Germany now exports more to former 
East Bloc countries than it does to the 
United States. 

Indeed, no other country enjoys as 


Geographic convenience played a 
strong role in drawing Goman dollars 
abroad, notably in the southern German 
state of Bavaria. 

Flanked by Hungary and the Czech 


much trade with Central and Eastern 
Europe as Germany, according to the 
German central bank, which last year 
carried out its own study of Germany's 
economic ties to the East. 

Because Germany’s eastern neigh- 
bors “have become one of the most 
important growth markets for German 
exporters,” the Bundesbank found that 
one-tenth of Germany's total direct in- 
vestment abroad now flows to Central 
and Eastern Europe, where it is em- 
ployed to open new ventures and take on 
new hires. 

Germany's status in these countries is 
far greater t h a n in other growth regions 
such as Southeast Asia, the Bundesbank 
wrote in a report. 


“fn the past we were absolutely con- 
nected with the Soviet Union in terms of 
raw materials and markets," said Zurab 
Zhvaniya, the speaker of the Georgian 
Parliament “Russia is losing its po- 
sition in Georgia as the traditional dom- 
inatra of our market And Georgian de- 
pendence on Russia is drastically 
decreasing.” 

Political and economic independence 
here is measured in degrees. In a nation 
sitting between Muslim countries to its 
south and east its northern Russian 
neighbor and the beckoning trade routes 
through the Black Sea to the capitalist 
West foreign policy has long been a 
balancing act. 

It has not been easy. Since indepen- 
dence in 1991, Georgia has been con- 
vulsed by civil war and challenged by 
secessionists in Abkhazia. 

The economy fell into depression. 
The average monthly wage in the private 
sector is rally about $40, according to 
government estimates, and government 
workers earn an average of $16 a month. 
A monthly pension is enough to buy only 
two small portions of meat 

The government rations electricity. 
Stranded trolleys line the streets during 
power failures and elevators abruptly 
stop. Seemingly every Georgian office zs 
equipped wife flashlights and kerosene 
stoves; some are lighted by candles. Vir- 
tually no traffic lights work. Truck, drivers 
huddle at night by bonfires of old tires. 

Still, wife the backing of the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund, inflation has 
been reduced from 62 percent a month in 
1994 to less than 2 percent a month now. 
A new currency has been introduced. 
The streets are safer. And the weakened 
economy is actually beginning to grow 


it in Russia’s sphere of influence^ 
The West may have the money. But! 
the reluctance of the United States and 

nr «. ■ - i . 1 * 


other Western countries to become ejK 
tangled in the volatile Caucasus region 
has forced Georgia to turn to the Rus- 
sians fra security. 

After Western nations mark it cteg 
they had no interest in assembling a UN! 
peacekeeping force for Abkhazia* , 
Shevardnadze promised Russia five mu!-*r 
itary bases on its territory in return for j£Sr 
aid in helping Tbilisi regain control over! 
Abkhazia and equipping the tiny Gecnj? 
gian Army. Russia already has abqut* 
8,000 troops in Georgia, ami the agree? 
meat- would make formal fee status of thpl 
force, allow Russia to ejqjand its military* 
presence and give Russia additional Ice?! 
way u n der the East-West accord limiting, 
conventional forces in Europe. 

Fra many Georgians there was a bitte£, 
irony in the agreement, since it was 
clandestine Russian support feat enabled 
the pro-Russia Abkhaz rebels to their! 
territory, in Russian eyes a strategically 
significant sliver on the Black Sea. J 

“Russia has a key to Abkhazia,' * Mr.! 
Shevardnadze said. “If it uses ihis key 
correctly, then it will get the bases." Bira! 


meat on Russian military, bases will qot, 
be ratified" ^feeParliamenL 

Georgia also agreed to Jet more thaw! 
10,000 Russian bonier guards patrol fee 
boundary wife Tmkey and the Black Sea- 
coast Georgia’s meager force of 5.0QQ 
border troops protects the other frontiers*. 

But while the Russians rushed to fill 
the security vacuum* Georgian officials 
persistently say the Russians have bepn 
more hindrance than help, and they sajf- 


tbar little progress has been made toward! 
resettling the 300.000 refugees forcpd! 
Out of Abkhazia by the fi ghtmg “ . 

Georgian officials say that Russian,* 
border guards are involved in taking, 
bribes and, contrary to their agreement 
with Tbttisi, performing customs checks:*, 
hampering Georgia’s efforts to expand; 
its trade with Turkey and Europe. 


Georgia one of the few former Soviet 
republics experiencing growth. 

But while Georgia sees its economic 

furure as a trading crossroads and ttkes to 

think of itself as a kind of junim member 
of the capitalist. West, geography puts 



, \i*< 




,v’ 










jwm m 


.*■ * 

••V*» 1 


.v ; =j*tsu»" 

l*r 0 


«'vC 

•*- -• >**# 

:• ->.'■*** 




• -*** 

JK -«•&*-- 

. ,*£• 

• r* f+J ' a|i 

...... 

-=■ 

-r. m 


|L/« I {pi 

N« l rn 


- 




: 'v 

. 


_*'WW £ 

•-*r 


-*;*«**ii 

*RL< 


\ ' 

fiN. 


8**kh.£ 


l v. - 

I V • 


.. .. 

i */•/ 




IS'.- ‘ . 


. /> ^ 

-■ -• A ■- 1 *«*■ 















2eri^ 


■ -'C.-h. 


• J - '■ .i'-i . 


• ■ -• 

1 ■ • ... ^ 
• : -Tr 

... v ~ r " 
f t y^r-* 


ns /te 




INTERNJTJflJyil j. ADVEKHSEMEIVT 

swias Are Accused 
On Anti-Sen aitism 

Said to burette Hate 


ADVERTISEMENT 


& le^stfd * c “K is nolJhe cSetlSrSe 
few “ 1 £S r «* S'™?. *e especMy « 

Semitic,” Mr.. RotedeM 

ftaJSSS?? &3SB&S53Sffl- 

firsSSSS r “• 


®* were trying to “Mi* . 

s£*|fS£i5! 1 

pbcHie^Ss “ 1 ? Ce ^® ndte fe' friends, it sounds as if tins 

™. frwn *« Ages: 

papeislS X^ n to » news " Tte/w* who claims his basic 

S« ~7 i a s.gg-‘asaas 
is^>~ s.'ss.Kssr 

3t jr I ¥ ®o<* present economics ar , „« . . ,. , 

rmwster, Jean-Pascai Dei- ■wld Sales Admitted 

^ ■ ^ 08estfeld The Swiss National Bank 
~25f i"? sen ^ cntre - admitted ctaiges by a U.S. 
mSS a r Jf? i, monIh *7 <**►. senator and the Worid Jewish 
ps'aUls Congress dot Switzerland 
l£r<puck compensation “ex- served Nazi interests daring 


CigSSWg"!**; “ex- served Nazi interests daring 
Itanoaand^ctemL*- fee war by reselling tooted 

sold to Spain and Portugal, 
aid Mr. Rosenfdd, whose or- but insistedtott the facts were 
gT™» - “ ® umbrella already known, Agence 
§^ I P.*[*f^P' a ® orsoJ[eWs Fraoce-Presse reported 

Mohday from Geneva: ■ 

i nere is clearly a conneo- **The new accusations rep-, 

. ho continued.. “Many , reseat nothing . new,” said 
rejsl justified by Delamuraz GabrieJJnri, a banV spokes 1 
Mid also have the feeling that man. Historians in the; 1980s 
iracabinet member is allowed wrote about the matter ia de- 
ter express himself this way, tad, be said. 
tfien_ the threshold of ami- • “It concerns gold bought 
Sermtism has been lowered.” by Switzerland from Ger- 
‘Most of the mail comes many and resold toPortogal. 
Bom older people who object If one omits the moral aspect, 
by Jewish calls for comp ea- it’s about a technical ex- 
am on 50 years after a war that changer , a -purchase and a 
neutral, ftemnrrarir fituiNmr. fnnnwwr ** , 


neutral, democratic Switzer- 
isftd did its best to stay out of 
’Sfeile collaborating m eco- 
nomics with the Germans. 
"‘The Swiss trave been ac- 


Senator Alfonse 0’ Amato, 
Republican of New York, and 
the Worid Jewish Congress 
made public Sunday docu- 


cised of profiting from deal- ' ineots dated 1945 and 1946 
ggs in Nazi gold and of hav- tbattbey saidprovedthe Swiss 
S& hoarded bank deposits of collaborated with fe&Nazis in 
&ws who died in the Holo- laundering gold stolen by the 
ahisL Rcichsbank from other Euro- 

■'■Many Swiss have rallied, pean central banks. ' 
behind Mr. Delamuraz, One document said that bc- 

whose comments were made tween May 1943 and Febru- 
& he finished a one-year term ary 1994 the Swiss National 
m the Swiss rotating presi- Bank sent 280 trades to Spsdn 
tkracy. and Portugal carrying tons of. 

3 A recent survey showed gold deposited m Switzerland 
less than a third of Swiss sur~ by the Nazis.; 
^yeddxjughtthe^ovemmeitt ' ' The documents were re- 
should distance nsdf from- cently discovered in the U.S. 1 


fob Delamuraz. . . National, Archives, said Mr. 

ni Another survey found that D* Amato, Who chairs the 

nor "feudF of the roteT#*” 
rinBuldJcesign^.. ■ — ".r- ,SsBiss.JtanV*.umd.. fly.. Swiss., 
Mr. RosenfeW sad many government in fire loss of as- 
kttea^writere.weae ^bowing a ■ setsof Ifolocaust victims- 
misplaced sense of solidarity - Mr. Jnri said be did not 
wjp^whzeria^bydefenifing know the details of the doc- 
Mr. Delamuraz, who has said aments, “bat the position of 
he regrets that his comments die SNB was explained at* 
may have offended Holocaust length to the press m Decern-; 
i&yivors and their femilies " ber.” 



^vgyActms . Iww Archer, tvfth husband 
h Tenyjastroir autism Jeffrey 

’ United States 


. v' v.- 


r f _ . 

7" ‘ 


Georgia Uranium 


Ijpy Michael R. Gordon 

_s- New YortThnej Sendee . 

MOSCOW — Responding 
to' - repealed American ap- 
peals, . Russia : indicated 
Monday that it would remove 
a cache of tmefcar material 
from Georgia by March. . 

The sopjriy of highly ea- 
ritped uranium and spent fiiel 
research reactor outside 
■TOlisi in the volatile Can- 
cfeushasheen a major worry 
0c American ofScrels. 
'^Fearful that it could fall in- 
to the hands of Iranian ageaUs, 

f ; dealers or terrorists in- 
on acquiring the ingredt* 
for a nuclear bomb, the 
•AHmcd States spent much of 
year hying to convince, 
tire foudans to take it for 

^^^ CpI Monday T Viktor 
Mjkhailov, the pahtjcally 
ifcwerfdl head of Russia’s 
Sfinistry of Atomic Energy, 
ifcgued as unusuaL public as- 
kance toat the transfer 
would be carried out in the 
rigfct two months. 

^‘During the past four 
ttonths: we have been solving 
tftfs question cm what I would 
describe as the bureaucraoc 
leyeL” Mr- Mikhailov said. 
‘'We are preparing far this, 
deration. 1 flunk we will be 
gftte to withdraw fins fuel in 
ptfeuaiy or March.’’ _ ' 

' I Mr. Mikhailov cautioned, 
rf&wever, that there were still 
some bureaucratic obstacles 
iffovetriome in Moscow. 


“There must be an inner- 
govemnieixtal agreement,” he 
sakL “Dpzens of nunistries 
are involved- We must clear all 
these opecatkres wife feem” 
Mr. - Mikhailov also 
provided details of the finan- 
cial squeeze feeing Russia's 
ffl ic VfflT industry . an d an- 
nounced that Moscow 
planned to cope by expanding 

nuclear exports. - 

The minister said* feat Wage 
arrears in fee nodear industry 
had been reduced to 15 
months from- three to four 
morifes. The delay m paying 

wages was redneed, he said, by 

taknig, large loans from ccait 
mercial banks at imerestrales 
fear reacbed 70 per cent a year 


He said that Russia hoped 
to build nuclear plants in 
China and India, and planned 
to complete a plant m ban: 
The Iranian project las drawn 
strong protests fromTJ.S. of- 
ficials, who say it will help 
Tefarm’s effort to develop nu- 
clear weapons. 

The minister added ' feat 
150 Russians specialists were 
already in Iran working on the 
project to build a nuclear re- 
actor! there. But be said that 
fee project was bang delayed 
by money issues in Tehran. 

“Now some questions 
arose over cash flow: bow fee 
payments will be ; miade, 
through what banks and so 
on,” Mr. Mikhafov Mid. 
“Iran is being a fltflfi 
choosy.” 




T,M»I ( > ! w wl W »j ' j i ii ^--1 

ir 

rj 1 1 1 '^»“ * a * * ; m *. 

3 Pi k¥ -j it, 1 * 11 1 %■'.**. ' ' 


maiy execution introduced m 
Sffo said fee policy was jn$- NewYear s Eve^ . 


nne Archer is one 


of the millions 


who have applied 


Scientology to bring 


about real and permanent 


improvement in their lives. For 


Anne, Scientology made life 


worthwhile and, in her own 


words, “made me feel the best 


of what I naturally am. 


Many, many others have 


found that through Scientology 


they achieved lasting happi 


ness, increased intelligence 


and genuine spiritual freedom. 


Here is. what some of them 


have to say: 


L ife was not always pleasant. Then I 
came to know Scientology, and things 


have been going on the right track ever 


since. I am able to be calm and in harmo- 


ny with other people, and mutual respect 


is an ordinary occurrence in my life. 


Francesco Marmo 


Policeman, Italy 


cientology helps me in many parts of 


my life, improving conditions. 


Scientology is not something to believe in 
what is true is only what you observe 
for yourself. I have observed that it works. 


that it helps me and others to become 


more free and to take more responsibility 


for our fellow 


Beni Holenstein 


Business manager, Switzerland 


B efore Scientology, I wondered if all 
there really was to life was to marry, 


have children, earn money, buy a car and 


a house, then die some day and never 
exist anymore. In Scientology, all my 


questions were answered. I evolved as a 


spiritual person. It is the most valuable 


thing that ever happened to me. 


Evelyne Kauf 


Businessu'oman, Austria 


A s a medical professional l am 

concerned with matters which deal 
with life. The knowledge about life which 1 
have obtained from Scientology has been 


an incredible help to me. I have seen so 


many young doctors become hardened, 


disillusioned and lose compassion because 


of the suffering to which they are exposed. 
Being a Scientologist and knowing 
Scientology has allowed me to grow in 
compassion and understanding and has 


made me more effective in helping my 


patients, my children and others. 


Megan Shields 


Physician, United States 


\ > »; I T(«T 'VTA ( 


Check the following In renet sites for 
information about Scientology. Each is 
available in English, French, German, Italian 
and Spanish: 


http://www .sdentology .or j; 
http://www.lronhubbard.org 
http://www.dianetics.org 

email: welxoaaerftscienl6logy.org 


VISIT OOK CHURCHES: Pay a visit to ymir 
oearest Church of Scientology. Addresses for 
our principal European Churches are given 
here. 


i 'U* •' fli.) :«.■ XZt,\ *"03 


AVAILABLE: You can obtain fee address of 


fee local church nearest you, and a tree 
booklet about Scientology, by calling 
03) 1 44 .74 6i 68. Or write to Church of 


Scientology Ile-de-France, 7, rue Jules C&ar, 
75012 Paris, France. 


Schottenfddgasse 13/15 


1070 Wien, Austria 


Belgium 


Church of Scientology 


European Human Rights 


and Public Affairs Office 


61 Rue du Prince Royal 


1D50, Bmssds, Belgium 


Storekongensgade 55 


1264 Copenhagen K, Denmark 


7 Rue Jules Cesar 


75012 Paris, 


Ger many 


Beichsuasse 12 


M One ben. 


Germany 


Via Abeione, 10 


20137 Mtianojiaiy 


Nieuwe Zijds Nixvixngwal 271 


1012 RL Amsterdam 


Netherlands 


« 




• 3 


Sjy 


Norway 


lilJeGrensen 3 


01 59 Oslo 


Norway 


Portugal 


Rua Actor Tabora 99 5' 


1000 Lisboa, Portugal 


C/ Moment 20, 10 dehs. 
28013 Madrid, Spain 

Sweden 

Goigaien 105 
116o2 Stockholm, Sweden 


Switzerland 


Badenersu-asse 141 


8004 Zurich, Switzerland 


Great Britain 


68 Tottenham Court Rd 


London, England W1P OBB 


THIS MESSAGE WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY A GRANT FROM THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCIENTOLOGISTS 

p *t, Hjjp i L ir nnt nnHWrti V j r-T “ir' J r*-l *t ■■■— ^»~ '*'■*. I wrMminr.v rnnam- rrvn* 

~^^^ B^»y ™T^ffaa«*opCr^i^^g«atwidilBOOiwt>MOn.SCT>fTntaQCTfe>»ttaeabtn«i^«>^«»gfctVTtfragniffoi<^ a»«to»§ rfiritaoiogy nni»A 
































































































HcraUr 



INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE MEW YORK TIMES AM> THE WASHINGTON TOST 


Not Above the Law 


Don't expect a thorough airing of 
Paula Jones's charges against Bill 
Clinton as the Supreme Court con- 
siders her case. There is to be no de- 
tailed discussion of the events alleged 
to have taken place five-plus years ago 
in a Little Rock hotel room. That scen- 
ario forms the basis of the sexual har- 
assment suit at issue, but the question 
before the court is a preliminary and 
straightforward constitutional one: 
Can a sitting president be sued civilly 
for misconduct unrelated to his official 
duties and that occurred before he took 
office, or must any such trial be post- 
poned until he leaves office? 

Fortunately, there is no precedent 
for a suit of this kind against a U.S. 
president, sirring, aspiring or retired. 

Mr. Clinton's lawyers have been at 
great pains to avoid this litigation, even 
to the extent of arguing, at one time, 
that as die commander in chief of the 
armed forces he was entitled to a 
moratorium on civil actions until his 
service was completed. Bur now that 
the election has been held, the tension 
in the White House has eased and the 
theory of the defense has become less 
complicated. It boils down to an as- 
sertion that the president — any pres- 
ident — is simply too busy to deal with 
civil suits, and that for the good of the 
nation any actions against him should 
be held in' abeyance until he leaves 
office and has more time. 

The lawyers warn of a future in 
which the leader of the free world is so 


entangled with depositions, testimony 
and cooling his heels in a courtroom 
corridor that be will not be able to 
handle a sudden foreign or domestic 
crisis or other important business. 

That’s not the way it works. Frivol- 
ous lawsuits, especially those filed 
against the president of the United 
States, can be disposed of quickly in 
the lower courts. Concessions can and 
have been made to accommodate the 
president's schedule. 

This case in particular is an un- 
complicated dispute that should not 
involve the chief executive in drawn- 
out depositions or much time in court. 
It's a simple question of believing her 
or believing mm, not an antitrust mat- 
ter that could go on for years. 

Establishing a precedent protesting 
all presidents from lawsuits while in 
office would be unfair to plaintiffs. 
Memories fail over time, witnesses 
die. Evidence gets lost or destroyed. In 
civil actions revolving divorce and 
child custody, for example, lives are on 
bold, and children grow and change if 
court orders are postponed for four or 
eight years. 

If Paula Jones has to wait until the 
□ext century for her day in court, 
justice, for her, will have been post- 
poned to the point of denial. The pres- 
ident deserves respect and cooperation 
on scheduling from the courts. But, 
like every other citizen, he is not en- 
titled to a four-year free pass. 

— the Washington post. 


Heavy and Light 


Two research reports on politically 
sensitive issues last week — one on 
abortion and breast cancer, the other on 
Golf War illnesses — offer a cogent 
reminder that scientific studies differ 
widely in credibility and authority. The 
abortion study, which largely dis- 
proved die notion that abortions cause 
breast cancer, was the most author- 
itative research yet on the issue. It 
surveyed a very large number of wo- 
men and used a research design that 
virtually eliminated the main cause of 
bias in previous studies. 

By contrast, the Gulf War illness 
study, which suggested that some vet- 
erans may have suffered neurological 
impairments from exposure to chem- 
icals, was only preliminary and sug- 
gestive. It covered a very small group of 
veterans, and its results may have been 
distorted by selective participation. 

The abortion study, performed in 
Denmark, should go a long way toward 
resolving an issue that has been 
clouded in. controversy for more than a 
decade. As long ago as 1980, some 
scientists theorized that women who 
abort their pregnancies may be left 
with vulnerable breast cells that, de- 
prived of hormonal changes in late 
pregnancy, are prone to becoming can- 
cerous. But dozens of studies of this 
possibility showed conflicting results. 

Unfortunately, virtually all these 
studies were marred by likely reporting 
bias because they relied on women to 
tell the truth about whether they had 
had an abortion. The studies typically 
compared the abortion histories of a 
group of women who had breast cancer 
with a group of comparable women 
who did not The breast cancer victims, 
as subsequent research showed, were 
far more apt to admit that they had had 
an abortion, presumably because they 
wanted to give the doctor all relevant 
facts that might help in their treatment. 
The other women were less honest, 
presumably because they considered 
the abortion embarrassing. 

The Danish study got around this 
inevitable bias by relying on official 


records rather than the testimony of the 
women. Abortion has been legal in 
Denmark since 1973. and mandatory 
registries are kept of births, cancer cases 
and abortions. The Danish researchers 
examined the records for 1.5 million 
women, of whom 280,000 had had 
abortions, some more than once. Over 
ah. these women were no more likely to 
develop breast cancer than women who 
had never had an abortion. 

The only uncertainty was a sug- 
gestion that women who had abortions 
in the second or third trimester did 
have an increased risk of breast cancer, 
but the number of women in this cat- 
egory was too small to warrant firm 
conclusions. 

The Danish work has also been chal- 
lenged on the ground that even the 
registry does not fully eliminate bias, 
because women with recent abortions 
have not had time to develop cancer, 
and very old women may have had 
abortions before the registry started. 

Further research is needed. But for 
now. this study shows that women 
need not shun a first-trimester abortion 
for fear of developing breast cancer. 

The other study, involving 249 Gulf 
War veterans, was more suggestive 
than authoritative. Researchers at the 
University of Texas Southwestern 
Medical Center surveyed veterans of a 
navy Seabees unit about their health, 
asked them about possible exposures 
to chemicals, and performed neuro- 
logical tests on 23 ill veterans and 20 
healthy controls. They found subtle 
differences in neurological function 
and concluded that some of the impair- 
ment may have been related to pesti- 
cides, chemical warfare agents or anti- 
chemical medications. 

But the small size of this study and 
the possibility that only the sickest 
veterans participated undermines its 
authority, research on multiple chem- 
ical exposures in the Gulf War is in the 
early stages and will require more com- 
prehensive follow-up, perhaps com- 
parable to the Danish abortion study. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


For the ’90s, Not the ’30s 

“My mind-set is Munich; most of 
my generation's was Vietnam," U.S. 
Secretary of State-designate Made- 
leine Albright recently told a report- 
er. But a secretary of state — and an 
administration — guided by such 
1930s interventionist ideas could 
well shipwreck U.S. foreign policy 
in the 1 990s. 

Fueled by a worldview logically in- 
capable of establishing priorities for 
American action, they would heighten 
the odds of the United Stales plunging 
into an endless series of foreign trouble 
spots completely unrelated to its se- 
curity or prosperity. 

As indicated by the Munich ana- 
logy. Mrs. Albright and other tradi- 
tional internationalists, whether left or 


right, believe that aggression and tur- 
moil anywhere in the world eventually 
will endanger America itself. 

Thus, despite the Cold War’s end, 
the continuing need for deep and ex- 
tensive U.S. involvement — including 
the use of military force — even in 
regions lacking strong militaries, stra- 
tegic locations, major markets or re- 
sources for American business, or any 
of the attributes usually associated 
with the term “vital interests." 

America’s major treaty alliances are 
doing more lately to draw die United 
States into foreign conflicts than to 
protect h from aggressors. 

The likely dangers of traditional in- 
ternationalism are starting to outweigh 
any plausible benefits. 

— Alan To nelson, commenting 
in the Los Angeles Times. 



ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 

KATHARINE P. D ARROW, Vice Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher & Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GETLER. Executive Editor 

• WALTER WELLS, Managing Editor • PAUL HORVTTZ. Deputy Managing Editor 
1 KATHERINE KNORR aai CHARLES MTTCHELMORE Deputy Editors • SAMUEL ABT and 
CARL GEWlkTZ. Asjccah? Editors * ROBERT J. DONAHUE, Editor of the Editorial Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE, Business and Finance Editor 
• REN£ BONDY, Deputy Publisher 

• JAMES MclRQD, Advertising Director • DfiOER BRUN. Circulation Duraor. 
Director de la Publication: Richard McCkm 


Inlernauooal Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chrics-dfrCanlle, 92521 NanUy-asr-Seme, Ranee. 
TeL- (1)41.43.93.00, Fax: Cut, (1) 41.430110; (1)41.43.9112 E-Mail: HdgihLcnm 

Editor for Aw Stekiri Rkhirdson. 5 CtMaisnMJiiipipoitOSJI. Tel. (65}472-7768.Fac{01)274-23J4 
Meg. Du. Asia. RttfD. KraeepM. 50 Chmusur Rl. Hoag Katg. TeL S52-2922-I/U. Fax 852-X22-1I9Q 
Gm. Mp. Gtnumy: T. Sdtiter, Fnedridatr. 15. 6 0323 FrenlfiuM. Td. *49 6919712500. Fax *49 
Fra US.- Michael Conroy. flS) Third Ate.. New Tod. NT. 10022. Td. 12 12} 752-3090. Fax: (212) 755-S7X5 
UK. Advertising Office: 68 Long Acre, London WC2. Tel.(l7l) 836-4802. Fax: {171) 240-2254 
SAJi. art capital de 1 200:000 F. RCS Nanttme B 732021126. Commission ParitaiTe No. 61331 
0 \ Wi. laumnkmal Herald Tribune. AO rights rrsened. ISSN. 0294-8052 . 



North Koreans Will Show They Aren’t Robots 


‘ASHINGTON — The recent de- 


fection of a large family from 
rath K 


W 

North Korea has South Koreans won- 
dering whether they are seeing the be- 
ginning of the end of the world's last 
Stalinist stronghold. 

Kim Kyong Ho, 61 , who had a stroke 
last year, led 15 relatives and a North 
Korean policeman across the Tureen 
River into China on Oct 26. For 27 
days they fled across 3,200 kilometers 
of unfamiliar Chinese landscape, re- 
lying on a network of Korean -Chinese 
to guide them toward Hong Kong. 

Mr. Kim was among the large num- 
ber (no reliable estimate exists) of 
Koreans dislocated by the Korean War. 
Distrusted by the totalitarian regime 
because of his southern roots, the fam- 
ily was moved to the northern border 
town of Hoeryong. The goal was to 
make it hard for them to establish ties 
with the South, but the family found 
ways to communicate with an Amer- 
ican relative living in New York, Choe 
Yong-do, who contributed his life sav- 
ings to facilitate their escape. 

This escape sends interesting signals 
about political realities on the penin- 
sula. If a family including five children 
and a pregnant woman can be led to 
freedom by a stroke victim, presumably 
anyone can get out of the North. 

Analysts in Seoul acknowledge the 
dramatic aspects of this particular es- 


By Chock Downs 

cape but are skeptical about what the 
group's exodus means as an indicator 
of North Korea's collapse. The number 
of refugees has increased this year to 
the highest postwar level, but it has 
fluctuated in the pasL reaching a pre- 
vious high in 1990 and then droppmg- 

Skepocs claim that this particular 
escape would not have been possible 
but for the generosity of a “relatively 
wealthy" American sponsor, the op- 
erator of an automated laundry in New 
York. They presume that China will not 
allow additional transits. 

But the Korean-Chinese network is a 
strong one. Some 2 million Koreans 
live in China. Those who helped the 
group succeed seemed to be guided 
more by ethnic altruism than by greed. 

The escaping 17 bad financial back- 
ing, but that may not be as unusual as it 
sounds, and the amounts involved are 
not imposing. In the waning days of 
German communism. West Germany 
reportedly paid as much as $70,000 to 
facilitate the passage of individual East- 
erners; the business became known as 
“the human trade." The per capita 
amount paid by the Kim family’s Amer- 
ican relative was substantially less. 

China could find opportunities in ta- 
citly supporting ordeny exits. A policy 


of leaving open avenues for freedom- 
seeking Northerners could win a modic- 
um of appreciation in the international 
communi ty of human rights advocates, 
something China sorely needs. 

The ethnic Korean population is a 
hardworking and productive part of the 
Chinese population; its allegiance to 
King would be enhanced by a sym- 
* ic approach on refugees. And 

behavior cm this issue can 

clearly enhance ties to Sooth Korea. 

A more troubling type of skepticism 
heard in the South is that the people of 
North Korea are “robots" or “auto- 
matons." This view holds that North 
Koreans have been brainwashed and 
are incapable of independent thought. 

This theory is given substance by an 
argument that without a Nordpolink 
similar to Willy Brandt's approach to 
FfP s ? Germany. North Koreans have no 
understanding of the culture or advant- 
ages of life in the South. They will not, 
according to this view, seek freedom. 

The sit uation in divided Korea has 
some similarities with that in formerly 
divided Germany. There were areas in 
Fast Germany that West German tele- 
vision broadcasts never reached. In the 
southeast, along the Polish border, one 
such area was referred to as the “Valley 
of the Clueless.’’ But even there, news 
was conveyed by word of mouth, and 
when the opportunity came to vote for 


those who would reunify Germany/ 
even tbe clueless registered their strong 
preference for freedom. 

This should not come as a surprise to 
free peopl**. A precept that underlies 

much of Western thought is that people 

will by nature seek freedom and strive ■ 1 
for liberty. Even if the North Koreans 


s ec urity apparatus that imprisons them, 
they deserve to be helped, 
h may be that the harder a regime tries 
to suppress the truth, the greater the J 
relative accuracy of news Spread by ? 
word of mouth. Five million re side n ts of . 
South Korea were bom in the North, -J 
more than 10 percent of the Republic's "jl 
population. They have an interest hi the- J 
welfare of Northern relatives, fit is haid to. J 
believe that they cannot find ways to 
communicate with them. 

To share the delusion of North. 
Korean leaders that lheir people are J 
servile devotees is to be unpr epared for. 1 
the events that unfold as the North. -] 
collapses, for die onslaught of human 

there-- 



may accompany 
demand for political change. 

The writer, associate director of 
Asian studies at the American Enter- 
prise Institute, contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post. 


Behind and Inside the Oval Office, Much Politics by Numbers; 


W ASHINGTON — Dick 
Morris once said that 
every time Bill Clinton had a 
problem, he got a poll in his 
head. That, as it turns out, was a 
sad understatement. Every time 
Bill Clinton had a vacation, he 
got a poll in his head. 

In 1995, worried drat the 
Clintons’ last vacation sailing 
with Jackie O. at Martha's Vine- 
yard had not been suitably pop- 
ulist, Mr. Moms recommended 
that die president go on a moun- 
tain vacation with high-tech 
gear. A White House poll on 
“lifestyle clusters" had shown 
that swing voters liked camping, 
hiking and technology. 

The president dutifully went 
camping and hiking in a national 
park, but was grumpy afterward. 
“That’s the first vacation I've 
taken that didn't help me in the 
polls." he said irritably upon his 
return, according to Mr. Morris. 
“The first one. After all my 
other vacations. I’ve always ris- 
en a point or two. This vacation 
I didn’t go up at alL" 

Dick Morris, guru, savior, 
weasel, has produced his book, 
“Behind the Oval Office.” It is 
a story of passion and betrayal. 
But in this bodice ripper the 
bodice doesn’t belong to the 
call girl who caused Mr. Mor- 
ris’s expulsion from paradise. 
Like all Washington love sto- 
ries, the intimacy is between 
two men. The unholy tale of a 
president and pollster locked, 
like a couple of bookies, in an 
obsessive relationship about 
point spreads. 

“Like the elusive Rochester 
in the life of Jane Eyre. Clinton 
would unpredictably, suddenly 
flit into and out of my life,’ ’ Mr. 
Morris thrills. 

The prose is panting. When 
Mr. Clinton's lip curled into a 
sneer. Mr. Morris’s blood froze. 
Before tbe president remem- 
bered that he was alive in 1994, 
Mr. Morris writhed “in self- 


By Maureen Dowd 


inflicted frustration.’* But then 
his “vibrating pager" went off. 
Tbe president was calling for 
advice on Haiti. 

Mr. Morris shivered. “My 
body was there, but my mind 
walked cm a high plain some- 
where else — A rot, rushing, 
wanning, stimulating, enticing, 
addicting ... I don't know any- 
thing about Haiti.’ ' 

But they were united, and 
Mr. Clinton was ooce again 
looming over him “like a se- 
quoia. ’ Mr. Morris fussed over 
nis ties before White House 
meetings. “Did this one smack 
of staid thinking? Did this one 
make me seem too arrogant?" 

He even cherished the big 
guy’s flaws. “Clinton has prom- 


inent bags under his eyes. I like 
them ... but most people don't 
agree." He said they found a 
makeup artist (an attractive one. 
so the president would sit still) 
who applied a substance that 
deflated tire president’s bags fix’ 
an hour. No wonder his staff 
fretted about the length of his 
television speeches. 

The book is a pathetic diary 
about two mercurial egomani- 
acs who spend all their time on 
makeover, reshaping Mr. Clin- 
ton’s look, personality, politics 
and party to match tbe polls. 

Mr. Clinton acts like a big 
baby, obsessing that be is nor 
getting enough credit for things. 
And die baby's baby is Mr. 
Moms, obsessed by sibling 


rivalry as he competes with oth- 
er White House aides for Mr. 
Clinton’s attention. 

So we have the spectacle of 
one childish man coaching an- 
other childish man on how to act 
more mature and patemaL 

“You seem to care too much 
about what others think of 
you," he told tire president 
“That’s not a father’s way ... 
You don't look presidential in 
light-colored suits." 

Mr. Morris says he focuses 
on issues. What he really means 
is that you can choose issues to 
project image. The consultant is 
excited that tire president has 
provided “a virtually unlimited 
budget for polling and mall rest- 
ing,” and that tbe two see every 
issue through die prism of Mr. 
Clinton’s popularity. 


Mr. Morris’s outrage at gen- 
ocide is touching: “I began to 
see that the budget and Bosnia 
were the two keys to repairing 
the public's perception of the 
president's weakness." 'i- 
His conscience is moved by 
starving children at home: “1 
told him flatly that a welfare vetp 
would cost turn the election.’’ y 
Even discounting for Mc- 
Morris's grandiosity, the lessen^ 
ofthe book is that the presidency 
has been corrupted and even 
ruined by quantitative thinking; 
All those numbers in tbe Ov^ 
Office are a curse. The boo™ 
demonstrates that polling has 
turned leaders into followers- 1- 
There will never be such a 
thing as greatness with a3-to-5r 
point margin of error. 

The New York Tana. 


j. 

Wrongs and Rights, and More Muckraking to Do 


W ASHINGTON — Amid 
all the accusations of eth- 
ical lapses and moral squalor, 
who and what can Americans 
believe in? 

The Supreme Court hearing 
on a citizen's right to bring a 
civil case against a sitting pres- 
ident exposes the hypocrisy of 
feminists who were prepared to 
sacrifice the principle of sexual 
harassment on the altar of polit- 
ical favoritism. 

Across the street. Congress is 
embroiled in the ethics of using 
illegal eavesdropping to be- 
smear the defense against 
charges of ethical violations by 
the speaker of the House. 

As if this wrong committed 
by Democrats in tbe cause of 
righting a wrong committed by 
the Republican speaker were not 
enough, the media are asking 
themselves: Was it wron£ ft? 
some journalists to be intimid- 
ated by a White House counsel’s 


“report" claiming that pursuit 
of Clinton scandals was a sin- 
ister plot by right-wing kooks? 

And this is only the tip of the 
titanic ethical-moral-legal ice- 
berg. Soon tbe independent 
counsel will present evidence of 
wrongdoing on Whitewater, 
Travelgate and tbe rape of pri- 
vacy in tbe FBI’s files. At tbe 
same time. Congress will hold 
hearings on tbe sale of influence 
to Asian business and political 
interests by a shameless pres- 
idential campaign team and 
Clinton legal defenders. 

What are we to tell impres- 
sionable innocents of this 
march of feet of clay? Who can 
assure them that anybody has 
clean hands? They wonder If 
the question-ducking president 
and the comer-cutting speaker 
and tire eavesdropping etnidsts 
and tbe self-hating media are ail 


By William Satire 

begrimed with guilt, where to 
turn for inspirational uplift? 

Youthful idealists, you have 
come to the right space. Here 
we deal in eternal verities tm- 


A Mild Chinese-Russian Affair 


H onolulu — Prime 

Minister Li Peng returned 
recently from a visit to Mos- 
cow proclaiming a Chinese- 
Russian “strategic partner- 
ship" that would "adjust the 
balance of world power" and 
“offset the influence of tbe 
United States." Some in 
America and elsewhere see this 
as cause for alarm. 

But if China and Russia de- 
cide to get into bed with each 
other, the appropriate re- 
sponse is to wish both of them 
pleasant dreams, since each 
will surely feel compelled to 
sleep with one eye open. 

It is not hard to discern tbe 
motivating factors behind this 
mooted partnership. Both 
China and Russia object to 
what Mr. Li describes as a 
“world dominated by one 
power." This mind-set incor- 
rectly ascribes motives and 
capabilities to the United 
States that are at variance with 
America’s declared foreign 
policy goals. It says volumes 
about how China and Russia, 
particularly the former, cur- 
rently see the worid. 

For Russia, the partnership 
appears, at least in part, to be a 
reflection of Boris Yeltsin’s 
continued frustration over his 
inability to get die West to pay 
serious attention to Moscow's 
concerns about the expansion 
of NATO. Thus the Kremlin 
may be trying to play a China 
card to get attention. 

There are important eco- 
nomic considerations for Mos- 
cow as well, since part of the 
new arrangement is an agree- 
ment between central banks 


By Ralph A. Cossa 


that will facilitate bilateral 
trade. Old enmities aside, Rus- 
sia tends to see China today 
primarily as a source of much 
Deeded investment and hard 
currency, the latter to be 
provided in significant mea- 
sure by purchase of advanced 
Russian weapons systems. 

Beijing no doubt views its 
strategic partnership with Mos- 
cow as a counter to the U.S.- 
Japanese security alliance. The 
Chinese consistently argue (in- 
correctly.) that the alliance is 
aimed against China as part of a 
containment strategy, and that 
tbe revitalization of U.S. -Jap- 
anese defense ties embodied m 
the April 1996 joint declaration 
by President Bill Clinton and 
Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashi- 
moto portends Japanese remfl- 
ttarization. 

In fact, nothing would con- 
vince Japan more that China 
needs to be contained, or that 
Japan's military (less than 
one-tenth jhe size of China's) 
needs to be expanded, than a 
strategic partnership between 
Tokyo’s two historic enemies, 
with which it has been trying 
to improve relations. 

China and Russia probably 
realize the limits of their re- 
cently declared liaison. Even 
during die early days of the 
Cold War, neither a common 
ideology nor a common en- 
emy could sustain their stra- 
tegic partnership. Some 
Chinese security specialists 
privately caution that while 
relations with Moscow have 


improved markedly, it is only 
a matter of time before Russia 
regains its "big power men- 
tality’' and becomes a force to 
be reckoned with once more. 

What China really seeks is a 
world with multiple power 
centers and an assurance drat 
two of them, Beijing and Mos- 
cow, are not overshadowed by 
Washington. China's official 
Xinhua news agency hinted at 
this in its account of Mr. Li’s 
visit to Moscow. “Tbe world 
is moving toward multipolar- 
ization,” it said, and “both 
Russia and China well deserve 
to be two important and in- 
dependent poles in a multi- 
polar world." 

Leaders in Washington. 
Tokyo and elsewhere should 
have no trouble with this view, 
since they realize that the 
world already is multipolar, 
that China and Russia are im- 
portant poles and will become 
even more important in future, 

and that cooperation among all 
the poles is essential to global 
stability and prosperity. 

While balance of power 
practitioners in Beijing or 
Moscow may be trying to play 
a Russia or China card, the 
best they can hope for is a 
somewhat tentative marriage 
of convenience. A long-last- 
ing true strategic partnership 
does not appear likely. 

The writer is executive di- 
rector of the Pacific Forum 
CSI$, a Honolulu-based non- 
profit foreign policy research 
institute. He contributed this 
comment to the International 
Herald Tribune. 


sullied by pragmatism's shades 
of gray. In matters of morality, 
these are wrongs: 

It is wrong to use power of 
position to extract sexual fa- 
vors, just as it is wrong to make 
such a charge falsely. 

Wrong to besmear and hu- 
miliate an accuser, and wrong for 
an accuser to denounce exam- 
ination of her motive. . 

And wrong to give anyone, 
even a president, permanent im- 
munity from tbe civil law, just 
as it is wrong to deny him res- 

S ite from lawsuits while in of- 
ce, and wrong to deny tire col- 
lection of perishable evidence 
to be used when it is ordinary 
citizen against ordinary citizen. 

In matters of ethics, these 
are wrongs: 

It is wrong to use tax-exempt 
money to support political 
activity, and wrong to mislead 
investigators about it, although 
an unintended untruth is less 
wrong titan a deliberate lie. 

Wrong for government to en- 
joy the fruit of a poisoned tree, 
using a tape obtained by invadera 
of privacy to increase tbe pun- 
ishment of an admitted wrong- 
doer, because unethical means 
do not serve ethical ends. 

And wrong for a White 
House counsel to expend tax- 
payer dollars to sell guUible 
newsies a conspiracy theory 
about conspiracy theorists. It is 
wronger for a lawyer paid by the 
people to abuse tbe claim of 
‘ ‘executive privilege” for dioir- 


• • 

sands of documents, some of 
which turn out to show wrongs 
doing by p residential aides. 

Ii is almost always wrong 
break the law. Wrong tb 
the police power to make p) 
for cronies; wrong to 
bank examiners and ft 
agencies; wrong to call up 
thousand FBI files for ~ " ' 
snooping; wrong to turn a 
eye to the use of foreign 
in illegal campaign do 
What’s left to be rit 
ft is right for a people to ha 1 
a rule of law that can — and 
our time more often does — - 
tbe most powerful and art 
to account 

It is right to have an ii 
feet, impatient, 
bamboozled press with 
power to proa the 

effective system of checks 

balances into doing its consfij* 
rational duty. 

What, then, do we tell 
dren, disillusioned by _ 
all around, on tire eve of ttyS 
second inauguration ofaT'“~” Jk 
cratic president ai 
tican Congress? 

We tell them to thank 
stars for tbe freedom to mi 
rake, and to look up from 
necessary mutual mi 
now and then to marvel 
democracy’s celestial crown. 

The New York Times. Ifi 



Letters intended 
cation should be 
“Learn to the Editor ” 
contain the uniter’s signatures 
name and ftdl address. Letters' 
should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be re- 
sponsible for the return of un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS Am 


1897: Russian Policy 

LONDON — The Times, in a 
leader on the new Russian For- 
eign Minister, says: “On tbe 
whole, it is not probable that tbe 
app ointme n t of a new Minister 
will exercise any very marked 
influence on Russian policy. It is 
for from likely that Count 
Mura vieff will suddenly become 
a power in the affairs of Europe. 
By a Long tradition dating back ax 
least to the days of Alexander X, 
the Emperor of Russia is in real- 
ity his own Foreign Minister. 

1922: A Crisis in Spain 

MADRID — The resignation of 
the Maura Cabinet brought to a 
crisis toe situation which has 
threatened to convulse Spain. 
For the jnst three years, espe- 
cially since the Morocco expe- 
dition, tbe question of the su- 
preme control of tbe military 

authorities has been paramount. 

Despite military protests, die 


Minister of War introduced a 
Royal Decree implying the dis- 
solution of the juntas by ordering 
that the presidents of afi officers’ 
committees should be chosen 
by die Cabinet instead of elected 
by tbe officers themselves. 

1947: 'Mercy Killings’ 

NUREMBERG — Documents 
claiming 30,000.victims by Nazi 
“mercy Jrillmgs" in the first 
year of the war were introduced 
by the prosecution in die war 
crimes trial of twenty-three Ger- 
man doctors. Extermination of 
120.000 persons by Hitler’s per- ■ 
sonaBy-ordcrcd euthanasia pro- ‘ 
gram was planned. The aged, 
.and ailing or defective persons, 
were taken to a “euthanasia sta- 
tion," then put in a gas chamber 
Or injected with lethal drugs. 
The court also indicted eighteen ’ 
high-ranking Nazi SS officers,' 
including Heinrich Himmler's 
chief- henchman, on charges 
of crimes against humanity. 






PITEBWAT10N AL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


Sewing Black Americans 
Into the Patchwork Quilt 


j By William Raspberry 

\ “Wc must delight in each other, 
wake each other’s condition our 
?wn. rejoice together, mourn to- 
getner and suffer together ... We 
must be knit together as one.” 

! — John Winthrop, first 

governor of Massachusetts 


ASHINGTON — Can we 
iVV Americans “be knit togeth- 
er as one" — as distinct end as 
united as a patchwork qn Jt? Or is 
|t more likely that we’ll come un- 
raveled. each group pulling from 
the others? Who are we? 

; These questions constitute one 
of the crucial issues facing us at 
tile end of the 20 th century, and 
they lie behind a fascinating effort 
on the part of the National En- 
dowment for the Humanities: an 
^ttempt to launch a national con- 
versation on American identity. 

J The idea goes back at least to 
1993. when Chairman Sheldon 
Hackney proposed “a national 
conversation open to all Axner- 
.... icans, a conversation in which all 
'l l Voices are heard and in which we 
grapple seriously with the mean- 
ing of American pluralism." 

!_The difficulties such a conver- 
sation might entail were revealed 
the other night when a racially 
mixed audience of several hundred 
saw a film — “Talk to Me: Amer- 
icans in Conversation" — com- 
missioned by the endowment 
■'But the conversation that fol- 
lowed — much like the film — 
feas more a collection of personal, 
often deeply moving, vignettes 
than a discussion of anything in 
particular. 

£ Still the question intrigues. Can 
Americans be knit together? 
Much of the film suggests we can 
bq. Americans of various origins 
talked with great feeling about 
their family origins in Sweden or 
ffaly or Russia or Japan and bow 
they now have been transmuted 
mto an American race. Even 
American Indians and Hispanics 
■Acknowledged some sense of this 
transformation. But .the black 
Americans (apart from the few 
atnong the experts discussing the 
film) seemed trapped in discus- 
sion of their problems. 

I suspect this disjunction was 
more the fault of the filmmaker 
than anything else — like a school 
treating black history as a once-a- 
ytar addendum rather than as an 

Anyway, when white people 


come at us to talk about pluralism, 
we naturally expect they want to 
hear about our problems, about 
how left out we reel. 

We do feel left out And many 
of us have come to see- our out- 
si demess as permanent. That, all 
by itself, affects the conversation. 
I came of age during a period 
when Martin Luther King’s dream 
of inclusion was the norm, when 
we still hoped that the country 
could somehow surmount race 
and become the America it wanted 
to believe it was destined to be. 

I’m still there. But many, many 
of us are not — and Tor good 
reason. To keep hoping that 
America will rise above race is to 
keep being disappointed. Finally 


you stop applying for admission 
to the club that keeps telling you 
“no” and make yourself believe 
that you never wanted to join 
those snobs in the first place. 

Should this fear of being left 
out — of falling among the dis- 
carded scraps that don’t get sewn 
into the patchwork quilt — be part 
of the conversation? Can itbe 
made pan of the conversation in a 
way that doesn’t risk painting 
blacks as moaners and crybabies 
who refuse to acknowledge the 
progress they’ve made? 

Can whites hear this part of the 
conversation — the ambivalence 
about our Americanism that is a 
part of black America’s psyche? 
Can we move beyond our pain 
before white America recognizes 
the seriousness of that pain and 
accepts that it is still being in- 
flicted? 

Do our differing realities— our 
certain knowledge that neither 
John Winthrop’ s lovely words nor 
the “all men ...created equal of 
the Declaration of Independence 
included us — keep us from work- 
ing to make the words mean what 
they should have meant? 

Can we leam to see ourselves 
fin Mr. Hackney’s words) as 
“playing roles in a common story, 
in which we are all linked to each 
other across barriers of time and 
boundaries of race, in which we 
share the shame of our mistakes 
and the glory of our achieve- 
ments, in which the meaning of 
America is to be found in the 
common ground of its aspirations 
of liberty and justice for all 7 
As the comedienne Joan Rivers 
might have put it: Can we talk? 

The Washington Post. 



Man’s Winged Victopr 
Has Transformed Life 


By Diane Ackerman 


As an American citizen living 
and working in Germany, I was 
appalled by the “letter” {Jan. 9) 
to Helmut Kohl from Scientol- 
ogy supporters. Tlie arrogance 
and self-righteousness of the 
advertisement's authors were 
surpassed only by their ignor- 
ance. 

Although America has pro- 
claimed that the Church of 
Scientology is a religion, the 
Goman government has decided 
otherwise. It is the right of 
Germany and any other demo- 
cratic government to decide 
what constitutes a religion. In 
Germany, Scientology has been 
proclaimed a for-profit organiza- 
tion, and one with extremist 

beliefs. ■ 

The fact that Germany ex- 
cludes from government or polit- 
ical office persons it deems ex- 
tremists is a credit to the German 
people. The constitution of Ger- 
many was specifically designed 
after World War H to never again 
allow an extremist group of 
»Ie to rise to a station of ra- 


the members of this special 
department — “Promoting Good 
and Fighting Evil" — are so 
close to Allah that they need not 
pray? 

RICHARD E- STEELE 
Nuuk, Greenland. 


No Caliphate 


peopl 

fluen 


luence or power. 

SUSAN ZUNINO. 

■ Erlangen, Germany. 

It is obvious that the Ameri- 


can celebrities who signed the 
open letter to Chancellor Kohl 
lack both international under- 
standing and an awareness of 
Germans’ sensitivity to compar- 
isons between present-day beha- 
vior and that under the Nazis. The 
Germans are always an easy 
target, and the letter was a 
cheap shoL 

I especially would have expec- 
ted Larry King, the CNN talk- 
show host, to be more en- 
lightened. 

JOHN SERNONE. 

Monte Carlo. 

Taleban Logic 

Regarding “ Taleban to Punish 
Any Failure to Pray " (Jan. 3): 

The Taleban leaders now have 
decided to check whether the Say It s Not So 
Afghan people are doing their 
five-times-daily prayers. 

All citizens, including shop- 
keepers and government employ- 
ees. are to stop working and goto 
the mosques at the call of the 
muezzin. Compliance is to be en- 
forced by a government depart- 
ment. __ 

Now, wait a minute. If gov- 
ernment employees are to go the 

mosques, who will be left to check 

who is complying? 

Or are we to believe that 


Regarding “In Istanbul. Most 
Muslims Eagerly Await Santa 
(Dec. 231: 

It is not true that Istanbul was 
for centuries the seal of the 
Muslim Caliphate. The true ca- 
liphate was never in Istanbul, it 
was mostly in Baghdad, some- 
times in Damascus. 

HUGH McLEAN. 

Berkeley. California. 


George Will is writing about 
civility (“Turn That Noise 
Down. You Voluble Solipsists. 
Opinion. Jan. 3) while Colman 
McCarthy is retiring as a col- 
umnist ("Yes. Peacemaking 
Can Be Taught Opinion. Dec. 

°This seems the reverse of what 
should be. Surely there is some 

mistake. .... 

avedon carol 
London. 


I THACA. New York — Perched 
in small gondolas beneath what 
looked like gigantic Christmas or- 
naments. three teams of hot-air 
balloonists recently set out to 
circle the world. 

The grander the quest, the 

graver the danger. 

Hitching a ride on 100 -mile- 
per-hour jet streams, sometimes 

meanwhile 

climbing to 30.000 feet, balloon- 
ists must face storms, mechanical 
breakdowns and hostile armies 
below. 

One of the Iasi great aero- 
nautical challenges, ballooning 
around the world ignites ora sense 
of adventure. But it should also 
tantalize ora psyches. Human 
flight is less than 100 years old, 
still marvelous and as puzzling as 
riding a pterodactyl, yet it has 
transformed ora lives. 

Now we can conduct romances 
over many time zones. Our re- 
lationships with our parents have 
changed. There's no need to di- 
vorce them when we many 
someone from a far-flung state or 
country. Even ora gene pool is 
changing because people from 
Australia. Puerto Rico or Japan 
can have children wiih people 
from California. Peru or China. 

How we earn ora living has 
changed, how we educate our 
voting, how we vacation, how we 
choose ora leaders, how we think 


IUUVJ2H. VUl 

of news, how we raise crops, con- 
duct police work, give emergency 
aid. All because of our recent abil- 
ity to fly. We no longer fight wars 
mainly with countries next door. 
Now it’s abstract, global, predi- 
cated on aerial surveillance. 

Hying has changed how we 
imagine our planet, which we 
have seen whole from space, so 
that even the farthest nations are 
ecological neighbors. And it has 
changed our ideas about tune. 
When you can gird the Earth at 
1 , 000 miles per hour, how can you 
endure the tardiness of a postman 
or a plumber? , , 

Most of all. flying has changed 
ora sense of our body, the per- 
sonal space in which we live, now 
elastic and swift. I could be in 
Bombay for afternoon tea if 1 
wished. My body isn’t limited by 
its own weaknesses: it can rush 
through space. 

One of the first words we think 


humans spoke, recorded in Indo- 
European as pleu. meant it 
flies." What an ancient longrag- 
After all, we are vertical by 

heritage — our primate ancestors 
raced up into the trees for safety 
and strategy- Thousands of yeras 
later, settled and civilized, we still 
follow those basic instincts. 

It’s hard to teach an old dogma 
new tricks. So we build high-nses, 
towers and ziggurats, and we re 
utterly obsessed with hierarchies 
— who stands above whom and 
looks down on whom. We climb 
corporate ladders, we battle for 

when I think 

of the 39 -year-old psydnamst 
heading this year's Swiss balloon 
team. What does he make of his 
devotion to soft, round objects! U 
stories tall? But perhaps symbols 
are the furthest thing from nis 

mind. The sheer marvel of flight-- 
that we can make unwieldy metai 
soar with such delicacy — con- 
tinues to astonish us all. 

Like ora ancient forebears, we 
too exclaim: It flies! Small wonder 
isolated tribesmen in Papua New 
Guinea greeted one charter pilot 
with bananas for his plane and a 
desire to know what sex it was. 

The airplane’s wheels were the 
first they had ever seen. 

Like a shamanistic language, 
flight speaks in different idioms. 
We can blast rockets to the stars. 
We can race across the sky on 
fixed wings. Ballooning appeals 
because it is more languorous and 
low-tech; it's adventure in an an- 
tique mood. , 

What a treat to stroll through 
the veils of twilight, to float across 
the sky like a slowly forming 
thought. Flying an airplane, one 
usually travels the shortest dis- 
tance between two points. Bal- 
loonists can dawdle, loilygag. cast 
their fate to the wind and become 
pan of the ebb and flow of nature, 
part of the sky itself, held aloft like 
any bird, leaf or spore. 

In dial silent realm, far from the 
mischief and toil of society, all 
one hears is the urgent breathing 
of the wind and, now and then, an 
inspiring gasp of hot air. 


The writer, a poet, essayist and 
naturalist, is the author most re- 
cently of “A Slender Thread: Re- 
discovering Hope at the Heart of 
Crisis.’' She contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


:y"' 







•r 05 ; 


• y?. Save up 



A two-month 


trial 


subscription 


qittL. 

acap 


to 60 


, the World's Daily 
5 ss and economics, 

■ all from an 


Yfes, I wou& to start rscaving ihe bkmtahanal Herald Triune- 14-1-97 
□ My chock b mdosad (payMi to Ae MJ 

BSr aSZXu. DVB* 

CfBffcotalchorgeawS be French Frtro^ 

Jrm. Dote — — 

Cord No: 

Signature: ■ " 

For business order*, ininde your VAT Ni i ^ w ^ mA/dJMZ iT-toT 

Nama. 

Bnl N anc. 

MtdlngAiitfcaK. 

Gy/Coda. 

County - 
HomolalNo: 


Job life. 


Justness Tel Nk_ 


Ab. A Mali Buearara Ortiz 
Preside* ofibe Republic of Ecuador 
1996 - 2000 

CONCESSION AND MODERNIZATION 
OF THE BUS TERMINAL IN GUAYAQUIL. 

He Government of Ecuador, received technics * Cham^rfCopstraction, the 

“ r 11,6 ta onhr 10 ^ 1 qullity 

Ministry of Finance anome r. Aeuilera" Bus Terminal in Guayaquil. 

dollars, and the retu rn rate 18 % approximately. 

The concession contract covers the following. 

* MSES'ifS'K-iSSfSSSS™" 

* Development of profitable areas. 

* Administration of the Bus terminal. 

* Planning, comrol and coordination of all operations related to 
passengers and cargo. 

» Total maintenance of the Guayaquil Bus Terminal. 

* Cleaning of the building, indoors and outdoors, including gardens.. 

Performance of surveillanceandcon^emen^y services. 

. . j fnr its£ 5 000 oo. Contact the Guayaquil Transit 

The pertinent bidding documentation can be «1“"“*** * j 4 , 4555 , 413 229. FAX (5934) 414554. 

"Z additional information may be 

Av Juan Leon Mem * 130 y Av. Pallia. Quito. Ecuador. Phone. l*u-J 
Art. Sectorial Transportation Program. 


Sr. Omar Quintana Baquerizo 
President 


|ng. Leonardo Escobar Bravo 
Executive Director 


Ota* UU*d 

□ I do not vrak to (WWW infonnrfon ban other Kjeenet ^ 

Offer voted bf new ntbsarbers offy 


Ing. Miguel Salem Mbo 
President 

Lcda. Marfa Augusta Cortazar de Vanegas 
Alternate President 

v CONAM Executive Director 

National Council for the Modernization of the State 

'Jra/ufuaweif, Our eeuunil/nerU- 

TOWARDS THE XXI CENTURY 
MODERNIZATION: A CHANGE FOR ECUADOR^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
TUESDAY, JANUARY 14. 1997 
PAGE 10 








Women to the Fore: A Soft Touch for Milan’s Menswear 


I* '"t&S 


• ■>< > 





OnMlkrMue 

From left: Jil Sander (top ) and her four-button tweed jacket ( bottom ) ; Donna Karan ( top ) and Miuccia 
Prada (bottom); Donatella Versace ( bottom ) and her color-block cardigan for the Versus line ( top); 

Versace's herringbone coat with plain lapels and pants; Vivienne Westwood with her jacquard-flower coat, 
and Valentino’s camel suit with organza shirt. 


BOOKS 


FLYING HOME AND OTHER 
STORIES 

By Ralph Ellison. Edited and with an 
introduction by John F. Callahan. 173 
pages. $23. Random House. 
Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 


S OME two years after Ralph Ellison 
died, his literarv executor. John F. 


VJ died, his literary executor. John F. 
Callahan, stumbled across a box of papers 
in the writer's Manhattan apartment. At 
the bottom of the box was a brown im- 
itation-leather briefcase, and inside the 
briefcase was a ruaniia folder of 
manuscripts, typed on brown, crumbling 
paper. The file was marked “Early Sto- 
ries." All had been written before El- 
lison's classic novel. “Invisible Man" 
(1952), established him as one of Amer- 
ica's modernist masters. 


The volume at hand. “Flying Home 
and Other Stories," includes those six 
unpublished stories as well as seven 
other free-standing tales ( that is, stories 
that were not selections or outrages 
from his novels). Together these stories 
form a kind of portrait of Ellison as a 
young artist, a writer still trying to dis- 
cover his voice as he explores the 
themes and techniques that would come 
to such brilliant fruition in “Invisible 
Man.” 

Many of these stories feel like ap- 
prentice works: There is an anger and 
sentimentality floating about; the supple 
irony of “Invisible Man" is still out of 
reach. And Ellison's myriad influences 
— from Dostoyevsky to Hemingway to 
Twain — remain close to the surface as 
welL 

Four of the stories, starring a pair of 


s named Buster and Riley, an: slight, 
by snapshots of youthful yearning 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


I N recent years, a World Senior Cham- 
pionship for players 55 years and older 


Lpionship for players 55 years and older 
has been added to the World Champi- 
onship and the World Junior Champi- 
onship. In the sixth running of this event, 
held in Bad Uebenzell. Germany, three 
players tied for first place, the grand- 
masters Alexei Suetin, Anatoli Kein and 
the international master Janis Klovans. 

Suetin, who is 70 years old. was given 
the title on superior tie-break coefficient, 
Lein. 65. was named second, and 
Klovans, 61. was third. 

Suetin demonstrated a deft positional 
touch in his defeat of the international 
master Boris fCatalimov. 

In their game , after 5 B b5 , a form of the 
Closed Sidiian arose in which positional 
play predominates over tactical melees. 
With 5...Qc7, Suetin continued by pre- 
venting double pawns with 6 Bc6. 

After $..-Be7. Kaialimov 's 9 c4 dc 10 
Bc4 d6 1 1 b3 let Suetin create an im- 
mobile e5 pawn with 1 l...de 12 fe. si- 
multaneously making the d2 pawn back- 
ward on a half -open file. 

Suetin 7 s 1 3,..Be6 indicated that be did 
not fear 14 Be6 fe, because the black e6 
pawn would have been virtually im- 
possible to attack, while the white e5 


pawn would have been more solidly 
blocked than ever. 

The maneuver with 2Q..Nd8 and 

21.. .Ne6 brought an important piece to 
defend the black kingside besides cov- 
ering the d4 square. 

After the exchange 22...Bh4 23 Qh4, 
Kaialimov was left with the worse minor 
piece, the one blocked by his center 
pawn. He also stood poorly on the 
queenside, and had dubious chances on 
the king's wing. 

Kaialimov made a desperate lunge, 35 
Rf6, hoping to upset Suetin. but the 
grandmaster took a pawn with 35..-Rd2!. 
and after 36 Bel Rd4 37 Qg3 Qe4!, he 
would have won a piece after either 38 
Bh6? or 3S Rh6?. 38...Qg4! 

Kaialimov was stymied, but when he 
began to pull back with 38 R6f3, he was 
lost After 38...Qg4, he could have clung 
to his h pawn with 39 Qh2, but 39...Ral ! 
40 Bh6 R H 42 Kfl Rdl 42 Ke2 Rbl 43 
Be3 Rb2 44 Kfl Qf3 wins everything. 

After 47...Qb3, Kaialimov was a 
hopeless four pawns down, and after 

54.. .Qc3. he gave up. 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 



KAIALIMOV WHITE 


Position after 37... Qg3 


White 

Kalinov 

1 e4 

2 Nc3 

3 14 

4 Nf3 

5 Bb3 

6 e5 

7 N45 
804) 

9 c4 

10 BC4 

11 b3 

12 fe 

13 Bb2 

14 Rcl 

15 Qe2 
16Bc3 
17 Qc4 
IB Qb5 

19 Reel 

20 Qe2 

21 Q12 

22 NM 

23 Qh4 

24 Rf2 
29 Bal 
76 Rcl 
27Qg4 


White Black 
Kat’mev Suetin 


28 Rcfl Ra8 

29 Qh5 Raa7 


33 tu 

34 ab 
35RJ5 

36 Bel 

37 Qg3 

38 Rfif3 

39 Qf2 

40 Be3 

41 Rh3 

42 gh 

43 Rel 

44 Ral 

45 Kg2 

46 Qf3 

47 KgZ 

48 Qa8 

49 Qe4 

50 M 

51 Kf2 

52 057 

53 Qb8 

54 Kg3 

55 Resigns 



kV^r''* 





■ M 








V ■ k V 

; r ; - 


- 







Mi. 


l : 


Jf ‘ r ’ 


I 



i-V 


| m . 









mi 


Ifil: 


# 

* 

$ < & 

m v * Ki.v 

/ T' ' 




'll 


By Suzy Menkes 

ttuemtrietuil Her aid Tribunt 


folksy snapshots of youthful yearning 
and confusion. Two others are slim 
slice-of-life portraits of life among the 
hobos as they hitch illicit train rides from 
one city to another. 

It is the later stories (“King of the 
Bingo Game," “In a Strange Country* ’ 
and “Flying Home”), written and pub- 
lished in 1944 while Ellison was 
serving in the Merchani Marine, that 
point toward “Invisible Man” with its 
brush strokes of lyrical surrealism and 
larger themes of existential self-defin- 
ition. 

Race, certainly, is an inescapable issue 
in all these stories. The first, “A Party 
Down a: the Square," is a chillingly 
detached account of a small-town lynch- 
ing, told from die point of view of a young 
white boy. The 12 other stories in this 
volume are portraits of black men. wo- 
men and children struggling to find a 
sense of self as they collide with white 
society and their own memories of pre- 
judice. 

Often race serves as an agent of hy- 
perbole. heightening tensions and fears 
that may already exist. The protagonist 
of “B ingo Game, ’ * who is trying to deal 
with a seriously ill wife and mounting 
debts, experiences the vertiginous real- 
ization that he has lost all control, a 
feeling exacerbated by the prejudice he 
has known all his life. 

“He felt vaguely that his whole life 
was determined by the bingo wheel." 
EUison writes, “not only that which 
would happen now that he was at last 
before it, but all that had gone before, 
since his birth and his mother's birth and 
the birth of his father.” 

In “Afternoon," a young boy notices 
that he gets in trouble with his mother 
whenever the white folks she works for 
make her mad. And in “A Hard Time 
Keeping t/p," two visitors to a city 
brace themselves for a violent show- 
down when a nightclub boss catches a 
light-skinned woman flirting with -a 
drunken black man; what appears to be 
an exercise in humiliation, however, 
turns out to be a friendly bet, misun- 
derstood by the visitors in their anti- 
cipation of the worst. 

But while Ellison's characters learn 
"the rules of the game’ ’ played between 
blacks and whites early on, they are 
occasionally granted a glimpse, however 
fleeting, of a better world in which a 


M ILAN — The peacock male 
that once strutted through 
Italian fashion has changed 
its plumage. Instead of 
macho designers parading their styles, 
now it is women who are defining 
menswear. 

In an unprecedented step for an Amer- 
ican designer, Donna Karan will unveil 
her menswear collection on the Milan 
runway on Wednesday — rather than at 
the New York shows next month. 

“I'm more excited about menswear 
than ladies' wear," said Karan, who 
arrived in Milan over the weekend. 
“Women have stolen men's clothes — 
we own it all — so starting with men is 
like a renaissance." 

A highlight of the fall-winter Milan 
season was the first sighting of Jil 
Sander's men's collection. The designer 
whose pure, spare clothes have put a 
powerful fashion charge into the 1990s 
sent out Monday a collection that won’t 
change the face of fashion but that fol- 
lowed a rigorous modem aesthetic by 
shadowing the male body with light,' 
luxurious fabrics. 

The effect was of wafer-thin suits 
caressing the shoulders and then dropping 
from die shoulder blades; of car coats that 
were short and supple, often in a shade 
that nudged the color of the pants; of 
sweaters so small they clutched at the 
throat with a minimal V. An industrial 
feel came in square-cut coats and shirts in 
crumpled nylon or beat-up leather. 
Sander, who said she wanted to use a 
Savile Row technique but make the 
clothes seem lived in for 10 yearn, called 
her modernist tailoring “soft sculp- 
tures.” 

“I was amazed how naturally it 
seemed to come together — I have al- 
ways been interested in men’s culture 
and it seemed almost organic," die 
said. 

Other women making fashion waves 
3re Miuccia Prada, who is in the van- 


Gianni Versace, who works with his 
sister Donatella. 

Significantly, when Versace opened 
the Itali an season on Sunday, his con- 
tribution was deliberately classic in its 
long jackets and brief coats, with con- 
trasting lapels that emphasized the com- 
plex mixes of textures, while Donatella 
produced the achingly hip Versus tine — 
all taut sweaters hugging the pectorals 


give or take the shaded velvet jeans and 
the embroidered overling shirts wort 
with tight-as-a-glove pants. Ferre’s thing 
is luxury sportswear, and if that is what 


you want, he does it with a spectacular 
flourish. Suits? Button them high over* 
heaving chest. Leather? Make it butter* 
soft as a long coat or hand and scaly as a 
mock-crocodile blouson. Camel hair? 
Line it up as a military parade of taifi- 
oring. Macho man, forward march! 

The current fl ight from country to city 
helped to sharpen up Cerruti’s linc.Jpj 
Single-breasted suits were cut close ter 
the body, and shown with sweatee^ 
rather than shirts and ties. High-waist 
pants and sweater sets with zippers d 
cardigans looked young and peppy, and 
speckled tweed duck-egg-blue paras 
seemed urban rather than rustic. Snakef- 
skin trims were too much, but the brief 

car coats were given texture and life with 

fur collars or with two-tone colors tike 
slate with rain-puddle gray- 

The new suits at Knzia Uorao were 
sober, dark and much like the silhouettes 
that defined the last cum of the century: 
long, slender, with four buttons high to the 
chest bone. The rounded back was often 
■ sfcraped'attftewttist with twaWtttxls Htofl 
sawed-off riding coat. That lode can be 
romantic and poetic, but here ft seemed 
dull, whether in window-pane -check 
tweed, covert cloth or velvet, always 
shown with the same nanuw pants, socki 
and sandals and open cuffs. 1 


and pants with contrasting fabrics strok- 
ing the legs at front and rear. Two of the 
Britpop group East 17 (named for their 
East London zip code) sat center-front to 
boost the show's bid for cooL 

“I think in eveiy man and every wo- 
man there is both masculine and fem- 
inine." said Donatella, who showed 
macho bull's-head motifs on shirts, as 
well as soft jersey cardigans and fluffy 
pink sweaters. 

Male designers are getting in touch 
with the more feminine side of them- 
selves. Valentino's couture line focused 
on porcelain-pale dusty pinks and blues, 
on camel jackets mixed with lilac bias- 
cut shirts, on deep-pile shearling and ox- 
blood astrakhan. The designer kept firm 
shoulders and wide lapels for the tail- 
oringbut feminized it Withfftmy organza 
shirts and opulent brocade neckties. 

It was less of the same — chmoiserie 


fancy pants and boat-neck sweaters — at 
Valentino's new V-Zone collection on 


guard of 1990s design, and Vivienne 
Westwood, who said as she surveyed her 


Westwood, who said as she surveyed her 
collection of lean Harris tweed suits and 
swashbuckling brocade coats: “l am in- 
terested in the relationship of the mas- 
culine and the feminine." 

Since Westwood works on the men’s 
line with her flamboyant husband, An- 
dreas Kronthaler, there are two different 
points of view. And the same is true for 


Monday. It was billed as a lifestyle line, 
but it was hard to imagine a modem life 
that includes pinstriped pants with a 
tracery of embroidery or brocade cargo 
pants. Suede car coats with pony-skin 
collars were a sleek take on a strong 
trend. 

The fashion story is that simple close- 
to-tbe-body silhouettes are enriched with 
touchy-feely fabrics and rich, soft colors, 
giving a new sensuality to menswear. 

Versace’s collection reinforced the de- 
signer’s image, without breaking new 
ground but absorbing his burgeoning in- 
volvement with modem art The program 
featured Julian Schnabel portraits of Ver- 
sace and of Donatella's children and, in 
the Istante line, there were geometric 
color blocks like abstract paintings. Plays 
on textures included velvet and fur collars 
on the trimly tailored above-the-knee 
coats, suede lined with herringbone or 
Harris tweed, and shaded knits. 

But just when you thought high- 
testosterone menswear an endangered 
species, here comes the last of the macho 
Mohicans! Gianfranco Ferre sent out 
Monday his manly take on menswear — 


bg AK«h9hI 


and sandals and open caffs. 


Alirt> of 


N OT all the news in Milan il 
from women. The American}- 
biased Richard Tyler will shoif 
his first Byblos collection oa 
Tuesday; American Tom Ford shows fof 
Gucci, and Milan maestro Giorgio ArJ- 
mani closes the shows Thursday. So is u 
significant that women are coming to thfc 
fore as menswear designers? { 

Westwood points out that sine? 
menswear tailoring is at the heart of hej - 
women's collection, the divergence 
comes mainly in the choice of fabrics 
and styles for men — and that thosf 
limitations are breaking down. i 
“Men have always looked to worae? 
— I think it steins from mothers dressing 
sons," claims Karan, who says that 
some men are just ‘‘clueless," but fesfc 


•• vfc* .4 


t 

e-~gr ^ 

- S 

••• .1 


some men are just "clueless," but fesjs 
so in the younger generation. j 

“What makes menswear fashion so 


exciting is that men are now accessing 
their own femininity and creativity/* say* 
Karan. ‘T believe that we are now open t* 
a much larger scope of menswear.” * 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Pitchers 
e Take to the 
dump 

11 Say "pretty 


i« Republican 
politico 
Alexander 


is Slop me big 
wedding 
16 Genetic letters 


J 6 a wiy?d 


Esc. 1911, Paris 

u Saak Roo Doe Noo” 


simple, plainspoken humanism erases 
all distinctions of color. 


all distinctions of color. 

The nanaior of "I Did Not Learn 
TheirNames," who had been "havinga 
hard time trying not to hate in those 
days,” meets an elderly white couple 
while hitching a ride on a train. Their 


i7 797SFaye 
Dunaway film 
201.ELM.or3M. 
e.g.: Abtjr. 

21 In this place 

22 Taboos 

aa of war 

2 < Luxuriate, as in 
the sun 

I 25 Tone down 
2 * Incredible 
bargain 

20 Boeing product 
25 The "I" in 
T.G.t.F. 

30 George Bush's 
home now 
3« Peer Gym's 
mother 
39 1932 Will 
Rogers tllm 
or Tofu source 
M Late singer 
named tar a 
Dickens 
character 
saMldmbming 

eo Douglas 

41 Adagio and 

allegro 

49 Pennsylvania, 
for one 

47 Food inspection 
inns 

50 Suffix with 
convention 

51 Kind of cto$et 


- i Puts into office 
a Exit 

a Coma out 
4 Bronchitis 
symptom 
3 Full house sign 

* Tennis's Monica 
7 Co-worker of 

Lois and Jimmy 

• Libertine 

9 30-day mo. 

10 Subject tor 
George 
Washington 
Carver 

11 Wave, as a 
weapon 

io Along the way 

12 He! tom and 
neon. e.g. 

1* Mortgage agey 

IS Teeming group 

24 Hard punch 

25 French 
assembly 

27 On-board 

greeting 

28 Bishop oi old TV 

3i Loosen, as 





Cu Rmi 


© JYew York Tunes/Edited by Will She rte.* 


simple kindness not only introduces him 
lo the fraternity of the dispossessed but 


to the fraternity of the dispossessed but 
also awakens him to the dream of plur- 
alism promised by America's founders. . 

Ellison expresses faith in “the basic : 
unity of human experience," a vision , 
that looks forward to the miraculous 
achievement of “Invisible Man.” which ( 
he would begin writing the following 
year. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the staff bfThe 
New York Times. 


A Space for Thought. 


52 Italian princefy 
family name 

83 Mata 

54 1948 A Va 
Gardner film. 

*7 N.V.C. subway 
operator 

so Olympic judge 
bo Come up 
so Prodigy 
competitor, for 
short 

•i Used colorful 
language 
*2 40- and 
51 -Across, e.g. 


aa Recipe directive 
aa "Long' or 
’short' amount 
34 'Don't look 

like that I’ 

95 Fait accompli 

36 Singer Cooiidge 

37 S3 minutes past 
me hour 

39 Puget Sound 
oty 

40Fran2ie6 


Solution to Puz2Je of Jan. 13 ^ 


42 Villain 

43 Look OW 

44 Record-setting 
van Gogh 
canvas 

46 — King Cole 

47 Fallen house of 
literature 


40 Squirrel away 

45 Rock's 

Leppard 

a® Outside* Prefix 

53 Miinchen Mr. 

55 Detroit labor grp, 
ae Grape masher's 
worksite 


SHHS Hanna aacno 
SnnH anas 

BQHQ HRinraiTt 


LJL3L3UH E33B1 

Rrarni fgQEEIGI 0333 


iV - 1 * ^ 

- 

kj • *>ir ’ 

^ • r?4£. 

r; 

V -V 

\ ^ ■•*** . 











"V.‘ tr 

'V>' 


ar 


ribunc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1997 


PAGE 11 



EU Warns 

Of Suit Over 
Airline Pact 

» 

'^-American Deal 
‘.Seen to Stifle Market 

\ C^fAtfby Oar DupaKiKj 

^BRUS SEL S — The European Com- 
jnusafflj threatened Monday to take the 
; 9 rmsh government to court if it cleared 
jthepiani^ alliance between British Air- 
i ways a nd American Airiioes on teens the 
jCOCdiiiissHHi considered too generous. 

If the stakes in a jurisdictional 

ij^rangle over the plan, the EU’s coan- 
jljetjbon oxmnisdoner, Karel van Miert. 
.urged British antitrust authorities to in- 
( on more concessions from the two 




Airbus Partners Agree 
On Blueprint for Change 

Plan Envisions Freestanding Company 
That Could Raise Capital for Expansion 


I ; The pact would “eliminate all com- 
;petmon, both current and potential, be- 
tween them on the market few trans- 
,portation of passengers between the 
;UJC and the U.S.," Mr. van Miert said 

in a letter sent Friday to the British trade 

I “blister, Ian Lang, and released to re- 
porters Monday. 

j Mr. Lang in December called on BA 
land American to give up 168 of their 
3352 weekly takeoff and landing slots at 
Heathrow Airport in London. The num- 
ber, equivalent to 12 daily round-trip 
frights, was far fewer than rival ILS. 
airlmes had wanted. 

*v. Both BA and British antitrust au- 


she executive body of the European Uni- 
on, has do jurisdiction over the 
and they argue that it did not investigate 
’three other affiliations betweeaU.S. and 
European carriers proposed since 1993. 
Britain’s Department of Trade and In- 
dus try said it was disappointed by Mr. 

3fcuan Miert’ s decision. 

’ - ’ (Bloomberg, AFX) 

]■ Lufthansa Faces Strike Risk 

t*‘ Lufthansa AG faces a possible all-out 
(strike by some of its staff next month 
•after one of its main unions said it would 
be proceeding with {dans to call a strike 
ballot, Reuters reported from Frankfurt 
The DAG white-collar union .said it 
would be polling ground and air crew on 
their readiness to strike over the next 
toree to four weeks. Thermion said it had 
hoped that two limited waBcouts it caBed 
list year .would be enough to posoadfe 
ahe airiiae-to reconsider ite pay offer. . 

-ivi-f ti - ’-<r 


Apidaa Vtamang/HaiMn In Hutewa/feurm 

Kevin K eeg an , former Newcastle United manager, left; at right, a Newcastle player, in striped shirt, in action. 

Britain’s National Sport Goes Public 


By Fred Barbash 

tVijfeTgitwt Pan Service 

. LONDON — When one of Britain’s 
most beloved soccer managers resigned 
Wednesday, it was easily the biggest 
story of the day in Britain — the stuff of 
news flashes on television and front- 
page stories in every national paper. 
The man is worshipped. 

More intriguing^, the resignation 
of Kevin Keegan from Newcastle 
United was also the biggest story in die 
City, as London’s financial district is 
known, and there was nearly as much 
armchair commentary from stock- 
market analysts as from sportswriters. 

The episode highlighted the hottest 
trend in the business of sports here and 
one of tile hottest in investing: Soccer 
teams are going public, taking their 
chances on the stock market 
As a result, while most people who 
follow. Britain’s most popular sport 
still want to know whether their team 
won, more and more of them also want 
to know whether toe team is outper- 
forming the market 
Newcastle United, following the 
example of 10 other big-time teams, is 
scheduled to begin selling stock this 
spring. While some people wanted to 
know how Mr. Keegan’s de parture 


might affect the team’s play, others 
were equally concerned about its im- 
pact on the potential share price. 

As a matter of fact, the listed teams 
are doing considerably better than the 
rest of the market in London, and that 
feeds the investment fever. By some 
reckonings, toe value of an average 
share in a soccer team rose 189 percent 
last year, compared with a rise of just 
under 12 percent for the benchmark 
FT-SE 100-share index. 

The trend is a sharp departure from 
the long traditions of soccer here. 
Many British soccer teams were once 
the playthings of wealthy and some- 
times flamboyant businessmen or 
were maintained by loyal local boost- 
ers. Most of the country’s 90-odd pro- 
fessional teams still are. 

But at toe top of the heap — die 
Premier League of the nation’s 20 best 
teams — public ownership is aQ the 
rage. The reason, as with all market- 
related matters, is money. A team can 
raise tens of millions of pounds by 
selling shares to an eager public, 
money that owners would otherwise 
have to take out of their own pockets, 
borrow from banks or raise privately 
from other rich people, hi recent years, 
the skyrocketing price of players and 
the desire for fancy new stadiums have 


increased drastically the nmnimre riiar 
owners must invest Newcastle 
United, which recently paid a record 
$22 million for a single player, hopes 
to raise roughly $250 million by 
selling stock. 

In toe Premier League, there is more 
money to be made than ever before, 
thanks in no small measure to the same 
man who purchased much of the tele- 
vision rights to America's National 
Football League. Rupert Murdoch. 
His Sky Sports network has bought 
rights to televise Premier League soc- 
cer, pumping millions in new money 
into die spore 

hi addition, pay-per-view games are 
likely to make their debut in Britain 
soon, courtesy of Mr. Murdoch, and 
are expected to produce even more 
revenue for toe teams. Money also will 
continue to pour in from promotional 
deals with sporting-goods companies, 
the beverage industry and other busi- 
nesses seeking to identify with Bri- 
tain's most popular game. 

The kick that soccer is giving the 
stock market began quietly in 1983, 
when London's Tottenham Hotspur 
went public. In the past two years, it 
became a craze, with teams from Liv- 

See SOCCER, Page IS 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


By Reginald Dale 

InunathmaltienddTrfyme 

W ASHINGTON — Proph- 
ets of doom are begin- 
ning to be heard warning 
that economic globaliz- 
ation is propelling the world to some 
indescribable catastrophe. The warn- 
ings are frequently couched in -apo- 
calyptic tenns — aid usually imply it 
is aQ America's fault 
Typical of the genre is anew book 
by the American author William 
Greider, “One World, Ready or Not: 
The Matric Logic of Global Capit- 
alism,** which is currently attracting 
attention in Washington. 

Mr. Greider expounds the f a miliar 
theme that multinational corpor ations 
are ruthlessly exploiting the workers 
of the world by switching production 
to wherever wages are lowest. Low- 
paid workers not onfy are s tealing jobs 


the theory goes, but will drag world 
wages down to their level. 

That much we have heard before, 
despite toe-fact that numerous serious 
economists have researched the pro- 
position and found little evid ence to 
support it — most foreign inve stment, 
for instance, leads to increased exports 

from borne. ' .. .... 

But Mr. Grader and his fellow 
doomsayers undauntedly go much fur- 
ther. The mass victimization of work- 
ers, they say, will ultimately provokes 
Know social noheavaL The wood, Mr. 


Greider writes, is heading toward 
some kind of abyss — “an economic 
or political cataclysm of unknowable 
dimensions.’* 

There is no doubt that globalization 
is already provoking a political back- 
lash. It can be seen hi labor protests on 
tiie streets ofEurope andin toe postures 
of politicians such as Pat Buchanan and 
Ross Perot in tiie United States. 

Those angry voices win grow 
louder when recession next bites. War 
and suffering ha ve not come to an end, 
aid neither have ideological conflicts. 
But the doomsayers* warnings are 
based on severely flawed premises — 
and they stem from moral , ratoer than 
economic judgments. 

Perhaps that is not surpn&ng. For 
those who dem't like capitalism, glob- 
alization prese n ts an awkward prob- 
lem — by most standard measures, it 
has been far too successful 

The breakdown of economic bar- 
riers and the spread of private invest- 
ment around the world are finally 
bringing hope and prosperity to vast 
regions hitherto mired in poverty. De- 
veloping nations are scram Wing to 
climb on the bandwagon. 

This is because,- although gJobaKz- 
aticn does reflect Anglo-Saxon free- 
market princq)les, .ii is nca exactly being 
forced down the rest of toe world’s 
throat by toe Unhed States. As China 
alow should show, most of toe worid is 
Arming to capitalism becanse it has seen 
that it weeks. 

Of course, anyone can travel to In- 


donesia, as Mr. Greider did, and find 
labor abuses. But die vast majority of 
investment by multinational corpora- 
tions does not go to low-wage countries. 
It goes to developed regions such as 
Europe, Canada and the United States. 

When companies choose investment 
sites, toe prime considerations are usu- 
ally not low wages, which account for 
rally a fraction of production costs, but 
other factors, such as proximity to mar- 
kets, tra nspo rt and c nmmimv-»rir»nc 

Nor do most multinational compa- 
nies abandon their factories when wages 
rise to look for lower-cost production 
elsewhere, as is frequently alleged. As 
Gary Hofbauer of the Institute for In- 
ternational Economics in Washington 
points out, most multinationals are not 
m labor-intensive businesses. 

When such dungs do happen, it is 
nonnsHy only in the highly labor-de- 
pendent dotoing sector, in which mul- 
tinationals are predominantly Asian, 
and in footwear. Even in those indus- 
tries, most multinationals pay high 
wages by local standards. 

Of course there is exploitation — but 
that hardly began wim globalization. 
American fortunes were made from 
sweatshops in the late 19to century and 
from slave labor before that. 

It is also true that not everyone is yet 
benefiting from the global economy, 
particularly in the poorest countries. 
But so far, globalization has done far 
more good than barm — and most 
multinational corporations are actually 
better behaved than they used to be. 


By John Tagliabue 

Now York Times Sorviee 

ROME — Pressured by Boeing Co.’s 
announcement last month that it inten- 
ded to acquire McDonnell Douglas 
Corp., the four partners in Airbus In- 
dustrie said Monday they had reached 
agreement to transform Airbus into an 
independent corporation. 

The restructuring should help Airbus 
reduce toe cost of manufacturing its 
aircraft and facilitate international busi- 
ness alliances while paving the way for 
outside financial participation, includ- 
ing toe possible sale to toe public of 
shares in toe company. Airbus said. 

In a statement issued at its headquar- 
ters in Toulouse, France, Airbus said toe 
agreement represented “an important 
initial step in the consolidation of the 
aerospace industry within Europe.’’ 

The agreement underscores toe grow- 
ing competition Airbus anticipates if the 
proposed combination of its two prin- 
cipal rivals in the commercial-aircraft 
marlrrt goes nhesut 

While Airbus Industrie, the consor- 
tium that sold its first jet in 1974. has 
grown to be a formidable competitor to 
Boeing, the market leader, toe present 
shape of toe consortium entrusts Airbus 
only with direct control of the marketing 
and sale of its aircraft Undo- toe agree- 
ment signed Monday, such essential 
functions as the design and procurement 
of components, production, testing and 
aircraft servicing would go under the 
direct control of toe new company’s 
centralized management. Airbus said. 

Discussions to change the shape of 
Airbus had been dragging on for most of 
last year, but a breakthrough came in 
December with toe announcement of 
toe proposed Boeing takeover of Mc- 
Donnell Douglas. 

Nevertheless, an agreement repres- 
ents little more than a memorandum of 
understanding, with only a broad out- 
line of the future shape of Airbus as a 
limited-liability company. 

Executives at Airbus, as well as in- 
dustry analysts, said toe toughest pari of 
the transformation of Airbus into a 
single corporation was still ahead. 


PRIVATE BANKING 


Airbus said the transfer to the new 
company of assets, such as design fa- 
cilities and manufacturing plants. 
hinged not only on a judgment of “how 
far toe assets are essential" for the con- 
struction of Airbus jetliners but also on a 
“detailed valuation" of toe assets, 
which Airbus said it expected to com- 
plete by the end of this year. 

Airbus aircraft are manufactured un- 
der a consortium composed of France’s 
Aerospatiale and Gennany’s Daimler- 
Benz Aerospace AG, each controlling 
37.9 percent of toe business, British 
Aerospace PLC, with 20 percent, and 
Spain’s Construed ones Aeronauticas 
S A. which holds 4 2 percent. 

Initially, work on Airbus jetliners was 
split among the partners according to tbeir 
share in toe consortium. But in recent 
years, Anbtis management won permis- 
sion from the partners to bid for stakes in 
future projects, with contracts going to toe 
lowest bidders. 

Last year, by most measures. Airbus 
won roughly 35 percent of new com- 
mercial-aircraft orders, leaving Boeing 
and McDonnell Douglas together with 
about 65 percent of the market. 

Airbus said it booked firm orders for 
326 aircraft last year, valued at a total of 
$23.6 billion. 

■ Aerospatiale-Lockheed Talks 

Aerospatiale and Lockheed Martin 
Corp. are discussing possible cooper- 
ation in defense activities, possibly in- 
cluding adapting Airbus planes for mil- 
itary use, toe president of Aerospatiale. 
Yves Michot, said, according to news 
agency reports. 

“We have a big interest in having 
talks with Lockheed Martin, and Lock- 
heed Martin has the same interest in 
having discussions with us." be said. 

Aerospatiale and Daimler-Benz 
Aerospace, meanwhile, have halted 
talks on a merger of their missile and 
satellite activities, Mr. Michot said. 

The French stale-owned aerospace 
and defense company also said it would 
post a profit for 1996 after four years of 
losses, citing a recovery in civil airplane 
orders and cost-cutting. 

(AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg) 


We’re not just on the map. 
We’re all over it. 


It’s not only our vast worldwide 
network that keeps us at your 
side at all times. 

It’s our total commitment to serving 
your unique demands, wherever 
you may be. 

From the time we opened our 
first office in Switzerland in 1876, 
Credit Lyonnais has earned an 
enviable reputation for Private 
Banking based on dialogue and 
personal relationships. 

The founder of Credit Lyonnais, 
Henri Germain, expressed it most 
succinctly when he created the 
bank’s motto: 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


| (Cross Rate* 

rSnuat* XO 


|rra*tfw» . rag 

iDadnOd 

I'ModrH 

naan 

I Mm Vert Qd — 
USi 

mao HUB 

!*« 

Zurich *30 

i ecu vat 

1‘sm um 


£ 0JL 
2 *71 U2Z7 

sos tuns 
vest — 

— IBM 
mra *u* 
1 -tmR nus 
uas* 
asst u» 
msa ns 
MB 
ran OM 
urn vast 
MSB 2»5 


HR 1* 
UBS WlSC 

*ns uus* 

CBM «MB»“ 
|f« *SMS 
Km UK- 

ran — 

stas is cm 

_ 1301 * 
2UZ WSJ 

usa a*r 

UU MBT 
4827 UN* 
USD iW* 


an 

— a* 

JUB -- 

wo raw 

ism sum 

M3M rat 

mm am 

UBS SO* 
yxsi ua 
issu 
usst uns- 

0J7K am' 
2JB? 4U1U 
2SEUMB 


m a 

UK* 13M 

ara» Mai 
uor ura 
yum urn 
raer 

an U4t« 
1 W 4 J 5 u 03 

4M* ism 
—■ wo 

usr — 
.un* ie» 
ram uh 
lex urn 


LibkMJbor Rates 


Deter D-Mart R*K SMu i*noc Vm ECU 

514- S* Z*U-3M» Itb-VM* SVt-OA 3V--SV. Vl-V» 

34MSti 5¥H-S¥k n*-3n» WU-3W **->, A -OH 

t* mtb sa-5* TV»-3Ya 3¥»-W» 

1-yror 5A-6 1U-1W 6ft -1 yu-sv k W-W 4-4* 

SwasAMnUnh Bank. 

Mas appBCOtle to Mutant UepaM of SI aSton w/nknum for tttuMeaO. 




ottonBotte. 


Other Dollar Values 

rwiwn ter* o*w 

MOM mM TI.H7 *■*■»■** 
man* J MS «■*■"»** , 


Su*Mtwm V , SI **** . . 
team Mr— 64X37 teWE rt*. 
ianT-ra J 3 K ‘ Wra ira ir *30 
ahUMNW Z*715 

i4 

forward Rates 

fin-r "22 


O n— y ter* 

Ml m 7-824 
tLZMtoudf UT« 
ntm-Bma **7 
Pte-rt* *2 
PMhhzwr 3So 

w* - ”"* ISIS 

Sto-S Mh* 


Cnnuqr hi* 

S.Mr.—ri 44*15 
*Kk«M 8*7.40 
SW ri - X im 65118 
‘Mm* . 37X7 

TMboht 2*63 
TMtfrtfel 110375. 
V4EMn 347B5 
V— bnBv. 47JJ5. 


ggS& iSS 1W» 

SSSS I-* 1 ;°y. 


Jap— sn— 


3»«v tutor *Mqr 
115JB6 -flS41 11*51 
wnra- uwi u«5f 


Key Money Rates 

UraariHM On 

DI—rala . 5JM 

nw.iA ■ w 

U—dblBiv QL‘ 

nEETo fRRRS JTR 

fMorCDsMin 548 

ItMapCFMn I* 533 

S awm Ticosny bS SJU 

H—vn—irW sas 

a^carltao— yhS . itu 

ipat naaf iai sat 

ftm 6M 

IH—Haewyaan &61 

JBfHrVrtanqrbara &85 

-MnnaUrKh3MayM 455 


TByawSaif— d 



tortf took of Canada 


frMthWoMPk 

4—UriaM 

Wf—tod 


Pih BrtWa 

&00 Bora—a rate 6X 

to o*mm r w * 1 ' 

SVt l-mthiaMta* BVt TO. 

548 MaikiMrt To TO 1 

540 hnUMrtrt TO* TO* 

5JJ3 IfrMGtt 7JS 1J& 1 

SM 

6Jn -ten cb 

Men— ha ret* 3.15 3.15 

447 ortnanr TO 314 

Up t-mahtoba* TO Vk 

U* 3— ri h te— fc TO TO 

ra fn a S lBlertBa t TO TO 

IB— rOAT SM 581 

030 Jtfmw.- Heaton. BtaornMn. 4 urrm 

jg L £SUSZ k c S5b t S IS o ‘ , * ,,< ' 
S3 Gold aj*. rJ/L crje 

257 

Zarick 35850 358.70 tOJO 

Laadea 35940 39940 —1^5 

XHTn 34000 359 JO -050 

Xii US-detaxpu ooncaLenrieflofflaw 

SBngs zurkh and Alter Wrtaoeofop 
3.15 ancF&Aig pace* New Yoik Curat 
XiB CtobJ 

5.93 SwmKBe—S, 


'Business is people, not just 
figures'. 

This has been the very essence 
of our banking philosophy from 
generation to generation. 

We listen well to our clients* pri- 
orities as we help them navigate 
diverse and fast-changing finan- 
cial markets. Perhaps that is why 
today we manage more than 
9 million private accounts. And 
why we are often cited as a world 
reference bank for the private 
customer. 

But there is yet another dimen- 
sion to a successful banking 
partnership. 

Your banker must make 
sure you get where 
you want to go. 
Providing innovative 
solutions and insight- 
ful answers through 
indepth resources and 
experience in the 
world's leadir^ mar- 
ketplaces. 



rssjf 

um 



Our Geneva subsidiary, specialized 
in Private Banking since 1876. 

Credit Lyonnais’ Private Banking 
network can always put the finan- 
cial technology and expertise you 
need at your finger tips. Precisely 
when you need it 
The combined strength of these 
two dimensions - dose, trusting 
partnerships and vast global 
resources - creates something 
unique in Credit Lyonnais Private 
Banking. 

Let’s talk. 


3.15 3.15 
TO 314 
TO TO 
TO TO 
TO TO 

549 58) 

on, turtm 


AM. PJA. OV 


CREDIT LYONNAIS 


SwnzERLU®: Geveva tel 4 1 22/705 66 66 - Headquarters for Credit Lyonnais International Private Banking 
Basletel.41 61/2842222 -Zurich tel 41 1/217 86 86-Luganotel41 91/923 51 65 
Paris tel 33 1/42 95 03 05 -Luxembourg tel 352/476 831 442* London tel 44 171/499 91 46 
Mokaco tel 377/93 15 73 34 - Vienna tel 43 1/531 50 120 • Montevideo m. 598 2/95 08 67 - Miami tel 1 305/375 78 14 
Hong Kong tel 852/28 02 28 88 • Singapore tel 65/535 94 77 









Mr 


PACE 12 


CVTEBJVATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-Year f - Bond Yield 



Dollar in Deutsche marks ■ Dollar in Yen 


157 -r 


152 - 




""nr- s~ 

O N D J 

IUD ~s 

O N D J " 

3996 

3997 

1996 

1997 

w~- 

’toawpanjjft .. 

■Index"'. ' - ' 

- Monday 

-#*»+.. . • % 



Close. 

■;Ckwe- ; Change 

.nm. r 

The-flow • 

6789.18 

■ 8703-79 40.06 


,.$8f 500... 

:75a5T 

75 850 Uniat 

#se 

s&p.hgo. 

.74SA9 

744A? . 40,07. 


CornpfseitB 

408 Jn 

400.76 -O.Q1 

w& r * r 

Nasdaq Composite ■ 1338J91 ' 

1329.26 '40iie. 

: AWBC. ,! . 

MarioetVatae 

586.M 

' 5Q6J04 ■*& 02 

|*oiro«to "• 

.tSE index v 

688188 

S9MJ3" • 


Bov^spa 

74117JS0 

.747S3.4J -M- 

JUotdcaOty 

Botea' 

9586SS 

3536.09 ■ ~Q$9 

^Sueqc^s/Ums MeivaJ 

674^8 

674.^' : 4JB6 


tS>SA General 

stcoas 

S13S.T6 4048 

>C&wns ■ . 

General " 

6523^0 

6S8A61 • -1-15 

Source: Btoomberg, Reuters 


InKRuuont! HcraM Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Outlook for a Better Office 

Microsoft Update Is Heavy on Internet Access 


By Steve Lohr 

Ne h fork Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — Bill Gates of 
Microsoft Corp. will take the stage 
of Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Cen- 
ter in Manhattan on Thursday to 
introduce Office 97, the new ver- 
sion of the company’s software 
bundle for office computing. 

But the real star of the show, 
analysis say, will probably be a 
new application, called Outlook, 
that has been added to the Office 
software suite, joining such pop- 
ular programs as Word and Excel. 

Outlook, analysts say, shows 
the progress Microsoft has made in 
linking its traditional products 
with the Internet, a key element in 
the company’s effort to keep its 
sales rising rapidly. 

The new application, they add, 
also represents Microsoft’s bid for 
leadership against rivals like In- 


ternational Business Machines 
Corp. and Netscape Communica- 
tions Corp. in the fast-growing 
market for so-called groupware 
programs, which help employees 
wore in collaborative groups. 

Growth in ihe Office line is vital 
for Microsoft because it is the 
company's financial mainstay, 
generating an estimated $4.4 bil- 
lion in sales last year. Industry 
analysts predict that Office 97 will 
prompt more users to buy up- 
grades and new software than did 
Microsoft’s previous office suite 
two years ago. The suggested re- 
tail price for Office 97 is $499. 
Office users can upgrade their old 
versions for $209. 

The Outlook program is called 
an information management ap- 
plication . It appears on a user’s 
computer screen looking almost 
tike an operating system, with 
icons along the left side. From this 


“shelL" or interface, a user can 
start other applications, read and 
answer electronic mail, schedule 
meetings or work collaboratively. 

The Internet integration is evid- 
ent, for example, when a worker is 
writing a report and makes a ref- 
erence to information that can be 
found on a site on the Internet’s 
Worid Wide Web. If the user types 
a Web site address in the report, 
say “www.whitehouse.gov.” the 
underlying software in Office 97 
recognizes that as an Internet ad- 
dress and creates the hypertext link 
to the specified site. It does not 
require the person writing the re- 
port to write any computer code. 

That kind of intelligence feature, 
integration with the Internet and 
tools for collaborative work appear 
to be an impressive combination. 
Microsoft has lagged IBM's Lotus 
Notes in groupware. But Office 97, 
analysts say, could change that. 


Blue-Chips Set Record 
As Bank Stocks Gain 




.V 


• J.P. Morgan & Co.’s fourth-quarter net profit rose 14 
percent, to $419 million, as revenue from securities trading, 
investment banking and other non lending businesses surged. 

• NationsBank Corp.'s fourth-quarter net profit rose 24 
percent, to $632 million, as it increased tending and fee-based 
businesses and cut costs. 

• Intel Corp. named its co-founder and chief executive of- 
ficer, Andrew Grove, as chairman, succeeding Gordon Moore, 
who will become chairman emeritus. Craig Barrett, the chief 
operating officer, will succeed Mr. Grove as president. 

• Phoenix Newspapers Inc. will cease publication of The 
Phoenix Gazette on Saturday, ending 1 16 years of operation. 

• The Food and Drug Administration recommended that 
Hoechst AG’s allergy drug Seldane be removed from the 
market because a safer alternative was available. 

• Bibb Co. plans to fire 580 textile-mill workers, about 1 1 
percent of its work force, by the end of March as it slashes 
production of home furnishings. 

• Ameritech Corp.’s fourth-quarter net profit rose 38 per- 

cent, to $570 million, as it attracted more cellular-phone 
customers. Blosunberft . AP. Reuters 


American Standard Rejects Tyco Bid 


The Associated Press 

PISCATAWAY, New Jersey — 
American Standard Cos., a maker of 
air conditioners and toilets, said 
Monday its board had rejected a 
takeover offer made last month by 
Tyco International Ltd., an indus- 
trial-products manufacturer. 

With the company a possible 
takeover target, American Stan- 
dard's stock closed $3 higher, at 
$43.25. 

Tyco, based in Exeter. New 


Hampshire, proposed a purchase for 
$4 billion in stock and cash, ac- 
cording to published reports. The 
reports said Tyco had proposed in a 
letter dated Dec. 5 to pay $50 a share 
in stock and cash and said it would 
assume American Standard's debt, 
which stood at SI. 7 billion as of 
Sept. 30. A Tyco spokesman con- 
firmed the letter’s authenticity. 

■ Santa Fe Weighs Higher Bid 

Santa Fe Pacific Gold Corp. said it 


would meet with Newmont Mining 
Corp. to discuss Newmont’ s 
sweetened takeover offer, Bloom- 
berg Business News repented from 
Albuquerque, New Mexico. Santa Fe 
said no decision had been made about 
whether to end an agreement reached 
last month for it to be acquired by 
Hotnestake Mining Co. Newmont 
raised its stock-swap offer for Santa 
Fe last week to $1 6.50 a share, or $2.2 
billion, and said it would go to Santa 
Fe shareholders with the offer. 


Officials’ Comments Bolster Dollar 


Weekend Box Office 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — The Relic” dominated the U.S. box 
office over die weekend, with a gross of $9.4 million. Fol- 
lowing are the Top 1 0 moneymakers, based on Friday’s ticket 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


l.The Reflc 

IPaatmunii 

59 A million 

ZEvtto 

(HaOrwood Pictures) 

S8XmlUlM 

XMlctneJ 

{New Line Cinema) 

S&5 mffilan 

4. Jerry Mogul re 

nn-stao 

57Xminian 

5. Scream 

(Dimension FBms) 

57.6 mllBon 

A Jackie auric Rrsf SWfce 

(New Une Onemai 

ItJmffltoi 

7. The People «. Loiry Ryiil 

(CotumhkH 

Sftondllan 

B. Turbtdenoj 

(MetnHSUdwynMarert 

S44mnHon 

9. One me Day 

On Coney Fa) 

SaAmffltan 

10. Bcam& ButWwad Do Amafca 

tFarnmoanf) 

S3 miBan 


Cimfdel bt Our SujfFum Dvpwches 

NEW YORK — ThedoUar soared 
it most other major currencies 
>. particularly the Deutsche 
mark, after supportive comments by 
the U.S. Treasury secretary, Robert 
Rubin, and the Bundesbank pres- 
ident. Hans Tietmeyer. 

Mr. Rubin reiterated that a strong 
dollar was in America’s interest, 
while Mr. Tietmeyer said that the 
Group of 10 central bank governors 
were not concerned about current 
exchange rates. 

The comments “give people ad- 
ded confidence about the dollar,” 


David Becker at Bank Austria said. 

The dollar rose to 1 3888 Deutsche 
marks from 1 .5859 DM on Friday, to 
2 16.475 yen from 1 16.125 yen and to 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE " 

5.3606 French francs from 53508 
francs but edged down to 13759 
Swiss francs from 13760 francs. 
The pound fell to $1.6755 from 
$1.6800. The dollar drew support 
against the yen from news that Ja- 
pan's current-account surplus fell 15 
percent in November, meaning Jap- 
anese traders and investors were re- 


ceiving less foreign currency to sell 
for yen. The dollar’s strength also 
stemmed from expectations for U-S. 
interest rates to rise while German 
rates remain low or fall further. 

"U.S. economic strength com- 
pared with Germany and higher 
U.S. interest rates than in Germany 
mean the dollar is ultimately headed 
higher,’ ’ said Peter Ullrich, a trader 
at GiroCredit Bank. 

Mr. Tietmeyer, meanwhile, cri- 
ticized the idea that the planned 
European central bank could set out 
to steer currency rates. 

(, Bloomberg , Reuters) 


Cxrq&dtnOwrSirftyvtoDijpMdta 

NEW YORK — Stock prices 
reached another record Monday as 
gains in ban& and computer chip- 
makers offset sliding oil shares. 

The Dow Jonesindustrial average 
closed up 5 39 points ax 6,709. 1 8, its 
fifth record close in six sessions. 
The 30-stock average would have 
risen more except for die decline in 
its four leading oil companies amid 

concern that oil prices may have 
peaked, threatening profits. 

Exxon fell 2% to 10314, Chevron 
dropped 13$ to 6814. and Texaco 
declined 1% to 105 V4. 

“Earnings announcements are 
going to be key,” said Mark 
Donovan, a principal at Boston 
Partners Asset Management 
"There's going to be a lot of action 
good and bad." 

Advancing issues outpaced de- 
clining issues by a 13-11 ratio on 
the New York Stock Exchange. The 
Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index 
edged tip 0.01 point to 759-51- The 
Nasdaq Composite index fell 1.1 1 
to 1330.91 

The yield on the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond was unchanged 
at 6.85 percent while the price 
slipped 3/32 point to: 95 18/32. 

The markets were underpinned 
by comments from Lawrence Lind- 
sey. a Federal Reserve Board gov- 
ernor; who said the U.S. economy 
remained on a path of strong growth 
and low inflation and that die risks 
that a shock might soon end to this 
period of expansion were siighL 

“Right now the economy seems 
pretty much well balanced,” Mr. 
Lindsey said in a televised inter- 
view. “We continue to have strong 
growth. We continue to have re- 
latively low inflation. I think it’s 
quite positive.” 

Better-than-expected earnings 
from J.P. Morgan lifted the bank 
sector. 

J.P. Morgan climbed 23$ to 
102V4 after it said profit rose 14 
percent in the fourth quarter. 

First Union helped its shares by 
announcing a $1.89 billion, 25 mil- 
lion-share buyback- If ibe bank car- 
ries out the full plan, it would re- 
purchase 8.7 percent of its shares 
outstanding, first Union rose 2 to 
7714. 

Barnett Banks said its net income 
jumped to 76 cents a share, 1 cent 
shy of Wall Street forecasts. Its 
shares rose l A to 40%. 

The company lifted profit by cut- 
ting its provision for bod loans, 
partly through selling $776 million 
m credit-card accounts to House- 
hold International Inc. Barnett 


earned 67 cents a share in the year- 

earlier period. • 

"The place I have the highest 
confidence of good earnings is m 
the financial services, Mr, 
Donovan said. 

Technology stocks ako were 
strong, with Intel rising 1%*<>145^ 
and Dell Computer rising 2% id 
6*’%. 

"Advanced Micro Devices ras£ 
1 % at 29VS. After the market closed, 

U.S. STOCKS % 


ft 


the chipmaker reported a fourth^ 
quarter loss of $2 1 .2 million despite? 
an increase in revenue. 

But many analysts were opting 
istic for stocks in general. With the 
economy accelerating from its thnri- 
quarter pace and inflation holding 
steady, stocks have the footing fa* 
climbing to new heights, they said. \ 
Investors pumped money mtoi 
U3. equity mutual funds in the* 
early days of 1997, after slowing; 
their purchases in December amid 
concern about the market’s volai-J 
ility. . , .. \ Ms 

Several fund groups, including! r 
Oppenheimer Funds Inc. and Janus 

Capital Corp., said flows so far ihisj 
month were at or near record rates.-. 
For December, the Investment 
Cornpany Institute estimated that a* 
net $133 billion was invested xa 
stock funds, down from S17.1 1 bil-J 
lion in November. Last year's low-j 
’ est equity fund inflows occurred in 
July when $5.76 billion was in-} 
vested, the trade group said. j 
For all of 1996, an estimated re-, 
cord $223 billion poured into equity* 
funds, exceeding the previous all-i 
time High of $129.6 billion in 19931 
by more than 70 percent, the ICIJ 
said. } 

Meanwhile. Fidelity Invest-^ 
meats’ flagship Magellan Fund in-} 
creased its holdings of technology! 
stocks and cash in November ami 
simultaneously reduced its bondj 
position. i 

Bob Stansky. Magellan's man-1 . 
ager, made the changes as investors0 
continued to withdraw money from 
the fund. An estimated $4.86 billion!' 
was pulled from Magellan in thej 
second half of 1996, said John Bon-/ 
namdo. editor of Fidelity Insight, anj 
independent newsletter that * — 
the No. 1 U.S. fund group. 

"We’ve got strong e 

coming in the fourth (quarter), 

that’s wharmost people are expecH 
ing,” said Richard Cripps. chie£ 
strategist at Legg Mason in Bal- 
timore- "We have momentum.” • 
(Bloomberg, AFf 


AMEX 


Monday's 4 pun, dose 

TTietop300mosi-fictM« shares, 
up M the dosing on Wal Siroei. 

The Associated Prats 

Me* mm u>wlow» Ota* 


Stock 


17", 

4"u 

lift 


as s 



ass? 


DOtwty 


FIAUSI 

FAulPr 


5£ 

kb m 
Si ia% 

2 3 

B't 

.sis iiv» 
1®5 

2239 12V, 

za m 

182 14ft 
152 MV, 
9S 24 Ml 

m & 

% 8 
SMI 10 
. B5 139, 
ni7 «* 
JTO4 iiv M 
796 1®, 
MO 4 

m a* 

917 

317 14*. 
196 ft, 
254 IM 
191 Ift, 
02 25* 
207 3 

c mt 

2160 4ft 
102 39-4 

ir am 

m 9% 
40 Ik 
744 6 

165 23% 

S90 6 

94 W» 
234 <h 
in? 55t, 
175 3346 
06 7116 
no 5>V» 
126 V„ 
39* 141V 

2315 173V 

418 2Yi 
714 7546 

312 49i, 

722 15% 

991 744V 
110 8ft 
266 12% 
739 14 Vv 

211 m 
as 17 

126 ISM 
137 0 

00 I*. 

1071 12 

sn iv„ 
09 27V, 
W 3ta 
3075 Vtm 
408 m 
186 5ft 
772 7%. 

1S5 10M 

1111 4% 

843 30% 
ins 72 

271 2316 

777 iota 
8305 7 

297 *» 

519 ■%. 

1365 7V> 

95 9«Vu 

498 116 

345 ita 

4019 21 
1Z1 16* 

88 4*„ 

£1 

«i I7ta 
UM 37% 
394 3ft 
114 5*1* 

IB 1516 
1617 10M 

130 3ta 

84 79V, 

siat Tta 
460 22ft 
90 19U 
229 2ta 
87 15V, 

«9 38M 
964 34ta 
266 18* 
H2 2*. 
117 12 

450 3ft 


£t 

iota 

»a 

? 

1 

B* 


17** Ota 
3ft -V. 
ii ♦ % 
17V, Ota 

I7ta — % 
4>ft» tft 
6ft -ft 
72% +% 

~ 1 


S 3 




17*. 

7% 


12 % 

12 

17Ju Ota 

74ta - 
uv, -ta 
24M -ft 
ffti 

i3ta ♦ % 
S'.v O 
5V. -ta 
»ta — *u 
lift 13% 

6 6*6 + ft 

6V , 6*6 —'4 

Ita Jta ♦ %. 

27ta 2fi’A 
Ita 

;» 

18*6 

116 
25 

an. 

30 


Jta 
23ta 
l*ta 
5V, 

1316 

... 

Sta ms 

Sta 

,. V " 
it** 


ita — ta 
Ita — ta, 

€ 

35V. *ta 
N. -ta. 
47*6 »*6 

«i* 

39 *ta 
10 '* — <5 

9ta *ta 
ta 

TJta — ta 
19*6 — ta 
Sta * ta 
13*6 -ta 
4*6 — *6 
.516 *ta 


QnVMiOL 

HO®* 

HauorMn 

HefisOr 

HBnOr 

Hsiwn 

WrtM 

Msbra 

Hacrxn 
Hgjco i 
HBnwrT 
MomeVOn 
MmVM 


ISO 

1361 

206 

196 

IMS 

201 


HomBa 

HovnEn 

m 

fetanfu 

impawn 

Impoao 

IrwtUkf 

WetfTcn 

HMTrwl 

WteSri 

taOPO 

W*t*B 


ita, 

IP* 
«u 
Ita 
4*6 
916 
17% 
SO M 
277 ta 
4190 Vu 
19963 3* 

2*96 37H 
IS IM 
3111 2K 
2S4 27 
144 6*6 

30 1R6 
m 9ta 
155 UM 
122 17*6 

!S % 

a io% 

1038 17 

98 7 

(434 10«6 
140 27*6 
347 47ta 
88 >1% 
104 7ta 

% sE 
1202 », 
179 6*6 


15% 

24V, 

1% 
I4ta 
Ita 
1IW 
17% 
7ta 
I 1 Vi* 
11*6 
1 

76M 

7W» 

Sta, 

1*6 

5*6 

I 

om. 

6<4 

38 

17 

23*6 

10 

6*6 

«4 

I* 

ft? 

Ita 

ltta 

16*6 

4V„ 

8*6 

enta 

ii 

37ta 

TV* 

SVi 

1416 

916 

3ta 

19 

ev u 

12% 

11 % 

7 

14*4 

37*6 

3416 

10 

7*4 

11(6 

3ta 

7*6 

14*6 

ta 

ita 

«S» 

9*6 

16)6 

SVt 

■ta, 

Jta* 

37*6 

ita 

2“ta 

»h 

« 

18*6 

8ta 

II 

14% 

ita 

Phi 

10*6 

I6ta 

4*Vi. 

«ta 

22ta 

<7ta 

iita 

2*6 

ta 

ita 

3Vl, 

6». 


,.ta ♦% 
»*ta -ta 
V H „ 
1466 -*6 

17*4 -ta 
2% *16 
is* — ta 

4M — V M 
ISta -s* 
24W 06 

BV i —Vi, 
I7ta * ta 
14% — ta 
ita _ 
11*6 — *6 
I3ta ‘ta 
8 

I'ta, -ta, 
11*6 — ta 
J -ta, 
76% —ta 
J 

»!, — Vm 
I'M. 

5*6 -*t 

7V U *v„ 
10 — ta 
4*6 

3816 -ta 
72 

23% -ta 
TOM -ta 
6*6 — 
9* *’A 

PA +Vu 

in! ’ V * 

Ita * Vu 
ISta —2 
16*6 
4Via 

EC* 

Oita. _ 
Ilta <■% 

32'A — *6 

3 «ta. 
5*6 — 
15% *16 

10*6 06 
3ta - 
19*6 -*6 

7 — ta 

J7V. -ta 
16% — J6 
7% -*6 

14*6 — ta 

37% *% 

3*54 _ta 

IB -ta 
7*6 -Hu 
11% * V. 

Sta — ta, 

116 -Vi, 

15 .% 

*1. »V« 
1*6 *W 
4(6 ‘ta 
9tk 

17*6-1*6 
4W — ta 
% -ta, 
'ta 

jVh -Vi, 
37% 

1*6 -ta 
* Hu 
7616 r 1*6 
4*6 »ta 
184, 

9 »ta 
llta 

16*. — *6 
166 *v„ 
r/u —Hu 
Mta -V. 
17 t% 
6% —>/* 
9% 

21*6 -ta 
47% 

im 

7% _ 

ta 

Jta 

Jta -% 

n, « m 


SMdt 


Sales M«w LnwLuresJ Choe 


Dow Jones Bond 



U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


Indexes 
Dow Jones 

•w Kgii Lam Last am. 

Indus 6739X2 £73420 6U9J4 <709.18 -5J9 
Trans 2766J7 2271U7 23*89 225U1 —847 

urn 23637 nun omu msa -itz 

Coma 208631 208823 707028 98045 -0.19 

Stnndord & Poors 


Hlgo Low Close a*. 
B9&B1 89142 895X1 —049 
548*69 543.16 54540 +0.14 
201.90 201 JW 201 AT -044 
83.08 82JI 8159 t021 
762A5 75649 759-52 +0*01 
74IL43 741.91 745*48 +054 

Hwh Law Lad am. 

mm 39943 4oojr -aas 
50940 505J8 50723 -048 
35643 35443 35520 -61* 
26137 760181 36726 +CL95 
35609 35X82 35448 - 081 


W>0 law Lad dm. 

133545 imS7 133040 -142 
1)4641 114147 114047 —129 
1JB749 128X00 128709 -197 
144140 1435.44 143649 -4.82 
160723 159820 159926 -043 
90739 mat nun -684 


tat low Last am 
58886 58549 51613 HI 09 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


□use Os. 

103372 +a03 

10CLQ1 -0.13 

106*03 +0.17 


Most Actives 




NYSE 


Vel Ktok 

LOW 

Lari 

am. 

BavNlwfc 

55853 22% 

22% 


+ ta 

AMO 

55310 30ft 

»ta 

29% 

+ 1%! 

MkroT 

4640 33 

31 ta 



AT&T & 

42922 37V, 




CmpAscs 

moo 47% 

45% 

45% 

—1% 

Compaq 

19061 79ta 

77% 


-% 

IBM 

2 am iMU 




PWtaiCOi 

30715 27ta 

39 

2Jta 

T% 

Malarota 

34276 Mta 

65% 

65% 

— % 

GoMdr 

7B5D4 Alft 

59% 


—Ita 

GeriBec 

27747 nata 

101 ta 

103% 

+ ! 

LH LOb 

26691 32% 

30% 

31% 

+ ta 

Merfn 

26575 14% 

13% 

13% 

— % 

MnJns 

24274 57 

*% 

*ft 

—ft 

WUMurt 

7544* 24ta 

23% 

23% 

— ta 

Nasdaq 

VSL Huh 

LOW 

Last 

at % 

Rashrnn 

1S97K) 15% 

14ta 



Inxs 

146050 I47«iw 

744 



Amgen 

100377 S4h 

52ta 



Coens 

(3424 tmtu 

68 

69% 

+ % 

NlalTech 

47458 ta, 

*a 



Mfcrasfls 

62044 85ta 

B3ta 

83% 

— ta 

Oracle s 

sraas 41% 

40% 



Reoenro 

56243 10% 

9 

9* 

-Jta 


52114 HVM 

KM 




5170 62% 


61 ta 


Moamd 

46321 lDta 




RMdRt 

45753 29% 




SunMics 

41737 28 




C-ftooas 

43107 19% 

14% 



TeteComA 

47353 MYii 

13% 

13% 

-l*u 

AMEX 


VdL ffigb 

LOW 

Lori 

am. 

XCLLtd 

62746 H 




Horfcon 

IWO 3% 

3%. 

3n/ u 


SW 

1303* 76% 

7 54ft 

MW, 


Ncoan 

9707 21% 

20% 


— % 

EChoBay 

8305 7 


6% 


AuOvra 

TO4 WV„ 




VkxB 

5487 37ft 

56ft 



Govttn 

5104 7 'm 




SreGapI 

4515 % 

V. 



KevEng 

4491 13% 

13 

UM 

+% 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 

Om 

fVev. 

Nasdaq 


CUM 

Prw. 

AUranosa 

DecSnad 

UndxnoM 

Toft* issues 

NewHtota 

New Laws 

1387 

11* 

786 

3356 

225 

15 

1273 

1735 

842 

3350 

195 

23 

Advtnoed 

Dedned 

UWnUM 

Tom issues 
Hew+*era 

Now LOWS 


2053 

7031 

1656 

5730 

740 

54 

2014 

7065 

1650 

5779 

l« 

66 

AMEX 



Market Sales 




Advanced 

OedUM 

Unrimoed 

Trio) issues 

New+Mis 

New Lows 

On 

290 

746 

704 

70 

37 

7 

Prey. 

274 

299 

171 

794 

32 

■ 

NYSE 

AlttoX 

Nasdaq 

OidiSSms. 

Today 

dose 

443v48 

23-50 

555.40 


Prey. 

coos. 

649.33! 

41X4 

659.53 


Dividends 
Company Per Aat Rec Pay 

IRRECULAA 

NYStE&GadfcrfB - 2375 3-12 


STOCK SPLIT 
Tyson Poods AXB 3 tar2 qM. 


|W 

14% 13*6 

2ta 7*6 
TVi, 2 2 

114 llta 11*6 llta 

*6 <6 43% 4Ata -2*i 

145 4V, 4*6 4*6 -^6 

•« 7*6 3 7 -** 

5516 349* 35 —16 

4*1. 4% 4*6 — U„ 

% 'Vll '9u — 

lift I4ta 14*6 

19*6 19*6 19*6 ♦% 

8ft Sta 1*6 - *6 

31*6 3716 Uta — *6 

17 16*6 16*6 —ft 

30*6 X 30% -ta 

Ita Pta 2«i, _ 

107 10% 10% 10% _ 

2£ ta. U V„ _ 

176 4 3>ta. TV* t» u 

6*6 «Yh £>Vi, -Vm 

W 15ft 17 W 1716 -ta 

■03 I. nta u - *» 

194 17 16ft 14ft Ita 


NontaimBk 


STOCK 

- 5% 1-31 


INCREA5E0 

AAkJ-Am Apart- Q JQS 1-14 


INmAL 

Tyson Poods An - .025 3-1 

Tyson Roods Bn -2225 3-1 


4-1 


2-14 


1-31 


fUKHILAa 

Q 22 1.23 2-18 


Company 
Applied Pwt A. 

Asioc Fa Cop A. 

Banyan StniTRMy 
Equ FsflEn ATif, 

Fartls Securities 
Hyperion 1999 
UfilnArel 
NrSt Elec&Gas 
NortMffiBk 
Parver Parsley 
Ptianps Petrol 
SmlltiBQmey Az A 
SmtHiBomAZB. 
SnOOiBom AZ C. 
SmtttiBamCAA. 

SntfJhSom CA a 

SmlthBamCAC 

o a mo BO r froL. 

stanTApRi g-poyoUe hi 1 
UMoorterty;! 


Per Ami Rec Pay 


a sn 
a .id 
Q .10 
M 33\ 
M JS61 
M JUM 
o m 

Q 3S 
O <05 
S MS 

m jwa 

M IM 
M 271 
M XHAS 
M J0638 


W 2-28 
1-31 2J 
1-22 2-20 
1-15 2-1 

127 2-14 
1-20 T-30 
3-11 4-p 

1-77 2-15 
1-20 1-JO 

1- 31 2-18 

2- 3 3-3 

1-M 1-3J 
1-28 1-31 

l-M l-3i 
1-28 1-31 
J-28 1-.31 
1-28 1-31 


Jan. 13, 1997 

Wgli Low Close digs Opfcit 


Grains 

awNicaoT} 

54D0 bumfeitnum- doom par butfMl 
Mar 97 288 16516 267V6 1 101*6 138^11 

MOV 97 um 266 M 26116 +001*6 56611 
Jut 97 270*6 567% 269% +001% 53655 

Sen 97 265*6 261% 264*6 +001 7,767 

Dec 97 267*5 24 Ita Z4J Vt *003' A 37JSJ 
ESI. sties HA. RTLStfas 101685 
FrfsooenM 2511695 off 2838 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

1 00 nta- donors Per ton 

Jon 97 7V-00 B5JD 23870 +3.10 6700 

Mar 97 234337 227,41 23230 +2J0 3S7» 

Moy?7 23100 22730 27900 -110 19646 

Jul97 23050 22730 22LX) +2.10 15661 

Aug 97 m . SO 22660 22600 +160 WH 

Sen 97 2223 22060 22060 +1.10 249 

Es>. soles NA FrTs. soles 39.843 
Erf's open inf 5S4W up V 20 

SOYBEAN Ott. lawn 
«US0 Bn- dpftn par 100 IU. 

Jon 97 2402 24.40 2465 +0.17 4613 

Mar 97 257S 2472 24.93 +OI7 4B6W 

MOV97 2555 2505 2521 +0.15 17465 

4497 STB 2530 2543 +117 1149$ 

Aug 97 2585 2545 2565 +OS0 2J08 

Sep97 25.95 2SJ0 2570 +0.18 2441 

EsLsatos KA FrTs.srfes 84V 
FfTstwenmi 80467 up 3519 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

' 5Q0a bu mtoknum- AiOprsparbiKM 
Jon 97 738 736% 742*6 +0.8S 4642 

Mar 97 761% 738% 736ta tO-OTta 7ft«9 

May 97 IjSPU 739ta 737% +00716 29319 

4897 764 730*6 7 39 +04816 26,934 

Aug 97 760% 732 735% +046 4620 

En. sales ha Fffs. soles 9U63 
Frrs open W 151.141 up 6873 

WHEAT tCBOT) 

50m bu mMmum- OaOarB ncr tauriwi 
Mor 97 191 ta 184 191 +044 32467 

Moy 97 177 36*ta 176*6 ‘00616 0639 

JW 97 361 36418 36016 +046 2245s 

Sep 97 lOV, 159 lav, +045 1.135 

Esj.sdes NA Fri’s. soles 27,927 
FrTs open int 64408 up 1722 


Livestock 

CATTLE COMER) 
taMnom.- cents oar to. 

Feb 97 6545 6560 6547 -US 31324 

Aw 97 UX SU7 S6M -B.W 30720 

JlXI 97 6415 6360 6365 -067 13.132 

Aug 97 64.15 6372 6367 — 0.10 11403 

Oct 97 6640 6665 6647 -043 7.191 

Dec 97 6877 6755 68.12 +C10 2788 

EsJ. soles NA Fri'a.sHes 19457 
FtrsannM 94693 up 287 

FEH1CT CATTLE ICMEtU 
50400 m- cents per to. 

Jon 97 6870 6860 6865 >4102 2696 

Mor 97 68.97 68.10 6865 -035 7421 

ADT97 6940 6830 6BJC -042 7609 

Ma»9T 6965 6845 8937 +042 3685 

Alio 97 7160 71^8 7165 +0-10 7JW 

Sep 97 71 JO 7135 7160 -005 421 

Est. safes NA Rfs-sdes 5607 
Ws own inf 19329 off 7S 

HOGS-Lhu (CMBU 
40400 m.- OHM Mr to. 

R*97 7830 77.10 77.12 -058 12415 

Anf 97 7437 7175 7195 -035 8627 

Jun97 79J5 7940 79.17 -023 4415 

Jul 97 7477 7430 7435 -ON) 1614 

Aug 97 7195 71M 7385 -005 1,251 

Oct 77 673B 6747 47.17 -045 1471 

EsLSOte NA. Frf'S.sflfeS ftflV 
FrTs open ini 32,131 off 3} 


High Lorn Ck»t Otge Opfetf 


High Low One at g* OpW 


Wgfi Law am m a ge optof— 
7645 7450 7465 +038 USK 


ORANGE JUKE (NCim 10-YEAH FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) OcJ97 ____ _ .. . 

lUCD^-certseerto FKOOOOQ-ptoBjlOO Pd Dec 97 7460 7405 7440 -069 9775 

iiw au 7425 +235 3D «OT 97 13944 12870 12946 ♦ftWlM® Mw98 7730 77.15 7749 +004 454 

NacVJ 7965 74« 79S 51 js J»1 V7 12B32 127 JO 12876 +094 10578 

kj5 nm * 175 tw S9> 97 17&£2 12t5B +*» w 

6497 S M S +175 1425 0x97 N - T - N.T. 9402 +094 0 

Est. sales KA Fri’s. sales 2391 EsI. volume: 143JW . Open tot 130077 up 

Frrscwnint 2U10 up 179 1,760 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND CUFFS 


E^SOhB NA Frf*S.5dtS 9^7 
FlfS open H 5/JS 59 UP 100 
HBAT1NOOL (NMBO 

taUnooai-GM»B«rBO< .5 

Feh97 7370 6940 6960 -2J5 817% 

Mar 97 njB 64.10 64.H —248 Tf.Mf: 

Apr 97 6735 45.15 1540 —168 KM+ 


Metals 


I7L200 oiflkB •otoofTBDnd er oa-« no — 

Slo VM&O +133 91412 «60 «20 


JueW 


12965 129.18 12945 + 1 JSS 1758 
EsLselec 41677. Pict-PUhc NUTS 
Pfev. open let: 90770 off 3381 . 


GOLD (NOW 
100 pay ot- Pal tors per troy as. 

Jon 97 Mii —050 I EURODOLLARS (065(1 

Feb 97 36170 359.10 39970 -050 94723 

Morn mss -0M Jan97 M610 M^O 9M10 —6 *711 

Apr 97 34150 34140 341.48 -0*8 BM FtbST 94370 94*8 MW 

Ain 97 34630 36160 36190 —OSS 17658 Mtr97 94350 M320 94330 -Wiltm 

Aug 97 347 DO 34730 34438 -OSD 0004 Jun97 90150 94J10 9+OT mm 

OdVJ 378 JO 36050 34878 -050 3,149 MarOO 93.168 «J30 +M 2&m 

Dec 97 J72J8 37050 37140 -050 1400 JunOO 11100 nsa ODD +W Sow 

Est. sales NA Fit's, snlcs TSM 5 Sen DO 91050 93JIH) 90020 +U 30943 

BPsaPCflM 2TO637 off 7M7 D ecOO 92J?8 VtSSB 923*0 +T8 24650 

SSSSSS* 0 IMS SS" 

Jon 97 1KJD 10040 109JI +060 4357 KITBM POUND (CMBU 

Feb 97 10450 107.10 107JS! +060 Z3n «J00 pounds s ner pound 

Mor 97 10735 KEW IfflSJS +045 26612 «ar97 166® 16636 16718 -32 39,983 

Asr97 1 0440 IflUO VHA5 +0-35 986 6*797 76700 16420 16480 -32 2430 2?.— SS. 2*5 2*2 

Moy 97 10118 1BL38 1E20 +050 57B3 Sep 97 16640 -32 16B7 

Am 97 SSZJOO HEjffifl 10176 +060 7J* Dec 97 1600 -32 7 

JU27 100.90 9970 JflttJB +1130 4472 EV.JPfes MA RRLMM 

Aug 97 9960 9960 99JS +065 580 FrfSOpenlnt 4X2(7 Off 13IQ 

Sep 97 9M0 98* 9860 +140 2600 CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMSQ 

Es';«*S NA Fri'A.aties H4M nxuuidMkn. furOHdS- . 

FrTs open lot 56600 UP 987 Mar97 7457 740 7451 +6 41*7. 

Jur»97 7500 7«1 7492 +6 8658 

Sep 97 7539 J520 7527 +6 36M 

. Dec 97 7568 7549 7540 +6 364 

* BLKta NA FtTs-wke; ft?Z7 

} Ftf* open Inf 5X179 Off IDS! 

GBUAAN MARK (CMSU 


6*1 97 sm SUB am — t* 57+Vj 

6697 6U0 SU0 6U0 +062 2M6, 

Aug 97 800 6060 600 >032 IWfcj 

5t»97 KLti: SOM SSJ0 -OT] 264fa 
NM97 6050 6058' i&SJ -053 16RS 

Dec 97 060 fflJS 60^8 -00 2JB4* 

BOiotM HA FrTs. spies 29620 id 
Wsopenmt 100,976 off 348 ,+| 

UGHTSWBT CRUDE WMBQ > 

7 600 6PL- doOars par MO 
FCbfJ 2650 25.14 25* -0* 77. 

MOT 97 15* 2466 2 468 -OK 

Apt 97 2X27 2L7S 24.10 -074 

MWJ7 2450 2355 2355 -064 

6M 97 23* 22* 2258 -057 3162^5 

-WK7 217? 2Z35 2X45 -BJ3 

Aug 97 2275 2268 2268 +020 _ 

»P97 2248 2160 2164 -ft* 1 


I 1 . ! K ' 

etu - 




Nov 97 2159 21* 21* +026 

D*C 77 2145 2855 3B6D -833 23*Ta 

R81M 2070 280 20170 To* 7^ 

Mor98 20* 20* HUS -026 XWK 

gtialm NAJ Rfi-ides 91*1 •' 

Frfsopenmr n>769 off 3190 


'J 


S8.VER (NC3WX1 
5.000 troy at- aerts par troy o*. 

**•77 4602 -46 

Feb 97 4696 -48 

Mor 97 4795 4(75 4717 -4 B tfWW 

Mow 97 4840 4736 4764 —46 9,973 


Jul 97 

SepW 096 4BSJ 4854 

Dec 97 4976 4886 4924 -48 

Jon 98 49X2 -48 

NA FWs. soles U602 
FrrsapenM 90658 off 444 

PLATINUM (NMSU 
SB ftw Ofc- itotars per hay e*. 

Jan 97 3SS5U 352X0 36100 -0* 


NATURAL GAS (NMERJ N 

IMOOi mm Mu'*, f per mm Mu — 

fjb?7 0380 110 1239 —86 27696. 

Mm97 2520 270 289 +1 25770 

Aor 97 2510 200 2445 —35 12632 

Moy 97 2790 1715 53 Mtffi- 

6m97 2230 2170 2170 _® 

6H97 2JOT 2155 2M0 -18 76H^ 

Aug97 2190 2150 2J0 -15 

Sftp^ 2190 21* 21* -15 661^ 

22.^ 2.1H -IS 

NO* 97 2*0 2260 JL265 —15 3.93K 

BF * MM ^3 2390 -20 7,1^T 


^ sales NA Fffs. sales 49,7*7 
FWsopeninT 1H5T9 Off 3703 

UILEADED6A5CNLJHE {NMBO 


J775 mi ao a6n 1 2UKH mu U.S per mo* 

4775 4808 -48 207 MW97 6349 6305 4334 -14 67.8» 
tm i unW 6370 63* 6365 -13 5.165 

^ , Sep 97 6402 6395 6408 —13 IJ7S 

Dec 97 6452 —13 » 

Esf.sales NA FfTs-Stfes 74.756 
FiTSopenM 74*4 up 1282 
JAPANESE YBMfCMEIU 
113 mtWPn yon. leer im yen 

Jan 97 364* 352X0 36100 -0* 20 M»97 JtDKTOQ JMB6S5 X0067D -36 6&391' 

Apr 97 36960 366* 36670 — 2.10 1W79 Jun97 JB8800 X08777 J8WS3 -U 1,911 -S 

AS 97 3SfM —237 2572 Sep 97 0X992 —X 254 5*2 S’® *5 -M6 31.909 s 

Od97 372* 37200 37140 -20 2184 B&sdes HA Frfs.Xni« 17JB US S“? -it* 

Jon 98 37388 -2* 1X74 RTsoCsnW TUB U> 1103 ■ 

SWtSHtANC KMBO 

FWsooenW 25X77 off MS nunofrmes. tparlnm: 

apse Previous Mor97 7329 7291 7319 -2 48637 

LONDON METALS OME) *9 5 73*5 J3» -I IJK 

Dooms BO, metric tun . NA Frfs.^^ 

1566S6 156716' FffsawiW 52319 up 215Z 

f*a97 96S\ Mtt ftn 7 

iss? gs sb as : 

940 9&n 9681 + 

M ^ ^ "ss 

K65 9559 9U4 Jaw KM D«:97 186X0 186J0Q 184XQ I3fl0 

„,BM88S U£8S £858 gf H H g M mJ*— ^ 

1040% io4« gLSJSifii ® ossffl^ ~ 

Fonirora 1067X0 1067% 1069V, 1070X0 SJ** j2yRbJB& 




lead 


Nickel 

Si 


cathpiies (HM Grade) 

245000 2,10X0 2415X0 

2266X0 2267X0 2261X0 2263X0 

681% 682% 689% 690% 

691X0 69200 67700 690X0 


S«97 

0«C97 


Sj*! , 7040X0 7050X0 7180X0 719000 JUM 

F&toOrt 710X0 7150X0 7275X0 729000 Sm>9$ 


for n 73xo 7a«s m* 77143 

Moy »7 7220 70X5 70* -1^ 5J71- 

jww tom m.z o ®* —mo 

SZ 8 —MO 04,' 

tv snte* NA RfftsokB . 

TWsPPHliBf 6SJ3S UP MS M 

GASOIL OPE) 

** nwWc ^ twI ^ ■ at lao too* 

227* 218X0 219X0 —7X5 2&65X 
Mar97 218.00 210X0 211X0 -MS llJW^ 

— 0X1 0 2D&B0 20225 2022$ -3JS &3IZ. 

+ 0X1 221627 200.25 l«X0 196X5 —225 3 X93. 

0 Jof 9T 19425 193-00 19075 —275 7J7D 
177X75 Jul 97 191150 191 JQ ^3X0 2518 

J426CJ AwW N.T. N.T. l^S^XO 
1 34661- Sepm 190X0 1»0J» 18675 

Jim tMJOO 185X0 -^25 KM 




Tie 






Pm. <pen ml usrom 

High Law dose Oige Ortnr 


ass a* ^ 

fss 2S-15 S-15 23-14 ^ajo 


TfWodl 

147 

PAi 

5% 



TrsAOtf 

2S 


9% 



Triton urf 

700 

ta 




TitoMes 

1875 

16% 

16ft 

16ft 


USFGF 

171 

18ft 

18% 



Uii Ena 

n 

35% 





155 

4% 

4% 

4% 


UniW 

720 

Yu 

h 



Urfmar 

W 



S 


LMaMtal 

IS 

4 

Jft 



UFoorti 


I'Vlt 

1ft 

l<u« 

< V H 

uSBiasos 


15% 

IS 



US CHI 

377 

77% 

77 

?7 

—% 

VKAdMT 

225 

11% 

iita 

lift 


Viacom 

1177 

J6ta 

36 

36 



net 

37% 

36% 


—'a 

vlocwtC 

1374 

9b 

ft, 

Vm 


VetaDfl 

2121 

Ift 


Ift 

— ta 

Vfewsc 

171 

Ita 

1V« 




86 

17% 

12% 

17% 


WRIT 

728 

19 



*A 

Wrbcalnd 

WTRET 

215 

355 

5’UU 

Uta 

S% 

1J 

5% 

lift 


WHanEs 

147 


5% 

Sft 


WMIUTe 

1006 

lift 

llta 


— ta 

WEB Iran 

755 

16ft 

16% 

16% 


WEBJpnri 

12SS 

17% 

12 

17% 


WEBSpnn 

IM 

Wi. 

IT’V,, 

10%. 

+ % 




11% 

11% 

— ta 

XCLUd 

12746 

% 

'A 

ft 

♦ft. 

Xytrai 



l"u 

1%, 

♦ ta 


Stock ToMes Explained 

Sales figuies me unoflldot Yaoly Mgfts end tows leflecr Ow pmipus 53 weeks plus the aims* 

weelcbu!niaiheWestli u dln9day.VWiawg^orsioditfyklendanounling»25pewOTormom 

has bean paid. Die yeora WgWoer range m dMdend « slwm far tno new stocks om«.ui^s 
olhefwise noted Fates of rfMdands ae apioaidsbuaenMnts based on the Mft&dMaattn. 
a - dMdend also extra is), b - annual rale at dividend plus slack dividend, c - Bquidattng 
dMdend. ee - PE exceeds 99rtd - adled. d ■ new yeorty km. M - kMi in tlK last 12 months, 
e - dMdend dedttW or paid in preceding 12 martin, f - annual rate Increased an last 
dectantion. 9 -dividend in Canadian Rinds, willed to 13% non-residence fax. I - dMdend 
dedamt otter spflHrp or stock dividend | • dMdend poU ft* year, omttted defcned, or no 
odteo taken 0 latest dMdend meeting, fc - dMdend dedared or paid this year. an 
oonirrwlattve Issue wttti dividends in arrears, m - armoal rate, reduced on tot detJaranon. 

a - new issue In the past S 2 weeks. Tlie higiHow iange twgtns wdfi the start ot trading, 
nd- next day delivery, p. mmol dhridaid, onnwri rate unkpwm. P/B - price-eamings ratio, 
q-dosed-end mutuoi tund.r- dhddend dedared or pa id in preceding 12 months, jmus stock 
ifividend. s - stock s,iW. DMdend begins wflti date of sptt. sis • soles, t - dMdend paid in 

stock In preceding 1 2 months, estimated cosh value on ex-dividend orex-dteJrttUtion dote. 
B-rmvyeartyh.gft.y-trodfcigftoned.vf-ineankrupfcyarreceiyBa/TiporberfTgieorganiajd 
underthe Bankruptcy Actarsecuriflesaasomed by such companies, wd- when distributed, 
wi * Men issued ww - with warrants, x - ex-dMdend or ex-rights, xdb - ex-datribulnn. 
m-whhoul warrante pek-tSvtdend and sales In ML yM-ytetd-z- series OiftilL 


PORK BOXES (CMERJ 
40000 tos. ■ cam dm- to. 

FC0 97 7880 7677 76M —1.10 

NxW 7155 7665 J6J5 —US 

MOV 97 J7M 7B.0S KJO 

JUl 97 79.10 7765 78.15 -065 

Aug 97 76.10 7660 740 -0* 

Esr.sotoi NA Fh-s. soles 2*6 
Frfsotontnt 7,174 up 331 


4,122 

1X71 

Uff 


Food 


CDCDA OiCSE) 


Mar 97 THO 

1331 

1336 

+3 

29*7 

May 97 1363 

ISM 

130 

+2 

18*3 

Jul 97 

1365 

1379 

1301 

+1 

11, MO 

Sep 97 

UD 

1400 

102 

+3 

tan 

Dec 97 

1419 

Mir 

1417 

-3 

2,332 

Eri. sales 4*4 

Fri's.MlR 

14J95 


Financial 

U5T. BRJLS (CMEK) 

IlnMto-PSOMlIlKX 
Mor 97 9690 94X7 9688 4X3 

Junfl 9471 94X9 9(71 -0X1 2717 

SeP 97 9448 -0X2 187 

Estate NA FrT\ sates i,10* 

FrPsapenint 7743 up 0 . 
frR.T*BEA5URY(CaOTt 

tlOOAM prin- Mb 8. xarii W1M pet 

Mor 97 105005 M5-M5 105-27 170*0 

JUD97 705-19 105-165 105-18 + 085 3XS4 3-MONTH PfBOR UAATtF) 
Ext soles NA FrTs. soles 81X0 FF5 mfloon - pte of lOOccl 

Fri'EOHnM 176,134 UP am “ 

MYH. TREASURY (CBOT) 
tiooxoa prin- m, & 33neion»Pc> 

Mor 97 108X4 107X6 107-M 316*2 

Jun97W-l7 787-09 187-17 17X66 

Sep97 . _ 106-39 180 

Estsdes NA Rfftsoto 13SL5S0 
FtfiooaiirY 328X31 w 8902 


*2X3 W77 9183 +0X7 46X16 Aug 97 21X0 3] jn M'S 

®72 92X+ B/r + Ofl7 31736 Sep 97 N.T N.T ni! 

1 H 

72AX 9209 92X3 +0X7 7, 

036 9132 92X4 +0X6. S 



^Est. sates: 47.1 67. Open InUl 60299 00} 

; 2£ g% 32 


Stock Indexes 


Ufaw.nasxKuBa 

auoxtodw 


JSw' gj* 7SL2B 78270 -M01BBX41_ 

*" S SS« +qm Sms M 2£5 27-5 >3*5 


5«J 97 »X1 9675 
Dec 97 9472 94X6 


3u& 29XM 5“ 77 "WO 78330 786* -4* 

*mrym 


Mar 9ft nx 96X4 96X5 +0X9 1&13S 
Jui 98 PfiJS 9 6J7 9433 +0X9 7 2X14 . 

94.U 94X4 96.10 +010 10725 
™ ■ - — - - * mdex -- 


See our 

Arts and ,\iriiqne8 

every Saturday 


CQFFEECMCSa 
37*0 kK. - cum eer to. 

Mart? 11900 WM 2UM5 —>,15 2777* 

May 97 117.10 11&25 H6* -I* 7*8 

Jul 97 11125 U4JN 1U3D -1* 2X28 

5eoW 113* 1 12105 172* -075 2X24 

Es. sate o*a Fri's.s** 4*s 
Fh'sceenint »*9 up 470 

SUGAR-talOILDll CNCSQ 
1 12*0 toe - eynS ner n. 

Nfrtt 7041 M41 1U -VS 72X59 

May 97 10.73 10* 1067 -017 32X76 

X497 10X7 UU7 10* -0.17 75701 

0097 TOM 1ft* 1ft* -6* 1M31 

Eg.Mta: 3*8 Wj. sUtt 99X06 
FH'soaeninr 153.907 


'US TREASURY BONOS (CBOT) 
(Bpd-SiHLMMft IBOpOJ 

Mor 97 110-22 110-05 1HH3 + U 444*7 
Jyn 97 110-04 I09-ZI 109-28 + 02 16X15 
SCp 97 199-20 UP-06 I0M4 + 02 SX92 
DOC 97 109-00 + 02 

EsLsote NA FrYLMlK 00X53 
FWSWanint 490*7 UD 13091 

gERNUN GOVERNMENT BUND OJWEJ 
0*250X00 -pH Of 100 ad 
f**77 TOfW fW^tOW +0J0 219*0 
99X5 9973 99X7 + - — 


Dec » 9SM 95.71 9SX4 +W3 
Mar» 9SX5 +014 T 


4JJ1X +5BX 


Jua97 


Etf.Wtog 188X68. FfOV.iatK: 235,165 
Paw. open IsL 223X43 up zm 


LgtSGlLTQjfFB 


Jun 99 9SJ26 95* 95* +0.14 £SS S5 Vt -K «34X +m3 ^ 

SjP » «X1 94X6 W» +0.14 1M6 S5?-.- ^j 1 ^. ° ^«U7 +S7X .1, 

DecW 94X7 94X7 9472 +0.13 1X21 937 ^ 

_ CAC*CMAT^ 0P4 ” ^ 

MOS y«OHTH EUROUOA (ueno jvfajwint . 

Ejlnaita-ptoonogpd 2367 S +3450 Z2AMT 

Mor97 9351 WLtat 93X1 + 0,71 703373 F™ g 2S8M 2365jt 23710+3691 IMS' 1 

ium SMj !W5 + ®- M 6M77 yw £ 29B5X 2371X 2377il+ M*a 1 4 j«~ 

*«0 + 0.17 34X95 Jw 97 2344D2338X 233M+34* 

liJis* 

Ete rahwie 14^34 Open haj 54033 gpjfttf 


\V " 


m . - 


■0X0 4X73 JunSfl 


Jun97 


42797. Pm.MMK 48X08 
•.OPT! JUL- 2JUU4 ap SOBS 

lndttstrlals 


*0197 109-71 109X7 

N>T. H.T, M8-29 +9-18 


E*t safes; 34491. Pm. safes 
Pmr.^Mlnb 130849 a8 


■17 + o-io ramsi OBnOM (NCTW 
' OLantoi.-oaWtperSk 

Ysz ^ m m Kesa? 


Commocflty Indexes 


Morn rin TLK iffi +ft« EGS Radar - 
JU97 7673 740) 76X1 ++L3S 7MB ti-i-Futures 

CRB 


date 

1X49X0 

IMS 

1«4K 

24140 


U 
ha 
«2 

— * -» ■ 

I iwnh^ 

241 J0 




.’V 







N, 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1997 


*% 


% 


European Stock Markets Surge 


EUROPE 


okyo Leads Bourses to Records 


— European stock 
jparieets rose strongly Mooday,.wnh 

into rewnl teritoty 

TT?cW*° a ^aod and 

u.s^dianK reached a record Friday. 

The maui Belgian, French, Span- 
jjk Sw edisk and Swiss stock m- 
9^es all closed at record highs. 

Markets in Europe were reas- 
oned when Tokyo shares jumped 
.7 percent after sharp losses last 
, recover y “» Nikkei 
r 5 '^} average helped stem wor- 
ties that Japanese in&titntimc 


- — — vvaocso t/UUU 

holdings to raise their 

France s CaC- 40 index hit a clos- 
^ high of 2361^ points, saroassinc 
the record of 2355.93 set Feb. £1994 
and underfiring the recent strength, of 


the French market, which had lagged 
its m a m European counzopartsLlhe 
. gdex rose 1,45 percent m a raEy 
n*«efl by expectations of higher 
Fitiicb corporate e armny riw^ year. 

" *‘The fu nda mentals, are good for 
the bo urs e, and they haven't changed 
■ interest' rates are low, corp ora te 
profits are ejected to rise on mod- 
erate economic growth, productivity 
« improving, ana exchange rales are 
favorable with the franc’s rferfjri*- 
against the Italian lira, British ster- 
ling and dollar,” George de 
Nesroeskery Kiss, an economist at 
Societe Generate, said. 

A strong dollar also helped lift 
shares of exporters such as Daimler- 
Beaa AG in Germany and. Glaxo 
Wellcome PLC. of Britain, while 
bank shares gained from higher 
bond prices and expectations that 


lowo* interest rates will increase 
profits from lending. Renault shares 
rose 4.15 percent to 113 francs 
(521.23) after Chairman Louis Sch- 
weitzer said he hoped the com- 
pany's car operation’s would break 
even this year. 

The 3teharcDAX index inJRrank- 
fort ended floor trading up 2136 
points, or 0.73 percent, at 2^5455. 

British shares also closed sharply 
higher, buoyed by subdued produ- 
cer-prices data that reduced fears of 
higher interest rates. The Financial 
Tunes-Stock Exchange 100-share 
index rose 50.7 points to 4.10730. 
In other markets, Stockholm rose 
1.98 percent to 2397.81, Zurich 
rose 0.90 percent to 23493 1 . Mad- 
rid was up 1.41 percent at 464.16, 
and Brussels gained 137 percent to 
1 ,97636. (AFP. Reuters) 


Kirch Move on SAT -1 
Signals a Shake-Up 
In German Television 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

FRANKFURT — Kirch 
Group's recent move to take a rea- 


dme in taking advantage of the 
new law. Besides moving to raise 
its stake in SAT-1 Saielliten 


jority stake in SAT-1, one of Ger- Femseben GmbH to 59 percent 


many’s top private broadcasters, from 43 percent, Kirch also re- 
signals a shake-up and consolid- cently bought a 24.9 percent stake 
ation in German television hold- in the sports channel DSF from 
rags prompted by a more relaxed Axel Springer Verlag AG, raising 
ownership law, analyses say. its total to 49.4 percent. 

At the beginning of the year. Kirch's plan to take control of 
Germany dropped regulations de- SAT-1 is being resisted by Spring- 
signed to prevent media owner- er, which holds 40 percent of the 
ship from being concentrated in a broadcaster, 
few hands. The revised law ended The SAT-1 contract, in a pro- 
restrictions preventing an indi- vision typical of the industry, 


vidual or company from owning a gives Sponger veto power over 
majority stake in a private broad- any changes in the company’s 


BankSaleLifis 
Austrian Bourse 


Gehe Wins U.K. Drug Fight 


Reuters 

VIENNA — Share prices 
r Jumped Monday as investors 
welcomed foe sale of Credit- 
anstalt Barikverein AG to Bank 
. .. Austria AG despite doubts about 
the potential benefits of foe 
l formation of a new superbank. 

The ATX index of 21 blue- 
chip stocks jumped more than 2 
. percent in reaction to foe sale 
agreement. Investors scrambled 

to pick np shares nf C reriitanct^ 
. pushing its preference stock up 
> 16-80 schillings ($130) to 495 
and the bank’s common shares 
r. up 9 to 72930. Bank Austria, 
i which saidSunday it expected its 
earnings per share to double ova- 
the next five years as a result of 
foe deal, was up 5 at 406. 

Creditanstalt's nonexecutive 
■ supervisory board chairman 
‘ Walter Fremoth, offered his 
resignation to the bank's new 
majority owner and said it was 
up to the executive board to 
, determine whether it wanted ro 
' stay on or put up their jobs for 
grabs as well. 

Analysts said the 373 billion 
'' schilling agreement to create the 
1 hanking giant was likely to be 
followed by a flimy of takeovers 
.in foe country's traditionally 
■' crowded financial sector. 


Bloomberg Business News 
LONDON — Gehe AG of Ger- 
many wen a yearlong battle for 
Lloyds Chemists PLC on Monday, 
giving the German drug wholesaler 
a strong position in Britain’s retail 
pharmaceuticals market. 

Gehe raised hs stake in Lloyds 
Chemists to more than 50 percent 
minutes after ftsrival, UniObemFLC, 
said it would not countefbid. as ex- 
pected. Lloyds Chemists recommen- 
ded that its shareholders accept the 
£684.1 million ($1.15 baUjan} cash 
bid from Gehe, whidb was 10 percent 
hitter foan that of UniChem. Gehe’s 


victory in the bidding war added 
about 924 pharmacies to its chain of 
300 stores, putting it on a par with 
Boots Cto., which has more than 1300 
stores. Gehe will control about 40 
percent of the British drop wholesal- 
ing market, in which UmChem will 
be foe second-largest player. 

“UriChem was outgunned by a 
stronger bidder,” Tony Cooper of 
Grog Middleton & Co. said. If Uni- 
Chem had offered more cash, he said, 
it would have ” wrecked their balance 
sheet,” and if it had offered mare 
new shares, hs existing capital would 
have been excessively diluted. 


caster, freeing 
Kirch to seek 
control of 
SAT-1. Con- 
solidation in 
the German 
television in- 
dustry could 


Broadcasters, under the 
new law, wOl be ‘more 
flexible and fasten 9 


holdings. Al- 
though h has 
not opposed 
the Kifoh bid 
outright. 
Springer has 
issued a state- 


help simplify the ownership struc- 
tures of the country’s private 


hires of the country s private 
broadcasters, many of whom 
struggle to make headway against 
popular government-subsidized 

‘Tm in favor of it,” said 
Friedrich Scbellmoser, a a analyst 


mem warning 
that its approval is needed. Kirch 
also is bolding talks to change the 
ownership structure of Premiere, 
the pay-TV channel owned by 
Kirch, Bertelsmann AG and Canal 
Plus SA of France. Kirch could 
emerge with a majority. 

Sou more changes, meanwhile. 


at Hypo-Bank m Munich. “Broad- are afoot in the Gorman television 


casters will be more flexible and 
foster. They will have a clearer 
profile in the market. 1 expect that 
p r ofi ts win also be better.” 


industry. On Tuesday. Audiofina's 
Compagrie Luxembourgeoise de 
Teleoimision is expected to an- 
nounce a merger with Bertels- 


Ladbroke-Hilton Pact Set 


The new rules still try to prevent mann’s television business to form 
concentration of media power by CLT-Ufa, Europe's biggest tele- 


barring any private broadcaster vision company. The new com- 
from capturing more than a 30 pany is to get 89 percent of RTL, 


Reuters 

LONDON — 7 Ladbroke Group 
PLC concluded a long-awaited 
global alliance Monday with Hilton 


Hotels Coro, of the United States, 
reuniting the Hilton brand world- 


reuniting toe Hilton brand world- 
wide for the first time in 32 years. 

Despite foe tie-up, which covers 
400 hotels in 49 countries, the two 
companies denied there were plans 
for a frill merger. Ladbroke has 
owned Hilton International since 
1964, when ft was spun off from 
Hilton Hotels, and Ladbroke has 
held the right to build Hilton hotels 
outside the United States. 


“We’re taking afiist step in bring- 
ing foe hotels’ business much 
closer," foe chief executive of Lad- 
broke, Peter George, said. “We’re 
putting die relationship back togeth- 
er, and who knows what may came of 
if?” Shares in Ladbroke were up 1 
peace at the dose in London, tn 232 
C$3.89). At foe close of trading in 
New York, HStoa Hotels shares were 
unchanged at $2530. 

Stephen Bollenbach, chief exec- 
utive of Hilton Hotels, said, “From 
our customers' point of view, this 
will look as if it s one company far 
the first time in 32 years.” 


percent share of die total market. 
Because no broadcaster has any- 
where near that share, however, the 
restriction has no immediate im- 


Gennany’s top-rated broadcaster. 

The agreement, which com- 
bines stakes that belong to Ber- 
telsmann and CLT. could lead to 


pact AQ in all, Germany’s media an agreement uniting two other 


law ranks among the most liberal 
in Europe, Mr. Schelimoser said. 

“It obviously makes sense to 
have a clearer shareholder struc- 
ture,” a Bertelsmann TV spokes- 
man said. “The new law makes it 
possible.” 

Kirch Group is a media empire 
based in Bavaria and closely held 
by Leo Kirch, the sole member of 
foe management board. 

The company is wasting no 


private broadcasters in which 
CLT-Ufa also holds stakes — 
RTL2 and Super RTL — into an 
RTL family. 

Bertelsmann, meanwhile, said 
a report that Walt Disney Co. was 
threatening to withhold programs 
unless it got a stake in CLT-Ufa 
and a bigger stake in RTL was 
* ‘nonsense. ’ ’ Disney has a minor- 
ity stake in RTL and a 50 percent 
share of Super RTL. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


HI* low dose Pmt 


High taw One Pm. 


High taw dose Pm. 


Monday, Jan-13 

•Tftamr?ofsrfcfiraflBiK — 

Tetekua 

■ High law host. Pm. 


MO* law Ouse Pm. 


CFSA 

Hear 

UoatrHdgs 


OmweafaoH 
(Malar Baa 
Degueia . 


Amsterdam *p5!2£{S2 


DoutTcMmn 

EtednwBunfc 

F mb U h 


A9K-AMJSJ 

Aaron 

AhnW 

Altar MeW 
Banco. - 
SobWoscva 
CSMcn 
OorttsdtePef 
_ 03 M 

h Ebwter 
FMbAmw 
Gtuonta 
CWSmcan 

•swap- 

Mum 

Hoottwenseaa 


I HG Group 
KLM 
KMPBT 
KPN 

NertndGp 

Nrflrtdo 

OcoGiMen 

PWHpsBae 


ftrioMNdEl 

HptMCD 

Roriwnai 

Rsflnoa 

SSSjouMi 

UnUmrcm 

VMdnlflfl 

VNU 

WoUeraWoro 


11S.T0 ttl 112X0 ITL» 

nan nun mse mx 

107X0 106 106X0 US5B 

349 JO 347 JO 24X50 347.10 
73 71 73 7tS8 

VM 3130 31 JO 37 JO 
MB 93J0 9450 MS 
331 X 32T 32M0 325X0 
17230 171 JO 17U0 170.70 
27J0 27.M 27X0 37 JO 
(OX 61 JO 63 61 JO 
52 SUB 51 JO 56.1© 
5t» sue Jtso son 
.14450 1AL38 14X10 139 JO 
309 *050 **60 30400 
39 JO 09 40.10 flUO 
21 JO 120 120 121 

6400 6X90 MX- KUO 
MX 47 JO 47 JO 48 
37 JB 37J0 3} JO VX 
65 6290 «ffl £360 
mm -44J0 4X10 47.J0 
26X60 261 261 JO 261 

mSQ 197X0 19X50 19440 
7460 ■ 7X7C 7im 7X10 
MX0 8230 81 8460 

vn Q350 135 130J90 

146 145JO U&St 14230 

ia» iSn.lSM 14MQ 

mS W 3»a®J0 30690 
30X80 29X30 30Z50 297J0 
B1J0 79 JO HUB BSW8 
3X60 3730 3X50 
32MB 31 WD 21X50 3MJB 


JRM.KHR> 

MM 

HahMboZni 

Hotdat 

KkU) 

Li nda 

LuMmmb 

MAN 


MaMaeM!Bdii«34a5 
Mon 123 

MundiRmCk.fl 3635 
PmanB - 30W0 


. 3075 1075 1078 
4UV 42.0X 4X05 

nxio 11355 in jo 

70X50 70250 48750 
X* M 74a 
3X30 3S.4S 3052 
49 4BJB 

303 308 305 

13725 13725 139 

246 24650 24S.M 
9X30 IB55B » 
127 12750 128 

IB 808 82 

SLV, 64 CTin 
69X5 7040 ,«8M 
*9 500 30 

MW- 1Q35 998 

-21-85 21 JS 2MS 
407 40750 
STB 48X50 47350 
3340 34 

. , 122 mm, 

3620 ' 3632 
-• 367 38850 384 

6B 6X05 


AMCHRS 
NonpaX 
NmXw 
R eBhmdiap 
toownaid 
- RutfWottww 
SABiOMfln 
Sobssssw 
Sam 
5BIC 

ngwOaB 


131J5 131 13U5 

3J8 3J0 3J5 

32X7$ 323 raw 

1930 1930 1950 
• <425* 4&2S 6625 
4X15 42J5 42J5 
6550 65 6550 

6450 050 64 

12X75 13X35 12X50 
52 52 52 

5425 5X50 5625 
185 18450 185 

6475 6630 6675 


Unlever 

1X80 

1X53 

ttJl 

1255 

UMAtwraace 

545 

*95 

5 

*96 

(ltd Nero 

*05 

*72 

*73 

*91 

.UtaJIWBSS.. ... 

- M 4 - 

—6X2,, 

..*53 

.-6X2. 

VeoriaiKDtw* 

*18 

5.13 

£13 

*13 

Vtaafona 

X55 

2X9 

2*4 

2X8 

WhBinod 

7X7 

747 

747 

7J7 

WBHaasHim 

347 

X3B 

343 

349 

mMn*ray 

4X7 

45B 

*63 

*59 

WPP Group 

X42 

246 

X41 

236 

Zeneca 

1*14 

1*98 

1*10 

16 


SCNMed 134 13050 132 127 

TtumaamOff 433 425 433 415 

StactirantiAsa 37 3SJ0 3180 37 


AtUCOpcoAF 

AveaaF 


CAC-40; 236] 27 
M»C13Z7JI 


Madrid 


loin Mr 46416 
PfCT«0 *g 45642 


Kuala Lumpur 


nngntDr 132038 

fmiHciaa 


Ganflno 1740 

Mol Banking OfJS 

UUeASbbF TM 

PetwwGcB 1020 

Rman 466 

RcsorbWMd 1340 

SbwOartn 1030 

TcMonJwd 3140 

Tenon 1240 

UME&bta* 2410 


17.10 1730 1730 
26 26 2475 

7JS 7.15 730 

IB H1.1 B 1X10 
4JQ 4JQ 460 
13 1X10 1X30 
MS IS! 1033 
aim aaro 2uo 


135180 13635 ___ 
77J30 7735 77 JB 
38X50 287 28X20 

9110 9220 
49S 495 500 

657 JO 663 64450 
711 71X58 712 


London 


FT-SE 10X41 8720 


Acatnar 

ACESA 

AguaaBaraNoa 

sr*"" 

Bowsto 

BanfeMUr 

BcoCMroNtap 

BcoExMar 

BOOfUpalar 

BcoSaMnnr 

CEPSA 

CaMame 

CPJW 

FECSA 

GasNaUsd 


AMavNOll 7-76 7jU 

AHMtDanwcq 422 423 


Helsinki HBCGa-nnM mom 


CuBorl 


Bangkok 


SETMueRXBI 


Mvlitfa5fC 

BngkokBkP 

VX&r* 

Stem Conan! F 

Stan Coro BiF 
THeannodir 


TMAkwaw 

TMFarattF 

UMCoam 


S 212 

»« 776 TM *Jt 

202 191 Ml 

52 4BJ5 50 32 

39JB 3725 » VX 

187 168 169 JM 

117 177 HO W 


KBSto 

MedloA 
MMB ^ 
JMMSataB 
wtsfc 
Nc4doA 

Orion-YMymae 

» 

Saropolnaur 


241.10 341.10 
3050 3930 
31950 226 

57 5XS® 
66 6720 
14.50 1520 
262 265 

3648 37 

117 11X50 
297 297-50 
178 1BX9B 
78 mao 
44 45t1« 


9940 TO 
0X90 WJB 


Hong Kong “sSKSSS 

1(L go 10 l 3o ia« ia« 


Bombay 


HMuOLewr 

HMudPoHOi 

-MOwBk 

wag* 

Safe BK Mb 
stmATOMny 
Tgto Eng Lm 


984 « 

889 875 

369J5 354 

109 M6 
-363 34450 
25950 34950 
234 21875 
25425 249-75 


[MtaTOsc:34S3Ji 

PMNEM1U1 

55 97450 98150 
75 86X75 80250 

S4 365 JM 

06 10675 1»^ 
SO 363 3«J5 
50 S6 349 

3S|^ 

a 35450 3SX75 


CrthayPodflc 1X10 

III 


ChbnOscnSUI X85 
SwRecEffl U7D 

SroftW 

■»ar s 

GnmiEoaki 3120 

ssssr 

issssSr 9X50 

Sssc? iS 

wffi; 2740 

^ 34. 


Brussels 


CWP 

Cubapo 

Cteefias* 

Co tail 
DoOnteLlon 

f|>i ^il_nf 

Beanwna 
Fetal AC 
Gtaoart 
01B 
SSL 

GMBaaqua . 

XMWMM 


BEX-28 feOBC 197456 
PlWfeMl*«J9 

! -m» ym wag 

f 5270 5330 a« 

) «5@& <830 6800 

} ™?S 

2 SS m 2 

i 35 S S 

1 *2™- ^ 

i 2010 MBS 

! ”2 2^ 

I 3070 3090 30TO 

i sac JS g* 

I 22H» 2240 2215 

i I» W" ® 


HonaUroobi 


11-90 1X10 
7025 HJ5 
2340 2140 
3340 3330 
MS 338 
1405 14M 
8-30 840 

39-30 4X90 
U.T. M.T. 
840 450 

39 » 

9 JO 9J» 
3X80 3X10 
7.M 7.10 

4490 4490 

^ ‘S 

1X15 1X25 
1480 1490 
37JS 2738 




J125 1X35 
475 493 

747 169 JO 
5575 5775 
2X80 2845 


AngBonVMer 6® &M 

Argos . 431 402 

AtaoGtaW 1J5 *“ 

Assoc Br Foods 474 — 

BAA 487 ' S3. B 

BoMnys 1X85 safr 

Boro aj7 X23 

BATtnd 5 463 

Soak Scotland 110 2J8 

BtooOTCte X72 346 

BOC Group X7S an 

Boob 427 6337 

SPOtnd .37© 343 

Bta/fenisp 1X70 12J6 

IMAtaMyt 406 599 

Brit Go: X22 XI 8 

Orotund 437 iZ3 

BiftPottro 7.90 7.07 

SS»B 435 425 

BTOSfert 1JS X53 

BtaTetoooro 406 xm 

BTR X» X47 

BwmofaOisarot 1X95 1X82 

Burton Gp 1^ X51 

CabteVnrotMa 470 443 

CodbtnSctai 492 479 

OMMCmn 414 405 

OoumUMan 49S 4JB 

CompoB* Gp 426 418 

CourtauktS 388 XB1 

DtoM 403 496 

BcdrocampansA 4J1 449 

EMI Group 1X03 1285 

Etaemtseoa 437 438 

Foot Cabot* MB 181 

Garfl Acddart 785 7J1 

GEC 407 196 

GKN 18 W 

GtaWdam 9.12 9 

GnnwdoGp X57‘ 

Grand fArt 442 433 

ORE IB W 

GfwnaBsOc 465 458 

OuMoea 443 435 

GUS 496 581 

Hunan . 087 X85 

Haw ■ 454 

HSK Mb* 1151 I 

lO 8 137 

ImpITobaoco 388 XB2 

msftmt 454 646 

LaSirata 239 2-30 

LxMSsc 7M 7M 

i am 2*53 Z44 

Legal GeelGm 3JM 383 

UoydsTSBGp AM 40 

LooatVMIr 224 X19 

s us 


7J3 7-63 
423 424 

687 588 

686 624 

U5 122 


tttwWotWDW 

N 


5X25 49 JO 
27 2665 
358 X» 
VS 490 


SacGenBdfl 
Mat ■ 
TfKfeM 
(K3 

UnknMMeta 


lffl? Twon ll^ no® 

ss ss s 1 

S&&3&M 

to DO lOOD 14750 14725 
BH» BMW BfflO EM 
J135 2120 2135 Z125 


5hW«pHJ| 


sBsssr 


Copenhagen aSJgg® 

1 I | I 

SS » » a 

Dupoajnfljk £»M 

8 ill 

^ %?sss& I I 

• M255a S 8 ■« 


aftOPBi 

TVBFOtntaatt 

HftorfH** 

vnwioc* 


9185 8958 

425 115 

ss a 

S3 

3X30 31-40 
® 3780 
21-65 2185 


^8 

490 SfiS 

■SS "si 

n s 

ixS as 

32-30 3X40 
37.90 M 
21J5 21.10 


Mcwtwy Asset 1X72 1X15 
MaaondGcH XU 201 
Moffftmer . 485 480 

MotWeot 7-68 782 

N**f 448 4Pfi 

□REISS 189 L86 

pm 422 tUO 

Pennon 787 783 

PWntfOa 1-47 143 

FarooGai M» xm 

PngoferFomiB 7JJ7 495 
Prudential 415 JUS 
MHmckPP 481 388 

Han* Group 425 412 

RKMCoini 789 7 

Rntand 138 129 

Head tan - 1X22 1X15 
RctaoUInDU 427 421 

RaUaHdgs 65V 6B5 
Ran Ml 345 

RMCeraup . 9.W 488 

.-a fs 

MjtaSsuflAli 446 429 
Safeway 4.15 484 

5flWw 295 3N 
SchrtSsn 1580 1587 
SoafNawnctfe 455 442 
saa Power 054 .ou 
SKmfcof -2J9 275 

5*£mTJWJl 684 685 
SMTaspR 1X30 1X14 
stare 1X30 ixm 

SnMlNttMw U6 175 
SnBWMe 7-92 7JSS 
SnnstM XU 787 
saenEta * 7S2 782 

at afl CUWCli - ■ -733 783 

Stand Cbufer .695 680 
Tate XLyfe 473 448 

Taco 055 049 

ThaafetWBW.. *87 5J« 

UGroep 554 sS? 

TanUas * 289 070 


Jakarta 


(iHtaini MArlTIjT 

^IW9fe«u45787 


®Sun 


BS&a 


SoWWWuKM 


*725 J5SSD 5SM 

1300 1OT !SI 1300 

'S W 9 

row MS 4850 4875 

6625 6625 

13450 UT2S S35S 13300 
1%5 705 rag’ ‘HOB 
4225 4200 4200 4200 


Frankfurt 


AMBB 995 

mum ia» 

A8taaHm 3748 

Attma .. nw 
BhBarSn * 

BASF » J9 

Baer 6X50 


.PwatawJ BBSX 

^ if e§ 


Johannesburg *JSSSSa 


31 Sfm 

& 


6X65 AXIS £ 

6095 4XW « 


%£££$? Maws i| 

Ang** 111 ™ QOS 4* - 47 4£30 
Bono* m mAO 23 2X50 23 

.310M8' 


m gs»« 


482 4J7 

i&ao fOAZ 
839 834 

468 445 

388 2 sa 

346 346 

842 X62 

625 6.15 

3- 70 344 

1266 1X52 
687 <W 
Z20 X19 

537 536 

- 7.18 781 

S22 586 

183 181 

482 3197 

281 286 
1X88 1092 . 
182 183 

446 449 

487 483 

5-13 543 

691 681 

623 6.16 

383 187 

4 99 5X4 
451 450 

1X9) 1299 
636 432 

t49. 147 

7X5 7 JO 

4- 04 398 

948 996 

949 894 

254 843 

435 433 

273 XM 
540 599 

596 

£S 

1X12 1X19 
744 733 

XU 180 
648 640 

X33 X31 

7J3 745 
248 245 

393 3J9 

48» *42 

119 222 

*73 *68 

448 444 

7X21 122) 

2-02 2 
491 *74 

35 8 

197 147 

626 620 

. 785 780 

143 144 

6 595 

7X7 
5.05 
_- 3X6 
*16 *25 

7X4 - “ 

130 
1U) 

*35 

6 « 

347 
899 

245 

U4 
9.10 
442 441 
*15 4J05 

190 X8S 
15X0 1565 


Prior 

Retool 

SnflonaEfec 

TOboadaiD 

Totaontaj 

UntarFenaw 

VatencCinnMrt 


18340 18340 
1765 1195 
5500 5670 
5760 5800 

7290 7320 

1185 1110 

19730 19800 
3525 3560 
2760 2760 
25350 *090 
8370 8430 

4170 4Z70 

2640 2670 
7710 7950 

9920 10BTO 
1245 1275 
3W00 32310 
1670 1710 

2560 2570 
5530 5670 
1295 1335 

5955} 6040 

32S 3275 
1210 1235 

1410 1440 


Accor 

AGF 

AlrUqukfe 

AfeaWAfaft 

Am 

Saocnfr* 

B1C 

8«P 

Canal plus 

Canafear 

Cnslno 

CCP 

Gatefcm 

QnWtaiOlor 

CLF-Oexin Ran 

Octal Agrtofle 

Dananc 

BBAquIMm 

ErtdantaBS 

Ewwuonel 

Gen. Eon* 

Hams 

l»ew 

Lofinga 

iMud 

VOreci 

LVMH 


656 656 

165 163 

843 821 

-»•* .J® 

348 353J0 34680 

414 418 m 

789 800 803 

199.10 199 JO (9880 

1097 1102 1107 

3330 3367 Zm 

2402® 239-10 
23*30 236 

418 624 415 

841 850 835 

471 47540 465 

1250 1365 1250 


AucskiF 
Etedrota BF 
.EXctmaBF 
Hawes BF 
Incentive AF 
ImestarBF 
(QmevftBF 
AlloOoBF 
PhanniUDkiin 
SamMkBF 
SCABF 
S-EBanksfiAF 
Standfe Fora F 
SlurnskaBF 
SKFBF 
SSA8BF 
StanrAF 
SrHnwflSSAF 
SydkranAF 
TmeBqraBF 
VoHoBf 


taoa. Goa* 
AUchelhB 


774 

759 

774 

754 

49940 490.10 495-70 487.90 

844 

830 

837 

B36 

*95 

*80 

*90 

*05 

706 

69/ 

702 

692 

375X0 371X0 

373 34*70 

TM 

780 

768 

773 

323-70 318.10 

320 31*10 

930 

907 

915 

915 

1961 

1934 

1*47 

1W0 

14*5 

1X18 

1430 

1408 

505 49*30 498X0 

491 


Sydney 


PartbaSA 

ParwlRjcnnJ 


Manila 


PSEbdBC 327X31 

FrwMteUGLM 


AfataB 

TMtoLond 

BfcPMBpU 

C&PHocna* 

Manta Elec A 

Metro Bank 

POnw 

FaBonk 

PhCUna DW 

SanMiaueia 

5M Prime Hdg 


30 3050 30 

30 3a SB 

147 148 149 

14 14 14 

129 129 130 

665 680 665 

940 940 9X0 

340 340 33780 

1505 1515 1450 

114 1U 119 

7.10 7.10 720 


Peugeot CB 

FfneoB-Pitn 

Pnmodes 

RartouB 

RlBE) 

Rh-PwdcncA 

RMSUHJClaf 

Sanaa 

5dneUsr 

SEB 

SGSTTwmson 

Ste&Biointe 


M 295.10 2S98B 28X20 
365 360 361.10 353.10 

mx 301 306X0 299 

550 534 542 544 

208 2124 2124 2092 

1495 1470 1491 1463 

11340 11X10 113 10B80 

1656 1599 1627 1623 

168 16110 16640 16X18 
1528 1527 


Amcor 
ANZBUig 
BHP 
Bonn 
Brambles In* 
BumsPfiMp 
CHA 

OCAmatB 
OrtaMy er 

CRALtd 

CSR 
Fasten Brow 
GiOAutantaa 
GoadroanFU 
lOAusWdo 
John Fairfax 
Laid Lease 


2X1 

2X0 

2xl 

2X0 

1241 

12.14 

12.14 

1214 

1X43 

1230 

12X8 

1241 

iffir 

*94 

WU 

53fl 

*75 

*<0 

6X8 

*60 

1VJI 

1936 

19 JO 

1946 

4X6 

*40 

*44 

4X4 

2X6 

259 

2X5 

249 

225 

220 

222 

221 

1X1 

15/ 

1X0 

1X3 

12.75 

13 

13 

1225 

2 HI 

276 

279 

2X0 

34.17 

2399 

24-09 

24 

795 

/XI 

794 

7.93 

1X3 

IJ9 

1X2 

1X0 


1174 1140 
379X0 37580 


Mexico 


Sues 

SritaiaUw 

TnaasanCSF 

Total B 

UAP 

Ustaor 

Volte 


550 541 

2815 2770 

793 779 

21980 217-50 
574 553 

172JO 167-60 

426X0 422 

1*080 138 

7980 77.95 
346X0 344 


2S3 745-40 
1154 1129 
377 37*50 
543 539 

2790 2720 

785 771 

218 216 
553 557 

1« 167- 
42*30 4i« 

14080 137 JO 
78X0 78-30 
34440 346 


matai>i ei 56a.n 

RMWSE2SMX9 


NemCoip 
Worth LW 
Podnc Dunlop 
Pioneer InJI 

Ptacer PucHfc 

Sartos 
Southcorp 
Mfe sta roero 
WtemMt 
Westfield ... 
WestpacBKng 
Woe&ttoPei 
Wooonrrts 


1484 1483 
6J4 6J3 

374 3J0 

X10 3X8 

344 155 

1X2 1J3 

in 5.12 
*07 *15 

*94 *94 

8J2 X14 

X35 X35 

7X3 735 

9J2 9J2 
109 107 


Afla A 

Bowed B_ 
Cumae CPO 
OfroC 

EropMndEsna 

GpoQRwAl 

GpoBninbuna 

KmtOaihMac 

TOntoaCPO 

TeMieaL 


39.15 39.JS 3940 
16-64 16JB 16X0 
31.10 37.15 31.15 
9X8 9X8 1006 

4I-* 41-46 4X50 
46X0 4*40 4*70 
2*75 2885 2*75 
16250 16330 16X90 
10X00 10X00 10680 
1*36 1*40 1*54 


Sao Paulo BawsM fedB741178B 

Pmtansa.ll 


Taipei 


stock MoMtahtC 7119X7 

PmtoaE W*77 


BmdescoPU 

BMilMPM 

CtaitePM 

CESPPW 

Gopei 

Eutem 

RauDanmPfd 

UaMSenicias 


8X0 8X7 

590.00 5BOXO 
4B.50 39.10 
5170 #J0 
1300 12X0 


Asia Cement 
Camay Ufa ms 
amo rtwo 3k 
Ortaa Steel 
CNnaTrofl 


IMBIktewattcu: 1M7*00 
Fmtea;il4l&M 


isEr 


11830 11560 11000 114» 
3120 3020 3105 2990 

4050 3770 3980 3730 

1287 1258 1378 1253 

21S0Q 2DC0 20 900 26300 
1935 1851 19*0 1854 

10545 ioi4D rose how 
WOO 8710 0990 8685 


PM 

TdeOresPM 
Tetenlg 
Tutaj 
TetapPM 
UnBtaiCD 
CVRD PM 


442X0 438481 
351X0 348X0 
279X9 274X0 
119X0 174X0 
06X0 8480 
143X0 140X0 
SS1.CQ14M90 
238X0 230X0 
35.00 33X0 
2X10 21X0 


Far East Text 
Hist Bonk 
Formosa CF 
HuaiiNanS*: 

HnalanTdtaa 

ICBC 

PiwktentErt 

TahmaCenrt 

Tatung 


» 5050 
177 177 

168 172 

3SJS8 25.70 
52 5280 
54 54 

2820 30 

176 ISO 
4X40 42X0 
MS- 7-48 
2*10 2*50 
8350 84 


Tokyo 


KUa!22S:lffI8J? 
PmtoOR 17383*5 


32150 31550 31550 31500 


GaamesBetatea: 69984 
Profane 64889 


2 ^ 


sfetec 


7150 6915 
7670 7305 

9675 9300 

1225 1188 
2995 2490 
3150 30W 
15840 14650 
15190 14050 
11059 mo 
7300 7100 
4495 4350 

4235 4130 


7050 6920 
7414 7345- 
9600 9M0 

1224 1185 

253S 2530 
3130 3 m 

14800 14750 
14995 14950 
9990 9805 

7160 7100 
MBS 4315 
4220 4120 


Dooom 

Daewoo Heavy 
KJa Maters 
KmeoHPw 
Korea ExchBk 
Karoo Mob Tef 
L£ Sataam 
Potang ironSi 
SOOtswaEtec 
SUnhoaBank 


94500 85000 93000 87000 
5310 5110 5200 5220 

16600 15700 15800 16500 
27400 26900 27200 27)00 
9450 9010 9400 8950 

464000 446500 460000 447000 
19100 19000 19000 19000 
405D0 39SM 40200 4000S 
45000 42000 44000 42300 
11906 11500 11500 11800 


AsaMOtetn 

Asatri Glass 

BA Tokyo Otasu 

BkYokoharxi 

BiUBedone 

Canon 

CHbaBrok 


0U 990 1040 

810 741 805 

800 894 

619 5S7 m 

1040 1010 1030 

1970 1 870 1970 

665 £15 659 

2070 2000 2fl» 

2360 2300 2330 

745 687 730 

2280 2160 2240 


Singapore Strutt* Tiroes: 2232X8 

PlWkMS-2242J1 


Montreal 




Bob Molt Con 
CtaTlnA 
Cdn (MIA 
CTFMSk 


kbib; 




RoytriBkCdp 


43U 43 43 43fa 

21 JB 21X5 2120 21.15 
37.18 SB MM 
32*5 32X5 3X45 3X45 
17X6 17» 17-60 17*5 

21 VI 21.10 21.15 2U0 

m a« m sw 

3*60 34X5 34U 3*70 

2*80 8&JB 3*70 JO 

7i4J 1614 15-35 75J5 
m 1235 1335 13*5 
27M 27JS Z7X8 27V 
2X05 25 35 W5 

24JS 2*35 24» 2*40 

1045 1035 HUB 1049 
4W 48J0 49 48V 


GsreMsFac 
CByDevtts 
CicJeCOTlnoe 
Dbfey E=ronm' 


DBS Land 
fnstri Heave 
HKLoml* 
HMuLeoagAi 
Janjfeftesn 
JoniSWtegle 
Keppta 


351 346 

2J5 174 
6X8 £.91 


1023 10.11 

-- JOJ5 


OBXferies 56138 
Protons: 55*13 


— -toreta? 
OSeoUrionBk 
Sorimana 
StogAWnsF 
'p- Pertm 

PnmF 

ST Ante F 
ST Ship 
StogTefeeenffl 
5o*s Steam 
UMMdastrU 


1020 

1JS 1J5 
7X7 7X4 
7X9 8X2 

7X4 7JB 


Den dorm Bk 
SRarn 


*91 *11 

£ tz 

SM 558 
*» *56 
£32 5X6 
272 279 


HraenerAao 
Men* Hydra 
NoakeSksgA 




OridaAMA 
Petto GeoSrc 
5ap(r RtatoA 


147 148 146 

14B 1« 147 

2X5D 2X90 2X40 
26 3*40 2*30 
182 I®SJ8 106 
47 JD 4BJ0 47X0 
313 315 314 

35*58 339 3» 

196 196 199 

TO m 50 TO 
4S 477 472 

272 272 274 

126 12*50 13*58 


WfeflTatHdes 
'tsnaaubtx 


1M0 1090 
1X90 1X5B 
1*30 1433 
oxa axo 

9.10 9 

535 5J5 

1*10 1198 
2-89 3X6 

338 128 

*55 449 

3J0 3X6 

11 1080 
332 130 

1J1 1.19 
1830 17X0 
*40 *30 

UtS 7X5 
1X18 1X90 
M.T. N.T. 
2830 2490 
332 330 
1X8 1X7 

3J3 X16 
*50 *46 

1J0 1-19 

1*60 1*20 
*20 4.14 


I1J0 UJO 

HJO 1430 
181 0JO 
9-05 9.10 

530 5-40 

1*10 1*10 
2X6 Z90 

128 128 
445 455 
3X6 178 

1050 H 

132 334 

1.19 131 

78 1830 
*30 *40 

e bxs 

13 1X90 
N.T. 1.76 

27 2830 
130 136 
1X8 1X7 
120 120 
450 AM 
1.19 132 
1*50 14*0 
430 *18 


QwgakuEiec 

2200 

2110 

7980 

3130 


816 

774 

016 

778 


1450 

1280 

1440 

13W 

DcSwBank 

552 

SOU 

£51 

519 


1410 

1370 

1390 

1410 


998 

*40 

W> 

937 


wa 

2430 

2540 


Fame 

3570 

3280 

2500 

3330 


FMBortk 
RjB Photo 


Stoekhotm 


AGABF 10750 106 10650 105 

ABBAF 790 781 783 776 

AssIDromroF 18950 18*58 189 187 

AStIO AF 336 391 33X50 329 


Honda Motor 
IBJ 
■HI 
Itochu 

tto-Yokedo 

JAL 

Jwto 

Kojnta 

KmstaEtec 

KB0 

KawaSted 

KDD 

KkrtdNlppRy 

miSnwwr 

Koto Steel 

KoroatM 

Kubota 

Kyocera 

KratoaEtac 

LTCB 

Maruhenl 

Moral 

ManuEkClnd 

MmsoEtevn 

MtoutataM 

MBWAtaWOt 

Mnsahtohi El 

MBsabbM&d 

MltsubtahiHvy 

MtotoisMMei 

AWtotWstoTr 

Mtaal 

MKstaFWesa 
MBM Trust 


ISO I960 7550 
wn 3330 3640 

hos iaeo 1090 
1070 1040 1060 

3090 3000 3030 

1870 1696 7830 
459 438 459 

542 512 5£ 

5540 S390 5500 

565 534 SO 

3630 3M0 TOO 
731 SS7 737 
231® 2150 2290 
1300 1260 1290 
297 281 M? 

7460 7109 7460 
720 703 773 

1130 980 1106 

232 2* 230 

m 806 BM 

535 515 535 

7330 7100 7310 
350 7130 340 
560 492 549 

455 428 457 

1820 1740 1820 
MM 1740 t»B 
987 963 967 

1070 1010 1869 

352 328 3® 

685 643 67? 

1170 TWO ft" 
860 643 

B75 BS3 . 
1460 722P 1420 
880 850 880 

1090 1035 7880 

M9 400 792 


PAGE 13 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 
' • FTSE100 

J m x 
/- «oo-- fc /n 


m -/y~ 

zayy-- 

2 %Fon 

1396 


- mf 

- 3700 — 


Paris 
CAC40 • 

2325- - - 
2250 -'“I 
2175 M 

2100- f- 

m \fi[ ~~~ 

IffiO-. c n hi 


1997 

Monday 


a s o N D J 

1996 1997 


Amsterdam 

Brussels' 

Ftenfcfurt 


Hsfohttl 
Oslo • 
London”" 
Madrid 
MBan . 

Paris 

gtocMK^rT^ 
VietmQ “ 
Zurich 

Source: Tetekurs 


gQ£ 

BEL-20 ' 

DAX 

Stock Marker 
HEX General 
08X • • 

FTSE1QQ 
Stock Exchange 
MBTEL' •" 

CAC40 

SX16 

ATX 

3P\ ■ 


Monday Prev. % \ 

Close Close Change 

652.76 ' 646.89- -*Q-S4 

1,97&S6 1,9*5^ HST 
2SS4S6 2P33.3? -t-0.73 

4^.50 461,96 +},12 


2,66657 2,62069 +t.7&\ 


561J38 555.13 


4,107-30 4^58.30+155 
464.16 457.71 +\A\ 

' 17^76.00 11,418030 4^26 
g^6L27 Z&jTSq 
3L597.81 2^47-40. ^1-98 
1,167,43 1,130104 *3-31, 
2JS49JI . 2JS2&.61 

Initnuboittl HcnM Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Daimler-Benz AG sold its postal-automation unit to Siemens 
AG. Terms were not disclosed. 

• Metallgesellschaft AG will buy 49.99 percent of AGIV 
AG, a holding company with interests in machinery and 
construction, from BHF-Bank AG. The companies did not 
disclose the sale price. 

• Zurich Insurance Co. plans to buy the 34 percent it does not 
already own of Zurich Reinsurance Center Holdings Inc. for 
S323 million. 

• AO Lukoil Holding's pretax profit rose S.8 percent last year 
on higher production and sales, to 3.7 trillion rubles IS661 
million) from 3.4 trillion rubles in 1995. 

• Snecma of France, the state-owned aircraft-engine maker, 
expects to report a 1996 loss of less than 500 million francs ($94 
million), about half its 1995 loss. 

• Elf Aquitaine SA signed a 30-year contract with Azerbaijan 

to find and produce oil in the Caspian Sea. Bloomberg 


Sears to Sell Catalog Unit 


CrmpOed by Ow Staff Fm m Dupwchts 

LONDON — Sears PLC said Monday it would sell its 
Freemans mail-order catalog unit to Little woods Organization 
for £395 million ($663.7 million), a move viewed as an effort 
to shore up profit and margins. 

In an another apparent effort to assuage shareholders who 
have seen their investment in the company fall 5 percent in value 
in five years. Sears' chief executive, Liam Strong, promised to 
return £4] 0 million to investors in the form of special dividends 
or stock buybacks. But analysts said investors wanted more 
radical solutions, such as selling struggling British Shoe Corp. 
or spanning oft Selfridges, the company's star profit performer. 
Sears’ stock closed flat at 88 pence. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Hito Um data Pico. 


The Trib Index 


171 76*50 
77X0 77 


Jan. 1. 1992* 100. 


477 407 

229 224. 


1045 1010 

512 505 


310 303 

195J0 194 


20150 200 

277 268 


188 IBS-® 
145 144 

68X0 6*50 
186 IBS 
30*50 29*50 

158 157 
122 118-50 

9*50 95 

189.50 187-50 
153 ISO 

112 107 

159 156 


ABOrtaaorfeK 242X30 
P roteus 241840 


806 738 8X2 805 

BJ» 7.95 795 7X5 

18-40 1809 1831 1812 
3X2 3X8 3X8 3X0 

2335 2X80 2110 23X0 


World Index 
Ragionoi htdexos 
Asla/Padfb 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 
Industrial bwfena 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance 
Miscellaneous 
Raw Materials 
Service 
Utilities 


ex 

Loral 

Ototga 

Kcfwnga 

dosing prices. 

ymrUdatr 

149.68 

+1.30 

+0-88 

% change 
+1331 

117.18 

+2.89 

+2.53 

-12.72 

160.68 

+1.86 

+1.17 

+15.45 

167.40 

-0.43 

-0-26 

+3050 

122.11 

-0.49 

-0.40 

+37.14 

175.35 

+0.83 

+0.48 

+31.86 

161 64 


+0.57 

+17^2 

175.35 

-0.23 

-0.13 

+29.30 

113.11 

+2B1 

+2.55 

-11.10 

161.71 

+0.47 

+0-29 

+19.07 

17754 

+1.54 

+0.87 

+25.20 

137.73 

+0.18 

+0.13 

+14.77 

144.09 

+2.23 

+1.57 

+1^33 


Trie Mnmrtomr Herald Tribune Worm Stock Index G tracks Ote U S. dolor vaboe ol 


280 mtematlonaty invOBtable stocks trom 25 coutntes. For mom Information, a bee 
booklet to avaJoUeby wndng to Trie Trib Index, ret Avenue Criartas de GeuMe. 
92521 NeialyGedm. Frame. 


CcmpSed by Bkxmberg Buomese News. 


High Law 


MuratoMfe 

NEC 

WUaSoc 

Nhrterdo 

NIpoCiwflIM 

Nippon Paper 


3880 3760 
1400 1350 
825 750 


HfeA LOW i 

Naranda Inc 32* 31x0 

NoronEnagy 3116 31 JO 
Nfttan Tefecnif 9*35 9190 


Nippon Steel 
Nippon yiwm 
Nissan Malar 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 


8165 

7930 

BIN 

8040 

Nava 

13.15 

12.90 

12.95 

262 

221 

rift 

264 

Ones 

21ia 

23 

23 

73a 

677 

7J5 

646 

Pancdn Petti; 


S2U 

52* 

562 

546 

554 

552 

Petto Cda 

21 XS 

21 JO 

21 U 

528 

481 

43* 

514 

PtocwDome 

29 JO 

2890 

29 

302 

MB 

Ml 

277 

PocoPeUin 

14 

13X5 

13X0 

493 

475 

490 

479 

Fotes/iSas* 

119X0 

117 

719 


OtfafcruElRr 
OnoPharm 
Osaka Gas 
Rfcatt 
Sakata Bk 
Saniya 
Samar Bank 
Sonya Etec 
Secant 
ScOw Ray 
SeUsri House 
SewfrElewn 


685 637 603 

2» 22? 245 

1590 1510 1590 

8620a 8250a 85000 

?40 m 739 

674 637 668 

3200 3090 3200 

309 286 296 

7240 1250 

635 740 


ShtotfsuOl 

snfcuotaBk 

Sony 

Sumitomo 

SuwswioBk 

SutnBOtem 

SomiloaioElec 

Suratt MAd 

Sumil Trust 

rated 

Totetm Pnarm 
Tatada Cheat 
TDK 

rahoWBPwr 
Total Bank 
TtrtteMorine 
TttkyoQ Pwr 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyu 
Tooen 

Toppon Print 
Tarayind 
TttsMba 
Toyo Sdkan 
TOyo Trust 
Toyota Motor 
VQaialctriSec 
Vonsaaouda 
YowxtaFto 
Yaw do Trust 


3700 2M0 
1580 13* 

445 415 

6620 6300 

3750 3S30 

1140 1120 

6650 6550 

1580 1520 

796 714 

ano 2 mo 

139B 1010 

7390 7250 

938 BB5 
1570 1360 

415 393 

1610 1570 

2S9 245 

999 905 

55 B 510 
2620 2530 

2256 2140 

7220 7020 

2200 2140 

1W0 905 

1040 OTS 
2450 230!! 

305 292 

580 537 

1250 1166 

1380 1260 

670 642 

720 689 

2580 2390 

825 m 
3120 3020 

495 465 

2260 2210 
559 532 

4)5 380 


Renaissance 
PJa AJsom 
Rooms Camel B 
Seagram Co 
SlteUCda A 
Slone CattsoU 

SfffTCpr 

ToBsman Eny 

Ta*B 

Tnegtato 

Telus 

Thomson 

TorOomBanA 

TronusUa 

TraroUaPlpe 

TilmorkFinl 

TitzecHahn 

TVXGoto 

Westcoasi Eny 

Weston 


49XS 49.10 
3*4B 34 

27.90 27X0 
5« asa 
53 52-OS 
21-80 21-55 
62 5755 
495S 48 

30X0 30 

40J0 39J5 
2005 19.85 

29X0 29 

3*95 3*65 
1705 1*88 
23-65 23-30 
42*5 4X30 


Vienna 


Ausl Airfares 
BraiM/nGoeu 
Bmd Vets PM 
Cietabiwt PM 
EAXSenerall 
EVN 


LettanQ 

Leytam 
Mayi-Mefcihof 
OMV 
OcflBrau 
OeslEMartz 
VATech 
IMmertwoer 


30X0 

30 

33'* 

30-05 

iaio 

9.85 

ID 

9J5 

23.30 

23.15 

23to 

TM 

73 

71 

72 

7I» 


ATX todoc 11*7X3 


ProfeoR 114141 

1671 

1671 

1640 

1640 

693 

407 

482 

407 

688 

490 

£ 

SS3 

493 

496 478-20 

3200 

3074 

3165 

3000 

1707 

1642 

1490 

1647 

1481 

1481 

1475 

1475 

67290 

665 

666 

665 

273 

276 27120 27*50 

595.50 

540 

593 

SS7 

132*95 

784 

'ft 

1304 

7B4 

’I 


019,90 811.50 81930 8UJ0 
1760 17B5175X951695JO 

2100 2080 2084 2079 


Wellington NSE^iMeeaofUM 


Toronto 


TSEluashtah: 6181*2 
Ptovmu; 590*93 


AbtablPrta 
AtoartaEneiw 
Atom Alum 
Anleiwn EdD 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Hew Sadia 
Barit* Goto 
BCE 
BCTctooomm 
Mediae Ptarat 
BonbanUaB 
SrocanA 
Bro-kMhicnte 

r-wnyrl 

QBC 

CtkiNaORcd 
Cdn NOlRea 
UnOaUPet 
OnPOcak; 

Comifwj 

Deteeo 

Denim 
DonahueA 
Da Part CUBA 
EiHONOvMng 
FtattaxFto 
Fekonhddoc 
ftocherOtolA 
Franco Neaado 
GuHCdaRes 
ImpcrtUOk 

tots 
IPL 

IMilkm, 

Laewen Group 
MunUBIdl 
MoororJiMA 

Utellifi mi 

Afenr 

NewMOgeNd 


2X15 2314 

32*4 3X20 
4*45 48X0 

17.90 17.90 
4110 4110 
45.10 4405 
3*49 3620 
6*20 65X5 
29X0 29(4 

6714 6 TA 

244 2*30 
30X0 3*10 
21X5 2090 
57,if Sen 
5720 57-55 
5*80 5070 
38.15 38.15 
2*15 2X80 
35.95 3605 
35 35-20 
2SVfc 2660 
1X60 1X80 
2*30 26 h 
31 31 JO 
37J5 36IO 
299 299 

29J0 3*10 
2X20 22 V< 
57S0 56 

11.55 1185 
6380 63'A 

4JJ0 4515 
4080 
17X5 17X0 
5Q 50X0 
1*60 I *35 
?£# 7480 
13H un 
27-60 27-70 
45.10 4*10 


AlrNZeoklB XB5 XB3 X84 X83 

Siterfylmtl 134 133 133 133 

Carter HoHo to 336 339 3J0 336 

Farm 5J» *94 SjOO *95 

BsherPnytel 57! 5-M iZ5 5x0 

FCForea 234 233 234 233 

Goorimort Frier 1J1 1-79 1JS 731 

lnttep Non *98 *95 *95 *90 

U«t Nathan X5B 3-55 355 338 

Nat Gas note X27 234 227 234 

HZ defining 2930 2170 29J» 2*70 

TMBComNZ 7X8 7X2 7X3 7X7 

WHsan Honan 1135 1135 115S 1155 


Zurich 


spuodeto 25W31 
Frotoofc 252*61 


Adecco 8 
AMraubseR 
Aies-Sanu8 
Balalse Hdg R 
ABB 8 
BK Vision 
BabstB 
CSHOWIWSR 
EteHRMCntB 
Fiscnere 
HHBPC 
holderbat* B 
JuLBwHdgB 
Neta*R 
NworflsR 
QalkonR 
FageaaHMB 
FMrorVbnB 
PMOB 
RoOttiHrigPC 
5BCR 


375 

362 

375 

359 

1143 

1130 

1130 

112B 

1325 

7TO 

1315 

13)0 

2690 

2665 

2680 

2650 

1664 

1650 

I6S5 

1646 

735 

724 

725 

734 

1950 

1«0 

1«5 

1929 

13*50 13*50 13*75 

3*SD 

537 

535 

536 

536 


— » 

SMHB 
Softer R 
Swiss Rents r 
5wtasa0R 
UB5B 
VbteraHrigR 
HVMetatwR 
Zurich AssurR 


1436 1425 143S 1429 
905 892 895 891 

1010 TO2 1007 997 

1414 1402 1407 J4]2 
1456 1444 1452 1438 
1563 1550 1561 1541 
13825 13750 137J5 137J5 
1485 1465 1475 1475 
671 4M 620 417 

203 194 200 194 

10735 10640 10735 IO590 
252 248 24*25 251 

1485 1465 TOO 1444 

3360 3285 3290 2040 
871 863 864 tun 

040 835 838 _ 

1399 1390 1390 1387 
1154 1144 1146 1144 
1177 1149 1154 117D 
275 26*58 269 265 

m 777 m m 

366 36X50 36X50 36X50 




























































































































PAGE 15 


•' " ■»* ■■ -Wi.- 


•\ 


; *>-■ - -•’ 



X.- 


r; 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY \ 4, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


_ < 


‘Ha^ 


rt *m| 


k Packer Hits 
jackpot in 
Australian 
Casino Bid 


Cl" 1 "** 11 " — intnifiu 

AUStralia,S ****** 
mm, Keny Packer, wffl mid 340 
million dollars (,$264.2 idS«i)to 

<* Harbor 

tfsnio, toe companies involved said 
Monday. 

*** Packer's company. PubBsh- 
«>g & Broadcasting Life, said ft 
TOddpay 240 million dollars for 
Rowboat lot’s 85 percent stake in 
toe management of Sydney Harbor 
10 0 million dollars for a 10 
percent stake in the casino ^vf 
Showboat, a U.S. -based gaming 
company, has an option to sell Pub- 
lishing & Broadcasting another 10 
percent of the casino. 

■•Australia's Leighton Holdings 
Ltd. owns the remaning 15 percent 
management stake in the casino. 

Mr. Packer, whose own gambling 
sprees in Las Vegas and Loalon are 

legendary, had sought control of the 
only legal casino in Sydney for die 
past three years. In 1994, Mr. Packer 
led a consortium to bid for the 12- 
year Sydney casino license but lost 
dot to the Showboat-led consortium. 

Mr. Packer is the biggest indi- 
vidual investor in Australia's largest 
casino. Crown Ltd. in Melbourne. 

- Die stake in Sydney Harbor will 
give Mr. Packer a lucrative share in the 
revenue that crosses the casino’s 200 
tables and 1,500 poker machines. 

' Casinos will become a third plank 

fpr Publishing & Broadcasting, 
which owns Australia’s largest 
commercial-television network. 
Nine Network LtdL, and toe nation’s 
largest magazine publisher, Aus- 
tralian Consolidated Press. 

“I can’t see anything but positive 
news,” Steven Marsh at Legal & 
General Investment Management 
jsaidof the transaction, which is srib- 
yfct to government and regulatory 
approval. Publishing & Broadcasting 
shares closed at a record 6.40 dollars. 
— 30 cents. Sydney Harbor Casino 
is rose 29 cents, to 2,27- 
(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 


Stock Plunge: Tokyo Will Let It Slide 


Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — The government, which has 
sprat trillions of yen this decade propping up 
stocks, will mostly be staying cm the sidelines 
fro® now on, economists say. 

.. JaparTs need to drive down one of the world’s 
biggest fiscal deficits, conpled with doubts about 
toe b enefits of market intervention, will deter it 
from pumping money into equities or the overall 
economy, in the view of several economists. 

Tms .government ha-s finally come to die 
r eal j Tati On rhar if ic gnrng 3 / y>r tair > 

direction, intervening is actually counterpro- 
ductive,'' said Mioeko Sasaki -Smith, an econ- 
omist at Credit Suisse First Boston. ‘‘Tbey've 
accepted the notion that it is better to let the 
market seek its own bounds.” 

The Tokyo market’s benchmark Nikkei Stock 
Average lost IQ percent of its value in die year's 

first week of trading before rebounding about 5 
percent Monday, and it has fallen 15 percent 
since late November. 

With . equities tumbling, market-watchers 
began speculating that tire government would 
be forced to put together a large spending pack- 
age to keep the market from falling further. But 
toe Finance Ministry's three top officials have 
denied planning any such measure. 

M any investors and analysts said they would 
prefer that toe government avoid priming toe 
pump and. proceed with deregulating financial 
markets. Many are also waiting for Japan’s Par- 
liament to come up with substantial measures to 
lower corporate taxes and brokerage fees when it 


convenes next week. Prime Minister Rywaro Ha- 
sbimoto, aware that Japan’s high debt cripples its 
ability to finance long-term projects, now says 
cutting toe deficit is a top priority. 

Few investors expect toe government to put 
together another large stock-price support pack- 
age, saying officials now realize that soch mea- 
sures artificially inflate the market, leaving it 
subject to a fresh plunge later. 

“The government should stop pampering the 
market,’ r said Minora Maeda, a fond manager 
with Yamaicbi Investment Trust Management 
Co. He said he would rather see “some real 


Trade Surplus Shrinks 

Reuters 

TOKYO — The currem-account sur- 
plus dropped 15 percent in November from 
a year earlier, pushed down by a surge in 
spending by Japanese tourists abroad, the 
government reported Monday. 

Hie Finance Ministry said the surplus in 
the current account — the broadest mea- 
sure of a country’s trade — was 664 billion 
yen ($5.69 billion) for toe month. 

The trade surplus in goods slipped just 3 
percent in November from a year earlier, 
but a rise in the number of Japanese trav- 
eling abroad was one reason Japan’s de- 
ficit in services widened 27 percent 


progress that accelerates the cleanup of the bad- 
icon crisis.” 

The Finance Ministry estimates banks and 
other lenders have more than 30 trillion yen 
($257 billion) in bad loans remaining from the 
speculative bubble of the late 1980s. 

For its part the government says it wants 
private industry to pui its own house in order. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsuzuka said 
Japanese companies should make their own 
efforts to improve business and help lift the 
economy. Eisuke Sakakibara, head of the Fi- 
nance Ministry's International Finance Bureau, 
(old toe Mainichi Shimbun that the government 
should let market forces take their course. 

“At this stage, the sooner you let the market 
seek its bottom, the faster it will rebound.” Mrs. 
Sasaki-Smith of First Boston said. “In the long 
ran. toe market is going to go where investors 
feel is right.” 

Analysts said last week’s stock plunge re- 
inforced a defensive screak among investors in 
die Tokyo markets, with players increasingly 
looking for companies that would do well even 
if Japan's economy did not rebound. 

Defensive investing can involve buying shares 
in companies that make money abroad, or 
companies that sell products that even hard- 
pressed consumers will not cut from their budgets 
— fish, electricity and antibiotics, for example. 

Thai type of strategy has led Tokyo investors 
into auto exporters, supermarkets and electric 
companies, analysis said, while companies such 
as up-market retailers are being shunned. 


Fears of a ‘Meltdown’ in Japan Banks’ Shares 


By Floyd Noiris 

New York Times Service 


Can tire banks of one of the world's great 
industrial powers be brought to their knees by 
bad loans? Will most of them go broke? 

Such were the fears that drove U-S. stocks 
into toe ground in 1990 — and in the process 
created a great buying opportunity for those 
wining to take a chance on finding survivors. 

Now similar fears, after festering for years, 
are coming to a head in Japan. An index of 
Japanese bank shares fell 15 percent in toe final 
four days of last week, sending toe Nikkei 225 
stock average tumbling by 11 percent 
The Japanese bank static index was not ex- 
actly skybome before toe latest plunge, either 
Since the end of 1989. it has lost 61 peroral of its 
value. Hie bearish case on Japanese banks has 
not changed much in seven years. Most banks 
never ready cleaned up their balance sheets after 
the bubble economy burst at toe end of the 1980s. 


No one can be certain how many really bad loans 
there are, in part iwanw the commercial real- 
estate market has not been allowed to fall far 
enough to bring out any substantial number of 
willing buyers. Instead, toe government has 
stalled, hoping things would work out 
So far, they haven’t, and bears see blood. “I 
think we are much closer to a meltdown in 

Japanese financial assets nr>w than we have ever 

been,” Jeff Uscber, editor of Grant’s Asia 
Observer, said. 

The current question for the banks is one of 
ctqtftaL Japanese bank accounting is sufficiently 

r qpe tint it is not easy to know just how dire 
situation would be if they wrote off all then- 
bad loans, but die general suspicion is feat h 
would be very bad. One source of profits to add 
to ca pital — from selling stock toe banks own in 

stock marker *fells. Atf in fee UnfterTstaies in 
1990, toe banks’ problems are having an impact 
on die economy. A bank worried about its capital 


levels is not a bank eager to (end money, and the 
Japanese economy continues to limp along. 

Over toe past couple of years, Japanese banks 
raised billions of dollars in capital with a clever 
type of security that now appears to be coming 
back to haunt them. They sold convertible pre- 
ferred stock, largely to foreigners, on what 
looked like “can't lose” terms: The conversion 
rate would be reset if the stock fell, but not if ft 
rose. But one bank stock, Daiwa Bank Ltd., has 
fallen so far that even resetting the rate won't 
help, and others are down almost as much. 

Gary Rosenfdd of Rose Hill Capital Man- 
agement, who runs a hedge fund devoted to 
Japanese securities, said the plunge had left Jap- 
anese bank stocks oversold and likely to bounce 
back. Banking stocks did bounce bade Monday, 
rising more than 6 percent as a group, while the 
Nikkei average rose 815.14 points, or almost 5 
percent. “But fundamentally. I’m not sure if 
there is any real attraction” in banking stocks, 
Mr. Rosenfeld said. 


SOCCER: Going Public h Clubs’ Latest Craze 


•*ji l V;W 


Continued from Page 11 

erpooh Manchester, Leeds and ocher places 
joining toe pack. Five or six other teams, in- 
cluding Newcastle, are planning. stock sales, 
and new spocts investment groups arc cropping 
up. * ' • 

* “The other teams are waiting np,” said Guy 
Feld, a football analyst at UBS Securities Ltd. 
Mr. Feld said he wondered whether investor- 
owned teams would be this successful in toe 
United States, where fens' interests and loy- 
alties are divided among several big-league 

SP 0 ^ . ■ . 

But the risk may be greater in Britain. 
t Soccer teams drop in and out of toe Premier 
League depending cm their p erf orm ance. If 
they do badly, they are relegated to lower- 
level, and less lucrative, divisions, while an- 


- •. 

. . . ■- 

'• ■' . 




fils new been easra- 
to aubecribe and save rith our 
nwwhdi freenearice. 

Just caD ns today at 
0800437437 



other is elevated. The worst thing feat 
could happen to a soccer stock. Mr. Feld said, 
would be relegation — which would drastic- 
ally reduce television revenue. 

In the United Stoles, few teams are publicly 
traded. Shares in toe Florida "Panihers hockey 
team and the Boston Celtics in basketball are 
bought and sold on the stock market. A few 
other teams are publicly traded as part of the 
larger corporat i ons that own them, such as the 
Mighty Ducks, a hockey team owned by Walt 
Disney Co-, and the California Angels, a base- 
ball team that Disney controls and has a 25 
interest in. The U.S. National Football 
does not permit teams to issue stock. 
ipact going public will have on the 
field of play has yet to be determined, although 
some repents here say (hat Mr. Keegan’s resig- 
nation is one of the first effects. The Times 
reported that Mr. Keegan had planned oeq quit- 
ting for some time to puisne other interests, and 
bankers advising the team on its stock issue 
recently advised toe club (hat there was legal 
danger in felling to disclose Mr. Keegan’s 
plans in its craning prospectus, die inform- 
ational statement required when a company 
goes public. Khe intended to step down, he had 
to do so now, they reportedly told Mr. Keegan. 
He went — with no public explanation. 


Ceased by OwSa^f From OUpetcUa 

SEOUL — A French presidential envoy 
expressed regret Monday over the toiled at- 
tempt by Daewoo Electronics Co. last month 
to take over Thomson Multimedia of France 
and promised fair competition for the re- 

*Tt is regrettable that Daewoo^ectronics 
toiled to acquire Thomson Multimedia be- 
cause of the rejection by the Bench pri- 
vatization committee,” Jean-Claude Paye 
told toe foreign minister, Ryu Chong Ha. 

“There wifi be no'disenmination against 
South Korean firms in toe future privatization 
program in Ranee,” be said, explaining that the 
delayed sale of Thomson was unavoidable. 

Paris had recommended that the Thomson 
group, with interests in defense and digital 
television, be sold for a small amount to the 
Reach Lagardere Groupe, which was to pass 
Thomson Multimedia along to Daewoo. 

But after toe plan triggered protests in 
France, the privatization commission rejected 
it Dec. 4, mainly because of concern that 
strategic technology would be transferred to 


the South Korean company. Mr. Paye said 
France would welcome another bid by Dae- 
woo for Thomson, adding that the South 
Korean company would be the most favored 
competitor. Daewoo has not indicated wheth- 
er it will resubmit its bid. 

The special envoy, a member of France's 
state council far international affairs, arrived 
here early Monday to try to mend relations 
between South Korea and France. But the first 
day of his visit was marked by a demon- 
stration of about 20 elderly disabled men 
before the Flench Embassy. 

The men. some of them waving canes, 
yelled that Mr. Paye should have been * ‘thrown 
out of the country" as soon as he arrived. 

They blocked a diplomatic car carrying Mr. 
Paye and the French ambassador, Dominque 
Farreau, forcing toe two to enter and leave the 
embassy on foot. 

The connection between the demonstrators 
and South Korean-French relations was un- 
clear; they made a point of whispering to a 
diplomat that “no one sent us.” 

(AFP, Reuters) 


Investor’s Asia 



Hong Kong 

• ; :§feng Seng tw m#\ . 13,131^0 4o.74 

Sjpgafwro.. 

. %235L4D 2,2^31-0.44 

Ss MniSr.-t ' 

AS.Ortfowss -! 2,422^0 2.4iaS0 + 0.18 

tok&'rrT 



Er r^aa 


Brawl- 






Jakarta * 

CWtipQStefnctex . EB&m 657.87 • 4X27 

WeBogton' 

■ '= v 7 2,406.81 

: «cwtMgr 


Source: Tetekurs 

buenutioiut HeraW Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Taiwan awarded eight lucrative mobile-phone franchises to 
local consortiums, most of them paired with foreign minority 
partners. Far EastTone Group, a partnership with AT&T 
Corp., won the broadest access. 

• Texas lnstruments-Acer Inc* a computer-chip maker 48 
percent owned by Acer Inc., will post a fourth-quarter loss of 
about 500 million Taiwan dollars ($18.2 million) because of 
falling chip prices. 

• Chinese police seized more than 200,000 pirated or por- 
nographic goods in a- series of raids over the weekend, the 
official Xinhua news agency reprated. 

• PT Barilo Pacific Timber shares closed nearly 18 percent 
higher in Jakarta, at 1 ,825 rupiah (77 cents), on speculation the 
company may be the target of a buyout. 

• Thailand’s central bank pulled out of a planned rescue fund 
to bolster troubled property companies, but Finance Minister 
Amnuay Viravan said the fund would still be established. 

• Japan and the United States are likely to resume talks next 
month on opening the $6 billion market for air-cargo and 
passenger services between the two countries, officials said. 

• Autoways Holdings Bhd. of Malaysia agreed to buy a 70 
percent stake in Tanir Bavi Power Co_ an Indian company 
that won die rights to build and operate a $160 million 

Jn Kamataka state. Terms were not 
V? 1'. Reuters. Bloomberg, AFX. AP 



France Regrets Daewoo Flap 

Special Envoy TeUs Seoul New Bidding Will Be Fair 


In Japan, Scandal Sells 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — Scandal sells well in Japan, but it is also 
regarded as undignified by this generally polite society. So it 
was not surprising last week when Japan's leading daily 
newspapers virtually ignored the news feat Daiwa Bank Life’s 
former star bond trader in New York, Toshihide Iguchi, had 
written a book about the financial scandal that cost $1.1 billion 
over a dozen years. 

But despite the scant attention to Mr. Iguchi’s book, “The 
Confession." a buzz seems to be spreading in Tokyo's pub- 
lishing world. Bungei Shunju Ltd., the publisher, has already 
increased the first printing to 60,000 copies from 40,000. 


FIDELITY FRONTIER FUND 

Soci&6 dtnvestissemeni i Capital Variable 
Kansallis House - Place de fEtoile 
BJ*. 2174 L-J021 Luxembourg 
R.C. No B 20494 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

At die Annual General Meeting held on December 27. 1996. it was 
decided to pay a dividend of US5 0.10 (cemv) per share on or after 
January 24. 1997 to shareholder of record on January 2. 1997 and to 
holders of bearer shares upon presentation of coupon no 9 

Paying Agent: KREDIETBANK S.A. LUXEMBOURGEOISE 
43, Boulevard Royal 
L-2449 Luxembourg 


0 




INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 



OFFSHORE BANKS 
■ INSURANCE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
HIWGRATlONfPASSPORTS 
TRADtflNANCE 

ASTON CORPORATION 
TRUSTEES LTD _ 

tad, Dough*. Mi a* Urn 
T*0MM«881 
foe OT5M B2R28 

iadon T«t rm) mam 
He. (171) 233 1511 
M Ho. MlDROaalBpfaBJtt 


18 Pad 


OFFSHORE C0VPANES. fir 

dueorrticB Teh London 44 161 741 

12M FK 44 tffl 748 BWBSSB 
MHJppMOUAl* 


Business Sendees 


GENEVA 

SWITZERLAND 

Rd Service 

is oar Business 

■htrrfwfhvwfjara 

• ttflxK, tefepere, ufat ml 

Utmie sums . , 

■ Tan&aon a nd wM iunos 

i ft i torifan d ate an i fawfo 


- — ! **1 nrtasnea 
moms iordalir oc noaHy rertal 

Ful corftfena and tfcnrton wand. 

BUSMESS ADVISORY 

SERVICES SA 
7 dm liny, 1207 GSKVA 
W7»06«fftrt382Z.Fax7W0li94 


YOUR OFHCE II UJHMtf TJ _ 
Bnd Sot* - Ufl PfrW Fatjeta 
l5r44 17t«fl 9IBB W 171 ■« 7517 


Kallback 

Offers 

Lowest Rates 
Ever! 

Enjoy ran mater savings on 
inemaQntsl cut Benefit from the 
some low talas attain a day. We 
secura tho cfauoti aod most retdb 
fines. Use Katoack from tame. Ml 
or Web and eave. 

Cri now nd save sue tochyl 

TM1-20MBMGOO 

F&1-2SH&6666 

Unas opn 2* tan. 

Aflfirts ngdriss wtoon*! 



-*417 Snni A mu West 
SMfe, WA 68*19 USA 


Capital Avertable 


COHMSKtAUBUSnESS FINANCE 
avriaUa hr any waWe prajacb urtf- 
wh. Fu Msf syottls ta Bnfeh to 
.CQqxnta Athens, (#4-1273^1300. 


Financial Services 


FUNDING PR0BL3IS? 

VBITURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL STATE 


Long tern) i 
Sypxted Gwramses 
eamad any upon Finfcg) 
mnfees to secure Mg 
tor vtotte jmjecB snangad by; 


BANCOR 


OF ASIA 


let' 


’HM94 

IBM® 


Bates CunrtiSBlon Assued 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Portugal 


meULVatnCtBpeaksb 

for sale. Tel- BRUSSELS 
7074446 


Switzerland 


□ BLAIS 

msz 


mam&m 

orsknasafitabad 

idhByahica 1976; 

Ateaflvs pspgta h MQ WTBBJ X 
VEVEY, WLLARS, DIABLBETS, 
CnuSHONTANA, etc. I to 5 had 
recss, Sfc 2W to as rio 
REV AC 

S, uoaarfisrt CHBl Smew 2 
Til 4132734 15 4D for 73* 12 29 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Paris Area Furnished 


AT HOVE it puts 
PARIS PR0H0 

Apadmms to iW fvnfeted or nd. 
Seles l Property Mamganem Services. 
SAv Hods TOTBPans FrOMSUOZO 

Teb 433 (0)1 45 63 25 60 


AGENCE CHAUPS ELYSEES 


Riristad Bjasoeres, 3 mortfB or itm 
er urtaitoftad, resdBrttt etes. 


Tel: 433 
Bee fS 


42 25 32 25 

45097 09 


5Sl 0WET 3-fiOOV FLAT, GO sqjn. 
US$3,000 math ret 6 months /*. Peris 
014354 G994 JCaneda +1 BT3-234-682S 


Paris Ana Unfurnished 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tet +33 (0)1 47^03005 


Employment 


Genera) Positions Wanted 


LADY 52, NATUKMHBWIST, mu* 
Ingusi. &penenc£ neurato®, pressure 
teapy.aioreaehpreUens.sBdksposr- 
BOT ett tawirs paws needm me* 
to astern Tot *33 i 40$ 3178 


Educational Positions Available 


ENGLISH FOR EUROPEAN BUSMESS 
saeta Eng&i language trainers, wrth 
KacMngfl>usintt& experience- 10 to 25 
ivusl moL at ran French angaries 
C* rawed Tet Pans 01 40 7J 38 26. 
Far 01 40 71 63 <6. 


TEACHERS WANTED - Very experi- 
enced American TEFL aechet reotared 
to train a French Cosiness eonsuOam 
iriti itirimri EnQBsti to negotiate to En- 
gfciL Most watts 3 tines 11 12 hout 
nwnngs tor approximately G months. 
Paris iBBi please tax CV endtor pnpo- 
sixr ta *3} Ml WM05 49L 


Internationa] 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


SWITZERLAND 


YOUR FAST TRACK 
TO AN EXCITING 
INTERNATIONAL 
CAREER 

■ 1-2 yr Qiploma progr.irr./r.sr. 
• University Degrc-? tr.-.r.stors 

Oiliciat !ATA Travel courses 

■ Major companies recruit 


mu hwwwj 

HOSTA 
Hotel & Tourism 

School 


issjb) L£ysin. Switzerland 

tel 4 l Z 44 S 3 1717 f.ix J 1 21 <53 1727 
c nv'i I : ho stri .I’.v orl -c c*m . eh 


Attention MZFL 

Teachers 

[Jbr krformaboa regarding our 1996 - 97 J 
“Nc i r ipw g in the Uasroa 
m&Lenab plea* contact 


Brralh^S5L5ribgtf 


Iti Avenue I . 

92521 N daily Cede* - France 
TeLr S3 lit 43 94 39 

Fau 53 I 41 43 9226 

E-maibekvean@rhL30ffl 


FRANCE 


waLroguB^t 

TaaeWng' 



i 


^ Ttanslsfon 


wmCU&SX 
. . Exchanges. 

MpPubas^ng 

i ■ / ■ * Z * •; 

fimm 1teV8t 






14 


i CreMtryOSbcnour 


rEvwy-day . 
fromlO 

.. ^JPof^ttvRaobri 

. TRADEtWr 
.. WKkmfev ter JJWUMPf 
. , " a3t>ajn,OOp»i. 


Fin antranc* 
4m laKBoaga 

































PAGE 16 







































































































































































PAGE 18 


^ KcralbS^rtbune 

Sports 


TUESDAY, JANL'ARV U, 1997 


World Roundup 


Lions Hire Ross 

FOOTBALL Bobby Ross, who 
guided ihe San Diego Chargers to 
the Super Bow i two years ago, was 
named the new head coach of the 
Detroit Lions on Monday. 

Terms were not disclosed, but 
Ross has reportedly agreed to a 
five-year. $7.5 million contract. 

Ross, who resigned as coach of 
the Chargers over what was termed 
“philosophical differences” with 
general manager Bobby Beathard. 
replaces Wayne Fonles. who was 
fired after the season. (Reuters) 

Woman Wins Dakar Stage 

rallying Juna Kleinschmidt 
made Dakar Rally history Monday 
when she became the first woman 
to win a stage. 

The German, driving a Buggy, 
took advantage of the struggle be- 
tween Mitsubishi's leading trio of 
drivers to win the 3 15-kilometer 
<ly5-mile) ninth section between 
Agadez and Oclan in Niger. 

Kleinschmidt poses no threat for 
the Mitsubishi in the overall stand- 
ings. She lies sixth overall. 414 hours 
behind leader Jean-Pierre Fomenay. 

The Frenchman took first place 
from Mitsubishi teammate Kenjiro 
Shinozuka of Japan by 17 seconds. 
Fellow Frenchman Bruno Saby was 
third, eight minutes six seconds be- 
hind Fcntenay. (Reuters) 

Uuser Faces Charges 

The United States Forest Ser- 
vice's plan to prosecute Bobby Un- 
ser. tire motor racing driver, for en- 
tering protected wilderness land on 
his snow mobile when he got lost for 
two days in a blizzard in December 
have caused waves in Washington. 

Senator Lam - Craig asked the 
chief of the Forest "Service on 
Monday to explain why Unser is 
being prosecuted. “The'inconceiv- 
abie "nature of this action begs an 
explanation.” said Craig, chairman 
of the Senate Energy and Natural 
Resources subcommittee on 
forests, in a letter to Mike Dombeck 
of the Forest Service. 

Unser said he was unsure, but he 
might have strayed a quarter-mile 
or half-mile into Colorado's South 
San Juan Wilderness on Dec. 20 
while snowmobiling with a friend, 
Roben Gavton. "There's no signs 
up there that say this is a wilder- 
ness." Unser said. 

The two became lost in a blizzard 
for two days after their snowmobile 
broke down in the national forest. 

The Forest Service said Unser 
was cited tor violating the Wilder- 
ness Act. which prohibits motorized 
vehicles like snowmobiles in pro- 
tected wilderness areas. He could 
face up to six months in jail and a 
$5,000 fine, if convicted- (AP) 

Baby in Charge 

SOCCER The owner of a Ro- 
manian district soccer team has ap- 
pointed his six-month-old son as 
club manager and player, a local 
newspaper reported Monday. 

The daily Sportul Romanesc said 
Aurel Rusu. owner of the Sadcom 
team in the eastern village of Car- 
agele. wanted his son Lucian to be- 
come "a great soccer player so I 
decided to introduce him early into 
sports.” (AP) 


Patriots and Packers Head for Super Bowl Showdown 

New England Stops Jaguars 
To Bring AFC Title to Parcelh 



By Leonard Shapiro 

Washington Post Service 


Wilic^lliiiiflTiiiii n 

The Patriots' running back Curtis Martin breaking away from the Jaguars' John Jurkovic in AFC title game. 


FOXBORO, Massach ussetts — The 
New England Patriots found another 
way to win despite the whipping wind 
and numbing cold, and their persever- 
ance ended with a 20-6 victory over the 
Jacksonville Jaguars at Foxboro Sta- 
dium for only the second American 
Football Conference championship in 
the franchise’s 37-year history. 

The triumph Sunday was mostly se- 
cured when the man they call “Big 
Play” — free safety Willie Clay — 
made the largest interception of his life, 
one of two turnovers in the final four 
minutes that ended a dream season for 
the second-year Jaguars. 

“We’re going to the show, dial’s 
right.” said Bill Parcells, the Patriots' 
coach. They are going to New Orleans to 
face the Green Bay Packets in Super 
Bowl XXXI on Jan. 26. 

If the Patriots win the Super BowL 
Parcells will become the first coach in 
National Football League history to won 
that game with two different teams. 
Parcells took the New York Giants to 
the summit in 1986 and 1990. 

New England prevailed Sunday 
mostly because of its defense and spe- 
cial teams, and despite an 11 -minute 


In NFC, Green Bay Overpowers Panthers, 30 - 13 


By Richard Justice 

Washington Post Service 


GREEN BAY. Wisconsin — Sur- 
rounded by reminders of their cham- 
pionship heritage, haunted by their re- 
cent playoff failures, the Green Bay 
Packers ended 29 years of frustration by 
returning to the only game that would 
please the great Lombardi. 

These Packers hear about Vince 
Lombardi almost every’ day. They drive 
streets bearing his name, they are con- 
stantly reminded of his accomplish- 
ments and they live in a city where his 
former players are still legends. 

On Sunday afternoon, these Packers 


moved to the threshold of winning a 
Lombardi Trophy of their own by de- 
feating the overmatched Carolina Pan- 
thers. 30-13, in the National Football 
Conference championship game. 

A roaring sellout crowd of 60,216 
filled the parking lots at Lam beau Field 
three hours before kickoff and stayed 
late, shrugging off the cold just as their 
beloved Packers shrugged off the 
second-year Panthers. 

Inside the Green Bay locker room, the 
celebration was decidedly low-key as 
players hurried home to watch the New 
England Patriots win the American Foot- 
ball Conference championship game. 
20-6. over the Jacksonville Jaguars. 


Again and again, the Packers reminded 
anyone who would listen that their mis- 
sion won’t be complete unless they win 
Super Bowl XXXI — and the Lombardi 
Trophy — on Jan. 26 in New Orleans. 

“It has been a fun ride,” the Packers' 
quarterback, Brett Favre. said. “It’s not 
over yeL" 

The Packers chopped up the National 
Football League's second-best defense 
for a team playoff-record 479 yards, 
including 201 on the ground. They con- 
trolled the ball for 38 minutes. They 
scored on six of seven possessions after 
a shaky start 

Green Bay's running back Dorsey 
Levens finished the game with 205 


Seikaly Leads Magic Over the Raptors, 88-85 


The iXssociated Press 

Rony Seikaly scored 21 points and 
got 17 rebounds to help the Orlando 
Magic end an eight-game, road losing 
streak with an 88-85 victory in 
Toronto. 

It was the second time this season 
Seikaly has shone against the Raptors. 
On Jan. 2. he scored all of Orlando’s six 

points in overtime, including die game- 
winning basket in the final second. 

Seikaly and Horace Grant, who 
scored 22 points and had 1 1 rebounds, 
kept the Magic in the game through 
three quarters, providing numerous 
second-chance points by outdueling 
Popeye Jones and company under the 
basket 

Seikaly had 11 points aod 10 re- 
bounds in the first half while Grant had 


1 4 points through two quarters, keeping 
the Magic withm striking distance until 
Anfemee Hardaway, who scored 10 of 
his 16 points in the fourth quarter, could 
find his rhythm. 

The Raptors, coming off consecutive 
victories, led by 13 points with less than 
two minutes to play in the third quarter 
when Brian Shaw’s 3-pointer sparked a 
17-2 run that ended with the Magic 
going ahead on Seikaly’s field goal. 

The lead changed hands several times 
before Darrell Armstrong’s 10-foot 
jumper put the Magic up 82-80 with 
2:30 to play. Carlos Rogers tied it with a 
short hook before Seikaly 's field goal 
put the Magic ahead, 85-83, with 1:02 
remaining. Seikaly then made the 
second of two free throws for an 86-83 
lead with 22 seconds to play. 

Damon Stoudamire had 1 9 points and 
a season-high 14 assists for Tomoto, 
and Jones had 13 points and 10 re- 


bounds. 

Toronto went 1 8-of-30 from tbe free- 
throw line, including an 0-for-6 stretch 
in the fourth quarter. 

Bucks l-ii, wa m ora 93 Ray Allen 
scored 22 points and Vin Baker had 17 
points ana 12 rebounds for the Bucks, 
who led, 79-66, after three quarters and 
scored the first five points of the final 
quarter. Latrell SpreweLl Jed the War- 
riors with 21 points. 

Golden State's Mark Price became 
the 201st player in National Basketball 
Association history to score 10,000 
points when be made a lay-up with 1 :36 
left in the first period, his first points of 
the game. 

Hornets 97, Kings 93 Glen Rice and 
Anthony Mason each scored five points 
in Charlotte's 14-4 run that gave it a 90- 
85 lead with 2:47 to play. 

Rice finished with 26 points and Ma- 
son added 24 points and 1 1 rebounds. 


combined yards. He set up the Packers’ 
first touchdown with a 35 -yard run and 
scored it by catching a 29-yard pass 
from Favre. 

Late in die third quarter. Levens 
turned a screen pass into a 66-yard play 
to set up tbe touchdown that gave the 
Packers a 27-13 lead. For most of his 
three seasons, he has been Edgar Ben- 
nett’s anxious backup. On Sunday, he 
was a star. 

“He was special in a special game.” 
the Packers' coach. Mite Holmgren, 
said. “You need performances like that 
in a game like this. He had a phe- 
nomenal game.” 

Levens finished with 88 rushing 
yards and 117 receiving yards. Bennett 
ran for 99 more. And Favre, the NFL’s 
most valuable player The : past two sea- ' 
sons, played at a championship level in 
throwing two touchdown passes and 
helping the Packers convert 9 of 17 
third-down plays. 

Everything else belonged to the NFL’s 
best defense. With mammoth nose tackle 
Gilbert Brown stuffing the middle, Green 
Bay allowed Carolina 45 rushing yards 
and one drive longer than 42 yards. 

‘ ‘They played at a different level than 
we did today.” Carolina’s quarterback, 
Kerry Collins, said. 

At die beginning, there were two ques- 
tions: Would the new sod hold up? What 
would be the impact of the weather? 

Neither the tun nor the weather made 
a difference. The sod was installed after 
the field was chewed up in a driving 
rainstorm during the Packers* playoff 
victory over the San Francisco 49ers last ■ 
week. 

Temperatures hovered between 3 and 
10 degrees Fahrenheit (minus- 16 and 
minus- 12 centigrade). There was no 
snow and only a bit of wind. 

The Panthers' coach, Dom Capers, 
said, “The weather was not a factor. 


halt in play because of a power outage 
that dimmed the stadium s lights mid-, 
way through the second quarter. “ 

The Patnots forced four mm overs that 
led to 17 points, including Otis Smith s 
47-yard finable return for the last touchy 
down and a 1 4-point lead with 2 minutes. 
24 seconds remaining in the game. 

“I was coming in to make a routine 
play and one of my teammates knocked, 
the ball ouL’ ' said Smith, who was signed 
by the Patriots after the New York Jets cut- 
him four games into tbe season. “I was 
just fortunate enough to get the ball.’ 

Clay led the Patriots with four in- 
terceptions this season. He got his fifth 
at precisely the right time, with the Jag-f 
uars driving toward a potential game-/ 
tying touchdown and facing a second 
and goal at the Patriots 5-yaro line. 

The Jaguars’ quarterback. Mark 
Brunei!, was aiming for right end Derek 
Brown in front of him toward the back 
of the end zone, but Clay left the re-, 
ceiver he initially had been covering an$ 
stepped in front of Brown and made the 
interception with 3:43 to play. . 

“Aw man. it was a big play,” said 
Clay, an offseason free-agem acquisi- 
tion from the Detroit Lions. “Otis andf 
were in a double coverage on No. 82.” 
receiver Jimmy Smith. “I saw the quar- 
terback look over. I just stepped in 
front” 

Once again, the Patriots* defense 
stepped up its play. It has been playing 
decently since the Denver Broncos em- 
barrassed the Patriots, 34-8, in Foxboro 
on Nov. 17. So far in the playoffs ti* 
Patriots have allowed only three field 
goals, and have not yielded a touchdown 
in 10 quarters. Lr 

Many of the Jaguars took the fiel£ 
wearing short-sleeved jerseys, despite' 
temperatures in the mid-20s Fahrenheit 
(-7 centigrade) at kickoff, winds of 30 
miles per hour (48 kilometers per hour! 
and a wind-chill of zero. • 7; 

The Jaguars were chilled in the open- 
ing minutes of the game by a disastrous 
sequence on their first attempted puntl 
Alter the Patriots forced Jacksonville to 
kick following their first three play? 
from scrimmage. Rich Griffith un- 
leashed a high snap. 

Punter Bryan Baiter jumped to catch 
tbe ball. By the time his feet hit die 
ground. New England’s rusher. Larry 
Wlrigham. had beaterr tbeblock "of Dari; 

U and was on to Barker, who 


ren 


was tackled at the Jaguars’ 4-yard line; ' 
Two plays and 45 seconds later. New’ 
England running back Curtis Martin 
crashed into the end zone from a yard out 
The Patriots had a 7-0 lead less than 21* 
minutes into the game, and Martin had 
scored in his 15th straight home game. ^ 
The Patriots were on the move again 
late in the quarter, with a first down at 
the Jaguars 19. But quarterback Drtriy <, 
Bledsoe inexplicably threw a pass to- 
ward a well-covered tight end. Bed 
Coates. Tbe ball was tipped by line^ 
backer Tom McManus and intercepted 
by comerback Aaron Beasley. The Jag* - 
uars took over at their 23, and beg ah 
driving nicely in the opposite direction. 

With Brunell aiming often at tight 
end Pete Mitchell, Jacksonville moved 
62 yards before stalling when Brunei, 
bad to throw tbe ball away on third dowp 
under a heavy rush from linebacker 
Chris Slade. Mite Hollis tucked a 32- 
yard field goal just inside the right up- 
right, cutting the Patriots' lead to 7*3 
with 10 33 left in the first half. « 


Scoreboard 


NFL PLAYOFFS 

GOHFEHMCe CHAMPIONSHIPS 

SUNDAY RESULTS 
Green Boy 30, Carolina 13 
Men England JO, Jacksonville A: 

SUPER BOWL 

SUNDAY. JAN. SB AT NEW ORLEANS 
Green Bay vs. New England, 6:18 DjilEST 


NBA Stampings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
ATLANTIC DIVISION 



w 

L 

p« 

GB 

Nwj York 

76 

9 

.743 



rjWonO 

25 

10 

.714 

1 

Wtashlngtor 

19 

15 

-559 

64 

‘Jriamio 

13 

18 

.419 

11 

New Jersey 

9 

23 

-281 

15V; 

Boston 

8 

25 

■242 

17 

PhiladeipNa 

8 

26 

.235 

17U, 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



CM CO 1)0 

31 

4 

■88fc 

_ 

Dstrofl 

26 

e 

.745 

4'i 

Allotua 

21 

li 

4S6 

B'9 


Clevekind ' 

21 

13 

.618 

9”. 

Charlotte 

19 

16 

60 

12 

Milwaukee 

18 

17 

514 

13 

Indiana 

16 

17 

-485 

14 

Toronto 

12 

23 

J43 

19 

WHim COHFSMIta 


1BDWEST DIVISION 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Haisnn 

27 

9 

J5C 

— 

Utah 

23 

12 

.657 

3'/. 

Minnesota 

16 

19 

,457 

1016 

Dallas 

12 

2D 

J75 

13 

San Antonio 

9 

25 

265 

17 

Denver 

9 

26 

.257 

17*A 

Vancouver 

7 

29 

.194 

20 


PA one DIVISION 



LA Lakers 

27 

10 

J30 

— 

Seattle 

26 

11 

.703 

1 

Portland 

19 

16 

■543 

7 

Sacramento 

15 

22 

.405 

12 

LA CRppera 

14 

71 

M0 

12 

Golden Stale 

13 

21 

332 

12 1 * 

Phoenix 

11 

24 

J14 

15 

minmv's nssurs 


Ortando 

27 

15 

22 24- 88 

Toronto 

26 

22 

23 14— 85 






MEMORABLE MOMENTS 
FROM JOHNNIE WALKER: 

RYDER CUP WITH 
BERNARD GALLAGHER 

Every Monday from January 20 


^^dvptltsernenl 


G.Sj Sprewd 7-IA S - 6 31. Smith B-16 2-2 
lft ten A8en 9-20 2-2 22. Bader 6-14 5-7 
1 ? . Rebouxb — Golden Slate 38 (Smith 7], 
Milwaukee 60 (Baker 121. Assist*— Golden 
Stale 20 (Sprewefl 6), MBwaukee so (Perry, 
Allen 6). 

Charlotte 25 20 24 28-97 

SuuawMtU 23 23 26 21—93 

C race 7- IB 9-10 26. Mason 10-16 «MS 
Abdul- Rout 10-18 041 22, WWomsan 8-15 2-2 
IB. Rebmds— Qratofle 51 (Dtvac 19, 
Sacramento 43 (AlSmffli 14). 
AssMs-Chartolte 18 (Bogues 11), 
Sacramento 23 (Richmond 5). 

The AP Top 25 


The top 25 letuTNL InTha Aam 


■dPn 


college beetatbefl pail, wtti flrat-place 
vMM In pareaUma*, records throusti Jan. 
12. toed point* bond on 25 potott lor ■ tint- 
place vota through ora point lor ■ 2SUv 
|daoo vote, and taM waafe lanidng: 


O: Grant 9-14 4-5 22, Seftoty 9-19 3-6 21; T: 
Williams 8-19 3-5 22. Stoudamire 5-16 7-S 19. 
Rebounds— Ortando 58 (Seiko If 1 7), Toronto 
55 (Janes 10). Assists— Orton da 19 
(Anderson 7), Toronto 26 (Stoudamire 14). 
GoklM Stole 22 25 19 27—93 

29 22 28 32—111 



Record 

Pis 

Prv 

l. Kanos (57) 

160 

1,761 

1 

1 Wake Forest (14) 

12-0 

1,718 

2 

1 demson 

14-1 

1,582 

5 

4dndnna1i 

11-2 

1,507 

6 

5. Kentucky 

142 

1,435 

3 

t. Arizona 

10-2 

1,393 

7 

7. AUmesoto 

161 

1,362 

n 

ft Iowa St. 

11-1 

1316 

4 

9. Utah 

10-2 

1,251 

9 

10. LDutevMe 

161 

1,119 

14 

11. Maryland 

14-1 

899 

19 

1Z New Matt 

162 

8S5 

18 

13. Duke 

11-4 

BI3 

10 

14 Xavier, Ohio 

11-1 

784 

12 

15- Stanford 

10-2 

723 

21 

16- VHIonova 

12-3 

698 

8 

17. Indiana 

14-3 

671 

15 

18. Michigan 

11-4 

515 

16 

19. Boston Crtege 

T0-2 

«A 

23 

20. Mississippi 

11-3 

393 

— 

21. Georgia 

162 

373 

24 

22. North Carolina 

9-4 

275 

13 

23. Texas 

B-4 

247 

22 

24. Oregon 

10-2 

177 

17 

25. Terns Tech 

163 

169 

20 


l. Kansas (164)) beat No. 22 Teas 8661; 
beat Niagara 134-73 beat Baylor 87-68. 2. 
wate Forest (124JJ beat Georgia Tech 766S 
beat No. 10 Duka 81-69. X Kentucky 04-2} 
beat Mississippi Slate 90-61; beat Conlslus 
68*4& lost to Mlislssippl 7669. 4. torn State 


01-1) lost to Marquette 67-6* beat OUo- 
homa 82-55. 5. damson 04-1) beat No. 10 
Duke 86-82, OT; beat Florida Slate 76-70. 

6. dndnnafl 01-2) beat Alabama- Birm- 
ingham 74-54; beat Miami Ohio 91-61. 7. 
Arizona 00-2) beat Arizona Stale 92-84. 8. 
VUanora 02-3) tost to Providence 91-68; 
beat Oral Roberts 64-44; last to Miami 61-59. 
9. Utah 0 0-2) beat Brtgham Young 61 -51 . 10. 
Duke 01 -4) tost to Na 5 demson 86-82, OT; 
tost to Na 2 Woke Forest 81-69. 

11. Minnesota n5-l)beatNo.l5tadtona96- 
91, OT; beat Na 16 Michigan 70-64. 1 2. Xartec 
Ohio 01-1) last to Dayton 98-91; beat Ford- 
bran 75-64. 13. North Carolina (9-4) last to Na 
19 Maryland BS-7S last to VfrgMa 7563. 14. 
LoutorfHe 03-1) beat North CaroBna Charlotte 
92-81; beat Georgia Teen 60-56. 15. todkew 
04-3) last la Na. 7 1 Minnesota 96-91. OT. 

16-MlcMgon 01-4) beat No.25 I Knob 88- 
74,- lost to No. 11 Minnesota 70-64. 17. Ore- 
gon 00-2) last to Washington State 81-76; 
lost to Washington 78-77. Ift New Mexico 
03-2) beat Texas Christian 79*64; beat 
Southern Methodist 78-58. IV. Maryland 
(14-1) beat Na. 13 Norm Carolina 85-75; 
beat North Carolina state 68-59. 20. Texas 
Tech 00-3) beat Oklahoma State 73-44; last . 
to Colorado 80-73. 

Zl. Stanford (10-2) best UCLA 10941; beat 
Southern Cal 8570.22. Teas tM> lost to Na 1 
Kansas 86-41; beat Kansas State 104-63. 23. 
Boston CaHege 00-2) beat Syracuse 94-ffit 
beat Notre Dome 73-61. 24. Georgia 02-Z) 
beat Voldemar 61-51 2ft iStaots 05M) bsMo 
Na 16 Michigan 88-74 beat Perm State 85- 
70. 


HOCKEY 


NHL SmMMNOS 


PAOFffi OVtStON 


OOm receiving vales: Iowa 92 Colorado 
90, Marquette 74 Connecticut 6& lands 65, 
Virginia 3S. Praridenca 32 Pacific 30, Cofl- of 
OnrWtan 1& E. Michigan ft Florida St ft 
Arkansas 7, Alabama 4 New Orleans 4 
Rhode Island 4 Tutto 5, Texas Clutsllan 4 
West Virginia 4 Fresno 51 1 Hawaii 2 
Tutane 2 UCLA 2 Princeton 1, SW Missouri 
St.l. 

Top 25 ComaK Results 

Hner the top 36 tesme In The A seoc h d c d 
Ptom* coOsge b os haUNrit poo tarad Inst 


PhRodalpnta 
Florida 
N.Y. Rangers 

New Jersey 

Washington 
Tempo Boy 
N.Y. Handera 


Pittsburgh 

Buffalo 

Montreal 

Hartford 

Boston 

Ottawa 


DaBas 

Detroit 

Phoenix 

St. Louts 

Chicago 

Toronto 



6F GA 
144 109 
124 96 

159 128 
1D9 108 
114 113 
134 IK 
lt» 127 

&F GA 
161 13S 
130 120 
146 152 
128 141 
124 1S3 
110 124 


CENTRAL OV»ON 


W L 
26 16 
21 IS 
19 21 
19 22 
17 21 
17 26 


PH CP GA 

51 127 107 
49 134 98 
42 120 141 
42 177 146 
42 121 125 
34 130 153 


Cotorado 

Edmonton 

Vancouver 

Anaheim 

Calgary 

Las Angeles 

San Jose 


W L 
26 10 
20 21 
20 21 
17 21 
16 23 
16 23 
15 22 


PIS GE GA 

60 isa ioi 

44 145 136 
41 133 142 
39 124 132 
37 110 130 
36 118 144 
35 107 731 


Final scores Sunday of Ore ratn-shartened 
$1.2 mJtoon Mercedes ChcmpiOTShipj on tt>« 
7.022- yard, par-72 La Casta Resort and Spa 
course at Carlsbad. CaHL. Sundays fourth 
round was cancelled due to ndn fewer m 

And hole of sudden-death playoff): 


a- Tiger Woods 
Tom Lehman 
Gw Boros 
PaulGoydas 
Prod Couples 
Store Jones 
Darts Lore III 

John Cook 
Corey Pnvtn 

Jkn Furyk 


70-67-65-202 

46-67-49—202 

69-68-70—207 

67-71-70-208 

69- 49-70—206 

70- 71-68-209 
70-47-72 — 209 
70-71-69—210 
7068-72-210 
6760-75-210 


CRICKET 


3D DAY Of «AY HATCH 
FREE STATE VS. INDIA 
mommy: w DLaewramraM, s. Africa 
Free Stale: 320-7 doctored and 259-2 de- 


I 2 0-3 

VtaKoaner 0 2 0-2 

First Period: A-BeBows 6 (Mironov) 
Secoed Period; v-Wotton 3 (Ridley, 
Common 3, A-Setame 25 (RaccNn) 4 V- 
SDOnger 10 (Rohfta) (sh). \ A-totyu 16 
(Rucrtta, Kaipa] (pp). THrd Period: None. 
Shots on goal: A- 14.17.10— 41. V- 7-9-7—23. 
Godin: a -H ebert V-McLeon 
New Jersey 0 0 8—0 

N.Y. Rangers 1 O 2-3 

First Parted: New York. Messier 25 
(Vorobtov) Second period: None. 
Penalties— None. Third Period: Now York, 
SamwtSGon 4 (Gretzky, toporisev). 1 New 
York. Robttaflte 18 (Gretzky, Sundstrami 
Shots an goal: NJ.- 7-12-1 4— 33. New York 9- 
13-5—27. Goodes: NLL-Brodeor, Dunham. 
New York. Richter. 

8108—1 
I 0 0 I— 2 

First Period: E-We*gW 13 (Smyth. 
Mironov) (pp). Second Period: H-fiurt 2 
(Onsets) Third Porte d. Nona. Overtime 3. 
E-Undgren 6 CWeigtit, Satan] Shots oo goal: 
H- 12-6-10-0 — 28. E- 10-9-9-2 — 30. GoaBes: 
H-Burte. E -Joseph. 

Baffafa 10 11-3 

Ptacnte a l l o-2 

First Ported: B-HotzJngsr 13 (Audette. 
May) Second Period: Phoenix. Tkaciwk 27 
[Gartner. Roeidck) (pp). Tbbri Ported: 6- 
Pecn 9 (WoM) WO. 4, Pheanfc Korolev 1 
(RoertcH. Manson) (pp). Owffcae: 5, B- 
Oawo ll„ Shots op gota: B> 9-11-9-1—30. 
Phoenix 7-10-17-0-34. GoaBes: B-Hasek. 
Phoenfa. Khabfeufln. 


Mercedes Championships 


Imtan 2966 declared and 1856 
Fme State and ImSa match ended In a 
draw 


1 ST DAY Of 4-OAT HUTCH 

NEW ZEALAMD » VS. ENGLAND 
MONDAY, IN PALMERSTON NORTH 
New Zealand Selection XJ tarings: 138 id 
our 

England Innings: 106 ter throe 



SOUTH AMEMCAN ZONE 
Bolivia 2. Ecuador 
Peru 2 am© 1 
Uruguay 0 Argentina 0 
flondta — t I. Colombia 17 potaL 2. 
Paraguay 14 X Argentina 10, 4. Uruguay 1ft 
5L BaMaftd. Ecuador?, 7. Peru 9, ft CM»& 
9. Venezuela 1. 


Botogna 0, Parma 1 
JorentusaAtakmtaO 
Mflonl.VfceraiQ 
Napoli 1. Inter 2 
PtacwraaudlneseO 
Rewtarw a Rarenltna 0 
Romo 4, Peru Ola 1 
Verona l.Larial 
Sampdorto 4, CagBarf 1 
w riiipe i 1. Juventus 30 points. 2. Sam- 
pd9rta2ft3lntor3a4.Vicflnw245.Fto*wtl- 
no 2ft ft MBon 24, 7. Parma 24 ft Ltato 23, 9. 
Roma 231 10. NapoU 73, 11. Batogm 22, 12. 
Atatanta 21. IX Udnese 19, 14. Ptooeraa lft 
15. Peniglal7,l&.Caglkiri 14. 17.veraru]l, 
IftReggkma 10. 


TENNIS 


MOMMY. M AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND 
FWAL 

Janas Bjortarm Sweden, dot. KgrawSi 
Carben. Denmark. 76 (7-0), 64L 


lire ROUND 

Asa Cortsson, Svredwv <W. Petra Lwigro- 
va. Czech RepubSC 6-1 6-« Steffl Graf 0). 
Gcntjom'.ttet.JanottcHwtortva, Slovakia 5- 
-I refbni- Tamartna Tonowgorn Thailand 
det Elena Makarova, Russia, 4-3. 1-4 46 
Brenda SdmUz-MeGarthy HD), NoHwrtamta. 
deli Park Sung-hers South Korea, 6-Z 2-4 6- 
2) Lartaa Neland, Latvia dei. Erie Do- 
mftilfcosic, AusmRa, 6-2, 6-7 Q-7), M. 

RBca HlroH, JapatL del Ludmaa Rfchtero- 
va. Czech Republic, 66 26, 66. ConcMta 


Martinez Q), Spain, deL Mbfatit Oremanj. 
Netherlands. 60. 6-ft Ainancto Coefzer (12), 
South Africa, dcf. Anna KourrAgva, Russia 

6- 2, 62; Maria Luba Soma Spain, def. Mtaa 
SaeM, Japan, 6-3. 6-7 (68), 7-5: WBrad Prob- 
StGermaiy, def. Sandra CadG UJS.64,26 

7- 5. 

Ines Garrodxrtegul Argentina def. 
Beyanne Sto wart Australia 62. 61; Safttoe 
Appetmnna (16), BeKftms, del. Helena Suho- 
va Czech Republic 62, 62: Arm Grossman, 
U& del Anne Mfller. Ui, 7-4 6ft Amabel 
Bwood, Australia del Lori McNeftU-S* 63, 
6 ft Lindsay Lee, U.S* deL Barbara Mutok 
Sknrania 2-4 63, 61 
Adriana GeraL aedi Reputflc deL Sandra 
Dopfer, Austria 76 (9-7), 62; NatoOa 
Medvodeva Ukraine, def. Chen U, China 6 
2, 36 6ft AJ Sugtyania, Japan, daf. GatUfam 
Crtriea Romania 76 (7-3). 6ft GlpI Fer- 
nandae, U6« deL Els Critera. ftrighm, 64. 
63; Kbnbertoy Pa UA, deL Gala Leon Gar- 
da Spain. 46 76 (7-0, 62. 

Ftorenda Lnbab Argerilna def. Arne Kre- 
nwr, Luremtaaurg, 7-5, *6 6ft Henrleta 
Nagywa Slovakia deL Emmanuele Gagfiar- 
* Monoea63,76 (7-3). Patrick: hV&Mnh. 
Canada def. Ale* Dechaume-Batlwa 
France. 66b 26, 6ft NatoSha Zvereva Be- 
kmiadet Nancy Ftbetb BeWum,76ni-9),6 

Node von Lofhm France- dst Sabine 

Hock, Germany, 46. 6a 6ft VagfedaRgana- 

Pascual Spata, deL CrtsMrw Tbrrens-Vriaa 
Spata, 46. 76(7-4), 62; Ruwmdro Dragandr. 
Romania deL JwBh meaner HU Austria, 6 

4 6-1 10-ft Mortem Kochta, Germany, deL 
Marianne Weidel WAmeynr, 1>JL 64 76 (7- 
41,60. 

Jeme Taylor, Aurirala deL Marta Antonio 
Sanchez Lanaza Spata, 76, 6ft 7-4 Kitsdna 
Bran* UA, del Paha Begeraw, Germany, 
61, 61; Jana Kandare. Germany, def. Kfokn 
MWBUkaJttpaa 6404 6ft Mary Plerca 
Fmae, det Etoia Lfthavtseva (13), Russia 
360-2,64. 

imi SUlIQLfS IK ROUND 

Staphane Sim km Fnmca dot Goto Bianca 
spata. 66 6ft 64; Todd Woodbridge. Au* 

tnda del mpik Kiwwlea Bdhtaaaa 64, 6*2, 

61i Michael Chang (2J, U&. def. Kris 

Gdhsaena Bdgkfla 60.4661; Derails van 

Sditeetann. Netherlands, def. Byron Block, 
Zlrnbawia 76 (7-5), 76 (7«3), Mi Aie* Cor- 
ndfa Spata, dff.robrAUUHft AuBtmSa76 
(7-2), 6ft 62. 

Rktnrd Frornberg, Aactraia del Brett 
Stawa New Zealand, 4626 76. 6ft 6T; 
RnandaMeOgeidi BrazftiktL David PrfnoA 
Gefraany, 67, 16 61, 7-4 9-7) Besnd tow 
barter, Genrnny, deL Maroas AaraBo Gorrb, 

5 pain, 64 76 (7-4), 166ft Koiaten Braosclv 

TMwms Mmam, Sweden, dBL Mmo, 
Drama Rapufak, 64 6ft a*. ^ 

7). 6ft 6toart.Srtotte& Austria deL Ale* 
Retafcel UA.646A 6ft Andrei Medv*je£ 
UkrabiadaLTWeny Champion. Franco. 76. 
62. 6ft RJdwy Reneberg, u A, del Oscra 
Burtran, Spain, 2-2 reared; Thomas Enavist 
(7), Sweden, .deL Mcafas PenSn, 


Venezuela 61,6464. 

Magnus Gustaffson 02), Sweden, d 

Grant Doyto, AwstraOa 67 (2-7), 63, 76 4 

Grant Stafford, South Africa, def. Jonfi Bui 
la Spain, 6661, 3-0 retired; Thomas Musi 
(5), Austria def. Geoff Grerd, U6, 6X64 
2; Cartas Moya Spola del. Boris Becker (i 
Germany, 5- 7, 76 (7-4), 36, 61. 64- Thom 
Cbrt»ne(l Spain, def. DanM voce*. C» 
Repubfc, 62, 76 (76), 7-4 
■tara^wnpue Fteurian, France, d 
Hiarorn Arad, Moracxa 76 6ft 6ft Pttri 

U ' 5 ' <***■ Andrei CUtnvsMy, Re 
sta, 76 (7-4), 62, 64- Tim Henmaa BriW 
deL Anrtel Pavel Romania 76 64 4 
Oats Wbodnrfl, UA, deL Magnus Name 
w ' v,i Don** H m baty. SI 
vaWa. def. Sainton Stoffe. AustraSa 16 7 
76 67 (4-7), 61. 

„F»?i tawi oet Justin Omehta 
R-41,36^ 6ft FettcMrartkiUJ 
^dstGregRusndskl B rtiala6467,7; 
6-ftCk atovo Kuerten, Brozfl. det MfcoelTI 
®®nvSwedraL 76 76 O) -9). 36 6ft Jei 
Kr^rtWtGwramy, det Sebastta Lmea 
Oonoda 6Z 67 (2- 7), 76 (7-5), 6ft RSI 
ffvssto, 

n Prana Argentina di 

Pot Cash, Australia 64 46 66 


usxnuu 

MATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCUOION 
PHOAMIPHIA-Pui f Derrick Coleman dh 
HijwedDst. 

P»TLAND-s«raen«ied FaWnrt RoMrv 

tne Mtaml goraeon Jan. a 


N ATIOHAL PQOTfljUi. i.car»n p 

fwedrteave. Signed OB Ky (e Wortha 
™n me pradloe souod. 

SEATTLE— SlgiWd S Joy BeOomv to tw 

toSSmSS 1, Slaned B*** 


NATKMALKt 
NNL-Swpanded n 


■r * locarea lorBashl 
•^mlewr In game an j, 
USAbGfiLiV-Agrer 
ddMacLeanen 3-yen 

COi 

"^^-Dtaded the 0 

wibehaifarrempiet 
cy WacHey. 


Praedeea. 

IDAHO STATK— Sun 
G Dedric Bcft 
Cedric RoUnsan arv 
raw the basketball e 
oftor beta* t 
«*dftwtar'sho(i«H| 
"WTHWH lOWiU. 

raottxiBopaeh. 

““TMEBN utah^i 

interim footbi 











Acuuag in 

Moya Stages L 


rote? 

ir»iei 3 ? 


By Robin Finn * - ' 
New York Tones Service 

MELBOURNE ~ He blamed 4he 
. ^nng summer sun for scrambling bis 
Mams hke eggs in a frying pa* He 
blamed the soft tennis balls for robbing 
- “fm of lus power and enhancing his 
■ Io °?y topspin- But When 

pons Becker, the defending champion, 
moked m ihe mirror Monday after his 
first match at the Australian Open 

umied out to be bis fast, he blamed 

I banself for fee 87 unforced emus that 
J W W the true tactical rale behind his early 

mmoval as the defending champion. 

■ “ I barely made a backhand return, and 
by the fourth set my forehand started to 

go away as well, and then *e only thing I 

bad was my serve,” said Becker, who 
succumbetU-7, 7-6(4), 3-6. 6-1, 64, to 
Carlos Moya, a 20-year old Spaniard. 

' ‘ ‘No excuses: 1 tried my best, but he 

^was the better man,' ’ said Becker, who 
' Exploited just 5 of the 18 break points be 
held against Moya’s serve. 

The Spaniard's only previous Aus- 
tralian Open experience was & fibrst- 
ipund exit last year, but that was over- 
ridden by a positive experience in his 

Qtdy previous meeting with Better. He 

beat him on a stick indoro. surface in 
Paris three months ago. 

“The victory over Boris in Paris is 
more than a victory, because fe«i I real- 
r. tied I can beat anybody cm any Mnd of 
surface, ' * Mqyasaui “ Atleastlcan go to 
a court to fight, not as a loser.” 

Becker was erne of only two seeds to 
fall on opening day. Elena Likhovtseva, 
fee 13fe seed, was ousted by unsoeded 
Mary Pierce, who won her first and drily 
Grand Slam crown in Melbourne in 1 995. 
Likhovtseva spoiled Pierce’s title de- 
, fense last year with a 6*4, 6-4 upsetin the 

second round. This time. Pierce, ranked . 
22d, came back to win, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4. 

" In contrast to Becker's struggle, peers 
rv. like last year's runner-up, the 2d-seeded 
LT. Michael Chang, 6th-seeded Thomas 
Muster, top-seeded Steffi Graf, and 3d- 
seeded Concbita Martinez aQ advanced 
Q. 1 in straight sets. 

Becker, a star attraction in a spotty 
men's field that now boasts just two 
former champions, Pete Samprasand Em 
Courier, disintegrated in five sets. Be 
wilted in heat he estimated at 120 degrees 
Fahrenheit (49 degrees centigrade) on 
court against a barrage of ground strokes 
from the weafeer-reszstanr Moya. 7 
‘ As the court turned from showcase to 
cauldron to crucible for the proud Ger- 
man, whose triumph here in 1996 haiteda 
five-year drought in. Grand Slam tour- 
naments, Becker did a^slow bum abd, 
finally a sorry fade. There were moments 
when be looked and felt not just molten 
but immobile. 

“My brain is scrambled eggs right 
tipw,” he said later, “because rmbum- 
ing. Especially my feet and feg? are 
pauly nrt, and thoe were timra fliat I 
couldn’t move at all because I was 
^fraid I'd lose the skin on my feet.' 7 
. The upset took three boms 31. 
*- minutes and ended when an obviously 
V 1 * disheartened Becker pushed abackhand 
return out of bounds on his challenger's 
second point, 

( ' Tbe 25th-ranked Moya felt feat ..the 
steamy weather helped iris cause arid 
was detrimental to Becker. 

7. “I'm still young and he’s 28 or 29,“ 
stud Moya, who then tried to avoid 
appearing undiplomatic. “Nobody can 


beat-Boris when he’s 100 percent.” 
. The last time a defending champion 
of the Australian Open fell in fee first 
round was Roscoe Tanner in 1977. 

Becker, who continued to accuse tins 
and other Slam tournaments of using 
softer balls to slow down the men's game 
and blunt fee power of its ace-mongers, 
considered tins 'a premature conclusion 
■to his 1997 Slam campaign. 

After a four-month layoff <ft»p to a 
wrist injury he suffered at Wimbledon 
(and has since blamed on politically cor- 
rect-but-too-soft tennis balls), Becker 
finished 1996 with a 12-3 record in his 
last four events. But on Monday, he 
admitted feat he lost his tinting alone wife 
his cool. 

In the night session Monday. Grafs 
opponent, 79th-nmked Janette 
Hnsarova of Slovakia, Had to be ta k e n 
off fee stadium court in a wheelchair 
after she wrenched hear left knee while 
chas ing a pasting shot at the end of fee 
first and only set of their abbreviated 
ma tch. Graf, who rushed to her fallen 
opponent wife an ice pack: and tended 
her until the medical crew arrived, won 
the 22 minute match, 5-1,. by default 

Chang provided first aid to a ball giri 
who fain ted in the third set of his oth- 
erwise unremarkable 6-0, 6-3, 6-1 outing 
against Kris Goossens of Belgium. 
Chang furnished artriSed towel to help 
revive fee girl - 

“I think she had&bxt too much heal,” 
Chang said. ... 

Anna Koumikova, fee 15-year-old 
phenomenon and youngest woman in 
die draw, fell -prey to her own impa- 
tience and was trounced, 6-2, 6-2. by 
12fe-seeded Amanda Coetzer of South 
Africa, a semifinalist in 1996. 



Tiger Woods Scatters 
Clouds With One Shot 


Sarvt Akoculrd I'lr*- 


Carlos Moya of Spain keeping the heat on Boris Becker in Melbourne. 


By Larry Dorman 

Sew i'o< Jlrrti Seniu 

CARLSBAD, California — What 
could have been grand and telling 
drama. 18 holes of golf wife tbe current 
and future king of fee game battling 
back and forth across La Costa, came 
down to one startling moment, one shaft 
of pure light bursting through the rain 
clouds feat covered the Mercedes 
Championships. 

That tight was provided by Tiger 
Woods, golf’s incandescent wunder- 
kind, who turned a rainy, soggy cne- 
hole playoff Sunday into an event worth 
remembering. Hitting second, after 
Tom Lehman's tee shot ballooned in fee 
wind and dived into the water hazard 
fronting fee seventh green, the 21 -year- 
old Woods lasered a 6-iron through the 
gloom and nearly into the hole. 

The bail hit one foot from the cup and 
spun back 8 inches away for a tap-in 
birdie and Woods's third victory in just 
nine PGA Tour starts. 

Just like that. One tournament gone in 
1997, one tournament won by Woods. 

“It’s a perfect start,'' he said. 

It certainly was a startling one. With 
rain soaking the grounds at La Costa 
Resort and Spa. rendering all but one 
hole of fee golf course unplayable, PGA 
Tour officials decided to shorten fee 
tournament to 54 holes and settle fee tie 
between Lehman, fee 1 996 player of the 
year, and Woods, the 1 996 rookie of the 
year, with sudden death. 

After play had been suspended for 2 
hours 45 minutes, the decision was 
made to pay fee rest of the field and send 
the two players who were tied at 14 
under par out to fee tee at fee seventh 
hole to settle things. 

“1 would have preferred to play them 
all,” Lehman said, “but what are you 
going to do?” 

What Lehman did was make a bad 


pass at a bad time. The yardage he and 
his caddie Andy Martinez decided on 
was 181 yards 1165 meters.) to fee 
hole. 

Interestingly. Woods and his caddie. 
Mike Cowan, decided on 186. Those 5 
yards may or may not have made a 
difference, but Lehman's 6-iron shoi 
was well below his standards, plum- 
meting into the lake 4 yards short of fee 
bank. 

‘ ‘ I was shocked." Woods said. 
“Very shocked.” 

So was Lehman. As he watched fee 
ball's flight, his expression said 
everything. His shoulders slumped as 
fee ball splashed. 

“The ground was muddy.” Lehman 
said. “Maybe 1 teed ii up too high, I 
don’t know. I hit the ball on fee top of 
the dubface, the wind got it. and away 
she went, into fee water.” 

When that happened, whatever po- 
tential drama remained seemed to drain 
right out of the proceedings. All Woods 
needed to do was put fee ball safely on 
the green and two-pun for par. Lehman 
would have to hole out an 80-yard shot 
for a par to have any chance of halving 
fee hole. 

But. among the other astonishing at- 
tributes Tiger Woods is bringing to the 
game of golf, a sense of moment is very 
high on fee list. He set up at the middle 
of the tee, ripped at his 6-iron shot and 
drew the ball very nearly into the hole. It 
was stunning. 

“Gosh,” said Lehman, “what can 
you say about that? Tiger hit a great 
shot You've got to lake your hat off to a 
guy who, when the other guy is in fee 
water, steps up and hits it stiff.” 

Wife fee victojy and fee check of 
S2 16.000 that went with it. Woods has 
now earned SI j 006,594 in just nine 
events. The previous record for fee fast- 
est million in PGA Tour events belonged 
to Ernie Els. who did it in 28 events. 


Richter Outshines All-Star 
As Rangers Blank Devils 


Oldest South American Rivals Lack Teeth 


The Associated Press 

Martin Brodeur is going to fee Na- 
tional Hockey League All Star game. 
Mike Richter is not. But Richter was 
the star as tbe New York Rangers beat 
theBrodeur and the New Jersey Dev- 
ils, 3-0. Richter made 33 saves 
Sunday for his third shutout of the 
season and 17th of his career. 

Wayne Gretzky set up a pair of 
tirirdrperiod goals to breakopen a 
dose game. Gretzky set up Un Sam- 

.. NHl.Ro ■*»»■» • 

uelsson 57 seconds into tbe third peri- 
od for a 24) Rangers lead. Gretzky 
and Lac Robilaille worked a give- 
■and-go 1 :54 later to make it 3-0. 

■Safety Dttdu 3, cauaofcaz In Van- 
couver, Teemu Selanne and Paul 
Kariya scored second-period goals as 
Anaheim beat tite Canucks to avenge 
a 5-1 beating last week. Selanne 
notched his 25th goal and Kariya ad- 
ded a power-play goal for fee Ducks. 

(Mm 2 , mh imlm i In Edmonton, 
Mats Lindgren scored, a power-day 
goal 227 into overtime as fee Oilers 
sent Hartford to its fourth straight loss, 
lindgren, standing in front of Hart- 
ford’s goaheader, Sean Burke, redir- 
ected a shot fora Doug Wdgfa to give 


Edmonton its first overtime victory this 
season. 

Sabras 3, Coyotm 2 Jason Dawe 
took the puck away from Dave Man- 
son and scored unassisted 10 seconds 
into overtime, lifting visiting Buffalo 
over Phoenix. 

* 11 Groups Want NHL Teams 

Eleven groups seeking the right to 
speed at least $75 million to join the 
National Hockey League are getting a 
chance to extol their virtues before the 
league’s executive committee. 

The league started hearing present- 
ations Monday from 11 groups rep- 
resenting nine cities — there are three 
groups from Houston. The NHL has 
not yet decided how many franchises 
to award, bow much to charge for them 
or when they would start playing. 

Houston’s three groups, along wife 
Columbus, Ohio; St Paul, Minnesota, 
and Hamilton. Ontario, made their 
pitches Monday. On Tuesday, offi- 
cials from Hampton Roads, Virginia; 
Oklahoma City; Nashville, Tennes- 
see; Raleigh, North Carolina, and At- 
lanta will make their presentations. 

The league is not expected to say 
which cities are in until at least March. 
The NHL has 26 teams and would 
reportedly like to get to 30 by 2000. 


Reuters 

The South American World Cup 
qualifying competition was thrown 
wide open when Peru and Bolivia both 
won to rekindle their hopes, while die 
continent's oldest foes, Uruguay and 
Argentina, drew 0-0 in Montevideo. 

Only two points separate third-place 
Argentina from eighth-place Chile as 
die marathon competition, in which fee 
nine teams play each other twice, nears 
the halfway mark. 

The top four teams in fee group qual- 
ify for the 1998 World Cup in France, 
wife Brazil exempt from the qualifying 
tournament as defending champion. 

In the past, Uruguay and Argentina 
would have expected to meet little re- 
sistance from the other South American 
nations. 

This time, they have found them- 
selves slugging it out with Peru, Bolivia 
and Ecuador, and playing second fiddle 
to Colombia, the group leader, and 
Paraguay. 

The relatively poor campaigns of the 
two great rivals added spice to Sunday's 
meeting — their first-ever in a World 
Cup qualifier — but despite fee tension 
there was no trouble, and only three 
players were penalized. 

Uruguay had the advantage 
throughout fee game, but Ignacio 
Gonzalez’s play suggested that Argen- 
tina may have solved its goalkeeping 
troubles. 

Gonzalez was fee fifth goalkeeper 


used in fee last year by Daniel Pasarella, 
fee Argentine coach. He gave a solid 
display. The highlight was a spectacular 
seventh minute save from Enzo 
Francescoli. Uruguay’s veteran striker. 

Argentina stays ahead of Uruguay on 
goal difference. Both have 10 points. 
Peru. Bolivia and Ecuador have nine 
points. Peru beat Chile. 2-1. in Lima. 
Bolivia beat Ecuador. 2-0, in La Paz. 

Peru overcame Chile with first half 
goals by Flavio Maestri and Roberto 
Palacios. Ivan Zamorano grabbed a con- 

WoniD Soccer 

solarion for Chile, which has eight 
points, two minutes from fee end of the 
game. 

Bolivia has failed to make fee most of 
playing ai 3,600 meters above sea level, 
drawing their Iasi three home games, but 
wrapped up Sunday's game in fee first 
1 2 minutes with goals by Jaime Moreno 
and Marco Etcheverry. 

Bolivia woo all its home games on the 
way to fee 1994 World Cup finals. 

Paraguay moved four points ahead of 
Argentina wife a 2-0 victory in an away 
game wife Venezuela, which has one 
point. 

■ Rio Championship in Chaos 

The Rio de Janeiro championship 
made a chaotic start Sunday when half 
of fee games were canceled after three 
of the four major clubs involved decided 


to boycott fee tournament, Reuters re- 
ported from Rio de Janeiro. 

Botafogo. Fluminense and defending 
champions Flamengo all refused to play 
to protest the format of fee 12-team 
tournament, which they claimed forced 
them to play too many games against 
minor opposition. 

Only three of fee six matches sched- 
uled for fee weekend took place. 

Vasco da Gama, the only major club 
to play, bear Bangu, 3-0, before a mea- 
ger 1 ,600 crowd. 

Vasco was without star striker Ed- 
mundo. who refused to take part in pre- 
season training because of a feud over his 
contract and was suspended by the dub. 

Instead. Edmundo took part in a 
beach soccer match on Copacabana 
beach. 

The rebel clubs decided to abandon 
the competition at a meeting Friday. 

* ‘Anyone wife any sense can see that 
there is no way we can take pan in the 
competition that Vasco and fee Rio fed- 
eration want.” said Alvaro Barcelos. 
tbe Fluminense president. 

Brazil is unique among major soccer 
nations in devoting half of its season to 
regional competitions. Critics have called 
for the system to be scrapped and re- 
placed by a single national competition. 

The Rio tournament is the second- 
most important regional competition, be- 
hind the Sao Paulo championship, which 
is to start in early February. A Rio-Sao 
Paulo* tournament is to start Saturday. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


THERE’S THIS CUTE LITTLE 
ftRL WHO SITS NEXT TO 
MEINMNPB&ARTEN.. 


ri TOLD HER MAYBE SHE 
AMP I COULD 60 TO i 
t PARIS SOMEDAY.. / 


I DON T EVEN KNOW 
WHERE PARfS IS.. 






beeetw&s. 
EARTH FEMALE. 
Ml NOT BE . 
ALARWE&. / 


QURPIMCTIS 
CrtWB.LEftSP 
fflHEB TOi 
awnNE. mi 

NOT TRTTO 
RESIST OR 
V0U LULL BE 
W5WINEP. 


VfcUS 
ABCtiTW. 
GEVBKK 
, HHE- 




Z. I 
8 

tflsat 1 




Twelve dAU/HEf io PfefTfcgS.ANP 









ART BUCHWALD 


Feeding the Lobbyists 


In Death, Selena Is a Legend and an Industry 


W ASHINGTON — In- 
auguration time is the 


TT auguration time is the 
busiest period for Washing- 
tonians. We are all cooking 
and baking and deep-frying 
chicken fingers for the thou- 
sands of people coming into 
town for the big occasion. 

Paid Peck, the Democratic 
chief caterer, was stir-frying 
pigs' feet, 

“Lobbyists 
have to be fed,” 

Paul said as he 
poured peanut 
oil on the feet 
“If they're not, 
they won’t buy 
any tables for 

^ v G “^ sb . irth - Buchwald 
day party. 

“I guess food and wine are 
what make this town go 
round,” I said. 

“They do during the week 
the president is sworn in. The 
lobbyists gave to us when we 
needed iL Now we're giving 
back to them — with cheese 
puffs and egg rolls. Fair is fair 
when you pay homage to a 
president.” 

“How do you decide 
which lobbyists get fed and 
which ones don’t?" 

“Political parties treat 
everyone like the homeless. If 
a lobbyist is hungry and he is 


on our side, he can have all the 
sweet-and-sour pork he can 
eaL” 

“I was under the impres- 
sion that the lobbyists were 
the major entertainers during 
a presidential inaugura- 
tion.” 

* ‘They’re in it. too. After all. 
if the big-shot telephone 
people show up and you’re on 
their payroll, you have to 
throw a party. But a party is 
nothing unless you can show 
off lots of congressmen and 
senators. So the lobbyists 
throw in extra PAC money for 
the politicians to guarantee 
that die pels will turn up at 
their event” 

“Yet what we’re really talk- 
ing about is food. Don't most 
people come to the inaugur- 
ation because they can't get 
these kinds of things to eat at 
borne?” 


By Larry Rohter 

New York Times Service 


P OTEET. Texas — Long before 
the murder that belatedly 
brought her to the attention of the 
English-speaking world, Selena 
had earned the title Queen of Te- 
jano Music and the affection of 
Mexican -Americans in small 
towns like this one. the self-styled 
strawberry capital of Texas. 

So it was only fitting that when a 
Hollywood production company 
decided to transform the martyred 
singer’s short life into a movie and 
to film some of its concert scenes at 
the county fairgrounds here, the 
crowd of extras that assembled was 
full of people who had seen the real 
Selena perform and adored her. 

Deep into the night on a warm 
autumn Saturday, grandmothers 
with babies in tow, entire families 
and knots of teenagers stood trans- 
fixed as Jennifer Lopez, die actress 
playing their idol, lipsynched 
Selena s greatest hits. “For me, it 
has always been Selena and always 
will be.” Roxane Avila. 16, a fan, 
said between takes. “I went to see 
her twice and always told my mom 
that 1 wanted to be like her. Now I 
can't bring myself to play her re- 
cords because it’s just too painful. 
So is this. But even so. I couldn't 
miss it.” 

Less than two years after being 
shot to death by a disgruntled em- 
ployee of hers in a Corpus Christi 
motel room, Selena is well on her 
way to becoming as much an icon 
for Latin Americans and Spanish 
speakers in the United States as 
Elvis Presley is for rock ’o’ roll 
fans or Marilyn Monroe for film 
buffs. “The torch bearer for a new 
generation of Latinos” is how the 
movie's Mexican- American direc- 
tor and screenwriter, Gregory 
Nava, describes Selena. 

That passion has fed a flood of 
posthumous books, records and 
memorabilia, making Selena better 
known today than in her lifetime. 

To Nava, whose previous movies 
include “El Norte” and "My Fam- 
ily: Mi Familia.” there is an es- 


Archaeologists Say 
Euripides 9 Cup Found 

The Associated Press 

ATHENS — Archaeolo- 
gists say they have found a 
clay mug of the ancient Greek 
playwright Euripides in a 
limestone cave where he used 
to write. 

A photo released by the 
Greek Culture Ministry 
showed the fragmented cup 
engraved with the first six let- 
ters of Euripides' name. The 
mug was unearthed from a 
grotto on Sal amis . an island 
west of Athens. 


Paul laughed. “You can 
say that again. People are still 
talking about the celery stalks 
I served last year at die cock- 
tail party for Dick Morris.” 

“Does the Democratic 
Party ever exchange menus 
with the lobbyists?" 

“All the time. We had a 
problem at Clinton's first in- 
auguration with deviled 
eggs, so we called up the nu- 
clear waste lobby, and it 
offered to hard-boil 230 plat- 
ters for us. This kind of co- 
operation makes American 
inaugurations the greatest in 
the world. Had Dole won. the 
nuclear waste folks would 
have done the same for the 
Republicans." 

I told Paul, “If I was a 
lobbyist. I'd like the chicken 
livers on potato latkes.'* 

“You're in luck. That’s 
what I am making next I've 
always said you can't have a 
decent inauguration without 
potato latkes.” 

“God bless America. " 


pedally mythic quality to the story 
of a sieger who rose from bumble 
beginnings through hard work and 
talent, overcoming barriers of lan- 
guage and culture, only to die vi- 
olently at die age of 23, just as her 
career was taking wing. “Look at 
Elvis, James Dean and Marilyn," he 
said. “They were all brought down 
by their sen-destructive natures. But 
for Selena to have been brought 
down this way is more tragic than 
the others because she really was 
living the American Dream .’ r 

In Selena's case, everything 
started with the music and her ca- 
pacity to produce an cue the sob in 
die voice that is common both to 
the blues and to Mexican music. 

“That teardrop she had in her 
vocal cords gave her an ability to 
interpret and communicate in her 
songs as if she had lived far beyond 
her years,” said Jose Behar, pres- 
ident of EMI Latin Records, who in 
1989 signed the band then known 
as Selena y los Dittos to a recording 
contract and nurtured her career 


through the recording of “Dream- 
ing of You,”" the posthumous re- 


ing of You,”" the posthumous re- 
lease that sold 3 million copies in 
the United States. 

Last year, a casting call in four 
cities to young Hispanic women to 
audition for the part of Selena as a 
child drew more than 20,000 ap- 


plicants, all of them made up to 
look just like Selena, whose fea- 


Iook just like Selena, whose fea- 
tures “were definitely more indig- 


enous than royal Spanish,” as Ed- 
ward James Olmos, who plays her 


ward James Olmos, who plays her 
father in the movie, pointed oul 
Id death, as in life, in other words, 
Selena Quintanilla Perez has come 
to represent a new standard of Latin 
beauty and confidence. 

Jennifer Lopez, the actress who 
plays the adult Selena, is from the 
Castle Hill section of the Bronx, 
not South Texas, and is of Puerto 
Rican descent, not Mexican. “But 
Selena was dark, like me, and had a 
Larin body, like mine, and didn't 
try to hide that," Lopez said. 

“She went up there on stage and 
said: This is who I am, and I like it. 


Why should I aspire to be blond 
and thin?” Yet there is more to 


Selena's continued appeal than just lpj 
ber appearance, as Lopez and otb- 
ers are quick to acknowledge. IJ 

Christy Haubegger, a Mexican- 'M 
American who is publisher of Lat- m 
in a, a New York-based magazine M 
for Hispanic women, said: “Selena 
is an icon to us because she is both 
culturally and physically like we g'j 
are, someone born here in the 
United States and definitely an j&j 
American, but also a Larina, proud 
of who die is and able to say she 
didn't have to lose her culture to be 
successful. She not only embodied 
ideals of Latina beauty but the 
straggle we live with every day, 

■ between two cultures, two lan- 
guages and two sets of values." 

Even before Selena was boro, of 
course, T Arinas like Rita Hayworth 
(born Margarita Carmen Cansino) 
and Raquel Welch (Raquel Tejada) 
had built large followings. But they 
gained their Came only by changing 
their names, trying to discard their 
identities as Hispanic women and 
projecting an exotic image that was 
sexy and submissive. That formula 
reinforced “a stereotype of us be- 
ing the oppressed half of a pa- 
triarchy, which we certainly 
aren't,” as Haubegger put iL 

The emergence of Selena, who 
spoke Spanish with a Texas accent 
and made a point of favoring die 
English pronunciation of her name 
(suh-LEE-na) over its Spanish ver- 
sion (say-LAY-na), also played 
with die ambiguity Mexican - 
Americans feel toward the cultures 
on both sides of that hyphen. 

“To this day, Mexican- Amer- 
icans are not viewed as kindred 
souls" on either side of die border, ; \ 
Olmos said. “We’re always right 
next door. You're not fully accep- gf 
ted by the country you live in, and H 
in the country you're from, you’re fii 
left out to hang.” !|! 

For example, Nava said that ^ 
when he had first pitched his ^ 
Selena proposal to Hollywood ex- ■ . 
ecutives, they thought she was 
Mexican, not American. “She 30 
could no more have come out of 
Mexico than Frank Sinatra out of 
Italy,” he said. A I 






•jaap*; 









I 


A fan hoi ding a poster of Selena at a recent tribute to the singer. 


ROYALTY 


PEOPLE 


Is There a Pudgy Czar in Russia’s Future? 


F OR the 15th rime. Bill 
Cosby won a People's 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Post Sen-ice 


M OSCOW — It’s the 
fondest hope of Mos- 


cow's most wild-eyed street 
protesters and a cherished 
dream for a handful of nos- 
talgia buffs who trace their 
ancestry to prerevolutionary 
Russian nobility. 

But is it possible that Boris 
Yeltsin, too, wants to restore a 
role for the Romanov dynasty 
as Russia's imperial family? 

Under a front-page head- 
line — “Yeltsin Welcomes 
Back Heir to the Czar” — 

Britain’s Daily Telegraph re- 
ported Dec. 31 that the Rus- 
sian leader had signed a secret 
decree to recognize Grand 
Duke Georgi Romanov, teen- 
age heir to the Romanov dy- 
nasty, as head of Russia’s im- 
perial family. 

Grand Duke Georgi, who 
has visited Russia a handful 
of times, is a 15-year-old who 
lives in Madrid, has been edu- 
cated at English and French 
schools, speaks halting Rus- Grand I 
sian and has a fondness for 
martial arts. He is the great-great-grear- 
grandson of Alexander H, a 19th-century 
Russian czar. 

The newspaper, citing an unnamed 
Kremlin source, said Yeltsin plans to 





The Awodattd fte* 

Grand Duke Georgi Romanov with his grandmother. 


cuum that is the result of the Communist 
regime,’' said Duke Vadim Lopukhin, a 
leader of Russia's Nobility League, a 
group that traces its ancestors to Russian 
nobility. “There is no national symbol; 


predecessor, is regarded as a 
national joke. Lenin is out, 
and so is Stalin. Communism 
is a sour memory, but demo- 
cracy in its twisted, uniquely 
Russian incarnation has in- 
spired no passion in the Rus- 
sian body politic. . 

So why not monarchy? 
Well, plenty of reasons. 
For one thing, there is no 
popular outcry in support of a 
Romanov return. When 
Georgi took a riverboat tom- 
down the Volga in 1993 with 
his mother. Grand Duchess 
Maria Vladimirovna, and his 
grandmother. Leonids Geor- 
gievna, they were ignored vir- 
tually everywhere. What’s 
more, Maria Vladimirovna 
committed the unpardonable 
gaffe of neglecting to cover 
her head when she visited a 
Russian Orthodox church 
near the city of Kostroma. 

“Russia has always been 
united not on the basis of a 
national idea, but on an im- 

penal idea, which presup- 

posed that the state was su- 
aother. perior to society,” Igor 
klyarakin, a sociologist 
wrote in the newspaper Kommersant 


L 


Jl Cosby won a People's 
Choice Award for favorite 
male in a television series. 
The show, “Cosby,” also 
was honored as favorite new 
television comedy series. 
Cosby tied with Michael J. 
Fox of “Spin City," who also 
got the nod as favorite male in 
a new television series. Other 
repeat winners in the 23d an- 
nual event included Oprah 
Winfrey, Tim ADen, Brooke 
Shields, Reba McEntire, 
Garth Brooks, Mel Gibson, 
Sandra Bullock and the tele- 
vision shows, “ER” and 
“Seinfeld.” The films “In- 
dependence Day” and “The 
Nutty Professor” also re- 
ceived awards. 


starring John Lithgow, 
Mandy Patrakin, Mary- 
Chapin Carpenter and Car- 
ly Simon. The show was ex- 
pected to raise $250,000 for 
the Christopher Reeve 
Foundation. The foundation 
will sponsor medical research 
on spinal cord injuries. 


second son. Prince Andrew, 
will speak directly to the cam- 
era in praise of a brand of 
cranberry juice. “Fergie,” 
has already posed for a pub- 
licity photograph for die 
Japanese . camera maker 
Olympus. She is hying to pay 
off debts of about 55 mil- 
lion. 


The Duchess of York is to 
score a dubious royal first by 
making a fruit juice commer- 
cial for American television, 
which could earn ber up to 
$1.7 million. London press 
reports said. The former 
Sarah Ferguson, divorced 
wife of Queen Elizabeth H's 


Fact: Barbra Streisand 
wiR not be performing or in- 
troducing* or anything at the 
presidential gala on Sunday 
night. And she may not show 
up for the inauguration the 
following day. Whispered 
Reason No. 1: The Clintons 


The military techno-thrill- 
er author Tom Clancy atten- 
ded his first space shuttle 
launch and wasn’t all that im- 
pressed. “Visually, it's spec- 
tacular,” Clancy said after 
Atlantis blasted off. “Every- 
body told me how noisy it 
was. Hell, anybody with kids 
deals with more noise.” 



are irritated at Babs because 
when she attended her first 
Renaissance Weekend over 
New Year's, she wore ber 
name tag only some of the 
time, “ftsopie were furious 
with her,*’ said one attendee. 
“Everyone -.wears, .a name 
tag,” in the spirit of demo- 
cratization of deep thinkers. 
W-e ll, th e president doesn't, 
but Hillary Clinton did. Ac- 
cording to witnesses who 
were there, Streisand bent 
over tiny Ruth Westheimer, 
took die sex counselor’s 
cheeks in her hands, and said, 
“Dr. Ruth. I'm your biggest 
fan.” To which Westheimer 
replied, “Who are you?’' 
whispered Reason No. 2r. 
Streisand is irritated at the „ • 
Clintons because they won’t 
let her sleep in the White 
House in die same room as 
her boyfriend, the actor 
James BroHn. The Clintons 
do, in fact, insist that unmarj 


•>- 

t : , Mil 

■ Mu/* 

, -ft ' 


■to'-: 





a * a 


ried couples occupy separate 
bedrooms. The Official Rea- 




Daily last month. “But, the peculiarity 
of the present moment is that tor the first 


welcome Georgi along with his mother that’s why the family's return could play 


and grandmother back to live in Russia 
early this year. The family — which has 
been living in exile since 1918, when the 
Bolsheviks executed the last czar and his 
immediate family — would be granted a 
“purely ceremonial” role, it said. 

Improbable? Sure. Immediately 


a positive role in stabilization.” He ad- 
ded, “They could become a symbol, an 
ideal to live by.” 

Yeltsin himself complained last year 
that Russia — whose national anthem 
has no lyrics, whose schoolchildren 
search vainly for heroes — is a country 


of the present moment is that for the first 
time a relative majority does not want to 
return to taking orders from the state. 
The priority now is personal interests 
and the interests of the family.” 

Masha Lipman, deputy editor of Itogi, 
a weekly news magazine, scoffed at the 
idea of reinstating the Romanovs in any 
capacity. There is nothing interesting 


about the Romanovs, nothing heroic or 
extraordinary that would lend them 


denied by the Kremlin? Of course. But in search of a national idea. Newspapers 


the report has nonetheless captured the 
attention of the Russian media and 
thrilled Russian monarchists. If the Ro- 
manovs are restored as Russia 's imperial 
family, some say, Russia will finally 
have the unifying national idea it so 
obviously lacks now. 

“There is a kind of ideological va- 


have since been running contributions 
from readers volunteering their thoughts 
on what the new Russia should be 
about 

But it has been easier to identify what 


extraordinary that would lend them 
prestige or save them from irrelevance, 
she said. Nor would it help that in Rus- 
sia's present lean economic condition, 
all three members of die Romanov fam- 
ily are quite pudgy, she said. 

“If you’re creating a myth, which in 


Lauren Bacall, whose 
films range from “To Have 
and Have Not” in 1944 to 
“The Mirror Has Two 
Faces’ ’ last year, picked up an 
award for lifetime achieve- 
ment. At the annual Palm 
Springs film festival, Bacall 
accepted her award from the 
actor -Gregory Peck. Rim 
clips showcased Bacall’s ca- 
reer. “I had no idea I'd been 
in that many movies,” sbe 
said. “I guess I’m older than I 
thought I was.” Bacall is 72. 


1 


bedrooms. The Official Rea- 
son: Streisand has been nom* 
mated for a Golden Globe 
Award and will be in Los. 
Angeles on Sunday at that 
ceremony. 


To avoid offending any of 
his friends worldwide, the 
celebrated Russian cellist and 
conductor Mstislav Rostro- 
povich plans to celebrate hi? 
70th birthday, which falls in 
1997, witii a series of per- 
formances. About -300 musi-f 
dans from 40 countries will 


pay homage to Rostropovich 
at the 22d Evian Musical 
Meetings from May 8 to IS. 
of which Rostropovich is 
festival chairman. On May 9, 
he will play in a concert qf 
chamber music, and on Ma>/< 
14 to 16 he will conduct coni 
certs with the Orchestra of 
Nations. A host of stars will 
participate in a concert for 
Rostropovich’s actual birth- 
day, on March 27 in Paris. ? 


Christopher Reeve is 
coming around again. The 


Russia does not believe in than what it itself is a failed attempt to form a state. 


does. Yeltsin himself is generally re- 
viled. Mikhail Gorbachev, his Soviet 


there should be something catchy about 
iL” she said- “The fat boy isn't catchy.” 


fund-raising efforts for his re- 
search foundation with a con- 
cert in Princeton, New Jersey, 



Vince BocrVAjtuco Ff«nce-Pres» 

UPON A STAR — Soul singer James Brown dancing 
on his new star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. 


S 




Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which makes 


AWT Access Numbers 


calling home or to other countries redly easy. Just dial the 


AT&T Access Number for the country you’re in and we’ll take it 



from there. And be sure to charge your calls on your AIST Calling 


- i 
--g 


Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous phone charges on your hotel 


btenMkwny from overseas: 



gja bill and may save you up to 6Q%* So use AT&T Direct" Service and 


you won’t need the luck of the Irish to get the fastest and clearest 


1. JiBt dial the AT&T Acces Number for 
the country you are calling from. 

2. Dial the phone number you’re calling. 

3. Dial (he calling card number listed 
above your name. 


* ■ EUROPE 

- , Iwwo, ....... .C2-9B3-011 

\ in** 

f \ FiteteL, JU0MMH1J 

' Gannqr jhhM 

Owes* 08-808-1311; 

into* .i-gaa game. 

naif* ;_.fn-itm 

HHwrtUi * JM2M1TI ■ 

RbmIi* A(lbacM)» ... .755-5042 

Spain* ..... J8MMB-T1. 

SmtML i _828-785-6Tt! ! 

Sathariatt* — .T 88 - 88 1 1 1 

1MM KhtfMA. 888MM811 

- iromn IIT 

Egjpt*tCaIrt))V_- ._ 518-808: , 

brad .177-1BH7Z7 

Saafi Arabia o _1-Mt.1l 

8HBET ; 


Wherr 1 - 8 00 - 550 - 


connections home. Check the list for AHST Access Numbers. 


Katya* 


.0-800-10 

HtHMtt 


Cart find the Access Nmaber far fecotrayjn'mci&n; bun? jDavkay opaatorfor 

XrXrDimfS*Tirt> I ar«Mf nrWaya: kyft wMtClW fc Wlg 




eyes are smiling. 


tad lekfta* dings taedoiallc In bells in (fcstelW mid snap m* be U$n or kmw fa? barind die counr boa rtkfa jau seeding 

bmUfc site US. odj. Cnn&vkKWMiT Aeoaarf led n Us US ptu m rtuknrfdHp based® dresuaj jau Mata* Vw caned ir US 6na all neotobedinc. •ft4fcpta»injae^MrfaMornbwarifar4d«ntOCita[»al^n«ta«^niasitei»A^ 

adldkfaiwm||iunij3f^{tan recite balcttiiinneiiiMagtealL Vnd-arGis 1 M*airCB» *Addaoral ctaipi oumfe Uanm "Wwi W* StaNnp-lEM.il Gita. COter}© 191 2 Warner Bw. lrc(j£CAneKK6K1&T * 


ART 


1