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To UN— If 

Release of Funds 
Linked to Reforms ; 
Foreign Aid to Rise 


By Thcrmas W. Lippman 

Washingum Post Service 

4 WASHINGTON — President ’ Bill 
Clinton will ask GmgressitarSl billion to 
pay off most of . America’s debt to the 
United Nations as part of a s nhstanri^ 
overall increase in tending on interna- 
tional affairs, accouhng to adounis&atiQn 
officials and congressional sources. 

In addition to the extra money for the 
United Nations — most of which would 
be appropriated but held bade as a way 
of pressing the world body for U.S.- 
backed reforms- — Mr. Clinton will seek 
to increase forei an affairs soenriinp anH 


foreign aid by about $1 2 billion above 
the 1997 level of $18.1 billion. 

Hying in the face of congre ssiona l 
demands for further budget redactions, 
the spending {dan for fiscal 1998 re- 
flects the president's view dial inter- 
national anairs spending has been cut 
too far already and former reductions 
would undermine the ability of the 
United States to cany out effective dip- 
lomacy. officials said. 
r . The budget Mr. Clinton is planning to 
■rend to Congress Feb. 6 will represent a' 
success for Secretary of State Warren 
Christopher and his designated suc- 
cessor. Madeleine Albright. They have 
argued repeatedly within the adminis- 
tration that further cuts of the magnitude 
envisioned in long-term budget-balan- 
cing plans would jeopardize U.S. na- 
tional interests. .. . 

Their views overcame the reluctance 
of toe director of toe Office of Man- 
agement and- Budget, Frankim Raines, 
to increase overseas spending at toe ex- 
pense of domestic issues, sources said. ' 

It was Mis. Albright’s conviction that 
Congress would nevex cotne up wito foe 
money to square accounts at mc United 
Nations while JSoutxos Boutros GbaH 
was secretary general that Jed ber xo 
campaign successfoDy for his ouster and . 
for his replacement by Kofi Annan of 
Ghana. Whether Mr. Annan, who took 
over Jan. l.will be a sufficiently vigorous 
and effective reformer to convince con- 
gressional skeptics remains to be seen. 

Mrs. Albright and other officials have 
argued that u.S. influence within toe 
. United Nations is declining, and that U.S. 
dexnands for refonn meet resistance, , be- 
cause the United States owes toe world 
body more than $1 billion in unpaid dues 
and peacekeeping assessments. - 

With Mr. Boutros Ghali oat of toe 

See AID, Page 7 



__ • m ■ ^ j - ' Thrfa Wrtgim Rii Mitk HupnbThr V* ^nATumv 

The Reichstag in Berlin is obscured by a forest of cranes erecting a new city, left, while in Bonn, life at the university quietly goes on. 


Berlin Walls Tumble 

But Budding Boom Draws Some Boos 


Bonn Reinvents Itself 

Small Town Prepares to Become Smaller 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Peat Service 

■ BERLIN — For much of thk cen- 
tury, Berlin has exerted a unique in- 
fluence on the world. From toe 1920s, 
when its ' glitzy cabarets transformed 
art into decadence, to toe smoking ru- 
ins of World War U and toe concrete 
wall that served as fault line between 
East and West, its landscape has helped 
define the times. 

Now, seven years after toe wall col- 
lapsed, Beilin is - creating an urban 
showcase for toe 21st century. .. 

' An extraordinary building boom is 
in .full swing, epitomized by 1,000 
towering construction cranes winching 
up concrete and steel as massive sur- 
gery is performed on the heart of Ger- 


many's once and future capital. By 
2000, three gargantuan tasks are sup- 
posed to be finished: 

• The separate infrastructures cre- 
ated over four decades when the city 
was split into hostile ideological zones 
are being stitched together at a cost of 
more than $20 billion, with energy 
grids, water mains, transportation sys- 
tems and communications lines woven 
into a seamless whole. 

• A colossal $100 billion collection 
of commercial and residential building 
projects is rising in the traditional city 
center, long scaned by the “deato strip” 
abutting the wall. The biggest of these 
will feature a “city within a city,” like 
New York’s Rockefeller Center, ere c- 

See BERLIN, Page 7 


By Alan Cowell 

New Tort Tunes Service 

BONN — It is one of the few para- 
doxes of this bland city that for all its 
days as a hub of toe Cold War, it never 
even began to shake the sobriquet at- 
tached to it decades ago try John Le 
Carre: a small town in Germany. 

Over the years, this university town 
by the Rhine acquired an opera house, 
a concert hall and fine art galleries. But 
it rarely transcended the image of an 
introverted place subsisting mainly on 
the influence-peddling and power 
plays of government. 

. Now, though. Bonn confronts what 
is arguably its greatest challenge since 
it became West Germany's postwar 
"provisional capital:” How will the 


city of 300,000 reinvent itself when 
most of toe ministers, legislators and 
diplomats move to Berlin, the real cap- 
ital, by toe end of toe century? 

Wfott will happen to toe grand villas 
where toe American and other am- 
bassadors live and toe offices that 
bouse the bureaucrats? 

What use will be made of one of 
Bonn's more curious Cold War 
leftovers — the so-called American 
Settlement on the banks of the Rhine, 
where American-modeled church, 
schools, football field, baseball dia- 
monds, movie house, fast-food joint 
and club still stand as icons of the 
values to be protected against the one- 
time menace of the Kremlin? 

See BONN, Page 7 


The Man Who Would Be Czar 


' BvLee Hockstader . . 

•: • -■ .. 

. MOSCOW —Tbe.wall clock in Alexander Lebed's 
austere office is five hours fast. He can't explain it, 
seems aeveF to ha ve noticed When asked, he scowls ai 
it, then scowls some more ai his wristwatch. 

No matter. Mr. Lebed is convinced his time is 
drawing near. 

With President Boris Yeltsin ailing and toe country 
adrift, Mr. Lebed, 46, remains by far toe most popular 
politician in Russia. He vows he will be toe next 
president, and opinion polls suggest he may be right 

“I am ready for toe elections,” said the retired 
general, beaming with confidence. 

No doubt. But toe problem for Mr. Lebed is what to 
do rathe meantime — and how to keep his name in 
lights. No elections are scheduled here until 2000. and 
by all appearances, no one of consequence in Russia 
requires Mr. Lebed’s presence right now. 


His life is an endless stream of interviews and news 
conferences, often back to back. On Tuesday, he jetted 
off to Germany. Next week he may appear in Wash- 
ington for President Bill Clinton's inauguration. 

Disdaining the role of legislator, apparently con- 
vinced that all jobs save the presidency are beneath 
him, Mr. Lebed has declined to run for a seat in toe 
upper house of Parliament, even though he could have 
won one easily. Instead, he is Russia’s gravel-voiced 
Chicken Little, telling all who will listen that social 
upheaval is coming — in March, to be specific. 

“Russia is a vast country, and it’s difficult to move 
it off-center,” he said daddy in a session with several 
foreign correspondents Monday. “But once the up- 
heaval has started, it will be hard to stop the mo- 
mentum.” 

By comparison, “Bosnia and Bulgaria will seem 
like picnics,” he said. 

See LEBED, Page 7 



AGENDA 

Hebron Deal Imminent 

JERUSALEM (AP) — Prime Minister Benjamin Net- 
anyahu of Israel was to meet Tuesday night with the 
Palestinian leader, Yasser Arafat, apparently to. wind up toe 
Hebron withdrawal agreement 
“I think it’s the finish,” said the U.S. consul-general, 
Edward Abingion. 

A spokesman for Mr. Arafat, Nabfl Abourdemeh, said 
the two leaders would meet at midnight at toe Erez c rossin g 
between Israel and the Palestinian-controlled Gaza Strip. 

A senior Israeli official, speaking on condition of an- 
onymity, said the meeting could end with “agreement, bat 
not a signing.” . . ' . ' ■ .. 

x ‘They still have still to negotiate a few points, he said. 
But the official added that the meeting would not be held 

4 ‘if we were not reasonably certain that it could end well. 

The negotiations have been going on since October. 

Antihistamme Is Deemed Unsafe 

Seldane, the antihistamine, is unsafe and should be taken 
off toe market, the U.S. Food and Drag Administration said. 
It has been blamed for perhaps hundreds of deaths from 



Arab Paper Resists Terror 

Letter Bombs Target Outspoken Al Hayat, 
Which Has Enemies as Well as Admirers 


unstable heart rhythms when taken with the antibiotic erym- 
romycin or with the antifungal drag ketoconozole. Page 2. 

Asian SodedM Where Onfy o Stni‘ It o. Joy • . 

— — — : 1 — . ' “ A Palestinian carrying her brother Tuesday in front 

the Americas ■ • . ' of barbed wire protecting a Hebron settlement. 

Ranking De mocrat Quits Gingrich Investigation • 

BUS I NESS/FfMAMCE P«Se11. Books ,....Pagt6, Opinion Pages8-9. 

SonthKowa Threatens Rttnce Over Daewoo Snub Crossword, —Page 10. Sports Pages 18-19. 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — On a spring evening in 
Beirut in 1 966, Kamel Mrowa looked up 
from final proofs of his beloved news- 
paper Al Hayat to stare at his assassin's 
gun. 

“My father died with two phones in 
his hands and his pen on .his desk be- 
cause he refused to back down or shut 
up. And, here they go again," said Hay- 
at Palumbo Mrowa, the 47 -year-old 
daughter of the paper's founder. She 
was named Hayat, or life, after her fath- 
er’s beloved journal. 

The killer had been sent, it is widely 
believed, to silence Al Hayal’s oppo- 
sition to the nascent Arab nationalist 
movement, then led by President Gamal 
Abdel Nasser of Egypt 

Having survived decades of plotting, 
controversy, extortion and exile since its 
founding in 1946, Al Hayat is now sub- 
ject to a new terror bombing campaign. 

“It’s our karma," said Lady Hayat, 
who is married to Lord Palumbo, m a 
conversation in London on Tuesday. 

Four bombs, with postmarks in Al- 
exandria, Egypt, were sent to toe United 
Nations bureau of the paper and dis- 


covered on Monday and Tuesday. The 
devices were safely defused. 

Similar devices were mailed this 
month to the paper's offices in Riyadh, 
London and Washington. 

Before toe Lebanese civil war forced 
it to shut its offices in Beirut in 1976, toe 
paper had been the target ofl 3 bombing 
attempts. The paper was resurrected in 
London 10 years ago. 

Over the last two weeks unknown 
individuals have mailed at least 14 letter 
bombs to its headquarters and its bur- 
eaus in New York, Washington and 
Riyadh. 

One of the bombs wounded two se- 
curity guards as it exploded in the news- 
paper's building in London on 
Monday. 

So what is a newspaper founded by a 
Lebanese Shiite Muslim half a century 
ago, purchased by a Saudi prince a few 
years ago and managed for the last de- 
cade by a highly professional team of 
Lebanese Muslim. Catholic, Maronite 
and Druze editors and reporters from 
every political and ideological comer in 
toe Arab world doing to merit such 
retribution? As they drifted to work 

See BOMBS, Page 7 


Kai PfUTenbocMCemai 

Alexander Lebed arriving Tuesday in Frankfurt 
where be said he would be Russia’s next leader. 


Opposition 
Is Declared 
The Winner 
In Belgrade 

Protests to Continue; 
Milosevic’s Party Gets 
48 Hours to Appeal 

By Chris Hedges 

New fly* Timex Service 

BELGRADE — Belgrade’s electoral 
commission, in a move that could signal 
a government decision to give up its 
attempt to annul election victories by its 
political opponents, said Monday that 
the opposition coalition had won control 
of the capital’s city council. 

The news, greeted cautiously by the 
coalition leaders and Western diplo- 
mats, could bring an end to the two 
months of daily street protests that erup- 
ted alter toe government annulled op- 
position victories in 14 of Serbia's 18 
largest cities. But these officials 
stressed that toe government statements 
remained ambiguous, without legal pre- 
cedent, and had granted President 
Slobodan Milosevic's Socialist Party 48 
hours to appeal the decision. 

The move, which overruled an earlier 
district court decision, was announced 
by toe head of the election commission, 
Radomir Larazevic. It was followed 
later in the day by an announcement that 
toe local electoral board in Nis. Serbia’s 
second largest city, would also honor 
the opposition election victory there, 
despite a call on Monday to carry out a 
new vote in several districts. 

“I remain cautious because there are 
48 hours during which appeals against 
the decision can be made." Ve&na Pes- 
ic, an opposition leader, said in Paris, 
where she was meeting French offi- 
cials. 

"if the results are recognized, then 
yes, it would be a turnaround because up 
to now toe government has always said 
that elections would not be recog- 
nized.” she said. 

Mr. Lazarevic said thai toe oppo- 
sition coalition Zajedno, or Together, 
had won 60 of the 1 10 seats in toe main 
city council. Mr. Milosevic’s Socialist 
Party, allied with his wife's Yugoslav 
United Left Party, would be given 23 
seats, with the remainder going to other 
parries. 

* ‘These may be toe cracks in the ice,’ ’ 
said a Western diplomat. “This could 
see us out of the crisis." 

Opposition leaders said they would 
not call off daily street protests, which 
drew more than 300.000 people to the 
city center Monday night to celebrate 
toe Serbian New Year, until election 
victories in all 14 of the cities they won 
in November were honored. 

Western diplomats here said that 
deep splits remained within the gov- 
ernment. And they noted that despite 
orders from Belgrade, party officials in 
Nis tried to defy toe government de- 
cision to hand toe city over to toe op- 
position. Such mutinies by hard-line 
Factions remained a possibility, these 
officials said. 

But Mr. Milosevic, who has been 
criticized by senior members of his own 
government and told by close allies, 
such as Greece, to honor the vote, ap- 
pears ready to concede defeat rather 
toon risk further isolation. 

The U.S. State Department has re- 
fused to send senior envoys, such as 
Assistant Secretary of State John Kom- 
blum. who was in the region this week, 
to meet with the Serbian presidem. 

Mr. Komblum announced this week 
that the U.S. government had drawn up 
an “action plan" to support democracy 
in Serbia. He said that trade with the 
United States would be discouraged and 
that assistance to pro-democracy groups 
would be expanded. 

“We’re trying to tighten the pressure 
on Milosevic and to demonstrate to him 
that there is a penalty to the type of 
behavior dial he has shown.” the State 
Department spokesman, Nicholas 
Bums, said in Washington. 

■ ‘First Step Toward Sanity 3 

Welcoming the Belgrade ruling, one 
of the key opposition leaders, Vuk 
Draskovic, said, “If it’s true, then it is 
toe first step of the Serbian government 
toward sanity.” Agence France-Presse 
reported. “We must be very careful." 
he added, saying toe reaction from the 
Socialists and courts would show if Mr. 
Milosevic has decided to accept the 
opposition victories. 


Mww&stand Price* 


Andorra 10.00 
AntiBes,.. .,..,..,15150 FF 
Cameroon ..1 .600 CFA 

Egypt „^.J££ 550 

France 10 . 00 FF 

Gabon .........1 TOO CFA 

Greece — — -350 Dr. 
ttaly 2,000 lire 

tvwy Coast. 1-250 CFA 
Jordan 1.250JD 


Lebanon L L 3,000 

Morocco -.18 Oh 

Qatar 1000 Hbls 

Reunion 125QR- 

Saudi Arabia - 10.00 A 

ShnegaL.-.I.IOOCFA 

Spaifu ;.*~225 PTAS 

Tunisia 1550 On 

CCA.E _1CUXJWi 

U.S. MiL fEur.)~~$1 .20 


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Tmadayctaa* 

IJ598 

1.6716- 

116J3 

5.376 

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8762^9 . 


TuaaBtytiqw . 
708.86 


prmdomtiBBB 

1.5887 

1.6755 

116.475 

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pmfcuictoMi 


prevtaafloag 

75651 


Tiptoeing Post China, Japan Extends a Hand to Asia 


' ’ " .By Michael Richardson 

■ Sraenumprud Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — In a move to strengthen its role in 
Asia, Japan on Tuesday proposed a wide-ranging 
partnership that would extend its relations with South- 
east Asian countries beyond strong economic ties into 
high-level political and security cooperation. 

The plan put forward by Prime Minister Ryu taro 
Hashimoto is an acknowledgment of the increasing 
international importance of toe Association of South 
East Asian Nations. But analysis said that it could 
annoy Beijing, which- might see it as a move to 


create a possible counterweight to Chinese might 
In a speech in Singapore described by Japanese 
officials as an important new statement of Tokyo’s 
policy toward Asia, Mr. Hashimoto said that he had 
gained toe agreement of toe five ASEAN leaders he 
had met for “the basic idea” of regular summit 
meetings between the group and Japan. 

He also said that to “ensure peace and stability in 
the Asia Pacific in the 21st century,” he wanted Japan 
to start “flank dialogues on regional security with 
each of toe ASEAN countries on a bilateral basis.” 
Mr. Hashimoto said that “several unstable factors 
persist” in the region. He did not identify them, but 


Japanese officials have expressed concern in toe past 
about China’s military modernization, its refusal to 
rale out the use of force against Taiwan. Beijing’s 
sweeping territorial and maritime claims in East Asia, 
and North Korea’s clandestine nuclear weapons and 
missile development programs. 

The Japanese leader was speaking after talks in 
Brunei. Indonesia. Malaysia and Vietnam as well as 
Singapore. He visited the other two ASEAN members 
— Thailand and the Philippines — last year. 

“Given the increasing importance of ASEAN as an 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1997 

PAGE TWO 


Pressure Against Girls / Abort and Try Again 

It’s a Boy! Koreans Exult 


By Sheryl WuDunn 


;Vt*w York Times Service 

S EOUL — When Lee Young Sun was preg- 
nant for the second time, she secretly paid a 
doctor to learn the sex of the fetus. He told 
her she would have a girl, and she took off 
with her family on a vacation in misery. 

She and her husband already had a daughter, and 
after considering the issue very carefully, they 
reached their decision. Mrs. Lee went to the doctor 
and had an abortion. 

suggested it to my husband, and now I feel 
differently, but at that rime, I fell driven to think that 
an abortion was necessary.” said Mrs. Lee, 35. 
"My husband says that he doesn't need a son. But 
when 1 ask him. ‘Will it be good to have a son?" he 
keeps silent. In that case, I assume his answer is 
ves." 

Echoing the contradictions of her generation, 
Mrs. Lee was tom between the demands of tradition 
and a growing appreciation for females in Korean 
society. Even as greater numbers of women stand by 
their baby girls, they also feel an age-old obligation 
to bear sons. 

So they secretly abort fetuses of females and try 
again. 

South Korea has 30.000 fewer girls bom each 
year than would be the case if there were no such 
abortions. That compares with 330,000 girls bom 
each year, suggesting that about one female fetus in 
1 2 is a boned because of its sex. China. India and 
other countries are also discovering that expectant 
mothers are aborting female fetuses, resulting in 
shortages of women and girls in society*. 

In this country of 45 million people, there are 
nearly 1 16 boys bora for every 100 girls, one of the 
highest such ratios of any country in the world. The 
only comparable figure is in China, where 118.5 
boys are bom for every 100 girls, according to a 
nationwide survey by the Chinese government in 
1992. The survey so shocked officials in Beijing 
that they never formally released the results. 

In other countries of all races and income levels 
where data are reliable, the ratio is 105 or 106 boys 
bom for every 100 girls. Because boys tend to die 
earlier, that ratio becomes one to one when the boys 
and girls grow up. But in some regions of South 
Korea, the figure has soared to as high as 125. 

E xcept in rare cases, abortions are illegal in 
South Korea, and disclosing the sex of a 
fetus is also against the law. But that is very 
hard to police, and doctors are said often to 
disclose the sex of a fetus in exchange for a bribe. 

In South Korea, the pressure to have sons often 
comes from women themselves, particular mothers- 
in-law. and some women feel that they have failed 
their husbands if they have not produced a male 
heir. 

When Lee Tae Rim. 29. gave birth to her daugh- 
ter. everyone in the family seemed happy. But soon 
after, her mother-in-law began to mutter that it was 
a shame the child was not a boy. Then Mrs. Lee 
became pregnant again and had a son. 

"My mother-in-law called up my sister-in-law 
three times to tell her it was a boy! " exclaimed Mrs. 
Lee. who stays at home to care for her two children. 
"Soon after! delivered my son, my parents-in-law 


moved us into a larger apartment. They figured that 
we needed an extra room for the baby boy." 

Since 1994, aborting female fetuses has been a 
criminal act, but it has also been a common one. The 
government has been trying to crack down on 
underground abortion doctors, and it arrested sev- 
eral doctors in October for revealing the sex of 
fetuses. 

That adds to the pressure on expectant mothers, 
whose fears are sometimes groundless. 

"It makes women very “nervous, especially if 
they are married to the first son in a line of first sons, 
and if she doesn't have a boy, she may fear sbe will 
be divorced," said Kwak Bae Hee. who helps run 
the Korea Legal Aid Center for Family Relations. 
‘ ‘Say a family has no son and only a daughter, who 
gets married. Then from the family's point of view, 
when the father dies, (he family dies with him. ” 

Traditional pressures were spuming around in the 
head of Park Un Hee. a 28-year-old pregnant wo- 
man who appeared distraught as she waited for her 
doctor's appointment at a Seoul hospital. 

"The doctor won't say, but I hope it is a son," 
said Mrs. Park, who has a 2-year-old daughter and 
during her pregnancy has seen rising expectations 
from her in-laws. “They don't say it openly, but I 
know they want a son." 

"Sometimes they tell me that the way I walk 
reveals the sex of the fetus, and sometimes they 
comment on the shape of my body," Mrs. Park 
added, a bit dejectedly. "From all the comments, I 
think it's another daughter." 

M rs. Park says she is already planning to 
have another child if this one is a girl. 
"This country is a male-dominated 
country,' ' said Lee Sea Baick, a demo- 
grapher at Seoul National University. "We look 
down on women. This concept comes from Con- 
fucianism. And we can't develop women’s status 
without destroying some traditional Confucian- 
ism." 

Most Korean women do not pursue careers, and 
professional opportunities for them are limited. 

In the 1970s. survey data showed that 27 percent of 
Korean women allowed their husbands to have con- 
cubines if they could not bear sons themselves. That 
is no longer true, and concubines have disappeared. 

In 1990. the government legally removed dis- 
crimination against women in property inheritance, 
and it has banned companies from recruiting em- 
ployees with "males only” advertisements. 

Still, favoritism toward sons persists, particularly 
in marriage. 

Though mores are modernizing. Korean sons 
have traditionally brought their wives into the nu- 
clear family, while daughters have married out. 
giving rise to the old Korean saying that sons-in-law 
never become family members. 

"We'll have a shortage of girls." said Cho Nam 
Hoon. a population scholar who heads the Korea 
Institute for Health and Social Affairs. "And we’ll 
have to import from abroad." 

Already there is a shortage of girls in the ele- 
mentary schools. Lee Yon Ha, a 7-year-old first 
grader, and her 13 girlfriends in the coed classroom 
at the Segomjong Elementary School are surroun- 
ded by 23 boys. 

"I don’t like all these boys around." she said. 



South Korea has 30,000 fewer 
girls born each year than would . 
be the case if there were no 
abortions. That suggests that 
about one female fetus in 12 is 
aborted because of its sex. 


speaking shyly as a few boys were leaping on their 
desks. "They are always fighting." 

But the boys are already sensing the lack: During 
folk dances at traditional festivals in the fall, several 
boys had to dance together because of the shortage 
of girls. 

When Mrs. Lee. the woman who had an abortion, 
subsequently bad another daughter five years ago, 
her father-in-law came to her during her recovery to 
ask her when sbe could get pregnant again. 

Then one day, he handed her a newspaper ad- 
vertisement on how to give birth to sons. Mrs. Lee 
took the advertisement, stuffed it in her wallet and 
never followed up. 

"My mother-in-law never said a word before, but 
lately she’s been suggesting: Why don’t you have 
another child, before it gets too late?” Mrs. Lee said. 
"My father-in-law doesn’t put pressure on his own 
son, but at the family ancestral worship ritual, he 
wishes that the ancestors bless my husband with a 
son.” 

Mrs. Lee says she loves her daughters and does 
not want a son . but there are moments of i ndecision. 
Wien she rides the bus or the subway with her two 
daughters, elderly women often come up to her with 
faces full of pity. 

"They ask me. 'Have you no son?' And I say. 
no." Mrs. Lee said. "Then they say. ‘Oh, you must 
bear a son.' That kind of remark makes me wonder 
for a few seconds: Am l doing the right thing by not 
having a son? Thai kind of remark makes me angry 
and embarrassed.” ■* 


Popular Antihistamine Deemed Unsafe 


By John Schwartz 


Wiishmyton Pnu Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — The popular an- 
tihistamine Seldane is unsafe and should 
be taken off the market, the U.S. Food 
and Drug Administration has an- 
nounced. 

Since its introduction in 1985, the 
drug has been blamed for perhaps hun- 
dreds of deaths from unstable bean 
rhythms when taken with the common 
antibiotic erythromycin or with the an- 


tifungal drug ketoconozole, the agency 
said Monday. Patients with liver disease 
have also reported abnormal heart 
rhythms when taking Seldane alone. 

The agency suggested that users talk 
with their doctors about switching from 
Seldane. also known as terfenadme. to 
another prescription antihistamine. Al- 
legro. or fexofenadine, which was ap- 
proved in July. Allegra has the same 
beneficial effects as Seldane without any 
of the harmful side effects, said Robert 
Temple, director of the agency's Office 


of Drug Evaluation. Both drugs are made 
by Hoechst Marion Roussel, a subsi- 
diary of the German company Hoechst. 

Pharmacists filled 6.5 million pre- 
scriptions for Seldane products between 
January and November of last year in 
the United States, according to Hoechst 
Seldane is also marketed outside the 
United States. In certain countries, it is 
sold under the names Teldane, Teldanex 
or Triludan, according to Hoechst and 
the Food and Drug Administration. 

Hoescht intends to fight the agency 
action, but at the same time, the com- 
pany has been encouraging consumers 
to switch to Allegra. 

Seldane was the first anti-allergy 
drug approved that does not make most 
users drowsy. Because Seldane’s po- 
tentially dangerous interactions with 
other drugs have long been known, reg- 
ulators ana Hoechst have repeatedly is- 
sued warnings to doctors, pharmacists 
and patients to avoid taking the an- 
tihistamine with those other drugs. 

Such warnings have caused the num- 
ber of Seldane-related incidents to drop 
sharply over time. But recent surveys 
have shown that some doctors and phar- 
macists continue to prescribe the po- 
tentially fatal combinations. Also, Mr. 
Temple said, even if pharmacists and 
doctors prescribe the drug properly, con- 
sumers may not follow their advice. 


U.S. Balloonist 
On Solo Flight 

Reuters 

ST. LOUIS, Missouri — An 
American lifted off on an around- 
the-world solo balloon flight late on 
Monday from Busch Stadium in Sl 
L ouis, an expedition spokesman 
said. 

Steve Fossett, 52. a wealthy Col- 
orado-based commodities broker, 
piloted his "Solo Spirit" balloon 
out of the stadium and over the 
Mississippi River, the spokesman. 
Bo Kemper, said. . > 

"The launch went very 
smoothly.” Mr. Kemper said. "It 
was a beautiful visual.” 

Mr. Fos sett's flight is the third 
attempt in less titan a week at an 
around -the- world balloon trip. It 
follows recent failures by rival 
teams in Europe and North Africa 
to crack one of manned flight’s 
great barriers, a goal that also 
eluded Mr. Fossett a year ago when 
his balloon crashed in Canada dur- 
ing a similar attempt. 

He already holds a world dis- 
tance record for a solo balloon 
flight, set in 1995 when he flew 
from South Korea to Canada. 


9 More Decapitated, Algeria Says 


rijWlCV Fram e-Prcsse 

ALGIERS — Algerian security 
forces have found nine decapitated 
bodies in the Algiers region, the daily 
newspaper El Watan reported Tues- 
day. 

Five bodies were found at Djebei 
Koukou. in an area near Algiers that is 
said to be a refuge for armed fun- 
damentalist fugitives and where se- 
curity forces have carried out several 
operations, the newspaper said. 

Four others were found at Oued El 
Kerma. near Baba Ali. at the southern 
exit from the capital, it added. 


The newspaper did not specify the 
age or sex of the victims or say when 
the bodies were found. 

Early Monday, the throats of 14 
persons were slit in the village of 
Tabainat near Blida. south of Algiers. 
Some of the victims were also de- 
capitated and mutilated with spades. 
The throats of five young girls also 
were slit in the nearby village of 
Ouled Chebel. 

According to press reports, the 
killings were carried out by members 
of the Armed Islamic Group, Algeria's 
most radical Muslim rebel group. 


Sudanese Rebels Clai 



To Capture Ar 


ii 


y Posts 


C<*rded*Oir ShfFrvn Dtsruahts 

ASMARA, Eritrea — The Sudan 
People’s Liberation Army said Tuesday 
that a joint rebel force had captured 
important Sudanese Army garrisons in 
the southern Blue Nile region. 

The rebel army's spokesman in Er- 
itrea, Y as sir Annan, said the operation 
was carried out Monday by a force 
formed by an umbrella opposition 
group* the National Democratic Alli- 
ance. The rebels captured three bases, at 
A1 Kali, Daimonsoor and Shali al FiL he 
said, and attacked the garrison at 
Maban. 

Mr. Arman would not give a figure 
for casualties. 

The new victories claimed by the 
rebels follow statements Sunday that 
they had captured the border town of 
Kurmuk and other army garrisons in 
Blue Nile Province as part of the first big 
combined operation by northern and 
southern opponents of the Islamic mil- 
itary government in Khartoum. 

The rebels in Kunmik, which is near 
the Ethiopian border, say they now have 
a foothold to launch an assault on the 
Muslim government in the capital, 
Khartoum, 600 kilometers (370 miles) 
to the northwest 

“I believe this is where we can win 
the war," said a rebel commander, Paul 
Malik Agar. "You can win the war only 
in Khartoum. This is the shortest way to 
Khartoum." 

A decade of civil war in Sudan, 
Africa's largest country, has mainly pit- 
ted the Arab Muslim north against the 
black Christian south. More than 1-3 
million people have died in the fighting 
and resulting famines. 

The government, which took power 
in a 1 989 coup, is described as a sponsor 
of terrorism by the United States, and 
Egypt accused it of being behind an 
assassination attempt on President 
Hosni Mubarak. Last year, the U.S. gov- 
ernment said it was sending military aid 
to Sudan's neighbors, Eritrea, Ethiopia 


and Uganda, which support Sudanese f- 
opposition groups. 

In Khartoum, an armed forces state- • 
mem referred only obliquely to the ; 
rebels, saying border towns had been * 
attacked by Ethiopian forces that were * 
accompanied by what it called rem- •• 
nants of agents and mercenaries. - 
Ethiopia denied invojvemem in the 
fighting. ‘‘ 

In an apparent effort to prepare public 
opinion tor a military campaign. Sudan _ 
state radio and television broadcast pa- 1 . 
triotic and military songs and poetry, 
along with messages supporting the 
government and attacking what they 
called the Ethiopian aggression. 

The radio said the Osman Digna bri- 
gade of the paramilitary People's De- 
fense Forces was preparing to leave 
Khartoum for Kurmuk. Sudan's leader. 
Lieutenant General Omar Hassan 
Ahmad Bashir, said the forces must 
"defend the homeland and deter the 
enemies of Islam. 

Despite tire rebel victories, analysts 
said they expected the Sudanese gov- 
ernment to succeed in repelling the 
guerrillas. 

"I don’t think this will change the 
situation dramatically." said Hassan 
Abu Taleb. an expert on Sudan at the 
Ahram Center in Cairo. “I think the 
Sudanese government will take steps to 
recapture tiie territory." 

The war has been hard on the civilian 
population, but the Sudanese govern- 
ment has made Blue Nile Province — 
and other territory held by the rebels — 
off-limits to aid groups. 

Baroness Caroline Cox of Britain, 
who was in the region until Saturday for 
the charity Christian Solidarity Inter- 
national, condemned "the politics of 
hunger waged by the government of 
Sudan against its "own people.” 

The baroness urged the international 
community to pressure Khartoum to 
open all regions of Sudan to human- 
itarian aid. (Reuters. AP) 


Mandela Aide Accuses U.S. 
Of Bullying on Syrian Deal 


Reuters 

CAPE TOWN — President Nelson 
Mandela’s spokesman accused the 
United States chi Tuesday of trying to 
bully South Africa over a proposed arms 
deal with Syria and said that Pretoria 
would not be dictated to by Washing- 
ton. 

"We detest this kind of behavior.” the 
spokesman. Parks Mankahlana, said in 
response to a U.S. threat to cut aid to 
South Africa if it goes ahead with the 3 
billion rand ($650 million) sale to Syria. 

"We don’t understand even why the 
Americans are so hyped over this 
thing,” Mr. Mankahlana said. “We’d 
rather be spoken to differently, as 
equals.’’ 

South African government officials 
have said the cabinet will decide at its 
next meeting, later this month, whether 
to approve the sale to Syria of equip- 
ment to upgrade the firing control on its 
Soviet-made T-72 tanks. 

Syria is on a list of countries that the 


United States accuses of sponsoring ter- ; 
rorism and against which k seeks to '. 
maintain an international arms em- * 
bargo. 

In Washington, the State Department < 
said Monday that it was deeply' con- ! 
cemed about the proposed sale. "It ■ 
would be extremely serious- if these | 
sales actually, occurred. ■■ if*aid. - . 

- Mr. Mankahlana said* 'the,- United ; 
States should not have gone public with 
its concerns in the way that it did. ; 

"President Clinton and President ! 
Mandela are a call away from each ■ 
other.” he said. “They phone each oth- | 
er very regularly." 

“We just don’t like being shouted aL ) 
We hope that they would know that it is . 
not the right way of dealing with us. We ’ 
are a sovereign country, and they are a -- 
sovereign country." 

South Africa, which is a major re- 
cipient of U.S. aid, has offended Wash- . 
ington by maintaining warm relations* 
with Cuba, Libya and Iran. 


Rwanda Politician Goes on Trial 
On Charges of Inciting Genocide 


Reuters 

KIGALI. Rwanda — Rwanda put on 
trial Tuesday a prominent politician ac- 
cused of being a ringleader of the 1994 
genocide of minority Tutsi master- 
minded by Hutu extremists — despite 
being an ethnic Tutsi himself. 

Froduald Karamira was a vice pres- 
ident of the extremist MDR-Power 
party under the former Hutu-led gov- 
ernment and is the most senior suspect 
held in Rwanda on charges of taking 
part in the genocide. About 800,000 
people were killed in Rwanda. 

He is accused of being a leader of the 
Interahamwe militia that led the attacks 
in the capital, Kigali, and was allegedly 
responsible for inciting genocide 


through broadcasts on^state-nm 1 Radio- f 
-Rwanda and Radio Mille Collines. 

Mr. Karamira > defense lawyer, Paul * 
Atita, who is from Benin, immediately 
applied for an adjournment of 15 days,' : 
saying that he had never met his client j 
before and had not prepared himself for \ 
the case. ' 

Mr. Karamira also requested a J 
delay. 

The presiding judge, Jariel Rutare- 
mara, adjourned the trial until Jan. 29. n . 

The trial of four Hutu, who had been ' 
charged along with Mr. Karamira, pro- 1 * 
ceeded Tuesday. J - 

If convicted, Mr. Karamira and the r 
four other defendants face death by 
ing squad. “ 


DEATH NOTICE 


Mr & Mrs Bruno Francois, 
his daughter and children. 
Mrs Martial DuBoucheron 
and her daughter. 

The DuBoucheron family, 
brotheis. sisters, nephews & 
grand-nephews sadly announce 
the departure for the 
ultimate voyage of 

GUY-LOUIS 

on the Carribcan on January 2nd. 
A religious ceremony will take 
place on Saturday-. January 18th 

zt 10:30 a.m. onboard 
“Le Colonier, Port Debillv, 
"Sl 16 Paris. Tel.: 01 67 23 96 95. 


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Honolulu. HI 968144922 



TRAVEL UPDATE 


Aristotle’s School Found 

ATHENS I AFP) — The ruins of the Ly- 
ceum. where Aristotle taught two and a half 
millennia ago, have been unearthed in central 
Athens, according to Culture Minister Evan- 
gelos Venizelos. 

The Central Council of Archaeology con- 
firmed that ruins found on the site of Athens’s 
new modem art museum are those of the 
Lyceum, the minister said. 

The philosopher Aristotle lived from 384 
to 322 B .C. and taught at the Lyceum from the 
age of 49 until his retirement at 62. 

The Lyceum was one of the three great 
schools of philosophy in anrienr Greece, to- 
gether with Plato’s academy and the school 
established by the Cynics after the death of 
Socrates. 

Warning on Air Safety 

WASHINGTON (Reuters! — A senior 
Boeing Co. official has said that growth in the 
aviation industry' could halt if air safety is not 
improved. 

Charles Higgins, vice president for safety 


r 


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of Boeing's commercial plane group, told an 
aviation safety conference that if the current 
air traffic growth rate and current accident 
rate continued, there would probably be an 
accident somewhere in the world every week 
by 2005. 

Data suggested that air travel drops off 
after major accidents, and with a major ac- 
cident every week or two, * ‘public confidence 
could erode to the point where growth in the 
industry might stop," be said. 

Tourists Favor France 

PARIS (AFP) — France was the favorite 
destination for foreign vacationers last year, 
playing host to 61-5 million tourists, the 
French tourist authority said. 

The number of visitors was 2.4 percent 
higher than in 1995, while the cash they spent 
was 5 percent higher at 144.2 billion francs 
($27 billion). 

A general review of Italian railroad safety 
has begun and Mill be completed by the 
summer, the national rail company's director, 
Giancarlo Cimoli. said Tuesday. (AFP) 


Europe 


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Forecast tor Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 



North America 
Seasonable and unearned 

In the Eat Thursday, dun 
cohlar Friday and Satur- 
day. The Great takas, 
Northeast end mid-ABartlc 
nil tum Wttarty cold Friday 
and Saturday as the eon 
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Manty dry and seasonable 
across the Rockies and 
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Europe 

Much of Europe wll be dry 
with near- id abovemomel 
temperatures through Sat- 
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wtt affect the British Islas 
Friday and Saturday; the 
showers will reach Paris 
Saturday. These near- to 
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Beijing and Seoul will be 
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through Saturday. Season- 
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V-^i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, "WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1997 


PAGE 3 


Sy John E, Yang 

_ WuAwgloH Port Swv>r? 

' Washington 

ethics^ 
oftbe speaker of the House of 
Representatives, Newt Gin- 
^ doubt on his 

**£ <Hd not in- 
tentionally mislead tbe House 
ethics committee and have 
jested die committee's 
JpP Democrat in potential 
criminal charges involving an 
intercepted telephone call 
First came die disclosure 
Jjat Representative Tom 
J^jopbell, Republican of 
California and a Stanford 
University law professor, told 
Mr. Gingrich in a closed-door 


Panel Member Resigns 

Tke Associajed Press 

. WASHINGTON — The House ethics committee's 
tanking Democrat removed himself Tuesday from the 
investigation of Ne w Gingrich, bowing to pressure over 
his role in the handling of a tapedphone call involving die 
Hoose speaker. Representative Jim McDermott, Demo- 
crat of Washington, said he would step aside “as a matter 
of conscience” less than a week before tbe panel votes on 
penalties for Mr. Gingrich's violation of House rules. 


meeting, of House Republi- 
cans last week that be 
spoken with the speaker's at- 
torney and concluded that Mr. 
Gingrich intentionally lied to 
Ms Lawyer and to the ethics 


JohnQ. Citizen and Wife 

Florida Couple Tell How They Taped the Speaker 


By Rick Bragg 

New York Times Service ■ 

GAINESVILLE, Florida — John Martin 
said be and his wife, Alice, were on their 
way to Jacksonville, Florida, to do some 
Christmas shopping on Dec. 21 when they 
picked up a “part of history” on their hand- 
held police scanner. 

What they heard was Speaker Newt" Gin- 
grich discussing with other high-ranking 
House Republicans how. to react to ethics 
committee charges against him. It was the 
same day that he had promised not to use his 
office and allies to orchestrate a response to 
those charges. 

When they recognized who was speaking 
on the cellular telephone transmission they 
had happened upon. ‘T was so excited to 
think I had actually heard areal politician's 
voice." said Mrs. Vfarrm sfnndm g shpnldff 
to shoulder with her husband at a news 
conference here Monday about the tape, 
which has led to acrimonious charges by 
Republicans. 

‘‘We were thrilled,” she said. 

The middle-aged couple — he is a main- 
tenance man at a school and she is a teach- 
er’s aide — are active in both the National 
Education Association and the Democratic 
Party in their home county in northern 
Florida, so they lave a keen interest in 
politics. 

Mir. Martin said they used a small tape 
recorder to record the conversation, plan- 
ning to play back the voice of the famous 
politician someday for their unborn grand- 
son, Matthew, who is due in three weeks. - 

But as they listened, they changed their 
mind. They took die tape to thetr repre- 
sentative. Karen Thonnan, aDanqcrat, and 
later, mi her advice, look tbe tape^ to the 1 
senior Democrat an fee Hfe^iefejcs com--. . 
mittee. Representative jim McDermott 

Theysaidtbeydfonotgjveihetapetotbe 
press but that politicians did. • 

“They did what good citizens ought to 
do, which was contact their congrcssper- 
son," said die couple’s lawyer, Larry Turn- 
er. “These folks are Mr. and Mrs. John Q. 
Citizen and did what we want citizens to 
do.” 


He said partisan politics did not play a 
role in their decision to come forward. 

The New York Tunes reported last Fri- 
day that a couple in Florida unsympathetic 
to Mr. Gingrich had provided a tape of the 
telephone call from a police scanner that 
happened to pick up a cellular telephone 
transmission. The article also reported dial 
a Democratic congressman had made a 
copy of the tape available to tbe news- 


couple from northern Florida, who just hap- 
ped to be politically active Democrats, 
would eavesdrop on a high-level Repub- 
lican conversation and tell about it. 

- But that is exactly what happened, Mr. 
Turner said. . . 

“I fed we did the right dung," Mr. 
Martin said. He compared the situation to a 
scenario in which he overheard the pres- 
ident or some other high-ranking official 
discussing an issue of national security with 
a foreign enemy. It was his “civic ditty” to 
tell, be said. 

The couple could face prosecution — 
and indeed some Washington Republicans 
are insisting on it — although Mr. Turner 
said no charges had been filed so far. It is a 
violation of state and federal law to eaves- 
drop on a cellular or bard-wired telephone 
conversation intentionally. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin said they never 
believed that it would lead to this, when 
they recognized that , voice. (Their lawyer 
would not permit them to use the speaker's 
name in tbe news conference.) 

Mr. Martin once served as treasurer of 
the Columbia County Democratic Exec- 
utive Committee and Mrs. Martin was once 
its secretary. 

: Political activism is almostabobby with 
tfe coHpfe r ^Jiey eat meals, with political 
programs playing on die television in the 
background. He saidiheir two children used 
to ldd them about iL 

. Another hobby is their scanner. They 
pick up all kinds of transmissions, and 
bought a newer, more powerful unit over 
Christmas. 

“To the horizon," he answered, when 
asked its range. 


THE AMERICAS 


McDermott, Democrat of 
Washington, the ethics com- 
mittee’s top Democrat 

On the tape, made Dec. 21. 
Mr. Gingrich and his lead- 
ership team discuss how to 
limit the political and media 
damage mom his admission 
that day that he had broken 
House rules. 

On Friday, The New York 
Tunes published excerpts 
from the tape, which it said it 
obtained from a Democratic 


committee. Later, tire Honda 
couple who intercepted a tele- 
phone conference call of the 
speaker and his lieutenants 
said that they had given a tape 
of it to Representative Jun 


‘These are very serious al- 
legations," said Representa- 
tive Nancy Johnson, Repub- 
lican of Connecticut and 
chairman of tbe ethics panel 
said. “I would need more in- 
formation before comment- 
ing further.” 

It is a federal crime to “in- 
tentionally intercept" tele- 


ally disclose" their contents 
if a person knows the infor- 
mation has been intercepted. 

Amid all the turmoil, James 
Cole, die ethics committee’s 
special counsel, was working 
cm his written report detailing 
die findings of Ms investiga- 
tion of Mr. Gingrich. The re- 
port is due to be released 
Thursday, with the case get- 
ting a public airing in televised 
hearings at least Friday and 
Saturday, a source close to 
Representative Johnson said. 
House Republican leaders 
have scheduled a vote Tuesday 
on p unishing Mr. Gingrich. 

The political impact of all 
this appears to be mitigated 
by the fact that Congress is in 
recess and lawmakers are 
scattered around the globe. 

The first surprise of tbe day 
came with the current issue of 
Legal Times, a weekly news- 
paper for tiie Washington le- 
gal community. 

The paper reported that in 
the closed-door meeting of 
House Republicans the night 
before tbe speaker's re-elec- 
tion, Mr. Campbell told Mr. 
Gingrich he had spoken with 
Jan Baran, who was the 
speaker's lead attorney in the 
ethics case until last mouth, 
and concluded that the speak- 
er had lied to him and the 
ethics panel. - 

Afterward, the paper re- 
ported and lawmakers con- 
finned, Mr. Gingrich angrily 
said that Mr. Baran had a mal- 
practice problem. 

The only reason Mr. Baran 
still represents him, the con- 
gressmen recalled Mr. Gin- 
grich as having said, was that 
his firm had all his documents 
in the case. 

The exchange came after 
Mr. Gingrich had spoken and 
taken questions from con- 
gressmen for nearly two 
hours and after many had 
left. 



Brui Sn»ikrHfUrr% 


RUNAWAY BUS RECOVERED — Police divers retrieving a bus Tuesday that careened across a road 
and into the Charles River in Boston. The driver drowned. There were no passengers aboard. 


Women Snub Jones 

WASHINGTON — In early 1994, 
an Arkansas attorney. Daniel Traylor, 
was trying to develop a legal case for 
Paula Corbin Jones, who had publicly 
accused President Bill Clinton of sexu- 
al misconduct He contacted women's 
groups for help. 

“I got little or no encouragement 
from any of them," said Mr. Traylor, 
who no longer represents Ms. Jones, 
die former Arkansas clerical worker 
who filed her sexual harassment law- 
suit on May 6, 1994. 

Now, the relative silence of national 
women's organizations in the Jones - 
Clinton episode has reopened a debate 
about whether partisan politics has 
clouded the judgments of women’s or- 
ganizations. 

The new round of sparring between 
conservative supporters of Ms. Jones 
and feminist leaders came as the Su- 
preme Court heard arguments Monday 
on whether a president should have the 
right to postpone a civil trial until after 
he leaves office. 

Ms. Jones's attorneys have accused 
wornen 's rights advocates of hypocrisy 
for not joining their client’s case, 
though they quickfy jumped to the res- 
cue of Anita Hill after she publicly 
accused the Supreme Court nominee 
Clarence Thomas, a conservative, of 
sexual harassment 

Women’s groups often file "friend 
of the court” briefs in cases involving 


sexual harassment discrimination and 
abortion. But no groups have signed on 
to Ms. Jones's case, either because the 
cases are different they say. or because 
conservatives have tainted Ms. Jones's 
case by making a political issue out of 
iL 

“This is a tough call for women's 
groups,” said Nancy Long, president 
of the Women's Bar Association of 
Washington, “because there's always 
going to be the question of credibility. 
She's up against the president of the 
United States." 

In 1991, women’s organizations ral- 
lied behind Ms. Hill, saying she had a 
right to be heard before the Senate 
passed judgment on Mr. Thomas's fit- 
ness to serve on the Supreme Court. In 
Ms. Jones’s case, they say. she is 
already guaranteed a hearing because 
her case is in the legal system. The 
question is not whether she will be 
heard, but when. 

Eleanor Smeal. president of the 
Feminist Majority, said it seemed like 
Ms. Jones's conservative supporters 
were using her case to score political 
points — starling with the forum in 
which Ms. Jones unveiled her alle- 
gations on Feb. 1 1 , 1994: a conference, 
in Washington of the Conservative 
Political Action Committee. (WPl 

Clinton Picks Romer 

WASHINGTON — Roy Romer. the 
68-year-old governor of Colorado, is 
President Clinton’s choice to be the 


chairman of the Democratic National 
Committee, a senior White House of- 
ficial and Mr. Romer’s office say. 

Because Mr. Romer, now in his third 
term, plans to continue serving as gov- 
ernor. Mr. Clinton intends to name 
Steve Grossman, a Massachusetts 
businessman and Democratic fund- 
raiser. to run the committee's day-to- 
day operations, the official said. Both 
men have been offered and accepted 
the jobs, the official said. 

The 430 members of the Democratic 
National Committee are scheduled to 
ratify the president's choices Jan. 21 in 
a meeting in Washington. 

The two men will take the reins as 
the pany is beset by questions about its 
financing practices during last year's 
campaign. Beginning in the summer of 
1995, the Democrats raised tens of 
millions of dollars in so-called soft- 
money donations to finunce an ex- 
traordinary advertising campaign pro- 
moting Mr. Clinton. Already, they 
have had to return $ 1 .5 million found to 
have come from questionable sources. 

(NYT) 

Quote /Unquote 

Anthony Rodham, a consultant in 
Miami and brother of Hillary Rodham 
Clinton, saying he rejected more than 
$ 1 00,000 that he was offered to arrange 
for the president of Paraguay to meet 
with President Clinton: “They wanted 
to pay me off. and you just don't pay 
me off." (API 


Photographer Says He Saw Simpson Wearing Shoes Like Those of Killer 


The Associated Press 

SANTA MONICA, Cali- 
fornia — O. J. Simpson's de- 
fense team reseed its case 
Tuesday and the plaintiffs 
launched a rebuttal to defend 
the integrity of photos of Mr. 
Simpson purportedly wearing 
tbe same model shoes as the 
IdUer of his ex-wife. 

ELJ. Flammer, a Buffalo, 
New York, free-lance photo- 
grapher, testified that he took 
30 pictures in 1993 that show 
Mr. Simpson wearing what 
the plaintiffs claim are a rate 
model of Bruno Magli shoes. 

To prove that be took the 
pictures, which he only re- 
cently discovered among old 
files, Mr. Flammer presented 
the negatives, a dated invoice 
for the photo assignment and 
- copy of the Buffalo Bills 
newsletter, which published 
one of tbe pictures in its 
November 1993 edition. 

Mr. - Flammer leafed 
through enlargements of all 
30 pictures and told the jury, 
“Those were the photos that I 
took that day." 

He said he recently dis- 
covered the negatives in a 
binder in his basement dark- 
room and provided copies to 
the. plaintiffs in the wrongful 
(W-ath civil suit against Mr. 


Simpson. Tbe former football 
star was acquitted of the June 
12, 1994 v murders of Mrs. 
Simpson and ter friend, Ron- 
ald Goldman, in October 
1995. 

' The color pictures were 
.taken Sept. 26. 1993, at the 
Bills* Rich Stadium in Orch- 
ard Park!, New York, and' 
show Mr. Simpson standing 
with members. of the teams’ . 
booster club called the 

back CTub/’^Mn* Flammer 
said. 

Mr. Simpson’s shoes can 
be seen dearly in each full- 
length shot ana plaintiff law- 
yers said they would call an 
FBI shoe analyst to testify, 
that the loafers were the same 
kind that-left bloody imprints 
near the bodies of Mrs. 
Simpson and Mr. Goldman. : 

Mr. Simpson has denied 
ever- owning- that- style -of- 
Bruno Magli shoes. _ 

Mr. Flammer said his pfo- 
Cures were taken on the same 
day* before the same game 
and at the same stadhmt as a 
photo shot by free-Jancer 
Harry Scull. Mr. Simpson’s 
defense has branded a photo 
taken by Mr. Scull a lake. . 

The Simpson defense has 
yet to call any witnesses ques- 


Away From Politics 

• Hoping to cure the District of Columbia^ feudal 
wok President Bill Clinton will propose a $3.9 billion 
daTttet would give tbe federal 
efhilitv for tax collection, pnsons and other major local 
Sl^proposal f?^^ g0Vem ^ 
a dramatically larger role in district business. , (Apy 

•An aDoanart stall warning wentoff 17 secoodsbefore 
r«ma1?£itoht 3272 crashed last Thursday near Detroit, 
aboard Vis flight from Cincinnati to 
S^Soutine until the commuter plane rofled 

% i^dySSd noseKlivedinvestigatoissaid. (AP) 


honing the Flammer pboto- 
graphs. 

Mr. Flammer is among the 
most important witnesses of 
the plaintiffs* rebuttal case, 
which is expected to wrap up 
this week, with dosing argu- 
ments scheduled next week. 

Defense lawyers rested 
their case Monday after Mr. 
Simpson’s older daughter 
testified about the shock, con- 
fusion and fear she felt when 
she learned of Mrs. Simpson's 
slaying, and about the police 
contradictions that followed. . 
- Aroelle Simpson was the 
last of 39 defense witnesses 
called by attorneys trying to 
convince jurors that Mr. 
Simpson was victimized by 
police ineptitude and wrong- 
doing. She was the first de- 
fense witness called in ho* 
father's criminal trial. 

Aroelle Simpson told jurors 
about the emotionally 
wrenching moment when De- 
tective Tom Lange told her 
about her stepmother's death. 

* Tie said mat she had been 
Hlted at her house and that 
there was somebody else with 
her,” Aroelle Simpson said. 

“How did you react?” 
asked Dan Leonard, a defense 
attorney. 

“1 was shocked,” she said. 


“I was stunned. I was upset, 
confused, scared.” 

She contradicted detect- 
ives' accounts of some of 
their actions at Mr. Simpson's 
estate the morning after the 
slayings. 

Amelie Simpson said she 
spoke with Mr. Lange after 
four detectives arrived at her 
father's estate early on June 
13. She said two of them, Mr. 
Lange and his partner, Philip 
Vannatter, knocked on her 
door and asked her where her 
father was. 

“1 told them I didn’t know 

where he was, but that I knew 

somebody who could get in 
touch with him,” she said, 
referring to Mr. Simpson’s 
personal assistant, Cathy 
Randa. 

Aroelle Simpson said she 
led the detectives from the 
back area, where she lived in a 
guest house, around to the 
front of her father's home and 
let them in. 

That testimony contradicts 
the account of Mr. Lange and 
other detectives who said Ar- 
neUe Simpson let them in 
through a rack door. Aroelle 
Simpson said she did not let 
them in that way because she 
assumed the back door was 
locked from fee inside. 


• The death of a newly released — 

aasssSSSSB 

SEcSSS®^-'® 


JOHNNIE WALKER 
AND 

BERNARD GALLACHER 

In our Sports Pages 
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Earlier, the defease re- 
called onald Thompson, a po- 
lice officer and witness for the 
plain tiffs, to describe how, 
under orders from Mr. Van- 
natter, he handcuffed Mr. 
Simpson when Mr. Simpson 
arrived at his home after tak- 
ing a flight back from Chica- 
go fee day after fee killings. 
Mr. Vannatter denied giving 
such an order. 

Mr. Simpson stepped down 
from the stand Monday after 


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The undated letter, offered 
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The judge ruled portions of 
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PAGE 4 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1997 


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CA No. 1«5CV019S7(SH) 


IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COUFtT 
FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

STEVE HIRSHON. DIANE ROSEN, 
on behalf of themselves and 
others simBaity situated, 

PlalntifTs. 

v. 

THE REPUBLIC OF BOLIVIA. 

Data 


SUMMARY NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF CLASS ACTION 
AND HEARING ON PROPOSED SETTLEMENT 


TO: ALL PERSONS WHO HOLD REPUBLIC OF BOLIVIA? 1J2%, 2 3/4% AND 3% 

EXTERNAL SECURED S/NKWG FUND BONDS OF 1968, BOND SCRIP OF 1868 

AND CERTIFICATES OF DEBT 

PLEASE BE ADVISED, that the plaintiffs have brought this lawsuit as a class action, 
on behalf of the class identified above, against the FTepubllc of Bolivia. The pteJnWts 
claim that ihe Republic ol BoSvia has breached its obfigattons under the terms of the 
Republic of BoWa 2 1C%, 2 3/4% and 3% External Secured Sinking Fund Bonds, Bond 
Scrip of 1968 and Certificates of Debt (collectively *the Bonds*] since on or about 
October 1,1989 when it stopped making interest payments. In ackStlon, plaintiffs dakn 
that the Republic ol BoRvia breached the terms ol the Bonds when it failed to redeem the 
Bonds on Octoberl , 1 995. The Repubfc of Boflvta has denied any and aO charges of 
wrongdoing or liability. 

PLEASE BE FURTHER ADVISED, thal on August IS, 1996, the patties entered Wo 
a Joint Stipulation ol Settlement and Dismissal with Prejudice (The Settlement 
Agreement") to sortie ihe claims thal were or could have been asserted in this action 
upon certain terms and condrtions, subject to the approval of the Court The Settlement 
Agreement sets fonh that the Republic of Bolivia wW redeem the Bonds tor thlrty-toree 
percent (33%) of the outstanding principal amount of the Bonds, with no payment of 
interest or accrued interest due on the Bonds. The class members wrifl receive this 
amount minus an amount for attorneys' lees and expenses. 

PLEASE BE FURTHER ADVISED, that the Court has scheduled a hearing on the 
certificatKXi of thts action as a class action tor settlement pumoses, the proposed 
Settlement, and on the issue of an award of attorneys' tees ^Settlement Hearing") at 
1:30 p.m. on April 4, 1997 in Courtroom 14, United States District Court for the District of 
CoftanWa, 3rd and Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20001. At the Settlement 
Hearing, ihe Court wffl consider whether the class should be certffwd; whether the 
proposed settlement of the class action should be approved as fair, reasonable and 
adequate; whether the class action should be dismissed on the merits and with prejudice 
against the defendant in accordance wWi the terms of the Settfoment Agreement; and 
whether to approve an application of plaintiffs' counsel tor an award of attorneys' fees 
and expenses incurred in connection with the class action. 

A description of the proposed settlement and the claims to be compromised, and 
details ol other significant matters, is contained in a detailed written Notice of Pendency 
of Class Action and Hearing on Proposed Settlement ("Notice"), which has been mailed 
la identtffabte class members. 

In order tor a class member to share In tlw proceeds erf the s^tJement, that person 
must complete and sttomlt a valid Statement of Claim and Release form and submit the 
Bonds to ihe Bank of New York by July 3, 1997. 

If you have not yet received a copy of the Notice and Statement of Claim and 
Release form, you should obtain a copy by contacting pteinttfts’ counsel. Shapiro Haber 
& Urmy LLP, Attention: Rosalind Horn, 75 State Street Boston. MA 02109, telephone 
617-439-3939, facsimile 617-439-0134. For further information, you may also contact 
plaintiffs’ counsel. 

PLEASE DO NOT CALL THE COURT. THE CLERK'S OFFICE. OR THE 
ATTORNEYS FOR THE REPUBLIC OF BOLIVIA FOR INFORMATION. 


Dated: January 15. 1997 


BY ORDER OF THE COURT 
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 


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PAGE 5 


i /• 


V V : * ■' ^ :i 

■/' : 

' - : V-. W; v., ... , 




INTERNATIONA!* HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 199; 


EUROPE 


•** . 




;arian Opposition 

Demands Vote by May 




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s. 


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eocr. ^ Associated Pnss 

poverty ^ *®* eT and - 

denSnLS f T he i^^ 3 ’ opposition 
S^Z^y ** Bulge's be- 

^P^ed to be searching for a formula to 
of daily protests. They' 

£,S £ *ai elections 

soomd be held before December 1998, 
w “en they are next due. - 1 

tJZSLa^!! remain far apart on a date, 
the opposition 
antes the Socialists forBulgana’s eco- ' 
nomic mess and warns them out of office 
as soon as possible. The Socialists say: 
Jp® economic chaos is so' bad that elec-' 
hons cannot be held before next year. 

Bulgarians are angry about a break- 
aown m law and order, and an economic 
nosedive that has left average wages' 
, to about $20 a month, inflation at 
■3UO percent and the country in danger of 
default on its $10 billion foreign debt. 
y® 81 * a ^* er Bulgaria removed its 
'u har d-Ime Communist leadership, 90 per- 
cent of the economy still is stare-owned. 
•z Unions representing -nearly a quarter . 
of Bulgaria's 8.5 million people say they 

£ — ■■-■• : ■ - 

nr 


will strike Wednesday to force the So- 
dalists fixan power. 

In remarks published Tuesday, out- 
going President Zhelyu Zhelev warned 
that Bu i iria was in danger of failing the 
economic .and political tests of post- 
Commtuust transition, and could "ex- 
plode” if the Socialists formed a new 
government 

' The opposition Union of Democratic 
Forces said that Parliament should be 
‘ dissolved bo later than March to clear the 
way for elections by May. 

. Mr. Zhelev 's successor, Petar Stoy- 
anov. appealed Tuesday to both the So- 
cialists and the opposition to “listen to 
the: voice of the protesting Bulgarian 
citizens'* and beam a common search 
for ways to save the country. 

: Mr. Zhelev, a former dissident who 
leaves the largely ceremonial office of 
president at the end of the week,. has 
refused to give (he Socialists the man- 
date for another government. - 
;. He told the dafly Routinent that the 
Socialists themselves were to blame for 
foe troubles,' and that he would not give 
their candidate. Interior Minister Nikolai 
Dobrev, a mandate to govern. 

“If a mandate is given now uncon- 
ditionally, the country will explode,” 



AFP 


WINNER — Jose Maria Gil- 
Robles Gil-Delgado of Spain 
wiping away a tear after he 
was elected European Parlia- 
ment president on Tuesday. 


Legislator Seeks to Force Out Yeltsin 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 


Mr. Zhelev said. Falling living standards 
have left people desperate, even Socialist 
Party supporters, he added, and the coun- 
try is ready for a much deeper change 
than Just a change of government. 

* ‘Bulgaria is me first post- Communist 
country which failed in its transition to a 
market economy, and is on its way to 
failing in the transition to democracy,” 
said Mr. Zhelev. 


MOSCOW — A Communist member 
of Russia's lower house of Parliament 
proposed Tuesday that the hospitalized 
President Boris Yeltsin be relieved of his 
duties because of poor health. 

While the suggestion from Viktor Ily- 
ukhin. chairman of the State Duma's 
security committee, has virtually no 
chance of approval any time soon, it was 
Che latest sign of political restlessness 
among Mr. Yeltsin's rivals, who have 
been increasingly outspoken since he 
fell ill with pneumonia last week. 

The Kremlin press service said Tues- 
day evening that Mr. Yeltsin's health 
had unproved and that his physical activ- 
ity had increased. It said that Mr. Yeltsin 
met for 40 minutes at the Central Clin- 
ical Hospital with head of his admin- 
istration. Anatoli Chubais, and spent two 
hours working on documents. 

After initially saying last week that 
Mr. Yeltsin had the flu. his doctors ac- 
knowledged that he had “moderately 
grave*’ double pneumonia. 

Mr. Yeltsin's latest ailment has un- 
corked the sniping and jockeying that 
was so common before his quintuple 
heart bypass surgery Nov. 5. Although 
Mr. Yeltsin was re-elected in July and 
inaugurated in August for a second term, 
be has spent little more than two weeks 


working in the Kremlin since that time. 

For more than a year, and without 
success. Communists have been de- 
manding that Mr. Yeltsin quit because of 
illness, and the president's charismatic 
critic, the retired general Alexander 
Lebed, has also demanded that the 
Kremlin chief step down. 

Mr. Ilyukhin circulated a draft res- 
olution calling on Parliament members 
“to regard the powers of the president as 
prematurely terminated due to his con- 
sistent inability to perform his duties for 
health reasons.” Interfax reported. His 
proposal would effectively trigger the 
untested constitutional process for hand- 
ing over power to Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin. 

The Communist speaker of Parliament, 
Gennadi Seleznyov, was circumspect. He 
said that the proposal would be sent to a 
legal committee for study, and then dis- 
tributed to the various factions, of which 
the Communists are the largest. Only after 
that process — which he said could take a 
week — might the issue come up on the 
floor. 

Mr. Seleznyov noted that the con- 
stitution's provisions on terminating the 
president's term are “veiy vaguely writ- 
ten,” and need clarification. 

In fact, the Russian Constitution, tail- 
or-made for Mr. Yeltsin after a violent 
confrontation with an earlier parliament 
in 1 993, does not say who decides that 


the president is incapacitated. It says 
only that his powers “shall be termin- 
ated’' if he suffers “sustained inability 
due to health,” or if he is impeached. 

Mr. Yeltsin’s aide in the parliament, 
Alexander Kotenkov, rejected the mo- 
tion as “legally groundless,” and ac- 
cused the president’s rivals of trying to 
“aggravate the political situation in the 
country.” He contended that only Mr- 
Yeltsin himself could decide to termin- 
ate his powers. 

■ A Ukrainian View on Alliances 

The Ukrainian foreign minister, Hen- 
nadi Udovenko, said Tuesday that he 
recognized the right of Russia and Be- 
larus to unite but warned Moscow to 
respect Ukraine's own choice to join 
whichever alliance it wished, Reuters 
reported from Budapest 

Mr. Yeltsin sent a letter to his Be- 
larussian counterpart President Alex- 
ander Lukashenko, on Monday saying 
that both stales should consider the idea 
of a referendum over unification “in one 
form or another.” 

Every country “has the right to form 
an alliance with other countries.” Mr. 
Udovenko said during a two-day visit to 
Hungary. “However, we would like oth- 
er states to acknowledge the fact that we 
have the right not to join and it is im- 
portant that other states should not have 
the right of veto.” 





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By John Schmid 

[ International Herald Tribune 

. FRANKFURT — Chance I- 

■ lor Helmut Kohl's Christian 
! Democratic Party on Tuesday 

■ issued an indignant response 
) to a group of prominent Aroer- 
. ican entertainment industry 

* figures who compared Ger- 
. many’s assaults on Jews under 

• Hitler to its current stance to- 
) ward Scientologists. 

“The historical parallels in 
' your letter are absurd,” Jo- 

• hannes Gerster, a member of 
[ Mr. Kohl’s conservative 

■ party, wrote to the 34 Amer- 
; leans who signed an “open 

letter” to Mr. Kohl last week 

* thatchaiged;“Inthel930s,it 

’ was the Jews. Today, it is the 1 

* Scientologists.” 

' The letter, whose signers 

• included the actors Dustin 
; Hoffman and Goldie Hawn as 
^ well as. filmmakers, writers 


- tiseinehrixi foe ^fiternatSsaal 
^ Herald Tribune;- 

Mr. Kohl bad called foe 
2 letter “rubbish” and declared 
> that ifsanfoors “danot know 


anything about Germany:.” 
Cataloging die Goman 
government's objections to 
Scientology; which he calls a 
“totalitarian organization,’' 
Mr. Gerster urged those who 
signed the letter to visit Ger- 
many to understand that It op- 
erares as a “stable democracy 
which respects and protects 
the freedom of its citizens.” 
“I am shocked andsad at 
foe level of ignorance thatyou 
displayed in your letter to the 
German chancellor,” wrote 
Mr. Gerster, who beads foe 
party’s advisory committee 
on domestic policy issues. 

Mr. Gerster asserted that 
Scientology “is not a church, 
at least not in Germany.” 

Hfs letter cited a March 
1995 ruling by a Federal 
Labor Court, which found 
foat Scientology has primar- 
ily economic goals, ami a sep- 
arate June 1996 ruling by an- 
Gejrqan /.comi foat 
ifoei- 

Minister Nprbert .Bluetn to 
ase phrases such 'as a “con- 
temptuous cartel of eppres- 
ston” to describe foe Sciento- 
logy Organization. _ _ - 


BRIEFLY 


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Reprieve in Rost Mediterranean 

ATHENS — A UJS. envoy said Tuesday that foe 
Cypros misrile crias was over and that “soaring ten- 
sions” in foe Eastern ^ Mediterranean had been brought 
under control for toe time bemg. 

“The purpose of my trip to foe region was to as much 
as possible reduce tension that really soared this year.” 
said the envoy, Carey Cavanaugh, after meeting With the 
general secretiuy of foe Greek Foreign- Mimsny, Al- 
exandras Filon. . - - - 

He said positive steps had been taken during talks 
Monday to .reduce tension ^between Greek and Thrfcisb 
Cypriots. - . - - 

Mr. Cavanaugh said he bad received assurances from 
foe Greek Cypriot president, Clafcos Cferides, foat re- 
cently purchased Russian anti-aircraft missiles would not 
arrive on xbe island for at least 1 6 months. . 

“1 think there is time to work on a solution, of foe 
problem,’-' he said. (Reuters) 

Swiss Bank Archives Discarded 

ZURICH — Switzerland’s biggest bank acknow- 
ledged Tuesday that material from its archives bad been 
disposed of in violation of a- government ban on foe 
destruction of records that might reveal details about 
financial transactions during foe Nazi era. 

Union Bank of Switzerland said one of its employees 
had thrown away documents last week in violation’ of 
bank policy, apparently thinking they were unimportant. 

Some of the documents were destroyed. The rest were 
found by an employee of a priva te security firm guarding, 
the bank preiruses and given to YiqpreseMatives^ foe 
Jewish OKnmuniry in Zurich. TTiey alerted (be police. 

The government banned destruction of archival ma- 
terial last month as part of investigations into allegations 
that Switzerland had colluded with Nazi Germany, 
sipboned off Jewish assets and laundered Nazi gpkLfAPJ 

‘Mad Cow’ Study Traces Feed 

PARIS — A French parliamentary mquxry mte“road 
cow* ’ disease has found evidence thai suspect; relabeled 
British feed may have been imported into Frmce m foe 
late 1980s through Belgium, the newspaper ^ Monde 



panel nau wauuunnu*‘'6“ jv “ ~": - .. 

for foe movement of Biftish bone meal trying to lose. its_ 

identity” from 1988 onward. ■ - ^ : 

The recycling of animal parts into feed is the main 
suspected cause of the «m! of foe disease, bovu» 

spongiform encephalopathy- (Reuters) 

2 Indicted on French Wiretaps 

PARIS — Two former senior French officials .have- 
been charged over a wire- racing 
presidentiai imti-tenorist team in. the -1980s, judicial 
sources said Tuesday. 

Paul Barrii, afbnner gendarme chief and member of the 
Elysee Palace ream, was charged with recenongcomputw 
So obtained ffl«aUy. Michel Deldwre. 
staff for Pierre Mauroy, prime minister at the time, was 

them of the indictments on Jan. 9, the.rources^smfo 



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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15. 1997 



ASWPACme 


am 


South Korea Strike 
Disappoints Unions 


Protest Fails to Paralyze Nation 


CanpJrJ hr Our StjffFrvm Papat. net 

SEOUL — White-collar workers 
joined 40.000 car and shipyard 
workers in protests Tuesday, but the 
strike did not live up to predictions 
that it would be the biggest in South 
Korea's history. 

Military specialists on standby to 
run trains and telephone services 
were never needed as union threats 
of a crippling strike fizzled. 

At Pagoda Park in Seoul, several 
thousand bank tellers and securities 
company workers wore black ties 
and black silk ribbons, saying they 
were mourning the death of demo- 
cracy exemplified by the govern- 
ment's secretive passage of labor 
laws opposed by trade unions. 

The labor law. approved Dec. 26 
in a parliamentary session attended 


only by members of the governing 


New Korea Party, permitted layoffs, 
breaking a tradition of jobs-for-life. 
and setting off a series of work stop- 
pages. The government of President 
Kim Young Sam argues that flexible 
labor practices will trim corporate 
costs and improve international 
competitiveness as exports sag. 

The rally against the labor le- 
gislation was 'intended to evoke 


memories of demonstrations in 
1987, when white-collar workers 
joined factory hands and radical stu- 
dents to force the military-backed 
government of President Chun Doo 
Hwan to accept democratic re- 
forms. 

But banks stayed open, most fac- 
tories were unaffected and apart 
front striking taxi drivere, public 
transport ran smoothly. 

The lackluster response to a call 
by the official Federation of Korean 
Trade Unions for two days of “all 
out" stoppages indicated that the 
worker militancy that once toppled 
military rule may be a spent force. 

Strike leaders also apparently 
tailed to agree on whether to con- 
tinue joint strikes. 

Heads of the outlawed Confed- 
eration of Trade Unions, which has 
been leading the fight against the 
new law. had hoped to enlist the full 
support of the larger, government- 
approved federation in expanded 
strikes. 

Bur after meeting with the con- 
federation's leaders, the official fed- 
eration said it had no plans to extend 
the two-day strike that began Tues- 
day. The new labor law continues 



Aibera Maqnei/Ilvr Annwd Fret* 

SQUATTERS’ STANDOFF — Members of a demolition crew shielding themselves Tuesday 
in Manila as inhabitants of a Chinatown squatter colony stoned them. Dozens were hurt 
during the failed attempt by the police to dear squatter families from privately owned land. 


B R I E F L Y 4 


the federation's monopoly as South 
Korea's only legal labor organiza- 
tion for the next five years, giving it 
little incentive to participate in an 
extended strike. 

In by far the biggest protest of the 
day, about 40,000 workers rallied in 
a riverside park in the southeast city 


of Ulsan before marching to the city 
hall No violence was reported but 
marchers, mostly from the giant Hy- 
undai Group, hurled raw eggs at 
offices of the New Korea Party. 

Office workers along the route 
threw open their windows and 
yelled, “We’re on your side." 


Ignoring Beijing, Top Taiwan Aide Meets Pope 


Gvnpita/ hr i?yr SugJ Ft r.*n Dujxa.-fi.'t 

ROME — Ignoring protests by 
China, Vice President Lien Chan of 
Taiwan met with Pope John Paul 0 
on Tuesday and extended an invit- 
ation for him to visit the island. The 
meeting took place only hours after 
Beijing warned the Vatican against 
meddling in Chinese affairs. 

The 35-minute audience at the 
Vatican made Mr. Lien, who is also ■ 
prime minister, the most senior of- 
ficial of the Nationalist island to 
meet with the leader of the Roman 
Catholic Church. 

Mr. Lien said that he had given- 
the pontiff an invitation to visit 
Taiwan as part of a tour of Asia and 
that “the response was positive.' ' 

■Mr. Lien described his rime with 
the Pope as “very gratifying,” but 
he declined to say whether be had 
discussed Chinese issues with the 
Pope or with his most senior aide. 


Cardinal Angelo Sodano, the Vat- 
ican's secretary of state. 

“We spoke of the general situ- 
ation in Asia and the world." Mr. 
Lien said. “I must say that on the 
issues raised, we were in agree- 
ment.” 

He acknowledged discussing 
“religious freedom" with Cardinal 
Sodano. adding that the issue was 
“currently very important” 

The Vatican is one of 30 remain- 
ing states — and the only one in 
Europe — to maintain diplomatic 
relations with Taipei, but not with 
the Communist government in 
China. Beijing regards Taiwan as a 
renegade province of China. 

Last week, the Vatican stressed 
that Mr. Lien's audience with the 
pontiff would be of a “private 
nature.” 

Mr. Lien said Taiwan had given 
the Pope a charitable contribution of 


SI million during the audience. The 
Vatican said the Pope had passed 
along the gift to Cor Unum, the 
department that oversees charitable 
works, and that it would be used to 
help reconstruction in Bosnia and 
the Grear Lakes region in Africa. 

The spokesman for the Vatican, 
Joaquin Navarro- Vails, declined to 
comment after Beijing warned the 
Vatican “not to interfere’ ’ in Chinese 
diplomatic and religious affairs. 

In Beijing, the Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Shen Guofang, said: 
“The Vatican has expressed its wish 
to establish diplomatic relations 
with China. It must cut its ties with 
Taiwan.” 

A break with Taiwan “is the first 
condition for normalization of re- 
lations." Mr. Shen said. “And then, 
the Vatican must not interfere in 
Chinese religious affairs." 

Roman Catholicism is virtually 


banned in China, where Beijing 
oversees a 3-million-member “pa- 
triotic church' that rejects the su- 
premacy of die Vatican. 

“Our religious system has been 
established according to our nation- 
al situation.” Mr. Shen said. “It is 
independent and autonomous.” 
Nevertheless, 3 million to 10 mil- 
lion people- are said to belong to an 
underground Roman Catholic 
Church in China that does recognize 
papal authority. It is forced to hold 
its meetings in secret 

On Monday, the Pope said he 
would be watching with special in- 
terest when Hong Kong returns to 
Chinese rule on July 1 . 

Under 3 Chinese-British treaty 
from 1 984, China is committed to 
upholding religious freedom in 
Hong Kong affer Britain hands over 
control of die colony. 

(AFP, AP, Reuters) 


Militant workers skirmished 
briefly with riot police near a Seoul 
cathedral where union leaders have 
sought sanctuary from arrest for or- 
ganizing the stoppages. 

The official federation claimed 
that 420,000 of its 1 .2 million mem- 
bers were on strike, but the Labor 
Ministry put the figure at just more 
than 50.000. 

The confederation vowed . its 
500.000 members would go ahead 
with indefinite strikes starting Wed- 
nesday, and subway and bus drivers 
indicated they would stop work. 

The Seoul government has pre- 

S ared fleets of privately owned 
uses to -run major routes, and sub- 
way operators nave said nonunion 
drivers will be able to keep services 
running for several weeks, if nec- 
essary. 

The government has threatened 
unspecified legal action against in- 
ternational labor leaders visiting 
Seoul in a gesture of worker solid- 
arity, local news media reported. 

John Evans, head of a labor ad- 
visory body to the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment, which. Seoul formally 
joined in December, said he had 
been questioned by immigration of- 
ficials about his activities. 

“This is completely normal,” he 
said of his presence as a star at- 
traction at worker rallies. "The ab- 
normality is the attitude of the gov- 
ernment.” ( Reuters , AP) 


Jiang Meets U.S. Lawmakers 


■’ fill* 

> ,, | illlfi 


BELTING — President Jiang Zemin granted a rare 
meeting to members of the U.S. House of Representatives 
on Tuesday, in a campaign aimed ar strengthening ties 
with the American Congress. 

Mr. Jiang was shown on state television receding 22 
representatives, the biggest U.S. congressional delega- 
tion ever to visit China, • 

“Improving Sino-U.S. relations and developing them 
on a healthy basis is in the interests of both countries." 


, . n J 


-.vm 


. a*'-*. 

"Va 


Mr. Jiang said. “I had very good discussions with Pres- 
ident Clinron in Manila in November, and we reached 


some important understandings. 

“The Chinese side is willing to grasp the present 
opportunities and. along with the United States, to reduce 
difficulties between our two countries. ’ ’ f Reuters.* 


Garbage Smuggler May Appeal 


St- 

J. 

.... 

:•* -a 




BEIJING — An American businessman sentenced to 
10 years in jail for smuggling garbage into China will 
decide later this week whether to appeal, his lawyer said 
Tuesday. 

William Ping Chen, 56, was sentenced Monday by a 
court in Shanghai for illegally importing 238 tons of trash, 
including banned household and medical waste, from the 
United States between July and December 1995. 

Mr. Chen’s lawyer. Yuan Jiyuan, said he would meet 
Mr. Chen on Thursday or Friday to discuss a possible 
appeal. 

Mr. Chen was also fined 500.000 yuan IS60.Q47) and 
ordered out of the country. But it was not clear if he would 
have to serve his 10-year jail sentence before being 
expelled. 

David Miller, a spokesman for the U.S. Consulate in 
Shanghai, said be understood that Mr. Chen would have 
to serve out his sentence. He said Mr. Chen was still in 
custody. But Mr. Yuan said Chinese judicial authorities 
could decide to expel Mr. Chen immediately. (AP) 


Hit**’ 


'.ct'-niiFi 


■/; 


v ’ 


.... 

ah! 

■-* 4 


I -ai 


Wellington Worried Over Waste 


WELLINGTON — New Zealand has expressed strong 
concern to Tokyo about the planned route of a ship 
carrying processed nuclear waste from France to Japan, 
Foreign Minister Don McKinnon said Tuesday. 

“What we want ihe Japanese to know. is that we are 
concerned about the movement of the ship.” Mr, McKin- 
non said. 

He said other South Pacific nations were also con- 
cerned about the route of die British ship, the Pacific Teal, 
which left Cherbourg. France, on Monday. (Reuters) 


For the Record 


A bomb exploded in a Srinagar mosqne in India's 
troubled Kashmir region Tuesday, killing three people 
and wounding at least four, police said. The bomb went 
off as worshipers prepared to break their Ramadan fast 
Tuesday evening, they said. (Reuters) 




.'*■? «ti 












Cl :*•** 


m 


Warring Afghan factions held a second day of peace 
talks in Islamabad on Tuesday, and plan to continue 
negotiations Wednesday. ( Reuters ) 


Japan appealed for volunteers Tuesday to help clean 
up bud sanctuaries smeared with oil leaking from a 
sunken Russian tanker. (Reuters) 


-F : - ■ ?•:.-»•■ <■?:'. tfc;' '. • ••• 

V-*\v' ttfc-.V:: • > 



- 4 -BOOKS 


You can understand computers 


now. Or wait for your children 


to explain them to you later. 


Understanding conies with TIME. 


THE LETTERS OF 
NANCY MITFORD & 
EVELYN WAUGH 

Edited by Charlotte Mosley. 
SSI pages . £25. Hodder St 
Stoughton. 

Reviewed by 
Katherine Knorr 

N ancy mitford and 

Evelyn Waugh were bril- 
liant and prolific letter writers, 
informative, quick and vi- 
cious. They were both, in their 
own ways, curmudgeons and 
snobs who knew a few genu- 
inely larger-than-life figures 
but a lot more people like 
Lady Diana Cooper who have 
become famous to the rest of 
us through the relentless bio- 
graphy industry. 

Although Mitford and 
Waugh were veiy different 
people with very different 
political opinions, they were 
intimate correspondents and 
close friends. This long re- 
lationship is poignant and full 
of love. And bile. Much of the 
malevolence is uproariously 
ftinny, though totally polit- 
ically incorrect, in some cases 
even at the time. 

In fairness to both writers, 
it must be said that a lot of the 
humor hides sadness. One of 


the things that "drew them, to- 
gether was a refusal to whine 
about the maudlin, especially 
in their own lives. These were 
lived with great but unsatis- 
fying fame, which did not pay 
all the bills or make up for the 
fears and the griefs. 

Waugh was a seriously 
troubled man whose relation- 
ships with his many children 
were complicated. At- the end 
of his life, the letters reflect 
the increasing darkness that 
overtook him. 

Milford found love — as 
her heroine. Linda, does in 
“The Pursuit of Love" — 
with a man who was not by 
nature monogamous, to put it 
mildly. She lived in Paris to be 
close to Gastoa Palewski, an 
aide to de Gaulle during 
World War n and later a 
French official, who was the 
love of her life and whom she 
fondly called the Colonel. To 
her great suffering, he married 
another woman in 1 969, when 
she was ill with cancer. 

Although Waugh and Mit- 
ford first met in 1 928, the let- 
ters begin in 1944, when 
Waugh was stationed with 
Randolph Churchill in Croa- 
tia. and continue to his death 
in 1966. During that time, as 
reflected in the Tetters. Waugh 
wrote “Brides head Revis- 


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ited." “The Loved One" and 
“Officers and Gentlemen," 
among other books, and be- 
came increasingly famous and 
misanthropic. Mitford wrote 
“The Pursuit of. .Lover" and 
“Love in a Cold , Climate" . 
and several biographies. 

Throughout, there is much 
merciless fun made of a stel- 
lar cast including “Baby Ran- 
dolph” Churchill, who in the 
early years covered here was 
married to the Hon. Pamela 
Digby, now Hamtnan; Lady 
Diana Cooper (“Honks”), 
Cyril (“Smarty Boots”) Con- 
nolly; the Windsors in exile 
(Nancy wrote that the duke 
“knows hundreds of facts. 
Somebody mentioned the due 
de Berry 'Murdered in 1824’ 
be said at once.") or Mil- . 
ford's husband, the good- 
looking. . boring and ulti- 
mately pitiful Peter Rodd, or 
“Prod." There is also much 
running commentary about 
Mitford’s father. LordRedes- 
dale, who is the model for the 
terrifying and hilarious Uncle 
Matthew in her novels. His 
feelings about foreign lands 
(“Abroad is a sewer") were 
not too far from Waugh's. 

Waugh and Mitford made 
fun of each other, sometimes 
in jest, sometimes in earnest. 
He _was stinging- on her leftist 
political views and friends, 
and on what he considered ri- 
diculous about the ColoneL 

She is usually kinder, 
though she doesn't miss the 
largeL In April 195Z she 
wrote: “Total to me is the 
mystery why you don’t live in 
Ireland. I should have thought 
the round peg would have 
happily dropped into that 
round hole years ago- Never 
have ! seen a country so much 
made for somebody as it is for 
you. The terrible silly polite- 
ness of lower classes so 
miserable that they long for . 
any sort of menial task at £1 a 


week, the emptiness, the un- 
compromising Roman Cath- 
oticness, the pretty houses of 
the date you like best, the 
agricultural country Jof 
Laura, the neighbours all low* 
brow & armigerous & all 100 
miles away, the cold wetness, 
the small income tax. really I 
could go on forever." 

• Waugh had a number of 
leitmotivs — some quite deep 
and thought through, som$ 
closer to pet peeves — and his 
letters are punctuated with 
cries of “Death to Picasso’! 
and strong words on the 
"frogs,' ' Elizabeth Tudor and 
Vatican U. He was also, h 
seems from these letters, an 
excellent critic for Mitford; 
both uncompromising and 
kind, writing as a master to . a 
student clearly not in his class; 
She did not take it all lying 
down, notably when he lec- 
tured her about Catholicism. , 
They were masters of the 
killer throwaway line. In 
March 1954 Mitford wrote: 
“Have you heard of the AbbC 
Pierre? They say he is the 
only man m Europe rich 
enough to keep Pam 
Churchill."(The Abbe Pierre 
is the French priest who has 
long campaigned for the poor, 
but most recently was inr 
volved in a scandal involvina»J; 
Holocaust revisionism. TLnre 
marches on.) * 

This book is intelligently 
and entertainingly prefaced 
and annotated by Charlotte 
Mosley, a journalist who is 
married to one of Milford'S 
nephews. ; 


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ends sadly, with Waugh 
becoming increasingly weak 
and erratic. The dark humor 
never left him, however. In 
August of 1964, he wrote: 
“Seldom a week passes but I 
read of a contemporary ac- 
quaintance falling dowu- 
szairs,. usually fatall y.’* . " 

International Herald Tribune 


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INTERNATIONAL 


New Nicaraguan Leader 
Joins With Sandinistas 
To Tackle Land Disputes 


A!e^? AG y A ~~ President Amoldo 
®* Saribba leader to 
to 55? a ® reed m a meeting here 
to study poverty 

pragess, however, on other issues, the 
Pendent said late Monday. 

The long-awaited meeting came three 


Berlusconi Bloc 
Supports Panel 
On Constitution 


Reuters 


1 r. ai? OME /- : Tb® opposition Freedom 
■ ■ ' Alliance decided Tuesday to support a 

ffnvMratUMt V . ** 


government proposal to set up a com- 
m is s ion of both houses of Parliament to 
draft reforms to the constitution, an al- 
liance leader said. 

. The centw-right bloc will “give an 
indication” in favor of the commission, 
Pierferdinando Casini, leader of the 
Christian Democratic Centex 1 , said after 
alliance leaders met to iron out differ- 
ences over which way to vote on the 


days after Mr. Aleman assumed die pres- 
idency. He succeeded President Violeta 
Barrios de Chamorro after winning an 
election in October in which Mr. Ortega 
finished second. 

Mr. Aleman’s decision to meet with 
Mr. Ortega came after the Sandinista 
warned eariier this ffinfl rti ^nt^Jir a pigna 
could experience violence if the gov- 
ernment followed policies that harmed 
the country’s poor. 

“We have agreed to mafo ta m this 
communication, main rain this exchange, 
to later take concrete steps dial win 
allow us to lay the basis for stability in 
Nicaragua,” Mr. Ortega said after toe 
meeting in Mr. Aleman’s presidential 
office." - * 

The" meeting clearly eased tensions 
and brought relief to Mr. Aleman, whose 
power to govern effectively will depend 
on his ability to reach an agreement with 
toe defeated but stffi powerful Sandfeis- 
tas, analysts have said. 

Even though its 'dvi) war ended seven 
years Ago, Nicaragua remains polarized 
between toe leftist Sandinistas and Mr. 
Aleman’s rightist liberal Alliance. 

The commission will be led by Vice 
President Enrique Bolanos and a 
Sandinista leader, Bayardo Arce. It will 
tackle land disputes that stem from the 
Sandinista practice of redistributing 



.'Si-...* 




• ~j£ dp *; ' 


Tighter Security 
At Tima Siege Site 



Mvtiu Bmfttaan 

A bomb disposal expert opening a briefcase that caused a security alert Tuesday outside the Lima hotel 
where President Bucaram of Ecuador was staying. The case contained papers and other harmless items. 


Ageitce Frence-Presse 

LIMA — Security around the Jap- 
anese Embassy residence was visibly 
tighter Tuesday, with no freedom in 
sight for the 74 hostages held by leftist 
rebels for more than four weeks. 

An army helicopter flew over the res- 
idence Tuesday morning as the police 
closed access to at least one additional 
street wife a possible view toward mov- 
ing the press away. 

Before dawn, there were small blasts 
from what sounded like an air gun out- 
side the embassy. But there was no con- 
firmation of any gunfire inside the res- 
idence or by toe police outside. 

The prolonged hostage standoff 
provided toe backdrop for a Landmark 
visit bene by President Abdala Bucaram 
Ortiz, toe first by an Ecuadoran head of 
state. Peru and Ecuador fought a brief 
border war in 1995. President Alberto 
Figimori of Peru had been using Mr. 
Bucaram’s visit to show that his gov- 
ernment was operating normally. 

Shortly after Mr. Bucaram arrived 
Monday, the Tupac Amaru rebels fired 
several warning shots because they said 
tor police violated an agreement to stay 
at least 100 meters from the residence. 


AID: Clinton Will Appeal to Congress for $1 Billion to Pay Off Most ofU.S. Debt to UN 


Continued from Page 1 


property in the 1980s. 
Titles to 


■ Senate is scheduled to vote Wed- 
nesday on establishing the conrnnission. 
A vote in the Chamber of Deputies is set 
for next Tuesday. 

Silvio Beriusconi’s center-right Forza 
Italia party decided late Monday to back 
toe bicameral commission. The hard- 
right National Alliance, which had 
favored a constituent assembly to draft 
the reforms, said Tuesday flyir it, too, 
had given its backing. 

Gtulio Maceration. the National-Al- 
liance’s Senate leader, saidhis party was 
satisfied because toe whole bloc would 
press for guarantees that the National 
Alliance had demanded regarding the 
outcome of toe reforms. Italy has sought 
to revise its 1948 constitution for years, 
but with scant progress. A two-thirds 
majority of the Parliament is required for 
coostiutional changes. 

“Tbe battles will be done in toe com- 
mission,” said GiuhanoUibam, aFraza 
Italia member of Parfiament. “It cer- 
tainly won’t be a walk in toe paik be- 
cause we have to rebuild die state. 
However, at least we will lift toe polit- 
ical debate to a higher leveL” 


thousands of farms, busi- 
nesses and houses are being contested by 
their original owners, many of them sup- 
porters of the deposed dictator. General 
Anastasio Somoza, and those who re- 
ceived toon as a result of Sandinista 
expropriations. 

• A new law allows toe former owners 
to get the properties back. (AP. Reuters) 


picture, the White House has devised a 
repayment plan under which only $100 
million would be paid in toe coming 
year. The remaining $900 milli on would 
be appropriated now in a separate mea- 
sure out held back until 1999 as a lever to 
ensure that Mr. Annan carries out sub- 
stantial reforms. 

Tbe idea would be to assure Mr. An- 
nan and all UN member countries that 
Washington is committed to paying 


what it owes while using the lure of the 
cash to overcome resistance to substan- 
tial change, one official said. 

For the -current fiscal year, ending 
Sept. 30, Congress appropriated $18.1 
billion for all international affairs spend- 
ing: foreign aid. State Department op- 
erations, UN activities and contributions 
to international lending organizations 
such as the World Bank. These funds are 
administered by different departments 
but grouped in the budget in what is 
known as the “150 account.” 


For fiscal 1998, Mr. Clinton will pro- 
pose to raise the 150 account to $19.3 
billion, senior officials said. When tbe 
proposed UN repayment money is in- 
cluded. the total would rise to more than 
S20 billion. 

That would still be about 25 percent 
less in real terms than the United States 
averaged in international affairs spend- 
ing throughout tbe 1980s and would not 
be enough, according to a report issued 
Monday by an independent task force 
sponsored by toe Brookings Institution 


and the Council on Foreign Relations. 

The group concluded that “cuts 
already made in toe international affairs 
discretionary account have adversely af- 
fected, to a significant degree, the ability 
of the United States to protect and pro- 
mote its economic, diplomatic and stra- 
tegic agendas abroad,’* toe report said. 

Dozens of former senior officials of 
both parties, academic experts and econ- 
omists endorsed toe report, including 
three former secretaries of stale and two 
national security advisers. 


Bos Veers Off Nile Bridge, 
KiDing 38 and Injuring 29 


Reuters 


CAIRO — A crowded public 
transport bus plummeted off a Cairo 
bridge onto the bank of the Nile on 
Tuesday, killing 38 passengers and 
injuring at least 29. 

Police said tbe bus, with an es- 
timated 70 people on board, veered 
off toe Sahel bridge in the Cairo 
district of Rod el-Farag, flipping 
over several times before landing 
upside down on toe Nile bank. 

Rescue workers pulled out at least 
30 bodies from toe muddy banks of 
toe river. Many died of suffocation 
or were crushed as the bos fell. 


BOMBS: Terrorism, Is Nothing New at Al Hay at, the Outspoken Arab Newspaper 


Continued from Page 1 


totally after 10 A^L, Al Hayat's opin- 
ionated reporters, editorial writers and 
technicians were practicing what toe pa- 
per’s unsigned editorial on die frontpage 
proclaimed Tuesday morning: 

“There are no heroes among us, just 
working journalists whose mission is 
their work, nothing more and nothing 
less. The poison that does not kill makes 


you stronger. 

IHs 


At Al Hayat, going about business has 
meant making waves and breaking 
news, publishing interviews that go 
deeper and further than the competition, 
having tbe best cultural pages in the 


Arab world and oj 
to reactionary Muslim fundamentalists 
and virulent anti-religious liberals, pro- 
Iraqi Arab nationalists as well as con- 
servative Gulf Arabs. 

In the words of an admiri ng com- 
petitor, Abdel ban Atwan, editor of toe 
Palestinian daily Al Quds, which is also 
based in London, this activity adds up to 
“in all truthfulness, setting the speed of 
the race every morning.” 

Al Hayal is not one big happy family. 
It is a turbulent competitive newspaper 
where journalists compete amid fierce 
jealousies and angSL 

On any given day, the columnist Ab- 
del wahab Badrakhan, toe paper's 


strident voice of Arab nationalism, be- 
moans the suffering to which Iraq’s 
people are being subjected by a “geno- 
cidal,” “uncaring” West, only to have 
Kamran Kaxadaghi. Al Hayat’s Kurdish 
commentator, remind everyone in toe 
next column how many of his people 
were gassed to death in toe name of 
Saddam Hussein’s ’’Arab nationalism” 
and demand that even more sanctions be 
imposed on Iraq. 

On another page, Edward Said, the 
Columbia University professor who is a 
frequent contributor, denounces tbe Pal- 
estinian-Israeli peace process as aplot to 
liquidate the Palestinian people while 
Khiialiah KhiraJJah, Al Hayat's man- 


aging editor, preaches that peace is the 
only option for Palestinians. 

Who would want to teach Al Hayat a 
lesson? 

It could be Algerian fundamentalists 
whose practices of cutting secularists’ 
throats have been exposed dramatically 
in the paper. But it could also be Al- 
geria's military government, which has 
been enraged by the newspaper's in- 
terviews with fundamentalist oppo- 
nents. who fax their statements and give 
lengthy exposes of their accomplish- 
ments to A) Hayat's Muslim fundamen- 
talist expert, Kamil Tawil — a Christian 


reporter 

Itcou 


it could also be Iraq, whose possession 
of a vast arsenal of missile and chemical 


BERLIN; Showcase for the 21st Century BONN: Will the Lights Go Out When the Government Leaves? 


Costumed from Page 1 


ted cm 17 acres (7 hectares) at PWsdamer 
Platz. Once Europe's buriest intersection, 
Potsdamer Harz has been a wasteland 
sincetoe Wall went up in 1961. 

• New quarters for toe German gov- 
ernment are being prepared cm abend in 
the Spree River, near tbe renovated 
Reichstag that will again house. Par- 
liament. About 14.000 civil servants are 
expected to leave Bonn to take upres- 
idence in the new capital within toe new 
three years. 

“This is undoubtedly toe largest urb- 
an makeover in modem history,” said 
Michael Monninger, architectural critic 
for toe German newsweekly Der 
Spiegel- “The reconstruction of Berlin 
exceeds what was carded out by Pope 

Sixtus Vin I6to-centnryRame,Geoige 
H aussmann in 19th-century Paris, or 
Robert Moses in 20to-cenmiy New 
York. What emerges may not be beau- 
tiful, but it will certainly be exciting.’ ’ 

Not surprisingly, the process has been 
fraught with controversy. Prom toe start, 
Hans Stimmann, toe city planner who 
has served as Berlin ’s budd ing czar, has 

lines of tra^ot^^^^ean urbanism 
and featuring low, modest buildings 
faced with stone, bride and glass. 

■ Mr. Stimmann has been attacked by 
modernists and traditio nalists alike. The 
first school claims he is striving to create 
’5 “New Teutonia” while suppressing 
the energy and imagination of those ar- 
chitects who represent Berlin’s penchant 
for the avant garde. The historical school 
contends he has stripped Berlin of its 
soul by forbidding decorative touches 
that would recall the pre- World War I 
Belle Epoque and other eras of this city’s 

Prussian heritage. ■ • 

• After being shoved aside temporarily, 
Mr. Stimmann has returned with a new 
master plan that be hopes will resolve 
some of toe conflicts. 

“Construction projects were done-far 

many separate spots cm toe map, but they 

were never connected in an overall 
plan,” Mr. S timm a nn said in an in- 
terview. “These projects are like is- 
lands, and it is our goal to Imk them 
.together in a harmonious way.’ 

t ■ _ v Wlon nnlT Ctrl 


toer financial troubles Jn the last two 
years, office rents have plunged by half, 
and more than 60 percent of available 
commercial space in the city center re- 
mains unoccupied. 

Some of those worries may be al- 
leviated once the government work 
force settles in Berlin, but there is still a 
gnawing concern that Berlin's ambition 
of becoming the new crossroads of 
Europe may remain unfulfilled. 

During the 1920s, Berlin was tbe hub 
of German; business, industry and toe 
arts. But today’s Germany is less cent- 
ralized, and once the government moves 
to Beilin, other rides will try even harder 
to retain their identities and enterprises: 
Frankfort its banks, Duesseldorf its fash- 
ion designers and advertisers, Munich its 
electronics and car makers, Hamburg its 
media and publishing companies. 

Already, severe budget cutbacks due 
to toe loss of subsidies are forcing Ber- 
lin's authorities to scale back some 
plans. But some urban planners say the 
austerity regimen has been useful in for- 
cing a reassessment of Beilin’s identity. 

1 'The economic restrictions will make 
us define our priorities,” said Falk Jae- 
ger, -a professor of architecture. “Now 
we will have more time, peace and quiet 
to contemplate it all. The old Berlin has 
such strength and character that it must 
be preserved. It makes no sense to build 
another Koala Lumpur here. ’ 


Continued from Page 1 


■ hi the manner of this sleepy place — 
whose location in a valley of still river 
air does indeed induce torpor — some of 
those questions remain only partly 
answered. 

The American schools, for instance, 
are merging this year with two British 
schools because toe Pentagon has with- 
drawn financial support. Employees at 
toe American Club have been told that 
their jobs tending tennis courts and 
serving Sunday brunch will not last 
forever. 

In broader terms, city managers here 
lave already formulated a strategy in- 
tended to make Bone part reridualgov- 
ernment town, part international city and 
part cutting edge of modernity — in 
principle. 

Bonn’s mayor, Baerbel Dieckmann, 
met with United Nations officials in 


princely three. The tower, he said, will 
serve as an emblem of a future in service 
industries, software and specialized 
banking. 

But, most of all, it will be the German 
government’s velvet-gloves handling of 
a city that nurtured Germany’s postwar 
democracy that will in theory tide Bonn 
over toe worst of toe change. 

Mr. D’Hein refers to toe Bonn tran- 
sition as an unprecedented experiment. 
Other countries, he said, may have set up 
capitals like Abuja in Nigeria or Brasilia 
in Brazil as administrative centers and 
seats of government. But no one has 
moved back to a real capital from an 
invented one, splitting the labor between 
old and new. 

“The greatest danger is in the area of 
image,” Mr. D'Hein said in his 12th- 
floor office in one of toe city’s two 


weapons was exposed by Ai Hayat’s 
strategic affairs correspondent, Qassem 
Jaafar. in a front-page scoop months 
before the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. 


existing high-rises, 
of pi 


New York last Thursday to try to per- 
~ ! UN agency. 


suade them to locate a small 
one that deals with the spreading of 
deserts, in verdant Bonn alongside two 
other modest UN agencies that have set 
up shop bens. 

Germany’s postal services have 
promised to build a gleaming new high- 
rise as a landmark on toe banks of toe 
Rhine — banging the number of tall 
buildings in toe city, according to Wern- 
er D’Hein. toe city spokesman, to a 


“A lot of people say the lights will go 
out here. People will go to Berlin and 
then Bonn is dead.” 

But that, he insisted, will not be the 
case: A full two-thirds of toe city’s 
25,000 government bureaucrats are to 
remain here to tend tbe seven ministries 
and other offices that will stay in Bona as 
toe trek to Berlin gets under way . 

In addition, he said, there will be a 
data superhighway and video linkups 
between Bonn and Berlin so that of- 
ficials can “work on the same document 


without sitting in the same room.” 

Not only that: A quarter of the $2 
billion of government money promised 
to Bonn to cope with the change will be 
spent on research and other facilities at a 
proposed Center for Advanced Euro- 
pean Studies and Research. 

The university here, one of the largest 
in Germany with its 38,000 students, 600 
professorships and 7.300 other employ- 
ees. is to stay. And many embassies from 
poorer countries whose diplomats 
bought property here in better times and 
cannot afford to sell up or move on will 
remain in Bonn, too. 

Tbe countertegument is that the lure 
of Berlin will simply be too great, that 
even those ministries like Defense, 
Health and Environment, designated for 
Bonn, will gradually be drawn to Berlin 
because that is where the power will be, 
along with tbe money and toe Parlia- 
ment, not to mention the seat of gov- 
ernment and the presidency. 

That argument, however, omits one 
factor the gritty thoroughness that of- 
ficial Germany brings to bear on die 
tasks entrusted to it. 

Thus, Mr. D'Hein said, since toe di- 
vision of labor between Bonn and Berlin 
has dow been settled at the highest leveL 
that is bow things will be. 

“In toe way Germans do, we have 
started it this way and we will carry it out 
this way.” be said. 


The paper's editor. Jihad al Khazen, 
periodically conducts groundbreaking 
interviews with Arab presidents and 
kings who have come to use Al Hayat 
both as a means of passing messages to 
one another and to loft trial balloons that 
are carefully monitored by every West- 
ern embassy in Arab capitals and by 
Israel, where toe intelligence system 
translates the newspaper's articles daily. 

By worldwide standards, Al Hayat is a 
newspaper of modest circulation. Hinting 
in London, Frankfurt, Bahrain, Cairo and 
New York, it has a distribution that does 
not exceed 200,000 copies a day at most. 
But it is. far and away, toe best and most 
intensely read Arab paper. 

Its ownership by Prince Khalid ibn 
Sultan, a nephew of King Fahd, has 
meant that it draws a line at negative 
news about Saudi Arabia. But it is far 
less subservient to Saudi interests and far 
less sensitive to Saudi objections than 
many other publications owned or con- 
trolled by Saudi interests. 

Tbe paper is not allowed to print in 
Saudi Arabia and is frequently harmed or 
delayed by censors there, causing it sig- 
nificant financial losses. 

By all accounts it is losing as much as 
$20 million a year. But with a personal 
fortune estimated at $2 billion. Prince 
Khalid has continued to finance it and 
remains largely on the sidelines, inter- 
fering catiy rarely to direct coverage. 


LEBED: Ex-General Who Would Be Czar Feels His Hour Is Near JAPAN: Seeking a Bolder Role in Asia 


Continued from Page 1 


critics who warned that toe new city cen- 
ter would beagbost town at right berause 
there was too much office space, r a* - 


.ways wanteoamgura ; 

marts, but in toe firsf years 
fication, I could notg^polito^ s J5? 0lrt 
for more than 20 percent 

ie rvwivmrw? that IS iQO tituE 


■ Mr. Lebed has issued a stream of 
similarly somber pronouncements 
lately, calling on Mr. Yeltsin to resign, 
insisting cm constitutional change and 
skewering "his dozens of bitter rivals. 
Then, in neatly toe same breath, be toms 
cherubic and contrite. 

“1 haven't wished anyone Bl for a 
long time already,” he said shortly after 
offering gratuitously nasty characteriz- 
ations of half a dozen well-known public 
figures. ‘Tve had enough fighting. God 
forbid.” 

Mr. Lebed’s rise to prominence was 
meteoric. His strong showing in the 
presidential election last summer won 
him feme and- a job as Mr. Yeltsin’s 
national security chief. He almost 
single-handedly brokered a peace deal 
secessionist rebels in Chechnya last 


wi 


r*iW v 


.i 


and we nml at least 

space for the city’s historical center. 

Mr. Stimmann seems resigned to fur- 
ther conflict, not least because most of 
the big-name architects taking part — 
I M. Pei, Renzo Piano, Richard Rogers, 
Norman Fbster, Helmut Jahn. An* 

Isozaki and Philip Johnson— would tike 

to make a huge splash with toe kind of 
daring innovation that brought 
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Walter 
Gropius and the Banhaus School- 
Mr. Stimmann also is bracing for fiir- 


felL thereby ending a bloody war. 

But Mr, Lebed's flame burned out 
quickly. Unable to refrain from picking 
public fights with nearly anyone of 
power and prominence, he upstaged 
everyone, induced a sense of turmoil in 
high places and was fired by Mr, Yeltsin 
after less tom four months on the job. 
Mr. Lebed’s conduct said toe president 
was intolerable. 

It has not changed much. Out of 
power, he has been just as obstreperous, 
if somewhat less viable. But toe strategy 
remains unchanged. 

- “The idea is. to. demonstrate he’s dif- 
ferent alienated, victimized by toe polit- 


ical class,” said Andrei Piomkovsky. 
director of toe Institute for Strategic 
Studies here. “He has very good 
chances because toe party of power has 
discredited itself enormously — from 
toe collusion of money and power, toe 
inefficient economy and so forth. But he 
has also demonstrated that he’s a nasty 
person with a very mean and vengeful 
character. Russian people are very Sen- 
sitive to this, so X mink he’s damaging 
himself. He has only one opponent, one 
enemy: himself.” 

Mr. Lebed, however, sees enemies 
everywhere, in fee course of the 90- 
minute roundtable Monday, he belittled 
Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin as 
“wasted material.” He called Ytm 
Luzhkov, toe Moscow mayor who is 
also a (residential hopeful, “toe best 
representative of raging nomenklatura 
capitalism. ” 

He disparaged his successor as na- 
tional security chief, Ivan Rybkin, as an 
ineffectual, “cold-blooded’ ’ bureaucrat, 
and Mr. Rybkin’s deputy, Boris 
Berezovsky, as a war profiteer. The 
Communist Party chief, Gennadi Zy- 
uganov, who lost to Mr. Yeltsin in last 
year’s presidential runoff, was dis- 
nrissedas a “card that’s been played.” 

Asked with whom be might form an 
alliance, he mentioned only two men, 
neither of whom poses a threat to him: 
tbe free-market economist Grigori Yavl- 
insky — “if he stops saying foolish 
dungs'* — and Svyatoslav Fyodorov, an 
eye surgeon who received less than 1 


percent of toe first-round presidential 
vote last June. 

Many analysts would not quarrel too 
violently with Mr. Lebed's character- 
izations of his rivals; still, they wonder 
who would be left for Mr. Lebed to team 
up with if he became president 
The vagueness about his team reflects 
a continuing vagueness in policy. Even 
after half a year of scrutiny, Mr. Lebed’s 
plans for reviving the economy, for 
fighting crime and corruption and for 
dealing with the West remain undefined, 
characterized more often by aphorism 
and criticism than by detail 
Asked about the economy, for ex- 
ample, Mr. Lebed called attention to 
Russia's massive capital flight, to “ab- 
surd tax, customs and tariff policy” and 
tbe absence of a workable insurance 
system. He spoke about cutting taxes 
drastically while tightening compliance 
to generate revenues. 

But he did not provide specifics, even 
whenpressed. 

“ There are. to put it briefly, a number 
of actions that need to be taken on toe 
tactical level,” he said in one typically 
cloudy answer. “The situation must be 
changed,'' he said. “But conditions 
have to be created for this.” 

He also provided fodder fra critics 
who doubt his commitment to civil liber- 
ties. To stamp out corruption, be would 
“obligate bureaucrats to declare not 
only their income, but also expenses — 
and to do so not only for themselves, but 
also for their relatives.” 


Continued from Page 1 


entity with one voice in toe international 
co mmuni ty, I think it particularly nec- 
essary to strengthen policy dialogues 
between Japan and ASEAN at various 
levels,” Mr. Hashimoto said. “To pro- 
mote Japan -ASEAN cooperation, strong 
political leadership is indispensable. 
Dialogues al top levels should be en- 
hanced to build stronger personal ties of 
trust between top leaders.” 

Tbe bolder, more assertive Japanese 
diplomacy outlined by Mr. Hashimoto 
appears to have been generally wel- 
comed by Southeast Asian governments, 
who see it as a way for ASEAN to 
increase its influence and ability to in- 
fluence developments in toe Asia-Pa- 
cific region. 

Japan already takes part in annual 
meetings with ASEAN at the foreign 
minister level, as do many other coun- 


end, tearing Tokyo free to pursue an 
independent mifiiary role in the region. 

He said that toe “most important” 
condition fra maintaining peace and sta- 
bility in die Aria-Pacific region was toe 
'"e United 


continued presence of the United States. 
“The Japan-U-S. 


tries. But having regular meetings of 
Japanese and ASEAN he 


heads of govern- 
ment would give Tokyo an exclusive and 
preeminent relationship with the group. 

That could cause concern in Beijing, 
where suspicion of Tokyo’s regional in- 
tentions remains strong. 

Evidently with such sensitivities in 
mind, Mr. Hashimoto sought to preempt 
criticism that his proposal for an up- 
graded relationship with ASEAN meant 
that Japan was seeking a potential coun- 
terweight against China and was plan- 
ning for tbe day when its long-standing 
alliance with toe United States would 


ments arc a very important framework 1 
engaging toe US. presence,” Mr. Ha- 
shimoto said. “Japan will continue to do 
its best to maintain confidence in toe 
arrangements.” 

He said that after toe U.S. presence, 
another “extremely important factor” 
for Asia-Pacific peace was “relations 
with China.” 

Noting that both ASEAN and Japan 
had “deep-rooted and inseparable re- 
lations” with China, he said that since 
Beijing had been following a path of 
reform, “ it is important for the rest of the 
world to support the policy direction and 
to engage in wide-ranging dialogues and 
exchanges with China so that she can 
secure fierposition as a constructive part- 
ner in die international community.'' 

Bat he stopped short of saying that his 
government would revive its grant aid to 
China in the wake of Beijing's decision 
late last year to halt nuclear weapons 
testing. Tokyo suspended the aid to 


protest toe testing. 

He also avoided direct answers to 


questions about whether Japan wanted 
to see China and South Korea join 
ASEAN countries in an East Asia Eco- 
nomic Caucus, as Malaysian leaders 
have long proposed. 


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PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, JANUAR Y 15, 1997 

EDITORIALS /OPINION 



Iferalh 


INTERNATIONAL 



©tribune 



K'fltlSHFD WITH THE WtU JUSk Tl)lt> AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The Gingrich Turmoil 


The schedule that the House Re- 
publican leadership has set for reach- 
ing a judgment in the ethics case 
against Speaker Newt Gingrich is un- 
workable. Members will be called 
upon to make a final decision without 
the full airing of the facts. The judg- 
ment date should be extended. 

The House ethics process is wisely 
set up to be bipartisan. On the ethics 
committee, unlike others, each parry has 
the same number of members . meaning 
that each has a veto over whatever the 
committee docs. That is one of the 
reasons why. over the years, the com- 
mi litre has been so notoriously slow to 
act. Likewise, it is one of the reasons 
why the decision Iasi month of the eth- 
ics subcommittee that had charge of the 
Gingrich case was so impressive. 

The subcommittee, itself evenly di- 
vided by party, basically found that the 
speaker had been circumventing if not 
quite violating both the tax and the 
campaign finance laws by converting 
supposedly charitable land therefore 
tax -deductible) contributions to polit- 
ical use. It also found that he had given 
the committee untrue information 
about the hind-raising activities — and 
that in both setting up and misrep- 
resenting the operation, he had vio- 
lated the rules by acting in such a way 
as to bring discredit on the House. 

In effect. Mr. Gingrich - pleaded 
guilty to both offenses while seeking to 
minimize their importance. The pro- 
ceedings now have moved to the stage 
of determining a penalty. That will 
depend on the judgment of first the full 
committee and then the full House of 
Representatives as to the seriousness 
of the violations. That judgment de- 
pends on details that have yet to be 
made available — and that is the judg- 
ment the leaders now seek to hasten, 
having sought all last year to do the 
opposite and delay the proceedings un- 
til safely after the election. 

What is needed, first, is the full report 
of the independent counsel who has 
conducted the investigation for the 
committee, then both explication of 
those findings and the opportunity to 


challenge them in hearings, and then a 
little lime to reflect To try to cram the 
entire process into the week ending next 
Tuesday — which, of course, is in in- 
auguration week, when the attention of 
press, public and many members them- 
selves will be elsewhere — is ludicrous. 
The Republicans would not stand for 
such a railroad if the shoe were on the 
other foot, and they would be right. 

The Democrats don’t help the cause 
of due process in which they have 
cloaked themselves when they drool 
for vengeance against Mr. Gingrich, as 
too many of them, including some of 
their leaders.- so openly do. The leaking 
of what appears to have been an il- 
legally recorded telephone conversa- 
tion involving Mr. Gingrich didn’t ex- 
actly distinguish them, either. 

Our own sense is that the recording 
of the Republican strategy session 
proved a good deal less than its pur- 
veyors implied. Mr. Gingrich is ac- 
cused of having reneged on an agree- 
ment not to join in orchestrating, in 
advance of public hearings, a public 
relations offensive against the charges 
to which he had pleaded guilty. Thai is 
what the recording is said to show. As 
with everything else in the case, there 
is of course a dispute about whether it 
does or not. But why should such a 
murky, unrealistic and insupportable 
limitation on self-defense, to say noth- 
ing of speech, have been imposed on 
him in the fust place? Which is the side 
that is supposed to be trying to quash 
debate in this case, anyway? 

The Gingrich case at this point is no 
longer just about Mr. Gingrich. The 
timetable the Republicans have im- 
posed makes it a case about the in- 
tegrity of the ethics process, the House 
and the majority party as well. 

If the facts are as Mr. Gingrich's 
defenders say. they have nothing to 
fear from further discussion. To quash 
the debate implies both that they think 
the speaker needs the help and that 
they are willing to give it to him. That 
is not the end result that the Repub- 
licans can welcome. 

— the Washington post. 


Bulgarian Dialogue? 


Bulgarians, inspired by their neigh- 
bors in Serbia, have taken to the streets 
to try to remove a government that is 
one of the most inept in Europe. The 
strategy may be working. On Monday 
ihe government agreed to the protest- 
ers’ main demand of early elections, 
although not early enough. New elec- 
tions should be held this year, not in 
1998. Nevertheless, the government 
response suggests that a political dia- 
logue may be possible in a country 
where inflexibility has been the rule. 

People power is something new in 
Bulgaria, which was always the Soviet 
Union's most docile ally. There were 
no major protests under communism, 
and since then Bulgarians have stoic- 
ally endured a series of incompetent 
governments. 

Both the Socialists and the oppo- 
sition Union of Democratic Forces are 
inflexible and tolerant of corruption in 
their ranks. They have been more in- 
terested in fighting ideological battles 
than getting things done. In December 
die Parliament dismissed a Socialist 
government, and the party then chose a 
different leader. But Bulgarians want 
new policies, not just new faces at the 
top. High on the list of what Bulgaria 


needs is a market economy. 

Central Europeans angry at the 
shon-ierm pain caused by market re- 
forms only need look to Bulgaria to see 
the long-term pain of not reforming. 
When communism fell in 1989, the 


Bulgarians had higher per capita in- 
comes than Poles. The Polish gov- 


ernment then instituted market reforms 
that, after a few years of decline, have 
sent the economy soaring. 

Bulgaria has done less to reform and 
privatize than any other member of the 
former Soviet bloc. Today the average 
citizen makes the equivalent of $30 a 
month, the lowest salary in Europe. 
The banking system has collapsed. 

The Socialists have neither the com- 


mitment to reform nor the public trust 
needed to carry it out. While other 


European socialist parties have insti- 
tuted economic reforms. Bulgaria's So- 
cialists have proved less willing to take 
political risks for the nation's gain. 

Both sides should treat the govern- 
ment’s statements as the opening of 
serious negotiations. This will require 
the government and the opposition to 
abandon their rigidity and work toward 
elections at the earliest possible date. 

— THE NEK' YORK TIMES. 


Look, It’s Cyberman 


Comic book heroes get facelifts all 
the time, shedding the frumpy for the 
sleek and the homely for the handsome 
in a calculated attempt to entice young- 
er readers. The makeovers tend to go 
unnoticed. But even editorial writers 
mined churlish last week when DC 
comics unveiled its new. somewhat an- 
drogynous togs for Superman, whose 
super suit is losing its trademark cape. 

Judging from the hysteria, few people 
had kept abreast of Superman’s meta- 
morphosis from Man of Steel to more 
like us. which has been moving along 
quite briskly for more than a decade. For 
half a century. Superman battled his 
way through the universe without so 
much as breaking a fingernail. But fans 
and comic book writers grew bored with 
invulnerability. 

First the writers de-superized the 
suit, which fell to pieces in combat. He 
began to bleed, not just on rare oc- 
casions but all the time. He became 
self-doubting and in need of counsel 
and companionship. Last fall, DC 


comics married him off to Lois Lane. 
His alter ego. Clark Kent also became 
more vulnerable, suffering paper cuts 
at the office and burning his fingers 
when cooking at home. 

As Clark continues to go the way of 
ail flesh, the process of humanizing 
Superman seems to have been aban- 
doned. He now bristles with electricity 
and. instead of merely leaping tall 
buildings, transmits himself through 
phone lines. To court the Internet 
crowd, the writers have dumped all the 
human frailties on Clark while turning 
Superman into a kind of Cyberman. 

Older critics are particularly un- 
happy about the punky new hairdo and 
the missing cape. The Sl Petersburg; 
Times pleaded. “Say it ain’t so." The 
Rocky Mountain News cried “Yuck.” 
But stripping away the cape and jazz- 
ing Up the suit were logical steps. If the 
old fellow is lucky — be is 60 now — 
the change could give him a new lease 
on superherohood. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


| E IMTHNATHmL *4 

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Helping Serbian Democrats Is the Only Option 

, « . « . » . .n T 7 " Zoran Diindiic and Vuk and armed_conftict in Kosovo. Bm 


L ENOX, Massachusetts — The fiery 
nationalism ihai made Serbs the first 
free people of the B alkan s in the 19th 
century has also made them the last to 
escape from communism. An appeal to 
Serbian nationalism enabled the Com- 
munists to keep their privileges, and 
power, in 1989, when party hacks else- 
where in Europe were losing theirs. 

But nationalism is no less an issue in 
Serbia now drat the Communists' dic- 
tatorial power is being challenged. The 
question is how it will affect the pro- 
spects for democracy there. 

The precedents are not encouraging. 
Democracy in Belgrade between the 
two world wars was an orgy of in- 
stability fueled by ethnic and religious 
hatreds, which were eased only by 
Tito's brutal dictatorship. Such rival- 
ries still pose a danger. 

For one thing. Serbian Orthodox 
politicians will control the destiny of 
ethnic Albanian Muslims in the south- 
ern province of Kosovo. And Serbia 
will be making decisions in a climate of 
conflict with neighboring Catholic 
Croats and Bosnian Muslims. 

The Serbs' ethnic insecurity is ag- 


By Robert D. Kaplan 


gravated by a ruined economy. No- 
where in Eastern Europe in 1989, per- 
haps not even in Romania, was the 
outlook so grim as it is in Serbia now. 
Disaster awaits if Serbian democrats 
turn out to be no better at reducing 
unrest than their colleagues in Bulgaria, 
where the economy has been collapsing 
and protesters have demanded new 
elections. 

Bulgaria, which has been near an- 
archy for years, can implode without 
necessarily destabilizing neighboring 
states. Serbia cannot. 

Bulgaria’s disappointing experience 
with democracy clarifies the impor- 
tance of geography and culture in East 
Europe's transitions. 

As was the case between the world 
wars, those European countries with 
Ottoman legacies close to die Middle 
East have had an extremely difficult 
time adjusting to a free society. 

In Serbia, opposition figures do not 
boast impressive credentials. The two 
main personalities of the democracy 


movement, Zoran Djindjic and Vuk 
Draskovic, have both embraced nation- 
alism when it has suited them- 
Mr. Djindjic campaigned for the Ser- 
bian Democratic Party of Radovan 
Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb indicted as a 
war criminal. Mr. Draskovic is an en" 


and armed conflict in Kosovo. But to 
stick with Mr. Milosevic is not an op- 
tion. The democratic process is already 

under way, as the protests in the streets 

have revealed. . , 

Washington, which has condemned 
Mr. Milosevic for refusing to recognize 


war crimmaL Mr. urasKovtc is an «i- ~ — ~ 

thusiast of the World War II-era Serbian opposition electoral E?2ta 

“ffiSsrrSfc..— 

men is that they have shown less hos- convenient 


diity to the West and to free market for the West risks a 
values than have Slobodan Milosevic’s chamofeve^^teh^SwhanCcm- 


UuUUlH W1VMW1 — ’ , 

Communists munists are still capable of perpetrating. 

If Mr. Milosevic falls. Serbia could They have done much worse. 

low warlords .o gSSSSfi ffiju 


the former Yugoslavia, creating 


eco- 


in tensity conflict into the next century. 

Mr. Milosevic, using an iron fist, has 
managed to restrain both Serbian war- 
lords and the ethnic Albanian Muslims 
seeking independence for Kosovo. 
Weak democratic leadership after his 
ouster could lead to aggression from 
Croatia, renewed fighting in Bosnia 


noraic and administrative aid. Should 
they come to power, however, there is 
no other choice. 


The writer is author of " Balkan 
Ghosts: A Journey Through History." 
He contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 


I > |rt ’ 


..... 

.. 


JlSfi-.- 

-i 









No Peace Without Justice, Which Is More Than Democracy 


3f 


N EW YORK — Peace is a product of 
justice; it is not simply the absence 
of violence. All violent conditions rep- 
resent earlier failures of leadership, 
either by wrongdoing or by default. 
They represent failures at local levels, 
and especially at national levels. 

With the interdependence associated 
with modem technology, they can also 
mean failures at international levels. 

It is much easier to prevent than to end 
wars and revolts. 

In Africa today, and especially in 
Rwanda and Burundi, we hear a great 
deal about ethnic conflicts. Yet these are 
taking place at particular times and 
places after members of the different 
ethnic groups have for long periods lived 
side by side in the same villages and 
towns, have worked together and have 
intermarried. Thus, ethnicity is clearly 
not a sufficient explanation of conflict. 

Ethnicity can, however, be used to 
conceal the real problems, the genuine 
economic problems or cultural clashes, 
behind the easily aroused human fears 
about those who are unlike ourselves. 


By Julius K- Nyerere 


Ethnicity can also be used to divide 
and rule. In Rwanda and Burundi, this use 
of ethnicity was clearly made by Ger- 
many and Belgium as colonial powers. 

Ethnic conflict will arise when leaders 
in die society deliberately strengthen the 
concept of ethnicity, and for their own 
purposes ignite hostility. In Rwanda and 
Burundi, conflict has economic roots. 
The fight for power is mainly a fight for 
economic resources. Ethnicity is simply 
being exploited. 

Conflicts of interest or desire within a 
social or political group are inevitable; 
they are an intrinsic part of living in 
society. And some level of conflict be- 
tween nations is also quite normal. Our 
duty is to prevent normal conflict of 
interest from developing into hostility. 

We need to defuse potential conflict, 
and deliberately build peaceful relation- 
ships through the extension of justice 
throughout the society. 

This duty, to say the least, is not 


countries it 

r introduction 

of political democracy can help, but it is 
not enough; indeed, it cam aggravate 
civic conflict When the political system 
gives the vote to the many, and the 
economic system gives bread to the few, 
civic strife is almost inevitable.. 

When the vote is a human right and 
bread is a privilege of the few, demo- 
cracy is a mockery. It cannot be an 
instrument of peace and harmony be- 
cause it is not an instrument of justice. 

The surest way to build and to main- 
tain peace within and between nations is 
to work for justice — justice for all 
persons and all groups. 

A nation and a world organized as a 
basis of upholding the principle of hu- 
man equality, human dignity, justice and 
respect for all will be a nation and a 
world where peace prevails. 

We are not there yet anywhere in the 
world, and certainly not in my part of the 
world. And I am not sure that the re- 
lentless weakening of government and 
community, and die equally relentless 


globalization and raarketization of our 

... _=.i — ve to ^ particularly 

building of peace 


■■■ ■ - ^ 

economies, will prove to be particularly 
conducive to the 
through justice. 


Where the law of the jungle reigns 
supreme, where might is right, where the 
game of moneymaking includes arms 
trafficking and corruption — what is 
justice? And what is peace? 

When governments are weak or cor- 
rupt or both, who can intervene on behalf 
of the weak in our poor societies? 

ffeople have instincts of cooperation 
as well as of self-interest. If societies are 
so organized as to encourage human 
cooperation and mutual toleration of dif- 
ferences, then building or maintaining 
peace will gradually become easier. Pro- 
moting justice to ail will become easier. 

Peace is a product of justice. They 
work for peace who work far justice. 

fit 


This comment has been adapted front 
an address by Mr, Nyerere. former pres- 
ident of Tanzania and facilitator of the 
Burundi peace talks, to the International 
Peace Academy in New York. 


How Patchy Reform in Latin America Can Be Self-Defeating 


L ONDON — A perilous new 
myth claims that Latin 
America is having a free market 
revolution. A grave danger 
resides in the fact that the cour- 
ageous but limited experiments 
in reform are giving rise to a 
powerful populist opposition 
and weakening the case for the 
free market precisely because 
they are so incomplete. 

If the limited reforms that 
have meant fewer state-owned 
enterprises, reduced inflation 
and increased foreign invest- 
ment were enough to bring 
about stability and prosperity. 
Latin America would have been 
prosperous a long time ago. 

After all, there have been 
periods in the past when mon- 
etary policy was not wildly out 
of control and the wave of state 
ownership had not yet begun. 
During that time, foreign in- 
vestment was omnipresent; so 


By Alvaro Vargas Llosa 


much so that all of our socialist 
revolutions (from Mexico in 
1910 ro Bolivia in 1952 to Cuba 
in l959toPerutn 1968) arose in 
the name of “sovereignty.” 
Yet the misery persisted. 

If competent macroeconom- 
ics is sufficient for a free and 
prosperous society, why is Lat- 
in America still backward even 
though since 1940 we have 
grown by an average of 5 per- 


cent a year — more than Europe 
nod? 


has grown in that same pent 
The answer lies in a simple 
but often misunderstood irony: 
Partial reforms and the single- 
minded focus on macroeco- 
nomic management — without 
commitment to private prop- 
erty, competitive markets and 
strong judicial and democratic 
political institutions — result in 
mercan tili Stic systems where 


the vast majority are denied the 
opportunities and benefits of 
economic growth. 

There are two great weak- 
nesses in tire current reform 
process in Latin America. Re- 
formers are confusing private 
enterprise with free market cap- 
italism. And reformers are fo- 
cusing on macroeconomic man- 
agement without considering 
institutional frameworks. 

Private ownership is not a 
panacea, HI -conceived privat- 
izations have replaced public 
monopolies with private mono- 
polies, transferring the owner- 
ship of certain sectors of the 
economy while still protecting 
markets and scandalously fuel- 
ing corruption. Telephone sys- 
tems demonstrate the problem. 


Throughout Latin America, 
>ers suffer hii 


users suffer high rates and poor 


Watch How Arafat Reciprocates 


N EW YORK — Benjamin 
Netanyahu spent most of 
the last few months trying to 
show the world that he was 
negotiating with the Palestin- 
ians in good faith. Now he 
faces the job for which he was 
elected: either show Israelis 
that he can give them a peace 
with security for themselves 
and their country, or in decent 
time tell them that it cannot be 
done, not now and probably 
not for many years to come. 

He said before he was elect- 
ed that he would work within 
the Oslo agreement signed by 
the defeated Labor govern- 
ment. That meant giving up 
major West Bank towns, in- 
cluding Hebron. 

He got somewhat more se- 
curity for those 400 Hebron 
Jews who believe that it is not 
a crime for Jews to live in one 
of Judaism's holy cities. But 
to make future talks worth 
holding he needed conditions 
on how to go on from Hebron 
— specific and internationally 
publicized steps of reciprocity 
from the Palestinians. To get 
that he paid a price. 

Assuming that the agree- 
ment is approved by Yasser 
Arafat, who has been walking 
away from it for about two 
months, Mr. Netanyahu 
agrees to a final deployment 
from che West Batik by 
September 1998 — almost a 
year before he wanted. 

There is nothing approach- 
ing agreement on how much 
of the- West Bank the Israelis 
will leave. Eventually, that 
and Jerusalem will be the 
make-or-break issues. 

Mr. Netanyahu and his sup- 
porters see territorial negoti- 
ation as a matter of survival — 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


time to spot and mobilize 
against attack. He is likely to 
insist on military control of at 
least 40 percent of the West 
Bank outside the towns — 
much high ground and almost 
all the Jordan Valley. Labor 
would have settled for lots 
less; how much it never said. 

Still, if Likud signs any ter- 
ritorial agreement, it is in ef- 
fect consenting to creation of 
an independent Palestinian 
state. Mr. Netanyahu can call 
it an “entity.” He can call it 
gefiite fish. It will be a state. 

But he got what be needed 
to continue talking peace and 
keep good faith — with his 
own people: the conditions of 
reciprocity that would make 
the talks believable to the 56 
percent of Israeli Jews who 
voted for him. 

They are set down in a “note 
for the record” by die U.S. 
team led by Dennis Ross. They 
commit the Palestinians to do 
things they promised at Oslo 
but have never carried out. 

Israeli sources say that as of 
late Monday these were; 

• Dismantling of the ter- 
rorist superstructure in Pales- 
tinian-controlled territory. 
That means disarming Hamas, 
Islamic Jihad and similar 
groups, or it means nothing. 

• Really, at last scrapping 
the death-to-Israel covenant 
of the Palestinian movement. 

• Reducing F&estinian 
aimed forces to the one police 
organization of 18,000 allowed 
by Oslo — not die half-dozen 


military groups that Mr. Arafat 
created with 45,1 


,000 men. 

• Extraditing terrorists in 


Palestinian custody. Twelve 
of the 27 terrorists on Israel’s 
wanted list are wearing Mr. 
Arafat's police uniforms now, 
and most of the others are 
walking free. 

• Closing offices outside 
Palestinian-controlled territo- 
ry. Most important: no longer 
using Orient House in Jeru- 
salem as a foreign office. 

• Stopping the constant 
verbal incitements against Is- 
rael by Palestinian officials. 
Mr. Arafat on down. 

If Mr. Netanyahu gives up 
any of these conditions, he 
may kill chances of majority 
support in his cabinet 

Israel commits itself to a 
preliminary redeployment and 
the start of final-round talks, 
both within two mouths. It 
agrees to consider these steps: 
stopping closure of its borders 
against Palestinians as an eco- 
nomic punishment, release of 
current “security” prisoners, 
free passage between the Gaza 
Strip and other Palestinian- 
controlled territory, and a Ga- 
za Strip international airport 

Egypt and other Arab states 
will have fascinating fits if 
Mr. Arafat lives upto recipro- 
city conditions. They know 
that it would remove Pales- 
tinians from the constant state 
of political warfare against Is- 
rael that has been basic Arab 
strategy for a half-century. 

So I doubt that he will live 
up to reciprocity conditions 
for long. But whatever he de- 
cides. ending the anti-Israeli 
political war will re main an 
underlying condition for ever 
turning peace talks into peace 
reality. That has been written 
in blood, so long. 

The New York Times. 


service because telephone 
companies have been sold as 
private monopolies. Users then 
wrongly deduce that capitalism 
is the cause of this abuse. 

Public transport in Buenos 
Aires is privately owned, but 
each route is monopolized by 
one company, thereby taming 
Argentines against the whole 
idea of privatization. 

Protecting these private mo- 
nopolies has led to the equally 
dangerous perception dial lib- 
eralization means giving priv- 
ileges to the rich. Of the 15 Mex- 
icans featured in Fortune's latest 
list of the richest people in the 
world, there is Dot one who has 
not benefited, however legally, 
from state-granted privileges. 

Around the continent there 
are also so-called strategic areas 
of the economy where privat- 
ization is not contemplated. 

Despite a phenomenal $250 
billion generated in the past 20 
years by the state-owned oil 
company, an estimated 80 per- 
cent of Venezuelans live below 
the poverty line today. 

On the macroeconomic front, 
some Latin American countries 
have made bold changes but 
have ignored the importance of 
institutions — justice, private 
property, solid money and 
democracy. The result is a re- 
form process with weak links 
that invites disaster. 

Lack of institutional reform 
is widespread. Private property 
rights are often ignored by gov- 
ernment During die 1986s, Per- 
uvian peasants de facto privat- 
ized 60 percent of the land that 
had been collectivized by the 
socialist agrarian reform of the 
1970s. Formal property titles 
are still not available. 

In Mexico, property rights, a 
crucial institution in any free 


society, can hardly be present 
under Article 27 of the consti- 
tution, which says “the nation” 
is the owner of all die land. 

In Peru, there can.be little 
trust in the country's institutions 
when the judiciary was disban- 
ded tty the president himself in 
1992, later replaced by a new. 
politically dependent court. It 
made no attempt to prevent Peru 
from becoming, according to 
Amnesty International, the 
country with the most political 
prisoners in Latin America after 
Cute, (approximately 1,100). 

Peru’s current system has 
been exposed during the hos- 
tage crisis at the Japanese Em- 
bassy in Lima. Vladimiro Mon- 
tesinos. the strongman behind 
President Alberto Fujimori, is 
not as efficient as we were led to 
believe — the entire intelli- 
gence service hierarchy are 
among the hostages! 

The Peruvian military’s ob- 
session with Ecuador is a na- 
tional security risk. While senior 


-5* 


officers were busy buying MiG 
temer Soviet 


fighters from the former , 
republics and placing key per- 
sonnel at the northern bonier, 
the internal enemy was prepar- 
ing its most spectacular blow. 

And the hostage crisis has 
revealed that political prison- 
ers, many of whom are not ter- 
rorists, are held in jails that re- 
semble medieval dungeons. 

Which country has under- 
taken a new reform of its justice 
system? None. Latin America 
divorces economic liberty from 
its essential political and insti- 
tutional base. ^ 


The writer is a Peruvian jour- 
nalist, son of the novelist Mario 
Vargas Llosa, This comment 
was distributed by the Los 
Angeles Times Syndicate. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


.nxZi ■* 


1897: Disease Control 


PARIS — In consequence of 
cholera at Plymouth and the bu- 
bonic plague at Bombay, the 
Council of Ministers has decided 
to take measures to prevent the 
spread of infection to ports on 
me north coast of France and to 
those on the Meditermean that 
are in communication with Brit- 
ish India. Passengers upon their 
arrival from Plymouth will be 
disinfected and placed under sur- 
veillance during five days. Also, 
the importation from plague- 
stricken countries into France of 
objects known to harbor disease 
germs will be forbidden. 


thousands of negroes from this 
country to Africa to establish a 
republic there. Garvey con- 
trolled a newspaper, (he “Negro 
World,” and organized the Uni- 
versal Negro Improvement As- 
sociation, with a membership of 
four million, and the Black Star 
Steamship Line, which was to 
give “every blade man, woman 
and child an opportunity to 
climb the ladder of industrial 
and commercial progress.” 


■- - 
' snfcWf- 




1947: German Travel 


BERLIN —The British Military 




1922: Garvey Upheld 

NEW YORK — Three thousand 
members of the Universal Negro 
Improvement Association vc^ed 
confidence in Marcus Garvey, 
who denied charges that he had 
used the mails to defraud in a 
scheme to transport hundreds of 





Occupation 
Zone to foreign countries. The 
plan is intended primarily to fa- 
cilitate die exit of non-Germans, 
many of whom are liv ing in dis- 
placed persons camps. The 
scheme was instituted shortly 
after some South American 
countries announced they were 
willing to accept immigrants. 


^ % * 


?■ i*l 





'*• «> '■sTJaST 
■-*< -ii , 
• • - 

-rose a 


.. ?•&■* 
';w a .' ' 



PAGE 9 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1997 


f ¥k 


OPINION/LETTERS 


Now the Liberals Have the Momentum 


.■VXfAgnNGTON _ 

afraid of 

. That is the policy director 

S* a ^o^senrative group ialk- 

^™blicaa intel- 
■lectual blues. Afw ^7rZ_ 


By E. J. Dionne Jr. 


Yes, these liberals were Dot 
embarrassed about using the 
■word “family.’',.' 

Here, for example, is Pro- 
fessor Sfcocpofc “Some may 
feel that it is best to avoid 


•of the tauemgabom families, test we 

ica_ Widl Amer_ exacerbate racially charged 

316 waiy diviaons between dral- and 

Sound 

years ago. the 




fiiocr; 


‘ 1 

* I 


wary 
Twenty 

- «$v. me Washington 
5“. *fas also about ideas. 
■““* then, it was liberals who 
|were m trouble. 

- "Liberals have run out erf 
ideas,’ ’ said Democratic Scn- 
.^or James Abourezkin 1978, 
■usmg a line repeated over and 
over well into the 1990s. 

- fa it possible that conser- 
i\ vatives, after a great run, are 

.now the folks with the tired 
ideas, and liberals, of all 
people, the possessors of in- 
tellectual energy? 

'.You begin to get that seme 
tram a series of papers given at 
a recent conference at what 
* «s organizers optimistically 
.V* called the “New Mqority 
Conference” in Wamsuton, 
Vir ginia. 

The majority they have in 
mind is liberal and Demo- 
cratic. The gathering, organ- 
ized by Stanley Greenberg, a 
Democratic pollster, and 
Theda SkocptiL, a Harvard 
professor, is the son of en- 
deavor conservative think 
-tanks once monopoli zed. 
These are politically shrewd 
liberal intellectuals trying to 
change the direction of the 
’iticaJ debate. Roll over, 
_ Kristol. 

The papers will soon be 
iblished as a book and can "t 
fully summarized here. But 
three things stood out in most 
of (hem: a sense that the con- 
servative era has run out of 
gas and that something sew, 
and progressive, is posable; a 
pealism about avoiding old 
'liberal mistakes, and an effort 
to link the idea of active gov- 


Voters showed 
they are vitalfy 
interested in 
social insurance 
programs . 


and family support;” espe- 
cially health cate and “re- 
tirement security issues." 

Surprisingly tor those who 
stock in political la- 
. voters who cared about 
health and soda] insurance 
programs were inclined to 
identify themselves not as 
“liberal” but as “moderate” 
or “conservative,” 'Which is 
to say that many of them were 
Democrats who now 
that Ronald Reagan's 
trinity — “family, work and 
neighborhood” — could use 
a little support from govern- 
ment. 

- Alan Brinkley, a leader of a 
new generation of New Deal 
historians, argued that, con- 
trary to conservative mytho- 
logy, government was a 
powerful feme for America's 


families. But 
I disagree. Family-friendly 
conditions are vital to both 
sets of families. And pro- 
gressives need not adopt a economic progress over the 
morally relative stance.” last 150 years. Without gov- 

Shegoesom “Most people ' — * — — 

accept that two married par- 
ents are best for rfriMrgn t 
even though each of us is per- 
sonally acquainted with 
mothers (or fathers) who have 
to soldier on outside this ideal 
situation — Progressives can 
acknowledge (be tension be- 
tween ideals and second-best 
necessities.” 

Contrary to conservative 
dogma, titis crowd contends 
that most families lack a tran- 
scendent faith in the tender 
mercies of the market and 
want help from government 


eminent spe nding for “dams, 

bridges, highways, harbors, 
schools and hospitals,” the 
most conservative areas of the 
country, the South and Moun- 
tain West, would not now be 
enjoying all the benefits of 
capitalism. liberals, he said, 
need (oremind the country that 


there are task s in which gov- 
ernment “must play a signi- 
ficant role, as it has in the past, 
or they wifl remain undone.” 

Theodore Manner and 
Jerry Masbaw of Yale offered 
a strong case for universal so- 
cial insur ance programs — 
Medicare, Social Security 
and. ultimately, national 
health insurance — as “pre- 
conditions fora workable sys- 
tem of industrial capitalism 
and political democracy.” 

And William Julius Wilson, 
one of America's best analysts 
of the plight of the inner-city 
poor, argued that a focus on 
problems that “’concern the 
families of all racial and ethnic 
groups” — among them job 
security, wages, escalating 
medical and -housing costs, 
public educ ati o n, crime and 
drugs — could foster “inter- 
racial unity” and "‘city -sub- 
urban cooperation.” . 

In all this there is 
something old, something 
new, something borrowed 
and something ori ginal. So it 
was in the conservative in- 
tellectual project of 20 years 
ago. Ronald Reagan built on 
his side’s energy. Will Bill 
Clinton? 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Use UN Pulpit to Denounce Evil 


G ENEVA — With Kofi Annan of 
Ghana just appointed the United 
Nations' seventh secretary-general, I 
find ray thoughts turning to Martin 
Luther King Jr- who would have been 
6S years old on Wednesday. 

Of course, no one unschooled in 
international diplomacy and admin- 
istration could fill the UN's highest 
office. Certainly not But J feel 
the world yearns for a figure endowed 
with Dr. King’s ability to evoke the 
“better angels of our nature.” And 
what better bully pulpit — to use 
Theodore Roosevelt's term — than 
the executive office of the world's 
only comprehensive international 
organization? 

Dr. King knew how to use a pulpit, 
not only to preach but to influence and 
motivate by example. He practiced 
nonviolence under dangerous and of- 
ten humiliating circumstances, and he 
showed that power flows from words 
as well as from force. 

Die 1945 Preparatory Commission 
of the United Nations spoke of the 
secretary-general as a figure defining 
“the principles and ideals of the 
charter to which the organization seeks 
to give effect.” 

Writing in Foreign Affairs 
magazine, the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity scholar Fouad Ajami has em- 


By Morris B. Abram 


guage, warned that “a house divided 
against itself cannot stand.” 

In the depths of fee Depression, 



A secretary-general, of course, must 
use his moral authority sparingly. He 
cannot deplete this authority by con- 
demning every crime perpetrated 

MEANWHILE 

around the world. He should reserve 
his words for egregious violations of 
universally accepted principles — 
such as the Bosnian Serbs' massacre of 
8,000 people in the UN -proclaimed 
“safe haven” of Srebrenica in July 
1995. 

The secretary-general can raise a 
thunderous voice against genocide, 
torture, violations of the rights of chil- 
dren, and summary and arbitrary ex- 
ecutions. By using his world pulpit, the 
secretary-general would elevate his 
office and the United Nations as a 
whole. 

History resonates wife examples of 
leaders using the bully pulpit to inspire 
their citizens in trying times. 

As the issue of slavery threatened to 


itself.” 

When the Nazis attacked Britain in 
1940, Prime Minister Winston 
Churchill cried out fear Britain would 
fight to achieve “victory, victory at all- 
costs.” 

The UN secretary-general ’ s bully 
pulpit has gone largely unused. In- 
deed, one would be hard-pressed to 
recall a single memorable speech or 
even a recognizable phrase from 
any secretary-general in the organi- 
zation's 50 years. Nor have the mem- 
ber states ever criticized a secretary- 
general for lacking this kind of lead- 
ership. 

In Kofi Annan, the United Nations 
has a good and experienced man. He 
has a moral vision and he now has 
fee world's pulpit. Let us hope be 
finds his voice as well as the courage 
to use it. 


The writer, former US. permanent 
representative to the UN in Geneva, 
is chairman emeritus of United Nations 
sunder the United Slates^ President Abr_ Watch. He contributed this comment 
raham Lincoln, using biblical lan- to the International Herald Tribune. 


VUAULI^V 

politic? 

Irving] 


to “soldier on” through 
time of economic chan 
Far example, Mr. 
berg, Pteshfe&t Bill Clinton's 
former pollster, argued that 
Mr. CKnfrin made important 
gains among middle-income 
voters (those earning between 
$30,000 and $50,000 a 
and votes without college 
degrees. Yes, Mr. Greenberg 
said, such voters responded to 
Mr. Cfintou’s moderate mes- 


sages cm crime and “values.” 
But they were vitally inter- 
ernment to the problems of ested in programs tint they 
working families. viewed as forms of “social 


> *• ft- at 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


NATO Expansion 

Regarding “Why Ameri- 
cans Should Heal NATO Ex- 
pansion" (Opinion. Dec. 27) 
by Brian Beedham: 

-i . . In stating that die British 
•are “by ami large in favor” of 
NATO extension, Mr. Beed- 
-ham is factually incorrect 
Opposition in Britain is at 
least as strong as it is in the 
United State, not . least 
among those who have been 
professionally associated 
both wife the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organiptioa and wife 
the Soviet Union. 

• Unless such extension is 
accompanied by fee neces- 
sary mfritaiy measures, it will 
be as useless and counterpro- 
ductive as the guarantee that 
-Britain gave Poland in March 
1939. If it is so accompanied, 
-it will certainly provoke 
countermeasures on the part 
of the Russians, and die 
whole meny-go-round will 
get going again. 

' The fact that the Russians 
are too weak to do much 
■about an expansion at the mo- 
ment is hardly relevant. Na- 
tions have long memories for 
this kind of bumfiiatHXi. 

In any case, placing Cen- 
tral Europe on the front line of 
a new confrontation is an odd 
way to ensure its security. 

MICHAEL HOWARD. 

Hungerford, England. 

■ The United States is direct- 
ing a dangerous expansion of 


rngaw 

NATO 


into Eastern Europe. 
£*Tbe question is why. 

**■ This military alliance was 
created to keep the Soviet 
Union in check, and even 
-NATO now admits feat its 
mission has been accom- 
plished. 

Imagine if fee Warsaw 
Pact had remained in exis- 
tence after die Cold War and 
‘was pursuing expansion into 
Mexico and other Latin 
American coon tries. We 
•know die reaction in fee 
United Stares would be a 
readiness to go to war. Now 
imagine how. fee Russian 
people perceive the 
aonof NATO right up to 

doorstep. 

From every perspective, 
NATO expansion is a 
■idea, with a hidden agent-- — 
keeping the annanteflts in- 
dustry in business. 

NATO should be abolished 
and the billions of dollars now 
annually spent on it trans- 
ferred to fee United Nations, 
■jhe dark years of fee Cold 
War made it virtually im- 
i possible for the UN to ad- 
vance its conflict- solution 
and peacekeeping abilities.. 
Now we have fee chance to 
make this vital world organ- 
ization stronger and nwre 
• • ■ — in short, to 


United Nations that is imper- 
ative in building a global vil- 
lage — one. wife social arid 
economic justice and a- sus- 
tainable environment for the 
21st century. . 

DOUGLAS MATffiRN. 

'San Francisco. 

For Europe and America, 
few things are more impor- 
tant than Russia’s undergoing 
a process of denxxratization, 

arms’ control and disarma- 
ment, working to combat or- 
ganized crime and terrorism 
and expanding its foreign 
trade. 

-The residents of Central 
and Eastern Europe also share 
tins vision. Unfortunately, 
this region was the victim 
erf tiie tragic conflicts that 
shook Europe twice in this 
century. 

We cannot forget the past; 
neither can we change it 
What we can do is change our 
vision. Frankly, the fear that 
an enlarged NATO would 
threaten Russia is artificial, 
and the moment the alliance 
opened up these fears would 
burst like a babble. 

America’s role in Europe is 
difficult to overestimate. Be- 
hind its involvement are uni- 
versal values — freedom and 
human rights — - as well as 
T>«riifYn«i interests. -Security of 
the nans- Atlantic community 
is inseparable from these con- 
cerns. Few believe today that 
history will recur, but 
prudence is not out of place 
— hence enlargement of the 
sphere of stability. 

I am convinced that can- 
didate natinns are ready to 
shoulder all membership ob- 
ligations, particularly the fi- 
nancial costs. We are not beg- 
ging for help. We are offering 
dy namic markets that are 
already part of fee OECD. For 
us, membership in NATO is 
an investment in fee priceless 
commodity of peace. 

TOMASZ chlon. 

Helsinki. 

The writer is first secretary 
at the Polish Embassy in 
Helsinki. 


^ Bad Movie 

Regarding “Has Chinese 
Intelligence Penetrated the 
Clinton White House?" 
(Opinion, Jan. 4) by William 
Sefire: 

This article was either a 
parody or a script for another 
Oliver Stone movie. 

JOSEPH J. STERN, 
Jakarta. 


fee great promise °f' *c 
UN charter- 

We must not fail m tins 
task, for it iai’tNATOor^ 
other military alliance but the 


Letters intended for pub- 
lication should be addressed 
- Letters to the Editor" and 
contain the writer's signature, 
name and fill address. Letters 
should be brief and an sub- 
ject to editing- We cannot be 
responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15 , 1997 
PAGE 10 


STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 



„„ kKJ 


The Beginning and the End: Eyre’s ‘Guys and Dolls’ 


By Sheridan Morley 

hUcmatumai Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — It is generally 
reckoned that the production 
that assured Richard Eyre’s fu- 
ture as director of the National 
Theatre back in 1982 was his “Guys and 
Dofls," and there is therefore a certain 
logic to having him start his farewell 
season with a revival of it on the same 
set, albeit with only one of the original 
cast. On the open Olivier stage we now 
have Clarke Peters, Joanna Riding, 
Imclda Staunton and Henry Goodman m 


LONDON THEATER 


place of Bob Hoskins, Julia McKenzie, 
Julie Covington and die late Ian Char- 
and 14 ye 



see the National now venturing 
into more of the ontaOTU » 
sicals, than chose perennial box-office 

Sa ^tore C STro° other musica! teats 
ajonnd town. At the King s HwU 
Ctamirtg low-budget sfcgtng 
score ever written by Vivian Oisfaad 

the one.be wessriUre^ l-tahe 


yi# 1 ' 

4 1- 11 


Mo 


it 




Imelda Staunton as Miss Adelaide. Henry Goodman as Nathan Detroit and the cast of ’* Guys and Dolls ” at the National Theatre. 


leson, and 14 years on there is inevitably 
a sense of the second company having 
moved into the all-neon set 
Most of all we miss the fare David 
Healy as Nicely-Nicely Johnson. Tal- 
ented though Qive Rowe is, he cannot 
begin io approach the show-stopping way 
in which Healy told us to sit down we're 
rocking the boat and as the sole survivor, 
John Normington, goes into the breath- 
takingly quiet “More I Cannot Wish 
You," it comes as an uneasy reminder of 


the sheer class of the original and the 
absolute adequacy of this revival. 

“Guys and Dolls" was always Olivi- 
er’s dream in his initial management of 
the National, and it says something for 
our changing attitudes to Broadway drat 
he was forbidden not only by ill health 
but also by a strong feeling on the part of 
his governors that the show was, well, 
not quite National material. 

As one of the true classics of the Amer- 


ican theater it is of course ideal National 
material, but it remains a curiously in- 
transigent show to stage; its songs are its 
plot, its characters are its action, and in 
the end it lives or dies by David Toguri’s 
breathtaking choreography and the com- 
pany’s understanding of the original 
feree-cent opera convention. 

The filmic opening titles on a screen 


Leon Fleisher’s Comeback 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribute 


ha^sc 


P ARIS — Brahms’s colossal 
First Piano Concerto has 
played a key role in Leon 
Flasher's dramatic life, or per- 
one should say his lives, 
firstplayeditinpubhczn 1943, at 
age IS, with Rene Monteux and th e 
symphony orchestra of his native San 
Francisco, and repealed it the next year 
in Carnegie Hall with Monteux and die 
New York P hilharmoni c. Last Septem- 
ber he played it again with the San 
Francisco Symphony, this time under 
Michael Tilson Thomas. A few days ago 
it was the Brahms again, with me Or- 
chestra de Paris under Carlo Maria Gi- 

nlini_ 

The drama is in what came in those 
50 or so years and is still going on. 
Fleisher won the Queen Elisabeth com- 
petition in Brussels in 1952 and his 
international career took off. Then in 
1965 his right hand became disabled, 
mainly by repetitive stress syndrome 
— then known mainly to pianists, mid 
now to an army of computer jockeys. 
In the wake of this catastrophe. 


musical career. He resumed perform- 
ing in the piano literature for die left 
hand (Ravel, Prokofiev etc.), and has 
added to it by commissioning works. 
He took up teaching, and has been 
director of the Tanglewood Music Cen- 
ter for the last decade, and launched a 
flourishing career as a conductor. 

But he seems never to have stopped 
Hying to regain die use of his right 
hand- An attempted return to the two- 
hand repertory m 1982 was nor a suc- 
cess. In 1995, he made a low-key 
comeback with Mozart’s A -major con- 
certo (K414), then in September went 
into die deep end of die pool with die 
Brahms. 

In Paris, the experience was not 
without its perils or its rewards. There 
were some muddy passages and cliff- 
hanging moments m the outer move- 
ments, but the second movement was 
profoundly beautiful. Throughout 
there were fine shading s of touch, dra- 
matic shaping and mastery of musical 
architecture. (After all, the man learned 
it from Schnabel!) 

True, die tempos were slow, but at 
82, Giulini takes bis time, and he also 


did with a majestic Brahms Fourth 
Symphony that came after the inter- 
mission. 


□ 


The Ensemble Intercontemporain is 
currently celebrating its creation 20 
years ago as the de facto performing arm 
of Ptexre Boulez’s Ircam music research 
institute. Saturday night Boulez and 
David Robertson shared the conducting 

and the ensemble share d the platform 

with die Ensemble Modem of Frankfort 
in a program that included a world 
pre mi ere commissioned from Elliott 
Carter, whose inventive energy does not 
sewn to be slowing down at 88. 

His Clarinet Concerto is a charac- 
teristically complex piece in which die 
clarinet sus tains a dialogue with dif- 
ferent groups of instruments through 
the wok’s six parts, played without a 


break. Alain Damiens played the solo 
plomb ar 


part with impressive aplomb and stam- 
ina for the foil 20-minute length. 


Boulez conducted, as he did for Gy- 

> rax 


orgy Kurtag’s Double Concerto far 
two orchestras, piano and cello, whose 
(tensity did not exclude an immediate 
appeal. 


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unwisely beg comparison with the great 
Brando/Sinatra movie of 1955, but this 


is a production in which the whole has 
always been greater titan its parts: It is a 
tapestry of small-time losers and big- 
band numbers, and though I still think 
Eyre's production goes a little soft 
around the edges of Runyon’s acidic 
original tales of the Broadway jungle, 
the brassy sound and tacky soul of Times 
Square is in there somewhere. 

If there is now the faint feeling of a 
second company inheriting the show 
after a long run, that is perhaps inev- 
itable. We have to recall that this was 
virtually the National’s first smash-hit 
musical, since when they have given us a 
lot of Sondheim and Rodgers and Ham- 
merstein under the Cameron Mackin- 
tosh g rant. If we are now more de- 
manding about National musicals they 


have only themselves to blame for giv- 
ing us so much else that has beep as great 
if not greater tfran rfr»g old warhorse. 

It's far too early to assess how, if at all. 

the National policy on musicals will alter 
under Trevor Nunn, though this year's 
choice of “Lady in the Dark,” a fam- 
ously difficult fra. Gersh win-Moss Hart- 
Kun Weill score, suggests that it is 
already mov ing into bolder territory. 

The only real objection thus far to 
National musicals is fh ?t, from “ Carou- 
sel' ’ to “A little Night Music” and this 
revived “Guys and Dolls,” they have 
been on the far side of safe. Given that its 
subsidy allows Ae National more tee- 
way, taken together with the Mackintosh 
grant, than virtually any other music 
stage in the country, it would be good to 


Wind’’ is that cornpai^veraitv. amu- 
szcal for and about children. Written 
originally in 1954, it has the charm of aa 
SSSct different penod. to oflate 
Victorian fairy tales as a gang of rowdy 
cousins and tbeir prim leader get caught 
up with pirates and mermaids and. the 

“Peter Pan” and a little to Emd Btyton s 
“Famous Five.” But Dan Craworohas 
riven it a loving, seductive stagmgforrii 
those who still complain that children s 
theater isn’t what it was in their day, just 
as long as their day was about 1896. 

And finally, to the Bridewell for the 
familiar of all three Sondheim an- 
thology shows: “Many Me ai 
The othertwo are, of course. Side by aide 
by Sondheim” and “Putting It Together." 
“Many Me a Little” is a wonderfully 
characteristic Sondheim title for this two- 
character anthology soogbook of all his 
early Manhattan numbers, many of which 

predate West Side Story. The double act of 

Clrve Carter and Rebecca Front admirably 
caught foe bitter-sweet spirit of these early 
numbers, in many of winch can be beard 
foe raitHrvMt for later, better and more fa- 
miliar Sondheim classics. 


-tm 


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<d-m 


MILAN MENSWEAR 


Think Small, the Mantra for the Fall 




By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


M ILAN — From the narrow 
shoulders, through the puny 
chest, to the snake-hip flat- 
front pants, menswear has a 
new mantra: small fc bea miftil. 

The consumer test for next frill is 
whether a man can squeeze into a jacket 
so narrow that only one of the four 
buttons closes at the breastbone. The 
designer challenge of the Milan season is 
to suggest how little has apparently 
changed — yet still bring originality and 
modernity to classic menswear. 

“It’s about male vanity, but 
something on fee inside — a private 
pleasure,” said Miucda Prada in a neat 
metaphor far her powerful collection. 
For she had built everything that made a 
difference inm _ flte~fabric of Iter' sleek 
clothes. That included the tecbnoHnylon 
that (ace defined Prada’s urban -indus- 


trial image but that now wat erpro of s fee 
ide or n 


natural fibers like loden and 


inside 

flannel. 

The clothes were slim and small: the 
short, fitted coat, the taut jacket, narrow 

woven wife stretch so that the iir and 
finish seemed new for twill suits, al 
sweaters and flannel pants. The 
skill was in the mix; mat loden suits wife 
crisp shirts and shiny ties, chunky sweat- 
ers overflowing from right jackets, and 
country looks made city smart All these 
came in neutral colors like black, blue 
and especially different shades, tones 
and textures of gray. 

Prada sets the agenda in Milan not just 
wife its fashion but also wife its present- 
ations, creating a mood wife products in 
fee showroom, the better to explain tech- 
nical innovations, while most houses 
show on the runway. The house's for- 
ward march is witnessed by the group's 
booming sales, projected to rise from 
463 billion lire (5300 million) in 1996 to 
737 billion lire for 1997, according to 
Patrizio Bextelli, CEO of Prada’s parent 
company, I Pellettieri d ’Italia. He also 
announced at a news co nfer ence on 
Tuesday an expansion into slti wear. 



matelot sweaters and formal jackets wife 


Maybe because Missoni’s 
seemed so capacious, the collection 
missed the fashion rocket boost that was 
suggested by its i 
ers woven into ; 


'lien 

xaii.1 


Dolce & Gabbana’s tight-fitting 
pin- striped jacket with white pants. 


irmerwear for men and women, home- 
wares and fragrance by fall 1998. 

“Sexy and romantic,” was fee label 
that Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gab- 
bana hung on their collection. It was an 
accurate description of the hip-hugging 
and high-waist pants, the skinny rib 
sweaters, the almost-classic chalk- 
striped suits curved in at the front — all 
offset wife funky, feminine touches like 
lacy cardigans, quirky hats and the oc- 
casional leopard print. . 

There were moments when die 
steamy sexiness seemed overdone (think 
chunky knitwear wife swim pants), but 
Dolce & Gabbana had a nice balance of 
light materials wife fleece or felted fab- 
rics. They also found a cute way of 
adding modem zest to classic tailoring: a 
scarlet lining to a dark, pencil-slim cler- 
ic’s coat; fee mother of peari buttons 
studding a shorter navy pea coat. And for 
a cheeky sailor look, there were tight 


passage: sweat-M 
patterns against a~ 
backdrop of myriad stars. Reinventing 
MIssonrs patterned knits as cool kit for 

fee 1990s has relied on a youthful fixation 

cm fee 1970s. The technique of creating in 
knit dawn-of-history cave drawings and 
funowed-fidd textures is esaraormnary. 
So are Taihfissoni’s color mixes of mus- 
tard, mauve and blue, like bird-of-para- 
dise plumage. Butfeey seemed wormy of 
something more than so ggy tonic sweat- 
ers wnd lump y cardigans and might have 
been shown in acruper, cleaner way. 

A youthquake has come to Bybfas wife 
tbearrival.of Australian-bc^Califbnria- 
"based RlcfiarcfTyler as designer. jTom the 
tweed: jacket straining over tie concave 
chest of a stripling model, was clear that 
Tyler was flunking small And hip. Nar- 
row herringbone tweed suits or_ brief 
tailored coats were set off wife brightly 
colored athletic shoes — pan of a game of 
funky mixing feat included b aggy jeans 
wife tmy tops and gritty tweeds wife shiny 
or fleecy sweaters. Tyler claimed he was 
flunking American suburbia in the 1950s, 
but the show looked suspiciously like 
London in the 1960s. Ana although fee 
collection was cute, fashion is too frumliar 
whb route 1966. 

Inventive fabrics are fee story at fee 
classic Italian luxmy houses. Since men 
in fur trims is a motif of the M ilan s eason, 
Fendi could indulge its lost for luxury in 
a sporty, off-to-the-mountains collection 
that included techno-nylon parkas re- 
versing to nutria or raccoon and knits 
mixed wife tactile textures, like chocol- 
ate brown velvet jacket and suede pants. 

Astomo Fusco’s classic line was a 
parade of light but sumptuous tweeds, 
wool and cmds, fashioned into fee sea- 
son’s' trends: coats long and slim; brief 
pea coats; with & lingering whiff of fee 
mfljtary in four-pocket jackets and epaul- 
ette trims. For men of substance, there 
were suits geoexous enough to move yonr 
shoulders and breathe out in. 




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international 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1997 


PAGE Z1 




Germany Moves to Sell 



a Shares 

‘Overdone’ Fears Depress Airline’s Stock 


BONN . — The government said 

l li! Vould ** remaining 
-sfake id Lufthansa AO rh« 


au otter me airline’s 
bwame registered, a decision 
Jai sent the stock price tumbling ueariy 


r?_: — legislation approved by die 
■Gwmm cabmet will convert the air- 

* ares “to re- 
■gstered shares. The legislation “clears 

iTftH 3 * *?. °l m P Jcte privatization of 
Lufjansa, ■ Transportation Minister 
Matthias Wissmann said. “I am con- 
ndent that with this new law we can sell 
the shares this year.” 


> 


^msclosrfatM.O 1 DeuSche mate 
(51 a 24) m Frankfurt, down 0.84. 

‘The fears in the market are over- 
•doDe, ’ said Nick de Bellaigue. a Euro- 
pe transport analyst at ABN-AMRO 
Hoare GovetL 

■ There was a mistaken belief that the 

shares would be more difficult to trade if 
■they had to be registered, he said, but 
planned improvements in computerized 
trading would make the type of share 
sold irrelevant. 

Tbe draft legislation aims to ensure 
that a majority of Lufthansa shares stay 


inGennan hands, Mr W issmnrin «iid , 
that the airline r emains the national flag 
carrier and retains international landing 
right s. If more than 40 percent of the 
earner’s shares are acquired by foreign 
buyers, the legislation allows Lufthansa 
to repurchase its own shares. 

The draft law, Much now goes to the 
Parliament for approval, marks the latest 
step in Lufthansa's transition to private 
ownership, a move designed to enable the 
airline to compete better in the European 
tnadcet- The final stage of airline dereg- 
ulation in Europe is set for April 1, when 
European Union carriers are to be allowed 
to transport passengers within- any do- 
mestic market in the 15-nation EU. 

“Tbe company has already embraced 
die idea of shareholder ownership, 1 ’ said 
Chris Avery, an analyst at Paribas Capital 
Markets in London. .“This move is more 
a continuation of a trend rather than the 
start of a new one.” 

Bonn still owns 35.68 percent of 
Lufthansa indirectly, after share sales in 
1994 to reduce state ownership below 
50 percent In December, the govern- 
ment sold its direct stake to the state- 
owned bank Kreditanstalt flier 
Wiederaufbau to reduce its 1996 budget 
deficit (AP. Bloomberg) 


7 

Seoul Says It Can’t Trust Paris 


i CmrAtitoOm&tfFmDtipiadHs 

SEOUL — President Kim Young 
■Sam told a French envoy Tuesday that 
France's decision last month to scuttle 
•an agreement to transfer Thomson Mui- 
■>timedia to Daewoo Electronics Co. was 
discriminatory and showed that Trance 
could not be trusted. 

“The South Korean people believe we 
-have been totally rfisoimmated against.” 
Mr. Kim told Jean-Claude Pave, a French 
•presidential envoy sent to try to repair the 
damage caused by the cancellation of the 
transaction. “We have a bad impression 
. of France ami have come to think France 
cannot be trusted.” Mr. Paye arrived in 
-Seoul on Monday and promised “a fair 
evaluation” in a new search for a buyer 
for tbe debr-laden consumer-electronics 
unit of Thomson SA He said he still 


thought Daewoo wonld be an appropri ate 
partner for Thomson, bat Daewoo has 
yet to decide whether it will make anew 
rod for Thomson Multimedia 
“We hear the privatization is being 
reviewed,” Mr. Kxm was quoted as say- 
ing. “ftwould be fbrtimatetf tbe result is 
satisfactory; otherwise there will he ama- 
jor impact on Korean-French relations-" 
South Korean politicians were 
angered by die French government’s 
decision to scrap its plan to sell Thom- 
son to Lagardere Group for tbe sym- 
bolic sum of 1 franc (20 cents). 
Lagardere was then to have sold Thom- 
son Mulitimedia to Daewoo. But die 
French government said it was not con- 
fident Daewoo would meet a commit- 
ment to create jobs in France. 

(Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


A Hit With Wail Street 


Investors have reacted favorably to 
Boeing's announcements. 


$120 OCT. 6 

Boeing’s largest 

— union goes 

-100 - on strike. 


60 



40 


20 


AUG. 1 
Boeing buys 
Rockwell 
International's 
military 
business. 


BOEING'S 
WEEKLY 
CLOSING 
STOCK PRICE 

1995 


DEC. 15 1 
~ Boeing 
announces! 

takeover I 
— of I 
McDonnell 
Douglas. 


1996 


1987 


1 

Source: Datastreom 


NYT 



Rilfa Irvht&m'Vni ViilTgin 

Philip Condit is facing a big challenge In getting Boeing and McDonnell Douglas to work as a single unit 

CEO’s Goal: Make Boeing All Ears 


By Adam Bryant 

New Tori Times Service 


SEATTLE — It is difficult to doubt 
Philip Condit when he says his most 
important management rule at Boeing 
Co. Is to be a good listener. 

After all, he seems to have been sent 
over from central casting for the role of 
chief listener. He is as approachable as 
a good high school science teacher — 
ana then there are his ears, which are of 
a rather impressive size. 

Mr. Condit, 55, knows how to poke 
fun at himself. When he led the de- 
velopment of the 777 jet. he estab- 
lished the “Golden Ears” award for 
employees whose listening skills led 
to innovations. 

“You can use anything to your ad- 
vantage,” he said. 

Mr. Condit, now Boeing’s chief ex- 
ecutive, will have to use every ad- 
vantage he has in the next few years as 
he tries to pull off the biggest chal- 
lenge of his careen getting die 200,000 
employees of Boeing and McDonnell 
Douglas Corp. to be greater than die 
sum of their disparate parts. 

He faces high expectations. When 
Boeing’s $133 tuition acquisition of 
McDonnell was announced in mid- 


December, industry specialists lauded it 
as a master stroke of common sense. To 
hear the companies tell iu they were 
suddenly two halves of die same 
grapefruit: Boeing was the world's 
dominant builder of commercial air- 
craft; withapromising future in military 
contracting; McDonnell was a leading 
supplier to the armed services with an 
enormous backlog of orders. 

The companies also said McDon- 
nell Douglas's steady military busi- 
ness would help Boeing smooth out 
the ups and downs of die commercial- 
airline business. 

“Neither one of us has die right 
current mix, said you can die waiting 
for the future,” said Mr. Condit, who 
takes the added title of chairman next 
month. “Together, we‘11 have a won- 
derful balance.” 

Thar is how it looks on paper, any- 
way. The hard part will be getting the 
two companies to work as one — the 
kind of task that Mr. Condit said made 
him generally opposed to such mergers 
in the past. He has watched from a 
distance as other mergers failed because 
employees of the acquiring company 
often insisted that their new co-workers 
do things their way. 

“Almost inevitably, you end up 


with one group fighting the other 
group,” he said. 

In fact, that sums up much of what 
has weighed so heavily on McDonnell 
Douglas, a company long character- 
ized by an “us-vs.-them'' schism be- 
tween workers at the Douglas com- 
mercial-aircraft operation in California 
and McDonnell employees in Sl 
L ouis, who build military aircraft 

Although it has been 30 years since 
McDonnell Aircraft and Douglas Air- 
craft merged, a story still is often told 
about workers at the Douglas plants 
sharpening their pencils down so far 
that only the Douglas name showed. 

For all his misgivings, though, Mr. 
Condit said the merger with McDon- 
nell Douglas was the logical thing to 
do. With the military industry shrink- 
ing, Boeing wanted to choose its part- 
ner early, rather than being left to pick 
through the leftovers. “It was the clas- 
sic strategic imperative,” he said. 

To make the meiger work, he said, 
Boeing wilt establish an orientation 
course to tell new employees from 
McDonnell Douglas, and remind Boe- 
ing workers, what the goals are for 
Boeing. McDonnell Douglas empioy- 

See BOEING, Page 15 


Placer Dome 
Bids for Role 
In Big Mine 

Offer for Bre-X Aims 
At Indonesian Gold 


Onapilnlbx ChrS/^ffTnatDifpjiihrl 

TORONTO — Placer Dome Inc. has 
proposed acquiring Bre-X Minerals Ltd 
for 635 billion Canadian dollars ($4.74 
billion) in stock to try to replace Barrick 
Gold Corp. as Bre-X's partner in de- 
veloping an Indonesia gold field that has 
been billed as the world's largest. 

The unsolicited bid, made in a letter 
sent late Monday, offers Bre-X share- 
holders a one-for-one stock swap, a Pla- 
cer Dome spokesman. Hugh Leggao. 
said. From a base of Monday’s closing 
share prices, the bid offers a 35 percent 
premium to Bre-X shareholders. 

Placer Dome’s plan also would give 
the Indonesian government a 40 percent 
interest in the Busang gold deposit on the 
island of Borneo, where Placer Dome 
would build a SI .7 billion mine and plant 
and mine as much as 200.000 metric tons 
a day. die Vancouver-based mining 
company said. Gold production would 
start in 1999 and is expected to average 3 
million to 4 million ounces a year. 

Analysts said the new proposal was 
an effort to force a bidding war for Bre- 
X, which has little mining experience 
and was ordered by the Indonesian gov- 
ernment last year to sell a 75 percent 
stake in Busang to Barrick. Barrick is 
linked to a company controlled by Pres- 
ident Suharto's eldest daughter. 

Mr. Suharto's government would 
have to give permission to Bre-X to 
consider companies other than Barrick 
as a development partner. 

Toronto-based Barrick is "almost 
certain to counter in some way if there is 
a fear that Placer would have a legitimate 
go” at buying Bre-X, said John Hainey, 
an analyst at Eagle & Partners Inc. 

Mr. Leggatt said Placer's offer was 
likely to be higher than any by Barrick. 
“It would be surprising if it was not 
superior,” he said. “We have the fi- 
nancial strength. We have the mine 
building expertise. We have done this 
kind of mine before.* * Bre-X shares rose 
1.75 dollars to close at 2330. Placer 
Dome shares fell 0.90 to 28.10, and 
Barrick fell 0.95 to 35.45. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


??. 




MEDIA MARKETS 


- . ..wy -*• .. 


Enron Aspires to Be a Household Name 


By AUen R. Myerson 

New York Times Service 


H! 


’OUSTON — Even if it is America's largest 
independent natural-gas company, and even if it 
does aim to dominate an electricity market that is 
.largo 1 than the U.S. telecommunications market, 

Enron Carp, has found that justteftrog people what it is can 
pose unexpected chaDenges. 

Its effort to choose an appropriate replacement for its old 
name, Houston Natural Gas/Intemoith, almost foundered 
in the mid-1980s when Kenneth Lay, the chief executive, 
learned days before the new name was to be announced that 

the company's first choice, “Enter- 

on,” meant the digestive tract ■„ . , , , «. 

On Tuesday, Enron announced its All CMlipwi^ ill 8 KICKOIK 

firet major advertising The Super Bowl game, 

build its usage at borne. It will start * ° • 

with television spots before and after 
the Super Bowl professional football championship g 
Jan. 26 in markets including New York, Washington 


and 


Houston Two-page newspaper spreads will follow the next 
day, with, advertisements in business m a g azi nes and on 
cable television as well. . . , __ _ 

The goals: to persuade Americans to demand aster 
deregulation of the electricity industry, teach them the 
Enron name and then win them over as customers. 

To reach those goals, Enron named H l irab et h Arenaall 
Tilney.t 


Shell Oil Co„ another client, complained of a possible 
conflict of interest On Jan. 1 the fnronacwwm went to 
Conquest which is based in Pans. Labe Ctolvy & Mather, 

Conquest is a unit of WPP Gromhased m London. 

Emeu. which builds power plants aflovratevrorki, is 
peihaps best-known internationally for. its 16-montft Jegai 
tae^Inctianaurfaoriti^ 

a $23 billion power plant m Maharashtra state. Work on me 
project Enron’s biggest international investment to date. 


started up again in December. In die United Stales, Enron is 
striving to transform itself from a natural-gas and electricity 
trader, transporter and wholesaler into a competitive elec- 
tricity retailer — and into a familiar name. 

“Enron is not a household name; we know that,” Mr. 
Lay said. “But we have a chance to create an AT&T for the 
electricity business” as changing regulations across the 
United States allow companies such as Enron to compete 
for more electricity customers. Several states, including 
Massachusetts and California, will begin to open their 
electricity markets to competition within about a year. New 
York’s lawmakers also are likely to debate the matter this 
year. Enron, pressing Washington to mandate nationwide 
competition, predicts that the $200 
L billion U.S. electricity market will be 
entirely open in about a decade. 

Enron’s initial advertising budget of 
$25'iniUion to $30 million for about six 
; 1 months is likely within five years to 

exceed $200 million annually — roughly what a company 
such as tbe long-distance telephone concern Sprint Corp. 
spends. 

Enron's ads feature customers around America and the 
world testifying that the company has brought them cheap- 
er, cleaner, more reliable energy. 

Many utility companies are lobbying to delay the drive 
toward deregulation and competition in the industry, saying 
it would force them to swallow the costs of power plants 
that bad been built with regulators’ encouragement. 

Enron’s approach would benefit Enron, not tbe public, 
said John Castagna, a spokesman for the Edison Electric 
Institute in Washington, which represents utility compa- 
nies. “Yon can't act in a thoughtful, prudent manner if 
you're racing into a bunting building, which may be what 
this particular company is doing,” be said. 

Some analysis, -though, applauded Eaton’s initiative. 
Given the fight shaping up over deregulation. Curt Launer. 
an analyst at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Inc., said, “It’s 
critically important to do this now.” 


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ExiX'pricma) servieu JcnianiL? pt*n?«>n£rl attention as wt*H as 
genuine concern for the financial well-being of our clients. 
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It is a simple principle upon wbicb we base our 
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conservatism, vigorously pursued, bas created a global 


ATTRACT NEW CLIENTS 


BY SERVING PRESENT CLIENTS 
EXCEPTIONALLY WELL. 


private bank of exceptional stability, capable of weathering 
tke roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republic's capitalization ratio, on a risk 
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discretion. 



WorlJ lljmJ^aartrrt of 
RafnAht n f 

jVjw Vnrt ft i jVw Vorfc- 


Republic National Bank of New York- 

Strength. Security. Service. 

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** 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


700 - 



A S O N D J 
1996 1997 


[ Exdhaoge ' Index - " 


1996 

Tuesday ' Prev. . 


N * SE 


The Dew 


Close Change[ 
€76229 67®! 18 +0.79 


I 

S&P500 

768^6 

759.51 

+1.23 

■ 

S&P100 


745-46 

+1.19 

1 VfS&..:. 

Composite 

4B5XR 

400.71 

+1J» 

its. 

MasctaqConposite 134758 

1330.91 

■+1 ^25 

:JUMEX,. 

ftteikst V^ue 

588-35 

586.13 

+0.38 

Toronto 

TSE Index 

60 54.86 

6001.68 

+0.89' 

S3d Paulo 

Bovsapa . 

76211.40 

74117.50 

+2^3 

MeofcoCrty 

.Soisa - 

3631^6 

3560.55 

+1.33 

1 Bt»us Afre»KJenml 

689.39 

674.38 

+2.23 

Sanfego 

IPSA Gcnerai 

5224.37 

516026 

+1J24 

Caracas 

Caf^laJ GeheraJ 

6479.52 

6523.90 

-0.66 

Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


nirnlilKOjI Hnulil Tnbune 

Very briefly: 


From SEC, English Lessons 


By Brett D. Fromsou 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — Most re- 
pons that companies and mutual 
funds are required to prepare for 
investors are so filled with incom- 
prehensible jargon that even fi- 
nancially sophisticated people 
wander in some cases whether the 
intent is to confuse the reader. 

That is the theme of a “plain 
English’' handbook just released 
by the Securities and Exchange 
Commission. 

The 59-page handbook is the 


*Tn some cases," the billionaire 
investor Warren Buffett wrote in a 
preface, "I suspect that a less than 
scrupulous issuer doesn't want us 
to understand a subject it feels le- 
gally obligated to touch upon.” 
Mr. Buffett is respected not only 
for his stock-picking genius but 
also for the well-written reports 
that his company, Berkshire Hath- 
away Inc., sends to shareholders. 

The handbook has been influ- 
enced by “Elements of Style." a 
classic reference book written by 
the late New Yorker magazine 
writer EJ3. White and one of his 


latest attempt by Arthur Levitt Jr., 
yft 


chairman of the SEC. to persuade 
publicly traded corporations and 
funds to “speak to investors in 
words they can understand." 

It is written for a special circle of 
readers — the corporate execu- 
tives and securities lawyers who 
prepare tens of thousands of dis- 
closure documents each year. 


former professors, the late William 
Strunk Jr. T 


The guide discourages 
using the passive voice, weak 
verbs, superfluous words, jargon 
and unnecessary details. It offers 
the following example of how a 
dense sentence can be made clear 
Before: "The foregoing Fee 
Table is intended to assist investors 
in understanding the costs and ex- 


penses that a shareholder in the Fund 
will bear directly or indirectly.*’ 

After * This fee table shows the 
costs and expenses you would pay 
directly or indirectly if you in- 
vested in our fund." 

Mr. Buffett said in the preface 
that when he wrote reports, he liked 
to pretend he was talking to his 
sisters, “1 have no trouble picturing 
them, he wrote. “Though highly 
intelligent, they are not experts in 
accounting or finance." He added, 
"My goal is simply to gi ve diem the 
information I would wish them to 
supply me if our positions were 
reversed." 

The guide suggests that corpo- 
rate authors strip away redundant 
information, then prepare a cover 
page intended to draw readers into 
the document- “If it looks like a 
legal document written by lawyers 
and for lawyers, many investors 
will not even attempt to read it," 
the handbook says. 


Mild U.S. Price Rises 
Help Stocks Hit Record 


Soaring Sales Lift Intel Earnings 


Consumer Prices Rose 3.3% in 5 96 

WASHINGTON (API — The government said Tuesday that 
consumer prices climbed 3.3 percent for all of 1 996. the biggest 
gain in six years. Bui if food and energy costs were excluded, 
inflation turned in its best performance in 31 years. 

The Labor Department said the 1996 advance in the con- 
sumer price index followed a 2-5 percent increase in 1 995. But 
outside the two volatile areas of energy and food, the so-called 
core rate of inflation rose just 2.6 percent in 1996. the best 
showing since 1965. 

• Ford Motor Co. agreed to sell its interest in Budget Rent- 
a-Car Corp. to a group of Budget licensees in a deal valued at 
about $350 million. 

• Limited Inc. is shuffling its management, with its chairman, 
Leslie Wexner, resuming control of the women's division and 
closing 200 apparel stores this year to try to revive profit. 

• Republic Industries Inc. will buy Maroone Automotive 
Group for $200 million in stock, extending Republic's hold- 
ings of car dealerships. 

• Nextei Communications Inc., in a first for the wireless 
industry, said its customers could travel anywhere in the 
United States and use their cellular phones without paying 
higher “roaming" fees. 

• Joseph Vitloria will retire as chairman and chief executive 
of HFS Inc. on Feb. 1 . Avis Inc. said. 


Bloomberg Business News 

SANTA CLARA, California, — 
Intel Corp. said Tuesday its fouith- 
quaner earnings more than doubled 
as sales rose 41 percent, beating the 
most optimistic analyst estimates. 

Intel said net income rase to 
$ 1 .9 J billion, or $2. 13 a share, from 
$867 million, or 98 cents, in the 
year-earlier period. Sales rose to 
$6.44 billion from $4.58 billion. 

Analysts had expected earnings of 
$1.83 a share, based on the average 
estimate of 35 analysts surveyed by 
IBES International Inc. The highest 


estimate was $2.05. The world's 
largest chipmaker’s stock closed at 
an all-time high of $147,125, up 25 
cents. It released its quarterly num- 
bers after the close of U.S. stock 
trading. 

The company said its board had 
authorized a 2-for-l stock split 
through a special distribution. 
Shareholders will vote on the split 
May 21. 

Intel said it expected revenue in 
the first quarter to be about un- 
changed from $6.44 billion in the 
fourth quarter and that it expected 


expenses to rise by between 4 per 
~ 1.2 billion 


cent and 5 percent from $1 
in the fourth quarter. 

Intel's chief executive, Andrew 
Grove, said the company's perfor- 
mance had been driven by growth in 
the Internet, personal-computer 
sales in emerging markets and cor- 
porate PC and software upgrades. 

On Monday. Advanced Micro 
Devices Inc. reported a fourth- 
quarter loss of $21-2 milli on, or 15 
cents a share, better than the ex- 
pected loss of 19 cents a share, as 
orders unproved significantly. 


C *i*»W From 

NEW YORK — Stocks closed at 
a record high Tuesday as interest 
rates dropped sharply after reports 
of small gains in consumer prices 
and retail sales soothed concern 
about inflation. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed up 53.1 1 points at 
6.762.29. Advancing issues out- 
paced decliners by an 11-5 ratio on 
the New York Stock Exchange. 

Among broad stock-market in- 
dexes. the Standard & Poor’s 500- 
stock index gained 9-35 points to 
close at 768.86, while the Nasdaq 
Composite index rose 15.45 to 
1346.36. . . , 

The bond market rallied, with the 
price of the benchmark 30 -year 
Treasury bond up 3 1/32 at 96 1 7/32, 
pushing the yield down eight basis 
points, to 6.77 percent. 

The government said U.S. con- 
sumer prices rose 0.3 percent in 
December, in line with forecasts. 
But excluding food and energy 
costs, prices rose 0.1 percent, half 
the expected rate. 

A December report on retail sales 
confirmed investors' perception of 
lackluster sales during the Christ- 
inas shopping period. Retail sales 
gained 0.6 percent in the month, 
only 0.2 percentage point more than 
economists had expected. 

The reports reduced concern 
among bond investors that grew out 
of Friday's unexpectedly strong re- 
port on December job growth. 

Benefiting most from the decline 
in interest rates were companies 
whose performance improves as in- 
terest rates decline, such as utilities 
and telephone companies, with 
their large debt loads, and banks. 

NationsBank rose 3% to close at 


106%. and Citicorp rose >S* to 
(04-14. Among telephone shares. 
Bell Atlantic rose 2 to 66VL and 
Pacific Telesis gained -% to 361-2. 
Financial-services, phone ana 


U.S. STOCKS 


power companies pay investors re- 
laiively large dividends* wfucb be - 
come more attractive to as interest 
rates retreat. 

Investors’ optimism grew after 
another round of strong earnings 
reports by banks and computer-re- 
lated companies Monday. 

"They’re surprising everyone, 
said John Komitzer. president of 
Buffalo Mutual Funds. 

American depositary receipts ot 
Ericsson rose V* to close at 33?* 
after the Swedish cellular phone 
maker said it would eliminate 300 
jobs in its Norrkoping, Sweden, 
plant that makes circuit boards and 
equipment for cable -TV networks. 

Ford rose Vi to 3334. The car- 
maker will sell its Budget Rent-a- 
Car unit for $350 million to a group ( 
of franchisees. a 

International Paper dropped ’A to 
42%; the company reported a S5 
million fourth -quarter loss on a one- 
time charge relared to its investment 
in Scitex. a maker of computerized 
printing equipment 

Among semiconductor shares. 
Chips & Technologies tumbled 5% 
to 16 Vi, even as the company said 
profit from operations rose 90 per- 
cent to 42 cents a share. I cent 
above analysts' average forecast. 
Tim Christofferson, the company's 
chief financial officer, said margins 
and shipments in the current quarter 
would fall from last quarter's re- 
sults. (Bloomberg. Reuters, API 


Wall Street's Rally on Inflation Data Lifts the Dollar 


• United Technologies Corp.’s Pratt & Whitney unit said the 
president of an Italian aircraft-parts distributorship had 
pleaded guilty to counterfeiting Pratt jet -engine parts. 


CimfnlfJby Our Stotf From Duputrho 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against other major currencies Tues- 
day. pulled up by gains in stocks and 
bonds after government data for 
December showed the U.S. econ- 
omy was growing without stoking 
inflation. 

The overall December consumer 


_ , „„ „ . price index rose 0.3 percent, as ex- 

• Spnnt Corp., AT&T Corp. and BellSouth Corp. emerged ^ whiIe ^ core ^ whlch 

as the top bidders at a Federal Communications Commission excludes food and energy costs, rose 

just 0, 1 percent. Retail sales in die 
month rose 0.6 percent. 

“it's good news for the markets.” 
a trader at a U.S. money center bank 


auction of licenses to provide a type of mobile-phe 

?. Licenses also 


. rone service 

known as personal communications service 
went to 122 other companies, which paid a total of $225 

billion. Blvomherg. AP 


in Chicago said. The trader said he 
now expected an adjusted annual 
growth rate of about 4 percent in 
U.S. gross domestic product to be 
reported for the fourth quarter. 

The healthy economic situation is 
drawing overseas investors lo Wall 
Street, and that is lifting the dollar as 
those investors buy the currency to 
finance purchases of stocks and 
bonds. 

“That's a perfect recipe for the 
dollar," said Walter Simon at Bank 
Julius Baer. “You have news of 
strong growth and low inflation, and 
stocks and bonds are rising, and 


economies are weak overseas.” 
The dollar rose to 1 3930 
Deutsche marks in late trading from 
13887 DM on Monday, to 1 16.930 
yen from 1 16.475 yen and to 53760 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


French francs from 5.3605, but if 
fell to 13735 Swiss francs from 
1.3759 francs. The pound fell to 
$1.6715 from $1.6755. 

The only developments holding 
the dollar back were comments from 
Japan and Germany, traders said. In 
Japan, the president of Toyota Mo- 


tor Corp.. Hiroshi Okuda, said the 
dollar should be trading between 
100 yen and IlOyen. 

In Germany, a Bundesbank council 
member. Olaf Stevett, said the mark 
had corrected its strength since die 
spring of 1995, when it reached a 
postwar high against the dollar. That 
suggested the Bundesbank saw no 
need for the dollar to gain further. 

(Bloomberg. Market News) 

■ Gold Tumbles on Sales Talk 


Fears that European central banks 
will sell a large part of their gold 
reserves this year to aid debt reduc- 


tion sent gold prices tumbling,-* 
Agence France-Presse reported. * 

The Dutch central bank recently 
said it had sold some gold, and this 
has triggered fears that other Euro- 
pean central banks were or would be 
selling gold to help their govern- 
ments meet debt criteria for joining 
the single European currency. 

Economic data for this year will 
determine which countries qualify 
for launching the single currency 
Jan. I, 1999. On the New York 
Commodity Exchange, gold for 
February delivery closed at S354.70 
an ounce, down S5.00. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 p.m. Close 

The lop 300 moss-active shares. 


up to closing on Wail Sweet 

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Rooem 

ROOK 

RavtdQa 

StrfnFWs 

SaaaCm s 

SBven wrffl 

SFcOqdI 

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DietiaMa 

STwOCm* 

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SPDR 

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TYrmy-r 
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Trarap. 

unutes 

Finance 

SP 500 

SP100 


Prertous 

Hlgb Low am 
B9&S1 B91J2 895.01 
SOM 5411* 545*0 
201.90 201379 20151 
83.08 8231 8259 

761B5 756.89 75951 
748^43 741.91 745J8 


Today 

AM 

90459 

54X3* 

20255 

8453 

7AX86 

75554 


NYSE 


iMpe low bar Oa. 




Composite 

t nduflrt QE 

TrotlSP. 

UORhr 

Rnonce 


40424 400J1 40507 -424 
51325 50723 5122} *449 
358.17 35520 3S729 »2JW 
2*5.19 24127 26458 t2Jl 
342^5 35440 3*147 *679 


580 n, 
VB 12U 


Ss 


201 Bh 
119 a*. 
1106 J7»i 


2 ’.« 

4V’, 

61* 


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97 31*14 

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-% 

Nasdaq 

High Law Lost 

an. 

- 

Composite 

1M8J7 133X84 1347 JS 

♦ 1X47 

* Vi, 

mistnas 

1149.12 114X52 114X52 

+ 7J1 


Bate 

129X25 120784 129X25 

+ 11.44 

insurmx 

I44SA1 14035 144X74 

• X97 

♦Vu 

Fhupv^ 

161X04 1403-4$ 141X04 

*1101 

♦ ft 

Troop. 

90X94 89X46 89X18 

-XIV 

— % 
—ft 
-% 
— % 

AMEX 

HMl LOW PM 

ChB. 

♦ ft 


58X20 58X13 SB7S5 

+ 1^7 

— Vu 

Dow Jones Bond 


— % 
.U 


Ctose 

og. 

Tto 

HBonds 

10X28 

+026 

—it 

10 UfflBJes 

I0Q27 

+0l36 

♦ % 

10 Industrials 

10X29 

♦CL26 


100 25 


92* 10*4 

125 B*i. 


116 
<78 7* 

115 5 

300 1 

191 2 

4H |t, 
307 20 


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9% 

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4*. 

5 

It* 

2*» 


71* 

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Most Actives 




NYSE 


v* High 

Low 

Lost 

am. 


85473 33% 

J0»4 

32% 

■3ft 


49144 47ft 


<7 

■ 1% 

CmpUSAs 

59305 IS 

14% 

17ft 

•3% 

WOMofl 

5726] 23% 

23% 

23% 

_ 

BoyNIwk 

51431 23% 

27ft 

23% 

•ft 

Conseco i 

49284 73 

70 

7flft 

•3% 

AT&T 4 

*488 J9% 

38ft 

38ft 

■ % 

COnoKia 

MOT 80ft 

71ft 

7*ft 


MtonT 

43115 33 

31% 

37V, 

.ft 


37611 49ft 

47 

49% 

♦2% 

EMC 

34442 38% 

35 V, 

38ft 

• 3% 

PeonCoi 

15550 J2% 

29% 

2*% 

> % 


34992 5554 

54% 

55% 

• i% 

tenOec 

3020 105 

103% 

104% 

■ 1% 

Motorola 

34Z35 67ft 

45% 

47 

♦ Ift 

Nasdaq 

VOL Mgh 

LOW 

Lost 

am- 

Intel 

1471/9 142ft 




avpjTc 

110024 21ft 

IS*,, 



Ciscos 

8(498 72ft 




N«ra?7Cm 

79023 75ft 




Mlcrostrs 

78D90 86ft 




CWtUKs 

74239 55ft 




Oracles 

72240 43ft 




PJ-Pinrii 

48(44 375* 




NMSCP4 

*5449 44% 




Exabyte 

4IB90 11% 




CraCtnc 

61414 1ft, 




DWICrtS 

41208 4SM 

*2% 



Amen 

58774 55 




TtoeComA 

54265 14ft 




RtafW 

54980 31 

30 

30% 

•IV, 

AMEX 


VOL Htoh 

Low 

Last 

Cap. 

XQ.LM 

H88 6 ft 




Horten 

269S9 4 



♦*; 


12453 77=r„ 

76ft 



AWJV 0» 

13202 7% 




ECboBov 

8442 6«7u 

4V„ 


—v, 

ViacB 





Htubro 

4156 39% 

37% 


♦1% 

Anwe* 

5782 9ft 



iCGCom 

5430 17% 




GrevhndL 

5404 41*11 

4% 

4Vft, 

-Vu 


Jan. 14,1997 

High Low dose Chge CWnt 


Grams 


CORN ICBOT) 

5.000 Bu mniiTiwn- WWs par burnt 

Mar 97 2.72'-; 144*: l71Wi -030*1 135.152 
MOV 97 223** 2,67V. 177 ‘.i »<UBU57*U 

Jul97 2J2V. 2*8 271 *002 5U54 

Sen 97 168 2*3** 2*7*6 +0.03 7AS2 

Dec 97 2*6 2*1 VI; 265V, ,003 3X224 

Esl. solos NA Mon's, sales 47J75 
Man's open M 297J99 Off IKK 


Hi^h 

Low 

Close 

1 

f 

OH7WCE JUICE (NCTN) 



1 WHO to*., cents Mr R>. 




Mar 97 83J» 

79 JO 

B2.« 

♦ 280 

21J17 

May 97 BSlBD 

83-1 □ 

85.10 

+2SD 

X3II 

JW97 8X40 

BX00 

K.IU 

*140 

IJK1 

Sen 97 91 JD 

0X50 

9X60 

♦ 2-25 

618 

Est sties NA 

Man's, sales 

2J45 


Man's open in] 

72J65 

up 455 



Metals 


SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOT) 

100 Mas- dollars Per ion 
Jan 97 23X70 0X50 23730 -1*0 SJB> 

Mai 97 moo 23X00 230*0 -4*0 37,142 
MOV 97 729 JO 227 JQ 22X00 -1JI0 I9JQ5 
Jul97 229 JX) 22X50 227 JO — UJO 1X711 

Aug97 22X50 22400 22150 -1J0 19S5 

Sea 97 271 JO 21X50 219JN -1*0 2*29 

Esf. sales NA Man's, sides 29 JW 
Man’s open ln» 85,9111 up 224 


GOLD <NCMX) 

too tray ox.- dollars per nov at. 

JB197 35170 — &D0 B 

Feb 97 391 JB 35400 3S470 -400 94*84 

Mar 97 35150 -X10 

Apr 97 361 JO 35600 35X50 -X10 3X412 

Am 97 363*0 35X00 35X80 — 5-19 17.991 

Aug 97 36X00 36X70 361.20 -5.10 5J77 

0097 36X20 3te30 363*0 —5.10 X14B 

Dec 77 37X70 36X50 16X10 -5.10 1X035 

ESf.aAB NA Man's, sales 42*43 
Man's open irt 203*30 off 7 


SOYBEAN OB. ICBOT) 

• 0*00 ite- eaHars per 100 IM. 

Jan 97 3458 2433 2455 -X10 1138 

Mar 97 2495 2460 2409 -004 52*43 

May 97 2126 2101 25J0 -X01 I7JV2 

JUI77 2SJ5 2132 2113 12.769 

Aug 97 2X62 2X44 2X62 -053 2*75 

Sep 97 2X70 2X55 2X70 1*41 

Ed.sote, NA Man's, sides 42*11 
Mon'sooenW 93*07 UO 44« 


SOYBEANS (CBOTI 

5*00 bu mWmurn- defers per bushel 

JQn 97 7J6V, 7J0 7J3* *0*1 3*67 

Mar 97 7*0 7J2U 7J7 +0*0V(.n411 

May 97 7 409: 7J1 7J7fc -0JB1A30JIO 

Al 97 7*1 V, 7JS 7 JB'A-X8®W 27.948 

Aug 97 737 733 7MV> -0*2 4*22 

Est.sdes na Man's. sales 83*81 

Man's anaiM 151560 up 2419 


M GRADE COPPER (NCMJQ 
25*00 tbs- anil per b. 

Jan 97 11X00 107*0 10X20 —1.10 

Feb 97 108 20 10425 10X75 —US 

Mar 97 107*0 10490 10X45 -090 

Aar 97 10X10 1D3JD 103*5 -0*0 

May 97 10350 101.90 102*0 -07* 
Tun 97 101 *0 — 070 

J* 97 1U1.H 20000 99.95 -055 

Aug 97 10X15 100.15 99*5 -050 

Sep 97 99*0 9X25 1X15 -0*5 

EM. sales NA Mon's, soles 6*50 
Men's open W 57*88 up 588 


4181 

2*79 

26*81 

991 

5,938 

742 

4J00 

602 

zsa 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Nasdaq 


I9V« 

3IH 

77'v 


7577 n„ 

737 


ton 

IP* 

S'* 


Xhm * 9„ 
17 s * -W 
17 -VS 

4 Vi 

5 — V, 

15% —V* 

10'A * V. 

IV* ‘Vi 
2*. -V* 

7V» -Pi, 
S'* * 'A 

1 '* — V|, 
?V. 

IVi, —Vu 

191* 

MV* • 4* 
TTh 
IV, 

3Vi f -V* 


Hig& Low TPM Oh. 


Advomxd 

DacHned 

Wncfifraed 
Told issues 
Mewrtflns 
New Low 


7300 2053 

lazr am 
(599 1664 

5736 5730 

277 240 

70 54 


AMEX 


Composite 

Industrials 

Banks 

lnsw one 

Finance 

Trwtw. 


134491 1338 5* 114491 -140Q 
114633 114453 114632 * 530 
129332 1287*4 129172 -6.21 
144X15 144035 1C4Q35 -158 
161X54 1403.45 1610.17 -11.14 
7D2JU 89831 m20 -1*3 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

S4H0 bu mm™n- aabors par busnd 
M£F«7 192 3*7 3*8 -003 29,961 

May 97 177V, 172 173V5 -0.006 X207 

JU197 161U 154 V, 158 -0*2 21*28 

Sen 97 165 0*0i: 3*1'/. -0*256 1,167 

Esl. sate NA Mon'x sales 17 356 
Mon'sopefilnt 61,908 all 3000 


SH.VBR (NCMX) 

5*00 Irav at- cents par boy «*- 
JWl 97 4641 -41 6 

Feb 97 461* -4 1 2 

Mar 97 4745 467* «73 -43 64167 

May 97 47X0 472* 472* -43 30331 

MV7 mS mS 47X6 —43 Xiffl 

SOP 97 484* 4845 4*13 — 42 2,962 

Dec 97 4915 488* 48X2 -43 5*15 

Ann 491* —43 9 

Es. sales HA Man's, sate 17*47 
Mon's men M 93381 uo 24Z3 


Market Sales 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMERJ 
40*00 On. - cents per n. 


PLATINUM (NMERJ 
50 rrav at.- doten pw bnv ox. 

Jan 97 360*8 —230 25 

A*rJ7 J6X7H 36150 36150 -130 1X773 

Jul97 370*0 368*0 367JBQ -U0 2392 

CW97 372*0 371*0 37030 -120 2399 

J*>9S 373*0 37180 372M -130 1,074 

Ea. solos NA Man's, sate 2319 
Man's anenM 24*13 of! 564 


224, 

17V, ,1* 

6 -VS 
Vil — Vi, 

»«b 


Advanced 
DecflnM 
Undmaed 
Tam issues 
NewVfimii 
Mew Lows 


33a 739 

727 246 

17V M5 

744 740 

37 37 

7 7 


NV5E 

Amex 

Nasdaq 

InmBEons. 


Today 

Pro*. 

Feb ?7 
Apr * 7 

tJ. w 
6X97 

6X?S 

6X10 

1X97 

6X90 

+447 31.163 
+0J8 29.183 

Ckse 

coos. 

Jun 97 

4195 

S130 

HB 

«8J8 

12-321 

53} SO 

540.07 

Aug 97 

6X05 

6157 

6XD2 

+0.15 

1U67 

2X84 

. 3187 

Oct 97 

4*41 

(t» 

4* at 

— 0J2 

7J1* 

642.68 

612.09 

Dec 97 

fXI7 

67.90 

6X15 

+ 083 

2831 

Ed. sate 1X94? Mon's, srtes 
Man's open int 9SJ12 up 719 

11017 



LONDON MRJuftUni) 

Do«are pernwfricton 
AJwattWD fHJob Grade) 

Sad isa5«, 1583'A 158X00 1586*0 
ord 1619* 1616*0 1617*0 1618*0 


1746 

12S 

3V, 


Dividends 

Company 


m '4 
19453 777v„ 
W8 5H»M 
71* ll'« 
627 v*l 
5289 7'/. 

755 Tl„ 
146 let* 
131 9"7,, 

TOO 15'6 
1405 3SW 
405 4Vu 
3183 164* 

779 19Hi 
265 14 

10* MW 
500 «i 
450 3 

97 flV, 
144 m 


7fcV, 

10 «» 

l*»i, 

2 


, *• 

7P»B 


5ttv m *» y M 


16 


7V. 

29., 


-K 

,'6, 


35 


15V. 
19'A 
IDV5 
29 >6 
9V, 


140 


TJpperv 

TanSree 

Toaper 

TownOy 

TWA 

TrraL* 

Tmsmnln 

7w*wn 

TrMiedi 

Tritei 

TubMex 


i/n t . 

Unoeu 
UnoxwiB 
Uni Ml 
Uni roor 

UgsMW 

USBosos 

US CHI 

VKAdM2 

VKS«i 

Viaeom 

Vinca 

ViaCwtC 

VUtOGg 

Vttrorvc 

WRIT 

mtoBimf 

weAnis 

WIRET 

WirwssTs 


BOS 7IV„ 
611 BIV„ 
913 HV< 
7153 

231 3046 
140 441 

I4B0 2’l 
IX 10V, 
793 V„ 
3667 6>V„ 
1*1 12V4 

IQS 14 
227 »16 
177 5W 
250 % 

3636 I6H 
308 1BH 
142 35V4 

148 tut 
734 

395 In 
III 5 
31? 4V, 

1254 I5W 
STB 2795 
106 Hta 
SK IM 4 
995 3eVi 
666? 369* 


B4ll 

3! t* 

BV, 

74* 

P>t 

ll<% 

1416 

<V| 

7*u 

10V. 

Vu 

6V, 

15 

13* 

IJ* 

S'*. 

& 

IB* 

34V4 

4* 


-»e 

9"7« -«7« 

14* ,* 

35* ** 

4U — * 
16 -* 
19* 

13* — * 

7*h - * 

?»., »V W 
3 — * 

Mu ■ — *„ 
32* -* 

*’4 - v, 

7* — J»„ 
8* -v, 
12 * - 1 * 
17* 

30* - V, 

4* 

2* 

10 * 

Vi» 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
IRREGULAR 

Cascade Bnep 
IDEXT* Exempt 
IDEXTxExB 
IDEXTxExC 
1DEX income Bus 
ID EX Flex Inca A 
ID Ex Flex Into B 
IDEXRexlncoC 
MunfVesf FfYtn 
MunlYld CA Ins II 
MunlYld InsurFd 
MunlYtd NY Ins II 
MunlYWNYlnsllI 

NCE Pemrfund g 


- JSO 
_ J3X7 
. *37 

- *3 

- ,W6 

- *28 

- .024 

- *25 

_ .1146 

- *97 

- .144 

- .1226 

- .nos 

- *7 


1-22 

1-14 

1-14 

1-14 

1-14 

1-14 

1-14 

1-14 

1-24 

1-24 

1-24 

1-24 

1-24 

1-20 


1-20 

1-20 

1-20 

1-20 

1-20 

1-20 

1-20 

1-30 

1-30 

1-30 

1-30 

1-30 

1-31 


STOCK SPUT 

Apogee Enterprises 2 for I split 
Doflur General 5 ford split 


INCREASED 


Coapaiiy 

Per Amt Rec 

Pay 

INITIAL 



Dollar General n 

. 85 

2-21 

3-10 

LevtaihanGasn 

- 40 

1-31 

3-14 

MBNA Inc n 

- .18 

3-17 

4-1 

South Sneet Fin 

- J» 

1-24 

2-7 

REGULAR 



Apogee Emerpris 
BardarsBkCZ 

O 89 
b .7031 

1-28 

1-22 

2-13 

3-3 

BordoysBAOz 

b .7138 

1-22 

3-3 

Bkitilnghani Sri 
Crown tort 

Q .10 
Q .25 

•24 

2-3 

2-4 

2-20 

LeoRona* Inc 

O .18 

1-29 

Ml 

Movado Group 

a an 

1-20 

1-31 

JVlunlVest NY bi 

M .1166 

1-24 

1-30 

MunlYld CA ins jl 

M ,1397 

1-24 

1-J0 

MurtYld InsurFd 

M .144 

1.24 

1-30 

MunlYUlnsll 

M 8796 

1-H 

1-30 

MutliYMNYlns II, 

M .1226 

1-24 

1-30 

RPM tac 

Q .13 

1-20 

1-31 

Santa Fa Poe Pipe 

a js 

1-31 

2-14 

VfflogeBncp 

0 .18 

1-30 

2-7 


FEEBCR CATTLE (CMER) 

SbdXIO lbs. - cents per ft 

Jen 97 6X60 6X25 6X45 -0*7 1311 

Mar 97 6X60 6X00 6838 +0*5 7*12 

Any 97 u.90 6X35 68J0 2*66 

May 17 6945 6X95 6940 *0*8 3427 

Aug 97 7T*7 71 AC 71*5 *0.40 1683 

Sep 97 71*0 71.45 71*0 * 0*0 425 

Esf.sdes 3.1 n Mai's, sate 2,159 
Man's open ail 19*16 off 13 



Spot 7085*0 7095*0 7040*0 
F-onrafl 


7190*0 7195*0 7140*0 

Tin 

Sad 5975*0 5985*0 5895*0 
Forworn 6020*0 6025*0 5940*0 


HOCS-Lean 1CA8ER} 

40.000 lbs.- ants par ft. 

Feb 97 7777 76*6 77J2 *0*0 

Apr 97 76*2 75J5 7620 -025 

Jun97 79.45 7X7S 79 JO +X13 

Jul 97 7X70 7X10 76*0 -0.15 

Aug 97 74*8 7X40 74*0 ‘X15 
Oct 17 6725 67*0 67.17 

Est. sates 9*34 Mon's, sales X317 
Mot's open W J3J24 up 1593 


1044'* 

fomom 1106.00 1107*0 1067*0 


1X260 

X919 

X561 

'-432 

1,146 

UTS 


Hlgti Law dose Chge Oplnt 


Hlgb Law Close Chge Oplnt 

10-YEAR FRENCH 60V. BONOS (MAT1F) 
FF5004W - ds at 100 ptf 
Mar 97130.18 12934 130*4 40*812X069 
Jiitl 97 1M.74 12X22 128L64 +038 10796 
Sep 97 126*8 12634 126.96 +038 132 

Dec 97 N.T. NLT. 9X*0 +038 0 

Est. whiaie: 200024 . Open Int; 139.797 up 
9,720 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFB) 

(TL 200 io«ien - 1» on 00 pa 

Ua97 130*3 129.91 130*5 * 0S2 99SH 

JOA97 UQJ0 129*5 130J7 , 0*2 1,904 

EsL sales: £9.942. Pm. sate: 64*44 

Prev. open Int 101.120 uo 3350 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI mman-ptsaf laopd. 

Feb 97 94.420 MJ7D 94410 +» 10399 

MOT97 HJK 94320 94360 +3# 415*24 

Apr 97 94J10 94250 94300 tllS 77 JU 

Am 97 94200 94120 94190 *U 3(1,907 

Moroo 93250 91120 91250 +120 38>ra 

Jon 00 93.190 93080 9X190 +120 35*07 

Sen® 91140 93*10 9X140 +120 3T.0E? 

Dec 00 93*40 92.950 93060 +129 2X550 

Eslsate NA Mon's. sate 359*46 
Man's open M 2,19X900 up 3(70 
BR1T15H POUND (CMER) 
ado pounds, s ner ocunj 
Mar 97 1*736 1*620 1*686 -32 37^2 

Am 97 1*600 1*590 1*68 -32 2*35 

Sgp 97 1*608 -3! 1*27 

Dec 77 1*568 -32 7 

BAsUes NA (Man's. sates 72*35 
Men's open W 40^61 on 206 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

IDAftSODHors, invOtiit' 

MW77 J455 J423 J425 -37 41*12 

Am 97 3487 7465 7466 —36 8*99 

Sep 97 7514 7505 7502 -25 1437 

Dec 97 7534 -34 402 

Est sate NA Mon's, sates 4*08 
Man's open bd 5X954 off 225 
8S1MANMARK (OMBE 
126*00 marta. s nw mane 
Mar 97 *337 *2M *296 -28 6X610 

Am 97 *371 *3H *334 -39 5*32 

Sep 97 *379 -3S 1J78 

Dec 97 *423 -29 1| 

Estates NA Mon'S. sate 21*« 

Mon's open at 75*38 up 82t 
JAPANESE YBH (CMER) 

12* mSSan van. S per 100 yen 

Mar 97 *08674 D0B62G JJ0U23 -47 6X402 

Am 97 .006774 *08734 *06737 —48 1,937 

SpjI7 *39654 -49 354 

EsLsote NA Mon'xsdes 9*30 

Man's open inl 70790 up 37 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

1 23*00 frtmabt bar *tmc 
Mar 97 739 7297 7316 -3 50783 

Jun97 7428 7369 7385 —3 1725 

5ep97 7456 -3 1.988 

Est. sides NA Men's, sates 15*79 
Mon's open ini 54*17 up 1698 

MMWTH EUROMARK [LI FEE) 
pMlreOta-terfioopd 
fittW 96*1 96*8 9691 + 

6toW 9692 96*9 9X91 

Apl77 9X92 94*0 96.91 Unch. 148 

iSS SS 2*5 * n +«Sib2jS 

Sep97 9AB3 9679 AU9 + 7 42X12 

DecW 9X67 9X62 94*6 + 0*2 13X506 

M* 2SS StS 2H2 *8* 

«« 2cm ISIS 83*04 

ss? ss :8s: 

*w!99 95.U 92LQ5 95L13 + pay 21,992 

« us ^ 

PIW. open te’wiwl' raw 3 
MMMTH STERUH6 (UPPE) 


Htfi Low Close Chge Optra 

Dec 97 7X80 7X42 7X61 *0*1 9*23 

Mar 98 77 JO 77*0 77J3 *0*2 456 

EA soles NA Man's, sales 5705 
Man's apenH 5X239 up 380 
HEATWaOL (NMBU 
te*00 pel- rants oer aa> 

Feb 97 70*5 £0*5 £9*7 -428 39*03 

Mar 97 4X50 67*0 67*6 -431 2X019 

Apr 97 6X55 6470 6X96 -426 HUMS 

May 97 62JD 61*0 62*1 -471 4459 r 

Am 97 60JD 60*0 60*6 -414 5.986 4 ' 

Jul 97 59JB 59*0 59.11 -416 3*11 


AUB97 59^1 59 JO 5916 -ale 1954 
Sep 97 59*0 S7J5 59*6 -416 2*09 


Oc7f7 60JD 59*5 S976 -411 1*0 

How 97 6465 6410 60*1 -411 1715 

Est. sate NA Man's, sales 49,159 
Mon's open ini 102.185 up 1209 


LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (MMBW 
1*00 but- donors oar tftL 
F0&97 2X35 2X90 25*9 -4H 09.142 

Mar 97 24*0 34*5 24*0 -411 60*99 

Apr 97 2X24 2392 2X08 -4*6 3X551 

Mery 97 Zl« 73M w w —0*3 2X155 

Am 97 23*6 22*8 22.97 +401 32*54 

Jul 97 22J2 2238 22J2 +409 14*88 

AUS97 n.10 21*9 21*8 +0*2 13J26 

S-S 21 nst +0*5 1X213 

0017 2173 21.13 2172 +0*9 9,141 

NOW 97 2490 2475 2084 +0*7 X331 

Dec 97 2464 20*5 2037 *410 21367 

JOT9B 2077 2077 33J7 +116 n*99 

«i» 3415 24*8 20*0 7773 

Est.selss NA Men's soles 
Men's Open W 275*54 off 10+915 

NATWAL.6AS MMBU 
8M nwn Mu's, t per mm Mu 

FehW 3*50 3730 U93 +09 2734 

» 2*90 2796 +136 25.947 

APTW ISO 2*50 2772 +119 12.944 

MOV 97 2J50 2750 235 +82 10*67 

Am 97 2750 2700 2740 +55 8719 

Jul 77 27H) 2170 2308 +35 7752 

5S5S J 1 * ll<B 1,80 »* 6*w 

S2.« 2-1S 3LI0 9 +>5 Nm 

f ££ Z2SS +10 1937 

ICO 2*00 2*05 ,8 7,198 

Esxsdtes NA MoiTxsate 34*61 
Man'sopenM 15X4IJ up 10 « 


+ 0tt 1,971 
+ 4*1 22X514 


UW^ADeD 6A50LHE (NMER) 

gWpAeWiwrBd 

S9S aM -IJM J?.® 

55-5 ajB OJA -093 1633 

2fiL^+ 2^5 "J® 67-« -4» 7*74 

MOV 97 B9£0 69S5 473 —OBJ 

Am97 WTO 6X35 68*3 —477 4*73 • 

jul. 77 . 6X90 6X91 6673 I*J2 l,a¥| 

gl.s des NA Men’s. sates 37*95 
Mai’soPftiW 64*65 on 1471 
GASOIL UPE) 

U-S.<toUais per metric tan- lots of 100 tans 
5*77 Z17JJ0 21XSQ 31175-^^047 

aS/S 22-52 207^ -us 11.929 

+0G75 199*0 I99J0 — ZJ5 8.017 

f ! Urr 3! JJX50 19X25 19X25 —3*0 1915 

Jun 97 18975 18875 18850 — 1J5 7*73 

Jul 95 N.T. N.T, 18X75 —150 2536 
^7 77 10675 19X25 1B6.00 —ITS 

, N.T. N.T. 18575 1*0 49a 

Oq 97 1B&2S 105-25 lfli w __i m ocn 

MqvW 1B6u00 18475 18<X)0 — 075 310 

Dee97 186.00 1B350 18X75 — nil imi 

Est salea: 1X812. Open IntM 130 im 91 7 




h 
« 
mu 
14%, 
27 
111-. 
104* 
15’+ 
35 V, 


12V. . U 

1JV, -Vi 
1J!+ —Hi 
5*i •« 

18 

1M - V, 

18Vi 

llli _v, 
4« —'4, 
**i, - 

VS — Vi, 
4'V. — >A* 
4M» ,VJ 
I5W -V* 
274 • tk 

1 l*i -W 
10W 
35*i 

35% — H 



Bank pf NY, 

Q 

-24 

1-24 

2-6 


FiM Bancorp 

O 

.22 

1-24 

2-1 

“ 

Ln-Z-Boy Chaff 

O 

81 

2-20 

3-10 

-Vw 

PoBCotp 

0 

.14 

1-24 

2-7 


o+MMoah Imppnntaale anousl pa- 
sbara/ADR; BHwyobta la Cmadaa hadN 
D+wattdfi iKnartertn s-semKnouoi 


PORK BELIES (CMS!) 

40*00 4b. - cmn nor ft 
Fab97 78iS 7X37 77*7 +477 

Mm 97 78.15 7X31 77.97 +172 

Mcv«7 7948 7171 7BM +QJ1 

Jul 97 IB*S 77.10 71*2 *077 

All 9«7 7X75 MM3 7X2S +tt£5 

ES. sales 7*8» Man’s, sates 2*69 
Men's open ini 7*24 off 19 


3.999 

1*14 

1.221 

467 


Food 


l UK n 
WEB Jon n 

WEfiMoyn 

WEOSngn 

XCLLTO 

Xytrtjn 


171 

"r 

'•a 

.ftr 

■ft* 

380 

ift. 

IV„ 

IV,, 

4 '% 

777 

1ft 

1ft, 

1 , *r+ 


002 

17V* 

18ft 

19% 

-ft 

121 

5ft 

S"u 

7'u 

— *« 

147 

17 

7 

IS 

-ft 

5M 

TJft 

■3 

13% 


470 

lift 

lift 

lift 

—ft 

141 

14% 

14V i* 

14% 

♦ft 

201 

)»i. 

15% 

lift 

-ft 

Hi 

17*u 

lift 

12% 


300 

17i% 

17% 

Ufa 

•fa 

125 

1* 

11% 

12 

—ft. 

67886 

ft 

ft 

v» 

-fa 

XII 

P'* 

Ift 

1% 

•Vi. 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales figure are unofficial, vtoriy Nghs and laws n*d We piWous 52 weeks plus the ameni 
weeXbutno(9tela»slteiJngtK7.W1ietea5pair5ad<(^ M end om CTmflnglo2SpercgnlorrTiore 
tm been pakL the mJ3HqtiUw<Wgeaia<0vklendoxAiarn hr txneiv stocks onfy. Unless 
atnenrtse noted, irtw oftfluWends art! anmrt Efctwsemerts bused on Hie lotesl dedtm*m. 
a - dividend also extra (s). b - annual rate at ifividsnd plus stuck dlvMend. c • llquidailng 
dividend, cc - PE eneeds 99*10 -called d - new veariy law. (M - loss bi ttie ksl 12 rnomtis. 
e - dividend dedotod or paid in preceding 12 months. I - annual rate, toaeased on tel 
dedarufloa g- dtvicimd In CaiWSan funds, sirfiiec? fo 15 ?j non-raWencv fex, i-dfvktend 
declared offer sotUmp or stock dividend, i -(ffvldend pcddttibiienr, omitted, deferred, or no 
acTion taken al idlest dMdend meeting. It - dividend declared or paid ihls year, an 
accumulative Issue with dividends In nneaa. m - ortmml role, reduced un last dedarahon. 
n -new Issue in ihe past 52 weeks. The hlgh-kw range begins w«h the sbrn oltiadlng. 
nd-neirfdBi'deliWerT.p-WIWiWidend.onTOoiiTTlBuntoxhWLF/E-futoMCinilngsnjna 

q + dranlend mutual fund, r- dividend dectared or pdd In preceding 12 months, plus stock 
dlvklend. *- slock spltt Dhidond begte wttti dale of spill, sfa - snlea. t > dhridend paid in 
stock m precsdlng 12 monltBW es«nidt9d cosh value an ejMthrtdend or ex-dfetrfiniHon date, 
a -new veafly MgKv-Mdlno hated, vl- In bankniptcy or rrateershipor being reorganteed 

under IheBonkruprqr Act or securities ussumed by such compaoles. wd - when rUstmnned 
■d - when lwu«V ww - wllh vwrrnnbL i - ex-dividend or e*-dgnts. bHs - owftslrmuttjn. 
xm - without Ytarraids, r- ex-dlvMend and soVh In fulL rW - yield i - *oV» in luB. 


COCOA (NCSC) 

10 metric lata - 1 per ton 


Mar 97 

1381 

ins 

133! 

+2 

28,989 

Mnvsr 

138* 

1360 

1361 

+ 1 

11349 

JUS 77 

1387 

1387 

1382 

‘1 

IUW 

Sen 97 

1408 

1801 

1401 

-1 

7454 

Dec 77 

1420 

M17 

1419 

+2 

11U 


E3- votes b.m Mon's. sd*s XJ63 
Man's open Ini 85580 off 253 


COFFEE CWCSB 
J7.S00 to?.- e«tfs oer ft. 

Mur 97 12250 119.25 HIM +175 2132 

Moy?7 1N*0 117JS 11885 + 2*5 7,*« 

JU197 117-25 T15JD 116*5 +2*5 2AM 

5ec?7 115*8 113*0 11X75 +13 1094 

Esl. soles H35 Man's, sales 8*81 

Man's open let isjOi an 3 


Financial 

US T. BILLS ICMB2) 

SI mmon- pTsor 100 oc. 

Mor 91 9X92 9X89 9X90 +002 X790 

Junt7 9X76 9X76 9X76 +0*5 2773 

Sep 97 9X55 9X54 9X55 + 0*7 I fir 

Est.sotes NA Mon's. sates 2X296 
Mon's coen ini 7580 off j? 

SYR. TREASURY (C80T) 

(100*00 prti- OH A 3bidi of 100 pet 
M0T97 r«-0B 185-26 106-©5 ♦ >25 t«,T71 
Am 97 105-31 105-29 105-31 + 13 X577 

Esl soles NA MorTLsates 29.268 

Man’s open W 17X741 off 386 

IB YR. TREASURY (CBOn 
1100*00 Brin- Bb X Snta al 100 pa 
MW97 108-1? 107-28 108-17 + 19 31X455 
JLH97 107-11 107-12 107-38 + 19 11*07 

Sep 97 107-15 107-12 107-15 t 19 uo 

Esijales NA Man's, sates 42537 
Mots open rt 330542 UP 2204 

US TREASURY BONOS (CBOT) 
npd-t190*DX+>H&32ndi teiao era] 

Mar 97 111-15 110-10 111-13 *1U «L226 
Jun97 1MM0 109-28 110-29 +101 Mjjj 
S ep 97 110-15 109-28 1W-1J +101 5,313 

Dec 97110-01 109-39 110-01 +101 3*B5 

ESC Kite NA Man's, sates 197494 
MISTS open if# 485,997 ail 4110 


JOT97 

Sflp97 

Dad7 

Mon 

Junsa 

SS 

D«58 

Mot99 

JUI99 

as 


n*7 9144 93*6 —0*1 91SU 

ra24 «2D 9323 UndL ^ 

n*0 9255 92*8 — 0*1 54297 

na nn 92*1 — 0*1 

H H 

» « U :9 H 


Stock Indexns 
SWCDMP.IW6X ICMERJ 
Mix Index 

kSm 77 XW +11*8185,987 

SJ2 S 4 ® 7K.I* +040 8*19 

SS 2^°° 771J0 +12*0 1419 

MA Monfc. salpa 75,168 

Mon’s open ini 19A271 “110 


3 M3I»!S8W 

ypw 4167* 4167* <215* + 5a* l^K 


^.‘S££SS s ® , *^« m 


12821 

uo 1.170 


WAOWTH PIBOR (MATTE) 

KTS? 1 ®* +^00 82,113 

Dee 97 V6J2 9647 9X7] +0*1 »447 
MorM 96J58 S45I 9643 +0*3 tUM 

*12 2 96:36 iSSiSS 


esl »te* — * 

PiW-apenlnL: 

CgC40CMATlR 

■tan 97^ano3?2§61J ?4pft0 +3840 21 wn 

Pi®** ffl® 3 

Jun 97 2380* 2345 * 2377 c 

Sep97^jaS* ^ 

Mar 9B 94195 SS+n 




K^ KiissS XSlUM 
sSw 94OT S5 SS >m * SSlA 

” WJ9 M.S* 95.03 +0*4 219? 
Dec 99 94.71 9^7) $476 h^O-CU 991 
^Jja volume: 5*97x Opwi tnL:344.77a up 

UMNTK EUROURA OJFPO 

BUj*w - wr < 


WjiKTHBBai 

w ESI vrtwms 22J6* Open irfti Si4M«ff 


Conwiortty Indexes 


«47 - 0*4 101,1*3 


K 5 

Sr*" 


8SSMHEIBB r " ,,,u ™ 

Mm 97 10127 lOOci? 101 2D + (03225, 


88 SS BS-JElg 


Close Pmfaos 

jas u«* 

1498.10 
1«» 14922 

241*0 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (MCSEJ 

1 17,000 lbs.- CDots per IB. 

Mtr?7 10*6 10*9 1041 +0*2 68,959 

May 97 10.75 1049 10*0 -0*1 32475 

Jul 97 10*8 1046 10* -0*7 2503 

OQV7 HUS 10S8 105? 16*17 

Esl sates U.N 4 Aten's, sates 30,123 
Man'soiwixn lSioi off ub 


.J147 10049 101*0 + 03322X534 

Juff97 10030 99*5 19030 +033 m 
EstHteK 234*50. Prev. sate: msii 
Prev. open Inl- 220782 up 431? 


as a 8 : B s 

*4198 9X38 9X29 + SS ’tS 

EsL softs: 4145CL Pm. sates run 
• Pmr.apsnhta M,ni up 2/fai 


Spot Commodities 


LONG CllT (UFFE) 
aaooo - pis t 32 nds otlOOpa 
M0T97 1DV-27 109-11 Ifru +| 


industrials 


, — —a , fl „ r <a * OJT iJftUD 

Jirn?7 1094a 1094)3 10945 + £5 
Eltsote: 52.871 Prev. sales 41340 
Prev oaenim- 14W37 up 95588 


C 0 TT 0 N 1 WCTN) 

SUM ft*.- carat pw ft. 

7*35 73*0 73*0 nxr. 

MW97 75*0 75*5 75te Ijw U4U 

;U97 7X85 7640 7640 Hfljj t2J 

Otf97 7X7* 7X45 7X4J 


E & "-» 

ss 


Pm. 


•a 


-J3 

1S7.00 
040 
*49 
1B9.17 
191 H 
0528b 


tm 







w • ■St ■ 



X. 



. ^ 






V- \ •.:'•<•>. -••- 




INTEBNATIONAt HERALD TRIBUNE, "WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1997 


RAGE 13 


’tie 


EUROPE 


°n Deutsche Telekom Loses Its International Luster 


AFX News 

- FRANKFURT — 

wtt mtcmatioaal ££ 
. the stock now that the 

.^Srs theNovcm,Kr 

olume of 2.1 million shares The 

■S£«?b=s5 

0 P ercenl from their highs. 

nf th. n aIways Ur » !d ^oa ahead 
of the flotation of a number ofEuro- 

^pean telecoms companies in the 
Mrty pan of tins year," Herre 
22S' ® analyst .at Independent 
Research, said. This caution seems 


to have been justified by the current 
slip In the share price.” 

Analysts said international in- 
vestors were giving the cold shoulder 
to the stock because they saw more 
a ttract ive, opportunities in planned 
flotations of a number of other Euro- 
pean operators, such as France Tele- 
com, planned for this year. 

1 ‘France Telecom vnll be coming 
to the market in March or April, and 
the initial evidence says that valu- 
ations are at a discount to the rating 
for Deutsche Telekom,” said Dean 
Smith, an analyst at G.T, Asset 
Management in London. 

"Those people still holding 
Deutsche Telekom could switch into 
France Telecom.” 

In addition, "with the prospect of 


bond yields trending higher at the 
end of the year, the Deutsche 
Telekom dividend yield is not very 
attractive,” Mr. Smith said 

A less than positive outlook on 
the telecommunications company 
from Goldman, Sachs & Co. and 
Merrill Lynch & Co. has not helped 
matters, some said. A ban on public 
comments by institutions involved 
in die Deutsche TeJekom issue ex- 
pired last week, and toe two U.S. 
investment bouses said the stock 
was likely only to perform in line 
with toe market in the near term. 

This stands in contrast to recom- 
mendations from a number of Ger- 
man houses, including Deutsche 
Morgan Grenfell AG, Dresdner 
Klein wort Benson AG and Vereins- 


& Westbank AG. who predicted the 
stock would outperform toe market 

Analysts, however, do not gen- 
erally expect Deutsche Telekom's 
stock to rail below its issue price. 

"As long as the stock stays above 
the price the private investors bought 
it at, they will hold onto iL but if it 
falls below, we could see a wave of 
panic selling,” Mr. Drach said. 

Mr. Smith said. "On an earnings 
or cash-flow basis it is hard to get a 
valuation above 30 DM” a share. 

One factor weighing on the stock 
at the moment is Deutsche 
Telekom’s investor relations. Ana- 
lysts have been unimpressed with 
toe company's decision not to an- 
nounce 1996 results until May 15. 

The company will only give an 


Car Sales Rose in 1996 CLT and Bertelsmann Aim High 


C**MfyOuri&/toa9VidK% 

— __ - BRUSSELS — Passenger-car 

v in Western Europe rose 6.6 

percent in 1996, more than the io- 
"tiustry bad expected, and South 
1 1 ) f* I**),, fem Korean brands made the biggest in- 
* Q(. roads in the lucrative market, with 
. .an increase of 38 percent, an in- 
dustry report showed Tuesday. 

The European Automobile Man- 

■ ufacturers Association said registra- 
tions of new passenger cars rose to 
1 2,8 1 8,700 last year from 12,026,900 
to 1995 in the 15-nation European 
Union plus Norway and Switzerland. 

-The figures were provisional but 
were not expected to change much 

• before becoming final. 

- Overall, more moderate growth is 

expected to Europe this year even 
.. . 'though 1996 ended with a solid up- 

swing. In December, registrations in 
f Western Europe rose 8.5 percent 
from a year earlier, to 789300 cars. 

.. Despite the increase, the man- 

. ufacturers association said it was 
still not happy with the results. 

? "If you look at the underlying 
factors,” a spokesman, James Ro- 
se nstein, said, * ‘you can’t say it’s a 
buoyant market." 

Ay The largest European automaker, 
Volkswagen AG of Germany, 

* pushed ahead of its competitors as it 
increased its West European market 

' share to 17.2 percent for all of 1996 
‘ from 16.8 percent in 1995. Its French 

■ and U.S. rivals lost ground. 

t ( 1 "Volkswagen will see further 

* -* 3 i'i n fx: growth in volume and market 

i It uli 'share,” said Falk Frey, an auto- 

industry analyst at Bank Julius Baer 


in Germany. “They are well po- 
sitioned to meet demand with new 
models that are clearly improved 
with mote favorable prices.’ ’ 

Mr. Frey said he expected VW’s 
rival. General Motors Carp., to lose 
more ground in Europe this year 
after GM's West European market 
share fell to 122> percent in 1996 
from 13. 1 percent the year before. 

Britain’s largest automakers — 
Ford Mixer Col, General Motors and 
Bayerische Motoren Werice AG's 
Rover Group lid. — lost market 
share to importers, which grabbed 62 
percent of die market, op from 58.9 
percent in 1995. 

Ford, Rover and GM blamed 
losses of market share on the ending 
of discounts to favored customers 
and reductions in fleet sales. 

But 1996 was a successful year 
for cars from South Korea, whose 
sales jumped to 248409, giving 
them a 1.9 percent share of the 
Western European market. 

It was also a boom year for car 
sales in Norway, with an increase of 
38 percent, and Ireland; which sold 
32 percent more cars. Sales were 
almost flat in Italy, however, with an 
increase of 03 percent. 

Volvo AB struggled, selling 55 
percent fewer passenger cars in 
1996 and dropping to a share of 1.6 
percent of the market, and PSA 
Peugeot Citroen SA slipped Co an 


Companies Say Media Venture’s Profit Will Rise 5% Annually 


CtmfOeityOir Stiff Frau Dapeacba 

LUXEMBOURG — Compag- 
nie Luxembourgeoise de Teledif- 
fusion SA and a unit of Bertels- 
mann AG formed a television and 
radio joint venture Tuesday and 
said they expected the company to 
post annual increases of at least 5 
percent in net profit over toe next 
five years. 

The venture. CLT-UFA. will 
operate 1 9 television and 23 radio 
stations in 10 European countries. 

Umversum Film AG is toe tele- 
vision and radio branch of Ber- 
telsmann of Germany . Bertelsmann 
and the shareholders of Luxem- 
bourg-based CLT will each have 50 
percent of toe new company. 

The venture has projected annual 


revenue of 5 billion Deutsche marks 
($3.15 billion), said Remy Sautter, 
who is co-chief executive officer 
with Rolf Schmidt-Holtz. 

CLT-UFA was created because 
die cost of buying rights co broad- 
cast programs is rising by about 10 
percent a year and greater resources 
are needed to compete with toe 
large American-based media rivals, 
Mr. Sautter said. 

* ‘We are not afraid of toe Amer- 
icans,” he said. 

Analysts said the earnings fore- 
cast was a positive sign For CLT’s 
owners, including Groupe 
Bruxelles Lambert SA. a Belgian 
holding company that indirectly 
has control of Compagnie Lux- 
embourgeoise pour l’Audio- 


Visuel &. la Finance, or Audiofina, 
and directly owns Electrafina SA. 
another holding company. 

Executives said the new com- 
pany planned to consolidate its 
strong positions in Germany. 
France, the Netherlands and Bel- 
gium. Mr. Sautter said toe company 
would invest its profits from toe 
“first few years” in new projects 
such as toe scheduled March 1997 
launch of Channel 5. a nationwide 
TV station in Britain that will be 
partly owned by CLT-UFA 

The company also plans to invest 
500 million francs IS933 million) 
in France, where it is part of a 
consortium developing a pay-tele- 
vision service to compete with 
Canal Plus S A. iAP, Bloomberg J 


French Pension Plan Draws Naysayers 


1 1 .^percent share of the West Euro- 
pean market in 1996 from 12.0 per- 
cent in 1995. Renault's share 
dropped to 10.1 percent from 103 
percent. (Bloomberg. AP) 


Bloomberg Business News 

PARIS — France’s plan to allow 
private pension funds will fall well 
short of the government's dual am- 
bition of channeling money into the 
stock market and stemming the rise 
in government pension costs, ana- 
lysts say. 

“I would not expect any miracle 
regarding those new funds,” said 
Patricia d'Hle. a fund manager with 
Monte Paschi Banque. 

Analysts said the new funds. 


poised for legislative approval, 
would eventually attract about 30 
billion francs (£5.6 billion) a year, a 
tiny proportion of the 450 billion 
francs the French invest each year in 
life insurance contracts. 

The government said it was con- 
fident the bill would pass after a 
debate Tuesday evening. 

“French households aren't used to 
toe idea of investing money with a 
view to getting a return in 30 or 40 
years' time,” said Svenja Nehls. an 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


HKk Low dose Pm. 


Ihesday, Jan. 14 

Prices to local amende. ■ - 

Tefeiwrs 

HW» Law One Pm. 

Amsterdam " eoembumi 

PnrtwCLH 

ABN-AMftO 11430 11230 116 It 

Aegon tu ll)-» tiuo ]j -_ 

AlwS 107X0 10630 107 JO 10680 

Atrn Nobel 24930 34670 24930 24L50 

7620 72X0 78J0 72 

31 JO 3030 30X0 3130 

9640 . 9430 96*0 9460 

DonttdiePrt 33130 327.40 33030 3»ft 

DSM 171,40 17020 17040 177-70 

27.90 73 JC 27X0 37ft 

6uo a mjo „«a 

53&0 5130 52.90 51/0 
55J0 S4J0 S5l50 5530 

.Kassr /sassa^-ffis 

ESS53S 0 ££ -ISiSS JS 

6530 64-10 6530 66* 
48 47J0 47 JO 4770 
3770 37.10 37.10 37.60 
65.10 6440 6490 6180 
4620 47 ft 4830 4W 

SSL, 

■BSSF S3S?.«i2 n 5 
S’^2 !Si«| 

15330 TSL30 152X0 


ABN-AMftO 
Aegon 
Atwhl 
Atm Notts 
Boon Co. 

BofcWfeacw 

CSMcw 

DoniWiePffi 

DSM 

V Bseder 

Forils Am* 
Getmda 
G-BroCCW 
Hagmeier 
■ HeCwken 
Heoaomtcn 

Huwboagias 

I NO Group 
RIM 
KNPBT 
KPN 

NMUaydGn 
Hutrtdo 
. OccGtimco 
pomps Elec 


Betoadarf 8490 

BMW — ‘ * 107? 

Cmtntabonk -41 JO 
OataferBem H6ia 
Dtguna •• 7U 
DevtxMBB* 75.95 

owrreMam scud 

DrcstaerBai* 48.9B 
Ete*rtUI 3B 

FWttenlusMed. 13730 
• Fried. Knw> 250 
Get* 10650 

HefctofcgZmt - 12770 
HrotelpM 8430 
HocMfcJ 6150 

Hc+Chst ■ 7025 

KnWnltf • 496 

Linda 1085 

Luttmsa 21-65 

MAN - 414 

Mnmeanaflfl 09 
Mata8ouieKtafl3430 
Metro 122 

MundiRwdcR 3648 
Preusug 389 JB 
RW£: 4430 

SAP pfd 219 

s^s mi; 
arntw rm 

isr 

VEW 496 

^nrogen 7U 


81 8130 BOO 
1074 1074 1075 

4170 417B 42-02 
11490 11575 U3J5 
7Bd 704 70230 
7555 7538 7466 
2932 2933 3045 
4875 MSB 49.10 
1M Hi 308 
135-20 135.40 13735 
24650 250 246JP 

104 10530 10530 
12660 127 12750 

B250 82-90 8430 
£230 62-30 64 

£935 70.15 7a* 
49450 495 500 

1040 1870 1035 

2060 2U1 2185 

41050 411 40750 

674 £7620 68050 
3375 3350 . 34 
12150 121 JO 12250 
3610 3420 3632 

38750 38750 38850 
6755 6755 £835 
21650 217 220 

13730 137 JO 13635 
7655 7696 7735 
28650 287 287 

93 9110 
495 496 495 

6S6 659 M3 

71250 71450 71350 


Liberty HUBS 
Liberty Life 
Minora) 

Nampofc 

Hwfmr 

RenrtwnxfiGp 

Rkheroart 


Soso! 
5WC 
Uger Oats 


121 

119 

119 

121 JS 

Urflevw 

14X4 

13ft 

1401 

175 

3ft 

370 

335 

Uta Assurance 

530 

603 

618 

22335 

323 

323 

UTS Mews 

635 

663 

6ft 

12025 119.75 

170 

12035 

Utdum»« 

696 

632 

662 

105 

10175 

103 

102 

WsKtarae L* ufc 

612 

60S 

610 

19X0 

1930 

1930 

19ft 

Vodafone 

261 

2ft 

261 

6675 

66 

6675 

6635 


765 

7J9 

764 

4230 

£ no 

4235 

42.75 

WBtamHdgs 

330 

120 

in 

. 66 

65 

66 

65ft 


467 

456 

4ft 

64 

63JS 

£3 ft 

64 

WPP Group 

2X2 

238 

2X1 

123ft 

123 

123ft 

123ft 

Zeneca 

1627 

16 

1634 


Htgt Low Close Pie*. 

PethnGeoSvc 771 26850 26650 272 

SOOT Pel kn a 126 123 126 12650 

ScftbsM 132 129 !31 132 

T nmsoctcn OH 4* 435 <39 433 

StDKtemdASa 3460 3630 3650 3680 


S3 5150 51.75 52 

5625 56 5625 5625 

IB* 184 184 185 

6675 66 6675 6675 


' Randstod H6g 
Robeco 
Rodoma) 
-Roflnco 
. Rtnnto 
; RowlDuVJi 
Unfever evo 
VmkKtnB 
VNU 

mtenKtan 

‘Bangkok 

. AdvintaSvc 
BwipRnkBKP 
KiunoTMlBB 
• PTTEsptof 
■StomCnnefriF 
Slom Cora BkF 
THecorraoto 
Tbal Airways 
ThriFmroBkF 
UMCmn 


Bombay 

t 

< BoMAiftt 
• HMKtLew 
_»MmrJiBlPetto 
{■find Dev BL 

| JJSmoAprre. 

sweat India 
Stent Aunprtry 
Tala Eng Ln 


Brussels 


Alatanf) 

Bracatnd 

BBL 

Betawt 

CBR 

Off 

fawn 

SSh 

Coburn 

DnBmnUon 

Etadabel 

E«Oro«» 

Ralls AG 

Gevoert 

GIB 

GBL 

Gen Banque 
Kiwanbank 
Ptfnelna 
Panrfin 

SoMy 

Trocwai 

UCB 

union MMera 


30990 302 SCOOT 3 O 

8130 8030 8030 9070 
. 3B4D 37.10 »30 
21 9M 77640 71750 71 W0 


SET Mec 88747 
prevtotn: 82U9 

260 246 25B 270 

250 23B 238 246 

52 50 JOW 5250 

384 382 382 390 

814 788 812 7W 

IBS 178 183 m 

SI 48 5050 50 

38-75 3750 37-» » 

^ IS 1ft IS 

988 950 PS6^ 976» 

889 871 875 882J5 

379 35250 3S 365 

109 102 m 11^75 

3S1 364 381 363 

259 24750 

239 222 237 JS 22350 

267 252 366» 2K75 

2425 93M Z3-75 23J5 

^ jS 352 £450 

BE LrMtodnc igi-” 

PmlBfB 197656 

10560 lflW T»» 1WB 

5390 5CT 53W S10 

6680 6830 6870 *830 

19600 nsso 1^5 

3225 3M0 J® 

30)0 3000 2000 2005 

1238 1234 1B8 1238 

11* US IIS .114 

1405B 1*00 1^ 

2055 VCS 2^5 3ES 

7730 7» 2J0 TOT 

3110 3»5 M 30W 

5530 S S SS2 IS 

222 J 2270 2240 

W I® IS* 

4335 4345 4300 

lust 11600 11725 
iom lwso loroo inn 
liSo MOT 

..... 4725 4730 4750 

TOlfl fffD 7010 TWO 

as 285 .338 

tO& 21925 22400 2UJ5 
(ms 14400 l*Kg Wg 
95000 87600 9tHW 8000 
2130 7J® 7724 3J35 


Helsinki 

Cottar 1 

EnsoA u 

HoUaraoMI 

Xeratro 

Kosfco 

Marita A 

Metro B 

Matso-SertaB 

Neste 

NoMnA 

Orion- VWyrnoa 

OntokuarouA 


HEX GMOllMkC 2098J57 
PnvRas; 266657 

248 SO 248 24130 
40 39-70 39 M 3950 
228 222 228 226 
57 S6» 5630 57 JO 
6830 £750 £8 £730 

1640 1536 1630 1530 
275 265 272 -Sg 

si rp 38 W 
130 117 120 UB50 

30250 297 302 29750 

181 179 17950 100-50 

81 8038 8050 00.10 

4620 4480 4550 45.10 
388 380 385 388 

10340 W150 10250 102 

8150 8040 81 8150 


Hong Kong “-JSSSS 

1090 1EL80 1070 1090 
3650 3550 3550 3630 

12.15 12 12.10 12.10 

” 7235 71 JS 7250 71.75 

2230 21J0 2iK 2130 

3330 3356 3350 3170 

OOTaOiaBLd 195 178 190 178 

aSeRnsErf 1690 1410 1465 1410 

w B.60 930 830 840 

40J6 3950 40.70 «1.90 
M.T. N.T- M.T. 14ffi 

170 145 8J0 850 

4030 ■ 39 40.10 .39 

1035 950 1005 9^0 

3350 33 33 3110 

7 JO 655 730 7.10 

47J0 4530 4600 44.90 
1605 1550 16 16 

94 9250 n 

850 170 675 175 

umushU ' 7175 7150 723S 72 

ySs H05 12-20 1235 
1495 1475 J4B8 1450 

2730 2755 27JC 2730- 

HRShoooHtlE 1430 1415 1415 1420 

H - - iaS 1255 1105 1335 

458 430 4-83 493 

171 1685D I7nn lg^ 

sssr 3J8 SS >3 Si 
es ss ss iti 
’5 JS ’% ’3 

32 2140 2130 21J0 
US Ul 3M 350 
493 488 493 490 

J5 27.10 
40 11-40 
92 9035 
530 5.15 

9.10 4K 
645 430 

71 JS 69JS 
WM 1750 
3140 nn 
3730 

2135 SIUV 


Kuala Lumpur cm 

Gantig 1730 17 

AWBonktafl 26 25JB 

MaltniShta^ 7.1S 735 

PetronsGas H10 9JS 

Renong .460 4ft 

Resorts Wald 12X0 lift 

Sfcw Dortt 10.70 9JS 

TetataanMal 20ft 2080 

Tenon 1130 12,10 

UWEnStaeera 2350 2190 

London pw 

pr 

AhbeyNart 103 737 

ABsd Domect) 437 430 

Ao*aWW? 628 605 

Argos 617 6 

Asda Groan 130 UJ 

Assoc Br Foods 481 473 

BAA -535 492 

Berdays 11.12 1080 

Bass 148 484 

BAT Ind 495 472 

Bank5aHkmd 336 3ft 

EJueCkcJe 3L7B 165 

BOCGrwp 1E5 170 

Boots 638 624 

BPS tad 377 370 

BrffAensp 1278 1258 

Brfl Abwiys 606 534 

Brit Gas 2J2 Zl£ 

BrflUrod 646 5J6 

Brff Pettei 7ft 733 


17 17ft 
ft ft 
735 7.1S 

975 1110 
452 440 

1Z20 1110 
975 10 

20.90 2090 
12ft 1210 
23.10 2350 


FT^E 160:41 68ft 
PrastaaR 418730 


003 

737 

001 

437 

4ffl 

424 

62B 

605 

620 

617 

6 

611 

1J0 

134 

739 

481 

473 

4X0 

605 

492 

503 

11.12 

10X0 

1U1 

8X8 

484 

0X5 

495 

472 

4 94 

336 

308 

334 


BrBStad 

BrnTeteawn 

BumoC Casual 
Burton Go 
Cable Wretesi 
CwJbwYSenw 
CarttanCorom 
Coranl Uirion 


CattrayPCKtfc 

gfsass 

CWBOLWri 
ChtaaOseasLd 
arinoRnsEr* 
Q* 

aac. - 

OrtaEtacPw 
GoKoPodfic 
OaoHengB 
FWPoefe 
Groat EaOto 
GaanBd«i0lw 
Goood Gram 

B5M1W . 

HendraaU 
HtCRtan _ 
HKCMiaGas 
HKSedrtc. 
HfCShoooHfls 
HKTfitaasBTO 

agar 

KrrteMwiWD 

SS^HdO 

New World Dev 

RVUMMadr 

Orfemd Press 


Copenhagen 

• BGBonk 3« 

a 

oSSB y * 8 

tvs mi b wwo 

FLSMBB S 

Kgbi vflMsne 
moMttMB 5SJ38 
soanuj fter S T79S& 
'Sb 358 

rmrBdUM - gl 


pJWtOOK 49750 

s s S 

S s 32 

% s » 

486 . 


175000 1 770M 17MW 

S«S 8 

335 33&5B » 


sfe-iSom 

Sing Loud Cta 
ahOiinoPost 
SsrinPocA 
TrimSlBTari 
TVBBWdcoslJ 
Wharf Kdgs 
wteetack 


Jakarta 

Asm mo 

Bhunlndoa 

BlMagad 

GukmaGwn 

Ipboomart 

laOaWd 

intone 

ssssE 

Teiehonuidns 


2730 27ft 
lift 11-« 
9050 9075 
535 625 

955 9ft 
630 6ft 
&J5 70JB 
17ft 17ft 
32 3230 
3770 37-90 
2070 2135 


Frankfurt 

AMBB , * 

mass 

aSochbo 

ar- || 

Boner «TJ» 


S iȤ 

III 

Sfi S 2 II 

<333 OX %% 
tUbS 4072 £075 
6150 4130 


Qwmflt Mob 45644 

sra sm sm xs 
1775 1725 1725 U75 
1275 1250 1275 7275 
11600 11525 11600 11550 
3550 3525 3525 3575 
^0 ftOO «S0 4850 

£475 £450 6450 6625 
13200 12900 1M0 13WD 
74S0 7375 7400 73SS 

42Q0 4775 4200 4200 


Johannesburg 

n limnlrt RK 25.15 2*95 25» -25 

5®£32S»I 341 341 3fl 341ft 

gEa "a ra-ra % 

,ss *8 *58 

P**S5nm 44ft 4&75.4SJS 4625 
24 2Sft 234J 2345- 
1830 W 1835 17.95 


EMi Group - 

M' 

GedlAoHeni 

GEC 

GXN 

GtanWMcoare 

GttnadaGp 

OrondM« 

GRE _ 

GromftsGp 

Gabnwro 

GUS 

Hroisofl 

Hays 

HSBCHM0S 

last Tobacco 
KSwfltfwr 
LaAnka 
Load Sec 
Loam 

Legal GeM Grp 

UMsTSBGp 

LocasVarty 

MMsSpBKEr 

MEPC 

Merciy Asset 
NatowGfW 
MMPowk 
twwfsi 

rtea 

Obnge 

PiO 

Pttaoh 

OltLbmfcji 

PMmGW 

PwflerFciwfl 

PwdertW 

RoBrockPP 

RonJsGwA 

RtcmCatar 

Rallond 

Reettma ' 

festtUMtU 

RevMKdB* 

Raora 

RMCGroop 


saMwry 
Sdmdars 
Scm Ht w e a nta 
Scot Power 
Secular 
Srrem Trent 
BhHTnaWpR 
Stabs 

SnlttBaplMw 

StnBhWtat 

SmBtulod 

StbenEiK 

ttndOaitar 

TataftLylft 

Tests 

TbenesWotar 
31 Group 
Tienop 
TnrpMn* 


3ft 176 336 

870 844 832 

624 636 625 

370 372 370 

1Z5B 1232 1236 
574 604 601 

2.16 221 2J0 

536 534 537 

733 7.14 7.18 

525 579 5L32 

136 137 153 

605 615 402 

231 150 251 

1035 )0B3 1038 

132 1-55 132 

436 472 434 

479 492 487 

5X6 5X9 5.13 

697 7.14 6.91 

624 627 623 

37D 377 393 

5 572 499 

447 452 451 

1272 1275 1271 
623 641 636 

139 131 139 

7-B3 7-96 735 

402 4.13 4X4 

935 9ft MB 
9X6 934 9X9 

8ft 830 &54 

439 435 43S 

2ft 276 273 

A58 53C 5ft 

434 436 430 

5.90 601 576 

085 aas 035 
536 153 5ft 

1X15 1338 1112 
730 730 734 

183 890 185 

64£ 670 rift 

232 238 2-33 

732 738 7-23 

232 2ft 238 
190 3.W 373 

453 480 43? 

2.17 219 239 

472 478 473 

464 433 468 

1230 1258 1271 

2X2 2X7 2X2 

435 5X1 491 

735 753 759 

531 556 5ft 

1X7 139 137 

630 443 4J£ 

753 IS 755 

133 137 133 

5ft 6.16 6 

6ft 7 696 

SLU 5L S7 5X9 
250 4X2 194 

412 424 416 

Aft 7 7X4 

3ft 330 130 

10.18 10ft 1021 
435 441 435 

Aft AM 673 
145 3ft 147 
175 PJ5 &S9 
239 141 235 

568 553 564 

9X3 920 9 M 

430 454 4ft 

415 427 415 
3X9 402 190 

1576 16 15X0 

644 652 644' 

3ft 151 15) 

274 277 175 

5X7 697 6X8 

10.15 1032 1073 
1006 10.11 W30 
175 176 176 
7X1 752 7X7 

775 777 7X9 

7X5 7X9 7X4 

729 733 733 

692 7.12 451 

-465 447 471 

154 167 154 

602 6X6 SL98- 
493 455 458 

sja iS5 &S2 

267 2X9 272 


Madrid 

AeerinM 
ACBSA . 
AguosBatcetan 
Aroertrafa 
BBV 
SrpresJO 
Bor Untar 
BcoCetaroHhn 

Bar Exterior 
Bar Popular 
Ben Santander 
CEPSA 
Corfflntnfc 

FECSA 

GasNotunti 


Taboenlera 
T&ioitoj 
UntanPawsa 
Voter Cement 

Manila 

Ayala & 

Mata Land 
MPmptf 
CtaPHaam- 
ManBaElecA 
Metro Bank 
Perron 
PC Bank 
PtilLraiflOta: 
San Miguel B 
SM Prime Hdg 


Mexico 

Alfa A 
Srowcdfl 
CernesCPO 
OftaC 

EmpMortama 

GpoCmso A1 

GjwHalnbMsa 

KtebCtakMec 

TetetasaCPO 

TetMexL 


AHearmAssle 
Bca Coran ltd 
BeoRrtewam 
Bead) Rama 
9 enerton 
Owtto ItaBono 
Edison 
ENI 
Hal 

GemmOAssJC 

1MI 

IMA 

jagu 

Medfetans 

Maroedtai 

Panrteat 

PWB 

RAS 

Rota Bonce 
S Potto Torino 

sw 

TetesmMla 

TIM 


Montreal 


Bee Mob Coen 
Grin Tiro a 
O ta IMA 
CTHB15K 
Gqt Matar 
GLWeULffKO 
KMsfnttflts 
iraasco 
ftnestaraQo 
LxbtirRCcs 
MeBBKQlflOdo 
Power Carp 
Power FW 
QuebearB 
Routs ComB 
tor* st cda 


A to 4 

BeraKaiCtaA 

o sStesk 

EtannareksBk 

Etatat 

HotslundA 

Ktroenwr Asa 

Hank Hydro 

NaKle&ogA 

HycSdteJA 

OrldaAsaA 


Baba tetac 46412 
Prwtaes464.lt 

17970 into 18340 
1775 1790 1795 
5600 5740 5670 

5720 5740 900 
7190 7190 7330 

1105 1170 1110 
19510 19510 19800 
3525 3530 3560 

2755 2755 2760 
26000 26300 26790 

sm m too 

4225 4250 4270 

2625 2630 2670 

7BC0 7890 7950 

9960 10I5O 10070 
7260 7280 1275 

31810 32500 32310 
1700 1710 1710 

2545 15*0 2570 

5620 5710 5670 

7375 1340 1335 

5970 S9S0 6040 
3260 3290 3275 

1220 1245 1235 

1425 1430 1440 


30 St 3030 

30 ao 

170 168 

1425 14 

128 129 

675 600 

9X0 9X0 

340 34D 

1505 1S15 

114 114 

7 7.10 


BabatndwcSriSUi 
Pmteic 356135 

3935 48X0 39.15 
16ft 17.14 lift 
31.15 31ft 31X5 
9X2 10X8 9X6 

41 JO 41.50 41-50 
46.50 43.10 46ft 
2PX0 29.95 28X5 
16430 169X0 163J0 
103X0 104X0 102X0 
1438 14ft 14ft 


Pterions UC7188 
11510 U4B0 11100 
3040 3330 3105 

3945 4300 MO 

1246 1315 1278 

20100 21250 20900 
1868 2016 1900 
10070 10710 10080 
8815 9105 8950 
4900 51 95 4995 

31200 32150 31550 
14550 1573S 14830 
2055 2130 5085 

6943 74® 70SJ 

7350 7700 7415 

9460 10400 *00 

1204 1274 1224 

2490 2600 2535 

3180 3710 3120 

14510 15280 14800 
14905 75330 14995 
97S 10600 9970 

7055 7550 7150 

4445 4700 4450 

4120 4310 4220 


tadaUriobtadnc 2934ft 
Pn«taD;29lOJ7 


Accor 

AGF 

Air Uau >de 

AJartHAfcffi 

A m 

Boned re 

B1C 

BNP 

ConolPtas 

Carefout 

Cnstoo 

CCF 

Cetera 

OntsflanDtof 

CLP- Deria Fran 

CiedH Agricole 

Danone 

EB-AguSalne 

Eririanla B5 

Eanrionner 

Gen. Eon 

Ho«s 

Irnetal 

Lntarge 

Legnsw 

LOW* 

LVMH 

Lyon. Earn 

MJdieanB 

P»®asA 

Pernod RkMd 

Pergeotca 

Mnoue-Prira 


Rh-PoulencA 

RoosseHTdof 

Soncfl 

StWeWer 

3EB 

SGSTboBisor 

SteGenaota 

Sodrsho 

S/Gotnta 

Suez 


Syrthetabo 

TluaiisoaCS 


Sao Paulo 


BradescoPtd 
Brahma PW 
Gem fa PM 
CESPPfd 


BauboncoPtt 

UB»5en*3as 


PvaarosPtd 

TelebrasPM 

Teteulfl 

Tetarf 

TetespPfd 

Urribonco 

CVRD PH 


Seoul 

Daeaai 

Ocnrooltetar 
Ha Molars 
Korea El Pwr 
Korea ExdiBk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LG Seraton 
Pahang Inn St 
Samsung Etec 
ShWwnBra* 


829 BJ0 
635X0 5B9X0 
CJO 40.50 
5230 saoo 
1330 112X 
39000 378X0 
438X0 432X0 
345X7 336.99 
290X0 278.90 
188X0 177X0 
88X0 S5J0 
144X0 141 JD 
156.17 151-03 
246X0 235 X 0 
3330 32.10 
23X0 2230 


CAC-te 2402-14 
Prwtaas: 234137 

ft 647 656 

167 170ft 165 

□7 852 843 

OO 437ft 430 

JO 34930 353-70 

.16 646 £18 

TO 795 BOO 

30 200ft 17930 

19b 1106 1107 

M0 3450 3347 

BL90 240.20 
1930 23630 
645 614 

864 850 

.10 493l 50 475ft 
158 1258 1265 
■" 783 774 

507 495ft 
831 837 

SO 650 690 

711 702 

393 373 

w 799 788 

na 3zi.io 320 
IV2 912 HS 
1978 1947 

05 1469 1430 

509 496X0 

J0 289 289ft 
JO 363.10 341.10 
.10 308 306X0 

135 547 5C 

125 2128 2124 
SO 1493 1491 

.« 1)630 113 

132 1664 1627 

,10 17630 166ft 
07 1527 1527 

143 556 53 

.90 25BJ3 253 

106 1134 1154 

393 377 

551 543 

71 2833 2790 

TO 792 
SO 219 ft ... 

06 552 553 

X0 172 168 

05 414ft 424.30 
X0 138X0 139ft 
35 78ft 78X0 
ft 360 34460 


828 820 
424.90 590X0 
42ft 40ft 
52-20 50.00 
1290 1189 

387X0 377X0 
433.00 439ft 
33899 34800 
288X0 279.99 
107ft 177X0 
87ft 8110 
144X0 142X0 
754.7? 151X0 
242X0 238X0 
33X0 3149 
2100 22.10 


Attos Copra AF 
Atresia p 
E tactndiaBF 
Ericsson BF 
Hemes BF 
Incentive AF 
Investor QF 
KlnneirikBF 
Wo Do BF 
Pharml/ptotrn 
SonavABF 
5CABF 
S-E Sunken Af 
SkandtaFoisF 
Skonsto BF 
SKFBF 
SSABBF 
SKjtoAF 
S» HamSes AF 
Syrimrfl AF 
TreflebQfgBF 
Volvo BF 


Sydney 


Amcor 

ANZBUng 

BHP 

Boral 

Brambles lira 
flams PhitiJ 
CBA 

CC Amaffl 
Coles Myer 
Comalco 
OCA LW 
C5R 

FasleisBrew 
GlOAusiroBo 
Goodman Fla 
lOAntnOa 
Jorm Fairfn 
Lend Lease 
Moyne Ntakto 
MIMHdgs 
Wat Ausf Bank 
News cap 
Nortn Ud 
Pacific Don bp 
Pioneer inti 
Placer Pafflc 
SortfK 
Soutticoro 
Wesfonort 
Wiern Miring 
Westfield Trt 
WestpocBUng 
WooCsidcPta 
Wootwnrlhi 


caapestetetee 686ft 
Pimta«s6S9ft 

99600 90000 99000 93000 
5455 5120 5310 5200 
16600 15600 16100 15808 
J8000 27100 26000 27200 
9600 9250 9410 9400 

4965M 460000 496500 460000 
90500 19000 19300 1900O 
43400 40600 434B 4CB0Q 
47500 44000 47500 44000 
12000 11500 11*10 11500 


43 42X5 
214 211* 

31.10 30X0 
32-15 32A5 
17X0 1735 
21.15 21-15 
20U 20X0 
35 3435 
2675 26X0 
lift 15.10 
13 % 1X35 
27ft 2716 
SS 24X5 
25 2445 
10ft 1030 
49X0 49 


42X5 41 

221* 2130 
31 30X0 
32.05 32X5 
1735 17X0 
21.15 21.15 

2M aw 

34X5 3430 
26X0 2670 
tWO 1535 
1135 1335 
27ft 27ft 
25 & 

25 ?4(* 
1035 10ft 
49.10 49 


Singapore *^££§33 


Cmebos Poe 
Oyoente 
Cyde Carriage 
DitayFarmint* 
DBS 

DBS Land 
Fraser A Weave 
HKLnte* 


10x0 lift 
1230 lift 
lift 16ft 
0X1 0X1 

* 9X5 

5ft 130 
12X0 14.10 
2.93 2X6 

3ft 3ft 
£35 6ft 
3ft 3X6 
70ft TttM 
332 33! 
130 1.19 
1730 IB 


OBXtariK561JS 

PtMobs 56130 

148 153 148 

145 148 149 

3230 22X0 2250 
25.90 36.10 2440 
W 1B6 105ft 

47ft « 48ft 
310 316 315 

35B 361ft 399 

193 200 196 

99X0 102ft 102ft 
467 478 477 


HonaLfiongHr 

JartMaten* 

JartSfrategt* 

<esod 

Katpeet 

MHtutaMmt 

OCBCtaretgc 

05ea Union &k 

Se wb Ota— 

Urtfl ASrOnt* F 

StagPcSm 

SbaPimF 

57ATO0F 

STSWb 

SttaTataeamia 

SMts Stems 

Lhd indusirtel 

UTtJCTSeaSAF 

WlngTalHrios 

^taUidaftss. 


Stockholm Bc “ 2 £: 3 f££ 

Pnvfaac; 2597X1 

AGABF 107 10150 108ft 10450 

ABBAF 784 781 785 78» 

AssiDoraanF 199 180 188 189 

Astra AP 334ft 326 331ft 333ft 


435 

638 

635 

630 

8 

7X5 

7.95 

e 

1330 

13 

13*10 

13 

IJfi 

136 

IJ6 

1.76 

27ft 

26X0 

27ft 

27 

132 

120 

120 

330 

1X8 

1X5 

1X5 

1X& 

330 

616 

116 

320 

446 

442 

4ft 

450 

Ul 

1.19 

1.10 

1.19 

1640 

16 

I£ 

1658 

420 

412 

416 

420 


Taipei 

AstaCetaem 
orthtryUtalas 
Qtng Hwa BL 
CMna Steel 
CfWnornia 
Evergreen 
FtsrEoslTexI 
Rrel Bonis 
FonnasaCF 
Huon wan 61 
Huatan Tefiran 
ICBC 

Prestaent Erri 
TahwnCena 
Tatung 

Tokyo 

Atnomata 
All K1 peon Air 
Asatri flank 
AsaniChem 
AsoW Glass 
sr 7oiiyc MVsu 
BkVakftama 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Oia»B<mk 
atubu E)ee 
Qiugokir Elec 
Her 

DaBctii Fang 
Dakua Bans 
baba House 
DcVnaSec 
□ensa 
Fannie 
Fun Bank 
Full Plata 


Honda Manx 

1BJ 

IHI 

noatu 

Kfr-Ytfade 

JAL 

JUSCB 

Kapma 

KansnIEIK 

Km 

Kowo Steel 

HDD 

Kintal Wpp Ry 

KMn Brewery 

Kobe Sled 

Komatsu 

KutaSB 

Kyocera 

Kjr^uEIec 

Marubeni 

Monti 

Matsu Etaclnd 

AtaSuEtecWk 

MIBUbtsM 

Mltsuttslll O) 

MlBibfcldEI 

Mitsubishi £rf 

MHwMsMHvy 

MAuusniMa 

Mitsubishi 7 r 

Mteui 

Mitsui Futtasn 
Miaul Trust 


5330 

53 

51 SO 

53ft 


Mkktl 22S 7899313 
Pterions: 1811679 

7770 

1030 

1090 

1040 

77R 

750 

747 

mi 

880 

8M> 

K» 

IW 

62S 

575 

679 

606 

low 

1010 

1040 

1030 

IWO 

1870 

1940 

1770 

659 

635 

659 

6W 

2080 

1980 

wro 

3050 

23TO 

2290 

2370 

2330 

745 

710 

745 

730 

2760 

2200 

2260 

xa 

2730 

2170 

2210 

2200 

HID 

796 

818 

816 

1470 

1340 

1400 

1440 

541 

515 

531 

551 

1400 

1350 

1400 

1390 


994 963 

2530 2400 

3540 3320 
1550 14«0 

3640 3460 
HOC 1070 
1060 1030 

3210 3100 
1B10 1710 
463 £33 

560 £35 

5JM 5350 

539 £22 

3850 3550 

7J5 690 

2310 2210 
1790 K70 

295 286 

74» 7520 
720 701 

1040 1000 

230 213 

859 835 

540 525 
7290 7140 
2240 2170 

545 520 

455 <33 

1800 T7SD 
17M 1700 
1050 991 

1070 1040 
352 330 

£78 656 

1230 1110 

880 Bril 
874 865 

1410 1330 

880 850 

1100 10ft 

792 742 


Investor’s Europe 


indication of hou toe year has gone 
a! the CeBit computer and electron- 
ics trade fair in Hannover in March, 
analysts said. 

“Between toe release of toe six- 
month figures in September and 
March, we will have had no ne* fig- 
ures,” Mr. Drach >aid. "This is no! 
justifiable for such a large company.” 

The lack of information meam’the 
stock will trade around current levels 
until then unless some significant 
news emerges, analysts said. 

But some German analysts still 
see a fair value of as much as 36 DM 
for Deutsche Telekom's shares. 

One incentive for private investors 
to hold onto their shares is that they 
will incur tax penalties if they sell 
within six months of the offerina. 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

29S 

2850 

s y 

2550 ft 

® A S O N 

1996 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 


London Pads 

FTSE 100 Index CAC 40 

4500 2500 

4340 5530 J 

4180 , 22fo Ayr 

m rAr 217:1 n 

3560 v m / 


Helsinki 

Oslo 

London 

Madrid 

MBan 

Parts 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Source: Tolekurs 


1997 1995 

Index 

EOE 

BEL-20 

DAX 

Stock Market 
HEX General 
~OBX ' 

FTSE 100 
Stock Exchange 
MIBTEL 
CAC 40 
SX 16 

ATX 

SPI 


1 D* 7 VV 

NO J t 'ASONDJ 

1997 

1996 

1997 

Tuesday 

Close 

Prev. 
Close ( 

% . 
Change 

657.83 

652.76 

+ 0.70 

1 , 991.50 

1 , 976.56 

+ 0.76 


2,948J8 2,954.95 -OJ21 
499.36 497,50 +0.37 

2 ^ 98^7 2 , 668.57 4 - 1.12 
561.75 561.38 40.07 

4,18820 4,107.30 +1X8 
464.12 464,16 -0.01 

12,080 JO 11,676.00+3.46 
2,402.14 2,361^7 +1.73 
2,627^6 2,597.81 +1.13 
1,163^3 1.167.43 -0^1 

2,555.41 2,549.31 +0.24 

Irncroiiijn-il HclXd TritrolK 


economist with Deutsche Morgan 
Grenfell. “There's a cultural prob- 
lem with private pension plans.’ ' 

The money invested in new pen- 
sions will benefit from tax breaks: Up 
to 5 percent of gross income invested 
in toe funds will be lax •deductible. 
Employers' contributions will be free 
of social-security contributions, up to 
a certain amount. Trade unions com- 
plained. saying fax breaks on private 
pensions would diven money from 
toe stale peasion system. 


Very brief iys 

• AHianz AG Holding offered to pay 385 Deutsche marks 
($2431 for each share outstanding of Hermes Kreditver- 
sicherungs AG, a loan insurer. as~ pan of an effort to tie up 
loose ends from the insurance concern's complicated share 
swap last year. 

• Siemens AG’s KWU Power Generation unit is open to 
‘‘intensified cooperation" with other power-plant makers, its 
chief executive. Adolf Huettl. said, but he refused to confirm 
or deny reports of a joint venture with Westinghouse Electric 
Corp. of toe United States. 

• British Airways PLC’s chief executive. Robert Ayling, 
said he remained confident that BA and AMR Corp.'s 
American Airlines could complete their alliance by the sum- 
mer despite disagreements with European regulators. 

• France’s finance minister. Jean Arthuis, said the gov- 
ernment would take action to make toe French banking system 
more secure and more competitive in 1997. 

• Industrial investment in toe European Union will only 

grow 2 percent this year, after a 3 percent expansion in 1996, 
a European Commission survey of business and consumer 
confidence indicated. Reuters. Bto.wthcrg. AFX. AFP 

German Industry Balks 

AFX News 

BONN — The Federation of German Industry on Tuesday 
dismissed Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s call for employers to cut 
overtime in favor of creating jobs, saying that other factors 
were involved in their decision to hire. 

Hans-Olaf Henkel, president of toe group, said he did not 
think that cutting overtime in favor of i new jobs was "a big 
opportunity” to combat joblessness, which, at 4.1 million 
people, hit a record in December. 


High Low CkKe Pro*. 

172 l69ft 171J0 171 

7B 77 78 77ft 

423-50 415 420-50 417 

JM 228 235ft 2» 

1143 1060 1135 106 S 

510 497 503 512 

318 309ft 317 310 

1W 195 197ft 195ft 
204ft 201ft 204 701ft 

280 Z 76 778ft 277 

IBB 1B3J0 186 188 

140 145 148 145 

69-50 68 69 68ft 

180 164 187ft 186 

309 303 307ft 306ft 

1SB 156 158 158 

174ft 121 124 122 

98 TO 96ft 96ft 
191 1B8J0 189 109ft 

154 145 ISri 153 

113 111 112 112 

165ft 140ft 165 159 

Ail Ofrfioerta: 241M6 
ProvitiB; 242230 

iflj ftO? tflS ao? 

7.96 7.92 7.93 7.95 

18X5 1836 I0L36 1X31 
3ft 3.41 145 148 

2110 23 2105 2110 

2ft 239 149 241 

12.17 12.13 12.13 1114 
1140 1330 1138 1138 
5J5 5 105 5-04 

074 630 6.70 6A6 

1933 1930 1935 1930 
4.45 4ft 443 4ft 
16£ 164 2-65 2-65 

3J3 120 337 122 

lAl 1X0 1ft 1-60 
1101 12X5 1101 13 

179 275 275 179 

24X0 ?40 9 24ft 24.09 
7.94 7X3 7X5 734 

1X7 1X2 1X4 1X2 

14X5 7443 >4 ft 14X4 
6X3 676 678 674 

3X0 174 179 174 

111 105 3X5 110 

173 3X5 173 3X4 

1X0 179 179 1X2 

5.11 <99 5X2 ill 

4.15 4X7 <10 4X7 

9.10 875 9X6 8.94 

871 8X8 8.14 873 

277 134 2-M 235 

774 7.19 7 ft 773 

9.71 9ft 9X5 9.72 

111 3X8 3X9 3X9 


The Trib Index 

Jan 1. 193T - lOO. Level Change % change year to data 

% change 

World Index 15100 +1.32 +088 +14.51 

Regional Indexes 

As&SPaafk. 7 1 16.34 -0 34 -079 -1 2 97 

Europe 161.93 +1-25 *0.7B +16.35 

N. America 169.70 +2-30 +1.37 +3259 

S. America 125.71 +360 +2.95 +41.78 

Industrial Indexes 

Capitol goods 177.56 +2.21 +1.26 +33.62 

Consumer goods 164.37 +2.53 +1.56 +19.05 

Energy 176 83 +1.48 +0 84 +30.39 

Finance 1 13.06 -0.05 -0.04 -1 1 .14 

Miscellaneous 162 00 *029 +0.18 +19.28 

Raw Materials 178.66 +1.12 +0 63 +25.99 

Service 138.99 +156 +0.91 +15.83 

Utilities 145.58 +1.49 +1.03 +14.50 

The (ntemaboria/ Herald Tribune WoM Stock Inde* C tracks the U.S. donor values of 
280 memedonallv Uwestabie tmm 25 onunmes For mom formation a tree 

OocAtof taavariahta by writing to The Tab kidet. 1 61 Avenue Charts s os GauA». 

2252 1 Afeuty Franco. Compiled by Btnomberg Business New. 


Stock Merkel tadec 713776 
Pmtoss:7189ft 
51ft SDXO 51 5050 

17B 176 176 177 

173 167 167 172 

2630 25X0 25XQ 2570 


175 100 

42X0 42ft 
145 148 

24X0 24X0 
83X0 84 

45X0 4460 


MuratoMtg 

NEC 

Niton 5 k 

Niiaendo 
Nipp Credit Bk 
NJpp EjpiBSi 
Nippon Ofl 
Nippon Pogw 
Nippon Sleet 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 

NTT 

Oboyrohl 

sSfejjL* 

UTKJ rnuiui 

Osaka Gas 

Rtoti 

SakuraBk 

Samoa 

ScnwaBank 

Sanyo Elec 

Secom 

SeUwRwy 

Sehlsul House 

Seven-Eleven 

Sharp 

Srtmtou 

Shta-rtsuOi 

ShtooknBk 

Sony 

Sumitomo 

Sumitomo 8* 

SumHCbem 

SumhomoEtac 

SutiritMeW 

Sumtl Tnis) 

TaBel 

Tabho Phaim 
Trt-Mlo Chero 
TDK 

ToholuBPw 
ToMBonk 
TiAta Marine 
Tokyo El Pwr 
TofcynGflS 
Tt*yu 
Tonen 
Twpon Print 
Tony i no 
Toshiba 
TayaSdten 
TayoTrua 
ToypJo Motor 
YamaKNSec 
VamanawH 
Yasudo Rre 
Yaspdo Trail 


High Lew i 
3790 3700 
1300 1 350 
800 774 

am 7940 

259 244 

736 717 

570 552 

553 512 

m 1 93 

511 484 

UO £52 
229 
1570 1520 
a seta 8340o 
733 691 

664 646 

3200 3090 

305 294 

SHU ISO 
744 690 

3050 2980 

1540 1440 

435 
6500 6400 

XKn 3800 
1130 1090 

6670 6550 

1550 1«0 

777 73a 

2040 2C30 

1100 1 060 
7480 7290 

940 900 

7550 1430 

443 410 

1600 1580 

259 240 

TO9 935 
550 536 

7730 2520 

2290 2170 

7330 7070 

2230 2150 

7020 939 

1030 1000 

2450 2350 

303 294 

S99 560 

1290 1MO 
1380 1200 

710 654 

708 m 
2650 2440 

025 7B0 

3240 3040 

489 475 

2250 2200 

555 533 

417 395 


Nmmdolnr 
Norten Energy 
Nth era Telecorn 
Nowj 
O ne* 

Ponato PelUn 
Petra Ota 
Placer Dome 
Paco Petto 
Potash Sask 
Ftenoisrona 
NJoAigom 
Rogers CairdB 
SamramCo 
Shell CUnA 
Slone Consota 
Suncor 
Tartarian Eny 
TecAS 
Tefcgtobe 
Tetos 
Thomson 
TorDora Bank 
Transana 
Tranftoa Pipe 
Trimark F7rn 
TtuecHohn 
TVXGold 
Wesiooasl Eny 
Weston 


Vienna 


High Low i 

32X5 31.90 

31.90 31fc 
95*» 94Vj 

13 12.90 

23X5 22.95 
52ft 52X5 
21 40 21* 

20.95 27X5 
<4X5 m 
119k, 117V3 
4935 40ta 
34.15 33.90 
2Bta 27ta 
56ft 54X0 
S3* 52.90 

21.90 21ft 

59.90 aw 
48+ 47X5 

3035 30 

39.90 39W 

19.90 191* 
29W 29.10 
35.45 34X5 

77 76X0 
23X5 23X5 
42ta 42.40 
30X0 30.10 
10.10 9>n 

23ft a»s 

74 72.10 


ATX Index: 7761X3 

Prevtaos: 1167X3 


Ausr AWnes 

IW7 

7681 

1640 

7640 

Bne+UnGcess 

693 68650 

690 

£88 

Bund Vers pin 

414 

414 

490 

490 

CredHansl Pfd 

49350 

480 

481.90 

496 

EA -Generali 

3220 

3180 

3210 

3165 

EVN 

law 

M7J 

1891 

1690 

irawunfnii 

N.T. 

N.T. 

M.T. 

1475 

Lernfng 

67350 

664 

673ft 

666 

Leyknm 

275 

271 

274 

274ft 

MavMIAeWwi 

S92 

581 

590 

593 

OMV 

1 297J0 1275.10 

72S7IXM.95 

OestBrau 

806 

782 

79S 

7B4 

OestElrtiriz 

818 815.10 

816 819ft 

VATech 

1765.90 

1740 

17451751.95 

WieneitMgcr 

2093 

2079 

2079 

3084 


Wellington Nzse-MindeaTeKji 

rlWlHftl 2401X9 


994 995 

2510 2540 

3520 3500 
1530 1S50 

3630 3640 

1090 1090 
1060 UU0 
3178 3808 
1800 1830 
455 & 

SSS 541 
5440 5500 

535 550 

3850 3MB 
730 73? 

2310 2290 
1290 1290 
295 297 

7450 74ft 
719 713 

1030 1100 
229 230 

058 090 

527 535 

7270 7310 

2230 22ft 
545 549 

454 451 

1780 1820 

1750 1790 

102C 96? 

1070 1060 

352 3S0 

668 672 

1220 lift 
075 BS9 
074 870 

7410 1430 

ffiO 

lift 1000 

791 792 


Toronto 

AMtot Price 
Afbcrffl Energy 
Aten Alum 
AMtfsonExpl 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nova Salta 
Barrie* Gold 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 

BtadwmPTWm 

B om banner B 

BtosconA 

Bre-n Minerals 

Garaear 

CIBC 

Can Nall RoH 

Con Nd ReS 

CimOaiilPB 

CdnPoemc 

Comma) 

□otascQ 

Duraw 

DpiwftoeA 

DuParaCdDA 

EuroNwMng 

FnirfauRnl 

Fatonbridge 

FfeteiwCtaBA 

Fronea Nevada 

GuJfCdaRes 

Imperial 09 

Inca 

iPLEnerav 

Laid low B 

Laewen Grroa 

lAaanBBIdl 

MoanoirfflA 

Meramw 

Moore 

ffewhrtjgsfttt 


TSE Industrials: 60S4X6 
Prettaes: 6M7X0 

60 2320 2316 2115 

30 32.15 3?U 3216 

90 48X5 48.78 40X5 
10 17X0 17X0 17.90 
|ta 4120 43X5 4310 
P* 4520 45X0 45.10 
05 35Vi 3145 36X0 

Sta £6X0 67.95 6620 

30 2915 2916 79ft 

73 73J0 67’i 

60 24X5 24X5 24X0 
90 30X0 31.90 30ft 
24 22ft 2128 21X5 
» 57W 58.70 57.15 

VA 5745 S70S 5738 
IW 50X0 57% 5000 

ft 37Vi 38X0 38.15 
ft 73.95 700 261S 
95 3535 3£ta 35.TO 
35 35X0 35 

PC 25ft 2fl« 25* 
!ta 12ft 12*6 lift 
ft 2640 7690 2630 

31 30ta 31 31 

37 36V; 3665 3735 

H 296 290 W 

I’* 29ft 30.15 29.90 
40 2230 TLX TLX 
« 57 57X0 57.90 

05 1)35 11X5 >135 
95 6214 6190 63X0 

35 4180 46ta 4170 
V? 4010 4030 40H 

B5 17X5 17* 17X5 

20 4F.90 X 50 
90 18ft 1090 1060 
B0 75M 7ax5 75X0 
SS 13X5 1345 13lft 
30 27ft 27ft 27ft 
£0 4430 46.18 45.10 


AlrNZMWB 

2.90 

2X4 

2X4 

7X4 

Brterty linrl 

>35 

133 

135 

IT) 

Carter HoltonJ 

132 

330 

330 

330 

FeriK 

5.00 

4.99 

S2» 

.5X0 

RsherPoykei 

175 

566 

5.6H 

5.75 

FC Forest 

235 

233 

234 

234 

Goodman Fdw 

1.78 

1.77 

i.n 

1.78 

inoep News 

6.90 

635 

6X5 

695 

UonNethon 

156 

155 

355 

155 

Nol Gas note 

129 

237 

238 

7.77 

NZRefWno 

M.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

29X0 

TrtecomNZ 

7X4 

7X0 

7X3 


was«i Hutton 

11X5 

11X0 

11X0 

11X5 


Zurich 

Adecco B 

AlusuhseR 

Ares-SeranaB 

BateseHogR 

ABBB 

BK viskn 

BofiSB 

CS HoWIngsR 

EtektrawrilB 

FbdwrB 

Hilti PC 

HeWanunfcB 

JuL BaerHdflB 

Nestle R 

Novartis R 

OerSkoaR 

PargesaHidB 

PtwrmVtenB 

PtrreUta 

RoCKHOgPC 

S8CR 

ScmndierB 

5G5fl 

SMHB 

SuberR 

Sates Retaft 

SwbaakR 

UB5B 

vraora Hog 8 

Winterthur R 

Zurich AsswR 


SPI todec2S5sxi 
Prevtaos; 251931 

378 370 375 

118 1118 1130 

310 1315 1315 

t6M 2705 26» 
653 I £58 1655 
TIB 730 725 

925 1930 1935 
435 134JS 13475 
535 535 536 

430 1435 1435 
891 902 B95 

«8 998 1007 

«4 1410 1407 

455 1464 1452 

SSft 15ft 1561 
136 137 137.75 

470 1472 1475 
«0 625 620 

197 199 200 

1690 10740 1Q73S 
247 25030 24835 
480 1490 1480 

Q30 3250 3390 

854 863 864 

837 638 

384 1397 1390 
130 1138 114« 

U5 1156 1154 
270 278 269 

774 778 77? 

L50 365JO 363ft 


































































































































PAGE 15 





Official’s Words Cal 
Tokyo Stock Storm 


1 NTEBKATIONAL HE KALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY JANUARY 15, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 

Australia’s Jittery Carmakers 

• rh<wi torm arViino that competition would 


Investor’s Asia 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 


By Sheryl WuDunn 

New York Tunes Service 


TOKYO — • Japan’s finance, min- 
ister seemed to reassure the stock 
market Tuesday, saying the Finance 
Ministry would watch the market . 
with serious concern after shares 
plunged in early trading. 

The fall of about 3 percent in the 
main index initially erased more than 
half of the gain made Monday, when 
the benchmark Nikkei Stock Av- 
erage partly recovered from its stag- 
gering losses of last week. But the 
market recovered on Finance Min- 
ister Hiroshi Mitsuzuka’s remarks, 
and the Nikkei average. closed at 
1 8,093.13. down just 25.66 points. 
On Monday, me; Nikkei average 




v»u mvmunjr, uic^niun average 
soared 815.14 points to close at 
1 8,1 1 8.79, up almost 5 percent from 
Friday. Those gains fizzled in early 
trading Tuesday, however, after an 
official of die Economic Planning 
Agency acknowledged the risks of a 
market decline, saying it would have 
a “bad effect cm banks.” 

He added, however, that “at this 
current moment, I am optimistic aid 
think the effects of a stock dectine. 
will be limited.'' 

Although Monday's gain offered 
some hope that the market was set- 
ding down, it was clear Tuesday 
morning that the conditions that 
helped bring about last week's 
plunge, which pushed the Nikkei 
index down more than 10 percent, 
still existed. 

Japan’s economic outlook for 
remains dull, a rise in the na- 


tional sales tax is expected to crimp 
consumption, and budget-tighten- 
ing by die government will nob 
public spending. Prime Minister 
Ryutaro Hashimoto’s * ‘Big Bang,” 
or plan to dereguiatefxnahcial mar- 
kets, als« has raised concern about 
the financial industry's ability to 
withstand new competition. 

Moreover, risky Japanese invest- 
ment funds seem to have influenced 
the wild mark et swings of recent 
days. Thus, analysts said, tbe market 
could -see more such volatility in 
coming weeks. These so-called bull 
and bear funds use index futures to 
make a gg ressive bets ou the mar- 
ket’s movements. Since their intro- 
duction two years ago, these funds 
have expanded to control more than 
400 billion yen ($3.44 billion) 

TV. nf riu A unrp cciv 


Reuters 

ADELAIDE —Tbe Australian car industry is at a 
crossroads: The country’s four major carmakers have 
plans to invest more than 4 billion AusnaltandoU^s 
($312 billion) in local operations, but they are 
nervously awaiting the government s response to a 

M^^Co^md General Motors Corp- tove 
warned they may scrap their plans for additional 
Australian manufacturing operations if the govern- 

futoreofdte industry in Australia will depart™ 
government’s commitment to fstslance — Kpeciahy 

ariff levels, export support and camcmK: raonrn 
Australian sales of iew vehicles rose 1 percent, 
UifiSTin 1996 from 1995. ^emdusuy s 
umbrella group said sales were expected to fall 3 
in 1997 The Federal Chamber of Automotive 
ESS Sd^hSd^ed at. 1980s levels 
despite a 20 percent rise in the population. 

The group said there woe few hopes for any major 


increase in the short term, addmg that com^uuona^ild 
intensify as cheaper imports became available, bnports 
took 46.4 percent of the Australian market m 1996 
Die Federal Chamber of 

domestic vehicle production fed !0 /*°ut “1 

1996. from 377.000 units m 1985. while the number of 
models produced fell to five from 1 j. 

Benefiting from the new global approach of toeu 
corporate parents, the Australian units of Genf^ 
Motors and Mitsubishi have made heavy investments 

in models aimed at export markets. 

General Motors-Holden’s Aui^pnve ^...wtoch 
has announced a five-year, 1.4 bilhon-dollar u*est- 
mou program, is to become the regional source for 
GM’s new Vectra model. Mitsubishi’s lo ^, ope T?. t1 ^ 
introduced a new engine last year. u ^ ch 
supplied to the parent company in Japan. The company 
also plans to export 25.000 Magna sedans a yearfrom 
Australia, following a 525 milhon-^l^ mvea^L 

Ford, meanwhile, is investing 1 billion ^ oUa |? “ 
produce a new Falcon model for the local 
while Toyota Motor Corp. has ^ ^20 ™lbon 
dollars on a new plant, pan of L 2 tuition dollars ' 
says it is investing from now until -WU. 


Hong Kong Singapore 

Hang Seng Straits Times 

15G00 — 

14000 -• 

13909- 

12000 - 

nooor^- — - — 2060 . 



Excising© index 

Hong Kong Hang Seng 
Singapore 


Tuesday 
dose Close Change 

13 ,293.87 13.289^1 +0. 0* 

~~2j215.5a 2.232.40 


Straits Times 

AflOrcfinsries _ 

18,093.13 is-imrajaH 


2,419.40. 2,422^0 -.“frig 


kuaJalumpurCtyifO^B 

SET 


1.211.04 1.220. 38 -0-7 7 
-1.85 



S*,oi.: Composite Index 68559 

t^T Stock Rterket Index 7,137 JB 7.189 .47 -Og g 

'■ r| ■ • ■ 1 ■■■■ nd r • ft 'OR 


•Astute 


PSE 


Jakarta Composite Index 656.SS 


3J261.72 3,270. 31 

+0d» 


ru-viiuuu jwui 

The largest of tbe aggressive bull _ _ 

funds, operated by Daiwa Securities ‘ . A . 

Toyota Sees Future Away From Autos 

equ^strategist at Jardme. Fleming — — »- * ■» Tnvora nlans to concentrai 

Securities LtiinTokyo. “ Sentiment 
is so powerful in the market, and it’s 
not that camected to valuation.” 

Investors have always had dif- 
ficulty evaluating the financial con- 
ditions of Japanese banks and 
brokerage firms, which have tra- 
ditionally disclosed much less fi- 
nancial information than their 
American counterparts. Japan’s 
thinly capitalized banks are still 
burdenedby several hundred billion 
dollars in bad real-estate loans, and 
it was those banks that bore the bnmt 
of the marke t sell-off last week. 


Caf^hOurSuBFnmttbpwOia 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor 
Coip. plans to generate profit from 
sources outside its core automot- 
ive business, notably in housing 
and Cf lty/rnim iminarinns, by 2000, 
Hiroshi Okuda, the company's 
president, said Tuesday. 

Mr. Okuda said that Japan s top 
autom aker hoped to raise the ratio 
of these new businesses to 10 per- 
cent of its overall sales by that date. 
In the year to March.31. nonauto 
areas accounted for just 22 per- 


cent of Toyota’s sales of 7.96 tril- 
lion yen ($68 J billion). 

“Ef you look back in history, 
there hasn’t been a single industry 
fhar continued to be profitable for 
more than 40 to 60 years.” Mr. 
Okuda said. “We aren’t bold 
enough to think the auto industry is 
immortal.” . , 

Toyota already has three tele- 
communications subsidiaries, and 
Mr. Okuda said the company was 
seeking strategic partners for glob- 
al expansion. 


Toyota plans to concentrate its 
efforts in the housing sector in 
Japan. If that effort fails, it will 
spin off the business, he said. 
Toyota also is producing leisure 
boats and aircraft engines. 

Mr. Okuda also said Toyota could 
not generate sufficient profit if the 
doUar weakened to 95 yen, as it did m 
1995. He said an appropriate dollar 
rate for Japan’s economic funda- 
mentals would be between 100 and 
110 yen: it was at 116.85 yen late 
Tuesday. (AP. AFX. Bridge News) 


Wellington WZSE-40 


Bombay Sensfcve Index 


656.09 
2.406.21 2,401.® 

3.467.40 3,453.16 


Source: Tetekurs 


Very briefly: 


to 



CALOR. RDWENTA. SEB. TEFAL 

1906 PRELIMINARY CONSOLIDATED SALES 

i — 


1996 _ 19960995 
fFRE minion*) (%) 


France 

Germany 

Other European countries 

NAFTA (USA - Canada - ModeoJ 

Other countries - 

Total' 


3,070 

LD60 

2JS90 

1.530 

1,615 

9,865 


-1 
-12 
— . 

+ 11 
+ 91 

+ 8 


Sales in the countries of the- European Union totalled 
FRF 6,390 million. 


t week. I 

BOEING: Chief Executive Wants Merged Company to Listen Up 

_ . ^ ^mnv’c culture, and shared more among employ- regulators J°"cemed al 


. j ^ d their comoanv’s culture, and shared more among employ- 

Contmned from Page 11 ^ ees ta idiffereni td«n« 

ees, in particular, have been * ' aceSj^h, but Mr. Condit 

through* lot f01 ^You^ reS&ling yourself if has shbwn he has an idea or 

gbnmicks aimed at shifting SfewDI two about ge^g« done. For 

behave as an integrated unit,” 

l. ‘‘TKmi ninn’t.” 



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he said. “They won’t 

But he does want real 
listening to occur more often. 
He routinely dresses down for 
trips to die shop floor because 
hefinds that when he is wear- 
ing a suit and tie, discussions 
take longer to get going. 

“Most of us in conversa- 
tions spend a lot of time for- 
mulating in our minds what 

we want to tell somebody else 

and not very much time 
listening,' ’ he said. 


example, when the Til pro- 
gram required a new building, 
be insisted it be built with es- 
calators as well as elevators. 

People talk more on escal- 
ators, he said, and they are 

more likely to travel one or two 

flights to other departments if 
they do not have to wait for an 
elevator. His goal, he said, was 
to “make a multistory building 
behave Ike a big single-story 
building.” 

Even without the merger, 
which is still subject to ap- 

_ _ a • 1 J 


regulators concerned about 
possible anti-competitive ef- 
fects, Mr. Condil has his 
hands full. He admits that 
Boeing mishandled union 
talks in 1 995 with a poor com- 
munications job that failed to 
avert a strike. Since then, the 
company has set aside about 
SI billion in stock forpossible 
navmer\t to employees begin- 
ning in July 1998 if its share 
price hits certain targets. 

Mr. Condit said the com- 
pany had chosen a stock pro- 
gram to create a sense of 

“shared destiny' ' rather than a 

profit-sharing plan because in 
the aerospace business, profit 
could be good in years when 
foe company was not doing so 


• Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. will 

consumer appliances to high-technology im ’ "JXthe 

improving profit- The company. which 

National; Iconic and Technics brands,^ 

such as semiconductors as well as informanon-technoiogy 

products including optical disks and mobile phones. 

• Thailand's cabinet approved a series of - m . 

over the financing of problem projects. 

• The Bank of Thailand plans to rase the foragn-inv^mt 
ceilfog forbad and finarWe companies to 40 percent from 25 

• Siunrtomo Corp.'s former chief copper trader. YasuoHa- 
mamk"* chareed with fraud in connection with muiubilhon- 
SStotaSHta tSorized trades, will face trial next 

month, Kyodo News reported. 

• Faber Group Bhd„ a Malaysian property and hotel coro- 

nl^Vto seU a 61— percent stake m the property 
developer Cirpriani Sdn. to Ikatanbina Sdn„ a privately 
held (rompany^for 1 83.3 million ringgit 


“ -T — which is still subject to ap- tne company — 

provS by rimreholdm and by wel, b y o,her — s. 


U.S.- Japan Pacts Get Poor Marks 

Washington Post Sen'icr 

effortsto open Japan’s market over the past 16 years, saying 
S fcweXn one- third of U.S.-J^anese mde 

m sienificantiy increased sales of U.5». prooui-is. 
^SpSid as ‘‘successful’; 
icanCh amber of Commerce in Japan wewalgW i 
cellular phones and the semicondurior awords of 1986 ^and 
199f . Among those rated as “unsucc^sful were 1994 
agreements on insurance, construction and apples. 


I 




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PAGE 18 


WE DIVES DAY, JAW ARV 15. 1997 


World Roundup 


Graf Awaits Verdict 

German prosecutors demanded a 
jaiJ term of six years and nine 
months Tuesday for the father of 
Steffi Graf, the world's No. 1 wo- 
men’s tennis player. They accused 
Peter Graf of trying to evade 19.2 
million Deutsche marks fSl2 mil- 
lion) in tax on his daughter's earn- 
ings between 1989 and 1993. Graf s 
lawyer will make a closing state- 
ment in the next few days. A verdict 
is expected Jan. 24. ( Reiners ) 

Big Loss for Barcelona 

soccer Barcelona wasted a 2-0 
lead Monday night to lose. 3-2, to 
struggling Hercules, Barcelona's 
defeat by a team that had not gained 
a single point in the Spanish first 
division away from home this sea- 
son shocked Barcelona fans, who 
screamed abuse at the team's 
coach. Bobby Robson. ( Reuters ) 

Norwegian Wins Race 

skiing Kjetil Andre Aamodt of 
Norway captured the men's World 
Cup giant slalom Tuesday, dock- 
ing a total of 2 minutes 23.52 
seconds ar Adelboden. Switzer- 
land. Michael Von Gruenigen. who 
led after the first run. made a series 
of mistakes on the second run for a 
2:23.69 total. Andreas Schifferer of 
Austria was third at 2:23.96. (API 

Odds Favor Packers 

football The Las Vegas book- 
makers have made the Green Bay 
Packers a I3!£- to 14-point favorite 
when they play the New England 
Patriots on Jan. 26 in the Super 
Bowl. (.AP) 

For the Record 

• The British yachtsman Tony 
Bullimore. who was rescued Jan. 9 
by the Australian Navy, was re- 
ported to be in good spirits Tuesday 
after surgery on a finger injured 
during his five-day ordeal at sea. 

• Robert Irsay. 73. the owner of 
the Indianapolis Colts, died Tues- 
day. more than a year after a 
massive stroke. 

• Kenny Dalglish has been 
named Kevin Keegan's successor 
as manager of the English Premier 
League club Newcastle United. 

• Juventus, the European soccer 
champion, will be without its Croa- 
tian striker. Alen Boksic, for two 
months after tests revealed a se- 
rious ankle injury. ( Reuters . AP) 



Cyclist’s Cancer Fight 
Takes a Hopeful Turn 

Armstrong Resumes Serious Tr aining 


By Samuel Abt 

Imernoikmal Herald Tribune 


fit enough, everything considered. 

“We rode about -120 kilometers yes- 
terday.” he reported. ‘‘I enjoy ndmg. Now 
it’s physically easier. I teel stronger. 

Stronger, not strong.” 

When he returns to Texas, he wiU con- 
centrate on weight training. “I m going io 


P ARIS — His numbers are good and it’s physically easier. I teel stronger- 
getting better, and so is he, Lance Stronger, not strong. ... 

Armstrong said happily here Tues- When he returns to Texas, , 
day- centime on weight training. * I m going to 

By “numbers,” the 25-year-old Amer- staitMon^yasiflwerestarunsyi 
ican bicycle racing star meant his markers ber or December, go back anct . i y... 
— the protein count in his blood that sig- typical off-season trai^g. sr^^^ - 

nifies how his battle against cancer is pro- mg,” he said. ' Then I U work on the aer- 
gressing. obic engine.” . „ 

“They’re down to three,” he said. While he remains in Texas, the another 
“Three from a high of 90.000.” Zero Cofidis rider; will be starting their season 
means the body is free of cancer. —first with a training camp in the soura or 

His “numbers” also mean the odds iha* France and then in races in rebnraiy. 
he will live and overcome the spread of When the riders trooped on stage to oe 
testicular cancer to his abdomen, lungs and presented oik by one, the Texan wot the 


Frank Ti i»L» b u n»*nw A^idrird IW 


Chanda Rubin of the United States during her victory Tuesday over Radka Zrubakova m Melbourne. 

Hit-and-Miss Capriati Bows Out 


he wiU live and overcome the spread of When the riders trooped on stage row 
testicular cancer to his abdomen, lungs and presented one by one, the Texan wot the 
brain. The cancer was diagnosed late in loudest ovation. His illness and recovery 
September, Armstrong immediately under- have been major news in Euro pe. es jjecialiy 
went an operation to remove the malignant France, where he has distinguished himself 
testicle and then began 12 weeks of chemo- in the Tour de France by winning two 
therapy, which ended in mid-December.. stages. . 

“At the end of die last treatment, I asked Wearing a white baseball cap to mask me 


my doctor, ‘If I was 50-50 before, where am 


St3 W earing a white baseball cap to mask the 
two scars that brain surgery left on his 


I now?’ He said 80-20. And that’s a month hairless head, Armstrong answered ques- 


tions through an interpreter. 

In which race did he expect to return to 
competition? 

“Any rare.” he said. “It depends what 
die doctors say.” 

He returned to this theme later when a 
television interviewer asked him how long he 


By Robin Finn 

Nnv York Times Scnicc 

MELBOURNE — Jennifer 
Capriati's comeback trail hit another 
Grand Slam roadblock on Tuesday 
at the Australian Open, an event she 
had not visited since 1 993. 

Assigned to Court 3. Melbourne 
Park's version of purgatory, Capriati 
had a hellish time as she toiled on the 
fringes of this ever-expanding prop- 
erty. Freight trains rumbled by on the 
adjacent railroad tracks, coveys of 
crows cackled overhead, and across 
the net. 78th-ranked Jolene 
Watanabe played a coy, conserva- 
tive match and let Capriati dig her 
own grave with 69 unforced errors. 

Watanabe. a 28-year-old Califor- 
nian, simply kept the ball within 
bounds and let Capriati hit-and-miss 
her way to a 6-2. 3-6, 6-4 defeat in a 
tournament in which Capriati had 
reached the quarterfinals during her 
untrammeled teenage years in 1992 
and 1993. 

“I'm not going to let this dis- 
cour age me. make me think I can’t 
play anymore; l have enough desire 
to want to reach my potential still.” 
said Capriati, who is 20. 

She then fell apart during her 
news conference when asked if she 


sensed how badly her fans wanted 
her to succeed in this second life on 
the tennis stage that anointed her a 
star at 13 and contributed to ber 
despair and disillusionment at 17. 

The day went more smoothly, for 
fourth-seeded Martina Hingis, who 
defeated Capriati in the Sydney final 
last Saturday, and seventh-seeded 
Lindsay Davenport, who was upset 
by Capriati at that same event 

Ensconced in the stadium court 
Hingis dismissed Barbara Rittner of 
Germany. 6-1, 7-5, and Davenport 
roused herself from a slow start and 
ousted 76th-ranked Nathalie Dechy. 
4-6. 6-1. 6-1. 

Like Davenport fifth-seeded 
Anke Huber, last year’s runner-up, 
had an awkward beginning, but she 
managed an 0-6, 6-2, 7-5 comeback 
against 31 st-ranked Amy Frazier. 

No. 2 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario. a 
1994 and 1995 finalist in the Aus- 
tralian. squeezed out a 6-4. 6-4 vic- 
tory over Italy's Gloria Pizzichini. 

Capriati found herself trailing, 6- 
2.3-1. before she buckled down and 
used her ground strokes to over- 
whelm Watanabe. whose 1 1 double 
faults gave Capriati several windows 
of opportunity during the match. 

But when she fell behind by 4- 1 in 
the third set after a double fault 



BUSINE 

SS MESSAGE 

CENTER 




Capriati was too nervous to make the 
kind of comebacks she achieved 
against Davenport and Chanda Ru- 
bin in Sydney. 

When Watanabe served for the 
match at 5-4, Capriati saved 2 match 
points but misfired yet again and 
netted a ball on the thud. 

“1 think I was nervous, and by the 
time I started loosening up, it was too 
late.” she said. 

Top-ranked Pete Sampras had 
never heard of Dinu Pescriu, his 
opening-round opponent, but he did 
not let the 169th-ranked Romanian 
qualifier use the element of surprise 
in their stadium court encounter 
Sampras, the champion here in 1 994. 
demolished his underqualified chal- 
lenger. 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. 

No. 1 1 seed Jim Courier, the 1 992 
and 1993 winner, let a 5-2 lead slip 
away in the final set before pre- 
vailing 6-7 f4-7), 6-3, 4-6. 6-1. 8-6 
over Dutch player Sjeng Schalken in 
four hours. 

Among the other seeded players to 
advance were No. 3 Goran Ivanisevic, 
who trounced the Australian Ben Ell- 
wood. 6-2, 7-5, 6-3. and No. 9 Mar- 
celo Rios of Chile, a 7-6 (7-4), 6-3, 6- 
3 winner against Petr Korda. 

(For more results, see Score- 
board. Page 19\ 


Despite die improvement, Armstrong In which race i 
makes no secret of his feelings. “It’s competition? 
scary,’’ he said. “The longer I’m away “Any rare,” b 
from my exams, the morel get worried till I the doctors say.” 
see the doctor again. It's such a relief when He retuned to 

he says, ‘You’re getting well.’ ” television imervie' 


His next visit to his doctor in Indianapolis expected to be away from bicycle racing. 


is scheduled Feb. 10. Armstrong, who was 
in Paris for die formal presentation of bis 
new Cofidis team, planned to fly home to 
Texas on Wednesday. 


H E ARRIVED in Europe last 
Thursday and has spent his days 
meeting his Dew teammate s, rene- 
gotiating his contract and resuming serious 
training. Until he began riding hard again in 
Florida late in December, he had not been 
training since he ended his season last 
September. 

“On the bike. I’ve never had to suffer as 
I did in the last few weeks,” Armstrong 
said. “I tried to ride through the chemo- 
therapy but I had to ride slow and to go just 
that speed would hurt. That was a big ad- 
justment. 

“And off the bike, of course, there were 
many. many, many adjustments to make, 
just mentally, knowing you were fighting 
for your life.” 

His new team is based in France and 
includes three other American veterans of 
the extinct Motorola squad: Kevin Liv- 
ingston. Bobby Jutichand Frankie Andreu. 
They said Tuesday that Armstrong seemed 


“Six months, a year,” he said. “Maybe 
forever, living is more important than ra- 
ting.” 


✓v. • 


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Li:;.'./-!/ •: 


1 ! ■'- *' fflll V ** 

Lance Armstrong mftis Cofidis capu 


972.8.77(8294. 
etcanAfcora. C 


jVwwwJwJoHsrg- 


SOH GO S0HG 0 GAS 
TO ELECTRICITY PROJECT 

Provision Tetecorrmrirafon Savins 
(Contucf No. J4S4-105J 

tavMton tor PicquMcriton 

1) Soups, a Tsnzanan Company whose 
principal shareholder wii be 0TC 
(Odd Tanzania tac. and TCPL Tata- 
ria he.). TANESC0 [Tanzania Bectoe 
Supply Company), TP DC [Tanzania 
Patraian DevSopmert CorparaUn) 2 nd 
varraas ntrftKateraf faring agencies 
intends io pre-quaHy contractors to 
provide tetecommuucaion services tor 
he Sorgo Stngo Gas to BeCMty Pro- 

S on a urikey basis. 0TC, assisted by 
swai. Is acting as Pfqed Manager 
tor hs work on betel d Songas. 

2) The Project irwotes the transpofafon 
of processed natural ass troro a gas 
fieri, to the viohity <3 Sorgo Sorgo 
(stand, to the dry ol Dai es Salaam, 
soma 230 km north ol the island (or 
power generation and other ndustnsf 
appficaftns. 

3) TetecoromuKaton services required 
mdudfl the provision ol mobile radio 
coverage along die pipaiie right of way, 
mice, urea and faesnife c anmfc ai omi 
between the gas processing plant on 
Songo Songo Island, the power 
gener a to r plant at Ubungo near Dares 
Satoam and Songas head office In Oar 
es Salaam. The proposed system may 
be a terrestrial ratio system, a satekte 
based Syrian or a combnahon ol terres- 
trial and satefite lacftes. Significant 
current and internati on a l experience wtt 
microwave and smefoe systems a a 
mrnnum reotfemert lor preouafiferitoa 

4) Copies ol the Preoualificaban 
Requieniens document wffl be askable 
lo interested companies on or about 
January id. 1997 and w« be farwanied 
on recant of a written request (mat 
courier, tax or E-mai) at the Wtowng 
address; 

0TC. da 

TclecoRstdl LMM 
*2091100 UelviBe Street 
tfanamr, B.a 
VttdM 
Tet WW01-3QM 
Far 601687-7289 

Warner. gvarriuntwgQtriworsriLnni 

Attention: Hr. G. van dsn Berg 

5) AppOcados met be dearty marked 
Prequalfcaton for Provtson ol Rato 
System, System integration, end 
Tetecommuneaion Services (Contract 
No. J494-I0S) and shal be received at 
the above address no taler dan 1&fl0 
fun toed one on Fstnvary 7, 1S7 

0TC. A Joint Venfae Between TCPL 
Tanzarw Inc. and Ocetol Tanzania Inc. 
TCPL 


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By Rob Hughes 

Special to rhe Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Trying a> pnt a lid on soccer 
corruption is like trying to trap odious 
vapor in a colander. The poison seeps 

ouL 

On Monday, coinciding with the start of a 
court trial into alleged match-rigging at th e 
top of the English professional game, UEFA, 
soccer’s European governing body, stated: 

Vantaob Point 

“UEFA is determined to fight corruption - — 
rest assured we will react to any attempt to 
harm the game or to bring it into disrepute.” 
Gerhard Aigner, the general-secretary who 
made that pledge, knows UEFA's hands- are 
full Day by day, the values of the game lose a 
little to the ruthlessness of business. Crooks 
move in on soccer’s money bags like pick- 
pockets to an open wallet, and they have a 30- 
year start on UEFA’s two-man special in- 
vestigating committee, formed 1 1 months ago 
to sniff out corrupters. 

Where should the secret investigators be 
this week? 

• Winchester Crown Court, south of Lon- 
don, began Tuesday die expected eight-week 
jury trial of Bruce Grobbelaar, Hans Segexs, 
John Fashanu and Heng Suan Urn on charges 
that they accepted or gave bribes to throw 
English first-division matches. 

Grobbelaar and Segers are goalkeepers. 
Grobbelaar was bora in Zimbabwe and Segers 
in the Netherlands. Fashanu was a center- 
forward, originally from Nigeria. Iim is a 
Malaysian businessman accused of providing 
$65 ,000 for Grobbelaar to let Newcastle United 
score and beat Liverpool, his former team, m 
1993 so that a betting syndicate in die Far East 
could beat die pools. That, and all other al- 
legations, are denied by the four defendants. 

The case, and the inevitable sullying of 
soccer’s image, continues. 

• France, meanwhile, awaits even moire 
incriminating outpourings of the Marseille 
affair. Bernard Tapie, former Socialist politi- 


[*? Kli-^ ■ ill HE H3] !»'■ SSEl Mw B teTil-jl: Liii 


football club, threatens to bring the game 
down with him. 

His presidency of Olympique Marseille 
brought France the glory of its first European 
Cup in 1993 and, almost overnight, the re- 


moval oi wai iropny wnea rum was dis- 
qualified following evidence of bribes to 
players of Valenciennes to “go easy” in a 
league match against Marseille. 

Marseille, subsequently spared bankruptcy 
when the city fathers and regional powers 
bankrolled $50 million in debts, is rising 
again. Tapie, now accused of spreading $20 
million over systematic match-rigging, 
threatens. Samson-like, to pull down the pil- 
lars of French soccer. 

“Everything that existed before me is sriH 
going on,” T&pie exclaimed when the report of 


Pierre Phdipon, the examining magistrate who 
has dipped for four years into Marseille's cor- 
ruption, was partly leaked last weekend. 

Tapie is expected to be back in court in May. 
“I intend,” he warns, “naming all the per- 
sonalities in trench football,” including club. 
It is a change of tune. Before this, Tapie swore 
his innocence, blamed Paris politicians for 
trying to besmirch Marseille ana socialism aiuf 
claimed it was aB a conspiracy. 

Most ofLvyhaL UEFA . knows is throagh 
media reports, but at least the authority looks 
for the facte: Artemi o Franchi, a previous 
UEFA president, threatened to sue invest- 
igative reporters. 

• Portugal is another hotbed of allegations. 
What started this winter with published in- 
sults between high officials has led to specific 
claims against Jorge Nuno Pinto da Costa, the 
most powerful man in Portuguese sports. 

BBs club. Porto, is a quarterfinalisr in the 
UEFA Champions’ League. His re ig n as pres- 
ident of .Porto and head of the Portuguese 
league and the referees commission leads to 
periodic accusations of vested interests. 

However, Fernando Buraia, a hotelier who 
once presided at the Farense club, has named 
nanus. He cited the 1984 Cup Winnecs Cup 

semttmai , charging that Pinto da Costa bribed 

Ion Igna with $50,000 to smooth. Porto’s- 
victory over the Scottish team Aberdeen. ’ 
Denials are profuse. Allegations are mount- 
mg, including claims that the Mafia is in- 
volved m Portuguese match-fixing. In a set>- 

S 81 ® G “™ aro - a referee, and* 

Manuel Rodngues. the president of Leca when 
rt was promoted in 1993, have been jailed for 
15 months and 12 months for bribery. 

But *e lid lifts on rife corruption in Par- 

ggswess: 

And UEFA has now invited Baiatato its Swiss 
headquarters io put on record his detailed 
claims of bribeiy m European dub matches. 

asraaU nation andasmafi 
federation, but its soccer rulers are big on 
ccmectoess. That, at least, is the implication of 
^th which they have moved -to 
ttat playere oa 


Wortd Cup qualifier in Ltaa^i 

srJasssit"!®® 


was struck off FIFA's list of licensed 

Scandinavia were 


appetite to deal with fur „ ds seem to have an ■ 

tea ^ dFIFA ' s 

An-. 

Lo%£» H Shes “MO* Staff of The Tams of. 


S' 








- 1+“*!-. I 

* . 











































PAGE 19 


I^IBBNAXIONALHERAIJ) TRIBUNE, WEDN ESD AY, JANUARY 15, 1997 

SPORTS 



The Associated Press' 

The Dallas -Stars woo in 
Montreal for the first thne in 
10 years, and the Ottawa Sen- 
ators won in Boston for the 
first time ever. 

Alexandre Daigle scored 
with 1:22 left giving Ottawa 
a 4-3 victory over the Bruins 

NHL RoUHttBP 

on Monday night. The Stsn- 


winless screak against the 
ins with a victory in Ottawa on 
Jan. 1. had lost their' H pre- 
vious games in Boston. 

The Senators' goalie, Ron 
Tugnutt, stopped 35 shots for 
his first -victory since Nov. ; Washington 


Stevenson scored for the Ca- 
_nadiem. 

- In the Senators' game in 
Boston, Daigle stole die puck 
at the: blue lme and passed to- 
Shaun Van Allen to .start the 
wimung^play. Daigle picked 
np the rebound of Van Allen’s . 
shot just off the goal line and . 

- angled it into the net. 

l8l—dara A ,- ItMigera 2 In 

- New Yak, Totnmy Salo out- 
played Mike Richter in goal 

.. as die Islanders snapped their 
seven-game wmless streak. . 

Capital* B^BfcqrfaLaafs 3 In 
Landover, Maryland. Peter 
Bondra extended his point- 
sowing streak to a career-high 
10 games with two goals, and 
■ remained un- 


27. 


In Montreal, rookie. Jamie 
Langenbrunner’s power-play 
goal in the secondpeiiodgave 
Dallas a 2-1 victory over the 
Canadiens. It was the Stars’ 
first victory in Montreal since 
_JFeb. 23, 1987, when the team 
r -/was based in Minnesota. 

Langenbnmner . took a 
cross-ice pass from Benoit 
Hogue and beat gbahender 
Jocelyn Thibanlt for (he win- 


beaten in January. 

Lightning S, WnM awrl t.* O 
RickTabaracci made27 saves 
for his 10th career shutout, 
and John Cullen scored on a 
55-foot sl&p shot as visiting 
Tampa Bay extended its un- 
beaten streak to five'games. 

Start* 5, Coyote* 4 In Sari 
Jose, Cahfomia, Tony Granato 

scored twice, including the 
game-winner with 48 seconds 
remaining. Granato’s winning 



Heat Find Sweet Revenge 

Rally Led by Howard Fails to Save the Bullets 

. - - i _ D.i 


The Associated Press 

With Juwaiv Howard playing for the other 
side this season, the Miami Heat beat the 
Washington Bullets — bur barely 

Alonzo Mourning scored 32 points 
Monday night and the Heat withstood a furi- 
ous fourth-quarter rally by Washington to 

win. 98-95. . 

Howard, booed throughout die game be- 
cause he spumed the Heat last summer, scored 
23 points and helped the Bullets rally from an 

NBA Roundup 




nmg goal at 16:06 of die goal' raw, off Benue Nich- 
second period. Jere Leotinen oDs’s third assist of the night 
a igf» scored fix 1 Dallas. Turner and 702d of his career. 

Scoreboard 


^ - 

. ....... ,*• ’ '■ ‘ — 

p 'Wv ■■■»■**** • |||| f * l A 

Atlanta's Christian Laettner charging past Cleveland’s Chris Mills. The Hawks won. 


£&."*■ \A 

"i*V i* ■ .-. - 

v - 

T.-sArVi 1 • im 

"iV ' 

S-..V . r 


82-60 deficit with nine and a half minutesteft. 
But they failed to catch Miami, with Chris 
Webber and Tracy Murray missing 3-point 
attempts in the final 10 seconds. 

Tim Hardawav scored 28 points as the Heat 
snapped Washington’s four-game winning 
streak. 

The game marked Howard's first appear- 
ance at Miami Arena since July 17. when he 
announced his signing with the Heat. 
three weeks later, the National Basketball As- 
sociation voided the seven-year. S101 million 
deal and Howard re-signed with the Bullets. 

Hawks 93, Cavafiars 79 In Cleveland. 
Christian Laettner scored 25 points as Atlanta 
won its sixth straight. 

The Hawks have won 12 of 15 and were 
coming off three straight overtime victoria. 

Jazz 97, 76cfs 96 Utah made just one field 
goal in overtime but it was enough to end then 
eight-game road losing streak in Philadelphia. 

Kari Malone had 28 points and nine re- 
bounds to lead the Jazz. Marie Davis had a 
career-high 24 points for the 76ers. 


uagic 114, Nats -111 In East R ul ^ 0 5{i 
New Jersey. Rony Seikaly scored 8 of nts 29 
points in the fourth quarter as Orlando wiped 
out a 10 -point deficit. 

Dennis Scott matched his season high with 
27 points and Horace Grant added 26 points as 
Orlando won for the third time in four games 
since the return of Penny Hardaway and Nick 
Anderson from injuries. 

Suns IDS, Maverick* 98 Cedric Ceballos 
scored 26 points in his first game back with 
Phoenix and the visiting Suns hung on to win 
after watching a 26-point, third-quarter lead 

^Masuailed by 1 1 points at the start of the 
fourth quarter, bur rallied to tie it. 95-95. on 
Michael Finley's free throw with 2:06 to play. 
Finley is a former Sun. 

The Suns retook the lead on two tree throws 


l lie OUIU 1CIUUIW ----- 

from Danny Manning with 1 :32 left, and Phoenix 
opened a 99-95 lead on Kevin Johnson s 14-foot 
jumper with 552 seconds remaining. 

Jim Jackson's lay-up with 49.2 seconds left 
pulled the Mavericks within 99-97, but Ce- 
ballos. who began his NBA career in Phoenix 
and was traded back to the Suns last week by 
the Los Angeles Lakers, worked inside for a 
lay-up with 33.3 seconds left to end the Mav- 
ericks’ comeback. 

Hornets 102, Nuggats loo In Denver. Tony 
Smith made a 10-foot jumper with 1 :29 left in 
overtime for his only points of the game and 
the only basket in overtime. _ 

By scoring only two points in die extra 
period, the clubs set an NBA record fw the 
fewest points combined in an overtime. Char- 
lotte made only 1 of 9 shots in overtime, while 
Denver missed all 10 of its overtime attempts. 


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aoDJoroPo-CMViurcM 
HOV ZEALAND JB VB. EH0L4N0 
-njESOW. IN PAUntSTON NORTH 
New Zeotand Setodton A lnolnQK 1 A 
England Innings: L54fcr three 
Rdn toreed ptoy to be odoratoned at 
hmch. 


Would Cop 

mrsoiMitti ioB 

tUBHUir. H 7DBAOOGH EWTRSILMB 

1. KMB Andre Aaoodl (Norway) two mto- 
ums, 23J2 seconds n:ia*vi:l2B8), 2. 
Michael von Groarinen cswtireitand) tttJB 
(1:1031/1^338), X Andreas ScMflerer (Aus- 
Ma) 22396 0:1132/1:12*4), 4. Heinz 
ScNIdMsger (Austria) 
0:1039/1:13.11). 5. ftedrto Nytwj (Sweden) 
224H5 0:11^/1:12510. 4. Ouentaer Motor 
{Austria) 22*34 0:1131/I:1Z13), 7. Lane 
KJus (Norway) 23*38 01.11-11/1^1271, X 
Rainer Satzgeber (Austria) 22440 
0:1099/1:1331)- 9. Steve Locher CSwOzer- 
Imt) 22442 0:11390:1X63). Itt Akta VOtf 
(Germany) 22457 0:11950:1 352). 

,. M iin,B - I.MkMwIvon 

Gruenlgon 460 polrta. 2. KjetB Andre Anmodt 
301, 3. Hems Knous (Austria) 2BX 4 Stew 
Locher 276, 5. Fredlta Myb«t) 251 6. lira 
Kaean(SwtoriandD 211. 7. Siegfried Vogire- 
(Austria) 167. 8. Rainer Smz^ber 165. 9- 
Guenther Matter (Austria) 148. ia Ian Pic- 
card (France) 145- _• 

Q«a.m*n l r 1.VonGruentgen577 
paints, Z Aamodi 551'. X Hwraas Sykora 
(Austria) 4A, 4 Knous 468 5. Oirtriton Gl»- 

dlna(t1a»y)415,4Mndw401,7.U«AW(and 

(France) 397.8. locher 334 9. Strata 33Z 10- 
VoglreltorAS. 




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FW PM Hone. S M P M p- 

tcMtnen - 8 (Modanot VWtook) Z *- 
Stevenson 2 

Langenbreoner 11 (Hogw, CBdMteO (ptf- 
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tr-ir — |- wofllndlea 10 potato. Pah- 
bjan i Australta4 


snRMMM _ 

WMH BMGLES. t*T ROW® 

Fkn Perfettl Italy, d*f. KotarinaStu- 
dert | awfc 5towkta,64,7-6(7-lfc^H»- 

her ( 5 ), Gerawny, det Amy Frazier, US. «-& 

62. 7-5j Usa Roymond, U5. dot Sloblion 
ftake-Bredonon,. AusAdto, 6-Z 6-Z Wto 
Grande. Holy, det Angetos Mtmtoto Spain, 
^ ^ 6* , 2- 

Lhidsay Davenport C7WJ-S. deL Nattwie 
Dechy. Franofc4^6-1,6-1.-MotomUi r 
dot Leiriw Cenkora, Crach Ropablta. JA6-Z 
6 - 3 f Jaiene Wahmabe, U3- del. Jentaw 
Qrariatl UA. 6-Z 341 6-t Kristte Boogeti 
Nemeriands, dot. Ntola Arendt, U3. 3^, 6- 

^ siting Wang, Totnan. ««. UnJ 
WMU3. 63i 6-1; Morin Hingis (4), 


SHttzBriand, deL Barbara Rtttnec. Germany. 

6-1,7-S Francesco Lubtata, Holy, detRochd 

McQuBkHb Austrato 6-Z 7-6 (7-4)! Mog- 
datona Grzybowskn, Poland del Sarah 
Pttkowsu, France. 4-6, 6Z 6-1. 

Dominique von Roost, BeiQtum, del _Bet- 
too Fuico-vaega. Aigenllna, 6-fc 63; StMo 
Farina. Itolifr del Atatanndra CTstn. Poland. 

6A 6-Z Chonda RuWn 05). UJL riel Ratfto 

Zrubakava Slovakia 7-6 (7-2), 6-i Mary Joe 
Ftanandez 04), UJ5, del. Laura Golarea 
Italy, 6-Z 4-6, 6-Z 

SondrineTestud Bonce. deL Ete wi Wop- 
m% Germany. 6-1 Ml Pott y^ Sclw yrier. 
SwHzeriand deL too MatoH (6), Croatia, 7-5. 
6-1; Yuka YasMda Japoa def. Kotrina 
Adams. U5. 7-5. 6-Z Atamdra FusaL 
Franca del Ginger Helgeson-NtelseivUA, 
foJ2m 

Irina Spbtaa (8). Romania deL Noofco 10- 
pmuta Japan, 6-Z 6A‘ Karina Hotoud ova 
(9). Slava Ida deL SMo Talofa OarfhLM, 
6-Z Yayuk BasuU, Indonesia del Naofco 
SawamaBa Jap«*w 6-1 4-1 reti red- Pooto 
Saaiez. ArgenHna def. Korin Kschwendt, 
Austria 7-6 01-9), 64. 

Jaonnette Kruger, South Alrtca def. Doftt 
Rondrfantefy. Mottagncer. 6-1 3-6. 6-Z 

IrtcoteBredttM^Awtrafladef.CormoMorar- 

taUA.6Z5ZMonaEndaJopaadeLKift- 

due Radford Auriwfla 7-5 6-1; Anoe-GortBe 
swat. France, deL Tntjano Jeanenlca Ylt- 

aostovta. 5-7. 7-1 6-4 

Batbara Schett, Austria del Nana MlyogL 
japoa 7-6 00-8), 7-6 0L6); Stephanie de 
VBa Belgium, det. Dentaa aitodkoraCzeai 
Republic. 6-16-7 (2-71,8-6; Sond mKMno va 
Ctech Republic, del Toml WMNbiger- 
Jones.UA. 7-6Q4-ia,6-1; Arantra Sg rrettez 
Viaela t2),Spota def. Glorto PtafcWm, Italy; 

U64,' - • 

MIN SINGLES. 1ST ROUND 
Alberto Benfiaiegul (16), Spain. deL Todd 
Larttam. AushaBa 6-1. 6-Z 6-« Aincwd 

Bqetsdi.Francadrt.DovWCoWwea.u3-6- 

d 6d 6-Z Wayne Fenelra (8). South Africa 

def. Corios Costa Spala 6-16-Z 6-Z Mfctioel 

Joyce, U-S- del Roberta Cuiretata Spain. 6- 

1,7-6 (7-4), 6-1. _ 

FHp DeWud Belghira, drt Femon Wlbler. 
Nethutands. 6-4 6-Z 7-5; Setgl Broguera, 

SptaadrtUeytonHewrtAiHtm8^3i6-l 

63! NlcUas Kutt Swedea drt Korim AtomL 
Morecc»6^M,H6»»^ U V^- 5 ^: 

den, Juan Albert Vltoca Spain, 6-1 6-1 7-6 
(7-3)- 

Moreeto Rios (9), ChBe. drt PW Korta 
ftedi Republic. 7-6 (7-4L 6-X 6-Z MaUVW 
WoshtagtoaU Jt. def. Jaca» Elttnglv Mefhep 
lands, 6-X 6-7 (6B). 6-i 6-Z Filer Tiranoc- 
cW, Australia drt Johon van Hereto Bta- 
glum. 6-7 (68), 6-X 6-4 3-2 CWI^ .Sort* 
Smgstoa Arawnla del. Marcos Ondnnka 
South Attica 7-6 (W), 7-5, 4-4 6-Z 
Mart Woodfotria Australia, drt Michael 
Tetania AustraBa 6-4 6-4 7-S Pe» Som- 
pras OX UJL. drt DInu P«OTla Romonto, 
6-Z 64, 6Z Goran Iwrtsevie «, Cretdta, 
del Ben EWmod Australia 6Z 7-4J-* 
jaws B)orkraana Sweden, drt Batman 


Ufihraeft. Crach Repubfle. 1 -6. 61. 6-4 6Z 
Lionel Roux, Franca drt Jonathan Start. 
UA. 1-4 66- 7-6 (7-0, 6-Z 13-11; Matt Ros- 
»t Swffizeriand, del Jovtor Sanchez, Sptaa 
6-4 7-6 (9-71,6-1; Send Draper. Aushtato, def. 
Ales Radulesca Garaumy. 6Z 6-4 6-7 (4-71, 
6 -Z Hernan Gwny, Aigenfina def. Onto 
Stonoyichev, Bulgaria 6-4 6-464 
jai Kroslak. Slovtada def. Andrea Gau- 
dmzl, Italy. 66, 64, 62 6-Z Adrian Vtanea 
Romania del. Hereto* Dreekmuna Ger- 
nwny,6Z6-l,4^ 64; Slava DosedeL CMrt 
RepuhfcdrtGuy Forget Franca 61 3-4 6 

X 6-4 Leonder Poes, indto, del Jaytrem 

Crabta Australa 6-4 6-1 6-4 

Kara! KuceraStovoUa drt Paul Hoarttute, 
Nettrertonds, 61 , 3-4 63, 66, 6-4 Jeff 

Toranga U A. del Bryan Shelioa U A.2-4 7- 

6 (7-1). 7-6 (7-2). 6Z Marc Goetarer, Gta- 
many, def. Kennelh Corisea Denmark, 64 6 
1,67 (2-7), 64 

jlm Courier 0 U. Ui. drt S|eng Scho«*a 
NettwriCHida 67 (6-7), 6-X 4-4 61, 8-4 
Christian Ruud. Nonray, drt Jon Stomertnk 

031 NettirefreWa 36 44. 7-i 6Z ItFZAL 

bert Co aa (10). Spain, def. PaMc* Rafter, 
Australia 7-5, 6-Z 7-5i 


NATIONAL LEAOUE 

ph IIAMLFH1A— Agreed » terms vrtth 
RHP Ron Binder. RHP woyne Gtxnra, RHP 
Lorry Mlletiefl. INF Dove Doster, INF Kerin 
Sefdk and C Bobby Efitalefla on 1-year mn- 
ttads. 


NATKMAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
CLEVELAND CAVAUERS-PUl G CoTl 

Thomas on Iniured BsL Adhwled c 

Shnwnefle Scott from toluredttot. 

PHILADELPHIA— PUl C-F Scott WMamS on 
bi|uted IlsL Activated F Mark Hendrickson 
fnm injured BsL 

PHOEMOt-Placed G Tony Dumas on the 
btamd ifeL Adtvaled F Ben Davis horn the 
Injured nst , 

Seattle— Signed F Terry Cummings to 1- 
ywcantrocl 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
PETfloiT— Named Bobby Ross coach. 


SMIHtSH PntST MVIIIOM 

Baraetana 1 Hereutes 3 

t l lli r t jleal Madrid 43, 

ZBarratono 44 ZDeporttvo Corona 3X 4Re- 

iri Betts 34 5JUfedco Madrid 34 4 Real So- 
ctodod 34 7.V08adoBd 3ft B.Tenerite 28, 
9JUbWe BHboo2X 10 . Valencia 27, llJWc- 
|og SreureWw 24 IZCeltn Vigo 24 13Jtara 
VaBeamo 21 1«jOvtedo 2Z IS-ComposWn 
21 14Esponyol 19. 17^ parting Gflon 14 
HUjogrtraes 14 19-SevOW l7.2ZHe«oitosl4 
21 ^oagara 14 22. Extrema dura 9. 


HAJOn LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

ANAHEtH— Agreed to t erms wilh RHP 
Mtte James on 3-year contract a nd RH P 

Travis Buckley on o minor league conhart. 

Baltimore— S igned RHP Shown Boskla 
RHP Gtowrml Carrara. RHP Chris FusseX 
RHP Sidney Porewa RHP AMe ShepteU 
LHP Brian Shousa RHP Matt Snyder, RHP 
Billy PeidboL C Ryan Luzlnsto. C Mehrin 

Rowirla C Leraiy Webster, 1 B Drew Densorv 
SS Kietty Gnibcr, 2D FrandscD Mflfo«*» 
AutfeOleda and Of Jerome Wcflonto mbior- 
league contracts. _ __ 

Chicago— Signed free agent pttcher Doug 

Drabek to 1 -year contract. 

ssattub— Agreed to twins with RHP Bob- 
by Ayala and RHP Scott Sanderson! -year 
carfrods. 


pmhonal hockey league 
NHL— S uspended New York Islanders D 
Rich PDon lor two gomes (one atomdy 
served) wttbout pay, and Bned WmSUOMas 
o result of a stashing Inddenl ogolnst Pitts- 
burgh Penguins. C Motto Lemteux on Jan. 
10 . 

ANAKEIM-Sent RW virieri Koipov to Long 

Beach of the I HL. . . . 

MLLAS-Arhvaled RW Gram Marshall 
fram tolured reserve. 

oetroit— P laced C Setgel Fedorov on the 

7-doy injured-reserve Rs>. Recoiled LW 
Tomas Hut n rgram fram Arflrandack. AHL. 

hartpord— H rasstgned G JerevSe- 
bashen Giguere lo Haifa*. JHL- 
tampa bay— P ut C Brian Bradley o n to- 
lured reserve. Recoded F Jason Wtomer from 
Adirondack. AHL ReasskpiedG 
Tyler Moss to Grand Rapids, IHL _ 

WASHiHOTon— RecoSed D Eric Oumon 
ham Portland, AHLj 

COKLICM 

UYUW— Named Jhn HoHond assistant 

lOOttxd CDOCtl. 

kaksas — N amed Bill Sal man -and Drereil 
Wyatt assistant toatbaU 
caacMSv 

POOVU3EHCE— Suspended C-F Abrkif 
Brawn tram the boBkettndl 
todeftiMy tardbcipllnaiy reasons. 
vmi— Named Ted Cato taauxdl enreh. 


Middlesbrough — was penalized three 
points and fined 150000 by English F A tor 
caning aft game at Blackburn last month. 
Mlddtaobiough was » pay hearing cost and 
could fooe compensation claim. The game 
will haw » be played at later date. 

THE CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC AND 
NIGER- how been dbQuatoteA oyi toe (Zn- 
federatlon at African Foatballfromthts years 
African dub uxnuetRtons for toSng to pay 
amutaiees. , . ^ 

VANDA-CWneM league champion, srgnea 
Krister Lundgren and Magnus Skald mark 

fram Sweden on 1 -year conmtrad. 


Kansas 
Overcomes 
Iowa State 


The Associated Press 

Top-ranked Kansas took 
full advantage of No. 8 Iowa 
State, which was missing two 
key players, to run its winning 
streak to 17 games with an BO- 
67 victory. 

The Jay hawks ’ center. Scot 

Coliebi Ba sketball 

Pollard, was considered 50- 
50 earlier Monday because of 
a badly sprained ankle. 

But it was the Cyclones 
who had the problems as cen- 
ter Kelvin Cato sat on the 
bench most of the game in 
foul trouble, and top scorer 
Dedric Willoughby missed 
the second half because of a 
recurring hamstring injury. 

No.13Dufca«4, Campbell 59 

Roshown McLeod had. 12 
points and 1 0 rebounds for the 
Blue Devils (12-4), who held 
ihe visiting Camels (5-8) to 
one field goal over the first 1 1 
minutes. 

No. 19 Boston CoBego 81, 
Georgetown 74 Antonio 

Granger scored 19 points to 
lead die Eagles (l 1-2, 6-1) to 
their fifth straight victory and 
best-ever Big East start. Duane 
Woodward added 15 points 
for Boston College. Victor 
Page had 19 points for the 
Hoyas (10-5, 3-4 >, who have 
their worst conference mark 
ever after seven games and 
have lost four of their last six. 



i |V 

& c2to <8w vrarn 














PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Bottom-Line Pensions 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK— There is a 
scheme afoot to privatize 
Social Security. My son the 
poor but honest carpenter 
asked what that would mean. 

“Son,” I told him. “it 
means in your old age you 
will be taken care of by the 
bottom-line guys.’* 

He seemed uneasy. “The 
bottom-line guys make me 
itch,” he said. 

I’d heard that whine be- 
fore. The boy can't afford 
health insurance, so he 
blames the bottom-line guys. 
Says they charge outrageous 
prices no poor but honest car- 
penter can afford. 

The lad used to hope there 
might be a national health-in- 
surance program. Then Harry 
and Louise made Congress see 
the folly of such things. Now 
the boy gripes that the bottom- 
line guys have a lock on. 
American medicine. 

□ 

Just because more people 
than ever are without health 
insurance, just because 
people who do have insurance 
may find their treatment being 
dictated by insurance-com- 
pany clerks — that is no rea- 
son to sneer at Harry. Louise 
and the bottom-line guys. 

“If you’d listened to Harry 
and Louise, you'd be glad you 
can't afford health insur- 
ance," I tell the boy. “Andif 
you could afford it, you'd be 
glad some spendthrift saw- 
bones couldn’t make your in- 
surance company pay for a lot 
of fancy medical tests." 

I couldn’t tell him for sure 
exactly how Social Security 
would work after it's privat- 
ized. The nub of the plan is to 
transfer billions of dollars 
from Washington to Wall 
Street. At present. Social Se- 
curity taxes bring in oceans of 


money which, if invested in 
stock markets, would earn 
more for the program than 
they do under the present pro- 
gram. 

This presumes that the 
market will never again col- 
lapse in the kind of ruin that 
began in 1929. And why not 
presume a Dow Jones aver- 
age soaring ever toward Para- 
dise? Where is it written that 
what goes up must come 
down? 

How you would go about 
getting your Social Security 
payment into profitable 
stocks is unclear. My son, the 
poor but honest carpenter — 
always quick to whine — 
complains that stocks, stock- 
brokers and the stock market 
are so alien to his way of life 
that he wouldn't know how to 
get into the big bull market. 

Has it never occurred to 
him to study the market quo- 
tations in the daily paper, to 
take a course in investment 
strategy, to invite some stock- 
brokers to his house for cham- 
pagne and smoked Scottish 
salmon? 

Thus entertained and oiled, 
they'd feel obliged to give 
him tips about how to invest 
his Social Security payments. 
They would say things like. 
“Get into perishables.” 

* ‘Dad, ’ ’ said the boy. * ‘you 
tell me: How do you get into 
perishables?" 

What an irritating question. 
What an exasperating son. 
What do I know about getting 
into perishables? Why do I 
need to know? 1 got into So- 
cial Security in die old days, a 
mere stripling of 16 years, 
when government didn’t ex- 
pect you to know about get- 
ting into perishables before 
they let you into Social Se- 
curity. 

In that bleak age, bottom- 
line guys gor no respecr at 
all. 

New York Tunes Service 


Bucharest’s ‘Dada’ Houses, Frozen in Amber 


By Jane PerJez 

Ncn- York Tb/us Service 


B UCHAREST — It is hard for outsiders, and even for 
Romanians, to imagine that this city, where whole 
neighborhoods were razed by the dictator Nicolae Ceau- 
sescu. was once a sophisticated urban capital with cutting- 
edge architecture ana an avant-garde artistic movement But 
indie 1920s and '30s, Bucharest was a center for modernist 
architecture, with dazzling white cubist-shaped houses with 
flat roofs and wide expanses of windows built for the newly 
rich. 

Amazingly, much of this architecture survived the lev- 
eling rampages of Ceausescu, who in die 1970s and ’80s 
destroyed a swath of Bucharest's 19th-century inner city. 
And today, as Romania digs out from its Communist past, 
the work of Marcel Janco, the painter and architect who 
designed many of the houses, is being rediscovered in 
exhibitions, books, and the buildings themselves. 

“During the 1930s. Bucharest was filled with modernist 
structures; even not-so-rich people built in this style," said 

Most of the houses were acquired by die 
govemeument but escaped the demolition 
orders of Ceausescu because they 
were scattered through the city 

Magda Carried, an art historian who recently organized an 
exhibition of Janco’s photos and architectural drawings at 
the National Gallery in Bucharest. “It was a fashion — being 
with Europe and being with your tune." 

The renewed interest in the Romanian avant-garde is 
inspired by a realization that Romanian culture had “good 
pans, not only the bad,* ’ Canned said. “We know that if the 
Communist period hadn't come, Romanian culture would 
have looked much better." 

Romanian artists were in the vanguard of the modernist 
movement. The sculptor Constantin Brancusi moved from 
Romania to Paris early in the century, and the less well- 
known Tristan Tzara and Janco were among die founders of 
the anti-bourgeois Dada movement in 1916 when they were 
young art students in Zurich. (In Romanian, Dada is “yes" 
said twice, as well as the word for a child's wooden horse; in 
relation to die art movement, Camed said, it is meant to 
convey “an object of the soul.") 

From Zurich, Tzara and Janco moved on to Paris, where 
the Dadaists were soon superseded by the Surrealists. Janco, 
whom Camed described as a larger-than-life personality 
bubbling with enthusiasm for the new aesthetics, returned to 
Bucharest in 1922 determined to transform the cultural life 
of his home city. He wrote and drew profusely for a new 
visual arts magazine, ContimporanuL which he helped pub- 

in 1926 along 
followers, 
his colleagues 



coincided with the development of Bucharest as a city. 
Until World War L Bucharest was little more than a 
market town that served as a crossroads between Turkey 
and Western Europe. Unlike the Hu n ga ri an capital, Bud- 
apest, which was conceived as an imperial city in the 
1890s and filled with grandiose structures of the Habs- 
burg empire, Bucharest still hark abundant undeveloped 
land in the 1920s and ’30s. With the growth of the oil 
industry after World War I, there was also plenty of 
money for construction. 

The main boulevard, Magheru-Balcescu, was lined with 
rail, lean structures that transformed Bucharest into one of 
the most compact modernist architectural areas in Europe. 
The buildings r emain to this day but are bard to distinguish 

behind layers of heavy grime, cracked facades and tangles of 
overhead wires and signs. 

“Photos from the time they were built show the town 
looking extremely white, full of air and very elegant," said 
Carneci, who edited a recent book, “Bucharest in the 1920s- 
1940s: Between Avant-Garde and Modernism." 

Most of the houses designed by Janco became gov- 
ernment property after die Communists came to power but 
escaped the demolition orders of Ceausescu because they 
were scattered through the city. But because they were 
inhabited by tenants with no money for repairs, they became 
dilapidated. 

On Mora Street, in one of the oldest quarters of the city, 
Cameci showed a visitor a three-story Janco house that 
stands in sharp contrast to the narrow cobblestone street and 
some nearby ramshackle cottages. Built of reinforced con- 
crete with a flat roof, die house features wide, rectangular 
windows interspersed with round windows resembling 
portholes, a signature motif of the 1930s. The balconies of 
the house are enclosed with iron railings that are also 
r eminiscent of an ocean liner. 

Die house is surrounded by a large garden, but everything 
about the site speaks of neglect Some of the concrete walls 
are cracked, aud the excerior is a dirty buff color tiiat looks as 
though it has not been cleaned in 50 years. The trees and 
plants are also un cared for. 

Another villa, designed for a well-to-do family, was built 
on three levels with two long balconies running me length of 
the house. The beige stucco exterior is peeling, and the wood 
frames of the long windows are cracked. 

But there was a positive side to such neglect, Carneci said: 
“Because no one had any money, the houses stand as they 
were originally built." Original iron doors with curvy Art 
Deco lines remain in place, and there are no additions to tire 
houses. 

As the economy in Bucharest starts to rejuvenate and laws 
for private ownership are defined, Cameci said, many of the 
Janco houses will become desirable properties. One such 
house, which is owned by a Romanian family living in the 
United States, is on the market for $500,000. a vast amount 
by Romanian standards. 

With the union of architects, the city government, now 
controlled by a coalition of parties that back market refra in s, 
is preparing rules mandating that the original design of the 



fob SfeMftkc !W- MUm 

Mag da Carneci, with a Janco dwelling behind her. 

1930s houses be kept, Camed said. One purpose of the 
recent exhibition on Janco, she said, was to increase public 
awareness of the value of tire architecture and the need to 
preserve it 

Like Tzara, whose real name was Sammy Rosenstock. 
Janco was Jewish. 

In the early part of the 20th century, anti-Semitic laws 
mw rfg it difficult for Jews to eater Romania’s b urg eo ni ng 
business sector, Cameci said. Thus the children of some 
wealthy Jews went into the arts and, like Janco, tried to fight 
the nationalist spirit of the interwar period. 

As anti-Semitic forces gained power in Romania, Janco 
left the country in 1940 and settled in Palestine, where he 
became a leading modem painter and teacher. In 1953, he 
built Ein Hod, an artists cooperative village in Israel 
Although be never returned to Romania before his death in 
1984, he sent albums in an effort to keep in touch with 
colleagues locked in by communism. 


INVISIBLE FIELDS 


PEOPLE 


A • "Wl /A j p / • j f C"wp Of • 9 A HOSPITAL spokesman says that Frank 

Americans Locus Quest for Beatitude on Feng Shut “SfiSSsasi?! 


By Molly O’Neill 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — The litter box could have ruined 
me. Four of the world’s leading feng shui 
practitioners were huddled over my cats' privy, 
their luo pans quivering with alarm. They stared at 
their trusty compasses in disbelief: the box was 
placed precisely on the point of “fomwate bless- 
ing” in the southeast comer of my Manhattan loft. 
It was inviting financial, emotional and profes- 
sional disaster 

Their consultation was meant to culminate my 
monthlong study of feng shui, the ancient Asian 
folk art of how one’s home might affect one’s life. 
Instead, their suggestions initiated several weeks of 
frenzied home improvements. 

Feng shui masters have consulted on real estate 
developments in the United States for more than a 
decade, usually to satisfy Asian investors. 

But a recent deluge of more than 40 books on the 
subject seems to have expanded the masters' mys- 
tical sway into Everyman’s bedroom. 

Newly minted feng shui consultants are spring- 
ing up in the telephone book, society pages and 
Architectural Digest to help Americans balance the 
ch'i in their homes. Pronounced “chee," these 
invisible fields of electromagnetic energy are be- 
lieved to determine vitality, fortune and love life. 
Ch ’i-direeting accoutrements for the home — wind 
chimes, table-top waterfalls and eight-sided mir- 
rors — are selling briskly in malls across die United 
Slates and internationally by mail-order through 
the Feng Shui Warehouse in San Diego, which 
doubled its sales to $400,000 in the last year, its 
founder, James Moser, said. 

At dinner parties in Manhattan, the well-heeled 
and ambitious have begun to debate the benefits of 
feng shui intervention with the same seriousness 
with which they weigh the benefits of Prozac or 
Paxil. They call feng shui “acupuncture for the 
home.” 

As more Americans learn to pronounce feng shui 
(“fung shway,” approximately), it’s getting harder 
to separate what may be valid ancient wisdom from 
a whole lot of feng phooey. 1 ended up reading 43 
books, interviewing two dozen experts, buying 
plants with ch'i-friendly round leaves, and painting 
the entire southeast quadrant of my loft aquamarine 
to beckon good fortune in what feng shui masters 
view as the home’s vital spot 
Louis Oliver Gropp, the editor in chief of House 
Beautiful, said. “The growing fascination with 
feng shui represents the public's need to bridge die 
physical and spiritual world." The same people 



K- YeeTThe Mew YwkTmci 

Lin Yon, a feng shui expert who was alarmed 
by this column in the writer’s apartment 

who tried to enrich their lives with alternative 
medicine, diet and meditation were in the first wave 
of feng shin devotees, Gropp added 

But the ripples of that wave are rolling into Mid- 
America. 

Stacey Muesig, an elementary school teacher in 
Dublin. Ohio, worried about the placement of her 
bed (optimally, the southwest comer of the house, 
the most auspicious spot to nurture a marriage j and 
her desk (it should facte the door, to forestall any 
unwelcome caller). And retail stores, banks, offices 
buildings, spas and even discos are honing their 
ch’i, as feng shut moves from the esoteric fringes of 
American society into the mainstream. 

Last month in Manhattan, the original Village 
Gate on Bleecker Street, once as dank and grimy as 
it was venerable, opened as Life, a nightclub, after 
a $10 million feng shui face lift transformed its 
domineering columns into cylinders mirrored for 
friskier ch’i-play. 

“It feels, ub, different,” said Eartha Kitt, who 


. by to see the new space (she is scheduled to 
form there next summer). 

Twirling on a dance floor whose inlaid wood 
design is reminiscent of an astrological chart, she 
countered a question with “Feng what?” 

“Ours is a culture that scrambles from one 
external solution to another,” said W illian Spear, 
the author of “Feng Shui Made Easy” (Harper San 
Francisco, 1995) whose 300 clients last year in- 
cluded the Royal Bank of Canada. “A feng shui 
consultant can spin dials and suggest external 
changes, but without an internal shift, the changes 
won't last.” 

In other words, you can pay a feng shui con- 
sultant six figures or you can hand over $250 for an 
on-line consultation. But you can’t buy prosperity 
or good health. The best practitioners promise only 
an environment conducive to spiritual enrich- 
ment. 

Ch'i, it seems, is not dissimilar to light or air. Just 
as a developer would not site a multimillion-doUar 
project on a geological fault, a feng shui master 
would not build in a place that gives his luo pan. the 
feng shui compass, a worrisome tilt. 

A conventional decorator worried that a struc- 
tural column in the middle of my loft stopped the 
eye. Feng shui consultants, on the other hand, said 
that the column disrupted the flow of ch’i. 

One consultant insisted that the offending column 
be addressed by a 510,000 demolition project. An- 
other suggested rounding die square column into a 
ch’i -gen tier cylinder covered in $2,000 worth of 
acrylic. Two others recommended $100 fixes: the 
column could be disguised by upholstery or dec- 
orative painting, they said, its effects mitigated by 
crystals, plants or wind chimes. 

Karen Kopta. a public-relations consultant in 
Manhattan, embarked on a six-month Feng shoi 
nightmare when she hired a consultant to choose 
paint colors and design some storage units for her 
apartment. 

“I thought if I could get a little cosmic harmony 
along with some storage space, why not?" Kopta 
said. 

From the consultant, she got a paint scheme, 
some demolition, no reconstruction — and a bill for 
$1 .000, fully a fifth of her entire budget She ended 
up painting her apartment herself and hiring a 
carpenter to design and build new storage units. 

Kopta dismisses feng shui as a well-intended 
plaything for the overindulged. Still, she worries 
about one suggestion she scorned, putting in a 
waterfalL 

“What do you think?” she asked. “Could a 
waterfall change ray life?” 


recovery from a mildheart attack and could go 
home by Friday. Sinatra is alert and chats with 
visitors, the spokesman at Cedars-Sinai Med- 
ical Center m Los Angeles said. It was 
Sinatra’s third hospitalization in two months. 
He was at Cedara-Sinai for eight days in 
November for a pinched nerve and pneu- 
monia. Last Monday, he was hospitalized one 
day far an undisclosed procedure. 

□ 

An Australian poet who wraps vast con- 
templations of mortalityin dry, easy wit has 
won Britain's prestigious T.S. Eliot prize. 
Les Murray, who lives in a country home 
outside of Sydney, was too ill to travel to 
Britain to a ttend the ceremony at the British 
Museum. He won £5,000 ($8,400) for his 
volume, “Subhuman Redneck Poems." Die 
award was presented to a representative of 
Murray's by Eliot’s widow, Valerie. 

□ 

Princess Diana has met war victims in the 
poorest quarters of Angola's capital Luanda 
and promised to send toys to comfort 
the children. Diana is on a four-day tour of 
Angola, to help a Red Cross campaign to 
outlaw land mines worldwide. At an ortho- 
pedic center on the city's outskirts, she chat- 
ted with ex-combatants and children waiting 
to be fitted with artificial limbs. Diana 
watched as the youngest patient Sandra 
Tigica, 1 1 , was fitted with an artificial leg. On 
Wednesday, die princess is to wear body 
armor to visit a minefield in a remote part of 
the country. 

□ 

France’s leading theater, the Comedie 
Francaise, marks the 375th anniversary of its 
founder, Moliere, in traditional fashion Wed- 
nesday. The cast, wearing stage costume, will 
gather round the bust of die playwright, bom 
Jan. 15, 1622, to bear a reading from the work 
of the theater critic and historian Alfred Si- 
mon. 

□ 

The British film director Mike Newell, 
best-known for “Four Weddings and a Fu- 
neral,” plans a movie on the East German 
dissident Vera LengsTeld, whose husband 
spied on her for the secret police, a press 
report said here. The story hit me headlines in 
1991 when Lengsfeld discovered what her 
husband Knud WoUenberger was doing 



ft<MQi*IIW |w i rrwniftwi 

With his image of Alec Guinness peering 
over his shoulder. Lord Snowdon sur- 
veys tiie crowd at the opening in London 
of a show of his theatrical photographs. 

when she consulted die files of the framer East 
German intelligence service, the StasL Lengs- 
feld. 44. now a member of Parliament in foe 
reunified Germany, told tike paper there was 
do intention to settle scores, but rather to show 
what life was Hire in East Germany. She 
divorced WoDeaberger m 1992. 


□ 


■ The first line in Woody Allen’s new movie* 
a champagne musical called “Everybody 
Says I Love You,” is sung by Edward 
Norton, andno one was more surprised to see 
it than he was. “I was not informed that that 
would be the first scene." said Norton, who 
plays a lovestruck swam. “What I saw it for 
foe first time they removed all sharp objects 
from around me to prevent me from doing' 
harm to myself.” Allen cast the movie with 
virtually, no attention to the actors’ singing- 
ability. “All he said was, ‘I’m not looking for 
Pavarotti. I’m just playing with an idea.’ ” 
Norton said. 


d 


r. 


Here’s somegristfortfae gossip milt Rir $li 
million, Liz Smith will write her life story. 4 
“I’ve thought about calling it ‘Blind Item,"’! 
the gossip columnist said Monday in the New 
York Post. “Maybe ‘Sex.* That did very well* 
for Madonna.” 


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