Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


Longtime Force Behind Milosevic 
Takes on a More Prominent Role 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Post Service 


BELGRADE — She runs her own 
political party and writes a maw^ 
column on fee side. Almost always 
dressed in. black, she serves as the 
government’s attack dbg and accuses 
opposition politicians of fomenting 
civil war. She was bom in a forest 
during an uprising against Nazi oc- 
cupation in World War H and sep- 
arated from her mother at the age of 
one day. .... ; 

Whatever else you say about her — 
and Mirjana Markovic has become 
the subject, of intense, derision and 
hatred on fee streets of Belgrade — 
the wife of Serbia's b eleague red pres- 
ident, Slobodan Milosevic, is not fee 
average first lady, - 

The relaticmship between Miss 


Markovic ami Mri Milosevic is cen- 
tral to any understanding of the 
present crisis in fete SearWed rump 
Yugoslavia, fee last Commumst-style 
dictatorship in Eastern Europe. - 
High school sweethearts, they have 
been together almost continuously 
since fee- age of 16 and r emain 


Army Will Complete 
Pullback by Friday, 
Government Says 


CtmrtkJ to On Su$ Frm Diiputo hri 


Pressure on Milosevic rises at 
home and abnmd. Page 6. 


■ - ‘.v 


fiercely .devoted to each other. 
Known by her mckname “Mrra,’’ 
Miss Markovic serves as her hus- 
band’s psychiatrist, political adviser, 
best friend and alter ego. 

According to dose associates, she 
is one of the few people in the pres- 








JERUSALEM — Parliament on 
Thursday approved Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu’s deal with the 
Palestinians to redeploy Israeli Army 
forces in Hebron, opening the way for 
the completion of a pullback Friday. 

The opposition Labor Party and left- 





ist and Arab parties joined with most 
members of the governing Likud eo- 


See WIFE, Page 11 


\ini-ni VbibK’J' \pnrv Hmn-fa-w 

Israeli soldiers moving out from a position in Hebron on Thursday as Israel prepared for redeployment. 





, % . , 


' •* * • 



U.S. Deeply Involved in Peace Process 

Promise of Long-Term Role Whs Essential to the Breakthrough 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Post Service 


came to closure only when they were 
satisfied that Washington would weigh 


WASHINGTON — One certain out- 
come of fee landmark redeployment 
agreement between Israel ana fee Pal- 
estinians is that fee United States and its 
diplomats will remain deeply and per- 
haps decisively involved in fee process 
for years to come. 

That is because fee agreement is 
structured to allow either side to de- 
mand that Washington step in if it feels 
the other is failing to fulfill its ob- 
ligations, officials and independent ana- 
lysts said. The United States is fee de 
facto arbiter of any disputes. 

Not trusting each other, the two sides 


in to help them over future obstacles, 
senior U.S. officials said. The result is a 


senior U.S. officials said. The result is a 
significant diplomatic breakthrough — 
ending a bitter stalemate feat threatened 
to tarnish one of PresidentBill Clinton's 
proudest foreign policy accomplish- 
ments and cloud fee start of his second 
term — but it will require sustained U.S. 
involvement if it is to become reality, 
senior officials said. 


‘I can assure you," Secretary of 
te Warren Christopher said in a fetter 


State Warren Christopher said in a fetter 
to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
feat was made part of the agreement, 
‘ ‘that it remains the policy of the United 
States to support and promote full im- 


plementation in all of its parts. We in- 
tend to continue our efforts to help en- 
sure that all outstanding commitments 
are carried out by both parties in a 
cooperative spirit and on the basis of 
reciprocity.” 

Mr. Christopher’s letter was neces- 
sary because Israeli and Palestinian ne- 
gotiators signed only a limited, detailed 
accord on the movement of Israeli 
troops out of most of the volatile West 
Bank town of Hebron . Their agreements 
on subsequent phases of implementa- 
tion were listed in an unsigned "note for 
the record" drafted by the U.S. me- 
diator, Dennis Ross, and backed by let- 


members of the governing Likud co- 
alition to vote, 87 to 17, with one ab- 
stention, for fee U.S.-brokered accord 
feat was reached Wednesday. 

The vote came after a 1 2-hour cabinet 
debate on the deal to pull Israeli soldiers 
out of most of Hebron and cany out 
three further redeployments from 
mainly rural areas of fee West Bank. 

The parliamentary resolution ap- 
proved "the agreement signed between 
the government of Israel and the Pal- 
estinian Authority on Jan. 15, 1997, in 
accordance wife the documents and ac- 
companying letters presented to it." 

Mb'. Netanyahu said in Parliament 
that fee Knesset's decision would help 
move Israel toward "peace and security 
with the Palestinians.’ ' 

"I thank the members of fee house. I 
hope in the future, during this gov- 
ernment's term, to bring complete peace 
agreements with the Palestinians and 
perhaps with Arab nations, in addition 
to the ones we have signed. ’ ’ 

Defense Minister Yitzhak Mordechai 
said earlier that Israel's withdrawal 
from much of Hebron would start after 
the Knesset voted its approval and feat 
he hoped to complete me pullback by 
the beginning of the Jewish Sabbath on 


See ACCORD, Page H 


Friday evening. 

Crowds of Palestinians gathered in 
the night chill of Hebron outside Israel’s 
military headquarters, meanwhile, and 
cheered as equipment was loaded on to 
army trucks. 

Israeli security sources said there 
would be little equipment left to take 
away once approval to evacuate 80 per- 
cent of the city was given. 

Mr. Netanyahu muscled the pact 
through the cabinet by an 1 l-to-7 vote. 
Science Minister Binyamin Begin 
resigned in protest. 

In Washington, meanwhile. President 
Bill Clinton’s future national security 
adviser, Sandy Berger, said that when 
Mr. Netanyahu visits the White House 
"in fee not too distant future” fee 
United Stales would ask Israel to con- 
sider reopening peace talks wife Syria 

Mr. Berger said there could be no 
comprehensive peace in fee Middle East 


vJz&i** 










Italy Clears 2 in Shooting of U.S. Boy 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Service 


ROME — A court in southern Italy 
acquitted two men Thursday who were 
accused in fee killing of Nicholas 
Green, a 7-year-old American who died 
in 1994 when highway robbers in a 
remote region of Italy opened fire on his 
family's rental car. 

In a brief statement fee court in 
Catanzaro declared that Francesco Me- 
siano, 23, and Michele Iannello. 28, 
who were arrested in November 1994, 
two months after fee boy’s killing, "did 
not commit fee deed." 


The presiding judge, Massimo Vec- 
chio, ordered Mr. Mesiano, who has 
been under house arrest since last 
month, to be released. 

Mr. Iannello, who was imprisoned 
until his release last month, was placed 
under police protection. He has admit- 
ted to four murders not related to the 
killing of the boy and agreed to co- 
operate wife fee authorities in clearing 
up their circumstances. 

While the public prosecutor, Maur- 
izio Salnstro, who this week had pe- 
titioned fee court for a co eviction and a 
23-year jail sentence for each of fee 
men, said he would appeal the verdict. 


Nicholas’s father, who attended the 
court session, said he was satisfied that 
fee trial had been fair. 

"I can only say that a car came in 
darkness and left in darkness, so I knew 
feat it would be very difficult to prove 
guilt," fee boy's father, Reginald 
Green, told Italian television. 

Asked whether he was disappointed 
wife fee verdict, he replied, "No. I've 
said throughout that I thought fee trial 
was being conducted in a thoroughly 
professional way.” 

Mr. Green, whose wife Margaret, re- 


See ACQUIT, Page 11 


See HEBRON, Page 11 


in 




AGENDA 


Head of Daimler Unit Resigns as Ger many’s Biggest Firm Regroups 


Honing In on Fugitive Financiers 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT -r- A monte-long 
power struggle between the two most 
powerful men at Daimler-Benz AG, 
Germany 's biggest industrial company, 
ended Thursday when Helmut Werner ■ 
resigned as chairman of Mercedes-Benz 
v jG, Daimler’s profitable luxuiy-car 
and truck division. ..... . 

The departure of Mr. Werner, 60, 
from one Germany's best corporate ad- 
dresses was forced by a. management 
overhaul ordered by. the chairman of 


Daimler-Benz, Juergen Schrempp, 
whose plan eliminates Mr. Werner’s 
position by dissolving the separate cor- 
porate holding for Mercedes-Benz. It 
would bring all of Mercedes' operations 
and its 197,000 employees directly un- 
der .Daimler’s -board, which Mr. 


both for steering Mercedes through’ a 
turnaround in 1993 and for his good 


Stferempp controls. 

Mr. Wsner, who had fought the re- 
organization for mqnfes, endorsed the 
new structure Thursday, but said he 
4 ‘saw hopossibllily " of working within 
-it. .'Mr: &hremppVnew hierarchy is 
expected to be approved by Daimler's 
supervisory board next Thursday . _ 

- in another indication of the highly 
competitive . terrain far- automakers in 
Europe; Fbrd Motor Co. said it would 
cut 1300 jobs, or about a third -ofits 
work force, at its secondrlargt&.British 
assembly plant as part of a drive to cut 
costs in its unprofitable European op- 
erations., (Page 15) 

A highly regarded manager known 


Tne Dollar 


Thuadwaa— 

_ 1-5945 

VBTBS 

H&B2S 

■55799 


T-fiBS 

1.6835 

116*75 

5 - 3575 . 


relations wife labor unions, Mr. Werner 
ranks as one of Germany’s most es- 
teemed industrialists. Just a week ago, 
Mr. Werner was the only German to 
appear on Business Week magazine’s 
list of the world's 25 most successful 
managers. 

Mercedes currently operates as an 
autonomous and sprawling concern 
within Daimler. Because it accounted 
for four-fifths of Daimler’s 105 billion 
Deutsche marks ($65 .72 billion) in sales 
and virtually all of its earnings, a 
Daimler executive said, "We have two 
chairmen, and that is one too many." 

• Few were surprised by the announce- 
ment. gjven Mr. Werner's distaste for 
the Daimler-Meicedes fusion and the 
rivalry with Mr. Schrempp that goes 
back years. Both men had competed for 


By skipping bail and fee United 
States ahead of his sentencing, fee 
former Hollywood mogul Gian carlo 
Parretti has become fee latest addition 
to the band of rogue financiers, in- 
cluding Robert Vesco and Marc Rich, 
who have put off their date wife 
American justice. 

Because of technological advances 
in international police work, chiefly 


fee growth in computer databases and 
fee lightning-fast transmission of 
photos, those fugitives are finding 
feat they can hide, but not run, at least 
not easily, after their initial flight. 

But for all that, the United States 
has had little success in persuading 
even friendly nations to tighten laws 
that provide safe harbors for financial 
fugitives. (Page 15 1 


Envoy’s Crash 
In U.S. Ends 
Sober Career 


By Lee Hocks tader 

Washington Posi Service 


PAQETWO 

England’s Battle Over Hedgeroirs 


THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

The Media and a 6-Year- Old's Murder 


Raytheon Deal Forms 
A U.S. Defense Giant 


INTERNATIONAL Page 11. 

Swiss Bank Records Were Destroyed 


See DAIMLER, Page 11 


Books..... Page 7. 

Crossword. Page 9. 

Opinion - Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 20-21. 


In a deal feat would create fee 
third-largest defense contractor in the 
United States, Raytheon Co. won fee 
bidding Thursday to purchase Gen- 
eral Motors Corp.’s Hughes Electron- 
ics unit. Raytheon is set to pay $95 
billion to acquire Hughes's defense 
operations. 

The combined company would 


trail only Boeing Co. and Lockheed 
Martin Coip. in size. (Page 15) 


TBILISI, Georgia — Two tragedies 
occurred on the night of Jan. 3, when a 
Georgian diplomat's car skidded out of 
control in Washington and caused a 
violent five-car crash, say family, 
friends and colleagues of fee envoy here 
in fee Georgian capital. 

The first, and most important, was fee 
death of a 1 6-year-old Maryland girl, 
Joviane Waltrick, a passenger in one of 
fee cars. 

But' another kind of tragedy, fee 
Georgians say, was fee sudden end to 
fee career of a young diplomat who was 
so highly regarded, hard-working and 


astute that more than a few people here 
maintained he could one day become 


prime minister of this impoverished 
former Soviet republic. 


Thwayda— 

SS 769-75 ?g7gg 


2 Years After Kobe’s Quake, Lives Are Still in Ruins 


former Soviet republic. 

That is fee view of friends, family 
members and high-ranking officials 
here who describe fee diplomat, Gue- 
orgui Makharadze, 35, as one of Geor- 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

Iruemafiondl Herald Tribute 




Andorm.™^,1000FF 
Antitafc_.lWO.ff 
Cameroon., t. 800 CFA 

Egypt .SESSD 

j Prance— ..i-HUM FF 

’ Gabon 11 00 CPA 

'G»«# ««360Dr. 

WOO lire 
Ivwy Coast .1550 CFA 
| Jordan :._1 J25D JD 


Lebanon — — U- 3.0® 
Morooco-.-- — 

Qatar 1 0DD Rate 

Morion 

Sauri Arabia -10.00 R- 
SenegaL-JJOOCFA 

Buriu.'. 225PTAS 

Tunisia. 1550 On 

uae.~ iaoo£»h 

UB.MIL(BftU-S1-20 


KOBE, japan — Her fece remained calm, but 64- 
' year-old Hisako Kohashi became animated, as she 
described fee .life she has led since an earthquake 
engulfed her home in fireand fee was forced to move 
into Atiny room that she shares wife her older broth- 
er. ' ’ '■ „ 

Her voice filled wife sadness, frustration and 

shame. 

"The toughest thing aboutEviag in a single room 
wift my- brother is changing into fresh clothes,” said 
Mrs. Kohashi, one of about 70,000 people still living 
fa jwfrrtan temporary housing twovears after an carth- 
omdre tore through this city westof Toiwo. 




H “Maybe if retaken my clothes off for a living I- 
could undress in front ofhnn,'* she said. “But I can’t, 
so when I want to change I seruHiim to the park to pick 
up rubbish," 


After some 6300 people died on Jan. 17, 1995, in 
Japan's worst earthquake in a half-century, there was 
tremendous sadness but also great hope and energy 
among fee 13 million residents who survived. 

The 300300 who sought shelter in schools, parts. 

3 es and shrines seemed determined to help one 
er rebuild their lives, and great progress has been 
■rrisn ig . 

• More than 200,000 have repaired their old homes 
and returned to them or have moved. After toppling in 
fee earthquake, the city's main, elevated expressway 
has been rebuilt and was reopened four months ago. 
The volume of goods passing through Kobe’s rebuilt 
port is approaching frill capacity. And tire city center, 
which once resembled a scene from a war, is brimming 
with shoppers. 

But for people like Mrs. Kohashi, who still live in 
. barracks-like compounds and are old, sick or poor — 
sometimes, all three — life is getting harder. Alter two 
years, public indifference to their plight has grown and 


they have suffered setbacks from officials in their fight 
for help. 

People still living in temporary compounds have 
become a distinct underclass, aid volunteers and local 
journalists say. 

Like the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki 
atomic bombings, survivors of the Kobe earthquake in 
temporary bousing are often referred to in derogatory 
slang. Children from the compounds are called pre- 
fabricated kids {kasetsuko) after the prefabricated 
buildings in which they live and the compounds, often 
isolated, are known as mountains of discarded old 
women (ubasuteyama). 

"People are just waiting for people stuck in the 
compounds to die or disappear," said Yoshihiro 
Tsujiuchi, a Buddhist priest who distributes food and 
relief supplies. 

People in temporary housing feel betrayed by fee 


gia's best and brightest hopes for the 
nature — and so resolutely sober that he 


future — and so resolutely sober that he 
is regarded as a bit of a square. It co- 
incides wife fee view of American dip- 
lomats who know him. 

It is also a view that is sharply in 


contrast — and utterly unfamiliar — to 
the perception of Mr. Makharadze in fee 
United States, where he is seen as a 


repeat traffic offender who police sug- 
gest may have been drinking shortly 
before the accident. 

The case has caused an outcry in the 
American media and the public, com- 
bining as it does the terrible deaih of a 
youth in the heart of the national capital 
wife fee hot-button issue of drunken 
driving and fee unpopular convention of 
diplomatic immunity. The intense focus 


See KOBE, Page 11 


See DIPLOMAT, Page 11 


r' : V 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY JANUARY 17, 1997 

PAGE mo 


This England / This Hedgerowed Isle 


A Struggle Over Cherished Terrain 


itr%< 

I \ ESSEX* 
ENGLAND % 


By Warren Hoge 

New York Times Service 

L ITTLE MARCLE, England — * ‘The coun- 
irie enclosed I praise, the other detightith 
not me.” Thomas Tusser wrote in his guide 
to English husbandry, and four centuries 
later that qu unessentially British preference for 
tidily arrayed land is being uttered again across this 
cherished terrain. 

Developers and agribusiness interests have been 
razing British land, and in the process ridding it of its 
most singular visual characteristic: the brambly 
hedgerows that articulate this rolling land and arise in 
any mind’s-eye evocation of English countryside. 

When the Romans arrived, this was already a 
hedged land; the only man-made thing older on the 
British horizon is Stonehenge. Generations of Bri- 
tons have kept nurturing the ancient ones and 
adding new ones. 

The destruction of what is now estimated to 
amount to more than 320.000 kilometers (200,000 
miles) of them began only after World War II. 

“Much of England in 1945 would have been 
instantly recognizable by Sir Thomas More, and 
some areas would have been recognized by the 
Emperor Claudius,” said Oliver Rackhara, author 
of "The History of the Countryside.” the envi- 
ronmental historians' bibie. More lived in the early 
16th century. Claudius took part in the Roman 
invasion of Britain in A JX 43. 

In just the last 12 years. 184,000 kilometers of the 
roughly 640.000 kilometers of hedgerows that 
crisscrossed England and Wales have been ripped 
out and burned. They have been sacrificed by 
developers of bousing subdivisions, business parks 
and suburban malls and by big farmers whose 
cumbersome combine harvesters and sprayers can- 
not negotiate the boundaries and comers created by 
the barriers. 

“Fanners like to say that hedges, come and 
hedges go, but as far as I can see, they are just 
going.” said Penelope Farquhar-Oliver. co-chair- 
man of the Herefordshire branch of the Council for 
the Protection of Rural England. Her 15th-century 
bam office in Little Marcle resembles a military war 
room, with maps, graphs, photographs and com- 
puter printouts on its walls chronicling the reduction 
of hedgerows over the centuries. 

Tim Eaton, the regional planning adviser of the 
National Fanners Union, said fanners were simply 
trying to "rationalize” the. landscape while 
hedgerow enthusiasts were “fossilizing” it. 

Ian Gardner, the farm group's policy director, said, 
"There is still a huge difference between even the 
most open of English counties and the prairie farming 
of Canada and the U.S.A., and I expect that dif- 
ference to be maintained for a long time to come.” 
That is little reassurance to people like Clive 
Aslet editor of Country Life. “Hedgerows have 
assumed a totemic significance in our feelings about 
the countryside.” he said. “They are a symbol of 
everything that seems good about our landscape. 

Aside from their historical and aesthetic value, 
they represent the country's most important haven 
for wildlife and plant species. And their destruction 
is causing the kind of alarm that arises over the 
disappearance of primary forest 
There is a centuries-old history of vigilance in 
Britain, a place with a proven passion for the care of 
its landscape. Time was when someone caught as 





Penelope Farquhar- Oliver of the Herefordshire branch of the Council for 
the Protection of Rural England is waging her war from Little Marcle, 


much as cutting a hole in a hedge paid for the crime 
by spending a minimum of two hours in the stocks. 

In the 17th century, hedge-breakers were 
whipped until, according to records in Essex 
County, “they bled well.” 

Nowadays, there is no punishment, and the sys- 
tem for detecting an act is voluntary and hardly 
scientific. "You just need to be driving about and 
see smoke rising.” Ms. Farquhar-Oliver said. 

S HE AND LEGIONS of other Wellington- 
booted celebrators of the countryside are 
lobbying the government to adopt promised 
regulations to a 1995 environmental law 
that have themselves become entangled in bureau- 
cratic bracken at Westminster. Under thai Jaw, 
someone removing a historic hedgerow would be 
subject to a tine of £4,800 (about $8,000) and 
obliged to replace it 

Advocates of saving the hedgerows won a round 
this month when a court ruled that the East York- 
shire village of Flamborough could not pull up a 53- 
yard hawthorn hedge to make a bowling green. 

Judge Tom CrackneU of Hull County Court based 
the decision on an enclosure act of 1765 under 
which the village had been ordered to “maintain it 
forever.” Just to show that he was acting on prin- 
ciple rather than some temporal whim. Judge 
Cracknel! noted that the hedge was "unkempt and 
scraggly” but still enjoyed the protection of the 
statute. The decision set off an outpouring of sen- 
timental editorial and legislative comment over 
endangered hedgerows, and it is now very likely 


that the punitive regulations will move forward. 

The winding hedges shelter footpaths and road- 
ways and provide corridors for plant seedlings, 
lowland animals and birds. Some of them are die 
reties of former woodland, some were planted in the 
Bronze Age, some are spontaneous, rising out of 
untended dry stone walls and fences. 

They figure in the landscape paintings of Con- 
stable and the poetry of Shakespeare, Swiff, Rupert 
Brooke, Edward Thomas, John Clare and even 
Robert Frost who spent foe summer of 1914 in a 
17th-century timbered cottage with a famous 
hedged path in nearby Dymock. John Betjeman 
wrote in his pastoral “Middlesex” that the only 
things preserving “our lost Elysium” were “a few 
surviving hedges.” 

Hedges are home to crab apple, spindle, 
hawthorn, hazel, beech, cherry, pine, plum, aspen, 
privet service, sycamore, wtutebeam. blackthorn, 
oak. ash, field maple, willow, elder birch, dog rose, 
broom, dogwood, holly beech and yew. In the 
spring they turn snowy with white May blossom, 
honeysuckle, daffodils, orchids and pale violets. 

They require care. “They exist” said Mr. As let 
the editor of Country Life, "because generations of 
men laid and tended them as lovingly as their suc- 
cessors might polish care on a Sunday afternoon.” 

Since they were often designed to keep cattle and 
sheep from wandering, they are robust and trim- 
ming them can be a muscular task. 

Such is the concern of the British for their flora . 
that pruners have taken to posting signs explaining - 
that they are helping, not harming, the hedgerows. 


The End of the World: 

Far, Far Off and Quiet 

Front Big Bang to 9 a la Eliot? a Whimper * 


By John Noble Wilfbrd 

New York Tunes Service 

TORONTO ■ — The end is not near. 

While others ponder the future in the 
approaching millennium or rue some 
impending "end of history” or “end of 
science.’ * a few astrophysicists special- 
izing in cosmic vision are casting an eye 
so far ahead that they dunk they can see 
the fate of the universe. How, they ask 
and are prepared to answer, will the 
universe end? 

Not with a bang, which presumably is 
how it all began, but with a whimper — 
as the poet T. S. Eliot said.' 

There will come a tune, safely off the 
scale for workaday concern, when not 
only will the sun die, but foe lights of all 
stars will also vanish. Left in the en- 
veloping twilight will be stillborn stars 
such as brown dwarfs, stellar ghosts 
such as white dwarfs and neutron stars 
and those powerful gravitational s i nks 
known as black holes. 

In time even these will decay and 
disappear. All that will remain in this 
bleak, darkened future will be an in- 
creasingly diffuse sea of electrons, 
positrons, neutrinos and radiation. 

This projected final dark era is ex- 
pected to begin at an incomprehensibly 
distant time: 10,000 trillion trillion tril- 
lion trillion trillion trillion trillion tril- 
lion years from now. 

If this does not exaedy spell the end of 
everything, it will effectively be foe end 
of foe universe as it is currently un- 
derstood. 

This, at least, is how two astrophys- 
icists from foe University of Michigan 
described the fate of foe universe in a 
report in Toronto cm Wednesday at a 
meeting of die American Astronomical 
Society. 

One of foe scientists, Fred Adams, 
called die projections "a quantitative the- 
ory of the future of the universe,” based 
on die assumption that recognized laws 
of physics will continue to operate over 
the very long-term future and another 
assumption, now widely held, that the 
universe is destined to expand forever. 

Mr. Adams and a colleague, Greg 
Laughlin. will publish a detailed ana- 
lysts of their research, tided “A Dying 
Universe,” in the April issue of the 
journal Reviews of Modem Physics. 

Mr. Adams and Mr. Laughlin insisted 
they had applied -a conservative inter- 
pretation of current knowledge and con- 
ducted rigorous calculations in devel- 
oping their far-reaching cosmic 
scenario. They also acknowledged then- 
debt to separate studies, published at 
least 20 years ago, by Freeman Dyson of. 
the Institute for Advanced Study in 
Princeton. New Jersey, and Sir Martin 
Rees of Cambridge University in Eng- 


land but said their own work had be- .. 
nefited from more recently acquired in- 
sights into cosmic evolution. J 

In what Mr. Adams called “a more 
complete vision of the future,” foe two „ 
astrophysicists scarred with the present .. 
“steUiferousera,” when stars dominate A 
foe universe. Star formation presumably r 
began a few million years alter the Big ^ 
Bang, the hypofoesized explosive origin 
of foe universe, and has continued up to ^ 
now, some 10 billion years. later. “ 

The following is how they see foe. ; 

future unfolding: . 

The sun is expected to die in about 5 
billion years, reduced to an exiin- ' 
guished remnant known as a white - 
dwarf. Earth might survive the solar 
death throes, but its oceans would boil* 
away from the beat of the sun’s final*, 
phase, and life — if it had endured that* 
long — would no longer be possible. 

But foe sun will not be alone in ~< 
passing from the stellar scene. 

Slowly, all the larger solar-mass stars- ■ g 
will turn to white dwarfs, and the more 
slowly evolving small red-dwarf stars - 
will assume more importance. The end 
of all star formation, foe end of the 
stellifer ous era, should come in 100 
trillion years. 

In the succeeding “degenerate era.” ~ 
most of foe universe’s mass will be in4_ 
foe form of brown dwarfs, which are^J 
start ike objects too small to shine from." _ 
nuclear fusion, as well as red dwarfs, 
white dwarfs and black boles. “. 

The white dwarfs will capture most of 
foe so-called dark matter, foe hypo-,, 
foesized weakly interacting particles 
that constitute most of the cosmic mass, ' ’ 
and the blade holes will be gobbling up» 
foe white dwarfs. 

Tbe decomposition of protons, basic’*- 
particles of ordinaiy matter, will destroy 
what remains of the stellar relics, ringing ■ 
down the curtain an foe degenerate era in ; 
10 trillion trillion trillion years. 

- Although the concept of proton decay, - 
somewhat analogous to radioactive de-J. 
cay, is widely accepted by physicists, 
experiments have failed to detect its slow | 
progress, so there is considerable un- • 
certainty surrounding any predictions ■ 
about it • 

The third period, the black-hole era. ; 
would be an even longer span of time ! 
during which even these objects with • 
their powerful gravitational forces j 
would slowly radiate away their mass - 
and disappear. ■ 

- After that will come the dark era — 1 
and even Mr. Adams and Mr. Laughlin • 
do not presume to say what will happen [ 
after foot. 

“This is not when the universe will ; 
end,” Mr. Adams said, “bot when any . 
given physical processes in the universe ; 
will cease to be important.” 


France Urges Traffic Limits 
To Fight Urban Air Pollution 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — The Environment Ministry 
on Thursday called for traffic restric- 
tions and free public transport in major 
urban centers across France in an effort 
to combat choking smog levels. 

The new proposals were made after 
high pollution levels — blamed on stag- 
nant weather patterns, rising auto emis- 
sions and winter heating — were re- 
corded in Paris, Lyon, Marseille and foe 
Normandy region two days this week. 

In Lyon, where foe regional council 
has already imposed a ban on heavy 
trucks in the city, a pollution alert has 
been in effect since Tuesday. 

The mayor of Lyon, Raymond Bane, 
pressed for passage of the measures to 
protect ‘ ‘the most vulnerable part of the 
population — the elderly and the 
young." 

A study last year by the French So- 
ciety for Public Health blamed pollution 
from car exhausts for nearly 1, 1 00 pre- 
mature deaths each year in major French 
cities. 

Environment Minister Corinne 
Lepage met Thursday in Paris with re- 
gional officials to discuss pollution risks 


and to confirm tbe government’s com- 
mittment to enact the new laws. 

The measures would “demand that 
councils impose traffic restrictions and 
make public transport free on those 
days,” she said in a television inter- 
view. 

* 'For the first time, measures looking 
at tbe prevention of risk to public health 
have been taken,” she said 

“But it is clear that we have to go a 
long way further and institute precise 
and concrete measures concerning auto- 
mobile traffic," she added 

Details of foe anti-pollution laws are 
still being negotiated but the govern- 
ment has the power to intervene in the 
case of extreme toxin levels. 

■ Rome Sets Traffic Ban 

City officials on Thursday ordered a 
five-hour ban on automobile traffic Fri- 
day in an effort to check rising air pol- 
lution. Agence France-Presse reported 
from Rome. 

From 3 P.M. to 8 PM., vehicle traffic 
in foe city will be restricted to public 
transport, ambulances and cars using 
lead-free fuel, the officials said. 


Traces of Explosives 
May Taint Innocent, 
U.K. Scientists Say 

Reuters 

LONDON — Scientists trying to 
find out if innocent people could be 
exposed to illegal explosives found 
traces of foe explosives in London 
taxicabs and airport luggage-han- 
dling areas, a British science 
magazine reported Thursday. 

Some forensic scientists said foe 
findings meant that people inno- 
cent of wrongdoing could be con- 
taminated by the traces and perhaps 
even convicted of a crime, accord- 
ingto New Scientist magazine. 

The study by the Defense Eval- 
uation Research Agency found 
traces of RDX, a chemical con- 
stituent of the explosive Semtex, in 
2 out of 20 Taxicabs based at Heath- 
row Airport in London. RDX was 
also found in the baggage handling 
area of Garwick Airport 

The article said scientists dis- 
agreed on whether foe findings 
meant innocent people could get 
traces of the chemicals on their 
clothes. 


Chicago 


uter 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A new computer 
system designed to ease a frustrating 
series of air traffic control failures is 
being introduced in the Chicago area, 
one of foe world’s busiest air traffic 
corridors. 

The modernized system, dedicated 
Thursday, is exjpected to sharply reduce 
problems that have led to hundreds of 
delayed flights in the Midwest and else- 
where. 

* ‘This is one of our big success stories 
in air traffic control modernization,” 
said foe acting federal aviation admin- 
istrator, Linda Daschle. 

“ft is great news for the traveling 
public,” she said, adding that it would 
increase foe reliability and availability 
of tbe air traffic control system. 

The system is known as foe Display 
Channel Complex Rehost. It is capable 
of processing 6.5 million instructions 
per second compared to 13 million on 
the system it is replacing. 

The old computer at foe Chicago Air 
Route Traffic Control Center in sub- 
urban Aurora was out of operation a 
total of 333 hours in 1995 and 326 hours 
last year, foe Federal Aviation Admin- 
istration reported. 

The new system is the first of five 


being installed at regional control cen- 
ters where periodic breakdowns of 
aging computers have disrupted air 
travel in recent years. 

Tbe next will start up at Dallas-Fort 
Worth in March, with ofoers to follow in 
New York, Washington and Cleveland. 

“Controllers welcome foe addition 
of new computer hardware that will 
allow them to better perform their most 
important task— ensuring foe safety of 
foe flying public,” said Barry Krasner 
of foe National Air Traffic Controllers 
Association. 

The new Chicago, center computer 
will process information from radar 


sites in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Indiana. 
Michigan and Wisconsin for display on 
tbe scopes used by air traffic control- 
lers. . 

A modernized air traffic control sys- 
tem is scheduled to be installed na- 
tionwide starting in 1998, with work 
continuing through 2003, but repeated 
breakdowns of older equipment forced 
foe federal agency to act more quickly 
for five-centers. 

The equipment for die five centers 
was budgeted for $63.4 million, but Ms. 
Daschle said ft was now expected to 
come in about $3.1 million under budget 
and 10 months ahead of schedule. 


Food Poisoning Kills a 17th Person in Scotland 


Agence France-Presse 

EDINBURGH — A woman in a Scot- 
tish nursing home died of food poisoning 
on Thursday, foe 17fo victim of an epi- 
demic that ravaged parts of Scotland late 
last year, the health authorities said. 

The announcement came a day after 
the government imposed tighter food 
safety rules to avoid a repeat of foe 
E.cou bacterial poisoning. Hundreds of 
people were stricken with foe illness, but 


most of those who died were over 60. 

The authorities said foe outbreak of 
the bacteriaT poisoning was traced to an 
award-winning butcher shop that spe- 
cialized in cooked meat pies. The owner 
frees criminal charges of negligence. 

“This has been an extremely serious 
and tragic outbreak, one of the worst of 
its sort mfoe worid,” Scottish Secretary 
Michael Forsyth said Wednesday in th^lj 
House of Commons. 


DEATH NOTICE 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


CARNEY, William L, 
of Essex Junction, VT, 
January 13, 199“ 
Survived by his brother, 
Matthew F. Carney. Jr., 
of Chestnut Hill. MA. 

A nephews and a niece. 
Memorial Service at the First 
Congregational Church 
in Essex Jet , VT. on Thursday. 

Jan. 16 at 10 a.m., and a 
memorial mass at Sl John The 
Evangelist Church. Wellesley 
MA. Sat. Jan 18 at 1 1 slid. 
Donations to the National 
Parkinson's Foundation, 
1501 NW 9th Ave., 
Miami, R 33136 USA 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BAOfiOJTS * MASTERS ■ DOCTORATE 
Fo; Wart, L/fe and Academic Experience 
TJrajgfc Convenient Home Study 

(806)597-1909 EXT. 23 
Pax: (3J0J 471-6456 
cjsag http: ( /www . pwu.com 
'*33^ Fa v sett denied resume tor 
EBH LB MUmi g w 
Pacific Western University 

1210 Auahi Street DeoL 23 
Honolulu, HI 968144922 



Cold Halts Northern U.S. 

MINNEAPOLIS (APj — Bitter cold, high 
winds and blinding snow paralyzed much of 
the Upper Midwest and tbe Plains on Thursday, 
stranding truckers, closing highways and 
schools, and causing at least six deaths. 

In Minnesota, Governor Arne Carlson 
closed all public schools, and many private 
schools followed his lead. “With the wind 
chill factor approaching 70 below across most 
of the state, we simply cannot allow our 
children to be outside waiting for the bus or 
take the chance of getting stranded on the way 
to school,” he said. 

In Wisconsin, blizzard-like conditions 
caused numerous traffic accidents and closed 
many schools, and road crews were struggling 
to keep up with blowing and drifting snow. 

Wind chills fell to minus-70 degrees 
Fahrenheit (minus-56 centigrade) in Iowa, 
where light snow with winds gustuzg as high 
as 42 miles an hour stopped traffic. 

Gulf Air Sets Big Cutbacks 

MANAMA, Bahrain (AFP) — Gulf Air 
announced Thursday that it would sell six 
Boeing 767 aircraft and stop flights to New 
York, Geneva and South Africa in an effort to 
prevent bankruptcy. 

The Bahrain-based airline will sell the air- 
craft from February to July as others it teased 


out last year return to service, company of- 
ficials told Bahrain's official Gulf News 
Agency. But the airline — owned by Bahrain, 
Abu Dhabi, Qatar and Oman — will still have 
to stop flights to New York, Geneva and 
Durban via Johannesburg, officials said. 

The restrocturing will also lead to cuts in 
staff, they added. The sales will cut Gulf Air’s 
fleet to 30 airplanes — including 1 1 B-767s, 
14 Airbus A-320s and A-340s — and reduce 
Gulf Air’s total worldwide destinations to 50, 
officials said. 

Japan Airlines agreed with Air France to 
begin a joint service between Tokyo and 
Istanbul starting April 1. JAL will operate a 
daily flight between Tokyo and Paris, and Air 
France will provide a daily flight between the 
French capital and Istanbul. (AFP) 

Greek formers threatened to set up bar- 
ricades on foe nation's highways again is a 
renewed effort to force more subsidies from 
the government They said the government 
had until Jan. 28 to meet their demands or they 
would set up barricades Feb. 4. In November, 
fanners parked 10,000 tractors on foe high- 
ways for several weeks. (AP) 

Malaysia and the United States will hold 
talks on giving Malaysia Airlines more U.S. 
landing rights. Transport Minister Ling Liong 
Sik said. It now flies only to Los Angeles/ APJ 


Forecast for Satun&y through Monday, as provided by AccuWealher. 


To** 

w> 1MW 
OF OF 
1601 BMa 
7W4 489c 

2)35 -aezpc 

1S/58 7/44* 

ItlS2 7/44 r 
BMC 1/34 B 
MB -1/31 pc 

tuj ease 

8/43 0/32 ■ 

«s ora pc 
uei rfu pc 
11/52 BM3c 
8/48 4/38U1 
1US2 3374 
4/30 -2/29 pc 
4/39 104 pc 
-1/31 -327*1 

8MB 307 pe 
Tam ISO* pc 
I3S 8/46 t 
7/44 5/41 r 
12/53 3/37 a 
1«50 OMB r 
5/41 -1J01 pe 
-WIG -13/9 pc 
5/41 -4/Z3 3 
12/53 1050* 
K7 -iSie 
7/44 S/41 0 
4/33 <209 * 
EMI -029c 
14/57 4/38 pc 
-4S8 -S/22 « 
EM! -aoope 
4/38 104 pc 
■iai -o/Z7 *i 
11/66 >04 C 

6M3 -1/31* 
C/43 0/32 pc 
*37 -lOf pc 


Middle East 

AfiuQnaa 23773 12*3 : 
Baku 13/53 8MB a 

Caw IH 1 7/44 pc 

Damaoaa 0/46 -i/9t pe 

Janusam aw« 1/34 pc 

Uaor 18*6 4/39 5 

Wyo* iM« 4 Q 8 a 


Con Oat Sc/ 
Duun 
EdHugn 
fSwanea 


Lai Pm«a 
Lai tun 
London 


Munch 

Mca 

Ode 

Part 

Pee* 

Raj*** 

non* 

SL P w urt ug 

BfccMwfc) 

Scactwura 

Tafcw 


Hi* UmW 
op cap 

18/81 1(1150 Ml 

rm* asspc 

3/37 - 8/22 pC 
14*7 E /43 a 
1263 7/44 pc 
7 M 4 . - 1/31 pc 
3/37 1 / 34 Ui 

7744 a 35 pc 
6/41 U 32 pa 
468 268 Ul 
17*2 SMB PC 
Was BMSr 
CM 3 6 Hi r 
7050 « 8 c 
V 37 - 1/31 c 
3/37 1/34 r 
W -esse 
SMB 6/41 1 
23773 17/821 
13/55 Wflr 
3/45 3/97 r 
W 48 4/29 C 
11/52 7/4* po 
4/38 JSEr 
■VZ2 - 7/20 m 
60S 429*1 
12*3 8/41 r 
■ 1/34 . 208 sn 
W 44 307 PC 
2/35 -2723 C 
•101 -4® pc 
13156 6/41 a 

0 Q 2 .1/31 an 
400 acerii 

405 104*1 

205 -329 c 
am sose 
7/44 2/36 PC 
8/43 1/34 pc 

ass oo 2 1 


21/70 laws 
16/81 AUSa 

17/82 7/44 pe 
lOSC 104 1 
SMB WSJ® 
18*4 307 a 
18*4 408* 


Imprint/ par Offprint, 73 rue de r£vangite. 75018 Parts. 






North America 

B/Hsrij> coicf Nr w* tfia 

eastern Great Lakes, 
Northeast and mkSAttanBe 
Into a arty next weak, 
although rt win turn less 
harsh in many areas Mon- 
day. Hie PWns nS mortar. 
ate to near normal anrt nor- 
mal ienta, whia Vie Rock- 
ies will be rather mild. 
Tumlne unsettled in the 

West by Monday, 

Noth America 


Europe 

UnaadM and fuming cow- 
er acran much ot western 
Europe, including London 
and Paris, this weekend 
Into Monday. Italy and 
aowheaet Europe wKf be 
maMy rty and raltier mid: 
northeast Euopa wfll have 
near- te above-normal tem- 
peratures. Turning unset- 
tled /n northeastern areas 
Monday. 


Asia 

Cold and mtinty dry across 
northeast China, 
Manchuria and both Kere- 
ns through the weekend. 
Turning colder across 
Jhifch of Japan, Including 
Tokyo, Ms w o eha n d. Sea- 
sonable in Hong Kong m»i 
a shower possible each 
day. Singspora and much 
of southeast Asia wfll be 
typkwBywwm and humid. 


J^owW 


Muigi 

A8MB 

Boston 

Chkago 

Ms* 

Darner 

□mfl 

itnUi 

Hoften 

Ua/WMaa 

Mem 


Taun* 

Mgb ImV 
C/P OP 

»32 -4/2Sm MrampoBl 
1/34 4ffi*s Mcrtreel 
-406 - 11/13 > Namau 

-a«-1Vt3* NowYoik 

WO 1/3* a Ortntto 
1509 -3/271 nomas. 
-ene -12711 pc SanFtwi. 

28770 16/84 04 SMB* 

80S ijQapc Toronto 
Mos afaape Vancouver 
22fll 14/57 pc WaaMnspon 


OF CF 
-1» «OUs 
-?1«-2fl/-1Bo 
24/73 18S*e 
-TOO -13/0* 
14/57 4/39 a 

IBM .flOSs 
1905 a/46 e 
on u*S r 
-12711 >18037 

am. war 

-4«S -12711 1 


^ 4^7,,P^prty ^- Qdnuif.M man.lMnSeaatm afenew (kata.. 
NOT. Moo. WWadw. *1 Rwp*.toWOTWwl data proWrtdCy/tocuWmthar, he. 01987 


Chtang Met 
Hanoi 

McCMUMl 

ESS? 

lamvaan 

•Mona' 
Karachi 
K. Lumpur 
K.ttnabWu 

Mar* 

NawDaH 

Ptnomftrti 

Piarte 

Rangoon 

Seoul 

Shansi*! 

SB- 

Tatfo 


aldara 

Cap* Town 


H* -tow* 
CM OF ■ 

•602 -130 1 

-ivcav-ii tc 

94/75 1708 pe 
-ESI <8718 0 
1BB0 603 pc 
. 2008 .HU9f 
1601 8/48 pe 

1203 7/44 C 
-13® -ITS PB 
1601 V 4 & 0 S 
-3S7 4716 8 


.180* 7M*F 
26778 1804 a 
T 702 1050 c 
3006 11/52* 
8108 22/71 pc 
3108 1305 a 
1609 9 / 48 C 


Latin America 

BmaMw 3 in 18766a ' 
Cwa* 290* 22m pc 

l£w 24,78 21/7DP8 

Mjfcoaty 1407- a/43 pc 
nodaJandm zb/be 22/71 1 
3M9 tt/B3* 


# 

-■ — rJ r 

DmUp 

L LMW 

OF 

f 33731 ? 

i 22/71 PC «- 
’ -7/ZD* 
i laeis 

1 8/48 * 

I 20188 PC 
1 77/70 pc 

1801 pe - - 
i am dc 
1 MOT pc... 

7/44 » 

• 28/731 - 

l iusape 

I 237731 J 

- 23/731 

■ 3008* 

■ 8/48* J 
\ 22/71 Be .1 

1 22/71 pc ' ’ 

I 23/73 pe - | 
-11713* " 

i ansant: 
i 23/731 . 

18/84 an 
! Wts 
1801 pe. 


7/4* pe 
I 1806 ■ 

I 11/520 'j 
I' 10150 a \ 

I jam po -M 
I ISM* rM 
I 8M6* >9* 
— —.U 

l 1*88*1 
l 28/71 PCJ- 1 

r 7t/7apB„, i 
s arstgc-Jl- l 

taa/m rr < 

L i 


Oceania 


23/73 T4 er« 

23/73 1W4JW 


Sifflj i4J57.ps- 
;ZV 73 Wt* di ^ 


. -T:.’!’??..- 1 £;.Cr~V..^ 




i ■ 
i 







*JS)Crt 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 




I : % James Brooke ' ; 

* ^ ew ' York. Times Service 

( ^? ado ~ M ^porters from as 

this sm^l^^vSvi 13 *“?? France . ronvergS/m 
dS?s^k£& M 01 ®tamaty, the newsme- 

no ^ anests were an- 


ers in Wake of 6-Year-Old Beauty Queen’s Murder 


Ramsey sang, danced and pirouetted her way to 
the top of the United States’ child beauty pa- 


nts. In death, her Barbie doll image has 
:ome a national icon. 


. Opening a windotyon the little-known world 
of child pageants, the nation's television screens 
inexorably replay capes of America’s Little Roy- 


K iy* **£*5^^ 


-i* - w wcar up me. mystery of 

S5JS2*!*? **■*<»“ beauty queen on 
Christmas night. Instead, two men — Brett Saw- 

S5 #l f 1 ? nnCT de P UI y sheriff, and Lawrence 
amitli, a former employee in a photo lab — were 
c harged Wednesday with obstructing govero- 
ment operations by peddling stolen crane scene 
pnotographs to a sameimi < Ai»t xKlniil 


beauty. 


'ealth, sex 
JonBenet 


al Miss — a precocious kmdergartner, dressed in 

sequins and rhinestones, her white baby teeth 
highlighted by contrasting fuchsia lipstick, and 
her large innocent eyes framed by blonde curls, 
tightened and styled in a Boulderbeaufy salon. 

On Christmas night, hours- after JonBenet 
received a new bicycle, someone sexually as- 
saulted her, fractured her skull, silenced her 
screa ms by placing duct tape over her month, and 
strangled her with a nylon cord tightened by a 
wooden handle. 

On the night of ttekillmg, only four people 
were sleeping in die 15-room house: JonBenet, 
her parents, and her 9-year-old brother, Burke. 

Since Dec. 26, 30 police officers, or one 


quarter of this city’s police force, have worked 
die case, the only murder in Boulder last year. ' 
Although detectives have focused heavily on the 1 
Ramsey family, the police publicly say they have 

no suspects. 

A security guard now intercepts reporters at 
the front door of the company run by John 
Bennett Ramsey, the father of JonBenet. At Chi 
Psi, die University of Colorado fraternity where 
ter stepbrother lives, fraternity brothers 


routinely chase televirion crews from the front 
porch. To handle the onslaught, the Ramsevs 


porch. To handle the onslaught, the Ramseys 
have hired Patrick Korten. an “expert in crisis 
communications” from Washington. 

“Job 1 is to try to make sure that the 50 to 60 


to 70 to $0 phone calls that come in each day are 
returned as best I can,” said Mr. Korten, a former 


returned as best I can,” said Mr. Korten, a former 
spokesman for the Department of Justice who 
handed such incidents as the Achille Lauro 
hijacking in 1985 and the Cuban prison riot in 
Atlanta in 1987. 

With a press list of more than 100 fax num : 


bers. Mr. Korten has resorted to posting the 
family's statements on an Internet Web site 
maintained especially for journalists covering 
the case. In the last five days, the site has 
recorded 14.000 hits. 

Mr. Korten is pan of a team assembled in recent 
days by Mr. Ramsey, a millionaire com purer 
entrepreneur. Declining to be questioned formally 
by the Boulder police. Mr. Ramsey has hired two 
handwriting experts and two investigators. 

As soon as it became known that The Globe, a 
weekly tabloid, would publish five crime scene 
photographs. Mr. Korten countered with a state- 
ment that “the editors of The Globe have shown 
themselves to be jackals, not journalists.'’ 

**We are a tabloid: we pay for information — 
everyone knows dial tabloids pay for infor- 
mation.” Michael Knhane. a vice president for 
Globe Communication Corp.. said Wednesday. 
The full-color tabloid, which claims a circulation 
of 1.3 million, paid S5.500 for seven crime 
photographs. One showed the wooden stick and 


white nylon cord apparently used to garrote the 
tittle girl. Two orhers showed the cord tied 
around one of her wrists. 

With fanfare. The Globe is matching a $50,000 
offer by the Ramsey family for information lead- 
ing to ihe arrest of JonBenet 's killer. 

In other transactions. Sygma Photo Agency 
paid S7J500 to a local photographer. Randy 
Simons, for his modeling archive of ihe tiny 
beauty pageant winner. CBS beat out a S4.000 
offer from ABC to buy a 1994 video of the 
interior of the Ramseys' house here. 

Instant paperbacks and movie scripts are 
already in the works, said Stephen Singular, a 
Denver crime writer who is working with a Los 
Angeles television production company on the 
outlines of a television movie. 

But the press attention is also causing a back- 
lash. 

” Vultures! ” people shouted two weeks ago at 
television crews that staked out the home of Miss 
Ramsey's grandparents near Atlanta. 


use 


By Jerry Gray 

New York Times Service 


WASHINGTON. — President BUI 
Clinton has broken weeks of silence over 
the ethics investigation a gnmct Newjt 
Gingrich, the Housespeaker, saying ftat 
both he and the public have grown weary 
of the partisan bickering over die case 
and urging lawmakers to pm it behind 
them and “geton with it" 

“I want it to be over, I want it to be 
over,” Mr. Clinton said Wednesday in 
response to a reporter's question about 


House Rule Targets 
Liberal Advocacy 


WASHINGTON — Last week, 
while all eyes on Capitol Hill were 
on the re-election of Newt Gingrich 
as speaker, the House passed a 
little-noticed rule, long sought by 
conservatives, that could be the 
first step toward stripping liberal 
advocacy groups of federal financ- 
ing. ... 

TTiis was not the declared in- 
tention of the measure, winch was ■’ 
buried in a package of rules that the 
House approved by a vote Jan. 7. 

Called ‘Truth in Testimony," 
tterukrequm^th^anyonefroma. 


before ihe* House. disclose how 
much money in grants ind 'con-' 
tracts the group h® received from 
the federal government in the pre- 
vious three years. 

The polffical subtext is thar the 
rule will disproportionately affect 
some of the ‘ liberal advocacy 
groups simply because there, are 
raoreofthenu . ... 

Supporters say Ihe rule will force 
some grant recipients to disclose 
that they depend on die . very pro- 
grams for which they are seeking 


grams for which they are seeking 
financing but are offering sup- 
posedly objective testimony. (NYT) 


A Medal for Dole 


WASHINGTON — President 
Bill Clinton intends to award fee 
Medal of freedom, the Highest U.S. 


civilian honor, an Friday to former 
Senator Bob Dote, his Republican 


apponem in the 1996 campaign, a 
White House official sard. 

-Mr. - Dole, 73^ was wounded 


while trying to rescue fallen com- 
rades in Itaty-jn 1945. (NYT) 


Quote /Unquote 


Attorney General Janet Reno, 
promising the Justice Department 
.would expand its effort to fight ra- 
cial discrimination: “There are 
some that think we have gone too 
■far, who think we have already 
achieved the aims of the civil rights 


ranovetnenLl say that is not so. Some 
I T\mericans, including some minor- 
ities, now question whether integ- 
' ration is-stifl a valid goal."'. (WP) 


the political warfare on Capitol Hill. 
“You know, the American people have 
given ns larger responsibilities. 

“I think in general, at least in my 
experience in my brief time here the last 
four years, way . coo much time and 
energy and effort is spent on all these 
tilings, leaving too little lime and emo- 
tional energy fin: the work of the 
people." . . 

Et was a statement that seemed as 
, applicable to Mr. Clinton’s . own 
troubles as those of Mr. Gingrich! 

Within hoursof Mr. Clinton’s appeal. 
Republicans were announcing that die 
fallout from Mr. Gingrich's case had 
prompted them to pursue yet another 
Investigation- 

Representative Thomas . Bliley, the 
Virginia Republican who is c hairman of 
the Commerce Committee, asked the 
Federal Communications Commission 
on Wednesday to investigate how a 
Florida couple picked Up a telephone 
conversation between Mr. Gingrich and 
other House leaders on Dec. 21 . 

The couple heard the conversation on 
a police scanner, made a recording of it 
and gave the tape to a Democratic mem- 
bo- of the ethics committee. 

Ax the urging of Republican leaders, 
the FBI announced Tuesday that it had * 
started, - with die concurrence of the 
Justice Department, an investigation in- 
to the taping of the conversation. 

Dec. 21 was die day Mr. Gingrich 
admitted bringing discredit to the House 
by ^fvingtbe committee false infor- 
mation a^d Jailing to consult' a lawyer 
a frolTeige course 

As. part of. the. agreement. he made , 
with investigators into the case, Mr. 
Gingrich had promised not to orches- 
trate any kind of attack on the ethics 
panel's, findings until after they had 
been announced. The tape recording 
iridicatecFthar-Mr. Gingrich bad broken 
that vow. 

‘ But the Democratic congressman’s 
role in giving die tapp to the media has 
turned the controversy in a different . 
direction. 

For weeks, the ^coifcmotioh over the 
ethics case against Mr. Gingrich has 
played out along witij news coverage of 
such Qmton problems as the Supreme 
Court case in which'jhe justices are to 
decide whether Paulti Cotpm Jones can 
proceed with her sexual harassment 
case against' th£ president. 

At Sir.' Clinton’s direct order. White 
House officials have refrained from 
commenting oa the ethics investigation 
against Mr. Gingrich. Apd administra- 
tion officials have sauted to worry that 
the infightmg-ortGapitblrHill over the 
matter might permanently sour the bi- 
partisan spirit that Mr. Clinton will need 
to get much of his agenda approved. 

.So Mr. Clinton said Wednesday, 
"The speaker should do whatever is 
appropriate, and we should get on with 
it, put it behind us and 'go oh with the 
business of the country. ’ ’ 

The White House spokesman. Mi- 
chael McCuriy, said Mr. Clinton had 
not spoken to Democratic leaders about 
the political firefighi and did not intend 
to intervene directly in the matter.. 

“That is a matter that the House has 
to deal with ap p ropriately." Mr. Mc- 
Cuny-said. . - 



Peru Rejects 
Rebels’ Call 


For Guatemala 


. ..&* 




To Join Talks 




C <rpi Ini h. Our Sljff Flint hipuh hr* 


v ■ 

r../ 


M) Spmen/Tlw v, Vurt. Tfeon 

PUT TO SHAME — A sign standing at the end of a driveway in Pittsfield, Illinois, as a condition of the 
probation sentence given to Glenn Meyer, 62, for bashing another farmer in the face with a truck fuel 
pump. Public humiliations, known as shaming penalties, are being introduced by judges across the country. 


Blasts Hit Abortion Clinic Building 


LIMA — Peru said Thursday it had 
rejected a proposal by rebels holding 74 
hostages that the Guatemalan govern- 
ment take part in talks to end the 30-day 
standoff. 

"The Peruvian government does not 
accept the proposal that a representative 
of the Guatemalan government take part 
in the commission." the Peruvian gov- 
ernment negotiator, Domingo Palermo, 
said at a news conference. 

He said it was the government’s be- 
lief that trying to bring Guatemala into 
the talks was an effort by the rebels to 
suggest a similarity between the re- 
cently ended civil war there and the 
situation in Peru. 

“With this suggestion the aim is to 
establish an analogy with a completely 
different reality.” Mr. Palermo said. 

He also said Red Cross visits to 
Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Move- 
ment rebels held in Peruvian jails were 
being suspended "to avoid disturbing 
the process of talks." 


The government is evaluating the rest 
of the rebel proposal, he said, which 
included the participation of an uniden- 
tified European country in the talks. Mr. 
Palermo did not say whether the gov- 


CoupiMtn £W Stuff Fnm Dnp&rhn 

ATLANTA — Two bomb blasts an 
hour apart rocked a building containing 
an abortion clinic on Thursday. The 
second bora,b injured severalpeople„ in- 
cluding police. and fire officials who 
answered the initial emergency call. 

Federal investigators said it appeared 
the clime was the target, but they could 
not rule out unrelated domestic terrorism 
as the cause of the explosions. 


The explosions, which went off as 
abortion rights advocates were announ- 
cing in Washington that anti-abortion 
violence had declined slightly, shattered 
windows, aeros? the street and terrified 
bystanders. President Bill Clinton con- 
demned the attack as "a vile and 
malevolent act" of terrorism. 

The first blast shattered one side of an 
office building housing the Atlanta 
Northside Family Planning Services 


center in the suburb of Sandy Springs at 
around 9:30 A.M. A little over an hour, 
later a garbage container in the comer of 
an adjacent parking lot exploded, in- 
juring several at the scene. 

Although the abortion clinic in the 


emmem had accepted that suggestion. 
On Wednesday, the guerrillas sai 


five-story building was identified as a 
possible target. U.S. Attorney Kent Al- 


exander said officials were also looking 
at otter dental, medical and legal offices 
in the building. (AP. Reutersl 


On Wednesday, the guerrillas said 
they were willing to accept a govern- 
ment proposal to set up a commission to 
negotiate an end to the siege. The rebels’ 
announcement again raised hopes of 
serious talks after weeks of broken 
promises by both sides. 

( Reuters. NYT) 


Cosby’s Son Killed 
After Stopping to 
Change Tire in LA. 


Martin Luther King’s Words Start Fight 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — The only son 
of Bill Coshy was shot to death 
along a Los Angeles freeway early 
Thursday, apparently as he stopped 
to change a flat tire on his sports 
car. The police said it might have 
been a robbery attempt 

The body of Ennis William 
Cosby, 27, was found next to his 
dark green Mercedes-Benz con- 
vertible, by a driver who stopped to 
help, the police said. 

Mr. Cosby's son died of a single 
gunshot wound, and a white male 
was being sought, the police said. 

Mr. Cosby, the 59-year-old 
comedian and television star, was 
told of the death early Thursday in 
New York, where GBS-TV’s 
“Cosby" is produced He and his 
wife, Camille, also have four 
daughters. 

“He was my hero,” a grim, 
puffy-eyed Mr. Cosby said 
Thursday as he went into his four- 
story house on the Upper East Side 
of Manhattan. 


By Kevin Sack 

Nn r York Times Service 


ATLANTA — Twenty -nine years 
after his death, the Reverend Martin 
Luther King Jr. is at the center of a new 
struggle, not over civil rights but over 
the property rights to his speeches, writ- 
ings and image. 

Aided' fry an energetic young mar- 
keting executive, Mr. King's family has 
become increasingly aggressive in re- 
cent years iii enforcing the hundreds of 
copyrights that the civil rights martyr 
placed on his intellectual property, in- 
cluding bis most revered speeches. 


While the family allows educational 
and other nonprofit institutions to rep- 


licate Mr. King ’s words and image with- 
out charge, it takes a hard stand against 
companies seeking to profit from them. 

Those efforts have provoked 
grumbling that the King family itself is 
profiteering, by monopolizing a legacy 
that many see as public property — 
spiritually if not legally. 


— After die family's prolonged dispute 
with die National Park Service in 1994- 


with the National Park Service in 1994- 
95 over control of a King museum in 
Atlanta, the intellectual-property debate 


has further alienated the family from 
many historians, journalists and even 
civil rights veterans. 

Few people question the propriety of 
the King family's efforts to banle compa- 
nies that have reproduced Mr. King's 
portrait on switchblades and refrigerator 
magnets or tried to market an ice cream 
confection called the Dream Cone. 

But other cases are less clear-cut In 
November, the King estate sued CBS 
for copyright infringement after the 
company had begun marketing a video- 
tape that included extensive excerpts of 
the network's own film of Mr. King's 
famous “I Have a Dream” speech. CBS 
had not paid licensing fees to the estate, 
which benefits Mr. King’s widow. Cor- 
effa Scott King, and their four children. 

Last week, with the help of Phillip 
Jones, a marketing agent based in At- 
lanta. the King estate struck a lucrative 
deal with Time Warner Inc. to produce 
new books of Mr. King's writings, mem- 
oirs by family members, recordings and 
CD-ROM’s of his speeches and a King- 
related Web site on the Internet. 

Mr. Jones, who became a close friend 
of Mr. King’s third child. Dexter, when 
they were students at Morehouse Col- 


lege in Atlanta, said the deal should earn 
the estate about $10 million a year by 
2000. Within three to five years, he 
predicted, the estate will be worth from 
$30 million to $50 million. Such high- 
profile business agreements have stoked 
a passionate debate about how Mr. King, 
whose 68th birthday would have fallen 
on Wednesday, would have dictated the 


use of his intellectual property. 
Mr. Kina, said David Garrow 


Mr. King, said David Garrow. one of 
his biographers, was utterly uninterested 
in financial benefit for himself and was as 
"uncommercial a person as you might 
find." After winning the Nobel Peace 
Prize in 1 964, he pointed out. Mr. King 
gave all the $54,000 in prize money to 
civil rights organizations, despite his 
wife's request that he put some of it aside 
for the education of their children. 

"I think the family has some right in a 
royalty sense, of course, to receive in- 
come from his writings, from his literary 
rights," he said. "But it's a question not 
just of degree or scale but of at what 
point does commercial aggressiveness 
really rub against the essence of King's 
impressively selfless personal legacy?" 

Supporters of the King estate call 
such arguments ludicrous. 


U.S. Chides Scientology and Bonn Away From politics 


State Department Repeats Criticism of Church’s 'Unfair’ Ad 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The State Department 
rebuked both tbe'German government and tbe 
Church of Scientology on Thursday over an 
acrimonious dispute between the two on tbe 
religious group's status in-Gennany. 

"We believe that the members of the 
Church of Scientology have a right to practice 
their religion in Germany and in all other 
countries,” said Nicholas Bums, the depart-- 
ment spokesman. ■ . ' 

The authorities in Bonn “have interfered, 
we believe, with the religious rights of many 
^ Scientologists, among them American dt- 

The German government contends that the 
U.S.-based church, with 30.000 members in 
Germany, is a threat to democracy -r a 
' Moneymaking organization with some traits 

. of onranized crime. , 

/ Last month, Germany announced it would 
keep people linked to the group out of certain 
.- public jobs, such as counseling and leaching. 

The governing Christian Democratic Union 
has ousted party members because of their 
J connection to Scientology. , . . 

The announcement prompted an aa m tne 
International Herald Tribune that was signed 
by 34 Americans, including many entertam- 
ment industry celebrities — among them the 


movie director Oliver Stone, the actors Gol- 
die Hawn and Dustin Hoffman, and the TV 
personality Larry King — denouncing Ger- 
many. 

The celebrities, none of whom are Sci- 
entologists. compared the Bonn authorities to 
the Nazis, and Scientologists to the Jews as 
victims. 1 ■ ‘ ■ 

The government of Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl has dismissed the ads as an insult to tbe 
.victims of the Nazis. 

Tbe State Department concurred in a state- 
ment Wednesday and repeated the criticism 
of the chinch on Thursday. 

“It is simply outrageous to compare tbe 
current German leadership to the Nad era 
leadership,” Mr. Bums said. "We have ad- 
vised the Scientology community not to nm 
Those ads, because die German government is 
a democratic government, and it governs a 
free people.” 

"we believe that the Getman government 
' ought to respect the religious rights of the 
Scientologists and all other religious com- 
munities in Germany.” he stud. 

But he added that (he Scientologists “have 
made a great mistake in launching this public 
relations campaign which incorrectly, obvi- 
: ously, and outrageously links the current Ger- 
man government to Nazi-type behavior.” 


• Two scientists rejected theories by O J. Simpson’s de- 
fense lawyers of planted and contaminated evidence, as the 
plaintiffs' rebuttal case in the wrongful death trial wound 
down. Brad Popovich, a genetic scientist, vouched for the 
reliability of DNA evidence, and said lab technicians had 
properly handled the blood evidence with "absolutely no 
evidence of any contamination whatsoever.’ ’ f AP ) 


• Sam Sebastian! Jr., a member of the famous California 
wine family, died after eating poisonous wild mushrooms, the 
first dftflrii in a recent outbreak that has hospitalized at least 
nine people in Northern California. Mr. Sehasnani, 32. died 
Tuesday, nine days after eating “death cap" mushrooms 
while on an outing with friends. (AP) 


• Denny’s Restaurants’ parent company. Flags tar Cos., has 
handed out $1.5 million to nine civil rights organizations, 
providing what one attorney called a “capstone” to the largest 
pubhc-acxxmmodatiotts settlement in U.S. history. The dona- 
tions were what remained of $54 million set aside by Flagstar 
in 1994 to settle two class-action lawsuits filed by several 
Secret Service agents and a group of students who said they 
had been discriminated against at Denny's restaurants. (WP) 


•Eugene Izzi, ihe Chicago mystery writer who was found 
hanging outside the window of his office, committed suicide, 
ihe Cook County medical examiner's office ruled. Dr. Mitra 
Kalekar, deputy chief of the medical examiner's office, said a 
t ranscr ipt of an unpublished novel contained on computer 

(IZ.l.. f-. 1 L.a IaiJ krta tn nftncllirL> thot \<fr I'm AT 


disks found in his pocket led her to conclude that Mr. Izzi, 43, 
took his own life. She said the manuscript 4 4 was like a script of 
his own suicide.” Some of bis friends and family had sus- 
pected foul play. (AP) 



Tbe Merchant Court. Singapore 
A delightful resort in tbe heart of the city. 


Htl.ix •« .< JW. o,m< njbt m th 

)%.irl of S'n.M,Vf/. 1 mii.il ftir-wf" I Vim I Heir in ibi 
then cmhJ,"! ,i rt.pM-iiylt iiii*n«plv>r fii‘l> 

Lin/niiftJ'fii'iJrn' (vul 

ifilllf* ifv .»tJ |ilin%‘ .ntirc .i II iu'I ■( JihW. rJ>n>ii* 
from ilv fiii.iiii'uf l>nh ,1111! th: failwii.ihh hiura .nil 
ml/rtjiiiiumi ,in,i! <:! ( tiila ijun ,wJ llt.il tjsiiy 
A> i» Aliakirci < luh 1I110I tou II nun rraj ,ire.iltr 
fnnltiin - nj>rc»s faun, In' pnnt/jr*. 

Lonifii mtnun rre.ihlii.-t- ■«",} rrtmnj JnuK An.! von 
ijit jitnJ L' Jwi't- ft lufly-fYinpjifJ fiir-nir--. 1 n.itt 
at lit iht tfwjtfil of ysur If It'll i.-flis Wvre J 
n'ntpufff jnJ f,:t -{.fiittri m.ii. him i'iUi 

ht ,iFT.nMrJ df inll Cj#* 

You'll jiuvnr ihr Abihnl l our! 

SiniWf’Orf (0 hr I be l>rtln! .iel.iu-jy, 

f'fwui/ly u'lw Y 0 H ui» 1 null) ijri .inn '•Mtwl WBIlnni 


1 

Fot rasttutiDDE 0 iM 5 « can 1 &S 1 437 ?2Ss Do Visit oui miringi sevsilt ji Mia.-'-'sno fatllf, com ‘iii pr r-mail id - irctioitUttnnnt! com 55 
30 Road Singapore 050281 let 1 &J 1 337 7188 F». tt5l 33-» 0808 Ji«- BS:03S6 RINTI Managed by Halu« inieinaimna! 


k-y- 




a/ro u as frosrsrcraaa 






PAGE 4 


ASIAIPACIFIC 


b 

u 

n 

n 

s 

1* 

d 

c 

d 

1 

d 

> 

a 

c 

c 

( 

i 

t 

i 

r 


Cracking a War Mystery 

A Chinese Mountain Reveals Fate 
Of 10 Americans and Their B-24 


By Edward Cody 
Washington Past Service 


MAOER MOUNTAIN. China — 
They were 10 young Americans on a 
temble night 52 years ago. trying to 
return from a raid on a Japanese-held 
harbor and put their bomber down 31 a 
forward base in China. 

They never made it. Their U.S. Army 
Air Force B-24 crashed into a cliff 1 ,800 
meters (6.000 feet) up the side of Maoer 
Mountain, southern China's highest 
peak, where dense bamboo forest and 
slashes in the granite cliff face swal- 
lowed die wreckage and its corpses. 

That poignant chapter in World War 
□ histoiy sprang back to life this week 
and took its place in the history of U.S.- 
Chinese relations. 

A team of Pentagon specialists, hik- 
ing down a boulder-strewn creek bed 
and rappelling over sheer drops, reached 
the crash site Tuesday and began the 
task of identifying the remains of the 1 0 
men who died far from borne. 

The Chinese government went to 
great lengths to assist the six Americans, 
making what seemed to be a particular 
gesture of cooperation ata time when the 
Clinton administration is under fire for 
dealing with Beijing in a friendly way 
despite discord over trade and human 
rights. The Foreign Ministry facilitated 
the work of U.S. correspondents who 
wanted to report on the wreckage and the 
U.S. Army's attempt to give families a 
hill accounting of the flyers’ fate. 


Local Chinese officials said the 
wreckage was discovered by two farm- 
ers who were scouring die slopes here 
for medicinal herbs. 

Maoer Mountain, or Small Cat 
Mountain, rises 2570 meters about 95 
kilometers (60 miles) north of Guilin, a 
major city in Guangxi Province. 

Jiang Juo and f£n Qiwen said they 
grumbled on debris from the wrecked B- 
24 in October after losing their way 
during the herb-hunting expedition. 

Informed by the two farmers, the 
local authorities passed the information 
up the chain of command. Several ar- 
duous expeditions, which officials said 
involved 500 people and expenses of 
$25,000, were organized to wing ar- 
tifacts. wreckage and bones down the 
mountainside. These included rusted, 
twisted tubes from the plane's machine 
guns, standard-issue .45 sidearms, a pair 
of glasses, dog tags and Indian-head 
coins from some crewman's collection 
— along with an array of disconnected 
femurs, tibiae and skulls. 

At November's summit meeting in 
Manila, President Jiang Zemin presen- 
ted President Bill Clinton with a video- 
tape of the crash site and various re- 
mains. Last month, during his visit to 
Washington, Defease Minister Chi Hao- 
tian gave Defense Secretary Wiliam 
Perry a pair of canteens and some dog 
tags from the crew, along with autho- 
rization for American specialists to start 
sifting through evidence on the site. 

"There’s much anticipation, and 



Second Lieutenant George A. Ward; Second Lieutenant 
>rge 

copilot In the front row: Sergeant Ellsworth V. Kelley, Staff Sergeant Anthony W. DeLuda, Sergeant Robert 


The crew or the B-24. In the top row, from left: Second Lieutenant George 

Robert L. Deming; Second Lieutenant George H. Pierpont, the pilot &ud Franklin A. Tomenendale, the 


L. Kearsey, Private Vincent J. Netberwood, Private Fred P. Buckley and Staff Sergeant William A. Drager. 


hopefully now there will be answers," 
said ihe leader of tire U.S. team. Jay Alan 
Liotta, deputy director of the Defense 
Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Of- 
fice, before starting up the mountain. 

The aircraft a B-24J with radar ad- 
vanced for its time, took off from a U.S. 
baseatLiuzhou, 100 miles southwest of 
Guilin, on the afternoon of Aug. 31. 
1944. Its mission, along with a number 
of other U.S. aircraft, was to attack 
Japanese shipping at the port of Takao 


in Taiwan and drop mines into the har- 
bor under tbe cover of darkness. 

Second Lieutenant George H. Pier- 
pont was tbe pilot. According to the 
manifest, he had nine others in his crew: 
Second Lieutenant Franklin A. Tomen- 
endale, copilot; Second Lieutenant 
Robert L. Deming, navigator; Second 
Lieutenant George A. Ward, bom- 
bardier; Staff Sergeant Anthony W. De- 
Lucia, engineer; Sergeant Ellsworth V. 
Kelley, radio operator, Staff Sergeant 


BRIEFLY 


Patten Hits Bade Over Ouster Taleban Reports Success 


HONG KONG — Governor Chris Patten, grap- 
pling with a growing scandal, hit back furiously 
Thursday at critics who suggested that his govern- 
ment had covered up why it ousted its immigration 
chief in July. 

The government says it asked Laurence Leung to go 
because he failed to disclose business ties as required 
under the rules, and it dismissed as groundless spec- 
ulation that Mr. Leung had spied for Beijing. 

Legislators say questions remain unanswered, 
such as who ordered an anti -corruption probe against 
Mr. Leung, why this was done, and whether or not 
other official reports exist showing he was a security 
threat. * '1 think there has been a lot of self-indulgent 
nonsense written and said about this case," Mr. 
Patten told reporters at the airport after returning 
from London. (Reuters) 


KABUL — The Taleban militia in Afghanistan 
captured a key airbase and a town north of Kabul in a 
major offensive Thursday, Taleban sources and wit- 
nesses said. 

The Taleban sources said their fighters had seized 
Bagram airbase and the town of Charikar, about 50 
kilometers (30 miles) from tbe Afghan capital, in 
heavy fighting against forces loyal to former Pres- 
ident Burhanuddin Rabbani. 

But a spokesman for toe ousted government's top 
military commander, Ahmed Shah Masoud, quoted 
by Iranian television, denied the fell of Bagram or 
any change of front lines than. ( Reuters ) 

India Protests Overflights 

NEW DELHI — India lodged a strong protest with 


Pakistan on Thursday, saying remote-cootrolied air- 
craft had made several recent intrusions into Indian 
air space. Pakistan denied any such intrusions. 

The United News of India said Indian Air Force 
experts were studying film of an incident on Wed- 
nesday when air force planes fired at a small, pi- 
lotless aircraft that had crossed into the western state 
of Gujarat from Pakistan. (Reuters) 

VOICES From Asia 

Seiroku Kajiyaxna, Japan's chief cabinet sec- 
retary, lashing out at Moscow for what be said was its 
half-hearted response to oil leaking from a wrecked 
Russian tanker, causing Japan’s worst-ever oil spill: 
"Some people have come to me and unofficially 
voiced concerns that Russia is thinking of the in- 
cident as someone else’s problem. I personally feel 
the same way." ( Reuters ) 


Seoul Is fi Sorry? 
It Railroaded ; 
Labor Law — ; 



William A. Drager, gunner; Sergeant 
Robert L. Kearsey, gunner; Private Vin- 
cent J. Netberwood, gunner; and Private 
Fred P. Buckley, radar observer. 

His mission accomplished, lieutenant 
Pierpont turned the plane bad: to Li- 
uzhou. But he was warned by radio that . 
fee base was under Japanese attack and 
feat be should divert to Guilin. But bad 
weather prevented landinglberc. Return- 
ing planes, many crippled by Japanese 
anti-aircraft fire, were asked to circle in 
fee milky clouds awaiting clearance. 

Fra- Lieutenant Pierpont and Ins crew, 
it never came. Off-course and approach- 
ing the mountain, they crashed into ob- 
livion, and feeir families never knew for 
sure wfaat ha ppened 

It fell to Mr. Liotta and his team to 
find out "It was a catastrophic crash," 
be said. “It looked like they went 
straight int o fee mountain top and the 
debnscaxne falling down the cliff." : 

■ News Brings Joy in the U.S. 

One member of the B24’s czew. Ser- 
geant DeLuda, fee engineer, died on his 
24th birthday. The Associated Press re- 
ported. His brother, Elmer DeLuda of 
Bradford. Pennsylvania, said in a tele- 
phone interview that hfcfemily wondered 
for years if Anthony might have survived 
oh an island. When he heard tbe news of 
the discovery, Mr. DeLucia said be was 
"shaking like a leaf." - - 

He added: "I was overjoyed to know 
at least be was found and we knew what 
happened." 


SEOUL — The governing party in 
South Korea apologized Thursday for 
railroading a labor, bill through Par- 
liament, but stopped short of promlsnSg 
to rewrite it; as strikers demand. ^ - 
The apology marked a step back from 
President Kim Young Sam s hard-line 
stand and came after violent clashes 
Wednesday between ihe police aqd 
40,000 workers and students in Scot* 

"It is very regrettable feat fee revision 
of the law was not smooth, for which I sun 
very sorry,’ ’ said Lee HongKoo. bead pf 
the governing New Korea Party.. * 
But Mr. Lee ruled out the possibility 
of rewriting the Jaw “for now." He raid 
only the law could be changed later 

if and when problems arose in its im- 
plementation. -* 

Mr. Lee’s concession failed to pla- 
cate union leaders. . _ : > A 

"ft is not even worth considerarion£t “ 
alL We are prepared for a prolonged 
struggle, and we are confident that pub- 
lic opinion is on our side," said Kwan 
Young KiL bead of the militant Korean 
Confederation of Trade Unions; wfajh 
is leading the strikes. 

■ "As the head of state," he saiji, 
“President Kim must think about sav- 
ing the economy, not his face." .. * 

About 10,000 South Korean, workers, 
angered by the arrests of three anUtam 
union leaders, marched Thursday on 
Myongdong Cathedral in Seoul, where 
seven strike leaders have taken $&£&$-. 

The police swooped during the night 
on the three leaders after the authorities 
warned feat North Korea was fanning 
unrest to topple the government- 
In response, Mr. Kwon, who was 
1 out in the cathedral along with 
six deputies, warned that strikes could 
be prolonged for two more months. The 
government estimates the strikes hatfe 
cost the ailing economy about $2i) 

Uoel in * — ‘ — ' * “ 


new law, passed daring a secret 
session of Parliament on Dec. 26, makfcs 
it easier for employers to lay off work- 
ers, while delaying for up to fiveyeajs 
the right to form trade unions. / ” ^ 
Seoul called in ambassadors from 
countries of the Organization for. Eco- 
nomic Coopoation aDd Development to 
ask for thefr.understanding on the law Jt 
also said it was sehding-'tedefe&ttib& to 


Paris to defend the law 

meeting Jan. 22. . (AP, Reuters, AFk) 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


-.- au. . 


■ — V . 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Caribbean 


SAWT MAARTEN, Natfwrfarafe Artite. 
Watertran Horn on Oyserpqnd, 4 bed, 
4 bath, pool boat dot* with 2 m. depth. 
3000* sq.m, tint Quad ocean access: 
Fax |SB1) 272-5101 US*. 


Ffencfi Riviera 


MCE CMS. Beatful Sfflom Bat 1 85 
sq.m. Located m pak. F1.5M Ideal tar 
professoral use. Tat Qi 5393 2302. 


BARGAIN! 8107 (Chime). Superb 7 
bedroom vita with i/2 acre Garden & 
pool FF3.71L Coast & Camay. The En- 
gfcft Es&to Agents on the French Rm- 
ara. Tat +33 (0)4 93 75 3t 07. 


Germany 


A PIECE OF LAM) from your native 
courtiy Germany. The artraomnuy i ‘ 
Idea, teepsates far you i your tarn . 
your fnerds or busness partners. Now 
available Special new year price USS 
5,000^71.. all indiKJw YJI.L User, 
tench phonefhu *49 (0) B9 - 929 4422. 


Great Britain 


H0I1ESEARCH LOUDON LTD Let us 
search tor you. Vto find homes / fiats 
to buy ano rent For tmfviduaJi and 
companies. The purchasers profession- 
id*. 7 daya-a-wek. Tel: *44 171 B38 
JOBS Fax * 44 171 838 1877 
MtolfewJxiineGaBichxojA/hom 


Greece 


STR0S SLAM), GREECE MOO sq.ro. 
land with 100 to. waterfront Swim on 
your house o! 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, elec- 
tric had. tafeca, My furnished. US 
IS or DU ttrita. for Whar Into cal 
Germany (*40) 0221 - 496199. 


CYCLADES - Swrifos htarsiZ-story W- 
dSortf lone, 58 bqml PrssUyrxe tea- 
son, firoptace. grand floor engraved In 
On rods. Bafcony wth pananfc view 
of the Aegean. 5130,000 negotiable. 
Owner tax *■ 301 / 7243145. 


Paris and Suburbs 


IKh, 31 BLD SUCHET - Exctyonaf, 
luxuriously decorated. 130 sq.m. 4£ 
rooms. 3 rd floor * mad's roan, cellar. 
Urtertabte prfra Vki Mey 1pm to 5pm 
or Tat ftmer 01 45 27 84 70. 


F0CH - EXCEPTIONAL 

Saw tide • Top Boor dipfex 
Superb 280 mm. * no sqm. tenace 
(parity fawned! 2 or 3 (Ktaxns. * 
2 potto, 2 maids’ room, 2 cefere. 
FT 13 Mol Tat +3J {0)4 93 61 48 ML 


PARS 16th North. High dm apartment 
300 sqjiL, 1st floor. 15 squn. enhance 
tai, 7 roars. 5 bedrooms: 3 wtfi baft 
en Bufta, i wth show room, at^pped 
tichen. Balcony feeing Bor. Coranut 
caftn by Moor states* on private 
garden ioo sq.rn. * Uakfs room + 
show + WC. irtergroin) garage *3 
estate Tat *33 |W 1 45 20 56 ffl 


FRANCE 



« MIPIM really helps in reducing 
our telephone bill... » 



Claude Heurteux, 

Owiiaai) of Grape Augute Thound, Fnace 


Rot CLiudc Hcurtmi\ - MIPIM'«6, oublvd us to nwt who are hopostibk n contact otherwise -• 

For its Blh edition. MlrtM'97 will caifter over tr^OO fxuTiapane. from 50 countries representti^ more than 2200 
companies. An unpiwxded oppommin to meet as Claude Heurteux confirms, the ley professionals of thr real 
estate In Ic manorial scene under m root. Foar day^ ol intensive, high-level meetings and negotiations al the 
world's Urges! rujl estate ptuf&sloiul v- ent of in kind. 



| '-~ y . 

Tender Notice following judicial liquidation 
Premises and Businesses pf NI^iBife Establishmab 


*Le PAiACi* and "L PRIVILEGE" 

in Paris (Ptfa) 






«d 3/3 MsC&fc 

Building with a suifece q»ce of about 3^300 sqm. on 6 levels 
(historic landmark dance hafl) 


All offers should be d< 
by January 3L 1997 at Span. 


at fee offices of 

Maltre Yannick PAVEC, authorized agent 
7 rue de Ifcubigo, 75001 PARIS/ ana 
at fee Gteffe da Inbanal de Commerce de Baxis 
1 Quai de Corae, 75004 PARIS 
(Service des procedures collectives) 

Thedos^ambeamsuhediriTheTrOnmtddeOmmerce 



ISIORMMIUX' \XI' N-\; f ()\ !Ui NT! : 

• .‘«7rV»'U\r./tU-. ,, *.£! / (k'lM'f • iV.'.lpJ 


WEST INDIES 


StBARfflEUMT 
FRENCH WEST MMES 


privacy. 

v^ws. Uni 

hose has ferae irfng room. tWng roan, 
raodamttefei. room araiJal 

tadi. Bedroan feuse has 3 rfoubfe 
bedamsOi bethrooms. (tod fedtfeo 
hUeL Qstfeite sunfedu art ferafed 
pao. The property has an aratartsito 
toranataertf tasew 
pmaqy. Fa safe owner. 

Fuc 212-155-8552 or 
fcsTet 212-SW-J 155 at 221 USA-=£ 


IVcxt Spedai Beading 

Real Estate In aid 
Arran! Paris 

on January 24, 1997 

For nfarma&on, cortftKl ywr local 

IBZ repwartSwaror Aric 
•fcU +53 (0) 1.4L43.93R5 
Boa 433 (0) 1^1^3.93.79 


PARIS ETDOJE . 

DHECTOWBL AVENUE NB. 
CHARHWG APAH7HENT 
4 moms HO ayi, tet floor, smy, 
doriifa eiposute, fan avenue & garden) 

anweat ffinwir«K«inQ, z oaoooms, 

2 OatoB (1 martris), Djp&wds, critt 
— (f comfamhlB "a aWe*, 7b few* • 

excBkrt rental revenue). FF 3,1 trifen 
Tfet ffl 40 54 80 67 Fax 0T 47 £5 47 10. ; . . 

HOUSTON, TEXAS, State of tha art 2 
barioom, 2 112 bath perthouse, vrffti. 
panoramic dms. ham betffing, at 
amerita. Desjjpwf ferferoeacafeen- . 
tertaWng. Owner transferred. US - 
S89SJU0 Ntytabfe FAX 2}2fflM8S7. 

WASHWGTON tUL, (UcLaan) .com- . 
ntaErttjr teaed 5 bedroom cotona, 2car. 
page USE 374^00 41-703 535 8277 . . 

USA Farms A Ranches . 

HBWTOFPARB 
LESAJKT L0U6. 

Ram and ratal, 145 sqJn* 

2 beebena, 2 beta eeangi 
Beesta Vm on dw Sana. : 

_ Tel <33 Q1432KQT or 0454091 

MZOM-OWNS HUST SELL bearti- ‘ 
Mid 80 acna ranettand. Tate ow total 
- prfae: H8JQ0JXLJM SSLOO itevn l 
■ .mortyr. VfrtacPA Box 3000; MtsyJe, 
Nevada B9Q24 USA., . 

PARC DE ROCOUENCOURT, Dear 
VERSAILLES, tty date apartewifl fa • 
perfect enter. 150 sqm 1 50 aqm . 
loggia. Vary mial, ctasa West ttyway. 
Bultiup nraien. aferm. bullet proof 
door, 2 ptftatttar. Tal 01 3555 B71B 
or 04 68 22 3 68 Ftt 04 68 03 14 05 

Monaco 

Bj 

Portugal 

MARBLE. Vast maibfe oropaflas to 
Ponoo a} for sale, fek ERUSSaS 
|+32^7O7fiLO0 

FA R K^ACENCE 
La ParfcPrim . 

. . 28 mmm da it Coata ' 

; -m- 88000 Honto CM) 

Tal (Vn S3 25 18 B0 
- for (177) 93 25 35 1) 
wvrwranfecariaroteada^ aganra 

Switzerland 

mmmUm 

Real Estate . 
for Rent 


Germany 


USA General 

US. PTOPSmES FOR SALE 
IfiOO apefafart unb. Great toooma. 
Aafang S2BWS. No vaonfei. 
CtaK wB cooridar esnfag Id T.O. 
Ttf 81MSW77J Fez 51MB8-1772 

HoBand 

. RBttHOUSE HTBMATXMAL 
, _ ItilfertJland 
far (snri) fmfehBd housarilris. 
31-205448751 Fac 31-2M465900 
1$£1, t083 An Anflfentan 

USA Reafdemtal . 

NYOHflh fare (0*0777*1 St « Rooms 

CWfflOS OFF 5TH AVEN1S . 

PlBitof condos him S275fl0M895fl00, 

Parts Area Furnished 

READY to HOVE M 
Tri *33W1 47^8012 Fax (0)14551757? 

low common dutpsa'reri sdau lam 
538041442 fa 25 ft hnmhotm. 
1-2 BedRNBB4repbcra. 

Joan tatt (2ia 05IMS2D 
Jams Bredn (212) 7S94BD9 

D0UGUS ELL9W1 

USpitovMtftemconi 

&.«. FUKffiA Useppa WmI SkU- 
edwMnRtyatdcntoinn.poOLten- 
n& croqwt pnrato tfacfc chany Boors 8 
+ 2 bedroom gtssf 

par mSiSn Italy ®^B 042 t 9 

tflRGBOATXET, FL Peanafate nri 
estate tanrieai Laay popate. 

Sham, Ron BaWma & Assoc, fefc - 
941-387-7193: Fax: 941-383^248 USA; 
E4fet lSK70team ( 

i 

\ 

■ oaiBstB, 45 mm. + bafccrw fern? 
+ dBQB. Tat ^(qjt 


Embassy Serw& 

V0UR REAL ESTAtf; 

, WBTT1NPAHS . : 
Tri: +33 (D)f 472D20JB. 


:o 


CAPHALE ■ RW73VKS * 

Handjrotad qufey (parinianfe, tf day 
Paris and subuts , 


.ffi RLT -a f aqjn. STUDIO + ttteo 

+ htfhroon fr during lowntoora 

faCBferijn sedwtof prfnto mm F3fl» 
rtusflfectrictor. Tel +33 {0^47 4838 7® 
(afec Jar. Jara Iran 10 am to 8pni * 


BOULOGNE ms fetrotart SSi 
W. 2/3 room*, nwfe rad' 

M*fe.FFB4XJOnBtmflCOi 

•Tfe «33 (0) 1 46 05 48 07 Fta 4806163& 


URGE, LUXURIOUS,' ELEGANT, 
tarfraww, nan to aw Tow», Fid 
«rtWd..T€t 311MSM2B0 USA . ■ 


PARIS m Steal 


45 


FnftM fumWied, Mt Sow, Kt F7.™ 
mOti. Omar « p),i W6 nag 


gEMA^vferafimisi 
. lufly tenWnd 2 -bedrocm ] 

Lee He**. F115Q0.Ts 



Parts Araa Unfurnished 


. "I®!! 

■ .^jg^^nwfentOtt Safes, 

2 paring FEOQO+chana 

THu +33 (0)1 45 O 52® 


WWOIE, 45imai flat 1» a 
Fttm Bpfentfid tfew on 
Swfe and PariA dm i - - 

metro, bus. FFUL500 da 
Trip 142 89 50 02 or | 


USA 


ROW YORK, WALL STREET 
randed OUricL Battery Parti 
.rishsd 1 bedroom b loagi 
feAttS- Mari far taMdral { 

OfUa_t h. ... ZT-i 


las * 1 ^ GnaiJWfcntCii 

PmiytiUira: 212^48-9223, Fac 


FULLY flBNSHB 

^ fe USS 0 ®- *** bi 

&f. Tflt 212^55-7272 art. 19 IE 


Internatio nal 
Herald TVibune 
- ads work 








Act 



•f - » B ^ 

























































O-^a t cr f ra 3- □> 3 5 


Pressure on Milosevic 
Increases on 2 Fronts 


Agencf Frame -Prrsse 

BELGRADE — President Slobodan 
Milosevic of Serbia was under increas- 
ing pressure Thursday at home and 
abroad to recognize opposition victories 
in local elections. 

As almost 30,000 people took to the 
streets for the 59th day of protests, the 
republic's Supreme Defense Council 
wanted that the politics] crisis was dam- 

No Yeltsin Ouster 

Agence Franee-Presse 

MOSCOW — Deputies in the Rus- 
sian Parliament dropped an attempt to 
begin impeachment proceedings against 
President Boris Yeltsin on Thursday, 
although there were continuing calls for 
him to resign because of ill health. 

Spending his ninth day in a hospital 
for double pneumonia, Mr. Yeltsin was 
“markedly stabilized” and X-rays of 
his lungs showed a * ‘positive tendency “ 
in combating the illness, the Kremlin 
said in a statement. 

The Duma Council decided not to 
include impeachment on the agenda of 
Friday's session, deputies said. 


aging the country’s international stand- 
ing. , , 

A Serbian opposition leader, Zoran 
Djindjic. told demonstrators that hard- 
liners in the Serbian regime were still in 
control and that Mr. Milosevic was not 
ready to compromise over the elections. 
“We have doubts and these doubts are 
growing daily.” he said. 

Both" the European Union and the 
Organization for Security and Cooper- 
ation in Europe turned up the heat on 
Mr. Milosevic, issuing strong calls for 
him to recognize opposition victories in 
municipal elections on Nov. 17. 

The European Parliament called fora 
freeze on economic and other relations 
with Belgrade in a resolution urging 
“that no discussions be begun on im- 
proving relations with Yugoslavia.” 
Meeting in Vienna, the 54-jnerober 
Organization for Security and Cooper- 
ation reiterated its demand that the Ser- 
bian government recognize opposition 
victories in 14 towns and cities where 
the results were annulled. 

The authorities have acknowledged 
seven opposition victories but even 
those could face legal challenges from 
Mr. Milosevic’s governing Socialist 
Party. 



STREET SUPPORT — A couple in Sofia encouraging students who continued to march and protest 
nationwide in hopes of forcing the Bulgarian govenment to agree to demands for early elections. 


Ex-French Defense Chief Linked to KGB 


B R ! E F L Y 5 U R C 


By Joseph Fitchett 

tnie matianal Herald Tribtuw 

PARIS — Offering fresh evidence of 
a fanner French defense minister’s Cold 
War links to the East bloc, a French 
magazine on Thursday published what 
it said are KGB documents showing that 
the late Charles Hernu was a regular 
paid informant of Moscow from 1953 to 
the early 1960s. 


The disclosure of a direct KGB link 
provides Soviet confirmation of the im- 
portance that Moscow accorded Mr. 
Hemu. But. like earlier reports by the 
same magazine that he worked for 
Warsaw Pact intelligence services as a 
fledgling politician, it sheds so light on 
the cmcial years of his career as he rose to 
the top of the Socialist Party and became 
defense minister in the early 1980s. 

Former Reagan administration offi- 


Surgeon-to-Patient HIV Case 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — In a rare medical case, 
officials say it is “highly likely” that 
a French surgeon passed on the HIV 
virus to a pattern during an operation, 
and they called for greater caution but 
no widespread testing. 

It is only the second known case of a 
health professional infecting a patient 
according to Professor Luc Momagnier 
of the Pasteur Institute, who co-au- 
thored a report on the subject A Florida 
dental surgeon is believed to have con- 
taminated six patients. 

Dr. Patrick Cohen, an orthopedic 
surgeon, apparently passed on the vi- 


rus in 1992 or 1993. during which 
witnesses say he cut his hands on a 
number of occasions. Dr. Montagnier 
said in the report released Thursday. 

' ‘The hypothesis that the patient was 
contaminated after being exposed to 
the surgeon’s blood during the oper- 
ation is highly likely." he said, adding 
that “it is not a scientific certainty." 

Officials said the doctor contracted 
the virus while performing surgery in 
1983. but was unaware that he was 
seropositive until 1994. The surgeon 
alerted authorities who began HTV tests 
on nearly 1.000 of the his patients. One 
was found ro be positive. 


rials who dealt with Mr. Hernu when he 
was in office said they still viewed him 
as a vigorous ally in combating Soviet 
subversion at the time. 

The allegations — that he supplied 
political information for payments — 
imply that Mr. Hemu could have been 
compromised even 20 years later as a 
cabinet minister, French specialists 
said. If confirmed, tire report in L’Ex- 
press would make Mr. Hernu the first 
cabinet-level officer in a Western demo- 
cracy to be exposed as a Soviet agent 

By taking Soviet payments, allegedly 
to finance his electoral campaigns and 
pay his rent as the magazine said, Mr. 
Hemu would have been vulnerable to 
KGB blackmail designed to make him 
“eavesdrop” for Moscow on top-level 
Western policy-making, according to an 
expert quoted in Le Monde. 

Another possibility is that French and 
perhaps U.S. counterespionage agen- 
cies detected Mr. Hemu’s activities and 
used the material to persuade him to 
work for the West while pretending to 
submit to Soviet blackmail. 

The L’Express article centers on a 
Soviet report, dated 1962, describing Mr. 
Hemu as a KGB agent code-named ‘ * An- 
dre." The dossier. L 'Express said, was 
given to the French government in 1992 
by a Romanian intelligence officer. 


P2 ‘Grand Master’ 
Arrested in Italy 

ROME — Licio Gelii, the former 
grand master of die outlawed P2 Ma- 
sonic Lodge, was arrested Thursday 
after Italy ‘ s highest court confirmed his 
sentence, Italian media reported. 

Reports said Mr. Gelii. whose lodge 
was at the center of a political scandal 
that brought down the government in 
1981. has a prison sentence of three 
years pending against him after the 
conclusion of his final appeaL 

The P2 lodge came to light in 1981 
during an inquiry into the banker 
Roberto CaJvi, a member who was 
found hanged in London tire follow- 
ing year shortly before the collapse his 
Banco Ambrosiano. Members of the 
lodge included top politicians, busi- 
nessmen and military officers, and its 
exposure brought down the govern- 
ment of Amaldo Foriani. (Reuters) 

Rome to Establish 
Reform Commission 

ROME — The Italian Senate on 


Thursday voted to set up a parlia- 
mentary commission to reform tire 
constitution and make the political 
system more stable. 

The measure is expected to go be- 
fore the lower house of Parliament 
next week for final approval . The Sen- 
ate vote . followed months of 
wrangling between the two main 
political coalitions over the scope of 
reform. • (AP) 

NATO Chief Stresses 
Talks With Russia 

VIENNA — Javier Sol ana 
Madariaga, the NATO secretary-gen- 
eral, said Thursday he wanted to have 
negotiations on relations with Russia 
“on target” by the time the alliance 
meets in Madrid in July. 

The meeting of the 16-member 
North Atlantic Treaty Alliance is ex- 
pected to decide on which former So- 
viet bloc countries would be invited 
into an expanded NATO, a move that 
Moscow has opposed. Mr. Soiana de- 
clined to elaborate on reports that 
NATO was planning to offer incent- 
ives^ Including economit assistance 
and arms conttol change.” (Reuters ) ' 


Bonn and Elf 
Deny Report 
On Common ] 
Income Tax 


By Tom Buerkle 

International HeratJ Tribune 

BRUSSELS — A British newspaper 
report that a group of countries l ed by 
France and Germany were secretly 
planning to impose a common income 
and social-security tax regime in coun- 
tries adopting a single currency was 
roundly dismissed Thursday. ■ 

“It’s completely untrue,” said a 
spokeswoman for Theo Waigel, the 
German finance minister. 

Officials at the European Commis- 
sion said that EU treaties leave income 
tax exclusively under the control of na- 
tional treasuries, giving Brussels a say 
only over certain indirect taxes like 
value-added tax. '' 

Michel Bamier. the European affairs 
minister who is negotiating changes in 
the EU treaties for France, also denied t 
The report, attributing it to pre -electoral ? • 
jitters in Britain over European policy. 

“From where T sit. and I am very 
involved in these negotiations, I can tejl 
you 1 have never heard of any such 
thing,” be was quoted by Reuters as 
saying. ' 

But although the story, in the London 
newspaper Toe Independent, appeared 
to have little foundation, it focused at- 
tention on plans for monetary union and 
EU reform that portend a radical change 
in the way Europe conducts -its busi- 
ness. 7 

There are fears in London, fanned by 
natio nalist sentiment ahead of die gen- 
eral election due by May, that Britain 
will be left on the sidelines by those 
changes. Those fears were underscored 
by .Tony Blair, the leader of the op- 
position Labour Party, in a newspaper 
interview Thursday. He told the Finan- 
cial Times he was concerned about a 
French -German proposal that would al- 
low some EU countries to deepen co- 
operation without hindrance from re- 
luctant partners. Such an arrangemenf 
could lead to an exclusive, inner core of 
countries and marginalize British in- 
fluence in Europe, he said. 

In a move that was likely to feed such 
fears, Yves-Thibault de Silguy, the EU 
commissioner for monetary afthiis, sard 
Thursday his services were preparing a 
report on bow some countries might take 
advantage of a new flexibility clause to 
coordinate economic policy more closely 
after the adoption of a single currency. A 
commission spokesman said fee report 
could indude proposals to move toward 
more common rates of value-added tax. 

•■ excise taxes, corpora®? tax; withholding 
*■ ; t£x bn' interest hicome add even Social 
security payroll' charges. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAY'S 


REAL ESTATE 
MARKETPLACE 

Appears 
on Pant- 4 


Business Opportunities 


IMMIGRATION OPPORTUNITIES 
Obtain Pamanott RaWency. 2nd 
Cowslip 4 ?rxJ ftasioori ns Economic 
trwesmera, iQC% legal Gcwmntrf 
Programs, staring al $28,000, ssued m 
90 to ISO days. Funds held in Escrow 
unU you recave your documents. 

MfEfMVOM. ATTORNEYS SA 
CARIBBEAN-. Fax -H590J 290 507 
Of Fax: HS9N 290 084 
E-AWL KTATTSAOLCOM 


Escorts & Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON - PARIS 

THE (WEST & THE HOST SINCERE 
IB - 38+ INTERNATIONAL 
BEAUTIFUL 4 ELEGANT STUDENTS 
SECRET ARES. AH HOSTESSES & 
MODELS 4 

AVAILABLE FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

BEVERLY HILLS 
NEW YORK 

SERVICE WORLDWIDE 

Escort Agency Craft Cards Welcome 

TEL LONDON *+44(0) 

0171 589 5237 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

WnkTs first & Wmj Eidusiw Seroce 
models. Beauty Queens. Actresses 
iUtflnguaf travel Companions 

Hdqh. 212-765*7886 NY, USA 

wwwjntf-eseortsxom 
Swnce mrtdwde. Cre4i cants, checks 
accepted. Vim ndeos & photos n 3ta 


BERLIN - 'MASON'S' 

ftwate Escort Service 
Tfit 0172 ■ *5 55 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
INSURANCE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
IMMIGRATIOWPASSPORTS 
TRADE-FINANCE 

ASTON CORPORATION 
TRUSTEES LTD 

19 Peel Road. Douglas, hie ot Han 
Tet 0(624 S265SI 
Fax; 01824 625126 
London Tefc (171) 222 6886 
fax (171) 233 1519. 

E Han No. astonSentopriseMt 


CUSS A COMMERCIAL BANK 

AvataUe lor mvnediale acquismon. 
US S 25.000 VWi correspondent Da* 
reiaamsfcp and asdanes. US $55,000 
FINANCE MERCHANTS GROUP 
Nassau Tec (242) 394-7080. 

Fie (2V) 3W-7Q82 
London T/F 44 >81 539 8246 


ROYAL PLATINUM SERVICE 

ATLANTIC 

LONDON PARIS 

WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

4+ 44 (0) 7000 77 04 11/22/33 


NEW YORK 

(1) 212 785 1919 
Ks 5 iat-st 3 r.com 
MtpJ/wmat-sto.com 


VENUS IN FURS 

Mffi WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 382 7000 

AS cads. Afrance twangs sttaroe 


ISABELLA AQUINAS 


ISWIlftoVlSs 


TEL LOGON 0171 438 57® 


mm MODEL Escort Service 

Nt Bmp i ti£ast(33)03«BZSm 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
51 Beauchamp Place. London 5W1 
Tee oin-sw h« 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES. For tree bro- 
chure or amice Tel: London 44 1B1 741 
(224 Far 44 161 ?4« 6558/6336 


Financial Services 



VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

Long tern cofiatea) 

Sup ported Guarantees 
{Carnmsswn earned only tgon fixu&kj) 
Bankable guarantees to secure turning 
tor viable projects arranged by. 

BANCOR 

OF ASIA 

fto na B1M2M 
Tefc [6W) B9M358 

Brokers Cctnrmson Assured 


•SWITZERLAND + GERMANY* 

Tefc; ++31-2M27 28 27 
ZlMCH43ENEVA«ASa-eaaE 
NEW: LONDON - BRUSSELS • VIENNA 
COSMOS Escort Agency Cmdt Car* 


LONDON ESCORT SERVICE 
0171 734 0771 


ELITE Escort Service 

NEW YORK CITY 
1-WM6W6OT 


— EUROCONTACT INFL "**" 
Top local 1 travel samce mwumde 
PARtS*ST004GLM'WJUnK)ME 
RIVIERA-BRUSSaSlONOWVaiNA 
GBEVA'ZURICHVnde GERMANY 
escort Serves Vienna ++43-1-2120* 3J 


LONDON HEATRROW 

THE ULTKATE ESCORT S6VTCE 

7H_- 0171 349 0837 


HEWS HGH SOCtETrVBaA-PAHS 
COTE D'AZUR & ZURICH ' SBiF 
international Escort S Trawl Seme 
Vienna ++43-1-53541Q4 al credit cards 


MtLANTKWE^ALY'LOmOfTPAfiB’ 
BRUSSOSlUGANCrMAOTIDTlUMCH 
ITDORF'RtVEfiA 'VIENNA Escort Ser- 
vta. TeL 39 (0038 823 5062 Cards 


SWITZERLAND & KT\ Escort Sen** 
ZiBtii * area Miss Vienna & BrazL 
Qu • *i an. Bade USA top model 
Nee fates i rams. 7-days: oil cards. 
"VOGUE" Tefc +41 {0) 79 T53 2875 


PRIME BANK 
GUARANTEES 

Verfeie CepSai France Available 
lor Garermwn Projects ml 
Government Convenes 
rtrat are lor safe 
Large Pnyecfc our Specfifcry • 
Also. Lang Term France tor 
Large and SnoS Compares 
No ccmrns&on Urri Funded 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Needed to ad as Uaisan 
Please reply in English 

VENTU RE CAPI TAL CONSULTANTS 
in* es trued bankers 
18311 Vffrtua BM, Suft 989 
Endno. CaHorafe 91438 USA. 
Fffl Noj (818) 905-1898 
TeL {818} 7BWM22 


Offices for Rent 


PARIS, RO POINT CHAMPS ELYSES 
450 sqm TOWTTtOUSE. ground tor + 
2 tors - )» sqm tasenai-Parttna. 
Beferoda Tefc +33 (0)1 C 04 49 11 


GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 
BASEL. LAUSAW4E. MONTREUX 
Cafl <332646 CO © Escort Agency 
■ ZURICH LUZSW 01/4832334 


LATIN 

CHARMING EXCLUSIVE ESCORT 
SERVICE 

LONDON 0956 307 404 


COLOQS-fflANKWRT-DOSSELOORF 
WIESBADBl-UAftZ-HEHMSERG 
Gaffs Escort Serves *49(0)171-531 1BtJ5 


EMHAHUaiFS ESCORT SERVICE 
" FRENCH SPEAKKG ” 

LONDON 0171 262 2888 


"•“FIVE STARS ESCORTS 
EDUCATED. CHARMING A PRETTY 
Servsa FRANKFURT 059-552221 


HELENA ESCORT SERVICE 
UXtOOH WA7HKW 2* HRS 
TSL 0850 1733<0 


jASUfS ESCORT SERVICE 
LONDON «?1 SOS 0564 
CPSNT CAROS ACCEPTED 


MUN1C H* WELCOME 
ESCORT i G UK AG5«Y 
GaS- 063-91 23 14 or 0172-S7TJ 1643 


NCKY Cfcarwafit BeadiA 
Prose Bow Servw 
Itesngtn 0171 792 0381 


PHHE TOE ENTERPRISES 
Escort Serose « tar York 
212-279-6522 


VALENTINES INTERNATIONAL 
VIP Escort Serose Central London oflra 
0171 SS 0005 Credit Cards Welcome 


VENEZUAIAN ESCORT AGENCY 
3sss! K m-y ts tar ije bnraus jurreunq- 
mrp. TeL 5376 6S3991 A8 Cards 24 fa 


Business Travel 


Ist/Busioeas Ossa Frequent Travelers 
Woittrte. Up to 50% 08. No cougars, 
no restrictions. Imperial Canada Tefc 
.1-574-34 1-7227 Fax 1-51W4I-799& 
e-mail address: rmpenalOlogin.net 
httpitanrJQgfcuwttmpBrtf 


Business Services 


Kailback 

Offers 

Lowest Rates 
Ever! 

Enjoy even greeter savings on 
mtemeftmal cads. Benefit from Ore 
same tow rafts 24-hours a day. We 
secure ttre dearest and meat rebate 
ines. Use KaUacfc from borne, wort 
a harts and save. 

cat now aid sew oore todqrt 

Tel 1-206-2844600 
Fax 1-206-282-6666 

Lines open 24 hows. 

Agere fames welcome! 


Lowest Int’l 
Telephone Rates! 

Cal The USA From 

Garrofrf _S0 33 

I# 5025 

Fiance 30.22 

Sfaeitand .-50.36 

Sweden S025 

Sari Arabs $083 

Cal Fix Ail Rates 
ascfa Mw 
Agents Wrtcone! 

KatIMart 

Tefc 1 -407-717-4222 Fa r 1 1 -M7- 7T7-W 1 
tOp^nxonvteSnort 


YOUR OfTO H LONDON 

Bond Street - Ua5, Fflorw. Fax, Telex 
Tet « 171 499 9192 Fax 171 4» 7517 


Seryked Offices 


WorhHffide 
Business Centos 
Netnrfc 

Busies arttESses, tombtal ofias, 
meeting lacBas ire 



Tefc *43-1 514 74 066 
.Fax ^43-1 514 74 300 

CH ZnUdBastelBemeSUf 
& GeSZiffl 
Tet +41-1214 82 62 
Fax +41-1 214 65 19 
LacsanreCeawa 
Tefc +41-21 «1 1313 
F» -*41-2! 641 1310 

D ItetrtrtofitoaierfAiffbagl 
BefafDjfegnefftartdortl 


Tet *40-2102 420 999 
Fn +49-2182 420688 

F Boro dob France 
PartsRorfaRema/ 
NmtetfTo B rtfBord tao d 
ToofcwMMoPtiHlBeAyoal 
ChnnaKJHtihDMi 
Tefc +33.1 53 « 54 53 
ft* +33.1 53 <S 54 55 

GB Prater Hhok London 

Tefc +44-171 222 «8 65 ’ 
Fax +44-171 22253 M 


Hoaeff Wa n toUM 
Tefc +39-2 481 W2H 
R» +392 480 13233 

H- AmtHttaSruntel 
Kaaslricwnifi HagueAJtredi 

B Tefc +31-20 520733 
Fax +31-20 520 7510 

P UsboafPorio 
Tefc +351-1 E5 7435 
Fax +351-1 355 7854 

HttdoSeas 

Empe Tet +41-1 214 6262 
Fa +41-1 214 U IS 
trial: 1015273011 
9J3t0TXanext*rr 

USA: Tefc +1-212 605 0200 
Fa +1-212 308 9634 
E-mefc wntoflaoLcora 


Legai Services 


DIVORCE 1-OAY CBfflFB) 
CaaorFa(7l4)96M6B.Wnte16707 
Seaicft BW. r>3 7. Ht rfrajfcn Sesdt CA 
®4B USA- Mnati - «5fflrrn§fajcar 


DIVORCE to 24 latr/gt. No Travel 
Stow 19® Tet ++9729771 B292. Fa 
9729.7718294 fiap.'/vrowhBlItHsia- 
4 cam/(am2.Gtttti3fta) lessee 


DIVORCE fN 1 DAY. No travel Wnta 
Box 577, Surtuv. U6 01776 USA Tefc 
508144^8387, Fax: 5(&4434)1S. 


Personals 


UAY7HE SACKS) ICART OF JESU5 
Oe adored, gtorfad, bred and preserved 
throughout the writ ram M torewr. 
Sared Neat « Jests, pay for us. Saw 
Axle, nrier gi rarates, Drey lor r& 
Sfa Jude Haber d «a Hopdess. pay 
to is Ampi £P. 


Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO DERG! FRANCE 
Wffl©© FF515. 7 DAYS: FF1580. 
TH: PARIS +33 (011 43 68 55 55. 


Announce m ents 


BAHEHE AS 

. A1M7JANYEUW7 
ftfc Hrxs TVA on derie facafa 
Mu*xi t&farUe w (tamde) 

Rentes tor faenon slraieus 

FRHKE (zone Q en m - TVA 20i8% 
GO: 3J96 FOCT. 2.44 

SDK 548 ' SCSPt 4SZ 


Get Dfisi? rar: 
AUaAG«{ftwQiaH-TVA15% 

l <G: 

GO: 1,13 

2WE S-l: 

a 

■&./f ■*«* 

SCSP: 1.42 
20HEN-B: 

GO: 1,12 FDD: 0j57 


®jGKSE en 7BJ • TVA 21* 

rea iiso 

SCV7: 33fl6 SCSP: 314)7 
HOLLAWE NLGA - TVA 17 J5% 

LUXESOOWG en LUH - TVA 15% 
Gft 2017 


g« Al « FTASMVA 18% 
SC87: 1Q241 SCSP 103# 

‘ Usage resfenwte 


OUR NOT SPECIAL tCAONG: 
HEAL ESTATE 
W & AROUND PAKS 
(Sales and Hwab) 

• «* be sfuearing on 
Hds*. 2«ti January. 

Fra rae deta2s please cortet 

WIGMATIOHAL HBUUI) TRtBUE 
PABS.T* +33 (Ofl 41 43 88 ffi 
or Far +33 (OH 41 43 83 70 
E-mst tosedOitUan 


TODAYS 


HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 

Appears 
on Page 13 


Attention visitors 


* you rea*ig fte JHT 
you travel, why not ^ 

also gel a al home? j 

Samwtey (tefivery aisteWe £ 
. '* key US dies 









Autos Tax Free 


Employment 


General Positions Wanted 













































































BOSSIER 


BOOKS 


i V.;. 

•-’* . . 

T r *^ 


Arraand Hammer 

Sy Edward Jay Epstein. 4 J 8 
poges. $ 30 JRandom House* 

▼ Reviewed by 
Stuart Auerbach 

I T was one of those star- 
spam * 


evenings -flat the 

Kennedy Center spffaafizes 
nu a black-tie gala in which 
™ government, political,' so- 
cial and business luminaries 
gathered for a fo* concert by 
-me National Symphony Or- 
^estra to celebrate the. 90th 
■birthday of the' oil tycoon Ar- 
>inaod _ Hammer. Hamm er, 

■jyho gained fame as theAme^ 

-ican capitalist trusted by 
.Kremlin leaders from T j»nin 
Gorbachev, ended the evening 

jjendi^m*^^'hc Stars^ind 
Stripes Forever/’- -As. ’I- 

-watched -the festivities -.1. .. Hyrntmer not only. (Cheated 
wondered why. a man sorich °®t his wives, bid in toe end 
-»ad sopowfirfbl, who (accord- cheated his mistresses and 
ing to his carefufly craftedini- children , oat of gromiSed in- 
■5g e ) had devoted so much, bcrilancesi. One nastress, 
time and money to toe arts and Betty© Morphy, was pregnant 
rWorld peace, needed to pay for .with Hammer's .r danghto r 
his own birthday bash. when he married has third wife, 

l- Now I know, having read Frances, whose J wealth fm- 
V Edward Jay Epstein’s arrest- ancedWspurthasein I956of a 
■ ingly written and htillkntly contorting interest at Occi- 
vresearched biography . of deptaL Heforced Betty e into a 
^Hammer, who died of cancer phony MeSocan 'maitiage with 


tied oa his passport 
... ddn. saying'he was go- 

mgtoJEngland and France.to 
ti uV wines and perfumes for 

■ Cow’ the femily 

business. later .years, hie 
vas tly exag gerated bis reia- 
J°®$"ip’wrth Lenin, whom he 
only once, and bis 
piyptal place in the viewing 
stand. -for Lenin's funeral 
Wfoiebjhe did not attend. 

:■ . lost as he used intelUger 
^pbjves to document Ha__ 

mer 5 ^activities as an agestof 
oormriimism, Epstein delved 
tfctptigh- court records and 
c onduc ted interviews with 
Hammer’s family members, 
mistresses and business as- 
sociates to detail his dupli- 
oiteus p^rsonal and business 
Bfe. Ctae of Epstein ’s major 

■ sources Was Hammer’s son 
Jntian, who did ‘‘Janes Bond 
stuff* for his father, inclnd- 


tiP 1990 at the age of 92 still 
^■seeking the recognition_and 

respect that he felt had eluded 

rbim in his tifetime. 
z r According, to- ^stem, 
-Hammer Irod a tie for most 
h©fhislife.Hewasridi,batfar 


aman she didn’t know, and 
while he. supported their 


’■ • ^ - 
-*t»- ~. 

■ - — v'ii*- 
iir - 5 


’ 

:•* rts* 
:a : 

m 

- u 

.’r 

'.n- 35 


: . - m 
• *?,■ 


TicCoria, lie disin- 
herited bet in his wifl. 


'consultant and mistress 
Martha Kaafman to change 
her name and ' appearance 
when. Ranees became snspi- 
dous.Karifman, who became 
Hilary. Gibson^ was promised, 
lifetime security but instead 
was firedhy Occidental soon 
after Hammer died. He 
treated Occidental Petroleum 
as his private preserve, con- 
troflmg (Sectors through un- 
dated letters of resignation. 
The . corporation . financed 
Hammer’sart collection, mis- 
tresses, extravagant lifestyle 


m his obituaries. J 
thropy was targeted to bum- 
Ash his image, arid, according 
-to the raft of lawsui&s that 
-followed bis death, included 
^unfilled pledges totaling al- 
bpost S3 millkm. Among 
them: $250,000 owed the N»- . 
itional Symphony for playing 
. flt his birthday party. : 

£ Epstein negates the myth 
.tint Hammer made money 
-irom his business dwitingg 
toe Soviet UmosL fo toe 


i-of las death, 4h&oaL ai^ gjpbal. travel? as well a^], 
■ . company he ruled with an iron slush funds in secret Swiss 
tist. Occidental Petroleum inid: accotmts AtS'jEhmnKr 
Carp., found that las«ostre- . used to babe public officials, 
ij^yat ifcalmg B haH amtiwi in a The one thing Hammer could 
; staggering loss of $2-5 id- not control was his legacy. No 
rjgon. t/- . matter how hard be trial to 

^ His first business veBpjres, t f?wjite history arid; recap- 
- jri 1 929. would have leftHam- stmet bis life, his death from 
-jpoer bankrupt had Statin riot ednder came too fast. ~ 

.bailed him out — notoat’of -pnog^iOO million cf.Oc- 
kindness rf his lx^tt but odgi^’s^roOTey, Hammer 
^father because -Hammer, fa j d ‘ bcnKfriiM &ewmtedtobehis 
1 toe cause of the ScaqstT: tin Ar- 



■'Ciux of EpSterifs book,%#ibh I w ti. toe wife 

relies beavfly on aew^»-3»-» <tf ft© tfcPQiftwK* pcsident, 

.for 



re- 


> trcpreneur butl as, . . 
W instrument of Rremfia 
who used Iris- 


iol.il® 
i ir« b 
sltlW' 






name carved 
letters, but 
asa'etdtrind 

, tt*mv , _ t local 

1 ities as a covtrfxlpnde^g resjdn^.iiot.as the tiurwease 
S money to ftamce Sanders* ’ tia^&mtB|rf»ad eayisaaned/ 
■ pionage in tii^Mllia^Staiesi ^ctaneathts place m his- 
j and Wesaxn Emope^ -■ . -j. v ^ttMaer schemed 

T porters Fra^M&^asmSed Mena - 
i Labor Party Oris name. <3?ne^. <*“? f ?® 51 10 

'from the party's , ann-and- nmtiinatehgu, tut first Ham- 
j hammer symbol), Arraand. - mqr-oeeded.a^anIoii for the 
j Hammer made his first trip tp crunes_ to 

! Moscow in 1921,, when he which *"*' n ^‘ 

'Tvas XL He torfc toe place of 
his father, Julius HauHnear, 
who was in jail, .for . man- 
slaughter hr a twtebed abor- . 
tion that his son had. ui fiact, 
performed, Jaliu? Hammer 
had been invited % Lenin to 
be the firiksndiy cartalist the 


Preskfem Geoege Bush 

1 tlsgpardpfii after Pres- 
Ideritl tiiaaid Reagan had re- 



totbe 

True to 

vrereneyerfaIfined.TheRoo- 
aU.- -Reagaa • % Reskfcatial 




ut uib uiwuj — — u .i * - yy 

new Soviet gov^imeotconld Fonroatioo socd ftc Hammer 
use to open commercial ties, estate for $650,000 in pledges 
with the West. r : _ • made in 1986, 1987 and 

Aimand Hammer’s tifo of 1988, , ... v 
deception started with thati. — ; 

t2jp. Documentation un- ‘ Stuart Auenxach is on the 
covered by Epstein straws that staff pf„Ttp Washington Post. 


BRIDGE 


.. W> 



.• 


. - 1 5 * - 



By Alan Truscott 


S OME of the most inter- 
esting problems are 
^in gte -dummy. in which yem 
are tiiown two hands- ami. 
-asked to find the best Site of 
piay, or even a guaranteed 
road to success. . 

, Cover the East-West hands 
and plan foe play in six 
spades. As South, you have 
^abandoned hopes of a grand 
slam, aftefrepriatetfly mWtmg 
“partrw -to assess Iris <£&- l 
•monds; and^nrast n ow try to 
insurer ' 12 tricks'. A trump TS 
“led; you win and play a 
second round. West shows 
out Whai'next? 

This requires dear dunk- 
ing rather than knowledge of 
obscure endings. All would 
■be well if yoo ooald cash 
■•dummy's skte-suit winners, 
but you cannot do that safely 
jjunril trumps have' been 
• drawn. The bad- dub- 
Imeans that a direct auetoptto' 
icash the club queen wHl fall, 
j The sohition is d^gam. 
[South draws'all toe t ramps, 
cutting hiinsdf off ; ‘Efom - 
idummy. Then he cashes two 
jdub winners and foe reduces" - 
,'He exits withafoamond. KAe 
1 diamonds split4*i. foe defend 1 . 
|er who wte-aoriai give South 


to dummy or 
toree dLanwrids tricks. - 
. This play will succeed un- 
y-yc toe diamonds are divided 
5-0, and ihat^is for less Kkely 
Than ther chfo shortage with 
Bast, which. defeats a direct 
attempt to each dummy’s win- 
ners- 

This deal .is. one' of many 
gemsintoe back issues ofThe 
Brid^B'^Wofid magazine, 
available at prices of one for 
$2, 5 for $9, 11 for$17. These 
are postpaid' “in toe United 
States. For more details, tde- 
j*one ai2) 866-5860. - ' 

■ ;■ NORTH 
♦ K5 3 
OKa72.- 
08«4 

. *QJ10 


WEST 

*7 : 
9JS. ■ 
VQMT2 

49*7633 


• EAST 
4**42 

0 Q 10*543. 

* fl 

442 


; soarrafD) 

. ' 4 AQJ 103 
OA 

• _ OAK133. 

4AK - 

Sofa vuinerabte. The bW* 

&£* , Wear Nordi. , : East 

T* : M . '2N.T. Pass 

34. Pass - 4 4 

■s * Pass . 3 * • 

^ « Pass ** ’ Pa8S 

-Pass 


•Vest 8hk*s Hie spado vevea- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 


RAGE 7 


ADVERHSEMEIVT 


ADVERHSEUfEIVT 




•ow t±iat we have told you a 
little about the Scientology 
religion, find out for yourself. 
Visit one of our churches. 
According to our scriptures, nothing in 
Diabetics or Scientology is true for you 
unless you have observed it. So we invite 
you to do so. 

Churches and missions of Scientology 
exist throughout the world. They welcome 
visitors, whether to receive Scientology 
services or simply to find out more about 
Scientology. Many of them hold regular 
Open Houses. 

. The book. What Is Scientology ?, 
available from our organizations and in 
libraries, contains all the important facts 


about the Church and will answer many 
of your questions. 

We are also on the Internet. Our 
websites are among the largest and most 
technically advanced on the Net. They 
offer a wealth of information about 
Scientology, as well as virtual reality tours 
of our most prominent churches and a 
Global Locator to help you identify your 
nearest Church of Scientology. 

To help you further understand what 
Scientology is, a special film — 
Orientation — has been produced. 
Oriejitation answers all your questions. It 
plays daily in all of our churches. 

And you are invited to see it with no 
charge or further obligation. 


POR MORE INFORMATION: 

Check the foiiowmR Internet sites for 
information about Scientology. Each Li 
available In English, French, German, 

Italian and Spanish: 

hnp://ww w.scientnfogy.t »rj* 
htipv'/www.Ironhubhartl.orR 
htrp: 4*ww w.cfia n eftes. org 
email: wdhrnasterebckmtqlctgy.MrR 

VIST OUR CHURCHES: Pay ii vesil l» your 
Dearest Church of Sdcniology. Addresses for 
our principal European Churches arv given 
hov. 

■ FREE INFORMATIONAL BOOKLETS 
AVAILABLE:. Yi hi can obtain the address of 
the load chunh nearest you, and a free 
Imuklei about Sticmolijpy. b)- calling 
■(3$) 1 44 74 fil 66. Or write lo Churih of 
.'H.x-ntidngy IliMle-fnimv, 7. me Jules Obsir, 
7Stn 2 Paris, h'p.mve. 


Austria 

Schonenfeldgaase 13/15 
1070 Wien, Austria 

Bdginm 

Church of Sckmvology 
European Human Rights 
and Public Affair. ORkv 
61 Rue du Prince Royal 
1050, Brussels, Belgium 


Denmark 

Soorekongensgade 'i'j 

1264 Copenhagen K, Denmark 

France - 
7 Rue Jules Cesar 
7S012 Paris. 

France 



Germany 

Beichfirowse 12 
NOHU2 Munchen. 

Germany 

Italy 

Vu Abet one. 10 
2UIJ7 Milano July 
Netherlands 

Mictiwe Zijds Vixnbuigw'il 271 
1012 ML AiiMenljm. 
Netlmiinds 

Norway 
Lille Grensen J 
01 so Oslo. 
NtKW-.I) 


Portugal 

Ru.i .\i1or TjJhjij ‘Hi s' 
lutn» Uslvci. Funugiil 

Spain 

l* MnnitT.i 2n. 10 dch.i. 
2K01.4 Madnd. Sp,iin 

Sweden 

GiHgutcn lift 
1 1W»2 SlcK klmlin, Sweilen 

Switzerland 
IJtidem.TNir.Lsv.- l-t] 

SiKH Zurich. Switzerland 

Great Britain 

iiS Totlenliam Cmm KlI 
bmdon. England WIH ulW 


THIS MESSAGE WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY A GRANT FROM THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCIENTOLOGISTS 

■ WmUUMt UUMilH.I Judltr -out* tip »a— W K,4qMU. I.,la.ifc# i.igii JaJ »,,,nrr->v> 









EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



PV RUSHED WITH TOE NE» YOBK TIMES ASD THE WASHWCTW POST 


A Hebron Deal at Last 


SrUrnne. I The Bad Mood in France Could Be a Harbinger 

THE WASHDWnW POST 1 O' 


Very Good News 

The Hebron agreement is very good 
news. Not that a fresh pledge to deliver 
chi old agreements is in itself occasion 
to cheer. It is that the Israeli side of this 
accord with Paicstimans is being done 
for the first time by a Likud-led gov- 
ernment. This represents a izistoric 
abandonment of Likud’s annexationist 
ideology of a Greater Israel, and an 
acceptance of Labor's readiness to par- 
tition the West Bank between Israel and 
a Palestinian state. The slide to this 
position of realism and justice is costing 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
nearly half his cabinet But it allows 
him to pursue a compromise peace. 

Hebron was hard not simply for the 
challenge of ensuring Israeli protection 
for the few hundred provocative Jew- 
ish settlers self-ensconced in a city 
precious to two peoples. The previous 
PaJestinian-IsraeJi Oslo accords had 
linked Israeli redeployment from 
Hebron to three further withdrawals, 
from the rural West Bank. In this 
space, everyone could see. lie the geo- 
graphical and political makings of a 
Palestinian state. Mr. Netanyahu's 
evident reluctance to go down that road 
threatened the end of the peace talks. 

It is not clear from where Mr. Net- 
anyahu drew the brave decision to 

The Road Is Open 

Tbe dynamic of peace in the Middle 
East has a surprising way of drawing 
even the most implacable foes together 
and overcoming seemingly insur- 
mountable obstacles. It happened 
again this week with the agreements 
reached between Benjamin Netanyahu 
and Yasser Arafat, two men who were 
barely on speaking terms just a few 
months ago. 

Weeks of tenacious bargaining 
ended with the Israeli prime minisrer 
and die Palestinian leader going be- 

for the withdrawal of Israeli ^troops 
from most of the West Bank city of 
Hebron. Through the diplomatic device 
of an accompanying note prepared by 
the American mediator. Dennis Ross. 
Israel agreed to complete a series of 
additional troop withdrawals from rur- 
al areas of die West Bank over the next 
18 months, and the Palestinians 
pledged to honor commitments they 
had made under tbe Oslo peace agree- 
ments but failed to execute in full. 

The United States provided a letter 
to both sides assuring them that it ex- 
pected to see these and other provi- 
sions faithfully carried out 
Mr. Netanyahu, harshly critical of the 
Oslo formula during last year's Israeli 
election campaign, has now embraced 
the peace plan as his own. He showed 
great courage in reconsidering his^po- 

more hawkis^cabLet collogues. 

Mr. Arafat also accepted difficult 
compromises. He agreed that the 
schedule for the remaining Israeli 
troop withdrawals could be stretched 
out until mid- 1998, dropping his long 
insistence on the original target date of 
September 1997. The new schedule 
will still allow negotiation about the 
final status of the territories, with most 


challenge a political lifetime’s beliefs 
and comrades and to take a larger view. 
It is clear, however, that in the Hebron 
talks he has made the Israeli conces- 
sions, and won from Yasser Arafat the 
Palestinian concessions, that ' enable 
the quest for peace to go on. 

With no maps drawn, no percentages 
of withdrawal indicated and no precise 
timetable for the crucial last redeploy- 
ment. the full extent of withdrawal 
remains up in the air. It inevitably will 
become engaged with the matter of the 
boundary between Israel and a Pal- 
estinian stare. The no less wrenching 
question of Israel's fervent settlers in 
the West Bank also remains. 

This agreement is an Israeli-Pales- 
tinian achievement. Egypt and Jordan 
assisted in their fashions. But it would 
not have happened without the diligent 
diplomacy of Warren Christopher and 
Dennis Ross. Tbe United States cush- 
ioned the violence and political uproar, 
from both sides, and kept tbe nego- 
tiators on the necessary broader plane. 
Great battles, between and within the 
sides, lie ahead. 

But with Labor already aboard and 
with at least half of Likud now engaged 
— and in the expectation of greater 
care to his obligations for Israeli se- 
curity by Yasser Arafat — negotiations 
can proceed. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

of the disputed areas no longer oc- 
cupied by Israeli troops. 

Mr. Arafat must now make good on 
his promises to tight terrorism more 
effectively by handing over certain 
suspected terrorists to Israeli author- 
ities, confiscating illegal weapons and 
trimming tire Palestinian police force. 

The bargaining of the last flew 
months has been less about revising tbe 
terms of the Oslo agreements than 
about developing a working relation- 
ship between Mr. Netanyahu and Mr. 
Arafat and preparing the stage for the 
next and most difficult phase of the 
peace talks. Relations between tire two 
leaders have improved, but still lack 
the degree of trust established between 
Mr. Arafat and the last two Israeli 
prime ministers, Yitzhak Rabin and 
Shimon Peres. Without the constant 
efforts of Mr. Ross, and a timely in- 
tervention by King Hussein of Jordan 
last weekend, this week's agreements 
could not have been achieved. 

Despite the detailed timetables and 
written commitments that both parlies 
have now made, many details of the 
unfolding peace arrangements cannot 
be foreseen or settled in advance. 
Among the problems still to be re- 
solved are competing claims in Je- 
rusalem and its environs and the ques- 
tion of whether tbe Palestinians will 
end up with a state of their own. The 
parties have merely agreed to begin 
discussion of these issues in two 
months. While they have reached ac- 
cord on a timetable for further Israeli 
withdrawals, there is no agreement yet 
on the extent of these withdrawals. 

This remains a bitter quarrel over 
fundamentals like land, water and se- 
curity, with terrorists on both sides de- 
termined to wreck the peace. New and 
dangerous crises are sure to materialize 
in the months ahead. But tbe road is once 
again open to a just and lasting peace. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Blowing Up the Message 

Whoever sent letter bombs to A1 
Hayat, the Arab newspaper, missed the 
main point In newspapers, you print 
the message, not mail it with Semtex. 

After envelopes containing greeting 
cards booby-trapped with explosives 
were found at the paper’s bureaus in 
London and Washington and at the 
United Nations, the paper's staff was 
understandably unsettled — especially 
because A1 Hayat has labored to prim 
. open debates on Middle East issues. 

The staff, which received no warn- 
ings or claims of responsibility, has 
avoided speculation about who sent the 
bombs. We don’t know why the bombs 
were sera. from where or fry whom. 

The envelopes were postmarked 
from Alexandria. Egypt, but they could 
have been mailed from anywhere in the 
world. It could be a completely random 
act of intimidation. 

The bombs, however, are sophis- 
ticated, expensive and most likely be- 
yond the reach of a lone lunatic. That 
leads some to suspect that a govern- 
ment or an organization is involved. A1 
Hayat has annoyed more than one gov- 
ernment or organization — as would 


any independent newspaper covering 
the intricacies of the Middle East 
The newspaper is a new breed in 
Arab journalism. Owned by Prince 
Khalid ibn Sultan, a member of the 
Saudi royal family, Ai Hayat has been 
a forum for differing views. 

Certain governments have accused 

while frmdamenta^Tgroups have ac- 
cused it of cuddling up to certain re- 
gimes and governments. 

Frustrations are abundant in the 
Middle East and often for good reason. 
The peace process has not moved for- 
ward with the necessary zest and, at 
times, fairness. Iraq, Libya and Sudan 
are angry over sanctions imposed on 
them. Some fundamentalists have 
played on social and economic frus- 
trations to further their causes. 

Sometimes, even when the explo- 
sives are sophisticated, the minds of 
the makers are not. It would be a shame 
if the perpetrators had a legitimate 
grievance. Their message was lost with 
the messenger. 

— Raghida Dergham, senior 
diplomatic correspondent and United 
Nations bureau chief of Al Hayat, 
commenting in The New York Times. 



ribune 


ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 

KATHARINE P. DARROW, Vice Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher & Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GETLER, Executive Editor 

* WALTER WELLS, Managing Efitor • PAUL HORVTTZ, Deputy Managing Editor 
> KATHERINE KNQRR ad CHARLES MTTCHELMORE. Deputy Et&tors • SAMUEL ABTand 
CARL GtWTKTZ, Associate Ediiars • ROBERT J. DONAHUE. Editor of the Eduorvd Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE, Business and Finance Editor 
■ RENfi BOND Y. Deputy Publisher 

* JAMES McLEOD. Advertising Director • DIDIER BRUN. Circulation Director. 
Director de la Publication : Richard McCtean 


International Herald Triton*. 18! Avenue Qaries-de-Ganlk. 92521 NeuiDy -snr-Sena, Trance. 
TeL: (1) 4I.43.93.0a Fax; Cite. 1 1)41.43.92.10; Adv„ (1)41.43.92.11 E-Mail: ib@ibLcoa 

EdbCffar,ba-MkludllicfadMu.5CatiertaTyKi,SiiigipmQ5JI.Tdl6S)472-776BTax:0)274-2I3f 
Mitf- Dir Asia. RaffD Knntqmbl. SO Gloucester JW.. Haul font. TeL 852-2922-1188. Fax 852-322-1190 
Grn. Wtr. limwiv: T. SeWufi', FrieMar. 15. Fnmtfimlhl.Td +49 6X9712500. Fax: *49 69197125020 
Pm. US.: ktkhiei Corny. BSOThitdA New fork. N.Y 10022. TeL (111 J Fax (HI 1 7S5-S73S 

UK. Advertising Office: 63 Lmg Acre. London WC2. Tel. (171 >8*6-4802. Fax : (171) 240-2254 
SAj. an capital de J 200.000 F. ECS Nanierrt B 732021126. Cotnrnssitm Poritalre No. 61337 
01996. liuenadaal Herald Tribune. AO rijfaf reserved. ISSN: 0194-8052. 



P ARK — In the spring of 1968, Le 
Monde’ s eminent political commen- 
tator, the late Pierre Viansson-Ponr£. 
proclaimed ruefully, “France is bored.” 
Almost immediately, student riots and 
workers’ strikes eiupted, bringing the 
country to a complete halt 

Specially called legislative elections 
that June ended the panic. But when he 
failed to obtain die re-endorsement he 
sought in a referendum a year later. 
President Charles de Gaulle stalked off 
into retirement 

Now France feels terrible. Ex-Prime 
Minister Edouard Bahadur speaks of 
its uncertainty, its fears, its ^'moros- 
ity ’ which be calls “unjustified.” Hie 
word of the moment is “crisis” — 
social, political, economic, moral. It is 
applied all round. Predictions of im- 
minent upheaval abound. 

Except for unemployment, stub- 
bornly above 12 percent no matter what 
palliatives are applied, most economic 
statistics are good. The trade balance is 
healthy. The franc is strong. Hie budget 
deficit is higher than Maastricht criteria 
prescribe for joining a single European 
currency, but not extravagantly so. The 
country's leaders tell Frenchmen that 
they are tbe world's fourth largest eco- 
nomic power. But the mood is bad. 


By Flora Lewis 


Nobody can really explain it The 
politicians, the technocrats, the union 
leaders, the businessmen, the philo- 
sophers offer assorted answers, but they 
don’t add up. President Jacques Chirac, 
a man of the right, goes on television to 
say the trouble ’is that the French are 
“too conservative 7 ’ in reristirtgehange, 
but he vows not to lay a finger on the 
“acquis social,” tbe accumulation of 
entitlements, privileges, job guarantees 
won in tbe fight for social justice over 
more than half a century. 

The national health care system and 
the pension regime are naming out of 
money. Yet die unpopular government 
quickly backed down m November and 
supported truck drivers' demand to re- 
tire at 55, after railroad workers had 
forced maintenance of their retirement at 
50a year earlier. There was widespread 
public sympathy for die strikers. 

Now there is a grassroots movement 
to set the general retirement age at 55 
and reduce the working week to 32-34 
hours. The unions are embarrassed, and 
the opposition Socialist Party, admit- 
ting that it is* ‘unrealistic, ’’is wriggling 
to find some alternative proposal dial 


would maintain pensions by “redis- 
tribution** — that is, from state funds. 

There are complaints about die 
stiffing levels of taxation, which inhibit 
enterprise, and the heavy govemment- 
imposed nonwage costs of labor, which 
inhibit earoloyment. But the experience 
oftbe last 20 years has brought the public 
to conclude that neither government nor 
opposition knows how to address die 
country’s problems. AO the theoretical 
formulas have been discredited. 

Yet there is no real challenge to tbe 
age-old habit of looking to “the state 77 
as die proper provider to fl T «gn«g» all 
woe ana misfortune. When money is to 
be spent or allocated, it is thought of as 
coming from a sort of king's treasure, 
seldom as taxpayer’s money. 

There is a growing understanding 
that the world is entering a new era, that 
old assumptions are not reliable. Eco- 
nomic growth comes with difficulty, 
and it does not automatically produce 
jobs. Globalization is blamed, Europe 
is blamed, but few really think there is 
die slightest chance that France would 
not be worse off if it tried to shut out the 
world and cower behind its borders. 

Economists and social historians 
warn that nostalgia for the “glorious” 
30 years of steady postwar reconstruc- 


tion and development, creating pros- 

w i-_ l.MMAinntT nnunPr- 




‘events" of 1968 were * taction 


against the cum rang —j 

dedicated to m3terialisttcaffliumcfc The 
call for “Imagination to Power, me 
rebellious students’ slogan, was not to 
imaginehow to get richerbw to magnus 
ator way to Eve. The “ ’68ers didn J 
find one, but they left an imdenayerof 
discontent, of doubt, of yeammg for 
another way to define tbe future. 

Out of the blue, it seemed, France 
amassed and ignited hidden but strong 
feelings shared among the youth of 
many countries that society was not ad- 
apting to die changing realities of the ■ 
world. Thai may be what is happening 
now. It is an insistent questioning o f the 
current mantra that die market, unre 
strained capitalism, e ac h for himself, is 
the only alternative to de ad e nin g Com-, 
m i mi s t ideology. It offers no answers. 

But it reflects real concerns. The 
mood cannot be brushed off as frivolous 
or sour grapes at loss of grandeur. The 1 
sum of dissatisfaction is greater thanthe 
pasts voicing narrow, specific griev-^ 
ances. ft may be a harbinger. 

c Flora Lewis 





First Korean Convulsion, Then Nationalistic Reunification? 


T OKYO — North Korea is in 
serious trouble. Its critical 
shortages of food, energy and 
foreign exchange are mutually 
reinforcing. They are driving the 
economy downward and creat- 
ing enormous social problems. 

The North Korean govern- 
ment appears to realize that the 
current course can lead only to 
irreversible decline. But fear of 
tbe consequences of change — a 
fete similar to that of East Ger- 
many, Romania or tire Soviet 
Union — makes Pyongyang re- 
luctant to take the kind of steps 
needed to reverse the decline. 

It recognizes the overwhelm- 
ing advantages enjoyed by 
South Korea; a booming eco- 
nomy, steadfast allies and tech- 


By Shinichi Ogawa 


nologically advanced defense 
capabilities. Tbe widening gap 
in national power between the 
South and tbe North makes 
Pyongyang hesitant to negotiate 
seriously with Seoul. 

There are serious risks in this 
situation, especially if South 
Korea is preoccupied or distrac- 
ted, as now by industrial tensions 
and strikes. The North may took 
for ways of using its only re- 
maining asset, rntiifar y mi ghr. 

Although tbe common view is 
that North Korea has no hope of 
success in a war with die South, 
the grimness of ocher alterna- 
tives could increase the relative 
attraction of military options. 


Conflict between the two 
Koreas would cause heavy cas- 
ualties, widespread destruction 
and great economic damage. It 
would also severely strain re- 
lations between the United 
States and Japan, China and 
the United States, and South 
Korea and China. 

Even without conflict, a pre- 
cipitous collapse of the North 
Korean regime is a real pos- 
sibility. Should that happen, 
neighboring countries would 
face massive flows of refugees 
from tbe North, which neither 
Sooth Korea nor Chinn seems 
prepared to handle. 

Korea might still be a prob- 


lem if it were reunited in a 
peaceful manner. It would then 
have to decide whether to main- 
tain Sooth Korea’s alliance with 
the United States and allow 
continued stationing of Amer- 
ican forces on fee peninsula. 
Tbe alliance and die U.S. troop 
presence are important ele- 
ments of the strategic balance in 
Northeast Asia. 

Managing relations between 
Korea and Japan could become 
more difficult after reunification. 
Anti- Japanese Mnrimwit among 
fee Korean people is strong. 
When combined with a possible 
upsurge of Korean nationalism 
after reunification, it could upset 
relations with Japan. 

Of course, there seem to be 


solid national interests that 1 
would be shared by Japan and 
reunified Korea led by the* 
South. Such interests, including^ 
maintenance of free trade and ; 
promoting democracy, might- 
appear to allow little room for” 
confrontation between the twb - 
countries. “ 

But politics begin wife pog 1 .* 
ular perceptions, not with reas^ 
otring. Public sentiment, no mat 1 -' 1 
ter how irrational, often has the r 
final say in democracies. - 

The writer is a senior re- 
searcher at the National Instill 
tute for Defense Studies 
Tokyo. He contributed this per- 
sonal comment to the Interna.-' 3 
tional Herald Tribune. 


J ,v ^ 


For Serious Trouble in 1997, Watch the Mideast and Africa 


: v - 


W ASHINGTON — For 
most people in most 
countries. 1997 should be a very 
good year. But there are some 
troubling new developments 
that must be addressed. 

The U.S. economy remains 
strong, with unemployment and 
inflation low and wife some 
signs of increased economic 
growth and declining crime. 

America’s West European 
allies are thriving, although fe- 
eing fee range of problems typ- 
ical of dynamic societies. 

Violent conflicts have sub- 
sided in former Yugoslavia 
(thanks to a very large peace- 
keeping force) andin Chechnya, 
Rwanda and Guatemala. North 
Korea made an unexpected apo- 
logy to South Korea, and China 
has fired no missiles over the 
Taiwan Strait — recently. 

Democracy is striking root in 
some unfamiliar soil. Demo- 
cratic regimes have survived in 
Central and Eastern Europe. 


By Jeane Kirkpatrick 


Russian voters chose an ailing 
democratic Baris Yeltsin over a 
Communist candidate, Gennadi 
Zyuganov, who pro-mised “re- 
integration*’ of the states of the 
former Soviet Union, and over 
the politically unknown, thor- 
oughly military Alexander 
Lebed. That was grounds for 
celebration. 

In Central America, Liberal 
Alliance candidate Aznoldo 
Aleman defeated fee former 
Sandinista dictator, Daniel Or- 
tega, in a tense, sometimes vi- 
olent election. 

In Asia, the most dynamic 
societies are still making eco- 
nomic progress and grow freer 
in spite of themselves. 

While no truly dramatic 
gains were made in spreading 
democracy. Freedom ' House 
rated more countries “free" 
than at fee beginning of 1996. In 
only two regions are no positive 


trends discernible as tbe new 
year begins. 

Chaos, war and social break- 
down have been too widespread 
too recently in Central Africa 
for op timism about feat large 
area of the world, although we 
should note that the remarkable 
Nelson Mandela continues to 
provide constructive, effective 
leadership in his country. 

The most negative trends and 

in the Middle East and Near 
East, where fee appeals of fun- 
damentalist religion and poli- 
tics are reinforced by Iran's 
continuing e ff ort s to subvert 
other governments. The spread 
of extremist politics in Saudi 
Arabia and Turkey is especially 
threatening to Western and 
American interests. 

Tbe Clinton administration’s 
nearly obsessive concern wife 
Palestinian relations continues. 


Behind the Grillwork in Court 


W ASHINGTON— When 
historic arguments are 
scheduled to be made, fee U.S. 
Supreme Court resolutely as- 
serts an anti-elitist seating 
policy for spectators. 

Regular court correspon- 
dents sit up front. Tourists who 
waited in line get seals in fee 
middle. Media biggies, histor- 
ic-moment groupies and other 
riffraff are properly shunted off 
to a side section behind heavy 
steel grillwork ornamented 
with die tablets of the Ten 
C nmrnanrirTtfnts . blocking 

their view completely. 

In Paula Corbin Jones v. 
William Jefferson Clinton, we 
overflow onlookers got our 
first taste of what it must be 
like to be caged monkeys in a 
zoo observing human viators. 

Questions ringed from tbe 
bench down at lawyers trying 
to present their argument 
about fee immunity of a sitting 
president from lawsuits. 
Justices interrupt at will, step- 
ping (hi lines of fee off-bal- 
ance lawyers. 

Because Robert Bennett, 
Bill Glutton's personal attor- 
ney, is a poker-playing buddy 
of Justice Antonin Scalia, Mr. 
Bennett took fee first heavy 
hits on the separation of 
powers and federal supremacy 
over stale courts — from 
Justice Scalia, of course. But 
El Nino later also made 
mincemeat of Ms. Jones’s 
lawyer, as fed a woman's 
voice that aimed out to be 
Justice Sandra Day O'Con- 
oorjs> She knifed through to 
feeiieart of fee matter. 

.Suppose a president gets in- 
to ajefeild custody dispute wife 
a sparse. Does fee president’s 
claim of immunity while in 
office mean that fee child 


By William Safire 

would have to wait up to eight 
years before learning where 
home is? 

That was a shot in the chop- 
pers to the solicitor general. 
“That’s the most appealing 
case for an exception I've 
heard," fee presidential de- 
fender had to admit But he 
hung in there asking for a 
hard-and-fast rule postponing 
any litigation until a president 
leaves office. 

How will it ora out? Will 
tire court find the sitting pres- 
ident out of reach of the civil 
law, as Mr. Clinton wants, or 
find that nobody is too busy all 
tbe time to duck a deposition 
or two, as Paula Jones wants? 

I am not as adept a court- 
watcher as my New York 
Times colleague Linda Green- 
house (who has the advantage 
ofbeing able to see the bench), 
but. despite the evident desire 
of Justice Scalia fora firm rule 
protecting presidents from 
ornery trial judges, it seems to 
this auditor that fee O’Connor 
Center will hold. 

The president will not be 
granted total temporary im- 
munity, buta barrier as high as 
fee court’s grillwork will be 
set for a plaintiff to hurdle 
before a president can be 
hauled into court. 

The Devil, in fee opinion 
expected in June, will be in tbe 
details. To preserve evidence 
for a delayed trial, can other 
testimony be taken now? 

Here Mr. Clinton is trying to 
have it both ways. His lawyers 
insist feat any litigation would 
be “all-consuming and aH-ab- 
sorbing,’ ' distractinghim from 
affairs of state. They want to 


freeze this embarrassing law- 
suit; no depositions from Mr. 
Clinton or from other, less 
busy witnesses — nothing. 

But even as die president's 
legal counsel were taking that 
hard-line position before fee 
court, his political spokesman 
was saying just the opposite, 
being sweetly reasonable be- 
fore fee bar of public opinion. 
That is because many of us 
think that even if fee president 
is let alone, the evidence of 
others should be collected be- 
fore memories fade. 

As Mr. Ointon’s lawyers 
demanded a total freeze, I felt 
tbe urge to leap to my feet 
waving the transcript of the 
previous day’s White House 
briefing. (Presumably this is 
why tbe court keeps pundits in 
cages.) There is *’a danger of 
loss of memory if you delay 
discovery." said press secre- 
tary Mike McCurry, incredibly 
adopting die Jones argument 

Mr. McCurry caved in fur- 
ther, abandoning Mr. Clin- 
ton's basic position that a pres- 
ident was too busy to be 
deposed: “You could say fee 
court will regulate fee taking 
of that deposition so it doesn't 
become unduly burdensome 
to the executive ... It’s kind of 
like fee Whitewater stuff, and 
you have to do it, provide de- 
positions. and you move on." 

Do justices read only briefs 
and not newspapers? Either 
the president's lawyers do not 
re p resent Mr. Clinton's newly 
flexible position, or his sooth- 
ing press spokesman has no 
idea of what Jones v. Clinton 
is about — or this is another 
case of Mr. Clinton pretend- 
ing to conciliate while having 
his lawyers stonewall. 

The New York Times. 


despite fee presence of several 
other problems in the region 
that are much more threatening 
to U.S. interests: fee spread of 
fimriamfintaiism to Saudi Ar- 
abia arid Turkey, thecontinuing _ 
efforts “of hranta subvert other 
governments in fee region, and 
Iran's determined efforts to pro- 
duce its own nuclear weapons; 
the rise of an even more fan- 
atical sect, Taleban, in Afghan- 
istan, which has already estab- 
lished control over large 
sections of fee country; tbe ex- 
tremist violence in Algeria; the 
terrorist bases in Iran, Sudan 
and Libya; Syria’s growing ar- 
senals; proliferation of weapons 
of mass destruction in the re- 
gion; fee resurgent stren g th of 
Saddam Hussein. 

These, one would think, are 
the principal threats to tire sta- 
bility of me Middle East an dto 
U.S. interests in the region. 

The violent politics and ex- 
tremist movements of tire 
Middle East acquire global sig- 
nificance became of fee de- 
pendence of so much of the 
world on Gulf oil, and because 
of close ties between countries 
in the region wife countries in 
Europe and wife tire United 
States— snch as France’s ties to 
Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia, 
ana fee ties of the United States 
to Israel and Morocco. 

The ease wife which terror- 
ists gain access to open soci- 
eties — d e mo nstrated by the 
fanatics who bombed the New 
York World Trade Cotter and 
public transport in Paris — 
makes us all vulnerable to the 
contagions of Middle Easton 
violence. 

Of course, die hostage takers 
in Peru remind us that not all 
violent politics is bred in the 
Middle cast. The Peru terrorists 
do not control die gov ernment 
of Peru, andtfris, of course, is an 
important difference. 


What gives file violent anti 4 ’" 
democratic regimes large sign!-* 1 
Seance outside their regions, as , 
well as inside, are fee violeift* 
groups who capture govern- 1 / 
meats .and then treasuries (eveti'- 
' quftB'&nalt sbttes' Have sigmfic// 
ant treasuries) and who are able 7 ; 
to buy weapons and technology/* 
and tore persons who can op-” 
erate than, and acquire missOds : 
wife which to deliver them. * 

Many of the most violent 1 
states in the world are making 1 
intense efforts tohuy, make dfT 
steal snch technology — for ex- 
ample, Iraq, Iran, Libya. Syria js 
and North Korea. - 

The world also faces perhaps/! 
25,000 Russian warheads, per- * 
haps 400 Chinese warheads, J 
and chemical and bacteriologies 
al weapons which give very^ 
small states the capacity to dcr 
neat, devastating damage t6 a 
large nations. £ 

This kind of vulnerability fe'. 3 
something new in fee world. If* 
is growing all the time. 

Technology and sophistics-") . 
tion spread across fee comma- j 
nication trails from, say, Chnfo [ 
to Pakistan and Pakistan to Iran, ! 
Iran to Syria and Libya, and, > 
somehow, to Iraq. Norm Kona ] 
may now have several inter 1 - 1 
co n t in e nt al ballistic missiles. [ 
Weapons of mass destruction j 
revolutionize geopolitics andJ 
overcome balances of powers 
We Hve on borrowed time in ' 
this defenseless condition. But 
we live well. 

© Los Angela Times Syndicate. 

Letters intended for 
cotton should be « 

"Letters to the Editor” and 
contain the writer’s signature, t 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are subject _ 
to editing. We cannot be re- 
sponsible for the return cf un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


• --r. ; 

-A ?•** ! 

Kr: *»'■ 


’*** ;.# 

V s w fl* 

aim 

i-li'.'.Viill 

toTiiC* 

•Vi: it 

KML m 

>■-’ am 

i rii. ttto 

•-v. 


i 

IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO I 

1897s Outrage in Siam ““fcr whose auspices fee 

WASHINGTON — The gun- S° ven f^ it 

boat Marinas left cJZ, 

China, for Bangkok, under in- mmtary lead-1 

sanctions to protect American Shih-vi * e . L * an S 

interests and see that nrnnfM-rurr.- Cabinet wdll resign, as 




-PPortmg General Wu. 

Vice^onsul-GeneraL Mr. Kd- in4 „ . . - 

left. The State Department re- Axmol Elected 

ferred fee oarage to fee Navy PARTS— ■ 
Department, requesting feat a 

vessel be seuL From fee State teader ’ 

Department it is said that ad- France 

vices received are to the effect years on fee 

that Siam is doing all she can to S? J™ after having received 
prosecute Mr. Kellett’s assail- *9 nMre *an foeiN 

ants, but the action taken by the Elected by 

Department shows featshe snot Socialists, Corn- 

moving quickly enough to suit scattered votes from 

Auriol became 

1922s Chinese Tension 

LONDON - Despatches re- KS; ^ amounced IW 


hai forecast an aimed conflict 
between Charig Tsolin, the re- 
actionary Tarium of Manchuria, 


1947s Auriol Elected 

PARIS — Vincent Auriol, sixty- 
two-year-old Socialist leader , 
was elected President of R an ee 
ofseven years on fee 
te ballot after having received 
mote than tbs0 
Sfr* *“**??• Hccted by 

support of Socialists, Com- 
“^ands^tteredvotesfrom 

Auriol became 
J’Jbce s first President tinder 
{“M^hmon of the Four* 
Kfipnbuc. He announced feat 
he would soon begin to work 

&ying “ 

2S2L* I ^““ ier to f cam fee 
cpumiy s first non-provirion^r 
Cabm « since the UbSaZ. 







• • r .. \ . 


CjrJAtr* \&& 


'N:!- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY X4JVUAKY 17, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS ‘ 


Finally, Netanyahu Has Earned 
The Right Kind of Enemies 


^I/'ASHINGTON — w 

nj! want to know what 

Benjamin Netanyahu pulled 


By Richard Cohen 


2& a. way, Mr. Netanyahu 
outsmarted himsetf. Hie ini- 
tial recalcitrance justified 
Mr. Arafat’s insistence on 


It’s No Fun at the Top 
Of the Free World 


iPH'lf 




uonsi Qer onlv k_ ^ - iswuuuauw jusunca 

He was denounced by onSo! 0 ^,??/ no ^' ®“ Mf- Arafat’s insistence on 
Pame MiniJ! Sahni^iSrt^ £?*■' Netan_ what turned oat to be an en- 
Yitzhak. Shamir, oneSfS w a ***6" dorsement of Oslo. The Pal- 

^<Jer statesmen of his own fe&stn iSP" cstiaian Icadcr simply w°ald 
political party not settle for S Was the 

"hose ** ****** 13851 version of a 

JO turning land over tTfte naimster, I amnig decision in Hebron. 

Palestinians can be summed tti ° a ^ tbed ton out to be a He wanted something from 
up in a single word never! ' M** Netanyahu he bad 

goaiiy, Mr. Netanyahu has The Israeli leader La ^ or 

t^e n^ht enemies , - . r Metier Party leaders: an expression 

■ Up to now, his critics have "^SVatually of masnL He.got it. 

s^JssssSa 

who had maA. it nosah).. denounced: that - for the destruction of Israel 

Xitzhak Rabin. ^ * somethmsr rail ! In addition^ Mr. Arafat must 

* Now, though, Mr. Netan- ^ T ^ e *^ m g Called mot® tbat = Palestnnan- 

y^hu has virtually adopted the Palestine IS contorfled territories are 

PWsS£- SJ* ■ '™“ - 

Pragrmte who would, afEr Rictard Haass cauf^ 


By Maureen Dowd 

3N — ft’s Outside, there were some 


W ASHINGTON — ft’s Outside, there were some 
no wonder so many jokers in Bill Clinton masks 


political party and a man 
ffiose policy when it. comes 
re turning land over to the 
Palestmians can be aimm^ 
g» in a single word — never! 

Mr. Netanyahu has 
tyc right enemies. 

; Up to now, his critics have 
«cn Israelis of the left and 
the center who smarted the 
Oslo agreement and mourned 
tee assassination of the man 
who had made it posable: 
yitzhak Rabin, 
i Now, though, Mr; Netan- 
yahu has virtually adopted the 
position he once denounced. 


IJot only will Israel essen- 
toUy pull out ofHebrpn, but it 


The Israeli leader 
has virtually 

adopted die 

position he once 
denounced: that 
something coded 
Palestine is 
inevitable. 


people are being driven away 
from government Who can 
stand this much scrutiny? 

It is di spi r itin g to many 
powerful men to have to an- 
swer for everything they do, 
when part of tee reason they 


MEANWHILE 


got into politics in the first 
place was to attract a higher 


dressed as flashers with tan 
raincoats and white, hairy 
legs. But inside everything 
was very proper, very cir- 
cumspect, as the justices bat- 
ted around some thoughts on 
separation of powers and 
constitutional scope and out- 
er perimeters of immunity. 

Nobody said anything 
eye-popping about trousers 
dropping. And Ms. Jones, so 



order of babes, and to reach a vivid in a snug blue angora 
rarefied atmosphere where sweater in last week's News- 


tee rules did not apply to 
them. 

What is tee point of mak- 


week, was nowhere to be 
seen. 

Still, the august proceed- 
ing ^perfectly captured tee 
comic predicament that has 







.WglSiS 




The Proprietor. 


eating all those chickie-beef comic predicament that has 
dinners, shaking all those befallen our p residen t 
sweaty hands, schmoozing At the very moment a 
all those tedious local offi- lusty pol could fully fake- ad- 
cials — when the top isn’t vantage of the perks of so- 


Palestine is inevitable. 
-There is no overestimating 
what' has been done — 


bis actions and some of his 
statements — his support for 


settled — -or even discussed. 

' Hebron, althou gh of sig- 


what it used to be7 
We used to have droit du 


defy, those perks are denied 
him because of the puritan- 


^ uone — new settlements, tee open- nificant religious meaning to 

ItlOlV- a b ? te ? mg of ^ taaaeA » Jerusalem bote Jews^and Muslmis, 

bitter-ender, is nsfat to feel — tfft 


■- Now we have Title ical nature of tee post-Anita 


culture, circumstance — and 
the scars from tee high school 
cheerleader who got away. 

In James Stewart's book 
'’Blood Sport," Susan Mc- 
Dougal said teat Bill Clinton 
told her he loved being gov- 
ernor because "women are 
throwing themselves at me. 


bitter-ender, is right to feel 
betrayed. Those Israelis — 
and their- synqpathizexs 


— seemed designed to nevertheless pales in impor- 

nmvnVn tfia DI A ■» . v - « * 


provoke the FIX) and scuttle tance to Jerusalem, 
tee peace process. Now, of Still, Mr. Netai 


UJ America — who believed course, one needs only ask 
in a Greater Israel, an Israel Mr. Shamir. 


teat stretched from the Medi- 
terranean to the Iordan River, 
have been rebuffed. No 
such state will exist In its 


As for Mr. Arafat, he t urns 


Still, Mr. Netanyahu — 
with the help of the US. spe- 
cial envoy D ermis Ross and 
tee- supposedly inept Clinton 


out to be what Robert Satloff administration — - hac done 
of the Washington Centerfor someteing extraordinary. In 
Near EastPolicy calls a “bril- ^ 


x- "V AVVOI fiSUHX VUWJ. VOU0 a IMll- 

P+? cc > tte PLO and Yasser Bant bargainer/ T He managed 
Arafat will create something., to turn. what' were ooce sup- 


— if hot a conventional na- posed to be technical and &- 
tipn with its own military, most routine talks about 


Near East Policy calls a “bril- tee very office he sought for 
fiant bargainer. " He managed so long, be essentially con- 
to tum . what were ooce sup- ceded teat a core element of 
posed to be technical and m- Ms ideology had to be aban- 
most routine -talks about dooed. In tear case, then, the 
Hebron into something far least his critics — me in- 


We have the astonishing 
spectacle of the Supreme 
Court deciding whether tee 
president of tee United 
States can be sued while in 
office for sexual harass- 
ment. 

1 went to tee Supreme 
Court, to a burnished room 
with red velvet curtains and 
gold tassels and a beautiful 


HilL post-Bob Packwood so- AH tee while I was growing 


ciety. 

Same people think it's 
simple biology. As Robert 


up, I was tee fat boy in tee 
Big Boy jeans." 

Mrs. McDougal said she 


Wright, the author of "The commiserated with Hillary 
Moral Animal, 1 ’’ wrote in tee Clinton, telling her tear polit- 


Interaet 


m agazine 


ical wives in Arkansas knew 


"From nature’s point of that "it doesn't change from 
view, a central purpose of the local, to tee state, to the 


pursuing status is to convert federal leveL The girls just 


with red velvet curtains and it into sex. get prettier.” 

gold tassels and a beautiful Yet, he goes on, “the very Young Bill Clinton must 
carved ceiling, to listen to the point of being alpha male is have dreamed that politics 
arguments in case no. 95- considered evidence, in would be grand. 

1853, William Jefferson modem America, of unfit- Success at the polls would 


W illiam Jefferson 


then something approxima- Hebron into something far least his nri rics — me in- 

bigger, and important — a eluded — can do is admit we 
.Whatever it is called and commitment from Mr. Net- have been wrong about Mm. 
whatever it may be, it wiD not anyahu to tee peace process. - The Washington Post. 


Clinton, Petitioner, v. Paula ness for the job! Talk about 
Corbin Jones. It itp't every defeating tee purpose." 


day that tee president is a 
Petitioner. 


Success at the polls would 
allow him to realize his two 
fondest dreams: giving away 


be run by Jews. 

..In tee end. tee dream of a 
Greater Israel collided with 


But maybe biology is not money in government and 
destiny. Maybe it's character, getting the girls. 


But tee joke was on him. 
When he finally became 
leader of tee free world, 
there was no money to give 
away and girls were no 
longer to be got — at least 
with impunity. 

Mr. Clinton is left lamely 
arguing teat be is too busy 
with NATO meetings and 
such to testily at a sexual 
harassment trial Which, of 
course, no one believes since 
the president had plenty of 
free time to meet with Asian 
influence peddlers rounding 
up illegal money for the 
campaign, and to pursue his 
goal of playing the most 
rounds of golf of any pres- 
ident 

This is not just a joke on 
Mr. Clinton. Liberals and 
Democrats have also be- 
come the victims of a cruel 
irony. They were the ones, 
after all, who militated to be 
stricter on campaign finance 


reform and sexual harass- 
ment. thinking that greedy, 
perverted Republicans 
would be caught in those 
snares. 

On Capitol Hill, as well, 
the rewards of office have 
become completely disasso- 
ciated from the attractions of 
office. 

What is tee point of claw- 
ing your way up to be 
speaker of tee House if 
Congress not only expects 
you to tell tee truth about 
your ethical lapses but then, 
when you're caught lying 
on tape, documents it in 
the newspaper? 

Ah, for tee sneaky old 
days of Lyndon Johnson. 
Ah, for the randy old days of 
John Kennedy. It’s just not 
fun anymore. It's no wonder 
so many people are being 
driven away from govern- 
ment. 

The New York Times. 


-This will not, of coarse, 

Monetary Union 


which the Middle East has no 
scarcity, and it is almost cer- 
tain that either individual 


Regarding “The Euro? A 
Foolish Plan That Could Do 


in America’s interest — as only be described as disgrace- 
wefl as in tee interest of the fill? No. Yet there is no dearth 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

only be described as disgrace- as free access to the collec- port was < 

friP Nn_ Y*»f rfwTP. i« nn rteirth invt ltv> TRtriv auitilnhilitv rh» lnictM> 


zealots or organized trarorists Harm All ArountT (Opinion, 
will strike in the near future. Jan. 9) by Robert J. Samuel - 


global economy — because it of snide remarks, innuendos 
is in America's interest to and downright insults (always 


Already, Hamas has _de- son: - 

nounced fbe Netanyahu-Aia- Economic and monetary 


have a prosperous, stable and 
reliable partner and ally. 


quoting others) directed at 
Paula Jones. Mr. Cohen is ob- 


as free access to the collec- 
tions and tee ready availability 
of experts to answer a huge 
range of public inquiries. 
However, we believe that 


port was commissioned by 
the trustees of the museum 
and in fact was published by 
them in order to encourage 
constructive debate on tee 


due to a reduction of IS per- 
cent in our public grant 

R.G.W. ANDERSON. 

London. 


there services remain of para- important issues it raised. 


Economic and monetary viously trying to discredit her mount i m portance and con- Nowhere in his report does 


The writer is the director of 
the British Museum. 


union is not an easy task and without appearing to do so. 
success is not guaranteed. JOAN BERNARD. 


fat agreement lit is only a umcn,orEMU,isnotadevice success is not guaranteed, 
matter of time until it strikes, tea has been introduped. In The European economy, like 
3ut there is a compelling order to deal with specific others, is going through a cfcf- 


jBut there is a compelling order, to deal with specific 
logic toanlsrad-PLOaccoro problems or to achieve some 
that not even terrorism can « external goals. It is tee next 


Order , to deal with specific others, is going through a dif- 
problems or. to achieve some fierft adjustment process In 


VemouRlet, France. 


tribute to the museum's Mr. Edwards suggest that the 
eminent international repu- museum's financial problems 
ration. arise from gross financial 

The story does not mention mismanagement; on the con- 
teat Andrew Edwards’s re- traiy he stares clearly teat it is 


alter. Jurt.recehtiy, £or/fn- : natealsu 
stance, an unhinged 'Isiacli economic' 
soldier named Noaon Toed- . European 


• cm the way to tbe 


tee context of globalization. 
The single; European market 


fategr^te&Jr -.^tn'jand economic andmonetary 


Americans seem blissfully 
unaware of looking ridicu- 
lous. 

■That the Supreme Court 


Believe That... 


Regarding “ Saddam 

Offers Amnesty to Spies 


Who Confess" (Jan. 10): 
Either April Fool’s Day 
has come early this year or 
you guys have gone com- 
pletely round tee bend. Sad- 
dam Hussein also forgave his 
two sons-in-law not so long 
ago and bow long did they 
last? 

BRIAN J. CAMPBELL. 

Wechelderzande, 

Belgium. 


mantookabustoHebronaod. teesingleEuropeanmaritet A 
shpt up the place, wounding single European ormpey is 


Europe and^ccH^solidatioa^rf . uni/m will make this wider, should be involved in a case 

■J — — — i -— 1 a 1 ■ _ _ ». * rtf o aviwi malrTnflr «a naen of « 


six people. About a week considered of essential impor- 
later, two texrmist pipe bombs tance in this respect. We think 


filled note nails went off m tee 
Tel Aviv, wounding . 13 • aM 
people. . - : • pan 


tion of our markets, 
not an automatic 


adjustment easier and more 
disable. 

HUGOPAEMEN. 

Washington. 


panacea, is 


Bote incidents coaid well nomiedeve: 


for oar eco- 


The writer is the head cf the 
European Commission Del- 
egation in Washington. 


of a man making a pass at a 
woman and being rebuffed is 
unreal. Even daytime TV 
would refuse the script. 

PAULINE HUDEK. 

Geneva. 


Jiave been much bloodier but The so-called convergence 
Neither managed to stop— or criteria are not objectives in 
evpn delay — tee b»Ro> over themselves and are not sup- 


British Museum 


Jones v.Ginton 


Hebron. Once, though, tiw posed to 
bombings would have jpro- results: ! 


vaked a punitive Israeli re- to measure the degree of con- 
action - — the by-now forma- vergence of die economics 


luce automatic. The care of Paula Jones v. 
are instruments . Bill Gli ptnn raises, many se- 
i degree of con- nous questions about public 
tee economics and private morality «nd tee 
v the EU Conn- delicate relation between 


Regarding “British Mu- 
seum Suffers Shrinking 
Pains’' (Features, Jan. 8): 
This downbeat account of 
Che British Museum bears 
little resemblance to the sub- 
stance of my discussion with 



laic closing of the WestBank that will allow the EU Conn- ‘ rteljjrei tr relation between stanoeof my discussion with 
apd Gaza border crossings cil of- Ministers to decide; them. Contrary to Richard tee reporter last December, 
and, more serious, a sospen- which member stares will be Cohen’s affirmation (“Paula ^ *■ c tn pbasaicd at that tune, 





sion of the talks with 
Arafat 


[ of fee first 


tee museum is a demon- 


Letters intended for pub- 
lication should be a d d r e ss e d 
Letters to dm Editor’' and 
contain the writer's signature. 


these criteria has given some tee press coverage it de- 
additional impetus and a serves. - 


sense of realism to the efforts Is he shocked th«t the com- 


name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are sub- 
ject to editing. We cannot be 
responsible far the return cf 
[Unsolicited manuscripts. 


of adjustment to a single mar- mander in chief of the U.S. 
kef. Which our economies Army should avedd trial while 


want to ter in any case. 

. EMU and a single currency 
will promote European eco- 
nomic growth and well-be- 
ing. We think they will also be 


the ’ press coverage it de- cation and scholarship. 
saves. We have an impressive re- 

Is he shocked that the com- cord of redisplays — no less 
mander in chief of the U.S. than eight galleries have been 
Army should avedd trial while opened, i n the past three years 
servicemen arc convicted and — and annually we mount 


*' * I 


railed for similar offenses? 
Not really. Is he appalled teat 
the president may have in- 


over 20 special exhibitions. 
Some may consider old-fash- 
ioned our commiunent to 


dulged in behavior teat can long-standing traditions, such 


CROSSWORD 


Not for 


■CROSS tr Victor over 

-SET 

Star in Perseus 1|Hmil#( 

,15 ‘The Prisoner ot *» Cuts inches off 
Zends' local® .. yards 
ie Liberty si Master hand 


xx Natty Bumppo's 
quarry 
MZbigsr 
XX Winter 
comment . 

X7 Car bomb? 
a* Comte Russian 
actor Mischa 


30 Drivers' aid, tor 
short . 

31 Sketch 

34 Business abbr. 
as Capadtate 
3550th 

- enntvafsaty.Ux 


Est/1911, Paris \ 
‘Sank RooDoeNoo’ 


■eoFnmcBair 
Jordon leader' 
41 "HcM DOi* 

43 From N^D. to La. 

44 “Hard Hearted 
Hamah* . 
composer 

45 Naval bases? 

4i Slalom 

maneuver * 
55'ReavHkta’prop 
saSwfli 
54 'Go on!* 
l» First name in 
horror * 


5» Last name In 
horror 

■e "A Dog of - 
■ Flanders' writer 
M Deputy 
«a Tiger Bose* 
actress Lanora. 
1883 

«s Easiest way to 

run 

•4 Have a trying 
. akpedence 
w Media event 


4 Start of Nero's 
• retgn 

5 Thing • 

' 5 Battle mettle 
T Bedazzled 
- a Sheriffs badge 
.■Torah place 
marker 

•io Man with an the 
answers 
11 Hurdle 
ix Coach's M.VJP. 
award 

is Think too highly 
pf 

‘A Study in 
• ScariaT 
inspector 
xi Darkness 
personified 
Z3 Workover 
» Party board 

xe CShril War 
general who 
became a 
best-selling 
author . 
a* ‘Under Siege* 

star 

33 Colonial 
newsman 

-as Prodded into 
retiring 

35 University of 
Montana sm 
XI Mixes before 
cooking 

3B Summer 
coolant 
4a Defender ol 
peopte'srights 
45 Sun Bowl s*e 

4T Riot participant 
45 Swift 



all the tea in 10811 . 


Every counlry has its own AT&T Access Number which makes calling home or to other countries really easy. Just dial the 


AT&T Access Number for the country you're calling from and you'll get the fastest, clearest connections home. And be sure to 


charge your calls on your AT&T Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous phone charges on your hotel bill and saw you up to 


60%* (remember that old Chinese proverb — a yuan saved is a yuan earned). Check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


MWb)MnM 


© jVew York Times! Edited by I Fill Shorts. 


l.jua dial (heAT&TMxesi Number for the counny you are calling 1mm. 2 Dial the phone ouinfcerwai're calling. 3 Dial ihe calling card raimber leaed ^Kjvt j^jot ramie 


Sohrtioa to Pnzde of Jan. 16 


fil Traffic director 
tx Canvas covers 
» Give Lite 


^ A Space for Thought 


i Quartermaster's 

IWHjour? . 

tWirmowad _ 
~3Bfini 


ST Cleans (up) 
ad Morning riser 
ei Inherited 


snasas aans nnni 
nsmaEJo idsibei sag 
EBQEsnsnaHEnEiara 
„ oejee aaaoaa 
nHBHHsnna aaaaa 
tsnas E33S0aa 
nsni3B0 anan asa 
naa 3300003 033 

300 BD03 000000 

□□□ana 0300 

0Q0H0 030000300 

nnnnss anaa 
nonoaanasaaaaaa 
□□a 0030 aaaaaa 
000 □□□□ 0000Q0 



man 


Swnten. ... . 

.... 820-716411 

fcmri**® . - - 

...022-803411 

mmm* 

08BB49-U11 

INgtn* 

.M80-1W-10 

IWMXtagdaa* 


FrwB 

.MW4M011 

MIBB1E EAST 


Bmnrail 

. 01M-W1B 

EiWMOIn)'' 

...5184280 

GreacM 


fcrad 

.177-188-2727 

Intad— 

1-895558488 

SaafiAnUa-: 

- .1-800-18 

Wf* 

...172-1811 

AFRICA 


HBtafanbo - 

B8022-8111 

flkm - 

0191 

.. . 

7S-5M2 

tenflA 

04M-10 

SnfeN... - 

...98MMB-11 

SmA Africa 

.HfflWM123 




Oaft bn! Ibe JUST Access Mmber far teondiy yuftt caHtagfron? jn >4 myopHawf farAFCT Nrra a, Seivte, 

rrMtratWn W>lill[rf/>wrm mm/irroriw 

d«»fOl wonfflkins irom crcnmswb ww pm«ii(a arajiard W ntsjof Ui rmfn mfJniity Hi iJema haul on aM'Ww pnJntn c r ictlm * CcmpjnJ K. wttn hMH IriTihmt charge b»] wi 
calh B the US. m Odsbt: IW5 usmi mn£ cuy bf la^ar w Juwr *pB»fine nwn ytur bfflnr mated, tta* d <b; knjjh ol call, las cto^d h haW iad de cnuari frarn atuth yw eaihiif Ml had 
matrtspanliflBamr^rwWcdlinjooBidbiiKOXOijnBSciiki^tfwkMfiniteUlonlr CaaUiWKumjtaeainattalttltaitiiftafltoilvIlS jti*maibinnU<&aBbmi«idieaimi?rr<M 

McdlBfritemaUldeUJ.Iafflid aiidHilolMed*Bt • Par phone •-‘(jfiing awihbt !□ ifajgnaed tumwci oriy ALraUdadU*U^ek^BpinneiH{ulRlacilcainpn , nKmilimi>gitxan 
THjMQ' {nAOddiVCslm IfcWHnoii cbaijss anaafe Harm CIM WSJ 




’’Til'- ‘ 


m 


a aMhaB»u^o,o« 




































































































































































? y)Cr* vag 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL ~~ 


PAGE 11 


New Questions for Swiss Bank Over Shredded Documents 


/ ~®y^^dL Andrews 

; N ™Y<rt-n*cs Service 

^S^ Ctl0n 5 f ? undreds of pounds of 

a subridiaiy that 

‘ i1S eaIl ? gS ^ Nazi Ger- 
many, according to 


wves f£ators said fee^kterial. 


jwi» uuioais g ain 

i ae historian ' kept no inveniorv of 
;■ 2* dwteoyed, whichlSiSe k 
. to cfetennine whether the bank 

■ a month-old Swiss law that pro^ 

' J^ts^companies from destroying £*, 

tenal that may shed Hgfa on Sfowtzer- 


land‘s banking relationship to Hitler’s 
Germany. 

Our main problem is knowing ex- 
actly what was destroyed,” said Peter 
Gosandey, Zorich’s district attorney, 
whois leading the investigation. ■ 
There were files in there that Hai^t 
back to the 1870s, and they are obviously 
not relevant But there are also doc- 
uments from the 1930s and 1940s, and 
the time frame is such -feat they could at 
least theoretically have been useful. ’ ’ 
The Union Bank of Switzerland 
denied that any “interesting” docu- 
ments had beat destroyed, saying the 
historian was ‘TOO percent confident 
that none of the materials are related to 
the Holocaust.” . 

. The company also said that the bank’s 


management had known nothing about 
die shre dding and . that , the action had 
nothing to do with the broader con- 
troversy over Nazi money. 

Blit bank executives were at a loss to 
explain how the historian, who has not 
been publicly identified, could have 
taken the action, particularly given the 
new law. 

“The historian made his judgment 
that these documents had nothing to do 
with the present discussion about the 
Holocaust — nothing, and that is the 
point,” Gertrude Ensmann-Peyer. the 
bank’s senior spokeswoman, said in an 
mterview Wednesday. 

Jewish groups here and in the United 
States axe asking a series of questions: 

Why had the bank begun destroying 


potentially relevant documents precisely 
when Swiss banks are under intense 
pressure to provide information about 
their dealings during the Nazi era? 

Why had the bank chosen this mo- 
ment to uncover a cache of documents 
that had been left untouched in a vault 
since 1945? 

How could the historian possibly have 
been unaware of the implications of des- 


troying documents? 

Switzerland’s banking industry has 
been under siege for months from Jewish 
groups and from the United States, 
where Senator Alfonse D’ Amato, Re- 
publican of New Yotk, has held beatings 
that publicized embarrassing informa- 
tion from American government 
archives about Swiss dealings during 


World War II with Jews and with the 
Nazi government 

The shredding at the Union Bank of 
Switzerland might never have come to 
light had not a night watchman named 
Crisrpph Meiii become curious about 
documents he saw being destroyed. 

The guard took a number of doc- 
uments from the bank last week to pre- 
vent their destruction and turned them 
over to the Israeli Cultural Center of 
Zurich, whicb is usually occupied with 
providing day care for Jewish children. 

Mr. Meiii, 20 years old and the father 
of two, is himself the target of a criminal 
investigation into whether he violated 
bank secrecy laws. He has been sus- 
pended from his job with the security 
company that served the bank. 


;Car Bomb Kills 12 People 
i At a Market in Algeria 


2S[ JSSSJMn uSSSESESZSSESSi 


wed in 
of the 


- a. - — MUbU 

& dozen Muslim zmtitaots m the Casbah, 
reports said. 

The car, parked among hundreds of 
other vehicles in Boufarik, 40kilometers 
- (25 miles) south of Algiers, exploded as 
thousands of people shopped m a huge 
dirt lot. 

The blast killed 12 people and. 
wounded several dozen otters, official 
Algerian radio reported. Official sources 


resurgence of violence in November that 
has left more than 300 people dead. 

Earlier Thursday, security forces 
clashed with about a dozen Muslim mil- 
itants holed up in Algiers’s ancient Cas- 
bah district, killing the entire group, 
sources said. 

Parole living near the scene were 
farced to flee their homes during the 
clash with members of the Armed Is- 


said on condition of anonymity that the lamfe Group, 
explosion wounded about 60 people. The group has been blamed for a 

There was no claim of responsibility, series of brutal massacres in the Blida 
but suspicion fell on Muslim militants region over the last few wi nn tha, and had 
who are battling the military-backed stepped up threats against residents of 
government in a five-year-old civil war the Casbah since the start of Ramadan, 
that has killed at least 60,000 people. the Muslim holy month of fasting and 
The weekly market draws crowds of prayer. 



MORTAL COILS' — First Lieutenant Rusidi of the Indonesian police showing a bunch of cobras to his 
colleagues Thursday in Jakarta. The police say the snakes will be employed as a riot control method. 


DAIMLER: 

Power Struggle Ends 

Continued from Page 1 

the top job at Daimler after the departure 
of Edzard Reuter in May 1995. Mr. 
Schrempp's supporters said he had been 
chosen over Mr. Werner for a reason: 
After Daimler's diversification under 
Mr. Reuter, which resulted in record 
losses at the company. Daimler needed a 
decisive man willing to * ‘stop the bleed- 
ing," they said, and take the kind of 
painful measures that were unpreced- 
ented in German boardrooms. 

Quickly earning the nickname 
“Ram bo.” Mr. Schrempp cut the number 
of business operations to 25 from 35, 
decimating Daimler's aerospace opera- 
tions and severing ties to the unprofitable 
Dutch aircraft maker Fokker NV — a 
move that drove Fokker into bankruptcy. 

But few assumed that Mercedes had 
caused any problems until Mr. Schrempp 
trained his sights on the management 
echelons. Mr. Schrempp wants the re- 
maining 25 Daimler divisions to report 
to his board more directly, without hav- 
ing their reports filtered through three or 
four layers of management on their way 
up. Managers loyal to Mr. Schrempp 
claim to have found layers of bureau- 
cracy that hamstrung his reforms. Mr. 
Schrempp said die company had a ratio 
of headquarters-level management to 
factory workers that was twice that of the 
average American company. 

Few analysts doubt that Mr. 
Schrempp will have a major role in man- 
aging die downsized Daimler empire. 

Thai could have some ramifications 
for Mercedes, at least in terms of man- 
agement style. The two men have 
sharply different approaches to the Ger- 
man business system: While Mr. Werner 
tried to .work wi thin its often constrain- 
ing parameters, Mr. Schrempp has 
wanted to smash the old order and re- 
place it with a more open. Anglo-Saxon- 
style approach. 

The fact that Mr. Werner succeeded is a 
tribute to his management skills — a trait 
that few associate with Mr. Schrempp, 
said Michael Klein, an analyst in Frank- 
furt ai Delbrueck & Co., a private bank. 


^DIPLOMAT: Georgian’s Crash in Washington Effectively Ended Promising Career ROBE: Many Lives Are Still in Ruins 


Continued from Page 1 

■ apparently prompted Secretary of State 
. Warren Christopher last week to as k 

■ President Eduard Shevardnadze of 
Georgia to consider waiving Mr. 
Makharadze’s diplomatic . immunity. 

1 Mr. Shevardnadze immediately com- 
plied, saying be was “ p rep ar ed" to strip . 
Mr. Makharadze of ms immunity from 
criminal prosecution pending the out- 
come of a police investigation. 

“He was a very promising diplomat, 
and we would. . have considered 

• something prammetefor him in the fir-' 

• tore,” Mr. Shevardnadze said Wednes-. 

; day, speakmgofMr.Makharadzfcm die 
’ past tense as many here now do. “ft-was 

with a very heavy heart that I took this 
.decision.’ 

“But no matter whattte sentence may 
be,” be added. ‘Tdstfll believe my very 
harsh decision would be justified. 
Justice is very. often ruthless.” 

But the president's decision is not 
final, and he did not rule out future 
negotiations with Washington over Mr. 
Makharadze's fate 
For Mr. Shevardnadze, a former So- 

- viet foreign minister, Mr. Makharadze’s - 
case is not only politically difficult but 
also personal. 

Before going to Washington when 
Georgia opened its embassy in 1994, Mr. 
Makbaradze worked for several years as 
a national security aide to Mr. Steward? 

nadze, one of a tight-knit group ofWest- 

• on-leaning young men determined to 
' build the foundations of modern demo- 
cracy hoe. 

Mr. Shevardnadze also has been 

• friends with Mr. Makharadze’s mother, 
'a teacher who receives foreign. youth 
.delegations here, for about 40 years. 

• Whatever ptnrishmesit Mr. Makbaradze 
: receives, rite prerident said it would pain 

• him “as if my own children were pun- 
’ished.” 

- - That is not the only pain for Mr. 

, Shevardnadze. The American media 

- firestorm prompted by the case has been 
r matehgd by an uproar in the Georgian 
! press. Newspapers here say the Amer- 
leans have demonized Mr. Makharadze, 
land they ****** Mr. Shevardnadze’s pre- 

t fcminar y dftridon to leave him tO the 
^American legal system as akin to thro w- 
’ ing him to tte wolves. 

< “If our best diplomat, oar leading 
! officer in our leading embassy in the 
; leading country of today's world, is not 
; protected by ms president and fry his 
; country, how safe are we, ordinary Geqr- 

- gians? 4 ’ asked New Generation, a mod- 
; erate Georgian daily. 

Mr. Shevardnadze, more politically 
secure than st any time in his nearly five 
: years as Georgia’s leader, saidhe would 
weather tte criticism, adding that tte 
: moral principle of just p unishm e nt out- 
weighed what he described as tte an- 

• liq uated. Cold War-era practice of dip- 
lomatic immunity. He is also keenly 

■ aware, and intensely grateful, tins $540 
million in U.S. aid, much of ft in tteforrn 


Mr. Makharadze doesn’t fit tte ste- studying economics al Harvard Uni- 
reotype. Georgians insist As die No. 2 versity. according to his aster Tamara, 
man m tte Georgian Embassy, he lives He does not smoke. Friends say they 
in a small apartment, for which the Gear- have never seen him drunk, which they 
gian government pays rent He makes point out is highly unusual for a Geor- 
about $16,000 a year. Of that, he sends gian man. 

$200 a month, home to support his el- . “He was well read and quiet and not 
deriy parents in Tbilisi, with whom he at all a typical young man,” said Gela 


man m tte Georgian Embassy, he lives 
in a small apartment, for which the Geor- 
gian government pays rent. He makes 
about $16,000 a year. Of dial, he sends 
$200 a month, home to support his el- 
derly parents in Tbilisi, with whom he 
lived before going abroad. That sum 
doub les their monthly income. 

' like the vast majority of Georgians, 
Mr. Makharadze owned no car, and be 
had virtually never driven one before he 
was sent abroad two years ago. Balding, 
booldsh-Iooki^g apd bespectacled, he 
hasnevermar&ed andhasnadno serious 


struck car flew into the air and landed on Continued from Page 1 

the next vehicle in line, in which Miss . 

Waltrick was a passenger central government After vowing to 

Mr. Makharadze has said his brakes help survivors rebuild, officials in the 


Charkviani, chief foreign affairs adviser 
to Mr. Shevardnadze. “He’s the least 
likely candidate for die type of image 
that’s been created for him in Amer- 
ica.” 

Nonetheless, the facts of the 


ir a Geor- failed, but investigators say that they 
have found nothing to support that stale- 
st and not meat and that skid marks suggest he was 
said Gela traveling around 80 miles (130 kilo- 
re adviser meters) per hour before the impact. Al- 
the least though Mr. Makharadze was not asked 


to take a test for drunkenness because of charge of earthquake relief, said last fall 
his diplomatic immunity — police at the that the government had not yet decided 
scene said they smelled alcohol on his whether to pay compensation. 


bookisMooking apd tiespectacled, he Makharadze case, as far as they , are 
has ncverinatQed andbas had no serious -known, have 'caused anguish here; and 
gjriffiends. Cotieagnes rmd family mem- not a little bewilderment. Late Jan. 3, die 
bers say he -spends virtually all his time Ford the envoy was driving slammed 
working. He spent his vacation last year into a car stopped at a red light. The 


breath — authorities say there appears to 
be enough evidence to charge him. But 
the degree of severity of the indictment, 
which could range from negligent hom- 
icide to second-degree murder, is un- 
clear. 


HEBRON: Parliament Approves Accord ACCORD: U.S. Deeply Involved as Arbiter 


Continued from Page 1 

without Syria. He will become Mr. Clin- 
ton’s second-term national security ad- 
visor after die president’s inauguration 
Monday. 

When Mr. Clinton sees Mr. Netan- 
yahu, “one of tte things that will ob- 
viously be onthe agenda win be whether 
it is possible to resume negotiations with 
Syna,” Mr. Berger said. ■ - 
In recent weeks, the president will 


leaders, so that we continue to work 
closely together,” Mr. Berger said. 

Syna says Israel must leave the stra- 
tegic Golan Heights as the price for 
peace. Israel captured die Golan in die 
1967 Middle East war. 

Mr. Clinton, who backed the land-for- 


Continued from Page 1 

ters from Mr. Christopher to both sides. 

“They agreed with the words but they 
just couldn't bring themselves to write 
them down, so we wrote them,” a Clin- 
ton administration official said. ”1 guess 


Continued from Page 1 4 'The government ought to remember 

who they are rebuilding this city for,” 
central government After vowing to said Mrs. Kohashi's brother, Keiji, 70. 
help survivors rebuild, officials in the ‘ ‘It’s supposed to be for us. Not for the 

national government stymied plans construction industry.” 
drawn up in Kobe to have Tokyo pay Peihaps a harsher reality for the vic- 
between 5 million and 17 million yen to tuns is the inability of the Kobe city 
those whose homes were destroyed. government to build low-rent public 
Seiroku Kajiyama, the government housing at the pace it promised, 
spokesman who doubles as minister in A prefecture] government survey last 
charge of earthquake relief, said last fall year found that 70 percent of the people 
that the government had not yet decided in compounds hoped ro move into such 
whether to pay compensation. housing. 

The Finance Ministry has allotted S30 Last month, however, officials said 

billion to rebuild Kobe's infrastructure people would remain in temporary com- 
but has strongly resisted {dying com- pounds until around March 2000. two 
pensation to survivors, saying that years longer than the prefecture orig- 
privale charity and personal savings inally hoped, 
should suffice. This angered the people in the com- 

pounds. 

But Norio Aoki, the city official in 
it I j i iv charge of a 270 billion yen project to 
ny Involved as Arbiter build 3.000 apartments in Kobe, said the 

slow pace of construction was unavoid- 
ganizations, said Wednesday that Mr. able because of Japan's development 
Christopher's letter to Mr. Netanyahu laws. 

“is very reassuring" because it says Under them, local officials must first 


The Finance Ministry has allotted $30 
billion to rebuild Kobe’s infrastructure 
but has strongly resisted {dying com- 


ganizations, said Wednesday that Mr. able because of Japan's development 
Christopher's letter to Mr. Netanyahu laws. 

“is very reassuring" because it says Under them, local officials must first 
"the United States’ commitment to Is- find the landowners, tenants and sub- 


peace approach initiated by the Labor you have to be a Middle East scholar to 
governments of Yitzhak Shamir and understand it'* 


alrote welcoming tire Patestituan leader parties ask for him. 


Yasser Arafat President Hosni Mubarak On Thursday afternoon, cranes were 

of Egypt ate King Hussein of Jordan. plucking Israeli sentry boxes from 

“Iwottld expect in the relatively near rooftops in Hebron, and army conscripts 
term a round of meetings, whether with were dragging away the paraphernalia of 
all four or with some group of those an occupation that began in 1967, before 
. r . V. ttey were born. They split open sand 
• — ’ bags, pulled down barbed wire and das- 


ACQUIT: 

2 Italians Cleared 


bags, pulled down bar 
mantled search lights. 


Shimon Peres, has offered tire continued Edward Djerejian. a former U.S. am- 

services of the American mediator Den- bassador to Israel and Syria, said: “The 
ms Ross to assist in new talks if tte reason for doing it that way is basically 
him. so that each side can use the U.S. rae- 

iy afternoon, cranes were diator as a court of appeal in their in- 
fill sentry boxes from terpretation of tire requirements.” 
bron, and army conscripts He said the issuance of letters in 
away the paraphernalia of which tire United States takes respon- 
that began in 1967, before ability for overcoming the lingering 
rn. They split open sand mistrust is a “useful negotiating tool” 
own barbed wire and dis- with which Israel and the Palestinians 
i lights. were familiar. 


raeli security is ironclad and constitutes 
a fundamental cornerstone of our special 
relationship.” 

By issuing a letter promising imple- 
mentation of the peace agreement. Mr. 
Hoenlein said, the United States ob- 
tained “a demonstration by Mr. Net- 
anyahu that he is really committed to 
moving ahead and will live up to Israel's 
obligations. Palestinian leader Yasser 
Arafat has to live up to it in reciprocity. It 
holds both sides accountable. Each side 
needs the other and the United States 
plays a larger role now.” 


tenants with a stake in any land slated for 
development and buy those stakes be- 
fore construction can begin. 

“To be perfectly frank. I’ve no idea 
how long it will take to redevelop this 
area because there are nearly 2,000 
people with a stake in it,” Mr. Aoki 
said. 

This delay comes as little surprise to 
Mrs. Kohashj and her brother. Like 
many made homeless, the Kohashis 
would like to move into public housing. 

The room they share is barely big 
enough — three meters by three meters 


If Mr. Clinton and ft is senior aides are — to lay out the foldaway mattresses on 


daunted by tte pros] 
more immersed in the 


■t that ttey are 
ddleEastthick- 


“We’re very happy to see them 
said Hamed Kbalil Aznr, watching 


iS Italians i^ioareci his butcher shop. “We hope the settlers 

will do tire same thing and leave our 
Continued from Page 1 town and let us live in peace.” 

But Hebron will probably remain a 
cently gave birth to twin girls, appeared flashpoint for Israeli- Arab violence even 
rattn throughout the court session. after redeployment, which in effect is a 
The southern ftaHan region of Ca- partitioning of the city center, 
labria, where Catanzaro ties, is no About 400 militant Jewish settlers 
stranger to violence from tire crime live in tire heart of Hebron. An additional 
rang e that flourish there. 5,000 live in fenced enclaves on the edge 

Yet the news that tire California boy of this city 00,000 Palestinians that 

was shot and killed in a failed highway c on tai n s the tomb of tire biblical Ab- 
robbery while cm vacation with his par- raham, a site revered by Jews and 
mttt and sister sent waves of grief and Muslims alike. - (Reuters, AP ) 

shame through Italians. ^ ^ — ^ ^ 

What perhaps most moved Italy was • 

Arwmm his organs f or transplant to save WIFE: As Troubles . 

tte lives of terminally ill It alia ns . 

Though Italy has care of Europe’s Continued from Page 1 

lowest transplant rates, after tire boy’s . 

(feoh Italian newspapers reported a ident’s immediate entourage who is not 
flurry of donati ons from Ttafians and afraid of him and with whom he consults 

.. *t _ • il *1 ms 1 n e nAnprimtlir «« Tiitrnimnliflr 


Mr. Djerejian said the letters are “as- et than ever, they did not show it. On tire 
surances but not a guarantee,” because contrary, they seemed to relish it 


the United States is not in a position to 
“guarantee” that Israel or the Pales- 
tinians will do anything. 

Mr. Christopher mate that same point 


White House officials offered quo- 
tations from Mr. Clinton's calls to Mr. 
Netanyahu and Mr. Arafat after the 


which they sleep. They share a kitchen, 
bath and toilet with 16 others, mainly the 
elderly and ILL 

The situation is made worse by the 
paralysis in Mrs. Kohashi ’s arm that she 
suffered nine years ago after a stroke. 

But when Kobe city recently offered 


agreement was announced to showcase them an apartment in a suburb, they 


after redeployment, which in effect is a ers of the UB. Jewish community, who 
partitioning of the city center. feared that a U.S. “guarantee” of im- 

About 400 militant Jewish settlers plementation could put this country on a 
live in tte heart of Hebron. An additional collision course with Israel if that coun- 
5,000 live m fenced enclaves on tte edge try felt it necessary to hold off on same 
of tins city of 100,000 Palestinians that future aspect of implementation. 


in a meeting earlier this week with lead- what they said was his central role and turned it down. Mrs. Kohashi said the 


ny felt it necessary to hold off on same Mr. Netanyahu sai 


that of the United Stares. 

“We really just wanted to say a be- 
lated thank you. You were superb. It 
would not have happened without you,” 


contains the tomb of tte biblical Ab- 
raham, a site revered by Jews and 
Muslims alike. ■ (Reuters , AP ) 


Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice 
chairman of the Conference of Pres- 
idents of Major American Jewish Or- 


“We cannot forget what you have either, 
done. We could not have done it without “I g 


apartment was too far from her doctor. 

“1 can’t go home," she said. “And I 
can’t stand being here. But moving to a 
place that's far from public transport, the 
shops and my doctor isn’t any good 


you ," a White House official quoted Mr. 
Arafat as telling Mr. Clinton. 


“I guess that to the city of Kobe,' ' she 
said, “I’m just a piece of lost bag- 
gage." 


WIFE: As Troubles Mount for Serbia’s Power Couple, the First Lady Is Increasingly First 


Confirmed from Page 1 partisan in World War n who was sus- 

pected of treachery by her comrades, 
ident’s tmmeritatg entourage who is not According to people who know her, Miss 




from starvation since it became mde- 

: pendent five years ago. ■ # ■ 

“If nor for America’s disinterested 
■ aid, tens of thousands of petjlfc ih.Geor- 
’ gia wonld havfi died freon fa m i n e,” he 
- said. . 

Most Georgians are equally thankful 
for American assistance Co a fledgling 
republic that, in its infancy, had to con- 
- tend with two hrmal separatist wars, 
f ‘ hundreds of thousands of refugees and 
competing warlords who unleashed an- 
archy on tire streets. - 
* But when it comes to tire Makh aradze 
icase, Georgian and American pexcep- 
‘ dons part ways. ^ ^ 

Some Americans tend to see foreign 
1 diplomats in Washington . as a h igh-Hv - 
ing lot — big-spending; party-hopping 
'womanizers who local. custom 

.-and law. 


flflri friwyi merease to the “Nicholas constantly. “Mzra is tte key personality 
effect.” of tire Serbian crisis,” says a framer 

' burial news reports after tire arrest of member of the government. “Ste or- 
Mr. Mesiano and Mr- lannelio suggested garrizod Slobo’s coming to power, and 
they admitted to the police that ttey had will be with him to the end." 
in fect opened fire on tire Greens' rental “Slobo and Mira" are inextricably 

car but mat they did not know Nicholas finked rathe public imagination. As Mr. 
and his 4 -year old sister, Eleanor, who Milosevic becomes ever-more reclusive 
survived the attack, were asleep on tire —he has made few public appearances 
back seat _ _ since street protests began over the al- 


Tbe Green family, from Bodega Bay, Ieged stealing of local elections an Nov. 
California, were during on tte highway 17 — Miss Maricovic’s role has grown in 
between Salerno and Reggio Calabria importance. . 
when tire assailants struck- The public perception of Miss 

Much of tte evidence dining the trial, Markovic is summed up by tte drawings 
which h»r«»n in February, centered on of Serbia’s best-known political carioao- 
police wiretaps, bat there was consid- is. Carat, who depicts her as a dumpy 
etable dispute between defense lawyers martinet with protr u ding teeth, a plastic 
and the prosecution about tire meaning flower in her shiny black hair and her 
of some of tte overheard conversations, head in tire clouds. In Corax ’s drawings. 
They were in heavy Calabrian dialect- ^ is usually pestering Slobo with wacky 

Mr. Mesiano reacted emotionally to ideas and telling him what to do. 
the reading of tte verdict, sobbing and The reality is more complex than the 
embracing his parents. caricature. Miss Markovic is the product 

Afterward, first he and fires each of of a family saga that is both tragic and 
h!s parents shook hands with Mr. terrac/Particulariy important is her re- 
QjTxaf- latiraiship with her mother, a Communisr 


Markovic has spent much of her life 
trying to vindicate the reputation of her 
mother. 

Mirjana Markovic was bom in the 
Serbian forest on July 20, 1942, in the 
middle of tire Communist uprising 
against Nazi occupation ofYugoslavia, 
the offspring of a casual affair between 
two well-known resistance fighters. Her 
mother, Vera Miletic, spent just rare day 
with the baby before resuming bar re- 
sistance activities. The child was handed 
over to a mill worker for safekeeping and 
given her mother’s nom de guerre, Mira, 
short for Mirj ana. 

Her earliest childhood memories, as 
told to a sympathetic interviewer in 


much of tire animosity between her and Party documents that have since dis- 
opposition leaders, some of whom draw appeared, is that she was tortured and 
their inspiration from tire Chetnik move- gave away the names of some of her 
menL comrades. 

The recent election campaign saw a Miss Markovic insists that her mother 

bizarre clash between Miss Markovic “never lost faith.” 
and the wife of Vuk Draskovic, one of In any event. Miss Miletic was ex- 


c has spent much ot her hfe menL 

i vindicate the reputation of her The recent election campaign saw a 

bizarre clash between Miss Markovic 
ia Markovic was bom in the and the wife of Vuk Draskovic, one of 
forest on July 20, 1942, in the the top three opposition leaders, 
of tire Communist uprising It began when Danica Draskovic, 
'Jazi occupation of Yugoslavia, whose father was a leading Chetnik and 
•ring of a casual affair between was killed by the Communists, de- 
-known resistance fighters. Her scribed her rival as “tire bastard product 
Vera Miletic, spent just rare day of wild partisan orgies in the weeds." 
baby before resuming her re- “It’s crazy, but we are still fighting 


ecu ted by the pro-Nazi regime on Sept, 
7, 1944,justafew weeks before Marshal 
Tito’s victorious farces marched into 
Belgrade. 

After tire Communist victory, Mira 
Markovic went to live with her maternal 
grandparents in the town of Pozarevac, 


battles from Worid Warn here,” says a in central Serbia. It was here, at tire 
Serbian politician who knows both wo- Pozarevac high school, that she met 
men well. Slobodan Milosevic, a handsome youth 


men weu. 

“Mira is physically allergic to tire 
very word ‘ Chetnik. ’ You just have to 
mention the word, and you immediately 


March 1994, are of hiding from tire produce an extreme, reaction. If you 
fiercely anti -Communist Chetniks, tire know this characteristic of hers, then it is 


fiercely ann-Commiinist Chetniks, tire 
Serbian royalist forces who collaborated 
at times with the Germans. 

Had the Chetniks succeeded in find- 
ing her, they would have been able to use 
ter as a pawn to blackmail her mother, 
who was arrested tty tte Serbian police 
in March 1943. 

Miss Markovic 's hatred of tte Cftet- 
nfles persists to this day, and explains 


Slobodan Milosevic, a handsome youth 
a year her senior. 

“Her sorrow attracted her to him,” 
wrote the interviewer. “He felt tire need 
to relieve ho- pain, to protect and cherish 
her." 

Why Mr. Milosevic was attracted to 


easy to manipulate ner. way rar. Milosevic was atxracrea to 

Barely nine m onths after giving birth Miss Markovic is a matter of much spec- 
to Mira, Vera Miletic was arrested in ulation here. According to some ac- 
Belgrade and taken to a concentration counts, he saw her Communist Party 


canro. 

How she behaved under interrogation 
has since become a matter of great con- 
troversy. The most widely accepted ver- 
sion here, based on internal Communist 


connections as a ladder fra his own 
advancement While Mr. Milosevic was 
the son of a priest from Montenegro, the 
Markovic family belonged to the par- 
tisan elite. 





INTERNATIONAL herald tribune 
FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 



RAGE 12 


Mexico’s Strenuous and Breathtaking Copper Canyon 


By Florence Fabricant 

New York Times Service 

LFUERTE, Mexico — THE choice, fora 
trip to the Copper Canyon region of 
northern Mexico, was the luxury train or 
the luxury lodges. We opted for the 
lodges and (he chance to hike the mountain trails. 
For about the same price as the fancy train, around 
$1,500 a jjereon, my husband, Richard, and Land 
another vigorous couple with whan we often 
travel, stretched a 14-hour train ride with one 

throa^oroofiSxico’s most' majesS^B. triP 

La Barranca del Cobre, or Copper Canyon, is 
one of five profound, remote canyons feat were 
created by volcanic upheavals and carved by 
rivers meandering through the western Sierra 
Madxe. This network of canyons is celebrated for 
being deeper than the Grand Canyon, abit of trivia 
that is entirely beside the point. Deeper, yes. More 
magnificent, no. But definitely less crowded with 
tourists. On several half-day and full-day bikes 
last October, we had the tram to ourselves. 

As for the famous Chihuahua-Pacific railroad 
that also gives a trip to the region much of its 
mystique, this engineering marvel, which took 
90 years to build, twists around the mountains, 
across high trestles and through 87 tunnels, 
climbing from sea level and over the Continental 
Divide. It can be thrilling, but there ate no views 
of the canyons from the train. 

We starred the trip near the western terminus 
of the railroad, at Los Mochis. on the Sea of 
Cortez opposite Baja California. A taxi took us 
from the airport at Los Mochis to the tropical 
colonial town of El Fuerte, where we spent the 
night. In the morning we picked up die regular 
Chihuahua-Pacific train, which rides the same 
rails as the private luxury train, for the initial leg 
of our journey into the canyon country. 

Riding Wist to East 

Riding the train from west to east guarantees 
that the most exciting and scenic part of the trip, 
the ISO miles (240 kilometers) from the Rio 
Fuerte Bridge, about 18 miles east of El Fuerte, to 
Creek a kind of frontier town along the way, is 
made during daylight hours, especially since 
delays are endemic. Far the best views it is 
essential to sit on die south side of the train as it 
travels east 

Stopovers are permitted at any point in die 
journey. We made three. 

The first was at Bahuichivo, to spend a night at 
die rustic Paraiso del Oso near CerocahuiTWe 
hiked to Gallegos Point, an overlook where we 
could see down to the Urique River in the bottom 



■ : : ’ : X ■ ft a • yy • ‘•(•s -? 



{■ msk m ' - 



fgi 


of Urique Canyon, one of the few places in the 
area where there is a view all the way down. Next 
was at Posada Barrancas, where we stayed in the 
Hotel Mansion Tarahumara, a fcncifiil, tnrreted 
structure near the rim of Copper Canyon. In both 
places we were provided with guides for hikes 
along the canyon ridges. 


a couple of miles from the famous Copper Canyon 
overlook at El Divisadero, we went on to Creel, 
the largest town in the region, where a van took us 
to the first of the two Copper Canyon lodges that 
would be our bases for the next six days. These 
were the rough-hewn, rambling Sierra Lodge in 
the highlands near Cusarare and die elegant River- 
side Lodge in Batopilas, a colonial silver-mining 
town at die bottom of Batopilas Canyon. Both 
lodges offer comfortable accommodations, 
guided hikes, food adapted to American tastes. 


Skip McWilliams, a filmmaker from 
Michigan who had been hiking in the Sierra 
Madre for years, bought the Siena Lodge in the 
early 1980s and the Riverside Lodge in 1992, 
resoring the former from conversion into a disco 


and die latter from demolition. Though slightly 
regimented in their approach to activities, meal 
times and the like, the lodges provide excellent 
options for outdoor recreation, from tenderfoot 
rambles along the river bank to more strenuous 
adventures. 

Before dinner some of the staff came around 
to li g ht kerosene lamps in our room and start a 
fire m the pot-belly stove. In early October, after 
the s umm er rains, the trees were green, there 
were wildflowers. the rivers were fairly full and 
die w aterfalls abundant But at 8,000 feet, day- 
time temperatures in the low 70s (low 20s in 
centigrade) dropped about 20 degrees at night 
The wood stove, duvets and flannel sheets were 
welcome amenities. The lodge also supplied 
excellent little battery-operated reading lights. 
There are no telephones and no tele vision sets. 

The next day we hiked to the Basiracota hot 
springs and die Cusarare Falls, a 14-mile round 

predpitous 1,200-foot on 

scree, then walking and climbing over boulders 
along the Cusarare Creek, which we crisscrossed 
on stepping stones. Our guide was a 15-year-old 


■ unglazed day jrots, leather thong sandals 
and simple musical - ins tr uments, as well as bas- 
kets, atthe most reasonable pices in the region. 

Santiago proved to be an excellent, tireless 
and sure-footed guide, endowed with a gentle 
charm and an uncanny knack for spotring bird 
life. A rummage in thie pocket dictionary came 
up with the worn for owl, when we stopped along 
the trail to watch the large silver and brown bird 
take off through the canyon. He also led us to a 
number of caves, same of which were used for 


SectioDoaucx ferlte Mew Yak ltae» 

A guest from the Sierra Lodge in the highlands near Cusarare pauses in midhike at site of 200-year-old pictographs. 


Ta rahumnra In dian , Santiago In addition to be- 
ing richly endowed with rock formations, stun- 
ning vistas and excellent hiking terrain. Copper 
Canyon country is also the land of the Tarahn- 
maras, a pastoral, senrinoroadic tribe first doc- 
umented by Spanish missionaries in the 17th 
century. They fled into these mountains from the 
lowlands to escape the Spaniards and then, about - 
100 years ago, to flee persecution by the dictator 
Porfirio Diaz. It is the largest North Americtm 
tribe after the Navajos. 

■■ HE shop at Sierra Lodge has one of the best 


burials. The hot springs spilling into the river at 
. .the jhatfway point gave uaa.cbance to unlace our. 
boots and bathe our feet while we had an odd but 
n<& bad piratic lunch of mashed potato burritos, 
fruit and bottled water provided by the lodge. 

The next rooming with 12 other guests we 
.dtfznbed into two vans for the trip to Batopilas,; 
reached after a five-boor drive that almost rivaled- 
(he train for switchbacks and breathta k i ng views. ! 
The vans are equipped with apair of comfortable' 
' seats -on their roofs, and the guests took turns 
riding in these, for the best views of alL 

siATtr Am moons We arrived in Batbpfiasi 
at about 2 PJVL - — in sultry ami supposedly 
unseasonal heat. The sweet little town with a. 
small square, a handsome government building, 
a church and a few shops stretches for about; 
three miles along die Batopilas River. Founded' 
by -the Spaniards in 1632 when silver was dis-; 
covered m the hills , the town is now a center for 
the cultivation of tropical fruits. 

Each of the roemsin Riverside Lodge, a bizarre, 
yet charming blend of colonial Victorian and; 
Moorish details, is different. Shaded witb shatters! 
and laoe curtains, roams are furnished with heavy ■ 
beds and **h* g?mt ttiwns. Rooms are lighted by! 
kerosene lamps. The town is electrifiedbot the- 
availability of power is anybody’s guess. When it; 
functions, the large fans in the rooms provide- 
relief from the teat | 

The food, attractively served on decorated 
cfainaware and pottery but hardly memorable; 
cooking, is similar to that at Sierra Lodge, where! 


some of the hi g hli g hts.. Most mails started with; 
cabbage soap. Dinners of stewed or grilled beef, 
pasta, fried fish and plenty of vegetables, plus; 
puddiaglike dessert concoctions. were typicaL 

Breakfast, with bot biscuits or com bread, was. 
invariably the best meaL 
- During our three-night stay in Batopilas we 
left each morning at about 9. First, we hiked! 
three miles along the river to die picturesque 
16th-century brick and stucco mission church at 
Satevo and the next day took amore strenuous, 
four-hour hike up to the abandoned Camuchin 
silver mine high above the river. We also crossed 
die river to visit die ruined Hacienda de San 
Miguel, the mansion, offices and metal-refining 
plant of Alexander Shepherd, a silver magnate 
and onetime governor of Washington. D.C. (in 
the three yens beginning in 1871 when it wasf. 
ruled by a governor) and who lived in Batopilas 
for 11 years at the tom of the century. 

We returned to Sierra Lodge for one night, 
were driven back to Creel and took a bus to 
Chihuahua, where we stayed overnight before 
flying back to New York via El Paso. 



- 1 1) 

« f " 


Edinburgh, a Wonderful Place for a Murder 



■ By Marilyn Stasio ■ - 

New York Times Service 

DINBURGH — ■ The first time I visited 
Edinburgh, during a season that die na- 
tives laughably refer to as “axing,” I 
□early perished from die cola and die 
damp and the icy drizzle that weeps incessantly 
down the stone walls and cobbled streets of that 
wind-swept city on the Firth of Forth. Without 
stopping to unpack the useless clothing I bad 
brought, off I ran to Victoria Street to buy a 
cashmere turtleneck with a matching tarn dy* 
came down to my eyebrows and over my ears. 

Ah, better. My second stop was an antiquarian 
bookshop on Princes Street, where I spent $10 on 
an original 1924 edition (eureka!) of “The Fatal 
Countless and Other Studies" by William 


That’s just the sort of book you want to be 
reading on a visit to Edinburgh, a proud, lofty city 
that takes perverse satisfaction in its violent 
history. Down these cobblestoned streets 
trundled the burdened cart of those infamous 
body snatchers Burke and Hare. Through that 
insalubrious alley lies TweeddaJe Court, where 
Begbie. a hapless bank clerk, lost his life and his 
purse. At the foot of the Royal Mile that bisects 
. Old Town, in the stately Palace of Holyrood- 
house, is tbe wood-paneled dining room where 
poor, handsome Rizzio, the luckless companion 
of Mary, Quern of Scots, was dragged away from 
his supper to his death. And somewhere beyond 
the city's gray stone turrets and spires, legend 
cells of a castle where Macbeth and his cruel lady 
called the King to come and be killed. 

Roughead. a distinguished Edinburgh lawyer 
with an obsessive interest in criminal lore, 
presented his case studies in “The Fatal Couot- 
*«u*Aiuafljn ess” in so seductive a narrative voice that no less 


a stylist than Hairy James became an ardent feu 
of his ‘ ‘excellent artind animation.” . 

“Bishops, bravoes and panders, poison-mon- 
gers and magicians” ail played their parts in the 
infamo us case of Lady Frances Howard, the 
"beautiful and evil” countess who was banished 
to obscurity in 1616 for the murderofSfr Thomas 
Overtury, a powerful court insider who was 
thwarting her ambitions to many the king’s fe- 
vorite. In his mann afin g style, Roughead goes on 
to recount all the juicy details of a conspiracy that 
involved certain “parasitic, prodigal and rapa- 
cious” nobility in the "naughty court” of Kmg 
James. Some said that the king himself was an 
accessory to the crime. “But as tothis we have no 
certainty," cautions Roughead. 


■ULTIMO MOUNDS Roughead wasn’t the only 
connoisseur of crime to discover in Edinburgh's 
forbidding architecture and bloody history the 
perfect setting for “a really good murder.” 
Modem Scottish authors such as Ian Rankin and 
Quiutin Jardme have also made the city their 
killing grounds and turned to its sinister past for 
literary inspiration. 

“This is a city,” Rankin takes glum sat- 
isfaction in reminding us, 1 ‘which flayed grave- 
robbera and made their skins into souvenirs, the 
capital of a country me of whose kings made a 
hobby of extracting teeth from his subjects. 
Nothing I could write about in such a context 
could ever be considered exaggeration.” 

Rankin's novels take readers down the city’s 
darkest, meanest streets. “Hide and Seek” 
slouches around the squalid haunts of derelicts 
and dmg addicts. The teenage throwaways who 
hurl themselves off the Forth Road Bridge in 
“Let It Bleed” take a bleak route from youth 
shelter to jail to tire morgue. And in “Mortal 
Causes,” a Denture chamber is discovered be- 


neath Old Town s t ree t s , in a warren of stone 
bmldings and passageways boned arnFforgotten 
in the 1600s when a plague swept the city,. .. . 

“I like to imagine that all my Edinburgh 
novels are modem rewpdrings of and critiques 
upon ‘Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,’ ” says Rankin, 
who calls his mordant style “tartan noir. " Tak- 
ing the classic honor story of his countryman, 
Robert Louis . Stevenson, as his literary model' 
suits his theory that Edinburgh has two faces: tire 


me mirror, lo Kaman, tnese dual moral per- 
sonalities suggest that “in writing about Scot- 
land’s twisted present, I might be saying 
something about its past psychoses, too.” 

Quin tin Jardine isn’t as dour a writer or as 
remorseless a moralist as Rankin, but his high- 
tension police procedurals featuring Assistant 
Chief Constable Bob Skinner will raise yourpulse 
rate. You wan’tnm into Jardme’s rude and-vulgar 
coppers among tbe Georgian terraces, crescents 
and squares in the New Town, but they are meat 
companions on a pub crawL Designated “Best 
City m Britain far Pubs” by the Good Pub Guide, 
Edinburgh has more than 700 of these hospitable 
spots, from elegant Victorian lounges to dark, 
cozy taverns with fireplaces. 

M Y favorite Jardine mystery is “Skin- 
ner's Rules,” which finds a savage 
killer preying on strollers on the Royal 
Mile. Sports enthusiasts might prefer “Skin- 
ner’s Round," in which members of an ex- 
clusive new golf club are being murdered right 
before an important to urnam ent. Given mat 
Scotland is acknowledged to be the ancestral 
home of golf, the arbiters of the sport at the Rqyal 
and Ancient Golf Club of SL Andrews are un- 
derstandably put ouL 


' Spicing the police investigation is tire rumor 
;^tiiat.the killmgs are , the ..erase of a local -witch, 
bumedatthe stake in die 16diceninry — a notion 
that no superstitious Scot would dismiss lightly. 
Even Skinner, who is a hard guy, gives the witch- 
burnings some thought. “The tourist people are 
h ap py to sell this country on the back of its golf, 
beaches and sailing,” hie notes, “but they keep 
quiet about tire bloodshed and persecution for 
which it was famous before then." 

hm tun If it doesn't stop raining in Ed- 
inburgh, you might be ready for side trips. You' 11 
want a couple of bodyguards — uh, tour guides 
— in Glasgow, Scotland's largest, grittiest city. 
William McJQvauney and Peter Turnbull write 
uncommonly unsentimental procedurals set on 
their nigged turf. Turnbull's cops have a streak 
of cynical humor (“The reputation fra violence 


on the behavior of small men from Glasgow and 
Edinburgh") and McEvanney's detective. Jack 
Laidlaw, has tbe voice of a poet and the eyes of a 
hangman. I leave yon in their capable hands, and 
recommend you begin with McDvaxmey's 
“Laidlaw” and Turnbull's “Long Day 
Monday.” 

And should you be bound for tbe Scottish 
Highlands (the home of “gentle people,’ ’ Turn- 
bull assures us), dump the tough guys and stock 
up on M.C Beaton’s enchanting series of cot- 
tape mysteries set in Lochdubh. The crime rate in 
this fictional village is so low that Hamish 
Macbeth, a young constable who “seemed part 
of an older, cleaner world,” spends most of his 
time salmon fishing. No wonder Beaton’s books 
sell so well in Edmbmgh. 

Marilyn Stasio writes the Crime column for 
The New York Times Book Review. 


Armani, Thin but Energetic 


MOVIE GUIDE 



QntiDjte Mom 

long-line camel coat. 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 

ELAN — The modem man 
is in for a thin time. That 
was tbe message of the 
Italian menswear season, 
which closed Thursday, with Giorgio 
Armani endorsing — and making sense 
of — the new. narrower silhouette. 

*T wanted men to seem energetic, 
athletic — but intriguing and even sin- 
ister,” said Armani of a show where 
black engulfed his habitual beige. Suits 
were shown with dark shirts ana ties ar 
shirts came in romantic black velvet 
shirts. Aficionados of Armani's baggy 

MILAN MENSWEAR 

pants found that the easy shirts and the 
abstract-patterned sweaters met fiai- 
frtjftt trousers, narrow in the leg. It wasa 
palace revolution. 

But built-in stretch has transformed the 
fitted suit And tbe comfort factor which 
is Armani’s trademark came in tailored 
jersey coals or cardigan jackets. And in a 
metaphor for the Milan season, Armani 
offered lots of options, from tweed jog- 
ging pants and baggy overalls in the 
Emporio Armani line through familiar 
slouchy suits. 

The multiple choices, make Armani's 
vast shows seem like a fashion machine 


viewing out suits or ski wear. But more 
than any Other designer in Milan, he ab- 
sorbs change and makes everything from 
the new suhouette to the revival of grey 
flannel seem part of his own aesthetic. 

Are you ready for another lone, dark 
winter? Donna Karan is. But m her 
show, she made a pencil-thin silhouette 
and dominant black seem palatable by 
giving everything a soft touch. 


of cardigan jackets that were as supple 
as sweaters. A severe Nehru neckline 
was the show's signature, but the high- 
necked jackets or sober-as-a-pnest 
coats were made in lush fabrics from 
alpaca though cashmere and velour. 
Karan offset her sophisticated tailoring 
with more rugged casual wear. And 
although overalls always look like they 
belong on the factory floor, chunky 
sweaters, sport coats and knitted jackets 
were a reminder of how few country 
clothes have appeared elsewhere. 

Etro, known for glossy fabrics, de- 
cided to make its first show a runway 
romp, from vivid tweed coats through 
paisley-patterned pants, not forgetting 
the cavemen draped in fake skins. 

Inventing a new way of showing lux- 
ury menswear is the challenge for Itali- 
an fashion. Runway shows capture the 
silhoaette and mood, but not tbe tactile, 
inventive fabrics that are the soul of 
modem menswear. 


JlRKY MaOUIWK 

Directed by Cameron 
Crowe. UJS. 

Tom Cruise is the Risky 
Businessman all grown up 
and wondering where his 
life went in the joyous re- 
demptive romantic comedy 
“Jeny Maguire." Like so 
many of Cruise’s best char- 
acters, Maguire begins his 
journey in the fast lane, but 
like many a frenzied yuppie, 
he suddenly realizes he 
doesn't know where he's 
going at such dangerous 
speeds. Though originally 
marketed as a sports movie, 
this affable picture is really 
another variation on "A 
Christmas Carol," just as 
its cocky, charismatic hero 
is Scrooge with a cell 
phone. As a top agent wife 
the Los Angeles-based 
Sports Management Inter- 
national, Jerry squeezes 
big-league bucks, out of 
fink-round draft choices 
drooling for sneaker en- 
dorsements. The men and 
women whose talent he 
sells have become little 
more than commodities in 
Jerry's eyes.- And while he 
hasn’t really given it much 
thought — who has time? 


— his life is as empty as 
George Stembreimer’s 
heart. Then thanks to the 
son of an injured hockey 
player, Jerry receives the 
wake-up call. As Jerry is 
haranguing his client to get 
back on tbe ice pronto, tbe 
kid flips him the bird. The 
next day, Jerry issues an 
idealistic ntission statement 
urging his firm to provide 
more service to fewer cli- 
ents and accept lower 
profits. Within a week, he's 
first fired, then dumped by 
his fianede and forced to 
revise, if not invent, bis life. 
In this, he las thesrqrportof 
Dorothy Boyd (captwating 
Renee Zellweger), an ac- 
countant so inspiredby his 
vision that she quits the firm 
to be with him. A single 
mother with a 6-year-old 
son (Jonathan Lipmdri, just 
about the cutest thing since 
dimples), she also has a ro- 
mantic interest in her gor- 
geous new boss. And Jerry 
is lonely, so the interest is 
mutual. The ensuing. court- 
ship, however, is blessedly 
unconventional as written 
and directed by Cameron 
Crowe of “Say Anything” . 
and “Singles.’’ Like, his-, 


youth comedies, his new 
film also boasts emotional 
complexities that are rare in 
the increasingly formulaic 
romantic gone. For one 
thing, Jerry’s life — like 
most people's — isn't 
defined by one relationship. 
In addition to his evolving 
interest in Dorothy and her 
child, he’s also trying to 
mans gp. his only remaining 
client. Rod Tidwell (Cuba 
Gooding Jr.). A brassy wide 
receiver for the Arizona 
Cardinal, Rqd pesters .Jeriy 
about tilt big bucks and the 
shoe commercials and Jetty 
goes to bat fen* him. Only 
this time he’s determined to 
put his client's interests be- 
fore his own. Gooding, 
whose weak was impressive 
but somber in “Boyz N the 
Hood” just about walks off 
with. the movie with his 
ebullient . grandstanding- 
here. Crmre seems to have 
grown as much as Jerry, for 
he brings gentleness, 
warmth and lighthearted- 
ness to tins rol^ qualities 
that we haven’t seen since 
he played aft guitar in his 
undenwuts in “Risky Busi- 
ness’^ years ago. 

(Rita Kempley, WP) 


My Fkllow 
Ammucans 

Directed by Peter Segal. 
US. 

“My Fellow Americans,” a 
sopnomoric comedy, sends 
former U.S. Presidents Rus- 
sell Kramer (Jack: Lemmon) 
and Matt Douglas (James 
Garner) on a cross-country 

flight from assassins. Bitter 


shaky alliance while scram- 
bling from helicopter to train 
to motorcycle to car to pick- 
up truck to horse. Ak«g the 
way,. they suffer the abuse of 
citizens who either ' loathed 
them while they were in of- 
fice or have now mis taken 
them for impersonators. The 
script is well stocked with 
snappy put-down humor, in- 
duamg on-target jabs at Dan 
Quayte. Jerry Fond and 
George Bush. But director 
Baer Segal loses his light- 
comedy touch after the first 
hour and makes an unfunny 
mess of the final, “crack- 
pot'’ chase sequence. Dan 
Aykroyd appears- briefly as 


be behind the «ssa«cmatirn 
plot, and John Heandis ahoot 
as a Quayle-Hke veep. - 
(Kevin McManus, WPy 


°y\L>o ' 



PAGE 13 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAS, JANUARY 17, 1997 

LEISURE 





Cut-Rate Carriers: Puritan Chic 


By Roger Collis 

Inuntarional Herald Tribute 


GOOD TRAVEL DEALS 





wtwtnmsrrv iwiii mt[\ 






AIR CANADA 

Canada 

Aeropian membefs earn triple mDes al partidpafrig Holiday Inn hotels and 
all Crowne Ptecza hotels In Canada. Priority Club members earn triple 
Aeropian miles. Unffl March 31 . 

' ■“ ^ 

CONTINENTAL 

AIRLINES 

. United States 
to Central 
and Soufa America 

First ffljjht earns actual mSas; second fight earns doitole mBes; third flight 
earns trijple mBes. VaBd for most economy fares; 25 percent bonus on 
’ unrestricted economy fV* fare). For travel until March 27. 


ROYAL BRUNEI 

. Britain to MWdfe 
East/Asia 

Two for one In first or business class. The second ticket can be used by 
accompanying passenger or anyone within six months. For flights from 
London Heathrow to Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Singapore, Brunei and onward 
.destinations to Asia and Australia. 


SWISSAIR . 

Switzerland to Asia 

New business-class lares with minimal restrictions at 30 percent below 
normal rates. Examples: Round-trip Zurich-Singapore, 3,750 Swiss francs 
($2,720); Zurich-Hong Kong, 4,564 francs; Zurich Beijing, 4,362 francs. 


UNITED AIRLINES . 

Fiance 

to United States 

“Des Amours de Ptix" promotion offers low round-trip fares from Parts to 
‘ 200 points to the United States. Examples: Paris-New York/Boston/P hD- 
adelphia 2^00 francs ($410): Paris-Mlami/Oriando 2,800 francs; Paris- 
San Franc*sco/Los Angeles 3,100 francs. Until March 31. 

* r . 

CONRAD 

INTERNXnONAL 

NHHHHHi 

Hongkong 

< ^ustoessBonus"packagefrom2^HcxigKbngdctiara($380)toraharbor- 

wsw room incJudes a&port traisfers, bresritfast, tree laundry aid pressing, 6 
P.M. check-out and no surcharge on ptxmertax. Until Feb. 28. 

•• 

HILTON 

INTERNAnONAL 

Worldwide 

Wtoter World of^ Savings promotion at up to 30 percent off normal rates at 135 
hotels worldwide. UnH March 31. 

T .“ 

HOTEL MAJAXNMMT 

Surabaja, 

Indonesia 

"Deluxe"^ ^angle/doUble rooms for $98 a ntf* Includes early check-to, late 
checkout and use af.heaHh dub. 


PALACE HOTEL 

Bering 

“Deluxa" rooms for $150 anight (saving $130 on normal rates) Include buffet 
breakfast. Until March 31. 

• > 

YANGTZE NEW 
WORLDHOTEL 

Shanghai 

-StwKtanf roomfbr$99 Includes buffet breakfast, welcome *tok,daBypapw, 
airport and downtown transfers, pressing of one siit or dress, use of health 
dub (except maissage). Until March 8. 

■ 

tfw HT «Uy dwtafl*- o«w. tm fanmnod thal wn> tonwl -0^ mvl*un»alltwrn,oruntototobooktt^ 


A BURGEONING clutch of 
low-cost, no-frills airlines, 

which offer bargain-base- 
ment fares, is providing a se- 
rious challenge to the major carriers for 
die hearts and minds of business trav- 
elers — especially on short point-to- 
point routes in Europe. 

Yon might call it Puritan Chic. 

Companies are learning to stretch travel 

budgets not by traveling less, bat by 
traveling smarter — reflecting^ a new 
ethos in b usin ess travel. No-frills air- 
lines blcR Ryanair, based in Irela nd ; 
EasyJet and Debonair in Britain; Virgin 
Express in Belgium; and Air One in 
Italy — all of them more or less modeled 
on the phenomenally successful South- 
west Air line s in the United States — 
provide just that opportunity. 

Their common formula is one-way 
fares with virtually no restrictions, 


with ga tin g upgrades and earning miles. 
But there is a legion of travelers in suits 

who either nm their own small business or 
have to control their costs to stay com- 
petitive because they’ll be charging it out 
to clients, who win use the Easy Jets of this 
world. But I tfwnlc ultimately corporations 
will start to use no-friHs airlines — once 
they’ve become truly establis h ed within 
Europe — within their travel policies. 
People are already forced to fly in the baric 

of the plane: The next logical step is to use 

no-frills carriers.” 

Christopher Cornell, a partner with 
the real estate firm Knight Frank in 


EasyJet for weekly business trips be- 
tween London and Glasgow. “Every 
business in ICI has its own budgets to 
manage, so if you can do a return fhgfrt 
for almost a third of the cost of standard 

carriers, then it does spread that budget 
out enormously. We're seeking better 
and better value for money n ow, so rf a 

carrier like EasyJet can get me from A to 

B safely at the times I want to travel, 
that’s fine. I don't want frills, free drinks 
and meals on a one-hour flight.’ ' 
Nathan Aziz Levi, a gem stone trader 
in Dusseldorf, uses Debonair to com- 
mute weekly to London. “Luton is a 

i r 1 1 . . I . onmianiMIt fr*r 


The Frequent Traveler 


which work for business travelers who 
need a flexible ticket, up to 80 perc ent 
cheaper than standard economy fares of 
major carriers. Industry insiders esti- 
mate *har around two-fifths of passen- 
gers are business travelers. EasyJet, 
which burst on the scene in November 
1995, has an estimated 10 percent mar- 
ket share on routes between London, 
Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen. 

Between London and Nice, EasyJet 
offers a round-trip for £89 ($150) rising 
to £158 as seals sell out, compared with 
£514 on British Airways for a Euro- 
budget economy ticket, which carries 
some restrictions. Even a full house on 
an EasyJet 737-300 is at leastas com- 
fortable as sitting behind the curtain (or 
in front of the curtain, for that matter) on 
BA. Nobody resents paying for drinks 
and peanuts when you're saving that 
kind of money. . 

Debonair offers a £104 round-trip be- 
tween London and Barcelona, compared 

with £149 for a restricted economy fere 

ot British Airways or Iberia, or £498 and 
£518 respectively for business class. 



wonderful little airport, convenient for 
st Loudon. What does 


my flat in West 

ann oy me though is that they only have 
the highest fare, £81, left when I calL I 
usually pay £42, maximum £58, one- 
way. The other day VLM had a nice 
return ticket for me to London City 
Airport, so I flew with them.” 

Marco Amitrano, an executive with 
Price Waterhouse in Newcastle, Eng- 
land, usually travels with major carriers 
on company business. “I mostly use 
Debonair for personal travel,'’ he says. 
“Bui if I were in business on my own, or 
trying to manage a budget for some- 
body, I'd go for Debonair all the tune. 
It’s die same comfort as BA.” 


RIAN Nangle. managing direc- 
tor of Munekata, an electronics 
company in Dublin, said: “We 

.*»« i. I.U. IAm 1< 


D«vid SdoAHT 


ARTS GUIDE 


The Downside 


biloiom 


Brussels 

Theatre Royal da la Monnate, tel: 

(2)217-2211. “Tristan und Isolde." 
Directed by AchJm Freyer. conduc- 
ted by Antonio Pappsno. with Ron- 
ald Hamilton and Anne Evans. Jaa 
22, 26 and 30. 


BRITAIN 


Scottish NatlonaHMiaryoflled-' 


i AlV« W 83M2^*eiP 
daily, lb Apt! 13: 


._j njudan Fraud: 
Earty watt." About 25 pakOige 
and drawings created- by foetig- 
urative British artist (bom 1922) be- 
fore met duringWorid Warll. • 


I nwwii 

Barbican Cantre, tat. (171) 638- 
4141, dosed Jan. 24. Tb Feb- 16: 
“O reamings: TTukunpjt" About 40 
paintings inspired by andent Ab- 
original sand mosaics, body dec- 
oration, ornamental headpieces 

and ceremontei ob|ed8 from Aus- 

trafia. - 


tures on tha theme of death, by the 
Haitian painter, draftsman and 
sculptor (bom 1941). : 

Hotel de Strife tab 01-42-74-47- 

75, ctoeed Mondays. To March 16: 

“Cecil Beaton: Portraits (fun Es- 
thete, de Marlene Dietrich a Mick 
Jaggec" More than 150 photo- 
graphs spanning 60 years of 
BaatonTs career.’ 

Musae (fArt Mpdeme de la Vito 
de Paris, tat 01-53-67-40^0. 
dosed Mondays. To Man* 23: 
“Jaw Mtohd • . Atoerota: .. Lbb . 
Evwwmerris, Jes Situations*- .tea.; 
Satfments.’" Pastels, aculpforas, 
phptogr ap h s jostera, tostetefonS; 
and samples of writing by the 
Ranch artist (bom 1953). • - 
HDseadetalfaeique,tei:01-44- 
34-4646. dosed Mondays. Open- 
ing. Jan. 16: This new mpseum, 

located in the Paris Cite data Ata- 
slque. focuses on music andjn- 

etnuBnente from the ITtit 18tn and 

IOBt centu ri es. Visttora can Baton 
- to the instruments on display With 
headphones. • 


Impressionism." More than 50 
paintings by Gustav KBmt (1882- 
1918k Egon Schiele (1890-1918) 
■ and their contemporaries. 


NETHI BLANDS 


Rottbmmm 

Kunsthai. tel: (10) 4404)321. 
dosed Mondays. To Fbb. 23: "SH 
Una.” A retrospective of the work 
of American photographer Saly 
Mar* (bom 1951), inducing more 
*en 65 landscapes- stiM fifes and 
portraits. Mann is'knownjor her 
‘ Wr^i^orfrfiyjng ihe psfcHottjIcto 
tendon between Ihow orid of chB- 
dfan and tear of adofts. 


and holidays, lb April 13: “Around 
Tiepolo: Eighteenth-Century Ve- 
netian Drawings.” A smafi axhto- 
ition of drawings by Marco Rlcd, 
Canaletto, Guardi and PlranesL 
Sotomon R. Guggenheim Mu- 
seum, td: (212) 423-3500, dosed 
Thursdays. Tb Aprl 16: “Rroee is a 
Riose is a Rrose: Gender Perfor- 
mance in Ptxjtography." The ex- 
hibition examines the ways hwhlcn 
identity is constructed in photo- 
graphy —from Man Ray and Coal 

Beaton to computer-generated im- 
ages — bote performance 

Hot the camera and technical mar 
' reputation ofthe image'. 


UNITED BT ATE I 


CLOSING SOON 


Los Ambles 

Music Center, tab (213) 972- 
7219. Tristan und Isolde." Direc- 
ted by David Hockney, conducted 
by Richard Armstrong, with 
Siegfried Jerusalem and Renate 
Behte.Jan.29, Feb. 1,4 and 7. 




CANADA 


MowTitaAL 

Musae d'Axt Co n tempore ln , tel: 
(514) 847-8232, ctoaed Mondays. 
To March 16: "WflBarn WSgman: 
Fay’s Fairy Tales." The Amerkan 
photographer recreates toy mo- 
ments In two tefty Isles by Cnartea 
Perrauft featuring Wegman's two 
WerinaiBner pointers. 


Hie Uegsron, tet 72-82*33. 
Vtaffs "Macbeth.” Directed by 
Cite* Helmut Drose, conducted ty 
Adam Rscher; wBh Alexandm 
Ageche, QhsnaDimtawaand Jyrid 
Makanm.Jm. 20. 22, 24 aral 26. ; 




The J. Pent Getty Museum, Mb 
(310) 458-2003, dosed Mondays. 
Tb April 6: The Eye of Sam Wag- 
. staff." More tern 40 photographs 
from Wagstaffs collection of 18th- 
and 20th-century photographs 
from Europe and toe United 
States. Features works by Aupwt 
‘Sander, Timothy (TSulfivan, Nadar 
and Jacquee-Henri Lartigue. 




Kyotd 

Suntoty Museum, tet (6) 577- 
. .0001 To Feb. 2: "KHmt and Vienna 


NnrYoMc 

Pterpont Morgan Library; tet 
(212) 685-0008, dosed Mondays 


Jan. 18: “Lucian Freud." TSI Aviv 
Museum of Art, Tel Aviv. 

Jen. 19: “Making & Meaning: 
Rubens's Landscapes." National 
Gallery, London. 

Jan. 19: "Johann Heforich Fuss! und 

John Milan: Das Veriorane 

Parades.” Staatagatole, Stuttgart 
Jan. 19: “Cotebo rations Warhol- 
Basquat- Clemente." Costello d 
RhralL RWofl, Italy. 

Jan. 19: “CoroL" Metropolitan 
Mueeum of Art, New York. 

Jan. 20: "Peter Beard: Carnets 
Africatos." Centre National de la 
Photagraphls, Parte. 

Jan. 20: “Directions: Rudolf 
Schwarzkogler." Wrehom Mu- 
seum, Washington, 
jan. 20: “Picasso et-le Portrait" 
Grand Palais, Paris, 
jan. 21: "Jasper Johns: A Retro- 
spective.” Mueeum of Modem 
Art, New York. 


Such differences are hard for business 

travelers (or corporate accountants) to 

ignore. The downside is low frequencies 
(three or more flights a day is rare for no- 

frills airlines) and lack of frequent flier 
programs — the prime determining 
factor in business travel — although 
Debonair and Air One have a loyalty 
scheme whereby you get an 11th flight 
free with every 10 trips. 

Research conducted by Market & 
Opinion Research International for 
Carlson Wagonht Travel reveals that 80 
percent of business travelers are pre-. 
dired fd forgo frifls for economy on 
ffipis withm Europe. 

Mike PlNL commercial director at 
Hbog Robinson Travel in London, said: 
‘‘TDbettst majority of corporate tta veleis 
in iny opinion will do all they can to navel 
in foe most comfort They don't care tow 
much it costs the company because they 
don’t have what I call a coal-face link with 
proftabflity — they’re more concerned 


London, uses EasyJet between London 
and Nice. “The prime reason is to save 
money — we are money-conscious if 
we’re paying for our own trips — and 
sometimes the timing s work better for 
us. And die telephone bodring systems 
work well. Lack of frequency can be a 
problem; and with their fast turnaround 

times, if there is a hitch it can throw the 

whole schedule back, and that is a 
bloody nuisance: They wouldn’t want to 
do that more than twice to somebody. 
Again, if you leave it too late, the cost 
goes up and the savings are marginaL 
That’s die downside." 

Nigel Suddery, an engineer who works 
for Amoco on an oil platform in the North 
Sea, uses EasyJet for private travel 
“Amoco pays the full whack when 
I’m on business,” Suddery said. “But 
when I travel to and from work. I pay 
that myself. EasyJet is just the same as 
Air UK or BA; the only difference is you 
don’t get the free plastic meal Big deal 
— who needs it? And they’re friendly 
people. The big guys don’t like it. I was 
talking to a BA pilot when I landed at 
Aberdeen the other day. I said, ‘How’s 
EasyJet affecting you?’ He said, 
‘They’re beginning to get to us; annoy 
us.’ Bloody good!” 

Ken Jones, national accounts man- 
ager for ICI’s paint division, uses 


(Jiasgow, unu WC save fl IUI Ui 
using Ryanair. We’re less concerned 
with frills because we don’t regard 
travel as something we do for the fun of 
it — it’s a necessary part of doing busi- 
ness. like walking round the factory or 
getting in a car and driving to a meeting. 
If we were to use Aer Ungus or British 
Midland all the time, our costs would be 
considerably higher.” 

Kurt Smets, who runs a clinical dia- 
gnostics firm in Brussels, said, “We’re 
a young growing company, traveling all 
the time m Europe ana we save a lot of 
money — at least 50 percent— by using 
virgin Express to Rome, Milan, Mad- 
rid, Copenhagen." He added, “There’s 
not much difference with business class. 
If the plane is full it’s terrible any- 
way.” 


USB service Karl Hellgren, travel 
organizer for Astra Pharmaceuticals in 
Brussels, said it is company policy to 
use Virgin Express whenever possible 
for short trips of an hour or so. “ Service 
is a bit less,” he said. “But we save at 
least 25 percent: there’s really no need 
far a meal or drinks." 

Air One is a no-frills carrier that has 
specifically targeted business travelers 
with high-frequency flights and peak/ 
off-peak fares on major routeswithm 
Italy. It started in November 1995 with 
13 daily flights each way between Rome 
and Milan — the fiftb-busiest route in 
Europe with 2 million passengers a year 

ending the Alitalia monopoly. New 

domestic routes include Turin-Rome 
and Naples-Milan. Peak-time Air One 
flights offer a Gold one-way fare which 
is 22 percent lower than the standard 
economy fare, plus a Blue off-peak and 
weekend fare that saves 40 percent 


■mo Royal Tlwtora, »u (46) 
69-68-69. "Itasca." Directed by 

Holgw BotaraL con*^ 
Latton-Koenlg. with LIsbath 
Batelev, Michael Syhratoer and 
Franz Gmndheber. Jan. 22, 24. 27 
and 31. 



Hoikteys and Travel L 

EXCEPTIONAL tax-free investment m ■ 

twsfaiBEsfoiUBy to Mce/Camas araa. ■ 

unBeVonkeL WmL MdlOMMa; I 

OODnpaen«jmta^83{0j4ffiM^ ■ 

Bed & Breakfasts 

MANHATTAN LODGINGS, NYC. Short 

uS - 

• Tet 212-47^2000 Fac 212477-042Q. |- 

llulifn 


Lebanon 1 

HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East nl B*ii. 

■ 5 m drtiie. Bce(4onai baton wot- 

budnes seivtes, bbmBb TV. 18 hibi 
toetef torn ahport . 

|+1) 2124781391 / (+33 ) (0)147200007 1 

USJL 

20 (L glass wait Central Part A CHy. 
LmxkJosiy fumiehei jaaio. fax, csbte. 
For business, musician orlmmoon 
Eoopie. 1 block to Caragte Hat 2 to 
Letemn, 5 to Lincoln (tenter, Vto* 
1 BT 8 , Ttaaten. WbbMv, ItartWy, 3 day 
weaken* (tnhtaura) or long term 
TeUFta 212482-1581 USA. 

Hoddey Rentah 

Caribbean r 


HOLIDAYS AND TRAVEL 



CT.BMIHaflff.F.WJ-pVffla? 

PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS - beach- 
frort to hHrte *flh poofe. Oar sorts 

SSKS!|[ffiLI«S 

(401)849-801 2Aa* HFNN tan 
FRANCE 05 90 16 20 - ENGLAND 0 

-BOMHBII 


COUNTRY HOMES 
IN NEW ENGLAND 



hndKrtoHtrlogl 

kHdfmBml 
VOYAGES AGMPA 
u.T-ta— fcJ-nanrMS 


discount travel 


Lk. CC'VP-VU E>L 


SBFB 




REGULAR FLIGHTS RT: 
theUes 4,560 F 

tqkok 3,460 F 

Dakar 2J90F 


MAURITIUS 


B da)Sfi be**d 

LANZAROTE 3.790 F 

rt, ifedaiet i* a on n * mutwii 

SENEGAL 3,790 F 

n* Mo» 3* 9 torn n*r® * tt0 * J 
mai D IVES 8,130 F 

Rtfs, QT+ Haul J* 9 ngha bowl 

W.-E. IN MADWD tSMf 

RgMs KT+ HcM ** A rl 9 rt * txwwaa 

HAM MAMET 

Htf & RI* HoaH 3* 9 dapft ntfBi * had Kura 

MARRAKECH ^ZASOF 

tfcwa KT. Hc td 3* ft tfapfl ^ btMni 

a noMi EfTBFBIt iikoh*. 

mknUtd 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


Heralb^S^Ttbuae. 

THE WOBLffS QiUtr NEWSBiPEB 


planning to run a classified AD? 


EUROPE 


HWKEIHCRfVii, 

T4.-PIIA1 092BS, 
RscPIM) 439370. 
hnAdoAMiom 


SVnZBMNDePuk 
- 72B3D31. 


GBMMff, NBWA ECBtIML 
HJEOft Frartfun, 

TeL (069) 971 2500. 
Fae(069)97T2502D. 

UMSKMGDQIfelflndbi, 

TaL pi 71] 6354802. 

Mae 262009. 
foe [0171)240 2254. 


TA: {021)728 L— 

Fbc [021)722 30 91. 

NOBIHAMEBCA 

NEWrOK 

TflL:PI2] 752-3890. 
TblfraEiSOO) 572-721 2 
Fk (21 2] 755-8785 

ASIA/PACBC 

H0NGX0NG: 

U: (852) 2922-1 IBB. 

TJbc 61 170 MHX. 
fac [852) 2922-ll«. 


persons), 
kitchen. 12m x 6m 


Entirely equipped 
stay in a region 

E n. i xm a -t-z ~ — t~ - 7~ . u_ 

med for its beautx its monuments, in festivabanci IB wine. 


CHARMING PARIS HOTELS 


Ttebsatloetoon 

hltehBBrtdPrt ^HOTELS 

ItbaLountlkaewiand 
Place dsbConconto 


t ^LBS G BEAUXLO&S 

*** DE. 



45% __ 

DISCOUNT 


Hospitality, Elegance, Comfort 


H6teJ Louvre St Romain 

5-7 iue Sakitflodi, 

.70 - Fax 01 428D.KL09 

maibie bathrooens, cane i v. 
ntetere, hwoom safe, hair afysre. 


Hotel du Continent 

30 ,ruedu Mont-Thabor 
75001 Paris 

TsLOl - fax 01.4261 5B22 

• 28 refined, ftjy alr-condttioned, 


cajale TV, nMias, safe, hair dtyas. 


¥ q T ttogrl^rs Soe^»1 Parlca^ 

Fwip aJe f¥H Paris" 

Only 525 FF per nieht for two all included 
(Double room, 


au ramuuEui -rv 

AU major Credit Cards Accepted. 


SKI HOLIDAYS 


SUPBIB HCfTH,wefl aniated on the 
rck in MarM Mocar*.Vmr adne- 
timprice offtn. induing al Indiwo 
. sM pjdoges. ExoeBalX resanns *** 
choice of psntmomlc cuisine. 
Great Holiday I 
Cat » book now ort 
Taj +H (0) 4 79 M 42 43 


L 


IERSEL FULLY CATERED, LUXURY 
private titoal hr iwL fite**™’ 

6 balmoms.T 0 t 433 p)«79IX)N82. 
Fat +33 (0)4 79 00 5B 32. 


m u»y mai. Ttt UX i-r~- 
nrTel / F« RWfl +33 fffinnVNL 


SH HOLIDAYS 

a on Friday, Fabnay m 
i contact hwfcte BemA 
Mantooral Herald TrhM, 

TEU PARS rW 01 41 ® ® 

FAX: PARS *33 W1 41 70 


COURCHEVEL 1,850 

CARAVEUE HOTEL 

'kirk 



lExoeptionalty sftuaSBd on trie slopes, 
ra^edinnw 


noaww bi u«i piw trees, ItRSVBiy 
conriortehle estebfatiment filere 


rooms & apaitmerts.^ The restaurant 
serves excalenl food writiqinBy 
service. Pteasant terrace, big sports 

L complex on premises. . 
Tot 433 (0)4 79 08 82 42 
RDC +33 79 08 33 55 1 


-HOTEL CHALET DES OURS— 
MEGEVE 

in precries resort: 

300 tarn piteb.Chalec hotel 
3 mbs bf fiaot n oentre vflage & 

Cchy Log Sres - Grear food & wine. 
We Speak luanc EmWl 
let +33 (0) 4 50 21 57 40. 
Fjob+HITH 4 50 V3 M 73. 













PAGE 14 


Thursday’s 4 p.m. Close 

Nartonwtde prices, not rrtaafng lata trades afcewftere. 

The Associated Pnsss. 


11 Mon 4 i 
WlllWStt 


»■* lnwNi 

m<« n Acsua 

IDS 9-..«CWUn 

TS MbACMtS 
R t'lACJMic 
T'k A ACM SO 
IN fkACMMO 
»% PSACMtAJ 
n ■- i; ACMMu 
ns MS Aomen n 
as im«I3TM 
MS M ACT 
JDS 71 A£5Cp 


VS JOS AMR 
ms ltku.ua 
u iisapt Iain 
M «nt*WWi 
sbvi niwsuud 

»% t 


as ITSAXAII 
MS IfuMrani JO 

US HkAtMOIOI JTD 

STS XSACtLAD «i 

S’ WMtVFilir 
irS llVaADBUa a 

MS 11SACMIIE, 

H lASAsniSMi 

?r*si AconSa BO 

2 M% I? Acusttl 

11 ^ l^Adi£i IJh 

W* ijto 

34* ffl'% AMD 
ll* fiViAMV 
I4H UAO«r«f 
n juiAtmi 

4j»»,Wi Ijne 


Ow no pe 10 th Hwn LowuaBaori 


73 fflt V 2 ft* 2 k'u 
h in im Rh 
io s? ** sr* to* 

- «* Wi in m 

_ ta f»* p* P4 
_ 1517 M 9h 

_ M»| t* ft*i *H 

- ui in 12 ^, im 

_ Sit »»l •'A *•* 

w wn m o* 
_ ZJO 1 / I O'* ** 
n m if ia* w 
u Mi a* w» b* 

« Wf 4ft* 4 IW 

7»p 41 * 4Wi 

12 TlV 771% fc»% n 
It toft 114 10** 21 

_ UM 15V, 1ft* IM 
7 TTOi «■«* a*! «% 

_ I TO* 14%. 24* 34*. 

31 ib* 3V. r*. St 
If QM 0 W4 O'* KP4 

>i iai a* m 

» it m* 17* I7U 
17 |7 M4 40* 

_ OM S JM 

It Ahl 311* M AH 
17 30DI » 2M U*4 
■M HH 37* JO* 
II SOM 1 TA 3** XT* 
_ 11151 25 1 * aowi* 35* 

J4 71119 U% 431% 

_ 449 I4H II 15* 

_ 1403 IT* 17* 17* 

A 103 19* It* It* 

M M/1 TO* 70 2D|4 

_ 717? 1»* 9* 9* 

14 49 WH If’* It* 


23* 33 , '*A»Touch 

39* h'AAirrdtdB IJ4 

m/vt 4ay.AtfTOiDlC zn 

ft fft'ioAtf p€A 1.99 

35 ]fl%Ald*pB I 4 
25 31* AloPplC lit 

21* 3DV,AWodip4 Ulr 

25 % M A***l*H 190 

25* S«h4tfCBlO 1 JU 

19* Tj*Ak¥»Kf3*> «3 

30* It^AtMlI 
9* lr*Atmrin 40 


a* iiwAhemn ao 

Z"* it%AacQff At 

14* l4‘4AlC0tH Jlo 

53 K AJCOSI JS*» 

117* II AIC05J BJiB 5« 


a* ir*A«eari«ff 
2 ft* 15 Aflmen 
a* usaiwnGo 


32* M'AAMhtffe It 

10* r*A0rm^T J4D 

6J'« 37*AA9MTF JS 

51* X7*Alttf4t ZJg 
EM MSAAUnfA l« 

MS MS ADM l .m 

ts iSADsmte 
as los A Wi ui ii m la 
11 rSAUvnitf 
IS ja.amnrOr 
IIS SUMlWn 
m irsAaam. 

71 S ekDcn .«o 
VS 34 Ataa 
•S SlaARWC 
Itk MSAma> pH US 
M>l ASSAnuac Ml 

MS IjVMUUlM IJfl 

ess les Arms! J* 

61'x DkAnwca AO 
US 22"i Amercdf Lit 

71 Dkunatk 
as lit* airmen 

13% UAKMM 
US IISAAnnuOr DM 

MS MSAAfVki DOT Ul 

P» IV.JmBu4 
SOS MSABraU LOO 
JM I A* ABnJPtA UL 
2SS 10 ABunP 55 
IDS ISAEgalGe 
A4S »SAQ> LAO 

ms nitanev so 

MS BwATlKtCa IDO 
lss imaFmiot la 
42 »t JTIbJGerFii UO 
MS MbAGCntM III 
MS M SiCpM I4D 
Bk AfSAQrDEld LOO 
25% ir Jiuimnn IJO 
SS ALAmSI M 

as is40»> job 

t * W J7*AHome» JJt» 

2* l*A*dPn» 
no* 8 fl*Af*tn«> M 


no at* 7t* »* -% 


30 115 tl* %3* «3* 

t %«t 7* 4* 4* 

_ 74 TT\ 77 77* 

27 H9N »* >IH ** 

_ *4 |T* 7tr* 77* 

I# 43 IS* 15* 14* 

_ 247 II* tJ%A U* 

it m n* ti* zu* 

1]M 14* 15 15* 

J9 **4U 34* 34 34* 

_ tt at* » *> 

- MOu 77* II* 73* 

Z1 711 AO* 9f* W* 

71 ASOTu 71* 49* 71* 

19 1074 24 74* 25 

XI 491 D 22* 27> 

IV 51 14V. 14* II* 

73 22714 25* 3«’ - W* 

_ 3033 Z7*d 34* 14* 

- 99T 45* 44* 41 

_ 6 » 24 

_ 5 23 23 23 

_ J 9 34 24 

_ IQ 22* 23 37* 

_ Tj 25* 22* 

, 34 3A* 34* 34* 

II M W |«* I4K 

7 2745 71* 71* 71* 

IS I2TO T3V, 22* 22* 


23 410 30* 49* SB* 

If Via C% 4f* 43* 

It MS3 34* 25* 35* 

23 mao 27* 3ft* 

^ 1X71 lft'% * lft’% 

10 1 MV 0 as* aa* 451. 

_ HI Ml* f« 100* 

■ m 44 <U« 4 S* * 

7? 177 MV, *7* >7* 

70 73 U'.t T3* 7T* 

_ |71 17* 17* 13* 

is 4 in nr* on 

17 Ml 31 30* 30* 

_ JOT c* n* ;M* 

_ ue 24* »«, » 

27 1*3 TV**, 25V, 

17 7021 3S* IS* U* 


_ 37 1*3 71* 75* 75V 

\S 17 7021 3S* IS* 15* 

S _ 92 II* 71* 71* 

13 at if* r'-« rr* 

_ _ 1 ST 2 * 2 3. 

Za _ 44 13* nu. 13* 

94 - til M* *4* U* 

IbA - 30*0 liv 13". 1J* 

_ 13 90 SO* »* SB* 

u n «7 40* m at* 

49 _ S3 21* 77* ITS 

M IB JWd 31* 31* II* 
13 20 & /»* 99* TO* 

A 10 15*5 3AV. ns 34* 

j 1 ] | tot JO*. JO* M* 

12 - B 10* Ml. If% 

1.4 it nu W* tr± 02 * 

t f _ 1447 4f»V 45* 45* ■ 

1 _ 1443 34* 24* 34* 

42 14 1577 XI* 31* 11* 

M ji m v • 5S 5* 

14 If 339 13* 17* 12 * 

_ _ 30 f‘% 7 f* 

_ U JIB 2 u «* B’% ■* 

. _ 111 II* 11 II* 

_ ID NH 3ft* 34 3ft* 

U 34 JOOftU *3 71'* n* 

_ IS 3l«a IS* 34* IS 

^ - 2984 4V. 4 4* 

7 1 - 78 S3* 51* SS 

10 IS 140 Aft OS OH 

&A _ <Uu All) V 

L2 K4 717 25* 25'. 29* 

10 44 29*3 t«* AO* AO* 

ftj _ 141 I5*% 25 25'% 

.. _ 0727 41* J r„ 41* 

_ - 901 15* 15*- 1^ 

_ ^ 130 7* A, 7* 

10 70S 14* 14 U* 

l.l - 1J7 25* 25* 2 S* 

_ - «ft 4* 4*w 4* 

19 13 349$ u 51 JVS 50* 
IJ - 2u2Q4* 204* 20 a* 

LA IS IV 27* ni* 2?‘« 

- _ 104 4* 4*% 4* 

ti u na «s 4i* d 

I J 17 14D61 W. n* 

UB 7 a 3ft* K 34* 

B I* /£ Ss Ss £s 

U - B* »S US SStk 

S : s r- s- r 

» i £ ^ ^ 

rj . M M t a 

u u tw« AT. aav, ilk 


Of YU PC 1«i HMI LBWL 

ja ■* '» "J sa 

„ 3 Jo m Jk 

_ II 773 Hk as 

ul u u lull MS ass 

i Cl _ II w ns n 

|Tm La n imi MS MS 
II 1 } H M M ik 

n id » 'V»u jn Ss 

ui u it im us as 


ae _ iii m La 

" * i *>£ s 

,? ,1 ,s r r 

« it imwn mm % 
2 i ana 73 i 

t i ” S 3 

u a Bleu 'S ! 1 I1 '* 
S DM Ik «s 
i a w » as 

; ^ 12 

8 : S SS SS 

« a 

^ _ n it if* 

IMST 

2 M 40 445 31, IV* 


1UV • 12 

W *- 


_ 04 ft W 

_ 1134 /* 7* 

_ 100 B* 9* 

_ n 14* 14* 

* 399 IV- If* 

_ 1017 44% V* 

_ 495 M* M* 

_ 209 HI* W* 

_ (ft ir* n* 
_ «M f* 7* 

I -S 14* IS* 

r *Sft IX ~ 

r iei ik is 

I, Ml as IBS 

a nv as as 
u cu an ok 
. ai ik m 
^ mo it m 

- m J* JS 

» n »i tn t 
U IMH Wk MS 

« ^ S' 35 

m a ns 

I I n* ns lis 
a w as as 

e aie Ma as 

ii ‘3» 3s S3 
3 Si r 15 

a M M as 

II 1443 XM 24* 

: =i §i ^ 

* as?. Ss js 

_ 161 MS US 

L Mu CIS CIS 

S as as 

II ’& w2 »X 
i'SWK 
SB « o 

D IN Ok Ik 
Jt 27T» '$S US 

- lll J*s .an* 


AL un M US 


MS — S 

’Stir 

XT* ** 
U3* -U 

ss* -* 

29* _ 

TO* «* 

79* -* 


11* lBVftAmMurr 

ios 'Ss^ffiun 

KS lf“ Aim’ll 

SX 

:? kx 

« S5J5S„ n 


!! H 'SiSSSS B 

^llnSSBr. 7« 

IH lk*n»Ncr 60m 

SfiB “ 

■AS AaSArrcritcn JJOI 

as *k*i«n ijl 

as la Amrwk » 

«as as AmocB un 

ais Hkkim i “ 

la ID Amoco an 

»k IP S Airmail 

■B tWSSi 

as MkHmSMi laa 
Ian lOv.Aimm JF JJ 

5k ^T*Amr*oyJ Js 

T3 AtsAnon* a 

SS IKSSffi 1 * 

•s srsass 1 * 

JAS HkvnTnl 
MS IflMplCP I A* 

asaf'i.AonBiA in 

*k minM 3* 

as lasAomv iJk 

ts ISAnex At 

Bk Hk«oP.»n 
»S M AOIMnMT AM 

Ss tKSffiK .u 

»S lASAMkd 

fis J» Aoror 3 

las HSA<aS& 'S 

10 TSAracnn 3H 
ts aSArtaaPT JI 
a»S iBSAra* At 
MM IS’kAlcoOnnl I AO 

Eras- o 

US II AreaMS J3c 
ps NAnan 
lss n AriPofw un 
as aswipun 2 jo 

ts ISArmcD 
MS B HIKPI in 
«S CPfcAirncMA *40 
a DS« mcMB 1*5 

»1S 5ISAmAm UO 
SAM L5SAIWE 

as as am 
L5S ITHAhAII 7» 

Ms aSAWOI JB 

ss iikinMi St 
as VkksCM m 
ns NkaoM ;.w 
7IS S7SAlMMol LIJ 
Its 11 ’AAStfC JO* 


. m AS A a — M 

u mu u % as MS 
n m ms Ms ms - 

v I3M ais <0 ais -■* 
*5 »S U. JS — S 
1* JOH IMS Ills HA -M 
_ 101 SS »| SS —‘a 

m uoa las i»s as — s 

n u s il‘ * us - 
_ at u'a ll'.k US 

_ *i ms ins ms -s 

- n mu 151 * ns — ' s 

_ on ss ss ss -s 

- M MS a-. M - 

n m us us its — n 

_ fi t its 2 a 


_ n 2SS JSS Kk 

_ iw ms iov ios 

is w os as as 

- Ml LAS MS MS 

IP 914 AIS ns AIS 

z a 3 If" !K r 

_ » IAS MM IM* 

s m LS JS IS 

It AM US 2IS 51% 


IA U n rat LBS Lfs 


li .1 Uk Uk 

= "% r s: 

ll 004 Ss US 
n ms its ■■ 

17 5BB Ilk MM 
ii its as ns 

_ M4 AS 4 

. in a ns 
it m ran us 

17 JM IIS Ilk 

n nu op as 

"A 

3 SS KJ? 

II fll 19* l£>% 

13 B 2 3 %* 

. U40 H* 1|* 
17 5ft$3 2S* KH 
Ifl 1417 40* Of* 
40 320 JI* JO* 

TI 7*30 *47* 144* 

- 59* I* fi* 

17 Ml 10* 3ft 
15 K3J 35* 34* 

97 7S* 73* 

14 VftV 35* S* 
M W ft ft 

- 3«45 4* 3* 

14 33* 31* 

. 303 IV* IV* 

7 172 MB* Ml 

_ 10 10 * 10 * 
n 73 37*37* 

S 2741 01 90 

123 SO* 17* 
3 24 1* 1* 

7ft ISO 34* 25* 
11 14914 49* 44* 
11 71 41* 41 

77 ISOM 24* 25* 
II II 11 * U* 
2 ? xmtr 43* 4r* 

” J SS 25 S5 

30 7S» V* MM 

V 4453 2113d 27* 

: ’J5 S S 

14 Ml u Un 
» A77A A] a 

^ MOT I'AA I 
M ltDA 3T% MV. 
a 1229 US IIS 

a ss ss 

r? J r sr 

" n m UM 

n im SS 

a TT> MS V 
_ 7 aas aas 

“ an “s 

! B 3rS 

r ss s? s: 


in — m 
ion -s 
vs — s 


is % a a 


ll'k CSAUsRp 
US LISAMMn 
MS rsauarkr AM 

AS MAUkk Ji 

MM laMASdEUtn I AD 

M M AodEMDl LAA 

A9 dkuiKan AD 

IDS MSAalmkn 


tss MSAitCtoal 
wn I07S AIBQCtl 

MS 20 SAB>Kn*r 
i l««m 
II a>% ATMOS 
ns jisAuawz 
as 24 aasNzm 
as t'KAifflr 


US aSAroatllCA 
as M'kAvdhiAB 
l*vk IIMAVEMICO 
IAS asAwarvDA 

ids n<m 

iLva It A<«tan 
»IS D'aAiW 
us laSArena 


»k ’A aAMrain 
US UHBSPiCP 
MS IlkKEg 
35 MSMMCr 
ns DkBUHa 
ail 7SBEA IflCD 
na iSBEAUrn 
TV. ISBECCcn 
S4H 3SH.BU 
BS IkBJSM 
TTS MS BMC 
US hkBOClKn 
T7S lA’AV'Pku 

us usurer 

«a tsBUT 
as ISBICHI 
I9M ITsBWAYCB 
LIS Okllf. 

» jkiuraa) 
ITS UMBOkLF 
AOS IJSMlPMU 
MS nkBMu 
32S 3T4Bd 
SS IV OU .M ll 
7>Yl E woe 
as iivtomw 
30S IWBOieHFn 
7?k jnaanaHei 
2 js usenmam- 
MS MSBncBlDK 
US UkBCUV 
ns niKCM 
IP. IlkDOkl 
tan waanciAAm 
a iiktoann 
27% llSBOncDtir 
3W I S'. Bams 


I7S VSBCdsH 

I7S xr-SkUPdaP 

2J7»I Hknonn 

as atsbpwju 
as AISMBDtt 
ATM 41 BAHpU 

M n 

MS MSBJDBDE 

MS ti Mur 
»S JISEDrolrdn 
US ItsnTCkLD 
M'A 9'ABKMOnlB 

»■* J7kBWy» 
its nkwnpe 
lOS UlABOPILDm, 
SI AASUvAmelA 
fl'Ti 52SUIA ma« 
MS MSBkADKaa 
M’k» MSBAmBIL 
»>■ MSBAAineW 
Mu CSBWUnOOJ 
Mft MRani? 
90S 41 BWfcTr 

»% 73 BnkTldl 

M WNBAMTuia 

W MSBSTII 6 

as ntBcaaADP 
as a b»«bi 

ifSirsuOweDK 
2 f% jaSBam ufl) 
MS a BMUaa 
VS 25SMad 
ITS SOBOlMI 

42 u «n«. 
aiH osStarmPi 
44% 22 

US MSHWTKM) 
■LS nagenMi 
IIS t'kBOOMI 
SIS nsBownut 
aas nsBnuadA. 

ns MSBonr 

24 22SfcnAW 

49 

MS 2JSBOT30A 

•a nSBoocnPr 

* U'VBMrtP 

» Bksmn 
m asBaanpPC 

US asBearLufl 
1*% IlkSamii 
Ji*. NkBrardA 

AIS B Bourn 
4A*» MvBeotti 
ITS nsBaovmi 
jr.i ItSBeteAl 



-EM 

II 14 A IIS 

_ no os 

II 140 2/S 


It 2014 Jfl 

u mi aas 

* JI "!* 


_ 9 22 S 

>4 ns 
_ 92 US 

- n us 

_ M 2SS 
_ ii jos 

- at 2 ss 

_ M TTk 

_ i*m as 

54 2JS 

- M MS 


_ ns Bk 

n am n 

H » > 

» J its 

- 35 SX 

-MS 

- ,553 L2S 
_ 1195 US 

- UJ IAS 

■ Be 

I 120 AS 

- att its 

- MS A TV, 

- Wu ■» 


at a. 7? i, 

S S a 1 * 

71 3125 AD* 

- 430 90* 

M 7VI ZJ* 
_ 477 1* 

14 7M4 XX* 

2 12350 JMft 

SJtnS lS* 

- il 8£ 

XI 2S* 

- 131 25* 

- nu zsiti 

I s s* 

- At 27S 
m ta> ana 
it mo ns 
14 44 ta ns 


1 BO 44S 

I “fugs 

M XW 1«% 
» TO » 


CltAAMU 5LS 
t» Vtlu us 
» isk * 

- UU IDS 

- no us 

- 8350 St 

g ’S 'ffi 

17 Ml 21 

- 022 US 

- St ss 
a mi ms 

1 W Ik 
ra ato ids 

- Ml M 

- HI MS 

- 120 LS 

- M IDS 

a a M 

n £o u tjk 

M me » 

M IIU M 
U J9W* AMD 


- a 24% 
jt MS Uk 

sus 

it <Hu as 

S « ns 

■s as 

A W IS 
- IA Ja% 
- AS 


ST ITS 

i is as 

** <MAI IDS 

sj?l sa 

- Mi HK 
a nut «m 
S2 san n 
n St ns 

ii ton ls 

M M4 uS 

- I» US 

- iio ns 

- tt as 

ii as 

- is ir% 

m m ms 

- ml on 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR IBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 

NYSE — 


S7h nsconuja 

ssaxsgz 

% 'XSSSl 

61 a cntaia 

<*S tf Cnepto 

too n oftE 
in wsoigpio 
MS MjrO^ofl 

Ssa«*Ai 

SS IK^Si* 
if it^ S &o n 

n% »annr 
is* imemw 
to* ivicrtupf 
!$* fO*CooN*r 
ta* 3>*CaovCa 

!£>£§£? 

'assa 

ft* 4*CM0flf 
Ift* TI*Qpnpftn 
4S* SIHCOW 

SSSftS ss n 

A* C u n d i Bl n 

IJ* HlOiCOfWjY 

U% mikim 
ES <5 Oman 
as latvca uitan 


q li ff KX 

U ij « atn 

'5 S^S'SX 

14 - 40 IV 

9 5 I r£ §5 

« *! ^ S fc 

r« _ iw ms 
ij si nu ms 
II II US ? 


: T5 « 

_ za us 

- * 2 » n 

_ >300 07 

- mod aas 

_ ” Sk 
_ It US 

- 5» £S 

i a m% 

5 MM 29% 


a JS Us 

^ 250 l€* 


31* M Cnwt 
It MtoCTWidA 

31 lJH&WfOB 
n* aHO»»E 

SXSSSSSm 

13* 9 Cr*F%MO 
JO* 2S Ctodpfl 
M* 19 SSchlB 
30* lX*Cr w lC i 0 

9 Igggjg 

IS* MfeOBTHn 
a* 17HQBCMn 

8 * r*&HHlMVl 

H OHCmiQ* . 
ST* UHOnC^Pf 
13* THCurCT 
39* Vfr Cnrftf'oC 

» * dHQoire 

* 2f*OommWtr 

17 10 Ottolnc 

10* JlHDenEM 
13 umoimc 
dViQflWr 
f*H t*C*3fimn 


? iS JK 

ia ivt is* 

a ^ € 
39 Iftfllf SO* 

- 5* 

S tn Si* 

_ J77S t& 

n 4 i«* 

)J IJBfw 51* 
^ Ti 11 * 
M 4 si 

n 1343 14* 

11 3002 31* 
If ««r 
_ W7 14* 


»* 2l*bOf>L 

VA 


S* 5SSSE*" « 

IT* M*DVlfeK _ 

14* SIHDtaV AJo 

H* laHOcft-THen 
34* 17 OtfSBtt .If 

15* umDarwMr .17 

Jb* 37V.OanoCii 140 

4ft* vmDmeMr .to 

IA* IlHDml .10 

14 r*DardBi J* 

19* 9 DgiaGti 


74* iftQjnmn 

ww* v DM* mo 

^1 TV r>VitJartSft 

31* 31*KM9Cly> JO 

10* lA*CMauyH 


M JJkMCrtl l.9« 

as snvDdEis in 

Mk L2 MEMn 1.91 
zis MSOaoTtln 
Vk akDnDu Ul 
9k DHdnOiU U7 
n% nkDHon im 

s 

TOtk USDIq«I 


s = 

•sx •’* 

S% 15 


If 1 PPMMM1I- «t 

Iftlft 4*DFC0rn 

29^ u^SSSf 5 

r 

jna l.vaEOG M 

las SSSICJur On 

199k USEMC 

S*»XBU, 2S 


U% XHAEoMorn . JO 

it itsEnmo i ta 

AOS DkEottl I AM 
MS HkEOUUI I At 
ITS WSErtn IM 

Its SMtCuOChm IJA 
U MkOU* UN 

ms sosemn ua 


usSsSar, 

to* nOEdlfti at 

ji* i**ec* 4 vtf« 

’SS^SSSd " 

2VW 15 Edtaanta IDO 
IDS flVEOO 

a OkHmoi At 

D« nHauatnF IJA 
A** rrEKCO 
STS mBcnrlM 2.11 
ja% X BPOMO I J* 

51 S SDSGMOkT n All 

w a Bait 
W* MSgonwtA 
US Ms Scot DM 

43% «SEOX ta 

9k asEHAuk. i Me 
ITS MSSKTvbCII III 
as oksnoa in 
us tsEter 
a u Etnas 
m »a<wi 
MS a»s n sp n «r Jle 
MS VSEAnMa JM 
as 7 Enacer m 
its nsemuRFi IJM 

US lASEMkiO I AM 
US IlkEMnO 1A5 
ITS H EireMM O’ 
■as meter. utd 
is • EimwH .rat 

I03S T7SBt»*S iw 

res irsBnott* IM 

TS 1 En»DAA 47 

TS A EfftlBn Jt 

Ms ivsFEcnfla uae 
ms aspnepp i Me 

■AS likQnglcD 
us inkauui .IM 

n% fiktnsi IM 

M% 17 BAvmh IM 

S! mlwff 1 l Jlo 
aas iTsesKM ja 

IAS DSEmClan .999 

JTS Okaiua M 

ns PHEnifBu at 

MS MS Cl S» n _ IJA 
as opsSmrccr zap 
os 14% Enron M 
37% BkBraH IM 
25% asenxen 250 


MS MSEitranJi 
as BkEnnao 


as MBUrt ptA in 

50S Nketnr I A 0 

25% mSunpr us 
29% aSSHPLAMda LIA 
MS MSavLAen US 

3IS USETMM SM 

27 USEMtapr Ul 

“ 

ns ukswau lm 


MS MkEMtw 
M’A BkempB 

as atsenunc 

II ASISpni 
15% uHaEtotrton 

ais SSEMfignet 
39% WkExmfT 
Ok 22 BptMJT 
a itsEwkiD 

ads taseraiAM 
ns ikSni 

lift «s ar ses 
aas nsEvmHtti 
MS irktwatCn 

s'iaissr, 

25k 

Hk 15 Stm 


us a Mcmv um 


3*iBSa» ,J# - 


13 * »*£o«wrtn»i J0 

Ss ".‘•as * 

s aass^ 

•W w ana- 

Ss 

9 ” AS Farm 

S5i ESS? ail 

atn 2 A%%nrCMa 2 M 
ts 5 % reran u 

a assss 1 % 3 

45% ESPkU P a* _ 
b» njt«peT*A»« ,-2 
lava otiwLiM i.m 
m% aispna.BUL 1 . 
M% ItkMM M 
MS 2 DUFetRBy 1 At 

MIA BSFeqWO A n 


MS atSFaiSt t 
rn aasHarm 
its ia net 

% .rsKu, 
IK 

assess, 

MV. 24 F>A 

its nkftmw 

Ms n > wn%B« n 
u ekftMe 

ass a. sum 

S tAHMW 
MFM5I 
ns ePvmnam 

3XS%SS3» 


ns ms F Cni- r 
MS 

2AM MSFRAPTM 
IL't TSFTttfl 

zts Hkfjnr 
its usP£i3 
17% lasRiwe 

srasev 

IIS DSRMB . 
A" » R*ni d« 
ns aspnneu 

MS iNFWrWT 
Sk 11 RdF«o 


arts pweanrsd 
54% EkBrnnc 
ids DSFreocm 

77 gltWBun 

ms mnnoE 
an nsESFnDa 

^ j;a£g£n 

ss ira^s; 
AeSasss* 

U* UHF*tf 
4ft* to*FMOD 
71* BHRMr , 

if* li. r o u donid 
11 mnoei* 
2 % w Asotitrii 

BVkL9S.FanipB_ 


fiwB 3X SX 25 

sasijal »a 

jlSEE 

aUtRSS 


” % R 

AS IS » 
U 51B Bm 


ATS SkAaiMi 
ns lA’aFomm 

Sia ikPnwe 


^XJXSSSSV 
y*g spa 

44 * im ftHM e 


V> w*j*m mQ> 

St mXulS 


s a sa »a la 

U Ss S5 S£ 

a HAD 21% M 71 

a I s z a 

<3 s '« % 'a 

- 19A 37* 77* 77* 

„ 71 Z *7* If* 

- Mu >4* MH U* 

19 13 57* pv. 

- «f M* MH &* 

£ S jK S 

" *S ^is *fi! ^5 

- n mu ts ts 

- Pt ASd ts ts 

- Itn MU MS MS 

ii w as Itk Su 

II 112 us 11 IIS 

- 42 9% N via 

. DPI M M «t 

5 i£ 2* S% 2& 

, sr ft 9 * "V* 

to 334 14* 19* D4* 

n. 1 4* 4* 4* 

_ a 4* 1 * 4 * 

3| CIO TV* 31* B 

- 40 jfH ja* au» 

% ns Eh an* ph 

: ja ji* ax sx 

7 "I B rn m 

fi S HH 1 «* ** 


s: sx sx 

ST 1 5X 2 B 

m n h 

ok ins as 


3*2? SSln 

77* MH CT^g pfY 

“^'“Sgsa* 

IIS tsonrra 

MU DSCidepL. 

IPS VkGdUr 
JDS likbM 
Pts ikcmat 

axsxgsfee 

5n??sass, c 

5ss smoawic 
22 % ITSCWUnv 
M% USOnChanii 

■ IS IkCdMB 

/ss sr cent 
IKS 69V]CJarf3*c 
27S LllVOmrtk 
AVk jkora 
IM MGrtM 
Its UkkCemi 


MS aSSAMAK 
it% Nkontma 
MS a GMH 


Ilk ^tSPsnro,^ 

^aSsSSi 

ssjasss" 

mk 97 tnnrai 

25 Skafki OK 1 

Ss BkC^NDL I 

35SS2 ¥Z58 

25 % Hkoncer 
n a enrac 
its 11 Grab 

Bssasss. : 

its maeir 
MS TtkCMMT 
IAS HsOkHkr 

ns nsanDOe 


fi loo 1m 

SraSi B 


_ 3SVu IT* 
_ 0 iu un 

14 1^ 41* 


ijm 

S uS Jm 

«0 Ml 10 


_ 605u MS 

S *% T 

- 1/4 IIS 

i ss 

is mis m 

S’iS’T 

" ^ IDS 

M » Sk 


«S PS _ 

t« *s 


”SS« 


WIA MM — U 
M IBS *S 

iam im —is 
27% MS — % 
*s as — s 

MS IDS _ 
27H 21 —4k 

its AAS - 
J9H ADS •% 

m as -vt 
mk its — vt 

» Z 2 _ 

OS .% 
AS AS .k 
I52M 152% — 2S 


leivi ms ••ka 
as ms _ 


1 i« ut 

a 20141 a ek 

19S 

m 35 

5 '4 S 

= % R 

9 «M MS 

*"£ SX 

- w ■* 


13* 14 — * 

13* to* — * 

ss % 

ts as - 
iss 15 s 
•os n .is 

TS TS — S 

ms ns -s 

MW MS — tk 
ITS US - 
nk ns _ 
ns ns _ 
ais LIS 
AIS AIS — S 
ISS 15S 

13 US _ 
ItS US — S 
» W I«a 



IBS 4CAGBXJ. 
SS fAGNPei 
11 U IlS CW n 

If* 11*GKXM 

■ W 

A 


ii -S Ji" 

_ n 25S 

5 Si 

IT U909 Xk 
» IT II 
71 JDIn 54% 
- 101 11% 
u s ns 
_ IA iis 

- IT 69 I4S 
_ IIOU MS 


US SSCAocDD 
M PA ASCAAKBt. 
is 1 CMona 
AS ISCMmDa 
US A CKAdD 


MS BkOTtmo 
9S aSCTTVoa 

as issemn 

2SS Mkomorn 

u movM 
■IS avacucd 
its 11 scum n. 


as ukHtdiAi 
US IfSHKOlA 
am iashccdi a 
rn wanes 1 
US OkHRE 
ns raiaac 
AAS AISHSeCDP 
»k u Hum 


ar iMHenMen 

IIS 1 HmcF<A> J2 M 
U IlhHOAGt UB U 
14 13 HW*d I .a u 

10 % ikwwrar jo aj 
1 IW HTSHBnfkOk* JO U 
us wwnsw . JJ* u 

ids 32'AHmar uo» 5J 
MS MS Hants uun ll 

* ” i&£n lJ * n U 

T9S ISSPAmm M IJ 

ais 17% Ham ■ jo at 

MS 13 Honml Jt W 
MS A Manual tk I2L9 
I 2 S • Hl » B affin _ 

Hk iBSMiPf _ - 

v a HoraSi B IJ 
a mitoM un ii 
APS HkHdrtwD J* J 

rsa S s i 

r gSUSS* IB aj 

JOS » TknsD 1AM u 

Si q 7j 

SX a s 


iSiiS&SS 

ass ip wo 

gsiSXSSS. 

ITS I9STSI1** 
■ ISSHMM 
BVk 2ISHCM1. 

j&RBggl 

sxtoss 


S s A2SHraS_ 

ns jeSN^mn 

SsSkiCSsC 
SSiESi* 




Q* fHMMIto 
to* to*(nceu 
to* ir*mm 
5 * njjijfrtft 
PH to* Honda 
49* 4 gHr t* M I¥>Wf 
» 13*IVCT9I 

a’isgar. 

risss 1 " 

as lS m nr^ L 
39S JSkHOtttTT 
W I IS Hum try 
pm nuaM 

MS MSW&MT 

ats atSHacrmr 

90S 33 MltM 
at M HOBtPtl 
us nkMofun 
US USISuTgltn 
BM SSHO^Vd 

£*SXi&Sg 

m ars H u H ii A t 
Ok IlkHuMl 

gwag* 

Ri TittS. 

us nsptvdMr 

]M 2A HU. 

is Knign 
is ■JnurALtwr 

R 

V* HHMMTR 


Si2&^ 

23% B%5fiw 

3*ii5KB? 

tPS AAsiTTPAarl 
M 22SI TT DtM 

MS n*Ciw 

sggg 


MS aASIBnora 
MS ifvkUMalain 
IS ISmslnd 

3SS MklSrOCI 


ut U 11 » Ik 

2 _ *3 ’Ss 
U2 U U SB R 

28 = 1 « 


S5 Ss 

aK 3« -s 

Ss as =s 
ant ats — s 


|ft a 

3XSsS l -S li 

MS 19 inaDnPAn 

Hu it& j? a 

RBuHSSr r 

■a .ix^d % a 

31S it Uon M £2 

ns nstniM ta .1 

•!* ismSm 


nase 

jkiSKET 
is SXISSE 

SB* 3ft Inoartm 

R toBSr 


S iS r *!& SX 55 R -iS 

■% ii a £ ss ax su -i% 

jSiiglSSHXiHX-® 
- 0 *?g S" ® as •* 

N U £ B 9S 9S 9% r 

. - IK > » *>*•_ 

* ii : lar R p* s* ■* 

mu., a. ill. ii if ' —S 
IM U n 141 15% its us 
n u . an il% 12 its' _ 

MU— 23 in ova u% Z 

* ti - 9 US IAS MS -ft 

tl 6.1 - a 13% u% 12* .ft 

J90 AJ - m 1»S |> Q 

a : 1 ik iis 5% - 

M ll . a MS ias MS —ft 

\rn 3J » to* .m 


3! U % to 

M U ^ M 

m &.I _ a 

jw <u k. m 

■ 49 03 m 41 

* IS % m 

a 1 a 


hkE niS-itCfij 

4Mb 35SMMO in u t Ha£ m Ok «k -% 


AJ <• ra n iht us — % 

. U O not ATS ATS AtS -% 

JS □ I !K SK XX -'t 

,a iV S *» >S ’K -a 

IJI U . 9 ITS ITS I2W - % 

M J 12 n H% Hk a -t 

IS H S "to p. 3X R 3 
.a. ,1 f | 5B a -? 

UR T.l 11 31 19S 19% 29S _ 

_ _ IAU AS AS AS —ft 

At U 19 1513 ITS IAS US -S 

It 9 . 1U-4AS 3k tes ■% 

jo u _ id ijs n as • % 

- KUAti us Iam us _ 

_ 19 3W aas an MS -W 
lM Cl 14 .11 n 2TH US _ 

At ij - 1 lAfir atn ats _ 

Bt A.I _ A* US IAS US 1 M 

LAA 52 50 Ml ITS 37S ITS — s 

9* X3 “ *8 R R P 

8S a a S R S S% = 

Lift 04 _ El 73* g* XS* «-* 

ja .1 n t3o ia* ra nR -* 

- 3A 17ft to to 77 

M ft4 19 431 u 27* B 37* -* 


SX SsS^t 


IJS 99 _ 

3 5 11 

IJ 26 



** S “ ^ 

Jtot 4LI ro M 

w u 5 S 
as S : A 

MUM 


iis rs^ss ? 

41* BiftjrMaft 

gp" SiHSELs 

p ss^sa 

us esEios 


AA 19 JM|> dn 2> ITS -S 

” li S S Sk Ss .5 
fi i tS li £ iS :s 
i5 : g S! | S2“i2 

p .1 _ 22 an 3s 25 % — %, 

B : 4 % ?! ”s .s 

A _ 1399 TS ts T -M 




“JXffiSS. - « H 
S s s 


iK-aSSS? 

IAS lASJoeUna 


ITS MiK-DI 

ass aisK-niM 

DTVk BkHW 

aps I lures 

3TS 2TSI0LM ’ ■ 

U SSKmrt 
ns AtsKmoneal 
as 27 KNEW 
Ats Mktm 
90S IT PCUEno. 

MS PSKcttAI 
IS PSKOIMpB 

SngSSSS 5 " 

3% iSKtmb 
US JsKaSrP 
Bk IMKCkS 


I I ITS IIS US -% 
t JS rib IS — S 

1 ns ofi 40% -as 

i SS R S£ -2 

! IS z 

l IS 14* 14* — * 

«■* «0 to — * 

! ’Si ’S! %i TX 

S ts rv. pt — s 
1 ns ns ns r) 
a ik ms n .% 


IM I0J _ *t SbS SU 

41 li IP 93 3TS 27 

.13 J 31 m AIS AT 


no wn ws kps ■St 

*t SbS Mt ats — s 

92 27% 27% 17% — S 


TJ Z "SI 
*j a* m 

M fi S 


IT m 27 
IIS II II 

9k m iw 


— n luo is ak 11 % - % 

57 ta — ids 11 1IW lift — s 

an m u m a ns m - % 

“ “ S J R “as R I 

ffiSSfi^axaxax-s 
*0 "i » Si 2s 3% 2 .« 

J0 ll ll 41 14 M 14 _ 

a u 11 W is u u —At 

sm IJ 15 UP AIS AN 41% — S 

.11 u u in 9 IS IS — % 

in u m anr ms ass its .% 

J0 U IA ATI S3 21% im — % 

J9 U H 163 N’t P0S MS ■ — S 

JA 9.1 - MB TS TS TS _ 


a IIS 22Pk — S 
vt m im — s 
IS TS TS _ 


29% MS MS —W 
Sk 23% 35% a St 

as is as _ 
ASd 4% (k — S 


TS T KSWCV JA 9.1 - no TS TS TS _ 

IIS IBSKmoM 59 U - 212 21 MS II >11 

lift 13SKTOAMI JB l3 _ MA OS Ok US 

MS lASKmum Uto IT . H tk 3 US 

42 mHumH m U 13 «n a% Ck as •_ 

ms risiccos _ st mi mi ■ ms .« 

AIS USKAMBt — 13 1534 IPS MS MS — W 

»% aoAKvPw >35 mu. n st sk m >k 

9% I KtrrGa _ - 230 ZS IS IS _ 

» MUffd IJO 3AJ _ M tsd ts «% — s 

75 SSSKOTMC IM LA M an TA% 7*s M ’% 

»% mSSraro infisniiiSsksii-* 

Su iJSSS” JA sj M iS m rSi £2 Is 

■St SiECS* & H A ^T. D, Sa 35 *35 *-!S 

£%2 SSffi iSKz 5 S5 Si £5 ^ 
T* ^SlnSff ”* ^Z j iS’2s%^s_^ 

M** “ A^ E W m ITS I7S I 


fts’SiSgA 

»a«RS?- 


TfTC .» _ 

i!S»« : 


Ik ,J%toOumi» 


, 3 f X 

M 13 Mn US IIS 

_ IAM 3b TS 


TS LOUTS . 

SstSSr - 


13 MSI IPAPP’ 
iis IA UnrTW 
2 N skuwan 
30*e Hkluna 


«s M%UaaM<n JT JJ 

MS MSUdoPkM M IA 

“At SUMtldO _ 

MS ntllkidr JOa J 

25% xukureran ant p 

ITS IISLCnwr .W A 

» OSLcuctdl J5 U> 

J3S USLtrOdtt LM 47 

SS 3SLMD _ 

IS umiaeOid* I.U TJ 

27% mtLnnrV _ 

IIS ITS Upon JB 14T 

IS ISLfivat 

iiX ikinS -IS Hr 

as 30%LAAvO> 74 IJ 

ns nsLwsi n u 


"ia 2 S a»5 m ns ov 

im ia - 10 tow ns nv 

w ^ SX 1 ^2 ’Ji 

Z 23 194? 37S m M* 

* u - ? iry. as u* 

.Sfi: ft 55 SS S 

JM !J Z m MS its in 

IJM TS - 9*2 MS JAV Ut 

22. L3 _ A33 17% 17% ITJ 

At jj n 399 aw ( 7 % in 

at 9 10 in ns ps m 

„ IT 4742 M 37ni% M 

- . M lllh Ml U 

-72 IS M It 25 MS MJ 

j» u 11 im a% n Mk 

5 11 M t» A £% *U 

At IA II 3M1 33S 31 Mk 

- - 134 % VS. *W 

M J ■ «25 MS 

24* U - l> B» 

.M J B ais ats 

TS It M Ol »% 

LM AT l> Atfu 3M 


is TSLDnvm 

aas asuoRD 

SXSXtES. 

ns usLindn 

!»% M LJICMC 


SIS Aosunon 
a ts ume 
a MSLAnaOr- 

45S %% L fidOD 

pts 73 Loanen 
MS IMloeanC 
AS IMlomn 
P»> nSLoowi 


muLD 



35 35^1*1 
^SSwSSfi.5 

5*RSSr , * A 

30 PSMCNDl 

a maakmFm 
2TS midCMMlDl 
9% SSMDC 
22% 2MMDU 


AOW TMMtMO 
11% iSAAIScmt 
n% 22 um On 

25St^u 
S Ss 

■SS MlUUSt 

an* u Mo a tH U i 


ia% iistMont 
iis lSSMonna 
«k Bkt i ra f 


I.U TJ E 129 14% 

_ » Hat its 

JB 147 W MU MS 

— 73 M 4% 

. i m I0J - IDA 11% 

14*9 MT - vt 9S 
TI IJ IJ Ol MS 

48 ij u a»n ns 

'£ T$ ” « R 

O J 11 HA Ada 

ijtr li ninno ns 
a u w am ns 

j u U M 2 In 

5i0 5J _ Ul U% 

L9H U 12 1574 9% 

li* id - n am 

S S : ifi S 

- - 12M I9S 

_ U 1419 4AS 

" « Tti 25 

* li * atn am 

IJO IJ IS JW MS 

136 U - 47 2fS 

.10 J - IM 37 

14* IJO .1 IVT 97% 

m j u on ms 

* 4 A » » 

_ - DO 19% 

JO J 10 UP MS 

ijo T.f M * 0 * aas 


Ji xi Jr aaai im 

40 U 17 M IM 
_ - MM IIU 

— 75 HI 19 • 

J4IBP 

uto if u mu xt* 

■* " 5 JS ss 
i3 as z^S S% 

M* .3 e ^ 

_ Jft TXJ 72* 

SO U 19 90 s an* 

BflfinSa 

n 2 A BUM 30% 

m H i n£i Ss 

in u . 1 AA M 
in iz . d am 

IK U . U MS 

.ia ij Id pa dm 
U f AD 15 MT »% 

»s g z 3 i 

JI HD _ m M 
^ B.1 _ Wto I 
4 U % 01# 7* 

Aft 73 _ U0 V* 
llh M _ V 17*. 

^iS ^ i?M^ Hi! 

I ” id n* 

a3i |3 “ ^ R 
jo ij 5 ^ R 

- u 1431 zStS 

I TK a 3 71 w,n 

a s s j? Sw 

Z ’* riS ’K 
.ton to* 
taw V a m aw 

“ :z5o“Sl 

_ - 11 S . MS 

IJO «U _ MSB IM 


S“35iSSW 

MS MUngtn 

2AW SkHAPCOI 
apt PSMcrcoi 

7 5 Mornm 

m %Mt>n> 
m nwnuv 

RRSSSr 

‘^esiRSfe 

ats mwowi 

Ok lkvMTVU 

ms ast raco 
low ireuntacxicD 
.u% nvutrad 
Mb Mywtng. 


33% SISAWMl 
AS HkMMLtn 
TS MkJHomoit 

S!S» 

ss rn IMA 5 


3 % ITStwCUMa 
S u assmxirau 
71 S WUMtnroB 

g* 2 SS?* 

sss*asa 


« h “ 1 a as 
Js a ; | 5* 

^la ft .1 rn ■<* 

jo W m og to* 

a» x _ m a#* 

.It! J V XX] m 

fJM *J V £• to*, 

40 y if n u 

ja U U toft n*d 

,; s ^ « is 

J 4 S M » 

- “ “ iS ^5 

JO 13 35 ms MW 

jo u to tg w 

■4 a = 3 1 . 

l.iat 3’ * is i^nt 

at j a pn as 

jd 19 at m » 

“ "l S ^ jt® 

2 S « ” S ® 

^ ” 1 ^ aP* 

j» 5 jh SC 

im w n im ns 

IE U B W 54% 


>■» « s >3 St 

IM *3 M suni «s 

■** » « 5-»s 

ax» fi m»b ns 


^ s 

JO IJ II 

an u ij 


R S5 -S5 ja. 

aos ns n.. — % 


Hi! SSSSSK 1 iS ij ; S K 

vT ,S u « a 

AT.. ft%A*»ai LM IJ 13441 dk 


IN U V EAT H 

1IM 
8 3 * *s * 

z z -S SX 


Ife 

TS tkWMJI* 
5% TWMeEn 

Sisas? 


Eapa 

am in« it» »t» 

‘JS 

jXiSSl. 


S!« 

s-ass^if 

ats SwmSm 


JA% B* 
Mb AS 

1 SS iSX 
35 35 
T ii* 

SI’ 

!Sw m 

its am 

-X “5 

its atX 

ss r 


j irt'i 

: U 


■i.iii! *11 
lUl* 1 




as inLMKMEB 

nSS^SW 
3* ftUSSSi 
jiSg5iS5% a 

is sxasR , „ 


3% n%A iapi Tja 

g$g;i£|iS 
iS2 SKS^ 1 

tSbiislIlF" 

01 * MMonnd, 

4* AftSSSo^n 


AIS M MUOtoT n d 

S!KKSS3‘ 

fas 11 mweSi 

<k MtWH 


4 S3 z 


n mmm 

hstSSS* 


15% DtaMMlMI 
14% WMMWl 
G SkiAMU 

UVa u MuMJbr 

us ijkMimr 


■% ISMngjI 
21 % w unon 

S% Ssre^nM 

kdhr 

ns issMMcp 

SS 2% IAS Ora 
21% UkMI 

its atsN*H>SRt 
M 17 NVMMC 
ns at rtossn 

S SSSSS" 

29% fSPbanua 
tm 43%AM<n 
I5S DUttOUUpHC 


- J SK SX 
sa22 i? s% 


i*gL 

Mil 

z 1AI MS 14% 

3 «■! 2& 355 

- JI sZ 

Z Sk IBS 14% 

- '§A low MS 

,2 ^ mrs .co-v 

- J IX % 
; B ■£ ■» 

* It! 

E 1 B i 


*s st a 

a ;k m 

J5 u% K 

» J¥* H* 

*U n% mt 

^ .^5 sx 

!S ii* H5 
S3 3% S5 
SISK 

no u% <4 

122 MS IA 

in u ns 

IT MS US 


ilid 

■irt*rdr*-M 


M*r 
V ^ ■ 

V*«. 

• * 

• ,j k«=id 4 ^ 


Ok -U - 
Bk -k § 


£ £ s *3 
^ 1 •* 
gs a ^ 

JSS s* a i 

“11 TS 



-.a 30k 


. j 

•< • 

• ■ -A** - 


"n'.0fa -aj 

i J -V- • f . •* 

'iW^-TA 
- jr £*■■:$ 

••• ^ 


■ISSSS! us 95 

ildPro* MOD u 

SI SB’S 

,5S5? uor if 




Sa uS.u 

!“ JI if 


17 mpniaAni 

ats rmptamOR 

5 aSwMwgy.n 

R-RaSSk 

tO » Mom on 


ara 4*o -A 

’J 5J K 

At* U7k TJ 

r lad it 


• Z bm Ss 

IS 25 

B lTg 27S 

tut 

£ 5*15 AOS 

235 m 

_ tin us 

17 5199 21 % 

z*T 3s 

_ in 

z.3S S 

- MOD Ats 

- ‘J** » 

Sin Ss 

75 Utt SOS 
- 2 « Jra 

_ IK STS 


p” a -s 

W 3JS —ft 

^ £' ** £ 

in sow -■js 
am ads -1 
ass «s — s 
u% us 
B» Ilk »% 


ttUSTRSET 


ax 1 tassr . as, 13 

^ JRW “ 

tna TMAPdicM) 3JA 25 

42% nupnvsr m Si 

35 JKirf S li 

A| mpbrtdOtn USD Z 

ZZ ZZXZM 1 % a 

MS rnWBtO 25*0 TJ 

B3B »* 


S .nS a£S 

i 

3 *5i“ Ss 

_ UH IBS 


ss ta -f 

A tv* -% 

•*. ns —IS 


ns AM *S 

R SS .ft 


ats 2BSMMS 

S* ’BSSSSo* 




am ids as 

R R ^ 

r?6 J** aft 



•T -ffx iei 


■IV .’6>k . 


hlBF 


US’ 

HU iiVkPdSSe 


m SsEESS? 1 

is ja ipufin. 

KSsSSH' 

CfflKKST 


*a 23% OEA 

it 9 % ore toe 
«S atibOOHBw 

J* rfsgftS?, 

20% SbOMI 

^rF^Sf 


R R 

Bs gs 


“ ’•< V 

I r . I ■- 


B* 3 
S* SX. 


fi SL U f9 * b*s 

an *jf f ^ R 

n 1 « n anu n iIX 

~ = *S S'* 3% 

' n bb W 

*3 a s S a a 


iiS 1 fir « 

IS* .ililiP 

s% » z w s'* «** - 

ifiH - 05r*lx^‘^ 

US 11SOMM 1 y ^ 5 SS f* 1 R -s 
hs 11 SSreor S at - j ^ ^ '» - 

2 % jo. <»M»* as \j ffi no % H- 13 •% 

* Mtgpii ia a h " L gj* ns — s 



E2t BSH2« 
JK RS I SIm 



^ S* 3s SX 


- 1 is SS 

1 j| S 85 8* la 

& a » s is 
i! S 2 ” 

ftiilix 

-slip 


v 

v ;*0i 

?.*« . *• 


CUHU 


* .:»* **5 

^ :■ v* intTi 

.- r 'T' ; . .Mt 

*■“ -■ ’■*» 

-t Jt . S^a 

-u’- >kk 

'r'JS ' i'Mi 
Z.eP 

•'• ?r 

- - '- 4 V*!' rtid 




*«- v>T ' **• 


s 

CoBfia ^OoPagel8 


j - ' ‘w ■*- vrT 

--k^lttd-^ 'A ' 

f ”-~l- . l * ' • I’’*' ■; 


• 4 -. _ 


.7 

•• J -4r--..Wr 














BUSINESS/FINANCE 


. FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 


PAGE 15 


Deal Creates 
A Giant in 
U.S. Defense 

Raytheon Wins Bid 
For Hughes Electronics 

— Raytheon Co. won 
tne bidding Thursday to buy the defense 
operations of Hughes Electronics from 
General Motors Corp. in a $93 billion 
deal that would create the third-largest 
U.S. defense contractor, behind Boeing 
Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp. 

The deal, the most recent combin- 
ation m the fast-consolidating defense 
industry, represents a setback for 
j Northrop Grumman Corp.. which was' 
also a bidder for the Hughes iiniL 
The combined company would have 
revenue of about $21 billion a year. 

Raytheon will pay $5.1 billion in - 
stock and assume $4.4 billion of debt 
held by Hughes Aircraft Co., the de- 
fense electronics subsidiary of Hughes. 

The bidding had been closely fol- 
lowed because the Hughes defense unit, 
which comprises Hughes Aircraft, was 
one of the last big U.S. defense assets to 
come up for sale. The subsidiary builds 
missiles, rad^r and heat-imaging sys- 
tems and employs 40,000. •„ 

“The combination of the Hughes and 
Raytheon defense businesses wiU cieate 
a unique technology compa n y arid a 
world leader in defense electronics,'* said 
Dennis Picard, chairman of Raytheon. 

Just last week, Raytheon acquired the 
defense electronics business of Texas 
Instruments Inc. far S3 billion. 

Raytheon said that upon completion of 
the Hughes purchase and the Texas In- 
stniments deal, the combined company, 

• J * based in Lexington, Massachusetts, 
would have about 127X00 employees. 

John Weaver, president of. Hughes 
Aircraft, would become president of die 
combined company and report to Mr. 
Picant ^ ■ • 

Raytheon’s shares closed $ 1.50 high- 
er at $43.50, while GM rose 50 cents to 
$60,625. 

‘ ‘Rayrheon is a guaranteed survivor,” 
said Ken Herbert, a Frost &. Sullivan 
analyst. The purchase, he 'said, “gives 
Raytheon the critical mass it needs.** ' 
The sale would Jepve the automaker : 
with $4.8 billiofl of Raytheon stock. 

"At theend of dief^^re^growth 
in the defenseindUstry ism defettseelec- 
tronics,” said Jon KutUar, an aeio^ace 
analyst for Quarterdeck Investment Part- 
ners. “Raytheon win be dominant in tha 
area.” ' | Bloomberg, AP) - 




ROBERT VESCO OtAJRIO GARCES- VEIJEZ 

date fled 1 972 date fled 1994 

WANTED FOR Fraud WANTED FOR 

Money laundering 

WHEREABOUTS WHEREABOUTS 

Imprisoned in Cuba Colombia 
last year - . 



IDGUEL COMZALO 
RECAREVJR. 

DATE FLED 1987 
WANTED FOR 
Conspiracy, bribery, 
fraud 

WHEREABOUTS 

Spain 


GtAKCARlO PARRETTI OHATTH PHARAON 


DATE FLED 1982 
WANTED FOR 
Tax evasion, illegally 
trading oil with Iran 
WHEREABOUTS 
Switzerland 


DATE FLED 1997 
WANTED FOR 
Perjury and 
evidence tampering 
Wt&REABOUTS 
Italy 


DATE FLED 1991 
WANTED FOR Fraud 
and racketeering 

WHEREABOUTS 
Believed to be in 
Saudi Arabia 


Homing In on Fugitive Financiers 


By Peter True]] 

New York Tunes Service . 

NEW YORK — Giancario Parretri, 
the flamboyant former Hollywood 
mogul, could well be visiting his aged 
parents at die family olive farm near 
Otviefo. Italy, his American lawyers 
say. But they are not sure, since they 
communicate with him solely by fax. 

Mr. Parretti. who mounted a $13 
billion takeover of Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer Inc. in 1 990 only to lose control 
of the studio a year later amid al- 
legations of financial mismanage- 
ment, is, after alt, a man on the run. 

The financier, jumped hail shortly 
before a Jan. 6 sentencing hearing in 
Delaware, his lawyers said this month. 
At the hearing, he faced up to 10 years 
in prison on perjury and evidence-tam- 
pering convictions growing out of the 
legal battle for.control of the studio. 

Exactly how and when Mr. Pftrretti 
left the United States is a mystery. But 
by skipping the country , he has become 
the latest addition to the band of rogue 


financiers who have put oft their data 
with American justice. In joining the 
likes of Marc Rich and Robert Vesco. 
be has entered the shadowy world of the 
high-powered fugitive. 

Because of technological advances 
in international police work, chiefly the 
growth in computer databases and the 
lightning-fast transmission of photos, 
those fugitives are finding that they can 
hide, but not run, at least not easily . after 
their initial flight- Those who last the 
longest find a haven and hunker down, 
law enforcement officials say. 

The authorities say that no ftigiti ve is 
ever really safe in an age when a next- 
door neighbor could regularly check 
out the Justice Department's wanted 
list on the World Wide Web. Tracking 
down fugitives “is getting a little bit 
easier using these sophisticated pro- 
grams,** said James Carney, an in- 
spector with the U.S. Marshals Service, 
the agency that brings them back. 

But for all that the wheels of justice 
can turn awfully slowly. Washington 
has had little success in persuading 


even friendly nations to tighten laws 
that provide safe harbors for financial 
fugitives. Often there are serious ques- 
tions about how hard anyone tries to 
find these international scofflaws. 

In Mr. Parretti *s case, an arrest war- 
rant has been issued by Delaware au- 
thorities. and a bail-forfeiture bearing 
has been set for Jan. 24, according to 
Paul Wallace, the state prosecutorhan- 
dling the case. But no American of- 
ficials have been sent to Orvieto or 
anywhere else abroad to find the fu- 
gitive. Mr. Wallace said, explaining 
that such bilateral matters take time. 

Even if Mr. Parretti is found, it may 
be some time before he returns to the 
United States, if ever. One measure of 
how hard it can be to win extradition is 
that in fleeing the country, Mr. Parretti 
left behind another legal battle in Los 
Angeles, where he had been fighting a 
warrant issued by the French govern- 
ment for other MGM-related charges. 

Washington has been trying to get 

See FUGITIVE, Page 19 


Ford to Cut 1,300 Jobs 
At Escort Plant in U.K. 

Losses in Europe Prompt Move 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

.\Vn KirJL Times Sen-ire 

LONDON — Ford Motor Co. said 
Thursday it would cut the work force at 
its Halewood plant, near Liverpool, by 
about one-third, or 1.300 workers, as 
part of an overall restructuring of Euro- 
pean plants by 2000. The Halewood 
facility makes Escort models. 

Ford held out the hope that a new 
multipurpose vehicle of the family sedan 
type may be built at the plant starring in 
2000 , but noted this would happen only 
if costs could be controlled. 

Its move is meant to stem losses in its 
European operations caused by bloated 
production capacity and poor sales. 
Some of the 800 Escorts made daily at 
the plant will be shifted to factories in 
Germany and Spain. 

The derision came as a shock to 
workers ai the plant. Although some 
cuts had been expected. Ford had given 
the Halewood plant its global quality 
award for 1996. 

Analysts said the failure of the Escort 
model to sell, rather than working prac- 
tices at the plant, was to blame. They 
said similar models, such as the Volks- 
wagen Golf and Opel Astra, were 
selling better. 

“People just didn’t like the Escort,” 
said Charles Young, director of Auto- 
motive Research at J.D. Power-LMC 
Automotive Forecasting. “It was not as 
exciting as the competition." 

David Gorman. Ford's European 
vehicle operations manager, said. “The 
actions we have announced today at 
Halewood assembly operations give the 


plant a realistic future, with an exciting 
new vehicle in the medium term, subject 
to approval and performance objectives 
being achieved. ' ’ 

Last week. Alex Trounan. chairman 
and chief executive of Ford, said the 
company had 1 'a cost problem which we 
are addressing very aggressively.” 

The company, which operates 12 
plants in Britain, said its Halewood 

Ford, citing the weak yen, said it 
might raise prices in Japan. Page 19. 

plant, which employs 4.500 workers, 
will operate on a single shift as of April 
“for the foreseeable future.” 

Speaking in Parliament. Prime Min- 
ister John Major described the devel- 
opment as a "very surprising de- 
cision." coming at a time when 
employment in Britain continues to 
show’ steady gains. He also noted that 
auto manufacturing has been a partic- 
ularly successful industry in Britain. 

But Ford’s losses in its 48 European 
plants, which reached a record $472 
million in the third quarter of last year, 
made the move imperative, according to 
company spokesmen and analysts. 

Union leaders at Ford rejected the 
move, which they ascribed to the lax 
labor compensation laws in Britain, 
where it costs less to fire workeis. Bri- 
tain has opted out of the so-called social 
chapter of the European Union, which 
offers strong protection to workers. 
They said they would seek urgent talks 
with management to reverse the de- 
cision at the Halewood plant. 


Lukoil Agrees to Buy 5% Stake in Kazak Oil Field From Chevron 


Ctmfaedbf(AvSk&FmriDbpito&n. 

MOSCOW— Lukoil, Russia's largest 
oil company, has agreed to pay about 
$200 million to buy 5 percent of the $20 
tuition Tengiz oil venture in Kazakstan 
from. Chevron Corp., a source familiar 
with tbe negotiations said Thursday. 

Lukoil quoted . its; vice president, 
Dzevhan Chetoyants, as saying the 
comjjttny antfChevtori had reached mu- 
tual understanding on all basic condi- 
tions of. the agreeroent, but tbe Russian 
company gave no further information, 

. . Although payment terms were not 


confirmed, analysts said the deal would 
benefit both companies. 

“It’s a world-scale field, and it fits in 
with Lukoil's strategy of diversifying 
away from Russia, getting in projects 
elsewhere,” said James Bunch of Renais- 
sance Capital. "Chevron in particular 
win probably welcome Russian partic- 
ipation because h gives them political 
leverage to negotiate pipeKne.aafcS.sL” * 

Lukoil’s acquisition, will reduce 
Chevron’s share of the Tengiz venture 
to 45 percent. Mobil Corp. holds 25 
percent, and the Kazak government 


owns the remaining 25 percent. 

While it lacks access to pipelines big 
enough to handle maximum output, the 
Tengiz field is producing 1 50,000 barrels 
a day and is forecast to produce 170,000 
barrels a day before year’s end. 

“Until the Caspian Pipeline Consor- 
tium gets started, having Lukoil in 
Chevron's camp will facilitate getting 
more' Russian pipeline capacity.” Mr. 
Bunch said. 

Mike Libby, a Chevron representa- 
tive, said Lukoil might help the U.S. 
company’s effort to export crude oil 


from landlocked Kazakstan, as the com- 
pany has a quota of scheduled space on 
the Russian Transneft pipeline system 
to the Black Sea port of Novorossisk. 

The arrangement with Lukoil is likely 
to involve Atlantic Richfield Co., which 
isclose to concluding a joint venture with 
Lukoil, an Arvo spokesman said. Under 
the 1 5-year venture. Areo is to finance as 
much as $15 billion of projects with 
Lukoil in the former Soviet Union. 

By 2010, ihe Tengiz field, in western 
Kazakstan, will be pumping 700,000 
barrels a day. It is estimated to hold 6 


billion to 9 billion barrels of oil. 

Shares in Chevron finished un- 
changed at $68.50, Mobil stock rose 
37.5 cents to $131-50. and Arco shares 
fell 1 2.5 cents at $ 1 37. A stock price for 
Lukoil was not available. 

"Lukoil will add real benefits to the 
Tengiz joint venture as a premiere Rus- 
sian oil company." said Dick Matzke. 
president of Chevron Overseas Petro- 
leum Inc, "Lukoil is a partner that can 
enhance the value of Tengiz by con- 
tributing Russian expertise and expe- 
rience. ’ f AP. Reuters . Bloomberg ) 


WAUL STREET WHICH 


Cliff-Hanger for Conrail on Eve of Vote 


By Floyd Norris 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Shareholder meet- 
ings are almost always run by script. 

Even when there is a proxy fight, by 
the time of the meeting it is clear to the 
participants' who will win. But Friday’s 
Conrad Inc. meeting, at which share- 
holders witi cast votes thtawUdetemiine 

whether to accept lessfiuin CSX Corp- in 
a takeover or bold on and hope that 
Norfolk Southern Corp. will be able to 
pay more, is an exception. It appears that 
neither side is very confident. 

The vote is formally on whether Con- 
rail will waive a provision of the 
Pennsylvania takeover law. If it does, the 
way will be clear for Conrail’ s desired 
suitor. CSX, to proceed with a takeover, 
and CSX says it will do so promptly.., 
If the shareholders vote against .waiv- 
ing the provision, then the game gets 
more interesting. Norfolk Southern, the 
other suitor, says it would then buy sense 
stock, paying more than CSX is willing 
pay and raising its stake to 9.9 percent. 
That offer to immediately buy some 
stock was made Monday and would 
seem to indicate that Norfolk Southern 
was not confident of victory in tiw vote. 

Even if Norfolk Southern did buy 
those shares, however, it would be pro- 
hibited by various laws and-OaoraiJ 
rules from .buying 'more, perhaps for 


years. There would be more court fights 
and certainly more shareholder votes. 

On the other side. CSX and Conrail 
officials say they expect the vote to be 
close. CSX and Conrail need a majority 
of the voles cast. 

■ Whatever happens, Conrail share- 
holders are getting a much better deal 
than seemed likely in October, when 
Conrail spurned talks with Norfolk 
Southern and agreed to a merger with 
CSX. That deal called for Conrail to be 
sold for cash and CSX stock then worth 
$92.50 a share. 

Now, Conrail stockholders have 
already sold 19.9 percent of the com- 
pany to CSX for $110 a share. If CSX 
prevails, they will get $1 10 a share for a 
further 2Q.1 percent and CSX common 


would work into a blended value of 
$103-58, 12 percent more than the orig- 
inal offer and 46 percent above Conrail’s 
trading price before the battle began. 

Moreover, while CSX originally 
: planned to delay paying the final 60 
percent until the Surface Transportation 
Board, a federal agency, ruled on the 
" merger, it now promises to complete the 
rfr-al quickly, assuming it wins the vote. 
That would leave CSX and its share- 
■ holders feeing possible losses if the gov- 
ernment eventually rejected the deal. 

.. Conrail shares closed unchanged 


Thursday at $103.50 on the New York 
Stock Exchange, a price that makes sense 
only if one expects Norfolk Southern to 
win the vote and complete its own 
takeover relatively soon, or if one thinks 
that such a vote would lead CSX to again 
raise its offer. Norfolk Southern shares 
fell $1375 to $88,125. and CSX rose 25 
cents to $45,125. Both suitors’ shares are 
trading for less titan they were when the 
battle began. 

The price for Conrail has risen be- 
cause Norfolk Southern entered the bid- 
ding, eventually raising- its offer to an 
all-cash bid of $115 a share. But Con- 
rail's board has spumed all overtures 
and, as CSX has raised its bid, has 
agreed to more and more impediments 
to a Norfolk Southern offer. 

On Wednesday afternoon, a federal 
appeals court in Philadelphia rejected an 
effort by Norfolk Southern to delay the 
Conrail meeting until it ruled on Norfolk 
Southern's appeal and decided whether 
fee so-called lock-up period was illegal. 

Many investors are outraged at the 
Conrail board’s refusal to go for the most 
money and want to send a message that 
such conduct is unacceptable. But they 
also realize that a vote against die Con- 
rail proposal will not be profitable unless 
Norfolk Southern finds a way around all 
the obstacles. If shareholders really con- 
trolled companies, that would be a safe 
bet. As it is, ft may be a long shot. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 
i 

Arastndna 1XU 

BrassA VM 

r raiM w t UBS 

umaxi (□) liar 

MdMSB 1S3I 

MUM IMS 

NBlYMfr) — 

Paris SJ*b 

Tokyo 11MB 

Toronto IMJ 

ZHfeft MSB 

1 ECU 122fl 

15PR .. UOi 


E DJL 

20*S- UBS 

sus xa 

IBS — 

— VO! 
•mm*, no 
&BUS WJ3B 
UTBo 

mm vast 
1W5 na 
I2.es QMS 
!WS 3*37 
07111 1*12 
i 1X8 


F#. UB 
us ana* 
i« yjo'-i 
msa uhb* 
uta isux 
wst 
auo 

SBC USMJ 
l oair - 

nil -us 
C202 W 
0356 ■ QOt I* 
SJW U9M1 
JJH2T3U* 


YM a pesos 
15381 ■ m ij«s* 
us Mm anus' 

LOT* LR66 LIFTS* 

tfiu, lira mns 
1UM* 9M15 — ■ 

lljflj I US* 

lltAH mu uses 

401M UMT 

— out uu 
usir — tar 
uor ibt 

MUSI im «2W 

WL1» ism u m 

■amen; New Vet* and 


Libld-Ubor Rates 1( 

Autos French 

polar D-Mark Frau sterttog Franc VM ECU 

l-fljontt 3-1*. .1VS-1W 6V» - fry, 3W - 3Vi **-Vi A - ilk 

3-mortfc 3-«M sto-lto era ■ wu ■ VN. 4-4V> 

frounlh STu-SV 3-Vta lto-l*k Mk-M* 3*ta-3Vto tfc-Vn t-UA 

l-year 3V«-3Vb 1Vb-TVw6'V)t- W*3Vk- 3V» a-ua 

Sweet Reuters. Uoytte Son*. 

RtdeaappMcaUeloUitetaankdipt^idsi mB&mnMrmtmtoreqiiMaa). 


Key Money Rates 


Tamo fairs o.^uii 
« Touuyaoepatakb: 

Other Dollar Values 

Contacy Pori Coneocy ■ 

„ Araentpua OffiffB. gcmcooL 

ir AMOtnOmS Utt HojKogl 

- AusMaasdi. 11.215 HU*.fDrf» 

Brazlieot UM& UBanpH 

C Mora y v oo aaaaa . MLnyU i 

CHdUnrai 2753 irfsfct 

poi&OkraM ton* tsraefraMfc 

ESWrt. pound 1392 BmAct 

Fta.nmtta aJO& MotoyLitoB. 


dinner 
Max. pen 

N.ZefltanriS 
ttont.kma 
RdLpe* 
PoHsflzWr 
. Pcrtescwto 
Ruts ruble 
Smdlifrot 
SO0.S 


Forward Rates ; 

Conner M+i : **ior cwtney 

PooMSfetMa ... WE*-- TjS»7 UTSS Jat*s*xre a 

CnoaSMiMtaT * \2B5t \XCO 1J8» Stotamrnc 

DautMMtotok " ISM. 1-58® 1-5853 


Owner 

SAfr.iwa 

S.Kor.vea 

SwejLtjmw 

Tttfeja»5 

TfcdtoW 

TtaktJfrfta 

UAEdttam 

Vesa-Mtv. 


3fl-4)a V SOUm 

1JSJST 114.1B HU* 
1.374S 1J784 1.3*41 


HUoflStoWB 
Discount rate 
Prime Mr 

FtaknitMfe 
JO-day CO* tfoMett 
ISfrdorCFAMion 
3 naan Treason Hi 

1 - year Treason UB 

2- &*TnnwtYbU 
s ^ w TreaggTDoto 
7-yMrTreonry Wto 
ip^tor Tmsary oote 
Met eor TmH»T bead 
Menu Lynn 3frdoy BA 
Japan 

taunt rate 
Cod wooer 
r-BWKtk MtfMM 


DouMMOTk' LSM7. 1.5887 1-5853 . „ 


i-nwan lotoilxioir 
10 -y«arOovt&aixt 
Cemoar 
Lombard rate 
CoRmq 

l-pontti to t erba ok 
3-oMdl) kiterbnk 
t-Doatb toterbank 
10-rrar Bund 


awe Prer 
5J». 5J» 
81* 8M 
SW SVk 
SJ3 SM 
S3 3 553 

MB 5.01 
550 557 

SM 555 

453 429 

442 439 

454 453 

483 479 

49S 485 

050 050 

043 043 

053 053 

054 054 
054 054 
250 250 


450 450 
3.10 ■ 3.1Q 
012 3.13 

113 013 

3.14 3.14 

471 578 


Brttnta 

Book taa rate 4 00 400 

CoUiwuer 5 Vb 400 

l-noatb iotoriMBk 6Vt 6 *b 

3-obbHi Wertonric £Vi 

A-mewlk MwrMifc 4h» Oht . 

lonurcn 7-40 753 

JFnwee 

tatemoBoande 3.15 3.15 

Cofl meant . 3¥is 3V* 

1-owaft taferflaot 31* 3M 

3-PMaWi totoitaolr 3U 3U 

fl motllti jWitiimlt 3V* 3V* 

IflWMT . ZB 542 

$oarcet Ueato^^BNomAen. Mfrrm 
Lynch, Bant ot T oKfO-M ihabishi. 
Conunerzoaot CiH*Lr>nnoB, 

®° W aja. PJ4 ergo 

Uxkh 35175 35370 —070 

1 r~1ni 35400 - 35305 -140 

Mow York 35370 355JW 4150 

' tL4 donors pcroonce. London otfktol 


315 115 | 

3Vu 3V*i 
31* 31* , 

3W 3U 
3V» 3V» I 

457 £42 ; 


® REPUBLIC NEW YORK CORPORATION 
SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDINGS S.A. 

Consolidated Statements of Condition 
and Summaries of Results 

These statements and summaries represent the consolidated accounts of Republic New York Corporation and its 
wholly owned subsidiaries and of Safra Republic Holdings S.A. and its wholly owned subsidiaries. Republic New 
York Corporation owns 49.1% of Safta Republic Holdings S.A.. which is accounted for by the equity method. 


REPUBLIC NEW YORK 
CORPORATION 

December 31. 


SAFRA REPUBLIC 
HOLDINGS S.A. 

December 31. 




1996 

1995 

1996 


1995 

Assets 



i in ihnusAmLs of USS 

L-vccpi jvr.shaic dotal 



Cash and due from banks 

S 

710.183 

5 675.683 

S 80.760 

S 

54.458 

Interest’ bearing deposits with banks 


5.909.195 

6.094.495 

6.U41.7 1 7 


6.058.483 

Precious mentis 


1.231.319 

J. 250.038 

— 


— 

Investment securities 


21.175.513 

16,238.545 

8.665.381 


7.351.100 

Trading account assets 


4.807.788 

4.035.606 

202.211 


155.172 

Federal fends sold and securities purchased 







under resale agreements 


2.ltiy.l09 

1. 749.268 

— 


— 

Loans, net of unearned income 


11.721.936 

9.843.9h0 

1.687.050 


1,443.803 

Allowance for possible credit losses 


( 350.358 1 

(300.5931 

(131,0711 


(130.3001 

Other assets 


4.984.166 

4.294.552 

677.361 


727.828 

Total assets 

S 52.298.851 

5 43.881 554 

$ 17.223.409 

s 

15.660.544 

Liabilities 

— 




— 


Total deposits 

$ 

3 1 .725.579 

S 24.9iy.633 

S 13537.947 

s 

1 1 .347,60 1 

Trading account liabilities 


4.402.085 

3.719.651 

148.326 


79.245 

Short-term borrowings 


5.446.841 

3.890.768 

1501.304 


1587.300 

Other liabilities 


3.169.016 

4.382,143 

417.722 


1.003591 

Long-term debt 


1.498.710 

1555.111 

175.000 


175.000 


Subordinated long-term debt and perpetual capital notes 
Manditorily redeemable capital securities 

Shareholders' Equity 

Cumulative preferred stock 

Common stock and surplus, net of treasury shares . - . 

Retained earnings 

Net unrealized appreciation /depreciation) on 
securities available for sale, net of taxes 


2,400.000 

350.000 

555.800 


2.406.440 


575.000 


Total shareholders* equity 

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity. 


Book value per share 

Client portfolio assets held in custody 


Net income, for the year ended 

Net income per common share (primary) 

Average common shares outstanding (primary) 


777.47? 


871.306 


891.091 

888593 

1.918.880 


1. 636.2M 


649.705 

566.292 

54.467 


(74.762) 


102.314 

13.222 

3.306.620 


3.007.808 


1.643.110 

1.467.807 

S 52.298.851 

$ 43.881554 

$ 17.223.409 

S 15.660544 

S 50.01 

$ 

43.24 

S 

S 1 

93.13 

11.064.678 

$ 83.46 

S 6.883.45 7 

S 4 18.840 

$ 

:ss.fri9 

s 

189.830 

S 162.104 

S b.97 

S 

4.66 

s 

10.78 

S 9.16 

55595 


54.060 


17.609 

17.692 


and cto&wpdcass New rork i 
(Febj 

Souke footers. 


Risk-Bused Capital Ratios 

As of December 31. 1996, Republic New York Corporation's risk-bused core capital ratio wax M.05<r (estimated) and 
total qualifying capital ratio was 23.75% (.estimated ). The ratios include the assets, risk-weighted in accordance with the 
requirements of the Federal Reserve Board specifically applied to Republic New York Corporation on u fully consoli- 
dated basis, and capital of Safra Republic Holdings S.A. Total consolidated assets under these requirements exceeded 
US$ 65 billion and total consolidated capital, including minority’ interest and subordinated debt, exceeded USS 6 billion. 

■ fc- - — - - — s 

Republic New York Corporation Safra Republic Holdings S.A. 

Fifth Avenue at 40th Sum >2. KniWard Rnyul 

N.. Yrwfc. Nrw Ywt I001R ^ L™*™* 

New York • Geneva * London * Beijing, • Beirut • Beverly Hills. • Buenos Aires • Cayman Islands • Copenhagen » Gibraltar • Guernsey 
Hong Kong * JaJuina * Los Angeles • Lugano • Luxembourg * Manila ■ Mexico City • Miami • Milan • Monte Carlo * Montevideo • Montreal 
Moscow • Nassau • Paris • Perth * Punta del Este • Rio de Janeiro • Santiago ■ Singapore * Sydney * Taipei ■ Tokyo ■ Toronto * Zurich 


--‘-/vr . • - •• :r. i* i ; 





PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 


** 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 



■ 

I The. Dow 

■ 30 Tear T-Bond Yield 1 



6100 


5500 ^— 

• Bfl 





67SSJJ7 


■prav*.. .% ... , 
Close Change 

S?26j 88 ^*057j 



■s&psaa- .■ J 

7G9.4S -. 7GT23 

•+G.29 


isspibo. - v 

75432. '-75 • 

+0.12 



• 4Q&S3- ' 40^04 

+0.12 

.SSTT 

Nasdaq Composite 134BJB6 1.338.40 

+6l28 

iftttEX/ ..■ 

.MaAal.V eftlb ■ 

58758 - 586.48 

+015 

■TttKWto. ■ ' 

Ttefeaoteoir • 

BfOifiB 60^i4 _ 

+0-63 

iss&s&r: 

Qovespa .■ 

7ffi57 Jab 76675.80 

-0.15 

««wo«*Y 

•a*a ' . 

* 3701-38 3709.66. 

^>-22 

Buenos JWresMerva^ ‘ . 

; 686.04 ,691.73 

-0.82 

Satrttego.-- 

{pSA Gonwaf ' 

' 5 &&S4 &G3.B3 

-028 

•Caw^a» . ■ * 


6396.96 6388.43 

+ai3 


Kodak Posts 22% Profit Gain 

Firm to Trim 4,000 Jobs, Mostly Outside U.S. 


C.**pMtnt'hr Suf Frew Duputatn 

ROCHESTER, New York — 
Eastman Kodak Co. said Thursday 
iis founh-quaiter profit from op- 
erations rose 22 percent, bearing 
Wall Street expectations, and the 
company raised its quarterly di- 
vidend for the first time in eight 
years, sending its shares sharply 
higher in late trading. 

The world’s largest photo- 
graphy company also said it would 
cut 4,000 jobs worldwide, most of 
them outside the United States, to 
consolidate its operations in its 
growing stable of photographic 
laboratories. 

Kodak said profit from operations 
rose to S395 million in the fourth 
quarter as sales rose 5.4 percent, to 


$4.3 1 billion. The dividend increase 
of 10 percent, or 4 cents a share, to 
44 cents, will be payable April 1 to 
shares of record March 3. 

“Clearly die decision to in- 
crease the cash dividend on our 
stock is a reflection of our con- 
fidence in Kodak's ability to con- 
tinue to deliver improved results," 
George Fisher. Kodak’s chairman 
and chief executive, said. 

The job cuts will take place in 
the next 12 to 1 8 months, a spokes- 
man said Kodak had 96.000 em- 
yees at the end of 1 995. 
tome of die cuts will come in 
offices that supported a recently 
sold portion of Kodak ’s copier busi- 
ness or the health and household- 
goods businesses that Kodak sold 


two years ago. the company said 
Net income in the latest quarter 
was $ 1 64 million, down 40 percent 
from a year earlier, as a loss at 
Kodak's imaging business and a 


$265 million restructuring charge 
‘ " by $277 


ploye 


were only partly offset 
million earned from discontinued 
operations. 

Kodak took a charge of $252 
million for the sale of the sales, 
marketing and service portion of 
its copier business last year to 
Danka Business Systems of Bri- 
tain. About 1 0,000 workers will be 
transferred to Danka as part of the 
transaction. 

Kodak shares closed in New 
York at $85.50, up $4.25. 

/ B loomberg , Reuters ) 


Profit Optimism Lifts 
Stocks to New Record 


[rack 


.♦1 



* l 


t () ]irho 


CaafiMlxQirSuffFretii Dvftmkn 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose to 
new highs Thursday on optimism 
about the outlook forcorporate earn- 
ings. though gains were tempered 
after remarks by a Federal Reserve 
Board governor sparked concern 
that interest rates were poised to rise 
if the economy sped ahead. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 

rose 38.49 points to a record 
6.76537, with advancing issues out- 


pacing dec liners by a 13- to- 1 1 ratio 
" ‘ kSt 


Source; Bloomberg. Reuters 


IntenuiKKul HeraldTntvoe 


Resuscitator of a Retailer Resigns 


Very briefly: 


By Jennifer Steinhauer 

Sen- Kirk Tunes Service 


Strong Revenue Lifts GE Profit 

FAIR FIELD . Connecticut (Bloomberg) — Genera] Elec- 
tric Co. said Thursday its fourth-quarter earnings rose 11 
percent on double-digit revenue growth at its NBC. GE 
Capital and appliance and power-system divisions. 

Earnings rose to a record $2.07 billion, or $1.26 a share, 
from $1.87 billion, or $1.12 a share, in the fourth quarter of 
1995, matching analysts' expectations. Revenue rose 16 per- 
cent. to a record $22.99 billion from $19.75 billion. 


Morgan Stanley Reorganizes 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — Morgan Stanley Group Inc. re- 
organized its businesses into two main business areas: securities 
and asset management. It said Thursday the move reflected the 
increasingly integrated nature of its global businesses. 

The securities business will include the equity, fixed- 
income and investment-banking divisions. The asset-man- 
agement business will include Morgan Stanley Asset Man- 
agement. Miller Anderson & Sherrend. Van Kampen Amer- 
ican Capital. Private Client Services. Merchant Banking and 
Morgan Stanley Services. 

• Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp., the largest U.S. health- 
care provider. agreed to buy Value Health Inc- a supplier of 
specialized health-care services, for $13 billion. 

• Digital Equipment Corp.'s profit fell to $3 1.9 million from 
$148.8 million a year earlier, but the decline was smaller than 
had been expected. 

• Tandy Corp.’s largest individual shareholder. Jesse 
Upchurch, resigned from die company’s board after being told 
he would not be renominated because of his criticism of 
Tandy’s chief executive, John Roach. 

• Mark Whitacre, the former Archer Daniels Midland Co. 

executive who worked as a government informant in a price- 
fixing investigation, was indicted on charges of having de- 
frauded ADM of more than $9 million. nyt. Bloomberg, ap 


NEW YORK — Allen Questrom, 
who took Federated Department 
Stores Inc. out of bankruptcy court 
and made it into the parent company 
of some of America’s most famous 
retail stores, said Thursday that he 
would step down as chairman and 
chief executive in May. 

He will be succeeded by James 
M. Zimmerman, Federated's pres- 
ident and chief operating officer. 

Analysts said they expected little 
change under Mr. Zwunennan- 
Mr. Questrom 's contract expires 
early in 1998. and he had hinted that 
he might leave before then. 


Mr. Questrom, whose career at 
Federated has spanned 30 years, be- 
came chairman and chief executive 
in February 1990 — two years after 
he resigned as deputy chairman to 
protest the acquisition of the com- 
pany by Campeau Corp. 

Mr. Questrom returned after Fed- 
erated riled for protection from its 
creditors under Chapter 1 1 of the 
Bankruptcy Code. He was charged 
with leading the Cincinnati toased 
retailer back to prosperity. 

Since then. Federated has bought 
RJL Macy & Co. and Broadway 
Stores Inc. The acquisition of Broad- 
way gave the company an important 
presence in California but left it with 
a debt burden that has put pressure 


on its earnings for several quarters. 

Federated’s department stores op- 
erate nationally under the names of 
BLoomingdaie's, The Bon Marche, 
Burdin es. Goldsmith's. Lazarus, 


Many's, Rich's and Stem's. 
“Havii 


iving done what 1 set out to do, 
the time now is right for me to 
leave." Mr. Questrom said. “This 
transition is something we have been 
planning for a great deal of time.'’ 
Federated's stock closed 75 cents 
lower at $30,875 in New York Stock . 
Exchange trading. 

“Certainly this was nothing that 
wasn’t expected," said Richard 
Church of Smith Barney Inc. “It 
just came a little sooner than we 
thought" 


on the New York Stock Exchange. 

The Standard & Poor's 500-stock 
index rose 235 points to 769.75, also 
a record. But the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond fell 14/32 in price to 
95 27/32, pushing the yield to 633 
percent up from 6.79 percent 
Bond prices reheated after 
Laurence Meyer, a Fed governor 
known for the accuracy of his eco- 
nomic forecasts, said inflation could 
accelerate — a wanting that often 
before has been a forerunner of Fed 
interest-rate increases. 

But drat backdrop, coupled with 
reports of robust profits from East- 
man Kodak and others, kept in- 
vestors sanguine about stocks' 
prospects in 1997. 

“f don't see any particular red 
flashing lights about inflation, al- 
though we need to keep an eye on 
labor costs,” said James R. Mar- 
garet, chief equity strategist at Rain- 
ier Capital Management. 

Profit growth of almost 15 percent 
among companies in the Dow in- 
dustrials helped the 30-stock index 
gain 26 percent last year. Few ana- 
lysts expected such robust growth at 
die start of 1996, and some investors 
say projections of 6J2 percent profit 
growth in 1997 may be too low. 

“Analysts are going to continue 
to underestimate how good profits 


are going to be." said 
ters,chief investment officers Mel- 
lon Private Asset Management. 

Analysis often fail to take into 

account productivity improvement 
and companies’ willingness to buy 
back stock, both of whicn boost 
results, he said. 

General Morors shares rose 'A to 
60%, and Raytheon gained \ n to 
4816. GM said it would sell its 
Hughes defense unit to Raytheon 
for $9.5 billion. Northrop Grum- 
man, which also bid for Hughes, 
rose % to 78. ■ 

Tommy Hilfiger rose 4 'r. to SO. 
The sportswear maker reached a 


U.S. STOCKS 


licensing arrangement under which 
Pepe Jeans London would distrib- 
ute Hilfiger products in Europe. 

Investors punished General Elec- 
tric, sending the shares down 1 •'/» to 

101V6 after the company reported an 
1 1 percent rise in earnings that only 
matched estimates. 

Digital Equipment shares rose 
2% to 36%. The computer maker 
reported a 79 percent chop in profit 
for its second quarter, but the results 
exceeded analysts’ forecasts. 

Telephone shares, whose di- 
vidends look less attractive as bond 
yields rise, fell along with banks. 
AT&T declined Vi to 38% in active 
trading. Bell Atlantic fell 2 to 66%, 
US Wes* dropped % to 34%, and 
BankAmerica slipped 1 % to 105%. 

Computer-industry shares got a 
boost from surprisingly strong 
profits at Sun Microsvstems. which 
rose 2 13/16 to 3 1 1/16. 

The Nasdaq composite index 
rose 6.93 points to 1340.46, about 
six points under the high it set Tues- 
day. f Bloomberg . AP. Reuters ) 





■ ■ .f-* 

• rr. - 


■ t - 1 . --- 




Dollar Rises Against Mark Amid Talk of German Rate Cut t 


LVxrdni hy Oar Sitf Frew DupoeArs 

NEW YORK — The dollar gained 
against other most major currencies 
Thursday, especially the Deutsche 
mark, after a top Bundesbank official 
indicated that the German central 
bank would consider cutting interest 
rales and said the mark's recent de- 
cline had not made it weak. 

‘ ’The allusion 10 a rate cut and the 
statement about the mark not being 


weak got the dollar going higher.’’ 


said Matthew Robertson of Neuber- 
ger & Berman. 

Hans-Juergen Knipp. a Bundes- 


bank council member, said it would 
be '‘nonsense" to consider the 
mark's current rate as “weakness." 

Given that the dollar has risen 9 
percent against the mark in the past 
year, traders bought dollars after his 
comments. 

Mr. Krupp also suggested that 
Germany’s sluggish economy 
might prompt a rale cut. which 
would make German deposits and 
bonds less attractive. In addition, the 
recent rise of unemployment in Ger- 
many to a postwar high "cannot be 
viewed with indifference by mon- 


etary policy," he said. The dollar 
ended at 1.5945 DM, up from 
1 3860 DM on Wednesday. 

Speculation that the Bank of Ja- 
pan was purchasing yen restrained 


ceatly. Prime Minister Ryutaro Ha- 
shimoto said the government would 
“take appropriate steps'* if cur- 
rency markets proved too volatile, 
the Jiji Tsushin-Sha news agency 


0.4 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


the dollar against that currency. The 
dollar was at 116.625 yen. down 
from 1 16.875 yen. 

Traders worried that Tokyo was 
ready to brake what senior officials 
have described as an "excessive" 
decline in the value of the yen re- 


ruh the U3. economy showing 
strong growth while Germany and 
Japan struggle, the dollar has room to 
rise further, investors said. The US. 
economy is picking up steam after 
growing at a 2.1 percent annual rate in 
the third quarter, analysts say, while 
Germany's economy expanded 1.4 
percent last year and Japan’s grew at a 


rate in the third quarter. 
.S. economic strength is the 
factor keeping the dollar’s trend in 
place,’ ' Chris Iggo of Barclays Bank 
said. 

• Against otter major currencies, 
the dollar rose to 13767 Swiss francs 
from 1.3416 francs and to 53795 
French francs from 53575 francs. 

The poand fell to $1.6795 from 
$L6835. Britain reported an infla- 
tion rate of 3.1 percent, down from 
33 percent, reducing the likelihood 
of an immediate cut in interest 
rales. (BloombergJdtjrkei News) 


„ t 


r s!.l> ' i t X k 




AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 




Thursday’s 4 p.m. Close 

The top 300 mast-active shares, 
up to the dung on Wad Stoat. 
The AaaoaaHU Pirns 


Sam High Lovr Latest Ow 


Sotos HUte Law Latest Owe 


100 

«Vj 

4 Vl 

370 

18 % 

17 % 

jl a 

4 

3 % 

Krtfl 

3 

7 % 

1 H 

uto 

11 

« 

T 7 to 

16 % 

94 

16 % 

18 % 

439 

tel# 

» 4 # 

M 

6 % 

6 %. 

471 

Uto 

13 % 

SI 3 

lito 

lSto 

TOO 

7 to 

/to 

304 

8 to 


1730 

n% 

Uto 

1 W 

Mto 

M 

147 

9 

»to 

El 

5 to 

9 >to. 

5 % 

9 % 

hi] 

Uto 

l»to 

TO 

'to# 

V- 1 

337 

4 % 

k:.: 

6440 

7 % 

4 % 

OS 

1 % 

ito 

SSI 

Ito 

w. 

L» 

a 

27 % 

an 

204 

ito 

16 % 


too 

2*4 

s 

641 

95 

19 

18 % 


’to# ♦ 

7 * *% 
6% -to 
*to 


M, 

M% 

«£v 

71 k 

0% 


+% 
+ % 
‘H 


M — 1 * 

% Ifc 
ift r 


3? 

— 

♦ to 

• £ 
-%» 


say 42V a? 
112 3 % 3 

150 3 * 3 % 

1*50 4 5 % 

105 3 % 3 

- silk soy. 



§ rsr 



a 

7M 

445 

IBM 


an. — 1 * 

4tk AVu —Xu 

13% 14 ♦ *. 

im IMS —to 
avk +% 
64fc l«ii ♦ %# 
Ito* I to* —Xu 
law u% 

S 3% -% 

.2% »* —to. 

111 k 17 *to 

£ .6 
% :fc 

*y> »vw * Vu 

Ito Ito* + %i 
6 % ilk Tl'M 
‘Vi# •%, —to 
9V. 9V, — Mi 

9% 9% — Vm 

111 k 12 + to 

6% 6% _ 
S'* 311 — V, 

3 ™ — k 
Ito 7to 


»u 

282 

IBS ,9*i 

172 12 

105 Wu 

fj 31k 

874 XV 

tv, tv r*u — *»» 
nv, m, zn» _ 
lov* id 10 — w 

Ik to K — 
I9n W* )Vr, —Xu 

Mk AM 4 ¥h - V„ 

S V|. to + ‘A. 

r»v n. 7*1 -v* 

m 10 Vk lOto 1014 *to 

461 17 11 llto *1k 

m, no ito 11 * -'*♦ 

1*8 4to m 4lfo tto 

95 TVS 7 to 77 A — v. 

1604 18*1 lito lSto *to 

ns Bto Tto m -to 

W Jto J*. 3 


FI 

33% 

32% 


tPto. 

V*u 

t J 

9 

8% 

sa 

11% 

11 

msz 

14 

«!» 

1U 

32% 

32% 

2234 

3*to 

31% 

147 

Tu 

3% 

1685 

3% 

3 

SO 

6 

5% 

IM 

1IH 

77% 

623 

10 

9% 

338 

3to 

3V#, 

125 

7 

Wu 

as 

2Vi# 

2 

213 

Mto 

13% 

■tm 

37% 

36 to 

447 

34% 

31% 

2S8 

l»to 

17% 

34T 

17% 

12 

133 

3% 

3Hu 

1424 

14% 

Mto 

220 

«• 

to 

148 

I'Vi# 

1% 

IS7 

16% 

16% 

MU 

4>V« 

4Wu 

146 

9% 

9% 

283 

IBto 

16% 

144 

tfi 

6% 

5087 

■toi 

% 

15991 

Vro 


MHO 

4V. 

3% 

2033 

39% 

39% 

382 

3% 

3fA. 

111 

t'fi# 

1 

113 

•Vu 

% 

Ml 

ten 

tej* 

6142 

2<Vit 

z% 

tsw 

19 

10% 

228 

9% 

8% 

139 

1*1. 

V f. 

28*9 

17V. 

16% 

539 

M 

9% 

W 

m 

27% 

1281 

a% 

a% 

461 

3% 

». 

1609 

6W. 

6% 

144 

'Xu 

% 

234 

12% 

12% 

w 

«1# 

■*1. 


£14 t to 

1 

llto 


5to 


?to -to 
314 *to 
ift —Vi# 
T/n ‘to, 


-to 
♦ to 


Kh 


ito -v u 


®to _»i# 


ito -to 
■to. ‘to, 
to* . 
3 to —to 
19V. ‘to 
3to# 

1'i. ->fH 
■to# ‘V|# 
4«* *Vu 

m 


«u *to 

a vs? 

Tto -to 
27to ♦I* 


-K 

-»u 

-to 


4to •». 
Ito • to 
24to —to 
10*. —to 
ion »to 
2W« —14 
av. 4 V,# 
av. —to 
5 -x„ 

is *to 
?to — to 
321* -Ito 
13to * to 


Indexes 
Dow Jones 


Low Lost Og. 


Indus £756-52 <28151 871SJ2 474SJ2 
TrtklS 2302 JJ 221X47 22*7 J* 7311 Ji ‘£43 
UW 231M 23854 23493 TO 31 -£31 
Como 71(042 aiQUM W94JJQ 210479 >9J4 


Standard & Poore 


,& = 


industrials 
Trartsp. 
unmes 
Finance 
SP 9 M 
SP 100 


High Law Ouse CBg. 
908.98 90057 90602 +437 
556.40 5 S 3 J 0 55457 + 0 .W 
2 Q 3 D 9 201-83 2025 B —056 
84-79 83.92 MM —051 
77 X 05 765 J 5 769.75 +255 
758.24 751-00 7 S 4 J 2 +052 


MHMSrrv 
M owtftoi 
MaxnTiPtin 
MaxmPw) 


% 


ML TTY n 


2«Jg -VS. 

Ito I 
12to -Ito 
31 —to 


NYSE 


Low Lost On. 


Composite 

Industries 

Trmoi 

UfiEty 

Ftaonee 


40240 404.17 406.12 ‘158 
514-47 511J0 513.79 ‘2LB 
361.96 360.00 360,13 
267 JS 244-53 26151 -1J7 
36253 15980 36140 -051 


Nasdaq 


% 


Law Last aw- 


Canpaih 

mdu^nab 

Banks 


Finonce 

Transit. 


I346J0 1337.90 U4048 
US1J3 114749 114*58 
130758 130357 1X7-66 
140.14 144136 1*4579 
162455 1621.19 182134 
9I45S SnOJO 91+45 


*655 

*558 

♦2*9 

*135 

.(LSI 

*346 


AMEX 


Nartck 

NJPotnl 

MfWtoms 


Wgh Low Lad OS- 
58855 34447 54736 *058 

Daw Jones Bond 


MS 

wmnfcn 


U 2 4 

58 % 

as Tv. 


AS 

JOB 23 to 
511 26 to 
9* 171k 
600 64 to 

S lto 

rv# 
2XS 7to 
406 3 to 
254 J>v„ 
840 18 

502 4 Wi» 
zm Sto 
81 S lito 
» into 


‘‘‘k 

1 


20 Bonds 
10 Wattles 
10 Industrials 


Close 09 

10330 — nM 

10039 *<L01 

10631 —aw 


Most Actives 




NYSE 


VoL Keb 

Lon 

Late 

a®. 

IrtGams 

78644 18 % 

16 % 

18 

♦ % 


57601 30 % 

28 % 

30 % 


TeOEsp 

54548 73 % 

73 % 

n h 


BoyNtw* 

55170 24 % 

n% 

24 to 

♦ to 

MaWrta 

48443 48 

67 % 

41 % 

‘i% 

oam 

48613 »% 

36 % 

36 % 

• «k 

vro+nn 

47540 22 % 

21 % 

23 

*i% 

AT&T 5 

46821 38 % 

38 

3 B% 

—to 

AmerOn 

42922 41 % 

J/% 

41 % 

* 3 to 

K men 

41888 11 % 

11 

11 

— H 

wolMari 

mn 23 % 

22 % 

23 % 


CoiHCAs 

39104 40 % 

38 % 

3 »% 


GnAMr 

35775 60 % 

99 % 

* 0 % 

4 % 

TeiMax 

35585 38 % 

38 % 

31 % 

-i»u 

SlJuoe 

35200 37 

35 % 

36 % 

—to 

Nasdaq 


VoL Web 

LM 

Lost 

aw. 

hosMici 

203341 31 to 

30 % 




I 644 Q 144 

142 %. 

> 42 % 


Alma 

91562 39 % 

35 % 




*2854 43 % 

41 % 



Venfrif* 

75517 21 

15 % 

20 


MkJtosi ts 

72740 87 % 

as 



Omjs 

72083 Mto 

15 % 

14 % 

+ % 

Of odes 

68056 

41 %. 

41 % 


AooteC 

60271 17 % 

16 % 

16 % 


DSC 

57258 21 % 

20 

21 % 

*i% 

Ascsnd 

54740 68 % 

65 % 

68 % 


WoritfOns 

SB 45 26 % 

25 % 

26 


ITS Rod! 5 

53117 70 % 


67 % 


GrertVJ 

50764 26 % 

34 % 

25 


Cocos 

•632 71 

69 % 

70 % 


AMEX 


VoL 

Low 

Late 

aw. 


■mto u 

13 % 

13 % 

*% 

HanwtB 

tstei 


Vo# 








U 505 6 Vu 

SVu 

6 % 


yo r 

izsas T7v* 

74 to 

mu 


XCLLW 

10983 V. 

% 





1683 35 % 

34 to 

34 to 

1 ^ 


OSS 22 

21 % 

22 




M 

TVu 


Ethofluy 

7360 «to 

6 % 

VTh 

♦ to* 


Jan. 16, 1997 

Wgn Low Close Chge Opint 


High Low Qose C 2 «e Octet 


Htgft Lan> Close Chge Opint 


High Low Oose ctqe opint 


Grains 


coMicaon 

5J300 hu nUrniUn- OOlkn POr buSWI 
Mir ft 27418 271* 27314 -MtHi 13 lJOt 
MOV 97 274 * 27011 273 % -Q 5 M 8 S 95 M 
JU 197 274 to 270*4 17 » - 4 Un%S 6^0 
SW 97 27 W* 25614 UBV, - 4 OTW 7,«3 
Dec 97 170 % 257 V> 25914 *aoi 39 J 30 
Ed. sides (LA. Werfs-soies 65.901 
WetfjOPWTirt 297562 m> 5538 


0MNG8JUKE CNCIM) 

llrODOfilkeOCnllM’lb. 

Mar97 BOTH 6030 8050 *055 21,914 

**trv97 8160 E250 B35D *055 5527 

J5T7 0650 8550 80) *0X5 150 

Seo97 8975 8855 B35 +053 673 

Est. sties HA, Werfs. sales 1913 
WKftoMftint 29719 IB) 4G 


Metals 


SOYBEAN MEAL KZOn 
WO rons- dolor# oer ten 

JW 97 24230 24 DJ 7 J 30.10 +IJ 0 4522 

Merf 7 235.40 ZXUO 2HX + 0 J 0 38554 

MOy 97 23250 ZKL 20 23230 +050 23379 

All 97 22200 729 JO 731.90 +150 17,044 

*47977 25-00 22170 228.70 *070 3.140 

Sec 97 2 ZL 50 22050 22150 2529 

Est.scte HA tote's. ante 25504 
WRfsoowrt 80399 up 653 


60LD04CMX) 

100 trarte*- daOort pwtiova. 

0*97 35130 *116 )U 

ft* 97 35650 353.10 13X0 +1J0 92746 

Mo-97 35550 +1J0 

Aorf7 35820 35450 35650 +150 31.702 

A*l 97 MM 35809 359.10 +1JQ 16,90 

Atia97 36L10 361.10 36150 +L90 6584 

00 97 . 363.90 +150 1032 

Dw:97 36770 36570 36653 +150 15535 

Ed- salat NA. WetTs-sctot 52549 
WBdYiannM 2D3533 0 « 494 


SOYBEAN OB-tCBOT) 
town as- rteiten Btr too tev 
Ate 97 2451 24.12 K27 —818 1967 

MCT97 3477 265} 3455 -4122 51.333 

MOT 97 2108 2476 3491 -0.18 17524 

Ail 97 2138 2108 2123 -117 13JB3 

Aug 97 2550 2551 2S34 -0.16 2528 

Set) 97 2555 2SJ3 2553 -0.16 2597 

ESLSDte NA WKfs sates 21,103 
Wetrsacentet 93533 oK 254 


SOYBEANS (awn 

LOUD buntntemm- (Men par bushel 

Ate 97 758 IJPm 7ATYt *010 2.124 

Mtr97 75i» 751 to 758% *10214 79,90 
May 97 7 MV, 7JB* 7 M +003 JU39 
All 97 7 JV/i 751 758 *aar* 30^S 

*LC 97 753 Hr 7J6to 753 +OC3to 4J99 
EsLsate NA vim's, sate 745 
Wed's eoenM 155.925 uc 2BS7 


HI GRAOe coppei (NOtX) 
i^riM a#, cants pe a, 

Jen 97 109 JO 108X0 10850 -890 

Ft* 97 10840 iaU3 W7 M -LW 

Mar 97 10800 10125 10180 -1.10 

ABrt7 10170 103J0 10L10 -1X0 

Mav97 ltaOS 10120 BX70 -030 

Am 97 101 JO -OJt 

M97 10150 MM5 lOtUO -470 

Aim 97 . 9950 -0J0 

Set. 97 mao 9950 99.10 -0J0 

EsLStfcs NA WKfS-sote 5539 
toM-s open Ini 54331 op IS 


14-YEA R FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 
FF5Oa000-ptso4 lOOpcf 
Mar 9713QA6 T3OJ30 13052 +05012X285 
Jlte 97 129.24 12870 12972 +050 10340 
Sep 97 127.26 127 JOB 127S2 +440 J9J 
Dec 97 9LT. N.T. 9888 +430 0 

EsL «hte»e: 231.724 . Open inL;l 3W1 6 Bp 
2,147. 

■TMJAN MVERNMEKT BOND (UFFE3 
rTLZOOmMcm-ptscflWxt 
M«97 1YIJ3S 13032 13L99 +837100345 

JW97 13080 13050 13042 +030 MW 

&L»te: 7M78 PteLsate: 65599 
Wav-Open ML: HOSTS up LIJ3 
BWO O OUARS ICMBO 
u ■man-tea of NO ad. 

Feb 97 94430 94500 944W 12543 

Alir97 W530 94340 04360 -» 400745 

Apr97 94330 942BB 94X0 -10 1JB4 

Am 97 94220 94 1C 94170 —20 363.946 

MerOO 93X0 73. J» 93X0 — 70 38 JU 

Am 00 93X0 91120 92.T40 -70 3S579 

Sep 00 91190 91070 91090 ~ 

Dec 00 91110 91990 93JJH1 

Est. tees NA Wed's, soles 351*45 
Wed'sssanW lUftlX ut> 3950 


’Zrzzr 


009/ 77.15 7865 769S *805 1379 

Dec 97 77.10 76A5 7496 —CUM 9.97B 

Mar 98 7800 77.90 77.93 -801 S21 

EsLsate NA Wars, sate 75C 
HWtcpenW 59555 up 377 
HEA 7 M 00 K. (NMBU 




30,979 

34772 


1637 

2X6 

25.962 

1X1 

6557 

768 

4X0 

607 

2*33 


BHTTtSH POUND (CMQO 
W5BP nauxK, » per pewna 
Mir 77 1J810 15708 15768 -41 37.348 

Ate 97 15760 1X16 16740 -30 2X5 

Sep 97 15700 -32 1*27 

Dec 97 15676 -14 7 

EstSdes NA Wtes.sdeS.856Z 
Wteswenk* 40567 up 917 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 


7iv* .to, 
8% -to 
J'M 

3% —Xu 
3% -to 
I7to *to 
a’v» * Vi# 
4to —to 
ms —in 
10 


Mk 


E3& 


Tto 


RecGotd 
BlS*T 
Pooera 
Scvcao g 


sctmti 

ScrvKo 

sneiidMd 

5ntein 

Sdtnet 

ecSosoai 


1W 2>Vi# 
lu ito 
1 M Mto 

87 27to 
2924 3% 

1076 22to 
IIS » to 
m 18to 
36/ Vi it 
ZB 10% 
>E6 




189 


Trading Activity 



Nasdaq 



NYSE 






a as* 



Close 


teww) 
□Wtoed 
Urtjwnoeu 
Total luies 

NewWteQ 
we* Lews 

1152 

1193 

873 

072 

220 

IB 

1283 

1287 

776 

3346 

*23 

20 

Ad I4KM 

Decfned 

Dnctxyvxi 

Nrwl SS* 
New Lows 

ms 

INS 

1704 

5724 

231 

66 

1930 

2136 

1667 

5723 

217 

75 

AMEX 



Market Sales 



Advcncea 

Detfoea 

Ltartranasd 
Total auitts 
New Kate 

OSM 

270 

2C 

187 

727 

9fW. 

265 

301 

179 

745 

NYSE 

Aimx 

Nasdaq 

Toter 

dose 

53134 

2209 

675L17 

Pie*. 

COM. 

636X0 

3103 

«i.ir 

New Laws 

10 

9 

tnmUSum. 



Dividends 

Cara posy 

Per Asrt 

Rec Pay 

Cowjwny 

Per Amf Rec Poy 


WHEAT (CSOT) 

SA0S bu mteimunt- (Mkrs pv butewl 
Mm 97 190to U2to 187% —883 28637 

Mov97 172% 166 171% — OJJlto 4966 

Ad 97 155V, 152 is -OXV.71J16 

Sap 97 156% lit 3S -0X1 1301 

Est.sote NA Wtes-sote 11JZ7 
WtesopenM 61,762 off 406 


SLVERtNCMX} 

UHNv ol- earns om tro» oc. 

-tan 97 471A *SJ 

Fab 97 <72-1 +£5 

Mo-97 4775 4645 4748 +55 

May 97 .481.0 4745 4745 +55 

Jilt 97 4865 4800 «S-1 t&5 

5epf7 4875 +S5 

0*097 4985 40U 6949- +57 

Jan 98 8977 +57 

Est. sate NA Wtes-sdes 14586 

tote’s open irv *35 02 off 436 


34 

2 

64307 

18321 

8712 

1945 

SJBB 

9 


48962 
■ WQ5 
35<7 
371 


Livestock 


CATTLE (OASQ 
41500 at- cento ear n. 

FetJ 97 45.90 6555 4572 -813 295W 

Ate97 6652 66.15 66JS -820 31,164 

An97 63JQ 6150 072 _ 1250 

Aw* 7 63JS 076 GAS *BM3 11.736 

Oo 97 6652 66-32 66.45 _ 7JG 

Dec 97 6815 St 37 6807 +80 U81 

Ed. sales ujm «6etfVscMs 15.104 
Wed's seen id 96421 up 645 


PIATBHM MMER) 

Mrov-at- daiites pw- nr« 

An 97 36070 +1AB 

Ate 97 30AO 3GO0 36L50 +L80 

Jut 97 367JM 36450 366.90 +LS0 

Dd77 369 JO +1J0 

Jan 91 37170 +1J# 

EsLsdes NA Wed's. sate 3,157 
WteBapenlnt 2SJ75 up 921 


30 

I9JM4 

Z9B 

un 

1476 


Previous 


5to 
12585 TTWm 
705 51IV m 
is *to 
211 Ito 
77B 2 


IRREGULAR 

Evergreen USA _ 009 -IS 

EveruwjnUniB _ 425 MS 

Source Cap Corp - .18 1-3! 


SHA Group 
BHCFfttd 


1-14 BHC Hnd 
1-16 Batoe Mm Gtte 

3-28 Burlington Mhn St 

CiGNAMi income 
Camivoj C0«Tl 
CotortoJGtB 
Coromu n lt Y Inv 
Coulter Caro 

Desert CommuiTtfr 
,3-3 Ewgrwi Bncp 
1-14 CMI mSi 


182 TV, 


STOCK 

Centennial Bncp _ Iff* 1-31 


INCREASED 


19 


I3to —to 
28% -to 

3 ^ 

Bto *to 

V* - 
Uto ‘to 


17 


Top5rra 

TtftPel 

TownCtv 

TWA 

Tnrsmrtn 

TroxMedn 

Tminch 

TteMea 

TvnvC 

USK5P 

uriBw 

unika 

IMmte 

UuHIl 

USBtowi 

USEtebs 

uscai 

VKAdMI 

Versor 

Vtosom 

vtafl 

VioCwtC 

VtStaGa 

Vitrortc 


VnWO 

»wiT 


Mto 

29 -to 
Ito -Vi, 

10to -to 

6to — 1 to 
14 

iato -% 
5 -to 
i*to -to 
12% * Vi 

lito -to 
Mto 

-to. 

5 *to 

L *V" 

5to -to 
14to -ito 
37to — % 
lito 

ito +to 
3* -to 
34% -to 

V« 

»u -to 
Ito. *Vi. 
17to 

IBto -to 
13to 

lOto -to 
lOtou ‘V. 
IStoK 
12to 
Wt, 

15to — 
1640 •% 

12% *v» 
I5 Vi# — »u 
12% »V W 
12 ‘Vi# 
ISV„ ‘to 


Algomo Centro) g 
Bancorp Conn 
Bryn Mawr Bade 
Costman Kodak 
FCNBCorp 
PFLCBanooro 
FsiNltmCarp 
KeyCorp 
Magna Group 
OppentwknerCap 
PPG Indus 
Roydiem Carp 
Tans Indust 


75 2-17 
705 1-91 
.78 2-3 
M 3-3 
■IS 1-24 
.12 I-Z7 
.16 1-30 
Jb 0-4 
25 2-15 
A5 1-31 
23 2-M 
.14 2-12 
.15 2-3 


2-14 

3-1 

*■1 


EverronSiffln?' 

GvergmSMln 


-■ Everorn SWln 
1-31 Psf «5An East 


SPEOAL 

OpenWmerCop _ .10 1-31 

REGULAR 

M R Cup _ Q .12 

Am Recreation Q JK5 3- IB 

Apogee Entwprts O J» 1-28 


2-J0 GTE Cp 
J-M Gtastenbunr Bk 
J-Jf IneOfipMtm 
J-10 bill Gome 

2- 28 Myers Indus 

3- 12 New Milted Sk 
3-12 Ogden C0TO 
2-28 Ply Gem IndusI 

Proctor Gemma 
_ SPfioncoro 
116 Sosquetenna Bnc 


S J>3 
X3 
S ,035 
Q 40 
M J7S75 
0 .11 
O .325 
Q .10 
Q -12 

- -05 

q J3 
M JJ5U 
M OM 
M JB22 
0 .15 

q -47 

_ 07 


M J&7 
0 SO 


Q SS 
Q JO 45 
Q J125 
0 .03 
0 AS 

a .os 
a 20 


1- 27 2-7 

2-1 2-14 

2- 13 2-18 

3- 10 4-1 

1-28 2-10 

2- 28 3-14 

3- Jfl 3-1+ 

1- 24 2-10 

2- 14 3-3 

2-28 3-31 
1-31 2-10 
1-15 1-16 
1-1S 1-16 
1-15 1-1* 

1- 31 2-7 

2- 30 4-1 

1*15 2-15 
2-20 2-28 
2-3 3-3 


FSDCR CATTLE (CMSU 
sumo Ox.- ceres per a. „ 

Jor 77 67,05 4840 69 AS *865 81» 

WOT 97 6877 6810 68J0 +053 7A73 

Apr 97 6895 fit* 68JS +850 MB 

MOV 97 6952 69J2 BJO +817 3550 

AM 97 7220 7155 72.10 +8U 1W1 

S®77 72.15 71 AS 72.87 +817 513 

Es. sates 3jn 2A4» 

WteiooenW 19574 up 255 


Ooae 

LONDON METALS 0J4EJ 
D olors par wattle ion 

|£!F ,, “l57?to 6 *15BQto 1586.00 1587A0 
Forward 1611.00 767800 16IROO 109M 

^Sro^^SS°22ttJ30 2447 JX) 
225080 22ST40 22S7A0 226800 


Mar 97 JS07 J671 J49I +7 

JunV7 JS50 J538 • JS34 +8 

See 97 J5BS JS73 7577 *9 

Dee 97 J624 7600 .7608. +W 

Est. sate NA Wed's, sotes 12.192 
wtesapteH mm mt tm 
GSWANMAKKtCMBtt 
1SUOO mu lu, spar mark 
Mcr 97 5331 A284 A297 -27 70404 

Ain 97 6344 JQ29 A337 —57 5^10 

gteW £m -27 1S75 

D*c97 5C4 -77 is 

EsLsaes NA Wtes.nte 26J30 

WecfsapenW 7X307-08 1597 
JAPANESEYEN (CMER) 

125 mlaonvwv Spot 100 yen 
Mot 97 .008667 JM5B9 JXB6U +26 78763 
Ate 97 A08775 JW705 J08774 +26 J M6 
S3»I7 ’ JOOB991 +34 354 

Est-seaes NA. Wea's.scte 12530 
Wtesapwimt 73.101 up zw 
SWISS RiANCtCMBO 
nsamvancs. * PMrtranc 
Mte97 J345 7290 73J3 —36 49,940 

Jun97 J38S 7364 7X3 WS1 

Sep 97 7456 — J6 \#n 

Estsote MA WteAMtes 16.123 

Warts opwiW 5X623 off 2055 
S-MONTH EUROMAKKOIFFE) 


9 63t +un 8223 SSy 
M«97 M54 96A9 . MA2 + OOl 2I7A8e 


HOGS-Uon (CMERt 
40AH a carta oer a. 

Feb 97 77 J0 76.W 7630 -130 12.906 

Ate 97 7657 7475 75 SI — I A3 9.901 

Ate 97 7925 7U5 7B.45 -847 8764 

AS 97 7165 7800 7835 +810 1456 

Aug 97 74A0 7150 7195 +810 1JB3 

00 97 6720 6600 66A7 —830 Mil 

EsLsate 8374 Wed's. sate S2B4 
wtesapantni 34J743 in <13 


as 

722a 2S 

Fwwort 7415A0 

Spot 593800 
SfWrt 598(200 
zinc 


700 J# 709% 
709 JB 71800 


710% 

719JJ0 


733800 7595JC 
243000 738500 


73BSOO 

739000 


Apr9 7 
Jun97 

s ep»7 

DmSV ftLTl 9iM 
Marta . 98B 96X7 

9632 9623 


a 


9M0J30 402500 
599000 607500 


603800 

608000 


^rward 111800 
HMi 


1097% tr05to 
1118% 112600 


1106% 

112700 


MM M23 96. 92 * <101 772 

9815 9620 9622 + 801 1862X7 
NH 9600 9604 +8a2 1-OJH7 

*610 1 42,777 
+ 002 108200 
+ 003 87,ni 

9SJX 95S7 St® +023 78501 

9526 MX7 9523 + 083 68198 
95X7 +004 39X97 

W.95 tans rcS 
+ 005 5X25 


Feb 97 71 JB 6905 69.92 -IJO 36081 

Mte97 69JD 6820 6838 — U4 24X57 

Ate 97 UiQ 6120 4131 -134 10354 

Harm SIM OM 62.43 —1.14 5X77 

Ate 97 <130 80LSO 6053 -104 5,9*3 

AS 97 «U5 5930 57X3 -899 3M 

AUB97 3923 -0.94 2.9*9 

S8P9» 6003 — OM 3205 

OCt 77 61J0 6020 60^3 -894 1A6B 

Nov 77 61 JO 61JQ 6858 -854 1284 

Est. Sates NA WertAsdes 47 M 
. Wed's open inf 104X31 up 2830 
UEHT 5WST CRUDE (NMER) 

IXOObbl.- doom par bbt. 

Fai97 2880 25X5 2522 -843 58769 

Mte97 2524 2420 24® -631 74X47 

Ate 77 3425 2*28 2L26 -851 38351 

Mnv97 24.15 2172 2321 -851 21036 

Ate® 2322 7124 2X17 -859 3MU 

AS 97 2295 2282 22X8 -CUSS 11566 

Augj? ZU8 2148 2134 -8X9 UX7I 

Sap 97 22.10 7190 21A4 -847 MX33 

M77 2U4 31^ 71X7 — ftX9 9276 

MW 97 21X9 21X1 31.13 -849 832 

Dec 97 21.12 3007 2882 -850 3UBI 

Ate 78 2805 2000 2856 -850 11X39 

toflO 19X5 19X5 I9J3 -850 890 

Btjdes NA WertL sates 148.161 
Warts nanirri 384X00 up 9843 
NATURAL SASCNMER) 

IM00 iron Wuto, i parrtsn blu 

Fit> 71 3XK 3395 1320 —291 36.126 

Mtr97 1159 2090 2090 —255 27, J© 

Ate 77 2X80 2J20 Ster) —350 14,925 

1280 tm -150 IL721 

Jun W 2034 2250 1250 -70 CL573 

AS 77 1270 2210 17H) —60 7733 

AU097 1245 1190 2205 —35 7.1B 

Sep 97 2210 iiBQ 2.IB -40 6004 

0097 1210 2195 1195 IS 7012 

Nw 97 2310 2290 20W IS 1«1 

D«97 2X35 2425 2X2S 7$4 

wars open w 1AMM8 up 777 
(MMBU 

42X00 0*4- cert# par art 
FSU97 6925 6800 6869 —816 24.727 

Mte97 69J0 6&JS 68L95 I nS Sjn 

MTV 7100 7025 70J0 I£a5 9^ ■ 

6990 70^ IflS 520# 

£-5 6700 6892 -865 40^ 

AS 97 6700 67.25 67.12 -865 2,121 

41039 

wetrsmanad 67057 up 2337 
BREHT4ML ORE) 

r j~ ^?^^ bC ^~ k)fe ° f, ' 000bgw<h 

FcD 97 23-71 ?? L 41 5759 n nc 1# » ■ 1 
0X1 ZUM aroll 

21-00 * 1,00 70X3 — 2X96 
i tSL50teK 41075. OpMilnt;l68768lip 


.*>*■ 






'.'••to. u px 


Oedfl 

MrtW 9500 9SX1 

Jwte9 9534 9S75 

Set#? 9+06 «400 

D0C99 9470 9463 

Ert sdis: 301X38 Rw. s*s 161871 
PiWLopgalnU L101J61 up 6X46 


Low Close Cligo Ophit 


Ftnendai 


r*o9T nsi nm <n» + 


JUB97 93X9 93.17 9136 


0.15 94462 
815 81336 


3-14 

1-27 2*7 

3-14 44 

2-0 3-7 

1-24 2-14 
1-31 3-14 
1-29 2-Zff 


PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

40X00 IBs.- carts Per a. _ ■ 

Fab 97 760S >475 7417 —1X8 1922 

MO-91 77. W 7502 75U -JJff J.tlJ 

MwW 77.90 7508 7i» -]JS 

Jut 97 76X5 75J0 78S 4*5 

Aut>97 7490 7X52 710 +832 

Etf.tees 2X65 WatflEdet 2X02 
HWsopertiffl 1210 UP W 


UST-BLL5 (CMBQ 

S^w’ , MM*' l S09’' M» -803 4744 

Jur 97 WT 9472 94W -402 1906 
t»fT MSS M37 MX2 -804 2M 
EsLsate NA 9Wtfs.SdB 7M 
vmdtapanint 14953 UD 9276 

jmiVEASURYtCBOn 
smtWtetn-oisS.aandjtertfl'pU , 

Mte 97 '.06-145 I05-X «6-fflS - 06 168782 
jun 97 105-31 105-225 185-2* - 06 7X30 

&.s*s NA WBrtLsde 3733 ■ 

Wed's 9t*i W 176X12 up 3157 


Sep97 93.16 9193 93.13 + 815 57J96 
9177 9204 +814 XU54 


D9C97 


D9« 

640199 

Jnn99 


si* ♦s- 13 a- 5 ” 

WJV TIM 874 +811 Z7097 
9ZW nsr me +S 11 njrn 
9167 9250 92X2 + 810 15X5B 

ng 9156 TZSt +810 7,990 

9U5 9252 92X9 +809 5X12 

WX8 92X1 92X1 + 0X8 SXW 

“ “ ' 8120 


2X16 
SASOIL0PB 

uA doBm par rneMc ton - Ms oflOO tans 

3! s 

SS” !Si!gi!gSrli 

a '»te. Open inf-- 



1X11 

427 

2X83 


3-5 KWiitfrqdMMllwtw 
48 sdg*9ADlbg pa r ole a Oi ted tow twds; 
2-12 BHM op m w iKU Wtort y. 1 Steal a roi od 


Food 


Stock ^ TaMes Explained 

Sdes figures or warns. Tteortr Wgte ond lows refled Hie prewtoua 53 wads dns Be cunrt 
woek, but ndtoekDesnocBn^dcv.McKaa^tgrstodi Addend sineiteEngto25peKMiinaoro 
ns b«i pdd Vw jwis Mglttow range aid dMdend ncahnni lerlhe new dods only. Untess 
dlmwfce noted, rates of (Mdonds me mnud dbburaanerts based on ■* MestdedonSm. 
a - Addend also extra fe). b - Grant role of dMdend pha stock dividend. 0 - Dquldotlng 
t*viden«L « - PE eraeads 99xld - cottod. d - new Teortr tow. dd - loss In Hie Wia months. 
e-drtfd«w dedored or paid In preceding 12 months, f- onriBOl rote, fnawsed on last 
dcdurofkm. g - dMdend in Canaan funds. sm#ctta 1 5% non-rowtene* to. 1- dMdond 
dedomf offer spBhipar slock dfuidend. l-dTrtfcnd pofd ft is ran-, omitted, deferred or no 
odton token at lotost dividend meeting, k - cfivWend dedored or paid IKS yen. an 
atxuRiulattve iswe wWi diutifends in ortearv a -onrant rote, iwhwd gn fast dectofflfton. 
n - new issue in the post 52 weeks. Hw ntgh-tow imge begins wWi the 5kOI Of trofflng. 


COCOA (NCSBl 

nmrtrlciara* leer tan 


1347 

IS2 

'108 

1375 

1391 

DU 

1390 

019 

1383 

1419 

MM 

1403 

IMS 

1414 

1820 


All 97 
Sen 97 

Dec 97 _ 

Est. idles 5M5 wafisoJo 
Wetfsopena 68589 up 668 


27XM 

lira 

nra 

7JBS 

8393 


HVR. TREASURY <0071 
IIBMD arto- prs 8 3»tes o» 108 pa 
Mte97 138-27 HM2 MB-03 - 39 327X16 
Ate 9710-45 107-16 W-ZT - 89 08)9 
Sip 97 ltR-06 — 09 180 

EsLstSes NA Wertls*s 82X20 
Wed's open ini 339715 up 5991 


>Vu 


nd - next day doflvefr. p - Wtlol dMdend. onnued rale unknown. P/E * pite-eo (rings rafc. 
IfuM 


amsecmsEj 

37X00 te- cert* oer t, __ . „ 

Mar 97 HUB 12105 m05 +0X5 22031 

MW?/ iaua usxo n?xs +i» 7xw 
AS 97 11600 11800 11700 +U0 3.148 
Sap 77 115JB 11400 114 10 +UD 2JS 
EsLuies Mini wartLSdn RU77 
W ed's o pen w 37X76 up 741 


US TREASURY BONDS {C807} 

(8 oo-jioaxoo-pti « )Mi ot leo oai 
MteW 111-27 110- 16 110-33 - 18 468360 
Ate 97 lll-W 109-01 EKM7 - 15 23018 
S0P9M1D-M 109-21 109-2$ ~ 13 $007 

Dec 97 110-10 189-08 .109-11 - It 8755 
EsLMte NA WertLSOte 348533 
WsrtsOPenW 497X08 of) 5551 


to 


i‘to# *to# 


q-doseiKnt mutueniind. r-dhtoenddedorod or paid in precedng 12 moidtito ptoiStock 
dMdend. s- stack sdfiL DMdend befllns w»i date at spDLsb- sales, t -dMdend paid in 
sladc (n proaeding 12 RMOtBi etelatotad cbs/i kM 8 an ex-dlvldend or B-dbMbuffen date, 
a - newfeariy high. »- trading hatted- H- in bankrapkr or rccerverswp or being icorgontad 
undent* Bflntowptey Act tejaeutfflesQ SBW gMt by sudiconip07ite&.»d-wticndt5t7i b*7 tad. 
wl - when bsuetV ww - wflh w urt ents. s - nc-dMdend or n-righB. »8s - ex-dismwiton. 
xw - wm«it wananto. r aniindend and sides in hrt. yld • 9W8 z - sales In fuR. 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 04CSO 
ITUDOte- cento oar b. „ , 

Ha 77 1179 UL56 1057 -&D5 68X06 

May 97 107* 10X5 1066 -80 31071 

Ad 97 1069 1051 Wil -0JU 2&7M 

oati 10X9 me tax? -os 15.9s? 

B9. sates 1IXH WertS. sales 8031 
wertsoatnu isdxm ad 9C 


GERMAN eOVERNMCKT BUHD IUFFE) 
DM2SMKI ■ sb Bf 160 art 
MW7 IBlS 101^101X3 +03B2B8W9 
JWI97 10007 10O08 10073 +033 £488 
EsLsAe 243X41 Prtv.safe* 208492 
230778 ap flS 


Jl... 

sas>99 

0OJ9 . 92X4 92X3 Ml 

Btaa: asm nef-aotes 62X66 
Pier. Cd« tefc 407X30 up 4051 

3-MONTH FtBOR CMAT1P) 

FF5 tndfaO - pt5 Of KO p<3 
Mar 97 9883 9879 9888 —Ml 78345 
Jim 97 9886 9882 9884 +4»«,990 
See 97 9883 9877 9880 +009 32*36 
Dec 97 9874 96 49 9872 +007 22X58 
Mar 98 9861 98SS 96X0 +002 14717 
Jun 98 96X3 9807 9842 +003 11087 
SOP 98 9821 9813 9818 +4U210512 
Dec 98 9896 9505 95X4 +003 %251 
Mar 99 95X6 95J6 95X6 +40311082 
Jun 99 .9508 9528 9838 +003 S521 
Sep 99 9SJ3 9SJTO 95.12 +005 2X0? 
DK 99 9483 9400 9404 +404 1031 
Est ntoac 62,739. Open hit: 244091 up 7. 
34MNTH EVMU AA OJFFSJ 
jj^nOdo^s ^^po ^ , + am WK 

M7J 9400 OH 9396 +902 64X16 

troW ,.9421 . 9420 9436 « 001 3830 

§557 94*3 9*3 «X0 +OOJ 34497 

138 £3 ft! S3 :S£ f§ 


* Slot* Indexes ' 

sag""** m 

tin’ll 

D8C97 79950 79156 793JD —IK « 
WBirSnanW 1970M off 1489 


FTMimOJFFE) 

123 OCT tBdex ortrt 


"iff 4, ff5 gJlO * SCO iirn 

E ts 


JBS7 

SW7 


"CfflCMATIn 

^"3^0 240^ ISHtliffl 


*» 24226 Tail VXrr 24 006 

Mar 97 la 1J SK 2^3 +1700 4955 

J«i 97 H3 |g«0+?7Jt» I87T6 

Sep 97 23950 2»S wo-9*] 7 - 00 ' LTn 
98 r$? ^92+1700 8326 


urns our cuffg 


CSMOB-Ph 8 33«a 84 100 act 

MOOT 111-08 09-25 llM* tfcZMaMS* 

JafT N.T. NT. IHtit IE? 327 


»«Se3! 128188. PwLlBles: 78U) 
PiSLCMsim: 147,981 up 5045 


‘ . Industrials 
COTTON 2 (HCTNJ 

h£& 7670 7485 . 74B -«* 23X66 
MOV 97 M» - 
AS97 77.15 


« N.T, N.T 5+SfTX Ivt’’ to' 4 * 
9. ™ teli «3.Qp»i»i|it6a2Z3tfp 

Commo ®y Indexes 



lilranito 




Nr ' 


*5 

'nba*.. 


'te i m ap rfi a M 


JUi —Q3S 18683 
7813 —0.13 J.771 


Moody's , 

gauare IX49.W 

gy. Futures ’ 1,90900 

CRB 149J4 

&&S0 ■ 24357 


X' 





C4 > | -88 





'•X 


-r*- ■ 

tvgp. . 

fUTHyt-pi- 


■:* 
— \i 

-4 




'r-' - 




** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 


RAGE 17 


I 


1 

1 a ?vu 


I 


.4 i 





Breakup 
Is on Track 
At Lonrho 

New Chief Affirms 
Support for Plan 

Bloomberg News 

LONDON — The new chief ex- 
ecutive of Lomho PLC said 
inursday he was committed to his 
predecessor’s plan to break, up the 
sprawling British conglomerate as 
ne reported that pretax profit fell bv 
more than half in 1996. 

Nicholas Morrell, who took over 
in October from the German prop- 
erty developer Dieter Bock, said he 
intended to cany out Mr. Bock’s 
plan to split off Lonrfao’s mining 
operations from its other businesses, 
which include hotels and African 
sugar farms. 

He said tafe were ‘ * progressing ’ * 
on the sale of Lonrho’s chain 0 f 10 
Princess luxury hotels, which it had 
wanted to complete by the end of 
last year, but he said concluding the 
deal was proving difficult. 

Analysts said they had hoped for 
a firm strategy from the company, 
whose stock price has fallen 23. per- 
cent since the news of Mr. Bock’s 
departure in October raised new 
questions about the breakup plan. 

Pretax profit for the year ended 
Sept. 30 slumped to £78 million 
($131 million) from £161 million a 
year earlier after Lonrho took an £87 
million charge on the sale of its 
Metropole hotel chain to Stakis PLC 
and £5 million in other charges for 
asset sales. Excluding the charges, 
Lonrho ’s pretax profit rose 13 per- 
cent, to £170 million. 

“Lonrho had a satisfactory year 
in many ways,” Mr. Morrell told 
shareholders. “Your board remains 
committed to the view that the best 
way of delivering maximum value 
for shareholders is to separate the 
mining and nonmining interests. 3 * 

Mr. Bock said in January 1996 
that be wanted to sell or spin off the 
hotels and other interests, leaving 
Lonrho purely a mining company. 
The stock initially rallied, but ir 
slipped back after Mr. Bock said in 
October he would sell his 18.4 per- 
cent Lonrho stake to Anglo Amer- 
ican Coro, for 180 pence a share, 
putting a limit on its perceived value 
in the market The shares closed 
Thursday at 124 pence, down 4.5. 


EU Sings Praises of, Japan’s Music Move 


Cr*”f*lnf by (hr SkrfAcm [tbpaLrln 

BRUSSELS — The European 

Commission on Thursday wel- 
cotoed a decision by Japan to ex- 
t*nd copyright protection to recor- 
wdmusic from the 1950s and 
1960s, signaling an imminent end 
to a long-running trade dispute. 

The commission said European 
musicians and recording companies 
stood to gain royalties erf as much as 
100 million European currency 
units ($122 million) a year from the " 
Japanese decision to extend copy- 
nght protection back 50 years. 

“This is a good day for the 
golden oldies,” said the EU trade 
commissioner. Sir Leon Brittan. 

The European Union is ready to 
withdraw a complaint over the issue 
in the World Trade Organization, 


he said, after a study of the Japanese 
reforms by EU legal specialists, if 
the European recording industry is 
satisfied with die reforms. 

The concession, approved by the 
Japanese Parliament at the end of 
•1996, ended a policy of 25-year 
copyright cover for sound record- 
ings and brought Japan into, line 
with the 50-year standard that the 
United States and the European 
Union had contended was required 
by world trade rules. 

Under the old Japanese policy, 
recordings from the ’50s and ’60s by 
the Berlin Philharmonic, the Rolling 
Stones, the Beaties, Edith Piaf and 
other popular and classical artists 
could have been compiled and sold 
without royalties. 

“The move by Japan is an im- 


portant development for the record- 
ing industry worldwide,” said Nic 
Garnett, director-general of JFPL 
the recording industry's internation- 
al association. After Japan refused 
to extend the copyright protection 
voluntarily, the European Commis- 
sion filed a complaint with the 
World Trade Organization last year 
seeking the change in Japan's $7.5 
billion-a-year recordings market, 
the second largest in the world. 

‘Tr's always a good deal for the 
industry when a copyright is ex- 
tended," said Phil Hardy, editor of 
the Financial Times Music & 
Copyright newsletter. 

Under the old rules, he said, 
“you could put together a com- 
pilation of Elvis Presley and sell it 
at newsstands.” It was usually 


smaller, independent companies 
that took advantage of the 25-year 
rule, he said. 

According to the newsletter, 
compact discs consisting of com- 
pilations of pre-197 1 music sold in 
Japan for the equivalent of S5 to 
510, while CDs of music protected 
by copyright sold for Si 9 to S29. 

The Japanese record industry as- 
sociation estimated that about 6 mil- 
lion such compilations of pre-1971 
recordings, valued at S48 million, 
were sold in Japan in 1995. 

The Recording Industry Asso- 
ciation of America put the total of 
lost sales at about $500 million, as 
a single compilation album could 
be a substitute for several original 
recordings, the newsletter said. 

(Bloomberg, AFPi 


Bundesbank Offers to Be a Model for Eurobank 


Ctm^tdt^OwSuBFnwDbpatckts 

FRANKFURT — The future 
European central bank should adopt 
a money-supply target as the best 
way of establishing its credibility, tire 
Bundesbank said Thursday, arguing 
for a continuation of its own policy as 
it said the initial phase of the planned 
European single currency would be 
‘‘difficult in any case.” 

In its January report, the German 
central bank said that when the Euro- 


for tire European Union’s new cur- 
rency, it would be operating in a 
“highly uncertain” environment 
The bank “ will not manage to 
handle such a situation without a pre- 
commitment to a convincing stability 
policy,” the Bundesbank said. The 


logical conclusion, ix said, was that 
“a monetary objective, whatever its 
detailed structure may be, should be 
included” in the European central 
bank's plan of operations. 

- The German central bank, which 
bases its own monetary policy on 
setting target ranges for growth in the 
money supply, said such a strategy 
would be the only way for the new 
central bank to gain credibility. 

The Bundesbank's current 
money-supply growth target is 
about 5 percent annually for 1997 
and 1998. It usually sets a target for 
a single year, but this time it set a 
two-year goal in anticipation of the 
launch of the single currency. 

The report said that “a pragmatic 
monetary strategy, adapted to the 


special features of the euro zone, 
seems important if one is to control, 
on the conceptual level, a start-up 
phase that will be difficult in any 
case” as the EU moves toward its 
goal of economic and monetary uni- 
on. 

The final decision on the policy 
approach would be a matter for tire 
future centra] bank itself. 

The bank is to start operations on 
the first day of existence for the new 
currency, the euro, scheduled for Jan. 
1, 1 999. The European Monetary In- 
stitute, the forerunner of the central 
bank, has not yet decided whether 
monetary policy should be based es- 
sentially on targets for growth in the 
money supply, as in Germany, or for 
inflation J as in Britain. 


Singapore Revises Offer on Telecom Trade 


Bloomberg News 

GENEVA — An agreement on 
global telecommunications trade 
drew nearer Thursday as Singapore 
submitted a revised offer to the 
World Trade Organization to open 
its market to competition, a month 
before a Feb. 15 deadline. 

That offer follows a new submis- 
sion from Bolivia and revised offers 
from Canada and Switzerland on 
Wednesday, the WTO said. 


A global accord would open trade 
and investment among about 50 
countries in tire $500 billion tele- 
communications market That op- 
portunity was missed in April, when 
talks collapsed amid U.S. objections 
to high international call charges 
and lack of access to satellite mar- 
kets, especially in Asia. Those is- 
sues remain high on the agenda. 

“International and satellite issues 
as well as other technical issues 


have been discussed in bilateral 
meetings between countries and by 
small groups,” said Nuch Nazeer, a 
spokesman for the WTO. 

U.S. representatives insisted in 
the last round of talks that Asian 
countries allow more foreign com- 
petition in their satellite markets for 
companies such as Hughes Elec- 
tronics. a unit of General Motors 
Corp., and Loral Space & Com- 
munications. 


j Investor’s Europe | 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

London Parts 

FTSE 100 Index CAC 40 


2950 

J 4500 

2500 


35C 

hr m 

m 


2® J 

4120 

J m , 

A / 

iSC jW 

m M 

\jTir m V 



m p 



2450 A S O N 

1996 

dj 3700 aso 

1997 1996 

NDJ IWU A SON 

1997 1996 

D J 
1997 

Exchange 

index 

Thursday 

Close 

Prev. % 

Close Change 

Amsterdam 

EOE 

669.55 

661.67 

+1.19 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

1.99&56 

2,005,37 

-0.34 

JFrankfwt 

DAX 

2^993^1 

2,988.45 

+0.16 

Copenhagen 

Stock Markat 

507.99 

506.54 

+029 

Helsinki 

H0( General 

2,70753 

2,68957 

+0.69 

Oslo 

OBX 

564.90 

560.40 

+0.80 

London 

FTSE 100 

4,197^0 

4,158.90 


Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

467^2 

482.56 * 

+1.03 

Milan 

MIBTEL 

12,0733X1 

11,878J» +1,64] 

Paris 

CAC 40 

2,407.77 

2,387.96 

+0^3 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

2,62&28 

2,615.66 

+0.48 

Vienna - 

ATX 

1.167^4 

1.169.36 

-0.12 

Zurich 

SPI 

2^68.85 

2,551.75 

+0.67 


Source: Tetekurs 


Iruemjjmul HnjWl Tnhun 


The institute has said that both 
approaches raise problems in meas- 
uring and understanding the beha- 
vior of the economy. 

On another point, the Bundes- 
bank's monthly report said the ap- 
preciation of the Deutsche mark 
against the dollar in the spring of 
1996 had not prevented an increase 
in Germany's trade surplus. 

Distortions on the foreign-ex- 
change market that occurred last 
spring “have now completely dis- 
appeared,” it said, but the strong 
rise in the mark at that time still 
weighed heavily on the competit- 
iveness of German exports, “espe- 
cially because, at the same time, 
high wage increases have affected 
business costs.' ' ( Reuiers, AFP ) 


Very briefly: 


More than 12 other countries 
have promised to submit new offers 
by the end of January, the WTO 
said. 

The European Commission said 
that it welcomed the new offers and 
that it was “now cautiously optim- 
istic” that an accord would be 
reached by Feb. 15. 

The next official WTO telecom- 
munications meeting will take place 
Jan. 31. 


• Roche Holding AG’s 1996 sales rose ! 1 percent, to 15.96 
billion Swiss francs (S 11 .62 billion); the drug company said it 
was helped by a weakening franc and that it expected profit to 
rise in 1997 for the 1 1th consecutive year. 

• Thyssen Stahl AG, Germany's largest steelmaker, said net 
profit fell to (74 million Deutsche marks (S 108.9 million) in 
the year ended Sept. 30 from a record 65 1 million DM the year 
before, as demand and prices dropped. 

• Havas SA’s shares rose 1 1 French francs (.52.04) to 400.80 
amid speculation that the media company would buy the 26 
percent of the publisher CEP Communication that it did not 
already own. CEP’s shares, which have risen 9 percent so far 
this year, were suspended Tuesday at 400 francs. 

• Scottish Amicable plans to float shares on the London 
Stock Exchange in three to five years; the insurer said it would 
pay policyholders an initial special bonus of £75 million 
($125.9 million) after giving up its mutual status May 1. 

• Olivetti SpA disclosed a gain of 573 billion lire ($37.2 
million) from the sale of a stake in Acorn Computer Group 
PLC as die shares, sold in June 1996 to Lehman Brothers 
International Europe, were resold in the market. 

• Mo & Domsjoe AB, a Swedish forestry company, said it did 
not think it would be possible to raise pulp prices until the 
second quarter. 

• Fortis AG plans to issue shares now valued at about 17 billion 
Belgian francs ($5183 million) next month to help pay for 
expansion, including its recent purchase of MeesPierson NV 
from ABN-AMRO Holding NV. 

• Banco Espanol de Credito SA's 1996 net profit jumped 19 
percent, to 24.6 billion pesetas ($184.2 million), as surging 
securities trading made up for a drop in lending. 

• Safra Republic Holdings SA, the Luxembourg-based par- 
ent company of Republic Bank New York, said 1996 net 
income rose 1 7 percent, to $ 1 89.8 million. Bloomberg. Reuters 


\ 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


ThtvsdaftJaRklS. . 

Prices In local currencies. 

TbMuhs ‘ ' 

Ugh Law Oa» Pm. 


Amsterdam »e 


ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
AhoM 
AkZOHaOd 
Boon Co. 

Boto Wesson 
n CSMcw 
“ Dented* Pit 
DSM 
Elsevier 
ForttaAmn 
Getronics 
G-aycv o 

hSmAh^ 

Hoomemevo 
Hw? Doughs 
INC Group 
KLM 

KMPBT 

KPN 

NedtadGp 

HuWdo 

OceGrWefi 

PMMEfcc 


IHdQ 

riil in — 

Kooecu 
Rodomeo 
HOB n» 
Rormrto 
RoyM Dutch 
UNtomcw 
Vends Ml 
VNU 

Wottea Kl cm 


UUO 
IMS) 
107 JO 
247.20 
82 
32 
97 70 
33X30 
171 JO 
28 
W-S0 
56 
57 JB 
14BJ0 
30370 
7030 
127 JO 
MM 
48.10 
3730 
65JO 
55 
MB 
19938 
77-50 
SIM 
13630 
1*50 
5030 
155X0 
107 JB 
31X70 
312 
KL40 
37 JO 
22650 


11739 11 BAB 
hub mao 
10630 W730 
Mi 24188 
7030 81.22 
31.10 3U0 
95L80 *730 
32 9 331.60 
16930 170 

2 MB 2730 

&4.1Q 6610 
5210 5530 
5470 5730 
14450 M420 

300.10 30230 
MSB 7030 

121 T2Sl5B 
6678 69 

4730 48 

343 3730 
6440 65 

5040 3490 
262 265.10 
1*7150 197.90 
73.90 77.40 
8030 0130 
13410 135 

14770 148 

5030 5070 
15530 1SSSO 

107.10 107.10 
309.40 31230 
309.50 31070 

79J0 79 JO 
.37 3ZJD 

217.10 22650 


Bangkok 

Adv Infos vc 
Bangkok BkF 
ttungThnl Bk 
PTTExptor 
SionCemrtP 
Siam Com BkHF 
Trtenwtasfo 
Thai Alnravft 

Thai Form BkF 

UtdConua 



SSTtedeE 82237 


Prmtonc 82&31 

244 

233 

232 

M4 

25A 

746 

356 

346 

55 

JJ 

52 

» 

306 

MV 

384 

386 

888 

m 

880 

832 

1*1 

1W 

3*0 

188 

53 

51 

5130 

52 

3375 

37 

3775 

3830 

176 

167 

176 

166 

173 

MS 

173 

170 


Bombay 

BoMAiim 

lHUmusI Lever 

7 hhkJusJ PotVn 

rod Dev Bk 

rrc 


Reflonoelnd 
Stale Bklitdlo 
srort Authority 
Tata Eng Loot 


1003 

91025 

380 

11150 

432.75 

274 

273 

320 

27 

3*0 


Brussels 

Abnanij 

Baras te a 

BBC 

Betaelt 

C8R 

CNF 

Catapo 

CnOKffl 

Cctfvyt 

Defoo&elJM 

Etactiubrt 

EtoctraOnc 

Form aG 

r£ oert 

GIB 

GBL 

GmBanque 

XiBdMtatmk 

Peteotoa 


50CGMI 
Satay 
TiadeM 
UCB 

l/nton Witter 


■W 

70M 

18900 

3290 

528 

118 

13800 

2070 

7800 

3108 

5630 

2370 

1515 

4430 

11850 

10075 

11300 

4740 

7090 

2525 

WW 

14700 

*0600 

ZDS 


Copenhagen 


BGBwk 

CartSMtgB 


* 


FL5 lad 8 
KobUjfltwvn* 
MvoMonBskS 
ScnhuiBcrB 
T3eDawi*B 


Frankfurt 


AMBB 

mm 

AMamHdg 

ajw» 

BkBMfa 

BASF 


- ; High Kata'* Ota*^ Pfirir. 


669JS 

<6147 

11740 
11240 
10670 
247 JO 

7540 
31 JO 
9540 


6240 6143 
04 83 

BMW - ml* 1000 

Gomueabonk 4X75 4345 
DaknitrBeat : . 1UH 714 
Osama 717 JO 71250 

Dentate Saak 7X70 78 

Dwt Telekom 3045 3040 
mariner Bank fijs 51.15 
FmeobB - • ' HI 313 
ResmknMeri 144 13830 


Fried. Kropp 
Gete 
HefafefbgZmt 
HenWr" 


13 

2740 
M.10 
5230 
55.40 
14670 
30X90 
69 JO 
120 
6740 
4760 
3650 
6440 
5040 
26X50 
19840 
74J8 
6266 
13550 

147.10 
S0JD 
15490 

107 
309 JO 

311.10 

80 

KM 

21740 


HoetMt 

Kaasartt 

ltade 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mamsaann 


240 246 

110 109.70 
12950 12850 
8850 8540 
-6540 6X60 
MTS 6843 
4W 483 
1059 1050 

2225 21 TO 
-4D7 403 

66230 65X50 


NtataflgeieSsttiafl 3371 3170 
Mans . - : . . 1H 1214® 

Munch Rued R 3690 3640 

Praam - 391 3® 

RWE 70 6840 

SAP pH .22640 72XK, 
Setertag 13920 137.ro 
Siemens 77X0 772® 

28450 281 

9455 9X90 
509 505 

665 66150 
721 71* 


sr 

vew 


6220 
KUO 
1086 
4345 
nsM 
71750 
7847 
3075 
51.15 
321 
14150 
24750 
109.90 
129 
06.10 
64 
W3B 
487 
1053 
2143 
405 
65450 
3X21 
12230 
. 3*® 
38850 
6640 
22540 
13840 
7745 
284 
9440 
50650 
. 664 
728 


6275 
8X20 
1100 
42.90 
V&SO 
712 
7640 
3045 
5030 
320 
136 
247 
10690 
129 
85.15 
6350 
7045 
496 
1045 
71 JO 
403 
64*50 
XL30 
ra 

3644 

392 

6040 

225 

wn 

7745 

28R50 

9440 

WJ 

66BJ0 

72230 


GFSA 

iscor 

tftwrHdOS 

Ubertytte 

MtaQRB 

Nampak 


RenftroncftGp 

Rtehemonl 

RntMaNnum 

SABmntes 

Somancor 

Srasl 

5BIC 

Tiger 0«s 


High 

LOW 

Close 

Pm. 


High 

LOW 

Oase 

Pm. 

11* 

118 

119 

119 

UnSever 

14.17 

1X95 

1379 

14X4 

372 

338 

371 

3u69 

UMAssuronce 

574 

118 

371 

5711 

324-32375 32X50 

324 

lltd News 

6.79 

63# 

675 

649 

12030 

II9J0 

120 

12030 

imwuttes 

X4S 

437 

434 

43V 

IIS 

10X75 10X75 

105 

Vendorne Li ufc 

5.12 

5XU 

5X8 

111 

19 

1835 

1835 

19 


2X0 

270 

140 

230 

69 

6X50 

69 

6875 

WWbreod 

736 

731 

732 

73J 

4250 

4275 

4275 

4275 

wnaioroslldgs 

130 

224 

378 

175 

6630 

6575 

66 

6630 


462 

443 

440 

4.46 


62 

62 

6375 

WPP Group 

142 

2J9 

2 40 

232 

125.75 12X50 12530 

12375 

Zeneca 

18 

1648 

1638 

1654 


517! 5125 5125 
5575 5525 B50 
18450 184 18450 

67 66 67 


51 7S 
5575 
185 
66 


Madrid 


Kuala Lumpur 


GwiOng 
Mol Banking 
Mama sup F 
PebonasGos 


Resorts WWW 
StneDwinr 
“ kanMal 


1640 

2625 

720 

945 

456 

1220 

*40 

2040 


TetefcomMal _ 
Tanaga 1270 

UM Engineers. 2240 


Coapodle 121442 
P iWtans 121644 

1670 1640 1640 
2575 2575 26 

7.05 7.10 720 

940 940 9.95 

434 464 432 

11.98 12 fZ20 

940 945 945 

2040 2B4 0 21 

1240 1230 12.« 
21.90 22.10 2240 


London 


Abbejri 

AMeriO 


Helsinki HExo*«pritari«a^ 


CuBorl 

EnsoA 

HaMomakn 

Kenma 

Jiesto 

Media A 

MflraB 

Meaa-SertoB 

Naae 

NettaA 

OduyYhtymoe 


UP . . 
Vaknel 


24930 

I? 

22330 
5530 
H 
1640 
289 
3770 
125 
310 
17B30 
B130 
46 JB 
3S0 
102 
. 0130 


246 24930 
3X30 3830 
217 217.10 
5430 55 

4740 67-90 
1540 16.10 
277 205 

36-10 37 

11730 124 

38530 307 

17630 17630 
8030 8030 
45 4630 
378 388 

WJD 100 

79.10 80 


248 

39 

225 

5490 

60 

16 

377 

37 

11040 

303 

179 

01 

45 

3» 

100 

0030 


Hongkong 


S«NX 30 Men 345SJS 
PlWfclOE 364*73 


930 93025 97675 
065 66675 88730 
360 360 36775 

100 101 10675 

39975 39975 41645 
24025 24625 263 

235 K430 

268 269 29125 

22.7S 23 2475 

345 345 369 



BEL-20 iodec 19983* 
PlHfeMS: 200S37 

11125 nzoo nm 

5370 5410 5420 

S®38 7080 

16650 18750 WOO 
3ZW 3365 
1*95 W 19B5 
1232 1233 1236 

U6 116 717 

135W 136^ 13650 
2050 2060 2075 

7730 7770 7740 

W * » 
5530 553B 5M 
2250 2370 2370 

M92 1510 IS® 

4340 4350 *410 

11550 11275 11750 
10725 10775 W9W 
11025 11075 11200 
4715 4725 6730 

71W TO » 
S15 3S20 252 0 
21900 22200 22 
14600 1469 14675 
MSB 89«0 90W1 
22S9 2340 2220 


DaoHenaBk 

FJnrtPorac 

Gnai Biota, 
GtwnodonB 8w 
GaocoGnwp 
Hang Lang Dev 
HaagSmoBk 

1 lunirnmn mv 

HendecoaLd 

HKRIrtl- 

HKCMnaGts 

HKEtadik 

HKStnngHMs 

HXTetacamai 

HtenMOHrigs 

HSBCKdgs 

HirttetaSwit 

HjsanDev 

JWuwnBHdg 

Kerry Pwps 

NaSMuM 

MMWertdDev 

NWHMhrimlr 


PcnrtOrtBTO 

«tos 

I Asia 


iHdgs 

SnOLflMCa 
SUOriaaPort 
Sate PocA 

-MS 

WtafHdos 


Slack iodtt M77* 

314J] JO* M S 

403-297 400 397 

m MO BSD 8*5 

Donfaen ’ W 366 M8 368 

DteDomteBk 516 50S »7 5JS 

05 SwmtagB 1570110 2547« 2OT00 

CVS 1912 B MOOOO 176000 139808 1790® 

851 WO 860 M 

6TI 679 679 M 

565 565 5P 

786 775 775 TO 

30 334 340 3# 

» m ffi » 

90 336 367 363 


1035 1070 
3730 3680 
1X25 1130 
7575 
2X10 

3«0 

1740 

BJ0 

4230 4030 
1875 1X20 
8J0 835 

4X30 42.10 
1085 1040 
35JB 3470 
TM 7J6 

49.10 4730 
1675 1445 
9675 9430 

9M 9.10 
7775 5 

1X30 1180 
1X25 14-K 
2745 27.25 
1480 1475 
1330 13.10 
4J0 -L23 

las in 

M VC M2£ 
29M 29.15 

22.10 7170 
VUO 20 

7J& -730 
5430 5175 
2X30 H.10 
330 XJB 
530 4.95 

28J5 £7.90 

1130 n.m 

*675 $4 

5J5 525 

9 M 9Z0 
645 6J5 

7475 7175 

1US UUO 

rm 2210 

3*30 3840 

2240 21JS 


1075 

36J0 

12 

76 

23.10 
3420 
403 
1745 

840 

41J0 

1825 

BB0 

4240 

1030 

35.10 
735 

4870 
1645 
9450 
9JS 
7575 
1X30 
1S20 
27 JO 
1488 
1X35 
485 
-181 
6125 
29.15 
21.95 
2020 
745 
53 

22J5 

343 

5.10 

2820 

1120 

9525 

5J0 

940 

640 

72 

1645 

3220 

39 

2240 


1080 
37 JO 
12 
78 
2X30 
3130 
4 05 
1740 
870 
4030 
18L25 
845 
43 
1040 
3X60 
735 
47.89 
1640 
9625 
920 
7575 
1270 
liOS 
27 JB 
UTS 
1115 
483 
17* 
6030 
2930 
2140 
2030 
735 
53 
23 
145 
5 

2735 

i 

71 a 
1820 
32J0 
3830 
21 JS 


rNoJI 7J8 

(Docaecq 460 

AngOon Water 6.18 

Argos 643 

Asda Group 1J0 

Assoc Br Foods 495 

BAA 550 

Badkiys 11.12 

Saia 8J0 

aATlfld 5JJ5 

Bonk ScDOdnd X31 

BtaCMr X93 

BOC Group W 

Bools 632 

BPS Ind 337 

BrttAerosp 1237 

BrBAfoVOTC 630 

BrttGos 225 

BUI Land 340 

BWPetan 7.16 

BSkvB 538 

Bril Start 120 

Brtt Telecom 421 

BTR 164 

BurmoP Qrjtrol Idas 

Burton Gp 138 

OteEeW Mt» 4W 

Cadbury Schw 484 

Coition Cranm 520 

Coaiml Unfon 7J1 


FT-SE1 Ota 419730 
P l W t — r .415BJI 

775 733 736 

417 418 41B 

6.10 6.16 6.19 

425 634 6» 

1 127 127 

487 491 486 

5 524 518 

HUM 11.10 17-0S 

730 549 839 

420 5.03 4.95 

3.16 3J0 320 


Afwtaai 

ACESA 

AguasBaroekai 

Amenta rta 

B8V 

Banesto 

Banktata 

Bod Centro HEsp 

BcoBrintar 

Bco Papular 

Boo Santander 

CEPSA 

Confliwita 

issr* 

FECSA . 

GasNaTnal 

Itenlrota 

Pryai 

Repsal 

Sevtaana Elec 
Tntocnlon 
TWeftmtoi 
Union Fanosa 
vaieflCOeneiri 



Bata Mac 46732 


Previous 46236 

18300 

18200 

18270 

18200 

1795 

1765 

1790 

1790 

5020 

5710 

5780 

5730 

5740 

5700 

5730 

5710 

7430 

7230 

7410 

7250 

1110 

1070 

1100 

109S 

1*100 

18*10 

19010 

17100 

3490 

3455 

3485 

3485 

2800 

2750 

2750 

2755 

26700 

26000 

24650 

26180 

8310 

8190 

8310 

8330 

4290 

4225 

4250 

4295 

2635 

2SM 

iron 

2620 

83m 

7760 

X1W 

7840 

10100 

9*10 

10100 

IDOO0 

1285 

1 253 

1285 

1250 

33990 

33310 

33850 

33400 

1700 

1665 

1700 

1685 

2570 

2540 

2565 

2535 

S770 

5690 

57® 

sm 

1380 

1315 

1375 

1335 

6320 

6040 

i.fm 

<ynn 

3M5 

3285 

3315 

32*0 

1240 

1210 

1240 

1220 

1420 

1405 

1420 

1420 


Manila 


■us 

8X9 

Ayala B 

30 

293Q 

30 

30 

633 

X66 

Ayala Lund 
BkPNBpbl 

3130 

16* 

X 

167 

3130 

169 

30 

168 

1278 

CSPHamu 

1S75 

1475 

1475 

1430 

578 

Mania Elec A 

126 

125 

125 

126 

XI* 

MrtreBank 

675 

SM 

as 

675 

534 

Petal 

10 

970 

9.90 

970 

7X7 

pa Bat* 

340 33730 33730 

340 

578 

PM Lang OH 

15« 

1520 

1540 

1515 

132 

SanAMgueiB 

no 

108 

109 

111 

4.16 

SM Prime Hdg 

7.10 

7 

7.10 

7.10 


Jakarta 

Asm mu 

Bkhrillodon 

BkNeom 

Gnri naoGM B 

tadooentenl 

Indofbod 

bidosrf 

-'1MM 


TuotmaJi 

hnfcota»M5 


W- 


995 *95 9H . *« 

M 14130 Wfi 144J0 

2813 HO. 2810 2750 

01150130530131330 U99 

31415 3t80 3196 3095 
5975 5870 5960 
*9. '70 4MQ 4930 4&S9 
63 JO 6095 61.15 6075. 


"■SSS 
BlfB 

1475 1300 1425 1300 

11400 llS llgS "M. 
3525 34H 3SS ^ 

005 4600 490D 
7025 MS gg 
13750 1^ 13M“ tSg 
7350 73M raj 

f5SmrSos( . 4075 90S <1Dtl 

Johannesburg »»SEgS 

g£T £ B ss a 

?W0 laS WO 1845 


Dixons 
EleCtroaHnpaneflft 433 
EMI Group 1270 

&££££ 

Fam comma 1 34 

Gent Accident aat 

*75 

iVtaBame 10 

jdaGp 

QnndMrt 445 

GRE 186 

GieenateGp £77 

Gatanee 439 

GUS 620 

Hanson 0.90 

Hop ,531 

HSBCHHgs 1412 

ia 730 

ImpIToboao 19B 

Ktaanster 634 

LodfirteE 146 

Land See 7jg 

iCTiw 233 

LegdGWUGrp 401 

UayrisTSBGp 477 

UKDsVlnBy 122 

Marts Spencer 530 

N1EPC .471 

NtaiainAscri 1159 

HaHennGita 111 

Manpower . 5X8 
NOTWMI 734 

Mata 532 

Otanae UQ 

P80 M3 

PenSHi 733 

PDUnoon 149 

PawrtGen 6J0 

Prerriw Fomefl 735 

PnittanU 544 

RnBtrockPP 4Z3 

Rout Group 43S 

PrtMncan 7 jm 

rad .137 

IM 1035 

BkfllnRM 438 

3 

RMC GtTOp 930 

Rote Royer . 233 

RndBkScrt 432 

RTZrog 9.12 

<K5anAR 470 

my 42# 

satastany .198 

Schrodan .1630 

SQPtNrtteadta 678 

Scot Power 1B2 

Securfcnr ZSS 

SweniTirtftf 697 

StHMTianspR 10J5 

State 1031 

5ai9bN£pte» 178 

5mfihKBne . ISO 

SmWstad 738 

SlhemElec 7.95 

Staoeandi 738 

Sasaniairtlef 737 

TOhlliLVto 468 

Tesco 370 

Thanes Water 6.12 

3iGrouO 5.D 

T1 Group 537 

ToroUm 230 


Mexico 

AHaA 
BnuodB 
Cenex CPO 
CBia C 

Empfltodenn 

GpaCnrwAl 

GpoHnlnbuna 

nabOadMa 

Televisa CPO 

TrtMexL 


4035 

1736 

3130 

1130 

3$ 

29 AO 
17400 
111.10 
15J2 


Milan 

M(BTtfema(iaKi2073JM 


PmtaaKllSTBJM 

Altoona Aolc 

12500 

12000 

12355 

12235 

Bai Contes Rul 


3050 

3210 

3160 

Bca FWeormn 

4215 

3VS0 

4190 

•nos 

Bead! Roma 

1320 

1260 

19875 

1299 

1260 

Benetton 


19X0 

19650 

Cretfflo ttoBana 

2060 

1V» 

7044 

1945 



10)50 

10720 

10260 


S 

s 

87M 

9030 

8900 

FW 

540B 

M5n 

4160 

4IU) 


32350 

31400 

31/40 

31500 

IMl 

15790 

14/50 

15625 

14006 

(NA 

2170 

2110 

2140 

2130 

Botaai 

Memet 

7200 

7900 

6950 

7510 

7024 

7710 

7065 

7500 


10450 

9960 

lft©J0 

10065 


1X5 

127? 

1Z70 

1241 


2675 

2535 

2660 

2555 

PtroB 

3230 

SIX 

SIX 

3140 


15380 

14990 

15320 

1.W45 


16000 

14M0 

15884 

1MU0 


10500 

9900 

11)444 

lffflB 



7210 

7600 

7500 


4820 

4500 

4664 

4U0 

TIM 

4600 

4570 

4550 

4390 


Montreal 

Bob Mob Cron 

CdnTheA 

CohUfOA 

CTFWSvc 

Gaz Metro 

GMMestLAoo 

Heala nBco 

Inasco 


21.15 


LafataHC 
NoUBJtCunadD 
PotaerCwp 
PmwtFW 
QWbKWB 
RapenCenuDB 
Royal Btcria 


4314 

42*i 

22X0 

22XS 

31,15 

3114 

31J55 

3111 

17.20 

17J5 

21 

21 

2SL 60 

aw 

34J5 

344) 

2 W 

2M 

H10 

15J0 

)iS5 

)» 

27X0 

an 

35* 

2M 

25W 

25X5 

UL10 

10.10 

4930 

504) 


Oslo 

AkarA 


DmmnkeBk 


237 


HafatandA 

KnemerAM 

NonkHyriiD 

NackeSkagA 

RyaaMdA 

OrUaAUA 

PeOmGeoSvc 

SogaPettmA 


159 

148 

2X10 

.26J0 

10530 

4830 

312 

356 

199 

106 

Mf 

275 

122 


15730 

145 

2X90 

26.10 

103 

4730 

307 

360 

197 

100 

4» 

269 

120 


15730 159 

14530 147 

23 2190 
26J0 9* in 
10150 1045D 
48 48 

mse 310 

36450 34230 

197 200 

105 102 

499 474 

27230 244 

121 122 


High Law dose Pm. 

Sen lb sled 134 13230 1X> 133 

TronsacntnOft «o «0 ISO «5 

Storebrand Asa 36.40 36 3aJ0 3630 


High Law Close Pm. 


PSG tadBC 3290.1* 
Prevlavs: 325832 


Paris 

Accor 

AGF 

AlrUoukte 
Alcotffl Ahlh 
AxQ 

Banco be 

BVC 

BNP 

Cbnat Ptas 

Cdnetaur 

Casino 

CCF 

CsStSem 

Qirtstian Dior 

CLF-Desda Fran 

Credit Aaftcoie 

Danone 

EH-Aqiritafne 

EiWanlnBS 

Eurotunnel 

GervEaux 

Hants 

ImeM 

Lataroe 

Legrand 

UJreal 

LVMH 

Uron-Eain 

WUcheUnB 

PortbcsA 

PBriWtfRicnrd 

Peugeot CD 

pOwirtPPrlitf 

Prwnodes 

RenauO 

Rexel 

Rh-PoulencA 

Rou5srt-Udaf 

Sonofl 

StlmeWer 

5EB 

5G5 Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodeadw 
StGattahi 
Swn 


CSF 


CAC4B: 240777 
Previa nx:2U7.W 


Baba todec 3701 33 
Pmtoosr 37*976 

4000 4030 40.15 
17.12 17J8 1778 
SSJ0 3D 45 3085 
1046 1046 1046 

4170 41 J0 4170 
4840 48^0 4850 
29.00 29.10 29 JO 
17170 17170 17A50 
10770 10770 11170 
1570 1574 1574 


TOMB 

UAP 

Usbw 

Video 


658 

652 

654 

651 

16930 

16630 

169 

16830 

862 

841 

860 

wa 

432 

42830 

432 

428 

3*7,90 

34130 

347-50 

341.90 

665 

640 

660 

6J6 

843 

Kl 

840 

792 

200X0 

19/XO 

199X0 

200 40 

1150 

IKK 

1140 

1106 

3457 

33BI 

3384 

3380 

24030 

239 

240 

738.9U 

239.90 

7X.UM 

236X0 

23830 

645 

620 

642 

63/ 

877 

864 

875 

864 

503 

4W 

503 

49X40 

1294 

1295 

1795 

1250 

802 

779 

795 

7/8 

so; 

495.10 

502 

490X0 

two 

KU 

#43 

836 

6.95 

6*1 

635 

475 

719 

/I3 

715 

718 

401. VO 

387 

400X0 

3fN 

310 

rtl 

795 

BOO 

31 9 V0 

316J0 

31830 

319X0 

922 

912 

914 

910 

1983 

1953 

1953 

1957 

1510 

1487 

1502 

1482 

520 

504 

519 

508 

29X40 

28930 

2*2 

2X70 

369X0 

365 

36/30 

36X90 

3BSJO 

299.70 

299.70 

30170 

565 

553 

560 

554 

•am 

2162 

2278 

2148 

1494 

1461 

1473 

14/4 

117 

11330 

115.10 

114 

1718 

1662 

1695 

16/0 

178 

17110 

17630 

174X0 

1528 

152/ 

152/ 

152/ 

546 

526 

542 

53/ 

MOJO 

252.10 

755./0 

1M20 

1116 

IliU 

1101 

1105 

429.X 

41X10 

42570 

41130 

559 

552 

SSO 

556 

2970 

2890 

2095 

2886 

795 

na 

795 

790 

217X0 

214J0 

217 JO 

21470 

559 

536 

551 

535 

17XX 

169 

169 

1/3 

440JO 

44X20 

44/ j0 

444 

14040 

138 

14030 

14030 

7H30 

//30 

77.90 

/8JU 

3/180 

363 

363 

370X0 


Brarinscopfd 

BrahnoPfd 


CESI 
Cope) 
Etetrobnre 
itoutmco Ptd 
■ I5entda& 


Peirobros PW 

TrtdntisPW 

Trtanig 

Teierl 

Telesp Pfd 

Unatancn 

CVRD Ptd 


840 

63X00 

44.90 

52.00 

1X80 

46070 

jingo 

36970 

28770 

19270 

8970 

14470 

I4OL0O 

24770 

34#B 

2439 


830 

SUM® 

42.90 

50.40 

1195 

39270 

43670 

36070 

27770 

18575 

8770 

14070 

15400 

24370 

3140 

2330 


Seoul 

Doat m 

DoMnaKawy 
KtaMtan 
Korea El Pwr 
Karoo ExchBk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LG Sera Icon 
Pahang Hun Si 
Samsung Elec 
EMahonSank 


ItatacMBbiadtac 29*574 
ProVfMR 293078 


1770 

21.15 

ZD* 

34.15 
KVi 
1570 
13« 


14M 


OSCtodec 56499 

Prertws: 56040 


Singapore 

CerebosPac 
CByDevUs 
CyaeCciaiage 
Dairy Farm ini' 

DBS Lend 
FraserS, Name 
HKLono* 

JardStnittgic* 

sm 

Sing Trteamim 
Stans Swam 
UUMUS8W 
UHOSenBXF 

wtnoTrt HOos 

•.■b ['J. defer* 


10.70 

1040 

1040 

1030 

13 

1170 

12X0 

1270 

17 

1680 

16X 

14M 

0X3 

QX1 

0X1 

on 

9X5 

9 

9X5 

9X5 

135 

570 

530 

625 

1170 

llfiO 

1370 

1070 

1SS 

190 

193 

Z94 

aa 

378 

128 

378 

U5 

615 

615 

640 

170 

338 

370 

170 

11.10 

10W 

11 

11 

132 

379 

332 

132 

174 

170 

UO 

171 

1BJ0 

18 

1630 

IB 

6X0 

630 

635 

640 

8 

730 

8 

7.95 

13 

172 

1170 

172 

TS 

13 

176 

2 8 

DM 

28 

28 

122 

114 

3.14 

3.16 

1XS 

1X1 

1XS 

1X2 

372 

3.1B 

3.18 

3.18 


4-Si 

4(0 

442 

175 

172 

172 

172 

1630 

1670 

1640 

1630 

414 

400 

410 

414 


Stockholm 5xmnd8c242aM 

PreitaQB 261534 

AGABP 10830 10430 107 10730 

A3 SAP 818 800 62? 788 

AHiDrononF 18730 18430 IBS 18730 

Astra AF 33230 324 33030 330 


Atlas Copco AF 
A vesta F 
Etedrahn BP 
Ericsson BP 
Henries BF 
incentive AF 
investarBF 
KinnevS. BF 
MaDo BF 
PtemVUptohn 
SandvflvBF 
5CABF 
S-E BatlkeaAF 
Ska nda Fare F 
SLanskn BF 


17230 

77 

416 

236 

1120 

518 


169 17030 17130 

74 7630 77 

408 «9 417 

231 ZB 233 

I08A 10*5 1120 

505 513 508 


320 31530 316 31730 

205 19830 204 20130 

202 196 1983 0 200 

28730 2B2 28330 284 

185 181 181 185 

150 MB 14830 14950 
69 U 6830 69 

194 18830 19330 190 

308 302 30530 306 


SSo Paulo 


8J7 870 

63070 61870 
4X20 4440 
5030 51.80 
1X10 1X00 
400X0 387X0 
45070 44070 
36070 35070 
279.99 277X0 
18530 1B8X0 
88X0 8730 

14flJ® 14XJK! 
15470 15770 
241X0 246X0 
■W4 BJ 
2439 2330 


SKFBF 

159 

156 

15730 

156 

55ABBF 

122 

1)9 

171 

HO 

SloraAF 

9530 

9230 

9330 

9330 

Sv Handles AF 

189 

183 

18730 

IBS 

SydtoatiAF 

155 

161 

153 

154 

TieUrtmrij BF 

111 

III/ 

1D9J0 

10830 

VohraBF 

166 

161 

165 

16230 

Sydney 

All Mtaaria: 2436J0 
Previous: 343870 


BJ2 

8.15 

830 

816 

ANZBMng 

772 

/X6 

7X7 

7.92 

BHP 

18X2 

183B 

18X2 

I860 


244 

1« 

142 

144 

Brambles hid. 

2240 

72M 

22.94 

2X44 


240 

117 

2.IH 

ZAB 


1243 

1277 

1240 

1270 

CCA mats 

1345 

1376 

1130 

1347 

Cotes Myer 

613 

604 

610 

613 


6X8 

666 

668 

668 


19X0 

1940 

1945 

1931 


440 

4.15 

440 

441 


2 M 

262 

234 

2X2 

GIO Aastrafla 

378 

376 

128 

37/ 


U1 

160 

131 

131 

la Austrafia 

13X8 

13415 

1108 

1120 


279 

27/ 

27V 

17/ 

Lend Lease 

2440 

aw 

avs 

2445 

Moyne Ntdriss 
M1M Hrite 
Nat AustBonk 

610 

9 

808 

8 

1.90 

1X7 

IX/ 

1X8 

1433 

1437 

1431 

1444 

News Carp 
North Ltd 

6MB 

4X6 

6X7 

6X9 

690 

3X6 

19/ 

3X8 

Pnciflc Dunlop 

110 

lt« 

3X9 

112 

Pioneer Inti 

372 

170 

1/2 

372 

PtacerPodfic 

1X0 

176 

176 

175 

Santos 

496 

492 

492 

49/ 

Soothcren 

475 

417 

4.19 

477 

Wesfonner; 

9.15 

9.12 

9.13 

9.15 

WtemMirtfig 

63* 

87/ 

834 

875 

«fesffieM7rf 

236 

2.13 

7-35 

232 

Wesipac BUna 

772 

/.IS 

7.19 

732 

WoafcAte Pel 

940 

9.33 

9J9 

9J6 

Woohwrths 

110 

10/ 

3X9 

108 

Taipei 

Stack Marfeeftadaic: 730642 
Previous; 71 6546 

AstoCerneii) 

51 

sow 

5030 

5030 

Cotter Life Ins 

1B0 

17/ 

17/ 

176 

Chong Hwo Bk 

170 

168 

I/O 

16/ 

CNtn Steel 

26 

25X0 

an 

2670 

Qtino Trust 

55 

5350 

533(1 

£4 

Everareen 
For East Tew 

5450 

32.90 

54 

32.10 

5430 

3260 

5130 

3230 

FtaJBank 

178 

176 

1// 

175 

Formosa CF 

4430 

4170 

4190 

4320 

H*»si Non Bk 

14739 

146 

147 

14530 

Hun km Tehran 

2630 

2470 

24X0 

25.10 

ICBC 

85 

84 

E4 

84 

President Ejrt 

4690 

4630 

4570 

4530 

TahvoiCanr 

60 

59 

60 

5930 

Tuhnifi 

5450 

53 

54 

S3 


Tokyo 


Composite index: 711 76 
Prevtaus; 69976 
99500 96000 99000 100000 
5520 5380 S00 5510 

16100 15400 16100 15600 
28400 Z7M0 28300 28300 
9500 BV90 9400 93SD 
53000 520000 530000 536000 
19700 19100 1*500 19800 
45300 43800 44400 45000 
4B9Q0 47500 48300 48300 
11900 11600 11900 71800 


NMtrt 225! 18144 J4 
Previous: 1809X13 


767 

SSO 

62* 


State Tines: 222034 
Prerioal.- 22ZL15 


ABnoomo 

MNIppMAlr 

AScinBanh 

1110 

1080 

1100 

70S 

895 

764 

864 

766 

579 

Asotll Cbem 

643 

623 

629 

Asa 01 Glass 

1060 

10X) 

1050 

Bk Tokyo Mteu 

2000 

I960 

195(1 

Bk Yokohama 

659 

655 

6W 

B*tgestone 

2120 

MHO 

2090 

Canon 

7450 

?«0 

2450 

Otta Bank 

750 

735 

744 


2260 

2230 

2250 

QiuaokuEtec 

Doliri 

22*0 

823 

2200 

0« 

2200 

804 

CUktHKang 

1450 

1370 

1410 

Oaten Bank 

538 

526 

535 


1410 

1380 

1300 

DatetoSuc 

1010 

996 

998 


2530 

2490 

2530 

FWWC 

3600 

34» 

3590 

Fup Book 

1570 

1480 

ISM 

Fuji Photo 
Fujitsu 

3710 

1120 

3630 

1090 

3660 

1120 

Hitachi 

1070 

1050 

1060 


3300 

3710 

32/D 

IBJ 

1820 

I//0 

1800 

I HI 

494 

469 

478 


556 

541 

547 

Ita-YOkoda 

5S90 

5450 

5590 

JAL 

545 

533 

537 


3820 

.1690 

JltO 

Kfltlnw 

745 

720 

/30 

KonsolEtac 

2320 

1310 

2290 

1280 

2290 

1290 


3U1 

291 

29/ 

KDD 

7570 

7450 

7570 

HflkiKlppRr 

720 

715 

/17 


1080 

iibil 

1070 

Kabetaert 

Ml 

220 

228 


860 

831 

836 

Kama 

540 

510 

535 

KyOCCRI 

7370 

7220 

AM 

KnsnuElK 

711/1 

7730 

2230 

LTCB 

546 

530 

544 


460 

445 

459 

Moral 

1800 

1760 

1/90 

MobuEtecInd 

1770 

1730 

1730 

masoEfecwt 

1050 

1030 

Kl SO 

MftwWsH 

1100 

lew 

lows 


352 

345 

350 

MHsuUShl El 

67* 

663 

iM 

MflWUstfEtf 

LEW 

1200 

im 

MlbutteMKvy 

880 

868 

876 

MteahbU Mel 

897 

888 

891 

Msutrishi Tr 

1435 

TWO 

1470 

MHsul 

890 

879 

m 

MBsuIFkigssn 

1140 

1100 

112(1 

MfiSUlTiusI 

802 

725 

194 


455 

555 


535 

3850 

730 


295 

7450 

719 


229 


545 

454 


352 

648 

1SJ0 

875 

874 

1410 

800 


The Trib Index 



Closing prices 


Jan t. 1993 = 700 

Lewd 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
% change 

+15.26 


World Index 

151.99 

♦ 0.47 

+0.31 

• 

Haglanal Indexes 

Asia/PadHc 

118.12 

*0.09 

+0.08 

-12.02 


Europe 

163.10 

+0.75 

+0.46 

+17.19 


N. Amenca 

170.19 

+0.69 

+0.41 

+32.67 


S. America 

Industrial Indexes 

126.56 

-0.49 

-0.39 

+42.14 


Capital goods 

177.00 

+0 66 

+0.37 

+33.20 


Consumer goods 

165.15 

+0.64 

+0.39 

+19.61 


Energy 

177.38 

+0.13 

+0.07 

+30.79 


Finance 

114.47 

+0.46 

+0.40 

-10.03 


Miscellaneous 

166.09 

+1.34 

+0.81 

+22.30 


Raw Materials 

180.75 

+0.69 

+0.38 

+27.47 


Service 

139.79 

0.08 

-006 

+16.49 


Utilities 

146.80 

+0.64 

+0.44 

+15.46 

* 

Tne Morawta HoraM Tribune World Stock Index 0 Backs the U.S ddar values at 
S0O ummananaity Invesiable stoats from 35 oountnes. R* more mtomasan, a Bee 
booMOi to available by uotuna to The Tub Index. 181 Avenue Charles do Gaute. 

! 

i 

i 

i 

93521 NeuUy Codex. Fiance 


CortpUed by Btoombetg News. 


MurataMtg 

NEC 

NfttoSec 
Nintendo 
Kipp Crete Bk 
Nlpp Express 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Paper 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Tosen 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 


lElRy 

Ona f 
Osaka Gas 
Rtoti 
Sakura Bk 
Swrtyo 
Santa Bank 
Sanyo Elec 
5eco*n 
SrtbuRwy 
Seifeut House 
Seven-E teven 


SM 

5NtHriSi/Ch 

StoioHtBk 

Sony 

Sionltomo 
Suntltonn Bk 
SumdChern 
Suraftanu) Elec 
Sundt Metal 
Sumfl Trust 
Talsd 

Tatsha Pham 
TakednChem 
TDK 

TohoMi El Pwr 
rota! Bank 
TaMo Marine 
TekyuBPwr 
Tokyo Gas 
Tnkyv 
Tanai 

Topaon Print 
Tormrlnd 

Tosrtiw 
ToyoSeffcan 
Toyo Trust 
Toyota Motor 
Yamal ciu Sec 
YawtnoucW 
YasudaFlre 
YosudaTnist 

atlOO 


High 

Law 

aoH 

3830 

3790 

3830 

1410 

1390 

1410 

BI9 

/B5 

79J 

2600 

7410 

7410 

257 

249 

755 

735 

/06 

/14 

572 

Wl 

5/1 

550 

539 

550 

311 

302 

309 

51D 

495 

504 

685 

AnH 

6HI 

260 

252 

255 

1600 

■550 

15/0 

BdCSa 

WSfla 

usxn 

735 

770 

rjo 

654 

640 

645 

32+0 

3/50 

3200 

305 

300 

305 

1300 

1270 

1270 

752 

710 

710 

3170 

JW4I 

3100 

1550 

1460 

1520 

466 

451 

458 

67X 

6510 

6/30 

4350 

4110 

4230 

mo 

uni 

mo 

6630 

6570 

6620 

1570 

1530 

1550 

785 

771 

fttt 

3090 

2070 

2080 

1120 

<090 

1170 

7700 

7600 

7690 

938 

921 

976 

15W 

1520 

1570 

440 

426 

440 

1610 

1560 

1580 

270 

265 

7/0 

965 

930 

957 

567 

£50 

566 

2720 

7690 

7/70 

2290 

2250 

7250 

7450 

7380 

7420 

2230 

2190 

2700 

1020 

991 

1010 

1050 

1020 

1030 

2440 

2410 

2470 

304 

:nu 

301 

597 

5/3 

MI6 

1300 

1230 

1740 

1400 

l.w» 

1380 

720 

/U5 

/I5 

716 

707 

/07 

2700 

2590 

2/00 

834 

818 

870 

3250 

3200 

3240 

+87 

-rao 

487 

2260 

mo 

7760 

549 

536 

539 

421 

410 

415 


250 

734 

558 

549 

3»3 

509 

672 

250 


7T8 

664 


732 


Toronto 


AtuftW Price 
ABwrta Energy 
Alcan Alum 
Anderson ExjH 
Sk Montreal 
Bk Non Scotia 
BarricLGaU 
BCE 

BCTrtecnnm 
Blochom Phann 
BonUjonUerB 
Brascnn A 
Brp-x Minerals 
Camea 
CIBC 

Cdn Noil Rod 
CdnNURn 
Cdn Bold Pet 
CdnPoeW 
Coffllnco 
Dotascn 
Domtor 
Donahue A 
DuPontCda A 
EuroNevMng 
FatitnFlnf 
Faicanbridee 
Hatcher QhU A 
Franoi Nevada 
Gulf Ota Ra 
imperial Oil 
Inca 
IPLEn 


iPLEnerey 
LokttawB 
Lorown Group 
MoanMBMI 
1 lira a 


Moore 

Newbridge Mat 


2330 

3270 

4935 

19.10 
44X5 
4635 

35.95 
691k 
3*30 

76V 
25 JO 
3135 
2530 
40 
59 JO 
53 
39V 
24’.* 

37.10 
38 

264 

1270 

2670 

33 

36.95 
299 

31-40 

22J5 

59 

I? 

6545 

47 

40.40 

13-JO 

m 

iBu 
77 JO 
1X65 
2014 
451* 


22.95 
32J0 
4830 
IBJ0 
4X90 
451* 
3535 
4835 
29 J5 
7435 
25 
31 <4 
3445 
59X0 
58.15 
5120 
3&40 
24 
asvi 
37 

25*0 

1230 

HAS 

30.90 

36K 

295 

31J0 

2220 

57*. 

nJO 

6435 

44.10 

4005 

18 

49 

181* 

76X0 

11*5 

2770 

itfiM 


22.95 2115 
3235 32-40 
4940 49JS 

18.90 1835 
J4li 4180 

46.15 4535 
35X0 35X5 

68.90 6B I 4 
2930 79J5 

74U 741* 
25.10 25 

31 te 31JS 
I4J0 2445 
5935 59.15 

58.90 57.95 
52JO 52XS 
3930 3845 
24X5 3A10 
35V* 36.90 

38 3tfti 
24 2570 
1230 1M. 

25U 3630 
31te 31 
36X0 36X5 
.295 “ 


3170 ^ 


2270 ___ 
59 5B 
17.90 1LW 
4570 64X6 

46.10 4635 

40.10 40JS 

1X15 >’-9D 

49 4945 
1835 18b 

Tri. 7670 
13W 1330 
28 2730 
4195 4570 



High 

Law 

Oose 

Noronttainc 

32X0 

37/4) 

32X0 

Norcw Energy 

31.95 

3135 

31 .VS 

Nihem Telecom 

95X5 

9460 

95X5 

No™ 

1110 

12.90 

avs 

Onex 

73 Q9 

22.y5 

22XS 

Pancdn Pettm 

55 

S3ft 

54t* 

Petra Cria 

21.90 

21X0 

21*1 

Placer Dome 

28.95 

2841 

28.V5 

Paco Proem 

1460 

llWt 

1435 

PotaSh Sort 

115.95 

Ulft 11155 

Renaissance 

4W* 

4970 

49X5 

HtoA^sm 

3140 

314 

32X0 

Rogers CanteJB 

29 

78ft 

78ft 

Seagram Co 

56^10 

5* a* 

56.10 

SheflCdoA 

54 

53 

53X0 

Stone Conwski 

21X0 

2170 

21ft 

Suncor 

60 

iiu n 

5955 

Tritanan Eny 

49 

47.90 

48X5 

Tack B 

31X0 

30X5 

31*6 

Trteglofae 

40 

39.90 

40 

Trtus 

iy* 

19.15 

19.15 

Thomson 

29W 

29.10 

WJ5 

TatDom Bank 

36ft 

35X0 

36X5 


16X5 

16X0 

1670 

TransCda Pipe 

24VS 

W«K 

2190 

Trtnwrt: FW 

42.90 

424* 

42X0 

Trizec Hahn 

30 '« 

29.90 

30 

TVXGatd 

10.70 

9.95 

10X5 

Westcoast Eny 

2185 

2170 

33M 

Weston 

74 

73ft 

Oft 


Pm. 
321* 
3135 
95 
1X05 
23 
Site 
21 JS 
28.10 
U10 
11X90 
4W 

31.90 
7870 

5314 

2140 

58*1 

47.90 
3040 
3935 

19te 
29 JO 
3535 
1670 
24.10 
43* 
30.15 
9.90 
2W 
74 


259 

961 

549 


300 

583 


706 

708 


540 

416 


Vienna 


ATX todec 1167X4 



PrevtauR II69J6 

Ausl AUnes 

1611 

1611 

1640 

1640 

Bnw-UnGoess 

697 

684 

690 

Ml 

Bund Vera Pfd 

410 

410 

49U 

m 

CretJBnren P« 

460 41570 417.95 

461 

E/WjenernO 

3255 

3180 

3180 

3290 

EVN 

1713 

16*01716X0 

WOO 

IrdenmfaU 

1490 

1490 

1475 

1475 

Lrrofng 

670 

65B 


668 

Lnytoim 

274 

272 273X0 

77110 

Mayr-Melnnaf 

595 

584 

517 

5 VI 

OMV 

1328 

1280 

1327 

1298 

oesl Brou 

802 

715 790X5 

f»1 

Oesl Elektriz 

625 

812 

820 81630 

VA Teth 

1759 

1/46 

1751 175630 

WteneTtonef 

08930 

2060 

2070 

2068 


Wellington NzsE-rofodrtcMAa 

PmleaKSaiJO 


TSE I BdadriaiE 61*336 

PrevtoBS: 6065J4 


AkN ZecJd B 

2X4 

2X1 

2X1 

2X4 

Briefly Invi 

1J7 

1J6 

136 

1J7 

Carter Holt ort 

134 

132 

3J3 

129 

Form 

570 

110 

5,15 

5.1 S 

FbtwrPaykrt 

5.70 

5X8 

5X8 

5.70 

FC Forest 

236 

2J5 

236 

236 

Goodman Fder 

177 

1J5 

1.75 

177 

indepNewS 

6.95 

6.92 

6.95 

4.95 

Lion Nathan 

165 

3X2 

163 

3X6 

Nui Gas note 

2J7 

134 

137 

132 

NZ Reflning 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

29X0 

TeieawiNZ 

737 

735 

735 

737 

WfcanHortOrt 

11X5 

11X0 

Uxo 

11.40 


Zurich 


AdKUB 

AktsufcseR 

Ares-SentnoB 

BntotecHdaR 

ABBS 

BKVtston 

BobStB 

CSHaUngsR 

Etektrowntt B 

FbctierB 

HUS PC 

HoWMsroikB 

JuL Baer Hdg B 

Nestle R 

NcmtfeR 

OtalikonR 

ProgteaHUB 

PtamVtenB 

PtetfB 

Roche Hdg pc 

5 SCR 

Sdvndter B 

SGSB 

SMHB 

SuherR 

Starts RrtnsR 

SwtssebR 

UBS B 

Vcdora HdgR 
WUiterthorR 
Zurich AssurR 


SPlbnla: 2568X5 
Prevfoac 2551 75 


372 

365 

369 

368 

1128 

1105 

1126 

1109 

1449 

1327 

1449 

1313 

2790 

2680 

2765 

2680 

1693 

1671 

1688 

1671 

733 

721 

729 

723 

1905 

1865 

1900 

1870 

138 

13475 

13775 

13425 

536 

535 

536 

536 

1455 

1445 

1450 

1450 

935 

910 

933 

915 

iooa 

*86 

1000 

988 

1413 

1395 

1408 

1391 

1474 

1463 

1468 

1464 

1554 

1540 

1548 

1552 

13730 

13530 

13630 

137 

1489 

1470 

1489 

1480 

037 

627 

637 

631 

202 

202 

202 

199,75 

1098S 

10800 

10985 

10850 

249 

24775 

249 

2453d 

IS3S 

1510 

1510 

1515 

3195 

3150 

3170 

3190 

902 

874 

902 

974 

868 

451 

866 

8$4 

1407 

1396 

1398 

1396 

1160 

1101 

1140 

1115 

1166 

1149 

1155 

1146 

27930 

276 

27B 

277 30 

788 

782 

787 

785 

36930 

36630 

369 

366 




- Vr 


3 «l4I^^Agi6i34,a>4 







PAGE IS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JANUARY 17. 1997 


NASDAQ 


at 

Dnf YW PE lDfe 


PMLBSaocR Dm »WPE IBtl W LwUtelOi'lie Hjj* Law SWB< 


UWonlD 
HfitlLow SlOCfc 


CM TOPE 1005 Hign LOwLCdnlOl'K 


3.4 M m W* M. 

B wi cm g* 


ill 

■n 1 ifiVi IS* 
10 1 33fa 9S 
lb 
fa 


SIS I nil' 

Ofv YU PE l®s Wtfi low uses Ofae WbbuwM** _T 

1 — — — m vp; 37 ** .— 

J4 13 | 8* 

UMFnts rV» J S 


UifM 


1 


* 




NYSE 





z E^ta 


m u il 


E 

ESrfe 

Z 3s awfl mw 

« m oj% 

3 \7B 2M 

= ”SS 

Mr 15 - 3337 a til 
“ _ MM lb 


£ — U 
3ffl 11 — 

30>k 4Mt *!'■ 
IS 15W —fa 
4Afa «fa ‘3*1 
M » - 

S2fa 54*0— Ifa 
W» 17 
16W 16* — y» 
i 3*4 tr* — •* 
CH MW -!** 


IWl VTtu ‘W: 
11% 11% _ 
25U asw ‘fa 


ss ira 

S'* S/I — ’ i 


r,ll 1 N 


M O »! 


zatt IE 
:sm « 

72 i5 ll [S M 

'" f a » ^ |s 

r w iw b 

_ 46 247 Wfa 
- U U24 MM 


13fa I3*i* — 

U 16% - 

*,2 Jjj 

26% u» 

49*4 en» 

43fa 44W+lfa^ 
*fa «* — Yi 

rl!*.; 

17% O +*> 


’ = =1 
“ S 1 


ris -fa 

tel - 


176 13 fi 4 




ei* 7' -. „P S3 

,Jn B 55 Is » S3 S* 


, a BO 25W MM MM 

US il . a »1 a, 

* IX SOS S9M 53'. S3A , 

IN 10 13 605 ■** >£* *£ 

IaF 7 1 II OT* *Jh I3W TTP 


IJ1 U II *377 Ok SPA Sk 

1-5» 114 '• 8 S» S m. 

|M 72 - 72 2^*1 

in u - Id **% » 

,.as H I S S3 3 ! S 3 

^ ®' ,7 }j & s" ff* 

|D4f 74 l» 3K7- BM *1% J'fi 

II 1 0 M IM 1Mb Ilk Ilk 

146 xS IS sra in* jam JTjk 

lin 7.4 _ 3DS DM n» Ij*- 

in AJ - HO MM 2 Sfa Uk 


140 53 13*1*1* ȣ as S? 

Irt U O MM Mil? »k 

m 14 - «M mw Bk Kfa 


10 2341 «*» 
_ 2M4 »M 
.MM 
14 0»u '«£ 

JD 1lV 
_ J14 W% 

- M ISM 


SSM 54"* 
9«M MHfc 
294% 19M 

34% 3M 
MUM 1D£% 


•B S3*S ss =h ••: 
B II r'T 3i 5S S£ •- 

1W *? » IM 3S SS 3« m ''f 


~ M6 MM 

* *5 r 


a m nik m> *% 

■ ® la ss 1 
S !SS « 85 •- 
^ hs us — - 


U S55 
“"11 
r ”s r 


•a urn ism 
15 in »* 
_ USA 27 1 * 

: SI SS 
; ^ SS 

n M 


I Mb 14M 
ISM ISM 

M 

Z3'- Z1M 
M'A 2«M 
3AM Z4M 
MM 2 *> 


8 * KEES? 

I« UMSMPai 
ISM lO^Oflto 

in* mk iwp 
MM irkMH i 
4VM JTMSSFnTrt 
H4b 1 *M»W »<0 
■h (MUM 

ism n asvcjk 
WM manwi 
iim uktoaC. 


401 1.1 19 1537 Tlx AJM — ■ 

_ M CM! » Ik JM - 

l oi 17 - IDS 44 a ASM ASM — M 

; . bi wk n jo — i* 




S"a? 52 

4 3!V% 

s jb m 


rS 6 > - si ok ok hs 

48 'i : *3S 52 52 


_ I BK 

S 0AI6 

a m «m 


W li 11 A7AS *Mb 41 ISM -J 
U J 73 4AAu SOM *'< A4Jb -* 
_ _ a oh m Xk 


k It a M asm «. Ok • 

_ » os nk ok iJM 

Z - »» Mb S 5M 

IM IDA *1 AM I7M I'M IIM 

. M 111 »M Ok Ok 

35 13 IS HI MM ISM »M . 

Ul J 14 1* Ok Ok I 

_ _ 1177 IBM J* I" ■ 

n 14 T3 M AIM mVf ABM - 

lflOf li 4 7<59u 27*% Z7Va 17% 

IJ " l?M 21 BV, n 

, » £> - tl j7£ 32 & 

‘S *S $ "5 52 35 £2 

_ S AD4 I6M 1AM 1AM 

_ A MX IM IM !■* 

_ DM J7M 37 I7V| 

■nr. _ _ 150 Ok IBM »M 

. S I KB MM A7M S3'* 

114 »3 . D 5AM Hk Bk 

A0 14 10 I Ok VI SOM 

40 U ID 111 Ok Ifk I4M 

Ul 61 ]» 41 AIM Cl « 

_ _ IW JMd IM IM 

it A U III Ok BVl JAM 

137 41 _ * KM «7"b «k 

140 43 14 4545 KM AIM KM 

A30 73- 740 MM SB SOM 

100 14 SI SIS AIM (DM AIM 

SB 10 17 ISS JOh Ok 30 

I M 13 II Abl 3SM JAM 35M 

31 7 14 Kll Ok Ok 14M 

lm . _ AH AM AM AM 

MUM 57401 J0 « Ilk MM 
40 13 74 MU ASM 44 k AIM 

U0 44 If III IIM IIM IM 


3* IXQu a 

n rza JWb 

v 5733 I15M 

,-B W IS 
” 5K S 2 

IS 1473 TIM 
73 1D1 I «M 
_ 47 JAM 

13 OA Sjb 

_ ni 3BM 


Oft »M 
9k 3 
A4M TOM 
II AM I ISM 

?,* im 

Sm 52 

fl JIM 
ISM I AM 


IIM IIMSIr*** 

JIM lAMVnDUS 
IIM A BlKMRt 
AIM B VuLTlCp 
V ISMSAunrlRA 
n r* i»MSuaP«inpn 
ASM BMSuwnWc 
37k 10 SnAkp 
7M imiDiCOCW 
3AM MMSu^Crts 
Bk IlMSlIItt 
33M TTMlundD 
SM 3kMCn 
ISM IIMSUnMkT 
54*- BkiaiUjHn. 
ISM WkSlPKCpIWI 
ASM OkSunN'S 
BM 2SM3UIIOD* 
4*M JTMStAMJJOra 
I'M » Sun^rfT 
MM » SunaC rfW 
24M 11 Swttan 
4AM SnkKAKTdA 
TOM UkSiMM 


49 13 13 SA MM 1AM 1AM - 
_ 47 1340 JAM ISM » . • M 

m 1 S ®! Ik !SS Jk -j 

S if 4 "W r 32 J£ 

-,‘S 5i “ ,.S u2 .J5 iJm :■ 

IS il S ai 3 52 ?W ^ :a 

•* “ fi 15 3 * 82 p ^ 

_ - 1I0S SDK 44M ■ ‘M 

'& H !! E 2m S5 Sm -2 

“ f r, .« r |2 32 :s 

5 13 ,1 'S jT nit S 2 - 

U M 4JA Jljk »S ^ 

'o “ » 5 1 5. !* SI "* 

!jB U - 1« S’* §M §2 -M 

.140 U If IK JM 1 *M • M 

- 10 Jim nfa !£• li; •>• 

_ _ IM Of NM 30M — M 

5L0ie3-31A»Mg,»fa- 

» « - ’S L I 1 ^ 

S li : ■ “ a T 

*5 f a *2 3K S2 K :2 

41 - " « w «5 ® j* 


In if - -J* 

18 = B 

3 ? « : 5 

^ 8 E I 

Sues 


& r - 

Iim Iw “j -k 

(AM 1AM I4M — M 


R R | ^5 

B 55 R s* 

Uk 1AM UM 


- 3 in 

^ 1 ? aS 


4A J5M 

il ik in 

K MM IK6 
SA Hk ISM 
47 3k IIM 


IBM IBM MM 
Sk 77 M ak 
Bk B WM 
ak m bk 


* O n -IM JM 

34 3 31 b« TIM 

35* A3 7 MU SM 


■im lOMSiaaowta 
SM A Sun OTBB 
Ilk AViSumn^l 


_ n km 

M 324 675* 
At 51 MV KM 

5* 3D27u KM 

55 1734 Bk 

21 W» KM 

If 1177 A m 

_ TB2 3SM 

55 'fa? 2 . 
i » S'- 
!! “5 S2 


Sk IX 5-^ClA 


35*b lOMSwICna 
IIM ISYlSunUWI 


5f M WMSW H O M 
34 UMSbtlrvalA 


| D IJ _ 774 11 IIM IIM - 

35 IJ II in ok Ok jJJM -M 

l l 14 3330 Q 13k Mk -k 

‘ “ BAV 3AM 5SM 3Sk -■* 

L00 13 11 45C 30. 35f "2 

IJU AD _ 705 131— Z3M ZP— — 1 M 

" £ 7*7 34M Bk 3AM ‘M 

_ 441 l» I7M Ufa — M 

o>* *■* ^ !2 a., as as 


K4i BMSuOfTc 

41— AMVrmCJi 
Ok I7MS*"0»U» 
31 M U’.S»™«c*i 
3SM BMSmcO 


T7Vi 7M TP W OOD 
s 3MTC35Y 
Hk IViTCCInK 


* _ -a US 33'* 35M Bk — I 

n lin KM AIM KM ' M 
- 3 a 4M 0M *M ‘M 

M 14 27 477- Ok JIM Bk — M 

_ 11 10 JIM JIM II bi — M 

m a* — mis ok 3IAi B — k 

S u M ” nJ IIM IIM *M 

on 47 l» H7 AM AY. AM — M 



_ 4 374 5M IM IM * M 

033 04 — 47 14 13M Ufa - 

.. a 1*S2 32*W Bk Bk — k 

_ 70 lin S5M SIM IIM — M 

.19 A M 1514 0AM 04*6 JAM — M 

No to _ 10 IIM OkOk. 

^ U . IV IM 1141 IM -k 

435 15 _ *30 94 34 SA >1 

_ _ AAS 33 Sfl W -k 

Ms IS - 27 WM 3AM 0AM r- 

.u 3 » « »k an ak -k 

Ut M - n 17 d B 0 — 1. 

mu. 36 23"* 2 SM »M *M 

IK _ a 3(74 MM 34 1AM 
.IK 10 _ 1221 AM AM AM 

_ B 3347 IBM 17k Ik • M 

JS> II a *238— Ok a KM — M 

-- il lA aSS a? 2 -’iS 

M S fl S Sm &2 55 1 

_ t US IM f 4 _ 

US 11 . It KM 40 ADM r M 
171 IJ _ 10 41 IIM ASM -» 

UI U 14 006 37M V 37k- *fa 

M U - IK Ok 0A 1AM ‘M 

_ ft *70 ZIM 23 21 — M 

44 U 31 17130 1**1 33M 33M — M 

1.47 AK 31 MSI bk bk 3M • M 

IJD u 17 30 Ok bk M >k 

- II W Ok 3AM 06M - 

.10 J *5 7*1 IIM 17 IIM — M 

IN 1.4 75 123* SAM SSM SAM — M 


! O » 
M A3— J7M 
»* S141 34M 


. U IM 25 M Bk *3*i 

JO - - *10- MM 16 14*- 

„ _ 111 I JM IIM IIM 

" i 85 T T 

'» •* ^ ns ns 

I.W IJ M 9989 41 «0£ w 


. I flTA 

■ 2 U » 

M 053 JfrH 

n « Hl% 


1 «H 149% 

17*% iaj% 

m ti% 
19*% M%i 
M* 3BV» 
4% 48*% 
6T4, UV% 
29*% 29* 

3% 1 % 


n 1M1CW 


z. Z * Hk ! ** JM li* 
« « i’ ft. S! 81 “**! 


ii* *3 — ss as ss S5 ~ 

0J0 11J - BS2 2SM KM Bk 


it! 41 14 141 NW Xfa a. 

.. _ JO40U I AM ISM IIM 

*«n 43 IJ 1021 TISM HIM II4M 



344 4 If 217* SO'* ® JM 

u U . lib UW « Uk ' 

.444 U - SI SB U KM KM 4JM • 

ID 00-1*7 KM 0AM MM 
IN U IA Kfl 4*M «M KM 
IDA 01 — 177 Bk 3SM 25 A 

.IS 12 M SK 13M llfa 11 ■ 

JM 11 It 2SA 0 7M 7M 

in! va .. A3 JAM JAM JAM 

„ 14 OK 17M I AM I AM 

<8 50 - 301 IB W M 

1.1 A 41 14 IIS TAM »fa f*M • 

■* • 14 IMS 11 1 - I7M ljfa ■ 

OA 54 . UAA 4M 4M *fa 

IKB 114 — 17B 14 ISM I AM . 

«. | O « Uk »» »» 

35 i.i is a iim yj 

IK 7.4 14 114 3* UM Ok 

f II 54 — lb IJ IIM IIM 

_ It 74 24V. MVt »k 
| |fif IJ II 782 IIM J1 31 

jj£ A _ 41 UM "fa 1* 

B 4 II 1713 DM Bk 2JM 

73 IJ 26 77* JJ-. AAM Uv. 

1 ffic 0J — 74 n III* l-M 

JO II 44 *35 U li l»M 17M 
■ Of IS IB IMS MM SAM UJ. 

IB J 14 *32 Ok Ok 30*7 

J* IJ II IBB 30 !»M I4M 

D U 11 37f '»M I* 1*M 

33 * 23 I D'k D» B'4 

n 4 M IV M'J. 52 7. SAM 

X 14 - 0*11 ll» I'M IIM 

111 " is B« 2Z S2 

_ 44 ZJf TOM 4V* 'BM 

“ J| 127* lOM UM Ok 

“ B «M IM «M 

*s 7 i a £ sa sa sa 

J ,1 » nS. u Sm 39 Sm 

to il II UA UM *<M 3AM 

« ,J " >3 £U 25 Bk 

«A4 IS 10 46 ASM ASM AY— 

H 'AM UM UM 

j— 24 il 303 Bk bk 2BV" 

7 * S _ 8 ? Ufa UM JAM 

■2 1 01 IBM 107. IBM 

a a ,7 a Sm »m k 
s ; - s? r i» 2 » 


4 II JA 7M 
II HI ISM 
40 732 li- 


nk I3fa 
llfa 1 * 
mv. MAM 
SAT. IS 
n> AW 
AM 7 
m* ISM 


n in an 
II At 1AM 
_ IA Ifa 
II UK Bk 
- BATA Bk 


UM BM TCWE M 
■k AMTCWK 
Bfa TkTCWD 

■ AMTCWBJ 
a K'-tdk 
17 B TECO. 

0414 05 TIGtAd 
Ik. MTTS 
*84 17 TJ*__ 
KJVblBMTJRBlE 
»M l**"IP r 
•Vi AMTgCCB 

Ifa Ifa TOC 

5* 37MTBWJ. 
IIM AMTV* CJB 
74M Ttv* ToOnvi 
20W 11MTBBHM-K 
IIM ■ 1ST L* —4 AT 
ISM WMTOMOT 
KM HM TOWS 
4M AWTlUtY 
oi uk naw fi 
BS. 1 * Tuny 

15M IhT BU BB 
S»M STMI2S5L 
Ifa SMTfUWtn 

sisaisar 

14% 4%TflU5f« 

1 19% ffiltuCA 

m% 10*%T 2#nr 
4 21 Tufi tni 

634% l%\%T%C»W»1 
ZS'4i P iiTg^qy 


jjq |1 Z IM 9*%i 9% J%% 

pS a »n la 1 * «%i n - 

SStJ-OAI n* BM «M -M 

JBp 74 t- n J7 -C* i 


3S 7 i fi V AS Ofa -M 

3 s » sa aa ss -s 

- 11 s ^ dr Jr i 5 -^ s 

- « S S « « % 

1J4 24 U 1144 Brt* HM 5IM -S 

- « Jff* ’5 

« ,J » B as ss 5“ -M 

iU “ : «i ™ 35 « 'J 

* 'i ■! is na ns -S 

* “ " §s fl ^ ss : S 

JO ,3 * 32K KM -JM KM 

4jp 17 u m it ■— OI. flfa — M 

j! a 13 B UM U 3M -M 

a 50 "S 1 ISt ss IS; i 
^ ,5 ms Sm ms js 

stsKijasaSfaffi^ 


o II O 114 ISM UP- ISM -u 

.in 71 fa flAA TIM —fa 

__ *2 fa fa fa — 'ft, 

_ _ BA Ufa IM Ifa —fa 

.jl * I4 1»» 23’V Dk Dh 

IJI 7A O ■ Bk a 25 — M 

IB IJ - 1 Bk Bk' Bk 

NUB S3B5 AIM KM 41 tl 
-5*7 l.« '■ S10 Ufa, Ufa TJ — M 

Jl Ul 34 1420 PM PM Bk — M 

IN 14 » MU 771. 744* 77fa .1 

IN 44 a SOI 21V* aDfa II N 

i-fa m u u m Bk m -U 

- H 114 lk ik Kh r 1 

in ao « 2S7 2BM It Ok -V 

5 * *1 - u nvt on sm -im 



w m - o m m in »im 

tit U - S Ok 1* s * M 

4JM U If IM 237 fa 33AM DAfa «M 

“ 'A iSt r "fS 'K -2 

N a I a « 5 m SS T5 

a « b * S' * Si l!S 

_ 7 127 4fa «M Ik lk 


<!!E 


- B mu 38 fa 37 


* u _ 111 IT MM IM 

I7» m a kia Ok II Ok 

ON S3 n 54*u **fa 4SV. SIS* 


Inter 


' - Cc Wr^Stf. 


HA 51 □ 773 Kfa Ok K 7 * 

fe “ : »? ov. S Sm 

■A a - "u Sm |m S 2 

iS *< u i id 2SM Ufa m 

IS tl - 'S u« »«« U“ 

tw TO — 4 K Ok K 

in . in on im tm r* 


’Sis s& u s % sa is 

24 j ij « - s* 

iju 71 1 n ii Ufa is* 

SI 73 IV Ufa IA-4 1AM 

‘Sa u Z M IIJ. MM IIP 

nr I A 1/ IKI Ufa 27 — H’V 

■“ JIU UM MV Ufa 

jn ~ ~ mm Ufa »>> nw 


JS 142 u lOfa 

_ 1241 Jfa 

IT 40 a-* 

B 177 BM 

_ 1471— MM 
W 1091 Ok 
H kk 
33 23W 47fa 

H OI bk 


_ I 111 111 * 

_ n ism 
- »* “ 


55H 3SMTtanA*ii 
KM KVT NI2 
ASM 0 Tntiini 
B» UMTaMOmt 
33M 71 fa T0-— - 

«m e. io b*— . 

JAM l7WfTr«»w« 

13 AfaTf h m CW I 
» OOM THkgl 
mm lOMTmeOin 
1AM II4.T»3C*4" 
UM IlkTBWP 


01 JAM SOM 

14 223iu V. 

15 IAJS BM 

_ 119 STM 

_ 50 AM* 

3A IM I7fa 

41 41 fa 


9 GK 


_ X Wi 

14 X 3AM 
4 SM JIM 
_ 0 SAM 

. Iff IS 
5* 163 2T« 

niJM av* 

U 477 by 

ii w m 


TM AMT BCa- 
7W ABM TfHOGa.. 

itm nwTnio«gt 

IS 1 — HHkT nwW 
25 I9MT «SN5K 
59 B Ternco 
37 M 24MYV6AS 
SM 23 fa TY A 44 8 
KM 1AM TUCB 

1AM UtkTvOVn 
oo ikiww 
15 II t€»7B 
ABM SMTfntjK 


R 8 i J E C 

!S S : 33 & SS -m 

,2 a s .ffi M sa ^ ^ -t? 

-s u fa s sa 

IS a ;*s is r v 

S 11 Bin SAM ® Jffa -fa 

§ is : sa isa is bl 

-ISiSSSK g! :5 

]£SrSu ^ ^ ^ 

* . s tm s U-! 

im U B TAfJI 4*fa 4AT— 4*V> — ■* 

iBiarsf .« 

15 « is Sm S2 SS za 


Sk 14*. Tin— fa n 

IJk I TMm 


103 7D A 574 

_ u in 
is m - a 
w j u TO 
UB U - »} 

9 43 - 1777 

j« 14 ii in 


Ok OIMTiCDBBS 
IKM nViI4MKD 
tffa K'AYaMS 

Sm « paoi 

J7VV IAMTaTO 

«m *£IS-Sk 

3AM -AlbTfaUEIM 

Bk akTAIBT*?. 

jaw a»Ia?SS 2 S 

Stfa MMTfUSIDM 


a it n 

ii ti u 3a 

|,4| 74 - 3A 

xn 61 17 on 


sisaj^ iss 

JM OMty • 


.154 l3 Z 3D2 

JH IS IS 333 

“ « 513 


iS « 1 B» Ok on 

4le 1 * 4U 25W BAM Bk 

1(B »sw» % 

r ii Si "£ s Sfa 

“ 16 MM »M 3Afa 

,40 ll SlINHiUJ "*S 'Ut 
ji i o w «!• £S fit 

_ 96 UU O'* 1JM Bk 
43 I0J _ IMO • ”• J/? 


S s jj 40-6 J4M Ok 

* « " ji? r i” 



JM fM tfaK 

ATM n TrKnm 
2SV. Bk'Wl.dT 
ifa TfaTBegh 
76M 4-.PTKB 1 

Bk ISfa TBM— . 
AIM KMTntrei* 
"fa n SSL. 

4 Is* BklMMI 
oi iaviUkk*' 
it»j lAM fnorwa 
ins UMTHonn 

n** 

V IlwWO-nll 

Bk nkm* 

S“ Mg? 

jam anweiAd 

sssa^K. 

lUSSKa 

KM JIVSIMKIn 
ATM 3AM ~n»—- " 
TM IfaTTk-lCP 

I3M 4MtUBW»Bf 


.1* lj A 1X2 IS. 1« UP —• 

IJ S“i 1 ■SSSKS^i 

1 1414 I4M UM IB* ‘ W 
IX 74 _ 'gmo gw gfa 1 

a t ,-7 ™ sa 
^iia'aMSfaS saiifa 

N »4 S n 3 Bk BM -fa 

l iS £! - Sm sa sa r 

Jg: jsgs: 

In u - IJ Bfa 2 Wi —fa 

s : 'i» *£ £ -J 

S3 13 “ 'S! 52 Sm SS ^ 


'" I U Ifa Ifa Ifa *M 

«• 46 30 10*1 IB 1 - W* - 

2 u r as iS Bh >m -fa 

** _ « ^3 Bk bk gs - 

. IJ ir 434 47V. AIM Ah ■ W 

in U II 2330 0 A 47 - Ifa 

do ij is m a . 25 25 ■» 


H J 13 41 MM JAM M*J -'< 

iiS m it s !!!i IS; _i* 


IJ9I f- II uv. ISM — M 

- g. too an a a 1 - -* 

RUB WMU WM 5 JJ HM -IJl 
jo J 17 778 XM Mfa bk -M 

■* _ 44 3U 41* Kfa Kfa — W 

IX 90 BA ISM 3SM BJ ■ M 

n 3 _ in Bk ak bk ■ fa 

in _ ISO Bk a* 37 rk 

j J • s £ ss £ 

« " ? 1 R % R Ta 

IX M - 17 !'■•* II* *"• —fa 



Z3Q _ _ 

US u . 

1-44 IJ *• 


- J 43W 4SW Ck -k 




national 

Fund 


ts a - 

ui u , 
.* 1.1 21 
Ul II , 


iju m m* aw • fa 
IA 3* Bh Bh ‘ fa 

■DA 1I4A IIM BK «'A 


i nits ■ DrttUrf 


a s s ss s h §' _i 

74 _ lU9 AIM 61 M -W 

“ n JK. «S Vt .* 


£* t.: £ 


- II WAu IM lk Wk .fa 

‘-2 ,1 IS 103 1?t,J ira» — M 

-**> IJl II Ul T2M 214k 214* *M 

- S ..5! « m* hm — ■* 

— .-s M 11211 711* 406* TO — 

Jl - 1*1 BM 14M IBM — M 

*N f.l _ ID 2S SS 25 _ 

UU. lb ik Ml n I 

.-H 3 £ X7Su n Hk BM . M 

» w D Tut BM JIM JIM — M 

1*7 15 - II MM MM Uk .16 

£13 Ob _ B ISM Bk m* tk 

DO li 2ft Ufa Jffa — Vfc 

- n u bmsii wk m* nh _ 

UfF 44 JA ts MW Sim UM fib 

N U 14 IB XI6 Bk N 

IN 13 IA Nil KM 4} o* .£ 

iS J !! S’ '*> m *5 




.. r..:v;J6T23*r! 

;.-a : jth.V 4 jj>? 


1 *'.:**? 


136 U 20 IM KM Kfa 40M 

- “ * » Si sa 


X U a ”S S" SS SS d! 

IX u «. .4014 2 Sfa Tm 


'• Sr-V-T. 

- : *- !-->*:■ 


ms. ii? i ™'iK isa sa “* 

1 1 S 1 1 f f t 

vH d !s ^ "5 sa p :s ■ -T- . 

•• “S ® & SS ft -i V ~ r - 

= 5 H S5 SS Sm :a ^ S i s ’. 

* G S 45 :5 ^ . • . 

^ ’3 S ^ I? is RS -5 . 


*• jnrfa. 


" ‘‘t v 'it 


'■re-, rr.a^t 


•' '** •*£ m .*»; 


•i S S F P is 

5 !« .8 sa 88 S5- *“ 

L j |2 3m Sm t« 

ij ji*^" ®fa Sit Sm -S 

J fi \ A is ” ® =| 

— ■% i«n mt ux mi .E 


t % i a 
£ a 


a !l a ^ ^ 

in u S *! Uj I*fa 

S“i5 * ^ S 

is rf i a fi S 


' ‘xrt 

' 1 WfV •; 

' :i; -*r 2W S'*** 

!»rti 


S JS 8 # “? 

fJJJ — fi 


1 ‘■V'- v-Tir^rv-' 




'• Ii:“ 5 I . 


































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1997 


PAGE 19 


Murdoch and Packer 
Settle Suit on Supply 

Of TV Prneram miner 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


When Beer Hype Falls Flat 


Bloomberg Newt 

BEIJING — It is a Thursday night 
in Beijing, and under dm throbbing 
strobe befits at Oriental Disco No, 1, 


^^tVOwSUfF^DUpaeka 

Austraiia 's two most 

powafuj media owners, RupertMur- 

^^^^P^a-.hayesettleda 
yearlong feud over control of media 
ana entertainment assets, their 
comoanies i, ■ 


— — r— lmirsaay. 

Legal action by Nine Network 

controlled by MrJWsSX 
mg & Broadcasting Ltd-, over an 
agreemem for Mr. Murdoch’s News 
j-orp to supply programming to 
Nme has been settled out of court, 
the companies 

Terms of the settlement were not 
disclosed. But under the agreement. 
Nine Network is to receive movies 
and television programs from Fox 
Network and Twentieth Centmy- 
Fox, both of which are owned by 
News Coro. 

Nine Network, which has rights 
to show matches in Australia's of- 
ficial rugby league, also has agreed 
to broadcast games played in an- 
other rugby league organized by 
News Coro., the Super League. 

News Carp, set up the Super 
League to provide exclusive sports 
programming for its Foxtel cable- 
television service, which it owns 
with _ the state-owned telecommu- 
nications carrier Telstra Corp. The 
battle for sports prog ramming is 
crucial to the success of Foxtel and 
its main pay -TV rival, Optus Vision, 
in which Publishing & Broadcasting 
has a stake. 

Mr. Murdoch said he applauded 
the success of the negotiations be- 
tween Super League and the Nine 
Network, adding that he had “the 


ughest Regard for Mr. Packer as a 
distinguished Australian business- 
man and broadcaster." 

That statement contrarapd u/jth Mr. 
Murdoch’s assertions in April 1996 
that he was not sure Mr. Packer was 
trustworthy and that Mr. Packer had 
gone back on agreements by being 
instrumental in barring the Super 


In late 1995, the two men reached 
.a series of agreements, including the 
transfer of the Fox prog r am rights to 
Nine, Australia’s top-ranked com- 
mercial television network, from 
Seven Network Ltd., Nine’s main 
rivaL News Corp. owns 13.9percent 
of Seven Network. 

Their agreements began to un- 
ravel when Mr. Packer backed a suc- 
cessful court action by the official 
Australian Rugby League to prevent 
the Super League from starting play 
in February 1996. In October, a high- 
er court overturned the results of that 
court action, paving the way for the 
Super League to begin. 

After the dispute escalated, Mr. 
Murdoch pulled out of that agree- 
ment, leading to the court action 
from Nine. It was not immediately 
clear whether Nine would have ac- 
cess to Fox programs as a result of 
the settlement 

Seven Network's shares closed in 
S ydney' at 4.21 Australian dollars 
($3.27), down 9 cents. Publishing & 
Broadcasting fell 2 cents to 6.62, and 
News Corp. fell 2 cents to 6.87. The 
settlement was announced after the 
market closed 

( Bloomberg , Reuters ) 


some^tXJ collegetoosare ooppmgto 
music by Boyz D Men. 

But “look at what they're drink- 
ing,” complained Simon Myers, 
promotions manager far Carlsberg 
AS, one of Denmark’s biggest brew- 
ers. “It’s aU Coke.” This is not a 
good sign, as the event, a dance con- 
test. is a promotion for Carisberg. 

Beer companies from all over 
the world are trying these kinds of 
gimmicks in China, the world’s 
second-biggest beer market in 
terms of consumption, but brewers 
here are still losing tens of millions 
of dollars a year. 

That is because China is still too 
poor for most people to be able to 
afford beer, even though compe- 
tition, when Communist leaders al- 
low it, is starting to push costs up 
and prices down; and h is not just 
beer sales that are tepid Makers of 
cars, computer software and nu- 


merous other products offering 
their products here are losing 
money trying to make initial con- 
tact with some of the country's 2.2 
billion potential consumers. 

“There’s going to be some fal- 
lout,” said Gus Gutherie, man- 
aging director of a Bass PLC brew- 
ery in the northeastern province of 
Jilin. “There are far too many 
players in the market.” 

The Chinese drink a lot of beer 
— 17 million metric tons last year, 
as much as the rest of Asia com- 
bined Most of it is of poor quality , 
brewed by hundreds of small 
companies and selling for around 4 
yuan (about SO cents) a pint 

China is “tbe biggest growth 
opportunity in the world,” said 
Alan Reid, chief operating officer 
in China for Foster’s Brewing 
Group Ltd of Australia. 

Foster’s has spent 5100 million 
refurbishing three breweries in 
China. Last year it produced 
125,000 tons of beer, including its 
premium Foster's brand and local 


beers made in partnership with 
Chinese brewers. Unfortunately, it 
must sell 230.000 ions to break 
even. Foster's has Josr S36 million 
here in the past three years. 

The high cost of distribution is 
partly to blame: Shipping wiihin 
the country is so expensive that it 
prohibits nationwide distribution 
of cheap local beers and can even 
be a problem for the more ex- 
pensive foreign beers. 

But that doesn’t stop the brew- 
ers from pouring on the promo- 
tions in an attempt to build brand 
loyalty for the future. 

At the Public Space, a fashion- 
able bar in Beijing, the walls sport 
‘ a neon Budweiser sign and Caris- 
berg posters. Ashtrays tout the 
Dutch beer Heineken. Cerveceria 
Cuauhtemoc Moctezuma, a Mex- 
ican brewer, gave the bar’s owner, 
Henry Lee. a refrigerator just for 
stocking its Sol beer. 

"Whichever company gives me 
the most," Mr. Lee said. “I pro- 
mote their beer.” 


Hong Kong 

Singapore 


Tokyo 

Hang Seng 

Straits Times 

Nikkei 225 

150K 

2200 


OT 

A J . 

14000 



■»vv*yy 

12003 J 

2i!0 ilU 

r 

20000 ' \ • 

12000 Jr 

2120' \(U \ 

f 

19000 \ 

iiooor^ 

2060 1/ 

1 

iflKH V 

10000 ^ SON 

D J SONDJ 

■.7000 A s o N D J 

1996 

1997 1996 

1997 

1996 1997 

Exchange 

Index 

Thursday Prev. % 



Close 

Close Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

13,630.68 13,766.65+0,47 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2,220.36 2,221.15 -0.04 

Sydney 

All Ordinaries ■ 

2.435.30 2,439^0 *0.06 


Tokyo Nikkei 225 
Kuala Lumpur Composite 


IB. 144.34 18.093.13 +0.28 
1,214.42 1,216.64 -0.18 

822^7 828.91 -0.76 

711.86 699.76 +1.73 


Ford, Citing Yen, Ponders Price Rise 


Cm^Std by Ov Su& From Dbpaxltes 

TOKYO — Ford Motor Co. (Ja- 
pan) Ltd, a unit of Ford Motor Co., 
said Thursday that the weak yen 
might prompt it to raise its car prices 
in Japan. 

“We’ve been trying to keep our 
prices competitive,” the unit's pres- 
ident, Koran Suzuki, said, “tea we 
may not be able to bold prices, as tbe 
current situation is very rough for us." 

The dollar, which has risen as 
high as 1 17.49 yen this week — its 


highest level in nearly four years 
and a rise of 47 permit from its 
postwar low of 79.75 yen reached in 


April 1995 — was quoted late 
Thursday at 1 16.55 yen. 

Mr. Suzuki said the automaker 


planned to expand sales by 11 per- 
cent in Japan this year, to 52,000 
cars, including some models man- 
ufactured by Mazda Motor Co. 

Ford aims for sales of 100,000 
cars in Japan by 2000, he said 
He added that - die company 


would focus on trying to sell larger 
“American-style” cars in Japan, 
rather than smaller models designed 
for the local market. 

Separately, the Chrysler Japan 
Sales unit of Chrysler Corp. said its 
new registrations reached 17,404 
vehicles in 1 996, up 20peicem from 
tbe year before. But Chrysler sold 
only 994 of its right-hand-drive 
Neon cars, amid heavy competition 
from domestic models. 

(Bloomberg. AP) 


FUGITIVE: Casting the Net 

Continued from Page 15 crimes, you have to be c 


its hands on some fugitives 
for years, even decades. For 
example, Mr. Rich, an inter- 
national commodities trader, 
has lived openly in Switzer- 
land since 1982 after freeing 
die United States to avoid 
prosecution in a tax case. Mr. 
Vesco fled federal charges In 
1972 that he defrauded mu- 
tual fund investors of $224 
million. He is serving a 13- 
year sentence in a Cuban jail 
for other matters. 

Ghaith Pharaon, the former 
front man for Bank of Credit & 
Commerce International and 
its illegal purchases of fman- 
cial institutions in the United 
States; was mdicted^m fraud 

199l!^^nOT? J Lte 1 ^Seen 
Saudi Arabia amf Pakistan, 
fanner associates say. 

Tbe number of fugitive fin- 
anciers is growing, said an of- 
ficial at the Office of Inter- 
national Affairs in . the 
Department of Justice's Crirok 
inal Division, without provid- 
ing specific figures. But die 
number of extraditions, relat- 
ing to financial crimes and oth- 
erwise, has stayed nriafivety- 
flaL During the L2-momhpen r . 
od ended SepL 30, 160 people 
were extradited in aU categor- 
ies of crime, according to tire 
Marshals Service. There were 
191 extraditions in tire year 
ended Sept. 30, 1995. 

What hurts the “recovery” 
rate, federal officials say, is 

that some countries. like Cuba, 

have no extradition treaty with 
tire United States, while ofh-‘ 
era, suit* as Switzerland, make 
distinctions among forms of 
financial skullduggery. 

“When you talk of fin a n cial 


crimes, you have to be care- 
ful,” said Erwin Jeoni, head of 
extradition at the Swiss Justice 
Department in Bom. In 
Switzerland, he said, financial 
crimes involve fraud or em- 
bezzlement. Then there are so- 
called fiscal offenses, he said, 
which cover tax matters. 

“We don’t extradite for 
fiscal and customs offenses, ’’ 
Mr. Jenni said, a policy that 
allows Mr. Rich to live there. 

To impnpve the Justice De- 
partment’s record for captur- 
ing big-time fugitives. Attor- 
ney General Janet Reno last 
month started an interagency 
fugitive alert service, in con- 
junction with tire UJ5. Infor- 
mation Agency and Voice of 
■America. The effort includes 
a World Wide Web site (http:/ 
/www.usdoj.gov/crimioal/ 
oiafiig/fiagitives-htm) show- 
mgpicnires of fugitives. 

The department and VOA 
began a radio broadcast. In- 
ternational Crime Alert, in 
August that hi ghlig hts a dif- 
ferent fugitive each week. 




Schlumberger 


The uxknta»d numuDcex tint as from 
~24'Jmn>7. J997 at KurAwocutir 1S.V, 
SgKKnot 174 Antterdupii the Cati fk< w 
SdifauDbergeT limited repr. 5 than* of 
r c ornu a auk erf USSOjOI per value, will 
he payable with Mia. 3,30 n« per 

Certificate repr. 5 shares and with EHk. 
6600 net per Certificate repr. 100 share*, 
frfiv. per nedte 16.12.96; U5IQJ75 per 
•hare). The dhri d end distribution » not 
nhject to in with holding at source. 

I PARIBA S 

AIHME«SlHAIlEKAVrOOH B.Y. 

Amsterdam, 10 January, 1997 


Ninth Property Lender 
Falls Victim in Japan 


Bloomberg Nova 
TOKYO — All Carp-, a 
real-estate lending concern, 
said Thursday it would close 
in March, tire latest victim of 
tire bad-loan fallout of Ja- 
pan’s property-lending boom 
of tire 1980s. 

If would be the ninth bank- 
ruptcy since January 1995 of 
so-called nonbank lenders, 
companies that take no depos- 
its but faid money they barrow 
from other banks, and analysts 
said it would not be tire last 
“Japanese banks ' bad-loan 
problems are far from being 
solved,” said Koya Hase- 
gawa ofNIkko Research Cen- 
ter. “This year, we expect to 


ADVEBTISEMEVr 

BAJWPQN PRINTING LTIL 

(CPBfl) 

Thr undrrsipin! unonnret that » from 
Jan buy £4. HW? n fe»-4noci«Ui? 
Anmndmi. dri. cpn. no. <9 fatxaaipmard b> «n 
“Affidavit") of Ute CDR* Dai-Nmpoa 
Printing Ltd. toil be payable with Dfk *L26 
per. CDR. repr. lOOrfu md with DO*. 9M0 per 
CDR. repr. UOOOifct (dn.per mnkae 3UW.96 
gran Yea (LOO p. ihj after deduction of 15*4 
Jammeae cec Yen 12QJX) = Dfk. I JS3 per CDR 
repr. 100 aha. Yen 1.200.- = Dfk IM0 per 
CDR repr. 1000 die. tfkhoui an Affidavit 20% 
Japanese uk Yen 1 60.— ^ Dfli 2.44 per CDR 
repr. 100 dat. Yea 1-600.- ■= Dfe. 24M per 
CDR repr. l400d».«iDbeiltdiidnL 
After 31.03.97 the dividend will only 
be paid under deduction of 20% Jap. lax 
wnA Dflii. &65; Dfk. 8640 reap. >0u and 
1.000 tha, in accordance with the 
Japanese lax regulation*. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam, January 10, 1997 


see more closures of non bank 
lenders than the five that col- 
lapsed last year.” 

The government estimates 
that Japanese banks and other 
lending institutions are 
saddled with about 30 trillion 
yen ($256.68 billion) in bad 
loans. Some analysts say the 
actual figure may be more 
than double that amount 
All Corp.’s debts totaled 
341.4 billion yen. The com- 
pany has 181.2 billion yen in 
bad loans — 85 percent of all ! 
its loans outstanding. i 

All Corp. said it had used | 
bed judgment in making real- 
estate loans on expectations i 
that land prices would rise. ! 


ADVERTISEMENT 

HITACHI LTD 

(CPUs) 

‘lire undenoened announce* that M from 
Jinnarv 24, 1997 at Kartadnir N.V, 
Anuurrilun, div. cpn. IM. 49 (accompanied 
bv an ’Affidavit') of thr GDRn HNaeU 
lid. will be parable with LMh. 3542 per 
CDR. repr. 500 dw. and with DfU. 7UJ4 per 
CDR. repr. 1.000 aha. Mir. per rec-dale 
3 1.09.9a, gross Yen 5.5 p- ah.) after 
Muc&m of 15% Japanese tax; Yen 41240 


ton. repr. I.IKIU ana. (dir. per rec-cutie 
3 1.09.9c, gross Yen 5.5 p- sh.) after 
deduction of 15% Japanese tax: Yen 41240 1 
= Dfk 649 per CuR repr. 500 sfe. Yen 
825.- - Dfk 1248 per CDR repr. 1.000 
sht, Without an Affidavit 20% Japanese 
tax: Yen 550,- = Dfk 8^8p«r CDR repr. 
500 aha. Yen 1.100.- «= Dfe. 16,76 per 
CDR repr. 1.000 sha, will be deducted. 

After 3143.1997 tbe dividend mil only 
bo paid under deduction of 20% Jap. tax 
wnfafXb. 33,43: Dfk 6646 reap. 500 and 
1.000 shs., in accordance with tbe I 
Japanese tax regulation*. | 

AMS1EBDAM DEPOSITARY 

COMPANY N.V. | 

Amsterdam, January 10, 1997 j 





To tire Holders of 

International Income 
Fund 

Long Term Units - Dentschemark Portfolio 

EBC Fbnd Managers (Jersey) LimitedAs Manager of tbe above 
menti oned Fund has declared the following dividend per Unit for 
tbe financial period ended 3ist December. 1996 . payable on the 
31 st January, 1997, in respect efUnta in issue on 31st December, 

1996. 

Long Tom Units - DetasdremarfcPOrtfblio 
DM 6.00 per Unit - payable Against Coupon No. 3 

Unit holders should send their Coupons to the Manager at EBC 
House, 1-3 Seale Street, St Holier, Jersey. JE4 8XL, Channel 

Islands or to one of the following Paying Agents:- 

Banque Gdndrale dn Luxembourg (Sdsse) S .A. 

Rennweg 57, 8023 Zurich. Switzerland 

Bannue G&frale du Luxembomg SA, 

50 Averme JJ. Kennedy, L-2951 Luxembourg. 


Airanecmems nave ww — 

Umts -mi Poitfbfio in issue at 31st January. 1997 may reinvest 

the dividend paid at that dare madditicxMl rents atapordresepwe 

to tbe Sc Net Asset Value per UnU it 3 1 st 
I Sin indication, the Basic Net Asset Value per Unit was 

. Ite doK rf bffissss <B 28* 

holders who desire to reinvest their dividend should advisefee 


SBC Fond Managers (Jersey) Limited 
Manager 

Dated ; 17th January, 1397 


To the Holders of 

International Income 
Fund 

Long Term Units - US$ Portfolio 
EBC Fond Managers (Jersey) Limited as Manager of tbe above 
mentioned Fund has declared tbe following dividend per Unit 
for the financial period ended 31st D ece m ber. 1996, payable 
on the 31st January. 1997, in respect of Units in issue oo 
31st December, 1996. 

Long Term Units - USS Portfolio 

US$2.00 per Unit - payable against Coupon No. 36 

Unit holders should send their Coupons to die Manager at 
EBC House, 1-3 Seale Street, St. Heliar, Jersey, JE4 8XL. Channel 
islands or to one of tbe following Paying Agents: - 
Bankers Trust Company, 280 Park Avenue, 

New York, N.Y. 10017. U^A 
Basque Gdndrale du Luxembourg (Suisse) S 
Renmveg 57, 8023 Zurich, Switzerland 

Banqne G6n6rale du Luxembourg SA^ 

50 Avenue JF. Kennedy, L-2951 Luxembourg. 

Arrangcmentt have been made whereby holders ofall Long Term 

Units - USS Portfolio in issue at 31st January, 1997 may reinvest 
the dividend paid atihat date in additional units at a purchase price 
equal to the Basic Net Asset Value per Unit at 3 1st January. 1997 

(as an indication, dieBasicNetAssetVataeperUnitwasUS$3285 

on Sth January. 1997). This right will be terminated attire close of 
business on 28th February, 1997. Long Term Unit holdas who 
desire id reinvest their dividend should advise tire Manager 
accordingly when presenting their Coupons far payment. 

EBC Fund Managers (Jersey) Limited 
Manag er 

Dated : 17th January, 1997 


CHIC Stock Recovers 

Bloomberg News 

HONG KONG — Shares in Cl’i'lC Pacific Ltd. rose 3 
percent Thursday after managers of China's largest Hong 
Kong investment company said they would hold the 15.5 
percent stake in the company they had bought at a discount 
fr om th eir parent company as a “long-term" investment. 

OTIC Pacific rose 1 .20 Hong Kong dollars to close ai 
41.80 dollars (55.40). The shares bad fallen about 11 
percent since the purchase Dec. 30 amid concern the 
executives would sell their shares for a quick profit. 

“That definitely helps," Andy Mantel or Shanghai 
Growth Investment Ltd. said of the managers’ statement 
“The managers committed a lot of money to buy a lot of 
share s." The managers bought 330 million shares from 
OTIC Hong Kong lid. ai 33 dollars a share — a 24 percent 
discount to the market price at the time. 


Bangkok SET 822^7 828.91 -0.76 

Seoul Composite index 711.86 699.76 +1.73 

Taipei Stock Market Index 7^06.« 7.165.46 +0.57 

Manila PSE 3,290.19 3.258.52 *037 

•Jakarta Composite Index 658,70 656.07 +OAO 

Wellington NZ5&40 : 2,434.89 2,431.30 +0.15 

Bombay Sensitive Index 3.455.88 3.492.26 -1.04 

Source: Telekurs lrucmai.xu! Herald Tribune 

Very brief iya 

• Nintendo Co.'s stock plummeted 660 yen. to 7,410 
($63.40), after the independent software maker Enix Corp. 
announced it would stop making games exclusively for Nin- 
tendo video-game machines. 

• Nomura Securities Co.’s current, or pretax, profit for the 
nine months ended Dec. 3 1 rose aimosr 70 percent from a year 
earlier, to 103.70 billion yen, as revenue from underwriting 
new bonds doubled to 36.90 billion yen. 

• Japan's crude-steel production fell 2.8 percent, to 98.8 
million metric tons, in 1996. 

• Taiw an began the international sale of a 4.1 percent stake in 
China Steel Corp. that was postponed last year because of 
falling steel prices and lower profit at Taiwan’s largest steel- 
maker. The Economics Ministry, which holds 45 percent of 
the company, expects the sale to bring in 7.77 billion Taiwan 
dollars (S2S1.2 million). 

• China's retail prices rose at a 4,2 percent annual rate in 
December, the smallest increase since 1992, compared with a 
4.6 percent rate in November, as abundant harvests kept food 
costs low. 

• Malaysia’s consumer prices rose 3.5 percent in 1996. 
compared with 3.4 percent in 1995. 

• PT Astra International’s Indonesian unit, PT Toyota 
Astra Motor, plans to export its multipurpose Kijang vehicle 
to other Southeast Asian countries starting in 1998. an In- 
donesian newspaper reported. 

• The Philippines received 5.6 billion pesos (S2 12.9 million) 
from sales of state properties in 1996, well below its budgeted 

f oal of 215 billion pesos, as it did not sell shares in Manila 
ilectric Co. and Food Terminal Inc. as planned. 

• Singapore's port authority said it had the world’s highest 
growth rate in container traffic last year, at 9.3 percent, and 
had narrowed Hong Kong's lead over it as the busiest 
container port. 

• Tuan Sing Holding Ltd. of Singapore will pay 80.7 million 
Australian dollars ($62.7 million) for a 39 percent stake in 
Grand Hotel Group. Bloomberg, AFP. AP, Reuters 




international perspective. 

Take advantage of this limited opportunity to fry the International Herald Tribune 
with a law cost, 2-month trial subscription and enjoy delivery to your home or office 
every morning. 


COUNffir/CUWENCY 

2 MONTHS 
NEWSTAND 
PRICE 

2 MONTHS 
OFFER 
PRICE 

DISCOUNT 

Off 

COVER PRICE 

AUSTRIA AJSl 

1.456 

650 

55% 

BELGIUM 

BEF 

3^80 

1.350 

60 % 

DENMARK 

DttC 

780 

360 

56% 

HNMMJ 

j 

624 

3)0 

50% 

FRANCE FF 

520 

210 

60% 

GSWANY* DEM 

182 

72 

60% 

GREAT BRITAIN 

E 

47 

22 

53% 

GRffiCE DR | 

18,200 

9.100 

50% 

IRELAND 

«£ 1 

52 

26 

50% 

ITALY 111 | 

145,600 

58,000 

60 % 

LUXEMBOURG iff j 

3,3800 

U50 

60% 

netxrlands 

NIGJ 

195 

78 

60 % 

NORWAY NOK 

832 

390 

53% 

PORTUGAL BC 

11.960 

5,000 

58% 

SPAIN PTAS 

11,700 

5,000 

57% 

SWEDEN 

SEK 

832 

350 

58% 

SWTTZHOAM) 

CHF 

166 

66 

60% 

HSEWHBK 

S 

- 

SO 

- 

• For MiformarioA meenM bond dofereryin moj 
Germany ec 013fr64 8585orla« IMP] P712« 

or German dries cal tol In* IHT 

HI. 


tf*s. I would bta to start reccwjp tbe International HeroW Tribune. ^ ^ ^ 

□ My ehfldi is enclosed (payable to the IHT) 

□ Please change my: 

D Amex D Diners Oub D VISA D Access D MasterCard □ Eunxord 
Credit card diarges wit be made in French Francs at currenl rates. 

Card No.’ 6?. Dote: 

Signature: . — , — 

For business orders, indicate your VAT Na _ — 

(IHT W Number 9174732021126) 

Mr/Mrt/Ms Fandy None: — — - 

RrsJ JobTiHe: — . — 

Mcding Address; , 

Qy/Cods: 

Country. 

Home lief *** —Ri-Jncst lei No 

E-Moil Address ., . — 

IgolrtuscapyofthelHTcfi: C 1 kicsk Q hotel D airline G other 
P I do not wish to reoene irdormafon from other earaUly screened companies 
Malaria* to: Uemabond Herokt Tribune 
181, avenue Charles dc Gavtie, 9252 1 Newil^ Cede*. FrwMS. 

Fax: +33 1J1 43 92 10 
OR CALL +33 T 41 43 93 61 

In Asias +852 29 22 ? I 88* fct the USftofl-frcte): I-S00-S82-2SS4. 
BMtnl Npi subtv BAcwn 
Oder vc£d lor now subscribers only. HA2M 


-sm. ' 7 , " r- T* - • “ 





World Roundup 


Rinker Leads Pack 

GOLF Larry Rinker. nearing his 
40th birthday and still struggling to 
make a living at golf, shot a 9- 
under-par 63, for the opening-day 
lead in the Bob Hope Chrysler 
Classic. Steve Jones, and Mark Cal- 
cavecchia were one shot behind. 

A couple of players were note- 
worthy by their absence, Arnold 
Palmer and Tiger Woods. Palmer, 
67, who had played in aJJ 37 pre- 
vious Hope tournaments and won 
five, underwent successful surgery 
for prostrate cancer Wednesday at 
the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. 

Woods is skipping the Hope after 
winning the first PGA event of 1 997 
earlier in the week at La Cost&AAP) 

Australia Beats Pakistan 

cricket Fast bowler Anthony 
Stuart made a hat trick as Australia 
took a three-wicket victory over 
Pakistan in its World Series limited 
ovens match Thursday. Chasing 
Pakistan’s total of IS1 for nine in 
50 overs. Australia closed with 182 
for seven. (Reuters) 

• An unbroken fourth wicket 
stand of 133 by Rahul Dravid and 
Saurav Ganguly brought India to 
233 for three at the close of opening 
day in the' third and final test against 
South Africa. (Reuters I 

Kami Recovering 

soccer The Nigerian interna- 
tional Nwankwo Kami is making 
progress from heart surgery but his 
Italian club. Intemazionale. said it 
was still too early to tell whether he 
would ever play again. (Reuters) 

Who's World’s Fastest? 

track Michael Johnson, who 
won double gold in the 200 meters 
and 400 meters at the Atlanta 
Olympics, and Donovan Bailey, 
who won the 100 meters in a world 
record 9.84. will run for the fastest- 
man title in a special 150-meter 
event May 3 1 in Toronto. ( API 

Ex- Jets President Dies 

Jim Kensil. 66. a former top aide 
to NFL commissioner Pete Rozelle 
and president of the New York Jets 
for 1 1 years, died Thursday. 


Courier’s 2d Round: 
Winning the Hard Way 

llth Seed ‘Gets the Job Done’ in 5 Sets 


By Robin Finn 

jVfW York Turns Service 


MELBOURNE — Nobody still indie 
hum at the Australian Open worked 
harder than Jim Courier in his second- 
round match Thursday; aside from him, 
none of the seeded contenders were 
made to feel like an endangered species, 
and nobody except Courier and his al- 
most unshakeable challenger dealt with 
the potential perils of a match that re- 
quired a fifth set for resolution. 

Living dangerously, working ardu- 
ously, and claiming not to mind it, Com- 

Avstialiaii Open 

ier plowed through another five-setter 
Thursday at the tournament he won in 
1992 and 1993 and where he is trying to 
reassert himself this year. 

After sneaking into a seeded slot by 
winning a title at Doha. Qatar, this 
month. Courier has sneaked into the 
third round the hard way. 

‘ ‘By land or by sea. I got the job done, 
and that's the ultimate thing for me," 
said Courier after his latest overtime 
effort, a three-hour, 37-minute contest 
where he got the job done by breaking 
for a 4-3 lead in the final set and con- 
verting his second match point. 

The 1 1th -seeded Courier improved his 
career five-set record to 12-12 with a 9-6. 
6-2, 3-6. 6-4. 64 victory against Slava 
Dosedel of the Czech Republic. Courier 
toiled through three consecutive five- 
setters here lost year, where Andre 
Agassi downed him in the quarterfinals, 
but this marks the first time he has needed 
lo survive two marathons merely to reach 
the third round of a Grand Slam. 

Courier said his growing familiarity 
with five-set torture contests ought not he 
interpreted as a preference for them. "I 
like to dish it out more than I like to take 
it," he said, "and I’d be happier to win in 
three sets, but each time I hang in there in 
these tough marches. I’m doing nothing 
but helping me in my own mind.” 

In the first round, Sjen| Schalken 
forced him to 8-6 in the fifth set. and 
Thursday it was the 67th-ranked 
Dosedel, a clay-court specialist who de- 
feated Courier at the 1994 Italian Open, 
who pushed the former champion to the 
limit on a chilly, windy cornt. 

By contrast, top-seeded Pete 


Sampras, playing under more protective 
conditions inside the stadium, produced 
a sloppy first set against Adrian Voinea 
of Romania but won the next three in a 
hurry to advance. 3-6. 6-2, 6-3, 6-2- 

In the evening session. 3d-seeded Gor- 
an Ivanisevic's shotmaking was so im- 
peccable dial be worked less than half as 
long os Courier did to get to the third 
round. Ivanisevic all but impaled Karol 
Kuccra of Slovakia with his serves to 
collect a 64, 6-2. 6-2 victory. 

Alike Huber’s second-round match 
against Francesca Lubiani of Italy bad to 
be postponed until Thursday after 
Huber's mother. Gerda, collapsed just 
before Huber’s match Wednesday af- 
ternoon. Though a heart attack was sus- 
pected initially, tests at a local hospital 
ruled that out. Huber, seeded fifth, woo 
her rescheduled match Thursday, reach- 
ing the third round. 4-6, 6-2, 6-0. 

After breaking 26th-ranked Lisa Ray- 
mond for a 54 lead in the first set, 4th- 
seeded Martina Hingis kept her Amer- 
ican challenger at the end of a yoyo for 
the remainder of their 63-minute match. 
Hingis faced just two break points to 
prevail, 64, 6-2. 

But Jolene Wacanabe, the 7Sth-ranked 
Californian who spoiled Jennifer Capri- 
ati's bid to end a Grand Slam losing 
streak was ousted. 7-5, 6-3, in die second 
round by Shi-Ting Wang of China. 

Man: Rosset, ranked 24th, main- 
tained it was just a case of a bad day, not 
continuing bad blood, that played a role 
in his 64, 6-1 , 6-1 victimization by 93d- 
ranked Jeff Tarango, the Californian 
who two years ago accused Rosset of 
receiving favorable treatment from ref- 
eree Bruno Rebeuh. 

Tarango was fined and banned from 
Wimbledon for a year after walking off 
the court there in 1995 in protest of 
Rebeuh, who also fielded a slap from 
Tarango's French-bom spouse. 
Tarango. now 3-1 against Rosset, later 
recanted his remarks about the popular 
Swiss player. 

Twice vulnerable to Grant Stafford in 
past encounters . 5th-seeded Thomas 
Muster stonewalled the South African. 6- 
3. 6-2. 6-2. 

Mary Joe Fernandez, a two-time fi- 
nalist seeded 14th, advanced 7-5, 64, 
against 30th-ranked Yayuk Basuki of 
Indonesia, and 1 5th-seeded Chanda Ru- 
bin downed Sandrine Tested. 6-2. 6-1. 




feb 24, 25, 26, 1997 Paris, France 


ecoi997 


ecortogiques strategies 


SV-V 




An international conference on strategic tools, plans and 

thinking about environment as a component of 
competitiveness, for industry and government. 

Day 1 Policy in the making 
Day 2 Programs - Case studies 
Day 3 Cutting-edge techniques 


Confirmed speakers 

Alain Juppe (France), 

Yoshifumi Tsu[i (fapan), 

Allan Kupds (Canada), 

David Buzzelli (USA), 

Franck Riboud, (France) 

Dr Walter jakobi (U.K/ Germany), 
Erling Lorentzen (Brazil) U.K), 
Klaus Tdpfer (Germany), 

Brice Lalonde (France), 

Mikhael Pozhivanov (Ukraine), 
Olivier Bomsel (France), 

Philip B. Watts (U.K), 

Bill long (OECD/USA), 

Corinne Lepage (France), 

Marius Enthoven 
(EU/Netherlands), 

Dr-lng Wolfgang Holley 
(Germany), 

John Resslar (USA), 

Cliff Bast (USA). 

lean-Fran^ois Bensahel (France), 
Brad Allenby (USA), 

Hiroyuki Fujlmura (Japan), 

Ezio Manzini (Italy). 


Or Werner Poilmann (Germany), 
Julio Velasco (Argentina). 

Tom Hayden (USA). 

Julia Carabias (Mexico), 

T. Van Santen (France), 

Takihiko Ota (Japan), 

Jacques Vernier (France), 

Flora Lewis (france/USA), 
Anne-Marie Boutin (France), 
Frances Caimcross (U.K), 

Mark Hertsgaard (USA), 
Fabienne Goux-Baudiment 
(France), 

Todd Gittlin (USA). 

Jacqueline Aioisi de Larderel 
(France), 

Betti na Laville (France), 

Don Carlton (USA), 

Francois feissinger (France), 
Michel Ogrizek (France), 
Bernard Tramier (France), 
Philippe Lameloise (France), 
Licia Bottura (France/Italy) 


For more details and registration 
information, contact : 

Association for Colloquia on the 
Environment, 

Penny Allen and Christophe Bonazzi, 
73 avenue Paul Doumer 
75016 Paris, France. 

T : 33 (o) 1 45 03 82 84 
F : 33 (o) 1 45 °3 82 80 
E-mail : ace@eco 97 .org 
Web site : www.eco 97 .org 

Ademe 


Honorary Chairman, Brice Lalonde 

with the official patronage of 

The French Ministry of the Environment and 

OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) 




Seifert Quits * 
49ers After ■- 
8 Seasons as 
Head Coach 


I V.: • 

.V :■ .■ 


By Dave Sell 

Washington Post Service 


Yulian Wvt/A^nwr (no^-IW 

Thomas Muster keeping the pressure on Grant Stafford to win Thursday. 


Baseball's Expansion Plan 
Hits Snag With AL Owners 


The Associated Press 

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona — The 
plan to put Arizona in die National 
League and Tampa Bay in die Amer- 
ican hit a bump when American 
League baseball owners rejected it 
duriag a straw vote. 8-6. 

But baseball officials still expected 
the proposal to be approved during a 
major league meeting Thursday. 

“I’m disappointed,” the Arizona 
Diamondbacks' chief operating of- 
ficer. Jerry Colangelo. said. ”1 was a 
little taken aback.” 

Under the proposal approved a night 
earlier by the ruling executive council, 
one expansion team would be assigned 
loeach league in 1 998. creating two 4 5-:. 
team circuits. 

But the AL’s first preference would 
be to get both teams and its second 
preference would be to get Arizona 
rather than Tampa Bay. 


Because Tampa Bay would prob- 
ably be assigned to the AL East, one 
team would have to shift from East to 
Central, and one from Central to 
West Kansas City, the team most 
likely to join the West, objected to the 
plan, as did Texas, which doesn’t like 
being in a division whose three other 
teams are in the Pacific time zone: 
Anaheim, Oakland and Seattle. 

The other main item on the owners 7 
agenda Thursday was the appoint- 
ment of the search committee for a 
new commissioner. 

The executive council also appoin- 
ted a committee to study the issue of . 
Japanese . players’ signing with UJS. 
teams. The : San Diego Padres: assert : 
they have acquired exclusive negoti- 
ating rights to pitcher Hideki Irabu : 
from the Chiba Lotte Marines. The 
right-hander's agent has objected, say- 
ing his client should be a free agent 


The San Francisco 49ers coach, 
George Seifert, who has the highest 
winning percentage in National Foot- 
ball League history, has resigned alter 
t*i ghr seasons, and indications are char be 
could be replaced by Sreve Mariucci* 
coach ar the University of California. 

Seifert, who won his second Super 
. Bowl with the 49ers just two years ago, - 
was under increased pressure after 
Green Bay eliminated the 49ers from the ■ 
playoffs for the second straight season. 
He had a year remaining on ms contract, 
and said he could have finished it. 

“This was the time forme to do this, ” 
Seifert said at a news conference Wed- 
nesday at the 49ers’ practice facility in 
Santa Clara, California. “It’s time for 
some new blood. I’m not saying my 
blood is stagnant. But I’m saying let’s 
just pass this on to someone else. 

The team’s president. Carmen 
Policy, indicated the 49ers were ne- 
gotiating with only one candidate to 
replace Seifert. 

A league source said Wednesday that 
Mariucci was negotiating with the 
49ers. 

Mariucci was quarterbacks coach for 
four seasons with Green Bay, tutoring 
the Packers' star. Brett Favre, before ’ 
taking over Cal for the 1996 season. 
Mariucei’s only Cal team went 6-6, with 
a loss to Navy in the Aloha Bowl. 

Seifert, who will be 57 next week, did 
not rule out coaching again. He replaced 
Bill Walsh, who resigned after the 1988 
season after leading ibe49ers to victory, 
in Soper Bowl XXUL Seifert guided the 
49ers to a Super Bowl title after the 1994 
season and leaves with a 108-35 record. 

. The 49ers became the 10th team to 
change head coaches since the start of 
the 1996 season, and there coaid be 
more. As oTWednesday night. Oakland, 
San Diego, Atlanta, New Orleans, St. 
Louis and the New York Jets had not ' 
filled their vacancies. 

The New York Giants on Wednesday 
completed their search for a replacement 
for Dan Reeves, who was fired, choos- 
ing Jim Fassel. Arizona offensive co- 
ordinator. Reeves, meanwhile, is re- 
portedly. -close - 1 to ...... completing 

negotiations with Atlanta. ..... 

A former quarterback at Fullerton 
State. Fassel' s only head coaching ex- 
perience was at Utah (1985-89), where 
he recruited and coached Detroit lions 
quarterback Scoff Mitchell. 


Scoreboard 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standi nos 


Muume OMSK** 



N 

L 

Pet 

GB 

NewYort 

27 

10 

J30 

— 

Marta 

26 

10 

-722 

H 

Washington 

19 

17 

-528 

rt, 

Orlando 

15 

18 

.454 

10 

Boston 

9 

25 

J85 

li'A 

New Jersey 

9 

25 

-265 

1616 

PtiOodetphki 

8 

28 

-222 

TS'A 

central onastow 



Orioago 

33 

4 

£92 

— 

Derrtat 

27 

9 

750 

Sfc 

AHonta 

23 

11 

.676 

816 

□evtaand 

21 

14 

400 

11 

Charfotte 

21 

16 

-SB 

12 

MBwaufcee 

18 

17 

.514 

14 

Indiana 

17 

18 

AB6 

IS 

Tarorrto 

72 

2t 

■333 

2014 

WKSTtUCO* 

mm 

KX 


UDWGST DtVtSKW 




W 

L 

Pet 

OB 

Houston 

78 

9 

J57 

— 

Utah 

24 

12 

467 

315 

AUnnesato 

16 

21 

432 

12 

Data 

12 

22 

-353 

1416 

San Antonia 

9 

3d 

2S7 

18 

Denver 

9 

28 

-243 

19 

Vancouver 

7 

31 

.184 

21*6 


rnCffKOIVWON 



LA. Lokere 

28 

10 

-737 

— 

Seattle 

27 

11 

Jll 

1 

Portland 

20 

16 

-556 

7 

Soaunrento 

16 

22 

>421 

12 

Gafden State 

14 

22 

JW 

73 

LA. CHopere 

14 

22 

J89 

13 

Ptwetax 

13 

24 

J51 



vamumifoin 

ISBN as 38 26 29—TZ8 

— -UpbJo 22 30 33 26—111 

OS; SprmraO 15-27 4-4 3& Smtt 1 2-1 9 2-5 
36. MuiUa 7-104-420; P: w euft gspoon 13-17 
B-11 34. Stoddibuse 7-1? 10-12 24. 

Rebrands— Golden Stale 52 (SmWi ID. 
PMnHpMD 4? rwaoSiospocai 1®. 
-Golden Stale 24 (Muffin 9). 
27{l«ecs»«J. 

30 23 24 25-194 

27 20 26 43—116 

HM Gffi 71-18 7-8 3d Pods 8-17 J-l 17) O 
race 13-24 6-7 35, Dhac 11-18 3-5 2& Mason 
6-13 34 20. Rabomds— New Jersey 52 
(WjSmrs, PBt Done 73# c/mtone 54 (Mason 
171. Assist*— New Jersey 21 CPoA a, 
Chartott* 34 (Bogws 9). 

CWcoga 31 26 22 33-112 


Mlaaeseta 25 24 26 27—182 

CPlppen 1 1 -20 4-4 29. Jarttm 12-22 (M) 25; 
AC Garnett >9-16 1-2 21, Atertwn-3-18 2 -221. 
Rebounds— Chicago 52 (Roam 151, 
Minnesota 46 (Vrunkovtc 91.' 
Assists— OUargo 32 (Kutac 7U Minnesota 
21 (Mabtrry?). 

Orlando 25 19 16 18-78 

Data 76 14 17 19-66 0: Hardaway 
10-15 6-6 26, Grant 6-12 2-5 14? D: Jackson 
6-14 <MH2. Gaffing 5-12 1-4 1 1. 

Reborads— Orlando 57 (Grant ScMyus 9), 
Data SO (Green 135. Assists— ortmdol? 
(Hardaway 7], Data 1 7 (Harper 65. 

New York 17 Zl » 27-94 

SaeAatoafe 15 17 24 21-77 

N.YJ Houston B-160-02a Eertng 5-14 8-11 
1C S JU MfflCWff 7-164-4 22 Emott6-V 2-2 
14. Reboun ds - -New York 56 lEwtofrOaMey 
115, San Antonio 44 (Perdue 135. 

AssKts— KY. 19 (Odds. Ward S3, San 
Antonio 18 (Johnson 65. 

Toronto 17 18 26 17— 78 

Seottffl 39 SS 33 33—333 

T: Christie 6-14 0-0 1 S, Rogers *-11 6-6 IS 
S; Pertta 8-8 2-2 26. tonp 8-13 9-10 25. 
Hawkins 6-12 5-6 21.Robanoffir-Taranto 44 
(WWams, Rogers 75, Seattle a (Kemp 12). 
Assists— Taranto 21 (Stowdamtra 7), Soothe 
32 (Payton JO). 

Detroit 30 15 29 29—103 

Vancouver 15 16 23 25- 79 

O: N« 1 1-75 9- 13 31. Hunter <S- 71 2-2 1C V: 
AbcIw-RoMm 6-773-615, Pwter 4-10 0-0 9. 
Rebounds— Detroit 47 (HtB ill, Vancouver 
58 (AMur- Rahim. Reeves Officuff ©. 
Assists— Detroit 21 (Hffi 95, Vancouver 20 
(Reefer 95. 

Indiana 29 37 29 79-108 

ULOppen 28 27 16 22- 93 

1: MBfer 9-173-3 25, Best 6-1044 1C LA-- 
MtuVn 5-70 3-3 15. VoupW 6-52 1-3 la 
Reboonds— tndtano 51 (D.Odvte, DofflPfer 
7), Los Angeles 54 (Vdvgbt 12). 
Assists— tndtano 22 (Best Si. Lot Angeles 15 
(Baity 5).! 

SWOOP G 
Utaffiano 94 paoDrthez 86 
P ena thbiotos 90. SevDla 71 
CROUP H 

Efes Plteen 74 SpBt 64. 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standings 


Florida 
N.Y. Rangers 
New Jersey 
Washington 
Tampa Bay 
N.Y. Isfendets 


22 12 10 
23 19 6 
22 16 5 
19 21 5 
17 21 6 
13 22 9 


54 128 104 
52 161 132 
49 113 110 
43 121 721 
40 128 139 
35 113 131 


NORTHEAST OMMN 



Hrst Perto* E-MaKhant 8 (Lam) (sttf- 
Sacoad Period: None. TtaM Period: E-Smyth 
20 (Amalb Weight) (pp). a E-McGWs 2 
dome, BtxJdWgert 4. E-, Smyth 21 
(Mironov, Amott) (pp)- Shots oa gaol: F- 8- 
16-16—40. E- 11-11-6—38, Goolesc F- 
Vbnbtesbrwe*. E-Joseph. 


TENNIS 


XTUUtnc Dtvaaw* 

W L T PtS GF GA 
PtttaWp Wo -27 13 5 57 147 111 


r 


% 


MEMORABLE MOMENTS 
FROM JOHNNIE WALKER: 

RYDER CUPWITH 
BERNARD GALLAGHER 


Every Monday from January 20 




Advertis e ment 


J 


Pt Ustta i tfi 1 2 0-8 

Hwtfenl • e »-4 

First Period: R-Hotcher 10 (UmleuA 
Jagi) (PP). Second Period: P-Woottey 3 
(Otausam Lemfevri a P-Jogr41 (LernleoA 
Francfe) TNrd Periods None. Sbofe on goab 
P- 108-2-20. H- 12-108-31. Goffifes P- . 
Loflme. H-Surte. 

W us b hi ghi o 8 0 1—1 

Ottawa a 2 3 s 

Href Period: None. Second Pvriod: o- 
Dcrigte 1? CZhottak. Caaneywoitti) Z O- 
Cwswyworth 7 (AHmdsam zMtokt (pp). 
TNrd Period: 0-Atftetsaon 16 (DaeMD) <0- 
Yasftln 19 (AHredssoa Duchesne) (pp). 5, 
Wv Simon 9 CJontau) A O-ZboDok 6 
(Cumeyworlh) (pp). Sbets an goat V*- 6-10- 
6—22. 0- 9-5-14—28. Ceafles: W-Kbblg. O- 
Tugnmt 

BentM 8 l 1—2 

NT. Istandws 0 3 6-3 

Rest Period; Nona. SOCOM Period: New 
York. SmotaH 13 (Herwrl, King) (pp). 7. B- 
Audette 15 CPtanJe, Habbigari (pp). TMrd 
Period: a-BaraabylCKGraseta Ptanfe) Shots 
on goal: 6- 6-9-9-24. New Yarit 9-10-7-26. 
taffies: B-SWriOs. New York. Hdraud. ' 

Los Angetos • 1 2-3 

Toronto 7 8 1—2 

Rtst Period: T'Nedved 1 Ooksv 

Warrtner) (pp). Sacoad period: L A- 
Nunnhen 8 (Stevens; Pemoffit) ThW 
Period: T-Smfld 28 (Sttmaun Mocoun) 4. 
LA-Nanataai 9 (Stevera Perreault) S Los 
Angeles, Okzykl4 (Bera. Yodfflteney) SUs 
en goat Uu- 8-12-8—28. T- 10 - 11 - 21 — 42 . 
Coeta: LA.43otae. T-Patvfe. 

Tbnpa Bay 1 0 1—2 

cthrodo o 2 2—4 

Pint Period; T-Yseboert 1 (HorariOt 
Wieroen Second PertoffiC-ScraWM (Locrata. 
Foote) 1 C-Mta4 (Keane) TfaM PerieffiT- 
Unshorn* (Burr, Sesvamw) (pp). 5 CJones 
17 (Lenfeux, Dooffinontil (na.6,C-0zefaih 
15 (De u dn m fe Mffieri (pp). Shots on goct: 
T- U-6- 12—29. C- W 2^-33. GooMc 7- 
TWxnocri. C-Rsy. • 1 

SLUMS >13-4 

r*BNffir 0 7 0—5 

Rtst Poriod; None. Second Per fed; S.U- 
Ti*goon8(H<AConiov)ZPtnenbt,Dra)se9 
(Quint top* g) (pp). TbM period: Sl.- 
Peflerbt4 ICoffia^Yerk) A^L^Courtnffi’12 
(Turgeon) & SJ.-tlngeon 9 (ModrariS) 
Stas on wriiSJ-. 5-)4-50-29. Pfwento 3- 
11-11—25. taffies: S.L-Futtr. Phoenix. 
KteffiRuiln. . 

tain lop—7 

Ceigatr ’ . 1 1 o-a 

First Period:- A-ffuaMn M) (Oota. 
5donbffi-2,C-RKtel (Stahara, Hotrod) 
(pp). second Peris* C-Rewy 19 (IgMo. 
AfeoenXppJ-TBWPo** None. Shots an . 
goabA-6-7-8— 21.C-5’13-8— 26.Cog1fes:A- 
HetatC-iatd. 


-Msrssaaus 

SECOND ROUND 

Goran Manfsovfc CL Croafc, det Kwtrf 
. Kucmv SkwoUa 6-Z 6-i Renzo Fartaa 
My, daLPeferTtamnaMAustraiiar 7-6(7-15. 

6-7 0-7), 6-Z 7-6 (7-4); Pete Samiam 0). de& 
Addon Votaeo 36««4 -2 TTumri 
. MusteriS). dsf. Grata Staflord 6^616^ 
Wayne Ferreira (S)daUavferFtmi6^a& 6- 
Z6-1; AtMrtGsstaOCO, de(. Jar Kraslak 6-1,7- 
6 (7-2). 7-6 (7-0); jtm Courier (11), det Slaw 
Dottdel 44 «, 3-& 64, 6-b Alberta Be- 
rasdegur (16), del Ttata Carbonetl 6-3t 7S, 

6* Scott Oqpa AusttQBa deL Fffip DeVWft 
Betgtaro, 7-6 (7-5), 7-5, 643s Chris Woodmft 
Ulffiod Stales, dec JW Novak. Ceech Reputdc 
6-Z 7-6 (84), b-z Mn* VAndfento Antalt 
dec. Homan Gamy. Argeiffina. 6-1, 645, 7 -* 
Ooratr* Hrtxity, SioraMa, ad. MeUas Kuffl. 
Sweden 6* 6-1, 6* hevfte GocMr. Sooth 

AMca, deb Gustavo Kusrfsis Braril 6-7 (5-7), 

645,6-1,64. 

WHEW WOLES 
SECOM3DOUND ' . 

.. QrandaRMn (15), UnBed Shoes, del San- A 
d*» Tariul Fionas. A-Z d-lt Aiante W* 
Sandni Vlanp CO, Shvhatfe De VBe T-a 
itaMIMiatffiiffiB (45,def.U*a«avrwind 
M- frS Ante Huber &), detftancesca Lty 
tamlAd. 6 -a wt Irina SpMea BZ del Joan- 
neite Kruger 6 - 1 , 6-1; Karina Hobsudow C9), 
dec Marie S make * 3 , Maiy Joe Fer- 

tataw (14), deCYbyiABawiM 7^6-4 Saidra •- 
Wtatat Cndi -fteptaffic del Annetaefln 

S^toC Honcp 6-» -»-& B-&- SAvfa Fortna. nay. 

deCPoolaSoaoB,Aigertlnn, 6 - 4 6 - 1 ; Barbara; . 
Schtal, Austria det AlBrondra Fusra Ftanaa. ■ 
2-4 7-5, 7-* totno Hoteudovc (71. Statata, • 
det MJcnte Brcjdta AusnaSa tr-Z 6-1 . *■ 



^■ieaterz Southend 0 

stoke a Stockport 2 
ll e v ej iitlca Qwrttei 1 • - • 

Sunderianda Arsenal 2 
WoMtamvi tarexharo- postponed 
Cwentty »a Woteg- poaftnmeri 


tWROHOUMO 

«WWcBjnwZVItaMZ 
Swwtag G4on Z Eaganyta 2 
tAOtonesz Cello Vfp 2 
CorapoetotaiOWedoO 
Rayo Vtafecono 3 , Ososuna 1 

Radng Saffimder VZanigma 0 

VWodoSdaRetaMcrtWa - 

bmonuripimi? 

RWtboui® 
JuMe nte& P ons SI Gemalnl 

xs, " n «* (» Rangers 1 


j-1V 

,-iT- 


,-rtTt - 


-v, * - ■ 


lUl: 


whraluv" 

Shertn^. 

RodniEV 

small a^.' 
cooii ; 




% 


life. 




v. 



"MtAYB. SOUTH wraGA 


** Wn **UAYS. nuasTM* 

■ ■ 


8 :1 




':Tr-'r:.Arr.% 


-i- — 











nite 


PAGE 21 


SPORTS 


ring American Cyclist, Suddenly, Europe Called 


[worola team, which was based in die 
n ^ted States but raced mainlv in 


PARIS — a year ago, Chris Homer *' ** Tour DuPont, representing the 

« working li ™ lKi opportunities ofeSdtotheFn 


now. 

ve known ("wanted to race Mkes 
I was 13,*’ he said, “but it's pretty 
bo do in America. The few pro 
we have don't pay the kind of 
^to warrant not working 9 to 5. 
“ that or make no money at 


state# racer m fee tinned 

22?:. offseason, it was feHtime 
wwic, he said. A 9-to-5 job. Infce 

JJg: rt W probably 20 boms a l^eifeer 

* dl ^ f . you ' re “?j*> a» <op fiv= pi*- 

and honpfiii ba8ed m • {oiado ’ .^ cn3 ® s m a race, it s hard to make feat 
HSrSuits • _■* .■ . P? BI ®h money. That’s where the money’s 

tori« go ? d ’ ^ttdnmvrc- ^at^nd it’s hard to be in fee top five 

Grand Pri* * e . SanDiego fee riders who are. getting paid a 

**? San Lm8 10841 sday are racing against you.” 
race. As a professional, his biggest vie- • * *- 1 h yuu " 

tory occurred in the Tour DuPont last.. 

May, when he won a two-man sprint 
into Greenville, South Carolina, after a '• 
long breakaway. He finished I Oth over- s 
all in the DuPont and confirmed the . 
general feeling that be might be a young .4 
nder with- a bright future. 

But where? Wife fee collapse of fee 


Bonier paused", then’ and looked 
fee hall be wassitting in. It was a 
:csmer movie house in Paris, about 10 
walk from fee Champs- 
-» that was being used to present 
[ythis week the new LaFrancaise 
Jeuxteam. 

l|fce most of fee 17 other riders, 
was wearing a white jersey wife 


the name of his team writ large across 
the chest over a stylized set of numbers 
i many games of chance 
l to fee French public by fee spon- 
sor. 

“I never realized I’d come to be 
racing in Europe,” he said. “This is fee 
full program . Indeed it is: La Francaise 
des Jeux has a 35 million franc ($6.5 
million) budget and plans to ride most of 
fee major international races in the com- 
ing season. The new team boasts three 
French champions — Eddy Seigneur in 
the time trial. Stephane Heulot on the 
road and Qiristbphe Mengm in cy- 
clocross — and the bronze medal win- 
ner in the road race at (he Atlanta 
Olympics, Max Sciandri. 

Like tbe man who didn't know if he 
could play fee piano because he had 
never tried, Homer was undaunted. 

‘T have goals to win fee Tour de 
France," he said wife a laugh, “but at 
this particular time my goals are just to 
race my bike, finish my races and get as 
fit as I cart.’’ 

Homer is the latest, and certainly nor 


fee last, rider to move from what is a 
marginal U.S. sport to the big time in 
Europe, from obscure, unrewarding 
races to the prospects of fee muJrimil- 
lion-dollar Tour de France. Fewer than a 
dozen Americans will ride in Europe 
this year. 

Since Greg LeMond proved 1 5 years 
ago feat an American could be a cham- 
pion in fee European spore dozens of 
others have cried to copy him. Some, 
like Lance Armstrong. Davis Phinney 
and Andy Hampsten. have overcome 
the differences in language and culture, 
fee homesickness and unfamiliar way of 
life, to star. Others, like Frankie Andreu, 
Ron Kiefel and Andy Bishop, have 
made a reputation as dependable team 
riders and built a long career. 

Some, though, have lasted a season or 
two and then returned home with their 
memories to ride in the Redlands Clas- 
sic or the 24 Hours of Somerville. New 
Jersey. 

At this point, just weeks before the 
season opens in February, both Homer 
and the team think he will do well. 


"He is very confident and I am too.*’ 
said Alain Gallopin. fee deputy dir- 
ecieur sponif, or coach, who discovered 
Homer last summer at races in Wis- 
consin. which he was watching before 
the Olympics. 

"He saw me race fee night before.” 
Homer remembered, "and we were 
dressing, preparing fee next day for fee 
race, and Gallopin came up to fee van. I 
thought he was just a fan. Lots of fans 
come around fee van. 

* ‘Then he asked me ifl wanted to race 
in France.” Just like that? "Yep." 
Homer chuckled. "Who wouldn’t?” he 
asked. His contract is for two years. 

Homer will live with the Gallopin 
family near Etampes. south of Paris, and 
train wife fee deputy directeur sponif. a 
former professional rider himself and 
fee longtime masseur for Laurent 
Fignon. the winner of two Tours de 
France. At 5 foot 10 inches. 1**5 pounds 
and sporting a blond ponytail. Homer 
resembles Fignon. 

“I'll workwife him.” Gallopin said. 
* ‘His head is very good. 1 am sure he will 



;auu 

This Tin ie, a Cameraman 

6 I Don’t Care Who ItJH^^Bulls Star Says 


The Associated Press 

One moment he was fee hustling Den- 
nis Rodman fans admire. The next mo- 
ment he was the reckless, unrepentant 
Rodman who also has become familiar. 

After tumbling into a row of pho- 
tographers, Rodriian kicked acameraman 
in fee groin during the Chicago Bulls' 

1 12-102 victory Wednesday night over - 
the Minnesota Tmiberwolves. ^ 

Eugene Amos was carried off feecourt 
on a stretcher and taken to a hospital. 
-Although Rodman said be dkta'r intend 
40 hurt Amos or kick him in fee grpm, he 
scoffed at Amos’s injury claim. 

“I thought I hit him m fee fejgjh, then.' 
all of a sudden he went back, "Rodman 
said. “I said, ‘What’s wrong wife you? 
I’m sorry I hit you.’ Then all of a sudden 
he says. ‘Get away from me.VAfl of a 
sudden he passed out. I'm Iike, ‘Yeah, 
right' It’s one thing to get hint, bur 
don’t pretend you’re more seriously 
hint than yon are." V. 

Replays showed feat Rodmaa's kick 
caught Amos very high orifee msideof 
the left thigh, and fee Timbowofves* 


physician, Sheldon Boros, confirmed 
that Amos, an in-house cameraman, was 
kicked iii fee groin. Amos was treated 
and released at fee hospital, where Be 
was interviewed by fee pohoe. 

"We took an assault report, listing 
Dennis Rodman as fee snspeclbere,"a 
police spokesmansaid. "However, ab- 
solutely no charges have been filed.’’ 
Reached.at home ‘early Thursday, 
Amos was emphatic when asked ff fie 
planned to fUe charges. 

"Most definitely," he said. “I feel 
hurt. I feel let down. I admired him. 
Wife everything. I just admired him.” . 
Amos declined to comment further; - 
Rodman said he twisted Ms jhkle 
when he fell over a photographer, David 
Sherman, who was seated beside Amos. - 
Rodman also said he intended to lock a: 
small camera he said Ajnoe.hnd. ■” 

"In fee first place, fee camera people 
are too dose along fee baseline,* Rod- 


said. “All of a sudden, boom, I step 
his camera. Any athlete win react fee 
same. I stepped and twisted my ankle, 
a$d then I kicked the guy. I don’t care 
<it was. He doesn’t need to be that 


|Aiong with a reputation as one of the 
n^' dynamic rebounders in NBA his- 
toky, Rodman has become better known 
indecent years for his flamboyant per- 
■’ scpalTife. His disregard for rules and 
conventions occasionally spills over on 
th^ court, like it did last season when he 
: tod- butied referee Ted Bernhardt. 
' Rqdnpm was suspended ty fee Bulls for 
twb games last month after a tirade 
dieted at fee officials following a 
game against Toronto. 

$cottie Pippen led the Bulls wife 29 
points. Stephan Marbury and Garnett 
sccjred'21 points each for fee Wolves. 

BuperSonics 122, Raptor# 78 In 

Sekitiej cfae SuperSonics set an NBA 
reoird wife 27 steals, and Sam Perkins 
tied fee record for most 3-pointers with- 
out cuss by going 8-fbr-8. 

-- - Ibgfe 78, ainMricfcs as At home, Dal- 
las lost for fee fifth time in seven games. 
Anfcmee Hardaway scored 26 points for 
Or^ndo. 

stone 103, flrinHu 78 hi Van- 

3 er,|Detraii’s Grant Hi D finished 
3lfoomts,'T I -rebounds and 9 as- 

77 Allan Houston 
sccfcd 20 pointej’amck Ewing had 18 
points and 1 1 rebounds and John Starks 
added 13 points as New York won in 
SanUntonio. .. 

• Warriors 128, TGmn 111 hi Phil- 
adelphia Label! SpreweJJ scored 38 
points and Golden State held off a late 
rally, to send fee 76ers to their 10th 
straight loss and 20th in 21 games. 

Haniats ns, Nate 104 In Charlotte, 
Glex^Rice scared 13 of his 35 points in 
fee feial ID minutes, Vlade Divac added 
25 paints and Anthony Mason 20 for fee 
victors. V 

Pttcen 108, CBppers »3 Reggie Miller 
scored 25 points as Indiana notched its 
eighth straight victory over . Los 
Angeles. | . 



Uc^oei DrnunboeMfWr Fnncr Preuc 

ITALIAN FIREPOWER — Juventus’s Ciro Ferrara (2) heading in a goal behind Paris Saint-Germain’s 
goalkeeper, Bernard Lama, and in front or defender Paul LeGuen. The Turin club crushed the French team. 
6-1, in the first leg of the European Super Cup in Paris. The second leg will be played in Turin on Feb. 5. 


Virginia Drought Helps Wake Forest 


The Associated Press 

Virginia had a 54-48 lead wife five 
minutes to play but failed to score forfee 
rest of fee game as Tun Duncan made 
two bank shots in fee final 1 :07 to give 
No. 2 Wake Forest a 58-54 victory. 

Duncan finished wife a season-high 
28 points. 

The Demon Deacons (l 3-0, 5-0 in fee 
Atlantic Coast Conference) won their 
25th straight home game and are off to 
their best league start in 34 seasons. 
Wake Forest and top-ranked Kansas are ' 
fee only undefeated Division I teams. 

Courtney Alexander led the Cavaliers 
wife 18 points. 

No. 3 C tewmow 67, Wo- 11 Maryland S3 

Greg Buckner scored 16 points, and 
Terrell McIntyre added 13, including 
two 3-pointers in a late 10-2 run, as fee 
visiting Tigers (15-1, 4-0 ACC) won 
fear life straight. 

No. 10 LouimrMo 82 , Kotwton 78 Fresh- 


man forward Nate Johnson scored a sea- 
son-high 24 points to lead fee Cardinals 
(14-1, 3-0 Conference USA). Damon 
Jones scored 15 points for the visiting 
Cougars (8-6, 0-2). 

No- 13 Duke 87, North Carolina- 
Greensboro 48 Jeff Cape! had 1 9 points 
and the visiting Blue Devils (13-4) 

cruised after holding the Spartans with- 
out a field goal for a seven-minute 
stretch midway through the first half. 

No. 17 hMSana 66, Northwestern S3 
Neil Reed, benched for the first half by 
coach Bob Knight, scored 16 of his 18 
points in the final 5:23 as the Hoosiers 
(15-3, 2-2) rallied to avoid their first 
three-game losing streak in the Big Ten 
since 1990. Jevon Johnson scored 16 
points for the Wildcats (5-10, 0-4). 

No- 19 Boston College 81, Fairfield 79 


Antonio Granger scored on a runner in 
fee lane at the overtime buzzer as the 
Eagles 1 12-2) avoided the upset at New 
Haven Coliseum. Danya Abrams had 26 
points and nine rebounds for Boston Col- 
lege. 

No. 22 North Carolina 59, N. Carolina 

st. 56 The Tar Heels (10-4, 1-3) scored 
fee game’s final 10 points to avoid ex- 
tending their worsi-ever start in the 
ACC. 

No. 23 Texas 86, Texas A&M 76 Reggie 

Freeman scored 30 points, and the vis- 
iting Longhorns (9-4, 3-1 Big 12) dom- 
inated the overtime 14-4 for their sev- 
enth straight victory over the Aggies. 

No. 25 Toxas Tech 67, Oklahoma 62 
Cory Carr scored 1 1 of his 26 points in 
the final 3!ri minutes, and Tony Battie 
had 16 points and 16 rebounds for the 
visiting Red Raiders ( 1 1-3, 3-1 Big 12). 
Nate Erdmann had 26 points for fee 
Sooners(9-4, 1-2). 


be a strong rider. In two or three years, 
he can win a classic.” 

Although he insisted feat he is not 
intimidated, fee American has more 
limited goals now. 

"I realize the depth that this field is 
at." he said. "The last race I did in 
America was Killington. Vermont, and 
on the last stage 1 helped set tempo the 
whole day." riding ai the from and 
keeping the speed high, "and still fin- 
ished over fee final climb with fee lead- 
ers. 

“Then I went to fee world cham- 
pionships and sat in for the whole race.” 
doing no work, “and got dropped. So I 
do realize fee depth of the field.” 

Until fee season starts, feat world 
championship road race in Lugano. 
Switzerland, is fee sum of Homer's 
experience in Europe. 

“So. I don't know how to set my 
expectations.” he admined. “I guess 
my expectations are to finish my races 
and leam how the racing is going. But I 
wouldn't mind winning something, 
either.” 


Avalanche 
Make It 11 
In a Row 

The Associated Press 

Still playing without injured All- 
Stars Joe Sakic and Peter Forsberg. the 
Colorado Avalanche extended their un- 
beaten streak to 1 1 games wife a 4-2 
victory over fee Tampa Bay Lightning. 

Keith Jones and Sandis Ozolinsh 
scored third-period goals Wednesday 
night for fee Avalanche, who tied a 

NHL Roundup 

franchise record for the longest un- 
beaten streak (8-0-3). 

Colorado’s Valeri Kamensky re- 
turned after missing six games wife a 
separated shoulder, but Sakic. Forsberg 
and three other players remained side- 
lined with injuries. 

The Avalanche's goalie, Patrick Roy, 
made 27 saves and look over fee National 
Hockey League lead wife his 23d vic- 
tory. 

Penguins 3, Whalers O In Hartford, 
Connecticut. Patrick Lalime became the 
first rookie goaltender since NHL ex- 
pansion in 1967 to open his career with 
a 15-game unbeaten streak. Lalime. 
who made 31 saves, improved his re- 
cord to 13-0-2. 

Sabres 2 , Islanders 1 Matthew Bam- 
aby scored wife three minutes left as 
visiting Buffalo won at Uniondale. 

Kings 3, Leafs 2 In Toronto. Ed 01- 
czyk scored with 3:49 remaining as Los 
Angeles extended its unbeaten streak to 
five games. 

Senators 5, Capitals 1 Daniel Al- 
fredsson. Randy Cun ney worth and 
Sergei Zholtok each had a goal and two 
assists as host Ottawa snapped Wash- 
ington's six-game unbeaten streak. 

Btues 4, coyotes 1 1n Phoenix, Pierre 
Turgeon scored the fust and last goals of 
fee game, and Grant Fuhr stopped 24 
shots as St. Louis prevailed. 

Flames 2 , Ducks i In Calgary. Al- 
berta Tbeoren Fleury scored fee de- 
ciding goal in fee last minute of the 
second period. 

Oilers 4, Panthers o In Edmonton, Al- 
berta Curtis Joseph made 40 saves and 
set a team record with his fifth shutout 


DENNIS THE MENACE FEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


v .* 4 







LAMEY 


Trr 


wUninimn 

TYREN 

ITT 

in 


L_ 


ITTT 

to 

Y1HRTT 


mr 

LD 


IW M SIWIHW) 


v — *i blonihe 

X aW-#1BW»niB«8« • 


^►AirDdomiji 

Kfota*** 

o : 

A? :r 7 Munich 

* %% J # B 

A A A Q O O 

So C SL <£* ™ Tate Tk* 


Information «39< 432/512464 


i 


fees 




V\ . ' 













OBSERVER 


The Man of Letters 


Little Pinky Schneider, the Leader of the Band 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — I'm just as 
disgusted as vou are bv 


ll disgusted as you are by 
Dick Morris taking zillions to 
write a book about how he 
elected President Clinton. It is 
shocking, and when I recover 
I shall write a column that will 
make patriots weep. 

In the meantime, as a 
writer, I am fascinated by 
Moms, the man of letters. 
The speed with which be 
wrote “Behind the Oval Of- 
fice* ’ suggests an author driv- 
en by creative furies. 

Scarcely four months have 
passed since we heard he had 
contracted to write a book. 
Now it is written and in the 
stores. Four months! The av- 
erage writer needs four months 
just to get over the hangover 
after signing a multiziUion- 
dollar contract, then needs 
three (X- four years to write the 
book. Sometimes 10. 


idem Clinton? Why didn't 
you get yourself elected? 

A. who wants to spend 
four years humoring Newt 
Gingrich and Trent Lott? I’d 
never have a second to devote 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — It has been said that 
New York isso hit) they named it 


to my writing. 

Q. When did you first know 
you wanted to be a writer? 

A. I've wanted to write 
since I first read the Bobbsey 
Twins. When I realized the 
Bobbsey Twins were making 
millions of other children as 


JT New York is so hip they named it 
twice — New York New York! 
There are so many hip musicians in 
New Yak that they compete for the 
privilege of playing hip music for 
525 a night per man. Or woman. 
Maria Schneider takes the standard 
si deperson cut even though she's the 
leader. 

Schneider’s New York big band 


happy as they were making 
me, 1 said, “Some day I want 


to bring that happiness not 
just to other children, but to 


What manner of author is 
this Morris? To find out. I 
interviewed him. 

Question: Mr. Morris, will 
you help your fellow authors 
by revealing the secret of your 


speedy writing? 

Answer: Gladly. The trick 


is to assemble all necessary 
tools before you sit down to 
write. Before signing the con- 


tract I lay in a huge supply of 
paper, ink and quill pens. 


paper, ink and quill pens. 
Then I don’t have to stop writ- 
ing and go to the chicken coop 
every time I need a new 
quill. 

Q. You write with a quill 
pen? 

A. A quill was what 
Thomas Jefferson used. I 
wanted ‘ ‘Behind the Oval Of- 
fice" to reek of Jeffersonian 
idealism. 

Q. Your book tells how you 
single-handedly got President 
Clinton elected. Why Pres- 


everybody, old and young.*' 

Q. What other books nour- 
ished your early determina- 
tion to write? The Tom Swift 
books? Tarzan? 

A. "Paradise Lost" af- 
fected me profoundly in 
eighth grade. 

Q. You read “Paradise 
Lost" in eighth grade? Was it 
a comic-book version? 

A. There is no need to be 
insulting. John Milton's 
mighty fine was to have a pro- 
found influence on the style I 
brought to “Behind the Oval 
Office." Not so pronounced 
perhaps as the oecline-and- 
fall man, Edward Gibbon, 
with his magnificently bal- 
anced 18th-century sentences, 
nor so forceful as Henry 
James with his absolute mas- 
tery of the interminable 
“which" clause. If “Behind 
the Oval Office" lives 1,000 
years. I'll owe it all to Milton. 
Gibbon and Henry James. 

Q. What are your fondest 
dreams for 1 'Behind the Oval 


bcnneider s New York big band 
works every Monday in the Green- 
wich Village club Visiones. Hav- 
ing her own big band means that 
anything she wntes gets played and 
exposure has led to commissions 
ana subsidies. She has taken her 
band to Portugal and China. And 
she conducted the Carnegie Hall 
Jazz Orchestra. 

When she carries her arrang- 
ments to be played by local mu- 
sicians during clinics and concerts 
in Sicily, Finland, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Germany, the Netherlands 
and France, she usually discovers 
musicians she would be glad to 
bave in her own big band in New 
York. Growth in jazz is geograph- 
ical right now. You find more and 


club was packed from the begin- 
ning and me live band soon sound- 
ed better than the tape. 

She had been known as Pinky 
growing up in Windom. Minnesota 
(pop. 4,000). Half her childhood 
was spent “in duck blinds with my 
father's friends.” (Her albums are 
sold in Windom’s flower shop). 
She played the clarinet in high 
school and earned a degree from 
the Eastman School of Music in 
Rochester. New York, where the 
respected composer George Rus- 
sell warned her about writing com- 
mercial music for a living. 

When you write in a specific 
style other than your own, he said, 
sooner or later you become 
whatever you are doing. It's like 
you are what you eat He learned 
the hard way, and then took a day 
job at Macy’s department store. 

Not following his advice, 
Schneider wrote commercial jingles 
after arriving in New York. Those 
“stupid jingle chords" started slip- 


ping in when she’d write her own 
music at night Finally , she opted for 
copying music instead. 

Copying all those individual 
parts from scores is mind-numbing. 
Neatness really counts. You cant 


more very good players (if few ge- even go on automatic pilot when 


muses.) in more and more places. 

Schneider has no particular nos- 
talgia for the classic big-band tra- 


the scores are written in concert key 
and must be transposed. And it is 
often a last-minute all-night affair 


diuon. She composes for a standard for a morning session. 


Office” now that the banking 

nf the 7.illinnc hchinH vmi? 


of the zilli ons is behind you? 

A. It will be heartwarming 
if The New York Review of 


configuration of four trumpets, 
four trombones, five saxophones 
and a rhythm section because a lot 
of music is already written for it 
and so you can find a very good one 
in any Western city of any size. 

Schneider and her then husband, 
the trombonist John Fedchock — 
they had both arranged music for 
Woody Herman — founded a re- 
hearsal band in 1988. Rehearsing 
as an end in itself soon gets de- 
bilitating so they quickly put to- 
gether a demo tape of charts written 


However, it pays good money if 
you're fast and accurate (and neat). 
Sometimes the copyist even gets 
points. And Schneider found it 
didn't waste her. “I was so frus- 
trated and angry copying all that 
music written by other people — if 
anything, it gave me more en- 
ergy.” 

She copied for Gil Evans for 
years, saving as a sort of apprentice 
(she re-orchestrated his score for 
the Martin Scorsese movie "The 
Color of Money”). Bob Brook- 



' cheeks, and not rears of joy .hearing 
one of her compositions played for 
the first rime. “I can't believe I 
wrote that,” she'll mutter through a 


Kleenex. . . . . 

It’s not that her music is being 
butchered. On the contrary, her mu- 
sicians get it about as right as pos- 
sible, ‘‘and they are supportive as 

well." They say things like Mana. 

remember, your music always takes 
time to develop.'’ Anyway, they 
seem to have the same problem. 

“At the Berlin Jazz Festival." 
she recalled, “the band sounded 
particularly beautiful, the way 
we'd like it always to sound. But 
some of the guys were still un- 
happy. ‘I can’t believe I played that 
awful solo,' they said. You know, 
there's something very wrong tore. 
If everybody agrees about how 
good the band sounded, how come 
we all rtiintr that we as individuals 
sounded so bad? I think we’re all 
unhealthy. There’s not one person 
in my band I’d consider healthy. 
They’re all wonderful people, and 
extraordinary musicians, but they 
suffer all the rime. That’s why 
they’re so supportive of me. We’ve 


they’re so supportive ot me. w i 
become one big support group 
Reh earsing the Orchestra 


Reh earsing the Orchestra Na- 
tional de Jazz to prepare for two 
concerts in Paris last month, it was 
dear how comfortable she is lead- 
ing men. Sitting in the graffiti- 
bound studio and loft complex on 
the Quai de la Gare, she pomted to 
the four giant window-wall 
“Daces” of die unfinished Bib- 


liotheque National framed in the 
window behind her, and said: "I 


wonder where people get the guts 
. . . have the kind of confidence it 


if The New York Review of 
Books finds my prose “as 
rich as Marcel Proust's, as 
lapidary as Flaubert's, yet as 
pulse-poundingly readable as 
OJ. Simpson's.” 

New York Times Service 


getter a demo tape of charts written Color of Money ). Bob Brook- and a lovable guy, they had a nas 
for Woody and others played by meyer, with whom she was study- argument about tempi. At the end. 
Woody and others. Circulating this ing on a National Endowment for he said: ‘ ‘Maria, why don't you just 
ringer around town was not strictly the Arts grant, introduced ha to the go out and start your own band?" 
speaking kosher, except that they late Mel Lewis. Lewis commis- The band she ami Fedchock start- 
had many of the same players any- sioned an arrangement for his Vil- ed broke up when they separated. He 
way, it got them a steady gig, the lage Vanguard orchestra. Although got custody of the trombones, she 


Maria Schneider considers composing “a bumpy ride.” 

t weekends with the 
ss and ... no! It was unable. 


takes to build a building like that. I 
only write a piece of music that will 


Schneider respected Lewis as the 
best big-band drummer in die world 
and a lovable guy, they had a nas 


subsequent album “E$nes- 
argument about tempi. At the end, cence” was nominated f aw two 
he said: “Maria, why don't you just Grammies in 1994. 


She considers compo^g a 
“painful process ... a &npy 
ride.” There's a great deal tffear. 


ride.” There's a great deal {ffear. 
She cries a lot Tears run dqjj^ ha 


only write a piece ot music mar win 
go into people's ears for maybe 10 

minutes, and I get scared. Where do 
the people who aren't scared come 
from? 

“What I'm doing is difficult. I 
know that* Not many people could 
do what I do. But then I wonder, 
you know — I still think of myself 
as little Pinky Scbneida from win- 
dom, Minnesota. What am I doing 
in this grown-up job?" 


FESTIVALS 


PEOPLE * 


Pina Bausch Choreographs Hong Kong 


A JUDGE ruled that one of Jerry 
Garcia’s ex-wives is entitled to 


By Jenni Meili Lau 


H ONG KONG —In 1986 when Pina 
Bausch was asked by the Teatro 


Argentina to choreograph a piece about 
Rome, she had no idea that it would lead 




to a decade of creating city-specific 
works. 

“At First I said no. I’m scared. What 
do I know about Rome? But it turned out 
to be a fantastic experience,” recalls the 
56-year-old German choreographer, 
who has since turned out dance-theater 
pieces based on the cities of Palermo, 
Vienna, Madrid, and most recently Los 
Angeles. Now, Bausch has found her 
first creative catalyst in Asia: Hong 
Kong. 

The work-in-progress will debut in 
March at the annual Hong Kong Aits 
Festival, the territory's premia cultural 
event featuring artists and groups from 
around the world. Preparation fa the 
piece started with a three-week resid- 



Jenni MriU Lai 

Bausch is getting a foothold in Asia. 


ency fa Bausch and her company, the 
Wuppertal Dance Theater, which in- 


Wuppertal Dance Theater, which in- 
cludes 29 dancers and a handful of tech- 
nicians and designers. Lodged in the 
local YMCA, they were in Hong Kong 
to soak up as much of the bustling en- 
vironment as possible, before returning 
to Germany to rehearse and refine the 
production. 

"We don’t have a catalogue of ques- 
tions. We have to trust what is coming." 
said Bausch. characteristically dressed 
entirely in black. 

A notorious workaholic, she had 
come to Hong Kong just after taking her 


Los Angeles-inspired piece "Nur Du" 
on a four-city tour of the United States. 


on a four-city tour of the United States. 
To her. sprawled -out Los Angeles is the 
antithesis of Hong Kong. "So many 
people and impressions coming ai you, 
it's impossible to digest it all at once. 
“One could spend a lifetime doing a 
piece about this place.’’ 

Reticent when it comes to discussing 
her work. Bausch said, “I like my work 
to speak for itself. I’m a choreographer 
and quite untalented to be a writer. I am 
no good with words." 

Nevertheless, Bausch does use words 
as a starling point for ha creative process. 


For years now, ha modus operandi has 
been to provide catalytic phrases during 
rehearsals, which the dancers "answer” 
with movements, words and, or song. 
Daring a recent practice session. Bausch 
threw out such Hong Kong-inspired 
terms as “floating bridge," "losing 
face" and "masses." The latter resulted 
in a dozen dancers, being lassoed together 
and led across the dance floor by a single 
performer. “We pick out a little here and 
there. Over 90 percent of the material we 
forget." said Bausch. tossing imaginary 
handfuls of trash over her shoulders. 

The company has appeared in Hong 
Kong twice before, in 1979 and 1993, 
both times performing repertoire pieces. 
The new project — budgeted at about 
$450,000 and co-produced by the Wup- 

S :rtal Dance Theater, Goethe-Institut 
ong Kong and the Hong Kong Arts 
Festival — is the company's firsr Asian 
commission. Eager to gain more ex- 
posure in the region, the troupe hopes 
that Hong Kong will serve as a gateway. 
The new piece will be taken to Taiwan 
after being performed in Hong Kong. 
Although attempts were made to show it 
in China, sponsors failed to material- 


nature of the program. A lot of compa- 
nies prefer to sponsor more conserva- 
tive. proven products, such as an or- 
chestra or a ballet company, rather than 
an avant-garde dance group.” 

Moreover, China’s cultural bureau re- 
quires that all foreign art works be pre- 
viewed and approved by national cen- 
sors before being allowed into the 
country. But because of the work-in- 
progress nature of the piece, that was 
impossible. 

Bausch says she has no political state- 
ment to make about 1997, controversial 
or otherwise, despite the fact that the 
new piece will debut less than four 
months before the territory reverts back 
to Chinese sovereignty. * 'I want to make 
a work about human beings and feel- 
ings,” she said. “I’m not going to pre- 
tend to know about the politics of this 
place; that does not interest me." 

“We are open to whatever she wants 
to do." said Grace Lang, program di- 
rector of the arts festival, who began 
discussing the project with Bausch three 
years ago. "We don't want to impose any 
kind of restrictions on ha creativity." 

The company's visit has become a 
small-scale cultural exchange program. 
The Goethe-Institut has mounted a series 
of related events, including video screen- 
ings of Wuppertal works and an exhibit 
on the Folkwang School, where Bausch 
started learning dance ar die age of 15 
under the tutelage of the late dance master 


XV Garcia’s ex-wives is entitled to 
521,000 a month from his estate, pay- 
ments the guitarist’s widow cut off after 
his death. Carolyn (Mountain Girl) 
Garda, who had two children with Gar- 
da and divorced him in 1993, has been 
at odds with Deborah Koons Garcia 
since the Grateful Dead leader died in 
1995. At issue was a $5 million divorce 
agreement that gave Carolyn 5250,000 
a year, or $20,883 a month, for 20 years. 
Lawyers for Deborah claimed ha hus- 
band was manipulated into signing the 
agreement while in a drug-induced 
haze. Judge Michael Dufficy in San 
Rafael, California, ruled in Carolyn’s 
favor after a 14-day hearing, “ferry 
honored the agreement while be was 
alive," Dufficy wrote. “Jerry’s estate 
cannot rescind the contract after Jerry is 
gone." Deborah and six other heirs plan 
to appeal 



•— ?r.- -• 

r ; 7 / - v ,.r 

••r'.'i ».* .'*'■*■< <*■'.»> '’'I 




Kurt Jooss. During their stay, company 
members have befriended numerous 


Princess Diana has left Luanda after 
a four-day visit to Angola to bring world 
attention to the human suffering caused 
by anti-personnel mines. Brushing off 
criticism by politicians back home that 
she should mind her own business and 
not get involved in politics — she called 
the comments “merely a distraction" 
— she pledged further efforts in the 
campaign; "I must continue to play a 
part in the ongoing worldwide cam- 
paign to ban mines. I hope my visit will 
encourage others to join the campaign. " 
She took home a defused anti-personnel 
mine as a gift 



Fergje’s Weight Watchers look, j 


was pictured by an Italian magazine 
cavorting naked with a Belgian stripper, 
has for some time displayed a taripa on 
ter left ankle. 


“We approached all the large German 
companies in China." said Uwe Nltsch- 
ke. director of the Goethe-Institut Hong 
Kong. "We eitha got a negative answer 
or no answer at all. “Perhaps it was the 


members have befriended numerous 
homegrown artists and choreographers, 
and some Hong Kong dancers have been 
able to join the troupe’s daily training 
sessions. 

Bausch’s influence on Che territory's 
modem dance scene is undeniable. 

“Before Pina, local choreographers 
were primarily influenced by ballet or 
modem dancers from America, such as 
Twyla Tharp and Martha Graham,’ ' said 
Mui Cheuk Yin, a native choreographer 
and dancer. “After seeing ha work, we 
suddenly discovered dance-theater and 
we began exploring its possibilities.” 


The celebrated Paris restaurant Fou- 


quet's, a landmark on the Champs- 
Elysees, was placed in receivership bv a 


Elysees, was placed in receivership by a 
commercial court here after its propri- 
etor, Charles Casanova, defaulted on 
debts to his bank totaling 530 million. 


Jenni Meili Lau is a journalist based 
in Hong Kong. 


Princess Stephanie of Monaco, only 
recently over a traumatic divorce, has 
proved her rebellious spirit is still alive: 
She has been sporting a new tattoo in 
recent days, according to the daily 
France Soir. The tattoo portrays a dis- 
creet flower on ha left wrist. Stephanie, 
who split from ha forma bodyguard, 
Daniel Ducruet, in October after he 


All that slimming scons to havj paid 
off. The Duchess of York ihaslbeen 
named by Weight Watchers as its Amer- 
ican spokeswoman. Fergie, as she is 
known, reminisced at a press conference 
about various nicknames she:bacj been 
labeled with when she was tippfflg the 
scales a little too far. First, “it was ‘Fat 
Fa-gie,"’ she said, “which -then gave 
way to 'Fat and Appalling Fergie’ ami 
after that my favorite — ‘Ferefe The 
Duchess of Pork-' ’’ She declinedto dis- 
close ha current weight, but her annual 
salary is reported to be about $1 mil- 
lion. ’■$ 


an e," the debut play of 26-year-old 
Martin McDonagh; “The Herbal 
Bed," Peter Whelan’s historical drama 
set in StnufbEd-Upan-Avon in 1 613; and 
“Blinded By die Sun,” the Stephen 
Poliakoff play about scientific fraud. 
The winners are to be named in London 
on Feb. 16. “Tommy” received eight 
nominations — three more than its 
nearest competitors — to lead the race 
for the awards, which honor theater, op- 
era and dance. In addition to McAnuff s 
direction, “Tommy" was cited for out- 
standing musical production, a separate 
category from best new musical; best 
actor in a musical (Paul Keating); best 
choreography (Wayne Cilento); and in 
all three design categories: sets, cos- 
tumes, and lighting. Its oddest nomi- 
nation was for James Gillan’s support- 
ing performance as “second pmball 
lout. .Battling “Tommy” as outstand- 
ing musical production are the Broad- 
way revue “Smokey Joe’s Cafe,” as 
well as two shows by Andrew (now 
Lord) Lloyd Webber — a revival of 
‘ ‘Jesus Cbnst Superstar” and his newest 
West End aitty, ‘By Jeeves.” Best act- 
ress nominees included Janet McTeer, 
for “A Doll's House”; Dame Diana 
Rigg for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia 
Woolf?” and Vanessa Redgrave and 
Eileen Atkins, who played dueling sis- 
ters in the Royal National Theatre revival 
of Ibsen’s “John Gabriel Borkman,” 
which closed Dec. 21. Pan! Scofield, 
who took the title role in “Borkman," is 
competing for best actor against Antony 
Sber, who plays English painter Stanley 
Spenca in "Stanley,” opening Feb. 20 
in New York. Other nominees were Ken 
Stott, as a put-upon Frenchman in 
“Art,” and David Suchet, Rigg’s spar- 
ring partner in “Who’s Afraid of Vir- 
ginia Woolf?" Joining McAnuff in the 
race for best director are Anthony Page 
("A Doll’s House"), Matthew 
Warchus (“Art"), and Sir Richard 
Eyre (“John Gabriel Borkman"). 


The London production of 
“Tommy," the director Des McA miff's 
version of the rock opera, dominated 
nominations for the 1997 Laurence 
Olivia Awards. Best-play candidates 
included “Stanley.’’ the Patti Gens 
drama; "The Beauty Queen of Leen- 


Wilson Pickett, 55, has been indicted^ 
on cocaine possession charges, nine 
months after police said they found 2 
grams of the drug in a nightstand at his 
home. The singer is best known for such 
hits as “In the Midnight Hour" and 
“Mustang Sally." He races up to five 
years in prison. 


i & 










«* 


a 


‘^1 




• V 

•:V‘ 

— st* \ /