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INTERNATIONAL 



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:> TheWorld ’ sDa fly Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



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Pans, Wednesday, January 22, 1997 


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No. 35.425 %. 




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AidbusKeqis 
Faith in Plan 
To Construct 



Boeing’s Decison 
To Abandon Project 
Raises the Stakes 




By Barry James 

Inumational Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The U.S. and European 
arch-nvals Boeing- and Airbus flew in 
sharply different directions Tuesday 
with plans to develop a new generation 
of super-jumbo passenger aircraft; a di- 
vergence that analysts said carried great 
risks for die company that gets h wrong 
and great rewards for the one th«r gets it 
right. 

Boeing Co. announced that it was 
dropping out of the race to develop a 
super-jumbo commercial airliner, while 
Airbus Industrie said it was confidently 
going ahead with plans to put a 555-seat 
jet into service early in the next cen- 
tury. 

Both companies have spent years 
studying the limited market for huge 
aircraft that in later, stretched versions. 
Airbus believes, may become flying ho- 
tels capable of carrying up to 1,000 
passengers. 

Boeing said late Monday that market 
conditions did not justify the risk or the 
-expense of developing a super-jumbo 
— — an estimated $7 billion. Financial 
markets immediately rewarded the de- 
cision by the company, which is busy 
reorganizing itself after announcing lan. 
month that it would swallow up Mc- 
Donnell Douglas, its only domestic rival 
in the commercial aiiiiner business. 
Boeing’s share price closed $7,625 
higher in New York, at $1 14.125. 

In Toulouse, France, a spokesman for 
Airbus said the four-nation European 
consortium believed that a number of 
airlines want such a plane, and that it 
was engaged in i^mr ‘‘custtHner lo- 
cus groups’* to definethe<fe£ail&: - 

“We are going to stick to our sched- 
ule no matter what Boeing says,” the 
spokesman added. That means the con- 
sortium is to begin construction next 
year, conduct test flights in 2001- and 
deliver the first. aircraft by 2003. But 

See JETS, Page 10 



Mirtuilh.lrfjl 


Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus, left, welcoming Chancellor Helmut Kohl to Prague for the signing ceremony Tuesday. 

Czech f Carman Accord: Putting the Past to Rest 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Tunes Service 


PRAGUE — Germany and the Czech Re- 
public tried Tuesday to break out of the cycle of 
appeasement and revenge that started with the 
Nazi dismemberment ofGsechoslovakia, sign- 
ing a bitterly . contested declaration that ac- 
knowledged wrongs each committed against 
the other more than half a centnry ago. 

"We want to ask for forgiveness, and we 


want to forgive,*' Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
concluded after putting his signature to a 
document that expressed German sorrow for 
all the victims of Nazi violence in the oc- 
cupation of Czech lands that began in 1939. 

“We should not forget, but we should not 
permit the tragic past to complicate our good- 
neighborly relations,' ' Prime Minister Vaclav 
Klaus answered after the signature ceremony 
in the Liechtenstein Palace. 

But Germany insisted on the first formal 


expression of regret from the Czechs for their 
forcible expulsion in 1945 and 1946 of an 
estimated 3 million Sudeten Germans. 

Continuing resentment of Germany by 
many Czechs made the document highly con- 
troversial and added an element of high drama 
to the latest German attempt to normalize 
relations with all its neighbors. 

Czech television reported that uniformed 

See ACCORD. Page 7 


House Votes 
To Fine Gingrich 

Speaker Gets Reprimand 
As Ethics Case Is Settled 


By Brian Knowlron 

Inieriurtonal Hcrj/J Tribune 


Wanted in Europe: A Homegrown Bill Gates 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS Faced with chronically high un- 
employment, Europe needs to nurture more 
i-style entrepreneurs in die in- 
lion technology sector to help spur eco- 
nornic growth and cream jobs, the governor of 
the Bffiu of France said m an interview. 

While conceding dial there is “no quick fix '' ’ 
for Europe*? persisttog -jobs crisis, which has 
now reached record proportions with 1 8 million 
people out of work, Jean-Claude Trichet none- 
theless stressed the importance of start-up ven- 
tures in information technology and said that he 
was constantly struck by “the confidence one 
sees in America.” . 

‘ 'I think everything is technologically driven 


in our present economy, and one of the most 
important things for Europe is to give young 
people the capacity to express ideas, creativity 
and to create jobs. We need more Steve Jobs, 
more Bill Gates in Europe,” he said, referring 
to the youthful founders of Apple Computer 
and of Microsoft “hi Europe, we need young 
people with bold ideas to foster new segments 

Last of three articles 

of our economy," he added during a wide- 
ranging interview in English at his office here. 

Mr Trichet, 54, also said that France could 
leant much from the Dutch economic model, 
and especially from the success the Netherlands 
has had in achieving a more flexible labor 
marker by making use of part-time jobs. 


He was careful to stress, however, ihai while 
he admires certain innovations in the Neth- 
erlands, he considered it inappropriate for 
Europe to allow the unbridled brand of Amer- 
ican capitalism. 

“The easy solution to unemployment would 
be to adopt the U.S. labor market environment, 
bur that will not fly here,” he said. “1 think it is 
absolutely essential, few the social cohesion of 
Europe as a whole, to respect our values, and to 
have good macroeconomic policies, but also to 
introduce specific measures without going 
down to the U.S. level. 

While acknowledging that European unem- 
ployment was high, he questioned whether 
joblessness in America, which Washington 

See MODEL, Page 10 


WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives voted 
Tuesday to reprimand its speaker and levy a 5300.000 fine 
against him. bringing an end, officially at least, to a prolonged 
ethics investigation that has rubbed emotions raw and cast a 
shadow over the opening of the 105th Congress. 

Newt Gingrich, the House speaker, was not present during 
the vote, though his lawyer was. Mr. Gingrich had admitted 
Iasi month to charges of misusing tax-exempt funds for 
partisan purposes and failing to provide the House ethics 
committee with accurate information. 

The outcome of the House debate Tuesday, which carried 
by a 395-to-28 vote, had been expected. 

Nevertheless, it was a jarring blow io an institution that, for 
all its battle-scarred history, had never applied so severe a 
sanction to a speaker. 

It came despite last-minute objections by a few of the 
chamber's more conservative members. 

“I feel strongly, feel very strongly, that it's not right." said 
Thomas Delay of Texas, the Republican w hip. "This pun- 
ishment is too harsh.** 

Reiterating his opinion that the investigation of Mr. Gin- 
grich had been petty and partisan, Mr. DeLay added. "This 
speaker has been prodded and probed from every direction" 
but no evidence has surfaced of '‘corruption or lawlessness or 
personal profit.'* 

Both Republican and Democratic members of the ethics 
committee described Tuesday as *‘a sad day." saying they 
deplored the need to punish a man who ranks third in the U.S. 
government, after the president and vice president. 

There were 196 Republicans. 198 Democrats and 1 in- 
dependent who supported the penalty. Twenty-six Repub- 
licans and two Democrats were opposed and five members 
merely voted "present." 

The vote allows Mr. Gingrich, a 53-year-old Georgian, to 
retain his leadership post A more serious possible sanction, 
such as censure, would have stripped him of that role. 

Nancy Johnson, the Connecticut Republican who is chair- 
man of the ethics committee, told the House that her panel was 
influenced by die fact that Mr. Gingrich had not personally 
enriched himself. 

But she left no doubt that the committee considered his 
breaches serious. 

"No one is above the rules," Ms. Johnson said. “Rep- 
resentative Gingrich failed to exercise the discipline and 
caution of his office." 

She also described the polarized atmosphere in which her 
panel had had to work. 

“The committee was forced to conduct its work against the 
backdrop of harsh political warfare." she said, and its mem- 
bers had become "the targets of coordinated partisan assaults 
in their districts.” 

“The American people are bone-tired of partisanship,” 
she added. "They want us to work together." She asked 
fellow members to reject "both the partisanship and an- 


See GINGRICH, Page 10 


to Fly 

Into the Teeth of a Storm 



By Edwin McDowell 

. New York Times Service 


r • NEW YORK — Four years ago it 
was toe “storm of the century,” wreak- 
ing havoc up and down toe Eastern 
• Seaboard of toe United States -with tor- 
nadocs and. 6-foot-high snowdrifts. _ 

. - 2 Last year if \mjeccnd snov« in New 

York and other parts of the. Northeast. 
This year, much of the United States is 
buried under record snows and ice. 

. - - Throu gh out all those ordeals, airlines 

have struggled to cope with an ava- 
lanche of delays and cancellations, and 
farious passengers have camped out 
••• overnight at crowded airports. Industry 
- losses have run into the hundreds of 
millions of dollars. • • 

T ; ; ; Now airlines vow they are ready to 

'■ rake some of . the sting out of winter 

r‘ : ' t. 

4 


The Dollar 



* Nm York 

TuaadmrdQH 

previous bom 

. _ ’ 

DU 

1 .8297 

•1.6265 


Pound 

1.6637 

1.6827 

- • ■ 

Yen 

117.015 

. 118.05 


FF 

■5-496 

5-454 


fa i he Dow |G 


3iir 

Tuasdty cion 

pwtauidoM 


■ +40.03 

6883.90 

8843.87 


■ S&p 500 1 

& 

chaog* . 

TunctayctaM 

pmutousdua 

* 

+8.02 

. 782.72 

778.70 



storms. They have invested heavily in 
new technology — from computers and 
telecommunications systems to de- 
. icing equipment — that lets them moire 
quickly notify customers of cancella- 
tions, remote flights and get jets off the 
ground as the weather allows. 

More import a nt still, many carriers 
say they are abandoning their old policy 
of getting planes and passengers to bub 
airoarts whatever the cost, instead pur- 
suing a more consumer-friendly 
strategy of rebooking passengers while 
fine-inning their schedules to deal with 
ice, snow, fog, thundershowers and oth- 
er inclraneoi weather. 

“The storms of the last-few years 
convinced us we were not doing the 
customers any favor by having them 
stranded in an a ir port fen" eight hoars,] ’ 
said Bill Beny, director of communi- 
cations for Delta Air Lines. “Now we 
mflr , ‘Why fly them into airports that are 
about to close?’ ’* 

'Indeed, the airlines are promoting 
thrall changes as evidence of their com- 
mitment to service. 

' The airlines intend mare than cus- 
tomer convenience. The new tactics 
help carriers prevent chaos throughout 
todr systems. For example, when 
severe rainstorms lashed Sl Louis two 
months ago, Trans World Airlines can- 
celed 60 flights in and out of Lambert 
International Airportrather than have 
them leave late and risk setting off a 
chmn reaction of delayed flights 
throughout the country. “Had we tried 

See FLY, Page 10 


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Crt* 1 Y-V'- 

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Books ...J_ — 

Crossword 

Opinion............... 

Sports 


Page 9. 

Page 7. 
Pages 8-9. 



AGENDA 


Car Bombs in Algeria Kill Up to 17 


Two car bombs shattered homes and 
shops and killed up to 17 persons in 
Algiers and a suburb Tuesday, accord- 
ing to hospital sources. 

One of the devices exploded as a bus 


went by in one of the busiest streets in 
the city. Hours earlier, the Aimed Is- 
lamic Group, the most extreme of the 
fundamentalist terror groups, warned 
of more carnage. Page 10. 


300 Sudanese Soldiers Slain, Rebels Report 


Colonel John Garang, the Sudanese 
rebel leader, said Tuesday dial his 
forces killed 300 government soldiers 
in a battle Sunday. He said that the 


battle occurred at Abu Shanena, which 
he said was about 60 kilometers (35 
miles) south of the strongly defended 
regional capital, Damazin. 


Curt Flood, a courageous man 
who changed the face of baseball. 

A Trailblazer Dies 

Curt Flood, who died Monday at 59 
after a yearlong battle with throat can- 
cer, in 1969 took -his struggle for free 
agency all the way to the Supreme 
Court He lost, but the players who 
came after him in the major leagues 
can count their blessings. Page 20. 

And James Dickey, 73, the American 
poet, died in South Carolina. Page 2. 

PAGE TWO 

Russians Are Drowning in Drink 

THE AMERICAS Pao*3. 

Democrats to filter Donated Funds 

ASIA/PACIFIC PagaS. 

Sri Lanka, an Island Resigned to tifar 



AteBeePnaarPnue 

THE FED'S VIEW — Alan Greenspan, right, chatting with Senator 
Christopher Bond before telling the Senate Banking Committee 
Tuesday that good news on U-S. inflation could be ending. Page 13, 


.... Pages 20*2L 


Where’s the Lift? Clinton’s Safe Homilies Fall Short 


Newsstand Pricea 


Andona..-....1000FF 
-.1250 FF 
1.600CFA 
JEBSJ0 
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Cameroon.: 

Egypt-—- 

France........ 

Gabon... 

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Italy-...-.. 


Lebanon — .-LL3300) 

Morocco iBDh 

Qatar 1000 Rials 

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Ivory Coast 
Jordan — .. 


,1250 CFA 
-.1.250 JD 


ThnWa.-u--1250Dln 

UAE mOGOrh 

ULS. MB. (Eur.).— S120 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Tima Service 



WASHINGTON — Presidents' second inaugurals, 
like their second trams, are usually less vivid than tbeir 
first, and so it was with the grand ceremonial opening 
of Bill Clinton’s second four years. 

Even by the reckoning of some of his keenest 
backers, he did not generate the kind of virionary lift 
he sought to impart. As if fearful in a time of divided 
■power aiid unc ertain mandates to offend either right or 
toft, he offered few specifics in a cautious, centrist 
filled with appeals for national unity and other 

upexceptionabte Jtomtoes. 

By definition, events like Monday’s lade toe ex- 
citement of a change in party control, as in 1993, or 
even a change in presidents with no change in party, as 


in 1989. Not that what happened this year was com- 
monplace. This was only the 53d innangural in the 
longhistory of the Republic, only the fifth involving a 
second terra since World War L and the first in which 
a Democrat began an elected second term since Frank- 
lin Roosevelt took the oath for the second time 60 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

years ago, when the storm clouds ofWorfdWarll were 
just beginning to gather. 

It was also a reminder that few nations on earth have 
any such tradition, and no other has one that stretches 
back so far. Others may transfer or perpetuate power 
through coups and revolutions, but in the United 
States, those thing s happen at «hr ballot box and are 
ratified in a ceremony before the West Portico of the 


Capitol. But the inaugural is also meant to be a 
celebration of the political system, a moment that 
reassures the American people that the electoral pro- 
cess works. Election Day divides, but Inauguration 
Day reunites and renews. 

Yet as they watched the swearing-in and the parade 
down Pennsylvania Avenue on Monday afternoon, 
Americans could look back upon an election that 
deeply dissatisfied many of them. The system worked 
once more, yes, but not at all well. 

All year long, right up through the balloting in 
November, voters told pollsters they were dissatisfied 
with their choices. More than half failed to vote at all. 
The conventions and campaign were remarkable for 
their dearth of ideas and for their expense. A sig- 

See CLINTON, Page 10 


In a Reversal, 
Seoul Accepts 
New Debate 
On Labor Law 


Car^Hlrd tr< Our Stag Fmm Dvparrhn 

SEOUL — Bowing to domestic and 
international pressure. President Kim 
Young Sam agreed Tuesday to let Par- 
liament reconsider a new law thaL has 
provoked the most serious labor unrest 
in South Korean history. 

At a meeting with his chief political 
rivals, Mr. Kim expressed sorrow over 
billions of dollars in losses because of 
strikes that followed the forced passage 
of the bill in Parliament. Production 
losses have been estimated at more than 
S3 billion. 

The strife has defeated the law’s aim 
of revitalizing a sluggish economy, the 
president said. 

He abo agreed to reopen debate on a 
law reviving a once-notorious domestic 
spy agency. 

And. in a farther about-face, he told 
the heads of three main political parties 
that he would instruct officials to sus- 
pend arrest warrants served on strike 
leaders, seven of whom are sheltering in 
Myongdong Cathedral in Seoul. 

According to an account of the meet- 
ing by an opposition leader, Kim Dae 
Jung of the National Congress for New 
Politics, Mr. Kim also indicated that the 
Korean Confederation of Trade Unions 
should be recognized. 

Church and civic groups, as well as 
the Organization for Economic Cooper- 
ation and Development, which South 
Korea joined in Paris last year, have 
criticized the new labor law as an in- 
fringement on workers’ rights. 

It gives companies more freedom to 
dismiss employees, adjust their hours 
and hire replacements for strikers, while 
delaying for up to five years new ben- 
efits for workers. 

isition leaders sought the meet- 


ing for weeks but the president had 
reftised to consider it until Monday. 
Union leaders said they were upset they 
were not included in toe talks Tuesday. 

Kim Dae Jung welcomed President 
Kim’s retreat from his hard-line stance. 
But the confederation said that strikes 
would continue if the government did 
not declare the law dead. 

. The confederation president. Kwon 
Young Kil, said at a i)ews conference in 
the cathedral: "Talks today have not 

See KOREA, Page 10 








Bootlegger’s Dream / A People Drowning in Drink 


Russia Takes Aim at Vodka Bacchanalia 


By Michael Specter 

IVeu York Times Service 


M OSCOW — She may not look the part, 
but Tamara Chemyshkova recently be- 
came one of Russia’s most wanted 
criminals. Feeble, aged and practically 
blind, she is nonetheless a foot soldier in this 
country's most profitable illegal enterprise. 

Mrs. Chemyshkova peddles bootleg vodka. Sta- 
tioned outside one of mis city’s most heavily used 
subway stops, the 63-year-old former schoolteacher 
sells up to 1 00 bottles of homemade liquor each day 
to a clientele that would gladly buy more. 

“I have never gone home with extra bottles,” she 
explained as she burrowed in an old green sack for 
a sample of her wares. “But now the cops are after 
us and the bribes are getting hard to pay. Yeltsin 
thinks he’s going to solve Russia’s problems by 
putting us out of business. Let him try.” 

Desperate to wipe out Russia's S3 billion debt to 
its own labor force. President Boris Yeltsin has 
decided to double taxes on vodka to the equivalent 
of 57 a liter, to restore the stale monopoly on the 
production and sale of the liquor, and to rein in the 
counterfeiters and smugglers who now account for 
an astonishing 70 percent of Russia's gargantuan 
market 

Mr. Yeltsin loves a challenge, but this may be one 
of his biggest 

Russians do not just drink vodka, they worship it 
Then? is no better way to judge the chaos of Russia ’s 
unruly marketplace, the porousness of its borders, 
the failures of its tax system or — most important of 
ail — the bleak health of its citizens than by looking 
at vodka consumption. 

"This bacchanalia must stop,” said Anatoli 
Chubais. Mr. Yeltsin's chief of staff, who is widely 
assumed to have been responsible for the decree. ‘ ‘It 
is a political decision. We have no other choice.” 
That may be true, but it is hard to imagine any task 
more futile for a Russian leader than coming be- 
tween its people and their ubiquitous drink. 

On advice from Lenin (one of the few tee totaling 
Russian leaders), Stalin thought seriously for a 
while about limiting vodka sales. He quickly came 
to his senses. 

When the last leader of the Sovier Union. Mikhail 
Gorbachev, made a major effort to curb drinking in 
1985, be was ridiculed as Mr. Mineral Water. 

To most of the world, Dmitri Mendeleev is 
known as the great chemist who devised the peri- 
odic table of elements. Here, he is at least as well- 
known — and far more fondly — as the Russian 
who first realized that 40 percent is the best pro- 
portion of alcohol for vodka. 

"This country is insane from that drink.” said 
Galina Tkachenko, who is in charge of the Health 


Ministry's uphill effort to teach people about the 
dangers of alcoh 


cohol. “I don’t even think it's worth 
trying to show people over 30 what vodka is doing 
to them. We are mostly just trying to stop the 
children before they start” 

In 1995, according to Health Ministry statistics, 
an average of 4.1 gallons of spirits were consumed 
by each Russian citizen, a count that includes in- 
fants and those too iO to drink at all. No country 
drinks more hard liquor, and it shows. Reported 
cases of alcohol poisoning, long an epidemic that 
has cut horribly into productivity, health and har- 
mony, rose by more than 25 percent in the last year, 
according to the government 

Alcohol abuse is a direct cause of what demo- 
graphers and politicians regard as potentially the 
greatest threat facing Russia: its sharp and con- 
tinuing drop in life expectancy. According to die 
Center for Alcohol Policy, an advocacy group, half 



No matter whal the shape of the 

economy, vodka here has always been 

a big part of iL In 1900, its sale ac- 
counted for 50 percent of revenues for 
die czar’s government. By 1988, the 
figure had fallen to 35 percent of the 
Soviet budget Today, vodka gener- 
ates less than 5 percent of revenues. 

Like most other branches of Rus- 
sian industry, vodka distilleries were 
unable to react to the pressures of a 
free market Famous brand names 
like Stoiichnaya and Smirnov could 
not compete and were quickly 
trapped in battles over their valuable 
names (Smirnov is fighting Smirnoff, 
an American make) as smugglers and 
bootleggers stepped in to meet the 
nation's insatiab le demands. 


W 


The Davydkovo market boasts dozens of kiosks 
setting vodka by the crate. There is pepper vodka, 
honey vodka and vodka with every type of fruit 
mixed in. Most of all, there is just plain vodka by 
the truckload. One couple was buying 400 bottles. 


of adult men and nearly a third of the women suffer 
some physical consequences of long-term drinking. 
The group estimates that half of all deaths in the 
nation can be attributed at least partly to alcohol. 


O THER health researchers decline to spec- 
ulate. noting that alcohol abuse is only 
one reason — dietary habits, smoking, 
living conditions, the environment and 
stress are others — that the Russian death rate is 
higher than in any other industrial country. 

“We don't feel comfortable throwing around 
hard figures," said Dr. Tkachenko, "because these 
things are very hard to separate. But anyone with 
eyes can see that drinking has forraany years ruined 
our health and ruined our economy." 

The Yeltsin administration seems to be focusing 
the financial part of this equation. In Mr. 


on 


Yeltsin's tough talk about cracking down on vodka 
makers, health was never mentioned. There has 
been no talk of cutting production, only of the 
government getting its fair share of taxes. 

Nothing has greater potential to supply a quick fix 
for the tax mess. Mr. Yeltsin’s measures would bring 
in at least $350 million a month. 


HH PEOPLE like Mis. 
Chemyshkova selling 
millions of bottles of 
vodka every day at 
kiosks, train stations and s t reet 
comets, usually for less than 52 each, 
the warehouses where vodka is pro- 
duced illegally are working overtime. 
Bootleggers get to keep about a dime 

for every borne they selL Five han- 
dled bottles a week translates into 
$200 a month for the seller, twice as 
much as the average industrial wage. 

* ‘We are well aware that vodka can 
be a cash cow.” said Levon 
Marutyan, director of the Dolgo- 
prudny Integrated Works, one of 85 
distilleries officially sanctioned in the 
Moscow region. "But we are nearly 
bankrupt. We are trying to make a 
quality product with tiie right ingredi- 
ents. We are willing to pay taxes, of 
coarse. But bow can we compete if 
thousands of people with stills and 
oak buckets can tram out something 
they call vodka, put it into a bottle and 
sell it on any street comer7” 

He can’t, as a quick visit to any of 
Moscow's outdoor markets will 
show. At Davydkovo, one such mar- 
ket there are dozens of kiosks selling 
vodka by the crate. There is pepper 
vodka, honey vodka and vodka with every type of 
fruit mixed in. There is vodka in plastic cups, ram ’s 
horns and soccer balls. Most of au. there is just plain 
vodka by the truckload. 

“I’m getting married,” said a man from Vor- 


Joon Falwwxi/Thr Now York Tone* 


onezh, in southern Russia, as he dragged a pallet 


with 2 00 bottles he just bought for $250 across a 
snow-covered lot "You can’t beat die prices." 


Much of the pure alcohol in Russia 
smuggled in from Belarus and Ukraine, 


is 


border crossings are not closely monitored. Itis then 
diluted with water and bottled 1 


i here. In tie western 
Kaliningrad enclave, a free trade zone, customs 
officials seized more than 25 tons of pure alcohol 


from. Europe m December alone. 

"This is a true crisis for Russia,” said Anatoli 


Kravchenko, chief of the state office on production 
and sale of spirits. It is his job to regulate the 
industry. And as he sat recently with five types of 
vodka lined up in shot glasses fora visitor to sample, 
be admitted that the battle would be a tough one. 

"This is our national product,” he said glumly. 
“Can you imagine Japan struggling to produce its 
own rice, or France its own wine? We are fighting 
for our identity.” 


Sudanese Rebel Leader 




Ream 

CAIRO— The Sudanese rebellead- 
er, Colonel John Garang, said Tuesday 
fe at his forces killed 300 government 
soldiers in a battle Sunday. 

Colonel Garang, speaking by satellite 
telephone from near Kurmuk on the 
Ethiopian border, said that the battle 
occurred at Abu Sbancna, which he said 
was about 60 kilometers (35 miles) 
south of the strongly defended regional 
capital, Damazm. 

“Accordingto the body count, it was 
not less than 300 government troops 
killed,” said Colonel Garang, leader of 
the Sudan People’s Liberation Army. 

He said that this battle should not be 
confused with a simultaneous battle at 
Keili farther south, in which the rebels 
say t hey killed about 150 government 
soldiers. The army in Khartoum, the 
capital, has denied that tie Kefli battle 
took place, and there has been no in- 
dependent confirmation of either 
battle. 

Colonel Garang. whose forces went 
on the offensive in eastern Sudan more 
than a week ago, said that one objective 
was to cut communications between 
Khartoum and Port Sudan, the country ’ s 
only big port 

■ Power Source Imperiled 

Douglas Jehl of The New York Times 
reported from Cairo: .. , 

The rebels have advanced to within 
70 kilometers of Damazin, the Blue Nile 
city whose dam and hydroelectric sta- 
tion provide Khartoum with most of its 
power, opposition leadm said 
Monday. 

The report could not be independ- 
ently co nfirme d, and the Sudanese gov- 
ernment has said that fighting remains 
in the neighborhood of the Ethiopian 
border. But the fightinghundreds of 
kilometers southeast of Kbartomn has 
prompted clear concern from tire gov- 
ernment, which has sent convoys of 
reinforcements to the front and a high- 
level emissary to seek support from 
other Arab capitals. 

Khartoum has said it is under attack 
mainly from the governments- of 
Ethiopia and Eritrea, winch provide 



NYT 


in 


Patten Vow Over Liberties 
Draws Sharp China Reply 


By Keith Richbutg 


HONG KONG Chinese and Brit- 
ish officials assailed each other verbally 


Tuesday over Beijing's plans to curtail 
terc, with Governor Chris 


Jan ies Dickey, American Poet and Novelist, Dies at 73 


By Albin Krebs 

New York Times Service 


James Dickey, one of the most dis- 
tinguished modern American poets and 
an essayist, critic, lecturer and teacher 
perhaps best known for his rugged novel 
"Deliverance.” died Sunday in 
Columbia, South Carolina. He was 73. 

He died of complications of lung dis- 
ease. The Associated Press reportal 

Mr. Dickey was a sprawling, life- 
loving, hard-drinking man once de- 
scribed as "a bare-chested bard." 

His poems often sang the praises of 
fighter pilots, football players and back- 
woods Southerners, but, as one critic put 
it, they were also "deceptively simple 
metaphysical poems that search the 
lakes and trees and workday fragments 
of his experience for a clue to the mean- 
ing of existence." 

In addition to books of essays and what 
be called self-interviews, Mr. Dickey 
turned out about 20 volumes of poetry, 
almost always composed in a solidly 


puiposeful English and celebrating the 
ordinary along with the sublime. 

His collection "Buckdancer's 
Choice" received the National Book 
Award for poetry in 1966. 

In 1970, Mr. Dickey published his 
first novel, "Deliverance," an account 
of a harrowing canoe trip four friends 
take down a roiling northern Georgia 
river. The book was a best-seller, and 
Mr. Dickey supplied the screenplay for 
the film based on it that was made in 
1972. 

The poet won many awards, including 
the Sewanee Review and Guggenheim 
awards for study and travel in Europe 
and the Longview. Vachel Lindsay and 
Melville Cane awards for poetry. 

Mr. Dickey said that writing “De- 
liverance” was one of the most chal- 
lenging experiences of his life. 

“1 wanted to write imaginative prose 
that did not strain for metaphorical bril- 
liance,” he said. “I spent time taking 
things out of my prose.” The book came 
hard, he added, because separating 


words from rhythm was tike "putting 
on a wooden overcoat.” 


month, he was a member of the board of 
Allied Domecq. 


civil liberties here, 

Patten promising that London would 
lodge a diplomatic protest and explore 
other steps to block the move, while a 
spokesman for Beijing warned blnnfiy 
that tody’s China was strong enough to 
stand up to the colonial power. 

With local outrage swirling, China’s 
designated chief executive for the ter- 
ritory, Tung Chee-hwa, maintained his 
silence on me issue, despite pleas from 
several quarters that he speak out 

stianThis wilJm^ess to^stand up for 


protests and to restrict groups’ contacts 
jvhb overseas organizations. 

-Tbepropcwals, approved by the panel 
• over the weekend ixi Beijing, would also 
roll bade recent electoral reforms that 
producedIHong Kong’s most democrat- 
ically chosen legislature in a centmy 
and a half of British colonial rule. 

Chinese officials have said provisions 
of the rights bill, and the electoral re- 
forms, need to be modified or scrapped 
because, in Beijing’s view, they violate 
the Basic Law, which governs the trans: 
for of sovereignty to China and lays out r 
the rales for the future of the territory. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Patten branded . 
China’s logic as “legal nonsense.” He 
said the proposed changes “send a voy 


Jose Ignacio Domecq Gonzalez, 82, 
Head of Wine-Making Company 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Jose Ignacio 
Domecq Gonzalez, 82. the aristocratic 
head of a Spanish wine-making family, 
died Jan. 15 at his home in Jerez de La 
Frontera in southern Spain. 

Mr. Domecq died of cancer, accord- 
ing to one of his sons, Jose Ignacio Jr. 

Mr. Domecq was renowned as El 
Nariz. or The Nose, for his ability to 
sniff out the nuances in the creation of 
highly regarded sherries. 

The Domecq dan owned Pedro 
Domecq. one of the oldest and largest 
Spanish sherry and brandy shippers, 
from 1816 until 1994. when it was 
bought by Allied Lyons PLC, the al- 
coholic beverages giant based in Lon- 
don, creating Allied Domecq PLC. 

Mr. Domecq joined the family com- 
pany in 1939 and became a member of 
the board in 1947. From 15)94 until last 


Adriana Caselotti, 80, the airy, in- 
nocent voice of “Snow White,” died 
Sunday at her home in Los Angeles. Sire 
had been battling cancer. Miss Caselotti 
was a convent-educated teenager in 
1934 when she won the role of the voice 
of Snow White in Walt Dumey's first 
feature-length cartoon. (AP) 


Hong Kong’s rights. 
Mr. Tung i 


Tung may deckle to address the 
issue in the next few days, possibly an 
Thursday, when he is scheduled to de- 


Robert Chapa tte, 74, a former pro- 
fessional cyclist and a French sports 
commentator best known for his cov- 
of the Tour de France, died Sunday 
after a long illness. (AP) 


in 


Vladimir Yarnnikov, 56, the head of 
die Kri stall vodka factory, died Monday 
in Moscow of cirrhosis of the liver, a 
source at the plant said. He had run the 
factory, one of the country’s main pro- 
ducers of vodka, since Soviet days, pro- 
ducing famous brands including Sto- 
iichnaya. (Reuters) 


liver an address ar an awards ceremony 
here, his spokesman, Stanley Shea, said. 

Analysis have said the controversy 
poses a difficult test for Mr. Tung, who 
can either reassure Hong Kong residents 
by rejecting the proposals and demon- 
strating some independence from 
Beijing, or endorse fee sug 
changes at the risk of provoki 
anger and being painted as a “yes man" 
for China. An editorial in fee English- 
language South China Morning Post 
urged Mr. Tung on Tuesdayto “step into 
limit: the damage.” 

The proposals that caused fee furor 
were made by a legal subcommittee of 


community and to fee international 
community about China's view of hu- 
man rights in Hong Konjg.” 

Mr. Patten said fee British side would 
raise its objections during meetings wife 
Chinese officials to discuss fee remainint 


lining 

handoverissaes, andhe also said the local 


Kong advisers. They would largely got 
the territory’s 1991 Bill of Rights, while 
enhancing police power to ban peaceful 


‘discussing wife Lon- 
i fee dramatic steps that we will now 
take.” A spokesman said this referred to 
fee British Foreign Office's lodging a 
protest wife fee Chinese ambassador. 

Mr. Patten also said, “ ‘We are looking 
at what more we can do.” 

But in Beijing, fee Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Shen Guofang, angrily dis^ 
missed what he called Mr. Patten’s ’‘so- 
called statement” 

“This is entirely an internal matter 
for Guna,” he said. “I want to remind 
the' British authorities in Hong Kong 
that fee government of China today is 
not fee pre-1949 government-’ ’ . J 

“We cannot accept any instances 
others trying to impose their will on 
us,” he said. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Rail Workers Cancel Strike in Italy Creek Labor Union Sets Big Strike ^ 


Forecast fbr Thursday through Satuday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asm 


ROME ( AP) — Unions have called off a slowdown and a 
strike that had threatened to disrupt Italian railroads. 

Protesting what they contend are inadequate safety mea- 
sures, engineers had begun reducing train speeds Monday. 
But they called off the action later in the evening when the 
government agreed to include unions in talks on improving 
safety. 

The protest was called following three accidents in 10 days, 
including the derailment of a high-speed express feat killed 
eight people. 


ATHENS (AP) — Greece's largest labor union called a 24- 
hour nationwide strike Tuesday for Jan. 23 to protest fee 
Socialist government's austerity policies. 

If heeded by the country's more than 35 minim workers, 
the strike by fee General Confederation of Greek Labor could 
shut down banks, government offices and private enterprises. 


No m 

AmMMsm 

Ankara 

Mhanm 

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Thailand’s cabinet decided Tuesday to 
struct! on of a second international airport in B 


id con- 
ok. (AP) 


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Cam CM Sol 
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A one-day strike by nearly 5,000 employees of Lebanon's 
national carrier. Middle East Airlines, brought traffic at 
Beirut Airport to a standstill T uesday . (AP) 


RwMton 

GMM 


The Japanese confectionery maker Lotte Co. Ltd. said 
Tuesday that it would build a commercial complex with a 
theme park in Moscow. (AFP) 


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' Bln there is no evidence that those 
countries’ forces have taken part in the 
offensive, one of the fiercest by Su- 
danese rebels since Christian forces in 
the south began to fight domination by 
the Muslim north 14 years ago. 

The rebel campaign has provided the 
first teal indication of Dae military 
strength of an alliance forged in 1991 
between the southerners and exiled 
northern opposition groups. 

Until the offensive began on Jan. 12, 
the northerners, who are raedomhiantly 
Muslims, had not joined fee predom- 
inantly Christian and animist southern- 
ers in combat against the government of 
Lieutenant General Omar Hassan 
Ahmad Bashir, who seized power in a 
mili tary coup in 1989 and imposed a 
strict Islamic state. 

By threatening fee hydroelectric sta- 
tion at Damazm, which provides Khar- 
toum with 80 percent of its power, the 
opposition forties hope to put pressure 
on die government and "create the nec- 
essary atmosphere for a public up 1-4 
to overthrow the regime,” 0 
spokesman, Fhrooq Abu- Iss; _ 

Cairo on Monday. ‘ 

Vice President Zabair Mohammed 
Salih is in on a trip in search of Ara£«- 
support So far, however, only Iraq and 
Jordan have responded favorably. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 


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PAGE 3 


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THE AMERICAS 


Democrats Name 
A New Chairman 

And Fund-Raising Is Changed 


Reuters 

. WASHINGTON — The 
Democratic Party, facing a 
^damaging investigation of its 
fund-raising practices, in- 
stalled Governor Roy Romer 
of Colorado as chairman 
Tuesday and announced 
moves to clean up its cam- 
paign financing. 

At President Bill Clinton’s 
request, Mr. Romer took over 
as genera] chairman and will 
act as the party’s chief public 
spokesman. 

Mr. Clinton asked a Mas- 
sachusetts businessman. 
Steve Grossman, who is close 
to Vice President AJ Gone, to 
be national chairman in 
charge of day-to-day activ- 
ities at party headquarters. 

. The new leadership was 
-approved by acclamation at a 
- meeting of the party’s nation- 
al committee, which imme- 
diately announced changes in 
Democratic fund-raising 
practices. Under these 
changes, Democrats will no 
longer accept donations from 
noncitizens or U.S. -based 
subsidiaries of foreign 
companies and will limit 
donations to $100,000 per 
person per year. 

. “There have been some 
mistakes that have been 
made.' ' Mr. Romer said. 
“Our absolute determination 
is that we're going to do 
everything we can humanly 
do to avoid those mistakes in 
.the future/’ 

- Democrats face a difficult 
year with Republicans who 
control Congress and are 
revelations 


care restraints over five years 
in an effort to show good faith 
with skeptical Republicans, 
The Associated Press report- 
ed 

"I think meeting them half 
way on this and perhaps other 
issues is the way to go." Mr. 
Clinton said, opening a meet- 
ing with his economic team. 

But Republicans have 
already dismissed reports that 
Mr. Clinton wants to trim 
$100 billion from the projec- 
ted growth of the huge pro- 
gram for the elderly, saying 
die plan to shift costs of home 
health care spending is a gim- 
mick. Administration offi- 
cials also have said that Mr. 
Clinton will reduce payments 
to health maintenance orga- 
nizations. hospitals, doctors 
and other providers. 

Mr. Clinton did not specify 
where he would cut the $100 
billion, leaving thai for aides 
to announce later. He said the 
cuts would amount to $138 
billion over six years. He had 
proposed cutting $124 billion 
over seven years. 

Republicans have called for 
slightly deeper cuts in the 
growth of the program . De- 
spite the certainty of Repub- 
lican criticism. Mr. Clinion ar- 
gued that he was moving 
toward their position in a bid to 
reach a budget agreement. 

On Capital Hill, Senate Re- 
publicans unwrapped a legis- 
lative agenda for the 105th 
Congress that features a $ 163 
billion, five-year tax cut and a 
constitutional amendment to 
balance the budget 

In the latest instance of the 



Vice President A1 Gore, joined by his wife, Tipper, celebrating his own second term at a Washington ball. 

i 

A Show of Calm in a Partisan Storm 


By Blaine Harden 

Washington Post Service 


away 

battled House. Senate Repub- 
lican leaders introduced 1 1 
measures including bills 
providing school vouchers to 
many families and malting it 
easier for workers to select 
time off instead of overtime 
pay. In contrast the House 
was simultaneously voting to 
reprimand and fine its speak- 
er. Newt Gingrich. 


ii 


eager to pursue 
^£ha£ the party illegally raised . Senate grabbing the legislai- 
C^arge sums of campaign ive helm away from the em- 
money from foreign donors 
and individuals who could 
not substantiate the source of 
the money they gave. 

The Justice Department 
was looking into the matter, 
and Mr. Clinton was under 
the microscope from critics 
who say that overseas donors 
tried to influence his conduct 
of U.S. foreign policy. 

Mr. Romer urged Repub- 
licans to join the Democrats 
in limiting the influence of 
big money on U.S. politics. 

■ “Come join us,” he said. 

“We're not frying in any way 
■to make political hay. We 
honestly need to have the co- 
operation of both parties.’’ 

Democrats had to return 
more than S 1 .5 million, much 
of it raised by John Huang, 

.who tapped his contacts with 
Asian corporations. 

Under the new rules 
Democrats would have raised 
S6.5 million less in 1996. 
party officials said. 

■ Medicare Restraints 


WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton triggered shouts of “Amen!” 
from among the bundled-up masses 
when be said in his inaugural address 
that voters did not re-elect a Democratic 
president and a Republican Congress in 
order “to advance the politics of petty 
bickering." 

So it was that as Bob and Marietta 
Heule walked off the Mall offer the 
speech on Monday they agreed that the 
one Clinton line they will take back 
home to Milwaukee is that “nothing big 
ever came from being small.’' They will 
keep this pithy homily in mind, they 
said, when Mr. Clinton starts mud-wres- 
tling with the Republicans. 

Across official Washington — where 
wony about corrosive partisanship has 
supplanted concern over deficit spend- 
ing. where a March civility summit 
meeting is being planned — Democrats 
and Republicans alike agreed that the 
president's call for a moratorium on 
meanness was both timely and useful. 

Whether it will bear fruit is doubtful. 


of course, given the partisan acid that has 
been spilled this month on Capitol Hill 
as part of the ethics investigation of 
Newt Gingrich, speaker of the House. 

Similar fodder for partisan sniping is 
available for Republicans in the Su- 
preme Court’s consideration of Paula 
Jones’s sexual harassment lawsuit 
against die president, and in the coming 
Senate hearings on improper Democrat- 
ic fund-raising. 

But in the warm and fuzzy glow of 
Inauguration Day, members of both 
parties tried their rhetorical best to find 
encouragement in Mr. Clinton’s con- 
ciliatory tone and his middle-ground 
declaration that government “is not the 
problem" and *‘is not the solution." 


conciliatory speech,” said Senator Dan 
Coats. Republican of Indiana. "Maybe 
die reality will closely resemble the rhet- 
oric this time." 

Most notable among the peacemakers 
Monday was Mr. Gingrich. At the tra- 
ditional luncheon in the Capitol that 
follows the swearing-in, the speaker rose 
to his feet, described the day as a “joy- 
ous occasion" and used the symbolism 
of a re-elected Democratic president and 
Republican Congress to extol the Amer- 
ican system. 

Mr. Gingrich hailed “this capacity to 
transfer power" as “ truly one of the 
miraculous events of the planet* ’ 

“While we disagree on some things," 
he added, ‘ ‘here you are among friends. 


“That's what should be the theme of and. as Americans, we share in wishing 


this Congress," said Representative 
Marge Roukema. Republican of New 
Jersey. “We need to look at how we can 
slim back government and still recognize 
that we have standards to maintain." 

Republican members of Congress 
pointed out that Mr. Clinton’s speech 
was both short — and short on sub- 
stance. But for the most part, many chose 
to be charitable: “The president gave a 


Genetic Defect in Brain Tied to Schizophrenia 


By Denise Grady 

iVftv York Times Service 


In the first initiative of his 
,second lerm. President Clin- 
ion said Tuesday he was pro- 
posing SI 00 billion in Medi- 


NEW YORK — Scientists 
have reported that they have 
linked a genetic defect to a 
brain abnormality that might 
help explain a hallmark of 
schizophrenia: the inability to 
filter out irrelevant sounds 
and other distractions. That 
lack of filtering can result in a 
flood of heightened sensation 
that makes it nearly im- 
possible to concentrate, and 
may be part of the reason 


Dad Leaves Son He Won 

The Associated Press 

CHICAGO — Baby Richard went home with an 
adoptive family when he was 4 days old. only to be 
returned sobbing four years later to his biological parents. 
Now. the father who fought so Fiercely to get his son back 
has left his wife and the 5-year-old boy. 

Otakar Kirchner moved out several months ago. and the 
boy is staying with his mother, Daniela, said Mr. Kirchner’s 
former lawyer. The couple also has an 1 1 -month-old girl. 

"I visit the family frequently and for extended periods 
of time," Mr. Kirchner said. “I love my children very 
much. Although it is painful for me not to be with them at 
all limes. I believe that this arrangement is the best we can 
do for them at this time." 


schizophrenics hear voices 
and hallucinate. 

The defect by itself does 
not cause schizophrenia, the 
researchers said, but it could 
be one of the risk factors thai 
combine to bring on the dev- 
astating mental illness. And 
because their research in- 
volved a brain structure that 
responds to nicotine, they 
also proposed a most unusual 
theory: that nicotine might 
provide fleeting relief for 
some of the distressing symp- 
toms schizophrenics feel, 
which might m turn explain 
their well-documented tend- 
ency to smoke heavily. 

The findings, reported in 
The Proceedings of the Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences, 
are the first to link a genetic 
defect to a specific brain ab- 
normality and a symptom of 
mental illness. 

According to the National 
Institute of Mental Health, 
schizophrenia affects more 
than 2 million Americans. 
Some 330.000 people a year 
are hospitalized because of 
the disease. Its cause is un- 
known, though a tangle of 
nature and nurture is suspec- 


ted. Scientists think multiple 
genes are involved, along 
with environmental factors 
that may include injuries to 
the brain, and viral illness or 
malnutrition in the patient's 
mother during pregnancy. 

Despite concerns about the 
preliminary nature of the 
findings, some scientists 
praised the way the study was 
conducted. 

Rather than blindly scan- 
ning the genes of patients for a 
distinctive genetic trait. Dr. 
Robert Freedman, a professor 
of psychiatry at the University 
of Colorado and director of 
schizophrenia research at the 
Veterans Affairs Medical 
Center in Denver, and his col- 
leagues based their approach 
on schizophrenics’ difficulty 
in filtering sensory input. Pre- 
vious research had suggested 
that the problem might stem 
from an abnormality in brain 
function that could be detec- 
ted in a laboratory. 

When a normal person 
hears a tone, the brain makes 
an electrical response that can 
be measured, and if a second 
tone quickly follows, the 
second response will be smal- 


ler. But schizophrenics are less 
able to inhibit the second re- 
sponse, and that seems to cor- 
relate with their poor perfor- 
mance on tests that measure 
the ability to pay attention. 

The researchers studied 
nine families with a total of 
104 members, including 36 
schizophrenics. Thirty-five 
of the schizophrenics, and 22 
of their normal relatives, 
showed the abnormal brain 
response on the tone test 

Next, assuming that the re- 
sponse was hereditary, the re- 
searchers began to study all 
the family members, looking 
for a genetic pattern common 
to those with the abnormal 
response. They reported that 
they found a possible location 
for a genetic defect in an area 
on chromosome 15. 

At the same time, they con- 
ducted studies in rats to 
identify which parts of the 
brain cells were involved in 
the responses to the tone test. 
The key to a normal response 

— and the presumed source 
of trouble in schizophrenics 

— turned out to be a structure 
called the alpha-7-nicotinic 
receptor, which responds to a 


chemical messenger, acetyl- 
choline. as well as nicotine. 

Another team pinpointed 
the location of the nicotinic 
receptor on chromosome 15, 
in the region that Dr. Freed- 
man’s team identified as a 
possible location for a defect. 

Although Dr. Freedman 
thinks the gene his group is 
hunting will turn out to be- the 
one for the nicotinic receptor, 
they have not proved it yet. 
Further studies in more pa- 
tients are needed to prove that 
die abnormal response on the 
tone test is truly a manifest- 
ation of schizophrenia, and to 
pin down the gene that causes 
it, as well as mutations that 
interfere with its function. 

But if the finding holds up. 
Dr. Freedman said, it would 
suggest that having defective 
or too few nicotinic receptors 
may predispose a person to 
schizophrenia. 

The fact that some healthy 
subjects appeared to have the 
same receptor abnormalities 
as their schizophrenic relat- 
ives would support the idea 
that the abnormality is a risk 
factor for schizophrenia, but 
cannot act alone to cause it 


POLITICAL NO i 


you Godspeed in your administration.' 

During and after lunch there was little 
sense of awkwardness among the as- 
sembled leaders. Except, perhaps, for 
the space that Mr. Gingrich always 
seemed to have around him. When the 
meal was over, as people crowded 
around Mr. Clinton to congratulate him, 
Mr. Gingrich stood somewhat apart. At 
several points, he was virtually alone. 


Bill Richardson Clams Up 

WASHINGTON — The day they name you to 
something, it’s like aiswarm of guys comes over from ine 
White House. locks the door, rips the telephone cord out 
of the wall and tapes your mouth shut. 

For Representative Bill Richardson, Democrat of New 
Mexico, this last bit was probably ihe ultimate torture. As 
a sonny-tempered, back-slapping politician from Santa 
Fe, he usuaUyhas something to say about just about 
everything. Just ask-him. 

■ No, don’t. . 

Ever since Dec. 13. when President Bill CIinton.se- 
. lected him to be .the chief U.S. delegate to the United 
Nations, Mr. Richardson has been on ice. Talk about the 
new job? No. Do politics? No.. Talk ro fmeign gov- 
ernments? No. Give floor speeches about foreign affairs . 
No. Talk to the press? Absolutely not. 

Mr. Richardson’s Senate confirmation hearing is next 
week,and is expected to go swimmingly, bur until it is 
over. White House types say, Mr. Richardson must never, 
never do anything to show that he even remotely en- 
tertains die thought that he might get the job. 

- The Senate, as almost everyone knows, does not like 
supplicants to presume, and the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee chairman, Jesse Helms, Republican of North 
Carolina, is riot someone to be presumptuous with. (WP) 

For Lebed, Inaugural Envy 

WASHINGTON — Alexander Lebed, the gruff 
former general who says flatly that he will become 
Russia’s next president, attended the U.S. inauguration to 
see how it’s done. He said it left him with a feeling of 
“white envy," which is the benign kind. The main 
reason, he said, “is a conflict-free change of supreme 
power in the United States for more than 200 years." 

He had never beard of a case when former U.S. 
presidents “have mud and stones thrown at their back/ ’ 
Mr. Lebed said. “We have yet to achieve this goal." 

Mr. Lebed, 46, created his own odd tableau Monday, 
sitting on a small couch, with two Republican senators, 
William Roth of Delaware and Gordon Smith of Oregon, 
crammed in the edges. Mr. Roth invited Mr. Lebed here at 
the behest of a constituent who runs a business-de- 
velopment group. By tradition, no foreign leaders are 
invited to inaugurations. (NYT) 

A Broken Christopher Departs 

WASHINGTON — Warren Christopher fell and broke 
his left wrist while cleaning out the garage at his home on 
his last day as secretary of state. 

Mr. Christopher, 71, was treated at a hospital and then 
went directly to the airport for a flight to Los Angeles. Mr. 
Christopher officially stepped down as secretary of state 
as Mr. Clinton was sworn in. His deputy. Strobe Talbott, 
will fill in until die Senate confirms Madeleine Albright 
as his successor. (AP) 


Quote/Unquote 


Representative Nancy Johnson, chairman of the House 
ethics committee, in the debate on reprimanding Speaker 
Newt Gingrich: “No one is above the rules. Repre- 
sentative Gingrich failed to exercise the discipline and 
caution of his office and so is subject to. penalty 
today." (AP) 


Away From Cosby Was Target of Extortion 


Politics 

• Governor George Pataki 

•of New York spent the night 
in an Albany hospital after a 
car wreck left him sore, but 
not seriously injured. A truck 
broadsided Mr. Piilaki's 
chuuffeurcd car us he was re- 
turning home. f AP) 

• A helicopter crew plucked 
two construction workers 
from the top of a truck that 
was stranded in the Los 
Angeles River after a flash 
flood surged into a normally 
dry concrete channel. Seven 
vehicles were trapped and 
washed away as the channel 
filled with five feet of water in 
less than a minute. tAP) 

• A coalition of 40 Indian 
tribes and the nation’s largest 
conservation group have 
asked Montana and the Na- 
tional Park Service to stop 
slaughtering wild bison that 
leave Yellowstone National 
Park and instead allow the 
animals to be used as stock to 
re-establish free-rooming 
herds across the West. The 
bison carry a disease called 
brucellosis, which, if passed 
to cattle, could cause them to 
abort their calves. (NYT) 


Woman and Tabloid Writer Sought $40 Million From Comedian 


iVpw York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Two days 
after Bill Cosby’s son was 
shot to death in Los Angeles, 
a woman claiming to be the 
comedian’s illegitimate 
daughter was arrested in what 
officials described as an ap- 
parently unrelated scheme to 
exton 540 million from him. 
the U.S. attorney's office here 
said. 

The woman. Autumn Jack- 
son. demanded the money in 
return for her refraining from 
talking to a tabloid newspa- 
per. officials said Monday. 

She and Jose Medina, who 
was to write her story, were 
arrested Saturday at the New 
York office of Mr. Cosby’s 
representative, shortly after 
signing a purported $24 mil- 
lion settlement to "end 
everything.' ’ the U.S. attor- 
ney’s office said. 

The defendants and the 
Cosbys were not strangers: 
For several years Mr. Cosby 
had been paying some of Ms. 
Jackson's educational ex- 
penses. an FBI affidavit said. 

But according to a report 
on ABC News that quoted a 
family spokesman, Mr. 


Cosby denied that she was his 
daughter and has a birth cer- 
tificate proving as much. 
Moreover, the FBI affidavit 
noted that Mr. Cosby had 
“paid for numerous young 
people in need of tuition as- 
sistance." 

When and how Ms. Jack- 
son got to know Mr. Cosby 
was not dear, nor was the 
amount of her educational as- 
sistance. Publicists for Mr. 
Cosby did not return tele- 
phone calls. 

Prosecutors said the extor- 
tion effort apparently began 
in November, when Ms. Jack- 
son called a representative of 
Mr. Cosby's, saying that she 
was his illegitimate daughter 
and that she was “out of 
money.” 

Mr. Cosby sent her approx- 
imately $3,000. but she con- 
tinued to leave messages at 
his home demanding more 
money, adding that she would 
go to the media if she were not 
paid. 

Mr. Cosby's representative 
said the entertainer would not 
meet her demands. So she 
kept lowering the amount, de- 
manding $30 million, then 


$25 million, then finally $24 
million to "end everything,*’ 
with 75 percent going to her 
and 25 percent to Mr. Med- 


ina. 


DEATH NOTICE 


GRAFF 

Paul, President and Chairman of 
the Klosterfrau Group, passed 
away on January 14th. With 
deep respect we take our leave 
of a man who supremely and 
with exceptional success 
directed the fortunes of the 
Klosterfrau Group for nearly 4S 
years. With an entrepreneurial 
instinct, hart, initiative, a high 
degree of personal commitment 
and, not least of all. a lucky 
touch, he guided the companies 
entrusted to him to international 
success. Apart from his family all 
his energies and loving care 
were for his enterprise and its 
employees. A great person, a 
gifted businessman and a 
reliable, fatherly friend has gone 
from us. His example win ensure 
we continue his life's work. 
Memorial service in Cologne on 
22nd January. 


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She’s 12, Innocent, 
Anda 



Appeasing Ju-Ju Gods, Families 
In Ghana Give Girls to Priests 


By Howard W. French. 


Afr** ftrt Tunes Service 


^ 1 ? oW » a shy smile, bare 

AblalSiS ?? 6 E 2 ted s i3 h 11131 serves ^ her only clothing. 

ofiervitude - 

* 1 ?™*. b^T mostly involve sweeping ti« dirt court- 
wnr«h , Ti^r! OCa i 5 Ush P 1 ^ 1 * a spiritual intermediary between 
SSffiR? “* of the ra's traditional reuSc^-*!. 
fJJJi? ^ respons^Umes will growio include providing sexual 
favon, to the pnest who has become hermaste. 

“ e meantune. she must learn to cookand to farm, serving 

iSS c“m 0g fieidS •*" 

\ servants like her are typically denied the fruits of their 

hard labor. Instead their families, often wretchedly poor, are 
to send food to feed them. ; V^. 

Miss Kotor has jiule idea of why she was sent to the shrine 
future toMds 3111 ^ ^° Ur mont h s a 8 ° OT . for that matter, what the 

My foftCT brought me here, but he never exrfained why,’ ’ 
A|. the timid girl, speaking in hairing English and inhernative 

**_£we language. *‘I was told that someone had done something 
bad in my family, but 1 was not told what it was.’ ’ 

without even knowing it. Miss Kotor has joined a com- 
munity of several thousand female ritual slaves in this comer 
of southeastern Ghana. Slavery based on racial and religious 
, differences stubbornly endures in a few places in Africa, with 
►Sudan and Mauritania often accused by human rights groups 
Zof tolerating it. 

* But in this area of isolated farming villages along the hanlcs nf 
% the Volta River, a lesser-known form of bondage still thrives. 

► Here, even today, girls known as tmeosi in -the Ewe 
■language, or slaves of the gods, are routinely given by their 
families to work as slaves in religious shrines as a way of 
►appeasing the gods for crimes committed by relatives. 

\ Ghanaians say the practice stems from a world view that 
sees justice and punishment in communal rather thyg in- 
dividual terms; an individual who has no connection to a c rime 
may be punished to spare othera. Similarly, when one-person's 
-offense goes unpunished, it isbelieved, vengeance may be 
wreaked upon an entire community. . 

- According to the tradition, which dares at least as far back as 
the 1 7th century and extends into neighboring Togo, Benin 
• • and southwestern Nigeria, the 


The practice exists 
in southeastern 
Ghana and 
extends into Togo, 
Benin and 
southwestern 
Nigeria. 


* 


trocosi must begin their bond- 
age as virgins. . 

.. Once given to a priest, a 
girl is considered his property 
and can be freed only by die 
priest, in which case ber fam- 
ily must replace her with a 
new young giri. To ensure 
that the gods remain ap- 
peased. this process is re- 
peated for a serious crime, 
with families giving up gen- 

, "■ erarion after generation of 

•girls in perpetual atonement. “The feet is that when a fetish 
[priest feels thanbe woman isna longer appealing, because she 
lhas borne many children and has been worked so hard, be lets 
;hcr go. at which tune she must be replaced by another girl," 
[said Mark Wisdom, a local Baptist preacher who began 
i camp^gn jug -r mHust jfi e prajpqce 16 years ago. “And this 
[conimSes jn perpetuity/ * 

. Thfc practice R ajmrngosdfrrismgcriti^^ 

[and in Ghana. In a 1995 report on Ghana, the U.S. State 
! Department called it one of several “discriminatory practices 
•that are injurious to female health and development.” ‘ 

A Western diplomat here called troqosi bondage “the most 
‘■fundamental human-rights violation that Ghana faces “ be- 
cause it consigns waimen to servitude and sexual abuse from 
- girlhood ro middle 5 ^. 

Gradually, women's rights advocates here say, Ghanaians 
have been coming around to feisvieW- Aftl^ugfr Gharta’ s 
constitution bars slavory, a bUTts pending before Pariiament 
that would specifically outfow-troccsw bondage. 

Miss Kotor is as unaware of die law as she has been of the 
reason for her p re dica ment But ia exchange for a bottle of 
schnapps, the traditional libation of cboiee,'tiie priest foe serves 
as one of seven trocosi “wives" provided an explanation. 

Resplendent in his white cloth and woven cap. holding a 
ceremonial scythe and burnished staff and wearing the long 
braided ropo necklace that is the trademark of an Ewe priest 
Kotinudr Akorti explains that Miss Kotor has been given to 
him to atone fora rape. ' : 

Not just any rape, he explained, with Miss Kotor listening 
silently, perhaps hearing the story, forthe .first time, but die sex 
her father forced a young niece to engage in years ago: That act 
resulted in Miss Kotor's birth, die priest said. . 

Mr. Korinucr- rejected the view that Miss Kotor’s case 
represented, ap absurdly cruel example of p un is hin g the vic- 

To you this may seem like a miscarriage of justice, but the 
Kotinuor said, speaking through 
, our fetish, who has made things 


gjrl will have to atone.’ ’ Mr. Kotinuor said, speak i n g through 
an interpreter. “It is die spirit, our fetish. ' vhrt Tl5, « thmtr* 

work this way, and only he can explain. 


Because of the religious nature of the practice^ many 
Ghanaians who advocate abolition 6 f trocosi bondage are 
^skeptical that a new law will end it [ ' . . . .. 

t> “This is something rooted ina very powoful superstition, 

bsaid Audrey Gadzekpo. a prominent women’s rights advocate. 

n“The'ircK:o» are not iterated Qrcaptnted: They are sent to the 

Shrines by people who fear char something bad will happen to 
wthem if they do not atone in this way. This will continue to.be 
hroe for a rime regardless of the law." . . . 

Z Individuals and private groups m Ghana have had s ome 
^success in persuading priests tom tte practice, usually 
^discussi ons whh paramount chiefs .and other prominent local 

said Wisdom Mensah, a social woiken ‘The fear of 
^retribution is still very strong, arid the people believe tharif the 
'trocosi return home they will begin to suffer all kinds of 
i-punishment. For that to change will take a long time. . 


j JZaire Envoy to France Is Dismissed 

5 A fence Fron ce-Pr esse 

! ROQUEBRUNE CAP-MARTIN, Em «* — 
i M h , ni Seko of Zaire announced Tuesday that he had 
! dismSLdS Zaton *X*ador to France, who lolled two 
‘ teenacers in a car crash in Menton, France, on Nov. 23. 
i’^Sani Baya, whohas since left ^*^*™** 
nressu re to have his diplomatic immunity liftedsinee^he 
'^ccittenL “In order to accelerate his appearan ce bef ore com- 
^Mtent French authorities, my government preferred this way 
of /parliamentary vote to hft his 

^ diplomatic immunity, he said. 




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&OODHOPB 


Mandela’s Cell a Bit Punishing to Visit 


l 


By Suzanne Daley 

Mv fort rimes Serve 


NYT 


Tt sure isn’t a 
comfortable or fancy 
tour. And there isn’t a lot 
to see, either. But that’s 
not really what it’s about, 
is it? It’s something you 
do because you need to.’ 


ROBBEN ISLAND, South Africa — On the 
boat over, Nonga Ndabankulu teased his chil- 
dren about their expectations. They thought the 
island would be larger. He said that was only 
because such big things had happened here. 

But now, in the grim passageway outside the 
cell where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for 
more than IS years, they could only stare. 

“It is so small," Mr. Ndabankulu said fi- 
nally. “As tall as he is. it means he never was 
able to stretch. I think the old man was very 
strong to survive this. It was very cruel." 

Since the island opened to tourists on Jan. 1. 
thousands have lined up to see the place that Mr. 
Mandela, who is now the president, once called 
“the harshest, most iron-fisted outpost in the 
South African penal system." 

Some have stood outside the cell and cried. 
Almost always there is silence as gaily dressed 
tourists, hauling children and video cameras, 
contemplate what life must have been like here. 

Bui if the final destination, a one -story stone 
barracks surrounded by rusting razor wire, has 
become a shrine, the pilgrim's path to it is across 
troubled waters. 

A fight has broken out between local charter 
boat captains and the government over who has 
the right to cany tourists from the jaunty Vic- 
toria and Alfred wharf — a slick collection of 
mails and museums that is one of Cape Town's 
premier tourist destinations — to the cell where 
Mr. Mandela became a legend. 


The charter owners, who have been taking 
tourists on luxury cruises around the island for 
years and expected to be allowed to land pas- 
sengers here when it opened, say the gov- 
ernment’s decision to run its own ferries and 
keep exclusive landing rights is eviscerating 
their business. 

But the new temporary' administrator of the 
island. Andre Odendaal. says the battle is about 
the charter- boat captains' "old South African 
arrogance." 

He says he w’ants to make sure that nonwhites 
can profit from a state asset. 

Right now the government 's S 1 6 boat and bus 
tour Is not exactly ftin. There are not enough 
seats on the feny's hard benches, so many 
passengers stand or lean. The rickety buses on 
the other side do not offer much comfort either. 
They have no air conditioning, and most of their 
windows are snick shut. 

To maintain what Mr. Odendaal calls the 
“sensitive ecological balance of the island." 
which is home to gazelles, ostriches and thou- 
sands of penguinsT passengers are not allowed 
off during the hourlong ride except at the prison. 
They are instructed to not pick up even a pebble 
as a souvenir. 

At various times. Robben Island was home to 
a leper colony, a mental hospital and an army 
base. It was used as a prison as far back as the 
1 600s. But in the 1 960s a special compound was 
built for non white political prisoners. 

In weather that ranged from scorching hot to 

f iiercing cold, they were forced to break rocks in 
ime quarries. 


Food and clothing were rationed according to 
race: "Coloreds." or people of mixed race, 
could wear long pants and eat bread with sup- 
per. “Africans" wore shorts and got less meat 
and no bread. Assaults were frequent. Beaten 
prisoners were forced to clean their own Wood- 
spattered cells. 

The tour is led by former prisoners. Some, 
like Bongani Jonas, are working here tempor- 
arily. A former guerrilla in Umkhonto we 
Sizwe, die military wing of Mr. Mandela's 
African National Congress, he is now a colonel 
in the South African Army. 

The guides do their best to explain the harsh- 
ness of life here. How it took years for the 
prisoners to win the right to more than one letter 
every six months and even then, the censors 
often cut the letters to shreds. How important 
prisoners like Mr. Mandela often spent 14 hours 
a day in isolation cells with only buckets for 
toilets, and often sick from the miserable food 
How cold sea-water showers gave many men 
rashes. How everyone slept on grass mats with a 
single blanket. 

Except for a cot and a wooden table in Mr. 
Mandela's cell, the prison has been stripped 
clean, without so much as a poster on its pale 
gray walls. No sodas or souvenirs are hawked 
anywhere. Some of the tourists grumbled. Oth- 
ers thought it appropriate. 

“It sure isn't a comfortable or fancy tour." 
said Cecil Triegaardt. a communications con- 
sultant. "And there isn’t a lot to see. either. But 
that’s not really what it's about, is it? It's 
something you do because you need to." 



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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Sri Lanka Remains Mired in a Violent Cycle as Reform 



By John F. Bums 

Yi'rl Tims Semi e 


COLOMBO — A year after a truck bombing 
devastated the old colonial heart of this city, 
there is an eerie stillness along the broad avenue 
where a suicide squad of separatist rebels set off 
hundreds of pounds of high explosive at the 
height of a working day. killing more than 90 
people and wounding more than 1 ,U0Q. 

TTie scene along President's Surer, in what 
used to be Colombo's financial district, is an 
epitaph for the victims of the worst terrorist 
attack in Sri Lanka's bitter civil war. Behind 
traffic barriers, policemen with automatic rifles 
stand before the ruined towers of the Central 
Bank building and the shattered masonry and 
twisted steel that once housed the offices of some 
of the country’s largest corporations. 

Despite pledges to rebuild what the bombing 
destroyed, the government of President 
Chamirika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga has left 


the wreckage much as it was after the attack on 
Jan. 31.1996. 

The government is financially drained by the 
war. locked into a bitter political battle with other 
opponents in Colombo, and so mesmerized by 
these problems that it lacks energy for much else. 

To many Sri Lankans, the ruins, a block from 
Colombo's palm-fringed Indian Ocean water- 
front, reflect the impasse that has settled over this 
island country of 16 million. 

After nearly 15 years of conflict, and a i least 
50.0(10 deaths, neither the government nor the 
rebel organization, the Liberation Tigers oFTamil 
Eelam, seems capable of winning. And the com- 
promises offered by Mrs. Kumaraiunga seem to 
fall far short of luring the Tigers into peace. 

The prospect of further conflict deeply de- 
presses many who had hoped that Mrs. Ku- 
maratunga might break the cycle of violence that 
began in 1983. when militants of the Tamil 
ethnic group took up amis to contest decades of 
discrimination by the Sinhalese majority. 


. The doubts have spread to many moderates, 
Sinhalese and Tamil alike, who have supported 
Mrs. Kumaraiunga 's peace plan, which centers 
on constitutional reforms that would extend wide 
autonomy to an area of the north and east where 
most of the island's 25 million Tamils live. 

Partly, the doubts focus on whether any deal 
short of an independent Tamil state would satisfy 
the Tigers’ leader. Vellupillai Prabhakaran. who 
has shown a willingness to shed blood, often with 
suicide bombings that kill scores of civilians. 

“The Tigers have a completely different 
concept of history, and of time/’ said Nee lan 
Tiruchelvam. a Tamil lawyer and politician who 
was one of the authors of Mrs. Kumaratunga's 
constitutional proposals. Mr. Tiruchelvam. who 
studied and taught law at Harvard, said no amount 
of military or political pressure was likely to shake 
the Tigers from their commitment to Eelam, their 
name for an independent Tamil state. 

Those who think the war may be unstoppable 
also lay some of the blame on Mrs. Kuraara- 


tunga. Hie third member of her family to govern 

Sinhaiese^first policies ofber father, Solomon 
Bandaranaike. who was assassinated by a Sin- 
halese militant in. 1959, and her mother, 
Sirimavo, who headed the government for much 
of the 1960s and '70s. 

Sirimavo Bandaranaike. now nearly 80, is once 
again prime minister, although the real power 
belongs to the president, Mrs. Kumaraiunga. 

While critics applaud Mrs. Kumaraiunga for 
courage in offering constitutional concessions to 
the Tamils, they fault her for turning the war with 
the Tigers, and the political battle with Sinhalese 
opponents in Colombo, into a personal crusade. 

“The commitment to a political solution is 
still there, and she is ready to take grave personal 
risks to see it through." a, senior official in her- 
government said, “But she’s a combative per- 
sonality, and that c-ould be her Achilles’, heel/ ’ 

In any case, the Tigers have rejected the reforms, 
calling them a formula for capitulation. And Mrs. 


Kumaratunga’s political opponents in Colombo, 
led by the United National Party, have aed up the 
reforms in a parliamentary committee. 

A year of hearings has failed to produce agree- 
ment on any of the key elements in Mrs* Ku~ 
maratunga’s plan, which would turn this highly 
centralized country into a “federation of re- 
gions,” including the one dominated by Tamils. 

Most Sri Lankans have resigned themselves to 
more war. After a train bombing in July that killed 
80 civilians in the suburbs of Colombo, the Tigers 
appear to have suspended their campaign, or at 
ieastto have called off the most deadly attacks. 

Diplomats and others familiar with Tiger tac- 
tics say that Mr. Prabhakaran may have sus- 
pended the attacks while he waits to see whether 
the Tigers will be identified as a terrorist or- 
ganization by the United States. A law enacted 
last year requires the State Department to draw 
up a list of terrorist groups that would be banned 
from- raising money in the United States or 
engaging in any other activities there. 


Thousands Flee an Afghan Town Recaptured by Taleban 


C-TtW .-tfi F'.ft Pufiochri 

KHACR KHAN A PASS, Afghanistan — Thou- 
sands of Afghan civilians continued fleeing their 
homes north of Kabul on Tuesday after the Taleban 
militia recaptured the town and ordered them to 
leave, witnesses said. 

The forced exodus from Charikar came less than 
a week after the Islamic Taleban recaptured the area 
from combined forces loyal io General Abdul 
Rashid Dustam and Ahmed Shah Masoud. 

All shops in the city, which once had around 
i 00.000 people, were closed, and there was no 
vehicle traffic except those transporting people 
from the town. “Through a loudspeaker. Taleban 
ordered all the civiliansTo leave Charikar. and we 
started packing and collecting what we could 


carry.” said Shah Ghasi. a school teacher. 

Observer* said they thought the civilians had 
been ordered out for fear they would rebel and 
attack Taleban forces. 

With their belongings, the road down to Kabul 
was dotted with women, children and elderly. Some 
were riding in trucks laden with civilians, some 
covering their faces with plastic sheeting against 
the extreme cold. 

Life under Taleban will be harsh, the observers 
said, since they carried General Dustam's bank- 
notes. which are not valid in Kabul. 

The exact number of the refugees was not im- 
mediately available. No accommodation has been 
arranged by any aid agency. 

Leader* of the Taleban militia had said they were 


determined to disarm civilians in the town of 
Charikar and other recaptured villages. 

But a Taleban spokesman said earlier that they 
had not ordered people in the newly captured area 
to leave. 

Taleban seized Charikar, 50 kilometers (30 
miles) north of the capital, and the nearby Bagram 
military airbase on Thursday. Taleban captured the 
same territory soon after seizing Kabul in Septem- 
ber but lost it after General Masoud, military com- 
mander in the ousted government, hit back with 
guerrilla taqtics. 

In their first drive north of Kabul in October, the 
largely Pash tun Taleban faced resistance from lo- 
cals north of Kabul, who are mainly ethnic Tajiks. 

(Reuters, AFP ) 


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Oil Spill Is Serious, 
Hashimoto Concedes 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryutaro Ha- 
shimoto said Tuesday that his government 
had misjudged die seriousness of the oil 
spill that is ■ polluting fisheries and the 
shoreline along much of the west coast. 

Mr. Hashimoto made the remarks during 
a meeting with Takako Doi, leader of a 
party that supports die prime minis ter's 
minority government, a spokesman for the 
minister said. Mr. Hashimoto told 
s. Doi that the government mistakenly 
thought the bow- portion of the Russian 
tanker that broke up in the Sea of Japan on 
Jan. 2 could be easily salvaged. 

The Japanese leader also told Mrs. Doi 
that he originally thought the oil was of a 
type that would freeze in ihe cold sea, 
malting it easy to clean up. But the fuel oil is 
of a nonfreezing type often used in Siberia, 
where the ship was headed. 

The oil-filled bow of the tanker still rests 
on the rocks near Mikuni; it contains 2,800 
ktioliters (2,500 tons) of oil. Rough seas 
forced salvage -workers to call off efforts 
Tuesday to remove oil from the bow and 
hampered efforts to clean up 5,000 kilo- 
liters of fuel oil that have spilled into the sea 
since the. vessel broke in half. The rear part 
of the ship, which lies 2,000 meters un- 
derwater, was still leaking. . (AP) 

Vietnam Sentences 2 

HANOI — Vietnam sentenced two 
people to death Tuesday and punished oth- 
ers with prison terras of up to life in a trial 
showing the government’s determination to 
crack down on graft . 


A court official in Ho Chi Minh City said 
Pham Minh Tong and Nguyen Ngoc Tan 
had been found guilty of fraudulent ap- 
propriation of citizens’ property and would 
be executed by firing squad. 

One defendant was sentenced to life in 
jail, and two were given terms of 20 years' 
and 6 years each- Two people received 
suspended terms, and one person was found 
innocent. (Reuters). 

2 Quakes in West China 

BELTING — Two powerful earthquakes 
struck Tuesday in the far-western province 
of Xinjiang, killin g at least 12 people, and 
forcing more than 2,500 families to flee 
damaged homes in the bitter cold. 

At least 27 other people were seriously 
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The first quake had a magnitude of 6.4; it 
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quake. 

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Bureau said. (AP) 

For the Record 

A deadly brew of homemade liquor 
killed 32 people in Pakistan's southern Sind 
Province, the state-ran press agency said 
Tuesday. It remained unclear what was in 
the homemade alcohol that the men drank 
Monday in Hyderabad. The victims ranged 
from 12 to 70 years old. (AP) 

At least one person was killed in bosh- 
fires that raged Tuesday near Melbourne, 
forcing the evacuation of about 800people, 
the police and fire fighters said. (Reuters) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 

EUROPE 



A Post -Milosevic Serbia 

Opposition’s Long-Term Aims Are Mystery 


Jty Joseph Fitchetl . 

_ International Herald Tribune 

*° discem ™ 

varce the likely direction of Serbian 
r'^/and developments in fee Bal- 

SEgf^ from power. Western 
experts said Tuesday that 
they had little hard evidence abend Ser- 
bian opposition leaders’ long-term aims 
Mid only hypotheses about their atti- 
tudes toward fellow-Serbs in Bosnia- 

Ko^^° Vma 20(1 *° P rovinc& of 

. Sources in London, Paris and Wash- 
mgton all said that their governments, 
despite deep uncertainties about the 
215: a showdown over power in 

Se™a, were cautiously optimistic about 
the opportunities for cooperation with a 
new regime in Belgrade. 

They also agreed that to get Western 
\ y aid a new regime could make com- 
promises to avoid ethnic violence in 
Bosnia or in Kosovo, with its restive 
Albanian majority. 

The most impressive thing we know 
about them is tow cleverly they have 
handled their protest movement, with a 
combination of fervor, ngtinnaiigm and 
humor that is the right revolutionary 
tactic in that culture.” said a Clinton 
administration official involved in fre- 
quent high-level U.S. missions to Serbia, 
including contacts with the opposition. 
But beyond that, none of the officials 

‘Mad Cow* Hits 
German Animal 
Of British Origin 


, Agence France- Prase 

' BONN — A new case of “mad cow” 
disease in Germany has been con- 
finned, the North Ririne-Westphalia 
Agriculture Ministry said Tuesday, 
bringing to live the number of cases m 
the country since 1992. 

The Federal institute for Virus Dis- 
eases in Tuebingen found that a four- 
year-old Galloway cow of British des- 
cent died of bovine spongiform enceph- 
alopathy. ..... 

The ani mal, bought in 1995 from a 
farm m Mecklenburg- Western Pomer- 
ania in northeastern Germany, died Etec. 
27. - 

Other cattle on the farm in eastern 
Westphalia have been put mouaianrine^ 
AU four previous cases of me disease 
in Germany, which Iris had one of the 
lowest uaddenCes m Europe, have been 
in cattle of British origin- 
German authorities have been par- 
ticuhfffy. severe m frefr rcstxictim of 
beef ana beef-product im p orts fr om Bri- 
tain because of fears for hnnwn heahh 
from tire bnnn disease. 


Sweden Leader Mates 


AgeateFruace-Pras* . 

STOCKHOLM — Prime Minister 
Goeran Persson announced a cabinet 
shuffle Tuesday, with changes at the 
defense and trade ministries, in amove 
te tig hten control over a gove rnment 
facing elections in less than two years. 

He also announced that a minister 
wttexrtpoitfoliowhoiepom directly to 
him would bewplaced. The new min- 
ister -without portfolio, Thage Peterson, 
was Mr. Peterson to- . 

places Leif Pagrotsky, who will take 
over as trade monster. The current trade 
minister, Bjoem von Sydow, becomes 
defense minister. 


siocks in Kosovo at least temporarily. 


CROSSWORD 


Protesters in Belgrade Are Beaten by Biot Police 


or experts churned to have clear ideas of 
whether the protest movement’s leaders 
are equipped to tackle the biggest 
threats to Serbia itself and to its neigh- 
bors: the Communist-style economy in 
which Serbia is still mired and the ul- 
tranationalist feelings that could make 
Kosovo the flashpoint for a new Balkan 
conflict, this one involving Serbia, Al- 
bania and Macedonia. 

But die experts agreed that Western 
governments have started in the last few 
weeks to consider the likely options in a 
post-Milosevic Serbia. 

That marks a change from the pre- 
vailing attitude since die Dayton ac- 
cords brought peace to Bosnia in 1995, 
said Jonathan Eyal, research director at 
the Royal United Services Institute in 
London. The attitude in Washington 
. and other capitals, he said, was to accept 
fee image that Mr. Milosevic projected 
of himself as the man who could im- 
plement the accord. 

. . Disenchantment has .set in, a U.S. 
official agreed, because of growing 
•' signs that Mr. Milosevic has Little in- 
tention of working out a c o mpro m ise in 
Kosovo, of obtaining the surrender of 
Bosnian Sobs accused of war crimes or, 
more important, of making changes to 
the battered Serbian economy. 

The breaking point may have come 
with the failure of U.S. efforts to get 
Serbia to open itself to foreign invest- 
ment For months. Western experts have 
followed one anotherto Belgrade, trying 
to convince Mr. Milosevic that this step 
was tiie only way to jumpstart the econ- 
omy and generate fee economic peace 
dividend sought by Serbian voters. 

After listemng stoUdly through hours 
of persuasion, Mr. Milosevic finally 
erupted during a recent session with a 
U.S. Treasury officiaL 

“Foreign money is rabbits?” he said 
angrily, according to another U.S. of- 
ficial at the meeting. “One* h gets in the 
country, it runs all around and you can’t 
find out where it all rods up. 

The outburst apparently convinced 
Clinton admirusttanoii officials that Mr. 
Milosevic would never be weaned from 
the reflexes of a lifelong Communist, 
who prefers control over wealth-cre- 
ation in economic policy. 

As a result, another U.S. official said, 
“nobody’s dying to push him out, but 
people are beginning to think about fee 
succession problem. ’ ’ They also recog- 
nize, the official said, that beyond their 
impressive management of street 
demonstrations now in their thin! 
month, Serbian opposition leaders ap- 
parently have conveyed little informa- 
tion about any long-term political 
agenda. , 

. “There are alot of unanswered ques- 
tions, including fee glaring absence of 
any clear guarantiees about opposition 
leaders’ views on the future of 
Kosovo,” said Jacques Rupnik, a Bal- 
kan expert in Paris. The two most prom- 
inent dissidents — Vuk Draskovic, a 
writer and ideologue, and Zoran 
ppndjic, a veteran politician — took 
uhranationalist positions about Bosnia, 
positions that may have been partly a 
tactical effort to outbid Mr. Milosevic in 
appeals to Serbian opinion. 

But Mr. Rupnik pointed out that those 
hard-line views have never been re- 
canted. 

. The third leader of fee opposition 
coalition, Vesna Pesic, has impressed 
Western officials wife her robust sense 
of humor, reflected in the effective use 
of ridicule as a tactic in fee demon- 
strations. She alro has called on Serbia 
to embrace, democracy, hu m an rights 
and other international nouns to inte- 
grate quickly intoEarqpe. 

Any successor regime to Mr. Mi- 
losevic’s, the analysts said, would be 
eager for financial and other forms of 
Western support, and might therefore be 


The Associated Press 

BELGRADE. — Several people were injured, one of 
than seriously, when riot police beat protesters marching 
through central Belgrade, independent media reported 
Tuesday. 

The marchers have been protesting the government's 
annulment of opposition victories in municipal elections on 
Nov. 17. The opposition coalition Zajedno is demanding 
feat the Socialist government of President Slobodan Mi- 
losevic recognize the results in 14 Serbian cities. 

But in the latest blow to Zajedno’s hopes, fee Supreme 
Court ruled Tuesday that the Socialist Party had won 
Smederevska Palanka, a town 80 kilometers (50 miles) 
southeast of Belgrade. The ruling — the second favoring 
the Socialists in two days — dimmed the chances that Mr. 
Milosevic was going to give up Belgrade. 

A fact-finding mission organized by fee Organization for 
-• Security and Cooperation in Europe certified fee opposition 
triumphs in 14 cities, including the capital and 


Smederevska Palanka. But the Socialists have so far ac- 
knowledged losing only five. 

At fee protests, meanwhile, taxi drivers joined the 
demonstrators Tuesday for the first time. More than 100 
cabbies drove through Belgrade, blowing their horns. They 
were greeted by students who were preparing to spend a 
third night in fee streets in their bid to outlast riot police who 
were preventing them from marching. 

Ending weeks of relative restraint during 64 consecutive 
days of protests, police officers waded into crowds Monday 


night — swinging batons and beating demonstrators — in 
at least three Belgrade neighborhoods, independent Radio 
B 92 reported. 


ana oeaang c 
ghborhoods, 


independent Radio 


The radio said several people needed treatment at hos- 
pitals. including a young man wife serious head injuries. 

The Telegraf daily reported feat Mr. Milosevic planned 
to call for new elections in Belgrade instead of conceding 
defeat. The report could not be independently confirmed, 
however. 


> • ; 

" ' • ' 1 
• "1 

>• 

. 

-* . : ; 



' 


■V 


Miles ldcnjnK/.4faKc Fnacr-PriMc 

MEETING OF MINDS — The French far-rigbtist Jean-Marie he Pen, left, and Vojislav Seselj, leader of the 
ultranationalist Serbian Radical Party, in Belgrade on Tuesday, where Mr. Le Pen voiced his support for 
Serbs who oppose what he called the “communist dictatorship” of President Slobodan Milosevic. 

Netherlands Nears Decriminalization of Euthanasia 


Reuters 

THE HAGUE — Tbe Netherlands 
unveiled steps Tuesday to further de- 
criminalize euthanasia but said the time 
was not yet ripe for legalized mercy 
killing on request 

“There are no plans to amend fee 
criminal code’’! to legalize euthanasia, 
Justice Minister ‘Winnie Sorgdrager said, 
because “debate on the issue has not been 
rounded off.” She added. “Public feel- 
ing about euthanasia must stabilize.” 


Dutch right- to-die campaigners and 
doctors have pressed for changes in fee 
law to guarantee freedom from pros- 
ecution for doctors performing euthanas- 
ia under strictly controlled conditions. 

Current Dutch law offers no such 
immunity, although euthanasia is tol- 
erated under certain circumstances: gen- 
erally, feat the patient was of sound 
mind and in unbearable physical or men- 
tal pain and had repeatedly asked to die. 
Before ending a life, a doctor must con- 


sult a second, independent physician. 

Under fee measures unveiled Tues- 
day. reported euthanasia cases no longer 
will be automatically referred to die 
public prosecutor but will be submitted 
to an independent committee of med- 
ical, legal and ethical experts. 

Dutch doctors reported 1 ,466 cases of 
euthanasia in 1995, but a further 2.734 
cases went unreported because doctors 
feared prosecution, a government in- 
quiry reported in November. 


ACCORD: A Czech- German Declaration of Regret for the Past 


Continued from Page 1 

police raided fee parliamentary 
headquarters of fee most vehement 
Czech political opponent of the dec- 
laration. the nationalist Republican 
Party, and barred all approaches to the 
hall where the signing took place. 

Behind a barricade on fee snowy 
courtyard just beyond, about 150 party 
members chanted “Come out! Come 
out! Traitors, come out!” while Mr. 
KlaosandMr.Kohl were meeting inside 
with the press. 

Newspapers published a poll, 
however, showing that only 21. percent 
of Czechs opposed fee document, wife 
49 percent for and fee rest undecided. 

“The great majority of the Sudeten 
community in Germany is ready to co- 
operate.” Chancellor Kohl said. 

But an organization speaking in the 
name of the expelled Sudeten Germans 
deplored fee absence from the document 
of any recognition of the legality of 
claims to the properties they bad be*n 
driven from oar compensation. In an in- 
terview from St u tt g art. Herbert Czaja, 
who for years headed fee League of Ex- 
pellees lobby, which speaks for millions 
of Germans expelled from Czechoslov- 
akia and Poland after fee war, said: 
“What the Czechs have explicitly de- 
plored in the document is "excesses' 
committed during the expulsions. The 
expulsion itself was the evil.” 


At a press conference after the sign- 
ing ceremony, Mr. Kohl said: “Property 
matters remain open. This is not an 
agreement, it’s adeclaration.” 

He seemed, as he did earlier by re- 
fusing to formally recognize the post- 
war Polish borders until after Germany 
was reunified in 1990, to be playing 
both to his home constituency, includ- 
ing its more irredentist elements, as well 
as to his still skittish eastern neighbors. 

His speech never mentioned Hitler, 
though it paid homage to tbe cosmo- 
politan culture of Czechs, Germans and 
Jews that radiated from Prague from fee 
time of Emperor Charles IV to Kafka to 
World War U, when fee Nazi occu- 
pation cruelly dismantled it. 

The document, negotiated over two 
years and initialed by the Czech and 
German foreign ministers last month, 
must be ratified by both countries’ par- 
liaments to fake legal effect Debate, 
scheduled for later this month in both 
countries, is expected to be vigorous, 
though approval seems likely. 

Mr. Kohl’s Christian Social Union 
party allies in Bavaria, where most of 
tbe former expellees settled, may tty to 
amend the declaration, however. 

Every nuance in fee text was 
wrangled over, including references in 
both Czech and German to “expul- 
sion." though fee Czech negotiators 
reportedly preferred something closer to 
“transfer” in their language. 


Key passages of the German doc- 
ument translate as follows: 

“The German side recognizes the 
responsibility of Germany for its role in 
a historical process feat led to fee Mu- 
nich Agreement of 1938, the flight and 
expulsion of people from fee 
Czechoslovakian border area and to fee 
dismemberment and occupation of the 
Republic of Czechoslovakia.” 

“It deplores the suffering and in- 
justice Germans inflicted on the Czech 
people by National-Socialist crimes," it 
says, using the full title of the Nazi 
party. “The German side is also aware 
feat fee National-Socialist policy of vi- 
olence against fee Czech people con- 
tributed to preparing the ground for 
flight, expulsion and forcible resettle- 
ment after fee end of fee war." 

“Tbe Czech side." fee document 
continues, “deplores the fact that the 
expulsion that followed fee end of fee 
war and fee forcible resettlement of 
Sudeten Germans from the former 
Czechoslovakia inflicted great suffer- 
ing and injustice on innocent people, as 
was also true of the collective nature of 
the ascribing of guilt.” 

“It especially deplores fee excesses 
that took place in contradiction of ele- 
mentary humanitarian principles and 
fee legal norms in effect at the time." 
the declaration says, noting that a 
blanket amnesty was applied to all such 
actions in 1946. 


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BRIEFLY EUROPE 


Austrian to Name 
Cabinet Monday 

VIENNA — Austria's new lead- 
er, Finance Minister Viktor Klima 
of the Social Democratic Party, will 
unveil his government Monday, 
party sources said Tuesday. 

Mr. Klima. who was nominated 
Saturday to succeed Chancellor 
Franz Vranitzky. will announce fee 
ministers at a meeting of party lead- 
ers, the sources added. 

Tbe junior coalition partner, fee 
conservative People's Party, is not 
expected to be affected by the 
shuffle. Mr. Klima has refused to 
comment on his plans since his nom- 
ination. The new chancellor and his 
ministers will be sworn into office 
Tuesday. Austrian news reports 
said (AFP) 

Clinton Urges Bans 
At Weapons Talks 

GENEVA — President Bill 
Clinton urged the UN Disarma- 
ment Conference on Tuesday to 
work speedily toward treaties ban- 
ning land mines and materials for 
making nuclear bombs. 

Foreign Minister Lamberto Dini 
of Italy opened the conference by 
calling for similar measures. 

In a message read by tbe U.S. 
ambassador to the conference, Mr. 
Clinton told the 61 nations attend- 
ing the two-month session, “All 
children of fee world deserve to 
walk the earth in safety." (AFP) 

Bulgarian Is Sorry 

SOFIA — The leader of the gov- 
erning Socialists apologized Tues- 
day on behalf of his party for dis- 
appointing the Bulgarian people 
during two years of government in 
which the country's economy col- 
lapsed. 

Prime Minister Zhan Videnov 
resigned last month under fire for 
having failed to implement eco- 
nomic reforms and halt inflation 
that exceeded 300 percent last year. 
Mr. Videnov also resigned as lead- 
er of the Socialist Party, the former 
Communists. Hie was replaced as 
party leader by Georgi Parvanov. 

In addition to fee apology, Mr. Par- 
vanov said in an interview wife fee 
newspaper Trud that he was open to 
dialogue with the opposition as weU as 
students and others who have led re- 
cent protests against the government. 

Tbe opposition leader, Ivan 
Kostov, welcomed the comments. 

“Be it after 15 days of street 
protests, it is a step in fee right 
direction feat the Socialist leader 
apologized to fee Bulgarians," fee 
official BTA news agency quoted 
Mr. Kostov as saying. ( AP ) 

Basque Charged 

PARIS — Jose Luis Umisolo Sis- 
tiaga, alleged to be the third -hi ghesi- 
ninking member of the separatist 
guerrilla organization ETA was 
charged wife terrorist activities and 
ordered detained Monday night, ju- 
dicial sources said Tuesday. 

Mr. Umisolo, also known as 
Joseba. was also charged wife com- 
plicity in robbery, possession of 
false license plates and resisting ar- 
rest. He was arrested Thursday after 
running a roadblock near Bordeaux. 
Spanish authorities have accused 
him of involvement in several ter- 
rorist attacks by the organization 
Basque Homeland and Liberty and 
in the deaths of a banker and of 
several soldiers. 

His wife. Gemma Perez de 
Rueta, who was arrested shortly 
after him, was charged wife vi- 
olating laws on arms and explo- 
sives and with belonging to a group 
engaged in terrorism. (AFP) 


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PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 



WMJSMED WITH THS MKW TOM. 


AM) THE WASHINGTON MET 


‘Spirit of Community’ 

Inaugural addresses often evoke a 
sense of triumph and a vision of battles 
to come.. For lovers of such sailing 
rhetoric. President Bill Clinton’s ad- 
dress on Monday was distinctly earth- 
bound. But it was also notable far its 
ennobling appeal to conciliation and 
what he called “a new spirit of com- 
munity for a new century.” The over- 
arching theme of die entire ceremony, 
in fact, was of racial healing, drawing 
from the official celebration the same 
day of Martin Luther King's birthday. 

The selection of speakers such as 
Jesse Jackson at a morning prayer ser- 
vice. and a series of inclusive religious 
and musical events during the day. 
were especially appropriate for the 
swearing in of Mr. Clinton and another 
southerner. Vice President A1 Gore. 

Mr. King's message was that Southern 
politicians could one day become the 
healers rather than the promoters of 
what Mr. Clinton called the “constant 
curse" of racism in American history. 

Looking beyond race, Mr. Clinton 
appealed for an end to partisan squab- 
bling in Congress. Thai was exactly the 
right sentiment at a time when, para- 
doxically, (he nation’s unusual run of 
economic prosperity has been accom- 
panied by rising bitterness and resent- 
ment, cutting across racial, cultural and 
political lines. But there was also an 
elemeut of strategy in Mr. Clinton's 
plea, which came after a week in which 
he called for a resolution to House 
Speaker Newt Gingrich’s ethics case, 
and awarded a Medal of Freedom to 
former Senator Bob Dole. His actions 
challenged Mr. Gingrich and Trent 
Lott, the Senate majority leader, to join 
his crusade against "petty bickering" 
or emerge as defenders of gridlock. 

For government to work, of course, 
it needs to regain the people’s trust 
The president's only reference to the 
scandals of the last year came when be 
looked toward a time when “the 
people will always speak louder than 
the din of narrow interest " These were 
perfunctory words for a public hun- 
gering for cleaner politics. 

To offset its more plodding pas- 


the speech contained a fine 
sense of history, as if the president 
were attempting to respond to some of 
the memorable phrases and moments 
of his predecessors. Sixteen years ago, 
for example, Ronald Reagan declared 
in his first inaugural address: "In this 
present crisis, government is not tire 
solution to our problem; government is 
the problem." Mr. Clinton updated 
that moment with a nice populist flour- 
ish whoa he said: “Today we can de- 
clare that government is not tire prob- 
lem, and government is not the so- 
lution. We the American people — we 
are the solution.” He was cleariy sa- 
voring the consensus in the last elec- 
tion that government is something 
more chan the enemy of Americans. 

The president's appeals for racial 
harmony sprang in part from a central 
accomplishment of his first term. By 
tackling welfare and gun control and 
presiding over a decline in crime, he 
has eased the ugliness of race in Amer- 
ican politics and restored tire Demo- 
crats^ authority on racial issues. We 
continue to feel that the welfare law, if 
left as Mr. Clinton signed it, will hurt 
tire poor. But if he keeps building on 
what be has done, he can carve a re- 
vitalized consensus in support of jobs 
and education for those on welfare. 

He waited until the end of his speech 
to mention his “bridge to the 21st cen- 
tury." More interesting was his invoc- 
ation of other turns of tire century in 
American history. The transition from 
the 18th to the 19th century brought a 
continent conquered and tamed. The 
transition to the 20th was more similar 
to what Americans face today. Rising 
economic inequality and edmic di- 
versity in the country led to the Pro- 
gressive Era and the government act- 
ivism that Mr. Clinton seeks to revive. 

History was a reminder, then, that 
for all die president’s desire for har- 
mony, it is government — and in these 
next four years a mixture of presi- 
dential determination and congres- 
sional cooperation — that will make 
his dream succeed or fail. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Bad Joke in Colombia 


A bad joke of a campaign against 
drugs is going on in Colombia, tire 
Latin American country whose traf- 
fickers are responsible for much of the 
drug supply that washes into the 
United States. A laughable jail sen- 
tence has just been handed down that 
will let the two reputed leaders oil the 
infamous Cali cartel, toothers, tun 
their business from jail. 

As expected and as justified, the sen- 
tence has been sharply criticized by the 
White House drug-policy director and 
the American ambassador in Bogota. 
But look at who else is criticizing these 
sentences: none other than Colombia's 
president. Ernesto Samper, tire very one 
accused of taking S6 million in cam- 
paign funds from these same brothers. 
‘ "Inis prison sentence gives Colombia 
a black eye and undermines everything 
else we are doing to fight tire drug 
war,” Mr. Samper says. 

One can guess what President 
Samper is up to. He wants to stay 
president. Given the outrage that many 
Colombians feel to see their politics 
and judicial process corrupted by drug 
money, he has been forced to go 
through at least the motions of a se- 
rious campaign against the traffickers. 
Hence his administration’s success in 
getting the legislature to enact an asset 


forfeiture bill last month. Hence his 
current call to heavy np sentences for 
traffickers. But for all of these ges- 
tures, Mr. Samper remains an uncon- 
vincing anti-drug crusader. Colombia 
will be fighting the traffickers with one 
hand tied behind its back as long as its 
favorite candidate is still president His 
tenure weakens the hand of the Colom- 
bian police and prosecutors who ac- 
tually are fighting the cartels. 

Drugs are not just a Colombian law 
enforcement problem. They also are an 
American law enforcement program, 
and before that they are a problem 
arising from American demand. So 
there can be no cheap posturing againsi 
Colombia. But it remains outrageous 
that the person who normally would be 
regarded as leader of the battle against 
the drug plague is in fact a hostage of 
the enemy . That for reasons of his own 
he may attempt to reinvent himself as 
an anti-drug crusader does not endow 
him with the credibility and indepen- 
dence to be effective in that role. 

Colombians in tire drug trade are 
accustomed to dismissing criticism 
from the United States as politically 
motivated. They also need to be em- 
barrassed and confronted by their hon- 
est countrymen. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


On Balance, a Good Job 

Warren Christopher can return to 
his law practice and, undoubtedly, to 
further community sen- ice comfort- 
able in the knowledge that his tenure 
was a time of impressive accomplish- 
ment for American diplomacy. 

Not the least of his achievements 
was prodding a president who entered 
office with little experience or interest 
in foreign affairs into realizing that 
managing U.S. relations with tire world 
was half of his job. It took a long time 
to get Mr. Clinton to focus on in- 
ternational issues, and during that peri- 
od U.S. global leadership was often 
perceived as indecisive and drifting. 

But he learned and in the process 
forged good ties with many of the 
world's key leaders. Give major credit 
to Mr. Christopher for helping guide 
the president in that essential role. 

During Mr. Christopher's term 
America pushed ahead with visible suc- 


cess in its sponsoring of die Middle East 
peace process, led in bringing peace 
and greater security to Bosnia, and con- 
tinued to support democracy, economic 
change and stability in Russia 

There were of course disappoint- 
ments and setbacks. Uncertainty con- 
tinues to shadow relations with China, 
Syria still shuns serious peace talks 
with Israel, congressional assaults on 
the foreign relations budget have 
weakened U.S. diplomatic effective- 
ness. A new secretary now faces the 
challenge and frustration of dealing 
with these hard issues. 

For Mr. Christopher it is the total 
record that counts. In a recent inter- 
view he cited Dean Acbeson’s sum- 
ming up of his term as President Tru- 
man’s secretary of state: “We left 
things better than we found them." On 
balance, the same can be said of Amer- 
ica's relations with tire world at the 
beginning of 1997. 

— Los Angeles Times. 



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Take Russians 9 Concern (her NATO Seriously 


M OSCOW — Beds Yeltsin and 
Bill Clinton, now in their second 
terms. remain on friendly terms. They 
have a summit meeting scheduled far 
March in Washington. Yet relations 
between Russia and America are al- 
most certainly in for difficult times. 

For Russians, nothing reflects this 
trend more than the nomination of 
Madeleine Albright as secretary of 
state. She earned a hawkish reputation 
at tire United Nations, and is expected 
to be tougher on Russia than hex pre- 
decessors were. Moscow would he 
genuinely surprised if Mrs. Albright 
showed an understanding of its wonres 
about NATO’s eastward expansion. 

More than anything else, NATO ex- 
pansion is reviving Russia’s old sus- 
picions of America. After Russia re- 
moved all its troops from Eastern Europe 
and the Babies, it does not understand 
why NATO troops should come to take 
their place in those countries. 

Russia strongly believes that it has 
tire right to become part of modem 
Europe. An enlarged NATO with no 


By Alexei K. Pushkov 

arrangement to give Russia an equal 
say on security issues is perceived as a 
negation of such a right, as a new 
attempt to refuse h a real voice in 
European matters. 

True, the Clinton adwiinigtrariri^ hag 
offered to sign a NATO charter in- 
cluding political consultations, an ex- 
change of military misaoos and a joint 
mechanism for resolving crises. It has 
declared that NATO has “no intention, 
no plan and reason’’ to deploy nuclear 
arms on new members’ territory. 

Bat Moscow insists that this is not 
s uffici ent If the alliance’s expansion is 
really not directed against Russia, dip- 
lomats here say, NATO should guar- 
antee foal it win neither deploy its 
troops in the new member countries nor 
prepare the military infrastructure. 

As of today, Moscow will not. sign 
any charter unless it includes clear ob- 
ligations on security matters as well as 
terms of cooperation between Russia 


and NATO, something that tire Clinton : 
administration seemareiuetant to give: 
If such & darter is not signed, there 
will be negative implications fra: other 
areas- of Kussian-Axnerican relations, 
such as arms control. Under present 
conditions, tire Russian Duma wfll not 
ratify foe START-2 treaty because it 
would weaken Russia’s ability to de- 
fend itself should & military" alliance-, 
its borders. 

his campai g n. Resident Clinton 



boasted that thanks to his pdicfesRus- 
sian nuclear missiles were no longer 
aimed at American cities. But the tm- 
plications of NATO expansion, unless 
reversed, risk raising questions ebaut 
the whole security .arrangement be- 
tween Rosria.and America. 

The resolve to expand NATO with- 
out answering Russian worries is per- 
ceived in Moscow, rightly or wrongly, 
as proof of a desfre to take advantage of 
Russia’s preseat weakness and to com- 
plete what Americans see as their vic- 
tory in foe Cold War. Russians tend to 
assess American policies toward other 


countries, particularly the former So- 
viet republics, through tins lens. 

Russians often blame U.S. backing 
of Ukraine for that nation’s defiant 
stand on security issues. America is 
also suspected of trying to squeeze 
Russia out of tire oil reserves ana stra- 
tegic pipeline roads of Transcaucasia. 

All ot this decisively weakens Amer- 
ican leverage oaRussbL'There used to 
be a dominating pro-Western fiend in 
tire Russian political establishment; but 
it is bound to be put on the defensive by 
NATO’s expansion. This fateful move 
will worsen other tensions that could 
otherwise be contained or strived. 

Eventually, instead of having Russia 
as a long-term partner, the United 
States risks confronting not necessarily 
an enemy but a runaway train moving 
in an unpredictable direction. 

The writer, foreign affairs director at 
Russian Public Television and a board 
memberqfthe Russian Council on For- 
eign and Defense Policies, contributed 
tms comment to The New York Times. 


Shift the Focus to China’s Momentous Economic Reform 


S HANGHAI — Reading 
foe American press about 
China is depressing. A stream 
of r epor tin g describes bow the 
government is brutally sup- 
pressing dissidents, doing too 
little to prevent destruction of 
tire environment, ti ghtening 
control over Hong Kong, main- 
taining an iron grip on Tibet, 
remaining . reluctant to open 
markets, and selling weapons 
and nuclear parts to rogue 
states. Such unbalanced report- 
ing is not going to improve 
Chinese- American relations. 

Whatever happened to 
China’s economic reforms? 
Western journalists seem to 
have lost interest Yet the re- 
forms are alive and continuing. 
In fact tire emergence of a 
murfcpf economy is an area of 
significant progress. 

The future of China depends 
on developing a modem mar- 
ket economy before tire coun- 
try is overwhelmed by infla- 
tion, unemployment poverty 


By Ramon H. Myers 


and enviro nmental degrada- 
tion. Without a domestic eco- 
nomy closely linked to foe 
world economy, China will be 
unable to feed, shelter and 
clothe its population of more 
than 1.2 billion. 

Nor will it be able to main- 
tain social and political stabil- 
ity. Should Cmna collapse, 
perhaps forcing huge numbers 
of its people to flood into 
neighboring countries, the con- 
sequences would be devastat- 
ing fra the peace and security 
of tire Asia-Pacific region. 

Some developments are 
fragmenting rather than inte- 
grating China’s economy. In 
1993 there were 193 auto- 
mobile production plants 
throughout the country. Most 
were subsidized by foe state. 
China does not need that over- 
capacity. But, lacking an in- 
tegrated market economy, bu- 
reaucrats and entrepreneurs do 


not have tire appropriate in- 
centives to decide which plants 
to close. Moreover,- many 
provinces are erecting banders 
to prevent competition. 

Restructuring the 150,000 
state-owned enterprises in 
China anrf placing them in a 
market economy is crucial for 
promoting integration of foe 
domestic market The Com- 
munist Party and tire govern- 
ment began doing this m earn- 
est in 1993. The aim is to have 
all state enterprises competing, 
without subsidy, in a market 
economy by tire year 2000. 

WID that goal be achieved? 
Chinese media discuss the pro- 
gress anddifficulties of tins cru- 
cial re fau n- The Western pass 
pays far too hide attention. 

In S hanghai which has links 
to every province in China be- 
cause of its economic and fi- 
nancial influence, there has 
been remarkable progress in 


restructuring state e n terprises. 
From 1993 to 1996, Shanghai 

municipal o fficial* placed foe 

assets of all such enterprises 
into a new framework of prop- 
erty rights and management. 

The Shanghaibureaucracy 
significantly downsized, and 
the assets of former state en- 
terprises are now managed by 
holding companies of different 
sizes and forms. 

The Shanghai government is 
experimenting with some 250 
large enterprises in which the 
government owns considerable 
assets. It has allowed the re- 
maining holding cbnqrenies to 
restructure further through 


foreign joint ventures and go- 
ing out of business by declaring 
bankruptcy. The municipal au- 
thorities are also trying to end 
subsidies to tire holding compa- 
nies by encouraging them to 
find innovative ways to survive 
in the market economy. 

In additio n, the S hanghai 


government has set up the 
Putong Development Zone, in 
winch incentives like low 
rents, tax-exempt start-up peri- 
ods, marketing information 
and other assistance are 
offered to domestic and for- 
eign firms that locate them- 
selves in foe zone. 

If this newly emerging mar- 
ket economy m Shanghai suc- 
ceeds, it will promote the do- 
mestic market integration that 
C hina so desperately needs. 
Asia's emerging giant is in a 
critical race against time to in- 
tegrate and modernize its econ- 
omy. If it fails, the impact on 
the Aria-Pacific region could 
be profoundly negative, just as 
success could be profoundly 
positive. 

The writer, a senior fellow at 9 
Sta/ford University's Hoover * 
Institution on War. Revolution 
and Peace, contributed this 
comment to the International 
Herald Tribune. 


Clinton Redux: Still No Telling Where He T hinks He’s Going 


W ASHINGTON — Bill 
Clinton approaches the 
2lrt century with the rhetoric of . . 
the 19th. IBs inaugural apeech;^ 
22 minutes of foggy references*' 
and McGuffeyesque bromides 
about foe human spirit, sounded 
as if he was reading from Billy 
Graham’s text The speech had 
its moments, but it suffered most 
from an enormous handicap. 
Tbeprerident had little to say. 

That’s O.K. A presidential 
inauguration is a pastry of an 
event — puffed up and sweet to 
tire eye buz lacking much in tire 
way of content Just a few stand 


By Richard Cohen 


out— r Lincoln’s second, FDR’s 
firsr and JFK’s only. The rest 
are mostly forgotten and, one 
would presume, deservedly so. 
But those that are remembered 
had more titan rhetoric going 
for them. They were delivered 
by great men in time of crisis. 

With all due respect, Mr. 
Clinton is not a great man — in 
fact, he could not be. Among 
other things, he is the victim of 
poor timing. 

The country is both peaceful 
and prosperous, and Bui Clin- 


ton. as he must surety teow. hi^ 
made only a marginal contri- 
bution to any of this. On ac- 
count of that rotten luck, hist- 
ory will merely note him, and 
then move an to something 
more interesting. 

Bat we live m tire age of the 
wind chill factor. To the most 
mundane of temperatures is 
given foe additional drama of 
wind, and so we are all made to 
feel that we are living in ex- 
ceptional times. 

A man such as Bill Clinton, 


Where’s That Democratic Realism? 


N EW YORK — For the op- 
pressed of the earth, tire 
victims of dictatorships and re- 
ligious tyrannies, tire most im- 
portant sentences in President 
Bill Clinton's inaugural speech 
came toward tire end. “Our 
hopes, our hearts, our hands are 
with those on every continent 
who are building democracy 
and freedom," he said. “Their 
cause is America’s cause." 

That passage is a matter of 
American belief, history and 
value, yes. But long before the 
inaugural he put it forward as 
also the essence of American 
self-interest. 

With lucidity he had ex- 
plained that governments based 
on political and religious free- 
dom for their people have to 
consult their citizens on matters 
of importance. So they are less 
likely to go to war or build 
economic and propaganda 
blackmail into t he? r relations 
with other nations. 

Mr. Clinton’s foreign policy 
aides gave it a name: demo- 
cratic realism, as contrasted to 
foe old realpolitik that caused so 
many wars. 

But Mr. Clinton, we hardly 
know you. 

It was four years ago that he 
delivered that passage, in bis 
fast inaugural. In his second, he 
had the decency not to repeat it 
or its substance. 

After he was elected in 1992, 
be killed his own policy of tying 
trade with Communist Chfna to 
progress cm human rights — not 
real democracy and freedom, 
just some easing of foe anests, 
torture, slave labor, religious 
persecution and forced abortions 
that tire Communists use to con- 
trol China and occupied Tibet. 

Without a U.S. human rights 
policy, the oppression of dis- 
sidents in China and Tibet in- 
creased sharply. 

Mr. Clinton responded by in- 
viting to foe White House the 
very general who ordered the 
Tiananmen slaughter. Talk of 
democratic realism and U.S. 
support for the causes of free- 
dom became ugly to the ear. 

How long should it take to 
know a man you encounter 


By A.M. Rosenthal 


every day by listening, think- 
ing, hearing about him? Four 
years and we do not know him. 
He does a variety of good things 
abroad — sometimes in action, 
as in Haiti, sometimes through 
influence, as in the Mideast. 
And sometimes in word. He 
preaches the religious and racial 
harmony he plainly believes 
necessary for the peace of the 
individual soul and of nations. 

But foe same man permits the 
clandestine sale of weapons to 
the Bosnian Muslims by Iran. 
This helps give the enemy of 
religious harmony a foothold in 
a slice of Europe that can never 
live in peace without it. 

He talks about helping the 
poorest children of America. 
But he goes along with a wel- 
fare revision that would allow 
states to reduce help to depend- 
ent children before their parents 
have a job. 

He lectures on the imperative 
need to stop proliferation of 
weapons of mass death but 
lorries away when China sells 
missiles and nuclear technology 
to other dictatorships. 

The president believes in di- 
versity. But as new inspiration 
he puts forward the vanilla- 
ization of American politics — 
blending spicily different Re- 
publican and Democratic philo- 
sophies into a bland milkshake. 

He talks about fighting drugs 
but never has the energy or de- 


sire to lead the struggle. The 
same is true about individual 
responsibility, a theme of the 
second inaugural address. Mr. 
Clinton blames only his aides 
for scandals from foe purloined 
FBI files to the payments by 
foreign businesses to the Demo- 
cratic treasury. 

1 voted for Bill Clinton. 
Twice. The first time was with 
enthusiasm, for two reasons. 


ical passion. And, to 
Hussein’s astonishment. Pres- 
ident George Bush left him 
alive and in power. 

Tbe second time I voted with 
grump. The Republicans gave 
me no choice that I could ac- 
cept Bob Dole on Chinese hu- 
man rights and welfare kids 
seemed a Clinton clone — and 
was also against decent gnn 
control. 

Anyway, in my late teens I 
discovered that I could not 
name the exact day of my ar- 
rival from Canada at the age of 
4. That marift me an illegal ali- 
en. I was allowed to finish afree 
college; nobody suggested oth- 
erwise. Tbe though! did occur 
to me dial if Mr. Dole had had 
his way, I would have been 
thrown out of kindergarten. 

I figure the president owes 
me something, me and foe oth- 
ers who vraed with grump, so 
that after eight years we might 
say, pleasantly, that we know 
the man. “Constancy" is the 
word I am thinking of. 

The New York Tuna. 


someone who always wanted to 
be president, cannot bring him- 
self to admit that he has been 
cheated byTnstoryrHe^ot wfiST 
. he wanted, but at the wrong 
time. Kennedy had foe Cold 
War, Lincoln the Civil War and 
FDR both a war and the De- 
pression. Mr. Clinton has. 
what? The Internet? He men- 
tioned it twice in his speech. . 

It would have been appro- 
priate then for him to have used a 
more modest rhetorical typeface 
far his address. I dunk Ronald 
Reagan would simply have 
talked to the American people 
— a kind of took-’em-m-fiie- 
camera speech which, some- 
how, makes eye contact with 
several million people at once. 

Mr. Clinton, though, reached 
for soaring language — a kind 
of Gothic — to talk about the 
government doing less, “one 
that is smaller, lives within its 
means, and does more with 
less. "If that is the bridge to the 
21rt century, and I am not quib- 
bling with the facts, then it will 
probably demand a tofl. 

Only when it came to race — 
always, it seems, the president’s 
most deeply felt issue — did he 
seem to come alive. He called 
our racial problem “America’s 
constant curse,” and only an 
ignoramus would aigue. 

When he offered foe vision 
dial American diversity “will be 
a godsend in the 21st century," 
he connected squarely with tbe 
American dream — mine, any- 
way, and tlK hope that my grand- 
parents had when they stepped 
off the boar ar Rflis Island. 

But Mr. Clinton was unable 
to sustain that moment. Indeed, 
he almost cheapened it when, 
elsewhere in foe speech, he 
talked about die invention of the 
computer and tbe microchip in 


the same breath as he did “the 
revolution in civil rights for all 
Afri can-Ameri cans.’ ’ Such lan- 
jfafigeT "suggested last-mill nfe 
tinkering, the hope that bloat 
would be mistaken for content 

America may not be in crisis, 
but it still has problems aplenty. 
One of them remains crime, and 
here Mr. Clinton was entitled to 
crow a bit The crime rate is 
down — dramatically in some 
dries. New York in particular. 

This, in a sense, is our New 
Frontier because diminishing 
crime opens op areas where 
many people were simply afraid 
to go. The Internet, hyped be- 
yond its capabilities, is all fine 
and good, but more Americans 
would like to go across town 
than travel in cyberspace. On 
tins subject, die president was 
virtually mute. 

An inaugural address is not a 
State of the Union message and 
even that, as we have learned 
over the years, is not a detailed 
legislative program. So a bit of 
soaring language is to be ex- 
pected and. indeed, required. 
Government, after all, is not just 
about programs and numbers. 

ft always surprised me after 
I came to this city how many 
people were drawn here by foe 
rhetoric of President Kennedy. 
Language matters because ideas 
matter. Bill Qinton lived to cam- 
paign and now be can campaign 
no more. Maybe that is why his 
speech was bereft of ideas, not to 
mention spirit It was flirty with . 
Cha utauq nan rhetoric and sug/l 
gested that although he. is sufi 
young, he already prefers the 
past to the future. 

He knows where he has been 
but not on the basis of his 
second inaugural speech, where 

he is going. 

The Washington Post. 


iai 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


Sorry, Partisan Clashes Are Needed 

B ILL CLINTON chose to echo George Bush's inaugural ad- 
dress, in which Mr. Bush declared that “foe people did not 
send us here to bicker." Mr. Bush then paused and extended his 
hand to two Democrats, Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell 
and Speaker Tom Foley. Tbe four-year gnawing they gave that 
hand did much to prevent a second Bush inaugural address. 

Mr. Clintoa on Monday decried “petty bickering," but the 
adjective hardly modifies tbe noun,- to stigmatize arguing as 
bickering is to declare it the low activity of small people. But when 
Me. Clinton, referring to the American people, spoke of the 
“partisan politics they plainly deplore." he denied what is ob- 
viously tire case. In a nation with two durable parties, when the 
electorate frequently entrusts the political branches to different 
parties, it is insisting on partisan clashes. . 

— George F. mil, commenting in The Washington Post. 


1897: Le Roi, Cest Moi 

PARIS —The lawsuit in which 
tbe Due. d’Oridans, foe Due 
d ’Anjou and Don Carlos have 
difference of opinion in regard 
to their coats or arms, advanced 
another stage yesterday [Jan. 
21] before foe Paris civil courts. 
Each claims to be the veri- 
table King of France, and to 
have in consequence foe right 
to use foe fleur de lys shield 
withoat label. This is an in- 
teresting enough case, but 
unfortunately ills taking place 
a hundred years too late. Tbe 
law courts of foe Republic will 
decide who really is foe King 
of France. Irony of fatel 

1922: A Call for Peace 

LONDON — Ringing appeals 
for peace as the solution of the 
troubles paralysing Great Bri- 
tain and tbe world proved the 
keynote of the Premier’s decla- 
ration of policy before his fol- 


lowers in what hag been 
anxiously awaited as foe most 
S i gni ficant political speech here 
for months. In rare form full 
of fight, bubbling with humor, 
Mr. Lloyd George spoke for an 
hour and a half, confident in the 
security of foe Coalition and 
more hopeful than ever of ul- 
timate prosperity in the future. 

1947: Marshall’s ‘No’ 

WASHINGTON — General 
George C. Marshall took office 

as Secretary of State today [Ian. 

21J, after bluntly denying re- v 
ports that he might be available T? 
as foe Democratic party can- 
didate for President in 1948. 
Many Democrats have dis- 
cussed the idea of drafting Gen- 
eral Marsh all if. Mr. Truman 
should not run again in 1948. 

But General Marshall, in ad- 
dition to disap^ing all Presr 
idential speculation, also said be 
considered foe Secretaryship of 
State to be a non-political job. 




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y\Cr* VA 2 > 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


It $ Time fora Standing UN Rapid Reaction Force 

JRUSSPTQ * ' _ ** Cj j- 


By Frederick Bonnart peacekeeping duties but also be ready to involved, initial costs would be low. 

prevent disorder \ c f? m unit y fo undertake peacemaking operations. The headquarters could be established 

the world is an ® which could involve it in combat- It would on the authority of the secretary-general, 

°f a benign world jjf t * iat tec ^^viiti^yabmKion their nationality, be rapidly deployable by the Security though die dispatch of any force would 


a mom at uut on 

<** * 

and niayhST 01 redQce “ ood&he d 

attempt to dispatch an 
^nanong force £*5 wtthWT 
^vals w Rwanda and Zaire again raised 
SI fQr n a Pannanent UN S &«*? 

calk are not new, Trygve lie, the 

«*_ 

J££~- i«W * 24 UN member 

actioS^ C ^? i „ J frieads ra IHd re- 
— submitted several proposals, 
fyneriy head ofUNp^- 
ly pmgaa d a Jong-standing advocate of 
•m independent reaction force, will give 
added impetus to their effort as the new 
secretary-general 

-£nch a force could help prevent crises 
man breaking out or situations from de- 
teriorating. It could also inhibit former 
colonial powers from independent action, 
ana prevent mercenary elements from en- 
gagmg m private enterprise operations. 

However, it would always have serious 
limitations. 

A UN “foreign legion” modeled on 
that of France, which is often mentioned, 
would not be suitable. The French Foreign 
Legion is part of the French Army, which 
provides training, logistics, adTttimgtwitiryn 
and most of the officers. "Die French Air 
Force is available to fly Legion forces 
immediately to their de stination . Legion 


To raise even a comparatively similar 
UN force would require a large ap p ar atus 
to back it up. The tasks of handlin g re- 
cruitment, trying, equipment, logistics, 
accommodation, families — to n?me - die 

Such a force could help 
prevent ernes from 
breaking out or situations 
from deteriorating. . 

most important ones — would all devolve 
on the organization. The necessary ap- 
paratus would be quite out of proportion 
m the operational elemOT, and very costly 
to boot Also, the type of volunteer to be 
recruited could not be a mercenary in the 
accepted sense of the word, but would 
have to be committed to die humane ideals 
of the United Nations. Once deployed, 
such a force would not be available for 
another crisis if one arose before the pre- 
vious one terminated. 

At the UN, aNetheriands proposal calls 
far a force the size of a light infantry 
brigade, composed entirely of volunteers. 
These would be ‘‘international military 
UN servants” with a status similar to the 
organization’s civilian staff. 

The force should be capable of normal 


an and sea-lift capacity. 

The overheads would be high; the 
annual cost, assessed at $300 milli on, 
is probably a conservative estimate. 

In a different proposal, Denmark has 
offered a headquarters to which some 
European nations known for their strong 
peacekeeping record are invited to assign 
identified units to make up a rapid re- 
action brigade. They could train together 
in peacekeeping exercises and be avail- 
able at short notice. The basic permanent 
cache could be small, and, as it would be 
nation-based, the backup overheads 
would be minimal. Letters of intent have 
been requested from interested countries 
and some have been received. However, 
this force is specified only for Chapter VI 
— that is. nonviolent — operations and 
would not intervene in combat 

A Canadian proposal combines the ad- 
vantages of these solutions without some 
of the drawbacks. A small international 
force headquarters, located az the United 
Nations in New York, would make con- 
tingency plans and take initial charge of an 
operation. Commitments of ready forces 
would be required from all member na- 
tions willing to provide them. It would 
therefore be much bigger and more uni- 
versal than the Danish-proposed force, and 

^required. As no UN-owned troops are 


The headquarters could be established 
on the authority of the secretary-general, 
though tiie dispatch of any force would 
always be subject to a decision of the 
Security Council, as well as to prior agree- 
ment by all participating nations. The 
recent refusal of China, for oatiooal rea- 
sons. to allow a peacekeeping force to be 
sent to Guatemala shows the obstacles. 
The discussions to release this force could 
take as long as previous negotiations, so 
that its military readiness could be nul- 
lified by political considerations. The sub- 
sequent control of its operations, similarly 
exercised, could seriously inhibit the 
force’s activity. The record in Bosnia is 
adequate evidence. 

Normally, such a force would be able to 
do no. more than deal with an immediate 
emergency. Nevertheless, if released in 
time, it could prevent a threatening situ- 
ation from developing into a crisis, and 
the presence of even a small international 
military force could save many lives. 
Thereafter, reinforcement by far larger 
national forces would be required. 

None of these versions woaid be able to 
deal with an operation like that in the Gulf 
or Bosnia. For this, the major powers, in 
particular the United States, would have 
to be ready to commit elements far larger 
than could be contemplated for any UN- 
owned force. This is a task for which 
NATO is now shaping itself. 

The writer, a veteran observer of 
NATO, contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


;On Civic Values 

Regarding “ But Honest Poli- 
■iics Is Full of Necessary Conflict C 
.(Opinion, Jan. 3) by Michael 
•J. Sandel; 

I agree that calls to renew civil 
-society and to engender civility 
|are just so much pablum, and that 
r^what we need to do is focus on the 
‘rtreal causes of the decline of dvic 
■and political participation, mid 
then to rally our civic values to 
■repair the damage done. 

This makes good sense because 
■the erosion of democratic partici- 
pation strikes at the heart of con- 
stitutional democracy; Le^ to the 
extent a state takes its legitimacy 
from the consent of the governed, 
an uncaring, intolerant and un- 
informed citizenry has got to be a 
dangerous thing. 

But Mr. Sandel then lays the 
blame for our present iscfrdlzfy a 


little too easily at some familiar 
doors: . “the coarsening effects of 
popular entertainment” and “the 
corrosive power of an u n fettered 
market economy.’' 

It is tempting to shrug the off 
the framer as just another in- 
tesgenerational demand to turn 
down that damned music. But in 
fact, popular culture has beat a 
significant promoter of public vir- 
tue in the past — Aesop, classical 
Greek d rama , ShalfftgpMm — and 
it still is today. Easy examples 
might be Sesame Street, neigh- 
borhood cable television channels 
and televised religious services. 

' The youth cultures around such 
musical treads as rave and rap also 
couta be harnessed to a more pub- 
. tic end — look at MTTV’s suc- 
cessful political coverage. 

These examples may seem 
ally, hot whatever one's view of 
tbeir substantive content, they are . 


examples of communities fram- 
ing public dvic values. 

As to the free market, it is sup- 
posed to encourage those things 
that market participants want and 
discourage those tilings they don’t 
want Along these lines, it is better 
to let citizens keep their tax dol- 
lars and spend them themselves 
than to let the state tax them and 
spend the proceeds on a policy 
that guesses what dozens want 
This is supposed to be a dtizen- 
empowering idea. 

I don't know die best way to 
instill a respect fra the common 
good in American society, but! do 
hope our political philosophers 
can start exploring ways to do 
this constructively, by harnessing 
— and not just whining about — 
die energy of America’s popular 
consumer culture. 

STOWELL R. R. KELNER. 

Loudon. 


School Punishment 

Regarding “Japan School 
Credo: Spare the Rod . Spoil the 
Child:' (Dec. 9): 

My recent experience as a ju- 
nior and senior high school stu- 
dent in Japan was quite different 
from events described in the 
article. 

The article says corporal pun- 
ishment is common in Japanese 
public schools. This is an exag- 
geration. Recently, teachers have 
switched from physical punish- 
ment to threats of bad reports on 
die evaluations submitted with 
students' high school or uni- 
versity entrance exams. There- 
fore, in most secondary schools, 
students now fear teachers’ dis- 
pleasure, not their fists. 

The article also ignores the fact 
that many students change 
schools or refuse to attend school 


at ail if their teachers are aggres- 
sive, and that many parents 
strongly oppose physical and 
mental p unis hment in schools. 

CHISAOAL 
Akita, Japan. 

Full-Throated Bore 

In keeping with everything else 
he writes these days. William 
Safire, in his column “Going From 
Small Bore to Full Bote” (Lan- 
guage, Jan. J3), gets in the pre- 
dictable potshot at Bill Clinton. 

Mr. Safire's obsession with 
putting President Clinton in a bad 
light erupts at every conceivable 
opportunity, like a vicious case of 
adolescent acne. It is getting 
rather monotonous. In his column 
on bores, Mr. Safire neglected to 
mention himself. 

MARC EMORY. 

Dusseldorf. 


Injustice Breeds Violence, 
In Peru and Elsewhere 


By Tomas EJoy Martinez 


N EW YORK — Twenty years 
ago die occupation of the Jap- 
anese ambassador's residence in 
lima might have looked like just 
another violent act in an era typ- 
ified by military coups, urban 
guerrillas and hijacked planes. 

But now it seems a scene out of 
Hollywood. 

What kind of desperation 
moved the guerrillas of die Movi- 
miento Revolucionario Tupac 

MEANWHILE 

Amaru to assault the diplomatic 
residence on Dec. 1 11 

Some outsiders, including the 
mother of Victor Polay Campos, 
one of the rebel leaders, were 
complaining about appalling pris- 
on conditions for jailed guerrillas. 
She denounced the way, since 
April 1992, her son has been 
forced to live — buried in a kind 
of grave. 12 feet long, and sleep- 
ing over a plank of cement 
Since the beginning of time the 
powerless have rebelled against 
the injustice of the mighty. And 
with the exception of Jesus Christ 
or, Jaier on, of Gandhi, human 
beings have not been able to find a 
response other than violence. 

In Latin America — at least in 
the last half of this century — 
violence has almost always led to 
defeat or to the worsening of in- 
justice. 

Violence is often beget by des- 
peration. desperation leads to iso- 
lation and isolation to blindness. 
This seems to be the lethal logic of 
the guerrilla movements. 

But when the rebels are forced 
to coexist with other human 
groups, and to leant about other 
forms of squalor, they start to look 
at the world in a different light 
In Bogota I was able recently to 
interview a Red Cross envoy who 
was in charge of delivering pro- 
visions to the people inside the 
besieged embassy. 

“The hostages are living even 
worse than in the jails die guer- 
rillas are complaining about she 
told me. “They have to wait hours 
on end to go to the bathrooms” — 
five for a total of 60 people. 

“They sleep in groups of six 
on the same mattress, and they 
are never allowed out for some 
fresh air.” 

Apparently, the psychological 
climate began to mellow when the 
hostages — who are, after all. 


diplomats — offered to take turns 
with the guerrillas washing 
clothes and cooking. After plan- 
ning for communal meals, the 
next step was to fix a strict sched- 
ule for using the shower. 

Every morning, before 6 
o'clock, the papal ambassador 
sweeps the floors and washes the 
rooms on the first floor. By 7 he 
celebrates Mass in a makeshift 
chapel- And so die collective 
needs of the hostages and tbeir 
captors are imposing a routine. 
From this routine steins a sense of 
order, and even solidarity. 

In a similar way, l7yearsagoin 
the Dominican Embassy in 
Bogota, when rebels took hos- 
tages, the lessons of everyday 
life became more useful than 
machine guns. 

I was there, in mid-March, 
1980. when about 20 rebels of the 
guerrilla group M-19 — Movi- 
miento 19 de Abril — who bad 
stormed the Dominican Embassy 
during a party were holding as 
hostages the 40 guests. That crisis 
lasted almost two months. 

Eventually, the invaders of the 
Dominican Embassy relinquished 
their weapons. Some time later, in 
1990, they became pan of the 
democratic process, forming a 
political party that elicited 20 per- 
cent of the vote during legitimate 
elections for the Constitutional 
Assembly. 

In Lima, nobody dares to point 
out what may well be the best 
solution: to forget, to forgive. 

For in such situations even his- 
tory is often hard-pressed to judge 
who is the culprit, whether it be 
the terrorists or the military juntas 
that also espouse terror. 

What else is to be done — raid 
the Japanese ambassador’s resi- 
dence by fire and sword, as is 
being recommended by some of 
President Alberto Fujimori’s ad- 
visers? But storming the residence 
could cause die death of many 
innocents. 

When irrationality enters by a 
window, as happened in Lima on 
Dec. 17, it is very hard for com- 
mon sense to leave by the door. 

The writer, author of “The Per - 
on Novel ” and “ Santa Evita is 
chairman of the Latin American 
studies department at Rutgers 
University. This article was dis- 
tributed by New York Times Spe- 
cial Features. 


BOOKS 




THETWO 

MR. GLADSTONES: . 

A Study m Psychology 
and History 

By Travis L. Crosby. 287 
’ pages. $35. Yale University 
Press. 

Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 

W AY back in 1910, Rend 
wrote a paper in which 
he subjected Leo na rdo da 
Vinci to the process of ana- 
lysis. “The domain of bio- 
graphy, too. must become 
ours,” he told Jung. 

Since then, there has been 
no end of famous — and often 
dead — analysands. Artists 
like sprnnri Taylor Col- 
eridge, Ernest Hemingway 
and Jackson Pollock have all 
been psychoanalyzed, as have 
politicians, from Napoleon to 
Lincoln to Nixon. 

This time, it is William 
Gladstone's turn. In Travis L. 
Crosby’s new book, “The 
Two Mr. Gladstones,” the 
four-time prime minister of 
Britain — the “Grand Old 
■Man” of Victorian politics, 
■and bead of one of the cen- 
tury’s most significant re- 
fraining governments — is 
-depicted as a passive-aggres- 


sive workaholic who was a 
victim of “multiple concur- 
rent stress.” 

The resulting book not 
only looks at Gladstone's life 
as a kind of exercise in stress 
management, but also views 
his considerable political 
achievements (and shortcom- 
ings) as byproducts of psy- 
chological predispositions. 

. One can see why Crosby, a 
professor of history at 
Wheaton College, was eager 
to put Gladstone on foe couch. 
The statesman was a mass of 
contradictions, notorious for 
the ferocity of Ins will and his 
sudden turns of political di- 
rection (on such major issues 
as franchise refrain, free trade 
and home rule for Ireland). 

Havipg started off, in Ma- 
caulay’s words, as “the rising 
hope of those stem and un- 
bending Tories,” be eventu- 
ally became the leader of the 
liberal Party, a refbrm- 
minded moralist who could 
say, “I will back the masses 
against die classes.” He was 
“a high-churchman who 
spoke foe Evangelical 
tongue,” Crosby writes, “a 
conservative who could ap- 
pear to be radical, and a par- 
liamentarian Of high office 
who could also move foe 
masses.” 


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While Gladstone was 
renowned fra his mastery of 
detail, his industry and bril- 
liant oratory, he was also re- 
viled for his impetuosity, ar- 
rogance and intemperate 
outbursts. His great rival, 
Disraeli, denounced him as an 
“unprincipled maniac,” 
while Lord Stanley harbored 
suspicions about bits sanity. 

In an attempt to explain the 
incongruities in Gladstone's 
life, Crosby eschews tradi- 
tional Freudian analysis in fa- 
vor of “a loosely out group 
of ideas known as stress and 
coping theory.” His central 
thesis is that “the apparent 
discords of Gladstone’s out- 
ward life can best be seen as 
the manifestation of a con- 
sistent effort on Gladstone’s 
part to nr?ahirarn within him- 
sdf a stable and coherent psy- 
chological state.” 

To achieve this sense of 
order and control Crosby 
goes rat, Gladstone tended to 
rely upon two types of coping 
mechanisms. The first was to 
go on the offensive and attack 
his enemies, thereby chan- 
ging “a stressful political en- 
vironment by removing the 
stressor.” 

If and when this tactic 
failed. Crosby argues. Glad- 
stone tended to feu back upon 

“escape -avoidance (or emo- 
tion-focused) coping by 
threatening resignation or ab- 
senting himself from official 
duties, or by distancing him- 
self in some other way from 
foe stressor, in order to alter 
foe emotion itself.” 

Instead of using this theory 
as one tool to clarify some of 
foe larger patterns in Glad- 
stone's life, Crosby dogmat- 
ically tries to use it to explain 
every controversial action 
and decision is the states- 
man’s life: He suggests that 
foe inconsistencies in Glad- 
stone’s politics duzing foe 


18505 — including his resig- 
nation from foe Palmerston 
cabinet and his own reversal 
on the Crimean War — were 
characterized by this impulse 
toward “both aggression and 
withdrawal.” 

And he suggests that Glad- 
stone’s management of die 
Church of Ireland bill and foe 
crisis of its passage in July 
1869 illustrate “foe impor- 
tance of foe element of con- 
trol in his psychological 
makeup, and the strategies of 
attack and withdrawal that he 
employed at times of 
stress.” 

Gladstone’s tendency to 
micromanage his administra- 
tions and forgo consultation 
with colleagues is taken as a , 
symptom of his control 
mania. Even what Crosby 1 
characterizes as Ins reluctant | 
imperialism — “be was will- 
ing enough to maintain, but 
not eager to expand, Britain's 
imperial responsibilities — 
is assessed in terms of his 
wiUiqgness “to withdraw 
from conditions over which 
be could not easily exercise 
control.” 

Gladstone's strange obses- 
sion with prostitutes, whom 
be befriended under the guise 
of charitable “rescue mis- 
sions,” is described as a “re- 
lease from the personal and 
financial stresses that houn- 
ded him” during foe late 
1840s and early 1850s. And 
Gladstone’s heated rivalry 
with Disraeli is similarly dis- 
cussed in terms of coping and 
stress management 

A year before foe centenary 
of Gladstone’s death, Crosby 
has done his best in this ill- 
conceived book, to turn foe 
statesman into a contempor- 
ary talk-show type — a dys- 
functional control freak. 

Michiko Kakutani is on the 
staff of The New York Times. 


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INTERNATIONAL 


Car Bombs in Algiers Kill 
Up to 17 After a Warning 
Of More Islamic Carnage 


CimrOrdfK Oar SktfFm* Oupwte 

ALGIERS — Two car bombs rocked 
the Algerian capital Tuesday in a new 
spate of bloodletting that destroyed 
homes and shops and killed up to 17 
people. 

There were varying repons of the 
death toll from the first of the blasts, at 
4:40 P.M., on one of the busiest streets in 
Algiers. It followed by two days a car 
bombing that killed 42 people in a 
nearby Algiers neighborhood. 

A second car bomb went off late Tues- 
day in an Algiers suburb, killing at least 
one person and wounding 10 others, 
security services said. People panicked 
after the bomb went off near a children’s 
amusement park, witness said. 

In the earlier attack, the bomb ex- 
plotted as a bus passed the booby-trapped 
car in the hills above the city center. 

The blast, which was heard 
throughout the city and sent up a plume 
of black smoke, was set off on the 


Raids in France 
Aim at Traffic in 
Arms to Algeria 

(TVanp/ft/fr, OarStuffFwa CHsfuO*a 

PARIS — French and German police 
rounded up alleged Islamist arms traf- 
fickers suspected of supplying guerrillas 
in Algeria in a sweep Tuesday m several 
French cities, officials said here. 

The police in Marseille said three sus- 
pects had been arrested there, six in Nice 
and six in other parts of France. The 15 
suspects were linked to an investigation 
by German police into European Islam- 
ist networks, the police said. 

Officials in Paris said munitions for 
Algerian guerrillas had been loaded near 
Frankfurt into vehicles brought from 
London. The police sweep took place in 
transit points, notably Metz and Bar-le- 
Duc in eastern France, as well as Paris 
and Mediterranean cities, they said. 

The police also found false French 
identity papers enabling their holders to 
travel through Europe and other coun- 
terfeit documents, the officials said, and a 
parallel operation involving 12 or 13 tar- 
gets was carried out Tuesday by the 
French secret service. 

The police operation was aimed at ‘ 'the 
bead of an association of criminals in re- 
lation to a terrorist enterprise," the French 
Interior Ministry said, and seven of the 
arrests were "linked to an investigation of 
an Islamic network in Germany.” 

Officials in Paris stud the operation 
was not connected with the bombing of a 
commuter train in the French capital 
Dec. 3 in which four people were killed 
and 100 wounded. 

The authorities in Paris, Marseille and 
other large cities have staged several 
operations similar to those conducted 
Tuesday since the attack in Paris. 

Most of the people arrested in those 
raids, all of North African origin or 
descent, were later released. 

There have been no claims of re- 
sponsibility for the Paris bombing, but 
investigators are said to be focusing on 
Algerian Islamic militants, who claimed 
responsibility for some of a wave of 
similar bombings in 1995. (AFP, AP) 


Boulevard of the Martyrs as it was 
packed with people during the evening 
rush hour. 

Rescue workers initially counted 1 1 
persons dead and about 30 wounded, 
while hospital sources said there were 16 
deaths. Security forces, however, said 
that five persons had been killed and 
"numerous” others wounded. 

Hours before the blast, the Armed Is- 
lamic Group, the most extreme of die 
fundamentalist terror groups fighting the 
government, warned of more carnage in a 
text published by the daily El Watan. 

“The war will continue and will in- 
tensify during the month of Ramadan, 
and we have the means and the men to 
punish those who are not cm our side,” 
wrote the head of the Aimed Islamic 
Group, Antar Zouabri. The text has not 
been authenticated. 

The fasting month of Ramadan, which 
began Jan. 10. is considered by Islamic 
groups as an auspicious time for their 
terrorism. 

“There is no neutrality in the war that 
we are waging," continued the text 
“Apart from those who are with me. all 
others are apostates and deserve death.” 

The warning followed a weekend of 
violence in Algeria that left nearly 100 
people dead, including (hose killed in the 
car-bombing Sunday, according to un- 
official tolls. That attack, which has been 
laid to the Armed Islamic Group, oc- 
curred in the working-class Belcouit 
neighborhood while the streets were 
packed with people. 

The weekend was one of the bloodiest 
since fundamentalists took up arms 
against the government five years ago. 
In addition to the Belcouit bombing, 
there was an attack on a village south of 
Algiers. Security forces said 36 people 
had been knifed to death in the village. 

France, the former colonial power, 
said Tuesday it was “concerned and 
shocked” by the attacks. 

They target the Algerian population in 
a “blind and savage way,” the French 
Foreign Ministry said. (AP. AFP) 



Continued from Page 1 

solved any of the basic problems.” He 
threatened to call out on strike 200,000 
workers in all sectors except public ser- 
vices Wednesday. 

In a further sign of compromise by the 
government, however, the police eased 
their cordon around tire cathedral. 

Mr. Kim's reversal followed a de- 
cision by the confederation to call off 
indefinite stoppages and limit industrial 
action to one day each week. 

“Anything can be discussed in Par- 
liament again, whether it is the labor law 
or the law on the Agency for National 
Security Planning,” a spokesman quoted 
President Kim as having said during the 
lunch meeting with the opposition. 

Both laws were rammed through Par- 
liament in a six-minute session at dawn 
on Dec. 26 while opposition deputies 
were absent 

President Kfrn previously insisted that 
the laws could not be altered. Never- 
theless, it was clear that hard political 
bargaining lay ahpari 


Kim Dae Jung appeared taken aback 
by tire abrupt retreat “Today’s meeting 
was not a total solution, but there was 
some advance and President Kim Young 
Sara showed an attitude of wanting to 
solve tiie problems together with op- 
position parties,” be said. 

He added that he complained that the 
security law would intimidate journalists, 
workers and opposition politicians, to 
which the president replied: “Then revise 
tire national security law, coo.” 

Kim Dae Jung added: “I was very 
surprised at this. ’ 

After he took office in 1993, President 
Kim imposed restrictions on die spy 
agency, which once bounded dissidents. 
Tbe new law restores its powers of in- 
vestigation, ostensibly to combat North 
Korean subversion. (AP, Reuters) 

■ Middle Class Shifts 

Teresa Watanabe of the Los Angeles 
Times reported: 

To understand why President Kim 
reversed himself, consider tire views of 
Jhee Byung Wook. He manages a hotel 


MODEL: French Bank Chief Calls for a European Bill Gates 



Jean-CIande Trichet 


Fran 


Continued from Page I 

puts at 53 percent, was really that low, 
commenting: “I will not talk of tramps 
and vagabonds, and black people in jail. 
Are we counting them?" 

“My suggestion,” be continued, “is 
not to change our values, but let’s see in 
Continental Europe those countries that 
are posting better job creation and see 
how they create jobs. If we could use more 
part-time jobs, as in the Netherlands, then 
we would have one million fewer un- 
employed here. The Dutch have changed 
the behavior of the employees." 

France, which remains mired in labor 
disputes and open hostility to privat- 
izations by many workers, is suffering 
from 12.7 percent unemployment, and 
the official Insee statistics office es- 
timates that it will rise to 1 3 percent this 
year. The Netherlands, which has 
achieved more flexibility because of 
sweeping structural reforms in recent 
years, has the most buoyant economy on 
the Continent, and its unemployment 
rate is just 6.4 percent. 

Although Wim Duisenberg. the Dutch 
central bank chief, and Hans Tietmeyer, 


CLINTON: Where’s the Lift? President’s Safe Homilies Fall Short 


Continued from Page 1 

nificant portion of the money, it turned 
out, was raised by illegal or at least 
suspicious methods. 

The president who was re-elected was 
given a 60 percent job-approval rating 
by the American public in the latest New 
York Times/CBS News Poll. But that 
support could melt quickly away if the 
various investigations and legal pro- 
ceedings involving Mr. Clinton — the 
Paula Jones case, the Whitewater affair, 
the matter of the once-missing legal files 
— draw political blood. 

Mr. Clinton’s main adversary of the 
last few years. Newt Gingrich, the House 
speaker, is in worse shape, about to be 
reprimanded and fined S300.000 by his 
House colleagues for having misapplied 
funds for political purposes. His approv- 
al rating stands at 15 percent in the 
Times/CBS poll. 


All of this has produced a toxic mood 
in the capital that inevitably dampened 
the spirits of political insiders, if not 
those of the citizens who flocked to 
Washington for the festivities. The pres- 
ident clearly recognizes this; he tried to 
dispel the miasma of partisan hostility 
with a ceremony last week honoring his 
main 1996 rival, former Senator Bob 
Dole of Kansas, and he said in an in- 
terview with The Washington Post that 
he hoped to deliver an inaugural address 
that would help to “flush the poison 
from the atmosphere.” 

Mr. Clinton touched on that idea in his 
speech Monday, noting that most Amer- 
icans deplore ’ ' the politics of petty bick- 
ering ana extreme partisanship. ” But the 
president did not make as much of it as 
many people had expected. 

He placed himself squarely in the 
middle of the road as he started across 
what be called, for the umpteenth time 


since the Democratic National Conven- 
tion, the bridge to the 2 1st century. He 
turned his back not only on the tradition 
of Ronald Reagan — “government is 
not the problem ” — but also that of FDR 
— “government is not the solution.” 
What was needed, the president went 
on. was “a new government for a new 
century, humble enough not to tzy to 
solve ail our problems for us but strong 
enough to give us the tools to solve our 
problems for ourselves.” 

The applause was less than thunder- 
ous. Afterward, a Democratic lawyer 
prominent in party activities, the head of 
a leading liberal research organization 
and a European diplomat said essentially 
the same thing: the president had not 
really grappled with the tough problems 
that face the nation, such as campaign 
reform, bringing entitlement spending 
under control, reducing racial hostility 
and improving the public schools. 


the Bundesbank president, both stressed 
in recent interviews the need to allow a 
steeper wage scale in order to create 
jobs, Mr. Trichet was more restrained in 
his remarks, saying instead that it was 
important in France “to preserve the 
values from our French Revolution, of 
liberte, egalitt and fraternity.'’ 

The french central hank chief did 
make clear, however, that he did not 
approve of the French practice of al- 
lowing transport workers and others to 
retire with a full pension at the relatively 
young age of 55. 

“Everyone seems to think that this is 
not appropriate,’ ’ he remarked. 

When asked if the single currency 
launch might be postponed m view of the 
struggle to achieve the Maastricht cri- 
teria by many countries, Mr. Trichet 
said, “1 am making the working as- 
sumption that it will be done, that a 
significant number of countries will 
meet the criteria, starting with France 
and Germany." 

Commenting on the view held by some 
in Europe that monetary union would not 
be meaningful without Italy and Spain, he 
said, “It could begin without any country 
that does not meet the criteria.’’ 

Taking a broader view. Mr. Trichet 
noted that the single currency was “a very 
complex historical endeavor, with mone- 
tary aspects of the first importance, and 
political aspects that are not to be neg- 
lected.” He said that the main justific- 
ation for the single currency was that “we 
have completed the single market.” 

Mr. Trichet declined to comment 
when asked if he supported the can- 
didacy of Mr. Duisenberg as the first 
head of a future European central bank. 
President Jacques Chirac and other 
French politicians have angered the 
Dutch, tiie Germans and some other gov- 
ernments in recent weeks by appearing 
to oppose Mr. Duisenberg even though 
he is apparently backed by 14 of the 15 
EU government heads. Asked to com- 
ment on rumors that he covets the job 
himself. Mr. Trichet replied: “Abso- 
lutely no comment.” 

The euro, he stressed, should be “as 
credible and as solid as the franc today.’* 
But he demurred when asked if that 
meant that a future European central 
bank might have to raise interest rates to 


achieve credibility in financial markets. 

“The European central bank wQi 
have the legacy of (hose central banks 
that will be part of the federal system that 
will be established in Europe,” Mr. 
Trichet said. “And the credibility of the 
European central bank wall come out of 
the credibility of those central banks that 
have gained credibility.” 

He said French monetary policy had 
been designed to generate sustainable, 
low inflation growth of 25 percent to 3 
percent a year, but be conceded that this 
was “in theory." Mr. Trichet said the 
Bank of France does not make its own 
forecasts, but he agreed with official fore- 
casts that growth in France this year will 
be about 23 to 25 percent. Most private 
sector economists, however, predict 1997 
French growth of just 2 percenL 

He contended that “we have to sep- 
arate the economic cycle from structural 
problems because on top of structural 
impediments our economic cycle is two 
years behind the Anglo-Saxon cycle-” 
“You had your recession in 1991," be 
said. “Ours was in 1993. The feel-good 
effect appeared only three years after re- 
cession in the U3. Maybe in one year’s 
time the feeling will be different In the 
U.S. it will be cooling down and here 
moving up." 

He added that to help economic re- 
covery “in Continental Europe and in 
France in particular, it is time to invest” 
Yet the french central bank chief 
praised Washington’s economic 
policies. "I must say that the way 
growth has been managed, with low 
inflation, bas been brilliant" he said. 

Turning to the increasing strength of 
the dollar in recent weeks, Mr. Trichet 
said this was in line with the call by 
Group of Seven finance ministers and 
central bank governors in April 1995 for 
an orderly reversal of its weakening 
trend at the time. 

Asked to comment on the recent call 
by former President VaI6ry Giscard 
d’Estaing of France for a devaluation of 
the franc against the dollar until it 
reached about 530 francs per dollar, its 
present level, Mr. Trichet paused. 

“I would prefer the question not to be 
asked,” be said. “I was myself an adviser 
to Giscard. I have great respect for him. 
On the currency I lave no comment.” 


Qtetoiml(wg><tTO Fuuui IV— 

A Buddhist monk being sandwiched between riot policemen in Seoul on Tuesday during a pro-strike march. 

KOREA: In a Reversal, Labor Law Will Return to Parliament 


unhappily situated across from the 
cathedral where workers and riot po- 
licemen have staged nightly confron- 
tations. 

The hotel’s restaurant has lost three- 
fourths of its business. 

The conservative Mr. Jhee had long 
frowned on South Korea’s student 
demonstrators over the years, passion- 
ately supporting Mr. Kim in tire election 
in 1992 and defending him ever since. 

Now Mr. Jhee’s sentiments have drif- 
ted. 

“When the audent demonstrators 
were here throwing rocks, X didn’t sym- 
pathy witi) them, but this is different,’’ 
he said. “These are workers responsible 
for the lives of their families. " 

In a battle for the hearts and minds of 
middle-class citizens like Mr. Jhee, the 
strikers have shown a power that many 
believed workers had lost. By brewing a 
volatile mix of public anxieties over job 
security and fears of a democratic back- 
slide, the strikers have inspired new 
sympathizers for the declining labor 
movement 


JETS: ; 

Super-Jumbo Is Off 

Continued from Page 1 . ■ 

industry analysts said the marketwould f 
ultimate arbiter of whedier the, 

going to te j 

pouring billions into an iffy : 

PStobectmvinc^^^i^s * 

done its arithmetic, said Richard Win- • 
editor of Airline Business, a: 

magazine for management- > 

ifuSding the plane, be said, was notso 
much a technical problem as a huge* 
business decision that could make or ^ 
break even a giant corporation. * 

“If Boeing has got it wrong, and there * 
really is demand. Airbus is going to bean » 
the enviable position of bong the only * 

maker ofthese very large aircraft, John 

Willingham, the managing di rector o r« 
Singapore Aircraft Leasing Enterprise, ’ 
told Bloomberg News. * 

As a result of the aviation clauses- 
under the General Agreement on Tariffs , 
and Trade, the AiAus part^re wffl be • 
able to realize up to one third of de- ^ 
velopment costs in the . form of gov- - 
eminent loans. But they will have to idy “ 
on capital markets and risk-sharmg part- , 
ners for the bulk of the investment. _ > 
Boeing ran into serious financial dif- 4 
Acuities in the early 1970s because ir-W 
took five to 10 years before it began* 
receiving returns on its investment in the-* 
Boring 747, which went on to become * 

its most lucrative aircraft . * « 

The Airbus spokesman said, the con- i 
sortium was fully aware of that dang er, * 
and would be looking for partners * 
around die world, including American ” 
ones. Asked to name potential partners , * 
he replied, “It would be a who’s who of “ 
the aircraft industry’ ' with one excep- 
tion: Boeing. 

But until Airbus changes its status J 

coic in-*> 
regular ; 

__ _ tve free- 
dom' of 'action. And Boeing, too, has ( 
discussed joint projects in the past with ; 
some of Airbus's partners — Daimler ' 
Benz Aerospace, Aerospatiale, British, i 
Aerospace and Construcciones Aero- - 
nauticas SA of Spain. 

Airbus and Boeing cooperated on a. 
joint feasibility study for the super- 
jnmbo, but went their separate ways4j 
more than a year ago when it became^ 
clear their ideas were incompatible. 

Boeing basically wanted to go with an ■ 
upgraded version of its successful but ' 
aging 747, while Airbus proposed an all- 
new aircraft that would incorporate the ' 
latest developments in fuel-saving tech- 
nology. 

Boeing sees die market for super- ' 
jumbos at less rt»m 500 planes; Airbus 
believes it can sell 1,400, which at a unit 
price of about $200 million would bring . 
m revenues of $280 billion. ' 

Mr. Whitaker of Airline Business , 
magazine said the companies were - 
drawing differ ent conclusions from the 
same evidence. 

For Boeing, building a super-747 ’ 
would mean creating a plane that would • 
compete with its existing models. For 
Airbus, however, a new plane could take , 
business away from Boring's 747 mar- • 
ket while fulfilling the demand for larger , 
aircraft. 

Airbus has been negotiating with . 
more than a dozen airlines that fly to or- 
from about 20 “capacity constrained” ^ 


from a “grouping of economic in-** 
i” under French law to 
company in 1999, its partners have 1 


terests 




v 


airports, such as London or Tokyo, 
where tiie only way for carriers to in- ■ 
crease business within doe constraints of . 
runway and terminal riot space is to • 
operate larger aircraft. 

But analysts said Boeing had doubt- • 
less drawn lessons from the evolution of' 
North Atlantic routes, where the trend . 
since deregulation has been toward 
smaller aircraft serving smaller cities — . 
London to Detroit, say, rather than Lon- - 
don to New York. So, the analysts said, it . 
makes sense for Boeing to concentrate • 
on developing stretched and other de- . 
rivative versions of its current fleet, in- ■ 
eluding the new 777, a twin-engined 
wide-bodyjet. 

Boeing has not completely abandoned 
tiie super-jumbo market. It said it was . 
moving half the 1,000 engineers en- 
gaged on the project to other tasks. But . 
Ron Woodard, president of Boring • 
Commercial Airplane Group, said the 
company would continue to study the . 
demand for a bigger plane than the 
747. 

‘'This re m ains one of the priorities of ■ 
oiar product-development efforts," he, 
said. “When the market develops for/i 
such an airplane, we will be ready.” ** 

But Mr. Whitaker said that by an- 
nouncing its withdrawal from the effort, 
Btreing may be closing the door in- 
definitely. There may be a market for the 

plane, be said, but it is clear there is room 
for only one manufacturer. 


GINGRICH: House Votes to Fine Speaker FLY: U.S. Airlines are Relying on New Technology to Let Them Take On Winter Sto 


Continued from Page 1 

imosity that has so deeply permeated the 
work of the House.” 

Yet, even during the speeches Tues- 
day, Democratic and Republican mem- 
bers of the ethics panel contradicted one 
another’s accounts of the committee's 
troubled progress. 

Hie vote Tuesday appeared certain to 
take some of the wind out of Mr. Gin- 
grich *5 political sails; he has been somber 
and contrite on the rare occasions when 
he has alluded to the case in public. 

It could, some analysts said, put pres- 
sure on him to work more closely with 
Democrats and support legislation that 
voters will see as constructive. 

In its vote Tuesday, the House wax 
confirming the recommendation of the 
ethics committee, which had voted, 7 to 1 , 
on Friday lo accept the sanction suggesied 
by iLs special counsel, James Cole. Mr. 
(foie spent two years investigating the 
case and produced a voluminous report. 

A final question of whether Mr. Gin- 
grich will pay the fine from his own 
pocket, as Democrats insist he should, or 
use campaign funds, has yet to be pui io 
rest. 


Benjamin Cardin of Maryland, a 
Democratic member of the ethics com- 
mittee, said during the House debrie that 
the payment "should come from his 
personal resources, because it is a per- 
sonal responsibility," 

An influential Republican, John 
Boehner of Ohio, chairman of the House 
Republican Conference, said earlier that 
if Mr. Gingrich used the campaign fund 
to pay the fine, “it’s going lo cause 
another uproar.” 

Mr. Gingrich's lawyer. J. Randolph 
Evans, has said th3t the speaker would 
not decide fora week or two which funds 
to use. 

The Georgia politician has paid about 
$700,000 in legal expenses From his 
campaign committee, a use approved in 
other cases by the Federal Election Com- 
mission. 

Wheiher the commission would per- 
mit Mr. Gingrich to use campaign funds 
to pay a fine is unclear. 

As speaker, Mr. Gingrich is paid 
5171 300 a year. His campaign fund 
contains more than 51 million in cash, 
according to the election commission. In 
1 995. he received more than $470,000 in 
royalties for book sales. 


Continued from Page 1 

to fly our normal schedule through the 
storm.” said Mike Robinson, TWA’s 
vice president of operations develop- 
ment, “ground delays would have been 
up to 80 minutes, which would have 
made practically every flight late the 
entire day and could have made us divert 
about 20 flights io other airports.” 

Perhaps most important, carriers can 
cut costs by managing their systems 
better in bad weather. Close to 10 per- 
cent of Delta flights were disrupted last 
year, half of them because of the weath- 
er, ri a cost of S440 million in lost 
revenue, overtime pay and vouchers for 
food and lodging. 

While Delta was quite profitable in 
fiscal 1996, earning S662 million on 
revenue of $12.45 billion, the industry is 
fiercely competitive and often shows 
losses or razor-thin earnings, so putting a 
dent in such expenses is a top priority. 

Probably no carrier has made a bigger 
investment to insulate itself from 
nature's blasts than Delta, the busiest 
U.S. airline with 973 million passengers 
last year. 

Delta figures its efforts will save it 


$35 million a year — more than enough 
to pay, in a single year, for the new $33 
million high-technology nerve center at 
its headquarters, adjacent to its major 
hub at Hartsfield Atlanta International 
Airport. 

At the Operations Control Center, as it 
is called, teams of specialists from each 
of six deportments — flight control, me- 
teorology, aircraft routing, crew rerout- 
ing. maintenance and equipment and 
reservations and radio — pore over 
streams of data transmitted by computer 
and deride whether and when to cancel 
or reroute flights. 

Only a year ago such information 
arrived ri several locations, often by 
telephone or teletype. Now, with much 
earlier access to tiie data, the group is 
able to act more quickly — and in- 
telligently — than before. 

Additionally, anew software program 
named the Inconvenienced Passenger 
Re booking System allows Delta to no- 
tify passengers of cancellations or 
delays and to suggest options — even if 
it means putting than onto rivals* 
planes. Delta Figures that the modest lass 
of revenue is more than offset by the 
goodwill that such flexibility generates. 


To rebook 125 Miami passengers 
scheduled to connect through Atlanta 
recently. Delta came up with 600 options 
on its flights and 300 on other carriers in 
less than a minute, said William John- 
son, who heads Delta’s efforts to im- 
prove flight rescheduling. 

By July, he added. Delta expects its 
software to provide instant information 
on how to redeploy flight crews, factor- 
ing in federal laws and union regula- 
tions. 

Developments in just the last year 
have been promising. This winter, for 
the first time. United Airlines has 
streamlined two systems for reducing 
flight delays. At Chicago’s O’Hare Air- 
port, for example, it automatically no- 
tifies air traffic control of changes in 
flight plans. 

“In the past we had to phone first to 
request the change.” said John Dansdill, 
the director of systems operations con- 
trol for United, a unit of UAL Corp. 
“This allows us to reduce delays by 
about an hour.” 

Passengers seem to appreciate the im- 
proved communication. During tiie 
evening of Atlanta's first expected 
storm, as large snowflakes began felling. 


rms 

James Toth of Delta’s reservations oi 
erations center spoke with a passenger 
Johnson City, Tennessee. The man, to 
that his morning flight to Chicago v 
Lincuuian had been canceled, was di 
lighted that Delta could still put him c 
ooc OT Us commuter planes out of Tr 
pty, Tennessee, to get him to Cine Inna 
m ti^ to make the eonneetion. 

When Mr, Toth was unaWe to find 
on a Delta plane for a Birminghar 
Alabama, resident whose flight to Jad 
sonviHe, Florida, was canceled, f 
offered to book him on USAir. H 
costomer thanked Mr. Toth profusely. 

Die biggest test for Delta will come 
the century” slart 
mto *e East Coast or if tBs wintt 
^here near tiie record ^ 
cumulations of snow of last winter. 

MrtJohiteon, at least, seems confide 
Delta has passed the technologic 
and personnel tests. ^ 

are ^ 55? 50 ’ man > r oftije people wfa 
n0w know oo 

. pne another, instead c 
put on hold. Noi 
2®** of talking and thinkin 

across divisional lines.” 




..'v 


-‘C 









22,1997 


mh 


STAiGE/ENTER TAINMENT 


<** 


80 A A 



1 <2* : 


LONDON THEATER 



Unmoce Bui MfSoo Hymn i 

^ e/cr Bowles and Daniel Betts in Peter Halts version of the Moliere comedy classic "The School for Wives/ 

Jessica as Blanche: Fascinating 




By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribute' 


•Vr.r 




-■ V 


L ONDON — Considering that 
she made her name on screen 
being clutched in the paws of 
King Kong, and has siiKe wan a 
brace of Oscars, Jessica Lange is per- 
haps the most surprising contemporary 
actress to luve regiiisitianfid Blanche 
DuBois in Tennessee Williams’ s stage 
masterpiece about dependence on the 
kindness of strangers, *~A Streetcar 
Named Desire.” 

Yet here she now is. at the Theatre 
Royal HaynuvkcL tackling the role far 
ibe third lime in a decade in Peter Hall’s 
new production, one of the most hugely 
fascinating, enjoyable and e ntertainin g 
misreadings ofa classic text that I have 
ever seen. 

1 First off, if, as she says, “the darkis 
~ comfortable to me.” this Blanche seems 
a little unlucky so have been caught in 
the full glare of a lavish technicolor 
epic, not so much “Miss Saigon” as 
“Miss Psycho” perhaps, but certainly a 
setting where Lana Turner or Joan 
Crawford might have been die more, 
obvious casting. 

The only two areas of show business 
whore Hall has never really achieved 
commercial success or accl a i m are 
movies and musicals, an d as though to 
repair that gap be has bizaneiy chosen 
to make this “Streetcar” far more Hol- 
lywood than anything even Lange has 
ever been involved with hitherto. 

At moments of high emotion, Steph- 
en Edwards's offstage score comes 
crashing in like a tribute to Dmitri 
Tlomkin or Eric Wolfgang Komgold. A 
set worthy of * ‘Porgy and Bess’] slightly 
defeats the claustrophobia and intim acy 
usually associated with this script, and 
all through Hall pulls lighting and sound 

effects of the kind much needed m Wil- 
liams's later and more flawed woxh but 

not really essential here. The o verall 
effect suggests a rescue job carried out 
Min a problem play hke Williams s 
"Camino Real” or “The Red Devil 
Battery Sign” rather that the us- 


ual stalely revival of a work of genius. 

Not that I really object to this: Lange 
is infinitel y better hare than rfw» was on 
Broadway five years ago, and die idea of 
“Streetcar” being hijacked by a driver 
determined to make it into a glossyepic 
is certainly something new. Toby 
Stephens is adequately Brando-esque as 
Kowalski, Imogen Stubbs is perhaps 
still a little local for Stella, but an im- 
pressive supporting oast boasts .Sandra 
Dickcsan (now there's a Blanche I'd 
love to see) as Eunice and Christian 
Burgess as the gentleman caller Mitch. 

Al times of high drama (and there are 
enough of those here) light and sound 
come crashing m as if we were into some 
deep-Souzh version of “Rebecca. ” Wil- 
liams hHnwJf, a melodramatic old 
showman, would have just loved the 
! of it, as wellas the sound and 


the usual low-tight despair and I just 
wish they had gone die whole hog and 
done it as a musical, which this pro- 
duction seems so itchy m become. ' 

N OT since Pinter gave Lauren 
Bacall the all-stops-ont super- 
star treatment in “Sweet Bird 
of Youth” has a Williams 
script been handled with such a sense of 
period stardom. What the production 
lacks in sheer dramatic energy (largely 
because Lange is a highly emaent per- 
former desperately lacking Vivien 
Leigh's unique ability to give us a wo- 
man on the verge of total nervous break- 
down and manic depression, which was 
precisely what she was undergoing at 
the time in reality) it makes up in grand 
guignol. so that we are subtly shifted 
from W illfams to Lillian Heilman's 
neighboring estate. 

The result is a mega-showbiz night, 
on no account to be missed: Just don't 
expect it to resemble any “Streetcar” 
you have ever seen before. This one is 
the full VistaVision, and die streetcar is 
only taking full-fare first class travelers 
with an aching nostalgia for melo- 
drama. 

Out of London, the best news of this 


new year is that the producer Bill Ren- 
wright has brought fee Theatre Royal 
Windsor, England’s longest surviving 
nonsubsidized regional playhouse, back 
to life wife an impressive new schedule. 
H is opening production ( about to move 
into fee Piccadilly) is also by Peter Hall, 
though in a very different mood. 

Moliere’s “L’Ecole des Femmes” 
(1662) has never been as popular over 
here as “Le Malade imagmaire” or 
“Tartuffe,” but Ranjit Bolt's new 
translation makes a joyous little parable 
as “The School for Wives.” 

Essentially this is still a one-joke play 
about a man falling in love with a teen- 
age girt and trying to ensure her vir- 
ginity which is of course lost all fee 
sooner, but Peter Hall has given it a cool, 
elegant staging built around fee won- 
drous double-act of Peter Bowles as the 
gullible prospective husband and Eric 
Sykes as his malevolent valet Sykes, 
one of oar last great vaudeville talents, 
has never been funnier than as the re- 
sentful. irritable, incompetent manser- 
vant wife fee manic, lethal sense of 
humor in distress; early dayslknow, but 
if we see a better comic turn on stage this 
year we shall be more than lucky. 

Al the Arts, “Showstopper” is a 
good idea gone horribly wrong. The title 
character (channingly sung but very 
blandly played by Jackie Chine) is 
Marni Nixon, that mysterious Holly- 
wood dubber who gave her voice to 
Audrey Hepburn in “My Fair Lady” 
and more crucially to Deborah Kerr in 
“The King and I” and to Rita Moreno 
and Natalie Wood in “West Side Sto- 
ry” before finishing up as a minor nun 
in “The Sound of Music.” 

The playwright, Dan Rebellato, 
clearly sees in this odd career some sort 
of metaphor for Hollywood unreality, 
but as he has apparently been unable or 
nn willing to clear performance rights on 
any of the great songs dubbed by Nixon, 
we end up wife a hopelessly lame mu- 
sical for solo performance in which 
Clune lacks fee charisma or fee intensity 
to make us care even remotely about the 
fate of Marni fee invisible singer. 


Taylor Troupe Brings 
Modern Dance to India 


! nt* 


,* - • : •. 


Bv Kenneth J. Copper 

Woshmguu M Service 


N 




sr-v J- 
r - '" s 

JlK -• ‘ 


troupe are introducing ^ ** ~ rr*” 
_ , 50fe an- 

country with are doingwifl seem 

'“MX 'so. Bui to Wwett ***** traditionS of 

India and those Shania Serbjeet Singh, 

the tody togetafl* spm. 

a leading dance critic. « to use fee body to express 

The ^ pj^caBty.’’ 

great pfaysicahty and of two books on Indian dance, 

^xnare delicate” than modem 





Indian daaceis various feelmgs and 

culruralgmbyri^graP^ 3 
especrally for lnd»- 


A FUNNY THING HAPPENED 
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SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE 

The Songs of Leber A Stoier 
Directed by Jerry Zaks 
QRA&WV W9WER) Best Musical 1896 
Tas^aiuJteWBdASBjjun.aesp^ 
Cal Taiechvpe (212) 238-6200 
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Andrew Uoyd Webber's New Musics) 
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‘Fledermaus’ Repatriated 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 


P 


ARIS — Like an astonishing 
□umber of German and Italian 
operas, “Die Fledermaus,” fee 
crown jewel of Viennese oper- 
etta, is an adaptation of a French play, 
“Le Revcillon” by Henri Meilhac and 
Ludovic Halevy. 

Never mind feu the French authors 
had themselves adapted a German play, 
“Le Revcillon” was a success in Paris 
in 1872, and two years later, further 
adapted and set to music I 
Johann Strauss, “Die 
started on its indestructible way in Vi- 
enna. The many plays of Meilhac and 
Halevy have been overtaken by obli- 


iajevy t 

vion, but fee writers are still around as 
Offenbach’s preferred librettists, and of 
Bizet's “Carmen.** 

The adventurous team of Moshe 
Leiser and Patrice Courier has come up 
with the idea of repatriating the operetta 
as “La Cbanve-Souris” and recon- 
ciling its text with “Le Reveillon” as 
much as possible without losing any of 
fee Strauss music. A neat trick, and one 
that takes some doing. 

The major change is to abandon the 
Viennese setting, so feat Orlofsky’s 
grandiose masked ball becomes an in- 
timate, somewhat licentious party 
thrown by the Russian prince in a mod- 
est hunting lodge deep in central 
France. 

This reduced scale led to a major 
musical decision, no doubt reinforced 
by the budgetary needs of a touring 
production, so fee orchestra has been 
trimmed to seven — four strings, flute. 


clarinet and piano — adroitly arranged 
byDidierPumos. 

For fee most part fee names of the 
characters are those of fee play, not fee 
operetta. Alfred, originally the prince’s 
orchestra conductor but a tenor in the 
operetta, keeps his voice. In the {day, 
Caroline (Rosalinde), the wife of Gail- 
lardin (Eisenstein), disappears after the 
first act But in tiie operetta, she appears 
disguised at fee masked ball and sings her 
famous esardas. so the play’s plot is 
adjusted to accommodate fee music. 

But fee basic motor of the plot re- 
mains. Most viewers of “We Fleder- 
maus” never really find out what fee bat 
of fee title is all about But in the play, 
the increasingly tipsy Gaillardin tells at 
length of how he humiliated Duparquet 
(Falke) four years earlier when, after a 
drunken costume party, he caused him 
to walk home in daylight in the costume 
of a bat The plot is the story of Dopar- 
quet’s revenge. (In the play, the costume 
is a bluebird, not a bat, which requires 
only a minor adjustment.) 

Including a maximum of dialogue 
and a maximum of music makes for a 
maximum of “Chauve-Souris,” 2 
hours and 45 minutes (not counting in- 
termissions), but the music is never far 
away when the talk becomes excessive. 
The Leiser-Caurier staging is amus- 
ingly detailed, Christian Feoouillat's 
sets were convincingly bourgeois-rus- 
tic, and a cast of young and attractive 
singers did well by Strauss. 

The coproduction, involving several 
theaters and fee Opera en De-de-France 
organization, is being performed 
through March 16 in theaters in several 
Paris suburbs and exurbs. 



The legend of Tristan and 
Isolde inevitably evokes Wag- 
ner's vast musical dimensions, but 
“Le Vm Herbe” by the Swiss com- 
poser Frank Martin (1890-1974) is a 
chamber setting of the same story for 
seven strings, piano and 12 voices that 
function as a narrative chorus bat whose 
individual members take solo roles. 

Martin called fee work a secular ora- 
torio, but the events and emotions 
evoked cry out for some kind of scenic 
representation, which it is currently get- 
ting in the basement Amphitheatre of fee 
Ojxau Bastille. 

The text is taken intact from three 
chapters of Joseph Bedier’s novel 
‘ Tristan et IseulL* ’ There is little of fee 
emotional exaltation associated wife 
Wagner. These lovers know they are 
doomed from the moment they fall in 
love, and fee work unfolds in 17 short 
scenes, wife a prologue and epilogue, 
like a long lament and in a musical 
atmosphere that uncannily suggests its 
medieval origins. 

The production is by Mireille Lar- 
roche and her team from of the Opera 
Peniche, which here has more space than 
it usually does on its Paris theater barge. 
Jean-Pierre Larroche's set is an ingeni- 
ous arrangement of wooden platforms 
and steps, a pool of water to suggest the 
omnipresence of fee ocean, and dec- 
orated fabric panels that are run up and 
down like sails. 

Corinne Sertillanges and Martial De- 
fontaine as the doomed couple and Soph- 
ie Boulin as Brangbein stood out among 
the singers, and Jean -Claude Penned er 
was fee solid conductor. Remaining per- 
formances are Jan. 23 and 25. 


PARIS FASHION 


Unbearable Lightness of Chanel 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — After all the excite- 
ment surrounding (he couture 
season. Chanel’s show, wife hs 
airy dresses and discreet 
presentation, lacked firepower. 

“It was deliberate — 1 left fashion 
folly for fee others and I wanted the 
show to be about the absolute refine- 
ment and lightness you can do only in 
couture,” Lagerfeld said after the show. 
It was staged again in the salons of the 
Ritz, Coco Chanel's spiritual home, 
while a whimsical portrait of Ma- 
demoiselle looked down from (he wall. 

Yes, Karl is best friends again with 
Coco. There were no gimmicks — apart 
from the personalized purses clutched 
by the models, who walked decorously 
through, tidy hair, well-bred posture and 
often sparkling wife real jewels. They 
included a diamond tiara, part of an 
aristocratic elegance in the show 
gleaned from new muse Amanda Har- 
lech, who was formerly wife John Gal- 
liano. 

The collection was literally feather- 
light, wife thin plumes rising like ai- 
grettes from fee hair and a fluff of 
feathers decorating a skirt Or — in the 
case of one tulle spiral dress — re- 
placing the spiky monkey-fur decor- 
ation feat bad been on a Chanel orig- 
inal. 

But mostly it was just signature 
pieces reworked wife imagination and 
extraordinary skills into Chanel “lite”: 
the nubbly tweed jackets simulated wife 
tuffs of ribbon on tulle, or jackets and 
fluid pants so airy they looked as though 
the fabrics were perforated. Against the 
daylight streaming through the win- 
dows from the Place Vendome, the 
clothes often seemed tittle more than a 
mesh of materials, wife layering, a seed- 
corn of beading and those inevitable 
visible underpants saving the models 
from nudity. 

But this wasn't a provocative col- 
lection. Quite the opposite. The day- 



ChaneVs rucked tulle dress. 


jac 

but 


wear was even dull, wife fee wide pants 
malting a slightly soggy silhouette. The 
kets were decorated only wife pearl 
uttons. never fee gilded double-C logo. 
An example of utter refinement was a 
black jacket wife white pearl buttons 
over a white blouse cuffed with black 
pearls. 

From early evening onward, the col- 
lection showed fee mellow fruit of the 
15-year collaboration between Lager- 
feld and tire ateliers. Is there any thing to 
which his aerobic design mind can 
stretch which they cannot accomplish? 
Sheer magic seemed to have spirited 
away the seams in a paneled skirt; pearl 
embroidery was reduced to pinheads; on 
a white cardigan, ruched tulle looked 
like piped icing; a sugar-pink feather 


jacket and pants seemed to be made of 
spun sugar. 

Feathers? Transparency? Not very 
wearable, huh! On fee contrary, this was 
fee ultimate show for a refined client 
and fee nearest we have seen so far this 
season to perfection in couture. 

But a low-key Chanel show, in con- 
trast to fee thrill of Galliano’s debut at 
Dior, raises fee question of whai the 
Paris couture shows are for. Current 
wisdom claims that they are just media 
vehicles. But fee clients are no longer 
players only because they are part of a 
discreet or distant society and are 
mostly shy of sitting from row. 

Last season Chanel sold, at 950,000 
francs (about $175,000) a piece, 13 of 
its Coromandel screen embroidered 
dresses. That disproves the theory that 
clients for haute couture at its most 
rarefied no longer exist, and indeed 
many houses have had record sales this 
season. Marie Seznec-Martinez, cou- 
ture direc trice at Christian Lacroix, said 
that last season's couture sales in- 
creased by one third. Oscar de la Renta 
said Tuesday that Balmain’s sales had 
doubled in 1996 over the previous year 
and that studio hands had increased 
from 20 to 60. 

Hanae Mori is another house feat has 
a flourishing business, especially in 
wedding gowns. It showed Tuesday a 
collection inspired by art bright and 
bold Pop Art flowers on floating chiffon 
or embroidered An Nouveau chrysan- 
themums. Mori also made artful cutouts 
on her long-line dresses — and then 
filled them m wife lace and chiffon. But 
her brushstrokes in fashion are always at 
their finest when she draws inspiration 
from Japan. 

A new Musee de la Mode, or fashion 
museum, opens Saturday in a wing of 
fee Louvre, wife a gala dinner Tuesday. 
It celebrates fee art and craft of fashion 
wife couture as France’s finest flower. 
Bur to justify its place in fee fashion 
world, couture has to appeal to clients, 
rather than just creating potential mu- 
seum pieces. 


DINING IN NEW YORK 


The cuisine, the wines, the crystal, the china, 
the linens, the leather, the paintings, the tiles 
and even the customers are Italian. 


Tony Mayfe 



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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22 , 1997 



















































BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 


PAGE 13 


%C\T* 


Nissan sets 
Expansion 
In Britain 

Investment to Create 
Hundreds of Jobs 

.^?^ DON — Nissan Motor Co. 

§£? 1 ®“ 1 «*> m vestment in its plant at 
Sunderland, m northeast England, to 
build a new model. 

. ™ove is expected to create 800 
jobs at Nissan uXi also is likely to 
• generate 2,700 jobs at British supplier 
Eurof^** and about 4,000 jobsaaoss 

■ Nissan, which employs 5,400 people 
f ;m Bntam and has 4.6 percent oftbe 
Bnttsh market, and other Asian auto- 
.makOT are putting pressure on Fbid-Mo- 
. tor Co., the biggest automaker in Britain. 
.^ w ? efc ’ Pond said it would eliminate 
1,300 jobs at its Halewood. plant near. 
^Liverpool to cut losses in Europe and 
.cope with a decline in its British" maricet 
share to 1 9.6 percent last year from more 
, than 21 percent in 1995. 

* There’s probably no market in the 
world more competitive than Europe for 
passenger cars,*’ said lan Gibson, chief 
executive of Nissan ’s British unit * ‘The 
'class of car we’re building is a very key 
•size. It’s either for die young new con- 
' sumer or the small family.” 

• Nissan stock closed at 688 yeti 
•($5.85). up 4, in Tokyo trading. 

Nissan's investment in the Sunderland 
•plant will build a production Kw. capable 
.of making 100,000 midsized cars a year, 
a class that competes with the Ford Es- 
.cort, made at Halewood and at two other 
.European factories. 

) Nissan has already invested £1.28 hfl- 
'lion in die Sunderland plant, where it 

• makes Micra and Primers models. 

, Unlike Ford, which lost $472 million 
in Europe in the third quarter of 1996, 
Nissan has increasingly profitable op- 
erations in Britain. Earnings from those 
operations rose to £10.4 million in l995, 
the latest year fra* which data are avail- 
able, from £159,000 the previous year. 

Nissan, Japan's second-biggest car- 
maker, said it would produce models in 
•the Pulsar range, which is called the 
. Atraera in Europe, at the plant starting in 
■2000. . (Reuters, Bloomberg) 

;■ Chrysler Profit Drops 22% 

Chrysler Corp. said it earned $807 
.million in the fourth quarter, down 22 
pen^m from a year earlier butenongfa to 
give the compmy its second-best annual 
profit in its history, news agencies re- 
'ported from Auburn Hills. Michigan. 

Its full-year profit of $3.5 billion for 
all of 1996 was topped only by the $3.7 
billion it earned in 1994. 

Its revalue of $61 A billion for the 
year was a record for the rirird-biggest 
U.S. automaker. 

The decline in earnings reflected a 
one-time charge of $279 million for die 
retirement of debt, the write-down zn 

• value of an investment in an electronics 

'subsidiary and pension and eariy-re- 
.tirement costs. (AP. Bloomberg) 



TbcNr-fcaVTmc 

From left: Jeffrey K a tenberg, David GefTen and Steven Spielberg. 

Hollywood Is Whiting 
Fora DreamWorks Hit 


By Geraldine Fabrikant 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — More than two 
years after the debut of DreamWorks 
SKG — the first attempt to begin a 
major new U.S. entertainment com- 
pany in decades — the studio is still 
waiting to make its first big splash. 

It will not release its first live-action 
feature film until “The Peacemaker,** 
a thriller, debuts in September. 

It has three televirion series on the 
air, but only one, “Spin City,” with 
Michael J. Fox. has a strong chance of 
generating enough episodes to pro- 
duce profits from rerun sales, several 
television executives said privately. 

George Michael's new album 
“Older,”- DreamWorks’ first major 
record, has had a lackluster reception. 

What is perils most worrying, its 
first animate d -film — an area from 
which the company expects to derive 
up to half its profit — will not appear 
until November 1998. 

, At any other company, such a record 
would doom executives to relentless 
criticism; and in Hollywood there are 
those who say privately that Dream- 
Works is a disappointment so far. 

But most acknowledge that even 
with die daunting risks of starting a 
new entertainment company, Dream- 
Works’ three partners — Steven 
Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and 
David Geffen — have a respectable 
chance of pulling it off. 

“There are only two brand names 
in the business: Disney and Spielberg, 
and DreamWorks has care of them.” 
said John Tinker of Montgomery Se- 
curities. “They have a strong capital 
base and experienced management 
That gives them a tremendous ad- 
vantage. The question is, can they 


survive given the increasing capital 
costs and risks in the business.'’ 

No one is willing to bet againsr Mr. 
Geffen’s deal-making skills. He built 
one of die biggest personal fortunes in 
Hollywood by creating and selling his 
record company to MCA foe. for $550 
nriOios in stock in 1989. Within a 
year, be cashed out for $710 million 
when Matsushita Electrical Industrial 
Co. bought MCA. 

Perhaps the greatest reason for cau- 
tion is DreamWorks' big bet on an- 
imated films. Ron Nelson, chief fi- 
nancial officer, forecasts that 40 
percent to 50 percent of Dream- 
Works’ profits will come from an- 
imation. 

Currently, 300 animators are work- 
ing on its first release, “The Prince of 
Egypt.” 

An additional 100 animators are 
preparing* 1 !*] Dorado: City of Gold,” 
for its 1999 release, and smaller teams 
are working an the computer-gener- 
ated films “Ants” and “Shrek.” 

That means about 40 percent of the 
staff of 1,200 is at work on anim- 
ation. 

Animation is Mr. Kaizeaberg's 
first love and where he built his repu- 
tation during his 13 years at the an- 
imation behemoth Walt Disney Co. 
Clearly he wants to prove he can do it 
again. But he also wants to do it dif- 
ferently fiom Disney. 

At die moment, Mr. Katzenberg 
does not expect that DreamWorks will 
rival fee Disney machine in marketing 
and merc handising film-related 
products. 

The company is still debating 
whether product tie-ins, Disney’s 
huge profit machine driven by an- 

See DREAM, Page 16 


Strong Sales Help IBM Profit Rise 18% 


‘ NEW YORK — International Busi- 
ness Machines Coro, said Tues day it s 
’fourth -quarter prom grew 18 pe rcent , 
-lifted by surging demand for its com- 
■puter services and stronger sales of 
-computer software and hardware. 

• IBM earned $2.02 billion in the 
quarter, up from $1.71 biUion a year 
■earlier. Revenue rose 5.6 percent, to 
$23.14 billion. ; 

The profit was the latest sign of a 
.rebound at the world’s largest computer 
•coropany and generally tell within. the 
tange of forecasts of industry analysts. 
-- But some analysts had said IBM 
would have to post earnings of at feast 
‘$4 a share and revenue growth of 10 
‘percent to satisfy rising enthusiasm 
about the company’s performance^^ 
£BM said its overall computer nara- 
’ware sales rose 1.7 percent, to $1166 


hfilioo, bur that its gross profit margin 
slipped to 36.6 percent from 39.6 per- 
cent Revenue from computer services 
grew 223 percent, to $6.01 bfllion. Rev- 
enue from software rose 3.9 percent to 
$3.72 bfllioa. 

But IBM was hurt by currency fluc- 
tuations and continued slack prices in 
memory chips, which are made py IBM. 

“We showed good growth in the 
fourth quarter despite a difficult year- 
ovez-year comparison, continued weak- 
ness m Europe and a greater- than-ex- 
pected currency impact,” said -Louis 
Gerstner, IBM’s chairman. 

For the full year, IBM earned $5.86 
billion. That was down from $6.02 bil- 
lion for all of 1995. Full-year revenue 
rose 5.6 percent, to $76.95 billion. 

The results were released after the 
dose of financial markets, rather than 
before trading opened as had been done 


in the past. A spokesman for IBM said 
the company had made the change at the 
request of analysts who sought more 
time to write their reports without being 
distracted by daily trading. 

“This is an opportunity to have 
people discuss and reflect on the results 
overni ght ,” said Daniel Mandresh, an 
analyst with Merrill Lynch & Co. 

But several analysts said that IBM was 
hoping to avoid the heavy swings in its 
stock price that had accompanied its 
warnings annmmcwne ntR in recent quar- 
ters. 

IBM's stock rose $2375 to $169375, 
a nine-year high. 

Because IBM is one of the 30 stocks in 
the Dow Jones industrial average, its share 
price can have a significant impact on the 
market This has happened particularly in 
recent mantis, as the company's shares 
have been soaring. (AP, NYT) 


(AP.NYT) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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Greenspan Issues Inflation Alert 

Fed Chief Says Wage Pressures Could Raise Prices 


CmpMtn. OarSiUffFrm Dbfukln 

WASHINGTON — The chairman of 
the Federal Reserve Board, Alan Green- 
span, said Tuesday that the U.S. econ- 
omy bad surpassed expectations in 
1 996, but he warned that the good news 
on inflation could be ending as low 
unemployment leads to rising wage de- 
mands. 

In his first testimony before Congress 
in six months on the state of the econ- 
omy, the head of the U.S. central bank 
gave a generally upbear assessment of 
recent developments. 

‘ ‘The overall performance of the U.S. 
economy has continued to surpass most 
forecasters’ expectations,” Mr. Green- 
span said in testimony to the Senate 
Budget Committee. 

But he let it be known that the central 
bank was on heightened alert that at some 
point the low U.S. unemployment rate 
would lead to inflationary pressures. 

The price of the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond recovered from a brief 
decline after Mr. Greenspan's remarks 
were released. It rose 16/32 to 96 12/32 
to yield 6.78 percent. Stocks, mean- 
while, marched higher, as the Dow 
Jones industrial average rose 40.03 
points to a record 6,883.90. 

Analysts interpreted Mr. Green- 
spin’s comments to the Senate Budget 


Committee as suggesting that the Fed's 
policy-making Open Market Commit- 
tee will not raise interest rates at its next 
meeting Feb. 4 and 5. 

“The economy has retained consid- 
erable vigor, with few signs of the im- 
balances and inflationary tensions that 
have disrupted past expansions,” Mr. 
Greenspan said. “By some important 
measures of price trends, inflation ac- 
tually slowed a bit in 1996.” 

Still, the Fed chairman left the door 
open for action later if growth accelerated 
from the 3 percent rate he predicted 
would be reported for all of 1996. 

Although it has taken a while, light 
labor markets are beginning to have an 
effect on wage levels, be said, implying 
that “the relatively modest wage gains 
we've seen are a transitional rather than 
a lasting phenomenon.” 

A “recent pickup in some measures of 
wages, be added, “suggests that the tran- 
sition may already be running its 
course.” 

So far, the Fed chairman emphasized, 
inflationary pressures have not become 
evident, even though the current recov- 
ery is now the third-langest in U.S. his- 
tory and has driven unemployment down 
to 5.3 percent, near a seven-year low. 

Mr. Greenspan said this was in con- 
trast to the long recovery in the 1980s, 


when tighter job markets led to higher 
wage demands and intensified inflation 
pressures. 

“In contrast to that earlier period, we 
have not experienced a broad increase in 
inflation; in fact, by some important 
measures of price trends, inflation ac- 
tually slowed a bit in 1996," Mr. Green- 
span said. 

But the Fed chief said the central 
bank, whose primary mission is to keep 
inflation at bay, had to be forward-look- 
ing in setting interest-rate policy, be- 
cause higher interest rates only work 
with a time lag. generally believed to be 
nine months or a year. 

“The question is, of course. Where 
do we go from here?" Mr. Greenspan 
said. “Can we continue to achieve sig- 
nificant gains in real activity while 
avoiding inflationary excesses.” 

He said widespread job insecurities 
had kept wage pressures constrained 
even though labor markets were tight 

But repeating a forecast be made a 
year ago, he said that ‘ ‘at some point in 
the future, the trade-off of subdued 
wage growth for job security has to 
come to an end.” 

By noting this in his testimony, Mr. 
Greenspan appeared to be preparing fi- 

See FED, Page 14 


Low Inflation Brings Italian Rate Cuts 


SmTI F rom Dapwi*n 

ROME — The Bank of Italy cut the 
official discount rate Tuesday by 0.75 of 
a percentage point to 6.75 percent as 
inflation remain ed moderate and within 
government expectations. 

The central bank, which also lowered 
its rale on fixed-term advances, or Lom- 
bard rate, to 835 percent from 9 percent, 
said the cuts would take effect Wed- 
nesday. The Bank of Italy twice lowered 
the discount rate last year by 0.75 per- 
centage poinL The latest cut left the rate at 
its lowest level in 21 years. 

The discount rate influences bank 
rates on borrowed money, and business 
groups had been pushing for the cut 

The bank said inflation had remained 
moderate over the past few months, in 
line with objectives far the current year. 
Italy's national inflation rate currently is 
at a 27-year low. 


Treasury Minister Carlo Azeglio 
Ciampi said the rate cuts would benefit 
the entire economy but especially busi- 
nesses. “This way,” he said, “there are 
grounds for a stable and lasting eco- 
nomic recovery.” 

Preliminary price data from 1 1 Italian 
cities released Tuesday showed infla- 
tion at 0.2 percent in January and 2.6 
percent over the previous 12 months, 
unchanged from December. 

The cities survey tends to be an ac- 
curate predictor of the final consumer 
price index for the month, which is 
scheduled to be released Feb. 4 by Istat, 
the national statistics bureau. 

Analysts had expected a rate cut, if 
any, to come after that date, provided 
that labor unions and employers reached 
agreement on wages. Talks have been 
under way for more than six months. 

Higher drug prices lifted consumer 


prices, die survey showed. A rise in 
prices for fresh foods because of cold 
weather was offset by lower prices for 
meat. Transportation and leisure costs 
declined as well. 

In Milan, the all-share Mibtel Index 
finished 1 1 1 .00 points lower, at 12^223.00 
The rate cuts were announced after the 
market closed. Trading has surged on the 
Milan exchange as investors shift money 
from government paper into stocks amid 
declining bond yields. 

“We shot up too suddenly and vi- 
olently,” said Mario Lesna of Deutsche 
Morgan Grenfell, “and now we are 
paying the price.” 

Government bond yields fell to record 
lows over the past two weeks, leading 
some fund managers to conclude that the 
shift to equities would continue as in- 
vestors sought better returns. 

(AP. Reuters. Bloomberg) 



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New Vurt m .Voir J'wt 


|p Republic National Bank of New York- 

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Investor s America 


The Dow 


30: Year T-Bond Yield 



Dollar in' Deutsche marks fl Dollar in Yen- 



1996 1997 

Exchange ■ --' index.. 


19S6 


1997 




•' The Dow 


Tuesday ■ Prew. ' ■ % 

. dose. - .Change 

96B3AQ . 6843.07 +0.58 


-wse-.“. 

S&P5Q0-. 

TKMWT • -M),7? 

NYSE - 

S&P-lOO . ! 

7W£i T; 761J7 'iOtSS 

NYSE s 

Ocfthposite '• 

r -: AhSt . 40931 . i*ftS5 

uis. 

hfastteq Composite 13TK97 1384^8 +0.93 

AKEX. J '- 

Market Vafite - 

•588A ::; .588-94; ■ +0.17 

Torortto 

TSSE. Iratex , • 

6031.08 3tiaS0 ' -054- 

SSoPhuio 

Bovespa 

7904S.10 ^354.40 +0.89 

Maxk»C»y 

Botea - - 

3717.34 ■ 37^^ • ‘ 4&.S9 

Buenos AirosMarval 

€86;&t " 68656 - u -+0-01 

Sattfago 

IPSA CSenoial - 

5258.67 5353-72 -1.76 

Caracas- . 

Capftal Genetaf 

636S^ . 6448.74 . -t-29 

Source: 9/oomberg, Reuters 

JmenulMu) NrraJd Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Chase and Citicorp Gain 


CowpiledtyQiaSkjfFnmDupiarhn 

NEW YORK — The two largest 
banks in die United States reported 
fourth -quarter earnings gains of 9 
percent Tuesday, and investors 
raised the stock pice of one but left 
the other unchanged. 

Profit at Chase Manhattan Corp. 
was held down by the cost of mer- 
ging with Chemical Banking 
Corp., while Citicorp's profit was 
held bock by weaker earnings in 
die bank's credit-card postfolio. 

But Citicorp’s shares rose $3 to 
$1 12.25, while Chase's stock was 
flat at 3592.875. 

Meanwhile, Wells Fargo & Co. 
reported an operating profit of 
$ 1 23 million for the fourth quarter 
after its acquisition of Fust In- 
terstate Bancorp., and its stock 
jumped $9 to $288.75. Net income 
in the like quarter of 1995 was 
£306 million. 

Chase Manhattan Corp.. the 
largest bank holding company in 
the United States, said fourth- 
quarter net income rose to £901 


million from S827 million a year 
earlier. Net for the full year was up 
20 percent to S3.59 billion, or 
$ 7 .54 a share, from $2.98 billion, 
or $6.25 a share. After accounting 
for the cost of merging with Chem- 
ical Banking Corp. last March, 
however. Chase's fourth-quarter 
net rose just 1 percent to $836 
million from S827 million. For the 
year, net income fell to $2.46 bil- 
lion from S2.96 billion. 

Chase said it had exceeded its 
expectations for cost savings from 
the merger, reporting savings of 
$235 million for the quarter and 
$555 million for the year. 

Separately, the bank said its 
deputy chairman. Edward Miller. 
56. planned to retire April 1. 

Mr. Miller, who oversaw the 
integration of Chase and Chemical 
and headed the bank's consumer- 
banking operations, said he 
wanted to work in another part of 
the financial -services industry or 
in the public sector. 

Citicorp, the second-biggest 


U.S. banking company, earned 
$987 million in the last three 
months ofT996, up from $905 mil- 
lion a year earlier, as strong gains 
in corporate worldwide banking 
offset a 20 percent drop in profit 
from credit-card operations. For 
1996, Citicorp earned $3.8 billion, 
up from $3-46 billion in 1995. 

Citicorp, die largest U.S. credit- 
card issuer, was bit hard by rising 
losses on the cards. Its worldwide 
consumer-credit costs rose 23 per- 
cent, to $844 million, and its credit- 
card profit fell to $290 million. 

(AP, Bloomberg i 

m Salomon Profit Rises 36% 

Salomon Inc. said its fourth- 
quarter profit rose 36 percent from a 
year earlier, to $228 million, helped 
by rising income from investment 
banking and bond trading, 
Bloomberg News reported from 
New York. 

The results included a $3 1 mil- 
lion pretax gain from sales of ho- 
tels owned by Salomon Brothers. 


FED: Greenspan Warning on Inflation 

Continued from Page 13 "" ° f "" 

nancial markets for possible future Mr- ^ researchers 

increases in intereS rates, even ^^^e^fSer- 
Uiough his prepared remarks gave a* rede inflalioD ^te 

no hmi as to when those rate m- 

creases might occur. . t a yea r. That is 

Many economists continue to pre- Pf* OT “^% nnr i l JL, a C on- 
dim thai the cental tank will keep appointed commission 

SSS^meS 385001185 Ttad the overstatement at U per- 
In his prepared remarks. Mr. CM***, overstates inflation 


questioned whether "irrational ex- new proou^ ^ 
uberance" bad pushed financial justment for qual^y m 
markets to unreasonable highs, Mr. . . 

Economists say they have begun That 
to believe that the central bank will rent level 
soon stan raising interest rates "is higher than we ^thought, he 


raising 

u.s. stocks" 


Demand Booms for 4 ‘Baby Bells 9 

NEW YORK IAP) — Four regional phone companies 
reported mixed profits Tuesday for the fourth quarter, as 
booming demand for extra phone lines and mobile com- 
munications softened the costs of investing in new services. 

Bell Atlantic Corp. reported a 12 percent drop in net profit. 
to $345.6 million, from the like quarter in 1 995. as sales rose 
7 percent, to $3.37 billion. 

Nynex Corp.. whose purchase by Bell Atlantic is awaiting 
federal approval, said profit rose 1 0 percent, to $4 1 6.5 million, 
excluding charges associated with a company buyout pro- 
gram. Sales edged up to $3.33 billion from $330 billion. 

SBC Communications Inc.’s net profit rose 7 percent, to 
£542.9 million, as sales increased 12 percent, to $3.8 billion. 

Pacific Telesis. whose acquisition by SBC is also awaiting 
federal approval, reported an 18 percent drop in net profit, to 
SI 91 million, as sales rose 7 percent, to $2.45 billion. 

• Exxon Corp. said higher natural-gas and crude-oil prices 
helped lift net profit 49 percent in the fourth quarter, to S2.49 
billion, as sales rose 20 percent, to $37.62 billion. 

• Lockheed Martin Corp.'s fourth-quarter earnings rose 50 
percent, to $465 million, largely because of one-time gains in 
1996 and merger-related costs in the 1995 quarter. Without 
those items, profit would have been $323 million, compared 
with $3 1 1 million a year earlier. 

• Whirlpool Corp.'s net profit rose to $45 million in the 
fourth quarter from $18 million, as a turnaround in its Euro- 
pean operations and strong U.S. demand for appliances helped 
revenue rise 4 percent, to 352.17 billion. 

• Continental Airlines Jnc.'s fourth-quarter profit rose 15 
percent, to $47 million, as passenger volume rose and op- 
erating costs fell. 

• Caterpillar Inc.’s fourth -quarter earnings rose to $381 

million from $300 million a year earlier as sales rose, but the 
company warned that its profit this year would be little 
changed from 19%. AP.Bloombem 


Spurt in U.S. Medical Costs Forecast 


By Milt Freudenheim 

Ne %■ York Timex Service 

NEW YORK — Medical costs, 
which have risen less than inflation 
for the last three years, are begin- 
ning to inch ahead in the United 
States and may be poised for a sharp 
rise, especially for small businesses, 
according to employers, actuaries 
and industry consultants. 

Employers said their health care 


costs were beaded for a 4 percent 
increase this year, according to a 
survey made public Monday. 

Some health care experts project 
5 percent to 10 percent growth in 
medical costs in 1998. 

Prices are under growing pressure 
as managed care companies strive to 
make up for the thin profits they 
tolerated while bolding down prices 
and pushing for new members. 

The underlying forces that drove 


up health care costs in the 1980s are 
still powerful: the aging population, 
compounded now by middle-aged 
baby boomers who require more 
medical services; more expensive 
medical technology like bone mar- 
row transplants to help cancer pa- 
tients, and new drug combinations. 

Costs might also rise fractionally 
from new laws that prohibit some 
cost-cutting, such as insurers' lim- 
iting hospital stays after childbirth. 


Rubin Keeps Talking Up the Dollar 


CmfxleeJ bv Ow- Sag F/rrtt OiifkXrkn 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against most other major currencies 
Tuesday after Treasury Secretary 
Robert Rubin reiterated his position 
that a strong dollar was good for the 
U.S. economy. 

Mr. Rubin also reaffirmed that he 
did not view the dollar's climb as 
detrimental to the U.S. trade po- 
sition. He said the key to cutting the 
U.S. trade deficit was “our com- 
petitiveness, not the dollar.” 

The dollar closed Tuesday at 
1.6297 Deutsche marks, up from 
1.6265 DM on Monday, at 5.4950 
French francs, up from 5.4840 


francs, and ax 1.4195 Swiss francs, 
up from 1.4165 francs. The pound 
was at $1.6637, up from $1 .6627. 

But the dollar slipped against foe 
yen after Japan's finance minister, 

Foreignexchange" 

Hiroshi Mitsuzuka, said members of 
the Group of Seven industrialized 
nations might soon comment on the 
weakening yen. 

The dollar dosed at 1 1 7.915 yen, 
down from 118.050 yen Monday, 
after Mr. Mitsuzuka said it would be 
“natural for Japan to take appropriate 
measures” in response to foe yen's 


“excessive decline.*’ Prime Minister 
Ryutaro Hashimoto was quoted by 
Jiji Press as saying that an erratic 
swing would be a matter of concern. 

Valery Giscard d'Estaing, tire 
former president of France, welcomed 
tiie franc’s recent fell against the dol- 
lar, saying the Bench currency now 
was fairly valued. 

“The dollar is now in the 530 
franc area.” he told the daily Le 
Figaro, describing that rate as “de- 
sirable and in equilibrium.” 

He also predicted that France and 
Germany would cut rates to stim- 
ulate the European economy. 

. (Bloomberg, AFP ) 


because of a rash of recent statistics 
suggesting that economic growth, as 
measured by gross domestic product, 
was expanding at an annual rare of 
35 percent to 4 percent in the final 
three months of the year, up sig- 
nificantly from the 2.2 percent rate 
turned in during the summer. 

In foe context of the current ex- 
pansion, many economists say they 
believe foe Fed will not long accept 
growth above foe 23 percent mark, 
fearing that it wilt set off a round of 
inflationary price and wage in- 
creases. 

Referring to his speech Dec. 5 in 
which he asked how the Fed would 
be able to tell whether an “irrational 
exuberance” had gripped investors 
in U.S. markets, he told the com- 
mittee that that comment had not 
been “a shot from foe hip.” 

He said, “We draught long and in 
detail that any such statement could 
voy well have immediate effects,” 
but he said the Fed felt it was im- 
portant “that everybody knows what 
we look at” in making monetary 
policy, including the movement of 
asset prices. 

At the time, stock and bond in- 
vestors worldwide took that com- 
ment to mean the U.S. central bank 
was about to raise rates to stave off a 


said. " (AP. Bloomberg) 

■ Strong Earnings lift Stocks 

A flow of encouraging earnings 
reports kept the stock market sup- 


ported, news agencies 
from New York. 


reported 


‘We've come off a very good 
earnings year, and analysts are fore- 
casting another good earnings 
year, said H. Bradlee Perry, a con- 
sultant for David L. Babson & Co. 
“As long as the earnings are grow- 
ing, the market’s going to have an 
upward bias.” * 

The Standard & Poor’s 500-share 
index closed up 6.02 points at 782.72. 
while gaining issues outnumbered 
losing ones by a 13-to-12 ratio on the 
NewVork Stock Exchange. 

Microsoft was the most active 
issue on the Nasdaq market, rising 
3% to 9416. 

Banc One was foe most actively 
traded issue on foe Big Board, rising 
1 3 1/64 to 43‘A a day after agreeing 
to buy First USA, a rival credit-card 
issuer. First USA-rose 2 to 47%. 

Johnson & Johnson rose 2‘ri to 
■53J6 after reporting a 20 percent 
increase in profit 
Nellcor Puritan Bennett provided 
one of the day’s biggest profit dis- 
appointments and fell 5% to 18V&. 
Slow sales of machines that aid 
breathing cut die company's profit 
HBO fell 49k to 63K alter the 


possible speculative bubble. Bond maker of computer systems for thef 


yields rose and the Dow Tones in- 
dustrial average fell ISO points the 
following day before staging a rally. 

Mr. Greenspan expressed disap- 
pointment at the reaction to the 
speech, saying investors “didn’t 
read as much of the context in 
which foal was stated as I would 
have preferred,” although be ad- 
ded, “Everybody noticed what we 
were saying.” 

Mr. Greenspan didn’t go as for 
Tuesday, although he noted that a 
“breathtaking" climb in stocks had 
helped investors to experience “an 


health-care industry released profit 
below analysts' expectations. 

Target Therapeutics jumped 10 
7/16 to 69 7/16 after Boston Sci- 
entific said it would pay $1:1 billion 
for Target, which sells the only 
device in the United States ap- 
proved to treat inoperable or high- 
risk brain aneurysms. Boston Sci- 
entific rose 2 to 68%. 

- Dow Jones fell -1% to 35%: foe 
media company was cut to “un- 
derperform” from “market per- 
form” by Oppenheimer & Co. 

.(AP. Bloomberg) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 pjm. Close 

Tha lop 300 moat-octwe atian+s. 
up to Dm doskn on Writ Svwl 
TheAsaoamd Press 


Sato HWi LowUdaM Owe 



Indexes 
Dow Jones 

Own Man Law LOO Q* 
L"*»* MJi.1t mas ten moso 
72P* oou * rnj^s 

OKI TOM U>9) 337 JB 73131 
a»no 21)243 2137.61 2I1I.1S JI34JI 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


»«ua 
+ 19.72 
+ 184 
"1*74 


Standard & Poore 

Prwrtau* Today 
Hip* Law dost 4c oo 
•17-46 91022 91125 919.75 
55014 SS282 55526 541.22 
20145 20259 20228 203J9 
•420 8541 8588 86J8 

7B056 774.19 77670 78209 
74543 740.15 76177 74755 


Industrials 

Tiunsp- 

UBBties 

Finance 

SP 500 

5P100 


NYSE 


ConwosP* 

mdustrUs 

Tnrao. 

U Wy 

Rnwci 

Nasdaq 


Composite 

fnaefrtafc 

Berks 

insurance 

Froioe 

DOBP. 


BOTcOne 

knwBoi 

FBUSAS 

Prestos 

CvpGom 

WonT 
AT&T 5 
WMMart 

FsJDMds 
cocoa s 
JonrUn s 

Oirya-s 

carman 

IntGane 

BasiSc 

Nasdaq 


VOL M*l 
112574 43* 

assoo 19% 
mmt an 
WS» 32 
5MI9 15 

am jm 

MM2 J9% 
54330 23% 
530)7 34* 
52109 40% 
49434 S3* 
47969 36 '* 
4*045 79 
43114 IT). 
41293 to 


Msh Low LOU dm 

41207 *707 41) ST .234 
52007 Sim 51909 >3JM 
36SJ4 35972 J6U1 >195 
26&42 2(601 36215 ‘002 
3038 34501 3007 *101 


Hah Law Lot aw. 

1374.11 134M1 137540 +1107 
1(4702 II59J8 11*688 *4J2 
131474 131000 131404 -212 
144147 140.12 14003 * 522 
744743 743703 T44743 *4.14 
927.99 921.18 971.18 -443 


AMEX 


HW LOW L«S> a*. 
7NLU 58749 58905 *101 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bands 
10 Uimies 
10 Industrials 


Otoe a*. 

10247 +086 

10046 *005 

10227 — 0.14 


Mtaaslts 

SunUics 

Nefcqrs 

InM 

Nona 

Ttro&T 

tVoae* 

mm 

S3 me 

Art*** 

HBOs 

3Com 

COCOS 

VLSI 

WcrWCms 

AMEX 


9W 

PeaGui 

xaud 

VkKB 

Echo&w 

Urttan 

(vaxcn 

rtonen 

NY Times 

Auction 


VaL HWj 

104(4 959* 

asa £«t 

00481 zm, 
B03» us% 
74777 77H 
72899 JOH 
70929 43<* 
4S745 47 
60629 18% 
58818 0% 
55105 66% 

5D576 77 
4S4C4 75>. 
48107 m 
47733 24% 


VOL Mgb 

27445 78U..I 
20070 S'* 
14377 i* 
13479 J4«k 
11302 49u 

ssa % 

71« 

71(0 3* a 
4179 (0>i 
5609 7H 


Law 

Lore 

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41% 

43% 

»ii%. 

17% 

1B% 

+ 1% 

«U% 

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+2 

31% 

31% 

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29% 

29% 

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34% 

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14% 

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m> 

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at% 

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41% 

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Trading Activity 


NYSE 

Owe 

Pre*. 

Nasdaq 

AdviKiced 
Decftiea 
Unchained 
TaW issues 
New Kata 
New Laws 

1306 

17*3 

799 

3348 

(92 

U 

1284 

1263 

na 

3334 

702 

13 

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yiwienoea 
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New Hans 
New Lows 

AMEX 



Morket Safes 

Arteanad 
Deemed 
IfeKtianoM 
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New wan 
New Lows 

Close 

252 

281 

205 

7JB 

41 

4 

Pie*. 

249 

252 

208 

m 

44 

12 

NYSE 
A me* 
Nasdaq 
tnmXBons. 


2116 2165 

1951 1829 

J6» 1733 

5725 5727 

249 227 

«7 « 


Prti 


7 n aT 

Close cons. 

571.26 539.22 

2S6I ra.18 

«4J7 99238 


Jan. 21, 1997 

High Low C tee otge Open 

Grains 

cnmicwro 

LOOBtM mHmiiih oMors ner bushel 
Mar 97 2J3U 2JM4 170*6-001 12M34 
MOY97 2JDU 24816 248*6 — 001»420*l 
Jul 97 209 Vt USTh 1 M — OJBMiSOJW 
Sep 97 244*6 245 245*6 -001 0.120 

Dec 97 244 245 245*6-001 SIATS 

Etf.Hto MA. Man's sUcs 64.976 
Man's open !ni 304.174 up T360 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOn 
100 km>- danm par ton 

JOT 77 2UM 2050 2ISJ0 +240 7J13 

Mar 97 238.40 23160 23ajD0 *130 39495 

May 97 23370 231-70 23X30 *0.10 21,285 

JM97 237.50 231.10 XSL30 -040 17448 

Aug 97 23000 22030 22908 +0.10 3JSS 

S*P 97 22100 22250 22300 2J45 

ESLsdes MA Mon-s-sato 23441 
Mon'S own irt B8J33 aR 755 

SOYBEAN OH. (QSOTJ 
60000 On- doners oer 100 to. 

Jan 97 24.02 2376 2382 —073 1720 

Mar 77 2646 2485 26.10 -023 49789 

May 97 36J9 3445 3450 -019 17409 

JU197 25.14 2*77 2*83 -ail 14060 

Aug 97 7573 2472 2587 -085 2758 

SeP 97 25 JO 2585 2573 +081 2449 

Ed. Wes MA Mon's, sdas 17433 
Mon's open int 92472 oil 446 

SOYBEANS JCBOT) 

5400 Du mWmum- (tailor* per busnri 
Jon 97 747% 742 744 +001% 963 

Mur 97 749 742% 744% 76*284 

Mav 97 747% 742 745% -0«% 32.929 

MT7 747% 742 743 -5811631.124 

Aufl 97 74J 7J8J4 741 -08M4 4J4S 

EsLWes MA Mon’s. sales SL747 
Mart's open w 162473 up 4821 

WHEAT ICB0T1 

S400 bu nnfcUrmjnv dottort per DuriM 

Mars? 182V 175 382U (005*427470 

Mav 97 347% 359% 307% +006 9.159 

Jul97 348% 3 43% 147 + 00854 2UMB 

Sea 97 300% 346 350 +080% Lffit 

6st- sales MA Man's. w» 19JI7 
Mon'S ooen W 624M up 2S4 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER> 

604Q0 to- cent* par fc. 

Feb 97 6612 6180 6502 -003 27467 

APT 97 67J8 6477 4640 -072 3U54 

Jun97 6435 6400 6602 -030 12^81 

A«iW MAT 6415 6415 -032 >i873 

0097 asn 6462 6405 -422 7JO0 

Dec 97 6470 6437 6U0 -407 2.961 

Estsoie* ha Man's, sales *4.182 
Mon'smnw mar up 1497 


FEEDBt CATTLE (CMER] 


2 

4W -W 
16U„ -■*. 
9% +% 
1% 

14% -% 
1«» 

3**u -% 
1 

15% -% 
10% 

»% — % 
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9 — ■* 

3% -'4 
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34% — <6 
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9% +% 

11% -% 
14% -% 
28% -% 
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204 4 32, 3Vn — Vu 

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>08 5 4% 4% — % 

3087 >7% 17% 17% * % 

I7Q 13 V. 1}% n% +% 

911 10% 18% 18% 

217 34% 321* 34% +74* 


Dividends 

Company Peer Anrt Roc Pay 

IRREGULAR 

TUC Beatrice _ 33 1-28 2.5 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Cable link 3 ior3 spO- 

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0 

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2-20 

FtxmleMae 

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0 

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0 

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SofatoklBncp 

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1-29 

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Company Per Amt Ret Pay 

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AH3 Common Bn 0 .IS i-30 2-14 
0 .40 2.7 2-27 

0 2b M 2-28 
O M 1-27 2-1® 
a .475 1-31 2-14 
Q 31 2-* 4 2-28 
Q .12 1-30 2-» 
M .075 1-27 2-14 
0 32 3-3 2-20 

O .10 1-7 2tf 

Q 35 2-5 2-» 
0 JW 2-7 2-28 
O .10 2-3 3-18 

0 £8 1-31 2-14 

Q JO 1-31 2-14 
Q 10 3-14 J-2B 
H JJ93 1-31 2-13 
M .7575 2-3 2-17 
Student Loan Cc O .12 2-14 3-3 

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im 


15H 



144! 

34% 

34 

34 



13% 

34% 


x- 

-% 

— % 

415 

s 

Vs 

tv* 

■v„ 

lift 

lUia 

ft 

l'A 

-Vu 

214 

12% 

19% 

12% 


411 

IM* 

IBV. 

ia% 

— % 

2» 

6% 

5% 

4% 

♦ % 

699 

13% 

n% 

13% 


548 

11% 

n 

11% 

*'/» 

m 

18% 

104* 

10% 

-toi 

05 

16% 

irerp 

<4% 


900 

W 

u% 

12 


m 

r?% 

«•%. 

I2K 


<50 

nw 

ii% 

lift 

—Vu 

14377 


% 

*% 


W) 


7% 




Stock Tables Explained 

SrOes OguPK are unafGdcri. VtCfty Ngfts ond laws reftKtr*> pie'itoas 52 «eks plus Trie aimnt 
yKBh,butnou»ietate4troiftiadoii-Whaeqapaorsfcidtia rii 5endcn»tin5nqip25paoenii j i i ie j i u 
Ota been cott1tayeo»ht9fr^n«9e and f u k fc n d cm sriowatoftie new dodo only. Urtes 
cffterwiseiioaL iwsaTdMMtnainuBldUburSdmenisOaseaan tfw kdosrdedmadoa 
a • dividend aba extra (s). b - annual rate of dividend plus stock tflyMend. c - liquidating 
dMtfend. ec - PE exceeds 9?,<M ■ COflMI. - new y«my foar. dd • lass in me last 12 tiBjntns. 
e • dfvMend declared w paid bi preceding 12 months, f - annuel raft, increased an last 
dedaatfan. g - dlvMend in Cmwd fan funds, subject to 1 5% naiwesldena: fiwJ-dlvKiend 
declared otter spB-up ar stock dMdandL \ ■ dividend paid ittis year, omitted, deferred, or no 
action token of latest Addend meeting, k • dMdend dedarod or pawl fWs year, an 
accumutatWe issue with dividends to arrears, a -ennutd rale, reeoced on km dedaratioa 
n - new issue in me past 52 worits. The TiktfWmv range begins a«»t me slarf et hoOing. 
nd ■ nead day deiWery. p^ - Wtw divtoend, mud rate unknown. P/E^ - iwiee-eoriiings ratio. 
R-ctee«^endmirt«dfcwtr-(lhidefldd«a»dwp(Dtotoprec«MfwJ?iaort»iapfts3to&t 
dividend, s - stock sp«. DMdend begins wift dole df split, sis - soles, t - dividend gran m 
slock in pfttmflfte 12 montris esnmotKi a»n valiie on et-iSy^imsi or ex-distrilw^vn one. 

a- new yeoftyldgtLV+iRnSng halted v! -in bOWruptcyanecelvenOto or betogfboxomlzed 
umJwlt»Bm%7uptt^ ActOTsecurttto assumed try such c&fflpc«».*nl -when 
wl ■ when issued/ ww - wtih womnb. 8 - « -dividend or w-righfs nR* - Ey uiSMbdlftn. 
xw - wBtwut wananD- y- ex-dfvfdcnd and sales in tuo. yid - yreid. z - sates hi hid 


JOT 97 70AG 70.10 7020 +028 

Mar 97 70JJS 69.42 69JB +017 

a urn mm mm ms +<u s 

May97 Wv® 0785 7BJS +0JW 

AUQ97 71DS 7270 7295 + 028 

Sep 97 7025 7280 73JB +022 

E&sdB NJL MatfS-Hte 1315 
MWsooenW 20322 up 2 5 

MGS-iean CCMBl] 

4UHIn.-iattBWB 
Feh97 TSM 7117 7542 -083 

AW 97 7545 7480 7525 *tMi 

Jun 97 nsa nx njr *ojb 

MV 7780 7665 7780 +083 

Aug 97 7405 73J0 7380 

OOV7 BM siflB 67.(5 +029 

e*.s*s MA Mores, mes uS 
MoresonenM 33j*ra up ii? 

PORK BELLIES (CME3U 

40400 CiL-eenrs per b. 

Ft* 97 7620 7483 752S +020 3,930 

Mar 97 7615 767S 7115 +110 1,140 

Mpy97 77.10 Tift 76)5 +035 1.560 

Jul97 7675 TUO 76*0 +003 141 

Aug 97 7480 7)80 7480 +080 389 

Eftiafai ma Mot's. sate 1849 
MoresooenH 7 JUS) UP 148 


Food 


1.995 

Mfl 

157B 

3J99 

3.117 

602 


11831 

10,128 

6932 

1.490 

1J88 

I+33S 


Hftn Law Oase CJtge opftt 

ORAM6E JUKE (NCIM) 
iMRM-cemiwd 

Mar 97 8785 8675 8680 *0.95 9801 

May 97 90.00 1880 1980 +1J0 5.934 

MV 9250 9IJ5 9280 *1JS U72 

Sep 97 9580 *680 95.40 +1J0 1.163 

Est.scdes NA Mon's. 6765 
Man's open M 31JM2 up 134 


Metals 


COCOA DKE1 

lOmttne ton - 1 oer ion 


partner az. 

35270 35170 -080 80866 
JS6SD 355.83 -IJ0 39,135 
35670 35680 -1J0 19854 
360.® 36040 -9,53 7JM 
3080 3080 +680 2032 
36400 38600 -180 15825 
Mon'&.sdes 2Z7A5D 
202191 up 81 


GOU> (NOW 
lOOtnwaz.- _ 

Feft 97 35630 
Apr 97 35600 
JUn97 ».® 

AU097 36080 
Od 97 3080 

Dec 97 36780 
Ed. soles NA 
Man's open inf 

HI GRADE COPPER 0KMX) 

25.000 Ha.- rjmi-i p« «>. 

JOT 97 1080 10880 1080 -085 3891 

Feb 97 10820 10670 WJB -U0 2810 

Mar 97 107.95 10480 10625 -Ul T&AU 

Apr 97 *0620 miM 10485 — L10 1827 

MW 97 10380 102.20 102.95 —7.10 6881 

Jim 97 10180 10189 HO. *5 — U0 763 

JJ97 K7L90 10080 10095 — L20 3,941 

AuaV i mm — uo 575 

Sep 97 10300 98.90 0.15 —1.15 204 

Est. sates NA Mon’s, sates 8.110 
Mar's open inf 56XS up Z57 

sB-VBi (Noma 

moo w o»^ ant* prrlrap «. 

Jot 97 4738 4710 *738 +2J 6 

Ft* 97 4878 «78 4678 -167 52 

MOT 97 4798 47U 47ZO —18 66490 

Mar 97 4BL0 4758 4768 — IJ 10^70 

880 4868 «08 408 -48 IL739 

Dec 97 4948 4938 4938 -LI 4JM 

Est. sales (4A Maret sates 5-510 
Alton's opot int 94846 up 131 

PLATWUM CNMER1 
sotrw U%- (Mm per (w at. 

Jan 97 35728 357.00 35780 +020 21 

Apr 97 363.40 36050 -080 19^00 

MSI 36170 36250 36250 —180 2917 

Od 97 36580 364J0 36580 -180 2899 

BLsttoS NA Ntores.90tes 1.766 
MoresapenM 25733 up 80 


Ctose 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
Dofesa per metric tan 


Previous 


fSLe 


158600 158780 
161680 161 780 


159216 

1622% 


1593% 


ComatafHtahCnxW H 
■ 20780 2^280 3489-00 


69780 

70780 


69000 

707% 


77780 

724% 


71000 

72580 


249480 

224980 2251 80 225980 226180 

Lead 

Spot 720580 721X80 727080 
Forward 731080 731580 737S80 
Tin 

595580 SflOW 599580 
__ 601080 601580 605080 
C^redg^cnreel |faw| 

ffiwwd 114180 1142.00 115080 


1327 

1356 

1312 

134] 

IS 

-4 

—2 

1319 

m 

1377 

-3 

1403 

tm 

1400 


1419 

1412 

UM 

-2 


V3B 


UJDf 

MV 1379 m im —3 11856 
7840 
UQ9 

Estsdes NA Moreissles OGS 
Mores open W 67764 up 2SS 

COFFEE CWCSE) 

IMDOtaL- cenh par b. 

Mar 97 1X80 127.10 12985 +«.» 2389S 

Mav 97 12780 12US 12600 +08S L224 

JU97 loin nun uus *145 vm 

Sepre 12200 11075 12085 +075 2J90 

£sLsdes MA Aten's. use 14 jB 7 
Mar s open W 39836 uo 1M3 

SU6A8+W0RLD 11 tNCSE) 
i I2JHD bs.* cents pern. 

Mar 97 HL4I HH 10.17 -0.10 66827 

M«y 97 1051 - 1025 1629 —8.19 34,1* 

Jul 97 10-45 IU6 IflUf —0.15 M.P9 

oo97 nun laa Ida -d» idsso 

Est.scte NA Men’s, sates s.sm 
Mot's openrt 1S0JQ7 aH IK 




High Low dose Oi0e Optat 

Hnanctol 

ITST.WLLSfCMOT 

SI mflfcn- (Hot w* pet 

After 97 (W H» «U1 4729 

JU097 94JS 9471 94JB +B8Z 3892 

Sep 97 um «54 940 +382 327 

EsLsdeS NA Mteres.sete 

MereiopwM B,i4i up 3 

SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

110080680- ate ft XMKaiinpo 
«6arV7m-TlS WS-29S 106-1 OS * ttS 10867 
Jim 97 106-925 105-265 106-42 + QB tSB 
ES. sates 4UDD Man sates 
AtaresopenW 177/05 efl 561 

11 YR. TREASURY (QMTO 
SHMOO arm- ate & SktooMOTpet 

Mar 97 100-23 107-31 196-21 + 0 XM,U0 
JUiP7WWi 107-U RM3 * m 1386? 
Sen 97 107.19 * 00 fill 

Bt sates 71863 Men's, soles 125 
Men's open W 2SU0B Off T40 

US TREASURY BONOS (CBCm 
n pa4Haei»«n&22ndi • lffw 
M«r97 111-20 UM* U*-M + 10 465874 
JOT 97 111-03 106-23- UWB • 17 2M70 
Set. 97 1HK7I 10M2 110-19 + U 5JH 
Dec 97 . 110-05 + *6 38S3 

Bt safes MU» MaftRto 36 
MaresapenW 501.132 eff 6SO 
LOHGGU.T 0JFFD 


7380® 


i 


WOh Ln Ook Chge Optot 

10-YEA R PREMOU SOU. BONDS (MATTO 
FF3KUM0 - pfc oflOO pd 
Mar 97 13078 13022 13054 +08612580 
Jwt 97 12988 12888 129.16 +088 11,787 
Sep 97 127.38 12720 127A6 +0J» 775 
Dec 97 N.T, M.T. 9682 +088 0 

EsL Vtdwuc: 157,979. Open Wti 130211 off 
Z182. 

EURODOLLARS (04ER) 
ll nMan-ptsof lODocr. 

Fed 97 94430 94390 9400 138*9 

After 97 94390 *430 9480 3K834 

Apr 97 9*330 94290 94820 +10 1874 

JOT 97 94220 94130 962W +20 365847 

MOT 00 93JS8J 93L190 91270 +30 3849S 

Junto 91230 93.130 10210 +0 34921 
SeP DO 93.170 91080 911® +38-3M2S 

DK 00 50090 93800 9X080 +30 3407 

Est. sales NA Mon*s.s0es 19851 - 
Morris open M 2,190882 off 7816 
BffmSH POUND (cum 
62jao«jOTKt(, s p«r pound 
MOT 97 1.6674 U590 -18610 -82 37841 

Ain 97 18620 T850 185B2 -82 2885 

Sep 97 1.6550 —82 1.027 

Dec97 LiStS -a 7 

EsLso to NA Mot's. S rin 
Morris open W 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMSO 
10MM<Mot>S porCdn. Mr 
MOT97 J5W J493 JSB +11 00D 

JOT *7 JB* 7538 J554 +11 ajRI 

SwW J®9 J5S5 7594 +15 X40 

Dec 97 JSS JOB JSB +17 419 

edsotes NA Morris. sOTn 
Morris 0PW W 
GBWANAUOC(CMB0 

iiMNnwicki par mark 

flf -SS -S 

jaBl dm 

^97 8258 JQ58 JZM 28® 

tact' 8380 —69 U 

gtsates Na Atarritsate 
MaresapenW 
JAPANESE YEN (CMEff) 

IU nMOTyM S Per ICS vwn 

MW” 80W70 801524 JD3S3B -73 72J83 

£2S£ -2SSJP J “ s ® -w mm 

^97 806771 80776 80B765 -tS «4 

NA Maris, soles 
ftftarismsiiw 

SWISS FRANC (CABO 

nSACO femes,* per Atbic 

MOT97 JJ35 JUBO JWO —422 4780 

JOT9J JVm J1SZ J15S —T23 l r »5 

Sob 17 J72b J225 J22S —124 L8® 

Ea.sa(es NA Men's, sties 

Mores open W 

W WfffW»TEKUH6flfffHD 
— 909 —BJOl 98.110 

S3 ~ 0Ja 90 ** a 

93.12 9384 9387 — 085 60434 

•2.93 9286 9289 —DAS gljat 

9282 9274 92J7 -aw 3Mj? 

9276 9286 9=89 -086 3W73 

92ri 9259 9264 -0.05 2U13 

2HS SfS “?85 «82« 

9250 9285 9287 —0.05 tun 

SB ^ %£ SS .=» 

FefeW tan tasf wjj (toed im 

» %£ S8 

+Sii9^S 

5^ %£ 

£2 Sfi ™ 

nM 75. IS 95.19 — AAZ 

W7 M89 9*tt —083 

?a ws 54® _&q5 

9441 WJ» 944= _oS 

W» WI5 W^-884 

. Bx IK SSS=§s 

Rasnat-^flr 


stow 

D«97 

58 


Wgb Low dose Chge Optot 
Oct 97 7640 7681 7401 -844 18M 

SES 3 45 IfS l** 5 

Sr'S T7, P. it*, 1kX 

^rtfes NA Mores, soiet WO 
Morris open inf 6UM up at 
HEATVKOA.(M«(} 

CM3 par pal 

eJS ASM ASM T 14 34.T3A 

Mar W 6485 SSI J:i7 24« 

APTW 63J0 63.10 (X10 —082 108*1 

sSL? 7 Sm SS <[U,D ~ au ° WO 

-tori 97 £080 59.20 ®.W +B.11 6,146 

MV 5&50 50JS A75 Id37 X0i 

Aii*7 0JO 080 0JB —032 2861 

— 99 JS 080 SJS +006 1927 

rwn ®J0 6010 —027 1JH 

Dec W (&JS 6023 (089 — OZ7 4860 

NA Maris. W bs 34337 
Aftwriso pentet ngg w loss 
UGHTSHST CRUDE (MMBl) 

1800 PbL- M lar» par MN. 

Jot 97 25 35 24J0 2UB — (LQ JAMB 

Mar 77 2*66 2415 SS -SJl 06890 

Apr 97 2485 2383 2171 ifft 

JOT97 7 m SS S5 -0l1S 

•I" 23-10 22J5 HJB nn n.(ic 

8697 2264 2284 2236 loll 

AU097 2201 ZL97 2280 -ft® iS 

gW 2188 1183 21^ — 086 149T2 

w 2-2 

to V 2092 2085 lj|g 

SL”a 

Mores apairai 367, wo off bbsi 
NATURAL GAS (NMER) 
iMtomrn WrevSpirnni uu 

2.830 2516 -154 24162 

Jiao 2832 —142 27863 
Apr97 2850 2.300 rm — |7j 18877 

«ww -Lm 1150 .-Tib 

J21J 7-1 a 2.150 — 45 OTO 

MV 2)50 2175 2 DO _*0 jjh 

1,10 78S3 

113# 2110 2.120 —35 *814 

Sw 97 m \ *9 -W 78*7 

S3 35 IS zj S 

SrtWOT te" IffMOT - *£*20**' 

28 g ss s is 

g ss :§S W 

IEJI SS ™ & 

^^tpttrneuctn.ktstaiooion. 


SS5 


JwteOl 

stood 

DfCQQ 


7.126 
37V 
121 
• 0 
100 


EWK. 

- JW97 M0S 9MB U84 I 


«« «s tato ;g»'' 

94W 9*29 9433 + 8S 
9450 9484 9446 lorn 

« Wl Md +5S 

9*88 9463 9485 + 081 


HI**® 


Jun97 110-14 110-14 110-11 - 
a.*6e* 66540 Prtu.nl**: 4S8W 
Pteu.apanteu ladioo «un 

ORinUN OOVeRKMENT BOND (UFFEJ 

dnqsmdo - ob of 1W otf 

Mur 97 lflffi I0IJS 1018B +OM22VS64 

Jtln97 10083 IW20 W8JET +006 8306 

Est.adex zlSrted Pmsote* U0.737 
Pm.epwtoL: Z31870 up SMI 

J^^^ e SP M8a,ma 

Muv aim isu s +&zjiiww 

JIM97 13180 13040 IBJ2 +086 i+40 

EstsahK 64821. PiW. jfltet 3980 
nev.apeatob ) 11339 up zaa 


MW igsoiffglSS-fM 7^*83 
Aop 97 18S80 laTw “]-» 2-705 

1^23^' 80 165:1 M0 °- Openbd9S7,l05up 

iS UWtaras 

3PHB3IIB 

Mlilli 
1JII1 1 

l.tfl 11 * 534137 - OHM lnL:laH7 off 

Stack Indexes 
SIP COMP. MDEXICMER] 

04MB 

imui 

ftw61,^B ■ 

£’&™ksr-'2rj? u ■ 

Kssho 

JH 


Morn 

JOT« — T _ 

BLsateE 4004 Prev.nm w+n 
Pw». open tat 255801 pp 

ai ggy ^ffoRtftATiP) 

Mar 97 96JB 9687 l «37— fly w - mh 

Mm ST 96» 96M itaffif— UJB 4L&6 

Sr£'K8UKS=|S^ 
■exaBS-ajrzffiiS 

Mar 99 9S6B 9183 M83-SS UbS 
Jwi 99 9580 9SJB MJB-SS ^ 

|«0 99 9£16 9S88 «S-0m 
UK 99 9480 9480 9481-086 

Mumim. ' Commodity 

- cotton 2 maw • • _ 

Kumtt&o cento par h. - - - 

M» 97. 74» 7288 73JB uiu 5,™ SSSD 
May 97- 7X80 - IMS 74H Zna gS nT Sl^ 

JU177 760 716S Tifi CM**"** 


,.,^»«w 2U i S ? ss«s iSSS ™ 


. NA 
1.92980 
1508* 
2*037 


Previous 
. NA 
1+92430 
15183 
24184 







PAGE 15 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WED NESDAY. JA NUARY 28, 199. 

EUROPE 



Bonn Sees Growth 
Of 2.5% in 1997, but 

Hope Fades at Firms 


Cntpikd b, tkrSaffFtvm DaparHn 


“I am a bit skeptical about all die 
BONN — Gross domestic product forecasts for growth this year of 2J 
will grow 2.5 percent in 1997 in both percent,” said Jochen Scfaober, an 
Eastern and Western Ger many , up economist at Hessische Landesbank 
from 1.4 percent in 1996, awarding Girozentrale. “Factors such as weak 
to extracts from the government's consumer spending will mean that 
annual economic report that were the economy only picks up slowly." 


leaked to German media Tuesday. 

The report, due to be released 
next Tuesday, also predicted that 
consumer prices would rise a mod- 
est 1.5 penrent this year, but it said 
unemployment will average 11 per- 
cent, up Grom 103 percent in 1996. 

The government’s optimism on 
GDP growth in the report, moreover. 


The German economy resumed 
growth in the second quarter of 
1996, but the government has 
warned that fourth -quarter output 
was “virtually unchanged” -from 
third-quarter levels. 

Though interest rates are already 
at historic lows, some analysts are 
betting flint die Bundesbank will 


contrasted with a sharp fall in con- come under pressure to cut them 
ftdence recorded among West Ger- again in the next few months if 

growth continues to wane and job- 
lessness keeps climbing. 1 T thin k we 
could see rate-cut hopes returning to 
the market,” Mr. Rosenstock said. 

-Members of the central bank's 
policy-making -council themselves 
have been sending out mixed mes- 
sages about whether to expect an- 
other rate reduction. 

While Hans Tietmeyer, the cen 
a nd Johann 


Weak Franc Lifts Nestle Sales 


VEVEY, Switzerland — Nestle 
SA said Tuesday that sales rose 7 
percent in 1996, buoyed by a 
weaker Swiss franc, and dial : it 
would post increased profit for 

I9 SalSal*e 7 worid's largest food » revive its erffee ^operations in the 
and beverage maker were 50.5 bil- United States, where Nestle the 
9 billion), third-largest marketer of ground 


cent against the dollar last year. A Wilhelm Bleuer of Banque Pictet 
weak franc helps lift income a. &Co. said. -They ^ve o^cod 
Nestle, which generates half of us themselves. Americans LOttee 
sales in dollars or currencies habits are changing, he saiiaddmj 
linked to the dollar. *ai competitors such as Procter & 

The analysts also said the com- 
pany's priority this year should be 


new 


Gamble Co. were bringing 
mixtures to the market amid stag- 
nating demand for instant coffee. 
“What they need to do is invest 
they want to 


ssasssss asasaaeass 


surpassing 60 billion francs for the 
first time. Nestle gave no profit 
figures for 1 996, but it said the rate 
of profit growth should exceed the 
sales increase. 

The company said it expected 
further increases in sales and profit 


market share. 

Nestle admitted that U.S. sales 
“did not live up to expectations" in 
1996. but it did not give figures. 

The United States is the com- 
pany’s biggest market, represent- 


Julius Baer said. Bui he said a res- 
olution of Nestle s U.S. difficulties 
was "a longer-term thing." 

Sales in emerging markets rose 
significantly in 1996. Nestle said. It 
said they were above average in 
Latin America as well as in Europe. 


wnnu vw- r npirent of sales and Lahn America as wen as m caul. pc. 

zg&sssz.**"* *■ "'-“ d 

to defend," 


Central Europe. 

Nestle's shares closed at 1.475 
francs in Zurich, up 6. 

(Bloomberg. AFX. Reuters) 


man companies in December. 

Harsh winter weather banned 
companies' expectations of strong 
growth for the second month in a row, 
as the confidence index compiled by 
the Ifo Institute for Economic Re- 
search fell to 95.8 in December from 
96/ > the previous month. 

The index of business confidence 
in the five East German states, which 
account for one-tenth of the national 
economy, fell to 104.4 in December 
from 104.8 in November. 

“1 think we’re entering a new 
weak phase in the economy.” said 
Adolf Rosenstock, an economist 
with Industrial Bank of Japan. 

Mr. Rosenstock and other private 
economists said the government’s 
growth forecast was on the optim- 
istic side and that record joblessness 

and public-spending cuts as well as 
the weather would depress senti- 
ment over the next few months. 


Trading Profit Aids Spanish Banks 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 

FTSE 1 00 Index 


Paris 

CAC40 



2<5 ®A S O N 
1996 

Exchange 

DJ Wa S on dj '“asond^ 

18S7 1996 1997 1996 1997 

Index Tuesday Prev. 

Close Close Change 

Amsterdam 

EOE 

67Z32 

673.63 

-0.19 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

JLQ24.97 

2.022.14 

+0.14 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,876.71 

3,030.68 

-1.78 

Copenhagen 

Stock Market 

501.71 

505.32 

■0.71 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

2,691 M 
569.76 

2,718.9t 

574.48 

-0.99 

-0.82 

London 

FTSE 100 

4,19650 

4.194.09 

+0.03 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

471.68 

482.09 

-2.16 


NOfan 


MIBTEL 


Paris 


CAC40 


2.409.88 2.406.10 +0-16 


Stockholm SX 16 


2,652.18 2.637.79 +0-55 


Vienna 


ATX 


1 ,17S.71 1.176.07 -0-03 


Zurich 


SP1 


Source: Tetekurs 


2381-59 2374.67 +0-27 

lnk-m Jlnuul IfcCdU TriMim 


Very briefly: 


Ctm^anl by Ow SktfFmn Duparlrs 

MADRID — Two major banks 


Both banks also were helped by 32 percent, to 812 billion pesetas 
growing commission revenue as Santander s investments abroad. 


• Credit Fonder de France's employee union represen- 
rejecied a govemmem-apfwmi.^ 


■ 6?S drinking retmnsonba^ deposits primarily in Latin American 

bv asuree in profit prompted many investors to move were able to offset weak lending nier ^ who was being held hostage for a fifth day by 

, , . . . s T h hadin^that helped money into mutual funds to try to income at home. The bank s total loyees see king to stop the government from dismantling 

StS^x^SginsonS lake advantage of a surge in stock Merest income rose 13 percent, to and putting S00 jobs at risk. 

SSifrvSnEinteresaraies. and bond pnees m Spam. 395.1 billion pesetas. Last year. Q a SwisJS ma ker of medical products a 

have suggested b UaM _ n««irinr»r A Smin’s ninth- Santander, which controls more Santander bought Chile s biggest rn ,i n «tnhno«[ laoeins earnings, will sell a 25 


was like' 

Juergen 
Olaf Sievert, 

gicmal „ . 

hintwd that further cuts are possible. 
Mr. Krupp also suggested the 
/ernmeut make the most of die 
‘flexibility” 


and ma- 
percent 


tom: Bankinter s move mto mortgages Wftrwav *<. state-owned oil company, agreeo wun 

sss SfJcgr; 

Baker's commissions grew 9 Bankre.er shares closed Tuesday over25yMrs . 


Trading profit jumped 91 percent, to 
6.7 billion pesetas. 

Banco de Santander's 1996 net 

n* 13j LS .iMSO^d^iaiJIfe • Pernod'^Ricard SA agreed lo buy EPOM. die second- 

Maastricht trealy on budget deficits t*setas.as SSetei* increased mulual^ods and Banco Santander shares rose .30. to , J Be si maker of ouzo in Greece, to try lo increase ns sales in 


whde tiK economy remains weak, M (Bhombeqi. .^FP) 


(AFX, Bloomberg) 


Sabena Plays Down a Possible Write- Off by Swissair 

•S' , ..d-.c-.uif.w.nVe The airline also hopes to bolster some of the airline s s 




C.npdrJlnOtr Staff Dapaxha 

IS M- tej^ted*io Sabeoa. Rather, i, would 

9 S Ss SA, may an- be a "pure accounang mauer 


, BBSr TQjggfe -fi«sw- 

, sari svsr&‘Z SS3£ sasssS 


- • Swiss Telecom PTT. the national telephone monopoly, 
formed a joint venture with two German energy supphers. 
Badenwerk AG and Energie-Versorgung Schwa ben AG. 
to create a telecommunications company in southwestern 
Germany called Communication Network Services. 

• Spanish investors placed 181 billion pesetas tSl - - 3 bilhoni 

some or me hihw * staff outside of or ders for shares in Telefonica de ** atl ^ 

Belgium to benefit from lower taxes government put on sale its remaining 2 1 percent stake, apain 

“ ™ ™*«= expects to earn about 650 million pesetas from the sale. 

• Biber Holding AG, a Swiss paper company, filed for 
bankruptcy as it said last month it expected to do and said its 
board of directors would resign. 


labor unions, 
year to cut staff 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


ii 



Tuesday. Jan-21 

Prices in local currencies. 
Tetckors 


Amsterdam 


ABN -AMRO 
Aegon 
A hold 

AkzoNoML 

Boon Oh 

Bob wen no 

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17180 m.lO 172J0 171 JO 
ma> ism atm w 

68A0 65JB ASM 6740 

54.90 S3J0 5CTO 54 

58,79 57 S?» ■ 

14MD 146.16 14430 VC JO 
297JO 2B5A0 73BM 791 JO 
7020 69 JO 6M0 TOM 

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660 



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;sr 

VEW 

vSSxtH «B«n 


384 379 380 

6630 6625 66J® 

231 W7H 22170 
13730 13175 13620 
7720 7780 
291 288 290 

73-05 9L4S 91J0 
511 505 507 

64930 *0 64730 

73830 733 736 74230 


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33S 331 

3J6 319 

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BBV 
Botesta 
BanHnter 
Boo Centra Htop 
BaiExMrlaf 
Bco Popular 

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CEPSA 

Cortloenre 

Con Mapfre 

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FECSA 

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Repaal , 

SwtHnnaEttc 

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Union FenoM 

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PM Long DW 

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2D04D 19530 19750 19900 
34S 3375 3440 3440 

J7?5 2730 5730 2740 

27630 27150 27490 27610 
8449 9180 M30 8^00 

zsm 4620 4730 47M 

1710 26H 2665 2670 

8800 BM 8800 8530 

10230 9950 1D2J0 10160 

13M mi 1370 13« 

33770 32870 33770 336*0 
1715 1675 1705 1710 

2740 2645 M90 2695 

5930 5810 5930 5920 

1450 1400 1440 1-00 

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3405 3340 3395 3385 

1260 1225 1255 1240 

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pmtonK 3739-59 

41-60 42-30 41-85 
16.94 17-00 16.94 
29-40 2960 29-95 
1080 10-92 11.10 
AIM 42-50 43.00 

48.90 49.40 49.30 

26.90 27 JB 28.00 


1260 
782 
509 
844 
7^5 

30 387 39A50 

760 767 785 

316 31870 31 7 JO 
804 904 877 

1918 1954 1M 

1458 1484 1495 

512 S23 523 

390-80 28320 29080 28^0 

374JO 349.30 372 374 

310 30020 310 299 

555 547 551 557 

2375 2335 2335 2363 

1495 1465 1489 1470 

117.90 114.70 1M TO 

1700 1661 1667 1700 

174M in 17450 17UB 
1528 1526 1S2B 1527 

SJ3 516 530 529 

24870 244M 247-JO M £0 
1117 1 091 1101 1091 

437.90 430 20 431 433 

555 548 551 5S2 

7699 2620 2675 2M0 

794 763 792 782 

22*60 79a 70 22460 223.90 
540 SIB 533 542 

171 166JM 170 167.50 

45270 44650 451 449.50 

137 JO 13850 13860 
7650 7455 7815 76J0 
365 35810 351-BO 36360 


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Milan 


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1 12223-08 

pltrtouv 1233466 


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LncnsVarOy 
MaiteSpemr 
ME PC 

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NafWetf 

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PW 
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12225 11900 12000 122M 
3175 3090 3110 OTS 

4195 4055 4165 

iS 1228 1245 1251 
70490 19900 70400 70250 
2H5 ‘Si® 2M5 2060 
10825 1047® 1M05 10640 

ss %£ s ny 

338® 31050 31900 

15950 15555 15900 15850 
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4585 67» 6M0 

7650 7420 7470 7710 

10700 10210 10450 1 0BO 
1307 1280 1307 1285 

2750 2®) 2750 2735 

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lStf 15050 15175 1 5300 
1^0 15095 16W 1WM 
10500 10005 1038a 10250 
7970 7755 TWO 7950 

jscimft 4485 4750 4850 


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3550 ^5 ^ ^ 

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4200 4150 4150 4125 


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Frankfurt 


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pj ote u c 1818611 

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Petrohras Pfd 

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Teteram 

Tefal 

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435.00 625-00 63580 63000 
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1 1M 13J0 1300 1160 
43500 10900 42300 412ljffl 
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29100 28900 289M 2M.99 

19fiu00 19000 193-50 l«O0 
91 JO 8860 91 JO 8968 
14170 140.99 14160 141.00 
15300 143.00 15300 14700 
25000 24300 249J2 24560 
nS 3201 3304 3140 
2465 23.95 2465 2464 


World Index 
Regional Index** 

AsiA/PXlfiC 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 
Industrial Indexes 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 

Energy 
Finance 
MisceSaneous 
Raw Materials 
Service 
Utilities 

SBHBg g «ag 1 

High Low Close Pre*. 

3165 32JS 3335 3155 
nx 32 DJ5 32‘-- 
06 9*40 94.40 96.10 
12.90 1200 1200 12.90 

23 2395 22.95 22.95 
55J. 55 55^ 55’': 

2170 1160 2165 £-2 
2800 28.15 28J0 2845 
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116 11485 11485 115J0 
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39.95 
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ATX bHttK 117871 
previous: 1176.07 

17M 
675 
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128.90 
3210 
1730 
1520 
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269 
547 
1370 
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829.45 
1753 
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104 10U9 I01J0 101M 
48 47 JO 4780 4760 
v*£ 300 305 381 

M 36450 36850 36850 
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526 513 519 525 

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128 124 1 W 



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4860 

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31 SO 

31.40 

31.40 

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39.65 

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19.95 

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36.65 

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820 

B2«J0 

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1720 

2190 

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CoraposOetade*: 69854 
Previous: 71846 

108000 99500 160000 108000 
5600 5300 5350 SS60 

16700 15700 15700 163® 
29700 28300 2B300 29300 
SSS9 8750 8850 8980 

525000 495000 500000 522000 
20600 19500 20000 20100 
43000 41000 41800 43700 
67500 45200 45500 47100 
11800 11400 11400 11700 


NZSE-40 Index: 2432J1 
Prertws: 2440J1 


Singapore 

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165 

2J8 

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29.70 

29.70 

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11/0 

11.45 


5PI oiUce 2SB1 J9 
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350 370 3S£ 

1104 1107 1120 
1490 1499 1479 
2750 2795 2790 
1687 1700 1703 
716 725 m 

.... 18W 1890 1895 

138 JO 13415 137.75 13SJ0 
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1401 1405 

1468 1475 

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1475 1455 
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11185 11035 11170 11179 
247J0 245J0 247 jO 247J5 
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3180 

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3*6 373 368J0 



Il 


I 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Thai Stocks 
Rise Despite 
Poor Results 
For Brokers 


C. nqnlni In Our Stoff frrwn Chspja-hn 

BANGKOK — For Thailand’s 
securities and finance industry, it 
was Black Tuesday. 

But although the entire industry 
reported disappointing fourth-quarter 
results, shares in banking companies 
rose amid optimism that 1997 would 
bring better times. The central bank 
had urged companies in the industry 
to report results on the same day to 
get all the bad news out at once. 

Many firms set aside more money 
to cover bad loans, an effort to clear 
the books for better days ahead. Still, 
analysis said that with the economy 
growing at its slowest pace in a 
decade, a rebound for the industry 
will come slowly, if at all, in 1997. 

"These are conservative results 
because of a conservative provision- 
ing policy." said Robert McMillen. 
managing director of General Fi- 
nance' & Securities PLC. "I can't 
see anyone deferring 1996’s prob- 
lems to 1997 unless they don’t have 
the money." 

Thai stocks rose despite the string 
of negative reports as investors bet 
die industry would improve this year. 
The Stock Exchange of Thailand in- 
dex rose 13.15 points, to 854.18. 

Brokerage firms were hurt last 
year as the index fell 40 percent and 
an increasing number of borrowers 
defaulted on their loans. 

Among the banks and financial 
companies that reported results. 
General Finance said its 1996 earn- 
ings per share fell 34 percent, to 3.89 
baht (15 cents), but its shares rose 
2.25 baht, to 46.25. Krungthai Bank 
PLC said earnings per share fell 14 
percent, to 6.95 baht. The bank's 
shares rose 1.50 to 54. 

But even if the Thai stock market 
snaps back, some of the financial 
wounds will not heal soon. Many 
finance companies are ill-prepared 
to face increased competition from 
foreign rivals, which they must do if 
Thailand is to join the world Trade 
Organization. j 

While the government ! has 
pledged to prevent the collapse of 
any finance company, it is openly 
encouraging takeovers or mergers 
and acquisitions. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Hong Kong Boom: Inflation Looms 





Reuters 

HONG KONG — The optimism 


that is spurring stock and property 

g rices to new highs ahead of Hong 
bong’s return to China has created 


a negative side effect — fears of a 
bubble economy and increased in- 
flation. 

Economists are starting to raise 
their inflation forecasts for 1997 in 
response to booming stock and lux- 
ury property prices. 

The benchmark Hang Seng In- 
dex has risen 25 percent since the 
beginning of September, but it 
slipped 135.45 points Tuesday, to 
13,732.79. 

"The outlook for 1997 is going 
to be less good than we thought.” 
said Kevin Chan, an economist at 
Salomon Brothers Inc. 

Salomon raised its 1997 forecast 
for inflation in Hong Kong to 7.0 
percent from 6.6 percent late last 
year, and Mr. Chan said further 
increases were possible. 

Concerns are mounting that rising 
price pressures — based on die op- 
timistic assumption that China will 
support Hong Kong's economy 
through the transition regardless of 
any political disruption — could in- 
flate a speculative bubble. 

"The term 'moral hazard* refers 
to the apparently growing belief in 
local markets that there is tittle 
dramatic downside risk — as op- 
posed to short-term volatility — 
because ultimately China will sup- 
port Hong Kong markets." Ian 
Perkin, chief economist with the 
Hong Kong General Chamber of 


Commerce, wrote in a newspaper 
column this week. 

In contrast to earlier fears that 
political uncertainty would torpedo 
Hong Kong's economy in 1997, 
domestic confidence in China's de- 
termination to keep the economy 
stable through the transition is so 
high that an unexpected problem 
has arisen — price instability. 

The sudden strength in the stock 
market last year was welcomed as 
proof of confidence in the colony’s 
future under China and as evidence 
of an economic turnaround after an 
export slump early last year and 
three years of austerity in China. 

But the optimism became con- 
cern in November when specula- 
tion emerged in the luxury end of 
Hong Kong's property market. 

Citing anecdotal evidence, Mr. 
Perkin said overseas and domestic 


investors confident of China's 
commitment to economic stability 
in Hong Kong were rushing to buy 
high-priced properties in anticip- 
ation of short-term gains. 

The Hong Kong government has 
since strongly supported a set of 
anti-speculation measures by the 
Real Estate Developers Associ- 
ation and has warned it will step in 
if there are signs that speculation is 
filtering down to the middle or low 
end of the property market. 

But economists said volatility in 
the property market would even- 
tually lead to broader inflation, 
even though it has been restricted so 
far to the high end of the market 

“This will not be good for in- 
flation expectations," Mr. Chan 
said. “In general, people will expect 
the higher prices in the luxury sector 
to affect medium and small flats." 


China and Taiwan to Hold Shipping Talks 

Blovmherg News 

TAIPEI — Shipping industry representatives from China and Taiwan 
will hold talks Wednesday in Hong Kong to ensure that trade between the 
countries is not disrupted when Hong Kong reverts to China in July. 

Taipei bans direct shipping to China and ships most of its goods bound 
for the mainland though Hong Kong. Talks between the Taiwan Strait 
Shipping Association and its Chinese counterpart, the Association for 
Shipping Across the Taiwan Strait, will focus on “practical and technical 
problems" related to an eventual end to the ban on direct shipping. 

But shipping industry executives said the more pressing issue was the 
future of shipping links between Taiwan and Hong Kong. 

China said in December that Taiwan ships visiting Hong Kong after 
July 1 must not fly any flag that implies that there are two Chinas. Beijing 
considers Taiwan a renegade territoiy. 


Mr. Chan estimates that an over- 
all rise of 30 percent in property 
prices would translate into at least a 
15 percent increase in rents this 
year. Rent accounts for 25 percent 
of theHong Kong government’s 
consumer price index. 

Food prices, which account for 
37 percent of the index, arc expected 
to by ;al leasts percent this year after 
holding steady last year. 

Hong Kong also could suffer 
from its currency link to the U.S. 
dollar. If the United States raises 
short-term interest rates this year 
by a quarter-point or a half-point, 
as many analysts have predicted, 
real interest rates in Hong Kong — 
the nominal rates minus inflation 
— will fall to about 1 percent, Mr. 
Chan said. 

Such low rates would propel the 
growing momentum in both private 
consumption and retail sales. 

China, with its aversion to the 
socially destabilizing effects of in- 
flation. has done little to encourage 
the exuberance over Hong Kong’s 
post- 1997 economy beyond saying 
it backs the currency link to the 
U.S. dollar. 

“There seems little doubt Hong 
Kong's new sovereign wants to see 
the local economy prosper 
throughout the year of transition 
and in the early years of its re- 
sumption of sovereignty," Mr. 
Perkin wrote, adding that China 
would not want to see Hong Kong’s 
economy “going on a speculative 
spree that will eventually run out of 
steam and cause a collapse." 


Japan Bankruptcies to Rise in ’97, Research Firm Says 


CoiqrMby Our Svff Fm Dopadia 

TOKYO — Corporate Japan suffered a high 
rate of bankruptcies in 1996. and more pain is in 
store as the economy struggles to achieve a solid 
recovery, a research firm reported Tuesday. 

Last year saw some of the country's biggest 
postwar failures as companies sank under the 
weight of debt left over from the boom of the 1 980s, 
Tokyo Commerce & Industry Research Co. said. 

The private research firm called the outlook for 
1997 grim and predicted that the number of 
bankruptcies would edge up to more than 15,000 
from 14,834 last year. 

The total debt of companies that went bankrupt 
lastyear was down 12 percent, at 8.1 2 trillionyen 
($68.78 billion), from the record level of 1995. 
But Tokyo Commerce said the total was still the 
third-highest ever, and the number of business 


failures was down only 1.8 percent despite a 
tentative recovery in the economy. 

In December, it said, although the number of 
failures fell 1.2 percent from a year earlier, to 
1.279, the total debt of the companies rose 40 
percent, to 598.10 billion yen. 

"The number of bankruptcies induced by the 
economic slump continues to be at an alarming 
level, especially among small and medium-sized 
firms.’ ' Tokyo Commerce said. It added that the 
gap was widening between earnings of healthy 
companies and of weaker ones. 

“While big companies successfully restruc- 
tured themselves via cost-cutting by shifting some 
operations overseas and reducing employees." 
die report said, “many firms driven by domestic 
demand have not been profitable, because of high 
production costs and falling prices." The research 


firm monitor^ companies with liabilities exceed- 
ing 10 million yen. The government keeps records 
on only the small portion of business failures that 
are processed through bankruptcy court. 

"I would not be surprised to see a fair number of 
bankruptcies and even a couple of potentially large 
bankruptcies coming down, even in the last couple 
months of this fiscal year," which ends in March, 
said Walter Altherr of Jaidine Fleming Securities. 
Real-estate companies are the most vulnerable, he 
said, because they are still struggling with losses 
on properties that have declined sharply in value 
since the boom ended. 

The new year has already brought some big 
failures, die latest being the restaurant-chain op- 
erator Kyofciru Co., which declared bankruptcy 
Sunday with debts of 10133 billion yen. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


„ 15000 

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' LmcttmJkxu! Herald Tnbuae 






Source: Tehkurs iwcnunwui 

Very briefly: 

• Philippines Airlines Inc. will double its capitalization, to 
20 billion pesos ($7603 million), through two equal issues of 
stock this year and next year. The money will be used to 
replace the airline's aging fleet 

• Morgan Stanley Inc. recommended that the Philippines 
sell a 100-year bond, saying investors were willing to pay a 
premium for an improving economy and political stability. 

• Manila’s wage board raised the minimum wage for workers 
in the city to 185 pesos a day from 165 pesos; minimum wages 
in other parts of the Philippines are set by local wage boards. 

• Mazda Motor Corp.’s president, Henry Wallace, said the 
weakening yen would Dot help the carmaker's profit for the 
current finan cial year, which ends March 31 . 

• Honda Motor Co.’s vehicle sales in' Thailand rose 44 
percent lastyear, to a record 42,421, helped by the launch of 
the Honda City car. 

• Toyota Motor Corp. hopes to list its shares on the New 
York Stock Exchange by around 2000. 

• Thailand delayed construction of a 973 billion baht ($3.79 
billion) second international airport as part of an effort to curb 
government spending. 

• Vietnam's commercial creditors, the so-called Londwtf 
Club, are considering an accord to restructure about S9QCF 
million in debt by midyear. 

• Acer Computer Latino America SA, a subsidiary of Acer 
Inc. of Taiwan, plans to buy the computer assembly and 
distribution business of ACBr Computadores Ltda. of 
BraziL • 

• Singapore invested in 16 percent more regional projects last 

year than in 1995, led by investments, m Indochina and 
Southeast Asia. Bloomberg, AFP. AP 


EUROPEAN MULTI 

INDEX FUND 

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Pout Switzerland Index Plus II ny a pas un dMdende pour >097. 

Les coupons sow papacies au* gwchets des institutions sutvantes: 

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Spaaitaetflet S A. Bank van Roesdare N.V. 

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Gen. KB Equteafe. KB Fi*oD( et HSA Pto-Fmd. 

Le Consei dAdmWstrauon 


Bloomberg Ne h-j 

SEOUL — South Korea's 
benchmark stock index pos- 
ted its biggest decline in three 
and a half years Tuesday as 
investors bet that poor cor- 
porate earnings prospects did 
not justify a 17 percent rise in 
the last two weeks. 


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Losses resulting from the 
country's biggest strike ever, 
which seems to be winding 
down, did not help either. 

The stocks most widely 
held by foreign investors — 
Korea Electric Power Co., 
Pohang Iron & Steel Co. and 
Samsung Electronics Co. — 
led the index tower Tuesday, 
accounting for about a quarter 
of the decline. 

Concern that the slowest 
economic growth in four 
years will drag on corporate 
profits reversed gains driven 
by declining interest rates. 
The yield on the benchmark 
three-year corporate bond fell 
to a three-month low 
Monday, stimulating more 
stock investing. 

The Korea Composite 
Stock Price Index fell 27.92, 
orabout 3.9 percent, to 69034 
— the steepest one-day drop 
since Aug. 13, 1993. 


Continued from Page 13 

imated hits, are appropriate 
for “Prince of Egypt" 

“It's not even a movie that 
the Disney Company would 
ever have made,” Mr. Katzen- 
beig said, adding, “For them 
there have to be stores and 
parks and merchandise.” 

Mr. Spielberg's major role, 
meanwhile, involves live-ac- 
tion films, where operations 
have been slow to get off the 
ground. 

In one scheduling change 
intended to fill the pipeline 
faster, Mr. Spielberg, who 
had not planned to direct his 
first DreamWorks picture un- 
til the summer, will start di- 
recting “ Amistad, ” a stray of 
black slaves put on trial for 
murder, in February. 

DreamWorks has not been 
shy about spending money. 
Not only has it locked up top 


television talent, but it has 
hired top-level executives at 
other divisions, including Mo 
Austin, the former Warner 
Music executive who was 
eagerly courted by Disney. 

It has also expanded its ini- 
tial plans to enter the business 
of interactive games, afield in 
which its initial offering, 
“Goosebumps,” is doing 
well. 

DreamWorks does not dis- 
close its finances. But so far, 
according to Mr. Nelson, the 
chief financial officer, tile 
company is ahead of budget 
in part because it has not 
“ramped up its feature film 
division" 

But unlike other start-ups. 
it has a strong capital base. 
The three partners together 
hold 67 percent of the com- 
pany, having put up $33 mil- 
lion each. Two other in- 
vestors are the former 


Microsoft Corp. executive 
Paul Allen, who committed 
$492-5 million far an 18 per- 
cent stake, and Mie Kyung 
Lee, whose family’s com- 
pany, Cheil Foods & Chem- 
icals Inc., invested $300 mil- 
lion for an 1 1 percent stake. A 
consortium of banks agreed 
to put up $1 billion in credit. 

DreamWorks executives 
say that they do not expect to 
show a profit for at least five 
years. But neither Mr. Allen 
nor Miss Lee seem impatient. 

“We’re very happy with 
the relationship with Jeffrey 
and David," Miss Lee said 
from Sooth Korea. “I don’t 
care about getting our money 
out ASAP." 

An investor could cash out 
if the company were sold or 
went public, said Alan 
Patricof, a veteran venture 
capitalist who heads his own 
company. But several tradi- 


tional venture capitalists ex- 
pressed doubt mat Dream- 
Works would produce the 35 
percent to 40 percent aver- 
aged annual returns that have 
characterize d the best deals. 

“For an investor to get 35 
; percent in three years, 
DreamWorks would have to 
have at least a $6 billion valu- 
ation." Mr. Patricof said, a 
MCA. one of the Hollywood 
giants, was valued at about $7 
billion when it was sold to 
Seagram Co. in 1995. 

Mr. Allen, however, does 
not share the venture-capit- 
alist timetable, nor does he 
see DreamWorks as a clas- 
sical venture-capital bet cm a 
“bunch of long shots." 

“Here they have a proven 
track record of w orking to- 
gether,” he sail, “ft’s like in- 
vesting with Bill Gates. If you 
have one Windows car Excel, 
things could be fantastic."- 


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PAGE 17 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 


: For Business and Pleasure 


SPONSORED PAGE 


4 Profile of a Worldwide Leader 


H oliday Inn Worid- 
yfe operates or 
franchises more than 
hotels and 380,000 
guest rooms in more than 
oO countries and territories. 

its inception in 
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has the right product for vir- 
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to choose from. 

A leader in technology. 
Holiday Inn Worldwide’s 
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largest privately owned, 
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Since it was introduced in 
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growth of Holiday Inn 


hotels’ reservations world- 
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Holidex 2000 links the 
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nights annually. - ■ - 

Holiday Inn Worldwide’s 
Priority Club is the first 
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: Corporate Account is tar- 
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national companies. Cor- 


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The Conference Network 
program provides a wide 
choice of hotels and meet- 
ing facilities, as well as 
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offers its guests more than 
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hotels are designed for 
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Program director: Bill Mahder. 


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^Conference Group 
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H obday Inn Worldwide 's Conference Network pro- 
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The program is based on a three-tiered structure, group- 
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children' up to d» 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 



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available on internet; ht tp, , //www.i ht.cQM/iHT/FUN;funds.html 


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PAGE 20 


^ HcralhSSribune 

Sports 


WEDIVESDAX, JANUARY 22, 1997 


World Roundup 


m 




J'.- 'W... Sif- i 



Tun Sdukmesy^Rraea 

Werner Franz clocked the fast- 
est time in practice Tuesday 
for the World Cup downhill 
races in Kitzbuehel, Austria. 

Parcells 5 Denial 

football Bill Parcells. coach 
of the New England Patriots, 
denied reports that he had decided 
to leave the American football team 
after the Super Bowl. 

A long-running feud between 
Parcells and the Patriots’ owner. 
Robert Kraft, has sparked stories 
for weeks that Parcel 1s. whose con- 
tract expires in February, would 
leave for another job, most likely 
with the New York Jets. 

Parcells said a Boston Globe re- 
port he would leave the team was 
incorrect and was irritated at sug- 
gestions that the uncertainty over 
his situation would be a distraction 
to his club as it prepares for the 
Super Bowl on Sunday. (AFP) 

Belgian Coach Fired 

soccer The Belgian soccer 
team fired Coach Wilfried Van Mo- 
er on Tuesday and appointed 
Georges Lee kens to replace him. 
Leekens has taken Excelsior 
Mouscron from the second division 
to the top of the Belgian league in 
two seasons. 

The Belgian team has been in a 
rut since losing in the second round 
of the 1994 World Cup finals and 
has dropped from 24th place in die 
FIFA rankings to 42d in the past 
year. Leekens is the third coach at 
the helm in just nine months. (API 

Guillermo Canedo Dies 

soccer Guillermo Canedo, 76, 
a FIFA vice president and chairman 
of die World Cup organizing com- 
mittee, died Tuesday after a long 
fight against cancer. Canedo joined 
the FIFA executive committee in 
1962 and was head of both the 1970 
and 1986 Mexican World Cup or- 
ganizing committees. (Reuters) 

Big Bucks in Texas 

baseball A day after signing 
Ivan Rodriguez to a S6.65 million, 
one-year contract, die Texas 
Rangers agreed to a $4.8 million, 
one-year deal with Dean Palmer. A 
few hours later, the Rangers agreed 
to a S2.85 million, one-year con- 
tract with right-hander Roger Pav- 
lik. more than double his $1.25 
million salary in 1996. (AP) 

Rodman Settles Dispute 

basketball The Chicago Bulls 
star Dennis Rodman has reached a 

5200.000 out-of-court-settlement 
with a cameraman he kicked during 
a game in Minneapolis last week, 
press reports said Tuesday. 

The cameraman, Eugene Amos, 
told Minneapolis police that he 
would not press charges because a 
settlement was being negotiated. 

Rodman was suspended without 
pay for at least 1 1 games and fined 

525.000 for his behavior during the 

game against the Minnesota Tim- 
berwolves. (AFP) 


Curt Flood: The Courageous Man 



By Murray Chass 

New York Tunes Sernas 


NEW YORK — In a recent letter to 
Frank Slocum, executive director of die 
Baseball Assistance Team, Curt Flood 
wrote: 

“The 1996 holiday season brings 
mixed feelings of joy and sadness. 
Therefore, we’ll take the advice that 
mother Laura gave to me when I was a 
kid She’d say ‘Start counting your 
blessings, Squirtis, by the time you’ve 
finished, you won’t have time for any- 
thing else.’ " 

Flood, 59, died Monday after a year- 
long battle with throat cancer, and it is die 
players who came after him in the major 
leagues who should count their blessings 
for having had a man of his stature and 
dignity and courage precede them. 

Professional athletes, for the most 


part, live for their rime. They generally 
don't care what happened before them 
and, worse, they often don’t know. 
Sadly, many baseball players wouldn't 
even be able to identify Food, wouldn *t 
even know that he was the forerunner of 
Andy Messersmith, another name they 
wouldn't recognize for the impact he 
had on their lives. 

But one day in Atlanta in the last 
month of 1994, the players in the meeting 
room of the players association exec- 
utive board knew about the man who was 
to speak to them. They saluted him with 
a standing ovation before he spoke. 

• ‘It almost made me forget what I was 
going to say,” Flood said afterward. “It 
caught me a little short. I felt a lump in 
my throat” 

Twenty-five years earlier, in 1 969. he 
appeared before another players asso- 
ciation executive board seeking support 


for the task he was about to undertake. 
The Sl Louis Cardinals, for whom he 
had played for 12 years, had traded him 
to the Philadelphia Phillies, and he 
didn't want to go. 

Richard Moss, who was the union's 
general counsel at the time, recalled 
Monday that Flood came to him and 
Marvin Miller, the bead of the union, 
and told them he wanted to challenge 
the system that he said “treated people 
like they were pieces of property.” 

“We weren’t sure if he was serious, if 
be had some other agenda," Moss said. 
“We arranged for Mm to come to the 
board meeting in Puerto Rico. The idea 
was to let him talk to the board and 
convince them that he was for real, that be 
really believed this and he was sincere.'' 

With the board’s support. Flood took 
his challenge all the way to the U.S. 
Supreme Court He lost, but his effort 


eventually emboldened other players, 
Messersmith in particular. Unfortu- 
nately, besides losing the case. Hood 
saw his career die. After sitting out the 
1970 season, he played briefly for the 
Washington Senators in 1971. 

He knew he wasn’t the same player 
he had been, and he walked away from 
the- only job he had known. A pariah in 
an owner-dominated business. Flood 
was not welcome to wear a baseball 
uniform. Instead, he drifted from coun- 
try to country, first to Majorca, where he 
opened a bar and became an alcoholic, 
then back to the United States, then to 
Sweden, then back home agai n . ■ 

In recent years. Flood operated a 
youth center in Los Angeles. He en- 
joyed working with children. He would 
have enjoyed working with young pro- 
fessional baseball players, too. but be 
never had the opportunity. Neverthe- 


less, he retained his dignity and, id the 
last year, his courage. . F ^ 

On Monday, the president of the 
Baseball Assistance Team, JO® 
eiola, recalled that be testified for me 
owners in Hood’s lawsuit. 1 T bought it 
the reserve clause went, baseball was 



n w guts for him . - 

In his letter to Slocum, Hood, also 
wrote, ‘‘Say this: ‘Curt accomplished 
every goal tharhe set for himself, and 
simply-moved on.” ’ 

He didn’t gain a victory 25 years ago, 
and in bis career he didn’t achievestat- 
istics that were good enough for the Hall 
of Fame. But when Flood’s name first 
appeared on titeHaU of Fame baH oL thte 
voter marked an ‘X’ next to it in - a 
symboliegesture. No one was evermore 
worthy of such recognition. 


Coetzer and Moya (Insiders) Advance, 
As Do Chang and Pierce (Outsiders) 


The Associated Press 

MELBOURNE — Amanda Coetzer 
and Carlos Moya escaped the searing 
heat with victories in air-conditioned 
comfort. And when the heat relented, 
Michael Chang provided his own. 

Chang wore down Marcelo Rios, 7-5, 
6-1, 6-4. on Tuesday to reach the Aus- 
tralian Open semifinals, after Coetzer 
and Moya became the first and only 
match winners so far in a Grand Slam 
tournament with the stadium roof closed 
because of extreme heat. 

By the time Chang played at night, 
outside temperatures had cooled from 
102 degrees Fahrenheit 139 centigrade) 
in the shade — and up to 140 degrees on 
court — to the low 70s. and the center 
court roof was open. 

But Chang, a finalist last year who is 
seeded No. 2, acted as his own pressure- 
cooker. pounding back shot after shot 
against the ninth-seeded Chilean. 

Mary Pierce of France, the 1995 
champion, also got to play in the even- 
ing cool, but had to come back from 0-3 
in the final set to beat No. 16 Sabine 
Appelmans of Belgium. 1-6, 6-4, 6-4. 

Pierce, who has slipped to 22d in the 
rankings from No. 3 early in 1995, bad 
plenty of help from Appelmans. The 
Belgian double faulted three times in the 
final set’s fourth game and once in the 
sixth as Pierce battled back to 3-3. Six of 
Appelmans’ 11 double faults came in 
the final set Another one ended the 
second set 


Appelmans said she missed her best 
chance when she failed to convert two 
break points at 15-40 in the second set’s 
seventh game, missing an easy putaway 
of a drop shot at 30-40. 

Pierce kept Appelmans on the ran 
with heavy grounds trokes. but her quest 
for winners led to numerous errors, too. 
Appelmans saved two match points at 4- 
5 before netting a drop shot while trying 
to save the third. 

At die start. Pierce said, she did not 
have much energy, but later managed to 
get her fleet moving and become more 
aggressive. “Days like these are the 
ones that count the most, when you feel 
like nothing is going well, when you 
don’t feel very good and you’re not 
playing good, to fight for every point 
until the end,” she said. 

She next meets the 12th-seeded Co- 
etzer, who ousted No. 1 Steffi Graf on 
Sunday. Coetzer advanced to her 
second consecutive Australian semi- 
final by beating Kimberly Po, 6-4, 6-1. 

*T would have preferred to play out- 
side,” said Coetzer, who trained in the 
Florida heal for Melbourne’s condi- 
tions. “I love playing out in the sun- 
shine. But it was probably a bit of a 
break for both of us not to be in the heat 
and the wind.” 

Coetzer wore down Po by running 
down every shotand waiting for her to 
miss. ■' ? ' 4 

“She moves you around with spin 
and slice and keeps it a little out of your 



Scnr J4olLu>d'Thr .Ixotatf-d IW 

Mary Pierce serving outside to Sabine Appelmans after the heat eased. 


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range,” said Po, who never had ad- 
vanced past the third round in 18 pre- 
vious Grand Slam tournaments, “im a 
little angry because I made so many 
errors, but she makes you do that. That’s 
her game.” 

Moya, who played his first four 
Grand Slam tournaments last year, nev- 
er getting past the second round, reached 
tiie men’s semifinals with a 7-5. 6-2, 6-7 
(5-7), 6-2 victory over a Spanish com- 
patriot, Felix Mantilla, seeded 14th. 

Mantilla said he also had come to 
Melbourne ‘ ‘prepared to play under the 
conditions that the tournament should 
be played under.” 

Keeping the roof open would prob- 
ably would not have made much dif- 
ference against the fit Moya, he said, but 
“I’m very disappointed on the way that 
I was treated.” 

He said be bad wanned up mostly in 
the wind and sun on center court before 
the roof was closed. Moya practiced 
next, under the roof. 

Moya, meanwhile, wanted to talk 
about the match. “I’m in the semifinals. 
I bear him and the first question is about 
the roof,” said Moya, who upset the 
defending champion, Boris Becker in die 
first round. *T was going to play anyway 
if it was snowing, raining or 60 degrees.” 
That would be 140 d egrees Fahrenheit 

Moya is the first Spaniard to make the 
semifinals in the Aurtralian Open since 
Andres Gimeno lost to Rod Laver in the 
1969 final. 



Carlos Moya, playing inside, returning shot between his legs in Australia. 

Grand Slam Officials Shut Out the Heat 


By Robin Finn 

New York Times Service 


MELBOURNE — With brush fires 
raging in the nearby suburbs, not a cloud 
in the sky and another day of dangerous 
100-plus degree heal forecast for Mel- 
bourne, the Australian Open on Tues- 
day took the unprecedented step of clos- 
ing the roof above the stadium, taking 
the quarterfinals out of the heat and into 
the aft-conditioaing. 

The Grand Slam event has been a 
cauldron of controversy for the past two 
days as a half-dozen players succumbed 
to heat prostration. 

“We’re breaking new ground: it’s in 
the interest of player and spectator com- 
fort, and it is, in fact, the first time 
anywhere in the world a Grand Slam 
match is being played under a roof due 
to beat conditions,” said Peter Bei- 
lenger, the tournament referee. He 


the decision to snap the toof shut Tues- 
day at 9 A.M. when he was informed 
that the brutal beat would continue. Bel- 
lenger said a cool front was expected to 
hit Tuesday night, making it likely that 
the Australian Open would be an indoor 
event for one day only. 

The tournament has a rale in force 
that permits closure of die roof in tem- 
peratures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit 
(35 degrees centigrade), provided all 
remaining singles matches can be 
scheduled inside. That rale was not in- 
voked in 1993, when Boris Becker and 
Tim Courier fought their final in beat of 
about 100 degrees. But officials said the 
stadium had not been building up re- 
sidual heat like it has tins year. 

On Sunday, Steffi Graf was foiled by 
heat exhaustion, Monday was the hot- 
test day in Melbourne in six years and 
Monday night was the hottest evening in 
two de ca des — all of which meant this 


tournament’s rubberized Rebound Ace 
surface was retaining beat like a sauna. 

“It’s so hot, especially on that court 
because a Rebound Ace surface just 
absorbs all die heat and makes it that 
much tougher to breathe and play; my 
feet were on fire,” said the world’s 
No. 1 ranked player, Pete Sampras, who 
suffered through a five-set Round of 16 
encounter with a Slovak teenager, 
Donunik Hrbaty, on die broiling surface 
Monday afternoon. 

Sampras admitted he bad mixed feel- 
ings about the tournament taking so rash 
a step as40 close die roof and transform- 
the stadium to an indoor arena. 

“I don’t know where you draw the 
line as far as temperature; as an athlete, 
you should be in good enough condition 
to go out and play in any condition, but 
the quality of the tennis in this heat is not 
going to be that great, so Pm kind of on 
die fence,” Sampras said. 


But Where Should the Princes Play? 


Special to the Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — In a world where a 20- 
year-old is king, where should the 
princes be groomed? 

The acclamation of Ronaldo as die 


World Soccer / Rob Hvohis 


Frenchman, Arsene Wenger, the coach 
at ArsenaL who exploits the rule that 


! «L 


greatest soccer player an earth suggests plucks another fine youngster oat of 
that his game knows no boundary. Ron- France. Already gone from France are 
aldo Luis Nazario de Lima has wily just 
turned 20, but with pace, vision and 
venom be scores goals for Barcelona, an 
ocean away horn his Brazilian origins. 

Where the grass is green and the ball is 
round, Ronaldo puts it into the neL 

In Lisbon on Monday, he ran away 
with the 1996 FIFA World Player of the 
Year award. National team coaches 
from 54 countries voted Ronaldo the 
outstanding talent in a team sport And 
while experts prematurely hung on him 
the label of bemg the new Pete, Cruyff 
or Maradona, there is already a boy 
hailed as the next Ronaldo. 

This lad, Nicolas Anelka, has been 
schooled in Paris but is about to be 
whisked away to London, where Ar- 
senal claims to have procured his ser- 


Youri Djorkaeff, Zinedine Zidane. 
Didier Deschamps and Lament Blanc. 
Gone, indeed, are die entire nucleus of 
the new French elite who MIGHT re- 
turn to give their homeland its finest 
soccer hour at the World Cup, in 
France, in 1998. 

“We should be able to protect our 
future,” insists -Philippe PiaL chief of 
the players' union. “Gubs ought to 
have die right to bold apprentices to 
five-year contracts.” 

Piar’s cry is in vain. So is die plea to 
UEFA from Noel Le Grant, the 


- 0 the migration of 
ted boys until they reached man- 
hood. Opponents very soon deemed it 
unconstitutional. They reasoned that it 
deprived a growing lad of an oppor- 
tunity that could be his’oniy chance to 
Strike it rich. ' * - J 

-® ut » fo® rub" France is not in 
too eye of the television moguls whose 
purse rates sport. The huge fees of the 
i v satellite wars are changing fhe soc- 

JSL23?’ . Priorities to the 

moneyed lands. That is what brought 
Rawldo to Europe, where, with luck 
and £OOd guidance, he can enjoy-a mfl- 
B ^ wll2t “oves Anelka 

across the ChaneL 

O F course, it must rankle at PSG, 

which, after nil ,1. : 5 -■» 


until players reach foe age of 24. 

i sag- 

• paiujr PCQU15C -Oi 

*A young player must have freedom to Canal f luj^ ?£!® visio1 ? ****?“ 


m payers rcaco uk age oi AP,. W which nft«- «ii • 

UEFA is sympathetic to such a sag- of Fie ra* 1S **! e P owe3 *ouse 

gestion. FIFA, tireparenl body, is ^ because -of 


vices. Anelka, tne crown pnnoe, is i / cnoose me ciud tie wisues to play tor at idem psr vlce 

and, with the blessing of his father and 16 years of age,” Sepp Blatter, FIFA's studio vniw * **, a te i evis *« l 

brother who act as his agents and with secretary-general opined in Lisbon, seam rw n ? w foments: . “it 

stealing players is illegal ha . 
France, but legal weis^. There ’jSKrtv 


vices. Anelka, the crown prince, is 17 choose foe club he wishes to play for at idem of P r ?*‘ 

studio voice, 
seems that stea 
France, but foga 

so much into its youth policy,” hesiifo . 

“Uni the* vAiinn African and .^nnrk . n, • ,< 

s! tpSr£S' i 

game ’ ^ business, 
OHtesuff of The 


agents 

the authority of FIFA, which sees no law 
preventing the marketing of teenagers, is 
lost to the league of his home country. 

It is a remarkable, but hardly unique, 
story. Paris Saint-Germain, which rave 
Anelka his apprenticeship and anticip- 
ated the rewards of his skills, will lose 
him without a cent when he reaches 18 in 
June. Last year's European Court ruling 
in the case of Jean-Marc Bosnian of 
Belgium, giving freedom to any player 
to move on without fee once he is out of 
contract, is now being interpreted as a 
charter for cradle snatching. 

To make matters worse, it is a 


when Ronaldo was crowned. 

“It is hard for France, which invests 


‘But foe young African and South 
American players develop through this 
freedom, and FIFA cannot differentiate 
between foe different countries.” 
Indeed not. Diego Maradona, long 
before the Bosman laws and long before 
Ronaldo, came out of Argentina as an 
unformed genius. Who is to say he 
would ever have blossomed on a world 
scale had he not passed through Bar- 
celona and then Naples? ■ 

The government of Argentina sought 








PAGE 21 


v .yja'4ki ■■, * 





V • 

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ertie 


Hep! 


SPORTS 



Super Bowl Is Very Big News in Boston, Very Big 


& 


/ »; Brett Favre, the Packers" quarterback, loosening up before a practice. 


International Herald Tribune 

T HB Super Bowl is in the air in 
Boston. It’s in the water. When you 
sit In your car waiting far the engine to 
warm up. die Soper Bowl leaks out of 
the radio like a mind-numbing gas. In 
die local newspaper, there are more 
words and pictures and pages about tbe 
Super Bowl next Sunday man all of the 
news about all of tbe world that tills this 
newspaper. 

In the bars there is cheering and ap- 
ilause whenever the face of one of the 
ew England Patriots, the local Super 
Bowl team, is momentarily broadcast 
from the TV in the comer. Women who 
don't know anything about football are 
saying. “Go, Patriots! Wooo!” Men 
who think they know something about 
the game are discussing it in the stock- 
market way, quoting trends and stat- 
istical values. Their voices rise con- 
vincingly. If tbe Patriots were a stock 
they would warn you to buy, buy, buy! 

All of this I know because I have been 
in the engine room. I worked in main- 
tenance. If you want to know bow big 
tbe Super Bowl is, please understand 
that I was one of 26 employees sent to 
New Orleans in 1 986 by the local paper, 
the Boston Globe, to cover the Patriots 
die last time they were in the Super 


Vantage Point 1 1 am Thomsen 


Bowl. There are many decent news- 
papers around the world that don't have 
26 people on the entire staff. 

Nothing in American sports unites a 
city like a team going to the Super 
Bowl. Later that year, the Boston Celt- 
ics of Larry Bird won the National 
Basketball Association championship 
and the Boston Red Sox of Bui Buck- 
ner reached the World Series, and 
neither of their successes was as nerve- 
rattling as the Patriots. 

In New Orleans, we were each writ- 
ing three or four stories a day — all of us 
— just to fill up tbe space around the 
newspaper advertisements that the busi- 
nesses in Boston were buying to ay to 


sron. I remember someone from our pa- 
per who had visited Berry's hometown in 
Texas celling me before die game how his 
people there spoke of him with a spiritual 
reverence. * 'There really does seem to be 
something about him." the reporter said 
to me, before the Patriots lost the Super 
Bowl by 36 points. 

Two years later Beny was fired, and 
the quarterback who had taken New 
England to its first Super Bowl. Tony 
Eason, was fired, too. 


cash in on the Patriots. Tbe best players 
esident The 


were covered like the president 
coaches were treated like the Pope. 

Players who weren't going to play 
were asked for their opinions under big 
thick headlines. The injured we wrote 
about in hushed tones, as if they were 
dead But they were also most access- 
ible, and the ones who could talk were 
quoted every day for two weeks. 

The Patriots* coach was Raymond 
Beny. a tall man with a vacant expres- 


T HE one thing that works in the Pat- 
riots' favor this rime was their re- 
action to winning the conference game 
last week thai put them into the Super 
BowL On the sideline they were hardly 
celebrating, and you could see their 
coach. Bill Parceiis, twice a champion 
with the New York Giants, walking 
among them warning them that they had 
not accomplished anything yet. The 
Green Bay Packers, earlier in the day. 
had been almost kissing each other. 

The Packers are 13-point favorites, 
and if they lose, it will be because they 
didn't know what they were getting 
themselves into. 


For one thing, there are something like 
5.000 “media people" — on Super Bowl 
photo day. they wander the field like a 
huge flock of noisy sheep — and for this 
week in New Orleans it's as if there’s 
only enough food for. say. 200 of them. 
The rest of them are crying to live off 
interviews with players’ wives and third- 

suing Linebackers, and press conferences 
about food, and the halftime show, and a 
feature with the guy who's going to be 
announcing the game live ro Indonesia. 

The one thing I remember, from just 
before kickoff 1 1 years ago. was how 
exciting football could be in a Franken- 
stein way. that the thing was actually 
going to come to life. By rite third quarter 
it was a rout, and by the end of the most 
lopsided night the Super Bowl had yet 
seen we had typed up enough words to 
fill a Salman Rushdie novel. 

Someone tried to convince the editor 
that our 30 or 40 tor was it 50?) stories 
should all have the same headline. They 
all should have been entitled. "46-10." 
Sometimes spelled out, other times with 
varying punctuation 146-10??) (FORTY- 
SIX TO TEN!t. but all of them, page 
after page, proclaiming the final score. 

The editor decided against iL which 
was a mistake. He could have salvaged 
something. 


For Hawks and Sorties, Perfect Is the Word 


The Associated Press 

It's been a perfect year so far for die 
Atlanta Hawks and tbe Seattle Super- 
Sonics. 

Tbe Hawks improved to'10-0 in 1997 
by beating tbe Charlotte Hornets, 106- 
97. on Monday night. The Sonics raised 
their January record to 8-0 with a 112- 
96 win over the Vancouver Grizzlies. 




Steve Smith scored a season-high 31 
points as the Hawks won their 17th 
straight home game. Christian Laettner 
scored 23 points, and Mookie Blaylock 
had 20 points and 10 assists for the 
^Hawks. Glen Rice led Charlotte with 33 
■‘■points. 

In Seattle. Gary Payton scored 30 
points as the Sonics handed the second- 
year Grizzlies their 1 00th franchise loss. 

“He's always been a great defender, 
but his perimeter shooting has taken a 
quantum leap/' Vancouver coach Brian 


Winters said of Payton. “He’s the full 
package nowl He is a great guard. 1 ' 

Shawn Kemp added 23 points, and 
Detlef Scbrernpfhad 20 fix Seattle, which 
scored the find 10 points of the game. 

Knicka as, BuBats 79 In New York, 
Patrick Ewing had 22 points and 14 
rebounds as fee Knicks won their 13fe 
straight home game. Buck Williams had 
17 points and 11 rebounds for New 
Yoik, which has won 19 of its last 20 
against the Bullets. 

Mjfw ukw 114, PMwMpMa 104 In 
Philadelphia, Glenn Robinson scored 
29 points as Milwaukee handed the 
76ers their 13th straight loss. Allen Iver- 
son scored 31 points for Philadelphia, 
which has lost 23 of its last 24. 

T li i lwi iimh— M,spuf»B3 At home in 
Minneapolis, rookie Stephen Mar bury 
scored 20 points and had 1 3 assists. 

Vinny Del Negro scored 22 points and 
reserve Monty Williams added a career- 
high 20 far fee injury-depleted Spins, 
who have lost seven of their last eight 


Lalwn 109 , Mavericks 99 In Ingle- 

wood, California, Nick Van Exel scored 


24 points, and the Los Angeles Lakers 
ry of the Dallas 


continued their mastery 
Mavericks. The Lakers beat tbe Mavs 
for the fifth straight time and 19th in 
their last 21 meetings. 

Nuggets 132, Not* 123 In Denver, 
LaPhonso FJHs scored a career-high 36 
points, and Mark Jackson had a career- 
high 22 assists as fee Nuggets beat New 
Jersey. 

Jazz 94, Cavaliers 74 In Salt Lake 
City. Karl Malone scored 32 points, 
including 14 in fee third quarter. Tbe 
Jazz outsooned fee Cavaliers 32-10 in 
fee third quarter to take a 77-48 lead 
heading into the final period. 

Sim 89, Pistons be In Phoenix, Kevin 
Johnson and Rex Chapman hit three- 
pointers down the stretch as fee Suns 
won their fifth straight at home. John- 
son. who stole an inbounds pass by Joe 
Dumars wife 4.9 seconds left to clinch 
the win, led fee Suns wife 19 points. 


Avalanche Rolls On, Unbeaten in 12 Games 


The Associated Press 

Even with Patrick Roy stopped by 
illness, there’s no stopping fee Col- 
orado Avalanche these days. 

Reluming to tbe same arena where 
they clinched last season’s Stanley 
Cup championship, die Avalanche 


NHL Roundop 


beat the Florida Panthers,' 4-2, on 
Monday night to extend their unbeaten 
streak to a club-record 12 games. 

“You're not going to go undefeated 
during fee regular season, so when you 
have a good streak going, you try to 
keep it up as long as possible." Mike 
Ricci, the Avalanche center, said after 
Colorado extended its streak to 9-0-3 
since Dec. 23. 

The last time the teams met at 
Miami Arena, Roy was unbeatable as 
the Avalanche won a 1-0 thriller in 
triple overtime to complete a four- 


game sweep in the finals. This time, 
the goaltender was not able to play 
because of sickness. So Craig Billing- 
ton stepped in and stopped 33 shots. 

Valeri Kamensky scored rwice in 
the final eight minutes to lead Col- 
orado’s victory. 

Capitals 3, Brains 2 In Boston, Kelly 
Miller scored two goals, and Jim 
Carey stopped 31 shots to lead Wash- 
ington. 

Mims 6, islanders 4 Pierre Turgeon 
and Joe Murphy each scored twice as 
visiting St Louis handed the Islanders 
their 10th loss in 13 games. 

Turgeon’s first goal snapped a 2-2 
tie at 3:57 of the third period as the 
Blues won for fee third time in four 
games. 

Sabres 2, Blackhawks 1 In Buffalo. 
New York, Dominik Hasek stopped 43 
shots and shut out Chicago over the 
final two periods. Hasek allowed 
Sergei Krivokrasov's goal in the first 


period and made 38 saves the rest of 
the way. 

whalers a. Maple Leafs i In Han- 
ford. Connecticut. Sean Burke stopped 
44 shots as the Whalers snapped a five- 
game losing streak. Keith Primeau and 
Kevin Dineen scored in the second 
period for the Whalers. 

Canadians 4, Rad Wings 1 In 
Montreal, Mark Recchi scored twice, 
and Jocelyn Thibauit made 35 saves to 
lead the Canadians. 

Recchi scored 21 seconds into the 
third period to tie the game, 1-1. He 
added his team-leading 23d into an 
empty net with 39 seconds to play. 

Canucks 6, Sharks 1 Markus 
Naslund scored two goals to lead Van- 
couver over visiting San Jose. 

Esa Tikkanen. Martin Gelinas. 
Pavel Bure and Dave Babych also 
scored for Vancouver. Ulf Dahien was 
the only Shark to beat Kirk McLean, 
the Canuck goalie. 


Scoreboard 


1 TENNIS § 

| HOCKEY | 

Australian Open 

NHLStanihnos 


Anaheim 
Calgary 
Las Angeles 
San Jose 


17 22 5 39 125 134 

17 23 5 39 112 131 
17 23 S 39 124 109 
14 23 5 37 113 141 


-15 


womnsMotta owuotbtoials 
A manda - Qriw <m South Mika, del. 
KtainrfrPaUA.444-1. . 

Alary Plats France. rial. Sabine Appel- 
mans 114). Belgium. 1-4, 64. 44. 

wouotoouBua auAirmnHMx 
Martino Hingis. Stf&erfond. and Natasha 
Zvereva Ml. Betas, Bat VbyMo Ruono- 
Pascuat, Spain, md Pooh Suarez, AigertkM, 
4-1 fr& Ltadsny Davenport USwondLba 
Raymond CD, U.5- del. CanchDB Marflnea, 
Spain, and Patrick! YbmbH 02), Argentina, 
*4. 7-4 (7-7); Uafco Neutral LoMs and 
Helena Sutawa 03, Czech Republic. deL 
Naoka Wflmuto, Japan, and Nana Myagl 
(73). Joan. A-Z 6-3; Gigl Fernandes UJfc, ana 
Arantxa Sanchez Vlairto O), Sprrin, del 
Nicole Anmdfc UA. and Murat Boteva* CS), 
NettwrtBOds.4-4. 7-4L 

MENBNGUBWMKTWWALS 
Carlos Maya, Spain, dot FeB* MmMta 
(141. Spain 7-5.62,671671.62 
Michael Chang CO. U.S- drf. Marceto Kb* 
(9), OlBe.7-5.fr 1,44. 

HCH DOUBLES CHMRTERnMLd 
Madv Woodford*. AoProSa, and Todd 
WMrtaridge Cl). AustreHa, dec Manta 
Oman, Czech Rspu&K. and Andre) «- 
hovskly HO), Ruste, 44 6-3. frS Wcfc Uadi. 
US. and Jonathan Slam Oil. 05* det Bis 
Ferreira, Sauih AMs. and Patrick Grritatt 
Ml, US. 7-S» 2-4.44.7-6 0-53. 


PMuWphto 
Florida ■ 
N.Y. Raagen 
New Jersey 
Washington 
Tampa Bay 
NY • 


mstte r gh 

Buftato 

Montreal 

Hartford 

Boslon 

Ottawa 


xrLAxncowwaN 
*1T» 
27 73 S 59 

22 13 TO 54 

23 19 6 52 

22 16 5 « 

20 21 5 45 
17 21 6 40 

13 23 9 3$ 

■UimCMTDMSON 

» L T Pie 
' 2S 75 

24 17 
IB 21 
W 30 

14 23 
14 21 


GF GA 
147 111 
130 108 
141 132 
113 110 
124 123 
128 139 
117 137 


5 

5 53 
8 44 
7 43 

6 38 
4 36 


GF GA 
147 134 
133 122 
153 158 
131 145 
131 164 
119 12B 


Oates 
Detroit 
St. Louis 


CMcapo 

Toronto 


Colorado 

Edmoaton 


WL.T 
25 17 3 
21 14 8 
* 21 22 4 

■ 19 23 4 
17 23 8 
17 29 0 
MCmctwwBWf 

W L T PH GF GA 
2a 10 « 44 158 IDS 
Zl 21 A 46 749 136 
ZT 21 2 44 143 147 


Pt* GF GA 

S3 130 in 
50 138 105 
46 137 151 
42 725 150 
42 122 129 
34 139 162 


MOWArStBDUf 
St. Loots 0 2 4-6 

N.Y. tataedem l l 2-4 

FM Period: New Yarik Mdnrris 12 
(Green. Betunji Second Period: S.L- 
Caraphea 15 (Canny) X New York, Mcftris 
13 (PcMy) (sh). 4. iLrMwphy 10 (Pianger, 
Rfmn) (pp). Third Period: S-L-Turgeon 10 
(Canpfaefc Perssoa) 6 S.L-Yom 9 
(Mod mite, Petsson) 7, S.L-, Murphy 11 
(Yarik PaBerta) B> Now York, Kruse4 (Webb. 
Armstrong) 9, New Ytufc McCabe 6 
(tansson, Ktag) 10. SJ_-Twgean 11. (en). 
ShateM got* 5.U 7-1611-28. New Yarfcfr 
66—18. Godlae SU_-Fuhr. New York. Sofa 
1 2 d-3 
1 0 1—2 
FM Period: B-Statos 2 (Roy. Stumped Z 
wwUBer 4 Htanowoldjuk, Eogtes) Second 
Ported: W- Juneau 13 (Housiey, Cate) (pp). A 
W-MHer 7 CKorawakhuik Hunter) TUrd 
Period; B-Ootes Jfr Stadsn potto W- 1616 
6—26. B- lfrfrlfr-33. GoaBcm W-Oney. B- 
TdtaS. 

CMcsga 1 t 9—1 

Buffalo 0 2 6-2 

FM Period: C-Kitvotausav 7 (Prohert 
Orates) Second Ported: B-RoyS (Primaou. 
WanO 3, B-Hotztogerl4 CZWtnfc Burridge) 
(sh). Third Period: None. Skats on gaofc C- 
14-15-15— a. B- 7-66-241 GoaBas; C- 
BeXour. B- Hasek. 


Toronto 8 8 1—1 

Hartford 12 1-3 

FM Porto* None. Scant Period: H- 
Ptfcneau 13 (Rice. Emerson) 2. H-Dineen 12 
(Wasiey. Cossets) (op). ThM Perio* T- 
Bersrirt 14 (Gfltnour, Muter) (pp). 4. H- 
CassetslS (Dineen, Primeau) (en)- Shots oa 
gar* T- 15-12-18 — 45. H- 7-14-5-26. 
GoiWte. T-Potvm. H- Burke. 

Detroit 0 l 6-1 

Mwrtrwd 8 0 4-4 

FM Period: None. Second Period: D- 
Droper 4 (Enoy, DwYtenoutn TMrd Perm * 
M-Recchi 22 {Savage Damphousse). 3 M- 
Tucfcer 5 (Stevenson). 4. M-Thomtan 8 
(Stevenson. Baron) (pp). 5, M-RecdU 23 
(Damphousse) (en). Shots on gold: D- 11-13- 
12— 36. M- 666-20. GoaBex D-Vcmoa M- 
ThlbauR. 

Colorado 1 1 2-4 

Florida 1 1 8-2 

FM Porta* C-RJcd 3 (Lemleugb Young) 
(pp). Z F-Lowry 9 (NemlrovsXy. stroka) 
Socoad Period; F-FttigeraU B (Lbidson 
Murphy) last). A C-Ccrtet 9 Uones) THM 
Porta* C- Kamensky IS (Lemlew. Foote) A 
C-Xanmaky 16 (Gueonw) Shots oo peak C- 
612-9—27. F- 15612-35. GoaffoB Cr 
Bntigion. F-VoablesbnudL 
SaiJose 1 8 8-1 

Vancouver 2 3 1—4 

FM Perio* V-Ge8nos 10 (Wdkeo 
Mvnyn) ZSj.-Dahian8 (Nanow.Turcwta) 
3 V-, Naslund 11, (pp). Second Perio* V- 
Buie 19, (pp). 5. V-, Babych 4 (Roberts, 
GeSnos) 6 V-TSdtonen 9 (Bim watten) 
TWrd Perio* V-Nosiund 12 Uoseplv 


Moflttty) (pp). Skdr oo pooh SJ.- 156 
8 — 30. V- 7-126-27. GoaOeK SJ.-Hrodey. 
V-McLkol 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


ATUumc annsoN 


San Antonio 

10 

27 

.270 

19% 

Vbncouver 

8 

33 

.195 

23% 


mcncoivtBOW 



Seattle 

29 

11 

J25 

— 

LA. Lokcro 

29 

12 

.707 

% 

PaiOaiKt 

22 

17 

.564 

6% 

Sacrarnento 

16 

24 

,400 

13 

Gcriden Stale 

15 

B 

J94 

13 

LA. dippers 

14 

23 

J7B 

13% 

Ptioenh 

15 

25 

J75 

14 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Micro) 

28 

11 

.710 

— 

New York 

28 

11 

.718 

— 

Washington 

20 

19 

.513 

8 

Ortando 

16 

19 

AST 

10 

Now Jersey 

10 

27 

J70 

17 

Boston 

9 

27 

-237 

17% 

PhOodetpMa 

8 

31 

.205 

20 


CENTRAL DtVtSTON 



CMcogo 

34 

5 

-873 

— 

Detrofl 

28 

10 

J37 

5% 

Attonto 

26 

11 

J03 

7 

Owrfcfl* 

22 

17 

-564 

12 

Ometand 

22 

17 

-564 

12 

MBwoukee 

19 

19 

.500 

14% 

IntSana 

18 

19 

.486 

15 

Taranto 13 

25 

-342 

AM 

20% 

inowEST avtstOM 

•vR 



W 

L 

Pd 

GB 

Houston 

31 

9 

-775 

— 

UMl 

27 

13 

.673 

4 

Minnesota 

18 

21 

.462 

12% 

Da Has 

13 

24 

051 

16% 

Dowser 

11 

29 

J75 

20 


MONDAY'S MSOLTC 
Wus htagtso 14 18 25 22—79 

New York 22 29 25 16-95 

W: Webber 612 3-5 17. Howard 5-11 66 11 
MY.: Ewtag 1621 222Z BJMOams 613 5-7 
17. RdMok-W. SO (Munson 13). N.V. 52 
(Ewing 1«. Arottts— W. n (Sblckkmd 5). N. 
Y. 19 (MM 5). 

MBwoufeee 35 25 26 28-114 

PbBodripbkr 38 2S 28 31—104 

M: Robinson 12-26 *4 29. Baker 11 -22 62 
73s P: tverson 11-29 67 31, Stockhouse 618 
7-9 23 Reboands-M. 53 (Baker 12). P. 54 
(Wecdherspoan 14). Assists— M. 25 (Douglas 
8), P.15 (Stockhouse, tverson 5). 

Chariot* 22 34 21 38-97 

AttontB 29 25 27 25—186 

C R)oe 1622 4-7 33 DNoc 9-12 65 21; A: 
s^mttti 11-24 5-6 31, LneRner 615 7-10 23 
Itahooads-C. 47 (DtwclS). A 52 (Mutwnbo 
13).Asritt»-C22(Maswi9), A21 (BJaytock 
1 ®. 

Soo Aurorae 17 21 30 25— 83 

MMesmo 37 22 18 19-96 

SX: Del Negro 9-183-421 Wlfflorasfrll 4- 
7 2 De M: Moibunr 7-15 2-423 Goroeltl616 6 


0 20. R e b oo ndi — S>- 46 (Perdue 13). M. 54 
(GugfWto 12). Assists— SA 17 (Almnder 
6), M. 26 (Marbury 13). 

Dates 23 20 27 29- 99 

LA. Lakers 34 23 32 28-189 

t>. Jackson 9-12 2-3 22 anting*-} 5 68 21.- 
UL Von Esd 613 3-3 24. Jonesfrl 1 7-10 21. 
Rebound* — D. 60 (Green 10). LA. 48 (O'Neal 
13). Assist*— O. 20 (Mashbunr ALA 26 
(Von Exel 8). 

New Jersey 27 30 31 35-123 

Denver 38 38 37 I9-I3Z 

NJj GUI 12-21 4^ 30. J.waiiams 12-17 2-5 
26; D: LEWS 14-18 3-3 36. McDye» 12 20 6 
729. Rebounds— NJ. 46 (OBannon91. D. 51 
(Johnson 10). Assists— MJ. 24 (Pock 6). D. 
41 (Jackson 22). 

devrioad 21 17 10 24- 74 

Utah 24 19 32 17— 94 

fc PhBs 61 1 o-6 17. Marshall >8 67 IZ U: 
Malone 1614 12-16 32. Horaocek 7-8 1-2 19. 
Rebounds— c. 43 (HQ B). U. 48 (Molone. 
Keefe 8). Assists— C.) 6 (Brandon 4). u. 25 
(Honwcek. Stockton 6). 

Detroit 22 19 21 24— 36 

Pfcoentt 17 16 24 32- 89 

D: Hunter 9-20 60 23. HR) 7-15 5^ 19: P: 
Johnson 7-14 4-4 19. Cefaallos 4-13 1610 18 
Rebounds — D. 44 (Thorpe 13), P. 48 
(WH Boms. Marring 8). Assists— D. 16 (H* 
11). P. IB (Johnson 6). 

Voocourer 24 29 25 18- 96 

SMrtto 35 30 25 22-112 

V: Anthony 7*104-4 2 a Abdur-RrSiUn6136 
61% S: Payton 11-14 2-4 30. Kemp 69 9-12 23. 
Reboands— V. 46 (Reeves 8). S. 37 (Sdiietnl 


7). Assists— V. 22 (Lynch. Edwards 5). 5. 23 
(SdwempC Hawkins 7). 


The AP Top 25 


The lap 25 teams )nTh» A ss o ci a te d Press' 

coBego basketball poll, with tlm-piaoe 
votes In poranthesas, re conta through Jan. 
78. total polnte baaadon 25 points torn Sr*- 
place vole through ana poM tor a 26th- 
pface vara, and tact week's ranking: 



Racord 

Pte 

Prv 

1. Kansas (71) 

18-0 

1.775 

1 

2.0etnson 

161 

1.688 

3 

3. Kentucky 

162 

1.587 

5 

4. Wake Forest 

161 

1^79 

2 

5. mah 

12-2 

1J97 

9 

6. LouipriBe 

16) 

U83 

10 

7. Maryland 

162 

1,319 

n 

B. Minnesota 

162 

1,300 

7 

9. Cincinnati 

163 

1JB0 

4 

10. Duke 

14-4 

1J» 4 

13 

11. Arinina 

164 

902 

6 

12 VBtanora 

14-3 

892 

16 

13. Michigan 

13-1 

840 

18 

14 towa St. 

11-3 

838 

a 

15 Hew Mexico 

163 

731 

12 

16. Xavier. Ohio 

162 

719 

14 

17. Stanford 

11-3 

585 

15 

){LCotonuto 

)4-3 

556 

— 

19. North CaroBno 

11-4 

480 

22 

20. Trans Tear 

12-3 

396 

25 

2). Indiana 

164 

362 

17 

22 Boston Cooege 

12-3 

226 

19 

23-Tesas 

9-5 

175 

23 

24. Tutsa 

164 

155 

— 

25. AAorguette 

12-1 

94 

— 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 

w 



Casablanca: 212 231 78 78 

Marrakech: 212 444 89 98 

Agadir: 2128843232 

Fes: 212583 09 09 


\ 












PAGE 22 




\'$G> 


. . ; * i 5 £j§i^ Jv'5^5^;-^-^^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Bill, Leader of Men! 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — One rea- 
son nobody takes Wash- 
ington seriously anymore ex- 
cept people far gone on 
political hashish is the names 
they use down there. 

Bill, for starters. It's hard to 
take a country seriously when 
it's run by somebody called 
Bill. Back in the Stone Age 
there was an afternoon radio 
show called “Just Plain 
Bill.'' That Bill was a barber. 
Bill is a fine name for a 
barber. You feel the male 
bonds slip tightly into place 
the instant you say “Scissors 
on the side. BUI. And not too 
much off the top." 

It is a terrible name, how- 
ever. for a leader of men. Sup- 
pose William the Conqueror 
had been called “Bill the 
Conqueror." Suppose Willi- 
am Tecumseh Sherman had 
been called “Bill Tecumseh 
Sherman." 

No wonder our president 
gets no respect Would William 
of Orange have got any if he’d 
been “BUI of Orange"? 

Then there's Newt Can 
you imagine a serious country 
under the sway of somebody 
called Newt? Let's say you 
are the Czar of All the Rus- 
sian You bear that an ob- 
streperous member of the 
Duma is threatening to shut 
down five or six of the Rus- 
sias just at Christmastime un- 
less you cut the budget 
“Who is this pest?" you 
ask. 

“Newt" someone says. 
“Surely you mean Rasp- 
newton." you cry. signing a 
ukase ordering salt-mine duty 
for those who lower the dig- 
nity of All the Rtissias by 
shortening their names to 
Newt Our American Newt has 
a gang. Its most important 
members are Tom and Dick. 
Formally known as Tom 


DeLay and Dick Armey. Are 
we in Kid City , or what? Tom 
isn'tastatesman;he'sapiper’s 
son. And a pig thief. 

With Dick we are right 
back where we started with 
Bill. Try to imagine King 
Dick the Liod Hearted. 

Tom, Dick and Newt run 
the House of Representatives. 
Bill, who runs die White 
House, has a gang too, with 
fellows like A1 Gore and 
Mike McCnrry hanging 
around the clubhouse. Ima- 
gine the chatter 

"Hey. A 1 and Mike, have 
you guys heard what Tom, 
Dick and Newt have done 
now?” 

"It wouldn't surprise me. 
Bill, if they’ve been putting 
pennies on the railroad tracks 
to see if they’ll derail a 
train.” 

“Weirder than that, AL 
They're going to shut down 
the government" 

“Wow. Bill. That’ll wipe 
Bob right off the game 
board.” 


“Bob" refers to one 
Robert Dole, a man old 
enough, believe it or not, to 
run for president while Hying 
to persuade everybody be is 
not a Robert but a Bob. 

What's going on here with 
these kids? My guess is that 
Newt is trying to make his 
whole gang so angry at him 
that they will throw him out of 
the club for helping Bill beat 
their guy Bob. 

Not that any of die kids are 
about to tell him to pack it in. 
They’re too loyal to the club to 
make waves fa- Newt 
They know that if it hadn't 
been for Newt, Bob might be 
president. When your club 
has a guy like Newt who can 
re-elect presidents like Bill, 
you'd have to be a sap to let 
him go. 

New York Times Service 


A Dazzler Who Found Repression Rewarding 


By Warren Hoge 

New York Times Service 

L ONDON — It seemed nothing could quiet 
the man on the mobile phone propped 
against an omaie pilaster of the Lanesborough 
Hotel’s Withdrawing Room. Not the be- 
wigged Eari of Huntingdon scowling from the 
wall not the humbling rich Regency appoint- 
ments of the suite, not the censorious glances 
of the crisply uniformed staff. 

Enter a tall, buoyant woman in a simple 
black jersey chess, with dancing ringlets of 
strawberry blond hair framing her famously 
translucent face like seaside taffy twists. 
There was a crash of silence. 

An upholstered screen was set up for pri- 
vacy. a three-tiered silver tea service was 
placed on the rosewood sofa table, and Nicole 
Kidman sat her posture-perfect 5 feet 10 
inches on an ottoman. The freeze-framed hotel 
lobby scene hummed back into motion. 

“Ihope you'll feel free to talk profusely,' * 
she was told as she reached for her Dar- 
jeeling. The cup stopped in mid-passage. 
Azure eyes fixed her questioner. “Don’t 
worry." she said. 

There was indeed no cause for worry, but 
there was cause for surprise. Anyone fresh 
from viewing her two most recent perfor- 
mances — as the rapacious, small-town tele- 
vision weather girl of “To Die For’ ' and the 
sexually repressed, intellectually insecure 
young American sucked into a dissolute mar- 
riage in the palazzi of old Europe of “The 
Portrait of a Lady’ ’ — would not recognize 
the frisky 29-year-old Australian actress who 
brought the sitting-room corner to raucous 
life with a tumble of words and laughter. 

She is in England filming “Eyes Wide 
Shut," the first feature-length film to be dir- 
ected by Stanley Kubrick since "Full Metal 
Jacket" in 1987. Her co-star is her husband, 
Tom Cruise, and the couple and their two 
adopted children, Isabella, 3, and Connor, 
who will be 2 next month, are staying in a 
rented mansion in Hertfordstrire. 

There have been mixed reviews of her 
arresting performance as Isabel Archer in 
“Portrait, 1, with both the favorable and the 
unfavorable centering on the dark and trem- 
ulous interpretation of the Henry James 
heroine that the New Zealand-born director 
Jane Campion. 42. brought forth from her. 

Their collaboration was an intense and — 
at one crucial point — pained one. resulting 
in the most ambitious performance of Kid- 
man's screen career. Her Isabel Archer is as 



LUa Bo«Bfnio ttew tmfcl 

Nicole Kidman, who stars in Jane Campion’s “The Portrait of a Lady.” 


coof and remote — some critics described 
her performance as cold — as Kidman is 
none of those tilings, testament to the reach 
this role represented for her. 

“I don’t find it cold when I watch it" she 
said. “I think we have spread it ouL We didn’t 
want Isabel as the heroine who arrives an the 
scene — ‘Now you meet your heroine!’ — 
with the hair flying and the bright eyes." 

In feet Isabel arrives on the scene with an 
expression as blank and vulnerable as a clean 
canvas. She is bound in a confining dark 
dress and, during die shooting, the restraints 
were to go from snug to sore. 

“We got tiie corset down to 19 inches one 
day." Kidman said, "and I would be in pain 
and have bruises and stuff on my body when 
I took it off. But it was a psychological thing, 
a thing where I wanted to be restricted really, 
really tight so that the more repressed I was, 
the I more I felt it." 

What Campion and Kidman were after 
was not the period heroine who, in the act- 
ress's words, is “divine, snide, bitchy, and 
every man’s in love with her" but someone 


who participates in her fate and loses control 
of it. “Isabel becomes strange and quite 
plain,” Kidman said. 

Doubts about whether Kidman could cap- 
ture tins elusive character occurred to Cam- 
pion during pre pa rat i on of the movie, and 
provoked what Kidman calls “the most dif- 
ficult thing I have ever been through.” 

The two women first met in 1981 when 
Campion saw Kidman perform in Sydney and 
cast her in her graduation film for die Aus- 
tralian Him, Television and Radio School 
But the headmistress of her all-gibd high school 
wouldn’t give the 14-year-old time off. 

The daughter of Australian parents, Kid- 
man was bom in Hawaii at a time when her 
father, a biochemist, was studying there, but 
she was retired in Sydney from the age of 3. 
So effective is her command of American and 
British accents on screen that it is startling to 
hear bow very Aussie she sounds in life. 

So Kidman didn’t get the part, but she did 
come away with a postcard from Campion. 
“I would like to direct you in something 
classical,” it said. Kidman treasured 


the correspondence but pot little stock in it. 

Four yeare ago, Kidman icanied that Cam- 
pion nught be xnaidnga. film of ‘‘The Poramt 

of a Lady” and thought, “Wdl, OX, any 
rihanrg toe’d be interested in me?” Hie 
learned that Campion bad been thinking of 
her for the role of Isabel. "It baffled me, 
because she could work with anybody, you 
know, but I flew out to Australia.’’ 

There, Kidman discussed the book and die 
movie with Campion, Laura Jones, the 
screenwriter, and Jan Cha pman , producer of 
Campi on ‘s 1993 film, “The Piano." Kid- 
man returned to Los Angeles and soon after 
read die script of “To Die For.” After learn- 
ing th a r Meg Ryan had turned down the role, 
she called 1 he director, GusVanSant. There 
was no Jamesian ambiguity to the approach. 
She told the director site was “destined” for 
the part. He gave her the job on die phone. 

“ ‘To Die For’ was great for me, and X 
loved doing.it, bat ‘Portrait’ remained my 
passion,” she said. In 1994, with “To Die 


For” in die caributnotyet on die screen, she 
received a telephone call from Campion, 


Kidman was stunned to leam at their next 
meeting that she was being offered not the 
role ofisabel Archer but an audition for it “I 
had only just got off the plane, and 1 was very 
upset, rad she was upset,” Kidman recalled. 
“ ^he^ wanted to see IsabeL She wanted to see 

this wench. She wanted to see my anger. She 
wanted to see all those other dungs that go 
into making somebody who they are. And I 
was frightened to show her any of that.” 
And what were Campion’s . misgivings? 
Wasn’t this one of those little manipulative 
. tricks of die director's trade? “I just had 
enough doubts that I thought the only way to 
sort it out is to by it oat,” Campion said. 
During the auditions, “I saw her becoming 
very intuitive with her work, willing to go 
places 1 hadn't imagined before.”. . . 

Two days later. Kidman remembered. 
Campion telephoned. “She said, ‘You’re nry 
IsabeL There’s nobody else I would want to 
ptaytois character.’ ” 

The two women are now collaborating on 
a project at least as daring as bringmg Henry 
James to the screen. They want to make a 
movie from the New yank writer Susanna 
Moore’s ‘ ‘In the Cut,” published in 1995, a 
dark novel of love and murder in which die 
first-person narrator tells the story of her 
passion told abasement. Kidman bought the 
rights and hopes to star in die film, with 
Campion as the director. 


& 

jkrfi* 


•£* 

•+ ' i 


POSTCARD 


PEOPLE 


From Parnassus to New Age: A Taos Retreat 


By Patricia Leigh Brown 

New York Tunes Sen-ice 

T AOS, New Mexico — 
D.H. Lawrence slept 
here. So did Georgia 
O'Keeffe. Ansel Adams, 
Willa Cather, Leopold 
Stokowski. Martha Graham, 
Mars den Hartley and Carl 
Jung, to name only a few vis- 
itors to the infamous house 
that Mabel Dodge Luhan 
built. 

If walls really did talk, then 
Mabel’s could provide an ear- 


in the upstairs bathroom were 
painted in quasi-petroglyph 
style by D.H. Lawrence. Ma- 
bel lured him and Frieda 
Lawrence to Taos by letters 
describing it as “Like the 
dawn of toe world.” The fas- 
tidious Lawrence was so scan- 
dalized by transparent bath- 
room windows, Rudnick said, 
that he painted them, “to keep 
out toe prying eyes of anyone 
who warned to climb up the 
roof in order to peer in. ’ * 

In die same bathroom Una 


Mabel s could provide an ear- c^»ooiornwiv»fc*T.««. Jeffers, wife of toe poet 

ful. For if Taos is a place of Today the Luhan House is a bed and breakfast Robinson Jeffers, attempted 

myths, this house was their to shoot herself on learning of 

incubator. It was here, in 1918, among House and the American Countercul- her husband’s affair with a younger wo- 
orchards and meadows contiguous to the cure.” man, an affair Mabel encouraged, Rud- 

Taos Pueblo, that Mabel Dodge Luhan As soon as the wealthy Mabel Ganson nick said. (Una Jeffers missed.) 

— a serenely tyrannical literary hostess Evans Dodge Steroe arrived in Taos, cut And that bathroom was also die set- 

who. Ansel Adams once observed, had her hair, donned a serape and married an ting for a scene in “American Dream- 
“talons for talent" — transplanted her Indian, the house, like one of her Ouija er,” toe 1971 underground film starring 
celebrated avant-garde Greenwich Vil- boards, seemed to develop a will of its Hopper, in which the actor is engaged in 
lage literary salon and built Los Gallos, own. Its occupants rode the waves of toe the bathtub in toe altogether with two 
an eccentric 22-room adobe house, with prevailing culture, often getting caught Playboy bunnies. Situated at the end of a 
her fourth husband, Tony, a local Tewa in toe undertow. quiet dead-end road not far from toe 

Indian, at the foot of the Sacred Moun- Now a National Historic Landmark, center of town, the house still reflects the 
tain. the house was conceived by Mabel as an tantalizing ■ contradictions and ec- 

Dennis Hopper bought the house from alternative to the materialistic main- lecticism of Mabel herself, especially 


her hair, donned a serape and married an ting for a scene in "American Dream- 

1:1,, u.. »• ,k. i mi — -ci 


boards, seemed to develop a will of its 
own. Its occupants rode the waves of toe 


Hopper, in which the actor is engaged in 
the bathtub in toe altogether with two 


prevailing culture, often getting caught Playboy bunnies. Situated at the end of a 


in toe undertow. 


quiet dead-end road not far from toe 


Mabel’s granddaughter 


Now a National Historic Landmark, center of town, the house still reflects the 
the house was conceived by Mabel as an tantalizing ■ contradictions and ec- 
alternative to the materialistic main- lecticism of Mabel herself, especially 


5160,000 in 1970, taking over Mabel’s 
idea of toe house as a counterculture 
mecca. Enchanted by its association with 


around stream, where the artists and writers she 


imported could nurture their creativity. 
But it has nevertheless developed a no- 
torious reputation over the years; It be- 


D.H. Lawrence, whom he called ‘ ‘the first came a setting for obsessive literary love 
freak,” Homier envisioned an alternative affairs and at least one attempted suicide 
Hollywood, a filmmaking center for the and was known in the Hopper era as a 
counterculture of his day. He rechristened prickly den of free love and drug use. 
the house toe Mud Palace and promptly During toe 1920s and '30s, Los Gal- 
married the singer Michelle Phillips or the Ios, which was named for Mabel's dec- 
Mamas and Papas in toe solarium (she left oranve Mexican ceramic roosters, who 
him a week later). still lord it over the roof, served, Rudnick 

Whether by accident or fate, the writes, “as a kind of life-crisis center 
house, now a bed and breakfast (S75 to breaking down and bealing, making and 
SI 50 a night) and a retreat center, where sometimes unmaking love affairs and 
teachers include “transcendental paint- marriages,” for Mabel’s invited guests, 
ers” and Tibetan monks, has drawn Even now, toe house seduces visitors 
three generations of messianic owners, as Mabel — once likened by a friend to 
who have tried to transform themselves “an aeroplane laden with explosives" — 
and the world from within its walls, as is said to have done. New Age Taosenos 
Lois Palken Rudnick, the director of might call it vibrational energy. The fed- 
American studies at toe University of ing is palpable, whatever it is. 

Boston, writes in her new book, “Uto- The bathrooms may be toe most cul- 


teachers include “transcendental paint- 
ers" and Tibetan monks, has drawn 
three generations of messianic owners, 
who have tried to transform themselves 
and the world from wi thin its walls, as 


Boston, writes in her new book, “Uto- 


bathrooms may be the most cul- 


pian Vistas: The Mabel Dodge Luhan turally colorful in the country. Windows 


c main- lecticism of Mabel herself, especially 
iters she when winter fires crackle, 
eativity. Drawn to what she called “toe spartan 

ed a no- truth" of toe New Mexico landscape, she 
vlt be- first came to Taos soon after New Mexico 
ary love won statehood in 1912 to stake her claim 
1 suicide on “a new world plan." Her role models 
era as a were largely toe Tewas at the Taos 
guse. Pueblo, whose lack of interest in material 

-os Gal- wealth and whose communal style of 
si’s dec- living in harmony with nature provided 
:rs. who heady inspiration feu alienated white in- 
Rudnick teliectuals. 

. center Her husband. Tony, was an in te r pr et e r 

ting and of Indian life azzd spiritual mentor for 
tors and visitors like Willa Cather, who is said to 
I guests, have based Eusabio in “Death Comes 
visitors for toe Archbishop’ ’ on him, 
friend to The house was reincarnated in toe 
Ves" — 1980s as a “psychospiritual center” with 
aosenos a New Age bent. Now it is being re- 
rhefed- incarnated yet again for Renaissance- 
weekend-style get-togethers a la Mabel, 
tost cul- with chili, rather than sexual intrigue cm 
rindows toe side. 


W HO GETS toe most fen 
mail? Some pop star, 
right? Wrong. It’s Pope John 
Paul II and Mother Teresa 
who get the most, receiving 
wedding invitations, birth and 
death announcements, 
other pieces of post by the 
thousands, making them the 
top fen mail recipients world- 
wide. Michael Levine con- 
ducted a survey far toe latest 
edition of his “The Address 
Book — How to Reach Any- 
one Who’s Anyone,” to find 
out which celebrities were 
getting toe most fan mail. 
Mother Teresa and the Pope 
topped the list, which also in- 
cludes the basketball great 
Michael Jordan, toe actor 
Brad Pitt, singer Madonna, 
the paralyzed actor Chris- 
topher Reeve and President 
Bill Clinton. . 


Ted Turner, die founder 
of CNN, is toe biggest land- 
owner in America, according 
to Worth magazine. The gray- 
haired news mogul owns 
more than half a million hec- 
tares (13 million acres) in 
Montana, Nebraska, Florida, 
Georgia and South Carolina. 


Alan Greenspan, the 
chairman of toe U3. Federal 
Reserve, has settled on a wed- 
ding date with toe NBC tele- 
vision reporter Andrea 
MitchelL They will many 
April 6 in Washington. 


The Joffrey Ballet has 
named Robert Alpaugfa as 
its executive director, effec- 
tive immediately. Alpaugh 
succeeds Arnold Bremen, 
appointed when the Joffrey 
moved from New York City 
to Chicago in 1995. 

□ 

Richard Howard, toe 
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet 


and translator, feels more 
than toe routine admiration 
of one writer for another, in 
this case for Jules Verne. The 
French 19th-century science- 
fiction novelist provided 
Howard with an escape hatch 
from a troubled famil y situ- 
ation during his youth. So, 
he will make the opening re- 
marks Friday at a screening 
of a restored version of 
“Michel Strogoff.” a 1926 
silent film based on a Verne 
novel. The screening is partof 
a four-day Verne film festival 
in New York. Howard was 
the translator of Verne’s 
“Paris in the 20th Century,” 
which was discovered in 
1989 in an attic by Verne’s 
great-grandson and was re- 


cently published by Random 
House. 


An international auction 
devoted to Beaties memorab- 
ilia will take place in Tokyoon 
March 22, toe British anctian- 
eers Bonhams said. The auc- 
tion, expected to fetch mate 
than £1 million ($1.6 million), 
will include Paul McCart- 
ney’s hand-written lyrics for 
the song "Peony Lane.” 


Henry VIH, toe British 
monarch framed far solving 
marital problems with an ax, 
will appear on a series of 
stamps with his six wives 
marking the 450th an- 



niversary of his death; Bri- 
tain's RoyalMail said. It is the 
first time all seven historical 
figures have been released on 
the same series of stamp s . 


Queen Elizabeth U has 
met with senior members of 
her finmly and dose advisers 
at Sandringham Castle in east- 
ern Fnglanri to diSCDSS future 

policies and priorities of toe 
monarchy. Buckingham 
Palace said toe triennial sum- 
mit of toe so-called Way 
Ahead Group included toe 
Duke of Edinburgh, (he 
Prince of Wales, the Dnke of 
York, Princess Anne and 
Mice Edward. The palace * 
declined to comment on spec- <-|' 
ulation that toe outcome of a 
zeccct TV debate an the future 
of toe monarchy and toe suc- 
cessful riot to Angola by 
Princess Diana were dis- 


Shiriey MacLaine’s nezgb- 
bon in Santa Fe, New Mexico, 
are jealous: They envy her 
property taxes^Hecords show 
Maclaine paid at least $1.15 
mfilion for her 36 moontaintqj 
acres in 1 992, but it is assessed 
at $107,643. She paid $589 in 
property taxes last year. BOl 
Donahue, who pays more 
than twice as much on 62 
acres of property, said be 
thinks MacLame is getting an 
“outrageous” tax break. 
Frank Novefli, a police ser- 
geant who paid just S15 less in 
taxes tium MacLaine, believes 
his landmnstbe worth far less 
tion hers. “I win trade her 
straight- op any time she 
wishes,” he said. . if 


The actor Kevin Costner 
will give an oil-cleaning ma- 


jDi 


ROYAJ. visit _ Prince WWen, simSSTS 

Netherlands during his five-day visit to NepaL anese officials said.