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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


,\fT The World’s Daily Newspaper 




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London, Thursday, January 23, 1997 



No. 35,426. 


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in Japan 

ocities 




By Nicholas D. Kristof 

• New York Tines Service 


OMIYA, Japan — Nearly six de- 
cad^ have passed, but when Shin- 
2 aburo Hone sees a baby he stfll 
cringes inside, and his mind replays 
the indelible scene of himself as a 
young soldier in China, thrusting his 
bayonet through the chest of a 
Chinese infant. 

Mr. Horie says the killing was un- 
intentional, but the memories follow 
him everywhere, and he has never 
mustered the courage to tell even his 
wife. Nor has he ever told her how. as 
a young soldier, equally inadvert- 
ently, he ate the flesh of a 16-year-old 
Chmese boy. 

“I can't forget die fact that 1 ate a 
human being, ,r said Mr. Horie, a lean 
79-year-old fanner, whose bands 
trembled as be excavated his war 
memories. “It was only one time, and 
not so much meat, but after 60 years I 
can't put it behind me.” 

Old men like Mir. Horie all across 
Japan are still besieged by memories 
of what they did, andrm treaty can end 
the conflict in their minds and dreams. 
World War 0 has also been im- 
possible to lay to rest because dis- 


riction in East Asia. 

C hina and North and South Korea, 
for example, want Japan to make a 
clearer apology far aggression and to 
pay the individuals whom it brutal- 
ized during the war. Just recently, a 
new quarrel broke out between Japan 
and South Korea over the Japanese 
government's refusal to pay official 
compensation to the Imperial Array’s 
fonner sex slaves in Korea. ... 

Yet while nothing in . this centmy 
has so transformed Japan as the war ' 
and its'aftennalh^ discossKJns of it 
remain a virtuaT taboo in many, fern- 


eir Memories, 

ecount the War 


dies. Of course, veterans in all coun- 
tries are often reluctant to talk about 
their worst memories, but in' J j 
many young people have no * 
Grandpa even went to war. 

Old men are now taking their war 
secrets with them to the grave here in 
Omiya, a farm town of 5 ,700 people 
set in the jutting hills of Mie Pre- 
fecture almost 320 kilometers (200 
miles) southwest of Tokyo. 

The men — and to a lesser extent, 
the women — who endured toe war 
years are often deeply upset that 
young people know so lime about 
those wrenching tones, yet they feel 
unable to open their hearts to those 
who were not there. 

“My story is nothing to be 
of,” said Mr. Horie, who was 
agitated as he spoke about his role in 
toe war. “So I don't drink I should 
talk too much about it.” - 

Over all, looking at Mr. Hone’s 
generation, it would be difficult to 

imiagpi^.«nn«^wpgf riding 

did wonse drings. .. 

From the time they invaded North- 
east China 'in 1931 and toe rest of 
China in 1937, through World Warn, 
Japanese troops massacred civilians, 
tortured, captives and raped girls al- 
most everywhere they went, and yet 
those samemen— now graying at toe 
temples, raising wrinkled hands to die 
ear — are tmfeihBgly courteous, 
gentle andhonest. 

They are deeply respected in their 
co mmun ities, and everyone knows 
they would never- think of cheating 
anybody or losing their tempers. 

. Yet they coDectively killed 20 mil- 
lion or 30 million people. 

Paradoxically, a decency shines 
through even as they talk about toe 
things they did, for i least in Omiya 

See JAPAN, Page 4 



New Blast Spreads Fear in Algeria 



Apiir« miifPBBM 

A woman crossing Wednesday near a parking barrier set up in 
Algiers to guard against car-bombings. Civilians patrolled the streets, 
and a new bombing to the south reportedly killed five people. Page 6. 


Ell’s Real Target 
To Move East: 2002 

Even That Date Is Optimistic, 
And Not for All 10 Candidates 


By Tom Buerkle 

Internationa} Herald Tribune 



Japan Targets U.S. Sport-Utility Car Buyers 


By Keith Bradsber 

New York Timex Service 


DETROIT — Clutching a white 
plastic shopping bag fell of car bro- 
chures, Carolyn Spicer, 52, a credit-uni- 
on manager, stood at the North American 
International Auto Show here and care- 
fully studied the light gray Jeep-like 
Honda CR-V on the platform. 

After looking at it from toe front and 
the side, she guessed it would sell for 
$25,000 when it went on sale next 
month, so she was surmised to leant that 
toe price would be $19300 for a well- 


equipped model. 
“If the 


she said. 


they keep that price,’ 

“it’s going to really go.” 

That is exactly rite reaction Honda 
has been hoping for, and precisely the 
one thaL Detroit fears^ ... . 


After years of limited success. non- 
US. automakers are staging an all-out 
assault on America's sizzling market for 
spore-utility vehicles, toe crown jewels 
of Detroit’s Big Three car companies. 

With such imports as toe CR-V ac- 
counting for most of the new offerings, 
and with the dollar soaring to nearly a 
four-year high against toe yen and 
climbing against the Deutsche mark, 
non-U.S. automakers appear poised for 
big sales gains in toe United States. 

In the next four years, at least 17 
Japanese or European companies plan to 
introduce four-wheel-drive sport-utility 
models into a market now dominated by 
Qnysler’s Jeeps, Ford's Explorers and 
Expeditions and GM ’s giant Suburbans, 
Tahoes and Yukons. This surge is a clear 

See CARS, Page 6 - 


BRUSSELS — In a misstep that 
sparked concern across Eastern Europe, 
the European Commission let slip its 
belief Wednesday that the European 
Union would not include former 
Warsaw* Pact members before 2002 and 
that only some of the 1 0 candidate coun- 
tries would qualify. 

The incident underscored growing 
concern across Europe about enlarge- 
ment of the 1 5-nation organization. 

Many cureenz EU members fear that 
enlargement will cost huge sums and 
dilute the bloc’s political cohesion, and 
many Eastern countries feel they are be- 
ing kept waiting unfairly while the EU 
focuses on constitutional reform and 
monetary union. The risk, European and 
U.S. officials say, is that a significant 
delay in enlargement could undermine 
support in Eastern Europe for the painful 
measures required for the transition to 
free -market economies. 

The European Commission attempt- 
ed to retract its statement after Poland's 
foreign minister reacted by reaffirming 
Warsaw’s goal of entering the EU by 
2000, an ambition widely shared by 
former Communist countries. But com- 
mission officials and EU diplomats ac- 
knowledged that the EU would have 
difficulty meeting even a target date of 
2002 and that the first group of countries 
to join was likely to be a small one. 

The incident started when the com- 
mission said in a statement on enlarge- 
ment that toe likely length of membership 
negotiations, which are scheduled to start 
early next year, and subsequent ratifi- 
cation procedures meant that “the earli- 
est realistic date for the first accession is 
likely to be no earlier than 2002.” 

Hours later, the commission, the EU’s 
executive agency, backtracked, calling 
the release of the statement “erroneous” 
and “regrettable” and restating the of- 
ficial postion that no date could be fore- 


NATO’s Cost: Civilian Rule 


4 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Tunes Service 






WARSAW — As Poland gears opto 

coovirxte Washington toatitmeets one of 
the conditions for joining NATO — hav- 
ing its mtotary tmder civilian control — 

tbf-T«p ji'geyidal. Tniiiieri in 

Moscow, is resisting rite redaction in his 
authority, according to a senior Polish 
defense official ana Western topkanats. 

The senior defease official, Andrzej 
Karkoszka, deputy defense ministex, ac- 
knowledged in an interview that toe chief 
of general staff, —General Tadensz 
WTler.ki, was fightingtiiles that give ci- 
vilians in the ministry the final say. 

The regulations, drawn up by toe 
deputy ' minister, went into effect in 
December... 

' The general ‘ ‘would Bke tobe on his 
own. as-be was,” said Mr. Ka rk nf g k a , 
who has had public disputes with the 
general. 

He that he also has had private 
arguments with President Ale k sa n der 
K waariewski over whether to keep Gen- 
eral Wftedd in charge of tbe military. 

[“Obviously the general staff, which 
was affected the' most stro ngly by the 
’-'iartny reforms, cannot be happy- about 
■I it,’ ’ Mr. Karkoszka told Tbe Associated 
Press in Warsaw. 

.. [But,' he added, “It has all been 
settled and we reached an agreement. 
The regulations could not have been put 
into life without rite consent of General 
Waedd.” He “accepted the new roles. 


is implementing them and acting ac- 
cordingly,’’ Mr. Karkoszka said.] 

. Under ri» new regulations, Mr. 
Karkoszka said, “despite what the gen- 
erals^, toe final word must come from 
the minister,” Stanisfaw Dobrzanski 

“We say -finances, logistical plan- 
ning, promotions, ; structural changes 
should be doae m tbe eivffian depart- 
ment of defense.” Mr. Karkoszka said. 

. “This is yoy difficult to execute, I 
admit” The Defease Ministry previ- 
ously served purely administrative 
functions. 

Diplomats said that the general's ob- 
jections had delayed formal publication 
of the new civilian control regulations 
and added that so fardipiomats had been, 
briefed about theroles but not presented 
with them. They -are technically in ef- 
fect the diplomats said. 

The 16-member North Atlantic 
Treaty Orgamzatforiis expected to an- 
nounce in July that Pfcland, tbe Czech 

See POLAND, Page 6 





CHECKPOINT — A lii, and Russian soldier guarding a roadblock Wednesday near Koraj, Bosnia. 
Soldiers were keeping Serbs away from Muslims, who were trying to return to their homes. Under an 
accord between the UN refugee agency and the multinational force, Muslims were to be allowed to return. 


How to Shock a Mexican Politician: Assail Adultery 


By Sam DiDon 

New York Times Service 



■ ‘ ■ ■ - 


■ The Dollar 


NmYM 

Wednesday dost 

preulouickna- 


Dll ' 

. 1.6409 

-- 1.6297. 


.. Pound 

1.6363 

1:6637 _ 

• 'ft 

Van 

11&835 

117.915- 

’ 


. . 5.496 ' 

£ 

a 

i he Dow 

a 

4 



■ L -ll 

-3187 

6850X13 

6683.90 . 

:r>' 4 

■ S&-P 500 ■ 

' dmpa 

Wednesday doe# 

previous doee ; 

9 

4351 

. '78*28 

782.72 

.^4 .. / 




MEXICO CITY — A prominent politician caused a 
• sensation recently when be called on newly elected 
public officials from his opposition party to be not just 
scrupulous in toerrhusbaridry of government fends but 
. also faithful in their role as husbands. 

Women who beard toe speech.by Andres Lopez 
Obrador, president of the Democratic Revolutionary 
~ Party, applauded. Mien fa -the audience cleared therr 
•foroats and squirmed. Over the weeks since, some 
male politicians have been mattering their view chat 


riie speech violated the proper separation between 
private and political worlds. 

One social scientist said Mr. Lopez Obrador *s in- 
cursion imo sexual politics reflected a profound recent 
evolution in Mexican sexuality. Another writer saw it 

Salinas de Gortari presidency, which ended in 1994. 

But few Mexicans would venture that adultery, 
which has been a male prerogative and a statistical 
noun here, is really on the wane. 

' ‘Our presidencies go through cycles.” said Guada- 
lupe T.naegfl, a journalist who specializes in Mexican 
mores and m ann ers. “One man is frivolous, the next a 


moralist. Now we’re living a post -Salinas moral crisis, 
and this speech is a reaction. But there’s been no 
fundamental change. Men here are still like little boys 
playing their pranks: they cheat on their wives, and 
then betray one lover for another. Adultery is still a 
national sport. Mexico is still a complete cheat-fest.” 
If infidelity continues apace, however, at least one 
of its classic institutions is in decline: tbe casa chica , 
the “little home’ ’ acquired by many men to maintain 
mistresses and often illegitimate children as well. In a 
Roman Catholic society in which divorce is dis- 


See MEXICO, Page 6 


cast beyond toe start of negotiations. The 
EU currently has scheduled them for 
early 1998. Unfortunately for the Union. 
Hans van den Broek, its commissioner 
for enlargement, had as much as con- 
firmed the 2002 date at an informal sem- 
inar of die HU and the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization on Tuesday. 

In a clear reference to President 
Jacques Chirac of France, who told 
Hungarian leaders last week that he 
hoped to see them join tbe EU by 2000, 
Mr. van den Broek said politicians who 
made such forecasts “know too little 
about enlargement. ' ' 

While he declined to mention a date 
himself, he told one EL? diplomat who 
predicted toe first new Eastern members 
would join tn 2002 or 2003, “I don't 
disagree with you.” The 10 countries 
under consideration are Poland, Hun- 
gary, the Czech Republic. Slovakia, 
Slovenia, Romania. Bulgaria. Latvia, 
Lithuania and Estonia. A European dip- 
lomat. who pointed out that it had taken 

See EUROPE, Page 6 


Yeltsin Goes 
To Kremlin, 
Stalling Vote 
To Oust Him 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — The lower house of 
Parliament on Wednesday first tentat- 
ively approved a resolution seeking to 
oust President Boris Yeltsin because of 
ill health, but then balked and put it on 
hold after Mr. Yeltsin made an un- 
expected return to toe Kremlin. 

The action by the State Duma, in 
which the Communists are toe largest 
single faction, suggested there may not 
be enough support in toe 450-member 
chamber to pass toe measure, although 
backers said they would try again next 
month. Mr. Yeltsin's sudden decision to 
come to work only two days after leav- 
ing the hospital after a bout of pneu- 
monia underscored toe Kremlin's sen- 
sitivity to criticism of the ailing leader. 

Mr. Yeltsin's surprise return was not 
shown on television, in contrast to prom- 
inent attention given to his Dec. 23 re- 
appearance after heart surgery. But his 
press service said toe president went to 
toe Kremlin at 1 1 :30 A.M. from his sub- 
urban Moscow residence to meet Prime 
Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin. Tbe 
Duma vote came later in the afternoon. 

Recently, Mr. Yeltsin’s doctors had 
said he would need several more weeks 
of recovery at home before going back 
to work. The “moderately grave” 
pneumonia was diagnosed after Mr. 
Yeltsin's initial recuperation from a 
quintuple coronary artery bypass op- 
eration on Nov. 5. 

One of his doctors, Andrei Vorobyov, 
who in die past has been extremely 
reluctant to publicly discuss Mr. 
Yeltsin’s health, denounced the Duma 
on Wednesday, accusing them of for- 
cing Mr. Yeltsin back to work pre- 
maturely. According to toe Interfax 
news agency. Dr. Vorobyov said he was 
astonished ai “toe uproar and mayhem 
raised by the members around an ele- 
mentary case of pneumonia which is 
ubiquitous in toe country now.” 

He added, “I dislike toe Duma very 
much because I regard its activity as very 
unproductive, very defiant and very un- 
civilized. Now the head of state will start 
work earlier than he should have, as he 
did after very serious heart surgery." 

Dr. Vorobyov, identified as scientific 
director of a council of doctors advising 
Mr. Yeltsin, said the president “ex- 

See YELTSIN, Page 6 


Publish — and Be Damned 

British Ministry ImposesBanfor Books on Elite Force 


By Fred Barbash 

Wastirtgion Fob Service 




Huttatmd PriQM 


Bahrain., 

Cypres. 

Oenmak 

Finland.. 

Gtoraftaf. 


... 1.000 Din Malta. 


-55 c. 


„ ; C. £ 1 JOO hfigaria„.125j)0 Naka 
.1A00DJ&. Oman —-..1.250 Riafe 
.12.00 EM. Qatar— -10.00 RWs 
eti.85 Rap«mBland-JR£.U». 
Great Britain _£O90 Saudi Arabia .10.00 B 

£E 550 S. Africa „.R12 + VAT 

Jordan. 1 . 2504 D LLAJE.— . 10 . 00 Dbh 

Kenya. —K. SH.15aUS.fcS. 
KuvraiU.^^ea0 FBs Znttbwe.— ZknSKUW 



■ LONDON — The British military’s 

• Special Air Sa^icc is ooe of toe world's 

most elite and renowned fighting and 
anti-terrorist forces. It was also one of 
toe most secret, until a few years a go 
when framer members, mclnding ns 
former leader, started publishing their 
memoirs — to toe great annoyance of 
toe British military. ' _ 

Tbetmlitaiy , having failed to muzzle 

■ the veterans by dissuasion; denunci- 

atioo iff legal action, amratmeed Wed- 
nesday that it would invoke a truly spe- 
cial force: shunning. _ • • ■ 

Henceforth, it said, any former SAS 
member who publishes a book on the 


unit will be banned from entering SAS 
bases, meaning they can no longer at- 
tend SAS reunions, dinners, commem- 
orative services or to just go and chat 
unto their former comrades in arms. 

. The ban will apply to veterans of all 
ranks, meaning feat the nation’s most 
decorated living soldier, retired General 
Sir Peter de la Billiere, 62, will no longer 
be welcome at the table of toe fighting 
force . he once led. Embarrassingly, 
while be was insistingit did not apply to 
him. a ministry spokesman was stress- 
ing the word “anyone." 

An informal ban had already been 
imposed by current SAS officers on 
Andy McNab, toe pseudonym of toe 

See SHUNNED, Page 6 



TbcAuoaaMftca 

General Sir Peter de la Billiere is a 
target of the Defense Ministry ban. 


AGENDA 


Italy Votes Constitutional Panel 

ROME (Reuters) — Italy’s lower 
bouse of Parliament on Wednesday 
voted, 534 to 70, to create a special 
commission to draft proposed con- 
stitutional refrains io end the coun- 
try’s instability. 


PAGE TWO 

Victims of Qana Are Not Forgotten 

THE AMERICAS Pa9«>3. 

VS. Approves Drug Testing Kit 

Books — Page 9. 

Crossword - Page 

Opinion Pages a-9. 

Sports ...... Pages 18-19. 


The vote was the fourth ballot in six 
months of parliamentary wrangling 
over the plan. It leaves the 70-member 
commission, formed from both 
houses of Parliament, just five 
months to come up with a draft 

Albright and Cohen 
Confirmed by Senate 

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday 
gave its blessing to President Bill 
Clinton's selection of Madeleine Al- 
bright as secretiuy of state and Wil- 
liam Cohen as defense secretary. 
Both were confirmed by votes of 99 to 
0, but senators took the opportunity to 
criticize U.S. foreign policy. Page 3. 


r 

\ 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23 , 1997 

PAGE TWO 


It Is Our Turn No w ' / Victims of Shelling Mourned Daily 


West Bank Deal Resonates in Lebanon 


By John Lancaster 

Kdj Ilia ohm Past Scnicc 


Q 


ANA. Lebanon — . As memorials go. 
theirs is neither beautiful nor grand. They 
■ lie in unmarked graves, capped with 
cinder blocks and crudely poured cement 
in an asphalt parking lot just steps from 
the United Nations compound where they died last 
April IS. 

Bui the victims of Qana have not been forgotten. 

Every day. the grave site is visited by people like 
Nariman Jaber. who stops by with friends on the 
way to school to read the Fatha. the opening verse of 
the Koran. 

“We'll never forget, because I can see the fam- 
ilies of the people who died and how they feel.' ' the 
teenager said. “They don’t just read "the Koran. 
They come and cry here." 

The grave site holds the remains of 99 to 101 
Lebanese — many of them women and children — 
killed when 16 Israeli artillery shells slammed into 
the UN compound where they had taken refuge 
during Operation Grapes of Wrath. Israel's effort to 
curb rocket attacks on its territory by Shiite Muslim 
guerrillas in southern Lebanon. Some of the bodies 
were too badly mangled to permit an accurate count 
of the dead. 

The makeshift mausoleum is a 
somber counterpoint to the generally 
upbeat mood that surrounded the 
partial Israeli troop withdrawal from 
the West Bank city of Hebron this 
month. 

With its fading silk flowers and 
curling snapshots of the dead, the 
grave site is a powerful reminder of 
the continuing conflict between the 
guerrillas and Israeli troops who oc- 
cupy a portion of southern Lebanon 
to prevent its use as a launching point 
for attacks on northern Israel. 



AMoll»h Bcny/Bvutan 


B 


UT the West Bank deal has 
not gone unnoticed here. 

Still struggling to rebuild 
their country after the 15- 
year civil war that ended in 1990. Lebanese are 
scrutinizing the agreement for signs that the con- 
servative prime minister of Israel. Benjamin Net- 
anyahu. might be contemplating a deal with Syria 
and Lebanon. 

“It is our turn now, no question about it. now that 
this deal is done." said Jamil Mroue. publisher of 
the English-language Beirut Daily Star, which re- 
cently reappeared after a long hiatus. 

After so many disappointments. Lebanese are 
wary of good news. Some fear that having unproved 
his relations with the Palestinians, at least tem- 
porarily. Mr. Netanyahu could feel freer to mm up 
the heat on Damascus — by stepping up attacks on 
the Hezbollah guerrillas waging proxy war on its 
behalf. Syria dominates Lebanon politically and 
militarily, and the two function as one so far as 



A father crying out in grief at the mass funeral for the 
victims in Qana. The grave site is a powerful reminder of 
the continuing conflict between guerrillas and Israeli troops. 


Israel is concerned. 

“Every day there’s 
shelling, and we’re liv- 
ing on our nerves.” said 
Hala Ali Iftuni. whose 
elder brother died in the 
Qana attack. 

“We are unable to 
sleep, believe me. after 
this war. People don’t 
want to stay in the south 
after what they've seen.” But she said the Hebron 
agreement had given her reason to hope. 

' * It made me feel that maybe there will be a deal 
in the south.” she said while visiting her brother's 
grave with an infant daughter balanced on her hip. 
“God willing, there will be no more massacres." 

Israeli military officials said the shelling of Qana 
was accidental, that Israeli gunners had been trying to 
hit a spot near the UN compound from which Le- 
banese guerrillas had fired rockets. A UN report 
called that explanation “unlikely” but did not rule it 
out. 

After the United Stales and France intervened 
diplomatically. Syria and Lebanon pledged that 
guerrilla groups would refrain from firing rockets 
into northern Israel or launching attacks from civilian 
settlements and Israel pledged not to retaliate for 


attacks on its forces by striking near civilian areas. 

Monitored by teams of U.S. and French dip- 
lomats working out of Nicosia, the arrangement thus 
far has prevented the tit- for- tat strikes on civilian 
areas that culminared in Israel's offensive in April. 

“All parties seem very keen to uphold the un- 
derstanding. including Hezbollah,” said Mikael 
Lindvall, a spokesman for the UN peacekeeping 
force in Lebanon. “No one wants to be the first to 
break it up." 

But die situation remains volatile, with frequent 
clashes between Hezbollah guerrillas and Israeli 
forces and their allied Lebanese militia. 

W OUNDS are still raw in Qana, a hilltop 
village overlooking the Mediterranean. 
Pictures of mutilated children adorn a 
billboard next to the burial she. 

A hand-lettered sign compares the Israeli attack 
to the Holocaust. A nearby photo shop, meanwhile, 
sells videotapes of the carnage for the equivalent of 
$13 a copy. 

Some say their wounds will never heal. 

“I don’t believe there will be peace," said Riyad 
Ahmed Jaber. a barber whose father and sister died 
in the attack. 

“A day will come when we are all in front of God, 
and we will take our retribution." 


Peace, It’s Wonderful, 
But Not in Split Hebron 

Arabs and Jews Both Voice Complaints 


By Joel Greenberg 

New York Times Service 


Tom Parker, Elvis’s Manager, Dies at 87 travel update 


By Neil Strauss 

New York Times Service 


“Colonel" Tom Parker, the strict, 
unorthodox and controversial manager 
who orchestrated Elvis Presley's career 
from 1955 until the singer’s death in 
1977, died Tuesday at Valley Hospital 
in Las Vegas. He was 87. The cause was 
complications from a stroke, said Brace 
Banke. a longtime friend and a former 
executive at the Las Vegas Hilton. 

Perhaps the best-known manager in 
show business. Mr. Parker — univer- 
sally known by the honorary title Col- 
onel — oversaw Elvis’s rise from a 
phenomenon in the South to a world- 
wide superstar. 

A rough-spoken, imposing business- 
man, Mr. Parker was known for fab- 
ricating his background. The most likely 
story is that he immigrated to the United 
States from the Netherlands around the 
age of 20 and traveled with circuses, 
settling down in Tampa. Florida. 

Mr. Parker began his management 
career with the singer Eddy Arnold, and 
went on to manage the singer Hank 
Snow. He booked Elvis as an opening 
act on a Hank Snow tour and began 
trying to persuade Elvis, his parents and 
his manager. Bob Neal, to let him 
provide professional guidance. 

In 1955. Elvis agreed to accept Mr. 
Parker as an adviser, who devoted his 
life to the singer. He sold programs and 
counted tickets at his shows. He ar- 
ranged everything from Elvis’s appear- 
ances on "The Ed Sullivan Show" to 


his profitable but bland Hollywood 
films. He persuaded Elvis to abandon 
performing and public appearances in 
the mid-1960s and masterminded his 
comehack in Las Vegas in 1969. 

After Elvis’s death, he was sued by 
the singer’s heirs for fraud and mis- 
management. and a Memphis court 
ruled that he had no legal rights to the 
Elvis estate. 

In 1980, he moved to Las Vegas, 
where he lent his experience to en- 
tertainers and served as an entertain- 
ment adviser to the Hilton Hotel chain. 

Diana Lewis, 77, Actress 

LOS ANGELES (LAT) — Diana 
Lewis, 77, an ingeaue who appeared in 
Marx Brothers and Andy Hardy movies, 
died of pancreatic cancer Saturday in 
Palm Springs, California. 


She acted in more than 20 films before 
marrying the actor William Powell in 
1940 and moving to Palm Springs. She 
became a philanthropist and a hostess 
for the desert community's film colony 
and lived in the same house — which 
became Palm Springs’ first designated 
historical site in 1995 — for 45 years. 

Irwin Levine, 58, Songwriter 

LIVINGSTON, New Jersey (Reu- 
ters) — Irwin Levine, 58. who wrote the 
best-selling song “Tie a Yellow Ribbon 
Round the Old Oak Tree.' ’ died Tuesday 
at a hospital in Livingston, New Jersey, a 
hospital spokesman said Wednesday. 

Mr. Levine's song about a man re- 
turning home from prison was the second 
most recorded song in history, after 
“Yesterday" by the Beatles, according to 
die Guinness Book of World Records. 


Speed Cameras Trap the Police 


Agence France-Presse 

LONDON — British highway cam- 
eras are trapping so many speed-limit 
violators that the police cannot keep up 
with prosecutions, and a spokesman 
said Wednesday that some cameras 
had been disabled as a result. 

A spokesman for the Association 
of Chief Police Officers told BBC 
radio that some police departments 
were disabling the cameras to stay 
within their budgets. 


The problem, he said, is that fines 
generated by the cameras go directly 
to the national Department of Trans- 
portation. while the cost of buying 
and maintaining the equipment, pro- 
cessing the daia and prosecuting vi- 
olations falls to local councils. 

The association wants the gov- 
ernment to pay for the administrative 
costs of the cameras, arguing that the 
national treasury would be the main 
financial beneficiary. 


French Rail Unions 
Call for Walkout 

PARIS (Reuters) — The two biggest 
rail unions called Wednesday for a 
strike Jan. 30 against French govern- 
ment plans to overhaul the heavily in- 
debted state railroad SN CF. 

The leftist CGT and CFDT unions 
said they had agreed on “a united re- 
action by rail workers to oppo se th e 
breakup of the SNCF.” The CFDT 
urged workers to plan protest actions * ‘in 
the spirit of November and December 
1995,” when a 24-day rail strike para- 
lyzed France, forcing the government to 
withdraw a previous reform plan. 

General Strike in Greece 

ATHENS (AFP) — For the second 
time in two months, die powerful GSEE 
trade union has urged its 600,000 
private and public-sector employees to 
strike Thursday for 24 hours. 

The action is expected to affect 
Olympic Airways, as well as the national 
railroad and public transport in Athens, 
where protesters plan to march through 
the streets to express their opposition to 
an austerity budget for 1997. 

The United States has warned its 
citizens living in India of possible re- 
taliation by separatist insurgents fol- 
lowing the extradition to India of a 
suspected top Sikh militant leader. U.S. 
officials said Wednesday. (Reuters) 


HEBRON, West Bank — The rows 
of vivid Palestinian pennants over the 
’ streets, marking the handover of most of 

Hebron to Palestinian rule, end abruptly 
at a road leading toward enclaves pf 
Jewish settlers in the center of die city. 

By the side of the road, in front of a 
new fortified Israeli Army position, 
workmen have put up bright tea signs. 

“A ttenti on!, the signs say in Hebrew 
and Arabic. “You are entering an area 
under the control of the Israeli security 
forces. The Israel Defense Forces and 
Israel Police operate in the area.” 

On the other side of the sign, a similar 
message tells people going the other 
way *hnt they are about to enter “the 
area of the Palestinian Authority” 
where “Palestinian Police Forces op- 
erate." 

The signs brought a sense of per- 
manence to the new reality that has 
taken hold here in the last few days. 
With foe first flush of change behind 
them, Palestinians and Israelis in 
Hebron, both in and out of uniform, are 
adjusting to new routines of a city undo: 
dual authority. 

The arrangements are working 
smoothly for now, although neither side 
is satisfied. 

“I live in two worlds,” said Hamdi 
Halaweh. whose home is in the Pal- 
estinian zone but whose butcher shop 
lies in the area controlled by Israel, 
some 20 percent of die city. 

“I leave home in the morning happy 
that I'm under the Palestinian Author- 
ity, but by the time 2 arrive at my shop, 
the feeling's gone. 

“Israeli soldiers stop me at a check- 
point, search me, put my bands up 
against the waiL This is no way to live. 
People celebrated in one part of town, 
but 200 meters away there was a curfew. 
What good is that? * 

The two parts of Hebron are a study in 
contrasts. 

While blue-clad Palestinian officers 
have already begun easing the notorious 
traffic jams on their side of town, clear- 
ing away illegally stopped cars and 
wayward pedestrians, a main road 
passing by the Jewish settler enclaves 
remains largely deserted, flanked by 
sandbagged Israeli positions. 

The Palestinian sector is still fes- 
tooned with the red, green, white and 
black colors of thousands of Palestinian 
flags as well as pictures of Yasser Ara- 
fat. 

The Israeli-controlled section is bare 
and subdued, filled with Israeli troops 
and police officers, and dominated by 
new, large Israeli flags draped over a 
Jewish neighborhood and - an army 
checkpoint. 

"In my own neighborhood I feel like 
a free human being with dignity,” said 
Kama! Abu Shama as he crossed from 
the Palestinian side into the Israeli-held 
zone for prayers at the Cave of the 
Patriarchs, a shrine sacred to Muslims 
and Jews. 

“At home I feel security and peace of 
mind. I can go to sleep at night with my 
door unlocked, safe from thieves, and 
the Jews can’t crane to arrest me. But 
here I feel powerless.” 

Not all Palestinians fed that way. 
Kheiri Dmeiri, who lives just inside the 
Israeli sector, said he had a new sense of 
confidence because the Palestinian po- 
lice are in town. 

“I go out at night now without fear- 
ing die settlers,” he said. 

“They know that if they pick up a 
gum there are armed Palestinians facing 
them. I know die Palestinian soldiers 
will protect me, gun against gun.” 

But there has been no need for aimed 
threats in the first days of the agreement 
in Hebron. Palestinian police officers 
and Israeli soldiers appear to be working 
in harmony to keep the peace, serving as 
barriers between the hostile Arab and 
Jewish populations. 

On toe road leading to die Jewish 
enclaves on Tuesday, two Palestinian 
liaison officers stood opposite an Israeli 
checkpoint at their jeep, crossing at ooe 
point to meet their Israeli counterparts. 

Palestinian policemen were stationed 
nearby to prevent any trouble between 
Arabs ana the settlers, who were kept 


well away in their enclaves by the Israeli 
troops. A joint Patestmian-Israeli jeep 
unit kept watch from a hilltop over- 
looking the Jewish neighborhoods. 

“We have no problems cooperating, 
and working together will build mist 
between us,” said First Lieutenant 
Ahmad Abu Hayran. one of the Pal- 
estinian liaison officers. 

“The problem is the settlers. They 
don’t accept the agreement, they're frill 
of hatred for the Arabs and one of them 
could pick up a gun and open fire. We 
don’t know what might happen in the 
future. 

But the settlers, as well as Palestinian 
militants, have done nothing so far to 
disrupt the new arrangements taking 
shape in Hebron. 

Deprived of Israeli Army protection 
outside their enclaves, the Jews have 
kept to their neighborhoods, steering 
clear of the Palestinian zone and trav- 
eling to and from Hebron on Israeli- 
controlled roads that bypass the city. - 

Some settlers acknowledge a sense of - 
defeat. 

“We’ve become like a foreign em- 
bassy here,’ * said Sophie Ron, who lives 
in a Jewish enclave. “The agreement 
preserves only a symbolic Jewish pres- 
ence in Hebron. This is not what we 
expected at all.” 

But Rabbi Moshe Levinger, who led 
the first group of Jewish settlers in 
Hebron after it was captured in the 1967 
Arab-Israeli war, called the handover of 
most of the city a reversal in a con- 
tinuing war. 


Kenya, Facing 
Famine, Plans 
Corn Imports 

Agence France-Prrsse 

NAIROBI — Kenya is faring the risk 
of mass starvation following a wide- 
spread drought, officials said, and the 
government has agreed to import large 
quantities of com. 

“Parts of the country are experien- 
cing persistent drought and hence food 
shortages due to the failure of both the 
long and short rains,” President Daniel 
arap Moi said in a statement. 

Last month politicians from the 
North-Eastern Province said that dozens 
of people from foe area had died of 
starvation. The claims could not be in- 
dependently ConfoiDed. 

Thousands of people, most of them 
herdsmen and their families, in the arid 
and semiarid North-Eastern and Eastern 
provinces are already dependent on 
food aid. 

Earlier tins month, the U.S. Agency 
for International Development 'ranted 
in a report that Kenya will have to 
import large amounts of food or face a 
disastrous famine. 

“Farm households in the marginal 
areas of Eastern Province face serious 
food insecurity following the imminent **' 
failure of the critical short rains,” foe 
report, tilled Kenya Vulnerability Up- 
date, said. 

It recommended that foe com be im- 
ported duty-free so that the most vul- 
nerable groups could afford corameal, 
which Kenyans use to make ugali, a 
thick porridge served with stew. 

The “short rains” in the semiarid 
eastern region of the country account for 
as much as 70 percent of total annual 
crop production, but prolonged drought 
has caused damage to the crop. 

Com prices in Nairobi have almost 
doubled in recent weeks with a 90- 


$25, up from $13 a year ago. 

Local economists estimate that the 
country will have to import more than 
1.3 million metric tons of its grain 
needs, including com, beans, rice and 
wheat Com is expected to constitute 
half of foe total food imports. 

A year ago Kenya had a bumper 
harvest But lower prices have discour- 
aged producers from keeping up pro- 
duction. Imports in 1995 caused a glut in 
the market resulting in low prices for 
farmers. C 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


WEATHER 


Resort 

Andorra 

Pas dels Casa 
Sddeu 

Depth 
L U 

1 60 21Q 
60 IBQ 

Mtn. Rex Snow 

Pta les Pistes State 

Good Open 'us 

Good Open V&r 

Lust 

Snow fwwwwitT 

tin «233?fl!s open. runs (w*wv 
21/1 2021 Kfe epax fwaiynjo 

Austria 

Ischgl 

45 

130 

Good 

Open 

Pc/d 

21/1 

sMlto open. gmddBmm temps 

Kitztouhel 

10 

50 

Pm 

worn 

1 hr 

30/1 

56/BO Os aim. bast si pass tttm 

Lech 

70 

iffi 

Good 

'ey 

VBr 

M/1 

sl Ms op* most pdas nesferr 

Mayrhoten 

30 

70 

Good 

Closed 

heavy 

21/T 

al 28 to open, good sBf swwM 

Obergurgl 

40 

150 

Gocd 

open 

VSr 

21/1 

alZTStsocen. ijMfitoig 

Saalbach 

3) 

30 

Hart 

Art 

Var 

21/1 

at Vs op*, wmewher rriied 

Sl Anton 

SO 

180 

Good 

Op* 

Var 

2Qn 

sf 3? *te qo*. some great sUng 

Canada 

Lake Louise 

130 

160 

Good 

Open 

V3r 

2JA 

alts CIS Open, fresh Antes 

Whistler 

75 

2*5 

Good 

Open 

to 

am 

at as to rear; spststoy 

Frwnow 

Alpe (fHuaz 

100 

260 


sbshy 

h*3VV 

am 

7*63 Bts own. nod nms oca Hart 

Les Ares 

70 

175 

Good 

Open 

Var 

20/1 

7377 Rs own. yW stove Tddftn 

Avonaz 

155 

175 

Good 

aai? 

heavy 

2W 

JS<4f Sts open, ffuw jftewfe 

Chamonix 

10 

2*0 

Good 

Same 

Var 

son 

<WS kb open, peal store awtto 

Courchevel 

too 

f*0 

Goal 

Open /wavy 

ZOI 

al 68 iBs apei good stit® ovwaff 

Les Deux Alpes 80 

200 

Good 

slushy 

heavy 

22/1 

sl S3 SB apsn. Mnay x at&xto 

Megave 

55 

170 

Fair 

skerry 

hwvy 

20/1 

evu US op*. gaevlaJ *Ww» 

Menbel 

GO 

140 

Good 

dually 

heavy 

20/1 

My open. aryoyaMr *ow moSaet 

LaPlagne 

too 

200 

Good 

Open 

heavy 

20/1 

mm IBs open. mUJUhi 

Sams Chevaler tS 900 

Good 

duafty heavy 


53/72 Bts open, aitaf wsr tgato 

Tlgnes 

105 

190 

Good 

Open 

heavy 

21/1 

most Bta open, same greet slfrQ 

VaMfts&ra 

130 

230 

Good 

Open 

VSf 

21/1 

S3A00 fills op*, hearydoiri! 

VaJ Thorens 

120 

200 

Good 

Open 

Var 

20T1 

2BQ9 Ms op*. IB arete ar ofcnxfe 

Qannany 

Barchtesgaden 

ID 

30 

fit 

dosed 

Pckd 

2*/1Z 

3KJ1 t/B open, xmeetet fmagd 

Oboretdort 

20 

80 

Far 

Hud 

Mtd 

30T12 

2EJX Ms Qpn psetydam 


Depth Mhs. Sb San Lbs* 

Resort L U Roes ptstes seme Same 

Italy 

Borneo 30 an Ftt Haiti Pad 20/1 IJ16 WS tpen. wyoyaas as as 

Corvima 155 435 GoM Open V* 19/1 

Cortina 55 120 Good Open heavy 21/ l s*5i 8b open grass above 2000m 

Courmayeur 50 240 Good nfa Var 20/1 2V22K3 asm. tooa pans superb 

Uvigno 100 SOS Goad M Vfr Sin XOliBs open. Putt arsaude 

Madeaimo Its 300 Good Open \ter 20/1 J&'l7ttscpin pMj/altovefe 


Selva 

30 

too 

Good 

Op* 

Var 

am 

of Bi Ba art seta renti op* 

Norway 

Ge/ki 

» 

so 

Good 

Hart 

Petal 

1 6/1 

a* 78 ids cpwn. HtSon rf iccusiy 

Switzerland 

Crans Montana 

60 

290 

Good 

Open 

Var 

an 

sWf Ms open acafifltf ar moe 

Oaves 

a 

150 

Good 

Gore 

Var 

Zrt 

K5 K5 csre. great stag 

Ktoste/s 

25 

150 

Gres 

Open 

var 

21/1 

5WS Mte epaa stops? slcirg ref 

Murren 

BO 

190 

Good 

ate* v fcasvy 

sen 

sSCscpen. goscL fany 4nr cbwn 

Saaa Fee 

a 5 

285 

Good 

Op* 

var 

2B1 

2S26 its op*, perieraiy jpa 

Si MonB 

so 

MO 

Good 

0»n 

Var 

31/1 

afG/Sopen wry $acc mosr ins 

Vfertter 

50 

190 

Good 

ste*y hwvy 

20" 

good C/ore SOOm 

Wengen 

20 

l» 

Good 

*ahy heavy 

2&'i 

iScDCaxm high nta good 

Zermatt 

55 

280 

Gore 

«y 

Var 

»! 

&73fcep9> mi eBnaucamelsna 

UA 

Aspen 

ISO 

170 

Good 

Ocre 

P«r 

ZZ1 

tub open, peat Omq 

Brecfcenrfdge 

1W 

220 

Good 

Open 

PWr 

221 

17 tats and 126 pars apsn 

Crested Butte 

160 

an 

Good 

Open 

Padr 

21/1 

al !JPs,nfH and tetris span 

Mammoth 

210 

3 90 

Gan 

Op* 

P*dr 

210 

26/50 Ks open, yea; slag 

Part? City 

175 

235 

Gan 

Open 

Var 

21/1 

sfl )/ as red ® trade open 

vail 

ISO 

200 

Good 

Op* 

P*dr 

221 

2S Ms red 46*4 sobs op* 

Winter Parle 

ISO 

180 

Good 

Op* 

Pn* 

22*1 

/&&) fits and 116121 sals epee 


Mtn-«*f»eMounai«aipB!as 

laaifcqio men vfege. Ait Allfoal sn». ^ 


IfcjMl 


Gffl. 


find Information on over 100 of the world's leading sid resorts online 

Planning your ski trip? 


Internet - http- //skiin. corn Mmitel 3675 connect » skim 


Europe 


Today 



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Forecast for Friday throu^i Sunday, as provided by AcoiWOether. 


Asia 



North America 

A cool shot wUf drop bite 
the nort wm Ptairw Friday 
then move eastward into 
®» Greet Lake* and even- 
tually the Northeast and 
mW-wtantlc this wee kend . 
Florida and the deep 
Southeast will stay mild, 
wftHe the Southwest turns 
mfcL The Northwest ett be 
mwetded and eoaeorethie. 


Europe 

Much ot Europe wH be dry 
through the weekend, with 
oolder air making a email 
westward push Mo east- 
ern Europe. Much of Italy, 
including Rome, w)D turn 
cooler, but wB stay near to 
above normal. Tempent- 
hees wH elm near to a Ur 
above normal over western 
Europe. 


Asia 

Northeast China, 
Manchuria and both Kore- 
as, Including Baying and 
Seoul, wilt be unseason- 
ably cold, but mainly dry 
through the weekend. 
Unsettled aver 

northern areas 


w Japan with 
ns mite c oM5 
south, but not 



cMy in the south, but not 
too far from normal. Sea- 
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Stogapora. 


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Primed by Nen-sfox International, London. Registered as a newspaper at the post office. 








Senate Gives 
Its Blessing 

To Albright 

And Cohen 


as defensesoretary . 

4*1?; ^ become the first 

^ ^ *e Stale DepamS 
fjJ ^ 9° hea - a former senator from 
JSr ■ wai be Mr. C^™ y t 
gAUran cabinet member. TlX «£ 
by 99-to-0 votes, earned 
S^^ bnto ” was sworo in for 

Mrs. Albright’s swearing-in is ex- 
P««d as«riy aiiSlyita^o 

horns of formal debate, no senator spoke 
a*g“J^Mrs. Albright, although several 
attacked Mr. CUntoa 's foreign policy, 
i r ^bright. 59, who is new the 

■■JSi^ssssis^'* 

The administration’s leadineforeien- 

Se S ator *&ms, foe 
Nor m Ca rolina Republican who ’he ad? 

n» Foreign Relations Committee, lav- 
ishly endorsed Mrs. Albright. 

“She’s a strong lady; sbe’s a cour- 
ageous lady,” Mr. Helms said on the 
Senate floor. Bathe repeated his blanket 
disagreement with Clinton administra- 
tion foreign policy, saying be hoped 
Mrs. Albright would turn it around. In 
particular, Mr. Helms criticized U.S. 
policy toward China, Etosnia-Herzego- 
vina, Haiti, Iraq, Somalia and other 
countries, as well as the United Nations, 
which he says needed to be reformed. 

In his confirmation hearing earlier 
Wednesday, Mr. Cohen said he would 
continue many of Mr. Clinton's 
policies. But he staked out new ground 
on Bosnia, where he said the United 
Stales would limit its commitment, and 
also said the United Stales must mod- 
ernize its weapons, consider cutting the 
Jrmed forces’ troop levels and tnm its 
attention to Asia. 

Mr. Cohen, 56, who replaces William 
Perry, promised that U.S. troops will 
leave Bosnia in 18 months and said 
European allies will have to take over if 
necessary. Administration officials 
have said they did not know what would 
happen after the 18-month deploy- 
ment. (Reuters, AP) 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


POLITICALS C 


IT7 . Z\ , , n, pay ourofhis own pocket She said doing so would 4 ‘help 

frOTneS Uvcr Uingnch S Jr iflB restore and rehabilitate the Congress. ” (NYT) 


' — j “w rmn Uaparhrs 

™v« TON - H* Senate 

j^ed swrftiy to put m 

C ^ bi T ® P ]ace OT We ^ 

ewifinmng Madeleine Albright 
as secretary of state and William rvw. 


WASHINGTON — As the speaker of the House of 
Representatives, Newt Gingrich, was formally reprim- 
anded, Democrats and Republicans alitu upwtimI pro- 
occupied about the hmlications of the $300,000 sanc- 
tion against him, - while his lawyer said the finp was 
originally nearly three times as high, 

StilUscnre Republican members remained aghast at 
we 5300,001/ figure and the possible precedent u might 
they ihoughtit was far too harsh. 

IJas.u roprecedeoted and can be levied on every- 
one,^ said Thomas DeLay of Texas, the majority whip, 
voicing on the House floor a fear that many other 
numbers expressed privately. Mr. DeLay, who holds the 
No. 3 position in the Republican hierarchy, was among 
26 member? of his party who voted against the re- 

J " - * 1 "* ^ e.* ' - 


, , . X — *>■ " **! Vi OUJUIC LUV 

punishment was too severe. 

As to how Mr. Gingrich should pay the money. 
Republicans said privately that from a political stand- 
point, they thought Mr. Gingrich should pay the fine out 
of his own pocket.- Privately, however, they worried that 
. he could set a precedent that would force any member 
who was sanctioned, to do likewise. 

As members emerged from a private meeting Tuesday 
moniipg with Mr. Gingrich before the vote to reprimand 
him, many said the $300,000 fing — - or 1 ‘reimbursement,’* 
as his supporters described it — was the main gnhj i-rr 
“The issue being discussed was whether others could 
afford that,” said one Republican. * ‘It’s an u nusua lly high 
amount. And just becausehe can afford it, it doesn’t mean 
the rest of us can. It may as well be a sentence.” 
The speaker’s yearly salary is $171 500. 
Representative Marge Roukema, Republican of New 
Jersey, said Mr. Gmgrichahould “set the example” and 


Clinton Hits the Trail Again 

NORTHBROOK, Illinois — Two months after win- 
ning his final campaign for elective office, President Bill 
Clinton returned to the campaign trail Wednesday. His 
new goal is to build public support for proposals that got 
him re-elected but now need congressional approval. 

He plans to travel outside Washington in the coming 
weeks to push his ideas ou education, welfare reform, the 
balanced budget and a host of bite-sized initiatives, such 
as expanding the Family Medical Leave Act, aides said. 

With little money and no real mandate, Mr. Clinton 
hopes to influence congressional action on his modest 
second- term agenda by taking advantage of the attention 
traditionally afforded presidents. 

He visited this affluent Chicago suburb to make his 
case for schools testing their students and bolding them 
to higher standards, preferably ones that reflect their 
standing with pupils throughout the world. 

‘To pretend that somehow holding ourselves to these 
standards — and agreeing that there has to be some 
uniform way of measuring them — is giving up local 
control, is just an excuse to avoid being held accountable,’ ' 
he said. “And it’s selling our kids down the drain.” (AP) 

Quote/Unquote 

Governor Roy Roroer of Colorado, the new general 
chairman of the Democratic Party, criticizing Jim Nich- 
olson, who was elected Republican chairman last week, 
for not speaking out on campaign reform. “It was greatly 
disappointing, to us at least, to see the new chairman of 
the Republican Party in effect take a pass on campaign 
finance reform." (NYT) 





• •-/** ■' *V-!; ' L . 


J S. it, .\ppl~yruit T nr IV— 

Mr. Clinton talking with Governor Romer of Colorado in Washington. 


Democrats 9 Limits on Donations Won 9 t Stop Flow of Money 


By David E. Rosenbaum 

. New fork Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Democratic Pany’s de- 
cision to reject Amarinng fi«n Arnffyyn snbsjdjfl li e g 
<rffbmgncn mpam« c»wMpnrwemh^nn wtricahlft iri 

the global economy of the late 1990s. 

If the party really does limit contributions to 
$100,000 a year from any one donor, it might find 
itself at a serious financial disadvantage- But the 
party can probably stretch the voluntary rules it has 
just established so that the limit has little effect 

Trying to regain the high ground after months of 
questions about Democratic fund-raising prac- 
tices, President Bill Clinton announced Tuesday 

noncitiz^Kwho live in 

He said the Democrats would immediately stop 
taking the unlimited donations known as “soft 
money” — ■ if the Republicans did the same — 
limiting such cantribtmons to $100,000 from an 
individual, corporation or union. 


Governor Roy Romer of Colorado, the new 
general chairman of the party, said at a news 
conference that the limits on contributions were ‘ ‘a 
serious step that’s going to cost us.’ ’ 

But nonpartisan authorities on campaign finance 
practices described the announcement as more 
public-relations gloss than substantive reform. 
Kent Cooper, executive director of the Center 

NEWS ANALYSIS ~ 

for Responsive Politics, a watchdog group, called 
the party’s restrictions on contributions “meth- 


First, consider the party's decision to reject 
contributions from subsidiaries of foreign compa- 
nies. By law. such donations are legal as long as 
drey are directed by U.S. employees and the money 
does not come from the foreign parent. Candidates 
cannot take corporate donations, but parties can. 


In the past campaign, American subsidiaries of 
foreign concerns gave millions of dollars to the 
political parties. 

Restricting donations from these subsidiaries 
might be popular, especially as the Democratic 
Party is under fire for taking questionable con- 
tributions from foreigners. The problem is that it is 
often difficult to decide just what is an American 
company at a time when American corporations 
are increasingly buying stakes in operations over- 
seas and European and Asian companies have 
extensive interests here. 

Take, for example. Honda America, a unit of 
Honda Motor Co. of Japan. It has 12.000 em- 
ployees in Ohio, makes cars from parts fabricated 
at American tool -and -die shops and sells the cars 
mainly to American customers through American 
dealers. Is this an American or Japanese com- 
pany? 

When MCI Communications Corp., the second 
largest long-distance telephone carrier in the 
United States, becomes part of British Telecom- 


munications PLC, does that mean it can no longer 
participate in American politics? 

American companies give their shareholders’ 
money to political parties for one main reason: 
They think it will expand their influence on the 
decisions of the American government, and they 
are doubtless right. 

So, say a Democratic president or a Democratic 
Congress is working on opening up the telephone 
market in Singapore to American companies. Does 
the restriction imposed by the Democrats mean 
that AT&T Corp. is free to give money to get a foot 
in the door, but MCI is not? 

Thai seems to be the case. “If the ultimate owner 
of an entity is a foreign company, then we would 
not take that contribution period,” said Steven 
Grossman, the party’s chief operating officer. 

“This doesn’t clean up the system.” said Ann 
McBride, president of Common Cause, another 
watchdog group. “It gives the illusion of solving 
the problem, but it's still going to allow a lot of big 
money into the party. ' ’ 


Away From Politics 

• The grocery stpre c^m Fpod ^Jon 
was awarded mofpjfcau 

-jwitive damages wo 

employees foe.^^ortfilowf 
(be chain's sanitation practices that was 
bused on video from hidden cameias. A _ 
jury found chat tteemptoyeeshkitrcs^ 
passed and ranunittEa fraud: .. (AP). 

• A small explosion near a Planned 
Parenthood clinic had nothing to do ... 
with the abortion dispute, the Wash-. 

a bme/worker had picked up a dis- 
carded hosing device — no more de-v 
structive than a firecracker — that 
went off in his hand. (AP) 

• Florida farmers say weather fore- 

casters are to blame for at least $200 
million in winter' crop losses from an 
tmexpeeted weekend freeze. The Na- 
tional Weather Service stopped pro- 
viding its agricultural forecasts this 
winter because of budget cuts, and 
local forecasters foiled to foresee the 
cold’s severity. (AP) 

• Parents of a female cadet at The 

Citadel military college complained to 
officials ^limassmem for months be- 
fore their daughter dropped out, court 
records show, contradicting assertions 
by officials that they quickly respond- 
ed to tile complaints. (NYT) 

• The space shuttle Atlantis landed 

in Florida, bringing home the astro- 
naut John Blaha, who spen t fo ur 
months on the Russian space station 
Mir. ( Reuters ) 





AnoBfoa d Pirn* 

A BRIDGE TOO FRAIL — Schoolchildren in St Marys, Georgia, 
crossing a bridge that has been deemed too weak to carry their 
loaded bos. The youngsters have been forced to walk across the 
bridge ever since the state posted a three-ton limit for the span. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Sierra Chab Making Waves Over a Lake 

Dus Sierra Club, the country’s oldest environ mental 
group, has caused a stir even among some of its importers 
by a proposal to drain Lake Powell, the second-largest 
artificial lake in the country, situated along the utsh- 
Arizona border. . ; . 

David Brower, 84, a former executive director of foe 
group, says that the influential group didn’t fully realize 
what it was giving up when, in 2 956.it agreed wim-Westeni 
water interests to let Glen Canyon Dam be built, creating 
Lake Powell, in exchange for no dams at Echo Park or Spot 
Mountain in Dinosaur National MonraneoL_ - 

Only years later, reports the Los Angeles Times, end Mr. 
Brower and others see the damage of foe deep sandstone 
canvons cat by the Colorado River and its tributaries. 

• Mr, Brower and the Sierra Club say a shxwffcasecan now 
be made for- draining the lake and restrain g the natund 
beauty of foe site: One study shows ta.it loses enough 

SiSM SSS 3 AESJ; : 

alanning amount in the arid West, wb^ewaw • sMfc . • 

ButSmcmems say font even the powerftd Swa* Club 
' i _ M,WkaoV a lot** that is not onlv 


weary after December’s excesses, New York state this 
week is collecting no sales tax on clothing items up to $500 
.and New York City is slopping its tax as well. The city alone 
will lose about $7 million m tax revenues, but proponents of 
the test say that shoppers — who increasingly have been 
lured out of the city, or across state lines, to lower-tax 
havens — wfll buy enough food and pay for enough 
transportation to make thai up. 


ve just 10 minutes to make 
rent a car and send your 


400.000 recreational boaters. 


Short Takes 


your connection, book a 


alar Mechanics, are one reason that Internet stations — a 
sort of Wgh-tech vending machine — could someday be 
commonplace in airports and elsewhere. In a version de- 
veloped by a San Diego company, the user sits in front of 
what loots tike a cross between a road-racer video game 
and apereonal computer, then inserts a credit card. Menus 
offer a choice of 200 services typically needed by travelers, 
such as reservations, tickets and shopping. 

In the history of classical music, notes The New York 
Times, 11 compact disks have sold more than 1 million 
copies. And one label released five of those 1 1. Any idea 
which one? The surprising answer Victoria’s Secret, the 
purveyor of poshiip bras and peignoirs. Two of those five 
rank just after the all-time classical best-sellers, the Be- 
nedictine Monks of Santo Domingo de Silos (No. 2) and the 
“Three Tenors in Rome” (No. I). Monica Mitro, a spcAne^- 
ntan for foe lingerie company, explained: “Fart of the appeal 
is that we took foe best-of concept People might not feel 
confident enough to buy an entire Mozart album.” Other 
retail chains, libs Wonderbra, Hanes and Pottery Bam, are 
following tiie example. The coffee chain Starbucks has sold 
50,000 copies of Its “Blending the Blues” CD. 

[niemoiumul Herald Tribune 


‘There’s a Killer in This Courtroom’ 

And Ifs OJ. Simpson, Plaintiffs Say in Wrapping Up Their Civil Case 


and Tom Kenworthy 

Washington Post Service 

SANTA MONICA, California — A 

§ lam tiff s’ lawyer has described O.J. 

impson as a savage, remorseless mur- 
derer and chronic liar who left a trail of 
overwhelming, irrefutable physical ev- 
idence of his guilt. 

“There is akiUerin tins courtroom,” 
tiie lawyer, Daniel Petrocelli. told jurors 
during a measured but dramatic closing 
argument Tuesday in the civil case 
against the former football star. 

Blaming Mr. Simpson for the 1994 
murders of his former wife, Nicole 
Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald 
Goldman. Mr. Petrocelli said the ev- 
idence — hair, fibers, gloves, clothing, 
blood and shoe prints — pointed to only 
one possible assailant, Mr. Simpson, 
who “lied and tied and lied.” 

Mr. Petrocelli asked jurors to ponder 
why the blood of Mr. Simpson, Mrs. 
Simpson and Mr. Goldman present at 
the murder scene, smeared in Mr. 
Simpson’s Ford Branco and splattered 
on socks on foe floor of his house. 

With sarcasm in his voice, Mr. Pet- 
rocelfi mocked die defense contention 
that Mr. Simpson was somehow framed, 
that evidence was contaminated or 


planted and that the shoes shown in more 
than 30 photographs being worn by Mr. 
Simpson — which experts say are the 
same as the killer's — were uot his. 

“What kind of man tells you that with 
a straight face?” Mr. Petrocelli asked. 
“What kind of man?” 

He answered his own question: “A 
guilty man, a man with no remorse.” 
Mr. Petrocelli called the 30 photo- 
graphs of Mr. Simpson wearing foe un- 
usual Bruno Mapli shoes as “one of the 
single most crucial pieces of evidence in 
this case,” evidence foal was not 
presented at Mr. Simpson’s 1995 crim- 
inal trial, in which be was acquitted of 
the double murders. 

“If he’s wearing that shoe, he did it,” 
Mr. Petrocelli declared. 

The summation, which continued 
Wednesday, followed three months of 
testimony in foe wrongful death suit by 
the families of Mrs. Simpson and Mr. 
Goldman. Mr. Petrocelli began by 

showing jurors photographs of foe vic- 
tims. alive and “vital,” a young man 
and a mother of two. Then be displayed 
images of their slashed bodies. 

“These pieces of evidence are the 
voices of Ron and Nicole speaking from 
their graves, telling us, telling all of you 
there is a killer in this courtroom,” Mr. 
Petrocelli said, jabbing his finger toward 


Mr. Simpson. “Thai’s the man who at- 
tacked them, confronted them and killed 
them on that Sunday evening in June.” 

Mr. Petrocelli said, “By their blood, 
they forced him to step, step, step, to 
leave shoe prints just like finger- 
prints.” 

Throughout the day, Mr. Simpson sat 
impassively, appearing unfazed, occa- 
sionally taking notes and whispering to 
his lawyers. 

Confronting defense assertions of 
Mr. Simpson's innocence, Mr. Petro- 
celli called foe defendant a liar “utterly 
incapable of accepting responsi bility for 
his actions.” 

Even when shown pictures of a 
battered Mrs. Simpson. Mr. Petrocelli 
said, foe defendant maintained that he 
never hit her. 

“What kind of mac takes a baseball 
boi to his wife's car right in front of her 
and says she was not upset even though 
she called police for help?” he asked. 

Mr. Petrocelli challenged Mr. 
Simpson's vague explanations for injur- 
ies on his left hand. “What kind of person 
says they have no idea how they cut 
themselves just hours before?” he 
asked. 

“Obviously a guilty man says he has 
no idea,” he answered. “He had uo 
credible explanation for these injuries.” 


FDA Approves a Drug Testing Kit 


Sec our 

tdAenafimaaXI fecrafrmettt 

every Monday 


By John Schwartz 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Par- 
ents who suspect that their 
children are using drugs soon 
will be able to use a gov- 
ernment-approved home 

The FooJ and Drug Admin- 
istration gave the first approval 
on^ Tuesday to a drug test avail- 
able without a prescription. 
The new kit, “Dr. Brown’s 
Home Drug Testing System,’ * 
tests urine for the presence of 
marijuana, PCP, amphetam- 
ines, cocaine, heroin, codeine 
and morphine. 

Approval came four 
months after the Food and 
Drug Administration and the 
Clinton administration came 
under fire in Congress over 
foe agency’s attempts to re- 
strict the distribution of a 
Similar product 

The “Dr. Brown” of foe 
test kit name is J. Theodore 
Brown, a clinical psychologist 
with a background m creating 
substance abuse. Mr. Brown, 
who formed Personal Health 
and Hygiene foe. to market 
foe product, said he hoped to 
have foe kits on foe market 
within six weeks and expected 
to charge around $30. 

Privacy advocates have 


long said that the easy avail- 
abihty of a drug test kit could 
violate foe rights of those 
rested. 

Some said they were “a 
little concerned about wheth- 
er it was going to be em- 
ployed in schools and other 
places. 

The new system is not a 
home diagnostic kit like 
those commonly available 
for pregnancy testing. 

Instead, it is a home col- 
lection kit, with a cup for 
collecting the sample and 
two plastic rubes with screw- 
on lids for shipping foe 
sample to a laboratory for 
analysis. The tubes are pro- 
tected in a plastic pouch and 
bubble wrap. 

Once foe testing laborato- 
ry receives the samples, it 
will screen them for drugs 
and then perform confirm- 
ation testing to minimize er- 
rors. 

The lab will then transmit 
results to Personal Hygiene, 
which is setting tip a tele- 
phone results center. 

Customers should expect 
results from one to three days 
after a lab receives foe 
sample, Mr. Brown said. 

The testing center will be 
staffed by phone represen- 
tatives who will not only give 


foe results of foe test, but also 
provide information about 
interpreting foe results and 
foe potential for mistakes. 

The center also will offer 
referrals for drug abuse coun- 
seling if requested. 

Each sample has an identi- 
fying number so that the per- 
son who sends one in can 
phone the company, give foe 
number and receive foe re- 
sults anonymously if de- 
sired. 

Four months ago, the issue 
of home drug testing erupted 
in Congress. 

The Food and Drug Ad- 


ministration moved to block 
distribution of a rest kit pro- 
duced by a company called 
Parents Alert 

Its owner. Sunny Cloud, 
distributed the nest without 
seeking foe agency’s approv- 
al, a process that Mr. Brown 
completed. 

The agency warned Mr. 
Cloud to stop distributing the 
test until it could prove foe 
test was accurate and the ac- 
companying procedures well 
thought out, and lawmakers 
and commentators decried foe 
move as evidence of the over- 
protective “nanny state.” 


Polo^ Ralph Lauren 

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ON MOST OF MENSWEAR, WOMEN SWEAR, 
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I 






PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Opposition in Seoul 
Rejects Kim’s Overture 


Coa&ki by Ov5a$F™m Ditpacha 

SEOUL — In a sharp challenge to the 
government. South Korea's opposition 
parties on Wednesday rejected Pres- 
ident Kim Young Sam’s offer to open 
debate on a new labor law, and the 
nation's top strike leader led a protest 
march through Seoul. 

Park Sun Sook of the main opposition 
National Congress for New Politics said 
a meeting of officials from her party and 
the United Liberal Democratic Party 
decided any debate in Parliament would 
be held only on the condition that the 
law was first revoked. 

Separately, the union leader. Kwon 
Young Kil, 1 eft Mycmgdoog Cathedral to 
lead 4,000 workers in a noisy march to 
protest the labor law after workers re- 
sponded only partially to a strike cad. 

8 North Koreans 
Defect to South 

Ctwyinl hi Our Sbtf Fmx Diqxscha 

SEOUL — Two North Korean fam- 
ilies, including a distant relative of 
former President Kim Q Sung, defected 
to South Korea by sea in freezing tem- 
peratures Wednesday. 

Among the eight defectors was Kim 
Young Tin, a relative by marriage to 
President Kim’s wife, a statement from 
the South Korean intelligence agency 
said. It was the second major escape 
from the Communist state in less than 
two months. 

The intelligence agency said the two 
families of four, including five children, 
sought political asylum after entering 
Southern waters in the Yellow Sea be- 
tween China and the Korean peninsula. 
They were rescued by South Korean 
maritime police and later arrived at the 
port of Inchon, just west of Seoul. 

Their defection followed the escape 
of 17 North Koreans from a single fam- 
ily who arrived here Dec. 9 after an 
arduous 27-day journey through China 
into Hong Kong. 

The defection Wednesday also was 
the first major escape to the South by sea 
in years. In 1987. 11 members of a North 
Korean family defected to Seoul by boat 
via Japan. 

An increasing number of Koreans 
have fled the North and sought asylum in 
the South following several years of 
chronic food ‘shortages. The recent rise in 
defections has been a propaganda coup 
for South Korea, but has also sparked 
fears about how Seoul would cope if the 
trend turned into a tide of refugees. 

Seoul is drawing up plans for re- 
ception centers for North Koreans that 
would offer immediate shelter and vo- 
cational training, the first of which 
could be ready soon. (Reuters. API 


For the first time since the law was 
rammed through Parliament on Dec. 26, 
Mr. Kwon and several deputies of the 
outlawed Korean Confederation of 
Trade Unions left the church where they 
had sought sanctuary from arrest. 

The Korean Confederation of Trade 
Unions, an umbrella group that has 
spearheaded the industrial unrest, said 
180.000 workers walked out on Wed- 
nesday. The Labor Ministry said 65,000 
workers put down their tools. 

Unions went ahead with strikes de- 
spite an attempt by President Kim to end 
the conflict by agreeing to Parliament 
taking a second look at the law. which 
makes it easier for companies to dismiss 
workers. 

The taw was passed in a secret ses- 
sion of Parliament chat excluded mem- 
bers of opposition parties. 

As part of his retreat, Mr. Kim said at 
a meeting with opposition leaders that 
he would order officials to suspend ar- 
rest warrants served on Mr. Kwon and 
his deputies for organizing more than 
three weeks of strikes. 

But Mr. Park of the National Con- 
gress said. “Any debate in Parliament 
must be made on the condition that the 
law is made null and void. ’ ' 

Mr. Kim. who argues the law would 
free up the labor market and trim com- 
pany costs as well as boost compet- 
itiveness, has said dumping the legis- 
lation would go against the 
Constitution. 

Unions have called strikes every 
Wednesday and demonstrations every 
Saturday. The Korean Confederation of 
Trade Unions said it would call its half- 
million members out on a new indefinite 
general strike unless the government 
repeals the law by Feb. 18. 

“We will go ahead with our plans for 
strikes and rallies.” Mr. Kwon of the 
confederation said, “unless the new 
labor law is totally nullified." 

(Reuters. AFP ) 







stmOmfltBAaKbUI'm 

A BELIEVER'S PLEA — His head covered with mud, a devotee of the Hindu goddess Yeliama begging 
for forgiveness in India as other believers marched by Wednesday during an annual pilgrimage. 

Hanoi Moves Forward With Forced-Labor Road Plan 


BRIEFLY ASIA 


Reuters 

HANOI — The government stepped 
up its rhetoric Wednesday on plans to 
breathe new life into a mass forced- 
labor program, prompting comparisons 
from economists to China's disastrous 
Great Leap Forward, 

The party newspaper Nhan Dan 
called for “the highest level mobiliz- 
ation of people.” 

Other newspapers detailed plans for 
the compulsory involvement of millions 
of people in construction projects, in- 
cluding a north-south expressway along 
parts of the wartime Ho Chi Mirth trail 
— the wartime network of roads and 
paths that Hanoi used to transport sup- 
plies and troops to the U.S.-backed 
South. 

The English-language Vietnam 
News quoted Prime Minister Vo Van 
Kiet as saying: “I can guarantee this 
will be a great construction site with the 
work of millions of people.” 


Vietnam has maintained a compuls- 
ory labor program for many yearn under 
which young people are required to de- 
vote 10 days a year to work for the state, 
or else pay a fee of 2,000 dong (about 1 8 
cents) a day for exemption. 

But under proposals set to go before a 
National Assembly committee soon, the 
program will be amended to increase the 
numbers involved by widening the age 
range of participants. 

According to government officials, 
individual provinces and cities will set 
their own new exemption charges, 
meaning in effect that wealthier urban 
residents will pay more. 

International and Vietnamese econ- 
omists expressed concern over the 
plans, with one likening them to China's 
Great Leap Forward campaign of the 
late 1950s. 

Thai campaign, at the behest of Mao 
Zedong, saw farmers abandoning their 
fields in a drive to produce steel in 


backyard furnaces. Millions died later 
from starvation. 

“It's not in tins size, not in this way, 
but the idea is the same,” said a Vi- 
etnamese academic, who declined to be 
named. 

“If die projects are small and closely 
related with tire interests of the people, 
it’s O.K.,” he said. “If it’s not well 
paid, not contracted. I think the ILO” — 
the International Labor Organization — 
“will be very interested.” 

Others reacted to the news with sur- 
prise. 

“We've been encouraging the gov- 
ernment to mobilize labor at the com- 
mune or village level for small self-help 
programs,'* a Western economist said. 
But “this overall thing is veiy surpris- 
ing,” be added. 

According to Vietnamese estimates, 
construction of the 1, 800-kilometer 
(1.125-mile) north-south highway will 
cost at least S5.5 billion. 


India, Shifting Policy, Turns Into a Good Neighbor 


By Kenneth J. Cooper 

Washington Post Service 

NEW DELHI — India, which for 
decades often bullied or ignored its 
smaller neighbors, has decided to be 
kinder and more attentive to the other 
countries of South Asia. 

In its first six months, the coalition 
government of Prime Minister H. D. 
Deve Gowda has pursued whai Western 
diplomats in New Delhi describe as a 
‘ ‘good neighbor” policy of giving more 
in its relationships with smaller neigh- 
bors than India immediately receives in 
return. 


“India must do more for the neigh- 
bors than we expect neighbors to do for 
us.” the external affairs minister, L K. 
Gujral. said in an interview Tuesday. 

The new foreign policy aims to pro- 
mote regional harmony and the kind of 
economic cooperation that exists in 
North America. Europe and Southeast 
Asia. The countries of South Asia already 
have agreed to establish a free-trade zone 
similar to ones in those regions. 

Mr. Gujral mentioned all South Asian 
countries except Pakistan in enunciat- 
ing the good neighbor policy during a 
speech last September in London. But 
h is government has also toned down 


official statements about its regional 
arch-rival and has unilaterally eased re- 
strictions on Pakistanis traveling to In- 
dia and on the distribution of Pakistani 
publications. 

So far, the biggest beneficiaries have 
been Bangladesh and Nepal. India's 
eastern neighbors. 

Mr. Gowda’s government has re- 
solved decades-old disputes with a 
treaty on sharing Ganges River water 
more equitably with .Bangladesh and 
another pact with Nepal on^yrater and 
hydroelectric power from a major trib- 
utary of the Ganges. 

India has also made unilateral trade 


concessions to both countries, and Mr. 
Gujral said similar measures would be 
extended to Sri Lanka during his forth- 
coming visit to Colombo, capital of the 
island nation. 

The driving force behind the shift in 
India's foreign policy has been Mr. 
Gujral, 77, a seasoned diplomat who 
served as foreign minister in the late 
1980s and ambassador to the Soviet 
Union in the late 1970s. 

“With neighbors like . Nepal, 
Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives and Sri 
Lanka, Indiadoes not ask for reciprocity 
but gives all that it can in good faith and 
trust.” he said in the London speech. 


U.S. Joins Britain 
In Whining China 

HONG KONG — The United 
States and Britain warned China on 
Wednesday on presenting basic 
freedoms in Hong Kong, while the 
territory’s future leader sought 
Wednesday to dampen controversy 
over Beijing’s plans. 

A Beijing-controlled panel pro- 
posed Sunday that Hong Kong laws 
on civil liberties and elections be 
scrapped after China takes control 

“We are deeply concerned over 
any attempt to weaken civil fiber- 
ties an d basic freedoms in Hong 
Kong,” said the U.S. State Depart- 
ment spokesman, Nicholas Bums. 

But Tung Chee-hwa, who will 
take over as chief executive after 
the handover, called for calm. 

“I think we are being too dra- 
matic.” be said on Hoag Kong ra- 
dio. “It is a very complex issue.” 

Governor Chris Patten said the 
“ill-considered recommenda- 

tions” would be “deleterious for 
our economic success and social 
stability.' * (Reuters) 

Talebon Claims 
Victory in North 

CHARHCAR, Afghanistan — 
Taleban fighters said they had 
pushed back a major offensive by 
opposition forces north of Kabul on 
Wednesday. 

“We repulsed a heavy attack of 
the enemy which has been going cm 
since early morning.” a Taleban 
commander. Mullah AzazuDah 
Agha, said in Charikar, about 50 
kilometers from Kabul. 

He gave no casualty figures, bur 
aid workers said they had taken at 
least five wounded Taleban fight- 
ers to KabuL ( Reuters ) 

Chinese Province 
Fears Aftershock 

BELTING — The northwestern 
province of Xinjiang was Seeling 
itself Wednesday for a major af- 
tershock after being rocked by twin 
earthquakes that lolled 12 and in- 
jured 40, local officials said. 

The two major earthquakes, 
measuring 6.4 and 63 on the 
Richter scale, hit the same eastern 
section of Xinjiang within a minute 
of each other Tuesday morning. 

“Although a stronger- earth- 
quake is less likely to hit tire area 
within a short jjeriod. an aftershock 
-measuring- more-titan. : | 

.Richter scale may possibly 
happen.” an official with the Xinji- 
ang seismology bureau said. (AFP) 


JAPAN: A Nation’s Elderly Veterans Are Tormented by the World War II Killings and Torture That They Saw - and Committed 


Continued from Page 1 

the tone is often not defensive but 
deeply contrite. 

while many Japanese argue that there 
is no need for the country as a whole to 
apologize to overseas war victims or 
compensate them, many veterans say 
the government should do more to show 
remorse for the war and to teach young 
people about atrocities committed by 
Japanese troops. 

“We should absolutely apologize to 
China and Korea,” Mr. Horie said with- 
out hesitation. “Absolutely.” 

The tension was thick as he began to 
peel away his own memories, and his 
hands shook like dry leaves in the wind. 
After two hours he took a deep breath 
and volunteered that he had eaten hu- 
man flesh. 

Mr. Horie and his buddies had eaten 
some rare fresh meat that had suddenly 
become available in the local market in 
northeastern China one day in 1939, he 


recalled. Then die kenpeitai. the Jap- 
anese secret police, came around asking 
whether anyone had bought meat in the 
market. 

'‘Some Japanese soldiers who were 
hungry had killed the boy and eaten 
some of his meat and sold the rest to the 
Chinese merchant, and we bought it 
from that merchant” Mr. Horie said. 
He added that he had heard that the 
Japanese soldiers had been punished for 
the killing and the cannibalism. 

The killing of the baby, Mr. Horie 
insisted, was just as accidental. He said 
he had been searching a village for anti- 
Japanese guerrillas when he saw a stack 
of dried reeds with an arm sticking out 
holding a gun. 

“I charged with my bayonet and 
thrust it into the reeds at chest height and 
I heard a scream.” he said. “I pulled the 
rifle out and there was a baby skewered 
on the bayonet. It was maybe six months 
old. and the hilt had gotten caught in its 
belt so it was stuck to die bayonet 


“It turned out that the baby's mother 
was a guerrilla, holding the baby as she 
hid in the reeds. The bayonet had gone 
through her as well as the baby, so she 
died too.” 

Mr. Horie paused, overcome by the 
rush of memories. 

Most of the old men who discussed 
the war said they were recounting their 
war experiences for the first time, and 
they spoke with a mixture of ache and 
relief. Some seemed happy in the twi- 
light of their lives to talk about the 
specters that still rattled chains in their 
minds, but they could not discuss quite 
everything. 

“1 did some terrible things that I 
would never be able to talk about,” said 
Junji Murata, who served in Chin a and 
also guarded American prisoners of war 
in a camp in Vietnam. “But we also 
endured awful experiences ourselves.” 

By all accounts, those experiences 
changed the veterans of Omiya. so that 
die arrogant young men who left for war 


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returned bumble and chastened, and in 
most cases ferociously hostile to war 
itself in any form. 

“War makes people do terrible 
things,” said Teruichi Ukita, 7 1 , a buriy 
man with a crown of white hair shorn in 
a crew cut, who was a military po- 
liceman and watched Chinese being tor- 
tured. “Humans are so stupid. You do 
terrible things, and you regret them 
later. At first, h umans seem so smart. 
And in reality they’re such idiots.” 

Omiya, like most of Japan, was 
caught up in the militarism of tire 1930s, 
and tiie local elementary schools tenght 
the boys military drills using wooden 
guns. “The greatest honor,” die young 
men of Omiya were told, “is to come 
back dead.” 

Yet very few in Omiya volunteered 
for service, most waiting until they were 
drafted. The reason for this hesitation 
had nothing to do with doubts about the 
aims of the war. The young men were 
simply afraid — not of the enemy, but of 
their own officers. 

“Very few kids wanted to become 
soldiers, because we knew that the army 
was very strict,” said Setsuo Ono, who 
spent four years in the war in China. “If 
you were a low-ranking soldier, you had 
to wash the officers’ underwear and 
polish their boots. If you didn’t do 
everything just right you got beaten 
up.” 

Often tiie new soldiers were lined up 
for officers to slap them in the face, or 
punch them or beat them with belts, 
sometimes until blood poured down 
their faces. 

For many of the troops, this kind of 
brutality was more evident, on a daily 
basis, than the atrocities against civil- 
ians for which the Imperial Army is 
better remembered. Most vete rans Ln 
Omiya do not dispute that atrocities 
occurred, but they add that it is not as if 
the typical soldier had been killing and 
raping civilians daily. 

Wazo NishL, 80, a stooped widower 
with a few days’ stubble on a deeply 
lined face, was a medic. He says that be 
never killed anyone and that in the entire 
war he saw only one barbaric incident 
— although he adds that he can never 
forget it 

ft was in the Philippines in 1942. A 
Japanese military surgeon decided to 
show a few medics how to remove an 
appendix. So he spread a sheet on a 
field, brought in a healthy Filipino, a 
civilian, and put a mask over his nose to 
anesthetize him. 

The surgeon cut the Filipino open, 
removed his appendix and sewed him 
back up. Then, the lesson over, the 
surgeon pulled out a gun and shot and 
killed the patient 

Perhaps none of the veterans in Om- 
iya is such a puzzle of contradictions as 
Mr. Ukita. Amiable and remorseful, Mr. 
Ukita acknowledges that he served 
inChina in the kenpeitai, tiie dreaded 
military police, and that he killed 


many Chinese people during the war. 

“I saw lots of torture scenes, but I 
don’t want to talk about it or remember 
it” Mr. Ukita said coolly. “It was said 
that even crying babies would shut up at 
the mention of the kenpeitai. Everybody 
was afraid of us. The word was that 
prisoners would enter the front gate but 
leave by tbe back gale — as corpses.” 

The torturers themselves, Mr. Ukita 
said, were “regular people” who 
simply did their job. Yet he acknow- 
ledged that some torturers had been 
worse than others, and he t drew a dis- 
tinction between those ' who were 
“cold” and others who were more “hu- 
mane.” 

“If you look in a man’s eyes as you 
torture him, then you understand him,” 
Mr. Ukita said. “When you ask him for 
information, you can tell from his eyes if 
he's telling the truth when he says, T 
don’t know, I don't know.’ The humane 
torturers would stop at that point, if they 
saw the man really didn’t know. The 
cold ones would keep going.” 

'Hie victims were mostly men, Mr. 
Ukita said, but there were some women 
. as well. These were extremely disagree- 
able memories for Mr. Ukita, and be 
tamed aside questions about what he 
himse lf had done and seen. 

* ‘I just can’t talk about it,” he said. 

Asked about the “comfort women," 
or sex slaves in army brothels, Mr. Ukita 
acknowledged that he had frequently 
visited them. Although some Japanese 
now insist that tbe women were pros- 
titutes who had volunteered, Mr. Ukita 
said that from his own experience he 
knew that the women bad been forced to 
work in the brothels. 

“At the time of tiie war, 1 was in my 
20s and single, and I didn't under- 
stand,” he said, growing more emo- 
tional. "But when I had two daughters 
myself, I started to realize what I had 
done.” 

At that point, Mr. Ukita’s voice 
choked and blinked, and tears welled in 
his eyes. He would not say exactly what 
his role had been, but in a tremulous 
voice he said that Japan should com- 
pensate the women for Che injuries done 
to them. 

Westerners often complain indig- 
nantly that Japanese see themselves as 
victims of the war rather than the ag- 
gressors, One reason for this perception 
in Japan is that by tire rad of the war, 
many people like Mr. Ukita — along 
with countless civilians — came to en- 
dure trials as severe as those the Jap- 
anese Army bad previously inflicted. 

In tbe chaos of defeat, Mr. Ukita 
remembers seeing Japanese refugees 
trying to ford a nver. and one young 
woman in particular sticks in his mind 
She was carrying a bag of possessions 
and leading a child and an elderly wo- 
man. When the river got too high, she 
had to let go of tbe bag. 

“Then tiie water got deeper/and she 
had to let go of the grandma,” Mr. Ukita 


said. “ And it got even deeper, and so the> 
wily way she could make it was to let go! 
of her child. She got to tbe other bank, 1 W 
and survived, but she was shattered. She> 
looked as if she were sleepwalking.'' J 
Mr. Ukita was captured by Russians) 
at the end of the war and sent to Siberia, i 
It was when he, saw fellow Japanese, 1 
being killed, he said, that be belatedly; 
realized the universal value of human! 
fife. : 

“Watching Chinese being killed, I> 
had had no emotions,” Mr. Ukita said.! 

“It was like a game. But when I saw; 
Japanese being executed in Siberia for- 
stealing things, I got so angry and erno-! 
tionaL ■ j 

The reticence of these older men to> 
talk about their experience is matched] 
by the obliviousness of youngsters to 1 
the war. Naruki Orita is a 13-year-old! 
boy who is known as a good student in{ 
Omiya Junior High School, but like 
teenagers everywhere he has trouble! 
keeping track of events that happened; 
before he was bom and thus seem likei 
ancient history. ! 

What country dropped the atomic 1 
bomb on Japan? ! 

“Hmmmm,” he muttered. “I’m notj 
really sure. I don’t know." i 

Naruki said he knew that his grand- ^ 
father had died in the war, but he did note 
know where. “We don’t ever talk about~ 
the war," be said. “No one’s inter-! 
ested.” 

His grandmother. Tsune Orita, a! 
stooped woman of 87 who lives with the; 
family, looked a bit embarrassed. 

“I just don't tell him about his grand-', 
father,” she said. Some people in Om-; 


it ended in a h umiliating defeat, but the. 
elders also say that when they were; 
children there was never much talk, 
about the Russo-Japanese War of 1905! 
either, and that was a national triumph.; 

Perhaps one reason for the tabooj 
aside from the painfulness of the) 
memories, is that in Japan it is con-; 
sidered poor form to brag or to whine^ 
and it is hard to ralk about a searing; 
experience like battle without seeming; 
to do one or the other. , 

When the veterans straggled home 
after tiie war, no one pressed them or 
even much sympathized with them. Yet 
while the Japanese veterans say their; 
efforts went unappreciated, they add 
that they have never heard of veteran^ 
suffering from emotional problems be- 
cause or the war. ! 

Perhaps one source of resiliency has! 
been -the strong sense of structure in 
Japanese life, giving each veteran a fa- . 
miliar-niche in which to move ahead. 

In any case, most veterans never 
looked back. 

“I don't talk about my experiences in 
the war with my . family,” said Teisaku 
Yosirida, die framer town barber, whei 
served in Korea. “I never cold my sort 
about it not even once. I never told my 
wife or grandkids, either.” 









EUROPE 




eeksFund 
ocaust Victims 


* Vi/tf. 


f*rnr>r:': 

■ • 4 *»v 

U T 


h'ti 


Associated Press 

® 5 PP e ? “P pressure W«foesda V fora 

zstJszsS^i 

.Gut, president of Credit 


igtyis at its lowest ebb since the Second 
World War,” Mr. Gut $ ai d. adding that 


rt(wa ,T,3 — «^«™nenc awtnewa- 
^ »' as private banks and 
“fffl^ccw^anifis, should quickly set 
dw*nte sur- 

vi y®|? of the Naa death camps. 
iJ™* ? a& * nc sses^ should jom the fond 
* <*“ for ££ 
£ butu 2 ls from other countries, he saki. 

His Call vrac hinttu? h» t . ■ . 


i__,. , * , « -***■*'«** me cao- 

roet to take up fee proposal mi aamw 

teaderdxip iq carrying it out '■ 

_ fay * miepiew with the daily Neue 
-^uercnw Zeitnng, Mr. Gut said the issue 
of hank accounts of Holocaust victims 
and other allegations that Switzerland 
profited from World War II required 
urgent action. 

Jewish grui. 

Jbanks may be 


have charged that the 

— — j — -aiding op to $7 hfllioh 

worth of Jewish assets, unclaimed after 
the owners perished in the Holocaust 
The banks contend the figure is Hkely to 

be ooiy a tiny fraction of that 
‘ ‘Switzerland's intennitinini) credib- 


nigwife die Swiss tradition of human* 
itarianisoL 

He did iwtpropose a size for the fond, 
. but made it clear iKsbdicved it should be 
well above 100 million Swiss francs 
($71 utiDion). The' fund should benefit 
all victims of the Holocaust regardless 
of their background, he said. 

■ Appeal to Sweden on Gold 

The head of the Jewish 


ooNazti 

during world War U, The Associated 
Press reported from Jerusalem. 

The request by Avraham Burg, came 
in response to the discovery of doc* 
mnents indicating that Sweden received 
far more gold from Germany dining the 
war than had been known and appar- 
ently disregarded warnings that the gold 
may haye been Nazi loot 

After the war, Sweden examined gold 
it had received in payment for exports . It 
returned to Belgium and the Nether- 
lands about 13 tom thru presumably had 
.been stolen. But Swedish radio arid the 
Dagens Nyheter newspaper said a new 
inquiry found that Sweden had received 
about 38 tens of gold from the Nazis. 



Kohl Speaks 
To Havel of 
Integration 
And Identity 


ftso MootkaRewre 

CATTLE SLAUGHTERED IN GERMANY — A veterinarian giving a lethal injection Wednesday to a 
Galloway cow in Brake!, Germany, after a member of the herd, imported from Britain, was found to have 
“mad cow” disease. Officials may order the destruction of up to 10,000 cattle originating from British stock. 


Keeping Monarchy Afloat, Britain Plans New Yacht 


By Fred Barbash 

Washington Post Service 


LONDON — The royal family may 
be in trouble, but the royal yacht is 
saved, as of Wednesday. Long live die 
royal yacht. 

Defense Secretary Michael Portillo 
of Britain announced Wednesday in the 
House of Co mmo ns that while the royal 
yacht Britannia win indeed be decom- 
missioned as planned, the government 
will pay roughly $100 million to build a 
new ooe. 

The surprise decision caused re- 
joicing in maritime and royalist circles. 
Supporters have fought a long battle to 
have a royal yacht ever since the de- 
commissioning was annnmy-Mi They 
had almost given up die cause, after 
being led to believe by the government 
last month that it was lost, that renov- 
ating the. old yacht would be top ex- 
pensive, and that building a new one 
would be even. more so. '\ 

For them. Wednesday was just like 
the old days. 


“Is tins not the best way/’ said 
Douglas Hurd, a Conservative member 
of Parliament, “to allow the sovereign 
to remind us and the world of the licks 
between this nation and die sea?” 

For opponents of the new vessel, 
some of mem republicans, some just 
tighlfisted and many who thought the 

fimS tced at all — ^was adso like the old 
days. 

It is a “relic of Empire,” declared 
Tony Banks, a Labour member of Par- 
hament- “We should give it up. It isn't 
necessary. Surely the queen is more 
sensitive to the fact” 

“With hospitals closing, tire need for 
schools to be built, with transport mu- 
lling down, all tbe needs in this country 
that aren’t being met,” he said, to 
“squander” £60 million was “an ap- 
palling piece of public relations.” 

Tbe existing yacht, Britannia, is cur- 
rently mi its way to participate in ce- 
remonies for the authentic end of tbe 
e mpir e — the transfer of Hong Kong, 
the last serious British colony, to China 


BRIEFLY 


tins summer. This is to be its last voy- 
age. Afterward it will be retired in an 
‘Appropriate” manner, Mr. Portillo 
said, with an “appropriate” use. 

The 6,000-ton, 400-foot (120-meter) 
cruise ship was commissioned in 1954. 
It is now considered too old-fashioned, 
too run-down and, in view of tie mon- 
archy's declining favor in Britain, too 
expensive to maintain or renovate with 
public fends. 

Its fans, including the Duke of Ed- 
inburgh, tbe husband of Queen Eliza- 
beth S, lobbied hard to save it or at least 
to replace it They contended that the 
Britannia was actually a money ma- 
chine, since it was used frequently to 
entertain foreign businessmen inter- 
ested in investing in Britain. 

At last notice, tbe government had 
committed tbe whole subject to “care- 
ful study,” which usually means 
death. 

Instead, Mr. Portilto announced Wed- 
nesday that money had been found in a 
“reserve” fend to build a new yacht “It 
is a symbol of the nation’s {aide,” he 


said, adding that the yacht was also a 
money maker and that the decision was 
the government’s not the queen's. 

Aghast, a radical Labour member of 
Parliament, Dennis Skinner, sand, “We 
shouldn't spend any more money on this 
aristocracy that's been pushing then- 
own self-destruction buttons in tbe 
course of the last decade.” 

Offended, Mr. Portillo told Mr. Skin- 
ner that these were “matters of national 
esteem and national pride which you do 
not share and, I think, don’t even un- 
derstand.” 

A Buckingham Palace spokesman 
said the queen was “pleased," and had 
agreed to contribute “to the furniture 
and fittings’ ' of the royal quarters on the 
new ship. The spokesman added that she 
considered “a new royal yacht as first 
and foremost a national asset for fur- 
thering British representational and eco- 
nomic interests.” 

Mr. Portillo said he hoped the new 
yacht — as yet unnamed — would be 
completed in time for tbe queen's 50th 
year on the throne in 2002. 


Austrian Cabinet 
Getting a Shuffle 

Reuters 

VIENNA — Austria’s next govern- 
ment began to take shape Wednesday 
with some familiar faces from the left of 
the ruling Social Democratic Party out 
in tbe cold and moderates poised to take 
on key ministerial roles. 

Viktor Klim a, the chancellor-desig- 
nate. is expected to name his team next 
week, but already three out of six Social 
Democrat ministers have resigned and a 
fourth exit looks likely. The post of 
finance minister, which Mr. Klima is 
vacating, must also be filled. No 
changes are expected among ministers 
from the conservative People’s Party, 
the junior coalition partner. 

Cabinet members who will probably 
lose their jobs include Interior Minister 
Caspar Einem and Arts Minister Rudolf 
Scholten- Mr. Einem has been assailed 
for making a donation to a leftist news- 
letter, and Mr. Scholten, who supported 
a provocative theater director, has con- 
finned his resignation. 


The Associated Press 

PRAGUE — Leaders of Germany 
and the Czech Republic, neighbors wife 
a history of J]! feelings, on Wednesday 
discussed the need for integrating their 
economies, while retaining their cul- 
tural identities in fee new Europe. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany 
met President Vaclav Havel of the 
Czech Republic on the second day of a 
visit aimed at dealing wife past distrust 
stemming from Nazi occupation of 
Czech lands in World War II. 

The Czechs also look to Germany for 
help in joining the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization and the European Union. 
The Czech Republic, along with Poland 
and Hungary, is a leading candidate. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Kohl and Prime 
Minister Vaclav Klaus of fee Czech 
Republic signed a declaration in which 
Germany expressed its regrets over 
Nazi evils, while fee Czechs expressed 
theirs over Czechoslovakia’s expulsion 
of Sudeten Germans after fee war. 

Even though he was one of its ar- 
chitects, Mr. Havel missed the signing 
Tuesday because he is still recuperating 
from lung cancer surgery. 

While the document is not binding, it 
is perceived as a gesture of good will 
and a precedent for the peaceful res- 
olution of conflicts in Central Europe’s 
maze of historical enmities. 

“I have great hopes feat in talks on 
broader European integration. President 
Havel will emphasize that we need not 
only a strong economy, but also cultural 
identity," Mr. Kohl said. 

He added that economic questions 
were important, “but it would be a poor 
Europe if we talked about money 
only." 

Mr. Havel said that during a 90- 
minute lunch, the two men had “con- 
tinued our talks on European integra- 
tion.*’ 

Mr. Kohl also met Wednesday with 
Cardinal MilosJav Vjk and went into 
Prague's Sl Vitus Cathedral for a brief 
prayer with the cardinal. 

Cardinal Vlk said afterward that 
churches made fee first steps toward 
reconciliation between the countries in 
meetings that started shortly after the 
end of Communist rale in the old 
Czechoslovak federation. 

“The churches presaged reconcili- 
ation," Cardinal Vlk said. “Kohl’s visit 
this morning was a tribute to what tbe 
Church has done in the past six 
years.” 




Spain dears Gibraltar Passports 


MADRID — 
colm Rifktod that It will 


Mal- 

Gibraltar-issued British 


least two weeks to a prison m southeastern Turkey. Turkey 
had argued to feat case, as well, feat fee allegations were 
completely unfounded. (Reuters) 

Stoyanov Takes Over in Sofia 

SOFIA — Petar Stoyanov formally took over from 
Bulgaria’s outgoing president, Zhelyu Zhelev, at a ce- 
remony hare Wednesday. 

Mr. Stoyanov took ova- command of the army from Mr. 
Zbetev, the feat directly elected bead of state in Bulgaria’s 
1300-year history, at a military parade outside fee pres- 
idency. Mr. Stoyanov, a 44-year-old lawyer, inherits a 
severe economic crisis and a political deadlock feat has 
prevented fee formation of a new government. 


At a joint press conference. Foreign Minister Abel 
Matutes «pid Spain, had not and would not rfeaDenge the 

ofthe British colony. Mr. Mkmdsaid he was pleased wife 
that “very important clarification" and said Madrid had 
offered an understanding feat there would be “no im- 
pediment” to free (toculiiOT for Gibraltarians. 

Spanish press reports recently said Madrid would stop 
recognizing British passports issued in Gibraltar. (AFP) 

Rights Court Hears Turkish Case 

who have a majority in Parliament. Mr. Stoyanov, elected 
«x foe opposition ticket last November, has backed calls for 
quick elections. (Reuters) 

suton Aydin Tirana to Ban Pyramid Schemes 

of Derik. in southeastern Turkey . contended that she was * 

beatenandraped white m foe custody of Turkish police for 

three days to 1993. The Tutkishgcwenuneat has denial ever 
d cftfoimg her and has countercharged feat, according to 
intelligence reports, she was a terrorist working for the 
separatist Kurdistan Workers’ Party. A decision was not 
expected fin: several months. 

The court ruled last month that Turkish police had 
tortured a Kurd arrested in 1992 as a suspected terrorist but 
never charged. In that case, tbe court ord^ Atomra to jay 
damages and legal costs to fee survivors of Zekt Aksory, who 

said he had been tortured white heM incommunicado for at 


TIRANA — Albania’s rightist government promised 
W ednesday to ban pyramid investment schemes, but a court 
jailed and fined demonstrators who mounted protests 
against fee ploys in Tirana over fee weekend. 

Foreign Minister' Tritan Sbehu said during atrip to Lisbon 
feat tbe government planned to push a law through Par- 
liament on Thursday to abolish the get-rich-quick schemes 
that led to street clashes. 

“Tomorrow a special law will be approved to Par- 
liament,” he said at a press conference. “We will take all 
the necessary measures to restore equilibrium.” (Reuters) 



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Algerians Police Streets; 
New Blast Said to Kill 5 


The Associated Press 

ALGIERS — Asa fourth bomb attack 
in as many days claimed five more vic- 
tims Wednesday, the young men of Al- 
giers took to policing the streets them- 
selves in an effort to stave off more 
deadly attacks. 

"We can't wait for the government to 
protect us." said a man in his 20s who 
was searching cars at a makeshift se- 
curity checkpoint in the Belcourt neigh- 


Guerrillas Fire 
Warning Shots 
In Lima Seige 

CcnfuWfr v OarSuffFnwn Dispatcha 

LIMA — Marxist guerrillas 
holding 73 hostages in the Japanese 
ambassador's home fired shots 
early Wednesday, causing police- 
men who were on guard to race for 
cover. 

The police were back in their 
positions soon after three bursts of 
automatic gunfire, apparently an- 
other warning to stay clear of the 
residence that Tupac Amaru guer- 
rillas cook over during a party on 
Dec. 17. The police surrounding the 
house were changing shifts at the 
time. 

The shots were followed by si- 
lence and there was no movement 
inside the compound. 

The shooting followed a day of 
unusual movements by security 
forces on Tuesday. The police 
moved to within a few meters of the 
front of the property, often running 
past and peeking through the open 
gates of the compound. 

Some officers threw rocks into 
the driveway. The purpose of this 
was unclear. 

The rebels, who are demanding 
the release of 300 jailed comrades, 
have fired shots four times in recent 
weeks. (AP. Reuters) 


Pretoria Calms U.S. 
Over Syria Arms Deal 

Reuters 

PRETORIA — South Africa defused 
a foreign-policy spat on Wednesday, 
saying it would consult Washington be- 
fore making a decision on a big arms sale 
to Syria, which the United States and 
Israel oppose. 

The proposed sale to Syria of South 
African tank-firing and guidance sys- 
tems, which came to light after a leak of 
cabinet papers this month, provoked a 
warning from Washington and an angry 
riposte from President Nelson Mandela. 


borhood, where 42 people were killed 
Sunday in a car-bombing blamed on 
Islamic insurgents. 

"We need to organize ourselves, to 
help ourselves," said the young man. 
who would not give his name. 

The militants had threatened more 
attacks during the Muslim holy month, 
and nearly 150 people have been re- 
ported killed since Ramadan began on 
Jan. 10. 

In tile latest attack Wednesday, a 
bomb exploded at a market in Blida, 50 
kilometers (30 miles) south of Algiers. 
Five people were killed and more than a 
dozen wounded, witnesses said, but no 
official death toll was given. 

In the past, the authorities have or- 
ganized auxiliary groups to help them 
defend against attacks. But Wednesday 
marked the first time residents in the 
capital have taken to the streets, in force 
and on their own. to police the city. 

In neighborhoods across the capital, 
groups of young men — many of them 
unemployed or street merchants — used 
fruit cartons, bricks and whatever else 
they could find to build barricades. 

Acting with police approval in some 
cases, and without it in others, they 
blocked off some streets completely. On 
other streets, they forced drivers of un- 
familiar cars to submit to searches. 

The Algerian authorities had no im- 
mediate reaction, and did not try to stop 
the young men. 

The bombing Wednesday in Blida. 
the site of a major military base and a 
stronghold of Muslim fundamentalists, 
wounded about 15 people and caused 
heavy damage to the marketplace, wit- 
nesses said. 

Villages in the mountainous Blida re- 
gion have also been the sites of mas- 
sacres that have left whol$ families dead. 
Sometimes the victims have been 
hacked to death; sometimes their throats 
have been sliL 

The Blida bombing followed two car 
bombings Tuesday in the capital that 
killed up to 18 people. 

On Sunday, 42 people were killed in 
another Algiers car bombing. 

The rash of attacks came within days 
of a threat by the Armed Islamic Group 
— the most radical of Islamic factions — 
to ste;~ up its war against "apostates" 
during Ramadan. 

"The war will continue and intensify 
during the month of Ramadan." said a 
statement signed by Antar Zouabri. lead- 
er of the Armed Islamic Group. 

"We have the means and the men to 
punish those who are not on our side." it 
read. "Except for those who are with 
me, all the others are apostates and merit 
death." 

The statement, put up on mosque 
walls around Algiers on Friday, was 
published this week by the French-lan- 
guage newspaper El Watan. 

Islamic insurgents have been fighting 
security forces for five years. More than 

60,000 people have been killed. 



Aar NabarVAgncc Fmcc-Pme 


WE WON’T GO — Pales tinian refugees on die Libya-Egypt border demonstrating against returning to 
Tripoli a day after Libya said they could come back. The refugees were expelled by Libya in October 1995. 

Libya Defies UN Ban on International Flights 

Ghanaian Foreign Ministry official greeted the Libyan 
delegation at the airport. The delegation was paying an 
official visit to Ghana, the agency said. It did not say when 
the plane landed in Accra and gave no other details. 

Earlier on Wednesday, Libya said it had told the Security 
Council that it considered itself no longer subject to the air 
embargo after it gave permission for an American-piloted 
balloon to fly over its territory last week. Libya has violated 
the ban on international flights on several occasions. 


Reuters 

TUNIS — Libya said Wednesday that a Libyan plane bad 
flown an official delegation to Ghana’s capital, Accra, 
despite a 1992 UN ban on its international flights. 

Libyan state-run television showed footage of a Libyan 
Arab Airlines plane and the main sign over an arrival hall 
reading Accra airport with Libyan officials being greeted. 

The official Libyan news agency, JANA, monitored in 
Tunis, said an adviser to President Jerry Rawlings and a 


SHUNNED: British Try a Ban to Halt Books About Elite Unit 


Continued from Page 1 

former SAS sergeant and author of the 
best-selling “Bravo Two Zero" and it 
aroused little public fuss. Similarly, with 
little reaction, an informal ban was ap- 
plied to some former members who 
showed up in a TV re-enactment of the 
unit's 1 980 hostage rescue at the Iranian 
Embassy in London. 

The formal blanket Defense Ministry 
ban, which covers Sir Peter, was another 
matter entirely. It was swiftly denounced 
by his admirers as "a great pity." “an 
insult" and a “hu miliati on.* 

"We don't distinguish between of- 
ficers and other ranks." said a ministry 
spokesman. “Some sanctions have to be 
applied. This publicity has been dam- 
aging and it's got to stop," he said. 
‘ * Regiments are tight, almost family units 
and we hope people would ask them- 
selves if they are giving up part of then- 
social lives for the sake of publication." 

The unit came to international atten- 
tion in April 1980. when an SAS team, 
masked and clad in black, stormed the 
Iranian Embassy wi Ji stun grenades and 


rescued diplomats from exiled terrorists. 
The SAS was deployed behind enemy 
Lines during the Gulf War — with less 
success — to destroy Iraqi Scud missile 
launchers, and has been used to combat 
terrorism in Northern Ireland. 

It was Sir Peter, commander of British 
forces in the Gulf War, who started the 
current publishing spree in the early 
1990s with his books “Storm Com- 
mand" and “Looking far Trouble." At 
least three other fanner SAS members 
soon followed his example. 

The books were submitted to the De- 
fense Ministry before publication, with 
some portions reportedly deleted after 
negotiations. Defense officials still did 
not approve, but had little recourse and 
found little sympathy in the British 
courts once cuts were made. 

Current SAS members and recruits 
now must sign contracts promising nev- 
er to write abort their experiences. 

Ministry officials have said privately 
in the past that they were concerned 
about the destruction of the “mystique" 
of the SAS, which they say breeds fear in 
an enemy, as well as about the com- 


MEXICO: 

The ‘ National Sport ’ 

Continued from Page 1 

couraged and men long consider con- 
traceptives a threat to virility, the casa 
chica was a standard fixture of the social 
landscape and a familiar backdrop for 
movies and novels. 

One example drew the public spot- 
light last year when Maria Bernal, the 
mistress of the former president’s broth- 
er. Raul Salinas, described how he set 
her up in a swank residence here only 
days after his marriage. 

But many men with slimmer wallets 
than Mr. Salinas's have been forced to 
abandon their romantic hideouts during 
the financial crisis of the last two years. 

"Business was bad, even for the mil- 
lionaires," said Mari sol Gonzalez, a 
real-estate agent in Mexico City’s 
wealthy Lomas de Chapultepec section. 
“So men who had three casas chicas 
went to two. And many who kept two 
now only have one.” 

Carlos Welti, a demographer who has 
been studying Mexican sexuality for 20 
years, said the decline of the casa chica 
was part of an evolution in sexual mores 
that has followed fundamental changes 
in the coodition of women, including 
increased education and growth in the 
□umber who work outside the home. 

Although the sexual realm has 
evolved, however, the sexual activities 
of politicians has never prompted much 
debate here, although over the years 
journalists have discreetly documented a 
series of not-so-discreet intrigues in- 
volving recent presidents. 

Gustavo Diaz Ordaz, a married man 
who took office in 1964, carried on a 
fabled fling with a burlesque dancer. 
Jose Lopez Portillo, who took office in 
1976, boldly appointed one of his young 
paramours to coordinate his cabinet Mr. 
Salinas, also a married man. earned on 
several well-known dalliances that 
helped him construct a virile image; he 
now lives in Dublin with a former aide 
who has borne him a child. 

But no politician had ever made adul- 
tery an issue. That is why Mr. Lopez 
Obrador's speech caused such a stir. 

* ‘Take care of your personal life." he 
told newly elected mayors from his 
party, whose founders split in the 1980s 
from the governing Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party, known as the PRI. 

"Share the emotion of public service 
with your wives and children. Don't be 
like the men of the PRI. who once in 
power show off a new woman and are 
the worst example for family unity." 

Several male politicians expressed as- 
tonishment at the speech. 

Lazaro Mazon Alonso, the mayor of 
Iguala, in the Pacific coast state of Guer- 
rero, said: "This doesn't apply to me, 
because I'm single. In my town there can 
be a new first lady every month." 


CABS: Japan Tries to Tap Into Americans , Love of Rugged Terrain and 4-Wheel Drive 


Continued from Page I 

threat to American automakers, all of 
which lose money on their cars while 
making profits on sport vehicles and, to 
some extent, minivans and pickups. 

"Without a doubt, the Japanese are 
going to be very aggressive" in the 
sport-vehicle market, said Alexander 
Trotman, chairman and chief executive 
of Ford Motor Co. For Detroit-based 
companies, he said, “tire weakness of 
the yen just makes the task a lot 
harder." 

It isn’t thar auto executives or analysts 
actually expect sales of American-brand 
sport-utility vehicles to fall Drivers' ap- 
petites for these trucklike vehicles are still 
growing, and most new imported models 
are considerably smaller and less power- 
ful than Detroit's brawny road hogs. 

But by focusing on more affordable 
alternatives — American models often 
run as much as $30,000 or more — non- 
U.S. automakers may be stealing a 
march on Detroit. 

Chrysler Corp., Ford and General 
Motors Corp. have dominated this mar- 
ket for years because many sport-utility 
vehicles began as little more than 
pickups with covered beds. With little 
expertise in truck-building, and with an 
initial skepticism that the craze would 
last, non-U.S. automakers dithered for 
years, introducing only a few models 
and not advertising them heavily. 

Now, Japanese automakers are pour- 
ing into the U.S. market with sport 
vehicles built on the chassis of small and 


midsized cars. GM, Ford and Chrysler 
are all developing similar vehicles — 
Chrysler is even looking at a sport utility 
version of its Neon subcompact — but 
still have a couple of years’ work to do. 

Executives at Honda Motor Co. and 
Toyota Motor Corp., which are making 
tiie most ambitious pushes with the new 
Honda CR-V and the highly successful 
Toyota RAV-4, introduced last year, say 
each views the other as its main com- 
petitor. Both companies say they are 
particularly eager to offer sport vehicles 
to their millions of remarkably loyal car 
owners who might otherwise be tempted 
by American sport-utility offerings. 

But these automakers also have an eye 
on people who used to buy upscale im- 
ported sedans and now drive large 
American sport vehicles instead. 

"The defectors that went to Explorers 
and these other vehicles are going to 
come back, because we're going to give 
them an alternative." said Richard Col- 
liver, senior vice president of Honda's 
auto operations in the United States. 

Most new imported models will also 
be built abroad, which could add a 
couple of billion dollars a year to the 
American trade deficit with Japan and 
feed trade tensions. Automakers else- 
where want to make sure they can cap- 
ture a large chunk of the market before 
investing in new factories in the United 
Stales to build sport vehicles. 

Mitsubishi Motors Corp- for ex- 
ample. plans to import 30,000 to 35.000 
Montero Sports this year, a model that 
went on sale in December for $17,620 to 


$31,110. “You need a minimum of 

100,000 vehicles a year” to justify the 
assembly of a model in the United States, 
said N.- Kevin Ormes, Mitsubishi's 

S vice president for sales and mar- 
j. "Until yon can get that kind of 
volume, you can't justify the costs." 

But the biggest question is bow large a 
share these automakers will capture of a 
huge and growing market. Sport 
vehicles claimed 14.2 percent of the 
American auto market last year, more 
than twice the 6.7 percent in 1990, and 
are catching on in Japan, T-atin America 
and the Middle East 
A statistical analysis by Ward’s 
Autoinfobank and DRI/McGraw-HiU. 
two data-research groups, predicts that 
as imported models pour in, the beady 
growth of American sport vehicles wifi 
moderate this year. 

The new analysis also forecasts that 
Asian automakers will capture 21.6 per- 
cent of the sport-vehicle market, or 

477,000 vehicles, this year, up from 19.2 
percent last year, or 41 1,550. European 
automakers are predicted to double their 
share to 2.6 percent by 2000. 

These vehicles are fabulously prof- 
itable. Ever since GM recovered its ini- 
tial development costs years ago, it has 
been making as much $10,000 in pretax 
profit on each Suburban that ft sells. 
Japanese companies’ profits are likely to 
be less because they are selling smaller, 
less expensive vehicles in a more com- 
petitive market. 

The strong dollar, which has reboun- 
ded nearly 48 percent from its low point 


France Hails 
Resignation 

Of Envoy Who 
Killed 2 Teens 


Agcncc Fnacc-Pre&e 

PARIS — France cm Wednesday wel- 
comed the resignation of Zaire's am- 
bassador to Pans, who can now stand 
trial here over a car crash on the Riviera 
in which two teenagers were killed. 

The Foreign Ministry said the de- 


cision, announced Tuesday by President 
Mobutu Sc se Seko, would come as a 
relief to the families of the two 13-year- 
old victims. 

Former Ambassador Ramazani Baya 
is accused of killing Raphael Lenoir and 
Ronald Lehartel on a pedestrian < 


promise of classified information about 
methods and practices. 

“We just don’t feel that it's useful to 
continually draw attention to the tech- 
niques and die way they go about their 
business.’’ said a spokesman Wednesday, 
declining to specify what secrets have 
been revealed. 

The spokesman said the ban applied 
across the board. But Sir Peter, in a 
statement Wednesday, said he didn't 
think it applied to him. 

Nevertheless, admirers took to tele- 
vision and radio in his defense. Retired 
Colonel Mike Dewar, art oft-quoted de- 
fense expert, called it a “great pity and a 
gross insult' ’ to Sir Peter. David Clark, a 
defense spokesman for the Labor Party 
said be couldn't help “gening the feel- 
ing that because certain officers have got 
away with it in the past by publishing 
books, where the other ranks have been 
punished, that on this occasion Sir Peter 
is being made a scapegoat" 

Winston Churchill, a Conservative 
member of Parliament and grandson of 
the wartime prime minister, called the 
ban a “ridiculous over-reaction." 


against the yen and nearly 27 percent 
from its trough against the Deutsche 
marie in April 1995, is giving auto- 
makers elsewhere an extra lift 

The dollar's turnaround has produced 
a sharp reversal in the fortunes of Jap- 
anese automakers' subsidiaries in the 
United States, which now find it much 
more cost-effective to import vehicles 
and parts from Japan. 

“It took the neptive and turned it into 
a positive," said Richard Gritty, vice 
president for small cars at Toyota Motor 
Sales U.S-A. Inc. 

Some American auto executives re- 
main optimistic in the face of the latest 
competition. They say, for instance, that 
most of the new Japanese models — 
such as tiie Honda CR-V and the Toyota 
RAV-4 — have four-cylinder engines. 

Most American sport vehicles have 
more powerful engines, leading Detroit 
executives to dismiss the other offerings 
as not big or rugged enough to satisfy 
buyers who dream of barreling down dirt 
roads in the Rockies. 

Robert Lutz, Chrysler’s vice chair- 
man, said the Honda CR-V was likely to 
steal sales mainly fro m tiie Honda Ac- 
cord and other imported cars, not from 
Chrysler’s Jeeps. 

For reasons that are not yet clear to 
market researchers, buyers of sport-util- 
ity vehicles tend to be far more brand 
loyal than car buyers are. so tiie relatively 
small market share of Japanese auto- 
makers in these segments means they 
cannot count on a lot of previous cus- 
tomers returning to buy tiie next modeL 


as he drove to a meeting with 

Mobutu. The police say be was speeding 
at (he time, dnving ax 100 kSametexs an 
hour in a 30 kilometer zone. 

“We are satisfied by the decision by 
President Mobutu, which will allow the 
j udicial process to go ahead," said the 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, Jacques 
RnmnaelhardL “Tbe decision responds® 
to the legitimate concerns erf the families 
hit severely by this terrible tragedy, as 
well as requests made by President 
Jacques Chirac." 

Mr. Baya left France after the Nov. 23 
accident in the Riviera town of Menton. 
Since then. Zaire has crane under intense 
pressure to lift his diplomatic im- 
munity. 

Marshal Mobutu, who returned to his 
Riviera villa recently to continue con- 
valescence from cancer surgeiy, said 
Mr. Baya would return to France to face 
prosecution by the end of the week. 

Officials in Kinshasa insisted Wed- 
nesday that Mr. Baya had not been dis- 
missed, but had presented his resigna- 
tion of his own accord. Officials noted 
that it is constitutionally impossible fora 
diplomat to be fired. 

■ Incident in Moscow 

The police said Wednesday that a 
Japanese diplomat ran over a f - J — 
in central Moscow tins wed 
the man's death, Agence France-I 
reported. 


EUROPE: 

Expansion Problem 

Continued from Page 1 

tiie EU two years of difficult negotiations 
to accept the wealthy, fiee-maxket coun- 
tries of Sweden, Finland and Austria as 
its latest new members, said ft was un- 
realistic to expeet the poorer East Euro- 
pean countries to enter as qiricldy. 

The reaction of Dariusz Rosati, Po- 
land's foreign minister, indicated that 
even in the East the idea that membership 
would take longer was settling in. 

“We have a plan, the year 2000," he 
said. "But frankly, if I bad to decide 
whether to enter in 2000 on poorer terms 
or in 2001 on better terms, I would prefer 
2001.” 

The view of the European Comnris-jgv 
sion is significant because the agency win w 
prepare the assessments of the 10 can- 
didate countries that EU leaders will use 
tins year to select the first East European 
countries to enter membership talks. 

In essence, the statement tint not all 
Eastern countries would enter the Union 
at the same time indicated that the com- 
mission was likely to judge many as 
unprepared to start negotiations. 

Some EU countries, particularly Ger- 
many, are pushing for the bloc to mimic 
NATO's enlargement process and open 
talks with a small number of countries. 
Bonn's favored candidates include the 
three countries that Western diplomats 
expect NATO to select at a summit 
meeting in Madrid in July: Poland, Hun- 
gary and the Czech Republic. 

“That is tbe German interest,” a Ger- 
man official said. “It is incooceavable to 
start with everybody because once you 
start, you cannot tell Lith uania or Bul- 
garia, ‘Sony, you are not ready.’ ” Seek- 
ing to soften the likely disappointment in 
several East European ra r»»a ls. Mr. van 
den Broek said he would propose new 
measures to strengthen ties between tie 
EU and countries that would have to wait 
for later negotiations. &■ 

* ‘The differences with the other coun- 
tries should be as small as possible," he 
told the seminar of European officials. 

A German official said tiie EU would 
need tooffer a “safety net" of aid or 
trade privileges to encourage continued 
economic reform efforts in the fanner 
Communist countries of Europe. 


YELTSIN : President ’s Return Stymies Opposition POLAND: General Fights NATO Priority on Civilians 


Continued from Page 1 

perienced pneumonia after the operation but now 
ne has no signs of pneumonia." 

“It must be clear to any reasonable person that 
the sickness does not disappear without a trace in 
two weeks and that it is always followed by a 
certain period of asthenia: general weakness, help- 
lessness. This must be taken into account" 

At issue in the Duma was a resolution sponsored 
by a hard-line member of the Communist Party. 
Viktor Ilyukhin, which called on the upper chamber 
to join in seeking Mr. Yeltsin’s removal for reasons 
of ill health. 

The 1993 Russian Constitution says thai if a 
president is incapacitated, the prime minister takes 
over and new elections are to be held within three 
months. But the constitution does not define who 
makes the determination about the president's 
health. The Duma passed no legislation to clarity it 
The constitution makes separate mention of im- 
peachment. 

The upper chamber, made up of regional leaders, 
including many allies of Mr. Yeltsin, is unlikely to 
go along with any attempt to oust the president. 

When the resolution first came up for a vole 
Wednesday, it passed 229 to 63 with one ab- 
stention. A minimum of 226 votes was required. 


But the first vote was called tentative and subject to 
further amendment On a second vote, the tally was 
87 for, 102 against and five abstentions. The res- 
olution was not defeated, only deferred, and can be 
brought up next month for renewed debate. 

Yelena Mazulina, a member of the centrist 
Yabloko faction, said the Duma was displaying 
indecision about the drastic step of ousting Mr. 
Yeltsin. ‘‘Such behavior, a lack of desire to make a 
final decision on this question, is evidence thar 
you're afraid of yourselves and of that question 
you've raised,” she said. 

Bui Mr. Ilyukhin, the sponsor, lambasted Mr. 
Yeltsin for his prolonged absence from the seat of 
power. “The president has been to the Kremlin 
only four times over the last eight months. Today is 
the fifth time," he declared, adding that he believed 
Mr. Yeltsin ’s heart surgery was ineffective and that 
the president had signs of Parkinson’s disease. 
Doctors have said the surgery was effective and 
they found no other evidence of disease. 

Mr. Ilyukhin said subordinates were running the 
country in Mr. Yeltsin's stead, especially the 
widely disliked but powerful chief of presidential 
administration, Anatoli Chubais. Russia is being 
“ran by people who lack constitutional powers/" 
Mr. Ilyukhin said, adding. "It is we who must stop 
the bacchanal of imposture in state power." 


Continued from Page 1 

Republic and Hungary can start tiie negotiating 
process leading to membership. 

They would be tiie first countries mice under the 
Soviet Union's mantle to join die organization, 
which was created to contain the Soviet militar y 
threat 

For a variety of reasons, Poland, the largest and 
strategically the most sensitive of the likely new 
members, has had more difficulty introduc ing ci- 
vilian control of its military than the two others. 

To atta in membership, a process that is expected 
to take three years, the new countries must be 
approved by the parliaments of all 16 members, 
including a two-tiiirds majority in the U.S. Se nate 

Civilian control of the aspirants’ armies will be 

one of the core issues in the Senate review, defense 

specialists say. 

Even though Lech Walesa, a former president, 
was a big promoter of Poland’s membership in 
NATO, he refused to sign a bin mandating civilian 
control. That was because he wanted to keep the 
military and General Wiiecki “on his side, just in 
case,” a Western diplomat said. 

President Kwasniewski, a former communist, 
surprised many when he signed the civilian control 
bill a year ago, shortly after taking office. 


General Wzledri declined to be interviewed. He 
was quoted in tiie Polish press in late November as 
saying that Parliament’s Defense Committee had 
been politically motivated in approving the reg- 
ulations. “We’ll tee what this baby grows up tobe," 
he said. 

He cold tiie parliamentary committee in Novem- 
ber that he questioned tire legality of tbe rules and 
threatened to take his challenge to die Consti- 
tutional Tribunal. 

But Mr. Karkoszka said General Wiiecki was 
particularly infuriated because in the reorganiz- 
ation of the defense forces, what is known as a land 
army has been established, under die c ommand of 
its own general. 

In effect this means that Poland, like the United 
States; will have three services — army, navy and . 
air force — whose commanders repent directly to 0 
the defense minister, instead of to General Wflecki. 
Poland's military has 220.000 troops, down from 
460,000 dozing tiie Soviet era. 

And, as in Washington, tiie chief of staff is to 
serve under the new system in a coordinating role. 

But how and when the system is put into practice 
is an opeu question. Several Weston defense of- . - . 
finals said Poland was finally moving in the right 
direction. But they said General WQrteki's resis- 
tance would slow the process. 





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Dare we say that it’s something you’ve thought for a long time? 


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EDITORIALS /OPINION 


7 I 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribuitc 


PUBLISHED WITU THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Priority to Hong Kong 


Ii comes as no great suiprise that 
China is seeking to cancel civil liber- 
ties and basic freedoms in Hong Kong. 
The surprise, if any. is how rapidly and 
unapologelically the Chinese steam- 
roller is moving in. China seems totally 
heedless of. or oblivious to. the dam- 
age thar such actions will bring to its 
reputation abroad, and to Hong Kong’s 
chances of remaining prosperous. 

The tiny British colony will revert to 
China on July 1 . The Communist Chi- 
nese government has promised to fol- 
low a formula of “two systems, one 
country.” That means allowing Hong 
Kong to keep the independent judi- 
ciary. unfettered media and respect for 
individual rights that have allowed it to 
flourish economically and politically. 

But even before the official take- 
over, China is casting doubt on the 
value of its promise. "Hie authoritarian 
rulers of Beijing have appointed a new, 
subservient legislature, which will take 
the place of Hong Kong's elected 
council. This past weekend a subcom- 
mittee of the handpicked Preparatory 
Council — meeting, appropriately, in 
Beijing — proposed rolling back a 
whole series of laws that guarantee 
freedom for Hong Kong's citizens. If 
formally approved by the National 
People’s Congress, the proposals 
would allow detention without hear- 
ing. curtail the right to peaceful 


demonstration and repeal the Bill of 
Rights. The changes “strike at the 
heart of Hong Kong’s civil liberties," 
sa id British Governor Chris Patten. 

China responded to such criticism 
with huffy nationalist pride. “I want to 
remind the British authorities in Hong 
Kong that the government of China 
today is not the pre-1949 govern- 
ment.' ’ a spokesman said. “We cannot 
accept any instances of others trying to 
impose their will on us." This is pure 
nonsense; no one is imposing on China, 
and no one denies that China, with its 
1.2 billion people, has die power to 
destroy die uniqueness of Hong Kong, 
with 6 million, if it so chooses. 

But China also should understand 
that such a choice would have con- 
sequences. The citizens of Hong Kong 
would suffer most, of course, but 
China's economy would lose, too. And 
China cannot expect the international 
community to put faith in its promises 
— to win entrance to the World Trade 
Organization or in any other arena — if 
China breaks faith with Hong Kong. 

The U.S. government has stated that 
a peaceful and successful transition for 
Hong Kong is a top foreign policy 
priority. How the new administration 
responds to this latest threat to Hong 
Kong's freedom will represent an early 
test of that commitment. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Repression in Indonesia 


v peopl 

heard of Muchtar Pakpahan, but his 
problems are a good index of how the 
country's democrats are faring. 

The government is carrying out the 
most severe persecution in years of 
independent organizations and leaders 
such as Mr. Pakpahan, who is head of 
the nation's largest independent labor 
union. There has been little interna- 
tional outcry, and most of that from 
trade unions, partly because the 
Suharto government is currently not 
bothering Megawati Sukarnoputri, 
daughter of Indonesia's fim president 
and leader of the opposition to Pres- 
ident Suharto. 

When the government engineered 
Mrs. Megawati's removal as head of 
her party last June. Indonesians rioted. 
Afterward, she was repeatedly called 
in for questioning. Since she has come 
to symbolize Indonesia's democracy 
movement, as Daw Aung San Suu Kyi 
does for democrats in Burma, her 
safety' is taken internationally as a sign 
that all is well. 

The current trials of political op- 
ponents are evidence of the govern- 
ment's anxiety over Indonesians' sup- 
port for the opposition, especially 
because parliamentary elections are 
scheduled for May. 

The government arrested Mr. Pak- 
pahan on July 30. just after the riots, and 
charged him with inciting them. Unable 
to find evidence for the charge, it is 
instead trying him for subversion. He 
faces a long prison term and possibly 
the death penalty for criticizing Mr. 
Suharto's role, Indonesia’s brutal oc- 


cupation of East Timor and the nation's 
economic gap between rich and poor. 

Mr. Pakpahan is important not just 
as a political activist but as head of an 
independent trade union in a country 
that has repeatedly used troops to put 
down attempts by workers to strike or 
unionize. His trial is one reason the 
U.S. trade representative is sending a 
delegation to investigate labor rights in 
Indonesia next month. This is a wel- 
come step, as Washington's desire for 
■ a good business relationship with In- 
donesia has led it to minimize abuses 
of workers there. 

The Clinton administration should 
resume a review of whether Indone- 
sia's labor practices make it ineligible 
for a trade status that currently allows it 
to export some products duty-free to 
the United States. 

Besides Mr. Pakpahan. 12 labor or 
student leaders are being tried on 
charges of subversion. The govern- 
ment is putting pressure on Mr. Pak- 
pahan's lawyer. Bam bang Widjojanto. 
to testify against his client It is also 
monitoring the activities and auditing 
the books — in one case going back to 
the 1970s — of environmental and 
human rights organizations. 

Harassment of nongovernmental or- 
ganizations is not the kind of repres- 
sion the world gets excited abouL 
Americans, especially, like to think of 
political events in terms of their effect 
on people we have heard of. Bui the 
real measure of a country’s political 
health is the fate of those the world 
does not know. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Gingrich Ought to Pay 


House Speaker Newt Gingrich has 
earned an ignoble footnote in the his- 
tory books. He is die first holder of his 
high office to be sanctioned for serious 
ethical violations. By a big margin, his 
colleagues voted to reprimand bum and 
to impose a $300,000 penalty for ac- 
tions that, by his admission, brought 
discredit on the House. Since Mr. Gin- 
grich is clinging to a job he ought to 
give up, he should at least pay the fine 
out of his own money. 

The ethics committee took a dive on 
this important question by failing to 
specify in his plea bargain that he could 
not use campaign funds to pay a debt 
that he incurred by giving false in- 
formation to the ethics panel. It would 
be a final insult to the voters whose trust 
Mr. Gingrich has betrayed to let him 
pay his bills with their money or from a 
defense fund raised from favor-seekers. 
Let him dig into his book royalties. 

That would not only be the right 
thing on principle. It would also be 
smart politics. Even Mr. Gingrich’s 
ever obedient apologist. Representa- 
tive John Boehner of Ohio, has ac- 
knowledged thar. It is a shame that 
Representative Nancy Johnson has 
caved on the repayment issue and also 
tried to reinterpret Mr. Gingrich's be- 
havior and her collapsed leadership of 
the ethics committee. 

On the “Today” show. Ms. Johnson 


said Mr. Gingrich should pay “some” 
of the penalty out of his own funds, 
which amounted to an endorsement for 
his dodging part of his fine. Ms. John- 
son also asserted that the ethics com- 
mittee investigation had established 
that Mr. Gingrich’s college course “it- 
self was not partisan.” This was a 
breathtaking distortion of die find' ~ 
of James Cole, the counsel for the > 
ics subcommittee, who meticulously 
showed that the course had been part of 
a * ‘coordinated effort” to promote Mr. 
Gingrich’s “Republican revolution." 

It remains a mystery why Ms. John- 
son and so many other Republicans 
want to shield Mr. Gingrich from pay- 
ing a just penalty for his misbehavior. 
Common sense tells us that there must 
be a silent bloc of Republicans who 
would like to be rid or Mr. Gingrich 
because he is a heavy political liability 
and because Mr. Cole's report details 
egregious misconduct that should be 
disqualifying for the person who 
stands third in line to the presidency. 

Mr. Gingrich has asked fora week or 
so to think about whether he will pay 
his fine himself or use other people’s 
money. Maybe die heretofore compli- 
ant Republicans who believe in ethical 
government ought to urge him to do the 
honorable tiling, unless they know in 
their hearts dial it would be poindess. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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NATO Expansion as a Crafty Consolation Prize 

■* V ... . - kt < TTI 


W ASHINGTON — Sometimes the 
news is in the noise and some- 
times in the silence. Iff you want to 
understand what is wrong with NATO 
expansion, the new Clinton adminis- 
tration’s first major foreign policy 
challenge, listen to the silence, the si- 
lence of Europeans on this subject 
The West Europeans support NATO 
expansion, but it is nothing they ever 
seem to talk much about or debate. 
They treat it as something that America 
will take care of, something that Amer- 
ica that will finesse with the Russians 
and that America will pay for. 

And that is the news. The West Euro- 
pean states are the ones supposedly 
most threatened by a resurgent Russia, 
which is right next door. They are the 
ones supposedly most in need of the 
East Europeans' joining NATO to cre- 
ate a buffer with Russia. And yet the 
members of the European Union seem 
about as interested in NATO expansion 
as they are in the Super Bowl. 

Why? Because the West Europeans 
think that the real threat to them is not 
Russia but Eastern Europe. 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


The Poles, Hungarians, Czechs and 
others clamoring to join NATO are the 
ones who really scare the EU. The EU 
members know that Russia is no threat 
to them now. What threatens them are 
all chose new East European free mar- 
ket democracies, whose factories and 
farmers want to export to Western 
Europe at prices that will undercut the 
West Europeans, and whose workers 
want to flock to Western Europe for 
jobs, which would drive down wages. 

Ru ss ian missiles and are aDeb- 

ulous, distant danger. Polish hams and 
workers are a clear, present danger. 

NATO expansion is the bone that 
EU members throw to East Europeans 
instead of letting them into the Union, 
which is what they really want and 
need. That is what would really bolster 
their democracies. 

For the West Europeans, NATO ex- 
pansion is the ideal way to block the 
East Europeans from becoming mem- 
bers of the Union — without feeling 


of Johns Hopkins University 

deftly noted; “We are going to extend 
the NATO nuclear umbrella to the East- 
ern Europeans, so that the Western 


ilty about iL As Michael Mandel- Russia in some NATO derision-malang 
J - - - ■ — • »’ ■ — - nrid thus calms Russian concents* a 

NATO team was in Moscow on Monday 

to explore such a charter. • 

Even if it succeeds, the Europ eans 
should heed a second alarm, from Sen- 
ator Joseph Biden of Delaware, the 
ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee: “I have serious 
reservations about NATO expansion.” 
Mr. Biden does not object to NATO 
enlargement in principle, but he is not 
y et convinced that it can be done without 

' a ■ ■ T T O r.asiirlnn 


Europeans won’t have to buy their to- 
matoes.’ ’ It’s like America telling Mex- 
ico it can join NATO but not NAFTA. 


The European Union assumes that 
the United States will just go along 
with this ahum. But it should take note 
of some alarm bells that have just been 
The first came from outgoing 


rung. The first came trom outgoing ---— 

Defense Secretary William Perry, who undermining 05. arms control treaties 
began a fairwdi mteroew by remark; 


mg to me tiiat the Russians are still not 
on board at all for NATO expansion. 

“I believe it’s going to be veiy dif- 
ficult,” he said. “The Russians, at all 
levels, are opposed to NATO enlarge- 
ment. At aQ levels they are still nervous, 
suspicious and fearful of NATO.” 

He said he believed in expansion, and 
rhat the Russians must persuade their 
public that this poses no threat to them. 
But be argued that it was imperative to 
forge a NATO-Russia charter that 
provides a framework for involving 


the benefits would be worth the price; 

He wonders whether NATO actually 
is the best way to bolster democracy m 

Eastern Europe. “If we are really going 

to alienate the Russians." he^asks, 
“what are we going to get far it?” 
None of this has been debated by die 
U.S. public or Congress, said Mr. Bi- 
den, and ""til it is, anyone who as- 
sumes feat Congress is on board for this 
is making a big mistake. 

The New York Times. 


Offstage in Moscow , a Succession Storm Is Gathering 


W ASHINGTON — Re- 
cent visits to Wash 
ton by two former Soviet 


ashing- 
iet mu- 


By Jim Hoagland 


itary leaders turned Russian 
politicians have left fee for- 
eign policy experts, journalists 
and others they met scratching 
heads and studying notes, hop- 
ing to find in the generals’ 
words and ambitions a glimpse 
into Russia's future. 

First came the visit of the 
charismatic Alexander Lebed. 
Last week came the more puz- 
zling Alexander Rutskoi, die 
ex-general who was Boris 
Yeltsin's vice president until he 
led an unsuccessful armed re- 
volt in 1993. Amnestied from 
treason charges by President 
Yeltsin’s enemies in the Duma, 
Mr. Rutskoi has again re-cre- 
ated himself, this time as a pop- 
ulist politician. 

Three months ago be was 
elected governor of the eco- 
nomically and politically im- 
portant Kursk oblast by an 
overwhelming majority. Last 
week he came to America in- 
sistently seeking foreign in- 


vestment for Kursk and fee 
kind of political approval from 
Americans that was once a fir- 
ing squad offense in Moscow. 

At a luncheon organized by 
the Nixon Center in Washing- 
ton. Mr. Rutskoi heaped praise 
on the late President Nixon, 
voiced hope that Mr. Yeltsin 
would quickly recover from 
continuing serious illness, and 
promised to run his oblast’s 
economy on Keynesian prin- 
ciples, which he had difficulty 
in defining. 

“I really loved this man," 
Mr. Rutskoi said, through a 
translator, of Nixon. “Since I 
entered politics in 1990, 1 met 
wife him every time he came to 
the Soviet Union or Russia. 
You could speak frankly and 
directly wife him.” 

Asked what would happen if 
Mr. Yeltsin disappeared, he ex- 
pressed horror at the chaos this 
would cause: “God prevent 
him from stepping down now, 
in these economic conditions. I 


wish him healthy again as soon 
as possible ... I know his weak 
and his strong sides _. We will 
woik together again.” 

Asked the same question, 
Mr. Lebed, who spoke to think 
tanks and other audiences, dur- 
ing his visit in November, did 
not bother to hide his sense that 
the Yeltsin era was ending rap- 
idly and power would flow to 
him in fee months ahead. 

If fee president recovers, Mr. 
Lebed had said, he will find out 
how he “has been cheated” by 
his staff and how badly the 
economy is being run. l T will 
mmm and jointly we will start 
taking measures to prevent col- 
lapse.” If Mr. Yeltsin goes? 

Well, I have plans.” 

Mr. Lebed, once seen as Mr. 
Yeltsin’s chosen heir but 
dumped from his job as na- 
tional security adviser in Oc- 
tober after Mr. Yeltsin won re- 
election in July, clearly be- 
lieves that he can win a demo- 
cratic election if it is held this 


year. Many others also believe 
ihai he has feat power, includ- 
ing Mr. Rutskoi. That at least is 
how I read Mr. Rutskoi ’s fer- 
vent wish that the man be once 
tried to topple stay well and in 
power as long as possible. 

The longer Mr. Yeltsin 
holds on, infir m but still in 
office, fee better it is for Mr. 
•Lebed’s rivals and for those 
tike Mr. Rutskoi who have just 
arrived at the political trough 
anti are still organizing their 
power and rewards. 

The trips by the two men to 
the United States convey mul- 
tiple, partly hidden meanings. 
Their conflicting remarks 
about Mr. Yeltsin’s future sug- 
gest to me, as do diplomatic 
reports from Moscow, that Mr. 
Yeltsin has never really re- 
covered from his heart surgery 
last autumn and is gravely ilL 
An intense, real power struggle 
is already being waged in the 
shadows in Moscow. 

Americans should find it re- 
assuring that the road to polit- 
ical and economic power for 


Russian politicians now in- 
cludes visits to America and 
effusive praise for democracy 
and free markets. “We don’t 
have to fix our economy, we 
have to release it, to let it 
dare,” Mr. Lebed said. 

Whatever level of sincerity 
ties behind such declarations, 
fee men who utter them find it 
necessary to appeal to con- 
stituencies at home and abroad 
who do believe in democracy 
and economic freedoms. 
Democracy has sunk roots in 
Russia at least to feat extent. 

But those roots are still just 
below the surface. “Demo- 
cracy means first of all law and 
order,” Mr. Rutskoi said, dis- 
paraging tire Duma as unne- 
cessary. “We need a strong, 
predictable authority m 
charge,” Mr. Lebed said, 
promising to stamp out corrup- 
tion among his political rivals.- 

A storm is gathering off- 
stage in Moscow. Outsiders 
are not likely to be able to 
ignore it much longer. 

The Washington Post. 


, via 

»{ ■ 



Inevitable Clashes Between Civilizations? Don’t Believe It 


P ARIS — Samuel P. Hunt- 
ington's claim feat our fu- 
ture may be one of wars be- 
tween civilizations has finally 
appeared as a book, three and a 
half years after the argument 
was launched in the quarterly 
Foreign Affairs. 

I attacked fee Huntington 
thesis when it first appeared. 
Despite the disclaimer of in- 
evitability wife which the new 
book ends, and its pertinent re- 
mark that the real struggle is 
between civilization and fee 
forces of barbarism, nothing in 
the new version changes my 
view that the Harvard profes- 
sor’s case is misconceived, 
curiously ignorant in its treat- 
ment of history and politics, and 
a disastrous guide to thinking 
about international affairs ana 
national policy. 

The book, called “The Clash 
of Civilizations and the Remak- 


By William Pfaff 


i*. - 


ing of World Order,” is a char- 
acteristic product of the academ- 
ic discipline. American political 
science, in which Mr. Hunting- 
ton is an eminent figure. 

That discipline emerged in 
the 1950s and has attempted to 
make political studies into a sci- 
ence on the model of fee natural 
sciences, so as to produce ob- 
jective and quantified conclu- 
sions, and reliable forecasts. 

Its critics would argue that 
what it has actually accom- 
plished is to cloak much opinion 
and prejudice in a language 
modeled upon that of science, 
and by so doing has increased the 
influence of prejudice and polit- 
ical bias on national policy. 

Mr. Huntington's book cites 
much social science theory and 
provides many tables concern- 
ing the characteristics of civ- 


ilizations, but in fee his 
argument is a matter of simple 
assertions that are neither self- 
evident nor proven. 

He says that the future will 
bring wars between civiliza- 
tions, since civilizations have 
replaced nations as the dom- 
inant source of peoples’ iden- 
tity. He has a particular war in 
mind, between the United States 
(“the West”) and ‘ "Islamic civ- 
ilization,” the latter allied wife 
“Confucian” or Sinic civiliza- 
tion (meaning China). 

He discusses other civiliza- 
tions in his paradigm, but his 
focus is on Islam. As fee Islamic 
countries do not as yet produce 
high-technology weaprauy, the 
threat be foresees is that of Is- 
lam armed by fhfr» 

This obviously is a simple 
combination and projection into 


Doing Pretty Well? and Worried 


W ASHINGTON — This 
is the word that keeps 
coming to my mind, like a 
single emotional flag raised 
over fee week of the 53d pres- 
idential inauguration: Sober. 

I do not say that to rain on 
the Inaugural Parade. Nor to 
argue with the people who had 
an inaugural ball. I am a goose- 
bump patriot. I came here for 
the pageantry, the sound of 
Jessye Norman’s voice, the 
citizen collage of hats and 
scarves, fee democratic ritual. 
And 1 got what I came for. 

But the weekend celebra- 
tion carried a sober aura 
around its glittering, glitzy, 
center. The subdued image of 
the times kept reappearing, 
like the pentimento under a 
painting, long after the Clin- 
tons filled their dance card and 
went home to bed. 

Saturday night, 1 watched 
the fireworks light the capital 
city’s sides, a show that 
brought thousands of celeb- 
rants out into the bitter cold to 
register their excitement 
These fireworks also brought 
91 1 calls from worried folks 
of the inner city who thought 
they were hearing a shootout 
At noon on Monday fee 
president was sworn in by fee 
chief justice. A week earlier, 
this justice had heard argu- 
ments in the Paula Jones case. 
At lunch Bill Clinton talked of 
working with Newt Gingrich. 
This speaker was about to be 
reprimanded and required to 
pay a $300,000 penalty. 

These are sobering mo- 
ments in any memory book. 
Nevertheless this was also 


By Ellen Goodman 

an inauguration built relent- 
lessly around the metaphor of 
a bridge. It was a three-day 
event that insistently, redund- 
antly pointed us ahead. 

Indeed, at times the forced 
march to the millennium be- 
came as mixed an emotional 
metaphor for this inauguration 
as the Barney who appeared in 
one of the futuristic tents on the 
mall. What do you make of a 
dinosaur for the 21st century? 

At one event, I heard Hie 
Wiesel tell an audience at the 
Holocaust Museum: “The 
wife of Lot was unjustly pun- 
ished. It is human to look 
backward.” We need to re- 
member. As Mr. Wiesel said, 
“We look forward with our 
backs to the future.” 

But what kept me sober this 
week was our difficulty look- 
ing forward* We do not seem 
to be embracing the territory 
that Americans once claimed 
as our own. 

Four years ago the first 
baby-boomer president took 
fee keys’ to the car from our 
fafeens’ generation. In 1992 
there was the sense of a fresh 
start There was an expecta- 
tion of boldness. Now it seems 
to have dissipated. The pres- 
ident delivered a speech 
riddled wife internal conflicts, 
his and ours, about the future. 

It was a sober speech about 
“bright new prospects,” but 
without a concrete promise to 
fulfill the great promise. 

In one sound-bite moment, 
Mr. Clinton said that “Amer- 


ica demands big things from 
us, and nothing big ever came 
from being small.” Even fete 
Clinton supporter near me re- 
sponded sarcastically, “Well, 
nice line.” These are small- 
minded times. 

The president spun utopian 
visions of a land with schools 
tiiat “have fee highest stan- 
dards in the world,” wife par- 
ents and children who “have 
time not only to work but to 
read and play together.” He 
described streets without 
drugs or guns, and spoke of an 
era when today’s permanent 
underclass is middle-class. 

But how many of us believe 
we are headed there? Or, more 
to fee point, that Bill Clinton is 
leading us there? 

Americans are the worried 
well, living in the present 
tensely. Standing on the edge 
of a century that often looks a 
precipice, we are jittery. 

We are at peace, but feel 
vulnerable. We are at work, 
but feel less secure. We are 
raising children, but have less 
confidence in ourselves as 
parents. Some worry feat the 
best is behind us. And others 
worry that these may turn out 
to be our good old days. 

This is how fee second term 
begins. There is no unpacking 
to be done by the presidential 
couple, although they carry 
much baggage. At the turn of 
another quadrennium, the 
inarching bands go home, and 
fee government goes to work 
wife a sober thought: It will 
not be easy to make any of us 
lookahead. 

The Boston Globe. 


the future of two current pre- 
occupations of the American 
■' polity community, Islamic fun- 
damentalism and terrorism, and 
China’s rivalry. 

My first objection to this ar- 
gument is that civilizations do 
not have governments and 
armies. There is no authority to 
declare war. 

The second is that Islam has 
no common set of political or 
economic interests. Indonesia is 
an Islamic country. So is 
Somalia. They have little in 
common, other than religion. 
Each has its own interests and 
grievances, which are not those 
of Egypt, Turkey. Iran, Iraq, 
Algeria, Turkmenistan or the 
Kingdom of Morocco. Why 
should they all want to goto war 
wife fee United States? 

Mr. Huntington answers by 
saying that the Asian Muslims 
occupy “sub-civilizations’’ so 
might stay out of a conflict wife . 
fee West, and tiiat civilizations 
have “c«e states” to take de- 
cisions for the m, hi the Islamic 
case this is supposed to be Egypt. 
B ut Egypt is closely linked to fee 
United States today. 

Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Ar- 
abia, Pakistan and even Libya 
have all been allies of the United 
States at one or another time 
since the World War IL The 
author has little to say about 
that, or about the political causes 
of the tension that now exists 
between some Islamic countries 
and the United States. 

He manages to discuss Arab 
hostility to the United States 
without connecting it to Amur * 
ican support for Israel. 

He implies tiiat Islamic fun- 
damentalism will do minate fee 


Islamic world in the future, and* 
asserts that Islamic society is 
inherently violent and intoler- 
ant, “involved in far more in-~ 
tergroup violence than peoples" 
of other civilizations.” , 

He blames the war in framer 
Yugoslavia, on the Islamic; 
minority there, whose numbers 1 
inspired in the Serbs “geno-A 
cidal” fears. This provoked. 
Serbian nationalism and caused? ^ 
the Serbs to attack Croatia, and* • 
then the Muslims in Bosnia, f 

“Massive civilization rally-! 
ing” followed, be says; all o£ J 
Europe’s Catholic nations ' 
backed Croatia, all the Ortho-' 
dox ones backed Serbia, and all/ 
the Muslims were for Bosnia. I 
All tiie United States (and? 
NATO?) gave Bosnia was “At 
noncivilbational anomaly in an I 
otherwise universal pattern”'- 
This is confused nonsense. 

The fundamental objection to 
the Huntington argument is that' 
he denies human responsibility. . 
Governments, leaders and indi-: 
vi duals will not be responsible*? 
for future wars. War will be pro-., 
duced by a cultural phenome- : 
non, the civilization. This is like - 
blaming war on race. 

If tins were true, future wars 
would have no final resolution? 
short of extermination. If-! 
Muslims or Chinese have toi 
fight the West because they are, 
who they are, and we are who 
we are, there is no solution. Be-, 
ing Muslim, Chinese or Western^ 
is not a negotiable matter. 

It is hard to believe feaz Mr./i 
Huntington sees the mortal im-„ 
plications of what he has writ- 
ten. Fortunately, it is untrue. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Tunes Syndicate. *■ 


t- 


r 


l&C 


i 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Kites for War 

NEW YORK — A successful 
experiment wife war kites was 
made on Governor’s Island yes- 
terday (Jan. 22} by lieutenant 
Hugh Wise, of the U.S. Army. 
The kites carried him 40ft. above 
ground, and Lieutenant Wise 
was satisfied feat fee kites could 
have carried him as high as 
necessary for military purposes, 
but, having no parachute, he 
did not care to venture higher 

1922: The Pbpe Dies 

ROME - — Pope Benedict XV 
died at six o’clock this mo rning 
[Jan. 23]. The Cardinals and 
members of the Papal Court 
were summoned at 530, and 
were present until the Pope 
breathed his last. His heart con- 
tinued to beat until six o’clock 
when Dr. Cherubini said 
gravely: “The Pope has passed 
away.” Cardinal Meny del Val 
carried out the time-honored 


ceremony of waning fee Pope' 
three times by his Christian 
name, Giacomo della Chiesa. 
When after the third call no 
answer was received, the car-' 
(final turned to die members of 
tiie Papal Court, who were* 
deeply moved, and announced/ 
“The Pope is really dead.” 

n 

1947: Couture Talk 5 

PARIS — - A French radio pro*" 1 
by the Haut^ 


Syndicate featured _ 
of midinettes eager the? 
.. ... should hear their bopese 
desires and headaches. One sakP 
fee giris would like to see “what; 
goes on” in the salons, where the- 1 
suit of their toil, the collection, 
is shown every day to private* 
trade and buyers. One speaker" 
was asked what fee label in a s 
dress actually stood for. She- 
replied: “It is a mark of French’ 
qualify” but was obliged to en- 
large on this as many present* 
did not get the foil meaning . 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 




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Sfi// Drift Toward 6 Unparalleled Catastrophe 9 

ASHTMrsiVNvr ** X X 


- A1 the Ni faul 
' Quo in eariv Dwym}**r t 


nuclear «emmT £ tueraraanonar 


By George Lee Bader 

more serious commentators, foe lessons of 
SO years at the nuclear brink can still be so 
grievously misread; that the assertions and 
assumptions underpinning an era of des- 


How should the United States see hs 
responsibility for dealing with the con- 
flicted moral legacy of the Cold War? Rus- 
sia, with its history of authoritarian rule a?d 
a staggering burden of social transform- 
ation, is 31 a^urpped to lead on this issue. It 
Mis unavoidably to us Americans to work 
painfully bade through the tangled moral 


to - ! . 8m S u,ar to bend 


me unpossiDie notion mar the power or 
nuclear weapons is so immense their use 


As a democracy, we were confronted 
with a tortuous and seemingly inextricable 


panacea. And worse, other nations are 
listening, have convened to our theology, 
are building their arsenals, are poised to 
rekindle the nuclear anus race — and to 
reawaken the specter of nuclear war. 

What a stunning, perverse turn of events. 
In the words of roy friend Jonathan Schell, 
we face the dismal prospect that “the Cold 
War was not the apogee of the age of 
nuclear weapons, tote succeeded by an age 
of nuclear disarmament. Instead, it may 


every effort wifelTi^ 31 " can h® threatened with impunity, yet their dilemma: how to put at the service of our well prove to have simply been a period of 

thoritv m w ivu i-l-i- 5?^ 1*”^ and au- proliferation contained. national survival a weapon whose sheer initiation, in which not only Americans and 

liJUiuy, KJ promote; the Condirmne All , TT-. £__J J. , J -t.- rs.-if-T w.- j r^r ■ ■ t. 


attitudes Co ?£“ :ions and Albert Einstein recognuKd this bazard- 

fiwmSSSPf WI ^ toi nankmd ousbut very human tendency many years 

ago, when he warned that "the unleashed 
pears to he res P < ?nse of whatap- power of the atom has changed everything 

save 017 modes of feinkujg, and thus we 

dismayed. COUraged ’ ^isappoanted- and drift toward unparalleled ca tas trop he.” 
EmxHira^ u* Many well-meaning friends have 
Bo °^ tffWHtnre counseled me that by championing dim- 
comtTftf ^ precetv^from every matron I risk setting the bar too high, 

now been * e is ? ue ^ providing an easy target for the cynical 

and widely joined, wrth great interest and drvertmg attention from the more im- 

™ir£^^ ,airfbo< ^ mediately achievable. My response is that 

roajongs of an eraagmg global consensus elimination is the early defensible goal, 
rattte nsks posed by nuclear weapons far and that goal matters enormously. All of 
benefits. the declared nuclear-weapon stales are 

* ar ' Quality of formally committed to nuclear abolition in 
““J*® P 0 ™® 1 ® who simply the letter and the spirit of the nonpro- 
ssed imperiously at fee goal of elm- Iteration treaty. 

aired ColdWar lilMOric, No one is more conscious than T am that 

nuned a personal epithet or two and settled realistic prospects for elimination win 
smugly back into their world of exag- evolve over many years. I was in the 
geraied threats and bygone enemies.. And public arena for too long ever to malra fee 
by critics who attacked my views by mis- perfect the enemy of the good. I hasten to 
rep re s en tmg them, such as suggesting tfaal I add, however, my strong conviction that 
am proposing unilateral disarmament or a we are far too timorous in imaginin g the 
pace of reduction that wouldjeopardize the good; we are still too rigidly conditioned 
security of fee nuclear-weapon states: by an arm* control mentality deeply 

And finally, dismayed that, even among rooted in the Cold War. 


outweigh feeffpresumed benefits. 

,, Disappointed, thus far, by the quality of 
the debate, by those pundits who simply 
sniffed imperiously at fee goal of rf&n- 
manon. aired their stock C^ldWarihetoric, 
buried a personal epithet or two and settled 
smugly back into their world of exag- 
gerated threats and bygone enemies.. And 
by cr itics who attacked my views by mis- 
rep resen ting them, such as suggesting that T 
am proposing unilateral disarmament or a 
pace or redaction that would jeopardize the 
security of the nuclear-weapon states: 

And finally, dismayed that, amring 


destructiveness was antithetical to the 
very values upon which our society was 
based? Over tune, as arsenals multiplied 
on both sides and fee rhetoric of mutual 
annihilation grew more heated, we were 
forced to think about the unthinkable, 
justify the unjustifiable, rationalize the 
irrational. Ultimately, we contrived a new 
and desperate theology to ease our moral 
anguish, and we called it deterrence. 

I spent much of my military career 
serving the ends of deterrence, as did 
millions of others. 1 want very much to 
believe feat it was the nuclear force that t 
and others commanded and operated that 
prevented World War HI and created the 
conditions leading to the collapse of the 
Soviet empire. But, in truth, I do not and I 
cannot know fear it was. It will be decades 
before the hideously complex era of the 
Cold War is adequately understood, with 
its bewildering interactions of human 
fears and inhuman technology. 

It would not matter much feat informed 
assessments are still well beyond our in- 
tellectual reach — except for fee crucial and 
alarming fact fear we continue to espouse 
deterrence as if it were now an infallible 


Russians, but Indians and Pakistanis, Is- 
raelis and Iraqis, were adapting to the hor- 
ror of threatening the deaths of millions of 
people, were learning to think about the 
unthinkable. If this is so, will history judge 
that the Cold War proved only a son of 
modern-day Trojan Horse, whereby nu- 
clear weapons were smuggled into the life 
of the world, made an acceptable part of the 
way the world works? Surely not, surely we 
still comprehend feat to threaten the deaths 
of tens of hundreds of millions of people 
presages an atrocity beyond anything in the 
record of mankind? Or have we. in a silent 
and incomprehensible moral revolution, 
come to regard such threats as ordinary — 
as normal and proper policy for any self- 
respecting nation?” 

This cannot be the moral legacy of the 
Cold War. And it is our responsibility to 
ensure fear it will not be. 

General Butler, commander in chief of 
the US. Strategic Command, retired in 
1994. This article was adapted by The 
Washington Post from a speech he gave 
this month at the Henry L. Srimson Center 
in Washington. 


Beiievi 


Nuclear Utilities 

Regarding “Who Will Pay for 
Nuclear Plants?" (Finance, fan: 
4): 

As a Chicago government of- 
ficial directly concerned wife the 
lejpvmioent restructuring of fee 
electric utility market in fee 
United States, I was greatly in- 
terested in this article. 

Chicago is saddled wife the 
highest utility rates in fee Mid- 
west because of the huge invest- 
ment in nuclear energy under- 
taken by the area’s electric utility. 
Commonwealth Edison. Restruc- 
turing of the electric market id 
allow open competition could free 
ComEd's overcharged ratepayers 
to seek lower-cost electricity, 
avoiding fee high rates inflated by 


the utility's nuclear debt service. 
' However, as the - article dis- 
cusses, nuclear utilities such as 
ComEd are proposing “exit fees” 
as part of the restructuring, to be 
charged to consumers who choose 
to leave old monopolies and bay 
energy on the new open market. 

: The article reports fee utilities’ 

argument that, if fee transition to 
free markets is too fast, they could 
be “badly = punished on Wall 
Street” if “shareholders are 
asked to pick up more of fee tab, in 
fee form of reduced p ro fit s and 
dividends.” 

So? Isn’tthis fee veryftmetian 
af^ Wall Street? Risk is to be borne 
by fee shareholders, who stand to 
benefit from sound investments 
and bear fee burden of bad ones. 
Hie “discipline” of the free mar- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

service, ket requires that the shareholders Bulgarian Perfidv 

pi*, rlic. Ivor rtw met nf th. iitiUnM 1 Karl » 


ket requires that the shareholders 
bear fee cost of the utilities' bad 
nuclear investments, not pass fee 
costs to the captiveratepayers. This 
isn’t punishment, it’s capitalism. 

The article also reports feat fee 
nuclear investments “lode waste- 
fully expensive in hindsight.” 
Well, not just in hindsight; they 
looked bad in prospect, too. These 
investments were made over the 
strong and sustained objections of 
consumers and environmentalists 
that these nuclear plants would be 
bad investments financially, en- 
vironmental^ and socially. 

HENRY L. HENDERSON. 

Chicago. 

The writer is commissioner of 
Chicago’s department of environ- 
ment. 


Regarding “Bulgarian Dia- 
logue?" (Editorial, Jan. 15): 

The statement that “the gov- 
ernment response suggests that a 
political dialogue may be pos- 
sible” is absurd and naive. The 
Bulgarian Socialists/Communists 
mpowernever kepi a promise and 
never meant a word they said. 
Their agreement to the protesters' 
demands for early elections is a 
well-known trick to remain in of- 
fice for as long as possible. 

Generalizations about the ruling 
party and fee opposition speak of 
ignorance. In feet, fee efforts of the 
opposition to "get things done” 
were blocked by fee Socialists. 
Masters of intrigue and perfidy, 
true disciples of their old Moscow 


The Melanoma Mystery, 
Or Don’t Look at the Sun 


By Laurent Schwartz 


mentors, they have deceived na- 
tives and foreigners alike. 

Bulgaria's Socialists/Commu- 
nists are governed by a disrespect 
for the rule of law and a contempt 
for the nation’s welfare. Their 
place is not at fee table ‘ ‘of serious 
negotiations.” Their place, rather, 
should be yesterday. 

SHKA PASTRAKOVA. 

London. 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed “ Letters 
to the Editor " and contain the 
writer’s signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


P ARIS — Diseases live and 
die. The scourge of the early 
Middle Ages was leprosy. The 
great plague killed up to half the 
population of entire cities before 
finally fading from Europe in fee 
early 18th century. Tuberculosis 
was the killer of the 1 9th century, 
cardiovascular disease is the ma- 
jor problem of our time. It looks as 

MEANWHILE 

if cancer will be the scourge in fee 
21st century. 

The most common forms of 
skin cancer are basal cell car- 
cinoma and squamous cell car- 
cinoma. They are caused by ex- 
posure to ultraviolet rays and 
appear on the face and hands. 
These tumors are usually benign. 
They very rarely kill. 

Melanoma is the deadliest form 
of skin cancer and is now the most 
rapidly increasing cancer among 
whites. In Canada, for example, 
its incidence has more than 
doubled in 25 years, it has tripled 
among whites in the United Stales 
in fear time. 

Melanoma has become a major 
public health concern. It is the 
second leading cause of cancer 
de aths in American white males 
aged 15 to 35. 

The steep increase in melan- 
oma mortality rates for U.S. 
whites from 1973 to 1988 cannot 
be solely attributed to earlier dia- 
gnosis of the problem, change in 
diagnostic criteria or an increase 
in the proportion of excised le- 
sions feat are referred for lab- 
oratory examination. 


Although all pigmented lesions 
change over tune, melanomas 
do so — in size, shape or color 
— rapidly, in weeks to months. 
The main clinical features of 
melanoma are a change in a 
lesion's size, color or shape, 
inflammation, bleeding or crust- 
ing. 

The treatment is surgical ex- 
cision. The survival rate is above 
95 percent when diagnosis is 
early. The prognosis for those 
with large lesions is poor, 
however, mainly because fee dis- 
ease spreads to other organs. 

Less than 20 years have passed 
since fee first studies linking sun 
exposure to melanoma were pub- 
lished. In 1992. the International 
Agency for Research on Cancer, 
In a comprehensive review, con- 


cluded that "solar radiation 
causes cutaneous melanoma.” 

But fee commonly assumed re- 
lation between melanoma and sun 
exposure may not exist. 

Ultraviolet radiation can cause 
melanoma in a fish but nol, ap- 
parently, in any other animal. 

Ultraviolet rays are known to 
create specific genetic lesions, 
which are found in other types of 
human skin cancer f basal cell and 
squamous cell carcinoma) known 
to be caused by ultraviolet rays. 
But these mutations are not found 
in human melanoma. 

Epidemiological data are also 
not straightforward. Melanomas 
are rare on fee face and hands, 
which of course are fee areas most 
exposed to fee sun. People who 
are continuously exposed to ul- 
traviolet rays — farmers, for ex- 
ample — are at lower risk. 

Jonathan L. Rees wrote last 
January in fee British Medical 
Journal: "The arguments relating 
melanoma to sun exposure are 
well rehearsed, but the relation is 
not nearly as clear-cut as it is 
between sun exposure and squam- 
ous cell malignity. Most melan- 
omas occur on skin that is only 
intermittently exposed.” 

Several measures for avoid- 
ing melanoma, including stay- 
ing out of fee sun and regularly 
using a chemical sunscreen, 
bave been recommended. But 
while sunscreens are known to 
prevent sunburn, their use has 
not made a dent in fee melanoma 
epidemic. 

After the skin, eyes are fee 
most common site for melano- 
mas. Under the microscope an 
eye melanoma is indistinguish- 
able from a cutaneous melanoma, 
yet these ocular tumors arise in 
areas feat ultraviolet rays cannot 
reach. 

This epidemic should be reas- 
sessed. There is no robust evi- 
dence to support most of today's 
measures to prevent melanoma. 
Concentrating attention on ultra- 
violet rays — indeed, on sunlight 
itself — could mean precluding 
better explanations. 

The writer, a physician and mo- 
lecular biologist, is a senior staff 
member in the department of ra- 
diology at Saint-Louis Hospital in 
Paris' He contributed this com- 
ment to the International Herald 
Tribune. 


#*- 

>t-r 




THE ISLAND OF THE 
COLORBLIND 

By Oliver Sacks. Illustrated. 
298 pages. $24. Alfred A. 
Knopf. 

Reviewed by Christopher 

Lelmiann-Haupt 

P ART of the fim and chal- 
lenge of reading Oliver 
Sadks’s engaging new book, 
“The Island of the -Col- 
orblind,” is pulling together in 
your mind its dispan * ele- 
ments. ‘This book is really 
two books,” Sadrs begins his 
preface, “independent narrat- 
ives of two parallel bttt in- 
dependent journeys to Mi - 
amnesia.” 

Sacks, fee author of 
“Awakenings” and “An An- 
thropologist on Mars” con- 
tinues, “I went to Micronesia 
as a neurologist, or neuro- 
anthropologist, intent on see- 
ing how individuals and com- 
munities responded to 
liwuwiat endemic conditions 
— a hereditary total col- 
orblindness cm Pingelap and 
Pohnpei; a progressive, fatal 
neurodegeneratrve disorder 
on Guam and Rota.” 

When be returned to his 
home on City Island in New 
Work, he eventually saw fee 
* ‘connection aad me an i n g* ’ of 
his experiences, and began to 
write. . . 

But he leaves to tire reader 
fee task of working out feat 
connection and meaning. 
Moreover, when he did begin 
to write, fee book began to 


By AlanTiuscott 
np HE Greater New York 

1 Bridge Association named 

Jim Krekorian Player of fee 
Year for 1996. 

The following deaf helped 
Krckorian win the 
North American 
South, playing wife Bob 
Blanchard, he bid three no- 
trump over East’s one club. 

TEs bid usually show; a 
l oug solid minor suit wife a 
stopper in the. opener's safe 
Based on this, west ■ dwuw 
m have tried a major-suit lead, 

^ aDdfeeclwicew^crnciaL 

After a hwrt. lead. South 
would have had fee first nme 
tricks, and after a spade lead, 
the defense would have made 
at least eight and perhaps 

^West’s actual diamond lead 
was poor, ' and South could 
count nine tricks. But tins was 


r KUI 

grow, as he puts it, like an 
unruly plant - 

, . “Since fee offshoots, in 
volume, now started to vie 
wife the text,” he writes, he 
decided to place “many of 
these additional thoughts to- 
gether, as endnotes.” So as 
well as making the connec- 
tions, the reader must also fig- 
ure out how to read fee book: 
text and then endnotes, or text . 
and endnotes together. 

As it rums out, you find 
yourself switching back and 
forth, reading the endnotes as 
they are cited in the text Re- 
markably, they prove to be 
both welcome and not in fee 
least distracting. The narrat- 
ive drive in each of fee two 
main sections is strong 
enough in its particular way to 
gjve leeway todi version. 

In the first section, “The 
Island of the Colorblind,” 
tins drive is provided by the 
interaction between -Knot 
■ Nordby, a colorblind Norwe- 
gian scientist whom Sacks in- 
. vised along on his Microne- 
sian journey, and the natives 
of the region who are sim- 
ilarly afflicted. 

Total congenital col- 
orblindness, or achromatop- 
sia, is a scary disease in feat it 
not only forecloses all sense 
of color but also makes its 
victims painfully sensitive to 
tight 

In Sacks’s telling, Nordby 
lends comfort to those af- 
fected, nearly 8 percent of the 
population, by showing them 

they are not alone in fee world 

BRIDGE 

match-point scoring, and he 
wanted an overtrick. Leading 
a club toward the king was 
tempting, but West’s railure 
to lead a club suggested that 
beheld fee ace. 

So Soufe cashed aD his dia- 
mond winners, and a slight 
discarding error by East left 
tins ending: 

NORTH 
* Q 9 5 
t?AKJ 
0 — 

*- 

WEST ^ ST 

;j 08 

♦ AS? 


and by presenting them wife 
visual aids like sunglasses to 
protect them from the light 
The islanders pay back 
Nordby and Ins companions 
by teadnng them about their 
culture and by sharing their 
lives. 

- In fee second section, 
“Cycad Island” after fee an- 
cient palmlike evergreens 
fear happen to be one of 
Sacks’s obsessions, fee nar- 
rative drive is that of a med- 
ical whodunit, or, more ex- 
actly, a what-caused-iL What 
accounted for fee neurode- 
generative disorder that the 
people of Guam, fee Chamor- 
ros, call fyticchbodig ? 

Sacks writes, “The dis- 
ease, seemingly, could 
present itself in different 
ways — sometimes as 
Tytico,’ a progressive para- 
lysis that resembled 
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 
(ALS, or motor neuron dis- 
ease), sometimes as ‘bodig,’ a 
condition resembling parkin- 
sonism, occasionally wife de- 
mentia.” 

It appears to show up m 
families, winch suggests that 
it is congenital. But it also is 
dissqppeuing. which implies 
an outside cause. A suspect 
for a time was the author’s 
favorite plant, die cycad tree, 
whose seed, despite being 
toxic, is used to make a form 
of flour fee Chamorros call 
fadang or federico. But the 
solution to fee problem has 
proved to be complex and elu- 
sive. 


Judging fee position accur- 
ately, Krekorian played low 
and could not be prevented 
from scoring fee overtrick. 

West did bis best by win- 

ning the club hide and playing 
his remaining heart, but South 
countered by winning in 
dummy and leading a spade, 
scoring two heart tricks in 
dummy at the finish. 

NORTH (D) 
*Q9S4 
<7 A K J 9 S 
07» 

*82 

' WEST EAST 

A US 7 AAKJS 

963 9 Q 108 7 

48054 « — 

* A9 7 8 *QJUS4 

SOUTH 


SOUTH 

♦ 32 
«42 

*32 

4AKQJ 1083 

042 

* K 8 

0 — 


*K8 

TtetoMdtag: 

Norm East SoBth 

" 

Pass 1* 3 NX 

led a spade. East . 
led the club queen. 

Pm Pass 

. West led die (flaranofl six. 


So given the flow of these 
narratives, yon don’t in fee 
least mind panring to swim up 
Sacks ’s tributaries of thought 
And the places they take you 
prove fascinating, whether 
they are medical arcana, 
philosophical speculations or 
literary asides. You read them 
avidly and then float right 
back into fee mainstre am. 

As for what ties fee whole 
book together, the secret is as 
elusive and complex as in any 
work of literary art. But you 
get some inkling in an auto- 
biographical section near fee 
end, where Sacks recalls bis 
childhood fascination wife 
ancient plants and his night- 
dreams of “peaceful, 
swampy landscapes of 350 
million years ago. a Paleozoic 
Eden,” from which he 
“would wake wife a sense of 
exhilaration, and loss.” 

H E adds: “1 think these 
dreams, this passion to 
regain the past, had 
something to do wife being 
separated from my family and 
being evacuated from Lon- 
don (like thousands of other 
children) during the war 
years. But the Eden of lost 
childhood, childhood ima- 
gined, became transformed 
by some legerdemain of the 
uncooscious-to an Eden of the 
remote past, a magical ‘once,’ 
rendered wholly benign by 
die omission, fee editing out, 
of all change, all move- 
ment.” 

To realize these dreams 
seems in pan what drew him 
to his South Pacific islands. 
Of coarse, they proved no 
Eden, but instead places of 
disease and ecological dis- 
aster, where, as he writes, on 
Guam at least, bird life has 
been wiped out by climbing 
snakes so numerous that they 
daily get into fee island's 
transformers and causa elec- 
trical failures known as 
“snakeouts,” and where, on 
Rota, fee “unique forests” 
are being destroyed “on a 
fearful scale, most especially 
wife the building of Japanese 
golf courses/' 

Still, Sacks’s humane m- 
qmsitiveness lends a philo- 
sophical perspective to every 
thre atening change. His 
scenes are stills from fee 
moving picture of timeless 
evolution. And the way his 
subjects accept their fate re- 
deems his story from gloom, 
even lending it a certain 
gaiety. 

Christopher Leftmann-Houpt 
is on the staff cf The New York 
Times . 




By maintaining a far-flung nelwork of news-gaihering resources, the World's Daily 
Newspaper brings you unrivalled coverage of world politics, business and economics, 
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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 


HEALTH/SCIENCE 


Hepatitis C: Progress in Preventing an Insidious Disease 


By Jane E. Brody 

New York Times Service 



EW YORK — The virus that 
causes AIDS, HIV, is hardly 
the only virus that can invade 
the body and wreak havoc 
for years without the person even know- 
ing it is there. 

Another insidious and perplexing or- 
ganism. already present in more than 3.5 
million Americans, is the virus that 
causes hepatitis C. When it first in fects a 
person, it may produce no discernible 
symptoms. But while still in hiding, it 
can disrupt vital functions of the liver. 


and in the long run it may severely 
damage the liver, causing cirrhosis, or- 
gan failure and even cancer, 

Although most Americans are far 
more familiar with hepatitis A, trans- 
mitted through contaminated food and 
water, and hepatitis B. transmitted 
through infected blood and semen, it is 
the more recently identified hepatitis C. 
transmitted mainly through blood, that 
is responsible for more deaths than the 
other two versions combined. 

As with HIV. no treatment exists that 
is certain to squelch the virus perman- 
ently. Even when treated with a virus- 
suppressing drug soon after it is ac- 


quired, the hepatitis C virus is likely to 
result in a chronic liver infection. 

Organ damage caused by the virus is 
one of the leadingreasons for needing a 
liver transplant. The virus is rarely re- 
sponsible for failure of the transplant 
but nearly always Invades the new liver, 
sometimes within a few weeks, and 
damages it 

With nearly 1.5 percent of the US. 
population already infected with the 
nepatitis C virus, the eventual effects of 
chronic infection make it a growing and 
costly problem for public health as well 
as die individual. 

That is the bad news about hepatitis 


PARIS FASHION 


The Elegance After the Storm 


By Suzy Menkes 

Inieriurtcnal Herald Tribune 




correct 


ARIS — It is the fate of every successful couturier to 
start by shocking the bourgeoisie — and to end up 
by dressing il In t967, Yves Saint Laurent sent out 
an African -inspired collection with wooden beaded 
dresses os extraordinary at their time as the Masai breastplates 
John Galliano showed this week for Dior. 

The collection Saint Laurent presented on Wednesday was 
pure in line, perfectly judged and conjured up establishment 

words like "impeccable" and " — ' " 

From the tip- til ted boaters 
above slim pantsuits through 
a soft sculpture of navy blue 
satin. Saint Laurent did not 
put a foot — ora whimsically 
colored shoe — wrong. 

“Au dessus dr la melee," 

Saint Laurent said backstage, 
meaning that he was standing 
aside from the brouhaha sur- 
rounding the current fall sea- 
son. The only paparazzi 
frenzy was when Claudia 
Schjffer — otherwise dressed 
in neat little suits — appeared 
in the green and white wed- 
ding gown with her bosom 
riding high. 

The day clothes were pre- 
dictably elegant, with signa- 
ture masculine pantsuits 
jazzed up with Op Art stripes 
on a shirt and necktie. There 
were navy suits for women 
who work; pale shantung 
dresses for ladies who lunch; 
and for that mythical "after- 
noon" attire, a trio of rose- 
printed chiffon dresses: pink, 
turquoise, lilac. 

Those perfect-pitch colors 
— as forceful in neutral tones 
as in the splashy shades — are 
all that remains of Saint 
Laurent, the inimitable fash- 
ion artist That, and his ability 
to sculpt a dress out of satin, 
so that it falls to a cowl back 
for a rose to nest Or to turn 
decorator by planting a scar- 
let bow at the back of a dress 
or a field of embroidered pop- 
pies on a bodice. 

Boring clothes? No. beau- 
tiful clothes, swinging out to 
the music from Woody Al- 
len’s new feel-good movie. 

But Saint Laurent summed up 
the embourgeoisement of the 
artist in him in a 1993 in- 
terview: "In the beginning, 
you are so happy, you have 
too many ideas, you don't 
think much about the women 
but of satisfying your creative 
gifts and putting yourself 
first.” Now, from his 
Olympian fashion heights, he 
is servicing clients. 

C HRISTIAN La- 
croix. celebrating 
10 years since his 
house exploded in 
bouncing poufs. Arlesian 
fichu collars and haute bo- 
hemian joie de vivre, ex- 
pressed similar sentiments. 

"Yesterday. I designed 
above all for myself.” he 
said. “Today 1 work for my 
diems." 

So for the first time, the 
collection had achieved a new 
serenity, a Lacroix fashion 
zen in which those once 
clashing colors were harmo- 
niously blended, give or take 
a sudden fiery glow of sunset 
red. yellow and pink. The in- 
tricate embellishment came „ . . . , .... 

as cameos of fabrics and tex- c nristian Lacroix s sheer coal with hand-painted 

tures, all intensely feminine flowers and lacy chiffon dress: Yves Saint Laurent's 
and subtly opulent. asymmetric one -shouldered draped dress. 

The costume party element 

had disappeared — or maybe been moved to Lacroix's work 
for the theater. So had any pretense at doing daywear (apart 
from a token coat or jacket with narrow pants i. 

It was straight into the cocktail hour with the lacy dresses or 
stiffer fabrics, lightened with a moonshine iridescence. 

Among the mostly-slender evening dresses appeared hyper- 
sophistocaied Provencal dresses in checks and stripes — the 
designer's only self-reference to his fashion patrimony. 

There was something lovely in this new calm — and 
something lost. There were a few soaring moments — a 





T was as though the 
challenge of new de- 
signers in couture had 
pushed Valentino to 
give the best of himself. That 
came through in the daywear 
as light pinstriped taffeta re- 
placing heavy suiting, or a slit 
in a skirt filled with point 
<f esprit lace. 

With such a refined col- 
lection that was sending the 
clients into raptures, why did 
Valentino feel the need to 
show so much sheer? 

Oscar de la Renta, basking 
in the reflected glory of Hil- 
lary Clinton’s golden inaug- 
uration gown, has another 
political admirer Henry Kis- 
singer. He sat front row at the 
Balmain show with his wife 
Nancy. 

*‘I don't have much expe- 
rience. but I thought it was 
beautiful," Kissinger said. 

De la Renta tossed off (he 
show likea pro. His mission is 
to dress the ladies he dines 
with, feeding them the three- 
quarter coal over a dress in a 
cheery shade of coral and 
youthful pants for day rather 
than only knee-grazing slim 
skirts. 

But don't lets talk hem- 
lines! For Balmain's focus 
was above the waist, with 
subtle slit-front or portrait 
necklines, chic with yellow 
lining black. Those couture 
details — like openwork 
seams on caffe latte — turned 
into grander gestures at night, 
as chiffon waves ruffled the 
front of a dress and feathered 
skirts fluttered below evening 
sweaters. 

The fine workmanship 
showed the symbiotic rela- 
tionship between the Amer- 
ican couturier and the Balmain ateliers. De ia Renta had even 
picked up some tips from Chanel: the matelot sweater em- 
broidered in a caviar of pearls was last seen at Rue Cam bon. 

But a showstopping djellabah. with bold motifs in cut velvet, 
was distinctly de la Renta's own signature. And all the evening 
wear had a light touch of modernized couture. 

One puzzle remains: De la Renta is boasting of his success 
in weaning the American president's wife from an Inaug- 
uration Day hat So why would he plonk cm hats at Balmain, 
adding nothing but a few years? 


MAURIZIO GALANTE 


MARCH 1997 

PRESENTATION OF THE PRET-A-PORTER COLLECTION AUTUMN/WINTER 1997/1998 

FOB INFORMATION CONTACT; MAURIZIO GALANTE S.A. 22 RUE DE PALESTRO 75G02 PARIS TEL. 01 .5S.3A.3-4.55 FAX 01.55.34.55.50 


paisley patterned coat wafting over a gleaming dress or a pink 
organza coat, hand-paimed with flowers, over a dress of pink 
and yellow guipure flowers. But the parade lacked a flourish 
of bravura. 

So the artist has laid down his brushes? Not at all! Lacroix 
had (ruffled his artistic talent under the gilded finishes and 
crusty lace surfaces. A fiery red tweed jacket had abstract an 
dabbed on the backbone; chiffon was hand- shaded to watery 
blues and greens. 

The house has also become a focal point for young 
craftspeople, who work on new materials, special effects and 
the accessories. They remain ebulliently inventive, from the 

saucy metallic lace veils to 
the rivulets of multicolored 
stones to the chinoiserie bro- 
cade shoes. 

And the clients, of course, 
adored such a wearable 
Lacroix collection. Sao 
SchJumberger described it as 
"divine" and Anne Bass and 
Nada Kirdar, at the Fashion 
Museum gala opening, both 
lamented that the problem 
was not deciding what to buy 
— but how to exercise re- 
straint. 

Well, at least they will be 
able to discount some of 
Valentino's feather-light 
dresses on grounds of inde- 
cency. This ravishingly pretty 
and delicately decorated col- 
lection. with its tumbling 
corsage flowers, included 
pare h works of lace so sheer 
that they revealed everything 
as the models retreated. 

The main theme was taken 
from the Japanese flowers 
that were set against the back- 
drop. Kimono jackets, cut off 
ana lapping the body, were a 
constant look, along with 
dangling Oriental parses. 


C. The good news is that though there is 
no vaccine to prevent it, recent measures 
have greatly reduced the risk of in- 
fection, and there are steps everyone can 
take to protect against it 

Hepatitis C is not spread through cas- 
ual contact, sneezes or coughs, food or 
water. In the past, the main route of 
infection was through transfusions of 
contaminated blood and blood 
products. 

But since May 1990, when screening 
of blood supplies for the virus began, 
there has been a sharp decline in die risk 
of infection from transfusions. In 1981, 
10 percent to 13 percent of transfusions 
resulted in transmission of hepatitis C; 
by 1992, the risk was down to less than 
I percent — three cases per 2 0,000 units 
of transfused blood. 

Now, intravenous drug use with un- 
clean needles is the most common 
known mode of transmission. Needle 
exchange programs could in theory re- 
duce the likelihood of this infection as 
well as that of HIV infection. 

About one case in 20 can be traced to 
infection through sexual intercourse 
with a virus carrier, exposure to con- 


taminated saliva or other forms of in- 
timate contact with an infected person. 

Those known to be infected should 
always practice ’safe sex; that is, us® a 
latex condom. Other protective mea- 
sures to be taken by an infected person 
include never sharing a toothbrush or 
razor with another person, taking care to 
bandage all open cuts carefully and nev- 
er donating blood. plasma, bendy organs 
or sperm. 




N about 40 percent of cases, the 
source of the infection is un- 
known. Some experts believe that 
a fair portion of these cases may 
result from activities like tattooing, 
body-piercing and even manicures, says 
Dr. John D. Hamilton, an infectious 
disease specialist at Duke University 
Medical Center in Durham. North Car- 
olina. 

Pregnant women who are infected 
with hepatitis C sometimes pass the 
infection to their fetuses, but it is not 
known co be transmitted through breast 
milk. A few cases among health care 
workers have resulted from being ac- 
cidentally jabbed by a needle. 


Many people who become 
carriers of hepatitis C do not 
know it until years bier, when per- 
haps a routine medical examination 
shows an abnormality on a blood test for 
liver function. In fact, most cases of 
hepatitis C acquired outside of a med- 
ical procedure are initially "silent," 
causing no symptoms to warn of the 
viral invasion. . 

Therefore, anyone who is at high risk 
of acquiring this disease should be 
tested for it regularly. 

If the infection causes immediate 
symptoms, they are likely to resemble 
the flu: loss of appetite, nausea, extreme 
fatigue, fever ana abdominal pain. 

Severe cases result in jaundice, a yel- 
lowing of the skin and eyes due to mal- 
function of die liver. But more often (ban 
not, hepatitis C is first discovered in its 
chionic, symptom-free state through a 
routine Uver-function test. 

The only treatments for chronic 1 
aritis C that have been approved by 
Food and Drug Administration involve! 
injections of interferon. The injections; 
are typically administered three times a* 
week for six months. I 



Seismic Blast: Bomb or Quake? 


By William J. Broad 

New York Times Service 



EW YORK — Late on the 
evening of May 28, 1993, 
something shattered the 
calm of the Australian out- 
back and radiated shock waves outward 
across hundreds of miles of scrub and 
desert. Truck drivers crossing the region 
and gold prospectors camping nearby 
saw the dark sky illuminated by bright 
flashes, and they and other people heard 
the distant rumble of loud explosions. 

The event might have been lost to 
history except for the interest of gov- 
ernment investigators in Australia and 
the United States who eventually came 
to wonder if the upheaval was die work 
of the Japanese doomsday cult accused 
of the poison-gas attack on Tokyo sub- 
ways in 1995 that lolled 12 people and 
hurt thousands. 

The fear was that the terrorists had 
acquired nuclear aims or other weapons 
of mass destruction and had been testing 
them that night in the Aust ralian wilds. 
The hope was that the upheaval was an 
earthquake, a mining explosion or even 
a meteorite strike from space, any nat- 
ural event. The evidence was ominous. 
Investigators discovered that the cult, 
Aum Shinrikyo, bad tried to buy Rus- 
sian nuclear warheads and had set up a 
laboratory on a 500,000-acre ranch in 
Australia near the puzzling upheaval. At 
the ranch, investigators found that the 
sect had been mining uranium, a main 
material for making atomic bombs. 

"Many experts had dismissed die 
possibility of nukes" in the bands of 
terrorists before the emergence of Aum 
Shinrikyo, Dr. Gregory van der Vink, 
head of the science investigation, said in 
an interview. "But the group was into 
biological and chemical weapons and 
was attempting to acquire nuclear 
ones." 

At the request of Senate investigators, 
the inquiry was led by the Incorporated 
Research Institutions for Seismology, or 
IRIS, where Dr. van der Vink is director 
of planning. The IRIS has more than 80 
member institutions at universities in 
the United States. It also has more than 
100 seismometers on all continents, the 
largest global network of these devices, 
which pick up faint vibrations traveling 
through the earth’s rocky interior. 

The doomsday cult that caused the 
worry first caught world attention after 
the Tokyo subway attack of March 20, 
1995, which involved the deadly nerve 
gas sarin, and was the world's first large 
chemical strike by terrorists. The cult is 
now charged in Japan with planning a 
virtual civu war meant to he carried out 



with some of the weald’s deadliest 
weapons. 

After the Tokyo attack, government 
investigators around the world raced to 
learn more about the group. Aum Shin- 
rikyo. or Supreme Truth, turned out to 
have accumulated some SI billion and 
to have won more than 50,000 converts 
in at least six countries. 

In tiie United States, the permanent 
subcommittee on investigations .of the 
Senate Governmental Affairs Commit- 
tee, at the urging of Senator Sam Nunn, 
mounted a major investigation of the 
cult. Senate investigators found that the 
group had thousands of disciples in Rus- 
sia and had bought guns, a military 
helicopter and other weapons there. The 
group’s construction nanister, Kiyohide 
Hayakawa, the reputed mastermind of 
tiie cult's efforts to aim itself, went to 
Russia 21 times from 1992 to 1995. 

Senate investigators say the cult re- 
cruited at least two nuclear scientists in 
Russia. Notebooks later seized from 
Hayakawa show he wanted to buy the 
ultimate munition there, fri one entry, he 
asked, "How much is a nuclear war- 
head?" and listed several prices: 

In Australia, the activities were just as 
troubling. Cult members arrived in 
April 1993, a little more than month 
before the mystery blast. Mr. 
Hayakawa, apparently fresh from visits 
to Russia, was among the initial party. 
After visiting several remote sites, the 
group bought a 500,000-acre sheep farm 
in Banja warn. Australia, about 400 
miles northeast of Perth. The site has a 
uranium deposit 

The cult brought in chemicals, gas 
masks and respirators, and picks, 
shovels, mining equipment and a mech- 
anical ditch digger. It also set up a 
laboratory stocked with computers, 
glass tubing, glass evaporators, beakers, 
Bunsen burners, mixing bowls and a 
rock-crushing machine. Documents 
seized from Hayakawa include 10 pages 
written during his visit to Australia in 


NYTi 


April and May 1993 that refer to Aus-| 
trail an properties rich in. uranium, m-A 
eluding one reference praising the high; 
quality of the ore. j 

The disturbance shook the earth oni 
May 28. 1993. at 1 1:03 P.M. local time.) 
but it was not until after the Tokyo] 
attack of March 1995, that an Australian! 
geologist, Harry Mason, brought thej 
seismic upset to tiie attention of Aus-; 
tralian Federal Police and Senate in- 
vestigators. . ; 

Dr. Mason noted that earthquakes* 
were very rare in tiie region and that’ 
mining explosions were illegal at night.; 
"Icmretitiy believe that a nuke is a very- 
real possibility but a meteorite and an! 
earthquake cannot.be ruled out either,", 
he wroteSenate investigators in October* 
1995; - - • • ! 




TTH that information in' 
hand,’ tiie investigators! 
contacted IRIS. The IRIS; 
team calculated that the: 
event was 170 times larger than the! 
largest mining explosion ever recorded* 
in the Australian region, to helping rule' 
out that possibility. The disturbance was 
calculated as having the farce of a small 
nuclear explosion, perhaps equal to up 
to 2,000 tons of high explosives. In- 
contrast, an atom bomb with a power of 
about 15.000 tons of high explosives 
leveled Hiroshima, Japan. But the sig- 
nature of the disturbance seemed to bei 
more that of an earthquake or a me-, 
teorite strike than a nuclear explosion. ; 

The IRIS experts judged that the vi-. 
olent episode was probably natural in 
character rather than being a manmade 
blast, prompting official Washington to. 
breathe a sigh of relief. 

The fall 19% issue of the IRIS news-: 
letter presents the analysis of the mystery, 
event — the first public disclosure — • 
and concludes that "the meteorite im- 
pact scenario is consistent with the eye-, 


H 


levels derived from seismic records. 


CROSSWORD 


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Solution to Puzzle of Jan. 22 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 


PAGE 11 


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Lara Stein is on a mission for Microsoft Multimedia Prodnctfons: to buy creative on-line programming from New York’s di gital entrepreneurs. 

Microsoft Mines New York’s Silicon- Alley Talent 


By Trip Gabriel 

New TortTima Service 

NEW YORK — Microsoft Coro, is 
a behemoth with 20,000 workers fa- 
mous for their uniformly ««roj office 
wear and their cool rationality, wheth- 
er analyzing a line of computer code or 
a marketing plan. 

Silicon Alley is the name given to 
the confluence of hundreds of small 


driven neediness for shipper style. 

For evidence, look no further than 
two of the first Dew-media locals it has 
gone into business with; John Holme 
and Michael Wexler, writers whose 
previous work was die book “Baked 
Potatoes: A Potsmokers’ Guide to Film 
and Video.’* 

For the last several months, Mi- 


aiucon Alley is the name given to crosoft has been combing Silicon Al- 
the confluence of hundreds of small ley for proposals for its Microsoft Net- 
companies staffed by creative young walk, & mini-largest on-line service, 
people drawn to New York City, ha behind America Online Inc. and Com- 
Manhattan lofts where once they might pnServe Inc. l-ast month it was re 


have formed little magazines or rock- 
and-roll bands, today they are pro- 
ducing sites on the World Wide Web. 

Now, with an eye on die huge po- 
tential of the Internet, tbe giant of the 
software world has come to Silicon 
Alley, looking to buy original pro- 
gramming from New York’s down- 
town digital entrepreneurs, who create 
everything from interactive soap op- 
eras to on-line magazines. 

But die seduction has not always 
been smooth. While the loft-dwelling 
designers are tempted by Microsoft 
Corp.’s riches, they remain wary. 

“As a software company, they’ve 
got a reputation for being very heavy 
handed*-’ said John Bortbwicfc, the 
chief executive of WP Studios, which 
publishes Total New York, an on-line 
guide to the city- “Tbereis an enor- 
mous cultural shift that has to take, 
place.” - 

That may be already happening, and 

Microsoft is the one that seems to be 
yielding, shedding some of its ted i- 


INTERNATIOZVAL MA2VAGER 

vamped as both a gateway to the In- 
ternet and a television-like source of 
original news and entertainment. Mi- 
crosoft plans to spend $200 million to 
$300 milBon in the next few years on 
Microsoft Network, with a nice chunk 
of the money ear marked for program- 
ming from independent companies. 

That has caugjbt tbe attention of the 
estimated 18.000 digital workers in 
computer-cluttered lofts in downtown- 
Manhattan, workers whose companies 
have names like Avalanche, Razorfish 
and Radi cal Media. Jtseemsfhat nearly 
aU of them haveroet with Lara Stein. ■ 
the energetic executive in New York , 
for Microsoft Multimedia Productions, ; 
or M3P, which develops mater ial for 
the Microsoft Network. 

wedc.^Mb? limn said in her'affic^in 
Worldwide Plaza, at Eighth Avenue 
and 49th Street, where two books dis- 


played side by side represent die worlds 
she bestrides: “The Road Ahead” by 
Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft, and 
a work by HJL Giger. the cult artist 
who created the slick, machinelike 
creatures of die “Alien” movies. 

Although Microsoft, based in Red- 
mond, Washington, has long had a New 
York office to sell software to corporate 
clients, Ms. Stein’s arrival in August 
was part of die company’s ballyhooed 
evolution into a media company. 

She shares a newly remodeled floor 
with outposts of two Microsoft on-line 
publishing ventures: a bureau of the 
political magazine Slate, and New 
York Sidewalk, a guide to the city’s 
cultural life dial will be available free 
on die Web beginning this spring. 

Ms. Stein, 30, a native of South 
Africa, is accessible to nearly anyone 
with a digital brainstorm — not jnsr 
multimedia professionals, but writers 
and artists with scant on-line experi- 
ence. and even chefs, bankers and stu- 
dents who find her by word of mouth. 

“A lot of what I’m doing is planting 
seeds and educating people who aren’t 
in the industry,” she said. 

But though many have pitched 
ideas, few projects have actually been 
given the greenligbt, and thepauchy of 
deals struck — only seven or eight so 
far — is an indication of the sometimes 
awkward mating dance between Mi- 
crosoft and Silicon Alley. 

Last fall at the Cool Site of tbe Year 
Awards, a kind of on-line Oscar ce- 
remony held at an East Village 
nightclub, the nomination of the Mi- 


crosoft program Explorer for Cool In- 
ternet Browser was met with hisses and 
catcalls. It was a telling expression of 
Silicon Alley's uneasiness about the 
giant Microsoft. 

Ms. Stein acknowledged chat there 
is anti-Microsoft sentiment in Silicon 
Alley, as elsewhere in the software 
world — it is the fear of becoming 
dinner for an $80 billion company 
whose famous motto as it stalks the 
Internet market is “embrace and ex- 
tend.” 

“I can’t change that overnight,” 
said Ms. Stein, who was hired last year 
from the interactive licensing division 
of Marvel Entertainment Group Inc. 
“I’m just one person. I'm trying to be 
as accessible as possible.” 

At the core of the culture clash be- 
tween Microsoft and some in Silicon 
Alley is tbe difference between a giant 
company where software is created by 
legions of anonymous programmers 
and tbe New York new media’s roots 
in the art and publishing worlds, where 
individual authorship is highly val- 
ued. 

In practical terms, it has boiled down 
to a dispute over on-line rights to the 
shows Microsoft is commissioning. 
Microsoft insists on owning tbe rights, 
but many Silicon Alley developers say 
the company is unwilling to pay 
enough. 

Jeff Dachis. co-founder and chief 
executive of Razorfish. a leading Web 
site designer, said: 

See MICROSOFT, Page 15 


Negotiators Approve Taiwan- China Shipping Links 


Omvaedbj OtrSxffFmmDopiXha 

HONG KONG — Representatives of 
China and Taiwan reached an agree- 
ment Wednesday on ending a 48-year 
ban on direct shipping links, a move that 
could diminkh Hong Kong’s locrative- 
role as a conduit for regional trade. 

Unofficial negotiators for the two 
ykte said they had agreed that shipping 
c ompanie s from Taiwan and China 
could apply to conduct direct trade be- - 
tween me ports of Fuzhou and Xiamen 
in southeastern China and Kaohaung in 
southern Taiwan. Direct links could start 
as soon as March, tbe negotiators said. 

“It was decided that (be two rides 
must begin direct ticks as soon as pos- 
sible.” said Hsieh Ming-hui, tbe nav- 
igation director of Taiwan’s Transpor- 
tation and Communications Ministry 
who led the Taiwan delegation in five 
hours of talks in Hong Kong. 

Because the negotiators forboth sides 
fam e from nongovernmental bodies, 
the agreement could be undermined by 
(political disputes between the two gov- 
enunents, analysts said. 

“The implication is, they readied an 
agreement on direct links," said James 
Wang, an analyst at Pteregrine Securities 
(Taiwan) Ltd., “but it’s stfllnotof- 

ft was the first time the two sides had 

held direct talks since relations 


worsened between Beijing and Taipei 
18 months ago during Taiwan’s pres- 
idential electron campaign. 

China regards Taiwan as a rebel 
province, and both governments have 
banned direct links since the Chinese 
Nationalists fled to Taiwan after losing 
the civil war in 1949. 

Taiwan is reluctant to take steps that 
could be seen as conferring legitimacy 
on tbe Communist government in 
Beijing or recognizing its sovereignly. 

Bat the business community in 
Taiwan has been pressuring the gov- 
ernment to extend commercial ties with 
the mainland by ending the ban on of- 
ficial contacts, which adds to costs. 

“It’s symbolically significant,' ’ Peter 
Kmz, branch manager of TNG Barings 
in Taipei, said of the agreement. “It s 
something that both rides can buildon.” 
Under the consensus accord, companies 
in the two countries will start applying to 
their respective cross-straits shipping 
associations for certification. They wifi 
then be able co apply to tbe Chinese 
government for final approval- Tbe two 
sides did not say whether shipping 
companies from aimer countries would 
be allowed to ply the new routes. 

“This consensus will boost fee pro- 
cess of achieving direct shipping 
links,’ ’ saidMeng Guangzha of China’s 
Gross Straits Shipping Association. 


“We hope that in the near future, direct 
shipping links will become a reality.” 

Trade between China and Taiwan 
totaled about $20 billion last year. 

Taiwan hopes to expand Kaohsi ung’s 
role as a shipping hub. Direct shipping 
would benefit Taiwan consumers ana 
shippers by bypassing Hong Kong, the 
world’s busiest container port- That 
would reduce by as much as 20 percent 
the cost of moving a standard container 
between Taiwan and Shanghai, analysts 
say. In 1995. one-eighth of Hong Kong’s 
container traffic consisted of shipments 
between China and Taiwan. 

“Transit times will fall, and rates will 
become cheaper,” said Dan Hell berg, a 
shipping analyst at S. G. Warburg Se- 
curities in Taipei. 

China prepared for direct shipping 
links in August, when its Ministry of 
Communications published regulations 
governing the application process. 

Under the rules, applications by 
Chinese and Taiwan joint ventures or 
wholly owned shipping companies 
would be processed within 45 days of 
their submission. Foreign companies that 
want to cany cargo or passengwts be- 
tween Taiwan and the mainland would 
need special approval from tbe ministry. 

Taiwan’s govern m ent radio quoted tbe 
head of the Taiwan shipping company 
Evergreen Marine Corp. as saying ship- 


ping companies that already had been 
approved by Taiwan for Kaohsiung, 
Fuzhou and zGamen now could apply to 
the mainland. Fourteen Taiwan and for- 
eign companies had dooe so, officials 
said. Neither side gave any explicit in- 
dication of how Beijing would respond to 
Taiwan shippers’ applications, and no 
mention was made of provisions for 
Chinese shippers. Taiwan radio said for- 
eign-flagged ships might begin sailing 
direct routes as soon as March or ApriL 
(Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


For Dollar, the Rally 
Just Keeps on Going 

But Some Say a Correction Isn’t Far Off 


fr» i to Suff Firm bapa^-in 

NFW YORK — The dollar was 
sharply higher against the Deutsche 
mark and the yen Wednesday and was 
higher against ocher major currencies 
amid expectations that the Group of Sev- 
en leading industrial nations would not 
act to halt the rise of the U.S. currency. 

But analysts said the dollar’s rally, 
which was given a boost Tuesday by 
statements from Treasury Secretary 
Robert Rubin and other U.S. officials, 
was showing signs of fatigue, and they 
said a correction could come in the next 
week if the Federal Reserve Board 
showed no signs of raising interest 
rates. 

Evidence that U.S. growth wilt out- 
pace any expansion in Germany or Ja- 
pan has fanned hopes that the premium 
that U.S. interest rates offer over iheir 
counterparts in Germany and Japan will 
widen in the coming months. 

This has lifted the dollar almost 2 
percent against the yen and 33 percent 
against the Deutsche mark in tbe past five 
trading days, particularly as Japanese 
policymakers were, until Wednesday, 
the only ones to signal any dissatisfaction 
with me pace of the dollar's rise. 

“All three blocs seemed to be in 
agreement about a rising dollar,” said 
Henrik Lumholdt. die senior economist 
at Bank of America in Madrid. “Even a 
gradual weakening of the yen is ac- 


ceptable for Japan. ’’The dollar's steady 
rise, which has been based on U.S. 
announcements of support for a strong 
dollar, was given a further boost Wed- 
nesday when prices on the Tokyo stock 
exchange dropped, said Steve Galla- 
gher, an economist at Societe Generate 
in New York. 

The fall in the Nikkei 225-siock av- 
erage averted fears that Japanese in- 
vestors were about to repatriate their 
capital to mop up losses on the national 
market, Mr. Gallagher said. 

The surging dollar also lifted Euro- 
pean stock markets to new heights Wed- 
nesday, hot on the heels of Wall Street, 
which recorded its 10th record of 1997 
on the previous night 
A European equities strategist at Mer- 
rill Lynch & Co. in London, Bryan All- 
wonhy, said that “the most important 
influence has been the dollar.” 

A strong dollar is good for European 
equity markets because a significant 
pan of the equity sector in Europe is in 
international companies, which tend to 
record their sales and profit in dollars. 

“If you get a strong dollar, (hen these 
companies see a positive effect in trad- 
ing figures.” an analyst said. 

In London, the Financial Times- 
Stock Exchange 100-share index of 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 


IBM ‘Disappointment 9 
Weighs Down the Dow 

Investors Had Hoped for Bigger Profit Gain 


Cu^ilalboOv Si^Fm Dapatcha 

NEW YORK — Stocks were mixed 
late Wednesday, with International 
Business Machines Corp. pulling down 
the Dow Jones industrial average amid 
disappointment that the company did 
not report as robust a profit as other 
computer-industry leaders. 

The Dow fell 33.87 points to close at 
6,850.03, and IBM accounted for all of 
the drop. On Tuesday, the Dow nearly 
reached the 6,900-point level on its way 
to its fourth straight record finish and its 
1 0th new high in 12 sessions. Declining 
issues outnumbered advancers by a 10-9 
ratio on the New York Stock Exchange- 

Broader measures were mostly pos- 
itive, however. The Standard & Poor’s 
500-stock index rose 3.51 points to a 
record 78623, and the Nasdaq com- 
posite index rose 1 1 .09 points to a re- 
cord 1388.06. Both measures also set 
records Tuesday. 

The focus of die day’s early dealings 
was IBM's seemingly impressive 
fourth-quarter results, reported after the 
market closed Tuesday. Tbe computer 
maker’s stock closed at $157.25, down 
$10.75, the equivalent of 36 points on 
tbe industrial average, and was the most 
active Big Board issue. 

Lifted by surging demand for com- 
puter services ana stronger sales of soft- 
ware and hardware. IBM’s fourth- 
quarter profit grew 18 percent, beating 
many projections. 

But the company’s revenue growth 
failed to meet expectations, and profit 


margins fell, prompting several leading 
brokerage firms to lower their invest- 
ment ratings and earnings estimates. 

IBM stock had been trading at 10- 
year highs in the past few weeks be- 
cause investors were optimistic about 
the earnings. 

“Given that the stock has run up, 
we’re probably going to see the begin- 
ning” of a decline, said Steven Milun- 
ovich. an analyst at Morgan Stanley. The 
drop could be as much as 15 percent in 
the next three to five months, he said. 

At least four analysts cut their earn- 
ings estimates for 1997. IBM's chief 
financial officer. Richard Thomaru said 
Tuesday that continued weakness in 
memory-chip prices and uncertainty 
about currency movements could fur- 
ther hamper the company's results. 

“They are going to have a hand time 
doing an encore.” said Bob Djurdjevic, 
an analyst at Annex Research in 
Phoenix. 

With many technology leaders hav- 
ing already rallied in anticipation of 
blockbuster results, investors have been 
betting on profits that beat projections 
by a wide margin, analysts said. 

Stocks also were being pressured by 
the bond market, which gave up some 
early gains after the Commerce De- 
partment reported Wednesday that 
housing stans plunged 12.2 percent in 
December to their lowest level in 18 
months. Bond prices worsened in the 

See IBM, Page 12 


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DoBar in Deutsche marks® Dollar in Yen 



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1 a. 

1.56 • • - 


114 : 

1J6 A S 
1996 




O N D J : 
1997 

,W A SON D ' J 
1996 1997 

Exchange 

Index ■ • 

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Close. . Ctoes ■■ •..Ctwg« 

NYSE 

The Dow 

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8797*7 . 688 AI -1j04 

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IPSA General 

4)36-79 525087; ->£0 

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Capita! General 

6328.47 636&S7 -0.58 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

iMeroalmul Hereto Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Profit Surges at Compaq 


Cmpiltd by OmSu&Fnt m Dupatthts 

HOUSTON — Compaq Com- 
puter Corp.’s fourth 'quarter earn- 
ings surged to $462 million from 
$82 million a year ago because of 
increased sales of computers to 
corporate customers and improve- 
ments in operating efficiency, the 
company said Wednesday. 

The No. 1 personal computer 
maker said sales rose to $5.42 bil- 
lion from $4.7 billion. The results 
were helped by a favorable com- 
parison with the year-eadier peri- 
od, which was hurt by acquisiDons- 
related charges of $241 million. 

Compaq's results exceeded 
most analysts’ expectations, and 
its shares climbed $4,875, to close 
ar $83375. 

“They’re gaining market share, 
profit margins are increasing, cash 
is growing, what else do you 
want?’’ said Stephen Dube, an 
analyst with Wasserstein Perelia 
Securities. 

Compaq said its gross margin, 
which is revenue minus the cost of 


manufacturing computers, rose to 
24.4 percent, its highest level in 
almost two years. Compaq cited a 
shift toward corporate computers 
and servers, which carry higher 
profit margins, as well as aggres- 
sive moves to cut inventory and 
speed up collection of payments. 

Compaq slashed inventory al- 
most in half, to $1.15 billion from 
$2.16 billion a year ago, said the 
chief financial officer, Earl Mason. 

Mr. Mason said Compaq would 
continue to report higher earnings 
and profit margins this year than in 
1996, although he declined to say 
whether the company would ex- 
ceed its fourth-quarter gross mar- 
gin of 24.4 percent 

Compaq’s profitability has been 
bolstered by new products, includ- 
ing a line of workstations aimed at 
engineers and financial profession- 
als. Compaq also hag acquired sev- 
eral companies that make systems 
to link computers in networks, so it 
can sell entire computer systems 
and not just desktop PCs. 


Also Wednesday, Computer As- 
sociates International Inc. shares fell 
on concerns about the company’s 
European sales. The company on 
Tuesday posted a loss and said its 
European sales fell 21 percent 

Computer Associates’ stock fell 
$2.75 Wednesday, closing at 
$4335. (Bloomberg, AFX) 

■ AT&T Posts Gains 

AT&T Corp. posted a fourth- 
quarter profit that reversed a loss 
from a year earlier, but its results 
were held back by unpaid tele- 
phone bills. The Associated Press 
reported from New York. 

The biggest U.S. long-distance 
telephone sendee provider earned 
$ 1 .62 billion, compared with a loss 
of $2.68 billion a year ago. Rev- 
enue rose to $1334 billion from 
$12.89 billion. But AT&T said in- 
creased fraud, delinquencies and 
bankruptcies cost it $200 milli on 
in the fourth quarter. 

AT&T shares finished down 50 
cents at $38,875. 


IBM: Shores Slip , Weighing Down Dow : 

Continued from Page II 


Federal Express Adjusts Prices 

MEMPHIS. Tennessee (Bloomberg) — Federal Express 
Corp. said Wednesday that it would adjust its U.S. express- 
delivery prices for distance and weight, matching a move last 
year by its rival. United Parcel Service of America Inc. 

The cost of delivering a letter overnight from New York 
City to San Francisco, for example, will rise abour 13 ppcent 
July 1 , while the price for the same service to Philadelphia will 
drop about 22 percent. Federal Express said. The company 
will charge $3 extra for picking up packages. 

The move follows a similar switch by UPS in January to 
distance-based pricing for air delivery service. That sliced 
UPS’s prices for short-distance air deliveries as much as 40 
percent while increasing prices for Ionger-distance service as 
much as 28 percent 

• ILS. housing starts fell 123 percent in December from a year 
earlier, after an increase of 93 percent in November. But for the 
year. 8,8 percent more new homes were begun than in 1995. 

• Procter & Gamble Co. plans to spend $60 million on 
advertising to introduce a new version of Ivory, the soap on 
which the manufacturer was built. 

• General Dynamics Corp.’s fourth -quarter net profit fell to 
S70 million from $88 million a year earlier, reflecting the 
company's exit from aircraft manufacturing. Sales were $896 
million, compared with $893 million. 

• Deioitte & Touche LLPs revenue for the year ended Sept. 
30 rose 14 percent, to $2.9 billion, with much of the rise 
coming from its management consulting division, which saw 
revenue increase 29 percent, to $1 billion. 

• Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. earned a net $716 million in the 

fourth quarter, reversing a loss of $142 million a year earlier, 
as stronger sales of its cholesterol-lowering drug Pravachol 
and its cancer drug Taxoi helped offset slumping sales of its 
heart medicine Capoten. Bloomberg, ap 


New York Times Revamps Editions 


byOiarSatfFrtmt DOpaaJts 

NEW YORK — The New York 
Tunes will extend its deadlines next 
month to offer later-breaking news . 
part of a series of changes that will 
also make die daily more widely 
available nationwide. 

The paper, which owns half of the 
International Herald Tribune, also 
reported Wednesday that it would 
gradually add color to the New York 
edition by early next year. The 
Times also detailed these changes: 

• On Feb. 18 it will begin printing 


a new edition at 10:45 P.M. and 
midnight at plants outside Boston 
and Washington for buyers from 
Maine to Virginia, some of whom 
now get a New York regional edi- 
tion printed at 9 P.M. 

• The paper has reached agree- 
ment with 33 other dailies for them to 
deliver the national edition of The 
Times along with their own papers. 
And in a deal with a magazine dis- 
tributor, The Times will be carried 
by more than 25,000 retail outlets, up 
from 17,000, within a year. 


• The Times will expand its four- 
section New York regional edition 
to six sections most weekdays after 
a $350 million printing plant begins 
operation in September. The sports 
section will be the first to get color. 
Buyers of the regional edition, some 
of whom get a paper printed at 9 
P.M., will gee a version produced at 
11:15 PM. 

New York Tunes Co. executives 
say the changes are part of an in- 
creased emphasis cm nationwide cir- 
culation and advertising. (AP, NYT) 


afternoon, sending interest rates 
higher, after the Federal Reserve 
Board reported that the economy 
grew moderately in December and 
early January without causing a sig- 
nificant increase in inflation. Ac- 
cording to a survey by the Fed’s 12 
regional banks known as the beige 
book, there was scattered evidence 
of increasing wage pressures but 
little indication of significant price 
pressures. 

The price of die benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond fell 18/32 to 95 
26/32, pushing the yield — a key 
determinant of corporate and con-, 
sumer borrowing costs — up to 
6.83 percent from 6.78 percent 
Tuesday. 

On Wall Street, mutual-fund in- 
flows continued to help shares. Mu- 
tual Fund Trim Tabs, a newsletter 
y hftt tracks money going to mutual 
funds, said assets werepominginal 
$28.4 billion a month, $500 million 
short of the record set last Jam 

“You’re having tremendous 
mand for stocks,” said Philip 
Brown, president of Meridian In- 
vestment Co„ which manages $3.7 
billion in equities. 

1 * You have an economy that isn’t 
doing that bad. Corporate profits 
aren’t declining — they just aren't 
going to be up as much.” 

On the heels of surprisingly good 
quarterly results from Intel and Mi- 
crosoft, other computer-industry 
shares held up amid IBM’s retreat 

On the Big Board, LSI Logic, a 
maker of memory chips, added 1% 
to close at 35% in active trading. 
Electronic Data Systems, a primary 
competitor for IBM’s lucrative 
computer services business, was 
unchanged at 47%. 

On the Nasdaq, Microsoft rose 
2% to 97% as the most active issue, 
while Intel added 4 1/16 to 152%. 
EteU Computer rose 2% to 66%. and 
Gateway 2000, a computer retailer. 


mazy, 
is de- 


rose 31* to 62%. * ’I don’t think IBM 
is the bellwether for technology, 
any more than General Motors , is* 
the bellwether for the U-S. ccon-a* 
omy,” said Sally Anderson, a se-f* 
nior money manager at Kopp In- 
vestment Advisors, which oversees 
$34 billion in assets and bolds, - 
about $8 million of CBM siocfc : 
“The economy has become much, 
more diverse. Ibere have been so. 

many new companies, and they’ve^ 

diluted *e impact of the bigv 

ones.” . . 

Other issues gained on positive.^ 
earnings reports. Dean Witter Dis-> 
cover rose $4 to 37%, Bristol -Myers _ 

US, STOCKS r 

Squibb gained 1% to 123%. and-. . 
Johnson & Johnson added 3% tor 
57%. AU reported higher fourfh-- 
quarter earnings. 

Weyerhaeuser shares fell 1% to- 
49%. The company said its fourth- 
quarter warning s fell 60 percent on >- 
lower prices for its pulp, paper and^ 
packagin g products. •_ 

General Dynamics shares were-", 
unchanged at 71%. The defense^ 
contractor said fourth-quarter earn- 
ings rose 9.4 percent on a small,, 
increase in revenue and lower op-, „ 
crating costs. v 

Steris’s shares sank 8 to 30 on the - - 
Nasdaq. The company's chief ex- 
ecutive officer said the medical , 
devices company . would post < 
lower-than-expected e a rn ings for ‘ 
its third quarter. 

Norand, a maker of mobile com- * 
puters, surged 13% to 32%, Western J 
Atlas said it would pay $261.3 mil- , 
lion, or $33.50 a share in cash, for 1 
Norand's 7.8 million shares. West- [ 
earn Atlas shares fell 2 to 70%. 

CPC International shares fell 2 to ■' 
80%. The food company was re- ; 
moved from the “recommend’’ list > 
by an analyst at Goldman, Sachs & 
Co. and is now rated “market per- a 
form.” (AP. Bloomberg) '< 


DOLLAR: With Nothing in Its Way, Rally Keeps on Going, But Some Traders See a Correction Soon 


Continued from Page 11 

leading shares closed at a record 
43 19.9 points, up 23.6. In Paris, the 
CAC-40 index set a closing record 
of 2,442.46. a gain of 1.35 percent 
on the day. The Frankfurt stock mar- 
ket surged 1.75 percent, or 51.96 
points, on the DAX index, which 
closed at 3,028.67. 

Share prices in Madrid built on a 
record erase Tuesday as die main 
market index rose 3.87 points, or 
0.81 percent, to 483.55. 

The dollar closed at 1.6409 
Deutsche marks, up from 1.6297 
DM at Tuesday’s close. It reached as 


high as 1.6445 DM, the highest it 
had been since June 15, 1994 when 
it was at 1.6495 DM. 

The dollar was also at 118.935 
yen, up from 1 17.915 yen. 

Against other major currencies, 
the dollar was at 53378 French 
francs, up from 5.4950 francs, and at 
1.4291 Swiss francs, up from 1.4165 
francs. The pound was at $1.6363. 
down from $1.6637. 

“The dollar is extremely sus- 
tained.” said Kit Juckes, an analyst 
at NatWest Markets. ‘‘As long as 
die German and Japanese monetary 
authorities accept seeing their cur- 
rencies weaken and do not contest 


the dollar’s strength, the dollar’s rise 
should continue.” 

“The German and Japanese si- 
lence, together with the feet that the 
United States is for a strong dollar, is 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

interpreted on the market as a green 
light fra - investing in American se- 
curities.” 

The dollar moved higher after Mr. 
Rabin said Tuesday that the dollar's 
gains in the past 21 months would 
not hurt the U.S. trade position and 
that a weaker U.S. currency was not 
the key to narrowing the trade gap. . 


The dollar extended its gains after 
news agencies reported that Finance 
Minister Hiroshi Mitsuzuka of Ja- 
pan said the Group of Seven leading 
industrial countries shared the U3. 
desire for a strong dollar. 

But traders said they were less 
confident about its imme diate pros- 
pects after a Bundesbank council 
member, Erns t Welteke, said its rise 
‘‘shouldn’t gp much further.” 

Mr. Welteke added that tire 
Bundesbank would not step in and 
buy marks to curb its strength, as 
“the markets will regulate the dol- 
lar's rise themselves.' * 

Still, traders, viewed. his. com- 


ments as a hint that the Bundesbank 
did not ward the mark to fall toq£> 


dollar could suffer a tem- 
porary setback in the next several ; 
days, traders said. 

The pace of the U.S. currency’s 
recent rise had made traders wary of ( 
missing out on its rally and forced ■ 
.thereto, keep adding to their dollar ' 
holdings. „ 

A pause in its rise could therefore 
be tiie trigger for a temporary pull- * 
back in the dollar as they use these' 
highs to cut back bets on a stronger 
dollar, traders said. (Market News,* 
LAT, AFP, Bloombergi_ 


AMEX 


Wednesday's 4 pan. dose 

The top 300 rrrat-acfcve shares, 
up to Bib dosing on Wdfl Street 
The AssaaaMd Pm9 


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179 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


Indexes 
Dow Jones 


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T rans 234137 23ML47 2337 J5 rron V17J8 
j TW 239 JII 24085 23099 MB , l TT 

Corn, 273749 7137JI 513442 213549 


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HMi low One C>bb Oplat 

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&0B0 buitdnBnuro- dollars par Busl>el 
Mar 97 172 169* 270V5-0«m IIS4S4 

Mcy97 UK 168 16M +OOOW 62.M4 

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Oct 97 

4692 

6670 

6682 

—005 

7,177 

2651 

3036 

DeeV7 

<662 

mm 

046 


1084 

67628 

68105 

EatMies HA. 

"rue's, sues 

12744 



neEADECOPfBI CNCMJ0 
2SJ00 Bip- cents per fa. 

Jar W . ,,us +145 iW 

Febfj 108-30 WJB IWJO +us 2J48 

Mar 97 HP JO 166JO W7J0 +1J5 21139 

Apr 97 10520 10*70 10520 +0J5 1J31 

«Wff MO90 102^8 KU75 *050 iMO 

Jun97 NO90 J-fiJS 7*3 

>4*7 Ml 70 10L95 WAS +070 1941 

AUB97 19870 +0JD 575 

Sep 57 59 JS 79.70 99JV +0JS ZSU 

Esi- sates NX Tue’s-sta 8,985 
TUB'S Cpenw aim olf 1329 

SB.VBZ (NOVO 
SMnra^anagvlTWB. 

Jan 97 
Fed 97 


>497 
Sep 97 


Jon98 

EsLsotes NX Toe's, soles 0999 
TWsapenM 93323 eff 923 

PLATMUMONBREK) 

5D »rw Ob- deta-s per tram. 

>ot 97 3ft50 -108 W 

Apr 97 36230 3SBJ0 359JO -Ut XVW 

>4 97 36LOO 36X00 363. KJ -179 Z9U 

Oct 97 36100 3S5J0 3600 — 1J9 336 

JanlB 36859 36850 366.70 —7 JO 1J76 

Est.xfes NX Tuc'S.sOm XSt 4 
Turt open inf 36*487 up 754 


400 

468L5 

4890 

♦u 

IS 



4704 

+w 

52 

474_5 

400 

4713 

+08 

4X40 

4/80 

4730 

4769 

+00 

10517 

482> 

<790 

«1J 

+09 

8747 



4860 

+09 

2.985 

4957 

4VJ 

4910 

*BS 

4744 



49SJ 

+0 0 

9 


».sdeK ,60247. Pm.it* e» earn 
PrBv.opentaL 116*483 up 160 
BJRODOLUUB (CNBQ 
n mDKaMts at iod kx 
F*97 94J30 WJ» MJ29 U921 

Mprw MJOO 9OB0 WJBO 393J0I 

APT 97 94J30 9430 *430 XT57 

*«» —78 368.150 
Mor9B 91300 9339 9X259 -99 3BJ8T 

>Ki90 9X230 93.180 *1190 —20 3&J53 

SaoOO 9X180 93T30 91143 -20 30539 

1 km -as acas 

EAmM* NX llNssdn 398J42 , 

Tile's Open in» 2J9CH3 up 162S1 
■wnatPoumccMHu 

ftitDj aountibSMr pound 
Mv97 U63B L6710 15326 -284 3U98 

>4197 US49 15290 1^00 3M 

S*P»7 16274 —276 UB7 

S"CW. 1-6248 -278 7 

Estscles NX TWi*to 6J90 . , 

. TUB'S open 39«62s 

CANADIAN DOLLAN (OUBO 


40J78 

8JB 

■4457 


Pintos 

LONDON METALS OME) 

DuUon per metric ton 

ABi (KMh erode] 

159416 1595ft 15N6J0 107 JO 
762400 7625-00 167400 1657.00 


170 

3ft 

3ft 

,3ft 

‘ft 

142 

10ft 

10ft 

I0W 

20 

3Sft 

34ft 

15 

-ft 

111 

13ft 

lift 

12ft 


129 

17ft 

lift 

!?■* 

-ft 

■16 

M 

15ft 

15ft 

-ft 

ITS 

ft 

15ft 

15ft 

+ ft 

201 

TBft 

27Vj 

ZTft 

-ft 

281 

3V„ 

1 

3 

-ft. 

741 

lira 

10 

10ft 

♦ft 

278 

ft 

ft* 

ft 



13777 BVlt !«i P*h -All 

754 14ft 14ft 14ft 'ft 

*74 lift 15 IS ‘ft 

m S n* 5 "ft 

52J ft ft ’»« - 

85*9 18ft 17ft ISto ‘ft 

1809 17ft 14ft 14ft -1ft 

415 34ft JJft 33ft 


Dividends 
compear 

IRREGULAR 
BickftfcGvnncA 
BJctRds Gvflnc C 
CdnNotRnBwr 
Ososk. flncaOrs 

STOCK SPLIT 
HoHeysvSeSv BK5 Mr 4 sp«. 
Htrtchtaon Tptfi 3 for 1 5p9L 
Slgcurp liK3lor2spnt 

INCREASED 
O M 
Q .10 

a M 

0 05 

a j» 
0 08 
HMeysualsm Q .125 

LaiiwlonCorp O 09 

PenflEmepr Q 

SummB Btshre O 09 

INITIAL 

CMACImesI - 03 

Comm BfcwtnSC _ .15 

TfuydersGpn - ,15 

REGULAR 

AKStolWds Q on 

Antfux Bon Q .125 


A bo Rec Po y Company 


-JJ408 

1-22 

>20 

- 0358 

1-22 

7-20 

9 J3 

>7 

>26 

- 07 

2-1 

2-17 



2-3 3-3 

2-7 2-21 
I-TI 3-3 
2-S 2-20 
2-6 3-24 

1- 31 2-14 

2- 5 2-19 
1-31 2-14 

3- 1 3-15 
1-31 2-14 


2-7 W 
2-28 3-14 
2-3 2-21 


2-S 2-17 
Ml M4 


Aitor Prep Tr 
B ater Hu ghes 

BoncopSoutti Inc 
Butler (Afg 
CCBFnd 

Carpenter Tech 

Code Inca S7*s 
Ciretalnw Stirs 
O* im Sfus 
CdMdGnOOn 
Conutscolflc 
Dauphin Depusff 
Eastern UWAssoc 
Eaton Corn 
FSFFndCp 
FWTennNcB 
BtaWesJmBqj 
Gvworo/nm 
Pam Non cp 
Peoples hist 
P erpetual FAktwesi 
Piper Jcfliay 
Queens dyBocp 
SOiUwt* 
WebsierCSyPeiS 
WtoBSFftrgo 


Per Aatt Roc Pay 

Q -175 3-71 
O -US 2-3 
O .19 H4 
O .13 3-19 
Q J 3 >17 
Q -33 1.31 
M J372S 3-31 
MJJ72S >21 
M J7» 4-18 
O -07 3-30 

07 2-7 
JO >21 
J1S 1-31 
JO 3-3 
-12S 141 
-30 >14 
JO 2-3 
-15 1-30 
.40 2-14 
OO 1-31 

■525 ’- 31 

075 >1* 

OS 2-3 
J7S >24 
,J0 2-3 
IJO 1-31 


MS 

>21 

4-7 

4-4 

4-1 

>6 

>7 

4- 4 

5- 2 
4-3 

>10 

4-11 

2-15 

>25 

2-15 

4-1 

2-10 

>11 

>10 

M4 

>19 

>11 

>14 

4-4 

>19 

2-20 


stoWAOlt^payutfeje 
ie h oI M t . 0 a oa rttili; 


IMS' 


"3 

ft 

4’Vm 

W 

4ft 

V, 

-Vu 

134 

4ft 

4ft 

.4ft 

-ft 

851 

14ft 

15W 

75ft 

-ft 

564 

aft 

»ft 

aw 

-ft 

9W 

14ft 

nft 

34ft 

-w 

4614 

Sift 

Dft 

lift 

♦ft 

Ml 

ft, 

v« 

Vu 


Ml 

9 ft 

2*u 

» 

-ft 

1 St 

Ift. 


IW. 


IM 

IVu 

iw 

1ft 


»5 

18ft 

15ft 

15W 

♦ ft 

30 

*ft 

Oft 

Aft 

-ft 

17* 

)3W 

lift 

l» 


215 

3ft 

3W 

3ft 

—ft 

*68 

11W 

11 

lift 


139 

10W 

I0W 

low 


275 

raw 

14ft 

14H 

— 


S Uft 14ft. W'l* 

isniu 19Vu 19t7u 

“ I6>V H 14ft 

12ft 12 13 

TO 73*Vm 1254 12ft -I* 

1SS 19ft 19ft 19ft rV M 

Ml I2 Vh IZft 12ft 

744 lift I lift. lift -ft 

592 15*4 U I Wp -ft 

70958 ft, ft ft 

145 1ft IM 1ft 


Stock ToMes Explained 

Sides Bgu« an unamdoLYealy Wflhs ml tons tefled Hie pmious2«weks plus flwamert 
wetobutnocn e 1a te tTi uJ nQdoy.WtiHgBSpaor5lodiia * Mggi u iio u nfln9to2SpgccrtgrBMe 

ini been pc*l me yeos M^Mour iroge end dMdeniiR shoan forte new atodaortv. Uidoa 
dheiwtae noted mes efiUMBndsoe omuol asbuaeme^ bused an to blest dedoidfan. 
a - Addend also adm ft), b • amwal rate af dividend oiiis sncJ dhrtdauL c • dqukuing 
cMdend.cc - PE eraeeds W.dd- Qded d - newyaarty to»b The tatiZ monffB. 

e - dividend dedored or ptfd in pteedlng 12 momns. f - annual we. inatased on kS 
deaxaitoa ■ - dMdend hi tatadJon funds, subjeern i» noB+esUaweta. I- cOvtond 
dadned after spff-upar stack tfvtdntdL |-<Swdend paid »h |eo& amaed. dedermt orno 
aato when ar latest dMdend meeting, k - dMdend dedaed or paid Ns year, an 
aoaumriartoe issue «Wi dMdends in omen. ■- oiMd nne. reduced on kst dedawhm. 
n - new issue In 0» past 52 weeks. Tl» K&hto* rqnge begins *Wi Bie staff aMiaa». 
ad - nexr day deitory. p- WtiaJ dMdend aAiwaJ idle enftnoem. PfE - prfcMamlngk raflo. 
q-dased-end mutual land. r-dMdenddedamd or paid in ptccedingl2mo*8hft ptvs stock 
dividend, s - slock soHL Keidend begins w«i dale af spGL sis - sate, t- dividend paid in 
slack in preceding 12 months, esttnuied cash valoe an n-dMdend or cx-ARMien date. 
»- nmryettty Wtfi v- trading m»W.Tl -ia baftniptcy orrecenertti^orbeiag rearganiBd 
underlie BatlknipBeyAa orsecutlfiesassumed by such anpanie&wd-wtoen disMbaled. 
id - when bsuedr wef - w«h wanams. x - e*4vfdend v es-rigMs. sdb - et-dbk&oSoa. 
8W - rrtttioutwonnnO y- ei-dMdmd and sales in luB. yld - yield. I - sales in fuJL 


7 CATTLE (CMSO 

i— ca n par &. 

to*7 70.29 69J2 69.92 -02S tJIO 

WrV «>0 B9.H) 69.13 -037 7J93 

Apr 97 0J2 69-72 S9JD -045 O5S0 

May 97 7000 6955 OJS -OH 109 

AlW *7 7100 TUI TUI -015 1216 

Sep 97 7120 72JS 72JB -017 OS 

Eawles NX Tue*A sales 3JM 
TUVS 00*1 kit 2DJT9 UD 497 

HOCS-Lean (04BU 

7S3S -flJS «US 
Aw 97 7177 7X07 753 +8.13 10319 

■ton 77 79 J5 79.15 79 S +115 6.911 

>7197 77J3 TUB 77.77 -023 1437 

AugW 74J5 7XS7 7X80 -4W U76 

DCJI7 67J5 66J0 66J0 -415 MBS 

Esi.safcs NX Toe's. seta 8409 
Tue'saoeninl 22,933 off 96 

PORK BQiJES (CMBO 

4U00 ft+- earft par ft. 

Peb97 7080 75J5 7552 +OZ 1946 

War 97 7000 7530 7547 +031 t.US 

MwW 77JS 7142 74X7 *045 1J75 

fl97 77.15 76JD 7670 *070 US 

Aw 97 7535 7055 74J0 +OJO 431 

Ed.sfts NX TWS.96M 2JZ2 
Tub's aoenirtf tea up 200 


Food 

COCOA (HCSE3 
lamcmc am- Sevan 


& 

ftoid 


1317 

1287 

12H 

-35 

16173. 

1346 

1320 

LSI 

-32 

2095 

mo 

1946 

T3SB 

-U 

noa? 

1395 

ISO 

1381 

-a 

8JM. 

im 

M78 

im 

-30 

407 


JUt 97 


Est softs 19JS3 Tue'osetes U92 
Tue’s ooenirs 8M51 up 467 

copreecmcss 

S'JBOfts.-oaKpirft. 

NicrW 137 J5 T275S WJO +SJ5 ZU78 

MOy*7 132J0 13025 0015 +U3 9J6 

MfT 129 JB 12X00 046 -4J3 3J23 

Seef7 12623 it?JS 12525 +4JB 5J4S 

fa-softs 15J97 Tue'S.wtes 1U28 
Tue-seoenH 4IJJ6 up 1710 

SUOAR-WORL0 11 QKSE) 

HUQB^CHQip^b, 

Morn ,ua ,ft - a >0.17 49J77 

MOV 97 ISJS 10.27 1032 *001 KJW 

JU97 7033 1436 U3» 26*741 

Od 97 1036 UL29 1435 *002 16,954 

EAsJta 22J73 Tue 1 ! tofts 46*994 
Toe' i open Irt 156307 up 5400 


CdMaOMOnsU 
2S05JX 2570-00 3*8700 349400 
2254J0 225X00 234400 2251-00 

nora 

Spot TOIVi 7KW 697-00 flWLOO 

mat 713ft 70JJX) 70754 

woid 

Spot* 1 71 60JJ0 717000 7205JXJ 731000 

fbr- 7265.06 727000 731000 731500 

word 

Srf 595500 596500 595500 596000 

For- 601500 60204X7 607000 601500 

Zbc (SpwSei Hfts SrodeJ 

Spc8^T36ft 1137ft 112000 112100 
Par- 114700 114500 114100 114200 

Wflb Um Ctae Qtge OpW 

Financial 

UST.HLLStCMBU 
ii nvei c n e« or lac ac. 

MOT 97 MM 9*92 #02 4JBI 

Jun97 9478 9477 9477 -Ml 3J32 

30797 M69 *L57 H58 -Mi 333 

EN. softs MX Toe's, setes 546 
TotfsaPWW 4264 IIP IM 

IYR.TREASURT (CB0T1 

anweM-pasMieiaM 

Mar 97 104-14 186-37 106-075 — O 171 Jtf 

JWI97H6-02 MS-31 105-31 - D US, 

Sep 97103-26 105-34 IBS-24 

QAltat 44009 TuVk. softs 39 J® 

tub's eeenH 180.13 up 2523 

MYR. TREASURY (OOT} 

siao oaa m+ pn s. 3Mi ai ho po 

Mar 97 100-26 106-14 W-15 - 0» 322J33 

Jon 77 13-06 W-S 197-2? - 06 11448 

Sep 97 T07-D — B6 <63 

Bt- safes 75000 Tne^. softs 7SJ07 

Tub's CB tnM 3370« off ins 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBCJT) 
gpoftB w oa ms aaatagneepqi 
Mu-97 171-25 111-01 in-01 - 15 479.9C 
JUH97 in-09 110-17 118-17 — IS 3U» 
Sep97110-2B no-OS ns-w - 15 5J3J 
Dec 97 109-32 — 15 US 

Ed. stas 404003 Tub's, sdes 40TJ19 
TUe'sepenW 5)5*735 up 1493 

CBU^CMRMMWY BUND OJPPQ 

040 +au: 


M0TJ7 JS2* Jm- JJ08 - 

>41 *7 7548 2S2B JS53 - 

S«P97 7600 7574 797 — 

25*97 7646 7419 7631 — , w . 

Etsnfcs NX TWisuta 5,748 
Tift's open W HJS7 
GERMAN AURKfOCBZ) 

WSJOfl mates. S per marts 
Mar 77 MB Jim JUt -65 75738 
■ton 97 JUB >143 J14S —57 MM 
MU -SB ZW 
Dee97 J229 —0 18 

Est sales NX Ttie's.saft* 40J42 
Tue'sapenW BX047 
JAPAMBBYBHOJBO 
1X5 rnRBan ven, S pot no ven 
Mar 97 70830 JB667 JXB460 -78 72JZ1 
>*] 97 J0M95 708568 708J71 -7» 'IS 

Si 7 am s jksb asms — « 

Br.sales NX Ttoeto-sdes 22466 
TOe'sepenH 75X0 
SWISS FRANC fOABO 
lftw etuKs spri iw. 

Mcr97 7093 JtC2 JSJ71 — 69 P en 

JUH97 TIM 70B 7085 —71 1)927 

tof7 71*2 Tiff 7152 -73 IJB* 

ea-sota NX TVssM 2DJ29 
Tub's open w 51415 
MAOMTH EOROMARK OJPR3 
DM1 rattan- Man OOpd 
FftfT HR 9631 9632 —am 1824' 

9SM 9631 9633 Uncfe. 2MJU 

MfS 9A9S 9633 Uncn. U<1 

9494 9691 9693 - 0.01 19U94 
96JP 9±Xt 9U3 -OJS U&Sj 

?6j3-aM lira; 

9621 

& V& 

N.T. N.T. 


Feb 97 6775' 6565 6640 +077 fflJH. ; 
MW97 <620 6575 6670 +079 27,575-- 

* 6170 SSJQ *0X 

4075 ■ 6LN7 +074 6JP*‘ 

59.1S 5990 +0J4 AIM 

5658 ®.15 +039 3J77 

AUO 97 SMS 5170 5945 +DJ» 2J99„ 

to 97 59 JO 39JS 59J9 +049 2JM W 

0£97 60J5 60J5 +U» MBs'* 

C«97 6075 6070 6070 +044 44M.: 

EsLsofti NX Tue^. sales 36776 
Tun open Ire 105488 <•> U9 
UOfTSWttr CRUDE {NNBO " 

I JBObM- daaan par bbL f- 

MOT97 2448 23J0 MJ2 8637B^ 

AW ?7 247) 2135 217) +0J» jKSffl 

Mov 97 2150 22.95 m +076 71.se* _ 

>m 97 23JM 2240 2U0 +Offi 

JUIW 22JS8 2270 2245 +0J9 liffl’’ 

AWW 22JS 2ZM 274 +074 SS'': 

ISSS S'? S-5 S'* * UA 

OH B-* 2145 rXT3 10715, 

S'2 la3i »-» 275' 

20j« m<4 XLBf +ai8 WBI/* 

Janie 2048 2044 2tue +022 10799^’. 

2X25 2075 +9,17 2JTC3 n 

aSta w iS. a.E'JS? 

77#* - 

mmrranMuXSMrinmWu ?- 

|«0 27*0 2J90 -46 23748 -V 

Mar 97 2700 2465 2420 —72 27J».> 

AWW 1OT 2JB 2J10 -25 137»^ 

MW97 2JD0 1140 2.160 -30 12773., 

>jn97 1150 2795 X130 -X BJtOs. 

-MW 2.135 2.100 2.710 ZW 8J72^ 

toBW 2. 30 2790 1120 7706.r 

Jto «» -fi 6391.1/ 

OCJ97 2130 2790 2105 —10 7X2 + 

fto-97 2215 2W0 22205 4J»_ 

D«W 2JD5 2290 2302 77787 

EsLsdes NX Tue's.se6M 45*517 
Tub’s open M 161,920 ue * 
WLRADHJSA50LWE WMBO 
4700091- cants per ooi 

Feb 97 <650 £6.93 6622 +478 22720 2) 
HZS BM SLS7 +X86 

tZJl, H K ^ tU1 tijoTT 

rrKSf^i tftjD 68^0 69.49 41174 fi_751 1 

-ton 97 6625 6740 S.I7 +074 

"W WO 6195 6637 +074 S3 Y 

^.e tdes NX TWs.3Qte 37J39 
Tift's eper tot 72J40 19 1374 • *_ 

CA50/L OPE) 

^5?S pern—,1,c,on -‘ otaof,0 Otoas - 

322^2 32°* n796 : - 


IM7 

Apr97 

Ja«7 

D«c97 

MgrfB 

M 

Sum 

Deoe 


Jen99 

sepw 

DuSO 


gs=asiil 

Ma -MS 1X73) 
9+42 —DOS 7J03 
H37 -Has -S 
2J.12-WB 111 

93JW -075 0 

9W5 -075 100 

SllS UX9G0 
Off 9747 


JunOO 

o33 

MMMfTvsraiojiiffain'D 

S+p9T 92JS 93.10 
D*c97 9378 9292 

Mart* 92 M 9U1 
totB 9288 9273 
5B09X 9281 9268 

On9t 9274 9241 
Mart* 9271 9257 
JH099 9263 9257 

to« 9258 9241 

SxS9 9254 9245 

EstseSes: 139795. nre. softs 104744 
PterepenlHL- 4KM7 wmijv 
>A tONTTt PJSOR (MATIF) 
PF5retftan-nteon00pd 
M» 97 9671 9676 9677 +X00 
Jun 97 9686 9681 9681 — 00] 

5«p 97 KJU 9678 gjB-ngi 
Dec 97 9676 9669 9470 +XD0 Uj£> 
Mar 98 9676 9658 9659 
Jun 98 96J8 9641 9642 +079 iSj 

d£» 76TO KV? SSiBS™ 

S 53 kt§ ssasfflSi 

Jun 99 KJ2 9040 55 JO 

8«p 99 95-15 9SJ5 9^15 X££r fj£i 

Dec 99 9489 9477 9488 +SS IjS 

Bd. WRunro 71J38. Opan Int 2557181® 



101J0 + 615227,566 
joo97 non loan toaro + ais 
ESLselet 211556 Rev. lofts: 23X430 
Pie*, apsjtt: 21470* vp 2135 


g sf Sf^-SS 


— 9607 

KM Si S| Z wf %% 
33 US Sis 

NR tur ta log 


MgM7 20250 199J5 20000 +OJ5. 13707 
& *9T TK50 T 93.75 T9470 +050 8712 
M° VW 19025 18850 T895Q +1J25 1469 1 - 

-to 47 T86.75 185.50 185.75 +050 7558 '5 
£12- 18 £-0? 1B5J5 +050 i»61 

gStZ.JLT. N.T. 18475 +050 1785?'* 

M97 7 JSf 50 +<IJ0 

w H'J- +075 lJHl ' • 

KS^uSSiKgjgg Jg:- 
KsMefib ** n '***"»«i m j 

^S^^^-WBOfiTOObomls i-: 

AwW ♦«* «*057^ 

2178 T7fW +(ub 25.943- 

aJ'S ??■?? +OJO 

j 11 w 21-15 21 -2* -HUIl 17717 , 

aw 97 li’S 2 K 2 + 001 ' U701 

S* 2078 2054 +003 2791-1 

rSS ?2^ s 20L2 O 202 J +004 SJ 44 'r 

TWn i+ _ 19.67 1977 +006 2 AO .. 

fttowae 1 19<ia 3J» V 

899 aT ' ”^387 00. Op«i Wj 15X15Aup 

;; 

&•- sales Nx t*-.- tMS 1J* 

Sis ss l 

a-sMeslSea us ^’ 

wSSSSr ' r, 

to au»:: 

*w 9724400 |SJ IS5 tSS r 

^;gga:g^ s f 5 r 

,H^™W2668i.Optn W461^56 o« v 

. Conuno «%iiidaj«s 




Oto Piwta!! 

N-A.V 

l.moo 1.92970. 

15006-v- 
2409? 


*4 



Wii* VJto 


BSTERjMTIONALHERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 


A W, ^ 




Germany Reaches Tax Accord 

Cuts Are Designed to Lure International Investors 


EUROPE 




- <+. 

-‘■rt-. ,_“v, 

. i. 


...... 


ri/i£ 

c 


a^a«ico l p OT ^ tax ^^ 
mng next year to try to make (£ 

al my^tors. Finance Minister Then 
Wggel said Wednesday ^ 
Entering a meeting of a woikme 

group on taxes, Mr. Waigel 
grates would crea^SS 

“JK®* new jobs’ 1 in Germany 

^ hoia a «** «»- 
to ^oonce <fe- 

aus of the plans, which are expected 
to reduce taxes by 25 Skm 
Deutsche marks ($15.34 billion) 
For die government, the tax cum 
wu^d traiM^te into a loss of about 
70 billion DM in revenue. 

It is not clear how the government 
would pay for the measures. So far 
Bom has said it wants to fill foe tax 
gap by eliminating loopholes and 
tocreasmg foe value-added tax by 
oneor two percentage points. . 

. The Free Democratic Party, foe 
junior coalition partner that in recent 
^rears has been the strongest advo- 


1 c ^ of - tax cjHs» has indicated it is 
uncomfortable with the idea ofrais- 
the value-added tax from 15 
percent. 

Sources from foe tax-policy group 
piaacompromise had been reached 
between Mr. Waigcl's wish to keep 
U^nmny’s sliding tax scale and foe 
call by the Free Democrats for a low 
•axnae at foe bottom of the scale. 

The new tax model would start 
™> a flat rate of U percent on 
annual income of between 13.000 
DM and 20,000 DM. The rate would 
then jump at first to 22 percent and 
eventually to 39 percent. The cur- 
rent bottom an d top are 26 
percent and 53 percent 

In addition to foe income- tax c uts, 
taxes on corporations would fan to 
35 percent from 47 percent The 
corporate tax changes would take 
effect Jan. 1. 1998. 

Tax reform, foe subject of con- 


its work Wednesday night, 
and Mr. Kohl and leaders from foe 
three coalition parties were expec- 
ted to approve the plan Thursday. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg ) 

■ Growth Grinds to a Halt 


Roche Shares Surge 
On Purchase Rumors 


IIMltUQ, 

is likely to become the centerpiece of 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s reflec- 
tion campaign next year. " 

The tax policy group was due to 


The Economics Ministry said 
Germany’s economy slowed to 
about zero growth in foe last quarter 
of 1996 compared with the third 
quarter, news agencies reported. 
Germany’s economy emerged from 
three quarters of stagnation last year, 
but the recovery has been slow. ‘ 

“In foe last quarter erf 1996, total 
performance was about foe same as in 
foe third quarter,’* foe Economics 
Ministry mm in a summary of its 
January monthly report. 

Gross domestic product grew 1.0 
percent in the thira quarter from foe 
second quarter. 

Separately, leading European 
economists said Germany's econ- 
omy would post solid growth this 
year and in 1998 but not enough to 
bring the unemployment rate below 
10 percent (AP, AFP) 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Roche Holding 
AG's strategic intentions jumped 
to the forefront again Wednesday 
as shares in the Swiss drugmaker 
surged 7 percem on speculation it 
could be planning a major ac- 
quisition . 

In an industry where the compa- 
nies keep buying one another, 
Roche is almost sure to use its 
large pile of cash to make a major 


Speculation about a major 
toche acquisition was heightened 


acquisition soon, analysts said. 
Such speculation is not nr 


Such speculation is not new. 
For several years, shares in such 
companies as Britain's Zeneca 
Group FLC, Warner-Lambert Co. 
in the United States and Sweden's 
Astra AB have jumped with foe 
view that Roche could be looking 


at buying them. 

While Roche insists it is well 
placed without an acquisition, its 
stock rose 765 francs ($541.13) 
Wednesday, to 11.935 francs on 
speculation it could be poised to 
sell its underperfonning 
Givaudan-Roure fragrances and 
flavorings division. The proceeds 
could be added to foe company’s 
$10 billion war chest for a major 
purchase, analysts said. 

“If Roche wanted to shed a unit 


SGS Shares Drop 
On Profit Stump 


EU to Open Boeing Inquiry 


-i ~-r; 


Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Shares of SGS- 
Thomson Microelectronics NV 
plunged 22 percent Wednesday 
after Europe's biggest semicon- 
ductor maker said fourth- 
quarter profit fell 15.5 percent 
and warned revenue could fall 
in foe first quarter. ' 

Profit fell to $142 million from 
$168 million a year ago, despite 
an increase in revenue to $1.06 
billion from $974.7 million 
The company warned that 
first-quarter sales would fen to 
about $988.4 million, hut by 
pricing pressures caused by 
oversupply in its lower-margin 
^memory products. It expects re- 
newed growth throughout foe 
rest of foe year. 

Analysts said foe results were 
broadly in line with expecta- 
tions but that investors were on 
edge because SGS-Thomson’s 
shares had more than doubled 
over the past year. They closed 
Wednesday at 379.40 francs 
($69.30), down 51.60. 


Bloomberg New 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission's top competition of- 
ficial said Wednesday that it would 
open an antitrust inquiry into Boe- 
ing Co.'s $13.9 billion acquisition 
of McDonnell Douglas Corp. amid 
concern that die alliance would 
strangle competition. 

The purchase, announced last 
month, would make Boeing the 
world's biggest maker of mflitary 
aircraft anaoolster its primacy in the 
civilian aircraft market, ahead of 


Europe's Airbus Industrie. 

“I had told you we were con- 
sidering investigating this, but there 
is now no doubt this is a case we 
want to examine,” said Karel Van 
Miert, competition commissioner. 
He did not give further details. 

Robert Alizart, vice president for 
corporate communications at Air- 
bus, said: “There are long-term im- 
plications of this merger; we will 
make onr concerns known to foe 
commission. At this stage, we’d 
rather reserve our views for the 
commission.” 

‘ Under a bilateral accord with tbe 
United Stales, the EU oonld block 


lieve I 


Boeing's acquisition of McDonnell. 

When Boeing announced its in- 
tention to bay McDonnell, Airbus 
said it was not worried because Mc- 
Donnell had practically ceased to 
compete in tbe civil jet market. 

Mr. Van Miert also said Wed- 
nesday foal government aid for in- 
dustry had reached worrying levels, 
and it pledged to get tough on sub- 
sidies that help weak companies and 
penalize competitive ones. 

The threat oy Mr. Van Miert “to 
try to be a little tougher than we have 
been” comes as foe co mmiss ion ex- 
amines subsidies for such compa- 
nies as Credit Lyonnais of France 
and Volkswagen AG of Germany. 

Mr. Van Miert said the latest data, 
from 1993 and 1994, showed gov- 
eminents dispensing 97 billion Euro- 
pean currency units ($1 16.8 billion) 
in subsidies to companies, with 44 
percent going to manufacturers. 

Meanwhile, foe commission also 
accused Italy on Wednesday of un- 
necessarily delaying foe opening of 
its phone industry and sad it was 
“less than satisfied” with Rome’s 
pledge to ensure fair competition in 
the mobile-phone industry. 


before strengthening its pharma- 
ceuticals portfolio, Grvaudan 


would be a prime candidate,” said 
Claudio Werder, an analyst ai 
Bank J. Vontobel AG. “It's foe 
(me unit that fits least into die 
company’s strategy." 

Roche Hffrlrrwrt to comment on 
the talk it mil sell foe business. 


Roche acquisition was heightened 
last year when Sandoz AG and 
Ciba-Geigy AG joined to form No- 
vartis AG. 

“Last summer, everybody was 
only talking about Novartis,” said 
Patrick Gansch, head of equities at 
Credit Suisse Asset Management 
and a Roche shareholder. “Now, 
Roche is back in vogue, and people 
obviously expect something from 
the company sooner or later.” 

While Roche feces patent ex- 
pirations of major dregs in several 
years, foe company that built itself 
on the success of foe anti-depress- 
ant Valium has some possible 
blockbuster drugs close to market 
that could push growth, along 
with a big foothold in the boom- 
ing biotechnology market. 

Smart Harris, an analyst at 
Dresdner Kleinwort Benson, said 
Roche could put together financ- 
ing of S20 billion more if it 
wanted to acquire a company. 
“They could rend a deal pretty 
easily,” he said. 

Combating newly powerful 
group buyers of dregs and strug- 
gling to cut costs to fund research 
and development, the drug in- 
dustry has seen dozens of agreed or 
forced marriages in recent years. 
These include Glaxo PLC’s $14.7 
biltioa takeover af Wellcome PLC, 
the American Home Products 
Coip. purchase of American Cy- 
anamid Co. for S9.7 billion and 
Hoechst AG’s purchase of Marian 
Merrill Dow Inc. far S7.1 billion. 


Euro Disney’s Sales Rise 


Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Euro Disney SC A, op- 
erator of the Disney land Paris theme 
park, said Wednesday its sales 
jumped 13 percent in its fiscal first 
quarter as attendance rose and vis- 
itors spent more money at its hotels 
and attractions. 

Euro Disney, Europe's largest 
theme-park operator, said sales rose 
to 1.13 billion francs ($205 mfllioo) in 
tire three months ended Dec. 31 from 
1.01 billion francs a year earlier. 

Operating revenue from foe 
theme park and hotels rose 1 1 per- 
cent. to 1.12 billion francs. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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Ftrt Book 

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Stockholm 5X 16 tateB 266J-H 

PWrtKi£;8fS.I6 


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IEJ 

IHl 

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NO'Ycktao 

JAL 

Jvsco 

Kepn 

Kansd Elec 

Kao 

Kora Steel 
KDO 

KMdNIpoRr 

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Kobe ssel 

Kmgtse 

Kfltate 

Kyocera 

K^aEK 

Mavtaai 

Mam 

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Z180 2090 

1450 2370 

760 721 

228Q 2260 

2210 2200 
BOO 789 
1350 1 310 
515 512 

1360 1J10 

997 974 

2480 2450 
3rt0 3510 
1380 13S0 
3490 X4Q0 
1170 1100 

1030 ICO 
3200 3160 
1490 1660 
497 477 

548 515 

5740 5710 
492 495 

3550 3570 
735 72S 

2320 2290 
1230 1250 
299 293 

7500 790 
713 714 

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217 211 

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769 739 



PAGE 13 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


2250- 

SBC 

as ~ 

2770 - -- 

*Dw7n-, 


London 
FTSE 100 index 

4500 

4340 — 

m 


Paris 1 
CAC40 

250Q _ 


22BQ fsfl-- 

2060.-/ 


A S O N 

1996 


3700 A S O N D J' 


<Kr,y*- r 

™ASONDJ 


Excha nge . 


Wednestfey Prev. 
Close Ctose 


Amatardam 

Biuaarts 

Frankfurt 

GflpMMtn 

HdsUd - 

Oslo 

London- 

Usdrid 

Man 

Ptarfs 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Source: Tetokuns 


EQE 

ea-20 

PAX . 

. Stock’ Ma/kat 
HEX General 

oax 

FTSE 100 
Stock Exchange 

MBTEL 
CAC40 
SX 16 

ATX 

SPt 


68138 67235 . +1-33 

2M7-S7 2,024.87 +t.12 
3^2aK7 2,976.71 1-1.75 
SB341 501:71 +034 

2,724-76 2,88138 +122. 
572.71 560.76 .<032 

4^19.10 4.185-50 +055 

475iTI 471.68 +0.88 

12,431.00 12^23.00+1^0 
2^42-46 2.408.88 +1-35 
2,887-55 2.652.18 +1^3 
1,18030 1,175.71 *039 
2,63847 2,581-69 *2.21 


Tmmwu.’ftol Herald Tntunc 


Very briefly: 


• Credit Fonder de France's employees released Jerome 
Meysonnier. the hank’s chairman, on the sixth day of their siege 
of tbe company’s Paris headquarters. The employees were 
trying to stop the government from breaking up tbe company, 
putting 800 jobs at risk. 


• France is considering a spending freeze this year, the 
government said in response to a newspaper report that said 20 
billion francs ($3.65 billion) might be cut from the gov- 
ernment's budget to meet foe European Union's single-cur- 
rency criteria. Under its finance bill for 1997, France would 
meet the requirement that the public deficit not exceed 3 
percent of gross domestic product. 


Analysts said sales were better 
than expected, suggesting the com- 
pany. which feces rising interest 
costs in the next few years, was 
attracting more visitors. 

“A sales increase of that balance 
was above my expectations.” said 
Jeff Summers, analyst at Klesch & 
Co. in London. “That suggests they 
are on line for park attendance of 
between 123 million and 13 million 
this year, which means they should 
be able to offset increased finance 
charges that (tick in this year.” At- 
tendance in the company's previous 
financial year was 1 1 .7 million. 


• Allied Irish Banks PLC's shares rose after the British bank 
said its acquisition, announced Tuesday, of Dauphin Deposit 
Corp. of the United States would increase earnings by as much 
as 9 percent by 1 999 through cost savings and witter distribution 
of its products. Allied Irish's U.S. subsidiary. First Maryland 
Bank, will pay about $1 36 billion for Dauphin. 

• Lazard's investment bouses were the most successful ad- 
visers on cross-border takeovers in Europe last year in a business 
increasingly dominated by U.S. investment hanks, according to 
Acquisitions Monthly magazine. The three Lazard businesses in 
London, Paris and New York collectively advised on 46 trans- 
actions with a total value of £12 billion ($20 billion). 

• Russia plans to sell stakes of 25 percent of the tele- 
communications company Svyazinvest to foreign investors 
and 24 percent to domestic buyers. Communications Minister 
Vladimir Bulgak said. 

• Kirch Group cannot broadcast or advertise its DFl digital- 
television programs outside Bavaria, a court in Hamburg ruled 
in deciding in favor of the pay-TV network Premiere, which 
has planned to broadcast digital programs across Germany. 


Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP 


Ifigb Low Close Pm. 


168 166*0 
74 75 

433 415 

245*0 243 

1032 1034 

5D9 510 

326 317 

207*0 205 

202 201 
271 267 

184 103 

144 144 

69*0 69*0 
197 18X50 
309 30450 
16X50 158 

117*0 120 

92 9250 
188*0 18X50 
155 155 

107 10fl*D 
179*0 175 


Piteous: MAN 


an a*6 

7.95 7.99 

1825 18X5 
341 3*1 

22J2 22*5 
239 237 

12*4 12-77 
1X02 13 

5.10 5*9 

<06 6*8 
19*0 19X6 
4X5 4X5 

2*0 2*0 
330 2X3 

1*8 1*9 

1X20 1250 
282 2B2 

2X70 2X17 
7X6 7X5 

1*3 L82 

15J2 1450 
6*3 6J7 

355 397 

X15 X09 

X67 3*8 

L77 150 

4*1 479 

422 4.14 

9X0 9X0 

825 425 

2X8 2X6 

7X6 7.19 

9X0 9X0 

XI 1 X10 


The Trib Index 



Closing prices. 

Jten. t. 18®.= 100 

Level 

Change 

nsetanga 

yw to data 

World index 

151.73 

+0-52 

+0-34 

+15.oi 

Aegtonoi htew 





Asa/Padfic 

115.11 

+0.87 

+0.76 

—14.26 

Europe 

160.41 

+0-2? 

+0.13 

+15 25 

N. America 

175.36 

+1.15 

+0.66 

+38.70 

S. America 

127.61 

-1.73 

—1.34 

+4032 

Industrial Induoa 





Capital goods 

181.00 

+0-32 

+0.18 

+36.21 

Consumer goods 

166.32 

+1-38 

+0.84 

+20.46 

Energy 

178.13 

+0.80 

+0.45 

+31.34 

Finance 

111.80 

+0.94 

+0.85 

-12.13 

Miscellaneous 

168.54 

+0.15 

+0.09 

+24.10 

Raw Materials 

177.67 

-0.47 

-026 

+25.30 

Senice 

138.86 

-0.B8 

-0.70 

+15-72 

IMitias 

144.63 

-1-24 

-0.85 

+13.7B 

The IntBmWionai Herald Tribune World SSIock Index G tracks the U.S. dotar mluea ct 

2B0 kitemadonasy rnvmstable crocks ironi 25 ctujntriex. For more information, a tnse 

boa/del Is available by wrtdna k> The Trtt index, 1B1 Avenue Charles de Gatrio. 

92527 NeiMy Gratae. Franca 


CompBad by Bloomberg Nom. j 


MuretoMfp 

NEC 

NB&oSec 

Nktando 

MppGtaBBk 

WpjHrtPoper 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yuseo 


NICK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 


OdakyuEl Ry 
OnaPtwm 
Osaka Gas 
Warn 
Sofcora Bk 

Santoro 

Sanaa Bank 
Sanya Elec 


High tare 

3B4> 3840 
1420 1390 

800 781 

7600 740 
247 — 

716 

571 563 

545 
297 

505 495 

701 699 

34 243 

1590 1560 

8550a 6440a 
716 686 

630 623 

3470 3300 


SefouRwr 

Settsul House 

Soven-£teven 

Sharp 

Shim try 

SWTMttUOl 

ShteuoknBk 

aUTTwOnw 

Sumitomo Bk 
SurakQKn 
Sumitomo Elec 
SuntH Metal 
SuradTrast 
TOIsri 

Tabto Pham 
TatadaOHcn 
TDK 

TohotarBPwr 
Total Bank 
ToUo Maine 

Tokyo El Pug 
Tokyo Gas 
Tofcyu 
Tanon 

Toman Print 

Toraylnd 

Toshiba 

Toya Setter 

TowTrua 

Toyota Motor 

Ynmalchl Sec 

Yamanooch) 

YtaudaFtre 

YaGUdaTrus] 


1350 1310 

719 702 

3200 3120 

1480 1 430 

457 437 

6640 6560 

4250 4030 

1110 1090 

6890 6600 

1460 1430 

750 728 

21iO 2120 

1120 1090 

7730 7670 

92* 910 

1430 1390 
421 415 

1610 1590 

270 257 

946 885 

534 506 

2720 2630 


7490 7420 

2250 2220 

969 955 

1030 1010 

2480 2440 

305 298 

560 541 

1210 1150 

1370 1340 

70S 685 

710 696 

3000 2740 

810 BOO 
3160 5500 
485 473 

2250 2220 

534 518 

400 389 


3840 3840 
1410 1380 

793 767 

7480 7530 
247 34S 

711 700 

565 560 

550 536 

303 291 

504 496 

697 £88 

244 240 

1580 1540 

8490a 8330a 
700 676 

629 622 

344) 3320 

297 293 

1330 1290 

716 690 

3200 3090 

1470 1410 

450 426 

6600 6550 

4200 4000 

1100 1090 

6880 6740 
1450 1 420 

740 730 

21 SO 2110 
1100 1 090 

7710 7600 

912 900 

1410 1360 

419 418 

1600 1590 

266 255 

945 B62 

533 510 

2700 2630 
2300 2240 

7480 7340 

2230 2220 

966 950 

1020 1000 
24M 2440 

304 296 
557 S3S 

1200 1140 

1350 1310 
693 610 

70S 691 

2940 2730 

B10 807 

3230 3200 
479 473 

2240 2210 
522 513 

4« 390 


Norotaolnc 
Nercen Enemy 
Where Telecom 
Nona 
Onex 

Proicdn Petal 

PekoCdo 

Placer Dome 

Paco Petal 

PcastiSasfc 

Rem&sance 

Rtowgom 

Rogers CtmtelB 

SedammCo 

SMCdoA 

Stone ConsaM 

Soncar 

TaHsman Ear 

TechB 

Tetogtobe 

lefts 

Thomson 

TofDom Bonk 

Transo/ta 

TransCttaPlpe 

Tronort Flnl 

TrtzecHrtm 

TVXGaM 

WesKaasTEny 


High Low i 
30ft 31.90 
33N 3X20 
95*5 99 

12*5 1Z70 
2X10 22-95 
55U 54* 

21*0 2IW 

26.10 27*5 

14.10 13ft 
116 11X90 
47ft 46 

32*5 32X0 
29 28ft 
5X40 5440 
44 15 5XB0 
20ft 17ft 
6*05 61X0 
47ft 45ft 
32ft 31*5 
39.90 3714 

20ft a 
29X0 2605 
36J0 36.40 
16*0 16X0 
24X5 2X95 
44ft 43ft 

30.10 29*0 
lOiOS 9*0 
2X80 23ft 

75 73ft 


Vienna 


ATX Mec 1118X0 
Piteous 117-U9 


AtnaAMnes 
Brou-UnGeess 
Bund Vek PfB 
Crtdtena PM 
EMJensrafl 
EVN 

Intenmtol 

LenUng 

Leytorei 

Mayr-MeWWl 

OMV 

Oesl Biau 

Oest Elekntz 

VATedi 

Wtatertteiger 


1760 1760 1724 

665 <72 670 

*04 404 404 

427*0 429*0 431 

3180 3180 3170 

1737 17521738*0 

N.T. N.T. 1475 

600 615 600 

261 270.95 265 

567 576 5» 

12551361*0 J3S7 
790 800 795 

830 839*0 829*0 

1712 1718 1720 

2190 2190 2185 


Wellington nbmmtowj; 

Ptcvwh ZwUi 


AlrNZertdB . . ___ ___ 

Bitartylmri 1X8 1X6 1X7 1X8 

Carter hoh onl 3X9 X34 137 U? 

Fora S.12 5.12 112 IIS 


2X9 175 X76 2J9 
1X8 1X6 1X7 1X8 


FWterPteai i* l« ifl sa 


Toronto 


TSEIoanstrtrts: 6058*7 
pravtooc 607SJ8 


AUH Price 
AlbateEnaray 
Alcan Aluro 
AnrienonEnpl 
SK Montreal 
BkNwaSCoBa 
Barrie* GoM 
BCE 

BCTetecamro 

BtadwrePhoira 

BombanflerB 

BrasamA 

Bro4 Minerals 

Cnneai 

OBC 

bin Noil Roll 
CdnNol Res 
CiinOcadPel 
CrinPocrtc 


Dom» 

iWri ll, 4 

DoPonlCrio A 

EuroNnMng 

FahtaiFM 

FoNnRirtiine 

ReMierOnflA 

Franco Hernia 

CuHCdBR85 

IroOrtUQi 

inaj 

aw 

L0fl«e» Croup 
MaOttfflBWl 
Moron MIA 
MeSmsi 
Moore 

NetrtridgtNef 


31X0 21.90 
32X5 32.90 
47 47ft 
16X1 1865 
44*5 45*5 
46 46*5 
35*5 35*5 
UM 67X0 
29ft 29*5 
6860 71.45 
2645 2<B5 
30ft 3DJ0 
21ft 22*5 
58X5 58X5 
58.15 58ft 
S2ft 53 
37ft 37*0 
2670 2<80 
35*0 35*0 
37*5 38 

2SX0 25X5 
1115 12.15 
24*0 26 79 
31J0 3lft 
3X4) 3620 
295 298 

3020 3040 

7? ns 22X0 
5X60 59ft 
11.10 11.15 
63ft 6185 
4540 4560 
39.90 39.90 
1605 1115 
«20 4830 
18X0 IBM 
75 75.15 
112) 13X0 
28 28.10 
4«*5 45.70 


FCFoiml 231 237 236 Z3S 

Goodman Ffler 1.75 1J5 1X5 .1.75 

inOepNews 6.95 <94 <95 <95 

LfentMhoi) 3*0 3*0 XOT 3*0 

NalCasnste 2*3 140 142 2*0 

HZ Rearing 29 JO 2970 29.70 29.70 

Tefocwn HU 7*5 7*0 7*4 7*2 


NZ Rearing 
Telecom hz 


WlbonHorton 11*5 11*5 1145 1140 


Zurich 


SPItedec 2638*7 
PretaoK 2511*9 


Aneoca B 
AluSiHoeR 
AfES-SeronoB 
BotabeHdgR 
ABB B 
SKVblOfl 
BOMB 
CSHuldlnosR 
EleWrowtlB 
FocherB 
HM PC 
HoMeroonk B 
JuL Baer Hog B 
NestaR 
NovaribR 
OarilonR 
PoiRtaiHUB 
PhamVfcn B 
PteflB 
Roche Hdfl PC 
SBC R 
ScHmflerB 
SGS B 
SMHB 
SutartR 
Swiss total R 
5wKso)rR 
UBSB 
VtriMOHdg R 
WHerimrR 
Zurich AssurR 


37650 370 

1126 1107 
1510 1499 
2860 2795 
1739 1700 
740 725 

1800 1890 

1«25 137 75 
S38 536 

1490 1494 

922 925 

1025 1009 
1420 1405 

1486 1475 
1570 1M5 
145*0 141.75 
14» 1485 
668 033 

210 204 

11935 11170 
249 247*0 
1529 1525 
3225 3200 


960 97B 962 

1362 1375 1361 

1210 1251 1195 

1146 1152 1155 

266*0 26B 275 

799 806 793 

374 37X50 373 


























































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 


RAGE 15 


Stocks Try 

■A Rebound 


ASIA/PACIFIC 



PlantoEndaTax 
Helps Start a Rally 

Bloomberg fi/ews 

Wednesday for ttefet foS 
days as investors welcomed a pro- 
Posal tp scrap a tax on the sale of 
securities as a sign the governing 
party was senons about deregulate 
*Hg flic financial industry. 

“Tins is seen as a sign that fi- 
aancml reform is starting to move 
forward, saidShingo Sakhic, head 
of cqmry strategy at Wako Secu- 
rities Co. 

The benchmark Nikkei 225 stock 
average rose 655.72 points, or 3.78 
percent, to 18,013.81 Hie broader 
maiket also rose, with the Toplx in- 
dex of all shares on the first section of 
T°^y° Stock Exchange p»inmp 
2930, or 2.17 percent, to 1378.6Z 
m Buying by domestic pension 
funds buoyed shares in The morning, 
naders said, and the market held its 
gains in die afternoon. 

Fuji Photo Film Co„ Sony Carp. 

and Canon Inc. led the advance, with 
Fuji rising 70 yen (60 cents) to 1 ,170 
yen, Sony advancing 110 to 7.710 
and Canon up 80 at 2,450. financial 
issues also advanced. Sumitomo 
Bank Ltd. rose 50 to 1,410, and 
Nomura Securities Co. gained 40 to 
1380. 

An official of the Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party said it was considering 
scrapping a tax on the sale of stocks 
as part of a package of financial- 
market reform proposals. The gov- 
ernment currently imposes taxes of 
0.12 percent on sales of eqoities by 
brokerage concerns and 031 per- 
cent on sales by other investors. In 
an interview published Wednesday, 
a member of a committee studymg 
deregulation said the tax should be 
ipboiished. 

“To implement fundamental re- 
forms of the financial system, we 
need to bring the tax system in line 
with international standards, 1 * So- 
ber Miyashita, deputy chairman of 
the liberal Democratic Party’s tax 
research committee, told the Maim- 
chi Shim bun. 

Yoshdnko Kubota, managing di- 
rector at Nikko International Capital 
Management Co., said of die pro- 
posal, “The total sum involved isn't . 
that great, but it means the Japanese 
market will be connecting with the 
[global market."- 


Red- Chip ’ Shares Recruit Investors 


Bloomberg News 

.. K0I ? G — Investors: China's 
People s Liberation Army needs you* 

_That, at least, was the message that Con- 
mental Manner Investment Co, controlled by 
me Chinese army, sent this week when it raised 
the equivalent of about $40 
mnhoa by selling stock in its 
gcoond fund-raising arn riy 
in two weeks. 

The moves cam* amid 
speculation that Conriocnt- 
aJ’s parent companies would 
seUit bargain-priced assets 
m China, where state-owned 
companies and government 
ministries have been sailing 
as «*s lor Jess than mark er 
value to their so-called red- 
chip Hang Kong subsidiar- 
ies, helping drive op share 
prices. 

. Continental's shares 
have nearly ■ doubled this 
mootfa amid speculation 
that its parents will be gen- 
erous. The stock dosed at 
4375 Hong Kong dollars 
Wednesday, down 5 cents. 

Baying into most compa- 
nies controlled by Beijing “is a leap of faith," 
said ling Ulrich, bead of China research ai 
Credit Lyonnais Securities Asia LtcL, “bar you 
have to be in early — that's where the op- 
portunity lies." Hong Kong already has half a 
dozen major Chines e investment companies. 
Stocks such as CITIC Pacific Ltd. and Guang- 
dong Investment Ltd. were the hottest issues m 



Source: BtoocnberQ 


town last year as their parent companies sold 
them ports, pig farms and other assets at bar- 
gain-basement prices. 

China International Trust & Investment Corp., 
““ — ’s biggest investment arm, established 
six years ago when it bought a 
nearly ban krupt listed local 
company. CITIC Pacific is 
now toe lOth-largest com- 
pany in toe Hang Seng Index 
of 33 major Hong Kong 
stocks. Its wares rose 70 per- 
cent last year, to 44.90 dol- 
lars. Investors have cooled in 
the n ew year, however, and 
CITIC Pacific's stock 
slipped^ cents Wednesday, 

Now, investors are trying 
to spot the “next CITlC. ” 
Continental Mariner, offi- 
cially a shipping company 
with a staff of just 25 in Hong 
Kong, has raised more than 
$60 million from selling 
shares so tor this year. It 
plans to buy interests in roads 
and water-purification plants 
iht in China from local govern- 
ments. It may also buy pro- 
jects from toe army’s business division, China 
Poly Grow. China Poly's assets include the 80- 
story Sky Center m (Zht^gzhou. Shanghai’s new 
stock-exchange building and a free-trade zone 
on Hainan Inland — sometimes spoken of as the 
“next Hong Kong" but better known so far for 
its reputation as abase for smuggling. 

“I don’t want to single out the PLA, but oar 


major shareholder China Poly is doing 
everything to help us," Oliver Lam. corporate 
secretary for Continental Mariner, said. 

Continental Mariner’s chairman is Wang 
Jon, son of China's late president Wang Zben 
and the chairman of both China Poly and China 
International Trust & Investment Corp. 

There has been speculation that he now favors 
Continental Mariner because of a dispute be- 
tween his family and that of CTHC Pacific's 
Chairman, Larry Yung, son of China's vice 
president. Rang Viren. But all of this speculation 
tends to stop many big investors freon doing 
anything mare than dabbling in the stock. 

"It has a very strong and powerful parent." 
said Sam Lau, who manages S300 million of 
regional funds for Invesccf Asia Ltd. "But we 
only took a little bit of the stock. We don't 
know a lot about the company." 

Amid toe lack of information about the 
companies, high expectations and rumors have 
driven their shares up to unprecedented heights 
in recent weeks. But many investors remember 
1993, when a score of Chinese companies 
bought up dormant Hong Kong-listed compa- 
nies. Shares in the companies soared for a 
while, only to collapse when China launched a 
three-year and -inflation campaign that is just 
starting to wind down. 

“Now things are going well in China, they 
see the opportunity to grow,' ’ said Nerissa Lee, 
who manages the $100 million China Fund for 
Guinness Flight Asia Ltd. 

“These stocks are flavor of the day." Andy 
Mantel, a fund manager with Shanghai Growth 
Investment Ltd., said. "A good way to value 
them is to look at the portfolio of the parent. Bat 
that's not so easy." 


| Investor's Asia 1 

Hong Kong 

Singspore 

Tokyo 


Hang Seng 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


OT - ■ 

2300 

22000- - 


1400 - 

„ m 

W aiooovy^V 

Asr ' 

13050 J 

\r m lL 

jr^ ■ 2Co« - • - 


12900 -Jr 

2120W ) , 

f . 19000 - - 

■>; 

• - 

2060 - 1 f 

- ',8000 

- -‘ft 

10000 A s ON D j ■ 2000 A S ON D j 17000 A S ON D’j ' 

1998 

1997 1«6 

1937 1996 

1997 

Exchange 

index 

Wednesday Prev. 

% 



Close Close Cmrnge 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

13^92.79 13,732.79 -029 

Singapore 

Straits Tones 

2^4001 Z250.79 

-QA8 

Sydney 

AW Ordinaries 

2.433J50 2,4 30.30 

+0;13 

Tokyo 

Nikket 225 

18,01348 17,358.16 +3,78 j 

1 Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,232.49 122063 

+097 

Bangkok 

SET 

8S8.97 854.18- 

+0.58 

Seoul 

ConposKe Index 

67834 69034 

-1.68 

Taipei 

Slock Maket index 7.290.77 7251 .04 

+055 

Manila 

PSE 

3^75J83 3,279^3 

-0.10 

Jakarta 

Compoale Index 

688.12 680.88 

+0.77 

WeBington 

NZSE-40 

2A27JI1 2.432.51 

-0^2 

Bombay 

Sensitive index 

3,427.09 3,382.74 

+1.31 


Source: Telekurs 


Ink ruii'iul HrraU Tribune 


Very briefly: 


MICROSOFT: Looking for Internet Talent in New York 


Continued from Page 11 

“What their problem is in toe 
comm unity now is that they ask for a 
lot of stuff - — they want to own all 
.the rights and don't want to pay 
necessarily far toe right of own- 
ership, and tous the deal they’ve 
been laying mi toe table isn't worth 
it" 

Microsoft’s position is that be- 
cause no one yu has figured bow to 
make money from Web-based news 
and entertainment, toe co mpan y 
must own on-line rights to justify its 
investment. 

“I know a lot of people have had 
trouble with tois," Ms. Stein said. 
“Talking to- artists about owning 
their baby is a hard thing. What I’ve 
said is, ‘Don't bring me your baby. 
Bring me something eke." ” 

Timothy Nye, the founder of the 
Sunshine Interactive Network, 
which is producing “Vanishing 
Point," a nonfiction on-line doc- 
umentary far Microsoft that is toe 
creation of Mr. Holme and Mr. 


Wexler, the “Baked Potato" au- 
thors, said that Microsoft's position 
is fair. “I think Microsoft com- 
pensates people they're working 
with extremely generously," he 
said, “and is buying rights that at the 
moment have no upside.’ * 

For all toe grousing, very few 
Silicon Alley entrepreneurs have 
declined to propose projects to Mi- 
crosoft. On toe contrary, most seem 
eager to form a partnership. 

to a period of turmoil in toe on- 
line industry, with many small Web 
publishing ventures faced with go- 
ing out of business. Microsoft’s 
willingness to sustain big losses on 
Internet content is a strong vote of 
confidence in Silicon Alley's fu- 
ture. 

“Microsoft is spending money, 
and that helps developers advance 
technically, advance financially and 
in some cases stay alive," said 
J onathan Tramper, a new media 
agent at William Morris who has 
many clients in Silicon Alley. 

Microsoft is anticipating toe day 


when toe market for its Windows 
computer operating systems is sat- 
urated, and toe company is making a 
muWbillion-dollar. bet that the In- 
ternet can become a new medium 
s imil ar to television or publishing. 

The company's most high-profile 
media effort has been toe year-old 
Microsoft Network, which has 1.6 
million subscribers. 

For those who have been 
showered in Microsoft stardust, toe 
enthusiasm runs high. “It’s huge, 
definitely, it's really exciting for 
us," said David Grossman, a part- 
ner in Rare Medium, a 15-person 
Web shop housed in an airy loft in 
toe Flatiron district that got toe go- 
ahead for an interactive game. “Mi- 
crosoft has such a large stature, and 
yet here they are taking a folksy 
approach and reaching out to toe 
young development community. " 

That is the bottom line all over 
Silicon Alley. The future of both the 
software giant and the homegrown 
upstarts may well depend on Mi- 
crosoft's success. 


China to Delay 
Cuts in Rates 


Remers 

SHANGHAI — Financial au- 
thorities have scrapped a plan to pull 
interest rates down another notch 
early this year because of fears that 
surging fixed-asset investment in 
China will get out of hand, bankers 
and traders said Wednesday. 

Domestic financial markets re- 
acted positively to signals from 
Beijing late last year that another 
interest-rate cut was imminent. But 
those markets are now digesting a 
new message that rates are likely to 
remain unchanged. 

A banker in Beijing said author- 
ities feared an inflationary backlash 
from a resurgence in fixed-asset in- 
vestment in the second half of 1996 
after two earlier interest-rate cuts. 

“There is the need to maintain 
austerity measures." the banker 
said. “Another bank interest-rate 
cut is unlikely in toe short term as a 
result." 


• China produced 100.4 million metric tons ( 1 10.4 million 
tons; of steel in 1 996. up 5.2 percent from 1 995. making it toe 
world's largest producer of crude steel, overtaking toe long- 
time leader Japan for the first lime. 

• Ford Motor Co. plans to invest S40 million to lift its stake 
in Jiangling Motors Co. to 33 percent from 20 percent. 

• Allied Domecq PLC is selling 3.000 cases of wine made by 
Vietnam’s Thien Thai winery, said to be the first wine made 
in toe country since French colonial days. 

• Bangkok Bank or Commerce PLC posted a net loss of 2.8 
billion baht (S 108.9 million ) for 1 996. reversing a net profit of 
860 million baht for 1995. 

• Duff & Phelps Corp. added the Philippines to a roster of 
candidates it was considering for credit-rating upgrades, chan- 
ging its outlook to “positive” from “stable." 

• Indonesia will raise toe minimum wage by an average of 
about 1 0 percent April 1 . with wages in Jakarta rising the most, 
to 172300 rupiah ($72.77) a month. Reuters. Bloomberg. AFP 


Confidence in Manila as Pay Rises 

Bloomberg Ne*S 

MANILA — A 12 percent increase in Manila's minimum 
wage, which raises Philippine labor costs to among the most 
expensive in Southeast Asia, does not threaten to undermine 
toe fledgling economy, economists said Wednesday. 

Manila’s wage board on Tuesday approved a 20 peso (76 
cent) increase in the minimum daily pay of workers, to 185 
pesos. The rise, effective May 1, was in line with expectations. 
It will put the minimum wage in the Philippines at the equivalent 
of about $7.02 a day, compared with $4.70 in Malaysia, 
according to the Economist Intelligence Unit. 

“Despite the increase in nominal wages, real minimum 
wages have been generally declining while productivity has 
been improving," said Luz Lorenzo, an economist with 
Peregrine Securities Philippines Inc. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Personals 


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INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


You wiB find below a sefedion of employment offers published in Iasi Monday's International Herald Tribune 
For a copy of bst Monday's paper, please contact Fred Ronan on Paris (1)41 43 9391 

m 



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the advertisers who appeared in our Euro- 
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1996, please complete this coupon & send it to: 

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PAGE 12 


Sports 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 
— 1 




B Sampras Advances After 5-Set Battle 

fi As Heat Wave Ends , American to Face Muster in Semifinal 






j!?; ^ - sf! 


- r v s?S(5\ ! » 

' ^ w. ' a* 




Rou Safonl^nic Amoral Prcn 

BOUNCE — England's Ronnie 
Irani and John Crawley, right, 
warming up for Friday's crick- 
et match against New Zealand. 

Asylum Sought 

soccer Sixteen players from 
Ethiopia's national soccer team 
showed up at Rome police head- 
quarters to ask for political asylum, 
Italian officials said Wednesday. 

The players had disappeared 
.Tuesday while on a stopover en 
route to an African Nations Cup 
game in Morocco on Sunday. The 
game has since -been called off. 

An official at Rome police 
headquarters, who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity, would say 
only that the I6 men had made the 
asylum request. The Foreign Min- 
istry said it had received no request 
for asylum. (AP) 

II sen Tipped to Head Ajax 

soccer The Danish soccer vet- 
eran Morten Olsen will replace 
Louis van Goal as coach of the 
Dutch powerhouse Ajax, the na- 
tional daily Aigemeeu Dagblad re- 
ported Wednesday. 

The appointment is “alroosr a 
done deal,” but die dub is delaying 
the announcement until its players 
return from a training session in 
Spain, the newspaper said. 

Van Gaal took over at Ajax in 
1991 and guided the dub to the 
UEFA Cup title in 1992 and the 
European Champions Cup tide in 
1995. He announced in October 
that he would be leaving the dub at 
the end of the season. (APj 

Downhill Postponed 

skiing Fog forced cancellation 
of two training runs Wednesday at 
Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy, causing 
organizers to postpone a women's 
World Cup downhill race from 
Thursday to Friday. 

A giant slalom, making up for a 
race canceled in Morzine and orig- 
inally included in the Cortina pro- 
gram, was skipped. The Interna- 
tional Ski Federation did not 
immediately reschedule it (AP) 

Mattingly Retires 

baseball Don Mattingly, the 
greatest New York Yankees player 
never to reach the World Series, 
will never get that chance. 

Mattingly, 35. who sat out last 
season when New York won the 
championship, formally an- 
nounced his retirement Wednesday 
at Yankee Stadium. A six-time All- 
Star and a nine-time Gold Glove 
first baseman, Mattingly hit .307 in 
a 14-season career. He was the 
American League's Most Valuable 
Player 'in 1985. ( AP ) 


Scoreboard 


The Associated Press 

MELBOURNE — One misjudged 
shot cost Pete Sampras an early night 
Wednesday and forced him into his 
second consecutive five-set match. 

But the heal wave in Melbourne bad 
ended, Sampras’s serves never wilted, 
and he has another rest day before the 
Australian Open semifinals. 

The American dropped serve only 
once, and fired 23 aces as he beat the 
lOth-seeded Albert Costa of Spain, 6-3, 
6-7 (5-71, 6-1. 3 : 6, 6-2. Wednesday 
ni gh t to move within two victories of his 
ninth Grand Slam title and second Aus- 
tralian Open trophy. 

“I thought I recovered pretty well," 
the world's No. 1 ranked player said 
after beating Costa in nighttime tem- 
peratures that bad cooled to the 60s. "It 
feels like I’m in pretty good shape. But 
one day off and then Thomas, which 
will be a war, so we’ll see.” 

He was referring to fifth-seeded 
Thomas Muster, who advanced to only 
his second Grand Slam semifinal on any 
surface other than clay by capitalizing 
on the errors of third-seeded Goran 
Ivanisevic of Croatia for a 6-4, 6-2. 6-3 
victory. 

The lone break of Sampras came in 
the fourth set's eighth game, when he 
decided not to volley a serve return by 


Costa, and then watched h land deep in 
his backhand comer for break point. 

**I misjudged it,” he said. "If I could 
do it over again, I’d hit it” 

That point ended up pushing him into 
an extra 30 minutes of play. 

Sampras said Costa had one of the 
best backhands he has seen. 

"On the run, I couldn't believe some 
of the shots he was hitting, such un- 
believable racket control,” Sampras 
said. 

Costa said he was disappointed at 
losing. 

"But I think I have to be happy now, 
because for me it was a really good 
tournament,” Costa said, adding, “He 
served really unbelievable.” 

In his game against Muster, Ivan- 
isevic hit 16 aces, but won only 28 
percent of his second-serve points as he 
tried desperately for winners and 
sprayed 54 unforced errors to the Aus- 
trian's 14. 

A combination of Muster's muscles 
and his coach's computer proved too 
much for Ivanisevic, still seeking his 
first Grand Slam tournament title. 

Ivanisevic said Muster “is so fit, he 
gets almost everything back, so I was 
thinking I'd have to hit winners.” He 
added. “I forced too many first serves 
and I played tactically not so smart.” 


-'a - 

v .*• .■ V.- "! 


, . * _ *, ■ 



Ci*p Btaod/Agmcr Fimr-Hw 

Martina Hingis during her victory Wednesday against Irina Spirlea. 


Also in the semifinals, facing No. 2 
Michael Chang of the United States is 
25th-ranked Carlos Moya of Spain. 

On the women’s side, fourth-seeded 
Martina Hingis of Switzerland laughed 
off a fall from a horse during a break 
from tennis on Tuesday and advanced to 
the semifinals with a 7-5. 6-2 victory 
over eighth-seeded Irina Spirlea of Ro- 
mania. 

Hingis next meets No. 14 Mazy Joe 
Fernandez, who won 7-5, 4-0 when the 
Belgian Dominique Van Roost quit in 
pain from an abdominal muscle injury. 

The other semifinal Thursday pits 
12th -seeded Amanda Coetzer of South 
Africa, who had defeated Steffi Graf 
here, against the 1995 champion Mary 
Pierce, unseeded after a dismal 1996. 

The 16-year-old Hingis is in an es- 
pecially good position to win her first 
Grand Siam tide because the top three 
seeds — Graf, Aranxta Sanchez Vicario 
and Conchita Martinez — lost before 
the quarterfinals. Defending champion 
Monica Seles stayed away with a 
broken finger. 

Hingis said she would not do any 
more nding during die Open — there 
wasn't time. 

The fall from the horse, she said, 
"wasn’t dangerous at all. My mom was 
there and she was laughing. Everybody 
was laughing. 

“Mentally, it just helps you some- 
times if you do something else and not 
just tennis all the time.” 

Hingis rebounded from early service 
breaks by the eighth-seeded Spirlea in 
both sets. Her Romanian opponent hit 
some impressive winners, but in the 
second set had 13 unforced errors to 
Hingis’s one. 

Keeping op such mastery could make 
Hingis die youngest winner at any 
Grand Slam tournament since Lottie 
Dod captured Wimbledon at the age of 
15 in 1887. 

Van Roost had upset second-seeded 
Sanchez Vicario and 15tb-seeded 
Chanda Rubin in earlier rounds. But at 
5-5 in the first set against Hingis, an 
abdominal muscle injury that had 
bothered her for a week, along with back 
and forearm pains, flared up strongly. 

With her serve and overhead shots 
fading. Van Roost fell behind, 7-5. 1-0. 
The pain still worsened and she quit 
after losing three more games. 

“I did the best that I could until the 
end,” she said. * T had to stop. It was just 
toomixAhurtiqg^prpoe.”. 

Still, there, was.the joy.of .a&apcing . 
beyond her best previous Grand. Slam ; 
tournament performance = — reaching 
the fourth round of the 1992 Australian 
Open. 

Ranked 43d in die world. Van Roost 
said, “I feel like I've achieved something 
extraordinary at this tournament” 







WiHtfldi VWAgcBCY ftrnni ftaa hr, 

Thomas Muster returning a shot to Goran Ivanisevic in Melbourne. • 

_ 

K uiik Leads in Figure Skating! 

Reuters an competitor who now skates for Ger-] 

PARIS — Ilya Kuiik of Russia and many, produced a surprise by taking 
Viacbeslav Zagorodniuk of Ukraine put third place, and Philippe Canaeloro of 
poor qualifying displays behind them to 'France was fourth, 
dominate the men’s short program Vlascenko produced a triple axeK 
Wednesday at the European figure-skai- triple toe loop for the first time but 
ing championships. would not admit to being surprised M 

Kuiik, the 1995 champion, and Za- his result r 

gcrrodniuk, die champion last year, called - “I'm just happy with my place anjl 
cm their experience to gain, respectively, happy with what I did,” VlascenkB 
the top two places after skating far below said. 

their best in qualifying Sunday. Candeloro fluffed his short programs 

Fourth and sixth in their qualifying inlastyear’s European and world cham- 
group, both skaters performed die key pionships, finishing fifth and ninth ip 
element of die short program — ■ the ' those, and was determined to do better 
jump combination — superirty, each in front of his home fans, 
completing a difficult triple axel linked He also achieved the triple-triple bqt 
with a triple toe loop. - had a minor problem withtne subsequent 

‘’Sunday was worrying because I was triple lutz because of a foot ixtiury. - 

trying to do my best, but on another “I felt under pressure, but I’m glad to 

level I wasn't worried because I know . be fourth, and now I want to be in the tog 
r.ye.bemskatingweU,” said Kuiik, three,” he said. . 

wanp^r of the fitle.at, n.pgTus senior , ,.I£e mem’smedais.willbe decided in 
debuUwp.yeats ago, V , . i' : the free skating Thursday night. 

Zagdrodhiufc appeared near-perfect ^ Thff ’RiSSahs Alexei Y8|[tidm~fcn8 
but felt he had made some minor errors. Alexei Urmanov. the Olympic chant 
He was satisfied, however, with his pion, who missed bis combination, held 
triple-triple, the vital move that ruined fifth and sixth places* followed by tKj5 
the chances of other skaters. Ukrainians Evgeni Flhita and Dmitri 

Andrei Vlascenko, formerly a Latvi- Dmitrenko, the former champion. 


Old World Needs a New Champion to Capture the Ryder Cup 


■ International Herald Tribune 

T HE European golfers' tour has 
turned up in Australia, which is 
about 10,000 miles from where any 
mapmaker would have thought to look. 
The season begins Thursday with the 
Sl.l million Johnnie Walker Classic at 
Hope Island, Queensland, where Nick 
Faldo hopes to start claiming a place on 
this autumn's European Ryder Cup 
team. 

Faldo, the Englishman who won his 
sixth major title last year at the U.S. 
Masters, figures to play only seven in- 
ternational -fie Id events this season that 
could earn him points toward die Euro- 
pean 12-maD team. "If I do well in the 
tournaments that mean the most to me. 
I'll make the team,” Faldo said. If he 
doesn't qualify automatically from 
tournaments like the Johnnie Walker 
and the four majors, then Europe will 


European Golf / Bam Thom sen 

of its two captain prize money of £30 million ($50 mil- 
hitn. lion) this season, which isn’t entirely 


have to use one of its two captain 
choices to include him. 

When Faldo moved overseas two 
years ago to join the more lucrative and 
competitive U.S. Tour, he forced the 
European PGA to face up to an in- 
evitable transition. This year Faldo and 
other great Europeans like Seve Balles- 
teros (Europe’s Ryder Cup captain this 
year) and Bernhard Langer will turn 40: 
Ian Woosnara will be 39 but feeling 
older because of a chronic back prob- 
lem. Suddenly there are no certainties 
about the foundation of the European 
team that must defend the Ryder Cup in 
September at Valderrama, Spain, the 
first time the event will be played out- 
side the United Stales or Britain. 

The European Tour will offer record 


helpful. Last year the tour realized a 
dozen first-time winners, but none of 
them suggested the charisma or ded- 
ication of Faldo or Ballesteros. Rather, 
their success suggested that the Euro- 
pean Tour might be growing too 
quickly, providing great rewards 
against meager competition. Unless a 
couple of young Europeans make dra- 
matic leaps, or elders like Langer and 
Ballesteros rediscover themselves after 
their poor showings last year, it would 
seem that European golf is about to give 
itself up to a generation of interchange- 
able, unexceptional money-winners. 

The U.S. Tour was in a similar rut 
until Tiger Woods turned pro late last 


season. After nine tournaments he has 
won three times and is seventh on the 
U.S. Ryder Cup points list He isprovid- 
ing America with the same healthy jolt 
that Ballesteros brought to Europe two 


"I think we are hurting very badly 
from the loss of Jose-Maria OlazabaL” 
admitted Ken Schofield, the PGA Euro- 
pean Tour’s executive director. Foot 
problems have ruined the 30-year-old 
Spaniard's career since be won the U.S. 
Masters in 1994. 

Europe’s generational answer to 
Woods was expected to come from Gor- 
don Sheny, the enormous Scot who 
upstaged Woods while leading Britain- 
Ireland to an upset victory in the am- 
ateur Walker Cup. But Sheny foiled to 
earn his European Tour card for this 
year ancLmust settle for a more patient 
route to the top. 


The most viable hope remains Colu 
Montgomerie, the hefty 33-year-ofl} 
Scot who this weekend begins seekinga 
record fifth successi ve European money 
tide. In order to step up, Montgomery 
must win his first major tide after con- 
tending a couple of tunes. No one will 
be surmised when he does. 

At mis early stage, Europe’s top lj2 
Ryder Cup candidates include no major 
champions. For the next ample of 
months the tour will wander. like a ship 
blown off course through Australia, 
South Africa and Dubai before landing 
on the Continent on March 20 for the 
Portuguese Open. 

There will be a lot of comparatively 
easy points to be won in Europe this 
season. In September, for the first time 
in decades, it might turn out that cha- 
risma and ingenuity has shifted dr$' 
matically to the side of the Americans. 


NBA Standings 


Atlantic Dnnsnu 
W L 

29 11 

28 12 
20 20 
17 IP 
10 27 

9 27 

i B 31 

CENTRAL DIVISION 
35 5 


Miami 

MewYom 

Washington 

OrtemOo 

New Jencr 

Boston 

Phttodeffihta 

0*090 

Detroit 

Atlanta 

Omttotn 

aewtand 

Indiana 

Milwaukee 

Toronto 


WDWHST DTHSION 

W L Pet GB 
Houston 31 10 .754 — 

Utah 27 T3 JUS 3W 

Minnesota 18 22 450 12'4 

(Mias 13 25 JU2 14K 

Denver 11 29 .275 19% 

San AntODlO 10 27 .270 19 

Vancouver 8 33 .195 23 

PACIFIC WVEJCN 

Seattle 29 11 725 - 

LA. Liters 29 12 .707 V, 

Portland 23 17 STS 4 

Gaidai State 14 23 .410 12Vi 

soemmenUi 14 24 .400 13 

Ptwenh IS 25 J7S 14 

LA-CHppen 14 W 348 14 

nNSSAYMiauautt 

MMMtfta M 30 11 35-104 

TWWIo W 31 27 80—110 

ftt Robinson 4-T5 >5 2?. Oarett 8-1 J -M 
2ft T: wahm 12-20 2-2 32, Rogers M3 3-4 

24 Camhy 9-14 5-7 23. 

Reb ou o to -Minnesota 52 (O m ren lM, 
Taranto 47 Clones 10). AS*Ms— Minnesota 

25 (MartHuy 10), Toronto 37 (Stoudotnlre 

WM*gM U 24 70 N-88 

Orlando 28 20 M 21-93 

W: Stridden! 10-19 1-3 2). Howard 9-182- 
2 2ft O: Seftaly 9-15 B-14 24. HcnJOWny 8-19 
0-0 19. RetoanN-WaMTifitWi 49 (Webber 
131. CMcndo 54 BeHm* 1»- 
Assists— Washington 24 (Striddand II, 
Orimto 13 (Hardaway 41. 


pcj 

GB 

.725 

— 

700 

1 

SK 

0 

Ml 

70 

.270 

17Vi 

xrt 

IB 

MS 

201*i 

£75 



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6 

J&* 

8 

SIS 

12 

SS* 

12% 

J00 

15 

.487 

15% 

.359 

wot 

2W 

PCt 

GB 

.756 

— 

JUS 

3te 

.450 

124 

342 

14» 

275 

19% 

J70 

19 

.195 

23 

725 



.707 


STS 

6 

,410 

12Vi 


13 

J73 

14 

348 

14 


Allan to 19 28 10 24-91 

Miami 29 22 22 20-94 

A: Smith 8-174-5 21 Mutombo 4-4 1 1-14 19; 
Mi Hardaway 9-21 0-0 24, Lenard 4-11 1 -1 19. 
Retaonds— Atfanla 50 (Mutombo 
45 {Mourning 91. Assists— Atlanta 14 
(Bttn+xx 9). Miami 24 (Ha runway 11). 
Houston 28 17 33 30—106 

Onrtotte 30 27 27 38—114 

H: Chester 13- 199-9 39. (Mailman 11-344 
2& C RICO 13-25 14-14 12, Curry M7 3-3 23. 
Mbouah— Houston 35 {Ototywen 9), 
ChtuMtoA (Mason 9). Asststs— Hauston 18 

(Otajuwoa Dreader. Moloney 4). Charlotte 32 

(Segues 10). 

New York 23 23 IS 24— B7 

rwtm 33 21 20 14—88 

K.Y4 Earing 9-23 1-2 19, CMds 7-13 2-2 1ft 
C Jordon 18-30 10-1) 51. Plppen 4-15 1-1 
lSJtebouads— New York 52 (Earing 14), 
Chicago S3 (Ptppen 10). Assists— New York 
17 (Childs 4), ChEoago 23 (Pfppei 91, 

IntBOM 23 23 20 24-92 

MBanuKM 28 U 21 25-69 

I: Sntfs 12-20 1-2 2& MCKny 4-8 4-11 14 
Miller 4-12 *4 14- M: Robinson 10-19 8-6 29. 
Bafcnr 7-17 8-n 22. totnmds-tndiafla 49 
(Smtts 91. Milwaukee 48 (Baker 14). 

Assists— Mbno 24 (Rase III. Mflwoufaee 
16 (Douglas 9). 

ULOfepers 28 13 23 18—82 

Pttltana 29 22 38 19-100 

LA: Rogerc 5-1634 14 5eoty 3-10 7-8 13; 
P: Robinson 10.130-1 33. Sabonta 7-172-517. 
Katanas— L jbs Angeles 40 (VOugm. Onflow 
10), Portland 5S (Robinson 9). Assists — Las 
Anodes 16 (5ealy. Rogers 4), Portland 25 
(Anderson )2). 

DoflbS 24 19 2S 25-93 

CoidMSMte 26 » 24 35-105 

D. Jottun 8-19 44 22 Gcano 7-U) 45 1* 
Gi Sprewd 16-27 M 44 SmMi 8-13 5421. 
Retomts-Oete 54 (Gdfing A Golden Stoto 
44 UVUriRn 7L Asststs-Datos 19 WosMtwn SI. 
Gown State 23 Gtmwel W. 


NHLStammnqs 


NORTHEAST OunSlOM 

W L T Pts 6F a 
Pittsburgh 24 15 5 57 171 138 

BuMa 24 17 5 53 133 122 

Montreal 18 SI 8 44 153 ISB 

Hartford 16 20 7 43 131 145 

Boston 16 33 6 X 131 164 

Ottawa 14 21 B 34 119 128 

eevnui. otvanoN 

* L T Ms 6F GA 
Dallas 25 17 4 54 133 114 

Detroit 21 14 8 50 138 1 05 

SL Louis 21 23 4 44 137 151 

Pboenfr 79 23 * 42 125 150 

CNcogo 17 23 8 42 122 129 

Toronto 17 » 0 34 139 1«2 

MCmCDMSttM 

W L T Pis GF 6A 


Colorado 

Edmonton 

Vancouver 

Anaheim 

Gaigay 

ins Angeles 

San Jose 


28 11 8 44 160 108 

21 21 5 47 1S3 140 

21 21 2 44 UO 147 

17 22 5 39 125 134 

17 24 5 39 114 13S 

17 24 5 39 125 153 

16 23 5 37 113 141 


ATLANTIC OmsiON 

W L T Pts OP CA 
■ 27 13 6 <0 ISO 114 


PhflafeftMa 27 13 6 « 1» 114 

Baida 7k W 10 54 130 108 

H.Y. Rongtrs 23 19 7 » 145 IX 

New Jenny S3 16 5 51 117 1 11 

ttygNiwton 20 21 5 45 124 123 

18 21 * « 131 1C 
N,Y, islanders 13 23 7 35 iw 137 


raoMrs amen 

-NHL Surab0417t Tuesdays NHL Sutft$- 
ByAfP-r 

Calgary 1 I 1 — 2 

Ptn UWH li 1 1 9—4 

FH Parted: P-Lemtew 30 Wooltoy) 2. C- 
Tltovl6(Gegner. Fteuty) (pp). Strand Ported: 
P-HoMWll (Frauds, woobeyl (no). Thirt 
Ported: G-Gdgw 13 (tgMa. abxM & P- 
Boxnes 17,4. P-Prancis 18 CJSgr. Johansson) 
(en). Short on goat: C- 1B-13-20WS1. P- MO- 
4-24 Coate: C-KfchL P-leftne. 

NMlN HIM 

N.Y. Rangers 2 118-4 

Rrat Petted: E-Smyth 22 (Budibager, 
WMghn. 1 N.Y.-LWM1 13 CVoraMw, 
Beutebaom) ft E-Smyth 23 (Mironcu, 
w a t g ntl (ppl- A N.Y.-Lcctdi 13 (Voroblev. 
Graves) (pp). Second Prated: N. Y.-VMUev 
1 (LnetdV Drtvet) TfeM Parted: E-Kovalenko 
22 CAmoft vwrgtm (pp). 7. E-Sam 15 
(Czwkawsid, Artiett (pp). 8. N.Y.-M8sater24 
CVoraoter. Lnetch) OWlbon: None, stte on 
goat E- 12-9-14-S— 4ft N.Y.- 13-14. 17-3-44. 
Gates E-Joseph. N.Y.-H«fly. 

Dellas 1)10-3 

PMadalfltei 1110-3 

pinrPertotelMjMim9,ftP-,HawadMd( 
12 (Coney, Ntenoo) (pot. Second Parted: 
P-Reofaeg 10 (Undras) A D-Modnm i7 
(LBMteen. H0«a7 TOW Pwtote 04*jgu« Ifl 

(Ntouwendyk, VertTOtW ft P-LeCk* a 
(Cortay) owrftnra Neon. Shots am pad- D- 
14-10-04-35. P- 10-13^0-28. Gw Hre D- 
Mnog. P-Haadnfl. 


coterato ■ 2 • 8-2 

Tempo Boy 8 8 2 1— 3 

Ffesi Period: None. Second Prated: C-Locrobc 
14 iMDer. Krupp) 2. C-Seoeryn 1 (Young, 
Gusarov) TWrd Period: T-Seflvtmov 12 
(Ysebawt Anderson) 4. T-Gonton 17 
fXammer. Langkow) O rra ttn ej ft T-HeuMer 
2 (Ysebeori. SeOvam) Shots on pool: C- 5-9- 
3-0-17. T- 16-11-14-1—42. COOP as: C-Roy. 
T-Tcrirorocd. 

Mew Jersey 3 0 1 — 4 

fliujchrr f 8 j— j 

Ftnt Period: NJ.-Andreyeftuk 15 (HoOk. 
SutOtfon) 7. tU -Andreydnik 16 (HoBk. 
Semens) (pp). ft NJ.-HoGk 9 (Suflhron, 
Sitewnc) Second Ported: None. TIM 
Period: NJ.-Goerte 17 CZdepoMnl & Los 
Angdes, Lopentere 5 (Bag) Stats ea go* 
MJ-- 14-11-8-351 LA.-4-) 3-15-34 Gwdlrac 
NJ.-Bradeur. UL-RseL 


Austmu aii Open 

OreDNESaATS RESULTS 
MBI-S BMGLE& raURTOtmOLS 
Thomas Muster (51. Austria del. Goran 
Ncrnsrarfc {3L CroaSa, 6-46-2 63; Pete Sam- 
Dies U). U 5, fief. Albeit Casta (10), Spate, 6- 
36-7(5-7)6-1344-2. 

WCMtEN-S 3MGLE5 QUARTERFINALS 
Maty Joe Fen w Bdg (14), UA. del. Do- 
rntraque vs n Roast Betgim 7-5 #4 (re- 
tired);, Martino Hingis (4), Switzerland, det 
Irina Sslrteo &). Ronwnia 7-5 4-2. 

WOUBrS DOUBLES SENteNAlS 
Lindsay Davenport □), ui, and Lbs Ray- 
mond (3), rji, art. Larisa Nefland (2). 
LBMa ond Helena 5utaro (3), Cadi Re- 
public. 7.5 6.3. 


Ausredn ft South Keren 1 
Norway ft New Zealand C 


JotEKK WftUMB RYPCN CUP 

Lnedteg ebvtenga ter B» 1007 Jabante 
OMwr Byte Cup to b>pteywlS*pt- 28-21 M 
VW(teRwnMlnSotavan<te.S(Win.ThoraplO 
temhero quoNy tor ihe tftwwn teamn end 


UA cspttenTOm KM and European eeptehi 
Sew PeQ««wn» aech one two wfltHanf 


t. Torn Lehman 682000 pouts, 2. Davb 
Love 111 52SJMH 3- Marie Brooks 519.75ft 4. 
PM Mkteetean 487.001 S. Meek OWteora 
42000ft <L Scott Hoeh «HL28ft 7.TleerWood9 
4auwa B. Fred Couples 351.79ft 9. Stew 
sucker 34250ft 10. John Cook 341.000. U. 
Tommy ToBes 32ftfl0ft 12. Kenny Perry 
31155ft 13. Jeff Moggen 296^35, 14. Stew 
Jones 290A0ft 15. Juste: Leonard 283L500. 
nrton 

1. Cottn Montfloraerie, Sofltend X7JA&. 7. 
Ttkxnas atom Denroait I89J4ft 3. CostanO- 
no Races, Italy 170,997, a Darren Cteike. 
NOrittmi irekmd )6M)ft ft Per-UJtft jp- 
MRSSsn, Sweden uaosd, ft Miguel Angti 
Mnrtev Spolnl37^41.7. Jean vmde Velde. 
Franee 102,14ft a. Pau BroarantSL Enstend 
94144 9. Sam Tammen. Scottand B8JMS, 1 ft 
MlgualAngeUlaKn«z l 5pdnBftl9Ckll.Pe- 
twMDcheft Engtand 79^1412. Mate Davlft 
England 74JW. 13. Sew Baflesteros. Spate 
71,03ft M. Andrew CoRart, Scotland 47^92, 
15. Roger Ootuoan. Englaad4£407. 


MAJOR LEAGUE MSCBAU. 

MSi&KAM LEAGUE 

AHATCUft-AgnedloletnswllhLHPAllM 
Watson on l-ywcordrecJ ond OF Bemctfp 
Brito on minoMeasue c ontract. Re-signed 
Tori KBKftnmn imnapar lor Bote, nl. 

lALTtMOK-Aigreed to terms wffii RHP 
Terry Mathews. RHP Alan MKs and LHP 
Arthur Rhodes on 2-y»or contracts. 

MSitM—Agned to terms wdbgBJbflFiyt 
on l-yeareenhacT. 

p*n»fT— Named Aten Trammtil assb- 
tanl to basetraP operations. Agreed to terras 
with RHP WBteBtelr, RHP John Rossogren. 
RHP Todd Jones ond C Man Watbedi on i- 
r oira u mmJ L 

UMSASOTr— AgreadtotamsyrtlhlBBeb 
Homeflnon l-yw c cntraO . 

mh-wauum— A greed to terns with IB 
Omtd NlUan and RHP Col Eldred on 3-yew 
c wtfi e a Agreed hi terns wffii OF Meat 
M Irak* on l-ywcoffiraeL 
ouaJWS— Agreed to terms wffii 36 Bren 
Cotes on 1 -rear contract. 

xuraE—riornedOrioreJoGwianwnog- 
er ond Store Peck Ditching coocfl lor EveWL 
N L- Homed Dorrtn Darner manager and Cory 


Wbeeiock pdching orach tor Peoria, ML. 

TEXAS— Agreed to tuns wffii 3B Dean 
Palmer ond RHP Roger Pmflk on 1-year 
contract. 

TOUMnft-Agreed to terms wtto OF Jacob 
Bnmfield an 1 -year contract. 

MXnONALLSMUE 

a KCMNATt— Signed RHP Hector Conosco 
to 1-year contrara. Named DarreB Rodgers 
assistant genera) manager, Jerry Flowers 
scout and Marion Styles and Fate Young 
parMlne sands. 

Colorado— Signed RHP Curtis Lrafcric 
to 1 -year CMhad. 

HOUSTON— Agreed to terms wltti 38 Seon 
Berry, C Tory Eusebio and OF Janas Mw- 
ton on 1-yaaiteonfrods. Nomad Alyson Peeke 
coon&nlDrofDUlflCfllkxii 

LQSANCELES~Agretd to tonus wtti CMfte 
Pteezs «m 2-year cortrad- 

MOimsUi-SlBnadOFan HoytllHFOr- 
tendo Cabrera. INF Ryari McGuire. RHP 
MBre Unman, RHP Stove FaMsete 2B 
Mae Lansing ond RHP Dare Mow to J-fijr 
contracts, toultod RHP lm Smith to tratetog 

CDffift 

ra rLADELPHtA— Agreed to term* wffii OP 
Tony Uangnter on 1-yaui conn oa 

st. ifMtt— Agreed to term wffii SS Boyce 
Dayton on 1 -year contract 


Canedo’s Death 
Shakes Up Soccer 

By Rob Hughes r T^ i 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Hie death of Guillermo Canedo in 
Mexico on Tuesday deprives world soccer of its second 
most influential administrator. 


NATIONAL BASKETBAU.AS8OCUTKM 
new Jersey— A ctivated F Xautar Mc- 
Daniel from tutored fcf. Put F Reggie 

wnemsoatetumiBst. 

POCNBAUL 

IMINNAL FOOTOALLLEASUE 
atiar t a- Wo n ted Oart n ee ma i utft. 
bupfalo— R esigned Wode PIU^S, rte- 
femlweaiodi, to muW y e ui a wl nitt 
CHuago-NobhH Matt Cmaaaugh offer*- 
sivecoordteow. 

ST. LWB-Haraed OKX Vtnneg coadi and 
presMoot of tebtoal operations oral slgoed 
Mraa S -yearcanlrP C t 
TWKPA Mr-Named Richard MeNemey 


specialized in World Cup organization and television' 
rights, was a significant presence at the wodd soccer - 
since 196Z He headed the organization for two 
World Cups mhisowa country, in 1970uidI98& he fed 
tbe^mmittee for the 1998 WoridCiqimFhmce^lhewas 

. accelerate chMge-from Latin’ 

rule in soccer, which will come anyway with- 

«SS=^5Sftft«as;' 

orgamzatiofl and would be the natural successor But' 
Joh^sonisra^g for the FIFA Residency in 1998. 

for 2001; 




wtt^uspentlednusMngbraCcip)MteL.W 
Craig Berabe teriwa goam and aned hln 
SI JWO for steswng teddon t in totf Wednato 
days game ogaiait Ottawa. 

■osT o w-l to oBiled G Scan BaHey ham 
Prartjence, AHL. RmHl^wd G Evgeny 
RyabctPIcoe trom Cbariattc, ECKLto hw> 
Mancft 

Buffalo Renened C Wayne PMmewto 
Rochester, AHL. 


A last impression was of Canedo’s mliah 

a } most yonthful p 

out (he wheix w asked to s 

le^ *“■ ^ Prog^s so for wfll t> 


i ' • 













SPORTS 


for Dodgers Piazza, $15 Million Over 2 Years 


The Associated Prw • 

ij ^95 ANGELES — When catcher 

^%l >R ^ fiUCZagreedloaOTe - 

o' 65 naHion contract with the 
“ affect ® dtte lives of 

J Ca ? h ^¥ il “ Piazza and the Los 
£ngeles Dodgers, for example. 

• Obviously, it didn’t hurt at all ** 
** d ®l a D ? d 8» r Stadium ne^s 
was introduced as 
mo offee togtest-paid players in base* 
ball. We just rat like it was a ba- 
rometer we could use.” 
j. Piszza avoided a potentially acrimo- 
mous arbitration hearing with the 
Bodgws, agreeing to a $15 million, two- 
«ar contract. The agreement came 
Shortly _after the two sides exchanged 
arbitration figures and less than 24 
hours after Piazza’s agent sad he was 
upset with the team over the neeoti- 
db ons . * 


.'2 \ ‘ L 

M % ^ 

■If**- A 


1 ^dnk what happened is after the . salary arbitration. 


we ruled onr numbers, both^tt^sreal- 
tzoi a fair settlement was about $15 
million for two years,” said Dan Loz- 
ano, Piazza’s agent. ' 

- Pi a zza , 28, was second in the Na- 
no tte League MVP voting lain season 
h™md San Drao’s .Kea Cwnfai cL An 
Aii-Star ni each of his four seasons with 
&e Dodgers, Piazza hit 336 with 36 
owners and 105 RBIs in 1096. 

After having to beat out Carlos 
H e rnan d ez in spring framing fn h rwwty* 
^Dodgers’ first-string catcher in 
1993, Piazza was aunamnious selection 
NL Rookie of fee Year, hitting 318 
with 35 homers and - 112 RBIs. 

He 1ft 329 wife 24 homeis and 92 

RBb in 1994 and 346 wife 32 homers 
and 93 RBIs in 1995. 

Piazza submitted a $7.63 minium re- 
quest, the hipest eyer asked for in 


salary arbitration, topping fee $63 mil- 
lion. Jack McDowell asked from fee 
Chicago White Sox in 1994. 

The Dodgers countered wife an offer 
of $6-1 million — mostby a franchise in 
fee process until this year. Mike Muss- 
ina requested a $7.1 million salary from 
the Baltimore Orioles, who offered 
$635 million. 

Lozano said his side called fee 
Dodgem after fee pasties exchanged sal- 
ary requests, and negotiations then took 
about an hour. 

“We’re very happy and I think the 
Dodgers are very happy/* Lozano said. 
“Mike is to have fhi< done and 

put behind him for two years.” 

Piazza will earn $7 million tins sea- 
son and $8 million in 2998. He earned 
$2.7 million last season — fee final year 
of a $43 million, three-year contract, 
and is eligible to become a free agent 
following the 1998 season. 



The Oilers* wing Marhisz Cxerkawski chases down a rebounding pack blocked by Glenn Healy of the Rangers. 

ji 

Penguins Stretch Unbeaten Run to 14 


The Associated Fress 

One long unbeaten streak was ex- 
tended hi the National Hockey League, 
while another one came to an end. 

The Pittsburgh Penguins stretched 
fear streak to 14 games wife a 4-2 
victory over the visiting Calgary Flames 
Tuesday night, wife fee rookie goalie 
Patrick Latime stopping 49 shots to ran 
bis personal unbeaten sizing to 16. 

“You just go out there and you don’t 
know hour jt*s "going td L go/’ said 

r MIL toawto ■ - 

LalLme, off to fee besr carterstartof any 
goalie since NHL expansion in J967. 
.It’s just great what’s happening 
now.” • ■ ■ . 

But the Colorado Avalanche's club 
record 12-game unbeaten streak ended 
in a3-2 overtime loss at Tampa Bay. Bill ' 
flHoulder scored the game-winner wife 
r 2-38 left in overtime.. . . 

PiiQMtn»4, w — g Mario Lemienx 
left fee game with back spasms in the 
first period and didn't return. He was 
injured midway through fee period when - 
he crashed into fee net after getting tied 


up wife the Calgary defenseman Steve 
Chiasson. 


~ “1 don't know fee extent of it,” Pitts- 


burgh’s coach, Eddie Johnston, said. 
“Hopefully he’ll be ready to go on 
Thursday’* against Colorado. 

. UtfiMne 3, Avataacbo 2 The Light- 
ning rallied to win after trailing 2-0 
heading into tte tiurd period. 

Houkier’s screened root from the right 
point eluded the Avalanche goateEalridc 
Koy for the win and extended Tampa’s 
home unbeaten streak to six games. 

; Bad blood between Roy and Ditto 
CfccartlK, -dating back to test seven’s 
Western .Conference final; . dominated 
the first period- One' sequence started 
wife the pair stashing each othernear the 
Colorado net. After play stopped, Roy 
dropped his gloves and skated tp the blue 
line afterGccarelH. 

■_ **Hepuiictedme,aiidifthat’shisbest 
punch tell be in trouble sane day,” 
Koy said. Neitoer player received a pen- 
ally m tte incident. 

^m3,itin3 In Ph il ad el phia, Ben- 
qit Hogue’s, first goal in more titan a 
month helped Dallas tie the Flyers. 
Hogue, who hadn’t scored since Dec. 
18, also had an assist for tiie Stars. ■ 

Jere Lehtinen and Mike Modano had 
the other goals for the Stare, while Dale 
Hawerchuk, Mikael Renberg and John 
LeOmr scored fbrfee Flyers. 

Paul Coffey assisted on Phil- 


adelphia’s first goal, moving him past 
Goraie Howe into second place far as- 
sists in an NHL career, wife .1,050. 

OBars4,Ranoaf«4 In New York, Mark 
Messier scored wife 1:41 left in reg- 
ulation time to give tte Rangers a tie. 

Messier took a feed from rookie 
Vladimir Vorobiev and beat Curtis 
Joseph wife a slap shot fra- his 26fe goal 
of the season. Brian Leetch (two goals, 
two assists) and Vorobiev (one goal, 
three assists) each had four points fa the 
Rangers. 

Ryan Smyth scored twice for the Oil- 
ers. who also got goals from Andrei 
Kovalenko and Miroslav Satan. 

D*vtt* 4, Kings 1 Bobby Holik set up 
two goals by Dave Andreychuk and 
scored one himself during visiting New 
Jersey’s three-goal first period. 

Martin Brodeur, who got credit for tte 
Eastern Conference’s 11-7 victory in 
Saturday’s All-Star game, made 33 
saves and nearly became fee first goalie 
in the franchise's 23-year history to shut 
out tte Kings. But Ian Lapemerc con- 
verted a rebound of Aid Berg's shot with 
6d)8 to play, spoiling Brodeur’ s bid for 
bis 17th career sbutoaL 

Scott Stevens and rookie Steve Sul- 
livan each had two assists, helping end 
tte Kings’ five-game unbeaten streak. 


“I think it’s a good deal for both 
sides.” Piazza said of the agreement. 

“Unfortunately at times, this is a 
business. We’re still people. The money 
is great.” 

Piazza’s contract is fifth in average 
salary behind Albert Belle ($11 mil- 
lira), Ken Griffey Jr. (S8.5 million), 
Roger Clemens ($835 million) and 
John Smoltz ($7.75 million). 

_ More than two dozeD players settled 
either late Monday night or in fee final 
hours before the union and owners 
swapped figures. The biggest contracts 
went to Milwaukee catcher Dave Nils- 
son ($10.8 million for three years), 
Texas outfielder Dean Palmer ($4.8 
million) and Rangers’ pitcher Roger 
Pavlik ($235 million). 

Brewers’ pitcher Cal Eldred settled 
after the exchange, wife Milwaukee 
giving fee right-hander a $93 million, 
three-year contract. 


Ex-Lineman 
Wins Award 
Over Drugs 

Los Angeles Times Service 

SAN DIEGO — A federal court 
judge has ordered the NFL pension 
plan to pay Walt Sweeney, a line- 
man in nine Pro Bowl games. $1.8 
milli on after agreeing wife his al- 
legation that drugs given to him by 
team employees left him physically 
and psychologically disabled. 

“The NFL fed me full of drugs 
for years and years and years.” 
Sweeney, 55. said after fee decision 
Tuesday by Judge Rudi Brewster of 
district court. * ‘Basically, I feel it’s 
ruined my life.” 

During his career, Sweeney took 
copious amounts of steroids, 
amphetamines. codeine and 
Seconal, many of the doses given to 
him by trainers and coaches. He 
also smoked marijuana as a way to 
cope with tte pressures of fee win- 
at-any-cost attitude of the NFL. 

The pension plan trustees, who 
have fought a two-year battle wife 
Sweeney over the amount of his 
disability settlement, can appeal. 
Their attorney, Douglas Ell, de- 
clined to say whether they would. 

Sweeney's lawyers said they felt 
the case could open tte way for 


ers from the era when teams enter 
endorsed or tacitly condoned the use 
of performance-enhancing drags. 

“There are hundreds of players 
in a similar situation as Walt.” said 
Rhonda Thompson, a lawyer for 
Sweeney and tte wife of Broderick 
Thompson, offensive tackle of fee 
Denver Broncos. 

Sweeney, an All-American from 
Syracuse, played 11 seasons as an 
offensive guard and special teams 
player until the San Diegg Chargers 
and then two with the Washington 
Redskins as part of George Allen’s 
“Over the Hill Gang.” He started 
154 consecutive games and says he 
took drags before, during and after 
every one of them. 

His headfirst style of play made 
him a favorite of fans. He played in 
nine Pro Bowlgames and retired in 
1975 after suffering a knee injury 
feat could not be mended by sur- 
gery. therapy or more drugs. 



livavrr Lifjrri- r I ran* -—Pi- 

Patrick Ewing of the Koicks creating space as he grabs a rebound. 

Jordan’s 51 Points Prove 
Too Much for the Knicks 


The Assoc laud Press 

Leave it to Michael Jordan to outdo 
everyone else in the NBA — even on a 
night when several players had games 
that Jordan would be proud of. 

Jordan’s 51 points in fee Chicago 
Bulls’ 88-87 victory ova the New York 
Knicks were the most scored on a Tues- 
day full of big individual performances. 

Latrell Sprewell had 46 points for the 
Warriors. Glen Rice scored 42 and Clyde 
Drexlerhad 39 for the Hornets, and Walt 
Williams totaled 32 for the Raptors. 

Jordan's crowning moment came 
when be buried a 20-foot fallaway to 

NBA Roundup 

give the Bulls an 88-81 lead with 26.7 
seconds left 

After that, the Knicks got 3-pointers 
from Allan Houston and Chris Childs, 
but it wasn ’t enough. 

Warriors 105, Usvsricks 93 In San 
Jose, California, Sprewell backed his 
career-high point total wife 10 assists, 
six rebounds and five steals. ‘ ‘It was the 
best game I’ve seen him play,” said 
Chris Mullin. who scored 18 points for 
tte Warriors. “He dominated the game 
from start to finish. 

Homots 114, Rockets 109 In Char- 
lotte, North Carolina, Rice and Drexler 
were trying to outdo each other as the 
Hornets snapped the Rockets’ four- 
game winning streak. Rice shot 13-of- 
25 from tiie floor and 14-of-l6 from the 
free-throw line. Drexler was 13-for-19 
and 9-for-9. 

Raptors 116, Timberwolves 108 In 

Toronto, Williams tied a club record 
wife six 3-pointers and shot 12-of-20 
from the field. The Raptors shot a sea- 
son-high 55.7 percent from the field and 
made 12 of 20 3-point attempts. 

Magic 93, BuUats 88 Rony Seikaly 
scored 26 points in Orlando. Floridi 
and Penny Hardaway had a clutch 3- 
pointer and layup down the stretch for 
the Magic. Orlando went 10-for-ll 
from the foul line in the fourth quarter. 

Heat 94, Hawks 91 Miami, playing at 


home, sank 13 of 19 3-point attempts, 
including a pair by Tim Hardaway in fee 
final two minutes, to snap fee Hawks’ 
10-game winning streak. 

Pacers 92, Sticks 89 In Milwaukee. 
Rik Smits scored a season-high 25 
points, and Reggie Miller and Derrick 
McKey each had 14. 

Trail Blazers 105, Clippers 93 In Port- 
land. Oregon, Gifford Robinson scored 
23 points and grabbed a season-high 
nine rebounds in leading the Blazers to 
their ninth victory in 1 1 games. 

■ College Basketball 

Indiana, ranked 21st. beat No. 13 
Michigan, 72-70, despite fee absence of 
its leading scorer and rebounder, An- 
drae Patterson, who missed fee game 
wife a knee injury. 

The Hoosiers 1 1 6-4, 3-3 Big Ten ) had 
lost three of their last four games, in- 
cluding a 1 7-point blowout at Purdue on 
Saturday. Patterson injured his knee in 
practice Monday and wasn’t in uniform 
Tuesday night. 

No. 7 Maryland 103, Pem 73 Keith 

Booth scored 26, and Rodney Elliott had 
a career-high 22 as fee Terrapins (16-2) 
used a 20-4 second-half run to take over 
the game played at Baltimore Arena. 

No. 9 Cinomrniri 77, *LC. Charlotte 67 

Danny Fortson scored 30 points and 
grabbed 15 rebounds, and Ruben Pat- 
terson made three j)ig plays down the 
stretch for the visiting Bearcats ( 1 3-3, 3- 
0 Conference USA). 

Mo. 10 Duke 70, N.C. State 55 Jeff 
Capel had a season-high 25 points — 
including seven over the final 237 — as 
the visiting Blue Devils < 15-4, 4-2 At- 
lantic Coast Conference) teat the 
Wolfpack for fee 12th lime in their last 
14 meetings. 

No. 18 Colorado 74, Baylor 70 The 

Buffaloes (15-3, 6-0 Big 12) won their 
eighth straight, and it was in their first 
game as a ranked team in 28 years. 
Martice Moore, who scored 19 points, 
broke the game's final tie with a 3- 
pointer wife 1:17 left that gave the vis- 
itors a 71-68 lead. 






















f j/\i 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 

Political Ins and Outs 


Genius and Madness: The Real Hero of 6 Shine 5 


W ASHINGTON — What 
you saw at the inaug- 
uration the other day only did 
honor to the big shots — 
people named Clinton, Gore 
and Gingrich. In spite of what 
the commentators mid you. 
these titled 
people do not 
run the coun- 
try. Those who 
are really in 
charge weren’t 
even in Wash- 
ington that day. 

They were out 
on Ac side of BucbwM 
the Beltway 
visiting other bureaucrats 
who also had the day off. 

One of the most important 
people was Hal Riley. For 30 
years Hal 's main function has 
been going to meetings. As a 
matter of met. it is impossible 
to find him during the work- 
day because his secretary 
keeps telling everyone he’s in 
a meeting. 

Hal’s power comes from 
the fact he never makes any 
decision during the meetings. 
In fact, he has a swing vote 
that recommends another 


China to Impose 
Curbs on Nightlife 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China’s cul- 
tural mandarins will curb the 
building of nightclubs and 
video parlors in a drive to 
wipe out decadent culture and 
ideas, the state news agency 
Xinhua said Wednesday. 

“The cultural market can 
never be a hotbed for dec- 
adent ideology and culture,” 
Xinhua quoted a senior Cul- 
ture Ministry official. Meng 
Xiaosi. as saying. 

The China Daily said the 
cultural clean-up drive would 
help China's ideological and 
ethical undertakings. 


meeting be held to discuss the 
decision that could not be 
reached at the meeting that 
was in progress. 


Another power in town is 
Arnold Forst in the Pentagon. 
Arnold was the first one to 
come up with a square missile 
that could hit the enemy from 
Trump Tower. 

So far the missile doesn’t 
work. But nobody knows how 
to stop it from being man- 
ufactured. So every time the 
missile blows up. the Defense 
Department gives Arnold an- 
other medal. 

Fred Boatwright is prob- 
ably one of the most creative 
people in the country. He in- 
vented an IN box that, by 
turning it around, can become 
on OUT box. This break- 
through has made it possible 
for every branch of govern- 
ment to handle rejection of 
applications thai have to be 
adjudicated by a person sit- 
ting behind a G-6 desk. 

For example, if someone is 
applying for a Medicare hip 
operation, it would go to a 
health expert who never 
graduated from high school. 
She would put the request in 
her IN basket, then another 
person in the office would be 
able to turn it around so it 
became an OUT basket. Once 
in the OUT basket it could 
then be sent to Anchorage, 
Alaska, where a decision 
could be made. 


The government is made 
up of thousands upon thou- 
sands of people like this, all of 
whom missed the inaugura- 
tion. It is these people who 
make the capita) function so 
well. Bill Clinton should have 
given them credit in his in- 
auguration speech — but it 
wouldn’t have been political- 
ly correct. 


By Seth Mydans 

iVfHr York Times Service 


P ENRITH, Australia — Shoes off, head 
bowed nearly to the keyboard. David 
Helfgott winds his way back and forth 
through the phrases of a Chopin prelude, 
singing, sighing, making buzzing noises 
with his mouth, talking to himself. 

“Keep playing, keep playing," he mur- 
murs, his eyes half closed. “You’re playing 
nice now. Gentle. Gentle. La la ia la. Just 
play every note and you’ll be fine. Smile, 
smile, smile. Image is everything. Image is 
everything. At least you’re playing well. If 
you’re playing well, you can survive now, so 
what’s this fear of the future? Zhhhhhhh." 

Transported by the music, he lifts a free 
hand to conduct himself and smiles. 

This is a recording session, and the aud- 
itorium of the Joan Sutherland Performing 
Arts Center is empty, but Helfgott, 49, is 
hardly alone. The darkened sears are pop- 
ulated by his ghosts, and be plays to them. 

“Papachka,” he says, referring to his late 
father, the man whose obsessive love and 
cruelty were inescapable elemenis of his 
upbringing. “Papachka thought it should be 
different Well, they like your playing. They 
like your playing. This js the point the point 
the point if there is a point.” 

In recent weeks Helfgott’s troubled past 
has returned in force to transform his life. A 
movie about him. “Shine." is a critical hit 
(Geoffrey Rush, who portrays the pianist as 
an adult just won the Golden Globe Award 
for best actor), and suddenly Helfgott is at 
the center of attention. He seems to love it 
He is here in the darkened auditorium, 
recording tracks for a second compact disc of 
his music, and as soon as he stops playing, he 
is surrounded by his manager, his piano 
coach, his wife and a television crew mat is 
preparing a report in advance of an American 
tour beginning in March. 

Helfgott has stopped playing, but he re- 
mains in motion, shuffling rapidly from one 
person io another like a fly bouncing from 
one lighted windowpane to another, hug- 
ging. kissing, chattering as he goes. “Awe- 
some, awesome. America is awesome.” he 
murmurs. “You'll be fine. You'll be fine. 
The worry’s the killer: the worry’s the big 
killer, isn’t it. Don’t worry. Don’t worry.” 
Helfgott’s wife and protector, Gillian, 
called his new popularity “a victory over the 
past” and said it seemed to have lifted some 
of the burden of pain from his shoulders. 




OMga H6<*/Th* N« VakTi 

David Helfgott, whose story is told in “Shine,” at tbe piano in Australia. 


‘ ‘Genius and madness,’’ she said, describ- 
ing a theme of the movie and of her hus- 
band’s life. “Someone once called David a 
genius and he replied. ‘Yes. but it doesn't 
come cheaply.’ ” 

“Shine,” directed by Scott Hicks, has 
been embraced by audiences for its deft and 
often humorous depiction of artistic obses- 
sion and the crushing of a psyche. As a result. 
Helfgott’s conceits in Australia have become 
sellouts, and a recording of his music bas 
climbed high on both classical and pop music 
charts in the United States and Britain. 

On his 10-moiuh tour, he will per f o r m in 
March in Boston, New York and Los Angeles 
and go on to Canada, Europe and Asia. 

The film is a remarkably faithful recount- 
ing of Helfgott’s life: his childhood of mu- 
sical accomplishment and parental cruelty; 
his decade in mental institutions, away from 
music, and his halting return to the piano, 
first in a wine bar in his hometown of Perth, 
and then, triumphantly, onstage again. 

The portrayal of Helfgott by Rush, an 
Australian actor who is also a pianist — and 
who spent just five days with him — is 
uncannily accurate, with all its hyperkinetic 
warmth and self-aware humor. 

“It’s the greatest movie ever made.” 


Helfgott exclaimed, delighted with the por- 
trayal. 

The crucial trauma of Helfgott’s youth 
seems to have occurred when his father 
blocked an invitation from tbe violinist Isaac 
Stem for the boy to study music in the United 
States. When the teenage David did leave at 
last to study at the Royal College of Music in 
London, his father disowned him. 

Months later, after a successful perfor- 
mance of his father’s favorite piece, the 
demanding Piano Concerto No. 3 by Rach- 
maninoff, Helfgott suffered a mental break- 
down sent him into institutions. Doctors 
gave him electroshock therapy and for years 
forbade him to play die piano. 

“I’m lucky to be alive, lucky to be alive.” 
Helfgott said as he played at die recording 
session. “I've been through hell, been 
through bell, keep s milin g, keep smiling, 
keep smiling You have to rem e mber I came 
from hell. I’m going to heaven. Dad’s in 
heaven, but he's proud.” 

What was his father like? 

“Well, my daddy was different from any 
other man in die world.” Helfgott said “Dad 
can’t help it. Dad can’t help iL He was de- 
manding, but tbe point was, keep to the point, 
keep to the point, I should say that Dad was 


and cruel, cruel. crueL” 


released by Penguin m the United states, 
Mrs. Helfgott describes her husband’s life in 
what he calls the “heaven” of their rural* 
home in Promised Land, two hours north- 
west of Sydney, -where she said be plays the 
piano at least six hours a day. 

His pleasures away from the piano include 
sw imming in their large" pool, and traffic 
jams, which, to die amusement of his wife 
and friends, he adores. 

“I love traffic; I love traffic,” he said the 
other day as Mrs. Helfgott, an astrologer IS • 
years his senior, drove him to the recording’ 
session. “Traffic is very important, and it 
shouldn’t be ignored," be said. “You have to 
be alert, because fhere’sapattem in the traffic * 
and it helps you to concentrate and to relax. 
It's very important to enjoy the journey.” 1 

Helfgott remains on a medication called 
Seranace for a psychological disorder that 
doctors have found difficult to name. “He is 
not schizophrenic or manic-depressive,’' 
Mrs. Helfgott said. “He is never depressed. 
He’s just a delightful eccentric." 

To polish hi $ playing and help keep him * 
focused at tbe piano, Helfgott meets reg- 
ularly with a piano coach, Mikhail Solovei, 
who heads the department of piano at the 
Melba Cooservatorimn in Melbourne. 

“I have never seen anything like this in 
my life,” said Solovei. who spent years as a 
concert pianist in Russia. “After the movie, 
everyone wants to hear him, everyone wants ' 
to see him. It’s something enormous.” 

The intimate mood of the movie seems to 
have created a sense of personal involvement 
in his audiences, Mrs. Helfgott said. 

“Some people like to sit in the front row, 
and if they can catch some of what he says, 
they get quite excited.” she said. 

One listener recalled with delight a con- 
cert at which Hetfgott paused briefly as he 
played, muttered, “Here comes a hard part,” 
and plunged ahead. 

For all Ids obvious pain and fragility, it is 
another rare quality that draws people to 
hmv his childlike warmth and affection. 

“He is absolutely lovable, though very 
fragile, that’s true,” said Solovei. “I would 
say he is a happy character. Maybe not all the 
way down: maybe some way down is foe 
tragedy. Sometimes for no reason, some- 
times be can start crying. But it goes away 
very quickly. The happiness is not a fake. He 
really has this very dunning personality.” 


BOOKS FOR COOKS 


PEOPLE 


The Proof of the Pudding Is in the Reading 


By Suzanne Hamlin 

New Kvfc Times Service 


IN books foe way murder-mystery fans 
go through Sue Grafton or Elmore Leo- 
nard and military mavens scoop up Tom 
Clancy. Some cannot resist taking the 
latest cookbook into the kitchen to see 
what promises it will keep. Others just 
read and dream, letting their minds do the 
measuring and mixing, the greasing and 
grilling, the slicing and sauteing. 

"I can’t even pass by a cookbook 
without picking it up. fondling it and 
cooking from it in my head." said Pat 
Adrian, who, as editorial director of the 
cookbook divisions of foe Book-of-foe- 
Month Club, oversees the largest cook- 
book club in the world. 

Like her colleagues in the book busi- 
ness. Adrian is committed to a genre in 
which, she says, “learning never 
stops. ' ’ There is no shortage of learning 
in this small but expanding part of the 
publishing industry. And the subjects, 
from healthy meals to haute cuisine, are 
as diverse as foe page-staining public. 

This publishing season, for example, 
just when eaters thought it might be safe 
to go back to meat and potatoes or at 
least to the moderate zone, along came a 
crop of books dealing with low-fat, 
lower-fat and no-fat foods. Balanced of 
course, by books offering full-fat re- 
cipes and* idyllic accounts of French 
farmhouse life. 

In 1 995. the last year for which figures 
are available, an estimated 400 hard- 
cover and soft-cover cookbooks were 
introduced by mainstream publishers in 
foe United States, adding to the large 
pool of back titles still in print, according 
to the American Booksellers Associ- 
ation, an industry group that represents 
4300 retail bookstores. The 400 titles do 
not include several hundred self-pub- 
lished books and community cookbooks 
from garden clubs, historical societies 
and nonprofit groups, all of which, while 
hard to track, add to the avalanche. 

Sales of mainstream cookbooks in the 
United States totaled nearly S42 million 
in 1995. or 4.1 percent of total book 
sales < fiction accounted for 50 percent 



Libndu RonrfvwThr ISen YuATimt* 

Bookseller Cheng and her wares. 

of sales), foe booksellers' group said. 
That was down S3 million from 1994. 
the peak year for cookbook sales, it said. 
But several book editors and sellers said 
that the 1994 figure had been helped by 
foe sale of 8 million copies of "In the 
Kitchen With Rosie"’ (Alfred A. 
Knopf), a low-fat diet book by Rosie 
Daly, who was Oprah Winfrey’s cook. 

Buyers are becoming younger. “For 
years, the highest number of cookbook 
buyers was always in the 55-to-64 
group.” said Sandy Paul, managing 
agent of the Book Industry Study Group, 
a nonprofit group based in Manhattan. 
“In 1993. the -MMo-44-year-old group 
started to catch up. Now. they're tied.” 

So. where are the other segments of 
the cooking and reading public — 
people 45 to 54, not to mention those in 
their 20s or 30s or 65 or older? 

“Not in this store." said Ellen Rose, 
the owner of the Cook’s Library in Los 
Angeles, a cookbooks -only store that 
stocks 3.000 titles. Rose says she is one 
of her own best customers. The only way 
she can unwind from a day of matching 
up customers and books, she says, is to 
go home and cook — from a book. 

"For me. the recipes have to work." 
she said. "Books should be written so 
people can cook successfully." 





But Nach Waxman, an owner of Kit- 
chen Aits and Letters in Manhattan, puts 
less emphasis on recipes. ‘ ‘What I want 
is a book thai enlarges the sphere of 
knowledge somehow,” he said. ‘ ‘There 
are great books like Paula Wolfert’s that 
make a real contribution to anthropo- 
logical research and books that explain 
new ingredients or techniques. And 
there are very personal books, like Bert 
Greene’s, that are so full of vigor and 
joy and energy. 1 get a kick every time I 
open them.” (The book. “Greene on 
Greens." was published by Workman 
in 1988.) 

Rose hires cooks to test new books so 
that customers can sample dishes. “It’s 
a pretty direct way of making a de- 
cision,” she said. 

Lydia Cheng, owner of Books for 
Cooks, a mail-order catalogue company 
with access to 3,000 titles, recently began 
selling cookbooks at a Manhattan kit- 
chenware store. “I’m not really a cook; 
I'm a professional eater," said Cheng, 
whose husband, Nick Staskiewicz, is a 
chef, as are many of her customers. 

“Chefs like highly visual books, with 
lots of great color photographs," she 
said. “They don't cook from them as 
much as they use them for ideas." 

For those permanently seduced by 
cookbooks, the good news is that more 
are on the way. The category is nowhere 
near the saturation point, editors and 
sellers say. 

What titles would sellers like to see? 
Rose said there is not a comprehensive 
beginner’s book with photos, by a re- 
spected cook. “Or a really good book on 
braising, which you can do ahead of 
time,” she said. 

Adrian, who picks books for foe 
Book-of-foe-Monfo Club based on her 
preferences and readers' requests, said: 
“We still need a shrimp cookbook. Like 
chicken, you can do anything with 
shrimp. And a yummy pressure-cooker 
book with meat, not just vegetables. 
And definitely, a book of one-pot pro- 
tein meals.” 

Taylor cited a need for “more ethnic 
books, particularly on 1 ^rin American 
food." an idea strongly echoed by Wax- 
man. 


S HE was the ultimate Cosmo girl for 
32 years, but now Helen Gurley 
Brown is making way for a new gen- 
eration. Tbe venerable editor-in-chief of 
Cosmopolitan stepped down with the 
February issue and was succeeded by 
Bonnie Fuller, a 40-year-old Canadian 
who successfully launched the Amer- 
ican edition of the fashion and beauty 
magazine Marie Claire. Fuller promises 
to maintain foe magazine’s emphasis on 
practical advice on relationships, work, 
fashion, health, beauty and sex. But foe 
look is being freshened, and Fuller ap- 
pears determined to bring a new edge to 
Cosmo’s articles, with pieces on HTV 
and sexual harassment in the works. 
One Brown tradition is already out: “No 
centerfolds," Fuller said firmly when 
asked the fate of Brown's male p inops. 
The February issue features two, for a 
total of six since Burt Reynolds posed 
in 1972. Brown, 74, will continue to 
oversee the magazine’s 29 international 
editions. Under her leadership. Cosmo- 
politan became the best-selling wo- 
men’s magazine in the world. 


Women’s Wear Daily announced 
Wednesday that John Fairchild, Us le- 
gendary chairman, would step down in 
March on his 70th birthday, although be 
will continue to write his column. He 
will be succeeded by Patrick Mc- 
Carthy, who is currently executive ed- 
itor of Fairchild Publications and is in 
Paris covering foe couture shows. 
Fairchild, whose acerbic critiques put 
foe once trade-only paper on foe map is 
known for coining some catchy phrases, 
among them “fashion victim" to de- 
scribe women wearing overelaborate 
designer ensembles, and “nouvelle so- 
ciety” to describe the New Rich in New 
York in the 1980s. 


The Nobel Prize-winning poet 
Seamus Heaney has won foe Whitbread 
Book of the Year Award for “The Spirit 
Level," his fust collection of poems for 
five years. “Other poets admire him to 
foe level of idolatry,” said the writer 
Malcolm Bradbury, chairman of foe 
Whitbread judging panel. “He is the 
poet of poets.” Over three decades. 
Heaney has built a reputation as the 
English language’s greatest living poet. 



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Helen Gurley Brown of Cosmo. 

reflecting foe wild beauty of Ireland and 
passionate contradictions of his native 
Northern Ireland. He won tbe Nobel 
literature prize in 1995. Tbe Whitbread, 
Britain’s richest literary prize, includes 
a cash award of £2 1.0CK) ($33,000). 


Unesco awarded its 1996 peace prize 
Wednesday to two Guatemalans — 
President Alvaro Arzu and die rebel 
leader Rolando Moran — for signing 
an accord ending decades of bloodshed 
in the Central American state. Henry 
Kissinger, the former U.S. secretary of 
state, who presided tbe jury at Unesco’s 
Paris headquarters, described foe dual 
award as “an unprecedented step” to 
honor foe men for agreeing to end the 
36-year civil war, in winch 140,000 
people died or “disappeared.” The Fe- 
lix Houpbouet-Boigny peace prize is 
worth 800,000 francs ($145,000), to be 
shared between the two men. 


The former British pop star Cat 
Stevens, who converted to Islam and 
gave up his music career in foe 1970s, 
says he plans to produce a recording of 


Bosnian music with two songs written by 
himself. Stevens, who now calls himsejf 
Ynsuf Islam, told a news conference in 
Sarajevo that he was impressed with 
mosic he heard while in Bosnia. The 
album would mark hisfirst venture into 
songwriting and singing in 18 years. 


Five directors have been nominated 
by foe Directors Guild of America as 
candidates ' far top honors at* its 49th 
annual awards ceremony, to be held 
March 8. The nominees are Anthony 
Minghella for “The English Patient”; 
Joel Coen for “Fargo”; Cameron 
Crowe for “Jerry Maguire”; Mflre 
Leigh for “Secrets & lies’ and Scott 
Hicks for “Shine.” Left off the list was 
MQos Forman, who won the Golden 
Globe Award for directing “The People 
vs. Larry Hym.” The Directors GmEI.* 
honors generally have been an accurately' 
barometer for the Oscars. Only four- 
times since 1949 has the winner of tbe 
guild’s award for directorial achieve-! 
tnent failed to win the Academy Award 
for best director. 


Robert Reich is putting students first 
again. The former secretary of labor will 
become a professor at Brandeis Uni- 
versity's Graduate School for Advanced- 
Studies in Social Welfare, which offers 
courses on policy areas including 
health, families and labor. Reich, 50,' 
was rax foe faculty at Harvard before the? 
1992 presidential election and helped 
write “Putting People First,” a book hi 
which foe future president charted his 
economic strategy for the nation. ! 


More than 30 years after surviving a 


foe ABC News correspondent JacK 
Sooth has been honored with a Bronze 
Star. In a ceremony in ABC’s news- 
room, Brigadier General Hank 
Thorpe pinned the medal on Smith, 51. 
who was wounded in both legs duritt. 
foe Battle of la Drang Valley in 1965? 
Smith, presumed dead, was used by an 
enemy soldier as a shield. While he 

befnjT shot by the jjfoith Vietnamese. 
Smith said, American troops fired, miss- 1 
ing him but killing the enemy soldier. \ 


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