Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


1 



He Gave Away Millions , Secretly 

For 15 Years, U.S. Philanthropist Took No Credit 


By Judith Miller 
and David Cay Johnston 

— Nov York Times Service 

NEW Y ORK — Over the last 15 years, a self-made 
New Jersey has ghSay 

^fiSSuT to un^osities, medical crated and other 
^etomes — but has done it in such secrecy that most 
who benefhaorwas. 

«ri n ? iSy** 9^“ Feeney, who made his fortune with a 
ai ? port i 5ho P s ’ covered his tracks so well 

mdis 


Alter years of secrecy, tee 65-year-old Mr. Feeney 
agreed this week to discuss his gifts because the duty-tree 
stores were sold this monte to LVMH Moet Hennessy 
Louis Vuitton of France and a lawsuit over tee sale would 
have revealed his anonymous donations. 

. Mr. Feeney — who ha* strong ties to Ireland and V ig nlw 
g u ide many gifts there, including personal donations to 
Sinn Fein, tee IRA’s political wing — was matter-of-fact in 
describing why he bad given away his fortune. “I simply 
decided Ifrad enough money," he sa id . 

- "It doesn't drive my life. I’m a what-you-see-is-what- 
you-get kind of guy." 

Harvey Dale, a New York University tax law professor 


See DONOR, Page 6 


Swiss Agree to Set Up Holocaust Fund 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 


be interpreted as a premature admission 


_ BERN — - After months of pressure 
from American Jewish groups to atone 
for wartime dealings with Nazi Ger- 
many, the Swiss government, hanlra and 
big business interests agreed in prin- 
ciple for the first time Thursday to es- 
tablish a Holocaust memorial fund in 
what a senior official called "the hu- 
manitarian traditions of Swi tzerland- " • 
Previously, tee Swiss authorities had 
resisted the idea of helping in the cre- 
ation of a compensation fund that could 


of guilt for wartime misdeeds. 

• In a statement after a cabinet 


- In a statement after a cabinet meeting 
last night, however, die government left 
open the question of its own financial 
participation, but. it indicated it no 
longer excluded the idea once the na- 
tion’s wartime record had been clari- 
fied. The size and purpose of the pro- 
posed fund also remained unclear. 

Swiss officials nonetheless portrayed 
tee statement as a breakthrough, saying 
it showed teat Switzerland was, in the 
words of one official, “open" to a 
fimd.’’ 


"This is a major step,” said Thomas 
Borer, a Swiss diplomat who leads a 
government task force created to deal 
with the crisis over Switzerland’s his- 
tory of gold transactions with Nazi Ger- 
many and its handling of dormant K»« v 
accounts set up by Jews who sub- 
sequently died in tee Holocaust 
American Jewish groups who have 
been pressing Switzerland to set up a 
fund to help needy Holocaust survivors 
said the government’s apparent policy 
shift "appears to suggest that (bey are 



See SWISS, Page 6 


U.ul|il«‘tpvr faft-IV. 

Tung Chee-hwa during bis news conference Thursday in Hong Kong. 


OIL, VIDEOTAPES AND THE WHITE HOUSE 


For Occidental, an Exemption For Clinton, a Thai Connection 


By David B. Ottaway 

Washington Post Serme ' '■ 


WASHINGTON. — Four months after President 
Bill Clinton signed a law barring financial trans- 
actions between American corporations and coun- 
tries accused of supporting terroris m , the admin- 
istration quietly exempted one- such country — 
Sudan — • where an American oil company was 
seeking a stake in. a -$930 million oil deal, ac- 
cording to federal officials and documents. 


policy of restricting U.S. commerce with seven 
countries blacklisted by the State Department. 
Those, on. tee list are Iran, Sudan, Syria, Cuba, 
Norih Korea, Libya and Iraq. 

Two years ago. Mr. Clinton forbade any Amer- 
ican oil company transactions with Iran. Admin- 
istration officials had long described Sudan as 
second only to Iran as a staging ground for Islamic 
extremists involved in subverting neighboring pro- 
U-S. governments. The U.S. government accused 
Sudan, of involvement in an attempt to assassinate 


By Christopher Drew and Jeff Gerth 

New York Times Senice 


The exemption last August fo: tee 1996 Aat^ Itotidbpt Hosni Mubarak of Egypt in 1 995 and has 


Terrorism Abt^v which Mr. . Qmtpo signed wife 
much fanfare in April, cleared the 'way for Oc- 
cidental Petroteum Corp. to negotiate with the 
Khartoum government. 

The company, based in California, won tee 
exception despite tee administration’s avowed 


pressed for tougher United Nations sanctions 
against Khartoum. 

A State Department official, who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity, insisted that tee exemption for 


See OIL, Page 6 


WASHINGTON — Maria Haley, a longtime 
aide to President Bill Clinton who is now an 
appointee of his at the Export-Import Bank, tried 
last year to push through an unusual $65 million 
financing deal sought by a woman whose large 
donations to the Democratic Party are under in- 
vestigation, interviews and government records 
show. . 

The proposed deal called for the government 
bank to help a company controlled by one of 
Thailand’s wealthiest families finance a Block- 
buster video store franchise in Bangkok. 

Officials of the bank say the proposal initially 
ran into stiff resistance because it seemed to fall 
outside tee mandate of tee institution, whose chief 


See BLOCKBUSTER, Page 6 


Canada Sets 
14-Point Pact 
With Cuba 


AGENDA 


By Douglas Farah 

Washington Post Service 


; HAVANA — - Defying U.S. efforts to 
isolate the government of President Fi- 
del Castro, Canada has announced a 14- 
point agreement with Cuba that pledges 
cooperation on human rights andseeks 
to shield foreign investors targeted for 
punishment by Washington. . 

, In a join* statement here the two for- 
eign ministers, Lloyd Axworthy of 
f!an«rta and Roberto Robaina of Cuba; 
said Wednesday teat tee two countries 
had agreed to "broadening and deep- 
ening cooperation' on the issues, of hu- 
man rights “ tooughjon^ seminars here 
and in Canada- and “academic ex- 
changes between officials, .profession- 
als and experts.” 

- Neither Mr. Axworthy nor Mr. 
Robaina spelled out exactly what that 
would mean in practice. 

The agreement also calls for unspe- 
cified cooperation in combating tee 
Hetms-Bunon Act, a US. law aimed at 
pu nishin g foreign companies that do 
business with Cuba. In addition, t he tw o 
countries agreed to increase cpoperatton 
in combating drug trafficking and in- 
ternational terrorism and broade n ing e co- 
nomic ties. Canada .pledged to provide 
Cuba with food and medical aid. 

Despite its lack of specifics, the 
agreement amounts t0 . 
commitment yet by a major US. auy to 
work closely with tee Castro govern- 
ment; and it represents tee sharpea di- 
vision yet between W as hingt on and Ot- 
tawa over Cuban policy. . 

[ President Bill Clinton on Thursday 



PepsiCo to Spin Off Its Fast-Food Business 


PepsiCo Inc. said Thursday it planned to spin off 
its sluggish restaurant business, which includes the 
KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell fast-food chains, into 
a separate company and focus on its faster-growing 
soft drink and snacks operations. 

PepsiCo shareholders will receive shares of the 
new company, which will rank just behind Mc- 
Donald’s Corp. among U.S. fast-food chains, with 


more than $20 billion in combined sales, and will be 
the biggest in terms of units, with about 29.000 
restaurants. PepsiCo said. 

Pepsi’s shares rose S2.25, to $34.25. in active 
trading on the New York Stock Exchange as share- 
holders anticipated the spin-off. One or another of the 
chains has regularly run into trouble — dragging 
down earnings or creating write-offs. Page 13. 


2 Veterans, Pickering and Eizenstat, Named to State Dept. 


Thomas Pickering, the veteran American diplomat 
who recently retired as ambassador to Moscow, has 
been called back into service as undersecretary of 
state for political affairs, the third-ranking job in the 
State Department 

Secretary of State Madeleine Albright also chose 
Stuaxt Eizenstat, a commerce undersecretary who 
has mostly recently been toiling to persuade Amer- 


ican allies to join Washington in isolating Cuba, as 
undersecretary for economic affairs. 

Tbe selection of Mr. Pickering and Mr. Eizenstat is 
seen as an encouraging message to Foreign Service 
officers — and as message to other departments that 
State intends to take the lead in matters that Mrs. 
Albright's predecessor. Warren Christopher, might 
have ceded to them. Page 3. 


Blue Chips Fall 94 Points 


THE BIRDWOMAN — One of the fantastic 
images from Thierry Mugler, whose show 
closed the Paris couture season. Page 20. 


Books — : 

Crossword 

Opinion .... — — — 

Sports 


Page 9. 


— Pages 8-9. 

Pages 18-19. 


Wall Street suffered a sudden fall at the close of 
trading Thursday on record New York Stock Ex- 
change volume, raising fears that the gains of the last 
two years may have peaked. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 94.28 
points, or 138 percent, to 6,755.75, while volume 
reached a record 683.8 million shares. 

“Essentially what we’ve got is a sense that this 
could be the commencement of a real reversal,” an 
analyst said. On Thursday, “many professionals left 
the office with a sense of surprise at tee severity of 
sell programs," he added Page 13. 


RAGE TWO 

LovcelL, an Old Mill Town, Mourns Tsongas 


THE AMERICAS P»g»3. 

ABC Network to Appeal 55.5 Million Ruling 


ASlA/mCIFIC Pass 4. 

OECD Rebukes South Korea Orer Labor Law 


EUROPE 


Pass 5. 


EV Says Ban on British Beef Applies to Haggis 


INTERNATIONAL 

Atmosphere of Fear Hangs Orer Algeria 


Pags 6. 


New Leader 
Supports Cut 
In Rights for 
Hong Kong 


He Says That Repeal 
Of Civil Liberty Laws 
Will Help Community 


By Edward A. Gargan 

AVm li’ft Time ' l 5,-r; li t' 


HONG KONG — In the face of cri- 
ticism over China's intention to roll 
back laws protecting a range of civil 
rights in Hong Kong, the man who will 
rule the territory under Chinese sov- 
ereignty declared his support Thursday 
for repeal of the laws. 

After the recommendation Sunday by 
a Beijing-appointed body that a series of 
laws, including core provisions of Hong 
Kong's Bill of Rights, should not stand 
when Hong Kong reverts to Chinese 
rule on July I, both Britain and the 
United States issued statements of dis- 
may over the move. 

Here in Hong Kong, a range of le- 
gislators. leading lawyer* and the ter- 
ritory's rambunctious press expressed 
alarm over Beijing's action. 

But it was not until Thursday that 
Tung Chee-hwa. a tough-talking former 


Hong Kong supporters in Congress 
won*}’ protests are too weak. Page 4. 


mission is to provide low-cost government fi- 
nancing to encourage exports and thereby support 
jobs in America. 

But Ms. Haley, a former White House official 
who by then had become one of tbe bank’s di- 
rectors. prodded its staff to support the project, and 
the deal won approval from one group of bank 
officials before collapsing amid unresolved ques- 
tions about the franchise's operations. 

The project was put together in large pan by 
Pauline Kanchanalak. a Thai businesswoman who 
attended an important meeting of Export-Import 
Bank officials at Ms. Haley's office last summer. 
Last year. Mrs. Kanchanalak has said, she and her 
relatives donated more than S200.000 to the Demo- 
cratic Party, most of which was later returned 


shipping tycoon chosen by Beijing to 
rule Hong Kong, declared his support 
for China's intentions. 

Two of the laws that China will void 
include reinstating authoritarian colonial 
legislation restricting the right to potest 
demonstrations and requiring the ap- 


proval to set up political organizations. 
“The key question here for the com- 


“The key question here for the com- 
munity to debate is what is more im- 
portant to the community — social order, 
inconvenience caused to the public at 
large or individual rights," Mr. Tung 
said at a high-society dinner organized by 
two leading newspapers. Sing Tao and 
the Hot® Kong Standard. "1 believe it is 
important to get tee right balance be- 
tween individual rights and social order 
for the good of the entire community.'' 

As he has in the past. Mr. Tung re- 
peatedly stressed tee need to subjugate 
individual rights, whether expressed in 
tee form of protest or through demo- 
cratic institutions, to “the good of the 
public at large. * ’ a good to be determined 
by a strong, executive-led govemmenL 

China's move to return to authoritarian 
colonial legislation that had been suc- 
cessively repealed by Hong Kong's elect- 
ed legislature in recent years has drawn 
protests from London and Washington. 

On Wednesday, the Chinese ambas- 
sador to Britain, Jiang Enzhu. was 
summoned to the Foreign Office to be 
told of London’s unhappiness over 
Beijing's intentions toward the laws. 

"We see no need or justification for 
changing teem." said a Foreign Office 
spokesman. ’ ‘The proposal to do so has 
caused widespread dismay in Hong 
Kong and around the world." 

A U.S. State Department spokesman, 
Nicholas Bums, said the Clinton ad- 
ministration was equally dismayed over 
China’s approach to the existing Hong 
Kong laws. 

“We’re deeply concerned over any 


See HONG KONG, Page 6 


The Dollar 


New Yortt 

DM 

Pound 

Yen 

FF 


Thursday close 

1.6324 


previous dose 
1.6409 
1 6363 
118,935 
5.5388 


The Dow 


Thursday close 


6755.75 


previous dose 


Thursday dose 

777.56 


previous dose 
786.23 


Said- " ‘ 

Kohl Presents Tax Reform to an Increasingly Skeptical Germany 


By John Schmid 

hilernanoaal Herald Tribune 


See CUBA, Page 6 


NmwMtand Price* 


- FRANKFURT — The German government un- 
veiled on Thursday what it calls its "work of tee 
f^n ftny»»nlantQ stimulate tee economy bv lowering tax 
rafftg and immediately moved to blunt -mounting public 
skepticism that the proposal insufficiently bold. 

The new tax code^ meant to make taxes “lower. 


Andorra -,1000 FF Lebanon.. — U*0Q0 

AtHas^^FF MoB*eo^—ie» 

Cameroon ..1£00GFA Qatar -- — 

Egypt £E5£0 Munfon 1£»FF 

France 10100 *= SsulArabto-1W»^ 

Gabon -_HOO CFA Seneg al — 

Graeco — $30 Of. 

Raty aaoouro 

Ivory Coast .1 550 CFA 

Join .1.250 JD US- ML {Eur.).-$m 


"There is avery real danger that Germany's big rax 
reform will miss its goals," Norbert Waiter, chief 
economist of Deutsche Bank AG, wrote in a report 
released Thursday, 

Mr. Kohl, who wants successful tax reform as a 
centerpiece in his 1998 re-election campaign, de- 
clared himself “very satisfied” with the results of a 
blue-ribbon commission of tax experts, which drafted 
the plan after a half year of disputes that had strained 

.J-ht nnalitinn 


i 


ampler- and fairer,” was conceived as a national Mr. Kohl’s ccntcr-nght coalition. 

morale booster, but it has evolved in recent days into Resorting to classic supply-side economics, tee 


will fell to 39 percent from S3 percent, and the lowest omy by giving Germans more to spend. The plan 
rattwilTfall to 15 percent from 25.9 percent. Corporate would take effect in 1999, giving Germans a shot of 



taxes also will be cut To offset tee revenue shortfall 
such cuts would create, the panel suggested abolishing 
a spectrum of write-offs, subsidies and ax breaks. 

- Recent polls, commentary and reports of political 
infighting within Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s own 
party Tanks reveal a widespread distrust teat tax 
reform will put more Deutsche marks into taxpayers’ 
pockets orinore Germans back to work. 


would take effect in 1999, giving Germans a shot of 
tax relief at tee same time they must give up the 
Deutsche mark for Europe’s currency union. 

Tax reform has moved high on tee political agenda 
in Bonn. There is rare unanimity among politicians 
that excess ve tax rates jeopardize Germany r s standing 
as a business and investment location. 



See GERMANY, Page 6 


I li'ntunn hillpp-nr/nir WwH IW 

Mr. Kohl discussing the tax reform plan Thursday at a meeting of his party in Bonn. 










spor 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1997 

PAGE TWO 


Relentless Booster / Paul Tsoii flfls's Cqmpmgii for IrQwell ■ 

An Old Mill Town Mourns Its Favorite Son 


By Sara Rimer 

ftfirtr York Times Service 


L OWELL. Massachusetts — To most 
people bevond this city. Paul Tsongas 
was the man with the odd voice who 
made a quixotic bid for the presidency in 
1992. No one really believed that Mr. Tsongas 
was going to be president. 

To Lowell, he "was the favorite first son whose 
extraordinary relationship with this once dying 
mill town transformed it, and the people who live 
here. The local newspaper. The Sun. made Mr. 
Tsongas's legacy clear in its front-page obituary 
on Sunday: “He" leaves his family and the city he 
resurrected."' 

Because of Mr. Tsongas's vision. Lowell, an 
industrial city of 103.000 people about 25 miles 
(40 kilometers) northwest of Boston, has a na- 
tional historic park that draws thousands ot 
tourists each year, a minor league baseball team, 
a new stadium on the way, a Sheraton hotel. 14 
new schools, thousands of jobs and. as important 
as all the bricks and dollars, renewed civic 
pride. 

“He made it cool to be from Lowell,” said 
James Cook, one of the former senator's legions 
of hometown friends and director of the Lowell 
Plan and the Lowell Development Finance 
Corp., a nonprofit economic development group 
started by Mr. Tsongas. * ‘Twenty-two years ago, 
you used to say you lived north of Boston. Now 
you say you're from Lowell, and proud of it. " 

Mr. Tsongas. a Democrat who died of pneu- 
monia Saturday at the age of 55 after a long battle 
with cancer, went to Washington as a U.S. 
representative in 1975. and was elected to the 
Senate in 1978. He stunned nearly everybody in 
1984 when he decided to retire after one term 
because of his cancer. But he never left Lowell 
or. in a way. his first job in politics as a Lowell 
city councilor. 

Two weeks before his deaih, from his hospital 
bed in Boston, so weak that nurses had to dial the 
phone for him. he was callin g around town to 
make sure there were enough City Council voles 
to keep the planned baseball stadium in central 
Lowell. Mr. Cook said. (The council voted 9-0 in 
favor of the site.) 

M R. TSONGAS never passed up an 
opportunity to promote his home- 
town. not even in death. In an ex- 
traordinary public relations stroke, 
he arranged for a public wake to be held at his 
Victorian house, in the stately neighborhood 
where the mill owners once lived, so the mourn- 
ers would have a chance to see Lowell. 

Thousands of people — from the waitresses 
who served him coffee to Mayor Edward 
Caulfield and to people from all over the state 
who never met him bui wanted io pay their 
respects — have filed past his coffin and through 
his beloved city this week. 

“He was the pillar of the Lowell commu- 
nity," said 7 1 -year-old Arthur Anton, the owner 
of Anton’s Cleaners and a friend of Mr. Tson- 
gas’s father, who also owned a dry cleaning 




NYT 


Mourners lining up outside Mr. Tsongas's house in Lowell, Massachusetts. In 
death as in life ; Mr. Tsongas always sought to draw attention to his beloved 
hometown. ‘ He made it cool to be from Lowell a colleague says. 


business, as he left the Tsongas house on Tues- 
day evening. “He had an ability to get people to 
respond to nis vision, his dreams. We’re so proud 
of him for what he has done for us, and what he 
left us.” 

With his back bent against the biting cold, Mr. 
Anton stood on the sidewalk, talking about the 
Lowell National Historical Park, which was 
signed into federal law in 1978, thanks to Mr. 
Tsongas’s efforts. 

“We would never have the park if it weren't 
for Paul.*' Mr. Anton said. “You know how 
many tourists w e get now because of it? They all 
come to see how the mills began, the quilt 
museum, die mill girls.” 

Mr. Tsongas’s funeral, held Thursday, was 
another opportunity to show off a revitalized 
Lowell. The funeral cortege was scheduled to go 
from the Transfiguration Church past Cawley 
Stadium, where the baseball team, die Spinners, 
will play umiJ the promised new stadium is built; 
past the Paul E. Tsongas Arena now under 
construction: the newly renovated Lowell High 
School: and onto the Lowell Cemetery, high on a 
ridge overlooking the Merrimack River, where 
Mr. Tsongas will be buried near his Greek im- 
migrant parents. Efthemios George and Katina. 

It is also in deference to Mr. Tsongas’s wishes 
that all week his friends and colleagues have 
been talking up the city. 


“He’d be lacking us right now if we weren't 
doing our jobs promoting the city," Mr. Cook 
said. “He had arranged that we would all talk to 
the media when and if it happened. It was the 
came thin g when be was running for president 
He joked that it was his marketing campaign for 
the city of LowelL” 

Mr. Tsongas's obsession with Lowell could be 
exasperating to those who wanted him to be 
president. “There we were on the presidential 
campaign plane, and he would be talking to some- 
body about some zoning regulation in Lowell/’ 
said Edward Jesser, a Boston political consultant 
who was Mr. Tsongas’s media adviser during the 
former senator’s campaign for the Democratic 
presidential nomination five years ago. 

F ROM the campaign trail, from Wash- 
ington, from his hospital bed. Mr. Tson- 
gas stayed in touch with Richard Howe, 
the elder statesman of the Lowell City 
Council. “He was always a Lowellian." said 
Mr. Howe, who has served on the council since 
1965. 

When Mr. Tsongas was elected to the council 
in 1969, Lowell, an industrial city of Greek. 
Portuguese and French Canadian immigrants, 
had double -digit unemployment. Nearly half a 
century after the mills had moved South, the 
city’s central business district was blighted by its 


£&r ,U*mkt*SIbc .iawdaCrd From 


abandoned and dilapidated buildings. 

“Between 1950 and 1970, Lowell just hit rock 
bottom/’ Mr. Howe said. 

“For youngsters graduating from high school, 
the only goal was to get out of Lowell. Our goal 
was to c-hanga the mood and the atmosphere and 
the direction government was going.” 

Over time , Mr. Howe and a group of others, 
led by Mr. Tsongas, made Lowell a place where 
people wanted to stay. As a congressman, Mr. 
Tsongas was able to secure milli ons of dollars in 
sta te and federal funds for improvement projects 
for Lowell. 

He did menial labor, too. One of the rituals of 
life in Lowell was seeing Mr. Tsongas at work in 
Kitrredge Park, the green space that be had 
helped restore. 

“I would drive down the street, and there 
would be this former presidential candidate 
sweeping the leaves out of die gutter/ ’ said the 
Reverend David Malone, the pastor at the Eliot 
Church, whose hundreds of Cambodian parish- 
ioners reflect the changing demographics of 
LowelL 

Three weeks ago. Mr. Cook said. Mr. Tsongas 
called him from die hospital to ask him to bring 
him three photographs — one of the arena under 
construction, another of the new supermarket 
being built in the Acre neighborhood, and one of 
Kitrredge Park. 

Mr. Cook had the 


them to the hospital- “We set them up on 
windowsill/' he said. 

“He loved this city as much as anyone 1 ever 
met.” Mr. Cook added. “Every team needs a 
coach or a cheerleader. He was boih for Low- 
ell.” 


A Statue Chisels In on Madrid’s Control Over Regions 


By Marlise Simons 

AVw York Tutus Sen- ke 


ELCHE. Spain — Once in a while, 
something happens that offends the 
strong sense of honor of someone in 
Spain, and the displeased party will not 
rest until the grievance is redressed. One 
such affront explains why a delegation 
from the city of Elehe. led by the mayor, 
recently marched into a Madrid mu- 
seum, surrounded a statue and sang an 
angry song. 

The statue was the Lady of Elehe, 
Spain’s most famous ancient icon. 

As every Spanish schoolchild learns, 
this finely chiseled face, framed with an 
elaborate headdress and necklaces, rep- 
resents an Iberian priestess or princess 
and is believed to be about 2,500 years 
old. 

She was found at a rich archeological 
site just outside this city 100 years ago. 
Therein lies the problem. 

Elehe. a sunny place of palm groves, 
shoe factories and about 200,000 people 
in the Valencia region, has asked to 
borrow the Lady this summer to com- 
memorate her discovery. 

Because Elcbe will then also cel- 
ebrate the 2.000ih anniversary of its 


foundation as a city, the mayor wants 
the Lady to be the centerpiece of a 
special exhibit to be held in a 15th- 
century castle downtown. 

But to Elche’s shock, a government 
commission has said no. It argued that 
the precious sandstone bust is too fragile 
to make the 400-kilometer (250-nuIe) 
journey from its home in the National 
Museum of Archeology in Madrid to 
Elehe in southeastern Spain. Some mu- 
seum officials said the government had 
refused for political reasons. 

Elche’s request and Madrid's rebuff 
are a slice of what is called the 
“autonomy question." the growing de- 
mand for status and power by the re- 
gions of Spain as they reassert their 
historical and cultural identity. 
Whenever Basques. Catalans or VaJen- 
cians want to expand their rights, it is 
usually at the expense of the power of 
Madrid, which for centuries has ex- 
ercised tight control over the nation. 

Madrid has gradually loosened its 
leash, giving the 1 7 regions, each with 
its own government, more say in issues 
like taxes, education and the use of local 
languages. But some conservatives fear 
that decentralization may go too far, 
pulling Spain apart. 


That fear also includes the fate of the 
country's artistic treasures. 

“If they’d get away with it,” said a 
curator in Madrid, “the regions would 
empty out Madrid's museums and take 
home their cultural properties." 

Calls for loans or restitution of cultural 
goods already exist. Barcelona is asking 
for the transfer of the historic archives of 
Catalonia, which are kept outside the 
region, in Salamanca. The Basque city of 
Bilbao has asked Madrid to send it Pi- 
casso's “Guernica,” which depicts an 
air raid on the city near Bilbao. 

“It’s preposterous to say that it’s 
unsafe to transport the statue," said 
Rafael Ramos, director of the arche- 
ology museum in Elehe. Noting that the 
Lady has already been to Elehe once, 
about 30 years ago, he added, “I think 
Madrid is afraid that we’U have a pop- 
ular movement to keep her and people 
will not want to give her back." 

Ivan Aranda, a coordinator of the 
festivities at the town ball, insisted that 
Elehe was “definitely not planning to 
keep the statue.” 

The snub from Madrid has now 
swollen into an issue of not just local but 
also regional pride. The town councils 
of Alicante, Benidorm. Santa Pola and 


In this Saturday’s 


•T-jH -S. v* i- 


Absolute 

beginners 



inancial planning 
for young investors 


LYTEKMTHJNAI. 



n 'Mi-jo* «fni tw» ww wm fore. iwi tuuKTin mu 

THE WDRLJTS DAILY NEWSPAPER 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


French Transit Workers to Strike 

PARIS (AFP) — Commuters in French provincial dries 
face travel snarls Friday, when unions plan a one-day strike. 

Five unions, including the General Labor Confederation, 
have called the action to emphasize demands for retirement at 
age 55 and a reduction in work hours. 

The strike could slow urban transport networks across the 
country, unions say. but the Paris mass transit authority, which 
runs subways and buses, is unlikely to be affected. 

Attacks Dampen Uganda Tourism 

KAMPALA. Uganda (AFP) — Rebel attacks in western 
Uganda, site of the country’s main tourist attractions, is 
hurting tourism, officials said Thursday. 

About 70 percent of foreign tourists who had planned to 
visit the Rwenzori Mountain National Park in the past two 
months have canceled because of activity by the funda- 
mentalist Muslim Allied Democratic Front, officials said. 

South African Airways will begin flights between Copen- 
hagen and Johannesburg and Cape Town in July, the Danish 
magazine Stand By reported. (AFP) 


other nearby cities have passed motions 
supporting Elche’s request. A local mu- 
sician has composed a ballad about the 
affair, which the mayor and other cit- 
izens sang the other day in the arche- 
ology museum in Madrid. 

Adding to this, Elehe feels newly 
vilified by the recent Spanish edition of 
an American book asserting that the 
statue is a 1 9th -century fake. 

John Moffitt, an art historian at the 
New Mexico State University, said in 
his book. “Art Forgery: The Case of the 
Lady of Elcbe,” that the shapes of her 
nose and eyes were too delica te to have 
been carved in pre-Christian Spain. He 
argued that spots where the statue is 
chipped reveal a whiteness that does not 
match the grayish exterior and could not 
have remained so pristine. 

Many scholars have dismissed Mr. 
Moffitt’s diesis. To most experts, tbe 
bust, which is about two feet high, rep- 
resents the finest example of early Iberi- 
an civilization and dates from the late 
5rb century B.C. 

Specialists at tbe Louvre Museum in 
Paris, which owned the statue until 
1941. said there was no doubt about its 
authenticity. 

The American's claim infuriates Mr. 
Ramos, tbe director of archeology in 
Elehe. About a mile or so from Elehe, he 
points at excavations that expose the rich 
history of the site known as La Alcudia. 








NYT 


He then heads for the temple devoted 
to an Iberian moon goddess. Near there, 
among the palm trees, a young faim boy 
digging an irrigation ditch came upon 
theLady in 1897. 

Nowin tbe laboratory of Alcudia, Mr. 
Ramos points to a statue recently dug up 
that was also chipped, and like the Lady. 
shows dial the inside of tbe stone is 
snow-white. “People claiming that the 
Lady is a fake are just seeking pub- 
licity/' he said. 

But the battle to bring the Lady to 
Elcbe continues. 

“We will not give up,” said Noelia 
Gutierrez, a student. “The whole town 
will go crazy when she comes.” 

Oddly, despite tbe government’s ban 
on travel, the Lady is expected in die 
Grand Palais in Paris in September. 


With a Bluff, 

Thais Pushed 

U.S. to Sell a 
Coveted Missile 


By Raymond Bonner 

Ne*- York Times Service 

BANGKOK —Just a few years after 
they ended their nuclear arms race, the 
United States and Russia are drumming 
up business for arms sales to Southeast 
Asia, with both countries offering po- 
tential purchasers some of the world’s 
most sophisticated missiles as incent- 
ives. 

From Thailand to Malaysia, countries 
shopping for advanced fighter aircraft 
are mmanding — and receiving — die 
rhanrr to buy deadly accurate air-to-air 
missiles that allow a jet pilot to shoot 
down an enemy plane he can not even 
see — indeed, one that might be as far as 
50 kilometers away. 

When Thailand first asked for tbe 
missiles, known as Amraams — an ac- 
ronym for their formal name of ad- 
vanced medium range air-to-air missile 
— Clinton administration officials re- 
jected the request. The officials feared 
that tire sale could cause regional in- 
stability and trigger an arms race. _ 

B angkok immediately said that if the 
United States blocked the sale of the 
missiles, it would not buy American- 
made F-18 jets, a pending deal worth 
nearly $600 million. The Thais made it 
clear they were considering die Russian 
MiG-29, which can cany a similar mis- 
sile. 

Washin gton eventually capitula t ed, 
even though American and Thai of- 
ficials say Bangkok did not really want 
to buy a plane from Russia. 

The Amraam’s journey from a 
w ea pon that Washington zealously pro- 
tected to rare that is now available to a 
range of countries illustrates what hap- 
pens once aims restrictions are relaxed 
even a little. U.S. officials and arms 
control advocates say. 

“Once we’ve said ‘yes' to one, it is 
hard to say ‘no’ to the next,” said an 
official in Washington. 

Tbe Amraam was one of the most 
effective weapons for die American-led 
allian ce that routed Iraq in die Gulf 
War. 

U.S. officials said this week that the 
decision to provide die missile to the 
Thai Air Force opens die door for other 
countries in the Association of South 
Ruff Asian Nations to make similar re- 
quests. 

The sale of Amraams to Thailand is 
also a telling illustration of die workings 
of the global aims bazaar. These days . 
US. officials say, it is business, not 
' ideology, that is driving sales. 

Navy admirals, whose pilots fly die 
B=i8, were early advocates of clinching 
the sale to die Thai Air Force by in- 
cluding Amraams in the deal. 

Just a few years ago. die United States 
would permit die sale of Amraams only 
to NATO allies. 

Then; in 1995. tbe United Arab Emir- 
ates went shopping for 80 combat jets, a 
deal valued at $6 billion to $8 billion, 
which the oil-rich country could afford, 
though there were questions about 
whether it had enough qualified pilots. 

The Emirates demanded various 
types of sophisticated gear for their 
planes, and ax the top of die list was die 
Amraam, U.S. officials said. 

After an intense debate, and over 
opposition from die Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency, the Clinton ad- 
ministration agreed. With that, Lock- 
heed’s F-16 has now emerged as the 
likely winner of die contract, edging out 
the French Mirage. 

After die sale to the United Arab 
Emirates, Thailand demanded the same 
missiles. “We caved to them as well,” 
said .a State Department official in 
Washington. “It shows bow the 
threshold gets passed.’- 

Now, Saudi Arabia and Egypt, whose 
requests for Amraams had earlier been 
tinned down, are expected to come 
knocking again. And this time it will be 
hard to say no,' U.S. officials said. 

Because of Amraam’s “extremely 
good” potential to hit aircraft out of 
visual range, any air force that has it 
enjoys a clear advantage over the en- 
emy, according to Jane’s Defense 
Weekly, apublicatioo that assesses nril- . 
itaiy weapons systems. 



1 
v !- 




V 




VI - 


WEATHER 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BIU9£L0m«IHSTBr5*D0CT{%ffli 
j For Work. Life and Acadenic Excerwice 
Througfi Camrenwit Home Study 
(808) 597-1909 £XT. 23 
Fax: (310)471-0456 
http: / iwwwjwi.com 
Fax or send detafed reaira for 

FREg EVALUATION 

Pacific Western University 
121 QAualti Street Dept 23 
Honolulu, HI 968144922 



Reprieve for Archaeology 

Reuters 

PARIS — The government 
on Thursday ordered a two- 
month-halt in a construction 
project in Rodez so archae- 
ologists could examine the 
site. Culture Ministry unions 
had threatened- to strike over 
plans to proceed despite the 
finding of Roman remains. 


Europe 


Tote* 

Tomoirow 



toww 

Mgr> 

Lew it 


C/F 

OF 

C/F 

Cff 

Afcanw 

16 /BI 

1060 pc 

i«i 

am pc 

Amaertmi 

7/44 

3/37 a 


4/30 PC 

Ankara 

S /41 

- 0 Q 7 C 

4/38 

■anaoc 

AJfWH 

16*1 

ems 

T 7 «? 

am pc 

Dm catena 

12/53 

8MB tt 1 

fi /48 

6/43 r 


11/52 

4/39 C 

e /43 

-aoaen 

Bar* 

5/41 

- 1/31 C 

205 

- 1/31 c 

Bneiste 

8/48 

4/39 pc 

946 

403 S 

Budape* 

JM 

037 *0 

33 / 

455 / 

Copvnnagen 

2/35 

•W 29 PC 

2 / 3 G 

002 C 

Core Oaf Sd 

15*9 

0 / 4 BC 

16*1 

8/44 ah 

Outtn 

V 48 

4*9 pe 

1050 

arts pc 

E^teurgn 

7/44 

104 pe 

7/44 

3/37 pc 

Rma 

12*3 

8 usc 

US 2 

6/43 SJ 1 

Frart/ufl 

409 

- 3 /Z 7 C 

2 CJS -337 pc 

Genm 

am 

6/43 r 

6/48 

4 * 3 * 

He/artP 

- 3 C 7 

- 7/28 pc 

-131 

-602 pc 

borfcii 

11/52 

7/44 8 

we 

V 34 W 1 

U*P?to«s 

21/70 

15*9 s 

20*8 

16*1 PC 

ua» 

13/56 

W 8 pc 

14/57 

946 pc 

London 

1050 

6/43 pc 

11*2 

7744 s 

Mated 

12/53 

Stic 

11*2 

S /41 r 

Mttra 

10*0 

8/48 dl 

am 

7744 r 

Mai 


BM 3 di 

5*5 

3/37 ah 


- 2 S 9 

- 10/15 an 

41/18 

- 14/7 pc 

Mimen 

7/44 

409 d* 

W 46 

1/34 Jh 

Nee 

13*8 

1203 r 

1355 

949 ah 

oho 

- 2/23 

■MZpc 

- 1/31 

-M 8 c 

Pans 

046 

« 33 di 

948 

307 G 

Prague 

09 

032 r 

307 

0/0 pc 

naym* 

002 

-131 an 

1/34 

-V 1 BB 1 

Raw 

14*7 

ante 

13*5 

7/44 C 

StPeentua - 3/27 

-an sc 

•307 

- 7/20 pc 

SBxSratn 

- 1,01 

-M 2 pc 

002 

<K 7 c 

Seasooua 

946 

9*3 r 

am 

« 7 c 

Teton 

- 3/37 

- 7/20 pc 

032 -632 pc 

Vance 

11 /W 

7/44 dl 

SMS 

3/37 r 

vton 

am 

406 S/I 

4/39 

■ 3/27 pc 

Warn 

Z /35 

■« 22 C 

1/34 

- 4/25 PC 

Za teft 

am 

943*1 

am 

430 o/i 

Middle East 


Forecast tor Saturday through Monday, as prcwictod by AccuWeaffier. Asia 



North America 

A cold shot wili swing Wo 

the Orest Lakes Saturday. 
then into fte Northeast and 
mid-Atlantic Sunday. 
Ahead ot this, it nibs mid 
and unsettled In the East 
Saturday. The southern liar 
will stay mild, while wet 
weather affects the West 
this weekend- 


Europe 

Much of Europe wfl be (fey 
with near- id aboveimrmal 
temperatuas tmugh Mon- 
day- CoWer air is eqnctad 
to mate a small push feito 
far eastern Europe this 
weekend, before retreating 
back into Russia Monday. 
Italy and sovtheed Europe 
wHI turn cooler Into early 
next — - 


Asia 

Cold across Manchuria, 
both Koreas and much of 
Japan through The week- 
end. Japan wS be unset- 
tled, wttita the Koreas and 
Manchuria stay dm. Nortv 
east Chino, inducing Bei- 
jing. wlil be near to Juet 
abewe normal Seasonable 
in Hong Kong and Singa- 
pore wkh soma sunshine. 


.3 an Sami 
31/88 21/701 
7/44 -seta 

3 nns i 8 *i * 

24/76 BHBI 
33» 1WB8 a 
23*4 2271 FC 
IMS 13*8 Po 

azne atmpe 
18*4 11*2 pc 
17*2 ZOSa 
29*4 M/75 pe 
a /73 SMS a 
31*8 2271.BG 
32*8 22/71 pG 
30*8 21/70 a 
Him #37 * 
32*9 22/71 pe 
31*9 21/70* 
3) AS 21/70 S 
M2 -SB28 
6/43 *27* 
SQM 29/73 pe 
M/M IMS* 
0 / 43 - 1 * 1 * 
MBS <2/53 pe 


Africa 


North America 


Mgian- 

CapalWi 


MflMgt 

Mae 


aiu Drey iM8 tesi po 

Baton 16*1 9UBpc 

can ieei rut pc 

Daman* BUS 104 pa 

Janatom BUS 1/34 pe 

LuWf 17*7 205 s 

F*y«r i6*i 7M4 e 


1MB 1467 r 
17*2 I25»pe 
19*8 fl/48 a 
1253 3/37 s 
1162 «/33 1 
21/70 «9a 
18*4 337* 


CMcago 

Data 

D«M/ 

Data 

HonoUu 

Hgu»> 

Loa t n j n l u a 

tana 


HM?* 2 owW 
or of 
- an 8 -ip* pe 

15*9 SKBtfl 
1/34 002 pe 
2*5 4621 
21/70 #37 a 
460 - 1(215 • 
2/35 - 1/311 
ZV 73 17*2 pc 

tom ana* 

19*8 7*4 pe 
asm ia* 4 pc 


or 

-an s 
1508 
11*2 
-Q29 
18*1 
E/43 
205 

men 

atm 

a /70 

zmo 


Lowir 

car 

-16/4 d 
BUI ttl 
104 ah 
-12711 RB 
#37* 
-700 pc 
■ana pc 
17*2 sa 
7t*4 a 
8U8 pe 
20*8 PC 


J| Dtt &artr 


HewYcA 

04x94 


LewW 
or 

■OT-7 ps 
■8716sn 
10*4 pa 
2*5 ah 
18*1 po 
11/52 po 

ana *h 

-4QEan 
-ttfif an 
•8718*1 

am ah 

. . Kates. 

ai-Wta.t-toftW-WeaBW. AH h ^ h, / i l a rwau ia 1i1 a H|n u i hl ai l by Aco WtaWn. ton. 01887 


SaoFtao. 


Tonne 

Vta e w ar 

W athtogun 


-TOO 

2670 

206 

asm 

19*8 

14*7 

439 

-1/31 

QB2 

BUS 


OF 
-14/7 d 
-7720 d 
17/92* 
104 b 
15/58 pc 
8 MQa 
snadt 

•409 40 
-a»«i 

471BC 

8/37* 


OF 

-lira 

7M4 

27*0 

12*9 

26779 

2871 

14*7 

205 

430 

- 1*1 

13SS 


K. 

Tints 


ism mat lass 7 * 44 * 

24/75 18*9 pe SH/75 13SBC 
1457 s/43pe 14*7 SMS pc 
29*4 UffiOpC 31*8 9N8* 
3086 21/70 S 31/68 22/71 • 
28*4 13*9 pc 31*8 ISSpe 
1BR 10*0 a 14/57 8/4$ ah 


Latin America 


Ounos Sta 33/91 17782 s 30*6 13*08 
Cantu 29*4 ZZfM PC 28*4 22/7100 

Una 27*0 71/70 pe rt/X 2T/7D po 

Medea Cty 10*8 5/41 a 18*6 6*1 pc 
ftodaJanako 28*2 SOUBpc 27/80 21/70 pc 
34*3 14357 8 £7*0 1030 pp 


Oceania 


>«wn±t«nv, pfrparty ctoudy, i^deudy. dvaho 


HStruoK 


Auckland 

Sphe* 


.21/70 14*57 pc 
24/75 10/BB I 


1 6*9 pc 
20*8 Hi 



Imprimi par Offprint, 73 rue de rkvangile. 750 1 8 Paris. 


iS 


ill- 




it 

i -V 


i ■ 


! filt \f 

* 

v* 


. .. .•> 








— -v- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


BAGE 3 


UN’s Leader 
Goes CaUing on 
Washington 
To Pay Its Debt 


By Steven Lee Myers 

New Kiri Times Seni'ce 

•' WASHINGTON — Kofi Annan, the 
new secretaiy-gpneral of die United Na- 
tions, made his way through the U.S. 
'capital Thursday, meeting with President 
Bill Clinton and Republicans in Congress 
xm a tour that seemed partly a victory lap, 
partly a fulfillment of an obligation and 
partly a campaign to persuade the United 
Stales to support the UN by paying its 
dues to the organization, 

' Mr. Annan, whose election as sec- 
retary-general owed much to Mr. Clin- 
■ron ’s campaign to oust his predecessor. 

- Boutros Boutros Ghali, failed to extract a 
-concrete commitment to repay the more 
than SI billion in dues the United States 
■had refused to pay for three years. 

But he received strong public ex- 
pressions of confidence not only from 
-Mr. Clinton's administration but from 
the opposition Republicans as well. 

1 After meeting with Mr. Annan at the 
White House, Mr. Clinton praised him 
as "a man committed to a revitalized 
'United Nations" and vowed to work 
■with Congress to repay the debt, 

- Mr. Clinton did nor specify how he 
-intended to do so, but officials have said 
■that his budget proposal to be unveiled 
next month would include a 5100 mil- 
-Jion payment in the coming year and a 

S9Q0 million payment the year after, 
.provided the UN took certain unspe- 
cified steps to restructure itself. 

"We cannot expect ro lead through the 
United Nations unless we are prepared to 
. pay our own way — and to pay what we 
-owe — as they do what they should along 
the path of reform," Mr. Clinton said 
-after meeting with Mr. Annan. 

*■ Vice President A1 Gore said the 
•.United States was prepared to pay its 
dues, but he challenged Mr. Arman to 

• create "a United Nations that wastes 

• less and produces more." 

Mr. Annan' s visit was his first official 
•trip as secretary-general and under- 
“scored the difficult task he faced in his 
-effort to smooth relations with Wash- 
ington. The UN has never been uni- 
versally liked in the United States, and 
‘Mr. Boutros Ghali was vilified in many 
quarters. 

> In stark contrast, officials at the State 
Department and the White House lav- 
ished praise Thursday on Mr. Annan. 
The undersecretary of state for global 

• affairs, Timothy Wirth, said. “People 
are very comfortable with him." 




Jar U*nprar/11ir W«iil lVr%* 

William Daley preparing to testify before tbe Senate Commerce panel. 


POLITICAL/ 


Daley Pledges to Depoliticize 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton's nominee for 
commerce secretary, William Daley, says that if confirmed 
he will take steps to depoliticize the department, which 
Republicans say has become an outpost ofDeroocratic Party 
filnd-raising. 

In a clear attempt to defuse any complications for his own 
nomination and to suggest that he has a. reform-minded 
agenda as Republicans prepare forcongressionaT hearings on 
campaign finance, Mr. Daley said he would eliminate 1 TO of 
the 260 politically appointed jobs within the department by, 
the end of the year. He also said he would suspend all the 
department’s international trade missions for 30 days while 
he develops guidelines for choosing participants to ensure 
that no special consideration goes to big political donors. 

“Let me say without hesitation, as someone who has spent 
many years in and around the political process, that there is a 
place for politics in public life,’' he said “But there is no 
place for politics in the Department of Commerce.'' Mr. 
Daley is a son of one Chicago mayoT and the brother of die 
city’s incumbent mayor. (NYT) 

High Support for Abortion Rights 

WASHINGTON — In a joint show of political force, 
Hillary Rodham Clinton, Vice President A] Gore and his 
wife. Tipper, each affirmed support for abortion rights at a 
luncheon here marking the 24tb anniversary of Roe v. Wade, 
the Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion. 

Both Mr. Gore and Mrs. Cunton also urged the group to 
work with opponents of abortion to reduce tbe need for the 
procedure. “I hope that we will be able to find ways of 
increasing dialogue and working together with people of 
good faith who do not share extremism as their rallying cry," 
Mrs. Clinton said. 

It was tbe first time that Mis. Clinton and Mis. Gore had 
addressed die National Abortion and Reproductive Rights 
Action League, which held tbe luncheon. Mis. Clinton bad not 


been expected to attend. It was the second lime infour days that 
she had made late arrangements to appear at a political 
suggesting she may be taking a more public role. (NYT) 

Money Talks, New Study Affirms 

WASHINGTON — It iriay be a political truism here that 
money buys influence and votes on Capitol Hill. But a 
research group hassought to prove the point in a study of 
votes and campaign contributions in the last Congress. In 
analyzing 14 heavily lobbied issues, the group found that 
corporations that poured money into Congress typically got 
file votes they wanted. 

“It might be an obvious fact that there's a connection 
between money and votes," said Nancy Watzman, a project 
director at the Center for Responsive Politics, a nonprofit 
research group that issued the study. But in analyzing the 
votes, she said, “we began to see how this relationship works 
oul This moneyas going for very practical business reasons, 
not because of lofty grand ideals. You need money to play 
and be heard.” . 

For instance, the sugar indusoy poured money into the 
campaigns of 61 senators and 217 House members who 
voted to maintain a sugar-price subsidy that consumer 
groups say adds an extra 50 cents to a five-pound bag of 
sugar The study found that the 61 senators who voted with 
the industry received an average of$I3,473 in sugar industry 
political action committee donations from 1991 to 1996, 
while the 35 senators who voted against the industry received 
an average of $1,461. (NYT) 


ged tbe group to Quote /Unquote 

: tbe need for the . ... j. 


Madeleine Albright, after she was sworn in Thursday as 
the first female secretary of state: ‘ ‘We must not shy from file 
mantle of leadership. If we are complacent or timid or 
unwilling to look beyond our borders, our citizens will not 
prosper and the framework of American leadership and the 
foundation of American security we have built could 
crumble with 21st centuiy speed.’’ (AP) 


Pickering and Eizenstat Get State Dept. Posts 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Madeleine Al- 
bright, who was confirmed Wednesday 
by the U.S. Senate as secretary of state 
by a vote of 99 to 0, has chosen two 
highly experienced government hands 
for top jobs in the State Department 

Thomas Pickering, 65, the senior pro- 
fessional diplomat in tbe Foreign Service, 
will become undersecretary for political 
affairs, the third-ranking job in tbe State 
Department, administration officials 
said. He will replace Peter Tamoff. 

Stuart Eizenstat, 54, a Georgian who 
ran domestic policy for President 
Jimmy Carter and serves as undersec- 
retary of commerce for international 
affairs, will become undersecretary for 
economic affairs in the State Depart- 
ment. He succeeds Joan Spero. 

Mrs. Albright. 59. was sworn in by 
President Bill Clinton on Thursday, thus 


becoming the first woman to be sec- 
retary of state. By choosing people of 
such stature for the two appointments, 
she is understood to be sending a signal 
to other government departments that 
she wants die State Department to play 
the leading foreign-policy role on mat- 
ters that have had strong economic com- 
ponents, including relations with China, 
Japan and Mexico. 

With Mr. Pickering, who had perhaps 
the most successful career of any pro- 
fessional diplomat of his generation, Mrs. 
Albright is sending an encouraging mes- 
sage to the Foreign Service officers who 
are the backbone of the State Department 
Mrs. Albright's predecessor, Warren 
Christopher, was criticized as letting the 
Treasury and Commerce departments, in 
particular, dominate policy formulation 
toward Asia and Latin America. 

Strobe Talbott the deputy secretary 
of state, a close friend of Mr. Clinton’s 
and a prime architect of the admin- 


istration’s policy toward the former So- 
viet Union and NATO, will remain in 
his post for the present Mr. Talbott 
who has been managing the parallel task 
of NATO expansion and negotiating a 
document governing NATO's strategic 
relationship with Russia, is expected to 
stay at least through July, when the 
alliance will announce its new members 
at a Madrid summit conference. 

Mr. Pickering stepped down in 
November as ambassador to Russia 
after more than 30 years with the State 
Department He was first named an am- 
bassador in 1974, when he served in 
Jordan, and has also been ambassador to 
El Salvador, Israel. Nigeria and the 
United Nations. 

Mr. Eizenstat who has also served as 
American envoy to the European Uni- 
on, has recently been managing a dif- 
ficult task: frying to persuade foe Euro- 
pean Union, Canada, Mexico and other 
American allies to join Washington in 


)ept. Posts Away From Pol i ti g* 

J_ • A leading AIDS scientist. Dr. David 

Ho. said he had pushed back by up to a 
isol atin g Fidel Castro's Cuba, as called year his plans to test whether infection 
for in the Helms-Buzton law, which the with the virus can be cured in some 
president signed last year. people. He said that “unequivocally,” 

While foe European Union still ob- HIV had not been eradicated from any of 
jects to Washington’s effort to punish the patients in his studies. (W)TJ 
European companies and business ex- 
ecutives for otherwise legal trading ties * U JS. citizens have another month to 
to Cuba, Mr. Eizenstat has succeeded in add to the 250 claims seeking corn- 
getting the Europ eans to take a more pensation from Germany for Nazi con- 
vocal public stance against Cuban bu- Generation camp survivors. Justice De- 
man-rights abuses, enabling Mr. Clin- partment officials said. (Reuters) 
ton to renew a waiver of foe most con- 
tentious part of the law. That section • A power outage prevented America 
would allow American citizens to bring Online customers from receiving e-mail 
suit in American courts against foreign for two hours Thursday morning. The 
companies that operate in property ex- technical glitch came as representatives 
propriaied from Americans, without of state attorneys general gathered to 
compensation, when Mr. Castro took discuss consumer complaints about the 
power nearly 40 years ago. largest U.S. online service. (AP) 

In addition, Stanley Roth, who had 

served as foe Asia director in Mr. Clin- • Pizzeria Uno, a leading U .S. restaur- 
ton's National Security Council, is ex- ant chain, has conceded that its ad- 
peered to be named assistant secretary vertisements for low-fat, thin-crust piz- 
for East Asia, replacing Winston Lord, za s were false and misleading. (NYT) 


Despite $5.5 Million Slap, ABC Backs Hidden Cameras’ Use 


Howard Kurtz trespassing because two of its 


tsy Howard N.urtz 
and Sue Anne Pressley 

Wniliinyhtn PtM Service 

WASHINGTON — De- 
. fending its use of hidden cam- 
•eras. ABC News has said it 
will appeal a jury's decision 
-ordering the television net- 
'work to pay the Food Lion 

• supermarket chain more than 
$55 million in damages re- 
flated to an undercover news 
•report. 

The punitive damages 
-awarded Wednesday were un- 
usual because the chain had 
•not sued sue for libel or legally 
contested the accuracy of the 

• 1992 broadcast on the pro- 
'gram "PrimeTime Live" that 

said some Food Lion stores 
•were using unsanitary prac- 
tices. Instead, the federal jury 
found A BC cuiltv of fraud and 


employees had lied to get jobs 
as Food Lion clerks and then 
shot footage with miniature 
cameras hidden in wigs. 

In an interview, foe pres- 
ident of ABC News. Roone 
Arledge, defended foe use of 
hidden cameras, saying: “We 
only do this if it's a very im- 
portant story and there’s no 
other way to get it. These 
people were doing terrible 
things, and we documented it 
by our cameras." 

Calling the damages award 
“unconscionable," Mr. 
Arledge said, “In light of this 
decision, we’re going ro have 
to take a harder look at how we 
do these things. But we won't 
be deterred from bona fide in- 
vestigative journalism." 

A lawyer for Food Lion, 
Richard Wyatt, hailed the 


6 A Fight For Money , 5 
Simpson Lawyer Says 

By Tom Kenworthy and William Booth 

U,n/Hff.<:mn PivrSemce 

SANTA MONICA. California — Lacking any motive 
to kill his former wife and her friend. O. J. Simpson has 
been set up by lying policemen and slandered by pub- 
licity -seeking frauds during his civil trial, Mr. Simpson 's 
lawyer declared. 

■This isn't a fight for justice," the attorney, Robert 
Baker, told the jury in his closing argument Wednesday. 
* ‘ If s a fighi for money. ' ’ 

Mr. Baker sought to' convince jurors that his client was 
not in a blind rage on the night that Nicole Brown 
Simpson and Ronald Goldman were murdered in 1994, It 
defied * "common sense,' ’ he said, for Mr. Simpson to go 
out for hamburgers with his bouseguest Brian (Kato) 
Kaolin. change into dress socks and expensive shoes and 
then slaughter foe two victims. 

•’You do not kill mo people without a motive." Mr. 
Baker said. "What caused the rage?" 

Mr. Baker dismissed foe plaintiffs' contention that the 
defendant wax homicidal because Nicole Simpson 
spurned him and kept him from his children. That, he said, 
was “as fallacious as anything I've ever heard." He 
added, "li just doesn't make any .sense." 

Indeed. Mr. Baker argued, if Mr. Simpson was so 
susceptible to rage, why didn't he explode in anger the 
night he saw through his ex-wife’s windows foal she was 
"performing oral sex" with another man. Mr. Baker said 
nothing could be more galling. 

Responding to the .summations of three plaintiffs' 
attorneys in the wrongful death suit by the victims’ 
families. Mr. Baker sought to debunk the plaintiffs' 
contention that his client was "obsessed" about the failed 
attempt to reconcile with his former wife, 

Mr. Baker asked that jurors focus instead on foe police 
and the alleged contamination or planting of evidence, 
such as the bloody socks and gloves. 

"It's law enforcement versus OJ. Simpson." Mr. Baker 
said, reprising the theme of Simpson's criminal trial, in 
which he was acquitted of foe double murders in 1995. 


jury’s decision and said it 
should nor hinder journalists 
from doing their jobs legally. 

*Tve seen thousands of 
hard-woridng journalists out 
there who don’t break the 
law," he said. "This won’t 
affect them." He said ABC 
had authorized the inquiry in- 
to Food Lion ' 1 without a grear 
deal of internal safeguards.” 

The jury’s foreman, 
Gregory Mack, indicated that 
jurors were sending a mes- 
sage with their decision. 
“The media has the right to 
bring the news, but they have 
to watch what they do." he 
told The Associated Press. 
“It’s like a football game. 
There are boundaries, and you 
have ro make sure you don’t 
go outside the boundaries." 

The jury struggled for six 
days to decide on punitive 
damages, and its award was 
smaller than the range of S52 
million to $1.9 billion sought 
by Food Lion, which has 
1,100 stores. 

The ABC report accused 
Food Lion of bleaching and 
doctoring spoiled fish and 
meat for resale. Food Lion 


said foe news report had 
caused foe value of its stock to 
fall by $1 .5 billion and cost it 
$233 million in profit But 
Judge N. Carlton Tilley Jr. of 
U.S. District Court ruled that 
Food Lion could not seek 
damages for lost business 
caused by the broadcast 

After the verdict Dec. 20 
finding ABC guilty of fraud 
and trespassing, foe same jury 
assessed ABC $1 ,400 in com- 
pensatory damages. 

The Food Lion suit has 
been closely watched because 
hidden-camera reports have 
become a staple of television 
networks’ newsmagazine 
shows. Tbe awarding of dam- 
ages rekindled the debate over 
how far journalists should go 
in pursuing a story, and sev- 
eral people said it would cause 
news organizations to be 
more cauoous in undertaking 
such undercover inquiries. 

Bruce Sanford, a lawyer in 
Washington specializing in 
cases involving freedom of 
expression under the First 
Amendment to foe U.S. Con- 
stitution, described foe award 
as "5 J million lashes, a case 


of whipping the messenger, 
pure and simple." 

He added: “There's a sub- 
stantial question here about 
whether the punitive damage 
is constitutional. It ought to 
be perfectly logical [that} you 
can't levy punitive damages 
when foe only harm was em- 
barrassment from truthful re- 
porting. Here is a classic case 
where ABC’s only choice 
was not to do the story." 

Jane Kirtley, executive di- 
rector of the Reporters' Com- 
mittee for Freedom of the 
Press, said the case may dis- 
courage smaller news orga- 
nizations with fewer resources 
from pursuing difficult sto- 
ries. * ‘The specter of a verdict 
of this magnitude, based not 
on an inaccurate news story 
but on tbe use of a particular 
kind of news-gathering, will 
have a chilling effect on in- 
vestigative journalists all over 
the country," she said. 

But William Serrin, chair- 
man of the journalism depart- 
ment at New York Uni- 
versity, cautioned that the use 
of hidden cameras and other 
subterfuges should be used 


cautiously and only as ‘ ‘jour- 
nalism of a last resort-" 

Mr. Serrin, a former New 
York limes reporter, said he 
was not sure the Food lion 
broadcast had been a good use 
of the lactic. “I didn’t think it 
was tbe world’s greatest sto- 
ry," he said. 

“It was typical television 
fare, not particularly good 
journalism. ’ 

Mr. Arledge said undercov- 
er reporting had a long tra- 
dition, but he acknowledged 
there had been “excesses" in 
tbe use of hidden cameras and 
that some stories were "too 
trivial" to warrant them, such 
as “catching some guy putting 
an old tire on a car when it 
should have been a new tire." 

Still, he said, “If you say 
‘I'm from ABC and I want to 
take pictures of rotten meat,' 
they’re not going to let you 
in." 

Food Lion contended that 
the ABC producers. Lynne 
Dale and Susan Barnett, had 
staged some of foe incidents 
involving unsanitary food, a 
charge that the network has 
denied. 



REAL-TIME INFORMATION FROM 
THE PARIS STOCK EXCHANGE. 

People moke decisions every day. They need the most reliable 
source of information available. 

In France, they read Les Echos, France's leading newspaper. 

Les Echos is now accessible via the net, offering preferential 
access to the Paris Stock Exchange. 

http:yywww.lesechos.com 


By maintaining a taHturg network ot newvgaihoring resources, ihe 
World's DaiV Newspaper brings you wirivoSed coverage cf world potihes, 
busme&s ana eaxwrnies, as wdTas science, technology, fame), fashion, tfw arts 
end sport y penpediva. fa ^ [la|1 . ji j^ J 

Triune with a bw cost, 2-mertli trial subscrijUion and enjoy delivery to your 
home or office every morning. 




2 MONTHS 

2 MONTHS 

COUNTW/CURRENCT 


NEWSTAND 

OFFER 



PRICE 

raw 

AUSTRIA 

BELGIUM 

ais 

B6F 

1.456 

3330 

650 

1,550 

DENMARK 

DKK 

780 

360 

FINLAND 

RM 

624 

310 

FRANCE 

FF 

520 

210 

GERMANY- 

DEM 

182 

72 

GREAT BRITAIN 

£ 

47 

22 

GREECE 

DR 

18.2Q0 

9,100 

IRELAND 

ERE 

52 

26 

flAIY 

m. 

1-45,600 

58AM 

LUXEMBOURG 

LFR 

3.3800 

TJ50 

NEltraiANDS 

NIG 

1*5 

78 

NORWAY 

NOK 

832 

390 

PORTUGAL 

ESC 

11.960 

5,000 

SPAN 

PTAS 

J1700 

5.000 

SWH5EN- 

SEX 

W2 

350 

SWITZERtAT® 

CHF 

166 

66 

ELSEWHERE 

S 

— 

50 



DISCOUNT 

OFF 

COVER HBCE 
55% 

60% 

54% 

50% 

60% 

00% 

53% 

50% 

50% 

60% 

60% 

60% 

53% 

58% 

57% 

58% 

60% 

•elHT Germany 


Xb, iwM$cv>o Oort recurymg ihe htarctkyiol HorM Tribune. 4A.J.OT 

□ My check is enclosed (payable lb ihe frflj 

Charge my. O AnwcD DineisD VBAD Access □ MasterCard □ Euraeod 
Ciwfa cod dngn wiS ha mode in frond* he ot oimnt iota. 

Cdndtfe Exp. Pock 

SgncUme. 

For business orders, indicate your VAT Nn: 

DHTVWNurtw FR74732021 126) 

Mr/Mrs/Ms Family Name: 

^"4 Mm> ■ U. WJ — 

MoAng Address: 

Oy/Co£n 

Courir)r_ 

H'weWNo: BwsrtuTdNcr 

bMaLA&tsr.^ 

IgrtiesoWofd-MTofc niciosk Dlwd Do-fae Oorfwr ' 

□ 1 do nol wish Id ream inbrmafian from dher cGrafuOy saemd amprai 

A<lai/ or fax to: International Herald Tribune 
181 A*iC. da GaJk. 92521 Ngu&yCedex. Franco. Fbc +33 ? 41 43 92 10 
OR CALL +33 I 41 43 93 6 J 

*> Asa i *852 29 22J[sa.Jn that k^ fr^f; T-900^87-2884 
Offer '*afid hr new subscribers only HA3M 




.. r 


t 





QO“P' l S =i* -o r- 61 IP w r v 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24 , 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC " 


In U.S. Congress, Fears 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tri bune 

WASHINGTON — Chinese propos- 
als to curtail the rights of people in Hong 
Kong after the British colony reverts to 
Beijing’s control this summer have 
drawn tart protests from the U.S. Stare 
Department and the British Foreign Of- 
fice. But Hong Kong supporters in Con- 
gress say they are concerned that the 

K tests have not been wider, and 
der. 

A Chinese government advisory 
committee over the weekend recom- 
mended repealing some Hong Kong 
civil rights laws and electoral reforms 
after the handover July I. 

In London, the Foreign Office 
summoned the Chinese ambassador in 
London to protest the recommendation, 
while in Washington, the Scare Depart- 
ment spokesman, Nicholas Bums, is- 
sued a strongly worded denunciation. 

“We are most disappointed, very se- 
riously disappointed, to see the rec- 


ommendations made the other day,' ’ he 
said Wednesday. ‘ ‘We think it would be 
a very serious mistake to deny to the 
citizens of Hong Kong these basic hu- 
man rights." 

But die growing number of U.S. con- 
gressmen following the issue, as well as 
other Hong Kong supporters, say they 
would like to hear similar language 
from the president's mouth. 

President Bill Clinton has yet to 
broach die subject in a major policy 
address. Analysts say he is wary of 
offending China or stepping on die toes 
of the British, a U.S. ally caught in a 
difficult balancing act as the end of its 
long rule over Hong Kong approaches. 

Other major powers have remained 
quiet on the issue, concerned about of- 
fending China because of its fast-grow- 
ing economic clout and looming mil- 
itary presence, analysts note. A Hong 
Kong spokesman in Washington was 
aware of no protests against die recent 
proposals except from Britain and the 
United States. 


OECD Panel Faults Seoul 
On Labor Law Provisions 


By Barry James 

I nier national Herald Tribune 

PARIS — An OECD labor panel 
found Thursday that the South Korean 
government was at fault for railroading 
through a labor law that failed to honor 
commitments to allow collective bar- 
gaining. 

The Employment. Labor and Social 


Visaless Balloonist 
Expelled by India 

Reuters 

NEW DELHI — The American 
adventurer Steve Fossett, whose 
round-the-world balloon attempt 
ended prematurely in India this 
week, left the country Thursday 
tired and dejected after he was 
denied an entry visa. 

Martin Barnes, a colleague who 
flew Mr. Fossett to New Delhi on 
Wednesday in a small plane from 
the Hindu holy town of Varanasi, 
close to where Mr. Fossett landed 
his balloon, said Mr. Fossett bad 
been forced to sleep in the transit 
lounge of the New Delhi airport 
after being denied entry. 

The U.S. Embassy said earlier 
that Mr. Fossett had been granted a 
visa, but Captain Bames said the 
orders may have been delayed. 


Affairs Council ‘ ‘considers that the new 
labor law does not fully meet the Korean 
government’s commitments to allow 
multiple trade unions and collective bar- 
gaining.*' the secretary-general of the 
Organization for Economic Coopera- 
tion and Development, Donald John- 
ston . said in a statement. 

Those commitments were made last 
year when South Korea successfully 
applied to join the Organization for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and Development, 
which includes the world's major in- 
dustrial economies. 

Despite the veiled wording of the 
criticism, the fact that it was made at all 
was rare in the annals of the organi- 
zation. Usually, the organization relies 
on what members call “peer pressure" 
to apply international standards of good 
conduct rather than expressing open 
condemnation. 

Agence France-Presse quoted a 
South Korean Finance Ministry spokes- 
man in Seoul as saying earlier that a 
“negative reaction” by the OECD 
“would be an international disgrace. " 

The mildly worded rebuke did not 
reflect the anger expressed in the or- 
ganization's Trade Union Advisory 
Committee this week over the Seoul 
government’s delay on recognizing in- 
dependent unions. 

Labor unions in Western countries 
will also face the need for change that 
has confronted the Korean workers, said 
Evy Buverud Pedersen, vice president 
of the advisory committee, but “I like to 
think it will be done through more 


of Too Little Ado About Hong Kong 


Nor is any conceited protest in the 
air. 

“We're not doing much to coordinate 
policy on Hong Kong with the other 
major industrial economies," said 
Nicholas Lardy, a senior analyst at the 
Brookings Institution, a Washington re- 
search organization. 

That means that if the handover of 
power on July 1 in Hong Kong were to 
go disastrously wrong, he said, “it 
could be Like after Tiananmen, where 
we're the only ones to apply sanctions 
with any bite." He was referring to the 
massacre of anti-government protesters 
in June 1989 in Beijing. 

If the president to date has had little to 
say about Hong Kong, members of Con- 
gress have not shown the same reti- 
cence. 

Senator Connie Mack of Florida, one 
of four co-chairmen of the congres- 
sional Hong Kong caucus, a growing 
bipartisan group formed last year, said 
in a statement Wednesday that he was 
“more than disappointed” by die pro- 


posals from the Chinese panel to repeal 
tile Hong Kong Bill of Rights ana to 
make 24 other changes in Hong Kong 
statutes. 

Another co-chairman. Senator 
Joseph Liebcrman of Connecticut, said 
the Chinese leadership was “breaking 
faith with the international community 
and undermining the foundations of mu- 
tual mist" 

A House of Representatives aide 
closely monitoring the issue said that 
sentiment was “very widespread” in 
Congress. 

U.S. interests in the colony are clear, 
said Stephen Yates, a China analyst at 
the Heritage Foundation in Washington. 
In addition to the more than 3 5,000 
Americans residing there, 1,000 U.S. 
businesses have offices there, and Hong 
Kong, the United States’ 15th largest 
trading partner, is a primary gateway to 
the vast Chinese market. 

But even as concern among many in 
Congress has grown over die possibility 
that China might severely restrict the 


rights pf the 6 million Hong Kong cit- 
izens, so has the awareness that Con- 
gress mav be powerless to prevent iL 

" We don't really have a forum except 
fbrMFN.' * ormost-favored-nation trad- 
ing status for China, said the House aide, 
who returned last week Grom an official 
visit to Hong Kong. He added, “A lot of 
members are grasping for a platform." 

The trading, status faces a yearly re- 
newal in June that has become more 
automatic since the Clinton adminis- 
tration last year said it would no longer 
link renewal to China's observance of 
human rights. 

Another potential lever is continued 
U.S. resistance to Chinese membership 
in Che World Trade Organization. 

Hong Kong caucus members say the 
issue will come up in bearings in both 
houses in coming months. 

But Mr. Lardy of die Brookings In- 
stitution said U.S. officials would find 
that “if things go bad" in the reversion 
to Chinese sovereignty, “they're not go- 
ing to be able to contain the da m a g e/* 



Aj ypc Ruu'Prcjft 


BRIBERY SUSPECT — Tsuneharu Hatton, 64, a former deputy transportation minister, cento*, en route 
to the Tokyo Detention Center. He was arrested Thursday on charges of accepting bribes worth 400,000 yen 
in connection with airport cleaning contracts when he was the chairman of Kansai International Airport Co. 


civilized systems and behavior." 

Some delegates said the Korean re- 
sistance was an example to labor unions 
around the world that face similar chal- 
lenges from globalization. 

The South Korean government 
passed the law in the interests of “flex- 
ibility." but the Korean labor leaders 
said this would mean workers would be 
thrown onto the streets with no social 
protections. 

Delegates from the Trade Union Ad- 
visory Committee and other major in- 
ternational union bodies visited Seoul 
this month to dramatize their view that 
the South Korean crisis indirectly af- 
fected workers in other countries. 

Yoon Young Mo, director of iqter r 
national affairs of the Korean Confed- 
eration of Free Trades Unions, told the 


advisory committee that the Korean 
workers would not back down from 
their strike action until the government 
declared new labor and national security 
laws null and void. 

He said the government's offer to 
rewrite the law was not considered an 
adequate response to union demands. 

Nevertheless, the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Develop- 
ment welcomed the government's offer, 
and said Its member nations were “en- 
couraged by the announcement that 
trade unionists currently in prison in 
connection with recent protests would 
be released and that the warrants for 
arrest of other union leaders would be 

suspended." 

The organization said it had encour- 
aged South Korea to begin talks that 


would, in the end, * ‘fully guarantee free- 
dom of association and collective bar- 
gaining." 

■ Seoul Warns on Illegal Strikes 

South Korea's labor minister warned 
Thursday that the government would no 
longer tolerate illegal strikes, and the 
governing party criticized the opposi- 
tion for refusing an offer to reopen de- 
bate on the new labor law, Reuters re- 
ported from Seoul. 

Labor Mini shy officials quoted 
Labor Minister Jin Nyum as saying at a 
meeting of business people that wildcat 
stoppages to protest the law had dam- 
aged the economy. 

. Mr-. Jin did not sp^ufy wh^^eaiures , 
wouldbe taken against strikers or when 
the government would a CL 


BRIEFLY ' 


Taleban Advances 
To Contested Pass 

SALANG PASS, Afghanistan 
— The Islamic Taleban militia 
burst through opposition defenses 
to capture three strategic towns and 
pan of the Salang Pass north of 
Kabul in a dawn assault Thursday, 
witnesses said. 

The Taleban fighters, who seized 
die Soviet-built Bagram air bate 
and town of Charikar a week ago. 
thrust north to take the towns of 
Jabal-os-Siraj. Gulbahar and 
Ghorband. dealing a devastating 
blow to three loosely allied op- 
position factions. 

They then pushed toward die 
Salang Pass, to within 20 kfiotnc- 
tersof the Soviet-built tunnel that 
leads over the Hindu Kush moun- 
tain range into provinces held by 
the Uzbek opposition leader Abdul 
Rashid Dustain. (Reurersi 

Taiwan to Produce 
Air-to-Air Missiles 


warplane, 
“We c 


TAIPEI — Taiwan plans to be- 
gin mass production of a new gen- 
eration of home -developed mis- 
siles to enhance its defenses against 
Chinese military threats, state tele- 
vision said Thursday. 

The Sky Sword-2, a medium- 
range air-to-air missile, was de- 
signed in Taiwan to arm the is- 
land's Indigenous Defense Fighter 
?, the broadcast said, 
fe can enter formal produc- 
tion," an official at the state-run 
Chungshan Institute of Science and 
Technology, Taiwan's mam 
ons research center, said on 
broadcast. 

He did not say how many Sky 
Sword-2 missiles the institute 
planned to produce or when pro- 
duction was scheduled to be- 
gin. ( Reuters ) 

Pakistan Coup Fears 

KARACHI, Pakistan — 
Pakistan, facing slower growth and 
rising inflation, could also face a 
military coup unless it solves its 
political and economic crises, are- 
search report said Thursday. 

The report, by SocGen-Crosby 
Securities, said that any delay in 
elections set for Feb. 3, or die pos- 
sible reinstatement of Benazir 
Bhutto's ousted government by the 
Supreme Court, or fiubne by the next 
government to implement economic 
reforms should be regarded as major 
risks to -democracy. Any of these 
could “prompt a coup d’etat by the 
military and aid democratic political 
.activity ,% aprotonged period.’ ' die 
brokerage said. . (Reuters) 


* 




REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


FRANCE 



t ok u-\ru v v> a \u saw own slit : 

{■fiviiNii (.'<■ 1 * 4 ”:;/) SMSl-lr. W-Of l l ? - i-ft-Wi. f . f.t, ; ; ■ • '/ 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Caribbean 


BEACHFRONT 

ST. CRQ0C, U.S. VHGH BLANDS 
Prims restoermal community at Carafe 
Reel. V2 acre parcel with powder soft 
wt«e sand teaches. Water on sue. 
Inquire: Richards & Ayer Reattan 
Phone: BQS-7724420 
Fax 808-772-2958 


French Riviera 



HAUSSMANN Group 


CAPFEffiAT 

WAGNIPfcBfT SEA VIEW 
VILLA. TBWACES. GARDEN 
PRICE : FFMOO.OOO 
Cmfe-KAW 
let +33 IDU 92 00 <9 49 
Fax 4-33 (0) 4 93 69 4Q BB 


Germany 


MUNICH 

kt beat oftr BpartmtnKoopfcc 
* otflca span + storefront 

n upmarta oty coder. 384 sqm 

12000 aim. outing s fttemai 

tertnartT 5 ferate 12 uriis 
Realty SCHRQTT Tdfex *4939.180193 


A PIECE OF LAND from your native 
county Germany. The extraostiirery on 
afea. keepsakes f» you 5 yaw tarty, 
you hands or Qua ness partners Noe 
arauatte. Special new rear pries USS 
WHO/sqm, an inclusive. Y.Mi. Voter, 
Minen phmifex *<g ioj 89 - 029 4422 . 


Great Britain 


HOMESEARCH LONDON LTD Let us 
search lor you. We find homes / flats 
to buy and rent For todriduafc and 
compartas. The purchasers professton- 
ais. 7 deyweeak. Tel: +44 171 838 
1066 Fax + 44 171 838 1077 
hdpJ/ww.fiorrwmcfuaiJtftan 


Greece 


SYROS BUND, GREECE 8300 sqm 
(and with 100 m. waterfront Swim off 
your house o( 4 bedrooms. 3 beds, elec- 
tric heal, fireplace, tuny furnished USS 
15 or 0U 21 rnSon. For further Mb cal 
Germany (+491 0221 - 496199. 


AfJCYON SAL 70 km from Athens, at 
the seaside, small 2 -swry vMs. quality 
Constiuaed & kristed, 1100 sqm | 
den, quiet surroumings. USS 
negotiable. Fax +301-2220333. 


Italy 


VENEZIA ■ Owner seBs apartment 
overioafcing Gudecea Card lfifi maps*- 
cant views on Verdes's most famous 
morunents and composed of 2 man 
moms. 2 anal nooms. kfchen. batioom, 
small stow room and a cellar, in old 
W«mg totally restored in 1968. New 
i and mBfc ua ns p cr taNu i L 
1 USS 350,000 or aquvafeit 
Tel: (3M) 3S109SB Or write Mr. Carom 
Pwiqwssa Ctatida 7 - 00196 Norm. 


QLEVANO ROMANO. An year vacation 
hoiBB n SaHna mcunains, 45 bn a. of 
Rome. 200 sqm, charming. 1 1/2 tore. 
Renovated, up to data- Beautiful view. 
700 m al Price DM 400000. Tat *45 
33 14 36 36 Fax *45 33 32 43 32 


Morocco 


MARRAKECH 

Sew&oaf property of 7SL27 acres 
(7.8 te| tar sale n teaudM petal garden 
(Ptfterw). Existing butting part. 
USS 4 mo. 

Conan Tat +41 1 405 99 55 cr 
F« +41 1 405 99 90 m SWnegger 


Portugal 


MARBLE Voss maibta propardes in 
Portugal lor uto. Tel: BRUSSEL5 
(+32-2)707 £4.08 


WEST INDIES 


ST. BAATffilfMY 
HUNCH WIST INKS 


house ha s large w ing room, rating mom, 
modem Merest, service room are] tat 
^ ^ B ert ram house h as 3 double 
bedrooms wCh bathrooms. Pod butt Into 
hialdB. Gardens, sundeds and shaded 
rate Tta property has an axceflem ate 
lor at adrttonaJ house without affecting 
privacy. For sate by miner. U8S2J00JBQ, 
F« 2 1 2-255-6552 or 
IE=sTefc 21 2-807-1 155 act. Z21 USA.--! 


P0RTWA0. LUXURY HOUSE, 300 
sqm on (mate got cans. Guestoouse 
100 sq.m., poof. Pnce (JSS650K Tet 
+464690 36200 Fax +4&&590 36265 


Monaco 


MONACO 

220 sqm aotmert, good content, 
spectacular view on the sea am tie 
PrapaSty, spacas firing room, three 
bedrooms, fitted kfeton nidi sems 
beck Brace. Storage cefai and parting. 
FFB^OOflOO. Negotiable t qu* sale. 

PAR K AGENCE 

Le Mi Pataca 
25 avenue do la Costa 
HC 98000 Haute Carlo 
Tel (377) 93 25 15 00 
Fax (377) 33 2S 35 33 
wm.montBcaito.mcfle9d«fparii agence 


Spain 


COSTA BLANCA, SPAIN, Eaten » 
top residence. Spectacular views. 2 
acres. 4 beds, 5 balhs. Pod PRIVATE 
SALE (jfffi 575LM0. Tet (340} 549 8456 
Fat (346) 649 7367 


PALMA DE MALLORCA, unqwr tease, 
150 sore. i8di cart., old town (shoppi 
dstrio). teamen (ttchen. lath, balco- 
ny nidi siqnfa view) and Shoo. S100K 
Induing charges. Owner *34 71610600 


l/SA Residential 


WMdHstar 

Harrison. NY 

SPECTACULAR Contemporary Ranch 
on private sere. 5 bedrooms. 3 V2 
baths, soaring ceilings, skylights, 
faptesa ii the Jwg nwn and maser 
betteom, aid a gotrmm ast-fii (ashen 
A must seed SSeJXU 

JULIA B. FEE 

We Stand For Westchester 
Tel: (914) 967-4600 USA 


HOUSTON, TEXAS, State of B» at 2 
betioom, 2 \li bait penthouse, 3.400 
sq. tt Luxury Pulping, afi antenoes. 
across ton grant Qwgned for targe 
scale entertairengfeofporaie events. IIS 
3699.000 Negate is. FAX SI W&9887 


NYC (Upper Were Side) 

DIRECT WVEfl VIEWS 

Gorgeous hill service 2 bedroom. 
2 bath on Rhrereldfl Dmre bekm 
CotirtW Urtereiy. S265JHL 
Ebl Gold 1212) 5808119 
Fax 212-680-3778 Alpha Properties Inc. 


UAW BEACH, FL Lour OcaaTOroni 
Condos Private Beach, Marine. Bay A 
Ocean View 1 to 3 bedrooms from 
S175-S350K. Spa A Ftarese Cite Swkn- 
mmg P 00 L Tana, 24 Hr. Secuty, Con- 
cierge & Valet Servtaas. Accord InfL 
1-3CW52-1456 Far 1-305352-1623. 

USA Farms & Ranches 

AftZONA-OffNER MUST SELL beauti- 
ful 80 acres renditand. Taka over total 
price Si 6,70000. Afit S250.00 down A 
montfiy. Wraa. p.o. 6n sdbo, Mesqub 
Nevada 89034 USA. 

Switzerland 


pra LAKE (SEWS ALPS 

L JSatetoftntoneretwtticrtred 
■ oor apecid^r stnc* 1975, 

ABraave praoertes in KWTREUX 
VEVEY, VTLLARS, DlABLBtETS. 
CRANS4WNTANA, etc. 1 to 5 tad 
rooms, SFr. 200,000 to 35 gdo 
REV AC 

52, Montoribrt CH-1211 Geram 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fra 734 12 20 

UNIQUE REStDENTfALflNVEBTlENT 
OPPORTUNITY. Modem, spacious 4- 
bednxHii house with 8,000 sqm. land 
am vineyards in qua cow*? location. 
150 maters above Lac Leman, giving 
ons d Be wtotfs best views. Accesstte 
to Lausanne and Geneve (30 mine}. 
Pnce about USS3 mdon. For sate as 
whole or pans. For details please fax 
+4f 2f 505 5321. 

Real Estate 
for Rent 


USA 

NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 

1 nek to 1 yea. Greta Locations. Cal 
Pat/Ctnqui: 212-448-9223, Far 
212-446^25 E4M atoon^GaoLcom. 

Germany 

B5UJN • WEST, CENTRE* stggb My 
funshea ftai 170 sqm. 2 metpfcenr 
tGcepkons.2 dcutte bedrooms.2 spadous 
gnea's etaateem, 

ftted tatchenbreakfast room, pariwo. 
T* +49 3034 llBa Fax: 3034 82164 

Holland 


RfflTNOUSE HTBMATUML 
No 1 fit Hofind 

tor fseni] fjTEdcd hasesOEds. 
TeL 31-208448751 Fax: 31-208465909 
NDovei 1021. 1083 Am Arttartan 



Rea l ^ate In And ArQ und R 





INVESTORS 
PREBAIL Offering; 

900 a^aitaerS^ » 
to choose from a 

traditional or newly built 
vacant or occupied. 
Numerous possibilities. 
Contact: E. Grimbert 
+33(0)607 7654 52 


* 


LATIN QUART! EF? 
NEW RESIDENCE 


Near Ujucemboung Gordo ns We 
offor studios to 6-rooni apartments. 
Bocony. terrace, garden, parkings. 
— S.C.I. — —III 
64 me t fAao s, 75006 Paris 
TeL 01 4222 7B92 Foe 01 4544 2679 
(Aho open Weahinds: 10-1 pm 4 3-7 put) 


Paris end Suburbs 


MARAIS PICASSO 

Prestigious renovation of 
HOlaDE SCARRON 
FOR SALE 

One high efess. independent 6+wm 
a p artmen t (240 sun) tun ooutntd & 
garoens. atsgnrcat patted eatings, 
bred, from end d XVlBh cettiiy 
REDUCED FEES 

VteraatfOafe* 

T* +33 Ml 53 E0 65 73 
SNC 



LEdela CJTE imHOHyn. Parting 
ILE ST LOUS, 90 SQril Owl Barton, 
boftc ww seine. II & wik needed. 
PLACE 0E$ VOSGES, ‘pfedetene', 

2 beds, mmm 
tent* tamtam Csnctae 
Tsi +33 (0) 1 4481 Q5Q0 Fax 4461 0866 ■ 


CROSSY-SUfWaNE 

YVBJNE5 

9 8RAN0 NEW HOUSES 
Ava&jie in 1997 
Neo - transport REH 
From F 1,600,000 to F 2,790 JOT, 
Tet +33 (0)1 39 76 59 65 


PARIS 18th lacing dots. High dass 
mitrwt 360 sqm, 1st floor. Sunny. 
Entrance tet, rscepten room, edtaHna 
(tiling man Bafasiy laefeig bote, 5 brf 
mans. 3 bahs etft 3 show s . EquppaJ 
ti&Ev Indoor stsrocage wh actress n 
gnwid floor state open onto privet* 
gantei 100 sqm + ifetfs room with 

shower + undararound gsage + 3 cbK 

*5 20 59 09 


BFffl. TOWER 

A CDMHAHQN OF tflQH CLASS 
LUXURY A REFIE} DECORATION. 
Freestone txiftig. 4th floor, 8ft. 
Doubta tiring, 3 bedrooiiB, 2 batos. 
Fbeptoces. nakfa stuctio. peritiig. 
Tet 014601 5899IFSC 014601 6018 


1® CENTURY TOWfWXJSE - 

500 sqm on 000 stpi garden. Ctetoi 
exara ten to iP4g 4 fl aw; wo od 

SbEPpSSmIb' SenesLTO^ 

Tat Owner +SJ (0)1 46 2S 01 S3. 


ovedno tti^ 
oardsn and c 


SAWT CLOUD* AttracCw apanment h 
presflfllous area. 66 som, factag sotffl. 
Boa de Boiriogm. private 
f covered tanace, central open 
1 and equipped kitchen. Private 
garage wOt ttiati access to apartment 
15 minutes to Paris centre by train or 
car. FtM Cd +33 (0)6 06 41 56 64 
or +33 (0)1 43 72 72 30 puna). 


VEART OF PARIS 
HE SAWT LOUtS ■ 

Rare sto retired. 145 sqm, 

2 bedrooms. 2 bads, Ngh cstiips. 
BeautW viw on mar Seine. 

Tti +33 (0)1 43294507 or (0)6 60454091 


LTLEADAM-SSon from PAWS 
Character house on 4,000 sqm treed 
park. Vast firing, study. 4 bedrooms + 
SrtrsTa a&fisr, trim ester, Orangery Nr 
shops/sdnoWsWtoi p? 1 45 33 03 00 


PARC DE ROCQlfENCOURT, war 
VERSAILLES, high dass apartment n 
ported cortfttm, 150 sqm, + 50 sqm 
togia. Very aieL dose West tigtway. 
Bttfthato WWren, alarm. buNst proof 
door. 2 paitetgBfcefiv. Teltn 39S 87ia 
or 04 86 22 59 68 Fax 04 68 03 14 D5 


1» ta FROM EHSLE, UPPER FLOOR, 
Hgh dan bdttiig. 420 sqm spates*. 
3 wings, study, firing, tatchen, 6 bed- 
rooma, 3 MttrootTB, 5 WCs, 
ternary room. 3.40 m cetings. fff 
mfcn Fax +33 (0) 1 


PORTE ST CLOUD bantering Parts. 
Ctoimlre 4$ sq.m, pted a terre wte 
treed rod Berate, Eflef Tower rim, d 
comforts. F1M Tel +33(0) 1 48MKH4 
or 06 60 64 60 14. ®JTAL POSSffllE 


ST. GSaiAH DES PRES. RUE JACOB 
Unique ■ Exceptional vm • Top floor 
aritof s stefier or 2 tewfs, etafr- 

case, 45 rooms. 2 base. Parting pice, 
edar. TeL +33 ( 0)1 <3 54 33 ffi. 


LEVALLOB / NELBU.Y. DUPLEX, about 
65 Bqm Uvirm bedroom, batcomr + 
large terrace. Itofcnq Fl^90.000. 
Tet Omar on +33 (0)1 47 45 56 81. 


PARtS-NEUtLLY7WOOD5 CIB 88 , 140 
sqm. double tireig. 3 bedrooms. 2 baths, 
juritig, batam, «h floor. Parted coral- 
dm KOTJXJO Owns: 014562 0386. 


16flV VERT WC - flPTES KfflJWJG 
teemg Bftd Tower, 250 sqm. S rooms, 
Bth floor, needs modemraation. 
F 4RSOMOO. Tet ^ r 45 M 56 69 


(EAR VICTOR HUGO Freestone hid- 
ing. Luxury 440 sqm. Re cap ti o ns , top 
floor, dremt, flnbce. miffs room. Spe- 
cial price ROSS Omw .014222 7882 


601 QSEOH THEATRE, character hid- 
ing. 4-roon flat its sqm dram. qteL 
taW. 3rd floor, nice BSuattan, parted 
coraMoa Cati in French p) 1 47424001 

CLOSE ETOfLL. COSY LOFT 200 
sqm, on sunny iRAJan, 3 bedrooms, 3 
bathrooms, i 960 style, quirt Tali +33 
(OH 47-272509 

ttlHLLY ST Mm Masnficenl 130 
sqm 'Moutgeois* Sumy, vfew at jus* 
era. Petfed axtdQon; refined' decora* ' 
Sons. QOOOiOOO Tet 049080 601ft 

EIFELTOWERjAwBaidonnteBJieriect 
condtincrtn, dates fm3 tadbams, 
130 eqm. HM. Tet ( 0)14303634 owns - . 

HEART 0 1 ST GENUA* Freestone 
txftftag. 3 roans + fneftfs room, sunny, 
«hatm.FFZ4M Tet +83 (0)1 4567 JUS. 

THOCADBIO. Uatom 1B3 sqm. 2 pate- 
bus. On upper tart, Sony. Balcony. 
FS. Tet +33. (0) 7 4587 8855. 

5tt MONGE, new 2 -rooro 48 sqm 
dm, 4th How, m. Ft 200 ^ 00 . 
Tet owner 014300 4633 (dice hs). 

70s HEART OF 5T GERMAN, fnssrtne ■ 
bttidtog. 172 sqm. Upper feral, sunny, 
drerm. F52MTrt+affl1 4557 B855. - 

YBISAfLLES - TRIANON PALACE 
VERY RARE TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE. 
Tet <0) 1 4786 23 34 

RENTALS | 


Offices for Rent 

PARIS, RD PQflfT CHAMPS ELYSEES 
450 iqm TTWNOSE. groute fbor + 
2 Boos + 190 sqm basawd- Partings. 
Beflmcta Tnt +83 (0)1 45 04 49 A 

Paris Area Furnished 

CAPTTALE ' PARTNERS 
MBdpfcM apertnwts, d sizes 

Paris and ateata 

Tel +33 p)H 81 48211. Fo(0)1-461482I5 
We bdp you bosh 

JHft, 7ROCADSTO, eiegsrt 80 aim 
aanjr. 1 bedroom. douUe JMig. roetie . . 
bathroom, flreptaca, TV, tax, cordless - 
phone, rawing madia. Fttym net . 
per month. February I7ih thru May Wl 
F arfTat ( 1 ) 45 53 2104 : 

m VICTOR HUGO ■ Luartwa,- 

totehed feutaert tauve+tito room 

4 bedroonw, 3' bathrooms, ktehw, iter . 
conditioning. SO sqm. F35.000 +- - 
F2£BQ. T*+33(^T4J« 73. - 

Wl, TROCADBR), JEWa dude, te-. 
rafted Trance oerisfiBu SW Tower. 
Sumy, quiet. F4.200 nrt 014240 9332. 


5AHT GERIUN. 66 1 
standard, t betforeiJ 
floor, enrstadang Saint I 
pft nnBL Tetfa fa* 804218 - 






ktaef Bcctreenodafat stutio-5 bedrooms • 
QxSb end semce assured ’ 
RGlOYTOIfOVEW 
Tsf +330)147588011 F» (0)1 45517577 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT N PARIS 
Tet + 33 ( 0)1 47 j 8 L 3 (L 05 


ST QERMAM DES PFES. Oner rate • 
for 1 year gorgeous i-hedroom tteptat, • 
110 sqm., to 18 & cBrtujy house. • 
FFISflXL Tet (Cfl 1 47 34 00 24 

APALACHK BAY WTSWATONAL _l 
FUBmSHH) PABJS APAHTMBTTS ! 
wmapatadreexoro 


t LOC4FUT.COM - CENTRAL PARE. , 
1 week toft mlhL Deluxe apataente, • 
TV, kren, Hfchens. Tet+33 0Q143O67O32 ■ 


dess, maid sa ivies 
Tet 06 OB Zi 32 V 


stotfebtoh ' 
per-weriL 1 


TISINB. 2 ram, gust m rdosd 
decoradon, eqUpped Sfw. FFTfiOO 
naetf. Dfiad owner (0) 1 45 35 Si 62 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


16 th, BLD FLAKDfflN 
Bcepdonti 7 rooms, dB biltirn, 
237 sqjq. targe reception FISflJO +. 
chapes. Tet +33 02 3S 8q 

GFF 


ITttL IETOC WJBtS 
Jn beeudu tottnq 4 roans, 93 sqm 
FlUOOO + chsma wHt raffs room. 

- Tet +33 ($1 49 02 36 H 

Gff 


«fc parc uomms uteet aria 

70 sqm. + extra firing Bccaraaodtoioa 
Ftjxb not T* +33 Hi 45 69 81 80 


2 «h ON TREED SQUARE, 33 sqnC 
stutij- Udnenq sharer room any. 
F3^9tiW net Tet (0) 1 43 21 36 47 


ON UOaeO0Rfi QARDBfS • 226 , 
. sqm 7. rooms; 3 baft* 3«d floor, newti 
rodone-TNnnming +33 (0) 1 4824.04® . 


PAHTIBW, sunny 2 

«, TarowT, (tpen * 
-n&k Feb.1, 



PAGE 5 


t 



* 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 34, 1997 


EUROPE 


) *£*£**,* ~ 
* Wafaw gftw Pag Seivin. 


ighs a Further Nuclear Weapons Agreement With Moscow 


in reduction 

«wjng to senior U.S. officials. 

interesl “ such 
^ SCCIU ^fense 
ftat ^ now examin- 
JDg the military consequences of or- 
“E®8 asmany as 1,000 additional nu- 
clear warheads to he scnqjped ra b3h 
**?**■ could leave residual forces 
®? ff. 88 2,000 weapons — or 
roughly the level of the 115. stratemc 
nuclear arsenal in 1 956 . 

The study represent the Pentagon's 

Pressure Rises 
■, On Yeltsin as 

• t •• * 

He Stays Away 

The Associated Press ' 

. MOSCOW —President Boris Yeltsin 
cud not appear at the Kremlin on 
Thursday, adding to. an atmosph ere of 
political turmoil as opposition law- - 
makers said they would press efforts to 
remove him from office for poor health. 

A day after a stormy Parliament ses- 
sion that failed to muster enough support 
for a resolution on Mr. Yeltsin's removal. 
Prime Minister . Viktor Chernomyrdin . 
condemned the Communi st -led move as 
“inappropriate and tactless,” ■ 

The Communists are demanding an 
appearance by the ailing Mr.. Yeltsin, 
who has not been seen publicly or on 
television since Jan. 6. But Mr. Yeltsin V 
aides say he unexpectedly visited his 
office Wednesday. 

Mr. Yeltsin's press secretary said the 
-president was working on documents at 
his country home, where he is recu- 
perating from pneumonia. ' 

Russia now faces “a general crisis of . 
state power, which is becoming .ntere ' 
and more evident,” Izvesttawrotein a 
front-page commentary Thursday- 
The president’s latest absence, aftera 
half year of heart problems and only 
sporadic Kremlin appearances , has em- 
boldened the harid-eoie opposition and. 
prompted increasing^cries for him. to 
step down. . 

The turmoil boiled over Wednesday in 
a raucous Partiamentsessioo over a Com- 
munist resolution — : natlegaflyhinding 
— to remove him iron offi^Tteiwxe 
than~siwe£ho^ 

result but amounted to a’ warning to Mr. 


firet debited examination since 1994 of 
ute mcnts of seeking new constraints on 
weapons that defined the status of the 
two nations during tire Cold War but are 
dow seen by maty military officials as 
having greatly dinmished impomnce. * 
Proposing new cuts is also seen by 
some U.S. Officials as a wav rn nenainri* 


Russian legislators to ratify the START- 
2 treaty, which calls foe the 50 percent 
reduction. Moscow has been balking at 
freacccmiongrounds that irwffl-oost too 
much to carry Out and will impel the 
Russia to build new strategic weapons to 
maintain rough parity with die United 
States at the ccilmg the treaty sets. 

_ . The Defense Department study is be- 
ing conducted both by the Joint Odets 
of Staff and by civilian experts at the 
Pentagon as a pari of a more sweeping 
review of military strategy and budgets. 
It is expected to be finished before a 
March summit meeting here between 


; Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris 
Yeltsin, the officials said. 

■' Mr. Yeltsin has said he supports set- 
ting a lower ceiling for UJ3. and Russian 
strategic nuclear arms than the one set by 
START-2, and some US. officials are 
pressing for Mr. Clinton to teach a tent- 
ative accord on the framework of a new 
treaty during the meeting. Details of the 
accord coukl then be negotiated once the 
Russian Parliament ratifies START-2, 
according to tins proposal. 

Former Senator William Cohen, the 
Maine Republican who was unani- 
mously approved by the Senate on Wed- 
nesday as secretary of defense, told the 
Senate Armed Services Committee sev- 
eral hours before the vote that “de- 
veloping with Russia a statement of 
principles” on a new nuclear treaty was 
“one measure under cflosKk^Qa.’* 
President Bill Clinton has been re- 
luctant to overrule the military on such 


sensitive issues, and U.S.-Russian dis- 
cussions on nuclear arms cuts essen- 
tially ended in 1994 when Defense De- 
partment officials decided that no more 
reductions were warranted at that time. 

Several officials said the review of 
U.S. nuclear force levels grew out of a 
request by former Secretary of Defense 
William Perry to General John $ha- 
likashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
staff, shortly after Mr. Perry returned 
from a disappointing trip to Moscow in 
October. Mr. Perry had sought ro per- 

raove toward ratificatiOT of thelSiTART- 
2 treaty, which was signed in January 
1993 by Mr. Yeltsin and President 
George Bush. 

Congress approved the accord in Janu- 
ary 1996. but Mr. Yeltsin has not put his 
political weight behind it, and the Par- 
liament has refused to vote on it. 

After bearing a host of complaints 



_ ’.Mil' 

umottia. • rJ An*Ni •dm&mlhaaiotfntKefKnt 

es “a general crisis of . UP IN ARMS— A couple supporting protesters Thursday who demand elections in Sofia. The main opposition 
& is becoming more party threatened mass strikes after President Petar Stoyanov failed to reach a compromise with rival factions. 

Izvestra wrote in a f ~ - 

salary Thursday. 

latest absence, aftera . , f 

What Lebed Sells, the Donald Buys 

ino (-rifts frrr him tn ir 


step down. : . By Rachel L. Swaras 

The tuimod boiled ewer Wednest^ m NewTorit-nmezSen** 

araiKXHtsFaruamentsesaoooveraCom^ — : : — 

munist resolution — jxji'lega^biadn^ -i NBW YORK — During his swing 

— toranowbimiram office; The iww, throughthe corridore of America’s busi- 
thansb/eraftow nesrwtW 

result but amounted to a’ warning to Mr. titemh^ generaf vdio a^ires to be the 
Ydtsm togetbacktowodcsomorfitee--:aexr president of Russia, hobnobbed 
wrase political raoblems. V . . .... .... wiibexecuiives at Du Pont in Delaware 
Members of the State Duma, Par- and sipped tea wifiifWaU Street investors 
lament's lower house, first voted, 229 to at the Harvard Qubin Ma nha tta n. 

63. tomaketheresolitfioathfcbasisfbra. .And. then heriropped in on die man 
final voce. But in a 102 to 87 vote, with/ wbo aspires to be treking of New York 
five abstentions, they rejected die mea^’ capitalism.. 

TUa ivrar r rutmnv/va rntttn- - It/fr T i^ko/l TVinolrl Tnmm 


sure. The Duma's press service main- 1 , Mr. Lebed, met* Donald Trump, 
tained after the vote that it duty.. amount .. For almost an hour Wednesday, the 

tedtoapostp«ieroent.andthathquybe twnrencanfered at Trump Tower in a 
taken up a g ain in February.- " meeting that was declared off-limits to 

The Russian Constitixtion says die the press. What could be in the works? A 
president no longer rules if there, is a . five-star hotel and casino smack-dab in 
”lasidng inability to exercise his powers Ried Square? ' V 
due to his state of-hedth.” But it does- ; Mr. Trump said be did indeed discuss 
not say who determines that inability,. . . his intentions to build “something ma- 
iriving Parliament no right to decide the jor” -in Moscow, maybe a hotel, maybe 


due to his state df-ftealth.” But itdoes- 
not say who detennines that inability,, 
giving Parliament no right to decide the 
issue and apparently leaving .the. ulti- 
mate decision up to the Kremlin. 


{Moscow pity offidals said Thursday 


they are on die verge of signing an 
agreement with Mr. Trump to revamp a 
hotel, The Associated Press reported. 

[Mr. Trump sard he could renovate 
the dilapidated Hotel Moskva within 1 8 
months, said the first deputy mayor; 
Vladimir Resin. But the American is 
also interested in redoing the nearby 
Hotel Rossiya, the official said.] 
Whatever Mr. Trump's plan, Mr. 
Lebed said, he was all for it, with one 
caveat. 

“The highest skyscraper in the world 
cannmbe built next to the Kremlin,” the 
Russian joked. “We cannot allow any- 
one spitting from the roof of the sky- 
scraper on the Kremlin.” 

But for all his jokes and witticisms, 
Mr. Lebed, 46, described his mission as 
a serious one. For while the ailing Boris 
Yeltsin remains president of Russia, the 
campaign to replace him is already un- 
der way, at home and abroad. 

And Mr. Lebed’s visit to the United 
Stales has been widely viewed as an 
attempt to win the support of U.S. busi- 


BRIEFLY 


• •• • ■ - thousands of opponents of President Slobodan Milosevic 

Scientology Groupls Ordered 
To Shut Down by Athens Judge 

ATHENS A judge has ordered Scientologists in Athens the opposition to take power there. (AP) 

under faJsTp^^ to court rtocuraents. Nationwide Strike in Greece 

‘ ‘The court orders tbc dissolution of the group based in 

Athens and orders it to pay all legal fees,” said a 23-page ATHENS — Thousands of workers took to the streets rn 
court ruling obtained by Reutera on Thursday. ... . a nationwide walkout Thursday, as seamen ended an I 1- 

The ruling said the Greek Center of Applied Philosophy, day strike that had crippled mtemanonal trade and services 
a ScientoJoEV croup, had obtained a license as a nonprofit, to the islands. . 

nuhiic mterest organization but instead made money and The one-day general strike by the largest Greek labor union 

but people’s mental and physical health at risk. against gpveronem-imposed austerity closed banks, public 

^ Court sources said the judge’s decision was registered and private offices and ground mass transit to a halt. (AP) 

. In Britain, Hints of Earfy Election 

center's lawyer was not avaJable fvcaauneat. (Reuters) LONDON — ■ Talk 0 f early general dections in Brian 

Seibs and Police Clash OverMedm ^ 

KRAGU JEVAC, Yugoslavia — PoHcemen beat up pro- committee, 
testers in.a central Serbian town Thursday during a face-off The Labour leader. Tray Blafr jumped at the opppr- 

local media, and the mayor warned that, tmity to telLLabour candidates Thursday that die action 
. . I d was a sign tire Conservatives were in a state of decay, 

iSeds of police offices bad barricaded tbemselvK disinte^raioo and panic." He added that “anything could 
insidTS^radio^d TV station in Kragujevac, about 150 happen rndie weeks atod, m a trference to th e dale for 
v;frtmPtPr<t 190 miles) south of Belgrade, to prevent their - general elections. Prime fcfimster John Major has promised 

raevuSe sturaunded by Stay would be held no later to May 1. (AFP) 


Nationwide Strike in Greece 

ATHENS — Thousands of workers took to the streets in 
a nationwide walkout Thursday, as seamen ended an 1 1- 
day strike that had crippled international trade and services 
to the islands. 

The one-day general strike by die largest Greek labor uni on 
against government-imposed austerity closed banks, public 
and private offices and ground mass transit to a halt. (AP) 


Serbs andPoUce OaskOcerMedia 

KRAGUJEVAC, Yugoslavia — Policemen beat up pro- 
testers ina central Serbian town Thursday during a faoe-off 
over control of local media, and the mayor warned that 

violence could spiral. . .. . . • 

Hundreds of police officers had barricaded themselves 
inside the radio and TV station in Kragujevac, about 150 
kilometers (90 miles) south of Belgrade, to prevemtheir 
takeover by new city officials. They were surrounded by 


■jt 

- r \ 


Scots' Haggis, EV Decrees, Gang Aft A-gley 


Apace Frontx-Prax- 

LONDON — Scottish expatriates got ■ 
a shock Thursday when fre European 
Union announced that its ban on British 
beef exports also applied to hag^s. the 
delicacy traditionally consume! at; 
Bunts Night uppers this weekajd. 

Haggis wasa populardtsh inthe 18th 
century and has been inunoitalized m a 
work by Robert Bums, Scotland s : na- 
tional ^"Add^toaH^ jn 
which here fists to n as great cbieftam 

o’ the pudduT race-” . 

Haggis is normally 'made fromme 
heart, lung, liverand assorted innaps w 

atop. Iced. 

m«al arid beef suet and stuffed into the 
sheep's stomach for cooking. 

Along with mashed turnips and pota- 


toes, haggis is the mainstay of tbe fra- 
ditiondBuras Night Supper and, in the 
Burns tradition, it is washed down with 
great mianories of another of Scotland's 
spec? Cities — single mail whisky! 

Scots living abroad have always re- 
lied on commercial exports to stock the 
weekend festivities. 

•But the European Union in Brussels 
said .Thursday that the beef products In 
haggis made ns export * violation of the 
embargo: / , 

“If the haggis contains beef tbenthere 
is no question— itcannot be taken out of 
Britain, even for personal- consump- 
tion,” said Gerry KielyJ spokesman for 
the EU agriculture commissioner, Franz 
Rsehler, who imposed the ban lastyear 
after the latest outbreak of ’“mad cow- 1 


disease. “I always thought haggis came 
from sheep,** Mr. Kiely said. “But if it 
contains beef, it’s illegal. " 

Robert Bums would “turn in his 
grave at this farcical stale of affairs,” 
said Mike Russell, an official of the 
Scottish National Party, which seeks 
independence from Britain. 

. His party, he continued, has “even 
heard reports of haggis being smuggled 
into European countries in diplomatic 
bags, which just goes to highlight the 
complete mess that the government has 
got us into over beef.” 

• “With a government of our own, 
which Robert Bums himself was a 
strong supporter of, Scotland would 
have secured the return of Scottish beef 
including haggis to Europe long ago.” 


nessmen and to portray himself as the 
one man who can lead Russia and pave 
the way for investment and democratic 
reform there. 

“He has come around to the idea that 
in, an attempt to ran for the presidency, 
it’s better to have the West in your 
comer,” said Steven Solnick, coordin- 
ator of Russian Studies at die Harriman 
Institute at Columbia University. 

“He may perceive that Yeltsin be- 
nefited greatly from support from the 
Americans in the last campaign,” Mr. 
Solnick said. 

Mr. Lebed received none of that sup- 
port during his bid for the presidency 
last year. The retired general, who won 
the hearts of many ordinary Russians 
with his critique of the country's hasty 
embrace of die free market, worried 
many U.S. politicians and investors 
with his sometimes autocratic demean- 
or and crude populist outbursts. 

. And while his popularity gave him a 
strong, third-place snowing at the polls 
and, briefly, a job as national security 
chief in the Yeltsin administration, it did 
not automatically translate into trust 
from the West. 

Mr. Lebed, who was dismissed from 
his post as security chief in October, 
took the opportunity provided by an 
invitation to President Clinton's inaug- 
uration Monday to visit the United 
States for the second time in a little more 
than a month. 

Mr. Lebed used the trip, from Wash- 

S to Delaware and mi to New York 
heading back to Russia on Wed- 
nesday evening, to reassure U3. busi- 
nessmen that as president he would wel- 
come foreign investment and continue 
the democratic process. 

“I want to build a free, democratic 
Russia,” he said Tuesday in remarks to 
the United Nations Correspondents As- 
sociation in New York. 

“The only thing I kill now are wars,” 
he added, describing his role in broker- 
ing peace accords in Chechnya and 
Moldova. 

He repeatedly stressed similar 
themes, saying that the Russian Army 
should not interfere in politics, that 
obstacles to foreign investment should 
be removed, and that he would not in- 
terfere with NATO expansion into East- 
ern Europe. “Russia should take it 
calmly,” he said. “There should be no 
hysteria.” 

But Mr. Lebed also insisted that Rus- 
sia’s brand of democracy would not be 
transplanted whole from Western soil. 
Press freedom, he said, would not ex- 
tend to the publishing of personal af- 
fronts to national leaders. 

And free enterprise would not ne- 
cessarily include the privatization of the 
energy, telecommunications and trans- 
portation industries. 

He left a strong impression on his 
audience. But even for those who met 
him, he remained something of an en- 
igma, especially since he was careful to 
avoid offering specific details about 
how he might manage economic and 
political change. 

Still, many of the business people 
seemed encouraged. 

And Mr. Trump, who pve the retired 
general a crystal apple as a parting gift, 
said Mr. Lebed had “a lot of wonderful 
ideas.” though he declined to discuss 
them. 

“He invited me to Russia and 1 ac- 
cepted,” Mr, Trump said. “I thought he 
was terrific.* * 


about the accord from Russian law- 
makers and senior Yeltsin aides. Mr. 
Perry became highly pessimistic about 
its ratification prospects and was con- 
vinced that Washington should take new 
action to shore it up — including an 
accelerated review of seeking much 
lower nuclear arms levels, several of- 
ficials said. One reason for his interest 
was that if START-2 is not ratified, the 
Pentagon will be forced to spend an 
estimated S5 billion over the next seven 
years on nuclear arms that would oth- 
erwise be eliminated. 

Among the Russian complaints was 
the fact that to maintain rough nuclear 
parity with the United States at or near the 
ceiling of 3.500 deployed warheads. 
Moscow would have to spend billions of 
dollars to deploy more than 500 new SS- 
27 intercontinental ballistic missiles to 
replace some of the older missiles that 
ST ART-2 orders eliminated. 


■ Offer on Sea-Based Missiles 

Washington will offer to cut the huge 
U.S. advantage in sea-based strategic 
nuclear missiles as part of its efforts to 
win Russian support for NATO expan- 
sion, Reuters reported Thursday from 
Brussels, quoting alliance sources. 

They said Deputy Secretary of State 
Strobe’ Talbott, the U.S. point man on 
relations with Russia, took the propos- 
als to Moscow on Thursday after con- 
ferring with the NATO secretary-gen- 
era, Javier Solaria Madariaga. 

Mr. Solana held five hours of talks 
Monday with Foreign Minister Yevgeni 
Primakov of Russia in the first official 
negotiating session on pcst-Coid War 
relations between NATO and Russia. 

“START-3 was not mentioned, but 
the secretary-general realizes fully well 
it is part of a wider package,” a NATO 
source said. 


Vichy Official Faces Trial 
Over Deportation of Jews 

Papon Loses final Appeal Against Prosecution 


By Craig R. Whitney 

\tn- York Times Serve 

PARIS — France’s highest court 
ordered an 86-year-old former govern- 
ment minister Thursday to stand trial 
later this year on charges that, as a high 
civilian official in Bordeaux during the 
German occupation in World War □, he 
had knowingly deported more than 
1 .500 French Jews to certain deaths in 
concentration camps. 

If he is tried. Maurice Papon, who 
was secretary -general of the Bordeaux 
regional administration during the Ger- 
man occupation, will be only the second 
French national to be tried on charges of 
complicity in Nazi crimes against hu- 
manity. 

Paul Touvier, was convicted in 1994 
of ordering the execution of seven Jews 
near Lyons 50 years earlier, sentenced to 
life imprisonment, and died there last 
July. Rene Bousquet, a former policeman 
acoised of deporting 194 Jewish children 
during the war, was killed by an assassin 
in 1993 before he could be tried. 

Mr. Papon’s trial, reopening the tor- 
mented issue of the guilt that France 
bears for crimes the occupation regime 
based in Vichy committed in its name 
during the Occupation, is expected to 
attract wide attention both in France and 
abroad when it opens in the Assizes Court 
in Bordeaux, probably this autumn. 

The Court of Appeals in Paris agreed 
with the prosecution's argument that 
there was enough evidence to try Mr. 
Papon on charges that he had known 
what would happen when he signed 
orders to deport 1.560 French Jews, 
including many children, to German 
concentration camps between 1942 and 
1944. Prosecutors bad originally 
charged him with 1.690 deportations, 
including 223 children. 

Mr, Papon denied knowing that the 
German aim was to exterminate the 
victims, and in an interview published in 
the Paris daily Liberation Iasi March, 
said that he had been put on trial because 
some people could not forgive him for 
having a successful career after World 
War n ended. 

■ The ruling Thursday ends Mr. Pa- 
pon's 15-year battle to keep the ex- 
plosive charges out of French courts. 

“It will open again one of the saddest 
chapters in French history." said Ger- 
ard Boulanger, a lawyer representing 
survivors of some of the victims who 
have asked French authorities to con- 
fiscate Mr. Papon's passport so that he 
could not flee the country to avoid trial. 
He has been free and living quietly in 
Paris while his case worked its tortuous 
way through die courts. 

"Undoubtedly, there should be oth- 
ers along with him on the stand, " said 
the siate prosecutor. Jean-Pierre Din- 
tilhac, during arguments last week. 
“The fact that he is alone does not 
exonerate him.” 

Mr. Papon’s wartime actions had 
been obscured until they were recalled 
in the French investigative weekly Le 
Canard Enchaine in 1981. when he was 
budget minister under President Valery 
Giscard d'Estaing. He resigned and was 
indicted, first in 1983, and after the 
Original charges were thrown out on 
technical grounds, he was indicted 
again in 1988. 

A decorated hero of the Resistance, 
he has fought every attempt to bring him 
to trial, ana denounced the ruling on his 
final appeal as a politically motivated 
miscarriage of justice, comparing his 
forthcoming trial to that of Captain Al- 
fred Dreyfus, the Jewish French Army 
officer accused, convicted, and later ac- 
quitted of betraying military secrets ro 


Grozny Renamed 
For Late Leader 

Reuters 

GROZNY. Russia — Zelimkhan 
Yandarbiyev, president of the 
Chechnya region, signed an order 
Thursday renaming the regional 
capita] of Grozny in honor of late 
separatist leader Dzhokar Dudayev. 

Mr. Yandarbiyev. at a ceremony 
in the devastated city center, said 
the capital would now be known as 
Dzhokar-Ghala (City of Dzhokar). 

It was not clear how the change 
would be viewed in Moscow, 
which waged a bloody military 
campaign for 21 months to try to 
stop Oiechnya splitting away from 
Russia before signing a peace deal 
with the separatists in August, 


Germany a century ago. “As with all 
political trials, the outcome has already 
been agreed upon with the authorities,” 
he said in a statement. 

About 76.000 of die 320,000 Jews in 
France during the war were arrested and 
deponed to Germany, most of them by 
French police, between 1941 and 1944, 
and few survived. 

Mr. Papon has claimed that some of 
the evidence now being used against him 
— documents he signed during the war 
attesting ro arrests of Jews by French 
police and to their expulsion from the 
country — were simply reports of things 
the Gorman authorities were doing, or 
had ordered the Vichy police to do, and 
that he had no idea that all the deportees 
would be killed in concentration camps. 

After the war. Mr. Papon became 
prefect of police in Paris under President 
Charles de Gaulle, and among members 
of the postwar generation he is better 
remembered for being in that post when 
more than 200 Algerians demonstrating 
for independence were killed in violent 
clashes with police in October 1961 . 


Turks Protest 
To Germany 
In Drug Case 

By Kelly Couturier 

Washington Pan Sen-ice 

ANKARA — The government has 
protested to Germany after two judges 
there alleged that Mgp-ranking Turkish 
officials, perhaps including the deputy 
prime minister. Tansu Ciller, have pro- 
tected heroin traffickers. 

* ‘These accusations are very ugly and 
we denounce them.*' said the Foreign 
Ministry spokesman. Omer A kbel. He 
added that protests had been made to the 
German Embassy in Ankara and to the 
German foreign minister, Klaus 
KinkeL 

Presiding over the sentencing of three 
convicted drag smugglers, a judge in 
Frankfurt said Tuesday that the court 
had found — based on evidence presen- 
ted in the case — that there were close 
ties between the Turkish government 
and heroin traffickers operating in Tur- 
key and in Europe. 

Judge Rolf Schwalbe was quoted in 
press reports as saying that two Kurdish 
clans known to be involved in the heroin 
trafficking through Turkey had “ex- 
cellent relations with the Turkish gov- 
ernment” and * ‘personal contacts with a 
woman minister in the government.” 

Asked Wednesday to name the wo- 
man minister, another judge in the case, 
Dox Neveting, was quoted as saying 
thar the two Kurdish clans had influence 
at “the highest levels of the govern- 
ment. and the name of Mrs. Ciuer was 
cited during the hearing of the case.” 

The allegations were made when Tur- 
key is being shaken by accusations that 
officials in the government and security 
apparatus have ties to a network of 
criminal gangs. In exchange for helping 
the government eliminate people 
deemed enemies of the state, including 
Kurdish separatists, the criminals are 
said to have been protected by officials 
and allowed to enrich themselves 
through drug trafficking, money laun- 
dering. extortion and other criminal 
activity. 

The scandal emerged in November, 
when an car accident revealed that a 
militant ultranationalist and convicted 
drag smuggler had been riding, in the 
same car with a top police official and a 
member of Parliament from Mrs. 
Ciller's True Path Party. 

The press and opposition politicians 
called the accident an indication of 
widespread corruption involving public 
officials, including Mrs. Ciller and 
Mehmei Agar, who was forced to resign 
as interior minister. 

A report from the prime minister's 
office has called for a judicial inves- 
tigation of Mr. Agar and Sedat Bucafc. 
the lawmaker who survived the car ac- 
cident. The report cleared Mrs. Ciller. 

Mrs. Ciller, who is also foreign min- 
ister in Turkey’s coalition government, 
reportedly is seeking an apology from 
the German government, but a well- 
informed source said that Bonn was 
unlikely to comment on the case beyond 
saying that its general policy was to 
respect the independence of the judicial 
system. 


< 






.DQSS'fS S ^ riS arojosrss S»oo*« ^sesooao tiojzosx* 





n 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FREDA*, JANUARY 24, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 



An Atmosphere of Fear 
Hangs Over Algerians 

New Wave of Terror Unnerves Residents ,* 
Debris From Bombings Litters Streets 


Agcncc France-Presse 

ALGIERS — In a dance hall on ihe 
outskirts of Algiers, a few rare Algerians 
come to dance to the hypnotic beat of Rai 
music, seeking to forget the wave of 
terror that is washing over their coun- 
try. 

With more than 150 people killed by 
bombs and knifings attributed to fun- 
damentalist Muslims since the Islamic 
fast of Ramadan started Jan. 10, an at- 
mosphere of fear rules Algeria. 

“During the day, I stay home.” said a 
young dancer who spoke on condition of 
anonymity. ‘ 'I only go out when I hear a 
car stop near the house, in order to check 
it is not suspect 

“But I don't want to die of suffoc- 
ation.' ’ he added, explaining why he had 
come to listen and dance to Abderab- 
mane Djali, a performer beloved by 
working-class fans of Rai dance music. 
' ‘The show is like a breath of oxygen to 
me." 


HONGKONG: 

Rights Cut Supported 

Continued from Page 1 

attempts to weaken civil liberties and 
basic freedoms in Hong Kong," Mr. 
Bums said. “We believe this recom- 
mendation should be re-examined re- 
examined carefiilly against China’s 
commitment to preserve human rights, 
freedom of the press, and individual 
freedoms in Hong Kong." 

In addition. Mr. Bums said the 
United States would be raising the issue 
directly with Beijing. 

For its part, China has said that many 
of the laws it will revoke were passed 
after 1984, when Britain and China 
signed the declaration to return Hong 
Kong to China and London promised not 
to change significantly Hong Kong's 
laws or electoral system. 

In fact, while hundreds of laws have 
been passed since then and Hong Kong 
has moved to a fully elected legislature, 
the only laws China has objected to 
concern civil and democratic rights. 

Here in Hong Kong, many of the local 
newspapers have harshly attacked 
Beijing's intentions. “This is an obvious 
attempt to emasculate Hoag Kong 
people’s freedom to demonstrate and 
collect petitions," said the Sing Tao 
newspaper. 

Even the Hong Kong Economic 
Times, often sympathetic to Beijing’s 
views, noted that “before amending or 
abolishing Hong Kong law, the Prep- 
aratory Committee legal panel,” the 
Beijing-appointed body that made the 
proposals, “should first consider die de- 
sires and needs of Hong Kong people.” 

And speaking to the Hong Kong le- 
gislature Thursday, Governor Chris Pat- 
ten leaned on the words of the 18th- 
century philosopher Edmund Burke. 

“People crushed by law have no 
hope,” quoted Mr. Patten. “If laws are 
their enemy, they will be enemies of 
law.” 

But Mr. Tung, who will become the 
chief executive of Hong Kong on July I, 
said: “The issue is not about the freedom 
of expression and freedom of assembly. 
The issue is not about human rights. 

“If people want to demonstrate or lie 
in the middle of the road, in ray view 
they’re welcome. They should be al- 
lowed to do so. But they must do so 
without causing inconvenience and 
harm to the community at large and they 
must do so within the law.” 

Similarly, Mr. Tung insisted that no 
Hong Kong group should be permitted 
any ties with foreign political organi- 
zations. He did not define what was meant 
by ‘ ‘political” and Ik did not elaborate on 
how the law would be enforced. 

It was “not true,” he said, that this 
was ‘ ‘a step backward on democracy and 
a step backward on human rights.” 

‘‘To the contrary,” he added, “I am 
glad that at a beginning offers new era, at 
the time when we are master of our own 
house, we, the Hong Kong people, will 
have the opportunity to ask ourselves 
what kind of community we want to live 
in for ourselves and our children. ” 


Still, the reality of violence was just 
outside, in the parking lot in which was 
the charred wreckage of several cars 
from a bomb that killed at least one 
person. 

The bombing was one of the small 
ones in recent days. On Sunday, a 
powerful explosive packed into a car in 
the Belcourt district of the capital killed 
42 people. The same day, the police 
announced that they had found the bod- 
ies of more than 30 people knifed to 
death in a village. 

On Wednesday, eight people were 
killed and about 30 were wounded when 
a car bomb went off south of Algiers, the 
third blast in the area that day. 

The blast occurred near the town of 
Boufarik. 35 kilometers (20 miles) south 
of Algiers, after Ramadan fasting was 
over for the day and people were 
crowding into shops, witnesses said. 

Despite its 3 million inhabitants, this 
once proud city has nearly become a 
ghost town since the wave of killings. 

Bomb attacks have become an almost 
daily happening, demoralizing residents 
who had hoped last year that die conflict 
that has already killed more than 50,000 
Algerians in five years was coming to an 
end after a lull in attacks and a victory for 
the government in a referendum. 

In the last few days, barricades of 
tables, chairs, boxes and slats of metal 
have been erected in many districts of 
the city to stop cars — and potential 
bombers — from parking in from of 
buildings. 

If a driver did stop, he was imme- 
diately challenged by youths armed with 
heavy sticks. If he was not known, he 
would be asked to moved on. 

In the atmosphere of fear that reigns, 
drivers are not allowed to leave their 
vehicles unless at least one passenger 
remains aboard. Side roads in dozens of 
districts have been closed. Everyone 
seems on the search for the next bomb. 



iRo^AsaioeFttocrfiej* 

Foreign Minister Lloyd Axworthy of Canada, left, surveying Yaradero beach, east of Havana, with a hotel 
official. Canada and Cuba, have announced a wide-ranging agreement for cooperation in several areas. 

CUBA: Canada, Defying U.S ^ Reaches an Accord With Havana 


Continued from Page 1 

praised Canada for trying to improve 
human rights in Cuba but questioned 
whether the Axworthy trip had made a 
breakthrough. The Associated Press re- 
ported. “I believe that our policy is the 
proper one, but I'm glad that the Ca- 
nadians are trying to make something 
good happen in Cuba,” he said] 

Unlike the United States, which has 
maintained a trade embargo on Cuba 
since 1962, Canada maintains normal 
diplomatic relations with Havana and is 
the island nation’s largest trading part- 
ner. Canadian companies have invested 
about $500 million in Cuba, the only 
Marxist stale in the Western Hemi- 
sphere, and Ottawa strongly opposes the 
Helms-Burton Act, as do other impor- 
tant U.S. allies. 


Ac the news conference, Mr. Ax- 
worthy said the Helms-Burton Act was 
“undermining the fundamental prin- 
ciples of international law” and called it 
a “virus in the system” of world order. 

Washington and Ottawa also differ 
sharply on how to effect human-rights 
reform in Cuba. Foreign nations and 
human-rights groups have long accused 
Cuba of repeared rights abuses, and the 
Castro government is extremely sen- 
sitive to such criticism. 

Mr. Axworthy, the highest-ranking 
Canadian official to visit Cuba since 
1 976, said Canada believed it could help 
bring change to Cuba “through active 
engagement and dialogue,” clearly dif- 
ferentiating his position from die U.S. 
policy of strict isolation. 

A spokesman for Senator Jesse Helms, 
Republican of North Carolina, chairman 


of tire Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee and co-autbor of die Helms-Burton 
Act, called the agreement “a sham.” 

“It actually has achieved nothing on 
human rights,” said the spokesman, Marc 
Thksssen. Mr. Axworthy “went Co Cuba 
with one purpose — to poke a finger in the 
eye of the United States. It's shameful.” 
Mr. Axworthy met with Mr. Castro for 
a three-hour dinner Tuesday and for a 
lunch Wednesday nearly as long. In ad- 
dition to tire measures regarding trade and 
human rights, the agreement also calls for 
joint cooperation “in the area of the ad- 
ministration of justice,” including the 
exchange of judges and judicial training. 

The two countries wifi also negotiate a 
“Foreign Investment Protection and 
Promotion Agreement” regarding ways 
countries can strike back at the United 
States over the Helms-Burton Act. 


Appeal Co Clinton for Help BLOCKBUSTER: Clinton Aide Pushed Deal for Party' Donor 


Algeria’s main secular opposition 
leader, Hocine Air Ahmad, called on 
President Bill Clinton on Thursday to 

E int a mediator to help end the vi- 
:e. Reuters reported. 

Speaking to journalists in Rome, Mr. 
Ait Ahmad said Algeria risked degen- 
erating into Somalia-style chaos, with 
the country in the hands of warlords. 

He accused France, the former co- 
lonial power that is close to the military- 
backed government, of failing to work 
toward a political solution and for in- 
difference to tire plight of Algerians “as 
if they were subhumans.” 

“We would like (his wall of silence, 
this Berlin Wall being rebuilt on the 
frontiers of Algeria, to be broken,” said 
Mr. Ait Ahmad, leader of the Front for 
Socialist Forces, asserting that Europe 
had made itself an accomplice to vi- 
olence by silence. 

“One of the initiatives we expect 
is that President Clinton takes a measure 
likely to help bring about peace,” 
he added. “Why doesn’t he appoint a 
mediator on Algeria? We believe that 
such an initiative in favor of a peace 
process will be likely to unblock the 
situation.” 


Continued from Page I 

because of questions about its origins. 

It is not known whether Ms. Haley 
was aware of Mrs. Kanchanalak's dona- 
tions, and a White House spokesman 
said the president was not aware of the 
Blockbuster deal, which would have 
been a small one for die bank. 

Still, Ms. Haley’s effort to push the 
deal forward is one of the first signs that 
some Democratic donors with foreign 
ties were seeking more specific help 
from the government than coffee meet- 
ings and photos with the president It 
also illustrates how some donors, in their 
efforts to get federal assistance, tapped 
into a close network of friends ana as- 
sociates from Mr. Clinton’s Arkansas 
days and zeroed in on agencies involved 
in promoting international trade. 

Mrs. Kanchanalak's donations were 
solicited by John Huang, the Democratic 
fund-raiser now at the center of federal 
inquiries into questionable donations 
from Asian and Asian-American busi- 
ness interests. Mr. Huang also arranged 
for Mrs. Kanchanalak to attend a White 
House meeting with Mr. Clinton last 


June 18. a day when she made $85,000 
of the contributions to the party. 

Records at the Export-Import Bank 
show that Mr. Huang also called Ms. 
Haley on June 18. And he called her 
twice during a crucial week in August 
when the fare of the Blockbuster deal 
was being decided. Mr. Huang and Ms. 
Haley are friends dating from tire mid- 
1980s in Little Rock, where they both 
knew Mr. Clinton, who was then gov- 
ernor of Arkansas. 

Neither Ms. Haley nor Mrs. Kan- 
chanalak would comment on the Block- 
buster deal, and Mr. Huang and his law- 
yer have declined, since he came under 
investigation last fall, to talk about any 
aspect of his fund-raising. 

Asked about the Blockbuster project, 
David Carter, the Export-Import Bank’s 
vice president for communications, said 
that in order to protect the confidential 
business information of its applicants, he 
could not discuss any specific deal 

But he did say that the bank had 
undertaken a study of whether it should 
get more involved in financing overseas 
franchises that might benefit American 
business, and that “I am confident that 


OIL: To Do Business , Occidental Won an Exemption on Terrorism 


Continued from Page I 

Sudan and a similar exemption for Syria, 
also put into effect in August, do not 
undercut the Anti-Terrorism Act 

Section 321 of the law bars American 
citizens and companies from financial 
dealings with nations that sanction ter- 
ror, violators are subject to up to 10 years 
in prison. However, the law also permits 
the Treasury Department to grant ex- 
emptions, which occurred in the case of 
Sudan and Syria on Aug. 23. 

Officials said the Syrian exemption 
was intended to encourage participation 
by Damascus in the Middle East peace 
process. 

As for Sudan, the sequence of events 
leading to the exemption remains un- 
clear. State Deparonent officials ac- 
knowledge discussing the issue last 
summer with both Occidental Petroleum 


and its potential partner in the Sudan 
deal, Arakis Energy Corp. of Canada. 

Occidental, founded in 1920 and 
taken over in 1956 by Arm and Hammer, 
who has since died, is an $18 billion 
corporation that moved into the front 
rank of world oil companies after it 
exploited a huge, risky field in Libya in 
the 1960s. 

Occidental has long been active in 
local and national politics. Federal Elec- 
tion Commission records show that the 
company and its political action com- 
mittees donated more than $600,000 to 
national political parties in the last two 
years, almost evenly divided between 
the Democratic and Republican Parties, 
including a $100,000 donation to the 
Democrats last March 29. Senior com- 
pany executives also donated nearly 
$100,000 to candidates, parties and 
political action committees in the last 


GERMANY: Kohl Presents Tax Reform to a Skeptical Germany 


Continued from Page 1 

Raids on German banks by inves- 
tigators trying to trace the flow of funds 
to tax-free accounts in Luxembourg have 
drawn attention to a German penchant 
for tax evasion. Half of 1996 revenues 
were estimated to have been uncollected, 
either due to outright evasion or ten- 
acious exploitation of loopholes. The tax 
system has become so complex that even 
tax experts admit to being baffled. 

“Tax reform is the most important 
answer to tire German economy’s cur- 
rent problems,” said Economics Min- 
ister Guenter RexrodL 

Tbeo Waigel, the finance minister, 
who led the tax work group, said that the 
new tax code would add half of a per- 
centage point to economic growth and 
spur new investment. 

But critics charged that Mr. Waigel had 
backed away from many of his initial 
promises for radical reform even before 
(he plan was announced. A group of 
Christian Democratic backbenchers 
known as the “young wild ones,” who 
have called on Mr. Waigel to resign, fear 
that interest-group pressure will lead to 
further backpedaling. producing tax 
tinkering instead of tax reform. 

The “work of the century” was how 
the government described lax reform last 


year, and those words have come back to 
haunt it In a front-page editorial Thursday 
tided “Why government cannot accom- 
plish a ‘ work of the century,’ ” the weekly 
Die Zeit said the real issue behind tax 
reform was whether the government was 
capable of vanquishing “malaise” 
through job creation and prosperity. 

Mr. Waigel has come under attack for 
proposing a 39 percent top rate, defying 
a 35 percent goal set by Mr. Kohl's party 
in October. This has been seen by critics 
as an invitation to the opposition to drive 
the rate over 40 percent and rain the 
reform. “Why give up so early?” the 
Frankfurter Ailgemeine Zeitimg asked 
in a recent editorial. 

Mr. Waigel also came under heavy 
criticism for “playing the card of last 
resort,” as Mr. Nofoert of Deutsche Bank 
said, by calling for a hike in the 15 percent 
value-added tax to help fill part of the 
gap. 

Mr. Waigel unleashed a firestorm of 
criticism when be recently said he 
wanted to raise die value-added tax by 
one or two percentage points to com- 
pensate for some of the lost revenue. 
Many of die leaders of Mr. Kohl’s party 
want a two-point increase to help bail out 
the social security system. But regional 
party officials, many feeing elections, are 
opposed to any rise in consumer taxes. 


Mr. Kohl's coalition put off a decision on 
raising consumer taxes until February. 

The AUensbach polling institute 
found that a majority of Germans believe 
the real impetus of income tax reform is 
to raise other taxes and not to encourage 
saving, investment and employment 
through tax relief. 

The Emnid polling institute found that 
79 percent of Germans doubt they will 
ever see a tax break or simplified taxes. 
Another 69 percent doubt that pension 
reform, which a separate government 
commission has tackled in coder to pre- 
vent a collapse in the next century of the 
stale- fundee retirement plan, will make 
their retirement more secure. A year after 
the government announced a comprehen- 
sive plan to attack joblessness, tie Emnid 
survey found that 9 in 10 doubted (he 
government would meet its goal of halv- 
ing unemployment by the year 2000. 

Kari-Heinz Daeke, president of Ger- 
many’s taxpayer association, criticized 
the 90.000 DM threshold for die 39 per- 
cent rate, which would result in many 
ordinary workers being hit with the top 
rate. Joachim Poss, finance spokesman of 
the Social Democrats, called the plan “a 
mixture of reform, retouches and tricks.” 
He attacked the proposed 15 percent rate 
on annual incomes above 13,000 DM. a 
level be said was too low to be taxed. 


two years, according to federal records. 

The exemption allowed Occidental to 
join Arakis in pursuing the development 
of a promising but abandoned oil field in 
southern Sudan that contains an estim- 
ated total of 35 billion barrels. The 
anticipated yield of 150.000 barrels a 
day by 1999 is expected to provide a 
windfall for the radical Muslim regime 
in one of the world's poorest countries, 
according to industry analysts. 

But Occidental’s hopes of tapping the 
Sudanese oil field suffered a setback in 
late November, when the Khartoum gov- 
ernment abruptly excluded the company 
from the development consortium, ac- 
cording to oil industry and U.S. gov- 
ernment sources. The government re- 
portedly was angered by a disclosure in 
The Washington Post that the Clinton 
administration was providing military as- 
sistance to three countries that support 
Sudanese rebels, the sources added. 

When Occidental sought the exemp- 
tion, precedents were not encouraging. 

But in considering exemptions to die 
Anti-Terrorism Act last summer, the ad- 
ministration rejected “simple parallel- 
ism ’ ’ between Conoco’ s Iran investment 
and Occidental's ambitions in Sudan, a 
State Department official said. 

Circumstances and “the state of our 
dialogue" with Sudan were “very dif- 
ferent” from Iran, the official explained, 
and “to make use of the economic stick 
against Sudan gratuitously made no 
sense at all.” 

Despite repeated calls to the com- 
pany's headquarters in California and 
Washington office. Occidental officials 
declined to comment. 


U.S. Says Saudis Withhold 
Information on Bombing 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Attorney Gen- 
eral Janet Reno said Thursday that Saudi 
Arabia have not turned over * ‘some very 
important information” from its inves- 
tigation of the June bombing that killed 
19 American airmen at a U.S. military 
housing complex in Dhahran. 

U.S. officials need, tbe information, 
requested by the FBI, “to assess whai 
action should be taken,” Ms. Reno said 
at ber weekly press conference. She did 
not disclose any details. 


the bank and Director Haley have acted 
appropriately at every turn.” 

Ms. Haley’s telephone and appoint- 
ment records, obtained by congressional 
investigators, show that she was a contact 
for a small circle of Mr. Clinton's former 
aides, golf buddies and associates from 
Little Rock who have tried to use their 
connections to make big business deals in 
Asia. One of diem. Mark Grobmycr, an 
Arkansas lawyer, met with Ex-Im of- 
ficials considering the Blockbuster fi- 
nancing. bank officials said. V 

Ms. Haley was one of the first staff 
members whom Mr. Clinton hired after 
he became governor of Arkansas in 
1979. She later accompanied him cm 
trade missions to Asia, heading die 
state's efforts to attract foreign invest- 
ment After Mr. Clinton became pres- 
ident in 1993, she served as a deputy 
White House personnel director under 
Bruce Lindsey. The president nominated 
her to the.Ex-Im Bank’s board in 1994. 

Ms. Haley, 53, is a native of the Phil- 
ippines. 

In an interview last Ml, she said that 
as a White House aide she had tried to 
help fellow Aszan-Araericans win fed- 
eral. appointments. She said she was an 
old friend of Mr. Hoang, whom she met' 
when he worked for a bank in little 
Rock, and had helped get him a job at the 
Commerce Department, where he was 
involved in promoting trade before lie 
joined the Democratic Party’s fund-rais- 
ing staff in late 1995. 

Ms. Haley said she also kept in touch 
with “old moods from Arkansas;’* like 
Mr. Grobmyer, after becoming one of the 
Ex-Im Bank's five directors. She said she 
had given them and their clients infor- 
mation on the bank’s lending programs. 

In the interview last fell, Ms. Haley 
said Mr. Grobmyer was “interested in the 
Ex-Im Bank” as a vehicle for developing 
business opportunities for clients.' 

Mr. Grobmyer ’s office issued a state- 
ment Wednesday saying that he had 
been aware of (he Blockbuster proposal 
but that he had neve: had any financial 
interest in it 


DONOR: 

$600 Million in Gifts 

Continued front Page 1 
and president of Mr. Feeney's Atlantic ■ 

Foundation, who has helped Mr. Feeney 

orchestrate his gifts since 1982. said: 
“He doesn't own a house. He tot . 
own a car. He flies economy .And I think 
his watch cosi about $15.” 

While large anonymous donations to 
charity are not unheard of, the scope and 

style of Mr. Feeney's giving, and his ; 
passion for secrecy, appeared to be * 
unique, according to independent ex- 
perts on philanthropy. ; ‘ ‘ • 

From the Mount Sinai School _ of ■ 
Medicine to Portland State University, . 
none of the U.S. recipients of Mr. 
Feeney's largesse knew who their be- 
nefactor was. Giants were paid by cash- 
ier’s check to conceal the source. In fact, 
the beneficiaries never realized that they 
owed their (hanks to a single giver 
they were told that the money came from 
several generous “clients” who wished 
to remain anonymous. 

Few of the recipients had ever even 
met Mr. Dale or Joel Fleishman, the - 
president of Atlantic Philanthropic Ser- 
vices, which actually gave away the 
money on behalf of Mr. Feeney's found- 
ations, the Atlantic Foundation and the 
Atlantic Trust. 

Mr. Feeney said that by giving an- 
onymously, he . could go about his life 
unhampered by pitches for donations. 

‘ ‘There are people who want, and rightly 
deserve, recognition for giving, but in 
our case it wasn’t important,” he said. 

He said he never set our to build a 
fortune, just to make a good living for his 
family. But as his fortune grew, he said, 
he never forgot that the reason a poor boy 
from Elizabeth, New Jersey, could make 
it through Cornell University was the GI 
Bill and a scholarship m his senior year. • 
He did not mention that to make ends 
meet in college he sold sandwiches late 
at night at fraternity houses, a touch of 
the entrepreneurial spirit that later 
helped him and a classmate found Duty 
Free Shoppers Group in 1960. 

He said that be retained enough 
money to take care of himself, a sum he . 
said was less than $5 million. He has set 
up trusts for his five grown children, he 
said, “wife enough money for what they . 
should, and will, need in life.” 

“My children are very kind and 
caring people who have genuine 
friends,’ ’ he said. “People are not close 
to them because they have a nicer sum- 
mer home than someone else but be- 
cause of who they are.” 

It was Mr. Dale who helped Mr. 
Feeney set up his foundations, which 
like ms duty-free chain, are based in 
Bermuda, avoiding the disclosure re- 
quirements of private foundations in the 
United States. 

Mr. Feeney also declined to take a 
deduction on his personal income taxes 
for fee money be gave to fee found- 
ations, motrier to preset^ (he secrecy. : 
And Atlantic Philanthropic Services, 
fee entity based in New York that 
screens applicants and writes fee checks, 
is set up as a for-profit company, also to 
avoid disclosure rules. 

Mr. Feeney gave his entire 38.75 per- 
cent interest m fee duty-free chain, 
known as DFS Group, to the two found- 
ations in 1984 (even his partner, Robert 
Miller, was not told). Now, the found- 
ations have received fee proceeds from 
fee sale of decontrolling interest in fee 
chain to the French company. 

The sale proceeds, along with other 
busmess assets fear Mr. Feeney has turned 
over to the foundations, have left the 
charity with a total of $3:5 trillion, even 
after fee $610 million that has already 
been distributed to charities, ft would rank 
as the nation’s fourfe-largest grant-mak- 
ing foundation if it were based in the 
United States, yet fee two groups operate 
wife tiny staffs,, just 20 professionals in 
fee United States and overseas. - 
The foundation's largest single grant 
was $30 million, according to Mr. Dale, 
who refused to identify the recipient on 
grounds feat fee Information might dis- 
courage other donors from supporting it 
One-fourth of Mr. Feeney’s contri- 
butions has been made abroad, half of 
feat in Ireland. The foundation also sup- 
ports projects in South Africa, fee 
former Soviet bloc. Eastern Europe, Is- 
rael and Jordan. 

There was less secrecy surrounding 
Mr. Feeney's activities in Ireland. Sev- 
eral Irish university presidents and other 
beneficiaries said they had met him sev- 
eral times. 


m 


SWISS: Bern Agrees to Holocaust Fund 


Continued from Page 1 

moving rapidly towards the establish- 
ment of a Holocaust fund. ’ ’ 

However, Elan Steinberg, a spokes- 
man for the World Jewish Congress in 
New York, which has taken a leading 
role in trying to pressure Switzerland to 
creating a fund, said fee organization 
remained cautious because, in a year of 
negotiation and confrontation between it 
and Switzerland. * ‘not one franc of resti- 
tution has been paid” 

The shift in Swiss policy seemed to 
indicate feat fee authorities here bad 
come around to sharing fee view of some 
of fee country’s main banks — a central 
pillar of both its economy and inter- 
national image — feat a bold, political 
gttture was required to defuse a festering 
crisis that could damage fee banking 
industry and fee econonw as a whale. 

Previously, Swiss officials had in- 
sisted that years of inquiries should pre- 
cede any talk of financial compensa- 
tion. 

On Wednesday, however. Rainer Gut, 
head of Credit Suisse, fee country’s 
second biggest bank, urged fee rapid 
creation of what he termed a ’’well- 
endowed ' ’ fund in excess of $70 million, 
to be financed in equal parts by the 
commercial banks, fee Swiss National 
Bank and the government. 

The govttturtent statement Thursday 
said fee authorities were prepared to 
negotiate the details' of a fund wife “all 


interested parties” and “welcomed fee 
readiness of some banking circles to take 
a rapid step in this direction.” 

The Swiss government marfe a pre- 
vious offer to negotiate a fund on Jan. 7, 
but, at feat time, said it was prepared 
only for the fund to be drawn from 
dormant accounts discovered in Swiss 
banks after World War H, That idea was 
rejected scornfully by many Jewish or- 
ganizations. Switzerland says that $29 
million has been found in dormant ac- 
■ counts, but maintains feat only a small 
proportion of fee money was deposited 
by Holocaust victims. 


Senator Alfbnse D’Amaio asked the 
U.S. ambassador to Switzerland on 
Thursday to relay to the Swiss gov- 
ernment his anger over fee .way fee au- 
thorities axe reported to be treating a 
whistleblower. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. . . . . 

After meeting with Ambassador 
Madeleine Kunin, Mr. D’ Amato said 
Swiss prosecutors should stop trying to 
intimidate Christoph Mefii, give assur- 
ances feat he would not be prosecuted 
and. make sure he got his job back. 

Mr. Mefli was suspended by Union 
Bank of Switzerland from his job as a 
security guard after he retrieved Holo- 
caust-era documents that an archivist at 
^bankhadsefe for- shreddtng, possibly 
in violation of Swiss faw t an& delivered 
them to fee Jewish co mmunity , ■ 


#! 



--J. i-v-'"*' 3'V - TT- - T— — ■: 






■wap*-** 


n-tuna 

" AHLDtaBdMPfe 

SfftfSSSS, 1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY JANUARY 24, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS j 23 ’ 1 w 

Advertisement _ http://wwwjht ^fum^ N ^ d5 ‘ m 


,n r * 


For Information on now w 


. UWWlF** 

WcawWJSg. 

ssssss&r 

ownOhWMf"* 1 




t sjSo 

■ lUMQ- 

S *5g 

mas ; " 

5 uxo® 

* H«» 
l SJI® 
X S318B 

I un 

X £2400 

c lum 
DM Jg® 

* s 

1 i s 


CANADUN DOLLAR POKTFOUO 
d 0335 A a 

c* OWB 


Edrpwiehighwcomeptfi. gj4 • gS^EnBSnF 

d - ■ ■ I •!» - Quamini Fv"4 h » 

2 rE5 ill * 53 » C unmun wagf j? 

2 SSti s 12^6 « <wnmR>M>f« 


DEUTSCHE MSB* POBTFOU0 ^ 
EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO & 
d OM 

2 aSai dm 

EUBOPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO IUH) 

2 SS£J ‘ IlS 

d Cm A* - im 

5 SS&? J “ 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

tf OnclA ^ 17jtt 

COBTORMt INVESTMENT MADE PTFL 

2 S I*" 



it (33-1) 41 43 92 12. 


kMIAAH s 


a meet r!l S , l , ^i v 

a Potn 
QUANTUM GROUP OP HINDS 

*“ n3n S£S r £a. L «. 


Ktl 


DM 1177-5!. 
EW 12*2.5 
la uiaw 
$ ljsijn 
J.F l.W-2 

* 1J9B4P 

s ;%»Aje“ 
sf Fix* 
s sn-g 
SF aiii 
QV iWJ* 
i tnse 
SF 1212.4* 
4 123721 


I I IkX 

4 2x2.02 

* n?niB 

f i :xs.' 

4 IS® 

1 247® 

5 ML® 

B S77E53 

n J2iife 
Fi 56/176 
ar lfiiSWi 
F. SJtf; 
Fl 


_ qubtOBT- B*oPr Fi*e 

m cueso te*1R-i2 1*-* 

■ Qusa Ford ■* '■' 

RABOBANK - W .JU£S7-ttfll 
5*^Si5 fc wci f?- ft 

M RS* Ki Hs MxO 
% gtS^FdBSFCS.' 
a BcsoSetFaEax' 

„ fchoMFCFlS.'CSRW 
REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

Hi CSJWCTE £4 i 

; i35fe£&3* I -s* 

:SK3tt3» 

- SWlfeA-SgW-i M|-- _ 

- ReaBT NTC '■v*±* £r ow*® 9 

swB3¥ 

d BMW? MwO. -i. u" 1 2 
w REntfS V. Law FC 
; SSSiwrFjrr 


d Set 3 

m U(*W«sWAM*; j j-- FS 
m U6<MnMJ«:S4J«l5e- 
S uoce«M*!P-r:K. 
m SWTyjft 
e P*ti TtaP . , _ 
a vnmTispi-wxJ — 

■fBJggSRSL** 

S Ua Glsee Fjc Em 
- JCTOBUC FUNDS IFAX «2S» 
a faa&c ul Hem 
a ®5usf»«-=« 

a ftfDucfic Ojcac- F««rS 

5 SSffiiWFSS 
2 SSS^t.^0 


12.71 
7J3 
10 10 
lt*2 

tx 

9(2* 

2JI 

423 

11JJ 

1127 

1043 

12H 

ta 

SL3 

2924 

•■US 


a SbCGW-WDW BO 5 
j ^ GaiF'Mi £cu 4ol4 
j •■tSOBXPW £cvi BCIB 

5 UCiBI-PrtiSFBWB 
? SB-WfWIUMBoiB 
e LBC En-rf^i^ Mg*—. . 

S SBiSoionTtwaCsr-S* 

- SSC 4CV ftapg, U.-T. 

r (IT -Wr. Fvw C MF .00. 

5 ^ bn Foot GEM IBM 

! - sat Sr'Fice’CWF 

; - sac 3V1 Floor VlSD 9S* 

i AIMlKa i'H'S* 

- urge : eia 

a BSr* sore Scdeawn 

5 w-'bomjsiE. 0 " 

; ECaBWCLHC lB" 

3 Fknn 06«l SWW» 
p FfsntrvaW 
3 CcmU9«aMClOI 
d GoePomow, 

f wmw 
c laavcw^ 

<f juBoi-Portao 
a SmnmaBond 4*iWfcn 
c Se. ersfli' 8693 VnOrtn 

. r.kj.mfa 
d urJwcw) Bma SeKCsn 
s unnwsai FuM 
p v«i Bora SWcflBn 


1M.42 

28S.lt 

-■87^ 

I4A.94 r 
117 Sfi ■ 
ill 47 


FF 2471" 

DW 

5 221 df 

Mo 93tAJH 

Lj S2SJ9.W 

Y SBtl200 

£ USAS 
SF 119X2 
SF BG&8 
SF M.U 
sf i*J( 
* 13041® 


PAGE 7 

« uK »lms s i aia?®, *8 i!«m® 

<? u|J £. Si*?! 1 tn Sow??® 

IK GLOBAL INVEaiOfKUJtGUE BttSEY 

d dSGSF - us T^iSfySjHS, * livjsn 
w ^j®5i"tS«sn l,,6S,LV * 7tin 

b^t^sssaai'- 

» ... . 1X42 

• s 1SJ4 

_ ttltciMJ'lEa**' 1 " < 1CK 

: 's|gjs is B 

• W'lP^vnSi-AIUoiMEjr C H; 111(7X0 
I W,:Wuna-»«Wl K ?B40 

^W^ESERYATlM PUH 
WPSlCTA*T«OBALM»WTH 

iPiUOtSTlHEMtHllLL i n.fi/. 

o Guse' 7ncnno»« Fima * *■*" 


^^^ynBATEorn'NKj 


P5t 114736 
E4V 110^71 


irr.« 


DM 

S 


DM 

4 

: 

s 

SF 

DM 


12.3’ . 

ffi.33 i 
11X6 
17.14 
ia:i I 
1B24 I 
1625 j 

i“ii 
1 122 
14® , 

16*1 1 
19J1 ’ 

1141 I 
12X3 i 
111! I 
I1J . 
1111 ' 


I B3 wmarTki 
-■ *" 1 SBESK T !S8 

mo mkhtum ^t iaanammbit 

n IkM PlomlB SFHB 

S Mwiusewi" 

Z m 32*» «^5 e, 


3 Aioemir, FdnaaA 
3 Aiwrc=n mw UB 
3 LB*, tinman MO A 

s i3ts»iCn»mO a 
j cwooi finswni □ B 
j DUWJOO'OTW* 
fl sp„iirCarwmeCA 

c i-ntJ CUBpor.'K CiB 

C jylijss* iCommiWBwn 

' £5 ?£*i>.h 

°‘ eh ctw "— —5* 

: !jsraffi“ a ' 

G^30C«i*rillO< 

3 Geoa Bolwcia 
3 gidooi mw"* S * 

,».... , j CkOdi Iriiann Cl 3 

1 HL I a DM. GBoat 3ona 
132* • c EBWHWSS’iiSt » 

IOTA". I e Eumr-tfiFUlneCe 
1B7® ; d 1/5 Sovcnowm 

164X2 I d rto "HI . 

IlliJt 3 CcV, Lir.iPwf" 

13S&4 2 USiUa.’O IW* 

99® e U4 ^meOf £» 

103.4* I d <4n«l 

° I^ mcrei Bora. 

THEEW9IB0KMENTAL 1M4PT TM « 153* *92 

031 S S2S 

; vg^ = '» 

TJ* E ^S2SfL«.D«l 


S 3U33 
FF ®g 
5F 79.77 

h us?S 

5 2C2® 

t 1629 

s 'g 

!F S ,i4 S 

s IS.® 
t 114V B 
l 27SJ2 : 
S I1J1A7 r 

; 16430 i 

S »4.1t 


Other Funds 

■ socn Lnm?” M 

« AXo*« 

* IdiMe GSH IFiefl Fd I 

r> 

■ »to» Fine Bona 
m *imn Fund Lv»*.'t 
“ iruna FSU3 
a UK Ocecnc F««a 
p Aca'.%cr. . 

41 «431 Sdl-ff-a^l^ 
m tuoilcnc .nierzr. utl 

• A.MHW FvM -» 

zi&3&«***f* vw ! 

_ Bioct DunnenaLK 

: BSSK£S&» 

• T ^^SvSSS" 

1174 j Cff UrwSc 'j'liGfm’JJ 

'.I® » Cc--Jrri'r'X:SC ; 4teHT 

44a I . cr 0TO--«i'Bwit2jMn4 
10.97 fl CB GOTHS' iriori F«n 
9J4 “ CC2;' Stool irueMBTttfs 

ilOS 1 p Srtira! L EasUn Eun 
lth | m cpmur> 'rtiitt 


10x15 

16246 

164 £6 
16434 
1C4JH 

‘.sirs 

91X6 

10617 

117.90 

10042 

K7XB 

19121. 


d Eurape DM Maa 

fl North Ainmca * IMAP 

fl Far Eos! * ,'69ia 

a Jaw V 10152® 

ALLIAMCE CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 

12® 

k U5 Gt Sbidcs B 6 12® 

!l j %s 

n A$ita Aflos Fd-ToooTDaCn * JIB® 

SSKSiSl^^f’M H 

m AHUM Future* Fdjprfll 
m Akrtw GBoM F<1 IDec311 

" ^SSKS 



■ m® 

Til® 
t 12049 
1 U&» 

} SB65 
{ ®12 
( 13UI 

i 92® 

S tSl* 

^POBTFOUD 

« -* l S?8 

s 14X9 


5 lEllF 

mm 

2 oSSeqhI 

d SSIM 



LSERVKHUD 


^UEfsaww 

i lists®! 

SI3I3U2E 


WjMMgMW* ,™ 
- SSSSa," - 


ASIA PACIFIC PERP0BMAHCE.S1CAV 
f APP * 

LMANAfiEMEKT LTD ^ 

Z OMSSrntn \ ^ 

* KS™wPd l *** M ‘ ’nffiS 
: sssstfSao. iuw * W7®* 

B AH AMjT MA7*M««*5£ r . UMITE P . 

10 London W1V0EB 

jnwmgrti^ , MM 

?“S£S{5ffi W 

SSSESS®b£^» * *fa 
f SSrSSaiuso * 

3 53t5SS3^3 ^ »S!» 

A BSLlninaJWiO® 

g gtEsss^S® 

S KbSSSigsl^, 

3 ttUSSB? 

- 8»-^RSSsSS 


late® 11 - d 

1«Sa" uS 
laffiL-ar ^^sss 

^ i H'SS»3S sf VttSKS 

HOST. fJ "®3 

FL «M!! 


„ tlqk SnCop< 

{BBk. 

3 - 

! SaSfcW; 


S Sis\3- 
: sssssSuS 

— GAIAOIB W P tP f HJHUStF^* 2 ^ 
nt^l 6»Hraffa*;K31 67 ittH J —,44 

: S8 1 - H 


Foefl-a 7140105 


VMS 

s sa 

! p 
j# 

OUI 
54440 


0 BBLUJ Woaj^KVEw i 

iflEHf'te 

tf NLIitim MBUCTHW. 




sgsfigs sssa 

tSUNIW 

KsKBr 

M9IGSEB PBHDU* . 

L^S^CTWMA^Wtr 

ffisg^-sagssssssss. 

ofMan 44MtM i 4QM32 


2275 

oSS 

ny 

] A® 
SF 130157 

dm mb 

FCu 147175 
E 1295X4 

% 11EUB 
FF 12720 
SF HI1JI 
SF HO® 
Ffl AM 1X0014 
DENMARK 
IB7B11 

Dtt jig® 

°“e rws 

n» 13JW® 
wdFd ®n ®8 

Sfa DM IgTJ 

I s JfSLlS 

DU 119® 
Fd DU 165® 



f* DMErimMk^Eauiy^ 

5 SlifeSSr^^ 

S SSSttoiF MggL'gy 

a koc» 6« E ^£i Rrv: 

S S^H^Su 

s ssaas^ss, 

. 1M Hmrne Fund _ 

RSISSBr^-ir..^,.,. ! USB, 


7X4 

10J4 

I6J* 

1193 


m G7*»SH=»y«L«' 
m DaHTUITI r unfl LJC 7DJOJ 

ri Trtflns 5 TCI Oft#n LldJDttl 

ftoild imm MU 8 LWlllI 


MANAGEMENT INC 

wawniaH 


1 679 WU 


n a- 1 

J1S® 



I ASIAN 

iwp«i»M*» 

GAMAlBMfa 


a Bma Vdor .us - DOdlR 
fl BMllMarVM 

3SE( 


v dam mnaaw 

: sfig& v 

: ssuKSSoort, i 

» GAMgmauaspM" i 

; J 

■ OAMRW4P 

: SSIES& 

: gus^vw 

m GAMHmRMO 

Z ^AMiS^MPODM 

Z a VMMU&mwUS* 


157.10 

54036 

Mil" 

tKq 

2705* 
190X3 
143J2 
117® 
Ml® 
230® 
139 J7 
14654 
241.14 
164X1* 
64125 
t 21290 
SF 301X0 
PF 2237J6 

1 314,9c. 

20434 
(. 1D42B 

VBjV 
17096 
174X1 
127X1 
116® 
96674“ 
14041 
14441“ 
125/4 



107.10 

2912Q 

WWW 

mxi 

12077 

C llX6z 

149* 

1429 

IMS 

IX(D 

V® 

1431 


DM 

d4 

c 

si 

l 



ttTTa HB! 

air 



m 

' j §M| 
i w& % 

S Hi® fl S pmrt /Morl. ^ 

* Bll S a Md»SotoBFa»B* 

IJj- hssS"™'^'^ 

CNE WTETWy An BOWC %n, 

' 1 1«(UKRH3 ^ 

SlSdAWW * 


; HHttSa 

: 

w OAM Pu EOMPiOP 

w KEKSSL 
Z SuSsFSpacttBona 

m CAMS 
a GAM Tl 

V GAM J 

V GAMTi 
w GAMTkvu. 

'BsSar!? . 

S 

w osAMMPConpaMo 

fl SammSmwMHidm 

i "s IB 

quo 

S 


37433 

11004 

HUT* 

651® 

123607 

111® 

434® 

E»JS7 

100X4 

10X4 

10016 



ssr 


QriFHtUruni» 


TV 


aI12iir ? M0497 
t 111444 

t 1139® 

1 110X5 

S 1489® 
S 115621 
S 11596® 
S 1577® 


msr 

fl FXLAL 11 Food 
5 FX1JUL n I Fond 
fl FJJLT, I Fond 
d FAS.T 0 Fund 
fl SAF^-Fd 

3 IjlB-Fund 

BSBfiW 1 , a® 

^5^^SaEWMH«rDB»*i«*« WJ 

l 20 ^ 

: ssssSpte * 

11Ja 

U>MBAI»«»jra»^,| ,0 %= 232X1 

* 

A SwluaRnd 

3 SSS5M3A"“ 

tf sooMff! 

nBLIFLEX LTDiCD 

fl M u M uH lHOr _ 

fl r wo« M yc Bn nTw 

a DonaUno imn 

a Japan«aeTgi 

i SS5S5 Si 

fl HY®™Sbi*KJ*» 

S SSSS»WITW_ 


. ttwertunDtttagw 

m Mamwyi WH 

* “SISKS £»SEp5rt 
n KS5 p' y r.iTrir^ 

of MoBiewim w*wwFd 

m Momenw WdaMopd 
to jte/iiWMMlfRn” ™ 

m M oiMWum Tj g g" figg 
m MbU P RI I* UltfwiANjdB * 

m MMOCWimVWiWMMr 

“ ul e 5S5£|S« v - 

* 

m AlWnot } 

BAJMraRO MANAGEMENT 
_MAM Moffi HCdOC 1 

TtSsSi^ssSSSS ! S.« 

fl lusutoowmouaD 5 nut 

: kssS'fSs*" 1 " 1 1255 

™^STs5 SS: 

: igSTSm^ mils— 

OLD MimiAEINTE tGUEBNSEYl LTD 

: psa,, i 

: ffl 

: i^ssf&c^ * gg 

; * 1JBJ 

tSm T WFJB lB FgM 1 295-2M5 

w "fSSSSLTHSa * 18“ 

w MS wonajnat « tpod? 

FteMinri i««* | Stjb 

ERWSBMM* j liW 

1 4SI.37 

2B2® 


1B9 9G 
14070 
il>3 

1K24 

lib® 

1262' 


fl SO NMMFiK 
A RGEur3t*Fi« 
d CO Pod'ii Fu^__ 
fl PO Dl*«rte F-jM 

a PG Band PL', 

fl SOEaenj^WOTtn-. 

5 BO Menw Pan F F L 
ilM RcttCS 5t* MCUtIJUir 5300 
BOTHSCHILD IGBOUP EDMOND BE] 

0*100 P LUN 5*3 MB30SO 

“SSsSSF r as 

- s «*«5 

rSP^m= «s 

5 SSteii^n^iineilAS s ^ 
SS&_.^ ? f f SB 


_ ira FUM income 
* ir.n Eamr 
. itniiar Eau-Ti 
4 LRaFiiMiwon* 
« Etctmcm Pcrrlaki 
•b Sttf <W3' 


| n fliun Tifl 1 ^ 

J TME»*A INTERNATIONAL FUND PLX 

SF 

3 71H!noM0iiieia - l*rd™' ^._ 


OV 


“0 


Ecu 

BF 

Fl 

If 


493X9 

647® 

07X7 

46L5P 

207® 

4041 

n*r 

25XB 
5668X0 
3350 
22X4 
77 71 
11 ® 
15X4 
1472 
12X1 
2014 
28X7 
179.13 
19® 
202.10 
10JM 
11357 


lENRnPiW 

WHO Fmtffcf . 


1 ww^ ri"*~ j 202X6 

: Miss’s®*^ ff ^ 
BfiTwP - “ 




Ed 1536® 
i 1X443 
Epj 10«i 


S SSSSSsb^" i™ imo® 

W WttP -ff’&KffirF Bol 197461 

“ 5SS^to£MS?.“ J "i^iS 

OPPEMMElMe* 0 » i.bc w* O**! - " 1 K7 m 

' ‘■“ J — ““"' 1 14675 

S 12061 

• 1 I2ZJ3 

I Ppptn Ml Ew iiLRl 1409* 

J J »■ 

ffflfe. 8* w 

SSSa*S ffis r’.|« 

— ■ — “ t ”““* 1Jd i II® 

I 14X7 

s 2403 

s 23J* 

t 1695 

S 16X6 

1 X* 3 

f 6® 

I 1197 

«"V m £8i 

I ss 


o OiUnoAHmBjeHg 
B QartmQ Enc wl J Pd Un 
m tSSma Riflfl _ . 

^SSS^^FdLM 

: ssssWisff” 

; HrtrMlX 


W U j'“* L“A _ 

- SSJgS?sWL .'• is® 

E PWWM Flftf Eft 

B Priacnc Fun= 

c PdaoxSt -fi j^r t£ 

t pntq« £i £~es "BBS. l s crj« 

5 PilmA Firt " 31 , gaol I® 

w fsi-isasc —"7 p- mciaj; 

•w ' e e -^ 

O IS 

Z Z ^SSe*AWli3WBI ‘ 1,S ^M 

" SrfeN WFirr A J 3flsL“ 

a SNecir« Imtf SA i utsoss 

BO THSCM IL 3 AgET M G MT fCU LTD 

m Mf Diymrtg ^.Csrr f igoun 

! ?^K52S3I£$v s »««-- 

5AM TAMDER M EW WORLD 1MV- ,359^, 

" Krik5?Rma 1 17075X09 

UCANDiNAVBlCA EN5K1LQA BABKEN 


i 1X299 
S 1.1141 
S 1J049 
S 1X441 

% i-ss 

y nJ3ta 
S 1.1239 
Set 17.920 
s 143® 

S 2.091* 
&M 9.990S 
50 11X0*1 

% 2152*6 

• 146898 

J ZOOW 
5 1.4930 

Y 79X148 

5 275*5 

! 2X6X4 

J 13050 
S 1X561 
S X426B 

s i7 !?? 

S 1X415 
% 1X274 

I 14X931 
S 7X401 
I 2.1177 
| 1X788 

Set 715125 
Set n jig 


its 

gir^j B- g3%@p 

-te®s i 


a ri 

a SnwFjBKDMflmnr “p 

iEfiSf-l 

«r Me® Oar DBMDH09 ‘S 
DM 

s srAi^r*^ °i 


■t ThePWMinFaLM 

snuBRSL 

: gSgS5afl‘nTS® s 

_ , rnihK»» 

isi 3 8aearsa ,» 

3 

s S&IBKA 

3 B9BST 


I 35007 
I ftxfflz 
5 10 04311 

* 673P3Z 

* 7X0191 

* fSLS 

S B702U 
O 17X4122 


.ANKEN F JND 

a EtnaouK _ 

d Flcniai OBem mi 

fl Gteallnc 
d txWmeMlne 
A vmWrolnr 

5 K 
5 £S&.® 

S 

a Mtosnicg^aKi me 
SKANKKWM 

3 ISSSSS? 

2 gss»u.» 

2 12SSSS 

A Eaunr Eeniln wnoi Eu »P« 

A Ew^Norlli Amatol 

fl SEwrQ«a tM ?* ,w 

A Inti Easwn Eunpe 
a Band Inn Arc 

2 ESKopjAtc 

i §Sgg« 

d Bead Swedmi me 
a Band DEM Act 
j Bond DEM Inc 
d Son! Date US Acc 
a Band Dc9ar U SJ»c 
a Swfdefi FtoiWe 

fl SMI Bond U SD KMW 

fl Shod Bond SudHi K"“* 

Z wS^—MGirWF*—* 

sssic'^M? 

S SSS'iSSS^SJ 

" sSSSweFulwFWWlo 

SOaETE&ENERXLE GROUP 

3 nwaj 

t iWsssEaiffi we ff ss 

- SGFAIUI Slmttay Fd FRF DM nc 5 ~*‘ 


15589 
09801 
1/638 
1X156 
133560 
113*15 
. 1X503 

Set 1S»M 


ta 


LI 10761® 
LA 1®0OOO 
l 1005 

S 735® 

5 110® 

5 712060 

S 1210® 

V 52119® 
5 1X77 

• «l-» 


tf 5 



i e 

Tnvcstobs hong KDNO 

PUGaRtenRdWK 

I ™ 
I 


s^TB 

J 

FF TBffl 




fl I! 


.•T. 


A - ’ 

,#;.i * 


* 



I y B7T®S 

JBiJi 



sSisr* * 

- 

SSSuF*”* 



1 1 

: 

r sSSrn Ffl'Sontf6G*«»»T W* 

; SSiFimaBwM'W* W 4IJW® 

■ J5S2“ KSSrSirtd * 31® 

: aasRsssBfei i ss 

■: IBKj 1 

SODmCAttfl MANAGEMENT I NL- ^ 

5 SAMDN«®i9tf 

; SANVNICGWT wedge 

w SAMSwaew^™ 00 ® 

: ^ c cS6&- 

3 ssaiSL 

A GSAMMOMrAJMjUa 
A CSAfJ Money MOaiW 
d OSABMenwMteSF 
d GEAM Monet MRS DM 

w G5AM Otw>- 
m ADM5A7A 
SOFA FUND UM1TED 


, FiMl nwi Ofl SA t 
a Foal iml FS W D w 
s Eosem C."j«oej Funa 

fl Tibc ureDmWiMl® 

- imrtMiO’itrt'KW — 

a -mcmKr Tlgi jj d LM 
fl ttarwyte SoM-Tton 

■ jouno 

■ Kcnre 

3 Alcan G raK*H 
c jown 

- A«P WadlMT'fl 
NEWTlGEF SEI_FUfcD 
fl ttonsrmg 
3 Jtoan 
a k'xn® 
e Pn*90»« 
fl TlWl 
c f/aeruo 
a .noooesw 

fl llLS UtA'iaiY 

fl On* 
fl Sunpu;* 

e p»w • 3C9 

TMOPNrafTHWAN FUND , Mj * 

: I^KgSs: * «*' 

WAN CAPITAL j ^lF OKXaH 

Foe *4 171 379 SOTMionsA* 171 ;» 

, TUiPFtfl , , ; un 

. TMn EmtrFWntofll \ 

m T11D1 f» D*RD ; 

. TKnFan . . } 

, TRan CunenCV Porn 1 

w tbot G**d ned«e 1 

TtBSMSW" I 

. Tran Giobd Flted Inc Pk J 
m Tran Cabal EouMcd p L 
TWEEDY BROWNE VALUE FUNDS 

» u3V0kie i 

. inn VOlur s * 

” K K ZWlri ' ' FAXi ^ M7 ' 

a E-Fund 
d J-F^nd 

A u-Fuita _ . 

A UBZ EunHnawie Ri® 

5 uBiWorialncnrae Ftioa 
fl uM Cota Fun d . 

% SSsSSSfflfEg 

s Mass?* 

a uiz WMEoup Rod 

2 aa^gaearr 

S UBZ 5ooaj*aoAi£ 1 “ 
fl us Vohie Graw^Fd 

r, UEZDhieniAcdSOTIMA 

™ TC S!ir 0, ** LMAS “ S 1491/87 

• {JDliMk 

• AAMnteS 

m 100 

, BniclnMd 

„ o/nnvea 

w EmuS .iold BMnnb 

m. DL9C991 InOto 
a Jogmxea 

» rjn 3f 1 ^l 

« AAOrdnoed 

: jssesSeo, 

OiPrTAL G^ ANTEEDIC 

: 

Z £ i5s.ES" s 

: &S5S p oSS» b b-m®a 

UNION BANCA1RE ASSET MGT III BAM) 
IHTURMATIONAL HAMILTON ^ 

Z E5S? ffAnuiw 5 w* 


„ Car.mGKWin Fwd 

m cmaa im iBun L*d 

a Cnflan le/a 

j Qnacm S:r=»y: Fund 
• O' son Lmwi 
m GcLiWm 
m fr.r.’jr itf. NV 
® Cffur Ccs Or.'tfW cot 

1 m ~*vrw n r a » |*i FlflVl 

„ r, ! “ cSSw AeiorA'ifl 
JJ I . CoiuneP GEU eebn fT 

■StS . * CortiwsitoahettaLi 

«-T ! I 2 SweaCSWDSM 

14c ^4 ; r* i^yaoC'MlCOI> i 

1 ? SSmshmw 

fl 2* A.’aenieMKFa 

n unx GiaMSaP*™" 

„ DV6- Nalln &aS Fund 

a Dierfu-- A0W4B F'-iofl 

f =T*PW?7aJ.KeW 
M OveB*a.__Fwd L« 

A inflle^MotguiA 
a £nu B«ia. ind P’u'F , 
c EmH Franrr mi PRO J 
c Full Finur IM. Plui 3 
A EYiHDcm.md FT»" 

a Enl'iein I® Hiftb 

c EmHlnu* indtiRuiA 

A =m.1 IWiy inorj (9W .8 
., Emit mm. i/ion *1 * 

a =t.J Net mSiiRosB 
- 0m4 IM P'X A. 


ECU IJ7® I 
Lj: ii»u ; 

u inr.jd ! 

LE 11942® I 

U: 10*16® 

11U24 


120 
34X5 
2X2 
45X4 
79*3 
57.17 
1159 
12i* 
105* 
;t» 
2U 
11. IS 

v£Jfl 
;: /& 
4/1 

9(13 


, EirH5auilna.Pi.Bj, 

. Cmtf'KI' nS.PIU6B 
fl iSnsSb inoei Pju* A 
5 Ens! 5»nzl lnde* f^ibB 
a EtiH UR lnoe> iwi 
11 Emil U* M3fi Pm 3 

n EtfT»rei!5* , , 

„ Er/«‘inLiq 
ti From Fans 

1 sirrUrd G<*r<.« U£ 

. Purl Tn»"i1 Ga? ~m 

Z SSS’ifSl® 

:,-r; , Fctj-A/’Jor I9inr 

!iS I - FtmKft4G^*T*« 

. 1 m FccSucr Fov im 

! s si?sssv3« 

2 ‘-“ fl. KM rb(r t/BFol LM _ 


16X4 

5 Iffi-S 
i <n® 
t 12/50 
I 7151 
5 11X1E 

SF *7017 
S 1®*® 
f eu.15 
1U JM 

5 1050® 

5F 79X7 
5 106451 

t 101/2 
1 1493058 
i lOUBt 
i 165X0 
SF 166. U 
i 30072 
•. 11623 

I 12® 

5 135/63 

BF 6714® 

BF 11®1® 

BF 110*7X0 
DM 553.18 
S 756X1 
i 1*5.74 
{ 30X3 

i 108*8® , 

SF 111® L 

1 "H-S 

i ii«io \ 

< 1197X6 r 

BF 15716X0 { 

BF 17204X0 f 
Of 10773* [ 

S 1176X7 t 
DM 121® 5 

36-. 1^® I 

U1 119065® . 

LU 17*812® 

F, 1106/7 
Fi lin® 

PW 18609® 

PR 3tOO£-» 

SF mxi 

iF t ess 

I 1(0.93 
S 1006X2 

< 1640 
S TTOtli 

< wm 
s II® 

SF I14DJF 
SF 10*7X5 
nv. vmj* [ 

£ 'GO t 

\ r 

r 


„ ^-iS conwMMe MLlO 
m 150/ irmEauiitraiJC 
004 inn Fiteo me Fo LM 


Gioecl AibJirO LM 

Z wSnGasduM W 

m C-ratutrad Bel Ad F U S -8 
n Maoism '.wu«f Renuranai 
.-, HuUW'HIOCPiLBDnNIW) 

• Hncna wMlon K.L . 

,, niF-uS W*nFws 

» IfiMGicermFo 
« IE».| hdCWfiLW 

■ rnfrttr 

'd '$*«£& 

SSSw 

IVZaln DM .Uffl 




1 ■* * imu 

; KSSAgs ^ & 

Z D* HH5 

. UBAM FRF Bona 
. 03AM GBP WO 

. UBAM WMWBonwOJF 

a U 8AM En«npn2§'°5I! , 

„ UBAM Einopeon Eg®Y 
a UBA74 Will Grand" EO. 
a UBAAl-JaBOWW 
. u BAJA Sin PocH 5 Aim 
UBAJA-US Eiony 


703410 

C 1182.9* 

SF 10*6X7 

1 nwxte 

dm 13*425 

^ 1292X97 

Y *913X07 
; 190SS* 

S 1807 8= 


■SP 

£ 


ChnsB 


15027 

16*28 

125.76 

153X1 

10139 

424X0 

139/7 

118X6 

10004 

100® 

10041 

10006 

10014 

19X5* 

139.11 


* !S*H£5 
°“s!?£E£ 

rs i ws 


n CtaSD 
» TheCvwusR’nd 

ip«RKALI«B»7/l«* 

« Amcnam Qiqw ^ c <0174 

: 

“^sr DLTD j iss 

id SR Ailca__ J 1&441 

m SR Wrmflflontf ^ 1 ^LaJ 

: s 5?&4 

SWISS BANK CDRP. 


a ™ t ?.ruiie.n DM II 


19*1® 
DM 1 10® 
DM 
DM 
DM 
DM 
DM 


133 79 
11-00 
117/* 
8457 
*1.10 


,. . 'iu0tnon»H«OBn 
,7. PltaenU Riui Ins 

m PomOOTCwn^LW 

: ?rFSSs ,So,^, 

J B«ol Ind Rino LJd 

: S3K??S«j« 

: gssS®gff aB 

2 RtoRoun von a# ow> y ? 

? ssai: 

n KFHr Ti^ssr 

«g!Ssa 



$F I7VX3D9 
SF W63J0V 
SF 267.*lftr 
SF 3473009 
SF 1*94«X» 
SF 241 X»V 

sf juaior 

SF 250X7Or 
SF l®-9® 
SF 1949409 
SF S3O950F 
SF 434/WV 

sf 4«J»r 


j U.U.F. DEM ABIen 

o U.UF.CEUBerWl 

3 U.U.F DEMR«e«te 
a U.UF. 5101 Terra 
d unk-a EwH Fund 

UanMC, 

a UBSBdtn»atFDaaiglC SF 
a UBS BO ln»CHF Intone* FV MOSW. 

d UE3 Bd Inw G«"**j A^a - 97 927 

d UB5 Bd m* CorwCfl *M0 219350? 

d UBS BdlntGBP rc fiSJSOt 

tf UB5 Bd in* G4bdJ ,((004X309 

d UBS Bd ln» JPY p, 285X30r 

a UBS Bd lit NLG . 114130V 

d UBS Bd In* U^D |rn | nuiMi FF lb* 7901 

3 UBSEPjmA ntoM oLWfl ‘^Oy 
3 iSEiSKSSsS i K 

3 aKiassasar ?? 

d UBS Eq Inv Energy 
d uB5Eo«w|iBOje 
d uBseqliwRona 
d UB5 Eq irw GetOKWV 
Z UBSEtfUwGRMI 

3 UB5 Ea In* Gajd pawta 

a UBS Eq RwGtmI Brtam 

5 «&S 

3 $pS§2 

a UBL El inti® £ 5®F*n™ .c uX0Ov 
a UBS Ed in* IwabWaai |p SjljJOy 
tf UBS Eo wySwRierWd 

5 * ,o£ ® 

. »Sa sf i nss 

S BSSBSSraEJ. d s £ i» 

a uBS ILwd Bd nu-D|M C 130.1*09 

3 BBIBiBB# r-'W® 

% BEifflPSSu* 

d UBS lUBU Eq JR-Ji-P 

a UBS lLu«l Bd jg-ffJL. 

d UBS IU»> Eo MW-EumP* "5 1 09 DOT 

/ iih< mm Efl In* BloWl _ ; 1 it jTe 

d UBS TLin' |<s s 1 10 o35 

a UBS OJnl Eoi-ajJoDraoan * ,001® 

3 SisitSlagra? S 104MOJ 

ft II BS CUdO . pf., iMUQy 

3 'lies 

a UB5 ILwJ Med !*»■ , Hirv.ia5Mt 

5 JB5 'LUU Med Terai HTJj. 1 5 ,tl ?ni<rSI 
3 UBS OjS Med Tern i-NL* ^ JSiSS 

5 4 S 

iligMgS 

3 SST-SSISSSS 

3 UB5 (Li»J MM lr»*BP 

a LBS (LaU MM IB-IIL 
tf UBS itS) A*M [n»-JPY 
a UBSILSjjjM'wJJLg 
j UBS lUn) HAM mt-uso 
a UBS (Lib) MM Unf-FEU 



: isss.% 

* 

\Wk, 




iSS.» 

S 

? S!sijgg&* 

l eseE^ 

Sms 


1 509® 

ff wa» 

SF 39® 

1 7X0- 

{ 814X9 

S 16X6 
5 M91® 

S 2530X0® . 

s 92IX4E I 

s jotoxi :. 

Ecu 1753*1 . 

S I4fl« . 
s 9® 

SF 1OS80E H 
S 9057 n 

i 8H \ 

l ^ 

: 1 j 

m li E E 


TS-imioi- 

s 1J6X90T 

DM S|j§ 


: 

= aESss? 9 - ^ m 


a ura/Mbai sen DEM 

« UnHMoool Warn Ecu 

a Unl-GW0 5i™»FBF 
. UM-GWhI SkdiiFS 

w U*Gloaol sieo* USD 
a Urdu Inti Ud 
m uS*fl«u«ov»dnfN.V 
■» vanoani 
. volalin- S*co» 

ir view FuRiiwFjma 


Era 15*9X4 
FF 806OB1 
SF 117125 

1 5M 

m 

<0 441 




AS ItflOW 
BF 7491 5M 

^J{!SrSj DM I^S 

d SflCModetM^M-DEM V 

tf »c MW MW M- 2s Em *«-lS 

0 SBC Mann H pr IS lisia® 

d 5BC Money MM «'K| FF 5750X9 

tf SBC Monet LB 67B798® 

iiSSBift 

5 SBs| : g, - «• 

5 SflcJSnMMM-ySD" 

3 IDSiT 

1 S33M& 

j |^!ES3.i. 


SF 41960’S 
FF S861.W0 
£ *65.8® 

1X1330489 ®0 

Y1W886XOO 

h mix* 

inm Ecu S87.920 

tf UB5 LUB,- 7AM StonMIDPJ IDR » 

■ slasa^H 


s llpffiSF” r s M 

j n& 

sSffisn^i 


465*30 
S 60X1 
Era 196X8 
Ecu 70S® 
IS 16191 

S 1«® 

5 7819 

SF S 

S 15636® 



iigdff 



S IEI6# ; ?11 

0 UBS port inv C op GKhfi 

s UBS Pon »* inc 1 m£ot 

1 KBS# * H 

3 U3SP® !“j!* , P?Sn 

a UBSPonlrarCwG JFFFl 

3 JBS P*d «w LdO® (FRFl 
d ubs pwi im w (ran 
3 UBS Pol lire MtlFRR 
d UBSPOnimCooe iUSDl 

3 UB5 Port im Cap CflHDi 

d UBSPonnre a USD) 

5 U6SP£13VW(U5D' |r 

? SS&Sser 1 •« 

•UI E® .ff/S?. 


a UBS Port ore Inc 

tf UBS POll lire Inci-^ Y> p. “7c 112/309 

s ^asi|ss 4 » 

3 U»{ua)FtipSln(inJ 

tf UBS IUi»l Pit RrUtftiSDI S ' luXJt 


DM 

SF 135/309 
FF 5158339 
SF IZ19I0T 
FF 4767109 
SF 133 (J09 
S 5L1509 

S 85.4309 

SF 117.1®* 


jS-AustraB»D«toBAS-AiGLli*iSe»®Dj; i 

BF-BaWHFtwwK^'® 10 *^ 00 ®^ 0 ^ ■ 
D^^STtortne DU -OmWi K hwniDo - US ; 
Dotes; ECU ■ Eurapw pgngq^Inft rT ; ; 

Bflortn; IDfl - tofcN»rfw Rn** & ■“‘■“J* 

LF - LunmbMS R»* «■*•! ' 

Uterstu HlD99fc ^ ' r * l 1 ^~"... ". ' 
Staonon DoUafK SF • S»X*« Ftme*; 8«« ■ 
^erStk KranBT THB -TW T “ ' ltK 

8 . isk® Oita NGm HA-'tW MMK 
kfi. - Hot Conmateao* *" J 
Mtfukl; SS • B»ek ; 

E*4«i; ■ • Oflw Prt® l«L » prolm. et*DC 

nteximed Mritar. m«4 ib®®* 1 ^ "* 

price. 1 8flbraled pnCW T- P 1 '® oNo/aw Z 

iMp prior B porttftosWSP 1 *®- 

l^oolWy; (J) ■ Wtiiffltfi W ' w9u*“ , r-W- 

i*te wrattp N - mortM »- 


g ^«5r-"- r " ■ ' MrrrrrB ■ ■ - 


v - ’ "■ 

;.• ‘A, j ■ 


luhnwcoaBS.IbMMsabtetti 



A. .. • “ 




r rr r : r 





POSSES. 9*36582. d£ SrPtfjrjff SICPPSC^ **=JQO >oc -D9Z05Z* 



/ 


- 




PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


l hi 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


HUBllSHED WITH THE HEW VDBK T1MBS *SD THE WASHINGTON POST 


Albright’s Turn Now 


Riding the magic carpet of Wed- 
nesday’s unanimous Senate confirm- 
ation vote, Madeleine Albright be- 
comes secretary of state this Thursday. 
She can be an eloquent champion of 
freedom around the world. How skill- 
frilly she blends that calling with the 
pragmatic politics of U.S. diplomacy 
will define her stewardship at the State 
Department Restoring America’s tra- 
ditional interest in democracy and the 
rule of law to the heart of Washing- 
ton's foreign policy agenda would be a 
service to the nation and the world. 

As America's chief diplomat and 
principal voice on international issues, 
Mrs. Albright must carry out President 
Bill Clinton's decisions. But she also 
has an extraordinary opportunity to 
shape the debate. She should use it to 
restore a better balance to policies that 
have become excessively driven by 
commercial considerations. 

America's national interests some- 
times call for putting commercial or 
security concerns ahead of human 
rights issues. It makes sense, for ex- 
ample, to negotiate with Stalinist 
North Korea on nuclear weapons is- 
sues. to expand trade with a less than 
fully democratic Mexico and to main- 
tain economic exchanges and diplo- 
matic dialogue with a China that tor- 
ments democrats and dissidents and 
bullies its smaller neighbors. 

But such diplomatic realism does 


not require Washington ro mute its 
distaste for provocative and repressive 
policies, as it has most conspicuously 
done in the case of China. Overlooking 
such behavior weakens U.S- credibility 
abroad and feeds cynicism at home. 
The American people expect their for- 
eign policy to reflect American ideals. 

Mrs. Albright is ideally equipped to 
speak out forcefully on freedom’s be- 
half. Her background as a refugee from 
both Nazism and communism has 
t au ght her the differences between 
democracy and dictatorship and made 
her sensitive to the need to reinforce 
market and electoral reforms with in- 
dependent civic institutions. Her 
strong scholarly grasp of foreign policy 
has now been seasoned by four years of 
experience at the United Nations. 

She takes office at a propitious mo- 
ment for new initiatives on democracy 
and h uman rights. President Clinton 
has grown more comfortable and ex- 
perienced with foreign policy. The not- 
able successes already achieved on 
trade, Bosnia, relations with Russia, 
Middle East peace and choosing a new 
United Nations secretary-general will 
free Mrs. Albright from some of die 
burdens of crisis management that pre- 
occupied Warren Christopher. It can be 
a remarkable match of personal qual- 
ities and political opportunity. Mrs. 
Albright should make the most of it. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Beyond Argument 


Bill Clinton struck a number of right 
themes in his inaugural speech, most of 
them unexceptionable but no less right 
for that The reason clichds become 
cliches, after all. is generally that they 
speak what seems undeniable, impor- 
tant truth to so many people. Presi- 
dential inaugurations are America’s 
great secular ceremony. 

Religious faith ana fervor may be 
present and quite reasonably so on an 
occasion of such consequence. But the 
ceremony itself is a revalidation of the 
secular democratic idea as the basis of 
the American civil order — the idea of 
freely accepted, responsible citizen- 
ship, in theory available to all. Insofar 
as it represents allegiance to a con- 
stitutional order rather than to a people 
defined by bloodline, it is a concept of 
national ’identity and nationhood 
wholly distinct from those based on the 
automatic entitlements (and mind-set) 
of ethnic heritage narrowly defined. 

These two concepts of national des- 
tiny impose different obligations on 
the people who live by them. So when 
President Clinton speaks, as he did on 
Monday, of the importance of com- 
munity and opportunity and respon- 
sibility. he is really citing the elements 
indispensable to the country’s very ex- 
istence. not just to its improvement 
some fine day. He is speaking of the 
elements that, at our best, distinguish 
us. They are not fringes. They are, as 
Bob Dole would no doubt have said, 
what America “is all about” 

The question is, as always in our 
national life, how much these fine pur- 
poses lose in the translation into im- 
mediate politics. And since an inaug- 


ural is a political rite as well as a 
constitutional one. you do not have to 
be an expert in deciphering codes to 
hear the political message being 
proffered along with the uplift 

The president took some credit for 
achievements — a few of which are 
disputable — in that part of the speech 
containing the “once agains.” Those 
were the assertions that “once again” 
(as a return, presumably, from lapses in 
the Reagan and Bush years) we were 
enjoying various kinds of good fortune 
— economic, environmental, familial 
and so on. And. as is his wont. Mr. 
Clinton, who is nothing if not ideo- 
logically voracious, more or less con- 
sumed the credos of left, right and 
middle, and left on the table only die 
discredited scraps of each's worst ex- 
cesses: the violence and prejudice of 
some and the irresponsibility of others. 
Finally, we thought we head again in 
the president's pitch for an end of “petty 
bickering” in our politics a plea for 
deliverance from the investigations still 
menacing him and die administration. 

Our guess is that he will get some of 
what he wished for but nothing like all of 
it. How much depends on the kind of 
government he runs in this second term. 
The phrase “new promises’’ may be an 
effective rallying cry, but the promises 
that remain to be kept are. as the pres- 
ident implicitly acknowledged through- 
out the speech, pretty old ones, although 
no less urgenr for that In a sense, he 
called on us all to be better citizens and 
better people. Who could disagree? Like 
so much else in his inaugural, the 
thought is beyond argument 

— THE WASHINGTON POST . 


Late But Not Too Late 


The latest official American pos- 
ition on anti-personnel land mines is 
diminished by the administration's de- 
sire to have it both ways. It is prepared 
to stigmatize these weapons, but only 
up to apoint that will let it keep some of 
diem available for certain American 
military uses. It is prepared to negotiate 
an international ban on mines, but the 
forum it has now chosen, the United 
Nations’ consensus-bound Geneva 
disarmament conference, promises 
only slow and uncertain results. 

The administration’s posture on 
mines suggests a tightly coiled moral 
readiness to rid the planet of unmarked 
“dumb” weapons that do not self- 
destruct and whose special quality is 
that, left behind as they commonly are 
when the soldiers depart, they menace 
civilians indefinitely. But die Pentagon 
weighs in with its own insistent and not 
immoral claim to retain (and use 
safely) ‘ ‘dumb” as well as smart mines 
to protect the lives of American sol- 
diers — right now in Korea, again 
perhaps in Iraq, or wherever. 

Actually, die contradiction can be 
resolved On the military side change is 


possible. Expert military testimony ai- 
t of other weapons 


tests to the existence 
and tactics to replace mines, smart and 
dumb, as protection for U.S. forces. 


But there is no changing the fact that 
dumb mines are uniquely resistant ro 
the code that mandates a full effort ro 
prevent weapons of war from becom- 
ing indiscriminate weapons of blood 
and terror against civilians. 

It is late in the century to be applying 
this code of civilian respect, but not too 
late. Americans, who have never had to 
deal with land mines on their own soil, 
need to ask the dozens of nations where 
leftover mines still explode today. 

The best U.S. course remains a uni- 
lateral renunciation. This would make 
America the instant leader of what a 
wave of international opinion has made 
a global cause. Next best is a nego- 
tiation. The Geneva approach is to wait 
for a consensus that draws in laggards, 
especially Russia and China. The Ca- 
nadian approach is to sign quickly a 
treaty banning smart as well as dumb 
mines and ro count on international 
opinion ro sweep the laggards aboard. 

Give Geneva a trial, suggests 
Patrick Leahy, the Senate’s leading 
anti-mine voice; if it doesn't work, 
switch to the Canadian way (IHT Opin- 
ion, Jon 21). Meanwhile, it would help 
if the military debate got out into tire 
open, so that people could better judge 
the Pentagon's pro-mine case. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 




Globalization: Fine for Some and Bad for Many 

^ - a* n r millions of subsistence farm 


W 7 ASHINGTON — An impression 
W prevails that despite some prob- 
lems with inequalities and turmoil, free 
trade is the major unifying force of- 
fering opportunity to working and poor 
people around the world. 

But a growing body of evidence 
from researchers in many countries 
shows the devastating results of the 
free trade orthodoxy currently in favor 
among most governments. 

The rise in inequality. A recent series 


By John Cavanagh 


world, these measures are turning 
Third World economies into casinos 


of Washington Post articles (IHT Dec. 
Dec. 31, Jan. 2, Jan. 3) acknow- 


30, Dec. 

ledges that free trade increases the gap 
between those who are pan of the new 
global work force and those left out, but 
it suggests that globalization is lifting 
millions out of poverty. However, the 
gap is important 

Researchers at the Institute for 
Policy Studies calculate that the com- 
bined wealth of the world’s 447 bil- 
lionaires is greater than the income of 
the poorest half of the world’s people. 

By our calculation, at least two- 
thirds of the world's people are left out. 
hurt or marginalized by globalization. 

More than three-quarters of the new 
investment into the developing world 
goes to China and nine other rapidly 
growing countries. A new global eco- 
nomic apartheid of 24 richer countries, 

ji • 


Dwindling jabs and wages. The 
series begins with a tour of a clean 
Philippine factory owned by a jeans 
company, where workers are relatively 
well paid. The article implies that a 
sizable share of Third World workers 
are entering this phase. 

But the article fails to mention the 
rampant subcontracting of clothing and 
footwear to people’s homes, where 
child labor is not uncommon, or the 
terrible living conditions that accom- 


pany many of the factory jobs. 

The 


a dozen rapidly growing developing 
countries and 14U that 


are growing 

slowly or not at all becomes one of the 
major new threats to global security. 


world’s top 200 corporations 

now have sales equivalent to 28 percent 
of the world’s measured economic 
activity, but they employ well under 
l percent of die world's workers. 

In addition, workers in most of the 
Third World's new global factories are 
denied basic rights to organize and 
strike. In the United States, companies 
use the fbnaar of moving production to 
China or Mexico to bargain down 
wages and benefits. 

Casino economies. One of the pillars 
of the most recent wave of economic 
globalization has been pressure from 
the U.S. government, the World Bank 
and other global agencies on poorer 
nments to open up their stock and 
rial markets to foreign capital. 


dreds of millions of subsistence farm- 
and fisberfolk have earned a live- 
miKl world economies into «suu» ets -S While Door in terms 

vulnerable to the whims of the twenty- hfaoodfor decad*^t^I»orm^^ 

somethings who manage the world’s 
muhralaS other investment funds. 

Envirorunental plunder. The ?osCs SotaftX huge 

jurie s ap plau ds the growth strate g ies of Afewpcopl J , jMjrihusi- 

SiS ini and *fPha- “P'S* 

ippines, but fails to mention that in each ness ® nns . more Ktinfoe ranks 

S countries "develof^ent; 4 has fafi 

been centered on some combination of of the hungry pojr 
tearing down forests, overfishing, rep- sense, deswywg vi 

id depletion of minerals and poisonmg able rural communities. ___ 

s&fess# sss£ sMSjgagt 

erations in these countries will spend environments ^ drpnneajot^ as 


wivnpumctua ow j---- 

of ft* .energy 2?*^" 

iserve the 


muen OI mciT energy y. ri 

erosion, depleted fishmg banks and m- termznmgfectorm e^nmsti 

■ SSXSSOSSU . 

sKffws&se jSSSSs: 

tering the cash economy and purchas- ^pand 
ing four first television set The first These will be ^ 

article juxtaposes a poor fishing family mtemationa! zietwork of organizations 
in the Philippines with another where of workers, enynomna«ahste, fennels 
the daughters’ factory income has and women. A growing 
opened tothe family the wonders of the idence suggests that die current rome to 
country’s sparkling new mails. economic globabzahon is not waiting 

No doubt economic globalization for most of humanity. 

■ . i -it: _ ■ — 


While offering new profit opportune 
ties to the global investing elite of the 


has offered this path to millions of 
people. Yet many of the rural com- 
munities that are bypassed or under- 
mined by globalization were weli- 
fnnrfi o nin g social units where hun- 


The writer is co-director 


suture for Policy Studies, a . 
tank, tie contributed this comment to 


the In- 
think 


The Washington Post. 


% f 

. * 




d. 


, • Y 

i r i* 

i. 


« ■ 


: r .^M 

. .i 


*. 'i 




- 

.-v '’*! 
wii 


*4 


,;«r« 

t-'-a 

'•-M 

;.->a 

■ ,,feS 






"*** 


In Japan, the Difficulty of Reform Tries the Public’s Patience 


T OKYO — With Japan’s 
stock market in steep de- 
cline and confidence in the gov- 
ernment’s ability to reform and 
revive the economy at a low 
ebb, the heat is on the cabinet of 
Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashi- 
raoto ro deliver on its repeated 
pledges that yesterday's men 
and their machine should be 
sent ro the scrap yard. 

Mr. Hashimoto’s forthright 
statement in his recent policy 
address ro die new session of the 
Diet that adminis trative and fi- 
nancial restructuring must be 
tackled in earnest leaves tittle 
room for retreat. The fate of 
both die present cabinet and the 
ruling Liberal Democratic Party 
hinges on the way he confronts 
the political and economic 
roadblocks ahead. 

Public disquiet at the lack of 
evident progress over admin- 
istrative reform of the bureau- 


By Roger Buckley 


cracy and its wide-ranging 
powers leaves the cabinet m a 
vulnerable position. 

Since every problem seem- 
ingly lies within the mbit of die 
rival ministries, the malaise in 
government is naturally attrib- 
uted to errors of the elite officials 
who are thought to run the coun- 
try. Ministries — such as those 
of finance, and health and wel- 
fare — are bitterly unpopular 
because blamed for bungling 
and alleged malpractices. 

Until recently, change was 
something that happened to less 
fortunate countries overseas. 
Japan is now having to swallow 
its pride and listen ro members 
of the British government lec- 
ture it on how to get out of its 
present hole. 

Japan is discovering the hard 
way that it has been infected by 


the “English disease” of ex- 
cessive welfarism. It is having 
to study the financial policy re- 
forms and corporat e manage- 
ment practices that have been 
used to good effect ro tackle 
structural problems in Europe 
and the United Stares. 

Behind the shocks to the Jap- 
anese ego ties die undeniable 
reality of the continuing weak- 
ness of the economy. After 
stock market and real estate 
booms in die late 1980s, the 
country has spent most of the 
1990s in seemingly endless 
stagnation or recession. 

Nothing that the economic 
bureaucrats or their industrial 
and political counterparts have 
tried has restarted the domestic 
engine. Growth has stayed low 
and will improve only when 
consumers reopen their parses. 


pump-priming has left the na- 
tion awash in concrete but has 
achieved tittle beyond keeping 
the politically powerful con- 
struction industry in business. 

Mr. Hashimoto is running out 
of options. While it would in- 
deed be desirable to reduce the 
powers of the men from the 
ministries and make them more 
answerable to their supposed 
masters in Parliament, the road 
to administrative reform will 
stretch into the eariy years of the 
next century. The call to dis- 
cipline the bureaucrats is useful 
for diverting attention from the 
government, but it does little ro 
kick-start die economy. 

The prime minister might ap- 
pear to have some time on. Ins 
side. Opposition parties are 
weak ana still continuing to 
fragment. They are unlikely ro 
provide an alternative to the rul- 
ing LDP for some years. 


He knows, though, that his 
position as prime rnmister de- 
pends on proving that his lead- 
ership produces results. Daily 
television coverage of huge oil 
slicks on the beaches, fkpreci- 
ation of the yen and meager pre- 
dictions for the economy give 
little grounds for complacency. 

Mr. Hashimoro has ro show 
that he is really in charge. It is 
hard to see where his short-term 
achievements are ro come from. ^ 
It will be dangerous ro rely on 
the much heralded but inevit- 
ably slow-waking package of 
adminis trative, economic, fi- 
nancial and welfare reforms 
while assuming that the elec- 
torate’s patience is infinite. 


The writer, who teaches his- 
tory at the International Chris- 
tian University in Tokyo , con- 
tributed this comment to the 
Herald Tribune. 


Shuttling Congresspersons to Remedial Classes in China 


L OS ANGELES — Will a 
new China syndrome, vir- 
ulent and ugly, wadi over the 
American scene and poison re- 
lations with Beijing? Mutual ig- 
norance is the historic enemy of 
mutual understanding. 

Other than some major 
Chinese miscalculation (an in- 
vasion of Taiwan, blowing die 
Hong Kong transition, another 
Tiananmen Square blunder), 
probably no one thing stands 
more in the way of improved 
Chinese-U.S. relations than a 
blustery, blowbard, meddling 
U.S. Congress. 

Consider a worried James 
Sasser, the U.S. ambassador to 
China and a former senator 
from Tennessee. He knows 


By Tom Plate 


Congress. Last March, in his 
Beijing office, he told me of his 
long-range ambition to “fly 
half of Congress” over to China 
to get acquainted. 

Last week the first session of 
the Sasser Cram Course for Po- 
tentially Confused Congress- 
persons materialized. Almost 
two dozen House members flew 
ro Beijing for arranged meetings 
with top Chinese officials, in- 
cluding no less than President 
Jiang Zemin. 

There was praise for Mr. Sas- 
ser's efforts. Exclaimed a 
cheerful, although dog-tired, 
Jim Kolbe, Republican of Ari- 
zona. who led the bipartisan 


pack into Beijing: “Extremely 
useful — many members came 
back with their thinking pro- 
foundly changed.” 
Representative Howard Ber- 
man, Democrat of California, 
who was not on this trip to China, 
is the ranking minority member 
of the House subcommittee cm 
Asia and the Pacific. His 14 
years in Congress have made 
him wise to its peculiar ways and 
means. He believes that the Clin- 
ton administ ration has a signi- 
ficant window of opportunity for 
unfettered Chinese-U-S. dip- 
lomacy because he doubts Con- 
gress’s present ability to spoil 
relations with China. 


ft is a Republican bouse di- 
vided, he says. One Republican 
camp focuses on the human 
rights issue; the other all bat 
ignores human rights to front 
for whatever U.S. business 
wants. And profit-minded ex-, 
ecutives generally want what- 
ever Beijing wants. 

“Yes, there is a deep desire 
in Congress ro micromanage 
China relations, says Mr. Ber- 
man. laughing a little. “But 
there is sucha fundamental split 


Responsibility Without Arrogance 


P ARIS — President Bill 
Clinton has launched his 
second term, to end in January, 
2001, with a ringing appeal for 
community effort, responsibil- 
ity and hope for all. There are 
always dire possibilities that he 
won't get there, but none are 
probable. So the rest of the un- 
certain world can settle down 
now with at least a fairly clear 
idea of who will be running the 
United States and how. 

But his insistent metaphor of 
“building a bridge ro the 21st 
century’’ is misleading and 
awkward. Building a bridge im- 
plies lmowing what is on the far 
side, which nobody does. In- 
deed. bridges are usually built 
from both sides simultaneously. 
And it suggests vaulting over 
obstacles m between. leaving 
them untouched, which could 
not and should not be done, and 
which he does not mean. 

On foe contrary, he has 
sought ro provide an inspiring 
goal in die face of bewildering 
technological and social change, 
an effort to revive a sense of 
cohesive national community. 

He spoke repeatedly of 
“promise,” but didn’t make big 
promises, stopping far short of 
the extravagant rhetoric of John 


By Flora Lewis 


ished belief of American lib- 
erals. Still, he recognized in a 
reference to Martin Luther King 
that ro evoke energy a people 
needs ro “have a dream,” and 
he offered it in a nationally as- 
sertive way that may swell 
American pride but seems to 
deflate others. 

When Americans tell them- 
selves that they are the “in- 
dispensable” nation, does it 
mean that they consider others 
dispensable? When die presi- 
dent says that die next century 
will see “the world’s greatest 
democracy lead a whole world 
of democracies.” is he claiming 
the aspiration, even the right, to 
hegemony that others suspect 
the United States of harboring? 

A certain boastfulness in the 
celebration of national rites is 
traditional everywhere, and 
Americans enjoy it no less than 
everybody else. But if Mr. Clin- 
ton's domestic intentions offer 
a reassuring prospect of a mod- 
erate, stable America despite 
the division of political author- 


frictions it may provoke. Yet 
there remains a strong strain of 
awareness that security must be 
a continuing concern, and that it 
requires allies and friends. 

Despite "rogue states” 
which support terrorism and 
menace neighbors, there is no 
longer a threat of major war dial 
could lead to apocalypse. But 
there is a real security issue 
nonetheless, the threat of in- 
stability. chaos, the renanonal- 
ization of defease in Europe 
against which a robust NATO is 
still needed. 

Diplomacy has become more 
important than arms in the cur- 
rent era, and that has not been 
acknowledged by the U.S. Con- 


in die Republican Party that in 
the end they won’t be able ro.” 

One issue that could galva- 
nize Congress, Mr. Berman sug- 
gests, is nuclear proliferation. 
China, he fears, is undermining 
international agreements by 
peddling sensitive technology 
to Iran and Pakistan. 

Chi the other hand, he. pre- 
dicts that die Republican ma- 
jority will not try to reignite the 
volatile Taiwan issue, which 
last spring nearly pro m pted a 
military showdown in foe 
Taiwan Strait ‘“Everyone 
learned a lesson from that,” he 
says, “Congress as well as 
China.” Well, maybe. 

Representative Xavier Be- 
cerra, Democrat of California, 
another jet-lagged Sasser stu- 
dent just in from Beijing, still 
worries: “I don’t think we can 
fathom what Ghinareally is. And 
when you have more than 500 
elected individuals in Congress, 
who knows what could occur 
over Taiwan? Should it happen 
again? No. But it could.” 

Bill Clinton may have a real 


sly for statesmanship 
_ jt now, but ft. won’t last in- 
definitely. He could not find his 
way ro Beipng during his first 
term, and now it looks as if be 
won’t get to it until next year. 
Badplanmng. 

Members of Congress are not 
the only ones jetting to Asia to 
educate themselves. So are stu- 
dents at some of California’s 
leading graduate schools. The 
University of California’s in- 
novative graduate school of 
journalism at Berkeley is j 
ing students off to He 
to observe the coming 
handover to Beijing. 

Says its new dean, China ex- 
pert Orville Schell: “Asiaisour 
backyard, and the op p oi tu nings 
are there just as much forjoeff- 
nalists as for business people.” 

And for America’s students 
of business, too: Last week, 
when it was announced that a 
giant $3 5-million grant had 
been handed to the University 
of Southern California’s busi- 
ness school, USC wasted no 
time in publicly recommitting 
to the PacRim. One program is 
to launch its entire 258-student, 
first-year MBA class on a re- 
quired one-month PacRim busi- 
ness course that includes a 


«r, 

■■■-'* * 
V>JJSi 


'ITT* 

; j 
.1 
■* 







• . 

: : 8 

"*fc 

’**■••* 
I c? u> 

.ia 

1 


• • 


>iM 




1 




week’s studyabroad. 

Says USC President Steven 


rie: “Asia is a big feet of 
life, for the next century at least. 
And it’s HA. and Southern 
California that are the gateway 
to Aria— not San Francisco or 
Chicago or Denver.” 

Los Angeles Tima. 


t. 


MS 

-sriwi 




■'rv.Mh 

- 


‘s* 


1 :. 


grass nor yet wot a public place 
in Mr. CUnton’s program. The 


itv. it is not so clear whether the 
pl&] 


F. Kennedy ’s pledge * * to pay any 
n forftee- 


price. bear any burden’ 
dom in the world, or of Lyndon 
Johnson’s "war on poverty.” 

Social engineering by hyper- 
active government has been dis- 
credited. Not only in the United 
States, it has come to be felt as a 
way of laying down a duck, 
stifling sediment of layers of 
unresponsive bureaucracy. 

“Government is not the 
problem,” Mr. Clinton said, re- 
jecting a persistent conservative 
slogan, “and government is not 
the solution, r rejecting a cher- 


pians emphasize responsibility 
or rivalry in dealing with the 
rest of the world. 

These has long been ambi- 
valence in American calcula- 
tions of the proper mix of the 
country’s moral and material 
interests. Henry Kissinger calls 
it “idealism versus realism,” 
although his definition of real- 
ism tends to be limited to a 
classical balance of power. 

Economic advantage has be- 
come a much weightier element 
in the thrust of American for- 
eign policy since the end of the 
Cold War, and that will evid- 
ently continue regardless of the 


incoming secretary of state, 
Madeleine Albright, has test- 
ified in confirmation hearings 
that foreign affairs are funded 
now by only 1 percent of the 
federal budget, although their 
conduct will determine 50 per- 
cent of Washington’s legacy in 
the next four years. 

Whether it is spurred by an 
enlightened self-interest and 
readiness for cooperation, or tty 
arrogance, America cannot lead 
the world or even mate its way 
in the world without contrib- 
uting. If the State Department 
and dependent foreign agencies 
are beggared, they can hardly 
help America flourish. 

Even though it is not abridge 
but a steady down-to-earth 
track that President Clinton 
needs to bold to get safely into 
the 21st cenUty, be has set foe 
direction, and it is on the whole 
an admirable one. It’s a pity be 
felt it necessary to bloat the 
national cock’s crow so as to 
arouse the public. 

© Flora Lewis. 


TS OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: Throning Tresses 


PARIS — (The Herald says in an 
Editorial:] To see one’s locks 
growing thinner never fells to 
give rise to annoyance. With a 
view to patting a stop to this 
disorder, the customary method 
is to be guided by newspaper 
advertisements and to apply to a 
dealer in cosmetics, supposed to 
be' endowed wife marvellous 
properties. In the majority of 
cases the hair continues to fail 
while the dealer’s exchequer 
grows heavier. The best planls to 
see a qualified physidaiL There 
are cases in which a foil return of 
one’s abundance of hair can be 


eminent by foe United States is 
as remote as it was nine months 
when Secretary of State 
laid down foe program 
of internal reforms in Russia 
which must precede any recog- 
nition by this country. The De- 
partment is convinced feat there 
have been certain “paper re- 
forms” m that cotmttyv but that: 
the nation is in just as deplorable 
a condition, economically ted 
in every other way, as ever. 


1947: Meat in Britain 


in the greater number of 
cases the physician’s skiTl can be 
judged by the reservations he 
formulates as to the fotare.' 


LONDON — British consumers 
can lode forward to eating less 
fresh and frozen meat^ because 
of a reduction in borne iriBmg 
and reduced imports from Latin 
America, British Food Ministry 
sources said. Restoration of 
meat production in foe United 


A 


1922: Soviet Problems 


WASHINGTON — Formal re- 
cognition of foe Soviet Gov- 


andistiedinwifolackL w 

stuff imports.^ Official sources 
raid: “Canned - meat snp- 
plies should be mamndned.” 


. V-'.Vi 



- 

•v*w g£ 

1 v7i_ 

*• 





spore 


DWERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1997 

’ OPINION/LETTERS 


He Gave a Solid Speech 

By Wil l iam Safire 

L ^weryou as an American— 

a phrase bv critin**^^ 11 !? selling, the 

tering ^ soinS?5 8 >'' °f paoiodc hymns, lie 

Stroma 

dependence w S' s P e ^ ch ~ y™ gamed an appre- 

arc blazinp ^ P“d ^ore than the usual 

W 2T ! ’ ■ obeisan “ >° the black commo- 

Z "*&■ “* rantafcr about the 

firanh Rrifain vr Tele- scourge of slavery, "his evocation 

of Martin Luther King Jr. “at foe 
Mws^per, dismissed President other eixl of tins Mail** and his 


1 

Li!' 

1 r f ‘'l 

IH»lflSETD i 


: J !»: 1 

: visit ■ 

mLTHETtttrm, 1 

1 

[ ;»*«' ' 

TEteWHOLE TRUTH, 1 
AMPHOTHWG I 


isit' '' ■ 

mn THE TRUTH- I 

ggulfljl ' 



Bib riwiuran outer tna orttns Mall” and his 

addr^^Kl^^ “we shall overcome'’ are pay- 

Rstvii^* ^aaai- hackfor monolithic political sup- 

President c\ w^ 3 ^° L ^*?°I!£h P 01 * a geanrine expression of 
tori^S^? l T ^ hf SF 1,1ST one ofhis lew bedrock principles, 
with -ipf^ 80 ^ blazed " The time for affirmative action is 

sn^hLr r r aS,W wl S om ' his oui of joint, but for Afr. Otnton to 
speech was a Teenortaw* nfFm* j • . 


speech was a respectable effort, 
forcefully delivered. ^ 

In assessing his second inaug- 
uraJ : much depended on bow you 
participated in the occasion. 

I f you watched as a conser- 
vative partisan, you could take 
umbrage at his pose of being 
above the battle. Who is this 
tricky friaagulator — dem- 
agogue of Mediscare and rental 
agent of the Lincoln bedroom — 


is good for the country. ■ 

He bestraddled the center like 
a woukMie''oolosw'tnft:* a Tte 
pre-eminent mission of our new 
government is to give all Amer- 
icans an o pport u n i ty — not a 
guarantee.’’ That sentiment was 
one Newt Gingrich had to ap- 
plaud, whole entitlement liberals 
had to cringe: 

At the same time-, Mr. Clinton 



How We Can Make Dying 
A Less Brutal Part of Life 


By Ira Byock 


. w , ru IW& bdilK UUM*t mxm WUIUUU 

to denounce as ‘ petty bickering replied to Ronald Reagan’s in- 

and extreme Dartisarahm** mn. mioiirdl “nnuamnAMt » «nt rlia 


and extreme partisanship ’ ’ con- 
gressional disagreement with his 
campaign misrepresentations? 

If you mtpkxed as a writer, 
you winced at his sentence frag- 


augural “government is not the 
somtion to our problem” with an 
oblique “government is not the 
problem and not the solution.* ’ 
Few can argue with Mr. Clin- 


ments, at the awkwardness of ton’s welcome call for an as- 
shaping a hope into a chapter, and sumption of personal responsi- 


at the risk of building a speech on 
the theme of a new “promised 


biBty, unless his simultaneous 
embrace of “a new spirit of corn- 


land” — inviting distrust of muniry” tnm« our to be a eu~ 
political promises or derision at phemism for the continued as- 
presuming to be a new Moses. ' . sumption of that responsibility 
But if you let the ceremony by government. 


His vision of “a land of new 
promise” — the “I see an Amer- 
ica where” construction beloved 
of American orators — is not to 
be cynically dismissed. It's a fine 
farrago of hopes that need to be 
expressed by our elected leader 
as he repeats the informal “so 
help me God” that George 
Washington added to the oath set 
doyen in our constitution. 

Viewed from across an ocean, 
the president acting as president 
comes across more vividly than 
when viewed inside our borders or 


D.C.’s Beltway. The office 
seems a bigger part of the man. 

Thai's a thought to keep in 
mind as the second Clinton term 
reveals the tawdry secrets of the 
first. His popularity is at its peak in 
die postelection rush of patriotism 
(1 believe the CBS-New York 
Times poll, though it was egre- 
gious Jy wrong about the election;, 
and this may be a good time to 
lock in profits on Clinton stock. 

The investigations may bear 
bitter fruit; the economy may not 
prop up his ratings forever; de- 


ft* kALnlfe-Sua itU&sarc:. <4* S'.Lo' 


cision-making will surely move 
to the Hill and then to his putative 
successor. Just as, in Mr. Clin- 
ton's stirring inaugural words, 
our actions at this moment in our 
nation's history will “define our 
course and our character.” so w ill 
his reaction to the process of 
American justice define his own. 

I like to think Bill Clinton will 
preserve, protect and defend that 
process, at whatever personal 
cost, remembering all that he rep- 
resented on Inauguration Day. 

The tow 1 Kflrt Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


^Breaking the Ice 


Regarding “ Israelis From Be- 
low. Arabs From the Top Down”- 
l Opinion . Jan . 20) by Thomas L. 
Friedman; 

There is an overwhelming ma- 
jority in the Arab world, notably 
among Palestinians, that yearns 
for peace and security arid a fair 
and equitable settlement with Is- 
rael through negotiations. It is die 
success of these negotiations that 
will ensure that extremists are fur- 


1 thw TnargitigHrwd j and gg antnaTI y 

drscanded. 

Nevertheless, there are oppor- 
tunities for leaders to go further, to 

break the ice with spectacular 
moves instead of just letting the 
ice take its time to melt: . 

Yasser Arafat could doff his 
battle dress and start wearing a 
business suit — a symbolic act 
that would reinforce a new image 
of peacemaker. 

Hasni Mubarak, King Hussein 
and Mri Arafat, separately, could 


address the Israeli Knesset to talk 
about die new era in Arab-Israeli 
relations. 

Benjamin Netanyahu could ad- 
dress foe Egyptian and Jordanian 
parliaments and the General As- 
sembly of the Palestinian Author- 
ity in Gaza to express his vision of 
reconciliation and coexistence. 

2s this Coo much to expect from 
leaders who want peace, security 
and prosperity for their people? 

S.A. SHERIF. 

Montrcux, Switzerland. 


‘Unconscionable Words 9 

Regarding “Wanted in Europe: 
A Homegrown Bill Geres" ( Jan. 
22): 

As a daily reader of foe Herald 
Tribune, I was alarmed by the 
reporter’s (non) reaction to the 
unconscionable words of Jean- 
Claude Tricbet. governor of foe 
Bank of France: “I will not talk of 
tramps and vagabonds, and black 
people in jftiL” 

The quote did nothing to en- 


hance an explanation of Mr. 
Trichet's doubts about foe accur- 
acy of American unemployment 
numbers. It was also wrong about 
the racial breakdown of the tl.S. 
prison system, in which whites far 
outnumber blacks. 

His words are typical of a 
French government trying to come 
to grips with its own multicultural 
character in a time of political, 
social and economic hardship. 

FRANKLIN SIRMANS. 

Milan. 


W ASHINGTON — Warren 
Hauser is dying. Should foe 
Supreme Court decide that termin- 
ally ill Americans have a consti- 
tutional right to commit suicide 
with a doctor's help, he would 
qualify. Emphysema and valvular 
heart disease have left him debil- 
itated and physically dependent 
Recently I asked Warren 
whether he had ever ihou ght about 

MEANWHILE 

suicide. He said he had when he 
first became seriously ill, but the 
idea hadn't crossed his mind in 
months, since he no longer wor- 
ried about suffering or becoming a 
burden to his wife and family. 

During foe years I've been a 
hospice doctor. I have learned 
from my patients foal when they 
are fairly comfortable and are 
confident they will not be aban- 
doned. dying can be a rich and 
meaningful time of life. That's 
when families have a chance to 
say things to each other, like: For- 
give me. I forgive you. thank you. 
I love you and — finally — good- 
bye. People can retell and record 
their stories, preserving the life 
they knew for those they leave 
behind. And they can reflect upon 
tbe meaning of their lives, with its 
satisfactions and frustrations, and. 
if inclined, explore foe meaning of 
transcendence. 

Today fewer than one in five 
Americans are as fortunate as War- 
ren. Outmoded habits of medical 
practice and outdated Medicare 
and insurance regulations effec- 
tively exclude most patients dying 
of advanced heart or lung disease, 
as well as those with Alzheimer’s 
or AIDS, from receiving the in- 
tensive level of end-of-life care 
that a hospice represents. People 
are left to choose between hos- 
pital-based treatment they may no 
longer want and going without. 

The fear of iwretievable suf- 
fering. poverty and dependence 
fuels the drive to legalize phy- 
sician-assisted suicide. The crisis 
is real. Studies document that pain 
among foe terminally ill is wide- 
spread and undertreated, even 
within our most prestigious med- 
ical centers. Making matters 
worse, our system financially' 
punishes people for being seri- 
ously ill and not dying quickly 
enough. Illness threatens a fam- 
ily’s source of income, medical 


treatment threatens its savings. 
All this can make assisted suicide 
seem a reasonable escape from 
inevitable agony. 

But approaching the end of life 
through foe lens of tssisred suicide 
is like looking through the wrong 
end of binoculars; foe view is nar- 
rowed and distorted. Dying does 
not have to be horrifying. Pain can 
always be alleviated. Relief from 
physical distress is foe first pri- 
ority. but it is not the ultimate goal . 
Beyond morphine and skilled 
medical care, it is possible to at- 
tend the dying in ways that honor 
and even celebrate their lives. 

We Americans must overcome 
our squeamish resistance to talk- 
ing about death and the messy 
aspects of illness. We must also 
move beyond our myopic inabil- 
ity to imagine dying as anything 
other than isolated, agonizing 
and bleak. 

As a society we can choose a 
higher road on which to care for 
our dying. Common ground is 
available above the increasingly 
divisive debate. To reach it we 
must raise standards of clinical 
practice, reform medical educa- 
tion and adopt health policy that 
expands access to comprehensive 
palliative care without pauperiz- 
ing families in the process. Yet we 
needn't wait for foe courts. Con- 
gress or state legislatures to get 
started. As family members, 
friends and neighbors, each of us 
can lake responsibility to see foal 
people are treated in a way that 
allows them to feel wanted and 
worthy during their terminal 
frailty’ and physical dependence. 

As a nation, we are right to 
finally confront foe stark reality of 
needless suffering among foe dy- 
ing. The present adversarial de- 
bate over assisted suicide is di- 
verting attention from the 
problem's roots and absorbing foe 
energy and creativity of those 
most passionate for change. We 
can provide solace and preserve 
dignity and human potential 
through foe very end of life. In- 
stead of arguing whether assisted 
suicide should be legal or illegal, 
let's do what is needed to make 
it irrelevant 

The writer, president of the 


American Academy of Hospice 
and Palliative Medicine, contrib- 
uted this comment to The Wash- 
ington Post. 


? IJ 9 tjt • 

» ■' 7: ;> 

VIRUS GROUND ZERO: 

Stalking the Killer Viruses With 
the Centers for Disease Control 
By Ed Regis. 244 pages. $23. Simon & • 
Schuster. 

ft VIRUS X; 

Tracking tbe New Killer Plagues 
Out of tbe Present and Into the - 
Future 

By Frank Ryan. 430 pages. $24.95. Uttle. 
Brown. 

Reviewed by John Schwartz 

I N May 1995. foe world looked to foe 
teeming Zairian city of Kikwit, where 
foe deadly Ebola virus was making an- 
other frightening appearance. Discovered 
in 1976. foe elusive microbe had long 
figured prominently in foe nigpttmares of 
virologists and global public health of- 
ficials: In its most virulent attacks, foe- 
victims bleed from evejy orifice, and in- 
ternal organs seem to melt away. 

Ebola had become a viral superstar, 
propelled to fame by two 1994 best- 
sellers: “The Hot Zone” by Richard 
Preston and Pulitzer prizewinner Laurie 
Garrett’s “The Coming Plague: Newly 
Emerging Diseases in a World Out of 
Balance.'* As the Kikwit outbreak hit 
foe headlines, sensational! stic movies 
inspired by foe books were appearing on 
«. television and in theaters. Tins multi- 
media wave raised the status of the 
Kikwit outbreak from hot news story to 
obsession; if you think sex sells, try 
doomsday. 

The journalists who had helped crank 
up this fear machine became part of the 
circus: When foe Kikwit outbreak 
began, Richard Preston’s publicists 
called journalists around the country to 
arrange an interview conference call. 
Laurie Garrett traveled to KflcwR to 
write up the outbreak for Newsday and 
Vanity Fair. Garrett and Preston became 


EBOOKS 

commentators on TV news reports. 

Now come two science books inten- 
ded to correct some of that hype. Both 
take us on a tour of modem virology, 
with starring roles for Ebola, hantavirus 
mid of course HTV. Both would rather 
teach us than scare us, though they end 
updoing both. 

Regis delights in deflating the scare- 
mongers, and be parodies foe scare talk 
surrounding the Kikwit outbreak. 
Thanks to global air travel, he writes, 
“Yonr own home — your very own 
neighborhood — was only a day away 
from the Ebola virus!” 

He then debunks. Such “hot” vimses 
as Ebola bom themselves out quickly, 
and are far from unstoppable. “A virus, 
including tire Ebola virus, was not 
something that magically tunneled 
through physical barriers. A layer of 
plastic or rubber was all that was nec- 
essary to contain it, and household 
bleach was sufficient to kill iL” 

. Regis's book also focuses on the her- 
oes of virology: foe men and women 
who identify and fight the nasties. As tbe 
book’s title suggests, he gives die most 
ink to the scientists from foe U.S. Cen- 
ters for Disease Control and Prevention 
in Atlanta. 

Ryan’s book is both broader and deep- 
er. He refrains from the reporters’ some- 
times-overheated prose, and corrects 
their errors. But the compelling human 
stories seem to drag in the tpfling. “Vi- 
rus X” comes alive when Ryan delves 
into the science, as when he grves a 

foe proofs iy^ich Stuart Nichol of the 
Centers for Disease Control was able to 
identify the hantavirus’s genetic se- 
quence even before the virus itself had 
been successfully cultured. 

Little wonder, then, foal Ryan really 
begins to cook as he draws sweeping 
scientific conclusions toward the end of 
foe-book. -He writes that “viruses," so 
often thought to be nothing more than 
parasites, play a much wider role" in 


nature’s grand plan. He takes on tire 
vexing issue of why viruses that coexist 
in relative harmony with their natural 
hosts emerge to attack humans with such 
lethal force. Because a bug that wipes out 
its target population will become extinct 
itself, it’s sound evolutionary strategy to 
reach an accommodation instead, and to 
“co-evolve” with the host over time. 
Ultimately, tbe bugs aren’t out to kill us, 
Ryan explains: They just want to move 
in, like microscopic house guests. 

New hosts for foe virus haven't had 
time to reach this accommodation, and 
so the initial encounters rend to be tragic. 
Yet once adapted, foe viral guests aren 't 
mere freeloaders: Ryan suggests that 
they become part of tbe host's arma- 
mentarium against turf invaders. 

Ryan ends with a call for better mon- 
itoring of and response to emerging dis- 
eases — and, just to make sure we get foe 
message, conjures up a hypothetical 
“virus X,” a true doomsday bug as 
lethal as Ebola Zaire but with the air- 
borne transmission abilities of measles. 
Bn riTrirn T. 

Regis, on the other hand, steadfastly 
refuses to fret, and takes on the increas- 
ingly popular apocalyptic notion that 
emerging diseases are somehow 
“Gaia's revenge” on humanity for over- 
development He cites with scorn the 
Preston idea that “in a sense, the earth is 
mounting an immune response against 
the human species’ ' and Garrett’s notion I 
that “the microbes were winning.” 

Journalism, and especially science 
journalism, is not just about getting the 
facts right It’s equally important that | 
journalists get the tone right — yes, to ' 
sound an alarm in the face of dangerous J 
complacency, but also to avoid scaring j 
the hell out ofpeople when it’s not called ! 
for. For those who want to find an an- 
tidote to virus hysteria, these two books 
provide a promising start 

John Schwartz is a science writer for 
The Washington Post . 



BRIDGE 


By Alan Trascott 

W ith four continents hi 
contention in foe clos- 
ing stages, the Cap Gemim 
World Top Invitational Tour- 
nament ended in The Hague 
in the Netherlands. In the cli- 
max, foe Brazilian partner- 
ship of Gabriel Chagas and 
Marcelo Branco, who have 
won many, world titles, 
surged to victory. 

These were foe final stand- 
ings: first, Chagas and 

Branco, 871 victory pants; 
second, Andrea Bttratn and 
Massimo Lanzarotti of Italy, 
840; third, Krzysztof Martens 
and Marek Szymanowski of 
Poland, 830; fourth, Lorenzo 
Lauria and Alfredo Versace 
of Italy, 800; fifth. Sun Ming 


and Wang Hong Li of China, 
797; sixth, .Lany Cohen and 
David Bericowitz of the 
. Unites States, 796. The pla- 
. dag of Sun and Wang was a 
remarkable effort by the oily 
women in foe worid-ciass 

field. ^ : 

The dia gra med deal helped 
Cohen and Bericowitz, as 
North-South* to win a close 
match against Laoria and 
Versace. . . , _ : 

Using foe Precision Sys- 
tem, Cohen, as North, had 
maximum values for his 
opening onc-di amend bid. 
l^e weirtHooiring overcall 
of two hearts by Versace, as 
East, showed a two-smter, 
with either both major suits or 
both minors.' . ... 

The next round of biflmng 
showed that it was the former. 


and Berkowitz bid two no- 
trump as a take-out move. Co- 
ben bid his hand aggressively, 
using two cue-bids to show 
his maximum, and the part- 
nership came' to rest in five 
clubs, foe only- game in which 
North-South, have a fair 
chance of success. 

The opening lead of a 
spade was won with the ace in 
dummy, and a tramp was led. 
East had to take his ace, and a 
second spade forced South to 
ruff. Beakowitz crossed to 
dummy with a diamond lead 
and ruffed another spade. 
When foe club ten was led. 
West- ducked, but he was 
helpless .when South entered 
dummy with a second dia- 
mond lead and played the 
dub queen. West’s trump 
nice could be extracted, and a 


heart finesse eventually took 
care of the remaining spade. 

NORTH 

♦ A543 
09 

0 AKQ2 

♦ QJ7B 

WEST(D) EAST. 

♦ 762 4KQ10D8 

0832 9K10854 

$ 753 *10* 

♦ K953 


SOUTH 

♦ J 

O AQ J7 
0 J9B4 

♦ 10842 

wMt^r BMg waavnitagralite. The MO- 

(ting: 

West North East South 

Pass !«■ 2 0 Pass 

2 ♦ pass Pass 2 N.T. 
Pass 3+ DM- P»»s 

Pass *9 Pass 54 

Pan pass Pass 

West led the spade two. 


in the bookstore 


Disruption - the hook. Horn auailahle at bookstores eueryuihere. 


©WILEY 

TratkPublbhino 


http://ojojoi.disroptioii.con! 







Bpss:iw„35s*r5a2,g£ 3C8¥SCJf StfS?S5S5 25SC 



From the Viktualienmarkt. the towers of several Munich landmarks are visible. 


Beyond the Hofbrauhaus 

Munich ’s Market and Museum Oases 


- v* . t f \ 
*--X~ 


-r:-r rn riZSZZXSZki 


By Susan F. Yim 


By Roderick Conway Morris 

International Herald Tribune 


UN1CH — “I’d like ro be able to 
say that no locals ever go to the 
Hofbrauhaus any more, but it's 
not quite true." said a Munich 
native with a shrug of resignation. The Hof- 
brauhaus is the city’s most famous beerhall 
and garden, and a must for visitors. But if you 
go there during the day, as likely as not you'll 
still see redoubts of florid-featured old Bav- 
arians impassively playing cards and puffing 
their pipes, apparently oblivious to the ebbing 
and flowing tides of dazed, two-country-a-day 
coach parties, boisterous foreign student 


groups, shop-till-youiirop Japanese office 
ladies taking a five-minute breather, and other 


ladies taking a five-minute breather, and other 
visitors from every’ corner of the globe who 
lend the place the air of an international airport 


departure lounge. 
Fortunately not 


Fortunately not as popular with tourists is 
the Viktualienmarkt, Munich's colorful and 
bustling open-air food market, which occupies 
the site where about 1.000 years ago some 
Benedictine monks C'Mumchen") first 
settled, unwittingly founding the city and giv- 
ing it its name. There are tables beneath the 
chestnut trees (and under cover in winter) at 
one end of the market, and in keeping with the 
good old beer garden tradition, you can bring 
your own food — either buying from the 
sumptuous, aromatic arrays on the stalls, or 
choosing plates of sausages, hot and cold meats 
and fish from several cookshop counters. 

However, not even all Bavarians want to 
spend all their spare time imbibing heroic 
quantities of their admittedly excellent brews 
and tucking into the hearty local dishes. Hence 
the rise of the alternative Munich cafe. serving 
more wines and soft drinks and offering light- 
er types of food, often with an Italian or 
Mediterranean accent. 

Among the most useful of these are the 
museum caffe, some of which have become 
popular meeting places for younger Munch- 
ners (and are accessible whether you're vis- 
iting the museum or not). 

For a city of only 1.3 million people, Mu- 
nich's level of cultural activity is famously 
high — and many of the city’s 40 or so public 
galleries and museums now have their own 
caffe. 


and unwind. The Glyptothek’s own cafe is 
located among ancient statuary — which in- 
cludes pieces from the magnificent frieze of 
the Temple of Aegina — with tables outside as 
well as m the classical central quadrangle. 

A stone's throw away is the Lenbach 
House, the opulent Italianate villa of the ex- 
travagantly successful and immensely 
wealthy society portrait-painter Franz von 
Lenbach (1836-1904) bad built for himself in 
the 1 880s as a studio-home. Len bach’s rooms 
and pictures are still to be seen, but the mu- 
seum is chiefly visited today for its unpar- 
alleled collection of pictures from the Blaue 
Reiter (Blue Rider) school, led by Kandinsky 
and Marc, and later joined by Klee, which 
flourished in Munich before World War I and 
became a major force in the development of 
abstract art. 

Lenbach. the man who painted Bismarck 80 
times, would no doubt be horrified by the 
transformation of pari of his haute -bourgeois 
residence into a shrine to modernism, and would 
probably die a second death to see the neon-sign 
and blackwood and tubular steel furniture of fie 
ground-floor cafe. For warm weather there are 
also shaded cables in the charming graveled 
courtyard amid the fountains, statues, trimmed 
hedges and Mediterranean trees (33 Luisen- 
strasse; 10 AM.-6 P.M.). 


A LSO nearby is the Neue Pinakothek, 
which has one of die finest collections 
of 1 9tb -century art anywhere (and is 
temporarily hosting some of die key Old Mas- 
ter works from the superb Alte Pinakothek 
holdings until they are returned to the old 
gallery's restored premises across the road, 
which are due to reopen at the end of the 
year). 

Alexandre von Bianca's Neue Pinakothek, 
opened in 1981, also has a cafe-bistro-pizzeria 
on the ground floor, with a leafy atrium and a 
terrace overlooking a large artificial waterfall 
and ponds (with ducks), in the middle of which 
is a striking Henry Moore bronze — making 
this a particularly cool and soothing place to 
rest tired eyes and feet in summer (29 Baier- 
strasset 10 A.M.-8 P.M.). 

Despite many losses in World War n, Mu- 
nich still has some distinguished Art Nouveau 
architecture, a great favorite with the locals 


AWI, Hawaii — The richly historical 
district of North Kohala, in the north- 
west comer of the Big Island, is also 
one of the most remote and least vis- 
ited areas in Hawaii. At the rocky beaches that 
line the nigged coast, including KeokeaBay, the 
water is too rough for swimming. 

The eastern slopes of Haleakala, on Maui, are 
visible across the restless waters of the ‘Alen- 
uihaha Channel, and the ‘apa'apa'a winds, 
which have inspired many a song, cross the 
channel with such force that the trees along the 
North Kohala coastline lean toward the moun- 
tains. From the shore, windblown grasslands rise 
to pasture land, deep green rain forest, then the 
Kohala Mountains. 

My husband, John, and I bad saved North 
Kohala for the last part of atrip to the Big Island 
last spring. We stayed in the former plantation 
town of Ha wi because it is so much like it was 25 
years ago when John first visited foe region — 
with one gas station, one very small hotel and a 
main street that is barely four blocks of shops, art 
galleries and informal places to ear. 

On narrow roads winding away from foe main 
street are simple wooden houses painted cheer- 
ful shades of green, pink, yellow or blue, with 
contrasting corrugated metal roofs and tidy 
yards accented by bougainvillea, hibiscus, bird 
of paradise, torch ginger and palms. Huge ban- 
yan trees shade the edge of tire little park in the 
center of town, next to the remains of the 
smokestack of the Hawi sugar mill that stands 
Like a memorial to a once-prosperous past. 

We arrived around noon from Waimea after a 
30-minute drive past cattle ranches and iron- 
woods along foe windingly beautiful Kohala 
Mountain Road. As our car rounded a bend or 



foe mid- 1700s. The birth size, several boulders 
surrounded by red dirt, seemed disappointingly 
modest until I looked toward the sea. 

Across foe channel, on Maui’s eastern flank, _ 
Haleakala rose majestically through a wreath of 
clouds. Kamehameha means "The Lonely 
One," and framed by foal stunning view, it 
ywrnftrf fitting that he should have been bom at 


guava, Christmas berry and imlnri nut tree s . 

On foe valley floor, we passed through & 
wooden gate and followed foe trail to the beach, 
where we were struck again by foe beauty of the 
surf crashing against foe cliffs. There was barely 
any wind, and as foe waves dashed against foie 
bluffs, foe sky bound spray appeared to melt into 
tire sultry air. 

Driving back toward Kapaau, we tamed left 
before the town, curious about a sign announcing 
“Kalahikiola,” and entered into a forest of palm, 
and banyan trees. Groves of macadamianut trees 
were to our left, and a large white church with 
exquisite wood-trimmed windows emerged to 
our right 


At Mookiru Heiau, 1 was very much aware of . : 

the sound of the surf and the songs of birds. Alii, ^ 
or chiefs, worshipped at this religious site long 
before Kamaharneha was bam. A lichen- x - 
covered lava rock wall surrounds a large plat- 
form of carefully laid stones. The interior erf the ; v- 
heiau, or temple, is visible from an opening in 
foe wall, bnl a rope bars entry for tourists. 

North Kohala is also a place of Christian , *• . 

churc hes and Japanese and Chinese temples, 
which served a diverse efonfc population in foe 
days when sugar was king, m 1975, foe lad — 
plantation shnt down, as sugar proved no longer* — 
economically viable, to cultivate. Today roughly 
4,300 people live in pockeK of North Kohala: a 
mix or Hawaiian famuies, others with plantation ' 


climbed a rise in foe road, we glimpsed ocean far 
below, and then a baby blue blanket of sea 


below, and then a baby blue blanket of sea 
meeting sky as we descended to Hawi. 

The new owners of foe Kohala Village Inn had 
renovated a ad painted the one-story main build- 
ing and two-story wing of foe small hoteL Our 
double room, in the main building, was simply 
furnished, clean and comfortable. 


Waves Dashing on Bluffs 


In the Heart of Town 


being foe Volksbad, an immaculately main- 
tained public pool complex (1894-1901) on 


One of the closest to foe heart of town is foe 
Stadtcafe at foe Munich City Museum, which 
contains collections on foe city's history, 
graphic art. photography, film, musical in- 
struments, puppets, and special exhibition 
spaces. This lively cafe overlooks a square and 
has tables in the museum courtyard in summer 
(1 St.-Jakobs-Plaiz; 10 A.M.-12 P MX 
The Glyptofoek (23 Konigsplalz) of Greek 
and Roman sculpture, just northwest of foe 
center, stands in the middle of a constellation 
of not- to- be -missed museums, whose caffe 
also provide an impressive diversity of ar- 
chitectural settings in which to ponder, relax 


foe banks of the River Isar, a leisurely stroll or 
quick tram ride from foe center. A high- 
ce dinged room with classic decor has been 
made into a welcoming cafe-bistrot, with 
tables outside in summer (Cafe Stoer, 1 
Rosenheimer Strasse; 11 AJVL-l A_M.). Close 
by is foe Muffafoalle, a former steam pumping 
station, recently converted into a music and 
theater center, where there are rock, jazz and 


ethnic bands, and dance events most nights. 
The Muffafoalle CaK crowd is young and hip, 
but still not too proud to enjoy their very own 
beer garden outside in summer (4 Zellstnasse; 
Mon. -Sat 6 P-M.-4 A.M.; Sun. 4 P.M.-1 
A.M.; the beer garden closes at 1 A.M. 
nightly). 


Since it was sunny and not windy at all in 
Hawi that afternoon, we decided to (hive to foe 
Pololu Valley Lookout at foe end of Akoni Pule 
Highway, a two-lane road that serves as North 
Kohala’s main artery. We passed clusters of 
bouses, horses grazing in knee-high grass, 
gulches thick with tropical foliage and vine- 
covered trees, and small steepled churches. 

By foe time we reached Kapaau — as small as 
Hawi and about 10 minutes away — tire sky was 
cloudy. In front of foe former county courthouse, 
a young couple was taking pictures of the statue 
of King Kamehameha, foe great warrior who 
united foe Hawaiian Islands in 1810. When we 
arrived at the Pololu lookout, foe cliffs were 
shades of purple and gray, and the light through 
foe clouds cast a silver sheen on foe sea. 

It took us about 20 minutes to hike down foe 
switchback dirt trail to foe black sand beach. A 
couple of times we had to make way for horse- 
back riders coming up from the valley floor. It 
was muggy, and we were grateful foe sun wasn’t 
beating aown on us. Pan dan us trees, which 
Hawaii ans weave into mats, baskets and other 
crafts, lined the trail along with breadfruit. 


T HIS turned out to be Kalahikiola Church, 
established by foe Reverend Elias Braid 
and bis wife, Ellen, Congregationatist mis- 
sionaries who arrived in North Kohala from New - 
England in 1841. Past the church and a moss- 
covered bridge is a three-story dormitory that’s 
now a boarding house, and a group of worn 
buildings that are private property of the Bond 
estate. It was like coming upon a bit of New 
England tucked into a tropical grove. 

That night we had dinner with friends who 
live between Hawi and Kapaau in an enclave 
old-timers still call Union Mill. In its heyday in 
the early 1900s, six mills and five sugar plant- 
ations flourished in North Kohala. The house of 
tire Union Mill plantation manager, owned and 
restored by our friends, is a two-story wooden 
structure originally assembled in New Hamp- 
shire and brought around Cape Hon to Hawaii 
in 1 885. Surrounded by plumeria trees and Aus- 
tralian cypress, it stands out among the smaller, 
simpler wooden bouses in tire little town. 

lire next day we began exploring North Ko- 
hala on foe southern end, at Lapttofoi State 
Historical Park. The park, a fishing village 600 
years ago, extends inland and along tire shore, 
which has been designated a marine life con- 
servation district 

We followed a clearly marked trail for about 
an hour, consulting a brochure available at foe 
park that explains tire significance of the grass 
and stone structures, shrines, outdoor Hawaiian 


ties and residents who were attracted to tire rural * 
nature of foe place. '* 

Tbelifoe churches and temples are weUmam-.^ 
tained. Striking examples are tire Hawi Jodo - 
Mission and tire older Kohala Jodo Mission in u 
Kapaau. The Hawi mission is on the Akoni Pule 
Highway just before tire entrance to town. 

To find tire Kohala Jodo Mission, we turned r 
right off foe highway just before foe old court- * 
house, followed Water WoricsRoad past several - 


houses and came upon tire bright green temple. : 
Built in 1903, the older temple, like foe rare in - 


Hawi. combines Japanese architectural accents * 
with plantation architecture. 

Driving from Kapaau toward Pololu Valley, 
we stopped at a Chinese temple and tiny ! 
cemetery. Bright lime green with lacquer zed • 
trim, tire two-stray Tong Wo Society Club 
House and cemetery date tack to 1886. Restored ■ 
around 1968, the club house is still used by foe : 
Chinese in tire area, many of whom are de- 
scendants of the first immigrants who came to 
Kohala in the 1870s. 


4 ■£: 


last* minute mowsing Our trip ended 
where it should have begun. On oar last mom- • 
mg, we found foe little state-run library in ’ 
Kapaau and its collection of historical material 
about North Kohala. While the librarian helped ~ 
my husband find a book of oral histories about * 
the district, I leafed through two albums of * 
black-and-white photographs, including pic- " 
tores, from -the. turn of the century of the plant- 
ation estate our friends now call home. * 

Across the street, beside the courthouse, we . 



structures and implements for daily life in place 
but no residents. 

Our next stop was Upolu Point, just south of 
Hawi. Kamehameha’ s birth site, and Mookini 
Heiau, the state’s first registered National His- 
torical Landmark, are just minutes apart on a 
road off Akoni Pule Highway and clearly des- 
ignated by road signs. 

A low lava rock wall encircles Kamehameha 
Akahi Aina Hanan, where the king was bom in 


hedges beside the budding. "These are for our 
king,'’ she told us, smilin g, as she placed the ' 
flowers in vases at the foot of the statue of " 
Kamehameha. People leave gifts for him all the • 
time, she said, of flowers, lets, even fruit. * 
Descended from apioneer Chinese family, the 
old woman had grown up near the Chinese .■ 
templ e and worked for the plantation in Hawi. -• 
After listening to her stories, we took our leave - 
afNrath Kohala and also of “The Lonely One," : 
whose presence still seems to fill tire secluded 
valleys and nigged beaches he once walked. i. 


1 Sr. 


Susan F. Yim, who lives in Honolulu, wrote .i 
this for The New York Times. s 


DINING 


More Trendy Than Tasty, Restaurant-as-Theater Can Be Fun 


By Patricia Wells 

liuermtional Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — In the French capital, 
we’ve entered the era when 
bars are not actually bars, and 
caffe are not actually caffe. It’s 
a clever psychological way for tire 
French legitimately to transform a formal 
dining experience into a casual one. 

Two of foe latest contenders in this 
class are the highly popular restaurant- 
as-foeater Buddha Bar, an oversized 
underground establishment near foe 
Madeleine, and foe equally trendy Via- 
duc Cafe, a pleasant ana beautifully 
designed restaurant under foe newly re- 
stored viaduct along foe Avenue 
Daumesnil near the Gate de Lyon. 


Buddha bad Open since October, foe 
200-seat Buddha Bar manages to fill its 
tables each night with a young, modem, 
international crowd eager to spend foe 


evening in this heavily decorated 
nightclub-like dining room where the 
kitchen makes an attempt to present 
authentic Asian fare. 

It's clear that most don't come to the 
Buddha Bar for a rich gastronomic ex- 
perience, but there are some passable 
dishes on the brief and pricey menu. My 
favorite was the traditional cold sesame 
noodles, a surefire dish combining egg 
noodles, peanuts, sesame paste, huge 
chunks of chicken and a gentle hit of 
spice. Equally good, and equally pricey 
(190 francs, or about $35), was foe 
entire sea bass, wok-fried and served, 
unfortunately, with a banal sweet-and- 
sour sauce. 

Although the Buddha Bar seems to 
advertise itself as a restaurant with pan- 
Asian cuisine, foe end result is pretty 
run-of-the mill Chinese. I am not sure 
which country would like to claim foe 
120-franc starter that combines lentils 
and scallops, but let me save any future 


diners the pain of sampling the offbeat, 
unsuccessful combination. The fried 
Vietnamese spring rolls were no better 
titan one might find at any of the city’s 
Asian carryout shops, and the Korean 
beef with lettuce leaves was equally 
underwhelming. 


li viaduc cafe Diners interested in 
viewing one of the city's best new 
neighborhood restorations should take a 
walk along the Avenue de Daumesnil, 
where dozens of artisans — from an- 
tique-linen merchants to modem fur- 
niture designers — have settled into foe 
vast arched arcades beneath foe old 
Daumesnil railroad track. Each shop 
seems to shout design with a capital D. 

Artisans and shoppers have quickly 
made Le Viaduc Cafe their action cen- 
tral. The space is beautiful, bright, airy 
and welcoming, with exposed stone 
walls, shiny wood floors, clear wood 
tables and plaid settees in place of the 


traditional banquettes. Too bad the ser- 
vice is so impersonal and disengaged, 
for this spot has foe potential of be- 
coming a modem Parisian landmark. 

The menu is brief and geared toward 
foe classics, with a thoroughly decent 
boeuf a la boureuignonne, a fine tartare 
of salmon, and a serviceable spinach 
ravioli with tomato sauce. The wine list 


is brief, with a deliciously lively 1992 
Savienv les Beaune from Simon Bize at 


Savigny les Beaune from Simon Bize at 
175 francs. And the fragrant, crusty 
bread is so good one can plow through 
several baskets without noticing. 


Buddha Bar, 8 rue Boissy cf Anglos, 
oris 8; tel: 0U3.05S0.00. Closed 


Paris 8: tel: 0U3.05S0.00. Closed 
Sunday lunch. All major credit cards. A 
la carte, 190 to 360 francs, including 
service but not wine. 

Le Viaduc Cerfe. 43 avenue Daumes- 
nil,Paml2;tel: 01.44.74.70.70. Credit 
card: Visa. Open daily. A la carte. ISO to 
200 francs, including service but not 
wine. 







PAGE IX 



I !i v u 1|( M l IQEV H (IhTfl n t 3 :/.1 » I !>* ; j t M tk I r M a H I »7AV FAOl IHH 



MOTHER 

Directed by Alb*n Brooks. 

S,a aft 

^ ff ™g from writer? 

sS^ Med reI ^on- 

for ideas and 
bewildered over all those 

w b° lacked belief 
12 r?v Heod erson decides 
£m? !y S h0an ? yze pn>b- 

{™- took a wrong turn 

? bfe. be concludes. And 

dSJS^^SP^ who w 

erecting traffic at that cru- 

gal intersection: Mother 
prooks, creator of such satir- 
* gems as “Real Life/’ 

I • itw^ m America’’ and 
Defending Your Life,” 
uves and breathes funny. In 
ttu.s comedy. Henderson 
^o^Judes that his only solu- 
t0 move back in with 
Mother, figure out what 
she s all about, and some- 
how put his life back on 
course. He*s taking a bold 
gep. Beatrice (Debbie 
Reynolds), his mother, is a 
disarmingly heedless des- 
S troyer of seas, including 
John's brother, Jeff (Rob 
Morrow), known to Mrs. 
Henderson's ne*»rc ne 


successful one," who’s at 
least as emotionally trwcy>d . 
up as his sib. Brooks and 
Reynolds perform together 
like, well, a dysfunctional 
family. Beatrice doesn’t talrm 
well to her son’s scheme to 
move in, redo his bedroom 
like the good old teenage 
days and spend quality time 
with her. And the vegetarian, 
health-conscious John really 
doesn't want to swallow the 
disgusting, generic-brand 
food she’s been stashing 
away in the freezer for years. 
As these strong-willed indi- 
viduals joust verbally with 
each other, the “blame’’ for 
John’s frazzled psyche shifts 
constantly. “I love you,*’ 
(^Beatrice tells John just after 
^she has implied that she 
doesn't think much of his 
recent sci-fi book. “I know 
you think you do," says 
John, as sweetly and gently 
as possible. We know 
Brooks is funny. But Reyn- 
olds is the comic rediscovery 


movie guide 



EBiMt Mataffmaon* noma 

Debbie Reynolds and Albert Brooks in "Mother." 

hCTe. Dramatically, “Moth- characters drawn from real 
er’ ’ solves John ’s whole di- life, including Assis tant Dis- 
lemma a little too coaveni- trict Attorney Bobby 


beimid Beatrice's psycho- win), who takes on die case 


neat and tidy explanation. 
But ‘ ‘Mother’ ’ has too many 
rewards for minor quibbles. 
(Desson Howe, WP) 

Ghostsof Mississippi 

Directed by . Rob Reiner. 
UJ>. 

In “Ghosts of Mississippi,*’ 
Rob Reiner opens a painful 
chapter in the bitter Civil 
Rights era. This account of 
the black activist Medgar 
Evers, who was gunned 
down in 1963, contains the 
usual Hollywood . caveat: 
Where the nets are dramat- 
ically inconvenient, they’re 
dispensed with or stream- 
lined. But as an amalg am pf 
drama and history, Reiner 
and scriptwriter Lewis Col- 
ick strike a surprisingly sat- 
isfying compromise. “Mis- 
sissippi” is a stirring 
courtroom drama spiced up 
with colcnfol Mississippi 


and Byron De La Beckwith 
Games Woods), Evers’ con- 
fessed killer, who has 
waltzed free after two trials 
ended with hung juries. 
When a local newspaper 
publishes allegations of jury 
tampering in die Evers trials 
in 1964, De-Laughter and his 
superior, Ed Peters (Craig T. 
Nelson), face enormous, po- 
larized pressure, along with 
seemingly insurmountable 
difficulties. The murder 
weapon and the original trial 
transcript have disappeared. 
Witnesses are either dead or 
unwQling to xetestijy. Evers’ 
widow (Whoopi Goldberg), 
who distrusts the prosecutor, 
is barely cooperative. Out- 
raged by die met that Evers 
was kilted in front of his wife 
and family, DeLanghter 
(who has children him self) 
decides to pursue die case to 
the bitter end. Reiner — who 
made “A Few Good Men," 


one of the best courtroom 
movies in recent years — 
gives us powerful reason to 
watch. The finale, which 
minors the facts enough for 
us to enjoy the experience 
and not feel guilty, is an ex- 
citing one. And in Woods, 
the director has hired the vil- 
lain of the year. 

{Desson Howe, WP) 

Turbulence 

Directed by Robert Butler. 
US. 

Fear of flying is synony- 
mous for millions with the 
terror of being helplessly 
bounced around on a stom- 
ach-turning midair roller- 
coaster ride. That’s why the 


s why m 
notion of 3. movie thriller in 
which a madman directs an 
airplane into heavy weather 
and worse is so tantalizing. 
And it’s what the trailer for 
die movie “Turbulence” 
seems to promise. But nail- 
ers can deceive. This Grade 
B stinker of a film stars Ray 
ZJotta as Ryan Weaver, a 
vicious serial killer being 
transported from New York 
to Los Angeles on Christmas 
Eve, and Lauren Holly as 
Ten Halloran, the plucky 
flight attendant who keeps 
her head and tries to save the 
day. Poorly paced and 


duuicuuj witii 

able dialogue and glaring 


UWIba HI lU IICU.4tlU.YW, JLU1“ 

bulence" is not exactly the 
kind of endurance test its 
makers had in mind. The 
movie is really a crude air- 
borne stalker film in which a 
sadistic killer takes over a 
747 aircraft, kills most of 
those aboard and plays des- 
perate cat-and-mouse games 
with the only person who 
can land die plane safely. 
Ryan, who is headed for 
Death Row, hopes to crash 
die plane into the Pacific or, 
better yet, have it make a 
kamikaze dive into Los An- 
geles and wipe out as many 
people as possible. Wifi 
Ten, guided by radio in- 
structions, be able to land the 
plane safely in Los Angeles 
before Ryan breaks into the 
cockpit and kills her7 Holly, 
unlike Liotta. main tains her 

dignity. But you’d be much 
better off waiting for the 
next flight out. 

(Stephen Holden, NYT) 


THE CAR COLUMN 




. .n*?:- 1 . s.-, x'-.r'?" y , . 




.7... vw fi 


^ eati 








The New , Sharper Ford Mondeo 


By Gavin Green 


M ORE than 80 years after 
Henry Ford revolutionized 
mass production, the men 
now wearing his shoes aim 
to change the car business all over again. 
The change won't be as significant as the 
moving production line, which begat the 
consumer society of tile late 20th cen- 
tury and put America and, soon after, the 
rest of die world on wheels. But Ford’s 
new “world car” program is pretty big 
stuff, all the same. 

In a nutshell, it plans to standardize 
major mechanical items, so that a Ford 
made in America, Australia, Europe or 
Asia may use the same engine, suspen- 
sion, gearbox and body panels and in- 
terior parts. The cars won’t be identical. 
American tastes are still different from 
Europe's, but they *11 certainly be more 
similar than they used to be. All major 
new Fords will now be world cars. The 
next one is the Escort, on sale in two 
years. Soon after comes a medium-sized 
Jaguar, which shares major mechanicals 
with a planned Lincoln. 

A CERTAIN WORDLINISE Ford’s first 
world car was the 1993 Mondeo. It was 
co- developed in Europe and America 
and pans for it are made in both con- 
tinents. Its European name was meant to 
imply a certain worldliness (Le Monde. 
II Mondo, etc.) but in America, where 
the grasp of Latin is weaker, it was 
called the Ford Contour and the Mer- 


Ford Mondeo 2.0 Ghia. About S280OQ. 
Four-cylinder engine, 19S9cc. ISO BHPat 
5700 rpm. F he -speed manual or four- 
speed automatic gearboxes. Top speed 205 
KMH \127 MPHi. Acceleration 0-100 
KMH in 9.7 seconds . Average fitel con- 
sumption: 9.4 litersi 100 km. 

cury Mystique. (What was the differ- 
ence between the Ford and the Mercujy? 
As usual with those nameplates, nothing 
— apart from the amount of chrome and 
about 100 bucks.) 

The car had a difficult gestation and 
an even tougher birth. Costs were way 
over budget. 

There were long delays, especially in 
getting the Contour and Mystique to 
market. Sales in America have been 
sluggish. This is partly because the rear 
seat legroom is poor. Lesson one for 
Ford: Yanks expect more legroom than 
Europeans. 

The American and European versions 
looked quite different, even if they were 
the same size and had more or less the 
same mechanicals. Unfortunately, both 
looked dull, which didn’t exactly help 
sales either. 

The new Mondeo, just launched in 
Europe, and its American sisters — the 
latest Contour and Mystique, unveiled 
earlier this month at the Detroit Auto 
Show — are now visual clones as well as 
mechanical twins. And they now look far 
sharper and more distinctive. Big 
teardrop-shaped head lamps give the one- 
time same-again styling a lift, as do the 
new front fenders, which impart a pleas- 


ingly high-shouldered style. Important 
mechanical improvements have been 
made, not least to the rear seats, which 
have liberated an extra two inches or so of 
legroom. 

In Europe, where the poor rear leg- 
room was never much of an issue, the 
biggest gripe used to be the vibratory and 
crude four-cylinder engines, which al- 
ways sounded as though they were trying 
to wrestle free of their mountings. Well, 
the engines have been improved. So has 
the steering and suspension, which now 
gives a quality of ride and handling that's 
not bettered in this class. 

T HE upshot is a car that’s taken on 
a second lease of life. It's still far 
from being the roomiest car in the 
class, but it is probably the best to drive, 
one of the best looking, one of the most 
comfortable and one of the best made. 
All round. I’d pick a Passat instead. But 
the Mondeo has suddenly leapfrogged 
many other newer cars, to vie for “best 
car in class” laurels. 

Even the “world car” program that 
begat it seems to be taking off. General 
Motors, which initially pooh-poohed 
the concept, now appears to be fol- 
lowing Ford's lead, co-developing cars 
for both sides of the Atlantic. 

Apparently, the world's car markets 
are starting to merge in terms of pri- 
orities and motoring tastes. 

Next: the Mercedes-Benz SLK 

Gavin Green is the editor in chief of 
Car magazine. 


ARTS GUIDE 


Edubumm 

Duff House, tab (1261) '818-181, 
open Thursdays to Sundays. Ocm- 
tlnulng/To Fob. 16: "Worts by 
Goya." Prints commemorating the 
250th anniversary of the artist * 
Scottish National Gallery of Mod- 
em Art, tal: (31) 332-2266, open 
daily. To April 13: “Lucian Freud: 
Early Works. " About 25 paintings 
and drawings creeled by theflg- 
urative British artist (bom 1922) be- 
'viliore and during Wbrid War II. 

London 

Royal Academy of Arts, tei: (171) 
494-5615. open dally. To Apr® 6: 
“Braque: The Late Works.” 

Throughout his fife. Braque re- 
peatedly returned to the ideas and 
techniques of the early years ot the 
century when he and Picasso cre- 
ated Cubism. The exhibition fo- 
cuses on his last 20 years, with 50 
paintings Inducting cytes of paint- 
ings such as "Interiors." "BfltenJ - 
Tbbles," “Studios" and “Birds." 
The exhibition will travel to Hous- 
ton in the spring. 


Paris 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tet 
01 -44-78-1 2-33. dosed Tuesdays. 
To April 7: “fees a rj-flstoke." Fo- 
cuses on how modem artiste bx- 
press thek vtekto ot the major pofit- 
ic^ events of the second hdf of the 
century. Includes paintings, draw- 
ings, sculptures, photomontages, 
installations and videos by Beck- 
mann, DaB, Chagall. Wee, Picas- 
so. Fautrier, Beuys and BoettL 
Muses dii Louvre, tei: 01-40-20- 
J3 -51, dosed Tuesdays. To March 
Tfe “Vermeer: L’Astronome et Le 
GeogTaphe Re unis." The juxta- 
position of “L’Astronomo" (from Le 
Louvre) and “Le Geographe” 
(Irom the Stadel Museum in Frank- 
furt) emphasizes their similarities 
in size, posture of the character, 
light and surrounding objects. 
Uusae UaUloL Id: 01-42-22-59- 
56, dosed Tuesdays. To Feb. 15: 
“Retrospective Qtoqpo Morano?.. 
Paintings, drawings, ^ ravings 
and watercotors by the 
artist Morandi (1890-1984) 


portraits, but mostly bottles, lugs, 

vases and candlesticks. 

Musee National des Momime^ 
Franca*, tel: 01-44^39-10. 
closed Tuesdays. To ApriMS- "L 
Architecture el le Design ctes Aiv 
nees 30 en France et en Europe. 

Drawings and objects doomtera- 
ing architecture and urban design, 
projects by Gropius and Mes v«j{] 
der Rohe, and plans by Me 01 *®*: 
sohn for Palestine: chawingsoj 
Hitler's Berlin. Stalins Moscow 
and Mussolini'S Rome; designs tor 
New York skyscrapers. 


Swnrawrr _ 

V Staatsgeterfe, tel: (71f) 212 - 
* 4074, dosed Mondays. Contim^ 
tog I To Feb. 1R “TKfOto wd 
Zachenkunsi VenedgsOtopoto 
and the Venetian Sketches)- a 
celebration of the ISib-century 
artist. 


akova, CtaucKa Pticote Bandera 
and Sergey Larin. Jan. 24, 26, 28,: 
?SO r J5sb:1v4&7and'0, : •••,„■ 

jjjAPAM ~ 

' Osaka 

Osaka Muntelpsl Museum of Art, 
tet (8)771-4874, dosed Mondays. 
ID Feb. 11: ‘Watisee and the Mod- 
em Masters from the Cone Col- 
lection cri The Baltimore Museum 
of Art." More than 80 Matisse 
paintings, sculptures and draw- 
ings. To provide the context In 
which the French artist (1889- 
1954) worked, major paintings by 
Bonnard, Braque, Cezanne. 
Gauguin, - Laurencin, Picasso. 
Rendr, and van Gogh are also ex- 
hibited. 


Amsterdam 

Hlstorlsch Museum, tet (20) 
5231-822, open daily. 1b Apr! 13: 
"Peter the Great and Holland" 
More than 250 objects from the 
Chamber of the Arts of the czar. 
The collection includes paintings 
by t7TfK»ntury Dutch masters, 
human anatomical specimens, in- 
struments, sculptures, garden 
designs, drawings, manuscripts 
and costumes. 


ducted by Richard Buckley with Gi- Maria Carminati, with Alfredo 
usy Devirtu, Marco Betti and Alain Kraus, Jose FarcDHia and Kathleen 
Vemhes-Feb. 1,4, 6 and 9. Casello. Feb. 1 , 5 and 9. 


Teatro Nadona! da Sao Carlos, 
tot (1) 343-0613. "U Traviate." 
. Directed by Pier Luigi Pizzi, oon- 


■ EPAIN 

Babcsuma 

Museu d’Art Contamporanl, tel: 
(3) 412-08-1 0, closed Mondays. To 
March 31: “Mike Kelley.” A ret- 
rospective of the latest works by 
the American artist (bom 1954) In- 
cluding paintings, sculptures, pho- 
tos, watercotors, videos and mu- 
sical pieces. 

Seville 

Tbatro de la Maestranza, tel: (95) 
422-65-73. “Lucia di Larmier- 
moor." Directed by Gian Carlo 
Menotti, conducted by Fabrtzlo 


Dallas 

Klmbeil Art Museum, tel: (817) 
332-8451, dosed Mondays. To 
March 30: “Michelangelo and His 
Influence: Drawings from Windsor 
Castle." Examples of Michelan- 
gelo's draftmanshlp and works by 
his contemporaries and followers 
document the artist's Impact on 
their technique, style and imagery. 

New York 

Academy of Sciences tet (212) 
82841230, cto&ed Saturdays and 
Sundays. To April 11: “Science 



;S NiA- 



Winter, Magic. 

ST. MORITZ, THAT IS 
THE KULM TO ME. 


Kl L \1 I lO I 1: !. ST. VIORI I" 7 



SKI H0UDAY5 

a Iwafrg torrid 

■ p ssyr'"* 


Bed & Breakfasts 


HAttHATTM L0D8MGS, HYC. Start 
stay luxury aparsaerte, superior B S B 
' itpiji. prat teaflore, tawed and 
UMOStKf. Manhattan Lodgings: 
Tet 2124752090 Fare 212477-0420. 


ftrmoffldflWsMrtact 

toatellwre 

wSBass” 


fiance ■ ■ 


TKNES, VAL 

folSMBa flWfiffi 


HOTEL AL BUSTML East of Beta*. 
5 starttotML Empiaal lusta sea*' 
Iffy, comfort, he cuHne, umetiOfig, 
butioess urvfcaa, MteHto TV. IS rin 
transfer 6om airport free. UTBX Fa* 
(rt) 2124781381 / (*33) (0)147200007 




PARIS 

LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE 

★★★★ 

13, rue D’ Agnesseau, 75008 Paris 
Just off the Faubourg Saint-Honor^ and The Etysee Palace 
A LUXURY APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE 


Very exclusive, located in one of the most prestigious neigh- 
bourhoods: Faubourg Saint- Honors and Champs Hystfes. 
Thirteen personalized large apartments up to 1200 sq. feet 
completely restored in 1992 with fully equipped kitchens. liv- 
ing-dining rooms, as well as one or two bedrooms, one or two 
marble bathrooms and some with studies. 

Ideal for both family holidays and business trips, a perfect 
“pjed-fc-tene’’. 

All hotel services. Daily maid service. Air conditionning. 
Underground parking. Complete security. 

For more information or reservations, please fax directly to: 
+33 (0) J 42 6635 70 oread +33 (0)1 4451 1635 




VILLAS IN TUSCANY 
COUNTRY HOMES 
IN NEW ENGLAND 


Qd BOW far jrwr 4w figftft-fayNg* 
inthn ofkrieg hXfcf ram 
htufyerHewBi^mi 
VOYAGES AOMPA PARIS 
TiL 33 1 45 08 44 80 
33 1 42 36 45 33 rf 





ST. HAHTHaaiy, MW- QVEH 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS • beach- 
trart to hfeidfl w» pods- Ax *9«te 
haw (rapscNd aS ribs pmntf. For 
rManteois si Sl Bara. Bl UarikL An- 

a.TAasJsmt 

R )40t2fia B47-K80, from 
03 90 16 20 ■ ENGLAND D 


i. to)1 *46» 56*40' 


PHUKET 5^90 F 

Vd^S«neKS-tMld« 

RED SEA 3,890 F 

PqhJ RT- HOOI « 8 on N • Mfl faomi - *M 
BghB KT- Haul 3* 9 *n/i ngn - tul tort 

MADEIRA 2,750 F 

nghs in* hobi 3* 8 aam mar® - mum 

W.-E. IN PRAGUE 2AZ0F 

Hgto rcu hrH 3* 3 o«te , MtUHt 

MARRAKECH 2,520 F 

' rare RT* had <* 8 *jV7 ngw - r«H Sort 

W.-E. (N LONDON 1,080 F 

Mm BT- Hen 3* 3 dM3 ncta » tmUn 


uetae at 
at on mm 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


From Ufa." The exhibition 
presents key moments in modem 
science as photographed by Life 
magazine. 

CLOSINO SOON 

Jan. 26: “American Photography 
1880-1965 from the Museum ol 
Modem Art In New York." Victoria 
& Albert Museum, London. 

Jan. 26: "P rims by Edvard Munch." 
Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. 


Jan. 26; "Irving Penn: Photo- 
graphs." The Museum of Con- 
temporary Art, Helsinki. 

Jan. 26: “Man Ray." KunstHaus 
Wien, Vienna. 

Jan. 26: “Robert Frank: Photo- 
graphies de 1941 a 1994." Centre 
Culture! Suisse, Paris. 

Jan. 26: “Russian Avant-Garde. 
1910-1924." Kunstmuseum, Basel. 
Jan. 26: “Henri Matisse: Master- 
works from The Museum of Mod- 
em ArL” High Museum of Art, 


Atlanta. 

Jan. 26: “The Power of Sugges- 
tion: Narrative and Notation in 
Contemporary Drawing.” Mu- 
seum of Contemporary Art, Los 
Angeles. 

Jan. 26: “Paul Nash: Aerial 
Creatures." Imperial War Mu- 
seum, London. 

Jan. 26: “Kirctiner Franzi in front 
of Carved Chair, 1910.“ Fun- 
. dacion Thyssen-Bomemlsza, 
Madrid. 


FLY BIMflN S 
KEY CITIES 
NETWORK 



V ' 4 F 'S* ' 


msm*. 

: ^y: : 


. f V r ' ■' \ 



Biman Bangladesh Airlines offers convenient connections 
to 26 major cicies worldwide - from North America 
to South .Asia, from the Far East to the Middle 
Ease, from Europe to the Himalayas. Right on 
top of the world - at down to earth prices. 


® Biman 

BANGLADESH 


BANGLADESH AIRLINES 

Your home in the air 






















mmi ui-aco 


H 

u 

A) 

D 

D 

& 

V. 

5* 

L 

Pi 

Si 

& 

L 

PI 

M 

n 

s; 

so 

« 

Ai 

IS 

M 

Of 

< 

IB 

7; 

Or 

IS 

ca 

CM 

( 

u 

Mi 


Thursday’s 4 pan. Close 

NatiMwHde prices, nol reflecting late trades eteewftece. 

7J» Associated Press 


Lw LtM Oi-»» 


ilk TIWBBSPlil 




? n as P 


- . in,**!? 

X'-, II'IAHMI 

fi fiSSAr 

f. "JAggPP 

nik w. acwun 

8>«ft2jK>3u 
H;* is wwn 
JO 1 * MV; 

S'. Ill* «c ■ Tocn 
U’t 14 ACT 

Nh iimaSjCb 

. »rt 

IS iS'S?* 1 
s'-swais- 

m 

Stti n*A£AL«d 
u*,4T§rs 
2»'^ is. jtirir cb 

»> sswh 

HV| UNAonMi 
^AtAlNlI D* 
J’ 17%*I)*#fe1il 


SJ 1 * 


Nil I/1.4 F pmtjv 
U lO'yAMD 
114 f wnr 
144 VbAtfVObX* 
'1 SfciVMWf 
liSAcm 


mi II H ’4 tin <0*- 

48?9IKjR 


«oo _. __ ._ . 

s> so - an 

TO IM _ W* » 

M )DD _ 7* 1* 6* 

is* tb _ imf its n;, 

w ».i . & «i ft 

m n _ ifc Hft lift 

_ - Jl’3 17* iaW 

. a iw wft 

_ a MAC 77ft as 

_ T] 14*1(1 Mft 4»W 

jo } n im £w, « 

Oi .1 l| 1304 Jtft lift 

w u it »ij iiw ra* 

III P . 17*6 I Aft 1616 

» ro a sot lift jo 

171 M a 4*1 u Nft a 

f MI-1 H a 

a id :i jm «»* m 

. _ 31 II 17ft 

B S> Q «U 47*1 <7* 

is _ imi v i nv, 

( 33 14 II .UlTj l*ft Ift 

231 .t II til 2iv, 74 *, 

_ » HI, Bft 

JO All 3841 *1* 43ft 

jib . . a sft as 

m ia a ihii »ft Mft 

_ Bfi 


JO . 


lift It 


* fi 


1 7lV It 2D 


a’w a-T 

_ __ »»% i>So 

“ 2.S 2* BS 

_ AJl ■)% MV, 
_ ifl rv »v 

- nili J f% 42V I 

l£ 

rti, r% 
*->S 


fi-hi 


1? 


0% 


■ih 

5^ IT* i 4antCD0 
flw r'aAirw 
U’u m-iAeriwnfl 
J/% 21 ;a4M%»k 
HS 2J- *«Annw HC 
•*? y^JininmifD 
M'y PthWnM 

nv> 

Si! 'AJSSSS 

5*0 *J<A.AifTflMiH_ 
M** ^viAP’Tdinm 
eiM, 43VuAirTcnP«C 
5* 2J> 

7l%4.G**p«C 
?J AlQ^DA* 
7n*WoPCrtO 
. _ iJVtUT'roCo 
30 I ■ 

13 ai J^tAfcrtwM 
M 1 ! UnAKttmV 
7JV. l«UAS)fTF.t 
SS 34'ftAlWla 
■un imAiCuiA 
Ol« J= 


1A> 6.1 _ l^r-f 


»'B 


B. 

_ . . !■* W* 

? .SU S'* " 

ii ■ hi. 

„. 1(01 lift lift 
CJM23SU Mil J7 
_ 31 74 V, Jtft 

_ 371 u BOft ’4V, 

? xff S5 a 

n I'iu Eft 


lift 31ft — -i 


150 _ _ ITT a 


I 


fa :i<k !<•« 


■ &L-4-^ 

JUtuSI 


i)f4r.iAiv 


sn 

.. 

sow. n 

?!'■ JIM. _- 

13'f l3SAir*rtTo 

’ifft‘iiftS®5; 

tp- IftAUf-greU* 

7«Vb rs Btcyivn 

<• IQ Aicna« 

a lt ‘ J UllAJWttif 
VI 2jviAkK V . 

FF5 

ra fiutJnHd 
iih lUktdWnd 

Bfi usaasn 

ft‘«Vtny<p’ 
DVi n »% ^nflpo 
/^«a 4/ti^UM 

S "* U'jAihnffl 
l '.a MMa AiTrM-rf»r 
i0‘- f-j ASr-viT 
u'l 3^4l,«fv 
M't VSAIM-BS 
3d'% com DIA 
i5« hJktlM 

’••a lOftiWflurniQ 
|1 i«iAfc»*n«i 

a’- ^.tAtarwC' 

fl'i *‘.W*nn 
JO 39 ftunxn 

n'n Jim A* coa 


-i a ,*a ^3 as S5 _a 

a If VTu *i J4 <U —• a 

T ’ 10 JS> Mo — *H 

i; 30 cm tev. vh mv: — .* 

If _ 111! W‘* Wa Uta —%o 

IJ 30 «M 41**, 4MM 4 — M 

SO _ . 7 fflly fQli fojh • Vr 

M 0 1«nu sl'a M, do — VI 

A 2» JAA 1»’1 


’7* — * 


It jp! |j'^ 

13 417 »H 

r 'ffl XS 35 


«7 ij p Vrr* 


MQ »J u 


Hu 06 04«a IA -I 

«; 4ft* a <M 46% -7 

Ei4 ?4ia Mft >414 

» T! « -5 


»n 


• AnvuG. 


AfrS 1*5 


?J1* li'oAinAiAM 
j;*m I0MAIMCKT 
47 4’ViArwn . 
7ft>i J2*-»AJTicn:pl 
n tsAowijp 
zn\ io\«mw-sr 
I J’a JloftHVeilWl 

I j Vi imftAwwir* 
25% ^lAAmUPfT 
>% I'ftAmBKn/ 

‘ ^’iSSS 


_ ^ 18 P4 30 M 


A 10 336. 


Ill f.l _ 

IQD 


_542 4% 


21*3 tt'4 - A 


I JO 


25% if ^ 

Si: 

ja% w.AfddJp 

25.. .'AAfnQ OlT 

2. fifitfflSfc 

26*. MNftCCllMA 

20*1 .M Ag-JptfJ .u> oa ^ 

Sfi fRj^Sa. fS ii = 

:.M AljArM.%1 Jo ’If ^ 

ift «TiJ ' 


ii §-ft a 1 * 

_ ItS SH S% 

fi iaf 43‘i. 
I6336.0U U|i 40Mi 

„ f/ «0»f 4l<t 40A 

rR J? r ni S% S£ 

** M r JS E IT 


Fit *% 


»>■ • A 


J?n t .» 


I|0K tt'«4min»> 

if*. |Q ArtWUUiTT 
IQftj «*^AJ>WLWT1 


*« 


4. A*J 


ii 37 14308 


3 'fiJcsft.Tu ijpT f|?i ft?lH -I’i 

j 5 ii ii e £ 


r 




3% jJS ->4 


7? a (%Ai*4Vrs 

f; rss* 

Sft ItftA jftP.'jn 
ffSEsr 

S'I:E 

;r. n'liiromi 

1>, 3 .ifnr to 

S'? SfiSSSSS 

7'v. -Vnwv A( 

r a..sss? i 

3:: lUiiSE* 

3 

34<»«!t '•. 1 A«T' B«» 
J»ft U>.(4XW 
7|ft IlftABIln. 

<*•* I'rAoci 
aw M'1 AofMrTtn 

i;t=^ 

I- l-M 

1ft i^ysssv 

3t*a iraArcuan 

24% IBiiAr^Kf'u* 
U' 1 ** lJW4rrtQn 
SH 2? *rtwRo n 

f: n .‘^0 
-ii: ^-s^s» 

3H 74%ftnPun 

mm 7# H JSS1. 

«f^ 45*iArmCMA 
59 Armc WB 

75 % si%AnvnM 
*4 jr^.AinwC 
f% JVjArru 
25^ 1*%AnAn 

Sn* ” 


- « t E 

j, 14 a 
V 1 H 
,( * * : a. 1 : 

I CCa 90 - 3a 11 

2U 1. » ^ Bfi 

« p tf- 

w 1# . Iff |1*. 

w V * 5t '!■. 'K ■?■•: 

.2 ii I s '?.'i u }4ft S4 Ite 

■J fc .' - *?' *?* T* 

40rn 00 . l» 7; -ft •>] 

« »> U ’5} s;: fe;7 iJft 

- »:.• •■ ‘1 ft 

370. V, H,C*X *■ » «• 

’2? fj a ,2 

•S it 8% 


5?fi 


70ft -ft 


83 Si E 

«. .. a ^ K 

?*» u 30 M3 lift it_ 

^ - 8 gy ff? 

S 2J w ojr ilft «/ 

_ 73 _»»l lift 15ft 

I M JJ i* Sww U“i Oft Uft —ft 

;oo ? 0 . » 7 sft a>» aft • ft 

3 . jj i«w aft iTft a -ft 

ti * ft : a %*, %i T a 

Ai O 5 r£ Mft 

_ 21M0UU SOT 
IS J 17 miu 43‘T 


50ft -ft 

Mft 

Uft 

06 —V; 

-i 

lift .ft 


S' 1 S5 
■K 

•.- I*, 

Si 


j**. —i, 
aft .ift 
43 ft -Ift 

i*ft —ft 


■1 lift 


ZTft 77ft 77 ft 


VP » 46*14 
. .. 14*0 _ . 

4J _ S6 71 ft , 

16 — 764 lift 17ft 

_ . 1254 J!»o 3ft 

7 1- II aft 25ft 

v» - g »»ft Bft 

. _ 1341 4ft 46, 

Jtr _ a 29ft 73ft 


a —1 


. —ft 
19ft —ft 
Jft —ft 
74ft 

zri —ft 
nil 75 


11 a 


aft 




74 M If 

00 10 t 

3»f >0 
46 I J £ 


__ 

r 7ii na 

II? 94«l 


69 


ia 

3i% 

M-Vi 

*2 9ft ift 

5154 04 43% 

‘ *$n 


10 - » »iH u 


:a 


» ft *',4 
ft 71 V./ 
ft *s< 


i n 


6V, 5ft 6V, _ 


ftJ 




sa e ._ 

«*•% JJ'VAV 

ift r 

»?’« 7'<.4A 

ia% imr 

>0% 74V|0 
19% 16 4tier\m 
»•* MV| ArtCepp# 
l«* i lO/ljAHRacfi 
30% j04kAfiP*7«77 
XV%ieq AttAciv*: 


>0 SO 24 


4% 1% 4% -H 


>0 - Jl* 3S> 


_ • IfS 4S*% 45 




f*v IK 4W 

IS% If »% 

fft ^ 


Bi 


3f m z« AinNZd 
f% 1‘aAwTr 
2f IO'bAURIFV 
J5% 

3*% l«*VAt0«Z<^W 
»> »%4^om>r 
BW 23%Aw4bi0tA 
74%A«gnefB 

S % 1} Mr A V£60C'7 
>1 

U'4 l%ArfiQd 

3 *. 10 AvMjuenn 
•a J*404^» 

J IM ASAWl 

IVj 

■4% fiAJlQr 
ff'a r« BiiA«rOi*t 
34%a IMBONCP 
Qv. MMBCCq 
£»•■ £hBCPb» pr 
/’A.OCAlncD 
9% t*iB££Stn* 
■% HAOECGon 
UmELA 


Ufl 40 14 HOI I3S% 136 116% — S 

51 - « J?* _a — % 

sS '5 

>I> — % 


2 V^jy-icr. _ , % ‘Vfc 

31 TOUATWCK loot 44 15 U& 72% 23% 

H% 2l*bA4fiJ>4Z l.ne LS _ II 11 30% 


7 K % ® 
-- ffS 


>0 J76K7 72 

S.F 33 7f9 37 




30-3 




25W TS'Xi 
__ _ ._ 25 % 25% 

« w 0 wiir 70 

Jj I f 22 2041 36% 1S% 

- « *el*i n% 

40 1.0 rt ZfSii «i'« 47ffe 

1 It If S osauu 61% 51%. 

- * 97 mv-i wv. 

: : S3 rtt ,L 

i S - : 83 £S »! 

jlo M „ 37 f*6 *% 

- - ->?• i* 

_ >6 in«f 0**6 46% 

. _ _ 1M7 34% 

W J 30 7f4 >8% 3S% 

0^ 20 .411 31% 31% 

>S5t 6.9 J) 101 11% l^A 


106 14 _ 


li% - V-, 

S* :5 

«Mk t1«i 

i» Tfi 

|i 

Silk **4i 

5S z 

<% 

«w — % 

as =a 


ffi l « 

. n u 

I 2 J ^ w 

L6 16 Tl le-V 


26% 30% 

r% —Ik 


47 m 3riB»cOne 
2*% irsBndHlpf 

.’■V ifcfin!Sf|WB 

S'i ^2S^r 

1^, irtBnCMt 
jyv. 

l|*»0<*ufn 
£ j»Wl«aAfle« 

>r% Ii iBGnclDpr 

«• C^lKLom 

'!■» i3'->2cSoniai 
3 5%DctJWHrtC 


_ iM iJS : 

M IJ IV3MM 31k 3> 37*% »Uk 

401 17 II Hi »t B% fri -ftk 

io y 11 76% Mi — % 

101 i 31 6M lf% lf% V9Vi 

100 10 r? 4221 27k Pk im *k 

l J2f 3i 13 Met? 44% « % 43% — % 

- - 117 lf% 10% ■»% — % 

140 *6 - 133 HA 2% 20% — % 

I IS 4-7 - 0 27% 27 V, 27% . 

J3» U H 16 S7% 57% 27% — H 

joc 40 00 ms jin J2k 'w — ' % 

n% 5i 11 4 13% ll% IMk 

tor 10 tS 52 SS 3S ^2 

1 !Jc 3.f- 77 26% 2B4 20% -% 


_ 116 10% 


6i% ov 


EdW 




30 

II 13 TXT 


Id3 01% 61 0 


30 30% lf% lf% 

>3 6)5 «*Ar t> 45% 

13 711 45% «S% 45% 


* i 'i 4 

£ H ft itES 

’3 « “ ii ss 

3 8t| :*• 

41 U . J»* ,*ft 


»s 

■Bft 


!Sa iiiMuinT 

lap 


rvi li-Ptuifloi 
?w c 

nn fiwiPBui 
47% 4l>.nslBilA 
2i% 41 BSBofD 
05 f$ »Bd<C 

74%ailDfC 115 

J6% Ii B*0 bIF 1 .97 

)l'bB»n«dn Jlo 

20 It ».T<0rffi J& 

31' * Z24AMonT« >40 

y% a'.vBAKi % %i 

ai?ii£WfYr% in 

ilOVa HkB^tAin Ilk 

31 klhBUiretA J.JS 

fOV, C^B»ArnPfB in 

76'<. NMaBKA P«CM Z~i 

J»»-x pSBUri Wl 100 

HWUArnPM 
56% ^kfiiAmADV 
Uk NkDUUnffZ 
■%% tl PflntT v 
?6'0 I> H**TI0I 
M 7a*4M7 0#O 
73%W' l iBr*T ptV 
27 Htttifttt Tn9S 


l^t 24 II 

^ i! : 


«ftd «ft 
J*ft 3**4 
»ift 

im 


S2 


JU 


U 2tk 26 


3 _ IW j?HH 

tr ij im?i“ Bft Kft 35 -»2 

*f _ s’ a*. »« a'* 

H in»Mv | ii’, KBft iSft -ift 

*’ —9 j»ft —ft U'« . ft 

M _ Ii *1 « fl 

,-4 - 9U »ft aft »■* 

- '* - it Sift S5ft TSft - 

'♦> It - "ft 3 Kft 5Sft 

;IJ If — J77 Mft 2»ft M'.6 _ 

1*4 7« _ 4|3 lift 2*ft a 

4® JJ II IT!! Wft H tift —Ilk 

»n *4 - a an aft Sft .ft 

(Jl 17 - S7 DU a ft 3««| _ft 

w _ 7M 3ft nU TJft _ 

if* 1.4 _ oi aw av. a*. 


BIT llftBmrcn 

Is MBS 

Wfe 6%B*U9Cmi 

16% 11 OueSar 
jin srnSSmSf 3 

"& 8SK. 13 8 

fisragf. » 

2" 1 RffiSe .M. i3 

»ft mtaim 

fl,. TSfe 


z S5 

AJ _ fjl 

»• 10 45 Si;* w% 

11 £ n» JfU Sf% 

I J t S fflJ ffli 


,r t: 


*■ “j z t» ijft 


4r% 41% — 

Ik f% 

r 


£ XJD »'T m J6 -ft 

'Jg-as 


rs* 


li% l)%0*BdffE 

kw Mklron .. 

ju 

r* laisey 

n> tfne w ur 


70. im 

s ^ 

_ . 2A14 _ 

« a B *« ** 
** ,*i ^ « 

Sr)" 1 ! 

- 55 7JUI 


JO 1? 


106% V lBiflFI 

Ttk | t4% 34%BaWv 

SaSSBlB. 

3i5 .'aJ**®- 1 

Tf% IHS 

4J.I 34ft 
47ft &V 
aft lift 


7* 


*'■« 


-(WBrfC 
MftHnrBBlD 
73ft B BatCHn 
lift lift Boro , 
1731 awi*ar*w 
4 7ft 3 uanoo 
M'T .'Tftftrvi'-. 

ara a bbtm 

aft 7(ftBonc6G 


«ift a'tanrJv. 
—ft ItfttUxMr 
1/v, lift Do, A— 
n iBft&ovN— 
»ft 2M«Haviii 

a Hftft*omPr 
aft HfttWnrU 
a aiiBioiTa 
M 7)ftBrar3p*C 
is*. »i*aaartaz 

ITft iruQHBrtftn 
III, * 

41ft E | 

—ft liftt 

lift I3ft| 

r* sifti 
a* sift? 
ift . 

Wft Jlft| 

74ft si, 
u fl _ . 

43ft 16-.M&B, 
Jl*t II §aaM1 
41ft >6M>, 
US 46‘UQunBiCa 
•7ft ft iwrotMB 
Bft nft tk naton 
ft ■• 1 r*.K7tO 
Bft »'.«! — 

S 74 ft 7 
MMWtf 
IBP WO 
lift ~ 


W» 10 . _ . 

isi iao _ 110 a*. Hft 

2 .® idd 101 aft 5va 

*Ut 2V 14 10 7 ru 74 ft 

M IS I* 14*1 Wft 17W 

. , M m in 

I 00 It ft M H« 44 

MB U Ii Ml 44ft — 

m sra —ft a— 

.14 j mn» M** aft 

II J«» J*ft IBft 

n a aft ,4 

_ UJ 


■ in* 1* 

Oi J 

US *4 . 

(94 3.1 a 


“ SI 


gs 


111 l» 17 

1*0 U 41 JOJfl 37V, 36 ft 

— Trm 74ft zrft 

ik M u an V'-. av. 

in u 1 ro m 34ft 

uo 1* enzttu a 1 - lift 

I. *7 ’7 _ It 25ft ZSft 


*SSi| 

n 72 


799 Ifs 3B% 
2710767 If S3% <•% 
XT 17 731 17% 17% 


It 9 If 

14 7413 


1% 


04* 


H* 27% 

S3 ■" 


22% — % 
*1* 

3 Vi —'* 
% —1% 
jr% _% 
T»% — % 
«?«• 


Eica 


9 &S 

25 % IS kB 
13% 1*0 
26% f%B 

SSSftl..^ 
S5 JSfeR 


.in u 

IDT) _ . 

ui 11 u ie«s —h —ft 

*4 IJ X IDH 3ft aft 
Jl is 91 U* 40ft Jt>« 

TOR in 14 IlSSu 71ft *7ft 

ca *7 _ a 44 »3'5 64. —ft 

ssa ii if 4 aft aft a* -ft 

.* - m aft aft am — ii 

M u IS 1*23 f*ft aft Sft —3k 

_ 11 ziiqimi mS u* -ao 

91 IIS] IIU IIS7 — * 


urn 


" “ : 23 

■* e s J Ik .. 

“* "1 a m ss 

_ 14 Mil IH Ift 

sa> *j - — 33-i jr* 


m 



10ft I Oft lift 

m *ft »*k 

23*k 93 13 

57 ft 77ft 7T* — ' 

Jft fi SS 

di% 3-t 00% — 1 

m% n io% - 

313 UVs 11 13% 

’■B S’* SF r :: 

JIM. 7% 1 1% — 1 1 

7* - 3- ^ 

II '2 K Bft Si a _■ 

I „ 146 14% 14 14 

IJ II fl*S B% nv. 

2.0 IS ATT 4)'*k 40'A 44’5 — % 

10 22 UA 4% 4% 6% 

_ J4 4tT 5 IJ16 !4Uf tr* 

- . IP 30% 34% J4W 

y fi-wiB ■« '?R -’a 

K s .& ,25 =1 

I 2 3D W S7 S0% 56% — r 

10 4 1W* 34*. 20% >4% 

S3 21 616 JO’« rffn Of-Hi 

1* i* ]4 »' l v a^ it* — ■ 

U _ 01 4% 4% Ik — 

Jo tr u> M% ffn PH -*- 

I2«k 11% — % 

46% 4J*3 — % 


1J0 1 J 16 0176 19% 

jf$ ) I 35 4Jfl Jl** 

'» S ^ * 

J >3 fe g . M 

im c* 17 fS ift 25 

144 14 15 131 ID fidV 

_ 40 37# 11% 30% 

s 

E P 


>i2k rtk 


SR Tl 


IJ 4% Jlf 




Ij n 

2.1 21 1201’ 9»% 

30 71 IV l»> 


34% - Vi 

ilk Ifh 

MH« IMfri 

wk uPk — % 


5.11*6 


: imi 


fm 


76% *ViL 

53% 41 *k? 


P* _ 

as sasafsa’ 

SiiRSSSr? 

JIM* Z7%C 

iffH I3%C 

S4S3 


9 1 1 100 ■' 

fj » ,s ^ I 

^ r? 3077^ 2^> 


'1 » » 


r 1 * 77% 

J »'k Jf% 

1% ■ k -Vk 

»SV, M'k — H 

07% 0t ( « -k 

*C% 41% 

26*4 fe'b 

■ s.m 13% 13% — % 

03% 41% 41 —1% 

r% 

M% 3%, 2% _ 


“6 IIR4 Wft gft 36 v, 

*0 IJ V 9% Dft -■* 


in U . IM 

” s,s? 

- _"S 


1195k KWftC 


10*1 


co-Mr 


lift 


Oft 12 “1 

xv, it c— PB-r 
Sift UN c—xco 
aft 7f>0-nM> 

Uk —ftc— i—coan 

lift ^O— — Z *1% "S ’"Ai 

S4 %*Sb£ '^S ‘-I ? ^ S5 !F 

-** jAftOs^v-. jis - »s -j* ??• 

iL’* 


1% >% — % 
vt Pk VS • \ 
11% Iiv> ns — % 
»S 1T% ji% — % 

in iij^ ^»h 

£H > ^ =5 


20% 30% — ■ 


■’S 1 : 


Else l i = 


-ft Sk —ft 


lift UN 


-ft J — 




I.'-K 




EE 

s;?r 

it 


16% 24’ftOneitfK 
«t n anrpfl- 
36% IfkQntoM 
3tfW 

25% MkaWCM 
11%CT%twM* 
5 ( %%OauA 


72* p9 

Bk 11 
II |4V 

«k si 

33% 51%, CrimC (i 
Jik l%Q*«v 

35% S0%Q«r 
25% »f%pihBprm 
IS% U%&lnaRI 
11% 5V,&0nTVo 
10% 4 OftTuc 
34% HkOmiA] 

49% 4D%CMqpfA 

M% 49%QHa t4B 

5% fJkOOifiAl 

tm tr 


ir «.? 


.10 2 36 

di ii _ 
8 ; 


S5 sa ..- 


3tft 16ft — ■ 


Ift M. 

^ a* 

ra iss 

k'i 16% 

Ifi 13 

lew lift 

^5 * 


tw -ft 


J 3 ii j 

13 1 

II is : a 
^isii “ 

iS '3 S 

i-s *5 ,: 

“ - 


n», ii-. «>• -•.. 
O', 19 Tift - ft 

Pft i'ft “5 


£•- E 5* =® 

»i, Mft »ft -ft 

m 1 * gt 

S'* a*, eft Zft 

tsa ^ h =i 

sR rf? aR - 


U( U IS 31247 
1A1 VI _ AI 


- » 


S3 U I 15 

l* Z* - '« 


t* _ 139# 

7-03 i-l _ D4 

■ 49 61 ^ 507 

, r *j S« «% sac M*i — 

Ljai 7J 30 204 35% 35% — 

w u ii * S* J 

^ - r 793U UH g% 0% - 

JO 16 16 101 30% 3l*k - 

— 53 »HW !6k Mk 25% * 

.fl SJ f I 17k ir-i 171k 

210 2J IT 13074 ITS kf* 06 —I 

lit fl _ 47 53% S3 fl% - 

M - ^ ® ffV 21% 


'to 


14% 


IT'f 


.-® 1^1 _ ZJIO 



45% MSC&corv 
01% 31%QrmM 
>6% M*OnCT> 
2f% MkQtfW 

K% 27%C 
S* M%C 
44% 3*C 
115% UkC 


100% 93% 5 

saga? 

36% 24SC 

23% use 
n% ?f%5 

% .due 

13% IQtkC 


X 


14% 74 14 — W 

. . _ _ 4t% 44% Mk — % 

“ = ,S " “ 

- - till 

ji ' Utal Sft 

10 U 510* 55ft 

Id a I5ISU M«k 

- a 1305 3 

t* i* ssi art 37ft 

ij it a>*< — — 

u - Si 

1* 13 MS Z Ift J7» 99ft —16 

- - *37 Ilk Ift Ift —ft 

vi ii tin aft a 1 , aft —ft 

* g an v. ja-4 Hft —ft 

aim « jn« b*» - — 

I* I51JM7U 115ft 119ft llllk —Ift 

Vi _ 7^ Sift *IV» Tift -V. 


lift 'ift lift 
II —ft —ft 
Hft lift in. 


*5ft si. lift 


■s» tg - lit Hft Hft Hft 

■ *g cab j* - » aft aft aft 

■ »*f — 7j _ 177 jm~ a a _ 

IS* 47 _ a Sw Hft aft 

1— 4a - ■ at, n*i m _ 

m 97 - lly »ft u »>ft -i. 

It? 7 j - a i/vi ztj. in, -a 

■S o 11 in. nft n 2ift -ft 

79 - IS 3070 


U V - 

4— 19 14 


Ift 


f% 7%f 
46% lt%t 

T 

5* SRI; 

110% 76% £ 

JO* 7%C 

03% 26%< 
IlM* >%t 
26% 24*C 
12% .^*C 
27% ll%C 


SS% 34%C 

DH JIMC 

2* S?3S r . 
?S s ?S l4 & 

ji; idftc^"- 

^ £L- 
!ia ftSaffl 1 

ion menne 

sfaa^sss&r 

JOS II Scam; 

r IjSJr 

Wk aft Come* 

11k BkOivnu 


1 45? 11% 11% 11% — •* 


. IMu 33% 23 23 

_ 14 3801 14% 14 14% — »n 

XJ l| W 20% *4% M% -% 

A 15 4013 M% 13% 10 -vi 

... f* 351 7 U 45% «% 40 Vr •> 


87 — I ’ED S 

H 1 - 5 

u « ws 


. 1% M% >0% - % 

mt««ii3% no* itq% ■% 
Ji* 20% *» -% 

” S K 42 42% - 

J 10 WO 5fl% im 0*% — % 

t.1 - 01 25% 25% 29% - % 

_ 183 4% 4% 4% _ 

« 14 5004 20% ink 19% -1% 
f 02 Z2O00 59* 97% flk _■% 

J 46 MOy 90% 94% 56 - *% 

“*■ JH 30* -n 

15% IS* - % 


1J0 -v 101 19% 

03—30! 14v. . _ 

A - m* 34% 32% 32% — 1% 

“ i! 


\£ 

.til 

_ 14 IJu Hft 

IJ*. 4l ~ ^ lift 

™ “ ^* 3 S *12 

'« ?s i .w % 

9 9 = 1 :s 

Jl 7d ~ 

100 u a 


17ft lift 

JR .. 

a 4ft .ft 

lift Eft —A? 

*5ft aft —ft 


tF --?'■ 


7Vl 

— 

*ft 7ft — N 

'R '!i 


at 7ft TV, 
386 lit, lift 
mv aft* aft 


■Zft I aft fl 


-i 


« 


4.7 H BQu Hft 93ft ZTS 

^ a itS g? JR IS? 

- nj »?'. Hft igN 

if M 


15ft lift Jift —ft 
56ft 54ft 54ft —ft 


r, 8 ^ Sft ^5 S-l 

<■? js ’;s ss r © 


2B[4 »% 


25% 23 C«EK 

^ss 

iffs 3 aPsr 

a sftc 

94ft BftC 

m 7 ? 

»ft ISIAC 

aft ir*i 

■7ft me— n 

IS« Mac 
oft rftZ 
Kft 44ftC 

k» 


aft >7ftc _ 
ZSft nUCamW 

Igft Alftconrril 
a; a c«««6 

nS D\‘ti 

J*® 
iRiis? 

v« unc 

« 'as 
tr « , *ssa L 


I', 


ij U 54* 16ft 

i-*J r.i _ « aft Mft MU 

UK u _ 16 »ft B 95 ft 

711 >4 . u» 2ft ffii EH 

U 44 — ISO *7 ft *Tft Ift 

K U . I» I0IW, ICON M0ft -. 

IE _ 36 Eft If 9." 

,4 * « j js ss es ^ 

0M> _ _ 20* left 15ft |Jft —v 

,a i noSa, Sn Sft T4 

_ _ idfu 16% »k is* - r 

.10 J 30 uv. Ok £3% » * 

^ S HOIT 711* 11% -1% 

ra 3 9 m « « —ft .ft 

— £ 11 1156 8ft 7ft n, —i 
t* it » 97ft B 97 — 

— - UK, tsv 55ft -ft 

in* nft Tift -ft 

97 aft 17 

.. aft aft ai, • ■-. 

rs me a 3ft 
... .. — 131 sift —ft soft —ft 

_ _ 170 Oft Ift I 1 * — V. 

_ 16 1 14ft lift 14ft _ 

7_H fcl IJ 9J9 Jlft 91ft 91* _ 

i.n IJ is n-jioSi m ££ -In 

3 si ’_ T ^,1% ,3* ^ ? 

« r « a ^ 

108 CJ II 6575 Sft lift JX* ->k 


a 


“ 1 .a 
§: - s 


ss 

V "' 

’teL— 

IR aRSSSS, 

lift .VftCflMCa 


UN llft C-— _ 

jfars^.8 


M _ 7 48 . . 

190 r 9 _ 172 14% 71k 24% 

fS is S ®,“ S 3' •? 
.■iss “ « s fl* sa 

- U JI^ ^ft 3M6 "Ift 

f3 r’i Z lut §* «u *>” 

7 7J « _ 130 *6 ft JJft _-ft 

53 

JJ* ii I a Bft lift &2 ‘ft 

_ r IB M SU V* - ft 

_ * .nr &* a* jr» -» 

_ 5 MB 904 Si, 3»ft — 'A 

_ 17 1*7 vj U TJ _ 

I .1 I « lift 21 ft 91* —ft 

. . M mt im n, •* 

: ; ig 11 im '*». •* 

A* 4J _ 143 IS Hlk -ft —** 

IJJc !!>_—»» TA ,T* j- 
JM J IS M «ft » 10* -* 

_ - M »4ft ft* »4ft .«•> 

_ I] M4U IT* Ifft 2!< -r'* 

ijj i5 13 *ot —ft c* «■* —ift 

« 49 _ a ITft i»* ft* -ft 

am iJ 11 *i7s a* a* Bft —** 


- 0“ 


_ _ NIC Ift S 


,4 a is 

1* 2J »aw 


& 

lift 


Sh 

na pe to won 


UWLBBlty— 


to S 2M* 


Hi z 


es © -S 

Uft Mft _ 


ON JuaWn 

J3 l l 93 CBirtH n 

avj S’cSlK 1 !? 

S ft SO'.CBUSAn 

n'v IflftCoi — Mr 
3 ini^&mnan 
94ft IkNCWOn 

34ft 15'iCIBlSlUfln 

js ’Rsssp. 

jc uivSwjm 
70ft locoodtat 
UN EftCCDCRE 

b H*z$a*n 

Hft JS Oifl DIB 

asiSft&ss 

a% r%ODvCAun 

0*» IkCrontn 


76% 4J‘-h Ciffxa 

Cl vk WkCuiwriWlr 

silk atft^Sn&w 

ISftQcine 

cSftCinftr 


■“tu. ftoo-ek 

Bft likOJCO |C 

lift SftdOE 
lift TftDBJwton 

a aft pit km 
nic more 

Ilft IlftDWIk^ 

Sift ¥1*08—11 
11* IJ*M-T*P 
3* 17 raCSom 
is* lOftEUmeMr 
»•. 77NDOTOCO 
Ub JO'SCkrcJirr 

it* 1 7* owl 

Ij I'VDaTOen 
ITft « DDMGn 

r ran* 

40% n DotfMwd % 
■ Ik f*HDoviSupn 

fi& if2SSJX5 

kk UkCMDfacv 

J3 sSftSS 

11 ItkDoitte 
M M%DE<joG« 
23% ifVkDftonPI. 


*§! IS ^ 
1 B» Sft 

01 Ji ' l 01% 

IFS 


13 Ii a*? Hft 

98 U 46 Hft 
7.7 I* 45 71* 


lie 41 
LIK SI 

ua 1 w 


fi M ii 

4 jji in iw 

Z Mlv Hft 

_ SS 9*ft 

“ S JJii 

» .s l« 


. u m . 

BJ _ 411 Z5U. 33ft 

S3 JS CIA 35 ft » 

41 11 W I* J* 

_ II 773 II* 18* 

- _ IDc* Mft Dft 

4J IS DM Hft 17', 

_ W * IJ lift 

- _ au n ii* 

3 .? is as a" 

:? .SS as 

23 full 07% JftVk 

IJ 19 4QT 14% 

•f A ,SS 4 

z r «£ J* j* 

1 3 If snj Sr% X% 

.- ^ 51 Si 

ii .1 «?« Si 55 

7J _ EH M. ft* 

I » 15 ZSU3 67% 41% 

« -83 If l*% 

U% If 6 


» k — % 
k — % 

30%. — % 
13% ' Vk 

91% -■.■! 


-5*i. -■> 


11% '»% -! 


CI3 


DKtlwvfT IA to _ 


it gi 

•*', 33ftD*DPnt 

K- Dsn;. 

t tHDVWW 

sa s^issr 

41 ft nvioncs* 

Ii'. llftDimciv* 

rs» a 

t WSSSSS.2 

irt H'-jDuk 
*M <■ DotOyo^ 
2>% 2>%DfflEUtF 

S UkcdEon 

% 

20"i It DtfEatn 

§ '.. iPkCfuTTrln 
% =n%DovtD>d 
% MHITVWDPIA 
25% hkQouOpn 
33% ilkDAMr 

.ffls ^ass^. 


£ 


% 


ik ii 1/ 23«6 3i% 

- n TOW pH 

m 16 14 WJg 51% 


- _ 1 ra 11% »o% 


: if .iss sa 

7J _ 0 29% 

\4 - 10 25% 

M - fi% 


: “ 

IJ 27 Jl7i 


ft 


Uft^T 

Tift DticHjl 


M U II CIS M 


II . 


Si sags?" 

ji% l6%DukvOnt 

JJVrn IfHDOOWTHOi f 

44% 30'iDQmRarft z_a m.9 r« 

IS l7%Drr»CCa6W 1?* I4« - 

f 1 1 flk(Xmr»« . 10 *? ft - 

)«k 74 nnM a 3 ib 

0 -ai jr%Kn-j_ 14 • 

S'iAHVdOviUiMA -ft - 

> 0 % rj ncoranti - . 

7T%D«Mlvr J6 1 j4 - 

4>kDQvcr 60 14 15 

5t% ir C VMrpq 

f 2 % eft cowOi 
Jl% nMkwjnv 
23% HkDOwwvi 
l&k IlkOrmi 
It 1 ! 23 %OHESV 
f% IH.Dr.5iO 

1 C' a r*f>v5irf 

IQ AHoCrv^M 

112% nkOuMrt 
mv f>DuconiiMi 




in 


19a 


u» 


- ..... n% iDk 
17 3T72 J4% 
if 4931 21% 31 

_ 411 27% 72*-. 


U4 22% 71 


l3 IB 92 31% 71 31% — % 

1.4 B 241 17% 36% V% • % 

M . 1304 4f-|*i 4*4n — Im 

- - 1061 13% 13% 11% *% 

2-4 _ Tfn Jt » * % 

\A 14 298) 0** 0% 2% *k 

_ _ 509 17% 17% 17% — % 

II 10 9047 Bl% 71% — 1% 

2J TO HUS 15% 54% 35% * % 

IJ 27 i-M 27 u* 7» V*r JJ —'A 

ft. If m 11% n 13% - % 

TV 24 I63A5 35% J0% 34% - % 

0.2 _ IM f% •% 9% 

0v4 - 0> » % Vk 

64 ft 1589 10 f% •> — % 

i-l 10 1B874 110% 107% IQTVi —\Vr 

ft 17 e iiw :ia 21% — % 


SS 

. . KSSS* 

REE. 

lift IJ PAfmA.- 
11*1 iNPAMota 
is* io*i=35fti 
n* ii*gfiri* 
lot* — 2«**9 

§* lf'*S£*IW 
M* « 

51* jfftRtkjva i»r 


Kv VWPE 1005 Wl Low LtdeJOrgP 

{3 a i j ^ sg ss z 

I a i j 1 K E ^ 

* * 85 ■ ” 



nftE 


1JV IB'aF— 

u sull«Mii 
I7>« HUWb 
TJ'.. 

35 HaasJP* 

St It M%»7MOpf 
if. u* pn»n4 
If.T n'kRttt— c 

Jj“" 5 Ea5?A* 


zoo AA » 

ip It 
g S -: i 3 
* 11 H s as 

^ ul f? #u £ 

•a a if %?* gs 

•5 S 13 %“ P 

I4S 9J II U»U U* 

_ _ ?T w* 

a IJ I) 6« JTVi 

w ^ “'“I* h 

Ifl 7J - fi 24% 

fK .1? - £ ft* 
.ail ^ «ia 

jm j it asm im 
T fiC S2J ^ I3J3 us 
1011 u & Jp 11% 
lij ij - * a.. 


41* JO'ftF 


.Pen 

n* » £?**c 

IJ* MkRlnro 
45* 9S WmBIOIA 



j® ai.EwwiOcJ 

5% if ••■; totokPH 

47% BHfthVi 
54' < 

70% 9% FOW Hit 
r KklfilftlMD 
2B% 26%<sof=n CMC 
2ft% S%8=tPnMP 
V'.« a%Fb|*4CH 
»"» IIWFfcfWV 

17% 11%l=%tf=E> 

0% ia%rmokin 
JS> IfUFVfEflvn 


2:% za B-gy. gf 
36% vkiwaa 
23% n%rw 
06% 34'kPMte 
71% *7% Fluor 


1JI ?fl j— 

u 43 ft 


ir% . 

11 ikFoean 

Sfi Jf*gffl? n 

111 ft Pom « 

nvlS^rfFaoMfi 

28k, 36i.-,FcraCDrr 
15% iQ%^vllaE 
42 C For Am 
It p-iRDcor 

c?i^S3Sf 

2% Iti'HPaunCH 
72% mn«M« 

34% «%FanM|M 
TT% f% France 
l0%FrtJnPin 
10% If PrleSV 
IQ AUiFrfcMuf 
8% r^FtnPt 
39 % lr.vFnuSU 
S2% 2V%Rnf*«ss 
•5J JHPWm 


- = .Ifl »'* >**• 

■ St ite 51% SM 

A 1» ^ 99 f* 

13 ^ n w » 

IJ — ff Jft H 

64 K« 1450 5% U% 

Ift 25 300 U% 20% 

?!-«!| 
_ ^ 109? 23V, Ok 

CA 11 WOO XI 33% 

44 U ft M 1 U% 1 10 % 

LI z iS 9* 

1 Su 




7J ft Ml UK M* 1C* — * 

if s t» & Jt - 8 K li? 

z !? 18 94 ii? *54 z 


ft, _ *- U* 1** ID* 

f is ft* ift sa si ^ 

7J9 — 50 r% «s •% * % 

“ a "a u « S -s 
si ® *& u ^ iS *'* 
za >: "t *» % % 

! ^ s 6 E sa tS 

— T* B* S* -u. 
H*«d H* N* — % 
ll* 19* If* - — 

' 3 “ a :H!Sli* s 

*fl il S S8 Su ^ a :e 

^“zHtfsas^ssra 

_ _ 0QI 2S% 25Vft 25% —M* 

- iS^rfiis; :i 

Z n uS 10% ffiS ^ — J5 



9S >i % i__ ft - _ _ 
SA'3 23% FrenW Pf 

21k 20 fhofiMn 

5% 5%E5E& 

4|% ^bFmlrbis 
22%F 
M%F 


,- &B8h 


£^g*x w !* Ii fl % 2% 5% 

55^1 D%&ATXPIA 337 6/ _ 740 a% 


5%C 


I .to 


hh 


_. £ z 'ffi, £ 

T8i 49 ItlHK «% 

enrv xi* xi _ ia a 


.... Ck 

Sc ssgrr -fa 

zm w%GTFDtnfy xiy 

*WS ?i » 

lOAaUDVuGT^FofC 1.14 7.9 

10% !‘-CiBCr J36 7J _ 

• % BHCOMI LOO* lOJ ft 

ivi &uioo5gI 0M jn « 

29 22%GaMt9d IJ6 


z =J5 


Arts 

& AimQUES 

Appears every Saturday. 

To advertise contact 
Kimberly Guerrand-Betrancourt. 
Tel: + 33 ( 0 ) 1 41 43 94 76 
Fax: + 33 ( 0 ) 1 41 43 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative. 

31 cralfc 2 S$ribunc 

mlbiiji «mn twr *n* mu tikes on ths *«mwmi ron 

THE WORLD’S DAID’ NEWSPAPER 


f% B DutPutn 
»k i0%pmPTF 

26^ u%d1*B£v 

g fi%Dl8ifP 
ftk 2>%DiA«DAA 

SS S5S«?Sa 

s:s- 8 sss- 

3* 

ia 

-'• » IJkDwtixi 
9J.6 zrNDvnAm 
BY, IWfcC tx» 5 

•I V.ECCH 

96* IrdEOG 
14* S*fet Char 

i“ 6 p£r 

53% 2S%g<7taft 

19% '‘tf'.SANS 

fagsisssi 

Sfi Ǥ35ft 

60% 62 QMvkto 

>3% MhESZT 


C/hr 

J2D B.1 - *% 

,f6 A I _ 21 15% 

1.10 *0 2*5 13% 

x!5 4c il n« 3 

iS ij n loci SS 

Ul U - 58 20 

M J.J ll 490AU IS’b 

2 OT «J ft »M 35% 

Z.M ’4 - Z700 MVj 

in w . iTo 3 

105 1-S _ ZI00 Z/V, 


UaUtfktf Ot^to! 


U® im* 11% 

!D Wf ? Mb 6% — % 

1 1 ^ 27% 2?,% 17% -. 

«S Jos 

17 0111 

iJidS 
fS ® 


*1 s I 

1S5 


fAM f J ft 

1^} 0J 10 

!s w :s 


I I « TS 
‘ fiS gfi=!S 
£* S =t 5 


lifi ’j*S? 

g* SfilSl 

S % 23 Ehm 

■b inEbi 


SS 

» T-SSB 

1?% ZbEWIRF 
11% 1i'>.P<UMm 

11% jav 

6^5 »Jv._ 

wh <f%| 


fi% 2f%E 
26 b 17%| 
16% _«ViE 

3c* a*^ 


IS* jini 

EEBf 

TT% »% DpOT 

Bn M'.fenuai 
II'* TtEl*£D 

a, 3i*Ejvan>MA 

MV, MhEftn 

&* aiiEriaf— 
:t* UfkfjntLA MB 

B'-'i lt'-.r*ai 

S HMrEiSSjft 

»■ .)-i_CnTCNRro 
I* IHEnyE* 

31 Ik lthEMKOa 
UN rri6Eui% 
»'* nuEacai 
Ct-f ENEtunm 
31 * B'llBJOt* 

S5 ^-l32S rt 

ss ssisssa 

94 ■ mUHM 

U ., muSsh: 


JV> U*Esm-7T 


IMIFknrfta 

11* Ske^v/IPa 

n* gnanwin 
llUEff—Jn 
9*16 9DNEWMHM 

“ iftgs*”" 
fi &SS' 


% M%€^(TCd 

pr 

10* Vi 77%&von 
01% ItoiBUANgl 


— . 80%FMC 

4|% Mipm op 

)C'i ^ 

,'7N tN lurch. 

m 

q-A 11 FODK7 
iJ imAXam 
9i. 11 F— i0r 

Cl* 7JNP..VJA30 

?• asgr 1 

3JTl If .F Uci tnm 

aiNFUm^MA 

_ . mtnOMB 
7* 5V,F**tavl 

:: ftssss. 

SS B2S5E?, 


- sa 

ll 5411 H* 
, . 30 6C7I J nut 

h it 'Hr as 

a dlt ii5 
b ISO SS 

- .! w * /* 

ll’MS ’I* 

i> JiK u* 
30 w* 


it 


gfi SS 

a* mv, . * 
71* { 1* — * 

« ® Si-.. 
SS SS =* 

r ? =a 

Ji* 91* .* 

nS JS =S 


HjB uj-apdi 
11* **oa 

17* I*0« 

3f"* D«Ga 
E> !J*SO 

7WV (f*£ 

J6* :i*Cs 

SS BlkS 

Ss ys? 

n * 17* e 

at* i4*s 

II* *tk? 

ajc » 2 

lw* 77* C 

37N l‘*C 

IN THMnHM 
ICJ6 7*CM*M 

S* “fiBSSSS 
SS ISfflK"" 

0k 3 GORin 

110V. l3A%C«ifi9 

5* 


LfltorLfliefeyop 


If 44% 7SH 2N% 

n 362 J0% 29% 

ll 
,J h h 

B sifiiffiim 104% 11 

nr n 21% : 

P 

r s s Is 

a gs « « 




,4k ik 4% 


■ i js y « .sis it ss: 

‘ u > use s» ^ 

« 0 5 J r iP 

■ft k “ ^ sa a* 

T ” •; z ,Ji r s- 

1 S5 JT 


SnSSKSS?' 


3SSSS 

s" a Hs 


“ B 





i? ii = 


7T 5SH.H 

mvi tokri 

S2£H 

36* Z3>K 


is t3 
55 '- * 


SS -? 


37* 57* 7* 

I* U •* 

iii 


Mk'J 

m 


f R 
ii ^ 


-tS 


J _ aa .1* 


17* n* ij* 


'j w ir.t 79* 


97* II* -* 


.41 31 19 IS ll* 

144 X* II 1011 a* 

8li!4fe|iF 

lw ?* ft e iv. — “ 

ze 3| b cS $a 

*3 s n».s as 


fig! 

is* m, 

!«* ii*5 

0* «*£ 

M 

^ . ___ 

M* bMucraam 

fiar 

21% 13 ( 

Wt If* 

»% m 


-M H il ® 5* 3. 


® ^ fi I 

lilt 


fo I 3*71 otj H* S?5 =* 

it u 3bu 9 * aS *8 Ji* 


SS -S 


90 1 - JOTI 

113 84 I 1 

i.ff « ’_* 0; ? 

%g ii 6 5 

tAj ; j - a 

14 «1 . IS 

w •— 00 

>.fo &6 r 


32 27% 

24% Uk 

26 25% 

21% Jl% 



38 


3 ti« 


31* X* Jl* — * 


IJ 15 "Mu *7* 
JJ JS MMP Jl* 
*< - B H 

is a 1415 it.-. 

tlf » 3974 

*.* I 

M - . _ . 

10* 


ift 


10* 


Sif 17 * lid IS* u* 

T7j 14 _ IJ 75-, M* 

Ul 4.1 n 649 JV-H B»| 


45* 44 


a* -•» 

J0> —74k 
96* •* 


a 3 

ft »3 


a* 

5 iii Su f 

18 Ml 46* 

1: a* »* ** *■« _•. 

_ KI 19* 14* 17 

- £1 13* l/k 11 * _ * 

}4 St 91* *1* 91* .-6 

- . 43 716 a* 3% —V, 

ft 1510 a-.k 77* a* .* 

_ 71U n* 11* IT* 

19 38lu 17* lb* II* . 4 

li 7*7 MU 8* M* — * 

W W 15* 


■W 

JIV. TJ 

ta is*as?° n 

jk 

t 

fSSS 'KffiSP 
« USES, 

■ss 4 *a? 

ii: 

_(* J,<7Tr*ioafl 


2W 
_ 9M 
if UMu 


?i a r 1 :: 
» S A* 


:3 Z 




R ’ia 


ij : 


ia^a 


in, .«* 
1171 — * 
M -* 


js» a *1 

m j - Hi! sf 


r b x-oj £ 48 -8 

is » ji ga fa sa =a 

71* ” 



R 


7MU •!» 

® a 

tC 


IS 


3 



giS I* . « 

£rs55 

ii h mu in* ** 

as s£ se jft 


ft — M J4* 

S3 li 7040 09* a* 

_ 09 If* IT* 


_ « 356 -sm 12* 71* • S 

U 17*1119 SB* 57* 57* •* 

IJ 11 M DU M 3* ■ * 

9 x mm < 3 * 2r* 5 -* 

U 14 1 7484 U M* 54* 50* — * 

oci me B* 19* 4* 

an — -n 


15% _ 


r* 


002 U 


H% 

w* ■»'* a c% 
102% 102% 
V* 


226. 


liisiwuisf 

14 JJ B%C 90* 

ft n iii h 

ft 74 1M lilt 

II 134> 70* 6** 
It 39g 4t* cc* 
IS* IS 


(V. 4'AC 

t i*S3Sr, 

14 fl IlkHWUl 

S3 awr • 

id* 'lit Sue 

*8 WF** 

sa 




IT* 


bft 


a 


_ 15 


4 222 ?Mn 14% TO* 


: a 


« LA 


c% 

rai 1^-2 15 

127 >m i/ 

il ISI is% IS% 

- 31 ff 41% B'n 
__ 1> fl 14% 14% 
?J !? *IEJi 5> =0^ 


w 


990 7* 




ZH XI 


L9 . 

.. K ^ „ . . 

8S IJ 7 5« W 

Jt or - I 4-k 

JS .3 itJfii&'Sa 


»Mr 
15* 11* 
95* »N 


M 

*S 


II* La*t 
15* U*6 
JIN 11*46 

16* 4NHOU5 

v* •; t*=7Mi 

ij6 .K, i5& 

Nk % Hapnoi 

%% te%n 

J1JJB 

57 3. H-cGfl 

U M* IU» W rl 
c* l Jv*HarNrD 


7346 nvr 71* -4* 

ft ft IB— 14* >346 14* .* 

Sx7g|Sii3 

E r JS JS 

..ft - »4 n au ** . 

44** 339 _ m l|* l>* 

1*4, ||4 _ 111 ii* U* 

m 1 4i m m il! 

... .■* ft 'MIS 47 45 

Z S » i? 

*■ 6 fl m« S* 

l« M 3030179* 74 

“ i w £8 

■sg" is E .... .... _ 

’iS « : iS % UB W -« 

w Ii _ <dM 11* ll lit, •* 

'S K : X iffi S5 li!i .fi 

\HR il z ’Si US {« S* -a 

ii ii 2 li g« ira «B '* 

.8? ^ ’.J 58 38 fS JS 


?to> *£ 




ISzS 

17* — u. 


M I? fl ?« 

tSScJI. 

1-04 79 ft 6 
iji e3 i'i m 
.1* .ii ai .ro 


A 


£ s St I 

J* i* |* -a 

llli 

g M % .* 




Eid! 


nr 


,5 is r; 1 1 * 


*3* s i fl? 


» = 

0 & 


-A 6* 'U' 

40% % 

90% 1B%_ 

sli 5 I 
bW 
A A, 

n b 10% B 


035 


a « 


jsISW 


5 


IS 


MD 11% 1 lUh - 

z % ga j* ^ 

- 'll BS ift BS “** 

E I W as p ^ 

ISS z 


_ ._ ii* n 

z 13 ift B 


IS ii 


151* 


’2 


iJ'SS 


fiS ’L .. 

iiA'ft *a za 

S5? #S> fi* -» 

RM =fi 
IK S5 a*- 3 ® 
Rft !5t 

SR «S 


19* “ H 




tfSSb 


.* 19 m 49% 09% «M — > 
- 2* JIM li'A 17% 17% — % 



;uS ’ J iT ^ 

3. 19 ~ -* 


I1ICR.S 
^ R 

R* w* 

z S-BS 35 S 
B M 35 a 
ai? B* 


R Wflift „, 

■*f» txMSam, 



. ro t ■ ” nan uwuacgOi’iN 

t w : % ,F I- ^ 

4 9{BfcFP ^ 
i^f m S J is §8 ® 

* - g *2 R ® 58 -i- 

S 8 Ip||% 


/T u 

J R M S SS K 

jll|G 


5 r. 5JU -yv — *• 

’ffi -3 
— 5 S3 *ft =15- 

■* Sflkb !• H, 

3 |4n l*ft ftl - 

*55 S3 H 

Z* 4* ;* 

a tt5 35 m— 33 »3‘ 

1 i i ® r 1 fe ^ 

I B i J 1 1 S '.5; 


S S z s i 

I li 1 ! 

T .1 n J 



ff? »*!* 


a :3 

tr, — ■>• 




,-4 - cJ £= 

a fi 3 t 


1 ■] I ,s i h 

n u pi If _J% 

r w 55ffl , fn l» J-l <v ™ 

laaMv aa?® 

eMfcnSvn 7$ <ki _ s» 


GB4 
lag :* 


.rs 


“ - a 

- - jJS I7VJ U* IT* »*, 

iig SI - i» S S‘4 £ 7 3; 
*5 n : as « h tf 1 

Z Z So 


s - - « 15 a IE 3 

^ fi r's & a a -? 

I si itk im uk •%# 




35 



J ? “I 

j? ,47 ^ ““f 

‘‘‘fiillb 

^ '! t& ’BS T« 'K =8 

U — * 7 .«* .#* » '4 


« E cS if* 

4,1 M —41 3? 


.AMoondu 

wafisss^" 

s-tMsa. 


^ il? il Bke^ 

f - la 5*.|a 
pff 

s* b S=* 






S2 


fl 


»* »M*J 
MW _7Vi3 _ . 
U-A 23*JHN«r 


Rjag& 

S3 


r* a a 


■SSS 


'Hu it* 

*3 ga 


ut S7 _ at 


“ 1 4» 


MSdS- 

SSST 


1746 

is 

4C* 

V* ailKIJM 

saw tftiemHPBf 

41 '4 !7*kNEii(rr 
«* 34*U>N 


4 flSjiii - 

~~ a a* at* — 




c 


91 49 ID <17 


R 



ii 


’« y a 


Z}_ a 


3A% aff% 2*M _4b 
29% S% fi% —4b 
fi%b 40% «% «% 

nm 


1 


nffl town 

ITS j]WK 

isjtajs 


£f " fl El 

BI 1 *» 

fi fl fi.fi i 

i e 1 


j* 

wfi 3 io nic P^ 

^ 2 aP“ 



r 




a 


_ 1 ni * 7 * 

as fi j fi £ S 

,jb ? 3 5 1? % 


♦a 


« 



M4*„. 
ib mw 

j* *IRI 

»* raw 



J*. fl 5 ffl 

S il > nil 


s a fl.i 


1.15 .<3 





j? fl 


71 


lieu 
k j i ® 



'? 9 


JR 



,3 4 if a 

» fl SI 
* 'Z fl a 

§ 


a? 


■» 

*s sa r m* t* 
■» S* fi fi j 

is* 400 a* 44 TB 


M* 77WUJCM 

®fifcgs% 



— ,*i Of 21 

■J.sr 

ij— i3 • u S* 

a j Asg |a 

iS j# I? — 

1.9* 71 _ 

sis 79 ft 

M ' 1 


•n* 


»=* 

s* JS 

S3 



-9 i .J 


* “ s ^ ss g» a .-a 
B j 3 S* «* as -a 

K .J ru ia u 11 — * 


.. .. U! 

fi fi 


F 

€ 



IIP 


5 S >sg » »8 
ai “ * 



H JJ jg wt it* m ♦» 

H R ra «* a* Sii — * 

K - _S *i» mm ♦.» 

*} E S fi sr h =5 

J 13 <nhj 79* (n* JO* —1* 

ijjS 32 § 1^ 7^ ^ 7ro| ^5 

'•a*« U M OU X* 34* ** V ■ 

a ? fi fi ^ 

«4 3 i 

il r S S* {ft M* ^ 

S g : ^! F ® r ,fi 

s a r «J is & fi. .* 

1 1 = | a I s = ;: 
J 1 = 1 r s 1 -= 
is=4t+e<t . 
1 1 = I to ■ K 4 N 
f 3 r J S* a a I* — |; 
iSiJCO.A-sf!' 



-G 


fft 2*2Sfit.J 

■il;! 

5:11“ 


fKwMYP 

SKSS? 


ffiSSS 



a 


m Q% a- 

ffiu fi +S 

^ E! -- 
or -* 


sports 


*.■ = SRSSES 

C^ftwedfoPageW 





















2 terali) 3 £&tilmnc. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY JANUARY 24, 1997 


PAGE 13 




enoe 


urn 


• .. r..- 


a i New Game Plan, to Buy Bandai 


By Andrew Pollack 

NwYoritlhna Sen** 

gBFiSSHS 


“ w W“y’ to *» called Sen 
would have : abont $6 biflionfn 
tevatme, more than Nintendo Co Mat- ' 

S» IaC ' 2L!? S 5 roInc ’ **• operations wiR 
®®’ s vMeo^rcade and 
bomegmne madunes toBandai’s Sailor 
Moon dolls _and otter character goods 
and its music and video entertainment 


divi sions . Bnt it might also be a troubled 
conjpaiw .analysts said, because berth 
and Bandai are facing difficulties. 

The planned transaction, valued ax 
$1.1 billion, can be seen as part of a 
consolidation in the world toy and game 
bus i ness. But combinations 1 tV» this are 
■ relatively rare in Japan, especially with 
■ite two companies not being in exactly 


.. TWo to three years ago, when Amer- 
ican toddlers cxmH not enough of tte 


n . fiva wuvu^u w UK. 

Power Ranger action figures and Sega 
was giving Nintendo arunferits money, 
the p residents of both Bandai and Sega 
dreamed of growing beyond toys and 
g a m es into the enticing - world, of mul- 


timedia and becoming the next Walt 
Disney Co. But Bandai announced last 
week that it would post a loss for hs 
current financial year, as sales of Power 
Ranger toys had fallen and its new Pip- 
pin machine for browsing the Internet, 
developed with Apple Computer Inc., 
had proved a failure. 

Sega, meanwhile, is felling to a weak 
third place in the home video game 
business behind Sony and a resurgent 
Nintendo, and its earnings are plunging 
because of write-downs on the value of 
its inventory at Sega of America. 

Now, tte companies will try instead to 
become an entertainment giant together. 

Under die agreement announced 


Thursday after the close of stock trad* 
ing. each Bandai share would be ex- 
changed for 0.76 of a Sega share. 
Bandai shares closed at 2J560 yen 
($22.40), up 200, while Sega closed at 
3,660, down 60. 

At those prices, the deal would have a 
value of 129 billion yen. 

Makoro Yaroasbwa, president of 
Bandai, would become president of the 
new company. Hayao Nakayama, pres- 
ident of Sega, would be deputy chair- 
man and chief executive, he said. 

The chairman is to be Isao Ohkawa, 
who is chairman of Sega and head of 
CSK Corp., a Japanese software com- 
pany that owns 20 percent of Sega. 



Skoda’s Octavia rolling off the Czech carmaker’s state-of-the-art assembly line, as a worker puts the finishing touches ou the automobile's engine. 


s Engines in Eastern Europe 


By Peter S. Green 

Special to the Herald Tribune ■■ 

MLADA BOLESLAV, Czech Re^ 
public — From , the outside, the sleek 
lines and sculpted hood of Skoda Anto: 
inobilova AS 's new Octavia sedan 
could easily be mistaken for a BMW 3- 
series, recalling, ite days before. Wadd 
War ST when Skoda's factories in this 
town turned out cars ilitfiwdBifGcF- 
marry’s best engineering efforts. 

But with a sticker pace of $13£50 for 


thebasic five-door Octavia, it also could 
be mistaken for a South Korean import 
The new .Skoda may look like a BMW 
and be paced like a Hyundai, but under 
tte hood the car is pure Volkswagen. 

• After five years of investment and re- 
engineering by Volkswagen AG, the 
Czech amomaker is an integral part of 
the German company's global empire, 
ft r epres e nts VW'sfiont fine in the battle 
witfi - Japanese . and Sooth Korean 
products for die emerging markets of 
Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Uni- 


on and, eventually, India, Egypt and 
possibly China. 

A vast and quiet light-filled han gar 
dial could be mistaken for a modem art 
museum, the new Octavia plant is far 
from the smoking, clattering, grease- 


Czech state. 

Skoda, with its well -trained weak 
force, established markets and reputa- 
tion for quality, has allowed VW to take 
on the Asian automakers with their own 
weapons: state-of-the-art assembly 


Thinking Aho o d /Commentary 

‘Bridge to the Future’ Must Be Broad 


By Reginald Dale - 

~ .. •' lnto7unumaj HnraldTribvne 

W ASHINGTON —President Bill Clinton’s fa- 
mousbridge to the 2lst century is banning to 
look narrower dim it used to. Admittedly, it 
has always been cfifficult topin down its exact 
design* But at least in the past Mr..CBntoa has managed, to 
imply that the world would beyery different in the years 
ahead, drat economic globalization was < 3r a t\gm g the entire 
context of America's future. - 

Only the faintest trace of tins new international reality 
was detectable in Mr. Clinton’s inaugural address this 
week. Instead, he seemed content to construct fire bridge by 
calling for changed attitudes toward 

Amenca’s internal political and -social . " . 

problems, such as racism and ‘petty It 18 HO lODger possible 

bickering’ ’ on Capitol HilL #* to torn ite 

Of course, inaugural addresses are ior America turn iis 

not asualty meant to eMmine tire state back OH the worid. 
ofihewaTOjaeyond America's shares __ 

one-side^toae co Mr. Oictcsi’s ciaim of the American 
economy bring “the strongest on Eartt”’— wtaut men- 
tioning^ its . huge and growing dependency an other econ- 
omies. 


When so many Americans are preoccupied with, do- nations, were only marginal ; 
on the world, ttoffie line between, the domestic and the 


H, quite the opposite was true.” 

- In the postwar years, the United States based much of its 
economic expansion on the growth of the international 
marketplace, and many Americans knew bow important the 
health of die world economy was to their living standards. 

It is ironic drat America should now be looking inward 
when it is infinitely more dependent cm foe outside world — 
and far better placed to add to its wealth and improve its 
living standards through increased international commerce. 

One way of measuring U.S. integration into die world 
economy is to look at expats, imports and returns on foreign 
investment. Those now amount to the equivalent of 31 
percent of total U-S. economic output — compared with only 
13 percent as recently as 1970, according to U.S. government 
figures. But it is not. of course, just the 
United States that has changed. 
r possible In fact, says Renato Ruggiero, di- 

I . rector-general of tibe World Trade Qr- 

t> turn Its ganization, the huge changes in the 

fOrJd. world trading system over the last 10 

years may in die long run prove more 

important than the dramatic geopol- 
itical shifts that accompanied the end of the Cold War. Of 
coarse, the two are closely interconnected. Bnt it is easy to 
forget that only 10 years ago the world economy was quite 
different: The Communist countries, and most developing 
nations, were only marginal players in the international 
t rading system. The industrial countries were getting away 
with plenty of trade-distorting behavior. 

Now there is a virtual global consensus on the need for 
emeu trade policies. Global interdependence, in Mr. Rug- 
giero’s words, is “not only releasing enormous energy for 
growth but also promoting a community of interest among 


frwwign is fayt uauc jww.ua. uiuwu uuauBjiwwtift*, 

S c he rx^Sis in history, Mr. Ointou might giro's words, is “not only releasing enormoc 
i ask faimself why the mood of America is so different now growth bnt also promoting a icommomty of mt 
f wS. was earlier in the “ American century” and countries at different levels of development.’ 

The community Mr. C3mton called for this week was not 

T series: “With, the end of the Cold ica.” That’s fine. But he should also tell Americans that if 

UiitedSraS has witnessed a rise in public there is such athmg as a ^ge to tte21rt century, they will 
Serawc to most international issues. After Word War not be the only ones on m 


lines, cheap skilled labor and just-in- 
time delivery. 

The gamble has yet to pay off. VW, 
which gives out few figures an Skoda, 
will say only that it believes the op- 
eration broke even for the first time m 
1996 despite slashing its planned in- 
vestment from 8 billion Deutsche marks 
($4.87 billion) to 3.7 billion DM. 

Asian carmakers are not Skoda's 
main competition, but the company 
does not doubt that they soon will be. 

For now, Skoda's competition in East- 
ern Europe, where it sells two-thirds of 
its cars, and elsewhere comes mainly 
from the lower-priced among the models 
made by Fiat SpA, Renault §A, Peugeot 
and Adam Opel AG. South Korean and 
Japanese carmakers including Daewoo 
Corp- Hyundai Corp. and Nissan Motor 
Co. are still relative newcomers. 

Skoda's German-bom sales director, 
Detlef Wittig, gambles thai the Octavia 
and last year's budget Felicia model will 
be unmatchable in the East. He may be 
right. In Prague, the demand for the 
Octavia has created a four-month waiting 
list. Launched in the early autumn, the 
Octavia is built on the same platform as 
Volkswagen's German-made Golf and 
Spanish-made Seat models. 

It is a 1.6-liter, 75-horsepower, four- 
door family car with a deep trunk, a 10- 
year corrosion warranty, Volkswagen 
parts and Volkswagen engineering. But 
a Skoda Octavia sells for far less than 
VW’s high-end models. 

“We undercut Volkswagen on pur- 
pose,” Mr. Wittig said. “We fill a mar- 

See SKODA, Page 17 


Sony to Turn New York 
Into a 4 2 d Headquarters’ 


By Andrew Pollack 

.Vrw Yc'l Times Soviet 

TOKYO — Sony Corp. said 
Thursday it planned to make New 
York its ‘‘second headquarters” to 
better supervise its sometimes 
troubled .American operations and 
keep track of rapidly changing Amer- 
ican media and technology trends. 

The move could strip some power 
from Sony Corp. of America, the US. 
holding company that has been in or- 
ganizational limbo since hs former 
(resident. Michael P. Schulhof, was 
ousted more than a year ago. 

Sony already has a reputation in 
Japan as an “Americanized” com- 
pany, and it now gets about 30 percent 
of its revenue from the United States 
— which is more titan ir generates in 
Japan. Akio Morita. Sony's co- 
founder and former chairman, often 
used to joke about moving Sony's 
headquarters to New York. 

Nevertheless, from the vague de- 
scriptions offered by Sony executives, it 
does not appear that the New York 
“headquarters” would be equal in 
status to the one in Tokyo. 

Officials said there would not be a 
mass movement of managers, ac- 


countants and lawyers from Japan to 
550 Madison Avenue, the elegant 
building in which Sony's New York 
operations are based 

Tamoisu Iba. Sony's chief financial 
officer, said some executives might be 
based in New York and that the New 
York-based and Japanese staffs would 
work closely together. 

"I want to make it a borderless, 
seamless headquarters,” he said. 

Nobuyuki ldei, Sony's president 
said the net result would be to grye 
more autonomy to Sony Pictures, its 
Hollywood movie company, and to 
Sony Music, the record company, and 
to take it away from Sony Corp. of 
America. 

Under the organizational setup that 
existed until late 1995. Sony Corp. of 
America was the overseer of Scwiy’s 
electronics, movie and record compa- 
nies in the United States. 

Executives at those units reported to 
Mr. Schulhof at Sony of America, who 
then reported to Tokyo. 

But this arrangement isolated 
Tokyo from what was happening in 
the American units, helping lead to a 
sudden and stunning S2.7 billion 

See SONY, Page 17 


Pepsi to Shed Restaurants 


C.*r&lnitK Oie Sag Fra* Dtspachrt 

NEW YORK — PepsiCo Inc. said 
Thursday it planned to spin off its slug- 
gish restaurant business, which includes 
the KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell fast- 
food chains, into a separate company. 

The company said it would give 
shares in the new fast-food concern to 
PepsiCo shareholders and focus on its 
faster growing Pepsi soft drink and 
Frito-Lay snacks operations. 

The new company would rank just 
behind McDonald’s Corp. among U.S. 
fast-food chains, with more than $20 
billion in combined sales, and would be 
the biggest in terms of outlets, with 
about 29.000 restaurants. 

Pepsi also said it would consider the 
sale of its PepsiCo Food Systems unit. 


which distributes more than S3 billion 
worth of restaurant equipment and sup- 
plies each year — primarily to its own 
restaurants. 

Pepsi’s shares rose $2.25, to S34.25. 
in active trading as shareholders an- 
ticipated the spin-off. 

Shareholders have clamored for Pep- 
si to sell or spin off the restaurants. One 
or another of the chains has regularly 
run into trouble — dragging down earn- 
ings or creating write-offs. 

Although restaurants are Pepsi's 
largest business, with an estimated 36 
percent of its $31.8 billion in sales last 
year, they accounted for about only 22 
percent of its operating profit, said Roy 
Burry, an analyst at Oppenheimer & 
Co. (AP, Bloomberg) 


Stocks Take a Drastic Tumble 


By Mitchell Martin 

Intemaiiorul Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Wall Street suffered 
a sudden fell at the close of trading 
Thursday on record New York Stock 
Exchange volume, raising fears that the 
gains of the past two years may have 
peaked. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 
94 .28 points, or 1 .38 percent, to 
6,755.75, while Big Board volume 
reached 683.8 million shares, surpass- 
ing the record of 680 million set July 15, 
another day of heavy losses. 

“Essentially what we've got is a 
sense that this could be the commence- 
ment of a real reversal,” said Alan 
Ackerman, executive vice of Fahne- 
stock & Co. Although he noted that the 
market had been “ characterized by sub- 
stantial volatility over the last 18 
months,” ai the end of trading on 


Thursday, “many professionals left the 
office with a sense of surprise at the 
severity of sell programs.” 

Jeffrey Rubin of Birinyi Associates in 
Greenwich, Connecticut, a firm that fol- 
lows technical movements in the stock 
market, said there were two large com- 
puterized sell programs in the last hour 
of trading that turned what had been a 
positive day for the Dow — the blue- 
chip index had traded above 6.900 
points for the first time — into a loss. 
“The first accounted for 40 points, the 
second for 88,” he said. 

Mr. Rubin did not attach much im- 
portance to the volume record, noting 
that activity had been expanding in re- 
cent years. 

For the second day. International 
Business Machines depressed the Dow, 
which fell on Wednesday, while broad- 

See STOCKS, Page 14 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 



OUTSTANDING Analysis for All Major Markets 
EXCEPTIONAL Execution Forex or Futures 

COMMISSION Spot PXZ-5 Pip Price Spreads 


SUPERIOR Selection of Managed Accounts 
FREE Trading Software & Data 

COMMISSION Futures $12*36 PerRFT 


Peter G.Catranis 

Forux a Futures Specialist 


Australia 1800125944 ffrfr'um 08001 5880 Bermuda 18008784178 Brazil 00081 1921 5S1 3 Colombia 38012D837 

Cyprm 08090605 Denmark 80016132 HUh« 08001 110064 0800902246 Ureett 00600119213013 

Gmnnny01308Z9666 /*»<•* AVwrf 8007209 Ireland! 800559294 Israel 177 1000 102 //*/>■ 187875928 

Japan 0031 126609 Korea 0038110243 Luxemburg 08004652 Mexico 9580087841 78 HethrrlanA 060220657 

N.4 «»Wr* 18009945757 V. 7ra/a»rfOB00441B80 Portugal 05011 2832 Singapore BOO 1 202501 £, ifriea 0800996337 

Spain 900931007 Snrdrn 0207931 S8 0BO0897233TW*rf 001800119230666 Turkey 0080013421901] 

t-niied Kingdom 0800968632 l nitr JSrw*18009145757 US -Toll Voice*! 14 -376-8020 US-Tnll r*v V714-376-8025 


Belgium 0800 1 5880 Bermuda 18008784178 Brazil 00081 19215513 

Denmark 80016132 Unlamd 08001 110064 France 0800902246 
Hang Kang 8007209 Ireland 800559294 Israel 1771000102 
Korea 0038110243 l uxrmkourg 08D04S5 2 Mrxira 9580087841 78 




- ■ 

.j *•*-•■*■ i 

i-*, SF 

... 


-ci- Vi* 

■ ■ V; 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


"Cross Ratee 


i t n* 
ue a* u» 

am 5536 *A! 

UM MM — 

US9 — 

XBM WSJ 1MB 

UBJt 2MB 9&J0 

fttwYMkOd — £*• 6KB S*“ 

*mk . ssm UO »s — na — Bit m 

Tat* raa wuo jus aA **■. ugj-iUM — * un 

ssss^as’iis'sis 

i ecu . twig g j® J5J2 JS isn w.w 

Other Dollar Values 

.°"—r ** «■» 22 JEw. ™ «■«*«■* 

Wiw 1X9968 andt*OC. wjff S.KK.VM 851 4 

•S|s 0297- HM8ICM8* SMLhMH 722W 

| 8nz8nof IMS t**onp+ »» J5J S- 197 TMbtM . 2528 

' nMHiinri UTTH ■ i ogt Tartfahfcii 11«8 

Cmckttarom 2X79 MM£ . W® 5407JS DtfMn 36705 

7*“"”*“ " „ ■ . ..■rhrir 13004 bd, JKU 


FA l MM « 

USB ttlT — 5MS 
uifl xna* . ms —— 
IMS us* uw uar 

UN3348UC Uffl 5*9805 

S5 »»- 

3MJ7 ' — IBB MBS 
S3B5 UWD urn tut 

SO UM MJI iSB6 

u» wat* ura •**' 

1304 ftfflPl* B7M -CB»* 
tSfij 1MB tM BOB 
«mao 56 Vfft BXB 


si. rm or pho 

- ufff isar ua war 
as uo si »fl a 

» ues lSB~ 22235 uu* 
23»msm 2WJDUM 
%m natrnwn — 
t,m» tun iw-e «« 
IBS 1TM5 Utf. dUS 

ins* uer iw 
ua — « m m 

- -—‘un 

• — USB* un» UBO* 
UIK Ufi un 8W . 
i3ti W.VB un non 


Ubld-Ubor Rates *^23 

. Swiss Fnk8 

DoOw D-tum* Fiona starfiaB Me Yen SCO 

1-emttl 5Vn-5ft 3WW» 1%-lVn 5^-«vta VK-SV, V*-V» 4-4U 

SUM » 9U-5Vi Sb-Vt* 4M-5K 3M-3M fn-fa 3^-4 

frtwnft 5*»-5*» M7-4M 3W-3VW **-*» Wa-4 

1-mar SV*-SV*3¥a-3*u Vi-* 3V*-4 

ftn ap (Jq nff B/ntk. - 

Rales avpBanbk to MaiaarikdtposIH at SJ atto tdahnum tor e&tvaknB. 


SSSS ^ SS 

PhkwUB 48753 *T 

Forward Bates 

teK, aam “ 

!SS £S? 15S ££* 

MMtMt 143» 


e m rmet rv* 

7 JO 

H.*5oni& MSB 
um*-*—* 

MWIW 
MsraW 56IBJB 


mwq r •*** 

S.Mr.m8 4 £25 

S.KM.M BS1MI 
SK&taMM 72224 
TOMBS 2744 

TWM. 2528 
TMtfefcftB 114741 
DtfMni 36705 
Vwr Mfr 47500 


Key Money Rates 

mWSMB awe 

Nxwrtrtft 5 lOO 

FttetrM 8U 

ramlMfc " BM 

SMorCKi Men ‘ SM 
IN-tfay CP diaien £32 

3MBlk TrattMT M SXO 

HcsrTnarayM 5J0 

l W a r TTwMKyW - 103 

SfnrTMmjrMO 13* 

7-fMrTnsaoBale MS 

T O j unr Twenty MW ■ &5B 

asyMrUMnytaW 6 £6 

MtrillrMk»«yU 493 

aa . 

DliCMBlratr . 050 

Colmey •• 842. 

I ■MWlWrtMfc 053 

1 — WklHinwH 056. 

iMfl MflWt ’ OS6 
Myearfiewtbm 252 


BiIMb 

Bank base rale 

Q*HW|f 


Smttfepabalr 
MU *fJw4 

TOjwrGW 


bbramnnk 

OilMw y 

T-rnttUalnW 

3*oanbdobaBk 

SHBMWtaMbOBk 

ifrWflrOAT 


480 4ft) 
Mt M 
bW <Vk 
6Vn 6V» 
Mt ttt‘ 
7J6 733 , 


115 3.15 

3 ¥* 
3 U W» 
31 * 3 Vb 
31 * M 
SSI 580 


■ 11481 11*34 11782 

’JT UM* 14202. wrss 


- JJ34S 13341 

t u tehew t 14399 143» 

SSSSSSOtS^^sSSSiSSi 


IwO w O nrt i 

earner 


. Storetat anotBrs. 

Lfuctb Bonn el TeXye-Minublsnl. 

awm fa fc OMflJMM* 

AJL FM. targe 

2 Me» 349 JS 34055 -235 

LOOM 34980 34000 —330 

NtWYott 3 SIJ 0 35 Z 50 +070 

US. dolbnpereuncB.uax)on officU 


17% fcJ 

Sauna: TbuMs. 


International Foreign Exchange Corporation 

THE RELIABLE PARTNER 

SEE US ON NBC TEXT PAGES 355 & 356 
Discounted commissions - 24 hour trading desk 
internet site; www.ifexco.ch - Reuters page IFEX 

88 bb route de Frontenax - 1206 Geneva - Switzerland 
Td (41)22 8497411 - 24hr (41) 22 849 7440 - Fax (41) 22 700 1913 


V 737 )CnPV ; • KMn spreads; no cormnisston 

I • MWmwri tnmsoctton 5100,000 H 
W — 1 ■ • Competitive margin rates Bh| 

IG Index pk. 1 Worv<idc Row, Ionian 5W1E5BI, Great Britain *TH&' 


For further details 
on bow to place your listing contact: 
CHRISTOPHER SETH fn London 
Tel: (44) 177 8364802 - Fax (44) 171 2402254 


Investment Mcragar Staait Chaussde oflers US. a 
rri nvBSJmemsIhe experts mcormend. ._ Mia 
i eflkxrtinvestTTKtfits_*-Ja^ 

K whe fiem investments can outperform them 
w banters and brokas. Tax re&ims. wBs, truss 


LY HILLS 


UA and non-U5. cflents 


BeraUCflg^Sribuie 



Drive Bevertyias, 


SUCCESSFUL FUTURES MARKETS 
PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 
HIGH RETURN LIMITED RISK 
NO MINIMUM PERIOD OF INVESTMENT 
PROVEN TRACK RECORDS 
ASK FOR A BROCHURE FREE OF CHARGE IN 
ENGLISH OR IN FRENCH 
GOLD HILL SERVICES SA 
RUE DE BOURG 6, 1 003 LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND 
TEL.(41.21) 320 58 31 FAX (41.21) 320 58 35 
PORTFOLIO MANAGERS AND BROKERS SINCE 1 982 
MEMBER OF THE NEW YORK FUTURES EXCHANGE 


Your 'one stop' 
Brokerage connection 

ttftlVIMldt 

Futures, Options 
& Forex markets 


Linnco 

L*ac*e *ia ra Urf W 4fcr*»«4 
in imi h— t lmnimi mu nc 









Investor’s America 


1 The Dow 

■ 3Q-.YeaF T-Bond Yield- | 

G7D0 y 1 

j-\. ft 

“A, 

m 


5500 

620 





A S 0 N D J 
1996 1997 


Exchange . index . 



fiysE 


"The Dow ■ 


67S&S5 68S0.G3 ■ -1:38 


>»se. . 

S&P500 ■ 

777J5& 786^3 v 

WSE-: 

S&P100 - 

■ 7B2J2X" ■" -771.18 " -1-16 

MYSE 

Composite 

. .4Q9.1S 412,80 .-0B8 

US.. 

Nasdaq Coarposite 1376.37 -0.70 

«H£X 

MwketVakie . 

589.69 .500.87 -0^0 

Toronto 

TSE Index 

604a Sri 8058.87 -0J30 

SfcPauto 

Bcn^spa 

78906JB0 78175UO +0&4 

Mexico Chy 

Balsa 

3G94.6S ' 3707.98 - -0-36 

Baertos AfresMerval 

• 677.29 ' 679.47 ' -0^2. 

SantiagD. 

IPSA General 

5240^7 5196.78 +0.84 

Caracas. 

Capital General 

6295.02 6328.47 . -0-S3 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

Inloiuiioiwi Herald Tnbunt 

Very briefly: 


TI to Sell Laptop Division to Acer 

DALLAS {Bloomberg) — Texas Instruments Inc. said 
Thursday that it had agreed to sell its unprofitable laptop- 
computer division to Acer Inc. and thaL it would focus on its 
chip business. 

The company also said its fourth -quarter earnings fell 41 
percent, to SI 73 million, or 67 cents a share, because of a 
decline in memory-chip prices. 

The company's shares surged S7.375 to close at $73,125. 
Terms of the laptop-business sale were not disclosed. The 
transaction is expected to be completed in the first quarter. 
Texas Instruments also agreed this month to sell its defense 
business to Raytheon Co. for $2.95 billion. 

• Boeing Co.'s earnings rose 52 percent in the fourth quarter, 
to $254 million, as deliveries of its commercial aircraft rose. 

• McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s fourth -quarter net income 
rose 1 1 percent to $207 million, or 98 cents a share. 

• Sears, Roebuck & Co.'s fourth -quarter profit rose 25 
percent to 5567 million, on robust holiday sales, bucking the 
trend of disappointing sales at other retailers. 

• Amphenol Corp. agreed to sell a controlling stake to a 
holding company formed by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & 
Co. for about SI .5 billion in cash and assumed debt. 

• Xerox Corp. agreed to sell its Coregis Group Inc. insurance 
unit to General Electric Co. for $450 million and its Apprise 
computer services unit to Andersen Consulting as it con- 
tinued to dispose of businesses outside the document-pro- 
cessing area. Xerox also said fourth-quarter earnings rose 12 
percent, to $426 million. 

• Northwest Airlines asked the Department of Transpor- 
tation to impose sanctions against Japan over Tokyo’s refusal 
to let the carrier fly a proposed Seame-Osaka-Jakarta route. 

• Texaco Inc received tentative court approval of a SI 76 

million race-discrimination suit settlement with 1 .342 current 
and former black employees. Bioombtrg. afp. .ap 


Enterprise Keeps It Simple 

Car-Rental Company Builds a Stable Empire 


By Gianna Jacobson 

,Vfw York rimes Sen nv 

ST. LOUIS — For 40 years. 
Enterprise Rent-a-Car Inc. has gone 
against the conventional wisdom in 
its industry. It not only ceded the 
bread-and-butter airport business to 
Hertz, A vis and other national com- 
petitors but also went without any 

celebrity-driven advertising cam- 
paigns or catchy slogans. 

Yet while Hertz Corp. and the 
others got the high profiles, Enter- 
prise became the industry's giant. 

Sticking close to the niche it 
developed — providing rentals for 
customers whose cars were being 
repaired or who needed an extra car 
— Enterprise became No. 1 in both 
fleet size and number of locations. 
Though it trails Hertz in revenue — 
at $3.1 billion to Hertz’s $3.8 bil- 
lion in 1996 — its estimated $500 
million in pretax earnings probably 
make it No. 1 in profit, too. Hertz, a 
unit of Ford Motor Co., does not 
disclose earnings. 

“Enterprise’s track record is as- 
tonishing. 1 said Jon LeSage, editor 
of Auto Rental News, a trade pub- 
lication based in Redondo Beach. 
California. “They hare very quietly 
and humbly built an empire.” 

Now. as the SI 6.5 billion in- 
dustry reorganizes in the wake of a 
six-month spate of acquisitions, the 
question is whether Enterprise and 
its owners, the founding Taylor 
family, can keep that empire, and 


that profit, largely to themselves. 

Characteristically, the Taylors 
say they will continue to go against 
die grain, keeping Enterprise in the 
family and out of airports. 

Andrew Taylor, Enterprise's 
chief executive and son of the com- 
pany *s founder and chairman. Jack 
Taylor, said; "Everybody wants to 
throw us in the same pot with the 
other rental-car companies, but our 
businesses are different. We have 
no plans to be in the airports. We’re 
sticking to our niche." 

Enterprise is a maverick in a lot 
of ways that have paid off and will 
be hard to match. Simply keeping 
its 3,100 branches away from air- 
ports reduces its overhead signif- 
icantly by cutting out airport con- 
cession fees. It also saves by 
handling its own reservations, 
avoiding 10 percent travel -agent 
commissions and a separate 3 per- 
cent fee that other rental -car 
companies pay to use a shared 
reservation system, and it employs 
a sophisticated computer network 
to track the location and service 
histoiy of each of its 3 15, 1 00 cars, 
keeping inventory lean and cars on 
the road an average of six months 
longer than Hertz and Avis do. 

At the same time, the company 
is known for an extra level of ser- 
vice; ft often delivers cars to cus- 
tomers' homes or takes customers 
to the cars. 

The new market picture will be- 
come clearer in the next year, as 


the industry adjusts to all the own- 
ership changes.' HFS touched off 
the flurry of deals in July when it 
bought Avis from its employees 
and General Motors. Corp. for 
$800 million. In the past few 
weeks alone, the following deals 
or related events have occurred; 

•Team Rental Group Inc. said it 
was acquiring Budget Rent-a-Car 
Co. from Ford for $350 million. 
Team Rental is the largest Budget 
franchisee. 

• Republic Industries said it 
would buy National from GM for 
$600 million shortly after it bought 
Alamo from Michael Egan, a rent- 
al-car executive who owned 94 
percent of it, for $625 million. 

“I’ve never seen anything like 
this frenzy of activity around the 
rental-car business, ’ ' said Neii Ab- 
rams, an industry consultant in 
Purchase, New York. “What is 
remarkable about Enterprise is that 
it is the only major player in the 
industry that has bad no changes in 
ownership or top management in 
the past four years." 

As the dust settles, Andrew 
Taylor remains h ellish about En- 
terprise, estimating revenue will 
jump to $6 billion by 2001. 

The company willgrow, be said, 
by opening more branches across 
the United States and especially 
abroad. With 150 brandies in 
Canada and Britain, Enterprise is 
preparing to venture into Europe 
next, beginning in Germany. . 


STOCKS: ^ the Big Roily Peaked? 


Continued from Page 13 

er indexes advanced. On Thursday 
IBM fell 6Vfe to 1 5 1 %. The company 
reported .. . higherrihan-expected 
fourth-quarter profit late Tuesday, 
but its sales growth and profit mar- 
gins disappointed investors. 

The weakness Wednesday in 
IBM hit the blue-chip Dow indicator 
but did not prevent broader market 
indexes from posting record highs. 
But on Thursday, the drooping Dow 
pulled the rest of Wall Street lower. 
The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
index fell 8.67, or 1.10 percent, jo 
777.56, while the NaSdaq composite 
index lost 9.69 points, or 0.70 per- 
cent, ending at 137837. 

Along with IBM. Sears Roebuck 
fell and helped drag down the Dow. 
Sears fell 2 to 49V6 after reporting a 
25 percent rise in fourth-quarter 
profit. One poinr of worry was that 
credit-card sales accounted for a bjg 
portion of the retailer's sales, 'ana- 
lysts said 

In general, corporate earnings re- 
ports so far this year have been 
“remarkably attractive.’’ Mr. Ack- 
erman said Yet the rally that has 
taken the Dow up from 3,834 at die 
end of 1 994' has outpaced the growth 
in profits, he said' 

The good earnings reports con- 
tinued after the market closed 
Thursday, with the computer retailer 
Gateway 2000 reporting better-than- 
expected results for its latest period 

Weighing on the market 
Thursday was a weak Philip Morris, 
whose shares fell 2% to 11716, The 
stock had been up about 33 percent 
in the past half year. Exxon, which 
fell 3>A to 102%, and General Elec- 
tric, down 3V4 to 1 04%, were notable 
losers on the day. 


The stock market's slide has die 
potential for embarrassing the inde- 
pendent strategist Elaine GareareUi if 
media reports that she had turned 
bullish early in the day are accurjj; 
Ms. Garzarcttu who predicted the 
stock market’s collapse in 1987, had 
been bearish since the early summer 
and thus missed a sharp rally. On 

U^. STOCKS 

Thursday, she was quoted by tele- 
vision and news agency repots as 
having reversed her position, saying 
stocks could rise 10 percent to 15 
percent in the coming year. 

After those repeats circulated, the 
sale orders hit the market Bui ana- 
lysts noted the fell on Thursday was 
within the parameters of market 
volatility in recent months. 1 

There were some bright spots, 
mainly in the technology sector. 
Texas Instruments Jumped 7 to 70% 
after it said it would sell its un- 
profitable laptop-computer division 
to concentrate on making computer 
chips. 

Before its earnings report. Gate- 
way rose 1 to 63%. and its rival Dell 
Computer was up 2% to 69V4. - 

Mr. Ackerman said investors 

could still buy stocks but ought to h* 

wary. “The strategy forthemomaLi 
is to be highly selective,' to be cau- 
tious and shepherd cash.”. 

Vans tar fell V» to 15 after the 
provider of services and products 
for corporate computer networks 
said its third -quarter earnings would 
fell short of analysts' estimates by at 
least 40 percent because of higher 
research costs and sluggish orders. 

McDonald ’s rose V/hto46H after 
the restaurant chain posted strong 
quarterly profit. 


Bundesbank Chief Takes Wary Stance on Money Union 


By John Schmid 

Inrenuliona) Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Tensions that 
have erupted in the past month be- 
tween Germany and France over 
monetary union were only the “ini- 
tial skirmishes.” Hans Tietmeyer. 
the president of the Bundesbank, 
said in a newspaper interview. 

In an interview with the weekly 
newspaper Die Zeit, which ap- 
peared Thursday, Mr. Tietmeyer 
said Germany would never enter 
into a monetary union with France if 
such a move threatened to create a 
“community of inflation." 

Although Mr. Tietmeyer pledged 
allegiance to the notion of French- 
German cooperation that is the 
linchpin of European unification, he 


injected a note of caution. “1 un- 
derstand very well the political rea- 
sons for the integration process, and 
J also share them personally," Mr. 
Tietmeyer said, “but I am of the 
opinion that a currency union that is 
not economically viable can lead to 
conflicts, and this can endanger the 
entire integration. One of my re- 
sponsibilities is to be aware of this 
and to work for an economically 
feasible foundation.” 

With these remarks, Mr. Tiet- 
meyer said in public whai other 
Bundesbank officials recently have 
said only in private: that linking 
Germany and France with a single 
currency could lead to difficulties 
after the monetary union. 

Germany and France have always 
been at odds over the degree of 


political independence of a future 
European central bank, but those 
differences have burst into the open 
in the past month. 

Like other German officials. Mr. 
Tietmeyer has doggedly fought for 
the proposed central bank's inde- 
pendence, an idea that economists 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

and German monetary officials ar- 
gue has not yet taken root in France, 
where the government has deemed 
central bank policy too important to 
be left to unelected technocrats. 

[Jean-Claude Trichet, governor 
of the Bank of France, voiced his 
support for an independent central 
bank, clashing with the view held by 
President Jacques Chirac. 


Bloomberg News reported. Mr. 
Trichet said the “guiding prin- 
ciple" for the future European cen- 
tral bank would be price stability, 
“guaranteed by die independence" 
of die European central bank.] ' 

Germans were upset last month at 
the European Union’s summit meet- 
ing in Dublin by ftench demands to 
creme a political body to act as; a 
“counterweight" to an independent 
central bank. 

The French “obviously do riot 
want to stick to what until recently 
was a consensus on EMU," said 
Holger Schmieding, senior econo- 
mist at Merrill Lynch in Fnaikfurt 

■ Dollar Gains Against Yen 

The dollar rose against the yen on 
expectations that economic strength 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


would keep luring global investors 
to U.S. securities and the dollars they 
need to purchase them but was 
mixed against other major curren- 
cies, Bloomberg reported from Ngjv 
York. \ 

The dollar was strong against z&e 
yen because of “die plunging of 
Japanese stocks." said Ken Wind- 
beim, president of Strategic Fixed 
Income. 

The dollar rose to 119350 yen 
from 1 18.935 yen Wednesday, butit 
slipped to 53075 French francs 
from 53378 francs. It was stronger 
against the pound, which traded at 
$1.6314, compared with $1.6363 
Wednesday. But it closed at 1.6324 
Deutsche marks, down from 1.6409 
DM, and dropped to L4160 Swiss 
fiariris from 1.4291 francs. 

in ; ■■■ ■■i*iTmi1i >■ i.»y« iTiViri i ■■ 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday's 4 pan. Close 

Thu top WO mcsi-aclivu shares, 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
TTw toocuM Press 

Sates Utah Low Latest Owe 
734 Ufa 15V, 


&KS8 



J l& 


!4fa -fa 
till —fa 
16 —fa 
16V. ,fa 

rot 


rife 


Astrok 

&£§ 
Aufomte 
A aso 
BAT hid 
Bsker 
BoUw 
Btitoty 
Borrtbs 


BeUPnwrt 

BWAS 

BJo/tCd 

BtonJT 

BOOMWl 

BoBTtJin 


BrMDtan 

CETEnv5 


QhiOcps 
Cuiwfo 
'-v. Ail n 
Cuuiitxn 

CttSJIAMS 

CFCdOB 

Cents* 

OwdTtir 

ecOwBJa 

CNet 

online 

Qvrirn 

CtiwnStr 

COUJj 

Comiorce 

CmarApn 

OraMai 

amptefc 

Concern 


LTU.il 01 

□I Ind 
DtititaM 
DtrtHO 
Mamet 


Jfa 1 

ft £ 
ft i* 

llVi IWk 

6 M 
3th 3 

3Sfa IS 

int Ufa 
1IM 9*to. 
fa fa 

1 >Vu 

^ J 

Vr, It 
79m 7*l , i* 
I0fa Iflfa 
m fa 
3*u Vh, 
Ufa 17fa 
IP* 17 
JM 3fa 
to, to 
VAt 3fa 
35fa Mto 
9*. Mb 

r*» 

ato Ufa 
llto 10fa 
Ufa Ufa 

35fa r 

rv» 3)t 

9fa 9fa 
Ufa II 
IDfa 10 
3"A» 

7 *fa 

l>Vi| l"<u 

fa* to* 
38V* Mto 

Ufa 34 
17H 17 
Ufa Ufa 
< 3 V, 

7V. Ifa 

Ufa llto 
Ufa M 
1‘tot Ito 
S 4to 
ito 4to 
ito ifa 
I8to Ufa 
6fa 6 
'to, fa 
to. 

JV, TA, 
«fa « 

Jfa 31* 
Ito fa 
J'fa, 7to 
ifa < 

30 Ufa 

Ufa Ufa 

7"i, ito 
17fa lhfa 
7fa 

Ufa 10fa 

Hfa m 
«7fa 47to 
I2to I2‘« 
I'Vu Ifa 


Sofas Hjon Low Latest dm 


KFXlnc 

KVPhA 

LnBnro 

MAI Sys 

MCSt*> 

MSR 

MoonRrt 

Medd* 


Mefcomda 

MkhAnt 

MitisRty 

MoaaA 

MSNkVTurt 


Nrtmedn 

NYTVnas 

NAVocc • 

NtfwiTcti 

Nwavx 

OmrtMut 

tticpr 

OnLuiTKl 

SES. 

PGECapcf 

PLCSvs 

PMCCT 

PGEsfE 

PiiiAinCn 

PtwsiC 

PEOGW 

PtttNot 

*** «-■ 

rrwMlit 

PHiRec 

PoUAud 

PohrrtMd 

Pdyiei 

PrpdLo 

Price*! 

ProAafan 

Pi*0PCT 

PsyeCe 

QCODtn 

RFPaw 

PpoGodl 

RUonlm 

Riser 

Rotors 

RovtdOa 

SC Ben 

SdnPMl 

SSYaiwNB 

5MOr» 

Scnutt 

Sarvfao 

SHfKWld 

SrrrtBln 

SmtfimM 

Srfinet 

ecSoflOMi 

Sswisoa 

SPDR 

'Pttd 

StorrtCp 

SWIhltA 

SOrgCmp 

5uMAtHiS 

SwhvNSI 

Tobfid 

Teohe 

TeOto 

TexBiOteft 

TeeBlHrf 

T i-xAVt 

ThemiaJ 

ThrmBian 

TTiCcts 

TmECOS 

ThmAis 

Thrtnst 

ThrmPn 

THmRt 

ThrSooa 

ThrmTer 

Thrmotse 



ffa 

IB 1 '. Ufa 
»fa 8V, 
Tto 7to 
4fa 4 It 
1 1 
Sfa Sfa 
12 12 
Ifa Ufa Ufa 
fa Ufa 3 i fa 


]p iS 5 1 ” 15 S 

MU Ufa Ufa Ufa 
3W 3fa 3lh* 3V,, 
111 Ufa Ufa Ufa 



Indexes 

Dow Jones 

Onn Hgh Law Last Cho. 

trete 608005 00660 BOJB BSU5-9UB 
Trans 7363X1 237&M ZMUB ZM0J6 -UD 

un 24IJ5 wx» znst mo -ao 

Cano SIMM 27M40 JWJ9 27ISJ0 —30.1! 

Standard & Poors 

Prevtom Twtay 
High Low Oose eao 
Industrials 92277 91644 922.76 91170 

Transp. 569.17 56177 56875 563.13 

Utmties 205JJ0 203.45 205J» 20377 

R nance 8776 8621 8773 8673 

SP 500 78623 779.56 78623 77693 

SP 100 77120 76X51 771.18 762LD9 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


U4 Ufa 

1 X 

i!St 

0152 ^ 
iw n. 

2343 tv, 
t« «fa _ . 

234 Bto 7iy« 8 

4037 « 40 Vi 

640 21fa 21fa Ufa 
210 7fa 7fa Tfa 

369 4 3fa 4 

406 2to* 2Vi 3fa 
1092 4fa 4*6, 4fa 

1M 6Vi, 6fa 6fa 
m 32fa 2ZVi 22to 

m m irii ^ 


Ufa Ufa 

ft ft 

Ufa ift 
4 4Vi* 
19to Ufa 
Tfa Tfa 
7fa I 
6fa 69k 


NYSE 

Oompasiie 

mdustnab 

Trai®. 

UM»V 

Rronc* 

Nasdaq 


Qnmlh 

ImkaoWs 

Bct ih 

inmronoe 


High Low Lad Ow. 

41674 40072 409.15 —165 
525.00 51450 515.15 —114 
370J6 36650 366-00 -122 
37173 TOM 26771 — 1J08 
37773 369.93 370.18 —370 


HW Law Lad an. 


Transo. 

AMEX 


140076 1380-45 138645 
1180.76 117423 117173 
1331.16 131466 133614 
147340 146525 146771 
1667.04 165924 166523 


•029 

•578 

• 729 

• 244 

• 6.83 


91720 913.16 91 X 16 — 0.73 


Mob Low Lad aw. 
593 JS 58671 5 B 929 —LIB 

Dow Jones Bond 



20 Bonds 
10 UBBlies 
10 Industrials 


dose Chs. 

10X35 - 0.19 

100.38 - 073 

70622 — 0.14 



Vet 

Men 

Low 

LOST 

ChO- 

PbpsICos 

305 B 47 

3 SWi 

32 to 

3466 

- 2 '« 

MicmT 

lam 

33 Vi 

29 Vi 

32 

♦ Ifa 

IBM 

B 4267 MV, 

ISM 

15146 

- 4 fa 

Taxhut 

nut 

73 h 

4 Mh 

Ufa 

-Tfa 

wwwait 

J SS34 

Hto 

22 fa 

22 fa 

—to 

AT 4 TS 

70514 

37 to 

37 to 

37 fa 

—1 


*9424 

B/to 

(Ufa 

mu 

♦fa 

McDrtdt 

40914 

4 /fa 



♦ Ifa 

CnvAsci 

57656 44 fa 

43 to 

43 fa 

♦ fa 

VmsJnrn 

56002 

16 fa 

1+16 

15 

-Tfa 

ArchDan 

46914 

21 

Ufa 

20 

—1 

RrtM 

450 H 


33 to 

3344 

—V. 


41 WJ 3 Sto 





36724 

I 9 to 

17*4 

179 * 

—Ifa 

Seagate 1 

3 B 5 U 

51 fa 

49 to 

» 

♦Ifa 

Nasdaq 

VaL 

MBb 

Low 

Loti 

Cha. 

WOridCms 

125414 27 Vu 

24 



Mhnsfla 

124024 

9946 




Wd 

117041 

IM+. 




Medarti 

1 Q 3 H 54 

1446 

13 V 4 

13 to 

♦to 

Oracles 

90979 

42 fa 

•to 



WAMUtt 

07233 

51 

•to 

SO 

♦ ito 


01 S 59 

33 fa 




DdlCtis 

79254 

Ufa 




US Rot* 1 

74390 

Ufa 

48 

68 Vu — JV,. 


6*798 

3 Jto 

32 fa 



AddMal 

61123 49 fa 




ABeras 

40130 44 *, 

42 fa 



GateTOOO 

58729 

6 Sfa 

62 fa 

43 fa 

+fa 

Ciscos 

57017 

74 to 




Rratnds 

46072 

44 fa 

41 

42 fa 

♦ ifa 

AMEX 

VdL 

t*ah 

LOW 

Loti 

Cba. 

SPDR 

24824 7 V fa. 

74 ’tot 

7 Tfa 

-IVb 


13209 

Bto 

Tfa 

0 



1300 ) 


6 

S9k 

,Vu 


11478 

35 V* 

33 fa 

34 



9430 

4 fa 

3 >fa. 

3 fa 

— fa 

XCLLM 

san 

to. 

fa 

fa 

—'A* 


0152 

71 

IT’V 

20 v. 



7634 35 to 

32 

34 to 

• 2 fa 

TWA 

7042 

ifa 

PI 

6 

♦ i/ B 

RovtiOO 

4023 

3 fa 

2 <Vi. 

3 fa 



Jan. 23,1997 

Kwh LOW Oos« Owe Opw 


Grains 

CORN (QOT) 

5200 ow nonenwn- cMtari oar buingl 
Mar 97 271 v, 249to ITOfa -0»\» 124J16 

MOV97 269W 247fa 24W — OjOO to 64084 

Jul 97 249 247fa 268to -OJOOU6US7 

S8d 97 240 145fa 246 Wff 

Dec 97 167 265to 2464 tBOQto42J26 

Ed. sales NA Wfitfs.s«4es 4463 
Wed's ansi ini 306411 up 1261 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CMT) 

100 ms- aanarsoer tan 

Mar 77 Z3&JB 23420 23550 -040 401873 

May 97 23220 23630 232.10 -030 21.205 

Jill 97 23170 229 JO 231.18 -040 18,861 

Aug 97 » 00 237 JB 229 JM 1105 

Sap 97 22150 222-DO 2ZU0 *070 2757 

0097 21440 21440 21440 *150 1438 

Ed. Kites NA. Wed's. s«es 21480 
Wad's open ir4 90.187 up 2770 

SOYBEAN 0BL (CBOT) 

KMnnett-doKrs ner loom. 


Wgh Low dose Ctise OpM 

MOV97 9640 8540 8740 -3J0 UK 

JUI97 9340 8940 9040 -249 I486 

Sep 97 9250 9240 -240 1438 

Est.sote* NA Wed's. Kies 3400 

weersonanw 


High Low Oose CJs* Opkd 


COLOOKMX} 

100 hwi 

JU197 

Feb 97 35240 
Mir 97 

Apr 97 35440 
Jun97 35640 
AUB97 35840 
0097 

Dec 97 36440 
EJL tales NA 
Wad's open M 


Metals 


tray m. 

35210 *090 
347 JO 35250 *040 
35238 *040 
34940 354.18 *040 
35150 35640 +040 
35440 25640 *040 
341-®) *040 
35950 36350 *040 
wars, sties 51415 
201483 off 3588 


5 

68,950 

68 

47473 

21429 

rm 

3432 

15486 


MBb Low dose Cbga OptnL 
iffiAnMsoa. ra»4En> 

42*000 oo$- emts per sol 
3240 * 6UTD9479 FtelW <745 66.M 6635 -054 3L790 

+ MS 4212 Mar 77 67JD 6530 6452 -057 27.271 

.. 0 Apr 97 6440 6X30 6337 _fi5 7 KL6B2 

‘ May 77 too- Six 61.12 -4.47 4,150 

4*197 6830 59 JD 5942 -Off 5,958 

JW 77 5940 59 .M 5847 -047 &C7 

AUB97 5930 59.15 ilH7 -OAJ 1082 

13,952 SW97 6040 59 JD SJ2 -047 2403 


ITALIAN OMVaNMnfTMNO ONTO 

ITL300 nBN» - pit aMQO pa 
ttaffl 13230 U132 IX! 

JonTT 13140 13149 13153 „ 

S«p97 13133 13133 13130 + 845 

Est sates S2447. Pro*, sates 6&32S 
Prev-apen Int; 114391 OH 1492 
EURODOLLARS (CMQ) 

SlrnOkhMlUaflOODef. . . 

Feb 77 94*20 94420 94420 . m = si _. 

Mar 97 94390 943J8 91380 390616 tt® AflB -OC 1#T 

Apr 97 94320 94300 94318 — M 2373 £3. JS£ 

Jun97 94210 94178 W.790 -10 345,179 

AAarOO 9126S 91200 9321C 40 3L5S9 WteTlOpBlrt 1D435 Off 1193 • 

junoo 933 do 93.131 m.m -m ss / m , mirswraniBK o— i 

sa as ssa ss 


NO 97 

24.11 

2192 

3410 

+0.10 

44.144 

Mov 97 

24.49 

2433 

2448 

+0.1J 

17J97 

Jul 97 

TAM 

2465 

3484 

+0.12 

RS66 

Aub97 

34,98 

2483 

3497 

+OI4 

2,761 

Sep 97 

25.10 

2495 

25 JP 

+015 

1613 

Dd 97 



95.9? 

+007 

726 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Advanced 


UnOiansed 
TaM Issues 
NnxHteta 
New Laws 

AMEX 


Adimed 

DecBned 


III 27 fa 26fa 27 
Ifa Jiv u 3fa 


Total Issues 
Nawsfiphs 
New Lows 


1140 
M « 
760 
DU 
395 
31 


193 

759 

a 


1222 

1328 

798 

3W 

290 

18 


207 

736 

41 

12 


991 
17D Ufa 
20 23to 
l« Ufa 
660 3tt, 
m Ufa 
2 » Wt 

251 
2»6 
147 <fai 
195 _ Sfa 


Nasdaq 


Aifaancad 
OecOned 
Unchanged 
Tonal issues 
NewHtehs 
New Lows 

Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amex 

Nasdaq 

inmGGoas. 


1977 7067 

2070 1963 

146* 1677 

5734 5727 

77] 20 

50 54 


Todar 


PlHL 


68340 701.91 

2646 3S4B 

747.59 720.79 


Tfa tv, 

1754 I Tfa 
23 23 

Ufa Ufa 
Jto. w, 
Ufa u 
9H W4 
14fa U 14 
4 V. 5 TOh 5U6* 
fa fa 
3 3fa 


Dividends 

Campany Per Amt Rec Poy Company 


2487* 79'1/a 76 TOb Ufa 
K93 5Jto 51V,, S1V„ 
149 10% Ufa Ufa 

311 1M 1>/i, Ito* 
5 64 1 516 IK Ufa 
473 |W« Ifa l'4i* 

Ml 5V] 4>0u 4Qr« 
2M 9fa 9to 9>A 
334 1 Sfa I4fa ISfa 

985 35to 35 35fa 
142B 5 ifa ifa 

107 ut ito, ito 
1043 ISfa I5to I Sfa 
254 IV Ufa Ufa 
200 Ufa Ufa Ufa 
441 27fa 26 27 

307 ISfa I ito I5 Vi 
» Ufa Ufa lOfa 
200 35 3*to 34fa 
1S1 Bfa 8Vt B'A 
454 7to ta h 7% 
4*4 14% 14% 14% 

125 9to «V M 9fa 
2542 15 to Ufa 15 
277 38 27% 27% 

1597 3Vt 2fa 2fa 
ra Ufa 10 10 

1073 V u fa Vu 
1042 4Hi 
156 Ufa 
396 ISfa 
358 5to 
5162 Ufa 
332 17 


IRREGULAR 

HeoBtieore Rlty _ m 1.39 

Morgans ton _ .11 1-31 

STOCK SPLIT 
Atoerto Cuteer 2 tor 1 spur 
Am RRy Trust 2 tor 1 sum. 
CQmpiwrareCwp2twi 
Corporate Exp 3 tor 2 op Bi, 

INCREASED 


2-17 

2-14 


-h 



AJberroCotvAOB, 

O 

.10 

CA woter 

0 J275 

Callaway Golf 
Cenluiy Bncp A, 
CSyNtilanti 

O 

Q 

a 

.07 

.as 

.n 

Cknskr&ncstn 


.07 

Eastern Bncp 

0 

.16 

Pfizer Inc 

Q 

J4 

Santa Monica Bh 


.oe 

Security Cap WL 

O 

J0 

WDSMnpNmMutl 

O 

.25 

XeimCap 

0 

22 

INITIAL 


DmntyFInn 
GCR Ntitings 

- 

M 

jta 

REGULAR 

ARCO Cheat 

Q 

.70 


2-20 

2- 15 

3- 25 
2-18 
2-13 
2-17 

2- 19 

3- 13 
2-28 
2-28 
W6 

4- 1 


2-21 

2-25 


3-7 


AZPutaSKOdWa 
BEA Income 
BEA Stmt Inca 
Bowaterlnc 
BronfbrdSvas 
CFKBncp 
Enogen Carp 
Harrs SvgsBk 
IN Energy 
Loews Corp 
Pen Energy Corp 

Piper Jalfrry 

Progress Rnd 
Roanoke El 
Rock-Term 
Russel Con 
SmfstBncsnrs 
SuburPonPro 
5 undone Hotel 
Trenton S*gs 
United Water 
VeuaTedi 

WPLHakl 
Webster Fin 
YantefleNtl 
Zero Corp 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


- 150 

M m 

M JM7S 

a m 

0 jD2 

5 22 

Q JO 
0 .145 
Q -285 
0 25 

0 M 
Q J375 
Q J32 
O .12 
0 JJ75 
0 .13 
0 .135 
O 50 
O 25 

Q .0075 

Q 23 
0 ,10 
Q .4925 
O .18 
Q .12 
Q JOB 


2-3 3-1 

2-7 2-18 
2-7 MB 
3-10 4-1 

2-7 2-24 

1- 28 MO 

2- 14 3-3 

2*4 2-18 

2-14 3-1 

2-7 3-1 

5-14 3-15 
2-18 3-11 

1- 31 2-17 

2- 7 2-25 
2-3 2-14 
2-3 2-20 
2-1 2-15 

1- 31 Ml 
2-1 2-14 

2 12 3.7 

2- 14 3-1 

1- 31 M5 
1-31 2-15 
1-24 2-14 

2- 3 2-18 

2-7 3-4 


Ed. soles NA Wed’s, sole; 2U67 
Wed's open int 89.239 off 2171 

SOYBEANS ((ZOT) 

MOO tei minimum- dMm per OwM 
Mar 97 7A2 7J7 7.41 to *<LOM 75J56 

Mov 97 7Xn 7J7to 7M +0JR 33,941 

M<77 7M 7 J8 Vi TJO *0©fa 31.946 

Aun77 7J9 7JS 7J8fa 4J21 

Sep 77 7.11 7J» 7.18W *OQl Vi IJ47 

Esf.saies NA Wed’s. sales 56^99 
Wad's open M 162J78 off 312 

WHEAT (CBOT] 

54)00 Du minimum- <Ulam par budwl 
Mrr 97 3J9fa 3J4 3J5fa -OJBto 27 J37 

MOV 97 363 VS 157 35! -UOSto 952B 

5477 117 113 143to -0JBJ U.526 

Sep 77 uvfa 346 146to -OQ3fa 1538 

Bd. sties NA Wocrs-sties 13525 
Wed's open iTO 64523 up 447 

Livestock 
CATTLE (CM90 • 

<*W)00 Ik.- aasli per to. 

FeC 97 65.15 6475 6490 -047 25.73 

Ate-97 6435 6192 66.17 -023 TSMO 

Jun97 6175 63J2 6167 -008 Jl/m 

Aug 97 6187 6170 6375 —0.10 13,977 

OcJ 97 66L9B 6655 £667 -OI5 7JOS 

Dec 97 6870 6840 6847 -413 1115 

EsL sties NA Wed’s, sties 11295 
Wed's open Ini 99J3S up 853 

FEEDBI CATTLE (CMBD 
504)00 Bn.- cants Ptf to. 

Jan 97 to.17 6980 70.17 *035 1627 

Mcr 97 1935 6880 8930 *085 77U 

Apr 97 69^» 4490 69.45 *415 2718 

Moy97 7080 6950 6987 * 032 3804 

Aug 97 7M0 7267 7257 +03D 3J39 

Sep 97 73.10 7272 7110 *12S 689 

Ea. sties NA Wed-s-sotas 1373 
Wed's open (rt 21862 up 243 

HOGS-Ledfl ICMER) 

40800 lbs.- eern par to. „ 

Feb 97 7685 7545 7642 *187 101139 

Ate 97 7685 7540 7638 +M5 11,193 

Jun97 0085 7VJS EaB tOM 74ISJ 

8497 7835 77.15 7tm +0JS3 1545 

Aua 97 7450 7170 7450 * 070 14B* 

CW97 6780 6480 6755 *065 UTT 

Est. sties NA Wad’s. S088S 9J14 
w«rsopeni« 3W1 up 944 

PORK BELLES ECMER) 

NL000 lbs.- grntiprrfc. 

Feb 97 7E53 7540 7852 +100 3594 

IWorW TOAJ 7530 7B47 +380 1JW 

May 97 7970 7670 79J7 +257 1883 

8497 7980 7490 7930 +280 454 

Aug 97 7780 74W 7642 +140 426 

Esr. sates NA Weirs. sates li« 
WetTsaoenM 0824 up 384 


Food 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCNDO 
25.000 tot.- cants par to. 

-km 97 H280 111JD 11130 +085 3832 

Feb 97 10930 18040 10850 -030 2871 

Mor97 10830 10670 1B7J0 -030 34825 

Apr 97 10530 10430 HM58 -850 1833 

May 97 10430 103.10 10335 -050 &3U 

8in97 10280 I0Z80 SKL25 -065 763 

M*7 VBJO IOJJ0 I0DL9J -070 1971 

Aim 77 101.70 10070 9988 -075 575 

SOP 97 9980 9980 99.10 -ftflO 2568 

BLjtiw NA Wnfs. sties 4480 
Wed's apon int 54765 off 338 

SLVER (NCMX) 

5800 irpy at- cents per tg, oe. 

Jan 97 4718 4678 4853 +153 27 

fi*97 ■ . 4855 +153 4 

WOT 97 4B9J 4718 487J +153 62341 

MOV 97 ffiSB 4778 4923 +JS3 11,128 

4497 4985 tiff-5 4968 +154 8322 

Sep 97 5015 +155 1945 

Dec 97 5085 4768 ms +158 4540 

Jtei98 5113 +159 9 

Esr.sties NA Wed's. sates 14,144 

Wed’s open W 92807 off 416 

PLATNUU (NMER) 
SOtrovoT.-aoiknoeriroyoz. 

Jan 77 35500 35580 3S4J0 +180 47 

Ate 97 35750 36050 *070 19,977 

JW97 moo 341.70 31280 *BJV znt 

Od97 36580 36580 36500 +170 2310 

Jan 96 367.40 +030 1877 

Est sates NA Wed's, sties 2320 - ■ 
Wed's open hit 26330 off 157 

Cloa* Previous 

LONDON METALS <LME} 
DoOaraperniBWcton 
AkMtenn atigh Grade) 

Spat 1612V4 16135s 1S94U 15955S 

For- 163880 163980 162480 162580 

copper CHtMdos (HU 6rada7 
Spot 256480 256980 Z505W 251080 

For- 227B80 227980 225480 225580 


Dec 80 0870 938M 93820 —48 24571 
B4 sties NA Weifs. sties 343340 
Weifs open tot 23BJW off 5664 
BRUSH POUND fCMER) 

42500 pounda. f par poond 


Mor97 2475 SL15 MS -086 84817 

Ate 17 24.10 2345 ZU7 -0 87 39864 

Moy97 2358 2UB- 23J9 -0.11 2L41I 

■Jun97 2381 TUT 2272 -OLlI 324S7 

Jti97 2244 2235 2232 -0 l18 15390 


Mar 97 14368 14180 15270 -66 345S8 Aup97 22S . 1208 2156 -0.10 13455 

JUa97 14356 14160 14244 -66 2J93 SwW 21J2 2142 -8W 15899 

SOP 97 14280 14KB 14214 ’ 1827 CWW 2142 fl55 71X -8.10 KU90 

Dec 97 14184 -64- 7 NwW 21.38 1155 20J9 —0.10 7422 

E»L *d» NA WBfs. rate. 32.171. -.•••• .£J4 MJM- J0J7 -089 2582S 

Wed's open tot 37885 off 1640 Jan 98 2070 3070 20JD —087 11465 

CANADIAN DOLLAR taflER). . ‘ S3 -'O “f. JjS 

100800 d0B»&S par OtoLdh* ma Wtefs. 1S3S* 

8NT97 7500 7465 747D. -00 478BT . , 

Jun97 75« 73D7 7514 -39 mm ™ «38 

SW” JSJ, ^4 7554 -37 3456 NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

r P f y7 j_ ' 7 ^i\ ^ n 450 WOOOwtebto'S.lPterrenllto 

r?^ 5 - st *“„ W14 IS«) 27H 1775 -133 24877 

Wed's apeiHnr 53824 U> 70 Mor97 .240 2430 JJ30 —Ufa TSJsa 

G E R M AN MARK IOHBO 2^4 1^ 22B -» 15JM 

iE800marfca. soar mark -Jfory 2.J2 1M08 

Mar 97 4141 4B9S. 4122 *16:-tU37- iiS JSS z - ,Pa ■ “ ,7 ^2’ 

JUI97 4179 4136. JlSt *u, ~ A*97~~ Z130 1)00- -J 


Est sates NA Wad's, sties ayw 
Wad’s open tot 0,10 op; 6121. . 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 
lUmtetanw, sear Uo iron 
Altar 97 806478 8DB403 Jt53*14 ' —44 
Jtil 97 800570 888515 8DE526 .—45 
Sep97 808680 808441 JUMP -46 
Esr.sties NJL Wad’s. soles 15731 
WMsopentot 77J42 up 2» - 

SWISS ntANCiCMBt) 

IZU00 francs, s par banc 


74,916 

2865 

452 


2606 

%*£ - 17 7416 

Sep97. 2730 Z09D 2.100 —7 6400 

Oct 97 2.120 2.105 2J» ill W 

Nav97 2410 2800 22N +10 4407 

Dec 97 2428 Z3S0 2329 +18 YSo 

Esf.jate NA Werfs. sates 54,185 
wetfsomtor 1&4848 wsaa 

UMJEAOEO CASOUNE (NMER) 

•800 Oti. ceres parp ti 

4aiB .6842 +080 21877 

Mar 91 a A3 4680 MM —085 2L429 


M«r97 jm J0I7 7066 +45 4410 25 S’?? «» -*21 12869 

An 97 7172. 7090 7131 +46 2.136 VStt? £15 £■£ “HI 

«« SS IMS ™ -»-se 

WM'sopanM SZU9 up mi 

3-MOMTH STERLIN6 QJFFE) 

£SK1800-f^ J ' 


JU97 6670 <640 6688 —029 2490 

Esr.sties NA Wed-s-sotes aST 
Wnfs open int 72,927 up 647 

GASOIL UPS 


^ ’ISIS §41 =£2’^ UAdtiSmT^rmtirie 1*1- (us efiooio^ 


NIcM 

te 


70780 

71780 


70880 

71880 


nito 

71280 


725580 726080 716080 
73S580 725680 726780 


702to 

71316 


717000 

727080 


8H97 ___ 

dS& SS Si? rSi MS KSS?ro2S22 l “ tiWZMW 

mms 92 SI 9287 92B8~0M 3&B75 20Z25 30480 +580 1SW2 

9282 9279 "9240 —SS 2L4QD Apl 97 19B80 TWJ5 197.73 +580 a982 

92 75 9272 -9273 —003 Jryw* May 97 197.25 17180 19280 *350 1471 

SS 9284. — 083 1&093 J«n97 18850 18780 18880 ttS 7568 

Sei SS S3? — 084 &I21 Jul 97 18S80 18780 18750 +285 2576 

W57 SS S- “SS ATO97 18880 T86J5 18785 +ZM 15® 

SS ??.« —084 SMI Se*jt97I87J5T865DTB7nn to 


JDD9BI 

S#p9B 

DtcSO 


Tto 

Spat 

For- 


599580 600580 595580 
<04580 605000 601580 
Ztoc CSpwcial Hlgli Grade] . 
Sgaf 113280 113380 112616. 


596580 

602080 


Juo99 

Sap»l 

D6C99 


PteiLap— l o t: g jBZ 
M60NTH EUROMARK 0LIFFE1 


TO47 910 nZ-0M un ™ 

52J47 PT«r Tr*rr - 13,8 OU97 187JD 1B7J0 1BA75 +250 182T 

SfSo 3S , '*Sr 2 !£ 4 " - Is 


TruSS) 845018 * 25 +ajso “« 


112716 

115216 115380 114780 114880 


tHBnmb bKippnndraote onouiit per 
soartfADR; la Canodkn foal 

“Huao&tT; Q-totor lerlf; vseaO^Mswd 


COCOA (NCSE) 

10 metric tora- S par tan 


^ 26to Kte Ufa 
JIM Mfa Ufa 33fa 
11471 351* J3fa M 

Z34 ’% V U to* 

2fa Jto Sfa 

Ito l»u ir u 

ito IVj lhi, 

I Tfa Ufa 

Ifffa l»fa 
Ufa Ufa 
. Ufa Ufa 

no uv„ uv„ uv* 
K7 Ufa it irn, 

7014 IT** Tl"fa Ufa 
449 12fa Ufa Ufa 
109 ir/ u l/fa IT 1 fa, 
104 IS>- Kfa Ufau 
8801 v M to fa 

174 |?„ Ito Ifa 



Stock Tables Explained 

Sties Agues «e unondaL Yenriy Mghs and loan retted Itie prwtous 52 woehs plus me current 

week btfnutme totes toxfiriB doy. wmereaspararsm(*wterwamauniing»25peiterttemoro 
hos been paid, ffteyeorebigWownjn^ and dividend oieshoBmtw the new stocks arty. Urtess 
ofterfatenaleAiPlMtiavterateaBannutiasaufieiwenKBagdontuiBetfdecla u lipft 

a - dividend also CjOto ($)- b - oreuiti rate o7 dividend plus 5tod( tfifadend. c - Bquldoflng 
dividend, a - PE exceeds 998M^ - tafcd. d - new yearly low. dd • loss In the lost 12 months, 
e- dividend dedorad or ptid hi preceding 12 monlhs. f - annual rate. Increased on last 
deda ration, g- dividend In Canadian Ikmds, subject la 15% non -residence fax. I- dividend 
dedared offer spfff-«p orsfocA dividend ■ dhrfcfend paid thfa yeor. araOted. deferred, or no 
atifon taken at latest dividend trading, k - dividend dedared or paid this year, an 
cuzumuiatnre issue with dividends in arrears, a -annual rale, reduced on last dedarotHm. 
n • new Issue in itie post S3 necks. The high- low range begins wltti the stort of trading, 
nd - nod doy deffuery. p . Initial dividend, annual rate unknown. P/E - price-earnings ratio, 
q- dosed -end mutual fund, r- dividend deciaredar paid M preceding 12 monttcb pfc« stock 
dividend, s - stock spm. OMdend begins with date of split, sis- sties, t • dividend paid to 
skxf! In preceding months, estimated cash value on ex-dhridendorex^EsIributkin date, 
u-newyedrfy v -mifing honed, w- In b«n km ptcywreCEivwshlpw being reorganised 

irnderffie BaaknptcrAd. ors«i;ifi>« wswned by sueftewnpartes. wd ■ when distributed, 
wi - when tesued/ 1 ww - with warrants. X - ev-dMdend or e* -rights, (At - ra -distribution, 
xw ■ without wo nanls. y- w -dividend and idles in lull, yld - yieli x - sales in luff. 


Mra 97 

1298 

1259 

1360 

—30 

20,93* 

May 97 

1321 

1295 

1295 

—16 

21,938 

Jul 97 

1351 

1324 

1325 

-25 


Ses 97 

1377 

1349 

1350 

-30 

*7» 

Dec 97 



1460 

—18 

407 


Estates NA Wed’s. sates IMS* 
Wedsnpenirt 91853 up 3602 

COflFEECCNCSE) 

J7J00 Ibv- certs per to. _ 

Mar 97 14280 I37J0 MOSS *475 235TC 

Mov 97 13650 13240 13585 +430 9.168 

Jul 97 13488 1S5D 131.75 +136 4887 

Sen 97 129 80 1Z5J2S 127.70 +245 Uffl 

Est. sties NA wed's, sates 1644$ 
WW’SOPWW 41536 up 300 

SUOAR-WORLOIl (NCSE] 
IIUUOhto-eMHIMrfa. . 

Mar 97 -1831 10.13 10.15 -8.02 90462 

Mov 97 1048 1174 1025 —087 34X19 

Jti 97 1088 BUS 1086 -803 26432 

Oct 97 1842 1830 1832 -08J 16889 

EsLsties NA WWs.5tia 32507 ■ 

Whfs open tot 156506 up V* 

MANSE JUKEtKTHI 

lLOOIIR».-cttV«nra> 

Mor 97 87 J5 8285 03.10 -J8S 38.798 


Rnandal 

U5T.B8J5(CMBU 
Si m— n-ptati WOnct. 

Mar 97 94.93 96.91 9LH M99 

Jlin97 94J5 9474 9475 —KB U31 

Sep 97 9454 9453 WLS4 —084 48 

Est. sates NA Wad'S.stiu «4 
Wed's open M 8418 up isj 

SYR. TREASURY (CBOT] 

*100808 PriO- PB 8.3MI 6f HO pti 
Mar 97 106-085 18640 106425 - 05 170414 
Junl7 W5-31 UI5-M 185-255- 055 1667 

Sap 97 IK-1* - OSS 

EsL sties 60500 WtoT*.asJs3 27460 
W£cfs spank* >77,101 off 1427 

WYTL TREASURY (CBOT? 
timooo prim p<* 8 3bvteaM00 net 
Mte77 108-17 108-05 10849 - 06 322JI7 
4*197107-30 187-10 1W-23 — 06- U819 
Sep 97 W747 - 06 663 

EST. 50k* MUM Msf&sota -7M93 
Wfetfs open tot XPJB9 up m 

US TREASURY BONDS {CBOT} 
u pcMlDMOO-at* A Steidf at 108 ptil 
Mar 77.111-07 >I»-® 116-27 - 06 48,775 
JM97IHL23 IKWB DM7 - 06 2720* 
Sep 97 J 10-06 109*24 109-30 - 86 5413 

Dec 97 109-16 — Of 3853 

Est. sties 300800 WW*. rates 33B801 
Wed ’sawn tat 506J13 off 9Z1S 

LONBttLTBJHa 

* SSSPffllSPWig - wo imsn 

JunP7 110-25 110-25 110-25 -W0 452 

Est sties HJ<2- Pror. rate* 

Prwv. epflnWJ 170983 up Bt 

German covnuuuurr bund ojppb 

DM250800 -Btl of 168ga 
Mro97 10176 181 JB W140 Until 22^190 
Jun97 10077 MBA* 18070 UetiL 6450 
Est totes: 174490 Pm.mex 220308 • 

Pm. open Int: 220740 Ofl *365 
18*YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS {MATtF} 

ewursssu.1 002122,279 
Jim 97 12982 12980 12942 +O80 14879 
Sep 77 12740 12740 127J2 +080 7*7 

Esl vrtome: 15*124. Open Wj 137, 145 up 
2,125. 


9091 -881 3824 Est satefi 1*W0 . 0MnklLti*675aff22? 
96*4 9SSi 9691 — O02 217J23 BRENT Oil (IBei 
9693 9693 9691.— 881 1466 „ IL0PE 7 

96» 7691 96.71 — omuL«4 Hf - 2? tani PwOarrel - Itis of 1800 barrels 
MU HJ8 .9680 -082 150665 Mar77 22.90 2240 2242 JnZtTTSi 

«4S «58 K42 — 88M5U36 Apr 97 2240 21M mVS S7?sI 

9647 9*4) 9SS-amimSn tErh 2us 2 ^ 

9625 96.17 9621 -am BS911 Jua^97 jlS 2IJ4 S-S 1515? 

«9B »91 9595 -081 75.131 jran 21 jj 21J« — ttOT 17871 

9548 9540 9545 —082 £Ubb l,J.cn 30.79—088 11475 

9541 9526 9520 - 881 4U» 23gr SS — <U>7 1929 

95.13 9389 «I3 -081 KJ74 SOW —007 5.344 

9429 9483 . 9487 .-081 16404 gH.” 2087 2087 1987 — 887 

?«3 ?<» ?«1 -08} MCS NX N.T. 1J^ B -087 Z&47 

466 Dbc97 19J2 1946 1?8S -087 3876 

» 35800 . Open inL; 153882 lip 


F9B97 

MK97 

Apr97 

Jun97 

S*p97 

Deal 

M«n 

jtmM 

SepM 

□K98 


Jan99 

S^9 
MtitB 
JimDO * 

sran 

DeoOO 


9435 9435 9436 -881 
n.t. tlx p4.il —am 
N.T. NT. 9181 UhdL 
NT. NT. 9164 -1101 
Est sties: 179454 Pw.sde* 2SU62 
Pie*, open Wj LIST. 759 off 16499 

MMOMTH PI BOR (MAT! PI 
FFSHlSen- ' 


Stock Indaxen * 

UPtAMP.ndcxccMte) ■? 

M0f"97 96J%~ 96JS "96J6— OJf) 77 , WJ JBar^TWJB- ~79i0) - mill mantni iwte 

Jon 97 9681 96JB 96^9-082 4&903 Jlh.77 VOX 7MJ0 WJB jBjb'W 

Sep 97 96JB 9675 96.75-083 34J42 Sep 97 BUM) J978C toil® KS 

Dec 98 7582 9586 9588 -084 10473 me lea niece 

Mar 99 9583 9540 9540— 086 TZ30S 

£S -an5 ““ 42788 44ie 

SH8 S555 «I?-085 2453 jubot nt tSf !^g 


D« 97 7485 9483 W83-085 MIT *pw NT ' NT £gJ5 l SJ 
eNvatamc 62.2B. Open tat: 260512 up 2w.6tiBs 14308 ^ 

>474. . . i-rev.o Honmt : 6M87 oft 94 

3-MONTH EOKOURA (UFFO ... , 

nui oMM-ptetinaea Cacobcmattf) ; 

Ma97 9340 9129 9129 — 0.11 94241 PROOper Index poW 1 ' 

s? s as.®=!s gs 
aa as as as-ss ass 

SeP « 24608 aSMwISJK SB 
j^Est. voluaie: 17423. Open lnt:44,M7 lip 


EsL sates 5&M8. Pro*. 
Pros open tob 254848 


rilw 5 


Industrials 

COTTON! 0ICTIQ 
SDAaa&,cteitsnarttL 
Mar 97 T5.U- 3485 746S +835 ntm 

May 97 7428 7588 7688 *031 174X1 

Jul 77- 7738 7645 . 77.10 +U5 74W , 

■ Od77 7735 7430 77.15 +U5- 189 

CtecS7 7722 7648 J7J2 1 032 10466 u ^ 

■ MV M- 78.10. -7788 '7885 »D3I » 

E5L Sties NA- Wee's, rate* 16816- r* Reuten 

WerfSaaenint 62470 off 1808 


Commodity (ndsTras 

Close 

L45IJ0 

CU.finww .... “S’* 1,73380 

« ■ ■ SB- '-388 


SI 


PAGE 15 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2-L 1997 


»ses 


Mercedes Loi 

Daimler Will Reintegrate Carmaker to Try to Cut Costs 


f 

STUTTGART JJaunlw Rmi t— . * » . num 

' AG said Thursday its eioht-v^t^ said. Daimler did not say how much 

.penmen! as a holding comn*nv j - ,s *1 to secure the restructuring would save, but it 

' widespread interests had and improve. Daimler-Benz’s com- said h could cut central adminis- 

"Ibat it was reintegrating its imematiooal native costs by 30 percent 

unit. Mercedes-BlSTJ ^ Iteparentin^uywiU take over 

.the parent company ‘ * w it» move came as no surprise Mercedes* main divisions and in- 
Tbe company’s aemCTw«» J^theresigration last week of the crease Mercedes’ presence on the 
! Daimler-Be^AeiT^^?Ar; jormer(*ief executive of Mercedes. Daimler management board. The 
-fiftancud^n/k^ Helraut w emer, who said he saw no new organization calls for five di- 

$*&* 23 <fep “- down 

traditional strong noint ° C1 !? M 5 1 : lt5 While many f^>d managers and Daimler’s shares rose after the 
‘ trucks, buses and lurSv -J?™ 18 analysts lamented the loss of Mr, news was announced. They closed 
" The new sSSSL „*-«v • ]? en,er ’ ***° *» considered one of at 116.05 Deutsche marks ($70.70). 

•’ rv; — l. ■ wUClUre. WhlCfl German V S best roanaraftTS. rHp im 110 rm tlv» PranW>rr+ MpItanaA 


The new woo consioerea one of at 116.05 Deutsche marks ($70.70). 

Daimler said mana 8Cts, the up 1.10 on the Frankfurt exchange. 

-Streamline managemenr St The stock has risen steadily in the 

^ bera weD received. past s« months from a low if 77 J8 

As part of the restructuring, the 
Mercedes division will be repres- 
ented by three executives on 
Daimler’s management board, ex- 
panding the board to 10 members 


effect April I. It was approved 

„ This way we ensure that do- 
.cisions will be made quickly and 


nv.uj ucuiauic luoiu upru.ruj, 

the up 1.10 on the Frankfurt exchange, 
i stock has risen steadily in the 
past six months from a low of 77 J8 
DM in July. Analysts, however, at- 
tributed the gain more to the strong 
dollar and a positive outlook for 
automakers’ shares than to the re- 
structuring. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Prosecutors Suggest Fiat Sentence 


ft 

Reuters 

TURIN — Prosecutors asked an 
Italian court Thursday to jail the 
JAamnan of Fiat SpA, Cesare Ro- 
' “dti. for one year and eight months 
,;on accounting fraud charges, die 
' news agency ANSA repotted. 

! It said prosecutors also had sc 
an eight-month prison for Mr. ko- 
_ mid’s co-defendant, Francesco Paolo 
'Mattioli, the company’s finance dj- 
’• rector. The two executives are ac- 
cused of diverting more than 30 bti- 
-hon lire ($18.8 million) into overseas 
accounts in transactions dating from 


die 1980s. Prosecutors allege that the 
funds, set up by five companies in the 
Hat group, were used to make pay- 
ments to political parties, politicians 
and Fiat managers abroad. The ac- 
cusations cover the period 1980- 
1992, before Mr. Romiti became the 
company’s c hairman. 

The trial is being held behind 
dosed doors as part of a procedure 
under which defendants would re- 
ceive reduced sentences if convicted. 
The procedure, which can result in 
any jail sentence being suspended, 
does not require defendants to plead 


guilty or not guilty. ANSA said pros- 
ecutors had made their sentencing 
recommendations during closing ar- 
guments at the bearing in Turin, 
where Hat has its headquarters. 

Mr. Romiti is also charged with 
one count of tax fraud. 

Mr. Romiti has been under in- 
vestigation since February 1996, 
when he tookover as chairman from 
Giovanni Agnelli, who stepped 
down, after more than 30 years of 
running the automaker. He has con- 
sistently denied any knowledge of 
the alleged slush funds. 


EUROPE 


Britain’s Ford Workers 
To Hold a Strike Vote 


CWryVird Hr Out Sn^Tnmn fiiwvii bn 

LONDON — Autoworker, will 
vote on whether to strike against 
Ford Motor Co. as soon as possible 
unless the U.S. company reverses 
its decision to eliminate 1 300 jobs, 
a union official said Thursday. 

“This is the most serious dis- 
pute we have seen in our industry 
for two decades,” a Transport ana 
General Workers Union national 
officer, Tony Woodley, said. 

. “We ore in dispute unless and 
until they reverse their disgraceful 
decision to close Halewood.*' 

Ford. Britain's biggest auto- 
maker. said last week it planned to 
eliminate one-third of the jobs at 
its Halewood plant in northwest- 
ern England, raising fears for jobs 
at the 20 Ford plants in Britain. In 
closed-door talks Thursday, uni- 
on leaders failed to persuade Ford 
managers to reinstate the jobs. 

The Halewood factory, near 
Liverpool, makes Escorts and 
transmission gearboxes, and Ford 
now expects to concentrate pro- 
duction of the next Escort model 
in Germany or Spain. 

The plant closed for the day as 
workers left to attend a rally in 
London where Ford workers from 
across the country cheered and 
waved banners in support of in- 
dustrial action. Strikes, once a 
regular feature of the British land- 
scape, have been cut drastically 
by nearly rwo decades of Con- 
servative Parry governments. 

Mr. Woodley said the unions 
would act as quickly as possible on 
the ballot but said die voting pro- 


cess might take five or six weeks. 

Meetings of Ford workers this 
week showed overwhelming sup- 
port for the unjon's opposition to 
the company's plans, he said 
With Halewood \s future now in 
doubt. Ford has asked for British 
government help to maintain pro- 
duction there after 2000. Unions 
say the issue may threaten the jobs 
of 1 0.000 other workers. They say 
Halewood faces closure, even 
though Ford has raised the pros- 
pect of building a new car there. 

“The attack on Halewood is 
viewed as an attack on all Ford 
workers in Britain.” Mr. Wood- 
ley said. “There is no justification 
whatever for what the company's 
trying to do. We have a plant that 
is" very productive, very efficient, 
that is producing cars' in a cost- 
effective manner.” 

For the government, the strike 
is potentially damaging because 
the job-cut plans show the risks 
that British workers face in what 
the government lauds as Europe's 
most “flexible” labor market. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg. AP) 

■ Isuzu Heads to Poland 

Isuzu Motors Ltd. said it would 
invest 380 million Deutsche marks 
(S2313 million), to build a diesel- 
engine plant in Poland, the largest 
investment there so far by a Jap- 
anese company. Agence France- 
Presse repented from Tokyo. 

Isuzu said it planned to set up a 
subsidiary in Tychy. in southern 
Poland, in March to build and op- 
erate the factory. 


Share- Sale Plans Lift Top Russian Phone Firm’s Stock 


Bloomberg News 

MOSCOW — Shares in RAO 
ilecom. Russia’s dominant tele- 
company, jumped Thursday 
.'.after the government said it would 
almost double the size of its planned 
/Sale of shares in Rostelecom 's parent 
company. 

_ Rostelecom shares rose 5 percent, 
[to close at the equivalent of $3.18; 
after the government said it would 
! .sell 24 percent of RAO Svyazinvest, . 
a telecommunications holding com- 
pany, to domestic investors, in ad- 


dition to the 25. percent offered to 
foreign investors two weeks ago. 
Svyazinvest holds a controlling in- 
terest in Rostelecom. 

“Rostelecom has reassured in- 
vestors that any integration into 
Svyazinvest win not materially af- 
fect the company andits goals,” said 
Ifeny Qfin, a stock trader at Troika 
Dialog in Moscow. In addition, he 
said, “the privatization process of 
Svyazinvest is now 

The - government estimates 
Svyazinvest ’« market value at $4.8 


billion to $6 billion, giving a 25 per- 
cent stake a value of $1.2 billion to 
$1.5 USion. Rostelecom’s market 
capitalization rose to more than $22 
billion after the stock’s latest gain, 
giving Svyazinvest’s 38 percent 
. stake a value of about $836 million. 

“Strip out Rostelecom, and that 
leaves you with $3.5 billion for the 
rest of the Russian telecom sector 


privatization process of owned by Svyazinvest,’ ' said Al- mg voting power ii 
t is now clarified, ” exander Kazbegi, a Russian-rele- companies, analysts 

zovemment wafmateg c ommunic ations analyst at Salomon holding company s 


c ommunic ations analyst at Salomon 
Brothers International in London. 


“That’s a reasonable price to pay 
for being involved in such a large 
country as Russia.” 

Svyazinvest holds controlling 
stakes in most of Russia’s regional 
phone companies as well as in 
Rostelecom, the dominant long-dis- 
tance and international company. 

While there is still concern over 
how Svyazinvest will use its remain- 
ing voting power in Russian phone 
said shares in the 
holding company should prove at- 
tractive when they are offered later 


| Investor’s Europe 

■n 

Frankfurt 

London 

Paris 


DAX 

FTSE 100 index CAC40 


3 2S& 

i3ffl 

23G 


SBC 


2395 

j 

293u 

J 41 ” 

V m 

At 


¥ «3 > 

lAT 2175 vj 



3560^/* 

* 


r 

^“ ; A SON 

D J 3755 A S O 

7«r V¥ 

N D J "'ASONDJ 

1996 

1997 1996 

1997 1996 

1997 

Exchan^ 

Index 

Thursday Prev, 
Close Close 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

EOE 

6B5.02 68120 

+0.55 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

2£7S.D6 2,047.67 

+1.34 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3,033.46 3.028.67 

+0.16 

Copenhagen 

Stock Market 

50604 503.41 

+032 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

2,785.95 2,724.76 

+Z25 

Oslo 

CSX 

578.49 572.71 

+1.01 

London 

FTSE 100 

4^71^0 4^19.10 

+1.24 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

47835 475.8T 

+0.11 

Milan 

MIBTEL 

12,653.00 12.431.00 +1.79 j 

Paris 

CAC 40 

2,461-25 2.442.46 

+0.77 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

2,726.90 2,687.55 

+1.46 

Vienna 

ATX 

1,18866 1,180.30 

+0.56 

Zurich 

SPI 

2,660.09 2.638.67 

+0.81 

Source: Teiekurs 


liivnvjh.,tu! hcrol.? Tnnuac 


Very briefly: 


this year. The upper end of the gov- 
ernment' s price estimate for Svyazin- 
vest indicates a price of S600 for each 
access line, according to Tom Ad- 
shead, a Russ ian-relecomm unica- 
tions analyst at Credit Suisse Fust 
Boston. That would be 50 percent 
above the average for Russian tele- 
communications companies, be said. 
The sale of 25 percent of Svyazinvest 
has been on hold since an agreement 
between Ster SpA of Italy and Rus- 
sia's State Property Committee col- 
lapsed in December 1995. 


• A group led by Mannesmann AG said it may raise its stake in 
its Arcor joint telecommunications venture with Deutsche 
Bahn AG. Germany's state -control led railway company, to 
74.9 percent in 1 999 from its cuneni 49.8 percent. AT&T Corp. 
and the Unisource venture of four European phone companies 
will each have about a 15 percent stake in the group led by 
Mannesmann. Deutsche Bank AG has a 10 percent stake. 

• France's consumer spending fell 0.8 percent in December 
from November, leading to a drop of 3.4 percent in the fourth 
quarter from the ihird quarter as a government incentive to buy 
new cans expired Sept. 30. Still, household spending rose 3.1 
percent in 19% from 1995. 

• Bic S A, a French maker of pens and lighters, is buying Tipp- 
Ex Holding GmbH, the German maker of the biggest Euro- 
pean brand of correction fluid, from Carls-Stiftung. a Ger- 
man charitable foundation. The company would not disclose 
terms. Bic bought the biggest U.S. maker of correction fluid. 
Wite-Out Products Inc., in 1992. 

• Philips Electronics NV plans to cut its stake in ASM 
Lithography Holding NV, which makes semiconductor equip- 
ment, to 23.9 percent from 35.4 percent- Philips said the sale 
was expected to raise 438 million guilders (S2375 million). 

• Allied Domecq PLC will sell its Exchange Bar restaurant 
chain, which has 24 outlets, to MorJand~ PLC. a British 
brewer and pub operator, for £32 million (S52.3 million). 

• Banco Bilbao Vizcaya's consolidated net profit rose 24 
percent last year, io 104.26 billion pesetas (5759.5 million) 
last year. The banking company raised its gross annual 
dividend to 230 pesetas a share from 1 98 pesetas a share. 

• France will order 48 Rafale fighter planes from Dassault 

Aviation. Press reports said Dassault had offered a 10 percent 
discount from the asking price of 300 million francs ($54.2 
million! for each plane. That would bring the value of the 
transaction to $234 billion. afp. Bloomberg 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


GF5A 


„ Thursday Jan. 23 . . 

PrJa» in tocol cumtnetas. 

Telebun - 

High Uw CM* R». 

Amsterdam :«■*{«}■ 

va 
m 
itsa 
253 
TWO 
3120 
.100 
34SLSD 
17M0 
•BUB 


Wall La* CM* PrmL ubwtyHdgs 
t kh uawl Oft Mar fiAO^ffitT^ybertyUfc- - 

BMW „ •. TOW 1070 1075 ' 1077 

Ctenraenfare* 43*5 -4X90 4143 mss 

Daimler Benz 11t05 U4JS 116X5 TH9S SjKLriiia, 

DtgoMQ 719 t99 70940 ■ 742 Kg™?? 6 * 

DwtadttBank BUS 83X2 8333 83X2 9275EEL. 

DcatTlMsa 3L» 3047 3M2 31.11 . 

DresdIKrBa* T 5*30 54.05 5*20 5448 

- 322 322 321 322 SHlonoor 


HI* 

Lam 

dan 

PlW. 


MBh 

Law 

OoM 

PlW. 

Wgh Uw dose 

PlW. 


High 

LOW 

Close 


105 

105 

110 

UnBevor 

1X78 

1X54 

1X76 

1353 

Saga PWroA 

129 

126 

120 

124* 

Adas Copco AF 

172 167* 

170 


358 

a* 

368 


5.16 

410 

510 

517 

St&sma 

135 

134* 

135 

135 

A vesta F 

74* 

72* 




320 

320 

DM Nows 

727 

7X9 

7.15 

7X2 

TransooHKi Off 

440 

425 

440 

435 

Electrolux BF 

441 

42V 

4J3 

11X75 

■ 117 

11BJ0' 

117 

UMUflWes 

484 

470 

670 

483 

Storebrand A90 

3430 

3520 

35* 

35 

Ericsson BF 

250* 

245 

249 

106* 

105 706JD 10475 


428 

4W 

495 

495 






Hermes BF 

1041 



1105 

17.90 

18 

18 


Z7B 

171 

173 

276 






IrrcertWeAF 

512 

*2 

512 

69 JQ 

6175 

68J5 

69 

Whfflnad 

IM 

783 

7X6 

7X5 






UwestarBF 

329 


4X50 

42 


43 

WBfiamHdgt 

335 

327 

3L34 

328 




Kinnevik BF 

214* 

208 

210 

£7 


fflQl 

65-50 


AM 

475 

480 

477 




M 0 O 0 BF 

20B 



57 

56 

57 

56* 

WPP Croup 

1* 

143 

ZA5 

X4B 






PnormAJpkolui 

277* 

267 


13475 123* 123L25 

12475 


1727 

1475 

1721 

1473 


491 

654 

69 1 

455 

Sandvlk 6P 

188 

IB3* 

187 

5050 

49 J5 

50 

5025 






A6F 

16670 16470 

166 

166 

SCABF 

144* 

142* 



ABH-AMRO 

Aegon 
,AMd 
■Atzo Nobel 
'.final Co. 
JBoiiWeMcva 
jCSMcw • 
Ttfjontsche Pet 

ffiiM 

EHH 
Forth Amo* 
GHlDrtCS 
G-Brocna 

.Itoogworacw 
■HnmoouabH 
-4NG Group 
JCLM 

SEP* 

Oce&Men 

-Pomps fitac 


. iHdg 
Rabeoa 
Rodamco 
RoSiks 
RmcMD 
JloydDutti 
•Untewrcw 
yawxMi 
Vnu 

HMnsJCJcw 


WJ0 12030 J 27.10 
120 11050 TJ840 
11540 nUD 11*80 
29L7D 2070 251TB 
- BO 7B40 7180 
3*40 33 3*30 

T0T4B 9940 10133 
34120 33V JO 34170 
183 179 1B2 

3140 M.W 2420 
6&B0 S7J90 £830 
5170 52 0 

6020 57 JO 5940 
14740 14S40 W 
399 291* 299 

7*80 7140 M40 
12840 12040 177A 
7140 70JB 71* 
51.70 4940 51* 
4140 41* 4150 
6640 6*80 £890 
S/J0 5*40 56* 
27640 27140 27*70 
21240 209* 21140 
7140 71* 7*40 
83 8140 8200 
134 130.10 13180 
15350' 151* 15170 
55* 5*50 5*90 
16040 IMS 140.10 
10840 108 m 

32170 31970 322* 
30*50' 30150 306* 
B190 82* 8340 
38.90 36* 3840 
22740 271-80 22640 


250 - 240 '240.18 249 

m* 11040 ni.i5 110.10 

132 131 132 132* 

8540 8340 84 85* 


»(C . 

Tiger Ooh 


FnnenlMMed 15040 149* 15025 150* SS 
RM-Krapp.. 

HeMfegZntf 
HmM pfd 
HocWW 

ll«i ■ i 'Imp 

rvO cC I IlT • 

Knratodt 
Unto 
LufltaMO 
MAH 


56 5550 56 

m w 184 

66 55 65 


5£ 

in 

£7 


ax, «* -£B 2 o as Kuala Lumpur cw iw j MHSg 


5150 

5780 

146* 

29540 


Gaming 


740 
71* 
49 JO 
41 
65* 
57* 
373 

7 & 

81 JO 


6944 6940 £945 70* 

492 484 492 4W 

1067 1061 1067 1055 
2135 2103 2125 2140 
411* 49540 41140 410 

657 £44 648 £43 

LX 33* 3127 3145 

UmdiRnaCkR- 3770 3720 JPK 3725 

PMUMOB 38140 378 38140 30940 

Me 68* - 6745 fit* 67* £ 

SAP pH 234 230 . Z33 23340 

SdsBfoS 134* W3 134* 132* " - ■ 

S 2W0 WTO 79* 7892 London 

r « vr| 

VEW __483 476 _« 4K AteyNaM 


P nwlew e 123249 

17* 17.10 1740 17.10 
2775 2675 2740 2675 


475 

455 

655 

VJO 

y* 

9* 

446 

440 

448 

1310 

1230 

1310 

975 

955 

9* 

30* 

2X40 

Ttian 

>310 

2310 

ss 

1310 

23 


FT-SE 11*427140 
PmtaB4219.il 


15 
5*70 
166 
10840 
322 
302* 
83 
37.10 
22150 


Helsinki 


fU'WM S&SSS 
— B 

HEX6taKmWBC08Mf ^? CB ' 

Bodays 


Pmtac:27M7£ 


Bangkok 

<Adf MoSvc 

'aongtokBt F 

Kioto Thai Bk 
PTT EWlor _ 
Sbtm CemeiK F 
Horn Com BK F 
.TeleconKoto 
TMAOwm 
'IB olFamBkF 

UW Ceram 


256 

m 

55 

412 

929 

204 

5*50 

43 

184 

T93 


5 ETtaec 849.g 

Pntta*8S8J97 

250 M0 M4 

2W 2* 276 

52 S240 5*50 

396 410 392 

896 90 0 

197 JS 

52 5248 

40* 4040 

180 184 

io5 in 


Otari 
ERMA 
HtMamaUI 
tonSn - 
Kuka 
MertkiA 
Motor B 
Mtaa-SartaB 
Neste 
NakfclA 


916 

H 

40 

179 

191 


ft Due to problems at the 
-’Source, Bombay stock prices 
Vwere not available for this 
:pdition.We regret the incoD- 
Ivenienoe. 


776 745 774 7.73 

4* 4.13 4* 4.14 

633 615 625 614 

641 625 635 6* 

127 123 124 126 

485 *80 4JS *83 

U0 5.13 5.16 5.15 

1US0 1043 1142 11* 
BjM B4B BL67 B66 
487 4* £J1 4.99 

MB 3.19 326 325 

AM 19» 4.33 198 

9*2 933 939 933 

648 6*2 646 641 

335 Ml 343 384 

1289 12* 1286 1285 
586 MB 5* 5* 

2.3B SJ6 226 227 

528 5.15 5.18 5* 

7* 737 737 7* 

582 677 681 5J6 

144 140 143 140 

435 *21 4* 421 

247 249 245 240 

BramACaitrel l®,« 1022 1033 10* 

141 144 146 141 

*94 484 4* *87 

4* *88 *92 4* 

582 4* *92 *97 

18* in* 1035 1045 CoraalUrtoa 787 6» 7* 7 

3610 36* 3580 CnmpaJsGp 672 6CT 6J2 658 

i 2 n* itm n* cuoiCSus xu mo im a* 

7iS 74* 7*75 75 Wot 5J» 427 4* 587 

nM ao? 2240 2240 SecWcOT««nl»<g .Ag 

'U'V 'is ^8 w 7 * ^ ^ 

^ ^ as ffi « a 

000 ^- bk ss Si. II IS a a 


Madrid 

Acerfmx 

ACESA 

Agora BoicriM 

AnKnfuto 

B BV 

Bonaflo 

BanUntar 

BcoCwtro Ktsp 

BooBdoIor 

8oo Popular 

Qco Santander 

CEPSA 

OxHIneaM 

CorpMapfre 

feoa 
G as Natural 

Iberdrola 

pit™ 

Room 

SMtamBoc 
rotoajWTi 
TeMmdai 
Union Ferana 
VaJeocCemenf 


ran tadec 47635 
Prwtas 47581 


17490 

1900 

6030 

SMI 

7970 

1175 

19630 

3*5 

2790 

2J3M 

8470 

475i 

7650 

8700 

10130 

1388 

32800 

1695 

2705 

5*0 

1405 

6280 

3400 

12 * 

14* 


17350 

1825 

5910 

5770 

7B30 

11* 

19300 

33* 

2720 

36B00 

8380 

*10 

2610 

8410 

9960 

1325 

321* 

1665 

26* 

*00 

1380 

4160 

3355 

1220 

7420 


17370 17540 
1875 1835 
5710 5960 

5810 5800 
7910 7880 
1160 1170 
195* 1*520 
3400 3390 
27* 2730 

36960 27460 
8450 B46Q 
4620 46* 

2625 2 65$ 
8560 8600 

10000 10050 
1345 1350 

32200 32800 
1675 1675 
2455 2645 

5>M» 5K0 

1380 1*0 

sm 6200 
3380 3370 

1235 12* 

1445 7445 


355 247 35S 350 

■mm 38* 3850 3BX BAT Bid 
219 216 219 21650 BwHSateind 

5670 55 55JS 55 gfeCWf 

4620 6650 67 6820 BOCGraup 

16* . 161- 16* 16 , 

280 288 280 280 BPBknd 

3650 36® 36* 3650 MASK 1 
122 11650 119* gJAtaav* 

332 320.10 33650 315 B*G« 

Orton-YMynae 183* I* 182* TO WfeSSS, 

bst 

10680 96* 100 * 99 MTehconi 

MM .84 82 tO» BOM 

.. — - — — ■ Barton Gp 

Hong Kong «BggSSS S&SSr 


Manila 

A|M>8 
Mta Land 
BkPtlNpt* 
COP Horae* 
McanaElecA 
Metro Bonk 
Priron 
pa Bank 


SMPrtMKdg 


SUB 

31* 

175 

USB 

132 

£98 

IttJS 

3* 

1380 

106 

7* 


pserac 

Pratan 327683 

28JD 28* 2BJD 
31 31* 31 

170 174 170 

1425 14* 14* 
126 129 125 

670 680 675 

9* 10* W0 
3* 3« 3* 

1565 1570 1555 

104 105 104 

7 * 7* 7* 


Bk&tfMfc 

To Our Readers 


China Ugm 


Mexico 

AHaA 

BanoaJB 

OimaCPO 

□trac 

Emp**odwnc 

GpoCBmAl 

Gm FBi inramn 

KbnbCkxkMK 

TetawbaQPO 

TeMexL 


42* 

17* 

30XB 

11.18 

42.10 
49 J8 

29.10 
17100 
108* 

1*98 


Brussels 



asst 

fSsa 

.tics 

; untei UHae 


^SSESSS. 

13Q00 12100 12950 121* 

TOT « f« 

svs 1 ! 

2050 3250 2050 2M0 

M 5- 

« a a ’1 

■ S OT 7W0 79® 

2112 Sot 

5740 5650 5720 568® 

2315 2250 Z3U5 2318 
1625 1595 1*8 Igg 

iSSO 4465 4535 4500 
iw A 12309 II800 
MD 11400 HUD 11« 
11500 11W} ’S 
4845 4310 4^ 

7108 7010 2® JSS 
2SW as 2580 25* 
3OTK na5 23380 Z2650 

-BB W ia ag 

98000 94700 77W0 «« 
2265 2375 2285 


GtatlSo ^ 3*90 3670 ^ d^ia, 

GwmgdjmliW M, aSnaSsGp 

HSs *s ™ ™ *s «■ 

-TSM n.75 71S 7|25 ^ 

hkSwI 12* 1180 1120 12J5 HSBt 

'Si 12 3 sfflsf® 

^11 ] § SSF 


*24 451 4JU 450 
Z85 279 Z80 284 

577 - 573 S7A 576 
MS ASS *45 4^0 

6S 623 626 635 

OSS 0-92 082 tt.93 

165 540 5ZT 583 

1474 U25 U34 U» 
7* 7J2 7* 7* 

US US UZ Ui 
668 662 668 661 
2* Z33 135 2* 

■ - — - -Id J 7C ice 473 4/3 I |-|- 7-W 7-80 7«W 7J| 

is s is is 

at- H it b ” 

B 5 s «i 4 »g 

!» *1 a m & gr ' 

“ “ va a ?sss 


Milan 


AHeonzn Aset 

BcBGamlbri 

BCQPktouraai 

BadfOnna 

Bfnanon 

CmtaltaNane 

Eebm 

IS 

Fkd 

GwenrilAssk; 
IMI 
IMA 


SlronTOSHda* 

SooUmdCo. 

SttiCMia P 0 *l 

Sh*bP«A 


489 483 *84 489 

467 *58 *63 462 

law I2J3 12.70 TUI 
-277 211 214 214 
5* 576 623 5.10 

753 778 752 780 

551 655 558 &» 

ill 205 211 206 

' 628 607 687 6lZ1 

IM 75) 7J0 75 S 

1* IjH US 145 
663 6* 641 646 


™®wnnw 

MhObOm 

rnnoM 

Pbtffl 

RAS 

Rota Bonn 
5ft»ak>T«lno 

TOeooaltafln 

TUi 


Copenhagen 

S 15 S B I ® 

teM'lt SB 494 * ® 

'OS SttmUrn B ^ 2SOOW25DOOO 250W0 SW0 

1 ? *8 J i 1 

, so 3» 30453 sa 

[ k S M4 3« 


Jakarta 


•iBsaa ££"** 



/LOT 645 raNGOO 663 fly* 6*1 MS 

74« 7175 7475 PittrtEfft**0 . 697 653 454 495 

i«0 Pnidsital 557 5* 637 529 

Tala sib Tad S* a* a* RnatMUPP 292 iTi 103 ijt 

TVBraHaids 3330 RankGroap *17 411 41S 415 

Wtetiltlgs »» Redercokn 784 696 7 659 

WwekKX 2250 2150 ZL6S 22W SiJ 133 3J6 238 

ReUbitt 10* KL46 1649 1045 

- 447 436 441 436 

785 689 699 486 
340 351 381 23S 
943 9* 987 987 

147 24S 147 244 

552 585 553 583 

942 9.15 942 9.15 

486 478 481 480 
411 401' 403 411 

293 383 351 386 

1580 1640 1645 1688 
68B 679 685 679 
277 162 ITS 264 

254 288 252 287 

. -7J6 655 698 7* 

giM-taftonr* SteSTmopR iof? io« ioa io* 

Johannesburg SSfgffi »• ; ms mj iw m 


jujiaW 6350 WOO 6^ S 

BQlteiKliP .j™ j|K0 12225 

PS2S( 71* 7075 nffl Tog 5drndM 

W* 'fig ^ ’tS Iggg 

aft a ^ ESu 


BaMobQMn 
CdnTlff A 
OfeUOA 

crRms* 

Gea Metro 

Gt-WestUfeco 

inoa 

(motors Grp 

LoUbhQu 

NaflBkCOMda 


Ptwwl 
QuebnoorB 
RogenCBnraB 
ItOTaIBkQta 


42.90 4250 
22 21M 

321ft 321* 
3180 3155 
1690 1665 
2080 SOU 
36* 35.10 
2585 2585 
1680 1610 
1420 1350 
2BK »*i 
26U 26 

2614 2550 
985 980 

5045 4945 


Oslo 


Frankfurt 

AMBB W 

££» £3 

-■BASF 5950 


OAX38P46 
ProtaOS: 302*47 
978 9K 9B 
49* 1S180 1SCT 
2B40 !W9 ^ 

MIS 1313 £3* 

SJB 3iS -SM 

MS »-» 
S3 SS || 

flS 6150 6244 


DoBflfilS 

'tirtSfeMBOT 

Geocar 


T72 169-25" 16985 J72 StadQmrtar 

4740 4785 4745 47* TSteiLUe 

2075 34 2480 Tos® . ... 

I* WJ0 13985 137 TlunMVM* 6* «2 452 655 

.urn 4 T 30 4280 4220 SGtap £30 S84 586 587 

^ H7S 2£98 -26* tlGraup • SM 584 W1 632 

l5iS it* 1*90 19* Tocnkkn 287 279 281 288 


182 l* 1* 181 
BJS 844 *79 444 
778 754 776 7J5 

750 770 7 JO 7* 

602 757 7M 6 

741 783 789 783 
453 448 448 452 

271 345 367 3J0 


DennoateBk 

EBam 

HafsbmtA 

RwemrAso 

MasJEtMtn 

Norak» skagA 

NiamdA 

omnsob 

PelinaeoSac 


Alrunukte 

AkadAWn 

An 

Banco ka 

BIC 

BNP 

CmalPhtt 

Gamrfour 

Casino 

CCF 

Cetetera 

CMHhaiDiar 

CLF-Dodo Fran 

CflMBAgikoto 

Donone 

EH-AquIUlne 

EridaniaBS 

Eurotunnel 

Gen. Emm 

Havas 

1 metal 

Lnfcage 

Legrand 

LtJfBOl 

LVMH 

Lmn-Eaux 

SSdKOnB 

Pcrtbcs A 

Remad Rbud 

Peugeot Cn 

PtaulM>iM 

Promodes 

RonaiHi 

Be«l 

Rh-paotencA 

HousBeV-Udal 

Sanafl 

SdoMUer 

SEB 

5G5 Thomson 
SwGetiaraie 
Sodaxtio 
UGetwta 
Suez 


068 B55 068 068 

47380 44650 472 472M 

360* 35280 39980 35260 
670 643 667 643 

899 asa aw ass 
22680 213 22640 21X90 

1231 1214 1231 1231 

3339 3270 3324 3Z7B 
241 23*40 239* 240 

25480 238 254* 23680 

700 660 695 MS 

930 919 923 723 

56S 496 49*60 502 

7289 1268 1268 1290 
798 787 796 790 

537 £31 533 535 

MI 831 631 836 

785 755 7 JO 7.90 

7E0 692 697 702 

39640 390 392* 39*60 

B25 792 824 796 

33S.98 325.50 333 32650 

00 907 927 897 

1966 >927 1958 1981 

1514 1475 1500 1493 

520 511 518 51 5 

299 JD 288.711 39*50 291 

380 37X10 378 372 

294.90 303 306 307-10 

554 Siffl 547 553 

2434 2337 2393 2372 

1492 1457 J44I 7496 

11620 112* 115.90 113* 
1730 >690 1713 1700 

179.70 17530 178 177* 

1528 1S27 1527 1527 

544 532 541 537 

266 257.49 SIAM 25*90 
1114 1100 1106 1117 


SyntMobo 

ThomsonC 


Bofcakutec 369*65 
PmlHE 378788 
41* 41* 4280 
1684 16W 1684 
29* 29* 29* 
1*90 1*90 1180 
41* 41* 4185 
49-10 49.10 49* 
2780 2888 2785 
17*50 17380 170* 
10580 10580 1Q5LB0 
14* 14* 1*72 


Total B 
UAP 
Ustnor 
Vote 


CSF 


4*5* 38650 
600 575 

2699 2655 

802 TO 
227* 222 

S54 536 

171 16780 
47)5* 461.30 


BndesaPfd 


MIBTataMBco: 1865X08 
PrattaK 1343180 

12640 12140 12640 12135 
3325 3105 3305 3205 

4375 4140 4375 4170 

1277 72W 7218 7275 

21850 20500 21850 20800 
2270 2115 2270 2150 

losso 70S* lows mm 
9450 vus nx ma 

5485 5170 5470 5170 

33600 32T00 33500 32700 
77135 16450 76090 16620 
2205 2185 2365 CTO 
1025 6800 6050 *30 
7SS0 7500 7800 7545 

11220 1055§ 11220 10695 
1354 1306 1349 1317 
2920 2795 2895 »0S 

3510 3370 3500 .3375 

158S0 15320 75735 15440 
17500 16150 17450 16145 
11495 10656 U495 107S5 
8075 7825 BOOS 79* 

* .4635 4700 4745 

4930 47S8 4890 4835 


aaSrtd 

UgMSentdos 


13* 


Teteil 
TrtespPfd 


CVRD Pfd 


47X50 

37380 

28580 

19280 

9*60 

151.99 

15780 

24B8D 

3580 


BJ0 

62980 

4380 

5*50 

1X750 

418* 

4S5X 

370* 

278* 

1B680 

88* 

148* 

151.00 

242* 

33* 

23* 


Seoul 

Doan 

Daewoo Heovr 
NaMaton 
Koran El PW 
Karen Exit BK 
Korn Mob Tri 
LG Sedan 
Pahang Inn 5t 
iBec 


Montreal tudaMauranui 

MWHUtaH Pravtac 291X88 


42* 43 

21H 22.15 
32* 32* 
31J5 311ft 
Iflt 16* 
20 * 20 * 
35* 3585 
2585 26 

16* U 
1485 1X90 
m am 

26* 2»ft 
2610 34-15 
9 JO 945 
4» 50* 


Singapore 

CerebosPoc 
□tyDwtP 
Cycle Carriage 
Dn^Rnnm* 

DBS Laid 

Fmser&Nfsn 

HRLond* 

HWWLeongRr 

JofdiMaitNM* 

Jort Strategic- 

Ifmtnr* 

nSni 

NqtemtaOttat 
OSCflHdflB 
OSea Union Bk 


OBXtodee 57889 
PmMcec 57X71 

167 163 164 163 

1* 147* 147* 147 

32* 22* 2X50 22* 
26* 2610 26* 2620 
105 702 105 102 

4X70 48 48* 48* 

313 301* 309* 303 

372 346* 366* 367* 
195 189 TO TO 

1U 111 112* 109 

SO 523 05 525 
2* 275 287 276 


StagAMrasiF 
Sing Pcttn 

S» 


wtagTolHdgs 


7380 

7030 

10* 

i£ua 

1470 

14 

14* 

14 

1430 

16 

16 

.16* 

0X1 

O® 

as? 

0X1 

9.10 

9X5 

9.10 

9.10 

SJB 

5X5 

449 

STD 

14 

11* 

13X0 

13* 

194 

191 

292 

195 

378 

320 

3* 

326 

410 

6 

6X5 

405 

3X8 

3X2 

142 

150 

11 JO 

11 

11* 

11 

356 

3* 

154 

3* 

124 

121 

123 

121 

19* 

7C.9B 

1940 

TU0 

435 

6* 

6* 

435 

8X5 

fl 

5 

B 

1190 

13* 

1390 

USD 

175 

1.73 

173 

173 

28* 

20 

28* 

28 

122 

322 

122 

122 

176 

171 

172 

176 

3J6 

130 

330 

3* 

5 

492 

496 

490 

124 

122 

123 

122 

17* 

1490 

17* 

1690 

446 

4* 

440 

440 


SUVMfloFWSp 
SKaiskoBF 
SKF BP 
55ABBP 
Mora AF 
SvHmllesAF 
SrdtoWiAF 
Trefietorg BK 
Volvo BF 


199 195 196* 197 

7* 307 JO 312 309 

172 162 169 JO 162* 

1J7 1J4 116 717* 

9158 91 95 92 

IBB* 186 187* IBB* 
159 155 156 ISA 

107 104* 105* 107 

180 177* 180 179* 


398 379* 
592 547 
3671 2659 
797 796 
224 228* 
554 539 
168 171* 
468 465 


1416 73140 U2.70 138* 
7195 72.60 72* 73* 
364 355 361 3M 


Sydney 

Al Ontewriesi 343450 
PretaacMSl* 


827 

416 

418 

821 

ANZBUog 

7.99 

7.92 

7* 

7.95 

BMP 

18* 

IBJB 

KU6 

182$ 


344 

328 

3* 

141 


2X65 

22* 

22* 

2272 


229 

226 

728 

229 

■* 

1X78 

12* 

1171 

1XW 

I - 

1104 

1293 

I2-V4 

13X2 


5.15 

£21 

5X5 

5J0 


485 

6.75 

476 

6X6 


19J6 

1921 

IV2S 

19JD 


436 

422 

42i 

425 


252 

2* 

X* 

2JO 

GKl AusnoBu 

134 

329 

133 

130 


1* 

T* 

T* 

1J8 

d AussnaEn 

1106 

1X90 

1190 

1120 

John Fdirtm 

2X4 

282 

2X3 

2X2 


Zl» 

2356 

2372 

7X70 

MaynaNkMss 
MIM Hdgs 

796 

7X8 

7.90 

7.95 

1X6 

1.83 

1X4 

1X3 

T5J4 

152? 

1561 

15X7 

News Carp 
North Ud 

486 

6* 

682 

6X3 

196 

192 

3 

195 

Padflc Ouritap 

176 

312 

115 


370 

3 Aft 

16H 

167 


1.74 

172 

172 

177 


4X6 

476 

41 to 

487 


422 

420 

422, 

422 


9.18 

7X3 

9X3 

920 

WmrWnine 

823 

821 

(UO 

025 

wesifletdTn 

2* 

22/ 

129 

228 


729 

723 

12 9 

725 

WoodsMePH 

9J2 

92? 

9.43 

920 

Waohrorths 

118 

310 

117 

311 


Sao Paulo *m^E*m*» 


8* 145 

630.88 *17 00 
44* 4110 
51.10 SOA5 
1175 1375 
425.B8 422* 
473* 457* 
372* 370* 
27959 28600 
190* 188.00 
9050 89* 
148* 150* 
157* 151* 
246.99 246* 
34* 3190 
2120 2*25 


Taipei 

Asia Cerown 
Camay Ufa Ins 
Chang HwoBk 
CMMStera 
China Tnrsl 


Far East Tod 
Brel Bank 
Formosa CF 
Kuan Nan Bk 
HoalonTelnn 
KBC 

President £m 
Taiwan Cemt 
Tatung 


ST* 
179 
170 
2 6J0 
54* 
56* 
35* 
178 
4*20 
14 650 
25* 


50 
176 
166 

25* 26* 

53 53 

54 54 

34* 34.40 

173 173 

42* 42* 

14250 14250 
24* 1*70 

81* 84 

47 JO 4683 4690 

64* £1* 62 

53* 



Tokyo 


CenpasBn bdK 676J91 
Ptntaas 678J4 

103000 90000 99000 10HOQ 
5350 5298 SOT 5290 
15900 15500 157* 15700 
272* 266* 272* 266* 
89* 8S00 BfilO 8760 
4920* 4760* 4795* 4860* 
ITS* 192* TOM 194* 
413* 401* 403* 408* 
44900 433* 4346’fi 442* 
11600 J13M 113* 115* 


State TEns; 234X34 
PmtaS22«0j01 


Stockholm *)££&* 

AGABF 1* 106* 107* 107 

ABB AF W4 BSD 873 854 

^JOonniF IBS 182* IBS 185 

Astro AF 339* 326 339* 32X50 


770 

BOB 

671 


656 


740 


803 

1340 

516 


983 


489 

545 


74? 


296 

75* 

718 

1140 

218 

861 

545 


525 

456 


350 

663 


867 

909 


760 


S3 

53 

53 

H&kel 225: 17909X6 

Platans 1801188 

1020 

1030 

1048 

750 

758 

750 

776 

783 

0» 

6«0 

647 

649 

1050 

1050 

10* 

1840 

1850 

1870 

648 

650 

657 

2100 

2100 

2180 

2490 

2500 

2450 

731 

731 

7* 

2250 

2260 

2280 

2190 

2200 

HIO 

795 

800 

800 

Wlff 

1310 

13* 

510 

516 

515 

1360 

1410 

13* 

970 

974 

997 

2430 

2450 

2480 

3400 

3440 

3*0 

1340 

1340 

1380 

3500 

3530 

3490 

1150 

1150 

1170 

TOO 

1051 

1030 

3200 

3210 

3200 

1620 

1620 

1690 

477 

486 

497 

537 

530 

5* 

5450 

s*n> 

5740 

492 

494 

492 

3390 

3410 

3SS0 

731 

735 

735 

2260 

2280 

2320 

1190 

1190 

1230 

290 

290 

299 

73* 

7380 

7500 

710 

715 

713 

mo 

1120 

1130 

211 

214 

317 

840 

BSD 

856 

510 

S27 

535 

7040 

TOW 

7220 

22» 

2250 

2270 

505 

50B 

524 

44» 

450 

*7 

1 680 

1690 

1740 

mo 

1730 

1730 

1020 

1030 

1020 

1050 

10* 

1080 

3* 

345 

357 

651 

658 

661 

11» 

1710 

1190 

8S5 

855 

869 

890 

B96 

891 

1300 

1300 

1380 

B74 

880 

879 

1080 

mo 

1100 

735 

735 

769 


The Trib Index 


— 

Closing pnoos. 

Jan. 1 , 1992 - 700. 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 

World Index 

151.32 

-0.41 

-0.27 

+14.75 

Rsgisnal Indam 





Asia/Padfic 

113.87 

-1.24 

-1.08 

-15.19 

Europe 

162-87 

+2.46 

+1.53 

+17.02 

N. America 

171.73 

-3.83 

-a 07 

+33.87 

S. America 

128.10 

+0.49 

+0.38 

+43.87 

bidiwtrtal Induos 





Capital goods 

177.78 

-322 

-1.78 

+33.79 

Consumer goods 

166.09 

-0.23 

-0.14 

+ 20.29 

Energy 

178.21 

+0,08 

+0.04 

+31.40 

Finance 

111.81 

+0.01 

+0.0 T 

-12.12 

Miscellaneous 

189.24 

+0.70 

+0.42 

+24.82 

Flaw Materials 

177.31 

-0.38 

-0.20 

+25.04 

Service 

138.59 

-0.27 

-0.19 

+15.49 

Utilities 

145.57 

+0.94 

+0.65 

+14.50 

77» tatemaaonal Hnratf Tnfaurw WtaW Snk* Index C tracks (ta US. Joter values ot 

280 aitamationoBy imostobte Blocks from 25 countries. For more tnfomabon. e tree 

booktatm avaSable by anting to 77® Trib Index. Tfil Avenue Cnaria s da CauOe. 

0PS21 NevSy Codex. France. 


P*»taxjry 'vews. | 

High 

Low dose 

PlW. 

High Lour Close Prw. 


3820 3770 
1430 14* 

814 7* 

7710 75* 
249 238 


710 

565 

565 

299 

504 

701 

342 


701 

546 

540 

294 

489 

695 

232 


Slock Market tadet 7219* 
Pr etao s 7290J7 


1570 ISM 
8530a B400o 
714 6B8 

630 621 

3520 3470 

3* 295 

1350 1330 

725 710 

3760 32* 

1460 1420 

510 465 

6660 66* 
<B0 42* 

1120 low 

6950 <7* 
1490 1450 

745 726 

2190 2140 

11* 1050 
7760 7690 

929 912 

14* 1360 
413 408 

1610 1590 

259 254 


S3S 


940 

520 


2810 2690 

24* 23* 

74* 7320 

2210 2150 

976 956 

1020 I KM 
2440 7420 

303 3* 

547 551 

12* 1210 
1360 1330 
705 684 

711 492 

2940 2B50 

B34 810 

3230 32* 
476 466 

2220 2190 


535 

4* 


520 

394 


3820 

1420 

803 

7710 

745 

704 

547 

550 
295 
5* 
695 
232 

ISM 

BSSOa 

681 

622 

3490 

306 

1340 

722 

3220 

1420 

SOI 

6610 

4340 

1120 

6870 

1460 

726 

2170 

1070 

7720 

912 

1370 

409 

1590 

256 

952 

529 

2790 

23* 

7330 

21 * 

974 

1010 

2440 

300 

551 
1220 
1330 

699 

701 

2890 

628 

3230 

467 

2220 

528 

4* 


3840 

1410 

793 

74* 

247 

711 

565 

550 

303 
504 
697 
244 

15* 

MffiB 

7* 

629 

3440 

297 

1230 

716 

32* 

1<70 

«50 

66 * 

42* 

11 * 

68 * 

1450 

740 

2150 

11* 

7710 

912 

1410 

419 

14* 

266 

945 

533 

27* 

23* 

74* 

2230 

966 

1026 

2460 

304 
557 

12 * 

1350 

693 

708 

2«40 

B10 

3230 

479 

2740 

522 

400 


D.-4 FOB 


Toronto 

AWlfcl Price 
Ateenr Energy 
Alan Alum 
Anderson Era* 

8 k Montreal 
Bk Norn Suita 
Barrtck Gold 
BCE 

BCTekamm 
Blflchein Pharrn 
Bombardier B 
BraxonA 
Bim Minerals 


CIBC 
On Nafl Ro« 
Cdfl not Res 
CdnOcctdPet 
Qtn Pacific 
Comlnco 
DoftHCe 
Dominr 
Donohue A 
Du Pars Cud A 
1 = doer Grow 
EureMnMng 
FdOitnFlw 
Fafconbrldge 
Fletcher did A 
Fran* Nendo 
GuHCdoRes 
imperial Oil 
mas 

IPU Energy 
Laid law B 
Laewen Group 
MaariWBidl 
ana mu a 
O nex 


22 

21h 

219> 

21.90 

,w»? 

3X40 

3X*5 

3XW 

47 70 

46'* 

4640 

4/14! 

18* 

1A» 

IbXft 

18X5 

46.10 

44* 

4iW 

45X5 

47U 

466ft 

4644 

4661 

■Kan 

ILOft 

JS* 

31J5 

67 s * 

' 66 

66.20 

67 JO 

29.W 

29 h 

79.70 

7VX5 

7J 

72X5 

rm 

7U1 

25X5 

24.1ft 

21X0 

2404 

31 

30- A) 

m 

30X0 

22,70 

7X04 

2X15 


589i 

M 

17 

5U5 

59X0 

59 

59X5 

m 

SSI* 

■J 

.94* 

a 

1790 

37* 

37.66 

37 * 

75,10 

24XU 

24X5 

'riUSi 

36* 

3S* 

3i*i 

31* 

38* 

:uift 

J/Vj 

38 

35.70 

?.5H1 

2120 

2135 

lid 

12 

12* 

1X15 

246*1 

24 

24 

2670 

321ft 

Site 

32V, 

314* 

7lte 

21* 

21* 

21* 

36.10 

35.63 

36 

36* 

2» 

2RS 

2 H 

298 

30l90 

*35 

MV, 

30.40 

22* 

2115 

2X15 

2X20 

60.94 

4 930 

60 

59h 

11* 

10X5 

11.10 

11.15 

63X4 

63X5 

6X55 

6385 

46* 

46.IS 

44.15 

44* 

40.10 

».9S 

«XS 

3990 

18* 

17.90 

IB 

1815 

48.90 

48*6 

48* 

4838 

1BJ0 

17.90 

IB 

18U 

77lft 

71.15 

75* 

75.15 

IX* 

13* 

13** 

1130 


Moore 

Newtuwge Net 
Naranda Inc 
Horan Enetyy 
MBiem Telecom 
Nova 
One* 

Pnnedn PetWn 
PenCda 
Plocw Dome 
PocnPettn 
Potash Sask 
Renaissance 
PJo Algom 
Rogers Camel B 
Seagram Co 
SheffcdaA 
Stone CoiWM 
Sunaar 
Talisman Eny 
Teck B 
TrteotaM 
Tdus 
Thomson 
TorDom flank 
Transom 
TronsCda Pfpe 
Trtmari Rm 
Trtzec Halm 
TVXGoM 
wesicoasrEny 
Weston 


28* 

47.15 
3X35 

33-* 

97 1 * 

lt£fl 

2115 

54M 

21* 

27VJ 

131ft 

114*4 

4M4 

3X10 

24.95 

55VJ 

54.40 

20.40 
6X90 
47* 

32.15 
38-9 

20 * 

2815 

37.10 

1640 

2460 

45 

*9] 

1014 

23* 

75 


28 2X05 
45*4 45J8 
3X10 3X10 
33 33 

9W 931* 
12* 12* 
22.95 2195 
54 54** 

20* 21.10 
26* 26.90 
13 131ft 

113.70 111* 

46.10 46J5 

32 32 

m Taos 

5X90 54 

S3JJ5 543$ 
19*6 20b 

61* 6X65 
4605 461 

31* 32 

38.10 3&30 
2005 2005 
2BJ15 28Li 
3665 3685 
1685 16.10 
24* 2435 

44% 44% 

30 30* 
9.70 1015 
23* 23* 
73% 74 


2X10 

45* 

31.95 
33* 

95t* 

12*6 

23 

54*4 

208C 

27* 

13VI 

114 

46* 

32* 

2090 

54*4 

5385 

20 

£1.90 

45.95 
3X15 

38% 

20.10 

» 

36* 

16* 

24% 

44% 

30 

9.90 

2315 

75 


Vienna 


ATX bMfeta 118686 


Pmrfoot: 1180* 


1760 

1760 

>»«> 

1760 

Bnw-Utt Goess 

6+5 66150 

6/3 

672 

Bund VerePtd 

403 

403 

403 

404 

CiWUansl Pfd 

434 429.1 D 

430 429.90 

EA-Generoll 

3220 

3180 

319D 

3180 

EVN 

1778 

1749 

17/1 

1/52 


1480 

14B0 


1480 

LHUtnff 

622 

£11 

£1190 

615 

Lerfcom 

296 

278 

293 

27M5 

Moyr-Meinlwl 

571 

465 

471 

570 

OMV 

1371 

1348 

13581361X0 

OertBreu 

797 

789 

795 

800 

OeaEtekbtz 

865* 

B36J0 

854 

R3V 

VA Tech 

1745 

i/m 

1735 

1718 

WtenaiMiger 

2200 

2172 

2190 

2190 


Wellington nee*w«:mi 7* 

9 Previous: 242731 


T5E ledUtWata 6040J0 
Pretaw.- 605X67 


AONZeflhlB 

174 

2.74 

X75 

2T6 

Brteriv Iwt 

1* 

U6 

U7 

1X7 

Carter Hooard 

137 

3-14 

3J6 

137 

Femi 

5.12 

5.12 

5,12 

5.12 

FUtrorPtrykd 

i.# 

w. 

soft 

ft* 

fc Forest 

2JD 

139 

X29 

2J0 

GfiffXnaii Fdet 

1J5 

1.74 

1T5 

1J5 


£.95 

6.90 

6.95 

695 

UonNatlron 

3X3 

XS8 

363 

1LM 

Non G« tirte 

2A7 

2X9 

X3V 

IM 

M2 Refining 

29* 

2V* 

W* 

29.70 

TtassmNT 

75s 

fJV 

152 

7.14 

WtanHwW 

11X5 

11* 

11.45 

11* 


Zurich 


Adecco 3 

AhaoisaeR 

Ares-SennoB 

Boiolse Hag R 

ABBfi 

BK Vision 

BobstB 

CSHeUbgiP 

EtektrowortB 

Fischer B 

Him pc 

HolderiunkB 

JuLBnerHdgB 

MesttR 

NowrltsR 

Oerti Irons 

PorgesaHiaB 

PnotmVbnB 

PlretfB 

Roche Hdg PC 

$BCR 

Semretenfi 

3G3B 

SAAHB 
SvuerR 
Swiss Heins R 
Swissair R 
UBS B 

ValorflHdgR 
WlrderinurR 
Zurich AssurR 


SPI lades 264889 
Prevtom: 263&S7 


397 

377 

395 

376* 

1152 

1137 

1148 

1126 

1 SOO 

1480 

1495 

1510 

287S 

2805 

2835 

2860 

1756 

1744 

1748 

1739 

75S 

736 

755 

740 

1900 

1850 

1880 

1880 

141X0 

139X0 

141 

14X25 

539 

536 

539 

S38 

1490 

1480 

1490 

1490 

92S 

915 

924 

922 

1030 

1022 

1030 

1025 

1434 

1416 

1434 

1420 

1492 

1482 

1490 

1486 

1600 

ISfcS 

1598 

1570 

J >17.25 

145X0 

146* 

145X0 

1490 

1485 

1485 

1490 

675 

660 

674 

668 

310.75 

m 

210 

210 

12160 

11835 

11900 

11935 

155 JO 

2*50 

254* 

249 

1536 

1525 

TS33 

1529 

3245 

7175 

3190 

3225 

952 

935 

947 

9* 

980 

950 

958 

978 

1391 

1371 

1390 

1371 

1305 

1257 

1265 

1251 

1190 

1165 

1189 

1153 

274 

289 

271 

268 

BIB 

804 

818 

806 

388 

380* 

386 

378* 


V* -CT ' 




PAGE 16 


Thursday's 4 p.m. 

The 1,000 most-traded National Maikst securities 
In I urns of doflof value, updated twice a y&x- 
The Associated Press. 


IZNtolttl 
High Lon Stock 

3b 

Mv YM PE mb Htfi LDwLor«tQi’oe 


i 

A 1 


5) 1 , 
31 *i 
«% 
JC.i 


I0<« ACT Ml 


IlHACTNd 


:5tai 

»h 17h ASA Hold 
14% SVi ASM Mis 
uv, OTi ASMUthO 
24% Hi ATC COM 
114 W.Abcctn 

131. 3 A£dnm 
12%/ 

7%/ 

IM B’^AOivisn 
•2S 11 f 

im 

44% 17%/ 

•UYiHIYjl 

7F„ 2SVj Adnn 
47 3B% AOvFCmn 

S8W IMSAlhitmia 
a% a Advonffi 

g ifflSASOnnS! 

% 9 AHvmefn 
IPO 22 Aooum 
34% » AfSp 
7M 57% Akzo 
33% 22feA«ionfci 
32%a%AietBid 

IthlOhSlKiPh 

ws Riga. 

47% ijhAWfOS 
«i> 15% AWtoc 
IS SVABfHS 

25% 11% Atrun* 
34% SVI Anion 
SW37V.ABi*r 
24 10% AirtJuSfi 

22% 6% AEooteO 
11% 4%AmerEco 
30% zt% AGreet 
Kh in* AHomPot 

8% If Amerm 


z/v ir'iwiffoau 

76% lOhAcroiqn 

15% 7 AmvWi 


47VJ 17 . 

MV uhApdtaGs 
34 1* AppWC 

2a % l r/» Aputsou 

34% 17V, ApdeOCT 
49% 2l%Aflldttd 
42% IBhAsoCx 
Wit TVu An» jl 
19% llh ATOrDnt 5 
17)4 71 ArtxxSll 
27% ThArdiCni 
IS 6% ArMCP 
19% 9% ArrtaPh 
44% 21 AlWtnt 
499, 2 ArTVQSCn 
ll%4iV«Amfl _ 
79% 35% Ascend 
41 IS AasODyn 
47% 22% AspedTd 
85 UhAspaflfc 
32 IBhAsCdGoA 
40% 23 AsforMF* 

MU I4W AIK&Air 

SSSMEk 

6)4 IftAuroSv 
25% 9% Auwex 
44% 18% AitfoOeSfc 

18% 7%Autormj 

32% lb Avtnfi 
24 lOhAvkfTcn 


_ ** 10SS 35% M 35% + 1 
_ 41 721 27% 26% 27 -% 

_ 32 442 34% 32% g 

- 57 13044 40% 38 S% +% 

- 72 S® » 37% 30% '1 

13 JO 23% 23 23% — Vu 

_ B77 lib 13% 14% + % 

_ _K22u4Ih S7% 6l% + W 

- 40 3116 12% 12% 12% — % 
_ „ 77S4 11% 10% 10«-"4i 
I : 774 28% W(1 2£%-l% 
_ 41 1177 SJV 3TA 37% —ft 

_ 7U7 SJ„ JKh .»» — ?! 


Li 


- _ IlM 99* «*ft *<u — n 

; H 1797 22 37% 27‘A — 1% 

_ 44 1812 20% 1216 70% »% 

- 32 M99 15% 14% IS + % 

_ « 4069 18% 17% 17% — % 

_ 2B2775UZ7 25% 2S% -% 

_ Bl&q*u44% 

3 1013174 30% 

_ 42 3496 45% 

_ „ 1101 54% 

Z Z 5J71 S' 1 T?~ 12% +% 
3 13 8114 49% 47% Oh *h 


JSI U 1311934 44% 
_ 22 12 19 Z7% 
_ _ aOMuJMfc 

1 1049 VI 64 

ju sum »; 
HHr V! _ 712 70% 
* ^ - 73* 31% 


£ SS--i!2 

n% 42% — j% 

_ . 3% 52% «•% 
^1% 32% + > 


MU M%+1* 

TrU. 27V. — % 

70’6 7B%— 5V« 

Sfi 

?li% 

tt*-3 
2% 2% ♦ %, 
_ _ 10% 10% — W 

iwarBaau 

r .2 S $5 itt .£ ^ 

_ _ jojo 52% |j% 13% — % 

e Essir 

f iSJBS? 


JBB 

X4 

19 

SU JS'A 



3^45 UM 
232 33% 

A3 




.Sfi 


_ 24 H553 23% 

_ 31 BB 11% 

_ 38 ■£» 29% 
__ 2054 34% 

— Afl ,r> 
Z iing” »% 

_ 7SJIU 24 
_ a 1353 74% 


_ 57% +1*6 

a 23% t% 
7% a% +% 
tVm 0% +V.I 

r 

aar^Tj t 

7% SVi« -Vr, 
n% HT4 +1 
M “ 

11% 


_... ia 

b; -j% 

4J51 2.4 

34 — % 


“ ib 28* 44% 


22 284 38% 
77 1172 34% 
_ 14454 17%, 
9513752 14 
25 2113 30% 
1461123 49% 


4% 15% +% 
B’.i 30% — % 
47% +% 
- — % 


_ _ 3370 24 24% 35 — % 

,3 !» V s 

= ? JBI % T 1 

_ _ 1301 13 12% 13 

_ Z 220 14% 14% 141% »’% 

J 22 504 32 30 30% *.% 

_ IB JIW 15 1 - 1 . 11% 14% * I 
1740 


_ 8^25074 uBO'-V 
_ _ 377 30% 

_ 3f 2098 42 
Z _ 1986 7T>4 

9 IW 

_ 2247449 47% 
_ 83 273046% 

“ 141^ 13 * 

i fif? 


7S%— 

9% 30% ►•) 
I 61 — % 

4% 74%-ltl, 

& Sn-1% 

0% 41% +% 


io% +% 


•in 

S2 


61% » BOM HD 
22 99. BE Aero 

43% 37 1 6 BISYS . 
42% 71% BMC SollS 
45% 70% Boons 
52 I3 %BoOvS« _ 
«1% (SOUBcOneptC 
25% liWBncCofc 
38% 23 BnkUnWn 
29% 20% BorNli 5 
29% 19 Barnett n 

S 36'< BOVVW 
% 14% 


S3”: 40' . Berkley 
33% 14 Bit inton 
58% 2b BWIwr 
48% 25Vi Blagen s 
20% 12% BOTiet 


30% O'.Briqntpti 
77% 0% BrileV 

B^KSP 

34% 74% BroeAsF n 
42% 2%fln*Jfts 

&4 ^r Tpm 
11 % I 

17% r 9et 
>8%M%( 

74 ?4%( 

47 1 . 9%( 

25"k 11% L-— 

30%- n%c0HPn 

fts&SRk 


_ 36 2643 57% 

_ _ 3428 22 

_ 42 1M7 33% 

_ 4327127 U51 
_ ^ 1844 43 VT 

_ _ 296 31 

ISO 4.1 - U1 85)5 

J4r 1.1 _ 13852415 m 
.160 _ _ 880 27 

- J3 tSS 3S 

_ 25 010 27 

_ 1711974 21% 
ja 1.1 13 I2ffl 44% 

_ 24 25» 31 W 

_ _ 7718 54% 

_ 8510743 AT 1 .. 


.10 


^ 17 7585 15% 

r S 1 ^ iK 
■ 3 * “ T 2S »+I 

_ _ OObl *iv„ 
_ 40 4410 3% 
_ 53 MIS 22% 
_ 20 447 14V, 
_ _ 1540 IS 1 . 
_ 24 4311 35% 
_ _ T714 2Ti 
_ 54 >974 27% 
I _ 1181 27% 

_ 12 i40i rr. 

_ U 2094 29 
_ _ 3534 15% 
_ _ MS7 37% 
_ _ 4JM l*-» 
_ 10013419 45% 

; 3 ^ 

_ 18 8494 14% 
_ 3B 387 25*6 
_ C 687 Jf'« 
_ 43 1043 24% 
. D 1 23 29% 
_ 23 7491 u3H 
_ 37 1331 13% 
_ 35 813 I! 

_ 19 1301 5% 

i"?ig 

“ IS IU5 5l% 
J*l 1J is ,3g 3% 

_ _ 245B 24% 
_ _ 41 073 «.% 

.10 A 16 914 17>i 
_ 23 7216 
_ _ E4 12 
_ , 2095 21% 
__ 9033 17 


44% 44% —2% 

42 4 2%—*% 

26% 24% ♦),. 
25 25% - 

52% 53' 1 +1% 
30% 30% — % 

5% _ 

JO a% ♦% 

45% 44% - 

JO 31 +1 

49% 49% — 5% 
4S' i 44 —1% 
15 IS —'>• 
1M 149; — 1% 
40 40 —ft 

13% 13% —ft 

4% 6% »V. 

5% sft *7% J 

14 14ft —ft 
13ft 13'. —ft 

& tsft +"»ft 

r% 

5*1, 7% _ 

2 7ft 28% '1ft 
I4H 15ft +ft 
3&%34 *'m -T*'ii 

Ur m U + l, M 

43% 43). — 2 
47 67 '2 

!S% S£i Ti 
rfc* 

34 24ft —>.+ 

»% e% 

^!-4% 
lift 12 '*■ 

S 5 

17 ir-i -% 

ll M'S 
» 38% - % 

21% 2l"i 
fli, 32"» ♦> 
23*, M —ft 

43 447. —ft 
14ft 14ft —ft 

7ft 7% —ft 
lift lift —ft 
20ft 21, +% 
15ft 14ft —Vi 


40ft 23 . 
"ft 71ft { 


s: 


» u 


n a &m 


aft US 
K% 

44 


iftCdwr 

44^27^^' 
34% 13% I “ ' 

Sft ’IftbfeTe" 
29ft l|% iTiiron s 
25ft IlftOirenima 

46% B%CraiFhi 
63ft Gifts 

VS iKSS 

sS: miSSSs 

34ft 10ft Ctvsaw 
SdOTIfV 
1 Ooamei 


„ 38 7»W Wi 


1A8B23 

J5I A 


9 14493 
5010154 17% 
5 til 14*4 
5 nil 32 
8 1307 13ft 
17 507 44 
32 352B SPA 
M 45 15% 
_ 10279 16ft 


asraji 74% 


22 %( 

m\ 


Conor . 


&: 

5% i 

31% I 
21ft 1 

14% 

35ft! 

49% 31ft < 

1 3ft o'.'+Gnoem 


51 

24 657 31 

!! ik 
: S Sh 

23 M74 32% 

_ 11483 29ft fir 

B .55 S2 I 
4 


34 V, 3H*— 1% 
27% 27% _ 

27% gft-lft 

S%S3g=l£ 

28% » -ft 

BBTa 

SnBtift 

20ft 21% +ft 

4 

18% fOft —ft 

14 14ft fft 

31ft 31S -ft 
lift 12% „ 

43ft Oft —ft 
54% 56% -1% 

15 IS —ft 
15ft if*. _ 
71ft 71ft— l'ftt 


47ft 87ft — 3 
29ft 29% —ft 
37 37% + ft 

13% 13% 


! SSkt! 

21% 21*4 


EiU 


37% lift? 
iTftjsr 


BS +K 

23% 23ft— 1% 
ff 17% +% 
17ft 17ft r 
13% 13% +5 
27ft »+ % 
47 *Tft * Vj 

15 15% - 

42*4 42% —ft 

44* 48% ^8* 

'SSVk^Ot 

jasa-f's- 

28ft 28ft -% 
15% 14*4—7%, 
Si 33% —1% 

IS 

13% iStiv; 

rsj-'. 

B% 4ft Ijft 
77V« 28% +% 



34 


M l7V,Dliero 
34% (2ft DSC 
31ft 87, DSPOns 
J3ft 13 DTIndl 
33)4 BftDdta 


55ft ITftDtaCNnvin 
35ft 15*4 B aWMO ie 
38ft 16% Doworr 
24ft 3ft Datofice 
28ta 13ftDaTC&B 
45ft 12 Dawn 
29ft 17ft DeeDnen 
47% UftPeoani 
35ft bftDendrle 
51 37%P>ra«ai, 

40ft 13ft I 


30ft 7ft Dl9<lnH 
ffl. Dpltjik 
33'S 0 DiaMiC 
I7 V m lift DoneCan 
43% 30 Dana 
28% 3% Deem* 
46ft f ~ 
4S%L.- = .. . 
IIS 3%Qontanv 
Oft 231* Dblebve 
44ft 16 DreaoE 
16ft SftOrraB __ 
43 17ft DuPonlP n 
47ft la Durttftii 
29% 19'aDurran 
99ft la' I Dvnotnet! 
lift a% ETminr 
2 r-« l4 J , EG T«4 
31ft oftEUmd 
25ft lift EMPI 
46ft ISftESCMedl 
35', 8'«E53T«Jin 
45V, lift EZ Cbm 
X% 8 EoTHrd 

Alft&JioSlar 

I3S 4* 

J4ft 19 

29'» 15*,EKSo 
14% 11 Eiaros 
39ft 31 la ElcArt 
98ft 30 EF1I 
38'..- lBV.BTrtn 
37 IP, EmCare 
25*", 6%EmksTcti 
53ft M EmmcSd 
24«.i f'.Emplyas 
46% 8 Encudi 
42ft lBftEnvw 
34% 17’iEwcDes 
34), llftEricTei 

22*+ 9ft Exabyte 

23% ll L i E+pdJnl S 
SB 2A4 Eaficpl 
23 10 EaZSIAi 

a». 21% FW> 

31' » 21 s , FHPplA 
29'-, f FPAMd 
18ft ViFSI Ini) 

15t« O FTP SB 
34ft 17*a FcmGob 
20ft S’hFastCm 
SI 3< FaSem 
74' , 45' , RWlT 5 
67 19", PileHCt 

•%P nJjne ‘ 


_ «i aft 
24 439 15% 

10s 

16 4231 10*4 

= '»} “S 

11 68ft 

r 

r n S 

Z U319M 
_ 93 1911 35ft 

= ! i M 
z*'£f. 

■1 

0 HB 

_ 321 19% 

= i3S!« 
iVA. 


IV6-F - 

„ 11 394 71% 21 21% —% 

_ 97 18692 77% 79% 20ft +ft 
_ 4515745 aft 31ft 71ft — % 

at 3 a 11W 38% 36% a Hft 

_ _ M 9 av, 0>*u — *|4 

i * ^ is% SS S* iiS: 

= l ^ & 3^ 

_ * 874 24% aft a% —4 

_ a inn 24ft a a _ 

_ „ 2935 l»ft 17ft 17ft - 

_ 25 731 XV, 20ft Mft —ft 

_ 46 503 45ft 5 a +2ft 

_ 7 4984 1 9ft 18 18% +V> 

i vvtss « %’**- 

J7f ZWi^aS{SSS*+ J g 

. a 2024 35ft aft 34ft +3 ft 
_ _ 4312 14ft 14ft 14% — * u 
_ 13 3057 9ft a% 8% +ft 
„ 42 1048 22ft 20ft 20ft —ft 

- 86 4292 U 34ft 32ft K% ,2ft 

_ _ 522 17 16ft lift —ft 

_ a 829 43 41% 42% —ft 

_ 1»57 7ft 7ft 7*4 _ 

_ _ 1370 36 34ft 35% .ft 
„ X 6001 43ft 42ft Cft —ft 
_ n ru ■/% -4 r *'i* 4% — I’* 

_ 41 8150 44% 431 1 , 43% —ft 
_ 76 87 39' « 37ft 39% - ft 

_ 11 934 16% 14 Uft _ 
.. 631 60".- 58ft 5|ft— iS 
_ 71 2710 43% 41ft 42% ♦% 
52 U 11 13] 27 »% Mft —ft, 

_ 17 2K18 Sift 41% 42*4+1 

- „ 7S97 Ulfft 18% 18ft —ft 
.10 A II 2415 Qft 27% 72". .ft 

_ _ S2J 8 7ft 7M% » JV„ 

- 18 501 19ft 18% 18% -I % 

_ _ 4419 37% 34 3S-i.+«Vi4 

- 4921910 32% :« 11 +ft 

_ 4 43% 43% 43%+ 1 

- a 2885 30ft 19% 19ft —ft 

_ _ va 7i% d 17% n%— ift 
_ _ 2410 5ft 5*% 5% +'/„ 
_ ,24H 33*1 31ft 33%+lft 
_ 15 171] u30% »% 39ft -ft 
_ 1012533 22ft 19ft 19ft -I % 
_ «j 8121 34W 36ft 35 —Ift 
_ 43 7ID4U9SW «% 96ft— IV, 
_ _ 4S9 24 23% 23V. —ft 

-72 952 26ft 25% 25% —ft 
_ _ BJS av, 21% 71% -ft 
_ n isos 19 a a »i 
_ 6322512 23% 21% 73 +1ft 

I ^ *ra ^ 36% 34% —ft 

Me 3 rwfs? M% S% -ft 

_ 19 94201143% fflft 41% +1% 
.. .. 5731 31ft 2T 

- M 2214 ID ". J 
~% 2 


J» 


Si 



134 


I 41^% +1*% 

t % rs *=* ^ ** 

- _ 4173 

z ■finish t 5 !!* 
jSvhtlS! 

Sv, » 

161ft 


SB). 2% 

»% * H 
a% -ft 
'ift -ft 


3.9 


ifl'fl 


INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24,1997 

NASDAQ 


9S 

av nOF£ 100, Hr9*> L»LrfMtQl'0* 


Sb 

Div VW PE 10«HMil-flwU»E5lOrBe 


39% 14% I 
IBS 
JOft 


Eft is 0252* 

81% 34% ForteaBli 


Ml 
r,a 
«si» 

m ja% 

»% 6ft 
46% a% 

2% !Jw 
IS Pb ™ 

aMllHGeniKts 

!9%SSmris 


20% imt 
19% loft r 

i 15% I 




i3 


"* +?» 


13 « J*. 

: ; W B6 « fe ^ 
- p P SEfft 
E $ I h L !|5 :5 

232 7Va 11 — 

M l3 15 324 So 48ft 41ft— 1ft, 




n 1M 
29% B HrtWiro 
43% 10% Heortpn r 
17’ij 7% Horan 
Mft H%KelM 


C-H 

„ J 17 W? 34 ^ 

149 ,7 7 4.1 D 0S% 

: § m r f7% 

- * fe 

: -Tffl \Z '» 

i 8 a i aS 

- S3,J ® % «£ 
. r Ira 4% S’* 

_ _ 1751 24% MV, 

I 13 »4 19ft 1»ft 
.12 .* 69 1014 14 Hft 

Z fl ^ Hft 

r ■ S?T *%JL 
Z-mt fl& 

i f ^8 

fill _ » 'll* 25V, 23ft 

■ fllP = ® & Sft Sft 
» a 436 a aft 

i a 1 3 s 
* d ^ ^ 

1617W U ^ft S8 
" _ flu an* Sft 

^ 33 1 5 TB F SJ* 
r fijavaa ^ 


«l% 21% Harry jk 


37% *9%Herl]lte 

sai!%assas 
«%»%■•- 
47% a 
B% 13% 

78% 20%.— — . 
110 M%HutUlT 

2B% li HviaeMr 


23% +ft 

27S +nlf 

it* 

19ft*!fti 

10 

19ft +% 

sa +« 


a -ift 
»% —ft 

jpS 

&.-S 

5% +% 

14ft -ft 
42 +1 

9ft — 1 ft, 
«%• — 1 > 
lift — *6 
44 +1 

as-is 

19% —ft 
20 % - 
28%— I'.’u 


34ft 9ftl 


Eft nsi 


IDTCopn 


44*6 a% IDXSwn 
»> 19** IHOPCn 
50% 1BJ* UACMIn 
23% 2ft IMP 
U 34 INSO 
25% 19 IPO+oMn 
37ft SftlSG Irrtl 
34% liftDtCCkann 
X% 10% Bros 
8% r-*afcraTm 
39% 24ft knaxCb 
17ft 5ftlmcfeW 
31% SV.lmU.Q0 
IS 1 .* bftkTUlRzp 
n% 11% Mn> 

13 4%f -■■' 

36% lift! 

Eft 9ft I 
9ft 11%' -. — 
am lAftlnocom 
71% aftlncvto 
14% II imaRes 
34% 14% Wormy 
35% 5% Imovoi S 
» 11 I — - 

39% 11% 1 
lift 4% I 
a 9Wi 
ni i u 
42% iSftnoSvss 
1S3%51 Intel 
117%2l%lnMwl 
11% 3% wee 
28ft IlftWrTft 
aft 11% Hercel 
21 iiftMHan 

»% 8% Wapti 
38% 13% hWCm 
17% 10% HlftHC 
mv. n hlCuw 
26 16% mirruxi 
51% Mft InlMwkn 
44% is% intermix 
14% 7% Irrteryv 
31% lOV'i IntwDca 
0% 25** Intuit 
M’i aftffwoenro 
E 13% tronMUn 
24% loft Isis 

21 tfttsolvwr 

40 I4%ltran 
39% ll*+JDASa(tn 
49% Sft jabfl . 

14% mjeSmn 

44% 17% KLA 
29V, lsv. Kernel 
20 12 V, KreJru 

I8*S 10*i Kinetic 

37 >»! ass 


Hft 

" ^ is Tt 

- 2119 2S% a% 

_ 745 12% 11% 

_ 1108 47 43% 

0 454 Mh 32 
_ 1737 34% 33% 

60 293 aft 35% 

31 972 37ft 35% 

_ 700 20ft 17V, 

- 4515 lift 19% 

32 5W 30 20% 

» 95 S'A 34ft 

„ 425 40% »% 

_ 2106 33 33- 

U 97B 14% Hft 
15 437 24% »%, 

H 912 108% tip 
_ 1000 27% Sft 
45 2308 34% 35*6 

KMC 

_ _ 417 27ft UVV Mft — % 

Z - 7857 45% 39% 39% — 1ft 
_ 2224 9 8% 8% —% 

_ _ 1751 an 20% 20% — % 

_ 46 5147 34 32 ft M. +1% 

_ _ »1 9% 9 9ft —ft 

_ 49 645 34% 32 32 —1*6 

I 13 14BI Mft MV, 74% 'ft 

_ .. in 47 44ft 47 *% 

- Jfc -iii 
‘■ B, “ z^^Tl ffiiS 

_ _ IBOuMO 3Sft » +9* 

68 1SS7 25ft Hft 25 - 

I"® J T> 21* -ftr 

z = 1509 ^ 5 

: : S In * m-S 

„ _ i9i »% 2o% a 1 * —% 

_ _ 5348 7 ift 6% +^ 

_ _ 9612 31% W 26% '% 

Me U » 5986(1 Mh Eft 23 vft 

_ 17 5444 2 r* E% 22*4—3% 

_ a iis2 a% a Si‘— !, 

_ _ 2519074*, 67% 47% — 1% 
_ . 7» 15% 15% 15% *.%, 
_ 3220340 24% Eh 73 —1 

no j 23 4238 28 IJ% M +% 

_ 24 9509 S »% 23% -h 

„ 29 TO 36ft 32V, 33V. - 

Z -36095 lift 10ft 10% - 

_ _ 5951 25% H% 2SJ* ♦ % 

- _ 9019 10% 8% 10% »I% 

307 ]9% 29% 29ft - 


20 .i a i 


.16 


111155% 151% 151% — % 
tul16% 111% 111% — % 

949 7% 7% 7% — 1 ft 

06 IB 17% 17% +% 

JS2 llh 13% 13V. .% 

02 19% 196. 19% -% 

«o inft in io*, ♦ ft 

24% —v, 
16ft +ft 
25% — % 
V* 


- _ 1306 24% 24 

IjD 13 1787 14% 16 

_ _ 33M 25% 25 

„ 16 229 -|ft 21 '4 21% 

- _ 307 aft 37*4 37% — +■ 

_ - 3027 28% 71 27% ♦% 

_ 21 MS 10 •% 9Wi. — "i, 

_ 10 2034 12% 12% 12% - 

4337 34% Eft 31% -7% 

j 72 m X 

- _ 177 Eft 
__ 9)4 lift 
_ - 1749 4% 

= S*fc 


is 


00 


.15 


zljfli?«l!ii+-S 


MV, A«* 


36V, -v. 


E 12 

S5'2479 

- 3137 


1| 

_.a 

|j 

tfiTS 


DM YUPE lOOt FBUl LOW Latest QT O* 


M% U% 
19% M% 
44ft 29% 




29%L^ 

Dft ?fi* tSSPf 2B A 73 JO 

8» = ii 

S ffitSSS 0 " ;'b!L-, 

h«QL. 

1 'sSs 1 : ijfl 



J4 


23 18 

„ 18 1538 

eP" 

A0,23i^ U 

zftm 


Ai 3 - xs 
M n 

.ID A V 




IS 


'+!« 


10% - 


«ft utkAMaodvs 


ss ssss 


»% m.. 

16ft 6ft* 

24% 10ft/ 

fl% EftMBcndn 
sfft OV, MIntAM 

11 ^ 

37%25%M0MXA 

Ilfs W 2 1 

ftefi i iM 


M 

S 2079 


Jtt 


20% -ll 


Si Sim* 

-f,v. a H CSm tn 

5&% I7ftNeHC0rs 
30ft I4ftNaorati 
2% BhNeonrube 

44ft 12*, Netcom 

I Oh OhNetmno 
K 34ft Metscpa 
56% » WoMjjAa 
15 ZhNwkOnP 
m% isftNmieGi 
21% yhNMcPari 
25% 9%neurax 
36ft uftMuon, 
ah l(H* Naumed 
27ft 14ft NOftWrtd 

a 12ft Keun 

a HftNexMOn 

20% 6ft Nimbus 
a% 9ft!SinU 

srVMS 

■5% 0% Novell 
aO%3lhNOufc» 

jK SS^is 

4H* 19ft I 

a% 19% < 

31*6 




^ M 

at 


.13 


N-0-8*-Q 

_ 4>i* 10% 

= i]f™5? 
z 

JJ 749 34V 

Z j* 1384 23*4 a at* t% 

J 73 1302 W* 18% in* - 

z Sisalfdr 

z = 

_ _ jE 5 w* iM* 14%,— is, 

z zra& u !F nw. 

= 5SB*BalSdB 
z z *a r iJS is « 

- - 2375 lift 10% 11% +% 
Z - 648 17ft 17 IT® — % 

- ,t& a {& :« 

W4 +ft 

- 1SBS :« 3” ^ 




z ff 


Uft 




140 4J 

1 Jib « 


lim 11% 28% —ft 

38% 3PA 37% — ft 
19% U% 18% « ft 

'af"*-!* 

37ft 36% 37ft +S 
IS 14% 14% — % 

«ls 

31% -2% 


- 18 


= Si 

100 oU it : 




-1002 


l2Montn 

»oh Low Stock 


JHPHorrb 


Dhr YldPE iflBH» Low Lobor (ypn 


I jj % PCHQhiC 

M. Pawiysi 






■ g&SM 


jsr i2 







Jft L 

44% 10 
31ft 9% 






isa?" 




3 S^% Sf% 

- —14646 sk m* 
. niwimm 


= iA«PI 
§!&"?« m n 

Z Z xSo Oik 50 is 

etami 

ctt.ai'S'sh 

e!J 

w* s ^ 

13 n 'M 

S 3377T2U. 

:«i® 


+ns* 





5 M 4046 Eft M 
jS 16 4475 43ft 413* 43% +T 
_ 44 4587 7 4ft 7 + 

i s 


- - 


_ in 


i 4 

54ft 22%5aa)yii: 
26% n*5«niHl 

Mh lOV.SSf 

IteiSSS 



04 U U 5B3 71% am 
_ _ IB4 §6% 35% : 

- 47 14 31% » 

_ 61 593 31ft 

1.16 b i2 u ^ am 

48 '1 ffi 

_ _ 2579 11% 2J% 

- 33 2D93U40 Mft 

Z Z USB 45 44 

JO j is 46 Ml tm 

Mia 5 *4i6 fr% sffia 
UOI u at fin 

mrn -mm 462| JbVl 

- 19 1766 Z3ft 

- _ 43M Z2% 

- fi 10102 19 



I MS 

30% lift! 
a*% 7h5 

fefKp- 

3+KSSS 

lift 


547 

= s« 

- - 4718 
_ - BTO! 

sS££ 









-rib 


1 


t£S 



Y M PE &WWU»U«Oi‘» 
W* Eft +% 




jJ jfil »h 

r ‘fi iw 5® Sj* "A 

- 

I PuAOD^k. mi ™ 

= ;s-lo-fi «7fi, 

; 9 «*4 48 <8ft +1 

Uft ira l4Tfc+2Vi+ , 

“ T4W"" 

~ At 2J ill Mg ~gfc ig a„ V 

|j* “ Z OT % ^ 7ft “ 

* «H >3 W 1*1 SSft s» ®ft - 
JDP - - 


»% : 


Z s* 


MU M 14% _ 

Uft KftJMe-Oi, 

SBGR A 

2B% Eft aaft+m. 


- T 

- 3il 

2 SS8.SB-DEflS3S' 

Za» 225 s* ssia *??. 

— X% - 


i mm - .. 

1 gbtlft 


■Ift 


9*™«t 





|SfS6fe*a-SS’ 
Ja® s% IF ss tc , 
= a *a«ffias^r 

« » i® JKr a JS 
M I' % Jft ffl ffi “ 

♦JJ*. 


1 ESSKi 

uo 30 re «* i 
1 - * Mb 3% 

L» 73 2 W2 4SJ. 


100 i2 2 
2JB 43 IS 


f’S&MS'' 

i«3 


37% 


yueer 


saSS-a 

B «% -s5 u^_sj 

E 

z z’Sfi&Sra 

z 

Z a +t%. 


6ft* 


1: 


Oft 
Hft +V 
4-ft, 





131 j 5 
f» .. - w 


NYSE 


Thursday’s 4 p.m. Close 

(ContiniKd) 

lonm Sis 

Los Sac* Dtv Yld PE IBfc W» UwLmai Qi ae 


is"! nihinvQi 

ISH IIMH V4PI 
21 Hi II Nvnsi 

«»> o 


— _ ifh m* ._ 

23 W - 3IA 141* nhi IS 

. _ M is Vi 14'^ iiVi 

ajfi SN 


wy. “ 



3V» 

ll 

l»»Qi 


4T/J 

wy _ 

43^4 qyj 

19 1?l Jls 
_ loU )[•+ 

- T* £2 i2" 

M ID ffl & 7 1 Vi 

, is I77n 1 1 Mi IDVi 

3 is 18*1 73 jv ri> 

J II ITU MV 23% 

U - II 2T+ zftta 

18 f9 1TW2 3*V> 74 

i s as Kvv 2s 

3 2 11 ® 35 X* 

l j ^ sa I* 

ii Z "B S% Sit 

■> - 171 7S» iSMi 

13 _ V 25 filh 


llMi lflVfc 


71 Mi 

fi* 

&S 

TB’Si 

UVi 

S»Mi 


IHts 

DW IfllMOmrScm 
llhi 18'^? 



H A SS » _ . 

*■' '7 KS St* aw 

“ ll SB !!S ^ ^ 

'ua 

ii S m jS 


K if. 

gw 79% 
lT% UH 


at = 


% Eft —ft 


B * £ £t K 

w - fis a w 

" " ,jc « ^ 

i3 ti rau laf. u-% 

U II M ]]V 21 V 

1J 11 JM A3 

_ l« 7908 33 M 33 Ml 

_ 22 1888 W 234 

- K 171 nv 5QH 

Ha’S I!" IF* 

*«! fjw »■* 


iRs 


'n|r gw 

i f? 1 as »* 

- “ usff 


—IV 
— i" 

*Mi 

-Mi 

— 'v 

• Vi 

• «*■ 

• Mi 

— W 
=8 



SilA 

13 JTMu »Hi 

li SS 5* BS 

!! ieS a5 S5 

u / m t» 

77 _ lu Ufc 1<H 

41 13 HJO0 l^A 

_ ^fl7 Ufl» OTS 

73 13 VP 3IH 

s J fi* 12*- rzifc 

11 Ml 18*14 [II M X 
71 . 24 3SVA 34 

&i - _5 « 2S» 

s.1 13 I72S8 Illv 7! Mi 

&5 - 90* » 2SVn 

■J _ 13 »M 2SV3 

- 1107 25*4 2SVk 


aoM 

u% 

91V. 



«HR3Dnon 


uPBfinawi 
aMggwppf ijs 
i j* PnirAH Ziof 
ir***mv** M 
i SlbPoar* 
iftPojtfsh 
ifiAPavtShn 
> aWMfllni, 

IN 

ugglEMAS at 


_ _ W3 

1J 11 JH2 — _ ... 

B * E 3AM m 
7 7in«i MM J*« 
_ _ 1122 10* " 



4MW«8E1 

liMftniF 

TMPrm**} 

MVAPrnCo 
llltPeMC on 
auhPMBt 
nwnvtfVMrt 

amnzer 

2>PhmPE 



U _ _ _ 

- - . w 

1^ w 10171 
_ _ JBM Jft 3ft 

ll 43 71927 Mft ID 

ll n m i« TTv, 

4.1 19 JU, 20 lift 

37 IQ 16% 16 

-iMuin'4 116% 

w »). m 

14 _ HV 41% +0% 

b .7 <:§ r & 

u . IB »« a, 

1 1 as Ha u«> i7% 

M II w ■ 7% 

U .. II S% 77% 

— 7M9 16% 16% 


117% . 

a* 

41% 

35% 


W H% . 

d ■ ® « 1. 

,s i « % at ■?£ 

1 I H Jp 17% 17% 

rs % 4»v m. i/w 

— 13% 

- 

'll 33% 

' »% 


9h «% 9% 


MPWmCr* tM 



Sb 

Dn, VW PE laa Hun Low Loan oi-ae 


4*% a-«Smpa 
ar, iiuninn 
3+% i«*ralara 

St 

IQV, RHwuo n 

itt ,'i.SSSffi 
??% 15®:. 


5SS%?3S!" 

2*'> 24 POJ&E5 

saE? 

jass^g 1 . 

IM U PMirvCQi 
isjv 1 1 ftWwf 
W* fOMiPMlOP 
U Premortc 

SS iffiRSS! 

3 Z3<VPrmFcri 


S ’S!E 

.lit 23^ 

'B8 

*!. T'we 


5ft 


m 

w*% an»p 
17% 25% P 

St d%E 
TL 8*1 


i|SM 

41% I9%inn«wi 
nv mhhc«. 


p 19 
11 % 6 . 

45% 56h( 
n I5%| 

4% IWg 
M l»%B 
13% 9%A . 

h kssszsz 

371m llMR«M 
r> 9’wt Tpwan 

M FtSMtFm 

j%4S8BK > 

!4S 


5 if ,sj aa ja 
ii is ?,z si 

IJ 27 E* *71% -ttlv 

■j 18 AS 2* ££ 
2i n ™ *5 JK 

4.9-102 V*‘> liM 
J 8 P 1»*V IIVm 
11 1* 42*7 41 41 

^ M it ^ 

Si & 127* S2 421V 
O _ 10 51 IL 

_ _ 180 KV MMi 

*J» 20 51Q «M 42*A 

80 . 7 7SM MV* 

"S'#*?! 

77 77CT U S5 !6Vi 

l=fll 

IJ m JP ll^i ilJV 

s f * % 

- - 25 22 Mr 


” *K *S! * 

28 11*S TH 27Vr 

:lFS 

15 H41A 1»H 
21 M 71 1* Ml* 
M 2318 J** fVVk 


im 


JQk 74 Me 
WJ* /1 1* pen FT 
8HPMF 
101* VMPHlCa 
101* 91k PHY M 

;S% StnCMTI 

Hh mpiGM 
]4% l]%P46HVT 

‘a ’?tKr„ 


r W 


»t aURJprff 
x mnjb 
*% AftRMITI 
t/ft 73 ROC Cm 
11% ni»CH 
lb 1 . 6%BPC 
+7% MWKTZ 
iMMmro 
7W M O lWBP . 
14% is PynaO n 

n% liSgSSrS)* 
Sfi Sw pSSP h 

41% UWROVnm 

30% 14 ROVTU* 
34% WlllSSw 

S%!SwSSg& 

MV IMMHW 

M% 1+ViRJMnco 

64 jWR gMD! 

B8JBW” 

16ft iSSKSSl 

3%rgs®& 

fiSSftgSIS™ 

MV JJ RBIHn _ 

SSh 




IS JSS 


J* 3.1 II OT 


1 


“’SB 


r 2 


1 

2SS — v% 

1101* — 1*4 
Ml* —Ilk 
29V» •«* 

■s — s 
-% 


B% •* 


iiv 11% 

T 5% 


- w 3ft 


5% 

: S3-B! 


ab 


- m lav 
M 10V 


716 7ft 7% 


■3 Hft Hft 
_ 1447 79. — 


as 


B* 


149 Ift IV 


a». ,v 


DM Vld PE Wfc +6on LpwLorgtf OT*Qg 


S% 7)v,ftrlGrb 

BhWW" 

fesiaM? 


» sates 

m ShWSTM 

Tit ’safe 

ii 

EPSt 
IP' 

St 

g 

4SVi 


J& 2 H ^iiini iSj 

_ — W ?Ok 70* 

.11 * m - i«J in? ;>> 

1 1 if i E 

urn 2.1 ll aw 9k »ft 

At 3 ” US tsft lift 

4 U II UjJ. 13% 

^T-U 

13 14 IfcTD S4V SJ% 

M _ J «ft 5. 

- _ 35 <1% 4D% 

_ 15 9936 73ft Ml 

SJ "fi *tt ftft 

- Sj -2 WS R% 

1] n w g 41% 

1IJ II 113 lgV M 17ft 

„ ia s% sa 

« BnSR, ist 2 

H - U4 m* w* 

- *9 np* ii 

i s a- aa a* 

^ w 15V 15ft 

W S»» M«i Wft 

” * "BS 1 ift S H 



35ft 33h5aSS 

Ssrar 

lM* |9 SSlM I 
21 Vl MkScMl 

36-V* W^oS 

88 ,'?w 

151* IIV* 

XHA 14Vi 

B" C 
a%as_„ 

ff*??5:SSgSffi 

44 Mi Z71t|ao5*Lr 

Bl* Jl 3n»i 
7*v* sn^ctmAn 

Hh vKsSgSrr 

sas (Hag 

xit* Bh5cwf 
bv* yas etyr am 

44H Z3n*SOM 
i4i* nsk- - - 
12 111* 



c 

?c 

zj 5 ?» «g 

4 - 41) 15% IS 

K » .13 lift 

ti ” *f 


IJVr —Ik 



mi 

in* wtsiow 

iS% sass?. 



s? sir 

«•* 27 


lilt 

irk Baf*«f*o 

JW n M W 

s*ga?sr 

2Uk MVk ^er i Lp pf 

lift 

» itvSEmm 

IhSasssfig 

issirasss 

19ft llhVmK+ _ 
JPk 12 Wl*rM|1 
ZfMi frkaSONt 

n pass 

28** 20Mi3OM 

SvIKJ ' 

S R"* 


11 h 


mi* ir*i 

«0V| MVASoCOvun 
0*1 71 1“ 

Sft^ 5 


m a 


3 91 

“ IS 



.... J13 42ft nr, 
Jl 14 4777 lift lift 

ZZ li 117 Hft in 

fO 30 990 104ft 10315 

1 ’ ’I 17.1 yv Uh 

IJS " 

7 4W« Ift Jft 
W lift 15ft 
W) n% 3Hk 
H Ml g 

S is .sB E sa 

u U 3 *n Ift 
25 is gb JD% Sft 

^ a'SS 8* gft 
“ - « 8Z 38 
x i n ig gSS jg 

83 

t5 ii IS ™ 3wl 

f ” ffi SS g* 

24 to ira a t,v> 

- .. -S.“ iiv iiv 

- 31 7391 44V 44% 

u m aj 2o% at. 

zi M ««*u 17ft m> 

« » ffi sa IsS 

J.I 1* 19% 17M 16% 

i3 _ un lift io 

a _ 7t zs a% 

M _ "I 54% 59% 

_ a auiu 40V 40 

- 39 5%7 36% >» 

-1 f, “w «* 

jj IS 

to — 

.» - 


... r ’? 

« ^ 

!« = ]S 

Z* 17 >!I — - 

s b^s ea 

40 11 «** S7V 


_ 11 ii. n% 7 —j 

9.1-4) 24% 25% 


13 MoStl 
tftdl LamSoA 



0% TWlM UB4 


Si'S B8 S* F* -s 
,iS ® * I SS 5* ^1 

■8 


as z 


= 1 


: tbBKj 

- 4 c B B d 
= III |3 
if: 7 B 111 


■M | 1 P 




= S 1 

s i|- 

£ C gjS 

u£ m !! ? S I# ^ it 

aSTf.^ ® * * 
<3 = s 
a n ™ 



ift d 3 ss ss s& a *+'8 
J ^ JZ iSi iS + 15 . 


a §il 



[7ft IJJ — Sj 


41% 1th 
9W .6*1 
31 Uft 

xrvt jt 

lS'A MTBWn 
Wft JTft toney_ 

«& 

2%gft?Sffi 

Hft 33ft T 

ksSSs 

2HAT8IM 
TfV* 41 TtfdC&p 

saK®a- 
w; 


I B j 1 g% &4 =? 

- § ‘i’l# ® is » 



» 

VP* lOtk 


jfiS.. 

gw gwti 
IvSftHSS 

2* 23ft ZVA 46„ 


23118 8 8-3 

■ 43 - 13 U am SS S% S% *ih 
M ,3 m.^s ffl n.w R Tft 

J 8 i J m ^ ^ _*3 

,J« 4 BSfi 3 

, ltilS 8 fc * 



_ — — 

01 A * 146 Hft lift SHk * % 

M i3 ’ ^ s« fih 5 ^ 

s a 03 Xr.Sk ar 


s 

‘5% -)t 



1)8 14VA0UBHI1 


ii 9 

1 ® g B a- ss — - 

* »« : vi 'a S § -* 







* 


PAGE 17 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


U S. and Singapore 
Reach Airline Accord 


* 

travel between d» too 

‘‘Singapore is pleased to be the 
mst w Asia to conclude such an 
agj«nent with the U.S.," Teo 
Mmg Kian, a senior official in the 
Ura^unications Ministry, said 

, r 1 ^ agreement, airlines of 
bothcountnes wfll be permitted to fly 

fey choose between 

^^Jore and any point in the United 
win be no restrictions 


yood rights,” which would allow 
U-'S-a iriines to pick up passengers or 
“• *e country with which it 
nad such an agreement and fly to any 
other country. The agreements are 
reciprocal, bat big UA airlines hav e 
many advantages, including a trigger 
borne Daswntm- w->n 


■ f o” I'.WN 

Singapore Airlines, though, is one 
of the world's most profitable ear- 
ners. The airline operates 39 round- 
tnp flights a week between Singa- 



F -h Singapore W1U UC me 

&st of a senes of so-called open- 
slnes agreements aimed at easing 
restrictions on airline traffic b? 
riveen the United States and Asia, 
foeworld's fastest-growing market 

But analysts said the deal would 
not mean much unless other Asian 
countries signed similar agreements 
•%th die United States. 

“It’s largely symbolic, but in the 

longer term, if everyone plays ball, 
it opens everything up to the ad- 
vantage of passengers;’ said Andy 
rakrns, an airline analyst with 
BZW-Pacific Union Co., a Singar 
pore siockbrokerage concern. “For 
Singapore Airlines h needs 
someone in the middle, such as the 
United Kingdom or Japan, to al so 
agree to open skies," he added. 

Many Asian countries object to 
the open-sides concept, saying their 
n a tional carriers are too vulnerable to 
be exposed to competition fixra large 
U.S. airlines. Inpnnciple, open-skies 
agreements call for unlimited “be- 


the United States operate 49 
round-trip flights a week between 
the two countries, the Civil Aviation 
Authority of Singapore sa iA 
Mr. Teo, the Commimications 
Ministry official, y«d air links be- 
tween Singapore and die United 
States would be strengthened as car- 
riers of both countries could “re- 
spond effectively to die dynamics of 
market forces to the benefit of con- 
sumers.'* He sa id itae « gnp*»nv»nf 
would fcnbanw tou rism as well as 
bilateral trade and investment 
The United States held explor- 
atory talks whh Japan an Jan. 10 and 
Jan. 11 and is to hold further talks at 
an unspecified future time. 

The Japanese market, however, 
has proved difficult to open. 

Japanese officials have argued 
that an existing U.S.-Japanese air- 
line accord was weighted in favor of 
the United States and that an open- 
skies pact would only increase the 
dominance of U.S. carriers. 

U.S. attention turned to Aria last 
year after a series of open-skies 
deals woe readied with Panada, 
Germany and other European coun- 
tries. Talks are also being held with 
Britain, but so far with little pro- 
gress. (AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Placer Gains Control of Mine 

Bloomberg News ■ 

SYDNEY — - Placer Dome lac: of Canada said Thursday it had readied 

^apua New Gumea’s^te^t gold mine while allowing Highlands ’ 
shareholders to own its other assets through anew company. 

Highlands had been trying far three weeks to secure the agreement, 
winch initially fell through after it tailed to win investor support. 

Under the agreement. Placer will pay Highland* shareholders 75 
cents a share — the same [rice as in its current takeover bid — and give 
them the right to receive shares in anew company holding Highlands’ 


assets other than the 
The new company, 
an initial value of 190 
Placer, which 
Highlands Gold3l 6 


zera gold mine. 

Hands Pacific, wfll bepaldidy traded and have 
l Australian dollars ($1473 mflfiou). 
owns 61.7 percent of Highlands, will pay 
t Australian dollars for a 25 percent stake in 


the Porgera gold mine, brin g in g its stake in the mine to 50 percent. 


Korean Steelmaker Fails 


I? Ckr SegFm Digmchn 

SEOUL — Hanbo Steel & General Construction 
Co„ South Korea’s second-largest steel producer, 
was declared bankrupt Thursday. 

The steel business accounts for more than 40 
percent of sales at Hanbo Group, Korea’s 14th- 
largest conglomerate, or chaebol . 

The chairman of the chaebol, Chung Tae Soo, and 
his relatives will hand over their shareholdings in 
Hanbo Steel to creditor banks, a spokesman said 
Thursday. Korean media reported earlier that 
Hanbo’s four main creditor banks were seeking a 
buyer for the company. 

“The decision was made this morning, and it was 
relayed to our main creditor. Korea First Bank.” the 
spokesman said. Hanbo’s main creditors also include 
Korea Development Bank, Cho Hung Bank and 
Korea Exchange Bask. 

The steelmaker has borrowed more than 3.6 trillion 
won ($431 billion) from Han if< and 13 trillion won 
from noobanking financial companies, mainly to build 
a 5.7 triflionrwon steel mill in Tangjin. Its interest 
payments alone would total 600 billion won tins year. 

The failure comes as the Korean steel industry 
wrestles with rising capacity and falling demand. 

“Korean steelmakers have to find overseas mar- 
kets to resolve die overcapacity problem, but pros- 
pects are not that great," said Knn Kyung Jong, an 
analyst with Daewoo Economic Research Institute. 

Hanbo Steel’s creditor banks have said they will try 


to complete construction of the planned mill while 
seeking a third party to take over the company. 

Bui analysts said it would be difficult to’ find a 
buyer, because ihe new mill will cost an additional 
700 billion won before it is operational. 

“It will be a headache for the banks to sell Hanbo." 
Park Jun Hyung, an analyst with Jardine Fleming 
Securities Co., said. * ‘If I were a businessman. I would 
not buy the debt-laden company.” He added, "In a 
way, Hanbo’s failure shows ±at nobody can win 
competition with Pohang.” referring to Pohang Iron 
& Steel Co.. South Korea's largest steelmaker. 

Still, Hanbo Steel's creditor banks are eager to find 
a buyer because closing the operation would be a 
huge blow ro the nation's economy, analyses said. 

“It is a waste of resources and national power if the 
steel plant, which is the country’s basic industry, is 
allowed to go down," said Shin Kwang Shik. pres- 
ident of Korea First Bank. 

Shares in Hanbo Steel fell 370 won to close at 
5,390. The stock has fallen 21 percent this month. 
Hanbo Steel had a loss of 89.9 billion won on sales of 
332.6 billion won in the first half of 1996. 

Mr. Chung, founder of die Hanbo group of compa- 
nies, was detained last year on charges of having 
bribed former President Roh Tae Woo. He was ac- 
quitted last month, but analysts said his legal troubles, 
along with delays in the construction of the new plant, 
had contributed to Hanbo Steel’s financial pinch. 

(Bloomberg. AP. Reuters l 


Investor’s Asia 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 



a s ON o J 
1996 1997 


A S ON □ J 
1996 1997 


A S ON D J 
1996 1997 


Extfunge 
Hong Kong 


Index 


Thursday Prev. 
Close Close 


Hang Seng 


% 

Change] 
13.61 0.33 13.692.79 -0.60 


Sargapore 

Shafts Times 

2J48M 

2,240.0? 

+0^7 

Sydney 

AflOnfinaries 

2,434^0 

2,43330 

+GD4 

Tokyo 


17,509j46 18.013.88 -C38 

Kota Uimpur Composite 

1,241.87 

1^32.48 

+0.76 

Bangkok 

ser . 

849.17 

858.97 

-1.14 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

676.91 

678.94 

•0.30 

Taipei 

Stock Market Index 7^19^56 

7&0.77 

-0.98 

Manila 

PSE 

3^2&38 

3,275.83 

+1JBQ 

Jakarta 

Composite index 

684.98 

686.12 

-0.17 

WeSngton 

N2SE-40 

2,417,80 

2,42721 

-0.39 

Bombey 

Sensitive index 

K A. 

3,42709 

- 

Source: Teiekurs 


Herjid Tnbuw 

Very briefly: 


Mazda Considers a Parts Pact With Ford 


CtmOedbyOwSafFnm Dapexha 

TOKYO — Mazda Motor Cotp. 
said Thursday it was exploring ways 
of sharing auto parts with Ford Motor 
Co., signaling ever deeper ties with 
the U.S. company, which controls 
Mazda with a 33.4 percent stake. 

Ihe Nihon Keizai Shixnbun report- 
ed that Ford and Mazda had agreed to 
share engines to cut production costs. 
Mazda said it was working on details 
of the cost-cutting collaboration and 


that it would make some decisions by 
the end of March. 

Mazda's long-standing ties with 
Ford intensified last year when Ford 
raised its stake from about 25 per- 
cent and installed Henry Wallace, a 
former Ford executive, as Mazda's 
chief executive. 

“We have plans to synchronize 
our cycle for launching new cars with 
that of Ford and to use common 
platforms,” a spokesman said. He 


said the company studying which 
models of cars should share standard 
platforms and whether engines 
should be included in die shared-parts 
scheme. A platform comprises a car’s 
chassis and suspension system. 

Mazda also said it "planned to 
spend 18 billion yen (S152.4 mil- 
lion) to build a computer network 
that would connect it with Ford and 
the two companies' suppliers. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg/ 


Japan’s Trade Surplus With U.S. Widens 


GmvMbrOir Su^FnwnDtipatdta 

TOKYO — Japan’s merchandise- 
trade surplus narrowed by a iarger- 
tban-expected 20.6 percent in 
December from a year earlier, but its 
surplus with die United Stales 
widened for die third consecutive 
month, the Finance Ministry said 
Thursday. 

The surplus, which measures 
goods passing through customs and 
is not adjusted for seasonal factors, 
shrank to 881.48 billion yen ($7.40 
billion) as high oil prices drove up 
import costs, the ministry said. 


But the surplus with the United 
States climbed 7.8 percent from a 
earlier, to 389.11 billion yen. 


yen’s value against the dollar 
fell 83 percent from August to 
December, and the dollar Iras con- 
tinued to strengthen this month. 

This indicates that "the pace of 
expons to theU.S. will continue be- 
cause America has quite robust 
growth with low inflation,” Akio 
Yoshino, an economist at Credit 
Suisse Asset Management, said be- 
fore the trade report was released. 

Vehicle exports rose 8.4 percent 


in December as Japanese auto- 
makers raised production to meet 
demand for models introduced in 
September. For all of 1996, Japan’s 
trade surplus shrank 32.4 percent, to 
6.7 trillion yen. the ministry said. In 
yen terms, it was the smallest trade 
surplus since 1 982. Still, exports and 
imports both reached record highs. 
Japan’s exports rose 7.7 percent, to 


44.734 trillion yen. while imports 
rose 20.4 percent to 37.990 trillion 
yen. It was the largest percentage 
increase in imports since 1989. 

(AP. Bloomberg, Reuters) 


• Standard Chartered Bank PLC. Sanwa Bank Ltd„ Dai- 
Ichi Kangyo Bank Ltd. and Shanghai-Paris International 
Bank, a joint venture of Banque Nationale de Paris and 
Industrial & Commercial Bank of China, were approved to 
handle local-currency business in the Pudong district of Shang- 
hai. Four other foreign banks won government permission to 
w ork in that business sector late last year. Some brokers said the 
move was an attempt to raise real-estate prices in the district. 

• China's recent decision to resume com exports could trigger 
a price war. traders said. China banned ov erseas sales of com 
in December 1994 to help rebuild its supply. 

• Malaysia's gross domestic product rose 8.2 percent last year, 
compared with growth of 9.5 percent in 1995. The man- 
ufacturing sector, which accounted for 343 percent of GDP, 
expanded by 12.8 percent, compared with 143 percent. 

• PT Mobile Seluiar Indonesia plans to invest 5240 million 
over three years to set up a cellular-telephone system that will 
provide cheaper service to Indonesia’s rural areas. 

• Japan's eight largest pons plan to reduce docking charges 

by as much as 25 percent May 1 to try to compete better with 
other Asian pons. Bkjomhnx. Return 

Firms Named for Manila Water Job 

The Associated Press 

MANILA — Consortiums led by two Philippine con- 
glomerates. Ayala Corp. and Benpres Holdings Corp.. won 
die bidding Thursday in the 57 billion privatization of Ma- 
nila’s water system. 

Ayala, a land developer, leads the Manila Water Co. con- 
sortium, which also includes Bechtel Overseas Corp. of the 
United States and United Utilities PLC of Britain. Benpres is 
joined in its consortium by Lyonnaise des Eaux SA of France. 

The two groups will operate concessions for 25 years and are 
to invest 57 billion in Manila’s water and sewage systems. 


SONY? Neu>$brk Will Be R& Second Home SKODA: With VW at Its Side, Czech Carmaker Carves a Niche for Itself in Eastern Europe 


Continued from P»ge 15 

write-off at Sony Pictures in 1994. Since 
Mr. Scbulbof resigned under pressure in 
December 1995, Mr. Idei and other ex- 
scutives in Tokyo have been taking a 
more direct role m overseeing Sony Pic- 
tures and Sony Mnsic. . 

Tire new reorganization, Sony officials 
said, simply recognized that feet Sony of 
America will no longer be placed above 
the American companies and un d e r the 
Tokyo headquarters in a vertical rela- 
ionshxp but wall be “more Kke an ex- 
tension of Sony Corp. of Japan,’ ’ Mr. Idei 

The New York headquarters will have 
ao operating functions bin only staff fonc? 
dons such as finance, legal affair s and 
strategic planning, he said. Sony 
dsn chang B the American unit’s name, 
said. 

Mr. Idei said be intended to hire 
someone by April to head the New York 
office, which has been withemtapresident 
since Mr. Schulbofs departure. He said 

the person would “not necessarily’’ betel 

American. . . . 

He said be had "no intention 'ofhinng 

Michael Ovitz, foe former Hollywood 


talent ageni who recently left the second- 
ranking job at Wait Disney Co. and bad 
been rumored to be talking to Mr. Ida 
scout ajob at Sony. 

Since becoming president of Sony in 
3995. Mr. Idei has shuttled to New Yak 
and California monthly, mainly to try to 
resnzzect Sony Pictures, which has been 
plagued by cost overruns and box-office 


Last autumn, he installed a manage- 
ment team heated by John Calley, a 
former president of United Artists, and 
said that at some point in the future — 
though not in foe near future — Sony 
Pictures might sell shares to foe public. 
Giving , the Hollywood umt more 
autonomy from New Yak could be a step 
toward that goaL 

Mr. Ida also said Sony planned to form 

a subsidiary to otter foe digital satellite 
television broadcasting business in Ja- 
pan. 

These are fores companies now provid- 
ing a planning to provide multichannel 
digital television from satellites, and Sony 
wants. in make an investment to be an 
“equal partner" in one of diem, he said. 


Continued from Page 13 

ket position Volkswagen is not able to 
fill because of the cost structure in Ger- 
many. If there were no Skoda in the 
group, Volkswagen would lose that po- 
tential market.” 

Skoda has a nice niche in Western 
Einope, where Mr. Wittig says about a 
third of Skoda’ s budget Felicias are sold. 
The rest are split evenly between the 
Czech Republic and Slovakia. 

VW bought 70 percent of Skoda from 
foe Czech government in 1991, edging 
1.4 billion DM 
invested 
Koehler, 

Skoda’s finance director, said. 

workers^with cosSy'robots, Skoda has 
exceeded its production targets. 

In fact, Skoda's cheap and highly 
skilled work force with nearly a cen- 
tury's experience in cannaking was foe 
mam draw for Volkswagen. 

“Now we are able to produce more 
cars than expected with a smaller in- 
vestment, with less fixed cost,” Mr. 
Koehler said. 

“If we change foe product, it will be 



much easier to build a new car with foe 
same people chan to build new robots.” 

As at VWs recently opened plant in 
Resende, Brazil, many of the Octavia 
factory workers actually work for VW’s 
suppliers and are responsible for foe 
quality of the assembly. Rib-like sub- 
assembly lines bring front ends, cock- 
pits, wheel assemblies and other major 
parts to the main assembly line. 

The subassembly lines are operated 
and staffed by 10 independent suppliers 
who boh then finished assemblies onto 
Skoda’s frames. The lines have their own 
loading docks to bring just-in-time de- 
liveries to the factory. 

As foe premier automaker in Eastern 
Europe, Skoda was a ripe target when 
Volkswagen bought it. From 123,000 
sales in 1990, Skoda managed to move 
only 27,000 cars in 1991 when prices 
were liberalized. 

VWs entry pushed that back up over 
100,000 in 1992. as VW quality control 
restored Czech consumers' faith in the 
car. In 1995, Skoda introduced the Fe- 
licia compact, its first new model under 
VW, and last year it sold 214,000 Fe- 
licias through October, up 25 percent 
from 1995. This year, Skoda hopes to 


make 340,000 cars in Mlada Boleslav. 

Western Europe is 3 tough and com- 
petitive market, but with Central and East 
European economies showing some of the 
strongest growth in Europe. Skoda ex- 
ecutives say their relatively low-priced 
cars are poised to build on the rising ex- 
pectations and lower incomes in the East 
In fact, Mr. Wittig says that with East- 
ern roads filled with large, aging West- 
ern luxury cars that were bought used in 
foe early 1990s, foe new Octavia has a 
vast pool of potential customers. 

“People won’t trade in a BMW or a 
Mercedes for a Skoda Octavia in Western 
Europe, but that will happen here.” Mr. 
Whrig said. "We will be foe alternative, 
for the first time, of a new car that matches 
the disposable income of customers.' ’ 
Analysts agree that Skoda's combin- 
ation of Czech prices and German qual- 
ity makes it well-placed to fight off the 
competition and become one of Eastern 
Europe's best-selling cars. Dagrnar Bot- 
tenbiuch, an automotive specialist at MC 
Securities in London, said Skoda had 
been vital to VWs expansion plans. 

"It’s beat a §ood investment fa two 
reasons,” she sard. “It gave them instant 
access to foe emerging market area of 


Eastern Europe, and it gave them a low- 
cost product.” Sooner or later, that com- 
pany is going to produce some real cash, 
and the extra volume that plant generates 
can reduce the price Audi and Seat pay for 
pans.” 

The Czech government, which has 
kept a 30 percent stake in Skoda, says it 
is pleased with Volkswagen’s perfor- 
mance so far and expects Skoda to ac- 
count for about 6 percent of the Czech 
Republic's total exports in 1996. 

vW executives say Skoda is com- 
mitted to keeping its own identity in the 
Volkswagen group, and it has plans to 
expand production into low-labor zones 
across the world’s emerging markets. 

Already. Skoda assembles cars in Po- 
land. and new assembly lines are going 
up in Minsk, Belarus, and Smolensk, 
Russia, where foe Felicia costs as much 
as a Lada, the creaky Russian car built 
from a 1970s Flar assembly line. 

Skoda is even hoping to bring its war 
with the Asians to their own turf. Besides 
talking with local partners about a new 
assembly line in Egypt, and with India's 
Eicher Group about building an as- 
sembly plant there, Skoda is now hold- 
ing talks about building cars in China. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAYS 

HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 

Appears 
on Pagp II 



1 - 

ftnonaft 



MAY THE SKm WMWjOFJjJ* 
Snw§»A S bwxU iwf8«r2w* 

ut Stem (Ms, helper 
pay farm. ^ 

bm hewn in W. Rttwwn nasi he 

roM-MG/TT. 


Swr AUTO DSNSI FMHCE 
EEKa^s.7W&msoo. 

ar.PWSrfSPJIfl® 55 ® 


Employment 


. ttflM CALffOBMA 
: cddBf&fe. art h e WM*” * 
. Ttfm T* 01832 572BB572301 


Legal Sendees 


OV0RCE to » ms. Lam. No Tmet 
Since 1963. Teh ++S7S7MB292, Fn 
972JL771B294. 

. atxanUvoiw. Caifcjerfal & Otecre* 


DIVORCE M 1 DAY. No trawl Wife 
to 3^S«*wy, HA 01778 USA. Tri 
SBM4&S387, F«c 50BWM1K. 


Announcements 


Attention visitors 
from fee US! 



in key U.S. rifles 
fa How 


tar* -WH3 


BABBS AS 24 

AU 24 JANVIER 1987 
P* Hob TVA an devise kale 
(ntixOoa depentfe at UanandB) 
Ram tea tee toaroe Mntaic 

FRANCE (zone Cj an FF* • TVA 20,6% 
GO; S# FOOt ZM 
SOT: US 5CS* 5# 

UK tow C) en U -TVA 175S {taut 8K) 
fitt 05517 PtXT: 0,3478 

AILEWOS I) DMA *TWin 
2OXI-0: 

GO: 1,10 

zoret-t: 

60: tjfi SCSP-. Ml 

20BEU-F: 

GO: tJS 5CSP. 1,37 

ZONEN-F: 

SCSR 1,42 
2QNE/V-G; 

fia 1JB F0D; 0,65 

BELGIQUE BlFBA- TVA 21% ' 

GO: SZjBS FOCfc 11,51 

SOT 33£ 5CSP: 21,4fl 

KOUAUEfamS) KjGA - TVA 174* 
SO: 1£9 

UKEHB0URG Bft LUFfl - TVA 15% 

G& 20,17 

BPAGNE toe A) » PTASHVA 16 % 

GO. te£B 

SOT 10ZA1 SCSfr 103# 

.* Usage ragtorarts 


Business Opportunities 


. OFFSHORE COMPARES. Fos trae bn> 
duss aAfceTfit Lotion 44 181 741 
.1224 Far 44 181 748 5558/8323 
. mmsffUtmeuk 


OffSHQflE BANKS 
WSURANCE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
BflSfflATKJN/PASSPORTS 
TRADEflNANCE 

ASTON CORPORATION 
TRUSTEES LTD 

19 Peri tad, Doughs, Wetflfen 
Tefc maw 926591 
ftr 01624 82S12S 
London T* (171) ZZ2 9656 

Fas m m rats. 

E IM No. Brian Oertwprteajwt 


gOKRATlON 0PMRTIMTES 
Otali PflmrM Ftetiency, 2nd 
CtaraNp & 2nd Passport tfa Econo™ 
m&m, ioo% topi Gowtrmrt 
ftepatn, state? » S 28 JXB, issued in 
90 9) 180 stays, Fi«B held In E»o» 
urfi m raceta wur cfccunerts. 

NlERNATlQNAL ATTORNEYS SA. 

CfiHtBEMt Fas W5BG) 2» 5S7 
Of Far +1590) 290 864 
S4ML‘ KW7TGAOLG0M 


CLASS A KUKROAL BANK 

AnSaUe fcr nnwSata wpfcttn 
US S 25000. eonopondflU terit 
Baaxsnb W uUutes. US 93JXB 
MANCE ISKWfTS SflOLP 
Nassau Tflt E42) 394.7080. 

Fa Sm 354-7062. 
lotion Tff 44 181 539 0248 


Business Services 


fallback 

Offers 

Lowest Rates 
Ever! 


Enjoy even greater savings on 
Memattro] cans. Benefit tram me 
same lo* rates 24-hon e day. We 
secure the dearest bm most ratistts 
fines. Use Kefiscc from home, wort 
or hotels and saw. 

Cd now nd save more Wsfi 


Tel 1-206-284-6600 

Fax 1-2M2-8666 
Lines open 24 noun 
Agerts Heines wicre! 


\kallback 


417 Seand Amue West 
taste, WA 96119 USA 


YOUfi OFfltt M LONDON 
Bend Street • UeL Phone. Pax, Telex 
Tet 44 171 499 3192 Fax 171 499 7517 


Lowest Inf I 
Telephone Rates! 

Call The USA rrm 

German* 8033 

IK 5025 

Fran* S)22 

SwzBla«l — S026 

Sweden $025 

Saudi Areas $023 

Cell Fir AR Rates 
25% Conmlssbn 
Agate Wetamel 

Mart 

Tel: 1-407-777-4222 Fax 1-«G7-777*:i1 

tepJnypnc^rv'teitmat 


Financial Services 


RINDING PROBLEMS? 

VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

Lens term snsezi 
SiCrpcrtEC GiSWUEK 
iCctrOEsur- earned afy up&n Fuming) 
'Bankable gusantees u seme fwtag 
to vase WUES arar^ed bf 

BANCOR 

OF ASIA 


>0104264 


Fni 
Tet i 


Bratera Carrenssix Assured 


PRIME BANK 
GUARANTEES 

VerSurB Capital Finance Avakabto 
In Government ProjecC and 
Gctemmen: Conpanes 
tteJ ire for sale 
Large Projects our Specially 
Also, urg Tam Finance lo 
lanp and Snail Ccmositie? 

No mmnieten Una Finite) 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Needed to ac as Liaison 

Pisa reply n Erajish 

VENTURE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 
tomtomi takers 
16311 Venture B« Suits 996 
Endno, CtWMte 91436 U&A. 
Fax No.: (BIB) 905-1666 
TaL (BIB) 


TODAYS 

REAL ESTATE 
MARKETPLACE 
with the special 
1* & AROUND PARIS 
Section 

Appears 
on Page 4 


Hcralb^feleribune 

the mngura mm nkvskvher 

PUNNING 10 RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

EUROPE NORTH AMERICA 


FRANCE BKfcfarij, 

Tet f01)4t 43*365, 

Foe (01; 41 43 93 70. 
fcmgi OovifeJedfl.con 

GERMAN?. AU518IA& CENTRAL 
0JRCPE FianHun, 

U: (069) 97 12500. 

Fbk (069)97125020. 

SWITZBUAKhPJy, 

V-m 728 3021. 
fee 1021) 728 3091. 

LNTOJQNGDCMr Lenta. 

TJL 10171)636 <802. 

Teles 262009. 

Fac 10171) 240 22S4. 


FEW YORK: 

Td- [213 752-3090 
Tel Aw 1600)5727212. 
Fac I! 12) 755-6785 

ASW/BACIHC 

HONGKONG 

TeL (8521 2^22-1186- 
Talec 61170 KWl 
Foe (8521 2922-1 190. 
34GAPC MB 
TeL: 223647B. 
tae 3250641. 

Tdoc 28749. HTSM 







^ HcralbSSnbunc. 




Sports 

FRIDAX. JANUAHY 24, 1W7 

PAGE 18 





World Roundup 


5 Rethink Asylum 

SOCCER Five of the sixteen 
Ethiopian soccer players who de- 
fected to Italy on Tuesday have 
decided to return home, the police 
announced Thursday in Rome. 

The players presented them- 
selves to airport authorities in 
Rome shortly before the scheduled 
departure of a daily flight to Addis 
Ababa. The Italian refugee com- 
mission has nor yet ruled on the 
cases of those seeking asylum. 

(AFP) 

Ertl Falls in Downhill 

skiing Martina Ertl of Germany, 
the women's World Cup giant sla- 
lom champion, had her world 
championship hopes ended on 
Thursday by a fall in training for a 
women 's World Cup Alpine down- 
hill in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy. 
Ertl injured ligaments in her left 
knee. The fall overshadowed an 
uneventful day in which the sun 
replaced the fog and snow that had 
forced the cancellation of Tues- 
day's and Wednesday's training. 

Warwara Zelenskaja of Russia, 
looking for her second career vic- 
tory, set the day's fastest time of 
one minute 31.24 seconds in her 
second run down the Olimpia delle 
Tofane course, ahead of Switzer- 
land's Heidi Zurbriggen in 
1:31.29. 

• In Kitzbuehel. Austria, warm 
weather forced organizers to cancel 
a practice session Thursday for two 
men's World Cup downhill races. 
A two-heat sprint downhill is 
scheduled Friday, followed by the 
classic downhill Saturday. 

(Reuters, AP) 


Mexico Retains U.S. Cup 

socceh Mexico retained the 
U.S. Cup on Wednesday by draw- 
ing, 0-0, with Peru in the four- 
nation soccer tournament in Pas- 
adena. California. 

The Mexicans finished with sev- 
en points, one ahead of Denmark, 
which earlier in the day beat the 
United States. 4-1. Pfcru ended the 
tournament with four points in third 
place. The Americans finished last 
after losing all three of their 
marches. a dismal performance as 
the U.S. team begins preparing for 
its World Cup "qualifying cam- 
paign. ( Reuters) 



Australia Awaits Young Finalists 

Moya Upsets Chang ; Hingis Rolls On, Beating Fernandes 


Oiglfcnl/ACnK'i* haore-IYcaM 

Mary Pierce on her way to a victory on Thursday over Amanda Coetzer. 


The Associated Press 

MELBOURNE — While Martina 
Hingis continued her steady climb to die 
top ranks of tennis on Thursday, Carlos 
Moya staged a more spectacular arrival. 

Moya, 20. who started his run at the 
Australian Open by defeating the de- 
fending champion .Boris Becker, is even 
more of a newcomer to the Grand Slam 
circuit than the 16-year-old Hingis. 

On Thursday, Moya reached Che final 
by stunning No. 2 Michael Chang, last 
year's runner-up here and at the U.S. 
Open. 

Moya forced Chang out of his usual 
game with strong and acrobatic play in a 
7-5. 6-2, 6-4 victory. He now awaits the 
winner of Friday’s semifinal between 
No. 1 Pete Sampras and No. 5 Thomas 
Muster. 

Hingis moved width) one match of 
becoming this century's youngest singles 
winner at a Grand Slam tournament by 
beating Mary Joe Fernandez 6-1, 6-3. 

She will face Mary Pierce in the final 
on Saturday. Pierce, the 1995 champion 
but — like Moya — unseeded here, 
advanced by bearing No. 12 seeded 
Amanda Coetzer 7-5, 6-1 . 

Hingis already is assured of moving 
up from No. 4 to No. 2 in the rankings, 
behind Steffi Graf. Monica Seles, who is 
injured and did not try to defend her title 
here, will drop horn No. 2 to No. 6. 

While Hingis has been playing Grand 


Slam tournaments for two years, reach- 
ing die US. Open semifinals last sum- 
mer. Moya never got past die second 
round in his first tour of the trig four 
tournaments last year. 

“I don’t think that anybody really 
expected him to get to die final, T ' Chang 
said. But, be added, Moya “played 
some great tennis.” 

"He was hitring his backhand down 
the line pretty wdv’ Chang said, “and 
his forehand was on today. ’ ■ 

Moya, seeking to become the first 
Spaniard to win the Australian Open. fat 
44 winners to 33 by Chang, and was. 
even better at avoiding unforced errors, 
making just 31 to Chang’s 46. ‘ 

"I was a little bit nervous at the 
begi nning , but I think he was more 
nervous because he made some easy 
mistakes,” said Moya, who reached the 
final in Sydney, a warm-up tournament 
to die Australian Open. 

Chang was frustrated again in his 
effort to win his first GramfSIam tour- 
nament since he took the French Open at 
age 17 in 1989. 

While Hingis has reached at least the 
semifinals of her last eight tournaments, 
winning three. Pierce has not reached a 
semifinal since Hamburg in April, when 
she improved her record against Hingis 
to 3-0. Ranked third in the world after 
winning the Australian Open in 1995, 
Pierce has since slipped to No. 22 be- 


cause of injuries and poor form. 

Coetzer, who upset Graf in the fourth 
round, battled back from 1-5 to 5-5 
against Pierce, but then found her op- 
ponent too tough- 

“I didn't know where she was miring 
the bail, I just couldn't read it very 
well,” Coetzer said. . 

Fetnandez found Hingis ready and 
waiting for neatly everything she hit. 

“I med throwing op some high balls 
and 1 tried attacking,'* said Fernandez, a 
finalist here in 1990 and l992. ‘ T made 
a few too many unforced errors os my 
forehand, going for shots, because she 
makes you go for more than you have to 
because she's so quick.” 

Hingis’s only letdown came after she 
had taken a 5-1 lead in die second set 
Toward the end of a 10-minute game 
with five deuces and two match points, 

Hingis argued a linesman’s ruling that a 

shot by Fernandez was good ana ended 
up losing two straight games. _ 
Hingis made no rniaafeg on her dunk 
man-h point, breaking Fernandez for the 
sixth rime of the match with a forehand 
crosscoart. 

. Pierce is die first unseeded women’s 
finalist here since Chris O'Neil won in 
1978. Moya became the first unseeded 
player to make the Australian Open 
final since Steve Denton in 1981. Mark 
Edmondson, in 1976, was the last un- 
seeded man to win this tournament 


With Teenager’s Comeback, a New Glimmer for Russian Skating 


By Christopher Clarey 

Specuil io the Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Figure skating and screen- 
play-ready subplots have been constant 
companions in recent years, and at the 
European championships, they con- 
verged again in the form of Elena 
Berezhnaya, an 18 -year-old Russian 
pairs skater with slightly halting diction. 

Berezhnaya. who won a bronze medal 
with partner Anton Sikharulidze on 
Wednesday, has not had her speech 
problem for long. It began last January 
when she was struck in the head by her 
fanner partner Oleg Shliakhov’s toe pick 
as they performed side-by-side camel 
spins during training in Riga, Latvia. 

The blow fractured and neatly punc- 
tured her skull. Doctors initially feared 
bleeding in her brain, but after emer- 
gency surgery, several weeks in a Riga 
hospital and therapy to help clear her 


blurred vision and improve her severely 
impaired speech capacity, she was able to 
resume full training in May with new 
partner and fellow teenager Sikharulidze, 
who happened to be her boyfriend. 

“I tola Anton, ‘This is your crystal 
vase.’ ” Russian skating coach Tamara 
Moskvina said, “ft was already broken, 
and it's very easy to break again a thing 
that has been broken once, so be careful. 
If you will keep it well, it will still be a 
crystal vase and nobody will see the 
damage.” 

Even if both had been in perfect health 
last spring, their progress in just eight 
months together would have to be con- 
sidered impressive. They already have 
fine line, speed and a well-defined sense 
of how to play off each other's move- 
ment. despite Berezhnaya's tumble on a 
throw during their fore program that 
kept them from finishing higher. 

The pairs winners were Russia’s 


reigning world champions. Marina Elt- 
sova and Andrei Bushkov, who train 
with Berezhnaya and Sikharulidze in 
Saint Petersburg. 

The silver medalists were former 
European champioos Mandy Woetzel 
and Logo Steuer of Germany. But die 
bronze medalists were the ones answer- 
ing the bulk of the questions afterward. "I 
feel good and happy for me,” said 
Berezhnaya in her beginner's English. "I 
didn't think about die accident tonight.” 

Berezhnaya's and the 19-year-old 
Sikharuldize's medal was more than a 
human interest story. It was also a re- 
minder that Russian skating fans proved 
capable of renewing itself in the wake of 
the Soviet Union's dissolution in 1991. 
At the rime of the breakup, many skating 
observers thought the writing was on the 
wall, but five years of change later. Rus- 
sian skaters continue to dominate the 
European scene despite economic hard- 


ship. a drop in interest in the sport among 
the young and the emigration of many top 
coaches to the United States. 

If anything, the Russians have be- 
come more dominant in the free^narket 
era. The Soviet system never produced 
champion women’s skaters, but la& 
year, Irina Slutskaya, 17, became the 
first Russian to win the European tide. 
This year the Russians stand a good 
chance of sweeping all four events with 
Bin Kulik. 19. and his quadruple toe 
loop in the men's division; Maria Bu- 
tyrskaya and Slutskaya in the women’s 
division; and defending world and 
Olympic champions Oksana Giitschnk 
and Evgeny Platov in dance, who main- 
tained a comfortable lead after 
Thursday's original dance. 

Some of the top Russians have found 
better conditions abroad: Kulik, 

Grischuk and Platov train with Tarassova 
near Boston in die United States. But as 


many stars have remained at home, in-: 
dueling foe top women, most of the top 
pairs and die defending Olympic men's 
champion Aleksei Urmanov, who con-! 
tinues to train with coach Aleksei Mishin 


teenagers Aleksei Yagudfeand the id. 
mg world junior champion Evgeny 1 


“Our biggest problem is finding 
money to pay expenses,” said .Mosk- 
vina, one of the high-profile coaches 
who remain ed and who over the past 
five years has had . to cope with pre- 
viously unknown problems such as 
sharply reduced Banting time for her 
skatexs and poor-quality ice. 

“We have limited conditions, but 
these conditions are enough for us to 
work bard.” she said. “We still have 
our coaches and capacity and ability. 
We simply have had to use more in- 
ventiveness now to find solutions.” 


Scoreboard 


HBA Standings 
uunureoHroiiKi 

ATLANTIC DMISMN 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Miami 

29 

11 

.725 

— 

New rp-J. 

23 

12 

.700 

I 

Waihinjlon 

20 

» 

iW 

6 

Orton da 

57 

1“ 

Ai2 

10 

Jeney 

11 

27 

J90 

17 

Boston 

9 

28 

J43 

18't 

Philadelphia 

a 

31 

-225 

20 

CENTRAL DWIBION 



Chicago 

35 

5 

375 

— 

Detraii 

26 

11 

-TIB 

6’A 

Atlanta 

26 

12 

-684 

8 

Charlotte 

23 

17 

-575 

12 

Cleveland 

22 

17 

-564 

12U 

Indiana 

19 

19 

-500 

15 

MBWQukee 

19 

20 

■487 

15S 

Toronto 

14 

25 

-359 

20V> 

nriSTEMI COMUBKIICS 


KtOWEET DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Houston 

31 

10 

J56 

— 

Utah 

28 

13 

683 

3 

Minnesota 

18 

22 

-450 

12'4 

Dallas 

13 

25 

JK2 

16'6 

Denver 

12 

29 

.292 

19 

San Antonio 

10 

28 

363 

19'4 

Vancouver 

8 

34 

.190 

23% 

PACIFIC DIVISION 



Sem#e 

30 

11 

.732 



l-A. Lowers 

29 

12 

.797 

1 

Portland 

23 

18 

-561 

7 

Saaamento 

17 

24 

.415 

13 

Golden State 

16 

23 

-410 

13 

LA-CSopen 

14 

24 

-3&B 

J4-4 

Phoenix 

15 

26 

-366 

15 

WEDNESDAY'S 

BKSOUS 


PMadetatao 

30 26 

26 

35 10-127 

Boston 

36 25 

! 30 

36 8-121 


P: Stockhouse 11-21 13-15 38. Wotters Il- 
ls 2-3 22; B:Doy5-19 4-7 17. v'tewrv 8- 1 6 7-8 
24. Rebounds— Philadelphia 82 [Cage 14). 
Boston 61 (WtalKer II). 
Assists — Phfladetptita 29 (Writers 11). 
Boston 26 (Wesley 1 1). 

Detroit 21 22 23 26- 92 

SacnnMBto 23 28 25 29— 97 

D: Hffl 12-27 9-V 33, Thorpe M2 8-10 24; 5: 
Richmond f-20 15-1633. Abdui-Rcufl 1-190- 
0 23. Rebsusds— Oetrod 41 (Thorpe 13). 
Scaameino 48 (Smith 121. Assists— Detrofi 
II (HR A}, Soaamento 22 flttcftnt end 10). 
New Jersey 33 16 27 37—183 

Sam Antonio 28 20 24 25— 95 

NJ_ GDI 13-24 56 32. KRttes 8-14 5-5 ZV 
SAi MaKwetl MS 041 2a Wflldns 5-10 Bto 20. 
Rebound* — New Jersey 52 (J.WWoms 14). 
Son Antonia 44 (E8tott 91. Asslsts-New 
Jersey 16 (Reeves 7), Sat Antonio 22 
(AJohwon 13). 

VUcoaier 22 22 21 19—84 

Denver 29 27 21 17—94 

V: Abdur-Rahtm 1 0-20 2-3 22. Reeves 8-12 
1 -2 1 7; D: UEBb 8-20 3-< 22. McDyess 9-23 2- 
4 20. Rebounds— Vancouver 49 (Reeves 125, 
Denver 58 (Jackson 16). Assists— Vancouver 
21 (Mayberry 7), Denver 23 (Jodtson 12). 
Utah 26 21 34 38—111 

Phoenix 19 24 20 36- 99 

U; MoJone 16-28 9-12 41, Stockton 8-125-5 
23; P-. Ceballos 6-15 7>7 20, Chapman 5-8 4-4 
1 S. Rebounds— Utah 37 iMatone 8). Phoenix 
44 (CsbaUos 10). Assists— Utah 27 (Stockton 
12). Phoenix 24 (Johnson 8). 

Portland 23 28 26 20—97 

Seattle » 21 25 23-98 

P: Trent 9-11 6-6 24 O’Neal M0 4-4 20; S: 
Sdwerapf Ml 8-9 2£ Kemp 8-17 7-11 
Z3.R«bouKb— Porttcnd 46 (Trent 7). Seattle 
46 (Kemp 14). Asststs-Parfland 21 
(Anderson )0). Seattle 25 (Payton W. 


EuwoLcaoue 

WEmesoAy results 

CROUPE 

Chorierot Beta. 67, CSKA Moscow. Russ- 72 
snoupe 

SevBa. Spam, 91. vneutbanne France 68 
Paw Fiance 66. PanattdnaOa& Greece, tb 
D fnamo. Mate. Rus. 64. Lfubt|ana Star. 76 
CROUP H 

Sarcefcna, Spain. 91. Etas Pnsea, Turkey. 67 


NHL Standings 



W 

L 

T 

Pta 

GF 

GA 

Pttfodeiohta 

27 

13 

7 

61 

152 

116 

N.Y. Rangers 

24 

19 

7 

55 

170 

139 

Florida 

22 

14 10 

54 

131 

110 

New Jersey 

23 

17 

5 

51 

118 

114 

Wahtegtan 

20 

22 

5 

45 

127 

128 

Tampa Boy 

18 

21 

6 

42 

131 

141 

N.Y. btandem 

14 

23 

9 

37 

12S 

138 

NOHTTEAST DMSKJN 




W 

L 

T 

Pta 

GF 

GA 

Pittsburgh 

26 

15 

5 

57 

171 

138 

Buffalo 

25 

17 

S 

55 

139 

123 

Hartford 

19 

20 

7 

45 

133 

146 

Montreal 

18 

22 

8 

44 

154 

164 

Boston 

17 

23 

6 

40 

135 

165 

Ottawa 14 

22 

8 

36 

120 

132 

CENTtUU-DCVtStON 

8 



W 

L 

T 

PS 

GF 

GA 

□anas 

25 

17 

4 

54 

133 

114 

Detroit 

71 

76 

9 

51 

140 

107 

St. Louis 

21 

22 

4 

46 

137 

1S1 

Phoenix 

19 

23 

4 

42 

125 

150 

Chicago 

17 

24 

e 

42 

125 

133 

Taranto 

76 

29 

0 

36 

144 

165 


PACme DIVISION 

W L T Ml Gf 6A 
Colorado 28 11 B 64 160 108 

Edmonton 21 22 5 47 154 1« 

Vancouver 22 21 2 46 147 150 

Anrteftn 18 22 5 41 128 135 

San Jose 17 23 5 39 120 143 

Calgary 17 25 5 39 117 140 

Los Angeles 17 25 5 39 127 160 

■mamrsiiseiTs 

Rorida 8 10 0-1 

Hartford 18 8 1—2 

Rrsl Perio d. rt-Prtroeou 1i (Emerson, 
Rice) Second Period: F-Rfegerahf 9 (Hough, 
Skrodlond) TIM Perio d. None. Overtone; i 
H-Kran 6 lOtiem. Ranhefm) Sbafs on goal: 
F- 7-15-16-3—41. H- 13-7-9-3-32. Goalies: 
F-PKzpafricfc. H-flurhe. 

Montnrd 8 1 8-1 

Baffato 1 3 2-6 

First Period: B-Dawe 12, (sh). Sncoad 
Period: B-Ptante 21 (Zhltaft) 1 B-, Hottinger 
15 (Audette) 4, M-Oanphousse 20 (Savage, 
ftecrtii) 5. B-Bamaby 11, Third Period: B- 
Peca 10 (Shannon. Burrklge) 7, B-Daure 13 
(Peat. Bunfdgel Shod oa goaf: M- *11- 
13 — 33. B- 9-8-16— 3X Grades M-Thtooult, 
JobtonskL B-Hasek. 

Boston « l 3—4 

Ottawa 0 g i—i 

First Period: None. Second Period: B- 
Oates 17 (Bourque) (sti). TIM Period: B- 
Haridns 2 (Kennedy. Mafiefe) 3. B-Ttxxhet 
11 iChynowefh) 4, B-McLoren 4 (Bourque) 5, 
0-8onk 2 (York) Shots ea goal: B- 4-1 T-9—24. 
O- 5-10-9—24. GeaBes: B-Tates. O-Tugnutt. 
Edmonton 0 1 8— l 

N.Y. Islanders 1 3 4-8 

FW Period: New York, McCabe 7 
(SmoBnsW. Potffy) Second Period: E- 
Kovalento 23 (Weight. Arndt) (pp). 3. New 
York. King 14 (Mdnnis. McCabe) 4. New 
York. King 15 (Green) 5. New York, Pertly 27 
(SmoOnskL Board) TbM Period: New York, 
Mdrads 14 (King, McCabe). 7. New Yota. 
Amstrong 4 (Hughes) 8. New York, Kruse 5 


Escorts 6 Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON - PARIS 


THE FINEST 2 THE HOST 5HCERE 
18 - 38* INTERNATIONAL 
BEAUTIFUL A ELEGANT 5TUDEN7S 
SECRETARIES, AM HOSTESSES A 
MODELS v 

AVAILABLE AS YOUR COMPANION 
MfflS SERVICE W0RLDWDE 
Escort Agency Credit Canto Yfekaw 

TEL- LONDON 4 + 44 ( 0 } 


0171 589 5237 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

Word's EiS 1 Most ExctoM Seiwe 
Models. Beatty Queens. Actresses 
UuttiQnquaj Trend Compaotons 

HdqBs. 212 - 755-7896 NV.l/SA 

Senee uoddwxte Cre® cants, checks 
acceded View vtdws l pMfts * 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
51 Beauchamp Place. London SWT 
Tet 0171-584 6513 


AMSTERDAM * DREAMS ’ ESCORTS 
and Owner Dare Sence for Hm or He. 
,31 (Ql iO-fc CB HI / &i ® 65b 


ROYAL PLATINUM SERVICE 

ATLANTIC 

NEW YORK 

(I) 212 785 1919 

LONDON PARIS 



Sense wwtowfe, onh nfl top mxfeis 
LONOON+PAR&MONACO+MADH1D 
sracKHOUiMaTaoRGtfes^ 
G£N£VA4?UflK>4MLAN(W53ME 
EfiUSSELS*OOPENHAG0kCYPRUS 
SrWffiUL+ATHBS^SUMJSSON 
DU6AMjERMANY+V1EW4A4J SA 
Office Bmps; ++43-V786 21 58 
Office Here York: 212 267 3953 csnfe 


*SWI 7 ZERIMJ + fiERHANT 

TeL: t^1-2JH27 28 27 
ZUnafr£8EVA4ASEbBEFINE 
NEW; LONDON - BRUSSELS - VBMA 
COSMOS Ese« Agency. CraS C Jtb 


ARtSTOCATS Escort Service 

3 ShaAfiure St Lmdan W1 
0171 258 0090 


VENUS IN FURS 

24W» WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 362 7000 

lUcmfc AAgnce txxtongs wetom 


HBDT5 HIGH SOOEmnB0IA1>AR6 
COIE UAZUfl & ZURICH ’ GB1F 
Itanakid Escort & Travel Senes 
Vienna ++43-1^354104 al craft cards 


LONDON HEATHROW 

TIE ULTIMATE ESCORT SEVKE 
TEL: 0171 349 0837 


aiROCOMTACT INTI ~~~ 

Tog local & (revel setwx werttrife 




RiVERA-BRUSSELSlOWarVlEWA 
G£NEYA'ZLMCH'r*c*e GERMANY 
Emit Save? Vara ++43-1-21204 31 


EU 1 E Escort Service 

NEW YORK CITY 
1-WWBW667 


JflUNO l/ODE ESCORT 

Serria mttrffc +» 0M22577S7 


SWITZERLAND A HTL Escort Service 
Zurich + area lfcs Vara & Brest 
CIU + Oi area Sadi USA lop node*. 
Mob bite & gens. 7-dafs; al raids 
“VOGUE" Tel. *41 (0) 79 353 3875 


••CONCEPT 2000** 
EXCLUSIVE ESCORT S Travel Agency 
FRAfKFUHT - 955 20 774 


GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 
BASa. LAUSANNE. MONTREUX 
Cal 022/346 00 89 Escort Agency 
■ ZURICH LUZERN 01*4632334 


DOSSEIJDOSFmOGNEfflANCTfflT 
VflESSyjEMIAWZ-HEIDELBERG 
Gab's Escort Eemce +49(0)171-5311805 


"EXECUTIVE CLUB 1 
LONDON ESCORT SEHYICE 
TB- 0171 722 5008 C&B Cards 


FRANKFURT* REQ0N 

Puri Class Escort, Dmrar * Date Semce 

T* 0® - 510 868 


HELENA ESCORT SERVICE 
LONDON HEATHROW 24 HRS 

TO- 0650 173940 


JASinre ESCORT SERVICE 
LONDON 0171 935 0564 
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 


■UNTOHEITALnOTOONT/UIB* 
®USSElSlUGANOUADRIDTfiJNlCH 
DTDORF-BJVJERA-VlHWtA &XW Sflr 
vra. TA 39 (0)338 828 5062 C®tfe 


WCKV ChansmSjc. SeauSul 
Prirate Escort Sance 
KTOnjiW 0171 792 0881 


TANYA. BLACK. Efeptt & Educstod 
London/ Heeftro* Prrate Escort Serves 
0)81 906 2261 Cratt Cards WScotne 


VAUXTM5 WTERNAnamL 
VP Escort Seivw ttms to vinr centra 
London oSea 0171 835 0005 al cants 


(Webb. SmoHnsU) 9. New Yor*. Webb T 
(Howto, Armstrong) (pp). Strati an gotd: E- 
5-8-4—17. New York 10-1 1-ID— 31. Goafimc 
E-Joseph. Esseraa. New York. Rdraud. 
Cofgory 1 2 0-3 

Taranto 2 11—5 

Rrst Period: GJgtata 14 (Oteson. 
Hogkmd) IT-MukrU (CtaiKGamoon (pp). 
XT-Coaper2(G(knaur,Vitarrinei1 (pp). Second 
Period: C-Ffcmy 20 (Rodn*,0*nsan) (pp).& 
T-Zener 1 (Ganrau) 6, T-Ctek 15 (Gamouc 
Sand to) 7. C-Reury Zl (Gagner, Htashto) 
Tbbd Period: T-Sundta 29 (Gamouri tan). 
Shuts on Boat C- 15-11 -9-3S. T- 6-7 4-14-04. 
GeekK C-RotaMV KJdtf. T-PoNtn. 

N.Y. Rtetgen 3 12-5 

W caW gton 8 2 1-3 

FW Period: New York, Leefctt 14 (GnBXy, 
Sitadsanm) Z New Yort. RobBoOe 20 (Mortar. 
Leetch) (pp). 1 New Ybrk. Vorobiev 2 (Gtrtzfcy, 
Ko^nvtsav) Second Potod: W-KonowoldiukB 
(Harder. Oofe) S iMondwa (Gancriil Tb»d 
Period: W-Bondro 29 (Ptvanfca Ea^es) 7, New 
Ytato. LenKM5 (Stnttam. Meoeto) B, New 
York, Graves 15 (Sundtoom, Mesleri tan). 
9MS on got* New It* 10-7-1 1— 78. W- T2-19- 
9-40. Gacflcs: Not Ytak, Herty. W-Creoy, 
Kotdg. 

PTdtadriphta 1 ■ 1 *-2 

Detroit 12 14-4 

first Period: P-KJctt 14 (Destontan) 
Second Period: D-Lktstraro 9 cstntotam, 
YTermonl 1 D- Konstantinov 2 (Lapotnto, 
YSerman) Tbbd Parted: P-LeCWr 29 
(Howerchuk) Ovtrttae: None. Starts on gent 

P-56-9-0— 20. D-1T-8-12-3— 34. GoaflecP- 

Hejdofl. D-Vemon. 

Vooconer 111 1—4 

Cttcogo 1 2 0 8—3 


nrit Period: c-MOer 11 (Daze, Sovanfl Z 
V-Wob8n 2 (Bare) Second Perio d. C-MBer 12 
(Dazw WetroWi) (pp). 4. OSbantz 3 {Do» 
Black) 5, v-, SMqa 13 (GoBnav GourtnalO 
(pp). Herd Period: V-Roberts 6 (MogBny, 
Hettsa) Overtone 7, V-Mo^kiy 19 (Wottm 
COUrtnnH) Stmts an go* V- 9-7-9-2-27. C- 
11 -13-60-28. Cedes: V-McLeon. C- 
Hadwrt. 

Ln Asgetes f l 1-2 

Sn Jose 2 4 1-7 

Rrst Ported: s J.-Notan 1& 1 SJ.-Turcotte 
10 (Mazurov, DctHen) Second Period: SJ.- 
Nofarr 7 9 iFiiesen Quota), 4, l-A^Fermo U 
(Boucher, Otczyk) (pp). & SJ.-> Kozlov ID 
(Nazarov, Nolan) 6, SJ.-Friesen 13 (Notan, 
Rognnisson) (pp). 7, SJ^Tiocorte 11 
(DoMen, AteSartey) TMrd Period: LA r 
PeneoutfB (Boocher. Otczyk) (PPL % SJv 
Friesen 14 (Nkhaas) (sh). Shota on goto: 
LA- 8-9-7— 2< SJ.- 24-13-8—45- GoaBes 
LA-Oofe* Flset. S J.-Ttareri. 

Kara Jersey 1 0 8-1 

Aoatwtra 1 2 8-3 

find Period: NJ^rtatston 15 (HoOc 
AodreychoW- Z A-Staanne 26 (Kortya, 
RucchW Second P e ri od: A- Kent 8 (Bettows. 
Karpa) 4 A-Kretya 17 (Mtrenov, Stasme) 
ThM Periota None. Starts on grata NJ^- 15- 
14-13-42. A- 13-13-4—30. Gooioi. 
Dunham. A-Hebert. 


WISMESOJCr, AT PMAQBIA. CALBQftMA . 
UaBed States l. Danmark 4 
McdCD&PecoO 

jo sound. (Our 
Aston VBIa X Nolls County 0 

■iwiramna ure 

OUAKTB9RMAL 

Stodcport2,SoutbDnqrtnn2 


AumtAUAM Ops* - 

~~ ~7 - .. -■ 

TURSDATSHESOUS 

Mmy Pteim Bonce, daf. Amando Coetzer 
nZL South Africa, 7-& M. 

Morflna tfingb (4L Swteertond det Mary 
Joe Ftanandez OO. UA. M. M 


Marttao Htaght Swtlzeriowt and Natasha 
Zvereva (4), Betoru»'def. Glgt Fenwnctaz. 
UA. and Aranbto Sanchez Vtcorto CD. Spahv 
6-3, 5-7, 6-2. 


Israel I, Greece! 

Italy 2. Nartbem Irekmdo 
Portugal 0. France 2 


Cartas Maya Spate, del MKtwri Chang 
(2), UJ»7-5,6-Z 6-4 . • 

MBIta DOUBLES OUARTERHNALS . 
Joan SBngft.- -NHiwrionds. dnd find 
Hoartmh C9. NeftiertaAdB. del ' Mark 
Knowtes, Bahama* and DanW Nestor (5), 

Canada, 6-3,1 -4 6-Z, 2-4 6-1 

Sebastfen Lareata Conadiv and Aiex 
O'Brien (7). del Nell Broad. Britain, ond 


Plri Norval OO, S. Mfco. 3-4 6A6-L 7-i 

—P DOMm OUA WOTHA IJS 
Anna KoaerWcMa Russia and Mo* 
Kwwt e* BatamraGdet LtenltayiontaUA. 
and Pdrick GaftrabhCB. UX 6-C 7-6 (7-fl. 

Lori McNeft ULS^ and Brian MoePfihv 
U^. riel Irina Spfetata Romania and Omoid 
Johnson. US.woftavec. 

Monan BategraL NeRiarian Os. and Rktd' 
Lendl C3J. US. Oet Neddie MedvratowsP' 
Ukraine and Joan Bttagh. Mdbeihndv 3- 
45-XG4. 

• PAvaCw 

ajR QrAWUCA ZDWE 
. UHOUPA 

Macarioate 4 San MarinoO 
Orognn JOoanoafd de£ OtaSmi Ron M 
2-6 6-aZomnScvce nta deL Domenka view 
6-1 frta Se v can l nVr uun McgiBnoavdalvM- 
nVGobrW PnjnctaiM 7-6 (7-S). 
TDriceriBWopteO 

' Berts Ergum del HnWrano KJdoneft-O 6- 
7(&7i Mt Erimn Oral del Yobones Setevie 
« 6-ft MostapbaAzkorarAkxiriAi Koragoz 
rieLSanutaGetaletfStaegne 64)6-3. 
cikmjpb 

Senegal & Armenia 0 

Jeon-Noei Start drt Artak Hentyoflten 5-J 
6-LYahlya Doumbfadet David BobaVem 64) 
64b DournbtaTTbtemo Ly def. HO|k 
tWMpQn7Hartyw*ra5-2 6-3. 

- LwKnixrargZSaszripMinegavtaol • 
JotmoyGoudenbowdef. BdarMuslaflc6- 
36« Sacha Tonia lost Id Medd ZaMiovic 6-7 
OM3) 1*6» Goud e ntao w /Po s ati Sdraul dot. 
Maslaflc/ZidiliDvrc 46 6-3 6<. 

Mrmlngtoara names tost) - 



ACROSS 

1 'Cowabungal* 
or *23 ekkldoo* 

io F or mii al Bd 

13 Horn® of the 
Hrttites 


Est. 1911, Paris 

“Sank I loo Doe Noo” 


CROSSWORD 


*€LfkeH.P. 

Lovocraft s to ries 
IT Onetime Sting 
operation? 

1 8 Go after 
te Farm areas 
20 Accepted 


21 Mirrored 

22 Ode subject 
csAlaU 

24 AduBerate 
2 aTao, fijerefty 
28 Letter ban 


20 1963 Martin Rttt 

Rkn 

31 Complimentary 
close 

*3 Kind of terming 

38 “Who knows not 
where a wasp 
does wear his 
song?" speaker 
Trurvrf 


39 Jewish months 
42 Census entry 
43 ‘Skin Deep" star 

4B 'Bonne 1" 

47 YeSow fruit 
49 Common finer 
so Aberdeen 
negative 
siSaftffitldte 

52 Depression 

53 Tens 

65 Oisfncfinad 
srMecficai 
disseettons 

89“ lUCk I' 

•o Garden bloomer 
91 Campaign tacSs 
62 Volcanologist's 
Instrument 


e Humorist Shriner 
7 Saiad garnish' ' 
9 Greetings from 
John Denver? 
.91856 Stowe 
nrareJ 

10 HoBday mo- 

11 Detox place 

12 Plains nedve 

i3Ftna#y 

understands, 

with “to” 

14 Something nice 

tofeef 

23 1076 Writer .. 
Olympics host ' ■ 

24 Aston movie 


25 1861 Oration 
Heston portrayal 
27 Cadence sounds 
29 Mandeb's poRL 
party 

as Hear again 
3«Bodcfish-bfOwn - . 
so Groove 
37 SmaH eatery 

3« Mato amends 

for 

40 Grow 
abundenVy 

41 Standpipe with 
twoopamgs 

42 Some 
wit ch craft 

44 involve 
49Come-on 


Bidiiiiii 


■■j 

MHB 


Hill MIHMII UIBH 
biiiii rfiiidiid 
I dlldlllll I 

Imi mail I 

iiiiii ZmmZ 


*5!S£ Miiiiiu 
MBIgl rillHHH 

Mi jgHfll 


©AfiPw York Times/ Edited by ffW Shorts. 

Solution to Puzzle of Jan. 23 


nQHQ QOJQgn 

QIIIBD IJJQnCT Einninia 



A Space for Thought. 


i McDonald's 
freebie 

s Where butts are 

(rote-pfays) ! 
raAJfenoebasfs 

P&tod 53 Froth 

aEstabbshafc* 

with 

4 Fears one 
s Mud. care 
provides 

B4 Hungarian 
patriot Nagy ~ 

H Kramden laugh 
se Cable leoera. ' 


illWil 

anmriR SH Ha oaaa 







































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24. 1997 


i Sabres’ Hot Sticks 


- nAw iwra rress 

Since the Jumbotroa score- 
board fell to the ice at the 
Marine Mi dland Arena, 
things have been falling into 
place for the Buffalo Sabres. 

The Sabres continued their 
success Wednesday night 
with a 6-1 decision over the 
Montreal Canadiens. 

The Sabres lost their lead- 
ing scorer, Pat LaFontaioe, to 
a concussion eariy in the sea- 
son and had more bad news 

' MHURod hpop ~ 

when their $4 million score- 
board fell. Since then the 
Sabres are 9-2-2 at home. 

Npw two . points behind 
Pittsburgh in the Northeast 
Division, the Sabres will have 
the advantage of playing 12 of 
their next 14 games at home. 

Jason Da we started the 
scoring for Buffalo with a 
shorthanded goal in the first 
period and closed it with an- 
cwfer in the third as the Sabres 
won their fourth st raig ht 

2, Panthar* 1 

Robert Kron scored with 14 
seconds left in overtime, giv- 
ing. Hartford the game over 
visiting Florida. 

Kron’s goal came after 56 
minutes in penalties — includ- 


were dealt to four players on 
each team for a brawl that 
broke oat after Florida reacted 
to the way Keith Primeau 
skated into goalie Mark 
Fitzpatrick with his stick. 

Manderm 8, Odm i Derek 


MaptoLrafsft, FIuim3Iii 

Toronto, Doug Gihnour bad 
five assists, and Weodel Clark 
celebrated his return to the 
lineup with the winning goal 
and an assist as the Maple 
Leafs defeated Calgary. 

mnin ! ■ 4 , niwtiimii 3 
At Chicago, Alexander Mo- 
gjlny set up David Roberts’s 
tying goal with 2:47 left in 
regulation and scored 1:24 in- 
to overtime as Vancouver ral- 
lied from a two-goal deficit. 

MIgbty Duetts 3, D*v8s 1 In 

Anaheim, - Paul Kariya, 
Teemn Selflime and JariKorri 
scored to lead the Mighty 
Ducks over New Jersey. 

Shariu 7, Kings 2 Owen 
Nolan had two goals and two 
assists to lead San Jose over 
visiting Los Angeles. 


SPORTS 




Kmg had two goals and an 
jsas, and Bryan Smolinslri 
nad mice assists -as the Is- 
janto snapped a four-game 
home losing streak. 

S« 3, Capital* » Brian 
L^etch’s second goal, with 
36.8 seconds left, broke a tie 

M l4u> r> . . . 


a four-game losing streak 

against Washmgton. . . 

ny»«2^itadinnga2ln De- 
troit, John LeClair’s 29th 

goal, midway in the third peri- 
od* « ave Phfladelphia a tie 
with the Red Wings. 

^ ***»• A S m tm * t Adam 
Oates. scored a shorthanded 
gaai in the'firet period, keying 
Boston’s t riumph at Ottawa. 
Bre^.Hteldns.Jrick Tocchet 
and Kyle McLaten added 

fhmUtVwilvl U rniw nnol. 


: ■ V-W&* .4 v. *• 


' "I **?’; 4 : \ • ; •. 



v ^ • 

• ** .*'*1 


• ? - . , , 5 . ****** 


England’s Nick Faldo playing from a bunker on Thursday hi the first round of the European PGA Tour opener. 

At Hope Island, Stand-In Shares Lead 


The Associated Press 

GOLD COAST, Australia — Aijun 
Atwal of India shot a 5-under-par 67 
Thursday for a share of the first-round 
lead in the PGA European Tour’s season- 
opening J ohnnie Walker Classic. 

Atwal, a 23-year-old who won two 
national pador college titles while at- 
tending Nassau Community College in 


New York, made it into the elite field 
only after his countryman Jeev Singh 
turned down a special invitation. 

“I was going to be playing in a local 
match-play event at home, but I’m play- 
ing against the best in the world.’' Atwal 
said. “Golf is not a popular sport in 
India, but it will be if I win. ” 

David Carter of England and Anthony 


76ers Beat Celtics 
In Basement Battle 




Painter and Steven Conran of Australia 
also opened with 67s on The Links course 
at Hope Island, while the 1995 winner. 
Fred Couples of the United States, and 
Rick Gibson of Canada topped a six- 
player group at 68. Nick Faldo of Eng- 
land was three back along with Ernie Els 
of South Africa and Frank Nobilo and 
Michael Campbell of New Zealand. 


The Associated Press 

Thirteen aimed out to be 
Philadelphia's lucky number. 

The 76ers snapped their 
13-game losing screak Wed- 
nesday night w ith a 127-125 
overtime victory over the 
Celtics in Boston. 

Jerry Stackhouse scored a 
career-high 38 points, and 
Rex Walters had the best 

NBA KpUndup 

game of his career as the 
76ers won for only the second 
time in their last 25 games. 

‘ * We stuck together, and we 
kept playing hard,” said Wal- 
ters. who jusi missed a triple- 
double with 27 points. 1 1 as- 
sists and nine rebounds. “At 
the end of regulation I looked 
up and thought the game was 
never going to end.” 

Allen Iverson made three 
free throws in the final 30 
seconds to clinch the victory 
in the matchup between the 
two worst teams in the East- 
ern Conference. Boston is 9- 
28. and Philadelphia is 9-31. 

After Iverson's free throw 
with nine seconds left made it 
127-12S. Boston had a final 
chance to win. But Dee 
Brown missed a 3 -pointer 
from the left wing with two 
seconds remaining, sending 
the Celtics to their third 
straight loss. 

Kings 97| Pistons 92 In Sac- 
ramento. Mitch Richmond 
scored 22 of his 38 points in 
the fourth quarter and wort his 
personal duel with Grant Hill. 


Richmond, who added a sea- 
son-high 10 rebounds and 10 
assists for his third career 
triple-double, scored all 1 1 of 
the Kings’ points in a five- 
minute stretch of the fourth 
period. Hill had 33 points and 
10 rebounds for the Pistons. 

Nets 103, Spivs 95 In San 
Antonio, Kendall Gill scored 
32 points, including 15 in the 
third period, as New Jersey 
beat the Spurs. Kerry Kittles 
added 23 points for New Jer- 
sey, which took the lead for 
good with a 1 5-3 run midway 
through the final period. 

J an ill, Sims 99 In 
Phoenix. Karl Malone scored 
a season-high 41 points, in- 
cluding 27 in the second half. 
John Stockton added 23 
points and 12 assists for Utah, 
which won for the fifth time 
in six games and stopped the 
Suns' five-game home win- 
ning streak. 

Nuggets 94, Grizzlies 84 In 

Denver. Mark Jackson had 
his 11 th career triple-double. 
LaPhonso Ellis scored 22 
points, and the Nuggets led 
from start to finish. Jackson, 
coming off a 21 -point. 22- 
assist performance Monday, 
finished with 15 points, a ca- 
reer-high 16 rebounds and 12 
assists. 

Solves 98, Btazars 97 In- 

Seattle. Hersey Hawkins’s 
layup with 2.8 seconds left 
gave the SuperSonics their 
ninth consecutive victory. He 
scored the winning layup 
after taking a pass from Gary 
Payton on a backdoor play. 


Packers 9 Man of God Exploits His Super Pulpit 


* By Timothy W. Smith 

■* New York Times Service 

NEW ORLEANS — They call 
Reggie White, the Green Bay Pack- 
ers’ star defensive end, fee minister 
of defense. It’s a clever play pa the 
foot that he is an ordained minister 
and an associate pastor at the Inner 
City Church in Knoxville, Tennes- 
see, and one of the most menacing, 
pass-rushers in foe National Foot- 
ball League. 

White is a reverent man: He be- 
lieves that God paved, die way for 
the Packers to get into die Super . 
Bowl so that Write could have a 
platform toadvancehis ministry. 

'But that platfonff imgfcl hot «*-v- 
tend beyond the final wtosde of foe ' 
game against the New England Pat- 
riots on Sunday. 

If the Packers win the Super 
Bowl, White may want to use die 
postgame momentt to say a prayer 
m front of the stadium crowd and, 
possibly, on live television. Some 
people in the NFL, however, are 
concerned about this and have dis- 
cussed it in meetings, accordin g to a 
person familiar with the situation. 

To die league, the pos^game pJaf- : 
foam at the Super Bowl is reserved - 
for presentation ceremonies and live - 
televised interviews of players and 
coaches. • 

Players often kneel in prayer on 


the field during and after a game. 

But should White be able to ex- 
press his reHgiousviews to a world- 
wide audience simply because his 
team was victorious in a football 
gmne? Does religion have a place in 
the NFL, sharing space on stage 
with the league’s signature event? 

This is not an issue with any real 
villains, bat it is a delicate situation. 
If White could espouse religious 
views, why not someone else with a 
political agenda? The league can’t 
take away White’s First Amend- 
ment rights to free speech, but it can 
deny him afree microphone. 

Christianity and spirituality are 
pervasive in society and in theNFL, 


around the Packers during this Super 
Bowl week. White’s spirituality is a 
strong influence in die Packers’ lock- 
er room: He often prays with such 
Teammates as receiver. Don Beebe 
and tight end Keith Jackson and has 
many other believers on the team. 

This belief is strong, too. 

Jackson said players believe so 
strongly in White’s ministry, which 
Jackson described as “teaching a 
inan to fish,” tear several players 
■donated money from an NFL Play- 
ers Association dues -rebate to 
White’s. ministry. It totaled. about 
$170,000: . 

..The players, Jackson continued, 
have a greater awareness of their 


responsibilities to the outside 
world 

“It starts with Reggie and guys 
like me and Don Beebe,” Jackson 
said 

“We’re willing to take a role- 
model stance, reach out to kids and 
say, ’Hey, this is not what you’re 
supposed to be doing.' We're an 
unselfish team and we echo that 
message to little league and high 
school football teams. We accept 
the role of a role model." 

Quarterback Brett Favre, one of 
the Packers’ most irreverent play- 
ers, does not feel he has to reign 
himself in when he is around White. 
They do, however, have a good re- 
lationship. 

“Whether or doc you believe 
what Reggie believes or not, you 
have to respect him," Favre said. 
“He doesn't do anything for him- 
self. Everything he does is for other 
people. He’s a good person and be 
means well.” 

White is trying to rebuild his 
Knoxville church, which was des- 
troyed by arson a year ago. 

He has said that through his min- 
istry he offers low-interest business 
loans. He said be had been trying to 
contact Magic Johnson about an 
idea to build 24-hour basketball 
gymnasiums next to foie movie 
theaters that Johnson is building in 
inner-city neighborhoods around 


the country. White said they have a 
proposal from the city of Indiana- 
polis to build a 24-hour gym. 

“To me, when you help people 
out of their situations you don *t have 
to preach much to them," White 
said. “In order to meet people's 
spiritual needs, we have to meet 
some of their economic needs. 
That’s what we’ve been working 
on.” 

He believes America will be a 
better place if people become more 
spiritually enlightened. 

For White', who has said that God 
has made the football field his pul- 
pit. religion and football are as nat- 
ural as a three-point stance. 

“A lot of people ask me questions 
about football and religion." he 
said. ‘ ’But the thing is that there are 
people's lives at stake. I don’t see 
the problem. Most of you guys, 
when we get down in the end zone 
and pray or get together and pray on 
the field, you have a real problem 
when it comes to that. 

“But there are people who write 
me letters, whose lives have 
changed, who have read my book, 
who are better fathers, better hus- 
bands, better men and women for it. 
That’s what it’s all about. 

“That's why I don’t understand 
when you guys have a problem with 
it when people’s lives are being 
changed." 


Kentucky Overcomes 
Top Scorer’s Absence 


The Associated Press 

Although Derek Ander- 
son's knee injury ended a stel- 
lar college basketball career 
and turned the rest of Ken- 
tucky's season into a question 
mark, the third-ranked Wild- 
cats met challenge No. 1 
Wednesday night with a 58- 
46 victory over Vanderbilt at 
Riverfront Coliseum. 

It was thetr first game since 
Anderson’s injury on Sat- 
urday. and it came on the day 

COULEGE BASKETBALL 

the fifth-year senior had sur- 
gery on his right knee. 

‘■This game pleased me 
more than any this season be- 
cause of die way we went 
after it,' * Wildcats coach Rick 
Pitino said. “They know 
what it means to lose Derek 
Anderson. They know our 
back's to die wall right 
now." 

Allen Edwards replaced 
Anderson, the SEC's leading 
scorer. 

No. 1 Kansas 89, Trass 

asm 60 The Jayhawks (19-0, 
5-0 Big 12), the only un- 
beaten team in Division L 


matched the best start in 
school history with their 39th 
straight home victory, the 
longest current streak in the 
country. Paul Pierce had 19 
points and Raef LaFrentz had 
1 8 points and 10 rebounds for 
Kansas, which scored the 
game's first 1 1 points. 

Now 14 Iowa St 54, Kansas 
St 48 Kelvin Cato, who was 
benched for the game’s first 
5 Vs minutes after a couple of 
bad practices, had 18 points, 
15 rebounds and eight 
blocked shots and made three 
late free throws for the Cyc- 
lones (12-3. 3-2 Big 12), who 
played their second straight 
game without injured leading 
scorer Dedric Willoughby. 

Florida St 84, No. 19 North 
Carolina 71 James Collins 
scored 22 points for the Setni- 
noies (11-4, 2-4 Atlantic 
Coast Conference), who held 
off a late rally by the visiting 
Tar Heels to snap a three- 
game league losing streak. 

No. 23 Ttejraa 76, Oklahoma 
86 Reggie Freeman scored 24 
points, and Ira Clark led an 
inspired defensive effort in 
the second half for the Long- 
horns (10-5,4-1 Big 12). 


Marlboro Man 
Opts to Keep 
A Low Profile 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A 
large Marlboro cigarette 
sign near (he end zone in 
the Louisiana Superdome 
won't be shown during 
the telecast Sunday of 
professional football's 
Super Bowl XXXL 

Under threat of gov- 
ernment court action, 
Philip Morris Inc. agreed 
Wednesday to temporar- 
ily remove the sign. The 
National Football 
League has agreed to 
consult with Fox Tele- 
vision. which will tele- 
vise the event, to avoid 
pictures of four smaller 
Marlboro signs in more 
remote locations of the 
domed stadium. 

The Cigarette La- 
beling and Advertising 
Act prohibits cigarette 
advertising on television. 
The Justice Department 
obtained a court order in 
1995 against Philip Mor- 
ris to make sure cigarette 
ads placed around arenas 
and athletic fields were 
not telecast during sports 
events. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




















PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1997 


OBSERVER 


As Big as Saucers 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — At a low 
point in my newspaper 
career, editors decided I had a 
unique talent for covering 
cold-weather parades. When- 
ever frostbite was in the air 
and a parade was scheduled to 
march down Main Street, the 
joy of covering it was mine. 

"And it was a joy at first. 
How well I remember the de- 
light of covering my first 
Thanksgiving Day parade. 
Those great inflated things in 
the air7 Santa Claus in his 
sled. I scarcely noticed that it 
was the coldest Thanksgiving 
in 17 years. My prose leaped 
hot out of the typewriter. 

Oh. those blessed cliches! 
“Tiny tots with eyes big as 
saucers.” “Genial policemen 
with eyes big as saucers." 
“Drum majorettes with eyes 
big as saucers.” 

My skill was noticed. Next 
Thanksgiving I was on the job 
again. It was a letdown. 
Everything was just like last 
Thanksgiving. There were 
big inflated things. Santa 
Claus in his sled and tiny tots 
with eyes big as saucers. 

And cold. It was cold. cold, 
cold standing out on that side- 
walk trying to think of a new 
way to say "eyes big as sau- 
cers." 


Little did I know that 
groundwork was being laid 
for covering the greatest 
parade of them all: the great 
Inauguration parade which 
streamed down Pennsylvania 
Avenue every four years to 
the music of high' school 
bands big as saucers. 

This triumph was still far in 
the future when I went forth to 
cover my third Thanksgiving 
parade. Instead of standing on 
the sidewalk this time. I stood 
al a bar with a restricted view 


of the show and had two mar- 
tinis big as saucers. 

I quit that paper after cov- 
ering my 12th Thanksgiving 
Day parade. The editor tried 
to dissuade me. “You could 
be one of the great ones.” he 
said "With a few more 
Thanksgivings under your 
belt, you could be to the 
Thanksgiving Day parade 
what Ernie Pvle was to World 
Warll." 


I wanted more, so I 
switched to another paper 
which topped my previous 
salary by 57.50 a week and 
sent me to Washington. 

The editor asked why I 
thought he'd paid that extra 
S7-50 to hire me. They were 
desperate for a good parade 
man. 

In those days you put up 
with a lot for S7.50. Every 
fourth January, wrapped in 
thermal underwear. I stood 
for hours in windswept 
bleachers on the north side of 
Pennsylvania Avenue record- 
ing the passage of high school 
bands, horse-borne cowboys, 
fleets of stock-car racers, re- 
enactors of Washington's 
crossing of the Delaware, 
winners of interstate baking 
contests, over-the-hiii Olym- 
pic champions . . . and mil- 
lions more. 

Quadrenniura after quad- 
rennium in those freezing, 
windswept bleachers took 
their toll. Finally — I forget 
whose parade it was — I 
broke, ran. stonned into the 
newsroom raving about the 
president's eyes being small 
as demitasse cups. 

There was nothing to do 
then but make me a colum- 
nist. That's why Monday I sat 
in a warm room watching the 
parade on television. They 
say my eyes were big as sau- 
cers. 

New York Times Service 


The Life and Time of Henry Grunwald 


By Robin Pogrebin 

:Vtfy York Times Service 

N EW YORK — When Henry 
Grunwald ran into Jacqueline 
Kennedy Onassis at a party in the 
early 1990s. he told her he was in the 
process of researching his memoir. 
“She said, ‘Research? Why do you 
want to do research?' ” Grunwald 
recalled in his soft voice still ac- 
cented with German. “ ‘What I want 
to know is what Henry Grunwald 
thinks about in the bathtub.' " 
Seeing the wisdom of this advice 
— reinforced by the urging of his 
family and friends — Grunwald 
wrote a very different book from 
what he had intended, interweaving 
descriptions of public events with 
personal impressions, pushing him- 
self through an unfamiliar process 
of self-disclosure. “It was not 
easy." he said. “I’m not very easily 
given to the confessional style." 

After Henry R. Luce. Time 
magazine's founding editor, Grun- 
wald is generally considered the 
magazine's most influential editor, 
the man who defined the magazine 
during perhaps its most significant 
period. After a career that saw him 
lead the magazine from 1968 to 
1 977. he retired as editor in chief of 
all Time Inc. publications in 1987. 

Sitting in his Park Avenue apart- 
ment recently. Grunwald discussed 
his memoir, "One Man’s America: 
A Journalist's Search for the Heart 
of His Country,” published this 
month by Doubleday. And al- 
though the conversation was wide- 
ranging and unhurried, somehow 
Grunwald, 74, remained remote — 
formal in his navy blazer, tie. royal 
blue cufflinks, black tassel loafers 
— and frugal with his tidbits of 
self-revelatory detail. 

If one had not read Grunwald’s 
recent essay in The New Yorker on 
his eye disease — macular degen- 
eration — it would be impossible to 
tell that this man was struggling to 
maintain vision. He moved with 
sure, albeit slow, steps. And behind 
his signature large glasses, his eyes 
seemed focused and alert, although 
Grunwald said he had to dictate the 


second half of his book and finds it 
almost impossible to make eye con- 
tact anymore. “Naturally, I found 
the condition upsetting.” Grunwald 
said with typical matter-of-facmess. 
“But I never for a moment con- 
sidered not finishing the book.' ' 

Getting him to plumb his depths 
in print took pushing — mainly 
from Mrs. Grunwald. “She would 
say, ‘You’ve got to take some 
chances and reveal yourself,’ ” 
Grunwald recalled, "u was tech- 
nically extremely difficult to shift 
back and forth between the per- 
sonal and what I call the public.” 

Still, Grunwald said he grew to 
enjoy exploring this untested emo- 
tional terrain. “I'm not trying to 
suggest that I was going around hug- 
ging all kinds of dark secrets," he 
said “But I found that it could be 
quite pleasant to tell about yourself 
— always hoping that people would 
care.” 

The 658-page autobiography 
seems a comfortable compromise. It 
retains its original ambitious scope, 
following Grunwald from his arrival 
in America in 1940 to the end of his 
tenure as U.S. ambassador to Austria 
in 1990, a period that offers a front- 
row perspective on public figures 
from Marilyn Monroe to Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev to Margaret Thatcher. 

But there are also flashes of vul- 
nerability, such as how it was to be 
a Jewish boy watching storm troop- 
ers with their swastika banners, 
move through his native Vienna. Or 
the pain of living through the vain 
attempts of his father, a librettist, to 
make it in American show busi- 
ness. And how he endured the loss 
of his first wife. Beverly Suser, to 
cancer after 27 years of marriage. 

He also writes about his own 
political development: resolutely 
anti -Communist, hawkish on Viet- 
nam, slow to remedy sexism at 
Time. “I was never a Victorian 
about women,” he said. “I hope I 
was never a male chauvinist But 1 
fell in rather too easily with the Time 
tradition of not promoting women to 
important writing or editing pos- 
itions. But 1 thick I was able to begin 
a process that got away from that/’ 



urn- UKiHittiTbfl V» lari Taut. 


Henry Grunwald working in his study in New York. 


At times, Grunwald touches on 
personal subjects in the book that 
leave one wishing he had opened 
the window wider. Like his brief 
flirtation with Catholicism. When 
asked about this episode in his life, 
Gninwald said: “It wasn’t perma- 
nent, it wasn’t real. I would never 
deny my Jewishness, and I take 
some pleasure in it.” 

Moreover, die all-consuming 
commitment to work dial Gninwald 
describes — late nights, weekends, 
long trips — makes one wonder 
whether be felt any resentment from 
his children about his absence. “I 
know they felt that, ‘Other kids are 
taken to ballgames and other kids 
have normal weekends wife their 
daddy and mommy, and why don't 
we?’ " Grunwald said. “I*m sure 
feat I seemed at some times too 
remote a figure. But I can’t tell 


nection with news. Certain events, 
certain ideas for stories, announced 
themselves, literally, in my pulse or 
in fee pit of my stomach." 

Grunwald described Tune as a 
graduate school, populated by ec- 
centric, brilliant tutors who playe j 
out their tantrums, love affairs and 
vices in full view of one anofeer. 

They are the sort of characters 
Grunwald might have created had 
he ever succeeded at his first love, 
writing plays. And be describes 
felon in fee book with a novelist's 
flare for detail. About fee film critic 
James Agee: “Otherworldly to fee 
point of often leaving his paychecks 
uncashed in his desk drawer." 

To this day , Grunwald said in his 
apartment, his inability to succeed 
as a playwright rankles. But he 
spoke of it as a skill feat, simply, he 
was never destined remaster. 

“It will remain a regret because 
theater was a great love of mine as a 


whether feat was very damaging or a 
little damaging or by now not at 
all." 

Grunwald said he maintained 
strong ties with his children — Lisa, 
a writer; Mandy, a Democratic 
political consultant, and Peter, who 
develops screenplays — all of 
whom read fee book in advance and 
shared their comments. And Grun- 
wald said he had few regrets about 
his role as husband and father. 
“There are certain things I would 
do differently no doubt." he said. 
“But 1 guess I would say. ‘1 did 
what f had to do.' ” 

• As be rose at Time — from copy 
boy in 1944 to editor in chief (1978 
ro 1987) — Grunwald loved the 
high-stakes pressure and heady 
power of feat business. 

In his book, he writes: “I de- 
veloped an almost physical con- 


first loves,” he said. “Would I 
change my life if I could? Should 1 
have quit Time and persevered in 
writing plays? No. I really can’t say- 
feat I would do that. It’s like want- 
ing to be a ballet dancer when you 
don't have fee body re be a ballet 
dancer.” 

Grunwald said he continues to 
admire the magazine today. White-' 
he concedes feat Time may no' 
larger be the intellectual status sym- 
bol it once was — a publication 
prominently displayed on people's 
coffee tables — Grunwald said he 
believes a good newsmagazine still 
has an important role in explaining 
events. 

“We are now surrounded, en- 
veloped, smothered by informa- 
tion,” he said. “Where news used 
to be something feat was relatively 
scarce — people waited for it — 
now we are almost in a position of 
wanting to fight off the news. 

“People need some guide 
through this chaos of ixrformation. It 
is becoming increasingly difficult to 
tell the bogns from fee real and the 
many gradations in between. I 
would think die newsmagazine is the 
perfect instrument to provide this." 





f , o i i ' 




j* . 


ON THE RUNWAYS 


PEOPLE 


High Fashion’s Future? Which that Screen 


By Suzy Menkes 

Internaricrhil Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Wife multicolored butterfly 
wings whirring. Thierry Mugler’s 
insect woman brought fee couture col- 
lections to a close. His extraordinary 
show, with its scarab bodices, spiderweb 
skirts and antennae headgear, was a 
flourish of superb showbiz that deserved 
to be seen by more than the packed 
fashion crowd. 

And so it was. Like many of fee 
spring/summer Paris shows, it was trans- 
mitted live on French television and will 
be screened across fee globe. 

In that, and in the central image of a 
chrysalis unfurling, fee show was a 
metaphor for fee current state of haute 
couture. The industry is undergoing 
metamorphosis, though no one quite 
knows what will emerge from the 
present confusion. And creating the right 
visual stimuli for the camera — rather 
than beauty, line or workmanship — is 
now how high fashion must be judged. 

What exactly is haute couture, now 
feat fee old rules (about handwork and 
size of studio) have been broken? Mug- 
ler seems to know. He marked his pro- 
gram with asterisks to denote which 
outfits were ready-to-wear. But the audi- 
ence was much too busy gasping at four 
black-clad models synchronized on the 
runway like scurrying ants to notice — 
or care. 

We knew what this spectacular was 
about: reinforcing the well-established 
Mugler image in order to promote his 
name and fragrance. 

So out came feat familiar hourglass 
silhouette — a caricature of fee Par- 
isienne lone model even had the in- 
evitable dog on a leash). She sashayed 
down the runway, in teetering heels, in 
her black tightly corseted suit. Some- 
times she played French coquette, some- 
times dominatrix. The drag queens in fee 
audience were in fashion heaven. 

This image has its origins in the 
1950s. in high fashion's glory days. It 
was updated by Mugler in the 1980s 
using modem materials like shiny vinyl 
or leather. He hasn’t done much with it 
since, although fee way he worked this 



lhwna» 

Valentino's flower-strewn dress. 

season, a stripy wasp bodice or the moth- 
wing texture on a velvet body suit, was 
very imaginative. 

Mugler has faithful fashion followers 
— like Mick Jagger’s wife, Jerry Hall, 
who appeared on the runway in a show- 
stopping. gleaming carapace. Such cus- 
tomers will order up one-off outfits to 
justify fee claim that this was a “cou- 
ture” collection. But fee made- for- the- 
screen show was really about marketing 
fashion in a modern way — and not 
much to do with modem fashion. 

So what was fee major couture mes- 
sage? Lightness was fee story in all fee 
spring/summer collections. At Valen- 
tino. nis many upscale clients sat trans- 
fixed at the sight of barely veiled der- 
rieres showing through nude lace. And 
Nan Kempner exclaimed backstage: “1 
don't need a new dress — I need a new 
body!” 

Everywhere, sheer fabrics — chiffon, 
lace, organza and tulle — were used in 


layers to create a weightless covering. 
And this being couture, feathers also 
played a major role, from the plumed 
skirts at Balmain and the aigrettes at 
Chanel, through the Bird of Paradise 
bolero from Jean Paul Gaultier and 
feathered sheath dress from Alexander 
McQueen at Givenchy. 

When fabrics have more substance, 
they are draped silk and jersey, fol- 
lowing the curves of the body. But what 
now looks quite out of sync are stiffer. 
masculine materials, as opposed to that 
pin-stripe image used on stretch ma- 
terials by Gaultier or on taffeta by 
Valentino. Suiting was thrown a curve, 
like John Galliano's reinterpretation of 
Dior's "new look” as curvy jacket and 
ultrashoit flirty skirt. 

For a return to femininity is also an 
issue. In fee couture shows, intended for 
women who are unlikely to have to fight 
for a place in a man’s world, such fem- 
inine clothes make more sense than in 
ready-to-wear. And for decoration done 
with a light hand, this has been a vintage 
couture season. 

Chanel’s beading in miniature pearls 
was a fine example of fee new luxury 
feat is about intricate workmanship 
rather than flashy show. Dior had a 
bravura display of beading in its mul- 
ticolored Masai effects and also in its 
swags of pearls, even on the lace-up-fee- 
leg sandals. From Valentino came fern 
embroideries that were an imaginative 
take on the romance of the flower. 

So many of fee effects feat make 
couture special hardly show on stage, 
even if all the runways have been 
brought down toeye level. So, in fee end, 
it is a designer's ability to fix an image 
through a picture feat marks the visual 
success of a collection. 

For that. John Galliano’s Dior debut 
was fee outright winner. The designer 
created indelible images of magic and 
romance wife his sugar-pink ruffled 
tulle ball gown or his bustled Belle 
Epoque silhouettes. 

Maybe in the end it will be the media- 
savvy intelligence of designers brought 
up on MTV and music videos that will 
create an image — and therefore a future 
— for fee aging art of haute couture. 


A FRENCH court acquit- 
ted Brigitte Bardot on 
Thursday of charges of in- 
citing racism in an editorial 
feat criticized fee Muslim 
ritual of slaughtering sheep. 
The former screen star was 
taken to court by several anti- 
racist groups for her comment 
in fee newspaper Le Figaro 
last year. Dining the trial last 
month. Bardot. 62. lashed 
back, insisting that she was 
“not a racist” but again de- 
nouncing Eid al-Adha as 
"that cruel celebration that 
floods fee soil of our country 
in blood." Bardot, who is 
married to a member of fee 
extreme rightist, anti-immi- 
grant National Front, said dur- 
ing fee trial that she was not 
“a flag carrier for any party 
but for the defense of anim- 
als." . . . The acquittal does 
not mean Bardot’s troubles 
are over. One of her former 
husbands. Jacques C harrier, 
and their only son. Nicholas, 
have demanded 6 million 
francs ($1.1 million) in dam- 
ages from her for what she 
said about them in her best- 
selling memoirs. In the book, 
“Initiates B.B.,” she de- 
scribed her then-unbora son 
as a “tumor’ ' and the husband 
as a violent alcoholic. 


Timothy Leary’s final nip 
has been delayed. Leary died 
in May at age 75. At his re- 
quest, his remains were to be 
launched into space aboard a 
commercial satellite last fail. 
Problems wife an unrelated 
launch, however, pushed the 
blastoff back. Leary wanted 
Gelestis Inc. of Houston to 
pack 7 grams of his ashes into 
a lipstick-size aluminum cap- 
sule for fee trip. Joining him 
in a larger, outer canister will 
be fee ashes of 23 others, in- 
cluding the “Star Trek” cre- 
ator Gene Roddenberry. Re- 
latives are scheduled to 
gather Feb. 15 at Vandenberg 


Air Force Base in California 
to watch a plane take off wife 
fee rocket in tow. The plane 
will land in Spain, where the 
satellite will be attached to fee 
rocket for a March 1 1 launch. 
* ‘The capsule orbits for alittie 
while. 18 months to 10 years, 
then it will bum up in the 
atmosphere.'' said a Celestis 
partner, Charles Chafer. “It 
will be like a shooting star.” 


Who has fee best legs in 
showbiz? It’s Tina Turner, 
according to a survey of 1,000 
men and women conducted by 
fee Hanes hosiery company. 
The earthy anger, who is a 
grandmother, strutted ahead of 
the actress Jamie Lee Curtis, 


who came in second, and last 
year's winner, the supermodel 
Cindy Crawford, who ranked 
third. The Belgian action-hero 
Jean-Claude Van Damme 
was voted best male legs, fol- 
lowed by Mel Gibson, while 
John Kennedy Jr. and Tom 
Cruise shared third place. 


The champion figure 
skater Oksana Band, who 
faces drunken driving 
charges, was traveling nearly 
100 miles per hour (160 ki- 
lometers par hour) when she 
ran her Mercedes off the road 
recently, police in Connecti- 
cut said. She still had die 
smell of alcohol on her breath, 
more than six hoars after fee 



crash, the- police said in an 
affidavit The 19-year-old 
Olympic gold medalist was 
charged with reckless driving 
and drunken driving in fee 
Jan. 12 accident, which left 
her wife a cut scalp and a 
concussion. She is scheduled 
to appear in court Monday. A 
passenger, fee fellow Ukrain- 
ian skater Ararat Zakarian, 
said be didn't think the ac- 
cident happened because she 
was drunk, “but because she 
got very emotional." He told 
Time magazine: “There was 


she loves Madonna. She was, 
like, performing, she was get- 
ting into it” 


Fwd ft om uj lteawa 

BUBBLY BY OLD BLUE EYES — Barbara Sinatra 
displaying a limited -edition Frank Sinatra Korbel 
champagne bottle featuring artwork by her husband. 


The Argentine-bom write 1 
and critic Hector Biandotf/ 
joined die Academie Fran- 
caise on Thursday as one of 
the 40 life guardians of the 
French language. Bianriotti, 
66, wearing fee Academy’s 
traditional embroidered uni-, 
form, took his seat in a solemn 
ceremony. He was elected by 
his peers a year ago to suc- 
ceed the late journalist and 
historian Andre Frossard. 
Bianciotti, bora in the Argen- 
tine town of Calchin Oeste, 
first wrote in Spanish. After 
emigrating to France in 1961 
and taking french citizenship 
in 1981,; he decided in 1985 to 
write in French. 


The Vienna Philharmonic 
will let women join if rank- 
and-file members agree, a 
move that would end its status 
as one of the last all-male 
orchestras. The orchestra, 
considered one of fee world’s 
best, can no longer 1 ‘bypass/ 
modem sends, its chainnafi, 
Werner Resel, told Austrian 
stare television. The final 
obstacle is a vote by members 
of the philharmonic. Are 
there openings? Yes, for a 
tuba ana a lead viola. 


f Ni‘i! { H i 


tl 



Ever)' country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling from France and other countries really 
easy. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country 
you're calling from and you’ll get the fastest, clearest 
connections. And be sure to charge your calls on your 
AT&T Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to 60%? 
So please check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


love 0-800-99-0011 


in the springtime. 


^iWfcmUdfc6un«r*phi« *DU "Or tat ooit CairnTl lo« to*- <0* Imri CTST 





Stqps to fanev offing 
iatenaftaallrfroa mom: 

1. just dial the AT&T Access Number 
far, the country you are caiHng from. 

2. Dial thepbone number yoti're calling. 

3: Phi the calling card number listed 
abera your name. 


AT&T Access Numbers 

EUROPE 

Anttaoo 022-983411 

Bernal*..- ..8489-100-10 

-....8-008-99-6811 

Bmuif 8188-9819 

Greece* .08480-1311 

Wad 1-800458-900 

flail* 172-1811 

Nattwtnds* JH22-8111 

Berta •*fltasgw)> 7685842 

Spalao ,....9804*08-11 

Sweden..: __J20-79W11 

Svltzortart*... J889-8H611 

Uattri KbQdcniA B889QM811 

E8nrt*(CairB)i......... 5WEB0 

tout .177-188-2727 

Snfi Arabia c .1-808*18 

BmaZT, “ -.9151 

KflUfa* -8-600-10 

South AHca..: M8MH123 


(tail fed tattem Ruder fetacoutcnota Jnaekaayopesnwfar 

fflar DtacP 1 Sendee, or ittunr at UpoMreeuttcara/tiaider