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. ; 

V’ ' -Ar^' World’s Daily Newspaper 

Swiss Envoy 

'-v'5'-"'^ ITlIlf'C! 1 


evte: 






PUBUSH£D WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


London, Tuesday, Jannary 2S, 1997 


No. 35.430 


Swiss Envoy to U.S. 
Quits Amid Uproar 
On Holocaust Gold 

Washington Denounces His QM 
To Ifbge Jfhr^ Over Jewish Claims 

By William Drozdiak 

Washiiiguui Pda Service 

. Switzerland’s ambassador to die United States resigned 
Monday amid m uproar over a coTiiideatial strategy pimer be 
wrote urging his govemment to ’’wage war” gainst Jewish 
groufs and others who had cridcizedSwiss failure to 
tor missing ass^ of Holocaust victims. 

The document, excerpts oi wfaidi ^ipeaied in a Zutidi 
-newspaper Suod^, labeled as “adveisaries” sudi aides as die 
Weald Jewish Cemgress and a U.S. senator, Alfonse d'* Amato, 
Republican of York, who have accuaed the Swiss of hiding 

die extent of their finarx^ coUaboradoo wiA Nazi Geimany 
ai^ refii^g to oon^sensate Holocaust victims or dietr relatives 
with claims to dormant accounts in Swiss 
The publicadoD of Mr. Ja^netd’s remarks dealt another 
i^vy blow to the integrity of the Swiss government and again 
called into questitm its credibili^ and its wiUhigiiess to 
ascertain the fate of die rais^g accounts. 

'Uie Swiss Fmeign Ministry released hfr. Ja^netd’s re^- 
nation letter, in which he said, ”I no longer find it approp riate 
to continue my activity as ambassador in this counoy.” 

Mr. Jagmetti, 64, had been sdieduled to retire in the 
summer. He had served as a diplmnat lor more dian three 
decades and was considered ooe of his country’s most pol- 
ished and experienced envoys. 

The United States denouiioed dre ambassador's call for an 
aggressive puUk-ielations campaign against American Jew- 
ish groups and odieis who had bra demanding compensatimi 
for the missing assets of Holocaust victims. 

”lf it's true the Swiss ambassadcu' made these lemarks, it 
betrays a fundamental lack of understandiiig for the com- 
mitment the United States govemment has to its own citizens 

See SWISS, Page 6 



EU Tensions Flare 
Over Call to Make 
Taxes More Uniform 

Bonn and Paris Seek to End 
‘Unfair Competition’ on Rates 



SaaoBTnn/neAiHaMdtai 

HOMECOMING — Natao Sharansky accompanying his mother, Ida MUgrom, off a 
plane at Moscow’s airport MUmday, 10 yean after he was freed from prison. The 
former dissident, now an Israeli cabinet minister, returned for trade talka. page 6. 


Dollar^s Surge: Too Much of a Good Thing? 


By David E. Sanger 

Ntw farilbiiaSeneke 

WASHINGTON Almost every day for the past 
two years. Tieas^ Seaetaiy Rdbm ^Inn has re- 
peated die same line whenever he was asked about the 


U.S. cutrency. "A strmig dc^lar,” Mr. Rubin, would markets. Mr. Rubin woo. 


Tbe dollar has also risen steadily against the 
Deutsche mark, the most important Eunxiean cur- 
rency, readnng a 31-mondi high of 1.^73 DM 
Mon^y, up about 7 p e ic enr this year. 

The low f<y tbe doDar two years ago created the fiia 
test of wfils between Me. Rubin and die currency 


repaU almost mantralike, ”is in die interest of die 
United States.” 


. But in werid finance, there is no such dnng as pure 
victoty; so even while President Bill CUnton’s ad- 


Now some people are wemdering whether Mr. Ru- ministratian dedaies die rise of die dollar a long- 

m — — - — — -a — ^ A- ^ A ^ - ... J r- ri i i-ff <1 m r m i~ ■ ««« 


bin's unieloiting siq^xnt for the dollar has been a Int 
100 unrdeating. 


ddayed vote erf canfidenoe in America’s renewed 


in its eomomic troubles for some time. 

In search of high returns, investors are h iding to 
the United States, figuring that its markets are a better 
bet than Japan or Emope. 

So vdule Mr. Rubin has been repeating his standard 
fare, bis counterpart in Japan. Rnance Munster 
Hirotiii Mitsuzuka; has sounded; a different theme. 
*’The yen's excessive fall a|ain^ the dollar is un- 
desirable,” he said last week m Tokyo. 

For trace. Mr. Mitsuzuka has many^ allies in DetroiL 
Tbe U.S. automakers have been wanung Mr. Clinton's 


Bv Tom Bueikle multinational companies to attract the 

inJLiumai HeraUTribwie ‘J-S- investment of any EU country 

lat^ear. 

BRUSSELS — Tensions over Ine ixactical impact of tbe French- 
Buiope's planned single currency shif- German calls appeared to have been 
ted nom the central bank to taxes blunted by die insistence of I^. Waigel 
Mcmday as Germany and France called and Mr. Arthuis that any move tow^ 
for more uniform tax rates across the uniform tax regimes had to be approved 
European Union to prevent countries unanimously all IS EU members, a 
such as Luxembourg and Irelaixl from requirement th^ has paralyzed eftorts at 
luring jobs and potential economic tax harmonization in the post Mr. 
growth away ftom other EU members Anhuis suggested that governments 
through fiscal incentives. adopt a ”co& of good conduct,” while 

Finance Minister Theo Waigel of Ger- Mr. Waigel said Iw would present pro- 
many opened tbe campaign at a meeting posals for common ground rules on tax- 
of finance ministers here, saying moves ation next month. 

banks and cmupanies to take advan- The two ministers also rejected the 
tage of lower taxes elsewhere in Europe possibility that countries adopting the 
were siphoning off German tax revenue euro, the planned common EU currency, 
and making h more difficult for the Ger- in 19^ might harmonize tax rates, using 
man government to meet die economic a French-German proposal to allow 
aitena for a single European currency. some EU countries to deepen integ- 
Tbe point was underscored by reports ration on their own. Mr. Waigel said that 
of an upward revisioD in the German 

government's deficit forecast for this See TAXES, Page 6 

year to 2.9 percent of gross domestic 
product, just under the single-currency 
ceiling of 3 peacent (Page 1 1 ) 

**We want and ne^ competition be- O QUm * Pi 

tween tbe various tax systems in Q ||7lt^ ijillTt 
Europe, but |»iority must be given to ^ 

measures to prevent unfair comped- . • 

tiOD,” Mr. Waigel said. /YR 

His call was quickly taken up by 

France, Italy and Belgium. In a com- ^ • O 

ment that evoked post French com- m 

plaints about so-called competitive ex- rl/wf/f/ 
change-rate devaluations uid ‘‘social •' 

dumping” within Europe. Fmance Min- T Uraabd- 

isterJean Arthuis ofFrance asserted that MJ^Ua/WyS 
“unfair competition” on tax rates and 
labor regulations was promoting dan- 

Kiirwiv,. nifth civ-h Youssef M. Ibrahim 

Europe cannot survive with such ■' 

practices.” Mr. Arthuis said. 

Ministers from Luxembourg and Ire- LONDON — Volvo AB on Monday 

land sought to deflect tbe pressu^ say- announced the surprise departure of its 

ing tbe Union needed to coordinate a chief executive, Soeien GyU, setting off 


3 Firms Shift 
Executives as 
Volvo Chief 
Leaves Post 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New York Tims Smice 

LONDON •— Volvo AB on Monday 


ecoaopiic streogte, Mz. Rubin finds himself under administratioo of a host of disasters in the offing: a 


The dollar has soared in recent weeks, louchiog attack by two groups who usually agree on alznost revival oftire trade d^citwhh Japan, a loss of all the 
1 19J75 yen on Monday. That puts die cunency up notinng: Japanese officials and U.S. automakers. I^ond tfa^ U.S. automakers have made up against 
ab^ SO percent from its low ^ just under SO yen Japanese officials say diey are tqppalled by die pace Japanese oraipetitors and jperhaps a round of “cost- 
reached in Areil 199S, and many analysts, irfter re- at wmdi tbe dollar has soared, even though it makes cutting measures” — a veued warning of layoffs, 
peatedfyprractingdiat die dollar would socn start to ihdr goods far more conqietitive aroond ibe worid. Widtout question, die weak yen has enabled lap- 
weaken, now expect die rise to Gtmtinue fw least a They see the to die dollar as wenisome evidence anese carmakers fo keep their jmees stable or even to 
while longer. T^ dollar has not been this strong foteiireestors around die wtaid are gjviiig up on Jt^an, 


r diey are tqppalled by die pace Japanese cratipetitors and perhaps a round of “co 
soared, even though it makes cutting measures” — a ve^ warning of layoffs. 


against die yen fev neariy four years. 


that investors around die w(Rid are gjviiig up on Jt^an, 
concluding that the coontiy may be hopelnsly mned 


See DOLLAR, Page 12 


range of economic policies to suj^rt 
monetary union rather iftan focusing 
narrowly tm items such as corporate 
taxes arid a wtdiboldmg tax on savings. 

Luxembourg has developed a huge 
erf^Mxe banlong industry, luring more 
than 1 triUioD Deutsdse marks (S612 
NUiMi) of savings fiom Germany be- 
cause it imposes no withholding tax. he- 
land used a cut-rate 10 percent tax for 


V.'. 



Titletowi U.S, A., aka Green Bay 

Vtctoiy in Super Bowl Reinflates Fans From Wisconsin 


• • '-njL' » *•. ■ t 







Oo*( I^WIba AaeciMrt AcM 

Mike Holmsren, coach of the Green Bay Packers, being carried off tbe football field by his 
players afttf they defeated the New England Patriots, 35-21, on Sunday in the Super BowL 


By IMvid Maraniss 

Wuhwif AM Pm Servtrr 

NEW ORLEANS — When the clodc ticked 
down to zero in die din of tbe Supe r do m e, Mike 
Hcrfn^ren was lifted <»to tbe shoulders of his 
Green Bay players and carried triumpbanlly out to 
midfield to accejK tbe shining tn^y named in 
honor of his le^ndaiy p r ed ece ss or. With Green 
Bay's convincing 3^21 victory overNew England 
in Siqier Bowl XXXI, die Lombardi Trophy is 
homewsid bound, headed back to the smallest 
in major league sports, vihich can now reclaim its 
proud nicknimie: Titletown U.S.A. 

accqrting tbe symbol from ftul 
Tagliahue, the commissiooer of the National Foot- 
b^lLeag^ who said that tbe modern-day Packers 
reminded him “of the great Lombardi teams.” 
Hohngren passed it along 0 > Reggie White. 

White is the Packers' proud warrior and spiiimal 
leader, whose arrival in Green Bay and extraordin- 
ary bond vritfa die fans there most clearly sym- 
bolized diis team's retiini to glory. 

The defensive end held tm tro{^ high, tears 
streamh^ down his dieete, and ran from midfield 
reward the stands re show it re waves ^ delirious 


Packer loyalists. Three decades of Packers me- 
diocrity suddenly seemed long gone and forgot- 
ten. 

Now White and quarterback Brett l^vre and 
Desmond Howard, who earned tbe game's award 
as most valuable player with his spectacular re- 
turns, including a 99-yard Jdekoff return for a 
touriidown, seemed pan of the green-and-gold 
legend. 

They were modern-day counterparts of Ban 
Stair and Ray Pfitschke and Wilbur Wood and 
other ^osts of tbe glory years, many of whom 
entered the Packers’ lock» room later Sunday 


li^t re help celebrate the victory. 
With the loss. New Eneland rece 


With the loss. New England recedes once again 
into tbe list of also-rans. 

Tbe j^triots have played in two Super Bowls 
and lost them botit. 

Along with the game, they also apparently lost 
their coach, the veteran BUI Parcells, who is said to 
be leaving for the New York Jets. 

“I talk^ to them about tbe game and what 
happened in the &>me and some of tbe reasmis why 
you lose a game Dice this,” Parirells said, soun^g 

See SUPER, Page 18 


chief executive, Soeren G^ll, setting off 
a tiiree-company execuove shake-up 
and prompting speculation diat the 
Swedish automaker may renew its 
search for an intemational partner. 

Mr. GyU. S8, has played a major role 
in restructuring Volvo, shedding some 
of its divisions over tbe last four years to 
focus on the manufocture of cars, trucks 
and building equipmenL Both the com- 
pany and Mr. Cyll said the departure 
was amicable, although it came a year 
earlier than expected. 

Analysts said the company may now 
be loolcuig for ways to increase its sales, 
possibly by lining up with another 
company, after having restructured its 
business. Four years ago, Volvo tried to 
merge witii Renault SA of Ranee, but 
the deal fell throi^. 

“Volvo could go it alrae. but I think 
there is a 25 percent chance they may 
take on a par^r,” said John Lawson, 
an analyst with Salomon Brothers Inc. 
in London. 

Volvo said Mr. Gyll would stay on 
the board, a move that assures some 
continuity for his policies. During his 
watch, Mr. Gyll sold off nearly $5 bil- 
lion worth of unrelated automobile 
product lines that Volvo used to make. 

He wUl be replaced at Volvo by Leif 
Johansson, 45, curren^ chief executive 
of Electrolux AB, Europe’s larg^ 
household ^spiiance maker, which in 
turn is getting Michael Treschow, cur- 
rently managmg director of Atlas Copco 
AB, as its new chief executive. 

Both Electredux and Copco are compa- 
nies in which the powerful Wallenb^ 
dynasty of Sweden hold substantial in- 
terests. The family owns half of Elec- 
trolux and 20 perc e nt of Copco but has no 
substantial holdings in Volvo. 

Mr. GyU said the Volvo group now 

See VOLVO, Page 6 


UiS. Chastises Germany on Scientology 


By Tluxnas W. Lippman 

WgMnitUn Post Service 

NVASHINGTW — The State De- 
.portment's amma? survey of humw- 
: rights emditioDS around the world will 
.cemtain expanded, toughened^ language 
lOTticizing Germany for restrictions on 
Church of Scieniology and its mem- 


Wew aa t a nd Prices 

SahRdn 1.000 Oh MaRa ^ -55 a 

■Cyprus X.£lbO Nigeila .. 125 , 00 Naha 

Osnmarft -.14.00 O.Kr. Oman. 1250Riais 

^Nand ....12.00 F.M. Qatar laoo Rials 

GbiaRar.. JE0.S5 Ri^kaiand...R£1/X) 

^resiBAajn....£0S0 SaucS Arabia .laoCR 

^ SE&50 S.Africa;..fl12-('VAT 

tordan -12S0JD UAE. 10.00 DIrh 

^ryaL-..^K SH. ISO U.S. UL (Eic.) ^ 1.20 
aMteil.......600 Fto Zhrt»bHS.,..2lm330^ 


beiSr ^ Clinton administra- 

tion officii. 

The r e p ort, to be issued Wednesday, 
will Germany for what asemor 

U.S. official called “a campaign of har- 
assment and intiniidation* against tire 
church. He said that the United States, 
seeking to protect religious freedom, 
bad urged Germany through diirfmnatic 



0294"8 



channels “not to prosecute petite for 
wrong tfainidns” but had bera xe- 
buff^ 

The Gemian response is, “We won't 
chan» OOT poli^, no matter what yon 
say,’’ a Ge n nan diplomat in Washmg- 
tim srid. “Yoe are a ing country. You 
can affod re have miUtias and cults. We 

C3D C* 

He said tiiat Germany, with 80 oul- 
lion people arid a un^ne sensitivity to 
the dangm of extremism of ite 

Nazi past, is obUged re limit activities of 
groups perceived as tiweats to national 
well-bemg. 

The U..S.-German dis^greemesic over 
Scientology is a rare irritant in Ama-- 
iea's^eneiaUy excellent relaireas with a 
Joey European ally. 

Aititooi^ tite lai^p^ was notice- 
ably riiai^ tins year, tire fatnsan ri^its 
report has noted ibeGerouia pos i tion cst 
die Scientologists every year smee 
.1993.- 

' While bteh'aides'. that it is 


See GERMANY, F^e.6 



AGENDA 

A Defeat for U.K. ConservatiTes 


LONDON (Reuters) — Britain's 
Conservative government was de- 
feated in the House of Commons on 
Mond^, 273 to 272. when members 
of Parliament voted against a change 
to a biU on education. 

The opposition Labour Party said its 
victory over an amendment to the Edu- 


cation BiU showed how hard it would 
be for Prime Minister John Major to 
continue to hold power until a general 
election, which wiU probably be held 
on May 1 (Page 5). 

Tbe Labour deputy leader, John 
Prescott, said. “The govemment is in 
complete disarray.'* 


U.S. Protests to Belgrade Over Use of Force 



VVrnm.EBU>WERS— 
ers in Belgrade as die oppo^ioo 
lost a court battle Monday for 
potitkal con tr(rf <rf die city, ^ge 5. 


WASHINGTON (Reuters} — Tbe 
United States imxested to Yugo-slavia 
during the weekend over police use of 
force against opposition protesters, the 
State Dqiartment said Monday. The 
dqiartment said h was a violation of a 
pledge not re use force. 

T& adminisiration also has con- 
cluded that the dftys of Slobodan Mi- 
losevic and laasjo Tiidjman as pres- 
idents of Yugodavia and Croatia n. : 
numbered, aad has begun se^dng 
identify the next leadets. Page 5. 


RAGE TWO 

Beying*s New AssauU on Caiholiea 

ASUUMCIFIC P«9a4. 

North Korea Delt^ /Voce Briefing 

Books Page 9. 

Crossword — Page 10. 

OpiniMi Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19 

b U mimUoitst O m s S M Paae4. 





FACE 2 


international HERALD 


rrnTMTTffE, SATURDiAy.^inHt)A3t, WESmABX 1-2, 1997 



INTEBNATIOlUL HERAIi) TRIBUNE, TUESDAi; JAPHIA^ 


PAGE mo 


Religious Repression / Beiitng Perceives Threat 

China Targets Catholics 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

New yof* Twit* Service 

Y UJIA. Qiina — It was tbe day beftne 
Easter 199S. and they came on bicycle, 
horse carl ^ on foot, thousands of 
Roman Catholics from the under- 
ground church, and diey climbed up into the 
forest on what is called Yujia Mountain, diou^ 
it is scarcely a hill. 

There, they clwsed away several troops who 
had never intruded in their place of worship 
before and who insisted that th^ were con- 
ducting training exercises essential to tbe na- 
tional defense. 

Then, the Catiiolics, more than 10,000 of 
(hem, began to pray. They Elied the pine forest 
here with their song. The leaders set u|> a plat- 
form from which they read out the Statures, 
and the people danced and reveled in dieir com- 
munity all the way up to the potent spiriuiai 
moment of the Easter sunrise. 

Today, the leaders are in jail, charged with 
interfenng with the military training exercise. 
Others are on the run. And a visit to this onetime 
hoibed of religious fervor is a somber thing. 

Over the last two years, Yujia and dozens of 
other centers of underground religious activity in 
China have been tbe target of a crackdown by tbe 
Communist Party authorities, who see reli^on 
as a vehicle for political organizatioii, dissent or 
outright opposition to the parQr's rule. 

The harsh treatment or Catholics in China 
dales to the ]95(^ when Mao's Communists 
expelled the last {»p^ representative and set up 
the Catholic Patriotic Association, an ofBcid 
church under Communist control. Driven un- 
derground. the unofficial Roman Catholic 
Church received a broad mandate from the Vat- 
ican to persevere by ordaining its own bisb<^ 
and odimting the liturgy to loc^ conditions. 

When Oiina emerged from tbe Maoist period, 
some churches reopened and religious tolerance 
expanded during the (980s, with Beijingseeking 
to lure more religious believers into the gov- 
emment-supervisra relimous tx’ganizatioos. 

But without a reconciliation with the Vatican, 
millions of O^olics lemam underground, 
where some lo<^ governments have tolerated 
them. Still, they are subject to periodic assaults j 
ordered by central ai^orities. 

The frr^ clues that repression bangs as heavy 
as the winter haze over this village in .Eangxi 
Evince, in southern China, are the wall slogans 
that the police have painted in recent weeks: 

* ’Catholics are not allowed to engage in illegal 
propagation acrivides.” 

“Catholics are not allowed to go to other areas 
and establish networks." 

“Get rid of all illegal religious gatiierings and 
activities." 

To enter this viU^e as a stranger is to set off 
alarm bells. The villagers know that strangers 


have been sent to live here as q>ies against their 
neighbors, and to rqmit to foe Publte Security 
police station any violation of foe harsh rules. 

* The eoveioment is afraid that if we piacti^ 
our religmn, will be harmful to seCttriQf,'’ 
Zou OinfMrtflwg 56, Said as her neighbors 
crowded around her. "The government is afraid 
I we will conspire with foreign countries and 
I overthrow foe state." 

Some of her nel^bois giggle at suefo a pros- 
I pect, but Miss Zoo is silent becaose all of foe men 
m her funily are eifoer in jail or on foe run for 
{sacticing their faith. 

T he new wave of religious r^ressioo in 
China $eeois ID Urgest measure the 

product of Presi- 

dent Jiang Zemin’s [“J^U 
policy to shore up tbe "so- f — 

cialist spiritual civiliza- ueae } 

tioQ" of a populadoD that 
pays as little attention as it 
can to central authority. CHINA 

Beginniiig in 1994, Mr. p. aiH 

Jiang began to preach to the EQ 

party mtli^ that "sodal 
Stablli'^" Is of pa ramount 
impoitanoe to foe party's muf n ri^ • 

survivaL Tbetefore. it must , 

be preserved at ail costs, JiAMexr — ^ 

even if that means slowing riiinmtimi 
the pace of Deng Xiaqp- >*! 

ing's eooQomic re forms, re- 
iaqmsing price controls 
when diey are needed and 
crushing and religious groi^ whose 

activities could senre as a vehicle to challenge 
the govenmient’s legitims^. 

To bend religion to the interests of foe state. 
Commiiniirt Party strategists have devised plans 
to ban house churches, arrest reU^oas leaders, 
register eh uro fa members and use cmlitarytaeans 
if necessaiy to block their unre^siBred gafoering 
places. 

The most recent phase of the crackdown 
began here in Novemim, when tbe police started 
arresting un derground organiaers to prevent 
t hem from holdin g a Christmas celebration on 
this modest mountain. Up until 1995, Cafoolics 
from all parts of Jiangxi traveled here four tunes 
a year to ;xay. 

The Car&ial Kong Foundation in Stamford, 
Connecticut, an advopey groi^ ztanied for the 
Qrinese prelate Cardinal Ign^us Kung, whose 
fTiinfewe name is Gong Pinmei and rriio spent 32 
years in prisem before his release in 1^8. es- 
timates that 80 people were detained in this 
area. 

A copy of an action plan to "destroy foe 
organization of foe Catholic undograund 
foices" around Yupa was obtained by local 
Caulks and smu^ed out of China. It was 
published by the foundation this month. 



FMick 


Signs painted by the police in « center gf lui dei^ivmd 

CatiuMc adxnty repireaaed by the Communist Phrty, toncofr 
sees r^igion as a velutdefor political opposition. 


JMNSJO— — , 
GiMnfftfMu 


Local f^thelics said re- 
C many of their 

'* curmber were still in deten- 

don and that those released 
had been forced to pay stiff 
to the police, equal to 
half a year's income. 

Tltt great religiotts leviv- 
al that sweeping 

NYT China two decades ago is 

coming under greater assault as a new geoeraiitm 

of Communist Party leaders in Brijing fears foe 
growth of its moraa and spiritual power as tbe 
official cre^ of Maixism-Leoinisni declines. 

"Nob^y believes in communism as a tra^ 
sceodent, quasi-reJi^ous ideology anymare,** 
said Richard Madsen, a sociologist at tbe Uni- 
venity of Califonm at San Diego who has 
oooqilefod a study of the underground Catholic 
Church in Chimu "bi the past, many people did 
believe, and ft motivated foem to woiik and 
soxnetitnes great self-sacrifice that gave a land of 
moral legitiniacy u> tbe Ccanmunist state be- 
cause it was a moral project to bmld foe state — 
a religioiis project ultimltieiy." 

Now, he said, there is a ‘*loss of meaning'' 
and a "sinrilual vacuum'* for mOlions of 
rhinese are tunung to reUgioD. 

By some estimates, more people have joined 
ChnkiaD grotqK in recent ye^ than have joined 
foe Communist Party. Today, there are about S3 
milljoo party membos, bur an internal Com- 
munist Party document estimated in Febroaiy 
1 9^ ^ fom were perhaps 70 oiiliioQ religious 
believem in China. 

When foe Oxnmunisis took powjer m 1949, 
foerewereonlyamilliQO Protestants in foe coun- 
try. Today fom are an estimated 20 millioin. 


fhmigb the publkly acknowledged figureremains 
at 6.5 miUioa. Govonmem statistics say foese are 
4 mOlion <^>thftKcR in China, but church or- 
ganiTttrinng aod Western academics say 8 mSlion 
to 10 minion is a more reliable estinoaie. 

Whatever foe number, it is growing, as is foe 
for^ that Comrounist Party leaders perceive. 

‘T think there is still a pecanoia ab^ foe role 
the dundi played in Eastern Europe," said 
Mickey Spinel, a research assodale at Human 
ttigfrR Wai^ in New Yoik, le&xring to tire sup- 
port that foe Catholic Ghnidi gave to foe collapse 
of emnmanism in Poland and elsewfacze. 


L ast qui^g. «hnaiaanri« of paramilUaiy 
police swept into the tiny enclave of 
Donglu in Hebei I^vince and des- 
tioyra a Marian shrine to which more 
than 1X,000 UDder]^ound Catholics had made 
pilgrimages the previous year. 

Tbe authorities have tried to keep 

foreign journalists from covering the current 
crackdown. A correspo p dent fin* The Wash- 
ington Post was detained in 199S for travelii^fo 
Do^u K> witness an outdoor Mass for 10,000. 
He was later released 

Tbe crackdown comes at a time when Beijing 
is locked in a conSest with Taiwan to win foe 

But John^^amm.' an^Am^an who has com- 
bined a business consultancy in China with 
hinrum tights advocac^, has watned the Chinese 
that r econciliati on with foe Vatican will be 
"veiy, very difficolt" if foe "bishops andpriests 
and Idty of one community are continually 
sobjet^ to beatings, to axtritraty det^on’* 
and "if theirplaces m worship, their holy shrines 
are destroyed and their celebwons banned." 


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Cuba Admits U,S. Law Damages Economy 



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By Douglas Farah 

Wtefcwgftw Am Servieg 

HAVANA The government of l^iesident 
Hdel Castro, stung by foe effects of U.S. le- 
pislation sedting to limit foreign invesmient 
D^, is striking back with a law that allows 
Cub^ to sue foe United Stales for damages 
tmd helps invesrois hide dieir activities. 

Cnlw officials now concede that foe Helms- 
Burton A^ a lO-mmifo-old measure aimed at 
punishing forei^ investors, has hurt the Cuban 
economy and dowed its gtowfo. While no 
imp ort a nt companies have left, new investment 
has slowed. 

The U.S. law strengthens and broadens the 
34-yw-old economic embargo against Cuba, 
denying visas to executives of companies that 
do busmess involving properaes that were con- 
fiscated from U.S. cQo^anies here after the 
1959 revolution. 

The law, which is opposed by all major U.S. 
allies, includes a provision allowing Axnericans 
to sue those cempames. But foat part of tte law 
has not yet taken effect, and on Jan. 3, President 
Bill CUnioo suspended its implementation for 
the second time. 

Id part because of foe law, Cuban offidals 
say foe economy, wUch last year showed hs 
fim serious signs ctf recovery since foe collapse 
ofthe Soviet union in 1991, will ^xml^foan 
was hoped in 1997. 

"The effects of Helms-Burton are real," 
said Carlos Fernandez de Cwio, a F^ign 
(^nistry official who deals vrifo U.S. relations. 
"It is DOC what Senator Jesse Helms said, foat 
foe law would brii^ this government to its 
knees in a year, but ic has our lives more 
fofficult. 

"As a result of foe law, many per^le are 


afrrnd to invest here.** 

In retaliafioD, the Cuban legislatme on Dec. 
25 pa^ed foe ijiw of RraffiTTnation of Cuban 
Dignity and Sovereignty. It allows Cubans, 
forot^ special courts, co sue foe United States 
if tii^ bare been "victims of jfoysicalbann or 
property damage caiised ^ actions suppcxied 
^ foe Unired States,*' including "murder, 
injuiy and eco pw nic damage suffered under 
torturers and assassins of foe Batista dictat- 
otshtp m* criminals in foe pay North Amer- 
ican unperialism." Castro overthrew the 
regime of Fulgencio Batista, who was stqr- 
ported tty Washington, in 1959. 

Whfle there is no way to enforce any court 
venhets against tbe United Stares, foe law 
further tangles relations and makes it more 
difficult to resolve property claims dating back 
to foe 1960s. 

The Cuban Uw recognizes the rights of U.S. 
citizens and companies to indemnification fdr 
ptopexty losses in foe revolution, Iwt fertnds 
compensation of any American seddng redress 
tiirough Helffis-Burtm. 

hi addition, foe law makes it a crime for " any 
fonn of coUaboratioD*' in cstying out Helms- 
Burtra, such as giving any Laformation fo«r 
wmild help the law be enforced or spealting in 
favor of tw law. 

Tbe law also formalizes foe Cuban gov- 
ernmem's right to help foreign companies hide 
investroena from U.5. officials through **fi- 
duciary crxnpanies, financial institutions or in- 
vemient funds." It also establishes tfm any 
money sent to fbfoans by relatives Uviog 
abro^ is tax-exempt and can be d^riied in 
interest-beazing, tuffd-currency accounts in 
Cuba. 

While Cuba’s economy riiowed a growth of 
7.8 percent iu 19SI6, economists and offirals 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Berlin Lays Tunnel for Rail Hub 

BERLIN (Reuters) — Eogmeers on Monday began one of die 
most spectacular construction a ap ect s of tbe work to tiaD5f<7nzi 
Beifin,usmg water canixmfobuOd part ofa new tunnel that gy** 

will run under tbe future government quarters in Berlin. y* 

The tunnel will carty a norfo-south rail line as part of a SSSS? 

I noject to make the dty a major rail hub and gateway to 
I Eastern Eorc^ It will pass amiost directly undenieafo foe 
I Reichstag, wnne the Geman Rariiament will meet ha giming 
I in 1999 when it leaves B<xm. 

I F.ngineersare apyfiying a new technique foat involves uaine 
water cannon to swill eaifo out from under prefebricated g«m 
' concrete tunnel sections. 2JSS 

China to Reyamp Train SaMces ^ 

BEUp^G (AP) — « China plans to niflke trains connecting 
m^or cities fester starting in April to lure back gul passengers mm 
frxxn bus and airplane travel, the official Xinhua press agency oS 
said Monday. gni 

Train spe^ will be increased to more than 110 ktiometers 
pfffaom(70milesperbour)oamo^y]^g-dis&inoejouriieys, SkTStaiuag 
JGxdiua said. Special trains ftr tourists are also planned. 

TUna 

A ftiel shortage gripped Lagos <» Monday, leaving cars vSm 
Iming up for hours at gas stahmis. A di^xae between two 
Nigerian agencies was Named for tire shortage. (Reuters) — 

MIddfa E 

Taiwan signed an aviation agreement with Cambodia to 
exeteage direct flights between Ta^ and Phnom Penh St? 
despite foe absence of d^lomatic ties tetween tbe two coun- SSSm 
tries, officials said Monday. (AFP) 


said that the pace would be hard to sustain this 
year and foat many pec^e would not p er c e ive 
muefo improvement in their daily lives. 

Because foe economy shrank by more than 
30 percent between 1991 and 1994, tire recent 
growth reflects a rebound frtnn a de^ de- 
pression rather than robust economic activity. 

For example, altiiougb the sugar harvest 
increased by 33 percent in 1S>96 — to 4.9 
milUon tons — it is still fer below foe harvests 
of foe 1960s. 

The sugar harvest this year is expected to be 
about 10 peicrat larger than last year. But 
world sugv prices are flaL. That, coined with 
foe rise in world oil prices, has the government 
snapp ed for hard cunen^, acending to gov- 
ernment economists and r^lomats. 

Cuba ran a $1.7 biUion trade deficit in 
1996, accordmg to official statistics, and has 
had to rely on h^-intnest, sbmt-term loans to 
meet finandal obligations, squeering the flow 
of bard cuntDcy. 

"b is a cash-flow problem,*' said Alfredo 
Gonzalez, senior advuer in tbe Minzstzy 
Economics and Plarating. **Our priority tins 
year is to deal with tbe external debt, to ease tbe 
tension in the ec on omy." 

Tbe difficulties are bemg expetieoced even 
tix»gb Cuba attracted 1 milhoa tourists in 1996. 
the most since the cevolutico. Gross levemies 
from tourism for tbe year were $ 1 3 bilJioa and 
net were S450 mflUoin. But Cuba’s 

formsi debt still stands at close to $1 1 billion. 

‘*Tbe government is bmced in." an econ- 
omist said. "The refmms won’t go backvtterd, 
but people wili not foel much of an improve- 
ment, because all the money tbe state ^ts wQl 
go to paying off tbe loans. We bad growfo of 
almost 8 percent, yet by January we have 
already run out of money.” 


WEAraER 


France Puts i 
Works of Art ‘ 
Looted From 

Jews at 1,955 r; 


By Roger Cohen 

NewnutTbntsSerncv 

PARIS -’•France, {rarsuing Its belaid 
cobfixmtation widi its coliaboradonfis 
' past under Nari ocdipation, b^ 
nbtocedibeftxTDation of acommlttee n 
identify and find property sfolea from 
Jewish femilies during Worid War Q. ^ 
The committee, to be headed by* a 
' "proRun!entpeisonality,**istoTep(xtib 

- tbe govenunent b^ore die end of the 
year on tte value and current legal stahti 
of the property, which is believed ‘fo 

many buildings owned tty the 
city of Paris and close to 2.000 wo^'of 

art in. Frencfo museums. *'■ 

A confidential report by. die Fteodi 
Auiflt Office, dated Dec. 7, 1995, and 
revealed Monday Ity tire newqnper ti 
Mosdev found that 1,955 works of ad 
mainly frxxn Jewish coUectors diiTT 
ing World war n were in Bendi mur 
seums. T^ wodcs included paintings or 

- drawings by Coutbet, Mooet, Rodint 

Renoir, Sisl^, Picasso and Puvis de Chaf 
vannes. | 

Tbe r^xrrt described the ui^bli* 
cized p resence in the museums of tires^ 
plundered works of art, and the evasive 
approach to them of French museum 
directors, as "troubling.** I 

Under a law of July ^ 1941, tire pnh 
Nazi Vidty government set as its obr 
jective tire eliminaiion of "al! Jewish 
influmee in the ecoDomy.*’ The 

seizure of property belonging m Jewifo 
femnifts in nance follow^ Of the 
330J)00 Jews living in Ffence in 19411, 
abom75.(^ were dqiorted to Nazi death 
camps. C^y 2^00 deportees retiinred. * - 
The records of what haf^rened to 
Frmufo Jews are contalired in an esf 
Hmflted 5,500 boxes of documents now 
in tire "afiftnai archives and emanating 
from the Vichy government’s Geneim 
Department for Jewitili Questions. Unt3 
now, the documents have been clasr 
sifiefo but Alain Juppe, the prime mim 
ister, made it clear mat foe committee 
would have acces to them. I 

Obfuscation and official sophistty 
long obscured tbe precise French role in 
the deportation and phmdering of Jewk 
duzzQg WMd War TL Presidents, in^ 
eluding Francois Mittenand, sou^ to 
distinguish between tire coUabocationi^ 
lemme of Vidty and ^ Fench stare, f 
But Prerident Jacques Chiiac put ah 
end to this equivocation on July l^ 
1995, riet^iari ng that “the criminal folly 
of tine occupiers was seconded tty thi^ 
Fiea}ch.bydieF{eDchstme.’'.- 
lire de^(» fo investigate tire fere of 
Jewish iffopeity under Vichy is cot^ 

- sistent^wifo (his dianged attitude: Last 
week, France’s hipest court ordered 
Maini^ Papon, 86, a former Vichy of- 
fidiaL to stand trial for crimes a^ina 
humanity. He is accused of ordering tbb 
arrest and dqrertatioo of 1,690 French 
Jews from 1942 to 1944. 

Tire forroation of tbe parrel also a{^re^ 
to reflect an attempt to pre-eiiqx (be poli^ 
ical storms that have engulfed Switzer- 
land. Sweden and Portu^ as tbrir apj- 
parent concealmeot of Nazi gold and 
other plunder has been revealed, mainly 
uzxler pressure from Jewish groups. 

Henri Hajdraberg, tire chaiman lof 
tbe representative council of Jewish in- 
stitutions in France, said tbe comn9t- 
lee’s planned investigation was part (tf 
"abealfoy process tfatt consists in think- 
ing that one cannot make peace with a 
past tiiat remains fii2^. " He added foat 
tbe claims of Jews in France were, m 
geaieral, "nm prouniaiy, but moiaL",. 

Last Ocrob^. tbe mayor of Paris an- 
nounced tire suspension of tire sale‘s 
city-owned apartments after a book 
called "Private Domain” by a 
natist named Brigitte Vital-Dtsr^ 
showed that some of tire 1389 ap^- 
ments bad been crmfiscated frem Jewiitii 
during the war. 

At die end of the war, Jews who sm- 
vived were sometimes able to reco^ 
ttietr pr op e rty or received mdemnities 
from the Fraich state. But triren tfa^ 
were no obvious or immediate heirs, aiqd 
no claims — as generaDy occurred when 
oaJy young dmdren survived — tfadre 
r^ipeats to have been scant effort on te 
part of tbe state to restore property to jis 
rr^itfol ownezs. 




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PAGES 






TRimnvF^ TlucsnAV, jakiiaw 9n loo? 

" mEAMEmCAS ’ 


For $250^000, Hhe Best Access to Congress^ 


By Don Van Natta Jr. 
and Jane I^tsch 

Ne*» York Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — For elite donore 
who contributed at least S2S0«0QQ, the 
Republican Pa^ offered a new entice- 
ment in its glided invitatitxis to the 
party’s convention in ^ Oiego last 
summer. 

. .Beyond the smorgasbord of peiks. 
^ access to the patty’s private skybox 
and a photo session with the Republican 
nominees, the pany promised a special 
tenelit: staff members to help with prob- 
).eim in Washington. 

circles, these 
'* 5250,000 donors became known as sea- 
* ticket holders. 

At least 75 corporadons and indi- 
viduals gave $250,000 or more to the 
iRepuUican Party last year, s e**^"g a 
standard for political giving tfmt by far 
surpasses previous elecdon years, when 
rap donors generally gave $100,000 to 


join the Team 1 00 club. The Democrats, 
too, help^ to escalate the race for big 
cmnibmkxis, bringing in 45 donors 
who gave $250,000 or more. 

The link between political Hnnarir<ns 
UXl access to g e w er mnamt nifRria!« is at 
the core of tfae fund-raising controversy 
that has enveloped the Danoctadc 
Parly. The party has returned $1.5 mil- 
lioD in questiofud^ ccHttribudons, most 
of it from Asian anrf AgiMfi - Afn^raw 
sources, and several congressional com- 
mittees as well as tfae Justice Department 
are investigating the matrer. 

Republicuis have seized upon die 
ctmtrovasy since it omted last fall, 
accusing Resident Bill Qbti» and die 
Democrats of giving lai^ donors spe- 
cial access to die White House, lute 

intimate nrith fhft pfrwidftm md 

overnight stays in die Lincoln Bed- 
room. 

The adminishadon disclosed last 
week that at one such White House 
gadiaing, iHominent bankers met to dis- 


cuss Twinldng reguladtxis with Clin- 

tcm, a senicx’ regulator a^ others. 

But the Donocrats are nm alone in 
their zeal to raise uiod^. 

In the last election. Republican fund- 


donations would hdp buy special access 
to the Republicans nmttmiHng .Con- 
fess. Even while Rqmblicans criticize 
Democrats for selling access to the 
White House, Rqwblican ftmd-raism 
are gliding out even mran endidt 
intches promising special rewards for 
bigdoof^ 

According to soUcitatiOD letters, in- 
vitations and interviews with dozens of 
Rqnibiican fond-^aiseR, the Rqiubli- 
cans have focused <m large ccxparatirais 
and individoais with interests pending 
m ^litb! HilL 

“Tnereisnoqnest^ — if you give a 
lot of moaey, you will get a lot of ac- 
cess,’* said a senior executive whose 
coiporation gave $500,000 to the Re- 
pouicans. ^’AU you have to do is send in 




h. 



.SptU, Reform Party Eilds Meeting Tepid Defense of CUntonSpeedk 


NASHVILLE — Hie Refbnn Paly has ended its oa- 
. ; tional organiring convention here w^ membeis as deeply 
•. divided over die direction of tiie party as when tiiey arrived. 


WASHINGTON — People at the White House were 
rimigg^g off bad reviews of President Bill Clintrai’s 
second inaugural address last week. Not that anyone is 


And Ross Perot loyalists left here even more firmly in exa^y vying for credit — Ikfr. Qinton is tile main ant^. 


J control of the party's future than before. 


th^ say. Butdintonites inrist it was not tiiat bad a s p eec h 


I A weekend of ^litical intrigue, back-room bargaining, and would stand up weD over time. 

. name-calling and endless hallway caucuses climaxM whra Besides, one source said, intenial polls indicated real 

, j the Perot forces, arigryttt the criticism leveled at them and at pec^ile — defined as anyone who lives outside the Wash- 
•: Mr. Perot by a faction, crashed the opposition and mgtoa area — IDced it, and tfae conservative Yr»k 

L/electedaslateofleadersdominatedltylongtiine loyalists to Times colmtmist William Safire, who as a former Spiro 


; . the two-time prerideotial candidate. Agnewtpeediwriter knows about these tilings, prooouiiced 

The action, which came after several efforts at com- ' hpietty good. 

- -pFoniise failed, tciggned a walkout Ity representatives from One im j xwt an t victory for tfae speechwriters was kifirng 

; .ihreestaies — Miiuiesota, Oregon and New York — andleft any meutiOD of that ”l^ge to tte 21st century” cUch^ 
. the losers cranidaining that Mr. Perot’s gt^ on the or- managing to avdd the phrase entirely and k^ping the 
ganization will prevent tiie third-iiarty movemeot ftom presidrat fiom even mentioning a until tiie end. 
i reaching its fiiU potential. The speech was widely prais^ for ns brevity. The idea 


. reaching its fiiU potential. The speech was widely paused for its brevity. The idea 

Russ Wmey, the newly elected Reform Party duur- was to keep it to about 14 imautes, tiie lei^tii of the first 
.man and Mr. Perot’s 1996 campaign manager, said the inaugural address. In fact, some of tiiose involved were 
' .weekend of conflict was healthy for the party’s evolution supnsed dial it lasted 22 minutes. The last rehearsal at 
, and that its members could now ^ back to the job of mi^ght tiie day befcse tiie inanguiatioD clocked the speech 
. organizing in the states and expanding the pa^. at 15 minutes. Mr. Clintmi aiq»uently slowed the driiveiy 

“Withm the vast inajority of meml^ofmis party, there and added a few lines here a^ there, 
is a greatdeal of {ride in Ross Perot,” Mr. Vem^ said. ”In Except for that ciie^ shot at short people — ’’Nothing 

‘ an attempt to be open, tiiey have suffered attacks from some big ever came from bei^ small” — tiie Clintomtes figured 
people who shinild be their friends. Now tii^’re saying he succeeded. (WP) 

- tii^'re not going to take h anymore.” 

But the dissidents said they wanted DO part ofa party in (Juote/ UnQUOtC 
.. which Mr. Perot remains the controlling force. view ^ ^ 

this as coming to a fork in the roai^” said Ralph Senator fafitch McCooneU, 

*. Copeland of Virgmia,ooeof the leadersoftfaedissidents. Republican m charge of ftmd-i 
”7ne Perot party is going down one path, and the oo]Sfr.Ctinton’sm)eaIsforai 
democratic, third-party movement is gomg down an- funding refonn: ”1 just have 
^ other,” OTP) Reftnm yoursell” 


Senator fafitch McCooneU, Rq^blican of Kentucky, tfae 
Republics in charge of ftmd-raismg fcx- ! 998 Senate races, 

funding refonn: ”1 just have two words to the presidcnL 
Reftnm yoursell” (NlfT} 


— - - - ■■ ■%^ iga.g togetbacktowoikandfindhumoragam.*Ttfimkit'stiine 

AW9y rfvin l^lluCS forinetolsUti)ep«spIe(hac,wehavefolaugb.yfo 

' . ' laii^'.” . . ■ '■ ' (Reuten) 

. • Janws.Et^Rliy* 68, .who IsjaUedfoT tiie assassmatioD of 

.Martin Luther King Jr., is biKk in the hosintal in NashviUe, eRain-weary Califomiaiis celebrated after a second 
. Tennessee, for the tiiird tixne in a cnontii with chronic liver round of sfonns failed to deliver as much run as predicted. 


disease. He was reported to be in critical coQditicnatriien be glaring the state’s weakened levees and exhan^ed emor- 
. was brou^ to the iK^itaU His lavtyer, ^>l^UliiaD Pggier, gency personnel from more fkxxJing. (NYT) 

* said earlier that Mr. Ray would db within months unless be 
received a liver tiansitoL (AP) • A fire roared through a lesidentit 


received a liver tiansitianL (AP) • A fire roared through a residential motel in Thcnntoa, 

) , Colorado, killing at least five persons. At leaA two penoDS, 

• Bill Cosby returned to work on his televisiw show fw including a fiiefii^hter, were injured. Imie officials said that 
- thefirsttimesincehisson was murdered on a Los Angeles tiie blaze at tiie La Hadenda Motel had destroyed at least 70 
,\frwwayeariierthismonih. Mr. Cosby said that it was time units. (AP) 

Bias Cases: Latcyers’ Pot of Gold 


By David Se^ 

* ..• WaskbigUm Pitit Service 

WASHINGTON — A 
New Ycnk attorney hit a 
(Texas-sized money gusher 
^recently, and die wind^ has 
'raiiai^ him to coosider a ca- 
'^^»ershi& 

' For more than a decade, 
.baniei Berger earned his liv- 
ing by suif^ companies cm 
behalf of disgruntled diare- 
■£oldas. Then, in 1994, he 
^was afqaoacbed ity a col- 
"leagitt to wotk on a race 
, Crimination lawsuit against 
Texaco toe. Now Mr. Berger 
1‘will earn a share of the nearly 
^9 million in lawyers' fees 


would rather accuse compa- recent years there have been Neariy all of the litigation 
nies of discriminatiCHi ™n heffysettiementsfm'en^oy- in diis area centas on whether 
defend against such al- ees against restaurant ehaing employees were passed over 
legations, sachasSboQey’sInc.(Si32J for promotions or gratuitously 

”I find it a lot more fim,” million) and Denny's ($54 fii^ So timply Ity not failing 
said James Hnbeig, a Crii- million), and against the minodties arid women, exec- 
ftunia attorns who leaped to Lucky Stores simennaiket utives can significantly reduce 
the plaintiff side shortly after chain ($107 millio^. On IM- their odds m getting sued. 
itefenriing State I^im Insur- day, the Florida grocery chain ’’It's highly unlikely that 

sraneone who doesn’t get 
hired ity a company is going 

Fees in class-action suits leave attorneys to sue,” said Eugene Volokh, 

a- professor at uCLA Law 

With the largest chnnfc ot the mon^. School ”Th^*re too busy 

; looking for ajob, and it’s very 

ance Co. in a huge bias suit in Pnblix Siqier Markets Ibc. hard for lawym to prove that 
1992. agreedtopay$81.SmiIlionto a cranpany discriminaied 

It riso is, very oftoo, more settie a raM-action sex dis- against a perscm because tiiey' 
profltaUe. Because of a crimination case. didn’t get ajob.” 

change to tiie CMl Rights Act Hguies such as those, law- Some bu^ess leaders le- 

in 1^1, lawyers who prevail yeis and legal e^iots said, gaid the outburst of disciim- 
in employment bias cases giet are amemg the reasons for the inatitm cases as <^iportuiiism 
a rare deal: Ihey are able to increase in class- a ction race run amc^ Though some 
charge die coogianies they and gender discriminarirai companies have treated : 


Nea^ all of the litigation 
in diis area centas on whether 
employees were passed over 
for promotions or gratuitously 
fir^ So tiinply tty not failing 
minodties and women, exec- 
ntives can ricnifica^y reduce 


bad for a case that lasted just 
,.two years. 

”We*re ^tting hundreds 
of calls from woikers across 
tiie countiy,” he said from his 
’Manhattan office. ’Tmgotog 
-to a hand in securities 
suii& but we're already con- 
siderir^ whidi bias cases to 
bring nexL” 

Until recently, discrimina- 
tion suits were considered a 
^specialized legal niche, and 
'attorneys who brought these 
C^ses typically .viewed them- 
selves as a new brand of civil 
ri^ts crusader. Now. as more 
(;ompames sudi as Texaco 
procuice bonanzas for law- 
yers, bias lawsuits are turning 


Fees in class-action suits leave attom^ 
with the largest chunk of the mon^. 

ance Co. in a huge bias suh in Pnblix Siqier Markets toe. 


crimination lawsuit against 1992. ^ ^eedtopy$81.5miIlionto 

Texaco toe Now Mr Berger is* oftao, more settle a dass-action sex dts- 

‘willeamashareoftheoeariv profltaUe. Because of a crimination case. 

SSn k &toiheCiviIRigbts Am Figures^ astoo^ »™- 

requestedrecentlyipartofa in 1 §91. lawyers who prevail yeis and 1^ cjqiettssa^ 
bZeember seolement-- not in emptoymOTt bias casw gpt w amemg the reas^ for the 
bad for a case that lasted just a rare deal: They are abl^ mnease m class-acm<m 
^ve^ charge tfae companies they and gender discnminantm 

PMrine hundreds sue double the usual hourty lawsuits to the past five years, 
rates — and sometimes more to 68 in 1996 from 30 in 1992, 
“ford™ spent ^kmg on nc«»ding » dte 


tocrease in class- a ction race 
and g«mdw discriminaiitm 


for fttnft spent working on according to the Equal Em- 

a case. Because three cases ployment Oroortunity Corn- 
can drag on for years and are missioa. to addititm, more of 
mudi more likely to be settled fhese cases are winding their 
rfiftn at trial, lawyers* wtty through tiie courts. sard this're an area ifa^ can 

fees in class-action suits often ”There^s a lot of conqie- branch into,” said Stqihen 

are enormous and invariably tition in this field dim Bokat, gsikal counsel at the 
leave attorneys with the days,” said B arry G oldstein U.S. CS^ber of Commerce, 
largest chu^ m the money, of the Sgipeistem firm. The bias litigation bocan is 
Whra State Fann settled a which has won more than to large measure traceable to 
class-action gender discrim- $600 millirai to damages and key conges in the Gv3 Rights 
innrinn in 1992. for toe- fees ill bias CBScs siuce 1991. Act of 1991. These ameod- 


lawsuiss to the past five years, mmAnting unfeirlv, usually 
to 68 in 1996 fimn 30 in 1992, the diserrmtnarinn Ig limited 


to a small aoop^ tiiey aigue. 
” A lot m law 3 ^ have had 


missioa. to additirm, more of their ajqietites whetted by 
three cases are winding their tiiese huge verdicts and re- 


gard this as an area tiiey can 
branch into,” said Stqihen 
Bokat, goieral counsel at the 
U.S. Cumber of Commerce. 
The bias litigation bocan is 


selves as a new brand of civil uianrai case m ^ 

ri^ts crusader. Now. as more mipte.fa wyersatthe OaU™ 
qompanire sudi as Texaco finn ofS*y^_&t6in. 


feesmbiascasessincel991. Act of 1991. These ameod- 
But some law professors ments maHn mqiloyment lit- 
cemtend that tfae rise in such igat^ highly lucrative Ity al- 


cases could have tfae unin- 
tended effect of lediictog the 


lowing piatntiffa in class- 
action cases to sue for as much 


practice. 

. A growing number of 
plaintiR^s lawyers are prowl- 
ing for aggrieved eniployere 
m rgveseat — niembei^p 
in the Metropolitan Washing- 
E aqJoymem lAviyers 
Organization, for example, 
more tiian dmibled to 209 
‘‘in the past five years. Mean- 
-.vdiile, the business of defend- 
uig.companies a^tinst accu- 
sations m discrimination— 
and advising executives on ; 
•how to avoid suits — is i 
Jjii^ 

> Moreover, s«ne lawyers 
who once were on corpckire ; 
Tayrolls are switching alle- ' 
glances, deciding that tiiey { 


Though die State Farm nire to hire 
was larger than most, to minorities. 


wfllingness of some compa- as $300,000 to damag es for 
nies to hire women and p»f»> and wrffhwng, raifare dum 
minorities. singdy recovering thtor pay. 


tfae chedt.” The $250,000 seasrai ticket 
was pitched as an entree to the party’s 
inner drcle and * ‘the best access to Coo- 
gress.” he said, adding. *Tt is literally 
touted as being in the i nner ganctum and 
the creme de la creme.” 

Most fund-raisers and donors spoke 
OD the cemdition of anonymity for fear 
that they would lose the access they had 
wmi with their donations. 

“I think it is fair to say that everyone 
in our organization, £r^ the on 
down, finds this atmogibere to be cor- 
rosive and unproductive,” said an ex- 
ecutive whose corporatirai donated more 
than $300,000. 

“You play because your competition 
plays. At least from our pergiective, we 
would much rather take a number at the 
door of a Congress person’s office, sh 
down like any other citizen and, when 
ournumberis called, go in, state our case 
and then leave. 

“I thought that is what die Consti- 
tution says bow it riiould be.” 


Giving Generously to Republicans 


Top 10 corporate demors to the Republican National Committee of 
soft money — contributions to poPitical parties that are not subject to 
any limits and are often spent on behatf of individual candidates. 

DOltoR JAN, 1,1995. THROUGH NOV. 2S.1996 totAL 

1 PMUp Mortis Co. Inc. 

2 RJR N£toisco Inc. )HMlii|iHHH 1,146,175 

3 Amer. Rnanctto Group HHipHi 794,000 

4 Atlantic Richfield Co. Hplpi 765,416 

5 Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Inc. HHH 680,345 

6 Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. iHHi 635,000 

7 AT&T ■■■i 546,440 

539,253 
529,500 
475,000 


8 US Tobacco Co. 


8 Enron Co^. 

10 Plaza Cleaning Sendee Co. 


Source: Common Cause 


Thu New Yocfc Times 


Dick Morris Is Gone, Not His Style 

Disgraced Consultant’s Strategy Is Still a White House Model 


By John F. Harris 

Washiiigitm Afst Service 

WASHINGTON — Dick 


The Morris influence was 
tiiere the next day when Mr. 
Clintm pushed for an early 
budget agree m ent with Re- 


Moiris was purged from Pres- publicans, coupled with new 
ident Bill Clinton's political concessions on Medicare 


draws of a more significani 
character. Bill Clinton. 

In Mr. Morris’s accouuL 
which has gone essentially 
unchallenged by administra- 
tion officials either publicly 
or speaking anonjmously. 


team after a sex scandal last cuts. Throughout his tenure, or speaking anonymously, 
summer, but die ooosuUaat’s Mr. Morris was a regular ad- every posable actimi or 
strategy and methods still vocate of tiie impcaiance of a policy that Mr. Clinton either 
reign at the Clinton White quick budget deri. took or considered taking was 


reign at the Clinton White 
House. 

The toand of centrist ideo- 
logy and poll-based political 
positioning tiiat Mr. Clinton 
and Mreiis fashioned 
during their collaboration in 
1995 and 1996 is, at leak for 
now, the governing model for 
ihepresiasnt’s second teem. 

Ine Wednesday strategy 
meetings in the Wtote House 
residence that the two men 


Mr. Morris's echo was 
there, finally, in Saturday’s 
radio address, when Mr. CUn- 
tOD annoiinc^ he was asking 
for $43 miliion in tiie budget 
next year to improve fo^- 


took or considered taking was 
subject to extensive polling. 

Mr. Morris says Mr. Clin- 
tm’s ‘‘self iiru^ comes from 
the feelings reflected by oth- 
ers around him” in a room, 
and he viewed polls of the 


renting model for aanouncements of small- 
it’s second teem, scale actions — designed to 


standards. Frequent electorate as “the ultiroae 


room.” He looked to positive 
poll ratings for ‘‘vindication. 


convince skeptical voters that ratification, and giproval” 
Mr. Clinton was doing things and regulvly complaint 


directly relevant to their lives 


began in early 1995, a bleak — were Mr. Morris's stock in 

time for the president, have trade. 

ccHitmued. Mr. Morris and Mr. CUn- 


aloud that he wasn't getting 
the credit he deserved Mr. 
Morris writes. 

And while Mr. Morris says 


ccHitmued. Mr. Morris and Mr. CUn- And while Mr. Morris says 

Mr. Mcffrisisnolcmgerin- ton.whohavewcekedclosely the polls weren’t always d^ 
vited,battiietwopoUsteishe for two decades, by their own cisive. he makes clear tiiat 
ushmisd onto the Cttoton accounts have h^ at least they were for many actions, 
rost^ — Matfc Penn and several fiieadly chats since even such trivial matters as 
Doug Schoen — still attend, Mr. Morris resigned last Au- where the president should 
admntistratioD officials said, gust, alihou^ ntother will de- vacation. 


And th^ still do regular scribe the frequency or sub- 
polling for tiie White House, stance of the calls. 


paid for Ity the Democratic 
National Commitlee. 

Mr. Morris's ideas oill pro- 
vcAe tcorion to tiie . Vlfliite 
House. Since tfae'eledioii ^ 
miitistiatioD officials say. 
there have been several de- 
bates over whaher Mr. Clin- 
ton shcKild present a ste^ 
bair^ of smaU-scale initiat- 
ives, sometinng Mr. Mxiis 
perpetually agnared fn*, c« 
whether te should slow the 


Mr. Mtnris’s lasting influ- 
ence is a touchy subject at tfae 
White House. Mr. Ointon 
and'Vice President'-Al Gore, 


they were for many actions, 
even such trivial matters as 
where the president should 
vacation. 

As Mr. Morris tells it, Mr. 
Clinton often kept his views 
secret from bis staff to avoid 
leaks and occasionally ex- 
ploded in firustratioiL ”1 
mean. I'm the president, so 1 


not 'Mr. Morris ' or <^er ad- get a vote, don’t l?'Don’t 17” 
visers, are the primary an- Mr. CTintdn supposedly 


tfaors of die centrist political 
strategy the adnotoistration 
adapted following the Demo- 
cratic humni aripn in 1994, j 
aides assert. And the White 
House is not eager to revive 
the giecter of a ccmsultanti 


filmed during an internal de- 
bate abinit his position on a 


bill barring national recogni- 
tion of gay marriages. 

Once, Mr. Morris said, he 
started shouting al a dispirited 
president “You’re the 
biggest problem,” he tells 
Mr. Qimon in one of the 
book's more dramatic scenes. 
‘‘You've lost your nerve. 
Ycxi're not the same man 1 
worked for in Arkansas. That 
guy took risks. . . . Where in 
the hell is he?” 

The While House has re- 
fused to comment on any par- 
ticular passage in the book. 
“Some of it is interesting, 
some of it's got insight ai^ 
some of it's wrong,” said the 
White House press secretary, 
Michael McCurry. 

Current and former Ointon 
aides, pressed on the inac- 
curacies, mostly point to 
small details, while inde- 
pendent reporting on several 
of the important passages 
tends to buttress the cons^t- 
ant’s accounL 

But Labor Secretary Robert 
Reich digHitos the book’s 
suggestion that Mr. Mortis 
was one of the few creative 
forces on a team of mostly 
conventional thinkers. 

‘‘DickMonis's arrival was 
not the point at which the 
adratoistration suddenly be- 
came creative,” Mr. Reich 
said. ' ‘There’s a lot of conceit 
to that proposition.” 


pace and promote a smaller who an embanass- 

number of lar^r and more ment 


substantive idetoL 


But what Mr. Morris has 


But die events of die last called his “symbiotic” rela- 
■ek show the extent to timshipwidi'Afr. C^tonisa 


week show the extent to 
which Mr. Morris’s world central questirai of die pres- 
view and approach to politics idency. The topic was given 
hold sway — not only with new currency this month by 
Mr. Ointon, but with many on die publication of Mr. Mew- 
tbe'T^te House staff, includ- ris’seamptogn memoir, “Ele- 


to^ aides widi iKidiiiig but dis- 
dam for Mr. Morris himself. 

It was diere Jan. 20 in Mr. 
Qinton’s inaugural address 
with die api^ to bipaitisan- 
ship, somtotong dial Mr. Moi^ 
lis. throu^ poUtog. became 
convinced the ebtOorate de- 
sires de^Iy. Don Baer, com- 
municaiiMS (drecta' and prin- 
cipal assistant in drafting the 
gieedi, was anxxig hfr. Mev- 
lis’s dose allies. 


ns’s camnugn memoir, “Be- 
hind the ^a! Office.” ' 

The first wave of publicity 
and reviews about the book 
focused heavily on the ec- 
centric persooafity of tfae au- 
thor — a man who, by his 
own testimony, has an ego 
that often hurtles out of con- 
tioL 

But tfae attention on Mr. 
Morris and tfae seff-obsessed 
portrait he draws of himself 
helped obscure the pratrait be 



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PAGE4 


BVTEBNAnOPUX BERAU) IIUBUWB ; IXJESI^Ai^ 

ASIA/PACIFIC ^ 


Taleban Offers a Conditional Truce 

Deal Wbidd Include Pisoner Exchange, but No Power-Sharing 


CaieUbr OirS^fnf O t yat^ j 

KABUL — ‘ The Taleban fundamen- 
talist Islamic movement ofiered Monday 
to d^lare a c»ase-fire in A^ghanism 
its Of^KXients clio{^)ed a demand for a 
power-sbaring ^reemenL 

Although ibm was no immediate 
xespODSe from the other side, fKoes 
unw General Abdul Rashid Dustam 
blew tbe strafe Salang highway 
north Kabul in an attempt to stop 
recent advances by Taleban troops. 

A Taleban ^mteesman. Amir Khan 
Muttaqi, said thk Taleban had two ccm> 
didoiis for a cease-fire: fr wants the op- 
posiiioD to agree to a prisoner exebao^ 
to ackn^iedge Tald)an nik. 

**There wiQ be peaoe in Afj^ianistan 
only if accqTt oie Takban,** he said. 

In eariier stateinent s foe al U a n ce fighting 
Taleban has demanded a poweretaring 
arrangement 

The Taleban wiuch has im- 
posed version of strict Islamic rule in 

two-tiurds of Afghanistan, has been try- 
ing to wrest the norfoem third fix)m 
General Dustam and fomier government 
fences under Ahmed Shah Masoud. 

On Monday, troops under General 
Dustam blastra a nearby monntain. 
sending asea of boulders crashing down 
on the highway ^xHit 105 kilwnefors 


(6S miks) notfh of Kabul dbeording to 
soldiers and rqK»rtieis returning from foe 
front line. 

“The Salang bigtiway is destroyed,*’ 
foe Taleban eommgmWRiTmnnflh Mo* 
hammed said. “This will only cause 
problems fonhe civiUaiis. We con- 

tinue our 

The Salang tunnel north of Kabi^ 
neariy three Idlcnneters long, Is foe main 
route to northern provinces and beyond 
to Central Asia. 

Altmi^ ^ Pakistan,, Iran and foe 
United Nadons to negotlafo a peaceful 
end to foe prottacted fighting have 
foiled. 

In recent weeks, Taleban has made 
significant gains on foe battlefield north 


offoec^itaL 

The fr^ line, wfaidi at one fone was 
just 20 kfiometers norfo of Kabul, is 
now 100 kilonMers from the cental. 

Eariy Mondajr, the Taleban militia 
pushed farther info enemy te n froiy. 
Troops captured foree disnicts of 
Ka{n» Prmdnce in northeastern Af- 
f^msfoa, previously under foe coatrol 
of Mr. Maud's troops, said Mr. Mut- 
taqi. The opposidon has given up much 
of foe temfoiy without a fight, accord- 
ing to witnesses and r ep oi teis tmuming 
fr^tbefiooL 


Meanwhile, Taleban soldiers have 
foioed residmits of notfoem villages to 
r^ocate fo Ka^ Th^ say they fear 
coUabotaiors among foe villm^ who 
belong to Paldstan*s minority Tajik eth- 
nic group, likeMr.MasMid. 

It is estimated that at least 25,000 
villagers have reached Kabul many of 
tbem with no money and only the few 
beltmgings foey oould catty. 

Schools in foe northern suburb of 
Khsir Khana have been takoi over by 
foe new refugees, acctmling fofttidents 
of foe neighboifaood. . 

A UN aid cooidmating agency in 
Islamabad said Monday font it had sent 
emergency relief for Afghans living in 
misembie ooodidoas on the front, with 
childteo d^ng of cold and hunger in one 
area. 

The UN OfBce for foe Coordmadon 
of Humanitarian Assistance to Afghan- 
istan said in a statement that convoys 
canying urgently needed Applies were 
en route to the country’s froutlme 
areas. 

The organiaatioD said in foe state- 
ment that as many as four chfldreo were 
dying each day because of cold and 
hunger in Sa^-i-Atasb area in the 
norfowestem province of Badghk* 

(AP, Reuters) 



RdUqw RdnnatMBa 

NO BANGLADESH PEACE, YET — Jyotir- 
Indra' Badhipriyn Larma, leader of fire rd>d 
Shanti od Monday after peace talks wifii 

the gover nment in Dhaka fisiled to reach a deal 


North Korea Abruptly Puts Off Briefing on Peace Talks 


SEOUL — Norfo Korea abruptly post- 
poned a meeting with the United States and 
South Korea on proposed peace talks for the 
Korean Pftiunsula, foe South Korean Foreign 
hfinistiy said Mraday. 

j^oogyang gave no reason for delaying foe 
hriemtg, ori^nally scheduled for Wedn^day 
in New Yack, unm Feb. 5, a Fotdm Ministry 
reokesman, Lee Kyu Hyong, said U.S. and 
Soufo Kot^ ofSc^ dm not know the cause 
of foe North Kocimo move, other ministry of- 
fidalssaid 

The briefing was to enable Norfo Korea to 
better nndeistand proposed four-party Korean 
pet^ talks, whira will eveaturily iuvcrfve 
as well North Korea bad requested foe 
briefing. Prerideat Bill Clinton and President 
Kim Young Sam proposed the four-wi^ talks 


in April as a move toward a pennanent peace 
on foe divided Korean Peniiunla. 

I^ongyang agreed in December to attend 
foe mettmg after apologlang over an in- 
cursion into South Korea by one of its sub- 
marines, winch landed 26 ii&trators. 

North and South Korea are still technically 
at war ^owiog foe 1950-1953 Korean con- 
flict that ended in a truce, not a peace agree- 
meoc. (AP, Reuters) 

■ TaiwHii Noicleflr Waste Pact 

Taewan South Korea on Mcxiday Co 
end its oiftosition to adeal under which Taq)ei 
will fiiip low-level nudear waste to North 
Korea, foe Reuters news agency reported 
fromTatpd. 

Despite mcreasing^ xtuliiaiit protests in 
Soufo Korea, Taiwan rejected SeouTs appeal to 


eadfoedeallftideraJan. 11 contract, foe state- 
owned Taiwan Power Col, known as T^wwer, 
plans to skip 60,000 barrels of nuclear waste 
over two yearn to foe Stalinist state. 

“The case is a l^al and reasonable bua- 
ness actiw^,** foe luwan Foreign Ministiy 
said. “We hope South Korea can treat 
Tahxmw’s intemadanal business contract 
with imumality.'* 

Taiwan urged Sooth Krxea not to came any 
“disturbance.” 

Seoul foe For^a Mmistry said, “should 
notir ite rferewifowlateralagiMrebetweenour 
counfiy and Norfo Korea to avoid further 

Hamay nrf t riarinnK hetween our Cftimtry afwi 

Soodi Korea.” 

Taipower dedined to disclose financial 
terms, but Taiwan nevre orgaoizatioas have 
report that foe tidliQr has agreed to pay 


PyoQgyang Sl.lSO for each barrel of nuclear 
waste it takes. 

Taiwan state television, quoting reliable 
sources, said Pyoogyai^ had sent engmoeis to 
Taiv^ to mspect foe island’s pons and that 
foe first Qucl^ waste mi^t be shipped to 
North Korea by the end of Rsbruary. 

South Korea says tiiere is no verificatioa 
foat the Noffo can store nuclear waste safely. 

Saosed of South Korean emdranmental ac- 
tivists burned Taiwan flags and an effigy of 
Reddest Lee Teng-hui of Thlwan onSatun^ 
in Seoul as Sotoh Korea sou^ to bring in- 
tentational pressure on Tam to cancel the 
waste pact Tlte Taiwan Fbccagn Mfuisixy said it 
was gitfgfiftd foat North l&xea was cr^bte of 
hanrflmg low-level radioactive nudear waste 
and foat the contract cooopUed with interaa- 


BRIEFLY 


Ptotest^i^ Meet Uuu Leader | 

BANGKOK Rcptcsfidiativtt of foousands of to- 
poveiished Tli^ catored 

dfitys to press TOT social justice, met the 
minister Monday, but refused to disperse until solutions ' 

werereach^ - . ' 

“We will live here until our demands are met, said - 

KamsaeoSertItoo,apto»«I®*^- *‘^‘^**®*^^'*'®*® ! 

k takes weeks orinontlis.** 

Goventoeot House is the office of Pnme Minister 
Chaovalit Ymigdiaiyut • . ' • • , 

Goveniixieiit offi(^ said it could take up to a week'' 

ji^ to narrow d^ereoces over some of ihc-eigirt k^ , 
issues tsdsed by the 10,000 protesiws, who m im-* 
poverisbed norttieasteni piovuices. (Remen) 

Patten Jppeal: Keep Press Free r 

HONG KONG — Governor Chris Pa^ on Monday. * 
urged Beijing, whidx just released' a Hong Kopg repor ter ^ 
after three yeais in jail, to let reporren m the teiriioty '• 
write wtoout f^ after itreverts to China in July 

Catoaieleased the Hong Kong jouroalist Xi Yang, 40, 
ooSatuxdayafterheservedtfaFeeyeaTSOfal2ryearprison ; 
term on spying chaiges. .... ' 

“We have our own system, and joumwisis m our^ 
system are not pot in prison for. embairassmg tto gov- "^ 

emment revealing foit^ tto gpyeniizMit aoight not ^ 

wish to have revealed,” 1^. Paitea fold a conference of . ^ 

foe CommoDw^fo Joumalirts Association. 

“If it woe odier than tiiat in Hong Kong, there would 
not be many journalists free to the stie^. * (Reuters) ^ y 

France to Speed Jets to Taiwm ^ ii 

TAIPEI— FianceWfflspeedupitsdefiverytoTaiwfoijJ tf 

of an initial batch of Mirage 2000-5 figbterjeto, ahning to f r 
wrest political frictions at a May sumnut meeting in 
a T^ipfet newspaper reported Monday. 

By moving delivery tbrwmd by one month, to April, 

Paris hopes to minimize pressure from Qui^ Tdvw’s- 1' 

aich-riv^ uton Resident Jacques Chirac visits Bdjing - . i ' 
in Mty, foe Conral Daily Nnvs quoted unideutimed'^ 
Taiwan Air Force sources as saying. ' (Reuters)'’^ 

For the Record " - 

Hftng Kong peHoe plan to dkarn five suspects willi ■ 
murder in coimectiOD with a karaoke bar blaze m which 
IS people were Wliad over die weekend, Hong 
government radio said, quoting the police. The bl^ iii 
the Top One karaoto ni^ chib m foeTsImshatsui fostiict-' 


wassus] 
tmf war 


lire ni^ chib m foeTsImshatsui fostrict-' 
bemg caused by a gaipline bomb in a 
rival gangs. (Reuters ) , 




Preadttt Fidel Ramos has ordered an intensified^ 

a^nst rtMasHna in foe Phnnyines as foe death V || 
toll from an oufoi^ rose to 39 ance foe start-of foe year, 
thepresidential palace said. JReuten)‘'^ 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TBJBLNE, TtJESDAT, JANUARY 28, 1997 


EUROPE 


17 . 5 . Prepares for Balkan Endganie 

It Sees Demise of Milosevic and Tudjman Regimes 


By Steveo Erlanger 

New York Timea Service 

WASHINGTON — A year after the 
ngning of die acc(^ tfiat ended the war 
in B osn ia , the Clinton adminisoratioo 
has concluded dtat the days of Presideat 

Slobodan Milosevic of Yugoslavia and 
President Franjo Tbdjman of Croatia are 
numbered. 

Wl^e dial number is a mystery, 
Washington has begun altering its 
polity, supporting the protests rf Mr. 
Milose vic s opponents, looking past 
Mr. Tadjman to identify a new gen- 
enuim of leaders and seriously coo*- 
sidering plans for commandos to cap- 
lure some of the roughly 70 petqile 
indicted on charges of war crimes. 

Only a year ago, the aH mi n igHi tirm 
look^ upon Mr. Milosevic anH Mr, 
Tudjman as guarantors of stability in 
Bosnia. 

The two men. both authnrltarian unit 
boOi with clear respcmdbili^ for the 
had Dcmedieless committed the3h> 


selves to erufing it by signing the Dfyton 
accord in Dec^ber 1995. 

Thousands of Amexicaa and other 
NATO troops were sent to Bosma to 
sqwirate the coinbatanis and prevent a 
recuronice of Uooddied. To protect 
those troops, the Clinton aAninicfratinn 
said, the United States arid its allies chose 
not to hunt down accused g«™t«atg 
'Today, the earth hasshified, with Mr. 
hfilosevic holding on to pov^ in the 
■face of protests and -Mr. 'nidjman 
gravely ill with {vostate caoc«. 

The Qinton adminislratioii has con- 
cluded that Mr. Milosevic is unwilling 
to do much nxm to suwort the peace 
idan, and that a stable Bosnia requites 
more democratic neighbofs. While Sec- 
retaiy of State Madeleine Albri^ 

vigoously of the need for demo-, 
cracy in the regi^ the administratioa 
has not decided how to proniote it. 

Asked about Mr. Milosevic and Mr. 
Tbdjman at a news conftreoce. 
Albright said that pc^des caimot be 
based ‘*oo any me mdividuaL*' 


Opposition Loses Legal Battle 
For the Control of Belgrade 


Xeuiers 

' BELGRADE — The Serbian oppo- 
siiim) movement lost a court battle with 
the governing Socialists oa Monday 
over control ^ Belgrade after disputed 
local elections, but took power in an- 
other large city, alAou^ with fow 
powers. 

Tens of thonsands of c^qxi^on jxo- 
testers joined an Orthodox religious hol- 
iday march in Belgrade eariierm the d^ 
as a Russbm diplomat met with gov- 
emmeot leaders Co sed: soludoos to die 
political crisis, apparendy with Utde re- 
sult. 

Polidcal sources said RiesideDt 
Slobodan Milosevic of Seriria ho^ to 
.. defose the uproar over annulled results 
•' of local elecDonsl^allowiiig protest 
to let off steam in public rallies, granting 
inconsequential concessicms wd divert- 
ineattention widi ecoiKHnic reforms. 

' TheZajedno.orTogetber.opposition 
coalition has carried out 10 weeks of 
street protests over the Sodalists' re- 
fusal to admit defeat in municipal elec- 
tSms nationwide. The lesnits had been 
nullified by die goyermnent over un- 
specified irregularities.’'^ 

^ In Belgrade, ihe city electoral com- 
n^sston, v^di bucked Sociatisi pressure 
^ awarded viccoiy to ^jedno last 
week, said Monday its ruling had been 
quashed fay the I%st Muriicipal 
The dhairman of die comznissioo, 
Radomir Lazarevic. said he was en- 
raged by the ruling. 

"The decision is completely ^gainst 
the law,' ' he said. ’ Truth and justice are 
endarigered. There is a legal right of the 
, people to stait a rebellion.** 

^igrede analysts said die cooit de- 
cision could set the s&ge for a political 
standoff in which Zaj^o and die So- 


cialists would try to form rival cify 
goveniments. 

The two rides had been involved in a 
series of legal moves and countermoves 
for electoral vindication in Belgrade 
since the original' annulmeot in late 
November. 

The electoral cammission ruled in 
favor of the Erst Zajedno appeal, but 
. courts under the influence of Socialist 
hard-liners threw out the decision and 
subsecpient appeals. 

Socialist authorities held two more 
rounds of elections that were boycotted 
as frauitailent by Zaj^ino. 

A panel ^xm tide Oiganization for 
Secunty and CoiqieTatioa in Eimtpe 
verified Zajedno*s claim to victory in all 
14 towns, but Mr. Milosevic h^ dis- 
regarded the agency's verdict 

The Socialists agreed, however, to 
cede power in Nis, die second-largest 
Serbian city, after losing several court 
appeals and failing to cover up blatant 
b^ot-box stuffing by the re^onal parfy 
boss, who was later e^Ued. 

Zajedno took the reiiis of government 
in Nis on Monday at the inaugural ses- 
sion of its regionri assembly. 

Mis was (Mte of four towns where the 
Socialists have recently admitted de- 
feat 

Meanwhile, Depufy FbreigD Minister 
Igor Ivanov of Russia met in Belgr^ 
Milan MUutinovic, the forei|^ 
minister of federal Yugoslavia, which 
groups Serbia and tiny Montenc^, and 
wife 2^jedDoleadeis to eixmiiage cmn- 
proDuse solutiims to the crisis. 

But TO breaktixTOUj^ was xqioiiied. 

Zajei^ has reject any dialogro cn- 
negotiations with tiie Socialists until its 
dmoo victwies are recognized in 
foil. 


Major Stud to Favor fbte May 1 


Renters 

LONDON — Prune \flnister John 
'Major has told ministerial coUeaguu 
that tus favored date for an electim is 
' May 1, Conservative Party sources 
said Monday. 

They said Mr. Major had reaf- 
firmed fee date at the start of a rabinet 
meeting at bis official country house, 
Chequ^ The meeting held v> 
consider what pledges m include in 
the party's election maniferiio. 

The Conservatives are now almost 
20 points behind die La- 

: hour Party in c^rinion polls. 


Mr. Major must hold an election by 
May 22, but feeie has been recent 
qiTOulatioa in British newspapers 
liret he might impeal to fee voters in 
April evTO March, 

A spokeswoman at Conservative 

seek a by-electioa in 
South, near UveipooL by next 
Mon^y. 

The by-election would then be held 
in late February or eady March, 
providing what could {vove to be a 
crucial snapshot of voter oparioD be- 
fore fee nationwide elecrion. 


The peatt accord ^*is. sinipmted ^ 
aoore just two leadeirs.^’^she said, 
and Ameiian policy remains fee effort 
'^to develop institutions” feat “can 
suppoiit an evoloti<m toward democrat 
arm capital martee.” 

A semor U.S. official, speakm^ on 
conditioD of anonymiQr, said Washing- 
nm was not tiymg to push Mr. MDosevic 
out of power or “calling fyr his de- 
mise.” But. fee official added, “bisaura 
is broken.” 

“Now it’s a matter of when his era 
ends, not if, and how it does,” fee 
official said. “Evdi if he 'survives, he 
won’t be aUe to exercise fee same un- 
hidled one- or two-person rule, wife his 
wife. The rules have changed.” 

U.S. and European offimals s^ tb^ 
canned {vedict wim> might succeed Kfr. 
Milosevic, vriiere fee cimem OTOOsition 
nugbi take fee country if he reD sud- 
denly, or what impact a chatty could 
have in Bosnia. 

Such uncertainties help explain why 
America's European allies are even less 
eager to posh fm serious political 
change in fee Balkans, senior U.S. of- 
ficials and smne senior European dip- 
lonuus say. They havealw^s caredless 
about creating a democratic and imifiad 
Bosnia than in stopping the war. Far 
fit«n acting to undermine Mb', hfilo- 
sevic, tile Europeans and Rusria are not 
willing to g^ even as for as Washington 
has to isolate him. 

“Washingtcxi has increased its ihet- 
oric over Seifria and is putting great 
pressure on Seriua, but has not really 
made the dedsion to say feat ifae sooner 
^osevic goes the bettn,” said Morton 
Abramowitz, president of the Carnegie 
Endowment and a former American 
diitioiinaL 

' *But the alliance is totafiy divided on 
bow to deal wife this guy. feat’s fee 

problem. A lot of people want to work 
something out beforeen bfilosevic and 
tile of^iosniaa, aid there is no agree- 
ment wifein the alliance on what pres- 
sures to bi^ on him.” 

Unlike its Eun^ieaD allies, Washing- 
ton withholds full diplomatic recogni- 
tion from Mr. Milosevic’s government 
and prevoits die World Ba^ and In- 
tematimial Mcmetary Fund from oper- 
ating there. These measures have foiled 
to induce Mr. Milosevic to free up the 
press, talk to the opposition, resp^ 
bfunan ri;^its and o^ up to formgn 
investment, U.S. officials acknow- 
ledge. 

U.S. officials succeeded in pressing 
for a common frtmt whlim fee Bosnian 
Gmtact Group — the Uhited Sfoies, 
Britain, France, Germany and Russia — 
to urge Milosevic to recognize and 
reinstate the original results of fee Nov. 
n-muoicipal elections. . ■ : 

Mr. Tadjman is baitily less of an 
autiaoritazian tizairMr.~MGlosevjc on is^ 
sues of democracy and mefea freedom. 
U.S. officials agree, but be has been 
treated differently, with full d^Iomatic 
recognition and internalicaia] hdp for 
economic reform. Croatia did not start 
fee war and did not suffer UN sanctions, 
and Germany led fee West in treating 
Nfr. 'Hidjman as more beni^ tiian Mr. 
Milosevic. 

Oroatiahas manipulated its own elec- 
tions and cracked down cm the media 
and intematidnal oeganizadans promot- 
ing human rights, U.S. nffie»«is ac- 
krowled^ and it has also been moviz^ 
to absmb the ethnic Croat part of Bosnia 
bmrieriDg on Qoatia. The Qoats have 
rise reristed allowii^ refrigees to return 
to the Kfojina region of Croatia and 
make it hard for ethnic Serbs to remain 
in the Eastern Slavonia region. 

But U.S. officials reg^ Mr. Ttid- 
jmao, 74, as an “old-fashioned nation- 
alist” formed in fee period of World 
War n, and believe tiiat after his death or 
retirement — there will be presideiitial 
eiectionsintfaeaecondhalf of 1997 — 
tte era of one-man rule there will be 
over. But in Croc^ there is also no 
obvious heir. 


New Austrian Leader Assembles Team for the Future’ 


Ratters 

VIENNA — The Austrian chancel- 
lor-designate, Viktor Klima, unveiled 
his ministeriri team Monday after the 
ruling Sodal Democratic Patty lead- 
er^p unarumously approved his 
choice of cririneL 

Mr. Klima, making his fust public 
appearance smee agreeing to take o^tr 
as chancellor from Eranz Vraiutzky, 
confirmed that fee Vienna city finance 
chief. Rudolf Edlinger. would ta tosover 
tile Hnance lAnistry and tiie forawe 
secretaiy for public works, Kazi 


Schloegl, would inherit the job of in- 
terior minister. 

Fooner Interior. Minister Caroar 
Einfm . vfeose rotation suffered uist 
year after it emnged he had made a 
donation to a newstofor, will 

move to transport 

“This is a team for the future,” NEr. 
Klima told a news cmiference. 

Kfe. Vranioky’s surmise zesimiatioii 

■c rhatwllnr and party leadcf onJan. 18 
triggered die stufee-up. . 

Fr^dent Thomas Klestil will swear 
in tte new adfewt to Tuesday. There 


will be no rfangpg to posts held by tiie 
junior coalitiTO partner, the conserva- 
tive Pete’s Pat^. 

Mr. Klima srid be hoped tiiat the 
coalitiTO pai^ would “wodt together 
TO a foir basis.” 


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INTER-CONTINENTAL 


HOTELS AND RESORTS 
biro * ‘Us MUa ISfl * Afan • iro • Tic Asm 





A bodyguard of Shamil Basayev, the Chechen independence leader, 
Toth^ Monday in the village of Vedeno, sooth of Grozny, the capital. 

With All Candidates Demanding 
Independence, Chechnya Votes 

cn ^ nui bstNentffnemDi ^ mdiet readying tiiemsclves wnH their 

GR0234Y, Russia — Against a scroched and devastated republic for 
backdrop of war-shattered towns and the electiros. They invited more than 
villages, Qietferos voted Monday for 100 foro^ observers, most from the 
a pr^ideat and a Parliament wife all Oiganizatron for Security and Co- 
major ranfitHatftg demaodiDg inde- operation in Europe, to monitor the 
peodence from Russia. voting, and promised to protect them 

Cfaedmya’s separatists have been after six Red Cross aid workers were 
Turming fee bfrislmi territory since fee killed in their sleep last month, 
war wife Russia en^ in August, and The Chechens want the world, and 

many lesidrots saw fee election particularly Russia, to recognize the 
Mond^ as an important stqp toward a elecdoo as fair, 
full sepatatiTO fi:^ Moscow. They see this as the first step in an 

**T^ election is about our free- inexorable march toward indepen- 
dom,” said Hassan Khalidov, a d e nce. 

framer businessman who served as a And that is precisely fee Kremlin's 

rebel filter in Chechnya’s war worst fear. 

against Russia. **Ihe Chechen people When Moscow withdrew its troops 

have waited hundreds of ye^ for last month, it gave Chechnya back the 
this. We are voting today witiiout any de focto independence it declared 
pressure frroi outside.’' when the Soviet Umoo broke up in 

There was heavy voter turnout wife 1991. 
lines of pecfite fcaming at some vot- But in a peace deal simed last fall, 

ing stations well before feey open^ fee Kremlin insisted onleaying aside 
Si^e early results were expected the questiTO of Chechen sovereignty 
Tuesday. for five years. 

After 21 mroths of brutal war wife Chechens already take it for gran- 

Russia, Chechens have been busily ted. (AJP, Reuters) 


More Unrest 
Is Anticipated 
In Albania 


The Associated Press 

TIRANA Albania — President Sali 
Berisha ordered tbe army on Monday to 
remove road blocks and defend public 
buildings after widespread rioting by 
people losing money in risky get-rich- 
quick schemes. 

More trouble was expected in tbe 
cafHtal. The ruling Democratic Party 
scheduled a rally Tuesday in front of 
hea^uarters of the main opposition So- 
cialist Party, the former Communists, in 
a show of suppMt for the embattled 
preridenL 

The Socialists and two other oppo- 
sition parties, fee Social £>emocrais and 
fee Democratic Alliance, announced 
that they, too. would hold their own 
rallies. Wife emotions running high, the 
competing rallies could easily get out of 
control. 

A day after Parliament — virtually a 
one-parQ'. rubber-^imp institution — 
empowerbi Mr. Berisha to summon the 
army to restore order, most public build- 
ings in Tirana were guaitied 1^ sol- 
diers. 

IBght trucks filled with soldiers were 
positioned outside the Defense Min- 
istry. Soldiers were also seen in front of 
tiie state radio and television center and 
other public buildings. 

2>efen5e A^srer Safer Zhtilali 
sought to reassure Albanians on 
Mroday evening: “In a democratic so- 
defy, the army will never be used 
against people. It will only protect the 
constitutional order and dmocratic in- 
stitutions.” 

Tbe decree adopted late Sunday at a 
special session r^ected the govern- 
ment's acknowledgement that additiTO- 
al forces were needed to help end dis- 
tuibances fueled by investors' anger at 
losses in dubious pyramid schemes. 

The decree, carried by tte official 
press agency ATA made no mention of 
a state of emergency being imposed, 
however. Such a move would give Mr. 
Berifea power to rule by decree. 

Ten soldiers on guard outside the 
stale r^o-televirion building were 
posted a day after riots rocked several 
cities. Angry crowds ransacked build- 
ings, smariied windows and attacked 
fee police wife paving stones. 

Tbousands have seen their money 
disappear in what are believed to bie 
I^raniid schemes. Tbe protesters link 
the end of payouts to the arrest of ^ 
pyramid operators. Tbey blame the gov- 
eniment for their arrest and are de- 
manding tiieir release. 


BRIEFLY 


More Russum Arms for Cyprus? 

MOSCOW — Russia may offer the Greek Cypriot 
govenimem even more missiles to counter Tbrkey's threats 
of a preenqrtive strike agroist those scheduled to be sup- 
jdied to the island, aRu»nan general said Monday. 

''Moscow mi^ sign a contract to sniq>ly the Repultiic 
of Cyprus until the Tor-Ml missile system,” the officer, 
who spoke on condition of anonymity, told the Itar-Tass 
news agency. The Greek Cypriots have already ordered 
another system, tiie S-300. 

Nervous about the numerica] superioiily of Tbrldsh 
forces on the island, the Greek Cypriot government bought 
the Russian-made missiles to bobter its defense. Turi^ 
has threatened military action to prevent fee missiles fixim 
being d^loyed on the island. (AP) 


by the convention's council of ministers. The EU has 
rejected post-apartheid South Africa's demand for full 
accessioD to the Lome Croveution, which grants devel- 
opiug countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific 
access to EU maricets. (Reuters) 

EU Postpones Yeltsin Meeting 

BRUSSELS — A European Union-Russia conference 
scheduled for next week has been posqxnied after tbe ailing 
Boris Yeltrin oonfimied he would be unable to attend, a 
spokesman for fee EU*s Dutch presidency said MTOday. 

The crofirmation that Aesiefent Yeltsin would not be 
mddng tbe trip to The Hague came amid renewed qie^ 
ulation about his health. The Kremlin said that Mr. Yeltsin 
would have no working meetings Monday and feat his 
schedule for the week would be minima]. (AFP) 


Pretoria Hopeful on Trade Pact Unionists to Stay in Ulster Talks 


PRETORIA — South Africa said MTOday it hoped to 
win partial membership in Anil in die Lome Convention, 
which would give it favorable access to markets in tiie 
Enn^iean Union. 

A statement issued after weekend talks here with Euro- 
pean Union trade offidals said feat fee two sides had found 
some common ground to an agreement, a^ that iftetoria 
hoped a membership protocol would be qiproved in April 


BELFAST — Britain said MTOday it was not seeking 
ejqrulsion of Protestant unionist parties from Northern 
Irdand multiparty peace talks despite attacks that the police 
attribute to unionist extremists. 

A Northern Ireland Office minister, Michael Ancram, 
said he did not believe that politicians linked to the banned 
extremists had breached the peace principles to which they 
agreed to win places at the talks. (Reuters) 



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INTERNATIONAL WFRAT.n TBJBUNE, TUESDAX JANUARY 28,1997 



Space Station Is Slowed 
By Russian Problems 

Vital and Costly Module Is a Year Behind 


Troubled Venture 


Ti'^ ^..^^1-:*:^ ar= ne 
■=._r n - I 

, ^ r 

i- I riu ' _ 

1 ■- 1 - ■'r ' i=- 


By WUliam J. Broad 

New York Tones Service 


NEW YORK ^ Plobfems wiih die 
space prograiD in Russia have delayed its 
main contribudon m die proposed in- 
tematiofial space stadon, endangering 
^ eadre project; some expects say. 

The Russian module is a centerpiece 
of the orbiting outpost, which involves 
is countiies and is expeoed to cost at 
least $50 billion and be the aze of a 
fbodnil field. The station is meant to 
symbolize, and help foster, a new era of 
ust-West accord and is an important 
part of the Clinton administration's Rus- 
sia policy. It is also NASA’s biggest and 
most pohtically complex project 

But the cash-poor Russians have now 
fallen nearly a year behind schedule in 
buildum a module diat is vital to the 
static^ success. 

So in an emeigency move, the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Si>ace Admin- 
istratioo decided early tiiis month to 
build a stopgap modi^ in the United 
States that will enable the station plans to 
go forward, even tiiougb the date for 
astronauts to move into the station will 
be pus^ back. NASA is racing to con- 
tain political damage while redoing 
the siatitHi plan. 

“The Han ger of its umaveling is 
greac.” saM Representative F. James 
Sensenbrenner Jr„ RCTublican of Wis- 
consin, who recently became chairman 
of die House Sttioace Committee. 

The plan calls for the othiting out|^ 
to be Didlt in stages by 13 countries, 
rqilacing Cold War hostilities with a 
new kind of ^obal teamwork. That work 


is to b^in late this year. The first two 
modules, Gnanoed try the United States, 
are to be sent aloft in November and 
December. In die original jdan, a module 
financed by Russia was to have been 
flown into ^»oe in April 1998, followed 
by numerous other component until the 
end ooDSttuctioa in 2002. 

The now-delayed Russian module is 
meant to provide life support for as- 
tronauts as well as stability and (vopul- 
sion for the orintal complex, keefniig it 
from tirnibling out of coutTol or falling 
back to Earth. 

Incensed at the delay, Mr. Seo^- 
brenner said tiiat if Rus^ was stfll with- 
holding the payments f<xr its space p^ 
gram at the end of February, the station 
team should ask the Russians to leave as 
full poitners, letting them serve only as 
subcootiaciots paid m do spedfic krtis. 

“R Russia continues to fail to fulfill 
its obljgatioas,” he said, “it will shake 
the political ai^ financ ial underpinnings 
of the station.'* 

The issue is hi^ on the agenda of 
Vice Pretident A1 Gore and Ptime Min- 
ister Viltior ChemomyixUn of Russia, 
who are to meet early next month in 
Washington. 

Mr. Sensenbrenner said he planned to 
bold hearings on the station's fate right 
after tiiat meeting. 

While NASA officials concede tiiat 
dtere has been ctmsiderable turmoil, 
they insist that the basic East- West part- 
oeiship is sound, if frayed, and tint the 
project is nowhere near coU^ise. Tbe 
sprawling outpost can be built on budget 
and on time aim can include Russia, &y 
say. 



t ;•••% 


SharaBD^ 

Asm 



for astronauts 

to keep the oufoosh/* -^ 

from tufflbflng . ^ ^ 
through space 
orfaR^badc . 
to Earth. 








The Function^, 

Ca^ Qbek, 

for by the Untied ' 

built by Russia, is jnafliy Jo^ 
storage and expedmen^ 

SBures; Miisi. MsSbMT AasMiefi 






-m 












NASA hself can ride out violent polit- 
ical storms because the agency, as a 
major source of frmds for aerospace con- 
traaors, has many powerful allies in 
Congress. 

**From tile day we started vritii tiie 
Russians, it has been the perils of Pau- 
Ifoe,” said Daniel Goldin, tiie NASA 
admittistraioc, in an interview, noting 
that prentious {voblems had been solv^ 
saying tiiat would be tiie case agam- 
“1 feel we’re going to build it with 
them.” he said. ‘T fael it in my 
bones.** 

Despite that, NASA is preparing for 
the wcxst It is studying a second niake- 
shift con 4 X)Qent, or a modification of the 
first one, that would give the statiou 


long-term stal^ty, even if the Russian 
module never shows up. 

fo a bold step, the first stopgap piece 
for NASA is to be made out of mililaxy 
gear, wHcfa would ^ipanauly be the 

' such diversion to a civilim pro- 
Tliat means that orbital equipment 
to help Americans spy on Rus- 
sia will DOW aid the Russians as they 
struggle to get their tedmological house 
in order. 

The station’s current troubles are part 
of a patiem of new stresses between tiie 
Uni^ States «nei»Hmg fric- 

tion over issues tike NATO expansion 
and nuclear disaimameoL To smne de- 
gr^ the project's fate U a hostage to 
wider politick currents. 


Even so, American shuttles and the 
Russian Mir roace station have suc- 
ceeded in linking up flawlessly in a 
series of warm-up missions in die last 
two years. The fouith American astro- 
naut to stay m tiie Mir is now aboard tiie 
Russian outpost for a fMir-moi:^ visit 
The recent problems mig^t delay the 
first pesmanent habitation of the mter- 
parinnfll space statiCHi by a half-year or 
so, pushing that milestone from 
May 1998 to December 1998 and per- 
il^ to early 1999, when the Russian 
module might make it into mace. That 
43-fbM-long (13-meter-lqo^, 23-ton 
cylinder, or sontetiung tike it, is essential 
if astronauts are to live a^ work in' 
orfat 


London? Beijing? Meet Feng Shui^ Hong Kong’s Real Ruler 


By Edward A. Gargan 

New Yott Times Service 


HONG KONG — The bristle-haired shipping 
O'cooo chosen ^Beijing to nio Hong Kong when 
130 years of British colonial rule fade away at tiie 
end of June was »*Tching for a place to ofganize 
his new governmeoL 

The minniai govenuneot, wludi has been 
openly hostile to many of Chip’s plans for Hong 
i^g, neveitiieless offered iqi a suite of offices 
atop one of the glitziest in the central 
business district The leader-to-be, Tung Chee- 
hvra, tamed them down. 

So Mr. Tung bustled about town, v^ secretly, 
before setting on two floors in whk is called die 
Asia Pacific Hnance Center, a mimned semi- 
cylinder joined at the hip to the Gticoip tower 
witinn sling^ac distance of the jaggedly angular 
Rank of headquarters. 

But despite the expansive views, the private 
elevator and die central JocatitKi. Mr. Tung turned 
first to a master of faig shui (ixonounced fimg 
shway), the Chinese ait of harmonizuig people 
and tb^ enrironment, to analyze the balance of 
ti^t and dark in die offices, the orientatioo of 
v^ows and doors, the angle of his desk. 

“Feo^ shui is sometbin^ ytw cannra reliise to 
believe in,” Mr. Tbng sw after receiving die 


master’s qiprova}. 

nods his h^ to a place do 1 feel comfortable.' 

Mr. Tusg had nude it clear even before be was 
selected in December to be Hong Kong's first 
cltief executive under juJe that be would 

not move into Govenimeat House, die cavernous 
19tb-centuiy edifice, somewhat resembling apro- 
viodal railroad station, where the current gov- 
ernor. Qiris Patren, lives and woiks. 

“ I’ve heard that Government House is crowded 
and the feog shui is not good,” Mr. Tting said. 

Feng shiu, literally *^wind and water,” is as 
central to Hong Kong's etiios as maldog money, 
eating and shopping. Houses are built only af^ 
consultation with geomancers, or practitioners of 
tite art of divination by means of geogr^ifuc 
features, to ensure a piq^^ous orieotatimi witii 
the landsc^. Funerals are often scheduled, deals 
struck and mve^menis made only after die seal of 
iqipraval from a fang shui pcacotioner. 

When Welksi Stum, a Hong Kong business- 
man, tours the ooloay looking for sites for his 
siqiennarkets, feog amn isattbeiopoftiieUstof 
hisconcenis. 

“1 have a fang shui master vdio accompanies 
me when I iiuqiect sites,” Mr. Sham told die South 
C%una Mcxoing Post “There's always die ques- 
tion of fang sfauL” 

The advice and benediction of feng shui masters 


are sought widely, and in virtually any sitoatioa 
A leading Hong Kong isduroialist. Li Ka- 
shing, resdteduJed his mother's ftmeral when a 
feng ghtu expert suggested a more appropriate 
time. 

When a number of riders at Hoog Kong’s newly 
renovated Hqipy Valley racecourse tumbled from 
tiieir steeds, jockeys am traineis demanded that 
feog shui eiqieits be summoned to assess die 
track’s harmony problems. 

Not everyone here if»ards feng sfani vrith sudi 
solemaity. For the past five years. Credit Lytxmais 
Securities has piblishaH whu it caQs its Feng 
Shui Index, a wry tod irreverent assessmmt of Hong 
Kong’s prospects and qpportuni^ for investors. 

With last year's md» predicting a fire at Mr. 
Patten’s home (tfame wasnT one), a fatal bunicane 
(jl was among the ratmaa years m memoiy), ai 
airfdane Hi«wter (ocne at all) and a digmal year oo 
the stodc markrJ (new highs have been the rule), the 
index, gleaned fiom tibe wisdom of various feog 
tAui experts, has been struggling to find its &eL 
And even the best feng shui does not ensure 
aadoDded bonxoas. The scuiptazed twin 
towm owned by tite LJppo Group, The hxkmraiBn 
conglanerate, are deemed among the most for- 
nin^iy oriented in the central business district But 
that dd not pimteot a Lippo director. James Rituty. 
fiom bdng cauj^t in a spreading web of aOe^oos 


TAXES: 

Dispute VFiAin EU 

Continued from Page 1 

would only increase the scope for oon- 
euro countries, of which Britain ^ipears 
themost likely candidate, to undercut the 
sinde-currency group on taxes. 

Hie debate reflected the faa that gov- 
ernments are only t^innin^ to grapple 
with tiie broader ioiplicanons that a 
single currency will have for the man- 
agement of Eivqpe's economy. Judgmg 
its inconclusive outcome, the Union 
is likely to remain anything but a ho- 
mogenous econoimc space of common 
rules and mentalities after 1999. 

In contrast to the dispute over taxes, 
nunisters put on a show of unity over the 
Allure Europe central bank, with Mr. 
Arthuis avoiding earlier French calls for 
creating a political countoweight to the 
bank. Mr. Arthuis was able to claim a 
growing conver^nce around a French 
pro p o sa l for an formal council of fi- 


GERMANY; Ri^Us Report Toughens U.S. Criticism of Bonn’s Treatment of Scientology 


Continued from Page 1 

hardly a major source of friction, the 
issue has a tugh dedbel level because of 
the involvement of such noted Sciento- 
logists as the actor Tom Cnrise. 

The subject is emotiooa} also because 
of diarges by die Sdentologiss that 
Germany's treacmem of them recalls die 
Nazis' persecution of the Jews — a 
charge guaranteed to infiiriate Ger- 
mans. 

Boon says it is trying to rein in what it 
reganfa as a dangerous and subversive 
organization because of the govern- 
ment's comtnioneat to iDaiotain, an open 
democracy and not repeat ezrws of its 
past 

The Clinton administration has been 
trying to walk a fate line, standing up ^ 
tiie principle of freedom of workup but 
distuc^ itseff from the Seieoti^gists ’ 
denunciations of a democratic ally. 

“We have criticized ^ Cemuns on 
this, but we aren’t going to support the 


nance nunisters from countiies adopting Scientologists’ tenor tactics agaimw: the 
the euro, noting that Mr. Wai^I's Gmrnan government.” said the State 


deputy, Juefgen Stark, had endorsed the 
propmal in an interview in Monday’s 
Handelsblatt newspaper. 

Jean-ChuideJundter, theLuxembtxng 
printe nunister aiul finaitee minister, pre- 
dicted the Union would t^ree on sud a 
council to allow politicians to “talk but 
not negotiate” wttii tite indqiendent cen- 
tral b^. At its core, die tax ddsate 
reflected the dilemma of several EU 
countries, notably Germany and France, 
whidi must increase revenues to meet the 
deficit requirement for a single currency 


Department ^lokesman. Nidiolas 
Bums, criticizins statements from 
church supporters iflMning tire campaim 
Scientology to the Nazis' aab- 
Semitic programs. 

Mr. Bums and other officials said the 
issue was not whether Scientology was 
good Or bad, beni^ or malevoleiu. 

They said the United States was ob* 
liged to swport tite church in the diqnite 
between Germany and the Scientolo- 
gists because Geniaan actions may have 
infifoged on tte ri^ts of U.S. ertizeas 


anist Chick Corea, aiuitiier Scirnitolo- 
gisL 

Scientology is a fast-bowing inter- 
oational organizatit^ founded in the 
1930s by the American science fiction 
writer L. Ron Hubbard, whose writings 
remain the group's ^ding texts. Its 
aims, as Imd down by hfr. iSibbai^ are 
“a civilization witiioutaisaaity, witiiout 
crinunals and without war. iMiere the 
able can proqier and bcaest b^gs can 
haverights. and where man is free to rise 
10 greater heights.” 

The Church of Stientology claims 8 
mflUon memben woridvdde, including 
about 30,000 in Gomany. A church 
spokesman said tiiat because Sciento- 
logy teaches that “man’s fundamental 
nature is not evil,” it has stirred hostility 
in particular among conservative Chris- 
tian tiieologivis in Qeimany. 

Scieatology has fought fong battles 
for legal acceptance as a rellgioD and has 
succeeded in many countries, mcludiog 
tiie Umted States. The Internal Reveime 
Service refused for decades to accord to 
Scientology the tax-exempt status long 
granted mainstream churdies. but since 
Y 993 the church and Its cmpo ra ie entities 
have had the same tax status as otber 


zatiem,” but that some German state 
governments have. 

The Chinch of Scientology, however, 
has posted on its World Wide Web ate a 
long, footnoted documem saying that its 
adherents in Gennany axe “the targetb of 
systematic discrimination in every strata 
of soci^ as part of an insidious ex- 
clusiraiatY poU^ initiated, euoouxaged 
and sanctioned by ihe governmeoL Sci- 
eotojogisis are routinely dismissed fiom 
jobs, dismissed from schools, dismissed 
from political parties, dismissed from 
social, business and political organiza- 
tions, denied fhe right to professiooal 
licenses, denied the ri^ to peeform 
their art, denied the right to o 


In a letter 10 the fotemationai Herald 
Tribune, Abraham Foxman, oational di- 
rector of the Anti-Defamation League. 
i to ondi bank ageed with Mr. Burns. Ife *aid that any 
accounteandobtamfoansandaeoiedthe effort to equate what is ' 


tetigions. 

*iotiie< 


but cannte 'increase tax rates, which are who are Sciemolo^tsl^ encouraging a 
abea^ high, without sdfliiig economic bojwoa of Mr. Quise’s movies and re- 
activity or eocoiiraging tax evasion. strioing p^ORnances 1^ tin jazz pi- 

Bw the sltepdcal commeDts of Pi- 

nance Mimster Ruari Qiunn iniflcated 


die German govenmaent, however, 
Sdentology is not a legitin^ Telrntm 
but a g r ee dy, cult-like oiganizatioa mtilt 
cm “pseudo^ience,” in wbicii “mem- 
bership can lead to psychological and 
phyncal dependency, to financial nun 
and even to svdeid^” acooiding to a 
podtioQ paper itistiibuted by the Ger- 
man Emba^ in Wariungton. 

Tbe paper says tim * 'the German gov- 
enunent has not Iriten any legislative 
action against tiie Sdentedogy organi- 


right to use public facilities and concert 
halls.” 

The Scientologists say tfa^ are 
"blacklisted. bo yw P e d, vitifled, ostra- 
cized end thTMteoed” because of tbeir 
^uich memberrixip. 

A Gredi judge tecentiy oidered a 
church center in Athens cloMd after find- 
ing that Scientology is “an orgamzaiioa 
vdth medical, social and ethiern practices 
that are dangerous and barmfiil.” 

An Italian court last month ordered 
JaD terms for 29 Scientologiste found 
guilty of “criminal associaikn,” In 
r ranee, a pr omin ent Sdeotologist was 
sentenced to 18 months in prison in 
Novendier by a Lyon court that held lum 
reqxmsible hr the suddde of a cfaurdi 
member who was unable to pay for 
church-sponsored courses. 

On Jan.16, several prominent Axner- 
icacs placed afun^page “Open Letter to 
Helmut Kt^” in several newspapera, 
including the frttemational urad 
Tribune, appealing for an end to die 


By Serge Schmemann 

• New YoHt Tones Service 

MOSCOW — Sa^g he was Vcio^ 
iog file Natan aiaransljy si- 

■ turned as an Israeli calntici minister 
'Mooday to the country firom which he 
was expelled nearly 11 years ago as a 
coQvi^M traitor. 

Landing in Moscow in the freezing 
darkness of eailp' momipg, the 49-year- 
old fbnner dissideot deniM feetii^ pF 
TKuraWa of triumph. - 

“V^ieD I was in priso^ I often 
dreanaedoflaridinginfaradinanEl A1 - 
' iriane — always an Et A1 plane — and 
bting met faere by my wife, AvttaL and 
her bn^ier Misha,' * be said. “But 1 have 
. iiever dreaxned of laxidiira in Moscow in 
an 0 A1 {dame, hfayberve been asked 
too many times what I’d feel about this. 
I've ain^ celebrated victory. Those I 
defeated m no kaiger in power. The 
struggle now is for 'building soong re- 
lations with Russia.”. 

The i n yori a oce of the visit for Imn, 
Mr. Sharansky smd, was tite symbolism 
arid tite nteszageofretiirniqg to his fatb- g 
er’s grave, and xeturning as an Israeli f 
leader. 

Accompanied by lus 89-^^-old 
modter, Milgrom, and his Mr. 
Sfaaransky drove to the cemetery in-a 
subtnb, Malakbovka. jffis fadter.Bmis, 
(fied in 1980, wiale Mr. Sharansky was 
in inison, ai^ he had nev« been to the 
grave. But the tombstmte had the m- 
scription be had dictated to his mother 
“His soul will sleep in peace. ^ seed 
will inherit the Land of IsraeL” 

“That feeling of closing the dccle,.'it 
was a veiy diaanatic firelmg at fae 
cemetery,” Mr. SharaosI^ said. Fol- 
lowmg tii^, he said, another circle was 
closed tiua one almost literally. 

That was when Mr. Sharan^, as ti» 
Israeli minigter of induTOy and trade, 
sign^ Mayor Yuri Uuhkov to increase ^ 
tn^ between Israel and Moscow. The “ 
ceremony todt place in a sparkling ban, 
Mr. Stunnsky said, next door to the 
building where-he was arrested 20 years 
eariier — which was also the last time he 
saw imydi^ of Moscow other dian Le- 
fortovo Pcisoa. 

“It was very funny,” Mr. Shaiansl^ 
sakL “Here I was arrested, and 20 yedn 
later Tm received witii state honore in 
the next buikiing.” • 

IJke msny old Miscoviies who bare 
reniiDed to tiie new Moscow of glinenag 
shops, glaring advertisements and bri^ 
Ugt^ Shai^lQr fou^ it both m- 
ferent and curiously fmiufiar. ; .*i 
“Of courre a lot is differeau but itrtiU 
looks surprisingly the same — the same 
streets, thesantehouses.” be said. “Yoa 
recognize ibe place where you met yow 
wife, where you held a demoastxatioii. 
One di fference is talJdiig to people: Rus- 
sians are less caiefol;tj^*re more free. | 
1 won't say absdutdy free, but more f 
free.” 

The most dramatic sense of dumge, 
Mr. Sharansky continued, came aia visit 
with teadiera fiom Jewish schools. 
“There were people from a thousand 
different Jewirii schools.” be said. 
“Tb^ were complaining about light 
budgets, they were squabbling over du- 
xftil pattern of organized per^ feient systems of educatioiL It was like a 
’’ofdciaitology.A^ODgtte^- -New York school board. To think that 20 

years ago the big thing was an under- 
ground class of 40 students. And here We 
are debating different systems.” 

The official purpose for Mr. Shar- 
ansky’s visit is to promote Israeli-Rds- 
sian trade, and toward that end the min- 
ister was accompanied by about 40 
Israeli busioesacDen. 

Tbe Russian news media interest was^ 
muted, perhaps because it has become^ 
cmnmooplaoe for fonner dissidents to 
come back. Few newspapers noted tbe 
return, and the eveoiiig tmevisimi news 
program focused on the economic and 
trade aspects of the Israeli visit more 
than on Mr. Sharmsl^ as a hero of the 
Jewish emigratiem movement who bad 
served nine years in Soviet prisons and 
labor camps before hdng freM in a sw^ 
for Soviet bloc ^es in the West 








over iaqae^ eampaign comrifaiticos to ibe 
Democratic Pat^ in the United States. 

Fbr lus patL thoo^ Tupg haS: cast his lot 
witii tite fimg dim niastff Chi^ Iw-IaL Mr. Qioy, 
who was hired by the government to screen the 
offices chosen by Mr. Tte^ said he was reassured 
by tite layout of tbe Asia-ndfic site. At the same 
ifinfe. he was troubled by the Biitirti GovecDor's 
offiiM. which he utgdl T^mg not to take ova. 

“Govennneot House,” said w. Cboy, referring 
to Mr. Pattm’s houte airt of^, “ was soiTouiided 
tall buQdmgs, which Mocked its spirit” 

Other fesig shui experts were less sanguine 
about Mf . Tung’s choice. Lee Quk-san, anotfaer 
local geomanotf . was unsettled the view of 
consnuction sites ^ buildings with inau^- 

rinwgl y iJmr p fr iangwlar and rarftmgiilar ghapttg.— 

from tite fixture dnef executive’s office: 

“If the dragon cannot see bis office, then be will 
be in boable.” cautioned Mr. Lee. In the cosmology 
oi feng shui, it is thought that a my^cal dragon 
reigns at the heart Hb^ Kon& exertiDg infliieiioe 
overall that happens. Vfr. Paiteirs spokemian, Keny 
McOlynn, was umufOed by suggtarions ett diriiar- 
roooyu Govemment Hoiro. 

“Tbe feaag shui can’t be all that bad,” hfr. 
NfoGlyim said. ’ ’When the gewemormoved in, the 
Hang Seng stock exchange index was a bit over 
^000 pcriiits. It’s now a Ut over 13,000.’ ’ 


“shameful 
cution 

natories were Dustm Hbffinaiu Goldie 
Hawn, Gore Vidal, Mario Puzo, Oliver 
Stone and Larry Kfeg. 

The letter caused a sensation because 
it likened Gennany’s treatmeDt of Sd- 
eatd<^ to its peraecution of Jews in die 
1930s. 

Mr. Burns, while deploring Gm- 
xaany’s actioos against Scientology, re- 
acted to the ad by ««ning the open letter 


-to 

Scieixtologists with what bappeoed to 
Germany’s Jews was not only ”hi^ 
torically inaocuratt, h is also an affiemt 
to tbe memopr the 6 million Jews 
siordeted during tiie HolocausL” 

The letter to Mr. Kohl was drafted by 
Bertram ^rtds. a prominent show busi- 
ness lawyer in Los Angles, who said 
that the signatories were not Sdento- 
legists 

I 1 & to do iL He said be took up tiie cause 


SWISS; 


;nauune» were not omcnai- J a ' v • 

that tite church did not ask AlUOUSSUdor tnUtS 
He said be took ito tiie cause ^ 

of Scdentoloigy because Mr. Cruise is a 


client and his movie ‘’Mission Xm- 
possibie” faced a boycott in Germany 
because of Mr. Cniise’s church mem- 
bership. 

Mr. Eneids said that German outrage 
over the Naa coomstrisoD was a “red 
hexring” because the open letter taiiceri 
only dbout restrictions on Jews during 
the early y^cs of Hitler’s rule, not tbe 
“ffiial rolution” that came later. 

!dr. Bums said be hiui thig 


Continued from Page 1 

and of the search for justice for people 
who had tiieir fiofnan rights fimdacnent- 
ally violated during die Second World 
War.” tiie State Dqiartoient spokesman, 
Nicholas Bums, said in Wasnineton. : 
“Itisveiy trouUing,”besaia. 
hfr. Bums said tiie ambassador’s 00 - W 
ticD of laimAfng a cTusade against the 
American critics of his goveninienL'’if 
acCTirately portrayed by me printed ex- 


hamstri^ Europe's more dynamic \ 0 L\ 0 :ChiefExecudveResigns,PromptingChangesatTopof 2 ()aierSu,edishFh^ 

economies by fmemg them to ad:^ the ^ a cy a r 

litntt taw «nt*r> nn<l IaIm- lAAiibaf wi — 4 1 ,1... : I i j , 


high tax rates and labor-market rigidities 
prevailing on tbe CmtinenL 

Hnance Minister Philippe Maystadt 
of Belgium cwnplained about Iri^ tax 
incentives, dtmg a decision tiiis month 
by Boston Scientific Europe, the arm of 
an American medical equipment com- 
pany, to shift Belgian operations to Ire- 
und with a loss of 273 jobs. 

Mr. Juncker sou^ to msikit tbe point 
tiiac Luxembourg was not tite only prob- 
lem eounny for Europe’s taxautiiorities. 
He drew latter when be recounted 
having received a letter at hmne from a 
Brigitte bank riainiing he could avoid 
tax ai home by (fKamg a nonresident 
account in Belgium, a country not 
wkiriy known for tax advantages. 


Continued from Page 1 


pent 

nest po^ that fits our criteria: a large, 
faced “a number of hnptntant strategic inteniarional compai^. to heavy 
- — — I ..^ 11 consumer prodj^. 



and structural decisions that will have 
consequences extending far into the fu- 
ture,” adding tiiat his decision to leave 
in Afvfl was pr om p ted his view that 
“tills is the prapa timt* to pass tiie 
bason.” 

Volvo’s shares in Stockholm closed as 
180 kronor (S2S), up 3. 

Volvo’s chairnen. Bert-CHof Svan- 
holnu said at a news c^eienoe in 
Stocldiohn that whDe Mr, Gyll coocen- 
trated on transforming tte group from a 
conglomerate to an automoiUle oper- 
ation, his s u ccessor, Mr. Johansson, 
would focus on marking com- 


a Swede and young,” Mr. 
Svanbolffi said, adding that if hfr, Jb- 
hanss(» could man^ to make refri- 
gerators “se^" m Etectrriux, be could 
turn Volvos into “sexy cars, too.” 

Volvo’s cteirman raid the new chief 
executive riiould identify “new niches 
and s^meoxs” in wfa^ Volvo can 
grow. 

Shtues in Electiolux rose 12 kronor to 
close at 438. 

Analysts said shareholders seemed 
either pleraed with tite move of tiie com- 
pany’s chief to Volvo or riued at tiie 


arrival of his rqilacement, M*. products and have pei^iie operate day- 
TVesebow. Of the three managers. Alias by-day fully tqi to ^peed.” 

Copco's Mr. Tresefaow has realized a Du^g ms four years with Volvo, Mr. 

return on investment of 27 percent over GjH has.cmicesUEated on rraiKfopwing 
the last four years. By contrast .Qec- Volvo into a primary transport equip- 


crolux has had a return of 13 pexcenL and 
Volvo has managed 22 

Atlas CopoostaaiM 
rt l^.5kroQor, down 1. 

*‘I tirink it is daiigeious to read more 
into these changes than what die com- 
pany said,” Mr. Lawson at Salomcm 
Imtbets said. “Gyll was a great deal- 
maker. He succ^fiiUy sold off non- 
core assets and was a g«>od manager, tet 
auiomobOe is not his industry. Now 
Vohro needs someone who bandies the 
tng ongoing p rogr a m of sdling th^ 


point with Mr. Fields and bad ngectisid '^ceqits of Us cable, was “just -wnxK- 
Mr. Helds’s aigumeaL . heMed.” 

- .'He defended tbe work of Jev^ 

groups and. of .Mr. d’Amato, wte ?s 
ebainnan of the Senate Bankhig Co^ 
mittee has vigorously piudwi for tiie 
release of secret archives tii»r would 
riled light on the relationship between 
Swiss banks and the Nazi re^me. i 
^ Mr. Jamnetti contend that the dfa- 
dons hadheen taken out of cooteXL 
he exmessed regret for having cmi^ 
any offense. 

Mnister Flavio Cotti saidfo 


ment group, focusing on tiie malring of 

cars and trucks. Now, analysts said, ^ ^ ^ 

Volvo ne^ someone good at selling Ben tte c^loet had cfecided to 
these products in the face of growing Mr. Jagraetti’s resignation and 
worldwide competitiDn. - 

Mr. Lawson said Volvo and die Jap- 
anese autornaker Mtsubiriii Corp. have 

had a lelationriiip and discussions for He said~tiie cable’s hostile attitude 
sometune, which could lead to fimher stood at odds with fee govenmens’s a 
j. L . . . strong conviction that everything had to V 

The Swediriiaiuomaker also has been be done to pursue a civil ante decent 

rraiorcdtohaveteWtalkswtiiChrysIer .diatogcre with interested parties partic- 
Corp,tiieNo.3li.S.aotomaker. ulariy the Jewish commumty., . 


ask pnseeutora to investigate how (be 
document had been turned over to Son* 




'c: , 

Ci;' 

1 '.': 







lim3(NAJ10NALH]^lAlJD TKEBl^ TUESDAY XANUARY 28, 1997 


PAGE 



IMERmnONAL 


^ Liberian Militias Hand In Guns 

Disarmed Fighters Find Old Enemies ArenH So Bad 


By Howard W. French 

Net*' Ymi Times Stn-jcr 

MONROVIA. Liberia — Ont- 
stripping expectations, thousands of 
from this country’s rival 
nulitias have been turning in dieir 
weapoM in recent days in compli- 
ance with a disarraament program 

intended to dissolve Libia’s armed 

factions fonnally by tiie end of this 
*moDCb. 

In soiTC of the most hopeful 
scenes this country has seen 
% the capital. Monrovia, was devast- 
-'bted nine months ago in weeks of 
'fighting and looting, (he disaroia- 
'ment program has steadily 
momentum as militia mem bers have 


Tltt peace plan is expected to 
culminate on May 30 - wnth inter- 
nationally supervi^ elMtioos to 
select a new piesident'and seat tiie 
first broadly recognized gpvem- 
isent siooe tbc a^assinatiou of - 
military dictator S^nel Doe in 
1990. 

**We have demobilized, say. 

10.000 men, and recovered over 

5.000 armsi. and tiieie are encour- 
a^ng signs of a real acceleration,*' 
said George NagaA; a senior 
official here. "Zjberia is not about 
to become an arms-free society. But 
things are moving in the li^t di- 
rection. and tiiat is an impOTtant psy- 
chological achievement’* 

E stimates of the number of com- 


have demobilized, sa^ 10,000 men, and 
recovered over 5,000 arms, libcria is not about to 
become an arms-free sooety. But things are 
moving in the li^t diredioii, and that Jg an 
important psydiological achievement.’ 


lined up at 11 centers around the 
country to surrender their arms. 

Hie disarmament drive is part of 
^ ;an ambitious transition plan set up 
by the Ectnomic Community cu 
African States, ra* Ecomas, 

'which has nrminfajj fMtH Of 

peacekeeping troops in Uberia 
' through most of the country’s fe- 
Todousiy destructive seven-year 
•civil war. 

Under the transitioa plan, which 
-was negotiated last year witii Liber- 
ia’s pnocipd armed factions, the 
'countiy *s militias will be considered 
outlaw^ as of Jan. 3L After tiiat. 
• the peacekeepers say, any Liberians 
-still armed be arrest^ 


batants have ranged from as high as 
60,000 to the Liberian govem- 
mem*s ctuxent estimate <a about 
23,00a 

For many, what has been just as 
impressive as (be qinckening pace 
of disarmameut has been the cnem- 
istry amoira the demobilized fight- 
ers tbemsd^. 

By late monui^ oa Satur^, 
scores of membm of rival factioos 
stood under a hot sun at tiie Randall 
Street demofnlizadon center m 
downtown Mmirovia. As tiiey gave 
up evetytiiing from shiny new gren- 
a^ launchers and marfimg guns to 
battered and rusty assault rifles and 
loose bullets, many of tiie men who 


were only recently sworn enemies 
seemed suiprised by tiieir earily 
fmged camaraderie. 

**We are friends now.” said 
Bobby 1101080, 40, who fought 
under the aom de guesre ‘^Od6 
Way’* with a faction mown as tiie 
Liberia Peace ConndL “Duxingthe 
war, if you saw your enemy there 
was- no room for conqxxmiise. But 
we retdize what (his war has done to 
our pec^le, and we have to move 
on.*^ 

As Ibunnm spedee, John Que^, 
32, from the Natitxial Patriotic Fimit 

Liberia, the Liberia Peace CoQD- 
ril’s tntter^ rival, listened in, nod- 
ding approvingly. 

Asl^ if be owed any all^iance 
to Charles Taylor, tte Photic 
Ront leader who lannch^ war m 
1^9 and ts now detennioed to win 
the presidency in (he May dectimi, 
Mr. Que^ bar^ cootained a 
sneer; 

“I worked under that man for 
seven years, and got no pay or ben- 
efits.* ^Mr. Queeh said. * T am free to 
vote for a new choice now. Charles 
Taylor is not god.” 

Canments lite these were 
edioed in conversations witii <xie 
militia membtf after anotiier, 
have concluded that tiie rMiUrth^A 
made tiieir leadera rich, from traf- 
ficking in gold, diamonds •tvf tim- 
ber, but left the filters tiiemselves 
as poor as ever, witii families 
shattered. 

In die end, many observers feel 
that what will determine the success 
of tiie traaatioD plan is how 
fectively the intemarioaal commu- 
nily can help devise and 
programs to mraio former m^a 
members, grvtng them a new start in 
fife, and to help rebuild an economy 
for this potentially rich land. 



itetal QnHmMVTke Mb YnlTtams 


Hundreds of militia members standing in line to turn in their 
arms in the town of Gbarogn. Thousands have been disarmed. 


For now. the demobilized are be- 
ing pven a month’s frxxL a radio or 
other small items and, xna few cases, 
temporary r^iazring roe^ or 

bel^with f ai ming . 

uN officials say that ^>out one- 
third of the militia members were 
under the age of IS, and many of 
tiiese have already begun remedial 
schooling. 

Beyond disarmament, many oth- 
er de^s that may prove critical to 
the success of Liberia's political 
trantititm remain to be wori^ oul 

Perhaps the most important is 
guaranteemg a free eiectim in a 
country with little tradition in this 
area. 

Under a political terangemenc 
that is a l^acy of one of many past 
failed attempts to settle the coun- 
try’s civil war. each of Liberia’s 
main faction leaders occupies a seat 
on a mling council of state. 

The cuirem transition program 


calls for tiie faction leaders to resign 
from these positions next monA. 
However, usmg their control over 
govenunenu £e warlords have 
placed surrogates in the country's 
cructal agencies, including the elec- 
toral cotiunission. 

Uberian civic groups and foreign 
donors have been dmanding that 
the electoral commission be disban- 
ded and replaced with a totally in- 
dependent election authority. Led 
by Mr. Taylor, however, some fac- 
tion leaders seem to be hedging their 
bets over the election by resisting 
such reforms. 

“We can’t let the faction leaders 
believe that just because we want 
peace we vrill let them run away 
with the process.” said Samuel 
Woods, head of the Uberian Ro- 
man Catholic Church's Justice and 
Peace Commission. ”lf not, we 
will be stuck in the same mess 
forever.” 


Makes Spotless Choice 

‘Mr, Clean* Pidsed ^r.4ftoni^ General 

Reutm 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister Benjamin Netan- 
yahu. whose p^ious choice of attomey general has 
ensnarled him in a criminal inquiry, nominated a re- 
placement hailed Monday as ‘‘Mr. Clean.” 

Elyaldxn Rubinstein, a 49-year-old Jerusalem court 
judge, has the distinction of having served as cabinet 
secretary in governments of both Mr. Netanyahu's right- 
ist Likud party and the late Yitzhak Rabin's Labor 
Party. 

He made history in Madrid in 199] as chief negotiator 
at Israel's first j^ce talks with Jordan and the 
estinians. Extending a hand to them under the glare of 
television lights. Mr. Rubinstein addressed the Jord^ans 
and Palestiiuans as ”my friends.” 

”1 believe he will add a lot of honor and a lot of 
accountabili^ to the judicial system in Israel,” Mr. Net- 
anyahu said in announcing the appointment late Sunday. 

Many across the political spectrum agreed, contrasting 
with the convulsions caused ^ his pre>nous appointment 
of Roni Bar-On, a lawyer from Jerusalem who was active 
in the Likud party. 

The Labor leader. Shimon Peres, when asked what he 
could say about Mr. Rubinstein, told Israel Radio: “Only 
good things. He is an extraordinarily intelligent guy.” 

Cabinet approval is expected Wednesday. 

Mr. Bar-Cte resign^ 12 hours after taking office, 
caught in a swirl of criticism over having gotten the job 
more for his Likud loyalty than le^ acumen. Then a 
television report gave rise to charge.s that the appointment 
was not only poor judgment but also crinunal. 

On Sunttey. the i^lice began an inquiry into (he 
Channel One television report that Mr. Bar-On*s ap- 
pointment was part of a deal vrith the leader of the strictly 
religious Shas party. Atyeh Deri, on trial on charges of 
britery and fraud. 

The report said Mr. Deri demanded Mr. Bar-On’s 
appointment in return for his party's support of Mr. 
Netanyahu’s accord with the Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization on an Israeli pullback from the West Bank 
town of Hebron. As part of the deal, Mr. Bar-On allegedly 
promised Mr. Deri a p)ea-bar|ain. 

Mr. Bar-On. Mr. Deri and Nu. Netanyahu all denied the 
charges. Mr. Netanyahu asked for an inquiry. 



«■ 


Paris Rejects 
I Call for Move 
On Algeria 

Rfuiea 

COPENHAGEN — 
;France’s foreign minister, 

• Herve de Charette, on 
Monday rejected an qppra- 
tion call ftira French iiutiative 

- in Algeria, saying that it was a 
..soverei^ state ttiat must re- 
solve its own problems. 

At a news ccmfeience dur- 
ing a visit to Denmait, Mr. de 
Charette was asked for his 
.respuise to a plea the lead- 
er of Ranee's Socialists. Li- 
onel Jospin, for Pads to lead 
•an effort to restore peace to 

- the former French colony. 

* ‘Algeria is an independent 
country, and for the moment 
we think it is the lespmsi- 
bili^ of the Algerian people, 
Algerian leaders, to find solu- 
tions to their own {noblems,” 
de Charette said before 
leaving for Sweden. 

In an interview published 
in the leftist Ftench daily Lib- 
eration on Monday, Mr. 
Jospin said that France should 
consult its Eurcqiean neid- 
' bors and lobby for grttter dia- 
logue between Algeria’s ^- 
emiaent and the mipositum. 
His call was publish^ a day 
after a rally in Algiers in 

• which protesters called for 
di^ogue with fundamentalist 

f Musluss. 

“I believe the intemational 

• •cooiinuniW must wake up,*’ 
Mr. Jospm said. “Nobody 
moves m Europe because 
■Frmce does not moye." 

Muslim rd>els accuse Paris 
•of suppcvtmg Algeria's mil- 

- itaiy-lra govenuneat and 
have threatened bombings on 

• French soiL They are be- 
lieved to behind ledial blasts 
in 1995 and 1996 in Paris. 

Mr. Jo^in said Paris 
should speak out de^ie tiie 
riric. saying France had 
alre^y been torg^ed and 
continuing violence in Alger- 
ia would only wnaen the 
danger. 

ire assailed both the rebels* 

- “fanatical terrorism martyr- 
.ing the population” and ^ 

' • Algerian goverrunent. sa}nng 
it intimidated nonviolent 
ponente and was sometimes 
Diutal in ' Finessing the 
I;, rebels. 

“'Hie Algerian govem- 
''•meni will overcome tenw- 
ism, modernize the country 

• and retain some h<^ to tiie 
potation only if it accepts 
' some evolution and paiticu- 
' larly dialogue with democrat- 
ic forces,** be said. 

Zs a speech Friday, PRs- 
• ' idem Liamine Zeioual of Al- 
' geria accused the le^ op- 
position of having a nidden 
'agenda of surrendering the 

• countiy to Muslim guerrillas. 
'■'Who are deemed responsible 

fra bmbings and massacres 
thm have Id jfed more tium 250 
-people this month. 

In ^giera. mean^le. 

three gunmen shorandkilteda 
' member of an aitii-fundanten- 

lalisi pai^, ^ly fw Demo- 

craqr and Culture, an Al^ian 
^ newspaper reported Mon^. 

^ The party member. Sad 
'Rabhi. was killed outside his 

home in Kouba. on the hefehts 

of A^ers, E! Watan said. 


BRIEFLY 


Report on BUco^s KiUers Denied 

CAPETOWN — The South African truth craninission 
on Monday denied a newspaper report that the Idllexs of 
tile Uack ccmsciousness leader of the lS170s, Steve Biko, 
had come forward ai^ sought pution. 

Phila Ngqumba, a spokesman for the Truth and Re- 
conciiiiuioa Coimiusao^ said the riddle of Mr. Biko's 
deatii in police custody in September 1977 had not been 
solved. Rcsponc&ng to a newspaper report naming five 
framerpolioeinen as Mr. Biko’s ktHens who said tfa^had 
decided to seek amnesty, the spokesman said, *‘We have 
not received any amnesty ^^ucaiion craiceinixig Biko's 
de^.” 

Mr. Biko, who (fied of brain damage in a Pretoria prison 
odL- was die most pnxnuient Uadz activist to die while 
detained without trial under security laws used to sup- 
press oi^xisition to s^Muthdd. (Reuters) 

Sees iVew 5^ 

JERUSALEM — PinreMmuterBenjiniinNeCany^a 
said Mraiday that he eiqxxied stalled peace talks widi 
Syria to resume, but reiterated that bis govenunent ^ewed 
tiie diluted Golan Heights as critical to Rxaeli security. 

Israel-Syria talks stalled 11 mraiths s^o, even though 
Syria and die previous Labor goveroment were close to a 
d^ that would have retumeddie Golan, seized in 1967, 
to Syria in exdiange for peace. Mr. Netanyahu has refused 
Syria's denumd foat be resume die talks £rom vdiere diey 
and embrace his predecessors ’ cranmitments. 

But be said, “I assume diat widi mutual goodwill and 
the help of die United St^es, we will reach a formula diat 
will enable the renewal of direct talks.’* (APj 

Fhmce Sends Aid toMadagascocr 

ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar — The French miJ- 
haiy was sending a plane, a hetieppeer and lescoe 'Workers 
to Madr^ascar on Monday to aid relief efforts, officials 
said 

More dian 1 (XI people were iqKnied dead or misring in 
foe aftomafo of a cydone dial left 30,<XX) bomdess. 'The 
cyclone, designated GreteUe, packed winds of up to 2S0 
kilometers per hour (155 n^s per hour) Biday ni^t 
when it hit the Indian Ocean islazid (Reuters) 

Japan Fears for Lima Hostages 

LIMA — Japm asked Peru oa Moaday to limit police 
maneuvers arraind die J apanese ambassador's home in 
Tima, fearing foey could onsettie the 72 hostages held by 
Marxist rebels inside. 

In an a pp a rent effort to unnerve die host^e^^akers. 
police have throvm stones and garbage into the grounds, 
fiown belictqAers ovoliead and moved in annored 
vehicles and men wifo high-powered rifles. Ihe rdteb 
have responded by fixing shc^ into the air azxl'dioutiDg 
that they would not surrender. (Reuters) 

The Shared Falkland Islands? 

BUENOS AIRES — The Argentine preadent’s idea of 
sharing the Falkland Islands with Britain would lemiire a 
rdfeieiidum. Foreign Minister Guiro K 
Telia said in an interview published Mraiday. 

President Cralos Saul Menem psoposed m Decranber 
to riiare die FaDdands with Britain — a proposal that 
l^ondon fiatiy rejected. Bziiam won a war with Argentina 
over tiie islands m 1982. (Reuters) 


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IAGE8 


EDrrORIALS/OPINION 


lUraUr 


rNTERNATIONAL 



jintiime 



PUBUSHED WITH TIB NKW VMK 11MB AND TUK WASHINGTON POST 


Ads Everywhere 


A compwy in Sweden is offing 
fiee long-distance tele^ume service. 
The catdi? Callers have to listen to 10- 
second commercials before talkmg, 
after <ne minute of conversation and, 
according to a report in the Financial 
Times, eveiy three minutes thereafter. 

What a g<^ ideal Some people may 
have diou^t that tfater lives already 
were saturated widi invaave advert- 
ising. Sunday’s Super Bowl consisted 
of extraiv^andy pr^uced commer- 
riflk wisfipM aioiw snipoeis of foot- 
ball, and even die on-field acdon was 
replete with built-in advertising — 
Brett Favie's Nike cap, Jim McMa- 
hon’s Reebok shoes anid so on. Public 
idevi^D’s brief tiiank-yous to spon- 
sors have grown longer and longer, 
suspiciously beginning to resemble 
wbm <Mher networies call "coaaaa- 
cials.” and some successful television 
ohaiwU consist of nothing but ad- 
vertisements and sales. 

And it’s not just television. These 
days, while airline reservation agents 
ke^ you on hold, tb^ occupy your 
time widi advertisements fbr them- 
selves. Stadiums and anmas now all 
come with company logos aitadied 
(d»e Inaugural Committee obviously 
missed an oppommity ifaete). Cash- 
strqiped towns have reportedly sold 
advertising space on the sides of school 
busa and police cruisers. Companies 
have tried beaaiiag ads into classrooms 
and doctors' waiting rooms. 

But tiiis latest innovation fioin 
Sweden proves that we are not even 
dose to saturation, and anyone who 
says otiiowise is being unneossaiily 
pggirifinigtig. The genius of Gratistel^ 


fon (dial's the Swedish firm's name) is 
to (rifer advwtisuig in escfaange fiwr a 
service that people want, and to really 
integrate it into customers* lives. 

It is a iformula that oooid be ex- 
tended. Who wouldn't put a few bOl- 
boaids on, or inside, his house in ex- 
change for shaving a point or two from 
the mortgage? Think how you could 
contain those rismg heaim care costs if 
patients would acctept an occasional 
commercial piped into the cqierating 
theater, recovery room qc magrirfic 
resonance scanner. Would Beethoven 
really object to a brief message be- 
tween movements if it lowered die 
price of a CD? Even oewqiapeis and 
fflagazutes, which have som ads from 
the tvynning , have somedung to learn 
about integrating the message — say, 
right here; how mudi harm would a 
or two oo OUT favoiite soft 
rfrtnir do? — mto tiie medhun. 

Now. we have to admit diat an ex- 
pert m Advertising Age was skepcu^ 

about Grati^elefim's p rospeca. She 
pointed out that most attempts to xn- 
tegrate advertising into the Internet 
have failed miserably, and Ae sng- 
gested That constantly interiuptisg die 
conversations of potential customens 
would be *’ibe worst posable prcseat- 
ation” for an advertiser. 

Maybe sbe has a point But crai- 
staotiy intemipting seems to us to be 
w fiat commercials do bi^ And we ^ 
imagine lesoutceful petite makirm 
use of those interruptions. “Cn 
course I wished you a h^y biididay. 
Ma," you coild say. ‘Tt must haw 
been during the cotrunerdal break." 

—THE WASHINGTON PO^. 


The Saudi Case 


Americans cannot live with last 
summer’s tenorisi bombing in Saudi 
Araina «mtil tfa(^ who can^ out the 
ntmeir are brought to justice and the 
financiai and logistical fae^i they re- 
ceived is made pudn. Attorney General 
Janet Reno and Louis Freeh, the FBI 
dirKtor, have every reason to press the 
Saudi government to share mfotma- 
tion about the investigation of the June 
bombing, which killM 19 American 
airmen wounded 500 others. 

The American relationship with 
Saudi Arabia is complex-and OBlicate, 
but can^ is sometimes needed. Ms. 
Reno and Nfr. Freeh have introduced 
some by ooamlaining diat unfulfilled 
promises of Smidi cooperaticm have 
p revented a thorough investigatioa of 
die truck bombing of the Khobar 
Towers spaitment complex in Dha- 
hran. They are particularly worried that 
die Saudi aiiAorhies will bdiead the 
primary suspects before Americans 
have a chance to question dieta. 

That is triutt h^^iened last year dur- 
ing Ok mvestigatum of a 1995 tecrtaist 
atmck against Americans in Riyadh. 
The execution of the main suspects 
prevented an exhaustive inquiry diat 
might have determined whemer diere 
is a Ixoader terrmist network in Saudi 
Arabia and die Middle East, possibly 
involving Iratun sui^Knt. 

The Saudi royal fai^y wants Amer- 
ican milit^ protectuxi but of the 
cmxqdications that can come widi it 


The Saudileadeish^ is also rehictattt to 
acknowlet^ that die kingdom imy 
now be h<^ to a rirdent opporitua 
intanc on ove r d uow ing the monarchy 
and evicting American fticoes. StiIl, dte 


reaction to American asastanoe in 
bombing investigatioD is destructive to 
both Saudi and American interests. 

The Clinten adnunisttadon’s impa- 
tience widi die Saudi investigation has 
not been matched by an equal deter- 
rmnadon to hold aocxiuruable die 
American notary officers who were 
tespoorible for dte inadequate security 
in iHiahn in- William Cohen, the new 
secreta^ of defense, sluauld not con- 
done e^^ to excuse the ne^eence of 
Brigadier General Tenyl Scnwalier, 

1 ;h« Emmrsm mfimumriff r ;n D tirfiian. 

The initial review of the bomtring 
found no justification for discipliiiaiy 
action, de^ite a Pentagon inqiuiy can- 
dud^ dial General SdbiwaUer had 
failed to talte essential stq» to secure 
the qpartnieot conqdex. If the final Air 
Force r^iort, due soan, is not amended, 
1^. Cohen Should ovmiule it 

The nulitary services seem to dunk 
diat holding officers accountable for 
devastating blunders undennincs mor- 
ale and unwly ringks out individuals 
for punirimteDt The real danger to 
nmw and professionalism is riueld- 
ing officers from responsibility and 
settii^ no price for failure. 

~ THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Sacrificing Science 


The U.S. National Academy of Sci- 
ences reports that federal spending on 
basic research and new tecnrologjes in 
19^ will barely rise above 1996 
levels, despite years of steady decline. 
Even worse, die five-year deficit re- 
duction itian, asembram by Coogiess 
and President Bill Clinton, will knock 
35 percent out of the country’s srience 


prmrams by the year 2002. 
The tre ■ 


trend is ominous because re- 
search pays big dividends, accounting 


for pertiaps half ^ growth in 


standards and raising ouqiut by 
cents or mote on eiteh invested dollar. 

The National Academy estimates 
diat Washington spends about $40 Inl- 
lion on actiindes that add to scientific 
kxiowledge. Biomedical research, 
primarily at the National Institutes of 
Health, gets about 30 p er c e nt of the 
science budget. The National Sdence 
Foundation, which funnels money into 
university research, accounts for only 
about 5 petoenL Programs outride the 
Institutes of Health have feUen by 
about 10 perce n t rince 1994. 

If Congress and the president insist 
on balancing the budget by 2002 while 
nving away $100 btUion in tax cuts, 
diey may have te trim die total mendiug 
on discretionazy piopams by 30 to 40 


iL But some programs, like bor- 
rpatrols and public health, win be left 
akxte. That will force Congress to take 
even more from {xogzams like sdence, 
where there is no riiort-term pay^- 
Mr. Clinton pronused in 19^ diat 
he would promote economic giowdi 
duoi^ public investments. Tte bud- 
1 tor 1998 diat be win deliver to 
igrera early next mcmdi may pso- 
small reductions. But after 
). he and Congress will find dwm- 
selves on a destructive course. 

^THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


pose only 
2000. heal 


Other Comment 


Deadlock in Algeria 

hi 1992, as die Algerian army m- 
texvcQ^ to prevent Islamic frmduten- 
talists from bring elected, it was 
widely believed that they would soon 
sweep the generals ma power by 
force. But rince then the army has 
consolidated its position, in pamet^ 
regaining the confikienoe of foreign 
investors. Unless die Islamists can dis- 
rupt oil production in the south, they 
are unlikely ever lo drive die military 

from power in Aiglets. 

— Ntue ZiMter Zeitung (Zariek). 


i^rrELvxnoxAL^ 


ESIABUSHED IW 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chdmtn 

KATHARINE P. DARROW, VIre Chanm 


RICHARD McCLEAN,PriitOA«r 4 Chitf Executive 
WC^ASLGETl£R.ExeaittveEiBtar 


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> KATHEMNE KNORR nd OlARLES MrremMORE. • SAMUEL AST aad 

Cam. G0VDnz. Anwifle £ifiianr • R(SEBT J. DONMIUE, £dter £riiRirjri Aqcs 

«JONATHANGAt%Aeri»aM/ftn(ncr£t&or 
• REN^BONDY.OqworAiUZrtn- 

• JAMES MdBOD, Aiteriulv OncM* • DQ31ER BRUN, Cifalaiion OlEreel 0 r. 
DbecteurdelaPtABcadoKRkMadMtCleaa 


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America 


BnlUant Run Seem Over? 


W ashington — "Whai a cen- 

noy it has beenl” said Bill Clin- 
ton at ^ iimugiwwtiAn week. 
“America became die world's mil- 
dest industrial power, saved the worid 
femn raanoy in two world wars and a 
long War. and time and again 
readied across die globe to millioDS 
w4io Longed to the bte&^gs of liberty. 

“Alo^ the way. Americans pro- 
duced the great middle class ana se- 
curity m oldage, built unrival^ centers 
of teaming and opened poUtc schools 
to all, the afom and explored die 

heavens, invented die emmuto and dte 
nticrodiip, and deeptoM the 
springof^tioe by malduag arevolution 
in civil rights for African-Americans 
and all minorities and extending the 
dxcle of citizensh^ opportunity aad 
digai^ to womeiL’* 

It was the greatest, oodaest run in die 

history of the world. But why are we at 
surii loose ends now? 

most of Che ceocuiy die Uitited 
States had the energy and emberanoe 
and inmertinence ot youth. We didn't 
just md win wars, we isveated 
Hollywood and rock 'n* roll, and made 
jazz one of the great art forms of the 


Bj Bob Herbert 


world We lut home runs and stole 
and hollered at the umpire. 
drove tot, played hard and laughed 
long into the mghL We had nerve. 
What happed? 

You got no sense from Mr. Ctintwi s 
that we axe in for a sixnilar tun 
across the 21st century. For the 
ment. at lease, we seem exhausted, nid- 
dextess, dismiaited. Our gr^ dreams 
have givea way to a oonoave.t^ipre- 
henriotL The draceadanK of the sql- 

dtera who got in Hitier’s face are afraid 
to ask their bosses for a raise. 

Mr. Clinton did not address ibis in 

hte speech, but Robert Reidi, in his last 
inajor address as labor secietaty. lut the 

TTiftfter head-on. As America continues 
re prosper, there is less aad less of a 
Muse that everybody has a stake in 
what is going on. More and more 
Americans are brizig left ouL 

The folks at the top are doing bceatfar- 

taldngly welL But the large mass in the 
miHHl e has been forced to work banter 
and harder (two joh^ tboree jobs, four) 

just to stay in pla^ Those at the bottom 


axe falling out of sight 

modest wage increases are ffllihg me 

elites wim fears of inflanoii, but at the 

latme time the inequality in emngs . 
continues to widen, 

“The lenwriaWe th^ 

first liiree decades after World War n, 

said Mr. Reich, “is thatprosFen^ was 
widely shared. Most pc^ in me top 

fito of tt» inoonte laditer »w their 
l iywifea double, and so did most peoi^ 

in the bottom fifth. Broadly shared 
prosperity — the assumption .tlyt we 
were^ in this togcfiier — higim^ea 
and fortified somealung about the char- , 
actor of America ttiat was the envy of , 
the rest of die world.'* " . 

That is now the stuff of nostalgia. 

• Broadly shared prosperity is 
What is.left is gr^ unceafainty and a 
sense of fa i n thear tedne^ 
fa an aiqiendix to his qieech,' Mr.; 
Reich wrote: ^ . 

“Fkom the 1950s tfaroi^ most of 
the 1970s the incmne of me poorest 

fiffa of Americans grew faster than the 

income of the top nffo. Between 1950 
and 1978 the inflatioD-adjusted family 
income of the bottom qumtite grew by 
138 percent, while die real income tx 


the richest 20 petcem of families grew 

bv^percent^' . . . „ . 

Butfton 1980 to 1995 the mflahoD- 
^taming s of adultt fatiM hl^KSt 
brackets rose Iw 10.7 wMc 0“ 
raetfiao wodrer^s fell by 3,6 per- 
cent and those in & loweM brackets 
saw tiirir wages decline by 9>6 priceoL 
“Wealdi is even more unevenly dis- 
tributedthanincome. Not only does the 
richest 20 percent of the Uiuted States 
hold the bulk of die total: wealth, but 
over die peri<^ from 1983 to 1992 tius 
group receiv^ some 99 percent of Ae 
tpfaLgain in wealth." 

■ You cannot sustain the American 
dxeam wife Aose kinds.of numbers. 
Andtbe *“ * ‘ 


is m- 


extricably bzdeed to die - dream. 

Democratic leaito. RkAanl 


House ^ . 

G^Aardt, in a speech on Friday before 
the ccooranic Pbli^ fasticii^ refetied 
■ to die widening gap briween working- 
- families and dte v^-oCF as the oacioa’s 
“<me unacceptable pnbieDL-*' 
America's great challenge as it 
' xnovesintoifaeeiid^meoftheOlniDa- 
(jingricb era is to find new leaderAqi 
tiiat points the way to botest solutions. 

Thr Afnt* IWi Times. 


Anti-Spin Reform, or Trying to Make Politicians Stop Lying 

Stevesi R* Wbisman 


N ew YORK — Now that 
the turmoil over Newt 
Gingrich’s ethics violalirais 
has to a repimumd, one 
aspect of the saga is brag 
overiooked. The deal tn whiidi 
he admitted bringing discredit 
to the House involv^ a pledge 
not to belittle the charges 
against him. 

The ettucs panel's concem, 
acorading to James Cole, !be 
special prosecutor, was to avert 
"qnn*' diat would tty to make 
die charges seem trivia 

repatatioos have 
been embellish^ at least since 
the Bible, or maybe Homo'. 
But (Rob^y iKk until now has 
a politician beim officially ea- 
jenned not to s{Mn, or let his 

ffiininn* ^UL 

To its dismay, if not sur- 
prise, the ethics commhtee 
Luer concluded diat Mr. Gin- 
gridb had violated tire agree- 
menL Thanks to a co^e of 
electroede scanner buns, he 
was revealed to have enlisted 
colleagues to Hi«ni« his mis- 
deeds as aldu to jt^walldng. 


When the transcript hecatne 
public. Republicans srid it 
showed Mr. (jingrich actually 
coxnplying with the no-^in 
deal, accomplishing the tare 
ai^ extremely fiffieult fact-free 
double spin in foil dayli^ 

fa the end, dte ernes pane! 
chose not to ^ anything about 
all of diis, petta^ coDclodiDg 
that t*>Tling Mr. Gmgridi not to 
qxn would be like teeing him 
nottobreadte. 

The paxiel deserves credit for 
craning up whh a novel cooeqx 
of justtec. Tmagm a if Richard 
Nixon’s resigoatirai and partfan 
baA been tied to a pledge not to 
denigrate ti» da rg ps a gainst 
him Politics would itever have 
been the same. 

The idea is not that far- 
fetched. According to an article 
by Stuart Taylor in The Amer- 
ican Lawyer about the ^ula 
Jones sei^ harassment suit 
against hfr. dintoo, lawyers 
00 both rides were discussii^ a 
possible sealemeot in winch 


Mr. ClbitOD was to agm not to 
deny tiie diatges ouixi^t. 

When a zealous White 
House spinmeister leaked 
word to Q4N that Ms. Jones 
was diop(»ng her suit benaoae 
she knew rite had no case, hfa. 
Jones's lawyera charged a 
breach of fahh and broke off 
the settieanent toks. 

Spaming usually does not 
^ preadeots hun trouble. On 
the contrary, historians say 
Franklin Roosevelt was good 
at it and John Kennedy was 
brillianL After ihe 1961 sum- 
mit meeting in Vienna, for ex- 
ample, Mr. Kennedy's aides 
put out the word rfi^ he h^ 
stood up well to Ntldia 
Khrushchev, the Soviet leader, 
whereas it fairer turned out that 
be had been eaten alive. 

Not until 1984, according to 
William Safire's “New Polit- 
ical Dictionary/* did the term 


'ton" enoer into poputo use. 
That 


; was when a phalanx of 

aides to Ronald Reagan — the 


original “spin doctors’^ 
entered die press room like a 
flying we^e, bent on coavin- 
eing re p ort e rs tiiat hfr. Reagan 
h^won tite first campaign de- 
bate with Waher Atoidale 
when it was obvi^ toenyone 
who bad witnessed it that he 
had lost. 

One definition of progres s 
(or linguistic dedine) is tiiat 
nowadays we have a televtsfon 
show called “Spin Ci^,“ 3nd 
jxess rooms at pruden- 
tial <feh"re« witit coroooed-off 
Mctions to spin doctors. 

We also hswe Sunday mom- 
mg talk shows with retired 
doctors like George Stahan- 
opoulos and David Gcigen 
helping CO satisfy America's 
D£ i pM«nrty unlimited sf^tedte 
to optooos, especiaUy oocoB- 
sideira opinion. 

Spinning is sudi a part of tile 
aimoqtiiere Aas it todc about 
17 after Mr. Clinton's 

second inauguid address for 
craiventional wisdnn among 
tdenosion ranomentatora to de- 
cide that it was a flop. ■ 


. Small wonder that politi- 
riang want to get out first witit 
their own -^»iu even -if thi^ 
have to create die oniprtunify 
by raomiring not to min. 

ThesignificteiceortiieGui- 
gridi case is that if s|)iiining^is 
unavoidable, mixing it iq> widi 
judicial or quasi-jumraal ^ao- 
ceetfaigs tsnrity. 

Nooetiteless, it is happen- 
ing. When James CarviUe, an- 
other Ctinton spin doctor, went 
on the atta^ against Kennetti 
Sobt, the Whitewater special 
{xosticutor, some Republicans 
declared toat he and the pres- 
ident mi^ be guilty of crai- 
qurittg to obstruct justice. 

Maybe someone ou£^t to 
brolter a deal in which F^es- 
ident CUnton^ Speaker Gin- 
gridi and various others pledge ■ 
to Stop themselves before they 
qiinagrin. 

It c^d never be enforced, 
of course, since both sides 
would want to put their spw on 
who actually got die better part 
of the deal. 

' ■ TheNete KarS Times. 


B oston — the head of 

Syria’s delegation in the 
peace talks with Israel says that 
tite late Prime MinisteT Yitzhak 
Rafan made a commitmHic to 
withdraw finom all of the Golan 
Heights as part of a jpeace agree- 
ment, and that tus successor 
Shimoo I^res reafiimied tiie 
commitment 

Walid Moualem. the Syrian 
ambassador to the United 
States, makes that among many 
points about die negooatiraas, 
ffl an interview in the Jouznal 
of Palestine Studies. Ifis com- 
ments are an unusually detailed 
statement of the Syrian view. 

He said tiiat last January the 
tulles were going so weQ tii^ tiie 
two rides sec a deadline of June 
“to cloee die lemaimng g^is,** 
with tiie expectation tiiat “by 
Squembe r me final docnmeztf 
wraild be ready." 

Then Mr. Feres called early 
Sections, tenorist bombs struck 
Israel and tiie Syrian-Israeli ne- 
gotiations were suspended. 

The interviewer, Linda But- 
ler, managfag editor of die jour- 


Bj Anthony Lewis 


nal, asked Mr. Moualem 
“ti&ou^ what medium** Mr. 
Rafan had conveyed his wilh- 
dravral offer. He i^lied, "I 
prefer not to stO^.** 

But be said the <dfer was re- 
pemed in die m^oriaimg room 
at the Wye Flaotetioo in Mid- 
land. “Axxl 1 told Dennis 
Ross,** the American facalhator 


in die talks, to “please register 
vbat the Israeli side sakL'^ 


Because the aim was “a 
c o mpt riie u slve agreement," 
hfa. Moualem said, die pailfes 
did aot sign points agnra but 
deporited tiiem with me Amer- 
icans until all the issues bad 
been resolved. 

The main matters to be oe- 
godated, apart from the Syrian 
demand for total withdrawal 
from die Gr^an. were seemity 
arrangements and normaliza- 
tioora relations. 

Ttamar RabiOOvich, WfaO IS 
Iriai^ ambassador in Washing- 
ton played a significant in 
tiie tails, took a very diff e r eot 


view of what tuqjpened when 
I tdoliODed him. Hehasre- 
tinxied to a hisiny professoirii^ 
at die UnivennQr cMf Tel Aviv. 

“There was oo a gr eement” 
on witiidrawal, be smtL “There 
was DO unumiun emt, tiiere was 
DO promise.*' If hfr. Mbualein 
beaid sometiung from someone 
OD die Israeli ride, hfr. Ra- 
binovidi said, “it was not de- 
posited with the Americans." 

As to finiehigg an agree- 
ment by September if die talks 
bad continue the IsiaeH said, 
“I don’t thfak this wonld hove 


tieallyoccuned,Mr.Ra- 
biDOvidi sairl, was that Mr. Ross 
and other American partici- 
pants, seeking to bridge the 
were given to undexstmd by the 
Israelis that full withdrawal, 
“was in the realm of the pos- 
sible" — but only if S^ro met 
farad's needs oo securi^ and 
Donnalizatioo. And “tite faradi 
coBidtoais were never met’* 

He called the hfoudem in- 


Picking On Airline Passengers 


W ASHINGTON — Next 
montii, a commisriicm on 
aviation secuci^ headed by 
Ifice Aesideot A1 Gore wiD 
reoammeod measures that, if 
inq^emente^ would tum 
Aiuericafl ainxirfa into virtual 
Chectorant Qi atUes. 

Ainines would be reqiured 
to mainiain a data base with 
personal information ab^ 
each passeogier (o detennhie 
iriietiier the passojOT should 
be subjected to hei^tened se- 
curity measures. 

Those who fit the profile, or 
uiiose names t^ipear on a 
secret “watch lisc“ for inter- 
national flig^ w^d be sub- 
jected to procedures such as 
mtrurive personal questioning, 
a dog sniff of their lug^ge, or 
a luggage search iQvoh^ so- 
itiiisticaled new devices that 
act like CAT scans. 

Worst of aU, the FAA is 
already wearing with private 
companies to ^elop imag- 
ing tedmologfes capable of 
{KOjecdiig a naked hriaae of a 
peisw under his or her dotb- 
mg in die search to ei^lo- 
sives and contraband 
J^rofiliog will not air- 
line bombings any more tiian 
it stopped hijaci^. There' 
were 28 hmeiangs of US. 
passeogd eueraft in 1972, de- 
^te profiling to dete rmine 
whose eany-on luggage 
would be X-rayed 
In fact, tbe profiles that are 


By Nojraon 


held up as models to tbe 
Uxiittd States to follow are in- 
eCfective aod discriminatory. 

Profiles do more chan 
screen -out frequent flyen and 
families witii dnldiea. Theo^ 
in effect select peqile who fit 
die stereotype of a terrorist. 
They fiequ^y discriminate 
on foe ba^ of race, reSgioBOr 
national raiein. 

The problem with profiles 
finom a securi^ standpoxni is 
that those who do not “fit tbe 
profite" are givea only curs- 
oiy attention, nr DO attention at 
alL It is all too easy to a 
ppsenger who “fits the pro- 
file'’ to hire or dupeafi^equent 
flyer to plant the bomb. 

Passengers soon may learn 
that they are in tbe suspect 
class. 1 m FAA has begim to 
dqiloy in busy airports lug- 
gage-zznagzng devices dm 
have a high "false poritive" 
rate. Passengers fittmgtbepro- 
file wbo alrrady have cbecaked 
their bags occasiocxally will be 
ceiled frra the waiting lounge 
m full view of other passen- 
gers to open their ched^ lug- 
gage to securic 


craved notion of the type who 
woold blow up a plaite. 

This profiling tysiem wiU 
fail, and when it do^ tbe piD- 
poDttts of proGUng will not 
admit that it doesn’t work; 
they will Insist that it could 
wm better if ooly more per- 
sonal information about pas- 
seagm were made available. 

Alreaity, the Gore commis- 
sioD is considering wbetber 
criminal hinoiy &a bases 
mairtfain ad by law eoforoe- 
ment agendes could be quteied 
to make die profile “better." If 
the commissiott were serious 
about security and dvO Ite- 
ties. it woold reject profile 
and embrace meastnes to: 

• Require frill 
match*’ to ibU bombera 
mi^ leave a pbne after 
planting a bomb in diecked 


gage to security personnel 
wire are Jolting for bombs. 

Tbe govermneiu has no 
bushiess requiring ahiines to 
track passengera travel and 
other personal information to 
detentoie who fits a ptecon- 


iuoinaie discriminatory 
secuE^ screening. 

• Impose strict limits on 
dissemination of passenger 
travel data and the use of 
overfy iniiuave s e ar ches.' . 

mvacy dteodterlibexty 
interests related to the 
against terrorfam deseivefar 
more discussion tium the Gore 
commissioo has allowed. 


Tfie writsr. a legislative 
cowisel at the national cffice 
(f the American CivU Uberties ' 
unum, contribtaed tiiis am- 
mem to The Washit^um Post. 


terview *-*a v qy uilrae s tin gdoc- 
iime^ to. most explicit and 
detailed Syrian comment . cm 
tiiese negoiialioiis." 

Mr. Moualem said Prune 
Monsters Rabin and Peres both 
“wanted to achieve a setUe- 
meot with Syria, but each had 
has own speed and conditions.** 
hfr. Rabin "wasreluctant, sus- 
picious, very cautious. He 
moved very slowly, indi by 
inch. Wbm Peres became 
prime mmister, be was in a 
hurry." Mr. Ra^oVidi said he 
a gi ew tiiat “Rabin was too 
s^aDdPeiestooquick.'*- 

On security issues, Mr. Mou- 
alem underiined Syrian rejec- 
tion at Israel’s proposal for a 
ground station in to Golan after 
whbdrawaL “We would re- 
fii9e,"hesaid, “eveaif it would 
be manned by Americans." 

On n^yr mi j^iTarinn^ he SSid 
totally open economic relations 
would not work when Syria had 
a per capita income of S900 a 
yearandlsrael S1S.000. He said 
to parties had discussed **a 
ttaDSitional period in vriiich we 
could raise our eermomy to to 
level vriiere tiiere can be com- 
petitiem without undue hardship 
on our society." 

Tbe interview makes clear 
bow bleak to proqiect is now 
for die fata^-^irian calks. Mr. 
Moualem said Syria was ready 
to resume them if to new 
laeli ^TvernmecE of Benjamin 
Nreanyabu recognized **to 
cOTmiTHttngnftt mgrfg hy the pre- 
vious governments.’* Mr. Net- 
aityahii. who has opposed wito- 
drawal, said only laa week that 
the Golan was “critical to to 
defense of the state of IsraeL’* 


cuneot rep reraiop ciontiniiftt. 
— Muhammad Mugntiiy, in 
The Watiungton Post. 


1897: SOiemn Raihvf^ 

ST. PETERSBURG — The 
most wonderful exaxqile of Rus- 
rian dS^oouicy to tony 
has been to mannerin which to 
Maixtiiixiian Railroad came into 
existence: A yearago, many said 
how ’impossiUe it was that to 
neat Russiaa Siberian xaiho^ 
ffioitid pass through Mmchuria. 
it woold mean war, so they held. 
Russia said notiimg. Sbe entered 
into a cordial, “entente" with 
China to piotto her int^rity. 
To-day tiie engineecs contract to 
onmtirae the hfaadmritin line 
vritinn five years from to 
commeocenieiit of wori^. 


1947; AICa^neDies 


MIAMI BEACH — “Scar^ 
face" A1 Captme, Chios's 
' igland chief - daring to 


^ orohifntioa era, died Sai- 
Jan.! 


1922; Fassive Women 


CHICAGO — Mss. Edith Mc- 
Cormick, Mr. John D. Roitioe- • 
friler's d^i^ter, who recently 
(fivotced her husband and is 
DOW introducing psydioandy* 
sis 10 Chicago^ owvereda lec- 
ture before, to Qif^o Wo- 


urday [Jan. 25] at hisPalm Island 
estate. He was foity-^dght yeto 
old. Capone’s mother, his wife 
and son were at his bedside in to 
twenty-five-room v^ where 
he bad Uved rince his release 
from Federal prison, vtoce be 
had s^ved a term for inoune- 
tax evasion. The minrf vriiich 
once directed a .$100:000,000 
yeariy illicit business bad 
been weakened by paie^ 





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iHgm 




Cil- . 




iMi 


■m 


_-gemm 




Ate 
tH to 


i'% ■ 

i-- 


W 4 






iQ not con- • 

S? From the Syrian Side, a Claim That a Deal Was m the Making] 






u ’ 

- r. 1'' 


ft.:.' 



“Notiung can oompensate 
to Syrian people to losing one 
inch of to Golan," Mr. Mcm= 
alem said. “Not even to moon! 
ft is a sacred cause... i 

“That is where we stand. Tbe 
American efforts are now fo-‘ 
cused on the Palestinian traclri 
We don't mind. We are not fa 
a burry." 

TheNewYortTbnex. 


Symm Lebanon \ 


O UTSIDERS fail to recog>' 
nize to link between L^ 
banon’s economic recovery and 
human rights. And baman 
rights cannot be restored witii^ 
out addrewring to role of Syria 
in to country s affairs. 

Syrians* human ri ghts have 
been severely curtau^ aod 
rral persmai incomes and liv- 
tog standards have steadily de- 
teriorated. More recently. Le- 
bwon, once the icon’s center 
of culture and business, has be- 
gan to mimic Syria. 

The Syrian army entered Le-. 
banonin 1976, and cementedits 
suraranacy there in October 
19W. Ifaifez Assad has since 
ruled Lebanon unchallenged. 

Semw Syriw militaty of- 
ficers act like, hi^ conunissioa- 
exs, bolstered by a local politicaf 
establiriunent interested in lin- 
ing its own pockets. ^ 

Mr. Assad has enforced great: 
er stabfaty m pure security terms 
m Lebantm, but to intentetioual 


cnmmnnity shqnlti W fllee . im tO 
to price the i^on willpay n tfad 


IN OUH PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO ■ 


man’s Qub yesterday [Jan.27].' 
“Tbe woM's work is accom-, 
plisbed by two forces, positive 
and negative. Man is the i)oa> 
itive force, woman tite neganvd^ 
If wonten want happiness, pense 
and serei^ of si^ tiiey must 
ImowihefrKimtatioasandtherr 
handicaps. To be pasrive is a 
woman^s great tote." 




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— 

; Scientology, Hollywood 
And the Power of Money 

By Frank Rich 


INTERNAnONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JANUARY 28, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


fUi 


ifirMi 


N ew YORK — In recent 
weeks, Ted Turner has 
KtenedRupen Murdoch to Hitler 
Gloria Stemem has likened Laiw 
Hym to a Nazi and Ricbaid John 
Neuhaus, die neoconservadve 
dieologian. has likened the United 
States to Nazi Gennany. But 
wten it comes to loose talk th^ 
tnvializes botit Nazism and the 
Holocaust, leave it to Hollywood 
to do so in the grand marw^ vve 
expect from an industry th^t can 
dream up “Evita.** 

• Earlier this inonth, 34 show- 
business heavies, rangtM fitom 
Goldte Hawn, Dustin itoffinan 
and Oliver Stone to studio heads, 
signed a $56,000 fiill-page ad in 
ibe IntematiaQal Herald Tribune 
scolding Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
6f Germany for his goveminent's 
*'shamriril pattern of organized 
persecution” of die Church of 
Scientology. Drawin g parallels 
between today’s Gennany and 
Nazi Germany, the ”<^ieo letter** 
ominously added: *Tn the 1930s, 
ft was the Jews. Today it is the 
Scientologists.” 

In a v^td — Oy! TTiis pio- 
clantatioD has provolmd outrage 
not oidy fron German officiaU^^ 
but from Jewish leaden like Ignaiz 
Bubis, president of Gennany's 
Central Council of Jews, who 
called it **insulting to die memory 
of the Holocaust's vicdnis.'’ In 
America, Alxtdtam Roxmaa of the 
Anti-Deiamation League alsopro- 
tested Hollywood’s missive as 
•’ludicrous*’ and ”an afEront” to 
die 6 ntillioa dead. ’’Even aBer 
•SdiiixUer’s List,* they’re icually 
ignorant,' * says hfr. FoxDoan of the 
^'s paiticipaDts. 

• Why have so many Hollywood 
parties, none of them SciemolO' 
gists and many of them Jewidi, 
invcdced the Naris on bdialf 
Scientology? At least half ^tbe 34 
signato^ have rast or ^nssent 
profesricmal ties m T 
John Travolta, Scientology's most 
famous recniiis. Odiers may be 
aloag just for the ride, but still 
pifaeis, as one produ^ {Wt h. 
■’would like to be makhig a movie 
Widi Tom Cruise or John Travolta 
as soon as possiUe/* 
i The ad was ooocdved by Ber- 
tram Fields, Mr. Cruise's lawyer, 
who says he became alarmed when 
the youdi wine of the Quisdan 
Democratic Chancellor 

Kohl's p^, called for a bt^coa 
of ”M5^ioo Inqiossitte’' because 


I Ke/Escwtf>«>’ffios E.SrtD 6S. 
1 NO ^OVil Wf eorOHfM 
THOSE QB^OJSLYTUOISE 

WTW: ^Kf.THoSE *RB4T MY TWtS * 


Mr. Cruise, die star, is a Sdentol*' 
^sL (Hadly the equivalent of a 
Naa book-bumiog, given that 
“Missimilmpon^e*’ wasahitin 
Germany, glossing $23.6 mtuinn 
there.) Mr. Reids says Iris client 
knew nothing of the wlridi was 

prompted by his own outrage. He 
also points out that its text scru- 
pulously refers to Geimany in the 
. pre-Hofocaust 1930s, never men- 
tiaiimg the deadi caii^ 

' Mr. Relds’s defense of the ad 
makes sense — up to aptrint It is 
true that Germany has vuilied Sci- 
eotologisCs and denied diern dcvS 


ers have noted. lt*s also true that 
HoUjrwood's open lener doesn’t 
zneadoo the death camps. But the 
ad still trivializes the Holocaust 
Michael Bereobaum, the Geor- 
getown University isofessor of 
theology who was research di- 
rector of Washington ’s Holocaust 
museum, notes that Germany’s 
measures agjdnst Scientologists, 
however t^fensive and woithy of 
protest, fell conaderably short of 
a prehide to genocide. 

And be doesn’t think the ad can 
^ off the hook sin^y by Imriting 
its historical analogies to Gennany 
in die '30s. ’^When we close our 
e^ and think of Nazi Gennany, 
we- don’t distiiuiriA between 
fine and after ’39,” he says. 

What makes die ad even more 
frivolous is diat it stodionsiy ig- 
nores the ccffltroveisy over Sa- 
entology itself — wb^ is at least 
as heated as the controversy over 
Gennany 's fireatment of Scieatol- 
opsss. Flo Conway's and Jim 
Siegehnan's book ^Snapping*' 
and a 1991 -Hme cover story 
have most reoentW raised serious 
questkns about group, wife 
Time arguing it is ’ *a hugely 
itable gtobal racket (bat survives 
by inttmirfaririg members and crit- 
ics inaMafia^ikemamier.” 

Mr. J%lds si^rs he didn’t know 
of 'Ume’s story, even dioo^ it 
prompted a huge libel case tiiat 
vindicaled Time (subject to a 5d- 
mtologyaipeal). 

But were any of the letter’s 
signatories to actualW look into 
co^aints against Sdeotology, 
they might ri^ ft^oing business 
wife two of fee i^ustry’s most 
bankable stars. Thai would re- 
qmre a courage diat in Hollywood 
is far harder to come by fean 
56.000 bucks. 

7%f JVoiv Ktrit TZtnes. 



GsTcHh.OuX! VWWffUsME? 
1 NEsCf? ON ~TKE, PHONE. . 

/porXTEVEN ONN K CBAULfR 
iHAYENOtOeAMCNi 

vo»ce,*nwris. mbirnwks 
Me, 1 H8KER9klDlHd%lU>H6S. 
me.HEE. 8R)UJM«r^ 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Sony’s EoQDOinf 

Regonfing “*Wanted m Europe: 
A Homegrown BiU Oates" {Jan. 
22) and “Bundesbaik Chi^s 
Blum l^ew: Europe Is Too Slaw to 
Adapr (Jan. 21): 

Seanrdusde Trichec, governor 
of the Bank of France ara a typ- 
ical mandarin produced by fee 
elitist French educational system, 
admires entr ro re p euis. Tliat’s hil- 
arious. Mr. mcbet is the very 
S^bol of there aren't any 
Bin Gateses in Ranoe. 

Hans Hetineyer, Mr. Trichet's 
equrvalent at tiw Cennan centra] 
bank, also admixes what he per- 
ceives as an American specialty: 
the wiilingness to take n^ts. Yet 
Mr. TiMxneyer, too, has made his 
career as a civil servant and, like 
bfr. Tricbet, is fee veiy opposite 
of an entrepreneur. 

Both men are symbols of the 
European malaise: Tl^y have a 
certain admiration for risk-takers 
who succeed yet an even clearer 
perception of bow to avoid risL 
STEPHEN BACK. 

Vence, France. 

The p^lem in Europe is not a 
lack mtoUigent and ioveotive 
people. It is the entn^ireaeurial 
^irit that is lacldog. Why? Be- 
cause creativi^ is not encouraged 
and (rue venture capita] is not 
available. 

TTie lac± of the latter is the prime 


reason for the jaervailing stagna- 
tion that prevents not only new 
enterprises from being crent^ but 
also ties the bands of many emsting 
small and medium-sized concerns. 
Many of feese burioBSses are being 
paid later arvt later their cus- 
tomers and thus have pnfelems 
coming up with fee cash to pay 
tiiexr suppliers cm time. In fee ex- 
treme case, this can drive a buri- 
ness into bankiupu^. At fee very 
least, it causes stress and wasted 
time vrife lawyers and in prqiariog 
eamlanatoiy cone^iondaice. 

u true venture capital vrere 
avaOaUe, fee uecessaiy cushion 
could be provided to encourage 
new busmess start-ups and keep 
existing firms gmng, thus creatuig 
and saving pte. 

Id America there is no such 
miserly reluctance to loosen the 
purse strings, and the percentage of 
profitable venture capital invest- 
ments is hi^. European bankers 
and inyestors would be well ad- 
vised to foDow this exanqile. 

W.PESTALOZZL 

Zurich. 

I am astounded to read feat the 
governor of the Bank of France 
seems to feel that Washington is 
fadgmg scno^ow in not counting 
”nan^ and vagabonds, and blade 
people in jail” as unemployed. 

fW many years now, the lu- 
lematimia} Labor Ofganization has 
defined as unemployed all people 


Why Are Wk So Scared 
Of Same-Sex Wedlock? 


By William Raspberry 


who are able to work and are ac- 
tively seekmg wmk but unable to 
find iL Both France and fee United 
States acc^ this definition. Thus, 
those in eifeer country who haive 
’’feilen out” of fee wc^ force and 
are no longer seeking work are not 
counted as unemployed — wbefe- 
er they be calM tramps, vaga- 
bonds or sans domicile fixe (as the 
homeless are known in Fiax^). 

Can it be that Mr. Trichet either 
doeai't know, or care, vAu> Is 
coveted the texm ”uneoq>loy- 
ment”? Yet unemplt^'meat is fee 
most impmant economic and so- 
cial pitririem facing France and 
Eurc^. It is frighteiuiig to think be 
win be among those setting mon- 
etary policy for all of Eun^ when 
tiie euro goes into effect 

JOHN E. RAY. 

Paris. 

Mr. Tricbet mentioned Steve 
Jobs and Bill Gates as model 
American entrepreneurs. Too bad 
he did not mention another en- 
trepreneur in the same industry; 
Fhilifpe Kahn, a Reochman who 
emigrmed to fee United States and 
founded Borland International, a 
major microcomputer software 
ccanpany. Had Mr. Kahn chosen 
to stay in France, he probably 
would stQl be teaching high 
school mathematics for a living. 
Or he would be unemployecL 

JEAN-CIAIXDE BERTHHJJER. 

Fourgueox. France. 


W ASHINGTON — Hawaii’s 
citizens may be about to do 
what its Stqmsme Court refused to 
do: outlaw same-sex marriage. 
The state House has approved a 
proposed constitutional amend- 
ment to ban marriages between 
members of fee same sex. Ap- 
proval its Senate would put fee 

MEANWHILE 

propos^ amendment before fee 
voters in November 1998. 

The result could be — in effect, 
if not in legal fact — the out- 
lawing of same-sex marriage is 
Amenca. Here's why: The U.S. 
Constitution, in Article TV, re- 
quires that ’’full faith and credit 
shall be given in each State to fee 
public acts, records, and judicial 
moceedings of every other 
State. *’ In^ means that marriages 
legally perfonned in one state 
must be recognized by all fee 
states. 

Given fee opposition to gay 
and lesbian mamage disclosed in 
one opinion poll Bnsr another, no 
state is soon likely to approve 
same-sex mamage directly. 
Hawaii did so indhwtly when its 
Supreme Court ruled that denying 
licenses to same-sex couples vi- 
olated the state constitution's 
equal-jnotection clause. 

Legislative attempts to reverse 
the ruling failed, and now op- 
ponents are trying to change ite 
state constitution.^e safest bet is 
that they'll succeed, and that will 
settle the question of same-sex 
marriage. 

There is, however, another 
question that it won't settle — at 
l^t not to my satisfactioiL And 
feat is, why are so many of us so 
adamantly opposed to same-sex 
marriage? 

There are two obvious ans- 
wers; that fee dictionary defin- 
ition of maniage is fee union of a 
man and a woman for the pinpose 
of founding and muntaining a 
family, and that same-sex mar- 
riage is a violation of the laws 
of God 

The first doesn't pre^m much 
of a problem in legislative drafts- 
manship. We already sanction 
nmrriages between people who 
have no intention of forming a 
family — senior citizens or in- 
fertile couples, for instance. The 
sec(»id. betog religion, is more fee 
province of fee church than of the 


legislanxre. That religious author- 
ities might choose not to recog- 
nize fee legidmacy of a union 
between, say, a Zen P^byterian 
and a born-again Hindu is no rea- 
son why a state shouldn’t issue 
the license. 

No, the polls sugg^ a repug- 
nance that is more visceral than 
technical or religious — a distaste 
bordering on fear. 

But fear of what? That allowing 
homosexual marriages will in- 
crease homosexuali^ and per- 
haps even help smead such dis- 
eases as AIDS? But feat makes 
sense only if you believe feere's 
value in keeping homosexuality 
in the closet and feat commit- 
ted couples are as likely as 
casual sex partners to be promis- 
cuous. 

Fear feat stretching fee defin- 
ition of marriage to include gay 
and lesbian unions will weaken 
marriage for heterosexuals? But 
how? Is fee strength of my com- 
mitment dependent on the nature 
of yours? 

Fear that homosexual couples 
will (gasp!) adopt children? And 
do what to them? Turn them 
gay? Leave them sexually con- 
fused? Make them laughing- 
siocks? 

I emtfess feat the idea of going 
against widely held beliefs makes 
me uneasy. Sometimes what we 
see as mere prejudices turn out to 
be fee hard-earned collective wis- 
dom of socie^. 

But sometimes (as used to be 
the case for transradal marriage) 
tbey are mere prejudices — no 
matter what social or scientific or 
religious evidence we offer In 
their defense. 

I could, if I put my mind to it, 
come up with a load of ev- 
idence against same-sex mar- 
riage. 

what keeps me from doing 
so is experieoce. I've known 
enough committed gay and 
lesbian couples to lose my fear 
that they are somehow dmger- 
ous. Many of these couples 
have seem^ as loving and as de- 
voted to one another as my wife 
and I. 

And if feey want to mark 
that commitment, 1^ involdpg 
the religious and civil forms 
used for the purpose, why isn’t 
that a good thing? Hfeat are we 
afraid of? 

The Wiishiitgton Poa. 


BOOKS 


m THE DEEP MTOWINTER 

By Robert Cfork. 278 pages, $23. 

Picador. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yazdley 

T his is a first novel, but you 'd hardly 
know iL No rites-of-passage angst 
haunts it, no self-focused autolnogFaph- 
ical Impulse drives it, no assmbfy-line 
prose or structure dimimsbes h. * ’In fee 
Deep Midwinto'*' is a fully mature piece 
of work, written wife care and command, 
at once imeUectually stimulating and 
enxotiooaUy gimhying. At a time when 
Vserious” American fiction is wan and 
self-iefesentia], Robert Clark reminds us 
feat tiie novel can still be peitineitt, can 
still exist in fee real world. 

It is set in St. Paul in the wmier of 


1949-50. This is impmta^ The less 
famous of Miniiesota's Twin C^es was 
bometowD of F. Scott Htzgerald, 
wife whose spirit ”In tixe Deep Mid- 
winter” is siimised; it is about people 
octemigfttfhidmaRtzger^ sto^,and 
the senobility wife wfeidi it trems them 
is akin to lus own. It could as easily be set 
in our own day as neariy half a century 
ago, but C3aik is writiog about subjects 
— dtuorce, infiddhy, portion, tiie loss 
ofTeUgious faith — feat have lost mu^ 
of tiieir ]>ow« to shock or dismay us; by 
considering them in an era wfaffl they 
still held fek power, be gives them new 
and revives thdr immediacy. 

The novdl opens wife the death (Mf 45- 
year-old James MacEwan in what ^ 
pears to be a bunting aocidem. His 50- 
yeaiHild brother, Richard, mcieves his 


CHESS 


By Robert Byine 


V IKTOR Korchnen bett Gilberto 
Hernandez in an exhibition match 
in Meiicb recently. 

In Game 7, what began as an English 
Opening became a Simlian Deteose 
afrer 6 e4. After 6..46, fee center pawn 
StrucRtre, white pawns at c4 and c4 
confroming die black d6 pawn, pro- 
duced feeMaroezy^ Und, a clamp that 
made it virtusliy impossible ever to 
play, or even threaten, a countsaxtack 
wife ...d5. 

In recent yeais. Black has preftffred to 

play 7.. Nd4 8 Bg7, with the idea of 

reduciiig material to relieve his cranqied 
position, but die Maroczyhind has been 
challenged in other ways, including 
Heroawez's mode of mobilfcatioii . 

Xonfenoi’s retreat wife 10 Nb3 pre- 
vented Hernandez from changing his 
mind and {rfaying 10..Nd4.Henianoez s 
10..415 threatened to put pressure on fee 
queearidewife ll..Jrt a™ 12~.a3. 

The long-winded journey Mtite white 

t fing kni^it, starting wife 4 Nd4, came 
ftin circle with 15 Nd4, mos^ in the 
interest of avoiding die exdiany^of 
knight for ah enemy knight Alto 
I3...NdcS 16 Ne6, the knight sped 

HERMAltoBZWLACK 



The plan involved in 18 Rabl and 19 
srto Bdl was to play b3.a3 and then b4 with 
toh a great increase in queenside space. But 
Kosdmoi took his time wife 30 Bt^ 
lish because he knew that Hernandez had no 
Qse way to improve bis position, 
twn Henian^'s Md for active counter- 
c4 wife 20~.f5? was i in dex sian d nh l e , 
iro- but it weakened bis position. After 21 ef 
hat gf 22 Rbel, Kcrch^ swhdxed his at- 
to tention to thee file, where be held a great 
ack advantage. His threat was 23 Bg5Nto 24 
Nc7. 

Ito Kordinoinicxeased the ptessure with 

lof 23Nd5.setti^alittletiap:23..Bb2?24 
oed Bc51dc 25 Bf5Qf5 26 Qb2 is disastrous 
ben for Black. 

iog Hernandez’s 24..BbS? only made his 

stifli^ position worse. He was prob- 
ire- ably already lost, but he should have 
hts- tried to protect bis weak e7 pennt fe- 
%*s ' reedy by 2A..Jti6 and 25~J(b7. In dto 
the case. Korchnoi would doable rooks on 
the e line and black resistance could not 
life last long. 

me Kordinoi's powetfol 28 Ba2! was 

the surely what Hernandez had overlooked 
of An.idacying24..BbS? 

Cto Hernandez’s defense with 29..3e5 

ied was Mown to smithereens by Xmeb- 
noi’s 30 Qd51 NdS 31 ReS! de 32 QdS! 
Si^ 32..JUB 33 Bf7 yields White two 
mhi ar pieotf for a roar, and Korriinoi 
had, in addititm, a tremendous passed dS 
pawn, Hernandez gave up. 


SICILUN DEFENSE 


We, 

EeNtaal 


atente KardMoi B awW 


NORCHNOmHrTE 
Pofiitton after 29 -• BeS 


J d4 

Nffi 

Xo« 

C5 

3NB 

cd 

4 N44 

NcS 

5NC3 

8e4 

Si 

7 Be2 

Bg7 

SB89 

M 

9M 

Bd7 

MNbS 

as 

11 M2 

NM 

US 

Ntf 

13KU- 

Bc6 

14 NbS 

' M7 

UM04 

Mes 

»Q«2 

Net 


17 

Mbs 

Nac5 

U 

Rfell 

I0i8 

1» 

20 

Bdl 

r 

21 

22 

er 

Rbel 

§7 

2S 

MS 


24 

Btil 

BbS 

25 

eb 

bs 

38 

aS 

14 

27 

BeS 

be 

28 

BaS 

Rb7 

28 

Nc2 

BeS 

30 

31 

SS 

MB 

de 

.32 

QdB 

Reelsas 


body and somt feeicaftobegiiis to settie 
his aiSairs. In the process be ccanes 
across two documents that arouse m him 
an almost unbearable snsindoa. The 
first is an entry in James’s diazy, the 
second is a letter to James from 
Richard's wife, Sarah. Together, how- 
ever circumstantially, they raise the 
suggestion that somehow Richard’s 
wife and IxDtiier had betrayed him. 

Thus we are launched upon a steny of 
p^dtolo^cal inquiiy and suspense. It 
involves not merely the aiangle into 
whi^ Richard is drawn but also a sub- 
ject — one that in time moves to the 
center of fee chronicle — iovolvicg his 
fevocced daughter, Anna, and a yomg 
man wife whom she becomes passion- 
involved. It Is a stoiy about decent 
people to whom indecent things happen, 
or may have hiqipened, or may in time 
happen. It is ab^ people who do the 
titing, even chough voices within 
oy out to do otiterwise, and people wfeo 
do fee wrong thing, even as they r^ud 
fhemsdves wife horror and shame. 

Toward fee end. as matters have sifted | 
titemselves oat aid fee human c^»ci^ 
to keep on going has been reaf&med, 
Richard and Anna find themselves talk- 
mgaboutwhatbashappenedtothem. 
guess I see bow much of wbat you think 
is evil is just ha^xpeostance tito people 
foO into,” Ridiard says, '‘that chooses 
them and feat feey follow. Especially 
wife love. It’s vBiy insisteiiL It doesn’t 
brook reftisaL If you go againsc it, 
there’s bell to pay.'^ 

That utterance is a trifle stiff, but this 
does not diminish its idterecc truth. 
Feofte make mistakes not because tbey 
are evil but because fe^ are people. The 
young man wife whom Anna falls in 
love; who in an hour of crisis is cowardly 
and cruel, is nm bad, merely inactequaie 
to tiie rfiatteaip. be confrrats. It is a 
draRenge both personal and moral, but 
he is merely a piesen^ile yoiB^g law^ 
oo tiie way up. He is infeke^ to rise 
above or b^ond tumself, and it is naive 
to expect him to do so. Instead Anna — 
aixi ferouj^ her, fee autiiorOafk himself 
— ^ans Wra a measure of foc^veness. 

Richard is ”not a emtentious man.” 
He “had found the least contentious 
comer of tire l^al professioo in wiudi to 
practioe: crasis and estates.” Whatever 
bis suspicions tfeout his wife's past 
faavior, be would beoutttfchara^srto 
confront her wife them. be per- 

mits them to rinuner and foster, to di^ 
appear into his subconscious and then 
suddenly to reappear, tonuiisg him with 
images of the dark unknown. When at 
last be comes to grips wife them he must 
tixFoa^ a nKxneot of hard cbotoe 
similar to the cne she faced. 

. ”lt*s so awfully hard to do tiie right 
thing in diis world,” Sarah had written 
10 James in fee letto feat r^uifaces to 
tmment Richard, “it's so rarely ftm or 
mteiesthig, at any tate.” In different 
ways each of fee people in this novel is 
put to tiia! teat, to pass it or fail it in 
variously revealing ways. 

JonaxhanYardlevisonthesu^ofTke 
WasJur^tonPost. ' 




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\ 





Clodcwisefivm top !4t: Bikkenbergs’ append knit: MTVs Bouedideta i Beyond the regular suit at the Paris shows: Luxury car coat with ndlitary epaulettes from Hermes; Gaultier's three-piece suit with tight pants in 

as Kenzo; McQueen modeling at Comme: VanNoten’s ethnic sweater. striped-and-plaid velvet; monster platform sneakers from W&LT; and Van Beirendonck's antennae headgear with tight top and baggy combat pants^ 


Luxury and Fantasy: The Feel-Good Factor in Menswear 


By Suzy Menkes 

huenmfional Hendd Tribuu 

P ARIS — Thae were 
dvtt ‘defming mo- 
meois at the French 
menswear shows, 
\^ik:h dosed Mk^nday. The fiist 
was the luxurioQS perfectUm 
simple q>ortswear in succulent 
fabi^ at Homes — > dodies vo 


^rtiet the aj^ietite even of a 
fashion-{rf)Obic male. 

Then there was Jean Paul 
Gaultier’s imaginative romp 
through skinh^ 'territory. 
He dreir narrow silhou- 
ette Old tribal plaids to disdU 
the trends of the faJlAvinter 
season: narrow suits, brief 
coats, slim pants, cabled 
knits, pinstripe, plush vel- 


On Mardi 14, die IniemadoruU Herald 'Ribune 
tpiU publish a Special Report on: 

Tlie Computer 
Industry 

Among the topics to be covei^ are: 

• Who will control the lines of communica- 
Uons? Telecoms or computer companies? 

• Hie Internet - questions of free speech. 

• ^Infonnation Stress Syndrome''^ in the 
oomputerized workplace. 

• Do palmtop computers have a future? 

• Where are savvy Investors putting their money? 

11m urction roinrideii with the CeBIT fair in Hannover. 

K*r a full ^piupvit and odvenisuig ratt^ Gj*^**^ contact 
the Sunplcmvois departmeni in Riris. 

Fax: (33-1) -ii 4o 02 13 or c-tnail: supplementat^ihlxam 

THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


vets and flashes of silver. 

But die most dramatic mes- 
sage came from Walter Vjm 
Beirendonck. His futuristic 
show of urbair protective' 
clothing and Mad Max 
headgear took as its theme the 
Avatar — the computer icon 

which a Worid Wide Web 
user invents a new persona. 

*Tt is so like frshioa 
because that is about dressing 
up,” said dieBdgimdesigDer. 
”Bui this is die ultimate — 
you can be who you want to 
be.” 

What modem man most 
wants to be is discreet The 
Paris shows were mmnly 
about ordinary clothes in ex- 
ceptional fabrics, trans- 
formed tiy stretch, shine, 
plush or indescenoe. 

That is why the Hennes 
show hit such per fec t faduoo 
pitch. There were no visible 
symbols of a luxury label, 
ap^ firom a belt or a scribble 
print on a dark shirt Instead. 
deri^ierVeroaiqueNidiaiuan 
the seasonrs car coat or 
die itxiger tre^ in stcolteabie 
leather and bky suede. 

Modem fa^ons came in 
upscale vetsions: cabled knits 
in spider’s threads of cash- 
mere; pale winny colon as a 
cloud gray sweater with 
cream cord pants; the car- 
^gan jacket m double-faced 
Shetland wooL subtly weav- 
ing blue widi silver. The Her- 
mes show vras a triun^ of 
reflnemeot and simpUaty. 


Gaultier had a message personas, from Microsoft 


But the detail was intriguing: 
breaking. up 


ture silver buttons. Claude 
Montana put silvq* strips on 


but not jnst the graffiti-on -a- oxinsteis to scxnal deviants, ppudi pocki^^ 

were .npbe^ sporty clothes ^..ibe surraoe of a cqat; cables, . s^kt colh^ ODi .t^oes . 


brick-wall prmt on jeans. 

Widi Marhiess on the for the club strene. The 
soundtrack.'** out" stoc^red- honetie was-a ti^xrtop worn 


slonbeads, ti^ trousers 
rt^ed above heavy boots, 
short, sh^ coats arid shaven 
hea^ paiiued with love and 
peace slogans. 

^Skinheads wore Just for 
fbesObouette,” said Gaultier. 
But it was also his take on 
fashion's modern mixes, like 
cuttii^ slithering panne vel- 
vet into shatp tfareeinece 
nuts and usi^ stripes with 
plaids. Or having dte pants of 
a close-to-the-body pin- 
striped suit strung fiiom sus- 
pends. London dnew up 
other references: to the top- 
baned Victorian gentleman, 
with a darting ra-coUared 
coat — ano^r trend to which 
Cteultier gave a unique spin. 

Oh tbe mad hats at 
W&LT’s showl The suneal 
sculptures included a com- 
puter balanced on die bead, a 
Nintendo monster’s face, or 
Mcdiican feadiers mechanic- 
ally whining. Van Beixen- 
d(wk brou^t out Bihish 
miUiner Stefuen Jones to take 
a well-deserved bow. 

Tte incredible creations 
reinforced the cyberspace 
story of the show, Thai was 
also out in neon-mes- 

sages like **Dress up 
avatar” and ’’Vision, vio- 
lence and voyeurism.” 

But beh^ the fantastic 



REAL-TIME INFORMATION FROM 
THE PARIS STOCK EXCHANGE. 

People moke decisions every day. Hiey need the inost reliable 
source of irTformation available. 

In France, they read Les Echos, France's leading newspaper. 

Les Echos is now occessible vio the net, offering preferenhol 
access to the Paris Stock Exchaoge. 

httpiy^wvvw.lesechos.com 


lES ECHOS -fjOTHiriG'S MORE RELIABLE. 


with ultra-baggy military 
combat pants or overalls. On 
tbezn Van Beirendonck used 
cranputer-screen primary col- 
ors, graphic camouflage-pai- 
Dems, graffiti and pbotopnnts 
to suggest urban warriors. 
Tennis shoes with bared teeth 
OB the platform soles were 
just one example of an ex- 
ceptional imagmation at 

W4^ 

Strong designs move 
wi& tbe times, while keeping 
a personal identic. Ax 
Comme des Garcons, design- 
er Rei Kawakubo took tbe 
cunent plaids to a fist horizon 
by cutting everything from a 
shirt to a sweater on the bias. 
Although tb^ sesastmes 
seemed forced, tbe dhigonai 
Tinf^ imposed an imaginative 
new geometry oo Comme’s 
signatore lio^ tailoring — 
modeled Alexander Mc- 
Queen of Givoichy. 

Texture was another story 
of the season. At Dries Van 
Notea, tlte silhoueoe was 
large, even muffled, with 
woolly hats and duffel coats. 


ftniowing knits; fledES 
scaitefed in Urrnaich- 

tfae gold dust on the runway. 

Mario Soibo, in apoweiful 
show, had sweaters with hon- 
eycomb efifects, fleece fiu- 
isbes or paitdies of furry kiiit, 
and pants that might be sbiny 
taorade or mat and hairy. 

Texture even bridges the 
divide between avant-garde 
and establishment desagners. 
Toudi was key to the tradi- 
tional styles at GeDtleman 
Cive^y, from the ridged 
cord suit, throu^ tbe alpaca 
coals and dienille caidig^. 


Mi 


ETALLXe spar- 
kle is also a com- 
mon fretor. Tbe 
.most imaginat- 
ive? S&uoless steel worked 
into gray flannel in a collec- 
tion basra on fabric research 
the British Nigel Cnr- 
tiss. Then there were tbe 
silvered {unstripK at Canltier 
and the molten silver .^ckets 
of Leonard's Chinese irnper- 
ial theme, among his inim- 
itable flowv prints. 

TliietTy Mugler's cut-witii- 
a-scalpel suits bad his sipia- 


iu^ stiver' biinons every- 
wheieL Those-UataxiLexierim' 
signals are the antithesis of 
djscreetTnodem fashion. And 
so is Montana's beautiful but 
fancy use of bead-to-toe coi- 
like yellow from butter 
tbiou^ ocher to tan shoes. 

At Dirk Bikkenbetgs, die 
metallic silver tie-knot sym- 
bolized a hard-edged military 
Style of trim shiits.and sweat- 
ers tucked into flat pants. 

Unifoims are another uni- 
fying theme, with Hermes 
lowing epanleoes, Ungaro 
cargo pants and Ki^nzo two- 
pot^ sh^ The Belgian 
Raf Simons focused on 
sdiool uniforms, showing 
precisely tatioied coats and 
shirts wbh color flashing in- 
side the back pleat oo models 
taken from hi^ schools. 

Dandy designers give the 
new, slto suits a certain el- 
egance. ^c Beigene updated 
tiie three-piece suit Ity bat- 
toning jackets high from the 
bieaMrone, adding a collar to 
tbe vest, a cravat to the neck- 
line and a patten^ lining. 

”It is a classic silhouette 
with touches <^fontasy in fab- 


ric and color — and abt^e all 
de luxe.” said Bergere. 

For OzwaJd Bpaleng, the 
dbai^. uitan suit is the stmy. 
but with a toueb of flamboyr 
ance in the titled shape and 
the peacock bright linings. ; 

Country clothes? Ther^ 
were camel and bexringbond 
coats, but an absence of tweed 
oo the runways — except for 
pepper-and-salt Donegals. 
Ingrid there were window- 
pane-checked wools among 
the flannels and pinstripes. ; 

But Ungaro played with 
tweed, mixing colors and tex- 
tures of jackets, pants and 
knitwear. And Jose Levy 
made his rtmway out of sawn 
logs and stuck on animal 
masks to enliven tweedy s^ 
arates and shearling Jackets. ; 

Actor Jean-Piene Leaud 
appeared at Ungaro. Sports 
ara television personalities 
modeled for Kenzo. He 
closed the European mens- 
wear shows with a burst ^ 

i 'oie de vivre, as soccer legend 
ose Toure and MTV pre- 
senter Panice Bouedidela 
showed off the clothes. 

Why real guys? Because 
modem designer menswear 
should be inventive — but 
also for the regular world. 


CROSSWORD 


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Est. 1911, Paris 
"Sdfllt jRoo Doe Noo* 


A space for Thought. 


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A New, Faster Internet 
Takes Shape in America 

For Now, Sleek System Is for Scientists Only 


By Deborafa Sbapley 

New Kart TinesService 

From his office in Urbana, TiTin^^ ^ 
wchael Nonnan, an astronomy pro- 
fessor, logs onto the rntarri fft eveiy day 
for byte-sized maaaging with col- 
leagi^ and sending mid lecehing text 
— ^ the way minions erf people wml^ 
wide do. But die Intemet is inadequate 
to han^e Mr. Nonnan's main wm of 
modeling the universe. 

At least, tbe trfd familiar Tntgmat 
inadequate. Bat 17 months ago, Mr. 
Norman, who woiiis at (be Umversity 
of niimris at Uibana-Qiampaign, and 
his colleagues set out to aimuiaw» what 
would happen if' our galaxy rniiirffi^ i 
with its nearest ne^bor, the An- 
dromeda galaxy. To £s en^ they en- 
listed thrM supercomputers in three 
states, linked to one another by fiber- 
optic telqrfioi» lines. 

Ibe ^ysics calculations were 
straightforward enough to nm on 
today 's IntemeL But to create the visu- 
alization so that sciemists could see 
millimis of stars moving through and 
past each odier — instead of poring 
over yards of printed Hata — all three 
computers had to interact with one 
another at the same rime. For that, a 
new kind of Internet was needed. 

Now, a new imemef is available, 
although access to it is still striedy lim- 
ited and its useis tend to be astn^ys- 


idsts; engineers and odia- qjedidisis. 

It is a sleek, capddoos, second-gen- 
erarioQ Loteraet, and about 100 U.S. 
coomuter sciaidstB are using it instMd • 

• of ^ crowded old netwodc invented 
just a couple <rf decades ago. 

• Hie new ndwoaic, called tbe Very 
Blgh Pferfonnance Backbone Nttwodc 
Service, is ^xmswed ^ the Nadonal 
Science Foundation and buih by MCI 
OMnnmnicarioas Corp. using some of 
its existing, fiber-optic networks. 

Lomrfng atoaod America in a 
14 , 000 -mile Q2,4004dlofneter) figure 
. ei^L it links the nation’s fire aca- 
dmnic simercoinpota' centers, includ- 
ing the mree ™t set Mr. Norman’s 
ghiaxies on a collision course. 

“We want to give the researchers 
who brou^ about the InteDoet a chance 
to lire again in die futare,’ ’ said George 
Strawn, tbe director of the Nationm 
Sdeoce Fonndatioo’s netwwk m g di- 
vision. More than aiprone, Mr. Strawn 
controls who uses dus unegqrfraed new 
resource and bowiast canqxises and the 
communities around them log on. 

That process, Mr. Strawn and others 
say, wnl take years. Thou^ the federal 
govenuneot started the network that 
became today’s Internet, ihe agencies 
involved, indiKfiDg the Nadoi^ Sd- 
ence Foundatioa, pulled out as die pub- 
lic lo^edonandacommcTcialmdastiy 
took^^ annind the tedmology. 

In 1995, die foundalion signed 


tibiute 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1997 



Lkyri Drf^cui^nirNewlMTai 

Inside Cave*’ at fiie Ai^one National Laboratory in niinois. 


an ^reemeDt widi MCI to develc^ the 
new intean^ As part erf an orerall 
“next-generation Internet’’ initiative 
amioiiii^ 1^ Rnesideat Bill Qinton in 
October, govemmeirf defense and en- 
etCT laboratories will connect to the 
hi^h-perfonnance network with tbe 
help m AT&T Coip. and Sjxint Corp. 


National Science Foundadra offidals 
that the agency spends S250 
mininn a year on advanced ftni wp iting, 
metudmg seed money for the new net- 
work. T& govemment’s investmeot in 
die pSOjeCt COnaStS mainly of a $50 

See INTERNET, Rage 15 


South Korea Orders Inquiry Into Hanbo Default 


SEOUL — PresidentKim Young Sam 
ordered an investigatioD Monday iiito the 
troubled Hanbo Groiq> amid opposiiioa 
accusations of govemraeni misconduct 
in an uofol^g loan scandal 
Hanbo Steel & Ceoeral Omstniction 
Co., which defaulted on debts last week, 
boiTOwed 5 trillion won ($5.9 billion), 
about 20 times its net wt^, mainly to 
;hmd a huge expansion projecL 
' Tbe Of^iositHHi called tbe loans Soudi 
Korea's biggest financial scandal and 
seized on ^ issue to attadc Mr. Kim, 


vdm is already (« the defensive during a 
presidential deed on year. 

“Presidait Kim ordeated a diorougih 
probe into die Hanbo case to detecniine 
bw the ptqjdit had been financed so as 
not u> Irave .a speck of suspicion,’’ a 
jnesidendal qmkesman said. 

Mr. Khn’s move follows creditoas’ 
announcement Sundry diat thi^ had 
foti]^ a coauninee to help solve 
Hanbo’s and sobcontractors’ problems. 

The Hanbo crisis also triggered alann 
in South Korean •financiri marke ts amid 
concern about its in^iact on baidc profits 


and the prospect that h could force tq> 
interest rates and to a credh crundL 

To prevent diat, the cmiiral bank 
pumped 2 trillimi won into the banking 
^tean to prevent a credit squeeze after 
injecting 1 trillion won on Riday. 

Last week Moody’s fovestcar Service 
Inc. had placed un^'review for pos- 
sible downgrade ratings of Korea Ex- 
change Bank, Korea Rrst Bank, and 
Cho Hung Bank, udneh have the biggest 
exposure to Hanbo. 

Meanwhile, Spudi Kmean stodcs feO, 
led by ifibobo Steri &. General Cbn- 


PAGE 11 


Europe Central Banker 
Strikes Solomonic Pose 

Monetary Institute Chief Steers Course 
Between French and German Visions 


snuction, which dropped 1 5 percerit The 
bencfamaik Kmea Composhe Index fell 
^.41 points, or 3 percent, to 6M.70. 

Haiibo Steel, tte county's second- 
laigest s teelmake r and the fiagship unit 
of the Hanbo Group, was sosp^ed 
Thursday and Friday, and drc^ipra 820 
won to 4370 on Monday. 

Ccmstniction and st^ shares led de- 
clines on concern of more busmess fail- 
uics in tiiose bidustries. Banks and other 
financial stocks foil because much of 
Hanbo’s debt to banks was unsecured. 

fBeuters^ Bloomberg) 


By John Schmid 

haenuoionat HeraU Tfibiote 

FRANKFURT — Tbe head of the 
European Monetary Institute stepped 
into a French-German diqjule over 
political influence on a future Emr^iean 
central bank Monday by sketching his 
version of the relation^p between tbe 
bank and finance ministers of member 
states. 

“It is in didr interest to be able to taUc 
to someone and emri peer {Hessure,’’ 
Alexandre Lamfolussy, preadent of the 
institute, said of the fin«^ imnisteTs of 
countries that join a angle currency. “I 
believe you cannot play with central bank 
indqiendeDce, but 1 do believe there is a 
need for at organized dialogue.’’ 

By the same token, a European cen- 
tral baidc also must have an open dia- 
logue with member coantries to be able 
to warn on excessive deficits, said 
Lamfalus^, v/boss institution is the 
foreninner to a European central bank. 

A rift has widened in Ihe past month 
between Germany and France over what 
some German officials percieve as a 
hidden agenda by tiie French m create a 
“stability coundJ’’ that is intended to 
appdy political pressure to the new cen- 
bank, which the Germans insist 
must be thoroughly independenL 

Some Genni^ also f^ the French 
would use their influoice to push for a 
weak common currency , to be called the 
euro, as a convenient way to tackle 
unemployment and sluggish growth. 

French officials insist diey have no 
hidden agenda aixl only want to create a 
body to coGs^ate ecmiomic policies 
for the new currency. 

Mr. Lamfolussy said he was express- 
ing a personal opinirai and not diat of tbe 
institute. He also denied he was endors- 
ing the French position. ‘Tdonot wantto 
refer to the ament debate,’ * he said. 

The EMI chief spoke a day before the 
German goveinment releases its annual 
rqiori on the state of the eccxKHny, in 
which it is esqiected to back away from its 
c^itimistic forecasts on unemploy- 
rnent and public defidts and ccMxsde that 
it wOI (Xily beunely meet die bendmiaik to 
institute a sin^ currency. 


The newest irojectiais are expected 
to leignite criticism of the government’s 
fiscal management and could motivate 
Finance Minister Theo Waigel to im- 
pose a government spent^g meeze as a 
way to stabilize the natioirs finances, 
observers said. 

The anmiai report will forecast a de- 
ficit of 2.9 percent of gross domestic 
product instead of percent forecast 
when the budget for 1997 was drafted, 
sources in Bonn said. 

Although the new target would be 
below tbe 3 percent ratio allowed ^ the 
Maastricht neaty on European union, it 
comes at a time when the government's 
credibility on its fiiuuices has been 
strained after the German deficit surged 
to 3.9 percent of GDP la^ year from an 
already high 35 percent in 1995. 

Ii does not help the government’s 
case that most leading outside experts 
consider its deficit targets unattainable. 
The six leading Gem^ economic re- 
search institutes, the Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisers, aiKl the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation md C^el- 
oproeut all agree that Germany will 
overshoot the single most important 
Maastricht criterion. 

There is “hfoh uncerhdnty’’ over die 
government's flutes, said Axel ffiisch- 
ke, an analyst in Boon at die Association 
of German Chambers (rf Commerce. 

■ Fand U^es Cut in I^nsions 

Germany must cut pensions, raise 
contributions and set up a tax-financed 
“family fund” toke^its state pensioi 
plan going into the 21st century, a co- 
alition policy group said Monday, Re- 
uters repor^ Bonn. 

A commission chaired by Labor Min- 
ister Norbert Bluem recommended cut- 
ting pensions to 64 per c ent of average 
net w^es by 2030. Contributiems 
would rise to 22.9 percent of wages over 
the same period. 

Pensions are now around 70 percent 
of net wages, a level too high to cope 
widi die cuirem rate of aging among 
Gennany’s 80 million peqile. The re- 
port said the number of Ger mans over 
tbe age of 6S would rise to 20 millimi by 
2030 from 125 million in 1996. 


Hiinking Ahead /Commentary 


PRIVATE BANKING 



V' 

t. V 

|| 


Britain Can’t Stop EU flexibility’ 


riflU excluded, nmgfog from taxation to justice and foreign 

WASHINGTON — sounds deceptively sinqile Aftersixcounoies,ledb!ylTanceandGennaiiy,fozmedfhe 

the logical answer to one of the thomest mblems origuoal European Commimily in the 1950s, Britain rallied a 

dogging the drive to Eun^ean unity since World warn. It second tier into a looser fiec-tiade area. Most of die laggards, 
goes by the seemingly hannless name of “flexibilitv.’* inclwfoig Britain, sdbseqpeatiy cau^ iq> utith the original 
Bitt it is fieicely controversial. Its adoption could lad- axasdreUmonprogiessivdyagiaDdedto 15meo]bers. 
ically change the nature of the Emppeanl^oa in the 21st The big difieieoce, of coarse, is that Britain is now inside 

century -^ven, opponents say, demioy it the EU and has a say in its developmenL In fact, Britain 


ically p hangp! the nature of the European Union in the 21st Hiebigdifie 
century — even, oppoiieDts say, desuoy it ^EUrndhaa 

The idea is diis: Given that ^nations cannot ^reelmw masts tm havi 

fost or how for to proceed with economic and political members to go 
integratioo. some should go foster and — ■ ■ 

fartiier dian odiers. tA 

The plan is favored hy Ranee and X>ntam laUefi tO 

Germany, the two main inotors of Euro- undOTStand that H joined 

oean umfication. A version trf it wSl • « 

aimni^ Certainly appear in the treaty a dynamic piTOCCSS tSf 
refonning the EU’s mstiniiions due to uterine the EU. 

nMfeJMl V«B AallUtiMIJfliilfn III JUIl^ ® 


be^inAm^^ — 

Without such a provision, the clear ^ 

risk is that umfication will grind to a halt once the EU 
expa^ to include 25 or more increasi^y diverse metn- 

bers from botii sides of the former Inm Ciiriain in tbe next 

several years. . . . ... 

But the plui has set off alarm bells m Britam — 
surprisingly, because ooe of its aiois is precisely to 01 - 
cumvent the British veto 00 closer unity — as weU as m 
other countries in integratiai’s slowfone. _ 

T^ fear that the creation of an EU “inner onto m 

pia^ mtolerable strains on the bonds that bind all its 

members together. . . „ l- 

Their alarm is heightened by tiie i^cfly approadung 
Stan of a single cunenw* die euro, m a hard core of 

countries cluste^ arourw Germany and Rtance — a prime 
example of flexibiliqf in action. 

Those who may be left out are n«y (paid to 
coantries may move <m to what the French call inten^M 

coo p era ti on’* in fields from which die others would be 


maisfai (Ml haviim the right to veto plans its fellow 
memben to go tmead more lapu&y wi^ut iL The claim is 
backed by tiie Labour Party, whicb 
m^ form rise next British government 
^ aft^ electioDS due to be bdd May. 

lit it inin«^ That dann, however, is not only 
J cooqileiely umeasouabie but also a 

icess by tactical error. A British veto would 

jrrj only force the others to proceed out- 

die EU institutions, where Britain 

would have even less influence. It 

would be much better to Ice^ any such move inside the EU, 
subject to certain essential safi^nards. Those are that flex- 
flnli^ diould only agqily to fiitiTO polides, iiot to the whole 
empus of integratioo adueved so far, and that nonpar- 
ticqiants diould always be able to join the inneT dicle as 
soon as they are ready to do so. 

Biitam’s basic irusudce is to hhas foiled to ^predate the 
foot that it joined a dynamic process 1^ entoing me EU. In the 
end, tbe others not alkw Brh^ to halt that process. 

Partly of JMtain’s perpetual obstructionism, U is 

now clw that flmdbil^ fo me best and peihiqis the rmly 
way to the Unirxi’s momentum as it gnq^les whh 

a host of new menibeis on (me hand and a single cunency on 
the other. 

in the past, Britam can catch iq> later if it wants. But 
die real proUem for die British is that flexibility will 
probddy take Eutr^iean int^tatiou farther than th^ will 
ever want to foUow. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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to^Mw* Itoposlto eT57 Ji«toi nMws toregutatooe. 


Key Money Rates 


Other Dollar Values 


UMM 

1J95S 

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.BlWlne 14M33 
lAlHanMi 132S1 
1‘WkditonM 77J7 


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553 &0 

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630 630 

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750 7 JIS 


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AJN. FJ*. caw 

2Mca 3533$ 3SaoO Uadi. 

Loodoi 3SU0 reuo 61.10 

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smcbAmok 


We’re not just on tiie m^. 
We’re all over it 


It'S not only our vast worldwide 
network that keeps us at your 
side at all times, 
it’s ourlDtal commitmentto serving 
your unique demands, wherever 
you may be. 

From the time we opened our 
first office in Switzerland in 1876, 
Credit Lyonnais has earned an 
enviable reputation for Priv^ 
Banking based on dialogue and 
personal relationships. 

The founder of Credit Lyonnais, 
Henri Germain, expressed it most 
succinctly when he created the 
bank's motto; 



“Business is people, not just 
figures". 

This has been the very essence 
cf our banking philosophy from 
generation to generation. 

We listen well to our clients’ pri- 
orides as we help them navigate 
diverse and fast-changing finan- 
cial markets. Perhaps that is why 
today we manage more than 
9 million private accounts. And 
vrhy we are often cited as a world 
reference bank for the private 
customer. 

But there is yet another dimen- 
sion to a successful banking 
partnership. 

Vbur banter must mate 
sure you get where 
you want to go. 
Providing innovative 
solutions and Insight- 
ful answers throi^ 
Indepth resources and 
experience in the 
worid’s leading mar- 
ketplaces. 



Our Geneva subskSary sped^lzed 
in Priveite Bantaigsinoe 1876. 

Credit Lyonnais' Private Banking 
network can always put the finan- 
cial technolo^ and expertise you 
need at your finger tips. Precisely 
when you need it 
The combined strength of these 
two dimensions - close, trusting 
partnerships and vast global 
resources - creates something 
unique in Creefit Lyonnais Private 
Banking. 

Let’s talk. 



CREOrr LYONNAIS 


Private Banking Network; 

SwnzERLANtx Geneva tel 41 22/70S 66 66 • Headquarters foi Credtt Lyonnais Internaucmal Private Banxino 
Basleteu 41 61/284 2222 -Zurich TBL 41 1/217 86 86 • Lugano tel 41 91/923 51 65 
Buustel 33 1/42 95 03 05 • Luxembourg TEL 352/476 831 442 - London tel 44 171/49991 46 
Monaco TEL 377/93 15 73 34 - Vienna tel 431/531 50 120 - Montevideo TB. 598 2/95 08 67 • Miami TEL 1 30S/37S 78 14 
Hong Kong tel 852/28 02 28 88 • Stnoapore tel 65/535 94 77 







FACES 


INTE8NA1 








PAGE 12 


nn^ERNAXlONAL HERAXJ) TIUBONE, Tuesday; JANUARY 28, 1997 

THE AMERICAS ■ 


•V?* ■*••:• *S/.« • :»v • 


30-Year T-Bbnd Yield 


- " 7iB 


- 82) 



Hilton Offers to Buy ITT 


Rising Bond Yields 
Undermine Stocks 


tfi i,-.. 122 — 


1.56 — 


A i 114 


a"' s 7) n”^d 'T 



Bochand# -Indsiir 


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ua', 


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SouroA- BbofTibBVff, Aautors 


[fflcmuiaml UenU TrifaoK 


OMfM l|r OM- Atf* Atw /Mpadhs 

NEW YORK — Hilion Hotds 
Osp. saM Mbiuiay it had aiade an 
imswcited offer to buy nr Coip. 
in a deal valued at a total of $10 J 
faUlion in cash and assumed debt 
that wouldmalEe Hilton the biggest 
casino operator in Las Vegas and 
dcuble its hotel busiaess. 

nr had do iinmediate commeiit 
on (he offer. 

**The combination of ITT and 
Hilton would bring togetibertwo of 
die world’s leading lodging 
companies as well as two praniCT- 
gaming businesses/* H3ton*s 
chief executive, Ste^ien Bolfea- 
bach, said. 

HD ton is moving in on a oom> 
puy Whose SMk has flawed 
sioo eltw asqnmoff&orotheoiig- 
mal ITT in December 1 ^5. Kites 
offered $55 for each ITT share, 
nr closed at $42,625, down 
$1,125, but in after-4iouis trading, 
tbe sluues junked $14.75, to 
$58 JO. Klton*s shares clos^ at 
$^.25, down 25 cents. 


In addition to die cash.offar, 
Hilton said it planned to asanne 
$4 J billion of ITT ddit. 

HUtoD said its offer was based on 
publicly availabtedata and diatwitti 
IIT’s coopmatioa “an ensuiqg re- 
view of private inftnmaiion could 
result in an even higher offer.” 
nr lost to HHtim m the biddiDg 


fa* Bally Entertainment Con. last 
year. HUtan paid S3 InUiM for foe 


yeu, Hiltan paid S3 InUion for foe 
casino ooDq»ny in December. 
nr, HUton would be the dominant 
casino openmsr in Las Vegas and in 
Adaodc Oiy, New Jeney. 

Hntoa salul h expected to save 
$100 milUon a year after tbe ac- 
quisition. 

“The Bally deal added to earn- 
ings. and foe Street liked it a lot. 
Ttot's vfoat l*m loddiu to see on 
dns de^’’ said Pieter h&ioo, 
manner at Pomade Associates: 

After the transaction was an- 
nounced, Standard & Bxr*s Oxp. 
said it might downgrade the ddit of 
HDtoo and HT because of the po- 
nemially negative effect on bood- 


bold^ ITT’s lodgisg operarioos 
orasiA of 4£5hotdls ww mote than 

130.000 rooms worldwide. It also 
owns 14 in las Vegas, At- 
lantic CSiy and elsewhere. 

' KtooD has 240.bMels with about 

100.000 romns, as wdl as 16 casi- 
nos. The confotoatiosi would tiiake 
KEton foe woiid’s lai]^ kK^I^ 
ari d ga ming coi^any, mltoo said. 

liT, Grinds manflgfts and owns- 
Sheraton hotels, the CIGA hotel 
chain and Qesar’s World casino^ 
also osnis a 50 peatjeot interest in 
Madison Sqiw Garden, as well as 
foe New.Yodc Rangjers ice bodoey 
team and tbe New York KnidB 
baskefoaU teaiiL 
HDtnn said it was reviewing foe 

AntertaTTini flnt for a StlWI^^ 

& and foat h was involvedin talks to 
license foe Sheraton trademark: 
firnn HFS Inc. of Parsq^nny, New 
Jersey. 

Wiiiwn also said it intended to 
take its offer, a cash and Stock bid, 
directly to IIT shaidioldezs. 

(Bleomberg.AP) 


Very briefly: 


• Honeywell Inc agreed to boy Measurex Corpse maker of 
control systems for psrper-processing machin^, for $600 
million in cash. The devalues Mfeasinex stock, which soared 
$10 JO to $34.75, at $35 a share. 

• CVS Cor^ is in talks to r^uire Revco D.S. Inc., said a 
person familiar with tbe situadon, a move that would create foe 
laii^ U.S. drugstore chain in terms of number of stores. 

• Ashland Coal Inc. and Ardi MSneral Corp. said they have 
agreed to combine into a new publidy traded company. 

• Merrill Lynch & Co. said fourfo-qnarter profit rose 47 
pert^t. to a record $445 milli on, on strong p erform ances in 
trading and inveament banking. 


American Express to Fire 3,300 


The Assodaud Press 

NEW YORK — American Ex- 
press Co. plans to lay off 3,300 
workers this year, or ab^ 5 percent 
of its employees, in an effort to 
improve me profitability of its travel 
services unit 

The announcement Monday 
came as tbe company reported that 
profits for foe fourth quarter rose 55 


percent fiom a year earlier. 

About two-durds of the jobs to be 
rfiminwttMi are overseas mid in foe 
conqiany's txavel-relaied opera- 
tions, adiidi include its credit and 
charge car^, said Michael O'Ndll, 
a ccHiqiaiw spdkesman. Some 
American Ejqvess offices will be 
closed in foe resmicturiag, includ- 
ing some overseas travel offices. 


Despite a Cham ctf $138 minfoa 
for severance and restructuring, foe 
conmany said it had net income of 
$^5 millioa m foe fourth quarter of 
19^, iq> from $384 milUon, a year 
earlier. 

Wall Street sent American Ex- 
press shares dowa on the news. Tbe 
cempany’s sZiares fell $U75, to 
$59.25. 


YORK — Stocks M 
Monday, extending last weeKS. 
pullback fiom record higte, as 

teaest rates rose toward fow highest 

level in four monfos in foe jittecy 
Treasury bond marktf. 

**Thae'$ a lot of ^pprehensute 
idjout where interest latM are 
over foe next three to. six 
months,” said Ned Riley, <Jief m- 
vestmczit officer at Banik Bostt)^ 

”ff/atos rise even fiirfoa.foiean^^ : 

be mote competiiion to foe^stoefc.. 
maik^ for a^donal doUass.” ' 

The yield on the benchmark 30- 

year bond rose to 6.94 percent from 
6J8 percent Friday, as foe pnee foil 
20/^pohn, to 94 15/32. 

lire highte ytel4ls helped send 
Dow JioDes aidiistiial average down 

35.79 poms, to 6,66069. The Stan- 
dard & Poor’s SOO-sliare index foU 
5 JD, to 765.02. ^ loshig issues 
mtfnntnher ed gaming ones by 2;^1 
CO foe New Ydik Stock Exchange. - 
”Ef foe bond marioBt conrinues to 
go lower, foeie’s no way foe stock 
market can rise m foe faiw of that,” 
said William Maifisoa, pceridmt of 

Ge rald E[laiiet Mattison; an insti- 
mth^ bztABiage. 

Bmd prices declined as. traders 
speculated t^ r^mts oa wages 
econoDiic output this vredc may 
show foster grov^ and acederat- 


sians a robust job markn was pus^ 
ing wages too high too fast. •.;i 

Qjticem over ftai unpptm^. 
data outweighed a report Monday 
that shovwM sales of previ««ly 
owned homes fcU a taggep-foan- 
ejmected 3 J percent ffl pecOT^. 

^bternationd Business Ma«un^ 

and General Motors were a drag 


US. STOCKS' -w 

the stock market, wj fo.IBM .co^ 

mirng to suflerfiomdi mpy attmyt 
about the coumuter roalors 


about the coumuter maters lourt^ 
feU 514 to I45,_.i 
GM was hit by profit-taking fioi{^ 
Friday, when the stock tore sironglK 
on specularion foe automaker would 
apnn unee a dividend increase.and a 
share buyback. GM*s board 
proved chose measures Monday^ 

and the shares slipped H to 61%. 

Micron Technology was ix 


Micron Technology was to 
tnost actively traded Big Board hk 

sue, rising 114to 33% amid rigns« 
- 1 j Cm- mwiMitM* 


ing tnflarinn. 

^mvestors me fociiring on foeem- 
plqyment cost index for foe fbuifo 
quaxter. to be released Tuesday. 
Cmmnents last wedc ty Alan 
Greeoniaii, foe chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, suggested 
poUcymakexs were watching ftx 


a rebound in pnees for cosoputv 
memory chips, which have foU& 
80 percent since last year. . 

Tbwer Automotive rose 314 to a 
iccord 3714 afiff agreeing to buy 
A.O. Smith's Automorive Ptoduefe 
imit for $625 million,, givuig it ^ 
manufocturer and supplier of <foas$is 
frames and other compOTcnts fon 
cars and trucks. A.O. Smith rose 7^ 
to 33%. 

CommunicadoiB eqmpm^ 
companies continued a decline 
triggered Friday when Cascadfe 
Ccnnmunications warned investoift 

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that growth in coming quartets 
would slow. Cascade fell 2% ta 
38W. (Bloomberg, Afi}^ 


NatSonal Semiconductor Corp. agreed to sell a majmity of 
its Fairchild Semicondaefor division to a group including 
foe unic’s managemMt and Steriing LLC, a venture capital 
finn, for $550 cmllion. 

• New Yoiic sued foe tobacco indostzy, joining l9otherstates 
tr^ng to recoup billions of dollars spent treating smoking- 
relaiM Ulnesses. Bloomberg 


DQUoAR: After TaUdng Its Currency Up for So Long, Is the U.S. Getting Too Much of a Good Thing? 


Continued from Page 1 als/’Bmce Steinberg, an economist other country aixned wifo a cinieo^ newcunen^, tfaeeuro, injiisttwo 


at Menin Lynch, & Co. has said, 
lower them a Int, while General Mo- “TheU.S.ecoDomyieDiamsvibrant That is how the markets view the 
tms Corp„ Fo^ Motor Co. and after six years of eiqimsion, foe dollar. ’The ^leed of tiie recent 

Chx^Ier Oorp. have raised their anese eooaon^ remains gripped by UJ. dollar surge m^ be promoting 
prices for foe new model year. deflation and nnancial-secmr prob- some official worries in Frankfurt 
hi Washington a^ on Wall Street, lems, and European economies are andT(d^,”SalomonBiothers1jQc. 
though, plenty of jusfoficatkms are stmggfling to grow.” told clients recently, **but no oett 

bring vmced every dw. The imud Blimringthp complaints fimnPe- — 

reduction of dte federal defidi;UJ. ooit and elsewhere, U.S. officials FOREIGN EXCSANGE 

offirialg say, has made foe dollar say foe rise of the drilar benefits the : 

more aoiactive than ever. Higher economy, as cooqie^oa from im- ibie plans to halt foe rise aq^^iear in 
mterest rates in ffie IMDsd States ports brips keep prices down and store.” 

make investing in TEeasury bonds fous contributes to keqnnginflatimi AsanKasureofpercqitioosabout 

arid other foiaradri instruments look and interest rates undneontroL eooncMnic stabiliiy, foe fotrign-ex- 
more promising, and ff anyfoing. Then foere is foe most intangih le diange matket is a telling incncator. 
analysts say, tfj. rates ate lik^ to benefitctfaIl:howtix»do11ar*sstraigfo WhatUisindicatingfoesedaysisifari 
ris^ while rates are e?mected to re- translates into d^lranatic stnn^ investors around foe worid find the 
main low in Japan and Europe. Fbtrign-pol^ practitionas differ United States foe best haven. 


W o nk o nd Box Office 


.-secKO' prob- 


Vte Aasadeted Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Jeoy Mbguhe,” “In Love and War” 
and *’Beveriy Hills Ninja* ’ tied to dominate foe U J. box <x6fioe 
over foe wericend, wifo a gross of $5.9 million eadL Following 
are foe Top 10 mone^nakers, based on Friday's tidret sales and 
estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


lems, and European economies are andTri^,** Salomoo Brothers Inc. 
stmgghnS ^ gmw.*' told clients recently, **but no cred- 


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tiiatlsviewedasQDlfaeiise^ years -- rihmnaring thft TVutsche 

That is how the markiBfc view foe mark as an investmeot instrument 
dollar. ’The ^leed of ^ recent. . “There is a pexo^itioD in Eor^ 
UJ. dollar surge may be promoting (hat foe Anieri^ eooiioaQr, and its 
some offioal wenries in Frankfurt pofiticri and ooeponte- feb^4s. foe 
andTrii^,** SaLomonBiothersInc. best in decades,’* Allen Sinri,- m 
told clients recently, “but no cred- eooDtxmst at-Primafo Dccdskn Eco- 
— - — — nociucs,said,**aDdfoeRisahmfoat 

FOREIGN EKCSANGE ^ dollar win eveatualty help 

: growfopcki^ around tbe- wood.” 


mterest rates in foe IMted States ports helps keep prices down and store.” 

make investing in Tteasury bonds fous contributes to keqnngiiiflatitm Asameasureofperceptioosabout SpecidatioathatdteUwS.eocMaamy 

arid other foiaradalinstrumeius look and interest rates undneontroL ecoocsiito stabffity, foe forrim-^ is giWing rapidly esoi^ to warratit 
more promising, and ff anything, Then foeie is foe most ititangih le diange market is a telling incncator. higher mterest rates fifted foe doQar 
analysts ssy, UJ. rates are likely to benefitctfaIl:howtix»do11fflr*sstiengfo WhatUisindicatingfoesedaysisfori apunst other cunendes MriMkQC, 
rise, while rates are e?mected to re- translates into d^lranatic stnn^ investors around foe worid find the news agencies repeated from New 
main low in Japan and Europe. Fbtrign-pol^ practitionas differ United States foe best haven. York. ^ - ~ 

”The dollar’s pofonnance res- greatly on this sab|ect But it never Investors arc nervous about The dollar rose to 119.575 yen' 
fleets basic ecrHuxoic fimfownM it- hurts to go into n^itiatioas wffi an- Europe, vdneh plans to move to a from 1 18.900 yen Friday, (0 .1.6473 


DM fimn 1.6269 DM. to 5JS7|| 
French francs from S.496S franqifr 
and to 1.4303 Swiss francs frona 
1A060 francs. The pound fell foi 
$1.6222 fiom $1.^. 

Tradossaid foe fourfo-quarterecRg 
ployment-cost index, to be releas$ti» 
Thesday, could contain the evideoof) 
of riring inflation foe Federal Resonfo 

Board needs to justify hitler ratesoo 

Also belpiDg tile diollar were ooin- 
r n««t;y from Jefotuon WUbehn Gadf' 
fowHi the Bundesbaak’s vice jpee^ 
ident, who said in an mterview to ^ I 


-iiteiH 

»*r( 


. .-iMteHI 

■■■ 

V-. -rnmn 


TNnj 


is giWing rapidly esoi^ to wartatit poUished Tuesday tiiat the dollar'}} 
higher mterest rates fifted foe doQar -recent rally presented “no pri^ 
apunst other cunencies Mriid^ danger tiiat could gravely aff^ 
news agencies r^xHted from New us.” His remarics followed another 
York. ^ : - ~ German offirial's comments that in* 


»■ " ■ .< 


The dollar rose to 119.^ yen' .focated Gemmy would sabasau^i 
from 1 18.900 yai Friday, (dX6473 _ sbraig doQar. (APP. 


■'IM k M Utkl 


AJWEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


MraKNATlONAt EUTOBES:; ' 


Mowday^ 4 pLiw. C lo — 

lb* tOB 90D iM*«edM Ahw, 























INTERNAllOI^ HEIUU) TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1997 


PAGE 13 


(h 


EUROPE 


<‘ff « House of Fraser Set 
To Trun Work Force 
By 10 % to Stem Loss 




Iniil 


Blenmberg Net%'s 

_LO1^0W — House of Fraser 
PLC said Monday that it would shed 
IB pexceot of its work force, close 
stoTtt and take charges of up to £49 
tniUioo ($79.8 miliiOD) as it reor- 
gwizes itself to combat widenine 

Tcsses and stiff competition. 

'The charges will mean the first 

fun-year loss for the retailer since it 

% listed its shares on die London ex- 
dwge in 1994. Analysts said mak- 
ing the cuts now should clear the 
vAy better earnings. 

' “The measures should set diem 
oft the road to recovery,’ ’ said Sam- 
aft tha Gleave. an an^st at Snth- 

IngersoU-Rand 
Bids for Newman 


Ml: 


% 


"• Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Ingersoll-Rand Co. 
made a fiiendUy £230 millio n 
($374.6 million) bid for Newman 
Tonks Group FLC on Monday, a 
move that would build the U.S. 
company’s hardware business in 
Europe and rescue Newman Tonks 
from a hostile Irid horn FIG FLC 
'' Newman Tonks, a maker of lodes 
md handles for windows and doors, 
said its board lecommended ^ 
179.4 pence a share bid frmn In- 
gersoU-Rand, viduch sells -’titniinr 
goods in the United States under the 
$phJage and Giynn-Johnson brands. 

launched a 148.1 pence tnd in 
ipid-December. 

* At Newman Ttxiks, now fighting 
the big^st current hostile 1^ in 
Britain, executives seized on tbe 
prospect of linking with Ingersdl- 
Rand as a way to give both compa- 
nies the global scope to eiqiand. 


“The bids are at total 

the chief execn- 


ends of the reectrum,’’ said 


tWe. ‘ ‘FKI gives us no benefiL T^tfa 
IngersoU-l^od, we have growth 
portunities everywhere we locA.*^ 

' Shares of Newman Ttmks rose 
28.3 ppce, to close ^ 180.5 pence,- 
reflecting some shardiokfers* expec- 
tations for FKl to urn Ingeisdl- 
Rand’s bid. The stock had uad^ near 
ISO pence sbnee mid-December, 
when FKl made its unwanted buL 


oroosite 
id Geoff 


erlands Ltd. “It will *akt» Hnw to 
come through; 1998 will be the 
year.’’ 

House cd* Fraser shares closed un- 
changed at 142 pence, after rising as 
much as 2 pence m 144. 

Three stores from House of 
Fraser’s Sl-^ore Army & Navy, 
Barkers, Cavendish House. Dickins 
& Jones, DH Evans, House of Ruser 
and odiv ret^ chr^is will close and 
about 1,(XX} of its 9,145 employees 
wiD lose their jobs. 

closures came afto Chief Ex- 
ecutive John Coleman started a re- 
view of the cooqiany's bosmess M- 
lowiiig his ^ipointtneot in Ap^ 
Mr. Colemao said in October that he 
planned to cut stores and jobs in an 
attempt to reverse decimps at tbe 
140-year-old retailer. 

House of Eraser’s loss in die half 
yearenefing m July inoie than tripled 
to £13.6 million from a loss of £43 
million a year earlier. 

In the same period, cooqietilcxs 
such as Kiogfisher FLC J(An Lewis 
^rtneiship and Sto^riiouse FLC 
made higher luofits. They benefited 
frt»i hitler ccosumer spending. 

Mr. Coleman Mamed poor plan- 
ning, stores full of goods that shop- 
pers did not want and low standards 
of service. He said problems in the 
ccxDpany’s buying department were 
so severe diat smne 144 buyers left 
the cmnpany in die last two years. 
There have been about 10 mer- 
chandise d ire c tors in as many 
years. 

Since Mr. Coleman toMt over, die 
craopany’s fiirance and operations 
direMors have resigned, aod House 
of Fraser has replaced two mer- 
chandising executives and its hu- 
man resources director. 

Of tte chaeges to earnings, £25 
million win cover tbe cost of writing 
down stock, £15 milli on will pay for 
jcb losses md another £9 million 
will pajr for stove closures. Mr. Cote- 
man said in October that the mea- 
sures could cost iqi to £50 million. 

House of Fraser said hs sales in 
die 26 we^ ended Jan. 25 rose 6.1 
percent over last year at stores open 
for more than one year. 

The numbers riiouid mean “a 
leascffitabte pCTfianmance this year,’’ 
said Heiinr Blyth, analyst at Gilb^ 
Elliot &(fo. 


Grundig^s Symbolic History 

Its Shifting Fortunes Match Those of Germany 


BbonAerg News 

FUERTH, Germany — In the 
years that followed Gnmany’s de- 
structum in Worid War n, a y«mg 
electrical engineer named Max 
Grundlg becune a symbol of the 
eatrq i renenrial spirit that hauled 
the aa&oa from ruins and helped 
turn it into the worid’s -tl^- 
ecooomy. 

~ a century later, die con- 
snmer-etectiDnics company he bmlt 
is a case study in the probtems diat 
rtww>tgi> Geiman manufactuieis’ 
profits ai^ in the case (rf some sudh 
as Gmndig AG. dieir existence. 

Now diitFhnte Etectioaics NV 
of dftB Nedierianm has withdrawn 

into die ' since**lS^, 

Ormxfig cannot survive mthout a 
new partner. Its chief executive. 
Pieter vai der Wal, made that pMnt 
laa wedc before sa^g he would 
step down in about eight weeks. 

The problem, analysts said, is 
not with Gnmdig’s products, 
whidi include stereos, trievisions 
and tel^ihODes, but wiA the cost of 
maldng them. 

“It's etqwQsiye to make 
p^ncts in Gennany and Aus- 
tria,’’ said Paul O’Donovan, an 
analyst at Dataqnest Inc. 

German companies such as 
Siemm AG attacked Ae problem 
by shaping an increaring share of 
operations to countries where 
wages were lower. While its Ger- 
man woric force was shrinking. 


Siemens ’s woik force outside Ger- 
many grew 9 percent in its latest 
finanaal year to account for al- 
most half of its worldwide total of 
about 4(X1,0(X). 

Other German corooradons are 
following soil, builtung factories 
in places such as Poland and the 
Czrob Republic, which offer labw 
costs far telow those in Germany. 
Even a Siemens diip plant in 6n- 
tain qualifies as a low-wage site by 
German standards. 

The strategy is hdi»ig die 
companies survive, but it also has 
Gennan unemMoyment whidi 
last monA readiea almost 1 1 per- 
cent, ot 4.15 million pec^de. 

Girundig has contributed to die 
Tiring jobless rale. Rmn a peak of 
more than 31,000 in 1978. its woik 
force has shrunk to 8300, about 
half of Aem in Gennany and half 
elsewhere in Europe. 

The decline is aU the more pain- 
ful in light of GronAg’s history. 
Mr. Gnindig and his cmnpany 
symbolized Gennany’s mrt- 
scfu0swunder. the “economic 
mir^e” that returned die country 
to prosperity iu a decade. 

Many of Germany's biggest 
companies existed long before the 
war, profited from it and rebuilt 
afterw ar d. Gruudig was founded 
fitun scratch by Mr. Grundjg, who 
ran an electric^ workshop before 
the war and managed to salvage 
enough of it to start making radio 
transformers in rented rooms in 


1945. Two years later, be began 
selling a sunple raAo receiver 
known as Ae Heinzelmaim. Tbe 
radio was an tirimpaViar^ hit be- 
cause Germans, still living under 
Allied miliu^ rule, could buy it 
without a ration card. 

In die years to come. Gnindig 
mass-pro^ ced a line of radios and 
soon bran^^ out into tape re- 
coideis and television sets. By 
I960 the comity had 30.000 
workers, mostly in Germany. 

Gnindig exenqilified German 
predrion and engineering excel- 
lence as it led development of 
products ranging from clock ra- 
Aos to video cameras. 

“They were in Ae forefront of 
many new products. They were 
quite an innovative cmnpany and 
still are," Mr. O’Donovan said. 

By the 1980s, Aougb, Gnindig 
had begun to suffer losses as com- 
petitors such as Sony CcKp. 
matched many German innova- 
tions at a lower price. 

Max GnmAg gave up manage 
ment of Ae compaiw to Philips in 
19^ and died in 1^9. Until this 
month. Philips managed Gruudig 
imHar an agreement that also nwHa 
it liable fer the German company’s 
losses, whi^ reached 598 million 
Deutsdie maiks ($3663 million) in 
1995 on sales of 33 billion DM. 

GrunAg has threatened to sue 
Phfiqis over its giving up man- 
agement control and to recover a 
250 million DM paymenL ' 


Opel and VW Slip on Home Turf 


Beuters 

FRANKFURT — Rival car- 
makers Adam Opel AG and Volks- 
wagen AG, Aeir industrial-espio- 
Aspute behind diem, face the 
of rebuilding maricer share in 
Germany after competitors from 
Asia gained buyers last year. 

The Federal Motm Office said 
Sunday th^ VW and Opel grined 
sales in 1996 but lost market share as 
rising sa^ of imported models hurt 
the poritioo of domestic carmakeis, 
who control 68 percent of Europe’s 
testmarkeL 

analysts say Aey believe the 
fi^ between Opel, Ae Gennan sub- 


sidiary of General Motors Corp., and 
VW had an impact on consumers' 
choice of a new car. The dispute 
stemmed from allegations Aat a 
fonner GM executive stole secret 
ifoia when he left to jmn VW in 1993. 
lie charges were sotted between 
the two comp^es this monA. 

Analysts said boA carmakers de- 
cided last year to concentrate on 
foreign sales, piarticularly in markets 
elsewhere in Europe, and had prob- 
lems wiA new models. 

The Federal Motor Office's le- 
poit showed that VW’s sales in Ger- 
many, mcludiag Aose of its import 
Mani^ Skoda and SEAT, rose 3J2 


percent to 664376 vehicles in 1996 
fr o m 643,739 in 1995 but Aal its 
market share fell to 19percentfrom 
I9.4percratin 1993. 

Ope] reported a 1.4 peicrat in- 
crease in sales, to 3603^3 units, but 
a drop in marioet share to 16 percent 
in 19%fitmi 16.7 percent in 1993. 

Meanwhile, Ae Korean brands 
Daewoo, Hyundai and Kia tackled 
Ae Eurqiean market wiA tough in- 
centives, which resulted in a 30 per- 
cent gain in sales for Ae three brands. 
11i^ sold a total of neaiiy 63,000 
vehicles m 1996 fora combined mar- 
ket slmre of 1.85] 

1995 level of 13fe percent. 


Investor’s Europe 



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source: retokurs 


iMeimioMal HcnldTnbunc 

Very briefly: 


• Hugo Boss AG, a maker of men's clothing, said Joachim 
V(^ its ixr^uction chief, would succeed Peter Litcmann as 
chief executive Saturday, instead of at the end of the year as 
previously aimouncecL The company gave no explanation. 

• Deutsche Lufthansa AG's chaiiman. Juergen Weber, in a 
letter to the airline's staff of 30,000, urged Aem to vote agai^ 
strike action in a ballot to be carried out by tbe trade union 
DAG. 

• KirchGnippe AG's chairman, Leo Kirch, demanded the 
resignation of Bemd Kundrun, managing director of tbe pay- 
television channel Premiere, the newsm^azine Der Spiegel 
report^ KirchGruppe, which bolds a 23 percent st^ in 
Piemiere, declined to comment. 

• Canal PlusSA'schainnan, Pierre Lescure, said he expected 
the company to p^t a slightly higt^ profit for 1996 than a 
year earUer and said resAts would rise again in 1997. 

• Thyssen AG said restructuring measures and an expec^ 
economic upswing woAd improve profit for the year ending 
SepL 30 de^te a weak performance in the company’s first 
quarter. 

• The Czech Republic cannot sell Ae state-owned Bud- 
weiser/Bodvar brewery unA a settlement is reached in the 
company's 80-year trademark Aspute wiA Anheuser-Busch 
Cos. of Ae Umted States, tbe Oech National Proper^ Fund’s 
chairman, Roman Ceska, said. 

• ComfMigiue de Suez SA said it would rebound frmn a 1 995 
loss to post a 1996 net profit of about 800 miUiou French 
francs ($145.6 million) amid improvements in all of its 
units. 

• Banco Santander Chile SA, controlled by Spain's Banco 

Santander SA, said 1996 net income rose 24 permit, to 40>4-l 
billion Chilean pesos ($96 million), on strong growA in 
commission revenue. Bloomberg. AFX.AB.Reuers 


n ! lit \lali WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


HWi Urn OoM PICK. 


Wgh UM Okc Prer. 


IfcNMiayp dFan. 27 

Prices M knl oinendes. 
TWekws 

■ Hlj^ Law Oh* Pm. 


. Lmt. am PMa. 


Ainaterciam 


Eoeimemw 





BelmiM 

SMW ' nm 
CDQMMRiMnk 4XK 
DU m rSWB 114.10 
Degussa 715 

lertiftifrirr" OUS 
DMlTckkOB 3MI 
DnsrieerBonlc SIX 
rmmiui ' '30 
rim*«Mi!d 14(M 
PrttiKnm wn 
GdM 111.40 

MMbgW 131A 
KhMoM njo 

SSS5 SS 

asr iS 

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2060 2050 2130 
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101 0750 JS 
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1520 1450 159 
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536 

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26110 2669 

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366 3639 

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616 

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773 

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495 506 

321 326 

203 20150 
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1849 1849 
1179 1889 
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729 729 
1919 192 

3119 310 

1709 173 

1169 1179 
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92 93 

184 186 

180 177 


Market Closed 

The Sydney stock market 
was cios^ Monday for a hol- 
iday. 


Thte Trib Inctox 



Closing prices. 

Jm I. 199S»1C0. 

Lmi 

Ctiange 

%chenBe 

ynrtodete 




Wchenga 

World tndex 

147.82 

-1.72 

-1.15 

412.10 

Regional hidBww 

Asla/PacHic 

109.91B 

-2.78 

-2.48 

-18.13 

EuiDpe 

158.94 

-1.73 


+1420 

N. America 

169.17 

-0J3 

-as5 

+31.88 

S. <4r7iedba 

kNtimlPl llKtCMMt 

125.33 

-aei 

-0.48 

+4a76 

Capitri goods 

173.29 

-2.46 

-1.40 

+3(141 

Consumer goods 

163.14 

-1.49 

-0.91 

+18.16 

Energy 

175.35 

40.23 

40.13 

+29.30 

Finance 

107.93 

-2.69 

-2.43 

-15.17 

NSsce^aneous 

165.07 

-1.48 

-0.85 

+21 J4 

RawMaleri^ 

173.53 

■1.21 

-0.69 

+2238 

Service 

136.18 

•0.88 

-0.64 

+13.48 

UtSbes 

140.83 

-2.05 

-1.43 

+10.77 

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174 

174 

177 

167 

165 

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166 

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259 

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529 

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519 

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539 

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175 

173 

172 

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419 

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144 

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259 

249 

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419 

169 

2970 

119 

429 

499 

289 

1729 

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419 4150 419 
1400 149 1454 
299 39 299 
1052 119 IBM 
4L15 99 41.15 
499 A10- 499 
279 209 279 
1699 1709 1719 
1049 1049 1059 
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NIM22SS 173849 
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9V 1020 
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For INVESIMENT 
INFQRMAXIOIV 
Read 


every Saturday 
in the IHT. 

SbialbjtfSSnbimc: 



PAGE )4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1997 


NYSE 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1997 


PAGE 15 


ASlAyPAOFIC 


Australian News Is Barons^ Latest Battlejront 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

NeH-YoHi Times Service 


S^NEY — Ii is ooe the great rescue 

?onny seas between 
Aus^a and Antarctica after beine en- 
«*ays inside the over&ned 
huU of his 20-meier (66-fooi) kctch. 

(fehydrated, surviving on “a 
bitofclmolate bottled water, his body 

radt^ by long exposure to icy seas. Tony 
Bulling was found through a highly 
operahon of the Australian Navy and 
An* Force after his sailboat this 

mmth in a solo round-the-worid race. Two 
nench sailon in the race were aiw rescued 
fiom ot^ boats that foundered. 

But it was Bullitnore, whose ordeal 
was me most harrowing, who the 

centw of the media's attention after the res- 
cue. Soon afterward; a less heroic ginio oii, 
under way. involving the open ch^Sooks 
and bare knuckles Australian television 
nenvorfcs and media giants behind them. 

So rough did die jostliM get for the ex- 
clufflve on the great survivd stoiy. with (me 
or (he networks even hiring bodyguards to 
keep the others at bay, scMne suggested 
Mr. Bullnn ore mi ^ tave pref err ed to tnm 

armmd and retain to the What w»»ifwg the wars particularly 

This was not the first time diat teievisum rough is the high (xmcentiation of ownership 


oetwoiks owned at least m part by the U- in a mtxiest znadtet of 18 mOlion pec^e. A 
Uonaires Rup^ Muidodi and Ket^ Padcer few Ing fish are thrashing in a Utde pond. 

Olympic Games in Ihe worldwide News Corp. empi 


had tangled. Last year’s 

Atlanta tunoed into viroial ddnnisfaes between 
rival camera crews seeking out Australian 
medalis ts. Almost routinely, the netwoaks raid 
one another's talent and braxow ftom a full 
bag of di^ tricks to ob- 
struct dieir rivals' news- 
gathermg effMts. 

As in other countries, 
the comp^tion here for 
news is drivoi by ratings 
and mon^. The battle- 
ground is the nightly 
news iHoadcasL The 
main news shows are on 
the air between 6 FM. and 7 PJM., and 
viewers are likely to qwnd the evening witii 
the nttwotk diey choose for news, so tnil- 
Jicms of dollars in revenue hinge cm me 
success of the news shows. 

**lt's a bare-knuckled business," said 
Alan Knight, director of the Aastralitm C^- 
ter fix' Indepeiulent JtMimalism at the Uni- 
versity of Tedhnolo!^ in Sydney. *‘Y(m 
don't stw as news Mtor of Channel 7 or 
Channel 9 if you fsil to deliver die ratings 
that Mordoch and Packer want to fnafntam 
their income." 


The netwodcs raid one 
another’s taloit and use 
dirty tricks to thwart 
rivak” news-gathering. 


empire. 

whidi Mr. Murdoch built fitmi a newspaper 
in Addrude from his father, now 

includes papas with two-thirds of tiie Aus- 
tralian readership — and practically all Aus- 
tralian newspiqiers out- 
dde Sydn^ and 
Mdbouxne. Mr. Mur- 
doch is a joint owner with 
another media baron in 
Sevra Netwrak Ltd., 
whidi runs Channel 7. 
The other owner is Kerry 
StclD^ a paitna with the 
American financier Khk 
Keikorian in tile film stiuBo Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Maya. Mr. Murdodi. who owns IS 
percent of Seven Netwcafc, and Mr. Stok^, 
who has 23 percent, deleg^ managemem of 
me station to an aggressive team of pro- 
fessi(Hials. The two men see eye to eye on me 
need to maxiniiae profits. 

hfeanwhile, hfr. Packer’s PuUidiing & 
Broadcasting Ltd. holdisg coomaDy is solely 
in G(»tnd cn Nine Network Australia T ja , 
of Channel 9. It is ako Australia’s 
magaane publisba and receody ac- 
coidra of the Sydn^ Harbor (asino 
Showboat Inc. of the Utuied States. Mr. 
Packer is repotted to be interested in buying 


control of John Fairfax Holdings Ltd., which 
owns most of the papers in Auaralia that Mr. 
Munkxdi does not control, including The 
Sydney Mcmung Herald, its flagsl^. 

The third conuneicid network is Netwoik 
Ten Lid., which controls Channel 10 and is 
owoied by Canadian interests. 

Each of the three commercial netwcxks 
tried to get Mr. Bullboore’s story for itself, 
but the battle was chiefly between the two 
richest and most aggressive — Channel 7 
and Channel 9. 

Michael Soumwell. areporter for Channel 
9, said he was rou^ied up by people working 
for Cbaooel 7 when be cried (o cake his 
camera crew into die public reception room 
of a hospital in Perth where Mr. Bullitnore 
went for treatmeoL 

"When the ambulance arrived, suddenly 
these guys were shoving us off balance and 
getting in front of me camera so we couldn’t 
get shots," Mr. Soumwell said "It was 
outrageous." 

J(^ Rudd a producer for Channel 7. 
acknowledged his netwoik had hired security 
men "to protect Mr. Buliimore fr o m a great 
many people who wanted to talk to him." 

The Seven Network "made an arrange- 
ment with Mr. Buliimore and his family,' ’ 
Rudd sud He declined to disclose de&ls but 
described amounts cited in the press, ranging 
up to $200JX)0, as "grossly exaggoated" 


(investor’s Asia | 

Hone Kong 

Sfogapore Tokyo 

51/:^ Times . N^dmiSSS 


15000 - 

... 2300 • • 

22000- 

— 

14000-- - • 


. rt^ 21000v^M^ 


13000 J 

218G . jU 

2000D ^ — 

-j— 

12000- 

21»VV\ 

' 19000 

..Ti 

iiooor^~ - 

- 2080 - l\r 

— 18000 

'■ u 

iwu^A SON 
1998 

b J ®®AS’0'ND'J ^™®'A‘S'0'N t) J' i 

1997 1996 1997 1996 1997 : 

&(Change - 

Index 

Mondsw 

Close 

Piav. % 

CtDsa 

HongKra^t 

Hang Seng 

13J94.90 13,379.55 -0.93] 

Steg^Mnr 

Skaits Times 

»,w>ggg 

2JM2.71 

.-o:t7 

Sydney 

MlOrcftiaiies 

Ciosad 

2,423.00 

- • 

TOfgfo 

NikkN225 

17,33AMI 17,659.36 

-200 

1 KuateLum^Coireio^ 

1J239.35 

1,244.13 

-0^ 

.'Bms^cofc 

SET • 

moASs 

848.56 



CoiT4x)ste Index 

664.79 

685.11 • 

-2.96 


Slock Maiket Index 7,156.9$ 

721Z2B 

^>.77 

■ItenHa ■ 

PSE 

3^10 

3,33253 

•0.28 

Jakarta 

CoR 4 » 08 ite index 

8M;98 

678.91 

aOJBS 

WWfeislon 

N2SE-40. 

2,393.25 

2,40027 

-0.29 

Sembay 

Senrt$v« Irufox , 

3,562:74 

3,435.82 

+3.70 


Souiee; Telekurs 


ImenuiiiHiai HnaUTrihune 


Very briefly: 


^ Giordano Shares Fall 25% 

Investors Question Companj^s Future in Oima 


Japan Stocks Fall on Fear for Banks 


CaepMbfOirSlifFhmDi^e^lKt 

HONG KONG Shares in 
Giordano International cnmmg 
off a week’s suspenaon fimn trading, 
fell 25 percent Monday amid investor 
cra^m mat die company fbnnte’s 
critidsm of Chmese leaders 
thwart its m^iansioQ effixts. 

■ Investors sold the stock after the 
ccnnpany.onetrfAsia's&istest-grow- 
ing appml merchants, said taSks to 
set up a joint venture wim a Chinese 
partner had stalled The announoe- 
ment cast doubt on Giordano’s ability 
to grow in the world’s most populous 
N country and sustain its five-y^ re- 
cord (tf strong ]Xofit growth. 

Giordano’s stock, which had been 
suspended from trading at die eexn- 
pany's request since Jan. 17, dosed at 
3.80 H(xig Kong dollars (49 oentsX 
down 125. 


The slide in the shares, wfai<di have 
mUen 71 percent this mootfa, illua< 
trated die mislty link between pol- 
itics and business in China and 
foreshadow rnore proUems for H(xig 
K(»g ennpanies after the territexy 
returns to Qaoese cootzol July 1 . 

“When you buy Giordano, 
you’re actualty buyiug all die un- 
certaioties it’s futing in China.’’ 
said Christina Chaing, a direemr at 
RBC Investment Management 
(Asia)'Ltd Hie nin&-}w-old emo- 
pany’s proUems in China stem fmn 
actions by its founder, Jimmy Lai, 
whose Next negaaine attacked 
Prime Minister U rag in 1 994 over 
his role in soufing tanks to crush 
ixo-democra^ (xotests in Beijing 
m 1989. Shoitly afterward, author- 
ities closed Gicodano’s flagship 
Beijing store. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


• TOKYO — A fiesh anxiety at- 
tadc over the heaim <^Jrqian’sofl(»- 
nugfaty banking sector dealt anodier 
bUw to Jsqianese sto^ Monday, 
driving tte bencfainaik share index 
down 2 percent in jittery trading. 

Sales of bank shares were 
triggered by a vsiety of vague ro- 
tnois about new problems and pos- 
sible large losses (m derivative se- 
curities by some JtqiaDese banks, 
brokerasa^ 

The talk raised concern about 
wfaedier banks abeacty stniggling to 
tackle loan problems wouldte able 
to survive in a more conqietitive en- 
vinxmiau after die government 

piwhflri tfarOU^ hs pending finaneial 

reform effexts, brokers said. 

The 225-share average lost 
354.46 po^ to close at 173^>90. 

Darluaiing the banking sector's 
mood was a midafternocxi an- 


nouncement mat Moody’s Investors 
Service Ihc. had lowerro its ratings 
outlook for Nippon Credit Bank 
Ltd., Hekkaido l^kushoku Bank 
Ltd., Yasuda Trust & Banking Co. 
and Cbuo TYust & Banking (^. to 
negative finxn stable. 

It said the banks had been having 
serious asset-quality problems and 
that their earnings, ctqiita] or re- 
serves mi^t not be enou^ to ab< 
sort) theirloan-loss provisions. 

The lepcxt sent interest rates in the 
l(xig-tezm government bond maricet 
lowCT as tzaders specolmed that any 
fbidier wtxsenhig of the heaim of 
Jtqian’s financ ial sector could pre- 
vent the central bank fitxn raising 
interest rales. 

The discount rate, or the rate at 
whfoh foe central baiik lends mcxiey 
to otter bat^. is at an all-time low 
of 0.5 percenL 

"Hie Bank of Japan lioesn’t have 


much left. Interest rates are already 
as low as they coigo,' ’ said Yoriiiald 
Mitsudea, managiiig director at 
Daiwa Asset Management Co. 

The yield on the No. 182 bench- 
maric 10-year government bond fell 
O.OS percentage point, to 2.3S per- 
cent, Its lowest since Dec. 5. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP) 

■ Toshiba Blames Toliyo 

The president of Toriiiba Qxp. 
said the slow pace of government 
reform was to blame for the recent 
decline in Japanese stocks, 
Bloomberg News reported. 

"They move too slow," the ex- 
ecutive, Taizo Nishimuro, said. 
I^ime Minister Ryutaro Hariihnoto, 
he said, "is not acting cxi what he is 
talking about That is the dilonma 
the government is facing. The stock 
maiket reaction is an expression of 
disappointment" 


• India is studying the feasibility of introducing a bill next 
month to end the state monopoly on radio and television. 

• Malaysia is drafting five "cyber laws" to underpin its 
ambition of becoming a global hub for multimedia companies, 
its telecommunications and posts minister said. 

• Volkswagen AG denied a report that it would invest more 
than S100 million in a joint-venture car factory in India, 
aimough a spokesman said VW had been seriously con- 
sidering investing in India for three years. 

• Southeast Asia will account for a significant pration of the 
expected 67 percent growth in global sea trade over die next 
decade, shipping-company executive.s said at a conference in 
Singapore, but tax and ship-registration policies in the i^on 
mi^t hinder batiKs’ efforts to lend the $200 billion to $400 
billuxi necessary to fund global fleet growth. 

• China’s state-owned enterprises are showing fewer losses, 
paitly because of interest-rate cuts made last year, the official 
State Statistics Bureau said. Only 30 percent of the 380,000 
companies surveyed lost money in the second half of 1996, 
down from more than 50 percent in the first half. 

• T^wan’s centra! bank will not cut its forecast for consumer- 
price inflation in 1997 to 3.0 percent from 3.3 percent unless 
compelled to do so by the cabinet, a bank officnal said. 
Analysts said the refusal indicated that the Central Bank of 
China was resisting adopting Taipei's figures, which the bank 
regards m<xe as targets than as fcxecasis. 

• New Zealand’s current-account deficit widened in the 

fourth fiscal ((uaiter on a slump in the services sector, brir^ing 
the deficit for the year ended Sept. 30 to a record 4.20 biuion 
dollars ($2.92 billicxi). « AFX. Bloomberg. Reuters 


INTERNET; A Sleeker System Takes Shape for U.S. Scientists 


Continued from 12 

millkKi, five-year agreement with MCI:; 

Indusoy spekesmeo estimate .that 
MCI is speodiDg lOtimesthearmamt of 
its award fn»n die foundation to buSd 
the netwoik — an investment that should 
allow the compaity to offer hi^-per- 
formance Intei^ services to ot^ cus- 
tomers later. 

Most of die fiba-optic lines are 
? already in place, being part of its national 
long-distanoe network. What is new are 
acivanced switches (made Ity Fore Sys- 
tems Inc. and Norfoem Telecom L&) 
and routers (made by Cisco Systems foe. 
and Ascend Conununications foe.), ac- 
cording to Giaries Lee, manager of the 
project for MCI. 

At the moment, the new netwoik is the 
domain of scientists. As with the first 
fotemet in die mid-1980s, Mr. Strawn’s 
division Im an "acceprable use’* policy 
restricting use to researcheis whore pro- 
jects have gone through a peer review. 

Once a project team gets cm. however, 
others at the same cunpus with a valid 
nc^ can use it too. Thi^-fbur collies 
and universities meeting in Chicago last 
autumn agreed to link up over more 
. (rafale fiber-optic lines at their own and 
V their research qionsors' eroeose. Since 
then, the project has signed up at least 
100 izistitutions. 

Most campuses connect to the Internet 
ROW through connections tfam can cany 
45 million bits, or 45 megabits, of d^ a 
second. Hiis month, die figure- eight 
backbone run by MCI for die National 


Science Framdatitm is raz^g its 
: to 622 megabits a se(»nd fixim 15S; 

: this £s m(xe (^ 10 times the present 
. Ihteinet’s.c^iBcity dncl moire than^,()CI0 
'times. die capaetty ^ ^.SOO.lnts a 
serond on most compioer modems. 

Besides canying Vbdy more data, the 
new foteroet is diniaent from today’s in 
two odier ways: first, users can be guar- 
anteed links ammig two or mcne sites at 
(Xice; second, the ability of distant ccan- 
poters te interact m real time malres the 
{XDcess so comqriex that even scientists 
cannot understand it widiout visualiza- 
tion. Thus, video wfl] be initiated widi 
OD-ltoe computing on the new Stte m et. 

Fv examiile, people can walk around 
inride visuriizations of, say, a molecule 
in "die Cave,’’ a duee-dimensfonal vir- 
tual-reality stage invented Ity Thomas 
D^anti Daniel Sandin of the Uni- 
verse of lUinods at Qiicago. 

"This is veiy useful for wmkmg in 
environments you can never actuiuy 
see," Mr. DdPanti said. 

Users stand inside a virtoal-ieality 
theater while two SG Onyx ctxnputm 
project the model of some comply for 
tenelationships, such as those fovolving 
a pitman’s effect on an antibexty. 

^di a viitnal-realiQ^ heads^ the user 
sees a dnee-dimenrional image of 
uteeeva is befog iDodeZed and, using an 
etecmmic wand, can manipulate the im- 
age, steering the emnpu^'s amputa- 
tions. The principle like that behmd a 
product suai as Lotus Notes, which lets 
lemoie users woik on die same doc- 
ument sunultaneously. 


But there is a vast diffexeiKx in scale. 
One {uoject befog undertaken on the new 
oetwo^ involves -studies of tmbolence 
jlty OfiyecMcBiyGan, a profr^soc of.ccnsr 
pu^ at jte Univer^ of Col- 

(xado. Tuitolence has implications for 
ocean currents sucdi as Q Nino, bur- 
rtixmes and solar flares. 

The data collected by Mr. McBiyan 
and his co l leagues outran die abilities of 
dieir cairpus conqiuters several years 
ago, so they began using the I^burgb 
Sipercoiipuliiig Center. "These com- 
putations goierafe as much as a terriiyte 
in one run," Mr. McBiyan said, usmg a 
unit of measttrement d^ describes <xie 
trillion Itytes of data. 

When MQ quadruples the maximum 
data transfer rate <xi die new backbone 
this month to 6^ megabits a second, 
"WeTl be able to bring the data back in 
a few hours’’ fogiaad of waiting 
overnight or, in some cases, for weelu 
for the existing foitemet to pass along the 
da^ Mr. McBtyan said. 

like others m die field of hi|^ per- 
formance cMiputing, Mr. McBiyan in- 
sist^ be was not fed up with the present 
fotemet: "I'm grateful for it vdiai I’m 
OD the road. Bnt becanse there are so 
maity people uring foe fotemet today, it 
is clogged up and unable to su{port tb^ 
higb-eod applzcations. What we’re (Jo- 
fog is not dying to have our own private 
netwoik but explore foe issues that have 
to be solved for the commercial network 
of tte next decade to be able to provide 
these services. You can say we're de- 
buggfog foe next version.’ ’ 


Samsung Will Limit 
Imports to Curb Deficit 

Bloombe^ Newt 

Sl^UL — Samsung Co., ^ufo Korea's Ingest in- 
dustrial conglomerate, and Ssangyong (foip., its sixfo- 
laigest, said Monday would Umit their imports to tty 

to help the country curb its trade deficit 
Da^ooCorp., foe fburtb-largest industria] group here, 
said last week that it would impixt no consumer goods 
this year, citing the same reason. 

South Korea’s trade deficit has ballooned recently 
amid poor eiqiorts and a surge in imports of coosuma and 
energy goods. The deficit doubled last year to a toxird 
$20 mllion ftom die (xevious year. 

Samsung's sales are ecjuivalent to 15 percent of South 
Korea’s gross domestic i^uct Its exp^ this year are 
projected to total $23 billion, and its imports to le^ $13 
billitm. That means it accounts for 16 percent of the 
nation's eiqxnts and 8 percent of its imports. 

Samsung’s chaiiman, Lee Kuo Hee, set those trade 
proje(Xi(X)s for tiiis year. Hie resulting trade anticipated 
si^us of $ 1 0 billi(X) in the company's account compares 
with a S7 billion surplus last year. Mr. Lee asked his 
executives to widen the surplus by conserving energy and 
cuibing impe^ of consumer goo^ in response to what he 
called a "national economic crisis.’’ 


If you missed the IHTs three 
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imT^«i</LTinN«. HERALD TBrnWE, SATPBnMf-SUWOiUf. FISRtlAMC 1-3, W>7 







PAGE 18 


SPORfS 


TUESDAY JANUARV 28, 199J 


itPl*** ^ 


World Roundup 


Packers’ Moxie Wins in a Game of ^Can You Top This? 


A Retiring Lewis 


ATHLETICS Carl Lewis> the most 
decorated track and field athlete lit 
history, will end his career in June 
in his hometown of Houston. 

“A Joi of people have been en- 
couraging me to sia;^ on, and this is 
the first time Tve said it will be my 
last season, but I intend to make my 
final race at Houston tn June/’ 
Lewis said at a meet in Sydney. 

Lewis. 35. has won nine Olympic 
gold medals and eight world titles. 
He has been invoI>^ in 10 world 
records, and bad 65 consecutive vic- 
tories in die long jump between 1981 
and 1991. {AP) 


Cantona Suspended 


SOCCER Manchester United's 
Eric Cantona has been suspended 
for two matches after being booked 
in Saturday's F.A. Cup match 
a^nst Wimbledon. The suspen- 
sion is Cantona's first since be was 
banned for an assault on a Crystal 
Palace fan during a match in Janu- 
ary l^S. 

• The {Portuguese team Boavista 
was fmed $35,000 on Monday for 
failing to control its fans during a 
UEFA Oip match gainst In- 
temazionale Milan. The Ians pelted 
a UEFA official with coins during 
the match in Boavista *s home city ctf 
Pbrto in December. {Reuttrs) 


Big Batting in Adelaide 


CRfCKET Brian Lara's 65 not 
ouL including 1 1 fours and two 
sixes, was a virtual oasis in a West 
Inditf batting <k»eit, as four wick- 
ets fell about him in the final ses- 
sion to leave his team 154 for six at 
on the third day of the test against 
Australia in Adelaide. 

The West Indies has the enor- 
mous task of reaching 387 with Just 
four wickets in hand to make Aus- 
tralia bat again. 

• England skittled New Zeal- 
and's opening baismen in the 
second innings go press for an im- 
probable victoiy in the first cricket 
lest in Auckland on Mcmday. 

At aurnps on the fouitii day. New 
Zealand was 36 for duee in their 
seemd innings, with Adam Parore 
on 16 and cafitain Lee Germon on 
four. New Zealand tnuls England by 
75 runs overalL (Reuters) 



By Tliomas George 

f/^yoriJiBusStr^e 




Packers' Brett Fa vre efae^ing nflter his toiididown pas to Andre RistHi. 


NEW ORLEANS — The GreftB Bay 
Packers showed the moxie, the eoura^ 
and foe spirit in the Super Bowl litai th^ 

had displayed all seasoo. They raced 
ah*a»H They fell behind. And then they 

got up and put the New England Patriots 
on the grot^ for good, winniog. 35-21 , 
in foe loidsiana Supeidome. 

tt was the 13fo consecutive victoiy for 
foe National Football Coofeieoce;, a 
^ring that be^ whh San Bandsco's 
victory over in Super Bowl XDC 
The Packers played wifo a confidence 
and in some areas a «imtlar 

to thm of the Packer teams Vince Lom- 
bardi fashioned in the late 1960s. those 
bruising teams with the pmchant for 
supnsme execution. That is what the 
Creen Bay offense did on Sunday, re- 
lying p rimari ly on foe wondetfiii arm of 
quarterback Brett Pavie and on foe spe- 
cial ^ents of leceivets Andre Risen and 
Antonio Freeman. And don’t forget 
Desmond Howard, the first special- 
teams player to win foe Super Bowl 
most valuable pl^er tioffoy. 

Affer a first half in which Gre e n l^y 
finished on top. 27-14, the Patriots 
drove with susto in foe third quaitm-. A 
Curtis Maitm l8-yaidninupfoemiddle 
closed the gap fo 27-21. There were 3 
minutes. 27 seccsids left in foe foird 


S x PlenQ^ of time for foe Patriots to 
wb^ bad started. 

■ But Howaiu pfcked a fine time to 

letuin his first kictoff for a iDOcbdo^ 

a pro. Eatacdy 17 seconds expired ^ 
tween Martin's score aid the beginning 
of Howard's 99-^ da^ foe longest 
lennn in Super BowL 
history. Hovraid skipped and waced and 
pimo^ and before long he had ouoim 

every Patriot into foe end aone. 

And just like that, be had run foe 

Patriots out of the game and out of Super 
BowlXXXL 

“On that kickoff ittunu he just 
going full speed throu^ foe hole," the 
^triots* wide recover Terry Glenn 
said. “They made a lot of big plays. 
That was the biggest" 

Howard returned four kickoffs for 
154 yaids (a record 383-yard average) 
and six punts for a record 90 yards: 
*s 244 yards in Jack returns, also a 
;upreBowlbe^ 

T^ose ntunbera told a large part of foe 
sTOiy. Coffiplemeotine titem were foese: 
Favxe completed 14 m 27 pas^ for two 
touchdowns and no intetceptitMts. New . 
ERgland's Drew Bledsoe matched him 
in touchdowns, and conmleted 25 of 48 
paRcwt for 2S3 yards, but threw four 
inteicqrtioiis. 

From the start, this Super Bow) was 
(xie big play after aoodier, as the Pattiote 
and tile Packets played can-you-ttqi-this 


that 
S 


In the Coaching Game, Are Oldies Really Goldies? 


football. Afteronlyahalf. 41 points 

been screed and . three Super Bowl re^ 
cords had fallen. • 

Green Bay had 27 of those first-half 
points, including foe game's first 10. It 
looked as if tiie Packers were on foetr 
way to a quit^ blowout before tbe ^t- 
ribts lebouDded to score the next 14 
points. Then the Green Bay offensB 
went on a scoring spree again fo finish, 
wifo a 27-14 balftime lead. - 

This tussle started wifo New Qigland 
winning tire coin toss, electing.fo Kt 
ceive and punting after Bledsoe mi^ea 
t unning back David M^nett on tiiird-' 
and-lO from foe New En^ind 36 wifo | 
thnt was too high and cob lon^ 
stt was wide open. Bledsoe mis? 
it, misfired it and was obviously 
just a little too jittery. 

There had been a lot of talk aboift. 
Favre's possibly being that wsty, too, tintf 
Z^vre uoially stares games so excited th^ 
he might throw his first Siqter Bowl paA 
S4 rows into the Supeidome stands. ‘ 
How about 54 yards into foe end 
zone? That’s what Favie did. Aftet 
Bled^ missed Me^ett and the Fax-: 
riots punted. Favie saw foe P|^o& 
cheat^ toward the nuddle and ro to; 
ward the Une to boiueod wifo 
Bay's two-ti^-eod alisament. Fayib 
csdled for the deep post, nom the left td 
tte middle, and Kson ran jc beautifiin^ 
It was a 54-yard score and Green Bay ' 
had gained a 7-0 lead -with U*.281eftm 
tbe first quarter. 

Bledsoe was t4of29ibr 187.yatd^ 


,8 \ . 








r!S’- ■ ■ . 








... 

■<L - .■ L. 

.rj 

!' 


with 2 touchdowns and 2 intercreKions,' 
in tbe first half. He passed for 123 yardk 


New York Tunes Service 

NEW ORLEANS — Visions of 
Vince Lombardi trophies must have 
been dancing in the heads of the Rams 
owner. Geor^ Froatiere, and the Saints 
owner. Tom Benson, at the Supre Bowl. 
Surely, the sight of the silver-haired, 36- 
year-old Bill Parcells patrolling foe 
sidelines made them think that a golden 
oldie can still make sweet music. 

Last week, the Rams dug iqr Dick 
VermeiL foe fremer Eagles coach who 
has been out of the business for 14 
seasons. Vermeil is not a fbssiU but 
some of his game plans need to be 
deciphered wifo the Rosecca stone. 

Now comes word that tiie Stunts have 
hired Milte Ditka, the former Bears coach 
who has iqpent foe last four years taUdng 
ab^ foofoall in an NBC stufoo. 

That leaves one more offid^ coaching 
vacancy — foe Oakland Raiders. OJC. 
the Jets job is open, but eveiyreie is 
conduced that Parcells is going to take 
that one. 


Vantage Poznf /TijeothtW. Smith 


If the Rams and Saints took a look at 
Parcells as an example of an older coacb 
^rito has gotten the job done and used It 
as a barreneter in hiring Vermeit and 
Ditka. then they've been woridng wifo a 
busted gauge. 

Yes, Pai^Us took a sabbatical fiom 
foe game, leaving the New York Giants 
after tiie team's viaoty over Buffalo in 
StflMT Bowl 70CV in 1991 and going to 
NBC for two years. Parcells spent two 
years talking football. But he didn't do it 
as long as Vermeil or Ditka. He wasa*t 
as out of touch with tbe nuts and bolts of 
the rame as long as they have been. 

Much has chotged rince Vermeil has 
been away from the game. The West 
Coast offense, tiie zone blitz and free 
agency are all new elements tha Ver- 
meil has never had to deal wifo. A 
couple of generations of {^yers have 
cofhe:and gober ainco Vemieil left the 


game m 1984. crenplaming of bumouL 
Tte Padeets* coaifo, Mike HolingresL 
who is considered one of the bri^test 
National Fbotbai! League coaches in the 
game, said tte playere’ altitudfs have 
chan^ dramancally in just the last five 
years. 

"R used to be five years you could 

ack guys to do things and they’d dO 
foem," Holmgren said "Now, lasko^ 
pjys to do things aodthey say, ’H^, wart 
a minute, wt^ are we tkiing it tiiis 
w^?' " 

w^iat’s going to happen the first time 


a player goes up to Difoa and asks why 

■ 9ty? 


th^’re doing something a certain waj 
Is Ditka going to smack him across ^ 
chops? Smteoce him to run tiie sradinm 
stairs? Same for VermeiL 
Paitxlls rehimed just in time for tbe 
heralding of tbe free-agnoc? era in tbe 
NFL. Venoril aod Ditka have not bad to 


deal with salary and free-agent vis- 

its in teir previous trourM. 

The major question about Venneil 
and Ditka IS wnether the modem NFL 
game has passed them hy. It seemingly 
had passed by Ditica, wtiio was fired^ 
titeBewaftrea5-ll season in 1991 
Ddtkawascoadioftheyearin 1985 and 
1988, but his alxasive demeanor and 
caustic b^vior rankled players, fens 
and Bftare 

Vermeil's wodofoolic s^le drove him 
away from die game, ff be remaiiis as 
driven as he was in 1984. he'U be doing 
more titan sleeping several nights a 
w^ on a couefa ffl & oll^ which was 
bis habit when he was wifo tire Eagles. 
Tte denumds 00 an NFL coarfo today are 
far greater than ti^ were in 1984. 

mybe Vermeil's saving gr^ will 
be dxat many of the things be was doing 
in 1984 have been out of vogue so long 
that lliey’ll be new again. 

Sent oflike beQ-bonoms and platform 
shoes: • • * 


in foe first quarter. But on his seconA 
possession of the game, he was interr 
cq>ted by comeiback Doug Evans at fob 
Patriots' 28. -n 

All foe Patriots ' defense allowed afev 
die turnover, tiiough. was a 37-yaifi 
field goal by Chris Jacke. Thau gave 
Gr^Baya 10-0 lead only 6:l8mtofo» 
first quarter. The rest of tbe quatti{| 
would belong to the Patriote. -Tl^ 
scored two UMdtdovms and exited tito, 
quarter wifo a 14-10 lead. - 

But Gt^ Bay won tbe seconB 
qua^, 17-0, and gat it started in dra- 
matic feshion.Tlie Packers sprrad titf 
Patriots' d^enrewifoamultiple-ieotov- 
er fonnaiion and wifo ev^one sprea^il* 
wide actoM tire litre of scrimmage. Th^ 
matched up Freeman wifo safe^ Law- 
yer'MUloy. 

MisinatitiL MOloy buinped Freeiiian at 
the line, but then HreBman zipped ri^ 
past him for a touchdown catch foat 
proved to be tire longest play from scrira- 
mage^SI yards the histoaryp^^ 
Si^ffBowL 



SCOREBOAR 







New Om^teUailoT) 


MARTINA HINGIS’ CHOICE 


Already competing in world-class tournameocs, the 
promising young tennis player Martina Hsi^ is 
creating a sensation with the elegant finesse and 
uncompromising strength of her game. Qualiti^ she 
finds in her Omega, on the court and in her daily life. 
“Trust your judgement, trust Omega” 

- Martina Hingis. 


O 

OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 

lacemec hctp;//www.om^a-ch 



..Vemn 


SUPER: Packers’ Victory Restores Green Bay as TiUetoun U.SiA;, 


Coatinued froin Page 1 


as if he was giving a 
farewell speech. "And foesi 1 
thanked them for what 
they've given to me this year 
in terms of effort Tb^ 
fought hard, we just cracked a 
little under foe pressure." 

Wifo the victory, the Pack- 
ers once again return to tire 
list of winnres. They have 
played in three Stqrer Bowls 
and wou foem all — tire first 
tbe sectmd and the 31st 
*T'm really bumbled 
tire experience." said 
Holmgren. "This is tbe 
greatest group of plajrers I've 
ever been around, tire most 
unselfish group of players 
I've ever been around. 

"Coach Lombardi bad a 
wonderful legacy for the rest 
of ire, and now we'ie tr^g to 
do our p^" 

Winning is tbe only tiling, 
Lombardi once said, but 
scattered throughout tire 
crowd on Sunday were Pack- 
ers fans whose tales of pride 
and obsession offered a vari- 
ation of foat theme; To tb^ 
being l<^al to their team was 
everything, and winning, 
when ft happeoed, was just a 
final sweet reward for per- 
severance. 

A group of frmr fans from 
Oshkosh, Wisconsin, made it 
inside tbe Superdome, driv- 
ing through the ni^t to reach 
New Orleans, and from seats 
scattered around the stadium, 
bouefo on the street for 
$1,000 each, tiieir hearts 
soared tbe firA time a Packer 
touched tire balk Howard 
fielding a punt and scooting 
32 yards upfield, ibe first of a 
of extiaordinaxy 
by him. 

Two ^ays later foey were 


on tbeir feet again, celebrat- 
ing Favre's !^yBrd touch- 
down pass to Andre Rjson. 

But after Green Bay 
jumped to a 10-point lead, 
they and tire throng of Pack- 
ers backers were stormed into 
silence by a 14-pfont Patriots 
comeback tfara feoughc tire 
fens of New Bnghmd to life. 
Tbe deccriiying first quarter 
piodnced more points — 24 
— than any previous Siqrer 
BowL 

Such tribulaiioiis were 
Dotfaing new for tire Oshkosh 
quartet, best friend since ju- 
nior higfa, who were all boin 
in 1967, the final triumphant 
year of LombatdL Their lives 
traced tbe lost years of Pack- 
ers mediocrity until tbe recent 
tesirisence. 

"What was the low 
p^t?" Bill Glatz, who sells 
aqfoalt. sard, pondering bis 
lifetime of fanaticism. "Fora 
Packers fan, there is do low 
point The team unity, tbe 
conirection between lire team 
and the community. We don't 
want to lose, but no one game 
breaks a Packers faiL It is a 
way of life.” 

Glatz and his buddy, Tom 
WeisfaeipL a student at Wis- 
cocsin-Osfakosh, were within 
ritouting distance of one an- 
otiier, 10 cows apart in Sec- 
tion 102 in tire end zone. The 
other members of tire quartet, 
Dan Muza, a lawyer, and Joe 
Gorwitz, also a snid^t, were 
on the other side of tbe Su- 
perdome and up in clnb 
seats. 

They dressed for tbe game 
wftb foe care of real {dayets. 
Glatz wore No. 21 in green 
and gold, tire Jersey loonier- 
back Ce^ Newsome. Gor- 
witz also came as Newsome. 
Muza wore Pa^'s jersty. 



SlHMTiK/A|! 


Aodre RisoD bauling in the ball for a touchdown runi 


tiie ubiquitous No. 4, and leans when tiiey saw Brookjs 
Weishdpl entered the stadi- in bis rented black Che\^ 
um as No. 87. tbe uniform of Blazer, waiting for a li^c to 
wide receive’ Rob^ chait^ 

Brooks. Brooks sight <]f 

The bond that so strongly Weish^l, rolled down his 
coQirectstheOshkofoboysto window, and asked, "He^, 


a fbotixdl team of players 
who in essence are ru e roea - 
aries brou^ to Wisconsin at 
nniltinunion-dollar salaries 


man, how come you doirft 
have a jersey?” 

The Ofokosh fen, wearing 
a workday shirt explain^ 


from college footiraU fecto- foat he hadn't had time to buy 
ries around the country is best auiuform. "Hold on." 

L.. rar.f-f rt , t 


explained tty how Weisbeipl 
gothisjers^. 

He am his pals were walk- 
ing down a street m New Or- 


Brooks. who reached into h» 
bac^ seat and tossed 
WeLfoeipl an autographed 
jersey. "‘Now you*ie reat^y,**- 


Steffi Graf Is Still Under Investigation 


Seuurs 

BONN — Gennanpiosecutmssaid 
Monday that they were still inves- 
tigating the tennis star Steffi Graf, 


whose father was found guilty last 
erfdoT 


Graf, whose agnahtre was on foe tax 
reCunas, had actively participated in the 
crime. He leconiiiieaded that the con- 
tinuing investigation of her should be 


week of evading nullioas of doDars in 
tax oa her eami^. 

Tbe Marmheim^secutor, Hubert 
Jobald, whose office has been in 
charge of the tax mvestigaticxi, said, 
'^The investigations mto Steffi Graf 
are stiQ going on. We are in charge of 
the case and wiUconciode itas soon as 
we can,” 

Tbejudge who sentenced her ferher, 
Peter G raf, on Friday to tiuee years and 
nine moafos in ^ on six counts ^ 
actual and atten^rted tax evasion said 
there was no in^cation that Steffi 


3ut Jobrid said tire judge's recom- 
mendation had no bearing on tiie in- 
vestigation, adding: "1 wouldn't like 
to specul^ about tiie outcome of the 
inves^ation." 

SteffiGrafhas told tax investigators 
she estnisted her ffitancial to 
1^ fEAer from an eaiiy age and had 
little idea how her money was man- 


The ixceecutor has in tiie past said 
die_ snspidons against Steffi are less 
serious than tixree against her fetber, 
■and hidicated tint he would study 'tire 


Dutcc^ of Peter Grafs trial before 
dwnding how to proceed wifo the case 
against her. 

In Tokyo, Steffi Graf appeared at a 
news conference Monday before a 
toutnameiu, but declined to answer.^ 
questions about the conviction of her? 
father for tax evasitm. > 

Speai^ before foe opening of the^ 
Pan Pacific Women's C^ren ext Tufts-lf 
day, Graf Aill looked weary from aa 
fright from Australia, whm she 
been defeated in the fourth round of foe> 
Australian Open and suffered iwa t ex-'i 
baiisrion ^ 

The issue of b^ fedier’s coavictiot^-* 
came up when reporters shnim»H quesrd 
tions to Graf what she was leaving-foe' ' 
room. She walked away with a riiriig. 






PAGE 19 



■ AUey-Oops Help Terrapins 
Past Blue Devils in Stretch 


Tht Associated Press 

A coi^e of aOoy-oop j^ys gave 
Maryland a big boost Sunday. 

Laron Profit dunked a pair of lob 
passes from Samnas Jasikevicius down 
dw stretch, helping the No. 7 Tetrmins 
beat the No. 10 Blue Devils, 74-70. 
y^itb the victory. Maryland moved up 
two spots to fifth place in the Division 1 
nmldngs. (See Scoreboard.) 

' “He’s a great passer, and when he 
^ws it up there, I go get it,” said 




)fit. who finished with 16 points. 
“There's ntw really too m w h of a de- 
bate on the location. He gets it there and 

- rtake care of the rest” 

j ' Die first all^-oop tied it at 66 witft 
' • 4d)7 left and die second gave Maryland 
the lead for good, 68-66. 

Terrell Stokes made two foul shots 
:• ilnifa left to gWe Mayland a 72-67 
"i lead, Iwi Duke pulled widw two on Jeff 
'( Gael's 3-poifiter with 54 seotmds le- 
Ruining. Jasikevicius had a lay^ 
blocked, guying Duke a diance for hs 
• second straight last-second victory at 
^le Held House. But Steve Wpj- 
.. oediowsld was called for diarging with 
7^ seconds remaining, aiy ;! Profit made 
. nvo shots to clinch the vktory. 

^Keith Booth had IS points, nine le- 
. bounds and six assists for ±e Terrapins 
(yj-2, 6-1 Atlantic Coast Confereace). 
Rtthown McLeod led Di^ (15-5, 4-3) 

- with 22 points and 1 1 reboui^. 

Ne.1 XwwM77,llo.160elocMl»e8ln 
.. Boulder, Colorado, Raef LaFrentz 
' scored 21 points and Jerod Haase added 
. 20 as Kmisas survived a scare. Tte 
V Jayhawks (20-0, 6-0 Big 12) led as 
. i^y as 16 points in the first half, ^ a 
second-half raHy put the Buboes (15- 
• 4. 6-1) up 64^ with 6: 19 left. LaHmtz 
then took charge, sparking a lO-O nm. 


No. 19 North CarelbM 61, No. &«Mn> 

oon 48 Ancawn Jamison scored 22 
points as North Carolina handed Oem- 
son (16-3, 5-2) its 4M strai ght loss at 
Ch^l Hill. The Tar Heels (12-5. 3-4 
ACC) played dieir best defense of die 
season and shot 63 percent from tbe 
field in die second half. 

No. 3 Komortcy 83, ArfwMo 73 Nazr 
Mohammed scored six points in the 
final four minima; and visiting Ken- 
tucky’s junssure was too much for 
Arkansas. Tbe Wildcats (18-2, 6-1 
&ndhea5teni Co nf ere p oe) nifv> 

free throws in the 6i^ 6:C)6. The Razor- 
backs (10-6, 4-3) made only 26 of 64 
utempts from tbe field. 

No. 9 CinehnoSi 100^ Sootbom CM 81 
la Los Angeles; DameD Buitoo scored a 
cai^-high 31 points, includi^ six 3- 
poimers to become Cincinnafi’s career 
leadn in that cate^;oiy. Burton has 262 
3-pointers in hi^ four-year career, 
passing LaZelle Durden’s mark of 260. 
The Bearcats (14-3) won for the 12th 
time in 13 games. 

No.21 iiniionoVp,9owi9t.5S Id State 
College, Pennsylvania., AJ. Goy^ 
scored seven consecutive points dining 
a 26-2 run and Indiana (17-4^ 4-3 Big 
Ten) held Penn State wtidmut a field 
goal for more than 1 1 minates, while it 
turned an 8-7 deficit into a 33-10 lead. 

■ No.S3T»o«78,Moooiol74 In Austin, 
Texas. Reggie Freeman scored 17 
points and Al Coleman added 1 6 f<ar die 
Longhorns (11-5, 5-1 Big 12). Texas 
watdied a 15-point lead distqjpear tn die 
second half out relied on its pressure 
man-to-mao dedfense and foul shooting 
to defeat die Tigers (10-9, 2-5). 

No. as MwiltHtf 61, noPoM 49 Id 

Chicago, Chris Crawford scored 22 
pmnts and Marquette’s defense held 
DePaul to 25 pocent shooting. Mar- 
quede(13-3,4-l Conference USA) totA 
control wife a 14-0 first-half mo. 



JSmSNATlOSAL HERALD TRIBUNE, JANUARY 28, 1997 

SPORTS 



Miami's Alonzo Moorning under pressure from Patrick Ewing, 


Knicks Beat Heat, 95-89 


The Associated press 

The Knicks ktspc Pat Riley out of the 
All-Star game wife a 95-89 triumph 
over tte Miami Heal in New York. 
Patrick Eiring scared 24 pmnts, Al- 




lan Houston had 1 7 and Charies Oaidey 
16fbrdie Knicks. The victoiy prevented 
Riley from coaching die Er^em 0»- 
feieooe AU-Stais in two wedcs. Since 
Phil lacks<» of C3uc^ can't coach fee 
All-Stars two years in a row, the 


goes to the conference coach wife the 
next-best record thiougli Sunday’s 
game& A victory would have done it for 
Miami, but instead ^ job will go to 
Doug Collins of tbe Detroit Pistons. 

Bueka apwB 79 Gknn Robi&soQ 
scored 19 poinls and grabbed 12 re- 
bounds and Milwaukee held visitinfi 
San Antonio to 10 pmais in the final 
quarter. 

tMran 104, IhuiirTwidra 103 In 

Seattie, Ivlick Van Exel scored 23 points, 
Eddie Jones had 23pomts and two key 
fiM ferws wife 1:(J7 left 


Jones Birdies to Victory 


Reuters 

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona — Steve 
Jones birfeed tbe last two holes to win 
the Phoenix Open by 11 shots, but fell 
one stroke short of equaling tbe all- 
time PGA Tour scoring recmd. 

Jones shot a final-round 67 to finish 
at 26 under par. 1 1 in front of Je^ier 
Pamevik of Sweden, who also bad a 
67. Nick Price of Zimbabwe was 
alODC in diird place at 14 under after a 
three-under-par 69. 

“Thank Go6 it's over.” Jones said 
cf fee tournament, which brought the 
sixth victoiy of his career, the first 
since fee U.S. Open in June. “This is 
the land ofresult you can neverjpred^ 
My goal after winning the U.S. Open 


was to prove I could win agw.” 

JcMies thought the PGA Tour scoi^ 
ing record, set by Ben Hogan in 1945 
and matched 1^ Mike Souchak in 
1 955, was 26 unw par rather tl^ 27, 
and so he believed he had made it. 
‘’I'm on the last hole. I’ve got tte 
tournament woo, and yet I’m feeling 
pressure,” he said. “When d^ the 
pressure stop?” 

For the rest of the field tbe pressure 
stopped when Jones began his round 
^ sinking two 2S-foot puns, on the 
fu^t bole for birdie and the next hole 
for par. 

“My putter was phenomenal,” 
Jones said. “1 ought to have it 
bronzed when I'm done.” 


Lemieux Scores at Home 


The Associated Press 

Mario Lemieux finally played in his 
hometown the w^ he plays everywhere 
else. He ded a National Hockey League 
record wife four goals in the thM penod 
to lead tbe Phtsbui;^ Penguins to a 5-2 
victoiy over fee Mcrntreal Canadiens. 

PiilsbDxgb’s loolde goalie. Patrick 
lafime, made 42 saves to bring his per- 
sonal record to lS-2-2. as the Penguins 


MHLRoundup 


won in Montreal Sunday for fee first 
time since Ocl 29, 1988. 

Res' Lemieux, a Montreal native, the 
performance erased some bad memor- 
ies. “That’s the best I’ve ever played 
here,” said Lemieux, who beca^ the 
life player to score four times in one 
period 

”Ir*s always difficult for me to i^ay 
here. A lot m pressure. There are so 
many people I have to take care of. Last 


night I chose to stay in my hotel room so 
1 could relax.” 

The move paid off. 

“Mario just took over in the third 
pmod,” said the Canadiens’ captain, 
Vincent Dam|rfiousse. “He got some 
breaks and he doesn’t miss on too many 
of those.” 

Lernieux is the first player to score 
four goals in a period since Washing- 
ttm’s Peter Bondra on Feb. 5, 1994. 

Jason Woolley scored Pittsburgh’s 
other goal on the power play, while Ron 
Francis had three assists. 

Oilw» 3i Ca^tals 1 In Landover, 
Maryland, Dan McGillis's second goal 
of the game snapped a third-period tie as 
Edmonton beat Washington for the first 
time since 1992. 

McGillis got a step ahead of Wash- 
ington defenseman Ken Klee, took a 
pass from Mariusz Czericawski and 
poked it past goalie Olie Kolzig at 4:53 
into the final period 


Scoreboard 


FOOTBALL 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. JANUARY 28, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Ethics Prohlems 



Buchwakl 


W ASHINGTON — TTie 
word on every- 
one's lips in Washington 
these days b * 'ethics.'* The 
word is often used as part of a 
greeting, as in “Have a nice 
ethics day/ * or usqdied in die 
quesdon “Did 
yon do some- 
dui^ nice for 
somebody to- 
day that wasn’t 

Despite what 
youi^evoy- 
cneind^town 
haset^Sro 
iliavealot 

odKR have just a teensy 
bit 

Years ago, nobody in- 
qiured about a person^ eth- 
ics. A member of Congress 
could violate the ethics code 
and oeta be found out 
But in the present world, 
we must live by die code or 
risk being tepaimanded by 
our peers. 

I have received many in- 
quiries from readers outside 
die Ca^tal Beltway waonng to 
know a someone could have 
an ethical lapse and lose hb 
mmal comp^ at the same 
dnie. 

The answer to diat is, yes. 
although the people who have 
done it steadftsdy maintain 
that ibeir staffers made all the 
mistakes. 

To examine “good" ed\- 
ics, one has to deal with such 
things as peijury, embeole- 


ment and the shredthng of 
documents subpoenaed by 
ethics committees. 

There is a lot of concision 
over ethical standards be- 
cause one man’s stealing in 
Washington could guaranree 
ano^ man a standing ova- 
tion. 

For help on this compli- 
cated subject I turned to 
Jeremiah Jumbo, an ethics 
mtdiessor at Pinoccfaio State 
Univetsi^. who said, “What 
die American p^le want 
more than anything in the 
world is clean govemment. hi 
order to achieve this, our rep- 
reseotodves in WasbingtoQ 
must be prq»red to defend 
their cxiUeagues to the death 
when they are accused of any 
wrongdoing." 


□ 


Wildlife at Risk in Zaire 


Rguav 

GENEVA — The survival 
of unique animals like white 
rhinos, mountain gorillas and 
okapi will be direatened if 
fighting in Zaire spills over 
into wildlife reserves, the 
Wtvld Wide Fund for nature 
said Monday in an ^ipeal to- 
the Zairean govemmenL 


The professor continued, 
“The trouble with ethics is 
tiiat everyone makes mis- 
takes. Who are we to say that 
soliciting ill^al fends for 
one’s crusade is good or bad 
for the country?' 

“How does a person de- 
cide?*’ I asked. 

“It d^iends on whose ox is 
being ^ored. The rule in Gw- 
gress is you don't reprimand 
someone just because he took 
the IRS for a ride." 

‘'Are you (^ninii^ about 
die future of die political eth- 
ical ^stem in the nation's 
capital as we know h?“ 

“I am if i t doeso ' c hurt any- 
body. We Americans play 
politics by the rules. Then we 
raise le^ funds to defend 
ourselves when we flout 
those rules. The worst prob- 
lem someone like Newt Cia- 
erich has is that be can’t call 
me Democrats crooks widi- 
out calling the kettle black." 

‘*Bat do you really think 
that the system is effec- 
tive?" 

“It is if someone pays the 
$300JX)0 himself." 


Evil and Banality: Berlin Play Stars Eva Braun 


By WilUam Drozdiak 

Wasfyitigloti Post S^rvi^ 


B 


ERLIN — The seoins is 
il IW. 


Hitier's bunker in April 
Outside, the Tliitd Reich is going 
in flames as the Allies press 
tireir final siege against the he^ of 
(he Nazi empire. But inside, a curi- 
ous calm has settled over the dic- 
tator's subterranean abode in the 
1 k^ before his death. 

A platinum blonde has mar- 
ri^ the man who exterminated 6 
miUiop Jews and nearly destroyed 
the entire mritinftnt. In the short 
interlude between toeir wedtUng 
and joint suicide, she rhapsodizes 
abom her love for clothes, gounnec 
meals and the leader who has cap- 
tivated her ever rince they met 16 
years carUer at a photographer's 
studio in Munich. 

Ste reminisces with girUsh em- 
barrassment about her first sexual 
encounter on a sofa with the man 
she affectionately calls “the 
Wolf." She pushes aside all dark 
thou^ts abom him. eiufiralled by 
die dream chat when Germany wins 
the war she will get to star in a 
Hollywood epic at^t her life with 
Hitler — to be played by none other 
titan Clark G^te. 


One of die last political taboos 
has just ^en in tbie realm of Gor- 
man eateitainmcnl — but the event 
has not been cause for much sat- 
isfactirat “Eva — Hitier’s Be- 
loved" iweseots the mofl sympath- 
etic portrayal ever given on a 
German stage of Eva Braun. Adolf 
lfiil^''s mistress and de facto first 


by tbe side of one of hisiOTy’s 
cruelest ogfes. 


They confiend that Breus, Zilce 

many G^nans at tire timo* 


lady of tbe Na:ti regime, 
si) 


iiooe opening in December, it 
has beonne one of the most coa- 
troversial productitms in the his- 
toiy of ^ Berliner Ensemble, tte 
famous theater group founded in 
1949 by Beitolt Brecht with the 
express goal of disrupting bour- 
geoissociety. 

And in the process, the ^ 
minute monologue starnng 
Coiinna Haifouch, one of Ger- 
many’s hottest actresses, has ant- 
agonized just abtw everybody. 

Feminise groups have been out- 
raged by the suggestion that Braun 
and her mundane tastes represent 
the embodiment of German wo- 
manhood. But writer Stefan 
Koldia and director Stephan 
Suschke, who conducted exhaust- 
ive historical r^earcb on tbeir sub- 
ject, say all ih^ were trying to do 
was project a fetfaful ima^ of a 
rood loyally 


simple woman who stood 



US. ArmSi^CDip 

The real Braun, whose portrayal has stirred anger in Gennany. 


she neverkaew abort Hitler’s hein- 
ous crimes and sou^ to avoid all 

occasions to know wout (ton. She 

spent long sliet(*es at titeir Bav- 
anan T nft » ir>r?fa retreat, wimtiung 
and indulging in inaBriai ob- 
sessioQs such as buildiDg a vast 
wardrobe of fen^ clotties and ex- 
pensive shoes. Slto saw Ifitler once 
or twice a mondi, but di^layed no 
apparent intetest in his politics ai^ 
never voiced doubts about his 
policies. 

Braun’s driving ambition to 
reach stardom in Hollywood is 

based on fact, according to KoWtz, 

who pored over historical archives, 
private papers and documentary 
fflmg in studying her life. 

“Her career ^>al was to become 
an actress and we know that Hitler 
promised that if he won the war, 
she would get to travel to Hol- 
lywood to play herself in the film 
about his life," he said. 

Suschke acknowledges that the 
play is “very poIidoUy incor- 
lecL" He insists, however, that his 
inte ntio n was not to impugn tbe 
motives or habits of German wo- 
men, whether or not they are too 
inr.ifnftd to show slavish obedience 
to the men in dimr lives. 

Rather, he wanted to hold a mir- 
ror to the aodience and make all 
Germans question whether they 
would have acted differently than 
Braun in demonstrating revulsion 
toward tte crimes of the Nazi lead- 
ership. “The point was to make the 
sympathize with her so 
th^ would not find it so ea^ to 
riigfnncp. them^ves from her, ‘ he 
said. 

But German tfaeater critics have 
been anytlting but sympathetic to- 
waid the play. 

“Do we really need conjecture 
today about the emotional bfe of a 
woman who bad no imponanoe ex- 
cept as the girifiiend of a mass 
murdero? ’’ atited a reviewer from 
Berlin's leading radio station. 
“The play is b^c^y banal and 



Sontiinl knwif/llpyifii 

Corinna Haifouch as Hitler’s mfetress fo Ensemble p^. ’ 


fiffldameotally tasteless." 1>e lo- 
cal daily Berliner Moigenpost said: 
“Tbe monologue is neitmc funny 
nor startling, illuminating nor ir- 
ritatmg. It doesn’t even attempt to 
show the indefinable figure bdiiod 
the staffed bn or the real stoiy 
behind the doomed bunker." - 
Haifouch. who was bom in east- 
ern Gennany and has woo sterling 
reviews for her roost recent roles rai 
stage, screen and televisimi, seems 
unperturbed feat the diallengihg 
task of delving into tbe tnscru&to 
diaracter of Braun has been de- 


scribed by the laUolds as “the flop 
ofherUfe." 

Tbe loud hisses and boos that 
have accompanied her curtain calls 
have not dismayed her. If anything, 
finds the reaction of theater 
audiences a Teassuriim indiration 
of how Germans firel toward 
Hitler's first lady and the willful 
ignorance that she represents. 

“The audience reactioo has been 
quite appropriate," Harfouefasaid 
“I myself swiztg between nausea 
and cloying emotion for this 
role." 


f(eiv Ridili 


« oti t 




A LIBRARY IN TURMOIL 


PEOPLE 


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A Book Is a Book Is a Book? Not in the ’90s 


By Tim Golden 

New Hirft Timet Sermce 


S AN 

When 


FRANOSCO — 
the city librarian 
unveiled the $140 nullion 
Main library here last spring, 
lus metapto mi^t have been 
(be building’s wide, inviting 
rotunda, filled ^tb new pa- 
trons light and a com- 
puter-age promise that the in- 
formatioo avrilable would 
grow ever more abimdant — 
never muid the shelves. 

Less dian a year later, 
however, the rotunda has be- 
<xmie a symbol to the tibrar- 
ian's local critics of a vision 
skewed: of hapless misman- 
agement in the design of the 
new building, of space Teras on 
sacrificed for computer ter- 
minals, of a research sanctuary where 
love for the humanities and social sci- 
ences has become lost in a rush to get on- 
line. 

Tbe libfurian. Kenneth Dowlin, is still 
considered a leading light in his pro- 
fession. He is one of two candidates fw 
the next presidency of the American 
Liluaiy Association and an articulate 
pit^ioncnt of using communicadon 
lectanolopes to create a new kind of 
public span. 

At the triumphant opening of the new 
Ubr^. he seemed a perfect fit for the 
San nandsco of the feture. a self-styled 
capiial of the Information Age. 

But this is sometimes a narcissistic 
city, one that likes to think of itseif as 
having many good sides. And most of 
those sides, it seems, had imagioed a 



Ja VilMmw IciiTM 

computers at the new San Fraodsco library. 


librai]r in their ima«. 

So U was feat advocates of a demo- 


the soft-spoken librarian said afterward 
outside die new Main's Latino/Hiqjanic 
Community Meeting Room. 

The inunediate cause of Dowlin 's col- 
la^ was acute financial chara. The 
public library system, which bad seen its 
budget nearly double to S3S.7 million 
after San Franciscans voted in a 1994 
initiative to set aside some of their prop- 
erty tax revenue for its revival, was 
running S2.8 million short 

To attribute tus demise to the deficit 
would be like blaming some last bad 
defenses against the barbarians the 
fall of die Roman Empire. 

“My real gnpe aixsat the San Fran- 
cisco Public Ub(^ is that they were, 
without any permission from the people, 
transforming a great research institution 
into a mediocre pofwlar libraiy, and do- 


In an aiticle in The New 
Yorker that rallied tbe ixttur- 
gents. Baker described the 
new Main as a gne^ gray dun- 
geon where a priceless card 
catalogue was coldly des- 
troyed and (kfeoseless books 
were condemned to the IMs- 
caid Room or tbe '"Deselec- 
ticxi Chamber." 

More than 200,000 books 
ended up at tbe dump, be 
wrote last October, "many of 
them old, haid to find, out of 
print and valuable." 

In incerviews, seven lilnv- 
ians oitical of Dowlin's ten- 
ure dracribed a dUTerent pro- 
cess. They said th^ for years, 
the San Francisco Public li- 
brary had done very little 
“weeding" — tbe practice of 
purging damaged and iess- 


A U. m the (royal) femily: Qoeen 
Elizabeth has agr^ to let Piin^ 
Charles appear ^tii his longtime mis- 
tress. Camilla Parker-Bowles, oo pub- 
lic occasions, die Sun reported Moimy . 
The paper publiriied photographs rii ow- 
ing that tbe prince regularly provides 
ooe of his chauffeurs to di^ Farker- 
^wles to London firom her home in 
Wiltshire, west of tbe cainial. Hie Sun 
said that ^ stayed two or three nights a 
week at tbe ponce'shome atHighgTove, 
Gloucesterabiie, and added thm the 
couple intended to appear in public to- 
gedW during tbe sumixier vacation. Tbe 
prince, who was divorced from Prin- 
cess Diana in August, has said be does 
not intend to rematry. Opinion polls 
show that tbe Brit^ l^bUc opposes tbe 
idea of ‘ 'Qtteea Camilla." 


□ 


crane trash-novel mainstream have 
bumped up against members of the lit- 
erary elite, and chonqrions of higfa-tech 
diange have battled Ubcary wockm in 
what remans a stubbornly union town. So 
h was that wben Dowlin waited through 
his rotunda one recent afternoon, it was to 
aiuXMince his forced resignation after 
neaiW a decade in the job. 

“rve never enjoyed ix 


mg that by tiirowtim books in a landfill,* 
e novelist Nicho&m 


used books to make room for the new. 

In preparation for tbeir move to new 
(fuaiters, the old Main's librarians some- 
times hurried to get rid of unused books, 
throwing out hundreds that they perh^ 
should have kept But die librarians said 
the scope and the sloppiness of the 
weeding had been exaggerated. 

Althmi^ Dowlin was not responsible 
for Snaating decitions that left tbe li- 
brary without enough room for all the 
booitt, city officials said, he did grow 
detached tom its day-to-day o perati txa. 

Some signs of a final vermet on Dowl- 
in's library may be seen in tiie booming 
growth of Its new. woridxtg-class jratrons 
and the lines of teenagers who wait 
patiently for time wife its Imeniet ter- 
minals and CD-ROMs. 

“It's so sad to be debating books 


Washingtou's political ^xx>h-bahs 
took turns twealong Prestoent BiD 
CUnton at tbe axinw dinner of fee 
Alfelfe Oub, Tbe Washington Post re- 
ports. Retir^ General Colia Powell 
may have delivered the best line of fee 
evening. He poked fim at Clintoo’s le- 
ceot hoc^ '^Between Hope and Ifis- 
tory," }jy annouocii^ that Random 
House would reissue it “as a fire log." 
Random House is selling “Between 
Hora and History" to btroksellers for 
$1 30 per co^, making it, fee news- 
says. “cheaper than good Idnd- 

ig-" 



*1»Si 

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MV'» 


AGENDA 


OiDfon Savs 
^ * 
^oniiuii is On 


liOduct Uita^^nifn 

GOOD KNIGHT — Tbeo Wa^el, tbe German finance minister, who was 
awarded a medal against deadly seriousness for tbe Aachen camivaL 


□ 


that Roberts was truly ill wife the flu. 
Muinelli has stepped in for a monthlong 
stint as Andrews’ vacation teUef to rave 
reviews and pacted houses. It's her first 
Broadway agmearance in 12 years. An- 
drews is due back next week. 


enjoyed politics much." 


the novefist Nichouon Baker said. 

Baker, a smnetiine resident of Berice- 
ley, across the bay. was recruited to fee 
cause last spring by a traditionalist core 
of San Francisco Ubraiians. By then, the 
traditionalists and tiieir union. Local 790 
of the Service Employees Uni^ had 
moved from fights wife Dowlin over 
mundane issues like staffing levels to a 
gueirUla campaign against what they 
saw as a great old libra’s desecr^on. 


versus cowutecs, vriien fee issues fa- 
cing San Francisco are of Utenicy, of 


immigrant populations." stud Peter Ly- 
man, the Univeisity Librarian at the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley. “Tbe 
public library needs to be a place thm 
helps ctaiidrra learn the basic ridlls of 
liferacy, diat helps immigraats become 
citizens. Ken was trying to create a sense 
of political coounuaity ferough teefa- 
notogy, and fee new library is m many 
ways successful on those grounds." 


There are reports of trouble backstage 
at Broadway's “VTctor/Nfictoria." Mis- 
cues by Liza Minnelli led to a badc- 
stage tantrum ber co-star, Tony 
Roberts, according to Tbe New Yo^ 
Post and the Daily News. Qting uniden- 
tified tbearer sources, both papers said 
Roberts stonoed out of the theater in a 
rase ovex Mutnelli’s alleged inability to 
dwver all her liaes prppmy . “Liza has 
a line that is supposed to b^ Tm a 
second-rate hooSsr, ’ but she said instead 
T’m a seco£zd-fate booker,' " tire 
quoted a source as saying. “That was 
too much for Roberts." Tbe actor re- 
portedly is staging a sickout until the 
show’s regular lead actr^ JuKe An- 
drewsyretumsfrom vacation. Aqrokes- 
man for tbe play denied tile story , Siting 
that feere was no trouble on the set and 


sneakers and dress shoes." And that's 
just clotiiing. It also holds ' ’a canteen, a 
Ugbt-weigbc hammock, Leafeerman 
tools, canned goods, granola bars and 
Tabasco saucer And, oh yes, toofebtysh 
and toothpaste." f..* • 


>!•.' .T;, 


M.c.i., 


□ 


□ 


It. Jun 


King Hussehi of Jordan ^ out of (he 

king, 61, “is in an excellent sluq>e and 
he will resume his activities unmedi- 
ately." his pfaysiciatt said in Amman. 


The Sundance Film Festival’s grand 


.jury prizes went to the drama 
“Sucuiay," directed by Jonathan 


Q 


Dao Ratber’s suitcase for going on 
assignments must be tbe size of a steam- 
er trunk. The CBS anchoonan told TV 
Guide his minimal contains: “Two 

suits, three dress shu^ half a dozen 
neckties, two work shins, a budi jacket, 
blue jeans, waders, a sweater, a wind- 
breaker. feeiznal underwear, un-feennal 
underwear, a pemefao. a paika, a trench 
coat, a toxedo, gloves, lace-op boots. 


ay," directed by 
Nossiter, and the documentary “Girls 
Like Us," directed Jane 
and Tina DiFeUdantoaio. More (baa 
127 feature films and 56 short films 
were shown to the 10,000 visitora dur- 
ing 10 days of viewing at the Utah 
festival, which has become a premiere 
showcase of independent dnema. . ■ 
Alejandro Amenabar's thriller “Tra- 
is,'^ about television violence aiKljXpr- 
nogr^y, won best film at fee Goya 
film awards in Madrid, beating the fe- 
vorite. Pilar Miio'sversioD of the 17fe- 
century stoiy “El Peno del Hor- 
telano." 






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