Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


it era I b 


INTERNA' 



ribuitc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


** 


Paris, Friday, January 31, 1997 



No. 35,433 


49 Years On, India Mourns 
And Reappraises Gandhi 

Is Debated as Ashes Are Dispersed 


By John F. Burns 

New York Times Service 

A LLAHABAD, India — In a mood of re- 
proachful retrospection, India turned the clock 
back nearly a half-century Thursday with an 
emotional ceremony on the Ganges River dur- 
ing which an urn containing some of the ashes 
of Mohandas K. Gandhi, long forgotten, in a 
provincial bank vault, was tipped into the water 
at one of India’s most sacred sites. 

For a few hours, this sacred city was host to 
events that seemed borrowed from the days 
after a Hindu nationalist assassinated Mr. 
Gandhi in New Delhi on Jan. 30, 1948. Sealed 
in the wooden casket where they had been 
placed after being scooped from Mr. Gandhi's 
funeral pyre, the ashes were taken from a spe- 
cial railroad car, honored by crowds of young 
and old shouting “Long Live the Mahatma!" 
and finally immersed in the Ganges to the sound 
of ancient Hindu death chants. 

Partly, the ceremony was a matter of un- 
finished family business, organized by a de- 
scendant of India's independence leader, Tush- 
ar Gandhi, a 36-year-old graphic designer in 
Bombay. The younger Mr. Gandhi learned 
from a Times of India report three years ago that 
a wooden casket believed to contain some of the 
ashes of his great-grandfather had been dis- 
covered in a branch of the State Bank of India in 
Cuttack, a city on India’s eastern coast. 

After months of hearings last year, India's 
Supreme Court authenticated tire ashes as hav- 
ing come from the division that was at the 

funeral pyre of Mr. Gandhi, who was cremated 
according to Hindu custom atop a pile of san- 
dalwood beside the Y amuna River in New 
Delhi. 

At least a score of urns were filled from the 


ashes and distributed across India for immer- 
sion in the country's rivers, but the urn sent to 
Orissa state, for reasons that remain obscure, 
ended up in the bank at Cuttack, which was 
Orissa's state capital at the time of Mr. 
Gandhi’s killing. 

Bat as much as the Gandhi family wanted to 
give their famous forebear “a final measure of 
peace," as Tushar Gandhi put it Thursday, the 
ceremony in Allahabad, an ancient city whose 
position at the confluence of the Ganges and 
Yamuna has made it one of the holiest sites in 
India, also made a political statement Many 
Indians who revere Mr. Gandhi believe that 
events in postindependence India have turned 
Mr. Gandhi, and not only his asbes in Cuttack, 
into a forgotten entity. 

As India, approaches the 50th anniversary of 
its independence on Aug. 15, 1947, many In- 
dians have been unhappily comparing the coun- 
try they live in with Mr. Gandhi's ideals — 
among others, nonviolence, religious harmony, 
concern for those trapped by poverty and caste, 
and a life free Of materialism. These Indians 
point to India’s covert nuclear weapons pro- 
gram, to soaring rates of crime and corruption, 
to political parties that appeal to divisions of 
religion, region and caste, and above all to the 
350 milli on Indians who still live in poverty and 
conditions of endemic disease. 

“We invoke Gandhi today as the M ahatma, 
the Father of the Nation,” said VanditaMishra, 
a columnist writing last weekend in The Pi 
oneer, one of the country 's leading newspapers. 
“But the politician and social philosopher who 
articulated an alternative model of society is, by 
a curious sleight of memory and imaginati on, 
transformed into the presiding deity of a system 

See GANDHI, Page 6 



Tushar Gandhi, carter, being helped by other family members as he pours the ashes of his 
great-grandfather, Mohandas Gandhi, into the Ganges River in Allahabad on Thursday. 


British Health Service Running a High Fever 


By Sarah Lyall 

New York Times Service 


LONDON — This has been the worst winter 
in memory for Dr. Don Wijetunge, who runs the 
emergency room at St George’s Hospital in 
south London. At times as many as 30 patients 
have been sprawled on gurneys outside his emer- 
gency room, waiting for treatment for things like 
pneumonia, heart attacks, stabbings and injuries 
from car accidents. 

Because government financing: cuts have 
forced Sl Gorge’s to do away with many acute- 


care beds. Dr. Wijetunge said, these patients 
have had to wait — often for 48 hours or more — 
even as their conditions worsen. 

“Our emergency room has become not only 
tire emergency room, but also the intensive care 
mot, the ward for the care of the elderiy and, at 
tunes, almost aplaceforpatientstodie, • hesmtL 
“This is totally unacc^tablft hi 1990- if I had 
oacpatiemovenughtmthedepaitinem,ifwasof 
major concern and T would move heaven and hell 
to find a bed, but now it is almost routine.” 

The problems at St George’s are mirrored 
across Britain, where a cold snap and a budget 


crisis have forced the cancellation of non emer- 
gency treatment, sent some of the sickest patients 
on long odysseys in search of beds and wreaked 
havoc on a system that has run on a shoestring 
even at the best of times. 

Over several wars, the situation has so de- 
teriorated, say ddctorsj^atients.'hojpilal officials, 
opposition politicians and economists, dial even 
some of the Systran’s staunchest supporters are 
beginning to wonder if Britain's beloved system 
of socialized medicine is in danger of collapse. 

See HEALTH, Page 5 


Berlusconi Trial Voided; 
New Start Set for Feb. 5 

Reuters 

MILAN — A yearlong corruption trial of 
former Prune Minister Silvio Berlusconi 
was declared null and void on Thursday and 
will start again from the beginning. 

The trial was thrown into disarray earlier' 
this month when the presiding judge. Carlo 
Crivelli, Stepped down over allegations of 
bias. The court president, Filippo Lo Turco, 
said the new trial would begin Feb. 5 under 
a new judge, Francesca Manca. 


Chirac Confers 
With Clinton 
Before Meeting 
Yeltsin on NATO 


Russian Mood Concerns 
West as French Leader 
Prepares for Moscow Trip 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tnbunc 

PARIS — Underscoring Western concern 
about the mood in Moscow, President Bill Clin- 
ton and President Jacques Chirac had a half-hour 
phone conversation Thursday about NATO en- 
largement before the French leader visits Mos- 
cow this weekend. 

Mr. Chirac's talks with President Boris 
Yeltsin will be the Russian's first direct ex- 
change with a Western leader since a bout of 
pneumonia that complicated his recovery from 
heart surgery in November. 

The phone call also appeared to mark a U.S. 
overture to Mr. Chirac, whose good relations 


NATO’s chier plans to intensify talks with 
Russia on expansion. Page 6. 


with Mr. Clinton are expected to soften the 
acrimonious bargaining between Washington 
and Paris over the Bench desire to place one of 
its officers at die head of the southern NATO 
command in Naples. 

That deadlock threatens to hold up plans to 
unveil a new overall command structure for 
NATO at a summit meeting in July — a problem 
that could complicate the outlook for the even- 
larger issue of striking a deal with Moscow about 
NATO’s plans to announce die names of new 
member countries at the same meeting. 

Reporting on the Clinton-Chirac conversa- 
tion, Mr. Chirac's press aide said that the two 
leaders discussed NATO's relations with Russia 
and Ukraine as well as the command dispute. 
The discussion was characterized in Pans as 
“constructive." 

U.S. officials in Europe said that they knew of 
no changein position by either side on the Naples 
dispute. By calling Mr. Chirac, Mr. Clinton was 
“putting into action an idea that we and the 
French have agreed on — that we ought to tty to 
get relations onto a new footing after the disputes 
that gave us a bad 1996,” a U.S. ambassador in 
Europe said. 

NATO issues are prominent in Mr. Chirac’s 
schedule, which includes talks Thursday with 

See CHIRAC, Page 6 


A 


U.S. Firms Experiment 
With Part-Time Scientists 

Temporary Workers With Ph JXs in Demand 


By Rick Weiss 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — When Mohan 
Khare needed a temporary employee to 
fill in for a while at his Maryland-based 
environmental testing company, he did 
what executives around the United 
States have done for 50 years: He called 
Kelly Services, the company that be- 
came famous for its “Kefly Girl” cler- 
ical workers. 

But the part-time employee that Kelly 
sent was not your average temp. This 
one had a chemistry degree from the 
prestigious California Institute of Tech- 
nology. was an expert in gas chroma- 
tography/mass spectroscopy and was 
completing graduate studies in forensic 
chemical analysis — just what Mr. 
Khare needed. . 

Meet Richard Baleersen, one of a 
lew breed of Kelly ramp: the scientist 
for hire. 

"I half expected to have to wait tables 




The Dollar 




DM 


1. 


1.6443 


Pound 


1.6135 


i.ez 


Yen 


121.855 


122.175 


6.523 


5.545 



+83.12 


6823 86 


S&P 500 


itomsayctoM 


6740.74 


+11.67 


784.17 


pmtouadoM 

77250 


Newsstand Prices 


10.00 FF Lebanon U.a000| 

- 1250 FF 

n .1 .600 CFA Qatar iMOftg 

IE 550 Rfanton 12.50 FF 

......10.00 FF Saudi Affbte-.10.00R 

.....1100 CFA Senegal — 1-JD0CFJ 

.350 Dr. Spain 525 PTA5 

■■ .-'--2.600 Mm Tunisia ..........1 250 Dm 

at.'lJSOCFA UAE. 

1250 JD U.S. Mi (Eur.).... -SI -20 



school,” Mr. Baltzersen 
said. ‘ ‘This is much better.” 

As the federal government hands 
more of its research to private con- 
tractors and science is run increasingly 
as a business, a growing number of 
laboratories are saving money and 
hassles by hiring sciennst-temps. In a 
quiet revolution little noted outside the 
research community, these contingency 
woikers — many of them with doc- 
torates or other advanced degrees — are 
chang in g the way science gets done in 
the United States. 

Industry advocates say the low-over- 
head scientists are helping U.S. lab- 
oratories stay competitive. But critics 
fear that the gradual replacement of 

See TEMP, Page 5 



Business 101 in Jakarta 

Companies Learn: Be Connected or Be Gone 


By Michael Richardson 

Inter national Herald Tribune 

JAKARTA — When Bre-X Minerals 
Ltd., a Canadian mining com- 

pany, found itself entangled in a jungle 
of conflicting ownership claims to one 
of the world’s richest undeveloped gold 
deposits in Indonesia, it turoeofor help 
to a little-known but well-connected lo- 
cal company. 

To gain quick government approval 
to start production, Bre-X said U had 
entered a “strategic alliance” with FT 
panman Duta, a consulting company 
controlled by Sigit Haijoyudanto, the 
eldest son of President Suharto, to win 
the permit and buy out some trouble- 
some minority shareholders. 

But Mr. Sign's involvement and mat 
of Mr. Suharto’s other family members 
and close associates in the battle to 
control Busang, a field on Borneo Island 
that contains at least 57 million ounces 
of gold valued at more titan $21 billion, 
is alarming investors. , 

Having poured tens of billions of 
dollars into Indonesia in recent years to 
develop its resources and low-cost man- 
ufacturing, investors now see 
Busang affair as a sympttm of die dtf- 
ficulty 8 and unpredictability of doing 


business in the world’s fourth most pop- 
ulous nation. Specifically, the 32-year 
rule of Mr. Suharto, 75, is altering its 
closing stages, and the expanding cor- 
porate empires of several of his six 
children are coming into conflict with 
each other. 

The Busang battle followed several 
other tussles for commercial supremacy 
between members of die first family, 
including the right to exclusive tax 
breaks to build a so-called national car. 

In a report to ccnporate clients. Polit- 
ical and Economic Risk Consultancy 
Ltd. of Hong Kong said that by showing 
very clearly the growing role of high- 
level political lobbying in the Indone- 
sian economy, the national car con- 
troversy and the Busang gold mine 
battle could damage inves tm ent and 
business confidence. 

“hi a situation in which government 
rules can be applied or changed freely to 
suit those in power, many new investors 
may simply decide that it is safer ro look 
elsewhere,” die company warned. 

Because Busang concerns “a very 
big amount of gold, people become 
greedy and are not afraid to use their 
political influence to get something 

See MINE, Page 6 


AGENDA 

Albright Issues 
Rights Report 

The U.S. State Department is- 
sued its annual human rights report 
on Thursday, denouncing problems 
in China. Indonesia, Burma and Ni- 
geria. 

It also cited problems in such 
friendly countries as Germany, 
South Korea and Turkey. 

Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright presented the report Page 6. 

Unocal Carp., meanwhile, said 
Thursday that it was expanding its 
petroleum business in Burma de- 
spite die report on human-rights 
abuses in die country. Page 13. 

MGETWO 

Ricanda's Justice Is on Trial, Too 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Wo Dinner, No Money’ 


Books.. _ 

Crossword — 

Opinion 

Sports 


........ Page 4, 

Page 18. 

— Pages 8-9. 
Pages 18-19. 


IntonMtfaBBf OauuUmti 


Pagmt. 


At the Rejusemk Reunion 

Sharansky Helps Recall the Bad Old Soviet Days 


AfcoceRan ct ftim 

Surrounded by masked prison guards Thursday, Natan Sharansky 
visited a KGB prison in Moscow where he was held in the 1970s. 


By Serge Schmemann 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — It was a reunion like 
most Russian reunions, with anecdotes 
about die old days, sentimental toasts 
and a table loaded with sausage, pota- 
toes and herring. 

The only difference was that the 
apartment holds the Andrei Sakharov 
archive, and the people gathered there 
were old dissidents come to see an old 
colleague, Natan Sharansky. 

To these people, some of whom had 
sat in labor camps or prison with Mr. 
Sharansky, he was not the Israeli min- 
ister of industry and trade, and not even 
Natan (the Hebrew name he took in 
Israel). He was Tolia (the Russian di- 
minutive of his Russian name, Anatoli), 
and the fact that he was a real gov- 
ernment minister was, for this evening, 
just another object of merriment. 

Mr. Sharansky was describing how 


he was driven away from the Perm labor 
camp in 1986 mi the way to freedom: 
“There was a police car in front, a 
police car in back and policemen at 
every intersection saluted?' 

“Just like today," interjected 
Viacheslav Bakhmin, a veteran of the 
same camp, prompting a round of 
laughter. 

“I always said, 10 years of labor 
camp was the best preparation for 10 
years of Israel," Mr. Sharansky de- 
clared, hreaking into his trademark 
smile. 

“In fact, one of the campaign slogans 
of my party in Israel was, ‘We go to 
prison first, then the Knesset.’ “ The 
allusion to the legal problems facing 
several Israeli ministers drew another 
round of laughter. 

Then Mr. Sharansky turned serious. 
He pointed to a portrait of Mr. Sakhar- 

See RETURN, Page 6 


White House Database 
Tracked Political Donors 


By Glenn F. Bunting 

Los Angeles Times 


WASHINGTON — Acting at the di- 
rection of the president and first lady, 
the administration in 1994 created a 
massive computer data system with fed- 
eral money to keep tabs on as many as 
350,000 people, including political 
donors. Democratic campaign workers 
and visitors to the White House. 

Despite guidelines and legal opinions 
advising that the system could be used 
only for official government purposes, 
the White House staff frequently re- 
trieved data on large political contrib- 
utors and turned it over to the Demo- 
cratic National Committee to help raise 
money far the president's re-election 
campaign, internal documents and in- 
terviews show. 

The use of the computer, dubbed 
“WhoDB" for White House Office Data 
Base, provides further indications that 
aspects of the Democratic Party's $125 
million fond-raising effort were carried 
out in die White House and that some of 
its components were based there. 

Also, the records reflect the assort- 
ment of perquisites beyond private cof- 


fee kl arches with President Bill Clinton 
that the administration made available 
for prospective donors: seats aboard Air 
Force One, personal notes from the 
president, lunch in the White House 
mess and invitations to watch a movie in 
the East Wing. 

It is entirely legal and customary for 
the White House to gather information 
from a variety of sources to help the 
president in his “official” capacity. But 
Federal laws prohibit the administration 
from providing such data to a nongov- 
ernment organization for partisan pur- 
poses, particularly apolitical committee 
such as the Democratic Party. 

A White House spokesman, Barry 
Toiv, said that the computer system 
served as an electronic social calendar 
by storing lists of people who have been 
invited to presidential events or re- 
ceived holiday cards from the first fam- 
ily. 

“The database is not a tool for track- 
ing contributors," Mr. Toiv said. 
“Nobody outside the White House was 
given access to it." He said that the 
program logging perks was developed 

See FUNDS, Page 6 










PAGE TWO 


Different Problems/ Rwanda and UN Tribunals Hampered 


Justice, Too, on Trial in Genocide Courts 


By Stephen Buckley 

Washinfdon Past Service 

K IGALI. Rwanda — The day 
Frodouard Karamira's trial 
was to begin, the steamy 
courtroom — built for 100 
people — was stuffed with twice that 
many. Mr. Karamira, a businessman 
who is accused of taking a leading 
role in Rwanda's 1994 genocide, had 

f often a defense attorney just three 
ays earlier. Four other suspects 
scheduled for trial that day had no 
lawyers. 

Tile three magistrates, thrust into 
the genocide trials after only a few 
months' training, held court for nearly 
four hours, then decided to postpone 
the proceedings. 

Nearly 800 kilometers (500 miles) 
to the east, in Arusha, Tanzania, the 
UN International Criminal Tribunal 
for Rwanda also is holding genocide 
trials. Defense attorneys are prepared. 
Fans cool the courtroom. Spectators 
watch horn a spacious gallery. The 
three judges, seasoned professionals 
from foreign countries, move the pro- 
ceedings along swiftly. 

Yet. beneath the surface, the UN 
trials are suffused with tensions that 
spring from allegations that include 
nepotism, cronyism and mismanage- 
ment of resources. 

As Rwanda tries to foster recon- 
ciliation in a country bitterly divided 
by ethnic slaughter and civil war, con- 
cerns are being raised that the cause of 
justice has gotten off to a sputtering 
start both in the government trials in 
Kigali and other Rwandan cities and 
in the United Nations tribunal in 
Arusha. 

“This meets our standards for a 
kangaroo court" a senior Western 
diplomat said of the Rwandan pro- 
ceedings. 

T he trials are meant to bring to 
justice people who allegedly 
took part in a campaign 
waged by the Hutu ethnic 
group, which accounts for about 85 
percent of Rwanda's population, to 
exterminate the Tutsi minority. 

Beginning in April 1994, Hutu ex- 
tremists in the army and civilian mi- 
litias killed more than half a million 
Tutsi, along with Hutu deemed to be 
enemies of the Hutu-led govern- 
ment. 

A rebel group led by Tutsi seized j 
power in July 1994 and halted the . 
slaughter soon afterward. With that, 
more than 1.5 million Hutu fled to 
neighboring countries. An estimated 
1 million of diem have flooded back 
into the country from Zaire and Tan- 
zania in the last two months. 

Now, with most of the refugees 
back in the country and the recon- 
ciliation process begun in earnest, 
some human rights observers and dip- 
lomats say the trials in Rwanda, for 
which some 90,000 suspects are being 
held, may fail because of disorgan- 
ization and lack of resources. 

Others express fear that corruption 


and dissension have poisoned the UN 
proceedings, which have indicted a 
handful of men suspected of organ- 
izing the 1994 massacres. 

“Justice is not die only ingredient 
necessary for reconciliation,” said 
John Keys, country director of die 
International Rescue Committee. 
“But it's absolutely key." 

One casualty of the violence in 
1994 was Rwanda's jusdce system. 
Many magistrates and law enforce- 
ment officials were either killed or 
fled as refugees. Courtrooms were 
demolished. Offices were without es- 
sential equipment, lacking even pens 
and paper. 

The Rwandan government, with 
the help of such major donor countries 
as the United States and the Neth- 
erlands and such groups as the In- 
ternational Rescue Committee, has 
scrambled to rebuild the system. It 
reconstructed courts. It resupplied of- 
fices with photocopiers, printers, 
pens, paper, ft recruited magistrates, 
who received four months' training. 

But even those strides have not 
brought the system back to normal. Its 
work force buckles under the 90,000- 
prisoner caseload, as about 1 50 pros- 
ecution investigators struggle with 
some 600 cases each. 

The overwhelming caseload has 
made the government reluctant to 
postpone trials, even though virtually 
all suspects lack defense attorneys. 
Trials began Dec. 30 and so far at least 
eight defendants have been sentenced 
to death. 

In the Kibungo prison in south- 
eastern Rwanda, Deogratias Bizi- 
mana. 38, and Egide Gatanazi, 43, the 
first two defendants sentenced to 
death, have appealed. Both are ac- 
cused of inciting and participating in 
the massacre of hundreds of Tutsi in 
Kibungo in 1994. 

Standing outside a dark, cramped 3- 
foot-by-6-foot cell that he and Mr. 
Gatanazi share, Mr. Bizi mana. a 
former physician's assistant, held a 
sheet or paper on which he had 
scribbled his list of reasons for ap- 
peal. 

“We appeared without lawyers, 
that's tiie first reason," said Mr. Biz- 
imana. a stocky man whose wide eyes 
frequently flash with nervous energy. 

‘ ‘I tried to convince them to allow me 
to get a lawyer, but they would 
not" 

Human rights activists and diplo- 
mats have denounced die proceed- 
ings. "The trials will lack credibility 
if things don’t change." said Alison 
DesForges, of Human Rights Watch/ 
Africa, who h^s studied Rwanda for 
three decades. “Serious prosecution 
appears not to be a top priority for this 
government" '■ 

Gerald Gahima, Rwanda’s deputy 
justice minister, acknowledged that 
the trials thus far “could be better 
conducted." 

“The magistrates are new to their 
job," he said. “They’re not sure what 
to do.” 

But he added that critics were hold- 



Deogratias Bizunana, right, and Egide Gatanazi, sentenced to death. 


ing Rwanda to an unfair standard. He 
said the trials were being conducted 
under the same system the country 
used before 1994. Then, trials fre- 
quently proceeded without defense 
attorneys because only 3 percent of 
defendants could afford them , Mr. 
Gahima said. 

Today, there are about 200 lawyers 
in Rwanda, but only 16 practicing. Of 
those 16. most have refused to rep- 
resent genocide suspects. After the 
first trials three weeks ago, such or- 
ganizations as Lawyers Without Bor- 
ders donated legal services, but most 
defendants still lack attorneys. 

“The standard is both unrealistic 
and unfair," Mr. Keys said. “To level 
these - complaints against Rwanda 
doesn't take into account the demands 
placed upon a very poor country.” 

The UN International C riminal 
Tribunal for Rwanda, meanwhile, is 
far from poor. Established 18 months 
ago. it has indicted 21 people. The 
first suspect — Jean-Paul Akayesu, a 
former mayor in Rwanda — went on 
trial Jan. 9 after several postpone- 
ments. 


An air of cool professionalism per- 
vades the proceedings in Arusha. 
Bottles of mine ral water are scattered 
throughout the courtroom and inter- 
preters provide almost simultaneous 
translations. The tribunal 1ms a $36 
million budgeL 

A principal stumbling block facing 
the Arusha tribunal — the fact that 
few of those indicted are in custody — 
was greatly diminished this month 
when Cameroon handed over four 
former Rwandan Hutu officials who 
are suspected of masterminding tire 
mass slaughter. 

Yet. a torrent of controversy and 
criticism has jolted the tribunal, 
prompt in g at least three investiga- 
tions -jnto its policies and actions in 
recent months. 

Some staff members charge that 
the tribunal's administrators have run 
it so poorly that they have delayed the 
pace of indictments and nearly para- 
lyzed the work of investigators. 

Others, Europeans and Americans 
in particular, have accused African of- 
ficials of using nepotism and cronyism 
to freeze them out of positions. 


Baghdad Accuses U.S. 
Of Fabricating Reports 
Of Turmoil in Regime 


The Associated Press 

BAGHDAD — Iraq denied US. al- 
legations about turmoil in President 
Hussein's regime and accused 
die Clinton administration Thursday of 

f E^d^ t fe^d 1 *e l ^aiement two 
days after U.S. officials said Mr. Sad- 
dam had put his wife under house arrest 
anH b ad Haimri hftri extensive military ex- 
ercises flra* could threaten Kuwait 

“It seems that the crew operating the 
kitchen for media lies in Washington 
resumed its task to mislead the public 
opinion of the United States and to raise 
fears in toe Kuwaiti leadership again," 
said toe statement, issued by an un- 
named official sp o k e s man . 

The jgfot e ment accused U.SL officials 
of ’ ‘forging facts against Iraq,’ * and said 
people would not believe me U.S. al- 
legations because ’’international public 
opinion is used to these lands of media 
bubbles.” 

U.S. officials in Washington have 
suggested that there has been a major 
power struggle in Iraq following the 
machine-gun attack Dec. 12 ag a in st Mr. 
Saddam's eldest son, Udai. 

Udai was seriously injured in the as- 
sassination attempt in the Baghdad 
neighborhood of A1 Mansoura. 

Meanwhile, Iraqi dissidents in Jordan 
said Wednesday mat Mr .Saddam put 
his wife under bouse arrest after toe- 
opposed his plan to forgave the killers of 
his two sons-in-law. 


The Iraqi statement was prompted by 
remarks Tuesday by a senior U.S. mil- 
itary officer who said Mr. Saddam had 
ordered naming exercises for his troops 
and' was pondering -invading Kuwait 
again. 

But White House and State Depart- 
ment spokesmen later denied that re- 
port ...... 

The White House spokesman, Mi- 
chad McCuiry, said lwwa&ndt aware of 
anything that would suggest “any of- 
fensive designs" on Mr. Saddam's 
parL ' 

The Stare Department spokesman, 

Nicholas Bums, also said he bad no 
evidence of such maneuvers, but he said 
that, gjven Mr. Saddam's past record of 
aggression against his neighbors, he 
“had to be put on notice that we are 
watching him.” 

“The message,” he said, “is: Don't 
mistake our resolve.’' 

Military exercises are normal -in Iraq 
during the winter months, Iraqi officials 
and Western diplomats in Baghdad 
said. 

They spoke on condition of anonym- 
ity. 

The invasion of Kuwait by Iraq in 
1990 prompted toe United States to as- 
semble a m ultinati onal coalition to drive 
forces from toe emirate, 
e Iraqi president increasingly has 
relied on a dwindling inner circle of 
close family members since the end of 
toe Gulf War in 1 99 1 . 



Israel Calls on Syria to End 
Indirect War 9 in Lebanon 


By Joel Greenberg 

York Tones Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu called on Syria to 
stop what he called a proxy war against 
Israel in southern Lebanon after three 
Israeli soldiers were killed there 
Thursday by a roadside bomb. 

The Iranian-backed Hezbollah, or 
Party of God, claimed responsibility for 
toe attack, which was carried out amid 
diplomatic efforts to restart peace talks 
between Israel and Syria that have been 
suspended for almost a year. 

President Bill Clinton has said that 
reviving the talks will be a central topic 
during a visit to Washington next month 
by Mr. Netanyahu. 

Israel accuses Syria, which controls 
large parts of Lebanon, of allowing 
Hezbollah to receive arms and wage a 
guerrilla war against Israeli forces oc- 
cupying a 14-kflometer-wide (9-mile- 
wide) strip of southern Lebanon as a 
buffer against attacks on northern Israel. 

Israel says it would be ready to with- 
draw from southern Lebanon in return 
for arrangements that would ensure the 
security of its northern border. 


Syria has rejected any deal oo Le- 
banon that would be separate from a 
broader peace accord that would ensure 
an Israeli withdrawal from toe Golan 
Heights, which Israel cwtured from 
Syria in toe 1967 Middle East war. 

Asked about a reported Syrian re- 
quest for an Israeli goodwill gesture to 
help restart negotiations. Mr. Netanyahu 
replied, “A very a ppropriate gesture 
would be the cessation of this indirect 
war that is being conducted against Is- 
rael and its soldiers in Lebanon." 

la the attack Thursday, a powerful 
charge went off shortly after midnight 
near an Israeli foot patrol moving in toe 
area of die village of Deir Siiyan. An 
officer and two enlisted men were killed, 
and another soldier was wounded. 

In a statement in Beirut. Hezbollah 
said its fighters had tracked the Israeli 
patrol and set off die bomb, causing “a 
big number of casualties.” 

The soldiers were the First killed in 
Lebanon since Jan. 8, when one Israeli 
soldier and three guerrillas of toe Shiite 
Muslim Amal movement were killed in 
a clash. 

Last year, 27 Israeli soldiers died in 
Lebanon. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Lord Rippon, 72, Common Marketeer 


New York Times 5er\-ice 
Lord Rippon of Hexham, 
the chief negotiator of Bri- 
tain’s entry into the Common 
Market, died after a long ill- 
ness Tuesday at his home 
near Bridgwater in south- 
western England. He was 72. 

Lord Rippon was known as 
plain Geoffrey Rippon and 
was Britain's sharp-tongued 
Conservative minister of 
technology in July 1970 when 
Prime Minister Edward 
Heath gave him the assign- 
ment of negotiating the coun- 
try's entry into the European 
Economic Community. 

Britain formally became a 
Common Market member in 
January 1973. 

Before being named to the 


Common Market negotiating 
post, Mr. Rippon expressed 
strong support for Britain's 
acquiring membership, but he 
took a hard Line on the terms 
of entry while managing to 
get along well with the for- 
eign ministers of toe Com- 
mon Market member coun- 
tries. 

An able lawyer who had 
several government posts un- 
der Sir Edward and two other 
prime ministers, he was made 
a life peer — a baron — by 
Queen Elizabeth in 1987. The 
title Lord Rippon of Hexham 
recalled the politician's par- 
liamentary constituency from 
1966 to 1987, Hexham, 
Northumberland, in northern 
England. 


Raya Garbousova, 87, 
Composers 7 Cellist 

NEW YORK INYT) — 
Raya Garbousova, 87, a cel- 
list who gave the premieres of 
several contemporary works, 
including the Samuel Barber 
Cello Concerto, died Tuesday 
at her home in De Kalb, 
Illinois. 

Miss Garbousova, a formi- 
dable musician whose tech- 
nique was equal to toe chal- 
lenges of such difficult works 
as Gunther Schuller's unac- 
companied “Fantasy,” could 
produce the bittersweet, soar- 
ing lyricism that the Barber 
Concerto requires. 

Miss Garbousova, a native 
of Georgia, made her formal 


MINISTRY OF JUSTICE 

Secretariat of Penitentiary Policy 
and Social Rehabilitation 

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC BIDS 

N’ 01/97 and 02/97 


PURPOSE: “To draft plans and build two prison complexes, using toe “turnkey” 
system. The construction shall be fully financed by the contractor and al his sole 
risk. The complexes will be built on properly located in Ezelza and Marcos Paz 
in the Province of Buenos Aires. Argentina and leased to the Federal Government 
for use by the Federal Penitentiary Service.” 

Interested parties may obtain the relevant documentation from the Diraccion 
General dc Mantcnimicnto y Obras Pen i lend arias (general Office of Prison 
Construction and Maintenance) after depositing the sum of US$15,000.- (fifteen 
thousand U.S. dollars/pcsos) for each lender specification at the Dcpartemenlo de 
Tcsnrcria (Treasury) located at Sarmiento 327/329, 4lh floor, Buenos Aires, 
Argentina. This office is open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 04:00 p.m. The 
deadline for payment is February 10, 1997. 

Bids shall he received at the headquarters of the Ministry of Justice, located at 
Sarmiento 327/329. lllh floor, Buenos Aires, Argentina, from 10:00 a.m. 
04:00 p.m. until April 14, 1997 and will he opened at 05:00 p.m. on that dale 


to 


debut in Moscow in 1923 and 
left toe Soviet Union two 
years later. By the late 1920s, 
she had performed in Berlin, 
Paris and London, and she 
gave her first performance in 
New York City in 1935. In 
1939. she emigrated to the 
United States, and composers 
were quick to recognize her 
as a champion of new styles 
and wrote works in her hon- 
or. 

Y iaimis Pipis, 108, 
‘Durable 7 Violinist 

NICOSIA (AFP) — Die 
violinist Yiannis Pipis. 108, 
listed in the Guinness Book of 
World Records as the world’s 
“most durable violinist" be- 
cause of his long career, died 
Tuesday, toe Cyprus Mail re- 
ported Thursday. 

Mr. Pipis began playing 
the violin at toe age of 10 after 
he was orphaned. He won 
several awards for his con- 
tribution to folk music. 

Robert Pelletier, 68, 
New York Timesman 

NEW YORK (NYT) — 
Robert E. Pelletier, 68, who 
worked at The New York 
Times for 37 years doing 
everything from executing 
promotional drawings to 
helping redesign the newspa- 
per, toed Tuesday at a hos- 
pital in Suffera. New York. 

He had retired in 1994 as 
assistant to the editorial art 
director. 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

MCHRQK5 • MASTER'S • DOPWWE 
FarWxfc, fife and Aadenic Experience 
Convenient Home Stufr 
(806) 597-1909 EXT. 33 
F*JC(atO)47f-€456 
HTTK / twwm .FWU.COM 

Fa tr serd deHed rear® tar 
Bgjnuiflm 
Pacific Western University 
1210 Atahi Street Dept 23 
HonoMu, HI 968J4-48Z2 , 



Power Cut Darkens 
Part of Paris Region 

The Associated Press 

PARIS — A power outage early 
Thursday plunged 100,000 people 
into darkness in parts of Paris: the 
Defease financial district, several 
western suburbs and the Saini- 
Cloud tunnel leading into the cap- 
ital, officials said. 

Die blackout that struck at 8:15 
AA4. was the result of a breakdown 
in two 220-kilowatt circuits, hitting 
the 8th, 17th and 18th districts of 
Paris, said a spokesman for EJec- 
trierte de France. Power was re- 
stored to all areas by 10:30 AJA. 

Also affected were toe suburbs 
of Nanterre, Puteaux, Garcbes, 
Saint-Cloud, Sevres and Suresnes, 
the spokesman said. 

The cause of the outage was un- 
der investigation, be sail 


French Union Calls Munich Plans Ahead 

A New Rail Strike 


PARIS (Reuters) — A 36-hour strike 
had an uneven impact on train travel in 
France cm Thursday, and a trade union 
called a new stoppage for Wednesday as 
part of a series of protests against die 
government’s plans to reform toe state 
railroad system. 

The state-owned railroad company 
SNCF said 30 percent of its employees 
stayed out Thursday, cutting traffic on 
main rafl lines by ane-tohd to two-thiids. 
SNCF said Eurostar trains through toe 
Channel Tunnel between England and 
France had run normally and that the 
high-speed TGV trains between Paris and 
Brussels had hardly been affected. 

Other high-speed traffic, however, 
was cut by one-third to one-half. Traffic 
on conventional main and regional fines 
was bety/een 25 and 65 percent of nor- 
mal, with southeastern fiance affected 
the most Commuter traffic in the Paris 
region was also hit. 


MUNICH (AP) — Five years after its 
new airport opened. Munich is propos- 
ing to build a second terminal by 2003 to 
deal with expected growth. 

With a record 15.7 million passen- 
gers. the airport overtook the fire-dam- 
aged one at Duesseldorf as Germany’s 
second-busiest in 1996, Willi Hermsen, 
brad of toe Munich airport commission, 
said Thursday. The Frankfurt airport is 
still the busiest 

But the Munich airport, which was 
built to replace one of Europe's most 
crowded and noisy airfields, is already 
inadequate, he said. 

Zimbabwe will start building an 
international airport next month in 
Harare that has been planned since the 
mid-1980s, the official Herald news- 
paper reported Thursday. ( Reuters ) 

Iran has banned smoking on all 
flights and in airport terminals, newspa- 
pers in Tehran reported Thursday. (AFP) 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Mm 

BaciigM 


GopMnoan 

CcMbMSd 

Dubfa 

EdMu^i 


Fsntturt 

Genu 


Istanbul 


L tabon 

London 


kb 


um 

Me* 

Ob 

Fa* 

Pi* 3W 

525** 1 

ftama 

Sl PiW i Bm j 

C >oc* iIk> ii 

SMoud 

TJfcW 

Veriee 


vttmsm 

am 


Toe*, 

Mgh LoaW 

OP OF 
israe wsse 
BK3 0132c 
-307 -VISC 
M/52 V3B s 

ion as«0* 

1194 -SS2C 
3137 -W7 pe 
8*3 1/34 pc 
to* -S/2* DC 
i/34 «ai 
20/88 1263 C 
8/48 S/41 • 
7M4 1/34 e 

9MB 1/34 m 

206 -8718 pc 

7744 -1/31 S 
-S/24 -12m si 
* rn 104 pe 
21/70 IKEA 
17/62 1263 A 
6M3 307 pc 
4467 SMI A 
W5Q 8M8A 
8«8 -307 « 
•504 -anSK 
205 -8TZ2C 
1365 5141 9 - 
■3IZ7 -S/IB pc 
3/37 -Id » 
K34 -sra» e 
4/30 3/37 sn 
14/57 205 pc 
srzj -TBOan 
-3/27-1 1/13 pe 
SMI -1(31 pc 
-4(23 -11/13 vi 
7/44 -2/28 pc 
4/39 aeffpo 
2/35 -Wlfipc 
4/38 -307 po 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeattier. 





Chang MM 


Unseuonrt* ] 
Cold 


North America 

A Met cold Btiat all move 
throu^i the Notfnast Sun- 
day, while unseasonably 
mHd air spreads lute the 
Plains and Great Lakes 
Ms weeks*. The Rockies 
writ start the weekend mAd. 
but thin gradually cool 
toward normal. Unsettled 
in Northern Saturday; oth- 
erwise. mainly dry In the 
West 


Europe 

Unseasonably cold air wfl 
push Into eastern Europe 
this weekend. This cold 
shot will be brief in the 
north, while aoutfwm-areea 
w* have a protanged cokJ 
spell. Northwest Europe 
wB average near to below: 
rtherwiee. much of the ran 
of Europe will average 
near to above nomOL 


Northeastern China, both 
Korea*, and southern 
Japan wB be mUd through 
the weekend. Northern 
Japan wfl average near to 
iust below normal; a brief 
cold shot will move Into 
Tokyo Saturday, then tum- 
ing milder Into Monday. 

ki Hong Kong 
** Singapore. 


North America 


Middle East 


MUQM4 26/77 

Bam 8(48 

CM 1366 

Pew go 6M3 

JcruMfarn E TO 

Lud» raw 

Arm 22771 


ISSipe 22/71 116? p 
2/35 PC 1162 SMIt 

4(39 PC 14/67 937s 
-SSia 8HS -3/274 
-307 pc BMS -209 ■ 
2(33 • 21/70 265 s 

BMSB ZU70 8(48 ■ 


Today 

t*0i LowW 
OF OF 

AnOorage -1/31 -aria an 

atone 1467 ssrc 

Boson -TOi -tOBan 

Oncago 205 -161c 

Qtatas ana 7Wt 

Oner tarn aezpc 

too* 906 MS m 

Hmtto 2BS2 20084 

Hoan 2008 lOBOi 

Los Anodes 26/79 1050 i 

Men asm ton a 


low 
or of 

-USB -8/18 c 
i t /Si 3(37 pc 
SHI -4(29 tn 
SH9 -7220 po 
am 4oo pc 
17(62 -U31 pc 
3 Hi -7C0 PC 
sow 31/70 pc 
23(73 msopc 
22m iosape 
a am 17*32 1 



Hnwpoh 



or 

104 -74ZDC 307 -STS ik 

H SSZ ^ Ame rica 



BHBb 24/75 106Q a 
J* 14/57 7/44 ril 

W44r 1050 3/37 sft 
.'I™ -504 «« 206 -ItVlbpc 
11/K2 7744 r 7*44 £35^ 

a/46 


23/73 


8,48 e iaai * 
21/70 13/55 pc 2009 14/1 
21/70 13/SSc 21/70 114 
ana bmsi 20m at 
WX86 zam i 3088 22 1 

3»9 12.53 « 33(01 111 

14S7 460 pc 1467 3/i 


&•*"* ** 33B1 HM6» 

22 “* 2862 ante 

U- - »70 20(GBpc 

1864 409 r 
"£*^•**0 28(84 22m c 
Sflntg W 32» a/46i 


3463 11 
2964 Z 
27/90 Z 
IMS I 
SSK! 2 
24.75 ( 


Impriitte par Offprint. 73 rue de T twngilr. 750 IX Paris. 


one 


Oceania 


SudOanS 

Swnsr 


22/71 1365 1 2Q(88 14/ 

27(80 2008 pc 27(80 22} 



PAGE 3 



m s } tin til h 
1 III l i'liilllm 






. •" .V ■ 



** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


‘No Dinner — No Money, ’ Foreign- Owned Company Tells Democrats 


By Leslie Wayne 

Ne > r tort Times Service 


WASHINGTON — Reacting to the 
Democratic National Committee's de- 
cision to bar contributions from U.S.- 
based corporations with a foreign- 
owned (went, at least one international 
corporation has asked the Democratic 
Party to refund its campaign contribu- 
tion and other companies are Joining 
together to oppose the ban. 

Pasteur Merieux Connaught, the 
French-owned maker of vaccines that 
has a factory in Swiftwater, Pennsyl- 


vania, has asked die Democrats to give 
back a $15,000 donation. This came 
after the company was asked not to 
attend a Democratic fund-raising dinner 
held here Tuesday night with President 
Bill Clintbn"ahd50btKiness leaders. 

The event was sponsored by the 
Democratic Business Council, and cor- 
porations paid $15,000 to attend. But 
Pasteur Merieux Connaught, which had 
been invited and accepted, was called 
the day before the event and asked not to 
come. 

“When I was told I was dis invited to 
the Clinton dinner, I said. ‘Fine, we want 


our money back,’” said Geof&y Pe- 
terson, director of government affairs for 
the company, which has 800 employees. 

Mr. Peterson said he was particularly 
disappointed by the Democrats’ action 
since he had been an early supporter of 
Mr. Clinton's and had served on the 
president’s steering committees in 1991 
and 1992 as a fund-raiser. 

Companies as diverse — and as large 
— as Philips Electronics, Shell Oil, ICI 
Americas and Glaxo Wellcome have 
joined to lobby against a decision last 
week by the Democratic National Com- 
mittee not to accept campaign contri- 


butions from U-S- subsidiaries of foreign 
corporations. 

The group will lobby members of 
Congress in an effort ro prevent the ban 
from spreading and becoming part of 
any overall campaign finance reform 
package. The group fears that the ban 
could extend io the Republicans and go 
beyond the Democratic National Com- 
mittee to other Democratic fund-raising 
committees. The Democratic National 
Committee raises money primarily for 
the presidential race. 

‘‘we want to remind members of 
Congress that we operate our political 


action committees and our soft -dollar 
donations in a legal fashion.” said 
Randy Moorhead, a spokesman for 
Philips Electronics North America, a 
company with SS billion in U-S. sales 
and the - maker of such products as 
Norelco shavers and Magnavox tele- 
visions. 

“We do not want to be confused with 
Mr. Huang and the others and the prob- 
lems that developed." Mr. Moorhead 
said, referring to John Huang, a former 
vice chairman of the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee who raised funds from 
Asian and Asian-American business in- 


terests. of which more than $1 million 
has been deemed improper and returned 
to contributors. 

“What this ban does,” Mr. Moorhead 
added, “is relegate all those American 
citizens who work for Philips Electron- 
ics to second-class citizenship.' 1 

Amy Weiss Tobe, a spokeswoman for 
the Democratic National Committee, 
said. “We knew thai this would be a 
difficult step and that people would feel 
unhappy ana disenfranchised, but it was 
important for the DNC to put its money 
where its mouth was in campaign Fi- 
nance reform.” 


POLITICAL 


/ v O 



Shoot-Out at the NRA Corral? N.Y.’s Dinkins Ponders a Run 


APPROVED — Charlene Barshefsky before testi- 
fying to the Senate Finance Committee, which sup- 
ported her nomination as U.S. trade representative. 


WASHINGTON — A fierce battle is under way for 
control of the National Rifle Association, with a hard-line 
dissident faction threatening to oust the current leadership. 

The power struggle comes at a time when the rifle as- 
sociation, long one of the most influential lobbies in Wash- 
ington. has lost membership, retains a negative public image 
of extremism and appears stymied in Congress because of 
aU-but-certain opposition from President Bill Clinton, who 
has staked out a number of high-profile anti-gun positions. 

The dissident faction, led by Neal Knox, the first vice 
president who has consolidated his power through the board 
of directors, is trying to topple Wayne LaPieire Jr., die 
executive vice president since 1991. Also on the firing line 
are the association's president, Marion Hammer, and its 
chief lobbyist, Tanya Metaksa. 

Mr. Knox's rocky history within the organization includes 
his ouster as chief lobbyist in 1 982 and his expulsion from the 
board in 1984 on charges of extremism. But be reasserted 

himgelf nvftrihftyftflffs and has built his influenc e SO that today 
he stands next in line to become president in 16 months. 

But Mr. LaPierrc’s supporters say Mr. Knox is not as 
interested in that volunteer, figurehead post as much as be 
wants Mr. LaPierre’s job and its $190,000 annual salary. 

Mr. Knox is expected to attempt his “coup.” as Mr. 
LaPiene calls it at the board’s meeting on Feb. 8 in Virginia. 
The vehicle is a vote that would change the lobby’s bylaws 
and reduce the number of votes needed to oust an officer 
from three-fourths to a simple majority of the 76-member 
board. The move is viewed seriously because Mr. Knox has 
fortified the board over the years with his allies. (NYT) 


NEW YORK — Declaring that Mayor Rudolph Giuliani 
could be easily defeated by a determined and focused 
opponent, former Mayor David Dinkins said Wednesday 
that he was considering ending his political retirement and 
challenging Mr. Giuliani in this year's election. 

Mr. Dinkins said he had been asked by several longtime 
admirers — he would not identify them, beyond calling them 
“big fans of mine” — to return to political life. 

Mr. Dinkins, who lost to Mr. Giuliani in a tight and tense 
contest in 1993, said they argued that he was the only 
Democrat with the credentials and gumption to defeat Mr. 
Giuliani. 

Mr. Dinkins said be had first rejected the idea, preferring 
to endorse one of die four Democrats already in the field, all 
of whom have been jockeying for his support. 

But Mr. D inkin s, who will turn 70 in July and is the host of 
a radio show and teaching an urban policy course at 
Columbia University, said that in the face of continuing 
entreaties, he had agreed to at least consider it. 

“They said. ‘Well, think about it,' ” he said. 1 ‘So I'll think 
about it.” (NYT) 


Quote / Unquote 


Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, 
urging Congress to set up an independent panel that would 
periodically determine how much the consumer price index 
overstates inflation: “This type of approach would have the 
benefit of being objective, nonpartisan and sufficiently flex- 
ible to take full account of the latest information.” (AP) 


Senate Panel Backs 
Balanced Budgets 


Hispanics Drop to Economic Ladder’s Bottom Rung 


By Carey Goldberg 

New York Tunes Service 

LOS ANGELES — If he dared 
tattoo gang symbols on his neck. 
Myma Morales warned her strap- 
ping 17-year-old son, William, she 
would bum them off with her iron. 
Or a frying pan. 

Such was the desperation of Mrs. 
Morales, 41. a naturalized American 
from Guatemala who has watched 
three of her American-born children 
seduced by the worst of inner-city 


Bureau statistics, Mrs. Morales is 
right to be worried. The data show 
that in 1995, median household in- 
come rose for every other American 
e thni c and racial group, but for the 
nation’s 27 million Hispanics. it 
15.1 percent 

: downturn, which affects the 
American-born as well as the newly 
arrived across a broad spectrum of 
socioeconomic indicators, has 
baffled social scientists. It has 
prompted : 8ome to i /yipqAat,.tnany 


comes of $7,500 or less fora family 
of four, 24 percent were Hispanic. 

Census dam show that for the 
first time, the poverty rate among 
Hispanics in the United States has 
surpassed that of blacks. 

These are not just statistical blips. 
Overall, household income for His- 

198<Mrom about $26,1)0010 under 
$22,900, while rising slightly for 
blacks. 

Nor do the data simply reflect the 


as well. Statistics indicate that 
America's Hispanic population is 
experiencing an almost across-the- 
board impoverishment 

“It is the American nightmare, not 
the American dream,” said Arturo 
Vargas, who heads the National As- 
sociation of Latino Elected Officials, 
based in Los Angeles. Though the 
Hispanic middle class has been 
growing, Mr. Vargas said, most His- 
panics are caught in jobs like garden- 
er, nanny and restaurant worker that 


Hispanics, members of the fastest ’.recent influx of illegal Hispanic im- ■ wfll never pay well and from which 


culture and seen her own earnings as growing ethnic or racial group, may 


a housecleaner shrink in recent 
years. With her diminishing income, 
she asked, how can she promise they 
will prosper like so many immi- 
grants’ children before them? 

“I tell them go to school and 
don't be like me, cleaning bath- 
rooms,” said Mrs. Morales, who 
scrubs and vacuums for $300 a week 
despite her degree as a medical as- 
sistant from a local college. 

To’ judge by the latest Census 


become entrenched as -America's 
working poor. 

Hispanics now constitute nearly 
24 percent of America’s poor, up 8 
percentage points since 1985. Of all 
ffispanics, 30 percent were con- 
sidered poor in 1995, meaning they 
earned less than $15,569 far a fam- 
ily of four. That is aimostthree times 
the percentage . of nou-ffispanic 
white people ini poverty. Of the 
poorest of the poor, those with in- 


migrants. “As we know from the 
dam in other studies," said Manuel 
de la Puente, the chief of the Census 
Bureau’s Ethnic and Hispanic Stat- 
istics Branch, “die immigrants lenfl 
to be krw -educated individuals, hold 
service-sector jobs and have little or 
no English, and all these tilings con- 
tribute to income." 

But when Census Bureau analysts 
separated out American-born His- 
Mr. de la Puente said, they 
I their income levels declining 


they will never advance. 

The declining income among the 
nation ’s Hispanic population is little 
understood and requires more study, 
researchers say, as do new data 
showing improved economic well- 
being among blacks. 

Researchers also caution that the 
Hispanic population, which is an 
ethnic term arid includes some 
blacks, is an amalgam of people, and 
their descendants, from nearly 24 
countries. They range from typic- 


ally prosperous Cubans of Miami to 
Puerto Ricans, largely concentrated 
in New York arid the nation's 
poorest ethnic group. 

Experts acknowledge that the in- 
flux of millions of Latin American 
immigrants over die last 20 years — 
2 million between 1990 and 1994 
alone, the Census reports — have 
pulled income numbers down be- 
cause immigrants tend to be poor. 

Dowell Myers, a demographer at 
the University of Southeni Califor- 
nia who has studied the region's 
Hispanic population, said. “Every- 
body’s going up the escalator but 
there 's a big queue at the bottom and 
tiie queue's getting bigger, so the 
average number of steps people 
have gotten up has slipped” 

The arrival of so many job- 
hungry new workers. Mr. Myers ad- 
ded, many of them illegal aod will- 
ing to work for pennies, has also 
driven down wages in low-skill pro- 
fessions like janitor, hurting other 
Hispanics in those fields. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
Senate Judiciary Committee 
approved a balanced budget 
amendment Thursday. 

The 1 3-to-5 vote sent the 
bill to the full Senate, where 
debate is scheduled to begin 
next week. The final outcome 
is too close to call, with both 
sides saying it could come 
down to one or two votes. 

Passage could hinge on 
provisions for the Social Se- 
curity retirement system. 
Many Democrats say they 
will not vote for the measure 
unless it removes the program 
from budget calculations, en- 
suring that recipients will not 
be threatened with benefit 
losses in a future year when 
Congress is struggling to bal- 
ance the budget. 

But exempting Social Se- 
curity, said Senator Orrin 
Hatch, the Utah Republican 
who heads the Judiciary 
Committee, would create a 
“tremendous loophole” that 
could make attaining a real 
balance impossible. 

President Bill Clinton 
weighed in with a letter re- 
leased Wednesday in which 
he warned that including the 
Social Security trust fond in 
future balanced budget cal- 
culations could pose “grave 
risks” to the elderly. 

The committee defeated 
six Democratic attempts to 
change the Republican-writ- 
ten bill, including efforts to 
exclude Social Security. 

As the committee was vot- 
ing, Democrats held a news 
conference to introduce a let- 
ter signed by 1.060 econo- 
mists. including II Nobel 
laureates in economics, warn- 
ing that a balanced budget 
amendment was “unsound 
and unnecessary." 

Two-thirds' majorities in 
both chambers are needed to 
pass a constitutional amend- 
ment, and Senate Democrats 
said the bill could get 70 or 80 
votes, well above the 67 re- 
quired, if Social Security pro- 
tections are added. 


I Famil y-P lanning Bill 

The administration is pre- 
paring to send Congress a 
measure to speed up spending 
on family planning overseas, 
setting up what abortion op- 
ponents describe as the first 
abortion-related vote in the 
new Congress. The New 
York Times reported from 
Washington. 

Family-planning advocates 
say tiie measure has nothing to 
do with abortion, since none of 
the money can be used for 
abortions. But foes say the 
money would be used to fur- 
ther the administration's 
“abortion crusade” overseas. 

Both sides recognize that 
the measure will be cast in 
terms of abortion, as it was last 
year when it nearly derailed 
the budget. 

At stake is the distribution 
of condoms, birth-control 
pills and tUD's around the 
world. Without the devices, 
the administration contends, 
there will be a significant in- 
crease in unplanned pregnan- 
cies, abortions and maternal 
and infant deaths. 


Jail Time 
Bars Vote 
By 14% of 
Black Men 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Fourteen 
percent of black men are cur- 
rently or permanently barred 
from voting either because 
they are in prison or because 
they have been convicted of a 
felony, according to a study. 

Of a total voting age pop- 
ulation of 10.4 million black 
men nationwide, an estimated 
1.46 million have lost the 
right to vote because of a 
felony conviction, raid the 
study, by the Sentencing Pro- 
ject in Washington. 

Of this disenfranchised 
group, 950,000 are ineligible 
to vote because they are in 
prison or on probation or pa- 
role, while about 510,000 are 
permanently barred in 13 stales 
that take away the right to vote 
for life for most felons. 

Felons are prohibited frora 
voting while in prison in 46 
states, and 31 states disen- 
franchise offenders while 
they are on probation or pa- 
role. Four states — Maine. 
Massachusetts, Utah and Ver- 
mont — do not bar prison 
inmates from voting. The 13 
stales that permanently de- 
prive virtually all felons of the 
right ro vote are Alabama. 
Arizona, Delaware. Florida, 
Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, 
Mississippi, Nevada, New 
Mexico. Tennessee. Virginia 
and Wyoming. 

Michael Tonry. a professor 
of law at the University of 
Minnesota and an expert on 
racial disparities in prisons, 
said he believed that as many 
inmates come from the' 
poorest, least educated and 
most isolated areas in the in- 
ner cities, only 15 percent of 
the black men in prison would 
be likely to vote.' 


Away From Politics . 

• A bomb exploded outside a county courthouse in 

Vallejo, California blowing out windows but causing no 
injuries, police officials said. It is the third bomb incident 
in the town in less than a week. ( Reuters ) 

• A drug called troglitazooe that offers diabetics the 
possibility of reducing their insulin shots has been ap- 
proved by tiie Food and Drug Administration. (AP) 

• Gambling proponents in New York said they would 

push for approval of Indian casinos in places like Niagara 
Falls and Buffalo, a day after the state senate rejected a 
constitutional amendment to legalize casinos. (NYT) 

• A man whom the FBI called one of the most powerful 

Russian mobsters in America, Vyacheslav Kirillovich 
Ivankov, was sentenced in New York to nine years and 
seven months in prison for attempted extortion and taking 
part in a fraudulent marriage. (NYT) 


Aviation Agency to Put Safety Data On-Line 


By Matthew L. Wald 

New York Tones Service 


WASHINGTON — The Federal Avi- 
ation Administration, under pressure to 
release information on airline safety and 
mishaps, says that it will do so next 
month on the World Wide Web, but that 
the information will not help rank air- 
lines by safety. 

Many of the reports are available now 
only by filing a request under the Free- 
dom of Information Act 
The agency said it had no statistics that 
could be used to rank airlines by safety, 
not even the data it uses to decide which 
airlines need extra inspections. Barry 


Bermingham. deputy administrator for 
system safety, said the agency would 
strive to make available information that 
was “valuable in the public's mind." 
But he said, such information would not 
allow anyone — a potential traveler, not 
even a statistician — to rank airlines. 

The agency did compare safety 
among airlines last spring, in a report it 
prepared for the transportation secretary. 
It gave the rates of accidents and in- 
cidents per departure for each airline. 
The report was described as an effort to 
prove that low-cost carriers set up under 
deregulation were just as safe as es- 
tablished carriers. 

But officials said Wednesday that the 


ranking, which has not been repeated, 
would not help passengers trying to pick 
the safest airline. 

The information the agency plans to 
make available will permit anyone with 
access to the Web to search through 
nearly 20 years of data to spot incidents 
of equipment failure, forced landings 
and other incidents. 

Two sources that the agency plans to 
make available by Feb. 28 are a National 
Transportation Safety Board data base 
on airline accidents and incidents that 
dates from 1984. and one from the avi- 
ation agency that dates from 1978. The 
information will be available through 
the existing Web page, www.faa.gov. 


How can you hear 
NPR*and PRHn 
Europe? Let us 
count the ways. 

Hear quality, independent 
programs from Notional Public 
Radio* and Public Radio 
fntemadoruf'on: 

Zurich Cable (RMflunon) 

24 hour* a day, 2nd audio track 
“ktfokanaT (TV signal) 

Munich Cable 

24 hour* a day, 105.95 FM 

l/Wiulrl - ftf^liein ef, 

vrona iukho iwiwonr 
Frve-and&balT hours a day on 
cable and on Astra IB Satellite, 
Transponder 22 . 11 £38 GHz. V- 
Pot, Audio Subcarrier 7-38 MHz. 

FM (selected hours & programs} 
Bet tin-Radio Charlie 87.9 FM 
HeUnki-YLE Capital Radio 
103.7 FM 

Geneve-lhbrld Radio Geneva 
WRG-FM8&4 
Stockhohn-Stodcholm 
International 89.6 FM 

America One Channel 
And of course, 24 hours a day on 
Astra IB Satellite, Transponder 
22, 1 1.538 GHz (VH-)J, V-Pot, 
Audio Subcarrier 7.74MHz. 



AMERICA ONE" 


Nsec finally you can Uetenteo. 

f M 5 a«a» S uMr ompjneE tg any Jbnma 
Ontallary Stenm* t4949.9B.Sjn 
E-wriwaBwnlB i ragpnjHt AiwriaDw 
b wonri n pel br Wriw M ID Ericsson. 



r«r ,6 ?' 

Ih-tclunl KbjiI SlDflJDLMf 


Tht Merchant Court, Singapore. 

A delightful resort tn the heart of ihe city. 


krldv io .j 4 mil. Jwfn-frinilrJ Mwv rftffil in (hr 
hbirt of SnuUlfvn-', l cult at fta-oin- Dr-trul ll*\k m lb< 
thirty .on fori of •> rr-orf-vjy/r ■ilnosphr’r. nth luth 
tWrifrm. Ira-ferm tsnnwnW f*vl. /uRy-nJiiip^cJ 
hrulth <«jJ /ilnr-i iml/r, jll ini j jvhhlrt ihrgir 
froia ihr Jiiuimui huh vaj thr f.i.hiMuihlr .iitJ 

rotcriiiniaml «niw» .*f < LuW l Joay JtJ Rail lAmy 

A- j Mm Krai t lah jjarri. you'll ta\ey mni ijnaifrr 
ffipiicyr- - nfm- that-rnA/ntl-taf Imubirr prmiojrv 

lonpiwrabiry fcrnibfii-1- ,ioJ emmuj JrmK AirJ you 

i.m ,tllraJ Io Fwvinr*-. a iN (ally flaunt-, f rulrr 

or in (hr iselorf nf yev cm men. rfnc u iiolchoct 
mMfMiirr ,mJ /irr -pnultr ahn hint lun 
hr ■i/wiufnJ ■(( infi 

Ym H Jniinrr il r illni&iar t xmt. 

Sflldilpiirr Io hr ihc prrftt t Jrlitmy. 

r-frikiffy rbni We iwffy iM 


g-4B 0. (an bui loirnci Bsbtilt « Mip jroen unm ewiAd or F ejil lo. auMBtorotmi mm sj 
~rn i&bi as? !tlB F»» (SSI 334 8606 II* H 320388 R1NH Hiiigtl by Rallies iPierunoiul 



REAL-TIME INFORMATION FROM 
THE PARIS STOCK EXCHANGE. 

People make decisions every day. They need the most reliable 
source of information available. 

In France, they read Les Echos, France's leading newspaper. 

Les Echos is now accessible via the net, offering preferential 
access to the Paris Stock Exchange. 

httpr/ywww.lesechos.com 


LES ECHOS -NOTHING'S MORE RELIABLE. 



PAGE 4 


wtkhnaTIO®^H^AIJ> 



Beijing Campaigns for a 6 Spiritual Civilization 9 


b R * E f *■ Y 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Past Service 


DALIAN. China — Spitting in the train 
station here will cost you a 25 -cent fine, and 


some city employees have started giving up 
one Saturday a month to visit the elderly. At a 


Dalian soccer game, watch your language: 
calling the visiting team “numskulls,” a fa- 
vorite local slur, has been ruled out of bounds. 
As for gourmet poachers who think the doves 
fluttering around new city parks would look 
better on the dinner table, they can tell it to the 
judge. 

China’s “spiritual civilization’' campaign 
has really taken root in Dalian, a Manchurian 
port that used to be notorious for rough lan- 
guage and now is heralded for civic pride. 
Mayor Bo Xilai. a rising political star and the 
son of a Communist Party elder, has pushed 
his city into the forefront of a national effort to 
revive traditional Asian values and civic spirit 
among a people who for the last 12 years 
mostly have been caught up in a race to get 
rich. 


Western-style economics, but without seeing 
their own culture eclipsed in the process. 

“Forme, I think China is an Asian country, 
influenced by its older generations,” ex- 
plained Zhang Wen, the Communist Party 
secretary for the government-owned Italian 
General Taxi Corp. “Influenced by the spir- 
itual civilization campaign, the people have 
come closer together. They help their neigh- 
bors and friends. They take care of one an- 
other.” 


growth has given rise to a newly assertive 
nationalism in which traditional values and 


Chinese history also have a place. 

A recent hit in Beijing was a book titled 
“China Can Say No,” in which the authors 
argued that China, with Us new place in the 
world, is emided to pay less attention to what 
Western nations have to say about human 


rights, trade practices or regional diplomacy. 

3i a spiritual civilization for China 


The idea of 

has been around since the mid-1980s, shortly 


the north end of the Yellow Sea. 

Lying 720 kilometers (450 miles) east of 
Beijing, Dalian has been known as the home 
of China’s championship soccer team — and 
the city that, through the spiritual civilization 
campaign, overcame a reputation for foul 
language and over-ardent fans who threw 
insults at visiting teams. 

“As Asian citizens of China, we pay at- 
tention to our ethics,” stud Zhan Jia Shu, 


The Chinese campaign also reaches back after Mr. Deng's liberalization moved beyond secretary and deputy chairman of the Dalian 

ia .U. «mai rnhdn titMAfi avul lufTQn fn wi v^nAfl tKa a/\ ^rtii Caasv S 7anc A S ntv hall- 


in to the country's revolutionary past, when 


itry 

the egalitarian Communist society formed by 
spirit 
s.That 


concern for others. That society, largely aban- 
doned under the economic and social lib- 
eralization started by Deng Xiaoping, also 
included heavy-handed repression. 

For that reason, many Chinese have in- 
terpreted the spiritual civilization campaign 
as an attempt by the Beijing leadership to 
solidify controls at a time when exploding 
capitalism has aimed much of the population 
away from the authoritarian government and 


Mao’s vision and began to produce the co- 
rollaries of official corruption, ruthless busi- 
ness practices and materialism. 

It was to include the Five Talks — po- 
liteness, civility, morality, social relations, 
hygiene — and the Four Beauties — lan- 
guage. behavior, heart and environment. 

But Mr. Jiang has revived the campaign 
recently with particular emphasis, leading to 
predictions he wants to use it to help dis- 
tinguish his leadership after the 92-year-old 
Mr. Deng dies. 

Some analysts see Mr. Xiang's accent on the 


City Soccer Fans Association, a city hall- 
sponsored group. “So as President Jiang 
Ze min said, the campaign has new meanings 
and old meanings, we don’t want our soccer 
Ians to be hooligans like in England. We want 
them to be warm, but civilized.” 

To make sure of this, Mr. Zhan said, die 
association broadcasts warnings against rude 
behavior, over stadium loudspeakers during 
matches and seeks to channel enthusiasm with 
a People’s Liberation Army band and blue- 
suited cheerleaders. 

7im Fenxiang, deputy director of the Dali- 


The campaign arose partly from a desire its proclaimed ideology of “socialism with spiritual civilization campaign as a way to an City Spiritual Campaign Office, said city 

among the top leadership in Beijing to prevent Chinese characteristics.” meet criticism from those in the Communist officials in pursuit of ways to improve Dalian 

Western values from invading China along Chinese officials frequently have cited fear Party hierarchy who feel China under Mr. 
with Western capital and flooding the country of chaos as a reason for continuing their Deng has moved too far away from Mao's 
with hamburger joints and all-night discos, authoritarian style of government, even egalitarian ideals. 

This concern, voiced especially by President though its Communist underpinnings have Whatever Mr. Jiang's motivation. Mayor 
Jiang Zemin, echoes similar sentiments else- gone by the wayside since Mr. Deng became Bo has thrown Dalian into the campaign with 

where in Asia, particularly Singapore and paramount leader. the kind of vigor that seems to characterize 

Malaysia, where leaders seek to benefit from At another level, China’s rapid economic this city of 52 million people, a port rich in 


also have traveled to Singapore, which has 
acquired a reputation for no-nonsense .civic 
behavior. Local journalists were sent to 
Singapore and came back with a 60-part series 
that was broadcast on Dalian television as part 
of the campaign to encourage respect for the 
environment and civic pride. 


Save up to 80 % 

\ ' N A i. !. 


■No Monthly Minimum * No Start-up. Une, or Monthly Fees 
•MititHjngual Operates -Customer Service, 24 taure/d^, 7 days/week 
“Itemized B®ng - 6 Second Biting Increments -Crystal CJear Sound Quality 

Perfect for Home, Office, Hotel, Fn; or CdUar Phams 


UJC. 


-2116 FRANCE. 


.35* 


B.S. ' 


GERMANY 37* SWITZERLAND «37* 


Call Hans at 44 171 360 5037 
Fax: 44 171 360 5035 


Or cal on 1 US. office at (201) 907-5166 or lac (201)907-5144 
Miaifc tribune® Fieww3rtdtete.com 
htto^/wwwJTe ww oridtete-com 

FteguMw raply ptaamMtiaiilttiMMbar ISISflSl 



Albright to Visit China on 9-Nation First Tour 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Ex- 
panding on a tradition. Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright will travel around the 
world next month to meet 
with leaders of nine countries 
in their capitals. 

At a whirlwind pace, she 
will spend one day in each 
nation except for Russia, 
where she trill stay for a 
second day. 

Traditionally, new secre- 
taries of state take a fast- 
paced trip overseas at the out- 
set of their tenure, with the 
focus on allies, especially in 
Europe. 

But Mrs. Albright is 
spreading her net wider to in- 
clude Russia and China. She 


departs Feb. 15 and ends her 
trip in Beijing on Feb. 24. 
where the Chinese leaders are 


bracing far a lecture on hu- 
man rights. 

Mis. Albright has sought to 
soften the blow, saying the 
strong U.S. relationship with 
China would not be “held 
hostage” to any single issue. 

In addition. President Bill 
Clinton has shown no sign of 
curbing trade with China until 
its human rights record, cri- 
ticized Thursday in die U.S. 
State Department’s annual 
human rights report, is im- 
proved. 

Administration officials 
said Mrs. Albright woald be- 
gin in Europe, stopping in 
Italy, Germany. France, Bel- 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAY’S 


HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 


Appears 
on Page 1 1 


Announcements 


BAREME AS 24 

AU 31 JANVIER 1997 
Pita Has TVA ai devise locale 
(Induction Apatite sur demands) 
Remptucs les baremes anemia 


FRAME lane Cl on FBI • TVA 20.6% 
GO: Ml FOtT 2,41 

SCOT 5.50 SCSP 5J5 


UK izone C] en Ul -TVA 175°. (fad 8^ 
GO. 05459 FOir. 0.3478 


ALLEMAGNE (zone I) DM1 - TVA 15*i 


ZONE f ■ G : 



GO i.io 
ZONE 1 ■ 1 ; 



GO 1D9 
zone a • f : 

SCSP 

1.44 

GO 1JK 
OUEIV-F: 
SCSP 1.43 
ZONEIV-G: 

SCSP: 

1A1 

GO 1.10 

FDD. 

085 


BELGIQUE en FBI - TVA 2iN 
GO 22,89 FOO nil 

SW7 3139 SCSP 31.49 


HOLLANDS (rone2) MG/I ■ TVA 17.5^ 
GO 1JJ99 


LUXEMBOURG en LUfil - TVA i5 e . 
GO 20.17 


E5PAGNE Irene A) en PTAS4TVA 16°i 
GO. 86,12 

SCOT. 102.41 SCSP 10329 


• Usage regtemontc 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S! 


I* 


If you enjoy reading die IHT 
when you travel, why not 
also get it at home? 
Same-day deSvery available 
in key U.S. cities 


'111 


(h Ne* York ctB 212 752 3890] 

ilcralb ^gC fcnbunc 


•Hi WMiirknuii niwmi 


Personate 


HAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS 
oe atino, gfentai, loved ana prasaved 
Ifmugtaul me world, wr and braver. 

Sacred Heart d Jem pray hr us 
San Jude, water o) rmades pray to 
us. San Judo, hew ot me hopeless, 
pray fans. Amen. Say ms prayer 
times a day. fry the rantfi day. your 
prayer me ae answered It has never 
tisen unown u lad FuoheaMn must he 
prams*. ug-tt 


HAY THE SACRED HEART <8 Jesus bs 
adored, glorified, loved and preserved 
throughout the world, now and forever. 
Sacred Heart rf Jesus pay tor is. Sant 
Juda. miliar of modes pray for us. 
Sasm Jude, helper of die hopeless, prey 
lor ib. Amen. Say Otis prayer nine tines 
b day, by the rWrth day jour prayer «ril 
be answered II has new been Iran 
to taJL ftbEcation must be promised. 
A.V. 


Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO DEHGI FRANCE 
WEEKEND: FF515. 7 DAYS: F1500. 
TEL: PARE +33 (0)1 43 88 55 S. 


Legal Services 


DIVORCE k> 24 hra. Lawyer. No Travel 
: ++972J.7718292, Fax 


ShtC8 1969 Tot • 

972.9.7718294. http^/wwwJmtkHsra- 
.&rtdenW&i 


eLcomttvon*. i 


i discrete 


DIVORCE t-OAY CERTIFIED 
Cel or Fez (714) 96B-0BS5. Wide: 16787 
Beech Bhd #137. Kuringtan Beech, CA 
92648 USA- e-maB - wstaroejunorom 


DIVORCE IN 1 DAY. No Havel. Write 
Box 377, Sudtuy. MA 01776 USA. Tet 
508M4M3B7, Fax 5004430183. 


Business Services 


Business Opportunities 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
INSURANCE BANKS 
COMPARES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
MMIGRATtON/PASSPORTS 
TRADE-FINANCE 


ASTON CORPORATION 
TRUSTEES LTD 


19 Peal Rond, Douses, We of Mar 
“It 01624 6265 


Tati 

Free 01624 825128 
London TNL- (171] 222 8888 
Fax: (171) 233 1518. 

E W No. aetonOertraprliejm 


OFFSHORE C0WERQAL BANK 
FOR SALE 

i Class A ficense and correspondent 


bank idtfonship. Nudes hofc&sg 
company vrtth Zundi office, and e U.S. 


fallback 


Offers 


Lowest Rates 


Ever! 


Enioy even greater savings on 
internal mat calls. Benefit tram the 
same to* rates 24-houra a day. We 
secure me dearest and most reTabia 
trees Use KaUback tram home, wurt 
or hotels and save 


Call now and save more today! 


Tel 1-206-284-8600 


Fax 1-206-282-6666 

Lines open 24 hours. 
Agents npanes mtconte 1 



l callback 


417 Second Avenue Wed 
Sealfle. WA 93119 USA 


Lowest Infl 


Telephone Rates! 

Call The USA Fran. 

Germany SG33 

UK J025 

France 5032 

Swcertmd $036 

Sweden -SO 25 

Saudi Arabia 


Cab For Al Rates 
25% Cocnissian 
Agents ttetoone! 


KallMart 

Tet, 1 ■407-777-4222 Far 1-dQ7-777-641t 
nttpj/rvpn comfloEmart 


YOUR OFFICE M LONDON 
Bond Street - VA Phene, Fax. Telex 
Tel. 44 171 499 919? Fax 171 499 7517 


artsdary New Y<rt Cfiy office, and 
a UJt subsidiary wth London ofltoe. 
tnunedma aausffion. 100% cat&oL 

us seam nwcE umcHANTS 

GROUP. Nassau tet 242394-7080 
Fee 242084-7082. London Wtac 
44 1B1 539 8246 


MflGHATKM OPPOflTUMTES 
Ottan Pemanera Residency. 2nd 
Ctaenshp & 2nd Passport va Econonto 
hvestman. 100% legal Government 
Programs, Sarong at 528.000, Issued n 
90 to 180 (fays. Finds held re Escrow 
until yw racenra your documents. 
WraWATIONAL ATTOWCYS SA 
CAWBBEAN; Fax: *(390] 290 587 
or Fax 4(590) 290 684 
E-MAL- INTATTOAQLCOM 


OFFSHORE COMPAMES. Far tree tra- 
de™ or adnee Tet Lnndan 44 181 741 
1224 Fax 44 1 S 1 748 6558/6338 
■wwppfetouai* 


OFFSHOR E LICENSED BAMS For in- 
formation call now Germany Tet 449 
(1722) 807 507 Fax *49 (230) m 381 


Financial Services 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 


VEHTUfS CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 


Long term txtearai 
Suppoted Guarantees 
I Gawigs cn earned only upon Furring) 
Bankable pcraa&es to secure hiring 
lor wade preyecs arranged by 


BANCOR 

OF ASIA 


Fn I 
Tebt 


1 8104284 


Brafcers Ccntmaaicn Asurad 


TODAY’S 


REAL ESTATE 
MARKETPLACE 
with the special 
MOUNTAIN CHALETS 
A SKI APARTMENTS 
Section 
Appears 
on Page 9 


gium and Britain before going 
on to Moscow to assist in prep- 
arations for projected summit 
talks between Mr. Clinton and 
President Boris Yeltsin. 

Because of Mr. Yeltsin’s 
poor health, the tune and 
place for the meeting have not 
been announced. 

From Moscow, Mrs. Al- 
bright will fly to Asia for vis- 
its to South Korea and Japan 
before winding up with meet- 
ings in Beijing. 

■ Beijing Hails Visit 

The Foreign Ministry in 
Beijing said Thursday that 
Mrs. Albright's visit to China 
was aimed at further improv- 
ing ties that had warmed rap- 
idly in recent months, Reuters 
reported. 

“China places great im- 
portance on this visit,” said 
the Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man, Shen Guofang. 

Mrs. Albright will hold 
talks with Foreign Minister 
Qian Qichen, Mr. Shen said, 
and a wide range of issues is 
expected to be discussed. 


m 


Vice President AI Gore is 
also reported to be preparing 
to visit Beijing in late 
March. 

Mr. Clinton met with Pres- 
ident Jiang Zemin of China at 
the Asiar-Padfic Economic 
ion forum in Manila 
ovember, where they 
on an exchange of 
presidential visits for the first 
time since early 1989. 

“A major topic of the 
meeting of the two foreign 
minis ters will be how to push 
forward relations on the basis 
of the presidential meeting,’ ’ 
Mr. Shen said of Mrs. Al- 
bright’s visit 

Mrs. Albright’s prede- 
cessor, Warren Christopher, 
went to C hina in November 
on a fence-mending visit that 
both sides hailed as a major 
step in repairing ties ravaged 
by disputes for well over a 
year. 

Mis. Albright has said she 
would confront Beijing on its 
human rights record, trade is- 
sues and weapon sales 
abroad. 


North Korean Defectors Try 
To End Suspicions in South 


clear up suspicions that their flight was set up by a Seoul 


w® 1 "® fueled South 

Vhed 


S ailing the escape. The excerpts were a 



Ate Tteflf ***/!>> A"****? 

Kim Hae Kwang explaining his family's defection. 


^ ^ i river into 

— but the handwriting was different in the two 
papers. One was an adult’s script, the other childlike. 
*Some newspapers alleged that the Agency ^National 
Security Planning, the domestic spy agency, had brought 
in the defectors to divert attention from strikes battering 
the government this month. 

“I took short notes when we were escaping to let 
people know about our journey,” the boy, Kim Hae 
kwang, replied to reporters’ questions Thursday. He said 
that he, his mother and elder brother made several copies 
to hand around. (Reuters) 


Patten Appeals on Rollback 


HONG KONG — Warning of “enormous and ir- 
revocable damage” to Hong Kong, Governor Chris Pat- 
ten appealed Thursday to a panel appointed by China not 
to roll back Hong Kong's civil liberties laws when it 
meets in Beijing this weekend. 

But Tung Chee-hwa, Hong Kong's next leader, said 
that clitics of the changes “are being misled.” 

“I think they should spend more time to really un- 
derstand, what is going on in Hong Kong.” he said. 

Saying it never consented to it, China has targeted the 
1991 Bill of Rights where it overrides other laws. China is 
also against legislation making it easier to hold demon- 
strations and to forge links between Hong Kong or- 
ganizations and foreign groups. (AP) 


Burmese Rebels on Rampage 


MAE SOT, Thailand — At least three persons were 
killed and thousands left homeless after Burmese rebels 
burned three refugee camps on the Thailand-Burma border, 
the police and refugees said Thursday. 

Thousands of Karen refugees who used to live in the 
sprawling camps just inside Thailand fled and spent 
Wednesday night in the rice fields or in the jungle far 
away from the camps, a refugee official said. ( Reuters i 


BOOKS 


PRNE BANK 


GUARANTEES 

Vertuu Cspfflt Fhanca Arafiabte 
far Government Projects and 
Government Convenes 
tat am far isle. 

Luge Protects our Special^ 
Also, Long Term Finance far 
Large end Smal Con 
No cotnrtafan UhN I 


REPRESENTATIVE 
Needed fa ad bb Liaison 
Please reply it Engfish 


VENTURE CAPITAL. CONSULTANTS 
bvestnwrt benfcera 
18311 Ventura Btai, Suita 999 
Endno, CaSomta 91436 IL&A. 
Fax Hex: (818) 905-1698 
TbL (BIB] 789-0422 


ANDREW WYETH: 

A Secret Life 

By Richard Meryman. Illustrated. 447 
pages . $35. HarperColiins . . 

Reviewed by Michael Kimmelman 


JS "Christina’s World" by Andrew 


Serviced Offices 


Your Office &i Germany 


we are ‘a yen semce 1 
• Coraptee office services at two 


" FiAy equipped offices far short 
term or long term. 

■ Inte m atanaiy eared (Ace 
end pwfeBwrl staS at your 


" Can be leoaly used as you 
corporate dcniSe far GenraryT 
Europe. 

* Your business operation can sbrt 
mmedaHy. 

* Since 1972. 


Lakes BurineK Senicea GmbH 
Lamo+tus am Hotzhausenpark 
ABtirianatrassa 22. 

80322 FranWurt am Han 
Germany 
Tet (SO 955154) 

Fax (69] 595770 


Offices tor Rent 


PARS, RD POMT CHAMPS aYSEES 
450 sqm. TOWNHOUSE, ground Boor t 
2 toon v 190 sqm. basement -Partings 
Bdenxte Tet «33 (OH 6 M « 13. 


Sates 


0NTAB0, CANADA, pfabneqae 
HaHjurton avnraroal resort property 
o vbZA heaareswflr over 200 meters 
d stottfne on pnstne Lake Xustog. & 
pnadmateljr 200 tdaewss northeast of 
Toronto. Existing Sfrfat trader pak b- 
cerae to buid 7 new 3-bednom chalets. 
Area famous tor fcfrng 8 boating as id 
as winter sports. Heath reasons cause 
cfibrtng siis lewwal for sale. Sekws enqui- 
nes only, please. Ctrtaa owners by fax 
415433-8923 


Business Travel 


Is&Bushxss Clase Frequent Traders 
Worldwide, lb fa 50% oft No coupons, 
no restrictions, impanel Canada Tet 
1-514-341-7227 Fax 1-514-341-7888 
e-mail address: ttnpBrtat8tojpn.net 
t iBpi^ we to gln i wWnro erM 


Wyeth the most famous work by an 
American painter since World War II? 
Maybe, judging from die hordes of tour- 
ists who go to see it at the Museum of 
Modem Art It hangs there along with 
Pollocks, Picassos and Cezannes, which 
Wyeth calls “putrid stuff." His con- 
tempt for modernism equals die con- 
tempt modernists have hald for him. 

In "Andrew Wyeth: A Secret Life,” 
Richard Meryman, a former writer for 
Life who befriended Wyeth more than 
30 years ago, makes the best case he can 
for the 79-year-old master of Chadds 
Ford, Pennsylvania. 

But bow much personal regard, can 
you end up feeling for a man who, Mery- 
man recounts, wrote, even if jokingly, to 
his future wife, Betsy, “I swear I’ll 
really beat you if you ever again doubt 
my love for you"? Later, Mrs. Wyeth 
recalled that “Andy’s dislike of my 
pregnancy was violent.’ ’ She said, “lam 
spared nothing of his wrath.” 

One of his sisters, we learn, describes 
him as “quite carefrilly a weirdo” who 
makes “fantastic statements to keep 
people puzzled and wondering.” She 
says he contrives 1 ‘fantasies about what 
he does, the most exquisitely built-up 
lies.” Meryman himself cabs Wyeth a 
“self-promoter" and a “closet show- 
man.” So when Wyeth is quoted as 
saying, “I’m not very nice,’ ’ you believe 
him. 


Wyeth is not a great artist Why, then, 
should we bother about him at all? Be- 
cause far half a century his fame has 
been a barometer of popular taste. Since 
he illustrated covers for Progressive 
Fanner and The Saturday Evening Post, 
then sold out his first one-man show at 
the Macbeth Gallery in Manhattan in 
1937, he has been endlessly feted: an 
honorary doctorate from Harvard in 
1955, the cover of Time in 1963, when 
President Lyndon Johnson also awarded 
him the Medal of Freedom. Then there 
was the frenzy around the Helga paint- 
ings. 

Meryman spends a good part of the 


book trying to explain, without quite 
explaining away, the fias< 


As celebrity biographies go. “An- 
"iecret Life” isn’t as 1 


drew Wyeth: A Secret Life” isn’t as bad 
as most because Meryman, despite his 
worshipful and often melodramatic ap- 
proach, doesn’t or can't, ignore the 
artist’s faults and critics. It's not news 
that unsaintiy people sometimes make 
great artists. 


fiasco that ensued 
after a Pennsylvanian named Leonard 
EJB. Andrews made front-page news a 
decade ago for having paid an undis- 
closed sum said to be in the millions of 
dollars for a cache of works that Wyeth 
had supposedly kept secret even from his 
wife. 

Why should anyone have cared one 
way or the other about these unremark- 
able pictures? Because they depicted the 
sturdy, blonde Helga Testorf, clothed 
and nude, mostly nude. She was known 
only as Helga, a mystery woman, and 
when asked to say what die works were 
about, Mrs. Wyeth added to the mystery 
by replying “love.” 

Big money, Mrs. Wyeth ’s implication 
of sex, and the artist’s celebrity proved 
to be an irresistible and intoxicating 
cocktail for, among others. Time and 
Newsweek, which put the square-jawed 
Helga ou their covers, and for the Na- 
tional Gallery of Art in Washington, 
which rarely organizes shows of living 
artists but leapt to do one of the Helga 
pictures in 1987. 

Hundreds of thousands of people 
flocked to the exhibition; its catalogue 
reproducing Wyeth’s soft-core rendi- 
tions of his recumbent model, became a 
Book-of-th e-Mon th Club best-seller. 

Then the whole affair turned out to be 
a bouse of cards, with Andrews as the 


produced a sadly circumscribed art. "I 
detest the sweetness I see in a lot of 
realistic painting,” Wyeth says in Mery- 
man s book. “Awful. I know because 
I ve done hundreds of them and will 
probably do hundreds more.” 


Michael Kimmelman is on the staffed 
The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


I 


RA Rubin sal South on the 
diagramed deal, in an IMP 
game, a form of duplicate for 
money players. 

He arrived at die excellent 
contract of six spades, which 
would make an overtrick mi a 
good day. 

But this was not a good 
day. and West held a certain 
trump trick and a probable 
club trick. 

West made the normal lead 
of the heart ten. which was 
covered by the jack and 
queen. South ruffed and 
cashed two top spades. 

This uncovered the bad 
news, and two heart discards 
from East made it clear that he 


had started with at least five 
cards in that suit. . 

Next, South cashed the ace 


NORTH 

*W87 

OKJ7 

OKAS 

*X98S 

WEST EAST 

+ Q32 *- 

0 10 9852 9AQ643 

073 OJ 10 862 

AQ103 *764 

SOUTH (DJ 
AAKJ8S54 
O — 

O AQ9 
AAJ2 


and queen of diamonds, held the heart eight and the 

** c,ub « ueen ’ foresaw dis- 

teSttJrV™ 8 “"“"8 pr°blen, s iTThe ho- 
time before throwing a heart, nzon. So the king and ace of 


A spade lead gave West his 
crick, and be led the heart nir 


Neither side m vntoBratoie. The bid- 


Sooth 

Wen 

North 

East 

l* 

Pass 

14 

Pan 

3 O 

Pass 

3N.T. 

Pass 

44 

Pees 

4* 

Pan 

8 * 

Past 

Pass 

Pass 


WeetM the hurt tea. 


*nme. 

This was covered by the king 
and ace, and South raffed. 

He now knew that there 
was a good chance that West 
held the heart eight, and 
would have to hold that card 
to protect against dummy's 
seven. J 

One more tramp lead left 
theposition shown at right: 

On the last spade. West 
nonchalantly gave up the club 
Jwee. frying not to betray the 
fact that he had been 
sqtwezed. But Rubin now 
worked out the reason for 
Wesr s earlier hesitation; He 


clubs were cashed to make the 
slam. 


NORTH 

*- 

07 

O — 

♦ K 9 8 


WEST 

«_ 

08 

0 — 

* Q 10 3 


EAST 

Ofl 
0 — 
*784 


SOUTH 


*9 

V - 
O — 

* A J 2 


■ .*;Y- 


^,rri"' 


IV'"' 


r 


Joker. The publisher of newsletters like 
Swine Flu Litigation Reporter, he had 
orchestrated the Heigahype to cash in by 
selling the pictures to a Japanese col- 
lector, reportedly for more than $40 mil- 
lion, their value enhanced by the Na- 
tional Gallery's (now squandered} 
prestige. 

J. Carter Brown, the gallery’s direc- 
tor, claimed to be shocked, SHOCKED, 
by Andrews' profiteering, though evety- 
one involved had cynical motives for 
promoting die works, except perhaps 
Testorf, who was no mystery woman, m 
fact, but a married mother of four and 
housemaid to one of Wyeth’s sisters. 
She was never the artist' s lover, and Mrs. 
Wyeth, her husband’s business manager 
and canny promoter, later explained that 
“love” was meant only to suggest the 
creative frisson between Wyeth, the 
Great Artist, and his subjects. 

I’m sure Meryman wanted to leave the 
impression of Wyeth as an American 
original, a charismatic individualist 
whose value as an artist relates to the 
peculiar and circumscribed world he has 
chosen for himself: that what's unusual 
about his work stems from what’s un- 
usual about his life. 

Actually, what's strangest of all about 
him is that people continue to find pic- 
tures like “Christina’s World” appeal- 
ing, considering how plainly melanchol- 
ic, even misanthropic, they are. 

Partly, perhaps, it's about mistaking 
ms vision of a bygone, rural America for 
mat of Grandma Moses, with the dif- 
ference that he paints it in a straight- 
forward way that appeals to a popular 
taste for empiricism and practicality, 
strangely circumscribed life has 


till KYlirU * 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 

" EUROPE 




T-.-.-jICV C : 
: «--v : - 


n Coalition Ally 
Portrays Kohl 
As Wavering 
Over Reforms 


CuepdeabrOrSk^Frem Dirac** 

BONN — The center-right govern- 
ment of Chancellor Helmut Kohl is “in 
difficult waters” over policy issues, a 
leader of the Free Democrats, junior 
partner in the German coalition, said 
Thursday. 

. The coalition “must decide whether 
it wants to continue its old policy of 
spending, or whether it commits itself 
decisively to a course of reforms,” the 
Free Democrats' secretary-general, 
Guido Westerwelle, said. 

1 ‘The question is already clear for the 
FDP,” Mr. Westerwelle said in com- 
ments broadcast on InfoRadio in Berlin, 
but “for the Christian Union parties 
unfortunately not yet” 

Addressing recent speculation that 
Mr. Kohl may be tempted to throw in the 
towel because of the problems and not 
seek to be his party's candidate for 
chancellor in Germany’s next legislat- 
ive elections, in 1998. Mr. WesterweUe 
said he imagined that Mr. Kohl did 
intend to run again. 

Mr. Kohl is facing the fact that the 
two major current tasks the coalition has 
set itself before the elections — re- 
visions of the tax and pensions systems 
— have fueled dissension between the 
Christian Soda! Union and Free Demo- 
cratic parties and among Mr. Kohl’s 
own Christian Democrats. 

Mr. Kohl plans to respond to his 
critics when he delivers a major address 
to Parliament on Friday. 

The chancellor will give “a fighting 
speech” to rally his Christian Demo- 
cratic Union and deliver a broadside at 
the opposition, which he believes is 
blocking vital changes, an adviser said 
Thursday. 

The 66-year-old chancellor had re- 
sisted calls by the Social Democrat-led 
opposition for a parliamentary debate 
on what his center-right alliance would 
do to fight unemployment 

Although no one has publicly cri- 
ticized Mr. Kohl, the attacks intensified 
Thursday when the Sueddeutsche Zei- 
tung daily led its frontpage with a story 
headlined “Massive Criticism against 
Kohl from the CDU Leadership.” 

The newspaper's report, without 
naming names, said party leaders were 
upset by Mr. Kohl's “clumsy” han- 
dling of the tax and pensions debate. 
They also said that Mr. Kohl had run out 
of ideas on how to turn Germany’s 
economy around. (AFP. Reuters) 


Chechen Leader Faces a New Battle 


By Alessandra Stanley 

Ww York Tima Service - 

GROZNY, Russia ■- — The 
newly elected president of 
Chechnya served most of his life . 
in the Soviet Army to reach the 
rank of colonel, but he never saw 
combat until Russian tanks rolled 
into the secessionist republic in 
December 1994 and he began 
plotting strategy against his 
former fellow officers. 

Aslan Maskhadov. 45. won 
overwhelmingly on Monday in 
elections that foreign and Russian 
observers alike deemed fair and 
democratic. 

He is deeply popular with 
Chechens. He is grudgingly re- 
spected by at least some in the 
Russian government. 

But his mandate is not open- 
ended: He has promised to deliver 
independence, and Chechen 
voters are as wedded to that idea 
as Russia is adamantly opposed to 
it. 

As a military leader, Mr. 

Maskhadov displayed both steel 
and finesse during the long, brutal 
war. The question now is whether 
he will be able to sustain that 
balance in the murkier atmo- 
sphere of peace. 

For 21 months of relentless 
bombing and artillery assaults 
that left many tens of thousands of 
people dead, most of them ci- 
vilians, Mr. Maskhadov was chief 
of staff of die Chechen forces, 
leading a small army of rebel 
fighters in a desperately uneven Mr. Mas’ 
battle against die once mighty 
Russian Army. 

Mild in mann er and reserved in speech, be 
came off as low-keyed and moderate during 
the campaign in contrast to his closest rival. 
Shamil Basayev. the brash rebel commander 
who led the violent hostage-taking raid on 
Budyonnovsk in June 1995. According to 
preliminary results announced Wednesday by 
the Electoral Commission. Mr. Maskhadov 
won 64.8 percent of die vote, to Mr. Basayev’s 
22.7 percent. 

Mr. Basayev conceded defeat but said he 
would not accept a job in the new admin- 
istration without major conditions. And in a 
theme likely to return race election euphoria 
wears off. he warned that Mr. Maskhadov 
must rid himself of “criminals’' and “Soviet 
bureaucrats” within his entourage. 

However easy-going he can sometimes 
seem. Mr. Maskhadov never gave an inch in 
wartime. And when negotiations with Mos- 
cow began and a fragile peace was finally 
signed, he was just as quietly stubborn. 

Even Mr. Basayev, when asked if Mr. 



V Munir han«*IYw 

Mr. Maskhadov’s supporters praying at his headquarters. 

Maskhadov might be too soft to hold out Perfaap 


Former army comrades de- 
scribed him as a by- the- book of- 
ficer who had great rapport with 
his men. 

He never served in Afghanis- 
tan. but commanded a regiment in 
Soviet-occupied Hungary. Look- 
* ing back, he said that when he 
served in Hungary, he did not con- 
sider himself an occupier, ex- 
plaining, “you must remember 
those times. 

But his consciousness was 
*£ rased later while he was serving 
in the Baltics. 

He was a regiment commander 
in Vilnius when army units 
stormed an independence rally in 
1991 and left 14 people dead and 
230 wounded. He had no role in 
that incident but has since spoken 
of his shame at not having un- 
derstood Lithuania’s struggle for 
freedom. 

After Dzhokar Dudayev, a 
former Soviet general, declared 
Chechnya independent in 1991 
and became its president, Mr. 
Maskhadov resigned from the 
military and returned to Chechnya 
to become commander in chief of 
the armed forces. 

He was close to General 
Dudayev, who was killed in April 
1996. But their temperaments 
differed. 

“He was rigid and loved emo- 
tion, while 1 always said we 
shouldn’t rush to war,” Mr. 
Maskhadov recently told a Re- 
uters reporter. 

“But on die question of 
ers. Chechen independence, I don’t 
differ one iota from him.” 
Perhaps his most critical decision came last 


against the Kremlin, replied, “You don’t August, when the Russians were in control of 


know. He could be even tougher than me. 
Time will tell.” 

His years serving under the Soviet hammer 
and sickle, however, have left their mark. 
Unlike Mr. Basayev he has always insisted 
that Chechnya needs strong economic and 

*lf I had any doubts I would 
not have voted for him. I 
would have told my men not 
to vote for him. 9 

political ties to Moscow. He has likened the 
relationship to “two apartment-dwellers in 
the same building complex.” 

He was bom in Kazakstan — to which 
Stalin had deponed Chechens. His family 
returned to Chechnya when he was 6, and he 
joined the Soviet Red Army at 1 8. 


the Chechen capital, Grozny, and were scour- 
ing the countryside to root out rebel forces. 

With the rebels seemingly facing defeat, 
Mr. Maskhadov launched a major offensive to 
retake Grozny, catching the ill-trained, poorly 
equipped and demoralized Russians off- 
guard. It took his men a week to regain control 
of the capital. 

Rage and defiance kept Chechen fighters 
and civilians united during the war, but that 
harmony is likely to dissipate as Russia re- 
cedes as an enemy and poverty, crime and 
corruption take their toll. 

Khamzat Baiayev. 40, the fierce-looking 
commander of Bamut, a village where rebels 
held out against Russian occupation for more 
than a year, said he did not believe Mr. 
Maskhadov would settle for anything less than 
full independence from Russia. 

“If I had any doubts,” he said gravely, “I 
would not have voted for him. I would have 
told my men not to vote for him.” 


Algerian Rebels Strike Again, Killing Ex- Army General 


Reuters 

PARIS — Muslim rebels in Algeria killed a 
former army general Thursday in the western 
city of Oran, security forces said. 

The security forces said in a statement to 
the official news agency APS that Habib 
Khelil was “assassinated by terrorists,” die 
term they use to describe Muslim guerrillas. 

General Khelil was murdered shortly after 
Abdelbaq Benhamouda, a union leader who 
was shot and Tuesday in Algiers, was buried 
in the capital. 

The French government, meanwhile, re- 
iterated that it would not push the Algerian 
regime to negotiate with its fundamentalist 


opponents, saying Paris had no business med- 
dling in the affairs of its former colony. 

“Algeria is not Fiance/’ Foreign Minister 
Herve de Charette said in an interview with 
the magazine L’Express. “That must be un- 
derstood and admitted once and for all. It is a 
sovereign country. It is up to Algeria to solve 
its problems, up to the Algerian people to 
decide their destiny.’ ’ 

Mr. de Charette bad already rejected a call 
titis week from Lionel Jospin, leader of the 
Socialist Party opposition, that it cake the lead 
in shaking Europe out of its alienee on the civil 
war in Algeria, in which about 60,000 people 
have been killed. 


Former President Valery Giscard d’Esta- 
ing, head of the National Assembly’s Foreign 
Affairs Committee, agreed with die govern- 
ment’s stance. After Mr. de Charette briefed a 
special closed-door session of the panel, Mr. 
Giscard d’Estaing said Paris’s policy was 
“neither intervention nor interference.” 

He stressed that Paris, which suffered a 
wave of bombings in 1995 that it attributed to 
Algerian rebels and which has been warned of 
new attacks, wanted to be in step with its 
European Union partners. 

Algeria plunged into civil war after the 
authorities canceled elections in 1992 that 
Muslim fundamentalists were poised to win. 


On Thursday, both Mr. Charette and Mr. 
Giscard d’Estaing welcomed President Liam- 
ine Zeroual’s pledge to bold parliamentary 
elections soon. 

But while Mr. de Charette declined to say 
whether Algiers should negotiate with the 
rebels, Mr. Giscard d’Estaing said they must 
be allowed to run in the elections. 

“All political groups, including Islamists, 
must be allowed to field candidates.” he said. 

But the Algerian ambassador to France. 
Hocine Djoudi, said in an interview with Le 
Parisien that although the election date would 
be announced soon, the outlawed Islamic 
Salvation Front would not be allowed to run. 


HEA LTH: Harsh Weather and Funding Cutbacks Wreak Havoc With the British Medical Service 


Continued from Page 1 

^ “My fear is that the system has been trimmed 
down so much that it can’t cope with any new 
pressure, "said Dr. Margaret Biott. a consultant 
in obstetrics and gynecology at King’s College 
Hospital in smith London. “There is no slack at 
all." 

British health care has long been bedeviled 
by problems like worsening hospital condi- 
tions, waiting lists for major surgery dial can 
stretch out beyond a year, differing standards of 
care in different regions and deepeningdis- 
satisfaction among health-care workers. There 
has been aslow migration toward private health 
care among people who can afford it But 

S le who woik with and are served by the 
c system say things are getting worse. 

"I think the system is unraveling,” said Dr. 
Caroline Marriott, a consultant psychiatrist in 
Belfast and the deputy chairman of the British 
Medical Association’s consultants’ and spe- 
cialists’ committee. “And unless mere is a 
really honest appraisal of what we are pre- 


pared to pay and the sort of service we can get 
from that, it will only get worse.” 

Health care has become a major issue in the 
general election, which must be held by May. 
Both political parties are being pressed by 
doctors and advocacy groups to commit them- 
selves to spending more money on the Na- 
tional Health Service, which now costs Bri- 
tain’s taxpayers more than £45 billion ($73 
billion) a'year. But with neither party willing 
to raise taxes, it looks as though no more 
money is forthcoming. 

Nor, the parties say. can they accept a system 
like the one in die United Stales, where pub- 
licly financed care is provided only to groups 
of die poor and elderly, and everyone else has 
to pay privately or through insurance. 

“Politicians of all parties are stating that 
people are entitled to expect very high-quality 
service where and when they want it and 
without having to pay for it,” Dr. Marriott, 
said. “But ar the same time, they’re not will- 
ing to raise taxes to the level that would be 
required to maintain the system.” 


It was in 1948 that Aneurin Bevan, the 
minister of health, ushered in Britain’s National 
Health Service, a hrave Dew program that 
promised free health care to everyone. 

For nearly 50 years, the system has held 
together, in large part because of the nation's 
pnde in its lofty goals and because of a general 
acceptance among Britons that inconveni- 
ence, bare-bone amenities, long waiting times, 
lack of consumer choice and such indignities 
as mixed-sex hospital wands are the legitimate 
price of free and comprehensive care. 

“For many years the health system has been 
the envy of the world,” said Dr. John Thur- 
ston, director of the accident and emergency 
department at Queen Mary’s Hospital in Lon- 
don. “In the United States, if you fall over, 
they frisk you for your Blue Cross card before 
they take you to hospital, but here, everybody 
gets treated, even the scruffiest drunk.” 

But an aging population, more expensive 
and sophisticated treatment and the Conser- 
vative government's systematic cost-cutting 
have stretched the health service’s budget to 


the breaking point. Last year. Dr. Sandy Ma- 
cara. the medical association's president, com- 
pared the health service to the Titanic and said 
it would need billions more pounds in gov- 
ernment financing to keep it from sinking. 

At the same time, rising patient expec- 
tations — fueled in part by the Patient's 
Charter, a statement of patients' rights drawn 
up by the government several years ago and 
used as a sort of consumer guide to the service 
— have made Britons less willing than before 
to accept the system’s failings. 

“Patients effectively are still subject to a state 
monopoly and have to take what they can get,” 
said Dr. John Spiers, chairman of the Patients 
Association, an advocacy group. “It is an oddity 
of English culture that people are supposed to 
say 'thank you’ for poor service.” 

Britain has many reasons to be proud of its 
health system, and indeed, the government 
contends that there is no crisis. Every year 
since 1 979. Prime Minister John Major said 
recently, the health service has had a “sig- 
nificant, real-terms increase in resources.” 


TEMPS: As Demand Grows, Firms Experiment With Scientists 


Continued from Page 1 

career scientists with short-term temps 
may undermine the continuity of re- 
search that has helped fuel the nan on’s 
global scientific lead. 

Harmful or not. the trend is already 
changing tire way researchers see them- 
selves. Lake workers in other fields who 
are finding their jobs threatened by cor- 
porate belt-tightening moves, many ca- 
reer scientists feel threatened by temps. 
Many are even joining unions. 

The temporary scientist business is 
growing even faster than the burgeoning 
temporary employment market over all. 
industry statistics show. Pharmaceuncal 

and biotechnology companies are lead- 
ing the trend, along with companies that 
test for environmental contaminants, in- 
cluding Envirosystetns. where Mr. 
K hare is president. 

Mr. Khare pays Kelly a flat weekly 
fee for Mr; ealtzersen. avoiding dis- 
* ability insurance, benefits and payroll 
costs. Kelly pays Mr. Baitzersen about 
60 percent of that fee. and provides him 
some benefits. 


“We offer everything from low-level 
animal handlers and glassware washers 
all the way up to Ph.D.s,” said Rolf 
Kleiner, vice president of Kelly Sci- 
entific Resources, Kelly's scientific spe- 
cialty division. “They span the discip- 
lines of chemistry, biochemistry, 
molecular biology, physics, geology, 
environmental science, you name it.” 

Since its inception 18 months ago. 
Kelly Scientific Resources has opened 
offices in 15 cities and expects to open 
10 more this year. Annual revenues in- 
creased 136 percent last year and are 
expected to double in 1997. 

At Manpower, the world’s largest 
temporary staffing services firm, tech- 
nical and scientific placements in- 
creased about 40 percent last year, mak- 
ing it the company’s fastest growing 
sector. 

At the country’s largest temp agency 
specializing only in scientists. On As- 
signment. Of Cslabasas. California, 
growth has been maintained ai 25 per- 
cent annually for several years eoasec- 
utively. On any given day. said its chief 
executive, H. Tom Buelter, more than 


2J00 On Assignment scientists are 
working across the country in more than 
60 laboratories. 

Contingency workers constitute only 
about 2 percent of the U.S. work force. 
But professional and technical workers 
account for about one in six of the tem- 
porary workers in die United States, and 
global trends are nourishing those num- 
bers quickly. 

Under pressure from low-cost inter- 
national competitors, U.S. laboratories 
are increasingly hiring just enough sci- 
entists to cover their slow periods, then 
using temps to fill in during busier times. 
Pharmaceutical companies, for ex- 
ample, often need extra scientists for just 
a few months to handle tests on a newly 
developed drug. 

Advocates say there are benefits to 
temping, especially for young scientists 
in the early pan of their careers. 

“It’s veiy difficult coming out of 
school today.” Mr. Buelter said. “What 
they need is experience. We market 
them, we introduce them, and we further 
their careers. We almost act like the old 
European apprenticeship.” 


Don’t miss 
the upcoming 
Sponsored Section on 

Congress Center 
Messe Frankfurt 

on February 7. 1997 



IK 



Village Scrutinized in Arson 

DOLGENBRODT. Germany — Three people in the 
village have been arrested in the burning of a home for 
asylum-seekers in 1 992. and prosecutors said many other 
residents conspired in the arson. 

“Die indications are thickening that there was a col- 
lection for the attack.” a prosecutor. Petra Marx, said 
Thursday, adding that most of Dolgenbrodt's 260 res- 
idents were involved in some way. 

The house was set ablaze on Nov. 1 . 1 992. a day before 
the first of 86 foreigners was to have moved in. A 1 9-year- 
old skinhead. Silvio Jaskowski, was arrested in May 1993 
after bragging at a bar that he had set the fire. He told 
prosecutors that residents of Dolgenbrodt, 40 kilometers 
(25 miles) east of Berlin, had paid him 12.000 Deutsche 
marks (S7.300). 

Mr. Jaskowski was convicted last year of arson and 
given two years’ probation. 

Town officials have denied his charges. But on Wed- 
nesday, prosecutors said, a 23-year-old village resident, 
identified only as Marco S.. said he and his lather were 
involved, while another man accused of helping in the 
attack was arrested Wednesday night, prosecutors said. 

A 40-year-old florist, Thomas Oste. was attested two 
weeks ago on charges of instigation to arson, and pros- 
ecutors said more arrests were expected. (API 

Britain to Start Parade Panel 

BELFAST — The British government agreed 
Thursday to create a commission to try to relieve the 
sectarian tension that arises with the summer parade 
season in Northern Ireland. 

But the Northern Ireland minister. Sir Patrick Mayhcw. 
said Britain needed more time to decide whether the 
commission should have legal powers to decide whether 
disputed parades could be held, as recommended by an 
independent review body. 

The announcement Thursday follows the publication 
of a report commissioned by the government; in it. 
experts recommended the creation of a panel to replace 
the police in mediating disputes about whether Prot- 
estants could march in Catholic areas. f Re liters) 

Transport Strike in Bulgaria 

SOFIA — Transport workers carried out a one-hour 
warning strike in the Bulgarian capital Thursday on the 
second day of nationwide labor protests against the 
Socialist government. 

In addition, the main highway to Greece was blocked 
throughout the night by protesters who pledged to stop 
traffic there until the Socialist Pony, the fomier Com- 
munists. agreed to give up power and hold immediate 
elections, state radio reported. (AFP) 

Germany Backs Reconciliation 

BONN — The German Parliament on Thursday ap- 
proved a declaration of reconciliation with the Czech 
Republic intended to set aside lingering resentments more 
than five decades after the end of World War II. 

The lawmaking lower house gave its blessing to the 
accord, which was signed last week by Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl and the Czech prime minister. Vaclav Klaus. 

In foe declaration, Bonn expresses sorrow for foe 1938- 
45 Nazi occupation of the Czech lands, and Prague its 
regret for the postwar expulsion of 2.5 million ethnic 
Germans. (Reuters) 


A two-month 
trial subscription. 

# 



- v: r $ * i’ 


SO* 


s 




Save u 

“ to 60 % 

a 


and sport ~ ofl from an international perspective 

TaltB u d w rtageafmislimtedopportunijytofryfalNanxrfcnolT 
Tribune with a Ictw cost, 2-monfn Tried subscription and enjoy delivery * 
home or office every morning. 


COUNTKY/CURRENCY 


AUSTRIA 

BELGIUM 

DENMARK 

FTNAND 

FRANCE 

GERMANY* 

GREAT BRITAIN 

GREECE 

IRELAND 

rouy 

LUXEMBOURG 

NETHERLANDS 

NORWAY 

PORTUGAL 

STAIN 

SWEDEN 

SWITZERLAND 

ElSEWHBtE 

Tflr iJtfmctBn ccffflmii 
«r 0J3WM B5B5 or fa 


»i Major Gcmm din cdl *oS (raa MT Germany 


THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


TSfr I would tfa to Von rraaning the b i l em zi ficnci Herald Tribune. 31-1*97 

□ My dtedt b endured ( p oyofcfc to the HT} 

Charge myr □ Amox [J Diners □ VISA □ Acatu D MostwCanJO Euro card 

Grad* card dagKwl bo irada an Ffonrii Frans ct omnt ram 

Ce*d Nn- _ P»p Dde: — 

Sip""*” - ■ - - - - 

For businwcnfcft. indicate your VAT No: 

phi uw Nuniw mirxxQ\ i wi 

Mr/Mrs/ Mi Fcxnily NbwiK - — — ■ 

Rra Nonvr — _ JobTelrr . - 

Moiling Addr mv — — ... ■- - 

Cty/Cade: 

Country _ ... . . - — _ - 

H n ™r W Nn* ftiwinWM Nrr _ — . ... - - - 

E-Mail Address: — — 

lad rtW* copy ihe IHT d: □ kiosk [71 hotel □ ortne □ oim 
UJ do not to receive information from o4w corefjy screened ccxnpoiie* 
Mad or fa* Id: International ttmeJd Inbuna 
)SI C * Goufc, PZS2I fiance toe +33 I 41 A3 W JO 

OR CALL +33 1 41 A3 93 61 

in Asm; +052 29 22 J f SB. In rhe US (txtB-fr+ep 1 -800-882-7834 
E - M a i l Mb: m bwto w 
Offer vefid (or new subscribers only. HA3M 




INTERNATIONAL 


U.S. Overview on Rights, 
Issued by Albright, Hits 
Both Friends and Rivals 


\ ^ 


By Brian Knowlton 

Inurmaionai Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The Stale De- 
partment, in issuing its annual human- 
rights report Thursday, denounced prob- 
lems in China, Indonesia, Burma and 
Nigeria and found fault with such 
friendly countries as Germany, South 
Korea and Turkey. 

The report was presented by the new 
secretary of stale, Madeleine Albright. 

Congress requires the annual rights 
surveys, which are regularly protested 
by die countries where the gravest vi- 
olations are reported. Anticipating that, 
Mrs. Albright said Thursday, “It is a 
testament to the reputation for candor of 
these reports that even those — and 
sometimes it seems especially those — 
who claim to reseat them read, them.'' 

The reports are supposed to be taken 
into account in forming and applying 
U.S. foreign and trade policy, although 
officials acknowledge that they may be 
subordinated to other considerations in 
dealing with powerful and important 
countries such as China, Russia and 
Saudi Arabia. 

The findings cm China — that the Com- 
munist government there had eliminated 
all active dissent — were reported earlier 
but reverberated more loudly Thursday 
with the announcement that Mis. Albright 
would be visiting Beijing Feb. 24 as part 
of a round-the-world tour. 

President Bill Clinton this week de- 
fended the U.S. policy of closer en- 
gagement with China in the face of the 
impending criticism in the rights report. 

The report said that the Chinese gov- 
ernment last year 1 ‘continued to commit 
widespread and well -documented hu- 
man rights abuses*' that stemmed finom 
“the authorities’ intolerance of dissent, 
fear of unrest and the continuing absence 
of laws protecting basic freedoms.” 

It also contained strong language about 
Indonesia, saying Jakarta had continued 
to commit serious human-rights abuses. 

Security forces continue to kill, tor- 
ture and mistreat detainees in some 
areas, including Irian Jaya and East 
Timor, die report said, while noting that 
respected observers had noted a decrease 
in serious incidents in East Timor. 

On Burma, it said the military au- 
thorities there bad increased systematic 
repression of human tights, although they 
had formally ended the house arrest of the 
opposition activist Daw Aung San Sun 

Die rights performance of the military 
government m Nigeria, the report said, 
“remains dismal." It said, “Security 
forces committed extrajudicial killings. 


tortured and beat suspects and detainees^ 
prison conditions remained life-threat- 
ening; and security officials continued 
routinely to harass human-rights and 
democracy activists, labor leaders, en- 
vironmentalists and journalists.” 

In presenting the report, Mrs. Albright 
made a point of dissenting frem the view 
that “economic progress is incompat- 
ible with respect for human rights.” 

She said, “When human-rights stan- 
dards are observed, sustainable economic 
progress is more likely, violent conflicts 
are easier to prevent, terrorists and crim- 
inals find it harder to operate, and so- 
cieties are more fully able to benefit from 
the skills and energy of their citizens.” 

She also expressed particular concern 
about religious persecution and intol- 
erance. “In too many countries.” she 
said, “from Sudan to Vietnam to Iran, 
this form of repression persists. In a few, 
including China, it has increased.” 

The report also said 

• Saudi Arabia, a U.S. ally, “com- 
mits and tolerates serious h uman rights 
abuses.” Last year, 66 men and three 
women, most of them Saudis, were be- 
headed on charges ranging from murder 
to witchcraft 

• Cuba “re mains a totalitarian ana- 
chronism, where human rights deteri- 
orated in 1996 and suppression of dis- 
sent worsened.” The report said there 
were increased reports of death* due to 
the excessive use of force by police and 
increased use of exile and internal exile 
to control the activities of independent 
journalists and human-rights activists. 

• On Russia, the report offered a 
mixed picture, noting that free elections 
had been held for a president and a 
Parliament. But h said prison conditions 
had worsened, lengthy pretrial detention 
continued, and “violent hazing of mil- 
itary conscripts sparked new protests.” ■ 
One “genuine bright spot” m Russia, 
the report said, was the withdrawal of 
Russian forces from Chechnya. 

• In South Korea, rfismmmHtion and 
violence against women were termed a 
serious problem. 

• On Germany, die survey, as report- 
ed earlier, noted dial members of die 
Church of Scientology had alleged that 
they had suffered government-condoned 
and societal harassment. 

• Turkey’s record was uneven and had 
deteriorated in some respects. In the 
southeast of the country, the report said, 
the government continued to day ethnic 
Kinds “basic cultural and linguistic 
rights.” It said “extrajudicial killings, 
including deaths in detention” and “mys- 
tery killing s” continued to occur with 







By Alan Friedman 
and J onathan Gage 

Inxemadoncd Herald Tribune 

DAVOS, Switzerland — Die NATO 
secretary-general, Javier Solana Mada- 
riaga, said in an interview here Thursday 
rhwf be would intensity mh« with Russia 
on expansion of the alliance to include 
former Warsaw Pact states. 

“We feel engaged,” Mr. Solana said, 
adding that he would be in Moscow on 
Feb. 23 fora fresh round of talks . He said 
he was eager to build “a military -to- 
military relationship with Russia*' out- 
side of NATO expansion talks and 
hoped to conclude negotiations on ad- 
mitting new members before the NATO 
summit meeting in Madrid on July 8. 

Separately, Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin of Russia restated Mos- 
cow's opposition to NATO expansion 
but announced that he would hold talks 
with Mr. Solana this weekend. 

The two men are scheduled to meet 


ova breakfast in this Alpine ski resort, 
the site of an economic conference, on 
Saturday morning. 

“Our position has not changed,” sa^ 
Mr. -Chernomyrdin, noting that Russia 
made fts opposition to NATO expansion 
known two years ago. 

■ “Moving NATO to our borders will 
not do good. It will do bad. Russia does 
not want to have any dividing lines,” the 
Rus sia n prime minister said. 

Mr. Solana, who met with the Russian 
foreign minis ter, Yevgeni Primakov, in 
Moscow on Jan. 20 to discuss NATO 
expansion and broader cooperation with 
Russia, said that “NATO’s opening is 
not against anybody.” 

“It is not against Russia,” he said. “I 
cannot conceive of a stable structure of 
security in our European continent with- 
out Russia.” 

The NATO chief said the Atlantic 
alliance’s meeting in July would decide 
which former East bloc nations would be 
asked to begin membership talks. 


CHIRAC: Before Meeting With Yeltsin, a Call From Bill Clinton 


Continued from Page 1 

Ukraine’s president, Leonid Kuchma, in Paris. Sunday, die 
French leader will have lunch with Mr. Yeltsin near Moscow. 

Mr. Chirac has gone on record in Poland and Hungary as 
supporting early membership in NATO for those countries, 
ana the caU from the White House underscored the importance 
which the Clinton administration attaches to cutting a dal 
with Moscow about enlargement, preferably in time far Mr. 
Yeltsin's scheduled visit to Washington in March. 

But the timing of the White House call could be useful to 
Mr. Chirac domestically, diplomats said, by underscoring 
U.S. readiness to accept a prominent French role in NATO 
affairs. Mr. Chirac faces an outcry in the French Parliament 
about his efforts to move French forces back into the alliance’s 
military co mmand. 


The criticism, which started over french legislators’ sus- 
picions that they were bring kept in the dark about a French- 
German document on military cooperation, was inflamed by 
remarks by the German defense minister, Volker Ruche, that 
the accord mean! that France, for the first time, was accepting 
the primacy of the U.S. nuclear deterrent via NATO in 
preference to French nuclear weapons. 

In feet, aQ the NATO allies, including France, agreed in 
1984 that. the existence of nuclear weapons in- the United 
States, Britain and France added credibility to Western de- 
terrence. That accord ended the long standing quarrel about 
France’s right to have an independent nuclear force. 

Defense Minister Charles MUIon said Thursday that the 
French-German document repeats “die position the Allies have 
reiterated many times” — that NATO’s nuclear policy relies 
mainly an U.S. hut also Bench and British arsenals. 


RETURN: Sharansky Helps Refuseniks Recall Bad Old Days FUNDS: Political Donors Were tracked 


Continued from Page 1 

ov, the creator of the Soviet nuclear bomb who became the 
Soviet Union’s best-known dissident and a man whom Mr. 
Sharansky, 48, has described as the most important influence 
on his generation and his own dissident activity. The same 
portrait, be said, hangs in his office with the mandatory Israeli 
portraits of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Pres- 
ident Ezer Weizman. 

“People come in and ask: ‘Is that a former president?’” Mr. 
Sharansky said. 

To which Alexander Daniil, another veteran of the dissident 
movement, added: “What they should ask is, ‘Who are those 
men across from Sakharov?’ ” 

Then Mr. Sharansky's rejoinder: “Well, I hope be has a 
good influence on them.’ ’ 

To these people, Mr. Sakharov was a champion and a 
protector, and the apartment had been a center for many 
strands of dissidence — the political diss ide n ts demanding 
human rights, the Jews seeking emigration, the Tatars and 
others seeking their national rights, the Christians seeking 
freedom of religion. In fact, Mr. Sharansky gained prom- 
inence first as a spokesman and interpreter at Mr. Sakharov's 
news conferences for Western journalists. 

Many of the old dissidents are scattered — Yelena Bonner, 
Mr. Sakharov's wife, was in Boston with her children; many 
of Mr. Sharansky's fellow refuseniks were in Israel or in the 
United States; die most prominent dissident still in Russian, 
Sergei Kovalyov, was in Chechnya monitoring its elections. 

But the names around the table invoked now-distant images 
of demonstrations smashed by KGB agents, of closed trials, of 
declarations smuggled from prison cells, of news conferences 
in musty apartments — Vladimir Porush, who was in prison 
with Mr. Sharansky, Malva Landa, Larisa Bogoraz, Alex- 
ander Ginsburg. Alexander Pograbinek, Alexander Lavut. 
Mikhail Kazakov, Natalia Kravchenko and Liudmila 
Alekseyeva. a lawyer who defended many of them. 

Mr. Sharansky’s mother, Ida Milgrom, 89. and his brother 


Leonid, now a businessman in Des Moines, were also there, all 

so now could laugh at whit once was a constant 'be^^ 

A question from Miss Bogoraz prompted Mr. Sharansky to 
describe the details of his release from Prim and the process 
that ended with his freedom in East Berlin in an East-West 
prisoner exchange. He recalled how be was put in a special cell 
and fattened up for six weeks: “They gave me eggs. I hadn’t 
seen an egg in 10 years." 

Then be described his drive to Moscow and the formal 
announcement read to him by some official: “By a special 
order of the Council of Ministers, you are deprived of your 
Soviet citizenship.” This drew a solid round of laughter 
around the table, followed by an even louder one when Mr. 
Sharansky continued, “I told them I was to make an an- 
nouncement of my own.” 

In Berlin, he recalled, his most vivid impression of die villa 
where he was kept on his last night was the smell of coffee — 
“strong, rich coffee, something I hadn't smelled in a decade.” 
These were details many of those present could appreciate 
and they joined in with their own anecdotes. “The last time I 
saw you was in 1984,” Mr. Porush told Mr. Sharansky. “It 
was Aug. 1. 1 remember because I was supposed to be set free 
that day and they gave me three more years instead.” 

Mr. Kazakov began describing a visit to a prison in Mas- 
sachusetts, which prompted a new round of talk about dif- 
ferent prisons. When he first arrived in Israel, Mr. Sharansky 
said, he asked to visit a prison: “I knew that was the one place 
where they couldn't hide anything from me, where I would 
understand everything immediately.” 

Many aodded in understanding. The years they had spent in 
interrogation, in prisons, in punishment cells and labor camps 
had required special skills and survival strategies. 

But this was no time for somber thoughts, and Mr. Shar- 
ansky quickly picked up the strand of his story. 

“We got in a plane to fly from West Berlin to Frankfurt, and 
it wouldn't start,” he said. “They told us to change planes. 
And here I had thought I had left Russia . . 


Continued from Page 1 

far the computer but never actually 
used. . 

But a former top Democratic official 
said in an interview that he and his staff 
routinely used WhoDB to identify likely 
candidates for increased donations. For 
example, he saikL the staff found out ho w 
many White House invitations certain 
donors were receiving, so they could 
arrange mare invitations for those tar- 
geted for increased contributions. 

This began in 1995 when the party 
was striving to raise money early for Mr. 
Clinton’s re-election in the wake of die 
Republican landslide the year before. 

“I started checking back with the 
White House just as a routine matter,” 
said Truman Arnold, a Texas oil ex- 
ecutive who served at Mr. Clinton’s re- 
quest as finance chairman of the Demo- 
cratic National Committee during most 
of 195)5. “It didn't seem to be veiy 
privileged to me. It was open to a lot of 


Experts in campaign finance said that 
the committee's use of the information 
raises questions about whether the ad- 
ministration went over the tine in using 
government equipment and personnel 
for political purposes. 

“This is a very sophisticated, state-of- 
the-art information file that is of great 
use internally to the White House staff 
and the president,” said Herbert Al- 
exander, director of Citizens’ Research 
Foundation in California. “But using 


that file for political purposes with an 
outside agency tike fee DNC is beyond 
die law and ought to be the subject of an 
investigation.” 

A House Government Reform and 
Oversight subcommittee has been in- 
vestigating WhoDB since July. The sub- 
committee i s at- odds wife the White 
House over fee release of computer re- 
cords and is threatening to issue sub- 
poenas for more material. 

Democratic officials said they were not 
able to confirm Wednesday whether the 
committee had' used the White House 
computer for fund-raising purposes. “We 
are looking at this internally rj^it now,” 
said a spokeswoman, Amy Weiss Tobe. 

Memos obtained by the Los Angeles 
Times reveal feat fee 1 administration 
took steps to keep the White House 
database secret 

In a Jan. 26, 1994, memo marked 
* 'confidential ’ ’ to Hillary Rodham Clin- 
ton and Bruce Lindsey, a top presidential 
aide, a deputy assistant to fee president 
Marsha Scott wrote fear fee WhoDB 
equipment and records were in a locked 
room in fee Old Executive Office Bnild- 
ing next door to fee White House. She 
wrote that she had taken extra, precau- 
tions to ensure feat fee project was not 
subject to disclosure under the federal 
Freedom of Information Act 

Moreover, Ms. Scott added in the 
memo, she was not seeking competitive 
bids from various software vendors be- 
cause fee process would “be open to 
public scrutiny and inquiry.” 


MINE: In Indonesia, Firms Learn, Be Connected or Be Gone 


Continued from Page 1 

from it” said Mohammed Sadli, a former Indonesian mini*; 
and energy minister. “It's nothing but fighting over treas- 
ure.” 

Under fee deal sealed in October, Bre-X agreed to pay PT 
Panutan Duta $40 million over 40 months for assistance in 
“administrative, technical and other support matters.” 

Bre-X also gave Panutan the money to buy out minority 
Indonesian shareholders and said it would get a 10 percent 
equity stake in the mine when the project was approved. 

The situation surrounding the Busang gold find is now even 
murkier. 

Bre-X's saga has entangled three Canadian companies 
trying to curry favor wife one of fee world's most autocratic 
governments. 

The affair has also stirred up nationalist and anti-foreign 
sentiment in Indonesia, with several economists urging the 
government to call an open tender for develo p ment of fee 
Busang mine to maximize Indonesia's participation and ben- 
efits. 

Under the constitution, “the Indonesian people are the own- 
ers of all mining deposits," said Rizal Rarali, a director of the 
Econii research institute in Jakarta. “But ironically, fee foreign 
mining contractors have been the biggest beneficiaries.” 

So an Indonesian minority shareholder in the mine, claim- 
ing wrongful loss of equity, has filed a 2 billion Canadian 
dollar ($1 .49 million) damage suit against Bre-X in Canada. 

In addition, two major Canadian miners — Banick Gold 
Carp, and Placer Dome Inc, —are trying to drum up support 
in Indonesia for their rival bids to take control of Bre-X and its 
controlling interest in fee Busang find. 

Banick appeared to have struck a deal with Bre-X in 
November in which Banick would control 67 J percent of 


Busang, Bre-X 22J5 percent and the government 10 petceaL 
Barrick's local partner is Siti Hadiyanti Rukmana, Mr. 
Suharto’s eldest daughter, whose PT Citra Lam tore group has 
interests in construction, toll roads, plantations, television, 
trading and pharmaceuticals. Banick has said it will use her 
companies as the main contractors for abstraction of fee $ 1 J5 
billion Busang mine if it wins a stake in the project. 

Placer Dome made an offer to merge with Bre-X in a S4.5 
billion .stock swap. Die offer would increase Indonesian par- 
ticipation in Busang to 40 percent from Barrick’s 10 percent. 

“We felt we had to get someone’s attention.” said John . 
Willson, Placer Dome's chief executive. “We want to say that 
if Indonesia wants a bigger stake in Busang, they can get it.” 
Ida Bagus Sudjana, mines and energy minister, has given 
Bre-X and Banick until Feb. 17 to settle differences wife 
minority shareholders- Otherwise, he said, fee gov e r nm ent 
would find new investors in the project 
Meanwhile, some even bigger Indonesian players have 
entered fee fray. 

The plywood tycoon Mohammed Hasan, a regular golfing 
partner of Mr. Suharto’s, bought a substantial minority stake 
m fee Busang gold deposit mis month. His purchases were 
made through PT Nusantara Ampera Baktz, which is 80 
percent controlled by foundations headed by Mr. Suharto, 10 
percent by his son Mr. Sigit and 10 percent by Mr. Hasan. 

Analysts see the purchase, which follows talks between 
Placer Dome and Mr. Hasan, as a move by Mr. S oharto to fry to 
defuse the Busang controversy by increasing Indonesian own- 
ership in fee project when production is finally approved. 

After meeting Mr. Suharto on Monday, Mr. Sudjana said 
fee president had told him that, if necessary, regulations would 
be changed to eliminate conflicts of interest. 

“We want the nationals of Indonesia to get as much as 

possible,” the minister said. 


GANDHI: Funeral Spawns Reappraisal 


Continued from Page 1 

that negates every conviction he stood 
for.” 

Miss Mishra’s article was one of a 
torrent in Indian papers recently deplor- 
ing what has been described as. India’s 
passion for celebrating Mr. Gandhi in 
speeches, statues and memorial books, 
and ignoring almost everything be 
taught Many of these articles have also 
condemned some of the more radical 
figures among India's new generation of 
political leaders for usiira Mr. Gandhi as 
a political football, often -denigrating 
him in personal terms and, Mr. Gandhi’s 
followers say, distorting his ideas. 

Mr. Gandhi has been condemned by 
one of the country’s most vociferous 
female politicians,: who uses fee single 
name Mayawati, for being "fee biggest 
enemy” of fee 150 million' people who 
belong to the dalit, or untouchable, caste. 
Mr. Gandhi’s prescription for untouch- 
ables — that untouchabtiity should be 
abolished, but that dalits should unite 
with Hindus of otter castes in working 
for broad reform — was strongly con- 
tested in his own lifetime by untouchable 
leaders who believed dalits should band 
together as a separate political force. But 
the arguments ofMr. Gandhi’s day rarely 
had the venom of fee recentattacks. 

■ Equally controversial have been the 


attacks oa .Mr. Gandhi by Hindu na- 
tionalists, who have never folly re- 
covered politically from the fact that one 
of their followers. Narhuram Godse, 
killed Mr. Gandhi, but who seem to have 
felt freer in recent years to challenge his 


Balasaheb Thackeray, the most 
powerful political leader in Bombay, 
suggested earlier this month that Mr. 
Gandhi’s habit of testing his asceticism 
by sleeping in fee same bed with naked 
young women may not have been as 
innocent as Mr. Gandhi said. Mr, Thack- 
eray also challenged fee habit of re- 
ferring to Mr. Gandhi as Father of the 
Nation. “At the most, he could be In- 
dia s son,” Mr. Diackeray said. 

Some leaders have even suggested fear 
Mr. Gandhi erred by pressing for in- 
aependence too soon. One of India’s 
Mamie scholars. Maulana 
Wahiduddin Khan, has said feat inde- 
pendence should have waited until India. 
w«h a current literacy rate of about 60 per 
cent, ted a better-educated electorate. 

p C ^u hl foUow «s perceived fee 
Bnush as fee. source of all evil. They 
bdtevediffeey threw fee British out, they 
could usher m an evil-free society,” Mr 


Mirra , 

Prune Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, center, with Swiss officials daring a stopover in Bern on his way to Davos. 

NATO Chief to Intensify Russia Talks 

a ion over breakfast in this Alpine ski resort, “Our goal is to he able to welcome 

the site of an economic conference, on new members byl 999 , he explained, 
and Jonathan Gage c. hn vt«> The. initial candidates are likely to be 


Th e initial candidates are likely to be 
Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Re- 
public. 

Mr. Solana also said feat NATO was 
prepared to provide “a secure envir- 
onment” in Bosnia should any NATO 
government wish to send forces there to 
apprehend War criminals. 

“We are prepared to help if any other 
type of force is sent by providing a secure 
environment,” be said, while emphas- 
ising that fee international military force 
an the ground “is not a police force.” 
Commenting on the flare-up over 
Cyprus between Greece and Turkey, Mr. 
Solana said he planned to travel to Ank-- 
ara next week “in an attempt-lib mak« 
clear the need to defuse fee crisis.” 
Addressing uncertainty about .the 
health of President Boris Yeltsin, Mr. 
Chernomyrdin said the president was 
folly capable of coping with fee affairs 
of stale. 


Swiss Waive y 
Bank Secrecy 
For Inquiry 

The Associated Press 

JERUSALEM —The Swiss Banking; 
Commission agreed Thursday to allow* 
investigators to search for bank accounts’ 
of Jewish victims of the Holocaust with-: 
out being restricted by Swiss banking* 
secrecy laws, a Jewish negotiator said, j' 
Avraham Burg, chairman of the Jew- 
ish Agency, haded fee decision as ai 
“breakthrough” in fee negotiations^ 
which have been marked by bitterness! 
and mutual accusations. • 

Die Jewish Agency is a semiofficial* a 
body based in Jerusalem and represent.; 
ing Israel and world Jewry. The talks; . 


are taking place in Zurich in fee framc-- 
vvoifc of fee Volcfcer Commission,; 
beaded by fee former U.S. Federal Re-* 
save Bond chairman, Paul Vokker.The! ' 
inq uiry is to be carried out by accountingl 
firms engaged by the conxrnissiofl. • 

In a statement issued by his office in, 
Jerusalem, Mr. Burg said tbc conunis- 1 
sion had been “shocked” to leant of fee) 
scant, response of Swiss banks to am 
earlier attempt by fee Swiss Banking; ; 
Commission to futd dormant bank ac- 
counts of Jewish Holocaust victims. * 

In 1963, when fee questionnaire was^ 
sent out, there were more than 500 
banks in Switzerland, he said, but only- t 
26 ■ ‘bothered to reply.” ( V 


BRIEFLY 


Caspian States Try 
To Save Sturgeon 

MOSCOW — The five nations, 
bordering the Caspian Sea have 
agreed on a $150 million pro g r am 
for fish farms to save the cavkr- 
producing sturgeon from extinc- 
tion, a Russian news agency said 
Thursday, 

Interfax said Russia, ten, 
Azerbaijan, Kazakstan and Turk- 
menistan might also ask oil compa- 
nies now operating in the Caspian’s 
rich offshore fields to earmark 
funds to help save the sturgeon, 
Caspian sturgeon are threatened 
wife extinction because of overfish- 
ing — especially by gangs feat 
traffic in caviar — and pollution. 

Interfox said Russia would setup 
10 new fish forms and renovate eight 
existing ernes on the Volga River. It 
said that Kazakstan had a new fish 
form in the Ural River and that Iran 
would open a farm this year. (AP) 

Bangui Replaces :, 
Its Prime Minister 

BANGUI, Central African Re- 
public — President Ange-Felix P&- 
tasse named a new prime minister 
Thursday to replace fee former gov- 
ernment leader. who was accused of 
siding with mutinous soldiers. 

Die new prime minister, Michel 
Gbezera-Bna, is a lawyer who had 
been the foreign minister. He also 
served in the government of Jean- 
Bedel Bokassa, the longtime dic- 
tator and setf-proclaimed emperor. 
That may win him support from fee 
anny, which enjoyed far more 
power under Mr. Bokassa. 

The military’s diminished role, 
along wife demands for higher 
wages, sparked three mutinies in the 
past nine months. The latest ended 
last week when soldiers signed an 
agreement to lay down their arms. 
Die former prime minister, Jean- 
Paul Ngoupande, ted been accused 
of backing the soldiers. (AP) 

4 Die in Blast Aimed 
At Colombian Group 

BOGOTA — A bomb ripped 
apart fee offices of a community 
association in central Medellin, 
Colombia, killing at least four 
people and hurting debris onto pass- 
ers-by in the street below. 

The 50-kilogram (110-pound) 
time bomb exploded Wednesday 
beneath a second-floor stairwell just 
outside offices of The Association 
of Neighborhood Groups, said the 
deputy national police chief, Gen- 
eral Luis Ernesto G Albert. 

It blew off the building’s con- 
crete facade on its first two floors, 
ripping open metal grating and 
throwing rubble into the street. 
Many of the 18 people injured were 
passers-by. 

General Gilibert said he bad no 
information on a possible motive. 

Die community association com- 
prises various nongovernmental 
groups in Medellin's poorer neigh- 
borhoods, where paramilitary ■ 

groups, youth gangs, and leftist urb- 
an guerrillas vie for control. (AP ) 

2 Dead as Wall Falls 
At a Houston MaU 

HOUSTON — Two people died 
and at least five were injured when a 
collapsed Thursday at a shop- 
ping center where a renovation pro- 
ject was under way, a Houston Fire 
Department spokesman said. 

Some of the elderly victims were : 
thought to be members of a group i 
S* S^^tly waiked through this I 
NorrhlmeMali for exercise, accord- i 
mg to news reports, 
pie spokesman. Rick Flanagan. 
“J" not w* known why fee 

PCf™ rf ^ at 11 "My have been 
tipped over by a tractor. (Reuters) 



























































































































* / 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


lit 


I M 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


FUBUSflgD WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON HWt 


Beijing Isn’t Berlin 


Bill Clinton offered a revealing 
glimpse into his thinking about China 
when he predicted on Tuesday that 
liberty would eventually triumph 
there, much as freedom brought down 
the Berlin Wall. The demise of com- 
munism may come someday in China, 
but it would be a mistake to adopt a 
passive American policy based on that 
optimistic prospect, as President Clin- 
ton seems to be doing. There is already 
abundant evidence suggesting that 
communism in China is not dying but 
is instead mutating into a new form that 
tolerates economic liberties while still 
suffocating political freedom. 

Mr. Clinton's press conference re- 
marks. read closely, were an argument 
against pushing China hard on human 
rights and iniemal political reform. 
The problem with this analysis is that it 
indulges Chinese repression and may 
be taken by Beijing as a sign of Amer- 
ican weakness. Likening China to 
Europe, when it comes to the course of 
communism, is a risky approach. 

America does not face a new Cold 
War with China, and does not need a 
containment policy to deal with 
Beijing. But Washington does need to 
be more assertive about its interests, 
more demanding in seeking an end to 
China's human rights abuses and less 
willing to sacrifice American principles 
for American commerce in China. 

There is a good chance that Mr. 
Clinton's stewardship of American for- 
eign policy will be judged in substan- 
tial measure by his handling of China as 
it takes its place among the great 
powers. So. too, will the leadership of 
Vice President A1 Gore, who plans to 
play a larger role on China in the 
months ahead, and that of Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright, whose com- 
mitment to human rights and demo- 
cracy faces its severest test in C hina. 

Mr. Clinton's faith in the power of 
trade and information to liberate China 
is stirring but unrealistic, and his ana- 
logy to the Berlin wall oversimplified. 
The increasing flow of information and 
the allure of nee markets helped un- 
dermine authoritarian governments in 
Eastern Europe, but these regimes did 
not voluntarily surrender power. Com- 
munism in East European states col- 
lapsed abruptly because the Soviet 
Union decl ined to sustain it any longer 
with force and economic aid, and most 
of East Europe's corrupt regimes 


lacked the means and killer instinct to 
terrorize their citizens. 

In the case of the Soviet Union, eco- 
nomic stagnation, an explosion of na- 
tionalism and political reforms initiated 
by Mikhail Gorbachev played a decisive 
role in the demise of communism. 

Chinese conditions are quite differ- 
ent The country, unlike those behind 
the Berlin Wall, is g aining economic 
strength, not losing it. Communism is 
not maintained by an outside power but 
by the Chinese government itself, with 
the assistance of the military. Sup- 
pressed ethnic nationalism is not an 
explosive force. With China's leaders 
maneuvering for power in anticipation 
of the death of Deng Xiaoping, there is 
little likelihood of political liberaliz- 
ation any time soon. 

The economic reforms initialed by 
Mr. Deng In 1979 have indisputably 
introduced free markets in China, and 
prosperity has spread to its major cit- 
ies. producing the beginnings of a 
middle class. But even China's eco- 
nomic experimentation has been con- 
trolled by a government determined to 
maintain its political authority. There 
is little sign that China's booming 
economy has produced concrete polit- 
ical change, or even the intangible spir- 
it of liberty that Mr. Clinton considers 
inevitable. China has done its best to 
restrict the flow of information to cit- 
izens, even limiting access to financial 
data and the Internet. 

In recent months the government has 
rounded up political dissidents and con- 
signed them to long prison terms after 
carefully managed trials. The U.S. State 
Department reports that by the end of 
last year all active dissidents in China 
had been jailed or exiled, a disheart- 
ening record that even the Soviet Union 
could not match once Stalin was gone. 

On the clearest current question of 
Chinese intentions, the return of Hong 
Kong to China this summer. Beijing 
has left little doubt drat it will strip 
Hong Kong of its liberties, even if that 
diminish es the economic benefits of 
the transfer to China. 

It is welcome to hear Mr. Clinton 
acknowledge that 4 ‘constructive en- 
gagement” with China has yielded dis- 
appointing progress on human rights 
issues. Unhappily, he seems to be un- 
der die illusion that future results will 
be different 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Goal Is America and China on Good Terms 


D AVOS, Switzerland — Asia and 
America are prominent on the 
agenda as political and business leaders 
oieet here in the Swiss Alps at the annual 
World Economic Forum. And so it 
should be. The relationship between the 
United States and Asia, especially 
China, will set the stage for global pol- 
itics in die next century. 

Madeleine Albright, the new U.S. 
Secretary of State, has correctly elev- 
ated Asia to priority status in the foreign 
policy of die second Clinton admin- 
istration. The relative neglect of Asia 
for much of the tenure of her prede- 
cessor, Warren Christopher, damaged 
U.S. interests and created a vacuum in 
the region until Washington realized 
the danger during the past year. 

The resultant rebuilding of Amer- 
ica's alliances with Japan and Australia, 
the renewed attention paid to the As- 
sociation of South East Asian Nations, 
the rapprochement and budding defense 
relationship with India, quiet diplomacy 
on the Korean Peninsula, a show of 
strength and resolve over Taiwan, and 
above ail a concerted policy of com- 
prehensive engagement with China 
have enhanced the U.S. position in the 
region and given Mrs. Albright a sound 
foundation on which to build. 

But bard work is ahead. Many issues 
crowd the agenda for 1997. In one way 
or another, they all involve China. 


By David Shambangh 

If die Asia-Pacific Economic _ Co- 
operation forum and die international, 
economy are to be strengthened, China 
must be brought into die World Trade 
Organization. A window of opportunity 
exists to negotiate terms of accession 
acceptable to Beijing, Washington, the 
European Union and WTO member 
states — but probably for no more than 
the next 12 months. The political will to 
do so could erode quickly if progress 
were not made soon. 

If China is not included in the WTO 
under trams that uphold the integrity of 
the institution, it will remain a rogue 
trading state that will be a highly dis- 
ruptive force in the global commercial 
and financial system. But if China is 
brought into the WTO, it will be forced 
to accelerate its economic reforms. It 
will become a more predictable busi- 
ness partner, and its large trade sur- 
pluses, including those with the United 
States, will be reduced. 

Hong Kong’s reversion to China in 
mid- 1997 will be the biggest test of 
whether Beijing can be trusted. As Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton noted in a speech in 
November to the Australian Parliament, 
it will be a “litmus test” of whether 
China can be a productive partner in the 
community of nations 


Beijing’s recent mows are not en- 
couraging. Many countries ® Asia and 
t he West, as well as the United Nations 
(with which the Chinese-British Joint 
Declaration is registered as an inter- 
national treaty), the World Court and 
the court of international public opin- 
ion, all have a high stake in ensuring 
that China and' its anointed officials in 
Hong Kong mamtain the territory’s ex- 
isting way of life and institutions. His- 
tory will judge harshly those who sit on 
their hands while Beijing attempts fo 
roll back Hong Kong’s established in- 
stitutions and freedoms. 

Another maw issue in which Wash- 
ington and Beijing have a large stake ** 
Taiwan. There is no simple formula for 
solving this intractable problem. The 
two sides flexed muscles over Taiwan a 
year ago, but have since taken stock of 
die j phPTY ynf dangers in the situation. 

The best guarantee of avoiding an- 
other confr ontati on in the Taiwan Strait 
is for Taipei, Beijing and Washington 
to agree on an acceptable formula for 
the 21 million Taiwanese to enjoy in- 
ternational representation short of be- 
ing recognized as a nation-state. 

China has always declared that it will 
not tolerate a “one China, one Taiwan’ ’ 
arrangement, but in fact it has accepted 
a “China, Taipei” formula in the 
Olympic Gaines, the Asian Develop- 
mentBank, the International Monetary 


Fund, the World Health Organization 
and other international bodies. 

International representation for 
Taiwan's citizens is the nub of the 
issue. If Beijing can give Taipei such 
"face,” and legitimate representation 
in global institutions, the independence 
movement on the island will be blunted 
and President Lee Teng-hui’s govern- 
ment will have little reason not to work 
out a modus vivendi leading to re- 
unification with the mainland. 

But for this to happen Beijing must 
abandon its zero-sum view of Taipei's 
place in the world, as we Has its policy of 
coercive diplomacy. For its part, Taipei 
must be ready to bargain sincerely and 
earnestly. It may never have another, or 
better, chance. The United States has a 
role to play, probably behind the scenes, 
in bringing about such a bargain. 

If the Taiwan problem can be re- 
solved, the road to productive Chinese- 
U-S. relations will be opened There is 


no „ , _ 

and prosperity for the Asia-Pacific re- 
gion than an amicable relationship be- 
tween America and China. 

The writer. professor of international 
fairs and director of tne Sigur Center 
Jor Asian Studies, at George Wash- 
ington University in Washington, con- 
tributed this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


f: 


f t 


l«s 


r-‘"! ‘ 

»i.-n "* 


Join Forces to Solve the Shareholder- Stakeholder Equation 


A Bad Amendment 


D AVOS, Switzerland — A 
critical change brought by 
the emergence of the network 
society is the lightning mobility 
of capital flows around the 
world This creates permanent 
pressure for high returns on 
capital so as to keep flows mov- 
ing inward rather man outward 
— to attract investment by 
providing the most conducive 
environment for it. 

This is leading to a situation 
in which capital markets are 
more and more perceived as 
dictating the course of events, 
forcing or tying the hands of 
policymakers, and fostering a 
mood that a top European busi- 
ness leader calls “share value 
fotichism.” Financial capital- 
ism is today overtaking man- 
ufacturing capitalism. 

If this trend is not kept under 
check by strong, farsighted cor- 
porate leadership, which bal- 
ances the short term interests of 


By KlatiB Schwab and Claude Smadja 

This is the second of two articles. 


shareholders with the long-term 
interests of the company, it is 
bound to exacerbate resentment, 
social tensions and labor strife. 

Counsel or not, a perception is 
already quite widespread that the 
benefits of the changes so far 
have gone to shareholders and 
financiers, while walkers were 
left to bear the costs. 

• Tackling this issue is made 
even mare difficult by a weak- 
ening, even a disintegration, of 
political power at the same time 
that the emergence of the net- 
work society concentrates eco- 
nomic power. This issue has not 
received as much attention as it 
should. If the present trend were 
to continue unchecked, its im- 
plications would prove serious 
for social and political stability. 

Most governments are en- 


countering serious difficulties 
in adjusting to an era of in- 
stantaneous and mulusourced 
information and communica- 
tion. They are being deprived of 
what was until recently a classic 
instrument of power — priv- 
ileged information. And they 
have to act and react at a pace 
for which their structures and 
modes of decision-making are 
in many cases not prepared. 

Governments’ mar gin of ma- 
neuver is today seriously limited 
by the crisis of credibility and 
moral authority that most indus- 
trialized countries are going 
through* and by the pressure to 
cot government spending and re- 
duce budget deficits. 

Meanwhile, last year's wave 
of mega-mergers and acquisi- 
tions is expected to continue 


and even expand tins year. The 
dominant role that transnational 
corporations -play today in in- 
ternational trade flows, and 
competition to attract foreign 
investment attention, create a 
perception that there is today a 
definite shift of power in favor 
of the capital markets and fi- 
nancial capitalism. 

The magnitude of the con- 
ceptual add -political challenge 
we are facing is such that no 
single group can provide appro- 
priate answers, or answers ac- 
to other social groups. 
i we need urgently is a con- 


business and labor 1 
Governments will have to re- 
design fae way they function 
and assign priorities, lest they 
be sidelined on key economic 
issues where their role nonethe- 
less remains essential to help 
balance conflicting interests 
and make sure that the most 


vulnerable groups in society get 
protection and assistance. 

Trade unions will have to re- 
define their role and priorities if 
they want to protect the interests 
of working people while not cre- 
ating obstacles to job creation. 

And corporations need to 
give new meaning to the old 
notion of corporate responsibil- 
ity. Business leaders will have to 
strike a new balance between the 
imperative of anticipating fast 
changes and the need for a long- 
term view, even if it sometimes , 
means resisting the pressure for v* 
instant shareholder gratifica- 
tion. Managing the shareholder- 
stakeholder equation is more 
than ever a critical priority. 

Klaus Schwab is founder and 
president of the World Econom- 
ic Forum, andClaude Smadja is 
its managing director. They 
contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


Congress threatens to pass a bal- 
anced-budget amendment to the U.S. 
Constitution just as the country ap- 
proaches an era in which, as a practical 
matter, a balanced budget will be neither 
possible nor desirable to achieve. The 
retirement of the baby boomers, which 
will begin about lOyeans from now, will 
put an enormous drain on the Treasury. 
Revenues wifi go down as the boomers 
leave the work force, while costs for 
Social Security. Medicare and other 
benefits will go sharply up. 

The costs can be cut a bit, but they 
cannot be avoided. The generations still 
in the work force will not be able to pay 
them out of current income without a 
larger tax increase than any president or 
Congress will want to levy, or should. 
To sustain the boomers while meeting 
its other obligations, the government 
will have to borrow vast amounts of 
money. That is one of the reasons for 
seeking to balance die budget now. The 
government ought to be trying to re- 
duce today the debt it is going to have to 
increase so much in the future. 

The balanced-budget amendment 
would be a bad idea under any cir- 
cumstances. Adopting it just as its terms 
become impossible to fulfill would be 
to magnify its defects even more. 

The measure does not guarantee a 
balanced budget. Rather, it makes an 
unbalanced budget harder lo pass. 
Three-fifths votes of both houses 
would be required, rather than simple 
majorities, as now. What the measure 
would really enshrine in the consti- 
tution is not fiscal responsibility but 
minority rule. A bloc of 40 percent plus 
one of either house could hold the 
government hostage on whatever issue 
it pleased. How often do you think 
these shifting minorities would be 
seeking less for their constituents, as 
opposed to more? The effect would be 
to raise, not lower, the price of adopting 
a budget each year — the more so in a 
setting where the government had no 
choice but to run a deficit and there was 
already fierce competition for fluids. 

The amendment would do. other 
damage as well. It would likely ex- 
acerbate recessions by continuing to 


force the deficit down when it ought to 
be expanding to offset faltering private 
demand. It would breed all manner of 
fictions and dodges as the politicians 
sought to evade its terms — and in the 
face of such evasions, it is not clear 
how the amendment would be en- 
forced. Would the courts write the 
budget? Or would the command of 
the amendment finally be winked at, 
in which case the constitution would 
be doubly trashed? 

The Republicans are pushing the 
proposal. The Senate may begin debate 
next week, and both houses are sup- 
posed to vote toward the end of the 
month. The vote in each is expected to 
be close. The president ana Demo- 
cratic leaders can beat it if they provide 
sufficient cover and apply enough 
pressure to keep their troops in line. 

The right way to get the deficit down 
is to cast the votes to do so now, not lay 
die burden on some future Congress 
that may not be able to meet it Mem- 
bers know that This is a fake show of 
strength and abuse of the constitution 
whose effect would be to harm tbe 
system of government it purports to 
help. They should vote it down. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

Other Comment 


Progress in the New Millennium? The Will May Be There 


XTALENCIA, Spain — 
V There is fashion in inter- 
national conferences, as in 
clothes or music, and the fa- 
vorite now is die new millen- 
nium. Valencia, with support 
from Unesco and others, has 
launched itself as a center for 
intellectual debate on the 
“Challenges of the Third Mil- 
lennium," looking back to see 
how far we have come and try- 
ing to peer ahead. 

The three-day meeting last 
weekend was revealing, as 
much in the reaction of the over- 
flow Spanish audience as in the 
messages of participants from 
all continents. There were ex- 
prime ministers, academics, hu- 
manitarian activists. 

But the stars were the artists, 
including the British actor Sir 
Peter Ustinov, the Italian writer 
Umberto Eco, the Peruvian 
writer Mario Vargas Llosa. And 
the central issue corned out to 


By Flora Lewis 


be optimism versus pessimism. 

Mr. Eco pointed out that the 
line of zeroes coming up on the 
calendar is arbitrary; time in- 
terlocks from one culture to an- 
other, but nonetheless it keeps 
moving. In 1831, he noted. 
Stendhal wrote that “Madame 
de R£nal was almost 30, but she 
was still a charming woman,” 
and he asked. “Would you have 
wanted to live then, in the cen- 
tury before aspirin?” 

K. Natwar Singh, a former 
Indian foreign minister, warned 
glumly, however, that “pro- 
gress is not inherent in history 
— it is an English concept, and 
a failed concept.” 

And an 85-year-old Spaniard 
in the audience, a lively man 
who will surely see the 21st 
century, marveled at the won- 
ders predicted for science that 
be has seen come true, and 


asked: “Why then don’t welive 
with more dignity? Is there a 
black hand upon us?” 

Tbe biggest applause came 
for the Spanish writer Antonio 
Gala, who said that “human 
rights denied one person erodes 
the humanity of all.” This is 
even more than the golden rule 
of “Do unto others as you 
would have them do unto you," 
he added, because “there is 
now a responsibility for those 
who are far, far away.” 
Valencia is apartictilarly suc- 
cessful city, reflecting the new 
Spain. Now 12 miflioo, it has 
managed to modernize with rare 
harmony, so that old monuments 
and new b uildings complement 
each other gracefully without 
squashing people. So its inhab- 
itants cheer warmly the ideals of 
peace, progress, compassion. 

But they are not alone. It is 


Dim Public Servants Recalling an Infamous Downsizer 


With the notable exceptions of 
Hong Kong and Singapore, even the 
lowliest business manager is likely to 
be more cosmopolitan in outlook than 
his [Asian] public-sector counterpart. 

With few exceptions. Asia’s gov- 
ernment workers remain miserably un- 
derpaid. Not only does low pay en- 
courage officials to supplement then- 
incomes through corruption, it virtu- 
ally guarantees a second-rate civil ser- 
vice because all the talented people can 
make much more in the private sector. 

Coupled with pay is education. 
Singapore’s top-ranked civil servants 
are no accident. 

— Far Eastern Economic Review 
i Hong Kong). 


W ASHINGTON — To 
judge by the PBS bio- 
graphy of Andrew Carnegie, 
that industrial baron was a com- 
plicated man, both avaricious 
and generous, whose life tells us 
something about our own times. 
He wanted to be remembered 
for doing good, but when be 
died be was mostly remem- 
bered for doing bad. 

His black, mark was the 
Homestead Strike of 1892. It 
featured a pitched battle be- 
tween the steelworkers and the 


private army of Pinkertons that 
Carnegie and his man, Henry 
Cay Frick, had hired. Neither 


ESTABLISHED 1S87 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen 

KATHARINE P. DARROW, Vice Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher A Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GbTLER, Executive Editor 

• WALTER WELLS. Managing Editor • PAUL HORVITZ. Depun Managing Editor 
' KATHERINE KNORR and CHARLES MmCHELMQRE. Deputy EJiun • SAMUEL ABTand 
CARL GEWIRTZ. Anuria? Editors • ROBERT J. DONAHUE, Editor of the Editorial Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE, Business and Fmave Editor 
• RENfi BONDY. Deputy PuNisfwr 

• JAMES McLEOD. AJwmswg Director • DIDIER BRUN, Ctrcukttion Director. 
Direaeur de la Publication ■ Richard McClean 


tanratioaal Herald Tribune, 181 Ai*cnac Charfes-de-OauHe. 92521 NanUy-sar-Seinc. France. 
TcL: 1 1 1 41.43.93.110. Far Circ, ( I J 41,43.92.10; A«tv„ I 1} 41.4191 IL E-Mail: ta@ihLCGn 

Editor f‘* Am Michael Kchardson. 5 Comrrban Rd.SuigoporrQSU. Tel. 10SI472-7M. Fas: 1651^4-2334 
Mng. Dir. And. RotfD Krtmejnhl.50 Gloucester RtL Hong Kong Tel. 352-2922-1/38. Fax- 852-2922-1190 
Gen jfjjr Gmnmy I Sch&rr. Fnrdndar. l5 6D323Fmi^rtM.Td 69V7J2JM Fat: +49 &I97I302Q 

Pm VS Mu few Caem. SJO Hard Ave., Ne* Yori. NJ.1002. TeL (2/2) 752-3S9Q Fax: (2/21 75SJ785 
L ; JC. Advcrtisuig Office: t>J Lmg Arw. London WC2. Tel. ( 171 } 836^802. Fas : ( 171) 240-2254 
SAS. an capital de 1 200M0 F. RCS Naruem B 732021/20. Commission Paritain No. 61337 
*5/ W. Iiuffiawwl HeraM Tribute. Alt rtgfo reserved. ISSN- 0294-8052. 



side was exactly dean. 

The Homestead union, tbe 
Amalgamated Association, for- 
bade apprenticeships, con- 
trolled the output of its mem- 
bers and segregated the work by 
nationality — _ the Welsh 
manned tbe rolling mills, the 
Irish die Bessemer process. 
And when replacements were 
needed, the union recruited 
them overseas. 

The steelworkers were dirt 
poor. When they lost their jobs, 
they lost their homes as wdQ. 
After the strike they were black- 
balled throughout die industry, 
while Carnegie and Frick both 
amassed great fortunes. 

How could a man who be- 
lieved in the eight-boor work- 
day (the standard was then 12), 
unionism and paying a fair 
wage have busted the one re- 
maining union at Homestead? 

Carnegie needed to be effi- 
cient. Other plants were coining 
on line that could make steel a bit 
cheaper, he had to back down on 


By Richard Cohen 


the eight-hour day when no other 
company would follow suit 
Hom e stead was not profitable, 
although tbe Carnegie company 
certainly was. Not even Carne- 
gie was immune from the forces 
we call the free market 

The same arguments are 
made today to defend down- 
sizing and the lamentable need 
to lay off workers. We are told 
that nothing can be done about 
it, since if wages are not re- 
duced and benefits are not 
trimmed, if executives don’t, 
make more and their workers 
less, then we would lose 
everything to somewhere — 
y’know, Japan or Mexico or 
maybe Thailand. 

Things are not as dire in 
America now as they were a 
century ago, but ample evi- 
dence suggests that your av- 
erage worker, die working man 
of lore, has been having a hard 
time of it Poorer workers are 
doing even more poorly, losing 
wages, losing benefits and in 
many cases their jobs. These 
trends, once thought to have 
abated, in fact persisted through 
tbe last third of 1996. 

In a recent address, former 
Labor Secretary Robert Reich 
tried to call attention to this 
inequality, saying that “the gap 
today is wider than at any tune 
in living memory.” He was 
scornful of those who lament 
what is happening but insist that 
nothing mu be done about ft. If 
that is the case, then in the long 
run we will “cease being a. so- 


ciety” — certainly one with 
any pretense of fairness. 

Notably, though, Mr. Reich 
does not say who is going to {day 
referee, restore fairness and, 
maybe, a healthy sense of ob- 
ligation. The etftc of tbe moment 
is so incredibly selfish that busi- 
ness executives are able to reap 
bonanzas for failing — haven’t 
you heard of Michael Ovjtz? 

When the rich get richer and 
die poor get poorer, the social 
compact — die belief that we 
are all in tins together — starts 
to shred. Mr. Reich said it this 
way: “We are not merely an 
economy, but a culture.” 

In Carnegie's time it was the 
government thaz eventually 
moved in to referee the contest 
between capital and labor. It 
protected the union, established 
the eight-hour day, got kids out 
of the mines and ensured rtwr 
unemployment was not synon- 
ymous with starvation. 

Now, maybe because it has 
overdone it, flew talk about a 
government role anymore. Not 
even Mr. Reich calls upon gov- 
ernment to right the wrongs he' 
outlined in his speech. 

America has always been en- 
amored- of business and suspi- 
cious of government. Maybe 
this outlook has served us well. 
But at die end of the 20th cen- 
tury. just as at die end of foe 
19th, a growing inequality will 
ultimately demand mat govern- 
ment force business to do tbe 
right tiling. Otherwise, as the 
life of Andrew Carnegie makes 
clear, even good people will do 
bad things to make a buck. 

The Washington Post. 


clear that people everywhere 
are hungry for words of en- 
couragement and hope, and the 
thought of a millennium that is 
not committed to deliver them 
is unacceptable. 

Strangely, there was scarcely 
any mention of what science and 
adventure can confidently be 
expected to offer humankind in 
the years stretching ahead. In the 
late 19th century, progress was 
an article of faith, and it 
was based on what the explosion 
of invention and knowledge 
would surely brings Now, tech- 
nological advance is taken' for 
-granted, it inspires little awe. 

The question of progress, of 
optimism, is focused on people, 
on social justice, on stopping 
the ravages of poverty, in short 
on moral and ethical progress, 
which are in doubt 

There is, I think, a fair mea- 
sure of progress in candor, 
which expresses at least what 
we acknowledge ought to be 
done even if we don’t achieve it 
There are still wars, but war is 
no longer, as it was for much of 
civilized history, a path to 
glory, a test of supreme virtue. 
Even those who preach it deny 
aggression, which used to be 
vaunted, and claim purely de- 
fensive justification. 

Poverty and vulnerability are 
tolerated, even exploited, but 
neither extolled nor accepted as 
naturally ordained. 

There is in the talk, if not yet 
in fact, an awareness of human- 
ity as a whole, inextricably 
linked. Sir Shridarh Ramphal, 
the former Commonwealth sec- 


retary-general, said the era calls 
for an “international civil sor 
ciety” and a "Pax Planeta.” 
Hie “Pax Americana is already 
outofdate/’hcsaid. a 

Globalization is not so new. ~ 
of course. The French historian 
Maurice Aymard chose to date 
it to Europe's discoveiy of 
America in 1492, which glob- 
alized a lot of things including 
microbes (tuberculosis west, 
syphilis east) and vegetables 
(potatoes, tobacco, com etc.) 
But it has a new impact on the 
way people think, and rules out 
the excuse of ignorance about 
what is happening to others. 

There was not much in the 
way of practical proposals 
about how to make the third 
millennium work better for hu- 
manity. There were no new 
ideas, no doubt not for lack of 
imagination but because tbe im-^ 
portant ideas are on the familiar ' 
list and risk sounding trite or 
utopian without deeds. 

As Sweden’s ex -Prime Min- 
ister Ola Ullsteu said, “We 
already know what has to be 
done, and for the most part we 
even know how to do it It’s 
political will that's lacking.’’ 

Perhaps the old unquestioning 
belief in progress brought too 
much disappointment in demon- 
strating that there are never per- 
fect solutions, only the oppor- 
tunity to face new problems. But 
Valencia and all the other places 
where a new millennium evokes 
thought show that fatalism, cyn- 
icism have not won. Aspiration, 
and goodwill, exist 

© Flora Lewis. 



In OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: Stuart Loyalists This text approves mak- ^ 

SS3WWSS! SSSmSj v 

Queen as “the present occupant the stamx agree 1 2 

of the Throne/’ obsetvedfae Z n0t * fort ^ 

anniversary of tbe execution in dudine m " 

1649 of King Charles the First Hnno Guam, i the Philippines, 

“The Martyr.” Two yea-saoo Bonin. FoSnosa 

teesonabk inscripdom wS “ d ^ Pesrado «s. 
placed on floral emblems round 1AA - 
the king’s statue in Trafalgar Sweets Seized 

square, but this year the Stuarts’ 

fnllmvaiv had (a ...l 


followers had to sutatit U th5r 5??® , ** 80 attempt to 

wreaths to the Chief Commis- flou J? s ! lin e black 

»f Worts. Some LeX ““h™ raided 

and 
huge 


, vyiiiuua- 

sioncr of Works. Some Legit- 
imists tried to introduce wreaths 
which had not been passed, but 
the police scared them away. 


“VU Muautl 

Rome’s swankiest cafes 
restaurants and seized huge 

1922: IVt on Islands 

WASHINGTON - The Jap- . 

anese delegation to the DisaroT kHnSSSf of * whlIe n °^- 5,000 9 
ament Conference received the SwJPTk 1 * SUgar ' 50 kiI °- 
reply on Japan’s position re- °L£ UtlBr e ggs. and 

garding fortifications in the Pa- iSnSf!?™* ^ sheets which 

win oe distributed to the poor 





i 


PAGE 9 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 


(, 


""< 1 '/; 


\ 


OPINION /LETTERS 


( \ In East European Thaw, 
Old Griefs Melt Away 

By Miklos Harassed 


* 


i«Ut 


Iff K 


N EW YORK — The West ob- 
serves the crises in Serbia and 
Bulgaria with mixed emotion. 
-Can the movements for change 
bring an end to hatred in these 
countries? Or will events vindi- 
cate the pessimists, who see na- 
tionalism as communism’s des- 
tined replacement in Eastern 

Europe? 

Old animosities once con- 
sidered unalterable are melting 
■away in the region, and European 
unification is advancing. Evi- 
dence of this is the recent recon- 
ciliation between Hungary and 
(Romania, as significant as the 
[first free elections after the fall 
of communism. 

] last September, Hungary 
land Romania signed a “land for 
ethnic rights’* treaty. At issue 
,'was the fabled land of 
Transylvania, which changed 
hands three times in this century 
(before the World War II peace 
awarded it to Romania. The Hun- 
garians in Transylvania, long the 
■largest minority in Europe, were 
subjected to the fiercely nation- 
alistic dictatorship of Nicolae 
Ceausescu. 

After the breakup of the 
Jt Warsaw Pact, debate re-emerged. 
Romania accused Hungary of re- 
visionist ambitions, and Hungary 
charged Romania with abuse of 
minority rights. 

But the reconciliation treaty 
settled this dispute. Hungary 
formally renounced all claims 
to its former territories — the 
first such action ever taken by 
•an independent Hungarian gov- 
ernment. 

Romania, for its part, guaran- 
teed Western European-type- 
minority rights to its 2 million 
ethnic Hungarian citizens. 

This reconciliation was 
achieved by two nations whose 
enmity had been another land 
mine under Europe' s peace. Thus, 
^ the countries of Eastern Europe 
are limiting their own sovereignty 
and moving away from the her- 
itage of the ethnic stare - — ca- 
pabilities that make them suitable 
for inclusion in NATO and the 
European Union. 

Now it’s the West’s turn to re- 
cognize these developments as 
parallel to those in Western 
Europe during the postwar peri- 
od. 

The region's growing mistrust 


of nationalists, be they ex-Com- 
munists or anti-Commumsts, is 
nicely demonstrated in (be evo- 
lution of the Romaman-Hungari- 
an accord. The Hungarian debate 
over the treaty began in 1990 and 
threatened to last decades. 

But in 2994, Hungarian voters 
cut the controversy short by elect- 
ing the Socialist and liberal 
parties, which promised to declare 
the Versailles and Yalta borders 
unchangeable and to sign agree- 
ments to that effect with Slovakia 
and Romania. 

In Romania, there was a simi- 
lar evolution. Those opposed to 
the treaty complained that the 
guar antees of minority rights 
went too far. 

But there, too, the pact’s 
supporters were vindicated by 
elections. 

And just a month ago, the vic- 
torious Liberal-Social Democrat- 
ic coalition formed a common 
government with the ethnic Hun- 
garian Party. 

Is this something that post- 
Kremiin pessimists would have 
ever predicted? 

Past passions survive benignly 
in nmmcRs of language; Romani- 
ans like to cite the French-German 
reconciliation as their model, 
which primarily sealed the trans- 
fer of territories. The Hungarians 
use the Austzian-Italian agree- 
ment, in which the rights of the 
ethnic Austrians were the main 
concern. In airy case, what has 
been achieved stands firmly in 
the tradition of earlier European 
d&entes. 

The future inevitably holds fur- 
ther disputes; ethnic issues will be 
around far centuries to come. But 
no longer will national borders be 
the issue, and the ballot will 
provide the answers. 

Central and Eastern Europe, 
die place where world wars, 
fascism and communism began, 
are developing resistance to 
chauvinisms that feed each 
other, hi this recovery, Hungary 
and Romania show the free 
of health. 


The writer, a visiting scholar 
at Bard College, was a member 
of the Hungarian Parliament 
and is the author of “ The Velvet 
Prison He contributed this 
comment to The Hew York 
Times. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Euro Skeptics 

Regarding “The Euro? A Fool- 
ish Plan That Could Do Harm All 
Around" (Opinion, Jan. 9) by 
Robert J. Samuelsoru 

Mr. Samuelson’s idea that 
U.S. officials ought to stop treat- 
ing the euro project with “re- 
spectful silence’’ and “express 
the skepticism it deserves*' is 
probably die surest way to make 
sure the single-currency project 
succeeds. 

Any serious indication that 
the United States might abandon 
its strict neutrality on the euro 
would induce die Europeans to 
dose ranks and push the pro- 
ject ahead, maybe somewhat 
blindly and more quickly than 
expected. 

MICHEL LELEU. 

Antony, France. 

Stability in Europe 

Regarding “Let's Be Serious: 
There's No Good Reason to' En- 
large NATO" ( Opinion , Jan. 19) 
by Mikhail Gorbachev and " Dis- 
senters on NATO Growth Becom- 
ing VocaT (Jan. 20): 


No one wants to see the Continent 
ever again engulfed by war. But 
broadening the military power 
of the North Atlantic Treaty 
tion is not the answer. 
To even the casual observer, 
the arguments made in favor of 
a larger NATO do not hold 
water. The idea of a “threat’’ 
is so simplistic as to be laugh- 
able. Arguments involving a 
“gray zone” or “security vacu- 
um” are no longer valid. Con- 
juring up this old Cold War 
specter obscures a new concept of 
security in Europe. 

A juxtaposition needs to be 
made between NATO enlarge- 
ment and expansion of die Euro- 
pean Union. Which will achieve 
increased security? Which do in- 
formed Central and East Euro- 
pean citizens say is more impor- 
tant to them? A more inclusive 
EU. This is especially true when 
discussing the exorbitant costs of 
admitting new members into the 
military alliance. Education, so- 
cial security, health care, employ- 
ment — these are the issues of 
most immediate concern to 
people. The hawks in some gov- 
ernments would like to believe 


These Borrowers Put Up 
What They Have: Spirit 


By Ellpn Goodman 


e all want European stability, otherwise. 


For the past two years, debate 
has raged on the issue of NATO 
expansion, but it has not been 
widely reported in the mainstream 
media. Also, as the second article 
points out, government pro- 
ponents of enlargement have “de- 
liberately confined the issue to 
diplomatic channels and avoided 
domestic discussion.” 

This deliberate decision to 
avoid public debate has served to 
impede discussion of Che many 
sound reasons not to expand 
NATO, or at least not in such a 
short time frame. 

SHARON L. RIGGLE. 

Brussels. 

'Meddling 5 at Home 

Regarding "Dissidence in 
China Now Tamed, U.S. Finds " 
(Jan. 29): 

Contrary to what China's 
leaders charge. Americans don’t 
warn; to meddle in China's inter- 
nal affairs. They simply would 
like die average Chinese citi- 
zen to be able to freely 
“meddle” in China's internal 
affairs. 

Eriks vane. 

Paris. 


B OSTON — Silvia Dillard 
wasn’t exactly a banker's 
dream customer. 

The only collateral the 34-year- 
old mother had was an entrepren- 
eurial spirit. Banks don’t tend to 
count on spirit. It's so bard to 
repo. 

Besides, the Bostonian raising 
three kids on herown is the first to 
admit that her personal credit was 

MEANWHILE 

“shot to belL” After a brief stint 
on welfare, Ms. Dillard says, “I 
didn't see any light at the end of 
the tunnel.” Bat she had a dream 
of starting her own business. 

So did Kathleen Gaskin. An up- 
holsterer ever since she worked for 
her father in Trinidad. Ms. Gaskin 
came to a crunch time when she 
was divorced with three daughters 
and an autistic son. Her son’s 
school bus and her employer's in- 
flexible hours collided: “I knew I 
had to be self-employed.” 

What these two women lacked 
was working capital. At least 
$500 for Kathleen to get a foam- 
cutting machine and staple gun. 
At least $500 for Silvia to pur- 
chase a vacuum cleaner, supplies 
and business cards to promote her 
new cleaning company, MAAD: 
Mothers Against Ail Din. 

And what these two women 
found was Working Capital. They 
connected with the largest of the 
handful of programs in America 
that are acting as banks for tire 
bankless — about 2,400 bankless 
women and men in 10 states. 

Working Capital offers micro- 
credit — loans between $500 and 
$5,000 — to people, mostly wo- 
men. through organizations in poor 
urban and rural communities. 

The idea began in Bangladesh 
20 years ago and spread to some 
of the poorest pockets of devel- 
oping countries where $2 can 
make all die difference. Now de- 
spite its thoroughly unsexy name, 
microcrodithas become as much a 
movement as an economic devel- 


Indeed on Thursday, Jeffrey 
Ashe, die former Berkeley free- 
speedier and former Peace Corps- 
man who founded Working Cap- 
ital, was given one of the fim-ever 
Presidential Awards for Excel- 
lence in Microenterprises. And on 
Feb. 2. die first microcredit sum- 


mit meeting is expected to bring 
2,000 people from around die 
world to Washington to launch a 
global campaign to reach 100 
million of the world's poorest. 

Like many of the overseas 
microcredit enterprises. Working 
Capital is not just a moneylender. 
The heart of the nonprofit op- 
eration is community building 
through group lending. 

Customers, as they are called, 
organize into small loan groups 
like the one that Silvia Dillard has 
dubbed SWIMM: Smart Women 
Independently Making Money. 

SWIMMers, for instance, meet 
once a month and talk once a 
week. They help each other with 
everything from child-care tips to 
financial advice. 

The members borrow money as 
a group and must repay it as a 
group. One deadbeat freezes 
everyone’s credit. The mutual 
support is also peer pressure. As 
Ms. Dillard says, “2 know, sooner 
or later, I’m going to see Kathleen 
in the supermarket.’ ’ 

This personal connection may 
be why Working Capital has only 
had to write off 3 percent of its 
loam to a population of borrowers 
the banks consider high risk. Il may 
be why microenterprises are being 
seriously touted as a possibility for 
some women who will be coming 
— ready or not — off the welfare 
rolls in the next few years. 

Sometimes, a small loan and a 
strong support group are what's 
needed to bridge the gap between 
an idea and a business, between 
dependence and independence. 

Today Silvia Dillard is paying 
off her first loan, restoring her 
credit and building up her roster 
of customers. Kathleen Gaskin is 
now on her fourth loan cycle, 
about to borrow $2,500 to ren- 
ovate her upholstery shop. 

For Jeffrey Ashe, Working 
Capital also says something about 
how you build community in a 
time when the safety net is un- 
raveling and jobs are scarce: 
“There’s a lesson here about how 
we can get through the millennium 
and not just by surfing die Net. 
This is about old-fashioned face- 
to-face accountability, about trust- 
ing and supporting each other." 

The "lesson” of microcredit is 
the real new math. It’s thinking 
big about lending small. 

The Boston Globe. 


UHM;n lie TJiffl 




REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


^ Reel Estate Sendees 


PMKHTY SEARCH SERVICE, 
FRANCE 

F»c +M (0| 5 62 « 27 91 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Andorra 


\ BEDROOM APARTUQrr, 50 nqjBL, 
new. beta* sfcam room, perk- 
n. Near sta resort. DM 07,000. Tot 
7. fire 82*673 


Canada 




BRITISH COLUMBIA - by owner. New 
Erecufcve-type home, ocean ne*. rant 
extras. Agents wtame. Phone Caret 


(250) 751-3008, Ed (306) 8322104. 


Caribbean 


BEACHFRONT 

ST. CROIX. ILS.WGM GLANDS 
Prime rastiantiaJ community at Candle 
ReeL 1C acre pared with pwdec-soA 
wire? sand beaches, water on ste. 
tnqrtrfc Rfchante A Aptr Rotas 
Phone 808-7724420 
fee 0077*4988 


French Provinces 


12 « FROM GENEVA CENTER. Usu- 
ry, new dn*w. 200 mm 4 bedrooms. 3 
baduooRB. 2 garages, marvelous vtow. 
Tetfex *11 21 625 10 45. 


MOUNTAIN CHALET 
& SKI APARTMENTS 


'A ' ! 


‘ French Aips 


KS8BEL - IE B&VHJERE 
OutstanAn location h the heart at 
■3 Vafinas*. A cfaeM to be butt. hsM- 
abto spaa m be dtOnd torn isi oyn. 
Fittings to pentiaB reqotiwnents. 
Ready to mt-ta Oaten 1907. 
Tfc <33 ft 1 « 00 20 01 


IERJBEL - 1£ B&.VEDERE 
to the heart of *3 Vrttaes' 

85 sgre. apadmefl. retinad decoration, 
ntiurtng tang non rth taffeta. 

2 bedrooms (ate, large toraco. 
rate, sH dosete atom cantata 
Ttt 433 (0) t 43 BO a 01 


COMBtOUX, NEAR VBSWE. Mtidato 
ChateL bntahbnriewon Had BtencV 
100 bul n LS» jam. grin 8 *»n 
* basement. 2 totems. No BUMS. 
Work mte.m&oflon Tat owner 
Puts .433' m 45 35 IS 21. . 


MHSEVE FtXtttEBRU® - 2 feertW 
tats 75 * 30 sl<r 4*5 rooms. Z haM; 
mm. 1U tar. tie* new atoPta 
Goto*, eetar. NO apsn FPI-SOM® 
+ fftolBL.*W34B8 8234 


EXCEPTIONAL HAS PROVENCAL* kl 
theVto; ti acres text ftah house *tir 
tower, 300 sun. Ruing space, 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 hBtfwwns, 55 sqA tiffing 
room, dining room + Bbrery + office. 
GussttaBC S bottom* 3 htihroon* 
40 sqre. bungalow. Swmntapool. 
sauna, Vktt/am, to* iron. FF3.7IL 
+33 (0)142362746 I (0)483347400 


French Riviera 


PEMNSULA OF SAW THOPEZ 
LA CROIX VALUER 
1IL00D sqm tend In Ngfrareteta - 
rcskhrfti area aft samnlng vis* 
w aaaMmyBflfeftmal woods. 

US Dote SSOJDOO. Omar 
TV. 4M9-5T1 Tit fee 4MM28 «t 


CAWES HARR4A, lota 2 room wh* 
tront apartment FFB5&000. Coast & 
Courtly, The Engfish Estate Agents on 
As French RMu. Tet +33(0)4337531 07 


CANNES CAUFQRME 60 sqjn. one 
bedroom flat, ft# nsw. panaame see 
view, pari, pod, warCroisrtte. FFl.Si 
+33 W 4 93 99 73 montage & toms 


Germany 


OF LAID boa your native 
y.ThaextiaonfnHyglt 
i- tor you A your taiy. 
iKtoess partners. Now 

, I new war price U8S 

5.000hqm, al totatin. YJLL Malar. 
Mata ptotiate W®" -829 4422 


Great Britain 


HOHESEARCH LONDON LTD UU* 
search tor you. We find home / Bate 
to boy and rent For taMduals and 
amenta. The pundtesms pndwsteh 
BteTdays-weeTT* r«tnM 
1068 Fast + 44 171 838 1077 
mftffmmmoBBauiiunMim 


Greece 


SYROS ISLAND, GREK. Ilu 
tad with 100 ro. waterfront. Swan oB 
your home of 4 bertraw, JJjta 
trie neat. taffeta. tufty famWtaJ USB 
15 or Dll 22 mBon. For tonher Wool 
Germany (+49) 0221 - 486189. 


Monaco 


MONACO 

PLACE DU DAHNti motel? - 
trildta w«h Moor swta nngpai 
. 154 sun. SPBtBDBnL two WwA 

^vritoesat-Cefajtagwge 
m toe same buftfe* 


. LaParkPtoace 

gawnfttatoOooji 

HC 90)0 Marfa Cato 
. Tto 1377) 9328 15 00 
■ Fk p77) 93 25 35 39 

www in ttaiito nr Anw*"^** Rd** 



Italy 

FDR SALE BY DVNER, hre tautous 
penthouses In Robb, snw Piazza dl 
Eta”* sril s^watiy nr joned. 3000 
5Tfc wlh 1800 sq. ft. tenoe mdlBOO 
. 5 Q. t wtii 1300 sq. 1 teraca tactea- 
br pouramfc tarn of Rons, rerreore 
Wo caBta A. Dirt at p12)20&0642, 
. USA, or ( 6 ) 4782 2003, fry. Brokers 
ptoan abstain. 

Morocco 

MARRAKECH 

SaraaSonti property of 1927 acres 
(7 J ha) tor sab in bentiM prtm ganten 
(Pekneoh). EtdsSng baiting penrtL 
USS 4 mto. 

Contact Tab -+41 1 405 98 55 or 
Fa* +41 1 405 SB 90 ate. StotneggBr 

New Zealand 

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND. New 
WrtMfee, Bay/CSy vton, 2 awrtnentfi 
' * Uy frarttad. E79V519CK uS. detea 
Fax USA: 510647-7837. 

Paris and Suburbs 

PAHS 18th bring bote High class 
anai inert 300 sqm, 1st floor. Staaqr. 
Entrena IriL recepBon room, adjDhmg 
dntog room. Bafcony toting hols. 5 baf 
rooms, 3 bate wffii 3 showers. Eqdpped 
tidwv Indoor staraase irth access to 
ground floor stuctio open otto pihrrte 
gardan 100 sqjn. * Uatifs room wtn 
sfrewar + underground gunge + 3crt- 
tits. Tti +33 99 1 45 26 56 09 

Em. TOWER 

A COHBMATDN OF UGH CLASS 
LUXURT 8 RSFWED DECOHATXXL 
Faeetons txAftia 4#i floor, 8 L 

Darts Suing, 3 bedrooms, 2 btfs. 
Rraptae*. otafS studkJ, pwfc;®- 
Tat 014501 aatilta: OMSOI S 01 B 

CMMMUMBNE 

YVaWES 

8 flfl/WD ICW HtXBES 
Ankble in 1987 
Naar tamport RSI 
From FF 1 . 800,000 to FF.2J1WWL 
DA +33 {191 39 78 a 85 

LIE ADAM - 3Skm from PARK 
Charactar tasa on 4000 stun, tread 
pari. Vast tang, state 4 bedrooms * 
aiteTs atofer. tom eetar. Oremaiy. Nr 
toqtaciioobtt^ 

PARC OE ROCttUQiCOUflfr, near 
VERSALLES. Wflh erase Epertmeni to 
- perfect cottfikA 150 spa. + 50 ayn. 

Sjnesws 

dD«2paitaipitorttaTO0i3as58m - 
0 rD 4 BB 22 59GBF8xM6BQ314(& 

FACING EDm T0WBI 
Dta» 210 am ftoge tetaea. 

Lfll +M (0)142896243 / home 4720B405 


6 th - SAINT GERMAIN DES PRES 
Il XVHtb century tusktan, 102 eqre. 
BporfmanL 4 tn htah wings. Wood 
peneHm, ’Vtosatto parqutt*- - floor, 
ctaro, ported orifcn. WHARTON Td 
® 1 4527 ® 30 


92 SEVRES, in oaoL TOWNHOUSE 
500 sgra. on 800 aepa gantan. Chart 
{1930), retention n 19 <ft 4 Boos, fts- 
ptans. Needs restoring, iq nta Paris, 
frsai Tafc trarnr +33(D)1 46 26 til 83 

' NEWLLT ST JAMES Hurihri 130 
sqm. ’Boupts' Susiy. *■ rt green- 
ary. Perfect condition, refined deoora- 
Nons. F3fl00,000 Tefc 049380 6010. 

RUE DE VAfEWE 7V| - HIGH CLASS 
7 rooms. 240 sqm. Vtow on gnta. 2 
mafds'rooms possible. Parttng. 
F5 ndon. let 1 « 27 30 30 

PARlS-ffflJlLLY/tfOODS Class. 140 
s^ra. dati* Sting 3 bethxns, 2 bstirt 
parting, betaiy, «i floor. Perfect cod-, 
lion KSOOLOOO Owner. 014562 0396. 

7th * ECOLE MUIARE Dorris Mq 
2 bedrooms, TO sqal 49t floor, etourtoc, 
eqiippod kitchen, very sonny, calm. 
F1 450003. Tat +33 (0)1 45 56 07 73. 

LEVALL0B / NHBLLT. DUPLEX, abort 
65 sqJB. LMng, bafruam, balcony ♦ 
trope tames. Parting. FFi^gftMO. 
Tab Owner on +33 (0)1 47 46 SB 81. 

NEULLY, 3 rooms, 5th floor, character 
bufldta. Qortta etasuroMrtiL FI^M 
URSfflT. Owner +33 (0)1 C 47 42 41 

Portugal 

PORTtHAO. LUXURY HOUSE, 300 
sqn. on private ori ooim Guastiimae 
100 sq.HL. poolPrioe USS6S0K Tat 
-HSMnflBBO fat +464590 SS265 

HAftBLE. Vast owtto properties to 
Portugal for sale, fat BRUSSELS 
f+3H) 7B7J408 

ifrain 

COSTA BLANCA SPAM. Estene t* 
Bp residence. Spoctaodar views. 2 
aces. 4 beds, 5 baths Port. PRIVATE 
SALE UK£ ETSjOOQ. Tat (346) 648 B4S6 
Fax (346) 649 7367 

PALHA DE IUUXDRCA, utijBtaMB. 

rtstira^partnert (Urita teSi brttu- 
ny win stoBib vtow) and shop. HOOK 
tactetag chapes. Owner +34 71610500 

Switzerland 


■ ■ r' t 1 

rttiariw prsperflat to MONTREOSt 
VEVEV, VLLAB5, DtABLSIETS, 
CRANS-NDHTAHA ate. 1 to 6 bad 
roorot, SPt 20tU»0 to IS nto 
REV AC 

52, ttnOritari Of mi Geneva 2 
YU AQ2-734 15 « Fte 734 12 20 

ZURICH 

ftpBdmrtG < U 2 reci!KpriteM 0 Qr 
arimtag pout gantei & tonnes wft 
U vtow ot Alpe A Late oe Zurich. 

-Rricfl Umbdctara 
TdIFax +41 1 482 83 01 Ml Lattes. 

USA General 

SOUTH COLORADO - S ACRES. Ha*. 
Iq, feting, river raffing, sting. JS450 
anti » taros. Owner finance. Tat 
B0244F3002. Fac SQ2S47-9044 USA. 


TUCSON, ARIZONA. 80 acres world 

eta» property. Prints aaftofheNa- 

tate FbnsL (tl Ntaon. Cal Juts W- 
tons, ERA Gan Realy 5BW774629 


USA Residential 


NYGSh Aw « 73al 9 

FABULOUS 5TH AVE CONDO 

EXCLUSIVE Extiaofdtoary 7 room on 
20h tor with 4 exposures. Views ul 
Central Park bore wary room. Most 
detinue Put Benin condo tn prime 
location. Ram cRxnlirty. 
febna SUiMar 
212-B91-7D0Qffles. 212-&&8Q57 . 

DOUGLAS ELUMAN 


COLORADO'S BEAUTIFUL ROCKES 
3X3 AND GOLF! 

Desirable properties in VaL Keystone, 
B re ctantge. and Copper teartato. 
SbJtfos, condos, ttatauses. tingle 
tan* homea. buUng lots. S50K-S3U. 
Or, kierti DureriBvmhar A Phytecfe 
PWte Ctodunr a Hmm* spectator 
Tab 97IHSKIZU Fac 97W8M515 


NYCCto AffiflO SI 


25 Room 


IDEAL PEMrTERRE 

Prestigious buidtog. Spactous 1000 ti, 
35 rooms with views ot Central 
Part Mortify charges taduda utitaes. 
Asks S350K. 

JUfa Camacho (2l2) 6S1-RE3 

DOUGLAS EUBIAN 


GLOUCESTBt-Stepa from ATLANTIC. 
"Woodroae 1 , turn-ati-fhe-cantuiy 16 room 
moition; B He fireplaces A more! 51.7 
ml Gtoucestar oceanfront on Ipswich 
Bay; aroer sunseml 5 bedrooms, great 
atm safe oceanfront home! 5525,000. 
Rockport-tn heart of art comrminfiy; 
oceanfront, 3 bedrooms, onoe**4te- 
ftne batted $450,000. Ml Cape Ant 
500283-2090, E-Mai: matin1S30 
aoUon 


1/SA Farms & Ranches 


ARQONArOWNER MUST SELL beaub- 
tid 80 seres renertand. Tale ner UN 
price: SllTWLDO. Just 525050 down A 
mortft. Wrta P.0. Box 3080, Itasquta. 
Nevada 80024 USA. 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


French RMera 



fflGMCaffWBM 

SAMWEAtWAWHWAT 

Atari* via factog mbtiraclad 
taws on toe eea. 5 bettajm, 

3 briroms, Maces ^eatagpcoL 
Choice Of cOvr vita tor rart. 

H, gu da Gaonl Lactm 
0O10 BEAtlBWJJB MSI 
Tit <33 BJ4 W 01 04 13. 

FBC 433 (§4 93 01 11 96. 


French Provinces 


NDRIIANDY (NEAR DRBIX) - HOUSE, 
tensrtaro, J ha. tad, tiwj 1 3 bed- 
rooms. Yearly rental: F4.000 momh + 
ctogea Tat fett +33 (D)1 40 45 73 7B 


PERFIGNON, 10 tan sea, 2 tovef house, 
udunashed, 2 terraces, 0 bedrooms. 

3 wash rooms, garden, peri. Yearly i 
rente. Tat Pans (0)1 40 -S 73 78 


Holland 

AHSTEROAlb A II0NUNEOTAL hid- 
ing with ganten south, on major canto, 
Hareagract*, near the Leidsetimat, 5 
chi waiting rtstanoe from sfcrit ex- 
change and mta bate. Turn-toy rtx> 
es an swtahbtwft video and atom to- 
sraflation. Various period rooms 
(famished 1 nquesteQ. JoM use t< seo- 
Trtanrt earaces is poetibte Attatafate lor 
tonettae ccoDatai. to euro Honm- 
tkm, contad DTZ Zadeftofl v.o.t. +31 
(0)20 6644644 

Maal acoxnrnodstnc stucfo-5 bodrooma 
OuBflto and «nice assaed 
READY TO HOVE M 
Tel +33(0)1 47538013 Fax (0)1 45517577 

CAPfTALE ' PARTNERS 
Hendptchad quaBy epartmenfi, al stzes 
Paris tat subufe 

Tai +33 9^1481 48211. Fte (0)1481 48215 
Wt hate you Inti/ 

ISmiOUSE WTERNATXXUL 
No 1 n Hoknd 

lor (semi) fumfshod housesnate 
Tat 3140-6448751 Fac 3^03466909 
Nlroven 19-21, KB3 Am AnBtedam 

HEART OF M0NIHAR7RE. US. owner 
rants druirtog, tally sqnppsd 2 -roan 
apertmett. Cam TV; titaferhisinass- 
bo) a coapb. FI^BO pat week, FflJOO 
net raoMh. Shat a tag toon. Tat +33 
MI-41 43 93 84 offteaBar 10am. 

Paris Area Furnished 

18ft, TTOCAD 6 R 0 . efegent 90 sqjn. 
sunny, 1 bedroom, doubto lying, mart* 
bathroom, ftrarface. TV. but, confess 
phone, answemg mactae, F13JQ00 nei 
per month. Febnoy 17th tin Hay 10th. 
Fb/Tet +33 ffll 45 53 21 M. 

Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARS 
Tefc 433 (0)1 47.201)5 

ST GERHAH DES PRES. Owner tarts 
to 1 year gorgeous 1 -bedroom duptax, 

110 sq.m., in 18th century house. 
FF1 5,000 Tat (0) 1 <7 34 00 24 


JfrraUQKnlnu 


CARIBBEAN 


MUSHQUE 

Private Island Paradise 

Balinese villa with pool 
3 bedrooms, lush biDside, garden 

Fax:604-926-8300 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


QUA! DE LA T0UMB1E, enxpbonal 
vtow on NOTRE DAME, 4 rooms, 156 
stpn. Justified price. Exdustay Teh 
+33 |0)1 42 44 11 38. 


MARAIS, SUPERB DUPLEX, 3M rooms, 
equipped kitcfien. 2 Oaths, sirny. 
Fiasoo rmrtL Tat +33 P}1 <272 33S 


USA 


NYC FURNEHED APARTMEWTS. 
i mek to 1 year. Great Locations. Cri 
PaUCWqui: 212440-9223, Fax: 
2124488226 E-Md attnma2NaoUan. 


Real Estate Wanted/Exchange 


PROPERTY WANTS]. House or apart- 
ment in a nc han ge tor Edwantian Rung 
Car (SM0CUJ00J. Consider Europe, U.5A 
or Austrafia. Cuh atiustmart esher way. 
Tat <4 (0)1424 893380 


FRENCHIAIEnCAN cope seek 2-bed- 
non hat central Paris Space. Chaim. 
FF1M max. TeVFax +33 (0)143287658 


THE WOttLDS UMIY NEVSHU’EH 


PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quiddy and easily, contact your nearest IHT office or rqDresenjanve wn 
texL You wiS be infcxmed of the cosf mirnecfcrfdy, and anas payment ts made your , 
c^jpear within 48 hours. Afl mapr Credit Ccarts Aocefried. 



, AUSTOU A CH4BtALBUKJPfi , 


isssa"" 0117 ’ 

EACYPSUSc Aim 

t&xim 

IMi® 


t 31 ^ 0 j» 4 ldBl 

H 31^0688137*. 
NOWrAY&SWBSt ■ 


i _:3S1-14S?-SV3. 



715ft 


IMRH> KMGOQM: knden, 

TfL 0171.836*802, 

Tfc 26200?. Foe 2402254. 

IVUPPLE EAST 
MWAMMaona, 

Tcf/Fnc 571734, 
BtABiTdAriv, 

Tat: 972^586245, 
972-99-586246 
Fbc 972-99-585685. 
JOBDAtitAmmcn, 

TaL 624430. 
fac 624468 
KUWAfaCanbd tendon, 

TAiCPl 8364802. 
fac 071 2402254. 

ItaANOK SVtoA: BairuL _ 
7aL/fact»)l)78ffi&4/7B&576 

AFRICA 

BSVRCbara 
T«L 34 99831 
Tk: 21274 VKD UN. 
fac 3444 429. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

J0HANNE9MQ: 

Tet (OT11803J892. 
fac (271 1) 803.9509. 

WORTH AAABUCA 

NEWYGtX: 

Tat. (212)752-3890 
Wf«]aX»572-721Z 
F« (2 12] 755*785 

TEXAS ffcuUon, 

TaL 281496^603. 
fac 281^96-9384, 

Tel Free: 800-526-7857. 


LAW AMERICA 

BOUVtA: Saw Cruz. 

TeL 159 1-3 53 99 00. 
fac |59l -3) 53 99 90. 

BftAZtoSoetWo. 

TaL 853 4133. 
fac 852 8485. 

ORJE: 5oAx» d» CM* 

TaL 63201 26,6^79 37. 
fax; 6320126. 

EOJAOOfcC 

lSc3l96HUQULS 
Foe [593 4? 321 266. 

W»(X)cMa«CN. 
tat (52 536 56 90 

fac ^^682 81 22/6874842/ 


A5IA PAOnC 


536’ 


HONGHONGe 

TtL {852)2922-1 188. 

7&_- 4TT70 HBOC, 
fac P52J 2922- 1190. 

JW ^hW’O210. 

TkJH3673.fic3201 02W. 

SN^aufiStap^, 
U: 223 6478. 
fac 325 0841. 

Tic 28749 tOSN. 

AUSMAUA 

NB80UME 

T*L 9650110a 
Free 9650 6611. 


-x.-. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 





Bangkok: Maddening, Energetic, Unmistakably Thai 

the easiest places to see truncated per' 
nances. But traditional dance is still re- 




By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 

ANGKOK — Bangkok is dead; long 
live Bangkok. Just as the first of the 
Chakri kings transformed a swampy vil- 
lage two centuries ago into a wonder- 
land of canals and temples, the bankers and busi- 
nessmen who run Thailand today have remade 

Jumble 



-growing i 

the world. Thailand is plunging pell-mell into the 
21st century, and its capital city is bursting with 
a population of 10 million — nearly one-sixth of 
the country's people — many trying to get rich as 
quickly as they can. 

There are still canals and temples, teak houses 
and saffron-robed Buddhist monks, but they are 
all but buried by the roar of the modem world. At 
the Erawan shrine, one of the city's most ven- 
erated spots, traditional dancers still perform to 
delicate melodies, surrounded by clouds of in- 
cense. But the music and the incense are lost 1 in 
the clamor of a major intersection. 

Thais ask themselves today: What has become 
of our culture? Who are we? What does it mean 
to be Thai? Yet with all the rapid change, 
Bangkok remains one of the world's distinctive 
cities — chaotic, heedless, maddening, energetic 
and unmistakably Thai. 

traditions preserved For visitors as much 
as for themselves, the Thais have preserved their 
monuments and traditions, and the city still 
offers quiet temples, ancient dance, fine res- 
taurants and marvelous street food, traditional 
massage, clamorous markets and hidden canals. 
And beyond the tourist sites, in the shopping 
malls and on the back streets, you'll find an 
energy, a warmth and a delicacy that have out- 
lasted the changes. 

When people complain about Bangkok, their 
grievances usually come down to one thing: the 
traffic, which seems each year to reach a new 


level of impossibility, 
traffic, golf lovers hoe are ! 
forward to the Honda Invitational 
tournament Feb. 6 to 9, where the 
rising young Thai-American star 
Tiger Woods will take pan. It will 
be held at the Thai Country Chib in 
Chonburi, about 40 miles southeast 
of Bangkok, with a ticket price of 
$8. calculated at 25 baht to $1. 

From Feb. 7 to 21, Buddhist de- 
votees make a pilgrimage to the 
Holy Footprint at a hillside shrine in 
Saraburi, 60 miles north of 
Bangkok. It can be a hot and sweaty 
hike, but offers a chance to view the 
religious devotion that is at the heart 
of Thai culture. 

Open-Air Concerts 

Concerts in the Park, a free 
weekly series of open-air perfor- 
mances in Bangkok's central 
Lumpini Park at 6 PJM., will con- 
tinue every Sunday until the end of 
March. One notable performance 
will be the appearance on March 2 
of Boy Thai, an innovative 10- 
member group that combines tra- 
ditional Thai music with contem- 
porary pop music, using both an- 
cient and modem instruments. 

The Nang Yai puppet festival at the Thailand 
Cultural Center on Ratchada Pisek Road will 
offer a rare dunce to see this traditional art. 
which survives in southern Thailand mainly at 
temple fairs and funerals. It is scheduled for 
March 27 but its organizers suggest confirming 
the Haft* by calling (66 2) 247-0028. Tickets: S 1 0 
to $16. 

No visitor to Bangkok should miss the Grand 
Palace, whose insouciant gaudiness rivals that of 
Sl Basil's Cathedral in Moscow. 

It is on Na Phralan Road, on the banks of the 



the Oriental Hotel or directly from 
pi at* b ehind the hotel. They will 
you careering up die broad 
Qiao Fhraya river among die rice 
barges and river taxis, or winding 
through the fetid canals of Thon- 
buri, where dilapidated homes are a 
reminder of the city ’s past 

If you allow a guide to persuade 
you to visit the floating market — 
do longer relevant to the city’s com- 
merce — go for the experience of 
the nr-tounst trap. Itis also possible 
to take a cheap seat on a nver taxi 
and join Thai commuters through 
the winding canals. 

A riverboat is a good way to visit 
the Grand Palace — as well asPak 
Klong T aland, one of the city's 
main fruit and vegetable markets. 

Adjacent to that market is die city 
flower market on Maharaj Road, 
where from dusk until dawn the 
sidewalks smug to life with colors 
and scents. This is whore orchids, 
lotus flowers, marigolds, zinnias, 
miniature roses, jasmine and fra- 
grant blooms of an kinds arrive late 
at night and are bought by hotels, 
restaurants, flower shops and fu- 
neral parlors. 


ThoNew YcskUoie* 


Chao Phraya River, and is open daily from 8*30 
A.M. to 330 PJVL Admission: $5. 

Thailand has an overpowering tourism in- 
dustry, and you can put yourself in the hands of 
professional guides who will assure that you will 
be comfortable and will spend plenty or money. 
Or you can search the alleys and canals behind 
the modem office buildings for a grittier 
Bangkok. 

Long-tail boats — sleek, narrow rivercraft 
driven by propellers at the end of a long metal 
shaft — can be rented for about $12 an hour at 


Nous op mum In a part of the 
world without traditional Western seasons, you 
know that spring is on the way when the mango 
and the durian ripen — usually in April. Tropical 
fruit is one great reason to visit Thailand, where 
markets overflow with produce that does not 
even have a name in En glish. The mushy yellow 
durian with its spiky shell is one of the ugliest, 
smelliest, most expensive — and some say aph- 
rodisiac — fruits m the world. 

Traditional dance and music are dying 
forms, discarded by most Thais. They have 
been preserved for tourists, and luxury hotels 


are 

formances. But traditional dance is sou re- 
quired for university art students, and o at- 
aders can see more authentic, sparsely 
attended performances- of the Khon masked 
plays and the Lakon dance-dramas at the Na- 
tional Theater on Saturday and Sunday at 10 
A_M. and 2 P.M. Tickets range from $ 1 .60 to .« 
$4. Check on performances with the box office 
st (66 2) 224-1342. 

Thai boxing belies the country s reputation 
for gentleness, employing bare feet, knees, shins 
imH fists with frightening aggressiveness. Audi- 
ences go wild, screaming their bets and waving ^ 
their arms. 

But it is also possible to go notforthe sport but 
for the music — — a mesmerizing performance of 
the squealing pi-chawa horn, chums and finger 
cymbals ihn* follows the ebb and flow of the 
bout, rising to hysterical intensity as the kicks 
and jabs draw blood. 

ATCHES are presented every night at 
7, alternating between Lumpini Sta- 
dium, Rama IV Road, telephone (66 2) 
252-8765, and Rajdamncun Stadium, 1 Raidam- 
neun Road, (66 2) 281-0879 or 281^205. The 
cheap seals, at $10 each, are packed behind a 
wire fence and are for bettors. Ringside is ex- 
pensive at $40 but it's tiie only way to really hear 
die music, and the seats are far enough away to 
avoid getting spattered with blood. 

Traditional Thai massage is also not so gentle ij 
— from the $160 half-day luxury treatment at “ \ 
the Oriental Hotel's spa to the $12 two-hour ’ 
workover at no-frills streetside parlors. A good 
masseuse can draw cries of protest as she probes 
pressure points and twists the back and neck. 

The best practitioners have studied at War Pti 
in central Bangkok, a school of ancient medicine 
where a visitor can buy an hour's sweaty treat- 
ment that costs $4 for Thais and $7.20 for 
foreigners. (A school official said that Thai 
customers would be offended if they were 
charged as much as rich foreigners.) 



Rafting the Rio Grande Under a Big Texas Sky 


By Sam Howe Verhovek 

Ne w York Times Service 




ANTHER JUNCTION, Texas — 
There is perhaps no place in the con- 
tinental Unitea States where one can 
feel quite as blissfully small as one does 
in Big Bend National Park in West Texas. It is a 
vast region of lonely desert and stark mountains 
that Spanish explorers called "El Despoblado,’ ’ 
the uninhabited place, and, according to Indian 
legend, it is where the Great Spirit deposited all 
the leftover rocks after the Earth was created. 

Truth be told, there is plenty of life in this 
desert wilderness, but it seems ephemeral, from 
wildflowers that pop out of the ground only after 
a rare spring rain to animals that dart or swoop 
into fleeting view, such as the kangaroo rat or the 
mountain lion, the roadnmner or the peregrine 
falcon. In the main, a visitor feels swallowed up 
by time and the unending vista, and that is fine. 

But beyond the desert the Big Bend, hard by 
the border with Mexico, is also home to a ribbon 
of water and life, the Rio Grande, that Park 
Service literature aptly describes as “a relent- 
less. gravity -powered belt sander that has been 
running for millions of years. " 

After one travels for miles and miles on rough 
roads through the Chihuahuan Desert, the first 
glimpse of the Rio Grande seems to offer a 
mirage of a different sort. One can’t even see the 
water yet. but way off in the distance, there is 
something heretofore absent: a bit of green, 
marking the banks of the river. 

One hot but brilliantly clear weekend last 
May. my wife, Lisa, two of our three young 
children and I took a memorable rafting trip 
along the Rio Grande, through Mariscal Canyon, 
the precise spot at which the Texas-Mexico 
border makes an abrupt U-tum for the north and 
from which the Big Bend takes its name. The 
canyon is a river hinterland where the limestone 
walls rise at some points to 1.400 feer (400 
meters ) above the river and where the light plays 
a spectacular visual symphony across the walls, 
ranging from dazzling yellow and glaring white 
in the middle of the day to shades of orange, red, 
pink, purple and brown as evening comes. 

floating on A RIVER For a day and a half, we 
floated, paddled and waded along the Rio 
Grande, sunned like turtles, crossed from Texas 
into Mexico and back again a good two dozen 
limes, slept under an impossibly starry sky, ate 
outrageously good camp food, and saw no hu- 
man beings other than two friendly guides from 
Far Flung Adventures, the rafting company we 
had chosen ro help arrange our mp. 

One of a handful of tour- operators in the park. 
Far Rung has been offering river nips in the 
American Southwest and Mexico for nearly 20 
years. The company did an excellent job of over- 
seeing every detail needed for a safe and enjoyable 
trip. While it is technically possible to secure a 
permit and do the trip alone, if one's group has 
rafts and the other necessary equipment, going 
with an experienced guide is far more common in 
the Big Bend, and far simpler. 

I had been on a boisterous Far Rung weekend 
trip through the Santa Elena Canyon, farther 
west in the pork, two years before with a group of 
male friends from Houston, and since that time 




Navigating the raft through a tight spot on the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park. 


had been determined to get to the Big Bend with 
my family. Gordon, who was 8, and Alice, 5, 
came, but Johnny, still sby of 3 at the time, was 
properly decreed by Far Flung to be too young. 
(The company's literature says 7 is the minimum 
age, but it is flexible.) 

The Rio Grande is easily navigable by raft for 
most of the year. Our weekend happened to 
coincide with a period of steady drought which 
cut down on some of the excitement of a typical 
trip. At times we simply had to walk the raft 
through a particularly shallow spot, but the river 
was so gentle that we didn’t have to worry about 
a strong current posing problems for tiie kids. 
They (and we) kept our lifejackets on, 
and from time to time we got out of the 
raft, lay on our backs in tee river, and 
simply let the Rio Grande slowly cany 
us along. 

If our long-weekend trip to West 
Texas was centered on the nver, it had 
its big-sky beginning somewhere west 
of Odessa, at the Odessa Meteor Crater, 
a funky, lonesome tourist spot a few 
miles off the interstate highway that 
marks a place where a great shower of 
nickel-iron meteorites collided with the 
ea rth mo re than 20,000 years ago. 

From the Midland-Odessa area, we 
drove for hours through the mind-clear- 
ing boundlessness of West Texas until 
we got to tiie littie ranching town of Ma- 
rathon and spent the night at the stately 
old Gage Hotel, an eclectic brick struc- 
ture built in 1927 by a cattle baron 
originally from Vermont 


Marathon is a gateway to the 800,000-acre 
(320,000-hectare) park, and very early the next 
morning we left the Gage and drove south to- 
ward the Big Bend. As the sun came up, the 
Chisos Mountains of Texas and the Sierra del 
Carmen range in Mexico slowly revealed then- 
selves, looking like cocoa-colored sand castles 
off in the distance. The desert vegetation was not 
exactly abundant, but it was there — prickly- 
pear cactus, creosote bush, yucca, mesquite, a 
few ocotillo with their long strands bearing 
orange flowers. With enough rain in the spring, 
parts of the desert can seem ablaze with wild- 
flower colors, but not last year. 


We entered the park at Panther Junction, and 
soon met our guides, Mike Black and Malcolm 
MacRoberts, two friendly, weathered men who 
announced to the kids that they would be limited 
to “3,000 questions each" over tiie weekend. 
Their beat-up van was loaded with first-aid 
supplies, tents, food and enough drinking water 
to provide each of us with a gallon a day (one is 
urged to drink almost constantly under the hot 
desert sun); two rafts rode on a trailer behind. 



[ O get to the Rio Grande, we drove for two 
id a 



T and a half hours on a bumpy, dusty road 
that had old stone foundations, rusted min- 
ing equipment and other silent reminders of all 
of tiie people who tried and largely foiled to 
scratch out aliving in the Big Bead. Mare recent 
relics included a goodly number of axles, tiie 
rims and wheels and an abandoned trailer, 
lodged on its side. 

At the river, we found an old school bus that 
had carried in a much larger group of adult 
rafters, who were already eating lunch. As befits 
the laid-back approach taken by Far Flung and 
other rafting companies in the Big Bead, the 
driver was laid out on the desert floor, daring in 
the shadows underneath the bus. "Well, me and 
8 million dogs can’t be wrong,” he remarked 
when he awoke. 

Lunch was a feast laid out under a mesquite 
tree on a portable table, and included three lands 
of deli meat, three kinds of peanut butter 
(smooth, chunky, old-fashioned), vegetables, 
cheeses, three kinds of bread, homemade salsa, 
fruit and chocolate-chip cookies. 

Afterwards, the larger group went on ahead; 
we never sawrhemagam. We had a safety lecture 
from the guides and set out on our 105-mile trip 
through the limestone- walled canyon, which 
would end late the next afternoon, ft was ter- 
rifically hot, but not unbearably so, for there was 
always the cool, mildly muddy water of the river 
to jump into. (It’s all right to dip in the river in the 
Big Bend, though one should not drink the water 
anywhere along the length of the Rio Grande, 
ana there are badly polluted stretches elsewhere 
that make it dangerous far swimming as welL) 
While the river was shallow, just inches in 
depth as it widened out, it was easily passable 
most of the way, and a careful reading of tiie 
walls showed evidence of a debris line as much 
as 30 feet or more above us when the water was 
running higher and fester in past years. The 
canyons, once part of an ancient seabed. tell their 
geological tales, though our eyes were also 
drawn to tenuous plants and bird life including 
red-tailed hawks, kestrels, black phoebes, cliff 
swallows, and a pair of peregrine falcons. 

WARM guides, hot sun We put nearly all the 
gear in one raft with one of the guides, climbed 
aboard the other and headed for our campsite at 
the Arroyo de BoquIIlas, a dry creek on the 
Mexican side, a spot where the play of the sun on 
the canyon walls was mesmerizing. 

Our guides were organized and efficient, and 
let us in on a little raft-guide h umor at the 
expense of landlubbers who had gone before us. 
Mike recalled one man who ignored his wife’s 
pleas to look at die scenery on her side of the raft, 
saying, ‘ ‘Aw, I'll look at all that stuff on the way 
back. ’ (Rafting is not a two-way proposition.) 

Dinner was grilled steak, parsley potatoes, 
salad, red wine and a chocolate cake meanin gl y 
baked with a Dutch oven over an open fire. We 
had tents in case of rain, but none of us 
ventured inside: it stayed warm and dry 
and the star show was too intoxicating. 

The next morning, after a "cowboy 
breakfest” of scrambled eggs, bacon 
and sausage, tortillas, cereal (just what 
the kids wanted), fruit and juice, we 
brake camp and continued on our way 
through tiie canyon, whose 


DININO 


Musical Chef 
Hits Odd Note 


By Patricia Wells 

Iruemational Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — The capital ’s game of musical 
cooks is accelerating, as is the mi- 
gration of chefs from the provinces. 
Christian Constant, who garnered two 
Mlchelinstars for his well-kept kitchens at the 
Hotel Crill on, has taken his copper pots and 
talents to his own establishment m the 7th ar- 
rondissemenL Replacing him at the Crillon will 
be the Michelin two-star chef Dominique 
Boucbet of his own Moulin de Marco uze in the 
Charente region of western France. 

The week-old Le Violon d'Ingres — a long 
and narrow restaurant that most recently was the 
home of the late Jean Delaveyne’s Regain — is 
already playing to a well-heeled fell house. 
Constant seems to be playing it very safe inthesv^ 
difficult economic times, with a good-value 240 
franc ($45) lunch menu that is priced 50 francs 
higher at night time. His menu is extremely brief, 
with a simple quartet of starters, fish and meat, 
along with a restrained selection from his ro- 
tisserie list. 

With his sterling track record, it's ray bet that 
Constant will do well on his own. That said, two 
recent dinners at his new establishment left me 
satisfied but underwhelmed, especially if one 
considers that Constant has been consistently in 
the running for the coveted third Michelin star. 

For sure, some of his dishes are models of 
punty and classicism, with a moist poulette de 
Bresse as tender as butter served with giant 
wands of fried potatoes, and textbook-perfect 
roasted lamb chops worth their weight in gold. 
Equally outstanding were his moist and meaty 
breast of guinea hen on a brilliantly conceived 
bed of turnip sauerkraut, and a grilled prime rib of 
beer teamed up with a welcoming shallot sauce. 

Also the plus side, you’ll find a soothing 
and satisfying nsotto (one of the finest I've eve? 
sampled at the hands of a French chef) dotted 
vnfo meaty nuggets of chicken and ringed with a . 
onlbant green herb sauce. £ 



Ksbsxnd Uada MMmO 


The Gage Hotel in Marathon, Texas, dales back to 2927. 


ahead and, choosing strategic spots 

where the canyon walls offered a bit of 
space, left Oreos for the children to 
find. Shortly after noon, we came out of 

the canyon; the land flattened out a bit, 

and there were no more natural walls to 
cast cooling shadows. 

Now it was really hot and, for per- 
haps the fejrtmile or so, we got out of the 
boat and floated along, looking up at the 
wide blue sky. 


XU or so rooks in the nation. The salad of s 
sandwched with fresh truffles is hardly 
^aginative t 

fre*black fruffles these days. And I foi 
braised calfs head starter interesting 
more than that. It’s the fish offerings 
the menu section I focus on first 

Sjf ve 8 eta b 1 “ are as out-of- 

can be, ami however I try I can’t imagine < 

*£5“ (twbue) and chestnmsor 

Service here is efficient and nolit*. „ 

a Iich “fiyl99 
Rotie from Robert Jasmin (at 340 franr* 





PAGE 11 



sf 

S :4. ‘ 

■ 

• *4- 


•h 




Uli 


V 


M 



A 9 


w 


■a 


the 
i h! ' * Mil 


P 




J 4 

9 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 


movie guide 



If s a zoo as Michael Palin , 

Fierce Creatures 

Directed by Robert Young 
and Fred Schepisi. US. 

The maddening thing about 
“Fierce Creatures’” isn’t 
that it’s puerile, klutzy, 
simplistic and incredibly 
corny; but that it’s also pain- 
fully funny — or can be. 
This reunion of John Cleese, 
Kevin Kline, Jamie T p* 
Curtis and Michael Palin — 
the team from the 1988 “A 
Pish Called Wanda” — 
spends most of its rime hon- 
oring a banal, farcical stray 
line. But the production is 
blessed with Cleese, who 
pulls out his characteristic- 
ally deranged mannerisms. 
As Rollo Lee. the new di- 
rector of the Marwood Zoo, 
he has the unpleasant job of 
informing bis employees 
that their beloved animals 
are in big trouble. It seems 
the zoo’s tyrannical new 
boss, an Australian mogul 
called Rod McCain (Kline), 
has announced some radical 
measures. Only those crea- 
tures deemed vicious — the 
real crowd-pleasers — will 
be allowed to remain. The 
rest of the collection — the 
lemurs, meeikats and coatis 
— will have to be, uh, re- 
tired. The zookeepers, in- 
cluding chatty Adrian 


outraged. They decide to 
stage a revolt. But their plans 
are complicated by two new- 
comers. Willa Weston 
(Curtis), a slinky, ambitious 
new hire, and McCain’s es- 
tranged, egoxnaniacal son, 
Vince (Kline again), who's 
unrequitedly in hist with 
Willa. The movie, written by 
Cleese and lain J ohns tone, 
isn't a sequel to “Wanda.” 
But it’s meant to evoke the 
same spirit- Unfortunately, 
we never reach that level 
(Desson Howe, WP) 


UntenalQfySmdloclac. 

J ohn Cleese, Jamie Lee Curtis and Kevin Kline team up in " Fierce Creatures . " 

(Bugsy) Malone (Palin), are her dashing secretary (Car- illicit rendezvous with Gas- 

pard (Antoine Chappey), a 
muscled sports photograph- 
er; she hops on the back of 
his motorcycle, into his bed. 
Director Belvaux, who was 
Claude Chabrol’s young 
lead in “Poulet an vin- 
aigre,” has whipped up an 
ingenious treatment of mod- 
em love, for his triangle 
doesn't follow the rules. As 
Nicolas sleuths and spies, he 
becomes more comic, more 
tragic, but somehow strong- 
er, Gaspard saves him from 
drowning and loses his grip 
on Alice. Leaud steals the 
show, as he has since he 
played the delinquent in 
Truffaut’ s “400 Blows.” 
Yon might have worried that 
his growth as an actor would 
be stunted, but he does mar- 
vels incarnating a child para- 
chuted into the rather flabby 
body of a brooding roman- 
tic. Secretive, deceptive, he 
hovers between chagrin and 
jubilation, he entertains him- 
self, and infects the others. 
Belvaux’s comedy never 
sticks characters with- one 
thing to do and one way of 
doing it; they do not exist in 
any recognizable milieu, 
defined by their clothes or 
apartments — they are free 
to move, and to move us. 

(Joan Dupont, IHT) 


Miro. 


El Perro 

DEL HORTELANO 

Directed by Pilar 
Spain . 

British filmmakers enthusi- 
astically adapt Shake- 
spearean classics for the 
screes, and the French fol- 
low suit with their great 
playwrights. But Spanish 
film directors have rarely 
dusted off the Spanish clas- 
sics. Now Pilar Miro is tak- 
ing a step in that direction 
with a delirious comedy by 
Felix Lope de Vega. Com- 
pleted in 1618, die tale cen- 
ters on tiie fetching young 
Countess of Belflor (Emma 
Suarez), who becomes jeal- 
ous of a love affair between 


melo Gomez) and a lady-in- 
waiting (Ana Duato). The 
countess orders them to be 
separated, prompting the 
secretary — increasingly be- 
dazzled by the countess — to 
proclaim **«■> she is like the 
garden watchdog (el perro 
del homktno ), who neither 
eats the tempting produce 
nor lets others eat. The fihn 
is a feast for the eyes, as the 
countess parades in a riot of 
period gowns in deep reds, 
yellows and blues through a 
palace at Sintra, Portugal, an 
on-location site. The acting 
is every bit a match for the 
visuals, with the players 
mastering tape de vega’s 
rich verse. The result is a 
heady journey back in time 
to Spain's Golden Age. 

(Al Goodman, IHT) 

Four Hire! 

Directed by Lucas Belvaux. 
France. 

Nicolas (Jean-Pi erre Le- 
aud), an aging intellectual 
looks like the most hapless 
cuckold: He does the mar- 
keting, cooking and cleaning 
up, and lives in gnawing 
doubt about beautiful Alice 
(OmellaMuti). How rightbe 
is to wony. A brilliant law- 
yer, she rushes from court to 


ARTS GUIDE 


BELGIUM 


Antwerp 

De Vlaamse Opera, tab (3) 233- 
66-85. “La Bohane” Directed by 
Robert Careen, conducted by 
Silvio Varvteo with Theresa Ctn- 
done and Cesar Hernandez. Feb. 
11, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22 and 25. 


BRITAIN 


CAMMHDOa 

FftzwilUam Museum, tab (1223) 
332-800, closed Mondays. To April 
20: “Paper Palaces: Architectural 
Works from the .Coflections of 
Cambridge University library" A 
selection of architecture books 
dating from 1472to 1800, Inducing 
16th-century architect Andrea Pal- 
lacHo’s “I Quatro Ubri” and Robert 
Adam’s 18tfMsentury survey of an- 
tiquity. 

London 

British Museum, tel: (171) 323- 
0525, open dally. To April 20: "The 
Shfbata Gift of Arils Porcelain.'’ 
Features 500 pieces donated by 
private collector AMhiko Shtoata. 
The pieces reflect Japanese taste 
from the eariy 17th to tire 1 9th cen- 
tury. Also, to April 20; “Heirs of 
Rome: The Shaping of Britain AD. 
400-900." Documents the transi- 
tion from Roman rule to the Saxon 
tings as being- one of adaptation 
and innovation. Illuminated 
manuscripts, metalwork, sculpture 
and coins from Britain and other 
European countries explore the 
expression of secular power and 
fhe transformatfon of barbarian art 
and culture through the written 
word. 

HSBC Money Gallery at the Brit- 
ish Museum, tel: (171) 638-1555, 
open dauy. This new gallery fo- 
cuses on the development oi 

• money In its forms and manufac- 
turing techniques, its purposes 

1 and culture] roles from its earnest 

■ forms in the third millennium B.C. 
to date. 

, National Gallery, tel: (171) 839- 
. 3321, open dally. To March 31: 
"Young Gafosborough." Explores 
‘ two genres developed by Thomas 

■ Gainsborough (1727-1788) during 
the 1740s and *SOs: landscapes 
and conversation pieces. 

Royal Opera House at Covent 
- Garden, tefc (171) 304-4000. Anew 
,. production rtl Hans Pfitzneris 1917 

* epic "Palestrina." Directed by 
*- NBtolaus Lehnhaff, conducted by 
•’ Christian Thielemann. with Thomas 

Moser, Rene Pape and Alan Held. 
Fsb. 1.8. 10, 15 and 19. 

Miiicmrm 

, The Whitworth Art Gallery, tel: 
- (181) 273-4865, open dafly. 1b 
; March Eh "Now We Are 64: Peter 
Stake at the National Gallery." 
Blake, a member of the British Pop 
Art movement creates works in- 
spired by, and often Including ele- 
ments from, paintings In the Na- 
” Ilona! Gallery In London. 



Patrick Vilaire's “ Baron Lacroix,” on show in Paris. 


51, dosed Mondays. To March 16: 
“Patrick VBaire: Reflection on 
Dealh." Seven monumental sculp- 
tures on the thema of death by ifte 
Haitian painter, draftsman and 
sodptor (bom 1941). 


GB 


Wen. an Rhein 

VJtra Museum, lei: (7621) 70-22- 
00, dosed Mondays. To August 
“Casflgfloni." A retrospective of 
the work of designer Achffle Cae- 
SglionL Drawing his -inspiration 
from dafly objects, Castigflonl has 
constantly searched for minimalist 
solutions. The exhibition features 
furniture and industrial products, 
as well as three instaBations. 


ITALY 


Rome 

Teatro defTOpera, tel: (8) 48-16- 
01. Strauss’s “Etektra." Directed 
by Henning SrocWtaue, conducted 
by Vladimir Fedoseyev. with 
Sabine Hass and Jeantee Altmey- 
ur. Feb. 4, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 
23. 




PRANCE 




.. Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 
01-44-78-12-33, dosed Tuesdays. 
- To Apr* 7: "Face a n-Ustofr®-” The 
exhibition focuses on how modem 
1 artists expressed thedr vision of the 
metorpoflUcal events of the second 
. half at the century. Features palnt- 
.. Inge, drawings, sculptures, pho- 
tomontages, installations and 
videos by Beckmann. Dsfi, 
Chagall. Klee, Picasso. Fautrier, 
•' Buoys and Boetti. Ateo. toSepl. 29: 
-“Made In France: 1947-1997." 
Documents artistic creation In 
France oyer toe past 50 years. 
.. Features pointings by Braque, 

. Chagall. Matisse and Picasso; 

’ pak^ig8.scu|pture®anddra«*®s 

'■ by contemporary artists, such as 
Baithus, Dubuffet. Malta and Bur- 
I an, as way as photographs and- 
1 - Video ]nataMkx&.rnraUraucfta 

,* the Center is fire an Jan. 31, Feb. / 

Formation Cartier pour TArt 
COfttemporafn, Mi: 01-42-1&-56- 


Mta 

Mfe Prefecture! Art Museum, tel: 
(590)27-2100, ctoeed Mondays. Tb 
Feb. 2: -Boudin at las PaWres a 
Honfleur." Works by toe Bench 
painter Eugene Boudin (1824- 
1698) who became famous tor his 
views of rough seas and wint* 
skies, and by contemporary pow- 
ers who were Inspired by toe Nor- 
mandy harbor of Honfleur. 


■ H»TH«ElAjlP _S_ 
Apclsoow 

Patels Has Loo Ntekmaal Mu- 
seum, (55) 577-24-00, dosed 
Mondays. To April 3: “The Tsars at 
Palate Het Loo: Treasures from toe 
Peterhof Palace from Peter the 
Great to Nicholas II." From the 
czars 1 summer palace, a selection 
of (terns, inducting Peter toe 
Great's throne and costumes, as 
well as Chinese porcelain and 
clocks. Other items include i8th- 
and 19th-century Russian porcel- 
ain. tableware and furniture. 

■ IWITZEUAMP 
Geneve 

Cabinet dee Estampes du 
Muses (TArt et dTOstoire, tel: 
(22) 418-27-70, dosed Mondays. 
To Fab. 16: “Artists Against Tor- 
ture.” 1b finance toe Association 
for Prevention of Tbrture. an ex- 
hibition and sate of engravings by 
19 artists, Including Georg Basel- 
itz, Eduardo Chflfida, Jasper 
Johns, Donald Judd. Jannls Knun- 
eWs, So! LaWitt, Richard Long, and 
Antoni Tuples. 

Uumhm 

Fondadon de P Hermitage, tel: 
(21) 320-50-01, dosed Mondays. 
To April 27: “Du Greco a Mon- 
drian." From toe private collection 
of Rolf and Margrt Weinberg, 60 
paintings, drawings and objects, 
mainly from the 1 9to and 20th cen- 
turies. French painters of the 
second half of the 19th century, 
and Russian avant-garde artists 
are weti represented. 


seen In pubtic. The axh&ition fea- 
tures 40 paintings created between 
1981 and 1987 that demonstrate a 
new formal and motional range. 
Pierpont Morgan Library, tet 
(212) 685-0008, closed Mondays 
and holidays. To Aprfl 13: “Around 
Tiepolo: Eighteenth-Century Ve- 
netian Drawings." A small exhib- 
ition of drawings by Marco Ricci, 
Canaletto, Guard and Piranesi. 


Washington 

Corcoran Gallery of Art, tel: (202) 
638-1703. dosed Tuesdays. -To 
April 11: “Jewels of the Romanovs: 
Treasures from the Russian Im- 
perial Court.” Costumes, paint- 
ings, icons and religious artifacts 
celebrating the Romanov Dynasty 

from toe 18th century to hs end in 
1917 as wefl as jewels and uncut 
gems from the State Diamond 
Fund established by Peter the 
Great in 1719. 

National Gallery of Art, tei: (202) 
737-4215. open dafly. To Apr! 6: 
“Splendors of imperial China: 
Treasures from toe National 
Palace Museum, Tfcipel." A 
presentation of Chinese paintings 
and cafligraphy, Jades, bronzes, 


Washington Opera at the Eln- 
sen how Theater, tab (202) 41 6- 
7800. Manuel Penefla's “O Gate 
Montes." Directed by Emfflo Sagl, 
conducted by Miguel Roe, with 
Ana Maria Martinez. Rafael Rojas 
and Eduardo del Campo. Feb. 2, 5 
and 8.' 



THE FREQUENT TRAVELER 


Help for Small- Business Budgets 


By Roger CoUis 

International Herald 7Yibune 


Martiqhy 

Fondatton Pierre Glanadda, tel: 
(26) 22-39-78, open dally. To June 
1: “Raoul Dufy." Paintings and 
drawings reflect how the French 
painter (1 877-1953) would devel- 
op Ms thematic series of paintings 
and drawings — PEstacade har- 
bor, black cargo ships, windows. 

NmrYomc 

Guggenheim Museum SoHo, tel: 
(212) 423-3840, ciosad Mondays 
and Tuesdays. 1b March 23; “Bfll 
Vtotar-Flre, Water, Breath," Two 
video Installations by the American 
artist who has worked In toe media 
arts since the early 1 970s. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art. tel: 
(212) 570-3791 , dosed Mondays. 
7b April 27: “Giambattista 

Tlepoto." A retrospective of the 
work of Giambattista Tiepolo 
(1688-1700). The exhibition In- 
cludes 80 paintings and 33 etch- 
ings including large works, dec- 
orative series and o3 sketches. 
Also, "Domenico Tiepolo: Draw- 
ings, Prints and Paintings." Works 
by Tiepolo, son of Giambattista; 
and “Venetian Prints and Books In 
the Age of Tiepolo." A efisplay of 
11 0 prints and books from the mu- 
seurfs coflection representing toe 
production of toe Venetian presses 
In the last caniury of the republic. 
Metropolitan Opera, tel: (212) 
382-8000. A new production of 
“Wozzack." Conducted by James 
Levine, with Maria Ewing, Graham 
Clark, and Michael Devlin. Feb. 10, 
14, 18 and 22. 

Museum of Modem Art, tab (212) 
708-9400, dosed Wednesdays. To 
April 29: “Wfflem De Kooning: The 
Late Paintings: The 1980s." Few of 
the American artist’s paintings dur- 


I NDEPENDENT and small-busi- 
ness travelers face a daunting para- 
dox. On the one hand they are 
often frustrated at not being able to 
profit from the service and expertise that 
travel agencies offer log corporate cus- 
tomers: on the other hand, it's hard to 
exploit die expanding galaxy of “ageni- 
less” travel services in cyberspace. It’s 
OJC. to say, “shop around.” Every self- 
respecting travel company has a home 
page these days. But unless you have a 
tame 12-year-old to surf the Internet, 
how do yon find the time? 

What tiie small-business traveler 
wants is a person at the other end of a 
phone who knows him and understands 
exactly what be seeds — eves if he isn’t 
quite sure himself — and the skill and 
motivation to provide it. It’s not enough 
to have somebody null up your “per- 
sonal travel profile” on the screen. 

Not many business travel agencies 
will talk to you — let alone open a credit 
line — if you spend less than $100,000 a 
year on travel. 

TUU-CONSUMIHG “Business travel- 
. cars in small companies often do the ar- 
ranging themselves — when you have, 
say, one secretary for six people in the 
office. But they tend to be much more 
savvy, experienced travelers, much 
closer to the bottom line,” says lan 

Africa and&el^ddle East for OACLpart 
of foe Reed Travel Group, in London. 
“There are all kinds of on-line systems 
that enable the independent traveler to 
select the best deals and then go down to 
their travel agency or book direct. But it 
puts the burden an the traveler to shop 
around All that technology will do is 
give them mote information at their fin- 
gertips; it’s time-ccKKuming. Small- 
business travelers still rely oo their travel 
agency. You would think there’s a hole in 
& market for an on-line phone-based 
travel service.” 

Les MiddledHch, marketing director 
at Hogg Robinson Travel in London, 
says: ’’We're in tiie process of setting up 
a small-business travel center branded 
independently from our main corporate 
travel service. There are nearly one mil- 
lion companies in the UJL alone that 
spend less than £50,000 [about $83,000] 
a year on business travel The potential 


_ _ rthaa 

that of ourjpresent corporate^ 

Adam white, business travel devel- 
opment manager at Going Places, a 
London-based travel agency, says: “If 
you’re coming on the phone and spend, 
say, a minimum £10,000 a year, we’ll 
give you 45 days credit and put you 
through to a dedicated business travel 
unit with the same array of negotiated 
air fares and hotel prices as a major 
corporate customer. If you spend less 
titan that, we’ll still welcome you, but 
will charge you for each transaction.” 

SPECIAL TEAM A.T. Mays, a sister com- 
pany of Carlson Wagonlit Travel within 
the Carlson Travel Group, based in 
Scotland, set up a small-business unit in 
July 1995, called Business Direct, 
which allows companies with a travel 
budget of less than £50,000 a year to buy 
travel direct by phone with one of a team 
of four people. They then qualify for 
A.T. Mays* special rates, including 
those of its consolidator, AirS avers. 

Jill Henderson, head of sales at A.T. 
Mays in Glasgow, says: “You will only 
ever have four people looking after you 
who understand your business. It gen- 
erally tends to be the traveler himself or 
herself who calls us rather Chan a sec- 
retary, so they know what they want and 
can conduct the business far quicker. 

“What we’re trying to do is to get 
bade to people — that old-fashioned 
quality — through efficient use of tech- 
nology. People are the real software 
after all. Yes, we’re going live on foe 
Internet in March with a reservations 
system called Expedia — a joint venture 
with Microsoft We’re building for foe 
future more than anything. The con- 
fidence isn't there yet, but there's great 
interest. Five years down the line, you 
and I will be having a different con- 
versation.” 

The Tiuphome Option 

Melody Goodman, a director of 
Gr&ye Dawes Internet in London, says: 
“We've developed a telephone reser- 
vations cento- in Colchester outside 
London for small-business travelers. 
What we recommend is a credit card 
payment for which we’ll make available 
special fares, preferred hotel rates and 
access to our 24-hour help line. We have 
an ‘agentless’ reservations service via 
E-maiL But we find it’s quicker for 


somebody to pick up the phone and say, 
this is wins I want, rather than crying to 
find the right bii on your computer. 1 

Rosenbluth International in Phil- 
adelphia, the thid-largest travel agency 
in tiie United States, offers the small- 
business traveler the same negotiated air 
fares and hotel rates that major cor- 
porate customers enjoy — either at a 
local agency or through a Rosenbluth 
“Intellicenter” located in a low-cost 
area such as Fargo, North Dakota. 

“Whatever the size of the travel 
budget, it depends on tbe comfort level of 
the client,” says Liz Joseph, manager, 
i communications at Rosenbluth 
“Some companies love 



the idea of being serviced through Fargo 
— it costs less dun an on-site facility, we 
find that smaU-business travelers typ- 
ically ask for fast turnaround; ticket de- 
livery, quick last-minute changes; and 
lowest possible fares. ’ ’ 

T HE mo st advanced "agent! ess” 
travel system is E-Res, developed 
by Rosenbluth for major corporate 
clients, whereby travelers can plan and 
make reservations from their laptops or 
office PCs. You can book flights, hotel 
rooms and car rental in “real time” 
without having to wait for E-mail mes- 
sages to be queued to a travel agency for 
action and E-mailed back to you. Cor- 
porations can “model” factors such as 
travel policies and priorities and the sys- 
tem comes up with the optimum choice. 

“We plan to launch around April 1 a 
version of E-Res for small-business cus- 
tomers, what we call Prestige Clients.” 
Joseph says. “This will factor in Rosen- 
bluth negotiated prices because they 
may not have their own rates. You’ll be 
able to dial up direct on a PC or through 
the Internet A 

Then there are ‘ ‘niche” agencies like 
Imperial Travel Consultants, with just 
me office in Montreal (plus the ob- 
ligatory Web site.http^/www.logiiLnet/ 
imperial), which specializes in saving 
money (as much as 50 percent) on first- 
and business-class tickets for “sophis- 
ticated" clients around the world. 

“Originally, our clients were individu- 
als or small companies,” says Dave 
Miller. Imperial’s president 
“But since the recession, medium- 
sized companies in Europe have started 
to work with us. Large corporations are 
more interested in management reports 
than saving money.” 


RECORDINGS 


Buuurr munis “The Real Deal” 
(Alfa): Following the death of Thel- 
onious Monk, Harris was sponsored by 
the Baroness Nica Rothschild de Ko- 
nigswater. He is perhaps the most loyal 
guardian of the piano tradition of Bud 
Powell. This, his first album since a 
recent stroke, comes through as hard- 
edge mmrmalfsm rather than weak. A 
minimalist Powell is something to hear. 
Released in Japan only, it was named 
album of the month by Swing Journal. 

CYMRI LAUMR “Sisters of Avalon” 
(Epic): Lanper is best known as the 
composer of the Miles Davis standard 
“Time After Time.” No, that's a bebop 
joke. Actually, she’s a big pop star. Here 


she proves that pop music can still have 
breadth and depth. Backing up her lines 
of grange — “I love to hate you” — and 
metaphysics — “I think I’m afraid 
when there's nothing wrong” — she 
plays dulcimer, bass-recorder and gui- 
tar. There is also a harmonium, a man- 
dolin, a violin and & zither in her band. 
They are mixed with drum loops, syn- 
thesizers and samplers. Hints of Jap- 
anese folklore sneak in thanks to the 
group Shang Shang Typhoon. 

Louis sclavu “Les Violences de 
Rameau” (ECM): The Bench love to 
1 avant-garde music with a muscular 
‘ay stubble. This fimirescope of 
the 18th-century composer Jean-Phil- 


ippe Rameau goes 15 rounds without a 
K-O. Miraculous multi-reedman Sclav- 
is, Superbone Yves Robert and Domi- 
nique Pifarely’s fiddle dance like but- 
terflies and sting like bees. 

BRAD mehldau “The Art of the Trio, 
VoL 1” (WB): Despite so many more 
publicized young lions, foe pianist 
Mehldau is the most likely to succeed. 
Since leaving Joshua Redman's quartet, 
Mehldau has been investigating unex- 
plored emotional (as opposed to tech- 
nical) territory. He is already a mature 
musician (this is his second CD as a 
leader) and he will grow. 

Mike Zwerin/IHT 


HOLIDAYS AND TRAVEL 


RESIDENCE HOTELS 


PARIS 

LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE 

★★★★ 

13, rue D’Agoesseau, 75008 Paris 
Just off the Faubourg Scam-Honort and The Etysee Palace 
A LUXURY APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE 


Very exclusive, located in one of the most prestigious neigh- 
bourhoods: Faubourg Saint-Honor^ and Champs Elysdes. 
Thirteen personalized large apartments up to 1200 sq. feet 
completely restored in 1992 with folly equipped kitchens, liv- 
ing-diningrooms, as well as one or two bedrooms, one or two 
marble bathrooms and some with studies. 

Ideal for both family holidays and business trips, a perfect 
“pied-a-terre”. 

All hotel services. Daily maid service. Air conditionning. 
Underground parking. Complete security. 

For more information or reservations, please fax directly to: 
+33(0)142 66 35 70 or call +33 (0)1 44 5116 35 


HOLIDAY RENTALS 



CHATEAU IN PROVENCE 
12 KM STREMYDE PROVENCE 
9 km AVIGNON, in ravishing 5 ha. park over- 1 
the Rhone VUey. 7 bedrooms (12-13 
en. French breakfasts. Entirely equipped , 
Enjoy a luxurious stsy In a region ] 
Its monuments, its festivals and res wine. 


I yean Monthly or by for 
i Contact for inprmaUotvFsx +33 (0) 3 22 i 


1 45 76.! 


UiOhIm 

ffOimS 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUST AH. Eatt of BdrnL 
5 tut data*. EaaplloneJ baton, mat- 
illy, contort, One cttoUw, comontons, 
bushes Bentos, sstetts TV. 18 nta 
transfer from airport free. UTELL Fat 
f*1) 2124781391 i (+33) MI-47200007 


USA. 


BREATHTAKING VEW OF NEW YCHtlt, 
20 9. gtas* wat Cactnl Park 1 GSy. 
Luxunouriy bintahed: pten, tax, i " 


unts. Theaters. Weekly, 
wsebndi (mUiMn) 
ToUfiK 212^08*1501 1 


Untoty. 3 toy 
or tog tana 
USA. 


VIUAS IN TUSCANY 
COUNTRY HOMES 
IN NEW ENGLAND 


Galas* hr /oar ft* 
hmhenmffniag 
hfeafporllb 
VOYAGES AGREPA PARIS 
T*L 33 1 45 OR 44 80 
-to 33 1 42 36 43 33 -t| 


Ski 


SUNOUDAVS 

Stodsl taring for sM ramfe, 

For mom dabfe cwflect 
braids Hone, 
MmafcodlMd Tribute. 
TR: PARS 432 01 41 G 92 M 
FAX: PARK +33jil 41 43 03 70 
E3Wb atfdbdOH7.CC* 


USA HOTELS 


Visiting New York City? 

Distinguished 509 room hotel overlooking 
Gramercy Park. Excellent Restaurant, 
Cocktail Lounge. Piano Bar and Room 
Service. Multi-lingual staff. Minutes to 
Business Centers & Sightseeing. 
Banquet and Meeting Facilities. 

Singles $135-140 • Doubles $145 
Suites $180 & Up 

Gramercy Park Hotel 

21xi Street & Lexington Ave. 

New York. New York 10010 
212-475-4320 
Fax: 212-505-0535 


Member of 
UlelJ Ini' I 



DISCOUNT TRAVEL 



Caribbean 


ST. BARTHELEUT. F.WJ_ OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILAS - beach- 
tort to Mbffe *fth pools. Our agsrts 
hm inspected to vitas personal^. For 
tesBMkm on & Beta; & Marta, An- 
pula. Barbados, UusUna. iha Vbgln te- 
Endu_. Cal W1UCO/& BARTH - US. 
(401)840-801 2/1 ax 847-6200. tram 
FRAfiCE OS 90 16 20 ■ ENGLAND D 
-40M94318 


Hototays and Travel 


EXPLORE TURKEY 
rttoton, ARfcokw 
Taste Ait, Rugs 
May. 4u», September 
ft* 1-215*67770 
or VHte P.0. Box 137(H) 
Nmam, IflWO m 


! ummc now Rub 
REGULAR FLIGHTS RT: | 

New-Yorfc 1,950 F | 

Lisbon 1,190 F 1 

Bangkok 3,480 F I 


■!». :c.i T »4 6 » 5 6 « 4 0 • 4 0 


3,690 F 8 

i ♦ bfflt'ist 


EILAT 

aeta w* w j* a e&n ■ 
REUNION 6.780 F 

H0A BT- MnW 2+ 10 D/7 N, bRtttaM 

HAM MAMET 1,870 F 
Htfe RT- 3* a dM/7 mgte » Ml DOM 
EGYPTIAN CRUISE 2.675 F 
ngMs n* Iran «* a ow^itgMi • to doh 

W.-E. IN ISTANBUL 1.460 F 

n^o bi* ku s* * <J»«n * I*. . wo 

MALTA 2,450 F 

Fighn B7- HOW «* a otfiT? n#ns - oca*d*5i 

MARRAKECH 2,850 F 

Hghci ST- Ho wa*8 » Ml bawd 

MtmtMu 
w 

iWteMsf 


FRENCH RIVBtA. Vrtaly 1 ws* W 
per year hr 2 paepte ow io wars in 
hotels. Exceptional tax-toe tomt- 
mrt it bwtoeeahttay travel a Wee/ 

Cannes area. View Mfei/wwwjieteom. 
oaLuk/- tlnrmKX/rniMiml.tm or 
Fax t33 W402B4M01 tor hrather i 


J ' 



PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY JANUABY31; 1997 


Thursday's 4 pjm. Close 

NaltamMe prices not Reefing late trades abewhefc 
The Assoaakid Pima. 



3 1 


JO O 1 

a a g 


- I s 

m 


S* 2! -IS 


ackii 


3 S ft* 

u m 

M «* MM 
«M 5» KP 


,J X 'S, KE£ 


Hi 

S5 n amp” 

&* IS! figS 

i «Ss 

Pes 

PEB 


*B> UM wn 

i£§r 


2 «* in >M 
m in «nM«i 

n» UH wiDaii 
Mo 33 AiMWr 

zim it «i naaor 

Aktn 

sn 3i_ w5w 

M inH Wan 

•)> » An 

JS 3n JSi 
55 S 2 JST 

hh J7* MrtC 
^ » Ms 

iPH- 

ah !M Annas* 

'i* SS "2, 

in *3 S5S 

ne 3ii* unsai 
IMI » MUM 

« .«* Maaaa 

:«*» ITU MEM 
»S 2 * aJoEobI 


sa !T sew 

,IM ,2m Aacjvpf 


3 >0 Mn 

S» S3 ItaOW 

s. £?■* 

» 1CM *jM3T 

«• in AoMS 

is SL 

5J* 38*1 IMWMV** 


^ S3 EL. 
32 53 SB- 

kIS* 

BfiHL 

£* W » 

u<3 6SSr 

s fig sasc 
£. i5 ess 


SJ»1 40* MM 

ESB 


is &* te. 
& » SPa 

IBB’ 


sPe? 

JSa^K? 

ft. S' SIR 


PfeB. 

35 as esc 

4m m km 

r seau 


Sv S3 

an mm Bin 

S 3 & sa. 

S2 atS SSf * 
*a % VSL, 

»*• SQM Mina 


I"- JP tT 


fill 

«! 
jo o j I 
IJO _ 28 


IS!] 

II jj 

9 .13 I J 

’iijh 

£ li If 1 

a a s 1 

f i * \ 



SIS! 


,2 S 

a * 

; = < 


.10 3 S 4 

4fl ■ '* 

Us j 


xii £2 . 
IJ! U 14 

“ s 


un ^ T? 

fill 

- a 
m ij It 

a 

JO 74 _ 

jo u fi 
|S M _ 

■ I; 

s j | 

uC 45 il 
a u " 


-Op Z I 

in a ! 

HE = 

ȣ 5 
1 b» 

"f i 


JP* _sn _»* -I H? ?£ 


. MO <7 


W Js SK3F' - « ; 
1*1 1! 
liigii: 


SB Sffl ^ SS"* i ! 

liMlIil 1 

is* fpEPiI. 


WS *s a R 

s: js S g 

r t a is 

B ( Es 


35 Ri 

IE! 

nis im i 

ail 

R IK f 

44* ]M [ 

2 i int i 

a f 

JK am e 


: ? Sa ^ ^ S*-St 

'f “ a ss r ^ sE 

“fiw» al m 4 I r 

*3 3 II R R ^ -fc fi 


SK »S gSSJ* 3 U 

If 9 ” - 


■» i s J 8 

^ l J -s ^ f 
a ^ I s 

2. *3 

BSSJII 


m 4* uu im 

a ^ ®f 3« 


W Jg &W J3 J 
mS z» oSmm UM JJ i 

S && “ 2 ; 

M iih Sww uso nu _ 


s!*a 4 a%s, f ; 

|, -s R HI g a 


J U it MtM 

: 3!«! 


«»i 

111 


1 s 
R §s 

» s 

s5 v 

S* 3» 

13M ISM 

n w 

B! 55 
£3 & 
S£ 55 


ji u n umim in! im *j» 
. i) is m it , mi -a 
A U . KM f (a . T _ 

ij; 1 1 j 

3 l!ife C I & 

iMuansmanm -m 
jq u S raw kS aw 5 m -» 

Ul U . 109 HI M 3A 

HJ B M ^ a R a 

J. 3 n '5 Jffl J £ ■£ :tt 

■" i G sT?: « € -ffl 
^ 8 ! S £• tfi 

ja zj W Mar zim Atm *M 

.fi u i q n « ch *m 

p & 3 

J a a 1 1: i S i 


J 1 i 319 47 4M 

a a fi -a is a 

Ut U U U N MV* 
ii JJ II ”S Z7M 

u« U n u3 3 mu 
■ra u ii rag Mi MM 

M B s ^ 1 » 

AM li|i r 

40 17 a ^ Sfi « 

•fl S g” 2 ^ i 


i is: 

ID* Uh GnqCBi 


33* Mh ^1 

s£ 'sssar 


uu 1 
I ^ 

US PS _ 

ura 43 it 
4 W 


IV u . 
in 13 _ 

fi 3 

J2n 6J _ 
_ M 


gW" »9 All.. 
^ 0 ?" UM a I 


: fi 

39a 37 fi 


|S.ts IlFi*! 
P Sf :t Era, 
h 1 4 2 “? 

J" JS c » 3 aggnpr JM Z Z 


« R ssss 

53* rat cMch 


0 4- 

I ii 
JO u fi 


dl»"!tr«BlRrS 

SpsJiESi 
H “ = If S? " 

fl!]: HI! il 


». oga OaMaai _ _ 

M* ra* KZSlSl 44 M 3 SJ - 

R 14 S"4 - 

urt* hbe’ u» &3 H 


? ’§ ?p 


jo a u 

ii 

vsa i 




lifl! 


^ S ! mh^ 
u: b j* 

li|lf 

aJiflp 

111 B fi£ 
S U _ is s? 

S H !! "I IS 


JB 5 " « 

^ “ = i 2 
IB M - Ii 

12 S 1^3 

«5 |7 _ M 


lilt 


1£ -M 
. m 4* 

■sis 

is * 


F £ Ig 

IIP 

Iisg 

!Ii 


a j « 

u* to 9 

iso eJ _ 
_ is 
Ul M 3 

- 'i 

■a a = 

|| = 

i a s 
33 

a ? 

in 


ap* HBflH 
as mcidD 

a 


stl M (£& 
UH lJ3Sa 


^ 110 } 4» 


iis *3 " 'ffi 3 ! 


I 

J4Bi 


■0 7- 3oM 

Sgf'i 

3J ■ 4Ki 

3 J ' *! 

m - - s 
... - u ns 


14 ! 

♦J* tW »• 


9 P 

*js L 


5 * as -<i 

k a* a 


» 3 >1 E ngr a a 
■ i Ijb* 1 ” 
P I ifei& 'M 

$ t* Gm 


ill s 

’ff i 

14* ?2 I 

uw 23 ra 
Z i 

si i 


*JA 


jii : 

s§ 

l? * 


JI 4 . ® 

= »1 
■as i J 

III} 

JB; J 

Jill 

as a I 


1 8 T S S a 
; s If 1 ifc f 

fiH |ol i 9 J! 
o“ 5 •Sf* 1 ? 1, 


i 

mSgp im hj n 
g-jf jv a* a 

is# n i 

1 

Bt dS-BH 

§ 

K a R • 

a 

SE *Sf 






^ SJ U 4 I 7 1 — 

)iiJ|i( i 

a a ' 3 J » l « 

jg *s a ♦“ 

ifyiiii 


liit 

iigsi. 

19 <4 


3 SI 


3. St IB"- a® J» g 

lir Jaf- 

ikii ■*?!= 

Flf .III 

ht.Wgp 4M l 


B" -*Si - j e 

a BBS. 

ap ». a 3 

49 u n 


s»p a-p 


SE'S 


r ^ w 6 

m* m* peo 



































































HmlfcSSribunt. 


' '“I l 




,I,T •■'inati, " 


* 


M;n BrTliffi 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Unocal Expands Burma Investment as Others Pull Out Over Rights 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Unocal Corp., die 
largest American investor in Burma, 
said Thursday that it was expanding its 
petroleum business there despite strong 
concern in the United States about hu- 
man-rights abuses in the country and a 
law that empowers President Bill Clin- 
ton to ban new U.S. investment there if 
the problem worsens. 

Shortly before Unocal announced its 
expansion, PepsiCo Inc. this week be- 
came the latest American company to 
pull out of Burma in response to pres- 
sure from shareholders, consumers and 
human-rights activists. 

Unocal said its Unocal Myanmar Off- 
shore Co. subsidiary and Total My- 
anmar Exploration & Production Ltd., a 
unit of Total SA of France, had signed a 


production-sharing contract with state- 
owned Myamha Oil & Gas Enterprise to 
begin exploring foroil and natural gas in 
a new area in the Andaman Sea. 

The area covers 11,068 square ki- 
lometers (4,427 square miles) and abuts 
the zone where Unocal and Total found 
thegiant Yadana gas field 
The new contract expands a rela- 
tionship in which Unocal and Total are 
. partners with state-owned companies in 
Burma and Thailand in a £1.2 billion 
project to pump gas from the Yadana 
’field to Thailand via an undersea and 
overland pipeline. 

Total has a 31 percent stake in the 
project, Unocal has 28 percent, PTT 
Exploration & Production Co. of Thai- 
land has 26 percent, and Myanma Oil & 
Gas has IS percent 
The project — which accounts for 
nearly one-quarter of the $5.27 billion in 


foreign investment reported by Ran- 
goon since 1988 — has become a major 
focus for human?rights groups. 

Thailand which needs the gas to gen- 
erate electric power, will pay $400 mil- 
lion a year for the pipeline supply. which 
is to start in rmd-1998. Rangoon' and the 
oil companies will split the revenue. 

Washington has repeatedly con- 
demned the Burmese military govern- 
ment for what Madeleine Albright, the 
new U.S. secretary of state, last month 
called “a kind of rolling repression in 
which small steps forward alternate 
with crackdowns and episodes of in- 
timidation and violence’^againsf demo- 
cratic forces. 

Myanmar is the name given to Burma 
1 the Stale Law and Order Restoration 


by the Sc 
Council, 


Hundreds of people were killed injured 



U.S. - Caribbean Trade 


U.S. exports 
to the Caribbean,. 
Lin$ bifflc 



U.S. imports 
from the Caribbean 
in $ billions 


15 



84 '95*84 

Saa/cs: U.S. International Trade Commission 


JHT 


Caribbean Reels in NAFTA ’s Wake 


By Larry Rohter 

New York Tunes Service 


KINGSTON, Jamaica — Three 
years after the United States, Canada 
and Mexico agreed to became a single 
market as part of the North American 
Free Trade Agreement, their exports to 
one another are booming. 

But in the Caribbean, meanwhile, 
the economies of island nations left out 
of the pact are reeling from the impact 
of that success and finding it nearly 
impossible to compere. 

From the apparel plants of Jamaica 
to the sugar-cane, fields of Trinidad, 
NAFTA has caused losses of jobs, 
markets and income. The capital arid’ 
investment projects that are vitally 
needed for future growth, officials say. 


are increasingly flowing oat of the 
Caribbean Basin and into Mexico. 

“The stark reality is that Mexico can 
now export its products to the United 
States free of duty, which makes it more 
profitable fix' producers to operate from 
there,'’ said Seymour Mailings, Ja- 
maica's minister of foreign affairs and 
foreign trade. “Putting it very simply, if 
that is not stemmed it could do untold 
damage to our manufacturing sector and 
economy as a whole.” 

NAFTA’s devastating effect on the 
Caribbean was widely forecast before 
die treaty's passage Jo 1993, and 
Washington suggested it would cush- 
ion the blow by extending similar trade 
preferences to the region. 

But President Bill CHnton’s propos- 
als to give the Caribbean “NAFTA 


parity” have foundered in Congress 
twice in election years and face an 
uncertain future in a new Congress that 
has mixed feelings about die benefits 
of free-trade agreements. 

The Caribbean now exports more 
than $12J> billion of goods to the 
United States annually, and a recent 
study by the World Bank estimated 
that more titan one- third of that total 
could be shifted to Mexico if the ex- 
isting trade rules remained in effect. 

The region’s once-flourishing ap- 
parel sector has been hit hard. In the 
past two years, more than ISO apparel 
plants have dosed in the Caribbean and 
123.000 jobs have been lost “as a 
direct result of trade and investment 

See NAFTA, Page 17 


which seized power in 1988 
after emshirir J ’ ' ~ 


or imprisoned in the crackdown. 

‘‘We are happy to expand our op- 
portunities in Myanmar,” John Van- 
dermeer, Unocal's vice president for 
new ventures in South and . Southeast 
Asia, said. “This step reflects Unocal's 
strategic focus of connecting growing 
energy markets to vitally needed energy 
resources.” 

Carol Scott, a. company spokeswom- 
an, said in Rangoon that the gas-de- 
velopment project was creating jobs, 
raising living standards and bringing new 
opportunities for the 35,000 people liv- 
ing in the area where tite pipeline crossed 
Burma ea route to Thailand. 

“We believe that keeping the door 
open to foreign business is the way to 
promote change in Burma,” she said. 

But analysts said Burmese opposition 
groups and American human-rights ac- 
tivists, who have already filed two cases 


against Unocal in U.S. courts to try to 
end its involvement in f 


ject, were likely to intensify their efforts 
to force the remaining Western pet- 
roleum companies our of Burma. 

Besides Total and Unocal, Texaco 
Inc. and Atlantic Richfield Co. of the 
United States and Premier Oil of Britain 
maintain operations in Burma. 

Mr. Clinton signed into law in 
September a bill allowing him to impose 
sanctions including a ran on new in- 
vestment by U.S. companies if repres- 
sion in Burma worsens or if Daw Aung 
San Suu Kyi, ibe Nobel peace laureate 
and leader of the opposition National 
League for Democracy, is detained or 
plarad under house arrest again. 

In a speech read by her husband at the 
American University in Washington 
this week. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi 
called for a worldwide boycott of 


companies doing business in Burma. 

“Investment that only goes to enrich 
an already wealthy elite rant on mono- 
polizing both economic and political 
power cannot contribute toward equal- 
ity and justice, the foundation stones for 
a sound democracy,” she said. “Please 
use your liberty to promote ours.” 

U.S- companies that have cut links 
with Burma in the post couple of years 
include Eastman Kodak Co., Walt Dis- 
ney Co„ Hewlett-Packard Co., Liz 
Claiborne Inc. and Oshkosh B'Gosh Inc. 
The brewers Heinekcn NV of the Neth- 
erlands and Carlsbeig AS of Denmark 
have also pulled out. PepsiCo said Tues- 
day it had stopped selling its soft-drink 
concentrate to a bottling franchise in 
Burma, ending its business ties with the 
country. PepsiCo cut back its presence in 
April 1 996 when it said it would sell its 40 
percent stake in a bottling joint venture. 


Toyota Chief Eases Threat to U.K. 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — The president of 
Toyota Motor Corp., Hiroshi Okuda, 
palled back Thursday from threats tire 
previous day to stop all future invest- 
ment in Britain if it remained outside of 
Europe’s planned single currency. 

Id a carefully worded statement, Mr. 
Okuda stuck to his gans by insisting that 
the single currency would be a “sig- 


nificant advantage” for business. But 
he added that it would hardly rank as a 
crucial advantage, stressing that 
Toyota's commitment to Britain bad 
“not changed at all” in spite of the 
government's increasingly hostile 
stance toward the single currency. 

Senior British officials were elated. 
Deputy Prime Minister Michael Hes- 
seltine said the statement proved earlier 
reports a “gross overstatement." 

But by insisting on the desirability of 


economic and monetary union, Mr. Ok- 
uda has cut some important ground from 
under Prime Minister John Major's gov- 
ernment. 

Facing an election that must be held 
by May 22, the Conservatives claim the 
vast inflow of foreign money and jobs as 
a key achievement of their government 
But that may be unraveling under stress 
from the very issue that has proved so 
divisive for the party itself — Europe 
and more specifically, monetary union. 


Fiat, Sluggish in ’96, Predicts a ‘Difficult’ Year 


Ctmrdedbj Our SatfFhmt Denches 

TURIN — Cesare Romiti, the chair- 
man of Hat SpA, forecast “a difficult 
year” for Italy's largest industrial com- 
pany Thursday as it reported pretax 
profit that matched last year’s only be- 
cause of one-time gains. 

Fiat earned 3.5 trillion lire ($2.17 
billion) before taxes in 1996, little 
changed from 3.4 trillion lire a year 
earlier. But the 1996 results included 
gains from a public offering of Fiat's 3 1 
percent share of New Holland NV on 
(he New York Stock Exchange. 

Excluding special gains, income 
from operations fell 45 percent, to 1.8 
trillion lire from 33 trillion lire, while 
sales rose 3 percent, to 78 trillion lire 
from 75.7 trillion lire. 

“All of these results were obtained in a 


contradictory world economic environ- 
ment.” Mr. Romiti said in the company’s 
annual letter to shareholders. He added 
that 1997 “also appears difficult” 

Fiat uses the letter to give hs views on 
the Italian and international economies 
and to give some indication of its results 
for the previous year. Detailed results 
will be disclosed in April or May. 

The new issue of the letter is the first 
since that has been published since Mr. 
Romiti succeeded Giovanni Agnelli as 
chairman in March. 

Mr. Romiti. in a nore touching on the 
world economy and Italy’s monetary 
r, said, “Our objective is to make 


a company that creates value." 
Fiat makes almost half of the cars 
sold in Italy, the world’s sixth-Iargest 
economy, as well as trucks, tractors. 


buses, trains, machinery and a variety of 
other industrial products. The company 
said operating profit last year came to 
23 potent of all sales, down from 4.4 
percent in 1995. The results were in tine 
with expectations. 

Hat said its 1996 cash flow was 83 
trillion lire, compared with 7.6 trillion lire 
a year earlier, and investments totaled 5.2 
trillion lire, down from 5.65 trillion lire. 
The Fiat Auto carmaking unit repotted a 
3.2 percent increase in sales, to 4253 
trillion lire. The company said its market 
share rose in countries outside Europe but 
fell 1.6 percentage poims to 44 percent in 
Italy. New Holland's tractor sales rose 
almost 5 percent, to 85.700 units, while 
sales of industrial and earthmoving 
equipment rose 16 percent, to 22,600 
units. (Bloomberg, AFP ) 


* 



WAUL STREET WATCH 


Spin-Off Mania Raises New Concerns 


By Leslie Eaton 

New York Times Service 


■EW YORK — With the an- 
nouncement last week that 

^its restaurant business mid 
hand it over to shareholders, the spin-off 
clearly became the corporate trend du 
Westinghouse Electric Corp., 
lonsanto Co. and General Instrument 


jour. 

Moni 

Coro, all have spin-offs under way, and 
AT&T Cusp, completed its three-way 
split by spurning off NCR Corp. last 
month. 

One goal of these deals is to please 
investors — and shareholders often have 
made big profits from spin-offs, as tong 
as they were witting to wait a while. But 
some analysts warn that the recent deals 
are so big said so ubiquitous that die old 
rules may not apply. 

‘ ‘The broad brush is still that there is 
very strong and positive ppformance 
after a spin-oeff’ ’Barbara Goodstein, a 
senior vice president of Rothschild Inc-, 
said. “But 1 don’t want to create the 
illusion that investing in them is like 
shooting fish in a barrel. I’m concerned 
about all the attention spin-offs are get- 
ting as a result of the very big deals.” 

Much of the pressure for spin-offs is 
coming from institutional investors, 
who prefer to diversify their own port- 
folios rather than buy diversified cor- 
porations. While a spin-off once seemed 


tike an admission of defeat — or at least 
a mistake 7— today the suggestion is that 
management really cares about share- 
holders and understands that modem 
buzz word “focus.” 

Spin-offs may have become “socially 
acceptable” after ITT Corp., the quin- 
tessential conglomerate, split in three at 
the end of 1995. Ms. Goodstein said. 

In a spin-off, a company gives its 
shareholders stock in a subsidiary that 
then becomes a free-standing company. 
The Internal Revenue Service does not 
tax the transactions because the in- 
vestors technically owned both compa- 
nies before the deal — and that helps 
explain their attraction. 

h ‘ft’s unlikely that we’d see a Jot of 
spin-offs if they were not tax free,” 
Robert Wittens, a tax specialist at Leh- 
man Bros., said. Congress has been 
studying spin-offs, he said, though so far 
it appears likely to restrict only a re- 
latively rare maneuver that companies 
use when they sell assets to another 


■have been around for 
years, spin-offs were relatively uncom- 
mon in the 1960s and 1970s, when the 
“smartest” managers were putting to- 
gether mixtures of unrelated businesses 
— conglomerates — on the theory that 
when one did poorly, another would 
prosper and ftarmng s would continue to 
grow. When a drversified campany de- 
cided to unload me of its units, that 


business was often seen as a poor per- 
former, not as a corporate jewel 

But once they were on their own. those 
clunkers often zoomed, at least after a 
year or so. A series of studies carried out 
at Pennsylvania State University found 
that over three years, stocks of spun-off 
companies outperformed both the broad 
market and their own peers by 25 percent 
to 30 percent. The companies actually 
performed bearer than other similar busi- 
nesses: They invested more money, their 
sales grew more quickly, and their op- 
erating income rose further. 

As the professors began updating their 
studies to include the last two years, 
however, they have noticed some changes. 
Not only are spin-offs becoming more 
common, but they are getting bigger. 

“In the ’70s and ’80s, ihey were 
usually about 10 percent of assets, small 
chunks” of companies, said James 
Miles, one author of the studies. 
Today’s deals, which might account for 
a third of a company’s assets, he said, 
“are essentially breakups.’ ’ In the past, 
be added, it was the smaller deals that 
tended to succeed most 

One of the ironies of the current situ- 
ation is thaz even as spin-offs boom, 
“we’re having a merger wave." said J. 
Randall Woomdge, another author of 
the Peon State studies. But, he added 
cheerfully, today’s mergers are tomor- 
row’s spin-offs: “You wait, in five 
years Disney spins off ABC” 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


jan. 30 Ubid-Ubor Rates 


A aifWii 

Inmb 


* 1 DJI RF. UN DJI I* IF. *■ C* 9*“J» 

IMS us IBM ea tnar — w un tar ua uar 

sms JUS MOW UTH 1W SSI — BJS M3B ail 2**B 

PnwM u rt VMS U» UM ftt«V U9M 4*** 14# UA‘ tan UM 

uZu UM ^ 2M MISS UDMtM UW 1N54S UM JM 

Madrid BUM WS ESQ MU* S» UM W.TTC 114737* KWH — - 

Mtar VlBXUBM itS VUB — OUt OM U9JS USI UBJS UJW 

NlwYlffcOb} - — UUa UX3 5512 UKM WO SJI 14U IMS DUS 

“ — £31 157 mg — US' UBS 0J636 UM *1*0 UJJ 

nut wj» 707 an uff km use is* - — uoi 

Town UOI U7S UM UM UM* UM UM* WH *gd 

UM ijom imk awn UUS* 17741 UIU — 1.1701 uss mr* 

vm us is® fcsws unen use aid ins uue J-®* . ,ttLSa 

sdr um - am wi 7Jin iv in ism d7.ua two h mm mo m 

tr TobajFcwttpouocttK TobuyouvdoSoti ~VuHf Of JOtk tiOc nmqu&BtS NA^netmaKibtn. 

Other Dollar Values 


Mint 
1 -month SM-5M> 2W-3M 
JflKWlti m-5* amt- 3ft 
6-month Sn-SWt Mfc-Wt 
]-T«ir 5¥»-6Vk 2»-3V* 


Jan. 30 

Safes Franck 

Franc Stating Ftrac Y«n ECU 

Itt-IU At-6U 3VW-3VW ft-Vft 4-4ta 

IH-7* <H*-6U m-3** tfc-H 4-4M 

lfe-IV 6W-6W 3Vn-3V» Fu- Vj 4Vk-4VW 

Wk-lW Mta.fifa 3U-3H 4Vk-4Vn 


tali 

Tokyo 

Towl 

Zurich 

3 ECU 
3 SDR 


Soukss Revtent UorCt Bank. 

ttatos opp/tcnbt* to Interbank deposits of SI miBfoa minimum (or vqahtricnO. 


Key Money Rates 


CarmKr 
Ararat M» 
AutaraRus. 
Austrian ka. 
Bradnot 


DBBMUraw 

enwLmwd 

.Fin. tmfctai 


• ta* 
0JW8 
3JBB* 

hjm 

iJkst 

37.99 

AJW3 

1393 

CB7M. 


Creek drac. 
Haag KragS 

Hang-tamt 

Wtann*ra 

tadn-rartofi 
fcrtrtt 
hracamfe- 
Kuwdnar 
Malay, flog. 


ta* 

2S7J3L 

7J4K 

.17034 

35483 

2371.10 

0.6348 

MOB 

03012 

I486 


Om m 
HtstaM 
H. ZrakndS 
Hons boon 
PMLpm 
PnfaftiMr 
tafcamta 
AtKirMt 
Santfl rtrnd 

54*9-3 


FtrS 

7JOS 

1-4503 

65197 

203 

100 

1AA40 

mi 

1750 

14077 


Per* 
OAfcwdl AJ«3 
&.1QK.WI AM40 
SwLlma 75585 
Tombs ZU4 

TMtatt 2M9 

TraMriilra . 115440. 
■ IIAErilrtran 34705 
Vnua.Mll. 47X00 


UUtadStatai 


SQdoyCDsi 
ISMorCPMMn 
3 nradk TrcrawT Ota 
1 -nnrTnonrrkta 
fryw-TraasuyMB 
5-yeor Traomrr rata 
7-war Tmarary rata 



Forward Rates 


ao-tay WAay Wtay Gmraqr 
iStarttag. UW 15177 1*1« 

tatdwtar 1J4S8 15*35 U405 Staatatac 

(XotKtauara 1,43*7 15368 153» 


MMhy . 8MW 9M*r 

121.47 12054 10UZ 

15335 141 89 .15141 


UfWWM 

Snnflty 

Loutanl'Rdc 


Cradhtdilta 1J4S8 U435 14405 stass*** “ • 

EMgtKtaM* 143*7 14368 .1^3*9 - . ’ ■ 

Soarcw INC Bank CAmKn*** vf5%*o 

(MRoat- Baaquv Ob Ftenn ^ *** <* 

.aonuhLiMUSMi. OKurdalBfmmiheJUSBcMedna* BttambmBoaaimma. 


MMMiBorwta «, FnuKO tPariS); 9or*<* 

.fTanukUitHFODiO. OHurdUa Sum** Associated ftwfc fUwmOwpiwtf «»*** 


3-awatt taiuta o t t 
irarfi Mertank 
Ik^rrar Bout 


5L00 
814 
514 
543 
i 32 
SUM 
528 
538 
&33 
444 
&58 
487 
ATI 


U50 

043 

053 

0156 

059 

247. 


A50 

130 

3.15 

3.35 

■3.1.5 

529 


SOD 

8U 

SM 

543 

IB 

504 

528 

6JU 

627 

648 

642 

651 

4.91 

050 

043 

053 

056 

056 

243 


450 

3.13 

3.17 

OJ5 

3.15 

552 


Irak tan* rata 
Cj 

1-1 


le y— rere 


6M 650 
61* 6V« 

6U 

at 6U 
at 6H 
747 753 


Meraranra rata 115 3.15 

Cedi uoacy 31* 31* 

l M oa n t tattraota 3iA 3U 

3«rad»i ta tar*ra> 3U 3U 

t-BHdta IstaiSadk • 318 3U 
lMwOAT 554 . 555 

Ssanns Uvattn, Btoomom 44«nffl 

ync*. 8aak0f Takfo-MtisaliliM. 
-- CraflTLnnBQb. . 


Gold 


2mkk 


AM. PM. OtW 


34920 34820 -255 
34920 34925 —185 

HewYwIt 35100 389.70 —ISO 
• us. daaan ptruraUmfen MfcW 


(Apr.) 
SouKKftmim. 


^ ■ "4 •• 


Only one bank 
gives you all of 
American Express. 

That means personalized 
service with a unique 
combination of banking 
partnered with card and 
travel capabilities to help 
you do more. All over 
the world, we’re a bank 
you can count on from a 
name you already trust. 



AMERICAN 

EXPRESS 


BANK 


t' IW, American E\pn>« Hank LlU. 






PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JASimm^T#97 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 




The Dow 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 



Dollar in Deutsche marks H DoliaF in Yen 



NYSE 


■ TteDo# 


A S 0 N D J 
1996 1897 

pf 






iiwdco^r Bo^ ' 

BiionogAlreoMerval ...... r “ " 

Sanq8 g° •'• ^ | 'i:..rT v;7 


Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


Imenadoml Herald Tribune 


. V. ■'■ ■ ■■-■ 

Greenspan Backs Fix in CPI 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON— Wading di- 
rectly into one of the most po- 
litically sensitive issues facing the 
government, the chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, Alan 
Greenspan, urged Congress on 
Thursday to move quickly to re- 
duce cost of living increases for 
Social Security and other benefits. 

Mr. Greenspan said Congress 
should provide more funding to 
help the Dqjartment of Labor fix a 
range of shortcomings in its main 

itiMS irrBnf fnflah'nn, tfiw fs onsum err 

price index, that lead the govern- 
ment to overstate increases in the 
cost of living. 

But Mr. .Greenspan said the 
United States should not wait 
while that technical process went 
on, and that in the meantime Con- 
gress should establish an inde- 
pendent national commission to 
set cost of living increases that 
reflect what economists already 


know about the problems in the 
cimern measurements. 

“This type of approach would 
have the benefit of being objec- 
tive, nonpartisan and sufficiently 
flexible to take full account of the 
latest information,'' Mr. Green- 
s' told the Senate Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Greenspan’s suggestion for 
a commission revived an idea he 
bad proposed two years ago, be- 
fore the issue had any political 
visibility. 

It was immediately embraced 
by Senator Daniel Patrick Moyni- 
han of New York, the co mm ittee’s 
ranking Democrat, and appeared 
to intrigue some of the panel’s 
Republicans as welL 

Urging senators to ignore cri- 
ticism that tinkering with the price 
index would be viewed as a * ‘polit- 
ical fix” to a technical problem, 
Mr. Greenspan argued that failure 
to address the overstatement of 
inflation would be a decision to 
ignore overwhelming evidence 


that the United States is overpay- 
ing benefit recipients for changes 
in d»' cost of living:' 

Since 1972, Social Security and 
other benefit payments have been 
adjusted each year. to acm^ for 
inflation. . . 

“Through these efforts, we are 
most likely to ensure that the orig- 
inal intent of the relevant pieces of 
legislation will be fulfilled in in- 
sulating taxpayers and benefit re- 
cipients from the effects of on- 
going changes in. the. cost of 
living,” Mr. Greenspan said. “At 
present this objective is not behig 
met,” 

Mr. Greenspan has said publicly 
for years that he believes the con- 
sumer price index overstates in- 
flation, and he said last week that 
research by the Federal Reserve 
concluded that the overstatement 
is around 1 percentage point a 
year, roughly the same conduaon 
reached by a appointed panel of 
economists appointed by econo- 
mists last month. 


Intel’s News on Prices 
Aids Wall Street Rally 




* 


NEW YORK — Stock prices 


Very briefly: 


Investors Seek Control of TWA 

MOSCOW < AP) — A New Jersey-based investment group 
is preparing a bid for control of Trans World Airlines ana 
plans to ally the carrier with Russia's No. 2 airline, Transaero. 
a Transaero official said. 

Transaero wants to link its 30-city network with TWA. the 
seven th-laigest U.S. airline. 71 k investors. Strategic Capital 
Group, would take the ownership stake in TWA 
Transaero’ s vice chairman, Grigori Guitovoi, said the in- 
vestors made a preliminary offer to TWA's board Tuesday. 
TWA declined to comment 

• Ashland Inc. will sell as much as 20jperoent of its oil- 
exploration unit to investors and spin off die rest to share- 
holders as part of a plan to focus on its refining business. 

• Sony Pictures promoted its corporate development chief, 
Kenneth Lemberger, to president of hs Columbia TriStar 
Motion Picture Group as the unit of Sony Corp. reorganized 
the stumbling Hollywood studio. 

• Chiron Corp., a biotechnology company that has suffered 
setbacks in the post year, will seek a new president and chief 
executive officer to succeed Edward Fenhoet, who will be- 
come vice chairman. 

• Magellan Health Services Inc. agreed to sell its psychiatric 
jitals to Crescent Real Estate Equities Inc. for $400 
boa to focus on its managed-care plans for mental-health 

patients. 

• Dow Chemical Co/s fourth-quarter earnings fell 0.1 per- 
cent, to $409 million, as a result of lower prices and higher 
raw-material costs. 

• International Business Machines Corp. is expected to 
announce that it will make a 50 billion yen ($410 million) 
dual-currency bond issue. 

Northern States Power Co. said it would join lawsuits by 28 
other utilities seeking to stop paying into a federal fund for 
.nuclear-waste disposal. AP, NYT, Bloomberg. Reuters 

AMEX 

I 

Thursday’s 4 p.m. 

i cr_ 

i TIM top an most ocflre shores, 

up to the dosing on WoB Street 

Ww Associated Press. 


Accor Considers Buying Red Roof 


By Mitchell Martin 

ImenuMontd Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Accor SA of 
France confirmed Thursday it was 
considering acquiring Red Roof 

Tnns Inc. 

“Red Roof is a good company; it 
is a good product,” said Gerard 
Pelisson, the co-chair man of Accor 
who was attending the signing of a 
deal at the United Nations dial 
merged Accor’s Wagonlit Travel 


business with that of Carlson Cos. of 
Minneapolis. 

But he cautioned that while Accor 
was interested in Red Roof, in the 
hotel business, “everybody is look- 
ing at everyone else.” 

Dan Dorfman, a financial colum- 
nist, wrote last week in Financial 
World magazine that Accor might 
be interested in Red Roof. 

Mr. Pelisson said Accor, which 
has been trying to raise its profit- 
ability. had wanted to maintain its 


leadership in the budget-hotel in- 
dustry. It owns the chains Motel 6 in 
the United States and Formula 1 in 


ly, I believe we could 
read! 5,000 hotels in 10 years’ time, 
up from 1,500 now,” he said. Red 
Roof now operates about 240 UJS. 
properties. Accor and Carlson bad 
been working together since March 
1 994, and they signed a deal late Wed- 
nesday to legally merge their travel- 
agency units inter a sin gle ra m p a n y 


Tokyo’s Threat Pulls Dollar Back 


CaaretdtyOarSefFnmKspieeka 

NEW YORK — Japan bran- 
dished the threat of intervention 
Thursday to prop up the fla gging 
yem and the dollar lost some of (he 
ground it gained in recent days. 

Eisuke Sakakibara, the head of 
the Finance Ministry's International 
Finance Bureau often referred to as 
“Mr. Yen,” said monetary author- 
ities would intervene in currency 
markets when they thought such a 
move would be effective. 

Dealers said the remarks by Mr. 
Sakakibara. who is credited with 
helping to talk the dollar up from its 


1995 low of 79.95 yen, had halted a 
trend based on recent reiterations of 
support for a strong dollar by U.S. 
Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin. 

“The dollar has softened; and the 
market is very, very long, so we saw 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

a lot of profit-taking,” a Credit Ly- 
onnais dealer said. “There were too 
many long positions on the dollar.” 
The dollar finished at 121.855 
yen, down from 122.175 yen Wed- 
nesday. 

Meanwhile, (he Bank of France 


surprised markets by trimming its 
intervention rate for the 16th time in 
as many months. But the central 
tank’s governor, Jean-Claude 
Trichet, dashed expectations for fur- 
ther rate cuts soon, saying, “The 
monetary policy council considers 
our intervention rate is presently at 
the appropriate level.” 

The dollar fell to 5.5230 French 
francs from 5.5450 francs, to 1 .6363 
Deutsche marks from 1.6443 DM 
and to 1.4233 Swiss francs from 
1.4265 francs. 

The pound fell to $1.6135 from 
$1.6200. (AFP. AFX, Reuters) 


j as pricing news on Intel’s 

flagship "chips brightened the profit 
outlook for other softvw^cooqwter 
and ^semiconductor cempanies- 

Tntel announced a smaller-tfaan- 
expected price cat in its Pentium 
microprocessors, which run 85 per- 
cent of the world’s computers. 
Coming offa quarter marked by the 
fastest raofit growth since the fall of 
1995, Intid’spricing plan wasasign 
that earnings could continue to sur- 
prise investors. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
rose83.12pointsto6,823^6,bring- 
ing its gain in January to 5.8 percent 
and its two-year rise to 78 percent, 
Procter Be Gamble led die Dow in- 
dustrials,; rising 4 1/64 to a record 
115W. The Standard & Poor’s 500 
index rose 11.66 points to 784.16, 
and the Nasdaq composite index 
gained 15.86 paints to 1,371.03. 

The steady risein profits, both in 
the computer industry and for cor- 
porations overall, “has gone longer 
and further than any of us anticip- 
ated,” James Kmg, a senior equity 
money manager at Voyageur Asset 
Management, said. - - 

“As long as cash flows continue, 
the market's going to continue to do 
quite we£L” 

Intel rose 534 to a record 160V4, 
bringing its year-to-date advance to 
22 percent Microsoft, whose En- 
dows software lands in most com- 
puters using Intel chips, tacked on 
3% to reach a record 101 Vfc 

Investors are flocking to compa- 
nies such as Procter & Gamble, a 
consumer-products mater, because 

large -companies with proven track 
records are expected to weather best 
the t ong^mhripated retreat in 
stocks, Mr. King said. 

Other tag gamers included John- 
son & Johnson, op l% to56%, Eli 
Lilly, up 4% to 86%, and Merck, up 
^V4 to 90ft. 

the 30-year . Treasury bond’s 
yield dropped four basis points, to 
68 7 percent from 6.91 percent, say- 
ing below the 7 percent made at 
which some investors consider 
switching into fixed-income secu- 
rities. The price was quoted at 95 9/ 
32, up from 94 27/32. Interest rates 
have risen more than half a per- 
centage jpoim in the past two months, 
and the increase has sparked ccocem 
that higher borrowing coats will 
squeeze corporate profits. ". 

UJS. bands lost some gams as 
traders feared a report scbednkd for 
Friday on fouxtbKjuarter economic 
growth might fhel inflation concerns 


and as corporations prepared k> sell 

at least $1 billion of debt. ■ 

Interest rates are climbing for 
much the same reasons as stocks 
because the economy is growing at 
a fester dip than expected just a 
couple of months ago.Furthermwe, 
higher employment and full-tiic fac- 
tory production raise the risk of 

IIS, STOCKS 

accelerating inflation and a boost in 
benchmark lending rates by the 
Federal Reserve. 

The Fed will hold rate-policy 
meetings Tuesday and Wednesday 
anti again in late March. 

While Intel cut prices on some of 
its older chips as much as 34 per- 
cent, it limited price cuts On more 
powerful, profitable and popular 
models to 2 percent or less. Many 
analysts expected the cuts to be 
deeper. Smaller, dupmakers who 
compete with Intel jumped. Ad- 
vanced Micro Devices rose 214 to 
35ft, and Cyrix rose ft to 2414. 

Makers of dynamic random-ac- 
cess memory chips rose after Sam- 
sung Electronics, the world's largest 
man ufacturer of memory chips, said 
it was cut t ing production because 
paces were below costs. Micron 
Technology, a U.S.-based maker of 
16-megabit memory chips, jumped 
214 to 3514 amid speculation that 
falling supplies would lift prices. 

Ameri ca Online rose 44 to 37% 
after the service settled with 36 
states to repay customers for poor 
service and said it would hold its 
membership at the current level of 8 
milli on until members could gain 
access to the system more quickly. 

Automakers fell as the dollar 
hovered near four-month highs 
a gainst the yen and two-) 
against the Deutsche i 
arose that greater pricing flexibility 
from carmakers outside die United 
States would crimp U.S. margins. 
General Motors feu % to 6014, and 
Chrysler fell 14 to 35ft. 

“The strength of the dollar is 
going to be a big headwind for 
companies that make their profits 
oversees,” said Larry Callahan, a 
money manager at Ryback Man- 
it Corp. in St Louis. 
Wachtel, an analyst at 
Prudential Securities, said money 
managers were running out of im- 
petus to push the market higher. 
r ‘Fourth-quarter earnings are com- 
ing to an end, die flow of money 
into mutual funds will slow In Feb- 
ruary, and we are gang to have an 
FOMC meeting,” he said. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 




U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTUBES 


BUS 5 VJO 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 103.19 

lOUtSWM 10023 

10 Industrials 106.14 


Trading Activity 

NYSE 



Indexes 

Dow Jones 

upon Mob taw Last do. 

Indus 8746J2 tout 674074 6BZUM +B3.H 
Trims 2374,10 233L65 2314X5 233872 *916 
UH Z03I 2M21 23287 23421 *114 
CMo> 210442 211736 209732 21T72B +19X6 

Standard & Poors 

Previous Today 
HI* Low Ohs 4X0 

90731 898.17 90621 92027 
56123 55426 55936 561.67 
200A5 19047 199.19 1»X2 
8622 85.14 86X6 8755 

77220 76532 77256 78151 
75840 74846 75040 76947 

Law Lad Ow. 

41136 40639 *113# *5.11 
51652 51146 51152 *634 

H| * SQ 30X7 M4M »UM 

2*643 2073 2660 +287 
37137 36773 3714* +4.13 


Hfeh- LOW Lari Os. 

136731 136131 136731 +1231 
114930 1 14433 114930 +5L50 
Tmnin limm 03100 +13* 
144938 144133 140930 +11173 
1663.07 166 2X 1 U6B49 +439 
88095 875.17 675.17 -081 


Mast Actives 

NYSE 



VOL 

MNl 

Lam 

Lad 

a». 

MJcmT 

14 S 02 S 

3615 

3 *« 


+ 7 W 

RHDrtai 

84052 

37 * 




Dancsksn 

sn» 

201 % 

195 % 



A+Touch 

49651 

26 

251 % 

25 W 

+7 

OmpUSAs 

473(1 

Wk 

law 

19 * 

+114 


PwriOos 

AT&T i 

AMO 

Brirtcer 

Compaq 

Tnraaai 

CmtenTi 

WatMart 

FordM 

Nasdaq 


Cisco s 
Navel 

Intel 

Oracle i 

Micnsftx 

Warworn 

JdtflNk 

Quantum 

3CBm 

SunMJcs 

AOns 

RoMs 

Read? 

Ainel 

RnSni 

AMEX 


437M 34* 
38331 39% 
3BD43 3516 
34785 1114 
34T78 ISM 
33637 44* 
32837 33 
32671 231* 
32174 371% 


ISSN 15T& 
3*1% 34V) 
3BH 394% 
3M6 35 

19H II 

831% an 

611% 63 
2*V% 261% 
23 231* 

33 329% 


+1 
+ H 
+ 14 
♦ 21 % 

♦ l“ 
-344 
—79% 
+ 14 


SOUS +898 SPDR 


Cbg. 

nm 

— 0.10 
+003 


XCLLW 
RwrtOu 
Echo Bair 


VoL Hfek 

Lew 

Lao 

aw. 

WJ64J 6PVh 

4514 

671% 

+ IW 

138592 119% 

11 

ilk 

+M 

18*671 16614 

15M 

1601% 

+B% 

108871 3814 

37 

371% 

— Vu 

*8217 10114 

« 

161 W 

+31% 

76*76 251% 

3411 

251% 

—W 

TOM 5W 

m 

3%% 

—41% 

63100 3914 

3H4 

3M 

+244 

50035 6614 

an 

6JW 

+214 

47839 321% 

314% 

311% 

— «Wh 

46577 44 

row 

431% 

+31% 

44461 401% 

snt 

m% 

—Mi 

41789 323% 

29Vj 

37V. 

+71% 

39250 «* 

421% 

49Va 


38520 29M 

361% 

281% 

VoL Hm 

Law 

Lad 

aw. 

29219 7W 


fl% 

+w 

32^ 

"ST 


S5!& 

1 

SHh 



6672 W. 

Vh 

1% 

+9% 

6119 ?Vu 

3W* 

3W. 

-»» 

5546 191* 

18* 

1H4 

+ » 

SU T* 

»i< 

21% 

5067 7Vu 

61% 

4H 

— w 


Jan. 30, 1997 

Mgh Low Close Orjt Qplrt 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT) 

UnUumMnrtn-amiParlMM 
MOT 97 27654 27314 274 -1 13UB2 

Mav97 274 27114 2716% -414 0,355 

JUIV7 2ml 26714 279 -116 4*411 

S«77 35716 264 365 -414 9X41 

Dec 97 20 364 26414 -2ri 44,139 

Estates NA Wad’s. sales 
Wad's apuiflt 30400 op M 

SOYBEAN 66EAL (CB0T1 
WO tons- Mars iv Ion 
Mcrf7 34049 237 JO 23726 — 3JD 317 86 

MOV 77 23650 33U0 23720 -320 21320 

Jo!?? 23150 23020 7SDJ0 -MO 19J03 

Aug 77 23BL31 227X0 227 JO —328 1346 

Sea 97 22150 22320 22320 -180 1579 

0097 21420 21320 21320 -MO IAS 

et sales NA. Wed’s, sows 27280 
VMtfsmnbr 69X17 up 1161 

soybean on. (ann 

40X00 In-carti par B> 

Mar 77 36.15 2325 2326 -025 4SJ15 

Mur 97 3422 3426 2427 -022 19269 

M97 3488 2424 2425 -023 15229 

Aug 97 2422 2485 2485 -0.15 3,117 

Sep 97 25.11 3491 2U0 -Oil Z521 

OdV7 2526 2502 2103 -023 747 

Estates HA. Wriflsatoi 1L240 
WcAopsnhir 90232 on 1360 

SOYBEANS (CBOD 


Nasdaq 


1330 IZ70 

B90 1190 

*07 B4Q 

312* 3322 

46 71 

9 27 


227 ZQ 

219 195 

719 711 

25 14 

■ 3 


New HWh 
N ow Lows 

Market Sales 


NYSE 
Am ax 
Nasdaq 
InmBUons. 


ansa Prev. 
2127 1W 
1S62 im 
1743 1758 

J73I 5729 
185 157 

65 56 


Tteor 


Prev. 


52841 597JJ4 

2035 24.19 

41488 599.13 


DMdends 

Cuapesiv Per Amt Rtc Par 

IRREGULAR 

Nth Europe OS _ jo. 2-14 3-26 

Toledo Edodpf A -8375 2-1 4 3-1 

Toledo EdaqpTB _ 4756 2-14 s-l 

STOCK SPUT 
DteMdlae3for2«n. 

Pem-Araericn Gm 3 for 2 spBL 

STOCK 

ConununByTrBn _ 10% 3-15 4-15 

UnBedSacarBiKB - 10% 3-10 MS 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Power TeiilSA 1 tor 6 raeno spOL 


company 

Daour Dawns 
FtdudcwyTrc® 

Fsl Independ n 
OTannluin Chera 
MBdieW Bncg 

SC Bonavp 

c- ftjtdMdend since gobig public: 


Per Amr tec Pay 

_ 88 2-10 3-10 

_ 2D 2-4 2-14 
. J0625 2-7 Ml 

_ .15 3-14 Ml 

_ 20 2-10 3-24 

C ® 3-6 2-20 


Mcr97 75ZV» 741 741% -M 77260 

740797 7379. 7229. 740 -9% 3M34 

All 97 jm 7401% 741 ~m 33821 

Aug 97 744 736 736 -8 5861 

Sep 97 71419 5S3 701 -4H 1J21 

EsLwtes HA- wed-Lsctes 60224 
Wed's open W 172865 up 3H9 

WHEAT (ONTO 

5800 bwmMaium-capli per IwoM 
Mw97 37319 370 Ml — t* 24804 

-Mar 77 33 m 356 3S» 10839 

All *7 . 3471% 344% 344% -2 3(271 

Sep 97 390 3471% 34746 —1U I2B 

Eststes HA. Wed's. sales 11JD2 
Wed's open M 64852 up 22 


Livestock 
CATTLE (EMBD 
41800 fci- arti pw II 
Feb 97 64.ro 6U5 6440 +042 17870 

Apr 97’ I4M 64.10 4MB +050 41844 

JUn 77 *172 6*35 64£ *020 M85B 

Ana 77 6*70 6430 6*25 +OU 16220 

Oct 97 6785 6780 0JO +082 980 

Dec 77 70.15 4927 4787 +085 3209 

Ed. sales HA WM’i.wtes 36840 
Wwfs open inf 10(866 up 3066 
FEEDER CATTLE (OMBQ 
naoaBfc-aMMParh. 

Am 77 67J5 &B UJ* 

Harm 4985 6892 4980 

Apr 97 7820 025 080 

MOT 97 780 ’ 70.10 7055 

AIS97 7*55 7*01 7*82 

Sep 77 7570 7481 7UD 


MflH Low Close Oge Optat 

ORANGE JUKE WCTN} 
198Mteb-aentipar«L 
Mar 97 8780 BUD 8730 -1.15 14237 

May 97 9180 89-66 9OJ0 _LflS 4847 

J0I97 9400 9L3S 9380 —139 3890 

S8P97 9420 9X50 9480 -130 1.997 

Ed. sates na W«rs.se4es UOO 
WWsopaoitf 

Metals 

GOLOCNCMX} 

miiwes-Mnptrtwa. 

FA 97 351 80 34680 34420 -580 23,101 

M8T97 351«8 M 

Apr 97 35100 34730 34020 -480 77230 

Am 97 35*00 347 JO 35080 —580 22819 

Aug 97 35550 3SU0 35*28 -360 M71 

Oct 77 36000 35450 35480 -480 3279 

Dec 77 36180 357.10 357.10 -480 U83B 

FA9B 36050 36080 36080 -420 2844 

Est. sites NA Wad’s, setes 64171 
Wed's open int 18*475 off 60S 
MGRADECOI’FBIINCMX) 
3SNQfel..OH(i>rU. 

RHOT 10330 10180 WL40 -180 IM 

Mar97 W2J0 10080 10120 -121 3*125 
Apr 77 ML10 9980 77J0 —120 1202 

May 97 mil fojo fojo -uo &m 

Ass 97 9985 9080 9680 —185 774 

AH 97 9880 97 JO YfM -380 *557 

Aug 97 9789 9685 ’ 9485 -180 409- 

S*P 97 9780 9*20 9** —180 2815 

OC397 940 9561 9150 —180 579 

EsLRtes NA Wed's. Ktes 1*251 
WetftapmH 51410 off 1935 
SLVBKNCMXJ 
4.000 Uoir OE^certi par.Mw oo. 

Fed 17 0280 3 

Mr*' 97 49750 -40680 49680 +280 5720 

May 97 50180 49180 50180 +2 JO T1832 

Jul97 50*50 47580 50*50 +120 USD 

SOP 97 50980 KBJO 50*80 +U0 3801- 

Dec97 51450 5D980 51450 +180 *684 

JonW SQ2D . 9 

Mar 98 SUB 1,51 

Estsates NA WteTksdes 14891 
Wed's open W 09297 off 274 
PLATTNU MCMMS O 
SDSwe*. i i J i . nwhurie. 

Apr 97 35120 35380 355» -430 30241 

Ad 77 359 JC 354JD 2720 -490 3293 

0(797 36080 3080 3S9JB -480 2279 

Jar 98 36580 1277 

Estsates NA WWvsrtes TJT7 
Wed's open int 36883 up 174 


Close Piwkws 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
Dalton pm metric too 

'lM4W a, lMV4 


Hgk Low Oase Chge Op M 

1 0-YEA R FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIR 
Ff^OOOOO - pts Of 1 DO pet 
Mur W 13062 13442 13454 +020114453 
Am 97 12920 129.12 12920 +026 15211 
Sep 97 12784 12784 T2752 -HUS 764 

OK 97 NT. NT. 9588 +028 0 

Est 9aMnK 87^)32 . Open tat: 134447 off 

MNl 

ITALIAN GOVERNMEin BOND (UFFE) 
rn.2Wp*au-iteorTt»pd " 

Mm97 13129 13083 U087 - 0J511U32 
J0U97 13020 130JS 12983 —024 920 

Soa97 NT NT. 12989 —034 

a«lK S9,iaPte*.*uteK 93597 
Pm. open to* 12W74 off 4230 

RJROOOLUkia (CMQU 
SI mUlaHtt 0(100 net 
Mar 00 9122 9411 9421 +064 39575 

Ante 9414 9412 *345 +084 35853 

S8P 10 9411 94V 73. W +684 31212 

DOCK 9382 9256 9401 +084 25400 

Mrn 01 9381 9257 1101 +081 25231 

Juaffl 9494 9252 9284 +084 20,144 

StPBT 9252 9280 9252 +084 11843 

Dec 01 9284 9280 JU4 +081 9594 

B* sates 34520 Wed's, sates 46MB 
Wed's open int 4271805 up 2547 
BRnwraowHomi 
0500 pounA, spot pound 
Mm 97 18200 V*KB 18122 43574 

Am 97 18180 LOOP 18096 2227 

■ Sep 97 1 Mm 18* 

DOC 97 1800 URSD 13M 7 

ESL sates 9JB Wed’s, sites 0,9V 
WRfs open tat 36850 up 230 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (OMBO 
10l5Mdgtanusaeradn.dk- 
Mar*7 J454 8*3* MB 415*1 

Am 97 7414 7477 740 85D 

S«P*7 7530 7530 7522 4508 

Dec 77 7576 J5SI 7H9 450 

EsLafcs 4863 Mteifs. sales 5815 
Wetfsopeninf 5480 off OS 
GERMAN MARK -COMBO 
UM 88 mate, s pw mwic 
Mnr*7 810 7t-G> 8138 82868 

Jun97 8184 81* 81V 5,164 

S*P 97 8219 8175 8307 1163 

DOC 97 820 II 

E* sc4es 22,178 Wed's. Ktel 2780 
Wed's venM 90013 off 3161 
JAPANESE YEN CCMBO 
IT lndtei ten, frarHOyw 
Mar 97 8290 5249 8275 74908 

Am *7 JOB 8361 - -8304 4999 

SeP 97 JSa Sm 8496 *36 

I^VfeTLSOte 3*137 
4d 77727 up 1907 


wud 


Wed's opanM 
SmSPRAMKOMERJ 
pSTOk uno . 1 ,ar (ro ne 
■cmii hmh MLm f7 JWM JQ25 ■+ «■>, 
JunYT 7150 7096 7129 


47861 

M0980 161080 140*110 16C7D0 72U 7T70 7191 MJ4 

JfAfOta* 16839 Wetfs-ates 17775 
“ 1290 


+022 9S9 

+080 7827 

+082 4946 

+8J5 

+8L2S 32& 

+o« uno 


244000 

31080 Z150JD0 219180 2192J10 DjE^U^SJnoorid 1 

ffl . 52S %£ %%- 

456X0 657X0 45*00 &SL00 Ap«?7 fUi f£ M 


3867 


INCREASED 


83 2-12 3-31 
J3 2-10 2-79 
X2 1-31 2-14 
.12 2-14 2tfl 
M M0 2-24 
.15 3-7 2-14 
82 M2 2-24 


Ambactac 
ANikmdlnc 
CanBBncp 
Crown Podf Piter 
EagteHnd 
GtanoetWW, 
Mdcassui Ooip 
MId-Am E»S 58 f 
NflieaslIMI 
PHI Suburtnn 


REGULAR 

O ..145 2-10 
0 J7J 2-26 
O 85 
Q ~ 

Q 

Q 

a 
0 


S3 M7 
75 MO 
.25 3-3 

JO 2-7 


3-5 

MS 
2-7 3-31 
2-3 2-14 


S J5 3-1 
BBS 2-12 


REDUCED 

SeairBnepMon O .115 M 0 2-25 
INITIAL 

- .125 3-7 3-28 


Sara Lee 
3he*Cda Udg 

SNmCAWatar 

Wneo Group 
WIEneroy 
■tb-i 


JO 2-19 

OS 3-3 
85 2-M 
J7 2-29 
31 MO 
88 2-M M0 
35 .9-14 2-28 
J2 38 
J8 M3 


3-3 

3-1 

8-1 

3-1 

3-3T 

3-1 

3- 7 

4- 1 
3-14 
M4 

3-1 


wad 

Tin 

Ed. sales NA. WBfft-Kies U85 
Wed's opwW 2X015 op 4E . . ^ 

HOGS I — tPyBO Ztac 

eaXDOKnL- cents per Is. Spat 

FTO77 76JV 75JS M +0B GW fS? 

AY 97 7*20 7150 7520 +4LT7 14819 want 

Am 97 8080 Ttsi USJB + 6 » 7J3S - 

8497 Nil 7US 7IX +ILS! 1867 

Aug 97 7535 740 7500 +451 18K 

Od97 6881 -67 JO 68.10 +037 1808 

&IM6S KA WWOSHte N317 
HteAapuM 34,193 off HT 


456X0 457X0 -454X0 4SL00 W97 
444X0 447X0 447X0 44&00 JM97 

7190X0 7300X0 7050X0 7055X0 £5? 
7390X0 7300X0 7154X0 715SXO 


5TOOXO 5710X0. 5740X0 5745X0 

5745X0.5775X0 5900X0 5905X0 58p99 

KtatHtafe Grade) NM 

1102X0 1103X0 1096% 1099% 

1125X0 1124X0 1121W 1122X0 


High Law Ctaoe Chge Opted jjtea 


6X1 

SS 

M m 

g 3 g :» k 

if?! JffS *** +0X4 647 

9*13 94J3 9*13 +0X5 

NT. NT. 93X9 +005 

NT. NT, 9U7 +0X5 


4-1 

3-3 


flMrNADfc up affWtaCio0aifMadS 
Ml ■iiMltam II mwg li III 


Stock Tables Explained 

Solos flguros an imondol.Yead7)4|^s and taws rofledliepRataas 52 weelek plus taeamunr 
wegfcbrtn(rPielateVteidfciqdgy.Whereogpmerslodc(te<cte>do(nourt%iglo2S |i m(gilorP tej ie 
has best pold. me yams hlglUow rongemltMdoiKlan itaun foHha nawsteda only. Uideso 
dtieraise rated ntasofdMdendi ononnuol ifikbunemeros baked on tee latest docMtan. 

□- dividend cdso extra (s). b - arniud rote o( dMdend ptas stock dMdend. < - OqiMiang 
(ftddeiw. a: - PE OBseeds 99xM -caM. i - newyemty km.dd - tan In the tat 1 2 norths, 
e- dividend (teetered « paw In pnxadng 12 months, f- annual rate Increased on last 
d«*srollcn. 9 - dSvIdend In Ctanalan tunds, sub led to 1506 non-residence fax. T- dhridHid 
dadared after 8 pfit-up or stack dividend. [-jfivkfcndpoM this year, whWhI, deterred, or no 
aellon takoe of latest dMdend (netting, k - dMdend dedaned ar paid ffte ye or, an 
aatemutaSralssue wlta dMdandotaaneacLm-mmual rate reduced on lost dedaitelaa, 
n - new Issue In the past 52 weeks. The Mgh-lovr range begins with the stmt (d trading, 
nd- next dor deffvery. p- InBU dMdend. annual rate unknown. P/E *prfcMHntag* ratio. 
q-cfased-endmutomtenNr-dMdtnddtKXindmpaU In pnca&iol 2 aKmtra< plus stock 
dMdend. - stack sptt. Dhridend be^fea wtlti date af spflt sis - sates, t- (Mdend paid In 
sioefc In proeexfing 12 monifas. esflaHtad cosh value on ex-dMdend m OMflcMbuttaa date. 
B-newimtYhlflh-v-trqcflnglia t te(Lvf-tebgnlgupteyorrecelventteporlj dn yui«jrgn nt »i l 
unflerttieBcnlgopfcyAcL or aeguriWeso s guroed by SDCh core ponte s, wtf-wtianfefcttuted. 
•1 - when BsueiV ww - with warrant*. * - ex-ttMdend or ex-rtghs. nffs - ex-dlstrftMitton. 
nr- wttaout wanants. r ex-tteridend and sales In IUL yld - ytatiLz- sates to luB. 


PORKBBLUGStCMOU) 

4&008 oml~ amts parte. 

Fob *7 79 JO W40 TUI +1XZ WJ 

Mm 97. 7985 7BJ5 79X0 +090 1894 

May 97 BJO JW M2 

Ad 97 7RS5 5WS8 3356 +085 40 

Aug 97 74XB 7US KM +147 ffl 

Bfcsctea NA Wolfs. 90s 109 ■ 

WBcTSopenW I8B UP 2SP 


Food 

COCOA Qicsd 
10 metric tans- Sam lan 

MmW 1325 J304 IBB 

Mmrff 130 «4 130 

Ad 97 1375 130 1374 

50,97 art UK vn 
DOC97 1422 140 1422 

eoLHtes NA. wars. sates 
Wad's apniTO 0859 up 3 1 
f nweer (MK5E) 

Mmn^4u^uSi£.ws30 

MOV 97 140 JB 13*25 WO -** 9 AH 


Financial 

UST.BLLStOUBQ 
Si mBBoo- pteel Utepd 1 , 

Mor97 9*95 9*92 9452 

Am 97 9*80 9*77 .9476 

SmW 9C6I 9*59 9459 ttXZ 

eu. sales 31 wws.scte3 aa 

weersaponn Uii 




176 

18 


Jud97 
4736 Sap97 

XB 7 °«* 

745 


WWllTHSTaLIPKJflJFFE) 

raama-igf/ioapci 

«rt?7 9165 9083 9383 U nfit ItfLltt 

9140 93X6 9338 Stetfc. 

M-U «L1S uS SS 

nu SS + &SI 5UW 


I Mam 
Junta 
Septa 
DecSB 
Nam 
Jam 
SqOTI 


nu 9182 9282 +082 njjo 

9173 917# *171 *0X3 3181? 

net H82 Jdxs SaJ 

9157 Mil 9254 + (LOT lun 

9189 9286 9286 +0X2 U» 

9143 9280 9140 +K Ttaf 

fiSi 9234 92X5 +0X4 jg 

9233 9129 9281 +U4 1*1 

test 81833 

"*"*»• ssarKiK'ff’ 1 " 

Morsnr 94J7 ton KJS +OK4MB 


High Low CkM Chge Oplnt 

MOV 97 7446 75 X 5 76 JB -887 11517 

J 0 t 97 77 JB TIN 77 X 0 -076 1356 

0097 7780 7730 7730 -030 180 

DOC 97 7780 77.10 77.10 -040 12331 

MorJO 7685 771 

EsLaotei NA Mffs. solas 4800 
vmrkcpanH . 

HEATHGOIL (NMBU 
*2800 art. cants ear got 
W »97 7070 4 EM 7034 +IN 15,154 

MWJT 660 46 J 90 48 X 6 +039 31830 

* WV O 6430 45 X 1 +089 14396 

AA 0 Y 97 6280 4 L 55 4221 +034 U 37 

Jon 97 4160 5985 6031 +089 4391 

3477 WM 935 081 +084 1304 

SS 8 I 035 60 X 1 +084 1062 

Sep 97 4081 WM <WH +084 3300 

Od 97 4 UH 6030 6051 3 ,MZ 

Nov 97 6121 +639 1330 

»jtees 47841 WWi safes <L 942 
WHftmenk* 95391 off 3091 
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMBU 
1800 ha*- dodan par fee*. 

Mor 97 25 X 0 3483 34 X 7 +00 0139 

Apr »7 3484 23 J 7 2*35 +082 38802 

May 97 ZLB 4 2380 23 X 0 +UB 21497 

Am 77 2132 2192 2131 +034 32867 

Ad 77 2233 2153 22.92 +034 15825 

AUO 77 2156 2122 2154 + 0 S 14344 

SIP 97 2222 2133 2122 +030 15864 

0(197 2188 2185 21 X 0 +OX 10707 

N°v»J 21 N 21 JB + 0 N 7 JB 1 

Dac 97 2130 21 X 1 2130 +030 24872 

Am 9 * 21 X 5 2052 21 X 5 +035 13,774 

FJbta 2085 2081 28 X 5 +027 7837 

Mmte 2086 tass ian 

Si** nMi 

Wad's open a# 353 365 up 4123 
NATURAL GAS (MMSU 
10000 mm Mw*i. S par mm biu 
Mor 97 2885 1800 2864 29,191 

Apr 97 1220 11 ® 2315 173 S 1 

Moy 97 2 X 90 2 X 40 1090 113*2 

Am 97 2 X 65 2 X 35 2 X 65 0846 

Art 97 1080 2 A 55 1045 &712 

AwK? 1100 2 X 65 2065 7350 

Sop 77 1165 2 X 75 1065 *445 

0(297 1125 1085 2 m &OT 

NW 97 223 D 2 S 80 1200 4872 

[tec 97 2 J 5 B 1315 1330 7394 

Am 98 2385 2345 134 S 5.90 

Estsates 2 SJS 6 Wctfs. sates 22395 
WtdTiopenM 148315 off 1223 
UNLEADED GASOUNE 0 IMHD 

Febtf 70 X 0 4630 69 X 2 +U 7 KLT 15 

*rg 0 ^ 6630 6985 + 1 JI 2986 

tSJG ♦ 1-13 11801 

May 77 7030 67 JO 7350 +im *751 

ABI97 03& ALSO 69.10 +0ta SX7S 

^97 OM 6*70 4735 +0JD 2X» 

BOw tei 3 4802 wad's. sales 273 a 
■Nadfeopantai 73315 up ism 
GASOIL OPE] 

^ l»nw«ciun - lott of itDtatB 

m££ S +*» 22.909 

5 ™ 97 20150 20 Q .75 20350 + 9 X 0 UL 742 

5Sy»7 IToSS ?Sn2 4024 

™l , „" 170.73 170X0 17050 +3jn 

Plis&yB&msi & 

Jr. 1 NX litis tIS 66 

Dec 97 184 X 0 186 X 0 184 X 0 + 2 J 0 im 

SniM"?»ss“ 

2 fivU 7 +133 35 X 45 

yyy 2223 2 lA 5 22.17 + 07 R 17 JIB 

Igxia 

eg 

"-T. N.T. 19.70 +H 0 


Nor 97 
Dec 77 


1187 

5L589 

1736 

1*32 

1270 


SYS. TREASURY KBOD 

-noojBXprin- pit Kites of loo pet 

UfffW-13 104-Qff 106-09 +87 115814 Bad* 

Am 77 MS-54 105-50 \QHb +09 10X0 ^1. 

Sw97 105-40 Htt-0 UM +09 
Eststes UX00 WetTLsdu 0834 

»YR. TREASURY tCBOTJ ^ ^ „ 

swoxaa Brin. Pts*. Stem of wo net Jun 97 MXO 96J5 HJr ZjT&JtSS 

Mar 97106-12 TOMB 10647 + 05 320J22 Sep W 9177 9171 94J4 IftS 



iCOKTC 


apeMHoxooHaaaizndsotnepcfl job 99 ocu kT, Trjir 

MmTnUKM 1W-05 1W-H +10 4KUXB Sep 99 K10 «X8 

A8197 1W-07 WH1 UO-92 +.W 32J03 ; 55 » WM SS 12S 

SapT7 109-28 109-11 109-M +W 5X21 7*** +afls — . 

Doc 97 109-06 108-26 109-06 ♦ M 4437 45X97, C^Jeri int;2S*l43B« 

at nles 475X00 Wad’s, ade* 5Z7X50 


S£S S2 %% Is J8S low 

» &S 2K5 Sfi 

U54 
3X03 
U4I 


wed's* 


1M 


to tr mjs SS wa ^ «^_coy»i^6d«pajF™ 


BOT.IOU NA Wtafwtaeo. MXW 
Wtanapnier <38» : im set 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 OOP 
1 TX00D b*> certsrar fa. 


Barit 


O-pBatlOOpd Jurff7 

101X9 101 JO T0L22- +U922U15 Sep97 


JHSBHWSf" 

nji n» — b 


£J 1 93.12 — 0 X 9 9 i* 26 l 
a*M —0X4 

10 D 48 j 80 M iOW ili 9 ~ 12 » D 6 S 7 SS g 56 -7197 -O 0 t 
eke 2Z2X55 **“ “ 

Off 6JUJ . 


: 23 U 54 


**% ft® H %S 4SS 3 iS «Soo^faS , a»i*Pd 
ww S5 SS XS ^ «x5 ^ m-rna * 90 ■ 

^.wtas ,S«s'tS! 8 w^ S “ iotas S1311.tem.mlt*: H88T 

Wfed'i Open » 15*820 aa, ssz . Prer. aura lata tcrxir off 9.156 


iSSi VFs. r- u w-w -fix* 

£2? 9*3 9*23 —0X4 rsx»' 

wa 9422 -SS lami 
Ettiotec 51 A7i Prtv, Ktex 01837 
PIPK Otanlrt: >6*336 

Mustrlsts ’ 

“EHS 10 * 1 * 9 

“XMft-awiMrfc. 

TWO 7431 74LB -0J0 2L752 


r- t _ T2A.IW LU/U 

uJ & m **** 37fS4Z - 0P«n Int: 142*388 + 

” Stock Indexes 

^a^P.wextaeo 

S 11 ;# 

«C4BWlAnn 

SIffisynS 

$ 8*18:11 
, N - T -®+SI 

3Un - OttanhS! 
Comm otihytnde^ 


A* 






A 5v 


H* 




£ 33 ? 

CR J B FWUrt ’ 


}*^7aio 

lxnjo 

150.77 

240X4 


1,957 JO 
152.19 
341.16 


l 




9 })\ 




\ \ 

_ ~ 

1 ^ S 1 1 * <( (' Alcatel’s Outlook 

On ’96 Profit Sends 
Stock Surging 16 % 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 

EUROPE 

Digital TV 9 s Spanish Torment 

Madrid Threatens to Ban Sogecable’s Service 


PAGE 15 


C-wyvfaJfn fteSfafPFmmLrd/wAtox 

PARIS — Alcatel Alsthom shares 
surged after the French company 
said Thursday that it expected to 
posL a net profit of about 2.5 billion 
francs ($451.3 million j for 1996. 

Shares of the electronics com pan y 
closed up 70 JO francs, at 523. 

Analysts said the profit projection 
demonstrated that Chairman Serge 
Tchuruk's three-year recovery plan 
had yielded results in its first year. 

“These results lend credibility to 
Tchuruk’s recovery scenario.’’ said 
Pascal Mathieu of Credit Commer- 
cial de France. 

They singled out the recovery in 

Glaxo Wellcome 
Names New Chiefs 

Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Glaxo Wellcome 
PLC on Thursday named its chief 
executive. Richard Sykes, to the ad- 
ditional post of executive chairman, 
effective in May. and designated Sean 
Lance, its managing director, to take 
over as chief executive a year later. 

Glaxo, the world's biggest phar- 
maceutical company, said the 
changes had been prompted by the 
plan of its chairman, Colin Comess, 
to retire after its annual sharehold- 
ers’ meeting in May. 

Analysts said the changes gave 
added power to Mr. Sykes, 54, who 
led Glaxo's $14.7 billion takeover 
of Wellcome Group PLC in 1995. 

It also represents the continuation 
of a meteoric career rise for Mr. 
■ Lance. 49. who was promoted to 
executive director in 1993 and man- 
aging director in 1996. He was also 
named chief operating officer. 

“It clearly indicates that Sean 
Lance has risen to the top of the 
pile.’’ said Bill Blair, an analyst 
with Greig Middleton & Co. “He 
has come up very fast.” 

Mr. Sykes will bold both the ex- 
ecutive chairman and chief executive 
posts for a year, after which Mr. 
Lance will take over as CEO and Mr. 
Sykes will remain executive chair- 
man. Invest ois and analysts said the 
appointments did not appear to signal 
any major changes at the company. 


telecommunications operations, the 
division that was largely responsible 
for the 25.60 billion-franc loss Alc- 
atel reported for 1995. Alcatel said 
telecommunications sales increased 
6 percent, to 71.15 billion francs, 
allowing the division to recoid an 
operating profit in the second half. 

“The return to profit for the tele- 
coms sector confirms that the Tch- 
uruk plan is working,” said Andre 
Chassagnol of the brokerage Mees- 
chaert Rousselle, “and the 21 per- 
cent rise in orders for the sector is 
very favorable.” 

1 ’Alcatel has really been focusing 
on core activities, and foreign in- 
vestors love Tchuruk,” said Eric 
Doutrebente of Richelieu Finance. 
“There aren't many better telecom- 
munications stock plays in Europe.” 

The company also seemed on tar- 
get in its asset sales program, ana- 
lysts said.. As part of the recovery 
program, Alcatel planned to sbed 
assets worth 10 billion francs. 

Overall, orders rose 8 percent, the 
company said, to 168.2 billion 
francs, including multimillion-franc 
orders for submarine cables across 
the Atlantic, a telephone network in 
the Philippines and cellular tele- 
phone networks in Russia. China 
and Indonesia. 

Sales were 162 billion francs, 
against 160.4 billion francs in 1995. 

Alcatel said its figures were “in 
line with the recovery plan and con- 
firm tee objective of returning to a 
satisfactory level of profitability in 
1998.” But it added teat final net 
profit would not be declared for a 
montb. Alcatel forecast in September 
that it would break erven in 1996. 

Alcatel's shares should continue 
to rise, many traders said, if the 
company sustains tee turnaround. 

“Alcatel is cheap,” said Michael 
O'Mara of Ocfdo & Q‘e. “If it’s really 
turning around, teen it’s not going to 
be cheap for long." 

But Chris Tucker of Paribas Cap- 
ital Markets Group said uncertainties 
clouded Alcatel Alsthom 's future. 

“This rise is a dramatic over- 
reaction,” he said. “I am not con- 
vinced teat its future is teat bright. 
There is still a lot of work ahead. So 
far it has failed to take a reasonable 
market share of the mobile phone 
market ’ ’ (Bloomberg, AFX) 


Bloomberg News 

MADRID — Sogecable SA and 
France's Canal Plus began selling 
Spain's first digital-television ser- 
vice to the public Thursday, de- 
spite a government threat to make 
theproject illegal by Saturday. 

Toe sendee. Canal Saielhe Di- 
gital, expects about 200,000 sub- 
scribers by year-end and hopes to 
break even with 800,000 subscribers 
in four or five wars, its managing 
director, Jaume Ferrus, said. 

He said its initial broadcast 
would take place as scheduled Fri- 
day in spite of what the Spanish 
media company has called gov- 
ernment interference aimed at 
delaying the project to help a com- 
peting government-supported ven- 
ture lea by Telefonica de Espana. 

A delay in tee project would 
deal a blow to Spain’s effort to 
catch up with Germany, France 
and Italy in tee field of next-gen- 
eration TV services and to attract 
new investment in hardware and 
programming. 

“We will not tolerate that tee 
government abuses its power at 
our expense,” said Jesus Polanco, 
chairman of Sogecable. 

Mr. Polanco is also chairman of 


privately held Grupo Prisa. which, 
along with Canal Plus, holds a 25 
percent stake in Sogecable and is 
Spain’s largest media concern. 
Banco Bilbao Vizcaya SA holds 
15.79 percent. 

He said Canal Sate lire would ini- 
tially invest 65 billion pesetas 
($468.6 million) and would have 25 
television and 27 audio channels. Its 
debut comes as the government ap- 
pears ready to adopt regulations to 
outlaw the venture’s decoder, the 
device teat unscrambles its digital- 
television signals for viewing by 
paying subscribers. The govern- 
ment contends teat the decoder 
must be compatible with those of 
competing systems, ft first pro- 
posed such a measure last Friday 
and is expected to approve it Friday 
and publish it as law Saturday. 

“I think it is impossible that an 
instrument used in the rest of 
Europe is. declared illegal in 
Spain,” Mr. Polanco said. 

Telefonica de Espana and the 
stale-owned public TV station Ra- 
dio Television Espanola are work- 
ing on a competing digital-televi- 
sion service that some say could be 
ready in the next few months. 

The government is selling its 


remaining 21 percent stake in 
Telefonica, tee national telephone 
company, though it will retain 
some management control. Tele- 
fonica's president. Juan Manuel 
Villalonga. is a former school 
classmate of Prime Minister Jose 
Maria Aznar, who appointed him. 

The Canal Satelite decoder is 
being used by 250,000 customers 
of Canal Plus in France and can 
decode signals of other systems to 
allow for the full range of basic and 
premium pay-per-view services, 
tee company said. 

The government wants the de- 
coders to be able to do more than 
simply cany competing systems. Its 
planned new regulations could mean 
teat broadcasters would have to per- 
mit customers to pay only for tee 
premium services of its competitors 
rather than buying tee full package. 
Thus, a customer of Telefonica's 
digital service, for example, could 
pay to watch a soccer match on 
Canal Satelite without subscribing 
to Canal Satelite’s basic service. 

Development Minister Rafael 
Arias Salgado said recently that 
tee government simply wanted ro 
ensure “that citizens have abso- 
lute freedom of choice.” 


Labor Costs Cut Profit, Bosch Says 


CaxptlrtJ by Omr Sag Frm Dapatcha 

STUTTGART — Despite a 15 
percent increase in sales brought on 
largely by acquisitions. Robert 
Bosch GmbH said Thursday teat 
high labor costs in Germany eroded 
profit in 1996. 

The auto-parts maker said it 
would spend abroad half of the 2.60 


billion Deutsche marks ($1.58 bil- 
lioh) planned for 1997 investment. 

“The profit level from 1995 was 
nearly reached.” Bosch said with- 
out releasing figures. “Because of 
tee sales growth, however, this 
means a percentage decline.” 

The private company said cus- 
tomers were no longer willing to pay 


BMW Predicts Stable Sales for 1997 


CanpMbrOir Stt&frnnDiipatHin 

MUNICH — Bayerische Motor- 
en Werke AG said Thursday it ex- 
pected 1997 sales to stabilize at 
“their current high level” after a 
sharp increase in 1996. 

Sales grew 13 percent last year, to 
52.27 billion Deutsche marks ($31.7 


billion; from 46.14 billion DM in 
1995. BMW said. Car deliveries rose 
7.3 percent, to 1.15 million. 

BMW said the increased sales 
were due to a shift in demand to 
more expensive models and to the 
weakening of the mark. 

BMW did not release profit fig- 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday, Jan. 30 

Prices hi tocolcunwides: 
Telekom 

High Low C lose Prev. 


Amsterdam “““Egg 


ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Atao Nobel 
Boon On 
Bob Wtew evo 
CSMcvo 

Dontodwra 

DSM 

Elsevier 

ForttsAmev 

Geftwtics 

G-Brocnn 

H M ne yer 

Hetmften 

Hoogownson 

Hunt Douglas 

IMG Group 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

NufrfCM 

OccGrittiea 

pnhjhEIk 


Rojpl Do** 
Unlever ew 
Vendwlifll 
VNU 

WoBetsKIcvu 

Bangkok 

AdvInfoSvc 
Bangkok BkF 
Krona Thai Bk 
PTTE*ptof 
Stom Cement F 
Stale Com BkF 
THecmrwsta 
Thrt A&vunys 
Thd Farm BkF 
(Ad Comm 


TUB 71 JO 
12*80 12450 
70.58 60.90 
55.10 5470 
41 4050 
67 JO 6450 
56X0 5450 
msa 263 
209.50 20® 

7160 7ZS0 
BIBO 

129-50 127 

15120 151 JO 
sen 5430 
157.00 157 

108 107 JO 

3J9.40 317.40 
907 385.40 
81 4>0 80.70 
3460 35J0 
225 9wan 


12040 120 

115 117.10 
11X20 112 

26060 26070 
7BJ0 SB 

3470 3410 
1D2J0 1 01.90 
338.90 33420 
17450 17X50 
27 JO 27 JO 
67 JO 67 

52 51.90 
3U0 5070 
146 745 JO 
28000 209 

TUB 71-20 
12680 125J0 
69 JO 69.10 
55.10 5450 
40J0 4070 
67 67 JO 
56 5S.B0 
26430 26330 
20070 208 

73 72.70 
B2J0 83 
129 126 

151.60 1 51 JO 
5470 5450 
157.10 158 

107.80 108 

319.30 315.10 
306 305.60 
88.70 BIJ0 
35J0 35J0 
224 221-60 


Beusbiriu. „ 

BMW IBS? 

Commmztinnk 42.18 

OaJmferBaa- nsso 

Degussa 7®1 

Deutsche Bank 8113 

DeutTetatoai 30J8 

DresdrerBank 5118 

Fresentos 323 

FftsentasMed 144 

Filed. Krupp 261 

Beta 111-40 

HeUetagZral 13X50 

Henkel pfd B4 

Hochtief 6480 

Hoechst 70 

Korstadt 501 

Unde 1836 

Lufthansa 22J1 

MAN 411 

Mnnnesmann 654 

Metaflgeseflschafl33B6 
Metre 125J0 

Mooch Rueck R 3830 

Pieussqb 392 

RWE 68.12 

££ K 

JT" *£ 

VEW - «« 

vSuwogen 776 


Low One Prev. 
U-.J2. B7HL..B7 70- 
’ 1047106150 1030 
I 41J5 41J5 41.90 
I 11450 11450 115.15 
I 69530 697 JO 70450 
t 8251 82J5 8275 
1 3101 3818 3025 
I 5180 52.18 51350 
I 320 322 312 

I 138 14250 14145 
260 26050 2S1J0 

i no 11840 now 

I 132 132 132 

I 8X18 8110 83 

I 65JD 6*30 65L50 
I 6075 6&B1 6989 
492 500 49050 

I 1032 1033 1 026 

2205 2X08 2202 
407 409 406 

I 641 641 . 649 

i 3206 32S6 32J5 
) 12480 125J0- 126 

I 3765 3830 3690 

• 390 3912 387 

! 6775 6700 6810 
I 21150 Z16 213 

I 137 JO 13880 13700 
I 7855 7802 7810 
t 310 31DJ0 299 JO 
I 9810 9825 9827 
i an ansa 
I 656 668 655 

i 768 76858 771 


GF5A 

Iscor 

Liberty Hdgs 
Liberty Life 
HHnorci 
Nanpafc 
Nedcor 
Rembrandt Gp 
RkhsnorJ 
Rost Platinum 
SA Braveries 
Samoncor 
Sasul 
SBIC 

Tiger Oats 


High 

Law 

Oase 

Prev. 


High 

Law 

Oase 

106 

104 

105 

106 

UnOavar 

1*02 

11?1 

1191 

156 

144 

1*5 

3J4 

Llld Assurance 

5 

*88 

5 

316 

314 

314 

31B 

Utd News 

7.14 

7.10 

7.14 

11*25 tlBJO 11*75 11*75 

utdUtiMes 

*63 

*45 

*63 

105J8 104J0 '10*50' 10*75 

VniHloineUtrts 

5 

*VS 

*510 

17 JO 

17 JO 

17 JO 

17 JO 

Vodaloae 

X74 

7 AS 

247 

6? 

47 JO 

67 JO 

4*75 

Whitbread 

7jS7 

762 

7J3 

43 

ouo 

4X80 

42J0 

WfllaatsHdgs 

13 

XIV 

Ul 

6X50 

6X40 

4X50 

6225 

WdKiey 

*73 

*65 

*68 

62 

59.75 

6*75 

60 

WPP Group 

X49 

X*l 

245 


TO 121 JO 
4975 4975 
53 5125 
185 1B3 

69J5 67J5 


4975 4975 
5125 5325 
183 IBS 
6925 6725 


Kuala Lumpur 

Ganflng 17.10 

Mat Banking 26 : 

Molina Ship F 6J0 

PebonatGa* 940 

Renong 458 

Resorts WWW 1190 

HmeDmtw 9.15 

Telekom ml 2816 ’ 

Ten™ 1220 

Utd Engineer; 22 ! 

London 


CmnsHk 127543 
PiMmk 121255 

17 17J0 77 

2725 2725 2775 
6J0 6J5 6JS 

920 920 9J5 

448 45B 448 

1240 1270 1250 
9.05 9.10 9.10 

1940 1970 20 

1149 12 1140 

21 JO 2150 21.10 


Madrid 

AcenmK 

ACE5A 

AguasBmtzlon 


Helsinki HBXGanen-m*^ 


SET todme 82811 
PrevtoUE 814J9 


256 246 

260 2S6 

HIS) 48 JO 
396 386 

884 852 

192 1 62 

52 49 JO 
44 40 V* 
180 174 

179 ITT 


250 246 

256 260 

49 JO 4875 
386 380 

868 892 

190 194 

5850 49X5 
4875 4IJ5 
178 174 

779 179 


Curtorl 
EnsoA 
Humomokl i 
Kern im 
Kesko 
Mertta A 
Metre B 
Mefso-SertoB 
Neste 
Nokia A 
Orion- Ytitymoe 
Oulokumpu A 
RatforuukJd 
Sampolnsur 
UpMiCymmene 
Vabnoi 


252 250 

38 3850 
215 214 

5490 5450 
66 65 

1620 16.10 
273 273 

35J0 36 

TO . 119 
307 JO 30*50 
ISO 179 JO 
7940 79 

43J0 44 

422 424 

96J0 9670 
88 86 


Hong Kong 


To Our Readers 

Due to a problem at the 
source, Bombay was not 
available for this edition. We 
regret the inconvenience. 


Brussels 


AUnsnB 

Boren Ind 

BBL 

Beknert 

can 

CNP 

CoDepo 

Codustt 

Cbfruyf 

Ddhotaeuan 


K Efctiaatf 
94 Electron™ 


Electron™) 
Fartts AG 
Gewrt 
GIB 
GBL 

CenBooque 

KiKtietbOAk 

Petroflno 

Potmrtwi 

PnroleBetge 

JocGenBetfl 

SaXroy 

Tradebd 

UCB 

Union MWere 


BEL-28 ledBC P4SJ7 
Prevtoas.-wn.47 

12250 12500 12MB 
5.S60 5540 5470 

'ms n-ffl 7080 
1f2S0 19400 19175 
3130 3235 3145 

2125 2140 21S 

1216 1236 1220 

— 115 116 

13800 MW 
1925 1B90 

7930 7M 
3145 3210 3160 

5600 5630 5570 

HH5 2333 2290 

1550 1575 1555 

4190 4530 ,4510 

1IB25 11875 950 

IJ650 U9M 
11625 11875 11525 
4765 4800 4760 

7030 7060 7060 

2550 2585 2545 

22300 22300 22575 
14725 14800 1 4725 
93600 94000 94000 
2365 2370 2350 


Asia 

Cathay Pacific 
Cheung Kong 
CK Infrastrud 
China Llghl 
Cftirsa Oseus Ld 
China Res Ent 
Chin Estates 
Cffle Poelflc 
CnscoPncfflc 
DoaHeng Bk 
Brel Pocfllc 
Great Eogie 
Guangdong Im 
Guoco Group 
Hong Lung Dm 
Hang Sens Bk 
Henoereanlnv 
Handenon Ld 
HKRmti 
HK China Gas 
HKElectrtc 
HKShangHfls 
HKTetecDBiBi 
Hcroewefl HCgs 
HSSCHdgs 


Keny Proas 
Nan Mutual 
New WOrtd L.- 
NWortdWrnstr 
Ortemoi Press 

Peart Ortemai 


La Asia 
5HK Preps 
Shun Tift Hdgs 
Slno Lm> Co. 
5 m China Part 
Swire Par * , 

TsdmShaTBil 

TV Broadcasts 
wharf Hdgs 
Wheeiodi 


9 JO 9JS 

3500 3530 
1175 1145 
72.75 72J0 
22J0 2255 
35JW 34B0 
420 410 

1645 16 

B45 830 

37J0 MSO 
9 9 

38 3840 
10.65 1040 
3140 31 JO 
6J0 6.90 

43.90 4470 


9040 9850 
am 805 
7175 7275 
1205 1205 
1460 T475 
26.75 2675 
1410 1425 
13J5 
448 470 

175 177 JO 
58J5 5875 


Abbey Nall 7.73 

AUedDomeaj 430 

AngHan Water 6 J 8 

ArgH 6,49 

Asda Group 1J4 

Assoc Br Foods 485 

BAA 5J6 

Brndcys 1147 

Boss 844 

BAT Ind 489 

9aak5ccBand 332 

Blue Cbde 3JB 

BOC Group 946 

Beals 6J5 

BPBInd 347 

BrttAemsp 1292 

BjD Airways 5.96 

Bin Gas 2J1 

BrOLond 507 

BiflFtaUm 736 

B5kyB 505 

Brh Steel 1J0 

Bib Telecom 429 

BTR 259 

8 -jrroah Casjroi 1839 

Burton Gp 152 

Cable Wfaeless 4B2 

Cadbury Schw 479 

Carlton Comm SJ2 

Comml Union 6.92 

Com poss Gp 670 

CourtouVJs 107 

Dixons 509 

EteCtiDCOmponwfti 447 
EMI Group 12B3 

Enteiprtseoa 604 

FornCoionW 151 

GertlAcddeni 703 

GEC 3.93 

GKN 180 

Gtoo Wellcome 9.77 

Granada Gp 800 

GrondMet 459 

GRE 279 

GreawBsGp STD 

Guinness 458 

GUS 644 

Hanson 893 

Hoys 545 

HSBCKldgs 1425 

ICI 743 

Imp] TatMCca 402 


1900 1900 19.90 
755 7 M 750 

££ %% S5 

iS IS 133 

2740 2705 2775 
l)J5 31.40 mo 
BS BBJS 88J0 
5J0 5J0 5J5 

aOS 895 8J0 

6JS 6.25 6J0 

■ 71 JO 72 73 

20J0 28NI 2815 
3350 34 3350 

3540 3570 35.70 
2170 21.95 2140 


Copenhagen 

BGBonk 288 

OlrtSOergB 391 
Oman Furs U) 

Danreco w 

DwtOontteBk 504 
D/S Svendbm B 255000 
ttSinjT* (76000 
FLSIndB 845 

KuaLutlhawK 68136 
NvoNardfekB 567 
SophusBcrB RSS 
TetaDanmkB 370 
irYggamco m 
unUonmoikA 335 

Frankfurt 

AMBB 950 

AdUn m 

AnauHdo JOBS 

Anona 1295 

Bk Berth) . 32.75 

S9.70 

BowtHmoB* 5245 


9 s 3 

S 52 ? § 

25JoSo M4»o asm 

,,4 gS ,7 1S ,,4 g? 

674 677 680 

SS5 581 M0 

645 648 B29 

360 3»4 354 

318 330 325 

331 3 32 XU 

D AX: 30I7J2 
Prerfoasi 2999 JO 

940 950 

15340 1EL20 

jhiS 3087 29U 
1288 1291 129* 

32 JS XL 35 X 40 
S9J0 59.30 58® 
55.75 MW 
61 50 6I5S 62W 
6171 61.34 62 » 


Jakarta 

Asminn . 
Bkinrt rndon 
Bk Negara 
Gudonq Gorm 
Indocemeni 
maotood 
Indosai 

SomaeemaHM 

Semen Graft , 

Tdekoraunttosl 


c wu p mnu kro rr 687J9 
Prevtans:69lJ4 

6400 6335 6350 6400 

IBM 1775 1775 1800 

IMS 1600 1625 1625 

11900 11300 11400 11975 
3GS 3600 3600 3600 
4SS0 5325 5350 5350 

6775 6660 6650 6775 

1«50 14525 14825 14525 
73QB 6975 70S 7300 

6200 417S 4200 417S 


Johannesburg ““JSJgS 

aff 1,111 

i s bwi 

46.10 

ig” ^ stth 23 2110 2110 
141R 1*825 141 75 14025 
Dc Been, 'JJ *2 "Sri? n m 4V40 

JAtf nS Sa 

IB 70 1760 17.95 1870 


Land Sec 7.65 

Lasmo 249 

Legal Geai Grp 341 

LUfttS T5BGp 477 

LaaoVority 111 

MarteSpeneer AW 

MERC 4J3 

Mercury Asset 1345 

NanorwlGrtd 2.12 

Natl Power 547 

Natwesi ra 

Nerf |47 

Orange 2JD7 

P&O 

Pearson 749 

PUJngtan 1J9 

PoweiGen 6J8 

Premtaf FamsU 5J0 

PnidenOol 5.45 

RaflbodtPP 346 

Rank Group 4* 

RedcMCofa 7.10 

HKftjnd 3J2 

Reed l rol 1052 

Rertakl InMal Affl 

Reroenrfd** 

Resim 343 

RMC Group 9-TO 

RoVsRoyce 240 

M kSaM fS 

g&r” g 

SaVnbuiY 340 

Schraders 1640 

Seal N e wc a s t le 
SOU Power *20 

Seeurtew 2J0 

Severn Trere 695 

Shell TranspR 10J7 

Qxre 1830 

Sm5h Nephew 141 

Smith Kune 8W 

Smiths Ind TTS 

StberrtElec J48 

Sregecaoch 745 

Stand Chaita 7J1 

Total Lyle 442 

T8SC0 344 

Thames Whiter 642 

31 Group 

Tl GTOUD 5M 

Tomkins 3-74 


FT-SE 100: 422840 
Previous 4K7J0 

6J6 6J6 747 

430 432 *30 

6.14 6J5 6.14 

6J8 646 836 

1.17 1.19 IJ3 

440 443 *81 

5.17 5531 5J1 

1143 11J7 11>M 

8.® 841 841 

*06 4J8 448 

113 114 3125 

190 196 196 

936 940 9J7 

6.10 6.1D 647 

161 165 343 

1245 12.91 1247 

193 194 5J4 

116 116 118 

5 5JJ7 S 

7.17 7J3 7J3 

577 540 164 

148 I^TO 148 

170 4J3 422 

255 257 259 

1828 1035 1031 

149 149 1J2 

473 440 475 

469 472 478 

5.10 5J2 ill 

642 649 649 

645 647 670 

342 345 184 

494 549 495 

428 445 435 

1270 1249 1243 

654 678 652 

149 149 149 

748 7.78 773 

189 193 193 

9J3 9J8 9.93 

940 9.69 940 

872 879 873 

436 459 456 

173 276 174 

161 MS 5Jfl' 

430 436 437 

6 6 625 

891 892 892 

540 545 542 

1403 1417 1403 

750 754 756 

348 199 196 

671 672 671 

128 130 131 

753 742 753 


BBv 

Banes* 

BanMntef 

Bcd Centro Hisp 

BcoBdertor 

BcnPaputor 

Bar Santander 

CEPSA 

Comtaeitie 

gC 1 *” 

FECSA 
Gas Natural 
Ibenbuta 
Piyca 
Repsai 

SeuBfema Elec 
Tabaadera 
Telefonica 
Union Fenosa 
Vahnc Cement 


Manila 


Anita Land 
BkPHnptal 
CAP Homes 
Manila EJecA 
Metro Bank 
Peton 
POBank 
PM long DM 
SanMiguctB 
SM Prime Hdg 


Mexico 

Alfa a 
B anacriB 
OraenCPO 
OftoC 

EmpModema 
GpgCaisaAl 
Gjw Fti IntHHsa 
Knib Own Me* 
TWevfaaCPO 
TeiMaL 


AOe mniAs stc 

Bca Comm llol 

Bca Hdemrun 

Ben 18 Rama 

SteSmi 

Cmfitahalano 

Edsan 

EK1 

Flat 

General Asslc 

IMI 

INA 


470 482 

451 448 

1199 11m 

112 107 

5JO 491 
755 767 

545 544 

1J9 105 

640 635 

742 742 

150 148 

654 648 

520 6 

SJ6 5.0 
343 377 

437 432 

7JOB TJX 
345 348 

1046 10J5 
457 440 

648 648 

125 333 

945 970 

138 IS 
5.71 STS 
9.16 9J5 

473 442 

392 388 

329 331 

1645 1653 
678 681 

173 172 

289 2.90 
692 681 

1855 1846 
1025 1826 

150 150 
840 848 

775 777 

755 771 

739 7JB 
745 773 

449 424 

161 342 

655 655 

114 115 

149 S4? 

172 271 


Medabanca 

Mnrdedson 

Parmalal 

Plrea 

RAS 

Ro« Banai 
S Paata Torino 
5ltt 

TetacamHafla 

TIM 


Montreal 

Bee Mob Com 
CdnTlreA 
CdoUOA 
CTRnf Sue 
Gqj Metro 
Gt-WegLOaca 
lowsco 
Invcstom Grp 
LobtnCB 
Nail Bk Canada 
Power Carp 
Power fW 
QnebecorB 
Room Comm B 
Royal BkCda 


Aker A 

BergescnpyA 
CtafettmtaBk 
DennoakeBk 
Elkan 
HofstundA 
KuaemerAsa 
Nwskl ' 
Nenke 
taymroed 
OrtdaAsoA 
PtilmGMSue 
SagaPoMiA 


1755 1751 1754 


Bain tadee 45949 
PrevlooE 4(150 

17000 17960 179TO 
7720 1720 1760 
5710 5750 57B0 
5690 5700 5710 
8000 SfflO 7970 
1125 1125 1130 

19300 19670 19590 
3355 3450 3340 
2720 2720 2710 

2SSB3 25580 1 

S6D0 87HJ 8540 
4370 4400 443® 

2430 2430 250D 

8090 B128 8370 
985B 9120 9260 
1260 1280 1280 
31400 31400 32300 
14OT 1615 1615 
2420 2420 2520 

5510 5530 567 0 

132S 1340 1310 

6140 6160 6240 

3225 3245 3225 
WO 1175 1170 
1420 U« 1435 


PSEMtae 339276 
Previous; 137161 

2850 2950 30 

3150 32 3150 

184 185 195 

1*25 1450 1475 
126 128 126 
708 700 695 

1075 115E 11 

34250 34250 345 

1500 1595 IS90 

If® 109 IDS 
750 750 750 


Beha tadec 3672J2 
previous: 30152 

4050 41.15 47.15 
15.16 1190 1550 
2950 2950 29 50 
1056 1058 1842 
44JBJ 4450 4160 
4838 4830 4855 
2755 2775 2850 
16150 16150 16250 
102 JO 10X00 10170 
1450 JA90 1453 


MIB Tefcroaflcc 122460a 
P i e vtaP Si 1219950 

12300 12050 12095 12100 
3245 3185 3235 3170 

4650 4470 4495 4465 

7330 7299 1320 1299 

21200 20800 20900 20750 
2260 2190 2190 2225 

10500 9960 9960 10165 

0880 8760 8795 8720 
5205 5130 5145 5210 

33300 32600 327S73 32350 
15950 15610 15675 19930 
2215 21S5 2215 21JO 

6090 6780 6JB0 6805 

7360 7190 7195 7290 

10780 10588 10500 10595 
1310 1290 1299 1287 

U95 3650 2670 2630 
3590 35® 3545 3S25 

15800 15620 15675 15610 
17945 17510 17820 17695 
11100 10860 10995 10800 
7795 7670 7765 7670 
4599 440 4520 4«5 

4830 4685 4700 4720 


High L0« Close Prev. 

5ctdi5ted 144 14ZJ0 142J0 141 JO 

TransaceanOfl 425 410 415 GO 

Storebrand Asa 38.90 37J0 3880 38 


CAD4Q; 25(086 
Previous; 2465J1 

706 726 70S 

JO IBOJO 17*20 
868 

.50 523 45270 

JO 36270 35880 
670 678 

883 891 

160 221 22370 

182 1183 1174 
353 3370 3358 

06 237 237 

JO 249 JO 247 
’M 670 6(93 

175 875 883 

-40 495J0 49BJ0 
U0 12SS 1246 
733 844 822 

>15 529 527 

712 832 B23 

J05 7 JO TM 

m obi 

401 397.90 
834 833 

128 332J0 327.W 
Ql 934 925 

Ml 1947 1947 
140 1450 1462 

4^. 

M 32050 3I0J0 
174 377 374 

199 302.90 301^0 
571 590 568 

Q2 23S4 23SD 
173 1480 1468 

118 121 70 T79J0 
190 1710 1730 

1 90 17980 sea so 

570 7570 1 515 

W 5S3 547 

571 m.m 271 

111 1136 1134 

JO 39-zea -39-50 

tio 621 612 

590 2739 2763 
m 850 91? 

an J52J0 249 

173 585 589 

.90 16X70 16X40 

174 479.40 471 JO 

SO 7680 7580 
150 35680 359 


High Low Close Prev. 


AtrUqufcta 
Aland Aislti 
Ajd-UAP 
Banco be 
BIC 
BNP 

Canal Plus 

Cdrtefaur 

Cosirn 

CCF 

CeMem 

ChrtrthKDtor 

CLF-DadaFran 

CiedBAgricme 

Danone 

EH-AqiMne 

Ertdanta B5 

Eurotunnel 

Gen. Earn 

Hava 

Imehrf 

Lafarge 

Legrand 

LtS; a! 

LVMH 
Lyon. Eoux 
MJcheBnfi 
Paribas A 
Pernod Rkwfl 
Peugeot at 
Ptnoud-Print 
Praroodes 
Renaufl 
Rexel 

Rh- Poulenc A 
RousstAUdof 

Sanofl 

Sdinelder 

SEB 

5GS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodotfio 
StGabata 
Suez 

Smanetabo 
TnansanCSF 
Total B 
Urtnar 
Valeo 


s§o Paulo 


Ericsson B 
Hemes B 
inceritfveA 
Investor B 
M0D0B 
Nord banker: 
PbamAJotohn 

SandiikB 
Scania B 
SCAB 

S-E BankenA 
SkandtaFars 
SkanskaB 
SKFB 

SparfaankenA 
SbxtshTpolefcA 
Stara A 
5vHnndJesA 
VolwB 

Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBUng 

BHP 

Banrt 

Brumbies Ind. 
CBA 

CC Amatfl 
Coles Myer 
Coma lea 
CRA 
CSR 

Fasten Brew 
Gen Prop Trust 
GIO Australia 
Goodman Fid 
KJ Austrafla 
John Fotrta* 
Lend Lease 
Moyne NkWss 
MINI Hite 
No) Aurt Bank 
NTO Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 
Normandy Min 
North Ltd 
Pacific Dunlop 
Pioneer irei 
Pub Broadcast 

Oardas Airways 

Santas 

Southcorp 

Wesfarmers 

WMC 

Watfieta Trusi 
WesJpoc Bking 
WMMt&WePft 
WoohMtths 


23*50 23050 

235 

233 

11 BO 

1075 

1109 

III9I 

505 

691 

503 49*50 

32*50 

324 

325 324J0 

203 19BJD 199 JO 

an 

237 231 -SO 23150 

m 

267 26X50 2*150 26*50 

184 

185 

186 

184 

186 

IR3 

184 

185 

145 

14X50 

143 

144 

7X50 

71 

72 

72 

195 

191 

19*50 

190 

310 

305 

307 

309 

14*50 

167 

167 

14/60 

116 

114 

M4 

115 

109 18*50 

IU9 

18*50 

9150 

9*50 

9X50 

9360 

1B6 

IHJ 

18*50 

183 

174 JO 17*50 

174 

172J0 


A8Ortfaartes:2«17A0 

Prevfaus:24i4ja 

&U XII 8.13 
8.05 8.07 886 

17 J8 17J9 17.97 

U0 1-e Z43 

2X10 2X18 2X10 
1X61 1X74 12JS 

1X86 1X16 1 
54H 5J2 S.02 

*41 641 646 

1880 1884 19.10 
A43 443 

2J6 X63 156 

2M X4I 
33] 3J0 132 

1.60 1JD 1J2 
1X40 1X45 1X40 
XB3 X84 286 

2X55 2X65 2X5D 
780 781 783 

175 174 1.77 

1X67 1577 1587 
1.74 175 177 

us us ut 
189 U0 181 
38S X92 385 

XU X12 
X76 378 382 

6J5 688 654 

X25 225 2J8 

4.76 477 471 

*30 434 431 

880 *91 


745 7j45 

9.13 9J7 


Bnidesoa PM 
Brahma Ptd 
Centra PM 
CESPFtt 
Cupel 
EMiobcw 
Haubanco Pid 
UgM Senridos 


Pemaras PM 

TetabrnsPfd 

Tetemig 

Teterl 

TefcBpPfd 

Untamco 

CVRD PM 


Dacom 

Daewoo Heavy 
KtaMaws 
Korea El Pwr 
Korea EntABk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LGSasdcon 
PuhmginnH 
Samsung Elec 
ShbdionBank 


8*0 *40 

63X00 62580 
4110 4X99 
50J0 50.10 
1395 1190 

41 7 415.00 

47580 477 JO 
36080 36580 
26080 27*50 
193.00 18980 
89 JO 8880 
14080 141.50 
143J0 74150 
23780 23780 
3460 3430 
2380 2100 


ampeiltelMjBC 67682 
Previous: 46X56 

101000 9BOOO 100000 96000 
5100 5000 50HJ 5100 

16300 16000 16300 16400 
38500 27400 28400 27400 
6990 6700 6060 6620 

535000 520000 526000 525000 
20500 20000 211100 30100 
43000 41000 42300 41300 
47900 46200 47100 47100 
10800 10300 10600 10500 


Taipei Stock Market fadCK 7221.98 

^ Previews: 7149 M 

Cathay (Jte Ins 
Chong Hwa Bk 
CMaoTungBk 81 JO 80 BQJ0 B0 

China Develpmt B9J0 87 JO 6® 87 

ClHna Steel 
Fits) Bank 

Formosa Plastic 6® 68 68 68 


Singapore shareaimgawTi 


bUtasMdstadme 292*96 
PrevieaK 289*76 

43 43 43 4X95 

21J0 21 JS 21*5 211* 

321* 32 3X15 3X30 

32» 32W 3K4 32 

16U 16.45 1680 1614 

2080 2030 20W 2020 

36.40 36.10 3*15 36 

2616 26 26W 24 

1*90 1616 1680 1*30 

U3S 1410 1430 1410 
»4S 2780 2*40 28 

2585 25.45 2*60 2585 
25.90 2580 25JO 2585 
9 AS 9JO *45 9JIS 
50 4W 49 JO 49.90 


OBXIodec 57138 

PmtauB 571^1 
164 167 165 

146 147 146 

37 JO 21 JO 2X10 

2588 2*90 2570 

100 101 102 

4950 49 JO 49 JO 

304 305 305 

360 362 36150 

199 199 202 

113 115 113 

500 509 500 

279 300 SB4 

121 JO 134 11X50 


Asia Poc Bmw 
Cerates Poc 
OtyDevBs 
Cycle Conloge 
DanyFremnit 
DBS foreinn 
DBS Land 
For East Leving 
Fraser&Neave 
HKLond’ 
JordMaOiesn" 
Jam Strategic ■ 
Keppel 

^1 
GTS Union 
Parkway Hdgs 
Sembawong 
Sing Air foreign 
Sing Land 
Sing Press F 
Stag Tech Ind 
SbnTatKamm 
Shahs Steam 
Tat Lea Bank 
Utd Industrial 
UMCrSeoBkF 
Wing Tal Hdgs 
•UnUSdotofs. 


PrtVtOW: 222*12 

7.90 7 JO 8 

10.40 1*40 1*40 
1190 1*10 1180 
1580 1580 1630 

077 us an 

19 19.10 1*90 
5JS 5.75 585 

*90 7 7 

1150 1X50 1160 

X79 280 280 

*05 *05 *10 

128 3J8 132 

1120 11JO 11 20 

414 4.14 413 

19.10 HJD 1930 
11J0 11J0 11 JO 
5J0 5J5 5A5 

780 785 780 

1330 1140 1130 
*35 *40 *45 

2*80 27.10 27 

166 X66 170 

336 330 138 

480 493 *03 

3J2 142 142 

1.19 1J1 1.19 

1630 1*30 16J0 
438 4L38 440 


Stockholm 

AGAB 1 07 JO 10*50 10*50 107 

ABBA 885 880 »0 878 

Ass! Daman 17*50 177 17830 177 JO 

Asm A 34*50 338 34X50 337 

MtaSCapnA 16*50 167 167 167 

AtriaUv 327 315 315 SOB 

Electrolux S 437 434 otso <04 


Inti Comm Bk 
NanYtiPtasli 
Shin Kong Life 
Tafann Semi 
Tatung 

Uid MOcro Elec 
Uta World Chin 


Tokyo 


Al Nig non Air 
AsaW Bank 
AsaWChem 
AsaM Glass 
Bk Tokyo AUtW 
Bk Yutajftoma 
Bridgejione 
Canon 
CMteBonk 
OnAu Elec 
Chagoku Elec 
DaSl 

DaScW Kong 
Dahro Bank 
Da hrn Haase 
Pa tan See 
Denso 
Frame 
Fug Bonk 
Fif Photo 


Hondo Mnor 

■BJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

ItD-Yakodo 

JAL 

JlKCO 

AaOraa 

KORHiElec 

kao 

KawaSleH 

KDD 

KJrttl Mlpp Ry 
KHnBmroy 
k ete Ste el 
Komtfhl) 
Kubota 

Kyocera 
Kyushu Elec 

Marubeni 

Manrl 

Marsu Elec fad 
MOfeu EMC Wk 
MfeuUUti 
WBlAbNCh 
NUtauatM El 
MftHAIs«E9 
Mitsubishi H»Y 
Mitsubishi Mot 
MlKuUsMTr 
MitUl 

Mitsui Fudoso 


176 175 

167 166 

81JS 00 
B9J0 87 JO 
2530 25.10 
175 174 

6 ® 68 
143 142 

OXJO 81 JO 
65 64 

107 JO 10*50 
57 JO 5*50 
54 51 JO 
3SJB1 38 

n 69 J0 


175 174 

167 165 

0*50 B0 
B® 87 
25JO 25.10 
175 174 

68 £8 
143 141 

BX50 81 JO 
64 64 

107 10530 
5&SS 56 
53J0 Slia 
3830 38 

70 69 JO 


NddMti 225: 7786484 
PmtoOK 1B33SJO 

1030 1030 1040 

751 763 775 

761 800 780 

625 625 635 

1040 1050 106i 

1710 1720 1760 

622 625 

2060 28*0 2120 
2530 2540 2630 

W8 670 710 

2180 2200 2250 

2110 2110 2140 

815 816 827 

1250 1260 I2S0 

487 495 495 

1360 1360 1420 

937 940 946 

2450 2400 2550 

3370 3380 3390 

1210 1220 1210 
3560 3610 3680 

1210 1220 1240 

1040 1050 1060 

3290 3280 3330 

1470 1470 1530 

455 466 480 

539 545 539 

5360 5400 5630 

495 498 507 

3260 3280 3290 

709 724 730 

2200 2210 2230 
1230 1240 1270 

295 297 291 

7060 7070 7360 

711 7T0 

1030 1040 1040 

209 218 

002 834 

513 515 545 

6840 6900 6800 
2130 2130 2160 

440 440 464 

464 473 472 

1710 1720 1740 

1700 1800 1800 
JOSI 1040 1060 

1080 1090 10» 
313 315 335 

671 675 693 

1330 1 330 1350 
865 876 877 

892 897 908 

1150 1150 1200 

875 885 879 

1230 1740 1270 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 

FTSE100 

45OT 

4340 


Paris 

CAC40 

2500 


£- ™a son 

1996 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Copenhagen 

Helsinki 

Oslo 

London 
Madrid ~ 
Mian 


Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Source: Tetekurs 


EOF 

BEL-20 

DAX 

-Stock Market 
HEX General 
OBX 

FTSE 100 
Stock Exchange 
MfBTEL 
CACAO 
SX 16 

ATX 

SP1 


N D J '* 

1997 

Thursday 
Close 
' B7SJJ9 
2.045.87 
3,017.32 
507.15 
2,712.73 

573L38 

4^28.40 

459.49 


A S O N D J 

1996 1997 

Prev. % 

Close Change 

672.63 +0.37 

2.031.67 +0.70 
2,99920 +O.60 

503.41 +0.74 
2,687.03 +0.58 

571.41 +0.34 
4^0750 +0.50 


459.49 460.60 -0.24 

124246.00 12,199.00+0.39 
2,503.06 2.485.01 +1S 4 

2.675.33 2,657.32 +0.68 

1,170.16 1,172.67 -023 

2.689.33 2,666.49 +0.86 

InicnuinHul HnaU Tnhuec 


more for products made in Ger- 
many, tee source of two- thirds of 
Bosch's products. Rising labor costs 
in Germany, it added, eroded re- 
ductions in production costs. 

Bosch said the increase in 1996 
sales, to 41 .20 billion DM. was only 
5 percent when adjusted for new 
acquisitions, (Bloomberg. API 


ures. In 1 995, the carmaker had a net 
profit of 692 million DM. Sales this 
year are off to a “pleasing start” and 
should be at least as high as in 1996. 
BMW said, fueled by the new 5- 
Series and Z3 roadster models. 
BMW stock closed at 1,052.50 DM. 
up 22.50. (AP. Bloomberg, AFP) 


Very brief ys 

• Italy’s cabinet approved proposals for reforming the coun- 
try's banking system and selling its stake in Autostrade SpA. 
which owns and manages the country's major highways. 

• Banca Commerciale Italians SpA will pay 360 billion lire 
l$223 million) for 55 percent of Biverbanca SpA, a retail 
bank in northern Italy. 

• Tele Danmark said thousands of employees had protested 
against drastic staff cuts that were part of tee broadcaster's 
streamlining program. 

• Marsh & McLennan Cos., a U.S. insurer, bought a French 
insurance broker. Corapagnie Europeenne de Courtage d’ As- 
surances & de Reassurances; the price was not disclosed. 
Yorkshire Water PLC plans a capital reorganization to 
reduce its equity and return as much as 10 percent of its market 
value to shareholders as cash. 

• Philips Electronics NV will raise 492 million guilders 
($266-5 million) by reducing its stake in ASM Lithography 
Holding NV, a Dutch semiconductor-equipment maker, to 
23.9 percent from 35.4 percent. 

■ Bass PLC's Holiday Inn Worldwide and Global Hotels 
Development Group Poland S A units will invest S 1 20 million to 
develop 20 Holiday Inn hotels in Poland over the next decade. 

■ Virgin Express, a regional airline, and the Belgian flag 
carrier Sabena NV will sign code-sharing agreements for 
flights between Brussels and Barcelona. Rome and London. 

• Rhone-Poulenc SA*s fourth-quarter net profit more than 
tripled, to 574 million French francs (Si 03.6 million ). re- 
flecting a successful shift toward health-care businesses and 
away from its chemical-industry operations. 

• Autoliv AB, which is due to become the world’s largest 
maker of airbags through an acquisition, said 1996 pretax 
profit improved 13 percent, to 1. 14 billion kronor ($157.4 
million), as demand for its products rose. Bloomberg. Reuters 


The Trib Index 

Jan. 1. 19S2 = tin. Lw 


Ctostng pneae. 


World Index 150.10 +1.41 +0.95 +13.B2 

Ftoghmal Mama 

Asia/Paahc 109.30 -0.82 -0.74 -18.59 

Europe 160.57 +1.67 +1.05 +15.37 

N. America 175.14 +3.14 +1.03 +36.53 

S. America 126.95 +1.32 +1.05 +42.58 

Industrial kydexu 

Capital goods 180.09 +3.16 +1.79 +35.53 

Consumer goods 166.65 +2.17 +1.32 +20.70 

Energy 177.48 +1.71 +0.97 +30.87 

Finance 108.46 +0.38 +0.35 -14.75 

Miscellaneous 163.57 -0.43 -0.26 +20.44 

Raw Materials 176.64 +0.90 +0.51 +24.57 

Service 137.18 +1.10 +0.81 +14.32 

UNities 140.88 +0.68 +0.49 +10.81 

The international Herald Tribune Wortd Stock Index C tracks the U.S. dollar vokresot 
3BO intemaomwOv mvestaOle stocks hom 25 countries. For more mtotmalion. a free 
booklet ia available by wilting to 77*- Trib Index. 18 1 Avenue Charles da GouOg. 

92521 NeurilyCedex, Fiance. Comptod by Bloomberg Nows 


Mitsui Trust 
MuralaMtg 
NEC 

NlkkoSa 
Nintendo 
Nlpp Crete Bk 
Nlpp Express 
Nippon Ofl 
Nippon Paper 
Nippon Sleaf 
Nippon Yuwn 
Nissan Molar 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 


Odakyu El Ry 
OnoPnarm 
Osaka Gas 
Riatii 
SafcuroBk 

Sankto 
Sam® Bonk 
Sanyo Eke 
Secoei 
Sefeu Rwy 
SeUsul House 
Seven- Eleven 
Sharp 
Sltirabu 
Sbtn-etsoCn 
Shizuoka Bk 
Sony 

Suimomo 
Sumitomo Bk 
Surah Cnem 
Swteomo Elec 
Sum* Metre 
SurnO Trust 
Taisei 

TaahoPhann 

TdkfidcChem 

TDK 

TohakuElPw 
Total Bank 
Tokta Marine 
Tokyo Ef Pwr 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo 
Totten 

Tarpon Prim 
Tony Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyo SeBam 
Taya Tiurt 
Toyota Motor 
YomoictUSec 
Yamanoucfti 
YosudaFIre 
Yasudo Trust 


Toronto 


Ahiiibl Price 
Alberta Energy 
Alcan Alum 
Anderson Erp! 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nova Scoria 
Bank* Gold 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 
BtoctemFtiam 
Bombardier B 
Broscan A 
Bra-o Minerals 
Catneco 
C1BC 

Cdn Nan Rid 
Cdn NotRes 
CdnOodd Pel 
Cdn Pacific 
CondncD 
Doteco 
Oam lor 
Dononue A 
DuPanlCda A 
EOper Group 

EutpNevMng 
FoWtn FW 
Fatcpntnldge 
FWdwrawiA 
Franco Nevada 
GuKCdoRet 
Imperial OU 

Inca 

IPLEnerar 

LdUpowB 

Laewen Group 

MacraBIBMI 

MaratafatHA 

Memanet 


High 

758 

Ml 

734 

dose 

743 

Prev. 

731 

Moore 

High 

28U 

Law 

27*5 

Close 

2*10 

Prev. 

2*05 

3640 

3460 

3660 

3610 

Newbridge Net 

45.90 

44.90 

45*5 

4*85 

1430 

1390 

1400 

1430 


3214 

32 

3X05 

1X15 

769 

755 

756 

770 

Noicen Energy 

3X80 

32J0 

3Vta 

3X80 

7720 

/550 

7460 

7550 

Nlhem Tetecom 

97ki 

9135 

97V, 

94 

224 

217 

221 

222 

NOVO 

1X70 

12b 

12J0 

1XJS 

714 

6V5 

mi 

695 

Onex 

2115 

2X95 

7105 

2105 

546 

S32 

532 

541 

Pancdn Peflm 

599: 

5BV 

S9'k 

5*70 

551 

522 

522 

549 

PcfroCda 

2Ut 

21.15 

2IJ5 

21.15 

303 

295 

294 

299 

Plucef Dome 

28L 

2/J0 

27.90 

2*60 

474 

4U 

463 

463 

Poco Pettoi 

1*40 

15.10 

15.15 

14.14 

730 

710 

712 

733 

Potash Sosk 

11105 11X05 11105 

11X70 

252 

745 

245 

243 

Renaissance 

4*10 

45J0 

44 

45J5 

1550 

1510 

1520 

1540 

RtaAlBOm 

J2* 

32 

32 

32 

8930a 

16 Ala 

Bo90a 

B750a 

Rogen Cantel 8 

27ts 

27>i 

27\S 

27.40 

690 

651 

662 

685 

SeogramCo 

53b 

42b 

53b 

5140 

439 

625 

*34 

440 

SneUCdoA 

55 

53b 

55 

53b 


IS* 3500 3530 

3IS 310 

1370 TOD 1340 

m tS3 665 

3X9D 3150 3150 

1341 1370 1330 

524 500 

6480 6410 6410 

424D 4120 4120 

1070 1040 1050 

6970 6850 607# 

1610 1550 1570 

760 72T 

2220 71 B0 2200 

1040 1010 1030 

8340 8090 8150 

915 B7S 886 

1320 1270 1790 

430 421 422 

1430 1610 1620 

267 253 

933 903 

53® 512 

2770 2680 2710 

24W 2350 370 

7850 76tB 7m 

2070 2810 2020 

930 ®10 923 

1110 IDeO 1070 

2330 2300 2X0 

309 300 

548 530 

1220 1188 1200 

1420 1360 1380 

688 448 67B 

706 692 492 

>100 3040 3040 

795 780 780 

3240 3120 3150 

445 435 440 

2270 2210 2210 

547 522 532 

353 343 345 


TSE Industrials 408*10 
Previous 4071 Jfl 

B5 21 JO 213k 21 JO 
B0 3U0 3U0 33V* 

80 47 47 JO «*i 

70 1B.C0 19.10 IBVb 

.•A 45J0 444 4595 

30 4*80 47 JO 46J0 
37 3*20 3*15 37 JS 


Stone Outsort 

Suncnr 

TaBsman Em 

TeckB 

Tetagtobe 

Telus 


20*7 TV- 

6!h 61»4 

46^j 4*10 
3X05 31 lb 

3&7D 3*45 
IT'S I9J5 


Thomson 

2*85 

2*30 

2*70 

2*40 

TorDrait Bonk 

37.15 

3*95 

37.15 

3*95 


16'? 

1*40 

1*45 

16b 

Transom Pipe 

2*20 

2195 

24.10 

24.10 

TriowrtFJnl 

44 

43b 

44 

43!? 

Trim: Ho bn 

32 

31b 

31 JO 

31 JO 

TVXGold 

11.10 

10-65 

HPi 

1*85 

westcoostEnv 

2155 

2X15 

2155 

Z3U 

Weston 

74b 

73b 

73 

74't 

Vienna 


ATX taderc 1170.14 



Previous: 117X17 

AusiA/rtines 

(80S 

1600 

1640 

1M7 


447 JO 

663 

667 

662 

Bund Vers PM 

391 

391 

490 

490 

CrwBnm3t Ptd 

427 -11 5 JO 

426 42X10 

EA^eneran 

3315 

3Z75 

3290 

3280 

EVN 

1755 

1722 

1735 

1749 


1495 

1495 

1475 

1475 

Letol rig 

617 

595 

597 

624 

Leykom 

303 299.10 

XI JO 300 1 0 

Moyr-Ms-if-do/ 

571 

567 

577 

570 

OMV 

1305 

12B4 

1294 

1300 

OeS Brau 

BOO 

788 

790 

m 

OertEleMrtt 

855 

B35 

836 

849 

VATech 

1734 

1720172*10 

1722 

Vrimeibetper 

21B4J0 

2150 

2152 

2170 


Wellington wrsE^todte Mao jp 

a Pt+vtoat Z392J0 


AV N XeoW B 

170 

?J8 

170 

167 

Brierty Imrt 

1.36 

135 

1J5 

1X4 

Carter Holt art 

140 

138 

140 

138 

Fend 

4.95 

4.94 

4J5 

495 

Fisher Pavkei 

5X8 

U6 

5X8 

5X9 

FC Fores* 

J*l 

121 

2X3 

XXI 

Goodman Fder 

IJ1 

1.78 

TJ1 

1.78 

Indep News 

*88 

*B6 

*88 

*88 

Ltar. Norton 

185 

172 

174 

179 

Nat Gas note 

2j0 

2J6 

X36 

2X8 

NZ Refining 

29 JO 

29 JO 

29 JO 

29 JO 

Telecom NZ 

7.49 

7A2 

7J4 

7.43 

Wilson Horton 

1IJ0 

11.40 

11.40 

11.40 


Zurich 


SPitadrc2689J8 


(.7.40 

6*40 

6690 

67 




J9ta 

29.40 

29.40 

29 JO 


401 JO 

39*50 


399-50 

74.90 

74.40 


7S 



1IST 


1150 

25.80 

25b 

2*00 

25.45 



1455 


14M 

30J5 

30.7D 

3*80 

3*70 


9A« 

2815 


2815 

2X45 

21b 

22 

21 JS 


1785 

1765 

1785 

1761 

56b 

55.70 

5*70 

56x0 



754 


757 

40b 

60 

60 JO 

6*15 



1895 

18®5 

1915 

54’4 

5341 

54 k 

5195 

CS Hotengs R 

144JD 

142 

144X5 

14175 

38X0 

38.05 

38X0 

38X0 

EtoinovffliiB 

541 

541 

541 

5TO 

25.15 

24J5 


25 


1504 

1-S2 

1504 

1482 

37 

3*55 


36k 


926 

916 

926 

917 

3*45 

37b 

37b 

3*10 


1029 

1015 

1029 

1010 

25X5 

25X0 

25X0 

25X0 


1475 

1450 

1470 

1454 

17.15 

11 JO 

11.90 

12J5 


1539 

1511 

1538 

1500 

55* 

2*60 

2485 

25 


1623 

1606 

1613 

1605 

32b 

32b 

33b 

33 

OeriSjn R 

14535 

W0 ft 

143 

14550 

21.40 

21.14 

21,34 

21.10 

ParaesaHidB 

1495 

1475 

1475 

1485 

36 1 ? 

3*70 

36 

36b 


699 

688 

694 

685 

295 

?»3 

295 

29S 


21575 

215 

215.75 

215 

31’« 

3*90 


31 

Roche Hdg PC 

12^ 

11975 

12000 

11910 

711* 

21b 

21b 

21* 

SBC R 

259 254-50 257 JO 

J55 

59.40 

SO 

58b 

59.70 


1520 

140S 

1495 

1509 

11JS 

11.40 

11. JO 

lib 

5G5B 

3195 

3174 

3125 

3185 

64W 

64k 

6455 

65 


m.': s 

962 

973 

960 

44b 

4120 

4540 

45X0 


Krrl 

945 

953 

9a0 

4**4 

39 JS 

39k 

J9.9S 


1300 

1377 

1390 

1374 

1795 

17.70 

17to 

17.90 


1295 

1281 

1293 

1282 

48b 

4 7 JO 

47.90 

A30 

UBS B 

1193 

1172 

1175 

lift) 

IBIS 

18 

1*05 

1*10 


HI 

279 280.50 

779 

7630 

7S.1I1 

7560 

75J0 

Winterthur R 

E'l 

B43 

850 

B44 

1X90 

1X4S 

12 JO 

1X95 

Zurich AssurR 

3®9 J0 

m 

39*50 38*50 


wn, OT ^HE^XKI^ s ATURPAy-StJNt)AY, FEBRUARY l-3^?97 


iiS 


PACE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 


Thursday’s 4 pan. Close 

TIk IAN mosHraded Nafiond fltatat securities 
In terms of doflcr mlue, updated twice a yew, 
77w Associated ftess. 


on ™ re 1 



NYSE 


Thursday's 4 p.m. Close 

(Continued) 


HW> lm Stock 


LOT Lntosl cm* 


Sb I limn 

«* vh re nH|i lot dm o« h*p lot swa 


PE WMgli 


IMS caw ragh LOT Stock 


* W PE lSngk Lot Lstod Orpc i ww"u* Stock 


Dh YM PE MBs WOT LOT LMW Ckrgr 


i;«ot 

Hign LOT Moo. 


Dto vw re ion Him Lot im orw 


1AM 73 1] ■ 

ii?. n <• "I 


13 il Sfl ^ & ” 

Z _ " ?p k 83 85 ;S 

* * S “I AS m Tfi :a 

-5 'i !? In fc jft k* *1*5 

, - 174* IM ft W| th 

*3 S s ® * S S 4 ? 

40 ” • ■S u fe IP Si •* 

in I? r it<*’ i?5 ifi! 4, 

■« “I II & !:iS 
: a 'S ft SP H 3 
s |t i jfi fe B i 

ct s: i: . s 4«i« M *#s .it 


a 4 ft f 

id u w* 194 

I.' 5J 441% 44 

'ilJ 2*m 

fo m 354 34”? 

4 0 1 Wi 
U U4I *h* 4*<i 

a *S B B 

» ® * i«) 

S" 

S*8# I 

!"» 16 *3 Ol 

34 140 3V< JJ'r 

- I> It IM 

- uir ft, 

* 1JTO W4 B7V, 

- ..$•< 4* 

S '* ?W 1) ■ w. 

wtl 7jto ant 
. II A) m> 

t® Unf\3Ft Mo 7 ! 

iv IMl W| S«H 

hotBS: f; 

t «£ I 

lilMr.lt', Mb 

'1 Tm "« 
N 'n »« M 
M «1 lie. i; 

_ to) I'M Ml 

s r 12*:i ■ rcr 

r ’Sis*. § 

ij-f 1 1 

? jf i 


$ jL ft 

- fC! KJ 1 i ,v, 

« *3 JG- & 
s 'S ^ w 
B 1 ft. ffii 
* iffi Sf? f 
£ .as 23: B 

Ik ® Uh 4Ti 

- m i*i id. 

! Si: 3KS 

'• 'ns & s. 

fl A4P P 

- Ass 

a S»Si ffi 

)% II 

S S 3K S3 

_ « li:. law 

« a as b 


ff- : 

h J. 
1 * 
‘I f 


5 |T» 

* » • 9 

■ « 1 
? ss S 

s .*fa 

H 1| s 

« jgi 


i|fi ^5 



II 

S *3 « 

D U fi 


IS S 


afii 

1 4 a 

ii 

b a i 
111 


n i 
asii 

A u a « 

'ffl fi ? *8 
* 73 « J 

. B j 
n a fi ^ 

s ^ 

»a i S 


dlS I 


: ! J 


ui H r nil 

si : d 'SS 

S 1 8 1 
“ « I « 



ffiS 

a 
jl Mi 

-U 

ift 

IT 

pj* 

l.'j 

Si* 

rpi 

1 . 

a: 

ICk 

SS 

Ml, , 

at 3 


7d; 

3'» 

-to 

-to 











































































































































PAGE 17 





INTERNATIWIAI. HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


^Samsung Says It Cut 
Its Chip Production 
Amid Slump in Prices 


Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — Samsung Electronics 
Co., the world’s biggest maker of 


memory chips, said Thursday [hat it 
reduced production in the last three 
months of 1996 and may cut it fur- 
ther, as prices of chips remain more 
than 20 percent below their cost 
South Korea's two other major 
chipmakers — Hyundai Electronics 
Industries Co. and LG Semi con Co. 
— said they had not decided wheth- 
er to cut production. 

All three, facing a slump in prices 
that has hurt profit, said they would 
shut factories for the three-day Lunar 
New Year holiday, which starts next 
Friday, for the first time in about five 
years in hope of shoring up prices. 
Prices for 16-megabit dynamic ran- 
dom access memory chips, or D- 
RAMs, which provide the memory for 
personal computers, mobile phones and 
many other electronic products, have 
fallen 90 percent since 1995 because of 
excess capacity. Samsung motres is 
percent of the world's D-RAM drips, 
which now cost $630 each. Samsung 
officials declined to say how much each 
■ |jhip cost to make, but analysts have 
estimated the cost at $8 to $10. 

Samsimg said, “We cannot help 
but consider production cuts as dif- 
ficulties mount for not only Samsung 
but also Japanese, U.S. and other 
Korean companies as the prices of 


Hanbo Chief Is Questioned 


16-megabir D-RAM chips are now 
below production costs. 

Computer drips are South Korea's 
largest export. The slump in their 
prices has helped slow economic 
growth and drive the country’s trade 
deficit to a record high. The trade gap 
is expected to reach $3.7 billion tins 
month, up 76 percent from a year 
earlier. 

Samsung said it would continue 
to reduce output of 16-megabit 
chips in 1997, m line with market 
conditions. Samsung shares were 
unchanged at 47,100 won ($54.81). 

In Japan, meanwhile, Mitsubishi 
Electric Cocp. said it would cut its 
production of 16-megabit D-RAM 
drips to 8 million a month in the first 
half of 1998 and 6 nrillioa a month in 
the second half of the year from the 
10 milli on a month it originally 
planned to make starting this month. 

Four of Japan’s five big drip- 
makers also are cutting investment 
in memory-drip production facilities 
for the year ending in March. Only 
Toshiba Corp. will leave semicon- 
ductor-related capital investment 
unchanged from the year before. 

Total investment m drip plants by 
the five major Japanese manufactur- 
ers win fall 8 percent this year. In 
addition, tte memory-chip makers are 
changing their product mix to focus 
less on 16-megabir D-RAM drips. 


CartpHa! by Ovr SuffFmtt Ditfiulcha 

SEOUL — Prosecutors sum- 
mooed the chairman of the failed 
Hanbo Group, Chung Tae Soo, 
from his hospital bed Thursday to 
question him m connection with the 
country’s biggest bankruptcy scan- 
dal. 

Mr. Chung, who was a contrib- 
utor to framer President Roh Tae 
Woo, now imprisoned for corrup- 
tion, was admitted to the hospital 
Tuesday after complaining of high 
blood pressure. 

Prosecutors said Mr. Chung was 
questioned about how he had se- 
cured billions of dollars of loans to 
finance aplant for Hanbo Steel & 
General Construction Co., the flag- 
ship company of the Hanbo Group. 
Choi Byung Gook, a senior pros- 
ecutor, said Mr. Chung also had 


been called in far allegedly writing 
$55.6 miTl ion in bad checks. 

Hanbo Steel, the country’s 
second-largest steelmaker, filed 
far court protection from creditors 
alter piling up 5 trillion won ($5.8 
billion) in loans. It defaulted on its 
debt payments last week. 

Opposition parries, calling the 
loans the biggest financial scandal 
in the country's history, have ac- 
cused the government of putting 
pressure on creditor banks to offer 
loans to Hanbo without adequate 
collateral. 

President Kim Young Sam 
ordered an investigation Monday 
into the Hanbo scandal, which has 
tainted the anti-corruption drive he 
undertook when he came to power 
in 1993. 

On Friday, Mr. Kim will preside 


over an emergency meeting of eco- 
nomic ministers to try to keep the 
Hanbo bankruptcy from rippling 
through the economy. The gov- 
ernment plans to inject $7 billion 
into the commercial banking sys- 
tem by next week to prevent a 
flood of bankruptcies among 
Hanbo's 850 subcontractors. 

Separately on Thursday, a court 
in Seoul called in Lee Chui Soo, a 
former president of Korea First 
Bank, for questioning. 

Korea First Bank lent $1.3 bil- 
lion to Hanbo Steel as the com- 
pany’s mime creditor. Mr. Lee was 
released from jail in October. He 
had been serving a three-year term 
for taking $330,000 in bribes from 
companies in return for extending 
loans to them. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Firms See Rise in Japan’s Car Exports 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Japan’s automobile 
exports this year wm rise for the first 
time in more than a decade as the yen 
Btnlrs in value against the dollar, ac- 
cording to forecasts by the country's 
11 automakers released Thursday. 

The companies predicted that ex- 
ports would jump 6.9 percent to 
3,968,000 vehicles in 1997. It would 
be their first yearly rise since 1986. 
As competition intensifies in the do- 
mestic auto market, the weaker yen 


is giving Japanese manufacturers an 
advantage overseas by making their 
products less expensive in terms of 
other currencies. 

The lower yen also has allowed 
some carmakers to raise exports to 
complement their overseas produc- 
tion. The yen has fallen nearly 15 
percent against the dollar since Au- 
gust and around 50 percent from its 
peak reached in April 19 95. 

The trend has U.S. automakers 
worried. The American Automobile 


NAFTA: Trade Pact’s Success Spells Wbefor Caribbean Nations Singapore Crafts Its Net 


Continued from Page 13 

diversion to Mexico,” ac- 
cording to the Caribbean Tex- 
tile and Apparel Institute. 

Textile manufacturing had 
.been one of the Caribbean’s 
few economic bright spots. 

f ? tween 1980 and 1995, Ja- 
aica’s garment exports rose 
from less than $10 million a 
year to nearly $600 million 
annually, an average annual 
growth rate of 28 percent 
But since NAFTA took ef- 
fect in 1994, Mexican textile 
exports have grown at a rate 
force times those of the Carib- 
bean region as a whole, hi 
1996, the Caribbean Textile 
; rnd Apparel Institute estim- 
ues, Jamaica's garment ex- 


ports fell by 7 percent, and 
7,000 jobs were eliminated. 

More than 600 Jamaicans, 
about 95 percent of them wo- 
men, felt the effects of NAF- 
TA when the Youngone Gar- 
ment factory on Marcus 
Garvey Drive in Kingston 
closed just before Christmas. 
The plant had been m aking T- 
shirts for export to the United 
States. But a Mexican factory 
took the business away with a 
lower bid, prompti n g foe 
Korean owners to shut down 
operations in Jamaica and 
send its employees home. The 
company then shipped its 
equipment to Bangladesh. 

Since NAFTA went into ef- 
fect. job-creation in Jamaica, 
a nation of 23 million people. 


has stopped and unemploy- 
ment has risen to 16 percent 
from 93 percent, according to 
the Statistical Institute of Ja- 
maica. Among women work- 
ing in foe apparel sector, the 
unemployment rate is now 
more than 33 percent 
Worse yet the loss of jobs 
and of U.S. support comes as 
tire pro- Amen can govern- 
ment here, with an election 
due sometime in foe next 
year, is completing an eco- 
nomic retrenchment that had 
been strongly urged by Wash- 
ington. Over the past decade, 
Jamaica has sold state compa- 
nies, reduced its budget de- 
ficit and increased its foreign 
reserves, but at a high social 
cost 


U.S. officials, however, ar- 
gue that Jamaica and other 
Caribbean nations are blam- 
ing NAFTA for deeper eco- 
nomic difficulties that will re- 
main even if trade rules ate 
eventually eased. In the case 
of Jamaica, they say, these 
include a revaluation of the 
currency that increased Us 
value by 123 percent last 
year, making foe country's 
products more expensive, and 
a host of regulatory 
obstacles. 

“The main problem here is 
government bureaucracy,” 
one official said. “It is dam 
near impossible to collect the 
licenses and approvals you 
need to get a business off the 
ground." 


CarpSrd by (W Stiff Frvm Dapesrha 

SINGAPORE — Fourteen foreign companies have signed an 
agreement to participate in a multimedia computer network foal 
eventually will link every home, school and business in Singa- 
pore, the country’s deputy prime minister said Thursday. 

The companies, including Microsoft Corp.. International 
Business Machines Corp. and NEC Carp., will mvestmorethan 
1 00 milli on Singapore dollars ($7 1 .4 million) over the next two 
years in the project, the official, Lee Hsien Loong, said. 

The network, Singapore ONE. is part of the government's 
effort to make Singapore a high-technology center. It will give 
information-technology corporations “persuasive reasons to 
continue to invest in Singapore,” Mr. Lee said. 

The other companies are Hewlett-Packard Co.. Andersen 
Consulting, Bloomberg LP, Electronic Arts Inc., Global 
Knowledge Network, Motorola Inc., Music Pen, Oracle 
Corp., Reuters Holdings PLC, Sun Microsystems Inc. and 
Yahoo! Inc. 

About 300 households are to be wired by April and 5,000 by 
year-end. The network is to have about 1 00 applications, from 
training and instruction to information services and enter- 
tainment. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Investor’ 


Hong Kong Singapore Tokyo 

Hang Seng Shafts Times Nikkei 225 

.15003 . 2300 -' 22000 

14000 * 2240 

13000 2180 jdW - 20DQQ-*- 

12000 — • 19000 - — 

mr*£- 2060 hF 18000 

m A SON or . 2000 aTo'nTT oi 


Exchange 


Hong Kong Hanggeftg ■ 
Singapore- SfraftaTimS 
Syd ney ■ ABOrdinaries 

Tokyo ; hfflckel225' 
Kuala Uim pur Composite 
Bangkok • • SET- • • ; 


N D J "'""'aTS ON D J 
1997 1996 1997 

Thursday Prev. . ' % 

Close Close • Change 

13268*0 13 , 285.43 + 0.02 

2&16.71 Z2BatS -0.15 
2,417.40 2,414.20 +0.13 
f7«864J84 - 18,335.30 -2.S7 
1,215-03. 1,212-55 +0.20 
820,18 ■ 814J3S +0,71 

676.52 863-56 +1.95 


Jakarta ' 
WelHngtort 
Bombay ’ . 

Source: Teiekurs 


SET- ■ ■ ■ . 820,18 • 814.39 +0.71 

Composite Index ' 676.52 86336 +1.95 

Stock Market I ndex 7,221.98 7,149.54 +1.01 
PSE ' . "• : 3,302.76 3^73.61+0.57 

Composite Index 687.29 891-34 -0.S9 

..N2SE-40 ZAOOSO £392.60 +0.33 

Sensitive index 3,51005 £525.97 -0.48 


InicfTuiimuJ Herald Tribnna 


Manufacturers Association said 
Wednesday that what it called “Ja- 
pan’s decision to export its way out 
of its economic policy problems” 
was “creating increasing frustration 
and concern” in foe U.S. industry. 

The group cited as “clear ev- 
idence of toe effects of foe yen's 
excessivedepreciation” the fact that 
Japan's exports to the United States 
fell almost 20 percent in foe first 
seven months of 1996, then surged 
20 percent in the next four months. 


Very brief lys 

• The Securities and Exchange Board of India announced 
rules that allow foreign institutional investors to invest in 
government securities and foreign institutional funds to invest 
in stocks. The rules also encourage takeovers by requiring 
buyers who seize control of a company with less than a 10 
percent stake to offer to buy at least 20 percent from existing 
shareholders. 

• Malaysia may allow more independent power distributors, 
foe minister of energy said after a limited-distribution license 
was granted this week to Northern Utility Resources Sdn. 
that ended the monopoly of the state-controlled electric com- 
pany Tenaga National Bhd. 

• The Malaysian Motor Traders Association said car sales 
rose 22.5 percent in 1995, to 275.615, slowing from the 44.4 
percent increase posted for 1995. The group predicted that 
sales growth would slow further this year. 

• Malaysia's Securities Commission will unveil a blueprint 
Feb. IS for an “over-the counter” market outside the Kuala 
Lumpur Stock Exchange to trade stocks of smaller companies. 

• Petron Corp.'s net profit in 1 996 rose 5 percent, to a record 
4.24 billion pesos (SI 61 million), as sales by the joint venture 
of foe Philippine government and a unit of Saudi Arabian Oil 
Co. rose 20 percent to a record 53.4 billion pesos. 

• Thailand's current-account deficit was 21.70 billion bah; 
($838.8 million) in November, a 28 percent decline from 
October and its smallest deficit since September 1995. Imports 
fell 13.1 percent, and exports slipped 5.8 percent. 

• Singapore drew a record 8.10 billion dollars (S5.76 billion.) 
in manufacturing-investment commitments in 1996. 

• South Korea's unemployment rate was 2.3 percent in 
December, compared with 1 .9 percent a year earlier. 

• LG Metals Co. confirmed it had losses in recent copper 
trading, but an executive said the amount was “much smaller 
than speculated.” Shares in foe unit of LG International Corp. 
fell 8 percent, the maximum one-day drop allowed on foe 
Korean stock exchange, to 13,800 won ($16.06). 

■ Japan plans to release an outline of its proposed financial- 
market reforms in July. Bloomberg, Reuters. AFP 


. v*--? 




>. .<C ~L . 








-V 


■m 










•u 








W 


mi 










vJ ailing? Of course - every week you can 
receive The Netherlander at home. In print. 

The only English-language weekly magazine 
that provides compact, well -organised and 
comprehensive information on the entrepre- 
neurial climate in the Netherlands - financial, 
economic, political and social. 

Surfing? Of course - you can now look 
up The Netherlander yourself, on the Internet 
wwwjietlierlander.com. 


With each day's news in brief and the full 
weekly magazine including special reports 
and a complete archive list. 

A particularly interesting feature is 
DAILY ME, an access system which you can 
adapt to your own needs. No time wasted — 
every day you can call up the precise informa- 


tion you need for your work. E-mailed direct- 
ly to your own network, either for you alone 
or also for your colleagues. 

A customised subscription ensures that 
those people within your company who need 
to be kept up-to-date on Dutch financial/ 
economic news are informed immediately. 


The JL Netherlander 


Take advantage of our special 
offer - 2 zveeks free trial! 
zvzozv.netherlander.com 


t Net net 


n ridsN 




3 V. 





. 



PAGE 18 


Iteralb^^Srlbune 

Sports 


FRIDAY, JANUARY. 31, ii 


J* 1 ' 




World Roundup 



i ■:/ 

Oreg Wood/ AFP 

Ernie Els hitting a tee shot dur- 
ing his first-round 73 in Perth. 


Turner Takes Lead 

golf New Zealander Oreg 
Turner equaled the course record 
with a 7 under par 63 Thursday to 
take a one shot lead after the first 
round of the Heineken Classic. 

South African Ernie Els, winner of 
the Johnnie Walker Classic in 
Queensland on Sunday, struggled to a 
73 and could miss the cut. (Reuters) 

Jordan Plans to Return 

basketball Miciiael Jordan, 
who turns 34 next month, says be 
plans to return for another NBA 
season. The Chicago Bulls superstar 
is playing this season an a one-year 
contract that pays him $30 milli on. 

Jordan said he believes he was 
playing at die top of his game and that 
he had been energized by die fans, 
who this week gave him a record vote 
in the NBA All-Star ballot. (API 

Kelly Set To Retire 

FOOTBALL Jim Kelly, the Buffalo 
Bills quarterback, is expected to re- 
tire Friday. Sources said Kelly, 36, 
will retire after 11 yeais with Buf- 
falo. He led die team to four Super 
Bowl appearances — all losses. 

• Jesse Sapolu, 35, a San Fran- 
cisco 49ers lineman and a member 
of four Super Bowl-winning teams, 
had surgejy to replace a heart valve, 
the San Francisco Chronicle report- 
ed Thursday. (AP) 

McDermott Quits 

cricket Craig McDermott, 
Australia’s second most successful 
test bowler, retired Thursday. Mc- 
Dermott, 31, who has had chronic 
knee problems, said he no longer 
had the desire to try another ; 
comeback. (Reuters) 

Padres Pursue Pitcher 

baseball The San Diego Padres 
will meet with a four-man com- 
mittee Monday to press their claim 
to exclusive negotiating rights with 
the Japanese pitcher Hideki Irabu. 

The Padres say they obtained the 
rights as pan of an agreement with 
the Chiba Lone Maxines of the Jap- 
anese Pacific League. Irabu, who is 
under contract to Chiba, and George 
Steinbrenner. owner of die New 
York Yankees, say the pitcher 
should be a free agent. Irabu wants to 
play for the Yankees. (AP) 

Bear Played Hurt 

football Baylor linebacker 
Dean Jackson says he played eight 
games with a broken neck after the 
team’s medical staff failed to dia- 
gnose the injury. Jackson led the 
Bears in tackles and interceptions. 
He said he was injured Sept 21 but 
that X-rays showed no break. 

“1 was in such pain the whole 
season, but they kept celling me it 
was muscle spasms," he said. (AP) 


NFL Rules Parcells 
Belongs to Patriots 


By Gerald Eskenazi 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK -r- Paul Tagliabue, the 
National Football League commission- 
er , has ruled that coach Bill Parcells is 
not free to leave the New England Pat- 
riots. 

Tagliabue said Parcells' contention 
that be was free to coach wherever he 
wanted next season ran "contrary to 
common sense." 

Instead, Bob Kraft, the Patriots’ own- 
er, still has tbe rights to Parcells for 
another year. He does not want Parcells 

back, and Parcells will not return. 

Negotiations between the coachless 
New York Jets and the Patriots are ex- 
pected to stan immediately, with these 
key questions: What kind of deal will 
satisfy Kraft, and how high will the Jets 
go? 

For die second successive year, the 
Jets have the overall No. 1 draft pick. 

"You tell me what someone with 
three Super Bowls is worth on the open 
market," an ecstatic Kraft said when he 
learned of Taghabue's ruling. 

The Patriots issued an unsigned state- 
ment saying “ It was time for the team to 
move ahead and build on the success of 
the 1996-1997 season." 

A team spokesman, Stacey James, 
added, "This is just the starting 
point.' ’ 

It is believed that the Patriots are 
interested in Pete Carroll, the former 
Jets' head coach who was dismissed and 
replaced by Rich Kotxte. 

Carroll, the San Francisco 49ers' de- 
fensive coordinator, reportedly has 
already told friends he will be going to 
New England. 

Steve Gutman, the Jets’ president, 
refused to comment on his team's 
plans. 

Parcells and Kraft asked for a ruling 
by Tagliabue to settle a contract dispute 
that at times overshadowed the Patriots 
team as it prepared for the Super Bowl 
last Sunday. 

Tagliabue found that an amendment 
to Parcells' contract last year gave tbe 
Patriots "an exclusive option*’ on Par- 


cells for next season. He originally 
signed a five-year contract in 1993, 
when tiie Patriots had a different own- 
er. 

Parcells insisted that he could resign 
as coach, pay the equivalent of his last 
year’s salary ($1.2 million) and then go 
to another team. 

This interpretation, said Tagliabue, 
would be "contrary to common sense, 
as well as to Massachusetts law." 

Also, a league spokesman made a 
point of saying that Parcells was not free 
to go to another club as, say, a general 
manager or an assistant or in any other 
capacity unless it is with Kraft's per- 
mission. 

Kraft is known to have told col- 
leagues Wednesday: "Who’s worth 
more? Keyshawn Johnson? Ki-Jana 
Carter? Dan Wilkinson? Or Bill Par- 
cells?'’ 

Johnson (of the Jets) and Carter and 
W ilkins on (of the Ben gals) have been 
the league’s last three No. 1 draft se- 
lections. Their teams have had little 
success. 

■ Problems in San Diego 

Tagliabue plans to visit San Diego to 
see if there is anything be can do to help 
solve the dispute that threatens both the 
Chargers and the 1 998 Super Bowl, The 
Associated Press reported. 

There is a chance that the expansion 
of Jack Murphy Stadium could be halted 
by a city referendum, and even a two- or 
three-week delay would be enough for 
the NFL to pull out the Super Bowl and 
for die Chargers to look for another city 
in which to play their 1997 home 
games. 

Round-the-clock work on the stadi- 
um began Dec. 32, and thousands of 
seats have been tom out to make way for 
new and upgraded seating. 

Other cities have contacted the league 
about staging die 1998 Super Bow] If it 
is withdrawn from San Diego. 

These cities include nearby Pas- 
adena, the site of the Rose Bowl, which 
is also among the options should the 
Chargers have to move next season’s 
home games. 


Super Bowl’s ‘Fresh Face’ 
Touches Down on Mad . Ave. 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — Brett Favre’s most 
profitable Super Bowl call might have 
come a few days before the game. 

Tbe Green Bay Packers quarterback 
shaved off his goatee, creating a look 
that middle America and advertisers 
would buy. 

After the 35-21 Super Bowl victory 
over the Patriots on Sunday. Favre is 
poised to become a national celebrity — 
someone who will command millions of 
dollars to pitch everything from sneak- 
ers to cars. 

"We feel he has the potential to be 
huge in 1997," said Bob Williams, 
president of Bums Sports Celebrity Inc. 
"He is also entering the marketplace at 
a very advantageous time. The Dallas 
Cowboys' image has been tarnished, so 
corporate America is looking for a fresh 
face when it comes to football.'* 

Though Favre won the league’s Most 
Valuable Player Award the past two 
seasons, he only has a handful of en- 
dorsements. making him practically un- 
known among advertisers. 

"His value has jumped tremend- 
ously," said Mike Levine of the Ath- 
letes and Artists agency. "I think he has 
to be one of the most valuable marketing 
properties around right now.’* 

Two years ago, Favre was barely a 
blip on the screen. After winning the 
MVP award a year ago and leading the 
Packers into the 1995 NFC champi- 
onship game, he climbed into the second 


tier of NFL celebrities behind John H- 
way, Dan Marino and Troy Aikman. 

But tiie boom has already .begun. On 
tbe strength ofhis play this season and his 
postseason heroics, Favre will join the 
parade of American celebrities to sport a 
milk mustache in a “Got Milk?” ad. 

One of the biggest reasons Favre was 
an unknown is that he plays in Green 
Bay, Wisconsin, the United States’ 
7 1st -ranked media market 

The small market and accompanying 
anonymity may have helped Favre’s 
image after he said this spring that he 
was addicted to pain killers and went 
into a treatment center. 

Such an admission usually means 
death on Madison Avenue. Still, Favre 
has thrived, and his image has been 
restored. His recovery came away from 
the glare of big city media in tbe NFL 
company town of Green Bay. 

"He remains tainted, but he’s shown 
that he bas recovered,'* Williams said. 
“That’s very important But T think 
there are some conservative companies 
that will still steer away from him." 

Favre might have further enhanced 
his image in the press conference after 
the game. The NFL said the week of the 
Super Bowl that it felt Favre bad re- 
covered enough to ooce again be al- 
lowed to drink a beer or two. But when 
asked if he would drink beer to celebrate 
his team’s victory, he said: 1 ‘What beer? 
1 don't know what you are talking 
about" 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Escorts & Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON - PARIS 

TW FINEST A THE MOST SMCBRE 
18 ■ 38+ INTER NATIONAL 
BEAUTIFUL 8 ELEGANT StifflOfTS 
SECBETABES, MR HOSTESSES S 
unrwc t 

AVAILABLE AS YOUR C0WAM0N 
HHRS SERVICE WORLDWDE 
Ettart Agency Cr*S Cmk UMcwe 

TEL: LONDON ++ 44 (0) 

0171 589 5237 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

WsttfB FUst & most EKteM Sense 
Nodes, Beauty Queen, Adram 
mffinmd Tart! Con cil OB l 


ROYAL PLATINUM SERVICE 

ATLANTIC 

NEW YORK 

(1) 212 785 1919 

LONDON PARIS 

worldwide escort service 

++ 44 (0) 7000 77 04 1V22/33 


Hdqtrs. 212-765*7896 NY, ISA 
offNlkiHproihjcan 
Senics «ortJw*J& Cr«H cards, ctedss 
acapRl We* vUoos & photos h office. 


ELITE Escort Service 

NEW YORK enr 
1-6BM6MSS7 


EUROPEAN 80DELS ESCORT 

Santa wtaoda, gohr Wl (op models 




Office Europe ++43+796 21 a 
OfflCt Nm Yorfc 212 2E7 3993 wb 


VENUS IN FURS 

24HR WORLDWDE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 362 7000 
Al cards. Advance boatings wfcau 


AIISTSlDJUl * DREAMS * ESCORTS 
aid Omer Das Senw hr Hfen « Her. 
+31 (0) 3K4 02 111 /ME® 


'SWITZERLAND + GERMANY 1 

TeL ++31-20427 28 27 
ZUT0QtGBOA4MSEL-B5VE 
NEW: LONDON - BBUSS&S - VIENNA 
COSMOS Escort Agency. CraS Canto 


ARtSTOCATS Escort Service 

3 Stafttm St London VI 
0171 SS 0090 


raws wgh soaETYTOtumas 
COTE D’AZUR & ZURICH ' GENF 
Warafanal Escort & Irani Santa 
Vienna -*-+43-1-5354101 al oh* carts 


’"***" EUROCONTACT HTL ■“***" 
Top local & navel service worldwide 

PAftSW30OifMIAIffl0ME 
nVEM’ffVSSaSlJGNDOIfVBINA 
G0CVA*ZUWCH*wlxito GERMANY 
Escort Sempj Vienna ++43-1-21204 31 

!®-Ain?OIIETTALY*LOI®OffPARIS* 

BRUSSQ5tJJGAN0*UADf®ittlMCH 

SMKrGLA$GOrSN AREAS Escort 
Senta TeL 38 {0)336 828 5062 Canto 


mm mm escort 

Stow* mrkMto +3Vfl3(&22577E7 


CHSSEA ESCflBT SERVICE 
51 Beudaap Ptace, London 5W1 
Til: 0171-04 6513 


GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 
BASEL, LAUSAWC. M0NTOBJX 

CaH 022S46 00 89 Escort Agann 
* ZUF9CH LUZBW OU463SM 


SWnZBfLAW) & INTL Eaeort Senta 
Zurich + ana. Mss France A Unfa. 

Bern & Basel: Black USA top model. 
Nice ladles & gents. 7-days; al canto. 
"VOGUE" Tet +41 (0) 79 353 3878 

CITY FRANKFURT (AREA 
Mara's Escort Agency 
Please cal 069 - 507 66 66 

COLOGNEUUSSHJXJflF-HUNKHinT 
WESBADEHUANZraDBJERG 
Gatfs Escort Santa *49(Win-53i 1805 

BHlAJgJELLFS ESCORT SERVICE 
" BENCH SPEAKWG " 

LONDON 0171 282 2888 

HELENA ESCORT SERVICE 
LQMJON HSATfflOW 24 HRS 
TEL 0850 173940 


INDIAN ESCORT SERVKE1QIC0N 
BsauBuL nMIgM, friendly 1 discreet 
CraS canto welcome 0171-2BW105 

WIBWATKMAL LOOTS 
Escort Sense flys around the vufcL 

CALL VFWA ++4311319-99-71 

ISABELLA AQUMAS 
EXCLUSIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
TH_' LONDON 0171 488 5780 

JASWTS ESCORT SERVICE 
LONDON 0171 935 0564 
CflSST CARDS ACCEPTED 

TANYA. BLACK. Began! & Educated 
London/ HeaSron fttae Escort Santa. 
0161 906 3281 Craft Canto Mtame 

VALENTINES INTERNATIONAL 
VF Escort Service photos to view cettat 
Union oBca 0171 895 0005 ri canto 


VttNNA*PRAGUE: KBWEDY’S Escort 
Setae. Friend*, elegant, atmwrve, 
canto. Day & lagnc (+*43 1) 535044 



'*7.: >. ' '•j, ; ■% - •-*, 

N 




HaAahklVAfencFiiKr+taK 

Terrell Brandon of the Cleveland Cavaliers moving underneath John 
Wallace, left, and Charles Oakley of the Knicks during the first half. 

Kansas Scrambles Back 
And Stays Undefeated 


The Associated Press 

Kansas was down 14 points at half- 
time in one of the toughest places to play 
in tbe country. Its starting center, Scot 
Pollard, was on tbe bench, his left foot in 
a cast. But the top-ranked Jayhawks 
fought back to keep bragging rights as 
thoonly unbeaten team in Division L 

Paul Pierce scored all of his 16 points 
in the second half as Kansas (2143, 7-0 
Big 12) rallied for an 86-77 victory over 
No. 22 Texas Tech at Lubbock Mu- 
nicipal Coliseum. 

Kansas managed its first lead of the 
game when five turnovers by the Red 

Raiders (13-5, 5-3) led to 10 straight 
points and a 64-63 lead with 8:30 to 
play. That was Kansas ’s first lead of die 
game. 

The Jayhawks made 16 of 18 free- 
throws down the stretch. 

No. 2 Wake Forest 68, Wofford 51 Tim 
Duncan had his string of consecutive 
double-double games stopped at 27. He 
finished with 10 points and five re- 
bounds in just 24 minutes as the Demon 
Deacons (17-1) gave their bench a lot of 
playing time in a non conference game 
against the visiting Terriers (5-13). 

Duncan, the 6-foot- 10 All-America 
center, also had his string of games with 
at least one blocked shot stopped at 
1 14. 

No. 3 Kentucky 92, Florida 65 Ron 

Mercer and Nazr Mohammed each 
scored 18 points far tbe visiting Wild- 
cats (19-2, 7-1 Southeastern Confer- 


ence). Eddie Shannon had 13 points for 
die Gators (10-10, 3-5), who fell behind 
36-15 after 12 minutes. 

Florida St. 74, No. 5 Maryland 70 Ran- 

dell Jackson scored a career-high 20 
points and Ron Hale added 17 as the 
Seminoles (12-5, 3-5 Atlantic Coast 
. Conference) beat a ranked team for the 
second time in a week. .Keith Booth had 
16 of his 20 points in the second half for 
the visiting Terrapins (17-3, 6-2). 

No. 11 Iowa St. 77, Nebraska 87 

Dedric Willoughby scored 21 points 
and the Cyclones (14-3, 5-2 Big 12) 
made 1 1 of 12 free throws in the final 
three minutes for the victory at Neb- 
raska (11-8, 3-4). 

No. 1 2 Duka 80, No. 1 9 North CaraGna 

73 Trajan Langdon scored a career-high 
28 points, and his seventh 3-pointer with 
41 seconds left sealed the victory for the 
Blue Devils (16-5, 5-3 ACC), breaking 
their seven-game losing streak against 
tbe Tar Heels (12-6, 3-5). 

California 70, No. 15 Stanford 64 Ed 

Gray scored 27 points, including four 
free throws in the final 46 seconds, and 
the Bears (15-5, 6-3 Pac 10) won their 
fifth straight overall and 15th straight at 
home. Brevin Knight had 15 points to 
lead Stanford (13-4. 6-3). 

No. 18 Colorado 69, Kansas St. 60 

Chauncey Billups scored 25 points as 
tbe Buffaloes (16-4, 7-1) won in Man- 
hattan, Kansas . 

Fred Edmonds bad 16 points and 13 
rebounds for Colorado. Shawn Rhodes 
had 16 points and 12 rebounds for the 
Wildcats (7-10, 0-7), who have lost 
eight straight games. 


CROSSWORD 


Cavs Mark 
A New Low in 
Loss to Knicks 

The Associate il Press 

The Cleveland Cavaliers hit a new 
low against the New York Knicks. 

The Cavs, who concentrate on pre; 
venting opponents from scoring rather’ 
than scoring themselves, managed only 
65 points Wednesday night. 



It was the lowest output in franchise a-, 
history. The Cavs, the trendsetters far* *’ 
the current milk-the-clock, slow-down 
style that consistently produces low; 
scores, had never been as bad offens- 
ively as they were Wednesday night in a 

NBA Roundup 

75-65 loss to the New York Knicks after- 
leading 34-29 at halftime. 

“Wien I looked at the score after the- 
first half, I thought it was a high school 
basketball game," Knicks forward 
Buck Williams said. - 

Cleveland shot a shade below 36 per- 
cent, scored only 14 points in the second 
period and managed just nine in the.' 
fourth quarter. 

Terrell Brandon, who had three of. 


Cleveland’s four field goals in the fourth 
period, finished with 24 points. The* 
Cavs, who held New Jersey to a fran- 
chise-low 62 points Tuesday, were 4-fbiv 
19 from the field in the fourth (quarter. 

Lakers 99, Spurs 92 Eddre Jones 
scored 19 ofhis 23 points in the second,' 
half and Kobe Bryant, making his 
second start of the season, scored 19 to 
lead Los Angeles to victory at San Ant- 
onio. r 

Trailing 74-67 entering the fourth" 
quarter, the Lakers rallied behind Joaes- 
and Bryant. The two combined for 1 1 
points as Los Angeles went on a 19-8 
run for an 86-82 lead, and Bryant con-, 
nected on a 3-point shot with 3.-07 left to' 
give Los Angeles a 91-84 edge. j 

Pistons 99, TYafl Btanrs 88 Visiting 

Portland hit 11 of its first 12 shots to taloL. 
a 24-6 lead. But Detroit went on a J7$fr 
run to take a 55-50 lead at halftime ami 
then opened the second half with an ll-v 
2 run to go ahead by 14- 

Heat 103, Celtics 83 At Miami, 
Alonzo Mourning had 24 points, 15 
rebounds and five blocked shots. He 
also had seven dunks, giving him 13 in. 
his last two games against Boston. * 
Boston, which lost its sevenfhT 
straight, was playing with six healthy* 
players and a limping Alton Lister. ‘ 
Magic 112 , Suns 105 At Orlando, 
Penny Hardaway had 32 points and; 
eight assists, both season highs, as the" 
Magic won for the eighth tune in 10_ 
games. 

Orlando rebounded from a 20-point- 
loss at Washington the previous night to 
climb back to _500 and extend the Suns’ 
losing streak to four games. 

SuporSonics 111, Warriors 84! Seattle. 

scored the fust 10 points of the gam»i 
had an 1 8-point margin by the end of flarT 
first quarter and led by as many as 36 
points in the fourth period in San Jose. ' 

Gary Payton scored 26 points, in- 
cluding six 3-pointers, and three team-' 
mates — Detlef Schrempf, Hersey 
Hawkins and Craig Ehlo — scored 14 
each. 

Seattle’s Shawn Kemp missed his 
first start of the season as punishment, 
for being late to practice. 

rears id, Raptors 99 Jerry Stack-, 
house made a 12-foot jumper at tbe 
buzzer after failing to stop Damon' 
Stoudamire from tying the game on a- 
long 3-pointer with four seconds left 
“I thought, *Oh no, here goes over- 
time,’ " Stackhouse said. 

Poeors 106, Hornets 95 Reggie Miller 


winning at Charlotte. Miller’s perfor- 
mance helped the Pacers bounce back 
from a one-point loss to the Hornets one 
night earlier in Indianapolis. 


ACROSS 

1 U.N. member 
since 1992 

it errand 

ti Second 
Triumvirate 
member 


is At home, to 
Hadrian 

17 Alternative to 
Italian 

18 Odd partner 
18 Best Actor 

nominee of 
1992 



★★*** 


HOTEL METROPOLE 

getjeve 

A PRIVILEGED PLACEI 
34,qu«ri<3to$njk3irisan 1211 Gsnew3 
lei.: Ml-221 318 3200 
. Fax: J4 1-22) 3 1 8 33 00 
&moiiwww.mrtffopole.<A 


so Swiss 
accompaniment 
*l Sentence- 
ending abbr. 

23 Get a lode of 
this! 

a* Doesn't leave 
on the doorstep 
as Besides 

27 U.5-S-R. 
successor 

28 Former “Beverly 
Hills 9021 O' role 

30 Counters 
32 ICndl of session 

» Raise, with 'to' 

3e Any Tom, Dick 
and Harry 
*7 Depleted 
38 By 

aa Jackson or 
Tyler 

eo Backed 
42 Hardwood 
43 1949-50 P.GLA. 
season money 

leader 

44F*atuaFonraine, 
teamwise 
4fi Refreshed 

47' Mine" 

(Beatles song) 

» Porters 
ao Misanthropes 
34 Former Woody 

companion 
ss One of the 

services: Abbr. 
so Spawning fleh 
37 The Lore 
Eagle's 
monogram 

SB Airing 

so Double dessert 
•* Show declining 
mental capacity 
84 ft may be taker 
out tor a date 
88 African 
antelope 


ee Sugar and 
others 


1 Eclipse feature 

2 Big name In 
jewelry 

3 Huddle ender 

4 Modem money 
8 Hop! Indian doll 
e Secured 

7 Part of a 
rausieaJnots 

a Nall site 

e Western 
shooter 

10 Diana votes 

11 ’Intimations of 
Immortality,* 
efl. 

12 Dentist's supply 

13 Popular 
collectibles 

i4Nonagona! 

22 Cover 
as Even more 
pathetic 

28 Ancient Roman 
officials 

29 Opposite of a 
pan 

si World leader 
who resigned 
5/6/74 

32 Notre Dome 
backet? 

23 Where Izmir is 
34 ‘Deliverance* 
‘Co-star 

4i One with a list 
43 Bad place to 
swim 

<*• Everything 
43 Dear herders 
Si Paris's 

AMdeone 



MaaOribwy 


48 Everything *3 Seasonal 

43 Deer herders transport 

•1 Paris's 88 Liberty 

•* UpuntU 

32 Kind of screen 82 *Whew!" 


0 Neu> York Timei/Edlted by H ill Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of Jan. 30 


KraiSaH 

Bng Q |j!g a a gan n Ba 

QPin nran 



snnn SBBHS 

niiinFin 


Stoiii ®* 13 

'h 

U0S ' 




!1* 







>y\ 


PAGE 19 




g !* 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY JANUARY 31, 1997 


SPORTS 


Pele Inspires Africa and Predicts Bigger Prizes 


CamtMh^OwrS^FKmDapaKfia 

Abedi Rife’s inspirational rote ® 
Africa’s 3-1 -victory over Europe in the 
intercontinental All-Staxinatch m Lisbon 
mMV no impression on the African 
team's bus driver, who drove off without 
him after the game. 

That was the only time me 34-year-old 


Pele, the African skipper who plays 
for Munich I860 in Germany after ' 
spells in Ghana, Qatar, Benin, Prance 
and Italy, scored Africa's opening goal 
after 14 minutes with a lob over Edwin 
Van der Sar, a Dutchman who is one of 
the tallest goalkeepers in soccer. 

Pele saw the result as proof of the 
rising strength of African soccer. 

Jp “It might be too early for an African 
team to win the World Cup in Fiance next 
year, but the day is coming when an 
African nation wiQ win, sooner rather 
than later. 

“The Europeans have always had die 
tactics and the intelligence; we have 
always had power, punch and-skflls. I 
am not sure what they can team from ns, 
but once we master their tactics, well be 
unbearable." 

Beni Vogts, the German national 
coach and coach of the European team, 
said that not too much should be read 
into Africa’s victory. 

“It might have been billed as the 
European All-Stars against the African 
All-Stars,” said Vogts, “but there were 
many top European players missing, 
'tttat team was not the best Europe had 
t? offer, and it would be a mistake to 
judge Europe and Africa’s status right 
now on the basis of that match." 

The game, played on a damp, cold 
night, was watched by fewer than 
10,000 people in Benfica’s vast Sta- 
dium of Light. 

Pole’s goal was the best of three well- 
taken ones. He rounded off a six-man 
move with a lob from the edge of the 
penalty box that left Van der Sar stran- 
ded. Vincent Guerin of France equal- 
ized for Europe a minute before half- 
time with a shot an the turn. 

Twelve minutes from the end, 
Mustapha Hadji of Morocco won the 


Scoreboard 





]wIWk1>DWA|mBln««-IVw 

Ronald deBoer of the Netherlands trying to evade Monssa Saib of Algeria in the Aftica-Europe game. 


ball near the halfway line, raced for- 
ward, exchanged passes with Sooley- 
inane Sane of Senegal, and then blasted 
the ball home. 

The match kicked off the European 
Union’s Year Against Racism. 

On Thursday, UEFA, Europe’s soc- 
cer organization, and CAF, Africa’s 
soccer body, formally ended years of 
barely concealed hostility by signing a 
friendship agreement 

The Convention, as it has been 
termed, was signed by Lennart Johans- 
son of Sweden, president of the Euro- 
pean football association, and IssaHay- 
atou of Cameroon, his counterpart in the 


African football confederation. 

Nanibia and Chad, two of the poorer 
African nations, were selected as the 
first two countries to receive financial 
aid, equipment, transport and commu- 
nication tools and coaching help as part 
of the deaL 

Also Thursday, Johansson said Bos- 
nian chibs would not be allowed to 
compete in European competitions until 
the rival factions m Bosnia agreed which 
clubs would represent the country. 

There are currently three bodies in 
Bosnia — the Muslim League, the Croa- 
tian League and the Serb League. Each 
organizes its own league and cup cham- 


pionships. All three are affiliated with 
the Bosnia-Herzegovina Football Fed- 
eration, which is recognized by FIFA, 
the governing body of world soccer. 

But UEFA is not prepared to admit 
three teams from each of the leagues 
into Europe ’s three cup competitions — 
the European Cup, the Cup Winners’ 
Cup and the UEFA Cup. ft wants the 
leagues to agree on one representative 
for each competition. 

A UEFA source said one possible 
solution would a series of playoffs to 
establish what would effectively be a 
single Bosnian champion or cup win- 
ning team. 


Still Full of Surprises, 
Sabres Nip at Flyers 


The Associated Press 

The Buffalo Sabres, one of the 
biggest surprises in the NHL this sea- 
son, moved within two points of Pitts- 
burgh, the Northeast Division lead- 
ers, with a 3-1 victory over the 
Penguins on Wednesday night. 

The Sabres weren’t given modi of 
a chance after Pat LaFanraine, their 

NHL Roundup 

scoring leader, was knocked out by a 
concussion early this season. 

But they are tied for the sixth-best 
record in the NHL. 

The Sabres dominated Pittsburgh 
for two periods and hung on after 
Jaromir Jagr’s goal for Pittsburgh in 
the third. It was Jagr’s league-leading 
42d of the season. 

Rob Ray and Mike Peca scored in 
the first period before Richard Smeh- 
13c ’s' empty-net goal with 27 seconds 
sealed the game for the Salves. 

Fty«irs 3, capitals i Ron Hextall 
stopped 29 shots as Philadelphia ex- 
tended its unbeaten road streak to 12. 

Rod Blind’ Amonr and Dainius 
Zubrus scored for the Flyers. 

DdvHbI, Senators 1 The rookie Jay 
Pandolfo scored midway through the 
third period to give New Jersey a tie 
with visiting Ottawa. 

Shaun Van Allen scored Ottawa’s 
goal and Damian Rhodes stopped 35 
snots as tbe Senators stretched their 
unbeaten streak to three games, two of 
them ties, equaling their season high. 

Blues 4, ample Leafs o Pierre Tur- 
geon and Brett Hull each had a goal 
and an assist as Sl Louis won at 
Toronto. 

The loss was the third in a row for 
the Maple Leafs, who have won just 
two of their last 12 games. 

A1 Maclnnis and Joe Murphy also 
scared for the Blues. 


Coyotes 3, Had Wings O Nikolai Kh- 
abibulin made 28 saves for his fourth 
career shutout, and Bob Corkum had a 
goal and an assist as Phoenix won at 
Detroit. 

Darrin Shannon and Keith Tkachuk 
also scored for the Coyotes. 

Detroit, which wasn’t shut out all 
last season, was blanked for the third 
time this season. Tbe Red Wings are 
without a victory in their last six home 


Stars 3, Ducks i At Dallas, Sergei 
Zubov had a goal and an assist, and 
Andy Moog stopped 25 shots as the 
Stars extended their winning streak to 
four. 

Moog registered his 346th career 
victory, top among active goalies and 
sixth on the all-time list. Moog out- 
played Anaheim's Guy Hebert, who 
began the night with a 1.98 gpals- 
against average in his previous 25 
games. 

Anaheim’s Peter Leboutillier scored 
his second goal of the season with 4: 1 7 
to play to spoil Moog ’s shutout bid. 

Avalanche ft. Kings 3 Claude 
Lemieux and Scott Young each scored 
two goals, and Colorado welcomed 
back the goalie Patrick Roy who re- 
turned from a hand injury with a vic- 
tory over Los Angeles and climbed to 
eight on the all-time victory list. 

It was tbe 335th victory of Roy's 
career, tying him with Gump Worsley. 

The Avalanche spoiled the return 
of the Kings* goalie, Stephane Fiset, 
who wasplaying at McNichols Arena 
for the first time since his June 20 
trade to Los Angeles. 

Mara 3, Sharks i At Edmonton. 
Andrei Kovalenko scored the game- 
winning goal late in the second period 
as the Otters won their third straight. 

The Oilers have won seven of 1 1 
games, while San Jose suffered its 
third consecutive defeat. 


| BASKETBALL | 

NBA Stmumnos 


luiBHeomniia 



ATLANTIC DIVISION 



V 

L 

Pet 

Gft 

Miami 

32 

12 

J27 

— 

New York 

32 

13 

J1I 

H 

Washington 

22 

21 

5» 

9% 

Orlando 

20 

20 

J>00 

10 

New Jersey 

11 

30 

268 

19% 

Philadelphia 

10 

33 

233 

21 Mi 

Boston 

9 

32 

220 

2TH 

CENTRAL DNHKN 



Chicago 

38 

5 

JM4 

— 

Detroit 

32 

T1 

J44 

6 

Atlanta 

29 

12 

207 

8 

Charkitto 

25 

19 

366 

13% 

Ctevetand 

24 

19 

356 

U 

MBvroiAee 

21 

22 

488 

17 

Indiana 

20 

22 

M6 

17% 

Toronto 

15 

28 

■349 

23 

mWEBT DIVBIQN 




W' 

L 

Pet 

CM 

Houston 

32 

11 

.74 4 

— 

Utah 

30 

13 

An 

2 

MUKsata 

DdSs 

19 

14 

24 

27 

442 

J41 

13 

17 

Denver 

13 

31 

295 

19% 

San Antonio 

11 

30 

268 

20 

Vancouver 

8 

38 

.174 

25% 


McatcMvman 



LA. Lakers 

33 

12 

233 

— 

SeaHte 

31 

13 

205 

1% 

Portland 

25 

20 

356 

8 

Sacramento 

19 

25 

.432 

13% 

Golden State 

17 

26 

J95 

15 

LA. C*pf»s 

16 

25 

J90 

IS 

Phoenix 

15 

29 

241 

17% 

WBBNUDCrS HSUUS 


Tmnto 

25 

aa 

IS 24— 99 

PMtadriphta 

38 

24 : 

25 29-481 


■n StoMtamlm 10-1 9 0-225, Garni* M8M 
18i P: Iverson 1M4 A-1031, MocLaan 9-14 2- 
3 21. Raboand*— 1 Toronto 56 Danes lffl, 
pnHwMpMa S3 (Cage 13. Awtaft— Toronto 


19 (Christie 6), Philadelphia 15 (lvereon 69- 
matter 25 21 25 38-111 

Monte N 22 M 34-112 

P: Johnson 9-1 2 2-2 22 Penan 7-1 3 04 17F0c 
Hardaway 11-18 7-8 32, SietaJy 68 6-9 IS 
Rebounds— Phoenix 35 (Cebalta 9), Orlando 
57 Betely 12J. Asteft-PhowUx24 Uotoaon 
153, Orlando 27 (Nadawaft Shaw 8). 

Basin » 21 24 16— S3 

Mted 27 30 27 19-113 

Bs Wesley 8-16 4-72EL Day 7-16 *7 19; At 
Mourning 11-16 24 24 Lsnard 8-14 2-2 
20.MmMto— Boston 46 (Day 8), Miami 52 
(Mounting 15). AsUsts— Barton 13 [Weiley 
4Xr Mtanti 28 (Httrkmuy 7). . 
ladkua . , M 24 25 21-106 

Charlotte 21 25 26 23- 95 

I: AUBer 14-22 6-7 4ft SmBs 7-16 8-8355 C 
Oat 13-22 68 34 Row 6-9 2-2 14 
Rshsmto— tnOana 5T (5mta 11L Chartalfe 
66 (Uwc 9). AM**— tadtana4*{Ba* 113, 
ChoiMto»(DNoc9). 

NnwYsTk 17 12 23 23-75 

a H 22 9—65 
N.Y.; Starks 8-1 6 4-4 2ft Johnson 5-14 3-4 
U Oakley S-1QM 13; C: Brandon 94044 24 
Mlfe 5-13 2-2 14 Mmmd»-New York 48 
COaWey 11), Oavatond 49 (MBs 11). 
Ssatsto— New YWh 18 (CUkte Starks 4). 
Oeveiand 19 (Sura 6). 

Fstltaad 32 18 17 22-89 

Danse 26 29 22 2V-9B 

. P: Anderson 44 54 14 Ttenf 4-7 5-8 1 A 
Brown 4-82-213; EkHBMM 5 8-10 27, Dwnaro 
4-10 u-12 aoj M s wnns r or ttonrt 41 
(Dudtoy 10), Detroit 44 ramps 12). 
As**— Portland 17 (Robinson Si, Detroit 
13 (Duran A. 

LA. mm M 13 22 33 — 99 

Sss Aatonto 26 28 28 16- 92 

LA^Jone* 7-175-6 23. O'Neal 9-18M321; 
SLAJ Wffldu 6-lfl 8- TO 2ft EDotr 8-T6 7-10 
23Jt Ui ss n 0» L os Anpete «l (O'Neal 19), 
San Antonio 51 (WDcJns 12]. AssMt— Las 
Angeles 23 (Van E*et 12), Son Antonto 17 
(Johnson W. 

Scans S3 24 31 22-111 

GoMea State 15 25 SB 26-86 

S: Payton 1 0-16 <H> 24 Sdweaqtf 69 22 14 
HaMUns +8 33 1ft ENo 6-11 00 14; &&: 


MuDi 10-16 46 24 Sprowefl 4-13 5-6 14 
Msbra— souffle jXKernplQhGaidan Stole 
48 CSmlh 11). Assists— Seattle 28 (Payton fl. 
Oaten state 20 (Cota Sprowefl 5). 


NHL Stanmnos 


miautcomusa 

ATLAHDC DfWBUW 

W L T PIS OF GA 
otita 29 14 7 65 159 122 

25 U 10 - 60 143 114 

igera 25 20 7 57 178 145 

wy 24 17 6 54 122 116 

ton 20 25 5 45 131 138 

toy 10 23 6 42 138 149 

mton 16-24 -9- 41 136 146 

NORTHEAST HVHHON 

W L T n GF M 
#i 27 18 5 59 184 154 

26 19 5 57 144 132 

20 21 7 47 140 152 


PMtodetohls 
poridr 
H.Y. Rtrogera 
NeW Jersey 
W Bstihfflton 
Tampa Bay 
N.Y.'tekmdsn 


Pittsburgh 

Bulkto 

Hartford 

Montreal 

Boston 

Ottawa 


Oatotado 

Ertaontan 

Vancouver 

Anahekn 

Calgary 

Las Angelas 

San Jose 


20 21 7 47 140 152 
18 25 8 44 158 182 
18 24 6 42 140 170 
1 5 22 10 40 1 28 138 

cernMLixvmoN 

W L T PS GF GA 
29 17 4 62 153 120 

22 17 9 53 144 111 
24 23 4 52 154 159 

22 24 4 48 139 157 

18 26 8 44 130 139 

19 32 0 38 149 180 
PAancHvanM 

W L T PS W SA 
31 12 I 70 176 120 
24 22 5 53 163 151 

23 23 2 48 155 160 
19 24 6 44 138 147 
18 25 6 42 123 145 

s 17 27 6 40 134 175 
17 26 5 39 124 154 


0 8 1—1 

2 8 1-3 


nit Period: B-Rny 7 (May, SmeM) Z B-, 
Pea 11 (Word WO. Secasd Period: None 
TIM Period: P-Jopr 42 (Nadved. Fronds) 
(pp). 4 B-Smeltik 8 (ZMnHO (en)- Shots os 
goto: P- 2-8-12—32. B- 15-14-10-39. 
GoaBss: P-DeRouvUe. B-Hnsek- 
Ottawa 1 8 8 8-1 

Maw Jersey 0 8 10-1 

Hrst Parted: O-Vta Alton X Second Period: 
None. Third Pwfed: N J.-PandoHo 3 (Hoffld 
Owrifne Atone. SMs «a gate O- 95-10- 
0—26. ILL- 6-14-13-3—36. GeaRes: O- 
Rhodes. NJ-rBrodeur. 

PMMdpbki 1 1 S— 2 

VtaWagkn 8 1 0-1 

Hrst Period: P-Brtorf Amour 17, Sealed 
Period: P-Ziftres 7 {NBnhnaa, Coffey) (pp). 

3. W-Bamba 31 (Ptwrtm) Third Period: 
None. Sboft on gout P- 14-85— 27. W- 9-15- 
6—30. Gaaffles: P-HertdL W-Grroy. 

Sfctesk 2-2' 0-4- 

Toronto 0 8 8-0 

First Period: iL-Turgeoa 12 (HuB Z SJ-- 
Moctoflft 12 fCompbafl YcriO (pp)- Seawd 
Period: SJLrMorphy 14 (Peflertn) K 5.L- 
HnU 27 (Mociroikb Turgaan) (pp). TbU 
Period: Nam. Shaft as goto: Si.- 14-7- 
12 — 33. T- 7-11-11-29. GaaBsw 5 J^FMk 
T-C ous to eou. 

Pbesntr 2 1 0—3 

Detroit 8 8 8-0 

First Period: P- Shannon 4 (Doan, 

Trordonky) Z P-Cakum S manning, 
noortmlO Second Pertecfc P-Thaaiuk 31 
CCDitomd Thhd Period: None. Shaft an goto: 
Ptwanft 1 0-1 0-1-21 . D- 7-14-9-30. GMadss: 
P-KhobDroftL D-VWTTOV 
Anaheim 8 0 1—1 

DM 1 1 1-3 

First Period: D-Ntouwendyk .16 

(Langanbnmner, Sydor) (pp). Se c o n d 
Pertwfc D-Madano 22 By doc Zubw} (pp). 
Third Period: D-Zuftov 7 (Vertwak, GBdaftO 

4, A-LabauflBer 2 (Drury, Karpa) Shots on 
goat Hr 12-11-3-26. D- 7-12-13—32. 
(Iwd lMT A-Hohort D-Moog. 

Las Angeles 0 3 0-3 

Cotorodo 4 11—6 

FM Period: C-Doodmcedi 21 (RkxL 

OzaHnstd (pp). Z C-Young 13 (Cartel 


UraoMZCv Rtod4 (Knw04,C-LjefiiIoiK2 
(CBoinstv Foatwrp) (pp). Second Period C- 
Lendeux 3 (Fonberft Kamensky) & LA.- 
Stovens 11. (pp>.7, Ut-Perreoufl 0 (Sterna. 
Yodsnenev) ft LA.-Nunntnen 11 (Norstrorn) 
ThH Period; C-Young 14 (Lnanii Corbet) 
Starts oa gn± LA.- 11-11-10-32. C- 14-14- 
16—44. GoaQes LA.-H»et ORoy. 

SaiJese 1 0 8-1 

Edmonton 1 1 1-3 

Hrst Period: SJ.-Donovan 4 (Yegorov, 
Hawgood) Z E-Murray 0 (AAanJwnt 
Kovalenko) Secasd Period: E-Krmdenkn 25 
Wdpht, Sfflon) Thlnl Ttariod: E-Llodgien 7, 
(p«) ten). Shaft an goal: SJ-- 17-8-1 0-3S.E- 
1(995—24. GaaBoK Sj.-Bettbur. E-Joeeph. 


i 997 Pno Bowl Tbaios 
dOWNUT, MB. * HI MMVMMP 


IHTERKHt LlNEMfiH — X-Joftn RDTOftb Wn- 

iMsaks xy-Brymd Ybun^ San Frandscu Eric 
Swann, Arizona. 

outside uMBBAOMRi— o-Ktortn Gfeenn, 
Ca ntibn; xy-Lanar Lxdhoa CaroOns Ken 
Hawy, Washtagtoa 

MBDE IMBMCXEltS-O-Sam MfBh CaiaB- 
ms Hardy Nktrasaa Tampo Bay. 

CORNERbACia-a-Ddan Sanders, Daflas 
x-Aenaas WIBtoais. Artiona Eric Davis, Qn^ 
oftes DarKO Groan Mtashhfflfsn. 

SAFETios-x-URoy Butter, Green Bay; x- 
AAettonHnnlsSai R andsca Patron Woori- 
■oaEMoft 

SPECIALISTS 

paoTEK-y-Matt Turk, WasWogtoro 

ptAesraaran-Y- John Kasay, Carolina. 

na( ktoii spEcuusT-pMIdioei 
BatoftCaralna 

speetur p ui m y JtotscfninntePattBs. 


Kansas CKys xyChad Brows Pmsfawgto 
Bryce Pngs BufMa. 

i wide linebackers— e-Junkir Seau, San 
Dfegro y-lcvon Kbktoml Pittsburgh. 

cornbbacks— xz-D. Corten Kansas Cly; 
sy-Asbley Anbrooev Cbidnnatb Rod Woodsaa 
Pittsburgh Terry McOarieL Ocddand. 

SAFttTtES-o-Camea Late Ptttsbwtfv «- 
Stow Atwater, Denver; Blaine Btrtnjs Hous- 
tnro Eric Tumor, Bafllmaro. 

BHCtALtSTh 

PBMTS*-y-Chris Garttadd. IndJcnopods. 

ptACEncxEO-y-Cary Btancttant imfl- 
aiapols. 

laac RETURN SPECIALIST- Dorid MeggaiL 
New England. 

special TEAiutlt— y-Jotin Henry AABa, 
Houston. 

x-storier; y-flrsMUne Pro Bowl satedtow z- 
totorad, will not plan r-lnjury isptaOWMid 


OFFENSE 

wide aetttVHO-a-Jeny Rks. San Pian- 
dsoor K-Hernan Moan, Detroit y- Isaac 
Broctr SL Lwhe Ok Carta Mfewwsato. 

TAOCLES~«-Er8( wmams, DaOos s- 
WBtam Root New Orleans Loans Brown 
Artrona. 

otMEos-wLarr Man, Dados s-AaruM 

AAcDroiM AAlnnascdro Nato Newton, Daflaa. 

cemERS-K-KevIn Gtovec Dabblb z-Rny 
Danaidaaib DaDaw r-F. Winters Green Bay. 

TWHT Qrw-*y-Wwtey Walls. Carolina; 
Kom Jackson, Green Bay. 

QUARTBtBACIS— RpBnlt FdVTft GfBOn 
Bay; z-Troy Aftroaa Dams r-Gus Frerotte. 
Wartttogton; z-Steve Young, San Froncftau 
r-KenyColta QiaBna. 

RUNNiNDBAaB-A-Bany Sanders, Detroit 
xy-Terry AOen. WasMngtaiv Ricky wuteis. 
PWtacWpWn. 

Fin i oaqb— I nrry Codec. Altana 

' DEFENSE 

ends o B o gg to White Groon Bay; xy- 
Tony Tolbert Dattas WMom FuO«, 
PModetoWa. 


wide RECavERS-R-Cart Pickens, Ctncto- 
naa zy-Tony AAarfln. San DtegroTbn Brown, 
Oakland; y- Keenan AtcCantoO, Jocksonvflte. 

tackles— xz-Gtiy Zlnunermn rv Denver x- 
Brace Armstrong, Now Engkmb Rtchroond 
Webb, AAkmt Tony BoseflL Jacksonvtte. 

cuARi»-K-8ntot Matthews, Houston; Xr 
WII S Melds, Kansas aty; y-Ruben Brown, 
Bufftrioi 

cenTERs-x-Dennantfl Dawson, HWs- 
bugft Mrok StopmskL Houston. 

TWHT EMDS-4-Smnnon stnitte Dsrmn 
Ben Coates, NewErcglamL 

QaARTH—AOKS-w-Jabn Elwoy, Demen 
Chew Bledsoe, New EngksRfe r-AAaik 
Brunei, Jacksonva* y-Vtnny Testavente 
Bodlmore. 

niHMiiro backs— xy-Tenel Davts, Denver; 
x- Jerome Befits, Pittsburgh; Cunts Martte 
New Eng tond. 

pot i BACkr-MBible Andea, Kansas CBy. 

DEFENSE 

enDS-x-Bruce SoHdv Buttotoc xysAHied 
WTHtams Denver; y-MJdwd Slndak; Seattto. 

lirmiM LMEMEN—N-CDrtn Kennedy, 
Setdfls *-0>estor MeGtoddatu Oaldandi 
Wctuel Dean Perry, Denver. 

atnsDP uKEBAOCERs-x-DentckThaDias, 


M ffl ow mMunoMi 

SOUTH AFTOCA VS. ZBiBABWE 
WEDNESDAY M CAPE TOWN 

Zknbabwa tontogs: 226 (50 oven) 

S. Attica tmingcZS far 5 (47 oven) 
Result: S. Africa wan by j wfckaft 


Aston Vito ft Sheffletd Wednesday 1 
Laodsft Derby 0 
Leicester 1, Sunderland 1 
MonctoHer Untied ft WhnMedm l 
Newcastle 4. Evertanl 
Notttogtan Forest ft Coventry 1 
Tottenham 2, Bladdwrn 1 
West Ham 1. Arsenal 2 
sTsmwwii Manchester Unttod 47 pototz; 
Arsenal 46, Uverpoal46c Nswcasfle42 Wfcn- 
htedon 3ft Cheteea 38s Aston Vlfla 3ft 
Shefflekt Wednesday 34; Tottenham 31; 
Leeds 29, Sunderland 29; Evston 2S Le- 


icester 27; Coventry 2ft Dwtry 2ft- Blackburn 
2ft Nottlngnom Forest 2ft- West Horn 22; 
Southampton 20; Mldffleshrough IB. 

mwwcw 

FOURTH ROUM], TOST LEO 
Las Palmdt (10 ft Valencia 2 
LJetdatt!) l.Cetta Vigol 
Altftlco Madrid Z Compasieto 0 
RayoVafiecano2, Extreanduia2 
Ractog Santander 1, Athletic Bllbaa 0 
6l64ftinM8ir 

WEDNESDAY, N LISBON 
Africa 2, Europe! 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Cleveland— N amed Dave KcBer coach 
tor Buffalo, AA, Joel Skinner manager and 
Boats Day coach for Ktoston, CL Jack Mid 
r nano g er tor CohanbiMr SAL and Cart WWs 
pitching coach for Watertown, NYPL 
Milwaukee— A greed to terms wltti IB 
John Jana an 1-yoorcaikiiucL 
SEATTLE— Agreed to terms with 3B Chris 
Sabo on mlnor-teogue contract 
MAT int f A i tionui 

CHlCAco-Agreed to torms with OF Dave 
Oarti on mtaor-leoguB contract 
Florida— A greed to torms wah INF Kwt 
Abbott an 1 -ye* aadrod. 

Philadelphia— A greed to terns wflh OF 
Ricky Otero an 1-year cantina and OF Der- 
rkk May on mLioz-fcoflua cotSeacL 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

VANCOUVER— Signed F Aaron wmams to 
l D-day controd. 

WASHOMTon— I Put C Lorenzo Wfllkans on 
k+mdllsL 

FOOTBALL 

NAT10IIAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

ARtzoMA— Named johnny R o land running 
bock coach. 

Atlanta — N amed Rich Brooks defensive 
coordinator. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


'AS SOON A5 A CHIU? 15 
BORN. HE OR 5UE IS I55UQ7 

A nnfi AMD A. RAM in 


/ THE POO N 
C(XJU? LEARN 


GO AHEAD DCfeM. ’MtfLL 
KISS AIL TU0SE. TREES. 


WCWOOlT.WliSRSP 
BETCCE'fcOWCWBiW 
\H3SE WTHE ECTOM. . 


WCNT® WIQ WKTftJHO. 
BESHJES.THEKElSPKeftas 
PEN.1UKK NWW«. GO 


MX BRAIN VsTmG 
^ KlttlLME. 





















PAGE 20 


OBSERVER 


Indestructible Newtie 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK —Just when 
it looks as if you’re not 
going to have Newt Gingrich 
to kick around anymore — 
Wham! Bam! Yes, Ma’am! 
Yes, Ma'am! It’s Newtie! 
Bade again, and just as lus- 
ciously Newtish as ever. 

Hie only man in America 
with popularity ratings lower 
than Q>unt Dracula’s, and he’s 
back. The famous reprimand 
— the only official reprimand 
ever laid on any speaker of the 
House, the news stories said 
— that did not do him in. The 
$300,000 die House fined him 
for finagling with the tax laws 
— that did not put a stake 
through the heart of Newt He 

is indestructible. 

In Georgia he said ail that 
recent nonsense in Washing- 
ton — the reprimand, the fine 
— all that didn't amount to a 
hill of beans. And anyhow it 
wasn't even his fault. That's 
what he said. Not his fault. 
His lawyer did it. 

If he had a butler the butler 
would probably have done it. 

□ 

Why did they pick on Newt 
then? Because he's not a lib- 
eral. If he had been a liberal, 
nobody would have made a 
fuss about the whole thing. 
The way things are run in 
Washington is. you can get 
away with anything if you're a 
liberal. You could imagine 
those liberals getting away 
with anything they wanted to 
up there in Washington. 

But, said Speaker Newt, if 
you're a conservative, watch 
out Make a single mistake, 
and you'd “better plan to be 
pilloried because you’re po- 
litically incorrect.”Here is this 
Newt, the human millstone 
who may not have sunk die 
Republican Party’s presiden- 
tial campaign single-handedly 


last year, though if he didn't it 
wasn't because he hadn't 
stared the bejeebers out of 
American voters. 

So in spite of that, his Re- 
publican colleagues, obedient 
to that humane but spooky Re- 
publican impulse to choose 
doom over disloyalty, had just 
re-elected him speaker of the 
House by a margin no wider 
than a paper cut. 

Afterward it looked for a 
whole week as if dure might 
be a new Newt, a subdued, 
thoughtful, mature Newt who 
would radiate the bogus hu- 
mility so essential to political 
success. Instead, happily for 
political junkies, die old Newt 
goes to Georgia whining that 
he’s been “pilloried” Having 
just been re-elected speaker, 
he now stands right behind 
Vice President AJ Gore in the 
presidential succession. With 
an unhappy weekend for both 
Bill Clinton and Gore, he 
could suddenly be President 
Gingrich. Some pillory. 

A lot of Republicans who 
secretly wished be would dis- 
appear voted to put him back 
in the speakership anyhow. 
They were driven by that gen- 
tlemanly, if suicidal, impulse 
to party loyalty that distin- 
guishes Republicans from 
Democrats. 

It is President Clinton's 
latest persona that Republi- 
cans would like to see Newt 
slip into. For the moment the 
president has become a bland 
moderate Republican ideolo- 
gically located slightly to the 
right of Dwight Eisenhower. 
Clinton’s is a quiet Repub- 
licanism hostile to show-offs, 
given to Sunday school ut- 
terances against partisan 
bickering and prone to brom- 
ides about balanced budgets. 

This is not Newt's brand of 
Republicanism. For better or 
for worse, he may be the only 
life left in the party. 

New York Times Service 


Star Wars’ Strikes Back — That’s Marketing! 


By James Sremgold 

New York Times Service 


are known, is being described by experts as 
one of die most impressive and tautly en- 
gineered pieces of marketing prowess ever 
conceived, as well as an example of what foe 
mo 1 vie industry has become; art in foe service 
of a huge commercial superstructure that 
needs constant feeding. 

Indeed, Lucas’s staff has produced a 
poster-sized, color-coded chart circulated 
amo ng the hundreds of Star Wars licensees 
that details, month by month, every mer- 
chandising and marketing event related to 
Star Wars from early last year until foe 
millynninm- Marketing experts describe the 


T < 

J— /makers and marketers talk, it is the ul- 
timate example of technology in foe service 
of pure arc George Lucas's “Star Wars” 
trilogy, which began a special -effects re- 
volution 20 years ago, has bran refurbished 
using even more advanced computer wiz- 
ardry and will be re-released in thousands of 
theaters in the United States, beginning Fri- 
day. 

Lucas has described foe project as a loving . 

gesture to a new generation of fans who plan, in its depth and breadth, as the most 

, am bi tious .attempt to 

date to exploit a film 
franchise. 

“I've never seen any- 
l£te it,” said Mi- 
Schau, executive 
editor of the Entertain- 
ment Marketing Letter. 
“It’s so well delineated. 
This is more than well 
thought out. It goes till 
the next century.” 

That perception mbs 
tire filmmakers the 
wrong way, since their 
whole sales pitch de- 
pends in large measure 
on the appearance that 
(he marketing just sort 
of happens and that foe 
real work is in creating 
art “This really doesn’t 
have anything to do with 
the film coming out,” Lynn Hale, foe Lu- 
cas film spokeswoman, said of the tsunami of 
merchandising. “All of this is independent 
of the film release.” 

But. as analysts point out, this is no am- 
ateur production. Since foe first “Star 
Wars” movie opened in 1977, Lucas's par- 
able about good and evil, clunky robots and 
rebels hatching plots in places like the fourth 
moon of Yavin has become the most luc- 
rative movie franchise of all, generating an 
estimated $4 billion in revenues, from box- 
office receipts to T-shirt sales. 

The new marketing plan could well 
doable that as Lucas prepares audiences for 
his next trilogy in foe ^ ‘Star Wars” series, to 
hit theaters beginning in 1999. 

The meticulously scripted product roll- 
outs fall into 35 categories, from a new Star 
Wars Monopoly set to books, action-figure 



BOOKS AND COMICS 

total sales: Bantam Books alone has 

$300 million published more than 25 
Star Wars books, 
most of which have 
appeared on the 
New York Times 
best-seller list. 


| TOYS AND PLAYING CARDS 
j TOTAL SALES: $1 2. billion 
j Original licensees include Kenner and 
Topps. Sales in this area are projected 
to surpass $200 million this year. 

Sources: Jeffries <5 Company (estimated sates); 20th Century i 


never before witnessed Luke Skywalker’s 
quest on the big screen. 

Commerce? Don’t be silly. There has, 
perhaps, been a bit of marketing surrounding 
this unusual event — heavy advertising dur- 
ing the Super Bowl, for example, and li- 
censing deals involving everything from ta- 
cos to Christmas ornaments — but don’t 
think for a moment that hype has been on the 
minds of Lucas's company, Lucasfilm, or 
20th Century Fox, the studio unit of News 
Corp., which is distributing die block- 
busters. 

“This isn’t about marketing,” insisted 
Jeffrey Godsick. the spokesman for Fox. 
“It’s something for foe fans, and we don't 
want to lose sight of thaL’ ' 

But for all the professions of innocence on 
the part of foe spin meisters, the “Star Wars 
Trilogy Special Edition.” as the new films 


toy,*- 

pfcpsgo Inc ., ^ ^Uas its The urge to build franchises is one reason 

^ to^s^r’snw^se of geant Bilko.” Those hits of past decades 
foe^^^ilS of StarWars toys by Has- offer item a *** into 

bra Inc and Lewis Galoob Toys line, have the nostalgia of the baby boomers. 

$21 miffidn in 1994 id Other protninat examples are foe Ster 
S70 tmfflon to 1995 and more than $200 Trek movies and TV shows, produced by 
mnitSrS year, according to NPP Re- Paramount; the B» senes, pr^uced bv 
Sw^SStiy. Warner Bros., and foe James Bond films. 

Even foe federal government is playing a produced by MGM. The fourth Batman film 
rate. HteSmithsoiuan’s National Air and will hit theaters this summer, accompanied 
Space Museum is Washington is ob- 
ligingly running a Star Wars exhibition 
fate? this year, which should further 
whin up interest — and revenues. 

The result is that the three remade 
Star Wars fi lms — after “Star Wars” 
itself, “The Empire Strikes Back' * will 
hit screens cm Feb. 21 and “Return of 
theJedi” on March 7 — are expected to 
<-am perhaps $100 million at foe box 
office. The Star Wars merchandise 
cpp id more than double, and perhaps 
triple, that figure just this year. 

“This has taken on a life of its own. 
which is what you want,” said Martin 
Brockstein, editor of foe licensing Let- 
ter, a trade publication. 

In Hollywood terms, the recycling of 
the Star Wats trilogy is a low-stakes 
gamble. Lucas has spent about $15 mil- 
lion on cleaning up foe negatives of his 
films and, using digital technology, 
adding everything from rodent-like 
c reatur es onto foe streets of Mos Eisley to 
whole new scenes involving foe nefarious 
Jabba the HutL The aim, apparently, was to 
change just eno u g h that pitchmen could 
rhara«ftri:»» the re-release as something 
new, without alip.naring foe Star Ware faith- 
ful- 

The concept of creating and nurturing a 
movie franchise is something foe original 
“Star Wars” — produced for about $12 
milli on in 1977, or $31 million in today's 
dollars — helped create. Before that, films 
were generally not conceived and sold as the 
kickoff of a huge marketing campaign. 

One of the reasons The studios are willing 
these days to invest $100 million or more in 
films that might well bomb is because it only 
takes one trig hit to more than compensate for 
all the losers. 

“It’s still a business where foe hits make 



by a marketing blitz. The franchise has 
already generated about $2 billion in rev- 
enues, Warner Bros, estimates. ^ 

The only re-release of an old film. withouiPfl 
changes, that ever produced significant box 
office revenues was Disney's animated 
“101 Dalmatians” in 1991.30 years after it 
originally hit theaters, which earned $61 
million. Disney, of course, is also the cham- 
pion of the tie-in; “The Lion King” brought 
in more than $1 billion with aggressive mar- 
keting and merchandising. 

The Star Wars phenomenon may rival 
that- Hasbro now produces about 300 dif- 
ferent StarWars toys. 

V We're selling numbers I can't disclose, 
but they’re huge relative to what you’d ex- 
pect at this time of year,” said Richard 
Ruskm, a senior marketing manager with 
Hasbro's Star Wars team. 


& i 


THE INFORMATION AGE 


PEOPLE 


For Cable TV, Old News Is Good News 


By Marc Fisher 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — The 
Challenger blew up 
again foe other nigfrL The mo- 
ment was just as quickening as 
the original event 1 1 years ago. 

The space disaster happened 
again on MSNBC, foe cable 
channel that offers incompre- 
hensible computer chat, daily 
news coverage and, for one 
hour each evening, old news. 

There’s more old news 
over on the competing Fox 
News Channel, where this 
weekend foe plane that flew 
into the Empire State Build- 
ing will do it again, decades later, still in 
glorious black and white. And 24 hours 
a day. cable's Oassic Sports Network 
recycles old Muhammad Ali fights, Mi- 
chael Jordan's college games, Nolan 
Ryan no-hitters and the like. 

In a time when “Live!” seems to 
equate with "good” in the minds of TV 
programmers, foe past is coining roaring 
back in foe most unlikely of forms — 
Old News. 

Whether it's nostalgia for simpler 
times or a yearning for a more discursive 
way of telling the important stories of 
the day. the tape and film archives of foe 
news networks are suddenly being 
mined not only for snippets of great 
events but for the whole package — the 
corny introductions, the bombastic 
theme music, the baritone announcers, 
the long, elegant sentences and the even 
longer camera shots of a solitary person 
speaking, a single scene unfolding. 

On TV, radio and the newsstands, 
there’s just too much today out there. 
Who would have thought that foe an- 
tidote would be more yesterday? 

Of course, the motive behind this 
flowering of news oldies was not en- 
tirely creative. “The strongest motiv- 
ation was that with the explosion of 
news outlets, you've got to fill,” says 
Jane Pauley, the NBC News correspon- 
dent who is moderator of MSNBC’s 
“Time and Again” series. 

“Until recently, the broadcast day 



was fairly limited,” she says. “Now. 
with unlimited outlets, you can imagine 
the financial advantages of broadcasting 
programs for which you’ve already paid 
the production costs.” 

But she is quick to add that, despite 
the pecuniary origins of Old News, “this 
is one of the most distinguished and 
fascinating broadcasts in television.” 

Although it’s hard to get a precise 
measure of the size of the cable audi- 
ence. producers at all three channels say 
they’ve been deluged with positive re- 
action in foe months since their pro- 
grams debuted. Viewers seem hungry 
for good stories told foe oM-fashiozied 
way. Old News was slower and quieter, 
but also more respectful. Sometimes it 
could be simplistically celebratory. But 
most often, it offered straightforward 
narrative, occasionally spiced with a 
dose of complexity. 

At Classic Sports, where the inev- 
itable focus groups have been convened 
to discuss what makes good old news, 
participants talked repeatedly about 
“feeling cheated by modern sports,” 
says Brian Bedol, chief executive of- 
ficer and founder of foe channel. 

“There's such overload in society 
today.’ ’ Bedol says. “Walk into a ware- 
house club and you’re overwhelmed. 
Send me back to the comer store, where 
I know where everything is. Same i 
with the Internet — who needs that 1 
of overload?” 


The oldies, Bedol suggests, 
remind viewers that mare is 
not necessarily better, that 
having editors filter out the 
noise to deliver the best sto- 
ries can make for better TV 
than the raw feeds of CNN 
and Court TV. 

Bedol and his staff of 80 at 
Classic Sports are pleased to 
comb through thousands of 
hours of past events to find 
foe ones with real quality. 
Similarly, the cable channels 
Nick at Nite, American 
Movie Classics and TVLand 
may have been bom out of 
desperation to fill foe hours 
on 100-channel cable sys- 
tems, but they have tapped into the 
audience's desire for someone in the 
wasteland to show die tried and true. 

"In the case of Fox, somebody real- 
ized a year ago that we have 10.000 
hours of incredible footage that used to 
play in movie theaters,” says Marvin 
Himdfarb, producer of “Fox Movietone 
News,'* foe compilation of old movie- 
house newsreels shown on Fox News 
Channel every Saturday and Sunday 
night “This was intended as straight 
nostalgia. My assignment was to make 
die show for the 50-plus crowd, who 
remember these films, and for the 24-49 
audience, who see it for the first time.” 
The old Movietones trumpet a distant 
formality, but the methods foe newsreel 
makers used had more in common with 
the tricks of today’s TV news trade than 
with foe news coverage from foe 1950s 
to 1980$ that dominates “Time and 
Again.” The newsreels, like the TV 
newsmagazines of today, were heavy 
with emotion- stirring music, leading 
questions and a kind of staccato, over- 
excited writing unlike any known hu- 
man 


T" 1 HE British rock star Nod 
X Gallagher was at the eye 
of a political storm Thursday 
after saying that drug-taking 
was as normal as having a cup 
of tea and allegin g thatheroin 
and cocaine were used in Par- 
liament Politicians and anti- 
drug campaigners united in 
condemning the 29-year-old 
songwriter. Members of Par- 
liament said he ought to be 
investigated, prosecuted or, 
worse, expelled from his rock 
group. Oasis. Gallagher 
made his comments in a BBC 
Radio interview after win- 
ning Britain’s prestigious 
New Musical Express mag- 
azine's Brat Award earlier in 
the week. He had been de- 
fending another rocker, Bri- 
an Harvey, 17, who was 


chef Paul Bocuse created foe 
award in 1987. The Silver and 
Bronze Bocuses went re- 
spectively to Roland De- 
buyst of Belgium and Odd 
Ivar Sol void of Norway. The 
competition drew chefs from 
22 countries, including South 
Africa, Spain, the 'United 
States, Britain, Japan and 
Ghina- French chefs could not 
take part. 

□ 

The actors Tom Cruise 
and Mel Gibson were foe 
biggest box-office attractions 
at U.S. and Canadian movie 
theaters last war, according 
to a poll of 500 theater own- 
ers. John Travolta came in 
third, while Jim Carrey 


dropped to 11th place from 
second in 1995. Completing 
the top 10 list in the Quigley 
Publishing Co. poll were 
Arnold Schwarzenegger, 
Sandra Bullock, Robin Wil- 
liams, Sean Connery, Har- 
rison Ford, Kevin Costner 
and Michelle Pfeiffer. 

□ 

No political connotation 
intended, perhaps, but Prin- 
cess Anne wore red while in- 
augurating the future British 
Consulate in Hong Kong. 
Anne came in matching red 
skirt and jacket to the cere- 
mony, which was also atten- 
ded by Jeremy Hanley, foe 
Foreign Office minister for 
Hong Kong, and Governor 


: and Again,” however, brings 
viewers back to that brief period in 
which television news was a quiet, se- 
rious form of storytelling. The corre- 
spondents and anchormen stay in the 
background, casually reading well- 
wrought sentences, leaving long si- 
lences, letting pictures tell foe tale. 


17 after drawing a sharp re- 
buke from Prime Minister 
John Major for saying that 
taking the drug Ecstasy was 
O.K. Gallagher said that tak- 
ing drugs was “like getting 
up and having a cop of tea in 
the morning.” He added, 
4 ‘There's people in the House 
of Parliament, man, who are 
bigger heroin addicts and co- 
caine addicts foan anyone in 
this room right now. As soon 
as people realize that foe ma- 
jority of people in this coun- 
try take drugs, then the better 
off we'll all be.” 

□ 

The recipe: Cook 

of pork and some a 

accompanied by three gar- 
nishes. Spend no more than 
five hours, and make it a meal 
for 12. The result: A Swedish 
chef is this year’s winner of 
foe Golden Bocuse gastro- 
nomy prize, judged the 
world’s best cook. Mathias 
Dahlgreo, 27, who normally 
cooks at his Bon Lloc res- 
taurant in Stockholm, was the 



and S15,000 prize in Lyon, _ RaWPma/tun*. 

where foe celebrated French Mathias DaMgren of Sweden with his Gulden Bocuse. 


Chris Patten. The building, 
which will be the world's 
largest consulate, is housing 
the British Trade Commis- 
sion until the July 1 handover 
to Communist Chinese rule. 

□ 

Decades of legal wrangling 
over rights to foe recordings 
of Jimi Hendrix have ended 
with an exclusive worldwide 
licensing agreement between 
MCA Records and the heirs 
and estate of the guitarist, 
who died 27 years ago. The 
Hendrix catalog will be re- 
leased on MCA Records in 
conjunction with Experier* 
Hendrix, a family-run entiiy. 
“His music is as fresh and 
innovative as ever, as he con- 
tinues to influence and inspire 
generation after generation of 
musicians,” said Zach Hor- 
owitz, president of Universal 
Music Group, which orches- 
trated the deal. Hendrix tunes 
like “Purple Haze” and 
“Foxy Lady*' generate $5 
million to $7 million each 
year in royalties. 

□ 

Hundreds of messages 
from the heyday of the tele- 
graph go under foe hammer at 
Christie's in April, including 
foe famous distress si'-.Ju 
from foe doomed ocean liner 
Titanic. “Struck iceberg. Re- 
quire assistance,” reads foe 
Titanic's plea for help as 
taken down by a wireless op- 
erator on foe night the ship 
sank in April 1912 with 1,523 
souls on board. Some of the 
other messages were signed 
Queen Victoria. They were 
put up for sale from tire 
archives of foe British elec- 
tronics group GEC-Marconi. 
zers nope the auction 
raise £1 million ($1.6 
million) for GEC-Marconi’s 
training fund in a salute to 
GuglieUno Marconi, the 


Italian scientist who 
veloped foe telegraph. 


de- 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling from France and other countries really 
easy. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country 
you’re calling from and you’ll get the fastest, clearest 
connections. And be sure to charge your calls on your 
AT&T Calling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill andsave you up to 60%* 


I love 0-800-99-0011 


In the springtime. 


So please check the list for AT&T Access Numbers, 


■oafljb* b Ac PS ^to«^«c^E»cocitarfl}icaErfjci2tni»L'5 ato nmttaanl daw tael nflitrmrnin 





Steps to follow whes caffisg 

iattniflk»aIbfroB orenoe 

Ljun dial tbe AT&T Access Number 
tw the coiHKiy you ue calling from. 

1 Dial the phoae number you're calling. 

3; Dal the oiling end mimhur Usted 
time your name 


AT&T Access Numbers 


EUROPE 

Austria *0 

. 022-WF' - 

BotQtalH* 

.0480-186- 

France 

.0-868-994011 

Gennsoy 

8130-0010 

awe* 

....8MBM311 

Intend 

. t •808-658-808 

Itsfy* 

.173-1811 

NBtasftawb* 

.. 064224111 

Raati •^Moscow)*.. 

755-5042 

Spate© 

...908-9948-11 

Strabo 

S20-795-611 

Swttzariaoii* 

0800494811 

United nomra a 

.8888404611 

MIDDLE EAST 

Eofpt»(Calra)» 

5104208 

Uraal 

.177*198-2727 

Saudi Arabia© 

1408-11 

AFRICA 

Sham 

6191 

Karos* 

0-800-10 


South AHm...- WWMH1Z3 


Curt Bndifaetoessrtamfaerftr da cranny jWb calling ton? Jos »k anv operator far 
AICT Dinar Senfce, or «Wt oar Web sfle ae IngtfhnnMUmfemlv 










PAGE 19 




g !* 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY JANUARY 31, 1997 


SPORTS 


Pele Inspires Africa and Predicts Bigger Prizes 


CamtMh^OwrS^FKmDapaKfia 

Abedi Rife’s inspirational rote ® 
Africa’s 3-1 -victory over Europe in the 
intercontinental All-Staxinatch m Lisbon 
mMV no impression on the African 
team's bus driver, who drove off without 
him after the game. 

That was the only time me 34-year-old 


Pele, the African skipper who plays 
for Munich I860 in Germany after ' 
spells in Ghana, Qatar, Benin, Prance 
and Italy, scored Africa's opening goal 
after 14 minutes with a lob over Edwin 
Van der Sar, a Dutchman who is one of 
the tallest goalkeepers in soccer. 

Pele saw the result as proof of the 
rising strength of African soccer. 

Jp “It might be too early for an African 
team to win the World Cup in Fiance next 
year, but the day is coming when an 
African nation wiQ win, sooner rather 
than later. 

“The Europeans have always had die 
tactics and the intelligence; we have 
always had power, punch and-skflls. I 
am not sure what they can team from ns, 
but once we master their tactics, well be 
unbearable." 

Beni Vogts, the German national 
coach and coach of the European team, 
said that not too much should be read 
into Africa’s victory. 

“It might have been billed as the 
European All-Stars against the African 
All-Stars,” said Vogts, “but there were 
many top European players missing, 
'tttat team was not the best Europe had 
t? offer, and it would be a mistake to 
judge Europe and Africa’s status right 
now on the basis of that match." 

The game, played on a damp, cold 
night, was watched by fewer than 
10,000 people in Benfica’s vast Sta- 
dium of Light. 

Pole’s goal was the best of three well- 
taken ones. He rounded off a six-man 
move with a lob from the edge of the 
penalty box that left Van der Sar stran- 
ded. Vincent Guerin of France equal- 
ized for Europe a minute before half- 
time with a shot an the turn. 

Twelve minutes from the end, 
Mustapha Hadji of Morocco won the 


Scoreboard 





]wIWk1>DWA|mBln««-IVw 

Ronald deBoer of the Netherlands trying to evade Monssa Saib of Algeria in the Aftica-Europe game. 


ball near the halfway line, raced for- 
ward, exchanged passes with Sooley- 
inane Sane of Senegal, and then blasted 
the ball home. 

The match kicked off the European 
Union’s Year Against Racism. 

On Thursday, UEFA, Europe’s soc- 
cer organization, and CAF, Africa’s 
soccer body, formally ended years of 
barely concealed hostility by signing a 
friendship agreement 

The Convention, as it has been 
termed, was signed by Lennart Johans- 
son of Sweden, president of the Euro- 
pean football association, and IssaHay- 
atou of Cameroon, his counterpart in the 


African football confederation. 

Nanibia and Chad, two of the poorer 
African nations, were selected as the 
first two countries to receive financial 
aid, equipment, transport and commu- 
nication tools and coaching help as part 
of the deaL 

Also Thursday, Johansson said Bos- 
nian chibs would not be allowed to 
compete in European competitions until 
the rival factions m Bosnia agreed which 
clubs would represent the country. 

There are currently three bodies in 
Bosnia — the Muslim League, the Croa- 
tian League and the Serb League. Each 
organizes its own league and cup cham- 


pionships. All three are affiliated with 
the Bosnia-Herzegovina Football Fed- 
eration, which is recognized by FIFA, 
the governing body of world soccer. 

But UEFA is not prepared to admit 
three teams from each of the leagues 
into Europe ’s three cup competitions — 
the European Cup, the Cup Winners’ 
Cup and the UEFA Cup. ft wants the 
leagues to agree on one representative 
for each competition. 

A UEFA source said one possible 
solution would a series of playoffs to 
establish what would effectively be a 
single Bosnian champion or cup win- 
ning team. 


Still Full of Surprises, 
Sabres Nip at Flyers 


The Associated Press 

The Buffalo Sabres, one of the 
biggest surprises in the NHL this sea- 
son, moved within two points of Pitts- 
burgh, the Northeast Division lead- 
ers, with a 3-1 victory over the 
Penguins on Wednesday night. 

The Sabres weren’t given modi of 
a chance after Pat LaFanraine, their 

NHL Roundup 

scoring leader, was knocked out by a 
concussion early this season. 

But they are tied for the sixth-best 
record in the NHL. 

The Sabres dominated Pittsburgh 
for two periods and hung on after 
Jaromir Jagr’s goal for Pittsburgh in 
the third. It was Jagr’s league-leading 
42d of the season. 

Rob Ray and Mike Peca scored in 
the first period before Richard Smeh- 
13c ’s' empty-net goal with 27 seconds 
sealed the game for the Salves. 

Fty«irs 3, capitals i Ron Hextall 
stopped 29 shots as Philadelphia ex- 
tended its unbeaten road streak to 12. 

Rod Blind’ Amonr and Dainius 
Zubrus scored for the Flyers. 

DdvHbI, Senators 1 The rookie Jay 
Pandolfo scored midway through the 
third period to give New Jersey a tie 
with visiting Ottawa. 

Shaun Van Allen scored Ottawa’s 
goal and Damian Rhodes stopped 35 
snots as tbe Senators stretched their 
unbeaten streak to three games, two of 
them ties, equaling their season high. 

Blues 4, ample Leafs o Pierre Tur- 
geon and Brett Hull each had a goal 
and an assist as Sl Louis won at 
Toronto. 

The loss was the third in a row for 
the Maple Leafs, who have won just 
two of their last 12 games. 

A1 Maclnnis and Joe Murphy also 
scared for the Blues. 


Coyotes 3, Had Wings O Nikolai Kh- 
abibulin made 28 saves for his fourth 
career shutout, and Bob Corkum had a 
goal and an assist as Phoenix won at 
Detroit. 

Darrin Shannon and Keith Tkachuk 
also scored for the Coyotes. 

Detroit, which wasn’t shut out all 
last season, was blanked for the third 
time this season. Tbe Red Wings are 
without a victory in their last six home 


Stars 3, Ducks i At Dallas, Sergei 
Zubov had a goal and an assist, and 
Andy Moog stopped 25 shots as the 
Stars extended their winning streak to 
four. 

Moog registered his 346th career 
victory, top among active goalies and 
sixth on the all-time list. Moog out- 
played Anaheim's Guy Hebert, who 
began the night with a 1.98 gpals- 
against average in his previous 25 
games. 

Anaheim’s Peter Leboutillier scored 
his second goal of the season with 4: 1 7 
to play to spoil Moog ’s shutout bid. 

Avalanche ft. Kings 3 Claude 
Lemieux and Scott Young each scored 
two goals, and Colorado welcomed 
back the goalie Patrick Roy who re- 
turned from a hand injury with a vic- 
tory over Los Angeles and climbed to 
eight on the all-time victory list. 

It was tbe 335th victory of Roy's 
career, tying him with Gump Worsley. 

The Avalanche spoiled the return 
of the Kings* goalie, Stephane Fiset, 
who wasplaying at McNichols Arena 
for the first time since his June 20 
trade to Los Angeles. 

Mara 3, Sharks i At Edmonton. 
Andrei Kovalenko scored the game- 
winning goal late in the second period 
as the Otters won their third straight. 

The Oilers have won seven of 1 1 
games, while San Jose suffered its 
third consecutive defeat. 


| BASKETBALL | 

NBA Stmumnos 


luiBHeomniia 



ATLANTIC DIVISION 



V 

L 

Pet 

Gft 

Miami 

32 

12 

J27 

— 

New York 

32 

13 

J1I 

H 

Washington 

22 

21 

5» 

9% 

Orlando 

20 

20 

J>00 

10 

New Jersey 

11 

30 

268 

19% 

Philadelphia 

10 

33 

233 

21 Mi 

Boston 

9 

32 

220 

2TH 

CENTRAL DNHKN 



Chicago 

38 

5 

JM4 

— 

Detroit 

32 

T1 

J44 

6 

Atlanta 

29 

12 

207 

8 

Charkitto 

25 

19 

366 

13% 

Ctevetand 

24 

19 

356 

U 

MBvroiAee 

21 

22 

488 

17 

Indiana 

20 

22 

M6 

17% 

Toronto 

15 

28 

■349 

23 

mWEBT DIVBIQN 




W' 

L 

Pet 

CM 

Houston 

32 

11 

.74 4 

— 

Utah 

30 

13 

An 

2 

MUKsata 

DdSs 

19 

14 

24 

27 

442 

J41 

13 

17 

Denver 

13 

31 

295 

19% 

San Antonio 

11 

30 

268 

20 

Vancouver 

8 

38 

.174 

25% 


McatcMvman 



LA. Lakers 

33 

12 

233 

— 

SeaHte 

31 

13 

205 

1% 

Portland 

25 

20 

356 

8 

Sacramento 

19 

25 

.432 

13% 

Golden State 

17 

26 

J95 

15 

LA. C*pf»s 

16 

25 

J90 

IS 

Phoenix 

15 

29 

241 

17% 

WBBNUDCrS HSUUS 


Tmnto 

25 

aa 

IS 24— 99 

PMtadriphta 

38 

24 : 

25 29-481 


■n StoMtamlm 10-1 9 0-225, Garni* M8M 
18i P: Iverson 1M4 A-1031, MocLaan 9-14 2- 
3 21. Raboand*— 1 Toronto 56 Danes lffl, 
pnHwMpMa S3 (Cage 13. Awtaft— Toronto 


19 (Christie 6), Philadelphia 15 (lvereon 69- 
matter 25 21 25 38-111 

Monte N 22 M 34-112 

P: Johnson 9-1 2 2-2 22 Penan 7-1 3 04 17F0c 
Hardaway 11-18 7-8 32, SietaJy 68 6-9 IS 
Rebounds— Phoenix 35 (Cebalta 9), Orlando 
57 Betely 12J. Asteft-PhowUx24 Uotoaon 
153, Orlando 27 (Nadawaft Shaw 8). 

Basin » 21 24 16— S3 

Mted 27 30 27 19-113 

Bs Wesley 8-16 4-72EL Day 7-16 *7 19; At 
Mourning 11-16 24 24 Lsnard 8-14 2-2 
20.MmMto— Boston 46 (Day 8), Miami 52 
(Mounting 15). AsUsts— Barton 13 [Weiley 
4Xr Mtanti 28 (Httrkmuy 7). . 
ladkua . , M 24 25 21-106 

Charlotte 21 25 26 23- 95 

I: AUBer 14-22 6-7 4ft SmBs 7-16 8-8355 C 
Oat 13-22 68 34 Row 6-9 2-2 14 
Rshsmto— tnOana 5T (5mta 11L Chartalfe 
66 (Uwc 9). AM**— tadtana4*{Ba* 113, 
ChoiMto»(DNoc9). 

NnwYsTk 17 12 23 23-75 

a H 22 9—65 
N.Y.; Starks 8-1 6 4-4 2ft Johnson 5-14 3-4 
U Oakley S-1QM 13; C: Brandon 94044 24 
Mlfe 5-13 2-2 14 Mmmd»-New York 48 
COaWey 11), Oavatond 49 (MBs 11). 
Ssatsto— New YWh 18 (CUkte Starks 4). 
Oeveiand 19 (Sura 6). 

Fstltaad 32 18 17 22-89 

Danse 26 29 22 2V-9B 

. P: Anderson 44 54 14 Ttenf 4-7 5-8 1 A 
Brown 4-82-213; EkHBMM 5 8-10 27, Dwnaro 
4-10 u-12 aoj M s wnns r or ttonrt 41 
(Dudtoy 10), Detroit 44 ramps 12). 
As**— Portland 17 (Robinson Si, Detroit 
13 (Duran A. 

LA. mm M 13 22 33 — 99 

Sss Aatonto 26 28 28 16- 92 

LA^Jone* 7-175-6 23. O'Neal 9-18M321; 
SLAJ Wffldu 6-lfl 8- TO 2ft EDotr 8-T6 7-10 
23Jt Ui ss n 0» L os Anpete «l (O'Neal 19), 
San Antonio 51 (WDcJns 12]. AssMt— Las 
Angeles 23 (Van E*et 12), Son Antonto 17 
(Johnson W. 

Scans S3 24 31 22-111 

GoMea State 15 25 SB 26-86 

S: Payton 1 0-16 <H> 24 Sdweaqtf 69 22 14 
HaMUns +8 33 1ft ENo 6-11 00 14; &&: 


MuDi 10-16 46 24 Sprowefl 4-13 5-6 14 
Msbra— souffle jXKernplQhGaidan Stole 
48 CSmlh 11). Assists— Seattle 28 (Payton fl. 
Oaten state 20 (Cota Sprowefl 5). 


NHL Stanmnos 


miautcomusa 

ATLAHDC DfWBUW 

W L T PIS OF GA 
otita 29 14 7 65 159 122 

25 U 10 - 60 143 114 

igera 25 20 7 57 178 145 

wy 24 17 6 54 122 116 

ton 20 25 5 45 131 138 

toy 10 23 6 42 138 149 

mton 16-24 -9- 41 136 146 

NORTHEAST HVHHON 

W L T n GF M 
#i 27 18 5 59 184 154 

26 19 5 57 144 132 

20 21 7 47 140 152 


PMtodetohls 
poridr 
H.Y. Rtrogera 
NeW Jersey 
W Bstihfflton 
Tampa Bay 
N.Y.'tekmdsn 


Pittsburgh 

Bulkto 

Hartford 

Montreal 

Boston 

Ottawa 


Oatotado 

Ertaontan 

Vancouver 

Anahekn 

Calgary 

Las Angelas 

San Jose 


20 21 7 47 140 152 
18 25 8 44 158 182 
18 24 6 42 140 170 
1 5 22 10 40 1 28 138 

cernMLixvmoN 

W L T PS GF GA 
29 17 4 62 153 120 

22 17 9 53 144 111 
24 23 4 52 154 159 

22 24 4 48 139 157 

18 26 8 44 130 139 

19 32 0 38 149 180 
PAancHvanM 

W L T PS W SA 
31 12 I 70 176 120 
24 22 5 53 163 151 

23 23 2 48 155 160 
19 24 6 44 138 147 
18 25 6 42 123 145 

s 17 27 6 40 134 175 
17 26 5 39 124 154 


0 8 1—1 

2 8 1-3 


nit Period: B-Rny 7 (May, SmeM) Z B-, 
Pea 11 (Word WO. Secasd Period: None 
TIM Period: P-Jopr 42 (Nadved. Fronds) 
(pp). 4 B-Smeltik 8 (ZMnHO (en)- Shots os 
goto: P- 2-8-12—32. B- 15-14-10-39. 
GoaBss: P-DeRouvUe. B-Hnsek- 
Ottawa 1 8 8 8-1 

Maw Jersey 0 8 10-1 

Hrst Parted: O-Vta Alton X Second Period: 
None. Third Pwfed: N J.-PandoHo 3 (Hoffld 
Owrifne Atone. SMs «a gate O- 95-10- 
0—26. ILL- 6-14-13-3—36. GeaRes: O- 
Rhodes. NJ-rBrodeur. 

PMMdpbki 1 1 S— 2 

VtaWagkn 8 1 0-1 

Hrst Period: P-Brtorf Amour 17, Sealed 
Period: P-Ziftres 7 {NBnhnaa, Coffey) (pp). 

3. W-Bamba 31 (Ptwrtm) Third Period: 
None. Sboft on gout P- 14-85— 27. W- 9-15- 
6—30. Gaaffles: P-HertdL W-Grroy. 

Sfctesk 2-2' 0-4- 

Toronto 0 8 8-0 

First Period: iL-Turgeoa 12 (HuB Z SJ-- 
Moctoflft 12 fCompbafl YcriO (pp)- Seawd 
Period: SJLrMorphy 14 (Peflertn) K 5.L- 
HnU 27 (Mociroikb Turgaan) (pp). TbU 
Period: Nam. Shaft as goto: Si.- 14-7- 
12 — 33. T- 7-11-11-29. GaaBsw 5 J^FMk 
T-C ous to eou. 

Pbesntr 2 1 0—3 

Detroit 8 8 8-0 

First Period: P- Shannon 4 (Doan, 

Trordonky) Z P-Cakum S manning, 
noortmlO Second Pertecfc P-Thaaiuk 31 
CCDitomd Thhd Period: None. Shaft an goto: 
Ptwanft 1 0-1 0-1-21 . D- 7-14-9-30. GMadss: 
P-KhobDroftL D-VWTTOV 
Anaheim 8 0 1—1 

DM 1 1 1-3 

First Period: D-Ntouwendyk .16 

(Langanbnmner, Sydor) (pp). Se c o n d 
Pertwfc D-Madano 22 By doc Zubw} (pp). 
Third Period: D-Zuftov 7 (Vertwak, GBdaftO 

4, A-LabauflBer 2 (Drury, Karpa) Shots on 
goat Hr 12-11-3-26. D- 7-12-13—32. 
(Iwd lMT A-Hohort D-Moog. 

Las Angeles 0 3 0-3 

Cotorodo 4 11—6 

FM Period: C-Doodmcedi 21 (RkxL 

OzaHnstd (pp). Z C-Young 13 (Cartel 


UraoMZCv Rtod4 (Knw04,C-LjefiiIoiK2 
(CBoinstv Foatwrp) (pp). Second Period C- 
Lendeux 3 (Fonberft Kamensky) & LA.- 
Stovens 11. (pp>.7, Ut-Perreoufl 0 (Sterna. 
Yodsnenev) ft LA.-Nunntnen 11 (Norstrorn) 
ThH Period; C-Young 14 (Lnanii Corbet) 
Starts oa gn± LA.- 11-11-10-32. C- 14-14- 
16—44. GoaQes LA.-H»et ORoy. 

SaiJese 1 0 8-1 

Edmonton 1 1 1-3 

Hrst Period: SJ.-Donovan 4 (Yegorov, 
Hawgood) Z E-Murray 0 (AAanJwnt 
Kovalenko) Secasd Period: E-Krmdenkn 25 
Wdpht, Sfflon) Thlnl Ttariod: E-Llodgien 7, 
(p«) ten). Shaft an goal: SJ-- 17-8-1 0-3S.E- 
1(995—24. GaaBoK Sj.-Bettbur. E-Joeeph. 


i 997 Pno Bowl Tbaios 
dOWNUT, MB. * HI MMVMMP 


IHTERKHt LlNEMfiH — X-Joftn RDTOftb Wn- 

iMsaks xy-Brymd Ybun^ San Frandscu Eric 
Swann, Arizona. 

outside uMBBAOMRi— o-Ktortn Gfeenn, 
Ca ntibn; xy-Lanar Lxdhoa CaroOns Ken 
Hawy, Washtagtoa 

MBDE IMBMCXEltS-O-Sam MfBh CaiaB- 
ms Hardy Nktrasaa Tampo Bay. 

CORNERbACia-a-Ddan Sanders, Daflas 
x-Aenaas WIBtoais. Artiona Eric Davis, Qn^ 
oftes DarKO Groan Mtashhfflfsn. 

SAFETios-x-URoy Butter, Green Bay; x- 
AAettonHnnlsSai R andsca Patron Woori- 
■oaEMoft 

SPECIALISTS 

paoTEK-y-Matt Turk, WasWogtoro 

ptAesraaran-Y- John Kasay, Carolina. 

na( ktoii spEcuusT-pMIdioei 
BatoftCaralna 

speetur p ui m y JtotscfninntePattBs. 


Kansas CKys xyChad Brows Pmsfawgto 
Bryce Pngs BufMa. 

i wide linebackers— e-Junkir Seau, San 
Dfegro y-lcvon Kbktoml Pittsburgh. 

cornbbacks— xz-D. Corten Kansas Cly; 
sy-Asbley Anbrooev Cbidnnatb Rod Woodsaa 
Pittsburgh Terry McOarieL Ocddand. 

SAFttTtES-o-Camea Late Ptttsbwtfv «- 
Stow Atwater, Denver; Blaine Btrtnjs Hous- 
tnro Eric Tumor, Bafllmaro. 

BHCtALtSTh 

PBMTS*-y-Chris Garttadd. IndJcnopods. 

ptACEncxEO-y-Cary Btancttant imfl- 
aiapols. 

laac RETURN SPECIALIST- Dorid MeggaiL 
New England. 

special TEAiutlt— y-Jotin Henry AABa, 
Houston. 

x-storier; y-flrsMUne Pro Bowl satedtow z- 
totorad, will not plan r-lnjury isptaOWMid 


OFFENSE 

wide aetttVHO-a-Jeny Rks. San Pian- 
dsoor K-Hernan Moan, Detroit y- Isaac 
Broctr SL Lwhe Ok Carta Mfewwsato. 

TAOCLES~«-Er8( wmams, DaOos s- 
WBtam Root New Orleans Loans Brown 
Artrona. 

otMEos-wLarr Man, Dados s-AaruM 

AAcDroiM AAlnnascdro Nato Newton, Daflaa. 

cemERS-K-KevIn Gtovec Dabblb z-Rny 
Danaidaaib DaDaw r-F. Winters Green Bay. 

TWHT Qrw-*y-Wwtey Walls. Carolina; 
Kom Jackson, Green Bay. 

QUARTBtBACIS— RpBnlt FdVTft GfBOn 
Bay; z-Troy Aftroaa Dams r-Gus Frerotte. 
Wartttogton; z-Steve Young, San Froncftau 
r-KenyColta QiaBna. 

RUNNiNDBAaB-A-Bany Sanders, Detroit 
xy-Terry AOen. WasMngtaiv Ricky wuteis. 
PWtacWpWn. 

Fin i oaqb— I nrry Codec. Altana 

' DEFENSE 

ends o B o gg to White Groon Bay; xy- 
Tony Tolbert Dattas WMom FuO«, 
PModetoWa. 


wide RECavERS-R-Cart Pickens, Ctncto- 
naa zy-Tony AAarfln. San DtegroTbn Brown, 
Oakland; y- Keenan AtcCantoO, Jocksonvflte. 

tackles— xz-Gtiy Zlnunermn rv Denver x- 
Brace Armstrong, Now Engkmb Rtchroond 
Webb, AAkmt Tony BoseflL Jacksonvtte. 

cuARi»-K-8ntot Matthews, Houston; Xr 
WII S Melds, Kansas aty; y-Ruben Brown, 
Bufftrioi 

cenTERs-x-Dennantfl Dawson, HWs- 
bugft Mrok StopmskL Houston. 

TWHT EMDS-4-Smnnon stnitte Dsrmn 
Ben Coates, NewErcglamL 

QaARTH—AOKS-w-Jabn Elwoy, Demen 
Chew Bledsoe, New EngksRfe r-AAaik 
Brunei, Jacksonva* y-Vtnny Testavente 
Bodlmore. 

niHMiiro backs— xy-Tenel Davts, Denver; 
x- Jerome Befits, Pittsburgh; Cunts Martte 
New Eng tond. 

pot i BACkr-MBible Andea, Kansas CBy. 

DEFENSE 

enDS-x-Bruce SoHdv Buttotoc xysAHied 
WTHtams Denver; y-MJdwd Slndak; Seattto. 

lirmiM LMEMEN—N-CDrtn Kennedy, 
Setdfls *-0>estor MeGtoddatu Oaldandi 
Wctuel Dean Perry, Denver. 

atnsDP uKEBAOCERs-x-DentckThaDias, 


M ffl ow mMunoMi 

SOUTH AFTOCA VS. ZBiBABWE 
WEDNESDAY M CAPE TOWN 

Zknbabwa tontogs: 226 (50 oven) 

S. Attica tmingcZS far 5 (47 oven) 
Result: S. Africa wan by j wfckaft 


Aston Vito ft Sheffletd Wednesday 1 
Laodsft Derby 0 
Leicester 1, Sunderland 1 
MonctoHer Untied ft WhnMedm l 
Newcastle 4. Evertanl 
Notttogtan Forest ft Coventry 1 
Tottenham 2, Bladdwrn 1 
West Ham 1. Arsenal 2 
sTsmwwii Manchester Unttod 47 pototz; 
Arsenal 46, Uverpoal46c Nswcasfle42 Wfcn- 
htedon 3ft Cheteea 38s Aston Vlfla 3ft 
Shefflekt Wednesday 34; Tottenham 31; 
Leeds 29, Sunderland 29; Evston 2S Le- 


icester 27; Coventry 2ft Dwtry 2ft- Blackburn 
2ft Nottlngnom Forest 2ft- West Horn 22; 
Southampton 20; Mldffleshrough IB. 

mwwcw 

FOURTH ROUM], TOST LEO 
Las Palmdt (10 ft Valencia 2 
LJetdatt!) l.Cetta Vigol 
Altftlco Madrid Z Compasieto 0 
RayoVafiecano2, Extreanduia2 
Ractog Santander 1, Athletic Bllbaa 0 
6l64ftinM8ir 

WEDNESDAY, N LISBON 
Africa 2, Europe! 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Cleveland— N amed Dave KcBer coach 
tor Buffalo, AA, Joel Skinner manager and 
Boats Day coach for Ktoston, CL Jack Mid 
r nano g er tor CohanbiMr SAL and Cart WWs 
pitching coach for Watertown, NYPL 
Milwaukee— A greed to terms wltti IB 
John Jana an 1-yoorcaikiiucL 
SEATTLE— Agreed to terms with 3B Chris 
Sabo on mlnor-teogue contract 
MAT int f A i tionui 

CHlCAco-Agreed to torms with OF Dave 
Oarti on mtaor-leoguB contract 
Florida— A greed to torms wah INF Kwt 
Abbott an 1 -ye* aadrod. 

Philadelphia— A greed to terns wflh OF 
Ricky Otero an 1-year cantina and OF Der- 
rkk May on mLioz-fcoflua cotSeacL 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

VANCOUVER— Signed F Aaron wmams to 
l D-day controd. 

WASHOMTon— I Put C Lorenzo Wfllkans on 
k+mdllsL 

FOOTBALL 

NAT10IIAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

ARtzoMA— Named johnny R o land running 
bock coach. 

Atlanta — N amed Rich Brooks defensive 
coordinator. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


'AS SOON A5 A CHIU? 15 
BORN. HE OR 5UE IS I55UQ7 

A nnfi AMD A. RAM in 


/ THE POO N 
C(XJU? LEARN 


GO AHEAD DCfeM. ’MtfLL 
KISS AIL TU0SE. TREES. 


WCWOOlT.WliSRSP 
BETCCE'fcOWCWBiW 
\H3SE WTHE ECTOM. . 


WCNT® WIQ WKTftJHO. 
BESHJES.THEKElSPKeftas 
PEN.1UKK NWW«. GO 


MX BRAIN VsTmG 
^ KlttlLME.