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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Friday, July 4, 1997 



No. 35,564 


Over NATO: 
The Crunch 


U.S. Debate 

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Prepares for Summit 

By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Far from ending 
at the gala sommit meeting next week in 
w -r- m ihe ■' Madrid, the NATO expansion debate 
trench coat and nrnipi-j djS seems to be just getting started 
and was just as convincing ^ * Over the past four years. President 
By that time the face lofifc j, Bill Clinton has made enlargement of 
a Greek shield after a Innun the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
work at Marathon, and iht ? a centerpiece of his foreign policy. He 
moved slowly, filled wiihna,- has convinced America’s sometimes 
possibly even a tinge of relvT £ skeptical European allies that it makes 
he kept on moving. c CLaa sense to bring former Soviet-bloc coun- 

A final story: A colica«u C rrti« inl ° what slarted out as an anti- 
that in 1965 the big buy I ni!? Soviet m ^ tar Y alienee. And he has 
Chu Lai, an airfield ,' n vi« persuaded Russia, albeit grudgingly, to 
occupied by Amenc-tn m, sign a cooperation agreement with the 
There, on that hot due m rhjTw “new NATO.” 
green hell, he would nor ■ Now comes an equally daunting task: 
on officers but save him%dltnrll convincin 8 the American public and the 
10 the enlisted mer> both M m Senate that it is in the national interest to 
lison and Bob Mitcham 1,. ihM-, commit American “blood and treas- 
And. to The bsi. pn**|"“ ure" to defense of East Europe cties 
ril Tuesdav in hi, ,| e , p . like Brao. Gdansk and Szeged. 

p The Madrid summit meeting is likely 
?to issue formal invitations to the Czech 
— . Republic, Poland and Hungary to join 
the alliance. Ob an interview Thursday 
with European broadcasters, Mr. Clin- 
ton dog in his heels on limiting ex- 
pansion to the three nations, saying, ‘*1 
don’t forsee any- circumstances under 


until 
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. Communications 
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which 1 woald change my position,’’ 
Tnn i'i 1 h £ C J 1 * 11 Reuters reported from Washington.] 
lon ' Ju! he had "» As the moment of truth a^roaches, 
, oTl . ■ largely, abstract discussions about 

fi TTi strengthening democracy in Eastern 

- L pc Zi L Zi ; ™ y 10 haid - h ^ de ? 

• *• ■ 1 questions about the econonuc and rml- 

J om itary costs of NATO enlargemenL 
poneots of expansion, on Capitol 
□ and in foreign-policy journals and re- 

. . . . . . search organizations, have begun rais- 

rk \ olpe. executive d >rr. w or theft ^ vofees in organized dissent 
.ymphony Ochestra Wj,h The shift in focus is particularly evid- 

flnKw managing dire-.; >r liit Baa pnt m rtv» Senate, which will have final 
bony Orchestra. Volpe ^npcMli responsibility for approving or rejecting 
n in' Detroit until the • rdfe-in'** changes in the 1949 Washington Treaty 
ieason begins in Sepiernher that set up NATO as a military bulwark 
^ against Soviet expansion. Last year. 81 

— 1 _ senators voted for legislation to prepare 

rer three years and J.JTbeaLwWj^ famer Communist countries for mem- 
rift. the Alexander S. bership in NATO as rapidly as possible, 

ill Foundation has annoumJ*® But last week, eight of those senators 
of its first Intemation-il C ucsslC®-- signed a letter to Mr. Clinton calling for 
on lor an orieinai ?1 j> "far more debate” on the issue and 

selected bv 60 internjii.'nil posing a series of skeptical questions, 
inids, including critic '. The expansion decision “could begin 

cachets. The recjpieni ■ to unravel tbe greatest military alliance 

wizeisManjula Padmanabhm®* in the history of mankind,” warned John 
a bhv “The Han es! ' ' Warner, a senior member of die Senate 

Aimed Services Committee who voted 
in favor of the 1996 NATO bilL The 
Virginia Republican worries tb at ex- 
pansion could prove very expensive for 
the American taxpayer and “breed fric- 
tion and instability in Eastern Europe” 
by fomenting rivalries between coun- 
tries admitted and those excluded, 
ill# ■ Changing foe treaty requires a two- 
thirds majority, or 67 votes, in the Sen- 
ate. Opponents of NATO expansion do 
not have enough votes now to block it, 
i, r according to political analysis. But it is 

clear foe coming debate will be tough. 
“This is one of the more momentous 
. decisions the alliaoce has taken and one 
Vililttf of the more momentous decisions the 
United States has taken,” said Deputy 
Secretary of Stale Strobe Talbott, die 
.a administration’s poinr man for NATO 
oivi y-u ” ^ expansion. Both tbe Senate and U.S. 

public opinion, he said, would have to 
be convinced that foe United States 
would be “safer in foe 21 st century” as 
And >urs a result of bringing in new members. 

“XtOftS ROCK- - . Thg new voices of skepticism in the 

Senate reflect a deep division among 
un-.ii academic and other nonoffidal foreign 
policy experts. Last week, 46 leading 
Specialists on foreign policy, including 
many fanner government officials, is- 
fr. sued an open letter to Mir. Clinton de- 
scribing dte expansion of foe alliance as 
,4 a policy error of historic proportions.” 
They predicted that NATO enlarge- 
. . N meat would result in a “new line of 

a tf) liemernbcr :n:u '•* division’’ across Europe, undercutting 
• - ^mocratic refoms in Russia, and a 

i weakenin g of foe giliflnrj* 
f’Jki * 1“ a sqarate letter to Mr. Clinton, 

more than 20 Republican and Demo- 
senators raised questions ranging 
from “What is foe military that 
NATO is designed to counter?” to 4 ‘Will 


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HONG KONG RELENTS — A protester demanding legal residency 
Thursday for bis daughter, who was born on the mainland. The 
authorities pledged to review the cases of about 1,000 children. Page 4. 

Hong Kong Limited 
In Taiwan Dealings 

Beijing Says Accords Need Its Approval 


CtmfOntbyOwStgffFrem Dbparhn 

HONG KONG — The new leader 
of Hong Kong, Tung Chee-hwa, 
began work Thursday on designing a 
fresh relationship wifo Taiwan, but he 
immediately found himself caught in 
a verbal cross fire between Taipei and 
Beijing. 

The immediate outcome was that 
Hong Koug, now a part of China, and 
Taiwan, which is called a rebel 
province by Beijing, named two high- 
level intermediaries to improve then- 
cooperation. 

But Beijing mode it clear that the 
move did not mean that foe newborn 
Hong Kong Special Administrative 
Region had been empowered to act as 
intermediary between foe two 
Chinese rivals. 

Mr. Ttag launched into talks with 
Taipei just a day after predicting a 
quick deal on Taiwan’s future status 
in foe territory. But shortly after he 
met Koo Chen-fu, a Taiwan business 
leader and chairman of the semi-of- 
ficial body set up to negotiate with 
China, Beijing's Foreign Ministry 
made clear that any dealings between 
the two sides needed central gov- 
ernment approval. 

Taiwan instantly fired back by say- 
ing Communist China was trying to 
squeeze foe Nationalist-ruled island 


by requiring all Hong Kong-Taiwan 
contacts to be reviewed. 

President Lee Teng-hui assailed 
Beijing for trying to force Taiwan to 
accept China’s sovereignty, saying 
unification could spring only from 
democracy, freedom and equitable 
prosperity. 

“Nothing good will come out of 
one side forcing its will on foe other,” 
Mr. Lee said at a reception marking 
Hong Kong’s handover on Tuesday. 

Mr. Koo said he had opened a chan- 
nel for dialogue with Mr. Tung, who 
appointed a member of his inner ad- 
visory council, Paul Yip, to act as his 
intermediary in Taiwan-Hong Kong 
affairs. 

Susie Chiang, of foe Kwang Hwa 
Information and Culture Center, a 
Taiwan agency in Hong Kong, said in 
an interview on BBC World Service 
Television that the meeting was a 
“breakthrough,” paving the way to a 
“new channel that is more practical 
and can resolve things more easily.” 

“It means we can avoid Beijing's 
interference in terms of the relation- 
ship between Hong Kong and 
Taipei," she said. 

“We will build up more official 
contacts in future, more close con- 

See CHINA, Page 6 


Lockheed Will Acquire 
Northrop for $11 Billion 


By Mitchell Martin 

Intem/riwwl Herald Tribune 


NEW YORK — One of the final 
consolidations of foe post-Coid War 
U.S. defense industry was announced 
Thursday when Lockheed Martin Corp. 
said it would acquire Northrop Grum- 
man Corp. for $11.18 billion in stock 
and assumed debt. 

Tbe takeover will amalgamate foe 
operations of Northrop, maker of the B- 
2 Stealth bomber, and Grumman, which 
produced the Lunar Module for the 
Apollo space program and such aircraft 
as the wildcat. Hellcat and Tigercat, 
with Lockheed, the largest U.S. defense 
contractor and maker of the Trident 
missile and F-I6 Falcon. 

Boeing Co., if it consummates its 
planned acquisition of McDonnell 
Douglas Corp., with roughly $48 billion 
of annual sales to Lockheed’s $37 bil- 
lion. would still be a larger company. 

Northrop Grumrnan's loss of inde- 
pendence is the result of declining de- 
fense spending since the fajU of the Berlin 
Wall. The U.S. Defense Department’s 
budget in fiscal 1989 was $294.8 billion, 
but that has fallen to $250.0 billion for 
fiscal 1997. The Pentagon, which is re- 
questing $250.7 billion for fiscal 1998, 
has pushed American, defense contract- 
ors to join together into a few strong 
companies “to encourage efficiency,” 
Norman Augustine, foe chairman of 
Lockheed said. 

In foe consolidation that followed foe 
Cold War, Northrop Grumman was 
considered by industry observers to be 
too small to remain independent. This 
year, it was outbid by Raytheon Corp.. 
foe third of the remaining big contract- 
ors, for two key takeovers: the military 
businesses of Hughes Electronics Corp. 
and Texas Instruments Inc. 

Last year, Northrop Grumman had 
sales of about $8 billion and bad 45,000 
employees. Lockheed Martin, by con- 
trast. had $27 billion in revenue and 
190,000 workers. Although Northrop 
had wanted to stay independent, its re- 
latively small size made it too inviting a 
target for Lockheed to pass up. 

“Northrop did not actively seek this 
-transaction* its chairman, Kent Kresa 
said. Lockheed approached his com- 
pany earlier this year, Mr. Kresa said, 
and its proposal was “certainly an al- 
ternate, positive way for the companies 
to go forward," especially when 
“shareholder value” was considered. 

The deal certainly created value for 
Mr. Kresa ’s shareholders. Lockheed is 
offering 1.1923 of its shares for each 
Northrop Grumman share. Based on 
Lockheed’s closing price of $99,125 a 
share on Thursday, down $4,875 from 
Wednesday, its offer is worth $118.19 
for each of Northrop' s 58.05 million 


shares currently outstanding, plus 8.6 
million to be issued to pay for its up- 
coming takeover of Logicon Inc., a 
smaller defense company. 

Northrop ’s stock jumped $2 1 . 1 25 on 
Thursday, to $1 10, and Logicon’s added 
$13.50, to $68. 

Despite foe windfall to Northrop' s 
shareholders, Lockheed is not overpay- 

The deal would force Europe’s aero- 
space firms to streamline. Page 17. 

ing, according to Roger Threlfall, who 
follows the aerospace industry for JP. 
Morgan Securities Inc. “They are pay- 
ing a full price, and Lockheed’s stock has 
run up quite aggressively over foe last 
couple of weeks.” Mr. Threlfall said be 
classified foe price as “full and fair.” 


Both companies stressed that they 
were in good financial shape. Lockheed 
earned $1.35 billion last year, and 
Northrop’s income was $234 million. 
Yet wifo encouragement from tbe 
Pentagon, the companies said they did 
not think antitrust problems with the 
Justice Department or the Federal Trade 
Commission would materialize. 

Mr. Threlfall said the companies did 
not have “a whole lot of overlap” in tbeir 
product lines, and Mr. Augustine and Mr. 
Kresa said they were planning to add jobs 
rather than pare employment. 

Although Boeing will be their main 
competitor, foe shrinking defense in- 
dustry has made all of the remaining 
players suppliers and partners to each 
other. Northrop, for example, makes 

See LOCKHEED, Page 6 


U.S. Jobless Rolls Swell, 
Soothing Inflation Fears 


Dow Climbs to High 
As Economy Cools 

CcmfMlaibt OarSatfFmn DapJKhes 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. un- 
employment rate unexpectedly rose 
to 5 percent in June from its lowest 
level in a generation, the Labor De- 
partment said Thursday. 

Tbe monthly jobless repon was foe 
most dramatic evidence to date that 
foe threat of rising inflation was re- 
ceding, and it sent the stock market 
into record territoiy. Economists had 
expected the unemployment rate to 
remain at the May level of 4.8 per- 
cent, which was a 23-year low. 

The report, which said the economy 
added 217,000 jobs, fewer than econ- 
omists had predicted, relieved worries 
that a booming labor market would 
lead the Federal Reserve Board toraise 
interest rates to want off inflation. 

The prospect of stable interest rates 
sent the yield on tbe 30-year Treasury 
bond to 6.62 percent — its lowest 
level in four months — from 6.71 
percent Wednesday. The Dow Jones 
industrial average rose 100.43 points, 
to a record 7,895.81. 

The markets closed early for foe 
Fourth of July holiday. 

Bond yields had dropped Wednes- 
day after Fed policymakers voted to 
leave the target for overnight lending 
among banks unchanged at 5-5 per- 


1 The Dollar \ 

New York 

Thursday 0 4 P.M. 

previous doso 

DM 

1.752 

1.7537 

Pound 

1.69 

1.6755 

Yan 

113.65 

114.45 

FF 

5.9065 

5.908 

L#, 

The Dow 


k a 

Thursday dose 

previous does 

+100.43 

7095-81 

7795.38 

| S&P 500 

change 

Thureday 0 4 P.M. 

previous dose 

+12.89 

916.82 

904.03 


cent The Fed raised rates in March, 
by a quarter of a percentage point 

The Fed decided to leave rates un- 
changed Wednesday in foe face of 
earlier evidence, confirmed by the re- 
port Thursday, that economic growth 
had slackened to an annual rate of 
about 2 percent from a decade-high 
5.9 percent rate in foe first quarter. 

Despite the rise in foe jobless raie, 
analysts said foe U.S. job market re- 
mained robust 

"Economic data are never 
smooth,” said Cliff Waldman of foe 
National Federation of Independent 
Business. “The fact that foe unem- 
ployment rate went up is nothing to be 
concerned about Basically, I still 
think we have a tight, strong labor 
market” 

See JOBS, Page 18 


Anxiety as Independence Day Visitor Nears Mars 


0*119*11# Our SmffFnmDuparha 

PASADENA, California — On its' 221st birth- 
day, foe United States is trying to put a motor 
vehicle on Mars. 

On Friday, Independence Day, America’s un- 
manned Mars Pathfinder spacecraft will drop onto 
the red planet and bounce and roll to a stop in a 
cocoon of airbags. If all goes according to plan, it 
will then release a rover that will explore foe 
planet’s surface. 

At a briefing, scientists could barely contain 
their excitement at what they might Jeam abont 
Mars, Earth’s closest planetary neighbor. 

After foe Pathfinder — force unfolding steel and 
graphite units — sets foot on the planet's surface, a 
done-buggy type vehicle called the “Mars Rover” 
will roll down a ramp to begin a one-week survey, 
charting the composition and size of Martian rocks, 
dust and debris. 

Peter Smith of foe University of Arizona, who 
beads the Pathfinder’s imaging team, said that the 
sophisticated two-lens camera on foe Rove: would 
zoom in on foe Martian landscape. If it looked to 
foe horizon, be said, it might see a blue sunset 


Scientists Whit for Images 
Of Surf ace of Red Planet 

“Think about an Earth sunset,” he said. “The 
gas layer scatters the blue light and what we see is 
red. Well, dust on Mars is red. so it's probable red 
light will scatter and you will see a bluish disk.” 

Tbe landing and the subsequent exploration of a 
tiny portion of foe planet’s surface by foe Rover 

A new glitch complicates the space ordeal of 
tbe Russian -American team on Mir. Page 6. 

will eventually lead to a human expedition to Mars, 
according to the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration. 

At NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pas- 
adena, scientists were optimistic about their latest 
venture to Mars. Tbe last was 21 years ago with the 
Viking orbiter and lander. 

The Pathfinder, launched on Dec. 4, 1996. will 


have completed a journey of 309 million miles 
(497 million kilometers) when it lands Friday. 

The first images are expected to be beamed back 
to Earth Friday afterooon- 
One of the questions the scientists in Pasadena 
and their colleagues around foe world hope to 
answer is whether there could have been life on foe 
planet, which is about half foe size of Earth. 

But at the briefing Wednesday they warned 
against such expectations. 

Rudolf Rieder, a geologist from Germany’s 
Max Planck Institute m Mainz, cautioned, “We 
will not be able to determine traces of life.” 

Bnt foe equipment on the Rover will be able to 
analyze rock and soil samples and answer ques- 
tions such as whether meteorites actually came 
from Mars, and what processes transformed rock 
into soil, he said. 

Meanwhile, the scientists in charge of the 
Pathfinder Mission admitted that Friday would be 
a nail-biting, anxiety-ridden day as they waited to 
leam whether three- and-a-half years of hard work, 
experimentation and fiy-by-the-seat-of-your-pants 
innovation would work. (AP, Reuters ) 



Fittl Pi we ifftaflCTx 

A mockup of the airbags enveloping tbe 
Pathfinder to cushion its landing on Mars. 


jisaved is 2 yuan ^ 


rpc-il’ 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Tunes Service 


SgcT toss Numbers. 


See NATO, Page 14 


Newsstand Prices 



I A«*wa..-. 10.00 FF Lebanon 113,000 

1Z50FF Morocco.™- 16 Dh 

■Caneroon-l-KJO CFA Qatar 10.00 Rials 

Egypt- £E&50 R&jnton .12.50 FF 

France 10 l 00 FF Said Arabia-. 10. 00 R. 

Gabon 1100 CFA Senegal. 1.100 CFA 

Italy- _2£D0Ure Spflh;...™_.225PTAS 

Wy Coast .1250 CFA Thneia 1250 Din 

Jordan -1250JD 10.00 Dfrh 

*uwa* _700 Fib U.S. MU. (Eut]™5120 




Italy' s Pirate Economy 

U.S. Presses for Crackdown on Quality Fakes 

omy is now competing against itself on 
world markets. 

That is because most Italian luxury- 
goods companies farm out production to 
small, specialist workshops, and foe 
temptation for some of these outfits to 
cheat on their corporate partners can be 
overwhelming. 

“I make a thousand bags and put 
them on foe books," said Nicola Cer- 
rato, foe chief anti-piracy prosecutor in 
Milan, mocking foenr attitude, "and an- 
other thousand, no.” 

Actually, Italy’s leather-making ar- 
tisans are only joining a national pas- 
time — skirting bothersome laws to 
make a fast, tax-free buck. An enormous 
market for pirated goods of all kinds has 
sprung up in Italy, rivaling those in East 
Asian countries. Tire underground 
bazaar offers everything from fake 
Gucci bags and belts to illegal copies of 
American software, music recordings 
and books. Experts estimate the size of 


ROME — In February, foe Italian 
police raided leather workshops in Mi- 
lan, Florence and parts of Tuscany, con- 
fiscating thousands of bags wifo brand 
names like Chanel, Prada and Dior 
marked for export m Spain. Switzerland 
and countries as far afield as Japan. 

The bags were not cheap rip-offs. 
Many were indis tinguish able from foe 
genuine article, and for good reason. 
The same craftsmen who stitched to- 
gether foe originals for foe luxury mar- 
ket were in many cases chanting out 
bootleg copies on foe side. 

Far decades. Italian luxury-goods 
makers have had to fight a flood of 
counterfeits made in Asian factories — 
a nuisance, but not a real threat because 
tbe shoddy quality of foe bogus articles 
gave them away to discerning eyes. Bui 
industrial piracy is taking root at home, 
wifo foe unnerving result that one of foe 
most skilled sectors of the Italian econ- 


See FAKES, Page 6 



AGENDA 


More Insight on ( Mad Cow’ Disease 


A study conducted at the Yale Med- 
ical School in the United States has 
lent new support to foe theory that foe 
mysterious agent that causes "mad 
cow” disease is also capable of caus- 
ing a deadly brain disease in people. 

Mad cow disease is thought to have 
originated in England as scrapie, a 
disease of sheep that appears to have 

RAGE TWO 

The Argentine Teenagers' Epidemic 

THE AMERICAS PngeS. 

Power Lines Don't Cause Cancer 

EUROPE PagaS. 

A Gun Battle Erupts in Tirana 


FAREWELL MATCH 
Becker resting Thursday during lus 
loss to Pete Sampras. Later he said 
it was his last Wimbledon. Page 22. 


Books 

Crossword 

Opinion 

Sports 


Page 12. 

Pagell 

«... Pages 8-9. 

Pages 22-23. 


The Intermarket 


Pages 14-15. 


The IHT on-line http :/Aw.v. iht.com 


spread to cattle and, more recently, to 
17 people, causing a new variant of 
the fatal human disorder Creutzfeldt- 
Jakob disease. Page 6. 

In Brussels, meanwhile, foe Euro- 
pean Commission said 3,600 tons of 
British beef had been exported il- 
legally to tbe Netherlands, Russia and 
Egypt despite a ban. Page 5. 

France’s Deficit: 
‘Significantly Higher’ 

The French finance minister said 
Thursday that the country's public def- 
icit could go “significantly higher” 
than foe 3.0 percent forecast this year. 
The minister added that if a July 21 
audit showed that the deficit was high- 
er than 3.4 percent of gross domestic 
product — exceeding foe 3 percent 
target to join foe European single cur- 
rency — the government would move 
to tax affluent households and compa- 
nies after this year. Page 17. 




, i *- *** 









-iu 


p ; 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY JULY 4, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Argentina’s ‘ Model Culture 7 


Epidemic of Teens Desperate to Be Thin 


By Anthony Faiola 

Washington Post Service 


B 


UENOS AIRES — It is lunchtime at the 


overflowing Hospital for Anorexia and 
Bulimia here, and hundreds of thin teenage 


girls cluster around rows of makeshift 
dining tables set up in the halls of this compound, 
where scales are forbidden and sizes are tom from 
all clothing. Drawn faces look up nervously from 
plates of meat and rice. Patients here must eat five 
times a day, which is not always easy for the new 
ones, more than 70 of whom arrive each week. , 
The patients are part of an extraordinary problem 
in Argentina, where a pathology of thinness is 
sickening young girls at an alarming rate. 

In a land renowned for the steak-loving gaucho, 
the rate of anorexia and bulimia — also known here 
as fashion-model syndrome — is three times higher 
than in the United States and possibly the highest in 
the world, mental health specialists say. 

Almost one in every 10 Argentine teenage girls 
has clinical anorexia or bulimia, according to a 
recent study. Local media are calling it a problem of 
“epidemic proportions." 

Reports of girls passim 




sports of girls passing out in school from self- 
starvation are increasing, and the government is 
considering state-sponsored prevention programs. 

Local health experts blame the problem on a 
remarkable obsession with thinn ess and model cul- 
ture that far exceeds even the weight-conscious 
societies in the United States and Europe. And, they 
say, there is a uniquely Argentine struggle with self- 
image and personal identity; in Bnenos Aires, it is 
said, more people undergo psychoanalysis per cap- 
ita than anywhere on Earth. 

“Our culture is a disaster when it comes to self- 
image," said Pablo Chapur, a psychologist with the 
Association Against Bulimia and Anorexia here. 
“In the States, there is a dose of individuality. But 
here, the pressure to be thin like a model has become 
overwhelming.” 

“Look around the streets of Buenos Aires," he 
said. “7116 women are all sticks." 

Since the days before Eva Peroo, the much 


revered onetime first lady, the Argentine woman has 

E rized thinness. In the fashionable shops of Barrio 
forte, an upscale district of Buenos Aires, women's 


clothes tend to be cut one or two sizes smaller than 
their European or American counterparts, increas- 
ing the burden on the local woman to maintain a 
slender figure. Near the open-air park of the tony 
Recoleta neighborhood, strikingly thin, long-legged 
models — and model look-alikes — sport black 
sunglasses and tight-fitting leggings while dragging 
on long-stemmed cigarettes in local caffis. 

But lately, the thinness culture here has intens- 
ified. The mass media and advertising booms since 
economic reforms in 1991 have increased the vis- 
ibility of waif-thin models, who have become idols 
for millions. In addition, a number of Argentine 
models — including Valeria Mazza and Raquel 
Man cirri — have broken into the international big 
leagues, catwalking for Armani and Chanel and 
appearing on the cover of Vogue. 

This has taken the fascination girls here have with 
the world of glamour and modeling to a new leveL 

“You don ' t find many Argentine girls aspiring to 
be lawyers or doctors these days," said Javier 
Luquez, a fashion and entertainment industry agent. 



Another El Nino Forms 
Stirring Fears of Havoc 


A 






■t- - 


'V. 


■4“ 


Weather Pattern Could Be Biggest in Years 


,‘r ■|*Y 


l iviana Mancuso, 18, a patient at the Hospital for Anorexia, and Bulimia in Buenos 
Aires. One in 10 Argentine teenage girls suffers from the maladies, a study found. 


“They all want to be models, to be part of this 
glamorous life they see in magazines." 

Demand for cosmetic surgery is skyrocketing. 

Indeed, Argentina's leading supermodeL, Miss 
Mane ini. lapsed into a coma of several days in 
December after undergoing liposuction on her 
already tiny frame. Last year, Argentine consumers 
spent $20 million on weight-loss products, accord- 
ing to La Nacion newspaper. In the commercial and 
middle- and upper-class sectors of Buenos Aires, 
gymnasiums ana health clubs are proliferating. 


S OME say the Argentine woman does it for 
the Argentine man. Others say it is a com- 
petition between women to see who can be 
the most thin or beautiful — in Buenos 
Aires, the words for thin and beautiful are used 
interchangeably. 

“A thin woman is just more elegant than a fat 
woman," said Gracieia Naum, a local fashion de- 
signer. “A woman who looks thin, who looks good, 
is more pleasing company, whether for a man or a 
woman.” 

The pressure for Maria Belen, 18, became too 
much after a former boyfriend called her “fatso" in 
front of her friends. She recently sat in a small room 
at the hospital here, fidgeting in a large chair as she 
talked about wrapping nylon stockings and plastic 
bags around her body to increase perspiration. Over 
the course of a month, she said, she virtually stopped 
eating. Her cheeks became sunken; bones protruded 
from her ribs and hips. In two months, black patches 
began forming under her eyes frc»n malnutrition. She 
stopped menstruating and cried at the sight of food. 

' ‘ After three months, people began asking if I had 


; I was so glad then,* ’ she said. ‘ ‘I thought, that 
I’m as thin as a model now. Now I’m 


AIDS; 
means 
beautiful." 

Maria Sol, 17, a balimic from a middle-class 
Argentine family, was brought to the hospital two 
years ago after losing almost 13 kilograms (30 
pounds) in three months. 

"I didn't fir in the mirror," said 'Miss Sol, an 
honor student who had won a scholarship to a top 
university here before her parents checked her into 
the hospital. “I just needed to be thinner, always. I 
needed to look like a model. I had to look tike 


one. 


Certainly, there are often pathologies particular 
to each child that can bring on the most severe cases 
of anorexia and bulimia, said Elisabeth Goode de 
Gamut, 88. considered one of the mothers of Ar- 
gentine child psychoanalysis. However, she said, 
tire “model culture" worshiped in Argentina plays 
a significant role. 

"Whenever you idolize something, you magnify 
it,” said Ms. Goode de Garma. “We don’t want to 
culturally identify with the rest of Latin America, so 
we fixate on some elements of European and U.S. 
societies — like thinness and fashion — and take 
them very, very seriously.” 

Those - ” sentiments seemingly have deep roots 
here, and the cases of men coining down with eating 
disorders also are rising markedly. Martin. 1 8. who 
gave only his first name, said he was committed to 
the hospital three months ago when his situation 
grew so serious that he feared swallowing because 
he believed "my saliva had too many calories." 

"You’ve got to be thin here," he said. “You’ve 
just got to be thin." 


Reuters 

MELBOURNE — International sci- 
entists have warned that an El Nin° 
weather pan era is occurring with the 
potential to cause billions of dollars of 
damage in key agricultural regions 
worldwide', particularly in Asia. 

An El Nino — a wanning of surface 
waters in the eastern Pacific near die 
equator — changes wind and other 
global patterns, wreaking widespread 

havoc in weather-sensitive areas. 

It brings droughts to Australia, fam- 
ines to Africa and floods to California. 
An El Nino usually occurs every two to 
seven years and normally lasts one or 
two years, in which time it can kill 
hundreds of people and destroy many 
billions of dollars in crops, fisheries and 
property. 

Its Spanish name is an allusion to the 
Christ child because the warming cur- 
rent often flows near South and Central 
American around Christmas. But there 
is strong evidence that the next El Nino 
has arrived early, which means it could 
last longer than previous ones, the sci- 
entists said. 

Meteorological and oceanographic 
readings from the tropical Pacific Ocean 
point to the formation of an El Nino that 
might rival the one in 1982 and 1983, 
the largest this century, which caused 
extensive damage in more than 15 coun- 
tries. 

“In places like Australia and South 
America, the effects could be devast- 
ating,” said Keven Trenberth, head of 
the climate analysis team at the National 
Center for Atmospheric Research of the 
U.S. Weather Service. 

Meteorologists meeting in Mel- 
bourne this week to discuss the climate 
said producers of agricultural commod- 


ities such as coffee, wheat, srig % and ; 
other staples faced the greatest rij&fttHa ■ ■ 
an El Nino, which typcallyv^mas 
droughts in the southern ben^jhec^ 
and floods and hurricanes in tfenorfr! 

Industries that depend bn I . 
power also are at risk,, as are.mias^ 
shipping lanes that require navigaijfe * . 
water levels to ferry supplies to ^nio^ 
min e sites. - >' 

In places tike Papua New Guinea and 
in East Kalimantan, Indonesia, .vssseS' 
have been marooned for weefepnih^ 
riverbeds. , . • -I' '• ji- 

Bill Kininmonth, head of thectimate ■ 
center of the Australian Bnreah fif Me^. 
teorology, said the central and eastern, 
parts of the equatorial Pacific Ocean 
"became warmer and the trade ,w|k£m- 
across most of the tropical Pacific- are; 
much weaker than normaL’ 1 .. . £ . 

Australian farmers and ranchers arr 
being warned to brace for drougin cca^ 
ditions, which threaten everything frearf 
wheat and canola to the raising of . 
stock. ’ ’ ’ 

In 1 983 , thousands ofhead oflrvestodC ■ 
in Australia were destroyed because that . . 
was no grain feed for them to eat. 

According to the Washington-based^ 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad* - J - 
ministration, the 1982-83 El Nino 
caused at least S8 billion worth of ecioe . 
nomic damage. . f. 

Oil World, an independent agricul- 
tural newsletter, has said there is a 50, 
percent chance that the United Staze^ 
Europe, and Africa would be negatively 
affected by El Nino, with floods and 
hurricanes in the United States arid 
Europe and droughts in Africa. The. 
newsletter said there was a 60 to 8} 
percent chance of an El Nino causing 
droughts in Oceanic areas and in Asia,/' - 


St 

D 

Bui 


Congo Puts Conditions on Probe^. 
And UN Indicates It May Agree % 


& Bu: 

Jourv! 

reiKtiO: 

!/— T-* 


One oli’ 


v ? : 

B-i 


Claret 


Reuters 

KINSHASA, Congo — The govern- 
ment of the new president, Laurent Kab- 
ila, insisted Thursday that the United 
Nations must agree to basic conditions 
for its investigation into allegations that 
his allies in the civil war massacred 
thousands of Hum refugees. 

The UN, which has accused Mr. Kab- 
ila’s government of delaying the in- 
quiry, showed signs of flexibility. 

In Geneva, the UN secretary-general, 
Kofi Annan, said the goal of the in- 
vestigation was to get at the facts. He said 


he was prepared to be flexible and prag-- 
if that was 1 


Flight of a Lifetime? New Yorker Sues Air France 


By John Sullivan 

AW York Times Service 


NEW YORK — Raviv Laor says he 
was minding his own business in a toilet 
on an Air France 747 over the Atlantic 
Ocean in May when he got the surprise 
of his life. 

"All of a sudden the lights just went 
totally out and the crew broke the door 
down," Mr. Laor, a 28-year-old Man- 
hattan resident, said. He said a steward 
charged into the tiny bathroom, scream- 
ing in French, and dragged him oul 
"My first reaction was ‘My God, 


something must have happened to the 
plane.’ " he said. 

“Literally, I had the toilet paper in 
my hand, and the guy grabbed my arm,' ’ 
he said "I was naked from the w aist 
down. People could definitely see me. 
The depth of my embarassment I cannot 
begin to describe." 

Mr. Laor recently filed a S3 million 
lawsuit against Air France. He attrib- 
uted the latrine attack to a faulty air- 
plane smoke detector that erroneously 
reported that be was smoking. 

A spokesman for Air France said the 
airline bad not yet reviewed Mr. Laor’s 


legal claim and could nor comment until 
it had done so. 

Returning from a stopover in Paris to 
Newark International Airporr on May 
19, Mr. Laor sat in the coach section of 
the aircraft He said he had had no 
trouble with the flight crew before his 
fateful trip to the lavatory. He also said 
be neither drinks nor smokes. 

After the steward dragged him out. he 
said, it quickly became apparent that he 
had not been smoking. But. he said, that 
did not calm the outraged crew. 

"The purser came down and he 
verbally abused me." said Mr. Laor, 


who lived in France for eight years and 
speaks French fluently. 

He returned to his seat, but asked for 
the names of the crew members. After 
about an hour, five crewmen dragged 
him into the galley, he said, and the 
captain arrived and threatened to have 
him arrested for arguing with the crew. 

Mr. Laor said he was allowed to leave 
after Landing. He said he had repeatedly 
trial to contact Air France but had never 
received a reply. 

An apology from Air France would 
have made a difference, he said, but now 
“I'll just let the lawyers handle it." 


matic if that was what was needed. “The 
most important thing is for us to get to the 
facts." he said. "The alleged mass 
killings ought to be investigated.” 

The inquiry follows allegations that 
Mr. Kabila's Tutsi-backed rebels or 
their Rwandan and Ugandan allies 
killed Rwandan Hutu refugees as their 
forces marched across Congo, formerly 
Zaire, between October and May. 

Mr. Kabila’s government wants the 
inquiry to cover alleged atrocities dating 
as far back as 1994. It is also demanding 
that the Chilean lawyer. Roberto Gar- 
reton, UN special investigator for the 
area since 1994, not take part in the 
mission. In April, he accused the rebels 
of massacring Rwandan refugees during 
their push across the region in 1996. 

Mr. Annan said the UN would like 
Mr. Garretoo to stay in charge, but in- 
dicated that it would be willing to re- 
place him. 


■ Shooting in Congo Republic 

Gun fire and mortar explosions 
wracked the capital of the Congo Re : 
public all night into Thursday, even as 
mediators scrambled to put a peace plan, 
into effect. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Brazzaville. 

The mayor of Brazzaville, Bernard 
Kolelas, was scheduled to meet Thurs- 
day with one of the combatants, die 
former dictator Denis Sasson-Nguesso, 
in hopes of persuading him to endorse 
the peace plan, which calls for a cease- 
fire to begin Saturday. 


- »'r 


y *Jr«r d ■ 

: i 


Algeria May Suspend 
State of Emergency : 


The Associated Press 

ALGIERS — In a sign that Algeria’s 
Muslim insurgency is easing, the courn 1 
try’s five-year-old state of emergencyj 
will end this Saturday, -a newspaj 
reported Thursday. 

Hie independent French language 
daily L'Autnentique, considered close 
to the government, said President Liant- 
ine Zeroual would lift the emergency' 
decree during a speech on Algerian Irjr 
dependence Day. 

The announcement comes in th?- 
wake of promises by the new govern- 
ment to end violence that hasr kflloj 
more than 60,000 people. 


i«ftl 

> 

L'._; .!:: 




.. ..i. 


W 

As 


4‘ 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


British Airways Seeks Mediation 


LONDON (AP) — British Airways, hoping to avert a strike 
by flight attendants next week, said Thursday that it had 


sought help from outside officials to act as intermediaries 
between the two sides. 


The airline said it had come up with a plan it believes 
addresses the concerns of the 8.500 members of the British 
Airline Stewards and Stewardesses Association who are 
threatening to walk off their jobs for three days in a pay 
dispute, starting Wednesday. 


E*. 1911 -PA*IS 


Just tell the taxi driver, “Sank too doe noo“ - Paris 

WE WISH U. A HAPPY 4TH TO U. 

5, me Daunou, Paris (Opera -Venddme) 

MS Europa, Berlin, Hannover, Montreux 


This way to 



Don’t miss it. A lot happens there. 


Unscheduled Trip for United Pilot 


HARRISBURG, Pennsylvania (AP) — A United Airlines 
jetliner carrying 101 people was forced to return to Chicago 
because the plane arrived in Harrisburg shortly after the 
airport had shut down for the night On Sunday, Harrisburg 
International began closing its lone runway from 1 i:30 P.M. 
to 6:30 A.M. for construction. 

Airlines were alerted to the closing, but the pilot of United 
Airlines Plight 728 believed he could land before the runway 
closed. Instead, the plane arrived too late and was sent back to 
Chicago, where the passengers were placed in hotels, and 
flown to Harrisburg on Tuesday. 


Air Macau will start twice-weekly service to Manila from 
July 21. four days after the governor of the Portuguese-run 
enclave is to sign an air accord with the Phibppines.fflt’urerj) 


Air France has reduced the number of short- and me- 
dium-haul flights in its summer schedule by about S percent 
after it was forced to cancel many flights because of pilot 
shortages earlier this year. f Bloomberg) 


Olympic Airways will increase the price of domestic 
flights by 7 percent, the airline said Thursday. Bui it also 
announced a series of discounts in several categories, ranging 
from 20 percent to 47 percent. (AP) 


Europe 



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30/57 

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14/07 * 

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Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 



North America 

A strong storm m Quebec 
will produce showers and 
thunderstorms with heavy 
downpours from New Eng- 
land Saturday to south- 
eastern Canada Sunday 
and Monday Thunder- 
storms with heavy down- 
pours are also Hkaty across 
the Southeast Sunny and 
pleasant across the Pacific 
Northwest. 


Europe 

Sunshine will return to 
most of England and 
Prance over the weekend 
with comfortably warm 
ahernoons. Warm from 
Ukraine to was tern Russia 
Friday, but cooler weather 
with showers will spread 
across eastern Europe this 
weekend. Drenching reins 
are Nkety In northern Scan- 
tfcnawa. 


Asia 

Soaking rains will persist 
across south-central 
China, but northern and 
western China win remain 


hot and dry with blazing 
sunshine Tokyo will be 


warm and humid with a 
thunderstorm or two, while 
heavier downpours will 
soak southern Japan. 
Warm and humid with 
showers in Hong Kong. 



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New York 
Orlando 

Phoenix 
San Fran 

Seattle 

TarorSa 

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, AUSTRIA 

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O' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


Tim, .» 

7 

cvoc 

tin Years 

■ncanes in the'nfr 

W'ff 1 

trisk, as 
M require 

ry supplies to remo!^ 

pua New Guineas 

^for°we^o a ^ 

iSSKLSS* 

arRs» 

■***«*««& 

: Pacif,™' 

normal" 

jcefordroughuon! . 

,o the raising Of live | 

ds of head of livesior k I 
stored because there ' 
or them to eat. 
e Washington-base^ 
ind Atmospheric Ad * 

. 1982-83 P E] £ 
biihon worth of eco- 

independem agricul- 
as said there is a 50 
U the United States. 

- would be negatively 
no. with floods and 
United States and 
jhts in .Africa. The 
ere was a 60 to RO 
an Ei Nino causing 
ic areas and in Asia. ] 

n Probe 
V Agree '! 

mgo Republic 

mortar explosions 
il of the Congo Re- 
o Thursday, even as 
;d to put a peace plan 
Associated Press re- 
iville. 

Brazzaville. Bernard 
iuled to meet Thurs- 
the combatants. the 
nis Sassou-N'guesso. 
ding him to endorse 
ich calls for a cease- 
lay. 

ay Suspend 
nergency : 


■Idled P'iiS I T : 

a sign that Algeria s || •’* - 

; is easing, the coun-- .' '■ 

state of emergency >.? 

jrdav. a newspaper .. 


Study Says Power Lines 
Do Not Cause Cancer 

But Some Experts Cite i Uncertainties’ 


maladies. But -16511115 have been no- 
toriously ' 'conflicting and at times con- 


— By Curt Suplee "" fusing,” said Robert Hoover, director of 

r Washington Post Sen-ire the cancer institute’s epidemiology and 

— V - biostatisiics program. 

; - WASHINGTON — Children - who With puzzlement abounding, the Na- 
: typufeear high-voltage power lines do tional Academy of Sciences assembled 
n&l&ve a greater risk of developing a panel to evaluate existing research. Its 
. ..Jjjgaf than other young people, a long- report, released in October, concluded 
^^waited study has concluded. that "the current body of evidence does 

-••.The eight-year, $5 million project, not show that exposure to these fields 
coortUnated by the National Cancer In- presents a human-health hazard." 

Sritnte and involving 1,250 subjects in But the panel noted that so many 
ifine.5ta.te5, is the largest U.S. attempt so studies had indicated a statistical as- 
far- to investigate one of the most erao- sociation between estimated residential 
tibnaQy incendiary public-health issues electrical and magnetic fields and child- 
. hi 'Americanilife; whether exposure to hood leukemia that the relationship 
dectrical aiw- magnetic fields from could not be ruled out. 
power lines ana other everyday sources That kind of uncertainty was the mo- 
tan cause or promote childhood Ieuk- tivation for the National Cancer Insri- 
einia. . tute study. Like nearly all previous ef- 

The research "tips the scale” in that forts, it employed the "case control” 
dfebate toward the conclusion that method — a system that has been used 
power-line electrical and magnetic successfully in linking cigarettes with 
fields "are. not a major, and probably lung cancer and toxic shock syndrome 
not even a minor component to the with tampons. 

cause of cancer,” said Lawrence Fisch- In such studies, researchers identify a 

er pf Michigan State, who heads the large number of people who have the 
cianber institute’s outside advisory com- disease of interest — in this cose, child- 
jmittee on the study. hood leukemia. They are the "cases.” 

Bat the new report, published in Investigators then locate an equally 
Thursday's issue of The New England large number of persons of the same 
journal of Medicine, met with mixed age, sex. race ana general living con- 
j reactions among health experts on the ditions who do not have the disease. 
yt problem. They are the “controls.” 

-Jepy Williams, director of the ra- Researchers then try to see if some 
dfotBoIogy lab at The Johns Hopkins factor — in this case, estimated ex- 
Oncology Center, called it “the best, posure to electrical and magnetic fields 
strongest study so far” and one that may — is more prevalent in the diseased case 
hasten the day when an incontestable population than it is among the con- 
iccmnulation of negative results means trols. 

tSat^at some point, we're going to have In the new study, researchers iden- 
tu sky there’s no risk.” tified 638 children aged 15 or younger 

v But David Savitz, an epidemiologist with the most common childhood can- 
at toe University of North Carolina at cen acute lymphoblastic leukemia. 
Chapel Hill said the finding, though which strikes about 1,600 children a 
“an important addition," nonetheless year in the United Slates, usually be- 
sbiied "the uncertainties' ’ of many pri- tween the ages of 2 and 5. 

-pr-^tijempts to estimate d person’s past The team then found 620 controls. 

- ^xpOsnre to varying electrical and mag- For each subject, technicians measured 
netic fields by calculations made years the magnetic fields in one or more 
x - after a diagnosis of cancer. homes in which the child had spent most 

.jTwishlcould say they’d succeeded of his or her life. Measurements were 
completely/ 1 Mr. Savitz said. "This taken for hours in each child's sleeping 
maybe as close as we come for a while area, and for shorter intervals at other 
to a major new effort” locations around the residence, includ- 

c ; Such efforts have proliferated since a ing the room in which the mother slept 
1979 . study in Denver first suggested while pregnant 
that children living close to high-energy In addition, technicians evaluated the 

power tines were two to three times subject homes 'proximity to power lines 
more likely than other children to de- of different wiring configurations, and 
yelop cancer. rated each dwelling on the "wire code" 

‘ Two decades later, there is some ev- . scales used in prior studies. 

Hence . suggesting that workplace or After analyzing the data, the re- 
household exposure to high electrical searchers found that wire codes were 
ahd magnetic fields may heighten the not correlated with incidence of acute 
risk of brain cancer, leukemia and other lymphoblastic leukemia. "Unequivoc- 
ally, there’s nothing there,” said Martha 
Lineti a-cancer institute researcher. 


w. *• ■ 

White House Opens Fire 
As Senate Hearings Near 


it French language 
je, considered close 
said President Lianv 
| lift the emergency 
jech on Algerian In- 
tent comes in toe 
by the new govern- 
wee rhat has killed 
people. 


■ v._:By Glenn F. Bunting 

.. j- ir . Los Angeles Tones Seme e 


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it Washington — . The white 
f Hcise and the Democratic Party have 
dpeued a concerted effort to discredit 
Senate hearings into campaign fiind- 
rausmg.abuses, while Republicans lead- 
ing^ separate House investigation are 
grating to quell disarray within their 
erwnranks. 

White House officials said Wednes- 
day, that the congressional hearings set 
to begin Tuesday would produce highly 
partisan Republican attacks rather than 
explore serious campaign finance im- 
‘eties in “even-handed" ways, 
ubticans.disinissed the criticism, 
ring that their inquiries were pro- 
ceeding on coarse and that the Senate 
- Behrings would provide substantive rev- 
elations. 

. Paul Clark, communications director 
ftirthe Senate Committee on Govern- 
mental. Affairs, said he thought the 
Democrats were worried. “I think they 
are concerned the. hearings will be a 
catastrophe for tbem-and they are doing 


sian-based conglomerate and then the 
Commerce Department before becom- 
ing a Democratic fimd-raiser. 

On Wednesday, administration of- 
ficials arranged a "series of private brief- 
ings with major news organizations to 
criticize Senator Fred Thompson, Re- 

g ublican of Tennessee, who heads the 
enate Committee on Governmental 
Affairs. They accused him of abandon- 
ing his commitment to lead an impartial 
investigation by concentrating on 
Democratic fund-raising excesses and 
ignoring Republican problems. 

The officials said that congressional 
committees had issued 442 subpoenas 
seeking information from Democratic 
targets since June 18, compared with 
only 34 for Republican subjects. Sim- 
ilarly, the White House and Democratic 
National Committee have provided more 
than 525,000 pages of documents to con- 
gressional committees, compared with 
1 1,000 by the Republican National Com- 
mittee, according to the White House. 




v .. 






Trail I "id'- 01/Th <• V»ooairJ Hlw* 


An overturned car lying amid debris from a storm that swept through Hamtramck, in eastern Michigan. 

Storms Strike Midwest, Killing 7 in Michigan 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Seven people have 
been killed os a string of storms struck 
(he Midwest, uprooting trees and turn- 
ing freeways into ponds. 

Among "the dead after the. storms 
Wednesday were three children and 
rwo adults who had sought shelter in a 
gazebo that was blown into Lake 5 l 
C lair. 

The gazebo was lifted from the wa- 
ter's edge of Pier Park in the affluent 
Detroit suburb of Grosse Pointe Farms. 
The Detroit News reported Thursday 
that at least four of the five victims 
were related, including an infant girl 
and boys aged 2 and 8. The Fifth victim 
was not identified, the report said. 


Eight people were rescued from the 
swirling water. 

The storms tore through Michigan. 
Indiana and Ohio on Wednesday, lift- 
ing houses off foundations and Hood- 
ing roads. Detroit’s mayor, Dennis 
Archer, declared a state of emergency, 
and about 19S.000 people were with- 
out power early Thursday in 
Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. 

More than 10 mobile homes were 
destroyed and 50 damaged, and a 37- 
year-old woman was killed when high 
wind and heavy rain pelted a trailer 
park near Holly, about midway be- 
tween Detroit and Flint, the sheriffs 
department said. 

A 38-year-old woman from Mount 


Morris Township, near Flint, was 
killed by a falling tree. 

The National Weather Service re- 
ceived unconfirmed reports of at least 
12 tornadoes touching down through- 
out Michigan, a forecaster said 

On the east side of Detroit, wit- 
nesses said what appeared to be a 
tornado lifted a house off its foun- 
dation and tossed it several feel Water 
levels rose as high as car windshields 
along one section of Interstate 75. 

The storms hit northwestern Ohio in 
the late afternoon and moved across 
the stale, destroying 15 mobile homes 
in southern Ohio, a meteorologist said 
In Indiana, tornadoes touched down in 
several east-central counties. 



Twisted beams lying beneath the highway bridge over the Big Sandy River near Kenova, West Virginia. 


Away From 
Politics , 

• Steel beams toppled from a high- 

way bridge under repair near Kenova, 
West Virginia, killing two construc- 
tion workers and injuring three others. 
Crews were removing a 100- ion beam 
with two cranes when another beam 
became loose and fell. Two workers 
were knocked off the bridge and fell 
1 00 feet to their death, Jim Perry of the 
U.S. Coast Guard said. (AP) 

• Beaches on Long Island Sound in 
Westchester County, New York, were 
reopened after county health officials 
determined that the water was no 


POLITICAL NOTES 


longer contaminated by the remnants 
of a sewage spill in the Bronx borough 
of New York City. Bat beaches in the 
Connecticut towns of Greenwich and 
Stamford remained closed for a fourth 
day Wednesday. • fAO’Tj 

• On the eve of the Fourth of July 

holiday, the Consumer Product Safety 
Commission said emergency rooms 
treated 7,600 fireworks injuries last 
year, a third of them suffered by chil- 
dren under age 15. That was an im- 
provement over 1995, when 11.000 
injuries were recorded . (AP) 

• The air force plans to try again 
next week to recover the wreckage of 
an A- 10 Thunderbolt jet that crashed 
into a Colorado mountain after veering 


800 miles off course. Some wreckage 
and human remains had been re- 
covered from die site near Vail, where 
the pilot. Captain Craig Button. 32, 
was killed April 2. The air force said it 
wanted to “recover weapons, flares, 
ejection seat pyrotechnics, the pilot's 
remains and other materials useful to 
the Accident Investigation Board 
studying the cause of the crash. ’’(APJ 

• The chief justice of the Alaska Su- 
preme Court stepped down as head 
of the court after being admonished by 
the Alaska Commission on Judicial 
Conduct for the sexual harassment of 
two female court employees. But Al- 
len Compton, 59, will remain on the 
court, where he has served since 
1980. (AP) 


Inheritance 
And Red Tape 
Keep the CIA 
Directorless 


By Tim Weiner 

Aten 1 York Times Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — A long-locked 
safe-deposit box and a stringent law 
have been keeping the CIA leaderless. 

Since April the FBI has been sifting 
through the safe-deposit box, wonder- 
ing what, if anything, its contents prove. 
The box was left to the brother of the 
prospective director of central intelli- 
gence, George Tenet, by the Tenets’ 
dead father 14 years ago. 

Meanwhile, the intelligence agency 
has had no director. Intelligence of- 
ficials say the CIA is drifting, with 
important problems piling up. 

The cause of the hold -u p. depending 
on who is asked, is the FBI, the White 
House or the independent counsel stat- 
ute. 

Follow along, if possible: The safe- 
deposit box contained telephone com- 
pany stock certificates and the leases to 
properties in Athens owned by the di- 
rector-designate's father. The father, a 
Greek immigrant who ran a diner in 
New York, scrimped and saved and left 
these valuables to his wife and chil- 
dren. 

Mr. Tenet says he was unaware of the 
safe-deposit box until 1994. when his 
brother opened it All told, Mr. Tenet 
had a six-figure windfall. That would be 
a pleasant surprise for most people. But 
the financial-disclosure forms that Mr. 
Tenet had filed as a senior member of 
the National Security Council staff in 
1993 and 1994 became clearly inac- 
curate. 

They were duly amended, and the 
whole matter should have been taken 
care of by the time Mr. Tenet was ap- 
pointed deputy director of central in- 
telligence by President Bill Clinton and 
confirmed by the Senate in 1995. 

The White House counsel at the time, 
Abner Mikva, accepted Mr. Tenet’s ver- 
sion of die events and decided that h is 
belated reporting of the windfall did not 
require a referral to the Justice De- 
partment. 

"All of these issues were held up to 
the light of day, and had been thor- 
oughly explored by the Senate in 
1995." said a spokeswoman for the 
National Security Council Anne 
Luzzatto. 

But as deputy director of central in- 
telligence, Mr. Tenet is covered by the 
law governing the appointment of an 
independent counsel, and after Mr. 
Clinton nominated him as director last 
March that posed a problem. 

Under the statute, if the bureau could 
not clearly document Mr. Tenet’s ex- 
planation, and if there was no clear-cut 
evidence that he was utterly innocent. 
Attorney General Janet Reno might 
have had to appoint an independent 
counsel in the case, which surely would 
have doomed his nomination. 

The White House counsel’s office 
could conceivably have dealt with the 
matter in 1995 by referring it to the 
Justice Department and clearing the 
matter up once and for all. It did not The 
FBI might conceivably have moved 
more quickly to establish that Mr. Tenet 
was not a money-grubber. It did not. 

All hands seemed to have been tied 
by the independent connsel law. White 
House lawyers derided that Mr. Tener’s 
technically inaccurate financial disclos- 
ure forms required a full-bore inves- 
tigation of up to 90 days under the 
statute. 

The 90 days are running out, and it 
now seems clear ro all zhar Mr. Tenet is 
morally qualified to be the nation’s 
chief of spies. 

Administration officials say he is 
about to receive a clean bill of health 
from the bureau, that he will be con- 
firmed by the Senate this month and 
sworn in as the next director of central 
intelligence shortly afterward. 

The process will have taken more 
than seven months since his predecessor 
resigned 


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that from happening.” he said. 

^ -But : the Republicans are grappling 
with' upheaval within the House invest- 
igatweistaff and. with criticism that the 
Sen^ comniittee has not fully organ- 
ized the hearings less than a week before 
they debut on national television. 

^ Tbe latesr developments unfolded at a 
pivotal moment in the 10-month-old for- 
eign donations ^ scandal At stake is 
whether- the' evidence presented during 




^Democratic fond-raising issue is a 
.-j^A^sus.aaticmal problem that demands 
merely atKithri - skirmish in the 
cpntffrtling: war of divided government 
since PtifisidentBill Clinton took office. 

■. The Senate, hearings sue expected to 
focus on allegations that large amounts 
of fcTC^money wCTe pumped into the 
Democrats *1 996presidential campaign 
irfviqlatifm of; finance laws. The com- 
mittee is expected to examine whether 
. foreign sources who donated large sums 
of- money sought and received special 
' faybrs from the president and his ad- 

npnishhtion. •'•’•••- 

y Sejararely, die Justice Department is 
investigating allegations of systematic . 
efforts by the C^ese., government to 
%tiel money into the Democratic Party 
aid alleged potential acts of economic 
. ; espionage by John Hoang at the Com- 
'njerce Department 

’ ’The Senate hearings will focus on 
topics from the alleged laundering of 
donations, at die Hsi Lai Buddhist 
J|aiiple- in Southern California, which 
involved a fund-raiser featuring Vice 
President Ai Gore, to the activities of 
Mf.Huang, who worked for an Ind one- 


Another Joint Chiefs Candidate 

Will Retire Rather Than Fight Mbiting homosexual conduct violaieJ the^onstimuonal 

WASONDTW -0^1 ^e icon- . 

oclastic Manne w ^° had been considered on o base and in private is dangerous to the mission of the aimed 

causes to be the next caiman of the Jomt Ouefs of ^e by a homosexual bmnotif done by a 

Safi f?™ notice he wdl retire from the corps OcL 1, heterose xual,” Judge Nickemmwoie in his opinion. 

° GenendSieehan's decision is another sign of Defense , Jo far. however, federal appeals conns have upheldthe 
Secretary William Cohen’s determination to move cau- f 

that wvelt^ed^titeo^or top candidate. General Joseph Trust Makes $1.4 Million Grant 

General Ralston, the Joint Chiefs deputy chairman, had To Study GcUTlpCLlgn Pit Bulls 
been viewed as Mr. Cohen’s likely choice for the post until n , ACim , rTAM .... i 

it was learned the general had engaged in an adulterous ^^HINCTON The Money Down the I 
affair in the mid-1980s while Sued from his wife. Award for 1997 goes to the Pew Trusts. This one » 
General Ralston removed himself from consideration for CV ®SJ 0 !®* „ . , „ . .... 

the chairman’s job after complaints th^t if he did not, it . Pew Trusts have awarded a S 1.4 million gn 
would raise questions of a double standard for sex vi- *be Campaign Management Institute at American 
clarions in the military. ** ■«« «*■“ fS* ^velop a c« 

Senior officers say Mr- Cohen now appears keen to avoid conduct for political consulrants and improve the 
any furor in choosing the next chairman. And General el^noncarapaigns are waged. 

Sheehan would have been a contentious choice — he . negative advertising and personal attacks o 
picked fights with rival services and Pentagon admin- nse ’ die a^imeem^tsays, the American Umvf 
Lratore. General Sheehan, 56. heads the Atlantic Com- FOgram^aim at the 3,000 people whoeam a ivi 
mand, based in Norfolk, Virginia, (LATi 


Study Faults Canada’s Military 
In ’92 Somalia Peace Mission 


Judge Attacks Army’s Policies 
On Gays as Causing Prejudice 

. WASHINGTON— A federal .district judge in New York, 
who was cme of the first to invalidate die Clinton ad- 
ministration’s “don ’task, don’t tell "policy on homosexuals 
in flu* militar y ^ hag t»T pam ied his ruling and declared that the 
policy was designed to encourage anti-gay prejudice. 


WASHINGTON — The "Money Down the Drain 
Award for 1997" goes to the Pew Trusts. This one wasn’t 
even close. 

"The Pew Trusts have awarded a S1.4 million grant to 
the Campaign Management Institute at American Uni- 
versity.” the news release says, “ro develop a code of 
conduct for political consultants and improve the way 
election campaigns are waged.” 

“With negative advertising and personal attacks on the 
rise,” the announcement says, “the American University 
program takes aim at the 3,000 people who earn a living in 
America's S3 billion election consultant industry.” 

Next maybe we’ll have a grant to give pit bulls lessons on 
how to be cuddly. (WP) 


Quote /Unquote 


President Bill Clinton on the death of the actor Jimmy 
Stewart “America lost a national treasure today. Jimmy 


By Howard Schneider 

Washington Post Sen ire 

HALIFAX, Nova Scotia — Canadian 
troops who were part of the UN peace- 
keeping mission to Somalia in 1992 
were "victimized" by commanders 
who sent them into the field unprepared, 
and who ignored problems developing in 
an airborne regiment until they escalated 
into the torture and killing of a Somali 
teenager, a commission has concluded. 

Far from being the fault of "a few bad 
apples," the events in Somalia reflected 
‘ ‘ systemic, organizational and leadership 
failures’ ’ in toe command structure of the 
Canadian Defense Forces, the commis- 
sion's chairman. Justice Gilles Le- 
tourneau, said Wednesday atanews con 1 
ference in Ottawa to release the' study. 

Defense Minister Art Eggleton im- 
mediately criticized the report as overly 
harsh and “insulting,” comments that 
reflected a continuing controversy over 
Canada’s response to the Somalia affair. 
Mr. Eggleton and a predecessor who cut 
off the commission’s work at its most 
sensitive stage contend that the military 
has already learned from its mistakes 
during the 1992-93 mission to Somalia 
and should be allowed to “put the past 
to rest." 

But after a two-year investigation into 
an episode that stained Canada's image 
as a global keeper of the peace, the 
commission asserted that the military's 
problems still run far deeper than polit- 


ical and military leaders have admitted. 

The problems were evident from the 
start of Canada's involvement in 
Somalia, the report said, when senior 
officials overlooked known breaches of 
discipline in the airborne regiment and 
assigned it to the mission without proper 
training or preparation for peacekeeping 
in the midst of a civil war. 

The problems continued in the field, 
the report said, where officers ignored 
incidents of “thuggery" and improper 
use of weapons by the troops. When two 
Somali youths were shot in the back 
' after apparently hying to steal supplies 
from a Canadian base, the incident was 
ruled to be within the “rules of en- 
gagement,’ ’ even though a military doc- 
tor said he thought a criminal inves- 
tigation was needed. 

Ultimately, the commission found, 
senior officers tried to manipulate in- 
formation to play down the incidents, 
and later lied to the commission. 

“We found deep legal and moral 
failings," Mr. Letoumeau saidL “There 
is no.doubt that senior officers did lie. 
Do we want a military that harbors 
people that are willing to go under oath 
and lie?” 

The commission's report, “Dishon- 
oured Legacy,” included recommen- 
dations that toe military police and 
justice systems be placed under inde- 
pendent command and that an inspector 
general be established to investigate 
military operations. 




f AGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JTJLYL4, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 



China lorries About U. S. Tests , but Denies Arms Report 


i 


BRIEFLY 


(folded fyOtir Staff FnmDnpjitlirs 

BEUING — China wanted Thursday 
that it was closely watching a series of 
underground tests in the United States, 
while at the same time denying that it 
was selling weapons of mass destruc- 
tion to rogue states. 

Officials dismissed U.S. reports that 
it had become one of the world's main 
exporters of equipment needed to make 
weapons of mass destruction and that it 
had diverted an imported U.S. super- 
computer to military use. 

At the same time, it called for com- 
plete adherence with an International 
ban on nuclear test explosions. It said it 
was closely watching the tests in the 
United States. 

“We stress that all countries shoold 
faithfully abide by stipulations in the 
nuclear test ban treaty," a Foreign Min- 
istry spokesman, Tang Guoqi&ng, said 
when asked to comment on a series of 
U.S. nuclear tests thar began Wednes- 
day. 

The experiments, which are designed 
to test weapons materials without trig- 


gering a nuclear blast, have come under 
fire from critics who say they violate the 
spirit if not the letter of the Compre- 
hensive Test Ban Treaty signed last 
year. 

Germany's opposition Social Demo- 
crats and die environmentalist Greens 
criticized the United States on Thursday 
for conducting the tests, saying they 
undermined the spirit of a recent test 
ban. 

The mayors of Hiroshima and Na- 
gasaki, cities that were devastated by 
American atomic bombs at die close of 
World WarH called on the United States 
to halt nuclear-related tests in Nevada. 

Some critics fear the tests could spur 
nations like China and Russia to launch 
their own underground experiments. 

Mr. Tang said Beijing had taken no- 
tice of the tests, which are being earned 
out in tunnels deep under the Nevada 
desert. “We will certainly pay dose 
attention to this situation," he said. 

He also dismissed a report in The 
Washington Post that said China and 
Russia had exported equipment used to 


mak e weapons of mass destruction. 
--This is malting something out of noth- 
ing,” Mr. Tang said. “It is a fabric- 
ation.” (Reuters, AP) 

■ CIA Accuses China and Russia 

R, Jeffrey Smith of the Washington 
Post reported earlier from Washing- 
ton: 

C hina and Russia were the world's 
premier exporters of weapons of mass 
destruction or related technologies dur- 
ing the latter half of 1996, and they 
assisted such countries as Iran, India ana 
Pakistan to develop ballistic missiles, 
poison gas weapons or a capability to 
make nuclear arms, according to a CIA 
report to Congress that was released this 
week. 

Using unusually blunt language, the 
unclassified six-page CIA report re- 
peatedly pointed a finger at China and 
Russia and said that g aining their co- 
operation will be “key to any future 
efforts" to stop the proliferation of wor- 
risome weapons in rogue nations or 1 
provocative regions. 


“The Chinese provided a tremen- 
dous variety of assistance to both Iran s 
and Pakistan’s ballistic missile pro- 
grams” during the period in question, 
the report said. It was completed last 
month by the CIA’s Nonproliferation 
Center led by the House and Senate 
intelligence committees. It said it re- 
flected a consensus view among gov- 
ernment proliferation experts. 

The report said, “China also was the 
primary source of nuclear-relaxed 
equipment and technology to Pakistan, 
and a key supplier to Iran” of nuclear 
equipment daring the latter half of 

A U.S, official said Wednesday that 
although China's behavior was “better 
than what critics claim,” Beijing still 
needed to enact a comprehensive reg- 
ulatory system to control its exports of 
potentially sensitive commercial goods. 
The official also complained that China 
had displaced Russia as the principal 
supplier of conventional weapons to 
Iran. 

While some of this commerce has 


been reported previously bj 
officials, the CIA report cast a spotbgm 
on several lesser-known mniartMM «: 
jated to the proliferation ofweapons of 
£ destruction. It said, for example, 
that finns in India, as well as Chinau 
had supplied Iran with J® 

making poison gas. In May. 
ton had said that only Chin ^? rn ^ 

were involved in W 

The report also said that in the last 
half >f North Korea and Russia 
had suuplied Egypt with equipment to 
Scud UUncflg- 
siies while Iran had supplied similar 
equipment to Syria. It desenbed these 
Snsacrions as part of a trend in wluch 
many Third World countries have 
been trying to reduce their dependent, 
on imports by developing an indigenous 
production capability for dangerous 

an ?he authors of the report contended 
that India, Syria and Libya have at- 
tempted to obtain eqmpmenr related to 
missile production and that "Iran s ac- 
quisition efforts remain unrelenting. 


Hong Kong Eases Stand 
On Children’s Residency 

Those Who Came Illegally Will Get Hearing 


The Associated Press 

HONG KONG — Reversing iheir 
previous hard-line stance, the author- 
ities said Thursday that children who 
entered Hong Kong illegally from else- 
where in C hina could stay if they proved 
their rigbr of abode. 

Mak Kwaj-ym, assistant director of 
the Immigration Department, said of- 
ficials would review the cases of an 
estimated i.000 such children. 

One of die biggest burdens facing 
Hong Kong's new government is de- 
ciding how to deal with children living 
in China who have at least one Hong 
Kong parent. 

Estimates of their numbers range 
from 35,000 to 130,000. 

A law that took effect Tuesday with 
the return to Chinese sovereignty says 
these children are entided to live in 
Hong Kong even if they were bora 
outside the territory. 

Before taking office Tuesday as chief 
executive, Tung Chee-hwa said the chil- 
dren would only be allowed to enter 
under the quota of 150 people a day 
from China. 

But on Thursday, Mr. Mak said chil- 
dren who entered illegally outside the 
quota would not be sent back pending 
investigations into their claims of Hong 
Kong parentage. 

‘ ‘We will also review those who were 
ordered to be repatriated but not yet sent 
before June 30, he said. 

Mr. Mak spoke after more than 500 
relatives of children seeking legal res- 
idency protested in the lobby of .the 
Immigration Department building. 

Parents raised their fists, chanted slo- 
gans and brandished banners. 

One of the protesters, Tsang Chiu- 
lam. was accompanied by his 1 1 -year- 
old daughter, who came to Hong Kong a 
year ago on a short-term visa for family 
visits but stayed on illegally. 

‘ ‘She has applied for residency since 
she was bora in 1986, but I never heard 
any progress since then," he said. "It’s 
an open secret that you have to bribe 
officials to get your relatives across the 
border.” 

Mr. Tsang said he bad spent about 
70.000 yuan ($8,400) in bribes to obtain 
residency permits for his wife and son 
and could not afford more bribes for the 
daughter. 

“No matter how difficult it will be, I 
will try my best to keep my family here, 
he said. "Here we have freedom and 
law and order." 

A social worker. Ho Hei-wah, who 
bad helped organize the protest, wel- 
comed the government’s decision but 
expressed concern that it could encour- 
age parents to smuggle more children 
into the territory. 

In another development Thursday, 


the new Hong Kong authorities sought 
to show political tolerance by ruling out 
action against groups that held a pro- 
democracy protest on the balcony of 
Parliament building on the night of the 
handover. 

Hong Kong's new Provisional Leg- 
islature issued a statement rebuking 
former legislators who took part in the 
protest for a “regrettable" action. 

But it promised to seek no punish- 
ment 

On the night of the handover, Martin 
Lee, a lawyer and leader of pro-de- 
mocracy activists in the former British 
colony, mounted the balcony of the Le- 
gislative Council building with his 
Democratic Party colleagues and ad- 
dressed thousands of demonstrators in 
the square below. 

Mr. Lee read out a declaration 
protesting the dissolution of die elected 
legislature and its replacement by the 
China-appointed interim body, and 
vowing to fight for re-election. 

The new legislature said it had re- 
viewed the incident at a meeting Thurs- 
day and decided not to pursue it 
"The meeting regretted the unauthor- 
ized action of this group, and strongly 
reprimanded their irresponsible way of 
operation," a statement issued by the 
Provisional Legislature said. 

The protest was considered illegal 
under laws enacted by the new leg- 
islature Tuesday. 

Inspired by China several months 
ago, die laws set restrictions on protests, 
requiring prior permission from the po- 
lice. The raws were retroactive to mid- 
night Monday. 

Although Hong Kong enjoys a high 
degree of autonomy as a special region 
of China under the handover deal, many 
Hong Kongers had feared Communist- 
style repression after the change of 
flag. 

Mr. Tung ridiculed the protest on 
Wednesday during his first news con- 
ference since the sovereignty change. 
But he took a lenient view and said the 
incident had failed to spoil the handover 
celebrations. 

A member of the Democratic Party, 
Lee Wing-rat, said the public had clearly 
supported the protest and vowed to hold 
another protest outside when the Pro- 
visional Legislature meets next Wed- 
nesday. 

“What we did was a lawful, peaceful 
and rational method to make a protest 
against the dismissal of the elected leg- 
islature and replacement by an appoin- 
ted provisional legislature. 

“I think the most regrets that people 
in Hong Kong feel at that time is that the 
elected representatives were pushed out 
by an appointed provisional legisla- 



.:~ r ••••'-'*' .. " "V J 

. ' 


T-upibimi 'LumuwWThf UmcumI fVw 

Fishermen in Kawasaki were unmindfol Thursday of the cleanup nearby, a day after the Tokyo Bay oil spfD. 

Spill Overestimated, Japan Says 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Washington Post Service 

TOKYO — Transport Minister 
Makoto Koga of Japan apologized 
Thursday for unduly alarming citizens 
by overestimating the size of an oil 
spill in Tokyo Bay. 

But Prime Minister Ryu taro Ha- 
shimoto preferred to look on the bright 
side. 

“It was a miracle.’’ he said. 

Both were responding to news that 
the oil spill, caused when a super- 
tanker ran aground Wednesday, 
leaked only about one-tenth the 
amount originally estimated by gov- 
ernment officials — nowhere near the 
record proportions that the authorities 
proclaimed Wednesday night. 

The oil spill never got near Tokyo 
and by Thursday ev enin g, maritime 
officials were saying it had been con- 
tained and even reduced. They did not 
expect it to grow larger, unless there 
was a nasty turn in die weather. 

In fact, they expected cleanup op- 
erations to be completed by Sunday. 
They also said there was little risk of 
fire, despite earlier warnings, because 
the type of crude oil spilled was not 
highly flammable. Cargo business in 
the busy ports of Yokohama and 
Tokyo, which feed into Tokyo Bay, 
was not disrupted as some had pre- 
dicted, although some freighters were 
rerouted around the slick. 


Fishermen monitoring the fishing 
and clamming sites said the prime 
ones had been spared, except for the 
site of the accident, where fishermen 
catch flatfish. The oil spill never got 
near the prized fishing areas in die 
northern part of Tokyo Bay near 
Tokyo. The slick did come close to 
clamming beds across the bay from 
Yokohama, but by late Thursday the 
oil had receded because of cleanup 
efforts and a change in the weather. 

* ‘We feel a little better now. We are 
still worried, but not to the extent we 
were before," said Tadaaki 
Yoshimoto, an official with Kaneda, a 
fisherman’s group thar is monitoring 
the fishing sites. In fact, he said fish- 
ermen were able to go clamming 
Thursday. 

Officials are still assessing any en- 
vironmental damages that may result 
in the spill from the 147,000-ton 
Panamanian -registered Diamond 
Grace, which ran aground Wednesday 
morning 35 kilometers (22 miles) 
southeast of Tokyo, just off the coast 
of Yokohama. 

After intense public criticism over 
slow government responses to two 
major crises — an oil spill in January 
from a broken Russian tanker that 
fouled the coastline and the Kobe 
earthquake — officials appeared de- 
termined Wednesday to prove that the 
government had learned to respond 
quickly to crisis. 


Mr. Hashimoto declared a national 
emergency, an emergency response 
team quickly formed and more than 
300 ships, large and small, were mo- 
bilized. 

A Transport Ministry spokesman, 
Atsushi Fujimoto, said the incorrect 
figures for the size of the spill were 
based on data for oil volume and ship 
position provided by the tanker’s own- 
er, Nippon Yusen K.K. 

“We assumed a worst-case scenar- 
io," said Mr. Fujimoto. “The bottom 
right side of the ship was touching the 
ground, so it was assumed the bottom 
of the two tanks filled with oil were 
hurt." 

But after the ship reached port last 
night, experts were able to closely 
examine the tanks, while a diver was 
able to go under the ship to investigate 
the damage. 

Much to their surprise, the damage 
on the bottom of the boat was limited 
to an empty tank. In addition, inves- 
tigators found that the two damaged 
ranks were leaking into an empty rank 
as well, because the walls between the 
tanks were damaged by the impact of 
the accident 

“The oil had Filled up an empty 
storage hold instead of spreading in 
the water," Mr. Hashimoto said. 

An official with the Maritime 
Safety Agency said the agency is still 
investigating the cause of the acci- 
dent 


In the Heart of Cambodia’s Darkness , Deepening Confusion 


By Seth Mydans 

A/fir York Times Se rvice 

PHNOM PENH — Before shooting 
their victims or dubbing them on the 
backs of their skulls with farm imple- 
ments. Khmer Rouge executioners 
sometimes told them: “To keep you 
alive is no gain; to remove you is no 
loss." 

Things have become more compli- 
cated now for die last holdouts of that 
brutal movement, who now apparently 
hold their longtime leader, Poirot, as a 
sort of hostage. 

Whatever they do, they may lose. 

After more than two weeks of con- 
fused alarms over reports of killing s, 
hostage-taking, struggle and flight 
through the jungle, a tense stalemate has 
settled over what seems to be the death 
throes of the Khmer Rouge insur- 
gency. 

"It’s so damn confusing you can’t 


tell what’s going on,” said David 
Chandler, a historian of Cambodia who 
has written a biography of Pol Pol 
First Prime Mims ter Norodom 
Ranariddh, the main source of a series of 
reports of the downfall of Pol Pot, is 
now issuing pleas to the rebels to let him 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

know what is really happening in their 
remote headquarters. 

A deal he confidently announced last 
week under which the Khmer Rouge 
would pledge allegiance to his gov- 
ernment and turn over their leader for 
trial still hangs fire. 

With the United States already work- 
ing to put in place the machinery for a 
tribunal to bring Pol Pot to trial for 
genocide, Prince Ranariddh has started 
asking the world to be patient * ‘We are 
Asians,” he said last week. “We take 
time. We take it easy." 


At the center of this confusing picture 
— if the prince’s reports are true — is 
Pol Pot, a man who has been described 
as one of the demons of the 20th century, 
responsible for the deaths of more than 
one million of his countrymen during 
his years in power, from 1975 to 1979. 

Unless this is some great “magic 
trick" of deception, as Prince Ranar- 
iddh’s political rival and co-prime min- 
ister, Hun Sen, has suggested, the rabies 
have been turned and Pol Pot, 69. has 
become a pawn in the struggle for sur- 
vival of his former lieutenants. 

Old and sick, he is apparently a pris- 
oner in his own jungle hideout as his 
colleagues cold-bloodedly discuss 
whether to hand him over for trial or kill 
him. 

“A small, muddled, erratic and often 
frightened man,” Mr. Chandler called 
Pot Pot — and now a man finally caught 
in his own web of intrigue and mis- 
trust 


More than 30 years after he took 
leadership of Cambodia’s Communist 
movement his colleagues have branded 
him with their ultimate denunciation: 
traitor. Yet it is not clear what those 
colleagues can do now to save them- 
selves. With the holdouts cornered in 
their headquarters in Anlong Veng, 
without the support of their former pat- 
rons in China and Thailand and with 
most of their armed forces already de- 
fecting to the government, their only 
hope seems to be amnesty. 

“They probably can’t decide what to 
do," said Steve Heder, a lecturer at the 
University of London who is a close 
observer of the Khmer Rouge. 

‘ ‘It’s a no-win situation, ’ ’ he said * ‘If 
they keep him alive, people will say he 
is still pulling the strings. If they give- 
him up, he’ll denounce them all for their 
role in the killings. And if they kill him, 
they’ll be blamed -for being as mur- 
derous as ever.” 


Do you live in Lisbon? 

For a hand-delivered subscription on the day 
of publication call 00 34 52 37 10 53. 



The negotiating prospects for the men 
in Anlong Veng are complicated by 
divisions within die government. For 
Prince Ranariddh and Hun Sen, who 
holds the.title of second prime minister 
the fare of the Khmer Rouge has become 
one more issue in their rivalry. 

While the prince has spoken publicly 
about an amnesty for the nominal 
Khmer Rouge leader. Khieu Samphan, 
Hon Sen . has warned that Khieu 
Samphan will be “hacked" with knives 
if he shows his face in Phnom Penh. 

Even if the two prime ministers reach 
an .agreement regarding this most 
presentable of the Khmer Rouge lead- 
ers, more-hated hard-line figures in- 
cluding Ta Mok and Nuon Chea’ are 
apparently also in Anlong Veng and 
may have a final word concerning the 
fate of Pol Pol 6 

After more than two weeks of un- 
confirmed and often contradictory re- 
ports from Prince Ranariddh and his 
military advisers and from the clandes- 
tine propaganda broadcasts of the 
Khmer Rouge radio, the general outline 
of this picture seems to be accepted bv 
most analysis here. But there remains 
the possibility that Hun Sen is right that 
the reports of divisions within the 
Khmer Rouge are a ruse. 

For the moment, whatever the true 
scenario, it appears that at the most basic 
level the situation at Anlong Ven° has 
not changed: Pol Pot remains in his 
remote headquarters with his armed 
men, just as he has been for most of the 
last 18 years. 


Opposition Calls 
\ Bangladesh Strike 

r DHAKA, Bangladesh -^ A in*- 
1 I tional strike called tty the ^po- 
sition to protest new mes-baHed 
traffic and shot down businesses 

I Thursday. • ^ 

Clashes the night before between 
supporters and opponents, of 
strike left 50 people injured. TV 
1 skirmishes broke out Wednesday 
night in Barisal, 75 miles 1120 ki-^ 
lometers) south of *e capital,.' 
Dhaka, when supporters of name 
Minister Hasina Wazed’s Awairri 
League tried to block an apposition l 
procession. Police fired rubber bul- . 
lets and. tear-gas to break. OR the;; 
fighters, who carried gin* ana 
homemade bombs. ' - 

The eight-hour strike was called 
by former Prime Minister Khaiida 
Zia’s Bangladesh Nationalist Party. 
The raxes, which went into effect 
Tuesday, include a 15 percenr sur- 
charge on all imports. CAP) 

Party Chief Backs 
Coalition in India 

NEW DELHI — The leader of 
Prime Minister Inder Kumar 
Gujral’s Janata Dal party said 
Thursday that he would not with- 
draw support for the. government 
despite deep leadership differences 
that threaten to split the party . 

“My: supporters will nor pull J 
down die Gujral government under j 
any circumstance,’' said Laloo 
Prasad Yadav. On Thursday. Mr. 
Yadav’s group boycotted a vote for 
the party’s presidency. 

leaders of the Janata Dal. the 
laigest party in Mr. Gujral ’s 15- 
party United Front coalition, voted 
to select their leaders Thursday, for 
the first time in the party’s nine 
years of existence. But Mr. Yadav 
contended that party voter lists had 
been rigged against him and he 
called on his supporters to boycott 
the polling. Results of the vote were 
not expected before Sunday. 

Mr. Yadav’s supporters plan to 
hold a convention Saturday in New 
Delhi that is expected to result in a 
split in the Janata DaL Mr. Yadav is 
said to command 16 Janata Dal 
lawmakers out of 45. The govern- 
ing minority alliance, of which 
Janata Dal is part, has 1 78 members 
in the 545-seat lower house of Par- 
liament, the Lok Sabha. { Renters i j 

A Malaysian State 
Sets Dress Codes 

KUALA. LUMPUR — The re- 
Bgious Malaysia's 
central Selangor state say they will 
crack down on Muslims who dress 
* ‘indecently’ * in public. 

“We will only detain those who 
go beyond the limit, like the case of 
the three women who took part in 
the beauty pageant," Nahwari 
Hashim, the director of the state's 
religious department, was quoted 
as saying in The Star newspaper on 
Thursday. ^ 

The department said that Muslim * 
women who wear body-hugging 
dresses, bikinis, low-cut blouses or 
high-slit skirts can be charged with 
indecency. ( Reuters i 

Seoul Troops Kill 
Fisherman in Error -i 

SEOUL — Soldiers fatally shot a 
fisherman near the southern port of r - 
Pusan after mistaking him for a j 
North Korean spy, the South 
Korean Defense Ministry an- ■ 

nounced Thursday. :’j 

_Min Rae Sup, 38, was inside a •’ 
military zone off-limits to civilians 
Wednesday night when soldiers Jj 
spotted him and three times ordered l! 
him to halt, the ministry said. 

When Mr. Min failed to heed the 
orders, soldiers fired several shots, 

11 said. .. .. (AP) 


Tensions Escalate 
Among Backers of 
Phnom Penh Rivals 

The .Associated Press ‘ 

r . o T ™AL KAENG, Cambodia — 
Cambodia s divided government was 
unaer more pressure Thursday after - ? 
forces loyal to the country ’s rival prime d 
masters engaged in a tense, sahdoff , 
th y a ^ er a , Fuefight that reportedly, f 

leftthree people dead. • ** 

wa * 00 Woodshed Thursday* 
but the confrontation marked an esr^ 

un.w?;“ ^spreading tension that is;i| 
undermining the uneasy coalition go v-j‘? 
emment led by the two £rime 
Prtnce Norodom Ranariddh and .th£| 
ronner communist Hun Sen. . . 

i H i S E!' S supporters, who.6iit v | 
more weapons thar.tp 
*^ofPruice Ranariddh, tystematicaityv^ 

p 2 0ce ' s Ptisans Thml < 
KSTfU 18 , ,?“?> northwest 

Am force ^ 



Mr Hun <:«n ,r i Kananddh's forces:- 

Sen’s SShS? ps ‘SP 1 to Mr. Hun; 
blocked _ ^nbexiian People.’s Party- 

Prince pSdd? ““ r0yal,st P®y of; 


o' uSp 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 



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Troops A»i • 
man in Error 


Albanian Monarchists 
Provoke Gun Battle 

Election Commission Chief Stops Work 


'A- 









hJe A 

* an4 ci ; 
ldi«> . V 1 
derwl " * 


By Jane Perlez 

New fori Times Sender 

. TIRANA, Albania — A gun battle 
erupted ourside the central election 
commission here at midday Thursday 
while inside, the top official, appointed 
' by President Sab Berisha, slopped 
■ work. It was apparently an effort by the 
Albanian leader to thwart the formation 
of. a new Socialist government elected 
five days ago. 

The special European envoy for the 
Albanian elections, Franz Vranitzky, 
saki in a staleroent Thursday that “polit- 
ical interference” was undermining the 
count, how into its fifth day, and that the 
slowdown ax the commission threatened 
run-off voting scheduled in some dis- 
tricts for this Sunday. 

U.S. and West European leaders have 
pat great store in the Albanian par- 
liamentary elections, which were run 
under the auspices of the Organization 
for Security and Cooperation in Europe, 
as the tool for restoring calm to the 
troubled country. 

Bnt Mr. Berisha, a hot-tempered 
rightist who bas pledged to give up the 
presidency but has shown the opposite 
behavior since the Sunday polling, ap- 
pears to be doing whatever he can to 
undermine the completion of the elec- 
tions, officials said. 

Run-off voting for 25 seats this Sun- 
. day will not alter the Socialist victory, 
European officials said. But while the 
counting remains incomplete, they said, 

" Mr. Berisha can continue to hang on and 
stir up trouble in a lawless country with- 
out an effective government and where 
almost everyone is armed. 

After learning of the statement by Mr. 
Vranitzky, a former Austrian chancellor, 
Mr. Berisha phoned him and in ah ab- 
usive tone lambasted him for daring to 
complain about political interference, an 
official at the OSCE said. 

Mr. Berisha asserted that the Social- 
ists were to blame for die dawdling and 
shouted that Mr. Vranitzky should “in- 
vestigate,” the official said. 

But Mr. Vranitzky urged Mr. Berisha 
to stop hindering the process, the of- 
ficial said. • 

The heavy shooting outside the ejec- 
tion commission, which is housed in the 
back of a major government meeting hall, 
lasted for about 15 minutes. One person 
was killed and five wounded, according 
to a private Albanian radio station. 

Policemen, who were at a nearby 
stadium in anticipation of trouble, shot 
at the gunmen, according to a witness. 


The battle started when a group of 
toughs marched down the city’s main 
boulevard from the central square after 
anending a rally for Leka Zogu, the son 
of Albania's King Zog from the in- 
terwar period. Mr. Zogu wants to restore 
the monarchy and become king. 

As they were shooting, several of the 
gunmen shouted, "We will get our 
votes, even by blood.” 

As the heavy rounds of gunfire rang 
out. a leading monarchy supporter, 
Guro Dural lari, an Albanian dentist who 
lives in New Jeisey , was checking out of 
his hotel across the street from the com- 
mission. "It’s out of control, I don’t, I 
don't know," Mr. Duration muttered as 
he raid his hotel bill. - 
The shooting was probably inspired 
by some of the dwindling circle of Ber- 
isha loyalists who are trying to use a 
failed referendum for the monarchy as a 
way of stirring up trouble, several West- 
ern diplomats said. 

Supporters of the would-bc king, who 
is a South African arms trader who fled 
Albania in 1939 as a baby with his 
father, are also supporters of Mr. Ber- 
isha. This is, in part, because Mr. Ber- 
isha acceded to Mr. Zogu’s demand for 
a referendum on the return of the mon- 
archy in last Sunday's election. 

According to unofficial results from 
the election commission, the monarchy 
received 20 percent in the referendum. 
Mr. Zogu has claimed that he really got 
60 percent and that fraud has cost him 


hi-- 


$ ■ 

<-.2. 2 ■van' I 











Emuin McvstaWThc AtxihqI Pk» 


Leka Zogu, right, the would-be king of Albania, at a rally in Tirana on Thursday before a gun battle between his 
supporters and the police. He charged that fraud accounted for the defeat of a bill on returning the monarchy. 


the return of his kingdom. Mr. Zogu. 
dressed in a military uniform and beret 
and wearing two pistols, appeared at the 
rally of about 700 people, many of them 
rifle-wielding young men. in the central 
Skanderberg Square. He was surroun- 
ded by about 20 men heavily armed with 
assault rifles and grenades and was then 


hustled away in a jeep. 

Chants of "Brother pick up the 
weapons, we’ll fight or die, we'll win," 
came from the crowd. About 300 of the 
700 men, rifles in hand, then marched to 
the commission headquarters. 

At the commission, the chairman, 
Kxistaq Kume, a member of Mr. Ber- 


isha 's Democratic Party, had stopped 
signing ballot papers, an official of the 
OSCE said. His signature is essential for 
the batches of ballots to be valid in 
Sunday’s run-off elections. After turn- 
ing up Thursday, he signed nine, an 
official said, and then was not seen 
again. 


Bosnian Serb President Acts to Dissolve Parliament 


Gomr&d In Our Saff Fnm Duperies 

BANJA LUKA. Bosnia — The Bos- 
nian Serb president on Thursday dis- 
solved Parliament, which is dominated 
by her rivals — allies of the former 
president, Radovan Karadzic. But the 
legislature will probably defy her and 
further escalate tensions. 

In decreeing that Parliament be dis- 
solved, President Biljana Plavsic said 
the move was justified because "the 
functioning of legal order is in a serious 
crisis in almost all fields.” 

She said that policemen were “or- 
ganizing criminal activities,” that she 
was being ignored by the government 
and that Parliament had been “carrying 
out orders from the informal centers of 
power” — an allusion to Mr. Karadzic. 


She said the dissolution was effective 
immediately and she set elections for 
Sept 1. 

‘Earlier in the day, Mrs. Plavsic wrote 
to the speaker of the Parliament. Drag an 
Kalenic, for an opinion about dissolving 
the assembly. Mr. Kalenic, who is loyal 
to Mr. Karadzic, rejected the idea. But 
seeking his opinion was a legal step that 
Mrs. Plavsic had to take before making 
her announcement on the future of Par- 
liament 

Parliament was scheduled to meet 
Friday in Pale, Mr. Karadzic's mountain 
stronghold just east of Sarajevo. 

Momcilo Krajisnik, Mr. Karadzic’s 
ally and a member of Bosnia's three- 
member presidency, suggested that Par- 
liament would not obey Mrs. Plavsic 


even before she ordered it dissolved. 

Although Mrs. Plavsic is empowered 
to dissolve Parliament Mr. Krajisnik told 
Sma, the Bosnian Serb press agency, that 
her decision to do so would be "void” if 
it was not accepted by Mb'. Kalenic or the 
Bosnian Serb government 

Earlier in the day, Bosnian Serb radio 
and television said U.S. and British 
units of the NATO peacekeeping force 
in Britain were preparing to seize Mr. 
Karadzic and General Ratko Mladic for 
war crimes. The men have been indicted 
by the United Nations tribunal for di- 
recting atrocities during the 1991-95 
war. 

The report quoted unidentified Bos- 
nian Serb security sources, but it was 
immediately denied. 


A spokesman for the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization. Chris Riley, said in 
Sarajevo that the “report is rubbish." 

“There is no change to our mandate 
or our guidance.” he said. 

The State Department said in Wash- 
ington that the report was "absolutely 
and unequivocally false.” It said there 
had been no change in the orders to 
NATO peacekeeping forces on their be- 
havior toward alleged war criminals. 

The television said an arrest order was 
issued June 18 after a meeting last month 
between the U.S. secretary of state. 
Madeleine Albright, and Mrs. Plavsic. 
Houses occupied by Mr. Karadzic and 
General Mladic were under constant aer- 
ial and satellite surveillance, it ad- 
ded. (AP. Reuters ) 


U.K. Exported 
1,600 Tons of 

Beef Illegally, 
EU Asserts 

CiwripA-JhtOwr SuffFnm Otipurritrs 

BRUSSELS — The European Union 
said Thursday that 1 ,600 tons of British 
beef had been illegally exported, with 
Belgian help, to the Netherlands, Egypt 
and Russia in recenr months despire an 
export ban because of "mad cow” dis- 
ease in Britain. 

The EU head office accused Britain 
of employing “manifestly inadequate" 
export controls and threatened it with 
legal action. It also urged EU govern- 
ments to sue traders for doctoring ex- 
portation papers. 

Seven hundred metric tons had been 
seized by the Dutch authorities after 
being exported via Belgium and the 
remaining 900 tons had probably been 
exported to Russia ana Egypt, said 
Nikolaus van derPas. spokesman for the 
European Commission. 

Mr. van der Pas denied press reports 
that British beef bad been fraudulently 
marketed in France and Spain and could 
not confirm reports of exports to such 
other third countries as Bosnia-Herze- 
govina. 

The commission said it found that the 
British beef was sent to the Netherlands 
“with the complicity of Belgian ex- 
porters." It was sold as originating in 
Belgium. 

Although exporters of the beef to 
Russia and Egypt were believed to be 
French and Spanish, the meat could 
have been bought from Dutch stores for 
direct shipment to non-EU countries, he 
said. 

It was possible they acted in good 
faith believing that the beef was Bel- 
gian, he added. 

He said there was no indication the 
beef was from British cattle that had 
mad cow disease, as bovine spongiform 
encephalopathy is popularly known. 

The EU banned all British beef ex- 
ports and ordered London to accelerate 
the eradication of mad cow disease 
through a vast slaughter program. 

Mr. van der Pas said Britain was 
ignoring its commitment to impose 
strict export controls on beef. 

“In the United Kingdom, export con- 
trols are manifestly inadequate," he 
said. 

An Agriculture Ministry spokeswom- 
an in London said Britain was aware of 
allegations that hundreds of texts of its 
beef had been illegally exported and had 
been investigating. "Action will be 


taken if the allegations are proved to be 
correct” she said. * f AP. Reuters ) 


EU Luxembourg Session Starts 

LUXEMBOURG — Luxembourg’s turn at the helm of 
tiie European Union kicked off in earnest Thursday with 
an official visit from the European Commission for talks 
on coordinating the work of the next six months. 

After discussions with individual ministers in the 
■ morning, the commissioners joined Luxembourg' s Grand 
Duke Jean for lunch. 

The main formal goal during Luxembourg's six-month 
stint in the hot seat is preparing the EU for eastward 
expansion, but it will also have to ensure that plans for a 
single European currency remain firmly on track. 

"It will be a continuing discussion whether the euro 
cranes- on time and with which countries,” Foreign 
Minister Jacques Poos told reporters at an informal meet- 
ing. 

Thedebate ’ViQ not leave us for a day. " ( Reuters ) 

Russia Jails Ex-Envoy as Spy 

MOSCOW — A Moscow court has sentenced a former 
Russian diplomat to seven years hard labor far spying for 
the United States over a period of more than two decades, 
the Itar-Tass hews agency reported Thursday. 

It said Vasili Makarov was recruited by the Central 
. Intelligence Agency in 1976 in Bolivia. Tass said he was 
found guilty of espionage at a trial last month but the 
details have only just been made public. The news came a 
day- after another Russian was jailed for 10 years for 
spying for Britain. 

After his recruitment, Mr. Makarov worked for the 
CIA until his return to Moscow in 1979 and then again in 
Spain from. 1989, Tass said. 

Mr. Makarov, who was bom in 1945, received more 
than $20,00Q for his espionage work, it said. (Reuters) 

Yeltsin ‘Changed for the Better ’ 

■ " MOSCOW— President Boris Yeltsin said Thursday, 
the -first anniversary of his re-election, that' he had. 
emerged abetter man from the difficulties he faced over 
the last 12 months. 

! Mr. Yeltsin, how 66, defied the odds to fight off a 
Communist challenge and win a four-year second term in 
ah election run-off on July 3, 1996. 

He spent the first months of his new term fighting for 
his life because of heart problems but bounced back after 

an^give a new iape^ to economic reforms. 

. “Fbrtrie. ii was not an easy year,” the Interfax news 
agency quoted Mr. Yeltsin as telling reporters in the 
'‘Kremlin. ‘‘It was a very difficult year. But this year 
changed' me as a person and I am sure it changed me for 
tite better.”' . (Reuters) 

Germans Criticize U.S. Tests 

BONN — Geimairy’s opposition Social Democrats 
and environmentalist Grecos criticized the United States 
6u Thursday for' conducting nuclear tests in the Nevada 
'desert, which, they said undermined the spirit of a recent 
test ban. 

: “The announced sub-critical Duclear tests by the U.S. 
are formally . permitted, but politically damaging,” said 
Gemot Erier, a Social Democratic deputy who heads 
Parliament’s disarmament and weapons control com- 
mittee. 

.• The experiments, announced Wednesday, were de- 
signed to, test weapons - materials without triggering the 
kind ofnudearchain reaction prohibited by the in- 
ternational -Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty signed last 
year. . "The critics of this treaty in countries on the 
threshold of haying nuclear weapons will feel justified,” 
Mr.’ Erlbr .said. - “Washington is unnecessarily endan- 
gering the' joint Western goal of an effective nonpro- 
Uferaiion regime.’.’ ' . (Reuters) 


Bonn Rejects Report 
Of Brutal Police Acts 

Foreigners Are Targets, Group Charged 

Reuters 

BONN — Germany rejected accusations by Amnesty In- 
ternational on Thursday that its policemen had systematically 
ill-treated, foreigners in the last two years and that much of the 
abuse was racially motivated. 

"German police are not xenophobic," said Interior Min- 
ister Manfred Kanther and Annin Jaeger, head of the interior 
ministers' conference of the federal states, in a statement 

“Those like Amnesty International who talk about ‘patterns 
of maltreatment’ in the police or say complaints are not carefully 
followed np are not speaking the truth,’’ they said. 

The London-based human rights organization, which first 
criticized German police behavior in 1 995, made the claims in 
a report that examined a variety of evidence from German 
inquiries into allegations of police violence. 

These allegations, together with the conclusions of the 
United Nations Human Rights Committee, which examined 
Germany’s rights record in November 1996, "support Am- 
nesty International’s view that cases of alleged police ill- 
treatment are not isolated incidents but amount to a clear 
pattern of abuse," the report said. 

Amnesty said many people bad accused the police of using 
excessive or unwarranted force in restraining or arresting 
people and of deliberately subjecting detainees to cruel, 
inhnman treatment or punishment. 

"‘As in previous years, the vast majority of the victims are 
foreign nationals, including asylum- seekers or members of 
ethnic minorities,” the report said. "In many instances, the 
alleged ill-treatment appears to have been racially motivated.” 

Amnesty said German authorities had investigated all the 
cases reported to the human rights group but that in many 
cases the inquiries had not been carried out thoroughly, 
impartially or promptly. 

But Mr. Kanther and Mr. Jaeger said that Germany had 
dealt objectively with individual incidents of incorrect pro- 
cedure by police officers and that independent state pros- 
ecutors and courts had followed them up with the necessary 
legal measures. “There is no doubr that the German police 
fulfill their difficult tasks true to the law,” they said. 



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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDA*, JULY 4 t 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


Unexplained Glitch Aggravates Space Ordeal on Mir 


Bv David Mrvff m 0 ™ difficult for the space ship to Mir switched to its thruster jets to try off arbitrarily. “We really don't like accident. The cosmonauts will have 

ii' ,7 d l ° D o nman absorb solar power. to maintain precise positioning. it when things begin happening to find the correct wires inside the 

The ^ip has been caught in a Two and a half hours later, the haphazardly,” be said. darkened, airless vessel, and be 

MOSCOW — The Russian- cyclical set of problems— the more gyrodynes in the Kvant-2 module. On Saturday morning, a new careful not to rip their pressurized 

American crew aboard the space power it loses, the harder ft is to keep also attached to the Mir, were turned cargo vessel is being launched to suits on pipes or jagged edges. 


station Mir faced new complications oriented toward the sun to generate off as a power-saving measure, of- Mir carrying vital equipment to re- 
in their troubled voyage Thursday more power. The biggest power loss ficialssaid. pair the ship from the crash test 


in their troubled voyage Thursday 
when automatic positioning sys- 
tems shut down, forcing the 100-ton 
vessel to rely on thrusters to main- 
tain a proper orientation to the sun. 

The shutdown was unexpected 
and followed Iasi week's collision 
between Mir and a drone cargo ves- 
sel. which also caused the position- 
ing system to turn itself off. 

Mission Control officials said 
that the two Russians and American 
aboard the craft were not in danger, 
but that the glitch was worrisome. 

"We really don't like this," said 
the flight director, Vladimir Solovy- 
ov. He noted that last week's ac- 


came last week when the cargo They said that the ship was now 
drone smacked into Mir. cutting off holding to “pinpoint stability," and 
30 to 40 percent of the electricity, that Mir would continue to use its 
The orientation toward the sun is thrusters until the navigational sys- 
maintained by electrically powered tem was fixed in a day or two. 
gyrodynes, which- resemble spin- Sergei Krikalyov, deputy flight 
ning tops, located in the Kvant-1 and director, said dial the reason for the 
Kvant-2 modules attached to the shutdown could not be explained, 
core section of Mir. “Mir is on its set orbit, but we’re 

According to Russian Mission having to fire the engines more of- 
contro! officials, the crew reported ten," he said. “All the gyrodynes 
late Wednesday that five gyrodynes are malfunctioning. It presents no 
in the Kvant-I module had stopped danger either for the station- or the 
r unnin g because of a problem with cosmonauts, as we have enough 
an electronic device that sends com- fueL But it is unpleasant" 
mantis from the computer that con- Mr. Solovyov said in a television 

interview that some of the gyro- 
dynes had begun turning themselves 


cident had bumped Mir into a dif- trois the ship's orientation. i 

ferent angle to the sun, making it When they stopped functioning,, i 

Israeli Woman Charged 
In Hebron Poster Spree 


week with the garbage-filled Pro- 
gress M-34 unmanned drone. 

The new cargo “space truck” 
must successfully dock with Mir, 
probably on Monday, before the two 
Russian cosmonauts, Vasili . Tsib- 
liyev and Alexander ramflcin, can 
cany out a risky internal spacewalk. 
The last accident occurred during a 
manual test of a docking procedure 
with the cargo drone. 

The internal spacewalk — in 
pressurized suits — is being planned 
for next week. The cosmonauts will 
try to reconnect severed electrical 
cables that run to batteries inside the 
Spetar research module. The Spektr 
was punctured last week during the 


Reuters 

JERUSALEM — An Israeli woman 
was charged Thursday with putting up 
posters in Hebron that depicted tbe 
Prophet Mohammed as a pig, and with 
endangering life by stoning a car, of- 
fenses that collectively carry a max- 
imum prison sentence of 24 years. 

The posters — pasted Friday night 
across 20 storefronts on the Palestinian- 
ruled side of Hebron — provoked an 
outpouring of Arab anger and a surge in 
anti-Israeli protests in the divided West 
Bank city. 

Prosecutors asked the Jerusalem Dis- 
trict Court to order the Jewish woman, 
Tatyana S us kin. to remain in custody 
until the end of her trial. . 

A police report said that she had worn 
a yellow shirt with a clenched fist — a 
symbol of the outlawed, anti-Arab Kach 
movement, when she put up the posters. 
It said the name of the movement's late 
leader, Rabbi Meir Kahane. was written 
across the shirt. 


on the road — a charge carrying a max- 
imum prison sentence of 20 years. 

Miss S us kin was also charged with 
harming religious sensitivities, an of- 
fense that carries a maximum one-year 
sentence, and with supporting a terrorist 
group, a charge that carries a maximum 
three-year sentence. 

In Hebron on Thursday, Israeli sol- 
diers posing as Palestinians surprised 
young Arab protesters, arresting a few 
who threw stones and burned an Israeli 
flag outside a Jewish enclave. The un- 
dercover soldiers spoke Arabic, dressed 
like Palestinians in plain clothes and 
wore masks and kefliyeh headdresses 
while mingling with a crowd of about SO 
youths. 

Troops wounded 37 protesters and 
shot an Arab teenager dead in a clash in 
Gaza on Wednesday. 

“I am sorry to say that they are step- 
ping up their attacks against our 

n ile,” the Palestinian leader, Yasser 
at, said upon his return to the self- 


During a court appearance Wednes- ruled Gaza Strip from talks in Egypt on 
y. Miss S us kin, 26, said to reporters: the crisis in Middle East peacemaking, 
rbey don't even let me bring a Torah Palestinians are frustrated over a 
roll or prayer book into jail. They peace process deadlocked since Prime 
n’t let me eat. They do interrogations Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel 
im morning till night " began building a Jewish settlement in 

The indictment said Miss Suskin Arab East Jerusalem in March, 
tied a stone at the car of a Palestinian But Mr. Netanyahu blamed the vi- 

jtorist on Saturday, breaking the rear olence on Mr. Arafat’s Palestinian Au- 
t window and endangering human life thority. 


day. Miss Suskin, 26. said to reporters: 
“They don't even let me bring a Torah 
scroll or prayer book into jail. They 
don’t let me eat. They do interrogations 
from morning till night” 

The indictment said Miss Suskin 
hurled a stone at die car of a Palestinian 
motorist on Saturday, breaking the rear 
left window and endangering human life 

LOCKHEED: 

A Deal for Northrop 

Continued from Page 1 

fuselages for Boeing’s commercial 
planes, such as the 747, Mr. Threlfall 
said, while Mr. Kresa said that Northrop 
was a supplier to McDonnell Douglas 
for its F-18 and B-17 aircraft 

Northrop and Lockheed grew from 
the same roots. In 1916, the brothers 
Allan and Malcolm Lockheed, whose 
name had originally been spelled 
Loughhead, set up an airplane company 
in Santa Barbara, California, with the 
designer Jack Northrop, according to the 
book “Everybody’s Business.” 

Malcolm Lockheed and Mr. Northrop 
left the company, although in 1 926 Allan 
Lockheed developed the Vega plane, 
which was flown by Amelia Ear hart in 
her transatlantic solo flight The com- 
pany went bankrupt in 1931, but was 
resurrected without Allan Lockheed in 
1932. 

Mr. Northrop, who designed the 
Vega, started his company in 1939 and 
invented the metal body construction 
that replaced wood in aircraft But 
Northrop later had legal problems that 
included a guilty plea by its former 
chairman, Thomas Jones, to a felony 
involving cash paid to a member of 
President Richard Nixon's 1972 cam- 
paign organization. 

The company also admitted paying 



Ruli HBtn.ari.Wo4r: 

An undercover Israeli soldier threatening a young Palestinian on Thursday after arresting 
him for throwing stones with other Arab protesters at a Jewish settlement in Hebron. 


Ignominious Rankings 


Italy has become one of the world’s hotbeds of industrial piracy, it regularly appears on a watch list of intellectual copyright 
infringement compiled by the United States Trade Representative. Here is how Italy stacks up in some piracy rankings. 


WORST INDUSTRIAL 
PIRATES, 1995 

Rankings based 
on well organized 
piracy networks, 
weak laws and 
inadequate 
enforcement 

1. Turkey ■ 

2. China 

3. Thailand 

5. Colombia *■*’ 

Source: European 
Brands Association 

ILLEGAL COPIES OF SOFTWARE, 1996 
Value of Sham of 
software domestic 
(millions) market 



Value of Share of 
software domestic 
(millions) market 


ILLEGAL VIDEO PRODUCTION OF 
UNITED STATES MOVIES, 1995 

Russia $312 million 

• -294 

China ‘ ; 124 

Britain 112 _ 

Japan 108 

Stxmx Motion Picture Association of Amenca 

— «i On the streets of Rome, 
knockoffs of Prada bags and 
other luxury goods are sold 
openly, usually by illegal 
immigrants from Africa. 

Photo by Stafano Mtcazzo/MY. Times News Service 

ILLEGAL, COPIES OF CD’S AND CASSETTES, 199S 

Number Share of Number Share of 

of copies domestic of copies domestic 

(miNons) market (millions) market 


United States $2,361 

27% 

France 

$412 

44% 

Russia 

222.3 

73% 

Brazil 

62.4 

45% 

Japan 

1,190 

41 

Russia 

383 

91 

China 

145.0 

54 

United States 26.6 

3 

China 

704 

96 

Canada 

357 

42 

India 

128.4 

30 

'Italy 

■ 21.5 

33 • 

South Korea 

516 

70 

Brazil 

356 

68 

Pakistan 

75.4 

94 

Romania 

21.5 

85 

Germany 

498 

36 

Haly # 'v- 

...341 ‘ 

55\. 

Mexico 

70.0 

54 

Turkey 

16.4 

30 


Source: Business Software ABance 


Source: International Federation of the Phonographic Industry 




darkened, airless vessel, and be 
careful not to rip their pressurized 
suits on pipes or jagged edges. 

“We understand there are risks in 
'this operation.” Mr. Krikalyov told 
reporters. “So we are looking at 
fallback options. ” 

Michael Foale. the American as- 
tronaut on board Mir. will wait dar- 
ing the repair job in the Soyuz space 
capsule attached to the orbiting sta- 
tion in case they are forced to aban- 
don Mir altogether. 

Meanwhile, the newspaper Se- 
vodnya reported Thursday that an 
error by Mr. Tsibliyev was respon- 
sible for the crash last week. The 
paper said he had foiled to punch 
into a computer tbe fact that the 
incoming cargo vessel was over- 
weight. As a result die cargo drone 
did not slow as fast as it should have, 
and hit Mir and bounced off. 


‘ModCm ’JMewagl 

Transmission Between Species c 
Is Said to Raise Strain’s Vmilenee 

By Denise Grady : 

N<w York Times Sr tried 

JB 3 Bsi*SS 5 g 6 i£& 

mysterious agent that causes madco* w 

Sricnce atemiled fry Laura Manuelidis forced onestrwn 9 
a human brain dise^e to : -> 

to a different, more virulent strain typKSinJB 1 * -w 

species to another, first hamsters and then ■ 

eventually developed a disorderttolMk^morel*e. ... 
mad cow disease than the original human illness. . • 

The findings minor what may have bappen^m 


causing a new variant of me ratal numan 
Creuizfeldr-Jakob disease. 

“These agents can change in a host and evolve, and • 
cause different kinds of disease,’’ said Dr. Manuelidis, 
head of neuropathology at Yale. She also warned thauhe ^ 
agents’ ability to transform means that public health, 
authorities tracking the fatal illnesses in human pop- 
ulations should be on the lookout for diveree signsof. 
brain pathology, lest they miss new cases and under- ; 
estimate the incidence of disease. , . 

Ashley Haase, head of microbiology at the University 
of Minnesota, called Dr. Manuelidis’s stedy quite ex- 
ceptionally interesting and important. ’ He said her team 
had developed the fust model of the disease m a lab- 
oratory animal that would let researchers study a se- 
quence of biological events that might resemble tbe ones 
that produced the new variant of Creutzfeldt Jakob dis- 

ea Dr. Michael Harrington, who studies neurological dis- 
eases at the Calif ornia In- 


The New Yuri. Tima 


sutute of Technology, 

said, ' ‘They've provided Tneg€ agents can 

change in a host 

when you go across spe- anil evolve, and 

cies and get a more vir- 

□lent beast coming out of cause OlHerent 

1L 'a 1 Kerza-Kwiatecki, kinds of diseage.* 
of die National Institute " " 

of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, said, “The in- 
re rspecies spontaneous awakening of this agent that they 
have shown brings up incredibly wide implications for 
the diseases of animals in humans.” 

The epidemic of mad cow disease in England, infecting 
about a million cows since 1985, is thought to have 
resulted from the widespread use of feed that contained 
rendered flesh from sheep and cows, which may have 
been infected. 

The scientific name for the disease is bovine spon- 
gifonn encephalopathy, based on the spongelike holes 
that it leaves in the brain. 

Last year, scientists reported that the disease may have 
spread to people in England, perhaps through contam- 
inated beer. Seventeen have died so far from Creutzfeldt 
Jakob disease, a well-known human disorder, but their 
cases were so unlik e the usual ones in people and so like 
the cow disease that scientists think the two must be 
related. 

As a result, American researchers have stepped up their 
efforts to monitor for both mad cow disease and the new 
variant of Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, but no cases of either 
have been detected in the United States, said Larry 
Schonberger of the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention. 

Nonetheless, as a preventive measure, starting on Aug. 
4, the Food and Drug Administration will ban the use of 
beef and lamb in feed produced for cows and sheep. 

The cause of mad cow disease, Creutzfeldt Jakob 
disease and related illnesses has not been identified, 
despite three decades of research. 

In the study being published Friday, Dr. Manuelidis, 
William Fritch and Yon-Gen Xi used a strain of infective 
material derived from the brain of a patient who died of 
Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease 20 years ago. Hie human tissue 
was inoculated into the brains of rodents, and their 
diseased brain tissue was then inoculated into other 
rodents and the process, known as passaging, was re- 
peated many times. 

In rats, the first group of infected animals showed brain 
damage resembling the original Creutzfeldt Jakob dis- 
ease. But in succeeding groups, the pattern changed, and 
the disease became more virulent, taking on charac- 
teristics shared by mad cow disease and the new variant of 
Creutzfeldt Jakob. It caused large, widespread plaques, 
consisting of deposits of a substance called amyloid 
protein, to form in the brain. j 

“Somehow, we got this new strain, and it’s different,'' I 
said Dr. Manuelidis. “With passage, the agent evolved , 
and changed." 

Her team also observed inflammation in tbe brain, 
which Dr. Manuelidis said meant that the animals’ inh 
mune system might have been trying to rid itself of the 
invading agent. She speculated that the immune response 
acts as a stress on the disease agent, which she think s is a 
virus, and may actually help direct its evolution. 


governmentofficiate in such countries as FAKES: Italy , Pressed by the U.S . , Is Trying to Crack Down on Its Parallel Economy in Counterfeit Luxury Goods 


1970s, and then had to pay a $17 million 
fine when some engineers falsified re- 
sults on government projects. Com- 
pounding the company's problems was 
its inability to sell the F-20 fighter plane 
despite years of marketing attempts. 

Northrop ’s 1994 purchase of Grum- 
man was its attempt to join the top ranks 
of the defense contractors, and it outbid 
Martin Marietta for the privilege. Later 
that year, Lockheed scooped up Martin 
Marietta, but Northrop's purchase of 
Grumman was insufficient to rank it 
among the top defense contractors. 

Yet the company has carved a niche 
for itself with such products as the 
Stealth Bomber and MX missile. Mr. 
Threlfall said that despite its relatively 
small size, Northrop could have re- 
mained independent for “four or five 
years” although he said the takeover 
was a good fit. . 


Continued from Page 1 

the illegal commerce at 56 billion a year 
and growing. 

Much of the pressure to crack down 
on the counterfeiting is coming from the 
United States. Software companies, 
mainly American, lose an estimated 
$350 million a year in Italy because of 
piracy; the music industry, also heavily 
American, says it loses S 1 00 million. 

The office of the U.S. trade repre- 
sentative, Charlene Barshefsky, keeps 
Italy on its watch list — a formal no- 
tification of Washington's displeasure 
that can lead to economic sanctions if 
trade offenses are not addressed. 

In a report published in April. Ms. 
Barshefsky praised the Italians for step- 
ping up efforts against piracy but urged a 
stiffening of penalties, which she said 
were “among the lowest in Europe.” 


Lorenzo Mazza, the head of the Fed- 
eration Against Musical Piracy, a trade 
organization in Milan, said that most 
Italians do not think twice about in- 
fringing so me faraway corporation’s 
trademark, patent or copyright 

“People copy software, people copy 
books, they don't pay television fees,” 
he said. “It’s a society of shrewdies. If 
you can get something without paying 
for it, you do." 

The dynamics of business here also 
make counterfeiting an easy game, said 
Salvatore Casillo, a professor of indus- 
trial sociology at the University of 
Salerno. More than most European 
countries, Italy remains a nation of en- 
trepreneurs, giving counterfeiters a vast 
potential supply of nimble and imagin- 
ative partners in crime. 

Mr. Casillo, who heads the Institute for 
the Study of Fakes at the university, said 


pirate manufacturers are often “not true 
companies,” but shifting alliances of in- 
vestors and manufacturers. “There may 
be three or four people, and each puts in 
50 million lire," or about $30,000, he 
said. “They purchase the raw materials, 
and contact willing craftsmen.” 

Counterfeiting has become so wide- 
spread that it anchors some local econ- 
omies. According to Mr. Casillo, its pre- 
valence helps explain why some areas 
with high official unemployment, like 
Naples, have escaped social unrest: 
Many jobs are not on anybody's books. 

Francesco Zerilli, a pol ice officer who 
oversees anti-piracy raids in Rome, of- 
fers the example of a criminal ring there, 
cracked earlier this year, that made black 
market watches bearing major brand 
names. A circle of financiers commis- 
sioned cheaper, imitation parts, often 
from trained jewelers. The timepieces 


were assembled in abandoned villas on 
the edge of Rome, delivered to legit- 
imate jewelry shops for a fraction of the 
cost of la coxa genuina — the real thing 
— and sold to un wining customers at 
supposedly bargain prices. 

Mr. Zerilli said that in just the four 
months it operated, the ring pulled in 
between $3.5 million and $4.5 million. 
And the jewelry shops, which paid $300 
or so for watches that retail for $2300 
and up. made a lot of money even after 
selling them at huge “discounts" from 
the prices for legitimate goods. 

Similar networks exist for shoes, 
handbags and luggage, he added. In Mi- 
lan, workshops even use cheap Chinese 
labor to assemble The final products. In 
Rome, pirated leather goods and other 
accessories are hawked openly. 

Designer houses are loath to discuss 
the problem for fear of tarnishing their 


CHINA: Hong Kong Limited in Taiwan Dealings 

Continued from Page 1 with the mainland passes through Hong Kong, 


Zapatista Rebels Vow to Shun Mexico’s Local Elections 


tacts” between Hong Kong and Taipei. 

A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman 
ducked questions on the meeting at a briefing 
with foreign journal ists shortly after the talks 
began. “Official contact, exchanges, nego- 
tiations, signing of agreements between the 
Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 
and the Taiwan region must be reported to the 
central government for approval,” Tang 
Guoqiang said. 

Much of Taiwan’s trade and investment 


with the mainland passes through Hong Kong, 
and Taiwan trade is an important source of 
revenue for Hong Kong's container ports, 
banking and other service industries. 

The Chinese Nationalists on Taiwan have 
banned ail direct contacts with China. 

With Hong Kong back in the embrace of the 
motherland, the spotlight is now on Taiwan, 
the final target of China's efforts to reunify the 
whole country. 

Portuguese-run Macau across the Pearl 
River estuary reverts to Chinese control in 
1999. {Reuters, AFP \ 


The Asiuciutnl Pre w 

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS 
CASAS, Mexico — Indian rebels 
In southern Mexico say they will 
not participate in local and state 
elections Sunday and have urged 
sympathizers not to vote. 

In a statement faxed Wednesday 
from “somewhere in the moun- 
tains of southeastern Mexico,” 
Subcomandante Marcos, the rebel 
leader, said the indigenous com- 


munities of southern Mexico 
“have decided not to participate in 
the upcoming electoral process." 

The Zapatista National Libera- 
tion Army gave three reasons for 
the boycott: the military presence 
in the area, the lack of respect by the 
government for Indian rights and 
what it called the lack of attention 
political parties have paid to in- 
digenous Mexicans. 

“The militarization of the indig- 


enous zones makes normal life im- 
possible,” the rebel leader said. 
“One cannot plant, walk, meet, con- 
duct business or wash clothes." 

The Indian rebels look up arms in 
southern Mexico on Jan. I. 1994. 
demanding better living conditions 
and respect for Indian rights. 
Twelve days of fighting left 145 
people dead before a "truce was 
called. Peace talks have stalled 
since then. 


image and damaging the bonds of trust 
with the craftsmen they rely on. 

A Gucci Group executive, who spoke 
on condition of anonymity, acknowl- 
edged that the “most problematic as- 
pect" of piracy today is the emergence 
of black markets for Italian-made luxury 
goods in East Asia, Japan and the United 
Slates. The counterfeits, the official said 
with a note of exasperation, “are 
identical products, not of low quality.” ■ 

Still, some legitimate businesses are 
starting to fight back. Raids like the one 
m February are increasing, and fashion 
houses are working with customs of- 
ficials to seize unauthorized shipments. 

The software business illustrates how 

legislation can make a difference. In the 
early 1990s, according to estimates, 
more than 90 percent of the software 
used m Ualy was pirated. Such large 
corporations as the Montedison chem- 
lca s S rou P* major banks and even such 
govemmenr agencies as the national 
highway authority failed to pay license 
fees. But lobbying by software produ- 
R °me to put into effect a 
\992 intellectual property ruling from 
me European Union. Today, the threat of ■ 
fines and prison has brought the theft- 
rate down to 55 percent. 

. ™hi ,c . lhal » more than double the rate 
in Amenca. the progress is real. “The 
™ ' s understanding the legal risks 
and the technological risks, likeviruses. 

re ^’ , dama & e 10 your im- . 
rnvsnFr Sai ^ Vea. a former Mi- 
and president of the 
Italian branch of the Business Software 
Alliance, an industry group. 


! I 


i j* 










ni- 


PAGE 8 


P. 




FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Hera lb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


rtULKHkU WITH THE Stw \()RK TIMR» AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Netanyahu’s Task 


Little over a year has passed since 
Benjamin Netanyahu became Israel's 
prime minister, but it must seem like a 
decade to him. The uneasy peace be- 
tween Israel and the Palestinians has 
been raptured, repaired and raptured 


his cabinet around the cote of prag- 
matists now represented by Foreign 
Minister Davis Levy and Defense 
Minister Yitzhak Mordechai. 


By leading his Likud party to accent 


the Oslo peace over the last year. 


again. Now Mr. Netanyahu is strug- Netanyahu created a new center in Is- 
gling to hold together a divided cabinet raeli politics but split his cabinet Since 


and Likud party. It would be a service 
to his country if Mr. Netanyahu ended 
the turmoil. 

The cabinet crisis began, with last 
month's resignation of Finance Min- 
ister Dan Meridor, ostensibly over a 
narrow issue of exchange rate policy. 
Mr. Meridor’s real grievance was with 
Mr. Netanyahu's imperious leadership. 
After narrowly winning election, Mr. 
Netanyahu pieced together a cabinet of 
right-wing, religious and immigrant 
parties to secure a parliamentary ma- 
jority. Then he largely ignored the 
politicians he had appointed, making 
policy through crusted personal aides. 

Now Mr. Netanyahu is having trou- 
ble winning cabinet and parliamentary 
support for his choice to succeed Mr. 
Meridor. the destructive former De- 
fense Minister Ariel Sharon. Instead of 
enhancing Mr. Sharon's power, which 
can only impede the Middle East peace 
effort, Mr. Netanyahu should rebuild 


January’s agreement to transfer most 
of Hebron to Palestinian control, cab- 
inet moderates have wanted to press 
ahead with further installments of 
peace. They have been stymied by min- 
isters from religious and immigrant 
parties. 

Bringing Mr. Sharon into the inner 
cabinet would undermine the moder- 
ates. Although Mr. Sharon is now will- 
ing to talk with the Palestinians, his 
uncompromising position on settle- 
ment expansion would make a nego- 
tiated solution difficult • 

Mr. Netanyahu's troubled first 
year should have taught him some- 
thing about the political costs of un- 
necessary abrasiveness and the impor- 
tance of reinforcing fellow pragma- 
tists in his coalition. He needs to apply 
those lessons now and put together a 
new cabinet capable of reviving the 
Oslo peace. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Mega-Merger 


The Federal Trade Commission has 


decided not to block the mega-merger 
between Boeing Co. and McDonnell 


Douglas Corp., clearing the way for 
creation of a giant in commercial avi- 
ation and weapons contracting. The 
newly strengthened Boeing will con- 
trol two-thirds of the world's airplane 
market. In many cases, it will have only 
one domestic competitor in the arms 
trade. Its S40 billion in annual sales 
tops the gross domestic product of 
most of the world's countries. “On its 
face, the proposed transaction appears 
to raise serious antitrust concerns.'' 
admitted the FTC chairman, Robert 
Pitofsky, and his colleagues. 

So why did the FTC, in a4-to-I vote, 
say yes? Simply put. the commission 
decided that McDonnell Douglas, with 
less than 10 percent of the world’s 
airplane business, wasn't viable 
enough to constitute real competition. 
Virtually ail airline executives told 
FTC investigators that they wouldn’t 
consider buying McDonnell jets in ihe 
future. The FTC blamed this on Mc- 
Donnell's failure to invest and “to 
improve the technology and efficiency 
of its products.” 

But a third competitor, even one 
with very little market share, can exert 
strong downward influence on prices. 
Two rivals — now only Boeing and 
Europe’s Airbus are left — can easily 
enter unspoken agreements not to com- 
pete on price, especially in an industry 
such as this, in which new entrants are 


This merger also virtually completes 
a shakeout in the weapons indusny that 
leaves in the United States only two 
colossal players for most weapons sys- 
tems. (Another merger, involving Ray- 
theon Co. and part of Hughes Elec- 
tronics Coro., is still pending.) 

The Defense Department has wel- 
comed and even. helped pay for this 
concentration, arguing that its post- 


Cold War needs can’t support a larger 
number of suppliers. The difficulty 


effectively barred by cost of entry. Mc- 
Donnell’s shareholders will do we 


will do well by 
the merger, as will its chief executive, 
Hany Stonecipher, who stands to gain 
$46 million in Boeing stock and stock 
options. But airlines and, ultimately, 
airline passengers may pay a price. 


here again is that the Pentagon won't 
be able to rely on competition to 
keep prices from soaring. Yet the 
most obvious alternative — increased 
regulation, control over profit marg- 
ins and the like — has been tried 
before, with disastrous results. Tins is 
a familiar challenge; one, admit- 
tedly partial, solution is for the 
Pentagon to sometimes consider for- 
eign suppliers. 

Boeing and McDonnell Douglas 
face one more hurdle on the way to 
their wedding: European regulators. 

U.S. officials in the past have 
aggressively applied antitrust law to 
foreign firms doing business in the 
United States; now European Union 
officials are reviewing this merger in a 
similar way. Some of their inflamma- 
tory comments before even hearing 
evidence raised suspicions that they 
were more interested in protecting 
Airbus than in reaching an impartial 
decision. 

Whatever their motives, though, if 
they come to a different conclusion 
than the FTC, they could hit Boeing 
with big fines in Europe — which 
would likely spark a major trade or 
diplomatic row with the United States. 
Stay tuned. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Defending the Pork 


Many members of Congress crit- 
icize the Clinton administration for 
promoting what they say is an essen- 
tially phony defense budget. It doesn’t 
contain enough money in coming 
years, they say, to buy the capability 
President Bill Clinton says the military 
will need. When you look at how the 
critics have behaved in recent days, 
though, you have to wonder about the 
sincerity of their concern. 

The issue they raise is legitimate 
enough. They point out that the Clinton 
administration’s military has been de- 
voting a larger-than-traditional share 
of its budget ro current operations, 
maintenance and personnel, while 
spending less than usual on new 
weaponry. In the poSt-Cold War era, 
the military has been busier than many 
experts had forecast, with deployments 
to Bosnia, Haiti and elsewhere around 
the world. At the same time, the fruits 
of the Reagan-era buying spree al- 
lowed the Pentagon to take a weapons 
procurement “holiday”; it could 
spend more on research, so the next 
generation of weapons would be as 
capable as possible. But this window is 
closing fast: even Reagan-era weapons 
are aging, and much in the arsenal is 
older than that. 

Defense Secretary William Cohen, 
acknowledging a coming procurement 


crunch, has proposed a couple of 
solutions. He points out that while 
total military spending has decreased 
38 percent since 1985, the military's 
network of bases, depots and other 
infrastructure is only 21 percent 
smaller. 

The obvious solution; another round 
of base closings. But these cost jobs, 
job losses cost votes and Congress so 
far has refused. Mr. Cohen also asked 
for more flexibility to give mainten- 
ance work to private firms; compe- 
tition could do wonders to that annual 
$15 billion expense. But members of 
Congress with depots in their districts 
are fighting that cost-saving reform, 
too. 

The House nonetheless found $331 
million for something Mr. Cohen 
didn’t want: nine more B-2 bombers. 
Actually, the $331 million is only a tiny 
down payment; the bombers would 
cost the air force — which says it 
doesn’t need any more B-2s — at least 
$20 billion to buy and operate in com- 
ing years. 

Even if Mr. Cohen realized ail his 
proposed savings, it's not clear his 
budget would match his strategy. With 
Congress playing politics as usual with 
a military budget that isn’t growing as 
usual, a mismatch is a sure thing. 

— THE WASHINGTON POTT 


ItcralbS^ribune 


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A Reminder of the Tides in Our Human Affairs 

«/ . - . Minmon interests and 


py' 


P ARIS — Many rejoiced and some 
fretted at Hong Kong’s grandiose 
handover ceremony, which marked not 
only China's resurgence as a power but 
the end of the Age of Empire. It was a 
remarkably peaceable, well-ordered 
end to a long and violent age in the life 
of nations, celebrating itself in fire- 
works, not firepower. 

Qualms about the future were nat- 
ural, not only because of the many 
uncertainties about China's intentions 
and evolution, but because every end 
signals another beginning. And this is 
-clearly a new, largely uncharted era in 
the way nations conduct themselves. 

Pause for a moment to consider the 
pasL Only a century ago Britain was the 
world 's one superpower, ruling the seas 
and large amounts of land on all their 
shores. There were other empires, al- 
most all European. France, Belgium, 
Holland and Portugal had huge over- 
seas colonies thai they had conquered, 
and Germany was striving hard to catch 
up. Russia, Austria-Hungary and the 
Ottomans ruled many nations under 
their flags and administrators. 

The tremendous change, which 
came in abrupt stages after each of two 
world wars and a 'third known as the 
Cold War, is a reminder that there are 


By Flora Lewis 


In 50 years, when the pledge of ‘ 'one 
i htm runs out ■ — - 11 it 


tides in human affairs. No stage is per- 
manent, but patterns recur. 

One historical impulse, as. old 93 
societies, does seem to have come to an 
end: the urge to territorial conquest as a 
source of wealth. That was the initial 
motive for empire and its aggrandize- 
ment to protect what had already been 
won. Modem states have learned that 
there are better ways, less costly in 
blood and treasure and more efficient, 
to amass wealth. They are called trade 
and investment. 

Colonialism did change the world 
dramatically, and in the era of decol- 
onization its terrible greed and excesses 
came to mark it as pure evil. Perhaps the 
worst was its self-justifying argument, 
the claim to intrinsic superiority 
providing the right to dominion. 

But Kipling's “white man’s bur- 
den," while a bad excuse, broaght not 
only bad consequences. Ii did begin to 
knit the world together, to spread ideas 


countrv, two systems - . 
lasts that long — historians will re- 
evaluate the Legacy of colonialism and, 
probably, find that it was a period m 
global development that had pluses as 
well as minuses. 






The need for peoples to find ways to 
.. -• — . — not dirnin- 


of enlighrenment and progress, to open 
I Kong is insisting 


minds. Already Hong ! 
on its attachment to British-imposed 
rale by law; honest civil service and the 
last-minute gift of democracy. 


live together is increasing, 
ishing, as global population explodes, 
environmental degradation becomes a 
threat and not just a pity and isolation 
assures destitution. 

Empire arranged this togetherness 
by force and humiliation, but that does 
not mean there isn’t a continuing need. 
The other way to go is by consent and 
participation, die essence of democ- 
racy. ‘Hie European Union is bumbling 
along in that direction, having trouble 
with vested interests and vested minds, 
but it is moving nonetheless in recog- 
nition that the only alternatives are 
worse. 

The United Stales of America dis- 
covered the value of consensual union 
early, though the record is marred by 
the terrible civil war. Its specific do- 
mestic solution is not a formula others 
can adopt, especially not when they 
already constitute established states, 
but it is an example of the strength that 


identifying common interests and fttdK; 
ing resources can create.; providing , 

there is consent. _ - r% 

President Woodrow Wton . 
launched the beginning of the endot ttw.-. 

Ace of Empire with his pledge 
tional self-determination attheend^fr 
World War I. It had limited applies 
and solved some problems while ;-c^gg r 
suing many otiiere./The 
Eastern Europe to join the Western 


#T-v 


dub” of NATO and the EU reflected; 
inadequacies of lonely ethrnc nw«m-- 
statehood in today s world and the reach • 
for a lareer embrace, certainly _npt.of- 
empire but of community ^nmethdess.. 

So after the fanfare of Hong Kdng . 
finally ends an old chapier/how are 
countries moving to deal wuh the new; 
one already begun"? In a refrahmgly - 
lucid forthcoming book. Zbigmew- 
Brzezinski analyzes the strategic op- f V 

po— ..»? 

“American 


nately, he titles it 

board" and stresses r 

in organizing the world, dux. 4. 


primacy 

lost as a transition. . 

The steady goal, as he puts iu must be 
“evolving the geopolitical core of l 
hared responsibility for peaceful gWOr.^fc 


al manag ement. 

© Flora Lewis 




Prop 


Thailand Has Learned a Lesson That Others Should Heed - W 


B angkok — The floating 

of the baht represents the 
triumph of Thai pragmatism and 
politicking over “face.” But, 
along with the Bank of Thai- 
land, it has left several Asian 
central banks that had crowed 
loudly about their ability to fend 
off speculative attacks looking 
decidedly foolish. 

The Thai decision has again 
raised questions about the wis- 
dom of central b anks — most 
notably that of Hong Kong — 
which stick to pegged exchange 
rates when freedom of capital 
movement makes it very dif- 
ficult to control money supply 
or interest rates. It also repre- 
sents another step away from 
Asian direct currency linkages 
to the dollar, which will ulti- 
mately be to the advantage of 
the yen and to Tokyo as a fi- 
nancial center. 

The Thais took almost every- 
one by surprise. They had ap- 
peared to have headed off a 
speculative attack on the baht a 
few weeks ago. By limiting for- 
eign access to the baht, they 


By Philip Bowring 


inflicted heavy losses on those 
with large short positions. No 
one was expecting decisive ac- 
tion from a new and little 
known finance minister in a di- 
vided government headed by 
Prime Minister Chaovaiit 
Yongchaiyut, who was himself 
thought anxious to avoid the 
political opprobrium of a de- 
valuation. In short, the market 
had assumed that the Thais 
would muddle along for a few 
more months hoping their trade 
balance would pick up. 

But facing conflicting polit- 
ical pressures, Mr. Chaovaiit 
decided that delaying what in- 
creasingly seemed ihe inevit- 
able would only make the out- 
come worse. The bahr-doliar 
link could have been held 
against the speculators, but the 
cost to the economy via crip- 
pling interest rates was growing 
by the day. 

A float — so far the baht has 


iperc 

no panacea. It will add to the 


debt problems of the many Thai 
companies that have borrowed 
dollars, and of the h anks that 
financed the credit boom which 
was the root of the eviL But it 
gives the government a little 
more room for maneuver and 
has so far been taken positively 
by the stock market and foreign 
investors. 

But it has sent shock waves 
through Asian central banks 
which had been making much 
of their cooperative agreements 
to defend currency values. 
Some of them may have 
suffered losses from earlier baht 
support operations. It has blown 
a huge hole in regional hubris 
and the notion that cooperation 
among central h anks with vast 
foreign exchange reserves 
could stand in ihe way of mar- 
ket forces. The debacle oc- 
curred 216 years after the region 
chanted “it couldn’t happen 
here” when Mexico was forced 
to devalue. 

Thailand’s problems are dif- 


ferent from, and smaller than, 
those of Mexico at the time. 
From a trade perspective the 
baht was not conspicuously 
overvalued. But the failure of 
major commercial banks, as 
well as central banks, to learn 
lessons from Mexico is at the 
root of the crisis. After a brief 
Mexican pause in 1995. foreign 
h anks lending in Thailand bal- 
looned and the trade deficit 
went from large to alarming. A 
fixed exchange rate and un- 
thinking credit expansion were 
the twin culprits. 

Most Asian countries now 
have more flexible exchange re- 
gimes than in the past, helping 
dampen the domestic impact of 
foreign capital movements. But 
two exceptions stand out. The 
Philippines in theory has a 
floating exchange rate but in 
practice has kept its peso stable 
against the dollar as evidence of 
its new self-confidence. But in 
the wake of the baht fall it was 
forced to push up short-term 
interest rates to levels that are 
inappropriate for the economy. 


If Manila cannot bring semne^;' 
flexibility back to its currencyv .i 
sooner or later it will suffer a, . U, 
Thai experience. . r 

But at least it has that option. ; 
Hong Kong, with its formal peg-.' 
to the dollar, does nor. Hong 
Kong has huge foreign ex-.--,.-.-' 
change reserves and no signif- ; . ; 
icant cuirent account deficit; 

But it has an economy as in- 
de bred as Thailand’s, and banks • . 
with more than 40 percent of 
their loans to property. Hong- 
Kong’s currency board mone- . 
taiy system assumes that money 
supply can contract as well as . 
expand to defend the currency. \ ■ ^ 
But that is clearly impossible - 
given the nature of bank lend- *. f : 
ing. Interest rises to defend the: "V 
currency would collapse the - 
property market and thus bank . 
asset quality. 

Thailand has learned the hard 
way that freedom of capital, 
movement and fixed exchange 
rates are, in the long run. in-, ", 
compatible. Who’s next for the 
lesson? 

Imeniurioihil Herald Tribune. 


Han- 




■i’-- 

r.' 






:: -v 


For the Mideast Peace Process to Advance, America Must Act 


N EW YORK— The Middle 
East is reverting inexor- 
ably to the hatreds and violence 
that characterized the Arab 
world’s relations with Israel for 
more than four decades. The 
United States seems to have dis- 
engaged from the peace process 
just as the historic achieve- 
ments of die Madrid conference 
of 1991 and the Oslo accords of 
1993 are unraveling. 

State Department officials 
have sought to justify this dis- 
engagement with the mislead- 
ing slogan that we Americans 
cannot want peace more than 
the parties to the conflict do. 
But, as pointed out in a report 
issued recently by an indepen- 
dent task force sponsored by the 
Council on Foreign Relations, 
the United States has important 
interests of its own in the re- 
gion. all of which would be se- 
riously damaged if the peace 
process collapsed. 

The report urges the United 
States to become more deeply 
involved in Middle East peace- 


By Henry Siegman 


making. The United States 
should seek to convince Israel 
and the Palestinians to agree to 
a new declaration of principles 
that would establish a frame- 
work for the difficult final- 
status negotiations that the 
parties have yet to engage in. 

For a majority of the task 
force, the most critical features 
of such a framework are: a) 
agreement that the goal of the 
peace process and the final- 
status negotiations is a viable 
Palestinian state on contiguous 
tenitonr in Gaza and most of the 
West Bank, and b) agreement 
that the territory on which most 
Israeli settlers now live will be 
incorporated into Israel, thus 
avoiding a traumatic uprooting. 

While these principles may 
seem contradictory, they are not, 
for 80 percent of Israel’s settlers 
live on territory that makes up 
only 10 percent of the West 
Bank, mostly along the Green 
Line that separated Israel and 


the West Bank before 1967. 

Palestinians understand that 
such a state would have to be 
demilitarized so as not to pose a 
security threat to Israel. They 
must also understand that such a 
state will not return Israel to its 
pre-1967 borders. Israel's gov- 
ernment must understand that if 
this peace process is to go for- 
ward, it cannot engage in uni- 
lateral actions that preempt dis- 
cussion of issues that die parties 
have agreed are to be part of 
final-status negotiations. While 
continued expropriation of land 
and settlement activity in the 
territories may not violate the 
letter of existing agreements, 
they certainly contradict their 
essential spirit and purpose. 

The task force report recom- 
mends that the question of sov- 
ereignty in East Jerusalem be 
left for Last, and that the status 
quo in Israel's capital remain 
unchanged for now. For this 
“nonsolution” solution to 


work, Israel must refrain from 
actions that change the demo- 
graphics of East Jerusalem, 
such as its plans for the con- 
struction of a major Jewish 
housing project in Har Homa. 

Also, the parties should not 
delay negotiations over die lo- 
cation and boundaries of an area 


A process that 
doesn't lead to a 
Palestinian state is 
a nonstarter . 


within the current municipal 
borders of Jerusalem (whose 
historic boundaries were signif- 
icantly enlarged in 1967) that 
would serve as the capital of a 
Palestinian state. Israeli accept- 
ance of such an arrangement, 
however symbolic, is a neces- 


sary expression of respect for 
and recognition of Palestinian 


Pinning Hopes on Mexico City Vote 


N EW YORK — Mexico has 
suffered through so many 
traumatic moments over the 
past two years that it would 
probably benefit from business 
as usual for a while. 

So it is logical that the July 6 
congressional and seven-state 
gubernatorial elections are be- 
ing dismissed in some quarters 
as insignificant as far as an au- 
thentic transition from author- 
itarian rule is concerned. 

However valid these obser- 
vations may be, they cannot di- 
minish the impact of the cam- 
paign and vote for the nation's 
second-most-important job: 
mayor of Mexico City, the 
largest city in the world. 

After 10 years of trying, the 
left-of-c enter opposition leader 
Cuauhtemoc Girdenas Soldrz- 

ano seems on the verge of ful- 
filling part of his dream of win- 
ning a clean election. The 
symbolic meaning of his prob- 
able victory cannot be under- 
estimated. Three explanations 
for it come to mind. 

If he wins, it will be largely as 
a result of his perseverance. The 
tenacity of this son of a revered 
president is worth emphasizing. 
He ran for president in 1988 
and, by even impartial accounts, 
had the election stolen from 
him. He founded his own party 
— the PRD — in 1989, which 
was roundly defeated in the 
1991 midterm elections. He ran 
again for president in 1994 and 
was beaten more or less cleanly 


By Jorge G. Castaneda 


by Ernesto Zedillo, after which 
many wrote Mr. Girdenas off 
politically. Yet he is now about 


to win the capital city, posi- 
tioning himself as front-runner 


for the presidency in 2000. 

Mr. Cdrdenas’s success 
would also be a tribute to his 
unrelenting opposition to the Sa- 
linas regime, and to his popular 
reputation as the previous pres- 
ident's chief nemesis. Now that 
Carlos Salinas de Gortari is the 
most hated figure in Mexican 
politics, his archenemy benefits. 
Mr. Cardenas is one of the very 
few Mexicans who never rode 
the Salinas bandwagon, and the 
voters of Mexico City know it 

Finally, a CSrdenas victory 
would be a reflection of voters' 
mowing electoral maturity. 
They want to ensure that the 
first elected mayor of the capital 
does not come from the ruling 
party. When they saw the dis- 
mal performance of the righi-of- 
cenrer National Action Party's 
Carlos Castillo, they tilted to- 
ward die opposition candidate 
most likely to win, not neces- 
sarily the one they liked best. 

But this maturity has its dis- 
advantages, and herein lie the 
dangers facing Mr. Cirdenas, 
Mexican democracy and the cur- 
rent process of renewal of the 
Latin American left. 

If the polls prove accurate, the 
voters ot Mexico City will have 


rejected the Institutional Rev- 
olutionary Party — PRI — with- 
out necessarily endorsing the 
Democratic Revolution Party — 
PRD. The election should be 
interpreted as the PRI’s defeat, 
not as the PRD’s triumph. 

With barely 40 percent of the 
popular vote! as seems likely, 
Mr. Girdenas can hardly con- 
sider his victory as a carte 
blanche. To do so would not 
only doom his chances for 2000, 

' but also discredit the opposition 
in general and the left in par- 
ticular, just as the transition in 


attachment to Jerusalem. The 
palpable absence of such re- 
spect in the style and attitude of 
the current Israeli government 
has been more damaging to the 
prospects for peace than dif- 
ferences over substance. 

The declaration of principles 
urged by the task force is not a 
substitute for the detailed and 
difficult final-status negoti- 
ations. It is not intended to im- 
pose solutions to the many com- 
plex issues than only the parties 
themselves can negotiate. 
Rather, the declaration recog- 
nizes that a peace process that 


does not lead to Palestinian 
statehood is a nonstarter. 

It asserts what should be ob- 
vious: If Palestinians are told , 
that even faithful adherence to 
the provisions of the Oslo ac- 
cords will not result in si viable 
Palestinian state, however de- 
militarized and however con- i 
strained its sovereignty, but will # 
at best yield a series of isolated . . 
bantusrans that remain effec- : 
lively under permanent Israeli • 
military control, there is no rea- . 
son for Palestinians to remain in 
such a process. 

For the United States to be. 
seen as seeking Pales tinian ac- 
quiescence ro such an outcome, . 
or as indifferent to its con- > 
sequences, is to damage its 
credibility and the possibility of - . 
playing a more constructive ^ 
role in the future. ' . . 

It is only when Palestinian . ... 
statehood ii seen as a credible.--; . 
goal of the peace process, and ' ' 
when Palestinian efforts to pre- . 

vent terrorism and violence in _4 
the areas they control are Con- 
sistent — and in the real world, . 
the latter will not happen without,' . 
the former — that the confidence 
necessary for the parties to re-j 
engage will be restored. Neither . 
of these conditions can be real- , , 
ized without far more deter;- : • 
mined U.S. involvement ’ ■ 


-ft 


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niju 

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vv 

qi 

ol 

hi 

si 

tii 


The writer, a senior feltowai'. 
the Coundl on Foreign Reid- , 
lions, was coordinator of . the" 
independent taskforce. Recon- 
tributed this personal continent 
to the Herald Tribune. V 


t j-.t 


IN OUR PAGES; 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Healthy Wine 


Mexico gets under way. 

Yet Mr. Girdenas’ s hard core 


of voters, the PRD faithful who 
stuck with him through the long 
Salinas night, want the world and 
they want it now. A CSrdenas 
victory would awaken immense 
expectations not only among the 
poor and radical of the capital but 
in die hundreds of Mexican vil- 
lages and towns he has visited 
over the past decade. 

Oth'er than symbolically, 
neither he nor anyone else can 
fulfill those expectations. How 
this dilemma is addressed, 
avoiding both disappointment 
and demagoguery, will be cru- 
cial for Mexico and its mad- 
deningly slow process of demo- 
cratization. 


PARIS — White wine has de- 
throned red wine on Parisian 
tables. In view of such a radical 
change, the interest of the 
public necessitated the inter- 
vention of competent people to 
examine the situation. Accord- 
ing to Professor Carles of the 
Bordeaux Faculty of Medicine 
the fashion for white wine is not 
justified for these reasons: red 
wine is much more natural 
and sound, and white wine does 
not possess the physiologi- 
cal properties looked ' ' 

this aliment. 


the Republic. It may be that the 
nation has become more accus- y • 
tomed to its own predestined; m- 
greatness. Ir no longer has to y 
assert it so strenuously.' Yet 
neitheroursnoranyothernation. 
can live upon its past; thegrav-;' . . 
ity of present and future tasks.: 
should engage the thoughts of ; - 
all Americans on this day. : . 




to 

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1947: Balkan Strife 


for in 


1922: Calmer Patriots 


The writer is an author who 
sen ed as an informal adviser to 
Mr. Cardenas. This article was 
distributed hy the New York intense, but 
Times Syndicate. 


T Herald says in 
an Editorial:] The anniversary 
of American independence 
wherever celebrated. Will prob-' 
ably be marked by less noise 
American patriotism is no lesi 

somewhat more 


, — • ^movnai more 
sedate than in the first century of 


LAKE SUCCESS, New York: 
— Britain told the United Na- 
tions today [July 3] that if it; 
cannot take effective measures 
m Balkans “we- had better! 
pack up.’ ' The advice was de-; 
kvered as part of a biting attack, 
on Russia, Poland, Yugoslavia^ 
Bulgaria and Albania for op** 
Pjsrag suggestions by. the', 
western powers for. checking- 
[he political strife in the'BaJ-'-.: 
Kam- Britain's Sir Alexander;-^ 
Lagodan said the success of the . 
proposed Balkans program 
might avert disaster.” . ./ 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


Waif's * Be Nice to the Constitution: Let It Be 


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W ASHINGTON — As 
the United States cel- 
ebrates Independence Day on 
Friday, politicians will sing 
The praises of the Founders 
and recite the blessings of the 
great documents they left as 
their legacy 1 . Too often, they 
• forget their speeches the oth- 
er 364 days. 

True, the Declaration of 
Independence remains pris- 
tine and unaltered, as power- 
. frl a summons to the con- 
science of humanity as it was 
■j Tithe moment it left Thomas 
'^■Jefferson's hand. 

’’ Bat the U.S. Constitution 
^something else. As Senator 
Dale Bumpers, Democrat of 
Arkansas, remarked the other 
day, there is a constant threat 
that at any moment. “67 sen- 
ators will agree it is just a 
rough draft** and think they 
can improve on “rhe most 
sacred legal document in his- 
tory.” 

Mr. Bumpers was speak- 
ing at a Capitol Hill news 
conference introducing an or- 
ganization called Citizens for 
the Constitution, a nonpar- 
tisan group dedicated, in its 
words, “to educating the 
public on the danger of con- 
tinuing, unrestrained at- 
tempts to amend the consti- 
tution.” 

In its. charter, the new 
group pointed out that in re- 
cent years '‘constitutional 
amendment proposals have 
become the favored first-step 
panacea for all societal tils, 
rather than a solution of last 
resort.” That is no exagger- 
ation. 

In the first six months of 
this Congress, three proposed 
amendments came to a vote 
inlhe House and two others 


By David S. Broder 


(on unrelated subjects) in the 
Senate. Think of it: Only 17 
amendments approved in the 
last 206 years but five 
brought to a vote in the past 
six months. 

Last week, on the day that 
the U.S. Supreme Court 
struck down a four-year-old 
law grandly named the Re- 
ligious Freedom Restoration 
Act, there was a virtual stam- 
pede of legislators to the tele- 
vision cameras, vying for 
sponsorship of a constitution- 
al amendment to right this 
judicial wrong. 

As it happened. Attorney 
General Janet Reno was testi- 
fying that very morning in 
favor of yet another amend- 
ment — this one to guarantee 
crime victims* rights. It be- 
came pan of President Bill 
Clinton's agenda before the 
1996 election, joining die 
grab bag of other mini-mea- 
sures on which he cam- 
paigned. 

All told, more than 100 
constitutional amendments 
have been introduced so far in 
this Congress, and the end is 
nowhere in sight. 

When 1 asked the notably 
fair-minded chairmen of the 
House and Senate Judiciary 
Committees, Representative 
Henry Hyde. Republican of 
Illinois, and Senator Orrin 
Hatch, Republican of Utah, 
about this rush to amend, they 
said the reflexive reach for 
constitutional remedies con- 
cerned them. “We should not 
be remaking the constitu- 
tion,” Mr. Hyde said. 

But both pointed out dial 
while many amendments are 
proposed, few are approved. 


Only one of the five that 
reached the House and Senate 
floor so far this year got the 
required two- thirds’ majority 
— the flag-burning amend- 
ment in the House. Mr. Hatch 
argued that even though the 
others failed, “it is healthy 
for the country to have had 
the debate” on the balanced 
budget, term limits and cam- 
paign finance controls. 

But the 60-plus former 
government officials, prom- 
inent lawyers and law pro- 
fessors, historians and others 
who are charter members of 
Citizens for the Constitution 
say the trend is worrisome. 
Coming from all points of (he 
ideological compass, (hey 
made clear that their target is 
not any specific amendment 
but rather the rush to satisfy 
short-term political imperat- 
ives by fiddling with a time- 
less charter. 

The co-chairmen of the or- 
ganization. financed by the 
Twentieth Century Fund and 
the Century Foundation, 
demonstrate the diverse 
nature of this save-the-con- 


"Any time a popular cause 
arises, some member of Con- 
gress will throw in an amend- 
ment and whoosh, it’s voted 
on.” he said. 

Thai too is no exaggera- 
tion. The three amendments 
the House considered this 
year were debated for a grand 
total of 16 hours and 23 
minutes — less than five and 
a half hours apiece. 

Mr. Courier made a telling 
point when he observed that 
increasingly constitutional 
amendments are being used 
“to drape a bloody shin on a 
political opponent.” 

In urging Congress and the 
country to slow down and 
think twice before rewriting 
the constitution, these folks 
are putting reason behind the 
rhetoric. 

The HtaAingron Post. 


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A Poet on Deadline , a Traveler Who Left Too Soon 


B ONN — Charles T. 

Powers was an American 
newspaper colleague who 
died last year at 53. He was 


By .Alan Cowell 


stitution coalition. A former also the author of a fine book 
Illinois representative. Aimer — “In the Memory of the 


his garden: Chuck was a 
writer and a well-reviewed 
novel was bis destiny. Only 


all. though, the portable Oliv- harrowing, long assignment. 


author- in- wairing. It is virtu- from the era of the typewriter, 
ally axiomatic that, after a but it was not a simple tran- 


etti threw down a more exotic 
challenge than the flickering 


Illinois representative, Abner 
J. Mikva, later a federal judge 
and Clinton White House 
counsel, is a liberal Demo- 
crat; former Representative 
James Courter of New Jersey 
is a conservative Republican. 

Mr. Mikva quoted James 
Madison's admonition that 
amendments to such a com- 
pact and delicately balanced 
charter should be reserved for 
“great and extraordinary oc- 
casions.” These days, he 
said, “it is scary what hap- 
pens." 


Forest" — which has just 

MEANWHILE 

been published to glowing re- 
views. 

The book should not have 
been posthumous because 
Chuck should have been alive 
to bask in the reviewers ’ well- 
earned praise, in his transition 
from foreign correspondent 
to acclaimed author. And 
there is a particularly cruel 


half-jokingly did we say his cursor on a lap-top screen: to 
articles were written for the turn blank paper into magic. 


poetry section of his news- 

way he would have 
wanted it this way. 

I traveled with Chuck in the 
time of the typewriter. And 
that is important, because in 
those early 1980s days the 
typewriter, far more than our 
passports, was the laissez- 
passer to the essence of our 
trade and hopes. The type- 
writer defined us as adven- 


the foreign correspondent 
will seek to turn out a book to 
capture all the moments and 
insights that did not fit into 
Little wonder then, looking the catalogue of 1,000- word 
right now at a black-and- dispatches. But, looking 
white photograph of us all in bade, the assumption was al- 
Ndjamena, the capital of ways that Chuck would com- 
Chad, that we were Masters pose something greater: the 
of the Universe, empowered hack’s life on the road was a 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


irony wedged between the' tuners, successors to Henry 
death of the man and the life Morton Stanley and Ernest 
of his creation, for The Book' Hemingway, even In diana 
that he was always going to Jones. (It was Chuck who pi- 


Deserving of Jail 

Regarding " Should These 
Pranksters Be Jailed?" { June 
21): 

The three young adults in 
this case — who were tried, 
convicted of manslaughter 
and sentenced to 15 years in 
jail in Florida for removing a 
stop sign from an intersection 


provide explanations of how 
people in the past lived. As 
history exhibitions, these two 
shows succeed admirably in 
their task. 

JAMES R. SMTTHER. 

JANET L. CORYELL 
Paris. 


Regarding "Metaphors of ing - (j une6): 
Travel Deaden 'documenia There v 


where three teenagers later X' " (June 28) by David Gal- 
died in an automobile crash loway: 


x write was his true destiny. 

Yet, fate robbed him of his 
to the (near) total economic triumph by a matter of 
domination of the real.” months. 

JEN BUDNEY. There is. possibly, a danger 
Milan. now that his death — 
wretched and unexpected — 
St. Savonarola ? will be woven into a literary 

myth, a temptation to see 
Regarding “ The Case for glory in his cheating of fate by 
Savonarola Gets a New Hear- fini s h i n g a manuscript so 
>" (June 61: long in the gestation, that, as 

There was already for so many other tortured 
methinp utterly erotesaue spirits, death and creation 


Jones. (It was chuck who pi- 
oneered what became the 
vogue for Nairobi-based cor- 
respondents — fine leather 
jackets, Borsalino trilbies.) 

The typewriter defined the 
era before satellite phones 
and modems, a time of in- 
accessibility and secrets 
when a broken telex meant 
either a long drive to the 
nearest working communica- 


The assumption was always that Chuck 
would compose something greater: The 
hack's life on the road was a prelude 
to a state of literary grace . Or, 
perhaps, a grand delusion. 

to nose and piy into a con- prelhde to a state of literary 
tinent's secrets, gathering our grace. 


string for what would inev- 
itably follow: The Book. 

The photograph is quite a 
thing really. Here we all are: 


Or. perhaps, a grand de- 
lusion. 

For how many journalists 
really mak e it across that di- 


Chuck; Robert Rosenthal of vide? How many postpone 
The Philadelphia Inquirer, the dream for so long that the 


The Philadelphia Inquirer, 
John Borrell. then of Time; 
Ray Wilkinson, then of New- 
sweek. Our faces brim with 


— were correctiy treated. _ Artists have been . cri- Church presuming to “reba- 
The article notes that the tiquing society and the insti- bilitate** Galileo, whom it 
three committed their acts of ration of art since long before once forced to recant the sci- 
vandaiism “during a night of Duchamp at the beginning of entific truths he had dis- 


There was already for so many c 
something utterly grotesque spirits, death 
about the Roman Catholic fused on a here 
Church presuming to * ‘reha- the book somehi 
bilitate** Galileo, whom it a truncated life. 


fused on a heroic scale as if an African river, thousands of 
the book somehow vindicated unbridgeable miles from New 


tions or an agreement to sit it self-confidence. The future is 
out, one more day, on a ours, vast with poteniiaL In 
shaded verandah overlooking the photograph, we are all 


But I don't think Chuck 
Powers would have wanted it 


shaded verandah overlooking the photograph, we are all 
an African river, thousands of Hemingway or Stanley, 
unbridgeable miles from New Scratch a reporter, of 
York or Los Angeles ' Most of course, and you will find an 


risks become too great? Sud- 
denly, the Master of the Uni- 
verse is departed and middle 
age turns die scales: on one 
side, the dream — bn the oth- 
er, the tuition fees, the mort- 
gage and the pension, loose 
teeth and failing limbs. 

Chuck Powers made it 


sirion. In the age of down- 
sizing, it took a buyout from 
the Los Angeles Times topro- 
pel the correspondent from 
Poland — where his novel is 
set — to Bennington, Ver- 
mont, where he finished his 
book. 

By all accounts, it was a 
troubled, painful time for 
Chuck and for those who 
loved him. If it produced a 
fine book, it also produced its 
share of rage and heartbreak, 
sickness and ultimately, 
death. 

The self-destruction of 
genius is. of course, one of 
tiiose myths that sustains the 
poet. But, looking again at the 
old photograph from Chad, I 
can i believe that this was a 
doom foretold, a virus in that 
golden blossom of self-as- 
suredness. And I know that 
Chuck could not have wanted 
it this way. 

The writer is the New York 
Times bureau chief in Bonn 
and a former Africa corre- 
spondent for the same news- 
paper. He is the author of a 
work of nonfiction — "Killing 
the Wizards: Wars of Power 
and Freedom from Zaire to 
South Africa." He contrib- 
uted this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


beer drinking” and thus were .tins century., It k suipnsing covered, hr that instance, it this way. The Book ~ as 'mo- 
driving around intoxicated as that a contemporary ait critic was clearly the church, rather tivation, ambition, rationale 
well. While they were not would be looking for “tra- than Galileo, that was in need — was central to what he 
peisonally involved in the ditional artistic genres” in the of rehabilitation. wished to achieve, and I think 


pereonally involved in the rational artistic genres in the 
crash, what they did while form of pretty sculptures or 
they were under die influence delightful paintings in this 
of alcohol renders them just day and age. 


as responsible as any drunken 
driver. 

NICHOLAS FRIEDMAN. 

Milan. 

^ Wliat Thpv like ‘‘documenta X” in Kassel, if the church’s next move may 

J Germany, has presented one not be to canonize Hitler. 

Regarding " The Franks : of the first big shows in recent LEONARDO de 

Their Times and Treasures " years to acknowledge a role ARREABALAGA y PRADO. 
Uurie 14) by Souren Meliki - for ait in today’s society. Madrid. 

an: There are countless artists 

We hope (hat no one is working today who seek to * Rorrolnna 

moved to dismiss the exhibits find a role for art in forms that 

at the Petit Palais in Paris and are political as well as poetic. a warning to visitors to 

the Musfie des Anriquit£s in With MTV, advertising, Barcelona: During a short 
S ainl-Germain -en-Laye on events like the made-for-tele- stay there, three of the mem- 
the Franks and Merovingians vision Gulf War, and Hoi- bers of ray tour , group were 
based on Mr. Mefikian's re- lywood domination, the splashed with white liquid 
view. In reviewing the Petit world is shifting from textual while in the subway. Fortu- 
Palais exhibition in particu- literacy to image literacy, so nately, we had nothing 
lar , 1 Mr. Me liltian seems to the need for intelligent dis- snatched away. But we were 
have expected ah an show course on image making has forced to give up a visit to the 
instead of the carefully de- never been more urgent . Picasso museum, 
signed archeological and his- As one of the “hardy ex- According to our guide, the 

torical exhibition presented, plorers” who has read the Spanish tourist bureau re- 
As professional historians, “documenta X” catalogue in peatedly warns Japanese vis- 
we were impressed by the full, I can assure Mr. Gal- itors about crime. But would it 
quality and enga g in g nature loway that the “mnsings” not be better if the authorities 
of these two shows. These are contained within by some of chased the rascals out of the 
historical exhibitions, de- the finest intellectuals and city center instead of laying 
sighed to teach people about artists of the last 50 years upon visitors the responsibil- 
the Franks. It is scarcely a would concur with the cur- ity of protecting themselves? 
‘^cheap populist .approach” ator’s premise that concern- If Barcelona's leaders do 
to provide expository text that porary artistic practices are root out the villains, I will 
makes clear to the .visitor the “a vital source of imaginary never visit the city a gain , 
surprising degree of sophis- and symbolic representations TSUTOMU hoshima. 

ticarion of Frankish life, or to whose diversity is irreducible Hiroshima. Japan. 


tivation, ambition, rationale 
— was central to what he 

rational artistic genres” in the of rehabilitation. wished to achieve, and I think 

form of pretty sculptures or But what are we to think he would have wanted his 
delightful paintings in this now of the campaign to re- new life as a successful author 
day and age. habilitate Savonarola, who to lead somewhere. I don’t 

Rather than suggesting that led mobs of adolescent thugs dunk he wanted to draw a 
works like these have lost all in burning books and works 'final line in the final pages of 
their contemporary relev- 0 f art? This oversteps the a single, posthumous novel, 
ance, as Mr. Galloway states, bounds of mere grotesque- I got to know Chuck 
Catherin David, the curator of ness, and leads one to wonder Powers and his wife at the 
‘Vlru-umfnra Y” in KacsAl nAvrmnm mnu rime, rhe author Phervl Bent- 


DO YOU LIVE IN 


“documenta X” in Kassel, 
Germany, has presented one 
of the fust big shows in recent 
years to acknowledge a role 
for ait in today's society. 

There are countless artists 
working roday who seek to 
find a role for art to forms that 
are political as well as poetic. 
With MTV, advertising, 
events like the made-for-tele- 
vision Gulf War, and Hol- 
lywood domination, the 
world is shifting from textual 


Palais exhibition in particu- literacy to image literacy, so 
lar, Mr. Meliltian seems to the need for intelligent dis- 


have expected ah an show course on image making has 
instead of the carefully de- never been more urgent . 
signed archeological and his- As one of the “hardy ex- 
teirical exhibition presented, plorers” who has read the 
As- professional historians, “documenta X" catalogue in 
we were impressed by die full, I can assure Mr. Gal- 
quality and engaging nanire loway that the “mnsings” 


signed to teach people about artists of the last 50 years 
the Franks. It is scarcely a would concur with the cur- 
‘ ‘cheap populist approach” ator’s premise that contem- 


a vital source of imaginary never visit the city again , 
ad symbolic representations TSUTOMU HOSHIMA. 

hose diversity is irreducible Hiroshima, Japan. 


time, the author Cheryl Bent- 
sen, 16 years ago in Nairobi, 
where he was the Los Angeles 
Times bureau chief. Chuck 
and I traveled together. We 
caroused together. We rode 
our big, red-tanked trail bikes 
together past the long-horned 
cattle and the herds of giraffe 
nibbling on the acacia trees in 
die Rift Valley. 

I didn't know him as well as 
others did, but I knew that he 
was a changeable man, im- 
mensely charming and utterly 1 
irascible, endowed with good i 
looks that he was aware of, a 
man who did not need to 
struggle for friendship be- 
cause friendship was always 
offered to him without con- 
ditions. 

But the abiding memory is 
of Chuck in his den in Nairobi 
after some trip or other, a 
stand-up typewriter perched 
on an old-fashioned wooden 
desk, waiting for just the right 
word ot phrase to waft 
through his open doors from 
the sunlight and birdsong and 
scented tropical blossom in 


MILO, 

SuwWr? 


Balkan 

SUCCESS. 


Do YOU 
$ .live.' 

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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. JULY 4, 1997 


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Adverti semen t INTERNATIONAL FUNDS July 3, 1997 

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JtKILL LYNCH GLOBAL CURRENCY 

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evxernationajl herald tribune 

FRIDAY. JULY 4, 1997 


Simenon 


0 Milas 100 


pigeons, so it is difficult to read except 
for the words “With the collaboration 
of the national lottery” and “Built with 
public subscription.” One day this 
spring, a cord had been tied around the 
neck of the bust and an envelope sus- 
pended from if The envelope, which 
-y was not sealed, contained a message, 
-O bot it seemed indiscreet to read it. In a 
good world, it would be a fan letter. 






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RAGE 11 


fThe Little Boy 
Of Outremeuse 

By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 

L IEGE, Belgium — The Liege 
that Georges Simenon left in 
December 1922 on the night 
train to glory in Paris was a 
booming city, not the morose place it is 
now. Steel made it boom. ”The great 
blast furnaces of Liege rose along the 
line like ancient castles burning in a 
border raid,” wrote Graham Greene in 
his novel “Orient Express.” 

■ Decades later. Simenon said in his 
memoirs: "I left Liege for Paris, where 
I had been promised a job as secretary to 
Mf a writer, very famous at the time but 
v forgotten today. ’ ’ He added that he took 
“flight from Liege toward adventure" 
l— learning to become the writer of 
more than 350 books by first churning 
our 80-typewritten pages of pulp novels 
a day under such pseudonyms as Gom 
Got; Plick & Plock. Poum. Zetre and, of 
course, Georges Sim. as he was nick- 
named in Belgium. (“Too literary*, my 

. little Sim,” Colette 

' t .. neth. - I justly said of his 
s early writing. 
L^Bn*55# ~ ■ £ “Make it simpler, 

~ V. ■ Uegfr'i® simpler and sim- 

asflwcp'NpELGlUM ) 

FfWKS g Three months 

xlcfl after he left, he re- 
{0 Mites 100 turned to Liege for 

■+[}' . two days to be mar- 

; ried. His first wife, Regine Renchon. 
whom he called Tigy, he had met at 17 
when he was a reporter for the Gazette 
de Uege. They were introduced through 
an student friends. She was a painter, 
which was another reason for the move 
to Paris, he wrote. It put them both at the 
heart of things, which Liege was surely 
not Nevertheless he knew that it had 
formed him: In Paris, ”1 remained un- 
shakably the little boy from Outre- 
mense. that special, separate area across 
the river from the heart of Liege. ’ ’ 
Many buildings associated with Si- 
menon both in central Liege and the 
Outremeuse district still stand, and the 
city’s tourist office has linked them in 
what a brochure calls the Simenon 
Route, a walking tour. It’s a way to 
explore the comatose city even if some 
of the 13 points of interest have only a 
vague relation to die writer — the Place 
St Lambert, for example, where his 
mother worked in the haberdashery de- 
partment of a large store. 

The tie-in grows stronger farther along, 
at No. 24 Rue Leopold, where Simenon 
was bom just after midnight on Feb. 13, 

1 903. A gold plaque on the stucco and stone 
U building reports this and does not add that, 

• be cause the 13th was a Friday, his mother 
had his birth registered as Feb. 12. 

■Five months later the family moved 
around the comer to No. 5 Rue de 
Gueldre, now a ramshackle building 
opposite a tattoo parlor. Two years later, 
another move, this time across the 
Meuse River and into the Outremeuse 
section, “a sort of parallel city famed 
for its anti-authoritarian spirit and love 
of tradition.’ ’ says the brochure. 

“We were poor," Simenon wrote. “Not 
really poor, not at the very bottom. My 
father was a cleric, a bookkeeper.” The 
family’s first home there, from 1905 to 
1911, was No. 25 Rue Pasteur, now Rue 
Georges Simenon. The row bouse was 
built jusr before the rum of the century, is 
. three-stoiy brick and looks like all the other 
’ houses in nearby streets, including No. 53 
Rne de la Loi, where Simenon lived from 
1911 to 1917 and went to school across (he 
street, and No. 29 Rue de l’Enseignement, 
1919 till his departure in 192Z None are 
tpm to the public. ; 

■ More accessible is the Place du Con- 
gres y the meeting point for six streets. “I 
had marvelous moments there,'' Simen- 
on wrote of his boyhood. In the center of 
the traffic circle, stands a bust of Si- 
menon. He is wearing a fedora, appears 
to have a cigarette butt in his mouth and 
to be wearing a trenchcoat. 

; The inscription on the plinth has been 
worn by die weather and streaked by 





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Author Georges Simenon. 


Liege has changed considerably since Simenon lived there, but glimpses of his city can be seen in the Outremeuse area, across the Meuse river pom the new town: inset. St. Jacques church. 


DINING 


In the Master’s Footsteps, the Essence of Bistro 


By Patricia Wells 

lmemutionut Htr.tU Tribune 


P ARIS — Imitation, they say. 
is the grearesr form of flattery. 
If that’s the case, then chefs 
such as Joel Robuchon and 
Guy Savoy should be very flattered 
indeed, since their creations show up — 
in one form or another — on a multitude 
of tables and in cookbooks around the 
world. 

The multitalented Savoy has cer- 
tainly made his mark in Paris, with his 
own gastronomic restaurant and nu- 
merous bistros run by his growing or- 
ganization. But since last fall, chef 
Franck Paquier — a former Savoy chef 
— has had the audacity (o carbon-copy 
the Savoy formula under bis own wing’s 
and his own power. 

Warm and Welcoming 

It would be a shame and a restaurant 
not worth visiting if Paquier did not 
execute Savoy’s recipes to a T. But the 
fact is. he does. And the decor and the 
ambience reflect the savoir faire that 
makes a modem bistro so welcoming, 
so easy to enjoy without fanfare or 
effort. 

Nothing says bistro like the crush of 
elbows, the pleasing-aromas of roasting 


meat and poultry, the joyful noise of 
people having a great time ar table. 
Enter L’O a la Bouche on any given 
night and that's what you'll find: a 
cacophony of good-time sounds and 
mouthwatering smells. 

Begin, if you will, with the delightful 
salade multi cot ore de gumbos cruusnl- 
lantes an sesame, one of my favorites 
first introduced several years ago at 
Savoy's La Butte ChaiUot near Tro- 
cadero. Four ultra-fresh giant shrimp 
are breaded with a touch of sesame 
seeds and deep-fried, then set atop a 
salad of matchsticfc-slieed beers, greens 
and varied vegetables. Light, perky, 
with Asian overtones, it's for the sum- 
mer. a sure taste of the 1990s. 

Less successfully executed was the 
tarte of tomato and mozzarella, a 
layered affair attempting to capture the 
fine Italian sun. but marred by boring 
cheese and Tomatoes that had’ a taste- 
less. northern personality. 

I have always adored Savo y'&duradc 
en ecailles. whole fresh sea bream 
• dropped, with skin and scales, into sizz- 
ling fat until the scales son of stand up 
like goose bumps. The result is ultra- 
crisp. crusty, crunchy. All this was set 
on a bed of luscious crushed cooked 
potatoes laced with olive oil. Yum! just 
as satisfying is the entrecote a la 
mignonette, a nice slice of juicy beef rib 


steak paired with a fine macaroni 
gratin. 

The wine list was obviously written 
by someone who knows little about 
wine (or hopes that the clientele knows 
nothing! since the nomenclature is 
bizarre, to say the least. A Cotes-du- 
Rhone is listed as simply coming from 
the Plan de Dieu. a sun-drenched, 
windswept expanse of land near Orange 
that produces great, mediocre and aw- 
ful wines, so die names give you no 
indication at all. Burgundies and Bor- 
deaux are mixed and matched as though 
they were interchangeable, and prices 
make no sense whatsoever. 

But go. without a care in the world, 
and enjoy the nicely priced 140 franc 
($24 > menu i if you don't want dessert. 
180 francs if you do). 

T RYING to join the same league 
but not quite succeeding is the 
new and popular Le Bistro de 
I’Olivier. not far from the Champs- 
Elysees. The first impression is pos- 
itive. with a warm welcome, a lovely 
golden decor and a display of Provencal 
posters. 

The end result was close to dis- 
astrous: A lion of aubergine that was no 
more than a quick-cooked layering of 
eggplanr, grilled green peppers and to- 
matoes slathered with goat cheese and 


slipped under the grill, no comparison 
to the classic country vegetable tian 
cooked for hours to a soft, glazed ten- 
derness. Equally misnamed was the 
barigoule of tuna made with giant Brit- 
tany artichokes, grossly oversized 
chunks of bacon, huge slices of carrots 
and a thick sauce that had no place in 
this supposedly light environment. 
When one anticipates tiny violet ar- 
tichokes from Provence braised in a 
delicately perfumed mix of fresh herbs, 
cubed bacon, cubed carrots and a touch 
of tomato, one's bound to be disap- 
pointed. And the tiny ravioli arrived as 
more a soup than a pasta course, swim- 
ming in sauce and unstemmed thyme 
rough enough to choke you — like 
eating weeds with cream. The saving 
gratre was the fabulous 1995 Cotes-du- 
Rhone from the Domaine Saint Esteve. 
a steal at 1 10 francs. 

L’O a la Bouche. 157 Boulevard 
Montparnasse. Paris 6: tel: 01-43-26- 
20-53: fax: 01-13-26^3^0. Closed 
Sunday and Monday. Credit card: l isa. 
Menus at 140 and ISO francs. 

Le Bistro de l Oli i ier. 1 3 rue 


Quentin-Bauchan. Paris S: tel: 01-47- 
20-17-00. fax: 01-47-20-17-04. Closed 
Saturday lunch and Sunday. No credit 


card. Menus at ISO (lunch only) and 
190 francs. A la carte. 200 francs, not 
including wine and sen-ice. 



'.«.uu « - lull 17 


Rediscovering Genoa: Not Business, but Pleasure 


By Roderick Conway Morris 

Iniemorionul Herald Tribune 




G ENOA — “It abounds in the 
strangest contrasts — things 
that are picturesque, ugly, 
mean, magnificent, delight- 
ful, and offensive break upon the view at 
every turn,” wrote Charles Dickens, 
during an extended stay here in 1 844, 
and this diverting h agger-mugger of the 
good, the bad, the unsightly and the 
beautiful, which the novelist came to 
relish, remains the essence of Genoa's 
character today. 

Once a popular resort even for those 
not coming here to board ship for other 
Mediterranean destinations, the city has 
for some years been our of fashion. It is 
still Italy's busiest port, but mass air 
travel and the shift of much cruising to 
more exotic waters have reduced its im- 
portance as a passenger terminal: the 
docks have been plagued by manage- 
ment and labor problems, and traditional 
local industries nave been in decline. All 
of which has undermined the old cer- 
tainties and die unquestioned conviction 
that Genoa’s principal business is busi- 
ness and stimulated a rediscovery, even 
by the Genoese themselves, of die city’s 
artistic and recreational assets. 

A turning point occurred in 1992 
when, as part of the celebrations of the 
500th anniversary of the city’s most fa- 
mous son’s voyage to America, the Gen- 
oese architect Renzo Piano opened up the 
previously walled-off waterfront of the 
Old Port, restored the old warehouses for 
public uses and, with Peter Chermayeff, 
built the Aoquario. Europe’s largest 
aquarium, on a pier projecting out into 
the harbor. This splendid coomlex now 
bouses 5,000 marine animals or 500 spe- 
cies — including, for example, sane 
extremely rare Mediterranean monk 
seals — and is due for further expansion. 
At the same time die Carlo Felice Opera 
House, derelict since it was gutted in a 
bombing raid in 1944, was rebuilt, and 
the grandiose P alazz o Ducale trans- 
formed into a cultural center, with gal- 
leries. cafSs and restaurants. 

Emphasizing the Vertical 

Genoa’s cityscape has been formed by 
its position on a strip of shore hemmed in 
by an amphitheater of steeply rising 
mountains . Space was already at a 
premium hundreds of years ago, and the 
solution has been to build up and up. This 
has produced one of the most striking 
surviving historic centers in the world — 
die Old Town, where even Renaissance 
palaces and’ ancient tenement blocks are 
seven or more stories high, skyscrapers 
by the standards of their tunes. 

The Genoese, moreover, were clearly 
in the habit of thinking streets a criminal 
waste of potential real estate, so these 
buildings ended up separated by the nar- 



#v 


RndmcV Mm- 

San Donato Church in Old Town. left;, the Palazzo Reale. and a family monument in the Staglieno Cemetery. 


rawest lanes and alleys, called carugi. 
The upshot is a densely populated war- 
ren that teems with pedestrians during 
the day, and seems sometimes like an 
Oriental bazaar. And, curiously enough, 
not only does Genoa have the distinction 
of providing the setting for one of the 
tales in “The Arabian Nights," but also 
appears elsewhere in Islamic literature, 
such as in the legendary folk epic of 
Sultan Baybars, where the Muslim prin- 
cess Miriam is drugged, kidnapped and 
imprisoned by the infidels in Genoa. In 
the past ihe Old Town had a somewhat 
unsavory reputation, but the police pres- 
ence is now more visible and during 
daylight hours it should be as safe as any 
other Italian city center. 

Hidden away in this labyrinth are 
some gems of Romanesque ecclesiast- 
ical architecture, whose arches and al- 


ternating bands of dark gray and white 
stone give an almost Moorish effect. The 
hushed interiors of these oases provide 
instant sanctuary from the bustle out- 
side, and they have an atmosphere of 
extraordinary antiquity and timeless 
tranquillity. Three of the finest of these 
are: Santa Maria di Castello, reputed to 
be the city’s oldest church, with an ex- 
ceptional 15th-cenmry fresco of the An- 
nunciation in its cloisters; San Donato, 
with a dazzling early 16th-century trip- 
tych by Joos Van Cleve, and San Matteo, 
ihe church of the noble Doria family. 

So dense is the Old Town ’s fabric that 
even a very substantial building like the 
16th-century P alazzo Spinola is almost 
tost in the maze, but it is well worth 
seeking out, since the interior gives a 
good impression of what life was once 
Uke for the city’s immensely wealthy 


banking aristocracy, and the top floors 
house a gallery, whose pictures include 
Antonello da Messina’s celebrated 
"Ecce Homo.” 

magnates and mansions Renais- 
sance ideas about urban planning led in 
1558 to the laying out of a wide thor- 
oughfare on the edge of the congested 
Old Town, the Strada Nuova (New 
Street), now called Via Garibaldi. The 
Genoese magnates vied with one an- 
other in the magnificence of the man- 
sions they built along it, making it a kind 
of Millionaires' Row, These families’ 
passion for ait have left the city with 
several superb public collections of 
Italian, Flemish and Netherlandish Old 
Masters, notably those now at the 
Palazzo Bianco and Rosso. 

Originally the palaces lining Via 


Garibaldi, which is slightly higher than 
the heart of the Old Town, had good 
views over the harbor, but most of these 
have been obscured by the city's re- 
lentless vertical tendencies. To gain a 
better impression of these lost outlooks, 
one needs to visit the Palazzo Reale on 
Via Balbi, near the Principe train sta- 
tion. The palace has a series of wide 
balustraded terraces on the seaward 
side, elaborate 18th-century interiors 
and some good paintings. 

Beyond the station is an idiosyncratic 
mansion, the Palazzo del Principe, a for- 
tified seaside villa built outside the city 
walls in the 1520s by Andrea Doria. the 
most famous representative of this family 
that played a leading role in Genoa's 
history- Doria (1466/8-1560), seafarer, 
warrior, statesman and patron of the aits, 
had his own fleet of war galleys, which he 
commanded as a mercenary admiral well 
into old age. and used to anchor at the end 
of his gardens when he was in Genoa. 

T HE grounds on the landward side 
were expropriated long ago to 
build rail lines, and the gardens 
running down to the shore have since 
been sliced in half by a noisy freeway — 
making the palazzo a prime example of 
the damage inflicted on Genoa *s heritage 
by ruthless modernization and haphaz- 
ard town planning. (The palazzo is, 
nonetheless, still important, not least be- 
cause its innovative interior decoration 
was highly influential on many local 
buildings. Opening rimes are rather lim- 
ited, but can be checked by phoning 255- 
509. from 9 A.M. to 1 P.M.) The Doria 
Pamphilj family, which has just com- 
pleted a comprehensive renovation of its 
gallery in Rome, hopes to restore the 
layout of the Principe gardens, and if the 
freeway could be made an underpass as 
pan of wider proposals by Piano and his 
supporters, the villa might yet become a 
symbol of Genoa’s regeneration. 

The Genoese have a reputation for 
being "careful” with money, which 
may go some way toward explaining 
why one can eat very well at moderate 
cost in and near the cosmopolitan Old 
Town. Among the best of the reasonably 
priced gastronomic havens are Pintori 
(68 Via San Bernardo, tel. 275-7507 j, 
which serves Sardinian and seafood 
dishes; Nabil (21 Vico Falamonica, tel. 
200-696). for Arab cuisine: and for tra- 
ditional Genoese specialties. Gran Caffe 
Roberti and Ristorante Ducale, in the 
Palazzo Ducale cultural center (5 Piazza 
Matteoti, tel. 588-040). and Ristorante 
Europa, which is open till 2 A.M. (53 
Galleria Mazzini, tel. 581-259). 

On Piazza Matteoti there is also La 
Tavola del Doge, an excellem source of 
Ligurian olive oils, wines, cheeses, sala- 
mis, pastas, ready-made pesto sauces 
and special basil to make die most per- 
fect homemade pesto (tel. 562-880; open 
Tuesday Through Sunday). 


i 




'PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 

LEISURE 


«*H'S FASHION 

Armani: 
Shapes of 
Summer 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


M ILAN — The first men's 
runway show from Prada 
was supposed to set off 
male fashion's Big Bang. 
But it didn't happen. 

The clothes sent out by a house that 
has had such a meteoric rise in the 1990s 
were good, strong casual pieces in soft, 
gourmet colors: peach, nectarine, 
crushed raspberry, clotted cream. They 
were modem in cut and fabric and easy 
to like — but not a style revolution. 

It was Giorgio Armani who closed the 
spring-summer season Thursday on a 
high note. His powerful collection 
didn't chahge the fashion world either, 
but it showed the designer in good form, 
introducing new cuts — especially for 
slim pants and shapely jackets. 

* ‘There is no point in changing all die 
time when you ask people to invest in 
something, 1 ' said Armani after pointing 
out the subtle details of an elongated 
business suit with vertical-slit pockets. 

- Armani has an established empire of 
stores to service, but he made that theme 
a light task as quiet suits, taut sweaters, 
floating shirt jackets, golf wear, jeans 
and exotic pareos strode briskly down 
the runway. Only the ending, with 20 
young studio designers lining up for the 
ovation, emphasized the awesome job 
of clothing men for all seasons and 
reasons. 

Armani's innovation was the intro- 
duction of slim-line pants, which, along 
with fly-front fastenings on some suits, 
gave a streamlined silhouette. Other 
changes were in texture: check-weave 
jackets with grainy pants or billowing 
silk suits with a sheen. Although colors 
were mainly muted, with dark shins and 
ties, there would be a sudden flowering 
of rose pink or shoots of spring green. 

Armani's skill is in incorporating the 
new effortlessly and showing everything 
with restraint. Even his dhoti pants 
wrapped around swimwear wouldn't 
frighten away the classic customer. 

Miuccia Prada has a house whose 
fortune is in its accessories. She played 
with fabric, texture and proportions, but 
her biggest statement was on pant 
lengths (short to shorter), worn with 
thick wrinkled socks and an ethnic-style 
rubber-sole shoe that looks like a win- 


SNAKES AND LADDERS: 
j Glimpses of Modern India 

By Gita Mehta. 297 pages. $22.95. 
Doubleday. 

Reviewed by Michael Gorra 

A T a dinner party this spring I sat 
between two novelists from South 
. Asia and listened to them talk about 
■ contemporary Indian politics. Was there 
■ any chance that the former prime min- 
• isier.NarasimhaRao.mighrgotojailon 
corruption charges? How about the re- 
lation between the Hindu fundamen- 
talist Bharatiya Janata Party and the 
thugs of Bombay's Shiv Sena? Did the 
Congress Party really think it could 
. bring down the government? Die con- 
versation was racily full of India's 
■ lifeblood of gossip, and I found to my 
surprise that I could follow it all. But 
then I had just finished reading Gita 
Mehta's "Snakes and Ladders." 

Published to celebrate the 50th an- 
niversary of India's independence from 
Britain, "Snakes and Ladders" takes its 
title from a board game in winch a roll of 
the dice determines "how many squares 
a player may move. ’ 1 Landing at the foot 
of a ladder lets you climb it, " sometimes 
moving thirty squares in a single throw." 
But landing on a snake means you have 
to slide back down "'while your gleeful 
opponents (streak) past." For Mehta the 
game provides an apt metaphor for post- 
colonial India, a country that sometimes 
seems to have "vaulted over the painful 
stages experienced by other countries, 
lifted by ladders we had no right to 
expecL 1 ' But at other moments, she adds, 
"we have been swallowed by the snakes 
of past nightmares, finding ourselves . . . 
back at square one." 

Mehta’s "glimpses of modem India” 
stand as an attempt to “explain" the 
country to herself, an explanation that 
provides a user-friendly guide to die 
many snakes who have stuck their fangs 
into contemporary Indian politics. She 



begins with an account of her parents' 
involvement in the Independence move- 
ment that echoes Wordsworth — "Bliss 
was it in that dawn to be alive." But 
Mehta then showshow the promised land 
of independence has been weakened by 
the dominance of the Nehiu-Gandhi dy- 
nasty. Her analysis seems fair enough; 
nevertheless it will be familiar to anyone 
who has read much about the country. 
What’s fresh about it is the deftness with 
which she weaves personal anecdote into 
political chronicle. So she describes at- 
tending a rally against Indira Gandhi's 
experiment in totalitarian rule, the 
"Emergency” of 1975-77, a rally held in 
Delhi's enormous Friday Mosque. The 
government cut off the electricity, and the 
resulting “darkness . . . added a somber- 
ness to the occasion . . . allowing us to see 
the great mosque as it must have been 
seen by’’ the Moghul emperors who built 
it, “its massive lines . . . undiminished by 
...neon.” And as for Gandhi’s claim that 
Indir a was India and India Indir a — well, 
I admire the drop-dead insouciance with 
which Mehta describes, being "bored to 
tears" by such "overbearing leaders." 

India’s ladders are more tentatively 
described. On one level they have to do 
with such things as the existence of a 
free press, and the continued function- 
ing, despite massive corruption, of In- 
dian democracy; with the fact as well 
that the country has become self-suf- 
ficient in food. But Mehta is also fas- 
cinated by the resilience of her fellow 
citizens, the ingenuity with which they 
manage to scrape up a living in the most 
difficult circumstances. In one of the 
book’s most memorable chapters, she 
functions as a subcontinental Studs Ter- 
kel. interviewing ragpickers at work in 
Delhi’s garbage dumps. And Mehta re- 
mains exhilarated by the astonishing 
scale of India, which beggars that of 
Western Europe — a country whose 
"lack of homogeneity" means that 
“most Indians view most other Indians 
as foreigners.” 


BRIDGE 


In Australia, the Rich Web of Desert Life 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Tunes Str ict 


probably best to start the desert journey 
in the Visitor Center near the entrance 
with a 20-minute film describing 4.5 


A LICE SPRINGS, Australia — , billion years of desert evolution. When 
A desert is a dry, barren, sandy the film ends, the giant screen rolls down, 
region, says Webster’s New revealing a wall of window with views of 
World Dictionary, naturally a stunning, roseate backdrop ridge. 


Pareo from Emporio Armani. 

ner. Another shoe, with a deliberately 
flattened shoe back (Gucci had them 
too) seems to be one of those so-hip-it- 
hurts trends. 

Viewed as building blocks in a mod- 
em wardrobe, Prada has some key 
items. Die show focused on the square, 
using it for the short-sleeved T-shaped 
shirt, the easy, boxy jacket, the wind- 
breaker and the car coat They came in 
flat, dry fabrics, with industrial fasten- 
ings like heavy zippers or patches of 
Velcro. As a poetic counterbalance, 
there were iridescent fabrics, cobweb- 
light sweaters and the soft colors — 
delicate mixes of powder-blush pink top 
with raspberry-sorbet pants, yellow 
with beige and blue with gray. 

So for, socooL But without a firm basis 
of clothes for work, the Prada collection, 
for all its well-designed items, seemed 
like a light and tasty meal missing amain 
course. But then that is modem too. 

T WO American designers staged 
still-life presentations. Calvin 
Klein has opened a store in Milan 
for his CK line, and showed a new 
collection that included suits as well as 
sportswear pieces from sweaters 
through parkas. In a botanical garden, 
John Bartlett played out a Jamaican 
cricket-meets-voodoo theme — all 
white flannels and striped and ribbed 
sweaters shown on guys with attitude. 

After the Armani show, the fashion 
crowd decamped in disarray to Paris, 
where, owing to the chaotic scheduling, 
the French menswear collections started 
on Thursday. 


BOOKS 


aEj gm region, says Webster s New 
world Dictionary, naturally 
incapable of supporting almost any life. 
A visitor to the arid lands that make up70 
percent of Australia might concur on the 
virtual absence of life — except perhaps 
for the flies that mass out of nowhere to 
storm ear, eye, nose and throat. 

Yet a new park five miles west of 
Alice Springs, a modem town of 25,000 
in the hot center of Australia, shows the 
desen to be a rich and diverse envir- 
onment One square mile of spiky spi- 
nifex grasslands may be home to 40 
different kinds of lizards. They burrow 
into the earth, climb trees, actually swim 
over the sand and live inside clumps of 
the grass next to die bristly seed heads. 
The red gum tree, a eucalyptus, is an- 
other kind of boarding house for native 
birds, ma mmals and insects. A hunts- 
man spider hides under a piece of loose 
baric. Termites eat through dead wood, 
recycling nutrients for the tree. 

This "biopaik" displays 350 native 
plant species and 120 native animal 
species, several on the brink of ex- 
tinction, like the hare wallaby, related to 
the kangaroo, or the greater stick-nest 
rat, a rodent that builds its abode from 
sticks. The park’s breeding programs 
aim to save these and other endangered 
species. The theme of the 3,000-acre 
( 1 , 200 -hectare) park, set against the 
backdrop of the West MacDonnell 
mountain range, is the web of desert life. 
Opened on March 23, the park is part of 
a major environmental education and 
research venture to promote the natural 
history of the Australian desert. 

Good vistas and shade spots abound, 
but since the area is still young, some of 
the 20,000 plants in me park seem 
scrawny. Visitors tread a one-mile, 
wheelchair-accessible path through 
three desert habitats — sand dunes, 
woodlands and mostly dry rivers — 
where plants and animals are presented 
in relation to their use by Aborigines. 
Visitors are urged not to stray from the 
paths because of possible damage to 
new plantings. Aboriginal guides tell 
how their forebears used the desert’s 
resources. 

Visitors to the woodlands habitat stroll 
in a large wire-fenced enclosure with 
gray-green emus and red kangaroos. 
Legless lizards, and tower-buiklmg ter- 
mites move freely in the exhibits in sand 
country; in die riveriands section, red- 
tailed black cockatoos and white-faced 
herons strut amid the gum trees. The 
paths form a series of rough circles with- 
in dicles with linkups that allow people 
to take exhibits in any order. But it's 


Mehta’s strongest chapters are not, 
however, the ones in which she makes 
such large cultural claims. Instead she’s 
at her best when her subjects seem at 
their most modest and most personal. 1 
enjoyed the wicked eye with w’hich she 
describes the visit to India of an Amer- 
ican corporate group called the "Young 
Presidents' Organization.” a descrip- 
tion that recalls her 1980 “Karma 


revealing awali of window with views of 
a stunning, roseate backdrop ridge. 

My wife and I beaded for the Noc- tJ sn ecnuiu. » — r 

tumal House to see animals that stir only ea«u dining We watched a - 2 -year- „ about” 

at night Day or night, most of the an- old English falconer, Paul Mander. wno Springs Desert Park » five 

imals here — from long-tailed quolls has been flying and training buds since _r Springs. Hottgs; in 

(related to kangaroos) to the echidna (one he was 1 1 , whistle and fling something arrange for a round-trip bus 

of two egg-laying mammals , die other that looked like a rabbit at the end of a . t0 ^ pajfc for abour .$L 5 , 

being the platypus) — have rarely been siring into the air. He did tbis sev^ . , uding admission. Thepik is 
seal. As we arrived, Justin Harrison, one times before a great wedgetail eagle s ^ p j^, every aaV-but 

of the keepers, was extolling the virtues slowly descended from hot air Admission is $10. S5 for 
of the lesser hairy-footed dimnart, a mar- it had been riding with its eight-root J-J™ . . ^ or 525 fa- a family 
supial weighing a mere 10 to 15 grams (a wingspan. It circled the ndge, aLghtea cm: ^ ^ childran ). Allow at 

third to half an ounce). ‘‘A ferocious and on a gum tree, and finally landed on (rw 

brave hunter,” Harrison said of what Mander’s gloved hand. He clutched least . 'p^ ^ Wildlife 

inside its glass case looked like a baby straps on the bird’s legs and fed it raw k® ^ Northern Territory., 
mouse. “If weweren’troimpressedwith meat. , , Tit, nnu? Pn« Office BoxlW 6 . 

just size, the tiger would have nothing on Sheila and Hank Wiltjer from L^rapmta , Ancir»B» 


l. . • -i. wilrief said that he used to driven 
habitats, they don’t contain ^ctor-trailer in the desertandlhai he 

of prey. Perhaps the most thnUmg jWtof one 0 f these eagles lift a: 

each park day takes pUoem outdow kangaroo, which had been nm over bya 
Nature Theater around 3.30 P.M. wnai ^ j|s ^ I0 grab s hunk of 

ihire of these birds —the wedge tafleagle, As someone who had spent aJdtpf: 

the black-breasted buzzard and the bam ^'^tobitat. he offered (us ap- 
owl— are fed- nroval of the park: ,f You see tirc whote_ : 

EA«U DINING We watched a22-yej*- ,dea0fW ^^ 

old English falconer, Paul .Mander- who Springs Desert Paric &five 

has been flying and naimpg buds since _ .(r wes t 0 fSice Springs. Hottgs in'- 




luding park admission. The parit is 
n 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. every tobat 
■icrmflC Admission is $10. 'S5- .for- 


supial weighing a mere 1 0 to 1 5 grams (a 
thud to half an ounce). ‘ ‘A ferocious and 
brave hunter,” Harrison said of what 
inside its glass case looked like a baby 
mouse. “If we weren’t ro impressed with 


Cola,” a shaiply satiric account of the 
marketing of Indian spirituality in the 
West- She offers an enchanting essay on 
her own childhood reading, on “lending 
libraries . . . that Fit into garishly painted 
tin trunks, small enough to be strapped 
onto the backs of bicycles.” 

P ARTS of "Snakes and Ladders" 
betray their origins as magazine 
articles, pieces not only for Britain’s 
Sunday Times but for Vogue and House 
and Garden as well. The book seems to 
have a disjointed structure, its chapters 
loosely stitched together in a way that 
makes ir neither a onified whole nor a 
collection of fully individual essays. But 
Gita Mehta's voice is marked by 
warmth and charm, and this volume 
serves as a fine reminder as to why India 
remains, in the words that she lovingly 
quotes from Mark Twain, ‘ *the one land 
all men desire to see, and having seen 
once, by even a glimpse, would not give 
that glimpse for the shows of all the rest 
of the globe combined.” 

Michael Gorra. the author of “After 
Empire: Scon. Naipaul, Rushdie ," 
wrote this for The Washington Post. 


mouse, “ffweweren’t so impressed with 
just size, the tiger would have nothing on 
it" Rs dinner that day was a big disn of 
crickets and cockroaches. 

While aviaries exist in each of the three 


Temptress Moon 

Directed by Chen Kaige. China. 

In "Temptress Moon,” Chen Kaige 
("Farewell My Concubine”) has cre- 
ated an absorbing, atmospheric saga set 
in .Shan ghai of the 1920s. But of course, 
the 1994 movie is a metaphor for con- 

S Drary China and its sodo-political 
ems. When he is orphaned, young 
gliang (Leslie Cheung) becomes a 
ward of the wealthy Pang household, 
where his sister (He Saifei) is married to 
Zbengda (Zhou Yemang), the heir to the 
household. But the idealistic Zhong- 
liang learns that his prime household 
responsibility is to cater to Zhengda’s 
regular opium needs. When Zhengda 
forces the boy to kiss his sister for his 
delectation (there’s an implication that 
Zhongliang is ordered to do even more). 
Zhongliang escapes from the house- 
hold. Recruited by a Shanghai crime 
boss, he becomes a gigolo who seduces 
older, married women, then blackmails 
them for money. Meanwhile, the Pang 
patriarch has died. But Zhengda’s brain 
— mysteriously — has tnmed into 
mush. This leaves Zhengda’s younger 
sister Ruyi (Gong Li) and her cousin 
Duanwu (Kevin Lin) to take over the 
household Sent by his boss to seduce 
Ruyi for financial g ain, Zhongliang 
finds himself falling in love with his 
larest target. Kaige’s images (by cam- 
eraman Christopher Doyle) are exquis- 
ite, and the story has an entrancing, epic 
quality. But unlike the Films of Zhang 
Yimou, you're never drawn in as deeply 
as you 're supposed to be. Kaige keeps us 
at an aesthetic distance from his subject, 
which makes the human tragedy in this 
movie something to pity rather than 
empathize with. I Desson Howe. WP ) 

Dobermann 

Directed by Jan Kounen. France. 
“Dobermann” is not really about dogs, 
although the dogs are not the nastiest 
participants. A hood named "Dob” 
(Vincent Cassel) has been trained to kill. 
His gang includes a goof called Pit-Bull, 
a rabid priest and a deaf-mute gun moll 
(Monica Bellucci). a feline kind who 
hisses at high frequency and uses las- 
civious sign language. Not that anybody 
has time for talk. Some dialogues ex- 
press comic-strip chic in English — 
"Welcome to reality. Baby.” sneers the 
police chief (Tcheky Karyo) when he 
captures the gun moli, because the cops 
who are pursuing this lawless, witless 
gang beat up women, bait homosexuals, 
torture transsexuals, kidnap babies, 
snort up, vomit blood and generally have 
a ball. "Dobermann” is out to show that 
its bark is worse than its bite — hail to 
the new, kinetic, ami-intellectual French 
movie, bound for glory. (A U.S. "in- 
dependent” bought the rights at 
Cannes). Jan Kounen has taken some 
actors and inspiration from Luc Besson 
and Mathieu Kassovitz. his mentors in 
comic-book culture. There's a scene 
where one of Dob's boys relieves him- 


(two adults and four children). Allow at 
least three hours. - ... . 

Information; Parks and wijdjbfe 
Commission of the Norfoem Territory^ 
Larapinta Drive, Post Office Box 1046, 
ah r* Sn rines. N.T. 0871, Austeafe,-- 


aneua ana nan x tyuijw 7T r MT OR71 Anstrafe:-. 

Svdney, who decided to visit the out- Alice Spring , • - * fax(6t*5v 

bkk instead of Europe tins year, were Telephone (61-8) 8951 8788, tax (6 HI 


back instead of Europe tins year, were 
among 300 or so people watching. 1 

MOVIE GUIDE 


8951 8720. 


self on the street, then wipes up with a 
page tom from Cahiers au Cinema; a 
statement, no doubt. Except that with its 
long shots on snorting orgies and drag 
queen parties, "Dobermann" poses, 
grimaces and bays at its own jokes, and 
die action gets so excruciatingly slow 
that it’s hardly even a movie. The best 
you could say is that "Doberraann" 

tnighf make good home entertainment 

for neo-Nazis. (Joan Dupont. IHT) 

Buddy 

Directed by Caroline Thompson. US. 
The young Katharine Hepburn in her 
“Bringing Up Baby” days could have 
provided what * ‘Buddy’ ’ needs: the cer- 
tainty that it is perfectly sensible to treat 
chimpanzees as children and dress them 
in tailor-made Bergdorf Goodman baby 
clotiies. And Gertrude Lintz, the woman 
whose true story is sugarcoated by this 
extravagantly peculiar film, apparently 
had that same aplomb. Living grandly in 
Brooklyn in the 1920s, she presided 
over a large menagerie and particularly 
over Buddy, a gorilla extraordinaire 
who lived to be 54. In her autobio- 
graphy, she warmly wrote of Buddy as 
"a child of the human stem.” Watered 
down into a film that will baffle children 
and raise their parents’ eyebrows, life in 
the Lintz household (presided over by 
Gertrude and her staggeringly patient 
husband, a physician named Bill) takes 


on an impossible innocence, "Buddy”: 
sees nothing peculiar about a chimp in, - 

vestandnedcne.nordoes it wonder who ■ 

in this happy household has the chore of. £ . 
changing animal diapers. Insiead,. the ™ 

film just watches appreciatively while . 

Rene Russo, as a glamorous but bland : 
Gertrude, fondly mothers -her hairy " 
brood. Rnsso works hard, but it would : 
take at least the eccentricity of a Mi- 
chael Jackson to make sense of her - 
character’s zoological proclivities. Sub- 
text is unmentioned but unavoidable '., 
here. It’s in everything from Buddy’s 
whopping Oedipus complex to the pat- 
ronizing master-slave dynamics created 
by the XJntzes* anthropomorphic nur-. 
turing ideas. Yet the film never even 
finds it odd when Gertrude and Bill 
(played straight by the usually funny 
Robbie Coltrane) sublimate what are 
surely big marriage problems into tiie 
act of feeding little baby Buddy his /> 
bottle. This sense of oddness is not 
helped by a scared, feral-looking an- 
imatronic gorilla infant that is anything 
but cuddly and has no spark of life. 
"Buddy” was written and directed by 
Caroline Thompson, whose earlier 
screenplays ("Edward Scissoihands,’^ 
“The Nightmare Before Christmas." 
“Homeward Bound,” “Die Secret 
Garden”) had more heart and whimsy 
than the earnest films she has since 
directed. (Janet Maslin. NYT ) 



| a u 


Hurstftistorisi 

: ;se? 

:• -T =- ;;;? 

-.ere z‘. 
: : -s 

' * ; . 

VfiK - Austria) 

-i ’. 35 -; r 

"5S'5ӣV 
*• • - ‘ rc-ect! 

s-- - 


Gong Li and Leslie Cheung in Chen Kaige ’s ** Temptress Moon/' - 

CROSSWORD 


| Call to order 

this book... 

...or *350,000 other 
kf/||l | titles, arr-srtpped to 
1 H1IJ V^u from the U.S. 

■ Asit hr our Ime catalog of bestsalors 
■yj 33 (0) 1 39 07 01 01 fie 33 (0) 1 39 07 00 7T. 


ACROSS 

i Word after a 
loss 

9 It goes with 
being 

snowbound 
ts Cost of 
occupation 


• 18 ‘Forest 

primeval' figure 

17 Marriage site in 
John 2 i 

18 Nickname of 
Emperor 
Frederick » 

19 Short summary 


AGENCE CHAMPS RYSEES 

FuntehBd apartments, 3 months or 
more or unfurnished, residential areas. 


By Alan Truscott 


Teams, the standings were:- teen able to underlead either match, putting them in a qual- 
Britain, 418 Fiance, 413; Is- of his black aces to score a ifying position and reducing 
rael 402: Italy, 383: Nether- third ruff. the British hopes substan- 


A FAVORED Italian team land 
led into the final day of will 
play at the European Cham- Tun 
pionships in Montecatini, T 
Italy, and it seemed likely to fails 
retain the title it won two opp 
years ago. deal 

The standings were: Italy, A 
597 victory points; Poland, tion 
588; France, 573; Norway, by i 
567; Denmark, 550. Five siblt 
teams will qualify for the arrh 
World Team championships doul 
in October. If 

Strong teams from Britain, sing 


rael 402: Italy, 383: Nether- 
lands, 381. Again, five teams 
will qualify to play in 
Tunisia. 

Die British East-West 
failed to take advantage of an 
opportunity on the diagramed 
deaL 

After a rather strange auc- 
tion, in which hearts were bid 
by somebody at every pos- 
sible level, the Danish South 
arrived in seven hearts 
doubled. 

If West had led his 
singleton diamond queen, as 


the Netherlands and Sweden he no doubt should have. East 


appeared unlikely to qualify, 
but an unheralded Spanish 
team, lying sixth with 546. 
could well snatch a qualifying 
position. 

In the European Women’s 


would have won and returned' diamond ruff. 


That would have represent- 
ed a penalty of 1,700 and a 
gain of 6 imps, since the Dan- 
ish East- West scored 1 ,430 in 
the replay by making six- 
spades. But West led the club 
ace followed by the spade ace 
and played a second spade. 
South ruffed, and in theory 
could have drawn trump s and 
guessed well In diamonds to 
escape for down four, a pen- 
alty of 800. 

However, he drew only one 
(rump before leading a club, 
and tiie defense scored one 


the British hopes substan- 
tially. 


NORTH 
*91 
O KBS 
*9742 

* 88 4 3 

EAST (D) 
82 *KJS4 

O 2 

* A865 
A K Q 7 5 

SOUTH 

*3 

7 A Q J 10 S 4 
3 K J 10 3 

* J 10 


WEST 

* A Q 10 7 8 2 
<7876 

* A 8 2 


his lowest diamond to suggest 
a club entry. 

West would have underled 
the club ace, scoring a second 
ruff, and would then have 


The result was done five 
for 1 , 100 , a swing of 8 imps to 
Denmark. 

The Danes scored maxim- 
um victory points in the 


East and West were vulnerable. Th 
bidding: 

East South West Nont 

16 1C 1 * 15 

SC O 4 C 50 

SC SC 8 ♦ Pass 

Pass 7 v DbL Pass 

Pus Pass 

West led the club ace. 


Tel Paris +33(0)142253225 
Fax Paris: +33 (0)1 45 63 37 09 


21 "Mission. 
Impossible' 
actress 

22 Jerk 

23 Abandon 

24 An follower 
28 Make jerky? 
as Unaware 

28 Second-ceniury 
anatomist 

29 Time od one's 
life 

30 Abstract 
sculptor Sir 
Anthony 

31 Table, so to 
speak 

32 Cheapskate 
34 Oahu outsiders 

37 A hole in the 
wall? 

38 Way logo 
Afibr 

4i Park alcove 
«2 Ticket 
dispenser 
44 Safari camp 
48 Highly 

complimentary 
48 Main ime 

47 Govt, org., 
1687-19S6 

48 ‘Crucifixion of 
St. Peter' 
painter Guido 

49 Electrician's 
need 

M 1961 Paul 
Newman film 

83 Richard of 'A 
Summer Place’ 

84 Maiden lover "in 
a kingdom by 

the sea" 

Ss Art 

philanthropist 

Sir Henry 
36 Petite 
57 River crossing 
France's Nord 
department 


i Santa Anita 
race track s<ie 
*Uke some 
lizards 

3 One of TVs 
Mouseketeers 

4 Calorie 
category 

s Philippine island 
or its seaport 

6 Actress Gardner 

7 Opera with the 
aria "Largo al 
factotum," wtth 
“The" 

s Behind, with "or 
9 Marsh of 
mystery 
<0 Fossil 
impression 
il "Evil Woman" 
rock grp. 

ia Warsaw's river 

13 Guarantees 

14 Chemistry lab 
selection 

20 King, maybe 
24 "Rats!" 
2 sLt.-Maj. 

go-between 

27 Roast site 

28 Blanket 

31 Loaded (with) 

32 Wild plum 

33 Better than 
never? 

34 Home for 
ecologists 

38 Weaver ol myth 

36 Bluer than blue • 
38 Krypton, e g. 

38 Perform a 
chemical test 
40 "Roots' Emmy 
winner. 1977 

42 Symbol Of 
authority 

43 Hall 

48 Adjust the 
tailoring 



' L 1 ! . 1 A . ,■ 

€ Afetu York Times /Edited by 


Solution to Puzzle of J uly 3 


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SlggBDB aamsoiis 
anna ^ 
mHrJH n OH0EIB CK30 

n mBon anas 
QQ nmiS DQ 303303 
□□□□ atsaa 

mranSRi 0 BH3HEPB 

HSgogaa aansaag 

Kju3 ann r-» *-w rr. rann 


«8 Up shade 
« Hares, to hounds 

#1 Liy Pang's 

dynasty 
®2 Velvet tinisn 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


PAGE 13 



THE FREQUENT TRAVELER 


GOOD TRAVEL DEALS 


he used l0 A 
i the desen « hv e » 
of: these ei? ^ he 
h had been rj! es ■ift , 

*** grab 

who had spent ? 
■“ft, he offered k °i ft f 
^‘‘Youseeihe^ 

for around^" 1 

"ff* f°r SftJVf 

admission. The tv i • > 
3 9 P.M. even J** *' 
j**® is siij ^ 

3lder or S25 for -,r tlJr 
foor children, 

2. Post Office* Both??- 
N.T. 087! a u J^ 
8)895! 87 SS .^ 


-ie innocence. ~B uddr 
wuhar about a chim? 

5, nondoes ii u onderJi 
jusehold ha* the chores 
lal diapers. Instead £i 
les appreciative)* wh,u 
J a glamorous biii blar ; 
^mother, her hJn 

vorks hard, but itw«2 
le eccentricity of * 
to make sense of h*, 
•logical prodi\ii ies .s2 
honed bur una^oidaNt 
trerything from Budd V j 
lpus complex to ihe pai- 
r-slave dynamics created 
anthropomorphic nur- 
ret the him never even 
vhen Gertrude and Bill 
u by the usually hum 
lie) sublimate what arc 
rriage problems into the 
; little bao\ Buddv ha ; 
ease of oddne» is not 
cared, fcrcxl -l r*«.ik ina an- 
Ua infant ih.:! i> unxihing 
d. has no ‘park of life 
, written and Greeted h\ 
•mpson,- v.h:*M earlier 
•Edward Sc.^jrhjnds." 
are Before Chn-rnm." 
Bound." ’’The Secret 
more heart jnJ .‘hinu 
est films 'he >ince 

(Jane: V 1 T< 



ftt. 


Are Laptops an In-Flight Peril? 


Soph* Damn: 


By Roger Collis 

lattrnunonal Herald Tribune 


S WITCH off that laptop and 
listen hard to the safety brief- 
ing' You may face a two-year 
jail sentence or a fine of 
T 00,000 Deutsche marks (about 
557,500). This is die penalty for un- 
authorized use of a “persona! electronic 
device" (PED in auiinespeak) under 
pew German legislation due to come into 
, ; force in a few months rime. The penalty 
^ applies only, of course, to pas- 
sengers on German-registered 
commercial aircraft. But it 
'signals a growing concern 
among aviation authorities 
that "electro-magnetic inter- 
ference" from PEDs might, 

' just might, interfere with air- 
• craft navigational systems. 

What if some teenage com- 
puter genius in seat 49B is hacking into 
* the flight management system? Or my 
neighbor is unlawfully using a CD- 
_ ROM? How can cabin attendants check 
“ what everyone is doing? Can they spot a 
“dangerous” gizmo if they see one? 
_ What about the microwave in the gal- 
ley? How harmless is my tape recorder? 
Dare I run through my last interview? 

Airlines and aviation experts talk 
• vaguely about “incidents” when PEDs 
ap ' might have interfered with aircraft sys- 
• tetris; yet nobody can come up with any 
’ hard evidence. The German authorities 
■ have made the point with the new Dra- 
opnian penalties. So is there something 
We haven’t been told? What’s going on? 
2s there some kind of cover-up, some 
' conspiracy out there? - 


4 





,/Edited b: 



' Takioffs and Landings 

Most airlines tell you to switch off all 
electronic devices during takeoffs and 
landings, or when the seat belt sign is on. 
At other times you are usually allowed to 
- use ' laptops, calculators, Walkmans, 
video recorders and cassette players — 
except for Iberia, which forbids the use of 
-all electronic equipment. Almost all car- 
riers ban cellular phones at all times. 
Japan Airlines allows laptops, CD play- 
era, video equipment and electric 
shavers, but bans phones, pagers, cas- 
sette players, printing equipment, port- 
able TVs and “any other device that 
' transmits electronic waves.” Cathay Pa- 
cific bans phones, CB radios, “or any 
radio-controlled devices’ ’ along with CD 
play as and any CD-ROMs. Lufthansa 
specifically forbids CD-ROM players 
and laptops with CD-ROM drives. 

' Some airlines encourage you to bring 
your laptop. American Airlines, Emir- 
* ates. Delta and United Airlines have 
1 installed 12-volt powerplngs in first and 


business class for recharging your bat- 
teries. 

Tim Goodyear, a spokesman for the 
International Air Transport Association 
in Geneva, says: “Reports that PEDs 
interfere with aircraft systems are apo- 
cryphal: Nobody has been able to give 
chapter and verse and there is no doc- 
ument anywhere I have seen that could 
present such evidence in an accident 
inquiry or pass the lest of a court of law. 
But prevention is better than cure when 
it comes to safety. We put out an advice 
three years ago that no elec- 
tronic device should be used 
at a critical phase such as 
during takeoff and landing, 
only in level flight.” 

Jochen Pieper, a spokes- 
man at the German civil avi- 
ation authority in Bonn, says: 
“Any safety risk needs a 
stronger punishment just to 
convince people not to use these devices 
when it is forbidden. The problem is 
who should be the person to identify 
culprits and instigate proceedings. 

’ ‘The problem arose with the first mo- 
bile phones. We had incidents where we 
suspected that electronic signals which 
were unable to make contact with the cell 
network on the ground had caused a 
deviation in the instrument landing sys- 
tem. CD players and laptops with a CD- 
ROM drive and cassette recorders using 
digital signals from die tape generate 
high voltages and could disturb flight 
control or navigation systems. The prob- 
lem seems to vary with the type of plane 
and where you are sitting. 

“We are looking at an electronic scan- 
ner that will detect in-flight electronic 
emissions so that if somebody is using a 
device, or perhaps has a mobile phone in 
his pocket that is not switched on, a light 
will come on in the cockpit. Another idea 
is for flight attendants to carry a hand- 
held scanner when they come round to 
check seat belts. Because electronic 
emissions cover such a broad frequency 
range, it's very hard to find out exactly 
which systems they might disturb.” 

Chris Mason, a spokesman at the Brit- 
ish Civil Aviation Authority in London, 
is more vague and less forthcoming. 

‘ ‘-We cannot categorically say that these 
things interfere with aircraft systems, 
but they might, and until research proves 
they are not a danger we require that 
electronic devices be switched off dur- 
ing takeoff and landing. Portable phones 
are banned at all times. There is cir- 
cumstantial evidence that electronic 
games, audio players, tape recorders. 
LCD displays and similar equipment can 
generate some form of interference.” 

■ David Learmount, operations and 
safety editor of Flight International 
magazine in London, says: "What’s at 


issue is navigation systems, not aircraft 
controls — flight management systems 
which fly the plane are not at risk; that 
has never been alleged, even with the 
fly-by-wire Boeing 777 and Airbus 320, 
330 and 340. Obviously, that would be 
worrying. Imagine if you could throw a 
signal at the power steering of your car 
and send it off the road. 

“What they did during the French 
certification of the Airbus was to blast it 
with the most powerful military radar 
from five meters away — strong enough 
to fiy an egg on the plane — and found 
that it didn’t affect anything. The FAA 
monitored these tests and made addi- 
tional ones in the States. 

“But pilots have got lots of anecdotal 
evidence that navigation might be af- 
fected. Some instruments operate in the ' 
long-wave band, some in the VHF band 
from beacons on the ground. And some- 
times. when a needle has been wobbling 
and pilots have said, go down the back 
and tell him to switch off his Gamebody, 
the needle has stopped wobbling. It might 
have been circumstantial, it might have 
been evidence. Pilots, of course, firmly 
believe it because it happened to them. 

“The FAA has said, ‘We hear what 
you say,’ but they've never been able to 
reproduce such incidents with extensive 
tests. But although they've failed to 
prove there's a problem doesn't mean 
that they don’t believe there might be 
one. And that is why airlines like Iberia, 
say. don’t use any electronic device 
during the flight.” 

“Most of the things people worry 
about in aircraft safety are wings that 
they don’t need to worry about,'* Lear- 
mount added. “What worries me more 
than anything else is pilot training. Most 
journalists writing about these things 
are really doing investigations into their 
own worries. ” 

L EARMOUNT raises the specter 
that cosmic rays from outer space 
might actually “reverse" aircraft 
digital systems, not just navigation but 
controls. * ‘Cosmic rays rarely penetrate 
beyond 40,000 to 50,000 feet from the 
Earth, so they are unlikely to reach 
ordinary planes at the height they fly,” 
Learmount says. “They might be able to 
affect the Concorde at 50,000 to 60,000 
feet, except that Concorde is so old that 
it has analogue systems. 

“But regulatory authorities are con- 
cerned. You can’t just write it off by 
saying that at 30,000 feet you’re OJC; 
there just might be a burst of solar 
activity that could reverse a few digital 
control signals. If that's a genuine pos- 
sibility. we’ve got to investigate. This is 
a relatively new area. You’ll probably 
find somebody deep in NASA looking 
into this. That’s real ‘Star Trek’ stuff.” 



■*:!*;'* ’ ? '■ . 
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AIR UK 

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AMERICAN 

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“DAAyBreak" excursion fares, available from Sunday to Friday between 5 
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nonstop services, save 50 percent on regular 21-day APEX fares. Ex- 
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LUFTHANSA 

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\ France to Germany 

Round-trip fares from Paris and certain provincial cities to Berlin, Bremen, 
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to Middle East 

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First-class round-trip fares from London Heathrow, Glasgow, Edinburgh. 
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Europe 

Business-class fares from London Heathrow, Gatwick and London City and 
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stay six months. 

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Introductory rate of 360 Deutsche marks ($206) per night for a double, 290 
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Europe 

"Europe for Less" rates of $129 or less per room at 35 properties and $99 or 
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UBERTEL HOTELS 

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Summer promotional rates at around 40 percent off normal rates at 28 
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Although the (HT carefuly checks thee 

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some travel agents may be iraware ol than or unable to book Viem. 




ARTS GUIDE 


AUSTRIA 


if i 


1 -Vienna 

paoerHaus, tel: (1)789-6900, dosed Mondays. 
, To Aug. 31: “East, Middle, West Works From 
> the Denver Art Museum.” A representative 
1 selection of American art after 1945, inducing 
\ works by artists of Abstract Expressionism, 
Pop Art, Minimal Art and Concept Art 

• Kunsthistorisches Museum, tel: (1) 525-24- 
1 403, closed Mondays. To Oct 19: "Gold und 
! Sllber aus Mexico." A presentation of pre- 
. Columbian gold and silver artifacts: While gold 
r objects were of paramount importance for their 
‘ ieBgtous symbolism before Columbus, sttver- 
\ ware, frturgfcaJ objects and decorations were 
< created for the Spanish conquerors who had 

. i Initially been lured tathe continent by gold. 

! MAK- Austrian Museum of Applied Arte, tel: 
, (1) 711-36, closed Mondays. To Sept 7: "Ja- 
■ pan Yesterday." Art from- ancient Japan such 
; as cult' objects from Buddhist temples, silk 
, screens and pen-and-ink drawings. 

BRITAIN 

! London 

• Barbican Centre, tel: (171) 638-8891 . Juty B: 

' World premiere of Leonard Bernstein's “A 
I White House Cantata.” The scenes from 11 
i American presidencies mil be conducted by 

• Kent Nagano, wkh Dietrich Henschel singing 
[ the presidential roles and Nancy Gustafson, 

those of the first ladles. . 

The National Gallery, tel: (171) 747-2885, 
open daily. To Sept 28: “Seurat and the 

- Bathers." This celebration of Seurat’s 28-year- 
old masterpiece “Bathers at Asrueres,” sheds 
new light on one of the greatest paintings of the 

- 19th century by placing It in context alongside 
examples of his earlier work, and virtually all its 
preparatory drawtogsand oil sketches. To set 
the broader artistic scene and illustrate the 
diversity of his sources, tiie. exhibition also 
includes 30 related works by Seurafs pre- 
decessors and -contemporaries, including 
Monet Manet Poussin and van Gogh. 

Royal Academy of Arte, tel: (171) 439-7438, 
open daily. To Sept. 28: "Hiroshige: Images of 
Mist, Rain, Moorv and Snow." More than his 
contemporaries, Hiroshige (1797-1858) ex- 
ploredatmospherlc landscape and his prints of 
peasants in the mist, of travelers In the snow or 
moonlit landscapes gtve a vrvfd picture of f 9th- 
century' 'Japanese society. The exhibition 



drawings, painfrigs, videos and 9dJpturea Fea- 
tures works by Brancusi, Inges, WaBeau. Rodn, 
photopaphs tyBtaesai and Mappttiorps, and Em 
acarpts. 

■ ISRAEL 


Sidnry Jant, 0*Uei> 

Bible scene by Segal in Los Angeles. 

brings together early impressions of designs 
from the Tokaido Road series, the Views of Edo 
and the Stations of the Klsokafdo Road. 

R 

Nice 

Musee d’Art Modems at cfArt Contempo- 
rahi, tel: 04-93-62-61-62, dosed Tuesdays. To 
Oct 20: “Dee Modemes aux Avant-Gardes." 
Documents art movements from the pest 
Work! War 1 period to the end of the 1950s, with 
works by artists that belonged to Dada. Fluxus 
and the New Realists. Features 150 works by 
25 artists Inducting Man Ray. Plcabia, Arman, 
Braun er, Klee told Ben, among others. 

Paws 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 01 -44-78-12- 
33, dosed Tuesdays. To Sept 29: "Las In- 
genteurs du Siede." From Gustave Eiffel to 
Peter Rice, a display of models, and archi- 
tectural documents Illustrates the works of the 
engineer-builders of the 20th century. 
Fondo&an Cartier pour fAit Conte»nporain,tei: 
01-&-1&5&50, dosed Mondays, lb New £ 
"Amors/ The expression of love as depicted in 


Jerusalem 

The Israel Museum, tel: (2) 6708-811, open 
daily. To Sept 6: The Ingenious Machine of 
Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy." 
Traces toe efforts of artists and anatomists 
from the end of the 1 5th century to the 1 850s to 
explore the human body and to display its inner 
structures and workings. Features works by 
Leonardo and Rubens. 

■ ITALY 

Bologna 

Galleria cTArte Modems, tel: (51) 50-28-59, 
dosed Mondays. To Sept 7: “Baselitz ." Works 
by the German artist (bom 1938), a leading 
artist fn the Neo-Expressionist movement, and 
best known for painting bodies upside down. 

Florence 

Forte di Belvedere, tsi; (55) 234-24-25. To 
SepL 30: “PhHIlp King.” More than 90 sculp- 
tures, drawings and prints by the British 
sculptor (bom 1934) are presented in the in- 
terior galleries and terraces of the fort. Cel- 
ebrated for his innovative use of plastic, fiber- 
glass and fluorescent colors, King has recently 
returned to human figures. 

Venice 

LVU Venice Biennale: More than 30 pavilions 
of art among them, a one-man show by U.S. 
artist Robert Coiesoott 12 site-specific paint- 
ings created by the Portuguese artist Jitiiao 
Sarmento; large-format paintings by Helmut 
Fade tie from Switzerland; aboriginal paintings 
in the Australian pavilion and oil paintings by 
Maxim Kan tor whose work often reflects the 
cfismal condition of Russians after the fall of 
communism. 


ated while van Gogh lived in Nuenen between 
1883 and 1885. Features drawings of peas- 
ants working on the land, women spinning and 
weavers, as well as landscapes. 

Stedenfk Museum, tel: (20) 5732.911, open 
dally. To Aug. 17: "Nan Goldin: I’ll Be Your 
Mirror." The American photographer (bom 
1953) exhibits pictures of her friends, self- 
portraits, depictions of the effects of AIDS on 
people around her or of the homosexual sub- 
culture in Bangkok and ManHa. Goldin evolves 
from dramatically Ht early works to bright dear 
photographs. 

■ 

Tokyo 

Bunkamura museum, tef: (3) 3477-9150. To 
july 21 : "Pierre Bonnard." 70 paintings by the 
French painter (1867-1947), whose paintings 
were influenced by Art Nouveau and Japanese 
prints. 

Watari-um Museum, tel: (3) 3402-3001, 
dosed Mondays. To July 27: “Chinese Con- 
temporary Art, 1997." Installations, video 
works and performances by contemporary 
artists from Hong Kong and China. 

■ PORTUGAL 


Centro Guttural de Belem, tel: (1) 301-90606, 
open dally. To Aug. 31 : “Francis Plcabia: Ant- 
ologia." After a short Post-Impressionist peri- 
od, Picabia (1879-1953) became an active 
member of Dada. the nihilistic movement that 
opened the way for Surrealism. 

■ SPAIN 

Wai niMt 

IV AM Centre Julio Gonzalez, tel: (6) 386- 
3000, dosed Mondays. To Aug. 31 : “ReaRsmo 
Magfoo: Franz Roh y la Pfntura Europea, 1917- 


1938." A survey of the artistic scene in Europe, 
between the two world ware, showing how 
painting evolved toward a depiction of reality 
as if observed through a magic After. Features 
more than 100 works by Beckmann. Schad. 
Picasso and Dali, among others. 

■ SWIPBM . 

Stockholm 

Nationalmuseum, tel: (8) 666-4250. dosed 
Mondays. To Oct. 19: “Cart Faberge: Gold- 
smith to the Tsars." Carl Faberge was jeweler 
and goldsmith to the czar in the last decades of 
the empire, and had workshops in SL Peters- 
burg and Moscow. The exhibition indudes 
some of the famous eggs, as well as enameled 
caskets, picture frames and small animal 
sculptures. 

■ SWITZERLAND 
Zurich 

Kunsthaus Zurieh,tef: (1) 251-67-65, dosed 
Mondays. To Sept 7: “Birth of the Cool: 
Amerikanlsche Male re) von Georgia O’Keeffe 
bis Christopher Wool.” At the time of Miles 
Davis's release of his legendary “Birth of the 
Cool" album, American art witnessed funda- 
mental changes. Works by Barnett Newman, 
Jackson Pollock, Alex Katz, VIJa Celmins and 
Chuck Close document its evolution from the 
1950s. 

M UNITED STATES 
Atlanta 

High Museum of Art, tel: (404) 692-4444. 
dosed Mondays. To Sept 28: “Masterpieces 
from the Pierpont Morgan Library." More than 
150 rare works from the library In New York. 
Features CM Master drawings, illuminated 
manuscripts, and authors' and composers’ 
original manuscripts. 


Fort Worth 

Kimbell Art Museum, tel: (817) 332-8451, 
closed Mondays. To Sept. 7: "Monet and the 
Mediterranean. 1 ' 70 works created by Monet 
during his trips to the French and Italian rivieres 
between 1883 and 1908. The exhibition will 
travel to New York. 

Los Angeles 

Skirball Cultural Center and Museum, tel: 
(310) 440-4500, To July 25: "George Segal: 
Woiks From the Bible." Five monumental 
sculptures present the artist’s personal inter- 
pretation of significant themes from the Book of 
Genesis. Segal Is best known for his down-to- 
earth scenes of humble characters set In real 
environments. 

New York 

Museum of Modem Art, tel: (212) 708-9400, 
dosed Wednesdays. To Sept. 2: "Paris: The 
1 890s." More than 200 prints created In the last 
decade of the 19th century by Bonnard, 
Maurice Denis, Renoir, Signac, Toulouse- 
Lautrec and Vuillard, as well as advertising 
posters, political journals, theater programs 
and sheet music. 


CiOSIWO SOOM 

July 6: "Red, Hot & Blue: The All-American 
Musical." National Portrait Gallery, Wash- 
ington. 

July 6: ‘The Peale Family: Creation of an 
American Legacy, 1770-1870." Corcoran 
Gallery of Art, Washington. 

July 6: “The Glory of Byzantium." Metropol- 
itan Museum of Ait, New York. 

July 6: "Louise Bourgeois." Fondszione Pra- 
da, Milan. 




Amsterdam 

Van Gogh Museum, tel: (20) 570-5200, open 
daily, lb Oct. 12: rvineant van Gogh: The 
Drawings." The second In a series of four 
summer exhibitions presenting van Gogh's 
works on paper, this show covers works cre- 


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PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


On Eye of NATO Summit, France Calls Diplomatic Cease-Fire 


briefly 


By Charles Trueheart 

^'adiiagnm Post Smkt 


PARIS Eighteen months after an- 
nouncing it would rejoin die military 
structures of the Atlantic alliance that it 
nulled out of about three decades ago. 
France is going to the NATO summit in 
Madrid next week with its conditions for 
re-entry unmet and its efforts to wield 
influence in the alliance unsatisfied. 

On die eve of the meetings in Madrid 
where the 16 members of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization will for- 
mally invite at least three countries from 
Central Europe to join, France called a 
diplomatic cease-fire in its campaign to 
expand the list to five countries and to 
enhance Europe's role in the military 
structures of the alliance. 

All 16 NATO countries agree that 


Poland, Hungary and die Czech Repub- 
lic should be invited to join NATO. But 
France, supported by eight other NATO 
members predominately from southern 
Europe, has lobbied for the candidatures 
of Romania and Slovenia as well. The 
Clinton administration insists that the 
list be limited to three. 

A French Foreign Ministry statement 
said all five countries met the conditions 

would noftriock the three. The decision 
in Madrid has to be unanimous. French 
officials also confirmed privately that 
they would not obstruct the decision. 

The statement also indicated that 
France was ready to accept that the Mad- 
rid meeting would show little concrete 
results for its yearlong effort to persuade 
the United Slates that the alliance should 
be reformed to give Europeans a bigger 


NATO: U.S. Debate Is Just Getting Started 


Continued from Page 1 

you make a cost-sharing agreement part 
of the expansion negotiations?” 

Under the current timetable, the can- 
didate members of NATO will be ad- 
mitted formally to the alliance on die 50th 


i the spring of 1991 
the Clinton administration is attempting 
to pull NATO peacekeepers out of Bos- 
nia. If the Bosnia peace effort seems in 
danger of unraveling, this coincidence in 
tuning could prove unfortunate for the 
administration. 

“It could be real trouble,” said Sen- 
ator Joseph Biden Jr., Democrat of 
Delaware, a leading supporter of NATO 
expansion. “It will play into the hands of 
those who question the purpose of 
NATO. They will ask why we should 
pursue the vision of an expanded NATO, 
when Bosnia is proof positive that 
Europe cannot take care of its own back- 
yard.” 

The anti-NATO expansion coalition 
is a disparate one. Signatories of last 
week's protest letter to Mr. Clinton in- 
cluded such conservative Republicans 
as Paul Nice and Gordon Humphrey and 
such liberal Democrats as Gary Hart and 
Robert McNamara. The anti-Russia 
hard-liners were represented by the Har- 
vard historian Richard Pipes. A long- 
standing academic sparring partner of 
Mr. Pipes's, the Carter administration 
official Marshal Shulman, represented 
dovish views. 

The arguments deployed by the anti- 
expansion coalition are also diverse. 
Within the foreign- policy community, 
there are fears that NATO enlargement 
will make it more difficult to conclude 
arms control agreements with Moscow 
and strengthen the political opponents of 
Boris Yeltsin. But such arguments seem 
to carry relatively little weight in Con- 
gress, where there is little sympathy for 
Russia. 

Widely differing estimates have been 
made about costs of NATO expansion 
and how much the United States will be 
required to pay. The Congressional 
Budget Office has calculated the U.S. 
portion of the costs at $330 million to 


$1.2 billion a year, over 15 years. The 
Pentagon, by contrast, has put the annual 
cost to the United States at $150 million 
to $200 million over 13 years, for a total 
of about $2 billion overall. Total costs to 
the alliance would be $27 billion to $35 
billion. 

By the administration's figures, this 
represents a cost to the United States of 
less than 6 percent of the total. 

Such a small share seems unrealistic 
to many analysts, in view of the fact 
Washington is the leading force behind 
NATO expansion and has traditionally 
picked up a much larger portion of the 
NATO bilL 

The other issue that seems likely to 
resonate in the Senate is whether Amer- 
icans should be ready to die to defend 
places like Budapest and Gdansk. Under 
Article 5 of the Washington Treaty, 
NATO members are obliged to consider 
an armed attack on any of them as the 
equivalent of “an attack against them 
all.” Traditionally, this clause has been 
interpreted to mean the United States 
would be ready as a last resort to use 
nuclear missiles to defend the territorial 
integrity of any NATO member. 

“We need to allay the fears of people 
in Eastern Europe that they might be 
undefended, but we don’t have to do it in 
this way,” said Senator Kay Bailey 
Hutchison, Republican of Texas, one of 
the leading skeptics on NATO expan- 
sion in the Senate. “I am concerned that 
we are dissipating our resources and not 
thinking carefully enough about where 
our troops will be deployed.” 

For many members of the foreign 
policy establishment, the strongest ar- 
gument against NATO expansion is that 
it would draw a new political dividing 
line across Europe. The countries find- 
ing themselves on the wrong side of the 
line, including Ukraine and the former 
Baltic republics, could fall victims to a 
renewed bout of great-power rivalry. 

The fears of the Russia experts have 
been voiced most forcefully by George 
Kennan, the father of the containment 
doctrine that led to establishment of 
NATO half a century ago. 

In an op-ed piece for The New York 
Times in February (IHT. Feb. 6), he 
argued that NATO expansion could "re- 


role in the command heirazchy. 

The late President Charles de Gaullle 
pulled France out of NATO’s military 
structures in 1966. 

For the United States, the most vexing 
of all in the protracted negotiations was 
France’s insistence on a European at the 
helm of NATO’s southern command, 
headquartered in Naples. 

Despite personal interventions by 
President Jacques Chirac of France, 
President Bill Clinton refused to give 
ground on the politically unpalatable 
option of putting a foreigner even nom- 
inally in charge of die U.S. naval fleet in 
the Mediterranean. 

The French Foreign Ministry state- 
ment said “under the current state of 
negotiations, and recognizing the pro- 
gress made, notably in the affirmation of 
a European defense identify, France con* 


siders that the conditions it set for a re- 
examination of its relations with die 
military structures of NATO have not 
come together.” 

Diplomats and analysts said the state- 
ment, which evoked “French author- 
ities,” aimed to show thai the French 
government was speaking with one 
voice. Mr. Chirac, a Gaullist, is sharing 
power 
Prime 

Jospin had said he was not pleased with 
how things had gone at the recent G-7 
meeting in Denver. He was not there and 
will not be in Madrid either. 

In any event, an official at the French 
presidential palace cautioned against a 
“hasty reading” of the declaration, par- 
ticularly one that might infer French 
surrender. 

“We’ll fight all the way to Madrid,” 


m with the Socialist-led cabinet of 
Minister Lionel Jospin. Mr. 



I 5u<n AjT*c»tac.Thc A\->u*cd Ptaw 

Anne Luzzato, a spokeswoman for the National Security Council, 
conferring with the National Security adviser, Samuel Berger, right, 
during a White House briefing Thursday on next week's NATO 
summit meeting. Secretary of Defense William Cohen looked on. 


store the atmosphere of the Cold War to 
East- West relations'* and “inflame the 
nationalistic, anti-Western and militar- 
istic tendencies in Russian opinion.” 

But fears of a nationalist backlash in 
Russia have been dissipated, to some 
extent, by the administration's success 
in persuading Mr. Yeltsin to sign a co- 
operation agreement with NATO. 

"There have been dire predictions,” 
Mr. Talbott said, “that, if NATO in- 
sisted on going ahead with enlargement, 
reactionaries and ultranationalists would 
take over Russia. This has not 
happened." 

If liberals criticize the administration 
for provoking Russia unnecessarily, the 
conservatives have taken the opposite 
tack. 

Former Secretary of State Henry Kis- 
singer recently depicted the NATO-Rus- 
sia founding act as a kind of political 
Trojan horse that would permit the Rus 
sians to infiltrate NATO from within ant 


weaken cohesiveness. But administra- 
tion officials dismiss Mr. Kissinger's 
concerns as exaggerated and insist 
NATO will retain its right to act in- 
dependently. 

Public opinion polls suggest there is a 
narrow plurality in favor of NATO ex- 
pansion. which has not been affected by 
the diplomatic skirmishing with Rus- 


sia. 


The precise level of support goes up or 
down by as much as 15 percentage 
points, depending on whether the ques- 
tioner emphasizes the political and eco- 
nomic costs of expansion. 

■ ‘The public is not paying a great deal 
of attention." said Steven Kail, who has 
conducted polls on behalf of the Center 
for International and Security Studies at 
the University of Maryland’ “Roughly 
off 


one-quarter of the population thinks that 
Russia is already in NATO, which tells 
you something about the level of at- 
within and tentiveness to this issue." 


he said- “Butif the conditions are not yet 
met, that does not mean Madrid rep- 
resents a failure. The negotiations are 
not closed." 

The French official eked a statement 
Wednesday by the U.S. defense sec- 
retary, William Cohen, that reflected 
U.S. agreement ihat the negotiations 
were continuing. 

The diplomatic retreat of the French 
government left unanswered the ques- 
tion of what conditions France will now 
set to rejoin NATO as a full military 
member, and what turn the negotiations 
might take. The Foreign Ministry state- 
ment seemed to be leaving the nego- 
tiating ball in a court other than its own: 
“France is available to pursue discus- 
sion with its allies to find better balance 
of responsibilities between Europeans 
and Americans.” 

Germany Wants 
Romania in Alliance 
‘Soon,’ Bonn Says 

Reuters 

BONN — Germany supports Ro- 
mania's bid to join NATO “soon” but 
will not take any firm position on wheth- 
er the alliance should expand by three, 
four or five members until the Madrid 
summit meeting, a senior government 
official said Thursday. 

The official said Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl fully supported Romania's desire 
for NATO membership. 

But, the official added, Mr. Kohl be- 
lieves the decision on how many coun- 
tries are invited to join the alliance 
should be made by all 16 members of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization at 
the summit meeting in Madrid next 
Tuesday and Wednesday. 

“Chancellor Kohl is in favor of Ro- 
mania's entry ‘soon,’ ” the official said. 
“It would be a misinterpretation of his 
remarks to take ‘soon’ to mean at the 
NATO summit There is no fixed date." 

President Emil Constantinescu of Ro- 
mania met with Chancellor Kohl in 
Bonn on Wednesday to elicit support ■ 
from Germany, whose voice could be 
decisive at die meeting in Madrid. 

During the summit meeting, Poland, 
Hungary and the Czech Republic are 
expected to be invited to join the al- 
liance. While the United States wants to 
limit the first enlargement to the three 
favorites, many European NATO mem- 
bers want Slovenia and Romania in- 
cluded. 

There was no news briefing after Mr. 
Kohl and Mr. Constantinescu met, but a 
spokesman for Mr. Kohl's issued a state- 
ment saying the chancellor and German 
government had “a lot of sympathy for 
the Romanian desire for early NATO 
membership and supports it” 

The acting head of the Romanian Em- 
bassy in Bonn said that there was no 
doubt Mr. Kohl supported the Romanian 
bid, but added that there was in essence 
no change in Germany’s noncommittal 
stance on whether Romania and Slov- 
enia should be added to the first en- 
largement. 


Nigeria Is Assailed 
For Delaying Vote 

ABUJA. Nigeria — Changes to 
the timetable for elections in Ni- 
geria have renewed doubts about the 
commitment of its military rulers to 
restoring democracy* opponents 
and analvsts said Thuraday. 

The committee handling the 
transition plan said Wednesday that 
elections scheduled for this year 
had been put off untti next -year at 
the request of the five legal political 

^^“We are being vindicated," said 
Ganiyu Dawodu. a senior figure in 
the National Democratic Coalition, 
which is opposed to General Sam 
Abacha's rule. “How many times 
have they shifted? I don t even 
know.” (Reuters) 

Iraq Readies Plan 
For Food Handout 

BAGHDAD — Iraq has com- 
pleted food-distribution plans to 
cover the next six months of oil 
exports, and will soon send them to 
the United Nations for approval as 
pan of the recently extended oil- 
for-food agreement, Iraq’s UN co- 
ordinator, Staffan de Mistura. said 
TTiursday. 

Iraq is permitted to sell oil worth 
$2 bimon over six months, under UN 
supervision, to alleviate hardship 
caused by trade sanctions imposed 
on Baghdad for invading Kuwait in 
1991. The oil-for-food pact, begun in 
December 1996, was renewed for 
180 days by the UN Security Coun- 
cil on June 8, bur the exports have 
been held up pending completion of 
the procurement and distribution 
plans by the government (Reuters) 

Argentine Leftist 
Gets Life in Prison 

BUENOS AIRES — A leftist 
guerrilla and self-proclaimed assas- 
sin of the deposed Nicaraguan pres- 
ident, General Anastasio Somoza. 
was convicted and sentenced to life 
in prison for leading an assault on 
an Argentine army base that killed 
39 people. 

A three-judge panel on Wednes- 
day found Enrique Gorriaran 
Merlo. 56, guilty of leading a 1989 
attack on the La Tablada barracks 
southwest of the capital. The panel 
sentenced Mr. Gorriaran "s former 
wife. Ana Maria Sivori, to 1 8 years 
for her role as “participant." (AP) 

Threat, in Colombia 

BOGOTA — Leave for all 
Colombian police has been can- 
celed, and all military personnel 
have been ordered back to their 
barracks amid threats of a new of- 
fensive by leftist rebels, the De- 
fense Ministry said. (Reuters) 


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Luxeirtowg 0600 2703 Netherlands 06 
0225158 Sweden 020 797039 Swlzer- 
tand 155 5757 UK 0800 695965 Bltfr 
1+33} 1 41439361 THE AMERI- 
CAS: USA (tort-free) 1-800-8822884 
Bsevtere (*1) 212 7523890 ASIA: 
Horn Kong 2922 1171 Indonesia 80S 
1928 Japan (Wreei 0120 464 027 
Korea 3672 0044 Malaysia 221 7055 
PtiRppfnes 895 4946 Singapore 325 
0834 Tafwan 7753458 Tnaitend 277 
4485 Bsewftera (+052) 28221171 


Boats/Yachts 


RYDER CUP. Princess 45 toot motor 
yacht moored Songrande (adjacent Vtetf- 
errama) available lor charter from 2 1 st 
SepL to 5ti Qtt Steepe 6 guests h 3 
double cabins. US5 12K. Fax +34 5 28i 
23 32 


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PRIME BANK 
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t 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


PAGE 15 


imt 2 



THE INTERMARKET 


^ +44171 420 0348 


RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE 


Real Estate Services 


gaits 


®U own A PROPERTY M FRAME 

■ Our senses oner in your absence- 
Mairenarce. dearang gaflenrg, open 

Mown m tsfis, gwararera tajss jK 

PLEASB DO NOT HESTATc TO 
CONTACT US FOR UORE DETAILS 

■ FAX 433 (SM 50 95 94 34 
Tet +33 (CJ4 SO 05 35 35 

7 Domafne de Crown R74160 Bossar 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Bahamas . ' 


PRIVATE GLAND IN 
TAX HAVEH-BAHAHA5 
On the spterid land & sea park in Em- 
mas, coe ci toe mod magticen islands 
100 pgort tjwae £ tor sale 35 acres 
5 Beaches, t ton 3 cocages S5 5U 
Til 305-S32-5896 Fn 3K-535-B306 


Costa Rica 


COSTARICA 

We sefl 247 sq m ha on the Paofc 

Coast wifi prwatt beach. 

near domesx aipoc 
Price . USS2.47D.000 
Tit +33 (0)1 4633 5252 Fax 4633 3S9B 


French Provinces 


SOUTH PER1G0HD FRANCE. SMALL 
ESTATE T7th cat. 3 bedrooms Guest 
house. 2 bedrooms: 2S4 sqm Uvtng. 

' 433 sqm. covered ouftuHngs. 2 ha 
raft land (gardens. 500 quay vines, 
ftfl forest Fully equipped, overtooking 
valley. Engfish owner 20 years. 
Exceptional. FF 1.8004)00. Tel/Fax 
+33 (0)5 53 40 62 26 


. BRITTANY ESTATE on 15 acres land 
nth a pond. 75 sqm. stone house At-' 
Da to be bed. Pres FF sauna Tet 
Mate Bouries +33 (0)2 67 47 42 78 


H* French Riviera 


HEART OF CAP FfflRAT 
Marital see view, FF16M 
Seanrt qrtvaie beach. FFWM 
' Charming frbaJran vte, FF55U 
200 sqm aroMecfs vita. FF5SM 
HEAR MONACO 

Sumptuous property with seaview, 
g&den, terraces, at bargain pics. 
HAUSSMANN Groin 
Tet +33 (0) 4 9200 49 48 
Fra +33 (0} 4 93 89 40 B8 
Mobfe *33 (ft 6 07 74 30 35 


KYTHMOS buna, a stone tun 4-tad- 
room iso sqm. house on 2 floors, 2 ve- 
randas, Etnflgttftng room 2 Uehens. «► 
rends wensu CTree. 2 wcs Furnished 
or unfuostad. Panoramic view, i mn 
tan beach Tet Ajhera +30 1 2B14808 
Tet tendon +44 f0)17i 352 0829 


Mexico 


PLATA DEL CARMEN, luxury iowv 
house facing Cozumel 1 block horn 
beech. 3 bedrooms. 3 12 baths, maibfe 
throughout. Rod top torace S bra Huge 
master ode TeL Menca On 52 987 
30351, USA Tet 305-534-8941. 


ST JEAN CAP FStRAT 
Lixurious via an 2 floare (caAOO sqm.) 
will afevator, 5 bedrooms wSh bath, 
large btytfiring room, wei kept garden 
(2200 sqm. 1 . pool garage etc. Conaa 
tax. Switzerland ++ 4 1 -1-926 7495 


Monaco 


MONACO and FRENCH RIVERA 

We SELL and LET apartments, 
houses, mbs. office spaces, 
venous range d press Five languages 
spoken Feel free u> contact us 




Le Art Palacs 
25 avenue de ta Costa 
IK 98000 Monte Cato 
Tal £377) 93 25 15 00 
Fn (377) 93 25 35 33 
Nwraontecatomtleadalparlf agerce 


MONTE CARLO 

Our agency esiabfched at the Prtncrpatoy 
of Monaco lor mare man 35 veers is 
dtemg is Experience We can advise 
on purotece end rental of apartments, 
bom slides to 7 rooms & offices 
We aararvarae private estates 


Tafc(377)S3S06GMFn 93504552 


MONTE-CARLO STAR tadng the sea 
Perfect "be* dans r&au* 
right an IIM (Mb Square 
kxtadta parting and celar 
FF5 ,500,000 

ErinahAy AFW (377) S3 30 98 59 


PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO 

Medina! vtega : chaining sunny apart- 
ment wfb breathtaking view on Monte- 
Carta and the Uedterraneen see. Very 
rttrasfing price tor a quick sale. 

♦ AGENCE 

Le Park Petace 
25 avenue da ta Costa 
MC 98000 Monte Carlo 
Tet 1377) B3 25 15 00 
Fn P77) 93 25 35 33 
wwjna«cartoJnc/ieadBf]st agave 


Pais and Suburbs 


AVENUE D1ENA 

CORNER PLACE DES ETATS-UIIS 
270 sqm hi In perfect caribou 
70 sq.m, ptanted terrace, big recaption. 
Aung room. 4 bertnoms, 4 taftrooms, 
overtooking ganfen. 2 garages. Private 
padtas ody. Tat +33 (op 47 20 91 48. 


VALLEE DE CHEVREUSE (78) HOUSE 
Exceptional tn mpconttei tetorkal & 
bucolic site iPon Royal), 25 ton Pans 
earner, 10 km Vercailes. 15 ton San 
Gatmam Wi school near goti / akpon 
250 sqm, B main moms, big hearaJ pool 
pooHwuseffiBQ. 2300 sqm landscaped 
S tried garden. 5-ear garage + 90 sqm 
artWs sadotaxeeu. Ready m movwn. 
SSOOjOOO (5 = FF5.70) Or S,300fflonh 
rert Mr Graces Noel, Tetephnre +33 
(0)1 3944 1260 Fax +33(0)1 3844 1266 


FACING BOIS DE VINCENNES 

Wgh ctes 139 sqm. duplex 4|h5lh 
floor 2 marble bafts, 2 bertooms. 
equipped Utahan, 40 sqm used terra*. 
Seorty. 2 parfom. b irusMo be seen. 

HAJCE AN OFFEFL. 

Tef Ms Boudtat r33 (0)1 43 68 27 69 
office Iran or home (Oji 43 68 57 22 


ON CANAL ST MARTM 
High dass Wings 
Starting from FFI6XOO per sqm. 
REDUCED FEES AO VALOREM 
+33 (0)1 44 51 55 55 


YOUR APARTTCNT 

M THE EMBASSIES QUARTER 
FACING RIVER SEINE 
160 sqm 1st floor, in 1330 fisted 
butfng FF3.BOO.OOO Tel +33 
(0)6 80135105 Fax +33 (0)1 40 31 80 36 


EXCEPTlONAL-i&h between V Hugo 
and Boe da Boutope. homy penhouse. 
large double ivmg. dntota apreure. bal- 
cony. new gardmsBfW Tower 28 sqm 
terrace. I bedroom, kfclm baft, cater. 
PossUe parking Direct sale by owner. 
FF1 .950,000. VbB Sat. JiJy 5ft 2-5pm 
31 av. Bugeaixl Tel +33 (OH 4720 2251 


SAINT LEU LA FORET, 12 mutes to 
La Defence, very large estate lor sale, 
racers construction. Iradtlonal n free- 
stone. 2,860 sqm landscaped perk, pos- 
siflyu OMtatrud pool and tenruoourl 
330 sq.m, fevbig surface. Pnce FF3.8M. 
Tet +33 (0)1 39 32 06 61 fin French) 


MASONS LAFFTTTE PARK - Luxury 
suburb, 17 tons Parts. 2/3 room apart- 
nwt 80 sqm + 20 sqm terrace. 4ft 
and top ttoore. oft. covered parking. 
Sptondty stated. FF125OD00. Tel +S 
(0)1 3912 3733 Fax <0)1 3912 42i 6 


IMQUE M ST CLOUD OWNER SHJLS 
HOUSE 300 sqm. an garden :500 sqm. 
ooctaswe suroirtkiE private access to 
Part FFE5 M. negottoa Tel +33 (0)1 
48 02 41 56 Fax +33 (0)1 46 02 32 08 


ST GERMAN DES PRES top floor fee. 
ifflh cent house, ideal couple. 3/4 
moms. calm. view. Tel +33 (0)143293757 


Switzerland 


to UIGANO and on LAKE LUGANO n 
offer luxurious residences end private 
homes in best locations on the lake or 
mountain aide Dre&rrfte views, private 
berths, morning poota. 

From SFR 400,000 
EMERALD CASA SA 
Vie Cassatneoa 10, CHE900 Lugano 
Tet +41-91-985 2050 - Fax: 985 aBB 



SWISS ALPS HISTORICAL BULGING 
FACING MATTERHORN. Exc^HonNIy 
sunny heathy cflnoe. ski resort, suable 
lor hotel heath center, apartment house. 
Sa stories. 2.700 sqm., 55 rooms. 3 
apartments (3 restaurants. 2 bare, bou- 
tique) in private park with Anglican 
church. VERY INTERESTING PftfCE 
TtfFax +41 22 7333311 


USA Residential 


NYC FIFTH AVESffc EXCLUSIVE 

MAGIC OF MIDTOWN! 

Live in kmunous mttown NY Walk 
everywhere Fut securey 2 bedroom. 2 
bafts. Large Bring room + tfintnq area. 
Wtadowd kitchen. Best buy" 1 
LESLIE CRQSSLEY 21^906-9218 

Brown Harris Stevens 


NAPLES FLORIDA 
ON THE GULF OF MEXICO 
Beach, go*, tennis, yac/n Luximous. 
new. spacious 3 bedroom, 3 bath (tal. 
metkaMen and nvxrtng rooms 
US 51^» 

Tarn Warren (Dowtflng-Frye Reoty) 
Tib 941-434-8049 Fax: 941-434-7324 


HORAGA BY OWNER S7HHC Set in 
San Francisco East Bay his Pnsbne 5 
bedroom. 3400+ sqlL. 11 yrs Private 
nmkx-pooi-5pa-top schools. Spacious 
master strte-2 boraa rooms, ftnb/ 
details E-Mat DANJPOWELLOaolcom 


BREATHTAKING 108 acres ruth 3-bed- 
room s&ne house to N-Y State Spectac- 
i4ar 360 degree nevs, 1-acre summing 
pond, roSng Helds & woods. IMS NYC. 
USSOOOti Teffra +33 (Oil 46341090 


Boats A Yachts 


BAIA 43 1995 OFFSHORE BOAT. 
2 x 425 CalerpUar, Amesson, Kavalar 
hul, 39 KT, otencers. dr condttmng, 
Raytheon integrated radar/depih/GPS/ 
autopDL genny, dtavghy. ouSnard. whke. 
tmenor cream. 2 cabins, shown + 1 
crew, 3 sets ewen, big trto rcarnaher. 
(A remote oonliDl sand, ask changer, 
tv. double service batteries , Poroetain, 
sfliramere, etc. $325,000 South France. 
Can sht> to USA. Fa [+377) 9205 7804. 


80’s East Grade Area. 

2 bedrfjoms/ 2 bam rams. No be. 


Lovely Bun-Hooded 5 room residence 
with beautiful antique furnishing and 
rear vtaw of gardens. Large eal-ii 
kitchen, formal dnlng roomibrasy. 
arcanoittoniria (fsmrasher, washar- 
r*yw. 54 ,300 monthly By Owner 

N.Y.C. TEL +1 212-535 6763 
and MRS +83 (0) 1 42 24 94 30 


Don't miss our next Special Reading 

Real Estate in the Sooth of France, 
French Riviera and Monaco 


on July J8 


Vanessa BOYLE in Paris: 

TeL: +33 fn) 1 41 43 92 06 - Fax: +33 (O)l 41 43 93 TO 



Belgium 


KHOKKE MET ZOUTE SEASIDE. 

Prime Shopping area, 100 sq.m . spit 
level, renovaled 1998. shop, ton g term 
rent and tahover negotiable. Avaiable 
October 1997 Please award Mr. Vaa> 
reman Fax +32500)27.45 alter 1930. 


French Provinces 


Be a Chatotain In the Lobe Valley 
Rem nfependera asle oi a LXVft sun- 
bathed Castle. Large reespum. equpped 
kdchen 4 rooms. 4 bafts, tovety panto 
lira we 80 irons from Pans by TGV. 

FFB-i2XXXYmonth or FFS.OOOwe*. 
ALSO: Aunt Ageftes chaidag cottage 
in me mtoore d the garders ofias 
3 vary coneonatt? rooms 5 2 baths, 
a rede oozy king S eqipped ktchen. 

FR^dOOmanfli FF300&week. 

Tel +33(0)549211502. Fra (0>549BS39G5 


Holland 


HOUEFWDERS 1NTL Herengracta 141 
1015 BH Ansentam Tel +3120 6382252 
Frit 6392262 EHnatwonselect«hpu4 


RENTHOUSE INTERNATIONAL 
No i in Hoflarto 

lor (semi (unshed house&'iflas. 

Tei 31-206448751 Far. 31-204465909 
Nhoven 19-21. 1083 Am Amsterdam 


London 


CHELSEA SW34Jgm qracoB 2nd floor 
Gat, fantastic locsui. age reception, big 
sunny balcony overlooking gardens, 2 
double bedrooms, kitchen, bedroom. 
GCH. radacorated itnughae £525 per 
week, unfumiud. Tel 44 pji7i35i2i26 


CAPITAL Aportmuts & houses tar rert 
shorttang stay tal see wm^tingsioji 
or takphone ++44 171 794 6702 


Paris Area Furnished 


Mr, M1ROMESNIL, 4 rooms. 90 sq.m, 
4th floor, Hl snipped kitchen. 35 sqm. 
Ruing will fireplace, dring, 2 badrooms. 
2 bathrooms, cupboards, btatot-prool 
door, sum, greenery. FF11.000 net 
Free now Tel: owns *33 (0)1 46477970 


16ft - CHAROON LAG ACRE, 2 rooms, 
71fi floor, Ngh class buldinq FF5.000 
IW- Tel +33 (0)1 46 22 24 M. 


16ft Metro DANELAGH owner renta 70 
sqm. + 16 sqm. bacony. ready to 
mML FFMJOO IW. (0)1 45274325 


17th, RUE DE SAUSSURE ruho YSeis 
2 rooms, shower roan FF4.000 charges 
Included Tet AG +33 (0)1 46 22 24 Of 





Waal ac com mo da t i on: sntoo-5 bedmons 
Oififly and senree assured 
READY TO MOVE H 
Tel +33(0)1 43129800 Fax (OH 4312980 


Embassy Service 

- YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tel: +33 (0)1 47iO3a05 


MA MAISON 

Specetst in Uglt Qualiy 
Ftmsrsd Homes <tm$ei£ Pars 

TEL / FAX- +33 (0}t 46 43 88 50 


AT HOME IN PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 
Apatmerts to rent turrashed a not 
Saks i Property Managemai Services. 
25 Av fate 75008 Paris Fx 014561 1020 


'LA HAUTE COUTURE* 

OF REAL ESTATE 
VERY HIGH CLASS. PARIS 16ft 
2 rooms. 4 rooms, 8 rooms. Partings 
SERVICES 'A LA CARTE" 

TEL: +33 (Oil 47 20 S) 06 
FAX: +33 @1 42 25 D9 92 


DENFERT ROCHEREAU. or avenue, 
double Irving. 1 bedroom. 111. quiet, 
sunny, television, taffy equipped, inter- 
phone, concierge. Iron, (fishes. Oiir 
rentals say we are the best. FRL500 per 
month. Tel. *33 (0)1 42 79 80 5& 


EXCEPTIONAL RUE DU BAG. 140 
sqm m kaetoied privtae coutyaid. Qu- 
et, 2 bedrooms, dnlng room, targe firing, 
al oomtorfs Free Ain iSttv - end Dec. 
FF4S»week. Cal +M (0)1 45 44 76 74 


5th, side) Mia’s chatmtog sunny quiet 
85 sqm. fivng, rflntog, bedroom, oflfce. 
1577-30/9. FFl i B0ttma+33«)}147O74a31 


MARAIS, 150 sqm apartment, modem 
rtarior, 3 bedrooms/2 bafts. 30 sqjn. 
lichen. Fori yr. +33 Ml 40Z9 0676 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 


ELEGANT 18th CENTURY MANOR HOUSE 
WITH A MAGNIFICENT VIEW OF LAKE 
GENEVA AND THE ALPS. 

A rare jewel completely renovaled. Spacious grounds Induck ferra 
and outbuildings, vineyards, swimming poo!, tennis court and bora 
riding facilities- Building possibilities. Private mooring nearby. 
Available for rent or purchase. 

Reply in confidence to: 

Globe Plan & Cis S.A. 

Ch. Claude Anet 4 - PO Box 247 - CH-1110 Morges 
Tel. 41 21 802 61 30 Fax. 41 21 802 61 32 
E-ma8swissaccess © swtesonlre.cn. 


FRANCE 


PARIS 

SQUARE AVENUE FOCH 

(private lane) 

IN HISTORICAL TOWNHOUSE 

luxurious renovation, 3 apartments: 

120, 1 60 & 300 sq.m. 

Tel + 33 (Oj I 44 55 SO 00 
Fax + 33(0)1 42 60 55 91 


Gerald Rrevner 


| Your REAL ESTATE Agent in PARIS 


Ullf tin (he research for \uu 
A ulil eslimalc the pmperlv 
TeL: 33(0) 1 33 20 08 50 
Va\.: 33(0)1 53 20 08 GO 

. rthwn 1 hml’cr 


South of France 
Pays Varois 

Ihn Saint Tropez, 2 hrs Monls Coda. 

Fufl charm o+Provenca Villa on 
hilkide. Imping noble view, 330 iq.m.. 
6 ha (and, pool, Kou+eLeepers lodging, 
sold ready to move in. SIM. 
Fax: +33 (0] L42223784 


HIGH CLASS VILLA 




MONTPARNASSE. 34 rooms. 105 sqm. 
+ 35 sqm. balcony, double parting + 
cellar Equipped ksctien FFil.500 m- 
during tfarges. Tet +33 ( 0|1 3025 0798 


SORBOfOE. charm. IghL aB amenta 
4 rooms till February. F9£00 net Tel: 
+33 (0)1 4633 9936. Fra [0)1 4329 0953 


Paris Ana Unfurnished 


LE DE LA CTTE, superb 5-room apart- 
ment. 125 sqm. Modem equfcped kitch- 
en, 2 bedrooms. 2 bafts, quiet, vwy suv 
ny. parting FF14.500 not including 
charges. Tel: +33 (0)1 43 29 47 05 


18th - RUE DE LONQCHAHP - 
5 rooms, on 4th floor, elevator, about 
100 sqm. - Hwh class building 
FF17.BOO. Tel +33 (0)1 46 22 24 01 . 


IGft, AVE MOZART, lovely 4 bedrooms, 
2 baths. Excaflem condition. FF22.050 
Tet +33 (0)1 42 15 04 07 


4th - DJE SABtT LOUIS, 35 sqm. 
bright 3rd floor, I fir. View on Seine 
FF4895 neL Tet +33 (0)1 43 29 30 00. 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
ments. From stufcs to 4 bedrooms. Tet 
♦41 22 735 6320 Fax +41 22 796 2671 


SPAIN 


Beautiful House 

GOLF CLUB COSTA BRAVA 

ft-no n'iil liilh lumv-lrd h^u-c iilI 
nilh jinden -ii* 1 irC + htilr'+it* Rirh- 
rni'fliL Big lnimri'-Hn nrrli firtV'ti.r. 
jchoaiina ,?yx+i dininvrarvn In wdnvn 
Me btc n> +n ivuh nivrt ne 
Kullj' etjuippeJ hi^ kiuhen. 'iiri}»- -+\Tih 
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BtMunful ivn ixw mounLuns. .ind 3i 
mm ii> the hrjirhe' 

MliuioJ fti ITh+neuiJi^n Onlf Out- 
Bovj iDttier s-jlf-omij-.-s neir 

Price £410,000 

Hrf-.Jam Fii >1 am Ruimn n‘ *> 

>u Cnsuru d’AmOtwro Spurn 
Us VJo’M.+i 
Ph-Ik- Fas 5 +t: K.vti-s 

Of 

Btinyil > L m Ridiur.i rf' l« 

>u Cnsuru d Am Gcioai M+sm 
Hi +*"> 

Fax 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 
week to t year. Great Locations Can 
FtaKWqur 212-448-9223. Fax 212- 
44M226 E-Mat aftomeHtoSaolcm 


'.‘DRAMONT near ST RAPHAa 
Very nice constrodton 
For photos & toctaoi Conrad on Hemet 
M^Tmembera aoUnoibhampaber 


NEAR 5T TROPEZ owner orfas anctant 
stone hnse esfeMy decanted, 5 bed- 
rooms. pool, t.700 sqm tend, peaceful 
amU weyanfc FfiJM +33(0)4 94782006 


PROVENCE- Afi kinds of properties. 
Please ask for Mrs Wavier. Agence 
Alta raer. F-84210 51 rSraer. Tel +33 
tan 90.88 07 53 Fitt 90 66 12 35 


Gnat Britain 


■ HOMESEARCH LONDON Let us 
seach'tor you We And homes / Bats 
to buy and rent and provide corporate 
relocation services. For rrefivkJuals 
. aqd corrpantas Tet +44 171 B38 
1068 Fax + 44 171 B38 1077 
ht^TremhoausBarohauA/fum 


GREECE • SPATA - VRAVRONA, 
11X00 sqm totdtem near toe new Inti 
Mprf. 1 X 00 m. tantte sea. panoram- 
ic view, todudbs house, newly hul, large 
storehouse, rinsyam. ofive trass & extra 
bcinias For more 1 intormstlon Tet 
+3094.465764. 


ELAM) OF EVIA. Rustic, ranowftd, hr- 
Msheti 34todroom bouse. 227 sqm., 
2500 sqm land, targe halcaiy, rqwctac- 
ubr stnset mountain ries. 2 his. from 
After®. USS 150.0MK Tal: +49^9- 
V332701, FAX +49-89-36101064. 


16th, POKIPE 

BEAUTFUL FLAT £9 ha ABOUT 
completely rehxnbkhed. 4 bertoons, 

2 firings, 1 dnlng. My equipped ktchen. 
3rd Boor, freestone biddkig. FF7 ndkn 
W (0)1 40 76 05 11 - 0 DB 81 OS 02 


16th, AUTElflL 450 sqiiL TOWWOUSE 
4 storeys. 13 train rooms, high dass 
Rttags. newly My renovated, 100 sqm. 
garden. US$17 U. Cal owner +33 (Oil 


42 88 13 13 Fte +33 Ml 42 88 13 33 


16ft, PASSY, 42 sqm. studio, batam 
on gatrfen, 81 FF990LOOOI Good con* 
ton. Tel +33 R1 47458868 no agencies. 


5ft LATIN QUARTER, Hemingway's 
apartment. 40 sqm. full of charm. 
FI, 150,000. W +33 (0)1 43 98 38 57 


78 - FHJCMfflOliES - 15 mins Paris 
La Defense. 17B> cert, house. Uaerf. By 
owner. 5700,000. Tet +33 (0)1 3Q5453B8 


FACING BOtS DE BOULOGNE, 23 sqm 
stodo, baft, resident, qutal cftamlnq 
FF570K. Tet +33ffl1 43 45 85 07 


LE SAHT LOUS, eneptional bordering 
water, suny ride, Wax, 4 bertuoms. 4 
-bafts. +33(0)1 55429234 rental possible 


DINING OUT 


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Otyaraj 

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HOTELS 


EDUCATIVE KOUDAY5 for Yaungsura: 
1-3 weeks stay in France with nice 
French fam% to Paris Daly French les- 
sons fnctuded ♦ touring Pare + weekend 
sports to farrandy TM +33(01611113281 


Bed & Breakfasts 


MANHATTAN LODGINGS, NYC. Short 
. stay tauy apartments, superior B & B 
registry, many locations. 
Tet 212-475-2090 Foe 212477-0420. 
E-Maft into &ffl an hretartooging& com 



Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East Of Bflhft. 
5 star dekne. Exceptional location, sao> 
ifly, contort, toe aristae, comertions. 
business services, saftflB TV. 18 min 
transfer from airport tree. UTELL. Fax: 
(981) 4-079439 / (+33) {0)147200007 


BREATHTAKMG VEW OF NEW YORK, 
20 fL gtass wait Central Part A (Sty. 
Lunsiousiy fumlsh«t piano, Sax, cable. 
For business, nstodan or fwwnoon 
couple. 1 btadt to Carnuie Has. 2 to 
Letterman, 5 to Uncoil Center. Muse- 
ums, Theaters. Weekly, Monthly. 3 day 
weekends {nirrimum} or long term. 
Tet 212482-1561, Fax: 7128844142 


ST. BARTHELEMV, F.WL. OVER 200 
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brat to hflslde wifi poofs. Our agents 
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LUBERCH. chtaring cfld ttora, tsnara. 
pool, 3 aSB. Tat +33 (OH 90384306 
Fax: +33 (0)4 90208850 


French Riviera 


LES PARCS DE ST TROPEZ 
Sum* high etas via, 

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pool vtift heated sea water. 


Holiday Rentals 


Caribbean 


4ACMBL, HAITI - Exnaontoaiy. tisunc 
house by sea in lovely wum tow 
Longtaort tom Inexpensive^ Ttoifax 
+33 (0)143458996 or Tel +1 2129791240 


Indonesia 


BAU 0CEANFR0NT YLLA 
New 4 bertuoms, 4 bafts - Kuta Beach. 

Ltcaiy private vflta, air candfaiiQ, 
jscuzzl, port Imo, 10 sal USS95G4tay. 
FAX: (65} 738 6009 


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Hospitality, Elegance, Comfort 


Hotel Louvre St Romain 

5-7 rue Sairrt-Roch. 

75001 Paris 

TeLOl .42.6031 .70 ■ Fax 01.42.fi0.10.69 
* 34 finely appointed rooms ad with 
marbla bathrooms, cab/e TV, 

Hotel du Continent 

30. rue du Mont-ThaOor 
75001 Paris 

Tti. 01 .42.80.7532 - Fax 01.42.61 .5222 
• 28 refined, tatty air-conrftioned, 


mmibais. in-room sale, hair dryers. 

| caWen/.miivbare, safe, hair dryers. 

1.BLT. Readers S 


e 


SUMMER In Paris 


Special Rate; 570 FF for two pen. one night all included 
Special Packages on Request (fora minimum of two nights stay) 
(“Summer Rates' includes American Buffer breakfast and all taxes) 
Valid from 27 June to 31 August 1997. 

AU major Credit Cards Accepted. 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


AUBERGE 
DU VIEUX VILLAGE 
D’AUBRES (NYONS) 

aim - Biological products possible - Diet 
1 !2 board start Wf per person! 
SWIMMING POOL.TY 
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- Fax: -+A3 lOU 75 2iS 36 10 


RENTALS 


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offering at 

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Tet +33(0)493 06 60 OO or +33 C0)4 93 38 OO 66 
Fax: +33 (0)4 93 06 60 20 or +33 (0)4 93 39 13 65 



Greece 


COMFORTABLE SEASIDE VILLA 250 
sqm wkh mntiicM vtow, mar Patras, 
Greece. Fil detsfc, rasavations. contact 

+3DJ42B6455 


PANAREA - Smal qtriat house, nta 
view. Renting: July S August Tel' +39 
90 983042 (leave message f absent). 


VENICE CENTER in bteUliul pelazro 
set eortahed M to I* ♦ doubta rooms 
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Paris & Suburbs 


ARTIST APARTMENT, tmurgote-. View 
on Sacra Cow. fflsqm, Aug & Sea.. 
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Residence 


French Riviera 

Villas - Apartments 

France 

rr 33(0)4.93 69 96 97 
Fax 33 (0)4.93 69 96 9 


SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA on 
famous 3rd SL Promenade luxury apai- 
mert, ail amenfiles, day/iredJmonft. 
Tel: 818073-3130 w 
Ifflp-ji/KtHfesijifomsp 












































































































































1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


NYSE 


Thursday’s 4 P.M. Close 

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The Affiocafed Press. 


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GLUMLY, SHE STARED 

AT HER REFLECTION IN THE SOUP SPOON 


AND FELT LONELIER THAN A GOLDFISH. 

Once again their annnal wedding anniversary pilgrimage to Scotland 
had been cancelled at the last minute. Last year Roger had jetted 
off to Taiwan on business. Full of apologies and promises that next 
year would be different. Now it was Singapore. Admittedly he'd 
brought her along this time.. And even taken a suite in the magnificent 
Raffles Hotel. (After telling her they were headed for the YMCA, 
the rogue.) But still. For him to be called away like this just as they 
were sitting down to dinner was just too much. She wished she'd 
never come. Her sullen thoughts were interrupted by a waiter asking 
if there was anything wrong with her untouched glass of champagne? 
She turned and found the - fellow grinning at her with 

the sort of impudent exp 1685 ' 00 her husband 

often employed. Which / J was hardly surprising. 

For indeed it was her husband, squeezed into 

the sommelier's uniform. The hotel administration 

had been more than happy to indulge the unusual request when the 
gentleman approached them earlier in the day. As for the lady, 
gallantry forbids quotation of the phrase she uttered at this point. 


i was hardly surprising. 

husband, squeezed into 
The hotel administration 






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L 


1 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


Stocks Fall 




By 1% in 


Hong Kong 


“ vf.‘ 


^Property Shares Pull 


Hang Seng From High 


- Gnapirdto Our Srjfl Finn Diipaulk'i 

HONG KONG, — Hong Kong 


stocks went on a wild ride Thursday as 
remnants of the festive handover mood 
pushed the Hang Seng index to a record 
high before the sobering reality of the 
property market polled investors back 
down to earth. 

The blue-chip index closed the first 
trading day under Chinese rule down 
141.05 points, or nearly 1 percent, at 
L5, 055.74. Handover enthusiasm had 



France Sounds Alarm 




t f 


On ’97 Budget Deficit 


1/3iiSK£s£Siit 


Finance Minister Predicts Big Overshoot 


5^ 



** >*•• • • 


pushed the index to an all-time high of 
15,363.61 during early trading. 

‘ ‘Handover fever is coming to an end, 
and investors are taking a break in the 
short run before taking new positions," 
i to said Edwin Cheung, a senior sales man- 

* ager at Taiwan Securities. 

The market reopened for trading 
Thursday after a break Monday. Tues- 
day and Wednesday, in part to mark 
Hong Kong's reversion to Chinese rule 
at midnight Monday. 

The Hang Seng index ended the final 
day of trading under British rule last 
Friday at a record closing high of 
15.1SK5.79 points. 

“It was strong before the handover 
and you have a bit of a morning-after 
effect," said Richard Venn, head of 
equities trading at CS First Boston. 

Analysts expected a period of con- 
solidation for share prices in coming 
days, with soft property stocks likely to 
, dampen sentiment after the chief ex- 
• Y ecutive, Tung Chee-hwa. said in his 

* inaugural address Tuesday that his new 
administration would increase housing 
supply to tackle high property prices. 

Mr. Tung said he planned to increase 
the . supply of apartments by up to 50 
percent above current levels. 

Apartment prices have surged an av- 
erage 60 percent since 1995 due mainly 
to traders' capitalizing on a shortage in 
the market, analysts say. It is these spec- 
ulators that Mr. Tong says he is tar- 


Northrop Grumman ’s Stealth bomber, left, a 1960s~era A2F Intruder, above, and the WWII-era Avenger. 


Lockheed Deal Squeezes Europeans 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 


geturg^ 


“The threat is there," said F ranklin 
Lam, director of property research at 
SBC Warburg. “ ‘Come near me and I 
will bash you.’ ” (Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


PARIS — Lockheed Martin Corp.’s 
plans to buy Northrop Grumman Coip. 
will increase pressure on European 
aerospace companies to merge and re- 
structure their operations, industry 
analysts said Thursday. 

With only two surviving major 
aerospace companies and a large de- 
fense budget, the American industry is 
now an even more formidable com- 
petitor for European companies thai 
still lag in terms of reorganization and 
cost-trimming. 

The European companies have 
watched with some dismay the wave of 
consolidations in the U.S. aerospace 
industry. The last six months have seen 
the sale of the space and defense di- 
visions of Rockwell, Hughes and 
Texas Instruments, in addition to the 
huge Boeing and Lockheed Martin 
takeover bids. 

Industry sources say that unless the 
Europeans can quickly cany out a sim- 
ilar consolidation, they risk losing out 
in world markets as well as being on- 
able to negotiate potential trans-At- 
lantic tie-ups from a position of 
strength. 


Andreas Breitsprecher, spokesman 
for Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG. said 
the Lockbeed-Northrop deal "shows 
how important it is that the Europeans 
do nor let up in their efforts to re- 
structure" foe aerospace and aircraft 
industries. 

The Lockheed-Northrop monolith 
will be the only major competitor to 
Boeing Co., whose bid to take over 
McDonnell Douglas won regulatory 
approval in the United States this week 
bnt still faces a possible challenge by 
the European Commission in Brussels 
later this month. 

Although Lockheed Martin's chair- 
man and chief executive, Nor man Au- 
gustine. said he saw no antitrust ob- 
jections to the merger, the European 
Commission did not say if it would 
challenge the deal as it has the Boeing- 
McDonnell Douglas tie-up. 

In Washington, a spokeswoman for 
the Federal Trade Commission said it 
was “too early to tell” whether the 
transaction will be reviewed for an- 
titrust implications by that agency or 
the Department of Justice. 

Now that the two U.S. aerospace 
giants have virtually run out of merger 
partners, the only way that the two 
survivors will be able to grow in the 


future will be to expand their inter- 
national operations. 

“As our industry becomes increas- 
ingly global, we must constantly im- 
prove efficiencies to compete in the 
21st century worldwide market 
place." said Lockheed Martin's Mr. 
Augustine. 

Mr. Augustine said Thursday that 
the combined company hoped to be 
active as a vendor and customer of 
other aerospace and defense compa- 
nies in the United States and abroad, 
especially in Europe. 

Seeking to allay European fears, he 
said: “I would say to our friends and 


Gwjx&if bv Our St&Fim Oapmchn 

PARIS — France’s public deficit 
could be * ‘significantly higher" than the 
3.0 percent forecast this year, Finance 
Minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn said 
Thursday, pledging that the government 
would take action if needed to curb it 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn said that if a July 
21 audit of public finances showed die 
deficit to be higher than 3.4 percent of 
the gross domestic product — exceed- 
ing me 3 percent single-currency target 
— his month-old government would 
move to tax affluent households and 
companies after this year. 

Both France and Germany are strug- 
gling to reach the 3 percent target this 
year amid record-high unemployment, 
which has cat tax revenue, and rising 
social spending. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn declined to forecast 
a figure for die deficit as a ratio of the 
GDP this year, which he said must await 
the results of the independent audit of 
public finances. But he noted (bar fore- 
casts ranged between 3.4 percent and 3.8 
percent 

As the government seeks income to 
offset the deficit Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin said late Thursday that France 
should be flexible about privatizing 
state enterprises and not turn its back on 
industrial reality for the sake of ide- 
ology. 


The Socialist said be would take into 
account “the cost to the state and thus to 


the taxpayer of frequent capital in- 
creases in a number of sectors, such as 
banks in difficulty." 

“I am not sure it is the state’s role to 
keep on bailing out financial institutions 
in trouble," he said. 

The previous center-right government 
had sought to get the deficit to 3 percent 
of GDP in its 1997 Finance Act. 

Germany, which wants a strict in- 
terpretation of the treaty to ensure that 
the euro is underpinned by sound fiscal 
policies, maintains that only those coun- 
tries that have reached the 3 percent 
target should be allowed to join the 
single currency. But Mr. Jospin's gov- 
ernment has said the treaty allows 
entrants that are track toward the target 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl on Tuesday 
said Bonn was sticking to a 3.0 percent 
target 

But Prime Minster Jean -Claude 
Juncker of Luxembourg has underlined 
his opposition to a literal interpretation 
of the Maastricht treaty budget deficit 
target for a single European currency. 

“I’m vetoing (his Goman interpret- 
ation that the treaty is saying 3.0 percent 
It does, but it is rich as far as miopretation 
goes." Mr. Juncker, said, referring to the 
treaty. Luxembourg holds the rotating 
EU presidency. (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


For Thailand, Enduring Woes 


colleagues in Europe, ‘The water's 
fine, come on in.* We would like to be 


Cimqn l n J bf Our StjffFnm tt ywri rj 


working with companies in Europe. 
We view ourselves as their more able 
partner now.” 

Lockheed Martin executives at the 
Paris Air Show said the corporation 
has been in contact with the European 
Airbus consortium about unspecified 
collaboration. Airbus has declined to 
discuss such a possible tie-up except to 
say that the four-nation consortium is 
talkin g with prospective partners all 
over the world to build a 550-seat 
super-jumbo jet designed to break the 
monopoly of Boeing’s 747. 


BANGKOK — Thailand’s economy 
will be mired in problems for some time 
despite strong medicine administered by 
the government, analysts said Thursday. 

Measures taken by the authorities 
since last week to force 16 ailing finance 
companies to combine with healthy ones 
and a stunning move to float the em- 
battled baht will help cure some sectors, 
the analysts said. But more bitter med- 
ication is needed, they said, in the form of 
lower interest rates, increased liquidity to 
help businesses, lower debt and stream- 
lined regulations on foreign investment. 

* ‘The latest steps taken are good and 
like a tank of oxygen." said Kenneth 


Courtis, chief economist at Deutsche 
Bank Group Asia Pacific. “Unless 
more significant changes are made in 
the next two to three months, tins tank of 
oxygen could be used up and Thailand 
could be in a worse position." 

Thai authorities acted decisively as 
the economy sputtered to its worst 
slump in over a decade. But the finan ce 
sector is still saddled with billions of 
dollars in nonperforming loans to the 


cash-strapped property sector. 

Official estimates of 1997 Thai eco- 


Officiaf estimates of 1997 Thai eco 
nomic growth are 5.6 percent, despite 
looming 1997 and 1998 budget-defici 


See THAI, Page 21 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Angelic Revision to Westinghouse Split VI EW POINT 


By Allan Sloan 

Washington Past Service 


in the pension flans and free up money 


WASHINGTON — One of the CBS 
a television network’s successful new 
' shows is “Touched by an Angel," a 
comedy series featuring divine creatures 
that come down to earth to rescue mere 
mortals from vexing problems. 

Michael Jordan, the guy who runs 
CBS Inc., tried to apply an angelic touch 
of his own last autumn to the stock price 
of CBS's parent company. Westing- 
house Electric Co., by announcing a 
plan to split the company into two 
pieces. The idea: separate media and 
industrial companies would be blessed 
with a higher total price than West- 
inghouse would fetch on its own. 

One part, to be called CBS, would 
have been deeded the glitziest, most 
valuable assets: the television network, 
Westingb ouse's huge collection of ra- 
dio stations and tax losses that would 
’ shelter $2 billion in future profits. This 
unit would be run by Mr. Jordan and his 
tophonchos. 

The second company, Westinghouse, 
would inherit the company’s dowdier 
industrial businesses and be stuck with 


to ray retirees medical costs. 
Whether they know it or 


Whether they know it or not, die 
companies’ retirees (past and prospect- 
ive) should raise their voices in a re- 
sounding hallelujah. 

Officially, Westinghouse revised its 
breakup plan to make it better for share- 
holders. not because of problems meet- 
ing its pension obligations. 

“We felt that the November plan, 
was going to satisfy the pension ob- 
ligations," said John Bergen, Westing- 
house’s spokesman. 


agency, Westinghouse 's pensions 
would have hung over CBS stock. 

Under Mr. Jordan’s initial plan, the 
new industrial company would have 
owned all of Westinghouse’ s industrial 
businesses, including Thermo King 
Coip., which makes mobile refriger- 
ation units. (Thermo King is unrelated 
to Westinghouse refrigerators, a busi- 
ness the company sold long ago.) 


Special Edition 


A timely message to Commerzbank's 
international clients and shareholders 


Under the new plan, Thermo King 
will be part of CBS, and the network 


Skeptics suspect Westinghouse re- 
vised me plan to avoid running afoul Of 


such problems as paying for pensions 
and retiree medical plans underfunded 
to the tune of some $23 billion. 

Sound fishy? You bet Maybe that is 
why Westinghouse now says CBS will 


be responsible for carrying foe under- 
funded employee-benefit plans. In ad- 
dition, CBS hopes to use most of its tax 
benefits quickly to eliminate foe deficit 


laws designed to stop companies from 
splitting themselves into pieces and 
leaving pensioners holding the bag. Un- 
der these laws, an independent CBS 
would have been on foe book for West- 
inghouse ’s pension obligations for five 
years. 

If the new Westinghouse could not 
ray, the Pension Benefit Guaranty 
Corp., foe federal agency that insures 
pensions, would have come knocking 
on CBS’s door looking for money. That 
prospect would doubtless have de- 
pressed CBS’s stock price, undermining 
Mr. Jordan’s rationale for splitting up 
Westinghouse in the first place. 

Neither party would comment on foe 
negotiations, but it is clear that foe 
agency was not willing to release CBS 
from Westinghouse’s pension obliga- 
tions without extracting a whole lot 
more than Westinghouse wanted to 
give. Without a release from the pension 


hopes to sell it for at least $2.5 billion, 
shelter most of foe gain with foe afore- 
mentioned tax losses and use about $1.1 
billion to make its pension funds whole. 
Because that $1.1 billion would be tax- 
deductible, a $23 billion sale would 
leave CBS with about $700 million in 
tax losses and $1 .4 billion in cash. 

CBS would use foe cash to reduce its 
debt. Mr. Bergen said CBS would save 
$1 12 million in interest a year by paying 
off debt, more than covering the $100 
millio n cost of retirees’ medical ben- 
efits. CBS would end up with far fewer 
tax credits than originally planned, but 
foe industrial company would be much 
stronger. And, of course, retirees’ pen- 
sions — and medical benefits — would 
be much safer. 

Westinghouse hopes to complete foe 
split-up by year-fran. If everything goes 
as planned, Westinghouse’s industrial 
company will have financial breathing 
space. And Westinghouse retirees will 
not have to depend on divine inter- 
vention to get their medical benefits and 
pension checks. 


Commerzbank 
building dynamic 
profit performance 
on substance 


To meet the objectives of its diverse and 
growing clientele worldwide and to reward 
the confidence of its 225,000 shareholders, 
Commerzbank is making substantial progress. 
This special edition of Viewpoint outlines 
significant achievements in 1996 and early 
1997, and focuses on some key aspects of our 
strategies for the longer-term future. 



CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates Ju * 3 

J - I ML FJF. Itt . DtH £F. if- A* O Pc* 
AadtRha LMT 33M U257 U3fl «l»* — 54B* MM MW* IA6 MB 

i Brncfc mas hm jus aim nwiws — zuas oao 

:-Y r« m Uwt M532 MO — .ft sa (MS- 0J334 4S4»- I.W» M3» 1J« 

% LMtaflbQ 1£B . IMS ?J2S M67J4 UM «JBB 1*75 MM 0X20X0 

Aftsa iaiH tarn bu» tuns aa* kb *ow mm — 

Mflon uuo unit 77ia MU — sun om twin mm L2MJ 


Ubid-Libor Rates -My 3 

Swiss Enoch 

Data- D-fttek Franc Storing Franc Yes ECU 

1 -month 2*¥x-3V» 1VS-1* 3Vfc-3*» Vi-** 4V»-4to 

Jmonttl 5*k-5>fe 2 ¥*-3*6 Ute-ltt. 6WW-7VU 3Vt-34* *W - V* 4W ■ 

6-month 5>Vto-5*»to3VW-»» m-m 7-7 to 4 Vt-SYn 

Hour S%-« 3*W-3U IH-ltt TM-7V> 3W-3W 4VW-4W 


moan UB4S1 van 771H ms* — ™ 

NtwYttkOU — T49a MS SJBB MOUSE SSDB JU7 1405 1LUS MW 


S9W -95905 1340 — 15939 01© 40ft 510 MB 

IU* T9!i? U IV 'Iff SU ua ?£ ~ 0,7 

IJ» ISA UB4 12324 ft«B* UA »* ftSS 3* — » 


Sources: Reuters, Uoy& Bonk. . , „ 

Rotes applicable to interim* deposits of Si mttUoo rnlnimm (or coalman). 


Zaks 1 IM im im UK iOi’ VM — 1-2*1 u® 


1 ECU . 1.1258 M7)9 ItW -4J5S IMS 2221 40335 HSU 12UB 
1 SDR . ‘ 1301 OXM 24231 BJ024 M8C8 V2S.OSOB WH M* 1525* »*» 

Cbsings^ Ams^fda mr Landoa MBan, Pads and ZedCrifidogs In Jltsj LmbwNe# tbftalJ 

PM. and Toronto totes af3 PM. . . . 

a To bay one pern# Ik To buy onedoBor: tints of IBtbtLfcnol qoolett HA^imamaoie- 


Key Honey Rates 


Other Dollar Values 


omwcf 

AimLpeso 

AnstragonS 

AanriansdL 

Bros real 

Q&w»*m 

OstiitanM 

Do&ob krone 

Enp> pound 

Fta-moridn 


Canane* 
GrMkdrtx. 
tong Kong $' 
Hung, forint 

Indnrapw 
lndo-repMi : 
Irish £ 
to uefl ll wk. 
Kmvdsw 

Mdhv.rios- 


CMronqr 
Met peso 
MZHtatfs 
Kent taw 
PM. peso 
PBkftzHrfy 
Pott escudo 
Ren ruble 
Soufirijml 
Sta9.S 


'Conner 

S. Ml rand 

S.KDf.WM 

SeNAUenn 

TahmaS 

Ikrfbrtd 

Turkish Era 

UAEdtrimm 

VeMLboflr. 


Forward Rates 


Conwy . JMey IMer 9Mof Cnnwey »*» »** 

PwndStaKm 1.6740 1.6721 16705 JopeM»9»n MX75 11123 11Z» 

OnrieSr *-374* UTU U692 StriHfrenc - 1X648 l^SW 1-4SSS 

Deutsche merit 1.7507 1.74ot 1.7424 


l\ 1? 


Somes: ING Bank (Amsterdam); Mosiw Bonk (Brussels): Bona CammerOaie thOana 
iS w^TrmrKe tPcrfsl; Bank of (Tom): 


Dscsatf Mb Sin 

Pliwrefe 1 Bft 

Federal fends 5H 

ye-dsr CDs deafcn £63 

188-dsy CP detden £S6 

3 merth Treasury MB £01 

]-yw Treanny Mi £26 

2- yeflr Trwwy MS £92 

3- ywr Treiswy a<d» £19 

7-year Trmsnrr note 624 

IB-ywTraosorr note £41 

aupMr Treasury bead £62 

Ucnm lyneh 30-day RA 5JJS 

■IPPW 

Dtaanolrale 0-50 

Caflaaoey S43 

l^MthMHbank U5 

34Hn1k intertank 064 

6-BMalfe Interbank 069 

lOyearGMfbmri IS) 

6enoiy 
Lombanl rate 

CaBcHnny 3.10 

l-nmalb tatertnak 3.10 

3-mnatb b rt t rt oMt 3.13 

6-oHotti briertnnk 3-16 

19-fter Band £61 


6» m 

7 SO 6 te 


7Vi* 7JM 
7.04 £99 


Pmr Mtebi 

£00 Bade base rate Oh VA • 

8V4 CaSmeaer £00 716 1 

5K 1-aentti tatertaok tt* 

£67 3-mevtb lafertaHk 7M 

£59 frannte Interbank 7Vn 7 JR 

£09 18-fear Git 7.04 £99 

£33 ^ 

£01 Dan 

£30 lotefveafHM rate 3.10 3.11 

£35 Qdlnotiey 39W 3V» 

£41 1-maafli latertmdt 314 3U 

£71 3-enteli Mertank 3Vn 3Vk 

£05 t-HKHlb BrtorW* 34k SO 

IlfearOAT £49 ££3 

n_50 Sources: Rwuten^Bjooabm MyrrHI 
rjr Lrnch, Bank afTeky^MiriublsM. 
®41 Comeatxmt. Oatf Lroanab. 

067 Gold 


no no 
3VW 3V» 


314 314. 

3VH 316s I 


34* 3«*| 

£49 £53 


AM. PM. dl*fle 
zorirt HA. 33260 +0 JO 

London 33230 33255 +£40 

460 New York 33260 32520 -7.10 

3.10 t/6. doOars per ounce. Lavtoa official 


3.10 aanas Zurich and New Ytrifmnlnij 
113 and dosbapdees; Beer York Capat 


113 and tterirtg prices flm* York t 
1M MWSJ 
US Source: Bethea. 


Intenntkxnl pesenca: 

Aknety. Answrimn. Antwerp. 
Ationii. fimigkoL BoreMotH. 
Beina Bekui, Bombav.Brete- 
ton Bnisds, Bud^tesL Baenos 
A«% CMro, Cwasn Cesrtim 
CWeogo. Capadapn, DrtSn. 
G«ww. Gfcrtir, Grand Ceyroon, 
Hang Km^ btanbvUsksra, 
Johansbug. Kw.Ljbrun, 
London, LnsAogstes. Lnwmbotra, 
Umirid. Manama, Mexico dry, 
IOm, Bfinsk. Moscow. New Verb. 
Novosieak. Osaka. Pairs. Prasuo, 
Bo te Junta, S6o P«id£ Seoul 
Shanghai, Saig^Mra, Si Pitere- 
te»0. Sydney, Taipei. Tehran. 
Tokyo. Toronto, Warsaw, Zorich. 


Dynamic start in first quarter 1997. 

After another record year in 1996, the Commerzbank 
Group is off to a strong start in 1997. In the Gist 
quarter, the Bank's operating result before risk pro- 
visions surged 20.5% to DM1,053 million. Group 
total assets reached DM471 billioo, up 5.1^ over 
year-end 1996. These achievements are a continuation 
of Commerzbank’s highly rewarding year in 1996: 
after doubling its earnings in 1995, the Group boosted 
its operating result alter provisions by 28.6$ to 
DM1,859 million. Aller-tax return on equity was 
10.1%. plating Commerzbank among Cermany'6 most 
profitable financial institutions. Our goal in tbe 
comingyeare is a step-by-step progression to 15% ROE. 

Position m bhibbvational finance expanded. 

International finance is a traditional strength of 
Commerzbank, which operates 50 outlets in 40 coun- 
tries. This area naturally rovers finance for trade 
1 18% of Germany's external trade), international 
fund-raising operations of alt types, forex and secur- 


ities trading, asset management and financial deri- 
vatives. In 1996, Commerzbank reinforced its pro- 
minent position an the international band markets, 
participating in 107 new issues totalling DM30 billion. 
Moreover, the Bank ranked first as lead manager on 
the Jumbo Pfkndbrief market, and also created the 
Commerzbank Jumbo Pfandbrief Index for this 
rapidly growing fixed-income segment. 

Continuing its strong development as an asset 
manager of choice for both private and institutional 
investors, Commerzbank in 1996 lifted assets under 
management by over 12% to DM120 billion. The 
Group now offers asset management expertise in 
13 countries with 24 operative units. 

Also rewarding was the performance of Commerz 
F in a n cia l Products, the Group's derivatives subsidi- 
ary. In only its second full business year, and still in 
an expansion phase, CFP posted an operating result 
ofDMI31 miUion. 

Strategy for International Investment 
BANKING. With earnings potential as its top priority 
- and size a secondary consideration - foe Group's 
overall strategy in international investment banking 
Is to base its core units in Frankfurt with strong out- 
lets operating in London, New York, and Singapore. 
Moreover, we plan to significantly expand our capa- 
bilities in equities organically, with a view of enhanc- 
ing profitability in this sector over the longer term. 

Earnings up in German retail market. 

Commerzbank is committed to increasing its earn- 
ings and market share in Germany's highly competi- 
tive retail market where we operate 960 branches. 
An intense sales offensive resulted in 80,000 new 
customers and increased profits in 1996. 

Sharp rise w share price. After a lackluster 
first half of 1996, Commerzbank's share price surged 
in foe second half to one of foe DAJCs ten best per- 
formers. Tbe net r ■ iy y 
dividend payout of i Fi iji uteiif yTj'toi^ * ~ _ a 
DM540 million is 4 

double tbe 1992 "yjQ « 

amount. In the first a! . v 8- '"’? “ 

five months of 1997 « 

our share price rose « 

by another 27.6%, a 

reaching a market ' • ' <4xo- : - v 

capitalLkm of l 

more than DM 20 • Hza B 

billion. I*?***" SSTteT 






Positive Outlook. In foe light of our accom- 
plishments in recent years and our dearly defined 
strategies for the future based cm substance, we are 
confident Commerzbank will mninbiin its dynamic 
profit performance in 1997 and beyond. 


For more information about our banking and 
financial services, contact Commerzbank's Corporate 
Communications Department, Frankfurt 
Fax +49 69 13 62-98 05; http://www.com metzbanlumm 


COMMERZBANK £& 


iu>d oft 


I 






C. PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 4. 1997 


THE AMERICAS 



The Dow 


30-Year T-Bend Yield 






A Price War atU.S. Dealers 

Cars Are at Their Most Affordable in 17 Years 


JOBS: U.S. Unemployment Rises Anew 


Continued from Page 1 


shares in smaller companies in ihe 
defense business rise as .investors 


THe ’ 1 7,000 jobs lhat empto?”* - 


rne - takeover target would Mjsjne 

225.000 pro- tony, news agenefe tepnned, 


Dollar in Deutsche marks B Dollar in Yen 




Vyv 


By Keith Bradsher 

New York Times Service 


F M A M J J 
1SS7 


' F M A M J J 
1997 


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4S&&50 45S3.94 /*087! 

J8W- S22.99 TtOSSj 
5850.01 • 5793.48 ■ M#? ) 
933&51 . 5125.19 *Z 32 ! 


DETROIT — Car shoppers 
might not notice it without looking 
closely at the ads, but the auto 
industry is in the thick of a price 
war, with more rebates, cut-rate 
loans, cheap lease deals and other 
discounts than ever. With Amer- 
ican family incomes rising at a 
hefty clip, these discounts have 
made new cam more affordable 
than they have been in nearly a 
generation. 

For the first time since early 
1981, the average car costs less 
than half a year's pretax income 
for the average American family, 
according to Comerica, the biggest 
Michigan bank. As recently as 
1994, die average family paid the 
equivalent of 30 weeks’ income 
for a new car. 

But in the three-month period 


just took a low-rate lease on a Jeep 
Cherokee after doubling her salary 
when she left her old job as. a 
dermatologist’s receptionist, 

'I see a lot of people able to buy 
homes, buy cars, things that were 
not in their reach two or three years 
ago/’ she said. "It has just been 
wonderful." 

The new cars are still not cheap. 
With an average price approaching 
S20.000, a midsize sedan remains 


The owner of a new 
Jeep Cherokee calls it 
‘just wonderful.’ 


available on most cars and a few- 
popular sport utility vehicles. 

Less expensive models also cany- 
discounts. The Toyota Corolla has a 
S700 rebate, while the Ford Taurus 
and the Dodge Grand Caravan and 
Plymouth Grand Voyagerminivaas 
all" cany- SI .000 rebates. 

But while this is good news for 
car buyers, for the auto industry 
the discounts are nothing to cel- 
ebrate, representing forgone 
profits at a time when a vigorous 
economy should be producing 
strong earnings. 

While Detroit’s Bis Three have 
on occasion offered more gener- 
ous deals, never before have Asian 

and American manufacturers alike 


m taTib- the 225,000 pre- 
dieted “by economists and a on De- 
low the 236,000 average for the first 
five months of die year. 

Job growth in service industries, 
particularly health care, slowed m 
June despite continued strong 
growth in computer services, engi- 
neering and management sendees. 

Factories added a modest 1 4,000 
jobs, while construction payrolls 
shrank by 2,000. 


Litton Industries^ which makes 
navigation and guidance a y np m e n t,! 
rose -Vs ro 4914. UnitedTechnotogies, 
the producer of Pratt h& Whittwy.jet 
engines and Sikorcky.heJkgpi^ 
gained I# to 86. Raytheon, which 
makes missiles, rose M to 533i. 

‘it’s a nice surprise." said John 
Bartlett, manager of tireOroqiKce 


U.S. STOCKS 


edstSd dmraTfy aS!of anhour to KSt 

aio hours would have thought it mjgte have - 

^Overtime fell by the same been some i ■■ 


offered such a wide range of dis- 
beyond the reach of millions of counts at the same time, said Su- 


middle-class American families. 
And many sport -utility vehicles, at 
$25,000 to $35,000, are distinctly 
luxury items. But most models are 


-- Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


iDttnuii.Ktoi Hi-rau Tribune ending June 30, it took just 25.4 getting more affordable — partly 


Very briefly; 


Time Warner Wins Cable Appeal 


NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Time Warner Inc. won an 
appeals court order Thursday blocking New York City from 
running Fox News Channel and Bloomberg Television on 
Tune Warner cable-tele vision channels run by the city. 

The 2d LT.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York upheld 
a November lower-court ruling that the city violated a fran- 
chising agreement by running commercial programs on city 
channels that Time Warner reserves for "public, educational 
or governmental’ ’ use. The appeals panel, in a 3-0 decision, 
said the city did not have a right to air whatever programming 
it wanted on the so-called PEG channels or to rent the city- 
controlled channels u> the highest commercial bidder. 


weeks of gross income to buy a 
new set of wheels. That, of course, 
is well above the 18 weeks it took 
in early 1974 when cars were most 
affordable; incomes had risen 
through the 1950s and 1 960s while 
government emission controls and 
safety regulations had not yet ad- 
ded much to the price of cars. 

Yet the current figures are still a 
big improvement. The calcula- 
tions do not include sport-utility 
vehicles, minivans and pickups, 
which have also been gening more 
affordable lately, although not as 


quickly as cars, and carried record 
discounts in June. 


discounts in June. 

Darcy Norris, a 41 -year-old ad- 
ministrative assistant in Houston, 


Tobacco Industry to Pay Mississippi 


because low used-car prices 
provide stiff competition, partly 
because there is a glut of prac- 
tically everything but the biggest 
sport-utility vehicles. 

Some of the most generous deals 
are on the most expensive models. 
Lexus and Acura are offering deal- 
ers rebates of up to S 1 .000 on most 
of their sedans, Chrysler has a 
$1,500 customer rebate on its 
premium LHS sedan, Oldsmobile 
is giving dealers a $2,000 rebate on 
the top-of-the-line Aurora sedan 
and the Bravada sport-utility 
vehicle, and Lincoln is offering 
53,000 customer rebates on its 
Continentals and Town Cars in 
some regions. Low-rate loans are 


zanne Kinsler. an auto incentives 
analyst at the consulting firm 
Coopers & Lybrand. 

The seeds of the current dis- 
count war were sown last fall, 
when Japanese automakers intro- 
duced new models that were less 
expensive to produce and when the 
dollar was appreciating sharply 
against the yen. 

Reluctant at first to cut sug- 
gested retail prices, Japanese auto- 
makers began offering temporary 
rebates, low- rate loans ana sub- 
sidized leases on a scale they had 
never tried before. Detroit’s Big 
Three initially ignored all these 
deals, then grew alarmed as their 
market shares began to erode. 

Only European automakers, 
benefiting from already high sales, 
have remained largely aloof from 
the fray, although Volvo has 
offered a few discounts. 


Overtime fell by the same 
amount, to 4.7 hours. But both mea- 
sures remained near historic highs. 
Average hourly earnings of all non- 
supervisors rose by 4 cents, to 
$12.22, in June, bringing the in- 
crease for the second quarter to 8 
cents, somewhat lower than the 
quarterly increases for the past 
year. 

Economists said the decisions 
the Federal Reserve would make 
concerning interest rates at meet- 
ings scheduled Aug. 1 9 and SepL 30 
would depend largely on whether 
labor markets start to tighten again 
later in the year, threatening to pro- 
duce faster wage and price rises. 

"If the unemployment rate con- 
tinues to point to a tight labor market, 
I would think the Fed on the basis of 
prudence would have to raise rates,” 
said Norman Robertson, economic 
adviser to SmhhfieJd Trust Co. in 
Pittsburgh. “You’re tailring a 
quarter-point increase, at most a half 
a point, by the end of the year. Thai’s 
not likely to topple the economy into 
a recession.” (A P. Bloomberg ) 

■ Lockheed Bid Fuels Stocks 


nothing quite as major as this.’ 
Arthur Hoean, a trader at Mo 


Lockheed Martin’s surprise bid 
for Northrop . Grumman helped 


JACKSON, Mississippi (AP) — The tobacco industry has 
agreed to pay Mississippi more than S3 billion to cover health 
care costs caused by smoking, guaranteeing the state its share 
of the proposed national tobacco agreement, state officials 
said Thursday. 

The settlement comes only five days before the state was to 
take cigarette makers to court in Pascagoula. Chancery Judge 
William Myers was to hear the case without a jury; he said 
Thursday he had been contacted by both sides and was 
canceling the trial. 


Rate Expectations Hurt Dollar but Help Pound 


• SBC Communications has filed a federal lawsuit in San 
Antonio asking the court to judge pan of the- federal Tele- 
communications Act unconstitutional after regulators 
quashed its bid to provide long-distance service in Okla- 
homa. 


• The New York Stock Exchange is considering changing a 
rule in a move that could make it easier for listed companies to 
defect from the biggest U.S. bourse. The Big Board’s Rule 500 
makes it almost impossible for a listed company to move to 
another exchange. tAP.Bioombergi 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against other major currencies 
Thursday as an increase in the U.S. 
unemployment rate suggested that 
the Federal Reserve Board would 
not raise interest rates soon. 

Hie pound, meanwhile, rose to its 
highest level in nearly six years 
against the Deutsche mark as traders 
bet that the Bank of England would 
increase British interest rates as 
early as next Week. 

The rise in the U.S. unemploy- 
ment rate is a sign that the economy 
may not be growing fast enough to 


prod the Fed, which left interest 
rates unchanged Wednesday, to 
raise rates when it meets in August- 
Higher rales mak e dollar deposits 
and bonds more alluring. 

“The dollar sold off pretty heav- 
ily" after the report, said John Nel- 
son of ABN-Amro Bank in Chica- 
go. "The U.S. economy is still 
strong, but it’s t railin g off'" 

At 4 P.M. in New York, the dollar 
was at 1 13.65 yen, down from 1 14.45 
yen Wednesday. It fell to 1.7520 DM 
from 1.7537 DM. The pound jumped 
to SI. 6900 from $1.6755, and to 
2.9632 DM from 2.9412. 


"There’s been a lot of buying of 
sterling for marks.” Mr. Nelson 
said. ' r Quire simply, the UJC. econ- 
omy is very strong, its interest rates 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


are high and probably going to go 
higher and the L".K.'is out of the 
whole EMU mess. Sterling is prob- 
ably going to go a lot higher." 

The British budget, released 
Wednesday, will do little ro rein in 
the country's burgeoning economy 
and failed' to quiet talk" of higher 
rates, analysts said. 


Traders said the dollar would 
probably not fall much fuitberon the 
unemployment report. The expec- 
tation that rates will not rise soon 
sparked a rally in U.S. bonds and 
stocks, and foreign investors need 
dollars to pay for U.S. assets. 

* 'Today’s numbers were good for 
the asset' markets, and that’s nor 
necessarily bad few the dollar,” said 
Thomas Benfer, director of foreign 
exchange at Bank of Montreal. 

Against other currencies, the dol- 
lar slipped to- 5.9065 French francs 
from 5.9080 and to 1.4675 Swiss 
francs from 1.4701. 


Arthur Hogan, a traders! Morgan 
Stanley, Dean Witter Discover & 
Co. said Thursday’s labor report ^ ; 
"takes away some of the feffjhat 
the Fed has to do somethmg^im- 
mediately, meaning the nextrneet- 
rag" on Aug. 19. j;’\ 

The Standard & Poor’s 50(P. 
stock index rose 12.89 points, to a ;; 
record 916.62. The Nasdaq com- 
posite index, whichlargely reflects :• . 
- technology stocks, rise 12 points,' 
to 1,467.61. 

On the COMEX exchange in 
New York, gold for August de- 
livery dropped $7:10, tt>'325.20. . • 
Gold stocks fell after Australia’s . 
central bank said it sokI167 metric j» 
tons of the precious metal, or 68 * 
percent of its holding, ibr S 1.784 : 
billion. . , . 

Banks, which benefit from a 
stable interest-rate environment, 
surged on the news. NationsBank 
rose 2 to 681/6, First Union gained 2 : 
to a record 97 l A and Citicorp rose 1 
1 1/16 to a record 129%. 

Cereal makers rose after General 
Mills raised, its breakfast cereal 
prices an average of .2.6 percent. 
The move could trigger, similar in- - 
creases from other cereal makers 
and signal an end to their expensive - 
price war. General Mxilsgained 2 7/ 

16 to 68 3/16. Kellogg scared 4 to 
91 and Quaker Oats rose 13/1 6 to 45 
15/16. U L 

Stockin PepsiCo rose 15/16 to 38 ” 
15/16 after the beverage and res- 
taurant company said it expected to 
have a .long-term sales agreement - 
with its Tricon Global Restaurants 
unit once the unit was spun off, lock- 
ing in the business at the .second- 
largest U.S. restaurant company. 

Signs of the economic slowdown 
hurt many so-called cyclical stocks, 
including automakers and metals 
companies, which - are sensitive to ", 
changes in die economy. SchJnm- 
berger, which sells services to the 
oil industry, fell 2 7/16 to 134 5/16, 
while Aluminum Co. of America 
dropped 114 to 77. (AP, Bloomberg) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursdays 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most odive shares, 
up to Ifte closing on Wall Street. 

The Associated Press. 


5*5 HUP Lae UM 


Indexes 


Most Actives 


July 3, 1997 


Kgtl Las Leant Qige Optra 


Sato Hip Law UM Qspc 


mm w* 

ir* n 


lit IDW 
ft m 
n* w. 
*k M 
li*, lift 
<» ft 
Ift Vh 
22ft 2Jft 
Hft M 
Ml 14ft 
■41t 14 

lft 1ft 
IVk 1ft 


ft 

S «ft 

n 

.IP ift 

4'. ill 


Dow Jones 

a PM Hut Low Lmr a* 

Indus 7M744 71M2fi 779538 7895J1 +1#M3 

Trans 280096 2US.M 2782.19 7777.40 +9.74 

Utg 23238 73174 73)77 232.77 >130 

Camp 242795 243245 2406.13 242991 >2297 


High lut LaJcfl Ch$e CpaA 


irt lift 
ft ft 


Standard & Poors 


57. 544 

19ft 19* 


r. '5? 

29ft 19ft 
ift 4U 


Mgh Urn On 
Industrials 10&46 1 040.101 0£U4 
Transp. 649.70 63999 64943 

UBKte 20072 19879 200.72 

Finance 103,82 10172 103*0 

SPOT 904 j05 091413 904JQ 

SP 100 88170 86807 881.17 


Vat Ha* 
459*5 14*1 
59435 45V* 
507D2 111,'* 
37193 J7M 
34494 34ft 
32357 25ft 
31741 9$ft 
31410 39ft 
30942 69V) 
29542 39 
79539 5011 

&§ iB" 

24394 105 
25944 2Zft 


UM* On* 

16ft 169* 
44*1 45ft 
JIM 
34*4 ITS) 
3S^» 36 


CORN (CB0T) 

'000 i't) minimum, jmls per Ousfie! 


342ft 35ft 
94V* «Tft 
39ft 394* 

JESft 

491t 49ft 
54^ 55ft 
HOT* 108ft 
101** 103ft 
21*1 22ft 
103ft 103V. 

rm 2w 


24394 IDS 
29W4 22ft 


Jul 97 

24*? 

244’ r 

2447. -1 

2*534 

Sep 97 

235-t 

232 

233 . -1 .- 

42393 

Dec 97 

23>. 

732 

233. 

142X13 

-'■lor 78 

;J3i 

240 7 

240-. -V. 

24.355 

May 98 

148 T 

344 

244’ : -2 

1213 

Jul ra 

251 ; j 

249 

J4« 7 -2 . 

r.! 5 ? 

Sep 98 

248 

345: 

245: --. 

3a3 

ESI sales 

47.005 T^ds sales 



PRANCE JUICE {NOW 
1 SSCE lbs., cents per b. 

■W5T 7525 7*30 7525 +70 1,294 

Sea or 7750 76X5 77X5 -X5 19,576 

M2.” 3C2C 79.40 8130 >.90 &2«J 

5143 EZ43 8325 >’25 Z52? 

Est sales 1200 Wees sd« 

.Vers csei jt 


High Low Latest Cbge OpM 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMATIF) 


High Law Latest digs OpM 


FF5DM00 - rtsollOOpcI 
Sap 97 12992 12972 129.88 >022 201722 
Doc 97 98X0 9020 9822 > 024 1189 
Stern 97X6 97X6 9772 +074 0 

EsL sates: 151,900. 

Opan lot: 2QS91 1 off 1,71 6. 


MarW 77.75 76.90 77JB . -.87 7,345 
May9B 77X0 7728 77X8 -X7 ' UM 
EsL salts laOOO W«fs sates 
VtetfsapenW 


lift 
2ft Ml 


ift m 

TON 9ft 


Nasdaq 


Nqsdaq 


Not Avaffabta at Press Tone 


8ft 7ft 
15ft 15Vi 


lift lift 
7ft M 
2ft 1H 
3ft 3 
lft lft 
i»ft leu 
384 X 
19ft lift 
<Pft 42ft 
1ft ft 
» 3ft 
6ft ift 
24ft 24ft 
12 lift 
15 14ft 


TTft 12ft 

1111 llh 


50 491* 

Ift Ift 


Not Available at Press Time 


H lift 
143140V* 
48*1 49 

47V. 47ft 
42 

7!ft 71ft 
ft ft 
31ft 32 
119ft 122ft 
121ft 1299* 
76ft 77ft 
63ft 64V. 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CEH3T2 

>00 Ions- Italian period 

JUI97 242-30 23700 239 60 -220 10313 

Aug 97 23420 22000 22160 >3 80 24195 

Sep 97 20920 20t-50 207.70 -2X0 16.757 

Oet«7 19020 195X0 1«7 j(B -110 14X07 

Dec 97 19100 la&OO IBV20 >Z2C 39.206 

Janes 190.00 187 JO 188.70 -200 4.17C 

Eil sales 28.000 Werfi sain 

Wads open rat 


GOLDlNCMXJ 

id trsr ec. - doaars per hoy ra. 

-1497 32X20 -7.10 5 

AugC7 33410^1450 32220 -710 104615 

Sep 9? 33400 32620 326.20 -7.10 

Cel 97 339X0 32620 32720 -7X0 9X35 

0« 97 33520 329X0 329.70 -7X0 31,038 

Fe»9S 347 HO 332X0 332.00 -7X0 9X12 

A pi 98 33420 -7X0 4X0 

Jon 98 34460 33640 334x0 -7.00 7.772 

Aig98 34640 339.10 339.10 -7.00 746 

EsL ides ALPOa IVads sates 
Weds open Irri 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (LJFFE) 
m. 200 niHlan - pis of 1 00 pd 
Sep 97 13528 13X77 135X5 +023 103001 
Dec 97 107X0 107X0 107X0 +0X8 950 

EsL sates: 57.685. Piter, sates: 71587 
Plte. open ML: 103,951 up 7256 


EURODOLLARS (CMER) 
SI aiBRoivpIs el 100 pcL 
Jvl 97 9X25 9X22 ( 


HEATING OIL DIMER) 

42X00 gal, mds per go) 

Aug 97 55X5 57X0 5276 -2.W 42X14 

S* 97 5570 5370 5371 -2.11 21X92 

Od97 5590 5370 5X11 -2X1 17X32 

Nov 97 5670 5X95 5X96 -171 11905 

Doc 97 57X0 5576 5176 -1X1 R757 . 

Jan 98 5745 5671 56X1: -1.76 12X54 'i- 
Feb 98 57X5 56J1 5X31 -171 6X31 / 

Esl sates 2X131 Wnfs sates 
Watfs often fed 


UGHT SWEET CRUDE OUUIQ 


SH? SJ-I! SHU MOO MIL- data* P«bH- 


Dec 97 9X06 9396 94X4 +X8 442.296 

MarM 94X2 93X7 93.99 +.11 298.987 

Jun 98 93.91 9176 93X8 +.12 247.583 


91* *r» 

lft 17ft 


Sft 

Pk 

Ift 

-ft 

5^m 

5ft 

54k 

+k 

N 

Zft 

7ft 

+ft 

14*k 

ms 

33*1 

4k 

r 

Nft 

2*4 

r 

>ft 

>ft 

6 

5ft 

5ft 

+* 

lfft 

IWk 

ljl 


7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

>5 

SSk 

« 

55ft 

-ft 

271k 

27ft 

274k 

■kk 

k 

v» 

ft 


41« 

area 

41 ft. 

4k 

24ft 

nw 

24ft 

•lft 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft 

-k 

291 

25ft 

254k 

•9k 

Hk 

29k 

W% 


41k 

4Vk 

4Vk 

•A 

9k» 

9ft 

9*k 

-Vk 

9ft 

» 

9ft 

*9k 

21ft 

21ft 

rift 

-ft 

Pk 

24ft 

M 

•ft 

7ft 

77k 

7ft 

-vk 

12ft 

12ft 

m 


12ft 

in 

Uft 

•S 

lm 

lift 

lift. 

•ft 

7 

tft 

m 

•ft 

a*k 

27ft 

2Pk 

-1 

5ft 

5ft 

54ft 

•V, 

Ifti 

9k 

1 

4k 

Uft 

Uft 

IN 

-ft 

■ft 

71k 

Ift 

•*k 

3ft 

M 

3ft 

-Vk 

Uft 

lift 

16ft 

»Vk 

lift 

U 

in 


1S4 

15ft 

15* 

-Vk 

ft 

ft 

ft 

• Ik 

5ft 

54k 

Sft 

•Ik 

5Vk 

4ft 

(ft 

•ft 

26ft 

Z» 

25ft 

■1 

3 

Ift 

lft 

•Vk 

5 

«k 

Mk 

-ft 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft 


1 

4ft 

1 


■ft 

■ft 

Ift 

-ft 

l»k 

Wk 

in 

M 

Kk 

-ii 

2ft 

2ft 

N 

■Vk 

flft 

37ft 

37ft 

-ft 

lft 

Ilk 

Ik 

>'4 

ltok 

Wk 

IHk 

• ft 

I7H 

lift 

11 

-Vk 

Wt 

9ft 

94k 

-Vk 

1 

2ft 

lft 

-W 

ft 

«k 

ft 


Wk 

5ft 

m 

■ _ 

9ft 

ft 

sit 


Ml 

0*1 

6<Va 

-M 

’/* 

ft 

ft 


9 

89k 

9 

■*k 

10 

9ft 

lft 

• ft 

ink 

ISk 

ISM 

•Ik 

14 

lift 

134k 

*>k 

4 

M 

III 

-Vk 

9 

M 

9 


9U 

9ft 

9ft 


■Vk 

4ft 

4k 

4i 

14 

Uft 

14 

• ■k 

lift 

19ft 

Wk 

• ft 

4 

4 

4 


41ft 

a 

41 

417k 

-ik 

St 

49ft 

58*t 

•1 

45 

43M 

45 

-Ift 

.2 

2 

2 

•ft 

lSft 

UM 

15H 

•Vi 

II 

Hft 

»4k 

■ft 

Ift 

8 

■Vk 

4k 

14ft 

In 

141k 

•ft 


DVk 

19 

•1ft 

15tk 

25 

Bft 

• ft 

Bft 

DM 


•ft 

IBM 

11 

lift 

-ft 

Uft 

14 

Uft 

-V, 

lft 

Ift 

Ift 

•ft 

nv. 

7*. 

71k 

•v« 

V* 

* 

ft 


it 

4ft 

4ft 


4-1 

(ft 

4U 


254 

lift 

2ft 

-M 

»« 

9 > 

9ft 

• ft 

1 + 

Ik 

lft 


i’i 

ttl 

if. 

•'«» 

2»>i 

2Tk 

29*. 


S 

4ft 

4-1 

_ 

■4 

rfa 

*u 

- B 

1 1 

1 - 

1- 

• k 

h 

S'l 

S*i 

•» 

17. 

17 

ir-. 

-M 

S'f 


6‘« 

• ** 

B • 

21 

22M 


*•■« 

to 

4ir-a 

•1 

4. 

)i 

4. 



Ufa 

Ilk 


27k 

»« 

24-1 

■k 

Hm 

a 

9. 

•M 


i . 

5 

- i 


w> n* 
17ft lft 
4ft 4ft 
77 26ft 
Hll* IV* 
Ift 1 
5ft 5ft 
53ft 57ft 
»ft 19ft. 
5ft 94 
15ft 14ft 
IS 14ft 
4ft 41* 
2 lft 
4te 4ft 
lift 17ft 
ft ft 
2V. 3ft 
19 IM 
21ft 21ft 
lift IM 
7ft 7ft 
12<ft 17ft 
ift i 
Hi 2ft 
Ift Pi 
2ft 3V. 
lift 15ft 
Ift 8V, 

I ft 
22ft EV. 
* lft 
*v* 4 1 '* 

7»k T 
6 5ft 
lift 15te 
3ft 3ft 


**“ AMEX 

Not Avaflabte at Press Time 

Dow Jones Bond S“ 5 fl Coi p 

""SS T i?£ S 

20 Bonds 10373 103X5 Harken 


VM. HM* In Obm OK. 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

40.000 fcv certs per ft 

Jul 97 22 13 2175 22.06 -.<3 6490 

Aug 97 2272 21.76 22.16 -X0 26773 

Sep 9 7 2245 2200 2235 -X2 11S54 

Oel97 22X5 12X8 2245 -.46 15450 

Dec 97 2255 312 2253 >48 42121 

Jan 98 2265 2235 2265 > 55 4.SW 

Est. salos 7X000 Wads sales 
Weds open bit 


6767 \Vt Ui 2v. +%„ 

4557 lft iv« iw 

5499 27 26H 77 +*l 

5514 69. 6V. eft >Vh 

5B94 5 4 ■ft, 406 -ft 

4544 71ft Mft 31ft +1* 

4438 , 24ft Oft 7*ft >!ft 


lOUIBffles 
10 Industrials 


SOYBEANS (CBOH 
5000 bu mtomuni- cents pet bushel 
JM 97 725ft 708 722 >11 

Aug 97 689 *481, >1 r. 

Sep 97 622 613 elBft >11 

New 97 594 58SW 592 *6L> 

Jan 98 997V4 $92 5«6ft >6ft 

Est. sales 55000 weds sales 
Weds opoti tnl 


HI GRADE COPPER INC MX) 

25.000 Ots.- cents per ft. 

Jul 97 114X0 112X0 113X5 -.15 6X69 

Aug 97 11270 111J0 111X5 ->75 3X34 

Serf; 11245 110.70 11175 -X5 34156 

Od 97 11000 1(79X0 109.45 -M 1.263 

Nor 97 10950 108X5 108.95 -55 1.206 

Dec 97 109X0 108X0 10825 -75 4202 

Jan 98 107X5 -.15 649 

Feb 98 10410 >.I0 545 

Mar 98 10550 105X0 105X5 >75 1X12 

EsL rafts 5500 Weds sates 
Weds open Ini 


MarW 93.68 9152 93X4 +.12 111X66 

Jun 99 93X3 9148 93X0 >.12 87X56 W*ft sides 


Aug 97 

2038 

19X6 

19X6 

-78 

90,955 

Sep 97 

2036 

1955 

19X0 

-J* 

68343 

Od 77 

2035 

19,60 

19X5 

-X6 

33351 

No. 97 

a 2U0 

19X9 

19X9 

-J9 

19364 i 

Ok 97 

^2(L2A 

IV7I 

1931 

-X5 

42.146 

Ate 98 

*20.17 

1933 

19.73 

■S3 

20,191 , 


Sap 99 9359 93X5 9356 +.12 7A97D W«*>op«Hir 

Dec 99 9352 9378 93X9 +.12 67X35 .. 


EsL sates NX. Weds sates 334X40 
Weds open kit 2X62925. oH 596 


-55 1.206 

-75 4202 
-.15 649 

>.10 545 

>7S 1X<2 


BRmSH POUND (CMER) 


^■TA s ssriv.. na m S S&-3E 

Dec 97 1X840 1X670 1X814 >.01 C 589 3X4.9 94M U4H lim 1404 


NATURAL GA5 (NMER) 

IftflOO man burs. $ per nan Mu 
Aug 97 2.110 2065 2101 +X36 41.994 

S«97 2J10 2070 2108 +X0B 21X95 

0097 2130 2090 2123 +X34 22593 

No»97 2255 2725 2253 .+283 11X34 


Mor9B 1X760 +.0134 

EsL sales NJL Weds sales 26X20 
Weds open Int 57X29. up 3738 


Jun »8 2X45 2X05 2X33 +X33 14524 

Est stfes 20453 Weds sates 
WMS open bit 


Trading Activity 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

5X00 bu mntawnt- cents per bushel 


Nasdaq 


AOMnd 
Decs nod 
Unchanged 
TW issues 
NewHUK 
New Lorn 


Naaa Pm. 

1985 1B41 Adwnoed 

754 ffl? Dedhed 

.537 577 Unaatoed 


3241k 

320 

370'- 

-3M 

5538 

334 

327 

327ft 

-S 

40.915 

346 

340 

3401m 

-5 

31,734 

354 

347 

348 

■ft 

*836 


SILVER (NCMXI 

5.000 huy az.- cent per bar «=. 

Jul 97 463.00 45150 452X0 -770 616 

5ep97 468X0 456X0 457X0 -750 58.178 

Dec 97 475X0 463X0 46370 -7.70 11982 

Jan 98 4655B -7X0 18 

Mar 98 479X0 47070 47070 -82® 8.977 

May 98 474X0 -8.10 2X56 

Jul 98 489X0 <7850 47850 -870 1.986 

Sep 98 48270 -870 685 

Est sates 9X00 Wads sates 
WedsopenM 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

WOOD Pollan. I per Cdn. (Hr 

Sap 97 J33Q 7287 .7320 +X024 39X58 


UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

42X00 gaL cents per gat 

Aug 97 59-50 5755 57X2 -T 


57X2 -177 37,909 


Atar98 .7390 .7310 .7388 +X024 544 SM0 5SX2 -1^ - 2X44 


Mar 99 .7390 .7380 .7388 - 

EsL sates NX. Weds sates 7X16 
Wed*s open bd 42,752 ofl 472 


3776 3397 Tatel Blues 


1927 2059 

1473 1948 

2200 1733 

5550 5740 

ig 2TO 

51 57 


Est sales 20000 Weds sales 
WOds open ml 


PLATINUM (NMER! 

SO tray az.- doeara per bay az. 
Jul 97 422X0 41650 416.70 


GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

^ 685 . 12SOOO marts,* per mark 

Sep 97 5754 5721 5738 >X003 101X44 

Dec 97 5790 5767 5776 + 0002 1X20' 

Mar 98 5814 +X001 227 

Est sales NJL Wads sales 36,798 
-50 1,250 w « f s opanlnt 102191, up 1G189 


Dec 97 56X5 54X7 54X7 -1X8 S706 

Janwi 5620 5482 54.82 -1X8:2716 

55X2 -TXB 1,178 

Mar 98 5470 55.92 55.92 -1X8 1276 

EsL sides 1&567 Weds sates 
WedsopenM 


Livestock 


Od 97 40850 404.10 404.70 -200 11X38 JAPANESE YEN (CMER! 

Jan 98 399X0 396 70 396.70 -200 1X54 


Market Sales 


CATTLE (CMER) 
40X00 lbs.- cents par ft. 


Uncbanged 
ToUtenr 
NeteHWlS 
New Lom 


Plea. 


Ttoqy 

Pn*. 

Aug 97 
00 97 

64X5 

67X0 

63X7 

6*90 

6192 

5735 

• X7 
+.17 

42.116 

2*757 

296 

NYSE 

baa 

an 

Dec 97 

70.25 

69X5 

7020 

*X2 

1*747 

ZS4 

379.24 

631X0 

Feti98 

71X5 

71 JO 

71X2 

> IS 

*927 

179 

Ames 

1*97 

33-25 

Apr 90 

73X0 

73X3 

7157 

>.15 

1234 

729 

ad 

Nasdaq 

347X2 

623J9 

Jun 98 

70.10 

69.72 

64.90 

+.20 

1097 

10 

tn motions. 



Eftl sate 7,587 Wed'S sate 9^182 




Jan 98 399X0 396 70 396.70 -200 1X54 

Esi sates 824 weds sales 

WedsopenM 

atose PreHaos 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

Dollars par metric Ian 


Aland nam (Ktab Grade) 

Spot 1587X0 1588X0 1583ft 1584ft 

Foraad 1609X8 1610X0 1606X0 1607X0 
Capper Cathodes (High Grade) - 


l zj mNxin yen. S par 1 00 yen 

Sep «7 X915 X810 X896 >X070 53X59 

Dec 97 .9027 X954 .9012 +.0070 1,103 

Mar98 .9130 +.0070 107 

EsI. sales NJL Weds sates 12703 

WOds open M 54269, up 4526 


Weds open M 92919, off 493 


2560X0 256300 2509X0 2511.00 
2404', 2405ft 7377ft 2378ft 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) ™. 

125X00 tans, S per franc 

Sep 97 X886 X848 X871 +.0007 4&M6 n^ E JL (IPE) 

Dee 97 X957 A914 X943 +JM6 TO 

Mar 98 7018 +X006 IH 


GASOIL UPE) 

UX. dottors per band - tab of 1,000 bonis 
Aug 97 168X0 16425 16450 — IDS 1A751 
SM97 J 69 50 16575 16575 -325 17X40 
Oa 97 17025 16800 16773 -275 A388 

Mw97 17225 1697S 16875 —250 7207 
Dec97 174410 T 7150 .172X0 —2X0 4.710 

Jan98 17525 17325 173.25 -2X0 9X61 

17S7S 174X0 17375 —225 5JS5 
Mai98 17525 175X0 174X0 —200 2X19 
Estsatet;14.120. Pre*. sates : 13X96 
Prev. open ter.: 7X358 up 1279 


lift* 

I7U ]]'* 


Dividends 

company 


Per Ant Rec Pay Company 


Per Anri Rec Pay 


taw. IM 
IS 14ft 
5ft 9- 
17ft 17ft 
92fti 9IWb 
STfti 571*0 
171* 1*91. 

21 L ?lft 

l‘» IVk 

mb hr 

Wt 10 
J7+» JA» 
V-» *ft 
IW KM 
16** 15% 
lift* lift 
zsft m 
15ft IP* 
lots m 
JUS* Xft 
lift ll'.k 


IRREGULAR 

EmboTettod An b X583 7-23 — 

EmNoc El Chile b .1649 7-18 — 

KeystSmRGrwtti . .70 7-2 7-8 


INCREASED 

Corby Disting b J5 Ml 8-1 
SPECIAL 

CoKCdaRes odip . XI MO 7-14 


Hancock Pat Pr 
Heallb & Retire 
MAHeaWi& Ed 
Merchants Hncp 
Mbie5aMrAppl 
NatandCa 


rice Entcrpr 
9 rime Refad 


Arden Realty 
Autodesk Inc 
CNB Bancshares 
CoUadlvE Bnqi 

EmeraingMB 
Ctebal Partners 


REGULAR 

Q 40 7-17 8-15 
0 JM 7 -11 7-25 
i Q -22 7-11 M 
O 25 7-16 7-25 
M .1325 7-1 S 741 
M .118 7-15 7-31 


ScriomnEms Hi 

Salomon IVW Inca 


Tefefoh Argent 

Wobainc 
WestoankCom 
cmhw aa|i b-apprwdmata ana ent par 
shore/ ADR; g-payaMe In Canadian funds,- 
DHHalMr; nftiwteity; s-«aiMi(inaal 


- .16 6-30 7-14 

M .0583 7-11 7-31 
O J6 7-25 8-22 
M X62 7-15 7-31 
O .17 7-15 7-31 
Q Jl 8-15 9-10 
O .08 7-14 7-24 
Q JO 8-1 8-15 
Q 295 7-18 8-15 
M .073 7-15 7-31 
M .125 7-15 7-31 
M .118 7-15 7-31 

Q 215 7-14 7-30 
b 344 7-14 — 

0 .035 7-15 Ml 
Q X75 7-17 7-25 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

50X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

Aug 97 81.X 80 15 90.95 +J2 

Sep 97 B027 7920 8025 +20 

Od 97 00.45 7965 80-0 +30 

No* 97 81X5 81X5 81.45 

Jan «8 8320 81.70 8220 +.25 

Mar 98 8220 BIAS 82.10 +20 

Ed. 2X91 Weds sd> » 1314 

Wed-, open Int 22X70, up 61 


62500 626 X 617X0 618X0 J???! “fJlfS S; 921 


Forward 637 % 438X0 629% 630 M ^ open tel 47. IX. up *561 


Spot 6850X0 6855.X 6795X0 6805.00 

Forward 695000 695500 *90000 6910X0 

n» 

Sual 5485X0 5495X 5485X0 5495X 

Forward «yi 00 5540 JM whim 5540X0 

Zinc rspecUHlgb Grade) 

Spot 1472X0 1473X0 1450X0 1452X 

Forward 149000 1-01X0 145500 1457X0 


® Sep 97 
0097 
No*97 
Dec«7 
Joji 98 
Fab98 


UX. doBars per banel- lots oH.OOOboret* 

18X5 18.17 1821 -071 69X73 

18X7 1820 1822 -0.45 5Z175 

18.90 1046 18^48 -0X4 15330 

1828 1099 1063 -0X5 10574 

19.00 19X0 1070 -0X1 16,253 

19.00 I9.C0 1080 -039 10431 

1827 1097 1062 —029 *512 


3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) '£££ 

£S«UH0- pis of IDO pd 

Sep 07 9285 92.75 92.83 -015 138271 _ 

Dec 97 92.67 92J6 92X2 -020 117,939 |^KH«J?X76. Plw. Mies S1X67 
Mar 98 0257 9245 9254 -0.19 89,036 Prev. open M.:18O140up 724 
Jim 98 9256 9244 92X4 —017 52421 

Sep 98 9257 92X8 9255 -016 ; 


Dec 98 9258 9248 9257 -0.15 29X06 


Stock indexes 


HOGS-Lnm (CMER) 

40X00 Rn.- csnls per to 
Jul 97 8*17 8320 8*00 +.75 

Aug 97 81X0 8090 8162 4 62 

Oct 97 7*20 73X0 73X5 +.« 

Dec 77 70^ 70X0 7070 +57 

Feb 98 69.10 6815 68.95 +js0 

Ed. Sides 7X65 Wads UlH 8.799 
WedsopenM 36X47. up 5 


Kflgh Low Close Cnge 


Financial 


6u m 

13ft lift 


Ifth 18 
ion M 


ft ft 
(h 


lift 12ft 

.5% » 


30ft ten 

SDft 49* 


rift M« 
13ft 13ft 
Da lift 
Uft W* 
lift *w» 
Ilk Ik 
27>l 36ft 
ft ft 
l<n 18ft 
ift 5ft 
*■« ift 
lift lBftt 
U 17-ft 


Stock Tables Explained 

fiOU^WUrt^ML Yearty highs and laws reflect the previous 53 weeks phB Bw current 
wwfc but nef Die ktoJInxBng doy. WhneospBtor stock (MdcndomaunangloSpeioenl or more 
>w» been paH Die yea is highJaw range and dMdmd me shown tor Hie new stacks only. Unless 
anemdse noted rates of dMdends are annual dtsbuseinenls based on ffie tated daekrafion. 
a - dividend abo extra (s) . b - annual rale of dividend plus stock dividend c • liquidating 
dMd an d. cc - PE exceeds 99.cM - called d- new yearly low. dd - loss in Ifte lastl 3 months. 
• - jMdnd declared or paid h preceding 12 morttis. » - omwl rate, increased on last 
deda rattan, g- dividend In Canadian funds, subject la 1S% nan- residence fax. l-dhrldend 
declared after split-up orstot* dhridend. | - dividend paid this yean omitted deferred, or no 
action taken at latest dividend meeting, k - dMdend declared or paid this year, an 
ocoimuiaftve issue wffli dividends in arrears, m - annual rate, reduced on last dedaralion. 
n - new ssue in the past 52 weeks. The Wgh-taw range begins wtfli the start of trading, 
ltd • next day defvery. p - initial dhidend anmid rate unknown. P/E • prioe^amlngs ratio, 
q - closed-end mutualfundr ■ dividend declared orperid In preceding 12 manflit plus stack 
dMdend. s- slock spill Dividend begins wOh date of split, sis- sales, t- dividend paid In 
stack In preceding 12 months, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or ex -distribution date, 
a • new yearty high, v- trading halted, vi -in bankruptcy arreartvership or being reorganlKd 
under Ihe Bankruptcy Act orsecurifles assumed bysuch companies, wri-when distributed, 
wi - when issued/ ww - wBh warranta x - owfiuidend or ox -rights. xCs ■ ex -distribution, 
xw - wilhou! warrants. y- ex-divldend and sales in fuU. YM - yieWLi - soles in fuH. 


PORK BE LUES (CMER) 

41000 lbs- cenft porta 
Jul 97 8175 82X7 87.17 

Ana 97 83X0 81 35 81 J? 

Fab 98 72X0 69X0 71.75 

Esl sates USD Weds sate 1101 
Weds open W *461 up 229 


US T BILLS (CMER) 

SI mBkin- pis of WO pel 
Sep 97 94X8 94X3 94X6 +.04 

Dec 97 9*/4 9472 9472 +X8 

Mar 98 9463 >.11 

Esl Hies N A Wad* safes 88 
Wetfs open W 1477. off 22 


04 7,939 

X8 534 

11 4 


Mar 99 92J9 9250 92JB -ft 1 5 21,719 SP COMP lunn rruent 

Jun 99 9261 9250 9259 -ftl4 12,955 SOOxteda DEX(CMEIU 

Est. sales: 362044. Plm.Bales: 13*187 Sep 97 929X0 914X0 927JS >H5* iTmu. 

Prey. open 526X74 up 1 2X46 Ox*T 93ftS0 WM S MM 

3-MONTH EURO MARX {UFFE1 Esl. sales NJL VVr.r. 1 * 7W 

DM1 mfllan -plsaflOOpd 

Jul 97 96X7 96X7 9*87 >am 4.177 * V8< ” “p® 1 9lt 18*131, up *122 


3-MONTH EURO MARX (UFFE1 
DM1 mfllan - pis of 100 pd 


96X7 96X7 9*87 >aoi *177 

N.T. N.T. 9*86 UndL 391 rnbimincBci 

MBS 96X3 96 JU li»* FJ5E 100 (LJFFE) 


Sep97 MBS 96X3 96X4 Uneft. 28*414 

Dee 97 9*77 9*74 9*76 >0X1 277,383 SnT.nL™ *a<« 


5YR TREASURY (CBOT) 
siaaooo Drin. nb & 640U M 100 pd 
Sep 97 106-55 106-30 10*49 > 

DecV? 106-31 > 

Mar 98 41 

E«i sales 52X00 Weds sales 
Weds open tel 


10649 + 30 212X22 

106-31 >30 1,486 

-01 


Jw, 98 9*54 9649 M53 TkK g*" **2%* *}*' Wf 

Sep 98 9*34 9*29 9*33 +QX2 152X58 NlT ^ 977J * 61l ° 1 

Dae 98 9oX7 9*02 9*06 +0.02 9*337 Est. totes.- UPiS. Piw. sates: 1*887 

Marte 95X4 9579 9SX2 +OX2 8*364 Pw+ open Inlj 48.246 up 137 


EM. sole* 13*69$ Prev. sate* )07,9*S 
Prev. open W : 1^81^49 up 12X01 CAC 48 CMATIF) 

FFI00 per bidn pobu 

■^57 2K*0 2910.0 2MBX >210 31X60 

(i,w ,»(» Aug 97 29S8X 293*5 2940 +215 1X62 

Sep 97 9*58 9*55 9*57 UrKtL 71803 2927X 29S6X +23X 20,721 

Dec 97 9*56 9*52 ft! -54 UndL 3*300 2989X 29B9X 2979X +2IX 923 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE) 

10 metric tons- S per tan 
Jul 97 1555 49S 1540 -47 

Sep 97 1573 1525 1 562 -52 

Dee 97 1623 1575 1611 -50 

Marte 16PJ 1610 M42 XJ 

Mayes 1*70 is33 14« si 

Jul 98 1680 1655 1680 -51 

Esl sole* 19,981 WWfs sates 1*731 
Weds open tel 107.084 an U77 


lb YR TREASURY (CBOT) 

S1IXMU0 prin- pK & 32mls ctioa pd 

Sop 97 109-09 108-15 109X4 > 22 331516 

Dec 97 108-27 108-16 108-36 + 23 *844 

Mar 98 108-14 ♦ 23 1 

Etl sales 99.999 w«n sales 

Weds open UK 


3-MONTH PIBOR (MATIF1 


FF5 rnflScm - pis of 100 pd 
Sep 97 9*58 9*55 < 


Mar 99 9*50 9*46 9*49 >0X1 30X54 f ^ ar9a 301*00 2993X300100 +215 7-nu 

Junte 9*41 9*36 9*40 +O.E 2*506 Est. sales-. 1*100. 


US TREASURY BONDS [CBOT) 


(BpcJ-Sloaooftflls A 32nds aMOOpctl 
5«07 1 13-15 112-01 113X6 +104 


5(^90 9*28 9*23 9*27 + 0X3 3*548 

DecW 96X8 9*03 9*08 +0.03 1*904 

Mm 99 9*86 9582 95X6 >0X3 1*058 

E«. *fcs: 27.11ft 
Open tel. 249.950 all 691 


Open hit.: 67,7,42 up STB. 


Commodity Indexes. 


43X516 EUROURA (UFFE) 


COFFEE C (NCSE) 

37X00 lbs.- csnh pcf 111 

Jul 97 I9U5 18700 87X0 X50 

Sop 97 174.00 167X0 16ft» 

Dec 97 155X0 ISH» 151X0 -100 
Mar 98 US 00 142X0 142 50 
May98 138-W **° 

Ed. sate *559 Weds uikn 179} 

IMMh open HU 20515, ofl 97 


Dec 97 113-02 111-22 113-26 +104 7*537 ITL tm08im - pis a( ICOpcJ 
Mar 98 117-22 112-15 117-1* +104 2X97 ^^5 9150 93 


Mar 98 117-22 117-15 117-16 +1 04 1397 

Jun 98 112-05 +104 801 D«W 

Esl sate. 480X00 VWds sate 

W+^opcntal £22 


"P «X5 9150 9151 -ft02 112X13 

J®-* 3 93X8 Tipi _om 8X851 

Mar« 9423 9417 9*21 +0.01 49X23 


Moody's 
Reuters 
DJ. Futures 
CRB 


l4Vk 14ft 
■] ft 1 1 1 ,* 

** 

I ■ n» 


For investment information 

RnqdTHl MONEY REPORT every Saturday in ihe IHT. 


5UGARWORLD 1 1 (NCSE) 

11 2X00 te conNpcrlb .... 

Ocl 97 I1J2 10.90 -IS *-U 

Mar 98 1132 11.11 11X0 +.W 


LONG GILT (UFFE) 

E50 aio - prs & JTnds oMOO pd 
Sep 97 114-71 JIJ14 114 15 -ft.10 161903 
0«97 N.T. N.T. 114-02 -0-10 
Esl. sain. 133X43 Prer. sates- 1047*5 
Pruv npmM: 161131 od *133 


W41 r<LU WM7 AssoooM Pres* Lowoo 

S52 4104 77,174 IjpIF/nonckil Futons Exrtemtje, inn 


94X8 >006 11394 
2° s 9445 94 54 +0.06 10528 
JtflW 9444 9437 9*44 +0X7 *505 

Esl. sate 70212 Prav. sales 4*090 
Prey, open «L: 317.045 up 2,975 


PetoWvm Exchange. 


K b mo iib jja --'® 

II 10 1096 11.07 
Esl sate 21971 Wrds sate 27x21 
Wrtfs open W 152X52, aH IAJ1 


GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFFE) IndllB 

DM2Sa<H0-phDM00pd uus 

Sep "J 10146 10197 102 42 +0.40 77*030 2PJU*** 1 ■ CNCTNJ 

D«r97 101 SO 10131 101.50 ift40 20 SfS 1 PwU». 

Esl •+*.->: 207.132. Pit*, sate 209X28 Qd” 2^ 

Ptewnmi 271WM up lft.85 O^, 7 , JiW 


Industrials 


An* »ur 

AHm and Antitjoes 

o\i*n- Syliinlav 


-.15 195 

"80 11X40 
-.89 42,109 




r:-. .Vnscss ; 

:.vm 


•:o:Djfch 
‘ev+r cvc 
■ Inff 
,NV 

•'■n^.vrcia 


?9h Eonaje 

oS3e 

i r Ao/ ^ 

57p^ 


Ss^ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. JULY 4, 1997 


PAGE 19 


EUROPE 




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Art** - .i-'"*' 

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British Stocks Climb 
To 34th High of Year 


Cdmpdrdb) Ck& Sfjff Fmm &l\()j&kn 

LONDON — British stocks 
closed ai a record high Thursday — 
the 34th of the year — a day after the 
chancellor of the Exchequer, Gor- 
don Brown, released his first 
budget. . 

But while banks and utilities 
soared, engineering companies 
suffered sharp declines, clobbered 
by the surging pound and the ab- 
olition of a tax credit paid to pension 
funds. 

The benchmark FT-SE 100 rose 
803 points, or 1.7 percent, to 
4,831.7. 

Mr. Brown said Wednesday that 
he would raise taxes by more than £5 
billion (S8.4 billion) this year. At the 
same time, he offered an unexpected 
cut in the main corporate rate to 31 
percent from 33 percent. 

Stocks initially dropped on con- 
cern that the budget did not go far 
enough to rein in accelerating con- 
sumer spending. But investors even- 
tually decided the budget showed 
the government did not see a threat 
from inflation. 

Stocks then surged on optimism 
the newly independent Bank of Eng- 
land can probably keep rising prices 
under control with just one or two 
small rate increases. 

Banks, including Barclays PLC, 
National Westminster Bank PLC 


and Abbey National PLC. which 
have been mentioned in recent re- 
ports on possible mergers, contrib- 
uted the most to the rally. 

Utilities were lifted by relief the 
chancellor did not impose a more 
punishing “windfall tax.” 

Mr. Brown said he would raise 
£5.2 billion from the lax, which is 
intended to claw back what it sees as 
excess profits made by the private 
owners of companies sold off by the 
previous Conservative government. 
The amount was in line with ex- 
pectations. 

British Telecommunications PLC 
shares rose to a thrce-and-a-half-year 
high after the government said the 
company would have to pay less than 
half the bill analysts had expected 
toward the "windfall* 1 tax. 

BT’s shares rose 22 pence, to 
4795 pence. 

The budget did not help Britain's 
suffering engineering and manufac- 
turing companies. British Steel PLC 
and Imperial Chemical Industries 
PLC were among the biggest 
losers. 

Mr. Brown removed the 20 per- 
cent tax rebate paid to pension funds 
and companies on dividends. That 
hurts big companies because they 
support large pension plans for iheir 
current and retired employees. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters 1 


Bonn to Overshoot Deficit Goal 

But Planned ’ 97 Minibudget to Meet EMU Criteria 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London . . . \ . JRaria . .. 
FTSE-1Q0 Index .- ; CAC4Q ‘ 

■ 4800 i i * 3000 


BONN — Germany is preparing a supplementary 
1997 budget with a sharply higher budget deficit, but it 
will still meet the target for joining the single European 
currency, a coalition source said Thursday. 

Under the budget, he said, the deficit would be 8 
billion to 10 billion Deutsche marks (5458 to 55.73 
billion) higher than now planned. 

But the source said the budget would still be in line 
with the deficit target of 3 percent of gross domestic 
product, which Germany has vowed to reach to 
qualify for economic and monetary union. 

Nevertheless, the higher 1997 deficit will force the 
government to make an embarrassing declaration 
that the economy is out of kilter, the only way it can 
get around a constitutional rule that its spending gap 
should not exceed its investment spending. 

‘•For 1997 we are choosing to go the route of a 
higher deficit.” the source said, “m 1998 it will be 
back in line." 

Finance Minister Theo Waigel will present the 
supplementary budget to the cabinet next Friday, 
together with his 1998 budget proposal. 

Otto Lambsdorff, a senior parliamentarian of the 
Free Democratic Party, said the tax increases or more 
stringent spending cuts needed to curb the deficit 
would hamper economic growth. 


This would aggravate Germany’s unemployment 
problem, said Mr. Lambsdorff. whose party is a junior 
partner in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's coalition. 

The deficit will still be better than worst-case pre- 
dictions of a 30 billion DM rise, thanks mainly to the 
accelerated privatization of Deutsche Telekom AG. 

The coalition was still debating 3 billion to 4 billion 
DM in proposed spending cuts for 1998, but the bulk 
of the work on the budget was done, the source said. 

Throughout next week, Mr. Waigel will meet with 
ministers to fine-tune the budgets for each ministry. 

The 1998 budget will call for spending little 
changed from 1 997 levels, and the deficit will fall back 
below the level of government investment, in line with 
the constitutional requirement, the source said 

Mr. Waigel won Transport Minister Matthias 
Wissmann's approval for a plan to suspend repayment 
of old railway debt in 1998, saving 2.8 billion DM, 
and to repay only 300 million DM the next year. 

The defe’nse budget, the last remaining hurdle, is 
largely settled except for the financing of the 
Eurofighter combat jet. 

In the next few days, Mr. Waigel will meet ex- 
ecutives from Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG — the 
German partner in the four-nation project — to try to 
complete financing for Bonn's 23 billion DM order 
of 180 Eurofighters. 


2800 « J 

2®Q /'vfy/v 


F M A UJJ 

1fl97 


F M A 

1997 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

B russels 

Frankfurt . 

Copenhagen 

Helsinki 

Oslo 

London 

Madrid 7 

Milan 

Paris 

Stockholm 

vteooa. 

Zurich 

Source : Tetekurs 


AEX 

BEU20 v , 

PAX' '. ' • 

Stock Marks! ’. \” 

HEX General 

tT- 

FTSE1Q0 
Stock Exchange 1 ;. 
Tiagrei.- • . 

GAG 40; • 

SX-46 • : • 

ATX • 

SPf. '■ 1 > 


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•13603- Vi 

2336.38 ,-2£08W& 

3*351,28. 

■ 3 ysss^ 2 . , aggag.; -.y 

ImcnuLitoul Herald Tribune 


BAA to Buy U.S. Duty-Free Chain 


LVMH Shares Rise on Talk 
Of Merger of Liquor Units 


Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Stock in LVMH Moet 
Hennessy Louis Vuitton SA rose 3.7 ‘ 
percent Thursday on expectations 
that the French company's plan to 
combine its liquor businesses with 
those of Grand Metropolitan PLC 
and Guinness PLC would succeed 

Bernard Arnault, the company’s 
chairman, met Wednesday wrtfa the 
heads of the two British companies 
in Paris to discuss a combination. 

Mr. Arnault, whose company has 
stakes in GtandMet and Guinness, 
proposed pooling the liquor units as 
an alternative to those companies’ 
plans to merge in a transaction 
word] more than $20 billion. The 
British chairmen, who rejected the 


plan initially, said after the meeting 
that they would consider it. 

Mr. Arnault last week bought 
6.37 percent of GrandMet's shares 
for $1.8 billion. If LVMH gets 10 
percent of GrandMet, it can call a 
shareholder meeting to challenge 
the merger. Eric Cachet, a fund 
manager at Jean-Pi ene Pinatton, 
said people thought “Arnault is go- 
ing to get what be wants.” 

LVMH rose 58 francs, to 1.638 
($277.96). Shares of GrandMet and 
Guinness, which have moved almost 
in tandem since they announced the 
merger plan in mid-May, both rose 
to records in London. GrandMet 
rose 16 pence to 614 ($10.13), while 
Guinness rose 8 pence to 618. 


i/ut Siojf From Dixpatrhn 

LONDON — BAA PLC, which 
operates seven British airports in- 
cluding London Heathrow and 
Gatwick. said Thursday that it was 
buying the U.S. company Duty Free 
International Inc. for $674 million, 
in a move that will create the world's 
second- largest duty-free business. 

BAA has been dying for a year to 
keep pace with rivals also eager to 
tap the quick-growing $20 billion 
world market for duty-free goods. 


BAA lost to Swissair AG last year a 
bidding battle fra 1 Allders PLC. 
BAA’s chief executive. Sir John 
Egan, said Thursday the company 
was seeking further acquisitions. 

BAA is “paying top dollar to po- 
sition themselves,” said Peter Ber- 
gius, an analyst with ABN Amro 
Hoare Govetr. The move should pay 
off, be added, giving BAA “sig- 
nificant buying power” with sup- 
pliers that could save as much as $25 
million in annual costs within three 


years. BAA shares surged 36 pence, 
or 6.3 percent, to a 52-week high of 
607 pence ($10.10) in London. 

The acquisition will almost 
double BAA's annual revenue from 
duty-free retailing, a market grow- 
ing about 10 percent a year, to $1.2 
billion. BAA's share of the world- 
wide market will increase to about 9 
percent from 5 percent, bringing it 
closer to DFS, which is dominant in 
Asia and has about 14 percent 

( Bloomberg . Reuters. AFX) 


Pharmacia & Upjohn Sees Upturn in ’98 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — The troubled 
U.S. -Swedish pharmaceutical com- 
pany Pharmacia & Upjohn forecast 
Thursday that poor sales and profits 
would continue for foe rest of the 
year but restructuring measures 
should turn the company around in 
199S. 

After weeks of market rumors. 


Pharmacia & Upjohn confirmed that 
the second quarter had proved weak, 
saying earnings per share would not 
exceed foe 37 cents in the first 
quarter. 

“But the positive things in the 
new program could overshadow the 
poor results," said Gustav Lenman 
of the Stockholm economic research 
Finn Ohm an. “We will see a weak 


1997 but 1998 is looking better.” 
Pharmacia & Upjohn 's new chief 
executive, Fred Hassan, said the 
company planned to simplify struc- 
ture and decision-making systems, 
clarify responsibilities and concen- 
trate investments on research and 
development ‘ ‘ We expect to receive 
benefits beginning in 1998 from the 
actions now being taken,” he said. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday, July 3 

PrtaMin local anrendfo, 

Tdekurs 

High Low dm Pm. 


Amsterdam 


ABN-AMRO 

Argon 

Ahold 
Aka Note 
Boon Co. 

Bats Wesson 
CSMan „ , 
DorflKhePd 
OSM 


FofffsAntoy 

Gefemts 

G-Bacaa 

issr 

Koogwemcn 
Horn Doughs 
IMG Group 

KLM 

KNPBT - 

KPN _ 

HSKF* 

OmGfWen 
Pulps Else 


37 JO 38X0 
14240 143JM 
14740 IfiPJSO 
27240 27120 
139 JO 139JH 
3740 38J0 
94JO 98.10 
112.10 115J0 
197 JO 19940 
32JD 3290 
91 

&U 0 ax 
mm 0.10 
101 101 
34450- 34840 
110,90 11330 
17150 174 

91 JO 9340 
44J0 4740 
43J0 4390 


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Rond Dutch 
Unfcwf-qn 
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VNU 

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Adv Info Sue 

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UM Cam 

Bombay 

Hhutat Ptflis 
tad Dev Bk 

ITC 

MrfHHMrTd 
Rdtanoalnd 
State Bk tads 
Sterf Autturty 
■ Tata Eng Lkd 

Brussels 


SBl/D 5050 
321-50 316 

25050 24SC50 
140 137 

104 106JO 
21040 21 220 
191 JO 188 
6440 64J0 
19350 19030 
115J8 TU.W 
il2jo Main 
442J0 COSO 
11340 11170 
4540 44.10 
24450 24370 


SET ioCtec 61751 
PNVtoBK 548J9 


High 

Deutsche Bank 10455 

DeutTetekoni 424S 

DresdimBank 6240 

Ffeseatai 399 

FraseriusMed 15230 

Wed-Knwp 342 

Gehe 122J5 

KutafegZari 169 

Henkel pW 10070 

HEW 47B 

HochHef 82 

HotCtoJ 7055 

Kocstom 642. 

Intmrer 0»ia 

Ltade 1380 

UrfUnnsa Tim 

MAN 544JB0 

Mamemann 784 

Meta8gesefcdion3i90 
Mehn 195 

Mdnch RuKk R 49*0 

Pmnsag 519 

RWE 76.70 

SAP pH 379 40 

Schesfeifi 19040 

SGL Coital 24350 

Stamm 10945 

Springer (A»0 1553 

SuedriKker 930 

Thyssen 434 

Vein 101 JO 

VEW 565 

Vtag 639 

Wkswagen 1404 


10170 103J0 
4245 4245 
42 62 

356 357 

15140 152 

340 340.10 
120J0 121 

MS 169 
100 10040 
444 465 

8050 81 

77 JO 7745 
635 637 

3940 80 

1363 1370 
T965 TUK 
541 JO 544 
780 78140 

~k 9n ■Kffl 
19331 19440 


76.10 76J0 
368J0 377 

189 189 

242 243 

108.15 10845 
1510 1553 
925 925 

430751 430J0 
10045 10OS® 
S53 563 

80140 80540 
1367 1402 


High Law Cfose Pm. 

SA Breweries 140 139 13940 13940 

Samancar N.T. N.T. N.T. 4*95 

SdSol 59 JO 59 5940 5940 

SBC 220 21 7 JO 222 222 

Tiger Dah 79 J5 7840 00 80 


Kuala Lumpur “-ggjjgg 

AMMBHdgs 1610 1590 16 16 

Gening 11.90 11 JO 1140 11.90 

Mid Banking 27J5 26.75 27J5 27 

MdlitfSMpF 7 JO 690 695 7J5 

PefmmCas 9 895 195 9.15 

Proton 11.90 1140 1140 1180 

Pubic Bk 4.18 4.12 4.12 A12 

RHOig 334 3J6 3J6 3J2 

Resorts World 7.95 740 7.70 US 

RaUnaraPM 2380 2180 24£S 25 

Stale Dartw 9 8J5 . 9 840 

TatakomMal 1248 12 1110 11M 

Teuana ll« 1110 1110 1240 

UM&Hpneen 1840 18.10 1130 1BJ0 

YTL 8.10 B LOS 8.10 


272 

272 

272 

248 

250 

238- 

242 

238 

J2J0 

3240 

3240 

29.75 

m 

406 

406 

370 

604 

574 

584 

542 

171 

153 

159 

153 


Helsinki 

EnsoA 
HuMamnfcil 
Kendra 
rcska 
Meitta A 
Metro B 
Meba-SerioB 
Neste 
Nokia A 
Orion- VMymre 
OotakumpuA 
UPMK ymmene 


HEX Canral tads: 329U8 
Previous; 324444 


48 

47 

48 

47.70 

2» 

223160 

225 

224 

52 JO 

50 

52 

a 

77 JO 

76 40 

7740 

7650 

20JO 

19.10 

1940 

19-40 

16740 

161 

167 

1*0 

44 

43 

44 

4CL/U 

142 

MOJO 

141 

141 

3K5D 

388 395JD 

384 

203 

198 

201 

199 

1(U 1(040 10150 

«54 

12640 12440 12640 12*60 

89 JO 

89 

89 JO 

89 JO 


Baramd 

BBL 

CBR 

Cohur* 

-DeBiate Lion 

Efcctabcl 

EteetaBM 

Fort* AG . 

Govont 

GBL 

GenBonque 

-KitdtaBn* 


RnycdP Betas 
SocGenBag 


16575 16»0 
7340 7250 

9700 9350 
3350 3290 

19875 19000 
- 1960 1920 

■ 78S0 7610 

3800 3735 

. 7820 7700 

, 3383 - 3355 
<140. 6030 
14700 14309 
14975. 14725 
13900 13775 
4975. 4940 
11300 TIOOO 
3S95 3495 
22775 21800 
14975 14850 

turn iimo 


3740 3740 3425 
45J5 45-75 41.75 
146 150 US 

126 128 117 


max 30 tedme <32144 
Prevtom 4332.90 

934 937J5 939 

1383 1395J5 141 940 
45240 457 459 

102 1Q2J3 103 

53625 54340 54450 
312 317JS 31175 
362 36840 

344J5 346 349 

23 2375 22 

440 44650 45140 


BEU2M0dac 24057 

Proma: 244493 

16200 1637S 1657S 
7250 7330 7310 

9K0 «10 WE 
3298 3315 3290 

19000 19450 19675 
1920 1970 1920 

7610 7800 7680 

3735 3800 3750 
7700 7820 769 0 

- 3355 3380 3380 
. 6030 6060 <110 
14300 14700 14275 
.14725 14900 14750 
13775 13900 13750 
4940 4975 497S 
TIOOO 11300 10975 
3495 3595 3510 
21800 22725 21S50 
14850 14975 14900 
119000 121000 120000 


Hong Kong "KJEjfSSS 

BkE&% 

OrihayPacBc 16JB 1435 U80 IMS 


Copenhagen 


373 

363 

371 

36645 

360 

366 

89223 

880 

890 

41004 

409 

411 

69049 

<74 

687 


Codon 

Dfljdsco 

DmkeBk 69049 <74 <87 . 680 

Srereforg B 351351 351351 351351 355000 
1912 B 241000 240000 241000 24^ 

tadB 23S 230 233 233 

KBbUrfttm 7TS 709 7T4 710 

Nvo Norilsk B aiu rt8 go 

Be B -987.98 972 985 986 

349 344 346 345 

361 - 354 358 360 

394 388 392 388J0 


jae 

Hang Lung Dm 
Hang Seng Bk 
Henderson Irw 
HendenonLd 
HK China Gas 
HKEIedric. 
HKTeteannm 

HuWdm 

SSSl*. 

Oriented Press 
PttntOiinW 

iKFHdgs 

Sho Land Co. 
Slh China Post 
SwbtPacA 
WlufHrigs 
Wheetade 


Jakarta 

Astra infl 
Bfchtfl kutan 
Bk Negara 
GudongGem 
tadocninri 

IfltKVDOD 

hvfowt 

SaaipaernaHM 
SamnCiiesa . 
TeHunuiddBi 


EL60 8.10 
33 32 

1605 1475 
76-50 73 

4440 43.90 
47 JO 
4450 4240 
9.90 9 JO 

1440 14 

117 110L50 
840 845 

60JS 6531 
■ 1SJS JSMi 
32J0 31.20 
1880 1810 
490 445 

236 234 

6BJ5 65 

2285 2125 
• 23 2140 

HUB 1865 
47 JO 45.18 
125 110 
1J4 1J2 

93 88JD 
483 445 

B45 LID 
1M 7 JO 
7050 67 J5 
3380 3280 
19.15 1&S0 


aw JS 

32JO 3230 
1480 1685 
7175 76J0 
23_25 2245 
43-90 <3.90 
47J0 4B-50 
44 4240 
980 9.90 
1435 1415 
114J0 110JO 
8J5 8JS 
65J0 6875 
1^70 UJ0 
32 31 JO 
1810 1850 

460 «0 

237 233 

66 6735 
22JS 2285 
2145 2110 
1865 1880 
4810 4850 
110 115 

137 134 

89 93 

478 475 

•130 840 

1M 7 JO 
6735 70 

3270 3160 
1865 1985 


Resorts tttortd 7.95 

RonannniPM 2380 

SbneDcntw 9 

Teiekon Altai 12J0 

T»swtai 1240 

UUErepneen 1840 

YTL 810 

London 

Abbey Nidi 9.15 

AHedDnnecq 439 

Angfln Water 745 

Anas 535 

Asaa Group 1J9 

Assoc Br Foods SJ2 

BAA &»7 

EonJoys 1105 

Brm 7.90 

BATFnd 547 

BonkScafland 4J5 

BiueCIrde 441 

BOC Group 1142 

Booh 747 

BPB tad 1M 

Brit Aerosp 1120 

Brit Airways 784 

BG 242 

Bril Land 809 

BritPeitai 7.93 

BSkvB 461 

BilStad 145 

Bril Telecom 490 

BTR 286 

BnnuhQstrai 9.94 

Burton Gp 1.17 

Cable WUetess 895 

CadbuiySdwi 871 

Cotton Comm SJB 

Comad Union 6.93 

CanmassGa 471 

ceutaubte 145 

Oban 495 

Bedmanponents 450 
EMI Group 1139 

Fnenjy Group 445 

EnteroriseoG 7.33 

FamCoionU 146 

Gent Accident 942 

GEC 389 

GKN 10 

GtaroWeflcoroe 1115 

GnnodaGp 7.90 

GrandMet 422 

GRE _ 191 

GrombGp 445 

Gutanew 421 

GUS 419 

Hws 585 

HSBCHUgs 1865 

ICI 832 

Impl Tobacco 387 

Mngfliher 494 


Coropcsir tariecTK^ 
PnvioaSi7a8U 

B07S 8035 to75 ^ 
2075 2025 3333 2075 

1625 1525 1575 1SB 
10050 9950 10MQ 10® 
3925 3875 MOO |9M 
S775 5600 5700 SfiOO 

7825 7500 Wf 

10WJ 98» 9MD »75 
5475 5375 JJg ^ 

4150 4000 4159 ASO 


Johannesburg *whwm 


Frankfurt 

.AMBB.*. 

Atfidos 195 

Aftono I" 

1 BkSerim 38» 

BASF <870 

BcygHypoBk , S*fS 

BoyVereWtarok 71'® 

fetot 9S 

1 

CKAGComnta 160 

ConoiMbank ,5035 

DabnHrSwo ltfto 

Degisso 9330 


DAX: 3887 J9 
pRvtads: 385476 

. 1570 IS75 1570 
1«4 19480 19110 
367 JO 36859 367 

186 188 187 

3640 3473 3482 
65 £ 6585 6405 
54tfl 5475 53.48 
7150 73 7140 

7081 71.15 .-70.75 
90S) 9040 92 JO 
3810 3880 39.70 
1457 MH 1442 
167 168 164W 

4985 4985 50.15 
145 14530 M490 
91 JO 92.10 9330 


AflpnAmGoid 

AnmoAralDd 

avmin 

BOftow 

CG.Smflti 

De Beers 

Driefonten 

FsJNoBBk 

Geflcer 

GFSA 

imperial Hri» 

IngunCoal 

bear 

Jatmntas tadl 
UKrtfHdgs 

Lberty Ufe 

UbUfeStari 
Mtaoroo . 
Nompnh 
y ertrnr 

RembnmdJGp 
Ridfoflwrt 
Rust RaBnuca 


3230 3280 
275 178 

Z7QJ0 271 
265 245 

198 MO 
1530 1170 
4980 4985 
2475 2495 
16450 16735 
3060 3030 
3635 3845 
2080 21 

106 106 

2420 2630 
197 3 

4050 61 JO 
32935 32930 
124 12635 
1730 1835 
10030 10235 
19J5 1935 
100 10135 
4425 47.75 
<930 7030 
« 8230 


Lead Sec 939 

Lasino 284 

LacpriGctaGfp 474 

U^sTBBGp 491 

Lucas Varfty 105 

Marks Spencer 5.13 

ME PC 5.17 

Mercury Asset 1330 

National Grid 189 

Stall Foaer 5J7 

NatWESl 084 

Next 400 

Nonridi Union 3J9 

Oniage 204 

W) 637 

Pearson 7.15 

PMagtan 1J4 

PaweiGen 780 

PieitierFmel 46B 

PrwteiAri 432 

RrttnckGp 400 

Rank Group 162 

RBCkOtCobn M 

Redtand 130 

(teedlnB 585 

RenMdhrtd 127 

RfiutenHdBi 470 

Roam 156 

RMC Group 935 

l % 

RTCreg 1035 

a 

gg aa „ ig 

SadNewcastie 4B 

SarfPowta 4M 

Saeuritw J® 

Severn Treat 938 

SM TmnspR 445 

Wir 1820 

5mlBiNepfKW I.B 

Swift KBne • ll.« 

5aBhstad 733 

SOietnElec 470 

Stagecaadi 439 

Skrod Charter 9-« 

T«6e&Lyta 438 

Testn 4M 

Thanes Water 7.78 


UMAssumce 445 


FT-SE 164 4*313* 
Previous: 4751 88 

840 896 862 

418 438 425 

490 7 JO 7 jQ 5 

5J0 535 SJ9 

135 1-36 1J6 

5l 30 SJffl 581 
532 407 531 

1185 1137 1111 
730 784 730 

530 537 530 

192 413 484 

421 429 424 

1049 10-61 10JS 
7.11 7J4 733 

3.15 115 122 

13.05 1388 1115 
478 684 493 

2J3 2J7 130 

588 403 5.94 

737 785 734 

4JT 455 440 

180 141 149 

436 400 438 

1W ZCa 2.16 
935 988 1088 

1.15 1.17 1.17 

538 587 5.90 

532 571 5J4 

525 587 5J6 

471 48S 686 

ui ui n 

130 131 245 

L81 tXl *.90 
4J4 439 4-50 

11 1135 1130 

437 440 439 

498 738 

1J4 1-67 

9.13 9J2 9.12 

381 3W Ml 
938 938 1089 

1285 1385 13.10 
7 JO 7.7S 782 

< 414 598 

2J4 284 239 

&J8 439 44D 

402 41S 688 

584 AW 419 
5J9 585 5J5 

1787 18J5 1830 
7.95 ai4 834 
331 384 380 

447 467 497 

140 153 i45 

833 936 888 

237 2-75 239 

4J5 435 4J3 

438 474 645 

» 3.CS2 286 

487 587 587 

587 5.12 585 

1230 1389 1239 
142 232 240 

538 i?1 136 

842 490 830 

470 473 <83 

3J1 131 338 

188 2.02 2 
414 420 421 

496 7.05 784 

135 130 136 

730 7J2 733 

430 m m 

£92 6J2 6J7 

436 682 6J4 

348 155 335 
9JS 9.70 9J7 

3.15 117 135 

£71 102 509 

2» 233 237 
413 421 432 

246 247 257 

931 9J7 937 

132 m 2J5 
534 4» 5J9 

1035 1045 1035 
466 471 4JS 

346 178 348 

330 178 335 
17 1735 1499 
449 68S 455 
336 426 385 

286- 287 285 

015 833 032 

423 443 434 

9J8 9.96 1035 
1.70 1J3 1J0 

1146 1175 11J0 
747 731 779 

430 433 445 
631 634 634 

938 988 934 

437 431 440 

3J0 405 3J& 
730 733 735 
507 5.13 5.11 
478 497 415 

233 236 236 

1735 1783 17J4 
433 445 434 
782 7.10 7.10 


UM UMIIes 
VendoneLkute 
Vodafone 
WMbread 
Wiliams Hdgs 

WnjnhT 
WPP Group 
Zenem 

Madrid 

Aoertnax 

ACESA 

Agues Bffltefon 

Agenkgfo 

BBV 

Banesto 

BankMsr 

Ben Centra Hbp 

BCO Popular 

Bca Santander 

CEPSA 

Cordtaente 

FECSA 

Gas Natural 
fcentrota 
Pipre 
RejHd 

ScvdtaiHi Eiec 
Tabocatera 
Tetefonica 
UntanFenasa 
Ifakmc Cement 


High Law Close Prev. 

734 470 7J5 785 

; 434 448 4J0 4J2 

108 2.94 386 199 

7.95 731 7.94 732 

129 125 377 3JB 

4.71 433 467 474 

239 238 246 239 

2040 1988 BUS 2021 

Bofca index: 62239 
Previaas: <13.12 

29600 29000 29400 29010 
2075 2015 JWa 2050 
<240 6128 6220 <100 
8720 8438 8700 B490 

12430 12710 124C- 12280 
1529 1470 1505 1465 

27300 26710 27100 26700 
i 5900 5610 5860 5640 

40070 38710 39990 39400 
4750 4655 4740 4645 

5050 4750 5030 5000 

3350 Jllfo 3325 3195 

B2S0 7570 8150 7880 

13380 1310# 13130 13210 
1395 1365 1375 1375 
33<M 32530 33550 ’Win 
1895 1B65 1 070 1885 
3120 3200 3140 

6460 6550 6430 

1535 1500 1510 1510 
BIBO 0Q» 8150 B070 

4510 4425 4490 4440 

1300 1285 1295 1300 

2440 2400 2440 2415 


High Lew dote Pm. 


High Law Close Pm. 


Manila 

Ayota B 
Ando Loud 
Bk Pump id 
C&P Homes 
Mungo EtecA 
Metro Bonk 
Pcfron 
POBunfc 
PMLongOlst 
Sen Mforal B 
SM Prime Hdg 

Mexico 

Aba A 
Banned B 
OrowCPO 
CKraC 

ErepMaderno 
GpoCaRoAl 
GfroFBamer 
Giro Fin labursa 

KmP ClarK Mex 

TetevtsaCPO 

TelMnL 


PSEfantaE 274282 
RlWfcWi 276680 


IB 

17 J5 

18 

17 JS 

2*25 

2340 

2175 

24 

.166 

164 

165 

166 

3025 

10 

10 

10 

IKgj 

05 

85 

85 

555 

535 

S« 

540 

*70 

640 

660 

660 

255 

255 

255 

255 

87® 

B60 

870 

865 

<7 

66 

6640 

66 

7J0 

7 JO 

7 JO 

740 


near 

AGF 

Air Uquidt 

AfcaWAKfo 

Axn-UAP 

Banco Ire 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Phis 
C nrrrfo ur 
Casino 
CCf 

Cetetere 

□oteflanDtar 

CLF-Dexn Fnni 

CredlAgricate 

Danone 

Ed-Aqultalm 

EiMredaBS 

EurtHfisney 

Euretunnai 

GoiEoux 

Havns 

hnetoi 

Lafoige 

Legrtiid 

LOrcal 

LVMH 

Lroa Ecux 

MldieBnB 

Paribas A 

fTimiml DViuil 

rcVTXMl Kulu 

PcuoratOt 

Pfanutt-PrM 

Pramades 

Renault 

Reset 

Rh-PauteneA 

SanoG 

SdMeMer 

SEB 

SGS Thomsen 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
SIGobcrin 
Suez 

S y ntHetai i n 
Thomson CSF 
Total B 
Udnor 
Valeo 


CAC-40: 293638 
Pmtoes: 299985 

728 943 925 

30 188.90 18730 
«° 962 953 

790 776 

J» 3MJ0 370J0 
752 752 759 

MB 978 973 

145 246 247 JO 

221 1240 1309 
150 4379 4373 
JO 28430 28580 
“ 257 25458 

712 713 

999 976 

560 570 577 

750 1280 1288 

770 974 981 

654 — 

9 MS 

30 7.70 73S 

757 757 

L10 428 427 JB 

761 769 771 

183 387.90 385 

165 1097 ld» 

175 2483 24H7 

IIS 1638 1580 

611 620 

30 36230 365 

115 41B30 413 

JO 315.10 311.1® 

176 579 5B3 

SB JB67 2825 

166 2415 2365 

JO WX60 147.90 
ns 1825 1839 
155 258.40 258 

.70 579 572 

JO 32830 

m IMS 1029 
-50 48530 48J.3J 
163 675 663 

*07 2929 291 B 

IS? 871 852 

J5 14.95 14.90 

760 750 

163 15460 

597 598 

02 104.90 104 

.10 388 37440 


Electrolux B 
Ericsson B 
Henries B 
Inaflfi* A 
Investor B 

MoOoB 

NonXnnken 

RwadUpiaha 

SaraMkB 

SamtaB 

SCAB 

S-E Bankan A 
Skandia Pars 
StojsirtaB 
5KFB 

S we tamhen A 
SwdshwJekA 
Stem A 
5v Handles A 
Vbhw B 


569 564 

31530 30450 
282 275 


234 23050 
16830 162-50 
87 84 

295 78930 
34430 34150 

206 204-50 

170 166 

N.T. N.T. 
129 127 

252 240.50 

207 2D450 


5e7 567 

312 30530 
28130 ttsm 
701 700 

416 40730 
251 248 

26450 266 

28330 27450 
. 227 22230 
23330 232 

168 162 
0&S® B4 
290 29230 
343 342 

205 205 

168 167 

N.T. 190 
128 12730 
25130 251 

205 206 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZ Biring 

BHP 

Bond 

Brambles tad. 
CBA 

OCAnntB 
Cotes Myw 
Ovnctco 
CSR 

Rrim Brew 

Goodman Ftd 

K3 AiKtrofio 
Lend Lease 
MIMHdgs 
Nat Aust Bank 
Ned Mutual Hdg 
News Cap 
PacncDuntop 
Pioneer lull 
Pud Broadcast 
RfoThtto 
StGeoroeBonk 
WMC 

WtsJpac BUng 

WooaridePet 

Vtaotearths 


Al Ordamies: 2742J0 
Pravtoae 2745J0 

I 0J3 030 8J2 
1 9J5 9J5 9.91 

I 1938 19.68 1933 
I 4J1 436 425 

I 2447 27 2636 

) 15.97 16 JO 1401 
1 1475 16.90 1494 
; 490 734 492 

I 735 735 7.15 

I 516 418 416 

' 144 2J6 2-45 

i 1.92 133 1.91 

! 1104 . 13.12 13.10 
! 29.17 2930 29 


Very briefly: 

• Renault SA reached a provisional agreement with 3,100 
workers over compensation at the soon-to-be closed factory in 
Vilvoorde. Belgium. 

• Siemens AG said it had agreed to form an alliance with a 
“leading global manufacturer of data communications 
products and solutions.” but declined to name its partner. 

■ VEBA AG, Germany's second-largest diversified utility, 
said its Raab Karcher unit would buy Wyle Electronics, 
based in Irvine, California, fra $810 million. 

• Italy's T realsury Ministry said its offering of shares in ENI 
SpA, the oil, gas and chemicals company, had been over- 
subscribed. The Treasury it bad offered 1 billion shares 
but received requests for 1.52 billion. 

• Neste Oy said it had formed a joint venture with RAO 

Gazprom of Russia to study foe route for a gas pipeline from 
Russia to Central Europe. ap. Reuters. Bioombem 


Former Mercedes Aide Indicted 


The Associated Press 

STUTTGART — A former Mercedes-Benz AG ex- 
ecutive was indicted Thursday on embezzlement, fraud 
and extortion charges for allegedly pocketing more than 
$2 million as head of the automaker's operations in 
Eastern Europe. 

Dieter Fink, who was fired by Mercedes in May 1994 
and became an international fugitive 10 months later, was 
arrested last October in France. He has been in custody in 
Stuttgart since his extradition in April. 


The Trib Index Pnces ** * 3:00 PM New Yoik time - 

Jan 1. 1992*100. Lewi Change % change year to data 

% change 

World Index ‘ 179.60 ' +2.68 +T.51 +20.42 

Regional Indexes 

Asia/PadUc 131.81 -0.11 -0.08 *6.79 

Europe 186.31 +3.06 +1.67 +15.58 

N. America 209.49 +4.99 +2.44 +29.39 

S. America 178J27 +1.61 +0.91 +55.79 

Industrial indexes 

Capital goods 224 67 +5.01 +2.28 +31.45 

Consumer goods 201.63 +238 +1.45 +24 JO ■ 

Energy 201.39 +4.90 +2.49 +17.97 

Finance 134.69 +1.57 +1.18 +15.05 

MtsceBaneous 177.49 -0.79 -0.44 +9.71 

Raw Materials 19239 +1.95 +1.02 +9.98 

Service 169.68 +2.16 +129 +23.57 

Utsties 177.93 +2.08 +1.18 +24.03 

The fritemotiofiaJ HoraJd Trtvne Wortd Stock Index O'ttackstM U.S. doBarvaluasct 
280 rnemanonaBy mestobto stacks trom 25 ccuntnee. For mom Mormabon, a (rau 
booklet is available bvwntmg to The Trib hutex.191 Avenue Charies da GauSe. 

92521 NeuUy Cedes! Franca. Compiled by Btoornbeip News. 


MBsui Fudosn 1540 
Mifsm Trial 
MurataMfg 
NEC 
Nikon 


1500 1510 
815 818 
4420 44£ r i 
1560 1560 


1942 

19J2 

1935 

19J9 

NftkaSec 

TDD 

m 

700 

700 

2.19 

2.13 

117 

218 


9580 

9»B 

9310 

9480 

648 

3J6 

649 

166 

6J3 

348 

653 

176 


9J0 

630 

897 

620 

905 

910 

625 










8 

745 

7.99 

742 

Nissan Motor 

836 

824 

875 

833 

22.9V 

22 JH 

2240 

2297 

NKK 

244 

238 

239 

239 

8.74 

8,65 

0.70 

BJ3 


1540 

1520 

inn 

1570 

840 

841 

844 

837 

NTT 

11006 

HNUh 

1080b 

inv<B> 

848 

7.91 

7.94 

7.97 

NTT Data 

1440b 

4390b 

4410b 

4449b 

1140 

11J4 

1134 

1136 


699 

601 

691 

699 

445 

*36 

444 

437 

Osaka Gas 

329 

325 

328 

329 


BofeatadR.-45M.16 
PreiriMs: 45S9J3 
5430 54.40 55.10 
7030 21.00 20 JO 
3530 35.70 35.15 
IZSffl II* 12J0 
44-00 4100 410fi 
5530 5530 56J0 
231 232 230 

33-95 3195 300 
3100 3155 3130 
123JD 124.00 12150 
1934 1934 1934 


M|B Teteroufco; 130330 
Preitens 1349400 


sso pauto Taipei 


Aluuiuu Arolc 
Bca Cooun Ital 
BcaEtaMiroro 
Bca di Rama 
Benetton 
Cieriito Halrnn 
Edison 

ENI 

Fiat 

G«wa» Arete 

IMI 

INA 


MeOtatmca 
Montedison 
garew _ 
Puiwutol 
Pot* 

RAS 

Aria Brora 
S Paata Torino 

Sid 

Telecom Itoftj 
TIM 


14100 18580 
4030 3865 

SlO 5710 
1210 1300 
28050 274M 
3420 3340 

8895 8730 

WOO 9840 
6560 6360 

3175® 314» 
14245 15805 
2615 2555 
5585 5405 

7510 7350 
11080 10820 
’184 1150 

490 475 

2590 2490 

4440 4335 
14535 13900 
22000 216M 
13300 12960 
10085 *825 
5585 5420 

5615 5465 


14100 13700 
3990 3925 
50® S745 

133® 1395 

ZJ400 27650 
3389 3400 

8855 8690 

10000 9SB 

6540 6375 

31550 31650 
16190 15940 
2590 25SH 
5510 5475 

7400 7395 
11045 10885 
1174 1155 

477 475 

2540 2510 

4360 4390 
16430 13900 
21750 21750 
13200 13000 
9900 10000 
5465 S W5 

5495 5590 




Souza Craz 
TeMraPM 


Tefal 
TetespPW 


Uskninas PH 
CVRD PW 


Docom 
Dusmo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
Ha Motors 
KOeaBPwr 
Kara E»± ffiv 
Kona Mob Tel 
LGSeaNam 
PdmglronSl 
Smuoa Dfciay 
Saasang Elec 
ShBdun 


5450 54.90 
76.00 71M 
SUM 3TJJU 
61930 625.00 
618.90 62400 
54000 551.00 
44700 A4t.<m 
30100 30500 
18800 19a® 
3&80 36J0 
11195 1130 

172.10 17300 

190.11 190.12 
16900 1 70.00 
36600 36900 

4130 4300 
1170 1195 
2630 2640 


CreamSe fate 77511 
PmtaoR 77739 

100000 98000 100000 96500 
8490 8100 8100 8360 

24400 23300 23500 24200 
14700 14500 14500 14700 
27300 26900 27200 27300 
6350 6100 6160 6200 

SOOOOQ 405000 490000 491000 
38000 36600 366B0 37600 
66600 651W 459CO 65BOO 
&m 48000 48500 49600 
73000 71800 72200 72500 
11400 11100 11100 11100 



UM Mlao Bee 
UM World Oita 


Tokyo 


Stock MreMfatiae 9027 J3 
PrevlaaK 8996J2 

14850 14430 145 14730 

118 11530 116 115 

7850 77 77 77SS 

14130 142 144 

30.10 29-4S 29AU 29.70 

116 113 113 113 

7030 68 68 6930 

117 114 115 11330 

68 66 6430 <7 

84 82 82 8230 

11630 113 11330 11530 

120 113 118 115 

55 *y3B foi pi 54 
110 105 10930 106 

<730 6630 <630 <630 


Mtka 225: 29121.41 
Prevfare: 2B196J2 


Singapore 


Montreal mhmmi 


Bca Mob Con 
CdriTtoA 
OfclUBA 
CTHhISvc 
G az Metro 
e-Wed Ufcoo 

J BQXCS 

lovesforsGro 
Lotto* Goa 
NoaBk Canada 
nwerCora 
FwarFm 
QuebaeorB _ 
RogaRCenroB 
ItaftiBkCda 


Aker A 

amsnana bs 
“ lURkeBk 


HafstetdA 
KvatfnerAso 
NaukHidra 
Henke SkogA 
WcuroedA 
Ortfo AsoA 
Petal GcoSvc 


43H 030 
29 2814 
36- 3585 
3735 3730 
10 1M5 

34 m 

41 K 41.15 

Utt 

2080 19.70 
1845 18.15 
34.90 3430 
M 32V. 
Wh 261* 
940 930 


43W 43 

2035 2785 
3585 35.90 
3730 37tt 
17,95 10 

3195 3180 
4145 40.95 
311* - 311* 
2080 1930 
18.15 1810 
34M 34 

3380 33 

24U 26 

930 9 

<545 <490 


AdaPBcBiew 
GaebosPoc 
ay.Devte 


TronscssaaOH 
Storebrand Asa 


OBXtedBC <71.16 
Pmtam; 44489 

140 149 1« 

175 1 70 17450 

25 2530 » 

28 2830 28-50 
143 145 141 

44 4430 4450 
448 453 448 

369 395 396 

253 260 356 

138 14230 139 

550 55530 550 

3<1 365 3<0 

630 150 14630 

143 145 143 

540 540 540 

290 4170 43 


Ftasert Neav* UlO 9.90 980 10 

HKLond ’ — "* 

JartMathesn 
JasdSMeglc 
KeppdA 
HeppdBank 
KappalFdt 
KEWd Load 
OCBCfon 

OSUiwn-.. . — 

FariHarHdg& 630 6J0 630 6^ 

-- — ■ — in m 6JB 


— »AI r 
Stag Land 
ShgPressF 

2J0 2J3 |S |<7 

TaTLaeBank ,tu 

UJdtadusJriai ._ ._ „„ 

UkiCrSeaBkF 1530 1530 1530 1530 

Wing Taj Hdgs 426 420 4J6 420 

IteWJ.dOtiW 

Stockholm 

A GAB 104 10230 104 10230 

ABBA 114 111 114 1IL50 

AsteOOnm 225 219 2» ,219 

Astra A 14730 145 14730 145-M 

Alias Copco A 221 214 219 213^ 

Aufctiv 300 30230 30330 306 


Piwtaw: 194491 
535 5J5 580 

m 585 410 
1330 1170 1150 
1440 1440 1480 
0.75 0 l 7< OJS 

1830 1030 1BJV 
444 448 442 

9.90 980 10 

239 2J0 236 

7J0 735 780 

1» 182 280 

N, T, N.T. 440 

164 334 336 

4J2 474 484 

176 380 330 
1490 1110 1490 

O. 95 9 985 

6 JO 450 435 

440 . 445 630 

13 1120 13 

US. 445 6^ 

78J0 2860 2880 
170 186 368 
1*3 169 237 

102 104 104 

UK 187 187 

1530 1550 1530 
420 426 420 


AsaM Bra* 
AsaNQwro 
AsatUGtass 
Bk Tokyo Mflsu 
Bk Ybkohana 
Bridgestone 
C«k»j_ 
ChubuEtec 
□tugotaiEtec 
Print 

Dda 

Dd-IOM Kong 
DntanBank 
Down House 
DahraSec 
DO! 

Denso 

Ejb! Japan Ry 
Eteai 
Panic 
ft* Bank 
FtS Photo 


1140 

1160 

1170 

743 

752 

745 

3830 

3850 

3910 

918 

936 

9Z3 

682 

693 

680 

1110 

1110 

1120 

2220 

?wn 

2240 

644 

64< 

649 


HacHjuniBk 
HNodii 
Honda Motor 
IBJ 
I HI 

IfoCha 

ifa-Yokada 

JAL 

Japan Tabocca 

Jasoi 


Kan*® Elec 
Kao 

Kawasaki Hvy 
Kawa Steel 
MHippRy 

issisr 

Kanasu 

KuMa 

Krecrra 

KvwhaEkc 

LTCB 

Mounted 

Maul 

Matsu Comm 

Matsu Elec ind 
Matsu EtecWk 
MBsubWi 
iUBsubfehlOi 
Mlubisbl B 
MtaubbMEst 
Mtaabtttil Hvjr 
Mdsuulm Mot 
MitedHStnTr 

Mawi 


2670 2620 2650 2590 

3160 3080 3000 3110 

20S9 SOfiO 20P 2100 

2050 3030 2040 2030 

2560 2530 2540 2540 

773 758 760 759 

1530 1510 1528 1520 

565 554 561 555 

1390 13® 1340 1370 
900 895 898 893 

8250a 8210a 8220a 8250a 
2790 2750 2760 2750 
SBtila 57Wa 5820b 5800a 
2210 2170 2210 2170 

4270 4190 4210 4220 
1640 1640 1460 1650 

6660 4570 4400 4550 
1570 1540 1550 1560 
1140 1120 1130 1140 
1300 1280 1280 1300 
3440 3380 3380 3420 
1690 1670 1490 1690 
447 436 428 442 

<02 S8S flO 611 
6700 <630 6660 6740 
535 524 534 585 

8820a BSOOa 8600a 0720a 
3920 3810 3810 3900 
659 644 644 <62 

2230 2180 2210 2200 


Ricoh 

Rohm 11700 

Sataira Bk 
Sankyo 
Samra Bunk 
Sanyo Elec 
Secant 
Seibu Rwy 

Sekkuiawn 

SrtwA House 1190 

Sewn- Seven 
Shop 

ShftokuSPwr 1980 
Sh&nizu 
Shta-ebuCh- 
Shfeddo 
Shizuoka Bk 
Scflbank 
Sony 
Sumitomo 
Snnltonio Bk 
SumkCheai ... 

Swnllorao Elec 1920 
SwnaMetoS 
Sund Trust 
Tafoho Pharm 3090 

TatedaChem 327{t 

TDK 8450 

TUhakuElPw 2030 

Total Bank 1150 

Taklo Marine 
Tokyo S Pw u>v 

Tokyo Electron ssgb 

Tokyo Gas 
TakyuCanx 
Tonen 

Tapper PiW 
Trouyfod 
Tocbnd 
Tosten 
TayaTrud 
Toyota Motor 3360 

YmremoocW 3080 

rex mtr.x UUO 


1490 1SD0 
11700 I17D0 
■831 B36 

3940 3980 

1660 1669 

496 504 

8290 8310 

5630 sua 
1140 1150 

1180 1190 

8600 8670 

1550 1550 
1960 1960 

660 660 
2990 799 5 
1870 19M 

1280 1290 

7280 7300 

9570 9640 
1040 1050 

1820 1830 

SM 504 
1900 1 — 

320 ■ 

1170 Il». 
3040 3050 
3230 320 

8350 8390 

2000 2030 

1130 1148 

1420 1430 

2350 2350 

5350 5410 

312 315 

670 67 6 

1280 1200 
1770 1770 

015 015 

713 714 

3010 3050 

937 959 

3300 

3030 


Moore 

IliHriirlHna ILd 

ndfunugc ever 
Nonuvla Inc 
Naroen Energy 
Nthem Telecom 
Nova 

OM9I 

PanaftPaflm 

PetroCda 

Placer Dame 

PocoPcttai 

Potash Sask 

Renaissance 

RtoAJgom 

R ogers C cmtel B 

Seogian Co 

SMCdaA 

Suncor 

TaRsanm Eny 

TeekB 

Tefcgtote 

Teles 1 

Thnnton 

TofDom Bote 

Tnnsalla 

TrensCda Pipe 

TriiraVFtaS 

Triioc Holm 

TVXGctd 

Westeaasl Eny 

Weston 


High Law 

28.20 2716 

651S <3te 
31.05 3030 
34.95 3414 

im 132.10 

12.10 11J0 

27Vi 27Vi 
28.90 28 

2335 2280 
2235 Zita 
14.15 1195 

102JS 100U 
3835 3&20 
3530 35 

26 2SJ5 
56.70 5SJ5 
28.90 2060 
3735 37 

45K 44V4 

29K 2835 
54 55 

as.?a 2t20 

34* 3W 
42H 42.15 
1<te 1645 
2835 28J35 
«3W 6 Wl 

30.10 29.90 

7J0 7J5 

25>* 2535 

91 89 


Vienna 

Boehfa-Uddeh 

CimfitnnstPW 

EA-General 

EVN 

Hughotenmen 

OMV 

Oral EleUrfz 

VA Stare 

VATech 
Wtenerberg Bau 


ATX index; 1381-40 
Previous: 136475 

1022 992.10 1020 1005 

5D1 494 499 JO #4 

3388 3310 3770 3350 

1645162330 1634 1640 
5® 532.75 539 JO 53140 
1622 1973161830 1614 

877 872 872 874 

589 580.10 589 584 

2532 2385102520.10 2392 

2619 2580 2610 2615 


523 

518 

530 

571 

364 

359 

362 

367 

(08 

693 

693 

m 


214 

211 

212 

21! 

917 

909 

915 

919 

554 

542 

549 

551 


8840 8920 
1970 1990 


2040 2040 
4100 4830 
2240 2240 
1300 1270 
1330 1330 
368 340 

641 645 

1630 1640 
870 075 

815 818 

1730 im 

1040 1070 


Toronto 1 

AMtaQms. 
Abeita Energy 
Man Akim 
Andtesaa Expl 
Ek Montreal 
BkNanSeaba 
BantckGokt 
BCE 

BCTeteoenm 

Bfodiem Phare 

BwnbarcScrB 

BrasanA 

CanecD 

CtBC 

C* Nall Rod 

CdriNaiRes 

Cdn Dead Pet 

CdnPodflc 

Qminco 

Do f a sa i 

Domra 

DonuhueA 

DuPontCdaA 

EdptfGcoup 

EuroNevMng 

FobfwFinl 

FtrioorAridge 

FteRtwrCMIA 

Franco Nevada 

GuHCdaRra 

Imperial OB 

Inaj 

IPLEnem 
LaidkwB 
Lo*«tn Group 
MaanUBM 
Moana tab A 
M^anex 


TSE industrials: 6581 .19 
Previous: 654934 

05 2TS 2530 2535 
a 35 35J5 35JH 
05 47J5 4730 47.45 
45 181* 1BL4S IflW 
45 551* 56 SSVt 

85 6330 63JO 6214 
«* 2935 29’i5 30.10 

30 4030 41.15 39.95 
IK 32=4 3115 32ik 
35 2835 2835 2835 
K 3130 3235 31 Vi 
56 34.15 3435 34.10 
45 50® JD80 51.10 
36J0 3635 3535 
40 62 42<6 6116 

20 3535 3535 3585 
80 32 ■* 3X65 321* 
30 39.95 40 40 

39 38 38.90 3741 

65 27 27^0 2730 

12 11.90 12 11.90 

30 29te 29 JO 30 
Hi 29W 29W 7916 
I'fl 2330 2330 2115 
35 AL55 40.90 42Vi 
97 395 397 394Vi 

15 2635 27 24L90 

!■* 2305 2105 23 Vs 
95 60 68 69.15 

V* 1130 111* 11 fa 

90 711* 7116 711* 
<0 40 40 4135 

40 4735 48.15 48J0 

20 19 19 19 

I'i 47V 47.95 4735 
19 1M0 18W 18.95 
10 84V* 86J0 8416 

90 1716 1185 122B 


Wellington MSE jatwfae ai?3» 

PievtaK 2493.16 
AteNZealdB 4J0 433 434 4J0 

Briefly hrrt 134 133 134 132 

COrierHaH ad 174 3J2 173 172 

Held) OiBWg 431 432 430 432 

Ffcfofi Ql Eny 4.75 436 4J5 463 

HddiCh Fast 2J0 2.16 117 118 

Retch Ch Paper 153 3J5S 151 3J2 

LnnNaOian 182 177 m 175 

Teteauaia 7Jt 756 7J2 756 

Wtaan Horton 11 JO 1170 11 JO 1135 


Zurich 

ABBB 

AdecmB 

AhtsuaseR 

Aros-SeronoB 

AMR 

Baer Hdg B 

BitiafeeHdgR 

SIC Vh tan 

Ciba5pecCheni 

QorianlR 

QriSu*»GpR 

EtektrowattB 

Ems-Chcinie 

ESECHdg 

HottMonkB 

LtacMaaiLBB 

NedteR 

NovarSsR 

DtffiknBuehR 

PttpesfflHIdB 

PhamiVenB 

Rtehrawre A 

PirefflPC 

RadirHdoPC 

SEC R 

SdiireSerPC 

SGSR 

SMHB 

S-utoerR 

Swiss RdnsR 
SvrissdrR 
UB5B 
Winterthur R 
ZwidhAssurR 


SPIfadOB 365531 
Prwiaf»3S0SJ6 

2244 2304 2239 
562 575 561 

1496 1508 1505 
22^ 2295 2290 
N.T. N.T. 060 
2220 2259 2214 
3445 3475 3470 
1193 1198 1196 
14035 14175 139 

W3 983 971 

194 197JS 19440 
540 540 560 

64S0 6500 605 
4705 4760 4755 
1366 1309 1358 
555 5<7 5S! 

1957 1976 1937 
2362 2449 2351 
171 J5 171.75 172 

1925 1950 1935 
B3ff 840 m 
2260 2260 2261 
285 287 287 

13310 13420 13300 
39*50 40040 395 

1023 1880 1832 
m« 3110 3035 
838 852 830 

1266 1266 1269 
2068 7106 2085 
1735 1773 1715 
16» 1700 1600 
1288 1397 1208 
596 613 591 


S 

























































































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1997 


PAGE 21 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


-j 


Thai Market Soars 
On Bahfs Decline 

Move to Revive Economy Lifts Stocks 


Letting a Currency Float 


The number of Thai baht to the dQ^,pfott&(taily. The chart bag*. J 
| 'been inverted to show the *~ <r ***»— ^ 

20 baht 


GmftlrJ In lluriijff Fnw pupjh An 

" BANGKOK Thai stocks ex- 
tended their biggest raJly since 
1992 on Thursday amid optimism 
dial the de facto devaluation of the 
country’s currency would help re- 
vive the economy. 

Bangkok Bank PLC. the coun- 
try’s biggest bank, led the rally, 
gaining 9.9 percent. Banks accoun- 
ted for much of the market's gain as 
investors bet the government’s de- 
cision to let the baht slide would 
lead to lower interest rates and 
more competitive exports. 

“The devaluation was certainly 
enough to get a knee-jerk reaction 
from international investors who 
would be buying more if it wasn't 
for the equity ceilings,” said Kent 
Rossiter, senior portfolio manager 
atNpcko Securities in Hong Kong. 
Thai stock-market regulations lim- 
it daily share-price movements to 
10 percent. 

The benchmark Stock Exchange 
of Thailand index rose S.7 percent, 
to 617.98, its biggest one-day gain 
since 1992. Twenty shares rose for 
each one that fell. 

“Shares prices are too cheap to 
resist,” saidThongglod Bhichaikul 
of United Securities. “Stocks 
might rise higher if there were no 
10 percent dally trading limit. ’* 

Since Wednesday, when the 
baht was allowed to float, the index 
has risen 17 percent, offsetting the 
decline in the currency's value. 

The baht was steady Thursday, 
with the dollar at about 28.75, and 
analysts forecast that the rate would 
stay between 28 and 29 for the rest 
of the year, provided there were no 


fresh shocks to the economy. 

“The big hit has already been 
uken.” one foreign analyst sai d 
"But people who are coming in to 
buy aren't really worried. The mar- 
ket is going up so fast they'll more 
than recoup any exchange losses.” 

Even after rhis week 's gains, the 
index has fallen 26 percent so far 
this year: in dollar terms, it has 
dropped 34 percent. 

Bowing to market pressure, the 
Bank of Thailand scrapped on 
Wednesday its system of pegging 
the baht to a basket of currencies 
dominated by the dollar. 

In doing so. it abandoned a de- 
fense of the currency that had cost 
the central bank billions of dollars 
and crippled companies with high 
interest rates. 

“In the long run. interest rates 
will be lower because we don’t have 
to worry' about defending die baht, *’ 
said Remgchai Marakanond, gov- 
ernor of the Bank of Thailand. 

Foreign shares and warrants of 
banks and developers, each of 
which would benefit from lower 
rates, gained more than 50 percent 
Thursday. Those shares are not re- 
stricted by the 10 percent limit on 
domestic share price movements. 

Stocks of exporters rose. The 
weaker baht should enable them to 
attract more buyers in international 
markets because of lower costs. 

In Mani la. President Fidel Ramos . 
warned monetary authorities 
against relying on remittances from 
overseas workers and “fickle" cap- 
ital inflows to finance the country's 
widening current-account deficit 

Mr. Ramos told the central bank 



Source: Btoomberg Financial Markets 


to be “ever alen against untoward 
pressure” on the peso as portfolio 
investors were “highly affected by 
the changes in market perceptions 
instead of by actual conditions in 
the country.” 

The peso and local stocks have 
fallen this year as foreign investors 
have worried that the Philippines 
may soon encounter the same fate 
as Thailand, which is reeling from 
a property glut and mountains of 
bad debt to developers. 

{Bloomberg, Reuters I 

■ Speculators’ Gains Limited 

The de facto devaluation of the 
Thai baht was not necessarily a 
victory by speculators against the 
currency, as some reports have 
suggested, traders said Thursday. 
Reuters reported from Singapore. • 
A trader at a European bank said 
he there were a lot of short positions 
in the market at the end of May, 
“but a lot of them gave up, covered 
their positions and slunk off.'’ 
“Sure, there were people that 
made money, but overall I would 
say there's no way the speculators 
won.” he added. 


George Soros, the international 
financier, has been named in re- 
ports as a potential winner in the 
baht devaluation. But traders ten- 
ded to dispute this. 

Mr. Soros declined to comment 
Wednesday on the devaluation, 
saying in one interview. “I don't 
want to comment on the baht be- 
cause we’ve been artacked by the 
Thai government and there "have 
been some exaggerated rumors.” 

The traders said the timing of the 
Bank of Thailand’s “managed 
float” of the baht was probably 
tied to the number of speculators 
left with short baht positions. 

The head of treasury at a Euro- 
pean investment bank said. “The 
bank had done all the hard work 
seeing the speculators off in May. 
I’m sure they wouldn’t throw in the 
towel and hand money on a plate to 
a load of short speculators six 
weeks later.” 

“My conclusion is that they 
waited for the bulk of speculators 
to bail out of their own accord — 
these positions are pricey to run. 
you know — and then do the sen- 
sible thing and devalue,” he said. 


Ford Weighs 
New Plant in 
Philippines 
With Mazda 


(Jar sue fnm [l7{KCftk « 

TOKYO — Ford Motor Co. and 
its Japanese affiliate. Mazda Motor 
Corp.. may build an auto plant in the 
Philippines, company executives 
said Thursday. 

“We are looking into a variety of 
joint business opportunities with 
Ford, including manufacturing ven- 
tures" in Asia outside Japan, a 
Mazda spokesman said. 

The Nihon Keizai Shimbun re- 
ported that the companies were con- 
sidering building Mazda-developed 
cars in the Philippines. 1 3 years after 
Ford withdrew from the country. 

Ford said that it had yet to make a 
decision, but the company said it 
expected to expand its presence in 
the Philippines by resuming expons 
there later this year. 

General Motors Corp. said Mon- 
day that it would return to the Phil- 
ippines after an 1 1 -year absence by 
importing cars made in Germany. 

Ford and Mazda plan a S450 mil- 
lion plant in Thailand expected to 
produce up to 150.000 pickup trucks 
annually. tAFP. Bloomberg) 

■ Chrysler to Cut Japan Prices 

Chrysler Japan Sales Ltd. said 
Thursday that its new cash-back 
program would cut as much as 1 1 
percent off the prices of its 1996 
Neon compact and Cherokee and 
Grand Cherokee spon- utility vehi- 
cles, Bloomberg News reported 
from Tokyo. 

Under the program, customers 
who buy 1996 model Jeep Cher- 
okee. Grand Cherokee and Neon 
vehicles with a five-year loan will 
make no payments for six months. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong. Kong 
Hang Seng 

17000- - - 

15000 
15000 
14000 


Singapore. 
Straits Times 


Tokyo 
: Nikkei' 225 



F M A 
1997 


Exchange.... 

lode* . .. .. 

Tbpssday Prey . % ■' 
dose Close Change 

Hong. Kong . 

.HangSsng. 

,15 t 05S.74' 15,19078 -0.59 

Singapore.- 

Stratonroea •••■ 

, tJBBStAb.,. 1^6651 ■ *0.33 

Sydney 

ABOnjinatfes 

2,?42J0 2.745,90 -0.11 

Tokyo 

NSckwaas;- ; 

.26,121.41 20.196.42 -037 

f KuateJoimporCtempostte.: ... 

1,080.61 • - 1,684.88 .. -039 

Bangkok ■ 

SET 

917.98 568.79 43.65 

Seoul 

C6mpos8e Irefex 

77536 777.29 -0.25 

Taipei 

Slock Market Index 9,027.63 8,996.72 ; +0.34| 

Manila 

PSE 

2,74042 2,764-39 -OBt 

Jakarta 

Canposfte Indax 

-.735-46. .73056 +0.73 

Wellington • 

NZSE-40 

2^19.68 2.46016 +1.06 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

. A323.46 4,333.80 -0.24 

Source: Telekurs 


Iremiiiiiaul HfraW Trihun.- 

Very briefly: 


r ; - 


Chinese Agency Shuts 11 Futures Brokerages Asia Motors to Cut Work Force 


Bloomberg Sens 

SHANGHAI — China’s securities 
regulator closed 11 futures brokerages 
Thursday as the government intensified 
efforts to clean up its financial markets. 

The China Securities Regulatory 
Commission said that the brokerages 
had been involved in illegal trading in 
foreign-currency contracts and lacked 
adequate capital. 

The move is the latest step in a crack- 
down that will help spur a decline in the 
number of futures brokerages in China 
by a third this year, to as few as 200, 
executives said. 

“The government is making an all- 
out attack” on illegal behavior by fu- 
tures and securities companies, said Ji- 
ang Chang, a fund manager at Haitong 
Securities. 


On China’s stock markets, shares fell, 
with Shenzhen’s benchmark index bit- 
ting a six-month low, as investors bet 
that further government action was 
planned. 

The Shenzhen Stock Exchange Com- 
posite index declined 5.3 percent to 
386.76. and the Shanghai Stock Ex- 
change composite index fell 4.2 percent 
to 1150.62. 

Shanghai's B-share index, which 
tracks only stocks available to foreign- 
ers, fell 3.7 percent ro 75.77, its lowest 
level since April 1 6. Shenzhen *s B-share 
index plunged 6.0 percent to 135.97, a 
six-month low. 

China's futures industry has been 
dogged by problems since it opened in 
1993. The worst occurred in 1995 when 
Shanghai Internationa] Securities Co.. 


then China's largest brokerage, violated 
trading rules and lost as much as S144 
million trading treasury-bond futures 
contracts. 

Last month. China’s securities watch- 
dog revoked the license of Jiaxin Futures 
Brokerage Co. after it was found to have 
forged financial statements. 

On Thursday it closed Xinyuan Fu- 
tures Brokerage Co., Dalian Zhongfu 
Futures Brokerage Co., Dalian Wanfa 
Futures Brokerage Co.. Liaoning Hai- 
wan Futures Brokerage Co.. Liaoning 
Jingxie Futures Brokerage Co., Hainan 
Xinfeng Futures Brokerage Co.. Hainan 
Futeli Futures Brokerage Co.. Hainan 
Shunfeng Brokerage Co., Hainan Hai- 
hung Futures Brokerage Co., Shangding 
Futures Brokerage Co. and Guangzhou 
Xinshijie Futures Brokerage Co. 


BltKinbert Newt 

SEOUL — Asia Motors Co. Inc. said Thursday that labor 
unions had agreed to let it reduce its workforce by almost a fifth, 
saving the company 43.4 billion won ($48.9 million) a year. 

More than three-quarters of the 5.238 union members at the 
bus and truck manufacturer, which is owned by the cash- 
strapped Kia Motors Corp., voted to allow management to 
trim the workforce by 1 .447 employees, or 1 8.6 percent of the 
total, a company spokesman said. It was the first time that a 
South Korean labor union has agreed to job reductions. 

The cuts will be made in the form of early retirement 
programs and the transfer of employees to subcontractors and 
a new sales unit by the end of the year, the spokesman said. 


• Indonesia will soon release a series of measures aimed ai 
lowering trade barriers and stimulating the economy, the 
minister of industry and trade. Tunky Ariwibowo, said. An 
announcement on the new rules could be made as soon as 
Friday, he said, adding that the package would include tariff 
cuts. He declined to be more specific. 

• South Korea's latest round of interest rate deregulation 
would push up some savings rates and spark fierce com- 
petition within the banking industry, analysts said. The central 
Bank of Korea, announcing the fourth stage of rate lib- 
eralization, said it would allow banks to set their own interest 
rates on savings accounts starring Monday. The central bank 
also said it would allow b anks to introduce money market 
deposit accounts and issue three-year bonds. 

• Japanese household spending slid for the second straight 
month in May as a sales tax increase kept more consumers out 
of department stores, supermarkets and restaurants, the gov- 
ernment said. Average spending fell 2.2 percent during the 
month from a year earlier to 312,345 yen ($2,7 16), the eighth 
decline in the last 12 months, the Management and Co- 
ordination Agency said. 

• South Korea has decided to push ahead with a delayed S2 
billion military plane project, known as the KTX-2, to develop 
advanced jet trainers with technology from the American 
aircraft giant Lockheed-Martin Corp. 

• British Gas Asia Pacific Holdings Pte of Singapore said it 
boughr a 44 percent stake in Gujarat Gas Co., India’s largest 
natural gas distribution company. 

• Merck KGaA. Germany’s fifth-largest drug maker, said its 
French subsidiary had signed a cooperation agreement with 
Teijin Ltd. of Japan to market asthma and dermatology 
drugs. 


Hanoi Blasts Foreign Employers 


Reuters 

HANOI — Vietnam attacked foreign in- 
vestors’ labor practices Thursday, blaming 
low pay. long hours and excessive production 
targets’ for unrest among factory workers. 

The official English-language daily Viet- 
nam News ran a front-page article about a 
recent labor-management workshop in Hanoi 
at which foreign contractors were lambasted 
for violating labor codes. 

Le Duy Dong, the deputy labor minister, said 
that white unreasonable wages and working 
hours were the main causes oi strikes, physical 
abuse of workers was also ro blame. 

Mr. Dong said the ministry had found that 
most labor conflicts occurred at small-scale 
enterprises set up with investment funds from 
South Korea, Singapore and Taiwan. 


Until now. the government of Vietnam has 
been wary of criticizing foreign labor prac- 
tices because of the country's heavy depend- 
ence on investment from abroad. 

Since the right to strike was enshrined in the 
labor code in 1994, the number of labor ac- 
tions has ballooned. Fewer than 3,000 people 
nationwide went on strike in 1994, while four 
times that number walked off their jobs in Ho 
Chi Minh City alone during the first three 
months of 1997. 

South Korean and Taiwan contractors have 
been heavily criticized for their treatment of 
workers at plants under contract to the U.S. 
sportswear giant Nike. 

Five factories producing shoes for Nike in 
Vietnam were cited in March by a labor-rights 
group for abusing their workers. 


THAI: Problems Endure Beyond Devaluation 


s» 1 
e 


Continued from Page 17 

forecasts, the first such short- 
falls in more than a decade. 
Economists put growth at be- 
tween 3 percent and 5 per- 
cent, compared with growth 
of 6.4 percent in 1996. 

The forced mergers and the 
baht's flotation were cheered 
by foreign 1 .investors. The 
stock market has soared in the 
past two days as foreign buy- 
ingretumed. (Page 21) 

The governor of the Bank 
of Thailand, Remgchai 
Marakanond, - said Wednes- 
day that with the floating of 
the baht, the central bank 
would not have worry about 
defending the currency and 
could be more flexible in its 
interest-rates policy. 

But analysts do not see 
rates coming down soon, es- 
pecially after the central bank 
raised its discount rate to 12.5 
percent from 10.5 percent 
after the baht float 
“I see light at the end of the 
tunnel within one year.” said 
Surakiart Sathirathai, a form- 
er finance minister who is an 
economic adviser to the 
prime minister. 

"The baht’s devaluation is 
not the panacea that people 
think it is/’ said Manu Bhas- 
karan head of research for 
SocGen-Crosby Securities in 
lai 

it investors want is a 
predictable exchange rate,” 
ne said. “The underlying 
problem in Thailand wasn’t 
export competitiveness,’ ' 


which could be improved by a 
cheaper baht. 

Higher interest rates — 
needed to prop up the currency 
— are likely to stifle economic 
growth and create a credit 
crunch, Mr. Bhaskaran said. 
In addition, a weaker baht will 
raise the coSt of imports and 
the cost of living, he said. 

“There will be a big hit to 
consumption activity, which 
will hit the economy,” he 
said. "You will get inflation 
rising and a wider current- 
account deficit” 

Mr. Bhaskaran said the cen- - 
tral bank was likely to stick to 
a tight monetary policy "to 
prevent problems from spiral- 
ing out of control,” adding 
that he was “cautious about 
the Thai market” 

“I still see many unpleasant 


surprises coming through,” 
he said. 

Mr. Bhaskaran said that 
among Southeast Asian cur- 
rencies, the Philippine peso 
was * ‘the most vulnerable' ' to 
speculative attack. 

The Philippines raised in- 
terest rates Wednesday to de- 
fend the currency, with the 
benchmark overnight bor- 
rowing rate at 24 percent from 
15 percent the previous day. 

“Thailand's structural 
problems may be worse than 
those of other Asian econo- 
mies,” wrote David Roche of 
the consultancy Independent 
Strategy, “but they are symp- 
tomatic of a general illness in 
the region. The worst may be 
over for Thailand. The trouble 
is only beginning for East 
Asia.” (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


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PAGE 22 


Knicks Keep Ewing 


basketball Patrick Ewing has 
re-signed with the New York 


Knicks in a four-year deal believed 
to be worth 565 million. 

The pact makes Ewing the 
second-highest-paid center annu- 
ally, behind Snaquille O'Neal of 
the Los Angeles Lakers. 

To create salary-cap room for 
themselves after 2000, the Knicks 
front-loaded the contract consid- 
erably. Ewing will most likely 
make 520 million his first season, 
518 million the second season and 
split the remaining $27 million over 
the final two seasons. (NYT) 

• The former European basket- 
ball champions Panathinaikos 
signed the NBA veteran Byron 
Scott on Thursday. The team said it 
paid $1.5 million for the 36-year- 
old guard who last played for the 
Vancouver Grizzlies and won three 
NBA titles with the Lakers in the 
1980s. { Reuters ) 


Waugh Battles On 


cricket Steve Waugh made a 
defiant 102 not out for Australia on 
Thursday, the opening day of the 
third test against England in Man- 
chester. 

Dean Headley, a fast bowler 
making his test debut for England, 
took three wickets, as Australia 
slipped to 160 runs for seven wick- 
ets. But Waugh and Paul Reiffel 
took Australia to 224 runs for seven 
wickets at the close. ( Reuters ) 


Tyson Hearing Next Week 


boxing The disciplinary hear- 
ing for Mike Tyson has been sched- 
uled for Wednesday morning in Las 
Vegas. Tyson had the right to delay 
the hearing for a month, but late 
Wednesday he returned a waiver 
that allowed it to be set for next 
week. (AP) 


Hong Kong's Games Spot 


Olympics The International 
Olympic Committee agreed Thurs- 
day that Hong Kong will continue 
to compete as a separate entity in 
international sports following the 
territory's return to Chinese sov- 
ereignty. 

Under an agreement signed by 
Juan Antonio Samaranch, the com- 
mittee's president, and A. de O. 
Sales, president of the Hong Kong 
Olympic Committee, Hong Kong 
will be known as Hong Kong- 
China. It will fly its own flag, and 
the Chinese national anthem will be 
played for flag-raising and victory 
ceremonies. t.AP} 

• George Weah scored as the 
FIFA World team beat an Asian all- 
star team Thursday, 5-3, in the Re- 
unification Cup, marking Hong 
Kong's return to China. (AFP) 




• ‘ i’.’ ’ . ". ' w 




Dylan Maninc//Rri*m 

Brazil's Dunga shooting for 
the World team in Hong Kong. 


Perec Pulls Out 


athletics Marie Jose Perec, 
France's dual Olympic champion, 
said she would not defend her 400- 
meter world title at the world cham- 
pionships in Athens after she fin- 
ished second in the 200 meters at 
Lausanne on Wednesday. (AFP) 


Scoreboard 


Sports 


FRIDAY, JULY 4»199? 


Mc< 


World Roundup 


Becker Abdicates and Bids Wimbledon Adieu 


British Men Also Lose; 
Hingis Makes Her Final 


By Ian Thomsen 

Irucrnaiiotul Herald Tribune 


W IMBLEDON, England — The 
applause at Centre Court has a 
special soothing effect, it was 
splashing around Boris Becker as gently 
as a waterfall as he met Pete Sampras at 
the net What had been a fairly straight- 
forward, quarterfinal victory for Sampras 
turned quickly, quietly into a traditional 
English ceremony, a coronation, or per- 
haps an abdication. 

‘ *1 told him this was my last match, and 
that it was an honor dial I played it against 
him,” said Becker. 29. In effect, he 
turned Centre Court and all its traditions 
over for the American to uphold. 

Becker said he will not play at 
Wimbledon again. He had not yet de- 
cided whether he will enter the U.S. 
Open next month in New York, but his 
Grand Slam career will end this season. 
“I just can't handle the strain of the two- 
week tournaments anymore,” he said. 

He did not say how much longer he 
will play in the normal, one-week ATP 
Tour events. “I kind of walked to my 
chair after the match, stunned for him,” 
said the 25-year-old Sampras after his 6- 
1,6-7 (5-7), 6-1, 6-4 victory. 

“Wimbledon and Boris went togeth- 
er, this was where he made his mark. I 
felt kind of honored in a way that I was 
his last match. I felt Boris was a class act 
on and off the court.” 

Wimbledon was rejuvenated by 
Becker a dozen years ago, when as a 17 
year old he became the youngest and one 
of the most charismatic champions ever 
seen on the grass courts of the world's 
oldest, most elegant tournament 
As he grew in stature it seemed to 
become more and more important that 
he uphold the timeless values of his 
favorite tournament He identified with 
it and it became identified with him. In 
the meantime tennis grew in popularity 
around the German market effectively 
created by Becker and Steffi Graf, the 
seven-time Wimbledon ladies champi- 
on who is herself considering retirement 
after undergoing recent knee surgery. 

Becker leaves Wimbledon with three 
singles titles — in 1985, 1986 and 1989 
— plus two Australian Open titles and 
one from the US Open. 

Less than two weeks ago, when the 
new No. 1 court was opened with a 
ceremony honoring great Wimbledon 
champions, Becker seemed especially 


proud to have been involved. In ret- 
rospect he could be seen taking in his 
surroundings and his place in the game. 
Throughout the fortnight he had seemed 
especially devout in Jus preparations to 
win one last time. He had not lost a set 
before his climactic meeting with 
Sampras, who had beaten him 10 times 
in their 17 matches, with Sampras hav- 
ing won both of their previous matches 
at Wimbledon. 

Sampras broke No. 8 seed Becker’s 
serve in the opening game. Four games 
later the match was suspended for al- 
most three hours because of rain. During 
the delay Becker could be seen, oddly, 
sitting alone in the Royal Box, reading 
what appeared to be a paperback copy of 
* ‘The Fight, ’ ' Norman Mailer's account 
of Muhammad Alt's upset of George 
Foreman 22 years ago in Zaire. 

“At that moment obviously, you 
have many ideas, but I was still trying to 
think about the match, because I ob- 
viously knew that it could be my last 
one,” Becker said later. “In the locker 
room it was so busy, and everywhere 
was so busy, that I wanted to have a 
moment where I could have peace of 
mind and just think a little bit” 




B ECKER EVENED the match by 
winning the last three points of 
the second-set tiebreaker. The 
key points had come against Sampras' 
second serve, and the American grew 
determined not to let that happen again. 
He ruthlessly provided Becker no open- 
ings and little hope for the rest of the 
match, and in so doing made it clear that 
he will be favored Friday and Sunday to 
finish off his fourth Wimbledon title in 
five years. Sampras has won 88 straight 
service games in this tournament, since 
losing his service in the second game of 
his opening match last week. 

“That was it for me,” Becker said. “I 
think it's a very good moment right now. 
I just don't feel I have it anymore, what it 
takes to win a Grand-Slam. I feel like I 
had a very good year this year, I played 
good in my early rounds, and to come up 
against Pete in die quarterfinal and how 
the match went. I realized I just don't 
have it anymore, what it takes to go all the 
way and win a championship like diaL" 
Becker’s German rival, Michael Stich, 
the 1991 Wimbledon champion, plans to 
retire entirely from the sport On Thurs- 
day, Stich methodically knocked out die 
favorite of the British, No. 14 Tim Hen- 



ing semifinal of Stich against Ptofine, - 
while Sampras might have some troable : 
devoting himself to a semifinal against . 


die unexpected Todd Woodbridge, 26 
years old from Australia, who, before 
this week had never made it past a Grand 
Slam round -of- 16. The pe^le filgj oat. 
of the Wimbledon grounds late -Thurs- 
day as if one of those rare perfectsum- 
mers had ended before they knew it and - 
tomorrow it was back to work. 

The ladies tournament has gone metre 
closely to form, in the absence of Graf. 
No. I seed Martina Hingis of Switzer- 
land reached her first Wfrnbkxba 
singles final with a 6-3, 6-2 victory 
Friday over Anna Kournikova of Russia. . 
The two 16-year-okls broke each" otter 
through the opening six games wteanr: 
Hingis threw a little tantrum, as well as 
her racket Thereafter she was efficiently, 
unstoppable. Her opponent, who-re^ 
placed Hingis as the junior world Nc>.‘l 1 
two years ago, was able to hold serve jest 
once overall. No. 42 Kournikova was the 
first Wimbledon debutante to reach tfre 
semifinal since Chris Evert in 1972.; . ■ ■ 
Hingis now becomes the first teenaged 
finalist at Wimbledon since Steffi Graf 
won her initial title in 1988, when she " 
was 19. Hingis will become the youngest 
Wimbledon singles champion of the’ 
Open era if she wins her final agamst No. 1 
3 Jana Novotna, who won the latest 
ins tallme nt of her bitter rivalry with No. 

8 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario 6-4 6-2" 
Court No. 1 turned out td be an 
abatoir for the British gentlesnea hopes. , 
Henman was never able to challenge 
Stich. ' 

“What makes it so frustrating is that 
24 hours agol was playing.some of the 
best tennis of my career,’’. Henman said, 
recalling his upset of No. 4 Richard 
Krajicek, the defending champion. 

‘ ‘Now I’m talking to you having played 
some of the worst tennis of my career. ” 
Said Rusedski, ‘ ‘l was just fatigued, I 
played something like 21 matches in die 1 
last three and a half weeks.- Even Cedric 
at the end of the match was aiding me if 
I was all right out there.” . . 

Though Rusedski was buoyed for the 
lad few weeks by his adoptive British 
audiences, but Pioline operates under 
different mores. He was raised cm clay- 
courts, and his hometown is host to the 
greatest clay-court tournament in the 
world Yet Pioline has built himself a 
better record on the grass courts of the 
enemy to the north, where do Frenchman 
is ever quite happy. He reached Wimble- 
don quarterfinals in 1993 and 1995, los- 
ing to Stefan Edbeig and Becker. 

“I don’t like everything, but, I mean, 

I feel comfortable to play here,” said 
Pioline. He declined to list the things he 
doesn't like about England’s -most fa: 
mous sporting event “It’s too long.’.’ - 




Frock l-mrii/du Ajmer Fraact-PttT-e 

Martina Hingis turning away after bouncing her racket on the ground 
in frustration Thursday during her victory over Anna Kournikova. 


man, with a 6-3, 6-2, 6-4 quarterfinal 
victory. Earlier, the other Briton. Greg 
Rusedski was escorted out of the 


Instead of one last Becker triumph or 
the an all-British semifinal, Wimbledon 
has three unseeded men semi final i sts for 


quarterfinal by the Frenchman Cedric the first time since 1967. Centre Court 


Pioline, who won 6-4. 4-6, 6-4, 6-3. 


will have to live with an unprepossess- 


Tour de France: This Year, Nobody’s Scared 

Classic Starts Saturday With Many Candidates for the Yellow Jersey 


By Samuel Abt 

/nurnatioruil Herald Tribune 


PARIS — Jacques Anquetil was the 
first of four champions to win the Tour 
de France a record five times, and this 
year’s edition of the world’s greatest 
bicycle race will honor him. Before it 
starts Saturday in Rouen, the city in 
Normandy and his hometown, the race 
will commemorate his first victory in 
the Tour 40 years ago and his death a 
decade ago at the age of 53. 

Like Eddy Merckx. Bernard Hinault 
and Miguel Indurain, who matched his 
record of five victories, Anquetil was 
the dominant racer of his time. In the 
late 1950s and 1960s. his formula was 
basic: Stay with the best climbers in the 
mountains, and demolish the field in 
time trials. 

Indurain followed that model in the 
1990s. To a degree so had the other two. 
more all-around riders — Merckx, in the 
late 1960s and early '70s. and Hinault 
in the late ’70s and ’80s. All of them had 
only to show up for the Tour and the 
only battle, as Hinault once put it was 
for second place. 

Those days seem to be over for now. 
The 84th Tour de France is generally 
rated a wide-open affair because Bjame 
Riis. last year's winner, scares almost 
nobody. 


For one thing, there is Riis ’s age — in 
April, the Dane turned 33. about the age 
that most other top riders, including 
Indurain, retire. For another, there is his 
record — until last year, Riis was a 
support rider whose brightest feat was 
third place in the 1 995 Tour. 

Finally, there is his lack of results this 
season — other than an impressive vic- 
tory in the one-day Amstel Gold Race, 
the leader of the Telekom team from 
Germany has been simply a face in the 
crowd. 

He was that last year, too, of course, 
before he turned the Anquetil formula 
upside down and stayed with the Tour’s 
best in the time trials before dominating 
them in the mountains. So, nobody is 
writing him off as a one-time wonder, 
but nobody is demonstrating much fear, 
either. 

Ivan Gotti, for example, finished first 
in the Giro d’ Italia last month and 
changed his schedule to ride also in the 
Tour de France. 

His Italian team. Saeco, maintains he 
can win. 

Just as confident is the Festina team, 
based in France , with two trumps to play: 
Richard Virenque and Laurent Dufaux. 
third and fourth in the last Tour. 

Then, there is Banesto. based in 
Spain, whose hope is Abraham Olano, 
Indurain ’s successor Rabobank, based 


in the Netherlands, whose leader will be 
Peter Luttenberger La Francaise des 
Jeux, from France, with the dark horse 
Davide Rebel tin, and ONCE, from 
Spain, with Alex Zulle and Laurent 
JalaberL 

Even Telekom has a candidate for the 
leader’s yellow jersey if its ace, Riis, 
falters. That would be Jan Ullrich, the 
23-year-old wunderkind who finished 
second in the 1996 Tour. 

Except for perhaps Jalabert and Re- 
beliin, each of these contenders is a 
proven power in the high mountains. 
Nobody less can win this Tour, which in 
three weeks will cover about 3,870 ki- 
lometers (2.400 miles) and, after the 
Fust week on the flat, will include two 
trying days in the Pyrenees (July 14 and 
15) and three in the Alps (July 19, 20 
and 21). 

In all, there will be 27 major climbs 
and 3 of the 2 1 daily stages will end at 
altitude — in other words, on a long and 
steep grade uphill. 

The first of two big time trials, or 
individual races against the clock, is 
also favorable to climbers. It will come 
near the midway point. July 1 8. after the 
Tour’s one day off, and traverse 55 
kilometers wiih a sharp 14-kilometer 
rise a third of the way through. The 
second time trial will cover 63 fiat ki- 
lometers on July 26, a day before the 



BRITAIN 


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counterclockwise race around France 
ends in Paris. 

Offering 1 2 million French francs (52 
million) in prizes, the organizers of the 


N.Y. Times News Service 

Tour have selected 22 teams of nine 
men each. At the moment, there does 
not appear to be an Anquetil among 
them. 


Major League Standings 


UUHUNLIMn 

EAST DIVISION 



W 

L 

PcL 

GB 

BcMimre 

S3 

27 

462 


New York 

46 

35 

J68 

7’.<r 

Toronto 

38 

41 

.481 

14‘y 

Detroit 

38 

43 

■475 

15 

Boston 

37 

45 

451 

17 


CENTRAL DIVISION 



Cleveland 

41 

36 

.53? 



Chicago 

40 

41 

494 

3 

Milwaukee 

37 

43 

468 

5 

Kansas Qty 

36 

43 

456 

6 

Minnesota 

35 

46 

433 

8 


WESTDMSKM 



Seattle 

48 

35 

-578 



Anaheim 

42 

40 

.512 

5V, 

Texas 

40 

41 

494 

7 

Oakland 

36 

49 

473 

13 




EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Atkmto 

54 

39 

451 



Florida 

49 

33 

598 

*•/. 

Montreal 

46 

36 

-361 

7-. 

New York 

45 

37 

549 

Sb 

PMaddphia 

23 

58 

284 

30 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



SI. Louis 

41 

41 

500 



Houston 

41 

43 

488 

1 

Pittsburgh 

39 

43 

476 

2 

Cincinnati 

36 

46 

439 

S 

Chicago 

34 

49 

4IQ 

r. 


WEST DIVISION 



Son Francisco 47 

36 

566 



Colorado 

43 

41 

512 

4'-, 

Los Angeles 

41 

43 

494 

6 

Son Diego 

37 

46 

446 

10 


wnuMr-s UNUCOW 

INTER LEAGUE 

MttwmdBM 000 130 001-4 6 I 

CineiMti 100 310 20*— 7 12 0 


B_Mc Donald, Adamson (5). Fetters (6). 
VBtone 171. Wkkinan (7) owl Mamenv. Lrvb 
17}; Tomka Sulfivan (7 ) and J. Oliver. 
W— Tomka 5-1. L— B. McDonald. b-i. 
Sv— Sulfivan nj. HR — Milwaukee. Bomlb 

nzi. 

A AflflTa Ml 001 000-2 7 0 

New York (AU 000 000 000-0 ] 0 

GJMaddinr and EddJ’rra. Gooden. Lloyd 

(8) , Nelson |B) and Qrordu W— G Maddux 
11-3. L— Goodwv 3 1. HP.— Atlanta. Klesko 
(141. 

New York (NU 100 011 121-7 14 1 

Detrvfl 011 301 121-9 10 2 

MOckL Acevedo (6), McMichacl <81 and A. 
CastlOa Hundey (8); Bknr. Sager (*], M. 
Myers (7). MKtfi 171. To Jones IBt and 
B Johnson, Casanova (91. W— Stair. 5 - 4 . 
L— MEcfci, 4-7. Sv— ToJones (It). 

HRs— Detroit TaCiarft 171}, Easiov ri3). 
Nieves nil. 

Kansas aty 000 000 IIO—2 9 0 

Ottawa (NU OIO 020 DO*— 3 9 2 

Appier, Ptefmrdo (7} and MocJarlame; 
Foster. Patterson (71. Butterfield Oi, ft 0 |as 

(9) and Servais. W— faster. 10-5 L— Appier. 

6-4. — Rojos (71. HR — Chicago. Sosa 11 71. 
Oakland 100 060 100-0 12 0 

San Francisco 010 000 000—1 5 O 

Oqulst. D. Johnson (Sj. Groom (71 and 
Go.WilUans: Butter. Cartoon (51. Poole (71 
and Jensen. W— O Johnson. 3-0 L— Poet or. 
5-3. Sv— Groom |3). HRs— Oaklanl 

McGwire (30). 5ptezic (El. Behsto (3;. Son 
Franccca Snow trot. 

Philadelphia Ml 103 030—4 12 0 

Baltimore 101 002 42*— 10 10 D 

Stephenson. Spradlin (4|, Brower tn. 
flahohro (81 ana Lieberthal- Kamieniecku 
Rhodes (6). Tejvia thews (9) and Laker. 
WebslerlBl.W— Rhodes. 5-3. L— Spradlin I- 
4. HRs— Philadelphia, Rolen 2 1101, Amora 
(2}. Lieberthal (II). Baltimore. R. Alamo' fB), 
R Palmeiro flSi, Hammonds 111}. 

Chicago (ALJ M0 DM 001—1 6 2 

Pittsburgh 010 007 OOx-J 1 i 

Havana T. Castillo !Ei and Fobrcrjc-i; 


Schmidt and KendaO. w— Schmidt 4-4. 
L — Neva no, 6-7. HR — Pittsburgh. Svcum 

(4i. 

Colorado IDO 900 000—1 4 1 

Texas ON 510 031—9 12 1 

Thomson. Dgwto (61. Scott IB). McCarty 
(8> and Je.Reed; Burkett and I. Rodriguez. 
W— Burkett 6-7. L— Thomsorw 2-6. 

Florida 003 000 000—3 5 1 

Boston Oil 000 BOO— 2 B 2 

KJ.Bramn, F. Heredia (71, Powefl iBl. Nen 
(91 and Zaun. Gordon Hudson (9) and 
Hottetwg. Stanley (9). W—KJ. Brown. 8-5. 
L— Gordon, 5-7. Sv— Nen 134). HR— Boston. 
Stanley (9). 

Ovetond 0M 003 000-2 10 1 

Houston 100 050 OQx— 4 10 I 

Hershoe* Merman 15), Ptunk (6), 
Asscnmachcr (81 and S. Ataman Hampton 
and Ausmus. w— Hampton, 4-7. 

L— Hershtser, 7-5. 

Minnesota 010 0M 000 O—l 5 O 

St. Lears 1D0 ON NO 1—2 ID 0 

TrvAsbury, Fr.Rodnqiiaz (71. Guardado 
(10) and SremborJt AI.Benes. Petkovsek (9) 
and DHeffcc W-Peflwwek, 4-4. 

L— Guardado. 0-3. HRs— Minnesota 

Srahoviak C5). St. Lous. /McGee (3). 

MontMd 010 300 200 M0 0-4 IO 1 

Toronto MO 031 000 OM 1—7 15 O 

D 2 innings) 

Hennanson D. Veres (5). M. Voldes (71. U 
Smith nil. Teflord 113), Urtrma (13) and 
'.VidW Person. 5pol)onc (Bl. QucnlriB (91. 
Plesac (10). Timlin (10) and B. Santiago. 
W— Tbnlirt 3-0. L— TeHord. 7-7. 

HRs — Montreal Sequi (71, V. Guerrero 15). 
Toronto. Carter no*. CDeigode (16). 

S«rtte 110 001 802— S 12 1 

Sen Diego 101 210 03*— 8 n a 

Fassera Man/anilo 16). Charlton (7), S. 
Sanders (8) aid Da. Wi tore JJHomHtoa 
Tt.VJoireO (8). Hoffman 19) and Flaherty. 
* v — J- Ha minors 6-3. L — Fossern. 6-4. 

'Seattle Sorrento (16). R Davis (12), E. 
Marfcnei 'Ml Son Dreqo. Henderson (41, 
Gom« |£ | 


Lai Angelas 008 310 011-5 14 3 

AimMu 120 000 010-4 10 4 

Part Guthrie 16). Ho» (81, Rodinsly (8). 
To-WoneO (9) and Prince Dickson. James 
(7), Hottz (8). Perdval (9) and Leyritz. 
W— Radinsky, 3-1. L— Pcrovol 2 j. 

Sv— To.WorreO (18). HRs — Las Angeles. 
Karros (191. Anohefan, PhOlips 14). 


Pint Bass — Jell BagwoA Houston Astros 
Second Bose— Craig Biggia Houston 
Shortstop— Bony Lnridrv GodniKdi 
mini Base— Ken Cammlh. Son Diego 
Outfield — Kenny Lofton. Atlanta 
Ouffldd — Lorry Waflusr, Colorado 
Outfield — Tony Gwynn San Dtoqo 


PACnC LEAGUE 

Soibu 4. Ota 3. 11 innings 


Rosier* lor nan Tuesday’s major league 
Att-BW Game el Jacobs Field in ChntaaidL 
Inflowing the na ming at pitchers end re- 
serves by die Alt-Star managers on Wednes- 
day: 

JURGTUCJUI LEAGUE 
STARTERS 

Cotchor — Ivon Rodriguez. Toms 
RretBose — Tlno Martinez. New York 
Second Base — Roberta Alomar, Baltimore 
Shortstop — Alai Rodriguez, Seattle 
Third Base — CalRIpkea Baltimore 
Oatfiefd — Ken Gnfley Junior, Seattle 
Outfield — David Justins Cleveland 
OirtfteM — BiodyAnricnan, BMttmare 
Designated Hlttar— Edgar Mortlnez, Seattle 
RESERVES 

Catchers — Sandy Alomar, Cleveland 
Infielden — Jeff CMBa MOwauVn 38: Joey 
Cora. Seattle, 2B. Nontar Garaaparra, 
Boston. SV Chuck Knoblauch. Minnesota 
2& Mark McGwire, Oakland. IBi Frank 
Thomas, dttaiga IBi 

OuffioUen — Albert Berio. Ovcnga- Bcndc 
WU&ama New York. 

Pttchrrs— Jason Dickson. Anaheim. Jimmy 
Key. Baltimore (X). Mike Mussina Balt- 
more; Randy Myers. Baltimore Jusitn 
ThanpMit Dehod, Jose Rosada Kansas, 
□avid Cone. New Yortu Mariano Rivera New 
York,- Randy Johnson. Seattle Roger 
OemcfB, Toronta Pat Hetdqen. Toronto Blue 
Jays. 

tXi — Invited to team hut declined Invi- 
latnn 

NATO HAL LEAGUE 
STARTERS 

Catcher —Mike Piazza Los Angeles 


Catchers— Todd Hundley, New York; Jovicr 
Lopez. Atlanta 

hi Bei ders— JeH Blauser. Atlanta 55; Andres 
Galarraga Colorado. 1 B; Mark Grace. Chica- 
go. IB. Chipper Jones. Atlanta 3B- 
Tony Womack. Pittsburgh- 
OoTHeMers — Motscs Alan. Florid® Barry 
Bonds. San Franasco; Ray LanktanL 51. 
Louis. 

Pitchers— TomGlavine. Aflonta Greq Mad- 
dux Altmria; Denny Ncogta A BanJa Kevin 
Brown Florida- Darryl Kite. Houston Pedro 
Martinez. Montreal; Bobby Jones. New York; 
Curt ScMOng. Philadelphia: Rod Beck. San 
Franasca Shown Eslca San Franosco. 


DKMJWD VS AOSnUlUA 
THIRD TEST. FIRST DAT 
THURSDAY. M MANCHESTER. ENGLAND 
Australia: 274-7 


Japanese Leagues 


CMIMIiUMIII 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

.GB 

YakuD 

45 

34 

0 

45? 

— 

Hiroshima 

34 

31 

0 

523 

V 

Ha ratlin 

34 

34 

0 

500 

10'. 

Yokohama 

10 

35 

0 

.462 

13 

.ChumctM 

30 

38 

0 

441 

>4' ■ 

Yomiuri 

79 

40 

1) 

420 

16 

MOFKUAOM 




W 

L 

T 

Pci 

.GB 

on* 

37 

23 

1 

415 

— 

Setbu 

16 

39 

3 

552 

5', 

Dora 

38 

32 

0 

543 

4 

Nippon Ham 

33 

36 

0 

.478 

8v, 

Kmtetsu 

37 

39 

1 

410 

13 

Lotto 

26 

38 

2 

.409 

13 


CROUP A. M KARL5KROOA. SWEDEN 
Sweden 1. Spain 0 

STAMMOS: Sweden 6 points; France 4 
Spain I; Russia 0. 

CROUP R.M KARLSTAD. SWEDEN 
France 3. Russia ! 

STAMMNC8: Norway 3 points; Germany 
Holy 1: Denmark 0. 

UUWFKJOTOH COP 
THURSDAY. M HONG ItONa 
FIFA World Team 5. Asian AD-Slara 3 


Mkhaol Stich, Germany, det Thn Henman. 
(14) Britobv 6-1 6-2, 6-4. 

MOM'S DOWHJHi 

QUAHTERFWAL8 

Wayne Blade Zimbabwe, and Jim Grubb. 
United States, def. Donald Johnson, United 
Slates, and Francisco Montana (12). U rated 
States. M, *- 1, 6-2. 

Martin Damns Czech Republic and Pavel 
Vlzncr (13), Czech Republic del. NeB Broad. 
Britain and Piet NarvaKl I ), South Africa 4- 
b 44.7-6 (7-3). 6-4. 6-1. 

Todd Woodbridge. Ausrtrafla. and Mark 
Woodforde (1). Australia def. Jonas Bjork- 
man, Sweden, and Nicttos Kuttt TO. Sweden. 
MU6104. 


pimaunaK— Purchased contract at OF 
Tumor Word Calgary, PCL Dcsjgnaled OF 
Mldra Cummings (or assignmant. 

SAN dieoo— Ad hrated INF Cndg Shipley 
from 15-day disabled fist Optioned INF Jorge 
Vehmdia la Los Vegas, PCL - 
SAN frakckco— Optioned RHP Dan Carl- 
son hi Phoenh. PCL Recalled LHP Doug 
Creek ham Phoenix. 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCUnOH 

L05 AMGELES-WahMd G Teny Dehere. Re- 
nounced rights to C Dwayne Schlnttrus. 

NEW romc— SJoned C Patrick Ewing to 4- 
year contract. 

PMiJEHtXr-Re-sig«ed C-F Maik Bryan) In 
2-year contract. 

san anton to— Re-signed G Avery Johnson 
to 3-year contract. 

to nanTO— Re-signed F Wbfl Wiflkims. 


Wimbledon 


women's swa m 


THUASDAVS msuira 

CENTRAL LEAGUE 

Yomnm ■, YoXutt 2 
Yokohama I. ChvmcM 0 


Mortina Hingis m. Swlbcriand- del Anna 
Kournikova Russia, 6-1 6-2. 

Jono Novotna 13), Creth Rf.-puMic. dot. 
Arantxa Sanchez Vlcorio (8). Spain, o- a. 6-2. 

MM’ssmaiK 

QUARTERFINALS 

Cedric Pwiine, France, def. Greg Rinathki. 
Britain. A- 4. 4664 4-3. 

I odd Woodhndge, Ainlmha del Nicolas 
t letar. C-eimany, T-6 17-7). 2 -a t-Q, 6 4. 

P«e Sampras (II, llnifudStatcj. del. Bom 
Becker (Bl. Gctmany.a-1.4 ) (5 -7)-6.l.6-4 


ANERICAM LEAGUE 

anaheim — P ut RHP Mike James on 15- 
dav disabled its). Recoded C Todd Greene 
from Vancouver, PCL 

CLEVELAND-Oaimed LHP Casey Whitten 
oH waivers tram Kansas City and designated 
nkn tar assignment. 

new ymk— O ptioned OF Scott Pose la 
Cohimbux. ILActivatod OF Bemie Wiffiams 
tram 15-doy rteabfcd Ibt. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

NL—Suspcndcd Montreal Expos IB David 
Segui lor I game and fined an iMKSsclosed 
amount lor charging mound m Florida Iasi 
Saturday 

co umado— Readied RHP Jamey Wnold 
(ram Cotoiadn Springs. PCL 

Florida— Aaivaied INF Ale* Arias from 
1 5- day disabled fist. Scat INF C tires KiopmsW 

toChailotlc.lL 

MONTREOL-Pecqllcd 3B Doi« Strange 
hom Ottawa. IL Oalwned INF Jose Vidro to 
Ottawa 

" B " -Signed LHP Geoffrey Goetz 
and Mm* proctor and assigned them ta 
McKOCl 


MA7KMXAL FOOTBALL LEAOUB 
Wiffald— R e-signed LB Mom Maddox, 
an cm nati -S igned LB AndreCaOns lo 1- 
yearcontrad. 

Pll VSVU8CH— T raded RB Erik Pegram tn 
5on Diego Chargers tor 1999 7-round draff 
choice. 


NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 

RMTON-Signed D Daw EBei? to 3-year- 
contracL 

CAROUHA-Namad WDfiam Hawkins and 
Susan Schmidt account executives tor mu- 
kettng department. 

DALLAS — Signed G Ed Bettour to 3-year 
contract. 

hew YORK islanders— S toned C Sergo; 
Nem dilnov and C Clmnte Lapointe on 3- year 
contracts. Renewed ir affiliation wttti Utah of 
IHL 

NEW YORK ranccrs— N omcd Don Mal- 
oney assrilanl general monoger and Marlin 
Madden director oi scouting 

phoenix— Signed F Mike Stapleton to 2- 
y«Kcortroct. 

sr. iDurs-Fired Bab Betty, ossisfant gen- 
eral manager. ^ 




.adiftomKtt 

«sssti 

park. ^ 

j? lhe"All-Slt 
^ondio4o« 
^rheorha-- 
McGwire 
^oth career *K 
^ fifth inning 
rie -ivith Johnny 
L all-time Iis) 
••It was a & 

said- who in H 
£ 411-Star b 

^icr,with49 

oat into the je« 
-- McGwire ai 
team Wedtoejd 
3 ger. Joe Totrc 
men as tea* 
Chicago s mn 
Reds 7, ■*• 
ended the vrorsi 
for-26 — with i 
fourth inning 


NEW YORi 
jitok much lfl 
much less the n 
mg pitcher in 
what v^ith a b« 
ginning to crop 
uniform and tb 
view of any rm 
.And when 
dons his post- 
he looks as if 
much more cc 
ting behind a 
nondescript off 
siead of standir 
sands of people 
' mound every fi 
i L«toks. so th 
| can be deceivin 
I ImJemoredece 
of Maddux’s 
hour fasrballs. 

Thus — as 
bore witness ? 
| whether he loo 
1 not. Maddux is 
almost always 
tollable. 

Locked in 
Dwight Gooc 
former Nation; 
Young Award 
took Maddux o. 
c m 2 hours and 
dispose of the ^ 
Braves’ 2-0 vie 
Sixty-five o. 
were strikes, 2 
the first-pitch, 3 
old Atlanta righ 
surrendered tin 
all faced 28 b 
over the minim 







OONNl 




4@ahr 


GlDlNO 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY ■*, 1997 


PAGE 23 


SPORTS 


u 


K1997 


Pioline, 
ne trouble 
&1 against 
Jridge, 26 
bo before 
st a Grand 
e filed out 
tie Thurs- * 
rfect sum- Jfr 
new it and 


'one more 
e of Graf, 
f Switzer- 
r unbledon 
-2 victory 
of Russia, 
iach other 
nes when 
as wel) as 
efficiently 
who re- 
orldNo. 1 
I serve just 
va' was the 
• reach the 
1972. 
ftteenaged 
iteffi Graf 
when she 
s youngest 
)D of the 
gainst No. 
the latest 
y with No. 
4 6-2 ' 
to be an 
leu hopes, 
challenge 


d 

e 


\ t 




mg is that 
mho of the 
nman said, 

4 Richard 
champion, 
ing played 
iy career.'” 
fatigued, I 
chesinfbe 
i^en Cedric 
tong me if 

yed for the 
ive, British 
ates under 
s d on clay- 
host to the 
snt in the 
himself a 
urts of the 
frenchman 
d Wimble- 
1995. los- 
:kCT. 

ut, I mean, 
:ere,” said 
e things he 
sr most fa- 
io long." ' 


f 




RMANV 


imbourg 


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1 swrvz. 
=rlbourg 

n.' 

iourctioval 

L’AJpe 

d'Huez 

ITALY 

V 


'ft 


% 


McGwire Clubs 30th Homer in A 5 s Victory 


The Associated Press 

Mark McGwire became the first 
.player to hit 30 borne runs this season. 
.- and he did it with flair. 

McGwire shanked a low, outside 

g 'tSch from Kirk Rueter into the right- 
rid stands in Oakland's 8-1 victory 
over the San Francisco Giants on 
Wednesday. 

- Backed by a brisk wind at 3Com 
Pare, the ball shot into the seats as 
McGwire became only the 10th ma- 
jdr-Ieague player to reach 30 homers 
- .i &y tbe All-Star break, and just the 
3fc. second to do it twice. Willie Stargell 
1 was the other. 

'-McGwire's three-run shot,* his 
359th career homer, highlighted a six- 
run fifth inning and moved him into a 
tie with Johnny Mize for 43d place on 
the all-time list. 

“It was a golf swing,” McGwire 
.. said, who in 1987 had 33 homers by 
tire All-Star break and finished the 
season with 49. “When I hit it, it just 
got into the jet stream and took off.” 
McGwire also made the All-Star 
team Wednesday when the AL man- 
ager, loe Torre, chose two first base- 
men as reserves — McGwire and 
Chicago’s Frank Thomas. 

■Ms 7, Drawers 4 Bret Boone 
ended the worst slump of career — 0- 
for-26 — with a two-run single in the 
- fourth inning to snap a 1-1 tie as 


compli 

game sweep of the season. 

Tig*** 9 , autc 7 Detroit pounded 
three more homers against New York, 
giving the Tigers a total of 14 in their 
three-game sweep of the Mets. Tony 

Basiiau Roundup 

Clark hit his 21st homer off the Tiger 
Stadium roof, and Damion Easley and 
Melvin Nieves added round trippers. 

Cubs 3, Royals 2 In Chicago. 
Sammy Sosa drove in two runs with 
his 17th homer and a run-scoring 
groundout. and Kevin Foster (10-5) 
pitched 616 strong innings. 

Oriohw to, PMffios6 President Bill 
Clinton came to Camden Yards, but 
he left before Jeff Reboulet snapped a 
tie with a three- run double in the 
seventh that carried Baltimore to a 
sweep of Philadelphia. 

Scon Rolen hit two homers and 
Ruben Amaro and Mike Leiberthal 
also homered for the Phillies, who 
have lost a season-high nine straight 
and 17 of 18. 

Martins 3, Red Sex 2 Felix Heredia, 
struck out Reggie Jefferson with the 
bases loaded in the seventh to pre- 
serve Florida’s second victory in its 
three-game series in Boston. 

The Marlins sewed their runs in the 
third on two walks, a two-run single 


by Edgar Renteria and a single by 
Gary Sheffield. 

Blue Jays 7, Expo* 6 In Toronto, Joe 
Carter ended an 0-for-16 slump with a 
three-mn homer in the fifth and then 
gave Toronto the victory with a two- 
out single in the 13th. Carter’s 1 15th 
career homer at the Skydome was his 
first to right field. 

The Expos won the opening two 
games of the first series between 
Canada's two major league teams. 

Pirates 3, white Sox i Dale Sveum 
homered and drove in two runs, and 
Jason Schmidt pitched a five-hitter as 
Pittsburgh completed its first three- 
game sweep of the season. 

Rangers 9. Rockies i John Burkett 
pitched a four-hitter, and Damon 
Buford’s bases-loaded double high- 
lighted a five-run fourth as Texas beat 
visiting Colorado. 

Buford was hitless in his last 2 1 al- 
bats before his liner to center sailed 
over the head of Quinton McCracken 
and gave the Rangers a 5-1 lead. 

Larry Walker went 0-for-4, drop- 
ping his average to .397, the lowest it 
has been since May 26. 

Cardinals 2 , Twins 1 In St. Louis, 
WiUie McGee's homer with one out 
in the 1 0th inning gave the Cardinals a 
sweep of Minnesota. 

St. Louis, which has won 10 of its 
last 12 games, reached die .500 mark 


for the first time after starting the 
season 0-6. 

Astras 6, Indians 2 In Houston, 

pitcher Mike Hampton hit a two-run 
triple in a five-run fifth to help his own 
cause, and the Astros avoided a three- 
game sweep by Cleveland. Sandy 
Alomar went 3-for-4, extending his 
hitting streak to 28 games, the longest 
in the major leagues this season. 

Padm a. Mariners 5 Tony Gwynn 
went 2-for-4 with a run-scoring 
double and got his average back to 
.400, and Rickey Henderson had four 
runs batted in as the Padres finally 
beat Jeff Fassero in a game played in 
San Diego. Fassero was 5-0 in 10 
games at San Diego, all with the 
Montreal Expos. He was traded to 
Seattle in the off-season. 

Dodgers 5, Angels 4 In Anaheim, 
Eric Karros's one-out homer off Troy 
Percival in the ninth lifted' Los 
Angeles to victory. Karros has four 
homers in his last four games and 19 
for die season. 

The game was delayed for five 
minutes in the fourth after the 
Dodgers' starter, Chan Ho Park, 
threw a pitch high and tight to Tony 
Phillips, who had three runs batted in 
and a homer earlier in the game. The 
dugouts emptied and pushing and 
shoving ensued, but there were no 
ejections. 



Tdiu fiaVrnn/lW Wndnl Vni* 

Edgardo Alfonzo avoiding the Tigers' Damion Easley to steal second for the Mets. 


Maddux Deceives 
On and Off Mound 

Mild Looks and Sneaky Fastball 


By Jason Diamos 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK— Hedoesn’t 
Took much like an athlete, 
- much less the most command- 
. ing pitcher in the universe, 
* what with a belly that is be- 
ginning to crop up beneath his 
uniform and the absence from 
view of any muscle tone. 

And when Greg Maddux 
dons his post-game glasses, 
he looks as if be would be 
much more comfortable sit- 
ting behind a desk in some 
nondescript office cubicle in- 
stead of standing before thou- 
sands of people on a pitcher’s 
mound every five days. 

Looks, so the saying goes, 
can be deceiving. And there is 
little more deceiving than one 
of Maddox's 86-miIe-an- 
hour fastballs. 

, Thus — asr the- Yankees- 
bore witness Wednesday — 
whether he looks the part or 
not, Maddux is the same as he 
almost always is: nearly un- 
hxoable. 

Locked in a duel with 
Dwight Gooden, another 
former National League Cy 
V Young Award recipient, it 
took Maddux only 88 pitches 
-■•L* in 2 hours and 9 minutes to 
' fr dispose of the Yankees in the 
Braves’ 2-0 victory. 

Sixty-five of his pitches 
were strikes, 20 of them on 
the first-pitch, as the 31-year- 
. old Atlanta right-hander, who 
surrendered three singles in 
all, faced 28 batters — one 
over the minimum. 


“I located about as good as 
I ever have,” he said. 

Maddux did not walk any- 
body. The closest he came 
was one full count in the first 
innin g, 

“That’s about as vintage as 
it's going to get," Bobby 
Cox, the Atlanta manager, re- 
marked after watching his 
four-time Cy Young Award 
winner strike out eight Mad- 
dux improved his record to 
11-3 while lowering his 
earned run average to 2.36. 

There was a time when the 
Yankees were hoping that 
Maddux would be working 
this sort of magic in the Bronx 
on a regular basis. That was in 
the winter of 1992, when he 
became a free agent after win- 
ning bis first Cy Young, with 
the Chicago Cnbs. 

The Yankees offered more 
■money. Much more.. But 
Maddux signed with the 
Braves, instead. That led 
many observers to question 
whether the pressure-charged 
atmosphere of pitching for 
George Steinbrenner’s Yan- 
kees might have had 
something to do with the 
pitcher’s decision. 

Not so, Maddux said 
Wednesday. “I like New 
York,” he said. “I’m one of 
the few guys who doesn’t 
complain about coining here. 
I like it here. I like the hotel 
we stay in. I like the bail park. 
I like die atmosphere.” 

What he didn’t like five 
years ago were the Yankees’ 
chances, he said. 



Orioles’ Myers Perfects His Non-Image 


Sur llaada/ 4 gmn-ftuvr-rtear 

Greg Maddux of the Braves pitching to the Yankees. 


“Ithinkaboutit,” Maddux 
said, when asked if be ever 
wondered bow it might have 
turned out had be signed with 
the Yankees. “But I don’t 
second-guess wbat I did. I 
was after a ring. If I’d come 
here. I’d have had to wait an 
extra year. That's the main 
thing, getting the ring.” 

As for the scrutiny and 
pressure, Maddux said: 
“We’ve got that in Atlanta, 
too. It’s not like it’s only New 
York. It wasn’t that. It was 
more National. League. I'm 
more comfortable in the other 
league. 

“And obviously I thought 
the Braves had abetter chance 
to get a ring than the Yankees 
did. I haven’t second-guessed 
iL Not once.” 

Neither have the Braves. 
Not when the pitching coach, 
Leo Mazzone, who called 
Maddux “just the greatest 
pitcher I’ve ever seen,” says 
of Maddux’s consistency and 
control, “It is something I 
will never see again as a 
pitching coach in my era.” 


Mazzone continued: “His 
game plan’s a very simple one 
— be pitches off his fastball 
and changes speeds. But, boy, 
he does that better than any- 
body." 

Randy Johnson of the 
Seattle Mariners, at 6 feet 10 
and with a 100-mph left- 
handed fastball, may be the 
most dominating force on a 
baseball field. But no one has 
been as consistently in com- 
mand as Maddux. 

Mazzone said: "Randy 
Johnson does his thing in a 
more spectacular fashion, 
whereas Maddux is more 
sneaky quick, changing 
speeds, more intelligent. A lot 
of people can relate to a guy 
like Maddux. Not being 
overly big or strong, his 
physique is kind of more like 
a normal person’s would be. 
But I’ll tell you what: the gun 
registers 86 on him, but it 
looks a lot quicker, because 
he’s so quick and there’s such 
late action on the ball.” 

And, for Maddux, that’s 
the only look that matters. 


Tlir Washington Post 

Y OU PROBABLY don't know 
much about Randy Myers. At 
least not nearly as much as you’d 
expect considering that, at 34, Myers got 
his 300th save this week and was named 
to die American League All-Star team 
Wednesday. Only one relief pitcher, the 
all-time leader Lee Smith, has ever had so 
many saves so young. 

Aside from a handful of colorful de- 
tails, such as the stun gun and the hand 
grenade he has kept in his locker. Myers 
likes matters exactly the way they are. 

"Image? I don’t have an image,” be 
said, knowing he’s got a beauL "Where 
I come from, a hand grenade makes a 
good paperweight.” And in which solar 
system would that be, Randy? 

Myers is content to be seen as base- 
ball's porcupine. In the bullpen pan- 
theon, he’s got a shot at both the save 
and eccentricity record. 

His reading materials, such as “101 
Ways to Kill a Man With Your Bare 
Hands," plus his gun magazines, are 
practically flaunted He’ll wear Bermuda 
shorts. Hawaiian shirts, cowboy boots 
and a Samurai headband All he lacks is a 
bumper-sticker. Have You Hugged Your 
Assault Vehicle Today? Every gesture 
practically screams. ' 'Do you really want 
to take the risk of getting to know me?’ ’ 
Yet when an inebriated Chicago bond 
trader once charged the mound in 
Wrigley Field trying to punch Myers 
after he gave up a homer, the lefty did not 
karate chop the intruder into a carpaccio. 
Instead Myers just wrestled him to the 
ground like any normal fellow. 

In the bullpen, teammates give him a 
wide berth, knowing he'll grouse about 
every bad defensive play or managerial 
gaffe. 

Yet Myers isn’t quite what he seems. 
You can’t play a character for years if 
it’s outside your real character. But you 
can also be considerably more than your 
public role. Superior relievers fre- 
quently take the part of their personality 
that best suits their baseball job. then 
magnify and distort it, deliberately mak- 
ing a caricature of themselves. ■ 


Vantage Point / Thomas Boswell 


Goose Gossage projected menace, as 
though he didn’t care what hitter he 
might maim. Bnt he was a pussycat 
much of the time, keeping his niceness 
hidden. The Orioles' Don Stanhouse cul- 
tivated a “Stan the Man Unusual” act, 
with a stuffed gorilla in his locker and a 
deafening pregame tape of "Dirty White 
Boy.” But, if you knew him, he could’ve 
been your kid’s sixth-grade teacher. 

Myers is tough. And eccentric. But 
he's also probably conning you. 
"Randy's really a good gny. He’s dif- 
ferent. He likes arguing. 

But a lot of the time, he’s just messin* 
with you,” said Brady Anderson, adding 
in Bradyspeak. “We’re all in over our 
heads, but Randy's a specialist.” 
“Randy can be negative about 
everything for the eight innings when 
he’s not in the game." says pitching 
coach Ray Miller, "but in the ninth 
inning, he’s the most positive, calm 
person on the field. He’s gotten every 
negative thought out of his system.” 
When Myers goes into his middle- 
innings grousing monologue, some 
teammates know bow to clam him up. 
“Just tell him how great he is and what 
a wonderful job he’s doing,” says one 
Oriole, "and he’ll walk away.” 

As Miller says. “He has a right to be 
different That’s a different job.” Every 
team scours its roster for pitchers with a 
“closer’s mentality.” Yet nobody 
knows exactly what that mentality is or 
why it’s so necessary. 

Every baseball lifer, however, agrees 
the first eight innings are radically dif- 
ferent, psychologically, from the ninth. 
Early innings are just a job: but when 
you close foe door, you’ve murdered 
hope. It’s personal between yon and foe 
other team. You're akin to a baseball 
killer. You need to cultivate whatever 
portion of your personality has a stom- 
ach for that duty. 

“A relief pitcher has to be able to let 
down foe world one day. then come back 
tomorrow," says Miller. 


If you're not too close to that world — 
to your fans, teammates or even moms ; 
on Mother’s Day — then maybe it 
doesn’t hurt so badly to let them down. 
If you keep them all at arm's length, it’s 
easier to come back the next day. 

Myers is usually no help on the sub- 
ject of Myers. You can interview him in 
four different uniforms over a 10-year 
period and you still get argumentative 
answers to simple questions. In his first 
Orioles game in 1996, he got a save. 
Twenty reporters gathered beside 'his 
locker, but none knew him on sight. So 
Myers sat directly behind them, nibbling 
cold cuts, enjoying their ignorance for 
15 minutes. When one reporter finally- 
sat beside him and said, “Nice way to 
start,” Myers snapped, “I’m earin'. ” 

Nobody is exempt. When Myers 
saved his 300th game this week, this is 
how he received the congratulations of 
his manager, Davey Johnson. “How 
about me walking that leadoff guy? You 
like that?” said Myers. 

After foe Orioles swept foe Phillies 
Wednesday, Anderson gave Myers foe 
treatment with which he may be most 
comfortable: the insult. 

"How come you never give inter- 
views?" needled Anderson. 

“I never give good interviews," said 
Myers. 

’ ‘How are people going to know how 
good you are?” chided Anderson. 

“I'm the best," said Myers. 

Perhaps only one person at Oriole, 
Park has a glimpse of the parts of Myers 
that aren’t on display on-a baseball field. 
Jody Hoskins sits behind home plate 
and. when she watches her fianeg, she 
sees a different man. Bat she knows foe 
rules. Not too much info. It’s scary out 
there. Her man needs armor. 

But, Jody, what about foe grenades? 
What about the stun gun? Does your 
man really practice killing with bis bare 
hands? 

“Randy has good family values,” 
she says. And smiles. 


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PAGE 24 


OBSERVER 


Mea Culpa Mania 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — It is ar- 
gued that apologizing for 
slavery would show great 
sensitivity. Why anyone 
would propose such an aim- 
less exercise except to dem- 
onstrate great sensitivity is 
hard to say. 

Both pardes to the slave- 
and-owner relationship being 
long dead, there could be 
nothing more grotesque than 
a generation of white yuppies 
apologizing for the sins of 
long-buried ancestors. 

Surely no sensible descen- 
dant of slave forebears could 
look on such a spectacle with- 
out disgust for the hypocrisy 
of it. No sensible white Amer- 
ican could countenance it 
without feeling embarrassed 
by its shabby theatricality. 

* Apologizing for the coun- 
try’s past can only gratify the 
apologizer’s desire to feel 
good about himself. It invites 
the audience to compare his 
moral tone to that of his an- 
cestors, so derelict in their 
respect for humanity, and 
come out a winner. 


apology not be civilized? 
would it not show modem 
Indians how much nicer than 
our forefathers we are? 
(“Sony, folks, for the bru- 
tality of our morally inferior 
ancestors. If it had been us in 
charge, with our enlightened 
New Age sensitivity, instead 
of those immoral old-timers, 
it would never have hap- 
pened.”) 

Few will quarrel with the 
government for apologizing 
to Americans of Japanese an- 
cestry who were put in con- 
centration camps during 
World War n. Since many 
who had suffered this mon- 
strous assault are still alive, 
the apology was not just an- 
other piece of posturing. 

England may be infected, 
too. with the apologizing fad. 


There is talk there of apo- 
ndif- 


logizing for Britain's indif 
ference to starvation in Ire- 
land during the 19th-century 
potato famine. Tony Blair, 


the new prime minister, has 
a som< 


□ 


Like every country, the 
United States has a lot of his- 
tory to apologize for. After 
apologizing for slavery, we 
could move ahead to apolo- 
gizing for what our forebears 
did to the Indians. 

Was it genocide? No, the 
word hadn’t been invented 
until it was all over. The 
words (hat had Americans 
spellbound back then were 
“manifest destiny." Destiny 
had given us a continent to 
populate. The Indians were in 
the way. Destiny demanded 
their removal. Such was the 
argument, anyhow. 

With that nasty history 
now far behind, would an 


suggested something of the 
sort might improve relations 
with Ireland. Yes, it sounds 
ridiculous. Northern Ireland 
is a place where one of the 
most passionate events of 
eveiy year is the celebration 
of a battle fought in 1688 be- 
tween Protestants and Cath- 
olics. The Protestants won 
and have never for an instant 
dreamed of apologizing. 

A lot of every nation’s past 
is terrible, atrocious, barbaric, 
but there it is: inescapable, 
monumental, the work of our 
dead ancestors, many of them 
no doubt hateful, a few per- 
haps almost as genteel and 
high-minded as you and 1. 

Apologizing for them 
would be as useless and ab- 
surd as shaking a fist at the 
Atlantic Ocean. It is painful to 
see them patronized by the 
pious sensitivity crowd. 

New York Times Service 


Another Movie Giant: Mr. Smith Goes to Heaven 


By Paul Hendrickson 

Washington Past Service 


W ASHINGTON — What we 
will remember about him al- 
ways is the recoiling modesty, that 
winning stammer, but most of all 
his sense of utter naturalness. How 
many movie stars in history can 
that be said of? Watching him, and 
he was so compulsively watchable, 
you never got die idea he was play- 
ing a role. You never felt he was in 
a movie. The actor in him just 
disappeared. 

Wednesday, a man bom 89 
years ago in a small Pennsylvania 
town, son of a hardware merchant, 
just disappeared. His name was 
James Stewart. 

He was probably the most im- 
portant American film actor since 
John Wayne. He died of cardiac 
arrest in a big Tudor house in 
Beverly Hills, California. The day 
before' Robert Mitchum, another 
Hollywood redwood, died a little 
farther up the coast, in Santa Bar- 
bara. Whether it is exactly true or 
not, the feeling this morning is that 
now they are all gone. The true 
postwar American movie legends, 
that is. 

American movie legend — it 
sounds so highfalutin. Was there 
ever an actor more lovingly im- 
personated? It was only a measure 
of how much he endeared himself to 
us. Jimmy Stewart is of a different 
order of magnitude. Something be- 
yond acting, something beyond 
cinema. Something that got into the 
core of our being. 

How did be ever manage that 
trick of inspired averageness, even 
when he was playing uncommon 
men like Lindbergh and Glenn 
Miller? He was about enduring 
American values. He was about de- 
cency. But we stereotype him at our 
peril. Hitchcock, for one, sensed the 
hidden other depths. He put diem 
brilliantly to use in three classic ' 50s 
films: "Rear Window ’ ’ (where you 
saw a morbid Stewart curiosity bor- 
dering on voyeurism); “The Man 
Who Knew Too Much 1 ’ (where you 
saw a very convincing vmdicnve- 


ness); and "Vertigo” 
(where you got the not- 
q uite-clear compulsions and 
eerie sexual obsession;. 

And yet that sense of 
everyday goodness over- 
shadows it all. Here is a 
story abouthim: In 1982, on 
the 50th anniversary of his 
Princeton graduation class, 
he sent in lus contribution to 
the big book that told what 
all the class members were 
doing. He gave his Cali- 
fornia phone number. You 
know, just in case anybody 
passing through town 
wanted to get in touch. 

He won the Academy 
Award in 1940 opposite 
Katharine Hepburn for 
"The Philadelphia Story.” 

But it seems unarguable that 
the black-and-white master- 
piece we will always link his 
name with first is “It's a 
Wonderfiil Life." U’s the 
tale of George Bailey, smal- 
town dreamer and good egg 
with a dark side. It's such a tired 
Christmas movie, but who can get 
enough of it? Somewhere in Heav- 
en this morning, Clarence and 
Donna Reed and Jimmy Stewart are 
whistling “Buffalo Gals, Won'tcha 
Come Out Tonight." 

Once, my children gave me my 
own copy of the movie. For weeks 
afterward, we’d sit in the den with 
the remote control and compuls- 
ively replay that scene in the first 
few minutes' of the film when 
George rescues his kid brother. 
Harry, who fell through a hole in 
the ice at the town skating pond. 

In 1991, when I told my sons I 
was going out to California to in- 
terview the real George Bailey for 
Life magazine, my then 3-year- 
old, John, told me to be sure and 
ask George if he was over his ear- 
ache yet. Because, as everybody 
knows, when George jumped in to 
save Harry from drowning that af- 
ternoon, he caught a bad cold that 
messed up his hearing for life. 

The maid let me in the front 
door. Probably I was still a little 



Jimmy Stewart as Charles Lindbergh in “The Spirit of St, Louis” (1957). 


undone at how easy it was to get in 
— no hedges or electronic gates or 
people coming out of sentry boxes. 
The maid said. “They’re on die 
patio," and I. in my anxiety and 
clunkiness, walked straight toward 
them, smack into the fine-mesh 
screen of a sliding glass door that 
led to a walled-off back yard where 


He said that George Bailey was 
[feu 


there was a lap pool. I knocked the 
iff its hinges. 


thing right o: 

"Great entrance, " his wife had 
said, coming over to pat my 
shoulder like a mom comforting a 
geeky son. "Don't worry, I’ve 
done it a couple of times myself." 

He said nothing at first. He 
walked straight past me and picked 
up the kicked-om screen and began 
replacing it in the roller track. His 
bony arms were stretched to either 
side' In that low, seriocomic voice, 
drawing out the words, he said. 
“You’re . . . not . . . the . . . first.” 
They were his opening words. 

A' couple min ares later, trying to 
break the ice, I asked him if he was 
over bis earache yet. And he 
laughed. And we got along fine. 


his favorite role. "Maybe not for the 
right reasons,’ ’ he said. "It could be 
a sentimental feeling. It’s the first 
picture 1 did after returning from the 
war. Then, too, I guess 1 like the idea 
of it. You see, it didn't come from a 
book. It didn’t come from a play. It 
came from one small statement; 
Nobody is born to be a failure." 

I asked what he would do if they 
came to him right then with a part 
that had George Bailey's magic. 
His answer was incomparably sad, 
but clear-eyed. “It’s over. It’s 
over. No, it’s over.” 

At Princeton he ate in the right 
clubs and made friends with people 
named Joshua Logan and Leonard 
Firestone. After graduation ('32), 
he lucked into some summer stock 


on Cape Cod, and then it wasjust 
lucking on out to Hollywood. For a 


time he’d acted in Manhattan. 
Guess who his roommate was? 
Some striving young' thespian 
named Henry Fonda. In California, 
they became roomies again. 
Within three years, he had his 


first Oscar nomination^ for 
“Mr. Smith Goes to Wash- 
ington,” and. the next year 
he had the Academy Award 
itself. 

He was a real-life . war 
hero, earning S3, 000 a 
week as a contract .star in 
1941 when he enlisted hi 
fhe-U.S. Army Air Corps. 
He flew 20-odd missions In 
a B-24 Liberator. He'woh- 
the Distinguished Flying 
Cross, the Air Medal. the 
French Croix de Gfierre. 
Life magazine followed, 
him home - to Indiana, 
Pennsylvania, •' where '.he 
waved in his uniform from ’ 
the courthouse. That was 
September 1945. He looked 
smashing. He was ..still a 
bachelor. He used to say he 
could never quite ieinem- 
ber when he met his wife 
. Gloria. He flunks they-; sat " 
m next to each other ata pariyv 
at Gary Cooper’s. He proV 
ably didn’t say much. • . 

He was all the things we thought 
he was. And he was alio more. 

Which is why he turned out to be 
such a powerful -actor- He was us- 
ing it alL - - 

He was about innocence — - 
though not entirely. The portrayal, 
of Jefferson Smith in “Mr. Smith 
Goes to Washington” is one of his 
finesrperfcHtoances. Here he is ar- 
riving in Washington so wide- 
eyed, taking in all the sights fforixa , : 
taxi. But there is much anger in that = 
movie, too, when Senatary Smith, 
finally learns how much corruption 
had been everywhere around him- - 
Lest we forget, there’s also a lot ; 
of wedting-stiff anger in die de- 
ceptively simple "It's a Wonder- 
MLife.” - 

And yet what lingers,: after > 
spending an afternoon with him, is 
the memory of such a decidedly . 
nice person. 

Receiving the life achievement 
award of the American. Film In- 
stitute in 1980, he said simply: "I 
give you James Stewart, a remark- 
ably fortunate fellow." 




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Pity the Poor Hollywood Chateau Owner 


By Todd S. Purdum 

Nt» York Tunes Sen-ice 


L OS ANGELES — When your attic 
has 20,000 square feet of floor space 
and 1 3-foot ceilings, you naturally don’t 
want the roof to leak. After all, the 
bowling alley, the doll museum and the 
gift-wrapping room might get wet So 
what’s a homeowner to do? Sue the 
contractor, of course. 

But when the homeowner is Aaron 
Spelling, the creator of over-the-top 
television programs from "Fantasy Is- 
land" to “Beverly Hills 90210," and 
when the house is his 45-room, 56,500- 
square-foot mansion in the lush green 
enclave of Holmby Hills, the trial is no 
ordinaiy tale. 

More than a decade ago. Spelling and 


hideaway the Spellings dubbed the Man- 
or. Then the Spellings, who moved in six 
years ago, started complaining them- 
selves, and they have not stopped since. 

The bowling balls were too heavy for 
the single-lane computerized alley. A 
toilet was set in front of a window, “so 
that the user would be directly visible." 
The tile work on the pool was shoddy. 

. And this week, in resolution of one of 
their complaints, the courtroom of 
Judge Dzintra Janavs at Los Angeles 
County superior court has been filled 
with patches of rusty sheet-metal roof- 
ing, corroded solid copper gutters and 
oversized color photographs of the- 
aforementioned leaky roof. The 
Spellings are suing LaMar Construc- 


equate just after the job was done. 

Lawyers for the contractor counter that 
the Spellings, to cut costs, insisted on a 
roof of galvanized sheet metal rather than 
the more expensive and durable copper 
and that the leaks result from a design 
flaw (to wit, the roof was too flat), for 
which the contractor is not responsible. 

On Tuesday, Mrs. Spelling, who 
looks remarkably like an older version 
of her daughter Tori, the pouty blond 


star of "90210.’ ’ sat quiedy in the front 
ick suit as lawyers 


his wife, Candy, bought the onetime es- 
Cn 


tion, and the jury trial is expected to last 
middle of next week. 


rate of Bing Crosby and two adjoining 
plots for $10 million, then tore everything 
down and spent an additional $35 million 
or so to build and landscape a massive, 
French- Georgian limestone chateau. 

First the neighbors complained about 
the endless construction and traffic, the 
curious tourists and the sheer size of the 


until the 

The Spellings are seeking $770,000, 
the amount they are spending to replace 
the roof with lead-coated copper, plus 
an unspecified amount in punitive dam- 
ages. They contend that they contracted 
for the finest craftsmanship and ma- 
terials but were stuck with inferior 
goods and shoddy work, and that the 
contractor knew the roof was inad- 


row in a simple blacl 
argued over whether the roof was sloped 
enough to assure adequate drainage and 
whether the gutters nad been properly 
installed. 

Spelling, who made his fortune with 
peekaboo shows like “Charlie's An- 
gels” and "The Love Boat" that critics 
knocked as “jiggle television." was 
plain-spoken in his opening testimony 
on Monday. “If it was explained to me, 
I wouldn’t know what he was talking 
about," Spelling said of the contractor 
and the' roof problem. “I still don't 
know." He stuck to his scripts, he said, 
and it was Mrs. Spelling who read blue- 
prints and contracts for the house. 



PEOPLE 


Mil.' Vl-oii Ipr. ■ )mii. —fiKw 

The Spelling mansion: A leaky roof. 


A JUDGE didn't buy the claim that 
Brian Wilson's mother's reputa- 
tion was damaged when her son .wrote 
that she stood by and watched his father 
beat him as a child. The federal court 
ruled that Audree Wilson cannot sue 
HarperCollins. the publisher of her 
son’s 1991 autobiography, “Wouldn’t 
It Be Nice: My Own Stoiy.” But 
Wilson's brother. Carl, another mem- 
ber of the Beach Boys, can go ahead 
with his defamation suit against Har- 
perCollins. The judge ruled that Carl 
Wilson can sue over whether the book 
unfairly portrayed his relationship with 
a California spiritual adviser and the 
book's claims that he condoned alleged 
abuse of Brian Wilson by bodyguards. 

□ 

The Spanish tenor Jose Carreras, suf- 
fering from a srubbom viral infection of 
die vocal cords, has been forced to cancel 
a concert Saturday in Cottbus, his third 
cancellation in Germany. The infection, 
which he picked up in Tokyo in June, also 
forced him to cancel concerts in Cologne 
and Ludwigsburg, the first time in 12 


years that' he has had to _ 
performances, his agents 


scheduled 

Thursday. 


Carreras had fits of coughmg during the 
first concert of his tour in Germany, in 


Hannover on June 26, barely managing 
to scrape through to die end. 

□ 

Jacques- Yves Cousteau, who intro- 
duced the wonders of the sea to the 
world, was buried Thursday in die fam- 
ily vault in Saint-Andre-de^Cubzac, the 
southwestern French town where he was 
bom. He died on June 25 at age 87. 

'□ 

Michael Jackson, who arrived 45 
minutes late because of a slight fever for 
his only concert this season in Vienna, 
faced rows of empty seats and criticism 


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Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous phone charges 


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on your hotel bill and save you up to 60%? Low 
rates and the clearest connections home 24 hours 


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a day. Rain or shine. That's AT&T Direct" Service. 


stays mainly in the plain. 


Check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to follow for easy calling worldwide: 

Just Ji.ii the .AST Access Number for the countn you 
are calling from. 

Dial the phone number you're calline. 

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EUROPE 


Sweden 

. .020-795-811 
. 0800-89-0011 
.0500-89-0011 
0800-89-0011 

Austria *o . 
Belgiinn* .... 
Czech RapubllcA .. . 
France 
Germany 

Greece* . . . 

Iralanda 

Italy* 

. DZ2-903-011 
.0-800-100-10 
00-42-000-101 

Switzerland • . 
United Kingdom a 


MIDDLE EAST 


00*800-1311 

1-800-330-000 

172-1011 

Eflyptw(Calni)* . 

Israel . ... 

Sand) Arabia* 

510-0200 
..177-100-2727 
. 1-880-10 

Hethertaode* . 

0800-022-9111 

AFRICA 


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Spain 

755-5042 

900-90-00-11 

Ghana 
South Africa 

0191 

.0-800-99-0123 


AT&T 


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AT&T Direct" Service, or visit mir Web •sin* jt http://www.jitt.com/tKiiein'