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INTERNATIONAL 


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London, Tuesday, July 8, 1997 


No. 35.567 



Mexico Votes for Change 

Governing Party Widely Rebuffed in Elections 



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A demonstrator bleeding in Nairobi's Anglican cathedral after the police stormed in and beat protesters. 

7 Dead in Kenya as Protests Erupt 






By Stephen Buckley 

Washington Post Sen-ue 


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NAIROBI — A number of people 
; were killed and scores were wounded 
Monday in dashes between protesters 
and security forces as political unrest 

.J erupted throughout this East African 

. - ; 7 -\ country. 

1 irjiicfc Reuters quoted die police as saying 

seven people bad been killed, including 
two men shot by policemen dispersing 
crowds. 

" Q Assistant Police Commissioner Peter 

- Kimanthi said that four people had been 


killed in Nyahuram town, including rwo 
men who were crushed to death when a 
crowd stampeded as police moved in. 
two were kiLled in Nairobi, and that one 
was killed in TTiika. 

It was the third time in the last six 
weeks that political demonstrations 
have rattled this nation of 27 million, 
where a deepening sense of crisis has 
taken hold with the approach of general 
elections, likely to be held later this 
year. 

In central Nairobi, hundreds of pro- 
testers. mostly young men. chanted 
"Moi must go!" as they scrambled 


through the streets. They also set fires, 
stoned civilian vehicles.’taunied ihe po- 
lice and hurled stones at them. 

Security forces responded by tossing 
(ear gas canisters — including one into a 
Filled church in central Nairobi — and 
by beating demonstrators with clubs. 

The protests, organized by opposition 
politicians and human-rights activists, 
are geared to push the government to 
reform electoral and other laws that the 
demonstrators deride as oppressive. 

Kenya embraced a multiparty pofit- 

See KENYA, Page 6 


I'itpUhi'K Sufhn<mDapOt1m 

MEXICO CITY — The Institutional 
Revolutionary Party has suffered its 
worst defeat, losing rwo governorships, 
city hall in the capital and its unques- 
tioned hold on the lower house of the 
Mexican Congress. 

Cuauhtemoc Cardenas Sotorzano. 
son of one of Mexico’s most beloved 


Emerging-market analysts voice 
confidence about the vote. Page 12. 

presidents, claimed victory in the may- 
oral election Sunday in Mexico City, 
heaLing the governing party’s candidate 
by a 2-to- 1 margin, preliminary results 
showed Monday. 

■*We will govern with honor,” Mr. 
Cardenas said. "This is a triumph of the 
people. A/I Mexicans have won." 

His victory gave the opposition a 
national leader with real political power 
for the Firsi time in modem Mexico. 

The famously glum-faced Mr. Carde- 
nas smiled jubilantly before his cheer- 
ing supporters and immediately set his 
sights three years ahead to the country's 
next presidential race. 

**' We have won the city,” Mr. Carde- 
nas said. "Lei's get set for the year 
2000 .” 

With 84.6 percent of ballots counted 
in federal congressional races, the gov- 
erning party had 38.6 percent of the 
vote .compared with 27. 1 percent forthe 
center-right National Action Party and 
25.6 percent for Mr. Cardenas's left- 
center Democratic Revolution Party. 
Five other parties split the rest 

A party needs at least 42 percent to 
win a majority in the lower house of 
Congress. Of the 500 seals. 300 are 


directly elected and 200 are allotted 
proportionally. 

“That's democracy.” said Humberto 
Roque Villanueva, the leader of the 
Institutional Revolutionary Party, as he 
assessed the damage. 

The parry is known by its initials in 
Spanish as the PRI. Through a blend of 
patronage, strong-arm tactics and out- 
right electoral fraud, it has held national 
power since it was founded in 1929. 

President Ernesto Zedillo, who was 
elected in 1994 afrera campaign that saw 
the initial governing party candidate as- 
sassinated, ushered in electoral reforms 
aimed at strengthening democracy. 

The election, in which 52.2 million 


Mexicans registered, was the first one 
managed by an autonomous federal 
election council formed under the Ze- 
dillo reforms. The council included no 
government officials. 

Jose Woldenberg, the council pres- 
ident, said he was determined to bury- 
Mexico’s history of elections tainted by 
suspicions of vote-tampering by the 
government and the PRI. 

Mr. Cardenas, who broke with the 
party in 1 987, becomes Mexico City's 
first elected mayor since 1928. The 
president has previously appointed the 
mayor. With 72 percent of the mayoral 

See MEXICO, Page 6 


Cardenas Drops His Scowl 

Mexico City’s Next Mayor Is Offering ‘Smile for History’ 


By Sam Dillon 

New Vvrk Times Semce 

MEXICO CITY — During much of 
die decade since he broke with the gov- 
erning party to become a leader of Mex- 
ico's fledgling opposition, Cuauhtemoc 
Cardenas Solorzano has been scowling. 

He was scowling in 1988 when he 
lost his first presidential bid in an ap- 
parently fraudulent election. He was 
scowling for most of the next six years 
as the government imposed an econom- 
ic modernization campaign he opposed. 
And he was scowling in 1994. when he 
fell short of the presidency again and 
heard grumblings about his leadership 
from erstwhile supporters. 

Bui after Mr. Cardenas became Mex- 


ico City’s mayor-elect Sunday in a land- 
slide vote, he stood before supporters, 
journalists and television cameras and 
cracked an ear-to-ear grin. 

“After 10 years, Cuauhtemoc 'is smil- 
ing.” said Homero Aridjis, a prominent 
poet and environmentalist. “Thai’s a 
smile for history.” 

Mr. Cardenas, the 63-year:old son of 
the president who nationalized Mex- 
ico's oil Fields, has emerged from Sun- 
day's triumph as the most powerful 
elected opposition figure since Fran- 
cisco Madero was elected president in 
1911 at the close of a 35-year dic- 
tatorship. If he rises to the vast chal- 
lenges of his new post, he stands a 

See WINNER, Page 6 


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Rover Sniffs and Tests Rocks on Mars for Secrets of Universe 

Off-Road Adventure Is Planned linages of Alien World Are Stunningly Clear 




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Gznptioib} Our Staff final Dispoxbrx 

PASADENA, California — The So- 
journer rover conducted geological re- 
search on Mars on Monday and NASA 
released a- series of new images that 
gave the surface a different perspec- 
tive. 

Among the new pictures was the First 
taken from the rover back toward the 
Pathfinder lander. 

That picture was of more scientific 
than aesthetic interest: Because So- 
journer is so low to the ground, about 
all that showed was billowing folds of 
an air bag that cushioned Pathfinder’s 
. landing. A bit of antenna was visible 
behind, but the main bulk of the lander 

- was not visible. 

New pictures taken from a higher 
position on the lander dramatically 
changed the perspective of rocks close 

- to it. Rocks that appeared to be large 
boulders in earlier pictures shrunk in 
size in those taken from a height of 
several feet. 

The rover, centeipiece of the first 
mission to land on die surface of Mars 
in 21 years, has traveled a total of 16 
.inches (40 centimeters). Sojourner 
spent the night backed up against a 
boulder dubbed Barnacle Bill. An in- 
strument called a spectrometer moun- 


ted on the back of the rover was used to 
study the rock’s chemical makeup. 

Measurements from the instrument 
were to be sent back to Earth later, and 
the analysis of the data will be available 
Tuesday, along with analysis of a spec- 
trometer reading on the soil where the 
rover first touched down. 

A vital cargo vessel docks with 
Russia's Mir space station. Page 2. 

Scientists announced that they have 
planned an off-road adventure for the 
rover, sending it to chum up the red dirt 
with its wheels on its way to pho- 
tograph a rock known as “Yogi.” 

In the dry language of science, the 
rover will conduct a "material abrasion 
experiment" on an agonizingly slow 
crawl across the landscape a foot or so 
from the Pathfinder spacecraft that car- 
ried it to Mars. 

To a geologist, subtleties in an or- 
dinary-looking rock can contain a feast 
of information — about its own past, its 
home planet and even the history of the 
whole solar system. And that is why 
geologists are so excited about the des- 

See MARS, Page 6 



Hie Sojourner robot rover exploring the surface of Mars near a rock 
known as “Barnacle Bill.” Many rocks will be sought out for analysis. 


By Kathy Sawyer 

Woshingit>}i Post Service " 

PASADENA, California • — 
Throughout the Space Age, workers in 
the Multi-Mission Image Processing 
Laboratory have been the first humans 
to glimpse post cards from alien 
worlds. 

Now, they may have outdone them- 
selves — churning out stunning images 
that have been pouring into the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Admin- 
istration's Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
from the Pathfinder spacecraft on Mars 
far more quickly than ever before. 

“Even we are amazed we could do it 
on this kind of time scale,” said Bill 
Greer, one of a staff of 20. The first 
360-degree panoramic view of the 
stark scenery at the Pathfinder landing 
site went up on a wall over the week- 
end. Fifteen feet (4.5 meters) long, it 
shows portions of the spacecraft in 
such clear detail that “you can tell 
whether a screw is a Phillips bead 
screw,” Mr. Greer said. 

The panorama is a mosaic of 330 
images — 110 each in blue, red and 
green — taken with a camera known as 
IMP (Imager for Mars Pathfinder) on 
the Pathfinder craft — not aboard the 


smaller Sojourner robot explorer. The 
-IMP was designed, to “see” like a 
person — out of two eyes set wide 
enough apart to create separate “ste- 
reo” images. The very slight differ- 
ence in the angles creates depth per- 
ception. 

The camera's head has what looks 
like a face, said Peter Smith of the 
University of Arizona, who is the chief 
IMP scientist In fact, that face was 
visible in the larger-than-life panor- 
ama. reflected in hardware as if IMP 
were preening before a mirror. 

The images are not only stunning as 
picture postcards, revealing new to- 
pographies on Mars. They are an in- 
tegral part of the team’s scientific mis- 
sion. IMP does not take simple 
snapshots. Its head contains two filter 
wheels, each holding a total of 24 filters 
that are controlled from Pasadena. The 
scientists decide which filters are ap- 
propriate for a certain image, and the 
wheels then spin to put them into 
place. 

Using the same technique employed 
to make 3-D movies, the colors in the 
images are slightly offset, creating a 
view in three dimensions. Ground eon- 

See CAMERA, Page 6 


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In Coup’s Wake, a Tense Phnom Penh 


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■’ Nrw York Tunes Service _ 

: PHNOM PENH — Tanks idled on 
tire - city’s ouekuts, piled high with 
looted motorcycles, sewing machines, 
tires and detergent. Patients lay on their 
beds in an empty hospital abandoned by 
their frightened doctors. Several un- 
claimed bodies remained in the streets. 

- Chi the day after a coup by one of 
Cambodia's .two feuding co-prime min- 
isters, the capital city was shuttered Mon- 
day , strewn with uncollected garbage and 
seemingly leaderless. The nation waited 


To Readers in. France 


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down delivery of ail newspapers, 
the Tuesday issue of the .IHT will 
riot be distributed in France. The 
. paper can be read electronically on 
' the newspaper’s web site: 

http^/wwwJhtcom 


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Kuwafi — -~„.70b FSs Zkiftab«e.„: ZJmSsaoo 


ITTI in suspense to leam how the newly struc- 

r~ e tured government would exert its power 

lf — and whether fighting would resume. 

Tanks idled on There were no complete reports on 
iled high with toe number of soldiers and civilians 
ving machines, killed during the Fighting. Reuters was 
mts lay on their able to confirm 13 deaths; Agence 
tl abandoned by France-Presse claimed 16 and the As- 
s. Several un- sociated Press 32, but officials said toe 
d in the streets, number was certainly much higher. 

»up by one of The coup leader. Second Prune Min- 
; co-prime min- ister Hun Sen, made no statement or 
; shuttered Mon- public appearance Monday. In a tele- 
led garbage and vision address Sunday night, be called 
le nation waited his rival. First Prime Minister Norodom 
Ranariddh, a traitor and said be should 
be put on triaL 

■anfg. In Paris, where he went Friday, the 

day before Mr. Hun Sen’s assault on his 
ke that shut followers. Prince Ranariddh launched 
newspapers, an attempt to rally international support, 
the.nfT will announcing plans to visit the United 


States. At toe United Nations, which 
spent more than $2 billion to broker 
elections and restore democracy to 
Cambodia in 1993, an official voiced 
concern for the safety of opposition 
members of Parliament. 

Mr. Hun Sen's coup placed in doubt 
the future of millions of dollars in aid 
from the United Nations, other inter- 
national organizations and several gov- 
ernments thai continues to keep the 
country afloaL 

The coup also raised concerns in the 
Association of South East Asian Na- 
tions. with some officials saying the 
influential regional grouping would re- 
consider its plan to induct Cambodia as 
a member this month. (Page 4 ) 

In a statement that was not broadcast 
over the government-controlled radio 

See CAMBODIA, Page 6 


AGENDA 

Rioting Continues Unabated in Ulster 


The Dow 


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Monday 9 A P.M. previous dose 
91220 916.92 


BELFAST (AFP) — Rioters burned 
scores of buildings and cars across 
Northern Ireland cm Monday and shots 
were fired at the police as unrest con- 
tinued unabated aftera Protestant march 
through a Catholic neighborhood 
The police said that 80 people had 
been hurt in the unrest, half of them 
police officers: that more than 25D 


Swiss Pledge Aid for Holocaust Victims 


BERN (AP) — About 17 million 
Swiss francs (S 1 2 million) will be giv- 
en urgently to needy victims of toe 
Holocaust in Eastern Europe, the head 
of a restitution panel said Monday. 

The decision came at the first meet- 


ing of a board dispensing 265 million 
francs in donations from Swiss banks 
and companies to Holocaust victims. 

The panel said those who had not 
yet received compensation for their 
suffering would have priority. 


vehicles had been burned, and that 
they had fired more than 1,600 rounds 
of rubber bullets to control rioting that 
broke out after the Protestant march in 
Portadown on Sunday. 

Earlier article. Page 2. 

PAGE TWO 

Low Notes in Rural England 

INTERNATIONAL Page 7. 

Tutsi Revenge Led to Zaire Coup 

Books Page 4. 

Crossword Page 10. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19. 


Tie IHT on-line http://vnvvy.iht.com 


In Enlarging NATO, Clinton and His Critics Look to History 


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By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Post Service 

MADRID — Eight decades after Woodrow 
Wilson summoned Americans to 1 ‘make the world 
safe for democracy,” and four decades after Harry 
Truman proclaimed a doctrine of supporting ‘ ‘free 
peoples" against Communist subjugation, another 
American president is urging his countrymen to 
help protect Europe from its political demons. 

President Bill Clinton is casting the expansion of 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to the bor- 
ders of the former Soviet Union in grandiose 
historical terms. The goal of toe United States, 
President Clinton told European leaders in May, is 


strengthen democracy, tempo- old rivalries, hasten 
integration and provide a stable climate in which 
prosperity can grow. ’ ’ 

The president’s promotion of NATO enlarge- 
ment as a kind of modern-day equivalent of the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Marshall Plan — which resulted in the recon- 
struction of western Europe and political recon- 
ciliation between France and Germany — has been 
greeted scornfully by his opponents. 

A more appropriate historical analogy, say the 


to “do for Europe’s East what we did in Europe’s 
West" after World War II: "defend freedom. 


critics, would be the humiliations piled on Ger- 
many after its defeat in World War f. They predict 
that NATO expansion could result in a nationalist 
backlash in Russia, just as the Treaty of Versailles 


cnea-ted fertile propaganda opportunities for the 
Nazis. 

Either way. both supporters and opponents of the 
administration agree on one point. For toe third time 
this century, American leaders have the chance of 
shaping a new system of international security. The 
rewards of getting the new security system right — 
and the risks of getting it wrong — are exceptionally 
high. The security arrangements that were put in place 
after World War D resulted in one of toe longest 
periods of peace Europe has ever known. By contrast, 
the geopolitical vacuum left behind World War L led 
directly to a new world war. 

President Clinton "has been very conscious of 
toe historical analogies,' 1 said the U.S. national 
security adviser, Samuel Berger. 

“He has talked about the pivot points of the 20th 


century — toe end of World War I and the end of 
World War II — and how toe differing choices we 
have made at these points of history have had a 
great deal to do in ordaining what has ensued," Mr. 
Berger said. “We have now come to a third pivot 
point the end of the Cold War.” 

Mr. Clinton and his advisers have repeatedly 
evoked the memory of postwar diplomatic giants 
— men like Mr. Truman and Secretaries of Stale 
George Marshall and Dean Acheson — to provide 
a historic rationale for their most far-reaching 
foreign policy initiative. 

Their critics maintain that toe lack of any direct 
military threat to toe United States makes it dif- 
ficult to compare toe present situation to toe post- 

See NATO, Page 6 


l 

* 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 


PAGE TWO 




Lawnmowing During Arias I Neighbors Protest Noise in England 

It’s Certainly Opera, but It Isn’t Grand 


By Sarah Lyall 

New Yvri Times Serrice 

G ARSINGTON , England — Peter Rodger, 
who lives in this picturesque Oxfordshire 
village, has become accustomed to hear- 
ing noisy little snatches of opera wafting 
through his garden every summer. But that doesn't 
make him an enthusiast. 

'‘You can hear the words, but since I'm a non- 
speaker of Italian or German, they don't mean any- 
thing to me,” said Mr. Rodger, who doesn't dislike 
opera per se, although be did once attend a per- 
formance of "Carmen” at the Welsh National Opera 
that was so bad, he said, the audience began to boo. 

“The principle of it is that the opera, as it stands 
at the moment, is too close to everyone else's 
property,” he said. 

Mr. Rodger's objections to the presence of the 
Garsington Opera here are shared by just about 
everyone on Southend Road, an upscale neigh- 
borhood in Garsington. 

For the last nine summers, residents have been 
treated — if that’s the word — to the intermittent 
sound of stirring orchestral surges, of sopranos 
hitting high notes and of construction crews setting 
up and tearing down opera-related equipment 
Leonard Ingrains, a well-connected business- 
man, first brought opera to Garsington in 1987. 
when he and his wile, Rosalind, organized three 
performances of “The Marriage of Figaro ’ ’ on their 
estate. Garsington Manor. The opera — an open-air 
affair under a canopy that evokes country-house 
spectacles from centuries past — flourished. This 
summer, three operas are being shown in 20 sold- 
out performances, each drawing 400 visitors in 
evening dress. 



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The opera - an open-air affair under a canopy that evokes country-house 
spectacles from centuries past - flourishes despite the neighbors ' complaints. 


W HILE Garsington is no Glyndeboume, 
England’s best known country-house 
opera and one that has the advantage of 
being miles away from any potentially 
pesky neighbor, it has achieved a degree of cred- 
ibility and prestige in cultural and operatic circles. 
Garsington circles, however, are another matter. 
“Our feeling is, 'How can we make life difficult 
for them?' ” said Monica Waud, who lives astone’s 
throw from Garsington Manor and is passionately 
devoted to her front lawn, particularly when the 
opera is in progress. 

“I have always mowed my lawn when it suited 
me.*' said Miss Waud, who enjoys cutting her grass 
with a powerful diesel tractor char can compete with 
even the heartiest renor. “Sometimes, the neighbors 
decide that their lawns perhaps need mowing, too. 
What a strange coincidence. 

Miss Waud led her neighbors in a Garsington- 
style civil disobedience campaign several weeks 
ago: As the sound of “Le Pescatrici" by Haydn 
piercedtheneighborhood, it met with a great deal of 


nonoperatic competition — the sounds of grass 
being cut, of hedges being trimmed, of hoses being 
turned on and of car alarms being set off. 

In a kind of grand finale, a private plane piloted 
by Miss Waud’s companion. Paul Gian grande, 
roared overhead. 

Though some of the singers were unsettled, the 
operagoers themselves maintained stiff upper lips, 
said Clare Adams, a spokesman for the opera. 

“The audience was very English.’* she said. “It 
was a bit like the Blitz. They all rallied together.” 

While the opera’s opponents are vocal and well- 
organized, Ms. Adams said, they hardly speak for 
the entire village. For one thing, most villagers 
cannot hear the opera from their houses. Also, the 
opera provides part-time employment for caterers, 
program-sellers and the like, ana village residents 
and school groups can attend dress rehearsals free. 

And the opera has hired a man, Ramon Shack, 
whose job it is to stand in the road for hours, 
monitoring die noise on two machines ("one's a 
backup,* * he explained) and making regular reports 
to Mr. Ingrams. 

Mr. Ingrams has also installed expensive noise- 
abatement screens, thick gray affairs that stand 
between the opera and the rest of the world. 

Bur Mr. Rodger, for one, says that they actually 
contribute to the problem, by causing a ruckus when 


the wind blows heavily. “The cords that bold the 
screens up slap against each other all night,” Mr. 
Rodger said. “I'm getting sleep deprivation. I’m up 
ar 2 o’clock in the morning.” 

I N February, the opera was granted planning 
permission by the Department of the Envir- 
onment in what was then a Conservative gov- 
ernment, overruling the recommendations of 
the local district council and causing residents to 
mutter darkly about a Tory Establishment cabaL 
On a recent night. Miss Waud and Mr. Gi- 
an grande stood outside with Mr. Rodger and Ann 
Tomline, chairman of the parish council. The birds 
were singing; the late-night air was sultry and 
intoxicating. 

Suddenly, the sound of an operaticaRy high- 
pitched voice soared over the noise-abatement 
screens, across the road, over the trees and straight 
in to Miss Waud's garden. 

“You might bear it and say. ‘It’s lovely,* " Mrs. 
Tomline said. “But who wants to hear it night after 
nigbt?” 

“It seems incredible that you could get a singer 
with that level of volume without any amplification 
at aU,” Mr. Rodger mused “I could scream as loud 
as I wanted, and they would never hear me.” 
“Should we try?” Mrs. To mline asked. 


Ulster in Near Anarehy= 
As Catholics Vent Rage 


The Associated Press 

BELFAST — Anti-British rioters 
threw Roman Caholic areas of North- 
ern Ireland into a state of virtual anarchy 
until dawn Monday, hijacking cars, 
wrecking shops and trying to km police 
officers and soldiers with guns, gren- 
ades and gasoline bombs. 

The violence left scores wounded; 
many from plastic bullets fired by the 
police, who were braced for a potential 
second night of mayhem. 

' A 14-year-old Protestant boy- was 
shot through the shoulder when a mil- 
itary base on the “peace line*’ of walla 
dividing the Protestant and Irish Cath- 
olic parts of west Belfast came under 
gun and grenade attack from Cathol- 
ics.. 

Belfast’s City and Royal victoria 
hospitals treated at least 24 wounded, 
while Altsagelvin Hospital in Northern 
Ireland’s second-largest city, London- 
derry, reported five casualties from ri- 
oting. 

The Irish Republican Army, which 
resumed its campaign against British 
rule 17 months ago. daunted respon- 
sibility for shooting a policewoman in 
the face Sunday night in the Catholic 
town of Coalisland. 

The outlawed group was believed re- 
sponsible for most of the nine gun at- 
tacks against police and army positions 
in Belfast late Sunday and early Mon- 
day, although a maverick offshoot of the 
IRA. tiie Irish National liberation 
Army, also claimed a share of the gun- 
play. 

Early Monday, soldiers in north Bel- 
fast dived for cover behind low brick 


walls in response to sustained bursts of: 
automatic fire ricocheting off the road- ; 

W And the street chaos continued Mon- ' 
day afternoon in west Belfast, when two- : 
passenger buses were hijacked at guo^- 
point and burned as roadblocks. Po-“ 
freemen said more than 230 vehicles had- ■ 
been hijacked and burned in Northern 
Ireland since Sunday morning. 

The rioting was touched off wheaty 
British authorities, unable to arrange a 
compromise between Protestant tn arefa^ 
as and Catholic anti-march protesters- 
in Portadown, forced the march through - 
the town’s main Catholic neighborhood" 
Sunday using more than 1,000 police- 
officers and several hundred soldiers in 
armored cars. " 

The Northern Ireland secretary, Mo ■ 
Mo wlam, said Monday that she un-“ 
derstood the anger in the Catholic com^ 
m unity but added: “Nothing justifies 
the orchestrated violence we have seen" 
in the last 24 hours.” 

If there had been some common sensc- 
or accommodation between the two*: 
sides, she said, it could have beefl- 
avoided. 

She said she would be speaking witfir: 
Protestant marchers about parades due— 
in the next days. * 

“I will expect to see some willing^ ^ 
ness and understanding of the events of 
this weekend reflected in their words 1 
and actions in the days ahead,” the 
official said. 

Orange Order marches were to con- . 
tinue throughout the week, including- 
later Monday in the mostly Catholic... 
village of Beliaghy. 


No Strings on Millions, 
Seoul Leader’s Son Says: 


The Associated Press 

SEOUL — A son of President Kim 
Young Sam told a court Monday that the 
millions of dollars he received from 
businessmen had come with ' ‘no strings 
attached.” 

Kim Hyun Chul, 37, who was ar- 
rested in May on charges of bribery and 
tax evasion, is die first close relative of 


After 2 Tense Weeks, Vital Cargo Vessel Docks With Mir 


By David Hoffman 

Post Struct- 

KOROLYOV. Russia — After al- 
most two weeks of mishaps and dis- 
appointment. the Russian-American 
crew of (he space station Mir cleared an 
important hurdle Monday for the repair 
of their stricken vessel, with the suc- 
cessful docking of an emergency cargo 
vessel. 

“Thank God.” said a flight control- 
ler as the Progress M-35 capsule slid 
into contact with Mir while anxious 
Russian and American specialists 
watched the docking on live, large- 
screen television screens at Mission 
Control here. 

The view, from Progress looking out 
at Mir with the Earth sliding by un- 
derneath. showed the cross-hairs for 
aligning the two ships. 

The docking occurred over central 
Russia, where communications with 


Mir are at their besL Progress was car- 
rying food, oxygen, water, fuel, tools, 
personal packages from home and a 
specially-outfitted hatch to allow the 
two Russian cosmonauts and American 
astronaut to reconnect some of the elec- 
trical cables lost after the June 25 ac- 
cident with an earlier cargo drone. 

The accident occurred during a prac- 
tice docking maneuver. The mood at 
Mission Control was suspensefal as the 
bullet-shaped Progress, with solar-ar- 
rays like wings, sailed close to Mir. 
During the last incident, while under 
manual control, the cargo vessel came in 
too fast and rammed Mir. puncturing the 
Spektr research vessel. 

This time, the docking was automat- 
ic, and picture perfect The controllers 
broke into applause. 

After Progress was attached to Mir, 
the crew decided to wait before opening 
the batch and unloading more than two 
tons of material. 


They are still husbanding badly 
needed electrical energy and want to 
replenish the batteries, officials said. 
Mir draws electricity from solar cells 
aimed at the sun. 

Sergei Krikalyov, deputy director of 
flights and a veteran Mir cosmonaut 

‘Thank God , 5 said a flight 
controller as the cargo 
ship docked successfully. 


said to reporters thai a dangerous in- 
ternal spacewalk is now scheduled for 
July 18, but he added, “Wearen’rinany 
rush, we want to be well prepared.” 
During the spacewalk, one of the 
Russian cosmonauts will enter the dark 
Spektr module and search out electric 
cables for reconnection to the special 
hatch. 


The cables were disconnected right 
after the accident as the crew scrambled 
to seal Spektr. When reconnected, the 
cables will bring more power back to 
Mir from Spektr’s still-operating solar 
arrays. 

The procedure is risky not only be- 
cause the module is airless, but also 
because it is cramped and may be con- 
taminated. 

The cosmonaut will be wearing a 
bulky Life-support spacesuiL 

Mr. Krikalyov simulated the space- 
walk in an underwater pool on a model 
of Mir last week, and said he was per- 
suaded “it can be done', and it can be 
done several different ways.” 

Mr. Krikalyov said his exercise 
showed that “it is possible not to go into 
Spektr, just haifwav in, and work in the 
hatch.” 

The hazard of going all the way in is 
that a spacesuit could be tom or cut on 
jagged material. 


The hatch opening is little more than 
two feet wide. 

Mr. Krikalyov said, however, that he 
thought it would be “easier to spend a 
little more effort to go through the 
hatch” because it would be simpler to 
connect the wires. 

The module was the base for much of 
the research work being done by the 
NASA astronaut Michael Foale, a phys- 
icist, who has been aboard Mir with two 
Russian cosmonauts for seven weeks. 

Russian and U.S. officials have ex- 
pressed uncertainty about additional in- 
ternal damage thar may have occurred in 
the module since the collision. 

A NASA spokesman said a team is 
asking two questions about future 
American paiticipation: Is Mir safe and 
“is it productive?” 

He said, “We believe it’s still safe to 
be up there,” but he stopped short of 
professing that the venture is still pro- 
ductive. 


an incumbent South Korean president to 
face criminal charges. If convicted, he 
could face more than 10 years in pris- 
on. 

“I received money from business- 
men who are ail my schoolmates,” KirfT- 
Hyun Chul replied to a prosecutor’s" 
question during the opening trial ses-' 
sion. "They collected the money vol- V 
untarily and gave it to me with no strings^ 
attached to it” 

Wearing a gray prisoner’s uniform 
and rubber shoes, the son emphatically- 
denied virtually all the charges against' 1 
him. The session was devoted to ques- ' 
tiooing by the prosecution.. 

Three state prosecutors asked more 
than 170 questions in an attempt to 
prove that the young Mr. Kim had re- 
ceived $3.6 million in bribes from two 
businessmen seeking government fa- 
vors. 

The son also was charged with evad- 
ing $1.7 million in taxes on $3.8 million 
he has admitted receiving from several 
other businessmen after nis father look 
office in 1993. 

Critics say the money was part of the 
$13.7 million left over from the pres- 
ident's 1992 election campaign. The Sj 
president’s son also denied that alle- 
gation during the hearing. 

Also on trial was Kim Ki Sup, a 
former intelligence official, accusal of 
taking $17 0,000 in bribes from a busi- 
nessman seeking a cable TV license. 

Mr. Kim, then the third-high est-rank- 
ing official in the Agency for National 
Security Planning, was dismissed after 
reports said he had passed documents to 
the president’s son. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


72-Hour Strike to Cut BA Flights 

LONDON (AFP) — Thousands of British Airways pas- 
sengers face 72 hours of travel chaos starting Wednesday, 
when cabin crew will conduct the first in a series of three-day 
strikes over pay and working conditions. 

Talks collapsed Sunday between the airline and the Trans- 
port and General Workers' Union, which represents 9,000 of 
BA's 12,000 flight attendants. 

At Heathrow International Airport, at least half of BA's 
intercontinental flights will be canceled and three-quarters of 
European services grounded. At Gatwick Airport, two-thirds 
of BA's long-haul flights will be canceled. But domestic and 


Do you live in Austria, 
Belgium, Luxembourg 
or Sweden ? 

For information about subscribing call: 

Austria 01891363830 
Belgium 0800 17538 (toll-free) 
Luxemiwwg 0800 2703 (toll-free) 

Sweden 020 797039 (toll-free). 

licralb^^Snlmitc. 

the wmurs duu ne*sb\peh 


European flights from Gatwick, and international flights from 
regional airports will run normally. 

Cameras Check AU Cars in Chunnel 

LONDON (AFP) — All cars using the Channel Tunnel are 
checked by a computerized system set up to fight crime, 
terrorism and drug trafficking. The Times of London reported 
Monday. 

Cameras read license plates and the numbers are checked 
against central police records in London, the newspaper said. 
If suspect plates are sighted, a control center is alerted. The 
system has been functioning for three months is to be extended 
to vehicles taking ferries at Dover, England, the paper said. 

United Adds Amenities for the Few 

CHICAGO (AP) — The skies are becoming friendlier for 
United Airlines' first-class, business and full- fare coach pas- 
sengers, who make up 9 percent of the United's customers but 
account for 44 percent of its revenue. 

The airline is offering them shower and valet facilities in 
airport lounges, more comfortable seats and preferential fre- 
quent-flier programs. 


The Zur icb 

Alt Suite note i 

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Zurich, very generous, c-'cganl end 
distinguished. Ar-k her offer. 

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Sci* our 
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every Saturday 
in Tbe Intemiarket 


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Coon Dal Sot 27WJ 

DiUln 2068 

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FanMurt 2078 

(toms 2373 

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Forecast tar Wednesday through Friday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 


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: 22/71 14/57 pc 
31/88 12/53 0 
26/82 19456 pc 
24/75 18/64 pc 
77/69 18*1 PC 
24/75 imi pc 
23/73 14157 pc 
26/79 17*82 ah 
24/75 15/99 pc 
26/79 1783 * 
19/66 1 1/52 PC 
21/70 1253 c 
27/80 IMI pc 
26/79 IMI pc 
25/77 73*65 pc 
23/73 1385 1 
2818? IB/64 pc 
SS/tS IBM pc 
26/79 ami 
25/77 17/62 pc 
26/77 16/61 pc 
32/89 (Ml pc 
22/71 16*4 pc 
27/80 178? pc 
27/80 1684 4 
2871 1386 c 
24/75 1988 4 
22/71 1366 pc 
24/75 13/55 pc 
24/75 1385 pe 
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24/75 14/S7 pc 
21/70 13/5600 
2*73 15/59 pc 
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23*73 1283*1 
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2*79 17*2 pc 
2577 1681 pc 
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3*102 7780*1 
27/80 2088 pc 
3381 1986 pc 

3S« 188/a 
27780 15/59 pc 
42/107 22/71 a 
43/100 708? 4 



North America 

Sunny, hot and dry from 
th© Southwest Into trie 
southern Plains, but the 
lower Mississippi Valley 
will be humid with scat- 
tered thunderstorms. A 
storm moving from trie 
Midwest vito New England 
Thursday and Friday may 
cause some heavy down- 
pours. Partly sunny in the 


Europe 

Scotland and Ireland will 
have a few showers, bin 
the rest ol England wa be 
pleasant, with some sun- 
shine Thursday to Satur- 
day. France, Germany and 
southern Scandinavia will 
also be nice with gome 
sunshine. Some heavy 
reins are likely In Bulgaria 
and from Romania to 
southern Ukraine. 


Asia 

A band of soakng ram wfl 
be across southeastern 
China, Just norm of Hong 
Kong. Beijing and all or 
northern ana western 
China will be sunny, hoi 
and dry Thursday into Sat- 
urday. Seoul will have 
thunderstorms Thursday, 
Bren party sunny. Warm In 
Tokyo with the chance lor 
showera. 


North America 

Wg5° , *?cwW 
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Atonta 3V88 21/70 1 

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Chicago 288 S 17782*1 

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Houston 33/91 2271 PC 

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SMS 2271 pc 
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36/97 25/77 s 
2984 26/79 1 
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3381 24m pc 
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31/86 26/79 PC 
3289 23/73 C 
3086 26/77 pc 
46/115 2984 s • 
2984 22/71 4 
3585 277804 
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31/86 23/73 pc 
42/107 3088 s I 
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27*0 22/71 f 2882 24/75 C 
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Latin America 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


arehy 

Rage 

5 bS 8S£** 

' CTe hijacked ai J* 0 
as nwdbiocks g p"; 
^Ovebicie^ 

• bamed in Northed 
ay morning. 01 
s Touched off whe 

• ““*le to arrange V 

Protestant mafch 
mu-march protesters 
march through 
^““‘ghborhoS 

J hnndredS^ 
■n.U'eQuholiccom. 

■ Nothing justify 
olence we have seen 

some common sense 
p between the tu 0 
it could have been 

uid be speaking witb- 
rs about parades due: 

to see some willing -1 
‘ding of the events rif 
seted m their words 
e days ahead.” the 

larches were to con- 
the week, includin'* 
the mostly Catholic 
f. 


lions, 

n Says, 

h Korean president to 
ges. If convicted, he 
tan 10 years in pris- 

iney from busincy,- 
/ schoolmates.” Kim 
d to a prosecutor's 
le opening trial sev 
cted the money vol- 

• to me with no strings 

* prisoner's uniform 
die son emphatically 
1 the charges against 
was devoted to ques- 
tecutipn. 

secutors asked more 
is in an attempt to 
mg Mr. Kim had re- 
n in bribes from two 
ing government hi- 

fi charged with evad- 
taxes on S3.8 million 
ceiving from several 
after his father took 

xmey was part of the 
over from the pres- 
tion campaign. The 
so denied that ifle- 
learing. 

vas Kim Ki Sup. a 
; official, accused ot 
l bribes from a busi- 
cable TV license. 
ie third-highest-rank- 

Agency for National 
was dismissed after 


"id 


Doeuments Said to Trace Lippo Campaign Aid 


By Lena H. Sun 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Senate investi- 
gators have discovered records that in- 
dicate areal e$uue holding company run 
by John Huang while he was working 
for the Jakarta-based Lippo Group ap- 
parently was used to funnel money from 
Indonesia into U.S. election campaigns, 
according to sources close to the inquiry 
into campaign fund-raising activities. 

.'Financial documents obtained by the 
Senate Governmental Affairs Commit- 
--r ■ee, -which begins televised hearings 
Tuesday into the campaign finance 
scandal, show that Hip ifing Holdings 
Lid., part of the lippo Group, received 
regular injections of foreign hinds and 
gave about $79,000 in U.S. political 
contributions, the sources said. 

• Mr. Huang, a former top fund-raiser 
for the Democratic National Committee 
who is the major figure in the scandal, 
formerly headed Lippo’s U .S. operations 
and was Hip Hing’s vice president. 

. Comminee investigators believe that 
they have developed the first substan- 
tive insight into how money directed by 
Lippo, amulti bill ion-do liar global con- 
glomerate, might have found its way 
into U.S. political campaigns. 


’7 0-Year Project Nears 
Completion at Last 

WASHINGTON — In 1926. Con- 
gress approved the construction of the 
Federal Triangle, a complex of gov- 
ernment buildings to replace a rundown 
neighborhood in the middle of Wash- 
ington, between the White House and 
the Capitol. 

Now, after a Depression, three major 
wars and uncounted shifts in public taste 


For months, key questions in the fund- 
raising controversy have been how for- 
eign money was channeled into U.S. 
campaigns and whether Lippo was di- 
recting illegal contributions by its ex- 
ecutives and employees. It is illegal under 
U.S. election law for anyone who is not a 
citizen or legal resident to contribute to 
campaigns, or for anyone to contribute in 
someone eise’s name. Any money 
donated by corporations must came from 
income generated in the United States. 

The financial documents obtained by 
investigators show that Hip Hing Hold- 
ings, based in California, did not generate 
enough income to cover the political 
contributions it made to local, state and 
federal campaigns from 1991 to 1993. 

Mr. Huang was in charge of Hip 
Hing’s administration at a time when it 
was donating to US. political campaigns. 
Investigators are also questioning wheth- 
er funds from the real estate company 
might have been used to reimburse Lippo 
executives for political contributions. 

The Senate committeois to hear testi- 
mony from two former employees of 
Hip Hing. 

Tracking Lippo has proved compli- 
cated, investigators said. The Lippo em- 
pire is divided into at least 143 sub- 
sidiaries and joint ventures in 11 


and political winds, the last building is 
almost finished and its first tenants are 
moving in. 

The soon to be completed Ronald 
Reagan Building and International 
Trade Center is a wide. L-shaped struc- 
ture on Pennsylvania Avenue that will 
cost up to $738 million, It will have nine 
stories above ground and five below. 

It survived efforts by some conser- 
vative Republicans in Congress to cut it 
back, thanks partly to former Repre- 
sentative Andrea Seastrand, Republican 
of California. 


countries. Many of the companies are 
domiciled in such jurisdictions as the 
Cayman Islands or Bermuda, where dis- 
closure laws are weak. 

Lippo’s owners, the Riady family of 
Indonesia, have longtime political and 
personal ties to President Bill Clinton. 
Mochtar Riady got to know Mr. Clinton 
in the early 1 980s when he and his sons 
became involved in a business venture 
in Little Rock, Arkansas. Mr. Raidy’s 
son James became active in Democratic 
Party causes with Mr. Huang in the 
1980s while living in California. The 
Riady family owned a California bank 
that Mr. Huang headed. The Riadys and 
their business associates have contrib- 
uted more than $700,000 to the Demo- 
cratic Party since L991. 

As a Lippo executive, Mr. Huang was 
an important figure in Asian-American 
political circles and helped raise money 
for Mr. Clinton’s 1992 presidential cam- 
paign and for Democratic senators. He 
frequently spoke out for more political 
involvement by Asian- Americans and 
suggested that campaign donations were 
a way for the Asian community to gain 
greater influence in the political system. 

Mr. Huang left Lippo in 1994 to be- 
come a deputy assistant secretary at the 
Commerce Department. He specialized 


She blunted the complaints of fellow 
conservatives with a bill to have the 
structure named after Mr. Reagan, who 
lives in her former district in Santa 
Barbara. (NYT) 

Medicare: Making 
The Rich Pay More 

WASHINGTON — After years of 
attempting to head off a Medicare crisis 
by cutting payments to die medical in- 
dustry, the Senate abruptly took a new 


JJ.S. Confirms Death of Mexican Drug Lord 


By Douglas Farah 

Washuighw hut Service 

.WASHINGTON — The U.S. Drug 
Enforcement Administration has con- 
finned the death of Amado Carrillo 
Fuentes, the leader of Mexico’s most 
powerful drug cartel, who died last week 
following eight hours of plastic surgery 
to drastically alter his appearance. 

-Mexican officials invited U.S. drug 
enforcement agents to view the body 
and observe^ the. identification proce- 
dures ata funeral home in his home state 


of Sinaloa, the administrator of the 
agency, Thomas Constantine, said in a 
telephone interview. The agents also 
photographed the body. 

Mr. Constantine said that according 
to information from U.S. intelligence 
sources and Mexican officials. Mr. Car- 
rillo and his organization had been un- 
der increasing pressure in the last six 
months, forcing the drug baron to live as 
a fugitive. 

Mr. Constantine said “fairly reliable 
sources" indicated that Mr. Carrillo had 
flown to Russia, Cuba and South Amer- 


ican countries recently, “constantly 
looking for a safe haven.” 

Because of thar, he said, Mr. Car- 
rillo’s desire to undergo massive plastic 
surgery made sense. 

Narcotics experts estimate that about 
70 percent of die cocaine used in the 
United States comes through Mexico. 

“Amado CanilJo Fuentes was argu- 
ably the most powerful drug trafficker 
in Mexico.” Mr. Cons can tme said. 
“The disruption his death will cause 
among Mexican drug trafficking orga- 
nizations will be significant." 


The Oyster. 


* ■■ 






.•ft jjj 


in international economic affaire, was 
responsible for Asian trade and had a top- 
secret security clearance that enabled 
him to participate in classified briefings. 

Just Wore joining the federal gov- 
ernment, Mr. Huang received $788,750 
from Hip Hing for what he described as 
“salary, bonus and severance bonus” 
for his Lippo employment 

Republicans on the Senate panel plan 
to raise more questions during the bear- 
ings about Mr. Huang’s contacts with 
Lippo while he was on the federal 
payroll. In addition to previously report- 
ed telephone calls from his Com m erce 
Department office to Lippo’s offices in 
Los Angeles, Mr. Huang often used the 
Washington office of Stephens Inc. to 
keep in touch with Lippo, congressional 
and White House sources said. 

He also used the office when he was 
still employed by Lippo but seeking a 
job with the new Clinton administration. 
Stephens is a large. Little Rock-based 
investment bank that had joint ventures 
with Lippo in Arkansas and in Asia. 

Stephens officials said A. Vernon 
Weaver, now the U.S. representative to 
the European Union and formerly head 
of the Stephens office in Washington, 
allowed Mr. Huang to use the office for 
personal business as a courtesy. 


tack last month: Make the rich pay more 
and raise the eligibility age. 

Senators voted to raise Medicare 
premiums for elderly individuals who 
make more than $50,000 a year, and to 
slowly increase to 67 the age at which 
seniors can start receiving coverage. 

Hie ideas, which are absent from the 
House budget legislation, are among the 
many proposals that will be up for grabs 
when legislators sit down with the 
White House to agree on a final plan to 
balance the budget by 2002. 

Thai agreement hinges on numerous 



bm Ca^a/nc Pic.-. 

Fred Thompson, Republican of 
Tennessee, is running the hearings. 


changes to Medicare, including one that 
would raise premiums for everyone, but 
the pair of Senate proposals are already 
emerging as among the most contro- 
versial. flVPJ 

Quote / Unquote 

Mark Souder, Republican of Indiana, 
asked what it takes to be a member of 
Congress: “You have to be at least glib. 
You don’t have to be an intellectual, but 
you have to be at least a pseudo-in- 
tellectual.” {NYT} 


Away From Politics 

• Two men and a woman were found shot to death in a Starbucks coffee 

shop in the fashionable Georgetown section of Washington. All three worked 
at the shop and their bodies were discovered in a backroom shortly after 5 A-M. 
when another employee arrived for work, the police said. ( AP ) 

• A Delta Airlines plane with 154 people on board skidded to a stop during 

an emergency landing at Albuquerque, New Mexico, injuring three people. 
Delta Flight 1470’s 148 passengers and six crew members left die plane via an 
emergency chute. The cause of the emergency aboard the 727 airliner wasn't 
clear. {API 

• A water-dropping helicopter crashed while fighting a wildfire in the San 

Bernardino National Forest in California, killin g the pilot. (AP) 

• A man wanted for spousal abuse held his young son at knifepoint at Port Sl 

John, Florida, before leading authorities on a 75-mile (120-kilometer) chase 
and plowing his truck into an overpass, killing them both. (AP) 


PAGE 3 


2 Strangers 
Died Together, 
Victims of a 
Ghastly Spree 

The Associated Press 

AUSTIN, Texas — The young men 
were strangers, one an astronaut’s son 
and the other a city employee. But they 
died together in the trunk of a sub- 
merged car, victims of what the police 
say were unrelated car hijackings. 

The bodies of Brandon Shaw, 20- 
year-old son of the former NASA space 
shuttle chief, Brewster Shaw Jr., and 
Juan Cot era, 25, were pulled from Town 
Lake on Wednesday. They were in the 
trunk of the elder Shaw's car. 

“As far as we can tell at this point, it 
was just a random situation. There was 
no connection.” Police Lieutenant Dav- 
id Parkinson said of the two deaths, 
believed to have occurred June 30. 

“It was an absolutely horrendous 
event — it would be a cliche to even call 
it a tragedy,” he said. 

Derrick Williams and Ahmad McA- 
doo, both 17. were arrested on aggra- 
vated robbery charges and the police 
may add charges of capital murder, 
which carries die death penalty. The 
police said one of the youths led them to 
the car. 

The police said the pair abducted Mr. 
Cotera and a woman friend late on June 
30. The woman was sexually assaulted 
and tied to a tree before the suspects 
disappeared with Mr. Cotera in the 
woman's car. 

Soon after, the teenagers allegedly 
rammed Mr. Shaw's 1982 Volvo, 
forced the two men into the Volvo’s 
trunk and pushed it into Town Lake. 

Both men were alive when the car 
went into the water, according to the 
Travis County medical examiner, 
Roberto Bayardo. Neither victim had 
apparent physical injuries and there was 
no evidence that they had tried to escape 
the trunk. 

The younger Shaw was a University 
of Texas junior studying architectural 
engineering. His father resigned as di- 
rector of space shuttle operations two 
years ago. 

He flew three space shuttle flights, 
then left the astronaut corps in 1989 and 
has since held several National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration man- 
agement jobs. 

Donnie Williams Sr., the father of 
one of the suspects, told the Austin 
American-Statesman that he was tired 
of being called by the media. 

“My son is looking at dying," he 
said. “There are already two people 
dead." 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 




Patten Charges 
ILK. Yielded 

On Democracy 
In Hong Kong 


BRIEFLY 






The Associated Press 

HONG KONG — After less than a 
week out of office, Chris Patten, the 


<*> ^ 
***■ . 


former governor of Hong Kong, has 
charsed that Britain ignored the former 


m 


charged that Britain ignored the former 
colony’s leanings toward democracy in 
an attempt to appease China. 

His allegations drew condemnation 
and denial from the government in Lon- 
don. But Paddy Ashdown, leader of Bri- 
tain ’s Liberal Democrats, an opposition 
party, demanded the release of docu- 
ments that shed light on what he termed 
a matter of the “gravest seriousness.” 
Mr. Patten said that London, under a 
former foreign secretary. Lord Howe, 
entered into a “gents' understanding” 
with Beijing to renege on a 1984 British 

S umise to introduce direct elections in 
ong Kong starting in 1988. 
Government polls conducted in the 
colony in 1987, Mr. Patten said, were 


•jff, „ ,*>*» x.-.J £ tv 

k'.-ft&S&fiSS 


wm 




jamo RmURetilfm 


A Hong Kong resident calling for Japan to apologize to China. 

China Makes a Vow 

f\wm 9 Q / 7 Mondanao since mid-June. C 

Ufl Ol invasion said the fionre on rebel loss 


shaped and framed in “spectacularly 
imaeinaUve wavs” to imply that Hong 


imaginative ways” to imply that Hong 
Kong's citizens neither valued nor 
really wanted democracy. 

"There is absolutely no doubt at all 
that the majority wanted direct elec- 
tions,” Mr. Patten said in an interview 
with the Sunday Times of London. 


“If I were a citizen of Hong Kong, I 
ould regard it as very bad that 1 hadn't 


would regard it as very bad that I hadn't 
been kept in the know and that my views 
had been treated in this way," he added. 

Hong Kong returned to Chinese sov- 
ereignty July I under a 1984 Chinese- 
Bridsh agreement called the Joint Dec- 
laration. 

Mr. Patten, an ardent defender of 
democracy in Hong Kong, provoked 
Beijing shortly after be arrived here in 
1992 by changing the election system. 

He sounded this theme to the last, 
saying in his farewell speech last week 
that democracy should be the territory ’s 
“unshakable destiny.” 

Mr. Patten's latest remarks could well 
be as personal as they are ideological — 
a response to British diplomats who said 
that his democratic reforms were a futile 
exercise that aggravated Beijing into 
aborting the legislature. 

"It's to be expected." said Michael 
Yahuda, a China specialist at the Lon- 
don School of Economics. “He's taken 
an awful lot of flak from senior British 
Foreign Office people, and also politi- 
cians, without being able to answer 
them,” Mr. Yahuda said Monday on 
Hong Kong radio. “In a way, if they 
dish it out, they've got to accept some of 
aback.” 


BEIJING — Top Chinese officials 
opened a new wing of a memorial hall 
Monday marking the Japanese inva- 
sion of the country 60 years ago and 
vowed that a richer, stronger China 
would never again fall prey to outside 
bullying. 

The deputy chairman of the Central 
Military Commission, Liu Huaqing, 
and the propaganda chief. Ding Guan- 
gen, presided over the opening of the 
Memorial Hall for the Chinese 
People's War of Resistance Against 
Japan near the Marco Polo Bridge in 
the capitaL 

“Although 60 years have passed, 
we will never forget the heinous 


about 150 rebels, 15 soldiers and 5 
civilians had died in fighting' on 
Mondanao since mid-June. Officials 
said the figure on rebel losses was 
based largely on reports from villagers 
fleeing battle zones. (Reuters) 


More Bombs Fall 
On Kabul Airport 


crimes of burning, killing, raping and 
looting committed by die Japanese 


looting committed by the Japanese 
imperialists on Chinese soil,” the 
city’s Communist Party chief, Wei 
Jianxing. said. 

The Marco Polo Bridge was the site 
of a July 7, 1937, clash between Jap- 
anese and Chinese forces that sparked 
the- full invasion of China, in which 35 
million Chinese died. (Reuters) 


KABUL, Afghanistan — Opposi- 
tion jets pounded the combined mil- 
itary and civilian airport for the third 
consecutive day Monday amid accu- 
sations by Taleban that Iran and Rus- 
sia were supplying the bombers. 

It was still dark Monday morning 
when Taleban anti-aircraft guns 
opened fire. Three jets flew low as 
they dropped several bombs. One of 
them exploded in an empty field near a 
multistory apartment building. There 
were no reports of injuries. (AP) 


Beijing Will Not Lift 
Ban on Missionaries 


Philippine Rebels 
Warn About Talks 


MANILA — Muslim rebels 
threatened Monday to pull out of 
cease-fire talks with Manila and start a 
major offensive if the Philippine mil- 
itary attacked their main camp on 
Mindanao. 

A1 Haj Murad, military vice chair- 
man of the Moro Islamic Liberation 
Front, issued the warning after new 
fighting broke out on the southern 
island. General Amulfo Aeedera, said 


BEIJING — Leaders of two stale- 
controlled groups that run China’s 
Protestant churches asserted Monday 
that the Chinese people had religious 
freedom, but they ruled out allowing 
foreign missionaries or foreign-prin- 
ted Bibles in the country. 

The officials rejected complaints by 
religious activists that China’s Com- 
munist leaders were systematically at- 
tacking independent religions activ- 
ity. “There is no general persecution 
in China.” said Han Wenzao, pres- 
ident of the Chinese Christian Coun- 
cil. “But China being so vast, you 
cannot expect the policy of religious 
freedom to be applied completely 
everywhere.” (AP) 


■* vJ.v. .' V-i'; . 

• ■ " ; . • r v 




inTtO-JurrBr-lr^nM 


r-T-.. : '■ 


INTO THIN AIRr 
A Personal Account of the Mount 
Everest Disaster 

By Jon Krakauer. 293 pages. $24.95. 
Villard. 


Reviewed by Michael Olmert 

M ountains don't kin people, 

people do. Certainly that’s one 


idea you stagger away with from Jon 
Krakauer's dramatic book. It's the defin- 
itive hour-by-hour history of the dis- 
astrous May 1996 assault on Mount 
Everest, when the mountain consumed 
12 lives, the worst single climbing sea- 
son ever. Six of 1 1 climbers in 
Krakauer's party met their deaths, in- 
chiding their able and enthusiastic lead- 
er, Rob Hall. 


But how can you blame the mountain? 
We were not designed to live at 29,028 
feet, the mountain's height as well as the 
cruising altitude of a 747. Still, we will 
try. Since 1924, 714 men and women 
have achieved the summit of Everest In 
the same span, 156 died. You’d like to 
think that they all went gallantly and 
sensibly. But' most didn’t. They were 
sacrificed on the altar of bod decisions, 
incompetent planning, a lack of extensive 
high-altitude acclimatization, sudden bad 
weather, a failure to listen to their bodies 
and, possibly most fatally of all, hubris. 

We must tempt fate, it seems. How 
else can you explain the death of pho- 
tographer Bruce Herrod two weeks after 
the carnage of May 10-12, 1996? He 
died on the summit, having run our of 
bottled oxygen and energy, after refits- 


CHESS 


By Robert Byme 


W HY' should anyone with a point- 
and-a-half lead and just three 


YY and -a -half lead and just three 
rounds to go in a tourney of top class 
players work hard to win more games? 
The Bulgarian grandmaster Veselin To- 
palov found out in the Madrid Inter- 
national Tournament. After six rounds, 
he had set himself at a comfortable pace 
of draws to cruise safely into solo first 
place. But he reckoned without the re- 
markable zeal of Alexei Shirov, who put 
on a three-game winning streak that al- 
lowed him to overtake Topalov and 
share first place. The moral is that To- 
palov should not have counted him out. 

The bluntest way of knocking out the 
e4 pawns is the l...d5 2 ed Qd5 of the 
Center Counter Game, for which Black 
concedes White a tempo with 3 Nc3. 
Once considered primitive, it has taken 
its place in the storehouse of current 
openings. 

At the Hastings International Tour- 
nament at the turn of the year, a John 
Nunn-Stuart Conquest game went 8 Ne4 
Qc7 9 Nf6 gf 10 Qe2 Nd7 1 10...Bc2 1 1 
Rc 1 Bg6 1 2 dS cd 13 Bb5! Nc6 14 Nd4 is 
powerful for White) 1 1 O-O-O, with a 
slight superiority for White. In the present 
game. Salov chose, after 8 Nd5, to avoid 


doubled f pawns by 8...Qd8 9 Nf6 Qfi5. 

After 10 Qe21, it would have been too 
dangerous for Salov to purloin a pawn 
with 10...Bc2? because 1 1 d51 Qb2 120- 
0 cd 13 Bb5! Nc6 14 Be3 creates crush- 
ing threats of 15 Nd4 or 15 Racl. Thus, 
the recapture with 9...Qf6 reveals its 
drawbacks. 

And once again, after !0...Bg4 II d5!? 
Bf3 12 gf, Salov was afraid to accept the 
pawn sacrifice with 12_.Qb2. Very likely 
he was right. For example, there might 
come 13 0-0 cd 14 Bd5 Nc6 15 Rabl 
Qc2 16 Rb7 Nd4 17 Qe3 Qc5 18 Qd4! 
Qd4 19 BcfrKdS 20 Ba5 Kc8 21 Rc7 Kb8 
22 Rbl Qb6 23 Bb6 ab 24 Rb7 Kc8 25 Rf7 
Ra2 26 Bd7 Kb8 27 Be6 Ra6 28 Bc4 Ra3 
29 Rb6 Kc8 30 Be6 Kd8 31 Rb8 mate. 

After 16 Be4 (16 Bb7? Rab8 yields 
Black excellent counterplay against the 
white king position), perhaps Salov 
should have played 16...Bc5. His 

16.. .Be7 let Shirov steal a pawn with 17 
Bh7 Kh7 18 Qd3 Kg8 19 Qd7. 

After 20 Rhgl, Salov could not play 

20.. .Qh4? because 21 Rg4 Qf6 22 Rdgl 
g6 23 Bg5 wins a piece. Moreover. 
20— 21 Rs>5 On 22 Rhfic.fi 23 R cfii 


SALOV/BLACK 


27 Rf I wins outright. 

Salov hoped for a counterattack with 
26...b4, but after 27 Qb4 Qf5 28 Kb3! 
Raa8. Shirov struck the decisive blow 
■with 29 Rg7! Salov did not bother with 



29— Kg7 30 Rgl because 30...Kf6 31 
Qh4 Ke5 fails into 32 Qd4 mate. 


Qh4 Ke5 falls into 32 Qd4 mate, 
30...Kh8 3 1 Qh4 Qh7 32 Qf6 forces mate 
and 30...Qg6 3 1 Rg6 Kg6 yields Shirov a 
winning ending. Salov gave up. 


CENTER COUNTER GAME 


SHIROV/WHTTE 


Position after 28 . . . Raa8 


White 

Black 

White 

Black 

Shirov 

Salov 

Shirov 

Salov 

1 e4 

d5 

15 c3 

<W) 

2 ed 


16 Be4 

Be7 

3 Nc3 

17 Bh7 

Kh7 

4 d4 

5 NI3 

Nf6 

c€ 

18 Qd3 
IS Qd7 

KgS 

be 

6 Bc4 

BfS 

20 Rhgl 

21 Qa7 

RadS 

7 Bd2 

efi 

Bc5 

8 Nd5 

Qd8 

22 Be3 

Ra8 

9 N(6 

Qf6 

23 Qb7 

Ra2 

10 Qe2 

Bg4 

24 Qe4 

Be3 

II d5 

Bf3 

25 fe 

b5 

12 gf 

cd 

26 Kc2 

b4 

13 BdS 

Nd7 

27 Qb4 

QfS 

14 0-0-0 

Ba3 

23 Kb3 

RaaS 



29 Rg7 

Resigns 


Michael Olmert. who wrote the Dis- 
covery Channel's Everest documentary, 
wrote this for The Washington Post. 


fBIJ CaB to order 
W : p this book... 

UfcjL. ; '^ij£J -Of 350.000 other 
ktfUl ■ VtJ&s, aif-shppod to 
m HI M youfrom the U.S. 

' As* tor our tree earatog otbesteeiiors 

-Tj 33 (01 1390701 m Pc 33 (0)1 MOT (to 77 


Bar Girls Fight for Tycoon’s Est^g 


The Associated Press 

MANILA — He was an unusual ty- 
coon, wearing tattered jeans in die offices 
of his corporate empire, flying a plane 
without a license and combing Manila’s 
seedy nightclubs for young bar girls. 

And when Larry Hiilblom, die Amer- 
ican founder of the air courier giant 
DHL Worldwide Express, died in a 
plane crash two years ago at age 52, he 
reft behind a fight over his $500 million 
estate eveay bit as colorful as his ec- 
centric lifestyle. 

Five young women, including three 
Fili p inn bar girls, claim he lathered their 
children and are pressing claims on his 
estate. They are pitted against his two 
brothers and the University of Cali- 
fornia, who were named as beneficiaries 
in a 19S2 will left by the unmarried Mr. 
Hiilblom. 

A court in Saipan, the Pacific island 
where Mr. Hiilblom lived for 10 years, 
plans to hold a trial on the competing 
claims this fall. 

Mr. Hiilblom was the “H” and ma- 


jority shareholder in DHL, the company 
be co-founded in 1 969 with Adrian Dal- 


sey and Robert Lynn. It now employs 
more dv>n 40.000 people in more than 
220 countries. 

The tycoon, whose body was never 
found, owned stakes in DHL, Air Mi- 
cronesia, golf courses, a cable company 
and real estate in at least 10 countries. 

His will did not provide for any chil- 
dren, but neither did it include a common 
provision denying any illegitimate heirs 
a share of his wealth — an omission 


that opened the estate to paternity suits. 

Three of the young women — two 
Filipinas and one from Palau have 
filed claims so far in the Saipan court, 
lawyers say. One other Filipina and a 
Vietnamese are expected to file soon. 

One of the claimants, Mercedes Fe- 
liciano, 17, contends that Mr. Hiilblom 
met her at a Manila-area nightclub in 
October 1994. She says he liked her 
because she was a virgin and took care 
of her after she got pregnant. 

The girls’ lawyers said they believe 
that their paternity claims can be proved 
by a mole that was surgically removed 
from Mr. Hiilblom 's face in 1993 and 
that is still at the San Francisco hospital 
where he underwent surgery. 

The mole is die tycoon’s only known 
tissue sample and is sufficient to allow 
DNA comparisons with the seven chil- 
dren Mr. Hiilblom allegedly fathered, 
the lawyers say. But the hospital has 
refused to relinquish the mole, accord- 
ing to the lawyers, who have gone to 
court in an attempt to obtain it 

Mr. HUlblom 's relatives, meanwhile, 
reportedly have turned down requests 
for blood samples for DNA tests. 

In April, Mr. Hiilblom 's estate held 
settlement talks with the various 
claimants in San Francisco. No agree- 
ment has been announced, and any deal 
would have to be approved by the 
Saipan court. 

The man who produced all this trou- 
ble probably would not have cared. 

friends and associates describe Mr. 
HUlblom as a man preoccupied with 


adventure, sports, lira and new 
making money. i 

‘ ‘He was very mucha bachelor,’ ’ sa5d>, : 
Neil Henderson, a DHL executive.: id;?- 
Manila. ' ‘He wasn't interested in a ; ; 
or kids.” • • ' 


picker before finishing law school ai ttetj - 
University of California ar Berioky.vv 
generally wore old jeans, a T-shirra&-%> 
sneakers, even at DHL’s head q ua rtefe^' : 
From his home in Saipan, he trav^ed^ ; 
often to the Philippines, Vietnam 
Guam, where he had apartments: swfe ’ 
businesses including restaurants • 

beach resorts. He would stayfbr week&sn 4r , 
one country, then travel on td ariofceb^ I 


planes and narrowly 


when he crashed a small plane 
flvinp without a license in 1993. 


flying without a license in 1993. Heiosfcj 
an eye and severely injured iris fa6e^ 
which doctors reconstructed with metal - ; 
plates, Mr. Henderson said. 

In May 1995, Mr. HiUWom and twp| 
other people left Saipan in a twm^engtS^ 
amphibious plane to explore a propos&j 
for minin g ash from a volcano on Pagag; 
island, but bad weather forced: thehl 


back. The plane crashed into theocejm4p&|' 
miles (75 kilometers) north of Saipai^ro 


The bodies of the pilot, Robert LoniS 
and a passenger, Jesus Mafuas, 
speaker of Northern Mariana’s Housed 
Representatives, were found. Mr. Hia 
blom’s body was never located,' bur * 
conrt declare! him dead. ' ...... - -a 


Cambodian Coup Puts ASEAN in a Quandary 




The Associated Press 

SINGAPORE — Cam- 
bodia’s Southeast Asian 
neighbors plan to meet this 
week to consider how the 
coup there will affect plans to 
admit the Phnom Penh gov- 
ernment ro their regional or- 
ganization, Thailand's for- 
eign minister said Monday. 

Cambodia's scheduled ad- 
mission into the Association 
of South East Asian Nations 
was only 16 days away. 

The seven-nation trading 
bloc may be torn between its 
policy of noninterference in 
members’ domestic affairs 
and foe group’s adherence to 
the principle of peaceful 
transfer of power. 

At a news conference in 


point with other members. 
The Thai foreign minister. 


The Thai foreign minister, 
Prachuab Chaiyasan, said 
ASEAN would hold a meet- 
ing in the next week to dis- 
cuss Cambodia. 

The Thai Foreign Ministry 
issued a statement that “in 
view of the latest circum- 
stances, Thailand will have 
to closely monitor the situ- 
ation and consult with other 
ASEAN countries on the 
latest developments in Cam- 
bodia, including the question 
of timing of its admission.” 

Earlier Monday, die con- 
sensus-driven ASEAN expe- 
rienced the unusual phenom- 
enon of members giving 


conflicting public statements 
on whether Cambodia should 


Bangkok, delayed for four 
hours while Thailand co- 


ordinated a common view- 


be admitted as planned at a 
foreign ministers’ meeting in 
Kuala Lumpur on July 23. 


“If this fighting does not 
stop, obviously ASEAN 
members will have to rethink 
this seriously,” said Foreign 
Secretary Domingo Siazon 
of the Philippines. 

A few hours earlier, 
Malaysia's acting prime 
minister, Anwar Ibrahim, 
told reporters that ASEAN’s 
position “has not changed,” 
adding, “Hie commitment 
has already been made.” 

ASEAN comprises 
Malaysia, Indonesia, die 
Philippines, Brunei, Singa- 
pore, Thailand and Vietnam. 
The group decided last 
month to admit Burma, Laos 
and Cambodia, dismissing 
pressure from human-rights 
groups and Western govern- 
ments over the Burmese mil- 
itary junta’s treatment of dis- 
sidents. 


In Cambodia; “domestj^p^ 
conflict should be resolved 
peacefully and the dispute 
ing parties shoidd exerois^^ L 
restraint to prevent che sim- ^ 
ation from worsening,” 
President Suharto 
donesia said ASEAN; 
accepted Cambodia 
member hoping to ‘‘tiring!*; 
that country to a peaceful^ 
life in this region,” he^ 
said. ; 

Several ASEAN govern^?-; 
meats urged restraint, called,^! 
for a cease-fire and expressed 
concern Monday. l-'rrfj 

Singapore’s goveraxnent^^ 
went further, saying: • 

“Singapore disapproves ' 1 ? 
of the change of government >j\ 
through, violent means 
calls on all parties to adhere'- % 
to the constitutional process-^ ir- 
es in place in Cambodia.” ' : .i 


ing to abandon his seriously behind- 
schedule final assault This means he 
must have clambered past and probably 
within a few feet of, the frozen and 
contorted bodies of guides Hall and 
Scott Fischer, a rictus of pain and icicles 
still on their faces. 

How could he have gazed on all that 
and still kept going? One problem is 
anoxia. Body and brain will not function 
on limited oxygen, and under those con- 
ditions one of our survival mechanisms is 
to turn off rational thinking, conserving 
that energy for more basic functions such 
as breathing and pumping blood 

As with any morality play, Krakauer's 
drama has a rich cast of characters, good 
and evil. The IMAX moviemaker David 
Breashears jeopardized his $6 million 
film by giving his team’s oxygen to the 
rescue attempt. The New Zealand guide 
Andy Harris sacrificed his already de- 
bilitated body to reach friends in perfl. 
Team leaders Hall and Fischer played 
both heroes and fools; they died trying to 
save the very lives they endangered. 
Most troubling of all was a New York 
socialite, who had to be dragged both up 
and down the mountain. The energy ex- 
pended in moving her about meant that 
others died. Moreover, she was out- 
rageously kitted out for the climb: two 
laptops, three 35mm cameras, video 
camera, digital camera, two tape record- 
ers, CD-ROM player, printer and this: * ‘I 
wouldn't dream of leaving town without 
an ample supply of Dean & De Luca's 
Near East blend and my espresso 
maker.” Not that she had to cany all this 
stuff, you understand. 

The going price for attempting the 
summit is 565,000. Trouble is, the 
powerful, rich and determined souls ac- 
customed to getting their way don't like 
being tinned around when they’re near 
their goal. So Everest is merely another 
target for the privileged. Tour-guiding 
has become big business, and guide out- 
fits like to boast that all their clients make 
it to the top. Some stay forever. 

To be fair, the culprit in May 1 996 was 
a sudden, hurricane-strength blizzard, re- 
sulting in whiteout and wind chili down 
to 100 degrees below zero. But such - 
weather is to be expected on Everest, 
which is, after all. in the jet stream. 
Timing is everything. 

This is a great book, among the best 
ever on mountaineering. Gracefully and 
efficiently written, carefully researched, 
and actually lived by its narrator, it 
shares a similar theme with another sort 
of book, a novel called “The Great 
Gatsby": i.e., the rich get away with 
murder. 


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tip V&P 


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Estate 

much a bachelor ". 
a DHL executive Ji ^ 
m * interested in a 

who worked as a P r 

sting law school a ’!!' 
alifonua at Berkei 
‘Id jeans, a T-shi n fe e> 
DHL-.hcadq^ 

- m Saipan, he tra^ 
?PP®es» Vietnam 6 ^ 

- ; had apartment!, ^ 

,duj g restaurant ^ 

would stay for wee^^ 

a travel on to a™* 
tie fished, golfed n* 1 

■Kiubs^rSj 1 " 

rowly escaped fe 
a small plane he w h 
icensein 1993. Heir, 
«ly injured his fj? 

constructed with .S 
erson said. ul 
Mr. Hillblom and n*„ 
iaipanuiatwm-enui' 

^oe xporea cm 

wi a volcano on &„Z 

w S? r forced '£ 

•■ashed into the ocean I! 
^s) north of Sai r a n 
the pilot, Roben Lu n » 
Jesus Mafnas. 
an Manana’s Houv t „, 
were found. Mr Hill « 
s never located. hm •. 
m dead. 


landar 


-ambodia. “domesia 
ct should be resolved 
fully and the dispui- 
trties should exercise 
nt to prevent the mu,. 
from worsenin';.' 
ent Suhano of Tn- 
ia said. ASEAN ha.j 
:ed Cambodia js a.- 
er hoping to "brint 1 
ountry to a peaceful 
n this region." h? 

erai ASEAN auvern- 
urged restraint', calls,! 
sase-fire and expressed 
■n Monday, 
japore’s governnicm 
miher, saying; 
ngapore disapprove- 
change of government 
.h violent means and 
»n all parties u« adhere 
constitutional pnxvsv 
•lace inCambt'dia." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGE 5 


\ -■ 


i Bosnian Serbs Sink Into Squalor as Their Leaders Amass Wealth 


By Chris Hedges 

■„ . Wr*‘ Tunrs Strviir 

“■ BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Hetzegovi- 

- na — The woman clutched half a loaf of 
bread and held out a small tin pot as a 

- local Red Cross volunteer ladled out a 

- ration of thick soup from an army field 
. ‘stove. 

■ ~ “I live up there,*' said the woman. 
Milena Vucetic. pointing to a rough, 
■‘unfinished house lacking windows and 
‘-a roof. “There are five of us. We sleep 
! on the dirt floor in the basement We 
J 'take turns going for water. 1 have some 
: -onions — tonight we will have onions 
"with the soup. 

“We all had homes in Sarajevo. We 
were neighbors. Now we live like an- 

- ‘imals rooting around in the forest. “ 

Mrs. Vucetic, a 53-year-old widow hi 

- -a frayed black dress, gingerly put the lid 

- ’on her soup ration and began walking up 
-the din road to her dwelling. The soup 

‘ line, made up mostly of elderly, forlorn- 
looking men and women, inched si- 


lently forward. For these 60 people, the 
soup would be the only meal of the 
day. 

It is to lives like this that the Bosnian 
Serb leaders, now quarreling over 
power and privilege, have brought 
many of the 800,000 Bosnian Serbs in 
what the leaders call the Republika 
Srpska. At least 1 0 percent of the pop- 
ulation depends on soup kitchens run by 
the International Committee of the Red 
Cross. The factories have been wrecked 
and lie idle. Roads, water systems and 
electrical grids are crumbling with neg- 
lect, leaving many villages without 
modem amenities. 

Salaries for teachers, doctors and 
government workers are six months in 
arrears. The uneraploymenr rate is 90 
percent. More than a third of the Bos- 
nian Serb population, some 300,000 
people like Mrs. Vucetic, who were 
displaced by the war, now live a life of 
abject destitution. 

For most Bosnian Serbs, the current 
dispute between their -former leader. 


Radovan Karadzic, who still calls the 
shots but stepped down under inter- 
national pressure because he has been 
indicted for war crimes, and Biljana 
Plavsic, the figurehead Bosnian Serb 
president, holds little interest. Even the 
2,000 people who gather each afternoon 
in Banja Luka at 


the rally organized 
by her office seem b W<e aU had homes in 
bemused and indif- o - tvt i- 

rerent about the Sarajevo. Now we live 

outcome. like anim als, roo ting 

"This is an ar- , \ 

gument about how around in the forest.' 

the ruling clique 

should divide the money between them- 
selves.*' said Mile Andie, 72, a retired 
waiter, as he stood listening to bom- 
bastic speeches over huge black loud- 
speakers. 

“It has nothing to do with us. If our 
leaders really cared about us they would 
noi have led us into this tunnel of 
hell." 

Under the Dayton peace agreement. 


the Serbian enclave, which makes up 
about half of Bosnia, was to be in- 
tegrated into a state jointly nm by 
Muslims and Bosnian Croats and Serbs. 
Refugees and displaced people were 
supposed to be permitted to return to 
their homes. And indicted war crim- 
inals, like Mr. 

. Karadzic and Gen- 
omes in eral Ratko Mladic. 

i- who is still firmly 

v we live in charge of the 

rooting Bosnian Serb 

_ f Array, were to be 

forest.' handed over to the 

— international war 

crimes tribunal in The Hague. 

But the goals outlined at Dayton re- 
main illusive. The Bosnian Serb leaders, 
along with the Bosnian Croats who con- 
trol about 20 percent of Bosnia-Her- 
zegovina, steadily reinforce the ethnic 
partition lines and refuse to cooperate 
with the Bosnian Muslims or to honor 
the peace agreement. 

The refusal of Bosnian Serb leaders 


Italy S umm ons Army in War on Naples Mob 


Return 

ROME — The government plans to 
send troops to Naples to help quell a 

' surge in mob violence that has shocked 
the country. 

Giorgio Napolitano, the interior 
minister, announced the measure late 
Sunday, but he warned that the army 
alone could nor defeat the so-called 
Naples Mafia, also known as the Cam- 
orra. which is locked in a bloody in- 
ternecine battle for supremacy. 

■ "We will define within the week a 

- provision fora limited and fargered use 
of the' military in Naples," Mr. Na- 
politano said in a television interview. 

: - But this will not solve all the prob- 
lems.” 

More than 80 people have been 
killed and dozens injured in a flurry of 
ruthless gang warfare that has swept 

- over the Naples area since the be- 

* ginning of the year. 

It is not the fust time that Italy has 
decided to send troops into the streets. 
The army was called up in 1978 after 

p the kidnapping and murder of Prime 

» Minister Aldo More. More recently, 
soldiers have been sent to the southern 

- region of Calabria and the island of 
Sardinia to help combat crime waves. 

Troops are still stationed in Sicily, 
five years after they were sent in after 
the murder of a leading anti-Mafia 

* magistrate, Paolo Borsellino. 

Mr. Napolitano’s decision came 








pi ' 

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Ap-nir hwii<-lV — 



Fra n™ L*iairui / Kfatcr FraniT-fViwc 


Giuseppe D’Anna, left, a kingpin in the Italian Mafia, has been a fugitive for four years. At right, a 
government soldier patrols a street in Palermo, Sicily, where troops are helping police fight organized crime. 


after another weekend of terror around 
the port city, which saw two suspected 
mobsters gunned down in broad day- 
light and a number of innocent 
bystanders, including an 8-year old 
girl, injured in the wild shootings. 

The troops “will relieve several 
hundred police officers in Naples, who 
will then be able to deal directly in 
fighting the Camorra,” the interior 
minister said in a newspaper interview 


published Monday. Around 600 troops 
are expected to be moved into the area 
to help restore law and order. 

Local hoteliers have complained 
that the sight of armed soldiers on the 
streets might dampen a tourist boom in 
Naples, but many opposition politi- 
cians said the troop deployment should 
have come earlier. "This is a bitter 
victory.” said Alessandra Mussolini, 
granddaughter of the Fascist-era dic- 


tator Benito Mussolini and a member 
of the rightist National Alliance. "We 
have been asking for the army for a 
year now.” 

About 40 Camorra clans operate in 
and around Naples. They have a more 
fragmented organization than the 
Mafia gangs on Sicily. Mr. Napolitano 
said recent police successes against the 
Naples mobsters had sparked battles 
among gangs for territory. ■ 


to comply with the agreement has 
causal international agencies to cut off 
aid. It has also helped the ruling clique 
to grow very rich. Besides having a 
monopoly on cigarette and gasoline 
sales, it controls every significant pro- 
duction facility and institution. Western 
diplomats say. 

“The ruling party runs the hospital in 
Banja Luka,” the largest city in the 
Serbian-held sector, said a surgeon who 
spoke on condition of anonymity. 
"When we get donated medicine from 


expropriated the largest houses, dress in 
flashy suits, drive luxury sedans and are 
surrounded by bodyguards. But as the 
leadership amasses wealth, the Bosnian 
Serb enclave that it governs sinks. 

"We have had three strikes this year, 
each lasting two weeks, to try and get 
the government to pay our salaries,” 
said Radmila R odic, 26. who teaches 
first grade, for which she is supposed to 


Fire Sears Salonika 

SALONIKA, Greece — Fire fight- 
ers tamed a huge blaze early Monday 
that destroyed nearly half the forest 
outside die northern Greek city of 
Salonika. 

The police said the fire also se- 
riously damaged the city's Jewish 
cemetery , built in the 17th century and 
considered a masterpiece of 
Ashkenazi architecture. A small Byz- 
antine church on the edge of the 
cemetery was destroyed. 

Residents and army troops joined 
the battle against the fire, which ini- 
tially raged on nine fronts on the heels 
of a heat wave. They were impeded by 
high winds and heavy traffic. (AFP) 

German Mock Video 

FRANKFURT — Defense Minister 
Volker Ruebe has vowed to punish 
soldiers who were involved in making 
a video of mock rapes and executions 
as training for duty in Bosnia-Her- 
zegovina last year. 

"We will take the harshest mea- 
sures against those involved and re- 
sponsible for this reprehensible act, 
also criminal prosecution.” the news- 
paper Bild quoted Mr. Ruehe as saying 
in its Monday editions. 

The private television network 
SAT1 said it had obtained a copy of the 
tape and planned to broadcast it Mon- 
day. Word of the video has proved a 


earn $20 a month. "But none of die 
strikes did any good. We have not been 
paid for six months. My generation is 
leaving.” 

A dark, frenetic despair is gripping 
the enclave. 

Banja Luka, like Pale, is dominatedat 
night by crowded bars blasting grating 
nationalistic Serbian music until nearly 
dawn. Jeeps roar through the streets, 
ignoring stop signs and traffic. Even in 
the middle of towns and cities, luckless 
motorists are confronted by gangs of car 
thieves who shove the muzzles of auto- 
matic weapons in their faces. 

“Robbery is just part of our lives 
now,” said Biljana Udovcic, 25, who 
works in a shoe shop. "If you resist, you 
are killed. Death means nothing here. ” 

European diplomats say their em- 
bassies m Belgrade, the capital of Serbia, 
have received more than 20,000 appli- 
cations in recent months from Bosnian 
Serb families to immigrate. And tens of 
thousands more Bosnian Serbs have fled 
to elsewhere in Europe illegally. 


major embarrassment for the German 
Army. (AP) 

Ankara Courts EU 

ANKARA — The government of 
Turkey’s new secularist prime min- 
ister, Mesut Yilmaz, pledged Monday 
to persevere with the country’s drive 
to win full membership in the Euro- 
pean Union. 

"Turkey will ensure its rightful 
place in die new Europe that is being 
drawn up,” said a government plan of 
action. The document promised rapid 
harmonization of laws to ease a cus- 
toms union between Turkey and the 
EU that began last year. ( Reuters ) 

More Freak Weather 

BUCHAREST — Searing beat al- 
ternating with chilly temperatures, tor- 
rential rains and other freak weather 
went into its second week in pans of 
Eastern Europe and the Balkans on 
Monday, leading to deaths and sub- 
stantial damage. 

Among the worst hit were Romania, 
where at least two people died in (he 
heat, and parts of the Czech Republic, 
where five people were reported miss- 
ing Monday and feared drowned in the 
worst flooding in 40 years. 

Heavy rainfall also continued for a 
third day in Austria on Monday, caus- 
ing dozens of traffic accidents and 
leaving major roads impassable. (AP) 


INTERNATIONAL 


bassy Service 

UR REAL ESTATE 
IGENT IN PARIS 
+33 (Off 47.20.3fl.05 

IT HOME IN PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

is to rera ® 

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Codless Newfoundland Goes High Tech 


By Howard Schneider 

_ . Washington Post Sfnict 

v ST. JOHN’S, Newfound- 
^ laod — The people of this 
province don’t get their hopes 
up easily. They have seen 


paying off, as local compa- 
nies- sprout in fields such as 
telecommunications, naviga- 
tion and mapping. 

If the image of Newfound- 
land is framed by its position 
as Canada *s poorest province. 


seemingly endless shoals of the reality is of a self-reliant 
cod fished to exhaustion, a people who have survived on 
prominent seal hunt declared "the Rock" for nearly 500 
— unfashionable and millions of years and may finally get the 
watts of hydroelectric power rewards of their durability, 
sold at bargain rates to the "Newfoundland has a very 

benefit of Quebec and the one-dimensional image in 






propping 
rest of the 






QUEBEC 


NEW h, 
BRUNSWICK 


‘MM 




y 


--United States. And that’s just 
within the last generation. 


* ‘Newfoundland has a very 
one-dimensional image in 
Canada,” as a 
i'v&tov < place forever in 
economic straits, in 
mi- J need of propping 
I up by the rest of the 
country, said Car- 
melita McGrath, a 
St John’s writer. 
“People here are so 
used to being on the 
edge, there is no 
PV'isHj shSne in it” 

The broad stat- 
istics are discour- 

I aging: unemploy- 
ment above 19 
percent; education 
levels far lower 
than the Canadian 
average; an aging 
population young 
people move to 
boom provinces 
nfT like Alberta and 
British Columbia, or even 
south to Nova Scotia, where 


- "There are many strands to opportunity is perceived to be 
*4he Newfoundland soul, and better. In a work farce of 

one is a razor-sharp cyn- around 225,000, more than ] 

- -jcism,” saidBrucePorter.ed- 100,000 receive unemploy- | 
itor of a Irterary magazine in ment insurance at some point < 

- this historic “port city, “We during the year. 


have been hoodwinked too But those numbers are not 
^many times.” _ . the ful) story. Joblessness in 

■f ’ Yet even the most“hard- Sl John’s, where the popu- 
i edgedskeptics find itdifificult lation clusters, is far lower 
j to deny tirat better times may 'than in the rest of the 
* be brewing. ' province. And even those 

i Two hundred miles off- : spread among Newfound- 
j shore, the first of what are’ land’s numerous rural vii- 
j egjected to l?e several oil rigs lages are by -no means 
i now stands in the North At- poverty-stricken, 
j -Untie; iceberg-proofed and : For much of the time since 
t . expected to punm its first John Cabot is believed to 

I i ...j.': j • i .j.j , enn .... I 


>' ■/ ’ Yet wen the mcaTard- 
1 edged, skeptics find it 'difficult 
j to deny that better times may 
J be brewing. 

I m “ J M -_£T i 


i crude by year's 


have landed here 500 years 


iO M2 

prfWTSM 


K. .On the. rugged interior of ago, tradition centered around 
{ labrador, joined with the is- fishing fra the Atlantic cod 
{ land of Newfoundland under that teemed along the Grand 
jbe same provincial govean- Banks. The fish helped sus- 
, ment, development : of the tain tens of thousands of 
t world’s largest nickel mine at Newfoundland families until 

* Voisey’s Bay proceeds with 1992, when the federal gov- 
1 the promise of thousands of eminent declared a morator- 

^I construcrion jobs- and nearly him on the fishery. 

\ f • 1,600 permanent positions. Modem trawling rechnol- 
1 In addition, provincial of- ogy, poor science, misman- 

* ficials say that efforts to steer age meat, perhaps even cli- 

* Newfoundlanders away from mate change and the 
KP^tories of fitting and into resurgence of a predatory seal 
; tecfoiology-based jobs ; are population — all were 


blamed for the disappearance 
of a renowned resource. 

The moratorium struck a 
devastating blow to the is- 
land’s culture; economically, 
it also deprived fishermen of a 
staple source of cash and left 
some villages without their 
fish-processing plants. 

The federal government 
partly offset that with a $1.5 
billion income assistance pro- 
gram. Twenty-eight thousand 
Newfoundlanders, more than 
10 percent of the labor force, 
qualified for the aid, and re- 
settlement into other jobs has 
been slow. More than 22,000 
still receive assistance, which 
is due to expire next year. 

Even in the fishing in- 
dustry, however, the worst 
may be over. Many fishermen 
have diversified into crab, 
capelin and other species to 
replace the income lost from 
cod, and the total value of the 
province's annual catch is 
now larger than it was in the 
years before the moratorium. 

Still, die fishery remains a 
precarious foundation for the 
economy, which is why pro- 
vincial officials point to the 1 
million-ton. $4.5 billion Hi- 
bernia platform and its po- 
tential sister rigs as important 
economic bridges. 

Hibernia, (he first of the 
rigs, was towed to its location 
in the spring, an event that 


prompted black-tie galas and 
the launch of a local Hibernia 
Beer. The platform has ser- 
rated edges around its base to 
fend off icebergs, but more 
importantly it is guarded by 
over-the-horizon radar and a 
team of ships ready to Jasso 
even the most treacherously 
submerged “growler” and 
nudge it off course. 

Actual employment is only 
about 600 jobs. But provin- 
cial and company officials 
say they already see a more 
important long-term effect as 
local films compete for the 
more than $300 million worth 
of goods and services that Hi- 
bernia will need each year to 
operate. 

Optimism over such proj- 
ects is hardly universal, fish- 
ermen complain that union 
rules prevent their unem- 
ployed colleagues from com- 
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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JULY 8, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 





minister i 


ftwrCiaM/ReBM* 


Troops loyal to Second Prime Minister Hun Sen carrying off looted goods Monday near Phnom Penh's airport 


Netanyahu Resolves Coalition Crisis 

Sharon, Denied Finance Portfolio , Is Loser in Infighting 

Roam Mr. Sharon would have been back in Mr. Sharon, who recently branded lie 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister the top cabinet echelon be vacated after Palestinian leaderY assCT Arafat a war 
Benjamin Netanyahu ended a coalition being forced to quit as defense minister criminal, signaled his mtenoonro raise 
crisis with his foreign minister on Mon- in 1*#53 following the massacre by Leb- his profile in the peace oy _ _ 

day at the expense OTtfiehani-liner Ariel anesc Omstians-of Palestinians in two ing araeem^astnKMih withtop^LU 
Sharon. • Beirut refugee earns that were suirou*- official, Mahmoud Abbas, also known 

Mr. Netanyahu bowed to Foreign ded by the Israeli Amy. as Abu Mazen. . ' 

Minister David Levy’s demands to dis- But Mr. Levy, a wily politician who Mr. Sharon, the architect ot f aaets 
mantle the inner ‘ ‘kitchen cabinet” that puts a prenriom on prestige, saw Mr. costly 1982 invasion “g 

sets peace policy, rather than include Mr. Sharon’s membership as a challenge to champion of Jewish Ktt 

Sharon, a former general his promised pride of place as coordin- West bank, played host Mr. Abbas alhB ■ 

The prune minister then announced ator of peace talks with the Palestine ranch in, southern Israel, raising spec 
that Mr. Sharon, his choice to succeed Liberation Organization. ■ olation (hat Mir. Sharon was trying ip 

Dan Meridor as finance minister, would Mr. Levy threatened to quit if Mr. soften his image, 
not get the top Treasury job. It will go Share® joined the inner team, a move m rnnfiihmoe Vote on Netanyahu 
instead to Yaacov Neeman, a lawyer that would have left Mr. Netanyahu with ‘ 

regarded as a political lightweight a tiny majority in Parliament. Mr. Netanyahu was expected to sufr 

“I think this crisis is a thing of the 1 Israeli media reports said Mr. Mor- vive another no-confidence vote m re- 
past,” said an Israel Radio political cor- dechai, who political commentators say 1 lament on Monday night, me ASSO- 
respondeat, Yaron DekeL “But (he has an eye on succeeding Mr. Netanyahu dated Pfoss reported from JenisaiOT.’- 
crisis was not over until Sharon was should the crisis-prone prime minister In a tough speech m the Knesset, tne 
denied the Finance Ministry, then bang, fall, actively lobbied Mr. Neeman to take opposition leader Ehud Barak tola tne 
crisis solved.” the Treasury job. prime minister that even if he survived 

On the face of it, Mr. Shanxi, cur- Mr. Shanxi. 69, mad e no immediate the vote, “You and your ministers know 


day at the expense of the hard-liner Ariel anese Christians.af Palestinians in two 
Sharon. Beirut refugee camps that were sunxmn- 

Mr. Netanyahu bowed to Foreign ded by the Israeli Amy. 

Minister David Levy's demands to dis- But Mr. Levy, a wily politician who 
mantle the inner “kitchen cabinet” that puts a premium on prestige, saw Mr. 
sets peace policy, rather than include Mr. Sharon's membership as a challe ng e to 


that Mr. Sharon, his choice to succeed Liberation 
Dan Meridor as finance minister, would Mr. Lei 
not get the top Treasury job. It will go Shan® joi 


Liberation Organization. • 

Mr. Levy threatened to quit if Mr. 
Shan® joined the inner team, a move 


instead to Yaacov Neeman, a lawyer that would have left Mr. Netanyahu with 
regarded as a political lightweight a tiny majority in Parliament 

“I think this crisis is a thing of the ' Israeli media reports said Mr. Mor- 
past,” said an Israel Radio political car- dechai, who political commentators say 
respondeat Yaron DekeL “But the has an eye on succeeding Mr. Netanyahu 
crisis was not over until Sharon was should the crisis-prone prime ministar 
denied the Finance Ministry, then bang, fati, actively lobbied Mr. Neeman to take 
crisis solved.” the Treasury job. 

On the face of it Mr. Shanxi, cur- Mr. Sharon, 69, made no immediate 


the Treasury job. 

Mr. Shanxt 69, made no immediate 


AILTDATVT A yi • , it m a • i r> * i rr* 9 tt* » ready national infrastructure minister, comment. But Israeli Army radio said he the people are ashamed and tired of to 

IuAItJLoUIJJLA: Capital IS lease Amid Lvidence of Coup S Violence should be faming at being denied a canceled a meeting with Mr. Netanyahu disgraces and fears that have been our lot 

* J m. ttmnopr hnid fwr T«r#w»i’s nunu> string)! on Sunday in what it ralH a possible since you came to power. 


Continued from Page 1 loyal to Mr. Hun Sen, echoed his state- 

ment that Prince Ranariddh would be put 
and television stations. Prince Ranar- on trial if he returned home. “Certainly 
iddh said. “I call on my people to join he will be arrested,” he said. “One 
me. my party and all other patriotic hundred percent.” 
forces to carry out resistance against The prince's military chief. General 
Hun Sen and his partisans.” Nhiek Bun Chhay, dropped from sight. 

But several officials of the defeated and even his brother said he had not 
royalist party appeared on television heard from him since Sunday. The gen- 
Monday, in the company of officials end's stronghold near the international 
supporting Mr. Hun Sen. to tell their airport was occupied Monday by Mr. 
followers to return to their government Hun Sen’s troops, 
jobs. Its grounds were strewn with to 

The appearances were an early in- debris of battle, and its orange tile roofs 
dication that a significant portion of were shattered by eight tank or mortar 
Prince Ranariddh's party would be will- rounds. A nearby Buddhist temple was 


* stronger hold on Israel’s 

ally of Prince Ranariddh’s forces — and a seat at the policy t 


ment that Prince Ranariddh would be put joined the war of words Monday, calling 


arances were an early in- 


on trial if he returned home. “Certainly 
he will be arrested,” he said. “One 
hundred percent.” 

The prince's military chief. General 
Nhiek Bun Chhay, dropped from sight, 
and even his brother said he had not 
heard from him since Sunday. The gen- 
eral's stronghold near the international 


Its grounds were strewn with to 
debris of battle, and its orange tile roofs 


Levy and to defense chief, Yitzhak 
to armed action “a fascist coup” car- Mordechai. 

ried out by “the Vietnamese Commu- “I fear greatly that Netanyahu has 
nists and their puppet, Hun Sen.” planted the seeds of the next crisis be- 
The station then carried excerpts from cause I believe that Sharon will not sit by 
a speech by Prince Ranariddh that was quietly now that another promise made 
first broadcast Sunday by its arch-enemy to him was not fulfilled,” said. Mayor 
station, to Voice of America. Roni Milo of Tel Aviv, a member of to 

The pop-pop-pop of automatic rifles ruling Likud party, 
could be heard occasionally around the Mr. Milo was referring to Mr. Net- 
city Monday, but few people paid at- anyahu’s attempt after last year’s elec- 
ten tion in the relative quiet, lifter to tion to freeze Mr. Sharon out of to 
thud of heavy weapons filled Phnom cabinet despite purported pledges to 
Penh on Saturday ana Sunday. give him a top job. It was Mr. Levy who 


quietly now that another promise made 
to him was not fulfilled,” said. Mayor 


a significant portion of were shattered by eight tank or mortar Penh on Satunlay ana Sunday. 


Prince Ranariddh's party would be will- 
ing to cooperate in to newly constituted 
government. 

There were unconfirmed reports of 
armed clashes Monday in Battambang 
and Siem Reap provinces. But the 
prince's forces are badly outgunned, 
their leadership has been driven from the 
capital, and it was not clear how much 
resistance they could muster. 

Chea Sophara. a high-ranking official 


rounds. A nearby Buddhist temple was 
also hit. and fragments of religious 
statues were scattered on its floor. 


sign of yer another cabinet crisis. 

Mr. Netanyahu quickly exercised 
some damage control on Monday, pub- 
licly putting Mr. Sharon on his limited 
ooismtatiou list 

Mr. Netanyahu’s office said the prime 
minister would consult "from time to 


Mr. Barak said Mr. Netanyahu had 
heightened social tensions and brought 
Israel to to brink of war with to Arabs, 
and warned lawmakers supporting him 
that “when the great fire erupts" they 
would “not be able to evade resporijvt* 
sibility and the judgment of the 


ca. Roni Milo of Tel Aviv, a member of to Mr. Mordechai on political and military 

xnatic rifles ruling Likud party. issues. 

y around the Mr. Milo was referring to Mr. Net- “The kitchen won't exist, but Sharon 
pie paid at- anyahu’s attempt after last year’s elec- will be in the picture,” one political 
et, after the tion to freeze Mr. Sharon out of to commentator said. “He will be con- 


Tbe small-arms fire appeared to have 
more to do with looting than with mil- 
itary engagements, but one Cambodian 


put pressure on Mr. Netanyahu to give nance Ministry as much as a greater say 


Mr. Sharon to infrastr u cture post 


time” with Mr. Sharon, Mr. Levy and people.” 

Mr. Mordechai on political and military Justice Minister Tsahi Hanegbi, de- 
issues. fending to government, insisted Mr. 

"The kitchen won't exist, but Sharon Netanyahu's public support remained 
will be in the picture,” one political strong. 

commentator said. “He will be con- The Knesset was to vote late Monday 
suited.” night on two motions criticizing th'fe 

He “He wasn't after the H- functioning of the government and 

n«nra» Ministry as much as a greater say third dealing with the freeze in the ne- 
in peace moves.” gotiations with the Palesti n ia n s. _ 


‘He wasn't after to H- 


m peace moves. 


Mr. Hun Sen's troops also occupied journalist was reported to have been shot 
both the residence and party headquar- to death by nervous soldiers. 


ters of Prince Ranariddh, which appeared Sold 
to have been looted. The airport, its duty- that id< 
free shops looted and its control tower Mr. Hi 
damaged by gunfire, remained closed. of loon 
The clandestine radio station of the mobile 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas — a potential stores. 


Soldiers still sporting to red ribbons 
that identified them during the battle as 
Mr. Hun Sen’s troops joined thousands 
of looters who raided warehouses, auto- 
mobile dealerships and electronics 


U.S. Seeks NATO Help on Karadzic 


WINNER: Cardenas 's Election as Mayor Is a Major Comeback 


The Associated Press 

MADRID — The United States will 
ask NATO leaders to help isolate 
Radovan Karadzic, to rebel Bosnian 


Dayton would provide,” Mrs. Albright 
said of to Dayton peace agreement 
The tensions in Bosnia will be to No. 
1 item up for discussion when leaders 


hanks would continue to deny $800 mil- p 
lion in reconstruction loans to the Serbs-. 
There was no immediate indication of 
anyplan to use force in Bosnia, whefd 


Continued from Page 1 

chance three years from now to become 
the first president in seven decades to be 
drawn from outside the governing In- 
stitutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. 

He will be an obvious rival to Pres- 
ident Ernesto Zedillo, who defeated him 
in 1994, but the two men have begun a 
cordial new relationship. Mr. Zedillo 
quickly congratulated Mr. Cardenas 
when his triumph Sunday becameHob-; 
vious. and Mr. Cardenas repeatedly 
praised Mr. Zedillo’s statesmanship. - 
“I think I can have constructive, col- 
laborative relations with the president,” 
Mr. Cardenas said during an interview 
on Biday in his car. 

Mr. Cardenas campaigned as an hon- 
est, anticorruption pragmatist, a stance 
that appealed to middle class Mexicans, 
many of whom voted against him during 
his two earlier presidential bids. But he 
forged his opposition party in alliance 
with socialists and is viewed by sup- 


<Ifj 




ponents this year dragged out property 
records from that period, accusing him 
enriching his family by transferring 
Michoacan lands to his mother, but 
voters seemed to dismiss them as nit- 


Kadovan Karadzic, me rebel Bosnian l item up tor discussion when leaders anyplan to use rorce m Bosnia, wnerc 
Serb leader and indicted war crimes sns- from the 16 NATO states meet for hmch. NATO peacekeepers are having diffv 
poet. Secretary of State Madeleine AJ- Tuesday, an alliance official said. cuity carrying out to 1995 accords 

bright said Monday. President Bill Clinton flew into Mad- reached nwr Dayton, Ohio, to halt the 


She told reporters that to North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization summit 
meeting would discuss “possible co- 
ordinated action” against Mr. Karadzic, 
who is making new moves to seize 


picking allegations, especially in com- power from the embattled Bosnian Serb 
parison with to major league thievery president, Biljana Plavsic, 
practiced by other PRI functionaries. Mr. Karadzic has managed to retain 


dominance wi ton to PRI of forei^ 


considerable political power in to Ser- 
bian republic of Bosaria-Herzegovina 


trained technocrats eager to privatize and has avoided an international trial. 


with socialists and is viewed by sup- Rio, who also loved to tour backwater 
porters and adversaries alike as the heir regions to hear the voices of Mexico's 
to Mexico ’s revolutionary tradition. As a hard-working and humble. 

result, there is considerable curiosity Mr. Cardenas Solorzano was bora on Cardenas received the most votes, 
here over how he will govern North May 1. 1934. to year his father became 
America's largest city when he takes president, and in his childhood he lived 
office in December. to life of n revolutionary prince. He 


industriespmany-of which his father had “We-will help those who he 

nation alise d, Mr. Cardenas split with the and isolate those who oppose 
ruling party, and in 1988 ran for pres- 

ident at to head of a coalition that TVT ATA, a All* 
included Socialists and Communists. jLNxtLA U« AS Allli 
During the 1988 campaign, Raul Sa- 
linas de Gortari, the brother of the PRI’s Continued from Pag 

candidate that year, arranged for federal 
police to tap Mr. Cardenas ’s phones. Mr. World War n period. 
Cardenas’s top campaign aide was slain “The circumstances are a 

Wrv» wwnuaf^Rmh-r, days before the balloting. Mr. Cardenas different,” said Susan Em 
T he next mayor of Mexico City, called to slaying “a message of in- president of the Centex for PoJ 

tinudation.” On election night, to gov- Strategic Studies in Washing! 
Rio, who also loved to tour backwater eminent halted the vote count and later granddaughter of Dwight Eis 


, if 4? 


rayton 

peace 

••■'".a 


rid on Monday for the meeting, at which 
the Western allian ce plans to open its 
doors to former Soviet-bloc foes. 

As for Bosnia, Mrs. Albright said, the 
U.S. wants coordinated NATO action 
against all who engage in “extralegal 
activities” in defiance of the peace ac- 
cords. 

She said she hoped to summit meeting 
would snpportMs. Plavsic and “point up 
to importance of isolating those who 
don 't support constitutional processes.’ ’ 

U.S. officials said that international 


ethnic war. 

“Economic action is very strong ac- 
tion, particularly when it is coordin- 
ated, ’ f Mrs. Albright said. ? 

The allies have repeatedly demanded 
that Mr. Karadzic and others let refugees 
return home, clear the way for the arrest 
of suspected war c riminals and hold free 
elections. The summit meeting is likely 
to reaffirm those demands. 

Mrs. Albright was briefed on to _sita= 
ation by Robot Gel bard, thesenkirU-S. 
envoy forthe Balkans. *'■ 


NATO: As Alliance Expends, Clinton and Critics Look to History 


Continued from Page 1 

World War II period. 

‘"The circumstances are completely 
different," said Susan Eisenhower, 
president of to Center for Political and 
Strategic Studies in Washington and a 


traditionally emanated from to 600- 
mile ( 1 ,000-kilometer) swathe of ter- 
ritory between Germany and Russia. 


whether it should evolve into a much 
looser collective security organization.' 
If military defense is NATO’s primary 

the veiy 


The administration’s justification for purpose, then it is obvious that 


at,” said Susan Eisenhower, such a singular extension of American 
nt of to Center for Political and military power is sample. History has 
ic Studies in Washington and a shown that America ignores Europe's 
aughter of Dwight Eisenhower, problems at its periL 
Tved as NATO’s first supreme At to heart of the dispute is the ques- 


declared Carlos Salinas de Gortari to who served as NATO s first supreme At the heart of to dispute is the ques- 
winner. Most Mexicans believe Mr. commander in Europe. ‘Today, all of tion of to future character of to al- 


May 1 , 1934. the year his father became 
president, and in his childhood he lived 
the life of ja revolutionary prince. He 


During Mr. Salinas's six-year 
idency, Mr. Cardenas campaign© 


Europe is free, including the former So- 
viet Union. You don’t have a situation 


liance. C 
thatNA 1 


oneats of enlargement argue 
has proved its worth over the 


lively against privatization efforts and of Communist aggression.” 


where half of Europe is facing to threat past half-century and that there is no 


“He’s a question mark," said Fe- passed his boyhood pushing toy trucks the North American Free Trade treaty. Administration officials agree that to 
den co Estevez, a political scientist here, past his father's feet in the presidential The government targeted Mr. Cardenas nature of to security threat facing the 
“Will he follow an old populist-statist palace and cycling through the wooded and his followers with vilification in to United States has changed. A single, 
tine? Will he try to pass rent control, or gardens of the Los Pinos presidential go verrunen [-controlled media and oc- overriding threat from a monolithic 


create make-work programs? Will he go compound, said Jose J. AJtarnirano, one 
out into the city's nooks and crannies of Mr. Cardenas’s boyhood chums. 


need for radical change. Their rallying 
ay is “if it ain't broke, don’t fix iL” 
The Clinton administration contends 
that NATO enlargement has already 
served as an incentive to east European 


casional repression. His party keeps a source has been replaced by a multitude countries to take the first steps toward 


and try to hand out goodies to every little 
group? We just don't know.” 

During Mr. Cardenas's campaign, he 
won to allegiance of kickea-around 
voters in to back streets and slums just 


Mr. Cardenas’s boyhood chums. list of some 500 activists assassinated 
After gaining a civil engineering de- from 1988 to 2994. 


gree at Mexico’s National Autonomous 
University, he studied in France, ton 


of different inclu 

smgence of centuries-old 


the re- 
ic con- 


After his third-place finish in the flicts that were smothered by to dis- 


1994, Mr. Cardenas was for a time 


pursued a private engineering career for dogged by self-doubt, associates said. 


line of the Cold War. 

fhe Clinton administration argues 


c ip line 
The 


settling to kind of border disputes and 
minorities problems that resulted in the 
Yugoslav conflagration. 

Opponents of expansion accuse the 
Clinton administration of being unable 


by listening attentively to their com- Celeste Batel; they have three children, 
plaints about PRI corruption, surging After one failed bid to launch a polit- 
crime and the country’s $3-a-day min- ical career in 1973, he won election to 


nearly two decades. He is married to "He is very seLf-criticaL and he was that a new NATO is required to deal with to make tip its mind over whether NATO 


He is very sen -critical, ana ne was 
wondering whether his cause was worth 
so much suffering, ’ ’ said Jesus Gonzalez 
SchmaJL a lawyer and friend. Bat this 


these new threats, many of which have should remain a defense alliance or 


act of taking in former Soviet bloc coun- 
tries will alienate Russia. If to goal is to 
promote peace and friendship among, ^ 
NATO members, then there is no reason + r 
not to include Russia in the alliance. 

The administration argues that the! 
new NATO will be the cornerstone of 
new system of international security 
dealing with a much wider array of 
threats than was the case during the Cold 
War. 

“Unlike Marshall's generation, Wtj 
face no single galvanizing threat," Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Albright said 
recently at Harvard, but rather, dangers! 
that are “more diverse." 

The problem is how to dramatize to 
need for such a security system in to 
absence of a “single galvanizing' 
threat” Critics complain tot to Clin- 
ton administration has so far done art 
inadequate sales job. 


imum wage. He appears to have learned to Senate three years later and, in 1980, year he surged more than 10 percentage T^T?]\T\^A • Ad- T d T dL D I* n. / n r» . .. 

his barnstorming techniques from his to a six -year term as governor of his points in one month in opinion polls to JVJEil I -L/tl* At lAROSt i 1/16 OS til€ l0llC6 Jtllt JLJOlCn UeiTtOTlS IF CltlOnS 

father. General Lazaro Cardenas del father's native state, Michoacan. His op- take a dominant lead that he never lost 

Continued from Page X “We want m i n i m al reforms," Mr. activist, to Right Reverend Tim 

MEXICO: Governing Party Is Rebuffed Broadly in the Elections ical system five years ago. Since then. “What Moi should do is meet the thehead and upper bodyafter leavin] 

O *' *•** * / nnIMm... kau* ann,.^ ihd >> •>U_ — I- 


Continued from Page 1 

vote counted, Mr. Cardenas had 47.7 
percent. His closest challenger. Alfredo 
del Mazo of to PRI, had 25.5 percent. 


ment, which will continue to have a large 
amount of power over the city’s finances 
and security forces. 

The president will still nominate 
Mexico City’s police chief and have the 


Preliminary returns and surveys of 


ical system five years ago. Since then, 
opposition politicians have accused the 
ruling 


g Ken; 


selected precincts showed the National known as 


African National Union, 
in. and President Daniel 


Action Party upsetting to governing arap Moi of using conuption and heavy- 
party in gubernatorial races in the north- handed tactics to stay in power. 


As mayor of Mexico's largest city, a power to veto the mayor’s choice for 


em state of Nuevo Leon and in central 
Qu ere taro. The PRI apparently held onto 


“We want minimal reforms,” Mr. activist, to Right Reverend Timothy- 
Kangeto said. Njoya, was kicked and pummeled about 

“What Moi should do is meet the to head and upper body after leaving the* 
opposition,” be added. “He does not grounds of to cathedral 
want to reason. Who else can we A few hours earlier. Father Njoya hacf 
tell?" come into central Nairobi to try to calm' 

The police beat several opposition policemen and protesters. : < 

politicians and human-rights activists “I am asking to police to show some? 

Monday, sending them to to hospital, restraint,” the clenc said. “We didn’t' 


federal district of 8.5 million people. Mr. attorney general. Health and education governorships in Colima, San Luis Po- 


Cardenas will have lo contend with over- also will remain under federal control, 
whelming traffic jams, suffocating air Mr. Zedillo congra t ulat e d Mr. Carde- 


w helming traffic jams, suffocating air Mr. Ze 
pollution, runaway crime and severe un- nas on 1 
deremployment. election 

“Running this city is not exactly a bed mocracy. 
of roses,” said Luis Rubio, a political “I ami 


tosi, Sonora and Campeche. 

Just a decade ago, the governing party 


Mr. Moi and other Kanu leaders have Monday, sending them to to hospital, 
alleged that opposition parties seek to Several were injured when the police 
foment violence and are too disorgan- stormed All Saints- Cathedral, where 
ized and divided to effectively lead to about 100 people were praying, and 


of roses,” said Luis Rubio, a political “I am confident that all Mexicans can 

analyst at the Center for the Study of say with pride and with unity that de- 
Development, a think tank. "The com- mocracy has been institutionalized in 


nas on his victory and said that to held all of Mexico's 31 state governor- 
election had reoffamed Mexico's de- ships. 

mocracy. There were scattered repeats of ir- 

“1 am confident that all Mexicans can regularities around Mexico during to 


country. 

* ‘How can we tell to people what we 


are offering if we cannot meet?” asked parishioners. 


Kimani Kangeto, a political activist 
who helped organize to Nairobi 


Development, a think tank. “The com- 
plexity of the city is enormous. ” 

So is “the potential for political sui- 
cide,” Mr. Rubio said. 

Mr. Cardenas stressed his willingness 
to cooperate with the federal govera- 


mocracy has been institutionalized in 
our country,” Mr. ZediUo said- 


voting Sunday. In to southern state of protests, moments after belmeted'police, of to Democratic Party, whom police 
Chiapas, suspected supporters of the Za- with shields and truncheons, scattered clubbed about the shoulders while he 
patista rebels burned election material at hundreds of protesters in a downtown was in to cathedral. 


He could become to first Mexican several voting stations and ransacked 


president since 1913 to face an opposition 
legislature, ending Congress’s decades- 
old subservience to the presidency. 


two to protest to vote. The rebels an- 
nounced last week that they would boy- 
cott the balloting. (AFP, AP, NYT) 


Several were injured when the police ask for people to come and be violent, 
stormed All Saints- Cathedral, where We wanted people to come for a peace- J 
about 100 people were praying, and ful gathering.” 

lobbed a tear gas canister that landed by The police said Monday afternoon' 
the altar, then beat bloody numerous that they had few details concerning 
parishioners. deaths elsewhere in the country. 

“These are the actions of fellows who In the town of Thika, just outside 1 
are really primitive,' ' said Mike Kibaki, Nairobi, a secondary school student was ' 
of to Democratic Party, whom police found dead; the police said they did not 
slabbed about to shoulders while he know the cause of death, but witnesses - 
was in to cathedral. alleged that security forces had killed the ! , 

Later in to afternoon, one longtime young man. . I 


* “These are the actions of fellows who 
are really primitive," said Mike Kibaki, 


Later in to afternoon, one longtime 


CAMERA: Stunning Picture Postcards From Planet’s Surface 


MARS: Rover Sniffs and Tests Rocks for Secrets of the Universe 


Continued from Page 1 

trailers will wear special goggles to view 
the images in three dimensions and pick 
a safe path for Sojourner, Pathfinder’s 
remote-controlled robot rover, through 
the rocky landscape. 

Hie camera takes panoramic images 
one small “tile” at a time. Its field of 
view is only 14 degrees, compared with 
human vision that may encompass 160 
degrees, or almost a complete half- 
circle. In a room filled with computer 
monitors almost to the ceiling, the im- 
age-processing team relies on high- 
speed computers and clever software 
that assembles the small postage-stamp 


pictures from IMP — the “tiles" — into 
a complete mosaic. 

Each postage stamp arrives tagged' 
with information that indicates the di- 
rection the camera was pointing when it 
was taken and other identifying char- 
acteristics that help the computer fit it 
into its proper place. 

“It’s like having eyes on the surface 
of Mars.” said a team member. Eric de 
Jong. As to camera rotates, “it looks 
just like turning your head and looking 
around.” 

The team had a mad scramble when 
the landing pictures began to arrive, as 
they pushed to get the first partial pans of 
the horizon out on the same day. They 


processed 120 postage-stamp images 
within an hour. 

“We were driven to this, ” said Mr. de 
Jong, “because Viking raised people’s 
expectations. We knew to Pathfinder 
team, press and public would want it. 
We knew we couldn't get away with 
releasing them just as little postage 
stamps.” 

Justin Maid, 28, a postdoctoral stu- 
dent who is working with Mr. Smith, 
said to job was "like tiling a bathroom 
wall” but that “without a computer it 
would take hours or days.” Noting the 
youth of much of to team, Mr. Maki 
said “It’s nice that we Gen-Xers can 
make a little history.” 


Continued from Page 1 

olate field of rubble and orangish-pink 
dust on Mars. 

An international panel of scientists 
selected to Ares VaJJis landing site for 
Pathfinder .in pan because it is in an 
ancient plain where they believe a 
mi ghty flood once swept rocks down 
from the highlands and slopes. 

Their judgment, it appears, has been 
rewarded. The Pathfinder images reveal 
a pattern in to rocks’ tilt that confonns 
with to direction of such a massive 
current. 

“We really do have to grab bag of 
rocks,' 1 that was hoped for. said the chief 
mission scientist, Matthew Golorabek. 

To to scientists, the tiniest subtleties 
in to variety of colors, textures, sizes. 


shapes, degree of dustiness and so forth, 
are of intense interest The site not only 
has an gular moles like the landing sites nf 
to Viking spacecraft in to 1970s, he 
said, but smooth rocks; not only av- 
erage-size rocks, but also small ones and 
some big ones. 

"On Viking l, it took us almost the 
entire mission to find a dark gray ex blue 
rock not covered with dust,” Mr. Go- 
lcnubek said. 

The geologists especially treasure to 
dark rocks whose true nature is not ob- 
scured by the omnipresent rusty dust 
And the smooth rocks, with their 
jagged edges rounded off, are consistent 
with transport by water. Others appear to 
have been thrown up from a nearby 
crater at a moment of impact 
Dan Britt, of the University of Ari- 


zona, said the Pathfinder imaging tech- ' 
nique, by analyzing the signatures of, 1 
various chemicals in the light spectrum ! 
of to sample, shows the soil itself varies 
in its degree of lustiness. J 

At places, there is loose dust that; 
differs from the soils solidly in place. 

In fact, said a rover scientist, HeaiyJ 
Moore, you can tell a lot about the place • 
from to images of to rover’s historic • 
first wheel tracks on the surface. 

“You’ll see the surface is indented,- 
compressed and reflective,” showing its | 
fine grain. 

The rover’s right wheels passed over a ■ 
rock. The fact that it didn’t move or get; 
pressed into the surface indica tes “a 
harder layer underneath.” These clues- 
indicate the dust is about to consistency ; 
of kitchen flour, he said. (AP, WP) ■ 




3 


INTERNATIONAL 


iting 


In Zaire, Tutsi Revenge Campaign Turned Sights on Mobutu 


ass 

Abbas, also kn 0 ^ 

architect of Israel’* 
? n of Lebanon and 
* settlement i n tS 

1STafii » rawing spec % 

18100 «>.r» 

te on Netanyahu 

vas expected to sur- 

rfideDce vote in p ar 

Asst 

otrom Jerusalem, 
bin the Knesset, the 
Shud Barak told the 
■ even if he survived 
your ministers knot* 
JKji and tired of thp 
“athave been our I™ 
>ower.” 

Mr. Netanyahu had 
ensions and brought 
F war with the Arabs 

iers supporting him 
sat fire erupts" they 
. to evade respon- \ 
judgment of the 

Tsahi Hanegbi, de- 
oment, insisted Mr. 
c support remained 

i to vote late Monday 
dons criticizing the 
1 government and a 
die freeze in the ne- 
Palestinians. 


adzic 


me to deny $800 mil- J 
on loans to the Serbs: 
oediate indication of 
rce in Bosnia, where 
ers are having diffi- 
t the 1995 accords 
on, Ohio, ro hair the 


By John Porafrct 

Hfeftmgfo/i Pag Service 

t» UVIRA, Congo — The Tutsi of this 
■is o lated border region of eastern Congo 
jrose up in a rebellion early lost October, 
backed by the armies of at least four 

.neighboring African countries. Within 
■ .eight months, the uprising that erupted 
in this backwater along the northern 
.shares of Lake Tanganyika captured a 
’jnineral-rich country twice die size of 
■Texas and toppled one of the roost cor- 
. .nipt regimes of the late 20th century. 

■ The swift campaign, in which rebel 
droops sped through vast territory famed 
for impassable roads and impenetrable 
jungles, pitted a disciplined David 
against a degenerate Goliath — the re- 
gime of President Mobutu Sese Seku — 
that crumbled as soon as it was pushed. 
-Because it unrolled mainly through hos- 
tile forests far from transport and com- 
munications — and because rebel lead- 
ers prevented reporters from 
Accompanying them — this extraordi- 
nary military feat was only sketchily 
described as it engulfed what was then 
jknown as Zaire last winter and spring. 

Now, seven weeks after the ailing 
^Marshal Mobutu fled into exile and the 
rebel leader Laurent Kabila installed his 
qew government in Kinshasa and re- 
named the country, interviews with a 
broad, range of rebel fighters, their en- 
Qg emies in Marshal Mobutu's army, in- 
T jemational aid workers and Congolese 
civilians who witnessed the fighting 
have provided a clearer picture. 

.. Their accounts show that the fight 
qgainst Marshal Mobutu was bloodier 
than previously reported. In the first key 
weeks, more than 9,000 people — 
mostly civilians — are believed to have 
died in battles in the east of the country 
from Uvira to Goma, according to Con- 
golese and United Nations officials who 
supervised the burial of the dead. Thou- 
sands more have died since, many of 
them Hutu refugees from neighboring 
Rwanda gunned down by rebel troops, 
some of them also Rwandan, under Mr. 
Kabila's nominal command. 

The accounts also indicate that from 
itjie outset the rebels targeted the Hutu 
refugees, who fled Rwanda in 1 994 after 
their leaders launched genoddal attacks 
against the Tutsi there. An estimated 
500,000 Tutsi, an ethnic group spread 
across several central African countries, 
died in the Rwandan bloodbath. But the 


killin g ended with a victory by 
Rwandan Tutsi, who gained power in 
Kigali, the Rwandan capital — along 
with a thirst for revenge. 

Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi 
backed the war in Congo lo avenge the 
1 994 genocide and to ensure that it does 
not happen again, rebel commanders 
said. Angola, Congo's western neigh- 
bor. brer sem troops as well. Its political 
and military participation helped trans- 
form the war from a limited, border- 
clearing operation to a campaign to 

From the outset, the 
rebels targeted the Hutu 
refugees who had fled 
Rwanda in 1994. 

overthrow Marshal Mobutu's govern- 
ment in Kinshasa. 

Western diplomats and UN officials 
are split on whether rebel troops actually 
received orders to massacre the 
Rwandan Hutu in Congo. But a number 
of sources said that one of the main alms 
of the rebel offensive at the beginning 
was to force the Hutu refugees from the 
camps they had occupied for the previous 
two years near Lhe Rwandan border. 

Also, the systematic way the killings 
happened — in Mbandaka, in western 
Congo; near Kisangani in its center, and 
around Goma and Bukavu in the east — 
have led UN investigators to conclude 
that the tragedy that befell thousands of 
Hutu refugees was no accident. 

One Rwandan Army colonel, inter- 
viewed in Goma, said his men came into 
this country for two reasons: to take 
revenge against the Hutu and to ensure 
the security of Rwanda, which they saw 
as being threatened by the Hutu militants 
still in the refugee camps. A senior Tutsi 
official in Congo's Interior Ministry, 
speaking in Kinshasa, said that Rwandan 
troops and their Congolese Tutsi allies 
were given a free hand to go after the 
Hutu refugees so long as they also con- 
tributed to toppling Marshal Mobutu. 

Rebel officers who opposed this 
policy were done away with, sources 
said. One officer, Andre Kisase 
Ngandu, a senior commander, was 
gunned down by Rwandan Tutsi troops 
near Goma on Jan. 6. a senior non-Tutsi 
rebel officer and other sources said. 

Mr. Kabila did nor participate in 


much of the planning or execution of the 
tight against Marshal Mobulu, Western 
diplomats said, and il is still unclear who 
masterminded the rebel victory. The 
Congolese government has identified a 
Congolese, General Nindaga Masosu, as 
top commander of Mr, Kabila's troops. 

But African and Western military of- 
ficers in Congo said that another officer 
directed the campaign and has told 
Wesrcm military experts that he was the 
chief of Mr. Kabila’s army. He is James 
Kabari . described as a Tutsi of uncertain 
nationality who speaks broken English 
and fluent Swahili, two languages used 
in Uganda, and who knows neither 
French nor Lingala, the main tongues 
used in Congo. 

The pretext for the initial uprising here 
was an order issued Oct 7 by the Mobutu 
government giving Tutsi 72 hours to 
leave the country. In reality, the revolt 
had broken out three days before. 

On Oct. 4, rebel troops who had 
crossed the Ruzizi River from Rwanda 
struck a hospital and a Zairian Army 
base near Lemcra, a village on the Ruz- 
izi plain between Lake Kivu and Lake 
Tanganyika. Within hours, the lieuten- 
ant colonel commanding the base was 
killed and government soldiers fled 
south toward Uvira. 

The assault on Lemera followed a 
formula that proved successful 
throughout the later fighting. The rebels 
attacked from several directions simul- 
taneously. confusing Marshal Mobutu's 
troops but leaving them an escape route. 
They infiltrated their men inside the 
village before they struck. They kicked 
off the assault by dropping a mortar 
shell into the middle of the army base. 
And they used walkie-talkies to co- 
ordinate their actions. 

The government troops fled south to 
Uvira, which fell on Oct. 24. The rebel 
troops treated local residents well, but 
Hutu refugees were separated from the 
returning crowd, and many of them 
were killed, witnesses said. 

On Nov. 1, Mr. Kabila, a small-time 
Marxist revolutionary who had enriched 
himself selling Zairian gold, emerged in 
Uvira as the representative of an or- 
ganization named the Alliance of Demo- 
cratic Forces for the Liberation of 
Congo- Zaire. At first Mr. Kabila was 
identified as the spokesman. Soon Mr. 
Kabila began calling himself the leader. 

Rebel commandos explained that Mr. 
Kabila, 56, who had been fighting 


against Marshal Mobutu since 1963, was 
a convenient choice. He had good re- 
lations with Rwanda, Uganda and an 
important rebel faction, the Banyamu- 
lenge of South Kivu Province, a group of 
Tutsi who constituted some of the rebels' 
most successful forces. But he himself 
was a Luba, not a Tutsi, and thus more 
palatable to Congo's 400 other tribes. 

From the outset, the main rebel tar- 
gets in this southern campaign were 
UN-protected refugee camps. The 
rebels mauled camps along the road 
from Uvira to Bukavu, 100 miles (160 
kilometers) up the road on the south 
shore of Lake Kivu.; they attacked the 
lnera and Kashucha camps north of 
Bukavu, where the UN had allowed the 
radical Hutu leadership to house its gov- 
ernment in exile since 1994. More than 
120,000 people bad lived there. 

On the day Uvira fell, about 700 rebel 
troops opened another front, sneaking 
into Zaire about 25 miles north of 
Goma, on the north shore of Lake Kivu. 


They struck first at the Kibumba refugee 
camp, which housed 200,000 Hutu. 

Marshal Mobutu's Presidential 
Guard, backed by Hutu militiamen, de- 
fended the camp and suffered heavy 
casualties, according to Mike Deppner. 
a Canadian doctor who works for the 
UN High Commissioner for Refugees. 

in Novem^^e^id, be found dozens 
of bodies stuffed in outdoor latrines and 
40 lying in the camp’s hospital with 
intravenous tubes still in their arms. 

Most of Kibumba 's 200,000 refugees 
fled toward Goma, finding shelter next 
to another massive camp, Mugunga, 
west of Goma. In all, more than 500,000 
refugees huddled near the lakeside 
town. Goma fell Nov. 1. 

Attacked from the north, from the 
east out of Rwanda and from the lake. 
Marshal Mobutu's defenses collapsed 
quickly. At least 6,800 bodies later were 
buried near the town, said Craig 
Sanders, a senior UN aid official there. 


In November, talk was rife in West- 
ern capitals of dispatching an interna- 
tional force to save the Hutu refugees — 
which could have grounded the revolt. 

On Nov. 15, Mr. Kabari’s forces 
solved that problem. They attacked the 
Mugunga camp from the west, giving 
the refugees one escape route — east, 
back home to Rwanda. That assault 
began one of the largest spontaneous 
repatriations in recent history. But, just 
as significantly for the rebels, it also 
ended any talk of an international force. 
From Nov. 15 to 19, about 600,000 
Rwandan Hutu refugees flooded home. 

Still, lens of thousands of other Hutu 
refugees were driven deeper into the 
jungle. The rebels pursued them, killing 
as they went. Meanwhile, the govern- 
ment’s defenses were collapsing. 

By the end of April, two-thirds of the 
country was in rebel hands. 

At 2 AM. on May 17, rebel patrols 
entered the capital, trudging into Kin- 
shasa along its rusting railroad tracks. 



Paul Grorp^Agcncc Fnncr-Pme 

BRITISH TEENAGERS DIE IN FRENCH BUS CRASH — A policeman checking the wreckage after a 
busload of British schoolchildren plunged into a ravine near the French Alps town of Moutiers, killing 
two students from the Manchester area and injuring 20 passengers. The accident’s cause was unknown. 


on is very strong ac- 
when it is coordrn- 
Jhtsaid. 

repeatedly demanded 
.na others let refugees 
the way for the arrest 
iminals and hold free 
unit meeting is likely 
emands. 

as briefed on the sira- 
Jbard, the senior US. 


toHistory 

evolve into a much 
security organization. 

: is NATO’s primary 
obvious that the very 
ner Soviet bloc couii- 
Lussia. If the goal is to 
id friendship among ( 
hen there is no reason 
sia in the alliance, 
tion argues that the 
e the cornerstone of ? 
ntemational securitv 
luch wider array w 
e case during the Cow 

■all's generation, wtf 
r amrin g threat." Sec- 
xieleine Albright sard 
d, bur rather, danger; 
'erse.” " 

how to dramatic tne 
ecurity system in fjf 
“single 

imp] am that the Clin- 
Hias so far done an 


^Little England’ in the Caribbean Weighs Divorce 


BRIEFLY 


By Larry Rohter 

New York limes Service 


.^BRIDGETOWN, Barbados — This 
is a place so enamored. of British values 
and institutions that people on other 
Caribbean islands refer to it as '‘little 
England." - ■ 

Yet a government-appointed consti- 
tutional revision commission here is 
considering whether to discard Queen 
Elizabeth n as head of state, declare 
Barbados a republic and eliminate for- 
mal ties to the British legal system. 

«. All across the English-speaking 
\ Caribbean, from Jamaica to Grenada, 

[ ^?jnrilar proposals are being advanced. 

■ Complaints vary from island to is- 
land, but one issue remains constant: 
popular dissatisfaction with the Privy 
Council, an executive body whose 
rgembers are appointed by the queen 
fnd which nearly all the British colonies 
in the Caribbean retained as their su- 
preme tribunal after they became in- 
dependent. 

L in 1993, the Privy Council ruled that 
prisoners convicted of capital crimes 
and not executed within five yearn have 
Offered "inhuman or degrading pun- 
tehment” and should have their death 
sentences commuted. 

.. But ever since, the number of crim- 
pials-cm death row in Commonwealth 
4 , countries in the Caribbean has been 
& jL growing, as has. the number of death 
* Sentences that have had to' be com- 
muted 

.. Growing, too, is the ire of a pop- 
ulation that is frightened by rising crime 
and believes strongly in law and order. 
>* "Ifyou murder a man willfully and 
Wantonly, you should be hanged for it, 
as Scripture mandates," said Hatherly 
Qnmberbatch, a construction foreman 
here. "We must have justice, and if the 
only way to get it is to let go of Queen _ 
Elizabeth, and the Privy Council, then so 
ietitbe.” 

, , In some countries, local governments 
have responded to public pressure by 
speeding up appeals procedures to beat 
the five-year deadline. But that ap- 


proach disturbs international human 
rights organizations and many lawyers 
in a region that regards the rule of law as 
one of the mpst cherished legacies of 
three centuries of British colonial ad- 
ministration. 

"The whole situation is of huge con- 
cern and very alarming," Piers Ban- 
nister, a Caribbean specialist at Am- 
nesty International, said in a telephone 
interview from London. 

"We're seeing the English-speaking 
Caribbean learning from the United 
States," he said. "It seems like a rush to 
execute, rather titan placing a priority on 


n. 


from 1994 to 1996. But by establishing 
the five-year ceiling, seen as unrealistic 
in a region of small states.with limited 
budgets) and creaky- bureaucracies, the 
Privy Council created a loophole that 
promotes abuse and encourages manip- 
ulation, critics of the ruling say. 

Kenneth John, a prominent lawyer in 
St. Vincent and the Grenadines, said 
defense lawyers "have been exploiting 
to the hilt all of the opportunities to get it 
past five years, and that is what has 
annoyed society as a whole.” 

The Caribbean has experienced a 
startling rise in crime in recent years. 





Atlantic 

Ocean 


0 JLUes 400 


ANTIGUA 
AND BARBUDA 


Caribbean 
■ Sea 


— 

: ST. KTTTS/NEV1S 

DOMINICA* f 

ST. LUCIA "■ 1 f 

! ST. VINCENT AND <r-, ji 

: THE GRENADINES \’ 


GRENADA „ . 




applying the death penalty in an ap- 
propriate and judicial manner." 

Most of the dozen English-speaking 
nations of the Caribbean are consti- 
tutional monarchies, in which an ap- 
pointed governor-general represents the 
British Crown. As independent mem- 
bers of the Commonwealth, they have 
their own elected governments, foreign 
policies and armies or police but retain 
certain trade preferences and institu- 
tional links with Britain. 

The 1993 edict did not formally out- 
law capital punishment, and nine men 
were hanged in five Caribbean countries 


INK DAD 
©TOBAGO 


TV New Ww* Tuna 


much of it in the form of robberies, 
burglaries and killings related to drug 
use or trafficking. In Jamaica, for in- 
stance. more than 920 people were killed 
last year — a figure only slightly less 
than that of New York City, whose pop- 
ulation is nearly three times as large. 

“Amnesty International is extremely 
sympathetic to the situation of countries 
like Jamaica, where the murder rate is at 
an all-time high," said Mr. Bannister. 
"But we believe that capital punish- 
ment distracts from the real issue, which 
is the appalling level of violence in that 
society." 


In Jamaica, more than 60 convicted 
felons are now on death row, according 
to .statistics compiled by Amnesty In- 
ternational, and complaints about the 
cost of housing them are growing. 

In the Bahamas, with a population of 

260.000. 36 people are waiting to hang, 
the group calculates, while in Guyana, 
which has abandoned the Privy Council 
but continues to use British law as pre- 
cedent, tiie figure is at least 16 among a 
population of slightly less than 

900.000. 

But the Caribbean country with the 
largest number of prisoners facing death 
sentences is Trmidad and Tobago, 
where 1 .25 million people live and, ac- 
cording to Amnesty International, more 
than 1 16 people are on death row. Those 
condemned include a prominent drug 
dealer and his gunmen, who killed a 
man who owed them money, and, to 
leave no witnesses, murdered the rest of 
his household. 

"If there ever was a case where you 
can justify the death penally, it is this 
one," said a diplomat in Port of Spain. 
“If the Privy Council ruling lets them 
off, there is going to be hell to pay." 

In Barbados, abolishing the link to the 
Privy Council has been one of the most 
popular of the ideas presented to a con- 
stitutional review commission in public 
hearings that began late last year. The 
country already has restored the use of a 
whip with knotted cords to punish crim- 
inals and widened grounds for corporal 
punishment in schools, 

"Capital punishment is always emo- 
tional, and there is no doubt of the strong 
feelings on the issue here." said Henry 
deB. Forde, a member of Parliament 
who heads the commission that is due to 
give its recommendations to Prime Min- 
ister Owen Arthur by October. 

But he said doing away with the Privy 
Council also appeals to nationalistic 
sentiment. 

"You can’t linger at the steps of the 
Colonial Office in London forever. I 
don't know why we continue to go 
somewhere else, cap in hand, for our 
ultimate justice." 


Islamic Law Cited 
In Trial of Britons 

RIYADH — A Saudi court ruled 
Monday that the brother of a slain 
Australian nurse could decide, under 
Islamic law, whether to spare the lives 
of two British nurses on trial for the 
killing if they are convicted. 

Anwar Bakhurji, the defense at- 
torney, said die court in Khobar rec- 
ognized that Frank Gilford was 
speaking on behalf of the family of his 
sister, Yvonne. The only other sur- 
viving relative is their mother, Mur- 
iel, 85, who suffers from Alzheimer’s 
disease. Mr. Gilford has declined of- 
fers to meer the families of the Britons 
and said he would not consider the 
option of a reconciliation before the 
court gives its verdict. 

Yvonne Gilford, 55, was found 
dead on Dec. 1 1 in a hospital dorm- 
itory in Dhahran. She had been 
stabbed 13 times, battered and suf- 
focated. Lucille McLauchlan, 31, and 
Deborah Parry, 41, have retracted 
confessions that they said were ex- 
tracted under duress and by promises 
of plane tickets out of Saudi Arabia. 

The Saudi authorities have said that 
it could be two years before any death 
sentence is carried out, following nu- 
merous appeals and the approval of 
the Saudi monarch. (AFP) 

46 Life Terms Given 
To Hamas Plotter 

BEIT EL, Israeli-Occupied West 
Bank — An Israeli military court on 
Monday handed down 46 life sen- 
tences to a Palestinian Islamic mil- 
itant convicted of planning three sui- 
cide bombings in Israel last year, 
court sources said. Hassan Salameh, a 
member of the Islamic Resistance 
Movement, Hamas, was convicted 
June 30 of planning the attacks in 
February ana March last year that left 
46 people dead and helped derail the 


Middle East peace process. 

Military prosecutors sought the life 
terms, as only people convicted of 
Nazi war crimes can face the death 
penalty in Israel. One judge had nev- 
ertheless argued in favor of capital 
punishment' but he was overruled by 
his colleagues, said the sources. 

"We cannot ignore the fact that his 
acts came after peace had arrived in 
our region," said Colonel Han Katz, 
one of the judges, announcing the 
sentence. Colonel Katz said the life 
sentences were justified to protect the 
population of Israel, adding that a 
"new peak" of violence had been 
reached with the suicide bombings. 

Hamas said the three attacks, in- 
cluding two against buses in Jeru- 
salem, were in retaliation for the as- 
sassination of one of its leaders in the 
Gaza Strip early last year. (AFP) 

25 Die in Colombia 
In Downed Copter 

BOGOTA — Colombian leftist 
rebels shot down a helicopter carrying 
24 soldiers and five civilian crew 
members to the site of an oil pipeline 
attack. Only four soldiers survived 
the crash, the army said. 

The Russian-made Mi-17 heli- 
copter apparently caught fire in the air 
Sunday and exploded when it hit the 
ground near Saravena, 220 miles 
northeast of Bogota, the army said. 
The civilian crew members were em- 
ployed by Helicol, the company that 
rented the helicopter to the army, the 
Defense Ministry said. 

Four soldiers survived the crash, 
three of them with injuries, an army 
spokesman at a military base in 
Arauca, near the crash site, said Mon- 
day on condition of anonymity. 

The National Liberation Army, the 
nation’s second-largest rebel group, 
is believed to be responsible for the 
attack. The group has been fighting 
the government for more than 30 
years. (AP) 




Universe 






Cbmpreheiisive yet concise, informed yet impartial, the affairs of the world unfold on the pages of the World’s Daily Newspaper. 


■it - 1 • ■ 


V 











TUESDAY JULY 8, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 



Jterafo 


INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW WIRK TIMES AND THE WASHING*** POST 


(tribune Bringing New Democracies Into the NATO Fold 

i THE WASHINCn* POST (J Q „ 


A Western Destiny 


It is a chilly and exclusive world that 
the opponents of NATO expansion 
would build in Europe. A whole row of 
emerging or re-emerging democracies 
of a European tradition aspire to the 
manifest psychological, political and 
— in a pinch — mi Mrar y comforts of 
alliance membership. The opponents 
would have these candidates forgo the 
confidence >hat membership would 
surely convey to their democratic and 
free- market elements. The old mem- 
bers would have to forgo die extra 
stability that NATO enlargement 
could lend to a region whose 20th- 
century history surely makes the case 
for a strong alliance. 

But, say the opponents, Russia will 
be provoked, its nationalists stirred and 
its own democratic prospects perhaps 
checked. It is a serious consideration, 
not to be glibly dismissed. But NATO 
has taken this into fair account by its 
deep consultations with Moscow, its 
measured pace and manner of enlarge- 
ment, its practical respect for Russia's 
concern at seeing a formerly hostile 
allianc e move closer to its border, its 
institutionalization of a place for Rus- 
sia in alliance structures and its steps in 
other arenas to satisfy Moscow’s post- 
Cold War cravings for a due place in 
the international sun. 

In fact, NATO has taken its respect 


gaiy and the Czech Republic — are to 
be invited into NATO at its Madrid 


summit meeting. The United States 
joined the rescue of Central Europe 
from two great wars and two tyrannies 
in this century. Only at great cost could 
it now deny the rescued the infusions 


of confidence and support that will 
help them to fulfill a Western destiny. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Support Yilmaz 


The United Stales depends on Turkey 
as a vital military and political ally in 
southeastern Europe, Central Asia and 
the Middle East. That makes it welcome 
news that Turkey’s troubled politics 
have now taken an encouraging turn. 
President Suleyman Demirel last week 
named Mesut Yilmaz, a firm secularist 
and democrat, to succeed the Islamic 
leader, Necmettin Erbakan, as prime 
minister. Mr. Y ilmaz has assembled a 
coherent parliamentary majority, a re- 
quirement for effective government his 
recent predecessors have lacked. 

It would be naive to gloss over the 
formidable challenges awaiting the 
new prime minis ter, including assert- 
ive generals, a brutal war against Kurd- 
ish separatists and growing voter dis- 
enchantment with the scandal-stained 
political establishment But under Mr. 


political establishment But under Mr. 
Yilmaz, the country’s least tainted sec- 
ular political leader, Turkey will have a 
chance to strengthen its democratic 
institutions and repair its damaged in- 
ternational prestige. 

Turkey has been in political crisis 
since its last election, in December 
1995, left no party with a clear ma- 
jority. Mr. Erbakan's Islamic-oriented 
Welfare Party got the most votes and 


eventually formed a coalition govern- 
ment. During his one year in office, 
Mr. Erbakan upset relations with 
Washington by courting Iran and 
Libya. But at home, he respected the 
rules of democracy and upheld sec- 
ularism as Americans understand it 

What cost him his job was his bid to 
bend the strict anti-religious rules for- 
mulated decades ago by modern Tur- 
key's founder, Mustafa Kemal Ata- 
turk. Turkey's military leaders 
responded with threats to remove the 
government by force. 

After three military coups in the last 
four decades, Turkish political leaders 
must take such threats seriously. The 
army's excessive influence has also 
thwarted attempts to seek nonmilitary 
solutions to the Kurdish unrest and to 
resolve the long confrontation with 
Greece over Cyprus. 

No Turkish politician has dared to 
challenge the generals over these 
policies, which have cost Turkey 
dearly at home and abroad. But if Mr. 
Yilmaz hopes to rally Turkey’s ali- 
enated electorate and repair relations 
with Western Europe, he must try, and 
America should support him. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Humanitarian Dilemma 


In a sense, the years of the Cold War 
were the halcyon days of humanitarian 
aid. Most conflicts were fought over 
ideology by parties whose leaders wor- 
ried about world public opinion and 
bad read the Geneva Conventions. The 
people who died tended to be com- 
batants. 

Relief agencies had limited mis- 
sions of caring for the wounded and 
refugees, and could do their work 
largely unmolested. 

The fall of communism has decen- 
tralized war. Nations once held to- 
gether by superpowers are breaking 
up. Since superpowers no longer see an 
interest in military or political inter- 
vention in far-off conflicts, relief ef- 
forts by UN agencies or private groups 
now fill the vacuum. 

The new warriors in Bosnia. Liberia 
and Rwanda are warlords or nationalist 
demagogues, indifferent to outside 
pressures, who seek personal profit or 
territory for their ethnic group. An aid 
group may now find itself dealing with 
five different clans vying for control of 
a city, or discover that the safe passage 
promised by a commander means 
nothing to an armed 1 2-year-old man- 
ning a checkpoint. 

Worldwide, 90 percent of war cas- 
ualties now are civilians, hi the last 
year, at least 19 relief workers have 
been murdered in Chechnya and Africa. 
Many agencies are forced to stay out of 
zones where die need is great. 

Even more disturbing to humani- 
tarian officials is whether their pres- 
ence in some conflicts relieves im- 
mediate suffering while supporting the 
political forces that caused the crisis. 

Relief is often manipulated by 
politicians and military leaders who 
know that if they starve people, aid will 
come. Aid almost always benefits 


those already in charge. To work in 
some areas, aid groups may have to 
accept some manipulation or control to 
gain access to victims. 

In Liberia, warlords have ber- 
ately starved regions to atu • food 
relief, which comes with truexs and 


other equipment the warlords steal. 
Rwandan Hutu who led the 1994 gen- 
ocide used refugee camps in Zaire as 
bases for military raids into Rwanda. 
The refugees drew food aid, which was 
taken for the soldiers and sold to buy 
arms. 

These hazards are forcing human- 
itarian agencies to redesign their prac- 
tices. While Oxfam, which specializes 
in providing clean water, would have 
rushed into North Korea in the past, 
now its leaders are being cautious, 
aware that they may not be able to 
control how their rid is used. The In- 
ternational Rescue Committee pulled 
out of the Rwandan camps in Zaire 
after eight months rather than see its 
aid support genocidal groups. 

Humanitarian groups must con- 
stantly check whether their projects are 
doing more harm than good. When 
efforts reach that point, the groups 
need to be prepared to pull out, pub- 
licly criticize the abuses and call for a 
political solution. The United Nations, 
which is one of the few places still 
inclined to broker the deals that may be 
necessary to end a crisis or even send 
troops, is also struggling to reorganize 
its humanitarian efforts. As it does so, 
it should remember not to mix human 
rights and humanitarian agencies. The 
compromises necessary for rid can get 
in the way of uncovering abuses and 
taking action against offenders. Both 
are necessary to end suffering in the 
messy new wars. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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W ASHINGTON — When Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton took office, the 


for Russian professions of concern up 
to the point of raising questions among 
some Americans about whether NATO 
is being “diluted.” The administration 
makes a good case that it is not, but the 
question will take much actual expe- 
rience to resolve. 

A further question goes to the extra 
costs and risks the United States is 
assuming as NATO adds, first, three 
new members and later more. It is only 
prudent to anticipate endless and 
wearying arguments over burden shar- 
ing. It is also necessary to be alert to the 
r riil itai y contingencies an expanded al- 
liance mi gh t face if over time the cur- 
rent good feeling in Europe sours. But 
the h as hing out of practical details of 
budget and policy should not be al- 
lowed to become vicarious and sym- 
bolic warfare against the idea of 
NATO expansion itself. 

The first three chosen to join this 
club of democracies — Poland, Hun- 


future role of NATO and the strength of 
America’s partnership with Europe were 
bring questioned. The war in Boroia was 
at its bright Russian democracy was 
under strain. Virtually everyone agreed 
on die need to bring the new democ- 
racies of Central Europe into our trans- 
Atlantic community, but we had agreed 
on no mechanism to actually do it 

This week. President Clinton attends 
a NATO summit meeting in Madrid 
with these questions resolved. NATO 
has ended the carnage in Bosnia. It has 
launched a relationship with a Russia 
that has itself renewed its commitment 
to democracy and reform. And in Mad- 
rid, NATO’s leaders invite the first 
group of Europe's new democracies to 
join oar allian ce. The United States 
believes this group should consist of the 
Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland. 

NATO enlargement is not a step we 
take lightly. It involves the most sol- 
emn commitments that we can make to 
another country. It will not happen 
without the advice and consent of the 
U.S. Senate. We have a responsibility 
to explain exactly why our policy 
serves American interests. 

The first reason is that enlargement 
will make NATO stronger and more 
cohesive. Our future allies share our 
most fundamental values and aspir- 
ations for Europe and the world. Many 
shared risks with our soldiers in the 
Gulf. Without hesitation, each 
provided troops to NATO in Bosnia, 
and Hungary provided the bases that 
allowed our troops to deploy safely. 

These nations will bear the cost of 
defending freedom because they know 
the price of losing freedom. They are 
ready, willing and able to contribute to 
our common agenda for security, from 
the fight against terrorism and weapons 


By Madeleine Albright 

The writer is the US. secretary of state. 


settled on the Czech Republic. Hun 
and Poland, and not others, as die 


proliferation to the quest for stability in 
Europe and beyond — and we should 


be ready to welcome them. 

The second reason is that enlargement 
lessens the chance American soldiers 
will ever again have to fight in Europe. 


Twice in the first half of this century , 
we Americans sent our troops across 
the Atlantic to fight and sacrifice in 
defense of Europe’s freedom. NATO 
was created to unify and bolster the 
forces of freedom and thereby make a 
third war less likely. Throughout the 
Cold War, NATO gave evidence that 
we were prepared to fight if necessary; 
by so doing, the alliance made it un- 
necessary to fight What NATO did 
then for Europe's west it can do now for 
Europe’s east where this century's two 
world wars and the Cold War began. 

The third reason is that NATO en- 
largement will help us defend Europe's 
gains toward democracy, peace and in- 
tegration. Just the prospect of enlarge- 
ment has given Central and Eastern 
Europe greater stability than seen in this 
century. As nations align themselves 
with NATO, old disputes between 
countries like Poland and Ukraine, 
Hungary and Romania, Germany and 
the Czech Republic are melting away. 
Democratic reforms are advancing. 
Country after country has made sure 
soldiers take orders from civilians. 
They are fixing exactly the problems 
that could have led to future Bosnias. 

The final reason for enlargement is to 
right the wrongs of the past Three years 
ago, we decided that if NATO was no 
longer a Cold War institution aimed at 
Russia, then it would no longer make 
sense to Kmit NATO to its Cold War 
membership. We recognized that if we 
were creating NATO today, we would 
not even consider making the old Iron 
Curtain its permanent eastern frontier. 
We would not say to any new democ- 
racy that having been subjugated in die 
past, it must be excluded in the future. 

Yet drat would be the unconscion- 
able result if NATO decided to stand 
still — and a prospect no critic of 
enlargement has been able to justify. 

As the Senate takes up these issues, 
legitimate new questions will be raised. 


Some will wonder why we are en- 
larging NATO when we face no im- 


mediate military threat. Our answer is ■ „ ,r-, 

that NATO is nota Wild West posse that ready to Wtfoe 


new members from Central Europe.-*- • 
The answer is that these countri es have : - 
cleared the highest hurdles of reform^ 
They have resolved every outstanding^ 
border and minority di spate.; They jar^ 


nuu Iiwipw “““ - * T7. .- JVATn momteTlhin • 

prevent a threat from even rising and to countries 


prevent a threat from even rising ana to 
promote common endeavors, such as 
the mission in Bosnia. 

Others will worry that enlargement 
might derail Russia's advance toward 
democracy and integration. In fact, re- 
formist leaders in Russia are ascendant, 
not because of anything NATO is or is 
not doing, but because they are ad- 
dressing foe domestic issues the Rus- 
sian people care about most What’s 
more. Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris 
Yeltsin have agreed to cut our nuclear 
arsenals even further. Russia was our 
full partner at the Summit of the Eight in 
Denver last month. Russia and NATO 
have signed the Founding Act of a part- 
nership that will bring Russia closer to 
the West than at any time in its history. 
All this happened even as NATO en- 
largement became irreversible. 

Finally, some will ask why we 


first round of enlargement to bea«md% 
success. And we want to make certaug; 

the first round will not be the last , 

What we are saying to thenewEuro-; ; 
pean democracies that will not be in-5 
vited to join in Madrid is not “no 
"notyeL ’ ’ We support their aspirations;, vj 
A nd while we insist on high standards , f: 
for new members today, we wffi aiso -- 
have a process that encourages others to 3 
meet those standards tomorrow. This is ^ 
the message tire president will taing^ 
when he visits Romania after the sum.- -3 
mit meeting, and that I will cany when I q 
visit Slovenia, Lithuania and Russia. ‘Ci 1 

This message is NATO policy. It.; 
also reflects President Clinton’s per-*;? 
sonal commitment, and mine, to build a 
Europe in which every natron is free- 
and every free nation is oar partner. 

£> Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Why Romania Should Be Admitted Now. 


R OMANIA should be among the 
new NATO member states chosen 


Xvnew NATO member states chosen 
at the Madrid summit meeting. 

As demonstrated over the past few 
years, the Continent's stability requires 
crisis management in the Balkans — 
and Romania offers significant capa- 
bilities in influencing political and mil- 
itary developments ui the region. 

The Bosnian conflict highlighted 
the importance of controlling the 
Danube. Without the ability to regu- 
late traffic on the river, it would have 
been impossible to blockade Serbia. 
The international community’s base 
for policing river traffic was in Ro- 
mania. 


Romania is also a power oh*tb&:& 
Black Sea, the great inland ocean ? 
whose importance is bound to grow-' 
sharply as it becomes the route en- 
a bling oil from Azerbaijan and Kazak- 
stan to reach international markets. ' r : 
For the moment, Turkey alone beats 
responsibility for trying to stab il ize the 
area. A second NATO member state ; 
bordering the Black Sea could be the ; 
West’s best tool to help ensure stability . 
in this crucial region. . . 

— Jacques Watch, an analystat 7 -' ' 
the Foundation for Defense 
Studies in Paris, commenting 

for the International ; 

Herald Tribune. 


Instead of Nagging the Japanese, U.S. Should Look at Europi 


ONDON — The contrast is 
rstiuk between Washing- 


By Brendan Brown 


ton's continual intervention in 
Japanese economic policy and 
its spectator role with respect to 
the emerging European mon- 
etary and economic union. 

Yet another G-7 summit has 
come and gone at which U.S. 
officials put pressure ou Japan 
to boost economic demand and 
accelerate deregulation. Mean- 
while. the leaders of France, 
Italy and Germany have been 
able to relax in the sunshine, 
despite the fact that their econ- 
omies, when aggregated togeth- 
er into "core Europe.” should 
be a choice target of concern for 
U.S. negotiators. 

Some simple economic arith- 
metic evidently is not being done 
at the U.S. Treasury Department. 
First take trade in goods and 
services. Japan is now widely 
expected to run a surplus this 
year of $50 billion, equivalent to 
barely one percent of gross do- 
mestic product Core Europe ( in- 
cluding Germany, France, Italy. 
Holland, Belgiiun-Luxembourg, 
Switzerland and Austria), double 
the economic size of Japan, is 
forecast to have a similarly 
defined surplus of $200 billion 
(some 2.25 percent of GDP). 

Second, take deficiency of do- 
mestic demand. The Internation- 
al Monetary Fund, in its most 
recent report on the world econ- 
omy, estimates that both the Jap- 
anese and core European econ- 


omies are operating at a level of 
output some 3 percent below 
productive potential. Third, con- 
sider labor market performance. 
Standardized data published by 
the Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development 
show unemployment in core 
Europe at around 1 0.5 percent of 
the labor force, compared to 3.25 
percent in Japan. Some com- 
mentators suggest the true un- 
employment rate in Japan could 
be double that, but even so that is 
still far short of the core Euro- 
pean level. And whereas eco- 


economic policy. 

Anecdotal evidence suggests 
that the principal factor behind 
Washington's passivity with re- 
spect to core European econom- 
ic policy is that core Europe 
does not feature yet on U.S. 
policymakers’ maps. U.S. of- 
ficials treat core Europe still as 
separate nation-states, no one of 
which iVKt&rly as large or im- 
posing of economic problems 


as Japan. EiASf? Germany, the 
largest of the European Union 


nomic recovery in core Europe 
since 1993 has been virtually 


jobless, in Japan employment is 
rising in a typical fashion in re- 
lation to the business cycle. 

So why is Japan the mono- 
poly recipient of Washington’s 
exhortations for programs of de- 
regulation and macroeconomic 
stimulus? Cynics would cite the 
importance of Detroit in U.S. 
politics. But that is surely too 
simplistic at a time of euphoria 
about U.S. economic prospects 
and record low unemployment. 
Yes. America in 1997 might run 
a deficit in merchandise trade 
with Japan of over $60 billion, 
of which one-half is automo- 
biles. But no serious economist, 
including Deputy Treasury Sec- 
retary Lawrence Summers, 
would argue that bilateral trade 
balances are a sensible target for 


largest of the European Union 
economies, does not flash alarm 
signals. The huge surplus in 
goods and services trade of core 
Europe is concentrated in its 
smallest members (Holland, 
Switzerland and Belgium-Lux- 
embourg) and at its edge (Italy) 
rather than at its center. 

No doubt once monetary un- 
ion, or EMU, becomes a reality, 
the U.S. Treasury will focus at 
last on core Europe as an entity. 
Providing the EU Statistics Of- 
fice in Luxembourg and the 
European Monetary Institute in 
Frankfurt get their act together, 
economic data for the new mon- 
etary area as a whole should be 
available at the end of 1 998. But 
what could bring an earlier 
change toward activism in 
Washington's approach to 
macroeconomic policy in core 
Europe? An unlikely but pos- 
sible trigger is Tokyo. Japanese 
officials, in response to U.S. 


pressure for policy change, 
could draw Washington’s atten- 
tion to some facts of interna- 
tional economic arithmetic. 

France is a more likely cata- 
lyst to Washington’s entering 
the policy debate in core 
Europe, notwithstanding the ir- 
ritation expressed in the Freach 
press tana by Prime Minister 
Lionel Jospin) at U.S. “arrog- 
ance.” The new Socialist gov- 
ernment in Paris has been press- 
ing for gjrowth and employment 
to be priority aims of EMU- 
wide economic policy and for a 
new institution, the European 
Economic Council, to balance 
the power of the European Cen- 
tral Bank. Mr. Jospin would 
presumably welcome U.S. of- 
ficials, ahead of the September 
G-7 meeting of finance min- 
isters and central bankers, ex- 
pressing concern about defla- 
tionary risks in the process of 
EMU. 

Washington, in pressing for 
reflation in core Europe, would 
have to take aim. at least in- 
directly. ai the still mighty 
Bundesbank, which is dominant 
in setting monetary policy 
throughout the area. U.S. nego- 
tiators would be following die 
lead of the Bank for International 
Settlements, which in its annual 
report called for countries pro- 
ceeding with fiscal deflation 
from a situation of no inflation to 
take out monetary insurance 
against deflation. The Bundes- 


bank in its two most recertre^S 
ports has declared that inflation, 
when properly measured, is now^J 
zero in Germany. Further, the-c 
Bundesbank sees no inflation' 1 * 


■ - l >>f 

Europe is still :*■% 

treated as a 

collection of . 4 

nation- states, no 1 ai 
one of which w ^ .i 

large or as - ; \ s § 

economically *»/*■' 

troublesome as $ if 

Japan. . 1 


threat from recent overshoots itr . -M 
its money supply target. 

The scenario of monetary re^TJw- 
flation in Europe this fell isrismgm* 
in probability. A timely turn m 
Washington’s economic dipleg -ag- 
macy toward Europe would re-^ 
duce the risk of EMU becoming^ 
a time bomb of deflation. U.S^||* 
officials now resting after longtf^K 
hard sessions in Tokyo could^ 
find fertile ground for their e£f 
forts during the next few months^ ? § 
in Paris, Bonn and Frankfurt. 


The writer, director and head^l'. 
of research at Tokyo-Afitsabishi' 
International in London^ co/C- 5 , 
trihuted this comment to the It 


ternational Herald Tribune. : ‘‘aV 

.. -stii 


China and Hong Kong in the Ring: No Simple Boxing Match 


H ONG KONG — For many 
Americans, the handover 


JLl Americans, the handover 
of Hong Kong is just the latest 
installment in the long-running 
China-U.S. morality play — 
“The Butchers of Beijing vs. 
the People.” 

But Hong Kongers look at 
events here with much more 
mixed emotion. For them, it’s 
not communism versus democ- 
racy, but nationalism versus the 
rule of law. That is. there is real 
ethnic pride here in the return of 
Chinese sovereignty, after 156 
years of British colonialism. 

But there is also real fear that 
what Hong Kongers appreciated 
most about Britain's colonialism 
— the rule of law — will vanish 
along with it As one Hong Kong 
businessman remarked to me on 
handover day: “I feel tom — 
like I just watched my mother- 
in-law drive out of town in my 
new Mercedes. I’m glad she's 
gone, but what about my car?” 

Well, what about that car? 
Since the reversion, there have 
been some intriguing straws in 
the wind here. The first is how 
relaxed this place is. The de- 
mocracy activists wasted no 
time defying a police ban on 
unlicensed demonstrations and 
the police responded that they 
were not going to waste taxpayer 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


that the U.S. television net- 
works focused on so relentlessly 
planted China's sovereignty 
here and then disappeared into 
their barracks. China's Commu- 
nist Party is still banned in Hong 
Kong, and Beijing is hesitating 
to make it legal, because if it 
becomes a legal party in Hong 


How long before 
elites in Shanghai 
or Tianjin say they 
can't compete with 
Hong Kong unless 
they have what 
Hong Kong has ? 


Kong it will have to run in Hong 
Kong’s next legislative elec- 


treated as potentially die next 
Tiananmen. But now that China 
has Hong Kong back, China, 
and Mr. Tung, can afford to be 
more relaxed, because leniency 
no longer constitutes kowtow- 
ing to Britain. Rather, it’s 
something they do in the interest 
of stability in Hong Kong, 
which is now also their interesL 
The second straw in the wind 
is the speech China’s president. 
Jiang Zemin, gave on handover 
day. Christine Loh, one of the 
leading pro-democracy activists 
in the recently disbanded Hong 
Kong legislature, insisted on 
reading aloud to me passages 
from that speech: “Hong Kong 
residents will enjoy their rights 
and freedoms in accordance with 
law and will all be equal before 
the law. ... A gradually im- 
proved democratic system suited 
to Hong Kong’s reality is an 


Hong Kong unless they have 
what he has vowed to preserve 
in Hong Kong — civil society, 
rule of law and a market econ- 
omy free of corruption? 




simplistic lens of “Butchers 
Beijing," you’ll miss those poF* v 


The point is that — post- 
handover — there are still real 
politics in Hong Kong. And they 
will add to the real politics 
already going on inside China. 
How much and for how long 
remains to be seen. But if you 
only look at China through the 


itics and their possibilities. The ', 
people who understand that 
are the democrats here. Unt& r J Jf 
China proves otherwise, arguefr ^ 
Ms. Loh, “The best thing Amer- ; ^"’* 
ica can do is not to look at Hong 
Kong as a problem, but as an r -^ 
opportunity — something 
might_actuaUy add value to 
U.S.-China relationship.” - >■£ * 

The New York Times. . '. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO ^ 


1897: Eastern Tension 


dons, and if it runs it will get important guarantee for its social 
creamed by the democratic and political stability. Hong 


money prosecuting them. End of 
story. My favorite democracy 


demonstrators were those 
selling miniature plaster replicas 
of the ‘‘Goddess of Democra- 
cy” the students of Tiananmen 
Square had erected. They went 
for $100 a copy, and they were 
“Made in China.” Where else? 

The Chinese Army troops 


creamed by the democratic 
parties. Tung Chee-hwa, 
China's handpicked chief here, 
last week promised that elec- 
tions for a new legislature would 
be held by mid- 1998. The hot- 
test-selling T-shirt at Hong 
Kong's Shanghai Tang depart- 
ment store is emblazoned: 
“Most Flavoured Nation." 

What might this be telling us? 
The relationship between China 
and Britain over Hong Kong 
was like a bad marriage: 
Everything one did the other dis- 
paraged. Any democratization 
by Britain, China treated as a 
stick in the eye. Any assertion of 
sovereignty by China, Britain 


Kong will develop democracy 
gradually with the ultimate aim 
of electing ihe chief executive 
and the Legislative Council by 
universal suffrage. Hong Kong's 
success is attributable to ... its 
well-developed legal system and 
highly efficient civil service.” 
W ha t ' s new is that the 


VIENNA — The murder of the 
Hungarian woman Anna Simon 
by an aide-de-camp of Prince 
Ferdinand of Bulgaria threatens 
to lead to serious complications 
between Bulgaria and Hungary. 
The bitterness of feeling be- 
tween the two countries has be- 
come so great that the Bulgarian 
Government has cancelled an 
order for 1 00.000 rifles given to 
an Austrian firm and has trans- 
ferred the order to Russia. 


change/ Into something rich aruff ' 
strange. To-day [July 8]; 100:.' 
years ago, Percy Bysshe Shel^; 
ley, one of the most remarkable:^ 
of modem poets, was drowned^ : 
off the Italian coast. The ashe^ 
of his body were consigned to' . 
the earth at this spot,- which Kir . 
had once called the “mostbeau'^.'-f 
tiful and solemn cemetery:’ * 'f 1 ' 


1947: FlyingSaucere^ J 


Chinese president wasn't speak- 
ing about some British colony. 
He was speaking about the im- 
portance of rights, legality and 


democracy for what is now pan 
of China. How long before elites 
in Shanghai or Tianjin come to 
Mr. Jiang and say that they can’t 
compete economically with 


1922: Shelley’s T omb 

PARIS — ■ There can be few 
more moving experiences than 
that of having entered at twilight 
the Strangers' Cemetery, near 
the Cestian pyramid and the Os- 
tian gate at Rome, and standing 
before the tomb of Shelley to 
have read the inscription, a quo- 
tation from the “The Tem- 
pest”: Nothing in him that doth 
fad el But doth suffer a sea 


NEW YORK — The mystery ]; 
of the flying disks, whirling . £ 
saucerlike objects skimming. ■ 
through the air at tremendous! 
speeds, remained unsolved, bat: fi 
reports poured in from all sec-i •'£? 
lions of the United States and’. 7 
eastern Canada that the phe-|l 
nomenon was observed ag ain.! 
The mystery objects haver! 
been seen in thirty-nine states.*: 
The disks were first reported 
have been seen June 25 by - 
Kenneth Arnold, a pilot, of 
Boise, Idaho, while flying over. ' 
the Cascade Mountains. V 




AMSTE 

JkLMR 

took full co 

Holdings L 

tOOpereen 

to strength 
share- 
KLM 

rmaining. ?■' 
from Bnh? 

Ltd.: it did 

UK genera 
l £483.8 mi 
The Du 

rose after 
duiidens (.- 
gaining fo 
help 

Airways l 
Inoney-los 

jjialvsts st 
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April 1. * 
Uberaiizat 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


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rasrs-E 

rttif ° 0t * no " bu » 
n their aspirations 

on “gh standards 
■day. we wig als,, 
■courages other, io 
tomorrow. This j s 

JSident will brini 
ima after the sum- 
1 will carry when I 
■raaand Russia. 
NATO policy. |j 
:nt Clinton’s "per. 
□dnune, to build a 
ery nation is free 
ns our partner. 

ne s Syndicate 

ted Now 

a power on the 
at inland ocean 
’ bound to grow 
es the route en 
>aijan and Kazak- 
ional markets, 
uricey alone bear:, 
ng to stabilize the 
"O member state 
Sea could be the 
Ip ensure stability 

h. an analyst at 
lion for Defenst 
ris. commenting 
he imernaiiemul 
Herald Tribune 


Europe 


two most recent re : 
iclared that inflation, 
rly measured. i> nm\ 
ffliany. Further, the 
k sees no inflation 


? is still 
l as a 
ion of 
■ states, no 
which is as 
>r as 
nically 
•some as 


recent overshoots in 

upply target. 

ario of monetary re- r 

irope this fall is rising *t 
ty. A timely turn in 
is economic diplo-’ 
d Europe would re- 
k of EMU becoming 
ib of deflation. U.S. 
w resting after long, 
ns in Tokyo could 
ground for their er- 
the next few month* 
nn and Frankfurt. 

•r, director and head 

at Tokyo-Mitsubisht 

al in 'London. l , ' n ~ 
r comment to tire In- 
Herald Tribune. 


\ Like Aeroflot, Mir Shows 
Russians 9 Ingenuity 




I By Fred Hiatt 

a 

■ W ^®®?rTON — There was don’t feel like taking their stamper 
; YV something so evocative about out of the drawer. 

! conditions on the stricken Mir — “The office is on lunch break 
J darkness, the cramped quarters, until 3 P.M.,” they might say. 

• the bad air, the accumulating hu- “But my flight is at two.’* you 
‘ man waste. Then they announced would point out, trying not to 


the likely cause of the collision (hat whimper. 


. led to these problems — an over- “The office is closed. Can’t you 
; loaded cargo ship — and it clicked, read?" 

: Of course. Just Like Aeroflot. So, yes, the pilots and other staff 

How many times, since the So- may have collected their little sur- 
; viet Union’s collapse, have we read charges for every extra passenger 
1 of a crash in remote Siberia of an and crate. Who in the former Soviet 
■ Uyushin-this or a Yak-that? Union can live on his or her salary? 

Though sometimes those planes Yet surely, at least some of the 
just ran out of fuel — and once the time, Russian soflheartedness is at 
pilot handed die controls to his fault too. For experienced travelers 
teenage son — usually the cause also know that even die most ar- 
was die same: overloading. Pas- mor- plated Russian functionary 
sengers standing in the aisle, pas- might suddenly soften into a sen- 
sengers in the toilets, boxes stacked timental pushover if she knew your 
up in the cockpit, cargo under wife was home alone, say, waiting 
everyone’s feet — just too many for you on her birthday. Then she 
kilograms for the bird to carry. might hustle you through some 
Now Aeroflot is said to be clean- back door right onto the tarmac, 
tag up its act, a ad Mi r’s latest mis- while scolding you for nor having 
hap is sparking calls in Congress purchased roses, 
for a re-evaluation of the U.S.-Rus- After all, what if the manual did 
sian partnership in space. Weil, it’s say the plane could carry only 44 
hard to argue with either dev el- passengers? The clerk, like every- 
opment, but piling on the Russian one else in the old Soviet Union, 
space program during its time of grew up knowing that nothing 



A Vacation Hideaway 
To Scream About 

By Hart Seely and Frank Cammuso 


• trouble is almost too easy. On the 
; contrary: This is a moment to recall 
; the ingenuity and human spirit that 
: keep Mir in orbit. 

It is true, of course, that expe- 


rienced travelers, upon bearing of don’t crash. 


you read can be trusted. Why 
should airplane specs be different? 
And most of the time, the clerks 
and pilots bet right. Most of the 
time, those overloaded airplanes 


; die Latest Russian plane crash, 
; might dwell on the darker side of 
‘ human nature, not on its indom- 

■ liable spirit They might speculate 
i how many bribes those extra pas- 

■ sengers had paid to get on board. 
; After all, if you've dealt with Rus- 
; sian airport clerks, you know they 


Russians grew up having to trust 
their instincts and their ingenuity. If 
they were lucky enough to buy a 
new car, they knew it would not run 
until they had overhauled the en- 
gine, scrounging and improvising 
spare parts as best they could to fill 
the gaps left at the factory. It was not 


‘ could keep you off the plane even if the most efficient way to run a coun- 
; yon have a ticket, just because they try. but it made people resourceful. 


That same resourcefulness has 
kept the space program going even 
as it has sunk from superpower's 
favored child to orphan of the 
Soviet demise. Sure, the Mir space 
station is in the 11th year of a 
planned five-year life span — 
so what? There’s nothing that can’t 
be fixed with glue, spit and a little 
imagination. 

American movie audiences 
gasped when Tom Hanks and Mis- 
sion Control had to improvise to 
bring Apollo 13 back from the 
moon. But that is what Russian 
cosmonauts do every day. 

American visitors to Mir are sur- 

g rised by how much junk seems to 
e floating around the station, but 
there is a reason for iL You never 
know when an old shoelace or worn 
screw might conte in handy (o ad- 
just a solar panel or plug a leak. 

So if Mir\s crew loaded too much 
garbage and human waste on that 
earth bound cargo vessel, which sub- 


sequently crashed back into the Mir, 
knocking out much of its power — 
and so far, that’s only a theory — it 
wouldn't be such a surprise. 

The cosmonauts long ago 
stopped doing things by the book: 
there is no book for their evolving 
mission. And that habit of impro- 
visation has provided an education 
for visiting American astronauts. 
When they go up in a future Rus- 
sian-American space station, it 
may be cleaner and more orderly 
than Mir. But just as surely, cir- 
cumstances will arise that not even 
NASA's manuals have foreseen. 

Now Mir’s two Russian crew- 
men are being asked to improvise 
again. Sometime this month, while 
the U.S. astronaut Michael Foale 
wails in the Soyuz escape capsule, 
the commander, Vasili Tsibliyev 
and the flight engineer, Alexander 


tempt a risky repair job they never 
practiced on Earth. 

If they fail, they might have to 
abandon Mir. or worse. If they 
succeed, they will be heroes, but 
they can expect no hero's welcome 
from an impoverished, preoccu- 
pied Russia. 

So would 1 take a ride in Mir? 
Not likely. Nor does it necessarily 
make sense for Americans to keep 
doing so; Congress is right to insist 
on a thorough safety evaluation, 
given the recent string of accidents. 
But it is worth remembering that if 
the Americans pull out. it would be 
a loss not only for the Russians. 

After all, it’s no big deal to fly a 
plane when the passengers buckle 
tbeir seat belts and check no more 
luggage than regulations permit But 
to land a plane that is overweight 
unbalanced, with passengers already 


Lazutkin, who have been in orbit jostling in the aisles to disembark, 
for nearly five months, are sup- you have to be a pretty good pilot- 


posed to don space suits and at- 


The Washington Past. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


NATO Not a Job Plan 

Regarding “ U.S. Arms 
Makers Lobby for NATO Ex- 
pansion" (June 30): 

U.S. defense manufactur- 
ers and their allies in the 
Pentagon are scurrying to 
cash in on an expected NATO 
expansion by dangling ex- 


tendency to lump together the 
economic fortunes of devel- 
oping countries. This shows a 
complete misunderstanding 
of the different market con- 
ditions prevailing in those 


ion. June 26) bv William 

PM: 


coming more affordable and 
available. These alternatives. 


Mr. Pfaff states categori- along with maximum recyc- 
cally, “Bill Clinton will be ling of paper, are crucial for 


gone as the year 2000 be- 
gins.” In fact, Mr. Clinton’s 


countries, including the so- term ends in January 2001 — 
called newly emerging mar- despite years of Republican 


kets such as the Philippines. 
The Philippines has an 


expansion oy aangnng ex- ine rauippmes Has an 
pensive weapons systems in older, more developed, more 
front of Central European na- active and wider-based cap- 
ital market than Mexico or 


dons. Meanwhile; die State 


Department and the Treasury Thailand. It has a floating ex- 


efforts spearheaded by Ken- 
neth Starr, and tens of mil- 
lions of dollars spent by both 
die taxpayers and Republican 
bigwigs. They haven't even, 
come up i with enough jp slap 


are expressing some concern change rate in both theory and the president with a parking 


about the economic con- practice. Yet Mr. Bowring 
sequences of projected in- did not point out that the peso 
creases in me military has been stable against the 
budgets of the Czech Repub- dollar precisely because of 

lie, Hungary and Poland. exchange rates determined by Alternative Phner 

Why this flagrant disparity the market. Alternative raper 

between the responsible fis- The Philippine Central Regarding “How Con- 
cal concern voiced by State Bank was forced to push up sumers Can Help Save the 
and Treasury, and a rather ixr- short-term interest rates pre- World's Forests" (Opinion. 
.elegant and opportunistic dsely to stave off attacks June 26) by Francis Sulli- 
pawking of wares by the De- against the peso resulting van: 
fense Department and its in- from dire predictions made The forest and wood cer- 
dustry pals? by Western economic ana- tification programs described 

..Such a situation arises lysts. Understanding the ac- by Mr. Sullivan are positive 
eyery time there is an im- tual conditions of markets in steps. He points out that pulp 
portant arms trade policy do- developing countries would and paper are the main wood 
qjtion. to be made, whether it help avoid such analyses, products consumed in de- 
ls- to end a 20-year ban on which only contribute to un- veloped countries. The cru- 
seHing U.S. weapons to Latin dermining an active and rial question is whether this is 
America or to support Central rising market a sustainable trend. 

European rearmament as a ANTONIO C. MODENA. It seems unlikely that the 
part of NATO enlargement Paris. world's forests can continue 

• No matter what tbe to support the dual demands of 

Pentagon and defense compa- * Short Ter m? timber and paper production, 

mps might say, NATO is cot a * Luckily, alternative papers 

U.S. jobs program. Defense Regarding “Get Used to from annual plants like kenaf 
industry lobbying — whether Blair — and Hope He Turns and hemp as well as from 
by company executives or Out to Be a Leader" (Opin- agricultural wastes are be- 


about the economic con- 
sequences of projected in- 
creases in the military 
budgets of tbe Czech Repub- 
lic, Hungary and Poland. 

Why this flagrant disparity 
between tbe responsible fis- 


MARC EMORY. 
Dusseldorf. 


elegant and opportunistic risely to stave off attacks 
[hawking of wares by the De- against the peso resulting 
fense Department and its in- from dire predictions made 


dustry pals? 

..Such a situation arises 
eyery time there is an im- 
portant arms trade policy do- 


by Western economic ana- 
lysts. Understanding the ac- 
tual conditions of markets in 
developing countries would 


qjtion to be made, whether it help avoid such analyses, 
i$~ to end a 20-year ban on which only contribute to un- 
selling U.S. weapons to Latin dermining an active and 
America or to support Central rising market 
European rearmament as a ANTONIO C. MODENA. 

, part of NATO enlargement Paris. 

• No matter what tbe 

tSSSSfjSSo!^ AShortTerm? 

U.S. jobs program. Defense Regarding “Get Used to 


AShortTerm? 


Hatch 


5ns of “Butchers (f 
ju’H miss those pn‘; 
*ir possibilities. J' 1 '-, 
understand tHai 
nocrats here. Vnul 
•s otherwise, arguec 
rhe best thing Arne^ 
; not to look at Hong 
problem, but as & 

something ^ 
Uy add value to tni 
relationship-' 

/ru York Times 


yearsago 

cornel 

eday U uI > . y cM- t 
Percy By*£ Sjf * 

be most r TSStfirf 

££**■ TS- 

led the "most . 
emnceinetery- 


■ Pentagon officials — has no 
place in the NATO debate. 

- • The American public 
should encourage its govern- 
ment to eliminate defense in- 
dustry lobbying * from 

derision-making on U.S. 
security policy, if not for 
security or economic reasons 
• 7 t£en af die very least for co- 
, _.h&ence. 

VrJQRDANA D. FRIEDMAN. 

- t--' London. 

J * The writer is the director of 
thejntemational Security Pro- 
gram at die Council on Eco- 
nomic Priorities in New York. 

Market Predictions 

Regarding “ Thailand Has 
Learned a Lesson That Oth- 
ers. Should HeedT ( Opinion . 
Jfdy,4) by PfdUp Bowring: 

J I When Mexico was- forced 
i jflewtae. Western econonj.- 
ie&mlysts were miickto'pre- 

worddsoon follow. The pre- 
qpm*onfellflat,buts«Qt shock 
r wpves through the Philippine 
maiket .These analysts are at 
it again with the baht crisis. 

. ■Western writers have the 


saving our forests. They also 
present promising economic 
opportunities as worldwide 
demand for paper grows. 

Alternative papers will be- 
come widespread once the 
forests are gone. The chal- 
lenge is to adopt their use 
, before that happens. We have 
a few years left. ' 

DOUG DAIGLE. 

Baton Rouge. Louisiana. 

Constitutional Mirade 

Regarding "Be Nice to the 
Constitution: Let It Be" 
( Opinion . July 4) by David S. 
Broder: 

Once the 55 regionally, in- 
tellectually. emotionally and 
professionally diverse dele- 
gates to the Constitutional 
Convention had completed 
their work during the op- 
pressively hot Philadelphia 
summer of 1787, George 
Washington and James 
Madison wrote to their Paris- 
based friends. General Lafay- 
ette and Thomas Jefferson, 
respectively. Tbe letters bore 
the same word: “miracle.” 

SHARI LESLIE S EG ALL. 

Paris. 


from annual plants like kenaf ^ 50- Year Friendship 
and hemp as well as from r 

agricultural wastes are be- 1 last wrote to you in April 


1947. I had just moved from 
Derbyshire to London, finally 
safe from bombing. I was 
lonely, so I wrote to the New 
York Herald Tribune in an 
appeal for a pen-friend. 

I was fortunate to receive 
three replies, and the third re- 
sulted in a special friendship 
that has endured until this 
very day. We communicated 


fig? 

■sis * 


throughout our teenage years, 
our college years, our careers, 
our marriages and our chil- 
dren. 

Thank you most sincerely 
for printing my appeal — you 
could not have known the joy 
this friendship has brought 
me. 

ELLA BELLENIE. 
lekenham. England. 


N EW YORK — Bub and 
Satey thank you for rent- 
ing on scenic Wrickey Lake. 

Please note these cabin 
rules and regulations: 

1. The locked basement is 
for storage only. Please stay 
out of this area. 

2. The Vanderpools. who 
live on nearby Wri chard Bay, 
will remove your trash and 
recyclables, at no charge, 
nightly. Just leave unwanted 

MEANWHILE 

items outside your cabin. 
(Note: Be sure to bring all 
wanted items inside.) 

3. If, while hiking, you 
meet a group of stray dogs, 
remember that they generally 
are more afraid of you than 
you are of them. Simply toss 
aside whatever food you’re 
carrying and move slowly 
away. DO NOT RUN! 

4. Please show respect for 
the flag that flies over the 
Vanderpool family com- 
pound. This signifies the Re- 
public of Vanderpool, a sov- 
ereign nation separate from 
the United States since 1973. 
Trespassers could face inter- 
rogation and incarceration. 

5. No diving off the chem- 
ical barrels near Vanderpool 
Point 

6. For day trips, we suggest 
nearby Porterfield (28 miles 
south on Route 182), home to 
the Exit 47 Truck Stop, which 
offers a $5.95 All-U-Can-Eat 
Grand Seafood Buffet, Tues- 
day through Friday. (Best to 
go before Friday.) 

Further south is Uncle 
Oinker’s Sausage Bam. 
where families can tour “the 
magic of meat from hoof to 
bun.” Free samples. 

Also, don’t forget Happy 
Land Park, featuring Big Rick- 
ety. the world's oldest and 
fastest wooden roller coaster, 
and Ultimate Pee Wee Fight- 
ing every Friday, tbe winner 
receiving a $50 savings bond. 
(If planning to enter, don’t for- 
get child's birth certificate!) 

7. At nighu you may have 
dreams about the basement, 
or at times feel an over- 


8. Because of the high-in- 
tensity lines from Rainbow 
Valley Nuclear Units I and A, 
radios, flashlights and other 
electrical equipment may turn 
on and off spontaneously. 
(No pacemakers, please.) 

Also, inside the cabin, you 
may occasionally experience 
minor electric shocks. MAKE 
SURE YOU ARE COM- 
PLETELY DRY BEFORE 
USING ANY APPLIANCE! 

9. You might hear shouts or 
explosions along Vanderpool 
Road between 1 1 P.M. and 4 
A.M. These are routine field 
maneuvers conducted by 
General Vanderpool and his 
troops. If such noises occur, 
merely turn off all lights and 
remain inside your cabin. 

10. Prolonged contact with 
lake water may irritate the 
skin. If problems occur, the 
Porterfield Bum Center (29 
miles south on Route 182) is 
open 24 hours a day. 

11. Now and then, federal 
law-enforcement officials 
may institute a blockade 
around the Vanderpool Re- 
public. If such a policy is en- 
acted, ask the highest-ranking 
officer for a pass allowing 
your family access to the cab- 
in. Upon request, Kevlar 
vests will be provided. 

12. Tap water reminder 
Brown — safe to drink. Yel- 
low — O.K. to drink, but 
chew thoroughly. Orange- 
like — turn off faucet and get 
out of cabin immediately. 

13. During your stay, you 
may have die pleasure of 
meeting “the Professor,” 
who lives in tbe woods not far 
from your cabin. He is harm- 
less. though it's best not to 
offend him by flaunting elec- 
tronic devices. 

14. As the cabin continues 
to settle, the creaks and 
groans of aging woodwork at 
times may sound almost as if 
someone is in the basement, 
begging to be freed For your 
own well-being and your 
family’s safety, please stay 
out of the basement. 

The writers, a reporter and 
a cartoonist for The Syracuse 


whelming compulsion to see Herald-Journal, contributed 
what ’s down there. Please, do this comment to The New York 
not go in the basemenL Times. 


DO YOU LIVE IN 


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A Flaming Case of Kitsch 
Rembrandt’s Altered States 
The Great Auction War 
Sleuths Among the Stalls 

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I 



Givenchy's tartan and python-leather suit with lattice-hair hat and antler skull bag by Alexander McQueen ; 
Emanuel Ungaro's pierrette dress on a Venetian theme with tutu skirt and feather trim. 


McQueen’s Dance of the Macabre 


P ARIS — What! No dead men’s 
bones, human hearts or livers? 
Just these caged ravens giving 
the audience the evil eye; a 
handbag with a skeletal Baxnbi head and 
horns; a fan with a bird-claw handle, and 
a cape made from what looked like 
RapunzePs chopped-off hair? 

After the buildup to the Givenchy 
show in the British press, nothing cqald 
have lived up to Alexander McQueen's 
billing as the Damien Hirst of haute 
couture using anatomical remains for 
his fall show. 

“I was quite worried when I read 
about it, but it isn’t true at all — just a 
story planted by our competitors,” said 
Bernard Arnault, Givenchy's owner, sit- 
ting front row in the University of Par- 
is's Medical SchooL transformed with 
red velvet drapes, Persian rugs, and tiger 
and lion skins to suggest a mad sur- 
geon's private den. 

McQueen has a strange, macabre ima- 
gination and an aggression about as well 
tamed as the fierce falcon he brought out 
as he took his bow. 

But what exactly is the British de- 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


sent out a discomforting message for 
women. 

Following in the fashion footsteps of 
John Galliano (but taking a tough route 
rather than a romantic one), McQueen's 
show went from Queen Victoria's Scot- 
land, through Madame Butterfly’s Ori- 
ent by way of Carmencita’s Spain and 
Latvia, which produced a dramatically 
elegant swing coat/ Needless to say, the 
only territory McQueen did not visit 
was the future. 

What is the future of a haute -couture 
house with a designer who has a savage 
talent to reference the past and give it a 
dizzy spin — but whose clothes as shown 
would frighten off the bravest client? 

McQueen called the collect "Eclect 
Dissect," and if you tore away the trap- 
pings Like black lace ruffled bustles, 
there were lovely pieces, especially the 
chinoiserie tailored coats or the watery- 
green silk top and pants under a silver 
coat that suggested the show was sailing 
into calmer waters. 


T HE audience now knows that 
the idea of such shows is to 
catch the camera’s eye — not 
necessarily to persuade the 
British ambassador’s wife or Demi 
Moore to hop into the frocks. 

And there is one customer out there 
crazy for the stuff. Step forward, Isa- 
bella Blow, McQueen’s erstwhile muse, 
who appeared at the show poured into a 
patent-leather Givenchy dress, with a 
bird on her head and trailing an oil- 
covered chain to express “the burden 
woman carries through her life.” 
Someone should tell McQueen that 
clothes shouldn't be one of them. 

Emanuel Ungaro was on a different 
fashion planet — but that also seemed as 
remote as the space pictures from Mars. 

“It was a dream that I wan ted to do — 
Venice in the winter," said Ungaro of 


signer doing, letting rip his obsessions 
in haute couture? Heaven knows, cou- 


ture needs energizing, but its funda- 
mental point is to make women look 
wonderful, not weird. 

In the show he sent out Monday, 
McQueen occasionally presented the 
best of himself — a few sharp pantsuits 
inset with lace and dresses where lat- 
ticework created an hour-glass silhou- 
ette. B ut even those clothes were dressed 
up with flying-saucer earpieces. Miss 
Ha vis ham wigs, and birds, birds, birds. 

Feathers flattening into a bodice with 
a beaked head dangling around the neck 
and a hot containing a fluttering live bird 


the strange, poetic collection that he sent 
out Monday. 

Think Venice — think Carnival — and 
so it was with the show, despite Ungaro's 
protestations dial it was not a theme. As a 
flurry of tutus pirouetted around the gold- 
painted floor and feathered headdresses, 
exotic unbans and intricate layers of pat- 
tern and texture passed by, you could 
imagine yourself in a gondola on the 
Grand Canal in another century watching 
the masked revelers go by. 

But here we are in the wash-and-go 
1990s, and even if the point of couture is 
that it should be extraordinary, Ungaro 
made little concession to modem life. It 
is true that pants predominated, but they 
tended to be wispy shadows of trans- 
parent lace, worn with long tunics under 
brief waist-length jacket Ungaro has 
very fine ateliers that can cut pin-striped 
pants effortlessly on the bias, but more 
typical was the men’s tailoring-fabric 
given a girly spin with a flirty skirt 

As for decoration. Ungaro just let rip, 
as though he wanted to mark the end of 
fashion minimalism with dense patterns 
and textures and with more tassels. 


feathers, fabric neckpieces and lace em- 
broidery than ever. The result could be 


beautiful in an oul-of- this -world way 
but rich, indigestibly rich. 

Yet the clients loved it 

“It was beautiful,” said Susan Gut- 
freund. “He has gone back to his best 
when he was layering fabrics and colors 
— 1 think he’s a genius." 

Imagine a 90-degree fashion turn and 
you have Adeline Andre's modernist 
poetry. The designer, invited by French 
fashion’s governing body to present a 
collection, chose the glass rooftop of the 
Fondation Cartier to show her sculpted 
clothes in soft fabrics, where sleeves 
were half-kimono, half medieval and 
the body was concealed with inventive 
wrapping and cutting. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 


isOWsmobile, 

eg. 

IE Sound during 
hay fever 
season 
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country-style 

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wrap 

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capital 

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Preppy 
Handbook" 
author Bimbach 
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If the Suit Fits, Wear It 

Menswear Message: The Man Makes the Clothes 


P ARIS — In the great Savile Row 
tradition, it is the clothes that 

make the man — mean ing that 

any body can be enhanced by 
the cut of a good suit 
The French menswear season that 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


closed on Monday took a different at- 
titude: It is the man that malms the 


clothes. 

That is why Paul Smith opened his 
bold and witty show with an aristocratic 
young man, nose sniffing the air like a 
pedigree hound, and why Yohji Yama- 
moto sent out a long, lanky giant beside 
a pint-size man, in similar suits, to prove 
that “one style fits all mankind.’' 

Using “real” men is supposed to be 
about asserting normality. Yet a cynical 
viewer of the spring-summer shows 
might suggest that without the changes 
of models and the all-over-town venues, 
most of the clothes would seem 
identikit: the three-button suit In iri- 
descent fabric; the soft shirt-jacket; the 
slender flat-front pants or bagg y ones 
with cuffs spilling over sandals. 

“It’s the sheer volume of blandness, 
the cookie-cutter fashion — it’s time for 
a change," said Smith. 

The aristocratic, eccentric English 
glamour of Smith's collection was such 
a departure from the designer’s regular- 
guy image that the audience watched in 
stunned silence suits patterned like 
stately home wallpapers or patterns of 
daisies on sweaters. 


The hippie-deluxe style was a ref- 
erence to a moment in the 1960s when 


Swinging London broke with Savile 
Row style. One model was even Saffron 
Rainey, nephew of the fashion muse 
Aman da Harlech, whose family was an 
integral part of the aristo-goes-pop era. 

The point of Smith’s show was to re- 
habilitate aristocratic dressing. Behind 
the couture reference — little gilt chairs 
and basting stitches on tailored suits — 
there was a sense of the nobility of well- 
cut. well-made clothing and the pleas- 
ure in dandy details from jaunty cravats 
through velvet slippers. It caught a fash- 
ion moment that marks Smith's move 
from street to chic. 

And so to French couture. Hedi Sli- 
mane. 29, who was in diapers when 
Yves Saint Laurent was storming fash- 
ion, sent out his first YSL runway show. 
By playing with color, texture and new 
fabrics and by tweaking the proportion 
of a fitted suit or safari jacket, Slimane 
refreshed the classics. The signature 
pants were made wide but straight and 
the necktie matched the shirt Safari 
jacket in whipcord silk gave a new spin 
to what the designer said was “a real 
pret-a-porter for a couturier.” 

Valentino does not seem sure if he 
wants to be couture — or cool The 
casual sloppiness of the V Zone line that 
opened the show with baggy pants and 
tunic sweaters seemed out of sync with 
Valentino’s precise image. But then so 
did the main collection’s contrived 
asymmetric one-button suits. Val- 
entino's message? That life’s a beach, 
judging by the sand-shewn floor, soft 
colors and sandals with eveything. 


T HE Japanese invented asym- 
metry. but Yohji Yamamoto in- 
stead focused on square-cut 
suits and coats. The not-so-new 
geometry seemed familiar, but the shirts 
were exceptional, with their handker- 
chief-fine collars, openwork on the 
chest, a stiff bow or a waterfall of silk 
folds to bring a touch of poetry to 
menswear without ever looking silly. 

Dries Van Noten invented the men’s 
show as a stroll around the block for 
regular guys. But there seemed some- 
thing lacking in his new show. The 
natural, even rustic textures, contrasting 
with glazed fabrics, were part of the 
modern juggling with materials. 
Everything from the low-waist wide 
pants through the cardigan jackets were 
impeccably proportioned. Sweaters 
layered with overshirts were in the male 
comfort zone. But is Van Noten wise to 
abandon entirely the ethnic touches that 
used to give his shows an extra charm? 

Kenzo swings merrily along that eth- 
nic traiL The bongo drums summoned 
up images of Africa: tree-bark textures, 
tribal prints on sweaters and on skin 
bared for the swimsuit section. From 
India came heal-and-dust colors for 
suedes, while bold batik patterns were 
printed on shirts. Kenzo’s great-escape 
formula enlivens straight-up clothes. 

Who is man enough to wear velour 
shorts — especially if they are in shock- 
ing pink? Rykiel Homme fell into the 
contrivance trap: modern sporty sep- 
arates fancied up with violent colors or 
abstract patterns. But it was easy enough 
to ignore the showpieces and pick out 
the real clothes: the sleek suits shown 
monochrome, a Ja Gucci, and the taut 
sweaters worn with soft suedes. 

Neither Thierry Mugler nor Claude 
Montana seem to be pushing forward in 
their men's collections. Mugler’s tail- 
oring is scalpel sharp and he has an eye 
for modem materials like rubber and 
jersey that give his collections an edge. 
Montana made the most of the one- 
button suit and showed his sleek leath- 
ers. But removing all the signature 
metallic trims made the show bland. 

The most exhilarating show of the 
season was from Walter Van Beiren- 
doack, a designer whose creative ima- 
gination is breathtaking and audaciously 
modem. By backing the W&LT col- 
lection of sports and club wear. Mustang 
jeans are on to a winner. For here was a 
superbly staged sbow that went straight 
on the Internet. A worldwide audience 
could view the winy opening of line 

dancing, a gruesome I >■ decadent vam- 
pire scene, a passage on stilts (a take on 


Pom* by SMpftMa SfeaAccM 


©New York Times/ Edited by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of Jnly 7 


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the current ultra-long pants) and a finale 
of frog-masked ballroom dancing that 
sent the live audience home cheering. 


Top: Paul Smith's wailpapcr-natterr r7™ M ' wn ”“ 
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TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 


PAGE 11 



* 


Chrysler 
Cuts Back 
In China 

1 A Slow Market Dims 
. Opportunities, It Says 

Bloomberg Sews 

BELTING — Chrysler Corp. said 
; Monday it would close its Beijing of- 
! fice, asserting that China's sluggish 
automobile market offered few oppor- 
tunities for new projects. 

The move underscores disappoint- 
ment among global companies at the 
slower-than -expected development of 
, China’s auto industry. Production of 
1 cars, trucks and buses grew 2.6 percent 
lasr year from a year earlier, barely a 
quarter of the pace for the rest of the 
economy. 

Larry Burger, director of Chrysler 's 
projects in China, said the third-biggest 
U.S. automaker no longer saw the need 
for a separate representative office. 

“Chrysler’s position is that it will not 
bid on other projects for the time be- 
ing," said Mr. Burger, one of three 
Cnrysler-employed expatriates to be re- 
called to the United States. 

Some sales and marketing staff will 
be moved to the company's joint-ven- 
ture plant in the capital, which makes 

^^^Thile car sales alone are still grow- 
ing at a rate of IS percent or more a year, 
car-making capacity has risen much 
faster. 

“In the coming one or two years, we 
won’t approve any new projects,” said 
Jiang Yrng, spokeswoman for the auto 
department of the Ministry of Machine 
Building Industry. “The market hasn’t 
grown as fast as we expected.” 

Chrysler’s bid to expand its China 
ce was foiled two years ago when 




ajmg picked Germany’s Mercedes- 
. Benz AG to build a SI billion minivan 
; and engine facility in southern China. 

In May, Mercedes Benz officials 
warned that continuing bickering be- 
tween the proposed Chinese partners 
and oversupply in the auto industry 
could force it to abandon die project. 

Another automaker, France’s PSA 
Peugeot Citroen, will leave its unprof- 
itable passenger-car plant in southern 
'Guangdong province, with General Mo- 
tors Corp. widely regarded as the likely 
^r^lacement .. 

• ■ Thelure forforeign autonrakers is the 
potential ize of die Chinese market. The 
country now produces annually only one 
road vehicle per. 1,000 people — ex- 
cluding moton^cles — compared with 

-about one in 10 in the United Stales. 

Clogged roads and credit controls on 
, borrowing, however, have stalled 
growth in the industry over the last three 
-.years. 

Chrysler’ s China focus will be its 
*joint venture, Beijing Jeep Corp. The 
"U.S. automaker bolds a 43 percent stake 
' rintbe venture, set up in the early 1980s, 
'’with Beijing Automotive Industrial 
Corp. owning the remaining share. 

* The company’s sales outlook is not 
^bright, with production likely to be little 
"changed this year. 

~ “By the end of tile year, the market 
‘ will be flat oar even a couple of per- 
centage points higher,” said Andy Okav, 
vice president of Bedjing Jeep. “Right 
, now it's our goal to hold our own.” 

Last month, Beijing Jeep became the 
' latest automaker to cut prices, shaving 4 
to Sperceat from the price of its jeeps. 

Cnrysler’s American rivals. General 
"Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co., have 
ho plans to reduce their presence. 



CjH DojcK/Thc Amuird Prev, kU Bend Lfcnufncffiunro 

Theo Waigel of Germany conferring, in left photo, with Dominique Strauss- Kahn of France at the finance ministers meeting in Brussels on 
Monday.. Mr. Waigel is at lefL In right photo, Jean-Claude Juncker of Luxembourg listens as Philippe Maystadt of Belgium makes a point. 

Instant Bootleg Videos Haunt Movie Industry 


By Linda Lee 

New York Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — The movie “Men in 
Black" opened across the United Stales 
last Wednesday — about six weeks after 
bootleg videos of the film went on sale 
on the streets of New York. 

“Batman and Robin" opened June 
20. It was available the same day at a 
Harlem market for $5. And a week 
before the U.S. opening of Disney's 
animated film “Hercules," a bootleg 
version was on sale. 

Video piracy is thriving in America, 
and nowhere more so than in New York 
City. 

The increasing sophistication of tech- 
nology and the eternal cachet of seeing 
something first are combining to in- 
tensify a persistent problem, despite 
raids on copying labs and the occasional 
:al intervention by well-known 


persona i iDiervt 
film figures like 


the director Spike Lee. 


In effect, boollegged films are like a 
nagging cold for the movie industry, a 
pesky problem that could undermine 
studios' financial health and in some 
places, like New York, threatens to turn 
into pneumonia. 

It is almost impossible to know how 
much bootleg competition costs Hol- 
lywood studios — though spokesmen 
quote “guesstimates" of lost revenues 
running to hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars a year. 

Whatever the financial losses, the 
studios fear they will escalate with the 
introduction of digital video disks, 
which would give pirates access to per- 
fect copies of films, along with software 
and hardware making them easy to rep- 
licate. 

Those in the industry say that lax 
enforcement of domestic bootlegging 
will hurt the business abroad, where 
piracy has been an even bigger problem. 
“To give up the ghost here would mean 


that the Chinese could say, ’Why pick 
on us? You can’t even enforce your own 
laws,' ” said Ed Arentz, who manages 
Cinemavillage, an an theater in Man- 
hattan. 

Many bootleg videos in the United 
States are surreptitiously copied with 
camcorders smuggled into advance 
screenings. But some come from inside 
the industry — work copies of films 
from editing houses, special effects 
houses and early test screenings. 

‘ ’Work prints get stolen all the time," 
said Tom Sherak. chairman of 20th Cen- 
tury Fox Domestic Film Group. “We 
By to watch it as closely as we can, but 
you can’t watch everything." 

And, using a $500 video camera 
tucked discreetly in front of his knees, a 
bootlegger ‘ ‘can go to the movies once a 
week and make $1,000 or more," said 
Bill Shannon, the head of the Motion 
Picture Association of America’s New 
York anti-piracy office. 


“If he makes 30 copies, and sells 
them for $100 apiece, that’s $3,000. 
And that’s tax free.” 

The association, which investigates 
and prosecutes piracy cases for the stu- 
dios. estimates that the bootlegging of 
films costs the industry more than $250 
million in potential domestic revenues. 

But the organization's figures for the 
economic impact of bootlegging pre- 
sume that a parson buying bootleg films 
would have spent $4 to $8 to see the 
movie in a theater, an uncertain as- 
sumption. 

Still, no one quarrels with the as- 
sociation's assertion that New York is 
the capital of American bootlegging. 

“New York is the center for this 
problem, and particularly for illegal labs 
and distribution networks," said Ed 
Pistey, director of United States anti- 
piracy operations for the association. 
“That’s why we’re focusing with rbe 
highest amount of intensity there." 


-is ingnr 


Hitachi Closes In oh IBM’s Mainframe Business 


By Laurence Zuckerman 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When Wells Fargo 
Bank decided it needed a powerful new 
mainframe computer early last year, it 
bypassed its longtime supplier, IBM, the 
world's biggest seller of mainframes. 

It turned instead to Hitachi Data Sys- 
tems. 

Why? Because Hitachi’s newest 
mainframe, the Skyline, was much more 
iwerful than anything International 

us mess Machines Corp. was selling. 

“We were growing; we needed big- 
ger machines, ” said Barry Lynn, an 
executive vice president in charge of 
Wells Fargo’s information technology. 
“Skyline became a real simple, elegant 
solution for us.” 

Since Hitachi introduced the Skyline 
18 months ago, large companies have 
been snapping up the machines as fast as 
Hitachi can make them, although they 
can cost up to $6 million. The demand 


has helped Hitachi become the No. 2 
mainframe computer maker, nearly trip- 
ling its share of the market to 20 percent 
last year from just 7 percent in 1995, 
according to Meta Group, a market re- 
search firm in Stamford, Connecticut. 

All this while IBM's dominance, 
though still great, has been eroding. The 
company’s market share slipped to 73 
percent in 1996 from 80 percent in 1995. 
Amdahl Corp., which was No. 2 in 1 995 
with a 12 percent share, slipped to third 
place with 7 percent. 

More important, the success of Sky- 
line has given Hitachi entree into the 
world’s elite buyers of information tech- 
nology — a group IBM had long mono- 
polized. In addition to the largest banks. 
Skyline customers include telecommu- 
nications giants like MCI Communica- 
tions, BellSouth and Deutsche Telekom; 
retailers like Wal-Mart, and the package- 
delivery giant Federal Express. 

IBM, shaking off forecasts of the 
mainframe computer's imminent de- 


mise, has continued to show surprising 
success selling its big machines. Still, as 
a result of falling prices, the company’s 
total revenue from mainframe sales de- 
clined in 1996. By contrast, Hitachi’s 
mainframe sales soared last year. 

Hitachi Data Systems, a privately held 
joint venture between Hitachi Ltd. of 
Japan and Electronic Data Systems of 
Texas, saw its revenue rise to $2 billion 
in 1996 from $1.6 billion in I995,Iargely 
because of the Skyline’s success. 

“Hitachi just walked into that mar- 
ketplace and captured a large percent- 
age of very large accounts," said David 
Floyer, a mainframe computer industry 
analyst with International Data Corp. in 
Framingham, Massachusetts. 

Still, Mr. Floyer, other industry ana- 
lysts and even some Skyline customers 
question whether Hitachi can capture 
much additional market share, in part, 
they say, because IBM’s mainframes 
will soon catch up with Skyline's com- 
puting power. 


But Hitachi executives are confident. 
"The future looks very bright for us," 
stud Bill Tudor, director of long-range 
planning for Skyline. 

The seeds of Hitachi’s success date 
back to 1993, when IBM, reeling from 
multibUlion-doUar losses, decided to 
stop developing its line of giant, water- 
cooled mainframes built around a chip 
technology known as bipolar. Instead, 
IBM focused on a new mainframe ar- 
chitecture referred to as CMOS that is 
based on microprocessor chips similar 
to those found in personal computers. 

The old bipolar machines were ex- 
pensive to make and operate but they 
were powerful. The new CMOS ma- 
chines, which sell for $500,000 to $5 
million, cost one-tenth to produce but 
have been much slower — at least in 
their early incarnations. Last mouth, 
after four years, IBM introduced the 
fourth generation of the new-style ma- 

See IBM, Page 12 


EU Backs 
Italy’s Plan 
To Cut Debt 

But Its Partners Warn 
About Project’s Cost 

C.'yqoJed Oar Sufi Frutn Pajvxlm 

BRUSSELS — European Union fi- 
nance ministers applauded Italy’s def- 
icit-reduction strategy Monday, saying 
Rome's chances of qualifying for the 
planned single currency hinged on put- 
ting the plan into action. 

But while the ministers endorsed the 
austerity package, designed to ensure 
that Italy meets the budget targets for 
monetary union starting in 1999, there 
was a note of caution from Germany and 
France over the costs of paying off 
Italy's large national debt The debt is 
equal to 123 percent of gross domestic 
product, more than twice the 60 percent 
target set by the Maastricht treaty on the 
euro. That will be a drain on Italy's 
budget for years to come, the rop French 
and German finance officials said. 

Finance Minister Dominique 
Strauss-Kahn of France called for 
“long- lasting efforts” to roll back the 
debt. His German counterpart, Theo 
Waigel, said Italy's debt was “a long 
way away" from the target. 

The Italian government said that in die 
1998 budget it would come up with 10 
trillion lire ($5.86 billion) in new revenue 
and would cut spending by 1 5 trillion lire. 
The 25 trillion lire of measures add up to 
about 1 -2 percent of GDP, the plan said. 

The EU ministers’ approval for the 
austerity plan does not ensure that Italy 
will be selected to participate in eco- 
nomic and monetaiy union from the 
outset. To do that, it will have to satisfy 
other EU governments that its economy 
has achieved a degree of stability nec- 
essary to prevent friction within a future 
single-currency area. 

The encouragement given to Italy, in 
fact, is likely to underscore fears of 
critics who have warned against creating 
a single currency that includes countries 
that fail to meet all the Maastricht cri- 
teria. Such a currency will be a weak 
currency, say critics such as Premier 
Edmund Stoiber of Bavaria, who was 
reported to have called for a “controlled 
delay" of the EMU project. 

But Prime Minister Jean-Claude Jun- 
cRSr of Luxembourg, the country that 
holds the EU presidency, ruled out any 
such postponement. “I totally exclude 
the scenario of a delay,” Mr. Juncker 
said after the monthly meeting of the 15 
finance ministers. 

The first group of countries to switch 
to the euro will be chosen by EU leaders 
next May. France and Germany are 
themselves struggling to pass the budget 
deficit test, which says deficits must not 
exceed 3 percent of gross domestic 
product. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn also said setting 
out a program for coordinating eco- 
nomic policies after monetary union 
was “an indispensable exercise." 

“A good economic policy is one 
which pays heed to all elements of the 
policy mix,” he said. 

Mr. Waigel urged EU governments to 
increase cooperation on budget and tax 
policies to help ensure the stability of a 
European common currency. He also 
said Bonn would support greater Euro- 
pean efforts to create employment as 
long as they did not cost money. 

"A better coordination of fiscal 
policy needs to be discussed in the com- 
ing weeks," Mr. Waigel said. 

{Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Northrop and McDonnell Douglas Reach Pact 

project, would produce the engine nacelles, tail sections and 
other components for McDonnell Douglas. 

The agreement, which extends through 2002, had been 
expected since the U.S. Air Force last year ordered 80 
additional C- 1 7s to increase its fleet to 1 20. 

On Thursday, Lockheed Martin Corp. said it planned to 
acquire Los Angeles-based Northrop Grumman for $11.6 
billion in stock and assumed debt, in another major step in the 
consolidation of the U.S. defense-contracting industry. Boe- 
ing Co., in the largest such transaction so far, is attempting to 
buy McDonnell Douglas for about $15 billion. 

(Bloomberg, AFX ) 


CanpilaJ by Oar Staff Fnmi DhpaKMn 

LOS ANGELES — Northrop Grumman Corp. and Mc- 
Donnell Douglas Corp. said Monday they had signed a $1.9 
billion agre ement through which Northrop Grumman would 

* continue building parts for McDonnell Douglas’s C-17 mil- 
itary transport plane. 

;. Northrop Grammar) makes the housings for the C-17’s 
engines, as well as parts of each C-17’s tail section, at its 
■facilities in Dallas, in Milled ge ville , Georgia, and in Stuart, 
3?loridal 

* - Northrop Grumman said its commercial aircraft division, 
4he largest supplier to McDonnell Douglas on die C-17 


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487 JO 


Forward Rates 


Ubid-Ubor Rates Jul V 7 

Swiss Prandi 

Dollar D-Moit Franc Storing Franc Ytn . ECU 

1-CMfltti S¥i ■ 5V» 3-3VS 6Vn-616» 3>4-3^ Vi-Vs 4-4VS 

3-mcnffc Wn-SH 3-31* IK-IMi «*-7 316-3* * - «Vn 4V* - 4Vi» 

6-moatti S«-5*i 3V*-3Vu IVn-IVd 7- 7Vi 3V«-3Mt x* - Wk 49* ■ 4Vu 

1-year 5h-6 3W.-3V* 7U-7M 3*»-3W M- t V» ilvfl* 

Sources? Reuters Uoytts Bonk. 

Rem oppscable to Mntbwk deposits of SI nUOan minimum foreoufrafenfl. 


Key Money Rates 

United Shrtt* 

HsaHUtmta 
Prim rate 
Fwlaral IWBte 
90-day CDsdwdm 
lBWoyCPdMhn 
3 moaft Treasury Wi 
1-yoar Treasury bS 
a-year Treasury M 
S-yiar Treasury nete 
7 -fMr Treasury note 
iO-rear Treasury wrt» 
3fr*eor Treasury b«d 
Metro Lynch 3 Wor RA 
Jama 

PiKiHMt rata 

cuawteiwr 

1 -WBftinterOw* 

34BMth hdarimk 

6400th Marta* 

1 Here- 6evt bard 


raw 

Ptw 

Britain 



550 

5-00 

Bank base rate 

M 

6)4 

8H 

Wi 

Caflpnaatv 

6 Vi 

6Vlt 

SVn 

SM 

1-auwfti intefbank 

0a 

(Ak 

555 

543 

3-awo0i Interbank 

7 m 

7.00 

555 

5-56 

6-a»afli Wtfbnk 

7Vt 

71a 

4.95 

£01 

lO-jaarQH 

7 M 

7 jh 

534 

536 




539 

£92 

Frew 



6.15 

6.19 

Intenretrttoa rota 

3.10 

3.10 

630 

634 

CafireoMy 

3Vk 

3* 

636 

641 

l-moatfatetertobk 

3U. 

3U 

458 

652 

Jrtuntfa Interbank 

3V* 

31* 

536 

5-05 


3M 

3M 



18-fMf OAT 

£84 

£48 


Cnmcy 

Pound Staffing 


mm toon tm i 

111J2 11147 11099 
14519 14470 1.4419 


30*0 M-day -ft-dor Qm*a<y 
1J81B - 14801 1J784 JopnotMfa* 

13691 13665 13639 Swiss three 

DantsdB mart TJ41* 1J380 1J342 

Soams: IMG Bant CAaalealmnb Mosm Book (BnmselsbBma Commas nolkmo 
(Mfiaal’BaivtindeFnuKeffhrf&bBaf^ofTidcyo-Mdnaisbirroe^il; 


QemoBt 


Cafinoaay 
1-noatti inlartoi* 

MaMth taldtarek 

SHWMtti totHtaok 
10 -yanf Damt 


050 OJfl 
044 039 

054 055 

053 054 
058 059 
255 2J4 

4J0 4-50 

113 3.13 

3.10 110 

113 113 

3.17 3.17 

5. 78 5.84 


Soon*: Realm 
Lfnclt. Bona of Taiyo-Ml. 
temmazbab, CmB Lyoitrah. 


ManMI 


Gold 


AJM. PJ*. Wfa 


ZlirMi 32455 318-25 -14.15 

London 31875 318.00 -550 

Now York 32530 319.00 -530 

US daUaa per ounce. London offiCW 
Adoer Zurich OflO New York opening 
and closing prices.' New Yon Comex 

(Aug J 

Source; Reutetf. 


Tflinking Ahead /Commentary 


Free Trade and Flying-Saucer Logic 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


W ATCH HILL, Rhode Island — People who 
claim they can prove the existence of flying 
saucers tend to “start with their answer and 
then work their way back to facts that will 
support them." according to an expert quoted in the Hart- 
ford Courant newspaper. 

He was referring to the widespread belief that an alien 
spacecraft crashed near Roswell, New Mexico, just over SO 
years ago. But he conld equally well have been describing 
the way many people form their opinions about the global 
economy. 

Even serious economists and politicians often begin with 
a proposition that they want 


Most rational people who start by 
looking at the facts, rather than Hhe 
answer, 9 will probably conclude 
that the benefits of free trade far 
outweigh its disadvantages. 


to believe — such as that free 
trade is good (or bad) — and 
then look for means of sub- 
stantiating it 

The most ardent support- 
ers of free trade, for instance, 
will construe almost any 
data to show that trade and 
economic globalization 
have nothing but beneficial 
consequences. 

But flying-saucer logic is far more often practiced by 
globalization's enemies — - for one simple reason. Most 
rational people who start by looking at the facts, rather than 
"the answer,” will probably conclude that the benefits of 
free trade far outweigh its disadvantages. 

Opponents of globalization must disregard a huge body 
of economic evidence and come up with their own al- 
ternative “facts," which often turn out to be subjective and 
anecdotal — though none the less powerful for that 

More of such faulty reasoning is likely to greet the 
release, due soon, of a U.S. report on the first three years of 
the North American Free Trade Agreement, which came 
into force among Canada, Mexico and the United States in 
January 1994. 

The report, like other studies, will show that the effects of 
NAFTA on the United States have so far been small but 
positive and that low-wage competition from Mexico 


presents no serious threat to American workers. 

The massive diversion of U.S. jobs and investment to 
Mexico that many NAFTA opponents predicred has not 
materialized. On the contrary, the United States remains by 
many measures the world’s most competitive economy and 
the biggest magnet for foreign investment. 

The U.S. economy is actually generating jobs so rapidly 
that it would lake only about two weeks to replace the 
equivalent of all the jobs lost to imports from Mexico and 
Canada over the past three years, according to the best 
estimates, and many of those jobs would have been lost 
even without NAFTA. 

None of this should be surprising. The United States was 
already open to trade with Mexico before the NAFTA 
accord was signed, and the entire Mexican economy is no 

bigger than that of Florida. 


’ NAFTA has had less impact 
on U.S.-Mexican trade than 
the two countries' relative 
economic growth rates. 

But many opponents of 
free trade wUl not be swayed 
by such considerations. 
They will continue to per- 
petrate the twin fallacies that 
NAFTA caused the Mexic- 
an economic and financial 
crisis of 1995 and that U.S. jobs are threatened by soaring 


imports from Mexico. 
Critic 


itics of NAFTA will deploy theirown “facts” — for 
instance, that labor and environmental conditions are much 
worse in Mexico than in the United States — which may be 
true but are beside the point. 

Such irrelevant arguments would matter less if the debate 
were only about Mexico. But NAFTA has become a test 
case of U.S. political willingness to accept further in- 
tegration into tne global economy and increased trade with 
developing countries in general. 

All the evidence suggests that globalization is in the 
interests of America and of its trading partners. If Amer- 
icans succumb to flying-saucer logic and turn against free 
trade, the whole world will suffer. 

If that were to happen, it might be better to let the aliens 
take over. 




THE AMERICAS 


30- Year T-Bond Yield 



Analysts Hail Stability in Mexico 


Shares Take a Late Tumble * 
Despite Rally in Bonds g 


Remm dfllo’s comments can only add to the authenticity of 

LONDON — Mexico’s economic policy is widely die results, and it only confirms there won’t be any 
expected to remain on its current track despite the major shift in policy as a result of this.*’ 
dramatic shift in the political landscape after the They said the fairness of the elections would be 
governing Institutional Revolutionary Party’s set- viewed positively by credit-rating agencies, though 
back in legislative and local elections Sunday, fi- an immediate upgrading of Mexican debt or se- 
nancial analysts here said Monday. curities was unlikely. 

Specialists in emerging markets said the fairness of But some analysts warned that there still could be 

the election, in contrast to - reason for uncertainty 

widespread charges of rr>t_ ■ u . i « about economic policies. 

fraud after previous elec- *■ VOtC SHOWS M 6X1 CO D3S C0ZZK6 3 Richard Gray, an emeig- 

tions, would be regarded long way 3 toward true democracy. mg-market, analy ^. t 

as a watershed event and J J BankAmenca Corp., 

should have a positive ef- said he was concerned 

feet on the country’s investment prospects. that party hard-liners might now conclude that they 

“There are lots of positive elements in this, par- had lost ground because of the absence of a “feel- 
ticularly that it shows democracy is now functioning good factor' ’ in the domestic economy, 
well in Mexico,” said Peter West, chief economist at “There is quite a lot of success to report on 

BBV La tin vest. Mexico, but most of it has been in the export sector of 

Analysts and economists also applauded com- the economy," Mr. Gray said, 
meats by President Ernesto Zedillo, who coagrat- “What the old guard will now claim is that there 
uiated the opposition candidate. Cuauhtemoc Carde- must be a faster rate of translation from that export 
nas of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, on success to the domestic side, and this is my concern 
winning the mayoral election in Mexico City. going forward.” 

“Mexico has come a long way to becoming a fully Another uncertainly, analysts said, is how die 
Westernized democracy,” said Chris Portxnan, se- government will handle budget negotiations with 
nior economist at ANZ Investment in London. ‘ ‘Ze- other parties in Congress. 


I 

1.55- p ■ M ■ A -j j- 

1987 

Btcbarse index ‘ 


110 -F M 


Mbr nSay 


NYSE. : The Ddw ' ■ ■ -7B$W9 ■■.7895-81 . -0.4? 

nyse : rjSSioo. ■'/! '■"■Taiaie- ■ 916.92 

NYSE WtoT". 8 9(MC'- 993.62 ' .•,■0.36 . 

myse comp&jte ; m.5s ■ '-qas 

«A: MasSaq Congoste' 14 &73 • 1467:61 ' . 

ame x . Jg£5S 

Toromo TSS fetfex ■ r ' 6530^90, B53&10 • -v-OBft 

a&oPattto g&espg^.. .. V .• 138024* t33 7g-39' 

Mexico C Hy gofea ! 471S33 4613-Q5 : ; r <^M 

Buen os AfresMarval ■ ; 84&13 % 833.08 WOras 

Santiago tPgA QeneraT''. S828 - 9* , S863.4Q'; ; 

Caracas Capitei General 3515.75 9467.44 .4iM>T- 

Source. Bloomberg. Reuters imemauiiul Hcraki Tribune 

Very briefly; 

integrated Health to Buy RoTech 

O WINGS MILLS. Maryland (Bloomberg) — Integrated 
Health Services Inc. said Monday it would buy RoTech Med- 
ical Corp. for about S9I5 million in stock and assumed debt (o 
bolster its position in the U.S. home health-care market. 

Integrated Health plans to issue about 15.S million shares 
valued at $615 million and assume debt and other obligations. 
• Aluminum Co. of America said its second-quarter net 
income rose 57 percent to S207.6 million, or $1.19 a share, as 
higher shipments offset lower prices for its aluminum. 

e Meridian Resource Corp. will buy Cairn Energy USA 
Inc. for $234 million in stock, the two Gulf Coast oil and gas 
exploration companies said. 

e Umax Corp. said it would build 12 three-dimensional movie 
systems for three cinema chains in the United States and 
Canada: it did not disclose terms. 

eSaf-T-Lock Inc.’s shares will not be delisted by the Nasdaq 
stock market for insufficient total assets, as Nasdaq officials 
granted the gun-lock maker’s request for a hearing. BUn>mberg 


A M J J 

- ftsv. •- -Vi* 
Close-' ■■ Chang* 
■ im£i \ -0:4? ■ 


The vote shows Mexico has ‘come a 
long way 9 toward true democracy. 


.91&2S' 

"astMO 

475.55^ 

1478.73 

§. II I . ^s H|‘ l ‘l ^ 

631.37 

6536*90. 

13S0244 

471533 

640.13 „ 

S628 91 

9515.75 


993.62 ’ /, -0.36 
477:66 
1467:61 ‘ 


'6576.10; fOBfr 
1337239' tOS7, 


633.06 ; . -tOBS 
. 5863.40'; 

9467.44 , .+05f- 

Ir>tenuui-rul HnhJ Tribune 


Weekend Box Office 

The ■-Isfr’a.Ta/ftrJ Pres i 

LOS ANGELES — “Men in Black’ ’ dominated the U.S. box 
office over die weekend, with a gross of $5 1 million. Following 
are the Top 10 moneymakere. based on Friday’s ticket sales and 
estimated >jles for Saturday and Sunday. 


The vote shows J 

dons, would be regarded Iona way 9 toward 

as a watershed event and p J 

should have a positive ef- 
fect on the country’s investment prospects. 

“There are lots of positive elements in this, par- 
ticularly that it shows democracy is now functioning 
well in Mexico,” said Peter West, chief economist at 
BBV LatinvesL 

Analysts and economists also applauded com- 
ments by President Ernesto Zedillo, who congrat- 
ulated the opposition candidate. Cuauhtemoc Carde- 
nas of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, on 
winning the mayoral election in Mexico City. 

“Mexico has come a long way to becoming a fully 
Westernized democracy,” said Chris Portman, se- 
nior economist at ANZ Investment in London. ‘ ‘Ze- 


Gold Plummets as Investors Flee 


Coa^oRnOvSt^FirmDopatha 

LONDON — Gold plummeted to 
a 12-year low Monday, extending 
last week's losses, amid concern 
central banks will sell more of the 
precious metal and that tame in- 
flation is reducing the need for a safe 
haven against higher prices. 

Gold fell as much as $10.55, to 
$313.95 an ounce, the lowest since 
July 1985, when it was at $308.25, 
according to N.M. Rothschild & 
Sons. It was last quoted at $318.00 
an ounce. 


Gold, at its lowest point since 
mid-December 1985 and down 16 
percent in the past year, has been 
overwhelmed by a wave of investor 
selling since the Australian central 
bank said Thursday that it had sold 
167 metric tons of gold, or two- 
thirds of its strategic gold stocks. It 
used the cash to buy U.S., Japanese 
and Ger man government bonds. 

“The Australian sale just 
knocked another nail in the coffin,” 
Steve Briggs, an analyst at the South 
African stockbrokers E.W. Balder- 


son. After looking at the prospects 
for inflation and better returns else- 
where, Australia's central bankers 
decided “they don’t want gold.” 
Mr. Briggs said. 

Gold is now in uncharted waters. 
The slump in price threatens to shut 
some high-cost mines, some ana- 
lysts said. 

On Monday. East Rand Propri- 
etary Mines Ltd. said its Benoni 
Gold Mining Co. division employ- 
ing 100 people would cease oper- 
ations. ( Bloomberg. AFP ) 


Dollar Falls on Japan’s Surge in Surplus 


1. Men In tisck 

{Columbia Pktum 1 

SSI milRon 

2. Foce'CH 

(Pammoml. ) 

SI6J million 

3. Hercules 

(Wall Disney) 

SI 2.4 million 

i. My Best Friend's Wedrflng 

(TrEtor Pictures! 

S1 1 million 

5. Barman & Robin 

,'HtmwaasJ 

SJL6 million 

b. Ou’ Ip Sep 

(Tnenaerii Cenrwy-Fau 

SSe, million 

7. Con Air 

(Touchstone Mums} 

S3 .6 million 

B.The Last World: Jurassic Parti 

1 Universal) 

$27 million 

y . Wild America 

(Warner Bias.! 

51 .B million 

1®. Speed X Craisd Control 

iTrier MUanttepfiW 

SI 5 million 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against most other major currencies 
Monday, dropping sharply against 
the yen, after Japan reported that its 
trade surplus expanded 129 percent 
in June. 

The dollar also fell against Euro- 
pean currencies on speculation that 
Europe's planned monetary union 
would be delayed. But it pared its 
losses after European officials again 
said the union would begin as sched- 
uled on Jan. 1. 1999. 

"The expanding trade gap is the 
main reason the dollar was sold for 
yen,” said Kosuke Hanao, head of 
foreign exchange trading at Indus- 


trial Bank of Japan. The country's 
ballooning trade surplus sent the 
dollar plunging because it meant 
Japanese exporters would have bil- 
lions more dollars to sell for yen 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

when they brought their profits 
home, traders said. 

The Finance Ministry said Ja- 
pan’s merchandise trade surplus for 
the first 20 days of June more than 
doubled from the same period a year 
earlier, to 453.2 billion yen. as auto- 
mobile and electronics exporters 
cashed in on a strong dollar to flood 
overseas markets. 


In 4 P-M. t rading , the dollar was at 
1 12.75 yen. down from 1 13.74 yen in 
London on Friday. U.S. markets were 
closed Friday for Independence Day. 
The U.S. currency also to 1.7530 
Deutsche marks from 1 .7565 DM. to 
1.4612 Swiss francs from 1.4675 
francs and to 5.9105 French francs 
from 5.91 17 francs. The pound rose 
to SI. 6903 from $1.6877. 

The dollar is expected to be hit 
again Wednesday when the Japa- 
nese government makes public the 
May current-account balance, the 
broadest measure of trade in goods 
and services. Three-quarters of the 
current account consists of mer- 
chandise trade. 


Cut>xtlnthvOxrSvffF'T*Hpui* a[ * n 

NEW YORK — Stock prices 
dropped late in the day Monday, 
despite a rally in the bond market, as 
declines in drug companies and 
hanks offset gains in computer-re- 
la red issues. 

“Investors are looking for a rea- 
son to sell,” said Gene Grandone, 
director of i nvestment counseling at 
Northern Trust Co. “With the mar- 
ket in the 7.900 area, people see a 
market that's a little rich and want 
to tak e a little bit off the table. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age, which flirted with record levels 
during much of the day and traded as 
high as 7,95 1 .22 points. closed 37.32 
points below Thursday’s close, at 
7,858.49. U.S. markets were closed 
Friday for Independence Day. 

Bond prices, meanwhile, rose as 
expectations for slow inflation and 
steady interest rates cheered in- 
vestors. The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond jumped 19/ 
32 to 100 19/32, taking the yield 
down to 6.58 percent, compared 
with 6.62 percent Thursday. 

“It’s hard to believe anything 
ran get rosier than this in terms of 
inflation and the economy,” said 
Mark Miller, a manager at Kayne 
Anderson Investment Management 
in Los Angeles. 

Some investors said slowing 
profit growth would rein the mar- 
ket's rally. 

“If yields are coming down be- 
cause maybe the economy’s slow- 
ing, then what’s that mean for 
stocks long-term?” asked Michael 
Schroer, president of Renaissance 
Capital Management. “It’s real dif- 
ficult for me to visualize double- 
digit profit growth. You’re going to 
start to see more of a normal single- 
digit profit expansion. ’ ' 

American Express fell 4% to 
78%. accounting for more than one- 
fifth of the Dow's decline, after 
soaring Thursday on takeover spec- 
ulation. 

“American Express is getting 
smacked around: that's the bulk of 
the damage on the Dow." said Jim 
Benning, a trader at BT Brokerage 
in New York. American Express 
has been the subject of takeover 
speculation in the market. “Noth- 
ing happened, so I guess people are 
getting out of that stock.” he said. 

Investors' are growing wary of 
buying stocks because the Standard 
&. Poor's 500 Index is already up 23 
percent for the year, traders said. 

The S&P 500-stock index was 
down 4.72 points at 912.20. The 
technology-heavy Nasdaq index 
was up 3. i 1 at 1 .470.72. 

Stocks reached records last week 


after the Federal Reserve Board de- V. 
c Lined to raise interest rales atit* _ 
policy meeting and the Labor De- 
partment said fewer job& than ex- - 
pec ted were created m.Jiine.’The 
two pieces of news pointed to steady 
growth with little inflation—— a re- ' v 
cipe for growing com^ny^Kofits. 't 

In the financial' '* sfectni^ 
BankAmenca fell 1, 3/16 to 67% • 

after Morgan Stanley, Dean. Winery 
Discover & Co. ciu the stock frank ' - 
“strong buy” to *‘6utpq^Dnn.'*;.;o £ 

Fleet Financial Group was dbwic^V# 
graded to “market perform” fforis 
“buy” ai J.P. Morgan Securities^.-- “• 
and it fell 1% to 64 The stock hadT .V ' 
risen 30 percent this year. ' . :-\V - / 

~~ US. STOCKS ■ ^ ’^4 V, 

: : — rrra : . 

Among drug stocks, Merck andRfE? ^ > 
zer declined. 

The S&P 500’s gold stocks lost 
the most in percentage terms, as» . 
bullion prices in New York reacheih - ; ' ^ . 
12-year lows. Barrick Gold and;?; ' 
Newmont Mining declined. ' . 

Compaq Computer; which repartsi Y 
earnings mis week, rose.- Intel, Cisco ;. 
Systems and Microsoft gained. j. - ; 

Those and other large computer-) 
related companies will see profits^ ^ 
grow over the long term because off , 
constant innovation and demand fbr*& 
productivity-enhancing computers,^? 
investors say. (Bloomberg, AP): 


IBM: \[f 

Hitachi Closes In • 

Continued Prom Page 11 j 

chines, which finally equal the J 
power of its last bipolar machine, f 
That left an opening for Hitachi, * 
which developed Skyline: a hybrid I 
machine that offered the power of j . 
the old-style mainframes .with; 
many of the cost savings of the new ! ' 

silicon-chip-based designs/ The 
most powerful of the cuntmt Sky- , 
line mainframes can process 780. 
million . instructions a second, or' 
MIPS, compared with 450 MIPS i . 
for the powerful CMOS machine i 
from Big Blue. \ 

In 1993, when much of the world i 
believed that mainframes would ; 
soon be replaced by networks of ; 
smaller computers, Hitachi's ! 
strategy looked quixotic But while* 
many companies are now devel- j 
oping new applications oh netrl 
works of smaller computers, then- 
large, critical applications, like tele- ’ 
phone billing and customer ac^ 
counts, remain on mainframes.-- — 


T 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Monday 4 p.m. Close 

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“SI? ?>V 10 — Vh 

i S Jikn 37W 37". M 

153 1(»» 10. , t 10V, 

ISDI I*, iv, . 

41: 11 itii* in*., —i* 

1 61 12* J IIS. 17V. ■ V. 


inn ft,, 1 _ 

B7 40 »■, 

J.'S fr». 6-,. 

[71 1<T« W « 10V, — V, 

S3? S ''<u - Gu 

PT 2’: 70 —V. 

1JI IB 1 * fli, — 

474 IS'i IS'* — 

IS 7 J7'» 21’, 73Vi -It. 


777 1BI* 16** IS’* -»* 

367 4?V> 41V : j-i, . | „ 

7Ti5 4S«, 47’k,, 43’ » -re 

143 l’Vi* 1>, 1 % — 

4*4 ItW ir« IT. 

ISS 7V. ?«■ 2*i — 

14*5 1BV, 10»u — 1 1 : 

li- 4V* 4'.,, S'* — ■■* 

836 8 7<ii, g — i.., 

IJU »4>V„ f4*.-„ I4*f ■ 

342 70’ i 18 1. S ,1 

2843 34V* 29 Vi 31V. _3«* 

4*3 33"*, 33’. XT', —'ft 

74* l0Va 17V, 17H —Vi 

174 145* 14>i 14V. 

731 3V* 3V„ 3*'b * ■.•* 

117 IW I'.i* i” w — >. u 

4007 7 41. *V„ —IV. 

IIS ?B«t SBVu 28’ i 

*816 44l r*, 4".', ■ *1, 

l« V» 31. 3 J * . ■ * 

720 SN*„ 8’. ■ l"u 

748 IOr u 4V, 4'v _>* 

« 7*v.. 25H, 76', ‘1 

3C 9 Vi 9»„ *’» . 

*S*< I V It* I V, . >» 

i«S 61. *«• 6V ■ W 

3844 X 1 . 7»v. 7»«, . w„ 


ITS 12 11V, Il’Vu if.* 

IK «’a 9i w, 

*25 77>n 27>* 7T-i 

OT 9V« 4 1 '* * 

43? T>, 7 7’>u ’ v* 

4475 7*.n IV, J —v,, 

I’l 4V» 3 Vi 31a 

807 |1* I’, )v» — r, „ 

I96> 4V, 4 4 —¥, 

517 |«„ IgV, 15 —V, 

44 4BV» 2Vj 

714 r *v, *■ v., . v„ 
:<j ». Ti 3 * Via 

785 !«’. 18’/. II 

416 43J* 421* 43 -V* 

494 3 a 5V* — V„ 

5-1. 5 S'-, — 

225 77 7*v* 7*i*„ 1 1„ 

TTJ 17' a 11V> II’* 

15* 15 Uv, 14V, — 

74M 4<* 4** JV, t ’.* 

433 * S'* j 1 , H/„ 

120 2Va Jls JU. _>* 

44* U% » 37- —It. 

531 20V, 704, _ 

IS* r, V, 6 Vi — 

no r fi, *<* r-. -v" 

45? TO lev? !«’*,. *V M 

750 8 7V, 3 K Vi 

«l 5*’ . S4-. 5* . *. 

330 27ki, ZT", 7J*„ 

143 17 I*’ .- . |? . ... 

935 -* I, ■<., —i* 


Heart 

7-33 

K. 

tft 

1ft 


HorrvA'Jn 

49 

17V. 

irv. 

171a 


Hernia 

183 

eft 

41, 

6", s 

v. 

Kuo+e 

2U1 

Sft 

20ft 

:i’a 

— 1 

HcvnEn 

190 

61i 

6ft 

ift 

-'.1 

id 

713 

4V» 

4 

lit 


Wen'.* 

680 

11" ft 

11V,. 

lift 


invCMia 

S’- 

V 

»ft 

lift 


ImpOHu 

217 

SJVk 


SJS'. 

• ft 

MuaTcn 

575 

Ita 

Ift 

IV, 

—VS 

InCrPd 

1576 

ift 

5'V„ 

61, 



MC 5hp 

MowHunl 
MoUwEnl 
MtnanPh 
Max 


Merto 
MedaUtg 
Metka 
Medtax 
MercA,r 
ML TTY 
Marmn 
Merrfltan 
Menendo 
MWotP.rv 
MtdcUEn 
MiHcfwila 

M3t* 77*rt 
Movreitr 
MumI 
NTNCcm 
Nabors 
Nolflevs 
MtPtmr 
Nnwhrm s 
NY Timer. 
Nenrtoa 
Ncreas 
rtAVacc 
NokWBc 
Navavx 
NJa n 
QenMiO 
CWcex’ 

Oncorrrwl 

PCEC70 0I 
PLC l-n 
PUV*. 
PcmHtij 
PmAmCn 
Fault/: 
PcnGla 
Pcop’-rTert 
PfuNil 
Ft*3TV9"a 
PinPvC 
POIVTilM 
Pnirth 

erktlii 
ewcMn 
PtibCT -. 
psvcCp 
PF Pow 
RecGaa 
PL/uitm 
RWt 
PotcrfiPh 


Wirt s 
Sptfeiaen 
Sentry T n 
Shencn 
SonTecn 
SiNerMs 
SrnlBV 
SmlBmM 
Sormf 
"CSot^cn 
SPDfl 
3>M«I 
SlilwrrM 
SuM/Jxn. 
Sulcus 
SuiCr, 
TSF 
TelOra 
TnB«di 
Thermen 
ThrmBion 
TRCorOo 
TTnflj 
Thrtrw 
ThrSoect 
ThrmTcr 
! TdrVOJi ■> 
Thimoiu 
Th ngyl 
Thrmot* 

, Ovrnjai 
1 Top S. CD 

TonPof 
| tmnOr 

I TWA 
Transmean 

TrtvWxf n 

TriMedl 
TuOMtr, 
IKFGP 
irriEns 
UnfloB 
UnJma 


V,rc8 

VoenCE 

Vero 

VjraCn 

uimmc 

VDVMN7 

WHIT 

WcshSW 

iMHAcn 

WlSET 
w»ea fssT 
WE BA si la 
WEBCan 

WE5M\ 

WEB no 

WEB Jm 
WEB AW 
WEB Me> 
WEB Sen 
WEB UK 
XCL LIE 


Saw Hiah LmyUtosl 

’® s %. 9 ;'{ 
154 MU I0V. HR. 
11E A'* * * 

US ?? ?'•* is 

270 Ilk l’Git 1ft 
3M 117,, IIVi. llfn 
1697* a„ *, 

.47 ?T» 7"n 

5?J A', *'*1* *’v 

•>?4 56’. 34 V, S6«4 

814 1»»* I? lf»i, 

4« 2l/„ 7’.* 7'- 

338 *>/■. 5V. SV, 

735 7tV„ W „ T4V,. 
424 3*. V* 

ia r. T-.. r. 

K \ V* 

207 107, lav* 10V H 

742 47"/i. 44 ft ST., 
B4 4ft JVt 3'V„ 

275 10ft ?*• 10'/, 

245 37 ]*ft 3tVu 
828 2Y.. 2 2’ a 

1*4 8ft IV Ift 

*79 '4* ft ft 

126 6ft Aft Aft 

144 lift lift JU, 
1*9 7ft 7ft TVj 

785 !5ft 15ft 15ft 

2W» I2'V„ 12ft l?ft 
350 1I'V„ lift lift 
■03 16ft 14ft l*v, 
l?fr JVr 3Y» 3V« 

346 4V. 3*, 4 

1*5 ''ia 1, 

45S »ft **,. *ft 

7671 4ft 3ft 4 

«39 77'V,, 77ft 77ft 
25 0 I0U Pft 9V„ - 

310 8'/, 8 8’.1 

723 St, 4ft 4U 
1643 sp.,, 52“,, S2ft - 
JIT? 70V. IJ'V.. ?0ft 
4*2 Uft 12ft 13*. - 
269 20 loi; |*ft. 

170 15 14?', 14ft 

■ 7? 4'm 4ft a„ 

30* 7'„ 7 7 

380 •*,, ’!•„ ft 

?f3 J 3"a 3’ , 

III 5ft 6'a 5ft 
734 |9t. It', 16 V, 
143 7’ a ? 2’.,. 

275 24ft 24ft 7f. 
8?S 21 ft 2I1 m 


599 i:-% 17 .. t? ., 
•*«9 S v . S* ta 5*. 

781 3ft J’. I 1 '. 

1067 J’-, 3>, 3’l 

121 2'. 2ft 

213 ly*,. 15ft. IS 1 . 

Ul 8'-j 7ft i'.j 

425 1 *■ I 

19*7 23'« 2?:.. 27’Vr, 
SJD 9ft S'., a--i 

7«l 8ft 8’V 8ft 


Indexes 
Dow Jones 

Opra H«e LOW y» C*a 

Indus 291*78 2*51 45 7828.18 78510* -4L7S 

Trans 2809.19 2835.23 2797.27 281 1S4 *.|3.« 

23X79 23423 230S1 231X3 144 

Comp 7437316 7448.04 741746 142241 -6^0 

Standard & Poors 


Most Actives 


Industriab 

Trartsp. 

U1ili#W 

Finonce 

SP50D 

SP100 


Nasdaq 


— 10773)0 107Z64 

- 649.79 652.00 

— 702.77 301.00 

- 1 0575 104^7 

- 916.92 912J0 

— 89062 »0 JO 


HK* Law JPJW. Os. 

4*0.44 47527 475.91 -1.77 

608A4 60125 602.19 -2JA 

431-58 427.14 428.11 *0.77 

29X71 790.43 790J9 -0.13 

441X0 43757 437.97 -in 


HW LOW lOJL Os 

I477JH 1467J6 146960 *1.99 

1194X3 118865 11B9J8 -367 

1*48.11 lAilai 1*41.94 -0*4 

1*7*61 1*6649 167575 «2ft0 

195602 194647 1947.16 -498 

97805 970J8 97X79 462 


HH LOW 1ML Ck* 

43623 630) 631.45 -2.89 


MtaJlT 

?!??? 

VMMal 

Kiinl 

Tnnuea 

Pftos 

WeTWl 

Untsrs 

fypskCO 


Nasdaq 


V*L HW 
67417 201* 
58493 IS 
533SS 16*1 
52196 70*1 
48678 4516 
4H2M 42ft 
45382 1 13ft 
42774 36M| 
39290 36 
31511 11*» 
38431 23ft. 
38178 64« 
3H 35 35ft 
37177 6* 
36850 39ft 


VoL raea 
12107 1 lift 
92*77 74ft 
91006 V49 
65955 49ft 
58986 ’Ya 
57838 49ft 
45599 125V4 
46604 77V* 
44133 131ft 
41259 2|V* 
381172 59ft 
14633 Vb 
33316 43H 
79739 50ft 
28210 14ft. 


U» MS Efts 

ft A ft 

16ft 16ft 4ft 
69*1 79ft ,H 
44ft 44ft -ft 
60ft 41ft tl*» 
l«ft|J3ft +5 

36ft 36ft. **• 
35 3P6 -Eli 
lift ll*ii -ft 
21*1 23ft. +TV» 
42V. 62ft -1ft 
3216 35 +1*» 

^1 l t« 
38>* M. 


. .77 73ft 
1 456*14* *a 
■Oft 49ft 
All ft 
ftft 46ft 
120ft 126ft 
74ft 76 
129ft 13W* 
»ft 219. 

5SV 57ft. 
ftj ft 

<2 ft arva 

.49 ifl. 

15ft IS** 


July 7, 1997 hh* u- 

Wgto Low Latest Ch^e OpM 

Jul97 7tSD 75.00 

Grains Sep97 njs noi 


CORN (CBOT) 

5J00 bu mMnwn- cm oer Dwitwl 


High Low Latest Oige Oplni High Low Latest Chgo OpM Hl^i La 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTIO LONG GILT fUFFE) ’ 

Sep 97 78J5 74JB 7435 —165 19^10 ^97 (*.j. N.T. 114-13 +0-03 638 COTTON 2 (MCTN) 

NW97 81 JO 78.90 79.15 -0» 6415 4T401 50^00 Par 


Low Latest CUB* OpM 


hdusbials 


iwrt si ju 7B.ni rr.n -tuo 0^13 p__ 

Jpn98. 84J5 B00 82XS -4L95 1517 


Esl sales HA. Thu's.sotes 1.564 


Ji497 soft V0 2409k —4V. Z3.134 wV^^rTrini 

Sep 97 231 2279k 229ft -4 MM83 lrvs 0PW” n1 

0K91 23016 227ft 22W -4 10,982 

MCT9B 240 236 237ft -3ft 2U3S 

MOY9B 2*516 20 % 243ft -3 3^01 Me 

J1890 2a 245 247 -2ft 7,411 

Sep 90 345ft 244 24516 —ft 367 GOUJ(NCMX) 

ESI. M*«S MA. Thu'S, sales 38.81? iW^ot-ctoiiarsiwriaww. 

Tl*rsepenw 367 J13 -**17 318.10 —4.10 


Pie*, open ltd- 167JB6 oft UZ1 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 
FF500000 - plsr* lOQpcl 
Sep 97 13042 12906 13a 57 *056 199.031 
Dec 97 9*112 98*0 99.16 . 056 X42I 

Esl soles: 12XJ47. 

Open Ini- M2J52 off X494. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 


Aub 97 335JO 31460 31®J» —12 JO 114.458 |TL 200 ndBon -ptsotlOOpd STS SS -T??; Sail 

Sep97 321 J20 31750 31950 — 6J0 I Sep97 136-30 135.33 13624 +0M 10627V mot S5' J«aa 10*011 

OCJ97 SUM 31680 OT10 -1UB J.IS Df£?7 N.T. N-T. 1003 +056 1,250 2?,m 14S 


SOYBEAN MEAL <CB0T) Sep97 32120 31750 31950 -4JD I **97 136J0 135.33 13624 +04< 

100 tons- action avion 03 97 S608 31680 371 10 —1X90 9,153 Doc 97 N.T. N-T. 10033 +05* 

Jlrf97 742.93 23740 24250 +250 9.190 Dec 97 33520 31850 32320 -1480 32419 Fri 45.7m Piee sates- J1577 
Auo97 22L50 22040 22640 +380 25457 Fef 98 32580 J2X50 32540 -640 9.264 

Sep 97 20940 20550 20X70 -140 17425 Aar 28 37850 32540 32750 -6.70 4440 w-SB Ml 2462 

0«297 I96J0 194JJC 19630 -030 MJA9 Ji»i9B 331 JO 32750 32940 -680 7.775 EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

Dec 97 10940 11640 U890 *190 36463 Aw 98 3*641 339.10 33X20 —690 747 si miMon-Ptsaf 100 pa. 

Jon 98 18150 18550 10650 -020 4,147 Ed.safes NA Thu’S. SO t« *0.000 Jul97 94J6 94.25 M.2S *001 

ER.sdes NA Thu's, sales 2X158 Thu’s open im 710.912 Aug 97 94J5 MJ* «4J* *0.01 


Est.sdes NA Thu's.sotes 2X158 
Thu'SOPteiint 116458 

SOYBEAN OL (CBOT) 

(0500 B»- cent* per b 


HI GRADE Cartel (NCMX) 
2SJB0 fak- cams per fa. 


747 si mlHon-pts ol 100 pa. 

All 97 94J6 94.25 94.25 *601 43533 

Aug 97 94J5 «U* «4J4 *0.01 16660 

Sen 97 9423 94.19 94J1 *041 560,905 

Dec 97 9408 9445 9106 +041 455.762 

_ Mw 98 9103 9199 9101 +042 310518 


Jul 97 7130 7Q.15 7140 —140 19h 

Oct 97 75 At 7X10 7X84 — U6 11/98' 

Dec 77 7605 7X30 3X75 -4JS 4U40- 

AW 98 77.15 7190 7540 -X00 7J& 

Mair98 7730 7535 7S35 —135 1579: 

Esf.sctes NA Thu's, sales 14,974 
Thu's open inf 65488 - j 

HEATING OB- (NMSR) 

exon go*, cams per am -4 

Aug 97 5100 5X40 5X78 -0.62 42J13’ 1 
Sep 97 SX60 5X00 53,45 ' *ttM 22. UL 


Nov ft OM MM OJD- *0M 74556: 

Dec 97 5620 55J0 5605 +029 14826 

Jon W 5670 5630 5655 +036 .11118 

FebTO 5685 5645 56.70 *039 « 35, 

M0T9B 5635 SUO 5190 +044 6152 

Apr ?8 5180 5150 5160 +044 . 3.148 

Bt.saies NA .Thu's. 2445B - 
Thu's open ml 147,441 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER ) 

1 .an Mii - dolors kh. - 


SSnS's? s-k -h J-2 tt?k !ia Isii iisf i? +om»£»i SS IS =JS 


AuBJ 7 aoj 2 JO 21.96 —020 26936 Sep 97 11180 1 09 JO I09JS — IJS 23473 Dec ?8 917J gjjo *604 147386 ' 

Sep 97 2X45 21.95 2X10 -035 16124 0097 10130 10785 10785 —140 1.279 mar9» sa/l 9X65 9348 +604 1^115 IJS !J-g -J-JT 

Od 97 2X30 2X00 2X10 -015 15463 Nov 77 1Q820 107 JO 107J5 -140 1,216 jZf! «L66 M44 +0M ^ M E&S Um .«» -f'. 14 

Dec97 m* 2X15 -438 4X102 Dec 97 10830 106J0 10670 -145 6192 9162 «15B «40 *0M Sill ‘SS SE Jil ^ 


Esl. soles NA Wl.sutes 18*578 

Thu's open inf 11X220 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bands 
10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Ona Chi. 

103.75 +028 

101.28 *OS4 

10621 +0JJ1 


Trading Activity 


2?:„ 

8"'. 1 8ft 

8’T 8*k 

lift 6-' 6- 1 ; *•« 

1JJ 7 * 7ft 

31: JV, 4’i 4ft 

463 1 * 

L?5 J4', r*. 74 

si: lift 11 lift 

<3 II 1 . IT lift 

35 3i ’" a*-/. 

T-v.. I'jr* 

TO 14 I4S, 14ft 
7 2 1|»*. 16V. !*■-, 

473 lift Hi. lift 
IU J>.'„ T ,, 3ft 
305 Uft lift T7ft 
« ,9't *'■ 4ft 

Ijo i-„ r „ ift 

1U ID* I, IT a UR,, 
214 14'*,, Uft |4. v,, 

tr? S t: ‘ij £ 

10015 97".. eon--- 91ft 
,£! 57V'. 57 ft 

1823 41ft 19', 20ft 
IJ7J I, | | 

in i"-., iv. in.,, 

14$ 'V„ 

346 3+ft 34".. 36ft 
W4 33ft 37ft 38 ft 
3011 r, m 4 ft 

«1? lift IS ISn,, 

1^ I S’. Uft ISft 
3ttJ 35ft ;j’-. Kft 
774 I Oft 10ft | Oft 

K8 37'a 3I». 3n„ 
J<3 li>, it. lift 
123 ll’u IlKa lift 
137 *ft *ft «v u 

414 13-ft 13’ M 13 *,. 
349 14 IS" : 14 

9^ 74'.* 7J > 74’, 



1ft 

|'- 

10 

9'j 

10 

ft 

" v .. 


rsu 

rv 

7ft 

I«ft 

in.. 

19 

13V. 

13ft 

12ft 

yv 

5ft 

Sft 

311. 

20ft 

21ft 

I7'i 

rrv.. 

I/ft 

Bft 

SO'. 

STVu 

11a 

I*a 

IW 

Sft 

4iv„ 

S 

*«» 

Sft 

S’Vh 

9*-„ 

9”. 

T.-., 

S’. 

2Vft 

sr-'. 


lift 

lift 

SP. 

3rt„ 

SPa 

ar-.. 

1 X 

i- . 

29ft 

B’. 

*i 


13"- 

Id * 

144. 

18ft 

S' a 

6 

II 

11 

12- . 

IT - '., 

11 

11-' , 

II-., 

III, 

13-v.. 

13ft. 

16 

16 


’g K ; : \f:: 

n’: 


Advoncec 

DecSneo 

■Jncnongee 

TcWfcwe* 

NecHlgts 

wwLWm 


td»nnc«i 
Declined 
Uncrionqaa 
To&mue 1 

SSS8? 


SemoGctd 9340 


Nasdaq 

Adtanced 
DedbRd 
UndTmwjed 
Tool Bsue* 
NMH4B 
New Low* 

Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amex 

Nasdaq 

innuBiam. 


W (AW h«S CV» 

IV* 

26 25V, 25k* +lVk 

5V» W flk 4k 

»• J* h +v, 

ry* 7i* 79* +v* 

Shi 5 5 -1 

931* 90^ft 91 Aka "ftj 

27V* 27V* 279* *+■ 

6ft 6ft 6V* *V» 

Sft 5** 5ft -ft 


(M-- ,-on ||S N-*' Wisdes 673.572 

tt^NA M TKrs open ant X690.788 up 27863 

Tin's open int 49JI1 BRITISH POUWJ (CIMBU 


Jul 97 733 712 73296 +1M 

AUO 97 699 677 697 * 91* 

Sep 97 615ft 606 4 Uft -4 

Not ft 585 577 584ft -7ft 

Jon 91 570 583 588ft -8 

Esl. soles NA Thu's, sdes 44719 
Thu's open Ini 141419 


732ft * 10ft 8.M4 Sa.VBt(NOMX) 

697 + 9ft 33449 seguiftK-campartavai 


1X701 Jul 77 52000 42000 42490 -77.90 4» Ma/W 


BRITISH POUND (CMBU 
62 . 900 pounds sperpouna 
Sep 97 1.6900 16790 1.6874 
Dec 97 1.6850 18710 1 .6818 


SB4ft -7ft, 66,941 Sep 97 «7j0 42450 42X50 -J150 6031 Esl. sates NA Thu's, dries 16717 

HBft -X 12403 Dec 77 46000 43180 43580 -3680 14.130 Thu's Open ml 60.593 up 2?64 

series 44719 Jan 98 43680 —2670 IB 

Mar 98 46080 43*80 441 JO —79.10 9.114 CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

Mav 98 46980 441.00 445.10 —2780 7856 100.000 aexan. j per can d»r 

. Jul 99 47X50 44980 44? CO -29J0 1.995 |ep97 7THS .7787 .7294 

pwousteri Sep 91 46880 45180 45100 —7970 685 Dec* 7 -TUS -7328 7332 


WHEAT (caon jul 98 47X50 44980 41980 -29 

Seo98 46880 45X00 45100 -29. 

^ 5JL Ed. soles NA Thu's. series 9800 

Sep 97 327 321ft 371ft —5ft 41J25 Thu's ooenud 9UB3 

Deo 97 3I9ft 333ft 2HVS -S 31,964 ^ 

WOT 98 347 343ft 344ft -Jft 5,048 PLATTNU61 1NMER) 

&t'*Ns NA TTsi's. scries 22J99 SMmv(a.-dalicnpc!rtiav k. 

mi's open «Y 06649 Jul 97 41100 <06.50 446.70 -10. 


Mar 99 rm J380 7364 

EH. sales NA Thu's, sales *80« 
Thu's open ;m 4J.I83 up 431 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 


1805 7069 

1673 163* 

2149 2038 

5627 5736 

175 » 

79 34 


52X61 451.29 

2780 2180 

J95^3 371J6 


Dividends 

Compotiy Per Amt Rec Pay compaqr Per Amt Rec Pojr 

IRREGULAR Am Water Works ----- 

Sobine Royalty Tr - .145 7-15 7-29 BJwnetj nc . . . 

Coto^ai intrmKJ 1 

STOCK SPLIT CotoitellmrGrt 

! 0 InlM Pet FreepffMcM^op 5 J25 7-15 61 

SLHcwp 3 tori split. Industrial BncD * 

„ LJOUIDATIIIG M JDS 7-34 7-31 

SlrowhatdgeClattl c.7-15 7-15 Scud W1 dines Opp O 83 7-21 7-31 

, ssafea ^saaiu , 

Am Ntt Bancorp a .03 7-31 B-ls g+manthfr; gg wrtifc s-sem+aanwri 

Stock Tables Explained 

Sates figures ore unofflctaL Yearly highs and laws retted the previous 52 weeks plus the 
cwrem week, but not the lotest trading doy. Where a spfii or stock dhridend amounting to 25 
(reran or more has been paid, the yeatshigh -tow range and dividend are shown fbrthe new 
stocks only. Unless otherwise noted, rotes of dividends ore annual disbursements bused on 
the lafest dodo ration. 


Livestock 

CATTLE 1CMER) 

+0-000 fav- oaailk par fe. 

Aug 97 6445 6150 6382 -Offl 41175 

OdW 67 JO <785 67.12 -422 25J43 

Dec 97 ALSO <9.90 7DJ25 -415 7A879 

Feb 98 71.90 71.55 71 J5 +412 6801 

Apr 98 7190 7382 7375 *017 1246 

Jun9fl 7030 69.90 70JD *412 XHB 

sates 10,788 Thu's srtes 6553 
Thu'sapenint 94855 up 636 

FEEDER CATTLE (OI6B1I 

5041 00 tea.- am per in. 

Aug 97 tin 80.70 80.90 -405 11,122 


5Drmy OL-doempcrtlov onL GEHMAH MARK ICMERJ 

JU197 41580 40650 40670 -1000 1.250 l3U™™.^lwrnort 

Od 97 39880 39410 39X70 -1280 1IJ38 Sep 97 5769 573 5740 

Jot 98 JWSQ 387.00 J87JO —980 1854 OC97 5801 577J 5778 

Est. sates NA Thu's, sales 821 War« JB20 5813 5816 

Thu's ooenwt 14.495 Eu sates NA Tlw's. sates 19809 

Thu's open iW 101,195 on )99» 


Close Previous JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

Atutetoum (Wgh Bmdt) ■ ,IU 9071 

Spol 1565V] 1566’V ISB3’1 1534*, . , , _ , ’ lw _ „ 

Forworn 159X00 159480 IMUOO 1607.00 S?',* 0 ** _•!“ *■**•* *M75 

Copper CattmlesUiMi Grade) Thu socenmr J9.9J9 up 5540 

Spd 254080 554100 255800 25*7 00 SWISS FRANC (CMERI 

FOTWW 240180 240280 JAA00 7407 00 5SSSSSf2S2* 

Spot 645ft 646ft 648.00 0*980 SEgy 7^ 69M 

Fot^O 65680 657.00 65700 65800 70n7 6W ^ 


Am Water Worto 
Biomet Inc 
Colonial InfimkM 
Cotenkil Im^rd 
fidd Asset 
Fxeeprt McM Cop 
Industrial Bnco 
Larin Am Donor 
Prospect St Hllncp 
ScudWIdlnco Opp 
Sun Co 
X- rate Inc 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

Q .19 7-25 0-15 
- .11 7-11 B-8 

M .078 7-15 8-1 

M 8535 7-15 8-1 

M 85 7-3 7-7 

4 J225 7-15 8-1 

Q .12 7-23 84 

Q 875 7-21 7-31 
M 835 7-24 7-31 
O 83 7-71 7-31 

a -25 8-8 9-10 


^ J 1 -® 22-70 80.90 —0.05 11,122 , *24000 &76Saa umin uuvnn ES- sates NA. Thu's, sales 16826 

SS Si JI as £S :S is SsS ™«— ”•«' » 

Nov 97 BX65 8155 C.U *057 X304 i?L MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 


Q .025 7-18 8-15 

o-darawAb-apprMMwteacwuntper 
sh are/ ADR ; g -payoMnln CaaMan funds; 
m-tnontWr, (MiuuTiify, Keenenngd 


a SS §3 SS :s^ 'S SzJSSJgz i 

».sates 3J8S Thu's. stries x«n ^^uSS^strio 

Thu's open (TO 22885 uo 715 Fanrart 146380 146480 I 

HOGS-LBOT (CMER) 

dJte tes -ainmwte - - - 

Jui 97 8US 8X75 1120 -OBO 6619 Financial 

Aug 97 8T.90 79® B0.I0 —157 13817 riTMJ racial 

0097 7615 7X80 7118 -0.75 1715 UST. BILLS (CMGRI 

Dec 97 78.70 7X00 70,75 -0.45 4517 SI rmbon- arts « >00 per. 

Feb 9* 6690 48JS 6677 —0.17 1.799 S»« 94 90 9486 9487 


Sprt 551080 «»00 5480.00 549000 

SSoSkW^gS?/* SSJ50 ° ”TS) TaST. 12290 

55‘uHS C |fflP) 1457’" 1458- Dw,7 ' ,,93! MBS S HS70 
^ord 146380 146480 W900 146900 4,106 


Thu's ccen.ni 35.345 ott 613 

1- MONTH STERLING IUFFE) 
csoaooo - pis of impel 


PnOffl 1 9M n.TS 1986 +1IT 95»t 

War 98 19.88 1975 1988 +ai3 5,1* . 

Apr 96 1989 19.74 1989 *083 4885. 

May 90 19 90 19.74 1950 +115 6733 

Est. scries NA Thu’s, sates 8X304 
59518 Thu'S men int 396888 ___ 

1T \ NATURAL GAS (NMER) • 

UM00nluiMu'*,tn« iiMiipiu 

Aug97 2090 XQffl 2868 41,961 

Sep97 2.100 2072 2JB7 21898 

Del 97 XI 10 UNO 2.100 . TUBS’ 

Nov 97 X245 X220 XZ35 T1J12 1 

39J72 D«W 1390 X365 2310 14504T 

1633 2-4TD 14539- 

555 1330 X335 10741- 

Mar98 2735 2720 2725 6,966“ 

A0r98 XtrO 2.109 LIU 3J&S* 

May 98 2860 1045 XOM X8I5' 

EB.SdW NA Thu's.sotes 70471 .'J 

Thu'S men iht 199564 

77,0*0 

1823 UNLEADED GASQUNE (MMHR) 

227 42,dm gw, cents per gal 

Auo97 5870 5785 5X85 36952 

“JO »85 +073 11^86' 

Od 77 5670 H85 5620 +648 74lf< 

Nm 97 5540 55.10 £40 +638 L493’ 

Dec 97 SAW 54.75 MW +6Z3 6650' 

“-J2 55 10 5530 *^18 XW4- 

1863 Feb 99 5577 imi 

107 Mar98 5645 5645 5645 + 653 i.ra n 

&t. soles NA Thu's.sotes 16746 
Thu's mai inf 7X823 


U.S donara per metric ton -lots o«1® ten* — 
S6357 Jtri 97 16375 161.® 16175 -0 75 l&S6f 

*« Aug 97 164.50 16775 16X25 —175 19.158 

>53 Sep 97 16550 16625 16450 — IDO 6864 

Od97 16850 16775 1677S —1.® 7,740; 

N«97 170J5 16975 16975 —1.® 674T 
171.75 171 80 170.75 -075 9k7Wj 
Jan 98 172 75 17170 171.75 —050 5700’ 

M1IB Fct ‘ >8 ,7100 172.® -075 ' 2557' 

g'on Est sales: 21 550 . P/ev. cotes : 1B460 ' 1 - 

Prev. open M.: 7697S up 14)43 ' 

BRENT OIL(IPE) , 

“ s |^pwbonei-loh(rili)®tm»ta , 

2S-2S 1797 18.19 +4X01 60*52. 

IH5 2 8 - 10 ,8J0 * QM taaas 

g?® ?§-!? ?«77 1841 +0.06 1S.970 


EiSHgaig m sssaa 


Est. sates 6MB Thu's.sotes 7545 
Thu'sopenint I off 360tt 


Dec 97 9475 94/5 MJS -002 

Mar 90 9467 9467 94*7 -004 

Est. scries NA Thu'v sates 258 
Thu's open mr 8514 up IJ7 


Jul 97 81.85 79.17 79.17 —1® IJU 

Aua97 81.10 7147 7842 —UK 4771 

Feb 98 7X75 *9 JO 69J7 —1.97 672 

Ed. scries LBZ] Thu's. Kries 2754 
Tt«rs aaea W 6285 off 177 


Doc 97 92J0 9X63 9X65 +071 12JJOI 

0.01 6.07& M*r*8 9261 9254 9XS6 Wncft. 94933 

a 02 511 Jun9s 9259 9253 9251 —0B1 59,226 

0.04 4 Sep 98 9240 9254 9255 -052 39520 

Doc 98 9242 9256 9X57 —0 02 29474 

Mur 99 9262 9256 9257 -0.02 21351 

Jur> W 9X62 9257 9258 ~Q02 116*0 

Sep» 9242 9248 92J9 —ao| iJiJj 


S YR TREASURY (CBOTl Sep 99 9242 9248 924? ^ROl 

kwSTgtTSF": f? "iSJ 

Mar 98 ^1 " J-MONTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

Est. sates NA Thu'S, sales 51491 

TNi'sonenw 27lsM f* 97 J 487 u,Kn 

Aug 97 9tM 9646 0*46 Unch 

10 TR. TREASURY (CBOT) S*p97 9645 9644 96.85 ,aoi 


NmM 1044 1050 18.70 +aij 10549 
NT. N.T. l&fifi +0.13 4517 
Mm 98 H.T. N.T.. 1B45 +0.13 yu 

Est. sates: 27462 . Pram sates : 13543 
Pre* open fed : 182,922 off 7< ^ 

Stock Indexes ' * 

MPCOMP. INDEX tCMBO 
5ao««da* 


tS A 

6517 "y 


DM1 nwUon - pis at 1® pci Sap 77 9322S 91S*c om« . — 

S’ SE S SE ss l :E 3SS “» -S II «Tff 


a - dividend also extra (s). 


■•■n-McciaiwriuwiI 97 964S 9644 96.85 »aO| 287.210 EsJ. ntes NA TJ»^t r~ —» 

sneuuo H* & IMA Of too BO [te97 94 J9 96JT 96 79 +0.02 764452 Thu'sooenUkl IIUK 4 

Sep 97 m-V IfMB WL|; + OB 335.79! «or98 96 JJ 9447 96.70 *a® 246HS 0,1 806 


p - initial dhridend. annual rate unknown. 


b - annual rate of dwtend plus stock Qj- P/E - price-earnings rate. 


ft den a. 

c- liquidating dividend. 

a -PE exceeds »9. 

ctd -coned. 

d - new yearly low. 

dd - lass in Oie Iasi 12 months. 


q -dosed -end mutual fund, 
r - dividend declared or poid In preceding 1 2 
months, plus stock dhride n d. 

*- stack spO. DMdand begins with date at 
spur. 

sis -sales. 


COCOA (NOE) 

lOfTMtrtctom-W 


e-dwtenddectored or paid in preceding 12 t - rflvtdend paid In slodc In preeodlng 12 
months. martin estimated cash value on ex-*- 

l - annudl rate, increased on last dodo- vidend or ex-dlstributton date. 
ro,l ® n - , , a - new yearly high. 

9 - dividend in Canadian funds, subted la * - trading halted. 

15 -a non -residence fax. *1 - in bankruptcy or recoavct x l uu or being 

l - dividend declared after spiff- up or stack reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act or 

dividend. securities assumed by such companies. 

i -dividend paid ttris yeas amffted deterred or wd- when ms&awted. 

no action mlcen at latestdiyirtend meetetg. «ri - when issued/ 

k - rfividend rfedaied or paid Bite yeac an ww - m!h warrants. 

occumuisCve Issue wfltidWdmds in arrean. i o« aWdCBtl nr nr riptitn 

m - annual rale, reduced an Iasi dedans- ass - wt-dtetrfbuBon. 

han. or - wZftioul warrants. 

n- new issue in me past 52’jveeks. The high- y- px- dh rldeod and soles in fulL 

ton range begins with the start of trading. yM-yleM. 

nd - nea day delivery. z - sates m fuU. 


1595 

ISIS 

1536 

1590 

1551 

1558 

M4B 

1605 

1610 

1668 

1631 

1438 

1480 

1455 

169 

1705 

1676 

1676 


Dec 97 109-04 109-01 109-01 • 0» 4.9« J«n« 9656 9642 9446 +043 im9« CAC40 (MATIF) 1 

188-11 * 07 I **•*• JA-J7 9633 Q4J6 >003 156755 PF3W per index point 

—* J? Bt-. Mtes NA Thu's sales 95.HK SSI'S SIS S® 5410 "043 100446 Jul 97 2950.0 292411 sown +174 3X0916 

Tlxi sopen tot M0. 7^6 Mar 99 9487 9583 9544 86.117 Aug97 39565 29310 29630 +170 127s 

zl US TREASURY BONDS ICBOn D«W ™ 2 %o MUD IlTn “S 

-4 16436 m pci- vino. or»-p*i a. invr, at ioo ocii up 4984 ET-Si «.!;■=! +1Z-9 _«8 


Esf.sctes 3423 Thu's, soles 20.633 
Thu's open ini 103.9Q3 off 3103 


Se097 IIJ.31 111-03 113-21 -15 

Dec 97 1 13- IB 117-25 111-09 - 15 

Mor98ll3-0l 117-17 112-31 • IS 

JOT 98 112-20 112-12 117-20 • 15 

Esl sides NA. Thu's. Vries 450.«r 
Thu's ooen mr *01.634 


15 451.292 J-MONTH PI BOP (MOTIF] 

15 26.279 FFSmlllujn -pIsot IMpfl 

15 JJ" ?9S9 *002 71.510 


rv££ 29 i XS ml - 0 -* 17 - 0 20475 

Mtaros Mnm _£O0 2994J0 +170 <M8 

Ntar98 3012.00 299943018® +170 7417 

ESC spies. At 98. 

tteon Ini. 60496 Up 491. - - 


COFFEE C (NC5E) Est sides NA. Thu's, sol 

17400 te.-«*n ear 10. Thu’sooenftri 481.634 

JW97 18640 10450 16555 — IJ5 611 

SeP 97 1*650 16X10 16i» —130 10494 UBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 

Dec 97 15240 149® 15145 +045 4.946 Urnun- piirt lOOcc* 

Mar 90 14X75 U2BB 14375 +1.75 X«B A4«7 9454 9453 9433 


Mre98 22 m 2? “ * 101 34J72 FTSE 100 (UFFE) 

Sfc si », s^ i aru.« +ao 

E 3 ss Ss ss ns sjLzxxisrJf ™ 

Pf»v. open frri-: Tl&n up 1,070 


a*.. SZ+'XL'** k» 


W" *» ‘2SJ »7» Open im' 2.^973 up 770 


Esr.sates 3.927 Thii'Lsofcs 1/B3 
Thu's open 2B571 off 274 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSS 
1 17480 1M.- ewifi P*r to. 


Sec 97 94JB «430 « JO • 001 6.267 
Esr. sues na. Thu s sates 6X2* 
Ttxrscaenrfn 49.400 off 1925 


OOW II* im 1146 *046 96278 BUNDJUFFEJ 


rn l ? N TJi euHOU,!AfL,F FE1 < 

ITL 1 mi Uteri - pfi t* 100 pc? 

OTP 97 V5J0 9344 9148 -001 1)1 JB 

S'” *o« £oS «»dyi 


Commodity fndoxes 


W90 5? its lljl :«? Saw ^Sk^rtsrt HOprt • ^7 Zn +004 SaSiS PoStefs 

Mdvn 11 IB II W IN tow tazn mn ,MBI *040 278-res 947* PJ.47 -CM SiS DJ. Fur 

jSw" US "m !15 tun SS ** ^ “ CRB 

u in -n*A —I— *4*u Esl Sain- 1 10. 1 88. Prav wriet ffl m _ ■ ' ' 4 -* J *471 +0(N 14.104 c_. 


Est. sales 5A8 Thu's.sotes 21390 
WsoomW 1S1.9H off 9® 


Esl salek 110.188. Pre* wrier 83,103 
Prw Dprti I m.- 286465 up 1,205 


74« 9477 ,00* I4.1M 
Csl ’JAi-, 31886 Pre*. sales- 19.570 
Pre* open hi. 340.488 up 931 


MOTate-r a ** # Pro*** 

PL ^ 

“ 232. IB 23538 

ftgocwtprf Press, land*# 

sssr 


N+ancrd Gp 


Jtt 'OTnien 
r"rf’PS Elec 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Tumble 

nds 

g and tfa e uS,® ^ 
fewer joK* ,^° r 

a:asa5? 

fell I 3/1 * *«»<», 
O. cut the Slock frri r ' 

rtssJsrte 

~STQCK S^^ 
itocks. Merck and pfi. 

,00 s 3 o| d stocks lost 
£n=en lage terms ^ 

". Ba ™<* Gold ;in . 
nmg declined J 
wnputer. which reports 

jjg-rose. Intel, Cisco 

gained 

orher large computer- 
antes »Ui see profit 
• *°pg term because ■ >1 

vaaon and demand l r. r 
enhancing computer... 

( Dtr,,,n>hrr(> ,\p. 


Closes In 

ed from Pa^e ! I 

h finalk L -qual || le 
1 st bipolar m.tchine 
1 opening r- . r Hitachi, 
ped Sksliiie j hybrid 
offered the power ot 
- mainframe-, vinh 
ost savings of me new 
vased designs The 
tl of the current Sk\ - 
nes can process "So 
actions a '•econd. nr 
ared with J5n MIPS 
■rful CM* >S machine 
c. 

hen much or the world 
t mainframes would 
aced by networks nf 
»mpulers. Hitachi ‘s 
ed quixotu But while 
ini<?5 are now de\el- 
application* >n net- 
aller computer'-, iheir 
applicati. v. * . kke tele- 
g and customer ac-' 
in on mamsMiiie' 


EUROPE 


KLM Takes Control 
Of Air UK Holdings 

Corner Seeks Bigger European Presence 


CanpM by Oo> ia# F**, Oapa t 4a 

- AMSTELVEEN, Nelherlands, 

— KLM Royal Dutch Airlines NV 
took foil control Monday of Air UK 
^foldings Ltd., raising its stake to 
100 percent from 45 percent, to try 
to strengthen its European market 


*.■ 


. KLM said it had bought the re- 
Jmaining 55 percent of the shares 
from British Air Transport Holdings 
Ud.: it did not disclose the price. Air 
UK generated about £284.6 million 
(S483.8 million) in sales last year, 
r The Dutch flag carrier's shares 
rose after tfae news, climbing 2.50 
guilders ($1.32) to dose at 68.50. 
Gaining; fiill control of Air UK could 
help KLM compete with British 
Airways PLC and strengthen its 
money -losing European business, 
Analysts said. 

* “This has become possible since 
April 1, the last phase of airline 
liberalization." said Richard 




« 


b 6 -,^' 


Metro Is in Talks 
With Dutch Firm 

Bloomberg Km s 

COLOGNE — Metro AG, 
Europe's largest retailer, said 
Monday that it was negotiating 
to buy the European warehouse 
stores of SHV Holdings NV for 
an estimated 5.2 billion 
Deutsche marks ($2.96 billion). 

Metro Holding AG, the Swiss 
company that owns 67 percent 
of the German Metro, already 
owns about 40 percent of SHV ’s 
86 membership-only Makro 
clubs, which are expected to 
generate 1 6 billion DM in sales 
- this year. It is seeking to buy the 
rest from the family that owns 
the Netherlands-based SHV. 

Shares of Metro AG soared 
4.7 percent, or 9.4 DM, to 205.5 
DM, as investors welcomed its 
strategy of expanding abroad to 
compensate for sluggish 
growth in domestic re tailing . 

“The only chance I see for 
German retailers is to expand 
internationally and that is ex- 
actly what Metro is doing.” 
said Max Resch, an analyst at 
Bayerische Vereinsbank AG. 


Brakenboff, an analyst at merchant 
bank MeesPierson, “This is a next 
logical step." The purchase must 
still be cleared by European com- 
petition authorities. 

KLM, together with its partners, 
has about 8 percent of the European 
airline market. The carrier is aiming 
for a 15 percent share. 

Air UK, with a staff of 2,000, 
carried 3.6 million passengers last 
year. Its routes include domestic con- 
nections throughout Britain and in- 
ternational flights to the Netherlands, 
Belgium, Denmark, Germany, 
France, Italy, Norway and Switzer- 
land. In particular, the “feeder 
value" of Air UK’s flights to Am- 
sterdam from 14 British airports will 
strengthen KLM's international mar- 
ket position. KLM said, adding that 
Air UK also operated service from 
London City Airport to Rotterdam. 

In addition to its passenger busi- 
ness, Air UK Holdings owns a main- 
tenance unit. Air UK Engineering. 

Separately, Alitalia SpA con- 
firmed it was in talks with KLM and 
other European airlines about com- 
mercial and code-sharing agree- 
ments. though it said no agreements 
had been reached. 

Last week. KLM again said it was 
considering selling its 19 percent 
stake in the U.S. carrier Northwest 
Airlines. Selling the stake could 
bring an end to a long legal battle for 
control of Northwest and help ease 
the way for an alliance with another 
European airline. [AFX, Bloomberg ) 

■ Next Move Is Boeing's 

A European Commission spokes- 
man said “the ball is in Boeing's 
court” after the European Union 
advisory committee on mergers' re- 
jection Friday of Boeing's proposed 
purchase of McDonnell Douglas 
Corp., news agencies reported from 
Brussels. 

The spokesman, however, did not 
rule out the possibility that the com- 
mittee may meet again before July 
23, the commission's deadline for 
taking a definitive decision, if Boe- 
ing comes up with new proposals. 

Separately, a commission 
spokesman said U.S. and EU of- 
ficials would meet in Brussels on 
Friday to discuss possible recon- 
sideration of a 1992 U.S. -EU agree- 
ment on subsidies to the aviation 
industry. [AFX. AFP) 


Coding Is Focus of Net Talks 


Germany seeks strong encryption 
technology to protect data from 
being manipulated or spied on. 


Reuters 

BONN — Economics Minister Gunter Rexrodt 
called Monday for the removal of restrictions on 
encryption technology as he helped to open a two-day 
conference on Internet commerce. 

The issue over technology used to scramble data 

for security purposes is 

expected to be one of the 
most hotly debated at the 
conference as industry 
leaders and government 
officials from the United 

States, Western and 

Eastern Europe, Asia 

and developing countries elsewhere discuss issues 
related to doing business globally on the Internet. 

In contrast to the United Stales, which currently 
restricts exports of technology that allows Internet 
users to encode their messages and business trans- 
actions, Germany has been leaning toward keeping 
coding and decoding software unregulated. 

“Users can only protect themselves against having 
data manipulated, destroyed or spied on through the 
use of strong encryption procedures,” Mr. Rexrodt 
said. “ ‘That’s why we have to use all of our powers to 
promote such procedures instead of blocking them.” 


Opposition to allowing free trade in encryption tech- 
nology has come mainly from security and law- 
enforcement officials in the United States and 
Europe. They say they fear the technology would be 
used by organized crime to hide criminal activities 
from governments and law-enforcement officials. 

“This argument 

doesn't hold," said one 
U.S. industry executive, 
who asked not to be iden- 
tified. “The way it works 
now is that only those en- 
gaging in illegal activities 
have access to strong en- 
cryption." Lasr week, President Bill Clinton stole 
some of the thunder of the European hosts of the 
conference by issuing a call to create an Internet 
“free-trade zone” within a year. 

Washington wants to carve out such a zone within 
the context of the World Trade Organization, with a 
group of core countries ready and able to put such a 
plan into effect. 

European countries and some developing nations 
are lukewarm to the idea, fearing that any such 
arrangement would disproportionately favor the 
United States. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 
DAX . . 



London 1 "3. 

.FTSE IDO Index -.M 

. 4600 i-f- • 3000 

. 4600- 



- 4000 - 

'f m a’ m jj‘ : »F-flTyTj< 

1997 1997 iw 

Exchange 


, Index 


Amsterdam "ABC 




Vodafone Streamlines, Gutting Jobs 





Frankfort . 

DAK 


Copenhagen 

Stock Market 


HeteCnW 

H£X<3enes#. ,• 


Oil a .'. 



tiorKkat ' 



Madrid 

Stock Er^enge • 

. &AJ7 

Milan . 

kfiSTB; ; . ' ; / 


Parts . 

CAC40- 


Stockholm 

sxte. ■ ■■ 


Vfemta .. 

ATX .. 


Zorich 

spt .... • 


Source: Telekurs 


Irenuuoul HcnU Trihanc 

Very briefly: 


CvuqiM In Om Stiff FninPawtilirt 

LONDON — Vodafone Group 
PLC said Monday it would reor- 
ganize its British businesses, incur- 
ring a loss of 250 jobs over the next 
18 months, as the mobile-phone net- 
work company integrates acquisi- 
tions made in the past year ana ad? 
justs to a slowdown in subscriber 
growth. 

The company, which has renamed 
all its British units and service pro- 
viders under the Vodafone brand, 
said the reorganization would cut its 


profit in its 1998 business year by 
£20 million ($33.8 million 1 but 
would add £ 1 0 million to its profit in 
1999 and £35 million in 2000. 

The company said it would re- 
organize its distribution, now run 
via six businesses, into three units, 
depending on whether their custom- 
ers are corporations, small busi- 
nesses or individuals. 

As a result of acquisitions, in- 
cluding those of People’s Phone. 
Talkland and Aztec, Vodafone has 
doubled the number of outlets that 


sell its services in the past year. 
Until Monday's reorganization, 
those businesses sold service on 
Vodafone's network as well as on its 
rivals' networks. 

In the second quarter of 1997, 
Vodafone added 53,000 customers, 
compared with 106,000 a year earli- 
er. In the same period, its rivals, 
Cellnet Ltd. and Orange PLC, drew 
more customers. 

Vodafone’s shares feU 8 pence to 
close at 298 on London's stock ex- 
change. (Bloomberg. AFX) 


U.K. Output Falls, and Pound Is Blamed 


Co*i*lrd hyOvi SxjfFrrua Dapuhhri 

LONDON — Manufacturing out- 
put fell an unexpected 1 . 1 percent in 
May from April, the Office for Na- 
tional Statistics said Monday, with 
analysts blaming the strong pound 
for reducing exports. 

The monthly decline was the 
biggest since June 1993, when out- 
put fell 1.4 percent, and suggested 
that the strong British currency was 
starting to hun manufacturers. Ex- 
pectations were that manufacturing 
output would show a 0.2 percent 


increase for the month and a 2.5 
percent increase on the year. 

But the Office for National Stat- 
istics said that there was as yej “no 
obvious sign” that the strong pound 
had affected exports. 

Although the strong pound has 
weighed on manufacturers' export 
revenues, it has also helped keep 
the inflation rate at 2.5 percent, 
leading economists to expect the 
Bank of England to raise its base 
lending rate a quarter point to 6.75 
percent at the end of its next two- 


day policy meeting, which begins 
Wednesday. 

Both domestic and export sales 
dropped in May, the statistics office 
said. The decline was greatest in 
industries — such as electrical en- 
gineering, chemicals and metal pro- 
duction — that most rely on ex- 
ports. 

“The figures are the first con- 
vincing sign the strong pound is af- 
fecting export orders, said Jonathan 
Loynes, British economist at HSBC 
Markets. (Bloomberg. AFX, Reuters) 


• The Bundesbank will introduce new 100 Deutsche mark 
and 200 DM (557 and $114) notes Aug. 1 to try to more 
effectively fight counterfeiting. 

• Turkmenistan objected to a $2 billion plan by AO Lukoil 
Holding of Russia and Azerbaijan to develop oil deposits in 
parts of the Caspian Sea claimed by Turkmenistan. 

■ Generate de Banque SA, Belgium’s biggest bank, said it 
was is buying a “middle-ranking" American asset manager to 
help lift its own asset-management business, but it declined to 
name the company being acquired. 

• Norway's central bank invited Norwegian and foreign 
investment companies to submit an offer to manage the 
government Petroleum Fund’s equity portfolio, valued at 
about 50 billion kroner ($ 6.8 billion). 

• AB Volvo is negotiating with General Motors Corp. about 

raising its stake in Volvo GM Heavy Truck Corp. to 100 
percent from 87 percent afx. Bloomberg, afp 

ProSieben’s Shares Start Fast 

GxnpOrd t* Our Sk$ Firm Diiporrbn 

FRANKFURT — Shares in ProSieben Media AG got off to 
a good start on their first day of trading Monday, but analysts 
said they did not expect further large gains, as the stock looks 
expensive at current levels and the company's prospects in a 
changing German media environment are far from certain. 

ProSieben's shares closed at 95 Deutsche marks ($54), up 
from an issue price of 72 DM. on volume of 2.7 million shares. 
The first German television broadcaster to be listed on the 
stock exchange, it sold 17.5 million nonvoting preference 
shares, and its initial public offering was 50 times over- 
subscribed. It also is selling 2.5 million common shares, with 
voting rights, to major shareholders. (AFX, Bloomberg) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Close 




dgb' Lo.-. 

L-’s: 5S"' 1 


. Monday July T-— 

Prices In local currencies. 
Tefekurs 

- .High Law Oom Pm. 


industrials 


Amsterdam 


(MCTN) 

cin»w*> 

JO "0.1 = 
.33 7110 

JK 7M) 


AEXbdac91US 

PrwfcwjrOT.lV 


. High 
Deutsche Bonk 1070 
Dad Telekom 43 
DresdnerBank 6105 
Fiesenhn 361 

Flew** Mad 15X90 
Fried. Kropp 346 
Gehe 

BeidWbolmJ 
Henkel pM 




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73 75 75 > : 

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ten r. Prf »" 
IN SI* 

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Li5 

L* 

lN 

.70 

.55 

iZS 


V-.. 

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55.23 

mi; 

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r. e. Trv' , * +» ■ 

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19 71 

19 75 

19 75 U 

19.76 

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ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
AksNotel 
Boon Co. 
Macva 
on 

P*t 

•, OSM 
tKi |l“*r 
Forth Amev 
" Gehwncs 
&8fl>ccvn 
• Hopemeyor 
nrmencp . 
Hflooowiiscva 
ttucf Demote. 

I' tHG Group 
KLM 
KHPBT 
KPN 

HcdUoydGp 

NaMdo 
OerGrirteo 
Bee 


Hdg 


l Dutch 
. . rcra 
VmdHM 
WU 

Mamaeva 


Bobcco 


4140 
147 JO 
17U0 
277 JO 
14M> 
384# 

97.90 
11840 

211 

33.90 
93.50 
68.10 
<9.90 

1QSJTJ 

34840 

114.10 

17050 

9590 

<940 

44 

8350 

5850 

33230 

26440 

M7 

10450 

210 

19450 

64J0 

19480 

11540 

114 

483 

11640 

48 

250 


3930 4080 
14530 146.10 
169 17240 
27150 27750 
14Z50 146 

3780 38.10 
9620 97 

1U» 11140 
m 20950 
3340 3X80 
9150 9340 
<740 68.10 
68J0 6880 
103 IQ5J8 
341 348.50 
112-70 11380 
15790 168 

9190 9540 
65.40 6840 
4140 4180 
8140 8120 
5750 SB.1D 
327 33030 
25840 26440 
14X10' 145.78 
10210 101?® 
- 208 208 
19140 19340 
.6430. 600 
194 19430 
11550 11550 
112 114 

43310 44290 
11190 11640 
46.10 48 

245.10 24940 


3940 

146-20 

149.90 
271X0 

142 

38.10 

96JO 

11530 

205 

3140 

92 

6740 

6870 

102.90 
34530 
11278 

171.10 
9450 

<6 

44 

8250 

5850 

32650 

257.90 

144.10 
103 

209.90 
19240 

64.10 
19160 
11510 
11130 
44070 
ms s 

■ iKII 

34640 


119 

169 

10550 

465 

8550 

7895 

639 

79 

1365 

3290 

55280 

820 


HEW 
HOCMM 
Houeftsl 
Kmdodt 
Lahnwyer 
Uncit 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Manoesmonn 
rtetaflgeseflsctwft 37.15 
Mm _ 306 

Munch RuodiR 5580 
PreusMB 54175 
RWE 7640 

SAP phi 384 

Sctaring 190-90 

SGLCmhan 248 
Semens 1DS80 
Springer (Axe!) 1655 
Suedzucfeer 934 
Hivhcii 438 

Vein 10535 

VEYV 580 

Vtop 80950 

Vwcwmgan 1412 


Law Close Pro*. 
10255 1(025 10230 
4270 42.90 43 

6285 6285 6290 
353 360 357 

152J8 153 152 

342 345 34550 

118 11870 11« 
16B 168 168 

10450 10450 105 

465 465 469 

8480 8550 B6 
7840 7880 7157 
63650 639 63950 

JM 7870 7940 
1350 1365 1343 

3230 3230 3270 
549 549 551 

m 814 805 

3650 3788 3590 
203 20550 196.10 
5400 5548 SAW 

525 539 522 

76 7670 77X1 
379 38250 378-50 
I 89 19080 18770 
34650 248 246 

10640 10885 10780 
1570 1640 ISO 
930 934 938 

437 437 437 

lfM.90 10575 10350 
580 580 575 

80S BOB 810 
1396 1411139050 


SA Breweries 

13925 13735 

140 

140 

UtdUWtes 

127 

7.12 

723 

Sonvumr 

3960 39J0 

41 

41 

Wendome U uts 

458 

452 

454 

Sosal 

.59. 57SD 

59 

» 

- Vodafone 

3JM 

2.98 

X98 

SBK 

21X50 215 

215 

216 

Whkbreod 

7.93 

7JO 

/JJ 

Tiger Oats 

78 7750 .’•T48 

78 

WHIkans Hdgs 

327 

322 

326 





Wbfseley 

X56 

452 

453 





WPP Group 

245 

•ixt 

7L44 


High Low Close Ptav. 


454 

386 

797 

L25 

453 


High Law dose Prov. 


High Low Close Prev. 


Kuala Lumpur 


AMMBHdgs 

Gening 

Mat Banking 

MalMSNpF 

PHranasGn 

Proton 

Pubic Bk 

Nenong 

Resorts Wortd 

RUtananiPM 

SimeDartv 

TMekDaimal 

Tenqga 

UUEnglnem 

YTL 


14 

1550 

1X90 

1520 

11.70 

11-40 

1120 

1120 

2725 

26 

2625 

27 JO 

7JB 

620 

7 

XB5 

fL0S 

X65 

825 

&80 

11.90 

11 

11.90 

11.90 

4M 

404 

410 

XI2 

330 

324 

326 

330 

760 

740 

7.10 

740 

26 

2420 

26 

25 

X70 

845 

BM 

X70 

1120 

lass 

11 

11-50 

1220 

1120 

12.10 

1110 

1X50 

1X30 

1840 

1X40 

8 

720 

72S 

7.95 


Madrid 

Acerinae 

ACESA 

Aguas Baiceton 


Helsinki 




Bangkok 

AA>Md5k 
Bangkok BkF 

Knew Thai Bk 
pit Expior 
iCemnl F 
iComBkF 


SET I 


fnm 

65789 


.iFanBi 
UMOamm 


200 

270 

270 

298 

252 

236 

236 

M2 

3X50 

33 

3X25 

35.75 

418 


410 

408 

572 

564 

566 

590 

MS 

128 

129 

144 

&25 

3725 

38 

4125 

55 

55 

55 

50 

141 

126 

• 133 

138 

129 

119 

119 

132 


EnsaA 
HufttamaWI 
Kemim 
fteko 
Media A 
McMB „ 

MMsa-Seria B 

Nash 

NcUa A 

Orion-YUrmbo 

Outokumpu A 

UPMKjmnene 

VcfcwS 


N.T. 
233 
53 
77 & 
20 
169 
45 
146 
409 
200158 
10450 
127M 
9080 


N.T. 

230 

5280 

77 

1980 

16750 

45 

MS 

402 

200 

104 

127 

8980 


N.T. 4880 
231 234 

5280 5140 
775# 7750 
2D 19.90 
169 167 

45 4£®S 
145 MS 
40750 40180 
20050 20050 
10450 10480 
12750 126.90 
8980 90 


London 

Abbey Natl 
AJUad DoaKCq 
Anota Wafer 

mS?Gtoup 

BAA 
Baidays 
Bass 
BAT lad 
Bank Scortond 
Blue Ckde 
«OC Group 
Boats 
BPBInd 
MAerasp 
BrO Airways 
BG 

Bril Land 
BiflPekm 


FT-5E 188; 481888 
PrevtoWL- 481280 


Bombay 

Ma}AUlO 
HkSUl Lever 
(flnduWPMta 
MOarBk 
tTC - 

rTal 


SeMteSOfednc 427185 
PnNon: 431382 


StaMBktadki 
Stool AufliorilT 
TMaEngLam 


947 

1403 

469 

106 

566 

320 

36775 

3S775 

23 

45050 


921 922.75 932 

13541343751371.75 

454 4S675 453 

703 1QX50 10X75 
55250 553X5 534.75 
237 287 31X75 

35X75 361.75 3S7-25 
353 354 350 

21.75 21J5 24 

43650 43675 442 


Brussels 


BEL-20 fedaxi 230487 
PnWtoUE 347X19 



FutU AG 
Gawart 
! GfiL .- 

Gun Banque 

I Kredtaninak 
i - Pebaln o 

1*3 tgl 

:Gaal 


UCB 


16500 16300 
7510 7360 

9®® 95M 

3360 3270 
rass? mss 
1980 1950 
7930 7760 
3740 3680 
8100 7790 

3370 3330 
6120 6030 
I4S25 14700 
14775 14625 
13825 13650 
5050 *•.!’ 
1I17S ‘343900 
3&60 35» 

2290 22200 
15100 14925 
124559 122000 


16475 16350 
.73E3 W0 

s s 

imo 18950 
1975 1W0 

7880 7790 

w 

8010 7800 

3350 319 

6110 6060 
14775 14775 
18725 14725 
13775 13750 
5050 ■WH 
10375 10950 
3645 _H5 
22450 22375 
15050 14925 
12099 121900 


Hong Kong 

sw 
Ss 

!S3sr<s 

HKEfcdric 

a™, 


Haag Stag: 148S8JB 
Pimkws; 1482X97 


B 6 u 


Swire PacA 
Wharf Hdgs 


X1S 

730 

8 

X05 

31 JO 

31.10 

3140 

31J0 

14 

1X50 

1X75 

1420 


71 

71JS 

72 

24 

HM 

yito; 

nK 

4220 

41.90 

47X 

47 JO 

47 JO 

4X90 

47.10 

4/4U 

4540 

4440 

454U 

44 

940 

9.70 

•925 

9 JO 

1403 

1X80 

1X80 

M 

11030 10X50 

107 

110-50 

. XX 

820 

XX 

XX 

6725 

6SJD 

66 

66 

1545 

1530 

1535 

1520 

31 

7V.9S 

79.95 

X 

1X15 

1725 

1/.9S 

1720 

448 

428 

443 

428 

247 

747 

745 

Ml 


63 

65 

6175 

TJX 

2X0S 

22.16 

•02, 

22.10 

22 

72 

2110 

1X90 

1X70 

1845 

1X70 

4740 

45LS0 

4X40 

4XSD 

323 

XUS 

108 

X10 

130 

125 

127 

1.35 

8725 

gis o 

8X75 

8625 

420 

440 

445 

4.70 

7J90 

7.55 

lit, 

7J5 

720 

X95 

72 0 

720 

68 

6X50 

6725 

66JQ 

32 

3140 

31 4U 

31.90 

1X10 

1780 

1785 

1X05 


Brtfl„_ 

BriT Tetocam 
BTR 

BwmahCaiM 
Burton Gp 

GabtoWtefcss 

CnflwnSctw 
Gartion Consul 
ComM Union 
Compass Gp 
Coartaulds 
Dtxont 

Badrecampora 
EMI Grow 

cnwmisa uu 

FdmCoteiU 

GeniAccktenl 

GEC 

GKN 

QaDHUaiM 
Grenada Gp 
GgndMH 

GreenafisGp 


Htdos 


Inpl Tobacco 


Copenhagen 

BGBonfc M3S9JD 375 38S 

CdrtdwreB 320 Ml 360 V3 

QSSoFob 950 930 950 925 

DDObco - 421 486 420 <M 

DeoDnskaBK 726 W„n7._7t0 

t» Seeodbig 8 355000 354MS 3S4645 » W 
DfiW2B 247000 244600 247800 245800 
FLSlgdB 234 229 134 232 

“ >L«lltm» 7U TU 714 JT4 

INMUB 732. 725 729 7» 

• BwB 1018 980 1000 1800 

‘DonokB 357 350 356 351 

iBaUcn 390 365 37L4S 367 

(A 401 38983 398 398 


Jakarta 

Astro Ini 

BklirtiMoo 

SkNdgoo 

GretangGore 

tadoonaedl 

hidofbod 

haioKrt 

SampoemaHM 

•Sffi^nGres* 

TcMuenunAcul 


8500 

2075 

159 

10100 

3925 

-5625 

7900 

10350 

5375 

4225 


Be 72X11 

Preriew! 73660 

8275 8400 8225 
3025 2025 2050 

1525 1525 ISM 

9975 10000 9975 
3D5 3M0 3W 

5600 56® AM 
7675 7850 7700 

10000 tm« 10000 

3850 5250 5400 
4125 4150 4175 


Land Sec 

Lxttmo 

Lcgat Gaol Grp 

UcSrHTSBGp 

LumVortty 

AfartsSpnaar 

MEPC 

ffiSSoS' 

NaflPmrer 
Non** Union 


PRO 


Frankfurt 

-AM&B 


DAX: 3971*4 
Piwtarc 3«J3 


v \wk 

■ W 

trti 


18 if* 

. - -AllN 1 



Johannesburg 

AndgaattiBks 3U0 30« 32 32 

ttn oa i Am Cord 275 272 275 275 

AngbAm-OiiP 268 24X50 27025 27X25 

«3SreSl8 363.50 256 262 262 

196 192 1« 

15 U TWO 1540 
£8 49ZS SO 50 
2525 . . 25 S M 
16740 16440 167.50 167^ 
3X25 29 30 30 

36 


PredenU 
Bate!* GO 
Rank Grow 
RedUUCotm 
Rsdtand 
Reed Inti 
RartaUMtal 
BeutenHdgs 
Rren 
RMC Group 
RnBsRssjca 
Royal Bk Sent 

Rt 




•m tod 


Baton _ 
C&SaHt 
De Bears 
DilefoaMn 
FstNoXB* 
Gencar 
GF5A . 
Imperial Hdg* 
IngweCaal 
hcor 

Johqntes Indl 
UtortvHdm 
Liberty Life 
.LMJfe Sturt 
Mlncns 

Nanpafc 

Nedcor ^ 

Rembrandt Gp 

RUwaiarf 

RusjPfcdtnom 


_ S 3X25 3625 
20.90 2X50 20.90 2X90 
9X50 9X50 102 102 

6675 6640 6US 6X75 
25 2450 2550 2549 
3 246 3 3 

6125 63 6175 S3J5 

340 33X75 33X25 33X25 
132 130 130 TO 

17.75 1740 1740 17J 
99 9X50 100 100 

19 1X50 IMO 19Z0 
100 V9JD 100 100 

47 4X25 47 <7 

mas 6X50 <940 6940 
78 7540 79 79 


StdHbwy 
StJirodeB 
Sent Newcastle 
Sad Power 
Seanfcor 
SrmrnTial 
ShelTnmpR 
Setae 

SmttbNapiKw 

SnBbKlM 

SmittdM 

sSdOater 
Tate & Lyle 
Tetco 

ThaaNsMMer 
31 Group 

US B 

UnBever 
Utd Asswnnee 

UMNarn 


922 

X62 

X75 

925 

445 

421 

440 

428 

7.15 

£97 

729 

7.10 

527 

£68 

£73 

£76 

126 

123 

126 

1X2 

549 

545 

£49 

549 

XB3 

X72 

£77 

528 

1247 

1113 

12-31 

1139 

728 

747 

748 

7J5 

XS8 

545 

549 

£55 

4.16 

X98 

413 

418 

420 

4.17 

426 

421 

IttS 

1050 

1055 

1042 

740 

742 

7,® 

7254 

110 

2.98 

322 

329 

1346 

1117 

1346 

1X15 

6J4 

647 

£70 

621 

225 

227 

432 

132 

£97 

545 

£89 

£M 

729 

723 

727 

725 

444 

4X 

439 

446 

IX 

126 

IX 

1XS 

£05 

450 

491 

499 

129 

122 

1.93 

126 

1004 

922 

9.98 

920 

L15 

1.13 

1.15 

1.14 

SJT 

540 

£61 

£75 

X72 

552 

£43 

£47 

525 

X1B 

£30 

546 

X78 

£63 

648 

£78 

622 

646 

£47 

£59 

122 

X10 

113 

xia 

4.98 

426 

498 

475 

HS4X 

423 

423 

£30 

1125 

1X11 

11.18 

11.15 

£47 

629 

£42 

640 

7.16 

723 

724 

7.13 

I4B 

147 

157 

148 

9.19 

927 

9.18 

923 

X86 

X75 

329 

329 

130 

927 

MO 

921 

1X37 

1X13 

1X36 

1133 

7.97 

727 

721 

729 

£15 

626 

£13 

£15 

227 

249 

224 

225 

428 

421 

436 

438 

1X14 

623 

628 

£14 

£07 

528 

6 

£90 

£84 

£78 

£82 

£85 

1823 

1845 

1828 

1X65 

824 

7.95 

822 

8 

X75 

322 

323 

175 

647 

XS 

£62 

£56 

245 

240 

241 

243 

9.15 

925 

9.m 

9.14 

249 

242 

246 

247 

429 

424 

435 

453 

XBB 

647 

£82 

£82 

1-96 

128 

1.97 

124 

X15 

528 

529 

£18 

£09 

£82 

£05 

523 

1104 

1220 

1222 

1X01 

22) 

245 

249 

245 

£57 

£45 

£54 

553 

X95 

820 

£82 

825 

621 

XA1 

£81 

646 

323 

322 

X26 

131 

112 

224 

226 

■m 

£17 

627 

£10 

£13 

7.13 

725 

725 

728 

125 

1.19 

US 

125 

745 

753 

757 

748 

458 

xsa 

454 

440 

£63 

£15 


£36 

7J8 

£78 

tea 

7 

342 

353 

155 

159 

944 

945 

958 

920 

112 

197 

2.99 

114 

5J7 

178 

182 

IP 

227 

221 

in 

229 

£13 

£97 

£05 

626 

244 

228 

338 

140 

9.18 

926 

9.15 

9.15 

229 

224 

127 

228 

624 

£99 

£24 

£02 

1043 

1020 

1028 

1040 

442 

448 

<42 

441 

160 

344 

349 

345 

181 

323 

.321 

325 

1740 

1722 

17JSS 

1720 

623 

620 

£87 

624 

420 

429 

414 

415 

IBS 

222 

223 

226 

X55 

842 

£53 

841 

447 

434 

443 

441 

1005 

923 

1026 

926 

120 

148 

120 

149 

1128 

1120 

1120 

1127 

741 

737 

7J8 

726 

448 

455 

448 

456 

£40 

£35 

£40 

638 

922 . 

948 

925 

9.97 

456 

453 

453 

455 

402 

192 

402 

327 

744 

723 

7J9 

722 

£09 

522 

£04 

525 

421 

473 

474 

421 

223 

175 

178 

243 

1728 

17J0 

17.70 

1745 

450 

443 

444 

446 

729 

721 

722 

729 


BE 
Banesla 
BonkJnter 
BcaCenfaaHtep 
Bca PopuJor 
Ba> Santander 
CEPSA 
CorttaMite 
Ma pfre 

FECSA 
Gos Natural 
Ibentada 
Piyca 
Repeal 

Sevffiana Elec 
Tcbaaden 
r e l e lon l ca 
Union Fenna 
Ui lent Cement 



Baba taderc 63477 


PlWfam: 62X79 

29280 

28800 

29200 

29300 

2025 

1960 

I960 

2065 

6200 

6070 

6080 

6200 

8930 

8600 

8850 

87M 

12640 

12340 

12630 

12410 

1495 

1470 

1480 

1500 

27950 

27500 

27850 

77890 

5900 

5830 

5880 

5870 

39590 

39300 

39300 

39300 

4720 

4660 

4719 

4710 

5078 

4915 

4930 

5020 

33 SO 

ms 

3350 

3365 


8160 

8260 

8190 

12800 

12770 

12780 

12970 

1375 

13SO 

1365 

1370 


33030 

33350 

33200 

issa 

1870 

1865 

3210 

3100 

3200 

3M) 

6*nn 

1520 

6500 

1500 

66G0 

1520 

6530 

1520 

M0 

8430 

B550 

8470 


4515 

4665 

4550 

1285 

1278 

1280 

12SU 

2475 

24X 

2470 

2450 


Manila 

AmdaB 

AvKaLand 

BkPtiBplid 

CAP Homes 

ManflaEtecA 

MrireBonk 

Pctron 

PCIBank 

PWUmgDW 

SanM^uWB 

SM Prime Hdg 


PSEi 


1X75 1775 
2375 2375 
160 158 

1075 10 

87 8540 
540 530 

640 640 

ZS5 25240 

■no mo 
67 66 

740 7/40 


! 275115 
275X96 

1X75 1775 
2150 2375 
158 160 

10 1X75 
86 8540 
m 530 
**» 650 

25250 
WO 730 
6650 67 

740 740 


Paris 

Amu 

AGE 

AvLinuide 

AknMAlsfii 

AJO-UAP 

Banco ire 

BIC 

BNP 

CmaJPIus 

Cometour 

Casino 

CCF 

Cefelem 

OirKUan Dior 

CLF-OedaFran 

Credit Agrieafe 

Danone 

Eff-Aquitalne 

ErtdaniaBS 

Euirensney 

Eunrtunm* 

Gen. Eaux 
Havus 
•metre 
Lafarge 

LVMH 

Lyon. Eaux 

MktaflnB 

PartbaiA 

Pernod Rtajrd 

PeuoeotaT 

PinauB-Prird 

Pmmades 

Renaurt 

Rewl 

RtMtoulexicA 

Saudi 

5dmeidei 

SEB 

SGSThomtwn 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
St Gabon 
Suez 


CAC-40: 294746 
PraftOOK 293648 


799 

37270 

785 

975 

25340 


674 

907 

9 

X» 

751 

4» 

783 


Total B 
Uslnor 
Vtdea 


C5F 


949 930 949 

19940 192.10 198 

970 948 970 

781 791 

367 371-50 

772 779 

963 970 

247 252.10 

1220 1201 B »2 

4420 4375 4392 

295 286 294 

255 251.70 255 

721 70B 712 

TCS3 986 1000 
568 556 564 

138740 128740128740 
975 966 975 

675 659 

908 897 

9.10 X90 

X25 7.90 

755 748 

439 423 

785 776 

38X90 380 3B540 

1110 1092 1110 

2500 2443 2483 
1639 1601 1625 
610 m 606 
36940 362 366 

420 417 420 

319.80 31X10 31X50 

581 563 570 

2919 2838 2915 
2490 2417 2465 

141.28 137 .At 140.60 
1800 177S 57JIB’ 
2S5J0 24X20 25150 
580 568 577 

331.80 325 330 

1053 1035 1044 

490 48730 489.20 
692 687 692 

2998 2929 2980 
872 859 859 

1440 14J5 14X5 
775 752 769 

16940 166 S) 167 JO 
595 585 595 

11080 107 11X28 

40540 39660 400 


935 
192 
958 
787 
36X10 
774 
970 
749 
1220 
072 
287 
256 
714 
996 
566 
1250 
973 
666 
900 
9 
7X0 
753 
437 
774 
384 
1099 
2442 
1616 
610 
36990 
419_50 
317-40 
573 
2873 
2442 
140.90 
1795 
253.80 
572 
327 JO 
1048 
487 
690 
2990 
874 
14.95 
774 
167 
593 
108-70 
40150 


EkdrotanB 

Ericsson B 

Hemes B 

Ineenttve A 

IrmskrB 

ffieDoS 

Nankwnken 

Piurnnryptaiia 

SandvftB 

Scania B 

SCAB 

&£Banfton A 
Skandia Fats 
Skanska B 
SKFB 

SpabankenA 
5HTOA 
SvHanckesA 
Volvo B 


608 
319 
286 
698 
423 
255 
266 
287 
23X50 
235 
1 67 JO 
89 JO 
336 
34X50 
206 
188 
12X50 
255 
214 


591 608 

31330 316 

281 285 

695 697 

416 42150 
250 HASO 
258 266 

281 285 

227 233 

231 23X50 
165.50 167 

8X50 89 JO 
306 327 

339-50 340 

203 205-50 
169350 177 

124 12X50 
249 25150 
20X50 713 


593 

315-50 

279 

694 

41X50 

251 

263 

284.50 
228 
233 

166.50 

SB 

308 
339 SO 
204 
169 JO 
126 
251 
20650 


Mexico 

AUa A 
Banned r 
CemearCPO 
OfraC 

EmpModema 

GpoCdisoAl 

GpoFBcoarer 

GpaRn Inbuna 

KfintrOaikMeu 

TetovfeaCPO 

TeUtaiL 


5JL50 

23.00 

36J» 

13.10 

4X35 

57.60 

.2X7 

3X00 

3185 

12XS> 
20 JS 


Baba ladrec 472X39 
P re v fea x <64X68 
5X90 5X10 5X20 
2170 2195 21-95 
3X00 3X60 3X95 
13.80 13.04 13-00 
4SM 4X25 4X00 
500 

M W Ml 
33M 3X00 3X40 
3110 33J0 32J0 
12550 12X50 126 JO 
20-00 2025 19.90 


SSO PflUto Bores^lJjJTJO 


Milan 

AUB TelceMfcor r. 

HHN 


Piwwotoll 


Aleanra Asdc 

14180 

14020 

141 50 

MIX 


4240 

4000 

4240 

4045 


5955 

5HM 

mo 

5920 


1346 

13011 

1346 

I3U2 


V 

MIX 

76300 

26350 

CredOo HoBono 

3350 

3456 

3395 

Edison 

8900 


raws 

8740 

ENI 

18075 

9830 

10030 

9990 

Rat 

6490 

ttVU 

64/5 

6480 


31850 

31 ISO 

3I8SD 

31650 

IMI 

16490 

15H5S 

16490 

161JW 

INA 

2600 

2540 

26X 

7565 

IMgas 

MeSoaf 

5550 

7525 

5465 

7340 

5500 

7400 

5540 

7430 


11375 

11180 

11375 

11200 


1196 

11/8 

1195 

1179 

OtareM 

50420 48X50 

4W 

481 


2535 

2480 

7SU) 

J5CU 

PM8 

4305 

4735 

4TO 

43U5 

RAS 

14800 

14590 

14640 

14710 

Rato Ban- 

21900 

2I3X 

21900 

21600 


13400 

12/MI 

13355 

12905 


10300 

9755 

10145 

9825 


5660 

6605 

5635 

5441 

TIM 

5740 

5640 

5725 

54U5 



Sydney 


AlOtdtearies: 271X00 
PmJoOK 273X40 


£75 

£70 

£71 

820 

ANZBUng 

928 

9MO 

923 

92/ 

BHP 

19J2 

I9J2 

1925 

1920 


£25 

4.15 

4.15 

4.78 

BnanWes Ind, 


2X10 

2X30 

2625 

CBA 

1626 

15.96 

15-97 

1X06 

GC Amalfi 

1726 

1X95 

17 

17 

Coles Myer 

725 

£94 

723 

£95 

Coradca 

7.14 

7.10 

7.14 

7.14 

CSR 


£10 

£16 

£15 

Fostore Brew 

£44 

X46 

221 

GowtaMnHd 

1.92 

1.85 

128 

1.V2 

KIAurtrala 

1X95 

1X85 

1X95 

12.90 

Lend Lease 

2X81 

2X45 

2X60 

•n 

MIMHdgs 
Nat Au st Bank 

1.93 

129 

1.90 

1.92 

1920 

19.78 

19 JO 

1920 

HktfMiriwrtHdg 

£18 

7.10 

XI 5 

2.1/ 


6-53 

£4/ 

621 

620 


£73 

X64 

3,65 

171 

Pioneer Irdl 

£10 

4.96 

£03 

£08 


8 

7.91 

137 

£05 

Rio TWo 

2223 

77 JO 

2X45 

2223 

SI George Bank 

£68 

£53 

826 

825 

WMC 

£27 

£12 

X14 

tat 

WertpacBkteg 

7.93 

1120 

726 

1124 

729 

1124 

7.91 

1109 

lMoofwarftB 

£45 

£41 

423 

424 

Taipei 

Stock MOW tatfec 930224 

Prariwc 925843 

Cottar LUe Ins 

157 

15? 

154 

152 

□mg Hwa Bk 
□rioo Tung Bk 

120 

11620 

117 T1XS0 

82 

78 

87 

7820 


145 

141 

14X50 

141 

□Ma Steel 

2920 

79.10 

2920 

2V JU 

First Bcaik 

118-50 

116 

115 11X50 

Fcmresa PtasSc 

71 JO 

6S> 

70 

6920 

HuoNotSI! 

121 

118 

118 

119 

Infl Comra 3k 

69 

6620 

6620 

67 JO 

Non Yd Piastres 

8620 

6150 

65J0 

84 

SKn Kong Lite 

12420 

119 

124 

121 

Iowan Semi 

126 

TO 12320 

TO 

U«5Sdo B« 

. 55 
12420 

54 

118 

5420 

17420 

5420 

117 

UW Wortd CMa 

7220 

70 

7120 

71 


The Trib Index 


Prices as ot 3rOO PM. New Yak arm. 


Jan. 1. 1992 = 100. 


Change 

% change 

ysartodBta 
% change 

World Index 

179.97 

•M3.45 

40.25 

+20.67 

Rbgianal Indexes 

Asia/PeaBc 

129.47 

-0.45 

-0.35 

+409 

Europe 

188.75 

+1.80 

-*0.96 

+17.09 

N. America 

208-55 

-0.88 

-0.42 

+2801 

S. America 

182.61 

+1.74 

40.96 

469.58 

Industrial Indexes 
Capital goods 

225.70 

+1.42 

40.63 

+32.05 

Consumer goods 

201.17 

-0.49 

-024 

424.62 

Energy 

202.35 

40.99 

4029 

+18.53 

Finance 

134.72 

40.57 

40.42 

+15.68 

Miscellaneous 

178.00 

+1.36 

40.77 

+10.03 

Raw Materials 

193.89 

+0.43 

40.22 

+10.55 

Sendee 

170J9 

40.34 

+0.20 

424.08 

Utilities 

180.61 

+1.38 

+0.77 

+25.90 


77»o International Herald Triune Worict Stock Index O tracks the U.S. dollar values ct 
280 ntemaiKinaBy Imoetabie stocks from 25 coteunos. Far mom Information, a two 
booklet Is availaltie by writing to The Tib Max. 70t Avenue Change de Gaulle, 

92521 NawByCedax. France. Com/Oatt by Bloomberg Nam. 


Mitsui Fudnsn 
Mitsui Trust 
Murafci Mfg 
NEC 

Nikon 
NBrkoSec 
Wntendo 


Unitantn 

W° lPM 


Seoul 

Doan 

DocwwHaovy 

KnreaBPwr 
Korea BcchBk 
Korea Mata Tal 
LGSendcon 
Pahang Inn SI 
Samsung Dblay 
“ I Bee 


CafusBe tatec 77131 
PTHioo*; 77974 

116000 108000 110000 108000 
8650 TOO 8300 8670 

24000 22200 22400 23700 

MOOD uma usob isooo 

27900 27400 274Q0 27480 
6200 5910 5940 6070 

510000 465000 4885D0 507000 
36800 34900 35700 36309 
66300 64600 65300 mm 
49600 4K4HI 47H0B 49100 
72800 TOW 70500 7W0 
11200 10700 10700 10900 


Montreal 

Bee Mob Con 
CdnTiroA 
Cite LW A 
CTRlTlSvC 
Gal Metro 
Gt-WesfUfcca 
osai 


LafahnvCoi 
Natl Bk Canada 
PaweCotp 
Power FM 
OmbKorS _ 
RagenCOMotB 
ttofflBkCdo 


4190 m 

S 60 2M5 
75 2X50 
37W 37Vk 
1X05 17JI5 
3190 3380 
42-45 4» 

ZIK 31W 
20.90 axis 

1X20 1755 
3X95 34J0 
35 3X20 
26 fi 26M 
9.10 190 
6X70 6530 


846X88 

PrtrtOK 344X66 

4X90 4170 
2X® 2X60 
2X60 2X60 
37% 37% 

nos n 

3190 33X5 
42 'A 4X35 
31% 31% 

2X90 2070 
17.95 1X10 
3X00 3X90 
34% 34 

2X45 M <4 
195 X75 
6X30 6X55 


Singapore 

Asia Itec Brew 
CerebosAsc 
fDtvtU 


DBS 


mat- 

JndMiAeai* 
Jaw strategic" 

bl. 



Oslo 


Aker A 


OBXiwfeto 67X76 
Pterlaw: 67X09 


DannonkaBk 
Elkeoi 
HoMlMd A 
KwemerAn 
Nook HjrirD 

NyamS? 

gaSr^c 


151 

185 

2570 

2X10 

149 

4X50 

463 

397 



U9 150 
180 IBS 
24.90 25 

2770 28 

144 149 

4X50 4X50 
455 458 

395 397 

258 259 

143 14X50 

573 590 

370 370 

147 148 

144 145 

540 540 

4X30 4X70 


149 

100.50 

2X30 

20 

145 

4X50 

458 

397 

259 

144 

578 

370 

149 

14X50 

540 

4X50 


„ jAlrH. 
ShgLmd 
SjngPressF 
Sjng Tech bid 
aftgTetaeroro 
Tania Bonk 
UH Industrial 
UtdOSeo BkF 
WftgTin Hites 
ItaU^ rfrtWL 


£80 

£70 

5JD 

£10 

£95 

£95 

1430 

1190 

1430 

1490 

1420 

1480 

020 

077 

078 

1920 

19 

1920 

470 

4J2 

424 

1070 

10 JO 

1020 

l£2 

156 

2J6 

7 JO 

7.15 

775 

1B0 

3J6 

178 

N.T. 

N.T. 

RT. 

170 

326 

328 

428 

424 

498 

408 

192 

404 

15LS0 

1570 

1&20 

925 

925 

925 

620 

625 

620 

£95 

£70 

£80 

1160 

1120 

1160 

£90 

625 

625 

3020 

2920 

3020 

1B2 

178 

378 

X74 

229 

170 

322 

196 

196 

127 

16J0 

438 

1JJ7 

1£J1 

4J2 

'ti 


Tokyo 

Afinonoto 

Al Nippon Ak 

Annuar 

AsdiiBank 

AsahidKOi 

AsatdGtass 

BfeTj4qreM0su 

BX Yotorioma 

Bridgestone 

canon 

□wbuElK 

Chugaku Elec 

DaiMpp Print 

Oofei 

Dat-letd Kang 

DaiwaBreik 

DofenHoau 

Oafere Sec 

DDi 

Denaa 

East Jo pen Ry 
Eotri 
Fame 
_ IBank 
1 Photo 


X60 


X84 


270 

3-02 

177 


HaehiurdBk 

I illuri J 

MnOCDi 

Honda Motor 

IBi 

Ml 

Itochu 

fto-Yotento 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

JlBCD 

Kaftan 

KonsoiEtoc 

Kao 

Kawasaki Hw 
Korea Steel 
BnHWppRr 
Kirin Brewery 
Kota Steel 
Kamcdsu 
Kubota 
Kyecora 

ass #EjK . 


Stockholm s xjsiwfec wu; 

Pfi ti Ui : 

AGAB 106 10X50 105 1W- 

ABBA 114 111 JO 113 .1 

ASNOoroan 236 223 22X50 

Astra A ■ 158 150 156 .. 

A iias Copco A 22150 220 22150 22150 

AutoGv 307 JD 30X50 30X50 307 


Matai Gnat 
Matsu Bee tod 
MateuBKWk 




«fcrt 225: 1970X17 


Previous: 1996820 

1150 

1130 

1130 

1160 

750 

740 

741 

/.» 

3750 

3660 

3700 

3800 

900 

8/4 

(WO 

W1 

m 

676 

m 

68/ 

mu 

1IUI 

1100 

1110 

3170 

3130 

2141 

2190 

436 

631 

631 

£17 

2610 

2550 

2590 

7990 

3140 

3090 

3110 

3160 

3050 

2030 

2050 

7040 

1030 

2010 

2010 

7030 


7480 

7510 

2530 

74S 

/its 

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750 

1470 

1430 

1450 

1500 

570 

V9 

570 

565 

13/0 

13M> 

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13511 

890 

870 

874 

890 

8430a 

B370O 

8380a 


2690 

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7630 

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55411a 

5770a 

2410 

3370 

7400 

mu 

4130 

4070 

4130 

All) 

1« 

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1540 

1410 

4J80 

4470 

4490 

4550 

1530 

151(1 

1520 

1530 

IMO 

nan 

1130 

1130 

12/0 

1350 

1270 

1260 

Z«m 

3710 

3770 

3330 

1640 

1600 

1610 

1660 

412 

400 

407 

417 

580 

566 

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565 

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660(1 

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sm 

573 

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537 

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3730 

3760 

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650 

647 

647 

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2150 

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mo 

ISW 

1570 

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m 

508 

510 

521 

155 

351 

3S1 

355 

698 

69? 

695 

692 

1180 

1150 

1170 

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710 

706 

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895 

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ms 

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534 

525 

536 

543 

8790 

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1950 

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1950 

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430 

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514 

503 

507 

509 

m 

2000 

4060 

2010 

4100 

2040 

4070 

2240 

2310 

3220 

2233 

1300 

1280 

1700 

1300 

1310 

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13X1 

368 

364 

365 

364 

647 

68 

640 

636 

1X10 

1610 

1610 

1670 

875 

866 

869 

871 

805 

796 

802 

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1710 

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1080 

1060 

1060 

1070 


Mp poo Start 
Nason Motor 
NKK 

SST"*' 

NTT Data 
□P Paper 
Osaka Gas 
Ricoh 
Rataa 
Saturn Bk 

Smkya 
Sanwa Bank 
Sanjo Elec 
Secom 

iSSJBU 

Setosui House 
Seven- Etown 
Sharp 

ShirolaiBPwr 

Sitoitw 

SluveteuCh 

Shhado 

Sbionka Bk 

Softbank 

ISStorao 

S um i tom o Bk 
SundtChem 
SumitomoEtoc 
SumB Metal 
Sum9 T rod 
TabhoPhom 
TakedaOtom 
TDK 

Tuhaku 0 Pwr 
Trttre Bank 
ToktoASariu 
Tokyo El Par 
Tokyo Etedsofl 
T*5>eas 
Total/ Carp. 

Tooan 

ToppaiPrW 
Toiwlnd 
Tostim 
Tosteai 
Toyo Trust 
Toyota Alator 
Vamanouctii 
kx JOB/ tax 1000 


Hteta 

Law 

ao» 

Prov. 

1520 

1490 

1490 

1530 

002 

770 

770 

808 

4230 

4190 

4190 

4460 

1550 

1530 

1530 

150! 

1770 

1730 

1760 

1800 

699 

692 

493 

700 

9320 

9220 

9220 

9360 

881 

863 

872 

sm 

612 

609 

610 

6M 

350 

346 

348 

353 

350 

841 

847 

837 

233 

229 

220 

234 

1510 

1450 

1460 

1520 

1060b 

10306 

10300 

1070b 

4280b 

4230b 

423tto 

4280b 

705 

695 

695 

<99 

325 

317 

K31 

327 

1520 

1500 

■El 

1510 

11800 

11800 

U«0 

IWffl 

SZ7 

805 

•m 

830 

3930 

3870 

38*0 

3980 

1630 

1590 


1630 

500 

490 

49V 

8270 

8700 

8240 

8240 

5630 

5570 

5570 

500 

1140 

1120 

1140 

1130 

1190 

1160 

1180 

1170 

8620 

flfm 

B600 

8620 

1540 

1520 

1530 

1540 

1970 

1950 

19*0 

1950 

665 

652 

465 

<69 

2940 

2920 

2950 

2950 

1900 

1890 

19® 

1870 

1280 

1260 

1260 

1280 

7400 

7300 

7318 

7430 

9*598 

9600 

9660 

9680 

1060 

1040 

1040 

1050 

1800 

1760 

1770 

1820 

510 

503 

503 

■ai 

1900 

1870 

« 


321 

317 

tel 

1150 

11X 

1140 

1150 

3180 

3120 

3160 

3130 

3289 

3210 

3210 

3300 

8400 

8320 

8400 

8440 

1990 

1970 

s 

1990 

1100 

1060 

1100 

1440 

1410 

1430 

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2310 

2280 

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2310 

5410 

5330 

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320 

316 

316 

318 

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453 

m 

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1270 

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1752 

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714 

709 

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3100 

2960 

3100 

3060 

932 

916 

918 

938 

3270- 

3180 

3190 

3280 

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3010 

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Nfliera Trteaw 
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Pancdn Prtlrn 

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28-20 

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4230 

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16-55 

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6114 

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60K 

6020 

30.10 

2940 

2940 

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£40 

£10 

61* 

61* 

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2£70 

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93V4 

9214 

9040 

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Vienna 

Bortder-Uddrti 

CreJtonstPfd 

EA-Gawnl 

EVN 

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aim 

OnstBektriz 
V A Stahl 
VATedi 
WenabeiaBau 


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129058 
138X18 

1018 999.90 101X30 987 

SIB SS9 513 51350 
3445 3387 3430 3455 

16451620-S9 1626 1635 

S3S 529.10 529.10 532 

1628 1610 1620 1623 

875 BS6 87X50 871 

58X95 571 5BX80 58X15 

2575253X50235X50 2551 
2852 2555 2643 2619 


Wellington NzsE^tewig 


Toronto 

AtaUfalCons. 
Alberta Energy 
Alar Atom 
Anderson Expl 
8k Manfred 
Bk Nan Sofia 
Baric*! Goto 
BCE 

BCTetecomin 
Btochan Phono 
Ban bonder B 
Brosenn A 
Cameco 
DBC 

m Natl Rnfl 

Ota tfatRes 

OtaOcOd Pet 

Cdn Pocfflc 

CmbicD 

Dafasca 

Oomtar 

DonobMA 

DuPoidCitaA 

Edper Group 

EumNevMng 

FaarfakFM 

FnfcniMdge 

FtotcberOMdlA 

Franco Nenda 

GuBOtoRes 

Imperial 04 

bn 

IPL Energy 
UddtowB 
Laewen Group 
Mpema BUI 
iInflA 


33 

3414 

50U 

36 

6216 


TSE iRtoStrtats; 655X83 
Pravtoas: 658X44 

2X05 26 56 26 

3516 35 3X10 35,® 

4X40 47.80 4U0 47Z0 
1X35 1X10 1875 1X20 
5635 56.10 56^5 5670 
6444 6X10 6470 6X10 
27.90 26U 2760 2870 

42.10 4175 41 JO 42 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 




A dealer 


















































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 


PAGE 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


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Chipmakers’ Shares 
Fall Sharply in Seoul 
On Export Prospects 


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SEOUL — Investors dumped 
semiconductor makers’ shares 
Monday after die government is- 
sued a gloomy outlook for exports 
following a sharp drop in microchip 
prices in the U.S. market. 

'J _ The finance ami economy min- 
istry said prospects for semicon- 
ductor exports were shaky because 
of the low international price of 
South Korea's mainstay 16-megabit 
dynamic random-access memory 
chips, or D-RAMs. The price of 16- 
megabit O-RAMs has dropped to 
less than $7 a unit in the U.S. market 
from $10 in March. 


Hyundai 
To Increase 


|||:: Its Capital 

35 £> ii Bloomberg News 


Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — Hyundai Motor 
Co., South Korea’s largest 
automaker, announced Monday 
that it would raise 5200 million 
to $300 million in September, 
possibly through overseas se- 
curities issues. 

Park Byoag Jae, Hyundai’s 
president, said the company 
would raise the capital to pay 
for offshore projects such as the 
construction of a $1.1 billion 
auto plant in India. 

“Hyundai is more likely to 
issue foreign securities, rather 
than taking out foreign loans,” 
Mr. Park said. 

Hyundai's sales in the first 
half of 1997 fell 7 percent from 
a year earlier, to 593,989 
vehicles, because of a strike and 
the weaker yen, which helped 
its Japanese competitors. Ex- 
ports rose 6 percent, to 282,560 
vehicles, while domestic sales 
fell 16 percent, to 31 1,429. 


The government's export forecast 
sent electronics shares tumbling. 
The benchmark Korea Composite 
Stock Price Index fell 5.73 _points, or 
about 0.7 percent, to 773.51. 

Samsung Electronics Co., the 
world's largest maker of memory 
chips, fell 2.8 percent, to close at 
70,500 won {$79.47}. Hyundai 
Electronics Industries Co., also a 
major chipmaker, lost 2.4 percent, to 
46,600, and LG Semi con Co. 
slipped 1.7 percent, to 35,700. 

All three of those companies said 
Monday they would reduce produc- 
tion of their mainstay computer 
chips by one-third in the next few 
weeks to ay to bolster prices. 

“Falling chip prices are darkening 
earnings prospects at Samsung and 
other chipmakers,” said Choi Chang 
Ho, an analyst at Ssangyong Invest- 
ment Securities Co. 

South Korean companies make 
about one- third of the world's D- 
RAMs. chips that are widely used in 
computers as well as calculators and 
other electronic products. 

Officials at the finance and econ- 
omy ministry said they expected no 
increase in chip exports in the 
second half of the year. 

They said the prices in the U.S. 
spot market indicated the trend that 
export prices would take a few 
months Later. 

Just last week, the Federation of 
Korean Industries predicted that 
South Korean semiconductor ex- 
ports would rise 49.2 percent in the 
second half of 1997. 

In another report, the South 
Korean central bank predicted that 
the country’s gross domestic 
product would grow at a 6.3 percent 
annual rate in me second half of the 
year, compared with a 5.6 percent 
pace in the first half, helped by a 
gradual recovery in exports and 
private consumption. 

Separately, a Taiwan company. 
Nan Ya Plastics Crap., said it would 
invest 100 billion Taiwan dollars 
($3.59 billion) to build three chip 
plants in Taiwan.fAFP. Bloomberg ) 


Manila Raises Interest Rates 

Officials Seek to Deflect Speculative Attack on Peso 


CampttrdbtOm Staff Fnm Dupartn 

MANILA — The Philippine 
Centra] Bank raised interest rates 
and intervened in currency mar- 
kets Monday to save the peso from 
a sudden attack by speculators 
amid fears of a devaluation. 

The speculative attack was 
blamed on weekend reports, which 
have since been denied, quoting 
Finance Secretary Roberto de 
Ocampo as saying ihe peso could be 
devalued in the next few weeks. 

Mr. Ocampo denied the report 
and said it was “unlikely” that the 
Philippines would devalue the 
peso. He praised the central bank’s 
decision to raise interest rates as 
“prudent foreign-exchange man- 


agement policy. " The central bank 
raised overnight borrowing rates 
to 30 percent from 24 percent to try 
to protect the peso from specu- 
lators. On Wednesday, the central 
bank raised overnight borrowing 
rates to 24 percent from 1 5 percent 
in two stages after Thailand 
floated the baht, which immedi- 
ately plunged, triggering speculat- 
ive attacks on the peso. 

Traders said die central bank 
could not afford to keep interest 
rates this high for long, because 
such rates make it expensive to 
borrow and thus choke off eco- 
nomic growth. 

“The peso is in trouble for a 
number of reasons,” one analyst 


said, “mainly because the Phil- 
ippines is at a similar stage eco- 
nomically as Thailand with the 
same structural problems.” 

The dollar was trading at 26.39 
pesos, unchanged from Friday. 

The trade and industry secre- 
tary, Cesar Bautista, meanwhile 
contended that only two or three 
foreigners were behind the spec- 
ulative attacks on the peso. 

“There are two or three indi- 
viduals who are trying to attack the 
peso.” Mr. Bautista said. “They 
are not Filipinos. It is something 
from abroad.” He added. “You 
can't blame them; they are trying 
to make money.” 

(AFP. Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Thais Hope to Gain as Baht Falls 


Bloomberg News 

BANGKOK — Waewdao Chi- 
eranan, marketing manager of the 
Royal Princess Hotel, would be 
high on any list of Thais likely to 
appreciate the benefits of last 
week's devaluation of the baht. 

Instantly, her job got easier. The 
13 percent fall in its currency's 
value makes Thailand more af- 
fordable for the thousands who 
come here to shop, snorkel and ride 
elephants. 

“Thailand is now more of a 
bargain, because people feel richer 
when they come,” she said. 

Tourists represent the main 


source of hard currency in this 
country . and they account for 5 per- 
cent of its gross domestic product. 
In 1990, income from tourism in 
Thailand totaled 111 billion baht 
($3.8 billion), triple the amount 
spent by Thais abroad. By last year, 
the ratio was down to abou 1 2 to 1 , as 
tourism generated about 2 1 9 billion 
baht and Thais spent about 1 10 bil- 
lion baht abroad. 

A boom in the tourist trade now 
would bring immediate assistance 
to an economy growing at its slow- 
est pace since 1986. But it could 
also bring unwanted side effects, 
such as increased inflation and a 


surge in interest rates, and it could 
make people such as Ms. Waewdao 
change their shopping habits. 

Like thousands of middle- and 
upper-income Thais, Ms. 
Waewdao has done much of her 
shopping abroad, helping inflate a 
current-account deficit that was 
one of the highest in the world last 
year, totaling about 8 percent of 
the country’s output 

“We’re hoping that an increase 
in foreign business will more than 
offset the impact on Thais,” said 
Pinthida Bhatayanond, marketing 
director of a six-story mall aimed 
at high-end shoppers. 


Jakarta Curbs Tariffs and Lending 


Conpdrd by Ovr Staff Frrm i Disptncha 

JAKARTA — The government 
unveiled an economic deregulation 
package Monday, cutting tariffs on 
1,600 items but introducing mea- 
sures to limit real-estate loans. 

The coordinating minister for 
economics, finance and supervisor 
of development, Saleh Afiff, said at 


a news conference that the govern- 
ment was cutting tariffs on 1,600 
items — 1,461 manufactured 
products, 136 agricultural products 
and three items in the health sector. 

The tariff cuts follow a call by the 
World Bank for Indonesia to step up 
the deregulation of its economy. Mr. 
Afiff said the package would do just 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong Singapore 

Hang Seng Straite.Times 

17000 - 2250 k 

16000 — • 2200*^— 

■“ AT 2100-V-A — 

woo - - yy 

13000 ■ U V-/ - 2000 V— ^r- 

12000 p- M - A m j J • 1950 F M A Ikij J 

1997 1997 

Exchange index Mondte 


.15000 vjft— 

14000 - - fX - 
13000^V-/ - • - - 

12000 FMA MJj 
1997 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 


21000 

20000 

19000 ji- -J 

18000 A V- 


F M A ft* J J' 17000 F M A M J J 


1997 

Monday . Prev. % 

Close : r : • Ctoee . Change 

Ho»g Kong Hang Seng 14JJ58£B t4,S2<L97 +024 

Singapore SUmts Times 1,99739 1.985.94 +0.81 

Sydney 1 AH Ordinaries ,2.713.00 2,733.40 -075 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 ia,7tlS.i7 19,98810 -122 

Kuala UimpurComposite ■ 1,06053 t,07&31- -1.19 

Bang kok SET 633,03 6g7.Q9 -3.68 

Seoul Composite Indax 7732x1 779.24 ' -0.74 

Taipei StOCkM&rke* Index 92*22-84 9,258.63 . +0 SB 

ManBa PSE 2,753.15 2,758.96 -0.21 

Jakarta Composite Index Mi 736.60 +0.19 

Wellington fjZSEjO ' 2,513.78 2,526.65 -051 

Bombay Sensitive index 4,291.45 4,323.82 -0.75 


738X11 736.60 +0.19; 

2,513,76 2,526.65 -051; 
4,291.45 4,323.82 -0.75 i 


Source: Tetekurs 


Ina-nviji <ul H.iald InfojiK - 


that and would help business and 
stimulate economic growth and ef- 
ficiency. 

He also said that as of next Mon- 
day the central bank would not give 
credit for land or real-estate devel- 
opment The World Bank has ex- 
pressed concern about soaring prop- 
erty loans. ( Reuters . Bloomberg) 


Very brief lys 

• D-Brain Securities Co., Japan's first brokerage to offer 
trading on the Internet in stocks of unlisted start- up compa- 
nies, will begin its service in August with shares of eight 
venture businesses. A ban on trading in stocks of unlisred 
companies was lifted at the beginning of July.* 

• Singapore's output of manufactured goods fell 1.6 percent 
in May as electronics production fell. The report came after the 
government announced that non-oil exports, a closely 
watched indicator, fell an unexpected 1.1 percent in May. 

• Syarikat Binaan Budi Sawmill Bhd.'s shares more than 
doubled in price in their debut on the Kuala Lumpur stock 
exchange. The Malaysian timber company's shares climbed 
as high as 9.10 ringgit f$3.61) from an offering price of 3.10 
before closing at 7.70. 

• Taiwan’s exports fell in June from May after an outbreak of 
hoof-and-mouth disease on pig farms hammered pork sales. 
Exports fell 2 percent, to $9.96 billion last month from $10.16 
billion the month before, but the figure was still up 2.7 percent 
from June 1996. 

• MasterCard International Inc. will have more payment 
cards in China than in the United States during the next 
decade, the company said. China is already MasterCard's 
second-largest market, with more than 13 million cards and 
transactions totaling $75 billion in 1996. 

• Kong Wah Holdings Ltd., a Hong Kong television maker, 

agreed to pay 960,000 Hong Kong dollars ($124,0001 in 
damages to members of the Business Software Alliance for 
using illegal software. Bloomberg 


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Japan May End Phone Restrictions 

Lifting of 2 Bans Could Make International Calls Cheaper Monster 




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A dealer signaling during the Nikkei’s 1*3 percent drop Monday after the 
bankruptcy of a contractor reignited concern in Japan about bad loans. 


i Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Japan may lift a bon on 
Internet-based . phone services next 
month, an official at the Ministry of 
Posts and Telecommunications dis- 
closed Monday, a move that could re- 
duce the cost of calls to the United States 
by as much as 90 percent 
Hie minisiiy will also scrap restric- 
tions later this year to allow bulk leasing 
of phone lines owned by Japanese in- 
ternational phone service companies, 
the official said. 

Both steps would give new compet- 
itors access to local phone networks 
connecting millions of Japanese homes 
and offices. 

The moves are a blow to KDD Co., 
the nation's biggest international phone 
company, which once bad a monopoly 
over international phone services from 
Japan. KDD shares fell 0.5 percent to 
7^610 yen ($67.34). 

KDD’s pretax profit fell by a third last 
year as customers switched to “call- 
back* ’ companies, which ring back from 
cheaper, overseas destinations. Those 
rivals — including AT&T Corp. of the 
United Slates — charge as little as about 
50 yen a minute for calls between the 
United States and Japan. KDD charges 
an average of around nine times that 
Internet phone technology has been 
plagued by reliability problems. KDD 
will suffer less from the debut of this 
service, analysts said, than from such 
experienced competitors as AT&T and 


British Telecommunications PLC using 
leased lines. 

Companies providing service using 
lines leased from KDD or Japan's two 
other international phone service pro- 
viders will be able to offer consumers 
discounts of 30 to 50 percent, said Tod 
Wood, analyst in the Tokyo Office of 
ING Baring Securities (Japan) Ltd. 

“That’ll probably have a much larger 
impact on revenue and profit than the 
Internet will,” he said of the effects on 
KDD. 

Because the supply of lines for in- 
ternational long-distance service ex- 
ceeds the demand, KDD and the other 
Japanese providers. International Tele- 
com Japan Inc. and IDC Co., will not 
balk at leasing out their lines at dis- 
counted rates to bulk users, Mr. Wood 
said. 

Hisao Horinouchi, Minister of Posts 
and Telecommunications, will address 
the topic at a speech at a conference on 
global information networks at the 
European Union ministerial meeting in 
Brussels. 

KDD has forecast an 18 percent drop 
in pretax profit to 17 billion yen for the 
business year ending next March. The 
company has about two-thirds of the 
286 bilUon yen market in Japan for 
international phone calls. 

■ New Worry Over Bad Loans 

Japanese stocks fell after the bank- 
ruptcy of a medium-sized contractor 


reignited concern about bad loans. The 
Associated Press reported. 

The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average 
dropped 262.83 points, or 1 .3 percent, to 
19,705.17. 

On Friday, the average fell 153.41 . or 
0.76 percent. 

The failure of the general contractor 
Tokai Kogyo Co. was a reminder to 
investors that Japan ’s bad- Loan problem 
extends far beyond the nation's big 
banks, traders said. 

It was feared the bankruptcy, with an 
estimated debts of 510 billion yen. 
would affect the company's 700 as- 
sociates and 3,500 subcontractors, 
while forcing banks to write off loans to 
the contractor. 

Tokai Kpgyo filed for bankruptcy 
with 510 billion yen in debt, mainly 
from nonperforming real estate loans. It 
was the fourth listed company to fail this 
year and the first listed general con- 
tractor to go under since the end of 
World Warn. 

The company specialized in building 
refrigerated warehouses, but it was an 
ill-timed foray into real estate devel- 
opment in the late 1 980s that left it with 
a mountain of debt 

The Finance Ministry has said Ja- 
pan’s financial system was burdened 
with about 29 trillion yen in bad loans as 
of March 31. 

That estimate, however, did not in- 
clude soured loans at hundreds of real 
estate and construction companies. 


Agcnee France-Prcsse 

TOKYO — Bandai Corp. an- 
nounced Monday the launching of 
an electronic pet called Digital 
Monster to capitalize on the world- 
wide success of its Tamagotchi, a 
chick-like “virtual pet" that re- 
quires diligent feeding, cleaning 
and nurturing. 

Owners of the “virtual mon- 
sters" can link their digital toys and 
let two creatures battle it out, 
Bandai said. During the growth 
process of the monster, players 
must supply it with plenty of “pro- 
tein," organize workouts for it in 
preparation for fighting and treat 
any injuries after a match. 

The well-being of the monsters 
depends on bow many battles they 
win and the quality* of medical care 
they get afterward, Bandai said. 

Digital Monster, which had its 
debut in late June, is priced at 1 J980 
yen ($17). Lhe same price as the 
Tamagotchi. Bandai said it expec- 
ted to sell 1.5 million units by the 
end of the year. 

Bandai has sold 10 million 
Tamagotchis in Japan since the vir- 
tual pet began to be marketed in 
November. * An English-language 
version has proved popular in mar- 
kets ranging from Singapore. Hong 
Kong and Bangkok to New Yor£ 
London and Rome. 



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World Wide Web: http://www.sci am.com. 






'Alvo- ^ (Trs.. 
























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PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 



Monday 4 p.m. 

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IJ 25 3494 30ft 19ft W* .ft 

_ 70 804 SS 1 * 3414 35 ‘ ft 

__ 630 12ft 12 ft 13ft *ft 

_ 42 3500 3S 33ft 33ft _ 


= IK“* 


.. _ 91 


__ 151 38ft 3/ft 38ft t ft 

Mf U 26 316 46Vi 45ft 45ft —ft 
_ _ 860 u 46 V, 43 ft 45V, * 1ft 
„ 17 7495 31 ft 39ft J9ft— 2*4 
_ 141»11 TTftft 

“ ^ ' fe8 U 25 
U 2930 10th 

- 6106 40 
58 7913 32'* 

_ 2791 25ft 
10 782 27ft 

- 668 14<k 


74ft 1ft 


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. _ 30ft —Ik 
Jft 21ft— Ift 
31ft 27 
13ft 14ft ift 



. _ _ . 74k ii • _ . 

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7ft 36ft 37 —ft 
(ft 30 38ft * ft 


14 2311 23ft 2lt*3! L Vu *Vu. 
35 1488 331k 32ft 37ft ilk 

45 1043 40 39ft 40 

3610830 56*. 54 54ft ift 

25 H l» UU IM ‘D 

_ 116(0 u 75ft 7]ft 74ku i Jft 

„ 14449 27ft 

_ 757 10ft 

_ 2N 37ft 

£3 14 2165 28ft .. 

a $ m t ?? _ 

_ _ 39ft — 

U 79 136 76ft 26 36 -ft 

_ 40 6271 32ft Sift 32ft ift 

_ 26 2343 (Oft 10 10ft iVi. 

„ 31 892 30ft 19ft 30ft ift 

l!3 14 293llSPfti *ft59W u 
_ 30l277 u3Sft 34ft 35 1 * ift 
_ _ 8096 lift 31ft 21ft —ft 
_ 4421881 J6ft JSft 36 ift 
J1 e 1.0 21 9101 TOVh 19 20ft * 1ft 
_ _ 341 27ft 27ft 37ft ift 


_ 2031205 lift 


„ _ 1550 7ft 
_ ft 832 40ft 
1.4 TO 24*4 
120 


25ft J3*i 23*i—lft 


Oft 9 

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- 1223635 13ft dllh .... 

_ 40 8018 30ft 27ft 28ft —ft 
_ - 339 »ft 8 8 —ft 

_ _ 1784 74ft 74 34ft i*u 

.. 56 1004 70V> 19*4 2Dft _ 

.. . 4714 33ft 32ft 33* u ift. 

_ >7 4477 I) 1 Oft 10‘S ift 
.. 45 415 22ft 21ft 31ft —ft 
_ 14 16904 9Vh Oft 9i/ u -Vi, 

_ fl 114 371* 37ft 32ft ift 
.. _ 1667 »ft 5ft 8ft — Vi, 
.. .. 2761 18ft lfft 1 7*4/1, — Vo 

_ _ 479 8ft 7ft 8 —ft 

_ .. 3740 I'm, ty- 1 

_ 6 1000 79ft 29 V. 39ft —ft 

_ 94 625 64*1, 63ft 64 —1ft 
_ 40 646 19 18 IS*!, «l 

_ 31 1(18 Sift 57 — 


_ ‘335 3ift ja 

_ 19 677 76ft fift 


_ 71 1264 U38 34ft 
•' 639. J. Vn 


I 41 w* ST’ftr 59ft 
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: M IB/W-U* 

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NYSE 


Monday 4 p.m. Close 

(Continued) 


rtdi Urn 9nd. 


Ow >M PE IQOt l*9»i law Loft* Ov< 



4 § • # ’i k :S 

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_ 4162 33ft 33ft 
J7 11U 25ft 25 



_ 735 7616 S5V» 7Sft — 1 

19 WUglJ 46ft 46ft ♦»* 


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23<Vi,134iCanKU 
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35 3itkC0mrrrat 
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39ft J2ftQirnRBIi 
T8ft 21 CmoBncs 
50ft ItftCompo™ 
70ft athCimxfSrv 
12t4 4 Onpcm 
39ft 10 Cmptttts 


631 lift lift 
_ .. 68 34ft 34V, 

82b U 14 170 47 4*S 

30 1.0 15 111 1916 1994 

M 1.7 18 1266 37ft 36ft 

■ w " « 's» sa sss .. . . 

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_ 81 2954 JBft 3Sft 375h , |ft 

47 1489 40ft 39 39ft —ft 

291 2414 Oft 24 -ft, 

5171 47ft 45** 45ft— Ift 



_ 33 


28*4 12ft L.._ 

28ft 17ft CoorsB 
lift 7 CorTher 
379. 16ft CroSlrtf 5 
37ft flftCoro&DS 
35V,, I6ftCo5tCO 
IT'Vb 6ft Cot* Cp 
16ft 6ftGoven«v 
29ft IvftCritrBfl 
13ft SftCrBioMol 
20ft 3ftCreTdJO 
30ft lOftCrwEvt 
29 V, kft&OACD 
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43ft TSWCuBnPr 
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X UViCVTir Co 

8ft 40uCy*Dgn 

31ft llftCvtvc 


55 1726 Zlti — .... 

16 163 17 I6'k 16ft —ft 

.. 3360 16'k 15ft l6V-,r*fa 

7 766 15ft 15ft 15ft ' 'S 

19 1402 36ft 36 »h 26ft —ft 
_ 3053 10ft 8ft Wu— Ift 
43 590 27ft Tkft «« _ 

_ 641B 14ft U* u 14** — *u 


I'sSiiS 


3477437 32ft 30 .. 

.. 1813 WV* 10ft I0« 

_ 2£B 15 14lk 14ft —ft 
22 WOO 7T& 16*4 76ft —44 

.. 770 7 **« V* -ft 

70 100*1 17ft 17 17ft *16 

30 638 20ft 771, 38 

1334615 12ft 12 12ft —ft 

_ 822 24 30ft 23ft 4 2ft 
17 255 42 41ft 41 v, — 

79 594 30ft 291, 39ft —ft 

60 2976 16 15 15 —1 

_ 362 17ft I* 16ft -ft 
SB 3757 53ft rtft 57' < ,7ft 
13 21Mt 70ft 20 20 'A >V| 

_ ASM CTjlMh 4ft -V* 
.. 979 ?7 75ft 76ft * ft 


[»-E-P 


44ft in. DO Grp 
33ft 17ft DSC _ 

31ft 6 DSPCm 
43t* 17 ft DT hub 
44ft SMhDoWVIIC 
46ft 23ft Duka 
32ft 5ft OtaDtmm 
29ft 15V, DWProc 
2416 15ft Dotascpe 
34ft 13 ft CW CSV 
74ft 5 DafdRce 
36 JftDciwn 
45ft 26ftDaupbn 
38ft 14ft Dove&B 
35ft 15ft Dawns 
34 15V,DovRun 
36ft UftDeriJne 
123ft 13ft Dancers 
rft 6ftDen,iTe 
55 37ft Dentscty 


. 55 738 43ft 47ft«»', l ,V|, 
,. -78968 22ft 71ft 21*4 —ft 
.. 24 8049 12ft lift 12ft >W 

.08 1 16 476 36 15ft JSft 

.. M 780 40 39 39 

.170 J 54 3103 40ft 30ft 19ft — ft 

_ 76 5601 25 22ft 22ft— 1ft 

.. 36 416 23ft 23 O'k *ft 

_ 46 566 19 ft H 19 -ft 

_ - 1827 19*4 17ft 18ft * 3% 

_ .. 1450 17ft lift lift * ft 

9 1199 34ft J?ft 34ft *ft 


120 


ii 19 3431 41ft 47ft 42ft —ft 

.. 30 540 271k 26ft 77ft —ft 

„ 37 437 35V, 331* 33ft —ft 

_ a 845 14 n 33K • V. 

- 9 7036 22". ii 221k 229, , _J/„ 


9ft 15ft Drtloalc 
17 SftDtanM 
38ft lOftDtoMK 
70ft lIftDhne?i> 
5414 31 v, Domex 
1814 aftDisermr 
28*4 161% DrSakxn n 
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51 23 PirTree 


53 ft 22 44 [_ 

19ft BftDresB 
63 17ftDuP0MP 
47ft 19ftDurrtft 
X 19ft DurcobiH 


26ft B'4ET rater 
30ft 14ft EG Td 


JS'k ISft ESCM fd 
35 1 -', BftESSTacJin 
30ft 13ft EjffVri 
31 17U.I3eUSAS 
33ft lOftEctioSW 
26ft SftEdfvCP 
36 Vk WVtEnslnNn 
42ft lSftEVSo 
77ft 17 Hctrols 
39ft 19ft BcArr 
51'%, 22ft ERl s 
25 fli Qusvs 
38 ft 18ft EVron 
39ft I TV. EmCnc 
37V, BftEmlsTel' 
53ft 30 EmmUBd 
28ft 3ftEmpvSs 
37ft SftEraneton 
46ft 16ftEncoa 
42ft 30ft Envoy 


.. 16 51580 u 1251* l» 135ft ,3ft 
.. 125 16V, 16 16ft rft 
J7 .7 19 2796 SOft 49ft 49ft - 

l.OOe 4J 17 381 Eft 31 ft 23*',, — ft, 

_ 30 585 78ft 2744 77ft —ft 

_ _ 3031! 7*4 7ft 74,1, * ti* 

_ 39 7177 27ft 27 7T‘ —Vt 

Mo - - 134 19ft 19ft 1944 iv, 

_ 36 2T5 50t. 50‘c SH* . ft 

.. 3881 17ft lift lift • ft 
_ .. 3786 38 36ft 9ft *t 
- 73 923 25ft 244. 24ft - 

. 38 1655 SO’4 48ft 48V. -Ift 

44 10 17 44ft 45 *U 46 'ft 

.. 1067 53ft 52 52ft 'ft 

_ 16 1310 19ft 19ft 19ft —ft 

_ _ 155 55ft S4ft 59/,, • >6. 

_ 63 6606 Oft 414* Oft —ft 

1.9 It 216 ?7 *b 28*1 »W|, —ft 
_ _ 7930 18ft 17ft 18ft _ 

3 20 640 29ft 284, 2Bft —ft 

_ 7206 77ft 25*k 77ft » |ft 

.. 10 8291 lift, 13ft 14ft 'ft 
25 3046 23ft 73ft 73ft —ft 
_ 37 70s 36 24*. 25ft,— lift 

. 378 16 15ft 15ft .ft 

.. 784 744. 13*4 14 - 44 


- 34 


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33 7005 24ft 24*4 74V, — *„ 

37 15568 36ft 14*4 35>V„ * ift, 

38 4144 rtft 48 48ft -ft 

70 851 19ft 14 18*4 .ft 

2i s« n 28 1 * aft -ft 

54 T9M 38ft 27ft aft —ft 
.. 144 21 ft 30ft 20*a . ft 
33 1323 41*. Oft Oft , 1ft 
17 1945 S' ' Sft Wt, — *„ 
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177 41 40ft. Ift 

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i 14 13*4 


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.. 39 1900 32ft 31ft 32ft .'-1 
.. 18 1794 14ft 14V, 14ft ,V„ 

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19 17n U 3l 

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19ft 19ft «ft 


39th liii FwrionSy 

_ S 4S23 XVh 39VU 39th .. 

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nft OftGasanlcs 
27 11 QdTBxn 

31 fftGflrrnrr 

a 4k lSftGonNutr 
26ft 16 Gcmek 
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17ft SftGealfi 

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2144 10’kGidLcw 
37ft lSftGKolSd 
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264k 17ft 

36 ISftGtabrtsirs 
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3544 25V> GdFnO 
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34 19ftS<ennd 


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752 1944 18 1 * 19ft 



- -11746 

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_ 16 118 _ 
_ 16 278 22 


17ft —ft 
.. _ 7»u +Jft 
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27ft 27T»*— 0 
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A _ -37 2trV„ 20ft 20ft 
_ 60 252 33 3744 32ft —44 

_ -- 224* 2744 7SVu 25ft— 1ft 
47 16ftl6>Vu »ft, 

8 46 744k 7491 —ft 
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30 ft 
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67 14 HQA 


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32ft ufi Harbors 
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55*4 36ft MtCnx 
1744 7th HtltWynT 
37ft 16 HOTlprr 
561* 27ft HdfeC 


- 16 
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- 23 453 

401 IJB 23 2S1 _ . _ 

J a .9 25 631 21ft Tlkii 71ft —ft 

20 8 16 648 26*6 76ft 76ft —ft 

.01 i . 36 73 2»Vi 79 29 

81k _ » 10 aft 20ft 28ft —4k 
_ 3402 23 22 72*1 * W 

- - 1 057 16*4 16 1* —ft 

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- 20 4wn 74ft 24ft 24ft 'ft 

_ 50 1614 77ft K 76ft * Ift 

08 .1 5212S39 71ft 

M ° r t 1*8 Is .... 

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54ft 77ftHonkid 
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- „ 2032 64ft 63ft 63 — 16k 

- ^ 607 6 5Uk, 514 

- .. 412 2914 a »ft — ft 

-. 71 653 17ft 16ft 17 ift 

M 18 17 15 37 36ft 37 —ft 

- 34 1953 Bft 54ft SS 'ft 

- - 973 u 17ft 1611k, 171k 'I 

_ _ 214} 16th 16ft 16ft —ft 

- - 1680 0 5*66 56ft SB 'Ift 

- 23 1 593 It 771* »■* —ft 

1.40 13 73 1344 47ft 40ft 41th .. 

_ 43 6140 36ft 35V, 36ft ■ 1 

40 14 12 1S3S 1714 171% I7tk —ft. 

_ 58 5519 22ft 2 Hh 22 ,1k 

- 19 6785 23ft M lift— Ift 

J6 12 21 687 46*1 45ft 44V„— Jft, 

- - 450 HW 37ft 31ft ,1 

_ _ 3Sn m\ 2*ft24>v, t *>/„ 

JO 1 4 27 417 141* lift 14ft, — *,. 

80b 2.7 16 3553 Xft aft Xft 'ft 

_ 13 MSS 27 36 2614 'ft, 

_ 2g nth 23ft 73h 'ft 


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59ft 70*4 Maun 
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28ft 27*4 

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20 4194 14ft Uft Mft — .. 

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52 IktbMedicbS 
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37** 19 Merrtec 
35 1 * 16ft MenWhB 
32 ft M*4Mcma 
15*4 iftMenlGr 
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9 938 a Wft 29ft —ft 


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35 IO*kMicraAae 
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75 ft 3 ft Micron B 

47** 18ft Micros 
1514 8 m3ctT1 


220 25 
29 5 


1277 23ft 22ft Z2ft — h 


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a*k H'7,i — 

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37ft 76,150 inti 
26 ljft Dms 
6ft lkiiLfTRfm 
75 UftlmuCBS 
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41ft liftlmunc* 

33 llftlmnct 
27*4 lift InipCrds 

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40ft 15ft InaCom 
Xft II Inbrmds 
74V, j?*, meyte 
45ft IlftbUMK-Bn 

16*4 11 MoRn 


_ »5 17ft lift I7> 'ft 

- 2684 36 jlft 32ft— 2 4 
_ 1032 19*4 1B14 19 1 /, 'ft 

- 1480 296, 34ft 74ft 'ft 

19 3876 13ft IW» Iff* * ft 
49 1297 Mft 33ft 34 — ■« 

16 W 32V. 30ft 31ft 'ft 

19-1475 18ft 1714 17ft —ft 
-29096 Ilftdl0ftl0=*»— !V B 


.1 246 


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169** ii'slrne, 

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lift HklMdeO 
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?5ft 13'/^ tmrtcm 


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17ft loft infmne 
SI’h 15ft tnmiwkn 
35ft 12ft IrVemeur 

fc^issr- 

33ft lift Invocore 
23ft 171* lonaTchn 
70*1 lift Isis 

5ftIi25E&* 

aft 7ft JPMCnn 
87 V, 8ft Jabil 

I*®: 

Wft 71 


„ STD M 5ft SW* — V'u 
_ _ 5656 u <3ft 38V, 43'* .3ft 

- 49 1741 31ft 31 31ft 'ft 

J2e 7J) _ 2935 71ft 28ft 20ft — «i 

- 7* 483 75ft 24ft TSVi, '»« 

_ 17 6887 M 31ft 32ft —ft 

_ 46 549 ll Sit 31ft 32ft 'IW 

_ _ 6BS £3 Ik 62 62ft — V, 

_ _ 1339 42ft 40ft 42*4 — 1 ft 

_ - 473 Mft lift lift 'ft 

_ -13242 9ft, fit 9 — ti, 

- - 1205 24ft 25ft 24 'ft 

IB 2S26 29Vi H", 2«ft 'ft 

24 2779 16 33 33V, —ft 

_ 7107 27ft 70ft 2114 

.. - 4834 10ft lOftKPkn — ft, 
.. _ 4517 25V. 74ft 74*h —ft 

- - 349 8 7=fr Wk — Vc 

_ 21 627 17ft lift lift —ft 

J41 ja 101189 149 145*4 |47*h 1 Hi, 

10B<7 IOTIYw 105 1 ', 107 '2ft 

_ _ 1927 411a 4»k. 411ft *Vj, 

- _ 4348 7>*\, 2'.',, 2»* —ft 

a 1044 71ft 191* 19ft— 1ft 

17 4440 Oft 27ft 33 

- 7® 8th 8*4 8ft 

_ _ 1397 Jlft aft 31 . 

.16 I2> 9 507 lift 15ft lift *ft 

_ _ 541 24 aft 731k. - 

- „ 46SS 19ft 17ft 18ft —ft 

_ 17 1033 9ft 9ft «r H 'i/i, 

1038 25’ . Mft 74V„ - Vi, 

786 23ft 7?V. 2?ft -ft 

7141 »ft 19*4 20*h - ■ 

1109 lift 14 14ft:— *s 

aa 76 ’ < 25ft 26 

1373 34 37ft 33ft —ft 

_ 530 37 ft 35ft 36ft 'ft 

42 4443 u9Jft 85th 91ft > Sft 
_ 1106 J8Yu aft 37ft -ik. 

18 607 16ft 15*i lift ift 


Ji 1.1 17 4440 


05 J ii 


- 43 




54ft 17ft i 
I, 19V, KOST 5 !* n 
ft 15’r.Vemd 
33ft 21ft KeySFn s 
19ft 13*4 Kk 


_ - 376 13V. 13W 13V. —ft 
4 36132708 Bft 71 271i— 15 1 .’, 
- 26 5137 17ft lift 17ft 


36V, 1SV,, Komoo 
35ft BvKvldce 


1.» 


2813065 54ft JJ.4,, 54ft. — > 

_ 76 28ft 78 28ft *1* 

25 (89 34V. 74ft 24ft — V„ 
17 582 Eft 31*4 71 'ft 

33 380 u 19ft 18ft 18th * V,, 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 


PAGE 1 




































































































































INTEHMmVVL 


PAGE 18 


Sports 


. * 


a. 


TUESDAY JULY 8 , 199 V 


World Roundup 



Rill Vidivnc taoadcJ Pnrn 

Shane Warne appealing in vain 
for John Crawley’s wkkeL 


Australia Levels 
Ashes Test Series 


CMCKET Australia quickly 
wrapped up the third test Monday, 
capturing the remaining five Eng- 
lish wickets in an hour and a half to 
win the match by 268 runs and 
square the six-match series, 1-1. 
England, on 130 runs for five 


wickets overnight, were all out for 
200. The fast bowler Glenn Mc- 


Grath took four of the five wickets. 
Among his victims was John Craw- 
ley, England's top scorer, who un- 
luckily trod on his wicket after 
making 83. 

McGrath also dismissed Mark 
Ealham, Robert Croft and Darren 
Gough. Spin bowler Shane Warne 
ended the match by having Andy 
Caddick caught for 17. ( Reuters ) 


Johnson Starts for AL 


baseball Randy Johnson, 
dominating batters again only 10 
months after back surgery, was 
picked to start Tuesday night's All- 
Star game when Joe Torre, the Yan- 
kees manager, named die Araer- 
ican-League lineup Monday. 

Johnson will be opposed by Greg 
Maddux, named Monday by Bobby 
Cox of die Atlanta Braves as the 
National League's starter for the 
game in Cleveland. 

It will be the second All-Sta£ 
start for both pitchers. 1 

Torre picked Brady Anderson to 
lead off and play left, followed by 
shortstop Alex Rodriguez, center 
fielder Ken Griffey Jr., first base- 
man Tino Martinez, designated hit- 
ter Edgar Martinez, right fielder 
Paul O’Neill filling in for the injured 
David Justice, thud baseman Cal 
Ripken, catcher Ivan Rodriguez and 
second baseman Roberto Alomar. 

Cox opens with second baseman 
Craig Biggio. The next two hitters 
are Tony Gwynn and Barry Bonds, 
who will either be the designated 
hitter or the left fielder. 

“Whatever they feel.” Cox 
said. 

Catcher Mike Piazza hits 
cleanup, followed by first baseman 
Jeff Bagwell, Walker, third base- 
man Ken Caminiri, center fielder 
Ray Lankford filling in for the in- 
jured Kenny Lofton, and shortstop 
Jeff Blauser filling in for the injured 
Barry Larkin. (AP) 


Yugoslavia Triumphs 


BASKETBALL Yugoslavia beat 
Italy, 61-49, in Barcelona for its 
second consecutive European Bas- 
ketball Championship and fourth in 
the last five years.' 

The forward Dejan Bodiroga led 
Yugoslavia's balanced attack Sun- 
day with 14 points. Carlton Myers 
led Italy with 17 points. \AP) 


Without Compelling Rivalries, Tennis Is a 



hurr national Herald Tribune 

W IMBLEDON, England — 
Wimbledon restored confi- 
dence in the game's Nos. 1, 
Pete Sampras and Martina Hingis, as 
well as created the promise that the 
world's oldest tournament will benefit 
from the home support for Tim Henman 
and Greg Rusedski, who should be Brit- 
ish contenders for years to come. 

But the sport is still in trouble. 
Sampras's fourth Wimbledon title in 
five years, and his 10th Grand Slam 
championship overall (leaving him two 
short of Roy Emerson's career record), 
probably won't uplift the doldrums of 
American tennis. Television ratings are 
down, and the sport simply doesn’t 
know bow to sell itself in more in- 
ventive ways, in part because its public 
relations are abysmal. So it all comes 
down to Sampras. 

But it seems clear that he won’t be- 
come a star in the United States until the 
end of his career, when he is vulnerable 
and the public latches onto him as it did 
to Timmy Connors at the end Until then, 
Sampras could use a colorful American 


Vantage Point/ 1 an Thomsen 


rival, allowing him to thrive in the role 
of straight man. But he doesn't see that 
happening anytime soon. 

4 *I think die Americans are really go- 
ing to have to enjoy whar they have right 
now," Sampras said “because I really 
don't see anyone coming up who's going 
to do what I’ve done and Andre (Agassi.) 
and Jim (Courier) and Michael 
(Chang)." Then he called for Agassi to 
end his honeymoon with Brooke Shields 
and come back to work. Well, Sampras 
didn't put it quite that way. 

“In the United States, you need a 
rivalry, you need some different per- 
sonalities, and when we match up we 
have that. Andre and I," Sampras said 
“People that don't follow tennis will 
follow te nnis to watch that match. For 
the past couple of years, we really 
haven’t had that in tennis.’’ 

Adding to the damage was last 
week's retirement from Grand Siam 
tennis of Boris Becker. Without Becker 
and Steffi Graf, herself considering re- 


tirement as she recovers from recent 
knee surgery, the German TV market 
has suddenly become vulnerable. If it 
crumbles, then all of Europe will suffer. 
Germany is the economic heart of Euro- 
pean tennis. 

“He's brought a lot of money to the 
game, especially in Germany with all the 
TV money, and he's the Michael Jordan 
of Germany,” Sampras said of Becker. 


T HE MEN’S TOUR has tried to 
react to these long-developing 
problems by announcing a break- 
through proposal for ranking its players. 
It seems, however, that Mari: Miles, the 
ATP Tour’s chief executive, failed to 
predict the response of European play- 
ers, agents and tournament directors. 
They claimed with justification, that 
the ATP Tour's restructuring plans had 
been formulated without seeking their 
advice. They argued that the tour was 
run by Americans and led by American 
players who treated Europe as a gold 


mine. Miles has since retreated and be- 
gun seeking their input. 

Yet the core of his (dan is a good one. 
First, he wants all of the top men players 
to enter all four of the Grand Slam 
tournaments — or face a lowering of 
their ranking'tf they refuse. No longer, 
then, could so many of the top clay-court 
g pOTaHsTfi refuse to play Wimbledon, as 
happened this year. 

In addition, the best players would be 
expected to appear at the eight most 
prestigious ATP Tour events. This 
woulaallow fans to start making sense of 
the tennis season. They could start look- 
ing forward to those 12 tournaments each 
year thar have real value. At the moment, 
the ATP Tour seems to be less a tour and 
more a sanctioned free-for-all ^ with 
many of the top players openly referring 
to tour events as mere preparatory tour- 
naments for the Grand slams. 

The current ranking system, based on a 
complicated points system that carries 
over from one year to the next, also needs 
overhaul Miles has suggested, wonder- 
fully, that all players start each year with 
zero points. Then the ranking system 


W ouId become a race from the start to see.* 
who finishes No. 1. The clay-court play- 
er* might take the early l ead». bpt all-rvi 
around champions like Sampras could >; 
overtake them by the end of the year, 

The problem will be to negotiate'-: 
which eight tournaments are. graded as 
the ATP Tour’s elite. ^ 

There have also been outcries. mat met.- 
new plan will reward the top playerswith-. ^ *-■ 
even more money. Miles would like to' ; 
see more nine-day ATP Tour . evrat*; - : 
paired with the women’s tour, as hap-^T 
heos at the Upton in Key Biscayne.-*-. 
Florida, but his critics say most sites laefc 
the facilities to put on a tournament for- "* 
men and women simultaneously - 
even floating the idea that the French^'; - 
Open and Wimbledon adjust their dates: k;.. 
to create a larger window than thecunenE 1 "-’ / 

....MMnn rium /hormrsl • ' Jf ; . 


two weeks separating them (honors). 
A system forcing tb 


„ je best players to?! 

meet each other a dozen times a year T 


meet caui uuia a - j— 

would create rivalries naturally, helping 
tennis become the second truly globaT 


league, after Formula One. If nothing- 
changes, te nnis might dwindle into a-y‘ 
game made up of regional heroes. 



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Sprinter Staying Cool 
Under Tour’s Pressure 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 


sprit 

the 


PARIS — In 1994, when he was the 
fastest amateur sprinter in France, the 
winner of 21 bicycle races in six 
months, Gordon Fraser picked up the 
nickname of Flash Gordon. The next 
few seasons, after he turned profes- 
sional, he became just plain Goid. 

“Three years without a win is a long 
time.” the Canadian admitted in an in- 
terview. “Especially for a sprinter. I 
went from where I was winning almost 
every week to getting my butt kicked 
eveiy race.” 

He sounded relaxed as be talked 
about his chances, and those of his Mu- 
tuelle de Seine et Marne team, in the 
84th Tour de France. Boosted by 
Fraser’s first professional victory, in a 
int in the Midi Libre race last month, 
ie minor French team found itself 
among the 22 selections for the Tour. 

■ y“I feel excited,” Fraser said. “We’re 
a small team, andthere’s a lot of pres- 
sure on me since I’m one of the main 
sources of results for the team. But now 
that I’ve got the win in the Midi Libre, 
the monkey is off my back.” 

He showed that Sunday by finishing 
seventh in the mass sprint into Forges 
les Eaux at the end of the Tour’s first 
daily stage. Fraser will have other 
chances for the next week, which will 
cover the flat territory where sprinters 
traditionally shine. Then the race enters 
the mountains, where they don't 

“The seventh place was very en- 
couraging,” he said. He finished just 
behind such big names as Mario 
Cipqilini, Tom Steels, Frederic Moc- 
cassin and Erik Zabel. 

Those are some of the men that 
Fraser, a 28-year-old native of Ottawa, 
will be dueling with. “I belong now, 
and hopefully..." he said, letting the 
words trail away. 

This is his first major Tour after he 
spent two fruitless years with the Mo- 
torola team. “I wasn’t really riding so 
well then, so I didn’t give them much 
confidence in me,” he said. “It was a 
big team and sometimes guys just get 
lost. I wasn't progressing, wasn ’t riding 
well enough, so they didn’t put me into 
enough races.” 

His new team does not have that 
luxury, a fact that Fraser appreciates. 
“My first goal is just to finish and 
maybe get some high places, maybe win 
because sprinters are never satisfied un- 
less they win. So obviously. I’m looking 


to win, but I’d by lying if I said I 
wouldn't be satisfied with a top five or a 
top 10 finish.*’ 

To gain that, he will need more than 
hopes. “1 finally got placed perfectly in 
the Midi Libre win,” he said. “That's 
the real secret in sprinting: being in the 
right place with 500 meters to go.” 

The right place, he continued, is just 
behind a leadout man who shepherds the 
sprinter into the last kilometer, setting a 
fast pace while letting him save his 
energy by riding in the draft. It’s called 
riding on a wheel 

“You look at Cipoilini's team, and 
they're basically leadout men,” Fraser 
said. “They ride the last 20 kilometers 
together, and there are always one or 
two guys left with him to ride on a wheel 
in the last kilometer.” 

A leadout man is precisely what 
Fraser's Mutuelle de Seine et Mame 
team does not have. ‘ ‘ What our guys do 
to their maximum is keep me out of the 
wind and out, of the real fighting for 


wheels until they go as far as they can 
go,’’ Fraser said. “That’s usually with 


two or three kilometers to go, some- 
times further’’ as the pace accelerates 
beyond his teammates' abilities. 

"After that,” he added. “I just take 
care of myself. In pro sprinting, there’s 
so much etiquette involved. If you're on 
your leadout man. that's your spot and 
normally people don't mess with you. 
But if you’re by yourself, you really 
don't have a place and you have to keep 
your elbows out and that sort of thing. ’ ’ 
According to Fraser, the sprinters to 
watch in the Tour are Cipollini of the 
Saeco team, Steels of Mapei and Zabel 
of Telekom. “I think they're the lop 
three,” he said. “For the best possible 
place, you try to be behind them.” 

If not, Fraser would like to follow 
Moocassin of Gan or Adriano Baffi of 
U.S. Postal Service. "You’re going to 
be top 10 with them," he said, since they 
are usually near the front. All custom- 
arily begin sprinting with 250 or 300 
meters to go. Wheels to avoid are those 
of JeroeQ Blijlevens of TVM and Rob- 
bie Me E wen of Rabobank because they 
both ride like Fraser and customarily 
make their jump from behind as the race 
begins to run out of road. 

“Like them. I’ll probably try to start 
my sprint with 150 meters to go." 
Fraser said. "Thai's really late.” 
Whichever wheel he follows. Fraser 
insisted he would not be intimidated: 
“Not at all. We're here, we deserve our 
spot, the team and I." 


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ROYAL GUARD — Mario Cipollini, the Tour de France leader, riding in Monday’s 262-kilometer stage to-« 
Vire in Normandy. Cipollini, surrounded by his Saeco teammates, wore yellow shorts and rode a yellow bike to "' 
match the leader's jersey he won Sunday. He increased his overall lead by winning his second consecutive sprint-** 
finish, catching Erik Zabel of the Telekom team in the dosing yards and holding off Jeroen Blijlevens of TVM. !? 

VJ 


Bolivia and Ecuador: Slippery Slope 


Reuters 

Bolivia and Ecuador slipped on the 
road to the World Cup finals in the 
weekend’s South American qualifiers. 

Ecuador dropped two precious 
points Sunday as it was tied, I-i, in 
Venezuela in the oil city of Maracaibo, 
while Bolivia, beaten finalists in the 
Copa America last week, lost by 2- 1 to 
Peru, which kept on Chile’s tail. 

Chile, which hammered the fading 
Colombians, 4-1. in Santiago on Sat- 
urday, leapfrogged Ecuador. Bolivia 
and Uruguay in the continent's qual- 
ifying standings. 

Chile, the group's top goal scorer, 
jumped into fourth place and plays four 
of its remaining five games at home. 

Paraguay suffered its first home de- 
feat in four years, 2-1, to second- 
laced Argentina, it stays on top, but 
eads Argentina by one point. 


The top four teams in the group will 
qualify for France. Paraguay, Argen- 
tina and Colombia, which is level with 
Argentina, are well-placed. But after 


World Cup Soccer 


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Saturday's debacle, Colombia has 
taken one point from its last five 
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tiago was set up by a first-half hat-trick 
by Mareelo Salas. Two of his goals 
were set up by the striker Ivan Zarnor- 
ano, who also scored a last-minute pen- 
alty for his 10th goal of the qualifiers. 

Peru’s victory in Lima kept it level 
on points with Chile, but it has played 
a game more, and its goal difference is 
worse than Chile’s by 10. 

German Carty and Jose Soto put 
Peru two goals ahead, although 


Bolivia could have forced a draw. It 
pulled one goal back through Luis 
Cristaldo and missed an excellent 
chance to equalize. 

Bolivia’s chances of reaching a 
second successive World Cup look 
increasingly remote. 

In a game between the only two 
South American nations never to have 
played in a World Cup, Ecuador con- 
ceded an equalizer eight minutes from 
time against Venezuela, the bottom 
team in the group without a victory. 

In Asuncion. Argentina ' ended 
Paraguay’s 100 percent borne record in 
the qualifiers with first-half goals by 
Mareelo Gallardo, whose free kick 
crept in at the near post, and Juan Veron. 
Roberto Acuna replied with a second- 
half penalty. Gallardo atoned for his 
Copa America performance, where he 
took four penalties and missed two. 




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__ 

Showing Mental Toughness, * 
Woods Takes Western Open 


By Clifton Brown 

New York Times Service 


nice to win a tournament like that , be^* 
cause that’s what wins majors. You-'; 
probably hit the ball worse in majors'*’- 
because of sheer nerves. It’s nice to be_ ’ 
able to rely on your mind. 

“I had to play very patient golf. I was 
in the rough a lot. I had to be very patient-* . 
until I had an oppor tuni ty to be ag- ■ 
gressive. And when I had that oppor- j 
tunity, I took advantage.” 

The tournament turned in Woods’s” 1 
favor for good at the par-3, 192-yaid No. ~i 
14, where he made the day’s most dra--*" 
matic shot, nearly a hole in one. Woods-”’' 1 
hit a 9-iron shot off the tee that landed - 
perilously close to the right bunker. . * 

But this was his day. The slope of the 
ground kicked the ball back toward the. 
hole, across the green from right to left, 
and it rolled slowly toward the hole as - * 
the crowd roared. The ball stopped less 
than a foot away. He tapped in for a— 
birdie, taking a one-shot lead over No- 
btio. 

When Nobile realized that Woods had 
birdied both Nos. 14 and 15, he figured 
that the tournament was out of reach. 
Nobile shot two under par for the day, but 
that was not enough to rattle Woods’. 

Paired with Loren Roberts, Woods 
started the day in a three-way tie for first 
place with Roberts and Justin Leonard. 
Leonard made three bogeys in his first 
seven holes, finishing in a three-way tie 
for third place at nine underpar with Jeff 
Sluman and Steve Lowery. 


LEMONT, Illinois — Tiger Woods 
won the Western Open with a round of 
golf that displayed many of his remark- 
able gifts — savvy, mental toughness, 
length off the tee and a flair for the 
dramatic. 

When the final round started Sunday, 
at least 15 players had a legitimate 
chance to win. But when the day ended. 
Woods stood alone on top, showing 
again that when he senses victory, he is 
like a shark that smells blood. 

Shooting a four-under-par 68 for the 

lltn/4 nnH finichinn 1 1 niula, .1 


round and finishing 13 under par for the 
tournament (275), woods won by three 


Mllud > ‘ ill'IL'Ilr lilts 

Woods hitting an approach shot in 
the Western Open’s final round. 


strokes over Frank Nobilo. 

The first-place check of $360,000 
pushed Woods's career earnings to 
S2.55 1 ,627. He has won $1 ,761 .033 this 
year, making him almost a cinch to break 
Tom Lehman’s season money-eamine 
record of $ 1 ,780. 1 59, set last year. 

Capluring his fourth tournament this 
year. Woods re-established himself as a 
favorite for the British Open this month 
if there was ever a doubt 

"I won with my mind this week ” 
said Woods, who wiU take a week off to 
get ready for the British Open, which 
begins July 1 7 at Royal Troon Golf Club 
in Scotland. “I didn’t drive the ball 
particularly well. My iron game was 
prerty good, and I putted in spurts. It’s 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8. 1997 


PAGE 19 


SPORTS 


DAi . JULY 8 



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Surprising Giants 
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Tkt Associated Press 

Just who are these impost- 
ors wearing San Francisco 
Giants unifor ms ? 

Is this the same team »har 
• pitched camp in Arizona 
without its pe rennial slu gg er. 
Matt Williams, who had gone 
io Cleveland? 

Is this the team that vir- 
. rually everybody with any 
knowledge of pro baseball 

predicted would finish last In 
the National League West? 

"There were not a lot of 
expectations for this team 
coming out of spring train- 
ing," said its first baseman, 
J.T. Snow. “I don’t think 
we've overachieved, but I 
think we've surprised some 
people.” 

Some? 

Mark Gardner allowed five 
hits in six scoreless innings as 
the Giants beat Colorado, 7-0. 
on Sunday to sweep their 
three-game series. 
i* With that victory, San 
■^Francisco reached the All- 
Star beak with a six-game 
lead in the division. 

.And the Giants did it the 
way they have so often this 
year. “We jumped them early 
today, that always helps,” 
said the Giants' manager. 
Dusty Baker, whose team 
now has seven shutouts. "We 
gave Mark a big lead early." 
Indeed they dia, scoring four 
runs in the first inning. 

■At the other end of the 
spectrum are the hard-hitting 
.Rockies, who have managed 
just six runs in their last six 
games — all losses. 

* \ The All-Star reserve, An- 
-»3res Galarraga, went into die 
beak with one hit in his last 
18 at-bats. Dante Bichette 
went 1 -for- 11 in the series. 
Quinton McCracken, who 
struck out three times on Sun- 


day. is I-for-2l in his last six 
games. Kin Manwaring is I- 
for-18 in his last six. "We’re 
struggling right now," Galar- 
raga said. "I’ve never seen 
the team like this.” 

Gardner (9-4) struck out 
nine as San Francisco won its 
fourth straight game. Snow 
hit a homer — his 1 3th of the 
season and eighth in the last 
1 1 games — and added a sac- 
rifice fly. 

Pod g ara 5, Padrat 2 Tom 

Candiotti continued his resur- 
gence as a starter, and Los 
Angeles won a season-high 
sixth straight with its first 
three-game sweep in San 
Diego in nine years. 

Candiotti (5-2), a knuckle- 
bailer, allowed four hits in 7 1 /* 
innings. Todd Worrell got his 
20th save. 

The 39-year-old Candiotti 
— who began the season in 
the bullpen after 14 years as a 
starter — has been an effec- 
tive replacement for the in- 
jured Ramon Martinez. 

Pintos 6, Cardinals 3 Jose 
Guillen had four runs batted 
in, and Steve Cooke allowed 
seven hits in seven innings as 
Pittsburgh completed a four- 
game sweep at St. Louis. The 
Pirates have won seven in a 
row and 10 of 13. 

A«tro* 6, Rods 5 Tony Eu- 
sebio. a pinch-hitzer, singled 
home the winning run in the 
ninth for Houston, which got 
two homers from Jeff Bag- 
well at the Astrodome. 

With one out in the ninth, 
Derek Bell got a pinch-hit in- 
field hit and went to third on 
Brad Ausmus’s single to 
right. Eusebio then singled up 
the middle off reliever Scott 
Sullivan to score Bell 

Mato 3. Mafint 2 In New 
York, Carl Everett singled 
home Alex Ochoa, who ston- 
ed the 12th inning by reaching 
second when Florida's right 
fielder, Gary Sheffield, 



Mays an AU-Time All-Star 
Ahead of Cobb? A Stretch 


Bv Shirley Povich 

Washington Post St nice 


Lm (Mi 'Tlic Wji jaird LY*"** 


The A’s shortstop, Tony Batista, turning a double play over the Rangers' Will Clark. 


dropped his fly ball. 

Cubs 8, Phidias 4 Mark 

Grace returned to the starting 
lineup with a homer and four 
runs batted in for surging 
Chicago. 

Grace, who had missed 
three stuns because of a sore 
right ankle, had a two-run 
homer in the first inning and a 
two-run double in the fourth 
as the visiting Cubs won for 
the eighth time in 10 games. 

Angels 8, Uarinsrs 0 Chuck 
Finley pitched a four-hitter 
and stnick out 13, and Dave 
Hollins hit a fourth-inning 
grand slam as Anaheim won 
its second straight after losing 
eight of 10. 

Visiting Seattle lost its 
fourth in five games and was 
shut out for just the second 
time this season. 

Athletics 9, Rangers 8 In 
Arlington. Texas, Tony 
Batista, recalled from the 
minors on July 2, hit a three- 
run homer and knocked in 


four runs for Oakland, which 
snapped a three-game losing 
streak and Texas' four-game 
winning streak. 

Brewer* 6, iwins 2 In Mil- 
waukee, Ben McDonald 
pitched six solid innings as 
the Brewers chased LaTroy 
Hawkins early for a split of 
their four-game series. Pitch- 
ing on three days' rest. Mc- 
Donald surrendered two runs 
on three hits with no walks 
and four strikeouts. 

White Sox 6, Red Sox S In 

Chicago, Frank Thomas, who 
will miss the All-Star game to 
rest sore rib muscles, hit a 
two-run double in the third as 
Chicago won its third straight 
and 1 1th in 16 games. 

In games reported in late 
editions Monday: 

Btuo Jays 2 , Yankees 0 Ro- 
ger Clemens pitched a four- 
hitter for his 39th career 
shutout and struck out 10 
Yankees. 

"Roger was too much for 


us,” Torre said. “You think 
he's getting older, maybe 
mellowing a bit But appar- 
ently not on the fifth day. He's 
still very dominant and 
throws very hard.” 

Indiana 8, Royals 7 Marquis 
Grissom's run-scoring single 
in the eighth handed Kansas 
City its eighth straight loss. 

Sandy Alomar, Cleve- 
land's catcher, extended his 
hitting streak to 30 games, 
longest in the American 
League in 10 years. 

Tigers 14, Orioles 9 In De- 
troit, Brian Johnson had a 
homer and three runs batted in 
and Travis Fryman also 
homered as the Tigers beat 
Baltimore. 

Expos 6, Braves 2 In 

Montreal. Jeff Juden allowed 
six hits in his sixth straight 
victory, and Vladimir Guer- 
rero bad a homer and three 
runs batted in as Montreal 
ended a four-game losing 
streak. 


WASHINGTON — My colleagues in the 
Baseball Writers Association of America 
have chosen their all-time All-Star team. In 
most cases they are perceptive and correct, 
and in some cases they are nuts. 

The one that leaps out ai us is their choice of 
the all-time center fielder — Willie Mays over 
Ty Cobb. What an aberration. 

Trouble is, there are baby boomers in the 
press box. To be forgiven, perhaps, because 
they never had the thrill of seeing Ty Cobb 
play. They're all caught up in the Mays hoopla 
of their era. 

Mays was. indeed, a great player, for his 
time. But as an effective ballplayer he 
couldn't carry Cobb's shoelaces. 

Anybody with a lifetime baiting average of 
.302 would merit Cobb's scorn. How about a 
lifetime average of .366? Willie Mays never 

Vantage Point 

hit that much in any single season. During 
more than half of his career he didn’t even hit 
.300, much less lead the league 12 times like 
Cobb, including nine years in a row. And how 
many times did Mavs hit .400? Humph. Cobb 
hit .401, .409, .420? 

In 1 928, Cobb’s average did sag to .323, but 
it is remembered that he was 41 years old 
then. 

In his last eight seasons. Willie Mays never 
hit .300. They want to compare him with Ty 
Cobb? They’re out of their minds. 

The other outfield selections. Babe Ruth in 
right and Ted Williams in left, are on the 
money. 

They named Paul Molitor the designated 
hitter, which raises another question. Why 
would Cobb, the greatest average hitter who 
ever lived, be so diminished as a DH that he 
got only two of the 36 first-place votes? 

In the main, most of the picks were sound. 
Lou Gehrig at first base, Rogers Hornsby at 
second base. Honus Wagner at shortstop and 
Mike Schmidt at third base — untouchables. 

But there was an unpardonable misfire 
when they rated Charlie Gehringer fourth 
among second baseman, behind Joe Morgan 
and Jackie Robinson. 

In the field the slick Gehringer could do 
everything they did and often better, and with 
a bat be was their superior. None of them ever 
hit .371 or matched his .320 career average or 
his 13 .300 seasons in one 14-year stretch. 


They rated Johnny Bench a better catcher 
than Yogi Berra, Roy Campanella, Mickey 
Cochrane and Bill Dickey, Gabby Hartnett 
and Carlton Fisk. Yes and no. It’s a stretch to 
rank Bench above six superb catchers, ail of 
whom outhit him by plenty except in the 
matter of all those Johnny Bench homers that 
led the league twice. 

Bench a better catcher, defensively, than 
those other guys? It’s highly questionable. 
You want the guy who hits the most home 
runs and produces the most RBI, take Bench. 
You want the catcher who could race home 
with more runs a game than Bench and outhit 
him by an average of 53 points every year, 
take Mickey Cochrane, as I do. 

They got it right when it came to pitching 
and they named Walter Johnson as their right- 
handed starter, picking him over Cy Young and 
Christy Mathew son and Bob Feller, among 
others. It was one more tribute to Johnson, a 
towering presence in baseball's Hall of Fame. 

But it was a fine line they drew when they 
named Sandy Koufax the all-time left-hander, 
over Warren Spahn and Lefty Grove. Koufax 
had the numbers (25-5, 26-8, 27-9) and the 
whizzing strikeout pitch. But Grove had just 
as fearsome a delivery and a 3 1-4 season. 

Spahn? He led the league in wins eight 
rimes. A tight fit, but Koufax is a nice choice. 

They took it all the way down to relief 
pitchers and said Dennis Eckersley was the 
No. 1 man, ahead of Rollie Fingers and Lee 
Smith and Hoyt Wilhelm and Rich Gossage. 

Relief pitching is such a tricky, confusing 
thing. The stats are unreliable. A guy comes in 
with the bases full, is clobbered for a triple that 
lets all three men score and is not charged with 
having allowed a run. Another pitcher gets 
one man out and is credited with "a save.” 

Meanwhile, die guy who pitched seven 
great innings often doesn’t exist in the final 
pitching tally. 

Picking relief pitchers reminds me of the 
episode long ago when some of us were 
matching wits in a New York speakeasy. 

Garry Schumacher, of the New York Jour- 
nal, was asked to name his all-time, all-star 
football team. He did, but was called by 
another one of us who said, "But Garry, you 
didn’t pick any guards." And Schumacher 
said, "Guards, guards. Who knows anything 
about guards except another guard?” 

And who knows the truth about relief pitch- 
ers? 


•Shirley Povich has covered baseball for 
The Washington Post for 75 years. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 

MHMCWI UUMOS 

EAST DIVISION 


kilometer stage to 
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consecutive sprint 
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WEST DIVISION 



i , SanFhsidsco 51 

3ft 

586 

— 

: Cos Angeles 

45 

42 

517 

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Cotorado 43 45 .489 8M 

San Diego 38 49 .437 13 

SIMMY'S UNUCOMS 

AMERICAN LEAOUE 

Now York NO ON 000-0 4 « 

Toronto 020 ON OCX— 2 ft 0 

Mendoza Nelson [81 and Girardi.- Clemens 
and O'Brien. W— Clemens. 13-1 

L— Mendoza 3-4. 

Kansas CHy NO 700 000-7 9 0 

amkmd 0M 300 Olfr-O 10 0 

BoUiec Casian IO, Olson (8), Modatane 
Hershlsec MesaT4), Aswnmocner [Si. Aft. 
Jackson (B) and S. Alomar. W— M. Jackson, 
1-1. L— Casian, O-l. HRs — Oevetand. 
Ranftrez 113L MaWBams (20). 

Bottom in o» Ki—9 in 

DotrolT 500 >40 <Ufr-14 14 3 

Erickson, Rhodes (5), Mite (7) and 
Webster. Laker [ft); Mochltx Bkrir W> 
Baathlo (ft). Damn (7). Mksfl IB), Aft- Myers 
(CO and B-Mmttn. W— Blair. 6-4. 
L— Erickson, 1 1-4. HRs— Balttamre, 

Reboa let <23. R- Palmelm 06), Benaa (17), 
Tarasco (6). Detroit Hlgglmon 04). Fryman 
(12). B. Johnson CO. 

Boston 200 310 000 — 5 13 0 

Chicago 013 200 0B*- ft 9 0 

Esftetmon, Wakefield (4) and HalMrerg: 

Baldwin, AAcElrov (ft)# Kantmer OS), R. 
Hernandez M and Pena. W— Baldwin, ft-9. 
L— Wakefield, 3-9. So— R. Hernandez (30). 
Mtamsala IN 001 000-3 5 1 

MBwuo feM NS in aas-ft n i 

Hawkins, Swindell (4), Trombley 16). 
Gomdotio (7). Aguilera (8) and G. Myers; 
BJMcDonald, Fetters (7). Wkkman (8). 
Da-lones (9) and Matheny. W— B. 
McDonald. 7-4. L-HowMns, 1-4. 
HR— Milwaukee, Matheny □). 

Seattle BN 008 000-8 4 3 

Anaheim 102 500 Bto-8 9 0 


Fassern ManzanUo [41, Lowe (51 and 
Da. Wilson, Marzano <51; CFInley and 
Td. Greene. W— C Finley. 5-6. L— Fassera, 8- 
5. HRs— Anaheim, Erstod (Id). Hofllns [IT], 
Salmon (IS). 

Oakland 004 104 #08-9 9 0 

Taras 311 010 830-8 11 1 

Prieto. D. Johnson (5). Groom (ft), A. Small 
(7), Taylor (8) and Ga.wmms; Santana 
Whiteside (4), Gunderson (ft). Patterson (ft). 
Wefietand (9) and M. Mercedes. «V— D. 
Johnson, 34). L-WhOesMa l-l-.S^Taylor 
(1ft). HRs— Oakland, Qmseco (JjaFSaftsta 
[4). Tews, Greer U3>. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

.Atlanta. ON 020 000-2 ft 3 

Montreal IN 012 20X—6 II 1 

Neagle. Ctantz (7). Bomwski (8) and 
Edd. Perez; Juden and Wldger. W— Judea 
11-2. L-Meogie. 12-2. HRs-^Attonta, 
Blauser (12). Montreal V. Guerrero (6). 
Chicago 3N 4N 810-8 14 0 

PMadetoMo ON 120 100-4 9 0 

F.CoatBa, Wendell [ft], Patterson (7), 
Rok» IB) and M. Hubbard; MJ-eitor. 
Stephenson (41, R. Harris (6L Spradlin (7), 
Brewer (81# Gomes (9) and Lieberthal W— F. 
Castillo. 6-9, L— M. Lettec 4-9. Sv— Ro|os (9). 
HRs— Often ga M a. Grace (9). Philadelphia 
Lieberthal (121. 

Pittsburgh 138 IN 020-4 8 1 

St Loots IN ON 181-3 11 0 

Cook* Sodowsky (81# Ldsello (9) and 
KendaS; Stotttemym Frascatore (8), Beltran 
(9), Pefitovsek (9) raid Dtfefice. W— Cooks 7- 
9- L— Stoffleroyre. 7-4. HR-PHtsburgh, J. 
Guillen (7). 

Gndnatl 400 IN 000-5 11 0 

Houston 104 ON OOV-4 9 0 

Burba Belinda (8). RumOnger (9). Sulfivrei 
(9) and J. Olivet; Hampton, Lima (4), Marital 


IB), B. Wagner (9) and Ausmus. W— B. 
Wagner, 5-3. L— Rem linger. 3-4. 
HRs — Cincinnati D. Sanders (4). Houston 
Bagwell 2 Q4J, L Gonzalez (41. 

Florida IN ON IN 000-2 8 2 

New York 010 HO IN #01—3 10 l 

Rapp# Poured (7), F. Heredia (8L Nen (9). 
Cook (11) and CJohnson; BJ Jones. 
McMJdnel (8), JaFranco (1 0), Acevedo ( 12) 
and Prolt W— Aceveda 1-0. L— Cook, 1-2. 
Cotorado 000 ON 000-0 5 3 

-fin Fnmdsca 401 028 00x— 7 9 1 

Burke, DoJoan (ft), McCurry (I) and 
Manworing; Gardner, Johnstone (7). Poole 
(8). D. Henry (9) and BetryhA Jensen 19). 
W— Gvdnec 9-4. L— Burke, 2-4. HRs— Son 
Fiondtcn Snow (13), Benyhlll (2). 

Las Angeles IN IN 188-4 8 1 

San Diego ON BN 011-2 4 1 

CandtaM, Radinsky (8). Ta-Watrell (9) and 
Piazza; Bergman Curmarie (4), J. Hamilton 
(8), Hofltnon (9) and Fkrheriy. W— Candloltt 
5-2. L— Bergman 2-3. Sv—Ta. Worrell (20). 


CYCLING 


Touh pe France 

Leading placing* Monday In to 282 tan 
(1628 Britos) 2d etage from SLVtalery-en- 
Cauxtolfire: 

1. Mario OpaHnl Holy. Saeco. 6 hours, 27 
minutes. 46 seconds, 2 ErikZobeL Germany, 
Telekom, same time, 3. Joeten Bififcvens, 
Netherlands, TVA/L s-L 4. Frederic Mon- 
casstav Francs GAN. sJ. 5. Sergei 
Outschaknv, Ukrabn Poll sX ft. Adriano 
BafA Holy, U A. Postal Service sJ. 7. amide 
Lamour, France, MuleBe Seine et Mo me. sJ„ 
& Henk Vogefcb Ausirrfia GANL S.L 9. Rob- 
bie MdEweti Australia, Rabobank. sJ„ 10. 


Massimo S tracer, Italy, Rosetta sx 
OVERALL: 1. Maria Ckicfitnl 11:15:3a 2- 
Chris Baardman, Britain, GAN 3ft seconds 
behkid; 3. Jon Uknch, Germany, Telekom. 3& 
4. Tony Ranting er, Switzerland, Cofidis. 41; 5. 
Abraham Otona Spabv Banesta 44. 6. Lou- 
rant Jatabeft France. ONCE. 4& 7. Jereen 
Blljlerrena 4& 8. E rik ZaheL 4ft 9. Tom SteeN 
Belgium. Mapei 5ft 10. Senas Knaven, 
Nomerionds.TVM.5l. 


GOLF 


Western Open 

Flnel ecoreo Swrday at the dtas 2 m»k>n 
MotornU Woutem Open on the 74773-verd 
(6,4flfrnwter), pen-72 Dubadnwd Course at 
the Cog Wk Gall end Country aub: 

Tiger Woods 67-72-68-48—275 

Frank Nobrta 71-70-67-70-27S 

Jeff Shimon 69-69-74-47-279 

JusUn Leonard 71-44-72-72-279 

Steve Lowery 70-72-44-71-279 

JlmFuryk 47-7447-72—280 

ShraiT Appleby 71-72-7848—281 

Torn wotson 72-72-68-69—281 

Jay Dobing 71-47-71-72-281 

Steve Pate 7W7-67-72-281 

World Bawkinos 

1. Tiger Woods (U-SJ 1071 points 
average 

2. Greg Norman lAustndlo) 1038 

3. Ernie Eb (South Africa) KL24 

4. CoUn Montgomnie (Britain) 9.7S 

s. Nick Price (Zimbabwe) 9S1 

6. Tam Lehman (UA.) 875 

7. Steve Elkington (Anstnftta) BM0 

& Mosashl Ozaki (Japan) 7.93 

9. Math O'Meara (U J J 741 


I a Nick Faldo (Britain) 777 
11. Phil Mick etaon (USJ 7.1 B 
lZSoott Hodt (UJSJ 485 

II Brad Faxon (U.5J6J0 
U Fred CoopteUW 4.74 

1 5. Jesper Pomevlk (Sweden) 147 

16. Ion Woosnam (Britain) 5J9 

17. Davis Love IN (UJSJ 5A3 

IB. Bernhard Longer (Germany) 522 
19. Justin Leonard (U-5J 5.12 
21 Tom Watson (U-S.) 5.10 


TENNIS 


World Cup 


Wintbledon 


■ere doubles 

FINAL 

Todd Woodbridgc and Marie Woodftxde 
(1). AustraBa def. Jocca EHIngh and Paul 
Howhuis C2], Netherlands. 7-ft (7-4), 7-4 (9- 
71,5-7,6-1 

FINAL 

Cyril Suk# Czech Republic and Helena 
Sukova (4), Czech Republic, del. Andrei OL 
hovskty. Russia, and Larisa NeBand (3), 
Latvia. 4-4 6a 44. 


BASKETBALL 


European Chaupioship 


SOUTH AMEKKAH ZONK 

Peru 2, Bofivia 1 
Argentina 2. Paraguay 1 
STAHOMOSe Paraguay 23# Argentina 22 
Colombia l£fc ChBe 1& Peru 1& EcuadulSt 
BaSvia 14 Uruguay 14 Venezuela 3„ V 

Wom en's Chain* ionship 
wowlioioh 

Norway 0, Haty 2 

IntehtotoCup 

8NUM 

Dinamo 93 a MSV Duisburg 1 
Heerenveen 0 Polo nia Warsaw 0 

OROOS7 

FC U nhersltate 0, Werder Bremen 3 
UrtonfaubparZ Visas Budapcsl 0 


Yugosiavta 61. Italy 49 


Washhrgton D.C. 3, Tampa Bay 2 
Daflasl Kamos Otyl 
San Jose 1 New England 2: 
STAHomascEastwn Caatomct D.C. 3& 
Tampa Bay 2& New England 22; Cohrmbas 
17; NY-NJ 13 tWMteraCenfsrena Kansas 
City 2& Colorado 2& Dallas 21; San Jose 17; 
Lu Angeles 11 


CRICKET 


Australia def. England by 268 runs 
Six match series 1-1. 


TRANSITIONS 


MMMI 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

ANAHEIM— Optioned LHP Malt Perisho to 
Vancouver# PCL 

Boston —Optioned LHP Ron Mahay to 
Pawtucket IL Activated LHP Steve Avery 
from 15-<tay dtoatfted Bsf. 

MILWAUKEE — Activated OF Marc New- 
field from 15-day disabled flat Optioned INF 
AntoneWBSomsan to Tucson, PCL 

Pittsburgh— Activated LHP Ricardo Rh- 
am from 15-day disabled list Optioned LHP 
Chris Peters to Catgar* PCL. 

Texas —Announced refimment of DH 
Mickey Teflteton. Activated INF BID Ripken 
from 15-day dbafaled Bst 

NATIONAL LEAOUE 

PHILADELPHIA —Optioned RHP CoMn 
Madura to Scranton-WBes-Bane IL Op- 
ttaned RHP Ron Btazlerto ChmwatK F5L 
AcfrvTOed RHP Mark Letter from T5-day rfis- 
a bled ted. 

Pittsburgh -Activated LHP Ricardo Rin- 
con from 15-day disabled fist Optioned LHP 
Chris Peters to Calgary, PCL 


FOOTBALL 


Canaman Football 

Toronto 2a Hamilton 15 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
Indiana polls -Released DE David 
WBMnson and WR Avery Anderson. 


THRO TEST, Bite DAY 
»omoay. m Manchester, eholami 
England: 142 and 200 
AushoSa: 235 and 395-8 


NATIONAL hockey leaoue 
los anceles— S igned D Garry Gcdteyta 3- 
year contract. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


I i 


£ 



SORKY I MI55EP THAT 
ONE, MANAGER ..V0U HAVE 
MV HEARTFELT APOLOGY.. 



l‘v RATHER HAVE YOU 
CATCH ONE FLY BALL 
THAN HAVE FIFTY 
HEARTFELT APOLOGIES.' 



HOW ABOUT FIFTY 
APOLOGIES, BUT UJE LEAVE 
OUT THE HEARTFELT5? 

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IlVXERJVAJIOIVAL 

Franchises . 

Appeare every ’Wednesday 

in The Intennarket i 
To advKtise contact JiicEth King! 
in our New York office. I 
TVL: (1-212) 752 3890 
Fax: (1-212) 755 8785 . 
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I 


PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Venetian Lagoon ASecomT Flowering of Japanese Filmmaking 


V ENICE — You can't go 
borne again — you can’t 


bum voice. “Oh. shut up!” 
One of my fondest memor- 


even go to Venice, a city of ies of Venice concerns the 
fond memories for me. I come Bestegui Gala, the costume 


here almost 
every year to 
swim in its 
sparkling wa- 
ters and snor- 
kel in the sou- 
venir shops. 

I met Kath- 
arine Hepburn 
in Venice when 
she was making 
the film “Summertime.” She 
was preparing for a scene on 
the canal, and I was smoking a 
cigar as I chatted with her. She 


Buchwald 


ball of the century. I went as 
Louis XTV in a costume I had 
rented in Paris; it had a few 
tears and included a some- 
what frazzled powdered wig. 
I wasn't invited to the party, 
so I crashed iL 

l arrived three hours early 
carrying a basket of flowers, 
and nobody stopped me at the 
door to the palace, although I 
did hear the security men 
whispering about checking 
my credentials. I boiled up- 
stairs to the second floor 


By Velisarios Kattoulas Ironically, the fete of independent direc- 

tmenuritnui Her*ut Triiwne tors started to improve ooly m die early 

— 1990s, when Japan slipped into its worst 

T OKYO — The success of Japanese di- postwar recession after stock and land prices 
rectors at the Cannes film festival in May crashed. Japan’s economy stumbled. Its so- 
capped a remarkable live years in which, after cieiy started to fragment under the strain of 


said,* ‘That is the filthiest cigar where there appeared to be 
I have ever seen. How dare you hundreds of bedroom doors. I 


smoke while talking to me,” 

I immediately extinguished 
it as she continued to upbraid 
me for my behavior. 


The assistant director came 
up to her and said, * ‘Miss Hep- 
bum, we’re ready to shoot” 
The set was hushed, and 
then we heard: “Roll ’em.” 
Suddenly Hepburn dived 
into the water, which was 
filled with every imaginable 
flotsam. When she climbed 
out someone threw a towel 
around her. I said, “How 
come you get so upset with 
me for smoking a cigar 
when you just dove into feat 
gummy water?” She re- 
plied in feat wonderful Hep- 


opened one and slid under fee 
bed. To my surprise I found 
two photographers already 
there. They told me to beat it. 
but I refused to go. 

It turned out that the room 
was occupied by a beautiful 
guest of Bestegui She was 
preparing for the ball, and 
since she had the loveliest 
ankles ( which was all we could 
see), we decided to stay pur. 

Finally, after fee guest left 
fee room we crawled out from 
under fee bed and went to join 
fee ball. 


two decades in a rut, Japan has returned to fee 
pinnacle of world film. At fee festival's 50fe 
anniversary, Shohei Imamura’s “Unagi” 
( “The Eel”) shared the Palme d’Or for best 
film, and Naomi Kawase's “Suzaku” won 
the Camera d’Or for best first feature. 

‘ ‘Japanese films have had a ted reputation 
because of all fee trash that's 
been produced in fee last 25 — — 
years.” said Aaron Gerow, a Shohei In 

lecturer in film studies at » 71 * 

Meiji Gakuin University in at l J. ? 15 < 

Tokyo “But there are rally the grand 
a lot of good films out there 
again. It’s just a shame it’s of the ItE 

taken fee Cannes film fes- • ..1 • i 

rival to make people pay at- 
tention.” In fee past five 


Shohei Tmamiir a , 
at 71, is considered 
the grandfather 
of the renaissance 
in the industry. 


years, more than a dozen Japanese films have 
won awards at international film festivals. 


A $125,000 Teddy Bear 


Reuters 

GJENGEN, Germany — A 

70-year-old teddy bear sold 
for 215,000 Deutsche marks 
($ 1 25.000 ) — just short of the 

world record — at auction 
here. The price was surpassed 
only by the $158,000 paid by 
a Japanese buyer for a 90- 
year-old bear in 1994 at 
Christie's in London. 


Even if you can’t go home 
again, fee nostalgia lingers. 
Bestegui, who treated all his 
guests like royalty, is now in 
heaven, his palace closed and 
empty. Katharine Hepbum is 
not here this year for her dip. 

Despite this, it's still good 
to come back. The lire is now 
165,000 to the dollar, and who 
can figure out what you can get 
for that in Italy these days? 

The highlight of my visit 
was fee moment I was presen- 
ted wife a Lifetime Achieve- 
ment Award from American 
Express when my card rang 
up for dinner at fee Cipriani 

Hotel. 


won awards at international film festivals. 

The last flowering of Japanese film came 
in fee 1960s, when directors such as Akira 
Kurosawa, Nagisa Oshima and Yasujiro Ozu 
were at fee peak of their careers. They pro- 
duced films depicting a stormy nation tehind 
a calm exterior. Families split by strife, chil- 
dren stripped of dreams and sword- wielding 
samurai in search of their destiny dominated 
the films, which won international acclaim 
for their portrayals of life as art. 

For much of fee three decades since, Japan 
has produced films of note only sporadically. 
The spread of television and the country ’s 
growing affluence and social stability 
robbed Japan’s directors of both an audience 
and the grist for their creative mUis. 

Their plight was made worse by Japan’s 
major film studios. Although they had 
backed Japan's master cinematographers in 


50 years of rapid urbanization and economic 
development. People told pollsters they had 
lost faith in fee politicians and bureaucrats, 
and filmmakers found themselves wife a 
compelling story to telL 

At around fee same time, new sources of 
funding came on stream PIA, a publishing 
company, started a film fes- 
rival to showcase and fi- 
lamnr a , nance first- time filmmakers. 

. , WOWOW, a satellite tele- 

JOnsiaerea vision channel, started giv- 

father feg annual awards for short 

„ features made by independ- 

laissance eat directors. And Shochiku. 

. one of Japan’s major film 

USLr J‘ studios, started Cinema Ja- 

ponesque. a chain of 20 

small theaters dedicated to screening in- 
dependent films never shown at big theaters 
because they rarely draw big audiences. 

Nevertheless, money remains right and 
Kawase’s “Suzaku” is a minimalist epic 
made on a minimalist budget It is a portrait 
of a young boy and girl in an isolated moun- 
tain village racked by depopulation, depres- 
sion and fee suggestion of incest 
Imamura, 71, an assistant to Ozu in the 
1930s, is arguably fee grandfather of fee latest 
renaissance of Japanese film. As well as the 
Palme d’Or he collected for "The Eel,” he 
won one for fee “The Ballad of Narayama” 
in 1983. Yet he too complains about poverty. 
He said Shochiku, which financed “The 
Eel,” persuaded him to make it his first 
feature film in eight years, only because “of 
fee money-less state of my affairs.” 

AO the same, he believes fee upheaval 
Japan has suffered in the 1 990s has spawned 


the 1960s. they increasingly shied away from ' a new generation of angry young 


provocative movies rooted in reality and 
turned to fee fantasy of cheap romance in- 
stead To this day, they continue to chum out 
poorly directed, badly scripted, conservat- 
ively shot films that bear little resemblance 
to the often tedious grind of everyday life in 
contemporary Japan. Without either oppor- 
tunity or funding from an understanding 
government to make memorable films, many 
Japanese directors ended up making soft- 


capable of making gritty, true-to-life films. 

‘ ‘I wish I had recognized it at fee time, but 
Japanese cinema went downhill after the 

1960s because all the badness seeped out of 

this society,” said Imamura, who plans to 
start filming another feature soon. 

‘ ‘Today many young scriptwriters dye then- 

hair and pierce various pans of their bodies 
and are thoroughly bad. ’' said Imamura. who 
also considers himself “bad.” “But they are 


core pornography for release on video or also the ones producing the most interesting 
trashy romance for television. scripts because in cinema badness is good.” 



Imamura and his wife at Cannes, where “The Eel” shared the Palme d’Orl 


PEOPLE 



- ** 


F OR years she was the woman Britons loved to 
hale, blamed for turning the marriage of Prince 
Charles and Princess Diana into a nightmare of 
divorce. But Camilla Parker Bowles, whose 20- 
year love affair with Britain's future king has both 
appalled and fascinated fee nation, may at last be 
winning some friends. Two television programs 
over the weekend seriously discussed the pos- 
sibility that Charles would at last many Parker 
Bowles, and after years of vilification in fee media, 
public sympathy seems at last to be turning herway. 
“A remarriage may not be ideal but it is better than 

an affair raiKtrla mama,, ” A .1 


unfortunate royal love triangle who has behaved 
wife perfect decorum.” 


The Mexican writer Angeles Mastretta won 
Venezuela’s Romulo Gallegos prize for Fiction, one 
of fee Spanish language's most prestigious literary 
awards, for the romance “Mai de Amor. ’ ’ Previous 


was the tricky part. “If we had tried to dpthls feree ’ 
years ago. we would have been laughed at, the. . 
climate was so different,” said McLachlan, founder 
of the traveling festival, the Lilith Fair, Among. 
performers taking part are Tracy Chapman, Su- 
zanne Vega and Indigo Girls. ' v_ f 


winners of the prize, awarded every two years, 
include Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Mario Var- 
gas Llosa. 


an affair outside marriage,” George Austen, the 
Archdeacon of York, said in a BBC debate. “I 


*5- 


Archdeacon of York, said in a BBC debate. “I 
believe there are grounds for accepting a second 
marriage, even though it may not be the kind of 
moral lead we might have expected from a king.” 
And an hourlong documentary on Parker Bowies 
painted a picture of a woman wronged by a public 
still ready to embrace fee more glamorous Diana. In 
a surprising about-turn, several British newspapers 
on Monday lined up with Parker Bowles who has 
never spoken publicly about her relationship with 

Charles nor complained about her treatment in the 

FNCORF — Mcmht'rc n f th- press. “Surely it is time to take a fresh look at this 

f T!- th Boys S ho,r of J! ar J e ?\ su, 8 001 m Washington after troubling state of affairs," wrote Ingrid Seward, 
donations from foundations, corporations and individuals erased a $400,000 budget editor of Majesty magazine, in the Daily Mail. “We 
gap and added enough money to send another crop of choir graduates off to college, should accept that Camilla is the one person in this 


At 75. Senator John Glenn would love to go 
back into space. Glenn, who became fee first Amer- 
ican to orbit fee Earth 35 years ago, said he wants to 
help in the study of aging. He said putting older 
people into space would give scientists a chance to 
look at changes in fee body’s immune system during 
aging and to study osteoporosis. So will he go? “I 
want to tell you John is an outstanding astronaut,” 
said Daniel Goldin, NASA administrator. “He has 


A burly oil worker bore his wife around a 236i ' ;: 
meter (774-foot) obstacle course to set a worid 'V 
record in the wife-carrying contest in Sonkajarvi; t 
Finland. Jouni Jussila pounded over fee punishing - 
course carrying his wife, Tima, piggyback in one V 
minute, five seconds to retain fee tide. 


Will Smith, star of “Independence Day” arid 
“Men in Black," is a self-confessed “ conspiracy 
theorist” “I absolutely believe that AIDS is a v 


resuit of testing in biological warfare," says Smith, 
fee subject of US magazine's cover story. There’s 


a burning desire to go back into space, and we’re 
giving it very serious consideration.” 


For Sarah McLachlan. finding fee talent for an 
all-women summer music rour was easy. Timing 


more: "The army’s spraying fee conunon.cold ta 
fee subway system of Manhattan to test different; 
medications.” Conspiracies aside. Smith says 
and girlfriend. Jada Pinkett, are happy but not 
quite ready for marriage. “There’s no reason tef- , 
rush into anything,’ ’ he says. “We are very much in 
love and life is just so beautiful right now." ; 





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